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No. 31,812 


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INTERNATIONAL 



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Published With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 188' 


Syrians Appear Set 
To Enter Beirut 
To Halt Fighting 


'I '5..U 


* v : • : 

i£ V \\ : 


The Associated Pros 

BEIRUT — President Hafez al- 
Assad of Syria was reported Friday 
to have agreed to send troops to 
Beirut to hall fighting between Su- 
ite M oslems and Palestinians m the 
city’s refugee camps. 

Hakika As- 

sad’s deriaon was made in re- 
sponse to a formal ropiest fay 
President Amin Gemayd of Leba- 
non for a “wider security .role by 
Syrian forces stationed is Leba- 
non.” 

The two leaders held five ses- 
sions of talks in Damascus over 
three days before Mr. Gemayd re- 
turned to Beirut on Friday. The 
Lebanese leader went to Damascus 
to seek Syria's help in stemming 
Lebanon’s continuing warfare. 

\> Mr. Gemayd indicated eadier in 
^Damascus that Syrian forces sta- 
tioned in northern and eastern 
Lebanon would hdp end fighting 
in Beirut’s refugee camps between 
Shiite militiamen and Palestinians 
and along the city’s Green Line, 
where Christians and Moslems of- 
ten exchange fire. 

The Lebanese president (fid not 
specifically say that the Syrian 
Army would move into Beirut. But 
well-informed sources in Beirut 
predicted drat the army would 
probably enter within the next few 
days. 

“It’s very dear,” Mr. Gemayd 
. cni*L “that security be hwnifwi 
: through Syrian forces with the co- 
operation of the Lebanese Army, 
pending the political reforms which 
wiB undoubtedly annoy more than 
one side.” 

According to a Lebanese govern- 
ment source; “The security' pro- 
gram would call for the formation 
of a joint Lebanese-Syrian military 
, force entrusted with collecting 
. weapons from rival Lebanese mili- 
tias and Palestinian camps and un- 


law and order throughout 


Mr. Gemayd was seen off by 
Me. Assad at the Damascus airport 
but. neither mas made a statement 
on the conclusion erf the talks, 
which also included political re- 
forms to give more power to Leba- 
non's Moslems. 

“The Lebanese time bomb 
should be defused,” Mr. Assad was 


ahar newspaper as saying Thurs- 


Syrian troops were sent to Leba- 
non in 1976 under an Arab League 
mandate to end Moslem-Christran 
fighting early in Lebanon’s 10-year 
dvfl war. Toe Syrians left Beirut 
after Israel invaded the country in 
1982, but a force of about 30,000 
men remains in the country. 

“Everybody must be disarmed, 
inrfndfng the Pales tinians. " Mr. 
Gemayd said. “J don’t understand 
the reason for anyone to carry arms 
after the Israeli withdrawal" 

The Israelis have pledged to be 
out by early June. 

“The necessary solution will be 
complete, or no solution at all," be 
ciwH “I found that President Assad 
(kja to dose the TAhwww file 



English Soccer 


Gan les Next Year 


The bodies of four Palestinians lay in a stadium beside the Sabra refugee camp on Friday after the camp fell to Shiites. 

Walters to Oppose r Unfair 9 Criticism at UN 


By Elaine Sciolino 

New York Times Sentce 

UNITED NATIONS, New 


tea said: “You can try to enlighten of the U.S. and its values and its 
them to the true motives cv the interests." 


them to the true motives of the 
United States; you can show th«n 


One area that Mr. Walters said 


^^abew^yfolS^e UA ddegateto 

SfftfddAlW thc.Umied Nations. Vernon A. 


how it’s to their advantage to vote be would have to learn more about 
with us and you can make plain is the Middle East ‘This problem 


inn, shunned a cease-fire and “ lo mnease support for Amm- 

2 - — ^ «*■- 

on Fnday. Cintw mfiil* at tk<» gam. tima now. 


that voting against us will have is the bij 
some cost in our bilateral rela- world," 
dons." avoid it 


forces fired rocket-; 


into the Chatfla camp in West Bei- 


Siates, while at the same time pay- 
ing attention to developing nations. 
“The United Nations has be- 


“Whhbolding of aid should be 
considered on a case-bv-case ba- 


is the biggest single challenge in the 
world." ne said. “I’ve sought to 
avoid it in the past, but I won’t be 
able to avoid it here." 

Despite what he said was a life- 


nil three hours after the Shiite come a place where many countries 
Amal mffitia declared a unilateral seek to achieve a lynching of the 
cease-fire following 12 days of United States by resolution,” the 
fiohrincr retired U-S-Anny lieutenant geuer- 


A Palestinian spokesman ac- al asserted in an interview this 
knowledged that the neighboring ' week - ^ lisa most shamefully un- 
Sabra had been overrun by fair attitode and one that arouses 
Amal and Shiite soldiers of the serious opposition from me." 


Lebanese Army’s 6 th Brigade after 
fierce Palestinian resistance. 


As for diplomatic tactics toward 
die developing nations. Mr. Wal- 


Officials Expect U.S. to Meet Arab Group 


sis,” he said, “but I would certainly long belief in the y^ue of talking m 
never advocate withholding aid one f. f ? es ’ ^ Walters said be 
from starving people.” 2 "*“ kw no dealings with the 

* Palestine Liberation Organization 

Mr. Walters, who assumed his at the United Nations. “The fact 
newpost last week, was reluctant to is." he said, “the PLO is committed 
discuss how his style would differ to the destruction of Israel and 
from that of his predecessor, Jeane therefore we cannot deal with 
J. Kirkpatrick. “Obviously, she them." 

came from academia and I come On the subject of apartheid in 
from an army background," be South Africa, Mr. Walters called it 
said. “But I think we arc entirely on “a doctrine that is abhorrent to 
the same wavelength in the defense . every freedom-lov ing American.'' 

. But how be deals with the matter 

at the United Nations, he said, will 
'I /T depend “on how the issue arises." 

IB (tFOHH Mr. Wallers, 68 , who visited 108 

coon tries in the past four years as 



Vernon A. Walters 

Mr. Walters said he was “slightly 
right of center, not a superpatricn, a 
bdiever in the values of the coun- 
try.” and criticized those who char- 


v By Bernard Gwertzman 

i .Net: Jerk Tiaus Sente 

WASHINGTON — Senior 
American and Jordanian officials 
say they expect the next step in the 
unfolding Middle East pace ef- 
forts to be an eariy meeting be- 

- tween the United States and a joint 
Jordan-Palcstinian delegation to 
discuss how io arrange direct talks 
with IsraeL 

King Hussein of Jordan told a 

- dozen U.S. congressmen on Thurs- 
day that Yasser Arafat, the Pales- 
tine liberation Organization lead- 
er, had told him he was willing to 
name Palestinians who axe not 
PLO members to the delegation 
but that he would like sane to be 
from the Palestine National Coun- 
cil. 

The council which serves as a 
Palestinian parliament, is made up 
of PLO and non-PLO members. 

[Secretary of State George Shultz 
^eud Friday (he United States was 
considering sending a representa- 
tive to meet with members of a 
joint Jordanian-Palestinian delega- 
tion in the Middle East, United 


Press lnignnwMl reported fro m The king said that the PLO. also pose such a conference, but Wash- sat ^° f ** i*rge, speaks seven lan 
Washington. was ready for mutualand simuJia- iegton says, h is sypipathetic to-SMSB*> .*™ e .^ uen ^y» ani - 

(Mr. Shultz at a news con- neons recognition tif Israel accord- Hussein’s desire to* have broader -wriemiver posable intends to speal 
ference that Hussein’s visit provid- ing to the participants in the meet- backing for any negotiations with to I e ““ a 6 ?“ r** own , l ° n 8 u ®- 
ed ‘Impetus to the pro«ss of mg. IsraeL _ Unlike iMrs. Kirkpatndt, he : sau 

peace-making.” Addressing Isradi security con- Psraefi officials expressed satis- planned to spend time sooalrz 

H think what the king has done ceros, Hussein' reportedly told the facuonFriday wiihSussan’s visit 
is move the process inarerysignif- congressmen that the PLO had to Washington, saying it was tm- gates loimgc. He said, too, tiiat hi 

agrS^Tconfcderation plan un- portant to the peace proems that S&ScSS'hTS . 0 
are many obstades we have to der which Jordan would have all the king felt encouraged but not 


IsraeL \ ’• Unlike Mrs. Kirkpatrick, he said senhower and De Gaulle as men of 

[Israeli officials expressed satis- }* 10 s P en f* t 3 f“ c l courags. He calls Mr. Reagan “a 

faction Friday with Hussein’s visit ^ colleagues m the UN dele- man who has given the country 
to Washington, saying it was im- gates’ lounge. He said, too, that he hack a pride of being American.” 
portant to the peace process that ^ Walters said he feds more 

the king fell encouraged but not ^ pecan ty Council as he could. stron gi y ^ gyp,, that the Vietnam 
victorious. Reuters reported from Mr. Waliws said be was conn- War was ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ro em- 

Jcrasfllem.] tomlu l to b^tgniiml as d epuly ^ of ^ and ^ 

[In Amm a n , Jordan, a PLO director of the Central Intelligence unselfish wars" in U-S- history, 
spokesman said that Mr. Arafat A®**? 1 W*SJ not .. bun *“* He said, too that he remained 

V by jf lc ‘ -rvS^l^IhSftSmlc very io ite UK of covm ac- 

i.-r?tiSssK£-T! ’"sTrrmSSSL*- 

Reuters reootted.1 said. “U didn’t seem to bother . He went OT^Tbe only probloa 

Kemers r epoueoj ibem. Afta all they run fairly large is thai it is difficult to use m the 

■ Reporter to Be Prosecuted intelligence services of their own.” United States. When the Soviet 
The Israeli Justice Ministry Nor. be said, did he believe that Union lands a tank battalion in El 
plans to prosecute an Isradi jour- the transition from secret diploma- ^ Nicaragua, that’s OJC. If 
nalist for visiting an enemy Arab cy to one of the roost highly visible w lauded a battalion of tanks to 
state, The Associated Press report- diplomatic posts in the world support the contras it would be one 
ed from Td Aviv. would be difficult °? die greatest stonns of modem 

Amnnn Kapetiouk, a reporter “Fm not intimidated and 1 don’t dmes. There’s an inequity here." 
for the Hebrew daily newspaper have apprehensions," be said. “I’m El Bluff is the port where Sennet 

Yediot Ahronot and the French not a timid man — nor a modest bloc ships are reported to have de- 

newspaper Le Monde Diploma ti- one." livened miliiary equipment. The 

que, visaed Jordan twice in the past - rd describe myself as a mag- contras are the anti-Sandinist aicr- 
six months chi a French passport, a matist tinged with idealism/’ he rillas who are backed by the Rea- 
govemment spokesman said. added. gan administration. 


wiHii way,” he said, adding There agreed to a confederation plan un- 
are many obstades we have to der which Jordan would nave all 
overcome.”] foreign and defense responsibility 

According to participants at the the West Bank and the Gaza 
congressional meeting, Hussein re- Strip, and the Pa l es tin ia n s would 
pea ted the assertion he made have “sdf-detennination" in the 
Wednesday that the PLO now was u®® to be reclaimed from IsraeL 
wilting to take part in a peace con- Mr. Arafat has not disputed 
ference with Israel ana negotiate Hussein’s statement on Wednesday 
on the basis erf two key United that he spoke with PLO authoxiza- 
Nations Security Cornual resolu- tion. But the State Department ra- 
tions. They- are Resolution 242 of affirmed (hat the United Stales 
1967 and Resolution 338 of 1973. wanted to bear the PLO “publidy 
Those resolutions have been re- unequivocally" accept the two 
ganled as the fimdamoual docu- resolutions before it would consid- 
ments by which Arabs couM signT <* meeting with the organization, 
fy recognition of Israel in return for Hussein, in the congressional 

Israel's return of lawfc in the meeting, called again for talks to be 
1967 war. They »1 m are ***** as held under the ’“umbrella” of an 
for ming the basis for negotiations, international conference that the 
and their acceptance has been the Soviet Union and other Security 
principal US. c o nditio n for deal- Council members would attend, 
mg with the PLO. The United Stales and Israel op- 


pressed satis- be planned to spend time sodaliz- courage. He calls Mr. Reagan “a 


portant to the peace process that ' NOuid altcnd “ “““v meetings of 
the king fell encouraged but not d* Security Council as he could. 


foreign and defense responsibility victorious. Reuters reported from Mr. Waliep said he was confi- 
fortne West Bank Gaza Jerusalem.] dent that his backgroimd as deputy 

Strip, and the Palestinians would [In Amman, Jordan, a PLO director of the Central InteUigaice 
have “self-determination” in the spokesman said that Mr. Arafat Agency wonld not bun his ability 
area to be reclaimed from IsraeL had talked with Hussein by tele- to deal with tas cdjragu^ 

Mr. Arafat has not disputed phone andhad «pre^d sansfao t^ e 

that he spoke wrth MO authonza- them. Afta all, they run fairly large 

to Be Prosearfed intelligence senlk* of ihffow? 
affirmed that the D meed S tales The Israeli Justice Ministry Nor. be said, did he bdieve that 
wanted to bear the PLO publidy plans to prosecute an Isradi jour- the transition from secret diploma- 
and nneqiuvocafiy_ accept the two nalist for visiting an enemv Arab cy to one of the most highly visible 
resolutions before it would consid- state. The Associated Press 'report- diplomatic posts in the world 
a meeting with the organization, ed from Td Aviv. would be difficult 

Hussein, in the congressional Amnnn Kapetiouk, a reporter “Fm not intimidated and I don’t 
meeting, called again for taBts to be for the Hebrew daily newspaper have apprehensio ns " he saii "I'm 
held under the “umbrella” of an Yediot Ahronot and the French not a timid man — nor a modest 
international conference that the newspaper Le Monde Diploma ti- one.” 

Soviet Union and other Security que, visaed Jordan twice in the past Td describe myself as a prag- 


Fd describe nr 


Council members would attend. six months on a French passport, a matist lin gr^ wi 
The United Stales and Israel op- government spokesman said. added. 


ell as a prag- 

idealism," be 


page : 


Legend's Dread Dmcula 
Laid to Genetic Disorder 


By Crisrine Russell 

Washington Past Service 

LOS ANGELES— A Canadi- 
an chemist says that the vam- 
^ pires and werewolves of legend 
{and films popularized by Bela 
Lugosi and Lon Chaney Jr. may 
have been based on real victims 
of a rare group of genetic disor- 
ders. 

“The folk mythology may 
have had same truth," said Pro- 
fessor David Dolphin of the Uni- 
versity of British Columbia. The 
diseases, known as porphyrias, 
are associated with a malfunc- 
tion in the biochemical produc- 
tion of heme, the red pigment in 
blood. 

Victims of the diseases are ex- 
tremely sensitive to light , and 
they accumulate chemicals 
called porphyrins that can trans- 
form oxygen into a toxic sub- 
stance that destroys skin tissue. 

The result, the chemist said, 

■ can be devastating — skin le- 
sions may be “so severe that die 
nose and fingers may be de- 
stroyed.” As the gums d^raer- 
ate, the teeth become prominent 
and fang-like and “the unfortu- 
nate individuals who suffer from 
this disease may become very 
hairy." 

“1 marine, if you wQl, the man- 
ner in which an individual in the 
Middle Ages would have been 
received if they only went out at 
night," Professor Dolphin said in 
.. ^a presentation at a session of the 
^American Association far the 
Advancement of Scienca 

“They would have an an i m al 
look about them, being haiiy, 
large of- tooth and badly disfig- 


ured. It has beta suggested, and 
it seems -mac than likely, that 
sodi people might well have been 
considered werewolves." he said. 

Professor Dolphin studies the 
body’s heme protons mid has 
published articles and books cm 
his findings 

In his repeat here, he said that 
the rare and incurable porphyria 
disorder, carried, but not always 
expressed, by about one in 
200,000 individuals, can be treat- 
ed in part by avoiding sunlight or 
retrying heroe injections that al- 
leviate some of the symptoms. 

“Since, in the Middle Ages, an 
injection of the red pigment of 
blood would not be possible," he 
said, “what else ought take its 
place? If a htrge amount of blood 
were to be drank, then the beme 
in ft, if it passes through the 
stomach wall to the blood 
stream, would serve the same 
purpose.” 

“It is ' ocr contention that 
bloodrdrinkmg vampires were, 
in fact, victims of porphyria try- 
ing to alleviate the symptoms of 
tbdr dreadful disease. The fdk- 
lore concerning thenoctamal be- 
havior of vampires would, of 
course, be consiste n t with their 
photosensitivity ” he said. 

I < eg ca ds about vampires, he 
noted, suggested thaTnctims of 
vampires like Count Dracula be- 
come vampires, too. 

■ “Thai’s also explicable,” Pro- 
fessor Dolphin said. In centuries 
past, people traveled little and 
the resulting inbreeding might 
have made porphyria more com- 
mon in some parts of the world. 

The professor dted a chemical 



Ethiopia’s Orphans: The New Crisis 

Government’s Plans for Care May Alienate Western Donors 


Bela Lugosi as Dracnia 

basis for a legend that if one 
sleeps with a wreath of garlic- 
aroond the neck, vampires will 
be warded off. 

Liver functioning, he said, in- 
volves chemicals known as cyto- 
chromes P-450 that also contain 
heme. They hdp rid the body of 
waste: Some drugs and chemicals 
can destroy fiver heme function- 
ing. and a key component of gar- 
lic can do the same thing. 

■ U5. Professor Skeptical 

Dr. Nathan P a s s, an assistant 
professor of medicine at the Uni- 
versity of California in San Fran- 
cisco. expressed skepticism 
about the theory, saying that “to 
try to elaborate every aa*ct of 
the vampire and werewolf myth 
based on what we understand erf 
the chemistry of the disease 
would be really stretching it," 
The Associated Press reported. 
..Professor Bass said he doubl- 
ed that people with porphyria 
would have craved blood, and he 
added that he knows of no vic- 
tims who had been harmed fay 
garlic. 


By Blaine Harden 

Washington Post Service 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 
When the cows were all dead and 
the food was gone, Mohammed 
Nure Stage, who is 12 years old, 
walked with his father to the fam- 
ine Mffip at Rati 

They planned to spend a night 
and bring home grain for Moham- 
med’s three yooiffier brothers. But 
Mohammed’s father never walked 
home. He complained of pain in his 
stomach and head; then he died. 

His death made Mohammed and 
his brothers four of the fstimatwi 
130,000 children orphaned by Ethi- 
opia’s famine. 

With rain returning to much of 
the country, the crisis m Ethiopia is 
evolving away from the fight to 
keep people from dying to deter- 
mining what to do with those who 
(fid not die. The most fragile of 
these survivors are the orphans. 

Afta his father died, Moham- 
med took the grain home hzrnsdf in 
bags on his back, a day’s walk in 
the roadless Ethiopian mountains. 
His mother had died three years 
earlier, just before drought set in. 
His pregnant stepmother had gone 
off to her home village to have ha 
baby and never returned. His aunt, 
who helped lake care of the family, 
died, too, before Mohammed made 
it home. 

By himself, in a village where 
children and old people were dying 
of starvation and everyone was 
fleeing to feeding caters, Moham- 
med look care of his brothers, 
wallting two days a week back and 
forth from Rati, mairmg a fire and 
baling grain in a big poL Afta a 
month, he gave up ami brought his 
brothers down to Bad. 



The Wuilagfui Poe 


An Etiriopi&n child at a refugee camp. 


The brothers all live now in a 
makeshift orphanage on the out- 
skirts of Addu Ababa. In an insti- 
tution that until last year was a re- 
education center for city 
prostitutes, they attend school, eat 
five meals a day and wauft televi- 
sion on Thursday nights. Before the 


famine, they (fid not know televi- 
sion existed. 

They are the lucky ones, a fam- 


They are the hickv ones, a fam- 
ily, with Mohammed, the man child 
elder brother, keeping watch. At 
the orphanage there are other diU- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 6 ) 


mm 


Reuters 

LONDON — English soccer au- 
thorities pulled their clubs out of 
European competition for next sea- 
son Friday afta rioting by British 
fans in Brussels on Wednesday that 
left 38 persons dead. 

The decision was announced by 
the Football Association, the gov- 

British soccer seems io be par- 
ticularly prone to violence 
among its fans. Page 2. 

eraing body of English soccer, as its 
senior officials were summoned to 
see Prime Minister Margaret 

Thatcher. 

The Football Association move 
pre-empted any ban by the Europe- 
an Union of Football Associations, 
which meets in Geneva on July 2 to 
consider its reaction to the Brussels 
tragedy. 

British government sources said 
that Mrs. Thatcher had wanted a 
two-year withdrawal to provide 
more time for the hooliganism 
problem to be conquered at home. 
But Mrs. Thatcher said she was 
pleased with the association’s deci- 
sion. 

At Wednesday’s European Cup 
final in Brussels, supporters of Liv- 
erpool charged fans of the Italian 
side, Juventus of Turin. A wall of 
the Heysel Stadium collapsed, 
crushing spectators. 

The Belgian Red Cross said Fri- 
day that 437 persons had been in- 
jured; an earlier figure had put the 
number of injured at about 200 . 
Thirty-one of the dead were Italian, 
four Belgian, two French and one 
British. 

The English Football Associa- 
tion ruling did not affect nine clubs 
from Scotland, Wales and North- 
ern Ireland that have also qualified 


for European play through their 
own national soccer federations. 
The association also dots not cover 

the English national lean 1 .. 

Belgium also formally an- 
nounced Friday an indefinite ban 
on all British soccer teams playing 
on its soil. 

Meanwhile, the Bdgion public 
prosecutor's office said that the po- 
lice had found six bullets ai the 
stadium where the Liverpoo'-Ju- 
vemus match had been played. 

British commercial television 
showed film Thursday night that 
appeared to show a spectator from 
a stand occupied by Italian sup- 
porters firing a pistol at the police. 
Belgian authorities said they also 
found a spent cartridge from a 
starting pistoL 

Autopsies completed on ail the 
dead had not shown any evidence 
of bullet or stab wounds' the office 
said. The bullets found were from a 
P-38, a pistol normally used by the 
police, and may have been lost by 
one of the 2.300 security men who 
patrolled the grounds, Belgian offi- 
cials said. 

The one-year ban, according to 
Ted Croker the Football .Associa- 
tion secretary, had been chosen be- 
cause entry to European competi- 
tion was fixed on an annual basis 
and because it was necessary to 
consider the matter one ; ear at a 
time. 

A Football Association state- 
ment said the government and the 
92 English league dubs should now 
cooperate “to ensure that this total- 
ly unacceptable behavior of En- 
glish supporters at home and 
abroad becomes a thing of the 
past.” 

The decision affects six clubs 
that have qualified to play in the 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


President Ronald Reagan's ambas- acterize him as an ultrarightist, 

sador ai large, speaks seven lan- calling them “chic liberaL" 

region says h is sj-proathetic ! J iem “J As for K* heroes, “Jesus Christ 

Hussem’s desire to haVe broader -wnen&ver posable intends tu speak stands at tiic head of the list." He 

to colleagues m their own tongue, said he also admires Churchill, Ei- 
Unlike Mrs. Kirkpatrick, he said slower and De GauHe as men of 


Weinberger Calls Losses 
Serious in Navy Spy Case 


By Philip Shcncrn 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger 
has warned that the unfolding UB. 
Navy spy case “represents a serious 
loss — it has gone on a very long 
time.’’ and law-enforcement au- 
thorities said they expected further 
arrests. 

Several employees of a forma 
navy officer accused of spying for 
the Soviet Union will probably be 
arrested soon on espionage 
charges, the officials said Thurs- 
day. 

The officials, who asked not to 
be named, said some employees of 
a Virginia private detective agency 
would be accused of helping the 
owner, John A. Walker, and two 
other members of his family to 
smuggle secret navy documents to 
the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Weinberger would not be 
more specific about the security 
and intelligence losses the United 
States has suffered in the case. 

He said, however, that the De- 
fense Department would strength- 
en its security procedures as a re- 
sult 

Some intelligence officials said 
they might never learn what secrets 
the Walkers gave the Soviet Union, 
out of the wide range of highly 
sensitive material that could nave 
passed through their hands. 

In Norfolk, Virginia, meanwhile, 
the government released new de- 
tails of the purported spy ring, 
which officials say included Mr. 
Walker’s brother and son. All three 
men served in the navy. 

The details, included in hun- 
dreds of pages of affidavits, offered 
an extraordinary glimpse of what 
officials have described as one of 
the most serious spy cases in the 
navy’s history. 

Mentioned are a booby-trapped 
safe fortified with concrete, silver 
bars, a cash payoff of 335,000 in a 
paper bag. meetings that apparent- 
ly occurred in Hong Kong and Ita- 
ly. a long car chase through the 
Maryland countryside, secret code 
books, guns and canes that could 
be turned into weapons. 

Mr. Walker's brotha, Arthur J. 
Walker, a retired lieutenant com- 
mander who taught anti-sub mari ne 
warfare techniques fa the navy, 
was arrested on Wednesday. John 
Walker and his son. Michael a yeo- 
man aboard the aircraft carrier 
Nimitz, were taka into custody 
last week. 

Each man- if convicted, faces a 
maximum sentence of life in pris- ' 
on. 

The FBI said that Arthur Walk- 
er, who retired from the navy in 
1973, has confessed to his part in 
the espionage operations. At a 
coun appearance Thursday, he was 
ordered held without bail. 

According to tbe unidentified 
law-enforcement officials, about 
four of Mr. Walker's employees 
will be arrested, probably during 
the coming week. They waked at 
his company. Confidential Re- 
ports, a private detective agency in 


Virginia Beach. Virginia, founded 
in 1981. Officials gave no explana- 
tion for delays in the arrests. 

It is unclear, the officials said, 
whether additional members of the 
Walker family would be arrested. 

The motivation for the conspira- 
cy was money, according to the 
FBI. “We don't see any other mo- 
tive shomng up.” said Bill Baka. 
an FBI spokesman. “We don't see 
ideological motives. .AD we see is 
cash. ’ 

According to FBI affidavits, two 
informers told investigators that 
Mr. Walker became a Soviet spy in 

1968 while working as a communi- 
cations watch offica for the com- 
mander of the Atlantic submarine 
fleet 

On trips (o Washington in either 

1969 or 1971, the affidavit said, one 
of the informers watched Mr. 
Walker “putting information 
which the source believed to be 
classified into a papa bag filled 
with trash and leaving the paper 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


INSIDE 



Tony Boyle, convicted in 
the 1969 murder of a mine 
union rival, died in Penn- 
sylvania at 83. Page 3. 

■ The Reagan administration 
delayed its decision on continu- 
ing to adhere to the SALT-2 
nuclear arms treaty. Page 3. 

■ Raymond Baire, a former 
French prime minister, will seek 
the presidency in 1988. Page 5. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Fragments pieced together in 
Rome illustrate the glory of an 
ancient Greek frieze. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The VS. trade deficit wid- 

ened to SI 1.9 billion in April 
from SU billion the previous 
month. 9 , 

SPORTS 

■ E th u o nton won the Stanley 
Cup, professional hockey's 
championship, by beating Phil- 
adelphia. 8-3. Page 1& 


1 








Pa gc 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUWDAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


British Soccer Is Seen English Chibs 

As Especially Vulnerable Will Forgo 
To Violence, Rowdyism Soccer thy 

By Jo Thomas fans and for attacks on shops by. JJg falTffTM} 

New York Times Service visitors. A 

LONDON — Although Britain Unlike rugby and cridtot, the «*■ (Coatiaaed from Paget) 

is known for civility and reserve, tire structure of E nglish football is ^nee imyative European, eompefr- 
for gracious manners flnf l the stiff based on leagues ind on winning jjpns season, 
upper lip. it has also been home for knockout competitions. The cm- They mdnde Liverpool, whose 
quite a long time to a youth culture phasis on winning, Sr Norman ob- ^ t ^p Tl g T i [ John Smith, had already' 
{hat can be poor, bored and violent, served, “must reduce the feel in g Mrs. Thatcher that his dub 

■ From Teddy boys and rockers to dial theyYc partiapatmg manure- not con^ete in Europe next 

mod and punk, it has given the !y pleasurable activity m which the 

j emdine sentiment is: may the best riw n»iw- hamd dubs are Ever- 



WORLD 



p All 


W*9S0 : '' up 

PlfifiiilSf'' 

''£# : % ■ 





mna ami n uiii- u ou auveu uib tZZ — . - " .« , . . yvat. „ 

wrid new andoutrageous: fashions grading sentiment is: may the best other barred clubs arc ■ 

and music, but today it is in the side win. ton, Manchester United, 1 

fimdight for a less desirable rear f *“ 1 °“g of ? m “jS*!? pooh Norwich Oty, Totta 

sSraBriiBhiocccrfm. . HoSpm and S ouihimp ttm. 

Fan violence at soccer games is leagues found, cone Irtm "pe The loss of European con 
baldly the preserve of Britain - rough sections of the working fonwffl be a serious finanoal 
the worst soccer violence took class. to the dubs, which can mate 1 

place in Peru, where 318 died in “Some wort .Some are uuenh £1 ^mon (51-25 rnfflion) fn 

■ nlnvnl Thrw either save verv hard mViimw 


The other barred dubs are Ever- 
ton, Manchester United, Liver- 
pool, Norwich City, Tottenham 
Hotspur and Southampton. 

The loss of European compett- 


mmSm&mzmM 


class.” to the dubs, which can make up to 

“Some work. Some are unenh £1 ($1.25 rnfflion) from a 

nloved. They either save very hard nuvwee f.,i mm. m Eurooe. 


piacc in rciu. wuac jid vum* m — 7 ^, . . , 1 ^ - 

1964 — nor is atrocious behavior plqyed. Th«y atiter save very hard successful season in Biropt 
nMnitiar tn soccer. or they dub together. Theyll tot a Manchester and Norwid 

van. travd 12 together, cut costs. 



Car Bomb Defused m^^ndo^ 

-^ajssasas $»g£«£ss 

Convict Denies Plot to 

tad*. k»» «ii!» 

recruited to kfll Lcca viawah fflms. 


^tedthestoryrfttxw^^^ aftotetoMML 

oBW4H»«4m 

w *!?“ *£ i- money and a pasgrort. w ^ ** 


peculiar to soccer. or they ch* together. They’ll toe a Manchester and Norwich had 

JM. Lewis, a U5. sociologist, van, travd 12 together, cut costs, ^ opposed any ban from En- 

talhed reports of riots at sporting aadsleep m railway stations. rope, saying h was unfair to penal- 

events in the United Stales between They come from depressed ^ them for what had happened at 
I960 and 1972 and counted 312, neighborhoods where, from child- a jjvHpod match. 

Baseball lopped the list with 97. hood, violence is the uutfl flcyof Although there have been re- 
Football and basketball ranked daily life, where men prize street that European soccer an- 

second and third. smartness and ttocapaaty to dnnk may consider tanning 

But long before the riot Wedncs- and fight. For ttose men, the soa- Scotland, Wales and Northern Ire- 
dav in Brussels in which 38 persons ologists found, figh t in g "is one of ^ weH as England, govem- 
were killed and hundreds injured, the few sauces of excitement, ^ officials said that Mrs. 
the British government, newspa- meaning and status available. Thatcher was not pressing the 

ners. academes, police and public “It goes hand in hand, Mr. ^nfier federations to pull out of 
, . r ._ 1 rwmninoniil “with a rfau» mVrtS- 


CYCIX)NE VICTIMS— IdaiidwoRttocoa^ of BangMe^«*ect®dv^tTOl^ 

of their bdonguags following the sfonn that ravaged the area a week 

there had been 1,798 bodfes recovered as of Thursday tart the courtly ? F***™? 

If j^itaunt General Hossam Mohammed Ddnd, said the final toD oosdd he 10,000. 


In a tdeviskm mtervrew Tbor^y. 

had raveatod his stray® ttotaflS^ 

“Yes. rai films, above all on 
iiTl yeSta 1981 fornnmtoSJ] 
Walesa, ta was rai lave from prison 


plied. Mr. Srezejms 

Soaxfflaa. When he 
cause his wife was 


Anti-Abortion Bombers Get 10 Years 


the few sauces of excitement, 
meaning and status available." 


Extensive Security 


lUUll Ulll VlftlJ »»»■ — 

»«■ ****** ->*— Thatcher was not pressing the 

“It goes hand m hand, Mr. federations to pull out of 

niJ *SintK a rtnv — 


pers, academics, pouw nuu puuuv — ■ . r^T . “ j ~ ~ smaller 

woe agreed that, in Britain and Dunning said, “with a dose identi- 
-i a, ka<i Wmv an ficaiion with the local community. uL * 


WCI L nVI fXU U1 UIIHiln — □ 1 ----- ( 

abroad, rowdyism had become an ficatiai with the local community, 
wdv staple of the game. They have They fight on behalf of theu- can- 


differed on the reasons and on munity against other comparable 
what can or ought to be done. communities. What you have m 
■ “Reds Are Animals,” said one of this country is the transposition of 

■ i! ? J t T ..... Maw Viwt nr rhirnan Pint"! 


Thatcher was not pressing me Reuters Thursday night to enable the an- 

smaller federations to pull our of PARIS — President Francis thoritks to make a final sweep of 
Europe. B _ _ Mitterrand opened the 36th Paris the assembled aircraft, weaponry 

Mrs. Thatcher said: It has been ^ 1<MT1 nHnnal Air Show on Friday, and exlnbitoisf stands. 

a veiy sad wedt fra this country sQ^^mied by thoesands of police . '. 

and for football Obvioudy_I am smpen and^S ASta 

S’to'dSc^rvra. ^ 


the banners displayed by Juventus 
fans during the match Wednesday 
night, referring to the Liverpool 


• — . — —J — * lira Guuuur, 

New York or Chicago street gangs citizens." 


Matthew Gokbby 

Thursday night to enable the ait- West European praeci lo build the £ fe^ resSa to two fflrwwdo- 

thorities to make a final sweep of European AuairfL S? J SSf^^« S were%stroyed by the bombs. A womens health 

the assembled aircraft, weaponry France has asked that the design gists whose officewse ocsuujcu j 

and exharitora’ stands. . office fra the todynw^ato art* S&nmons. both 21. 

.. . r enane be located m the Pans re- . Mi- Kavc Wianns, and Mr. _ 


After tonzing the 
aerospace technology 


. engine be locatea m me rans io- 
01 gjan, while Britain has masted on 


. hardware, Mr. Mitwrand 

Officials said that the extensive . ffiaht dema 


r #awa minis ters of France, see 


. .» . m w» hail tmWrfw? 


into a football crartraL" 

Richard L autterbuck, a retired 


ui^m , lObiliUK IV uiw M IMUldlU I* vlutmuuMV, a iv ui wi uaiu jjbujsiv auu ow --j— 

fans, whose color is red and who, major general and universily pro- people as a result erf die actions of 
until the Brussels riot, enjoyed a fessor and author of 10 books on our citizens that it requires very 
reputation for being relatively doc- political violence, said: “The only firm derisions and voy firm mca- 

■i- I A (k. onJilra ■ _ .1 L .1 1 ■- n 


She «dd that “there are so many SShSv 

people and so many injured ^ ' 

proplewa result of the waknis c£ oyhwd foBowmg threats of ter 

our citizens that it requires very _ c 

firm derisions and very firm mca- The entire area was seated 


chapter of the National Organization la 
the maximum penalties for the couples. 


ile when compared with the warlike thing they can attach themselves to sores.’ 1 

tribes that nave followed Leeds q their local football team In past Asked about her plans for con- 
United, Cbdsea, MfflwaD, West years, we had wars, and you went - — J ~~ 1 


Ham and Cambridge United. to Berlin or Paris. It is the same Thatcher said she hoped to push a 
Eric Dunning and two other so- rfiing yon had in those chau vinistic law through Parliamen t in tune fra 
riologists at the University of days: They desperately want to be next season that would ban the sak 
Leicester, John W illiams and Pat- — - -* ■«— —* * — ,v — -• -* — t -- 1 — — »• — » 


:or- At a press cratference, he said monm to review me vcnuuc. : 

oa U.S. Bans Psychedelic DrogMOMA 

— ' — 

P p _ _ . _ • most common nsera are coDegMgp youtiis and jorag 

isurge of Basque violence 


and Pat- paJt of a group- They get together of alcohol in stadiums. Other mea- 
studying and for one day in the week hfe has sores were also under consider- 
ican soc- some purpose and some excite- ation, she added, 
tot year menL" ■ OihM I^rinresFflns 


published a book, “HooUgans ^ ^ m awfuli distorted 

Abroa^’lunderwntte 11 by the adventure ,« Dr. Anthony 
Football Trust. Siorr, an author and psychiatrist 

In Jus introduction to the book, ^ t * s a distortion of the 

Sr .Norman warlike aspect of toman beings.” 

‘^rmanrf the bust, explamed -vidtancei is a youth problem," 
that Enghsh football has certain ^ded. “We don’t provide 
features ttot make it rorae vdnera- for people to do 

S—- 

spectator sport of the masses. Rug- _ . _ 

to and cncket, Sr Norman said, Glyn Ford, a Labor Party mem- „ 

attract comparatively few specta- ber of the European Parliament, is Workers’ Stadium. 
-j rhsiiiman of the Fnrnnean Parlia- ‘ ' T ' 


■ Omn Lectures Fans Basque separatist violence over a 

Ninety soccer fans who rioted in 24-hour period this week. 

SUAtSSj IfiolMcchM claimed 10 lives this 
* r n.k,«’r ,k» mraitn. 


from two of China’s s 
Chympic gymnast Li 
women's volleyball 
Pint The Associated 
ed from Bey ing. 


iOTtars,the 
tog, and a Thi 
lyer, Lang iriTWi 
ness report- three 


Reuters block of ffl»rtments near Pamplo- campaim but it achieved a proper me 

PAMPLONA Spain — Three na. ganda &cct ataoad. 

persons, including a 14-year-old The boy was killed while tefling The grotrphas abo kept up at- . . . __ 

boy, were killed in an upsurge of his unde over an apartment inter- tacks on French targets in the . __j 

Basque separatist violence over a com that a woman and a man bad Basque country. A Rmato show- 

24-boor period rids week. just left a suspicions parcel on the room was Mown np m Bilbao on yj® 

doorsteo. they said. Friday, causing extensive damage. California. 

Violence has claimed 10 fives this The Mims appeared to be part The lnffings have brought re- 

maah ‘ of a new^toiOTeby the guerrilla A folia 

The boy and a policeman were group ETA standing for Basque twnaBst Party, which controls the Alglld 

playra. Lang killed by a bomb which injured Homeland and Liberty, in its regions autonomap gpvmimmt, ISLAMA 

iepm~t three __ ._ a . . — year — .l_ p— — r— i. 'v hi> Tiartv hoc fgiinml a nMntinlnl PdOStam 


ats— — 


has been linked to two deaths it 


Jar newspapers reported Fri- capital of Navarre province. . 


three other ooucemen ana a worn- j /-ycar-uiu ukul «« an muvp4i- , — - ■ r™ ;r . , 

an late Thursday in this northern dent state, including the Spanish The party I has favored a negotiated 

•._» wf - # Ufirnn# nrmmWK! and SfltlCntfiDt Willi L1A. 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) — Afghan jets hravfly bandied a 
«« ’Pririov kfllma at least seven ttosems, official sources 


R ”|- dsyjbal pom remora: shorty brforc. t*o men shot to 

said, Glyn Ford, a Labor Party mem- at Thursday’s meetmg m Begings death a staff manager at a muni- 
her nf the Fnmnean Parliament- is Workers’ Stadium. .■ n 


er soda] stratum. 


Mr. Li, winner ot three 
medals at die Los Angeles ( 


tors and “Saw upon a rather high- chairman of the European Pariia- Mr. Li, winner of three gold 

cr soda! stratum.” menfs Committee of Inquiry that medals at the Los Angeles Ofym- . . 

Soccer is also the only sport in has been looking into the rise of pics, said he was “deeply grieved” Police sources raid the bomb was 
'England in which large numbers of fascism and racism in Europe, and when he learned about the riot, apparently set off by remote con- 
fans travd to matches played away he is concerned about signs that which followed China’s 2-1 loss to trol when a patrol car arrived to 
from tome, setting the stage for neo-fascist grams may be foment- Hong Kong in a World Cup qnali- check a reoort that a drug addict 
fights between home- auditing mg football violence. tying match oo May 19. 


lions factory near 
of Bilbao. 


Basque port 


Police sources said the bomb was 


check a report that a drug addict 
was threatening residents of a 


and French Basque provinces and settlement with ETA 
Navarre. ETA has continued its terronst 

In April ETA launched a bomb- campaign against the Spanish state 
ing campaign on tourist beaches, despite the granting of alarms mea- 
There were not any injuries in that sure of hone rule in the region 

Weinberger Calls Losses 
Serious in Navy Spy Case 

(Continaed from Page I) Virginia. The ban would be worth 

. ... - , , about $6,000 each at current silver 

bag near a tree at the side of the 


Pakistani village on Friday, kffling at least seven peraau, affinal 
s&idL 

The village, Swir, is about 15 miles (25 kflometera) from an 

iuv “^1 I . 1 * J_| ftmnwSnm 


sive is under way to try to break thereto! blockade. • 

The official sources, who asked not to be identified, said thevfflage was 
heavily Humagpri in the bombing. ... 


UIAJU UU1V1, iJlMJau \nr; — ouuom a tn jm . i v uuuuiu w 

turn to other countries for arms became .the United States is ra^f 
ptovMUnfrpromhed weapons and. spare parts, the Sudan News Agency, 
reported Friday. ■ • 

Brigadto Osnan Abdullah Mohammed, in a statement distributed by 

the ajsencv, said Sudan’s new leaders wanted to diversify arms sauces “to 

» fl J L. - —---J 


% n “ paces. 

®2* . . , _ Another affidavit described an 

^ mfdnna\ wtom jwcm- daborare effort to trafl Mr. Walk- 

er** car on tiie ntoit d his arrest 

John Wafta’s fonrra- wic, oh- jj,. ^ pid^dim eariy an the 

wm* 1 nmaring of May 20, a few hours 

Walker received S35.000 m cash m ‘ — 


source in difficult times. 

Without daboratin^. Brigadier Mohammed said the United States 
“even failed to meet its c o mmir ment of provktog spare parts fra an 
important branch of the armed forces.” 

In Washington, a State Department spokesman, said of Brigadier 
oriJLhmnv Mohammed’s statanent: “We oon’t know what he’s talking about We’ve 


S 1 figs j 


«ml« 

AUWMIhM 


tribune 




a paper b 
ion," the 


^edmOJOincashm SJK&1»«SlM«y «aiemoits raying thm pro^ 

foundmaanmtarfasfa- doammt, ^ a adudol spot m 

m r a. s ‘ rmv ” j 


Opeiing fra Tdka 
Is Seen In Moscow 


imit Leaders Vow to Fadi 
an Eoonomie Reowway 


ion, the affidavit saw. . Maryland, the FBI said. 

To the atmt • **»* “j The bureau said that most of dw 

w K ni fmnnhfL documents, wfaidi described Soviet 
denrial sources has bom oozrobo- movemoits in the Medi terra- 
rated and foond to be truthful and L«hem 


FortheRecord 

ibed Soviet The Tokyo District Court denied Thursday a reunest to rrteweSadaim- 
Meditcrra- chi Hirasawa, 93, who has qjent 30 years on death row. The court said a 



M!ns 


wSSSSs 


W?i 


"^cutors in Norfolk also re- W th« TVh™, wjt 

imuvI n ion» mwntnrv of material UJS. mt cl lige n ce o ffic ial s say, they Iraq saw its planes raided three Iranian ones, Tehran, Kazvm 

found in^^areh ofJ^m Walker’s m most concerned about the do- Kashan, on Friday and downed an Iranian, jet fighter. . j 

twvKtorv home m Norfolk. The Oils of American anti-submarine Prune Minster Laurent Fabtas of France will make an official vis 
IWO^tqry none m lNOnoia. inc ... Pact Berim m Time tn fl the fiwtt Ktf a Cnw. 1 , 


tSK SSaagSv wAa. ^rl 






2FOU 

Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 
we’ll give you an extra month ofTribs free with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price 
in most European countries! 


nearly every wall 
3 and paintings of 
to. Some of them 
meters) tnH And 
s in Frig Hs h along 
d paths between 
EaYs students are 


razOT maucs. saioy pins ana suvas orphanages bankrolled by the West tm* n 

CHURCH SERVICES £SfiS,“SSSaS!KS 

1 will not be embraced. He does not If the government’s showcase nr- ^ttmg EritrMn r^ds m Asmara 


1? "Hassanlbrahiin, 12, alsoa no- pdaSdren’s^ml^SSedOTa SriJSS 
SS^'L^nln. AMra. c «^v « “J L^f ^ Barren plain about 120 miles (190 S ^ S 
Sunday 9 «wa. it ajn. mother are dead. StiR he says his kflometers) south of Addis Ababa, k! cbddren, to is not real- 

churth school and nwnjry li cub. wm!c> parents would viat him at the or- is any indication of how EtMmia w^orMML His qwlher is alive m 
cteyfc 12 new. TtLx.72Q.17 xl phanage, except that they don’t like intends to raise famine «§£££ But *“* 

CBOitAL BAFTtsr OWKH, 13 Rub du Western aipport for orphanages orphanage to 

VWGakmbtar, 73006 fmh. Metre Str In EtifiOpa, AS m mudl <rf Afi> seems imlikriy G gtt a gOOd ettaatiOBL 


ets. He beats im other children and 
will not be embraced. He does not 
speak. 

Hassan Ibrahim, 12, also- a no- 
mad orphan, says Ms father and 


Eritrean rebels tn Asmara 
lent Ethiopia, was in the 
up ot war orphans to crane 
nldren's Village. l ike most 


5 pjh « l«i ii Y»i i 

HaodthiiwiiiadMbKnpaipn ateMtiv mniuabmtatf 

PtaMutMWoatfiMwdiSl.WW 


'ToiSubscriptiooMjxager.IrtenxrfkxidHerekdTrftDm^lBLcr^eriueChcxtesde-Gai^ « 
j 92521 Naji^Cecbc.RTXice.Tdj: 747 0729. Tetecdl 2832. H 

Please er^ my subscripfion for: ™ 

a5 m2morthi □6mortht DSmorths 

[+1 month free) (+2wBetefre^ (+1 weekM ■ 
n Murherlrkanrlntwl H 


Sulpice. Sund ay won hip h Engfah <M5 ca, kinship is the one reliable insur- 
om, *•». a. SomarviB*. t«l= tarjuxa. once peasants ha vc azaxnst dcstiiu- 


seems unlikdy. 

At the front 0 f the 
age, behind a painting of 


wuiNUg MfflST OflJRCH, touTI Md . .. . — > — — — — — — ~™ 

mobon. Engfith whom do not know thor fanffly inAmharic: “We growing children ^ Ranald Reagan is like Eihio* 

56 name and ^urot reuraber the are determined to foBowour Com- P^’s former emperor, HaOe Sdas- 
name of their home village, the munist fatha- cranrade Chtomlu ^ “an oppress^/’ 

■ - TWPOU S U ^ sm Mariam’s meth- Meskerem Getachew, also 13/ 

u»», owch^W,, ML fa. 04” tas b«n it the Oriktei-s V®,«* 


Fra three hours ««* Saturday 
monring, he attends political edu- 
cation class. Asked about the Unit- 
ed States, he' said he has been told 


aasJ 


P Mycheckisendosed 

flecae charge rny: □ tags □ AmeriooiEiqaRs □ Diners Qub 
□ Euroccid □ Mcstercord □ Vw 


&wa 

NdheHmdt 


Cod expry dcSe. 
Grd account 
nutrfaer i — i — 


■SgnAn. 


UNKJN r.O. fa od.” 

63P7 r *idbfe>.TdL. 71468. Friday wrvieu pUfl UtTMOOX UnnCfi — and TUf 

lojocLA. ■ vale relief agencies. None erf them 


, JUB ucienoniiai io touow our Uom- 

name of tbar home village, the munist father comrade Om? imn 

!*!*■ ^ ■* 


S^n 

Sxwkrd SIy.I 

tat of Europe Ncrti Africa famerFi a J. 

ill M 

T553ran5X5«at55Si5^Slra 

te I s! M 


odM&M in Europe Cantaes bm. dren wto are malnottnaicd, sick, m five setf-contamed schools oa a _ 

Dkk, 5 aringrtraat 20,1271 NCHuimuThe traumatized and, ui many cases, 23JJ00-acra (9200-heoarel rito Tt ^ «>* Soviet Umon and the East 

Miinio— i. atajw. 3OT*?Sr?iasts sa-f.4" f«4” saw. 

snxKHOiM Jjp**** «»«««««. grant from the Swafish govern- 

iMMANta tSSSTSl tata. wean hrai^itra not, - ment and $1 milKofl from No caher country has helped." 

FrtaJydiMoH MIomMp. Sunday 11 : 0 a have ro many needy dnldrcn, said ed Nations Children's Fund. Asked what she has heard about 

ta. {08)316051.131223. Mcngisha Hade, bead of the Etirio- The camuus-stvfe srfmok the United States, the mum food 


VACATDN KTRUCnONS 

IvJbaaw fl inflli em ■ *> ; — ; 

□ PtooMtt>HaBndiiir»bgi|aiMdur»igiiiyd»w»ariade^ 

□ I would B* to hove the poperierttotnyvecaienaddrm peasaendaseinsmicfan^ 


To place an adeerthement 

in thiM MKtum 


odal Welfare. 

The government has two strafe* 


Ms Ettnbetfc HERWOOD 
UlATbO^Cnlle, 
42521 Picnfflr Cedes, Fnnoc. 
TeLx 74-?. 12.65. 


*“ “Kf>«uauLc. iu one or uie , — p rr" ■“*“ mo uoiucu naies 
top- schods, for 550 chfldren aged from K»gm^ awarreeently and that EiW 
The 6 months to 7 years, there are kut- c P' a Snce the revofation. shg- 
ans derearten-like playrooms. The has improved. 


’g as / 

s|Sa»a asitss sSssslS 

With tree rood. houses, pomes and trees. said. “We douThaveto 



' r 1 


A I • 

... • ’ 


law l hid 
i Mhvrinii 


tnuvxtnrv hnmc m Norfolk The auu-auuuuuiiK: iniuna i wnii ji-hhhs ui i xeuistc wiu u uu aui uluuuu you uj 

and the list were ordered warfare that John Walker might East Berlin cm June 10 and II, the first by a French prime minister, ^ 
unsealed Ttoisday by a federal ^ve sold. spokesman said Friday in Paris.. (Reaenf 

magistrate in Norfolk. ; — 

On the inventory were a 357- ___ . 

S££=ES Ethiopia’s Orphans: The Focus Shifts 

contained “concealed vials.” rji /“'i ^ a # 

Jf£rf%£laHHD A o Government Care for Survivors 

document dated 9-74,” an envelope ^ 

containing numerals naval docu- (Coiiflnned fro** Page I) The second strategy is to build However, on nearly every wall 

meats, a tag from the^ West German dren who have no idea where any of orphanages and expand existing there are pictures and painting* of 
airline Lufthansa and receipts from their relatives are. who cannot re- ones. The government, poorin the Cokxid Mengistu. Some aftbem 
an Italian moteL member hfe before the feeding best of years and sevtady squeezed are 10 feet (3 meteral taH And 

camp, wbo dream at mgfal about by the cost of f amine relief and the there are sloeai 


^*hal-; 


4 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


Page 3 






-sVs 


^AMERICAN TOPICS 


Rostenkowski, a Name to Region With i 




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By Bob Sccrer ? “ machin e" hade and catapult him other. “Eveiybody was shocked at how well he 

Lot Angeles rimes Service into the House speakership, when Thomas P. did considering the pressure he was under," 

WASHINGTON — “Dear RostY,” the °’ Ne ® Jr- a Massadiusetts Democrat, re- said W illiam Daley, the 36-vcar-old son of 
tfflfgr atn on Representative Dan Rosten- tires in wo years, or into the mayor s office die late Chicago mayor. “He's never had a 
kowskfs Hfsk read, “Your response to the ® Chicago, often the highest aspiration for tough campaign so he never had to use media 
president was the greatest.” It added: Tin Parians from lhat diy. before." 

one -of. those who feel like suckers when we Witb Democrats, Republicans and jour- Mr. Rostenkowski. whose father and 

pay oar taxes.” grandfather were powerful Democratic poli- 

Whether they were addressed to “Rosty” , , 1. 1 j “dans in Chicago, was a favorite of the elda 

or, just as frequently, to “Roasty,* “Rep. Everybody WHS Shocked Rt Daley, who ran the famed party machine in 
Rospcnkowski,” “RostencowskT or “Ro- _ . Chicago with a strong hand for more than 20 

seenkowski," the mostly favorable cards, let- DOW well he did Considering years until his death in 1976. In addition to 
t&s and telegrams have been pouring into ° picking Mr. Rostenkowski for a congressio- 

the office of the House Ways and Means the pressure he was under** nal s* 31 m ! 95S * Daley also installed him as 
'Committee <4iaiTrnan following his televised * parly boss in the heavily Polish Northwest 

response Tuesday to President Ronald Rea- _ William Dfllev. Side WMi *1* congressman still lives 

gan's lax revision plan, * and spends almost every weekend. 

Although he is a 27-year veteran of the — On the Ways and Means Committee. 

House and the head of the committee that nali$t$ suddenly gushing over him ^ Ros* which until a few years ago dispensed corn- 
must pass on all tax legislation, the Illinois tenkowski has been quick to capitalize rn the mince assignments, Mr. Rostenkowski 
Democrat hardly has been a household name attention. On Thursday, he posed with his serv " c d as Mayor Daley's point man. ensuring 
outside his native Chicago, where he learned fan mail for television and newspaper pho- due Chicago Democrats won powerful slots, 
to swap patronage and favors with Mayor tographns. Never considered a tax expert, Mr. Rosten- 




10 swap patronage and favors with A 
Richard J. Daley, his political mentor. 


graphere. Never considered a tax expert, Mr. Rosten- 

Meanwhfle. his staff distributed “Write kowski rose to the committee chairmanship 


Dan Rostenkowski 


‘ r "i r ^ 15 


SaufcrvUrited Pma tMamvicnd 

HARD TIMES AHEAD? — Matneen SdEvan rides through Manhattan in search of a 
fare. New York’s 20Q horse-drawn cabs are under attack fay animal protection groups. 


ing frustrations with the present tax system Republican outlined the president's program 
— has thrust the gruff, burly representative for Mr. Rostenkowski’s committee. 


into the national lime light as the man who 


ytimi un minim al inepnaiurni spinpm o«uT»aiiii 6 

r Mr. Rosienkowski's committee. political insuncis he learned in Chicago 

Although they contend that Mr. Rosien- 'could be more of an asset to Mr. Rosienkow- 


198! and promptly was embarrassed by During the administration of President Jim-' 
esidem Reagan, who worked around him my Carter he opposed Mr. Carter's attempts 
pass a sweeping tax cut. to trim deductions for expense account' 

But analysis say the wheeling-and-dealing meals, a favorite target of tax reformers, 
ilitical insuncis he learned in Chicago Although he has never faced a serious 
uld be more of an asset to Mr. Rostenkow- election challenge. Mr. Rostenkowski holds' 


could decide the fate andform of tax reform kowski’s abilities have long been underesti- ski in die tax-revision debate than knowing one of the largest electoral funds in Congress 


if ii is to come rhfc year. 


by his colleagues, even some of the rf*e ms and outs of tbc lax code. 


and has invested much of the monev in tax-' 






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Forecast forU.S.: 
Growth, Good Times 

John Naisb&tt, a futurologist, 
the anther of “Megatrends" and 
a champion of the Sun Belt, de- 
livered these nuggets to an audi- 
ence of mayors m Austin, Texas, 
The Washington Post reports: 

Fact: last year; 700,000 new 
companies 'were started in the 
United States.' In die prosperous 
1950s. no more than 100.000 new 
concerns were created in a single 
year. The entrepreneur is Ameri- 
ca's engine of growth. 

O bserva tiott: The union 
movement is dead. The welfare 
state is finished. Both woe by- 
products of the Tate, imlimwnlM 
industrial era. 'People 'who talk 
about Japan Inc. nnssthe point. 
It's a world economy : now, in- 
creasingly. dnn rinateri by USA- 
Japan Inc. ... 

Prediction: Fitness is oo f ad. 
What was once a nation of farm:, 
era, then of workers* is now. a 
nation ofderks: Clerks need ex- 
ercise and ihat n tontfam- 
ing boom is sports equipment. 

Observation;, .Urbanisation. 
im crested. The peculation is 
spreading and thinning. The 
“gentrification” of a handf ul of 
inner cities in the Northeast is an 
over-observed blip an the big 
screen, Eke someone “walking 
south on a northbound flight" 

Prediction: Baseball, for chil- 
dren of all ages, wiD go on forev- 
er. But football, “the industrially 
inspired sport,” will “go into a 
long slide. 


For the first time in his speech, 
the seer was met with stony si- 
lence. In football-mad Texas, 
there are some things you just 
don't say. 


ACbmpaterized 
Tteign of Terror’ 

Jennifer Schuster, 19, of Bar- 
bank, California, was put on pro- 
bation and ordered to take psy- 
chotherapy and do 200 hours erf 
community service far 'enlisting 

m OTMlwif mmpnter wilhiiMtf ^ 

or “hacker,” to conduct what the 
prosecution called a “reign of 
electronic tarot" on a rival for 
her boyfriend’s affections. 

The hacker, Steven Rhoades, 
20,1 got 50 days in jafl. He had 
previously been put on proba- 
tion for tapping into a North 
American An* Defense Com- 
mand computer, in the style of 
the Elm "WarGames-” 

Police officers testified that 
Mr. Rhoades broke electronical- 
ly into the credit card files of 
weadie Mdnick, 21, who said 
she had received as many as 50 
anonymous threatening tele- 
phene calls a day. 

