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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Pans 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich. 
Hone Korg, Sineapore, 
The Hague and Marseille 



INTERNATIONAL 


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n.; No. 31,814 


ZURICH, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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To Negotiation Bid by Hussein 


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New York Tima Service 

TEL AVIV — Israel has reacted 
in two voices to the peace move 
made by King Hussein through 
Washington last week. 

Details of. the Jordanian 
proposals were conveyed to the 
racu cabinet on Sunday in a letter 
from Secretary erf State George C. 
Shultz to Prime Minister ^hminn 
Peres. 

v Similar letters went to all NATO 
•■^governments, which the United 
States hoped would provide the in- 
ternational umbrella for ne^otia- 

[MiT^huteTtald Israel that Hus- 
sein was “Willing tO nTwnmi t hrmsfitf 
immediately to direct talks with Is- 
rael," The Associated Press in Jeru- 
salem quoted the ne w spaper Haar- 
etz, in ibe paper’s Monday edition! 
A Hebrew translation of Mr. 
Shultz's message, as published in 
Haaretz, said Hussem’s position 
and the support he was receiving 
'from the Palestine Liberation Or- 
. jganizatton was “a signal of asignif- 
' icant change in the political envi- 
ronment." 

[A senior Israeli official, speak- 


ing on condition that he not be 

identified, confirmed that the pub- 
lished text was , accurate hut incom- 
plete. He refused to disdose un- 
published parts of the message.] 
Moderates in - the cabinet were 
encouraged by the king's expres- 
sion of readiness for direct talks 
before the end of this year between 
Israel and a joint Jordanian-Pales- 
tinign delation on the basis of 
Security Council resolutions that 
impEcatiy recognize Israel 
They also approved the king’s 
statement that he was thinking m 
tennaof Israeli-occupied territories 
going to a Jatdaman-Palestmian 
confederation rather than to con- 
stitute a separate Palestinian state 
between Israel and Jordan. 

t Jifwt hard liner s voiced alarm 
over Mr. Shultz’ s expressed inclina- 
tion to favor talks between U.S. 
officials and a Jotdanian-Palestin- 


day that 
members of the Palestine National 
Council, the Palestinian equivalent 
of a parliament in exile, could be 
considered non-PLO far indusion 
in the Palestinian Hdeg^tinn not- 
withstanding the American pledge 
not to hold discussions with the 
PLO until it recognizes Israel’s 
right to exist Deputy Prime Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Shamir described the 
Palestine National Council as the 
“brain and soul of the PLO.” 

[Defense Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin, interviewed Monday on an 
American television news program, 
rejected any participation py Pales- 
tinians liiiiwt to the PLO, The As- 
sociated Press reported. 

(“We wouldn't mind if Jordan 
will bring Pales tinians, leaders of 
those who reside in the West Bank 
or the Gaza Strip and others, as 


inn delegation before they open nc- 
gotiarions with Israel. Deputy 
Prime Minister David Levi said the 
talks “behind Israel's 
were designed to accord de 
facto recognition to the PLO. 

The- lord-linen attacked Mr. 


long as they are not PLO mem- 
Mr. Rabin said. 




£*-■ Siu tjj,. 


As Cease-Fire Crumbles, 



bens’" 

[Mr. Rabin also repeated his call 
for direct talks with the Arabs, 
without U.S. participation. “For 
the time being, all the talks are 
about meeting between a Jordani- 
an-Palestinian delegation with the 
United Stales,” Mr. Rabin said. 
“To the best of my knowledge, the 
United Stales and Jordan are not at 
war. If there is a need to 
about peace, let the Jordanians 1 
directly to us, the way President 
Sadat did, about peace.”] 

At the Israeli cabinet meeting, 
several I And ministers called fra - 



Socialists Win 


Solid Victory 
In Greek Vote 


The Associated Press 


Andreas Papandreou after his party’s victory in the Greek elections. 


Thatcher Bill Would Outlaw 
Alcohol at Soccer Stadiums 


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The Associated Press 


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BEIRUT — With Israel plan- 
ning to complete its withdrawal 
from Lebanon this week, Syrian 
. .troops are reported to be preparing 
.rfo move into Beirut to stop the 
'chaotic fighting that has raged for 
two weeks. . ■ - 

Three people were killed in gre- 
nade attacks Monday and 25 oth- 
ers, inriudmg a French trace ob- 
server, were wounded as fighting 
flared agam m the embattled refu- 
gee camps and an the Green Tine 
dividing the city into Moslem and 
Christian sectors. 

Hie cease-fire between Palestin- 
ian and Shiite Morion farces that 
was declared Friday appeared to be 
crumbling. The pohee Monday that 
two people died and 19 ..were 
wounded in overnight dashes in 
jand around West Beirut's Chada 
Refugee camp and the suburban 
itorgicBang'ni earn Thwsaid that. 

one person was kflfa and five were 
wounded in tonririms along the 
Green Line. 