“They told me I was going to 
die,” she said “They knew every- 
thing about me. It was terrify- 

"fee said she lost interest in 
Miss Schuster’s boyfriend after 
two dates, and hasn’t seen him in 
months. 


Short Takes 

Tbe Z2d amendment to the 
U.S. Constitution ban President 
Ronald Reagan from seeking re- 
dection again. But Burton Pmes, 
vice president of the Heritage 
Foundation, a conservative think 
tanlr says that thanks to the 
power of patronage: “He’s not a 
lame dude He’s going to be giv- 
ing away jobs and goodies for the 
next three years.” 

Union Square Park at 14th 
Street near Broadway in Man- 
hattan. long known tor graffiti- 
covered statues, broken benches 
and drug dealers, has been re- 
opened after a S3.6-imffion res- 
toration. In an effort to keep the 
drug pushers out permanently, 
tbe park’s thick busbes have been 
removed and police patrols have 
been reinforced. 


Shorter Takes: Sagging oO 
prices «nd disappointing explo- 
ration results have reduced the 
w mnher nf d rilling ri g t off Amer- 

ican shares Iran the usual 4,800 
to 1,830 today, according to the 
U.S. Energy Department. 
. . Americans contributed a re- 
cord $7425 billion to nonprofit 
charities last year, an increase of 
11.1 percent ova 1983 and well 
above tbe inflation rate of 4J 
percent 


ARTHUR 


More importantly for Mr. Rostenkowski. congressman’s most ardent supporters ex- Despite his pledge to push tax simplifica- exempt inieresi-bearing industrial bonds. 
57, his eloquence on this issue, uncbaiacter- pressed surprise at the image he projected on tion. Mr. Rostenkowski has not previously wen while speaking against similar tax 
istic for him, may help him shed the i«na gp of television. forged a reputation as a champion of reform, dodges in committee. 

Panel Criticizes Tax Plan 


But Pledges Cooperation 


By David E. Rosenbaum 

New Ter* Times Service 


looked at every issue in terms of 
fairness, economic growth and sim- 


WASHINGTON — Treasury P 15 ^ and that d« state and local 
Secretary James A. Baker 3d has «« deduction failed on afl three 

won promises of bipartisan coopa- co “? l f , 

a tion at the opening congressional I don 1 t h i n k it s fair for people 

hearing on President Ronald Rea- ' m ^ ***« to subsidize thwe 
gan’s Jax reform plan Sharp ques- high- tax states, he told Mr. 

lioning from members of the Downey. 

House Ways and Means Commit- 10 answer 10 a sundar challenge 
tee, however, foreshadowed fro® Representative William J. 
months of negotiations ova some Coyne, a Pennsylvania Democrat, 
elements of the proposal. Mr. Baker declared: “The dire con- 

Ahnost afl the representatives sequences people say are going to 
took issue with one aspect or an- happen, we just do not believe, 
other of the sweeping administra- Several l^slators from North- 
don proposal to rede^gn the feder- anm and Middle Western states 
al income lax system, but nobody asserted that tbe president s plan, 
disputed Mr. Baker’s declaration by abolishing the deduction for 
that “there is a clear and compel- «a lc and local taxes and diminish- 
Hng need for reform.” ®8 ihe tax incentives for smoke- 

“He has struck a populist slack industries to invest in plant 
chord,” tbe committee Aamruin, and equipment, would discriminate 


Representative Dan Rostenkowski ngjmsi then- rqpow. 
an Illinois Democrat, said of the Mr. Baker said the Treasury had 
president. “We need tax reform, not tried to calculate tbe economic 
The country needs tax reform.” i®pact of the plan by regions be- 



Tbe country needs lax reform.” 

As a symbol of bipartisan ap- 


cause to do so would be “divisive." 
He said the Treasury had con- 


peal Mr. Baker arrived at the.hear- ^7^ <rf toraies pai?£y 
ing Thursday morning wearing a p^ie eaSi^ J250.000 or more in 

^ 1983. The rraulis showed, be said. 

Roster button. Rostenkowski ^ -pepp^ ^ justifiably oul- 

RTuhvl his idevLSfid nsnnn.se to Mr. . / r . ... 


President Reagan held up a pair of overalls presented to him before he gave a speech at the 
courthouse in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, during a trip to promote his tax revision program: 

Plan Would Alter Campaign Funding 


aided to ‘devised respoiac 1° Mr. ^ ^ 

revision: “Write a letter to Wash- il,,. k.If lluw l.noir. 


By Robert Pear 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A provision 
of President Ronald Reagan's tax 
plan, if adopted, would radically 
alter the way presidential cam- 


OnAdheringto 1979 SALT-2 Treaty 


United Pros Intenpuionai 

WASHINGTON — Pres 


Although the U3. Senate never Pexte. have recommended that Mr. 


1 


WASHINGTON — President ratified the SALT-2 treaty negoti- Reagan stop complying with 
Ronald Reagan notified Congress ated dining the Carter adnrinistrar SALT-2, charging that Moscow has 
on Friday that be is delaying until tion, both 'the United States and violated some of its terms. - 
Jane 10 a report on whether the the Soviet Union have agreed to 

administration intends to adhere to comply with its terms. H rnmnliance Foreseen 

the 1979 strategic arms limitation Mr. McFariane said that contin- _™"7 . ■ . . , 

treaty to give h time to consol t with ued comphance with tbe missile .5 e 2Sf n 

NATO ahies and further assess its limit is an issue of “complexity and said Thuraday they etpected the 

utilitaiy and diplomatic options. importance” lhat has required “our 


revision: “Write a letter to Wash- half of those taxnav- °{ P^tloQt R«ald Ragarfs tax 

iOgton. Just xridrwa ft. 10 Rosty. pbn - 11 *4°P' ed ' wouJd ra*caDy 

t fomwft n nr"- - ! ers.Tid said, paid as much as 20 alter the way presidential cam- 

“TlV./. .. . r, percent of their income in taxes. paiBls have been funded since 

With hundreds of lobbyists fill- and more than one in 10 paid taxes 1975 

01 1655 ' b * n 5 P*”* 01 °* ^ m ' The plan proposes that Congress 

bearing rooms on Captto HID and comes. currcmsystem of public 

standing three-deep along the The administration’s proposal financing for presidential elections 
walls, MrJJaker answer^ amum- he said, would restrict tax shelters repealing the $1 checkoff al- 
tee members quesdons. He rieided impose a minimum tax on lowed on tax returns, 
questions ranging from such krge those using various tax breaks. As a At the lop of their returns, lax- 
issues as the overall impact of the result, according to the Treasury p ayers can indicate whether they 
tax plan on the economy to such secretary, the wealthy would no warn jj of their taxes to go into the 
relatively smaU ones as the dedua- longer be able to avoid taxation. presidential Election Campaign 


“Repeal of the checkoff would Southern California, said of the 
eliminate public funds for presi- proposal to eliminate the checkoff: 
dentin! campaigns unless direct ap- “This is a direct attack on public 
propriations were provided” by funding. With a divided Congress 
Congress, the administration said and with the potential of a veto by 


■ MM* M a * J» — D I lUlvUlUOi UMUVM Villi ILJtoLU 

■ Compliance Foreseen for Uoda the president’s plan, he Fun d, which last year paid S40.4 

Reagan administration officials nanicapped ctoWren. said, 79 percent of taxpayers each to Mr. Reagan and to 

said Thursday they expected the _ The issue foremost m many lq^ would owe than they owe now his Democratic opponent, Walter 
president to continue honoring, for l ^ ators to be the or the same. The remaining 21 per- F Mondale, for the general dec- 

* . • , , « o/immiefrohAti e nmnncsl fA rrtWtl rani no /wnfimipri rnAiiln haw ■ r._ 1 


in a book explaining the lax plan, the president the possibility of 
The tax plan also proposes ic Congress appropriating the money 
eliminate a lax credit for political independently is very problemat- 
contributions 10 federal, state and ic." 

local candidates, political action Although he does not make the 
committees and national political $1 contribution on his own tax re- 
parties. turns. Mr. Reagan has accepted 

Herbert E Alexander, an au- more Tederal money from the presi- 
thoriiy on campaign finance and dential campaign fund than anyone 
director of the Gtizens Research else; a total of S90.5 million in 
Foundation, a nonpartisan group 1976. 1980 and 1984. according to 
affiliated with the Universitv of federal records. 


President Reagan was required most' comprehensive analysis and 
to send die report to Congros by careful consideration" over many 


June 1. 

The notification of a postpone- 


months. .. 

He said among the judgments 


meat on the SALT-2 treaty was the president must take into ac- 
made in a letter to Representative count is the pattern erf Soviet non- 


Thomas P. O'Neill Jr* the speaker comphancq with exist 
<rf the House, by Mr. Reagan’s na- aims treaties, the scale 


nuclear 

tbe past 


lit* F<ktu* 
for Sunivofi 


!^ional security adviser, Robert C. and projected Soviet strategic 
r ’ McFariane. buildup, the requiranenis for as- 

Mr. McFariane said the report suring effective U.S. deterrent 
would deal with tbe admmis tta- forces in the face of the Soviet 
. lion’s policy (rf not .undercutting bufldnp and what strategic weap- 
^LJ) existing strategic arms agreements ons the United States wotrfd need if 
njjjl as kmg as tbe Soviet Union exa- it decided to iw longer comply with 
k rises equal restraint. SALT-2. 

“Spaaficaily, the rrport is to de- In additimi, Mr. McFariane said 


Times reported. . 

going to be 

Many officials said they believed tion,” said R 
that Mr. Reagan would modify the J. Downey, 
toms of adherence to avoid further York. 
dismanUing of U.S. nuclear forces Mr Baker 
as reouired by the treaty, which 3g ^ ' r h a , q, 
placed limits on the number of each 


dass people on Long Island are untied, “are not sympathetic cases’ 


going to be Tories in this revolu- because they “are enjoying special 
tion,” said Representative Thomas current low tax benefits or conces- 


to lorgo private contnouDons in 
,eoc cases ihe general election, 
ing special Since the 1976 presidential race, 
or conces- when Jimmy Carta, the Democrat- 


Mr. Baker responded time and 


as required by the trea* which 

placed limits on the number of each 

side’s bombas and missiles. 

The officials concluded that Mr. Dive for Spanish Wreck 

Reagan would not want to nm the * 

risks of outright renunciation, Ult rlOTMm IieldS bOlu 


it of New si ons that are not used by tbe ma- j c nominee, de fe at e d the incum- 
j°n t y-'’ bent Republican, Gerald R. Ford, 

3 time and Several legislators pressed Mr. ^ public financing system has 
nation had Baker to justify figures showing achieved a rough parity in financial 

that taxpayers with incomes ova resources between the two major 

$200,000 would have an average parties' nominees. 


rises equal restraint. SALT-2. 

“Specifically, the itport.is to de- In addition, Mr. McFariane said 
scribe tbe implications of ihe USS Mr. Reagan would have to consider 
Alaska’s sea trials for the no-under- the pace of the new round erf nude- 
cut policy, assess potential Soviet ar arms negotiations u n d e r way in 
responses to the- Uit no-undercut Geneva. ' 


which the 
bank wi 


said would be a new 
Congress on top erf 


The Associated Press 


struggles over the budget, the tax KEY WEST, Fl ori da Divers Missouri Democrat. presidential elections and the 

Shand Central .America; a srardong the wreckage of . a Span- Mr. Bate responded that, on checkoff system.” The system, he 


tax reduction of 10 percent under Richard A. Viguerie. a direct- 
the Reagan plan. mail marketing specialist and fund- 

“The losers are tbe people in the miser for conservative ca us es , said, 
middle dass,” complained Rep re- “Most conservatives would wel- 
sentative Richard A. Gephardt, a enme renal of federal financing of 


come repeal of federal financing of 
presidential elections and the 


responses to the-US: no-undercut 
policy decisions, make’recommen- 


"As of this date, we are complet- 


dations regarding future- U^. po- ing oar assessment of the military 
Iicy, and review So wet activities and diplomatic impB eations and 


system and Central America; a o. » Mr. Jtaxer responaeo rnau on checkoff system.” The system, he 

xwisative reaction in tbe United tsh galleon sunk m a hurricane m average, taxes would be reduced in ^ “distorts the election process 
States and in Western Europe, and 1622 “P every income class and that a tax and has probably worked to the 

a decline in Soviet-U.S. relations. ““ w °f“ of cut for those of the wail thy class advantage of Democrats.” 

r tv rrsrt of tre ^ Qrc ' - “S 15 U . who were not usmg tax shelters was The administration said the 

However, the «act terms of and four pieces of emerald-encnist- proper. checkoff was “unrelated to the Dur- 


". ;>• with respect to existing strategic options,” be said. “This issue wiD 
aims agreements,” Mr. McFariane be discussed by the president and 
’ .> wrote. his key adrisera al a fo rmal Nation- 

l - The Alaska is a Trident subma- a] Security Coancfl tnecting at- the 

■ '■ fine whose missiles would exceed beginning of next week.” 

’ the timits called for in SALT-Z It At the same time, Secretary of 
' ' - * will begin sea trials in the falL Mr. State George P. aultz will meet in 
^ — j'i'- c . Reagan must decide whether ro Lisbon next week with the foreign 
i stop complying with the agreement tranistexs of the North Atlantic 

. . . " . or to retire a number erf dda mis- Treaty Organization. 

siles to keep within the timits of the Some officials, including Assis- 
f> -r r ] accord. tarn Defense Secretary Riraard N. 

; ; Tony Boyle, 83, Conyicted 

In UmonRival’s Dealh, Dies 


States and in Western Europe, and 
a decline in Soviet-U.S. relations. 

treasure, 1 

However, the exact terms of and four pi 
compliance were st£D in doubt after ed jewelry, 
a meeting Tuesday of arms control Arehaec 
advisers at the White House. They may be get 
were said to have reflected the drw- tbe wrecks 
sions among the senior cabinet offi- sflver bam 
cers. which sank 


r - checkoff was “unrelated to the pur- 

questions of business tax- poses of tbe income lax” and was a 


Archaeologists believe drvers atioo, Mr. Bate said, without pro- ^source of confusion” for many 
may be esttmg close to the bulk of yiding documentation, that the taxpayers. It does not increase or 
t WI ?* a 5 e ” 7 president’s plan would lead to a decrease a person's lax liability bui 

silver bars lost with the Atocba. significant increase in capital for- earmarks money for the election 
which sank in the Marquesas Keys, matron. fund_ 


ne Aaoemed Press ' become the 11th president of the 

WILKES-BARRE. Pmnsylva- union jn 1963, tbe first president 
nia^Tooy Boyle, S3, the former from west of the Mississippi, 
president of tne United Mine Mr. Boyle was convicted in 1974 


-^president of ihe United Mine bfr. Boyle was convicted in 1974 
'Workers who was convicted bf or- of the three murders but the state 
doing the murder of a union rival - Supreme Court, overturned that 
died in a hospital Friday. verdict m 1977. 


Mr. Boyle, who had been in the 
coronary care tzedt. bad been in 31 
health for most of the past decade. 

W A. Boyle, who used the name 
Tony, was serving three consecu- 
tive life terms at the state prison at 
Dallas for the murders of Joseph A, 
Yablonskl Mr. Yablonskfs wife; 
Margaret, and daughter, Charlotte. 
The YabJonskis were shot as they 
slept in their Garksville borne on 
-pec. 31, 1969. 

* Mr. Yablonski had lost a bid to 
Mr. Boyle for the union presidency 
and was planning to challenge that 
loss. 

Mr. Boyle rose from the coal 
fields of southeastern Montana to 


verdict in 1977. 

In his retrial in 1978, he was ! 
convicted again of three first-de- j 
gree murder counts and received j 
three consecutive life terms. In ; 
1982, the state Supreme Court up- 1 
held the second conviction. 

Eight other people, including 
three Cleveland men who accepted 
the assassination contract for | 
$5,200. either confessed or were 
convicted of participating. 

in September 1973, Mr. Boyle | 
attempted to take his own life with 
an overdose of barbiturates. Before 
be went to prison, he was defeated 
for re-election by Arnold Miller, a 
reform candidate. 


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Page 4 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


Hera lb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune. 


Widi TJw Nfv York Times wad The W ashingto n Port 


The Foul Show Went On 


If the world needs a civilized Europe, and 
if Europe needs civilized sport then the 
deaths of 38 fans in mayhem at the Europe- 
an soccer season’s crowning match are a 
calamity of the first order. While the abomi- 
nation in Brussels unfolded on television 
Wednesday ni ght, millions watching in Eu- 
rope and Africa must have shuddered in 
unison. The moment of dread has passed, 
but the collective memory of it can help one 
and all to try to set things right First, two 
scandals have to be clearly admitted. 

For more than a decade now, English and 
Scottish society and its authorities have col- 
luded cynically in the toleration at home and 
the export abroad of drunken vandals pos- 
ing as soccer fans. “Shame on nations that 
pose as civilized and yet send these brutal 
scoundrels out into the world," an Italian 
sportswriter exclaimed, as quoted on this 
page yesterday. Indeed- What is government 
for — whatever the party in office, and 
whatever the difficulties — if not for main- 
taining order and addressing the social 
causes of disorder? What is a society’s lead- 
ership for, if not for assuring decent employ- 
ment prospects to its young people? The 
United Kingdom is not alone in the dock. 

The second scandal was that the big 
match was played. The official rationale was 
that it had to be played to forestall further 
violence. But those corpses left by the pre- 


match thuggery were still warm when the 
winners — Juventus over Liverpool 1-0 — 
pranced gleefully in front of their fans. And 
the 31 Italian dead were still being counted 
when other delirious fans danced in the 
streets at home in Turin. 

At least the 1972 Summer Olympics in 
Munich were interrupted for 24 hours of 
mourning after the slaying — by political 
terrorists, not by elements within the sport- 
ing community — of 17 persons, including 
1 1 Israeli athletes. A Spaniard, watching the 
Brussels tragedy in horror, has now recalled 
the time when the wceklong fiesta in her 
native village was called off on only the 
second day because one villager had been 
killed in a bull run. But is homely decency 
compatible with big-money sport in 1985? 

Soccer is not dead. Ask the youngsters 
who play it — or any of the 101,799 specta- 
tors who watched Brazil and France play a 
marvelous Olympic final in the Rose Bowl in 
Pasadena last Aug. 1 1. What seems to be 
dead, in the minds and hearts of so many 
public officials and sports authorities, is the 
sporting ethic Whether the security of the 
good burghers of Brussels truly required that 
soccer gladiators and their Swiss referee go 
on with the show is debatable. That the show 
was shameful is not debatable. Soccer’s 
commercial sponsors might take note. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Beyond Sabra and Chatila 


Again Palestinians are dying in Sabra and 
Chatila. True, it is not September 1982, when 
Israel’s Lebanese Phaiangist allies, talcin g re- 
venge for the killing of their chief, murdered 
hundreds of civilians whose PLO protectors 
bad been removed from Beirut on the promise 
— by the United States and Israel among 
others — that the civilians would be safe This 
time Lebanese Shiite militiamen of Amal are 
seeking to prevent the slightest rebirth of the 
“state within a state’' that the PLO set up in 
Lebanon in the 1970s. But again, although 
there is nothing like the earlier hue and cry, 
Palestinians are dying in Sabra and Chatila. 

The Shiite community is the largest in Leba- 
non. one of the most socially aggrieved and the 
one with the most to lose from a PLO rebirth. 
Such a development would diminish the Shia 
community’s national place, draw punishing 
Israeli reprisals, feed its fundamentalist wing 
and invite further Syrian intrusion. Amal is, in 
the Lebanese fashion, unforgivably bloody- 
handed. Accounts of its shooting of PLO hos- 
pital patients are not softened by accounts of 
PLO shootings of Shiite patients. But the Shi- 
ites are not without a political logic. 

That leaves, of course, the Palestinians: It 
leaves them exposed in the Palestinian slums 
of West Beirut and no less vulnerable in south- 
ern Lebanon. It is quite possible that the PLO 
itself, either the Yasser Arafat mainstream 
associated with Jordan or the Abu Musa group 
manipulated by Syria, provoked this latest 
upheaval. But that does not alter the basic fact 
that the Palestinian people are still rattling 
around the Middle East, miserable themselves 
and making life miserable for others. 

Enter King Hussein. Eventually Syria wiD 


have to be brought back into Arab-lsradi 
diplomacy, but its current minority Alawite 
regime is more immediately concerned with its 
own survivaL The Jordanians are the necessary 
and only available expediters on the Arab side. 
King Hussein has been in Washington, playing 
an uncharacteristically bold and helpful role. 

He now daims PLO backing for the idea 
of taking a joint Jordanian-PLO delegation, 
under the “umbrella" of an international con- 
ference inducting the Russians, into direct 
peace talla with Israel- These talks would be 
based cm Security Council resolutions 242 and 
338, which embody the broad concepts of a 
settlement, and would be aimed on the Arab 
side at creating a Pales tinian West Bank-Gaza 
state in confederation with Jordan. 

Much diplomatic work remains to be done, 
not least by the United States, to put King 
Hussein’s proposal on a firm footing and to 
match it up with Israeli proposals. In particu- 
lar, the PLO must come forward to state ex- 
plicitly its own policy. Presumably few people 
need to be reminded of the times when posi- 
tive-sounding arrangements between King 
Hussein and the PLO have crumbled. 

But some of the elements stated by the king 
— acceptance of resolutions 242 and 338. and 
direct talks —are, if validated, of tremendous 
potential value to Israel Other dements — a 
seat at a table, a state in confederation with 
Jordan — arc of no smaller potential value to 
the Palestinians, whose alternative is, after all 
Sabra and Chatila. The promise now viable is 
merely a glow on the far horizon and it remains 
to be made real but for that prospect the man 
responsible is King Hussein. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Reporting Isn’t Optional 


No reporters went along when U.S. troops 
invaded Grenada in October 1983. They were 
barred by military commanders. When De- 
fense Secretary Caspar Weinberger was que- 
ried two days later, he gave an answer to alarm 
anyone brought up believing in civilian control 
of the military. He said he “wouldn’t ever 
dream of overriding a commander’s decision." 

Now Mr. Weinberger and the administra- 
tion have in effect been been asked the ques- 
tion again by a panel of former civilian and 
military officials, scholars and journalists con- 
vened by the Twentieth Century Fund. “We 
started with the premise that U.S. information 
policy in a war zone is a civilian concern, not 
simply a military operational one," the panel 


says in a welcome new report. “Prior to 1983, 
US. presidents understood that they bore this 
responsibility; they did not relinquish it to 
military commanders . . . Civilian authority 
did not defer, as it did in Grenada, to the 
commander in the field." 

The failure in Grenada was needless, the 
panel concludes. No valid security reason ex- 
isted for keeping reporters oat And the failure 
created a harmful precedent. Reporting from 
war zones “is not a luxury but a necessity." 
Despite the limits imposed by the fog of war, 
battlefield reporting creates a vital link to the 
home front The first priority remains for civil- 
ian commanders to penetrate the fog of peace. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Opinion 


After the Disaster in Brussels 


A disaster like this bears directly on the 
standing of {Britain] in Europe, on its relations 
with friends and neighbors and on the work 
many do with them on our behalf. It cannot be 
temporized by (he usual mishmash of charge 
and countercharge. The plain truth is that for a 


minority here international football represents 
an opening for copious drinking followed by 
mindless and damaging violence. One issue 
only arises now: international obligations. The 
most appropriate step (that British] ministers 
could take is to request a two-year ban on our 
participation in European football. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 


FROM OUR JUNE 1 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Union of South Africa Is Born 


JOHANNESBURG — The Union of South 
Africa has been ushered in everywhere quietly, 
the people seeming somewhat indifferent to 


this epoch-making event in their history. This 
is probably due to (he fact that King Edward's 


death has given a check to the festivities which 
would otherwise have accompanied the open- 
ing ceremony, and especially to innate racial 
shyness, exaggerated as regards the British by 
the disappointment that a coalition Govern- 
ment has not been formed. Most of the news- 
papers which originally were pro-Union are 
not enthusiastic that the [Louis] Botha Cabinet 
is completed on a non -coalition bask A fea- 
ture of the thanksgiving services is the propor- 
tion of them conducted on bilingual lines. 


1935: Roosev elt Criticizes Justices 
WASHINGTON — President F ranklin D. 
Roosevelt bitterly criticized [on May 31] the 
unanimous decision of the Supreme Court 
invalidating the National Industrial Recovery 
Act as threatening to wreck the entire recovery 
program, and indicated that as one solution to 
the problem it had created he might summon a 
constitutional convention for the purpose of 
rewriting the entire constitution in the light of 
twentieth century conditions. “The decision of 
the Supreme Court against the NRA,” the 
President declared, “has deprived the national 
government of control over national social 
a ad economic conditions and relegated the 
interstate commerce clause of the Constitution 
back to the era of horse-drawn vehicles." 


international herald tribune 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
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Exttuirrc Editor REN£ BONDY Apart Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR .4bwm» PuNaher 

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© 1985, International Herald Tribune. AO rights reserved. 




Bulgaria 
Watches 
Its Image 


By Flora Lewis 




gOFIA — 


dneit bidpnss. whM wilt t he 
RoS trial duipng “ i . ( £$ 

& ■« 

Urge Turkish minority, ^ “g? 
accounts of (hugs and arms traffick- 
ing. it has made officials edgy, all the 

ajorc so because of an mteasesawn- 
alist in recent years mat is 

still gaining momentum. . 

In fact, Tiw k iri g the ccaoxxy s eth- 
nic Turks dmnge their names to typi- 

ca] Bulgarian ones has bea< 


■# 


jV 


•1 




The old lam, f Aneye for an eye , 1 leaves everybody MauL — Martin hither King Jr* 


What Reagan and Gorbachev Should Say 


to prove that Bulgaria is 
a “one nationality state.” 

There are an estimated one Ambon 
people of Turkish origin among die 
million Bulgarians. Several ban- & 
died have reportedly died in dashes 
provoked by the compulsoiy name 
U, otw , although it is impossible to 
obtain reliable figures, the off i c ial 
stand is that “there are no Turks in 
Bulgaria,'' and that the people in- 
volved are descendants of ’’pure” 
Bulgarians who had been converted 


I- - £ 


•) t : 


•# 


Bulgar 

under 


W ASHINGTON — Ronald Reagan and Mik- 
hail Gorbachev have agreed to hold a sum- 
mit meeting but cannot seem to set a dare for iL 
Each has said be wants better relations with the 
other, but tension remains high. Consider the pos- 
sibility that they might break the deadlock by 
in ning a statement along the following lines: 

We recognize that our two nations possess awe- 
some power and that we hold in our hands not hat our 
own fates but the lives of everyone on the planet as 
welL We share a single paramount concern, which is 
that our two nations must never go to war against 
each other. We must ensure that no crisis anywhere, 
nor the use of a nudear weapon by a third power, nor 
an accident or misunderstanding, will lead to the 
outbreak of war between us. 

We affirm that we share other common interests. 
We both wish to keep nuclear weapons out of the 
hands of third parties. We want to spare our econo- 
mies from unnecessary military buildup. We have a 
joint interest in solving such global problans as 
hunger, poverty and environmental threats. 

We recognize that relations between our countries 
have been marked by grave mistrust and by the threat 
of war. Our political systems differ greatly. Our two 
countries oppose each other in many ways and in 
many places. We recognize that intense competition 
and mistrust will be presat in our relations for 
years to come. Even so. we pledge that we are 
committed to avoiding war and to pursuing coopera- 
tion in areas where we share goals. 

We resolve, therefore, that henceforth our common 
interests will take precedence over our disagree- 
ments; and that we will not allow the rivalry between 
us to threaten global destruction. 


By John Marks and David Landau 


leaders could give new life to the already moribund 
- ■ it the escalation of re- 


This statement is naive, pethaps. Yet it almost 
certainly reflects what most people in both Ameri- 
ca and the Soviet Union would uke to see happen. 

Such a joint declaration does not ask either 
nation to weaken its defense, to condone the oth- 
er’s actions or to give ground. It amply asserts that 
preventing war must oe the predominant motive in 
American and Soviet policy. 

There is a precedent for such a sweeping turn- 
around: the 1972 breakthrough in US.-Qrinese 
relations. A Republican president, Richard Nixon, 
ami the leaders of a major Communist power 
overturned a quarter of a century of enmity. True, 
America’s rivalry with the Soviets is strategically 
much more critical than the rivalry with China ever 
was. But bad feelings between Americans and 
f*htniKi» had been as entrenched, as violent and 
even at times as dangerous as those between Amer- 
icans and Soviets have ever been. 

The instrument of Qrinese-U-S. ra pp rochement 
was the Shanghai comnmniqud of 1972. A tree 
“umbrella" agreement, it sain in essence that po- 



Wtk ; at no cost to strategic deterrence it would 
reaffirm diplomacy as the principal medium of 
superpower relatio ns. In short, it could change the 
very framework of U_S.-Soviet relations. 

How could this be enforced? 

Nothing between the Americans and the Soviets 

can be enforced today. Superpower relations take 
place in a barren landscape where no guarantees 
exist. Some Americans say, “You can’t crust the 
Russians,” and -<hnflar sentiments are echoed 
about America in the Soviet Union. 

Trust is iwt the issue. The only sure bets between 
the superp o wers are those that are based on com- 
mon interest. Such cooperative possibilities must 
be sought, carefully discussed and actively en- 
hanced. If these common interests are not devel- 


oped, relations will almost certainly remain dose 
* * “ ’ 'it But if they J ’ 


to the nuclear flash point But n tney are devel- 
oped, a new relationship may evolve, as happened 
with the United States and China. 


ts would not be allowed to prevent 
ited States 


good relations, and it enabled the Unit 
and China to defuse their conflict over Taiwan — - 
an ulcerous problem that had almost led to war. 

Neither the United States nor China had to 
renounce fundamental beliefs or endanger its secu- 
rity. The Shanghai communique is an excellent 
model for the land of joint agreement on which 
Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev mi phi agree. 

An “umbrella ” statement by US. and Soviet 


The way to begin the process is for Ronald 
1 Mikhail GOrtMChev tO 


Reagan ami Mikhail Gorbachev to state their 
commitment to a new framework of relations, and 
then have their subordinates work out the details. 


Mr. Marks is the director of Search for Common 
Ground, an organization that develops innovative 
approaches to international issties. Mr. Landau is the 
author of “Kissinger: The Uses of Power." They 
contributed this comment to the las Angeles Times. 


Tax Reform: Democrats Score in the First Round 


W ASHINGTON —To the sur- 
prise of almost everyone, in- 
cluding themselves, congressional 
Democrats have come dose to steal- 
ing President Reagan's thunder in 
the first-round sparring for political 
advantage on the tax reform issue. 
But when the last round arrives, it is 
stiB agoodbel that Mr. Ragan will 
have bus hand raised in victor/ — 
unless his own partisans in con- 
gress throw the fight 
The Democrats gained the ad- 
vantage when Mr. Reagan delivered 


By David S. Broder 


the gut were u tiered by the man 


from Chicago mosL people were see- 
time. “Why should a 


less of a populist television pitch for 
i the r 


his tax plan Tuesday than the While 
House had advertised, and when the 
Illinois Democrat who chairs the 
House Wavs and Means Commit- 
tee, Dan Rostenkowslti, filled the 
vacant screen with the kind of 
straight-from-ihe-sho older talk that 
the people have not heard from 
Democrats in a long time. 

Instead of Mr. Reagan sounding 
like FDR, as this reporter had mis- 
takenly predicted, Mr. Rostenkow- 
ski came on like the Harry Truman 
of the 1948 campaign. 

Mr. Reagan had the high-blown 
rhetoric, which was effective in its 
own way. Bui the lines that reached 


ing for the first time. ’ 
bank teller pay a higher rate of taxes 
than the bank she works for?” Mr. 
Rostenkowslti asked. “Why should 
a gas station attendant pay a greater 
share than the oil company?” 

Republicans from Representative 
Jack Kemp to retired Senate Major- 
ity Leader Howard Baker described 
Mr. Rosienkowskf s speech in glow- 
ing terms, and Democrats quickly 
picked up their cues from him. By 
midweek all of them were portray- 
ing themselves as the protectors of 
the middle-dess wage earners in the 
coming congressional battle. 

Mr. Reagan gained points by pot- 
ting his stamp on the issue, ana be 
has a chance for a largo' win if his 
teammates help him. The immedi- 
ate advantage was admitted by the 
Democratic National Commitlee 
chairman, Paul G. Kirk Jr.: “Tax 
reform allows Reagan to change the 
subject, to get off the defensive.” 
An official at the Republican Na- 
tional Commhiee agreed that "com- 
pared to MX missiles, aid to the 


’contras' or budget deficits. I'd sure 
rather have the president out talk- 
ing about this issue.” 

Looking ahead, many Republi- 
cans also see the Rostenkowslti 
strategy as improving the chances 
for cany passage of a tax reform 
package. By dedaring that they 
would improve, not oppose, Mr. 
Reagan's proposal die Democrats 
have put themselves under obliga- 
tion not to sidetrack the measure in 
the Democratic-controfled House. 

Republicans may be overestimat- 
ing Representative Rostenkow&kfs 
cooperativeness and underestimat- 
ing his anle. A congressional alfy 
predicted that the Qricagoan will 
search during committee hearings 
far “specific examples of unfair- 
ness” in the Reagan plan. If they are 
found, they will be used to under- 
mine the credibility of the 
approach “just the same way 1 
used the overpriced toilet seats and 
wrenches” to turn opinion against 
the pres dent’s defense proposal. 

But Mr. Rostenkowslti clearly 
does not want to see tax reform die 
in the House. And “when it passes,” 


said Republican pollster Robert 
Teeter, “Ronald Reagan will be sil- 
ting there smiling, handing out the 
pens and saying This is what Fve 
been for all my tife.’ " 

However much it may be altered 
en route to the White House, Mr. 
Teeter argued, the reform “will be 
one more step toward the Republi- 
cans’ identi fi cation as the party of 
lowered taxes ... A tax system 
that’s seen as more fair is not going 
to turn young, middle-class voters 
into Republicans in one fell swoop. 
But if 5 another step in convincing 
them Republicans have the country 


moving on the rightpath." 

long-term GOP hopes dc- 


These 

pend, of course, on the Republican 
Senate’s cooperation. A Reagan 
strategist says: Tf we’ve got a 50-50 
chance of getting a decent bill 
through the House with Rosien- 
kowski’s help, you’d have to say the 
odds in the Senate are worse. I'd say 
less than a 30-percent chafer to- 
day.” The Senate finance Commit- 
tee has a higher proportion of spe- 
cial-interest advocates than Rep- 
resentative Rostenkowskfs coun- 
terpart committee in the House. 

The Washington Post 


^ Ottoman rule. They are now 

being “liberated’’ and mvited to share 
“Bulgarian national consciousness.” 

Thais in the old Balkan and East 
Euro pean tradition of trying to sup- 
press minorities. It goes back for cen- 
turies as wave after wave of people . 
imposed themselves on others. 0 
ft j| quite different from tradition- 
al Communist policy, which pledged 
to respect minorities. In the original 
Co mmunis t lexicon, “protetarunmiB- 
ji n^matiftnalfa m” was to overcome 
“bourgeois nationalism," but that 
ambition has faded. Now, prerevolu- 
tionary history is revived and rehabil- 
itated all through Eastern Europe. 
Regimes still trumpet “pride in so- 
cialist achieveiiienv bid they do not 
rely on it in seeking legitimacy and 
allegiance. They stress the nation. 

Long-term thinkers in Moscow 
have to be bothered. It is not a direct 
challenge, but a way of saying Rus- 
sians are not necessarily special and 
others want to speak for themselves. 4 
Bulgaria has long been much doser m 
to Russia than any of the Soviets’ 
other allies. Turkey is the historical 
enemy here. Sofia is one of (he few 
Comxmmisi-ruled cities that still has 
a monmnent to a oar. Alexander II is 
memorialized m the square faring the 
old Pariiamentfor Russia’s role in 
helping to free Bulgaria from 500 
years of Turkish suzerainty. 

caMy tiedftothr RusSu^ No coun- 
try ((flows the Moscow line more 
precisely or willingly. The Kremlin is 
still the protector. And yet, the most 
ismortant idea here is Bulgaria for 
Bugaxians, glory to their own state. 

Foreigners say Bulgarians have an _ 
inferiority complex, and local JokcsJ* 
reflect ims. But Bulgarians like to 

C t out that their first state was 
icd 13 centuries ago, well before 
there was a Russia. 7ie anniversary 
was lavishly celebrated in 1981 with 
many reminders that Saints Cyril and 
Methodius brought Christianity and 


W: 


*“,:i 4 
.. iu * - 




i n 


to Russia from hoe. 
all of there is great an- 


The Man Who Runs State Is Supposed to Be Shultz 


W ASHINGTON — In a manner 
reminiscent of the spirit of Mc- 
Carthyism, a small band of arch-con- 
serva lives in the United States Senate 
is waging a dirty little war. This time 
it is against the career people in the 
U.S. Foreign Service and the man 
who is supposed to be in charge, 
•Secretary of State George Shultz. 

I say “supposed to be” because 
that is what the war is all about. 

On the face of it, it turns on partic- 
ular presidential nominations, most 
conspicuously that of Rozanne Ridg- 
way. She is a respected careerist, and 
Mr. Shultz wants her as his assistant 
secretary of state for European af- 
fairs. Her credentials are impeccable. 
But the conservative challenge has 
nothing to do with professionalism. It 
has to do with ideology, and with who 
should be making these personnel de- 
risions on behalf of the president. 

Mr. Shultz has this presumptuous 
notion, as the right-wing Senate ideo- 
logues see it, that he ought to be able, 
subject to senatorial “advice and con- 
sent,” to surround himself with mist- 
ed, tested, top-level advisers of his 
own choosing. He also thinks be has 
the right, subject to the same consti- 
tutional restraints, to select the career 
officers he thinks will ably and faith- 
fully act in the interest of Ronald 
Reagan’s policies as ambassadors. 

That is not only his sense of how it 
ought to work, it is also his sense of 
how the president thinks it ought 10 
work. Not so Jesse Helms, the nay- 
saying North Carolina Republican 
whose positive thinking is reserved 
for promoting the tobacco industry. 

Having made a shambles of former 
Secretary of State AJ Haigs efforts to 
staff the foreign policy apparatus at 
die start of the first Reagan term. 
Senator Helms and more than a doz- 
en cohorts are doing their obstruc- 


By Philip Geyelin 


tionist best to make life at least as 
miserable for the man Ronald Rea- 
gan has entrusted with (he role of 
principal foreign policy-maker in the 
second Reagan administration. 

Mr. Helms and five hard-right col- 
leagues recently wrote Mr. Shultz a 
letter demanding that the secretary 
consult with them before he even 
makes his selections. That way, they 
could hope to knock off the nomina- 
tions of all but the truest conservative 
believers by threats of filibusters or 
other harassments, without ever get-* 
ting to an open confirmation process 
and a vote by the full Senate. Mr. 

lution^ 0 provirion for “advice and 
consent” was consultation enough 

So now we have the familiar tech- 
niques and ta c ti™ — the blacklisting 
of professionals; guilt by association 
(not with Communists, mind you; as- 
sociation with Democrats is enough): 
loyalty tests graded by devotion to 
pure Reaganism (simple patriotism 
or even affiliation to the Republican 


oen 1 


Party doesn’t do it). 

The breakage is familiar, as well: 
dam ag e to distinguished caress, for 
e xamp le, or to morale in the profes- 
sional diplomatic corps. The politi- 
cians and the political appointees 
come and go but the Foreign Ser- 
vice’s expertise and its contiibutiou 
to continuity and to institutional 
memory are indispensable. 

Finally, there is the damage to the 


antediluvian to fit the Helms 
view. But the Ridgway case is 
as good an example as any of how 
this political terrorism works. Mostly 
it takes the form of downright dis- 
ingenuous assaults on the qualifi- 
cations and integrity of individual 
nominees, by word of mouth and by 
friendly media mouthpieces. 

The whispering campaign would 
have it that Rozanne Ridgway is un- 
qualified to handle European affaire 
by reason of having no arms control 
background, a requirement never be- 
fore imposed on the job. It was not 
required of the incumbent chief arms 
control negotiator. Max Kampchnan. 

She has no experience with the 
Soviets, it is said, as if her latest tour 
as ambassador to East Germaity, a 
previous ambassadorship in Finland 
and work on NATO affaire had given 
oo insights on the “evil empire.” 

But did not her career fetch hex up 
for a few months in the job of coun- 
selor at the State Department while 
(hang cm!) Jimmy Carter was presi- 
dent? Indeed it did. That may be the 
real right-wing knock against her. 

Finally, Heims and Co. are even 
circulating the nonsense that Mr. 
Shultz is “purging” the ranks of the 
political appointees by putting a 2ft- 
ycar limit on their tours, by way of 
favoring the professionals. Actually, 


the president recently signed off on a 
general three-year rule on political 
appointees, bringing them in line 
with the same rule for career people 
laid down early last year. 

The insinuation is that career offi- 
cers cannot be trusted to carry out the 
president’s wishes, that the secretary 
of state cannot be trusted to see that 
they do and that the president cannot 
be trusted to keep the conservative 
Faith. Against that squalid tine of 
argument, to his lasting credit, 
George Shultz is hanging tough. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


vuMVfi uiuwv MM i ftHiui IA4VI 

to Europe. It was cut off during 
Turkish period and emerged a stag- 
Mmbaek wator, but things have been 

in Poland — living standards have 
improved significantly and are now 
better than m the Soviet Union. 

First Secretary Todor Zhivkov has 
proclaimed his ambition of making 
the country the “Japan of the Bal- 
kans,” an enormous extravagance no 
doubt Still, there is an industrial 
base now and a passion for moderni- 
ty- From a totally peasant country, 
Bulgaria is down to some 20 percent^ 
of its labor force in agriculture and 
is making computers. 

To be sure, me Russians have con- 
tributed to tins spurt with aid and 
what amounts to s ubsidi zed t rad**- 
But Moscow is apparently ti ghtening 
up now, and the pest disastrous win- 
ter revealed critical fragility in this 
economy. So the prospects znay be 
dimm i n g. There is a labor shortage. 

Ethnic Turks, mostly rural have a 
much higher birthrate than the rest 
The n a ti o n a l d ream needs riwgn- wni. 
gratioa is ruled out. It is strangely 
blind, after their own experience of 
stubborn cultural survival, that the 
Bulgarians imagine they can chang e 
men t alities by changing namw 

It does show, though, how far Sta^ 
hn sidea of a monohefric Soviet bloc* 
has broken down, even in staunchly 
reliable Bulgaria. Dirty tricks are 
dirty tricks. They happen. But the 
regime is especially upset at being 
accused of sponsoring them on Mos- 
cow s behalf. Most of aD now, Bul- 
garia is concerned with its fma y. 

The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

»£ !_• t .. 


The Citizenship Lottery 

^Regqrdmg “Citizen Murdoch : : 
Pledge Allegiance" (May 17): 



orderly waitings of the foreign policy 
machinery. Even when Mr. Helms 
loses, as he usually does in the end. 


the disruption and delay are a dis- 
traction from serious business. 

Mr. Helms and his unhappy band 
have marked down a half a_ dozen 
recent Shultz nominees as insuffi- 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to dte 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing We cannot 
be responsible for the taunt of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


rngmia. Amsterdam. 

Talking Sex to the Pope ^ Renault Team Biked 

Regarding T Since When Is 1 m „ gf*? «ptw on cyclist Lau- 


When Is Lust a 00 < 9 c &t Lau- 

New Problem. ?" (May 24): JJ? Wap 16) states that Fig- 

Edwm M. Yoder Jr asks whv ^ FranCc ^ 

have c omm en d ed the young people ^^ER CLEWETT. 

* J flHimmiKw m m ft 




x- 


i 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SImNDAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


Page 5, 


CIS- 


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PARIS — F.-rm-T Prune: Mmis- 
icr Raymond Barre ha.- ended 
mom hs of spauiJti.-p. by announc- 
ing Fnd.ty Ip.jI he mter.di SO run 
fi-r r res* Jem in WS. bus v.nhcu! 


pan just for the pleasure of heieg a 
candidate. - 

Mr. Banc said that any power 


| 

I -: 3 ^S 


People’s Daily Plans 
An Overseas Edition 


By John F. Bums 

,Vm Ycrk Times Service 
BEUING — People's Daily, the 


many of them have adopted a pro- 
Taiwan line. 

Newspapers favoring the Corn- 


base that be might build up would jc*f% ’ 

be as a result of confidence placed * *' - • 

in him and his policies by the ‘ ‘ 


French people, but commentators •» 

said he evidently was hoping to _ oj 

attract support ’from disaffected , jf?sj 

members of the center-right Union 

for French Democracy party. . ‘ ! *2 

Under the French Constitution. * ‘ • ■:< 

the president boids office for seven j- . ^ 

years, with wide-ranging powers. .Ixi** 

while Parliament is elected ever.- '*»£&■' JE-&§L 
five years. 

Parliamentary elections are due 
in 1986. and both Mr. Chirac and 
Mr. Giscard d’Eslaing have indi- SajUtiKle Ba 

cated that they would no i mle out 








55^*^; 


tng opinion poils as the most popu- 
lar opposition figure, ahead of Mr. 
Gisc-ard d'Es tains and his other 




m 


Ravotuitd Barre 


that it will publish an -overseas 
edition” in New York. San Francis- 
co. Paris. Tokyo and Hong Kong 
beginning July t. 

It will not 'be exactly the same 
newspaper. At a ceremony here 
Thursday, officials of the" paper 
seemed to acknowledge that the 
fare that the People's Daily serves 
its millions of domestic readers 
may be a little on the dull side. 

Li Z twang, the editor in chief, 
said the overseas version will drop 
half of the material published in the 
domestic edition ami substitute ar- 
ticles that are considered more Iike- 


'■ supporters of Andreas PapandreoiTs Pan- Hellenic Socialist Movement 

rained at Constitution Square in Athens Friday in advance of Sunday's elections. 

Greeks Vote Sunday in Close Contest ; 
Focus Is Socialism or Freer Economy 


Realm 

ATHENS — The people or 
Greece will vote Sunday in general 
elections that are expected to be a 
close race between the ruling So- 


ad minis nation. So far. the over- on Greek territory, which, he said. 


lures have been firmly rebuffed by 
the Papandreou forces. 

The elections, called four months 
before the expiration of Mr. Papon - 


ciallsts and the opposition conser- dreou's four-year term, are the con- 
vatives. with neither certain of win- sequence of i political dispute over of better relations between Greece 
ning an effective majority in i he March 10 resignation of Con- and its European Community part- 
pariiamenL s tan line Caram anils as president, ners. Mr. Mitsotakis has said that if 

The underlying issues are wheih- The opposition politicians com- he is elected, he will align Greek 
er Greece will have another four plained of what they termed dubi- business laws with those of the Eu- 
years of the socialism of Prime ous parliamentary procedures to ropean Community. This is impor- 

Minister .Andreas Papandreou. or elect Mr. Caramanlis's successor, tant to business interest. 

return to a liberal, free-market Christos Sartzelakis. 
economy advocated by the New Greece's presidents are elected 
Democracy Party of Constantine by parliament for five-year terms. 

Mitsotakis. There are no constitutional proce- 

Should the Socialists win. ana- duresfor removing or impeaching a 


“serve Greek defense interests.'' 

Mr. Papandreou wants the U.S. 
bases shut in 1988. when a pact 
expires. 

New Democracv is also in favor 


ning an effective majority in 
parliament. 

The underlying issues are whe th- 


ing politicians, including Mr. Mil- 
lenranti. a Socialist, na.s formally 
announced an intention to run for 
the seven-year presidential term. 

Mr. Barre chose an interview in 
Friday's issue of ihe conservative 
weekly magazine L' Express to 
launch his candidacy, although he 
said that his hid depended on the 
will of the majority — a reference 
to the increasing importance in 
French publics of opinion polls. 

“If at the appropriate time I have 
the feeling that 1 can benefit from 
the deep confidence of j large part 
of the French people, who would 
be ready ro support me in that 
difficult ta'-k.” Mr. Barre said, 
"then I would he a Candidate, but 
separate from any party." 

“Bui I would not be a candi- 
date.” he added, “if 1 did not think 
those conditions had been fulfilled. 
That is to say. I would not be taking 


habitation.” 

Bui Mr. Barre said he was firmly 
against any form of cohabitation, 
adding: “Cohabitation would 


S^-vv . , ” -• edition” in New YorL San Francis- corapeiilore. , • . 

co. Palis. Tokyo and Hong Kong Since 1981. Peoples Daily Has 
■iggSvaRl beginning July 1. weighed into the contet directly by 

•■vVfj It will not be exactly the same using photo-onset techniques to, 

newspaper. At a ceremony here publish facsimile ediuons on the 
Thursday, officials of the paper presses of a Chinese new^wperin’ 
seemed to acknowledge that the San Francisco. Sht Dai Bao. t ne ; 
f^rr- &?-■ f ■ . fare Lhai the People's Daily serves circulation of that edicon, mainly- 

r'i*X-Vf ; -T. f i its millions of domestic readers in New ^ ork and San Francisco, is 

'SVvg'r; may be a little on the dull side. reportedly 11,000 copies datlv. , 

:&r.§gP5S d Li Zhuang. the editor in chief, Mr. U said that the new edition 

-*3 said the overseas vetsiai will drop would seek to lay before its readers,- 
iXm. S half of the material published in the an “authoritative, accuraie and,. 

Raymond Barre domestic edition and substitute ar- overaTT account of China and its- . 

tides that are considered more like- policies, of a kind not hitherto 
mean two lost years for France, ly to interest readers abroad. avaihbie to toeign ' 

How would it be possible to act He was vague as to what would He emphasized the importance 
eiTec Lively in a difficult national or be eliminated, but an assistant said of gelling China s message across ■ 
international situation, if the gov- privately that it was safe to assume effectively to compamots in. 

annum is limited in its actions bv that there would be few of the Hong Kong and Macao. Although - 

live presence of a president of the lengthy polemical tracts that arc a there are a number of pro- Beijing 
opposition tendency?” standard feature of the party paper - publications m Hong Kong, they- 


serving ina righlistgovcrnmeniun- mean two lost years for France, ly to interest readers abroad, 
der a Socialist president, a practice How would it be possible to act He was vague as to what would 
known 'in French politics as “co- effectively in a difficult national or be eliminated, but an assistant said 


at home. are outnumbered by on 

Mr. Li was dear about one thing, newspapers and journals. 


identical tracts that arc a there are a number of pro-Beijing ' 
feature of the party paper' publications in Hong Kong, they- 
are outnumbered bv pro-Taiwan - 


U.S. Prosemtor Aecased in Drag Case 


f ac . however, and that was that the new Eventually, the paper intends to . 
Mi U»rug *oase edition will strive to be livelier than transmit pages for the new edition. 
avh York T„*x sorter cocaine. The same charges were ^ domestic version, whose arri- by satellite to printing plants in. 

A made against Siacv L. Honeycutt, cks were once desenbed by Mao. New York. San Francisco. Hong 

NEW \ ORK — A prosecutor ;n a woman with whom Mr Perl- no stranger to polemics himself, as Kong, Pans and Tokyo, so that, 
the office of the U.S. attorney in mimer shared ^ ap;irlro enL “long and smelly," like the w T ap- overseas readers can get articles 
Manhattan has been arrested ana j. , , g atlorpev ror South- P>ngs used to bind women’s feet in and news at the same tune as do- 1 
^Harged with stealing up to ern nicuicl of New York. Rudolnb prerevolutionary China. mestic readas. 

S5 00.000 of heroin and cocaine w j t was jjj e fust Mr. Li even suggested that West- Until satellite tra nsmissi on is 

from a safe used by tne offices ^ lha , s ' e r ious ,-rimin.il charges ern correspondents in Beijing available, the edition will be pre- 
nar colics umi. had ^ brought against a wo ri- should contribute articles to the pared from photographic plates 

The suspect. Daniel N. Perlmut- j^o prosecutor in tne office. The new edition to brighten it up. sent by air express from Beijing u 
ler. 29. an assistant U.S. attorney, arrest of Mr. Perlrautter, one of 1 31 Par many years. Chinese-lan- foreign printing plants, 
was also charged Thursday with assistants, has hall “a devastating S Ud g e readers in dozens of cities Officials said the initial press run 
possession and intent to distribute impact on the morale and sensitiv- throughout the world have had a worldwide is likely to be about 

the drugs — 8.7 ounces (about 250 jties of this office.” Mr. Gi uliani choice among batteries of feisty 20,000, about the current overseas 


ern District of New York. Rudolph prerevolulionaiy China. 

W. Giuliani, said it was the first Mr. Li even suggested that West- 


22. a woman with whom Mr Perl- no stranger to polemics himself, as Kong, Paris and Tokyo, so that, 
mutter shared an apanroenL “long and smelly," tike the wrap- overseas readers can get articles 
The L' S attorney for the South- P^Ss to bind women’s feet in and news at the same tune as do- 1 
em District of New York. Rudolph prerevolulionaiy China. meric reader* . . 

\V Giuliani said it was the first Mr. Li even suggested that West- Until satellite t ransmiss ion is 
time that serious criminal charges ern correspondents in Beijing available, the edition will be pre- 
had been brought a gain st a work- shouid comribute articles to the pared from photographic plates 
ins prosecutor in the office. The new edition to brighten it up. sent by air express from Begrng to 


Icials said the initial press run 


grams) of heroin and 29 ounces of sa jo. 


Chinese- ianguage newspapers, but circulation of the domestic edition. 


Mitsotakis. 

Should the Socialists win. ana- 


lysts expect that Greece's strained president in office, so political 
relations with the North Atlantic commentators predict more :ur- 
Treaty Organization will worsen, moil for Greece in the event of a 
Also, they say that the position of conservative victory. 


Athens on farm prices will continue 
to cause friction. 

The campaigns of Prime Minis- 
ter Papanareou's Panhetlenic So- 


The campaign has been fought 
largely over economic issues, with 
Prime Minister Papandreou prom- 
ising to curb inflation and unem- 


rialist Movement and the conserva- plovmeni Mr. Mitsotakis pledges 
lives have been aimed at the 10 to cut taxes. He has also said that if 


percent of undecided voters. 

For the first lime, the Moscow- 
-iine Greek Communist Partv 


he becomes prime minister he will 
initiate talks with neighboring Tur- 
key. involved in a "dispute with 


could become an important power Greece over the issue of Cyprus 
broker if either Mr. Papandreou 's and territorial and air rights in the 


movement or the New Democracy 
Party' fails to get enough votes to 
form a workable government 
The Communist Party has re- 
peatedly hinted that it would like to 
take part in the Socialist-controlled 


>73 _, jt. 

!©&, 


Aegean. 

The challenger has also promised 
that he will improve Greece's rela- 
tions with the United States. He is 
.n favor of allowing the United 
States to retain four military bases 


Qeedes 


Turk on Bulgaria Trip 


By John Tagliabue 

iVew York Tinas Service *d : .5g 

ROME — In the summer of 
1980. Omer Btjgci drove to Bulgaria • .£54. 
with three friends from Switzerland 
in two cars on what he later told 
Italian investigators was a holiday 
trip to his native Turkey. 

But Mr. Bagci. 39, insisted under 
cross-examination at his trial here 
Thursday that he spent only several •! 
hours in the country. 

“ I wns on mv wav to a vacation," ' r;* 1 ^ 
he said. “In Bulgaria and Sofia I ;VrJ; 
stopped to see no one.” •. * 

Mr. Bagci is one of eight defen- ''' 
dants — five Turks and Three Bul- 
garians — being tried for what the 
^prosecution says was their role in a 
purported 1981 conspiracy to as- 
sassinate Pope John Paul ft 
A prosecutor. Antonio Marini, 
questioned Mr. Bagci insistently 
Thursday, concentrating for the 
first time since the trial began frienc 




' vaMI 

m 

mm. 


ppjjjji 


Omer Bagci 


first time since the trial began friend he identified in testimony on 
Monday on possible links to the Wednesday as a Turk liring in OI- 
Bulgarian secret service. ten. Switzerland, who took part in 

Mr. Marini pointed to three the conspiracy to shoot the pope, 
stamps in Mr. Bagci s passport, in- Mr. Bagci said Mr. Erdem was 
eluding one dated Aug. 30. 1^80. the man who introduced him to 
from Kalouna. a Bulgarian town Mr. Agca in Switzerland :n. January 
near the Yugoslav border, and an- 1931. four months before the pope 
other from a Turkish border cross- was wounded, 
ing point dated Sept. I. 1980. ap- The prosecution contends that 
parently showing that he stayed in two former diplomats at the Bul- 
Bulgaria in the three-day period. can an Embassy in Rome and an 1 

The trip to Bulgaria is important employee of the Bulgarian state air- 1 


4j;o the prosecution, because it was line conspired with the Turks in the 
at Lhat time that Mehmet Ali Agca. assassinati-.in plot. 


the pope’s convicted assailant, says 
lhat he was in the Bulgarian capital 
of Sofia, to pick up a forged pass- 
port from Bekir Celenk. a purport- 
ed Turkish racketeer with links to 
the Bulgarian state security service. 

Mr. Agca later used the passport 
to enter Italy to carry out the attack 
on the pope. 

Mr. Celenk. 51. who is one of 
four defendants being tried in ab- 
sentia. is under house arrest in So- 
fia, but Bulgarian officials have re- 
fused to extradite him to Italy. 


Mr. Marini questioned Mr. 
Bagci about details of a meeting in 
Milan in May 1981. when Mr. 
Bagci says lie turned over a pistol to 
Mr. Agca. 

Speaking m Turkish through an 
interpreter. Mr. Bagci described 
how he parked his car in Milan, 
leaving ihe Browning 9mr.: pisiol in 
it and took a tax: to meet Mr. 
Agca. After dining in a restaurant 
n«r Milan’s Termini train station, 
they returned io the car and Mr. 
Aged took the pistol, placing it in a 


Mr. Bagci said he was traveling black leather attache case, he said 


to Turkey with three Turkish 
friends, all migrant workers in 
Switzerland. He said one tras-eling 
companion was Eyup Erdem. a 


Four days later. Mr. Agca u.-»ed 
the gun to shoot the pope and two 
American women in St. Peter's 
Square. 


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imygNATTONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUBPAY-SDWDAT, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


AUCTION SALES 


VEMTES AUX ENCHfeRES A VBKAILLES ============ 

FLORALIES 1985 

IMPORTANTS TABLEAUX MODERNES 

notammenf par : 

ANGRAND, BAUCHANT, DE BOAT, BERAUD, WMBOIS^BOUDW, J 

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GERNEZ, GERVEX, GLBZES, GOKG, GRQMAfllE, GUIUAUMIN, HAMBOJ^, JOMGCT®, KKMJE, 
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■ VERRJ £RE-LE-8 U1SSON - 91 370 FRANCE ■ 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Gerard Sculptures Deal 


By Michael Gibson 

baemaOamd Herald Tribune 

P I ARTS — Mkfad Girard’s re- 
cent work includes a stoking 
group of sculptures of raw, ham - 
mered steed and 14 large charcoal, 
pastel and ink drawings. 

The sculpture is composed of 
five monumental pieces, four of 
them more than 6 feet (2 meters) 
high, which have affinities with 
prehistoric standing stones. They 
are all coarsely hammered, with a 
handsome texture, and all bear im- 
printed upon their middle a perfect 
circle. But what malms them a sur- 
prising statement is the progression 
that one cannot help reading into 
them from left to rigjto. The-fignres 
to the left are closest to theprrfus- 
toric model, those to the right have 

thmthapanf a w alking figur e 

all of them face (or seem to con- 
verge upon) a fifth, much smaller, 
jnece, marked with the same enig- 
matic circle. 

The group suggests that Girard 
has given Ms art a goal that is no 
longer “art about art” nor, most 
certainly, the flip irony of the cur- 
rently fashionable styles. Gerard is 
concerned with the coherence and 
significance of life, though he does 

- - - ?r . 


HOTEL DES VENTES, 2 bis rue d'Esttanne cTOrves 
Thursday, June 13, 1985 crt 9 p.m. 

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by OHARAS, CROTTl, DELACROIX, DUFY, IACOMBE, MANE KATZ. 
MANGUIN, SCHWABE, TARKHOFF, WAROQUER, ZORN 

E xce ptional series of 4 paintings by PA GALLIEN, 

Public viewing Saturday 8. Wednesday 1 2 and Thursday, June 1 3 from 
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INTERNATIONAL 
WINE AUCTION 

26 June at The Cafe Royal 
in London. For your FREE 
COPY of the 120-page illus- 
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write to: International Wine 
Auctions, Department I, ' 
47 Holland Park, London, 
W11 3RS. 


not venture outside the specific idi- 
om of art His drawings, in which 
the charcoal is applied topaperin a 
myriad of short jabs, call to mind 
the way iron filing s are arranged 
into a patten by a magnetic field. 
There are some rich and strong 
implications in this work. 

“Michel Girard," Galerie Jeanne 
Bucher, 51 Rue de Seine, Paris 6, to 
June 21 

a 

lost Gamarra is a Paris-based 
Uruguayan painter who has 
evolved a style and theme that in 
his current exhibition have readied 
a delectable maturity. Gamarra 
tells a story in a landscape. The 
landscape is vast, sumptuous and 
luminous, with a curious and al- 
most indefinable nuance that in- 
tentionally suggests the art of the 
ex-vo ta This in itself is a brilliant 
find, because it opens the door to 
the deep mythic connotations of 






Michel GSranFs group of sculptures, on -new in Paris. 


the Latin American worid that are serving than, or slipping awa^or m 

the substance of Gamana’s narra- being hunted and, m onepamtmg (m»ted very u _ 

tive. The tales Gamarra tells have a at least, caught by them. The Forest of thee* 

common ground with those oT Ga- is often a setting for mysterious onto -R^dSd 

brid Garcia MAixpte, and the apparitions - the snake is one of child on ^shoulder, 

paintings in thecumsit show are them, bnt there are also gkwittS pomts to tbe sky mdetatehes * 

aSvSylaiw, which gives them a forms, iridescently lummous birds skull on Ms tap. 

-- ” and human figures. 


suitably epic scope. 

The scene is mostly the 
forest, in which various human _ 
ores (Indians, a priest, a soldier or 
policeman, etc.; appear. Before 
tiwm, behind them, under water or 

X in the trees, a mythic anaconda, 
ays sli ghtly clownish with his 
broad red-and-white stripes and his 
black-rimmed eyes, can be seen ob- 


One of thelarger paintings de- 
picts a sweeping landscape domi- 
nated by thunderclouds from 
which lightning is falling; The 
scene is a beach off which the three 
chips of Christopher Columbus are 
shown lying at ancho r. Columbus 
and his men appear in the distance, 
riding inland on white horses, while 


to take a painting of this 
sort as a moralistic statement: it is a 
numinous dream about a mythic 
spirit world. 


- . •n»e pgiptings arc a dcbghi tcir fr. 

V--,yw$ Mdto- narrative contmj 

V V !2; noetic; a «B»W 

tine scape snd SR, 

devoid of i™y 
mam used 

whidipoUticid laeraKoaroeanfrJ 

^^r ^^/deroidof tomwt- | 

eveoto-ButmtiiiKtopn^-r : 
tkmhasgrownde^4™“*55T.y ; 
Manicbitesm has beat reph^ by , 

ofouud and mterestiag : , 


vfai Gamarra." Galciie Albm j 
Loeb, 12 Rue dis Bcaux-Arts, Parts \ f .fk> 

troJuiyfi. Irflllt 1 * 1 ' 

Henri Michaia died last yw at j' k 

the age of 85. He was one erf. the | 
outstanding figvires of art and liter- 

aiurem France, a singular aadao-g^ \ 

thentic poct wbo uiwwed mb»^ j- . - 
and animals of the imagination arm 
wrote with equal originality and ; 
evocative power about journeys to 
the Far East journeys to the inner j 
recesses of the mind and journeys j 

into the worid of mescaJmc and i - 
other drugs (which be took under ; - 
medical supervision). Michaux was ; 

a solitary figure as a man and as a j 
writer, a person of tattrcme sensitiv- 
ity diffidently courteous and cut 1 

uied. And ever since before Worid 
War ll when he had his first exhi- 
bition, bis undassifiable produc- . 

(ion as an artist has been equal hl W 
quantity and quality to that of Ms 
fiteury output — and equally wi- 
ntired. The exhibition at Le rant 
Cardinal is devoted to paintings 
done in the year preceding & 
vWh, and shows that this remark- 
able artist continued working with 
inventiveness and persuasive force 
until the wary end of his life. 

"Henri Michastx," Le Pewit Gar- 
£nal 12 Rue de rEdunuH, Paris 6, 
to July 31. 


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INTERNATIONAL 
EDUCATION GUIDE 

Write Ur. Fnn^oise Ofmenu International Herald Tribune, 
181 Avenne GrariefrdeGeaBe, 92521 NeuiBy Cede*. Frame 


Peter Hall’s 'Carmen' 
Shines at 



By Henry Pleasants 

G LYNDEBOURNE,' England 
— The first new production 
of this year's CHyndeboume Festi- 
val Opera is Sir Fete Hall's of 
Bizet’s “Carmen,” with Maria Ew- 
ingjLady Hall) in the title role. 

This is Glyndebcunie’s first ven- 
ture with “Carmen," and after iu 
premiere a majority if not a unani- 
mous verdict would seem to have 
been: “And high timer Originally 
composed as an Optra comique, 
with spoken dialogue, given tore in 
its original form, “Carmen" is es- 
sentially intimate musical theater 
rather than grand opera, and in this 
intimate setting one can welcome 


ttroui Carmen* and already a 
notable accomplishment v 
She gets strong support Iran her 
fellow American Bany McCauley 
as Don Jbsi, rather too American 
in appearance in the first two acts, 
but— with appropriate makeup— 
splendid thereafter. David 
Holloway is a too- American Esca- 
miDo and Marie McLaughlin a vo- 
cally secure if rather too-British 
Mirada. 

But after Ewing’s Carmen, the 
glory of this performance is in the. 
pit, with the London Philharmonic! 
under Bernard Haitink honoring 
every treasurable detail of Bizet's 
enchanting score. 

Hie festival opened with a reviv- 
er T_t r— ». inoo -r 



?. if 
;t j*. 


!ir“ 

U 


and savor countless orchestral and . --- 
vocal ddicades often fast in a large 1 983 prodiKUon of 

opera house. AnaL 

HalTs production takes (his info 
account, seeing to it that the audi- 
ence is privy to every nuance in the 
unfolding of the drama. It iaa sol- 
idly traditional production, en- 
riched by no end of im aginative 
detail, played against defiantly re- 
alistic sets by HalTs long-time col- 
laborator John Bray. 

But if the production is tradi- 
tional, even conventional, the char- 
acterization of its central figure is 
noL Ewing’s Carmen is no hip- 


Rossini’s “La Cenerenfoh.” An al- 
most entirely new cast is headed by 
“ * i Watidmson, a pretty and 
fluent, if s o me tim es explo- 
sive, imderella. But the honors of 
the evening go to the veteran Sesto 
Bruscantini as Don Magnifies and 
his fdfaw Italian Afcssandro Cor- 
ddli as Dandini. 

Further perfonnanoes erf "Car- 
men" June 1, 5, 8, 13, 15, 21.2fi.39 
and July 2; of "La Cenercntola" 
June 2, 4, 7, 9, II, 16, 23 and 28. 

Utis year’s festival also includes 


DINIS 


CLA 


at .-»•« 


'oAii? 


swinging v amp or sex kitten. She js new productions of Benjamm Brit- 
a self-contained, independent, w3- ten's “Albert^ Herring" and a dou- 
f ul moody woman, ambivalent, We-bfll of Oliver Knussen’s *" r 


HOW 


something of a loner. 

In her singing, if not in her play- 
ing of the role, she recalls, wbrther 
wittingly or not, the art of this 
century’s greatest Carmen, the 
Spanish Concha ta Supervia, who, 
as we know from her records and 
from the testimony of those who 
remember bo - in the theater — she 
died in 1936 — did most of her 
acting with her voice. 

Ewing moves very little, project- 
ing mood and character through 
posture, attitude and facial expres- 
sion, but her voice, rarely, and then 
most effectively, allowed to ring 
out, is extraordinarily rich in vari- 
ety of color and shade. Again like 
Supervia, she takes liberties with 
the musical text to make her vocal 


. and “Where 
_ w Are" and revivals of 
Richard Strauss’s “Arabella’’ amL* i 
Mozart’s “Idomeaeo," “ 


HEN 



India’s Disco Bear Set 
For Paris Performance 

The Associated Prai 

NEW DELHI — Munna, India’s 
popular dancing bear, is on his way 

>le gathered at a 
' on Thursday to 




to Paris. 

Dozens of 
hotel in New 


. w “r , T ' A " notei m Mew Detlu on Thursday to 

points. She lias eome m lac wmc bid Manna bon voyage ^hestoolf 
aibcum oa llut account, but w]l 10 French rod, v^l 
hivenoDefrom thB comer. ^ound on th, lawn. 

This is her first Carmen, and at scheduled to perform in Paris at the 
the nmment the c h araae ri zatiou Festival of India, to be inaugurated 
seems from time to time a little self- by Prime Minister Raiv Gandhi in 
consopus, a little studied, occa- Paris on June 7. M luma’s trainer 
sionalW obtrusively stagy But that said the bear would be Down to 
should, be ironai out as ihe works Paris in a wooden cage and, while 
her way mto toe role. Hers is an on the road, will getadaily allow- 
onginaL mteUigeut, thoroughly anceofSIOO. J 


antiques 


; -COLUF 


( >M> K 


'y* i;; T ' 

■ Atorw;, 






ENGLKHOAK furniture 

XVII ih & XVIII tii centuries 
A CHOICE OF: 

BUREMJ ■ COFFER - GATELEG TABLE 

^StoE BOARD - DRESSBt - 

: ^OURT CUPBOARD 
UWRDROBE - WRITING TABLE . 
JACOBEAN CHEST OF DRAWERS - 
CHAR & ARMCHAIR 

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>/ life 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY. JUNE 1-2. 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 




V':, 

•• -• \-M: 

-irij r T. 




V£?t 


■ ■ an ’« 

ai... ..-"‘■s., 
•••», 

■ ,j| . . ■ 







-«*# ~'nv r.»_ •• ..r»-»4ir --a«a 



Sculpture fragments from the Sosian Apollo arranged as they appeared In die frieze. 

Fragments in Rome Show dory of a Greek Frieze 


■ i: ..- ^ iin . 

.... . .. 

v 

!:• 

! . ‘ '. T ffij 

■ • a j. ; 

•'"■■w it. 

7. l *- T rrtjg - 

; 

... T:;r ‘ 1 «vt 6 ' 

. i u » .* 

■ . I. .'.' 


By Edith Schloss 
3 OME — Michadangdo is sup- 
-IV posed to have said that if you 
look a good piece of sculpture up a 
mountain and threw it down, it 
would arrive at the bottom min us a 
limb or two, maybe full of cracks, 
but still a beautiful piece of sculp- 
ture. 

This dictum is wonderfully con- 
firmed at the CaphoHne Museums, 
by what is left of the sculptures 
from the temple of the Sosian 
Apollo, a great frieze of figures 
ignobly mauled by the vicissitudes 
of history and natural disaster, 
j. The group of human and animal 
bodies with their draws and weap- 
ons was made in 50QB. C of Paras 
marble for an Apollo temple, prob- 


ably in Eretna, a town in Euboda 
under the dominion of Athens. 
Once fo rming a fluent dean entity, 
now in broken parts that have beat 
assemb led. wi th painstaking still, 
they still radiate authority and 
grace. 

There are about 10 figures: a 
fallen warrior on the right, pans of 
riders, heroines and heroes dis- 
persed on either ride of a grandly 
erectgpddess, a dying man on the 
left. They are cast in poses to fit the 


INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 

PARIS 


DU 25 AVRIL.AU 15 JUIN 1985 


11 V *( la r men' 
Llvndeboun 





RENOIR... 

ET 

XU 6 EXPOSITION : 

"MAITRES 

IMPRESSIONNISTES 

ET 

MODERNES” 


Catalogue upon request :1Q S. 




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daniel 

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26, avenue Marignon 75008 Paris - TSL 266.6033 


■■ DENISE RENE ■ — ■ — 

196, Blvd. St-Germain, Paris 7th. 222.77.57 

CLAISSE 

les averbaux 

vernissage Thursday June 6, 1985 at 7 p.m. 

= GALERIE HOPKINS-THOMAS = 

4, Rue de Miromesnit, 75008 Peris - Tel.: 26531.05 

RENOIR 

Drawings and wotercplors 

, , - — Until June 29, 7985. - 

GALERIE MERMOZ 

| PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

— 6, Rue Jean-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel: 359.82.44 

■ ■ GALERIE TRIFF 

® OLD KILIMS 

6, Rue de VUniversite - 75007 PARIS - TflL 260.22.60 , 


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-ROBOT FOUR TAPESTRIES- 
MOtCT, KtS, PICASSO, KHjON, 
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AUBUSSON 

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pnsents 

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FOREIGN NASTK ARTISTS 

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LONDON 

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(LONDON) LID. 

6 Albemarle St. Wl. 01429 5161 

FRANCIS BACON 

29 May-31 My. 1985. 
Mmv-M. 10-5.30. Sat*. 10-1130 


MV SEE ARTS DECORATIFS 
107 rue de Rivoli Tf 001 

AMADO 

f f. oorrr rr la phirre 


LONDON 

. LONDON 

- Original - 

PRINT FAIR 

ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS 
FRIDAY it— SUNDAY 23 JUNE 

10imw6pm 


gable of the temple roof, and they 
are bound by a delicately agitated 
symmetry. 

The scene depicts a battle: young 
Greek men are vanquishing young 
Greek women ■ — the goddess im- 


perturbably watching over the 
deadly contest The men represent 
the new Athenians, winning over 
an older force, the Amazons. Sym- 
bols of the agricultural, matriairin- 
cal societies that dominated the 
Mediterranean back to prehistory, 
the Amazons were now losing out 
against men, trim had learned how 
to navigate the seas. 

The subjugation of the Amazons, 
Or “ AmflT 7 f>nnm.vliinT a subject 
often used in Greek art had a pro- 
foundly religious but also political 
meaning, and in this case, probably 
symbolized the victories of the 
Greeks over the old Persians in 480 
B.C. 

Centuries later, in the reign of 
Augustus, this 4 marrn n nmarhia 
was hauled from Greece to be recy- 
cled for Rome by one Caius Sorius, 
and was raised a gain in the temple 
of Apollo Medicus near the Ha- 
mini an circus. Sn«ans bad con- 
quered the Jews in 37 B. C_ became 
consul in 32 B. G, and later also 
was active in the campaigns in the 
Near East and against Egypt So 
here once more the rherg e of the 
vanquishing of Amazons, the tam- 
ing of a primordial dark force, 
stood for the conquest of older 
races — ancient peoples, orientals, 
barbarians — by a younger, more 
forward and vita] one. 

The Roman temple of the Sosian 
Apollo, with its group of Greek 
sculptures under its gable, rose on a 
central holy rite. It was probably 
gnawed at by floods and earth- 
quakes, but in the end it was most 
certainly destroyed by neglect, af- 
ter Rome lost its privileged posi- 
tion as capita] of an empire. It 
disappeared after three of its north- 
western columns crashed into the 
nearby theater of Marcel] us, a fact 
that was ascertained during the 
first modem excavations in 1932. 

During the excavations, some of 
the col umns of the temple were 
assembled and stood up at a dis- 
tance from their original site for 
more picturesque, scenic effect, 
where they can be seen to this day. 

At the same time what was found 
of the Greek statues ended up in 
the storerooms, palaces and muse- 
ums of Rome. Only in the last de- 
cade. did it dawn on the specialists 
that a fl the dispersed, finely mod- 
eled pieces trf marble might not 
only compose into single statues 
bur that were also parts of a com- 
plete and intricate whole. 

Under the guidance of Eugenio 
La Rocca, director of the Capho- 


Mehta Draws Mixed Reviews 


The As so cia t ed Press 

L ONDON — The New Yoik 
i Philharmonic, under the direc- 
tion of Zubin Mehta, opened a 
month-long European tour in Lon- 
don Thursday with a mix of offer- 
ings that got as enthusiastic audi- 
ence reception but lake warm 
critical reviews. 

Mehta, in his seventh season as 
music director, was called back on 
stage a half-dozen times to ac- 
knowledge the applause and cheers 
of a near-sellout crowd at the Royal 
Festival Hafl. 

But both The Tunes of London 
and The Standardfound the perfor- 
mance lacking. “Given the orches- 
tra’s renown, its appearance here 
should have been a knockout af- 
fair,” wrote The Standard^ Chris- 
topher Grier. “It wasn’t quite that 
last night, despite the obvious mer- 
its of us principal offering, Mah- 
ler’s Fifth Symphony.’’ Paul Grif- 
fiths of The Times also found 
Mehta’s handling of the dosing 

DOONESBURY 

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Mahler work masterly, but his oth- 
er two choices disappointing: “1 am 
not quite sure why there should 
have been a decision to begin this 
concert with two ways of not hear- 
ing the New York Philharmonic.” 

The concert opened with Bach’s 
Hard Brandenburg Concerto, for 
which Mehta reduced the 1 30-piece 
Philharmonic to 10 strings and a 
harpsicord in chamber-orchestra 
fashion. The full orchestra then ap- 
peared to play the American com- 
poser George Crumb’s “A Haunted 
Landscape,” a surrealistic piece 
commissioned and first performed 
by the Philharmonic last year. 

Griffiths said that wiriJe It was a 
pleasure to hear the Bach, “it 
seemed a high price to have to 
bring a whole symphony orchestra 
across the Atlantic for this.” 

As for the American composi- 
tion, Griffiths said, “Crumb's 
sounds fail to become music for die 
simple reason that nothing is ex- 
pected of them.” 


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Drouot: Playing by the Old Auction Rules 


line Museum, they searched and 
conjectured fike detectives on a 
trail After seven vears of sJemhing 
in vaults and cellars, after careful 
restoration and much discussion of 
what the fragments in what 
kind of action they were engaged 
with each other according to their 
position in Greek mythology, the 
parts of the figures of the temple 
gable were assembled as a group as 
nearly as possible in the order they 
used to be. Though fragmentary, 
they are of fltaminating harmony. 

Even those nnfanrihar with aD 
the styles of Greek sculpture can 
see this work has gone beyond the 
severe plainness of Olympia, with- 
out yet having reached the classic 

finish of Pa rthenon or PhidUUI STL 

Here are the traces of a sculpture 
both and unaffected 

— stiB of simple pose, even dose to 
awkwardness — just before Greek 
culture reached its zenith with its 
cool dassidsm. 

Of one Amazon we see only the 
shred of a battle skirt, of Nike the 
proud body and the blunted bead; 
there is the torso of a hero — H tra- 
des? — straining in combat; naked 
Theseus hmges Toward — to drag 
an Amazon by the hair or to stab 
her? — and above the turmoil 
towers implacable Athena, head- 
less, young breasts under a cuirass, 
her dress falling in straight folds 
like the noble lines of a column. 

Shins, ankles, claws on arms, 
horses' thighs, a warrior’s emascu- 
lated torso — the collage style of 
our finv» has made us used to frag- 
ments. Our Himdii can easily jump 
over interstices and lacunae, and 
enjoy imagining the whole. 

So the sphntoed composition of 
marble figures before us becomes 
modern. One londy curving knee, 
one bent waist of a helical of an 
Amazon fighting for her life, dra- 
matic details that decay and time 
have brought out to stand by them- 
selves. in isolated focus, are splen- 
didly boned down, like a line of 
poetry. 

Sensibly documented, well light- 
ed, easy to view, the new exhibition 
of Amazzooomachia is a brave ef- 
fort It will eventually be shown in 
Greece, where h came from about 
19 centuries ago. 

“ 'Amuzoaomochio, ” Palazzo dei 
Conservaori, Capiioline Museums, 
until end of June. 

Edith Schloss is a painter who 
regularly writes in the IHT about art 
showings in Rome. 


tmemniotial HercU Tnbune 

P i ARTS — The last place where 
the auction game is played ac- 
cording to the old rules is Paris. At 
Drouot, there still are sales where 
the works of art are sent, for the 
greater pan, by pri vate owners who 

SOUKEN MeUKUN 

have had them for years, not deal- 
ers nor “investors” who buy some- 
thing here and resell it there a year 
later. This is thanks to France’s 
wealth in works of art as well as to 
its archaic auction system that has 
no equivalent elsewhere. 

A typical sale that included some 
wonderful objects was conducted 
by Paul Renaud on Wednesday. Its 
like would be inconceivable in Lon- 
don. 

Starting at 2:30 P. M-, it began 
with drawings and paintings, went 
on to folk earthenware from an 
important collection and outstand- 
ing French faience of which some 
pieces are matched only in the Lou- 
vre and in the faience museum that 
opened in Rouen a few months ago. 
Around 3.45 P. KL, the subject 
changed to “ works of art and furni- 
ture” which included two 19th cen- 
tury animal bronzes, some “China 
Trade Porcelain,” Louis XVI peri- 
od clocks in marble and ormolu, a 
marble bust or a woman by the 
French academic sculptor J. Cle- 
singer dated 1867. and a fantastic 
musical clock signed by William 
Kipling with a lacquered wood case 
in the best English baroque style. 

About 4:30 P. M.. objects gave 
way to furniture, ranging from 
19th-century imitation Louis XV 
and Louis XVI armchairs to a 
Transitional period commode with 
the mark of M. Ohneberg, trim was 
received into the Paris Guild of 
cabinetmakers in 1773. Rugs from 
Iran and French 17lb-century Au- 
busson tapestries rounded off the 
proceoiings. 

It is not easy to draw public 
attention to such sales, if only be- 
cause it is hard to deride what to 
focus on — the catalog cover car- 
ried three different tides, printed 
(me under the other: “Old Master 
and 19th Century Paintings,” 
“Earthenware and Faience from 
Rouen,” and “Works of Art and 
Furniture.” The auctioneer's mail- 
ing effort appears to have been 
minimal Although a subscriber to 
all Drouot catalogs. I got my copy 
at Druout on the sale day. Adver- 
tising was confined to (he Gazette 
de l'H6tel Drouot, a trade maga- 
zine that comes out on Fridays. For 
dealers in New York or London the 
only serious way of learning about 
such sales is through “runners,” 
agents who are aware of what they 
are after and keep them posted by 
telephone. 


Collectors, on the other hand, 
occasionally get informed by the 
experts who perform at DrouoL 
Unlike Sotheby's or Christies ex- 
perts. who are’employed full time 
and exclusively by the respective 
auction houses! Drouot experts are 
independent professionals consult- 
ed by auctioneers on a day-to-day 
basts. In Wednesday's salt the ex- 
pen for faience was Georges Lcfcb- 
vre. who is an authority on the 
subject In Europe and is known for 
his straightforwardness in business. 
He must have been the key factor 
accounting for the presence' of buy- 
ers from West Germany and other 
European countries in the room. By 
contrast, advance information is 
not easily sent out by furniture ex- 
perts. Theirs is a field where it is 
almost impossible to tell before- 
hand what might interest a private 
buyer. There was not much that 
Alain Nazar e-Aga and Roland Le- 
pic, both first-rate experts, could 
do about the fine 18th-century 
clocks or the Transitional com- 
mode they bad cataloged. 

It is against this background that 
the contrasts in price patterns at 
the sale must be assessed. Paintings 
were not expensive. A seascape on 
a panel showing a ship tossed in a 
tempest with a lurid ray of sun 
coming through black clouds illus- 
trated the late 18th century roman- 
tic mood in the precise manner 
prevalent on the eve of Neo-Classi- 
cism. Signed by Jacques Antoine 
Vanin ( 1/60-185 1). it was an excel- 
lent buy at 17,500 francs (about 
SI.S70) plus the sale charge: 17.6 
percent up to 15,000 francs and 
1 32 percent on the remaining 2J500 
francs. 

- A downright bargain was avail- 
able in one of many lots not listed 
in the catalog because vendors had 
brought than to the auctioneer at 
the last minute. This was a land- 
scape with a horse, admirably por- 
trayed. and hunting dogs in the 
highly realistic style of the 1860s. 
Signed by J. C. A. Valette. it was 
knocked down at 1 1.500 francs to a 
Paris dealer who usually buys Ori- 
entalist painting and rare books 
dealing with the Middle East 

Pottery, on the contrary, sold 
wdl. Figures may not seem impres- 
sive concerning folk earthenware 
but it never fetches high prices any- 
way. The best piece was a 19th- 
century, brown glazed flask from 
the workshop at Sauxemesnil in the 
Coteotin district The flattened, 
bulbous body is decorated with 
bas-relief scenes, including one of 
Jesus and the the Good Samaritan. 
It was knocked down at 17.000 
francs. 

The earliest French faience was 
cheap too because it belongs to a 
category that has vanished from the 
market for so long that it has virtu- 


ally been forgotten by collectors. A 
!6ih -century oval bowl shaped like 
a bath, with an embracing couple 
moulded at the bottom, was an 
absolute rarity of a kind not seen at 
auction for years. Even with chips 
around the rim. it was inexpensive 
ai 12,000 francs. 

But when it came to the more 
familiar Rouen faience of the IStii 
century, collectors rallied enthusi- 
astically. A dish with polychrome 
chinoiserie decoration, made 
around 1730. went up to 71.000 
francs. Another dish decorated 
with pagodes and marked on the 
underside with the monogram 
G. B„ which stands for Guillibaud. 
zoomed to 88.100 francs. The fact 
that the pieces came from the col- 
lection of Roger Monmeiien. the 
dean of French faience collectors 
now in his 80s, apparently galva- 
nized his fellow collectors. They 
did not seem to be turned off by the 
presence of the old man. who sat in 
the front row surrounded by his 
family. More than once Monme- 
Han ran up prices by bidding on his 
own wares, grumbling audibly and 
even gesticulating when he thought 
the auctioneer was not doing a 


good job. Taken all round, he 
should be wdl pleased with the 
financial outcome. 

But when it came to decorative 
objets d’an such as clocks there 
were no collectors, only ordinary 
middle-class Frenchmen and 
shrewd dealers. The middle-class 
Frenchmen paid stiff prices for 
low-quality objects and the shrewd 
dealers got masterpieces for pea- 
nuts. There was a marvelous 
French Louis XVI dock in the 
form of an ormolu obelisk support- 
ed by four lions on a marble pedes- 
tal with a dial signed by Simons. Ai 

65.000 francs, the obelisk clock was 
din cheap. 

The bait bargain of all, however, 
was an English musical clock by 
William Kipling, Knocked down at 

50.000 francs, it is probably worth 
four times that figure in the inter- 
national market. Ostensibly ac- 
quired by a Drouot clerk who gets 
many commission bids from deal- . 
ers who know he will not run them 
up. it is believed to have gone to a 
leading London gallery. 

Drouot remains on Irreplaceable 
treasure house for those who know 
their way about the world. 


Kurosawa, Missing Mishima’ 
Highlight Tokyo film Festival 


By Koichi Nakagawa 

The Associated Press 

T OKYO — The first Tokyo In- 
ternational Film Festival 
opened Friday with the premiere of 
“Ran,” a Shakespearean story in a 
Japanese feudal setting by Japan’s 
most acclaimed director. Akira 
Kurosawa. 

“Ran” was not completed in 
lime for die last Cannes Him Festi- 
val. Kurosawa spent nine months 
shooting his 27th film, which he has 
said “is to round out my life's work 
in films.” ft cost SI0.4 million, un- 
usually expensive for a Japanese 
film. 

The 75-year-ofd director has de- 
scribed “Ran” as a rendition or 
Shakespeare's King Lear in a Japa- 
nese setting from die 16th-century 
feudal period. 

Meanwhile, the American and 
Japanese producers of “Mishima” 
claim that the organizing commit- 
tee unfairly rejected their movie as 
a festival entry. 

The film, directed by American 
Paul Schrader, depicts the life of 
Japanese novelist Yukio Mishima, 
who killed himself in front of Japa- 
nese Self-Defense Force soldiers in 
1970 after failing to rally them to 
rebel- The producers say the com- 
mittee bowed to pressures from 


right-wing nationalists, eager sup- 
porters of Mishima. who felt (he 
movie was “insulting ” to Mishi- 
ma's cause. 

But the organizing committee 
chairman. Shigeru Okada. said the 
film had not been submitted as an 
entry. 

Large crowds were expected for 
showings of David Lean's “A Pas- 
sage to India.” Yousscf Chahine's 
“Adieu Bonaparte.” John Korty's 
“Ewok,” “The Killing Fields” and 
other films premiered elswhere. 

A total of 137 films from 42 
countries are to be screened during 
the 10-day festival. 

The competition section, called 
Young Cinema *85. offers the win- 
ner a prize of $1.5 million toward 
production of a new film. It is open 
to directors born after 1945 and 
who have released fewer than five 
commercial films. Young directors 
entered 519 films in the contest, 
and a special screening committee 
has narrowed the field to 16. 

A “most promising filmmak er” 
will be selected, based on evalua-. 
tion of completed films and future 
film plans, organizers said. * 

Masato Hara. executive director- 
of the festival, said he would like to ^ 
make it an annual event. 















.xisU - ' i.' -f' 








.j£s . 

jM- ■ 






KLM certainly do their best to keep their younger passengers happy. 
With special attention for children travelling alone. 

Take for instance the fun-filied Junior jet Lounge at Amsterdam ; 
Airport Schiphol. With the latest video games. Exciting films. And almost* 
everything a child could wish for. Our unaccompanied minors also get clear 
identification tickets. Plus personal attention on the ground. 

And in the air? \Xfell, there arc toys, books, and colouring crayons 
for our younger passengeis. And on request a meal specially prepared jusr 
for them.But then it’s all pair of KLM 's award-winning service. 

The Reliable Airline Mij MU 


• 




Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 1^2, 1985 


NYSE Mosf Actives ' 



VOL Htab Low 

Last 

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14% 8% AnHmn JM 

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23% 14 ArtiHst 

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340 19% 19 19 — % 

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174 13% 12% 12%—% 
21 »% 25% 36% + % 

239 22% 22 22% + % 

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667 30% 29% 30% + % 
2 44% 43% 44% 

16 40% 49 40% + % 

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110 TO TO TO +4 
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100 104 0 5021 19 184* 18% + % 


Compiled bv Oar Scoff From Ditpatdcet 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New Yoii 
Stock Exchange dosed higher Friday In active 
trading, rebounding from some early selling 
with a boost from lower interest rates. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials rose 
9.63 to IJ 15.41. topping the previoos peak of 
UQ9.70 reached on May 21. For the weds, the 
average gained 13.44 points. Advances out- 
paced declines by nearly 2- to- 1 on the NYSE. 

Big Board volume totaled 134.14 million 
shares, up from 108.76 milli on in the previous 
session. The NYSE’s composite index dimbed 
.90 to 109.63. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department reported that new factory orders 
fell 0.5 percent in ApriL The drop came after 
revised declines of 0.7 percent in March and 1.1 
percent in February. 

That fresh evidence of sluggishness in busi- 
ness activity helped touch off a decline in inter- 
est rates, and a rise in bond prices, in the credit 
markets. 

up more thaiTsflO for evoySLQOO in face value. 

Analysts said that the market got background 
support from strength in the bond market and 
news of oil-price cuts. But they said that take- 
over rumors fueled the strength. 

‘The strength has been without doubt in 
rumored takeover stocks and the focus of those 
rumors has spread out from food stocks into 
any stock that has ever had a rumor circulated 
about it sometime in the last 10 years,” said 
Trude Latimer of Evans & Co. 

As a prominent blue-chip issue and the No. 1 
holding of investing institutions, IBM some- 
times can set the tone for the market as a whole. 


Dollar Stages Retreat 


The Associated Prea 

NEW YORK —The dollar staged a sharp 
retreat late Friday as new evidence of slo^ 
econo mic growth in the United States raised 
expectations of further declines in U.S. interest 
rates. 

A decision by Nebraska banking officials to 
close four banks because of problem loans had 
little impact on late trading, but analysts said 
could lead to more declines in the dollar when 
markets open next week. Trading had been 
mixed in Europe Friday. 

The Federal Reserve said its index of the 
dollar against 10 other currencies dropped 1-01 
percent Friday and .was down 1.43 percent For 
the week. The dollar fell to 3.0475 Deutsche 
marks in New York from 3.0825 Thursday, 
weakened to SI -288 5 to the pound from 
S 1 .2765, and to 9.295 French francs from 9394. 


After falling a fraction in early trading, h 
climbed in later trading. 


Long Island Lighting Co. was active after the 
county executive erf Suffolk County, where 
Ulco is situated, dropped his figbt to stop the 
opening of the Shorefaam nuclear-power plant. 
However, Governor Mario Cuomo of New 
York said that be still opposed the opening of 
the power plant. 

Occidental Petroleum was higher. 

Ohio Edison, Middle South Utilities and 
Kansas Gas & Electric were active. 


(UP/. AP) 


T2MonMl 
HUM Low 


Slack 


si*. Close 

DJv- YM. PE lOOsHMi Low Quot qroe 


37% 26 Baron wi 14 30% 37% 38% +1% 

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M2 

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61% 43% BrfsIM 
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24% 15% Brckwy 

40% 29 BkyUG . .. __ 

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8% 4% COC 
57% 27 CIGNA 

32% 23% CIGpf 

CIGpf 

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44% 34% CPC inf 220 

23% 14% CP Nil 140 64 

21% 19% CRIIMI 2870 9J 


1480 SJ 12 221 244* 24% 24% — % 
3J0 24 20 2987 117% 114 117% +14* 
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610 


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30% 15% BnkVBl 140 13 ID 


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13 330 10 *% 10 + % 

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31% 17% BOUKli 

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251* 17% Bay Fin 

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13 35% 25% 35% + % 
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713 33% 31% 33% + % 
120 33U> 3116 32V6 + J* 
1232 90 89 89% + % 

153 31% 3116 31%— % 

29 32*6 22 22*6 + W 

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5 30 38 38 

1101 30*6 30'* 3016 + % 

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223 20% 19% 199*— % 
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35 17 227 23% 22% 22% + % 
393 31% 31 21% + % 

3.1 13 9902 20% 20 20% —2% 

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25110 712 2216 21 22 +1% 

64 14 303 55 54% 55 +16 

24 IS 5003 60% 03% 40% +3% 

02 44% 43 44% +1% 

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8.7 107 57% 53 57% + % 

.4 28 09 20% 20 204* + % 

60 10 2223 70 73% 70 +2*. 


14 14 
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14 37 
34 11 
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■3 

1.7 29 
24 


54 

425 

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27% 18% CSX 
10016117 CSX pi 
40% 24 CTS 
12% 7% Caine 

33% 22% Cab of 

14V6 1% Conor 

22 11% Co I Fed 48 

49% 32% CalFdPf 675 

20% 13% CalttHl 

1IV6 H% Camml 

28 15% CRLka 

8% 3% CmpRa 

73% CamSe 

45% 38% CdPac a 140 
15% 14% CdPac wt 
7B 141 Capcits JO 
27% 15 CapHdl J? 

14% ID Carina 8 48 
4016 24% Canute MS 
20% 15% CarvFI 40 
29% 19% CorPw 240 _ 

25% 19% CafP pt 167 10J 

48 35th CarTec 110 55 10 

11% 7t* Carrol J7 J 11 

44% 30% CaraPlT M0 24 9 

30% 10% CartHw M2 60 11 

35% 19% Car+wl ja 15 13 

18% 9% CascNG M0 M 8 

16% 9% ClHttCk 

29 15% CsJIC pf 1M 

43% 28% QrtrpT 50 14 


95 21% 2116 21V6 + M 
191 21% 21 21% + % 

3788 .20% 30% 20% + % 
I 160% K9% 15916 +4% 
147 33% 33% 33% 

43 8% 8% 8% 

240 Z7 20% 26% — % 


15 1238 


13% 13% + % 


21 


730 21% 21 21% + % 

5 49 40% 4S%— % 

21 18 17% 18 + % 

319 13% 13% 13V*— % 
352 20% 19% 30% + M 
49 3% 3% 3%— % 
929 76% 73 70% +3% 

92 45% 45% 45% + % 
08 15% 15% 15% + % 
471 216% 213 316 +2 

3J 11 1792 24 22% 34 +1 

41 11% 11% 1T% 

125 34% 33% 34% + % 
576 23V. 22% 23% + % 
1227 28% 27% 2816 + % 
7 25 25 25 

2M 38% 37% 38 +% 

174 8% 8% B%— % 
178 40% 44% 40% +1% 
413 30% 30 30% + % 

90 39% 35% 35% + V* 
43 17% 17% 17% — % 
1032 10% 10% 10%— % 
220 22 % 22 % 22 % — % 
2302 34% 34% 34% + % 


X0 10 
IJ 11 
9J 7 


X2 12 
63 10 
4 26 
55 9 

11 


3 23% 23% 23%— % 
047 103% 101 103% + % 

246 9% 9% 9% 

176 42% 4Z% 42% — % 
378 25 24 25 + % 


27% 16 CtCO 76 

106 62% Cetanae 640 

15 7V* Conor n j04 

43 33% Centef 238 

26% 17 Canton n . _ 

25 17 ConSoW 203 BJ 7 1408 34% 24% 24% 

21% 17% CenHud 244 102 6 111 21 27% 27% 

26% 2016 CHudpf 24%1 1.1 2 26% 20% 26% + % 

46 30 CnlLtpf 650 1O0 ante 45 45 45 — 1 

19% 14% Oil I PS 1J4 15 10 159 19% 19 1916 + 16 

25% 17% CnLoEl 208 8.1 7 49 25% 2SV> 25% 

351* 29% CLaEI Pf 611 114 16 35 35 IS 

111* »% £*M£« MO 122 5 800 TO* 10% 10% + % 

» 13 CVfPS 140 163 6 281 11% 18% 1B%— % 

191* 2% ConlrOf 1121 2% 3% 2% + % 

11% 7% CnfrvTI 40 74 8 BO 10% TO* 10% + % 

23% 1016 Cenvlll 240 114 9 26 20% 20% 20% — % 

»% 15% Cn+eed 702413 143 27V. 27% 27% + % 
24% 16V* CossAlr 40 14 II 2818 21% 19% 20% +1% 

34% 10% Chine In 40 17 1409 23% 23% 231ft + % 

27% 19 Oiml pf MO 65 10 30% 30 30% + % 

54 43% Cbm! pf 600 87 4053 52% 53 + % 

10 0 Cham So 40 66 12 025 0% «* 8% 

4% 1 vIChrtC 111 2% 2% 3% + V* 

1% 16 vlCbl Hrt 154 % % % 

4% lift vIChrfpf 10 2% 2% 2%— % 

40% 35% Chaa 340 64 6 590 50% 50% SOU + Vi 

47V* 30% CftOMPf 5J5 I1J 25 47 40% 4016 

50% 40 Cham of 651elX0 300 54% 54V* 54V*— <4 

57% 51 Oma afl24Da23J 42 52V* SI*. J2% + fe 

21% 15 CM sea 73 34 8 5 20 19% 19% + % 

34U. 24% Cheated 148 M 13 40 29V. 29 29% 

43% 23% OtmNY 248 0J 0 2123 41% 40% 41% + % 

55% 55% 55% — % 

MV, 54 54 + % 


12 Month 
man Low 


Bis. 


Stock Dlv. YM. PE UMaHIdi Low Quot. QVoe 


108V* 90 C50 pfolSJS T65 5BU1O0V4 10516 105% — 

108% 97 CSOpfnlSJS 164 49IUO0 105% 105%— 

40% 27% Combi n 2.16 65 9 170 (7% 47% 47% 

37% 35% CmbEn IJ4 57 11 1W0 33% 31% 32% 

-JS 3^ TO 502 14% 14% 14% 

J0 10 15 08 17% 17% 17% 

3 3348 10V* 9% 18% + V* 


X00 1043 
M0 11J 
2jOO 11J 
2J7 103 
2J7 11J 
232 U 
MO 


40 


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140 16 9 
240 11 9 

rn 33 6 


1716 8 Camdb 
20 15% ComMfl 

33% 8% Comdro 

31% 23% CmwE 
17 13 CwE pf 

IS 13% CwE pf 
23% 18% CwE Pf 
25% 20% CwE pf 
30% 17% CdfTlES 
34% 20% Content 
35% 20% CPsyce 
35% 20 Camper 
1716 11 CemeSc 
4010 14% CptVBI 
34% 22% ConAes 
24% 13% Canotr 
19 13% ConnE 

2910 19% CmNG 
15% 10% Conroe 
3S% 24% cornea 240 0j 

47 38 ConE pf 530 104 

30 20% CnaFi+5 1.10 XS II 

47% 31 CnsNG 232 13 9 

8% 4% ComPw 
29% 1316 CnPpfB 650 150 
39% 20 CnPpfC 652 127 .- 

48 33% CnPpfD 745 169 

48% 25% CnPpfE 772 ISJ 
48% 25 QiP pfG 776 155 
20% 11% CnPerv 640 154 
22% 9% CnPprU 340 153 
23% 10% CnPprT 378 15.1 
48 25% CnPpfH 748 154 

24% 11% CnP PTR 600 ISJ 
M% 10% CnP orP X98 153 
23% 10% CnPprN 335 153 
1016 7% CRPprMlSO 163 

15 7 CnPprt. 2J3 144 

34% II CnPprS 602 ISJ 

16 71A CnP prK 243 ISJ 

47%‘ 23% CnftCp 240 58 22 

10% 4% Confl II 

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12 CirtlHpf 

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2410 18 ContTal MO 77 9 

38% 24% CtDatO 72 23 

33% 23% Canwd 1J0 15 12 

3V* 1 vlCookU 


4V* 

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67 17 10% 16% — 

7 17% 17% 17% 

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301 3U0 31% 31% + % 
7B4 34% 34% 3416 — % 
38 27V* Z7% 27% 

0 1312 10% 1510 10% + % 
50 1192 U% 14% M% 

25 16 440 35% 34% 35% + % 
784 24% 24% 24%— % 
5 11% 1810 10% 

12 29% 2916 29% + % 
30 13% 13% 13% + % 
3577 35% 34% 35% + % 
1 47 47 47 

734 31% 30% 31% + 10 
. 3E0 44% 44% 44% _ 

10 4593 7 0% 7 + % 

71 Or 30 29 30 +1% 

270a 35% 34% 3S% +1% 
lOSOz SO 48% 50 +3 

94BZ49 40 49 + % 

000x50 48% 50 +1% 

199 28% 24% 20% +1% 
•0 23% 22 23% +1% 

116 25% 23% 25 +1% 

1578x 50 48 . 50 +2% 

121 25% 24% 25% + % 
82 25% 24% 35% +1% 
150 20% 23% 25% +)% 
32 17% 10 17% +1% 

173 15% 13% 15% +1 
80 20 24% 25% +1% 

119 17 15% 16% +1% 

789 44% 43% 44% + % 
7% 7% 7% — % 

303 2 1% 1%— 

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031 % % %— % 

39* 10% 18 18% + % 

1143 23% 22% 23% + % 
3728 31% 30% 31% +% 
100 31% 31 3T%— % 

3 1% 1% 110— % 


Conor 1.52 65 M 1AH 34% 34% 34% — % 


&0 

3 

XI 0 
IJ 19 
3J 

3J 17 
67 II 
22 17 
22 
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38 30% 30 30%—% 

723 14% 13% 14% + % 
49 19% 19 19% + % 

707 26% 25% 20% + % 
31 12% 12 12% + % 

75 25% 25 25V6 

36 12 12 12 

990 40% 3ta4 40% +1 
77 40% 45% 45% + U 
70 75 74% 75 + % 

1 8% 8% 8% 

138 31 37% 38 +% 


34% 27 

38 30 CooFfPf 290 

27 12% CraspLb 

20% 12% CoprTr A0 

26% 15 COOPvhi A0 

19% 11% CapwM At 

27% 17% Cardura J4 

15% 10% Core In St 

40% 30% ComGs MO 

48 23 CarBIk U» 

77% 44% CoxCm M 

TO 410 Craty 

30% 32 Crane MOB 62 11 __ 

83% 40% CrayRs 17 1140 80% 79% 79% — % 

19% 15% CrcfcNpf2.il 11 J 10 IBM 10% 10% + % 

51% 50% CrckNaf 559 SO% 50% 58% — % 

23% 18% CrmpK Ml U 11 22 21% 21% 21% + 10 

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23 1206 NBI 

22% 17% NCH 
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46% 33% NWA 
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120* Tto Harnbh 
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806 ion HarGrn 
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14% 906 Lamurs 

4% Tto LamSas 
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41% 22 LeeBrd 32 2J 19 
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210k 15% LosP lot JS 22 f 
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t . ,< r : ;■ SATURDAY-SUNPAY, JUNE 1-2 , 1985 




ECONOMIC SCENE 


;5^JSome See U.S. Tax Han 
^ As Keeping Deficit High 


£* -4: 




* i •: 

v ... 


’*■*> 


ByLEONARDSHX . 

i. New York Times Service 

N EW YORK— What wUlbct^^ectscaithe econo- 
my of Frcstdeut Ronald Reagan's historic set of pro- 
posals for overhauling the tax. systanTIbe effort to 
answer that question requires not. only an analysis of 
£ the plan itself, as set forth in the administration’s 460-page 

« volume, but speculation on what changes mB be made by 

** Congress and accepted by the president before it becomes law — 

’= assuming that it does. . v 

• . *; % * The tax package is essentially revenue-neniraL The condHna- 
> , 7 i*;. vti°n of rate cuts and base-broadening would, according to the 
’ ! . -^Treasury Department's calculations, mean a net revenne loss of 

J i*.“ just $125 biHion Ai ri ng the I 

.. jy-pp-ta*- 1986 think 

works, the tax bin win wind up • effectively mean a - 
as a much bigger tax cut that ■ . 

win undo the deficit-cutting ' much l-lffiCT tax Cut. ; 
•• ,' r y . . operation now going on and ■ ■ ' ' ' 

V will keep deficits lrigfr for 

,'v years to cone. . ' . 

( £ \ - -Barry Boswbrth of the Brookings Institution says. that. “it win 

V. be hard for Congress to broaden the tax base more than the 
. ‘ president has done; and it wfll bb erat harder for Congress to 
„ 2 upset what the president has already given away in rfete cuts.” But 

*ȣ' from^e on enuMuismgpHivimpns .... 

' Ira Shapiro^ the director of tax policy foe the accounting firm 

. y ?;■ . Coppers A Lybrand, contends that, in the process of malting the 
> » tax padcage politically acceptable, the administration gave up too 


-that die measure will 


mean a 


*♦ 5 ... . 


rt it. 


* - • < ■ . 


He says that one dear sign that the Treasury knew in the end 
the revenne loss was too great was its effort to recapture S67.7 
billion over four years from corporations that had “windfall” 
gains from accelerated depredation taken when the tap corporate 
income tax rate was 46 percent rather than the 33 percent the 
president is proposing. Other -analysts note similar changes to 
pick up revenue here and there, such as taxing the first 10 percent 
of employer-paid health-care benefits. 


A 


major battle is looming over the proposed disallowance erf 
deductions for state and local taxes, including property 


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licralb^fesSribune. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 

Page 9 


» Jf JL taxes. The White House will fight hard because it needs 
>? that money to balance the cuts. But high-tax states, headed by 
"l New York, will fight just as hard, or harder, to protect the 
. deductions and, as they see it, their states’ viability. 

>. /Uthongh the mnnnmberedhifih-^ ^tates may lose, proper^ 
'4 owners and real estate interests have a much stronger chance to 
;v prevail in protecting the deductibility of property taxes. 

Qivgn the cftnc esanns already made to various pressure groups 
■ by the Treasury Dqiartment and White House, Congress is tikdy 
to fed freer to cat its own deals. This increases the probability of 
1 converting a nominally revenue-neutral package into a tax cut. 
Apart from ddiberate actions by Congress or the White House to 

• • reduce burdens on particular groups, however; further revenue 

losses may result as businesses affected by higher taxes change 
their operations and s truct u res to reduce their tax liability. 

• If budget deficits increase, wiH the tax revisions be a drag on 

• economic growth? 

v v Some sufqjty-side economists dung off the deficit problem, 

; n asserting that the tax cuts are stimulative and that growth itself ' 
wB shrunk the deficits; Mr. Rcagan 1ms .expressed, that vievt- 
Some Keynesians, who regHrd the supjrfy-sidm as Keynesians in 
. . disguise, arc willing to tolerate the dtfidts in a time of unemploy- 
ment and excess capacity. Mr. Bosworth, a Keynesian, suggests 
that one cannot ngect out-of-band the position; “Let the deficits 
■■ ran; the economy is. adjusting to them. 

But he and a broad range of Hberal and conservative econo- 
(CoBtinani oo Page l£CoL4) 

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AP. - ' ‘ 1 


Chrysler 

Couiliiig 

Jet Firm 

Talks Continue 
With Gulfstream 

The ABociaud Pnas 

DETROIT — Chrysler Carp, 
said Friday that it was negotiating 
to bay Gulfstream Aerospace 
Corp_, a maker of corporate air- 
craft, for S646 miHicm. 

Chrysler said that h intended to 
buy 100 percent of Gulfstream's 34 
million shares ai $19 each. The 
automaker has S7.9 billion in cash 
and marketable securities on hand 

Golf stream would become a tiny 
part of Chrysler, the No. 3 UJi 
auto maker. in Savannah, 

Georgia, its 1984 sales were $600 
zmltian, or about 3 permit of 
Chrysler’s $19^ billjon. 

Neither company would say 
when any agreement might be con- 
cluded 

Gulfstream stock dosed Friday 
at $17.50 a share on the New York 
Stock Exchange, up $7,25. Chrysler 
shares dosed at $35,625 on the 
NYSE, down 87 S cents. 

Allen Paulson, Gulfstream's 
chairman and holder of 71 percent 
of hs stock, said that bfc had grant- 
ed Chrysler a six-month option to 
buy 6.7 milUn n of Us shares while 
talks continued on a buyout of the 
public shares. 

Automotive industry Analysts 
said that Gulfstream has an attrac- 
tive backlog of orders for its execu- 
tive jets,indodicg tbe popular, 19- 
passenger Gulfstream 3. Bat the 
analysts had differing views of the 
Chrysler move. 

Joseph PhiHippi of EJF. Hutton 
said that the purchase was untimdy 
tyramgi* the Reagan ad min is tra tion 
is “trying to dump" the investment 
tax credit and “companies buy 
those jets because they can write 
them off ” 

David Healy said Us company. 
Dread Buniham Lambert Inc, es- 
timated Gulfstream’s profits this 
year would be $35 ntiuion to S40 
million, making Chrysler’s poten- 
tial buyout 17 times earnings. “I 
guess yon could call that a premi- 
um price,'* he said 


Canada’s Secretive Family of Investors April Trade Gap 

Gull Purchase [ ' I W 7 « 1 1 • TT O 

Turns Spotlight Vr 10 . 61100 . lU Uti^* 

On Reichmanns np ^jk-| -■ nm* 

L Billion 


Gulf Purchase 
Tarns Spotlight 
On Reichmanns 

By Doughs Martin 

New York Times Service 

TORONTO — The Rrichnann 
family, founder of Olympia & York 
Developments Ltd here, prizes its 
privacy. But hs shrewd business 
dealings and huge successes have 
repeatedly pm it m the spotlight- 

In 1976, (Mympia & Ymk bought 
eight New York City office budd- 
ings at the bottom of the market for 
$320 ntiMon and saw their value 
climb to some $2 binknL 

In 1981, after a bitter fight with 
Thomson Newspapers Ltd, the 
company bought Abitibi- Price 
Lux, the world's largest maker of 
newsprint, when that, industry was 
considered weak. But the Reich- 
manns plowed more than $150 mil- 
lion into improvements and found 
that they had caught the newsprint 
market just before an upturn. The 
market value of the family’s com- 
mon shares, 93 percent of die com- 
pany, has almost doubled to $900 
miDlmi, since tbe end of 1983. 

On May 23, the secretive family 
company bought 60 percent of 
Gulf Canada Ltd, Canada's 
fourth-largest cal company, from 
Chevron Carp- for about $12 bil- 
lion. The move has spurred specu- 
lation fha* in wmi» financial quar- 
ters, there is the belief that the price 
of oil has stopped its five-year 
downward spiral and may be head- 
ed up. 

[when Chevron bought Gulf 03 
Corp. in 1984, it acquired the 60- 
percent hiding in Gulf Canaria. 
The other 40 percent is held by 
institutions and private investors.] 

But regardless of essentially un- 
predictable movements in the {nice 
of o3, analysts have said that the 
inlaid immmw sense. “They 
got a heck of a good price,” said 
Denis Mote of the investment 
house of Maisson Placements Can- 
ada. 

The deal is nicely hedged be- 
tween oil-producing operations^ 
winch would benefit from an oQ- 
price rise, and refining and market- 
ing operations, winch would bene- 
fit from a price drop. 

Partly because of strong support 
from Canadian tax and investment 
authorities, they were able to whit- 


(Mympfa A York Hobfingst 9M 


Gulf Canada Ltd. «X»* 

! (pttroieomaxpkirafionanddevelottwi) 


Brines Ltd. 

(ninkig and asbestos operadona) 


Mwm Wtftar Reaouroas Ltd. 
(petroleum dewtapmnt) 


Tiflon Financial Corp 


TOHH-PriceLB 

(heKvriniaiQpfiHS) 


Otyiwta&YoaDevtiopinBntLDl 100% 
(real eaate devdopmenQ 

BriUnmoiMcfa an oonad taefade: 

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AmToaorlPaaul 
Enhsto* Sqora UBoskn) 

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Hhitd FtaiKW Caalw «mn>;r undw 
amttidlon h Nm Yirt 


13% Ml Stack Brothers W0% 

___JE |) (real ealate and bwestnwntqpeciaSsts) 


EngBsti Property Pi_C. 100% 


tie down the price that Chevron is 
believed to have been asking by 
some 15 percent, to $16.21 a share. 

Without the sort of controversial 
publicly financed takeovers fa- 
vored m recent years by state- 
owned Petro<!anada, the Gulf 
agreement by itself increases Cana- 
dian ownership of the country's ofl 
resources to 45 percent from 40 
percent. Gulf, whose Canadian 
ownership rase to 86 percent from 
26 percent, is now the biggest Ca- 
nadian-controlled oil company, 
pasting Fetro-Canada. 

The Reichmanns have thus 
proved to be good Canadian patri- 
ots while scoring whai is generally 
meed to be a very sweet coup, ft 
fits their reputation. 

The family, winch founded 
Olympia & York, is generally ac- 
knowledged to be the world’s larg- 
est office landlord; it owns the larg- 
est newsprint company, and is 
budding North America’s single 
biggest project: the $15-biIhon 


CatifacFfcirriMf 
Creel estate deretoproBm) 


TitrecCffip. 36% 

(shopping camera and office tessino) 


J framafnnoanMnoiMMriiiylandr ■ 
1 Rwntan ■ 

The New YcHl Tine* 

Battery Park complex in lower 
Manhattan 

The faiqily also is budding con- 
siderably more than $1 billion in 
projects in eight other UJS. titles. 

Olympia & York is 92-percent 
owned by three brothers — Paul 
Rekhmann, 54; Albert, 56. and 
Ralph, 51. The rest of the company 
is believed to be divided among 
other siblings: Edward, who lives 
in Israel, Louis, in New York, and 
Eva Heller, a sister, in London. 

The three major owners, who 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
trade deficit widened to $11.9 bil- 
lion in April from $11 bdUon the 
previous month and continued to 
grow at a faster pace than last 
year’s record-setting deficit, the 
Commerce Department said Fri- 
day. 

Separately, the department also 
reported that orders to LT.S. fac- 
tories fell 0.5 percent in Aprd, the 
third consecutive dariine and ninth 
in the last 12 months. New orders 
fed $900 rntdion in April, to $190.8 
billion, it said. 

Orders had originally been re- 
ported down (L9 percent in March, 
but that was revised to a 0.7-per- 
cent drop in Friday’s report 

The trade deficit swelled to $44.6 
trillion for the first four months of 
1985, up 5.8 percent from a year 
earlier. The excess of imports over 
exports has been a major factor 
holding bad: growth in tbe indus- 
trial sector. 

The government said a rise in 
petroleum imports and a rebound 
in imports of Japanese automobiles 
contributed to the increase in 
April’s trade imbalance. 

Meantime, housing industry 
leaders shrugged off a report 
Thursday of a 12-perceni decline in 
single-family housing sales in Aprd 
and said lower mortgage interest 
rates were already helping spur ad- 
ditional buying 

The Commerce Department and 
tbe Department of Housing and 
Urban Development said Thurs- 
day that housing sales fed to 

612.000 units on a seasonally ad- 
justed annual rate in April, down 
from 695,000 in March. 

New-home sales for the first four 
months of 1985 were 4 percent be- 
low the year-earlier period’s, and 
April sales this year were 5 percent 
below April 1984. 

Jack Carlson, executive vice 
president of the National Associa- 
tion of Realtors, said fading mort- 
gage interest rates and continued 
strong demand wdl keep new-home 
sales at an average annual rate of 

659.000 for the next few months. 


Australia Sets Sights on Being Major Pacific Banking Centei 


E uiufrutyBepa ^o jfayji 

■ swin rmtt 

Dollar iHftxfc Franc . SterHaa Franc KCU - »* 

1 RMOffi TOM* PM* BMH niM2*. 9W-9H 

j moan* 7 0w-7 vw 5M*t SIMM. 12M-12*. MSrUh ■ - tto-9% 

3 mourns 7*4.7% 5«hSK T29M2% Wtt- TOW 94W» HA 

4 month* MW SSW0W. ,5iwSfc WW-H* WtW-Wlw Wft-TW 

trow' nt-m 5*w* JH-5K .i2ft.ua m** 

Sources: Maroon Goa ratify taoHer. 0*1 SF. Pound. FT); Umto Bank (ECU); Reuters 
(SDR). Roto s apnfl mno to MM4M Mranta a ttt mutton oMim tar eautvafent). 


By John M. Brocfcr 

Lai Angela Tima Sender 

SYDNEY — Australia, after 

S i of self-imposed isolation 
turbulent world financial cur- 
rants, now wants to become a ma- 
jor banking center in the Pacific 
Basin. 

The task likely wdl take years 
because Australia enters the game 
late against such established rivals 
as Tokyo, Hoag Kong, Singapore, 
San Francisco and Los Angeles. 
Observers predict, however, that fi- 
nancial markets in the region w£D 
become increasingly specia liz e d, 
allowing the continent to carve its 
own niche in, say, commodities or 
certain types erf trade finance. 

After two years of debate under 
a new Labor government, Australia 
in February Tot the first time grant- 
ed full banking powers to 16 for- 
eign financial institutions. 

UJL Joblessness 
Again Increased 
During May 

Reuters 

LONDON — Britain’s un- 
employment rate, excluding 
school-leavers, rose a provision- 
al and seasonally adjusted 3,400 
in May, to 3,179,600, or 13.1 
percent erf the work force, the 
Department of Employment re- 
ported Friday. The jobless total 
was a post-world War Q re- 
cord. 

• InAprikvacmployzaeattose 
a downwardly revised 28^200, 
and also totaled 13.1 percent of 
tbe labor force. 

The unadjusted jobless total, 
which includes people leaving 
school, fell 31,600 in May, to 
3^40,900, or 13.4 percent of. the 
work force. In April, this mea- 
sure of unemployment was 33J5 
percent of amiable workers. 

The secretary of state for em- 
ployment, Tom King, said the 
latest figures support the view 
that last mootns Sharp rise in 
uuenqrfdynKsii was erratically 
high, although the underlying 
trend is Stdl upward. 

Government sources said tbe 
underlying increase in adult un- 
employment is about 10,000 to 
15,000 a month. Adult unem- 
ployment has risen by 11,900 a 
month during the last three 
months. 


The banks, including five major 
US. concerns, are expected to 
pump hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars of new capital into the Austra- 
lian economy in exchange for the 
right to take deposits ana lend di- 
rectly to Australian consumers and 
businesses. 

The payoff for Australia is en- 
hanced stature in world money 
markets that only global banking 
companies can offer. In addition, 
the four major Australian b anks 
that have thrived trader protection- 
ist regulation wdl be allowed to 
expand abroad under retiprotiiy 
agreements. 

Australia’s finance minister, 
Paul Keating, surprised the world 
hanking community by admitting 
16 fbragn banks, after giving indi- 
cations for more than a year that 
only six or seven would be granted 


mated teller machines is some of 
Coles's 1,000 stores next spring. 



meut and business plan. It appears, mated teller mad 
however, that the banks are re- Coles's 1,000 stori 
thinking their Australian ventures Chase Manhi 
m light of the larger-than-cxpectfid New Yor 

freshman class. Guaranty Truss 

One banker said there were even nounced subsumt 
rumors that one or more of the 16 mitments but are 
might choose not to eater the sud- reticent in outlini 
denly competitive Australian mar- plans. It is expect 
keL concentrate more 

Citicorp, the biggest U.S. bank- corporate market 
ing company, said it plans to com- Also admitted 1 
mil $400 million in cmital to its 11 banks from Jap 
new Australian subsidiary. Go- Germany, China, i 


But a larger-than-expectcd $43- 
bflHon surge in the narrowest meas- 
snre of the U.S. money supply — 
M-l — in mid-May has some ana- 
lysts speculating that money 
growth could make it more difficult 
for the Federal Reserve Board to 
cut interest rates. M-l includes 
cash in circulation, deposits in 
checking accounts and non-bank 
travelers checks — money most 
easily available for spending. 

The surge was more than twice as 
large as the $2-bfllion increase most 
analysts had expected and bond 
prices slipped afterwards. 

“You can assume that the Fed is 
not going to ease further at least 
until the June (policymaking) 
meeting," said Elliott Platt, an 
economist for the investment firm 
of Donaldson, Lufidn & Jenrette 
Securities Corp. “It puts Lhear po- 
licy cm hold." 


Japan Says 
Its Surplus 
Widened 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan’s current-ac- 
count surplus widened to $4.13 bil- 
lion in April from $3.46 bdlkm in 
March and $3.51 bdliou in April 
1984, the Finance Ministry said 
Friday. The current account is a 
broad measure that includes trade 
in merchandise and nonmerefaan- 
disc items, such as services. 

The merchandise-trade surplus 
in Aprd narrowed to $4.14 bdliou 
from $4.18 bdHon in March. The 
surplus a year earlier was $3.91 
bdUon. 

The overall balanoe-of-payments 
deficit mew to $1.12 billion from 
$189 mdliQn in March. The deficit 
a year earlier was $1.79 billion, the 
ministiysaid. 

April exports grew 22 percent, 
to $14.72 bdKon from S14J9 bd- 
lion in March and $1428 billion a 
year earlier. 

Imports grew 3.6 percent, to 
S10SS billion in April from $1021 
billion in March and S10J7 billion 
a year earlier. 

The long-term capital-account 
deficit widened to $5.55 bdHon in 


Chase Manhattan, Bankers April bran $5.07 billion in March 
Trust New York and Morgan and $439 bdhon a year earlier. 
Guaranty Trust all have an- April's nomnerchandise-trade 
nounced substantial capital com- balance moved to a $93-mdHon 
mitments but are somewhat more surplus, from a $348-mdlion deficit 


their business in March and a deficit of $288 
that they wdl million in April 1984. The deficit in 


concentrate more heavily on Che transfer payments narrowed last 
corporate market month, to $102 mdlion bran $377 

Also admitted to Australia were million in March and $114 zmDiou 
11 banks from Japan, Britain, West a year earlier. 


new Australian subsidiary, Gti- Germany, China,' Canada and New The short-term capital account 

bank LuL, and open as many as 50 Zealand. showed a 5314-million deficit in 

branches nationwide. Many other big foreign banks ApriL In March, it had a 5881- 

Bank of America, pursuing a have had a presence in Australia million surplus, and in April 1984 a 
broader retail strategy, plans to for years, generally operating $6 38-miHion deficit, 
fund its Australian unit at about through consumer-finance compa- Japan’s exports to the United 


.... 

. vss** 


16 foreign banks, after giving mdi- Paul Keating sumer market in strength through Los Angeles-based Security Pa- earlier, mainly because of car sales, 

cations for more than a year that an association with Australia's dfic, for example, has provided they said. Led by shipments of steel 

only six or seven would be granted “css opportunities emerge tor largest department store c hain, corporate- finance services through and television sets, exports to Gn- 

Hcenses. The resulting scramble for bankm, GJ. Coles & Co. BA Australia Lid. its Security Pacific Australia Ltd. na more than doubled, they said, 

markets by the big banks could Pe^le win make a decision cm m begin installing auto- unit since 1970. (Reuters, UPI} 

take some of the fun out of opening where they can operate as they wish 


fund its Australian unit at about 


$100 mdlicm but to attack the con- Dies or merchant-banking offices. 


Japan’s exports to the United 
States rose 12_5 percent from a year 


Los Angeles-based Security Pa- earlier, mainly because of car sales, 


up a new amrineni. from a regulatory point of view. 

“AD the banks who applied were Singapore is still highly regulated; 

v«, Hnno knno murh less so Ausrra- 


canght by surprise,” said Ken 
Swan, senior victrtireskleat of Aus- 
tralia & New Zealand Banking 
Group Ltd. and manager of its Los 
Angeles office 

“We’re ai a point where the 
banks have been allowed in but 
haven’t started operating. You’ll 
see a considerable change in the 
Australian market over the next 
year, but how it all evolves, only 
time wdl tell,” be added. 

. Mr. Swan said his bank wel- 
comed the foreign competition be- 
cause it was linked to deregulation 
<rf the dom estic hanking industry. 
Most interest-rate codings were lift- 
ed and limitations on tending vol- 
ume relaxed. He said Australia’s 
future as a major regional banking 
center depends in large measure on 
tiie direction of the government's 
deregulation efforts and what busi- 


HongKong, much less so. Austra- 
lia soil is in the process erf deregu- 
lating,” Mr. Swan said. 

To be granted a license, a foreign 
bank had to specify its intended 
capitalization, local equity involve- 


To Our Readers 

Some Friday statistical data 
is missing from this edition be- 
cause of serious technical prob- 
lems at Reuters. 


REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA 
MIN1STERIO DE OBRAS Y SERVIOOS PUBUGOS 
SUBSECRET ARIA DE ENERGIA HIDROELECTRICA Y TERMICA 



On the French Riviera 

THE ONLY FRENCH 
CASINO WITH A FULL 
COMPLEMENT OF 
FEMALE DEALERS 


Markets Closed yo 

Financial markets were dosed Friday m South Africa for a holiday. . 


Gold Options 



WUteWeW&A. 

LOttlttMattlhK 
1111 Gram tSwfcwrirai 
TcK. 31® 51 - Tdm 2*3*5 



RES IN DBP 

An Account for the Cautious Investor 
to Protect and Increase Capittd 

US. DoBar Denominated 
Insured by US. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute Confidentiality 

CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
• AND TRUST 


Loews 

LaNapoule 

aHau) 8 Guano 

fiw minute drive 
from d o win o wu Cannes, 

- on the beach 


11 



RESIN DEP 

Casa Postale 93 

1271 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus and 
account application to: 


Address. 


wetmotmUSA. 


S.A. 

HH3ROELECTTBCA NORPATAGONJCA SOOEDAD ANON1MA 

ALICOPA COMPLEX 

PIEDRA DEL AGUILA PROJECT 
PREQUALIFICATION OF FIRMS 

Subcontract No. 730/ 1 and contract No. 750 

HIDRONOR S_A. will coD lenders fa- the design, manufacture, tran sportation, erection, testing and 
putting into operation oh 

Subcontract No. 730/ 1 

“Penstocks and Botton Outlet Linens” 

— Four (4) 9.00 m, diam. and 111 m. long penstods^ partially embedded, and ax 140 m. head 
(design pressure). 

— Three (3) 4JOO m. dam. and 75 m. Jong bottom outlet liners. 

Contract 730/1 has got partial finenring from Inter-American Development Bank. 

Contract No. 750 

“Bottom Outlet Gates' 1 . 

— Three (3) 4.50 m. x 3 m. maintenance gates, 110 m. max. head 

— Three (3) 4JS0 m.x 3 m. operation gates, 710m. max. head. In both asses, embedded pieces, 
servomechanisms and control systems are included 
Contract 750 has got partial financing from Inter-American Development Bank. 

(n connection with these tenders HIDRONOR SA will receive and consider relevant information of 
firms or youp °f faras with adequate technical and financial capacity interested in s u bmitt in g tenders 
for these works. 

Relevant data on HIDRONOR SA and the PIEDRA DEL AGUILA Project, and the procedures to be 
followed for the submission of the above mentioned information and references, can be found m the 
prequafificaKon documents, which may be purchased by the interested firms as from May, 27th, 1985, 
at HIDRONOR offices, Av.LNAJem 1074 -4th. floor- 1001 Buenos Aires, Rep. Argentine!, Tbe. 
Na 22240 HINOfiAR, from 10 am to 1 pun. 

Their prices are; 

■ Subcontract No. 730/1, $a 150,000.— or US. $300.—. 

• Contract No. 750= $a 150,000.— or US* 300.-, 

Information and references of interested firms or groups of firms, will be received at HIDRONOR 
offices, Av. LM Aiem 1074 • 4th. floor - 1001 Buenos Aires, Rep. Argentina, up to: 

July 26th, 1985, 11 am, for Subscoptract No. 730/1. 

July 26th, 1985, 3 pm, for Contract No. 750. 


.wtuv 


















Page 10 


CVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


Friday^; 

MSE 

Qosoig 

Tablet include the Mttoflwicte prices 
up ta the closing an Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


It Month 

HWln 


Stock 


Sts. Ckwo 

Dtv. YM. PE lOteHlah Low Quot. Chw 


(Continued from Page 8) 


>9 5% Omnen 

19% 1M Oneida JO SJ 9 

»% 2 0% ONEOK XU 7J it 

26% 19% OrmRk 204 7J 9 

137k 7% Orange J3t 49 14 

20% 19% OrtonC M 19 

ITU Bh OrlonP 37 

31% U Orion Pt 175 94 
31% IM OiltMM A4 27 IS 
33% 17% OvmTr 72 13 17 
19 13 OvSMn JO U IS 

37 25% OwenC 130 it f . 

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15'i 1(K*> Oxford .44 14 12 1144 13«4 im 13 


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+ % 


.16 

1.12 

J2 


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Eb IS PHH JO U 1} 

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19% 12V Poprett JO 
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23V 131k PovCsh 
W 6V, PnMy 
IV Penaa 
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27V 20V PoPL .. 

31 3Wk PaPLnt 440 123 
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25V 20 PaPLdpr240 114 
28% 22V PaPL«hMX2$ 110 
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96V 01V PoPL or 11 J0C 114 
M Silk PoPL pr (LOO 1X1 
B V 581k PoPL pr 5.70 124 
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148 


2J6 

236 


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a 31V 20V 21V + V 
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370*95 95 95 — V 

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12 Month 
Hid, Low 


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Dhr. Yld. PE HMteHtoW Low Dual. Qi~00 


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95V 62V PhllMr 
75 KM Phllpln 


2X 


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34 23V PteNG 

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141 50% SO 50% — V 
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50 107V 107% 107V +2V 

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65V 51 PSEGpf 7X0 11.1 
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4V 2V PubllCfc 

13V BV Puebla .16 IX 
9V 41* PR Com 

15 «% PuoefP 1J6 11.9 

21% 101k PuiToHm .12 .7 

36'k a% Purutof 16 48 
10% SV Pvro 


lia MV 25% 26V + V 
199 11% 13% 13% — V 

353 42% 42V 42V — V 

1 85 85 85 +1 

589 12 11V 12 +V 

354 13V 12% 13* + V 

bo 8% av sv 

74 9% 9V 9V + % 
— .. 367 17V 17 17 — % 

33176 12M M 29V 30 + V 

X 12 1160 IIV 11% 11V— V 


a ij 14 
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60 33 31 
160 
X0 


ivn iyn — v« 

% E+a 

7% 7% + V 


69 20V 20V 30V 
27 17V 17V 17V + % 
644 20V 20V 20V + V 
7 24% MV 24% + V 
45 34V 33% 34 - % 
32 33V av 33V + % 

43% 42% 43% 

38V 38th 38V 

22V 22% + V 
27 38% 37% 38% + V 
13 4249 17V 16% 17V- % 
327 363 30V 29th 30% + % 
48 13 1365 54 53V 53V— V 

26 21 444 15% 15V 15V 
36 9 S3 39V MV 39V +!V 
404 22% a 22% + % 
108 63V 63V 63V— V 
11 19% 19V 19V— % 
8 1678 7% — 

134V 7V, 

6001 7V . _ 

28tfa 44% 44% 44% — % 
8001 99V 99 59% +1 

200z 54 53V 54 + V 

ICte 61 61 61 +1 

3 3441 4 V 3V 4V + V 

500* 9V 9 9V + V 
M 10V 9V 10V + V 
a 14% 14V 14% + % 
a 13 12V 13 +% 

S 12% 12V 12V + V 
11% 11% + V 

55 12 11V 12 +% 

9 658 24V 24% 34V + % 
810391 31% 30V 31% 

7 13% 13V 13% + V 
300x 36% 36V 36V + % 

500z 40 40 40 +1 

10008 47V 47V 47V + V 
33 30% 19V 30% + V 
3190* U% 59% S9%— % 
13 22V 72 32 + % 

10x104 104 104 +1V 

10167 a 67 +1V 

150x 69V 69V 69V 
21501 66th 66V 66V + % 
250z 66V 66V 66V +1V 
7301 HV 85^ MV +1V 

S M 11V 11% 11% 

S 6 6V 6M 6V — V 
I 637 16% 14V 14% + V 
14 2584 17% 17 17V— V 

a 320 26% 25% 36% +1 
7 1M 7V 7% 7% 


49'k av OuokO ■ 1J4 XS 14 2363 50% 49% 50V +1% 

S% IS QuohSO 80 M 34 155 21% 31 21V + V 

11% ft** Ouone* 34 274 9 8% OV + % 

34% 73 Oumtor 1X0 4.9 10 109 Bh 32V 32V + % 

25% 14 Ok Rett J40 1.1 17 74 23% 22% 22V + % 


16% 

6% RBlnd 

041 

J 

88 

M 

8% 

44 

29% RCA 

104 

24 t: 

7714 

43V, 

42 

19% 

79 RCA pf 

3X0 

9J 

200* 37 

37 

too 

71 RCA Of 

40D 

40 

II 

99 

97% 

32% 

24% RCA of 

213 

47 

12X5 

31% 

31% 

3*b 

29% RCA pf 

165 

9J 

9 

37% 

J7 

9% 

6% RLC 

■20 

28 10 

198 

7% 

7% 

4% 

18% 

3 RPC II 
12% RTE 

X6 

37 10 

354 

94 

J% 

18% 

3% 

17% 

11% 

7 Bodies 


9 

175 

11% 

11% 

45 

25% RolsPur 

1J0 

22 16 

3572 

46% 

45 

S'. 

5<i Romod 


U 

4162 

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6% 

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16’- Ranco 

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47 ,0 

9 

17% 

17% 

11 

66 

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47‘a Ravcm 

44 

7 30 

221 

64 

3% 

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60% 

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48% 

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34% Rayfhn 

IJO 

34 16 

11 

1559 

10 

47% 

9% 

47% 

11% 

7% RroOBI 

40 

43 

530 

9% 

8% 

■31 

16% RUBal pf 212 

114 

221 

18% 

18% 

166. 

9% RflRef 

ixse 97 10 

18 

13% 

13% 

17% 

9 RfKnEe 


11 

242 

9% 

9% 

17% 

7% Ream, 

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3J 15 

167 

8% 

7% 

", 

7% Reece 


21 

9 

8% 

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1% 

41% 

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23 RricfiC 

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20 II 

47 

% 

41% 

% 

40% 

8% 

3% RipAIr 


II 

6153 

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■% 

7 

i;% 

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4% RpGvai 

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260 

275 

1% 

10% 

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144 

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36 

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45% 


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42V + % 
33 —Ilk 
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7% — % 
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44V +1% 
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9%— V 
8 

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% 

41 — % 

8V + % 
]% 

10 V— % 



PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Oviloa X SHIke 
Undertime Price Call*— Lasl 

Jim sen Dee Jim Sep Dec 
I2J80 BrtlhJi Pauads-ceaf* per unit. 


B Pound 

100 

r 

r 

r 


0.15 


13.08 

105 

r 

24 J0 





178.98 


10.10 






13.08 

115 

1180 

UJO 

r 

005 

1X0 

275 

139B 

13 

9.10 

1000 

r 

0.05 

240 




400 

700 

1X0 

0X0 



1308 

130 

135 

495 

6.00 

2JS 



1398 135 030 265 <00 

SUM Canadian DaUarxeati per anil. 

r 

r 

r 

CDallr 

70 

r 

r 

r 

r 


0X0 

7296 

72 

r 

1X0 

r 


0.68 


72.9* 

73 

0X7 

075 

r 

ajB 


1X1 

72?6 

74 

r 

UJO 





?296 

* « 

r 

0X1 

r 

r 

r 

r 


62X00 west German MorhxwiK per unit. 


DMark 

3 

460 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

3778 

39 

160 

r 

r 

t 

r 

r 

3278 

3B 

2®D 

105 

r 

r 

023 

r 

3278 

31 

1X0 

r 

r 

cun 

041 

0*7 

K.3 

32 

0.94 

1.7» 

r 

Wl 

072 

r 

0 3 

23 

0X6 

1X3 

1.3 

tus 

r 

r 

323 

34 

007 

0J7 

1X1 

r 

r 

r 

327# 

35 

as i 

0X3 

0X2 

r 

r 

r 


T2SJ08 Freed, Frana-IBIM of a cent per unit. 
FFranc 105 r r r 0J5 

107J1 110 0XS r r r 

< 75X000 Japanese Yen-lMth* ot a cent per onlf, 
JYm a r r r r 

»« a 087 IJO 

39.90 40 021 0J9 

>9.90 41 0JR 060 

3990 a t OR 

19.90 43 f 019 

6X3M Swiu Froao-cenls per unit. 

SFronc a f 4J7 

an 36 r r 

an 3? ix6 r 

an a ia r 

an v 0J3 1J8 

a«8 40 0.17 1JU 

an 4i ojm oa 

Tonrt CPU *ot IL5BS 

TOVI pufvpl. 7,913 

r — noi traded, s — W> odtien offered. ft-Od 
lbsi is premium lourcncseortaiJ. 

Sou'cv ap. 


0.04 

r 

IJ4 


OJM 

0.10 




034 


0.93 

IJO 


032 

053 

1.30 


Can open mi. 231x03 
Put open bit. 164 x0b 


50% 35V SCM 
12% BVSLIndS 
a 19V 5PSTcc 
32V IS Sabine 
22 16 SabnRi 

18% IIV 3 ted Os 
10 SV StBdSc 

7th 1% SftdSwt 

34% 21% SafKin* 

34V 31% Satwy 
MV MV Soup 
22V 16V SIJPLP 
11V 9 SPOUf 

10V 3th vlSelem 

34V 22% SdUlleM ... .. 

54 50V SOllM pt X99e 7J 

27% 17% SDIcGs 224 8J 9 
9V a% 5JuanB J*e 98 11 

11% BV SJuanR 33 

51 31 Samir J6 

2SV 18% SAnrtRt 1-94 
30% TXPA SFeSoP 1-DQ 
41 36V6 SaraLee 1X4 


2J00 42 T3 134 48V 47% 48Vk + V 

22 2.0 10 26 H 10V 11 + V 

JO 16 U 153 30% 29th 30% + V 

04 J 32 2187 16% % 16V 

3Jleli9 284 17M 16V 17 - V 

20 L9 15 75 16 lgk 1»- V 

n IQ fh M 9th + V 

U Ih Ih 1% 

X0 US 704 33 32% 32V 

1X0 SJO 10 J47S 32V 31th 33 

S2 1.9 11 21 27% MV 77 


IJT U 
120 107 


.16 J 15 



140 

44 

14 

131 

18% 14% SouIRE 

XO 

1.1 

46 

18 

22% 14% SavElP 

140 

77 



12 f«h SavEBf 

1X8 




9% 4% Savin 





27% 17% SCANA 

ZM 




46% 33 5riirPto 

148 

37 



50% 34% SdMmb 

1X0 

33 


5757 


4- V 

21V 21V 21V— V 

31 11% 11V 11% 

61 5V 5V 5V— V 

879 30V 30 30V + th 

533 53V 53 53 — % 

440 37 26V 27 + % 

M 9Vk 9* 9V 

_ 41 10V 10% 10V + V 

IX IS 3123 34% 33% 34% — V 

BA 13 44 24V 23% 24M— % 

34 Ik 10031 ZV 27V 2M +1V 
15 11 WB 4IM «0V 4&tt- % 

30V 30V 30V + Ml 

18 17V 17V— V 

21 20V 20V + V 

11V 11% 11% 

7V 7%h 7V + V 


a% 37% a — v 

11V 11% 11% — V 

911 31V 30V 31V + % 

B4 59 58V 59 

B53 38V 37V 38V + V 

111 14% 14 14V— V 

31 41V 41Th 41V 

a 37 36V 36V— V 

14 12% 12 12% 

a I6M 15% 16 

16% lJM, SooCnfCilO 1X2 B 14 'SJ 

27V 14V SeaLnd M 2X 7 3070 20V 19M 20V + V 

5V 3V SeaCO 46 4% 4V 4* _ 

44V 30 Seoorm JO 1.9 10 1784 4»l«}flh + h 
21V 12V Seoaul 18 195 18% 17% 18V + Vk 

28% 19% SeolAIr X0 IJ H 421 MV 25V 26 

32V 19% 5ealPw 1-00 19 B 1S8 25% 25% 25V + V 

65V 39 SeorfeG IJO 18 16 2016 54% 53V 54M — V 

38V 29% Sean 1-76 4j 1019542x 30% a 38% + % 


13% 7% SdAII .12 1.1 17 

32V »V Scoolnd 31 24 13 

feOV 48% ScotFet 10 

39% 25% ScottP 1J4 U 10 

16V 11V ScetlYk J2 X7 11 

43% 20M Scovlll 14 

45 av SeoCnt X2 1.1 9 

12V 9% SeeCtpt 1X6 11.9 

16th 12V SeeC pfS X10 1X1 


30X03% 102V 103% + % 
110S 20V 28V 28V 
14 17V 17% 17V 
822 a 34V 34V + V 
364 14% 13V UVh + V 
87 24 23% 23V + V 

U 40 59V 57% + V 

79 36M 35V 34V + V 

414 av a au 

475 39% 39V 39V 
99 4M 6% 6V + V 
7 13% 13V 13V 
147 18 17V 17V 


106V 97 Seonpf 9820 9.5 

aV 19 5ccPocs TJ4 -L6 7 

20V 11% SelpLI 
MV 24V SvCCp b X 0 LI 17 

18V 11V Shokiee 75 11 34 

25V 11 Shawln X0 25 8 

60 52V ShellO UO 3J 11 

38% 28V ShellT 1J70 Sl5 

30% 17% She Ida J) U i 

39V 24 Shrwin .92 2J 14 

8% 4V Shaefwn 6 

17V 12 Showbt X0 4X 14 

18% 12% SlnrPad 1XO OJ 8 ... - - - 

41% 24V SHmal IJO 2X 16 4076 41V 40% 41V + V 

62 48% Stall pf 4.12 6J 48 60% 59% 40% + V 

38% 2* S Inoar X0 1.1 9 596 37% 36 36% — 1 

32% 24% Stamp! 3X0 II J 9 31V Bh 31V— V 

18 12% Skyline XS 1 6 3D 191 13V 13% 13V + V 

UV 20% Slattery JOe 12 15 7 25% 25% 25% — % 

19V 9% Smith In 32 U 512 9ft 9% 9% 

70V 5m Smft.B 230 4.1 II 24a 68V 66% 68 +1% 

67V 36% Smuckr 1JB IX 17 32 67% 66 64 — V 

41V 29% Snapon 1.16 XI 13 246 37% 36% 37 — V 

43V 27 Sonat MS 4J 8 1427 38% 37% 38% 

19V 12% SanvCP .168 IJ 13 5250 16V 16V 16% + V 

38>A 22% SooLbi 1J0 43 14 9 28 27V 70 

40% 27% Source 3J0 8J 

73 II SreCPPf 2x0 1X5 

23V 20 SCrEpf 250 10X 

29V 22 5oJerln 2X8 85 11 

49V 41 Soudwn 1J0 23 II 

30V 72 SoafBk U9 41 9 

11 5th SoetPS 1X5I23X 41 
27V 18 SCalEl 234 77 t 

aV 14V SouthCd 1.92 «5 7 

26% 17 SoInG** 1J0 AS 0 

41V 79 SNETI 2J2 6JJ 10 

25 21V SoRypt 2X0 10X 

31 73 SoUnCo 1.72 S.9 

34V 73 Soutmd 1J0 

16V 11% So Roy .12 


72 39% 39 39 

• a 22% 22V 

2 23V 23V 23V 

157 29% 28V 39% + V 

57 43V 43 43 — V 

375 29% 29% 29V— V 

a 7 6% 7 + % 

5508 26V MV 25V 

4225 20% 20V 20% + V 

406 26V 25% 26% + V 

137 39V 39% 39V + V 

18 25 24% M 

76 29V 29% 29V + V 

2J II 3499 35V 33% 35V +1V 
J ffl 807 14V 14V 14% + V 


8V 6% Soumrk JO 11 5 476 6V 4V tVl 
47 Somkof 7JBe144 2 49% 49% 49% 

14% SwAIrt .13 5 16 4025 24V 23V 24% + V 

26 185 12V 12 12V— % 

1.24 75 8 448 17 16V 16V 

too 75 8 1157 80% 79V 80V + V 

52 2J 10 87 2SV 24V 2SV + % 

1JS 8J 9 617 23V 23% 23V + V 

52 4230? 102 12V 13V 12V— % 

240 16V 16 16V + % 

1.92 33 10 4170 50% 51V 51V— V 

152 45 10 IDS 34 33V 31% + V 

154 4.9 10 55a 38V 37V 37V— V 

1-76 25 17 1040 63% 61V 63V +1V 

JO 35 18 2431 av 21 a% + % 

56 17 11 47S 21V aov av + V 

IS 11 
SJ 8 
XI 

II 

37 9 
32 II 
10 10 


20V 11% SwIFor 
17 10V SwtGaa 

80 55 SwBell 

39 19% SwEnr 

24% 17 SwtPS 
17V 11V SPOHon 
37V 15% SpectP 
33% Sperry 
30V Sprlnos 
_ - 31V Souoro 
64V 37V Soulbb 
24V 17% Staler 
22V 16V SIBPnt 

IV 11 SfMotr 

V 39V SWOOfi 

73% SOOh pf 125 

MV 6V SfPacCs 
16% 11V StDndn S3 
lW StanWk 
- - MV Starrotf 
11 8% SteMSe 

3tk 2V Sfecaa 
30% 14% SfercM 
11V 9V Sir I Bo, 
StrBcrf 
nv 23% SleiiDp 
a% 15% StevnJ 

27 SlwWm 1X8 
BV StkVC Pf IJO 


32 

2J0 


13V 12% ITO— V 
47V 


.96 

IJO 


45V 32V StanoW U0 


213 ...... _ 

2384 47V 46% 47V +1V 
140* 73% 73% 73% —I 
283 19V 19V 19V + V 

293 14V 14 14 

380 301k 29V 30V + % 

... . io a a 33 

1200112 19 10V 10V 10M + % 

.12 18 122 3V 3 3V 

.76 18 10 11 19% 19V 19% + V 

26 7.1 9 17 10% 10% 10% 

241 _ — 

16 14 7449 33% 32V 33V +1V 
65 11 183 18V 18V 1BV 

XI 16 92 37V 27% 27V 

8J 20*11% 11V 11% 

19 B 37 41V 41 41 


120 

120 


37 

25 StoneC 

40 

22 10 

245 

27% 

26% 

27% + % 

53% 

35 StaPSfta 

1.10 

23 10 

442 

47% 

46% 

47% + % 

31% 

15% StorEq 

1X4 

X8 15 

202 

'/I 

20% 

20% — % 

12% 

79% 

2 vIStorT 
33% Storar 

40 

9 

1064 

368 

7% 

73% 

2% 

74% 

2% + % 
75% + % 

31% 

18% StrtAAt n 

40, 

21 

28 

10% 

18% 

18% — % 

18% 

14% StrldRI 

XO 

4? 30 

44 

16% 

■6% 

16% + % 

■% 

16% 

1% SuavSh 
21% SunBks 

1X0 

34 12 

11 

369 

5% 

35% 

5% 

34% 

5% 

35% + % 

37% 

24% SunCh 

40 

IX 10 


V 

37 

37 

14 

53 

6% Sum El 

43% SunCo 

230 

46 11 

38 

900 

9 

50% 

8% 

49% 

9 + % 

50% + V5 

ov 

90% SunCnf 

225 

23 

1 102 

102 

02 —3 

49% 

34% Sundstr 

IJM 

40 12 

323x45% 

44% 

45% +1V» 


12 Month 
H tofi Low 


Stock 


Dlv. VM. ftS HteHjgh Lowounfc CJfpe 


28% 16V tWAPfBia H I. |JS 2L S* » + V 
30V 20V Tronam 1XJ *4 13 13U am 29k, mi + V 


av 16% franfitc 122 107 
12% 10% TARt fk UO XI 15 

a 20% TmCAin ? 

S7% 37% rraraco 116D 4.1 10 

66V 45% TmtCPf X87 X2 
25% 19V TranE* 120 HU 
13V 6V Tramp s 

97 80 TrGP* 1032 10J 

24% S TrGP p f 250 HV1 

13% 6% TmsOti ? 

36 U. 70 Tiwnwy 1J0 SJ 9 

19 24V Trnwtd M 

11% 9th TwW wtA 
a% 22V TWW Pf *2 
17% 14% YwWrt 'ik is 
48V 2SV TttWln 104 42 18 
5814 SOM TW« 4,16 « 
27% 19% TrICon , JS 81 !* 
a 20% TrlCnpf 2» X9 „ 
28V 13 Triaind XO IX 30 

31% 30% Trio Pc IJO 
48 24V Tribune 5* _. „ 

bV 4 Trtcnfr X«U 

BV 5% Tried -M 11 15 

37V 13V Trinlv JO 17 

35V 11% TrftEna J0*> * ** 

14V Bth TrilEpt 1.10 &2 
41 Vh 29V TUCSEP 100 7J 10 
15M 9% Til II Of X4 14 IS 

» 16 TWtaiDs JO *7 10 

41 28V TycoUl JO 11 10 

17% 11V Trier* X0 16 8 


M M% 20V 30% + V 
M IMh T2% 1ZM + th 
20% — M 

■21 MV 93V 53V 
33 62% 61% 42 — % 

S *2f “P* — v 

121 9% 9% 9% + V 

490* 95U 95 95% + % 

M M* Mk + £ 

... . aarr* 

12 12 251? 38% 37V 38V + V 
79 30% 20V 20% + V 
11 Jim Sr imh- V 
» W 16V— V 

gg fi* g% <7% * % 
147 5SV St 55V + V 
113 MM V - V 

i a a 28 + % 
44 27V 27 27V + * 

241 26V a% 21V. ~ % 


TJ 17 1232 4SV 44V 44% 

“ I H M M 
as «v oh 4»— v 
149 13V m 13M— % 

109* 24% 23% 23% — v 

747 a% a a +i% 

148 15V 14% uv + v 


u 


49V 32V UAL IAV 15 9M4U 9V 60V S3V +4% 

a% av ual pf 2xo 4f ai5 a 32% a +2V 

KV 7V UCCEL ia MM 13V 14 + M 

£Sh 1«? UGI W 8J ID O 23* ZNk + V 

ink 7 UNCRk 371 10V TOM VU — % 

14 io URS XO U J6 m 11_. 10% 11 + V 

3}% 17V USPG 

38V 22V USCi - — ,, 

19V 13 UfHPrtf 30 IJ 1! 

60% 45 UWIvr 

102% 75 UnlNV 

41% 30V UConrn 


1 J9e X2 9 
52*52 10 
1X4 4X 10 


57M 33% UnCorh 3X0 
19M IS** UnE^K 122 92 
37% Unilpf ia 12J 
54V 39V W"| g **! J'| 
31% 24V gnElPfMAAO 125 
67% 49V UElBfl- Wfi 3H 
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18% 13M UnEI Pf 2.1J 115 
25% 19V UnElflf 272 07 
63 43th UnElpf 7X4 tlJ 
65V 49 UEIpfH ftJJO 1X1 
SV 34% UnPoc IJO 
114V 82 UnPepf 725 


„ U 16 122 11 10% 11 . .. 

ISO 6032 9 1107 36% 75% 36V + V 

1X8 4J 7 657 39 38M 38% + V 

a 13% hv av + v 

2 59% 58% 58% — V 
348 10m 99% 100V +1 V 
4W 33% 3SV 3BV + M 
OX 9 2702 40% 39V 40% + % 
46 5M 5 5% 

9602 MV WV 18% + % 
2001 33 33 S3 —IV 

300* 37% 37% 37% — V 
2670* 55M S3 55U +1M 
a av av av + m 

5000*48 40 « +1% 

394 a 25V a + V 
16 18V 18% 18V 
8 25% 25V 25% 
330*63% S3 «3% + % 
300x 66 45V 66 +1 

XX 12 4187 SIM 49% 5BM + V 
66 35 110 109 109V 


j 73 24M 20% m 30% + V 
1 3% 3% .3% 

11 380 17 16V 16V 

96 16V M% 14V + % 
2 64 Ml 41% 40V 41 + M 

7j 22 4731 av av av— V 


12V 7V SunMn 
36% 24V SunrVI 
45V 19V SupMkf 
17V, 14 Swank 
21V 16V Svbran 
15% 11M SymaCp 
65 38% Svnfe* 

a% 25% Svsco 


65 439 7V 7% 7%— M 

X8 1.9 13 730 34M 35% UU. + % 

X2 .9 13 896 45V 45V 45% 

■TO 5J 14 43 15% 15V 15V— M 

lM M 10 201 18% 18V 18V— % 

30 12 14V 14V 14V + M 

1.92 XI 15 1128 67A 61% 62% 

26 u i6 1113 36V a av— % 


60 36% UV 36% — V 
263 32V 32V 32V 
502 11V, 11% 11V 
a 17M 16V 17 
277 22% 32V 22V + V 


90'i 35V TDK 26e J 17 
MM 24 TECO 2J6 72 9 
13M 7V TGIF 17 

19 1TV TNP 125 7X 8 

25% 17 TRE IJM 4X 15 _ _ 

a v 58V TRW MO 42 10 1191 71V TIM 71U— M 

177Uia TRW Of 4X0 XS 1 156V 1S6V 154V— 1% 

ISO 110 TRW pr 450 3X 4 133 133 IB 

BV 2% TocBoot 332 3V 3U 3V 

77V 52V, ToftBrd 1.12 15 14 5M 76 74V 75V, + Vi 

19V 12 Talley .10* 5 14 so IBV 1B'« 10% — V 

21V 14% Talley pf I JO 4J 28 21 20% 20% + % 

77 44H Tambrd 320 46 IJ in 71 'a 70’i 7DU— % 

3S46 23% Tandy 16 37B0 33V 32% 32V— M 


a 


X92 


ISV 12V Tnovcfr 
«'■* 51V Teklrru 1J0 
5% 2M Telcom 
302V 195V Tekhrn 
24 13’k Tefrale 

48% 21% Tele* 

39lk 25V Temsln 
45U 37M Tennco 
MV- n Terovn 
18% 9V Tesoro XO 
32% 30% Teaorpf 116 
40’-i J1V Texaco XOD 
36% 31'k TxABc 
31V TexCm 
39 av Tax Eat 
MV 25 Tenind 
147% 86% Taxlnif 
3V I Taxlnl 
36% I4'i TexOG* 

39 78% TxPoc 

39V 20% TexUlll 
5 2 TezHin 

5iv Textron IJO 
56% a% Textrpl 2 jM 
l0% 5lk Thacn 
24 14% Therm E 


IJ 


13 
a 

7 
10 
1.7 a 


37 13V I3M T3V + M 
500 SPA 36V 57 — M 

127 3% 3U 3% + V 

471 261V 255% 257% + V 
206 18% 10 18V — V 


43% 28% TnmBI* 1-36 JJ IS 
18V 12% Thom In Mb 4J 9 

26V 13% TtenMed X0 IS 9 

Z7V 14 Thrifty 60 U 13 

MV 17 Tidwfr .Ofl 52 

103V 99% TUwlPflO.lSelOJ 
10V SV Tlperln 
57% 33% Time 

23% 12 Tlmplx 

53% U% TlmoM 

58V 47v* Timken 

+k 4% Titan 
10V 7% Titan pf 

39V, 14% TodShn 
31% 14% Tokhm * . . _ 

10V 13% TolEdls ZS2 142 5 
37% 24% Tel Ed Pi 322 I4J 
2814 32 TolEdpfl7SU4 
»«. 30 TolEdPf 3X7 111 
31V 25V TolEdPf 425 14.1 
10% 13% TolEd Pf 2J6 13.4 
18% 13V TMEtf Pf 221 IU 
45% 13V Tonka 1 20 5 7 

53% 19% TootRoi JSb IJ 15 
52V 19V Trchmk IJO If 14 
I7M 10 ToroCo XO 2J 9 
4M 1 Tosco 
19% 8% Towle 


11 2575 av 19% 39li 

IJ 8 a 14% 341k 14% 

7.1 12 77a 41% 40V 41 — % 

10 539 22% 21% 21% — IV 

19 M3 10% 10 10% + V 

9J 4 23V 23V 23V— V 

BJ 35 2367 34% 36V 36% + % 

IJ! U I 35 32% 32% 32% — % 

1J6 +5 7 312 35 33 35 +]% 

Z20 6J 9 649 35% 34 V 35V — M 

J0t> 2J 14 7A 29V 2B% 28% — Irn 

2J0 2-3 9 1906 HI, 87V 08% +1 

188 2V -% a %_ % 

.18 1.1 10 *610 17V 1*% 17 

M IJ ]1 15 34% MV 34% + V 

2J2 9J 7 4631 28% 27% 27V * V 

14 4V 4% 4V 

35 13 395 S3 51 S1V + V 

37 J MV »V 56V + Th 

99 12 10 9% 9""h — V 

22 V 35 24% 24% + % 


125 37% a% 37 — % 
63 (S'* ISM 15% * % 
141 16% 15V 16% + % 
486 19% 19% 19% + % 
323 17V, 12% 17% — M 
5 101% 101% 101% 

3325 7% 6% 7% + 'k 

IJ 16 5580 S5V 53% 55 +1% 

17 1095 18% 10% 18% — % 
36 16 830 52% 52 52% + V 

72 49% 49 49% + V 

159 SV 8% 8% 

23 10V 1DM 1C% 4- V 

tit 30 28V M +1 Vi 

130 17V 17% 171k + V 

652 17% 17% 17% + % 

IIS 26V 25% a + % 

45 27 MV KM — M 

10 25V, 344b 25V + V 

3 30’- 30% 30% + % 

7 IN* 17% 17V— M 

7 16V I4'A 16V + V 

397 41V; 30% 40% — V 

54 49M 49 4«v— M 

860 4SV 46% 47V— 1% 
SB 14% 14 V 14V— % 

1097 n a 2k 

IS 9 8% B%— % 


IJO 


IJ6 _. . 

1 JOo 36 IS 

IJO «J 
IJ2 *X 1 
37 10 


38V 23% ToyRU * 30 35M 40 371* 39% +1V 

35% l*V Tracer 24 i.i 13 -an 30V MM— % 

1SV 7% TWA 76 6502 19 18V IBV + V, 

lj% 11V TWA pf 125 152 213 MV l4tk 14% + M 


Sam Mourn we unaHIcld. YearW titan ana laws ref lea 
me Previous 52 weeks Plus the current week, but not the Wesl 
traaino aov. Where a spin or nock UixKMttd omnunling to 25 
percent or more has been paid, me veer 's tush- low range end 
dividend are shewn tar the new stack only Unless otherwise 
noted, rates oi dividends arc chrugI disbursements based on 
me lafesl declaration. 

a — dtvMiend alia exirais). 5— onnuoi rale of dividend plus 
aeck dividend, c — llauldailng ciividena da— called, a — 
new yearly low.e— dlwiaenddedaredor pa «m preceding 12 
months. 0 — dividend In Canadian funds. *vbi«f la 13V 
non- residence ta*. I — dividend declared offer splli-ua or 
stack dividend.! —dividend paid mil voar.omirtea. defer rea. 
or no dcfion taken at latest dividend meeting, k — dividend 
aeciared or paid inn year. cr. accumulative issue with divi- 
dends in or rear*, n — new Issue In the past S3 week s. The nioft- 
low ranee begins with me start of Iredino. no — n**i day 
deilvrrv P/E — orice-eammas ruiio. r— dividend declared 
arPOHfin preceding I? months, plus slock (HvidernLs — stock 
jam. Dividend wains wirn note of soilf . sis — safes, t— divi- 
dend paid in slock In preceding 12 mantra, asumaied cash 
-olue on OK-dluidand or gx -distribution date, u — now yearly 
high, v — trading halted, vi — in bankruotever receivership 
or being reorganised under the Bankruptcy Act. or securities 
assumed bv such companies, nd — when distributed. *f— 

wnen issued, ww — with werrams. > — ex-divuena or ev- 
rlobt*. ndis — ex-dislribuMon. *«x — wlthaui warrants, v — 
eyxilvioend and sales in full, via — yield. I — tales m tell. 


20% 9% Ufllrwi .18 

5% 3U UnHDr 
17 1DM UnBrnd 
16% 9% UBrdPf 

40Vk 20% UCbTTV .M 
33% 22% unEnrg 2X8 
17% 9 U litem 2J0 1 12 

28% 19% UllhiPf 397 14.1 

rr 11% uiihipf 320 133 

14Vi 10 UlltePf 1J0 1+5 

231b 14M uniflnd 60 2.9 

43 23 i/nlMnn 22 S 

42 26 UJerBk 126 38 

lev 9% UfdMM 
2% 2M uPkMn 
38V, 22 UJOlrG 
VM 5M uSHom 
42M 29Vi USLXW 

38% 23 UJShoe 

29% 22 ussteat 1J0 15 

135%115% USJfl pr 12J5 97 ,. 

» 22% USStl P( 2-25 74 204 29% 29% 29Vb + V. 

39% 31% USTob 172 +4 13 1178 3TVi 33 37V. + % 


XW 16% 16 1«h + % 

51 38% 27% J8M+1H 
4DOz 17 16M 16 Vt — % 

M I3M 13 13M + M 

B 321 20th 19% SOM + V 
16 10 42% -fifth 42% + % 

9 13 41% 41 Vh 41th — M 

0 44 12% 12% 13% 

1 3 2% 3% 2V— M 
B 25BB 35V 33% 34% + % 

120 8% 8M 8M + M 

231 35% 34% M — M 
22 15 90 38% 38% 38% + M 

» 1840 28% 28M 38% + M 
20 132% 131% 131% —1U. 


.12 

jo u a 


9 

64 12 
9 15 
4.1 7 
A 17 
3l9 12 
47 7 
3X 


78% 55% U5West 532 73 I 846 
13 6 UStckn 

45 29M UnTech 1X0 3J 

39% 28% UTehPf L55 &J 

24% 17% UrtTd 172 U> 

21 14Vk UWRl U8 

Uh 21 IA unlfrda JO 

21 IA 14% Untvnr JO 

a 7V, unvDev .15 
27% IBM UnlvFd IJM 

23% 15% UnLiwf IJO 

S3 X UnocU 1JD 

HV 32% unoclwd 

113% 45 UPlohn 2L5& ZX 

43 23% USLIFE 1J4 3J 

10'* 8% U Site Fd IJ40l«U 

25V 20% UtaPL 2J2 95 

77 21V UtPLPf 2J0 10J 

27% 21% UlPLpf 2.90 11 J 127 

22% 17% UtPLPf 236 II J 10 

19% 15V UfPL pf 2JM 10B 6 

26% 15% Utl I ICO 1 J2b TLB 7 19 

21% 17% UtHCdPf 2X4 117 2 

23% 18% UIHCopr 2X1 114 1 

35 29% UIHCopf 4.12 12.1 II 


78 77 78 + % 

161 7 6% 7 + M 

9049 46 42Vb 43% +1M 

1408 38 37 37% +1 

470 23V 23% 23V + % 
7 20% 20% 20V— M 

107 23% 22% 23M + % 
55 19% 19% 19% 

277 24V 23V, 24V— V 

108 27 26M 27 + V 

125 Z1H 21 21K— M 


Hlh 36% 26% + % 
31% 21% 21V— M 
1>V 18V 18V— M 
23M 22% 22% — % 
71% 21% 21% + % 
22% 22% 22% + % 
a a a 


38% 21% VF Corn 1.12 2J 10 933 39 37 38% +1 

12V 5V Valera 1230 12V 11th 11%— % 

23V 16 Voter Pt 3X4 15.1 61 23 22% 22*4 

4M 2% VaKvIn 
28% 19 VonDrs 

4M 2% vara, 

13V SV Vorconf 
46 vh 27V varlan 
13% ?v, vara 
25% 19 veaco 
8% 3V Vetstto 
11 8% VestSe 

46% 25 M Viacom 


45 av> voEPpf SJO llx 
0 54 VaEPpf 7JT2 1TX 

79 MW VaEPpf 8J4 11 J 
H 6BW VaEPpf 975 UJ 
0 52Vk VoE pf J 772 11.1 
64% 49M VaEPPf 770 I1X 
68% 51% VaEPpf 7X5 I1X 
73 IIV Vlshay s 
41% 70 Varnad 
78 MM VuicnM 2J0 


33 7% 2V, 2% + M 

3 22V, 22 22M 

16 3 2V 2V— M 

20 9Vr 9W 9Vh 

J 15 1357 31% 30W 31 — M 

4J 13 32 10 9V 10 + M 

10 20V, 3S 20M— Vk 
31 7Vh 7% 7Vh + Va 

48 11M 10% It- + M 

854 46% 45% 4599— V 

20* 43% 43% 43% + % 

36001 69% 66th 64W— 2M 
3660; SOM 77 BOW +3M 

100z 86 86 B6 +1 

5000* 69% 69% 69% + % 

sum. 65 63 63 

rate 64% 64% 64% 

15 77 22W 22M 22M + V, 

II 22 41 . 41 41 — M 

3J 11 37 74 73% 74 + M 


93 4.1 6 


J6 

X0 .. 

X0 3J 14 
150 

17001 07 
X2 .9 20 


Mf 


sj a 

27 11 
37 


17 17 

3X U 

3X 14 
7J 0 


29% 22 WlCOR 270 
»V 21M Wochv s 1J0 
25% I6M Woehlrt X0 
10% 6% Walnoc 

52% 35% WalMri 78 
79 14% Walorns 

23M 15V WkHRSBlXO 
38W » WalCSv XS 
37M 22 Wattlm 1X0 
50% 29M WoltJp* U0 
2SV 17% Women M 
MW 17 WntCm 
42% MV Womrt- 1X8 
«% 14% washGi 1X6 
a% 15V WkHNat 1 JB 47 
23 16 WshWI 2X8 11.1 

27% waste .92 IX 1' 
_ TO watkjn 
12V, 4 WeanU 
23% 12% WebhD 70e 9 IS 
40 29V WeHMk 70 1 J 14 

59Vh 30V WeUsF 2X0 4J 8 
49M 40 WefFpf 4J7elOJ 
ffl% 22V WeiFM 2J0 10X 12 

18V 10V Wendy* 31 

27% 16% WestCa .44 

43V 34V WstPtP 270 57 II 

13M 9% WstCtT g IJM 81 

7 2V WnAIrL 86 

2 % WtAlrwt 

22 8% WAirpf 200 97 

22% 8% WAirpf 2.14 9X 

I0M 4 WCHA 
1HM 92 WPacI 
24% 5% WUdlon 

»■ 24% WnUnpf 

8% 2% WnUPfS 

15M 4V WnU PfE 

a 5M WUTlPfA 

35% 19% WsIPE 170 

41% 31V wesivc 

a 25V, woven. 


14 2BV 28% 28 V + V 
260 37 36% 37 + V 

115 18% 18% 1S%— % 
121 8% TV 8 — V 

J 27 3115 52% 51% 52V + % 
19 482 28V a 28% + M 


44V 34% Weyrpf 2J0 

51V 43% Wovr pr 4X0 vx 

92 77 WhelLE 575 6X 

24M 6% vlwnPtt 
» 10W vlWnFIIPf 

49W 36V Whirl Pi 2J0 44 

32W 24th WhltC U0 5,4 

41 W 36V WhlfCPtOJO 77 
31 17V Whltehl 

25M 14M Whittok 
12% 6% Wlebldt 
MV 8 wiifrd n 


__ 1267 57M 56M 57 — V 

76 IX II 915 27 26V 24V— V 

25 4% 6 m + % 

548 21V 21V 21V— M 
» 39% 38V 38V + M 
147 59V S9M 59V, + M 
100 48M 48M 48M + M 
51 27 36% 36V— M 

1.1 » 3143 19 18% IBM + M 

17 15 0 25V 25V 25% — V 

682 38% J7W 38V + V 
51 12V 12M 12V + % 

7541 6V 6M 6V + M 

251 2 IV IV— M 

6 21V Z1M 21V + M 
82 SV 21V 22V + M 
9M 6V 6M 6V 

9 125V 124% 125V + V 
m isia io% lov 
5 32M 31 31 — M 

44 4% 4% 4V— V 
116 9% 9M 9% 

12 low io% in* 

35 11 6356 34V 33V Jm + Vh 
172 34 9 449 38V 3BM 38V 
170 45 19 2050 29% 2SM 2HV — M 


10 


31V 22% William 1X0 45 
SV, 2 WllHlEI 
8M 4 It WllkhrO 
36% 25% WlnDIx 
30% 7% Wlmtbo 
13% 5Vb Winner 
7% 3% Winter J 

38% 24% WIscEP 2X8 67 
07 68V WISE pf arm 185 


14 42% 42% 42% 

32 SO 49% 50 + % 

10* 90 90 TO 

40 8 TV B + % 

200* 15V, 15% ISM + M 

9 544 45% 44% 45M + M 

193 a 27M 27V 

3 41% 41% 41% 

11 33 a 27V a + % 

X0 77 IT 1166 22V, 21V 22% + M 

47 8 9% 9% IV 

12 16 12M 11V 12 + M 


| UpSp Futures May31 


Secant Season 
Utah LOW 


Open man Law Oam CM. 


Grains 


WHEAT f CRT) 

5000 bu minimum- doitaraptrbiafM] 

350 3.12% Jui XMM 117 114 IIS 

374V. 115 Sep 3.18% 3.18% 116% 117M 

3X3M 118 DM 378 3a 37S* 177% +JMh 

374th 377% Mar 378% 379% 377M 379 +JCM 

4JS 3.16 May 117 3.17V, 116 116 —03 

37792 275 JuJ 277 279M 277 279 — JIVh 

Est.Sota* Prav. Satan 8799 

Prav. Day Open Ini 39X30 offUU 
CORN (CBT) 

SJOObu mini mufiMleiiars per budwl 
Ul 272 Jill 274 214% 273 274M +JI% 

371 ih 256% Sep 159 159 257% 251% +59% 

255 251% DM 255 2JHM 253% 254% +J0V 

3.10 2X0% Mar 2X3% 2X4% 2X3 ZX3 

171% 264V, May 2X< 2X8% 267 267V, 

2M 2X4M Jui 267% 2X8% 267% 2X7% +J0V 

2B6M 251% Sep 253 253% 253 2X3Vh +J1 

E*L Sales Pnev.SbiM 20J44 

Pr». Day Open lnLT02J64 uoIX36 
SOYBEANS (CBTl 
L Obu minimum- doliars par bushel 
7.99 SL56Vi Jul 5X5W 570M 5X3M 5X7V, +M 

756 554 Aug S59M 5X5 559 5X1% +J» 

471 551 Sup f Wi 5X0% 555 SJ9 +J5 

6X0 554 Nov SJSffla 5X4Vh 558 VS 5X2 +J«6 

679 5X4M Jon 5X9 574 5X9 572V, +JBk 

7X2 575 MOT SJO 5J4 SJO 3.8SVS +J» 

779 U3Vh MOV 5J0M +J6M 

658 $J8Vh Jot 5.94V, 577 594 +J6M, 

Ett. Sales Prev. Sales 34jio 

Prav.DovOPeninL 65019 uoL792 
SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT) 

lUtonB-doflonpertan 

19650 117X0 Jul 119J0 12170 119 J0 119.90 +170 

18800 120X0 Aua 12130 124.10 12210 12270 +170 

17950 1231ft Sap 12470 127 JO 12430 12530 +1J0 

18050 12650 Oct 127 JQ 1295D 127 JO 128J0 +1X0 

184J0 131X0 Dec I33JHS 13SJ0 TABS 133.90 +170 

163J0 i34sn Jan 136J0 mm imjsj +ijb 

20650 I39J0 Altar 14150 14250 MUO 14U» +1X0 

16250 May 147J0 T47J0 Mtstl 14630 +78 

10JO 148J0 Jui 15200 152JH 15UN 15050 

Est. Sales Prav. Saids 8564 

Prav. Day Ogwi Hit. a X9» UP 351 

SSSErUBUSS^Bn 

3272 2270 Jui 3032 30X2 30J0 3007 -^15 

3175 2250 Aua 29J0 2970 28J2 28J7 —.09 

31.10 2250 SOP 28JO 28.10 27 JO 2772 — -04 

3057 22W Oct 2675 27.10 24J0 26J5 —05 

395 5 22.90 DtC 2570 36.10 25X4 2576 +J6 

29J7 23X0 J«i 2550 2570 25X3 2555 +J3 

mxo 2440 Mar 7500 7590 2475 25.10 +.12 

27X5 24X0 Mar 2459 2458 2455 24S 

25.15 2430 Jui 24X0 24X0 2438 24X2 +J9 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales 17J62 

Pruv. Day Open Int. 59X29 off 424 
OATS f CBTl 

SJOOtHj minimum- dollars per bushel 
138M 1X7% Jul 1X9 I5T 1X9 150% +JXt% 

179 1X7M See 1X8M 150 1XIM 150 +J1M 

1J2W LSflk Dec 153% 154% 153% 154M +J1M 

1X7% 1X1 Mar I58W 158% 15BM 158% +J1% 

1X3 1X3 May 1X1 +J1 

EsLSales Prev. Sales 492 

Prev. Dav Dean mt. 2775 off a 



Season Season 
High Low 


LOW 


lOOJOO 

Ian 13670 
14230 
lM5e 177JS 
eft satai 49ft PftViSrtP M 
prev. Dav Open Int. SJ45 upW 


Oera Htarii 
HMD MOST 14070 14030 


136X0 Jan Miff Sm ijojo +1XU 

moo Mar 1»J0 14QJB JJgg +LM 

— “ MOV 14QJ0 +I.M 

Jut MOJO +M5 


Metals 


COPPER CCOMEX) 
25X00 Ibkcwb per *>. 


6U5 

8835 


61J5 
57 JO 


Jun 

Jul 

Aua 

Sen 

Dae 

Jan 

Mar 

M ay 


4070 51.15 


4130 

62J0 

6285 

83X0 

4400 


6205 

6305 

win 

43J0 


8210 5750 

8435 5850 

0430 0X0 

80X0 0X0 

74X0 xua 

7440 61 JO 

JM0 420 Sep 6450 «» 

70X0 8400 Dec 6535 6535 

7030 65J0 Jen 

67J» 66X0 Mar 

Est.Saln 11500. Pray-gpjes.ua 7 
pruv. Day Open InL 81301 ap5D6 

ALUMINUM CCOMEX) 

40X00 Harden* per a. 


80X0 

6 0 , 79 

*1^ 

cm 

6285 

62)0 

n 

647S 

6535 


49A5 

0X0 


Livestock 


CATTLE [CMS) 

4QJ00 ibs^ cents ner it* 


6990 

5905 

Jun 

6040 

60X7 

59X2 

40.10 

—32 

6747 

*045 

Aua 

63-10 

6345 

6282 

ma 

—40 

65.90 

68.10 

Ocf 

62X0 

6125 

6240 

42X7 


6705 

6150 

Dec 

<345 

6415 

6325 

4120 

+05 

6745 

6210 

Fob 

6445 

6460 

6407 

6455 

+05 

<7X7 

66X5 

63X0 

63J3 

Aor 

Jun 

65X5 

65X0 

f <112 

4545 

65X0 

+05 

+X0 


Esf.Sotea 22902 Prev. Sales 25X79 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 50804 off 370 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMS) 

MMA ib*^ cent* per lb. 


5 1123 34% 33 33% + % 

7170 



67 JO 

6840 



5084 33% 13% »% +1 

7200 

6410 

Sots 

67X0 

4&25 

67X0 67X0 

+JQ 

21 4071 107% 101% 107% +3 

7232 

*425 

Oct 

67.15 

6800 

67.10 6740 

+X5 

10 1782 35% 34% 34% —TV. 

n* 



68.10 

A8JS5 

6000 68X5 

+35 

75 10% 9% 10% + % 

7940 

6460 

Jan 

6942 

7000 

<943 69X5 

+95 

13 739 24% 24% 24% 


66.10 

Anar 

69X0 

4905 

69X0 69X5 

+35 

12 26 25% 25% — % 

7000 

7000 

Apr 



69.75 



at. Safes 1587 Prww. Sales 2305 
Prev. Day Open IM. 8X24 up 512 
HOGS (CME) 

30X00 Ma- cents per lb. 


5540 

4440 


4740 

4X10 

47.12 

47X5 

+40 

55X7 

4705 

Jul 

5040 

5125 

5025 

51.NI 

+X3 

5437 

47X7 

Aug 

5035 

51.10 

5X15 

5X80 

+X3 

51.75 

4500 

Oct 

4700 

47X7 

46X5 

4727 

+22 

50X5 

45X0 

Dec 

4700 

4842 

4722 

48X5 

+45 


4425 

Feb 

4X90 

4900 

4X70 

4X77 

+07 

47X5 

44X0 

Aar 

4&.W 

4625 

4600 

AAtn 

-03 


4600 

Jun 

4820 

4X20 

4820 

4825 

+05 

49X5 47X5 Jul 4900 49X7 

Est. Sales 6X82 Prav. Soles 7X34 
Prav. Dav Open Inf. 21164 off 490 

48X0 

4X0 

J7 


PORK BELLIES (CME) 

3SJOO Ibc- cent* per lb. 

8247 61.12 Jui 6585 67 JO 6555 67J5 

BO-65 SC-20 Aua 6555 67.15 65X5 a 07 

7630 63-15 Fed 7290 7172 7258 7140 

75.40 6400 MOT 73JX) 7235 7100 7135 

7560 70.10 Mav 7290 7390 7290 7412 

7400 030 Jul 7400 7400 73X0 74M 

Est. Sales 6926 Prev. Sales 7X19 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 11X25 off a 


+130 

+1X2 

+J0 

+30 


Food 


COFFEE C (NY CSCE) 

37500 ira.- cents Perm. 

15200 12201 May 143JS 144X0 I433S 14400 

121 JO Juf 144X2 14530 14405 14410 

127 JO Sep 14530 14650 14530 14533 

17935 DM 14610 14610 145.16 14116 

12050 Mar 14450 144X0 14450 14453 

13150 Jul I427S 14275 14275 14275 


10a 

147X0 
14670 
145X0 
14X00 
14200 
Eat. Sales 


13275 Sep 
1X50 Prev. Sales 


Prev. Day Open lot. 12X17 upBI 
5UGARWORLD 11 (NY CSCE) 

1 12000 lbs.- cents per lb. 


1X06 


14213 


+J7 

—.49 


-J » 
+.12 
+J0 



9.95 

2X3 

Jul 

110 

115 

306 

114 

+. 

17 

369 37% 3714 37% 

925 

306 

Sep 

320 

329 

220 

328 

+. 

5 

4 49% 49% 49% + % 

905 

3.17 

Ocf 

3X5 

347 

234 

345 

+. 

8 

1321 26% 34% 26% +1% 

725 

260 

Jan 

328 

3X8 

278 

303 

+. 

3 

1833 28% 27% 28 - % 

923 

198 

Mar 

422 

429 

422 

428 

+. 

2 

2545 41% 41 41V> + % 

7.15 

420 


<47 

448 

442 

447 

+. 

2 

130 21% 71 7I%— % 

669 

445 

Jul 

AM 

466 

440 

465 

+. 

0 

50 2S% 25% 25% — % 


426 

Sep 




478 

+. 

0 

276 22% 22% 22% + % 

4.94 

420 

Oct 

<93 

494 

492 

496 

+. 

1 


Est. Sales 10X75 Prev.Sales S.TO 
Prev. Day Open Int. 92340 up 653 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tans- Spot ton 


2400 

1998 

Jul 

3038 

2079 


2075 

+34 

2415 

1987 

Sep 

2030 

2055 

20QA 

2050 

+1? 

2337 

1945 

Dee 

2009 

2030 

3009 

2025 

+15 

2190 

2130 

2110 

1955 

19*0 

1960 

Mar 

Mav 

Jut 

2032 

2073 

2032 

2041 

2048 

2058 

+16 

+13 

+18 


Est. Sales 2X36 Prev.Sales 3303 
Prav. Dav Open Int. 21.109 upll 
ORANGE JUICECNYCE) 

15000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

18485 13830 Jul 14230 M5J0 141J0 14655 

18200 13630 Sep 140X0 14330 140X0 14215 

181 JO 13600 Nov 10X0 142a 139X0 14L10 


+275 

+230 

+1 JB 


32 

6675 

8245 

5210 


48X5 

4620 

4685 
48.10 
5133 
49.90 
53X9 
54X0 
51 JO 


jun 

Jul 

Aug 


4675 47.10 6573 


44X0 

47X5 


4650 

47X0 


47X0 

41X5 


•Jt «1 « 


Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
Mav 
Jul ' 

Sep 
Dec 
Jan 
Mar 

EstScdes 279 Prav. Sales 282 
Prev. Day Open I nL 2261 off 31 

SILVER (COME3Q 
5JKM tray a%- cenfs per fray «. 


6625 

146TJ 


59BJ 

5620 


Jun 

Jul 


8145 

617J 


<160 

&J0J 


*11X 

815L5 


1I83X 

mm 

12150 

1193X 

10480 

9460 

9400 

799X 

789X 

mix 


8561 

6568 


7250 


<0X5 

68X5 

61X5 

4L» 

82X5 

6285 

8345 

63.95 

*4X5 

8195 

4570 

6595 

66X5 


4675 
47.10 
47X0 
47 JO 
48JB 
4930 
49-90 
50X0 
5130 

5200 

5X10 

53X5 

5615 


61SX 
<190 
«2J 
6268 
8990 
6417 
mi 
661 X 
071 X 
(WB 
6973 
70X1 
714X 


5730 S«P <250 *®0 
5900 Dec 6Z7J 647J «8J 

59S0 Jan 

M7J Mar 65X1 850.1 
621J May 6SU 667X 
8350 Jul 
6410 Sep 
6670 Dm 
73S0 Jan 

mp Mar 7250 7250 

EsLSales 15000 Prev.Satas 1X983 
Prev. Day Open inf. 76007 off 298 
PLATINUM [NY ME) 

SO troy as.- delta* per trey 0*. „ 

7*706 25U0 Jun 341X0 2*600 2UJ0 26800 

449X0 »109 Jul 28200 268X0 26200 26700 

39300 25000 Od 366X0 27300 2*6M 271X0 

373X0 24000 Jan 27300 276X8 271X0 276X0 

Est. Sales 1X03 Prev.Sales 1X53 

Prev. Day Open tnL 11X03 off 123 

PALLADIUM (NY ME) 

100 troy ai-aoUors per oz ._ 

159X0 9625 Jun 9708 99X0 9638 

JJU5 95J5 Sea 9700 1BO0O 

141X0 9500 DM 9725 18025 97 ja 

127X0 9700 Mar 99 J5 101J0 9975 

11400 9675 Jun 

Est. Sales l.lll Prev.Sales 1035 
Prev. Day Open Int 7X31 off X 
GOLD (COMRX) 

UDtroy at-dollars per troy oz. _ 

51000 28700 Jun 31610 31900 31250 316» 

ri im 313X0 Jui 317J0 

48500 29100 Aug 31610 32X00 31*00 319A 

49X00 29700 Oct 32000 326X0 32&J® »J0 

301X0 DM 32300 33000 moo ZZ7SO 

30600 Feb 33200 33308 33200 33} JO 

31470 Apr 33620 

43670 320X0 Jun 34300 34X00 341X0 34100 

«/&« 331jffl Aug 34*00 

39570 33X00 OC* 

39X00 34200 DM 35*40 

Apt 36X20 

Est. Sates 25000 Prev.Sales 43J9 
Prev. Dev Open Int 132X56 up 47 


97.95 

9X78 

9X95 

9695 

99X5 


-.15 

—.19 

+05 

+.10 

+.15 

+00 

+X8 

+J 5 

+xo 

+t§ 


+.90 

+00 

+05 

+95 

+95 

+9S 

+9S 

+95 

+.95 

+95 

+J95 

+J5 


+U 

+20 

+11 

+L9 

+10 

+U 

+U 

♦IX 

+IX 

+L2 

+ 1.1 

+10 


+400 

+4JM 

+500 

+500 


+xo 

+1JS 

+1X0 

+1X0 

+1X0 


+XB0 

+X10 

+2X0 

+290 

+2X0 

+OXO 

+2X0 

+2X0 

+2X0 

+2X0 

+208 


*—roaund-l POmtewo”^^” , 


sup 


9Sf 


laafMunP- 
L3350 J 
L4430 1^— v 

10800 10200 

!38 * 

s sss & M 

® ss * 

jSh Jun jmo 


uai, 13/00 „ 

izsss 23790 JSS H48 +B 
{^95 L3300 U395 +U 

IM» 


.7340 

0320 

-72W 


0504 

Eddies 


0300 


■ 733ft +M 
0390 MO 
0368 *7} 

73*0 +<9 

0900 J3» +48 


0317 

0108 


pra^owdpetiiid. \Tsnonna 
FRENCH FBAHC ...... •• 

^SST^ASTk^-SS"'"* ■«" :SS3S ® 

,10940 


00615 

S ||sss| ^ 

Prav. Dav Open int. eejoe onilJ. 

JAPANESE YE N (!****) 

| mams 1 

0O41AO 3S4m +lf 

Etst-tato* &A1 

prav. Day open Int 16709 off W6 

SWISS FRANC(IMM) 

S^ranc-^nfraudlsWOOT 

X»0 ^ ^ 

rtM 7SH Dec J895 0975 
^ Mar XOIft -40» 

Gst. Sale* »0W Pw.Sriee XUM 
Prev. Dav (teen mt. 2*073 up 723 


jb» jm +a 
0080 Jt» ■-+«■• 

a SS US; 

■ Jit- 


industrials 


3- 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

aipniton-ptianoopcf. _ „ 

92X1 87.14 Jun 9X83 9X99 9200 92X1 +08 

92X8 1694 Sep 92X1 9149 92X1 92A5 +.10 

9X22 8507 Dec 9117 9122 9X17 9200 +.10 

H J6 B6X0 Mar 91J3 91X7 9103 91X6 +09 

JO 8701 Jun 91X0 91X0 9U0 91X6 +06 

91J1 8800 S«P S135 9106 91-36 ?U1 +06 

91.15 89 JH CM 91.13 91.12 91.12 91.19 +06 

90-97 89X8 Mer 9100 +07 

EsLSalea 10049 Prev.Sales 11015 
Prev. Dav.Open Inf. 37X00 wUR 

.M YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

SffilUIOOPrin. Ms &32nds at impel _ . 

B6-12 71*9 Jim 865 86-27 88-7 8+24 +13 

85-11 75-18 Sep B5X 95-26 85-1 95-22 +12 

8+9 75-13 DM B4-4 84-24 8*4 9+22 +13 

83-13 75-14 Mar SCW 83-29 IM BWI +14 

83-22 74-30 Jun 82-17 83-7 12-17 834 +14 

Est. Sales Prav. Sales 1X930 

Prav. Day Oaen Inf. 51098 us 480 

US TREASURY BONDS (CRT) 

(8 pct-OlauObpts X 32nds pflM pet) 

77-15 57-20 Jun 76-30 77-14 7+14 77-11 +11 

76-2 57-10 Sep 75-21 7+16 7S-I6 74-13 +18 

76-5 57-8 Dm 74-23 75-17 7+19 75-J5 +18 

7+2 57-2 Mar 73-29 74-22 73-24 74-30 +T* 

73-10 54-29 Jun 73-1 73-29 73-1 7348 +18 

72-70 56-29 Sep 72-11 73-7 72-11 734 +18 

72-1 56-25 DM 7149 72-20 71-27 72-1* +17 

TVl* 56-27 Mar 71-11 734 71-11 73-1 +17 

71 63-13 Jun 71 71-W 71 7V17 +17 

70-18 634 Sep 70-8 71-5 71-3 +17 

69 6244 Dec 704 70-24 704 70-22 +17 

Est. Sales Pnev.Saics2i9X55 

Prev. Day Open IntJUJOl eftU72 

GNMA (CBT) 

SIOOOOO prln- pis X 32nds ofinpct 
7343 57-17 Jun 73-19 744 73-19 7+1 +» 

73-9 59-13 Sep 734 7341 734 73-18 +?S 

73-22 594 Dec 73 734 73 73 +10 

714 58-20 Mar 72-7 7340 720 72-16 . +10 

70-27 50-25 Jun 724 734 7140 7M +« 

6X31 15 Scp rt-32 +10 

Ei». Sales Prev.Sales BOB 

Prev. Day Open Int 4XU w>77 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

Si minion- Ms at 100 pet 

9X46 8SJ0 Jun 9X41 9140 9X41 9X59 +.14 

91.92 85JJ0 Scp 910* 9207 9U6 9X06 +.17 

91X6 8504 Dec 91X4 9TX4 91X4 9L5B +.15 

9105 1656 Mar fl.U +.14 

9074 8643 Jun ®«J3 +.11 

9054 B7J6 Sep 9053 +09 

8809 8804 Dec 9005 +07 

Est- Sales 382 Prev.Sales 474 
Prev. Dav Open Int. &143 off 109 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mllllan-atsof IOOpcL 


9116 

8249 

Jun 

92.10 

92X5 

9209 

92X4 

+.11 

91X6 

8453 

tap 

91X0 

9L72 

9149 

91X8 

+.17 

91.10 

8488 

Dec 

9104 

91X4 

9104 

91X2 

+.15 

9X70 

86.10 

Mar 

9X65 

9002 

9X69 

9X81 

+13 

9X38 

86J3 

Jun 

9X33 

90X9 

90X3 


+.11 

9X13 

3708 

Sep 

9005 

9XD9 

9805 

9X16 

+09 

8909 

89X7 

87X8 

8744 

Dec 

Mar 

89X8 

89X9 

89X8 

8908 

8943 

+07 

+05 


EsLSalea 35X90 Prev.Sales 3X659 
Prev. Dav Open lnM31XH off 2435 


LUMBIR (CMl) m 

r IS50O U73B 1S45X -UUO +.M ' 
SS SeP U6S8 15800 1X5M 157X8 +0* - 

,M10 H* ta 156X0 15X90 15620 tSTJe +L30 

inoo 144X0 Jan ULta i«sxo uijb 1*U0 +U0 

KM moo Mar U5J» 167 JO 145X0 147J0 +UD- 

17UD 1M0O MOV 17U0 WUM'ITUff 171.H +100 

183J0 17340 JUI 1KXB 17S30 123X0 17X50 

Est. Sales MB1 Pr»r- 
Prav. Dav Open IbL *0» eft rtS 

COTTON JINYCO 

•wrwa 

SS SSS 

7675 61X0 MOT 

7000 61 J6 May 

7805 *305 Ml 

65XQ 59X0 Od 

EsLSales, 3000 Prav.Sotal 4001 
PravToav Open int MX35 UP»I 

HBAT1NO OIL (NYMR) 


61X8 £US «UA 4237 +JB. 


6X99 

6X30 

6308 

020 


6095 
6X21 I 


6X50 

6300 


<xm 

6X20 


«UB 




+01 
+01 - 








63X0 

Jun 71X0 ■ 7L80 

71X5 

71X0 

7520 

65X5 

Jui 7140 TUB 

7lSS 

71X9 

73X0 

6X25 

Aua TUS 7ZM 

71.70 

7645 

*900 

Sap 72X5 7225 

72.15 

72X9 

77.10 

71XD 

Ocf 7345 7345 

7X30 

£2 

74X5 

7200 

Nav 701 70S 

7435 

7X25 

7200 

Dec 


7140 

7690 

74X0 

Jan 

Fab 

Mar 

r- 

7425 

76J3 

75X5 

7400 

7400 

AW 


7455 

Esf. Sates 

Prev. Sates 7X27 



406 ’ 
-in 


Prav. Dav Open ML 1X053 m>3M 

CRUDE OIL (NYM8U 
lJCObbL- deltas per bbi. 

2X56 24.1B M 

29X7 3635 AW 

39JM M®S 5#P 

29JO 24X5 Od. 

»X0 34X0 NOV 

29X0 a« DM 

Ell. Safes Prav-Safe* 17X27 

Prav. Dav Open int S0J71 off IS 


27X5 

27.18 

S3 


2751 

7733 

2701 


2703 2704 —08 

3706 Z7X2 +J1 
3LM 27.11 »0I 

s-w 

2600 3650 




Stock Indexes 




SP COMP. IMDRX(CMR) 
pohtfiwtfrintT 

19100 15610 Jun 18X35 190X5 HUS 189X5 +105 

194X5 1*000 Sep 19200 19405 191 JU 19115 +1.10 

TV7J5 17500 Dec 19525 19705 19530 19640 +105 

20005 nan Mar 19X55 lTXXS HUS 199 JO +1JS 

EsLSales 70X60 PreuLSateB 51X46 - 
Prev. Oay Open InL 68X87 

VALUE UNE (KCBT) 
polnbontfonfs 

219X0 17300 Jun 199X0 3B1X0 1MUS 20L3S +XP 

712X0 1X175 3*0 3OZ0Q 2D5JS 28163 2BU0 +08 

21300 30000 Dec 3092 30935 20935 209.10 +.» 

Eft Sales Prev.Sales uk 

Prev. Day Open tal. 7J86 up »4 

NY58 COMP. INDEX CNYFV] 
points and cents 

11090 <000 Jun 109.15 liaxs W9J0 W9J5 +XS 

11330 91X5 Sep 111X8 11X85 I1L40 11X25 +00 

mix in 30 Dec M4X5 114X5 1I3XB 11430 +05 

11730 H9X8 MOT 11635 +00 

Est. Sal M 15010 Prev. Sates 13J21 
Prev. Dav Open InL 12X39 aft 304 


Jh 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's. 

Reulero 

DJ. Futures. 


Close 
905.10 f 
NA. 

moo 

232J0 


Com. Resacurtt Bureau. 

MoodVs : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - prefimJnary; t - final 
Reuters ; base 100 : Sep. IS, 1931. 
Dow Janes : ba» 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 
91030 f 
1.82040 
119X4 • 
230.90 . 


Market Guide 


CBT: 

CME: 


NYCSC E: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NY ME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


CMcaao Board of Trade 
OiMdoo AAercontUe Exchange 
Intarwttana l Meaetary Market 
SL 0 !^ 0 /^ 0 ^ 1- Exchpno* 

York Coobo, Avar. Coffee Exchange 
New Yortc Cotton Exchange 
Commoditv Exchan ge. New York 
New Yo rk MercantUe Exchange 
Kmsra atv Board of Trade 
New York Futures Ekchcnpe 


London Commodities 

May 31 


36V, 29% WiSCPL 2X4 73 

37% 25V, WIsePS 2X6 70 

40Vk 27% WlttO 1X8 43 9 

1FA TV, WofvriV 34 24 3 

25V, 18% WUedPt 00 3X 16 


7 4345 31% 29% 31 +1% 

718 5V, XV* 5%— % 

.10 14 16 39 71* 7 7 — % 

1X8 4J 13 352 35% av, a + (h 

30 IX 11 1257 13 12H 12%— % 

42 281 ft% 6% 6%— % 

6 6% 6% 6% 

1046 37% 36% 37% + % 
TOz 85 85 M — % 


397 36 35% 36 + Vh 

161 37 36% 36% + Vk 

a 35% 35% 3S%- % 

103 lOVh 9% 9*h— % 

si a a 72 


46 Vh 37 Wolwtfl L00 O 10 3008 47% 46% 46% + H 

65% 46W WoM Pf 2a 34 8 65% 66% 65% 

4{h 2% WrldAr 148 4% 4 4% + Vh 

67% 48 WrlglV 100c 24 13 94 69% 67% 69% +2% 

6 3% Wurttzr B 3% 3% Mb— % 

18 10% WVULO 72 29 13 161 11% 1IM 11%— % 

23% 17 Wynns A0 3X 7 63 17% 17% 17% + % 


90% 3J% Xerox 300 60 21 19820 50 48% a + % 

56% 45% Xerox Pf 545 100 32 54% 54V. 54W + % 

79 19 XTRA X4 24 10 282 26% 26% 26% — % 


30 TA ZatoCp 

23% 12 Zooota 

56 ta Zavres 
3Q 18Vh ZenlfhE 
21% 14% Zeros 


102 44 9 636 30% 29% 30Vh + U 

04 6.9 24 19U 12% 12% 12% — % 

48 0 17 1805 53th 52% 52% — 1% 

9 3459 23% 72 22% + % 

a 10 16 33 18% 18% 18% + % 



NEW HIGHS 


AMR Coro 

Am Cppi lBd 

Am Home pf 

Americ5or 

AssdOG of 

BellSouth 

Bntsr Cased 

CSXCcpf 

CorsPIr 

□tlcpadpf 

CnPw450pf 

CnPw440or 

CnPw4pr 

CnPw223nr 

Dart Kr off 

DeltOAlrl 

DIGIor afB 

EALwtO 

Exxon 

FlFdlArfx 

GMtr J75pf 

Gerber Prds 

Harshev 

INA InvSec 

ipoteftEnt 

KeitoeaCa 

LFECOTO 

LI L Co PfE 

LILCgpfV 

LiLCopfR 

MOVDSM 

MercantSI 

NabiscaBrd 

NJ Ruses 

NarStePw 

NVNEX 

Oh Pw 77 tort 

PaPL342pr 

PfUlaEt7M 

PorTG 2ft0of 

PSEG 740pf 

RochGetE 
SouJer Ind 
Sterl Drug 
TWA 

UALinc 240n 
UnEI BofL 
uf corn 

VEI72 772pf 

Wondvks 

XeraiSeSuf 


Amtosca 
GCA Co 
Kyocera 
RJvcrDakn 


AZP Group 
AmExpreu 
Amerltedi 
AnheuserB 
Auto Data 

tier key Pho 
Barden 
Coma Soup 
ChubbCos 
Cluetl Pm 
C nPw 74Spf 

CnPw360pr 
CnPwSMta 
CnPw402or 
DarlKrfl wl 

DefE 745pf 

Daneiev 

EALwtA 

FedICo 

FINafnwdn 

GenMai Snf 

Gravfindpl 

Hamlet 629 

indiMB68Bf 


KeihModCo 

uny Ell 

LlLCapfl 

LILCspKI 

LIL Canto 

Maytag 

M anteomSe 

riarMMEn 

Newtiail 

NSPw411of 

Ohio Edison 

PSA Inc 
pgPL290pr 
PflEI 14625P 

ForfG448of 

PSEGWHpf 

SPSTeeh 

SauindGEs 

Textron 

TWA225PIB 

USGs 

UnEI 744pf 

vestaurSec 

YaEP 72Dpt 

WnAir 2l4pf 

ZaleCorn 


Amer Can 

Am Her ll li 

AmS tores 

ArchDnM 

Balt GasEi 

BikHIIIPw 

Barden wl 

GdnPocg 

OnG 12S2pf 

ConAgra b 

CnPw772pf 

CnPw37Bar 

CnPw385pr 

CnPw343Pr 

DaylonHua 

DelE 324pr 

Dravfus 

EITorlto 

FedNof Mtg 

Gen Food 

Genstarpf 

Hortmar* 

Heuslind 

inaiM 21 tort 

JerC 1350lrt 

KJmbClark 

Litton Ind 

ULCopfX 

ULCopfT 

Lucky Star 

McDer 2t0af 

MaqraCarns 

Nats vc Ind 

Newhallnv 

NSPw 880P4 

OhEd 440N 

PSA Incdaf 

PepsiCo 

PMrtrtAvs 

PrtmeMof & 

OuakerOats 

SaraLee 

Southland 

Textn2ttef 

TuesonEP 

UnEI 640pf 

UnEIBafH 

WoEP772pf 

warnacn 


NEW LOWE M 


CrackMtadl 

GateBtHou 

LTVCPPfA 

TmCdaPteer 


DafsGenl 

GWDMar 

MarxCtrl 


AmCanSof 

Am Home 

AmSforaiA 

AssdDGd* 

BauschLb* 

Baring wi 

CNA Pint 

CdnPacwl. 

arcus 

CortnNG 

CnPw 776pf 

CnPwTHbrt 

CnPw250pr 

CrownCrk 

Doan Foods 

DelE 4I2 p4K 

EastnAirL 

Eamk231pf 

FederDStr 

GenGi until n 

GaPw2$2pf 

HaillaMyr 

Humana 

IntMuHIM 

JarCeB7tort 

LNHouS 

LaneSta ind 

LlLCoafW 

LIL Coats 

MacvRH 

Mellon Bk 

NWA Inc 

NewEng El 

NIM4I0P4 

NoSPw 7frt 

OhEd020nf 

PacHTel 

Petr lost t 

PNtaurv 

PSEGUOpf 

RabtnPur 

SoarsRoeb 

Suit Beil 

TavsRUst 

UAL Inc 

UnEI4pffll 

ucoarrv 

VoEPOXtef 

weihRjrCo 

Wrigiev 


FtBTkodlpf 
HHgGlI 
Pioneer El 


Dow 
Bid Adc 


Prav loos 
Bid 


High Low 
GASOIL 

us dollars per metric ton 
Jun 22000 219X0 219JS 21905 21805 219 JO 

21800 217a 2i7a 217a 217.2s zi7a 

22025 21?a 219a 219a 219a 21905 
371-50 221 a 220X0 271-25 22005 22105 
N.T. N.T. moo 22400 223a 224a 
N.T. 223a 227a 224a 227a 
N.T. 224a 230a 22500 moo 
N.T. 22400 23000 22L00 23000 
N.T. 221U» 23400 223a 23000 
Volume: 688 lots of IH tans. 

Sources: Reuters and London Ptrratevm Ex- 
change fgasofU. 


Jly 

Abb 


Oct 


Dec 

JN 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


London Metals 

May 31 


Previo u s 
Bid As 


Close 
Bid i 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric ten 
soot aisa ana bjilu 84ia 

forward H39J0 84000 B6400 B64X0 

COPPER CATHODES [High Grade) 

SterOng per metric ton 
soot i,i2ia 1.122a 1.1SLD0 i.isya 

forward 1.72400 1.127a 1.165a 1.166a 

COPPER CATHODES (SfOOdOrdl 
Sterl lug per metric ton 

soot ui7a l.uxa i.issa l.isda 

forward 1,117a 1.118a 1,154a 1,15480 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ton 
Spot 2«oa 2Pia 29190 39290 

forward 298a 29X50 24«a 299a 

NICKEL 

Sterl too per nulric ton 
spot 4330a 04000 4400 JO 4^400 

forward 4312H 4JIiOO 4385a 4389a 

5ILVER 

peeper fra?™ ^ „ 

forward 495 a 496a 496a 496a 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric ton ___ 

spot 9475a 9X850 0 9X30a 9aia 

forward 945000 «45ta 9JOOOO 9X0Sa 

ZINC 

Starting per metric tan 
spot 9KM 99300 10790 60000 

forward tKBM 608 a 615a 614M 

Source.- AP. 


Company 

Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, 
are in local currencies unless 

otherwise indicated 


Japan 

Hitachi Zosen 


Yoor 

Revenue- 

Profits 

Per Share. 


1884 

4+4330. 

5,180. 

4.56 


1913 

426X90. 

7,120. 

AM 


Italian Inflation Slows 

Reuters 

ROME — Italian consumer 
prices rose 0.6 percent in May. after 
a 0.9-perceni increase in April, Is- 
iat, the oETidal slaiistics institute, 
said Friday. The year-to-year in- 
crease in May was at 8.8 percent, 
the same as i.a April. Ia May 1984, 
the figure was 1 \2 percent. 


Paris Commodities 

May 31 


Cteag 

High Low Bid Ask CTge 

SUGAR 

Fraocb francs per metric ton 
Aug UOfl UX5 1093 1096 +20 

Ocf U7B 1X00 1088 IJM + IB 

Dec 1J34 UT5 T J38 1J30 + is 

Mor U92 1J75 1JB0 IJ83 +15 

May N.T. N.T. 1X20 1X33 + 15 

Auo , 1X95 1X95, 1X00 1J05 +16 

Est. val.: 1X00 lots of SO tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 1024 tote. Open Interast: 17030 
COCOA 

French francs par 108 kg 
Jtv N.T. N.T. 3005 2064 —34 

tap 2043 2030 2037 2033% -20 

DOC 2020 2010 2015 2016 

Mar Z4W? 2047 2035 2050 + 10 

May N.T. N.T. 2JM0 — +15 

Jtv ILT. N.T. ZJM — +15 

Eit. val.: 200 lots af 10 fora. Prav. octual 
sales: 121 tote Open interest; 695 
COFFEE 

French francs per 100 kg 
Jly 2X20 2X20 2X15 2X35 +5 

Sen 2X95 2X70 2X71 2X76 —9 

Nav N.T. N.T. 2X12 2X15 —11 

Jan N.T. N.T, — 2X75 +5 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 2X75 

May N.T. N.T. — 2X75 

Est. val.; 11 lotsaf5 tons. Prev. actucd sales 
61 late Open Interest: 369 
Source: Bourse au Commerce. 


j Dividends May 31 


Company 


Par Ree 


Husky Oil 


6-26 6-12 


Per Am! 

INITIAL 

O 09 
STOCK 

aiyi-on Cora _ io% 

STOCK SPLITS 

Lleberman E nterp ri se s — 3- tar -2 
mmtv Ld X inv — 5-forx 
Mforoseml Cora — 5- fur-4 
Wedfech Carp — 34sr-2 

USUAL 

Arina Life & Cos 
Cadillac Folrvlew 
aiyran Cwe 
CHYNotTCoro 
□fckey-Jahn 
Gulfsfream Ld X Dv 
Inn I non Prop 
Key Pharm. 

KbnberlyOork 
Lancaster Cotamr 
Ld of Lincoln 5W 
LtaiMAIr 
Longview Fibre Co 
Merch on ts Bk N Yk 
MaoaO-A 

Mam, a-e 

Natl Bank of Canada 
fttarweseolne 
Re— l Furniture 
Shell Oil 
Union Padfic 
Wousau Paper Mills 
Wtahlre Oil Co T* 

WoteriSne Tech 
Mnndi M-MmrtMvi O-ODortefly ; VSeml- 
AoaaaL 
Source: UP!. 


Q 46 

ft-IS 

Ml 

A 05 

7-31 

7-15 

Q 02% 

115 

7-30 

0 92 

7-17 

6-28 

a 03 

7-15 

7-1 

O .IB 

7-11 

6-U 

a X3 

+21 

6-ld 

Q 05 

7-9 

6-14 

a xs 

7-2 

6-7 

O • .17 

+29 

+10 

O J8 


+20 

O 40 

6eV 

+12 

- J2 

7-10 

+25 

O 25 

6-24 

6-14 

O 07 

7-5 

+14 

a 05 

7-5 

+14 

G 33 

8-1 

6-27 

Q 03% 

MB 

+14 

Q 03 

7-15 

+26 

Q XO 

6-24 

+10 

Q 45 

7-1 

+12 

Q Mi 

7-1 

+14 . 

S 05 

7-12 

+14 

. JB 

Ml 

+14 


SAP 100 index Options 

May 31 


Srikf 

Prtti 

MS 

no 

173 

MO 

Ml 

HQ 

W5 


Canned 
Jb fa sv 

n% - - — 

14V) H - - 

« n a - 
s n n n 
HI B 4) A 
% i7/ua m 
l/M 7116 1 »% 


PitsLesf 

Jns ih Jog Sv 
T/TA I/M l/M — 
1/U U1I H 1 
l/M snt f/M % 
% 1 l/M IT/M 1% 

n n n n 

Hi M ft i 


mucednbna WJ9D 
TftMcaacgmMLBUn 
Tow sor -take PJtt 
Tfttdwf fleet U.43UH 

HMBtaJI taw MU* 00—1801+ LB 
■Sco roe: CME. 


Asian Commodities 

May 31 


HONG-KOHA GOLD FUTURES 
if XX per oaoce 

Close 

Kteb Low bm Ask Bid Ask 
Jun _ NX N.T. 31200 31400 315J0 3T7J0 
Jly — N.T. ILT. 31400 31400 31600 31800 
Aug — N.T. N.T. 31600 31800 31805 32000 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 31700 32100 32200 3240® 
Dec _ N.T. ILT. 32400 32600 326.? S atenn 
Feb „ 32900 129 00 32X00 330.00 33000 33200 
API _ 33300 333J0 332J0 334J0 334J0 mm 
Volume: Mints of lOOoz. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UXJ per ounce 


Jun . 

SepJ 


Hleb 
313.10 
31&SD 
N.T. 
. ILT. 


mio 

316X8 

N.T. 

N.T. 


Volume: 149 late oflDOoz. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Molayslaa ceatc per kilo 


Settle 

31X70 

316X8 

318X0 

32050 


Settle I 
31500 

32100 

32300 


Jfv _ 
Aug. 


19405 
19125 
192X0 

195X0 

Volume: 11 tote 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Idlo 


19475 

19X75 

194X8 

19650 


RSS 1 Jun__ 
RSSI Jly— 
RSS 2 Jon— 
RSS 3 Jun— 
RS54 Jun_ 
RSS S Jun— 


□MC 

BM Ask 
171X0 172X0 
16X75 16900 
16800 16900 
16600 16700 

16200 16*00 
15700 15900 


Previous 
BM A* 
19425 194J5 

192X0 T93J0 

19100 19400 

19X25 19600 


Prev teas 
BM Ask 

170X0 171JO 


MfUi® 

167X0 

165X0 

161X0 

156X0 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Matavstoa rlnarits per 25 ton 

bS~a* e sr 

Jun 1X60 1JOO 1J2M 

Jlv- Lira 1,220 1.190 

I 1080 1.130 1090 

1060 1.110 1070 

1050 1090 1060 

NOV 1033 1070 1JM0 

Jon 020 I0&B 1030 

' — 1020 1060 1030 

MOV 1010 1050 102J 

volume: Clots of 25 tons. 

Seurat: Reuters. 


68X0 
68X0 1 
166X0 
163X01 
I38XO 


1X10 

1X30 

1.140 

1,120 

1.IOO 

1080 

1X70 

1070 

1060 


15. Treasury Bffl Raw 

May 31 


Offer bm 


J-mortlh 

6H0onm 


709 

7.1? 

7J9 


7JB7 

7.17 

7X7 


Yield 

7X1 

7X6 

7J6 


Source; Satamar flrartcrj 


Prev 

Yield 

7J1 

773 

Lu 


Cer man Engine ering Orders 


Reuters 


FRANKFURT — Orders for 
toe West Cerman engineering in- 
dustry rose 33 percent in April 
from the year-earlier level, the in- 
dustry association, VDMa, said 
Friday. 


Explosion at NATO Pipeline 

Rat tea 

RUESSELSHHM, West Ger- 

7 A wK& a! . tadc Frid ay 

tonaged a NATO pipeline ne^ 
the Rhine-Main US. air base near 
Frankfurt the police said. Thcv 
said no one was hurt in the exnlcv 
sion. ^ 


^ CaghPric-e6 May 31 


Commodity and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santas, to, 


Printctoth 64/30 38 %, vd — . 

Steel billets (PftfJ, ton 

Iran 2 Fdry. PMla, ton ___ 
Steel scrap No i hw PI ft. _ 
Lead Soot, lb — 
CoPPerriecL.lt) 

Tin (SlraHs). Ih . 


anctst.u Baste lb 
Palladium, oz . 

Sliver N.Y.ox 

Source: Ap. 


Yew 
Fri AM 
1X8 IX2tt 
003 0J7 ' 

47300 453Jff4K 
21300 21300 ~ 

79X0 100-101 
20-21 25-28 

71-73 69%-72 
60012 6X797 

OJ6-07 Q52 X3 
106 155 

6X1 9443 


DM Futures Options 

May 31 

w. Geram UsMSOB rams cads nr not 


Price Jea Ca §»B** , Dae 

31 MS US IB 

32 • cm im 1S5 

33 023 1.14 Ijj 

« ttW ft?5 1X0 

*> fifil a«, 4L94 

36 0JT 228 S3 


_ Pets-Seffle 
Jon 5ep Dec 

— 0X7 n>u 
Uf 0X6 

oa i.m 
U l 168 
2.15 2J4 

- 112 


0X8 

168 

1.9B 

2X5 

133 


tart ML 6J30 

CM: Thor. «oL 2*43 «ian brt. men 
Ms : Tteir. voL 1X09 open int. 37XS0 

Source: CME. 




U.S. Phone Fee 
To Rise $1 Today 

New York Tuna Server 

NEW YORK - The price of 
5 as ‘!L ; tel *Pj*P n . e service lor resi- 
tewmd tawnoKs with one line 

Sr-£ , iai. , st , iff£ 

K3E5S£S.«^«*i 

will affec. 

almost 90 million households n& 
wdl as about 5.7 million small busi- 9? 

P 1 lenns of lotaI dollars, ^he 
mw charge means that Americans 

*an SI bUlion 
nC ^ 10 tele- 

^^ce, according to indus- 

3S£3E5£ , 1 ?*SS 

aw- supporters of the nS? 

*ay, households have 

taWI-edSSlSiat 


'“mSSS don 






it-N* y: - 


- ' v:r' 4h =- 


**-.**;»•»■ 


> ** 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUKE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


if Merger Plan Uncertain 
For Krupp, Klockner 




**Vv* rrflrjfi 




Mn< %.-* -tfr 


i M • 


Jbum 

BOCHUM, West Germany 

Hie planned merger of Krupp 
Stahl AG with the steel-making op- 
erations of IGdclmer-Werke AG 
stittis in que s tion, Krupp’s nutnag- 
: «g board chairman, Alfons 
- said Friday. 

Tfe said (hat the future of the 
proposal would not be clear until 
the end of negotiations about gov- 
ernment subsidies and other mat- 
ters. 

“Only then can we decide wheth- 
■ er, under such conditions, the fu- 
sion plan can make economic 
sense,* he said. 

Under the merger plan an- 
i nounced last October, Krupp and 
1 CRA Ltd, the Australian mining 
group, each would take a 35-per- 
1 cent stake in (he new company, 
StaMwerke- Krupp- Kl6ckner. 
■| — jjbH. KJOckner would hold the 
remaining 30-percent share. 

The plan would create a- steel- 
maker with annnal output of Pine 
million tons cf crude steel and a 
workforce of more than 40,000. 
Only Thysseu AG would be huger 
in West Gennany. 

Mr. Gfidde said that the merger 
cannot go ahead unless the govern- 
ments in Bonn and in the regional 
states affected by t he proposal 
agree to support SKK with public 

. mid^tat it needs*350 
. U4 million) to cover half rtf its 
expected res t r u ct uring costs. 

Meanwhile Friday, Krupp Stahl 
said it had a group net profit in 
1984 for- the first time since 1979. 
Krupp Stahl is 74-percent owned 
by Fried Krupp GmbH. 

The steel poop had a net profit 
of 2334 mutton Deutsche marks 
($7.60 nrillkHi) last year after a net 
loss of 344 million DM in 1983. 
Sales rose 10.1 percent, to 6.08 bD- 
Uoq DM, from 532 bfflion. - 

The chairman said that the group 
has shown a profit so far tins year, 
but he gave no details. He said-that 
the group expects to show a profit . 
‘■vl 985, based on figures so far in 
uwjyear. 

Krupp has been particularly 
hard-hit by the strong U 3. dollar, 
since iron ore is quoted in that 
currency, he noted. DoUar-streaglh 
last year added around 100 mfllinn 
DM to costs. 

In merger negotiations, the gov- 
ernment of Lower Saxony state las 
so far (kdined to back the proposal 
because Klddaier intends to dose 
its Georgsmaricnhuette mill in the 


state, with the loss of about 2,000 
jobs. 

The state also is Stacking the 
payment of 75 millio n DM in state 
aid to Klfick^for past restructur- 
ing measures. 

Mr. Gfidde said therndger could 
not gp through unless GttHgsmar- 

kohuette was dosed.. 

“Solutions must be found in the 
political arena,” he said. 

State dections are doe neat year 
in Lower Sammy, which is gov- 
erned. by the Christian Democrats. 
rfariffrtiftr Helmut Kohl's Chris- 
tian Democrat-led government also 
must approve aid for SKK. 

'A gov ernm ent auditing agency 
review of the proposed merger is 
expected to be akey factor in fleter- 
mming ff BcBm wB grant aid to 
SKK, but it is not dear when that 

review will be complete. 

Mr. Gfidde said that SKK also 
had to win the support of banks but 
talks had not yet started because 
the position, of tbcgwexanxnt and 
regional states remained unclear. 

“There’s no point in taking the 
third step before the first,” he said. 


Disney Studies 
Sale of Some 
Of firm’s Assets 

Atar York Tima Sorter 

NEW YORK —Walt Disney 
Productions says that it is coo- 
sidermg selling some of its as- 
sets, including all or parts ofits 
Disneyland and Walt Disney 
World amusement parks and its 
hotel properties, as part of a 
financial restructuring. 

Despite reports of the pro- 
posal Thursday, Disney’s stock 
price closed $2.62 lower at $87 a 
share on the New York Stock 
Exchange Friday. 

The company said if it sold 
either of (he parks, or parts of 
themTit would continue to op- 
erate than through leaseback 
arrangements or management 
contracts. 

Analysts said the move was 
logical far Disney, which last 
year endured a healed takeover 
baule that led to the Bass fam- 
ily of Texas gaining a 25-per- 
cent stake and to the hiring of a 
new management team led by 1 
Michael Eisner, former presi- | 
dent of Paramount Pictures. , 


IBM Says Profit Likely to Drop in 2d Quarter 


By David E. Sanger 

Mew York Tima Serrate 

NEW YORK — International 
Business Machines Coip., painting 
a worsening picture for its business 


dons issued by the company this 
year. 

The latest statement blamed 
“disappointing GNP growth” of 
only 0.7 percent in the first quarter, 
and the continued strength of the 


“We keep hearing from them IBM itself has made no such pre* 
that they still expect 'solid growth' diction. In response to an inquiry 
in 1985,” Ulric Weil, the technol- Thursday night, the company said 
ogy analyst for Morgan Stanley & that it sees no major changes in the 
Co„ said. “But bow are the)' going sales trends for any of its major 
to get solid growth if the first quar- product lines. However, die coul- 
ter was down significantly ana the pany's statements to analysis and 
second quarter is now also predict- reporters so far have suggested that 
ed to be down? It makes you won- the company, considered a bell- 


First-quarter profit fell 18 per- dusyy. has been constandy refigur- 
cent, to 5986 million, as revraue «g 11 s own numbers, 

rose a meager 2 percent to S9.76 Lost fall IBM predicted a good 
billion. first quarter for 1985. In January 

John F. Akc* IBȣ prudent 

radJtoteSInadl^SedTf b=n« than midhiu performance 
mM coSinued m S grow with the 

industry." Thus, sohu analysis sug- F f trua '? lhe rompanj 

that in & a ,ow r,K ' V™*- 

range of 3-5 percent might be con- Analysts widely interpreted that 


Ted Turner Explains Bisks in CBS Bid 


Byjterid A. Vise 

Waskingsm Pan Service 

WASHINGTON —The Atlanta 
broadcaster, Ted Tuner, respond- 
ed to questions raised by the Secu- 
rities anid Ejxhange Commission 
by fifing a statement with the agen- 
cy that emlainsthe risk to inves- 
tors in his rad to acquire control of 
CBS Inc. .. 

Mr. Turner’s fifing with the SEC 
on Thursday did not contain any 
material fhangf* in the terms of his 
-hostile takeover hid. There had 
been some speculation that he was 
able to attract partners to add cash 
to Ms proposal, “but he apparently 
has been unsuccessful in that ef- 
fort. 

There is no cash incMn Tomer’s 
bid. Instead, be offers CBS stock- 
holders a complex package — in- 
dudmg risky, unsecured securities 
called junk bonds — in exchange 
for their stock. He plans to help 
finance the proposed takeover by 
selling many of CBS’s businesses, 
Mr. Turner is waiting for govern- 
ment approval before taking his 
proposal to CBS stockholders. 

William G Bevins, vice president 
of finance of Turner Broadcasting 
System Ino, said that they expect 


m the near future, said that a which has severely hurt ter down significantly and the pany s s 

slight decline is probable m its IBM's profitability oversea/ Gross second quarter is now also predict- reporter 
second-quarter profit. national product measures the total ed» be down? It makes you won- the com 

The prediction late Thursday value of a nation’s goods and sex- der how ^ define ‘solid.’ ’’ wether c 
cameaftti a day of heavy trading in vices. First-quarter profit fell 18 per- dus yT- 6 

IBM shares, following reports that Bui the company said nothing cent, to $986 million, as revenue v 

industry analysts had trimmed about the state of the computer rose a meager 2 percent to S9.76 Last f 

their eaminy expectations for the business, at a time when other ma- billion. first qua 

company. On the New York Stock jor makers, including Digital John F Akers, IBM’s Dissident ^““1 
Exchange^ IBM gained 87 cents to Equipment Corp., Wang Laborato- andchfef eSSSive. has P said re- ' 

SI 28.87 Fnday. nes, Apple Computer Inc. and oth- centiy that be would be satisfied if te 5 "? 111 

Nanethdess, IBM said it was ere, say their sales continue to fall reM continued 10 “grow with the PI ! 

sticking to its outlook for “a strong far below earlier expectations. industry.” Thus, some analysis sug- "7: 

second half,” bolstered by the de- Analysts, however, say they be- gested that earnings growth in the P r 
livery of long-awaited new main- lievc the company has hardly been range of 3-5 percent might be con- Analy 
frame and disk storage systems, exempt from the industry down- sidered a success within IBM if the 10 mean 
The company also said that il ex- turn, and suggest that by the end of fortunes of competitors do not im- in the fi 
pects to exceed $50 bfllian in reve- the quarter business could women, prove. peeled i 

ones in 1 985. Thai would indicate a 

Conti Takes Over company notes 

tough year Tor computer compa- . . „ _ — 

nies, bat well short of the 143- AUStTUl lUetum Bank Baraputra Malaysia Bhd three pti 

the omnputer giant last year. HANNOVER, West Gennany supervise activities c*f its six subsid- them to 

Thursday’s statement was the — Continental Gummi-Werke AG iarics. The move follows the discov- Angeles, 
latest in a series of earnings predic- said Friday that it had taken over ery that the state-owned bank's n-j™ 

the Austrian tiremaker Semperit Hong Kong subsidiary had ip- LTTTiV 
_ ■» Reifen, strengthening its position curred bad debts of $1 billion in 4nnnhv 

• W1 rHS Rl/f as Western Europe's second-largest property loans from 1980 lo 1983. 

t Cf i/ LtlJlJ M-JIMJL tire maker, behind France’s Miche- Boeing Commerrial Airpane Co. 25 ^ , 1 

im of Seattle has introduced an ad- ? Vr 

, ., The acquisition was expected to vanced version of ihe 747 — the maKer 53 
pnor to constunmaaon of the raise cSriiare of theE^an 747-400, or Dash 400— that it said quaftef 


wether of U.S. high-technology in- 


sidered a success withinlBM if the 10 mean there would be no growth 
fortunes of competitors do not im- in the first half, but most still ex- 


pected a higher second quarter^ 


COMPANY NOTES 

Bank Btarapntra Malaysia Bhd three planes and spare engines for 
said it had set op a division to 12 years to GECC which will lease 
supervise activities of its six subsid- them to Western Airlines of Los 


curred bad debts of $1 billion in 
property loans from 1980 lo 1983. 
Boeing Com merri al Airplane Co. 


Dataproducts Corp. says it plans 
to cuts its worldwide work force to 
4.000 by July from 6,000 in January’ 
as part of a reorganization plan. 


{ration statement desetib- prior to consummation of the 
Turner's offer “will dear merger, it would be expected that 


rhr OFT TwTw^t f ^ market to 17 percent from the wiD fly longer distances, conserve ““ *" b Phillips Petroleum Co. said 

Sri? ?rv5 present 13 percent, the managing fuel and be cheaper to operate. quai1er ' shareholders overwhelmingjv ap- 

director, Helmut Werner, said. British Aerospace PLC said that Degussa AG said parent compa- proved proposals linked toils £ 

TRSsmri Conti Gummi bought 75 percent of the Civil Aviation Administration ny sales rose 4.5 percent to 4.7 struct unng plan designed to fend 

" Semperit Reifen from its parent, of China has signed an agreement billion Deutsche marks ($1.53 mil- off unwanted takeover attempts, 

mgt rewier Semperit AG, for 47 mfiBonDeut- to buy 10 BA 146-100sfor $150 lion) in the first half of fiscal 1985 

The. tiling, mauaes i»w sche marks (5153 milli on) The re- million. The 86-sear, four-engine from a year ago. The Frankfurt- Southwestern Energy Co. and 
mancjal nroiections. also savs ■ ■ . J _r._ , I „..i. „ J J : i u r- i r~> J 


the statement dears the SEC “we Failure to make required flymen 
can mail it to the shareholders," he would adversely affect TBS an 
said. “The document amplifies a might reader h insolvent" 
number of areas that the SEC The fifing, which indudes ne 
pointed out needed more explana- financial projections, also saj 
tion or disclosure. ” that, although TBS believes ti 

CBS has said repeatedly that it jnnk binds and other securitieit ‘ SemperitReifen 
exposes Mr. Turner’s takeover bid plans to offer m exchange for CBS Coya a Yusosla 
STS*, CBS said it plans to fflfcd md marte- 


Conti Gummi bought 75 percent of the Gvil Aviation Administration 
Semperit Reifen from its parent, of China has signed an agreement 


of sStie ^ Angeles-based primer 

vanced version of ihe 747 — the ma ^ er ^ P® 1 a R? 1,1 
747-400, or Dash 400 —that it said *f aI ads Ju ^ e ^°,, d 'j 

wiD fly longer distances, conserve “P* 15 ,osses ,n ^ f°H owin g 
fuel and be cheaper to operate. quarter. 

British Aerospace PLC said that Degussa AG said parent compa- 
the Gvil Aviation Administration ny sales rose 4.5 percent to 4.7 
of China has signed an agreement bulion Deutsche marks ($1.53 mil- 


Page 11 


Alfa Romeo 
Talks With GM 

The 4 Siivia ted Pros 

MILAN — Alfa Romeo 
SpA, an Italian state-run auto- 
maker. said Friday that talks 
with General Motors Corp. 
about a cooperation agreement 
were in the “exploratory stage.” 

Ettore Massacesi. the Italian 
company's chairman, added 
that “at the present stage any 
prediction about an agreement 
is premature." He did not con- 
firm reports that a possible 
transaction with GM might in- 
clude the takeos-er of a minority 
stake of Alfa Romeo bv the 
U.S. group. 

Alfa Romeo. Italy's second - 
laigest automaker "after Fiat 
SpA, is holding talks with sever- 
al European and U.S. automak- 
ers on joint ventures. 


month period. No profit figures 
were released. 

Mitsubishi Motors Corp- of To- 
kyo says that it and Mitsubishi 
Corp. want to raise their stakes in 
Hyundai Motor Co. to ?_5 percent 
each from 5 percent. A spokesman 
for Mitsubishi Motors said that the 
purchases would be made on the 
sharemarket. but he declined to 
elaborate. 


v tire maker. The year, 500mflhon-Hong-Kang-dol- 


Lastweek, CBSsmd it plans to W&l thus give Conti ac- lar ($64 35-wsMm) exchange-fadl- 

constda financed transactions - cess to markets in Eastern Europe, ity agreement wiU not be signed 

mchidmg a possible merger or the Mr. Werner said. Conti also a- until early next week, banking 


inrhiritng a possible nuiger or the 

repurchased some of its own »“ ‘ " m pects to benefit from Semperit’s sources said. Signing had been ex- 
shares — that would increase the devdey or be ma mtamro . success in selling tires in Japan, peeled this week, but no reason was 

price of CBS slock in order to de- where almost a fifth of the 5 J mil- given for the delay, 

feat the bid. Bon tires sold by the Austrian com- G Itab A Ca is leading a consor- 

Mr. Turner’s filing with the SEC pany in 1984 were sold Conti tram of Japanese companies that 

explains that, because his takeover Gummi’s stock closed Friday at has signeda $7 5- million lease 

14000 DM, oa^Fr^nStoct jgg. « A 0--i Hecrfic 
on borrowing, there are ra*s of SKfilmmission anoraval. Exchange, up 20 pfennigs from Credit ■ C^. for Borag i B-737-300 


ti-orlinv mnrV’i>tc for nnv ^ m (^uiau uuuyt, •'■J •jiwmii wi u»- «gucu 

Mr- Werner said. Conti also ex- until early next week, banking 
aJSL IS? ^ 10 benefit from Semperit’s sources said. Signing had been ex- 

H-taTC* pected ^us^weefc. but no reason was 


cations Commission approval. 5*7 

nonpayment of interest that could ^ ^ bem risina this Thursday. 

end up by hurting investors. week, amid market nimoxs that the I 

“In the event that TBS (Tomer company was gping to announce a 
Broadcasting) fails to make anym- merger. CBS officials said Thurs- 
terest or principal payment TBS day that no major announcement 
would be in default,” the fifing was planned, 
states. It continues: “As a result. The stock, which opened for 
the maricet value of TBS securities trading on Tuesday at l$Bi, dosed 
would decline significantly. In the Friday on the New York Stock Ex- 
event that such a failure occurred change at SI 17 JO, up Sl-625- 


aircrafL The consortium will lease 


day that Tin major announcement 


CBHIMIM BM AIM I HueerfMBL 


Floating Rate Notes 


May 31 


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DnEKNAHONAL POSITIONS 


SALES MANAGER 

South America 

Excellent opportunity with leading USA Com- 
pany, one of the world’s largest manufacturers 
of high quality replacement parts for commer- 
cial, industrial, and retail markets including such 
products as equipment, machinery, engines 
(auto and marine) products. Experience in sales 
and/or marketing required. Auto, truck, marine 
products or automotive aftermarket products 
experience desired but not required. WiU con- 
sider other sales experience in South America 
markets. Must be bilingual. Please call or send 
resume to: L. Karp, THOMAS MANGUM 
COMPANY, 930 Colorado BIvcL, Los Angeles, 
CA 90041. (213) 259-0600. 




La Direction Commetdale 


Non Dollar 


?! ** Wpi 



kWfti 


EKHUEH 


II)NDaSOCIOBER3t25,t98;x 

sixth aimual Intonation 

6fl Daily 

Eighties" ^ wffltafceptace on OctoibarM and25mLtHitkm. 

TWti»meofU^yea^scoDfcrenceis* < Sar^^ 



senior executives 


■—■■I | i ,1— ■■ 


r*. T » Vi l KTi 4 « mi iu « i ‘:'i i i :i . 


ManeContemce Office, 181 AvenneChaflesrieGaone, 
*521 NeuflWCedex, France. . . . 

•Mephone: {^l)74ff-l^E^^Tdex;03S95L 



aerospafbk de la Division H6Hcopt6res 

uraspatide de i'aerospcitiale SNI 

ttfOSpil'KI* 

wxosperf" 9 ^ fecherche potr son Etablissemenl de 
LA COURNEUVE ( 93 ) 

TRADUCTEUR 

BIUNGUE 

Francois - Anglais 

De formation superioure (ES1T, ISfT, maTfrfse,...) le cxindi- 
daf retenu aura 2 0 3 anodes d 'experience profession- 
neUe et une bonne connalssance dans le domaine 
adronautique. 

Envayer lettre manuscrite, CV, photo d 
Monsieur le Chef des Relations Soclales de 
f AEROSPATIALE S.N.I. 

2 & 20 avenue Marcel Cochin 93126 LA COURNEUVE 


Value Line 

INTRODUCTORY TRIAL 

only $75 

(about half the regular rate) 

If no member of your household has subscribed to Value 
line in the past two years, you can now receive fuli-p»e 
analyses of about 130 American stocks each week for the next 
12 weeks for $75. as a double bonus at no additional charge, 
you will also receive the 2000-pace bjuesore Reference Serv- 
ice (covering 1700 American stocks) and the 72-page booklet, 
"A Subscriber's Guide" which explains how enen intaperi- 
enced investors can apply thousands of hours af profes- 
sional nrsewtij to (bar own portfolios byfocusiriv on only 
two unequivocal ratings, one for Timeliness (Performance in 
next 12 months), the other fir Safety. 

We make this special offer because we have found that a Ugh 
percentage of those who try \5ilue line for a short period stay 
wfth it on a longterm basis. The increased drouIatiOTeri- 
ables us roprenride this service for &r less than woukJ hare 

to be charged our long-term subscribers were their number 
smaller. 5end payment along with name and address together 
with this ad to; Dept. 5i3BOi 

The Value Line Investment Survey 

\4dite Line, Iik^ 711 TTiiidAve^ New \brfc,N.Y 10017 

USA 

P2fywaxtokx^c«UTimcies(Srfti^l64.Frencfifr738,Swiasft-205. 
DM 242) and requests for information shodd be directed kj. Vilue 
Line, Ate Alexandre de Saax-Phalle. 1 tec. de^ Vitos. 7500? Raris. 
CIH551S3.59J 

DMribmcd by KLM Royal Dutdi Airiioes Pidalicanon Distributjon 
service Holland ADdw 4 weeks for ddhnery 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


JM 


L’Agmce NoKotmle Pour PEmplol 

AGENCE SPtaAUSfc DES ING^flHIRS ET CADRES 

12 Rue Blanche, 754 36 Farit CB3EX 09 
TeL » 280.61 .46. Bn. 71. ■ 285.44.40. Ext 42. 


• O0OUL DMNAOEMGMT; MaHurtfrig, 
MFG and ADM^ 59, Grad. Oiem. Eng.- 
1KSEAD, flaenf French, Ee^dt, Gennan. 20 
yuan e x perience in Management, Franca 


GENERAL MANAGEMENT-MARKET- 
ING AND SALES, 38, Pk. D. tired In Bus 
Ad., muKBnguol, 15 yam mter m Bongl 
■anaganant e xposure hi camumer prad- 


and Europe. Sola and prafB orimled. Able ire*, profit minded, ipedofat at new compo- 
te xtort or reorganize European ubvefiory, ny (pradurfs) laimch, sdra force hiriojj^rnin- 
wbhes dxrfkrtflpOfl epportuni l y. Kef.: 432- tng, mo U w rtn g, raorhetinfl strategy, strong 
PAKSS CAUtES 1/JCB. leadership, ofa*ty, organizer, performer. 

GENEKAL MANAGER: Fora, American SEEKS GB4ERAL MANAGER FOSmOK 
46, wadang papers, fluent in French plus Paris based, frequent travel OJL, no raloca- 
jom* Gemav wBling » TviecaW, spedd- ten. Met: 434-PAJttS CADRES 1/JCB. 
ixnd on French and Anglo^axan computer 
oMOun fi ng systems indhjrfng security outfits, 
data base and data eommunicatiar plus 
Treasury, Sadgah and Mortmtiw g with ae> 

aten of enterprise/ business la ke- 0 *ars. CONTROU ER, 35 yews old, MBA CO- 
Raf.: 43S-PAKSS CADRES 1/JCB. LUMBlAUNIVBtSITY + fUBKHBUSNESS 

TECHNICAL EHGWDSR, Irteraotenal SCHOOL, fully bSngual French/ Engfah, 
trodingf, 32. elee ho teehi u tis- Mi w Jia nicyBec- good Imawiadge e# Spanish. 10 yaantuwo- 
homes Autematen. Expert in data process* rienee in oudKnfl. finance manogement. 
ing, diptonu b) bkennltond IrabBog EngGsh, Goad experience in reporting, budgets, 
SpanWi. Professional experience 10 years strategic pfcmnmg in iorge or Ejrape- 


in Fiance and abroad. Technical aid sates m 


Good k n owledg e of a»«u- 


■qdpnMKtt goods and adwmeed tedmiogy mm/luxury good* business in Europe, 
one. Terfeteoi supervision. Sofas Manag e- SEEKS diaBenglng position hi rte m at l o rad 
awnt LOOKING sindlar situation to oaOte comptny wishing to expand frendi/Euro- 
ueeiMx ddoc5w>y-fkAN0E.A|good.flefc peon business. Ref.: 433-PAPtS GAPRE5 
436-PAR1S CADRES 1/JCB. 1/JCB. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
31 May 1985 

The net asset value (notations shown below are supplied by the Funds listed with the 
exception of come funds whose quotes are based an issue prices. The Mlowina 
marginal symbols Indicate frequency ot quotations supplied for the IHT: 

(d) -daily; (w) -weekly; (b) • W-monthly; (r) regular hr; (I) - irregularly. 


ALMAL MANAGEMENT 

twl At-AAol Trust. SA 

BANK JULIUS BAER & Ca Ltd 


Kw) Lloyds int'l Pacific—. SP I3&90 
i-tw] Llovds UH L Smaller Cos. _ S14.74 


—Id 1 BoertxmdL 

—id J Conbar— 

—id I Equiboer America 

—Id ) Eaulbaer Europe 

—Id ) Equibaer Pacific 

—Id 1 Grobar 

—Id J tt nfUim ' 

BANQUE INOOSUEZ 

—Id I Aslan Growtn Fund 

— (w) Dlvorbond _______ 

— (w) FI F— America 

— Iw) PIC— Film™ 

— — Iwl FIF— Pacific 

—Id) Indaeucx Multibonds A. 
—Id I indoeuez Muttibonds B. 


SFysaso — id i Class a 

SF 12MJH — Iw ) Class B - Ui 

. Sll&un — <w> Class C- Japan 

SF1245JW OBLIFLEX LIMITED 

SF ll?ijn — Iw) Multicurrency 

SF 10B4JW — Iw) Dehor Medium Term — 

SF 167400 — Iw) Dollar Long Term 

— iw) Japanese Yen 

.,1,— — I w) Pound Sterling 

— , Jlrfi —Iwl Deutsche Mork — 

- s Vt»oi —twl Dutcn Florin 

“ S 11J7 ~ <wl Swbs Fronc 

_ S16J) ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
_ SV 1 J 6 PB8SS78. Tlw Hogue f 0701460670 
_ S 15042 — Id ) Bevw Behsgingert++ 


BRITANNI APOB 271. St. Heller, Jersey PARI5BAS— GROUP 

— Iw) BrlLDollor Income- — S om — Id i Cortna international SBJL69 

— Iwl BffLS AAonogXUjn- S9JW —Iwl OBLl-DM - - DM 1.192.94 

— id 1 Brit. InlLSAAreiotusortt SI J170 — Iwl OBLIGESTION SF9145 

—Id I Brit. IntU Monoa-Portl 1 1.179* —Iwl OBLI-DOLLAR — S 1,17740 

— tw) Brit. Am. Inch Fd Ltd SI JUS — Iw) OBL 1 -YEN Y 101 ^ 0(1 

-Iw) BrftXteM Fund S 0 JUB -twIOBLI-GULDEN FL 1072.94 

— Iw) BrJLMonnaCorrencv— 1 14.14 -Id] PAR 01 L-FUND_ S9&99 

— WJBrlLJanatt Dir pierf.Fd— S0.M7 — fd/PARfNTERFUAiD— s 10848 

— (w) Brit Jersey Gilt FuraL— . — 10217- —Id) PAR US Treasury Bond S1HL59 

Hid ! HrtMStartS TSrtif FlSrn - “ SOJ54 ROYAL B. OF CAN ADAJ>OB24fcGUERNSEY 

Id) Brn. worm Team. Fund *0J54 ^. (wI RBC Canadion Fund Ltd *1141 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL -Hwl PBC For EosULPocJKc Fd— _ S KLBO* 

— Iw) Capital trttl Fund S3734 ,-^lwi SBC Inti CapiM Fd. *7U2 

—Iwl Capital Italia SA S1159 -+jwi RBC mil income Fd SIIJO* 

rsEniTCmui; MnncoBircti -+(d ) RBC MmCurrencv Fd. S 212 S 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES I j. 1^1 onr •«, u u« 

— Id I Actions Suhses SF 38400 RBC lwm „ 

—Id) Bond Valor 5wt SF I05J0 SKANDI FOND I NT L FUND 144-8-236270) 

— Cdl Band Voter EFmar* DM 1087D — (w)lnc.: Bid SS.I7* Otter HJP 

— Idl Bond Voter US-DOLLAR SI 1648 — IwJAcc.: Bid S5.19 Otter J5J7 

— Idl Bond Valor Yen Yen 1 06*91 DO citeucv, luTCDVJATinyAl l Tn 

—Id) Convert Voter Swt SF 11340 S'gfSSS&SJlsta 

-Id) Convert Voter US-DOLLAR. S117J4 j^^^^cuLondOfHI 1-377-0040 

, riHiw SFJUAJM — IB I 5HB tsona buna — 5 JUJJI 

-M I ttEEaZCaSSSIZZZ- SF 76^ -<"> SHB 'n" Gn »wtn Fund *21J>6 

S . F .1!?5 SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 


—Id I C5 Fonds-aunds 

—Id 1 CS Fends— Inti 
—Id ) CS Money Market Fund 


f 12S5S ~ td I America- Valor 


— Id > CS Money Market Fund DM 1M7J0 — id » D-Mark Bond Selection DM 117.76 


SF 16X75 —id ) Dollar Bond Selection 
—Id ) Florin Bond Selection 

— —Id) Inlt-rvnlor 


S 12944 
FL 121.99 
5F 91J10 
SF 562.00 
_£ 1IKLD2 


SF 86 J» 
SF I2IJS 
Y 10JMUI0 


—Id ) Energie— Valor ' 

—Id) Ussec 

—id ) Eurapo— Voter 5F 15425 — |d ) miervalar 

—Id l PacWc —Valor- — — SF167JI — (d ) japan Porttol 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC -Id ) Ster I Ira Bond Selection 

H^.77Uknd(m wall —Id ) Swiss Foreign Bond Sel. SF IDLES 

LONDON EC2 I0 1 »2ff?J97) — <d ) Swlssvalor New Series - SF 31(05 

tw! FlM twrv.Cra .iw Li d. V3H? — > Universal Bond Select — sf bsju 

(ml Winchester Dlversitled** S2146 — id i universal Fund™ 

Iml^J^wSer Rraicki 1 Ud 594^ —(a > yen Band Selection 

|w) Winchester Holdings F Fm% UN|QN BANK QF SWITZERLAND 

Iw) Worldwido Soairltles S/S 3^— 54X86 — M ) ^niCT U^. Sh. SF 41.25 

Iw) Worldwide Soectel S^2te_ 1 1 J96.9B —Id Braid- Invest—- SF jW 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM H|d ) Jwan-lnvest SF 937J0 

—fjd j Cpne witra - — —(d) SaTI South Atr.Sh. SF 50740 

—fid I Infl Ranienlond DM93J9 —(d I Sima (stock price) SF 197J0 

Dunn A HorgW 6 Lloyd George. Brussels union INVESTMENT Frank I art 

— Im] DXH Commodity Pool- snOTJ"" — <d I Unlrenta DM44.70 

-1^1 & Gote Poo! J 195.71 “• — t d l Unlfonds DM24J0 

— |m) Winch- LHe Fut. Pool — S 61486 •** — i UnlfOlt DM 7i-55 

— Im) Trans World Fut. PoaL. S 85147 — * —fa j UNIZINS. DM 111.95 

fac mgmt. ltd. iNv. advisers Other Funds 

1. Laurence P aunty Hill. E C4. 01-62X4680 

AttantiL— — — — r*113i Iw) Actnwnds investments Funa. 52144 

IliwIFACEroon 5 1089 n*>AMIMI *11* 

—I w I FACOrknial 3 26.71 (m)AHWLI rf SXB0 

Jr (w) Aouita internal hv>0] Fund_ S 12746 

FIDELITY POB 671 Hamilton Bermuda (r ) Arc* Finance IJ 5 —. 5878.97 

— (m) American Values Common „ SB5J7 (b | Arione S 1411.92 

— Im> Values Cunv4>re( SJOIJB tw) Trustcor mn Fd. |AEIF» S 10.19 

-Id ) Fidelity Airier. Assets, S 6944 (w j bnp interbond Fund S 10X73 

“15 ! EH!!i , ft¥ tral10 F i ln i *54$ tw) Bondseiex-lssue Pr SF 1J8-B 

—to 1 Ptemttv Dtecaverv Fund SI03 lin) Canada GUJ-Mortgogo Fd s 933 

SJSS W I Capttol Present. FdL inti S1U5 

— } FWe jty Far East Fund S20.1B <w) Citadel Fund 5182 

—Id 1 FWe jty inn. Fund- J S981 (d j cj.R. Australia Fund S 10.IM 

—Id ) Fidelity Orient Fwid S36J1 id ) cj.R. Jason Fund sum 

-Id ) F (dei ty Frontier Fund 51X35 lm) Cleveland Offstmre Fi — j 2J3148 

~ *5 1 SHX56 t wi CalumWoSecurllles FL1I6J7 

— Id ) Fidelity Sad. Growth Fi 5U66 (b ) COMETE S86X2B 

—Id ) Fidelity World Fund S 3236 < w > Convert. Fi InTI A Certs S 943 

FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN !*} Ctmw rt- Fi mn B Cam 5 27. >7 

c ye} Id) D. Witter Wld Wide I vtTst 51057 

— iwi kSw — " 1 5 io (b ) Drakkar Invest.Fund N.V_ 11.14X31 

—im) Strategic Trading * 1-12 {?.! SI5.*E? JiJff 


_ * .... JWJ Drevhis Inter continent — 

GEFINOR FUNDS. I w) The Establishment Trust S 1.13 

— <w) East Investment Fund 534X55 Id ) Eurooe Obi Krai tons (*75 

—Iw) Scottish World Fund £115471 I w) First Eagle Fund S144143I6 

—Iw) State St. American 516539 (b ) Fittv Store Ui 5 Bo I TO 

CapILGukLLIiLaiA gent ill -491 4330 Iw) Fixed income Traits S 10.19 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT C ORP . Pr SF 21X2 

f B ,'W.SI Peter PW1. Guernsey. 0481-9015 KSSS Setecllon Fi Tsf 7252 

Im) FlrturGAM S.A . .. . S11D21 (fi » CfJv.n. 1 1 In S2SA6 

iS® lnc Id ) Governm. Sec. Fund* S87J3 

\"\ Inc- 3 14L5? (u , Frank!- Trust Intetrfns — DM 4247 

tw) Haussmann Hldgs. N.V S11-C56 

tel SSS S y. IW) Hestla Funds S 106.19 

Iw) GAM Franc-wal SF 101.23 , uortzon c --~i S 1.164.70 

f d } te te7 l ? > te l S l rn"^7 (rn) IBEX Holdings Ltd SF 107/4 

(n) CAM North America inc S 1M.18 (b J ll_A irrtl Gold BOtua — s 9£8 

(W) GAM fi. ATOrtca Unit Tnisi . HWJDp ! - SliS 

te! S1,47 I Jw> InKrt^Fund-—- S30lS 

S'*! ■ iEm KITt. ,d I Imermlning Mut. Fi CI.'B'— 5469S8 

I w) GAM SlerL A Inti Unit Trust- 13445P lr 1 Inn Securities Fund ——— S930 

I ml GAM Systems Inc. SK&21 K \ '.yiSKnSc ■ - I-IM 4» m 

(w) GAM Worldwide Inc 514120 \ mSesl Attanr knies— HZ— SI, A 

(mi GAM TvchO SJL Class A S114S4 ,'r i iiSlfarhme Inti Fund SA 51158 

Iwl Japan Select Ion Fund 510721 

5947* Iw) Japan Pacific Fung S 10155 

515.13 uni JetterPtns. IntLLtd— — S ICWW.es 

51747 Id ) Kletnwart Benson mn Fd S2241 

5X97 (w| Ktelnwart Bens. Joa. Fd S 69.97 

J23.1B I wi Korea Growth Trust 59A5 

S 1024 Id ) L ft I com Fund S 123741 

Si 156 |wi Leverage Cup Hold S 17627 


- sie*J 

- 53826 

- S 34-51 

- S 1.13 

- m/5 
S 1441426 
. 5 Bel JO 
■W S 10.19 

SF 21825 

- 5728 
SF 7242 

- S2X06 

- SB? S3 


Id 1 GAM International inc. 5 10943 i n , i jgp V Hcridinas Ltd— 

In) GAM North America inc. S 104.18 2) iLAlntlGmdBWW- 

(w) GAM N. America Unit Trust. 1O«J0 p m i imertSidSA _ 

te!KSo*!f B S1,47 I Jw> !K£rt«Fi£?=: 

(w) GAMRlNT CORP. ■■■■ . ■. ^ id i lnierminina Mut, Fd. 

Tn,S *- Kfe? Ir ) inn Securttms Fund . 

. Cm) GAW SvSfWIft lflC. , Sluo^l (d 1 rnvetia DWS , 

fw) GAM Worldwide Inc Sl-ELZO K { ££3 Afianr laues_ 

(Mi) GAM TVCt® SJL Class A S114S4 } r , i^faHune Inti Fund 

G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. — 

—Iwl Berry Pat. Fi L ri- 
ll ) G.T. Applied Science 

— d ) G.7. Aseatj HJC GwtJlF 

— Iwl G.T. Asia Fund 

— d 1 G.T. Australia Fund 

— d ) G.T. Europe Fund— 

— Iwl G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund 
—Id > G.T. Dollar Fund 
—Id ) G.T. Bond Fund- 
— Id 1 G.T. Global Technlgv Fd 
—Id ) G.T. Handu Pathfinder 
—Id ) G.T. Investment Fund- 

Id ) G.T. Japan Small CiFund 

—Id ) G.T1 S^tTaimo Fun d StiS3 {wl 


14.95* Id ) LtouJboer S IJ15JU 

S 10.71 tw) Luxfunrt 57943 

5 1144 (ml AAognatund N.V S 17227 

52449 Id ) Mediolanum Sel. Fd. — — - S 1449 

51825 IbIMereore Y 109.966 

wu IwINAAT 51X71 

__ 527.17 Id 1 Nlkko Growtn Package Fd 5 X72022 

-B.iKissa-w— ■ *« ftSXB& ESBSE . a ia 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTL.XA. Iw) NAMF 5 15108 

Jersey. P.O. Box 63. Tel 0534 76029 I ml NSP F.l.T $15721 

Berne. Pil. Bo* 2621 Tel 4131 2J40S1 id 1 Pacific Horizon Investment 


— I d J Crossbow (Far East) 

— id) CSF (Balanced). 

—Id ) InlnL Band Fund 
—Id ) tni. Currency U4. 

— td I ITF Fd ITac h notogv) 

—Id) O-SeoS Fd (N. AMERICA) 


5F 11.10 Fd -.J1J2947 

SF2644 Iw) PANCURRI Inc S15J7 

if 1 Parfon Sw. R Ed Geneva SF 129740 

S2S.™ Ir i pgrmal Value Fund N.V £1,25623 

lb) Pletodw — $103728 

EBC TRUST CO. (JERSEY) LTD. !*J K££IT'iiUi cr^i VSHS 

Sidle®:: 1 BwZHisxScSS-— .S10S6 13 ! gS2£ i rJ2 d . L ERB4B 

— IO ) Short Term 'A' fDistrl 512209 {? , SF ffi2 

-d) Short Term-BMAeaiml— *1.1390 « } f£^«»^Ltoienw«jirg — S9JB 

-W) Short Term ■BWDJSr) 50B692 Jwt' 

i — r— swsi iwi state st. Bank Equtty HdosNV sui 

-iwl Long Term sa.gr [ w) strata investment FumU. $2042 

JARDINE FLEMING, P0B 70 GPO Ho Xg Id ) Syntax Lttl'CC lass A)' — 5 841 

— IP 1 JJ= Japan Trust Y 4W (wi Teatna Growth Fund SFE&44 

— ib) J.F South East Asia— S3W» (w) Tokyo Pot Hold. ISea)™__ SM23 

— (b I J.F Japan Technotogv Y 71 jw Iw) Tokyo Pac- Hold. N.V nMniw 

— f b ) J.F POCHIC SecJUATC) S5J6 Iw) TrmwooeJfir Fu nd- SBX03 

—ID ) JJ 5 Australia— 54.15 Id ) Turquoise F.^ut $ 1M4S 

LLOYDS BAN K I NT UPOB 438. Geneva 11 (S! rUSSyBrSwie n u Smb efSSS 

—Hwiuaydslnri Dollar S 11020 Sm, IIShm 

— 4-IwJ Llovtte Init Europe — SF 11520 7 1 UNicoFmSr* ^ n.fSHS 

-41.1 Ltovds Inl l Growth — SF 18620 [2! HS < £5K£rg 

-+lw) Llovds intt Income— SF 32150 [g! HH! VlffiMJ 

-+ ( W) l lavas mn N. America. 5 1«30 }“} Vftjf 

idt WtertH CikwICA 1 1120 

DM — Dwtschc Mark: BF — Belftium Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; lf — 
Luxembourg Francs: SF — Swiss Francs: a — asked ; + — oiler Prices:b — Md 
cnanoe P/v SM ton Per unit; NLA.— Not Avoilotte; N.C — NoiCommunlcated;*— 
New; S — suspended; S/S — Stack Soli!; • — Ex-Olvidend; •* — Ex.Rk- ”» _ 
Gross Per fo rm once Index April; • — Redemgl-Price- Ex-Csupon; ••— Farmeriv 
Worldwide Fund Lid: & - Otter Price mo. preilm. flhSws4+ - ttaftTffl 
price as on Amsterdam stock Exchange 














Er idays 

MEX 

Qoang 


; 21% 11% CDI s 

9% 5 CMICo 

4% i«CMXCa 
19h im CHS JU 1JB 
19% 9Vk CoesNJ 
B% 4V, tool e A 
U* 10 CaIRE 1-26 9X 

26 IBM Colmtn X 0 U 

- 6Vi 3»% Cotton n 
1% to Coitn wl 
■ IBM 7Vb Calprup XOtlOJ 

18% 94b Comco J2 IX 

• 3% l^ft Campnl 

72Vi 13% CMarco M 



2Vb 1% LSB 
3% 2% La Sara 

7% 2% LaPnt 4 

62 2» LaliuSo .130 

15% 119b LndBnn .54 17 9 

17Tb It LdmkS J2 IS 17 


25 IV, lto IV, + Vb 
12 2to 2to 2W— Vb 
■ 4 Hi 4% 4to + (b 

a St 53% 54 
5 14% 14% T4% 

46 17% >7% 17% -Mb 




Over-the-Counter 


Sale* lo NMrt 

loo* Hhm Lew SPAA-Oite 


IMS Hloti Low IPJULCb'K 


Mav 31 


CMCrb 

Cora CHs Air 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


S als 30 s 

cerC All 2.1 136 3«b 


693 2 Mb 1%— •» 
2016% 16% 16W- % 
997111b II 1IV4 + to 
I83I2V, 12% 12% + % 


Sale* Hi Net 

HO* HM Lew 3 P.M. CHI* 


sale* In Ne( 

1«0« High Lew JPJM.Qi'oe 


Coral In 86 Mb I 1 

Carter! t 07513% 11' 

Cascade 1.40a 10 446% 46 

Cose vs 5224% 24 

Oncors 74 9% B 

CntrBc ISO 55 20332% 32 

Centcor 3916% 16 


: A&MRJ 6 5% 5% 5%—% Auimfii 

f AOCTI 7515% 14% 15% + % AutoCp 

r 51 ?. * U 2512 * IT IS* t £ AuSfin 

m AEL* 2225 24 25 + % A va ere 

“ AFG 4021% 21 21 — % AvntGr 

f ASK 27815 14% 14% Avn ck 

f AST 58816% 16% 16% — % Avatar 

, AT8.E 17311% 11% 11% — % AvtoKSw 

? ATE 20 4 4 4 + % 

lAomRf 4423 22% 22%—% I 

I Abrams 3* IS 10 4% 6% 4% — % ■ 

Acad in 20 25 147 8 7%B+% 

l AcapRs 15% 5% 5% + % 

i Acetrta 125 9% 9% 9%— % 

f AcuRav 20 .9 17322% 2Mb 21%— % 

n AcetOS 1116 15% 15% 

L ACMAT 4 9. 9. 9. + % 

f Actvsn 32 *» *b *1. 

r Aclmas 5319% 19 19%—% 

■ AdocUt 547 3% 3% 3%— % 

.Adage 22 1% 7% 7%— % 

(Adltnw .70 25 1421 28 28 

‘ Adlo D9c A 723 22% 22%— % 

fAavCIr 321 1% 7Tb 8 

- AdCPt 32 4 3% 4 

L AdvLns 223 % % 

AdvGen 118 1% 3% 3% 

‘ AdvSam 21 12 11% 11% — % 

I Ad v Tel II 6% 6% 6% 

Aeauim 198 4% 4 4% + % 

AprSrsi 5*4 3% 3 3 

LOO S± 32 18'* 17lb 17% —1% 

80 48 300 14% 16% 16% 

AocvRt t 13133 3Mb 33 — % 

AH Caro 30 5% 5% 5% 

Air MO .10* 5 7313'- 13% 12% 

AlrWIsc 31816% 16 16% + % 

105 4% 6'. 6% + % 

25e 15 47l»'-4 16 14';.— % 

t 214'- 14% 14'- * % 

J0p 1.1 13526% 36% 36% 

1.40 45 174 33% U 33 1 * — % 

3*7 22 21% 23 — lb 

A la ere* 13 4% elb 6% + % 

50a S 35 42 56 SO +6 

JMo 2 462 741b 23% 31%—% 


■ Acetos 
L ACMAT 
' Actvsn 
: Aclmas 
• AdacLb 

■ Adoga 

r Adlsnw 
f Adla 


3316% 14% 14% ,au « 

44 4% 4% 4%— % Centcor 

2810% 10% 10W— % 75“}* 

383 7% 7 7% + % ChB?® 

21 8% 8% 8% CFdBk 1.12 3J 

55 5% 5% 5%— V» CJerBK 1-30 4.o 

1W 4% 3% 4% + % CnPrtSv JO 37 

13 8% 8% 8% — % £RsyLf .18 1.1 

131323% 22% 22% — % CWlsBn 54b 27 


136 3% 3% 3% 

86 1% 1% Mb 
87512% 11% 12% + % 
446% 46% 46% — % 
5224% 24 24 — Vb 

A* 3& + SS 

3914% 16 16% + % 

346 46 46 

5931 30% 31 — % 

3335% 35% 35% — % 
4526 25% 26 + % 

1 13% 13% 13% + V, 
2117 16% 16%— % 

331 31 31 


CRsvLt .18 1.1 2117 16% 16 

31323% 22% a%- % | S225S ■2? H .JJL. 21 
10218% 18 18% + % 30 11 1 ? 3 ?S *9 3?, 

1617 16% 16% | Cetltwl 8 1% lib 1! 

I CntvP c 591 5 111 II II 


Cetiturl 
CntyP* 

Cerdvn 

■ I Cerbr A 

51 — 14 I Cermrk 


r AavCIr 
- AdCpt 
, AdvEni 
.AdvGen 
" AdvSam 
k Ad V Tel 
Aeauim 
Apr 5vsi 
. All BCD 1X0 
tAIIBsh 80 48 

• ABCVRt t 

Air Carg 

Air MO .10* 8 

AlrWIsc 

AICkBC 

Alik MI J5c 15 

AhANt t 

AhkPc J0e 1.1 

> Ale>B • •* 

« AH m 

' Aioere* 

Allcoin J0a J 

r AletJWI XSo 2 


28 28 

22% 2»b — % 1 

7Tb 8 


AlleoBv 48 2X 139 20% 30V, 20% 

AlmOri 74 8 1391b 291b 2«Vb— % 

AUdBn 84 36 152533% 23% 23% — lb 

AliaCao IXOa 4J 1423 21% 33 

AlldRsh 731 Sb S% 5% + 'b 

AJInel 3*3 2^. 2Vi 3% 4 % 

AHrGar 8 12 11% 12 + W 

AlpMK 86 A'b * 4W + % 

AIpnGP 37 3% 3 3 — W 

88 B 7% B + U 


AHdRsh 
AJlnet 
AllvGar 
AlpMIC 
AIpnGP 
Ailmcr 
Attos 
ABun 
Amcnst M 28 

Anwtrd 
AWAIrf 
AmAav 
ABACI S 1.00 48 


120 45 *2 51V. 51 51 — W Wrmrtc 

6 716 6% 6% — % gtus 

■10a 1 j 4 7 7% 6% 7W ChadTh 

44 2Tb 2% 2% aunpPt .10 2X 

MW I B — 14 ChncCD 

21 7% 7% 7%— % OmpEn 

IXOa 28 6 36% 36 36U + W Owrolt 

80 1.1 170 30 70 — 3 „ .. 

104 IW 7% 8 +% CtarnSs JO IX 

.I0e A 15134 23% 23% — W Chattm 88 28 

274 45 249% 49% 49%—% gtkPnl 

781 17 1 22% 22% 22% 9? Tch 

.90 *3 24019 IS% 19 OlLwn 

174 47 58439% 29W 39% 4 ■- Chem*» 

17 9 SV. 9 

80 10X 31 fl 7% 8 

170 48 Zln. 27 1 - 27V. ChryE .13# IX 

80 18 627% 26'. 27%—% 1 - fl0 45 

IXOa 47 69 43W 42% 43% — 'L O' (Chi 

80 2X 11333% 33W 33% + % gJPK 

34 13 12% 13 4 W gill* _ „ 

156 37 748 48 48 — Vb Chncnd 1X0 5.1 

1X0 *8 80 30% 10% 10% Owner 

2712'b 11% 12 Oiranr 

24915% 15 15V s 
57 Si'i OW (W 

loss r* 1 | ClnnFs 174 25 

329ir-b ll'-l Wrtt: S'**"* 

IM 3'i 3 3% C nteS 

38 9 9 * CisXier 

'X4t 87 51 12% 12% 12'- s + Vb cipneu 

Ma 27 133 36% 36 J6W + W Cl'"?"' 

772 4 3 33 H 53% 54 * U 

.13 18 80 6% 6'*. £S9° 

*7i t 7 azFta 

180 3 1% 3 + lb CtiUtA 

-too l.l 30 VU 9W 9U CI:Ut B l.M *X 

91 9'- 91b 71- — v* CltvFed 80 4.1 

49018 ir* 18 +% CNNCP 83b 37 


Ct:Ut B l.M 68 
City Fed 80 4.1 


ABnkr 50 47 
AmCarr 
A Conti 
AmEcal 
AEbPl 
APdSL 
AmPrst « 
AFIetcS 
AFurn 
A Cm! 

AmlnLI 80 33 
Alrtleu s 

AlnvLf 20b U 
Am Lack 
AMoant 
AM5 
AMdSu 
AMIdl 
AN I Ins 1X0 37 

APHvG 
ACuosr 


3*3 2^» 3Vi 3r* * % 

8 12 11% 12 6 W 

86 6'b 6 6W + lb 

27 3t» 3 3 — W 

MB 7% B + W 
JMIUh 11 11 

130 11 W 10% 10% 

80 35 3314% 14 W 14W 

07e t.4 75 4ii 1 *1 

3813 10% 10 10% + % 

toil tl 11 —«• 

l.M 48 4 22 31% 21% 

50 *J 0711% 11% 11%—% 

45011% 10% ll's 4- Vb 

23 7W 7 7% 

133391b 38 28% + % 

109 6 S% A 

80 38 121 15% 151b 15% 4- % 

I 302 1% 0 B — 'i 

31021 23% 25%— W 

78 27 63 12% 12'i 12% + W 

58 18 1031 33% IS 35% + % 

80 33 43313% 13% 13% 

*27181] 18% 18% 

70b 37 10 * « 1 + % 

38 10% 10W 10'*— V* 

92 V 8' 4 BVs 

38 16% 16% 16% + Vb BO 

.11 IX 14B17. 16% 16% B9 

1414 11 % 1* 6 V. 

X8 37 64 33Tb 3Tb 32Vb — lb Bn 

4 4% 4% 4% Bn 

656 lb % Vb Bn 


1 25 ll r 4 11% It % 4- % Ckrtrsrs .10 8 

72 2.1 3015% 15% 1S%— % ClarkJ « *« 

50 4X 312 b 12% iIvs+'» ClaslcC 

2X0 85 2211* 231* 33'b n*«rn» 

JUS, B40 8*3, 

72 . -b 

170 38 74533% 13% 33W + W - 

80 25 *9 24'. 33% 23% — % CstSav 

7817% 17 lP.b + W CobHsc 

1241 S'- 15 IS 6 W CobeLb 

81 4% 4U 4% + •* Coca ail 56a 18 
103 13V] 13 13% W £9* ur . 

287 7% 7 7 — w Coeenle 

233 T.s 7 1 - 7Vt + % CBSmis 

333 1 Pu 17 17 COUJBR 

57% 7% 7% — w Coinen 
151 IVi 14* «%— % CojFOl 

110 4% 4% 4% 4- ■- Collins 

I 5 4% 4% 4% CalABn 

-20e 28 im lb n CBcopA X0* 3.9 

t 1B2 ■•„— ColnGos 15* 8.9 

150 4 0 6V37W 36% )T. t 1] ColLfAC 1X0 3X 

70 15 29*30% 39'. 26% f % £°i rTle 


2 1 % 4 % *% 

75 4Vb 4 4l 0 

nifl’i taw law 


AbecCo ICQ 4X 397 2AW 3S% 25% 
Am5It s 36 12V> 13 12% + Vi 

18S 3h 3% 3V) 

200 I H «* 
AWstCa I 22 7W 6% 7% + W 

Amritrs 180 5.0 109033 31% 32 + W 


4»36'. 35Vj 35% — Vb CmaAl''. 
16 4% 4% 4Va— V* Comgpl 


amrwst 

Atnciin 

AmskB .77 3.1 

Ames* 170o 37 

AiTipOdJ .40 ?8 

Anodlle .18 1.7 

Anwetc 
Anal r I 
Ancren 
Andrew 

Andros 

Apeoee .12 17 

ApaloC 
ApoleC 
AptBio « 

AMflCm 

AptdMt 

AptdSii* 

Archive 

ATDOSV 

Ari.-B 88b 30 

Artat 

Ashton 


AsdHsl .17 l.l 

AstraAl 
Aslrtm 
As Irons 
Astros* 

Attar 84 U 

AKGsLt 353 87 
All Am 800 18 

AtlntBc .90 17 

AtinFd 
AHFIn 

AtIPmi .06c 8 

All Res 
AtSeAr 3 
Audvid 

AjRtrnn 


SO 20% 20'~ 70% 

244 8 79b 7*1 

.73 3.1 I S3 23 W 23% 2JW + *i 

7»i37 33B 38 38 — 'b 

.40 24 1815% 14% I5U 4- W 

.18 1.7 25 6 5% 6 

405 14 13% 13% — lb 

Mia 99b ID + Vb 

61 12% 1? 12 — V a 

228 21% 22 23% + U 

66 4Tb 49b 4% — 

.12 17 35 99b 0% 9% I 

7837 IBVi 14% 18 + % ■ 

13502 IB 171b 17%— % cCBb 88 

I7SW 2J% 26 + *b CCOR 

10714% 14% 14% — '.b CPRIlb 

093 36 24 %25>b- , 4 CBTBs 80 

HlO'.b 10 lO'.b + '» CBTCP 180 
a tV, 6% CCXNI 

5020% 20 M%— U CML 

80b 30 4l36*b St 9b 34% — % C PI 

96 8 7% 7%— % CPT 

847 9% 9'v 9U CSP 


106811% 11% 11% ComClr 2.12 17 

siiy-b 14% 15'b— 'e CmeeU 1X4 25 

1379 1% 17, 1=*, + >, CmBCol 7* 14 

.9 246 IS 14% 15 + W CrnCJBn 2X0 47 

49 1% 1% l'.j CmdFd 

44026 2Tr 25ib— W CrtilSnr 50a A9 
1.1 3618'!. II IB + 'b CwlltlF 

125 8V» 8 8% CmwSv 

46TJ'i WA W « + V4 CcmAm 
2016% 16". 16% — % Comlnd 78 17 

18 1554% S4i* S4l* — '* CemSrs 

425 9 7% 7% — % ComShr 80 67 

J 34 19Vb 19 19% CltlBCd! 

15 17zri 36% 27% + % Comooa 

_ CmpaT 

C 1 Cmpo 


.1 10311% 11% 11% — 


10510% 10'b lOib— % cadve 
SB 4% 4'b 4V* CAC1 


74 4% 4’b 4’« CAC1 

2 n»b 111] U'U CbfYSC 

S.H" 7 L Cadmus 

71 l?v> 17 iTVi e v. Calibre 

85 30% 33'- 30% CdlAmp 

334% 24'A MU— % CalMte 

633!b 33% 33'b - % Coisivg 

JO 11% 11% 11% CalWtrs 280 

BID'S 10'b 10’b Gallon P 

5 8 S 8 CnFnr .16 

1203* 35% 36 — ■- Co nortC 

314 1s% 16 lfl — '-b Canon I 

254 34i'.- We 24'. Conrad 

9 1'* 3% 3% — i« CapFSL 


Cadmus 76 17 
Calibre 


88 28 7331% 31*. 31 W— '. CmpSy i 

44 7% 7W 7% Campus 

615 6 S'b SVi— CCTC 
80 11 31 SOW 19 19 — % Cmp* 

180 4X K45V* 45 45% + W CPtAut 

#2J0 20 20 — - CmoDI 

12 89b 8% 8% Co>Ent 

476 17W >6% 17W— Vb CftuMM 
252 6W D 6>b + % Cmpltti 

165 B’b 8W S% + % CmpLR 

10 4U 4% 4% Cm DI M 

*0 2% 2% 2% CniBNet 

246 4 3% 1%— W CmpPflS 

5*1 28 16020% 20 Cmofc 

76 17 3 21V. 21 W ST- + ‘i CmTsks 

14 2 n. I'm— Vb Crroutn 

170 2% 2% STb ♦ Vb C'* cM 

401 9% 9'b 9Vb + Vb Ccipirc 

50 4l» t'b 4'* + % Cmsrve 

180 s.7 1145% 44 45% +1% comshr 

16 3 2% STb Comstk 

.16 1.4 9311% 11% 11% Cnmtp 

430 18 1T% 171b + % cower. 

Xlr .9 IBS 23' 3 23% 7T j - w CokpM 
f 714 7 1 . 7’-a 1 Coni'- 

70 28 104 10 9% 9-y + % I conr.vn 


Cetiturl 8 1% Tvb 1% + VW 

CntvP s X9I 5 111 II It 

42 13% 13V4 13% + % 
.12 17 7 7U. 7 7 

85 2% 2% 2% 

1268 12% 12% 12% + Vb 
ChadTh 30 % % % — W 

OimpPt .10 28 10 5% 5% 5Vb + V* 

ChncCD 31 5% 5% 5%— % 

OmpEn 1P1 5% 4% 5% + M 

51 10 9Vb 9Vb — 1 
5 6>i 6 VI 6Vk 

ChrmSs 70 IX SB at 19% 19% 

' 88 28 10 law 1BU law— % 

330 19% 18% 19 + W 

47 8% BW 8% + % 
78 18 190 27% 26% 26%—% 
Chemca M 6% 6 6 

CtlFab 2 A'— 5% Hi 

Cherokr 4 17 18% 17% IffV. + % 

ChryE .12# IX 2011V* llVb 119% 
ChesUfs 1X0 65 20 24% 24% 74% — 9b 

90210% lOVb I0%— Vb 
8683 % 82 Vb 83% + % 

1427 26% 36%— Vb 

amend 1x0 5.1 4419% 19% 19% + v. 

Chattier 460 30 W 29% 30*i 4- Vk 

Chronr 129 Pi B% B%— W 

. ChrOw 5 78 2.1 Ml 181b 17% 17%—% 

| Qivm 3 .10 15 1134 TVb 6% 6%— % 

ClrmFs 174 25 19SOVb 50 50% 

<-InMlr ,01r 656 20% 19V: 30% + % 

■12o 7 49 34V: 34 34V] + % 

421 18% IIW 18% 
t 4 7% 7% 7%— % 

38 5% 5% 5% + Vb 

170 35 5575 34V. 34%— % 

St 38 664 21% 21% 21%—% 

1X4 38 9730% 30% 30% + % 

t 2038 37Vi 37\b— % 

CtsUtB l.M «X I032W 32% 32V, 

city Fea 80 4.1 56010% 9% 9% — Vb 

CtvNCp 83b 37 122Tb 27% ZTVj 

CtolrSr * .10 A hJ?« 23 23% + % 

50 35 313$% 25 25 

8 7% 7% 7'A 

ClearCn 4317% 17% 17% 

CfevfRT 2X0 9.9 It S8*k 19% 20% + % 

1*9 20% 20% 20% + % 

1914% 14Vb 14V, — % 

I71SW 14% 14% — 1* 

20 3'b 3 3% 

#0 IT. 16% 1TA + % 
CocuBlf 56d 18 *00339% W-, 39 + 

303 14% 14 14'b— VS> 

_ 213 2% 2% 21. 

Cnhmls 42019% 17% 18 —1% 

127 4% 4'b 4% + 1* 

33 lJTk 13% 13% + 1% 

521% 21W 21% + % 
23C 4% 4'b 4% 

.480 38 11171b IT- 17% — V. 

CEcqd A M3m 3,9 164 15% 14V] 15% + % 

CoinGos 15* e.9 28 17% 17VS 17V, 

ColLfAC 1X0 3X *7 32 Vb 13 33 — % 

26116% 16% T6H — V11 
Jt 3.7 51319'* 19% 19*b 
14 flv* g B'b 
34810% 9% 10 + % 

GoluMM 1X0 IX S33V] 33’b 33'b— 2% 

Comars 74514% 13*, 14% + % 

Comorc 22 .1 3914% 13% 13% — % 

earnest* .12 8 237*91. 9’b 27’b + % 

.11 18 140812% 1»% 11V]— y, 
279 2% 2Vb 2%_ Vfc 
2.10 5J ICR] 3«% 39% 

9 4% 4% 4". 

ComB Pi 22 IB’b 17% 18<b + % 

ComBsh 2X8 38 14 55'. 54Vi 55 + ij 

ComClr 2.12 2J 39 79 78 79 +1 

CmceVJ 1X4 25 25361# 36% 36% + w 

CmBCol 7* 16 4314% 13% 13% 

CntCIBn 2X0 47 547% 47% 47% + Vb 

CmdFd 119 13% 13 13% 

CmlSHr 59a A9 514 ID’i 10 10W + '.y 

!74el6X 71 7% 79b 7% + % 

1 12 12 12 * VS 

W 3Vi 2 2 - Vb 

Comlnd 58 15 87628% 28 lb 23% — % 

CemSrs B510 9% 9*#— v. 

ComShr 50 65 40 7% V.i 9% + Vb 

CmoCdS 43222 21% 23 

11C1 STb 8% 8% 

Xlr 1111 ifly* 11 

8 C 18 76429% 28% 29 

7 Sib 51b SV'i— 4b 
215 9’b 9Vb 9'b 

25 3 2% 27b- W 

2074 9% B'b 9% + VS 
I90«S4% 23% 74% — Vb 
104 61b i'b 6Tb -t H 
08 7 1111 II 11 + lb 


3X0O1312 44522% 23% 
1x0a BA 82 199b 18% 
IXBalDX IBS 16 ISVi 
3X0 132 23422% 22% 
188 32 2345% 45% 

-60# 12 535 35 

152 5.1 13 ® 30 

141 4% 4 Hi 

X5e 12 7 4% 4 

180 45 1729% 28 Hr 

512V, 12% 
3715 14% 

111 5% 5 
XB 8 138 20V, 20 
38 5% 5V, 

26* 45 22 8 8 

2708 6% 6Vb 
134116% 15% 
114 3 Vi 3% 
80 22 30M1BV, IBVb 
19821% 20 

47B S'.T 

2X8 32 20053% 53% 
146 2Vb 3% 
47 44b 4Vb 
5 61k 6% 
80 IX 121% 21% 
91 lib % 
.14 1.1 112% 12% 

56 3X 221S 14Tb 
10 9% 9% 
87326% 2AVb 
I 7 7 

11 15 IS 

50 25 11152Mb 28% 
1 4V. 4% 

2613% 13V, 
At 18 1331% 31 VI 

54 45 60199, 19% 

56 25 29722% 22% 
58 1.1 80 7Vb 7 

1024 23% 

1368 16 14% 


sieNud 
_ <4 EleRnt 
_ % ElcSd 
ECnlsrl 
+ Vb Eld Mis 
E Iron El 

+ V3 Emcor 

_ <b EmpAIr 
+ -m Emulex 
+ 2 End to 
Endvco 
EndoLx 
+ vb End wtB 


Saws In Net 

100s KM, Lew 3P5A.aiUe 

HO 15 % 151b 15% — Vi Fudiek 


21 14% 14 14% + % 

171211b 20V: 20%—% 

2012% 12% 12% — V, 
4610% 10 10U 

29212 111ft 12 

37 %. «i %t 

22 9% 8% 9 + % 

238 9 B% B% 

6 4 3% 4 + % 

100 6% 6% 6% + lb 

22513% 13 13V, + lb 

81 8Vb 8% Mb + % 


Sales m Not 

1801 HW L«W JPALCtTee 
118 71b » TVb 


14W + W iFmHBs J2 2X 190161b IStb 15%— Mi 


+ % I Exovlr 
+ Vb I 


+ vs Enrgos IM. 62 10126 25 26 + V, 

_ 14 Ensnlh 1.08b 52 219 19 19 

EnoCnv 53 18% 11% 18% + Ur 

+ V* EnFad 22011% II 11% + % 

— i* EnsOII s 211 m 8% 

Enochs 20 15 1613% 13Vb 13% + % 

+ w EnfrCet 22312% 11% 12 + % 

Envrdn 67 5 4% 4% 

EnvSy s 13518% 17% 18 + % 

EnvrTs 10210% 914 9% + % 

ElUoBI 141 13% 13% 1314 + % 

+ Vb Epson 1610% 1014 1014— % 

_ lb Edsco 12 9% 9% 9% 

+ % Eauat 24616% 16% 16%— lb 

Ecu Ion 14 5% 51b 5% 

+ 14 Eat Bca 540 2.9 57299b 28% 28% — %. 

EalwraB 128 S.I 10225% 25 25 

+ % Eaton 3 U Ml 7% 76b — % 

+ vb ErkrTI 55e 28 123025 34% 34?b— % 

EvnSul 5 15% 15% 15% + % 

Evrud 2 3V4 3% 3Vt + % 

EkChfnt 114 14 14—44 

Exovlr 146 10% 10 10% + % 


. ^ FDP 5 8% «% 8% + % 

+ J4FMI X2e 5 660 7% 6% 7 + % 

— 16 Fob Will JO 13 77 15% 15% 15% +1 
.... Falru, .16 28 39 6% 6 6% 

+1% FalrFIn 3 9% 9% 9% + % 

I FamHI 1 1 fc h W + b 

FrmHm 47026% 25% 26% + % 

... FcrmF | 289191b 18% 18%—% 

*JS '* I* FrmHo f 23 4 3% 4 + % 

7 i. 7 2,_ t’S PTmG 1J6 2.9 402619b 4Hb 611b— % 

2? Si £?±S FarrCo 34 20 1512% 12 12 — % 

ISIS'* *?5 ,?£ + S «*8tM SB1H% 10% 10% + H 

4?1 VS 11% «1%~% FedGps 22*521% 20% 20% + % 


16 7% 7% 7% + Vb Feroftu 

396319Tb 18% 19% +1 Ftbnm 

66 6% *% *14— % FMVcr 

411% 111b 11% + % FHIhTs 

1831 24 23 24 +1 Fl ogle 

80 6% 6% 6% + Vb Flhntec 
396 9* 96 +1 Flllrltt 

29620 19V, 20 + % Final cn 

39812% 11% 12% + Vb Fin Inst 
161 4% 4% 49b + Vb FJnomx 

1 7% 2% 2% Flnluan 

10 18% 18% 18% FAlaBS 


58 10% 10% 10% + % 
22*521% 20% 20% + % 
327 5% 5% SH— W 
2620% 19% 19%— % 
60 57% 57% 57% 
3151% 51% 51% + 14 
6534% 3414 34% + 14 
52920% 20% 30% — % 
7 ,6% 16% 16% — % 
17 4% 4% 4%— % 

31 7 6% 7 -rl 

204 716 7 79b + lb 

20113% 1314 13% 


-28b IX 2515% 15% 15%—% 

114 7% 7% 7% 

214 14 14 +Vb 

4 12W 12 12 

.10 S Mil 10% 11 + % 

*2 St % %+* 

55448% 47% 4714—% 

MU 18 15 14% 15 + % 

.10* 8 227 27 27 —114 

XSe 8 5 12 12 12 + Vi 

610V4 18% 10V, + % 

.75 r 4X 3515% 15% 15% — Vb 

93 2% 19b 2 

U 4 3% 4 

4238 B% 7% 8 + % 

.18 2 241V* 41V* 41(4 + % 

TO 4 % 4 % 4 % + Vb 

XSe IX 91 5% 5 5 

23814 13% 13% 

X8 1X 65 7% 79b 7% + Vb 

JOB IX 1113% 13% 13% — % 

2A 1J 80*620% 20 2014— lb 

1J0 6.1 TOSS 28 28 + % 

-57 3X 34 17% 17 17% + % 

XSe 4X 3313 1214 12 +14 

24 12 3721 2014 2094— % 

83 % % lb 

1081 14% 14 14% + Vb 

27 13 12% 13 

M 45 39171b 17 17 

At 3X J3% 12% 1Z%— 14 

93 6% 414 614— % 

19 81b 8 I 

5414% 1414 1414— lb 
45 3% 3% 1% 

133S7 6Vb 5% 4«4 + % 

12 7% 7% 7% 

X5e A 25 12% 12 12 — Vb 

A8r 28 6 20 19% 20 

17611 10% 11 

JOe 7X B 6% 6% 6%— % 

1011 22% 21% 2214 + lb 
15% 5% 5% + % 

2 1314 13v* 1314 
211 13% 129b 13Vb— V* 

147 8 714 714— % 

71 6% 61b 6% 

1581614 16% 16% 

10 1514 15% 15% 

JO 25 227 0 714 B +14 JoriiLf* 

19615% 15 15 Jocbsn 

xso 8 712% 12 12% + % JomWtr 


Soles Hi Net 

IMS High Lew SPJVLChlW 

10 2% 2% 2% LlCCIas 

7825 24V, 25 lS 

14 3% 3V> 3% LonaF 

4902114 21 21% 4- % Lotus 

7412% 121b 12Vb - LOBactl 

7M % ft 

, "12 *1 vre CZ 

298 5% 49b 5 


Sa%*tn m 

Ml* HMt Law 3PJM.CVM 

XS X 75145 44Vb 4414 /" 
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N 











































































^7v V:.;;..,-: 


INTERINATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


Page 13 


Failure to Try Hutton Case Defended Analysts See 

U.S. Aule Says Trial Might H ave(^ ^*88®* ^UtS 


Canada’s Secretive Family Firm 


By Michael Wines 

Lot Angeles Tuna Service 

WASH INGTON — The Justice 
Department, in the most detailed 
defense yet of its decision sot to 
prosecute individuals in the RF. 
Hutton <& Co. check- kiting investi- 
gation. has said that settling the 
vjtse earlier this month averted a 
lengthy, legally uncertain trial that 
might have caused a financial pan-' 
ic 

In a letter to Senator Thomas F. 
Eaglet on, a Democrat of Missouri 
who serves cm the Select Commit- 
tee cm Ethics, an assistant attorney' 

v 1 n " 


worth more than jl djiHlfion . had 
shewn a seftnesstowa^^to^^ 

. lar crime by the Justice Depart- 
ment's top ranks.' 

Mr. Eatfctoo, who tad sharply 
attacked the agreement in a letter 
to Attorney General Edwin Meese 
3d, said Thursday -that the depart- 
ment’s ddfensc^simply won’t fly.” 

In jt related mow; an aide to 
Smatnr Ctaries'McC Mathias of. 
Maiytand, thcSftxifld^anJcmg Re- 
publican on the ' Senate Judiciary 
Committee, said the panel would 
examine die Hatton agreement this 
summer in hearings on white-collar 
crime. The House Jwficiaiy Com- 
miUee Jm scheduled similar hear- 


ken “primarily responsible* for 
the multibiDioo-doUar yhwn e, in 
which 400 bm rl re w ere HrfnnwWi 
The prosecuti o n of the two would 
be “very difficult,” Mr. Troll 
wrote. 

tfOur career prosecutors opted 
tar the numerous overwhelming 
benefits of tte immediate rota- 
tion,” Mr. Trott wrote, “and we' 
find their judgment to be absolute- 
ly sound and above reproach.” 

But the explanation failed to 
sLem persistent congressional 
charges that the Hutton settlement, - 


The six-pagclettcr from Mr. 
Trott defended as “extraordinary” 
: the' Hatton setflement, which re- 


Reuten 

WIESBADEN, West Germany 
— West Ge rman importprkes feU 
’J> percent in April fromMarcb, 
dpt were 6J percent higher than in 
April 1984, the Federal Statistics 
Office said Friday. 


' written bemans izCpvadraft checks 
to banks, Jhen used the funds to 
. make millio ns more in illegal inler- 
csl . ' \ • 

Hutton -pleaded guilty to 2,000 
--counts of Baud, paid a 52-uhnion 
fine and S750,0w in prosecution 
costs, and agreed to repay the vic- 
timized banes for at least 58 m3- 
Bon in interest they had lost 
■While it ^department policy to 
hold individuals rather than coro- 
pamesittponsble for crimes, Mr. 
Trott dated, the benefits of the 
Hutton setttemeat “were so sub- 
stantial that they deariy warranted 
-an exception to our policy." 

P ro aA htio n of the two Hntton 
employees, .both non-executive 
workers in the company's New 
York; cash-management offices. 


would have been “veiy thorny” be- 
cause <rf recent Supreme Court rul- 
mgs that have clouded the 21 reality 
of cheek-kiting, he wrote. He also 
said a trial would not have assured 
^payment of all b anks who lost 
money in the fraud. 

Moreover, he wrote, a lengthy 
trial uad the capacity to undercut 
public confidence" m the banks 
that bad suffered losses under the 
Hutton scheme. 

“One has only to look to the 
recent problems m Ohio and Mary- 
land,” where savings and loan asso- 
ciations have suffered runs mi de- 
posits, “to see how fragile public 
confidence can be,” Mr. Trott 
wrote. 

Mr. Eagieton rejected those ex- 
planations Thursday, saying that 

he “still cannot comprehend how, 
with 2,000 felony cotmls returned 
in this case, no one is guilty of a 
crime.” 

Senate aides familiar with the 
case also questioned the tetter's ex- 
cuses. Among questions left unan- 
swered, they said, were why a fraud 
scheme that coded in 1982, leaving 
no mortally wounded banks, re- 
quired immediate settlement to 
avoid a public panic. 

They also questioned why Hut- 
ton had agreed to such a huge cash 
settlement if even the conviction of 
two lower-levri workers was uncer- 
tain at best. 

“The question that has to be 
raised is, why it was so important to 
Hntton to avoid any individual 
prosecution?” a Senate aide 
“The question, really, is, what’s the 
tradeoff?” 


(Continued from Page 9 ) 

mists believe that, in the long run, 
persistently high deficits hurt 
growth, because they keep interests 
rates higher than they otherwise 
would be, curb business investment 
and weaken the competitiveness of 
UJS. industry and agriculture. 

Some fear that, sooner or later, 
dhe swelling national debt will be 
inflationary, as the Federal Reserve 
win finally be driven to monetize 
the debt — to create too much 
money to enable the government to 
finance the national debt. On the 
other side, if a tough Fed chairman 
such as Paul A. Voldcer refuses to 
permit high inflation, that will, 
with huge public borrowing needs, 
drive up interest rates and retard 
econ o mic growth. 

There are, to be snre, strong pro- 
growth dements in the tax pirn, 
especially the art in tax rates and 
“the perception of fairness,” which, 
as the president argues, should en- 
courage incentives for work, sav- 
ing, risk-taking, investment and in- 
novation. Changes in the 
capital-cost recovery system, 
though less of a bonanza for some 
than the existing system, remains 
generous and would be less distort- 
ing of economic choices among 
new investments in structures, 
equipment anH inventories. There 
is also aid f or research and devdop- 
ment 

Yet, with all its strengths corn- . 
pared with the current tax system,' 
the critical issue about the coming 
tax struggle is whether Congress 
can keep the tax legislation from 
becoming a major tax cut. " 


(Continued from Page 9) 
wear yarmnjkcs and dark suits re- 
flecting their Orthodox Jewish be- 
liefs and dose their construction 
sites on Jewish holidays as well as 
others, are said to contribute one- 
tenth of their ImmwiM income to 
worthy causes. 

Olympia & York has a lean man- 
agement team. The company has 
only 700 employees, compared 
with 1,900 at radiiiar. Fairview 
Corpn the publicly held. Toronto- 
based real estate company. Most 
investment decisions are said to be 
made by Albert, president, and 
Paul, executive vice president 
Sometimes, associates say, those 
decisions are made on the basis of 
quick corridor conversations. 

The Rekhmann brothers fol- 
lowed a winding trail to C* n *A*, 
starting a tile business here in 1956. 
Thar father had bear a successful 
entrepreneur in Austria before 
moving to Tangiers and Morocco, 
then to Canada. The family’s deri- 
sion to buDd a warehouse in. 1958 
was its first foray into the North 

.American real estate business. 

Now, the family is estimated to 
make a profit of more than 
$500,000 a day from its worldwide 
network of 100 skyscrapers and 


other investments. In addition to 
its own holdings, real estate invest- 
ments in other companies include a 
22J-percem stakem Cadillac Fab- 
view, controlled by the Bronfman 
family, and 36 percent of Trizec 
Corp- one of Canada's biggest 
shoppmg-cea-ter and office- bald- 
ing devdopere. 

The Rei ch man ns also have ex- 
panded into Canada’s financial 
arena. They own 13 percent of Tri- 
ton Financial Corp, with interests 
in banking, insuranne and real es- 
tate. 

Previous oil interests include a 
13-percent stake in Hiram Walker 
Resources Ltd.; 49 percent of 
Brinco Ltd., and an indirect inter- 
est in Coseka Resources Ltd. 

In Gulf ( VnftHn analysis say 
that the Rdchmanns are baying a 
company with the best position in 
Canada'spotentiaQy rich offshore 
sectors. Gulf owns 25 percent of 
the Hibernia oilfield off the coast 
of Newfoundland. Last year, it 
drilled <me of the most productive 
wdls in the Canadian part of the 
Beaufort Sea — the Amaufjgafc. ca- 
pable of pumping oil at 13,200 bar- 
iris a day. 

Gulf also has been perhaps the 
best explorer among major ou com- 


panies onshore in the last three 
years. It participated in the Gulf 
Rwnscy fmd northeast of Calgary; 
the Detail play in British Colum- 
bia, and Peerless Lake in northern 
Alberta. 

The company’s ouLpul of 
123,000 barrels a day is behind only 
that of Imperial Oil Ltd., which is 
controlled by Exxon Corp, and 
Texaco Canada Jnc. a unit of Tex- 
aco Inc. of the United States. Un- j 
like most Canadian majors, Gulf 1 
has largely managed to replace its i 
production with new finds of con- 
ventional oil each year. 

The Rridunmns have not said 
how they plan to finance the Gulf 
purchase, although a number of an- 
alysis suggest that they are so cadi- i 
rich that limy could amply have 
written a 522-billion check if they 
wished. 

James Doak, an analyst with 
Hist Marathon Securities Ltd. in 
Toronto, suggests that if the deal 
was financed by banks at an II- 
percent rate, the interest cost would 
come to about $120 million a year. 
The Rrichmanns would get only 
about 552 million a year in divi- 
dends from their part of Gulf Can- 
ada. which would then leave a $68- 
miTlinn “ financing gap.” 


Apple Expected 
To Restructure 

New York Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple 
Computer Inc. will shortly an- 
nounce a nuqor restructuring in 
an effort to streamline its oper- 
ations and cope with rapidly 
declining sales, a source close to 
the company said. Apple de- 
clined to comment on the re- 
port. 

The plan would dose the two 
separate product groups in Ap- 
ple, the Macintosh ana Apple u 
groups, the source said Thurs- 
day. They would be replaced by 
a division in charge of manufac- 
turing and product develop- 
ment for all Apple products and 
another in charge of sales and 
marketing of all products. 

One result of the reorganiza- 
tion would be that a co-founder 
of Apple, Steven Jobs, now the 
head of the Macintosh division, 
would have no responsibility 
for day-to-day operations. He 
would, however, remain chair- 
man. 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE I HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


SERVICES 


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-.-ah.- N 


** 


Page 14 


ACROSS 

1 Avoid formal 
nuptials 
6 Chateau story 

11 embarrass 
16 Poke 

19 Unit of 
capacitance 

20 Ancient 
stringed 
instrument 

21 Malory’s " 

d'Arthur" 

22 Gone by 
23J.Bl.Bame 

opus 

26 Mover's need 

27 Incipient grads 

28 Groups in 
coops 

290Id English 
letter 

30 He abdicated 
for love 

32 A rival of 
Babylonia 

33 Musical, 
syllables 

35 Where cows 
browse 

36 Carson 
McCullers opus 

46 Hound’s sound 

47 Golden or 
Walden 

48 Suffix with 

Brooklyn or 
Israel 


ACROSS 

49 Excessive 
sentimentality 

50*'. . .Shrew” 
musical 

54 Place 

55 Lugged a thug 

to the jug 

57 Baseball stat. 

58 International 
aid org.: IMS- 
47 

59 Rumanian city 

61 Traveler's 
need 

62 Pusher’s 
activity 

64 Self-defense 
system 

65 Evelyn Waugh 
opus 

69 Vampires 

70 Tend to move 
(toward) 

71 Furniture 
wheel 

72 Mine, in Metz 

74 “Ad per 

aspera,” 
Kansas motto 

75 Handle 
clumsily 

78 Tequila, e.g. 

79 Japanese 
woman diver 

80 Rarity, to J.R 
Lowell 


ACROSS 

82Bambi’saunt 
83 Hippie's home 

84“ your 

pardon!” 

85 Thessalian 
mountain 

86 Poe opus, with 

"The” 

94 Altar on high 

95 “Middletown" 

co-author 

96 Climbing. 

twining stem 

97 Australian 

marsupial 

100 Opp- of 

masculine 

101 Cozy; familiar 

104 Woolf's" 

Dalloway” 

167 Nest-egg acct. 

108 Browning opus 

112 Whereto find 
cattails 

113 Rose-colored 
dye 

114 Humiliate 

115 Lout 

116 England's Isle 

of 

117 Hit hard 

118 Daisy cutter’s 
relative 

119 Prenuptial 
events 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


Altar-ations byjoylwouk 


1 

2 

3 

4 

b 

T5 " 





a 





57 



■ 

28 


DOWN 

1 Newts 

2 Beit of 
“leonine” 
fame 

3 Pyriteand 
galena 

4 Chum 

5 Safe, as some 
mushrooms 

6 Inter, as a 
Pharaoh 

7 End: Comb, 
form 

8 Retired 

9 Engagement 
gift 

10 A descendant 
of Aaron 

11 Halfway 
between bow 
and stern 


DOWN 

12 Nonsense! 

13 Skill 

. 14 Addison's 
partner 

15 Kept control 
over 

16 Sumatran 
neighbor 

17 Chinese 
gelatin 

18 Uniting force 

24 Mine vehicle 

25 Spruce 

31 Handful of 
cotton 

32 Napoleons 1 
and III: Abbr. 

34 Country 
address: Abbr. 

36 Tad 

37 “Next of skin” 


DOWN 

38 Lohengrin’s 
love 

39 Eastern 
Church bishop 

46 Take turns 

41 Needle case 

42 Rainy 

43 Light 

44 Bruited 

45 Pan of 
"G.W.T.W.” 

51 Less clear 

52 Make beloved 

53 Kringle 

55N.J. river or 
bay 

56 Winged ant 

59 Madagascan 
lemur 

60 Taj Mahal site 


RE-ENCOUNTERS IN CHINA: 

Notes of a Journey in a Time Capsule 

By Harold I. Isaacs 192 pp. $19.95) 

M. E. Sharpe. 80 Business Drive, 

Armonk, N. Y. 10603. 

Reviewed by Albert Feuerwerker 

W HILE EVERYONE goes to China now — 
including one’s dentist and writers for Hie 
New Yorker — I cannot imagin e that any other 
account by an American of two weeks in Beijing and 
Shanghai in October 1980 could have yielded miits 
as rich as this memoir by Harold Isaacs. 

In the early 1930s, when be was in his early 20s, 
Isaacs edited a Communist-sponsored newspaper in 
Shan g hai , the China Forum. He came to know 
many of the leading leftist Chinese intellectuals who 
were young too in these years when they confronted 
the repression of the Knonrintang regime. Tbe Chi- 
na Forum rallapseri and Tcaara was abandoned by 
his Communist friends when his own political out- 
look took him in a Trotskyist direction, in Beijing, 
where he lived during 1934-1935, he wrote a classic 
account of events in China in 1925-1927, The 
Tragedy of (be Chinese Revolution” (still in print in 
a revised edition first published in 1951), which 
made it impossible ever after for any serious scholar 
to heed Stalin's version of the portentous episode of 



61 Biographer of 
artists: 1511-74 

“We 

please” 

63 Othello’s 
betrayer 

64 ‘‘Gunsmoke" 
role 

65 Nantygioasd 
.Wales 

66 Scaramouch 

67 Gets around 

68 Appearance 

71 Music symbol 


BOOKS 


77 Tear’s partner 

79 Fitting 

80 Largest Arab 
emirate 

81 He loved 
Carmen 

84 Charged atom 
87 Sd. room 


the “first united front” between the Communist 
Party and the Kno min tang. 

In succeeding decades. Isaacs was Newsweek’s 
war correspondent in China until expelled in 1945, 
reported on immediate postwar development in 
Asia, and then in the early 1950s began a distin- 
guished career as a professor of political science at 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from 
which he retired in 1976. Apart from writing half a 
dozen important books on cultural confrontations 
and the impact of political change on group identi- 
ties, in 1974 Isaacs published “Straw Sandals: Chi- 
nese Stories 1918-1933,” which he had first underta- 
ken in Shanghai in the early 1930s with the advice 
and assistance of the writers Lu Hsun and Mao Tun. 

But from (be demise of the China Forum until the 
enormous changes that followed tbe death of Mao 
Zedong, Isaacs was a non-person in China — his 
account of “The Doctored Photo” in this memoir is 
an instructive example of the Leninist proclivity to 
rewrite history. Even the redoubtable Soong Gang- 
ling, Sun Yat-sen’s widow and rice chairman of tbe 
People's Republic — ■ “Sane” to Isaacs in Shanghai 
in the 1930s — was unable to invite this old friend 
on her own. Isaacs, and his wife, Viola, came at last 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 


□□□□ anno □□□ □□□ 
□□□□□ □□□□ □□□ □□□□ 
□□□nananncia □□□□□□□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□□□□ □□□□ □□□ 
□□□a □□□□ □□□□□ naan 

□□□ naau □□□nan □□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□ 
uuaanm nanaa □□□□□□ 
manna annaa □□□□ 

□□aa Eaaana □□[!□□□□□ 
□□□□□□□□□a □HuaapEnnaD 
□□□□□□an nnnnna □□□□ 
□□□a □□□□□ □□□□□ 

□□□□□□ auaaa □□□□□□□ 
dedddo □□□□□ □dqq 
□□□a □□□□□□ anna □□□ 
uuqej □□□□□ naan □□□□ 
□□a □□□□ uaaanan □□□□ 
□□□□□□□□a □□□□□□□□□□□ 
□□□□ nan aaaa □□□□□ 
□aa □□□ aaaa □□□□ 


to revisit C hina as guests of the Chinese Writers’ 
Association in 1980, largely because of their earlier 
association with Lu Hun, whose letters to Isaacs 
about the compilation of “Straw Sandals” had 
found their way to the People's Republic. 

The body of this evocative and supplely written 
memoir consists of Isaacs's notes of his conversa- 
tions with these friends of his youth: with Soong 
Ching-ling. nearly 90; Mao Ton, 84 — both (tied m 
1981; the woman writer ling ling; the economist 
Chen Han-seng, and others. Many had spent 20 
years in internal exile or imprisonment, victims of 
Mao’s anti-rightist campaign of the 1950s and the 
Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. Tbe 
vignettes are brief and by the choice of those inter- 
viewed, the accounts of their experiences and cur- 
rent outlooks are not always very revealing. But 
there is enough to rivet the reader’s attention, aided 
by Isaacs' technique of juxtaposing both ends of 
half a century. 

Most of the conversations center on personal 
experiences, with the broader political scene refract- 
ed through these individual lenses. In a concluding 
chapter. “Of tbe Larger Politics,” Isaacs brings 
together his friends' and his own observations about 
such matters as “judging Mao” and “the limits” to 
political and artistic expression in China today. 
There have been change and perhaps some pro- 
gress since 1980, but these remain exceedingly 
touchy matters. 

For the historian of modem China, the pages 
devoted to Soong Ching-ling are probably the most 
valuable. She emerges here not as the elderly, smil- 
ing plaster doD evoked by China Reconstructs and 
the like, but as a tough, politically committed, often 
disappointed, but nevertheless warm and genuinely 
idealistic survivor. Isaacs sadly notes that he re- 
ceived no positive responses to his suggestions that 
these prominent personages write their own stories. 
And for many whom he re-encountered in 1980, it 
was as if be had not lived at all in the intervening 
five decades. For a few brief hours the threads 
sundered in the 1930s were picked up again. 


ir- 

PLEASE. BRADY— HOC UP it 


GARFIELD 


Albert Feuerwerker, chairman of the history depart- 
ment at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, is a 
specialist in . modem Chinese history. He wrote das 
review for The Washington Post 


3 


/ WHEN MR. exetTEMENT H 
V steps into -me ROOM, 1 
C VOfJ CAN COT THE APATHV I ' 
WITH A KNIFE ZJ 





©1985 Unttsd Fssu»Sync9caujnc A 






jOftEBOAItl 


''Sometimes its nice to HEAR. things 'stead 
OF BEIN' TOLD THINGS!" 

WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



c 

F 

C 

F 



c 

F 

C 

F 


Aloarve 

22 

72 

15 

59 

tr 

Bsraa&ak 

30 

8* 

25 

77 

a 

imiHTfiBHl 

21 

10 

5 

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fr 

Belltos 

1* 

44 

15 

99 

a 


a 

82 

16 

61 

ct 

Hone Kano 

28 

82 

25 

77 

r 


23 

73 

13 

55 

d 

MlmHo 

35 

95 

25 

77 

o 

Betorads 

25 

77 

14 

57 

*r 

New Delhi 

37 

99 

28 

82 

d 


34 

75 

12 

54 

tr 

Saael 

21 

70 

15 

59 

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23 

73 

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48 

It 

Shaavhal 

25 

77 

IB 

64 

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BaclMrtst 

29 

84 

IS 

59 

fr 

Slfiwopiirv 

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25 

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20 

48 

13 

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st 

TalpM 

30 

84 

22 

72 

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21 

70 

14 

57 

tr 

Tokyo 

23 

73 

14 

57 

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Casts Del Sal 

DuOUs 

25 

II 

77 

44 

18 

a 

44 

44 

tr 

a 

AFRICA 






EttMiP 

19 

44 

6 

43 

tr 







Florence 





d 












tr 







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20 

44 

10 

SO 

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24 

75 

18 

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HelslnU 

20 

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16 









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24 


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73 

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London 


44 

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Madrid 

IB 

64 

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SS 

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Met 

DUO 


Rcvktavlk 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 


a 73 
27 II 
30 60 
SB 73 
Zurich 72 73 

MIDDLE EAST 


21 S3 15 59 
32 73 I 44 

34 75 17 a 
23 72 10 50 

35 77 14 57 

17 63 13 55 
11 53 7 43 

28 82 15 59 
20 48 7 45 


10 90 

18 44 

IS 59 

13 54 
13 SS 


Buenos Aim — — — — 

carom 27 81 31 70 

Lima 35 77 14 57 

Mexico atv 38 82 tl 52 

Rle tfe Janeiro 27 81 3D 48 

NORTH AMERICA 


petre l 
Damascus 
jennotom 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 

SrfMar 


— — — — no 

— — — — no 


23 73 

34 79 


17 43 
21 70 


13 55 

17 43 


9 48 
18 41 


sh+hewere : Mf-mow; tf-Hormv. 


Affdiorafi 

11 

S3 

6 

43 

r 

AKvtta 

31 

n 

11 

84 

PC 

Boston 

28 

79 

12 

Si 

PC 

CIUcoo* 

30 

14 

19 

44 

PC 

Denver 

24 

75 

9 

48 

PC 

Detroit 

11 

18 

14 

61 

St 

Handle lu 

30 

84 

22 

72 

fr 

Houston 

35 

95 

a 

a 

K 

LnAutefes 

a 

73 

14 

61 

PC 

Miami 

31 

48 

IS 

84 

Cl 

Minneapolis 

19 

84 

15 

59 

d 

Montreal 

20 

41 

6 

a 

d 

muon 

29 

B4 

21 

70 

st 

New York 

24 

77 

IS 

59 

PC 

San Frandsca 

18 

44 

II 

52 

fr 

Seattle 

20 

«8 

9 

48 

PC 

Taranto 

17 

43 

6 

43 

PC 

WoeMnuton 

24 

79 

18 

41 

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o-avercast; pcuarthr ctoudv: 

rri uiiis' 


5ATURDAV-S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Sllotlllv Chopev. FRANKFURT: 

Fooov early, (air toller. Temp 24 — to (75— 50). LONDON: Pan hr cloudy, 

Temp. 22—9 173—481, MADRID: Slormv. Temp. 19—14 lit- 57). NEW 
YORK: Ratnv. Temp. 24— 1*179 — 601. PARIS: Fair. Temp. 34— 13 ITT— Ml. 
ROME: Fair. Temo. 30— 14 (»— 571. TEL AVIV: Fair. Temp. 31 ->4(88 — 571. 
ZURICH: Foweortv.toiriotler.Temp.24— ll (75—531. BANGKOK: Srarmv. 
Temo. 31—6 IB — 77). HONG KONG: Ctoudv. Temo. 39— 34 (84 — 79). 
MANILA: Ckwdr. Temp. 34 — 25 (93 — 77). SEOUL: Forav. Temp. 22—14 
(73—41). SINGAPORE: Stormy. Temp. 31—25 (BB— 77). TOKYO: CtogdV. 
Temp 21 — 14 (JO— 57). 


Wh*W Stock Markete 


ABN 

acf Holding 

Aeuon 

AKZO 

AhoW 

AMEV 

AXlom Rubber 
Amro Bank 

BVG 

QufhrmoiKl T 
Cotond HMp 
Elsevier- NDU 
Fokker 
OP Brocades 
Helneken 


KLM 
Noarden 

Nat N edder 

NedUayd 
Oce Vender G 
hoots 
miitm 


Radamco 
Rolinco 
Rorerrto 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever 

venOm moron 
VMF Stark 

VNU 


444J0 44250 
209 20* 

18950 ISA 
1(77 JO 10720 
22A50 222J0 
245 24025 
las sjts 
8120 8020 
201 204 

92 91.50 
38J0 3450 
1 1850 119 JO 
125 128 

18450 183J0 
149 147 

60.90 SL 40 
58.70 59 

4920 4940 

4640 AA50 
1*250 173JO 
32A 32550 
82 AIM 
5850 5420 

7450 7*20 

139*0 13920 
8020 8850 
4550 45*0 
197J0 19620 
345 345 

29.10 29 

20450 206 

20350 20550 


Previous : 21050 


Arbod 
Bekoert 
Cocker ill 
..Cobeao 
I EBES 
GB-Inno-BM 
GOL 
Gevuert 
Hoboken 


Prmweta | 


Kredle KxHik 
Potrotina 
Sac Generate 
Safina 
Solver 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

unera 

VMlB Mantaene 


1785 1770 
aooo tooD 
73S 333 
3250 3220 

3100 3005 

3480 1575 
2010 2015 

3950 3950 

5460 5yr 

2270 2245 

8950 8750 

4170 8190 

1975 1980 

71M 7180 
4420 4450 
4300 4373 
5500 5440 
1700 1445 

7200 7130 


Owreol S todU odose : 334421 
Previous : 2349.51 


AEG-TaJefunfcen 
Alllanr Vori 

Altana 

BASF 

Davor 

Bov Hypo Batik 

Bay Vereiitsbane 

BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Cant Gum ml 
Daimler-Benz 
Degussa 

Devtoene Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 

Dresdner Bank 

GHH 

Haraener 

Hochtief 


12320 194 

1287 1748 
357 358 

21880 91750 
2&22UB 
340 34*9 
375 152 

2I&50 214 

323 315 

385 385 

199 19450 
1090 140 

825 801 

3400 34590 
148 18290 
55490 H I 
23190 22790 
15490 154 

312 33190 
530 530 


1 Close Free. 

Hoecfwt 

BUB 


Noose* 



Horton 

177 

17B 

Hum* 

28550 

287 


324 

317 

kail + 5ott 

243 


Kar*to« 

22330 

238 

kauttkd 

23433 

237 

114— 

259 

258 


7030 

7038 


18730 10430 

Linde 

450 

451 




■MAN 

142 14150 

Mametmann 

172.10 14750 




Nixdorf 



PKI 


Ain 

Porsche 



Preunoo 

276 27330 







Rhekunetall 





443 


35430 




Thyesen 


Vebo 


Vomwogenvterk 

248 2*440 


591 

* 


| Prrrtoat : 1221 JO 



f 

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Bk Easi Asia 

2430 

pi 

Oteufis Kona 

16JD 

i r \ * 1 



B > 'i' 1 ■ 

China Unfit 

16 

1 * j 


9 

9 

Mono Sena Bank 

53 


II 1 1 -* 

B.V.I 

II. Vi ; 

■y.l 

■ a 


Bk-*.] 

r-Tl 

M ■■ 

38 

38 

HK Land 

5JH 

530 

■ L i ■ 

■ irTtr'-*-' 'em 

8.10 

94 

m 

lit M 

195 

sg 

HK Wharf 

430 

Hutch wnampoa 

2430 

L3J 

Hveon 

031 

041 

Inn Otv 

037 

038 

Jordlne 

1130 

11.40 

JordlneSec 

1110 

Irjl 

■ • • .1 * 

■>1 

■XI 

ll:.’." "a! 1 ■ 

» 

21 

New World 

735 

7.15 


2.175 

2.15 

SHK Proas 

1230 

|>J. 1 

Stotu* 

330 

p^/^1 1 

IB . 71. 

B'i.1 

tie J I 


1.91 

130 


134 


When lock A 

730 

fX] 

Wing On Co 

220 

Bill 

Wl«t»r 

5.10 

5.10 

world Inn 

2.15 

215 

Haag Sana Index 
Previous : 1491A4 

M13J7 


II 


S14 

314% 


207 

197 

Angle Am Cold 

587 

US 


222 


154 

ISO 


379 

379 


549 

SS9 

GA.T. 

303 

308 

Beectnm 

383 

378 

BICC 

no 

231 

BL 

35 

37 


Blue Circle 
BOC Group 


BP ,n ‘‘ U, 
Brit Home St 
Brtf 
Brit; 

Brtfoil 
BTR 
Burmail 


Cadbury Schw 
Charter COBS 

Commercial U 

Cora Gold 
Courtouids 
Daloetv 
De D eers* 
DistiKers 
Drketantetn 
F Isons 
FmoS’Ged 

Gen Accident 
GKN 
Glaxo £ 

Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hawker 
ICI 

lal Group 


531 531 

309 309 

108 195 

288 248 

528 528 

306 301 

194 197 

395 400 

2SJ 220 

383 384 

Wi 2B5 

550 550 

157 157 

188 TI4 

224 
542 
144 
423 
542 

*2SJk *2$% 

345 348 

*24 S2AI. 

182 182 

596 595 

222 


547 

148 

425 

540 


Fermi lal la 
Flat 
Flraktor 
Generali 

IFI 

I to Ice men tl 

itatoc* 

Itoimobniart 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Plreill 

RAS 

Rinaoconte 

srp 

SME 

Sola 

Slanda 

Slot 


MIB Currant index : 1341 
Previous : 1354 


Hue* Aw. 


Clese Prev. 

>4020 13999 

Atlas Copco 

113 

113 

3T70 3205 

Bolhton 

191 

195 

tLQ. NX5. 

Electrolux 

275 

Z76 

48950 47700 

Ericsson 

310 

307 

8010 8200 

Ceeeite 

375 

380 


Handebtoanken 

144 

147 

1425 1435 

Phormocla 

191 

193 

| »»/ ■ » T . 

Saob-Sconto 

. N.O. 

N & 


SarxJvik 

9LQ. 

1690 1704 

Skaraka 

90 

« 

6550 6530 

5KF 

210 

218 

2565 2599 

SvtodtoMfiatdi 

202 

208 

49750 70100 
79SJ0 795 

Volvo 

215 

ImtoMf a J] 

217 

m jb 

2234 2270 
N.Q. N.O. 

3244 3328 

15990 15560 

Prevtoas : 37AM 

J IkivA • Ml 



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Legal General 
Llovds Bank 

Lonrho 

Lucnj 

Marks and Se 
Metal Bo* 
Midland Bank 

No) West Bank 

PondO 
Pt tx (no ton 
Plessev 
Prudential 
ROOM Elect 

Randtonirtn 

Rank 
Reed inn 
Router* 


1245/6412 45/84 
308 303 

695 495 

277 967 

850 
234 
425 
774 
188 
245 
291 
490 
572 
174 
303 
136 
415 
347 
464 
340 
300 
142 


232 
<27 
779 
184 
766 
290 
685, 
569' 
174 
304 
137 
413 
349 
447 
341 
300 
148 

6*B Ml 

1J0 192 

SlOOVj SI COW 
30 153 

402 «4 

345 348 


Raral Dutch C 44 37/6444 37/M 
RTZ jgf Off 

Saatehl 573 m 

Solrabury 338 328 

Sear* Hotdinra 97 Vj 97Vj 

f** 1 493 493 

STC 170 it5 

Std Chartered 474 <77 

Sun An lance 458 u 

Tote and Lvle 480 45* 

Tesca 280 2 a 0 

Thorn EMI 4u 444 

T.l. Group 270 9(8 

Trutataar Hse 357 388 

Uftromar 22B wi 

Unilever c M 19/M11 11/37 
United Biscuits 190 IK 

Vickers 3« 293 

WooNrtrlh 80S VS 

FX80 Index : 1 BI19B 
Previ ou s : 198440 
F-T9.E. 1H Index : 131300 
Previous : U14J* 


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Aped Index : 22395 
Preview : 2393 
CAC Index : 23X18 
PrtvtoW : 22298 


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DBS 

FrasarNeove 
how Per 
metope 
MM Bonking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

SMngrHo 
Skn«Daroy 
snore Lond 
Swe Press 
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St Trod me 
UpHod Overseas 
MOB 

streets Thnes tsd Index : B114T 
: 817.14 


N.O. 248 
490 4.15 

125 590 
234 242 
Z « 242 
.890 495 
9JS 940 
394 394 

^ IS 

2J8 298 

ir> a 

1 . 10 1.10 
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CSR 

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Elders Ixl 

Hooker 

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Mood ton 

MIM 

Myer 

Not Aus Bank 
News Carp 
N Broken Hill 
Oakbrtdee 


r«r. 1 


Souttriand 
Thomas Natton 
WaternMWn 


MftHne 

BonUne 


242 

250 

28D 

284 

460 

454 

434 

434 

328 

328 

215 

2Z7 

370 

370 

528 

514 

370 

372 

212 

212 

630 

630 

272 

273 

222 

215 

293 

29B 

158 

15B 

194 

2 

230 

220 

M4 

296 

1*4 

198 

444 

440 

770 

740 

245 

236 

101 

1 

«2S 

433 

405 

408 

143 

144 

570 

580 

S 

25 

191 

no 

393 

403 

429 

4 73 

140 

1« 


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AW O r dto i NI index ; 873:50 
Prevtoa : 874:48 


T«kr» 


Akgl 

400 

401 


1100 

10/0 

Aeahl Clate 

879 

•87 


80S 

STO 

Brtdoectone 

525 

134 

Cmwn 

1190 

1200 

Casio 

1450 

1460 

Cl toh 

420 

428 


1050 

1040 


443 

645 

Dalwa Securities 

374 

347 

FOOUC 

8210 

8570 

Full Bank 

1570 

1590 

Full Photo 

1790 

1310 

Fulitsu 

1080 

1120 

Httochl 

736 

753 

Hitachi cable 

499 

700 

Hondo 

1320 

1330 

Japan Air Line* 

6800 

6830 

Koifma 

215 

318 

Kansai Power 

1770 

1700 

Kawasaki Steel 

143 

147 

tcirin grewerv 

745 

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4S0 

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Kubota 

329 

335 

Kyocera 

4530 

4650 


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1410 

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604 

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1020 


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850 

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745 

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1330 

■ '■ 

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■J7 

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Nissan 

610 

BtTl 

Nomura Sec 

1148 

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Olympus 

>198 

1190 

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1490 

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Ricoh 

925 


Sharp 

915 

my. 

Shlmazu 

744 

■ 

SHnetsu Chemical 

890 


Sony 

4220 


Sumitomo Bank 

1830 

l|i v 

Sumitomo Chem 

246 

BP rT ” 

SWnl tamo Marine 

6*0 

■ \ 




Tatael Corp 

237 


|lu_ -L- ■ 

488 


fcl - : L* IB 

881 


TDK 

4400 


Teilln 

458 




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371 

Toyota 

1230 

129 

Yamal chi Sec 

750 

758 

NBckel/O-I. Index : 

1273*44 

Prevtoin : T2798LZ7 

New Index: 997 A3 

Prevtoos : MN8J7 



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3095 

3100 1 

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1725 

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1440 

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389 


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407 


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1915 

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4900 

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prevtoos : 459 JO 




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700 Aora lod A 
9171 Aft Energy 
400 Alto Nat 
M9 AtoomaSt 
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7800 C Nor West • 
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137312 Can Trust 
8300C Tung 
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8000 Qto Nat Res 
2)0977 CTIreAt 
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4500 Cara 
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115 Ceton 175P 
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3800 CaavsRtn 

1500 Corrwesf a 
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108708 Czar Res 
5300 Daen Dev 
SO Doer. A 
8500 Denison A p 
5280 DsnisanBf 
400 Devsicoo 
5000 Dlckran A f 
500 Dictum B 
5*OOOomanA 
29246 Dafasco 
301 Du Pont A 
17720 Dvlex A 
7108 EkohomX 
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31420 eauftySvr 
100 FCAInti 

8UC Falcon C 
20080 Rcnbntee 
5640 Forty Rm 
10375 Fed ind A 

500 F City Ftn 
39889 Fraser 
600 Frushoof 
850GendbA 
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19874 Geocrude 
1800 Gtoraltor 
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25350 Grandma 
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13440 Hawker 
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3390 H Bov Co 
73076 Images 
3930 Indaf 
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19400 Inti Thom 
10153 Intpr Pipe 
320 Ivoaa B 
12875 Jdfmock 
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475 440 470 +10 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, JUNE 1-2, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


a. » . 




r A. 


-- r v. 




> x 

■"* ' v 

i’* i 

• \ 


•r-'-t \ 


lakers Tie 
NBA Series 
With Celts 

^.ingryjabbar > 
Scores 30 Points 

CcmpUedbyQir Staff From Dbpatha 

BOSTON — If Korean Abdul- 
Jabbar really was sleepwalking, 'as 
he said, in die first game of die 
National Basketball Association’s 
championship series, then be most 

have been mnrm—THng in flomi* ? 

Thursday night , 

Their season riding with the rise 
and fall of each of Abdub-Jabbart 
skyhooks, the Los Aagdes Lakers 
beat the Boston Critics, 109-102. 

. -Abdnl-Jabbar scored 30 points 
bar IS fra 26 shootmgand grabbed 
17 reboimdsin the victory that tied 
the best-otaeven series at 1-1. , 

"He never ceases to amaze me,” 
said the Lakers’ coach, Pat Riley. 
“He was jut determined out there 
for 42 minutes, shooting those 
books, naming the floor, rebound- 
ing. That’s what makes him so 
great.” 

If AbdntJabbar seemed-, deter- 
mined, it was for a good reason. In 
the Lakers* embarrassing, 34-point 
loss Monday in Game 1, be had to 
be one of the most embarrassed. 
..jetting into foul trouble early, he 
finished with 12 points and three 

rehoonfk m V. Jt gonfring nrninfwn 

He received much criticism over 
the next few days. CBS television 
analyst Tom Heinsbhn made an 
od^ reference in Game 1 to Abd- 
nLJabbar’s age, 38, which made die 
Lakers’ center fame. 

Thursday, though. Abdnt-Jabbar 
Vented his anger on the Critics. 




Oilers Rout Flyers, 8-3, Win Stanley Cup 



•"v ■* ’• 

• : 

r . >*' V 

/ 




MFP Gretzky Gets 
A Goal, 3 Assists 

By Robert Facbet 

Washington Poa Service 

EDMONTON, Alberta — The 
National Hockey Leagues longest 
season has been spared a finale in 
June. The Edmonton Oilers did not 

spare the Philadelphia Flyers, how- 
ever, as' they wan thar second 
straight Stanley Cap Thursday 
night with a crushing 8-3 victory. 

Tie (Bias’ eight goals woe the 
most scored in a cop-deriding game 
since 1917, when the Seattle Metro- 
politans finishe d off the Montreal 
Panadient, 9-1. 

Wayne Gretzky had a goal and 
three assists in another spectacular 
performance and received the 
Conn Smythe Trophy as the most 




; •' 








Conn Smythe Trophy as the most 
vahrabteplayer in theplayoffs. 

Paul Corny and Made Messier 
each had two goals and an assist as 
Edmonton completed a four-game 
sweep after dropping the opener in 

Philadelphia. 

“I think we’re absolutely the best 
team in the world,” said the Oilers’ 
coach, Glen Safher. “We’re a great 
hockey team. Fd like to play any- 
body who wants to play ns.* 

For a wMe, ft appeared the game 

and season might never end. When 
the Flyers drew back-to-back pen- Mife 
allies 10 seconds apart in the third HnjU 
period, coach Mike Keenan called nna H 
his players to the bench and a 
lengthy delay occurred before he Fuhr, a 
sent them back out. with his 

Then, after Edmonton goalie victory. 
Grant Fnhr foiled Dave Pbulm on A ton 
the second penalty shot in two ended : 
games, a brawl broke out that Lindber 
lengthened the season by another eadier i 
20 mmoles. first sta 

.Overcoming the riOxness that ers* net 
seems to take im so much attention with 41 
at what should be hockey’s finest before ti 
hour was the brilliant play of “Wei 


,r* •S ->‘ ; 



AraionKlMtedf Phtt hi— niikiuirf 

The Celtics’ Robert Parish left Kareem Abdxd-J&bhar and 
Magic Johnson han gi n g as he span around rtwm to score. 




V * 

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r-*.- •• » .'»• 
X— - * ■- • r " ' --t • 

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MS 

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t - r 


“We knew he was going to come 
out and act like that tonight," Bos- 
ton’s ML Can said. “AH he read 
in the papers was how old he was. 
That made him mad. If there had 
been a newsp ap er strike, we would 
have won toamiL” - 
‘ 'An early indication that Abdul- 
Jkubar was ready for redemption 
occurred in the locker room shortly 
before game time. He walked over 
to each teammate and gave words 
of encouragement, a rare display of 
outward motivation. 

*T don’t think he likes to be 
called old,” the Ukas* Bob hfc- 
Adoo said. “A lot of people said he 
ought to retire.” 

It was good for the Lakers that 
he did. Another defeat before head- 
ing home for the next three games 
would hove flung them h«Hfl«ng 
against histcay: Only two teams 
have come back from 0-2 defiefts to 
win a <4*nyini>Ai[>«rigt , 

the Lakers made some 
Fwgngesjram tire fiist jpime^the 
most noteworthy bong no spread 
out on off emelo allow Abdul- Jab- “ 
bar nrere roam towodc; inside. An- 
other prime bcncfiraaiy of that 
switch was Mkhad Cooper, who is 
supposed to be a point guard and 
not a shooter. But he made 8 of bis 
9 shots and scored 22 points. 

“Cooper was dm one who realty 
hurt us down the stretch,” said the 
Cd tics’ coach, K.C Jones. "We ex- 
pect Kareem to get 30, but we don’t 
expect Mkhad Cooper to beat yen 
cm offense.” • 

Since fdlow guard Byron Scott 
■gjtfn was not doing ranch again 
this game, missing L& of 17 shots, 
and because forward Janies Wor- . 
thy was in foul trouble. Cooper 


took over tire shooting that Abdul- 
Jabbar could not handle. 

Cooper did not take many shots, 
but they came at the tight tune. 

The Critics found themselves 
down by I8 points at the half. But 
when LanylM shook offa2-for-8 
first half and scored 12 of Ins 30 
points in the third quarter, Boston 


were double-teaming Kareem 
heavily, but our ball movement was 
much better tonight, which I 
thought was the key to die game. 

Since ft was the team captain 
speaking. Cooper said, he was only 
following orders. 

*T couldn’t help it,” be said. 

But AbdnUabbar still bad some 


'•> 




•- Mt W : ■: ‘ 


■«*.*i* • . 

i - - - 

' ' '• - • . 






■' • ■ '• 


: ■ . •< 


-i* v.^ . ^ <*'L< *' •* 


Mike Krnsbehiyski (26) is congratiriatcd in second period by teammates, from left, Paid Coffey, Jari Knrri and ChmSe 
Hnddy after scoring the Offers’ sixth goal. Stamfing dejectedly at his goal in the background is the Flyers’ Bob Froese. 


Fuhr, a leading candidate himself Bod put a beautiful backhanded Before the period ended, Coffey 
with his record-tying 15th playoff P 353 oa Korn’s stick in the near had scored on a 50-foot tint during 
victory. rinde. The Finn fired Lhe puck over a power play, the puck popping out 

A torn tmdon in his right leghad Froesris right shoulder for his 19th of Froese’s glove and dipping un- 
ended Philadelphia goalie Belle playoff gori, tying Reg Leech’s der the crossbar. 

Lindbergh’s seastm a few hairs 1976 made for the Flyers. The Oilers removed any doubt of 

earlier and Bob Froese made his Thirty-seven seconds lata WiHy the outcome with a three-goal sco- 
first start since April 2 in the Fly- linditfmni rinded defender Mark aid period in which they outshot 
os’ net. Edmon ton bombed him Howe and beat Froese from the the Flyers by 17-8. 
with 41 shots, building a 4-1 lead right wing rirde to make ft 2-0. Messier scored the first of two 
before the first period ended. After Rich SuOer scored the first unassisted goals on a breakaway 

“We knew Froese hadn’t played of his two goals for the Flyers, after raring past the bewildered 
for a long time, so he’d either be Gretzky a gam dazzled the sellout Dvorak. Thai it was Gretzky time 


da the crossbar. 


to 87-75 g oin g into the words of caution. 


foudli period. 

But it was a sore-legged Robert 
Parish who led a Critic rally that 
cot the Lakers’ lead to 102-98 with 
3:45 to go- Parish, who had 18 
points, scored seven in a two-min- 
ute span of the last quarter. 

AfW the Lakers’ Ma^ic Johnson 
reversed Ins dribble and drove the 
lane lor a basket and a 102-96 lead 
following a thre&paim play by 
Parish, Kevin McHalc sank a 12- 
foot jumper and the Critics were 
withm four points. 

frtm^e'coma. Twofree throws 
by Bird cut tiie lead to four again. 


“The series ft still very young," 


AH three of his assists came on 
sensational passes, and he made at 
least thee more that should have 


Before the period ended, Coffey of the final series after Kurri, tied 
had scored on a 50-foot shot during up by two Flyers in the slot, man- 
a power play, the puck popping out aged to shove him the puck in (he 
of Froese’s glove and dipping un- right wing circle. That came mo- 


ments after Gretzky had hit a post. 


first start since April 2 in the Fly- Lindstrom eluded defender Mark ond period in which they outshot 
os’ net. Edmonton bombed him Howe and beat Froese from the the Flyers by 17-8. 
with 41 shots, building a 4-1 lead right wing rirde to make ft 2-0. Messier scored the first of two 
before the first period ended. After Rich SuOer scored the first unassisted goals on a breakaway 

“We knew Froese hadn’t played of his two goals for the Flyers, after raring past the bewildered 
for a long time, so he’d either be Gretzky a gam dazzled the sellout Dvorak. Thai it was Gretzky time 
sensational or have a hard time,” crowd of 17,498. Hus time he again, as be made a perfect center- 


The Oilers removed any doubt of And since Kuni, Mark Napier and 
the outcome with a three-goal sec- Krushrinyslri all shot wide after 


Sather said. “It’s a difficult situa- picked off Derrick Smith’s 

f — i., *> i 


he said. “Don’t be surprised if it been converted into scores. 


goes seven games- 1 won’t be.” 

(LAX ; WP) 


tion far anybody.' 
Jari Knrri opem 


and faked defender Miroslav 


ing pass that left Mike Knuhri- 
nyski time to count the stitches on 


‘Wayne deserved the Cons 4:54, after 


Smythe. He played just great,” said Marsh into the right wing coma Froese’s right shoulder. 


opened the scoring at rak out of his path before dropping Freese's glove before lifting the 
Gretzky beat Brad the pud: to Coffey, who put it over pock ova the helpless goalie. 


Gretzky scored his seventh goal 


Noah Edges Qerc; Leconte Upsets Gomez in Open 


ConpikdbfOtrSwgFnmlXspciAa McEnroe, the reigning Wimble- have to play a guy who can hit score would have been deuce at KaneUopoulou erf Greece, 6-3, 7-5, 

PARIS Yannick Noah of don. and UJL (ben champion, who, heavy topspm from anywhere on that point instead of advantage after losing control of ha serve in 

France got past Jose Lois Clere of is seeking his first French Open' the court but if I make my shots, he Noah when it was replayed. the second set 

Argentina, O-lT 6-7 (7-4), 6-4, 4-6, title, defeated Marcos Hoccvar of won’t be able to do that. Yon can Qerc, who until then had waged 
8-&onFriday in a cantroversiai Braal, 6-2, 6-1, 6-2, and said he frit get away with shots Kke he hits on a gritty battle, appeared shaken af- 

rtmuLn wn d m»rrfi at tV F nwdi “relaxed and comfortable.” day that you can’t get away with an ter the controversy and proceeded 


But with the shot dock running Open trams cbampianriiips. 


McEnroe needed only 90 min- other surfaces.” 


day that you can’t get away with on ter the controversy and proceeded 


to lose the next eight consecutive 


down to nothing, Cooper made a Joining Noah in the final 16 were uks to beat Hocevar, 30, but ex- The Noah-Qere match, which points and the match. 

jump shot from the top of the key. tcp-see4ed Mm McEnroe, No. .7 pegs mdi more diffiodty in the featured briffiant tho ug h erratic Nystrom, seeded to be McEn- 


The 24~second dodt showed no Joakim. Nystrom of Sweden and next threc^ round s where next he 
time remaining as soon as the ball Oedwriovalria’s Tcanas Smid. the prays Sundsuoni and men, posa- 
lrft Coopcfsbands, but when it fell No. 13 seed. Henri Leconte of hty- Nystrom and 1982 French 
thnxigh the basket, the Lakra had France upset No. 5 seed Andres Opaichanqnon^ Wflamkr. 
a 106-100 lead with 1:51 left. Gomez of Ecuador, 6-3, 6-4, 64, to McEnroe said fa three Swedes 
Unlike Game 2 from last sea- set up a fourth-round match with canncH be tamped togfaer as day 
sen's championship series. theLak- Noah; Na 4 Mats Wllanda beat court tofaefayers because cadi 
ers* lead hdd up in the last two EmOio Sanchez of Spain, 3-6, 64, ptyy® differently, 
xninntes. This time it was the Cdt- 6-3, 6-3, and fdlow Swede Henrik “Sure they’re three day coot 
ics who nwufa rnkt ^lre s , Dennis Sundstrotui No. 12, heat pliers but so are a lot (rf rays in 

Johnson riumked a free throw with Tarocxy of Hungary, 6-3, 64, 6-7 tins to nmament ," said McEnroe, 
1: 12 left, then Danny AingecoDid- (5-71 6-3. wbo has ajlit his two meetings with 


was marred by a coitrovasial roe’s < 
late in the final set easy 


-2, frO. 6-. 


wnmt, nan an 
triumph ova 


y. Nystrom and 1982 French Noah, the Na 9 seed, was down qualifkr Simon Youl of Australia, 
xn champion WUander. by 5-6 in the set but had just taken Smid beat another Australian 

McEnroe said the three Swedes the advantage on his serve. After a qualifier, Darren Cahill, 6-2, 6-1, 6- 
miot be lumped togetha as day quick exchange, Qerc dribbled a I. 

urt baseline players because each weak shot that just cleared the net Gomez, whose topspin style 
ays differently. and Noah slmped a quick smash should be more suited to the slow. 


“Sure they’re three day court 


and Noah slapped a quick smash chnulri be more suited to the slow, 
toward the si o rime . red day of Roland Garros than the 

The ball was called in, but Qerc, aggressive style of Leconte, always 
and many other observers, thought was under pressure from the 


Bassett, 17 and the No. 8 seed, 
turned in a 7-5, 64 triumph ova 
qualifier Gabriela Dinu of West 
Germany. 

Graf and Sabatini, both 15, went 
to second-set tie breakers before 
dmchmg their matches, 6-1, 7-6. 

In the tie breakers, Graf, die No. 
1 1 seed, edged fdlow West German 
Bettina Bunge, 74, while Sabatini, 
the No. 14 seed from Argentina, 
beat Annie White of the United 
States, 7-2. 

Evert said that when she was 


red day of Roland Ganos than the leading KaneDopoulou, 19, by 6-3, 
aggressive style of Leconte, always 34) she fdt pleased with ha play. 


1:12 left, then Danny Ainge collid- (5-7), 6-3. wbo has spta his two meetings with it was oul uerc protested vene- 

cd with McHale on me^Able and In women’s s r n gW i Chris Evert Sundstrom, with a loss in the 1984 meoity. The referee stood by the 
his 15-footer feD shot short- Lloyd, Catfing Bassett, fifhrida Davis Cnp final. “ItTL be a good line judge, but Noah eventually 
Afterward, Coopa called the Sabattm andSteffi Graf all stum- match against Sundstrom. It do- agreed to have the point replayed, 
“the most favorite in my c&- bled slightly before advancing into pends on how we play against each The Fre nchm a n won the game 
roe r, probably because it was the the fourth round along with 1 0th- other. It’s definitely a m a t c h where on the next point with a volley off 
most important I was just taking seeded Bonnie Gadusek and sur- if I don't play well, m lose. the servme return. But bad the dis- 
the shots that came to me. They priang Terry Phdps. “It's obviously tougher if you puled call gone in Ckrc’s favor, the 


the the fourth round along with 10th- other. It’s definitely a match 
ring seeded Bonnie Gadusek and sur- if I don't play well, FH lose, 
hey prising Terry Phdps. “It's obviously tougher i 


wbo has splft his two meetings with it was oul Qerc protested vehe- Frenchman's attacking game. 

’ oss in the 1984 menlty. The referee stood by the Only once, when he broke Le- 
CtTL be a good line judge, but Noah eventually Conte’s serve and then held his own 
istrom. It do- agreed to have the point replayed, midway through the second set, did 
ly against each The Frenchman won the game Gomez show any sign of justifying 
a match where on the next point with a volley off his high seeding 
m lose. the service return. But bad the dis- Evert, the Na 2 seed from Fort 
ougher if you puled call gMie in Gere's favor, the faiderdale, Florida, beat Angefflri 


especially bar serve. But then she 
saved three consecutive double 
faults. 

“I had that bad service game and 
she also came up with good shots. I 
probably got a bat impatient, but I 
got my game back together, and in 
the end I was happy with it,” Evert 
said. (AP, UPI) 


Gretzky passes left them open, the 
final score could have bon even 
more one-sided. 

Poulin got the fourth penalty 
shot in the history of the final series 
after he was hooked down by Cof- 
fey on a breakaway with the (filers 
two men up. Since Poulin got off a 
good shot, the (filers protested ref- 
eree Bryan Lewis’ decision, but it 
became immaterial when Fuhr 
Stopped Poulin a gain 

“He backhanded it right on top 
of my stick,” Fuhr said “1 didn’t 
expect to see any penalty shots, but 
it just so happened I got two in two 
nights. That’s my job, to stop the 
purk." 

Gretzky finished the playoffs 
with record totals of 30 assists and 
47 points. He now has 100 career 
playoff assists, one fewer than the 
all-time leader, Denis Fotvin. 

Coffey, who played fa last four 
games with an injured hip, had 12 
goals, 25 assists and 37 pants, all 
playoff records for a defenseman. 

■ Oilers Promote Madder 

The Oilers’ assistant coach, John 
Muckier, 50, signed a three-year 
contract to be co-coach Thursday, 
United Press International report- 
ed, and Sather, who also is the 
team’s president and general man- 
ager, said, “John Muckier and I 
will be co-coaches if I come back” 
next season “and he'll be the coach 
if I don’L I don't know what Pm 
going to do." 

Muckier has been an Edmonton 
assistant for four years. He coached 
in the minors ana at the semi-pro 
level and bad a disastrous stint as 
bead coach of the Minnesota North 
Stars durmgthat team’s second 
year in the NHL, 1968-69. 


: Mi) 



SPORTS BRIEF'S Gooden, Hawkins Make 

Dalglish Becomes Liverpool Manager All the Riffht Pitrhes 

LIVERPOOL, Eoriand (AP) — Scottish international strike- Kenny. X 


Tennis 


Stanley Cnp Finals 


mnf MW-t Edmonton. Karri W 
(Gratxfey. Huttr). 40*. Z Edmonton, LM- 
■fm5{Ma*stor).5m.XPMtodctoMa>U 
soltor 2 (Snritti). Zdl, 4, Edmonton. CoMnr n 
(Grmtzxy). ISM. X Edmonton. Coftor 12 
muddy. Kuril. 17-J7 U»o>. W Hto 
Brown, pm Mamina), l.«j Joctton. Cdm 
(■KsaMna). 1:0b Hamdar. PM (hoMna). 
b45: jacfcmn.Eton (rouoMnrt.M:«: Ctom- 
mon. PM nwoMna). H Ml 
teems Ported 4 EOmontoa. M wil ar IV 
»:«. 7, Ed m o n ton. Kn »rt M ft n n*1 S (Gratzky, 
Hum >. W3DX Edmonton, Oratekv 17 (Hum. 
Caftovl. UOX P mmU m T ocdwt PM 
Toochot PM OtoWaaLd^l; 
Mentor, Edm Chookino), 7:95; POch Softer, 
pt* Jam-ctwcUno), ttMi McCWtand. 

troaaMaal.Bea; PotormvPM (rowd>- 
bwI. IS:Mj Andoraoa Edm (rousMno). 
i5:u; BrawaPM (nwMio).1Mb Mc£M- 
laML Edm (rauoMne). VOX 


Baaketball 
NBA Tide Series 


TMrd Porte d ■». PMtadrtmta. Proto > 
IH em, Poo fin), VJ» Ipb). m Etenontoa 
Uteooftr U, SM. IX. PtttxMpMa, Rich Srfler 
2 {Sadttil. 7d& Pa— moo teowltr. Edm 
OMoklnaV db Zml PM (nwoMno), 1:55; 
Coftev, Efim, troooMno). 1 US; Joduoa Edm 
(trtontno). bS7i UMW. Edm «W(0»-*Mckln8l, 
bZb Cravaa PM (book too). 12:28; Froese. 
PM, ntm! by Rldi Suiter Mottling), nA' 
Brawn, nil, mataratecandnd (flaMfiW). 
15:22; Morafv PTiL mofor-mlxcaodurt-uaiTie 

mto condua taofiHnB), 15SB; Jocfcam. Edm, 
doobia nbor—cMdud [imoMnosin- 
— ortomonUko conduct), 1532; McOolland, 
Edm. owdor^ntecond u ct-anma mtoeondu c t 
(floMtaa), 1S3L- 

p — My teal Iteul ln, PM. IMrd period, 
mind. 

ton — I P bltoiotebte ton Fuhr) >0- 
7—22j Edmonton ton Praam) TMM2— 41. 


French Ope n 


.■Marat: Bryan Lads. 


MER1 SIHOLBS 
TMid Round 

Tomes SmM, QMchwtowaMa. del. Damn 
Cohm. AiMfraflo. SZ *-L 6-1; JooMm Hrv 
tram. swtdMV <tef. Simon Youl. AuMralla M. 
*-0,6-2; John McEnroe, U A. dot Meren Ho- 
oevor, Brazil. 64, 6-), 64; YamdCk Noah. 
Franca, dot. Juw Lute Ctam AraantlnouH.6- 
7 (44), 64,4-d, M; Hans GIMemeMcr, Chile, 
itef. Jorao Arrest, soatn. 7-5. 6-V 6-b Moll 
WflaMHVSwaden dtL Emilio Sanchezs Soata, 
36. 64. 6a 64; Honrtt Sundsiram, Sweden, 
daf. BMocts Toraczy, Huneorv, 64 66. 64 (5- 
7)6-3; Hanrl Looonte, France, d at Andres 
Gomez. Ecuador, U. 6-4. 6-4 

WOMEN'S SINGLES 
Third Round 

Bonnie Gadusek. UJS-deLCadle Calmette, 
France. 62, 66; Stem Graf, West Germany, 
def. Bettina BunobWetd Germany. 61, 74 17- 


4}; Gabriela SabaNnL Araenttna dec. Aim 
Wdte. UA. 61.76 (7-2); Chrti Evert Lloyd. 
ILS»<M. Anoattl KoneHowdou, Greece, 63, 
7-5; Carling BaBett. Canada, del Oatxieia 
Dtau. West Germany, 7-5, 64; Rosaiyn Fair- 
bcMk.5ai>tti Africa. «teC textile Caela, west 
Germany, 44,74 (1341). 64; Tiny Photos, 
UA, def. Nathalie Tauzktt. Fnmee, 64 1-6. 6 
7i MomielaMate*va,4, Butonr1a.deL Marte- 
Chrtsttne Cntttfa Ranee, 64 61 


Baseball 


RamMs 

Worthy 

AbdoKUtor 

Sadf 


KiiMMi 
tortom 
Tam Rbndl 

v r . 


LOS AMO CUES 
is toorftfta . r n of nts 
1 6 1 2 7 t 4 1 

6 M 4 6 4 2 5 1* 

IS 26 • I 17 1 no 

5 171 3 4Z2.11 

6 * 2 4 413 3 14 

1 7 4 5 1 0 4 4 

t * 5 4 4 5 2 22 

9 4 12 4 0 3 5 

o m'tm 

? 

44 99 20 2* SB SI 32 (Of 
BOSTON 

to too ft fle r a ra ids 


MCHte* 

6 

a 3 

3 7 2 5 IS 

Bird 

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21 1) 11 12 3 2. JO 

. Porteh 

4 

• 4 

7 W 2 3 It 

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4 

H 3 

4 6 3 2 IS 

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Torn ftbndo 
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U 37 w ns HUB 

- LM —Id 



31-3131 23-49* 


, Tens pitot end;. LosAnpeisi. Coanerl-2. 
Bostoa Bird UTMaleNR D.jelutson.8lrd. 

, r 

SCHItMJLC 
(Hftoe Had VI) 

June 3: Boston at Lee Anoatet ... 

June S: Boetoa of Lae AdaeteB. . . 
June 7: Boetoa at Lea Ai m ete s 
s-June f. Left Aneetes at Bos ton 
x-June It: im Anee tes at 1 — to o 
(*4f neosnary) 


Hrarsdafslinefioores 


AtoB to tCAW LBAOUB 
(taMeed - - -aes ne hb-s 7 l 

Dram* . , . «u tat tee-3 s i 

Blrtaas, ABtarton IB) and Heath: TerralL 
Henmdei T» and Atahda. W-TerrelL 6L 
L i t rte as . M. w a He rn o n d sa (III. HRs— 
OokloiM, Ortflln (11. Detroit, Herndon (4). 
CaWerate - tNB MB OIS— I 3 ? 

•tew vara • BBBitast»-4 s • 

Romank* and Honan; Cowtey, Rlohottl 
(Bjonawy nea ar.w— Cewteyv*a.L — Romon- 
. KK 62. Sv-WNHW HO). HRs— CaWornta, 
Hawaii Cl). Hear Vwrt ^ Poaqwo n), R obert son 
nt 

■mdtts • • ‘ ate tea eat— 3 7 1 

— *— »•* Ml N* * 1 »— B a t 

•Mans Bantu m. Thomas 151. Vande 
Ben CQ, Stottea (S) nadOcorr; Oawts ond 
RavfsnL W-Oavt& 61. U-Baatas. 66. 
M P'M d i ' BU BM M-7 M • 

■to* 0 " bib to Bi«n-« u 3 

. til . bntaAS} 

smfltoo*, M0«Bi (IL Dovta HI 
UMHteto OfM0.Tni|»B JZLatenlw (4) and 

•Manx W— Stantey. VI U-Oavl*. 1-i 
HRs Bsaton, Bwdmr m. oedman (4). 
Keem Ctty 2N Ml MS— 3 I 0 

man Mu-4 1 • 
LaMraodt and aundtanu Stover, NoHw 
(B. Jamas G^aod FWc.W-Saover.5-L L— 
LAMwidBJLSu JUBHm.HR— Oriaew, 
Ft* C11). 

MmOMAL UUOUB 
•tew Ysrtt MB m Bto—2 S B 

Son noun =.. MB MB WS—J 4 * 
Gooden and Oartar; GotLwmimnt(n.Gar- 
™«e m teet .Tcart*. or C Baden. 74. L— 
Gen. M. HRs— New Vara, Footer m. Sen 

FroKtecteTnNMd rt). 

Me ob ool . BM IM CD— 4 n 2 

fw Otooo 1 ON to n*— S M I 

. sraaasdsr.stOa»reCS),Luc»{7).Burke 

WM MtomteFlbBeRM l*>;HowUnkDo- 
. Lew tlL U fte rt t W and Kewtedy. w H aw 
WBB. ML. L m ote o dei . H Sv— Lottcrts 
OL H Rs *tenl rs id. W to ntoofaoi n CO. San 
Woea Mnrttear2.(6E 


St Loots BM m on— < f B 

Altaata M0 MB MS— ■ S I 

Andulor. Campbell (6) and lUeto; Motikr. 
Daemon (6). Camp (8) and Corona. W— Annu- 
lar. 61. L—M (Mar, W. Sv— Ctonpball 12). 
HR-fit Loote, Clark (9). 

PMtnaeteain an mi art— « 7 • 

Lbs Aepalei til M MB— 1 > 1 

Denav end Vlran; Volenzualo. Ntedanfuer 
(B), Howell (f) and Sdoecia. W— Denny. 26. 
L Vnlanzuata, 5-5. HRs— PhfledeUdUtL Vlr- 
Ml (6). Los Anastas. Marshall Cl). 


Transition 


Motor Laawe BassOaO— Announced fee 
raeianatton of Bob Win, dtractor of Intorme- 
Hon. 

American Loam* 

K.Y. YANKEES— Placed Henry Cotta out- 
(Ndder.aa tea iSdoy dlsaMad usL Rocallod 
DanPasqtMbowtfloldar.tnn Cotomboiof ttw 
Intel iKdteaal Leaeae. 

CLEVELAND— Recalled Jenry wuard. 
etdetwr. from Maine of the Internat i on al 


ATLANTA W ooed Lon 8actcer.pttcber.on 
B* 16day dteafated Rst called ira Sieve 
SMetotpUcher. fram Rktanoad ol Ibe Inter- 

pgtfo n frf 1 tipm 

N.Y. METS— Acttvated Colvin SctibUOL 
Pitcher, from Me dtenbtod Rst Placed Ron 
GardanWne. InfMder. on ttw 2M ay dlaMed 
list ratraaettee to May 2S. 

SAN PRANCtSCO— Placed Brad Wdlmaa. 
inlMder.an tbe2!Ldar dtsablad 0$t RecoUad 
Rick Adame, tafteMor, from Phoenix of the 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


1, in San Frandsco. 

Hawkins allowed 10 hits in 7 273 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cost DMstoe 

WL.PCl.G8 

Toronto 79 13 659 — 

DafroH 25 U to » 

Bommora 23 19 to 4 

New York 23 2B J35 S¥x 

Mflwaokee JO 22 JOS B 

Eaten 21" 24 AST ft b 

Cleveland 14 29 J56 VPfi 

west DMstoe 

CotHarPto 25 2D to — 

Kansas Oty 25 2D to - 

aiicaw at 2 t to aw 

Ookktad & 33 <40 3 

MMWHda HUM* 

same ao 23 to 5 

Tows 16 0 to * 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Cost DfVWM 

W L Pd. GB 

N«w York 27 15 to - 

rhlmnn 25 17 iK 2 

Montreal 27 W to 2 

EL Lento 33 0 -523 3 

PhttodetoMa 37 27 to 11 

Ptttefaurah 13 31 30 12Ki 

west Dtytolne 

fiem Dleoo 26 17 i05 — 

dnckmall 34 21 to 3 


los Angela 

Atlanta 

Sen Fraodsw 


27 

t* 

to 

2 

33 

21 

to 

5 

17 

27 

to 

11 

15 21 
OtVtolM 

MS 

12Ki 

- 36 

17 

MB 

— 

34 

21 

to 

3 

34 

31 

to 

3 

22 

34 

JO* 

M 

11 

26 

J» 

XV, 

. u 

M 

JU 

Mfc 


Cl NCI NNAT I— Sfcned Emanttol KtoB,0ne- 
bo cU t r . oad Sean Thomas, cernorttock. 
GREEN B AY— waived Rtch CamoteO. 

MIAMI— Stead Mike tendto, defensive 
bade, to a mafttvoar contract 
NEW ENGLAND— WnhiedMtefcey Stlmfr 
oad (Mad YouseCL tdefeert aad John 9tee- 
wmboGensIve Bn emaa. 

HOCKEY 

NoHoenf Hotkey Leoooo 
NJ. DEVILS— Steoed Leu Vatro^ aedstonl 
cdoUv te a bin yea r an tnaq. 

Toronto A ce oi red Ooa Edwmda,Baol- 
tender.fram ttwCototeV Flames teexdnnee 
ter Mm coaeUeraHaas, 

America Hacker Leaeae 

NEW Haven— A imownced the resleaatten 

of Ntek B ev er ley , head arndv. 

TENNIS 

UMted sates TaeeteAflMdetiM 
UST A Named Geera* Bueerry, Sine 
CteVries, Dan Cddte. Mm Crabto Luke Jeo- 
sen, Chris Kennedy, Mlebael Karos. RSOc 
Leach. Wdwrd Mntmrewii a. Brad Peorae. 
Mdtey Aeneberaand Jaba Roesos members 
of the IMS Jonter Oavts Coot Named John 
Htatoencw^nd Ron Hloio u iinimd John 


Dalglish was namedlliuisday to swxeed Joe Fagan as manager of the _ 

Liverpool soccer team. Fagan, 64, reagned following the European 

Champions Ciro in Brussels, having coached the dub for two yean. _ SAN FRANCISCO — Dwighi 
Because of fats managerial inexperience, Dal glish, 34, wfll be Gooden was dominant. Andy 

for the first two years by former Liverpool manager Bob Paisley, 66, who Hawkins was lucky . Thursday, 
will come art of retirement both came away with impressive 

victories. 

Irwin Leads in U.S. Golf Tournament 

BETHESDA, Maryland. (UPI) — Hale Erwin, winner of last week's - 

Memorial Tournament, shot 6- under-par 66 after carding 31 on the front BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

nine Thursday for a two-shot lead after one round of the Kemper Open. 

Two shots behind Irwin were George Archer, David Lundstrom, Peter New York th^nienie 2 

Oosterfams and Bany JaeckeL Ten golfers were tied for third after 39 J* ^ s^Franri^*^ =Gianis,2. 
players bettered par. Last year, only eight managed a sul>-par first round. ’ Hawkins allowed'lO hits in 7 2/3 

Lopez Leads LPGA Despite Penally K 

ry Hmgfa, tdd her she was v -2 

penah^d because she had taken 83 seconds to select the chib far his tee threw go -Vvehad 

* te te* to. rm 

r__ *|_ _ The victory was the 1,355th for 

ror me lieoora fa Padres’ manag er, Dick Wfl- 

Tbe University of Florida, told last month it could keep its Southeast- ^ 

era Conference football title although having been put on NCAA eaver ’ 

probation for|wo to ^Ttunday by thcSEC nMn te 

rafifrimia fradiman Jfl bctler the Mets had given him a 

Jhm FSLf uL 92ZfZ2 t £F!V*‘* few more runs. ThursdS, he need- 
world best m the women’s triple jump, leaping 44 feet, 6% inches m _j # t,_ ,| t V ■ 

sjsS’Satw: 

The Deaf ?x Nuggets owner. Red McCombs, in what be called a sudden 
dedflcm, mmounoed he ft selling the National Basketball Association _ _ , . _ 

team to two Houston businessmen, Sidney Shlenker and Allen Becker. Lan&nais o, fares tl 

(AP) In Atlanta, Joaquin Andtgar and 


Compiled by Ow Swfj From Dijpaidta BiD CampbcD pitched 2 five-hittCT 

SAN FRANCISCO — Dwighi and Jack Clark hit his ninth homer 
Gooden was dominant. Andy this year. 


lawJuns was lucky. Thursday, PHffies 6, Dodgers 1 

fa came away with impressive Sacrifice flies by Ozrie Virgil and 
K i one f- , Mike Schmidt, plus three earors by 

Gooden added 14 fi*«uts to die Dodgers, give Philadelphia its 


his league-leading total of 89 as the victorymLos Angdes. TheDodg- 
— — ers have 62 errors in 46 ganres. 


Orioles 8, Mariners 2 


In the American T nagne. Storm 
New York Mets beat the Giants, 2- Davis unveiled his new forkbafl 


and baffled Seattle. Eddie Murray 
doubled in two runs during a six- 


and got shaky relief hdp, nm fifth. 

Padrg neaped wilh a 5-4 Bed Sox 8. T™s 7 


victory over the Montreal Expos in 
San Diego, giving Hawkins his 10th 
victory without a loss. 


In Boston, Jim Rice's one-out 
single scored Glenn Hoffman from 


“I can’t explain it,” said Haw- **?*??* y ^^ b f," ra fa8 0 mn 
kins, who struck out four, walked mfafatomof the llthafter Ron 
one and threw 98 pitches. Tve had Davis hit two batters that inning, 
to struggle a lot latel y, but Tm White Sox 4, Royals 3 
w inn i ng ." In Hiiwiy i, Carlton Fisk hit his 

The victory was the 1,355th for 1 lih homer this season and pitcher 


inc vicuny was me jot i im nomer mis season ana pitener 

fa Padres’ manafflr, Dick WH- Tom Scaver beat Karwas City for 
hams; he is 17th on the aD-rime Hst, his 293d major league victory. 


having been tied with Earl Weaver, 


Delta: it lhe Mets had given him a 
few more runs. Thursday, he need- 
ed little help. For the I8th time in 
two years in the major leagues, he 
struck out 10 or more batters in a 
game. 

Cardinals 6, Braves 0 
In Atlanta, Joaquin Andujar and 


Players Consider AU-Star Game Boycott 


Lai Angeles Times Service 

NEW YORK — The All-Star Game at Minne- 
apolis Jnty 16 is in jeopardy because the Major 
League P&ytrs Association, frustrated by lack of 
progress in negotiations for a new coDective bar- 
gaining agreement, is considering a boycott of the 


polls the players cm authorization for a strike: 

Said Don Baylor, the Yankees' designated hitter 
and leagneplayer representative: “if the playns 
want to walk oul on the All-Star Game and resume 
playing three days later, that’s become a genuine 
possibility. I’d say that the AB-Star Game ft in 


Soecer 


WORLD CUP qUAUPmO 
GraopOn* 

ARmta a. Poland 1- 


A boycott was discussed during last week’s 
meeting of tile union’s executive board in Chicago 
and apparently has been gaining support as the 
anion s acting executive director, Donald Fehr, 


The players also are known to have dftenssed a 
continuation of the boycott at the start of the 
second half of the season, as well as a September 
strike threatening the playoffs and Woria Series. 


Yankees 3, Angels 1 

With Joe Cowley and Dave 
Rigfatti pitching a three-hitter 
against California, New York won 
its 10th straight at home. Dan Pas- 
qua, making fa major-league de- 
but, homered in his second at bat 
TIgere3, A’s2 

In Detroit, Larry Herndon’s 
homier, leading off the bottom of 
.the sixth, helped beat Oakland. 

Tim fatsashft Kirk Gibson wilh 
a pitch in the third nwitng, fatting 
tire Detroit outfidder’s lower lip in 
two places. It took 17 stitches to 
dose tire wound. (UPI;AP) 

■ Dn*i Indictment Returned 

A federal investigation of posti- 
Me drug sales to major league base- 
ball players has resulted in thein- 
fatment of seven people, none of 
them basd»H players, on 165 nar- 
cotics counts. The Associated Prtss 
reported Friday from Pittsburgh. 

Baseball was not mentioned in 
fa indictment, which was unsealed 
following a 14-month investigation 
byagrsndjmy. 










Page 16 


ART BUCHWALD 


Remember Nicaragua 


ASHIN GTON, June 15. 

▼V 1999 — Officials and veterans 
gathered in the nation’s capital to- 
day to cdebrate “Nicaraguan Re- 
membrance Day” and honor the 
more than 200,000 American GIs 
who died in the recent war in Cen- 
tral America, 

The ex-Gls, dressed in old khaki, 
some wearing combat boots and 
medals, marched from the steps of 
the Capitol to the recently compIeL- 
ed memorial 
overlooking the 
Potomac. 

The war, 
which began 
during the sec- 
ond term of 
Ronald Reagan 
and was contin- 
ued by two other 
presidents, end- 
ed in a stalemate _ _ 
with the with- Bucfcwald 
drawal of U. S. troops after a de- 
cade of fighting. 



names of his buddies on the memo- 
rial wall "It was Vietnam all over 
again," be said. “We were able to 
get control of the cities, but the 
Commies hdd the counoyside. We 
didn't know which civilians were 
for us and which ones were against 
us. So after a while we started 
chnnriwg at anybody who looked 
suspicious. When we couldn't bold 
on to real estate, Washington de- 
manded body counts. Based on the 
counts, every president since Rea- 
gan promised we'd be home by 
Chris Unas.” 

□ 

Bx-Captain Robert Simpson, 
who was shot down in a helicopter 
by a Soviet missile near Jinotega 
and held prisoner by the Sandinists 
for four years, was bitter because so 
many Americans refused to go 
when President Reagan asked Con- 
gress to remstitute the draft in Sep- 
tember. 1986. 


An estimated 535,110 fighting 
men on both sides and 1,620.0 


1,000 


civilians died during the bloody po- 
lice action. 

□ 

Former Chief Petty Officer 
Clyde Durban had served on the 
destroyer escort Fishtail, tbe vessel 
that President Reagan claimed had 
been fired on by a Nicaraguan PT 
boat. It was because of this incident 
that the president asked for a “Gulf 
of Fonseca Resolution,” which he 
said gave him tbe legal justification 
for ordering the U. S. Marines to 
invade Managua. 

Durban said, “it was nighttime 
and we never did see the shrp that 
was supposed to have attacked us 
in the Gulf of Fonseca. Some of the 
guys on board the Fishbait said 
they thought it was a fishing boat 
shooting up flares. We never 
dreamed that the United States 
would go to war over it." 

Harvey Robinson, a former in- 
fantry lieutenant who had been 
wounded at the Battle of San Ra- 
fael del Norte, tried to find the 


He said, "After the October ri- 
ots, when an estimated three mil- 
lion kids declared they would go lo 
jail rather than fight in Nicarag u a, 
the pres dent had to backtrack on 
his call for national conscription. 
So this left the professional military 
people and the unemployed to fight 
the dirty little war. We got our 
butts shot off while the guys back 
home ware earning big bucks and 
getting the best jobs. ‘Nica ra g u an 
Remembrance Day' doesn't mean 
diddly bans to the guys who were 
there." 


r Rambo’ Tops at Box Office 

The Associated Press 


HOLLYWOOD — Sylvester 
Stallone’s “Raxnbo" led the way at 
the box office over the Memorial 
Day holiday, the summer's first big 
movie weekend, grossing $315 mil- 
lion at a record 1064 U. S. theaters. 


George P- Shultz, who was Ron- 
ald Ragan’s secretary of state at 
the Hm#» of the “Gull of Fonseca 
Resolution,” and is now t e aching 
diplomacy at the University of Chi- 
cago, tola reporters be still feds the 
United States did the right thing. 
“At the time. Congress would not 
support the freedom fighters in 
Honduras, nor CIA efforts to de- 
stabilize the Sandinist government. 
So we had no choice but to get our 
American boys directly involved. 
The price may have been higher 
than we predicted, but we kept tyr- 
anny from being exported to Haiti. 
In spite of the casualties, the im- 
portant thing is that President Rea- 
gan sent a strong message to the 
Russians that he Would do every- 
thing to maintain his credibility. 
Tm sure that if faced with the same 
set of facts, Ronald Reagan would 
not hesitate to throw our boys into 
Nicaragua again.” 



To Applaud or Not to Applaud 


By Will Crutchfield 

See) Tot* Times Senior 

N EW YORK — The pulse 
pickens; the fiddler’s left 
frand becomes a blur as the pia- 
nist’s fingers race up and down 
the keyboard. The momentum 
builds to the final scale and tri- 
umphal chords: Ta tah! Turn 
T iimmmm ! The violinist draws a 
long, intense down bow; with the 
release his aim flies exultantly 
into the air. 

Then: Awkward silence; a bit 
of coughing, some shifting in 
the soloist looks at the 
floor, tbe bow arm drifts sheep- 
ishly down. From the jpianist, a 
note or chord for re-tuning, as the 
performers wind down from the 
pitch of excitement they have 
built without, the release of ac- 
knowledging a response to it. 

Where are we? In a major con- 
cert hall, amid a sophisticated au- 
dience. Otherwise, a few people 
who had beat stimulated by all 
that action would have done the 
obvious, and their more knowl- 

ly ftave shiu^dtiKm. Andwfry? 
Why, because it’s only die end of 
the first movement, and thnngh 
the music says "Please applaud," 
concert decorum in the late 20th 
century says “Please wait.” 

It was not always this way. 
When most of the multi-move- 
ment music we play today was 
written, it was assumed that audi- 
ences would express their plea- 
sure at each pause. At Haydn’s 
London concerts the movements 
that pleased most were actually 
encored. The “Clock" andante 
was a particular favorite. So, a 
generation later, was the corre- 
sponding movement erf Beetho- 
ven’s Seventh Symphony — to 
the extent that when on me occa- 
sion in 1816 it was not encored, 
Beethoven's sympathizers in the 
Viennese press fell obliged to give 
the excuse that “dense crowding 
of the audience hindered the free 
use of their hands.” 

But if this is a difficult pill for 
the decorous modern concengoer 
to swallow, it will be almost 
shocking to realize that audiences 
in those days (and for a long time 
after) habitually applauded dur- 
ing the music as weB, especially in 
music involving a virtuoso solo- 
ist. C.P.E. Bach lamented tbe 
vanity of the pianists who would 



GramMa 


not even play the opening, of a 
composition in a simple manner 
because "they could not bear to 
be so long without the bravos.” 
When Malibran and Pasta 
in “Semiramide.” It is reported 
that the applause broke in “like a 
thunder dap” at the end of «ac h 
One m their bravura daets, ending 
just as suddenly as they drew 
breath to continue. Concerto so- 
loists were applauded doting the 
orchestral tuttis (there is an anec- 
dote of Mendelssohn consulting 
with Spohr on the appropriate 
len gth of a ritomeDo: “How long 
shah they applaud?”) 

As late as the torn of this cen- 
tury, at his triumphant “L’Ehsir 
d’Amore” at La Scala in Milan, 
Enrico Caruso was applauded at 
the end of his solo m the duet 
“Chiedi alTanra" and after the 
first verse of “Una furtiva la- 

The 
knew! 
fectly 


One anecdote has a 
Thomas Beedum whirling ri 
on the podium after the first 
movement of “Harold in Italy” 
(or perhaps it was another work; 
most Beecham anecdotes come in 
multiple variance) to ay, “Not 
now. you fools!” 

Sir Thomas taught fajs Fngfah 
audiences particularly wdL To- 
day, as a general rule, they wait to 
the very rad of the last chord, and 
at the opera they do not applaud 
mid-scene. There is tbe story of 
Montserrat CabaDfi to prove that. 
The Spanish soprano elected to 
transpose down the florid and 
Hiffirail r cnndndwio «crinn of the 
e jut. *» Tk«. 


C point is that the Milanftri 
1 their opera. They knew per- 
r wdl how to express their 


first act of "La Traviata.” There 

the retitati^ilat separated 
from the preoeding dew aria so as 
to modulate down half astep. But 
Caballe preferre d simply to sing 
the recitative in the lower key 
from the very beginning. That 


express 

and then get out of 
way. And if, in ext raordinar y 
dxcomstances, they wanted to 
“stop the show” in between 
verses of an ana, the orchestra 
knew perfectly wdl how to wait 
awtnk and then resume. 

Who chang ed all thic, smri 
when? Moves to bar encores in 
opera (not applause, but the actu- 
al repetition of a number in re- 
sponse) were already afoot before 
1900, and Toscanini broke with 
La Scala early in the century over 
this point. He came to the Metro- 
politan Opera and supposedly 
hannraf encores then; though 
press accounts show that they 
continued from time to time 
through the 1920s. 


staff explained, “they don’t ap- 
L”*Farix» ‘ ~ ' 


plaud.” *Tor me," the (fiva know- 
ingly responded, “they applaud.” 

But they didn’t. In wimm si- 
lence, Cahallft drew breath »nd 
made her expedient obvious to 
one and aD through a 
jarring shift of tonality . } 

Bui the change has been signif- 
icant evoywhere. 

It can be heard from broad- 
casts that a group of short pieces 
in a piano recital would still be 
applauded one by one in the 
1 930s and ’40s, but by the ’50s the 
concert programs of some leading 
recitalists were requesting that 
ause be wi thheld until the 
of a group; or even until the 
intermission. 

Some critics still praise a so- 
prano in “Otdlo" for holdin g the 


only works if the slow ana is 
applauded, so that most Hstmers 
can “forged the pitch of its final 
note. "Here," the Covent Garden 
audience rapt when her “Ave Ma- 
ria” wins tbe hig her reward of 
awed silence — but that observa- 
. non can only be made by those 
with long opera-going memories. 
Likewise, one stm hors a com- 
ment something tike, “How re- 
freshing to bear the lines that fol- 
low ‘Vutoria!’ in Tosca’ rather 
than a barrage of applause for the 
tenor.” When has one last not 
heard them? “Victoria!” seems 
not to have been applauded here- . 
abouts for over a dec a de, even 
when Franco Corelli was the ten- 
or singing 1 l 

That’s a far ay from the days 
when Beniamino Gigli would 
stop the show with Rodolfo's tit- 
tie introduction of Mhni to his 
friends in "La Bohtme” or when, 
as we hear on the Metropolitan 
Opera’s superb centennial moad- 
cast the entry of Law- 

rence Tibbeu on stage was greet- 
ed with a warm bin brief and 
unobtrusive hand before he bad 
sung a note in “La Traviata.” 

Tibbeu on that occasion 
earned his greeting by s i ngin g the 
elder Germonfs music so mag- 
nificently that it is hard to think 
of a superlative that could not be 
applied to his performance. The 
rapport he felt with his public 
certainly didn’t lead him into 
g mnAefji riding ; mightn’t it evfll 
have inspired him to give bis 
best? It certainly inspired Artur 
Rubinstein; who used to say that 
he knew something was really 


wrong if he didn't get 
after tbe first 


si movement of Tchai- 
kovsky’s First Piano Concerto. 
To the vary end of his life Caruso 
judged his success in “Histt" by 
the reaction to those two num- 
bers that worked so wdl for him 
in Milan. 

Ultimately all these issues will 
remain matters of personal pref- 
erence. But anyone who feds the 
urge to applaud a beautifully exe- 
cuted symphonic movement or 
an exciting concerto opener, yet 
feds inhibited about breaching 
custom, might take comfort in au 
even more sacred tenet of modem 
music-making. If your instincts 
tell you to dap, do so; you'll 
aiirwei cer tainly be fulfilling the 
composer’s intentions. 


people 

Sharing Getty 


BfflumH 



have agreed to se^ a i»wsuit over who ge» the credit for / 

fold (W«r i S4-WHiQ° fSfftrtsB 

divide the bluest mMfcurtmv a t ^ Titarafr , 

of $750 prob™ with the 

meat was Tr£ hasb^a member 1- 

the attorney for lfrjnMW m ££ faces djsriplixraiy action for \ , 

Getty endShislOTecropOT^W speakSuT^n«aD«tpci!ji*^ 

sag. afe gfe* 
a-JKlSsSS assssjssa 
=s saj£«™§ - jsgSSSSS , 

whorepittaJtsGo^onGd^,Mn bCTo/Ienncssee. thcDAR’s prea- 
the settlement, which was in ms- ooro, «w-~f ■ 




Up 111 WJ — — - — | 

Paid Getty and ms mother, Sarah 


for writ 


already been set aside for payment 

of state and federal capital gams 
taxes. Gordon Getty, 51, and Eo- 
, Pad Getty Jr, 52, two of J. 


LrcmuriBwnstefaandjOOi 

raw uj o», -*» **•» '~ ~ cians representing 14 countries *31 
Getty’s sons, are each to over- embark on acoaool MtircaHeda 
see a $750-million trust. A third “journey for Peace” to coincide 
$750-miIEcu trust would be shared ^th the 40th amtiversary of the 
by the three daughters of another atom jc bombing of Hiroshima oa 


LUC lUlUUi 

would be divided into three parts 
SO that J. Paul Getty’s fourth son, 
the out-of-favor Jean Ronald Get- 
ty, would get only about $3,000 a 
year while the remaining income 


DOUSLUU, — — J « 

.New York in a statement aanottoc- 
ins the tour with the Europe®. 
Community Youth Oidtestra and 
more than 300 choristers and aob- 
ists. Tbe 18 , 000 -mile (29,0GG-kfc>- 


JWU waaiiw uiv - ■ ■ U — * IMA iuw ^ 

would be distributed to Goman meter) lour wOl inchufecooealSA 
and Eugene Paul Getty and their Athens, Hiroshima, Budapest 

— . Vienna. Tbe artists, staff anti pro. - 

duction organizations will wmsr 
their fees, and income after ti- 
the Htfoshka 



Saturday by rock star Bruce 
Springsteen, a promoter says. 
About 60,000 fans are expected to 
converge an the liny village for a 
four-hour concert by Springsteen, 
35, on the grounds of Slime Castle, 
30 witIm north of Dublin, tbe open- 
ing concert of a European tour by 
SpringsteoL Villagers, still jittery 
over a concert by Bob Dylan last 
summer during which spectators 

became rowdy, were assured by the 

promoter Jim Aiken that extensive 
security measures had been ar- 
ranged to prevent trouble. 

□ 

Faith TEbeno, a writer and busi- 
nesswoman in Shcrbora, Massa- 
chusetts, has readied a settlement 


].j rj:>f ' 
- . Jill «■* 

The Italian theater director (S*- - 
no StreUer has been arretted on . , 
rfiar ges of illegal pottesaon. of 
police sai 


t - i 

* H 


drugs, police said Tbulittiy. 
Strehler, 63. was served with the 


lull 


> 

*V f J 


arrest warrant and then placed un- 
der house arrest at his sptrtmat nt 
a residential block near Milan’s 
central Piazza del Duonm. Police 
said the arrest warrant was issued 
by the office of the state prasecui' 
in Bergamp, near Milan, 
conducting a major inve. 
in to drug trafficking is the - - u . 
mo area. Strditer’s name came mttr 
the invesrigatkm as a result of l * 
tapped conversation on the ide- •* 
5 fine of & suspected open tie ' 
police said. ; i' 


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ZURICH: 


■11166062 
all 170591 
1720.95.63 


fMlWjMO^ 



nn 

Companions 

uu 

DAKS 


LONDON 


Exclusive DAKS 
clothes and 
accessories for 
men and women 
available from 
DAKS stockists 
around the world. 


CS Stmcscti 

St 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN UNB IN Ti 


OVER 1,000 AGB4TS 
U5JL-G 


in UEJL - CANADA 
350 WOCm-WlDE 
OBBUMATB 

PARK Dwfaowto h U am M ktod 

(01) 343 23 64 


FRANKFURT 


(069)250066 

DUSSHDORF/ RATINGS 

(02102)45023 LJIILS. 

MUNICH IMS. 

(089) 142244 

WNDON JftC s; 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSBS: z^sa 

(02) 425 66 14 

USA ACad Van liMH fain Cmp 
(0101) 312-481-8100 


DEMEXPORT 


PARIS • LYON • MARSEILLE 
UUE • MCE 

Inti moving by spodafal From 


■mi movmg oy ipooaM tram moor 
atw i in Fnmce to c£ dries to the wood. 
Teh free from France 16 jOfy 24 10 8? 


CONTMEX Gutbusiers to 300 atm 
woAJwkL* - Air/Sea. Coll Omrin 
281 1881 Pam (pear Opera) Cant too 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


INTERNATIONAL 


MIDCKJE EAST BASE. ViHat, Hats, land 


from ussauxn. Brtxhuie and Sd: 
maria, r.OE 


Uteomoria, r.OE. 4282. Umanal. tel 

051 72917 tbe 4565 Tbeoin Cv. Cyprus 

BELGIUM 


WHY RENT OFFICES when you can 
buy 1000 iqjn. in center of Brussels 
(near Ave. Lome). USS250000. Mr. t 
Hcdvoet. tel. Brusseb 322/6489991 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


FRENCH RIVIERA 

Ne>t to Monte-Carte, owner seto hocurv 


townhause, tongra gm. 2 bedroom. 3 


barbeaie. pnvare 

garden. Fantastic view, located m mag- 


nfkenr private perk with svnmnng 
’ & sauna. S250.000. 5100/100 


pod & sauna 5250,000. 

dawn owner wdl finance the dfF ercnc e 
m reft currencies. 

G. GHONE 
6 Ave da Gnui u ms. 

MC 99000 Monaco. (93) 30 52 28. 


CANNES. Owner set* One of the 

finest £ rarely available 4-bedroom 

upatments m CcWtmie. 220 sqjn. 

fiwnfl m 100 (qjn. terrace. 4 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA'S NEW 


SUPER PORT 

In the boy of Fabnci5 mins. Pohna, 15 
■rim. Airport, 664 berths 8 to 38 melen. 
2 for 141 to 60 1 nets 1 each, indnidod 
TV/ rrvrn/ water /phone cannediois. 
P rofe ssi onal Port Mano ge ment Co. fill 
marine services: lamer, rodo sip, trav- 
eUift. reair, fuel iktoon, in & outdoor 
Winter htnistontk, U-ground ca--parl- 
lodcers. CaqAtmertcry service & lei- 
sure focBtiot medoal. barks 
ping, catering entertoiiunent. 
none naartty. ConinetuU area com* 
poses 85 unis on 13,171 sqjn. si ail 
Plus 21 amer t^xrtrow7sc4wve&7Bin 
separate hatury condamnun - al in 
front fate akmg main piers. 

Top iwii S i no nMl 45% said! 


Hurry now before next prioerise! 
Coreact dsedy devefapen: 


FUBtro PUNTA PORTALS, 5-A. 
Director Comerdal 
C/Marina 101 Porjah Nous 


Mtdarcn. %tdn 
_ 1 CAUU E 


or Tlx 686861 


SWITZERLAND 


SUNNY SOUTHERN SWTTZBBAM) 

LAKE LUGANO 

Lafasude oportmentj in a large 
beaulifid pant (17j000tqjn4vwdi swan- 
neng pod, private mama cndprivofe 
beads. Itf quoity. Ap a rtments 80 sqjn. 
up to 190 sqjn. + terraces 24-47 
sqjn. Prices: SF453A00 - 5F1 .123/00 
or; The Residenzo Bivatoga in the South 
area of the Lake offers opartmen fc 
from 57 sqjn. to ISO sqm. overlooking 
die telat and die mowtmm. Prices 
SF710.*50- SFm4SD. free for sale to 
foreigner* Matgagss al lesr Swiss 


EMHALD - HOME LTD. 

Vki O. Caflori 3. CH-6900 Ingcno 
Tel: CH-91-542913 
Tbe 73612 HOME CH 


after 7 pm. 


FBMAY VOLTAIRE Apartment. 3 

bedrooms, Mgh dose, decorated by 

top Itofcgi desnyer.foly fumiihed (a 

5155^00. tSTBO) 42 94 34. 


CREAT BRITAIN 


BUOaNGHAMSKffiE. letted hntooc 

manor house, 30 nurtures from Lav 
don. 7 maaruficent rooms with an 

addliand Am wtf cartoned amee. 

Around 050,000. Cd (0753) 883613 


GREECE 


SUPER LUXURIOUS lOraam vfla 5 
badtt, 3 firepteem, swuttning pool. 5 
terraces, phone, paric etc. Urge* tor 
reasons of dipariure/ batgwjpna. 
Guaraiteed reidd. Write 1HT text, 
DBQ, 26 Pindoraa 5L Athens 10675, 
Greece. 


ITALY 


SUMPTUOUS CAPI8 VUiA 
with br emld a ting view of SampSoni. 

4 b e dra oms each with bathroom 
anoxia, masrefastf rcoapWn anxa, 

c m uxunouvy *BTfRsneo, tvitoca 
garden. hec*ea wnmnmg poaL 1(00 
sqjn. on 21eveis. SennsA quarters, 
fufiy equpped. very iage kddien area, 
exaJent modem amenli«, garage. 
Shari wafang datance from Capri 
center. Owned by foreni company. 

Write B ox 234/, Henxl Trdwte 
92521 Net* Codex. France 


HORB4CE Xm CENTWY palace, 

man floor fuly rtpc-red in the heat 
of Rorance between Piazza 5. Croce 
& Palazzo Vecdtte. 12 rooms about 

375 sam. 4- toque terae terrace. 

mmffX. Tet W42/50ra or write 
to Brazzin vbj Q. Capporv 44 50121 
fimae Holy. 


In the chorn w ig mountaxi resort of 

IEYSIN: 

RBS)ENCELES FSB4E5 

Overioobng arptefxfcjAjpme panora- 
nra. 30 mn. from Montreux and lute 
Geneva by oar. 

- you can mi quality reridenoes 
with mdoor swimming pod and 
fitnnss foatews in an ioed 
cnvKormwre for leisure and sports 

rates 

up la 80% mertgoges. 


Re rid e n ee le s Ftew es. 1854 Lenin 
SVflTZEnAND 

Tel: (025) 34 1 1 55 Tbu 456 120 ELAI CH 


LAKEGB4EVA 


MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lowriy epcetmenti wth rnognificent 
wm of trite Geneva and mo m toen 
Montreux, YJlarv Verbter, les Diabfer- 
ru. Chateau rfOo near Gstoad. ley- 
Op p ort uuBitai Per 


Prices from Sfl 23j000. 

Liberal m o rtg ages d 6H% atterejt. 
SMKPUN SJL 
Av Mon Repos 24, 

CHIOS LeuamteTSwit-eritnl 
Tet (21) 22 35 12. Tte 251 85 MELS 
J Sfasee 1970 


SWnZBLAM) 


STUWOS/APAlir- 

. . / CHALET5, LAKE G9IEVA - 
MONTREUX or m these world famous 
rends: ttAN SjWNT ANA. LB 
DIABLOErS. VSttBL VUIAKS, 
JURA & region of GSMADL From 
sn 10,000 ffolMo fiCSi of w% 

inrerest. 

REV AC LA. 
KwArtarnfinei 
52 Mortbrifad, Of-1202 fflCVA. 
Tet 022/341540. Telex; 22030 


ZUBCH - SWnZBUND. Affxofr 

■naleiy n mins hidtwqy drive from 
theaty. PenHtouMMOuwufly Btuded 
on a Mfcti*. Mfttnfon 4 lake view. 2 

bedroomt. 2 bate, loty ri ttwg room, 

(tong, fneploce, 2 storage rooms 
bde-up garage. Appretamriy 85 
sqjn. Even, 74 HA terrace area 
PnOe 5F55(unO. Finoriang avatebte, 
Sde toforagnen posSrie. W.L Gen- 
etobau, Podtech 190, BQ57 Zurich. 
1^ 61-312 34 33. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GMEVA - MONTREUX. Far 
sde tp fansgners, 4 Dais, take view, 
from Oudcier, no sales carnris- 
Jufy 19fe. Excefier* «*■ 


vidual financing ovaSable. CoteackJB 
DfflUK SX. rue de " 


IMMOBRJBl SX, rue de Bourg 17, 
1003 Lausanne, Swonnfoid TBb 
2091 07. Her 24453 BAR. Qt 


USA GENERAL 

AUSIM TEXAS. 1 bedroom condo- 
nraxn near IBM 4 Texas Instrv- 
menis. Fully emfoped kitdien and no 
shared wdk. tiStijXX). Price mgo- 
iMa as owner non Rving in Garnio- 
ns. IP. Herman JAieHstrane 1% 
7)43 Va-htegen/Bu. Tet49- (B 7W 
-13679. 

TEXAS Red Estate Investments. Cam- 
mood, Office & Apartment Buid- 
mgs. Mmteun JIOOJBO. Confxterttal. 
Steven Stavran, Attorney, World 
Trade Centre, PaX Box 5B66I, Dalas, 
TX 75258 USA. Tel: (817} 3^63888; 
tbu 79-4839. 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

9 KMS ST RAPHAEL Bto mawm te 
woods to let yeaty 0) 3423208 ml 

GREAT BRITAIN 

UJMICN, UTTLE VOKE adaoenl St 
John’s Wood, 400 yards American 
School with own garden and (frect 
access to 314 acre garden. 4 bed- 
roams, 2 brehroann, xxge entronoe 

cwngs WBvmonea or lumanea- 
£450/weelc. Weekends: 01-870 4703, 
weefcdaysi 01-499 2918 

EXECUTIVE SUnB MAYFAR. Luxu- 
ry furnahed opartmenti, newly dcoo^ 
rated, fuly urvioeii seaefexid/telex 
foaBm, tASanSSB per weefc. 3 
inortte to 2 yeore. Mountcurzon Mmv 
agemert Ltd. London 01 491 2626 
Men 299185. 

LONDON KMGH1SBUXSE superbly 
furrtehed I bedrocxri lire. £250 week- 
ly. 01-589 8223 

HOLLAND 

Renthouse Intematiwial 
020448751 (4 lines] 

Nederhaven 19-21, Amsterdan 

DUTCH HOUSV4G CB41RE B.V. 
Define rank*. Vcfcriiadr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020421234 ar AMTfo 

PEIBt BRUM MAKBAARDU 
b*n Harema Service-Rant* 
Aaretardaa. Tel: 020-768022. 

ITALY 

CHIANTI 

Are you plonnteg to vert Ffarencri 
Why not stay autnde the aty in enacre. 
testoricre erode. 15 minutes from Flor- 
ence. large axrtry estate with vine- 

yvas, moms aid kwe poyipu 

guesh. SwwAmericon owned 4 mov 

agecL For rasrevdion oal Florence 
8071625 and afc far Silvia 

When in flame: 

PALAZZO AL VBABRO 

Luxury oportmont house with Furnished 
tai, araSabte far 1 wenkand mare 

Wl ita Via OCH VeuJTD 16. 

00186 Home. 



PARIS AREA FURNISHED 



REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-ELY5S5 8 B 1 


Studte. 2 nr 3-room apartment. 
One murii dr more. 
tE CtAIHDGE 359 67 97. 



GOMTORTABlf 19TH ORffURY 4 


bedroom ham, garden, 20 minutes 
51 A* r. Ji 


Part center, — »«%■. 
Sept. 3, 51000/month. Tab 


II in 
13335. 


2ND RUE ST. DEWS. For artel. 3 
room, 60 sqm. 18th century bond- 
ing. To rert for 3 months. 19000. Tet 
2» 95 25 or 274 16 16 


FORUM DCS HA1IES. 1 
Quiet, 
deep. 


i DCS HALLES. 1 JJy/H5 Sept. 

3 


UfflH OIIARIB. 2 room, fci 
borhroom, WC axtoetefy equ 
F2000 weeMy. Tab 261 7749T 


SHORT IBM m Lotte 
No opems. Teb 329 38 83 


Quotor. 


RKHBSU DROUOT 1 brfooom. 2 
29654 55. 


fiwHB.todmri.bote. M2W54i 


MARAIS. Luxurious 3 rooms, sunny, 
quiet. F5W0 owner. Tab 857 5923. 


3RDBEAUBOURGmce2 room ffo. cd 

""85219 


comforb short term. Owner 828! 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


131H SOUTH PARIS. Chtorirg home, 
160 nm with office & garden, toe: 
FlojxJo/month. Writ Sat 3J0 w. / 6 
pm- Can be said. Teb 548 71 S 


SPAIN 


IBIZA 


U7VRY HOUSE 
M toaarion, 3 km. 




bedrooms, 4 bate, aD convenience*, 
■rroces & ac 


big pool, terraces _4 ggdoj for mi 


ham now an - 3, 4 or S5000' northiy. 
Clearing woman. Paris 256 02 55 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


SPAIN 


POtB«CA,MAULOKA. Tame Jin, 
July or AngusL Large rSo. magn3i- 
cent view, pod, lOnws. to t«i. Large 


Dvina/dteeia, large modem lateben, 4 
double beuuocn s. ‘ 


j bate, help au 9- 

able. Prim 260 60 18 or 8ax 2336, 
Herc4d Trbune.92S71 NeufayCedex, 
France 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


nOFBSan AMBOCAJN dmrdm 
dudte 6 2 pHkes, meublfi ovee tHfr- 


EMPLOYMENT 


EmxrnvE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EXECUTIVE POSmaN 
ARAB GROUP has a chtdengjng 
ope ra ig in KUWAIT far a international 
aomnwvial-busteeii lawyer, fonAar 


with French / E^fecjjgyr ^ro efc e. 


fluent ARABIC 

prsferabl y Jw duuu p, Egyptiai 
Pttorinian. IH) & Gwexpnri 


would be an asset, immas 


experiemt 

wimcerrifi- 


wiB be treated wirii strict I _ 

Write Attn: Mr. ABDUL MONEM 
POB 26555, SAFAT, KUWAIT 


Otoat poor Jten/faAt/Aairt. VQ&en, 
thate l et 5lnse ou dime. RJWO a 


F7JOOO. Ecrir* Box 2341, Herald Tri- 
bwie, 92521 Neufly Ctefet, France. 


AMERICAN LAWYB seeks fv3 
rontei 3/5 borkoom 
b 7th. Cd Haris 265 T4 01 


c 


EMPLOYMENT 


KJR MOKE EXECUTIVE POSHIONS 
LOOK UNDBl 

TNTERflAnONAI, P05TTION5" 
PAGE 11 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 


Reporting to the (resident of a rapefly 
'sign & 


expanding Genian hi-tech derign 
venture copto aompany. SuoDstshd 
(zaxWata wi atsbl m the promotion of 
anteH. product, as wefi os posiily be- 


is a necessity , Fluent English is requteed- 
ArtKhc crerfiwty and/or raaricetirig e» 


pincnciH 
deuce with 


Jflsasssss 

'»h resume, and LO. photo if 


poaUa. Storting sdfoy 
num. Bax 2337, J 
Nau3yGsdex.Fr 


COMMOOAL MANAGBI te Maine 
tedustry, enateaer [ medxeiical, mate- 
rids or dviq, ftoete in EngBiK ftendi 
& Genual, location Fnance. Sdes 
A/or monagemenr axperienon re- 
<Mrod- Sdioofenor work mqterience 
in USA a + . Company is n saftng 
knovA 


retaled indusTry, so mterasf or 
edge of 
not requxed 


edge of tdfag would be hebhibaf 
raid, nonce: (74| 28 14 19, 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


„ BOBOflWE ASSISTANT 
Rcportteg to the presideni of a ngidhr 
oponcfcig Gmdten hMech design & 
ventore copto company. Soaessful 
axKfidate wl oust e? tee proroaften of 
on «eL product, «B weB as ptffifSjSjr be- 
ing Matured « the image camacean. 


mg Moturaa m me vnage campaig n . 
GtpabSty to travel & paisteiy rdarata 
b a neemoty. Huert English is reqdrad. 
Armtic creauwJy and/or marieettna ex- 
penenceiian — * — * 


deace with resume and 

ClvwtifM 
posHiJio. Jttjing 


rtovinconfi- 
IXL photo if 


^vannum._Bo^2338, Herald Tri 


Nmdy Cedex, Finanae. 


WrL MAJOGEnteG MANAGBL 
for tell Bmneis Association & ftjbtstar 
to pfcm aid imdement cortteuota inti 
direct maS, _wedte, group sdes and 
cxtop.promohoiiL Mcto be experienced, 
crer*™. anentod, adxevcr. 

Bared m Print and London. Write ten 
Trade Awn. 37, Qw rfAnjau, Pane. 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBWON EXECUTIVES 


toeutosewe Ae tflAW 

m Ocn imlm* woritf- 
f«t ma* of wham ma in 

totanm and faxfaatev, wdl 

iwmI A. Jto# tofer as ( Path 
6135951 baton TO on i, me- 
soring that wa am telmc yaa 
bat*, and mar ni e sn qpa wi 
appmr sri&mdg boars. Tba 
ram k US. $9.00 or lead 
mgrivatmd par Bna. You mast 
to wfaae p M l and varX- 


WHO WR1 ffiNT my FuCy furwhed 

house in Paris/ Surefoes, 10 


.... ._ ranAa 

West of Baa de Bi 

ri t d i tfi. 2 be droona , 

and mdoor oarage. Cdl 
“"0610310 or 10= D. Batten. 


The Netherlands. 


BUSINESS 

OPPOintlNITTES 


BROKBtS 

WVBTMHMT ADVISORS 


Yopr dents am nweri m one of An»- 
ca 1 most exciting tednaiogica! bredt- 
ina 


doiter nutmdiBfry. 

PhtoxhMd. High onrud ttotringi 
far many, marry yean. “ 

antTBanoa. 


olamilablein 


Wnh, Frendi, 
Contact: 


. MtSeri- 


Geraan. 


STOBE PLAN SJL 
Av Morvtopos 24, 

Tett21)223512-Tbs25185MHJSCH 


GOLD MINERAL MINE 

Uaensed m Colorado, USA. J2i mfl- 

Bon (IIS.) needed to fletmteeirtP! 

produdion. i 

Lwrwwatrve, 

mere m plan. Principals, investment 
njtogj p. bankers only should utete 


payback. Top, 


JJ'L Weis & <v he. 
210W.22St,OakBrae^L60521 USA 


ATiemON SAlflR ARABIA Agtnts- 
Can you suxessfidy represere my 
a'ri defeae seen systemf Are “ 
techmcd? Wl you invest U5*' 

L Stewart, Av. Louae 368, II 
sob, BdgiuciL 


HOW TO GET 2ND PASSPORT / 

ere/ Greece 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JUNE lOtfi ISSUE 
ON SALE JUNE 3rd 


BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 


• Super Chips: Experimented 
Silicone Chip About to 
Start A Revolution in 
Electronics 

• Reagan's Tax Plan; 

Who Wins - Who Loses 

• Oil at $20 a Barrel 

• Japan: NTT Tdces a 
Lesson From The Bell 
Breakup 

NOW ON SALE 
AT All INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


ART CONSULTANT M18th 6 19tt> 
century Engfish panitegi w3 encase 
bid ^ LOJ n is tteai eft; & odvee an 
purahares for pritoe or investment 
Bax im, IKT, 63 Long 
9JH. 


purposes. BOX' 
Acte, loodog. 1 


roe SAIEBRUSaS 250 m. from ffC 

kristar hotel Cmafauded 1980. 42 


roamv with s taff. Prior BF4S iriEan 





BUSINESS SERVICES 


MTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

IMIM1TOMC 
UJJL 8 WOBLDWDE 

A comp te e sodd & buanets 


212^765-7793 
212-765-7794 

330 W. 56te St. N.YjC 10019 

■"Jnsr 


YOUR MAN M FWLAM3. Office. 

semtoy. Mex. tong intenxdtend ex- 
perience. Address: Hutefc OY, Otsav 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


MTL EXECUTIVE 32. AmeriauvWtot 
Point GtaL uetmf C ntfiierin 
MBA, 6 yews Corps of Dimnaerx, 
currently assigned as General Man- 
ager ofUS coraum 


ager ot US caniumr 
te Munich resaw 


many 
in US. 


ar Gerraan compaty 


fluert Getman. Oeferee tedui- 


Bax 2160, LH.E, Friodrictetr. 
FranUurt/Main 


interest, HeaM rapf^to 


AOMNSTRATIVE ASSISTANT, 27, 
mceMn in infLjxteiic udminstration, 
bodaround in x*T finenae & trade, 
frendi « camptfaer fluent, *wsl frav- 
n ThW World e 


etod, strong intro world expenene e , 
mSJle. Douglas Odder, 40 Sanford^ 


Colorado SjOTgs, GO 80906 USA. 


Trit 303471 -I 


general 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AMHBCAN GPWAl, MANAGBI 

^Hreered male 


faring in France, cfl required 


paper*. 25 year* laid experience in 
sanKonduaon, consumer eleeranic 


ll NeuBy Cedex. Frtro 


CmU traveled 
r wants Paris pertten as 


Assistare/Girf Firidoy for executive. 
7837^2661 


Carry. Tefe 813/8^-8266 USA. 


RMVCS11GATIVE JOURNAUST seeks 
coawnasior*. No crasies. ManhdJ 
ffrance) Teh SB04 B3 34 


LADY, 36, seeks, postioo a house- 
Izifrer / conqxnon South Eirra but 
open to offer*. Tek 07-674 5SS7 UX 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


TRAMMGH 

■School leu SI 

Pori*. 


HeraUTrifaune, 92521 NeoHy CedS,' 

IrortCrfL 




TUTOR, AMOCAN with academic 

i needed fcy an 8 year old 
- 1 bafian famDy qiereflng 

. toil Jufy t8 - Jan! 

«. Write Cterami 684 Sroadwa 
^^NY. NY I06l2 or cal (21 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


IRAOBt OF CHINESE sdf deferae. 
g fravuL 6 months intensive training 
raunw, Prwipies. TaoS 

|wrctogy. pMowpiy, jsydicloBy. Pn-I 


ested mcteriiluab & _ 

group*. Far info write or odfc Franeb- 
oo Vargas. P.O Bar 60327. Uk 
tel, " 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


URGENT 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT. 

Report 12 oounfriec cmalyzed. 
Decak: n WMA 45 u Lyrehursr TCE, 
Sate 510, Certrd, Hong Kgng, 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

(fare dtemends in any pries range 
at kMexst Hhatosd* prices 
dna from Aims 
er of the dtemond world. 
FJgwroreee. . 

Fa heo pm tot htob 

Jeaddm GeUmpm 


wadi® 

PeBcoamtrare 62, 8- 201 8 Arevrerp 
Heart ef Antwerp Oiarnand mdutry 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DIAMONDLAND 

The largest showroom in 

Antwerp, Diamond Gty 

Appefanaratr 33A. Tet 323/2343612. 


Sidiam Diamonds, Jewelry 


Export prices died from factory. 
Centre IreotiMdiunai hrier Hernw s 
, Enironre. PO BoxJdTSfc 1 

1210 Bnmefa.Tei: 322 7 218 28 83. 
open wwMayi 9anv6pnj, So. 2-4pa. 


needs temoefiota experienced how 
fceeper. Lsamete nee 2 tbAbm, 4 & 5 
years, organired, repeonsMe peooa 
MteTto b nor a nwmd household. 
TheaJne-hourehold. Stdary ne 
Oeji iwn. AquofaifoKe vrith 
preteroblo. Contocf: WT 
BdhtDractor Fnv*furt 
manortoge ll, 6000 FmMwf 1. 

MR! W-25 62 319 or 554 


DAUA1 TEXAS. <nc«M fanily 

seela: Everei wpar.2 ktaeh cMdren, 
towKMS country home. Roam end 


or &»- 

. . .. traveffog in 

end May - eddy June a>dd 
a personal meeting. Write 


GXL Pout >2 Summit. Cedar m. IX 
USA 751 04. Tet 21 4-2&6S53 ortelw 
170450 CHAINSPROQCEI. 


A jj PAI ! t -- U y « Mock from NYCs 

styssswa^ 
s^ ; , sara,"&: 


SS^^Tsrjjst 


AU PAUL 

Buy mom 
*r and 5 


FL Estate home. 
wWtpresdtool- 
thavee- 

^"weetoto 
gxxto m rensrances & photo to L 
NWTISAml, Plantation, 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


OQUPIL MAITRE DTK7TEL VA1H, 

chauffeur, cook, sewing, roang. 
areoUng FrencH, in order fa work in 
frtxiceondUSAe xc iilteritrefareqcx*. 


Contact vnnia^ 2V. Dos Aquas bv- 
4, LC^. Tet 6847mnbon, 


re* No 
Portugal 


mn mnannii nn~ 

hid. 


da Start July 1. One cMd. 

■peakra NorvsmloBr, private roam. 
MidphblD&refBiHxnJoAmto- 
dwv 11511 Wfteper Sound Dr, Bora 
toon, a 33438. 


AU MB/NAM4Y. Start August. 

Cara aF iiewbot n girt Eght home- 

work, driving, own room fCbrdh. let- 

ter, photo, phot* & references tot 

Moguveb 2Sv5 Arteboro Sd, Shdcer 
H-phri, Ohio 44120 USA. 


AU PARI WANTH) W USA for July. 
Ncevunober. ahrep Soeiaa 2 kite- 2 


CAl 


USA FAJUU1Y, Mifon, Wy seeb nanny] 
^tto^^to^erw^owura, Bt-f 

jrauawt August. Soa^CcSl 0009-1 
26570482. 


2 FRENCH AU PARK WANTED inv 


L'AUBBGE DU IBRAN, seeks reima- 
■ tor far adult grouR evening ere ertnn- 
■Hi 5027311 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE 

pdiens nanny, mum's helpers & __ 
brandies of 1st dan faein rinnuKt^- 
hefa iW rWwxte.(^| Soamtnm, 


AU PASS, 

re 8.011 


Lfxxton 730 8122/5142 B4 hourd U- 
CEMPAGY. Tbe 895D67fgn*lJ r. 


28 YEAR OLD TONALL refiable. loak- 
mg foray par poiftoo te Europe for 
•. V« pronde references. Be- 




ALWAYS AVA ILABLE IQWON orfy 

*Wy tnaxts i 
diauffeu re. gloam , Bureau, 730 8122 
Ucenced emptoymeitf agency 


FRH4QI PROFESSOR EngJah/ltaSan- 

galago 


WOJSH NNN8& Mathers Hdps 

fc^^SOiurch 


29044/S 


vwy 90od. rrfenstcet 
Gaida, 17 me Dare, Pais 8rK 


AUTOMOBILES 


not paid, vtdid tIJufy BASocMstjcoJ- 
«d dqrm system. Swn Brawn Baveri. 


iixUbB.,. 
USS4SJOO.T. 




GmujN 




■ Paris 551 80 


,1 982, toJXC 
2^* efu wo«ral, l 
owner to/XX) a near offer, eut 
tort axxftwn. London 763 72i3 ‘ 


AUTOKENTALS 


OMjHCl HINT A OUL Preaigc m 
W.inxmre 
7313040 : TeESnSm 


fHuaiSt 


AUSTBA * EAST EUROPE USSISlOO 

^u. d y~/imn^ Q ' * Jrat WtbrUBct- 
smtr. 8, A-1Q20 Vienna Tet 241694. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


AU PAffi. Core of 5 war red & 1 yw 



Imprimt par Offprint, 73 rue de PEvangle, 75018 Paris. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


. JRA3MA SHHMB 
Sfaffipfaig to/fram U5JL 


MAXMA: Mwmg (3) 


23* 33 { 


SHWYOUB CAB TOR FROM 

Fr 


VUvAAOWSiPANDSAVH 

Bekeurn. teh 231 42 39. ftu 714 gT 


FRANKRJRT/ MAM-WJ 

bennam GmbK Telfll 
PfafaepaM over Europe "ro/ 




WORLDWIDE Car shipotea & reenf 

lab AIK. NV. Anbenfo2? 2000/W 

i^erq Beltnxn.03/231 l6S31x3l» 


1RANSCAR 20 roe Lo W.7SM- 
Ptek TeL 500 0304. Nat 9521 

mm V43M- 


Aniw&p; 23399 65. Qxem&G* 

AUTO CONVERSION 


EMISSION 

ENGINEBUNG 


MooncAnoN of new Moca 

CARS M GOOD RUMNG > 

CONDmON. MOST: 

MQtCH)ES $4,000 

BMW $4,000' 

PORSCHE $4,000 

JAGUAR $4,500- 

FBHRARI 308 $5^00 

TESTA ROSSA $6,1 

* ONE OF THE LARGEST CM 
‘ AIL WORK COMPLETED AT I 
SHOP 


nNBT-QU AUTY COMPOMMS-; 
jittll lllll 11 ——i 


our owni 

FEDBtAILY RECOGNtZB) 

LABORATORY 

CUSTOMS BURBAGE AND. 
■ONDMO AVAOA8U 


USA (714} 898-2182 

TLX 704358 KRAtt COM UD 


HAVE YOUR BMW, MERCEDES. 
POKCHE JAGUAR amnrted to" 
meet US-Satety & arntsstea Ucnttonfc'. 
for nport to the U5. Our work is My 


documented & g u ar ante e d to bea^ 


proved. For rare 5 yeegi & older u., 
intaty drege ora required- He«f • 
cdl or write for apprfa tti Bert. XE5 

auto axraaoNL p.o. bck 

TmU. D7D00 SIUTTGAJIT 70. ta. 
B7111 760W6 or 721013, tfac 72Sm s ~ 


dot/h>a 

to us 



mnes. Europe la UM 
Sernpodstraat 117. J 
Hogue. HoRand Phone 


Vim . 1 

v 1 ? |J 


pOT/B A OONVBBUNS to U S> fc . 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


2x190^2^1-1 

ooch Car — — ,-^nr 
1 x IMF •« hC+A™, 


loaded 



CAMERA 
i W 
JAGUAR 


My 


M A2 SOT. *85. Uue/aertP 
• DM77JJOO 


Kl AjVL^ TdTSerman/n 6234 
W2 + 4621T 

— — Jt. 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CARWMM UJJL^ 

mat da to ,fari^g'ear^ ) w ^f uc 
tc^andley^.. It indudes itewl 

LM1 SA 

crnoAi rolls flora 
maib for beoum 

TAX FKBE CARS 

KHLS ROYCE BWTIEY 

KANGEondLANDROVH 

n*«coaaouiG74« 

1170 Brassok 

n^S^. 92 

TlXi 20377 

tom deanava & dipping proeecbrei 

7000 StMtgvti, Wes} GentKmy 

imaesttis 

SjSrjaPsyfc 

, W MPWG tSRMCS 

Aj ipecxdzed Germexi or fomadar 
"* fa- Eute- 

”°" “c/cnfr eight. US cro- 

anwraofDOT / B*A 

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