Colonel Antoine Devirieu, com- 
mando- of the 57-member French 
trace observer team in Beirut, said 
that Sergeant Major Jean-Louis 
Kohler was wounded in the foot by 
a bullet at the unit's headquarters 
cm the Green Line. - 

Since the Shiite militia Axnal at- 
tacked the Palestinian refugee 


force base was assassinated and bis 
sou was seriously wounded by gnn- 
men'in acar in eastern Lebanon on 
Sunday. 

The kilim of Coland S uleiman 
Daoud Mazloom, commander erf 
the air base at Riyaq, in theBdcaa 
Valley, sped away after the attack. 
The reason for the assault in the 
eastern village of Ablah was not 
known. 


In Baalbek Lebanese sources 
dose to Syrian intdhgpnce officials 
said Sunday that Syrian Army 
troops were grouping in two remote 
bares to move to Beinrf s eastern 
outskirts under a joint Lebanese- 
Syrian security plan. : 

Authoritative sources said die 
Syrians and die i-ghanese units 
would form a peacekeeping face to 
oversee President AmhiGanayd's 
plan far disengaging the waning 
factious hr Bdrat 

One Lcbancsfr -source said the 
move could come “in a week to 10 
days,” once the Israeli withdrawal 
iscoinpfet& 

Syria sent troops into Beirut in 
1976 under an Arab League man- 
date toqudl the Lebanese civil war. 


an immediate »md vigorous denun- 
datiou of the the proposal. The 
prime minister stopped short of 
that in drafting a oommuniqu£ af- 
ter the meeting. 

Writ-placed sources in Jerusalem 
confirmed Sunday that Mr. Peres 
had told Mr. Shuhz during his last 
visit to Jerusalem that Israel would 
not blacklist Palestine National 
Council members who renounce 
the PLO charter and its call for the 
destruction of Israel. 

The communique issued after 
the meeting was ambiguous on the 
issue, stating, “The government of 
Israel rejects the participation in 
the peace negotiations of PLO peo- 
ple and anyone who advocates the 
destruction of Israel.” It thus left 
the question of the participation of 
PNC members open. 

Nor did the cransnmiqu6 specifi- 
cally oppose the planned pr dimi - 
nary talks. It said: “The prime min- 
ister made itdear that Israel would 
welcome any progress toward 
pace and bdieves the way to do 
this is throngh n egotiations that 
will begin and continue directly be- 
tween Israel and a Jordanian or a 
Jordanian-Palestiman delegation.” 


The Associated Press 


LONDON — Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher announced 
emergency le gislatio n Monday to 
curb soccer violcnc^ and pledged 


her support in bringing to justice 
se Britons who were involved in 


those Britons who 
the stadium riot in Brussels last 
week in which 38 persons died. 

In a statement m the House erf 
Commons, Mrs. Thatcher pro- 
posed a bin an alcohol at soccer 
stadiums and oil buses carrying 
supporters, and said riie hoped the 
measure would go into effect ben 
fore next year’s professional soccer 
cmoti starts in the f»H- 

The legislation also calls for a 
ban on containers that can be used 

as nrissflea. 

Mrs. Thatcher said that rite 
agreed with the indefinite ban on 
English ebb competition in Eu- 
rope, imposed Sunday by the 
Union of European Football Asso- 
ciations, Europ e an soccer’s govetn- 


“We beBeve it to be right," Mrs. 
Thatcher said. “Radical change is 
needed if football is to survive as a 
spectator sport.” 


The 38 persons were kilted and 
were 454 mjnred last Wednesday 
when Liverpool fans charged into a 
section of a Brussels stadium where 
supporters erf Juventus of Turin 
were sitting. 

A wall collapsed, crashing many 
to death. Others were trampled in 
the panic that followed. Thirty-one 
of the victims were Italian. 

Britain’s attorney general, Sr 
Michael Havers, said Sunday that 
British suppoters identified from 
photographs or video nwordings as 
having participated in the riot 
could be extradited formalin Bel- 
gium or Italy. 

The Union erf European Football 
Associations, winch has 34 member 
nations, met Sunday in Bern, and 
the group's president, Jacques 
Georges, annoimcM the decision 
>tp ban English teams from Europe- 
an competition. 

The soccer union did not take 
specific actum against the Liver- 
pool dub and delayed a vote on 
whether to ban the English nation- 
al team from the European soccer 
championship. -The ban does not 



ATHENS — Prime Minister An- 
dreas Papandreoo, whose Panhd- 
lenic Socialist Movement won a 
convincing victory in Sunday’s par- 
liamentary elections, announced 
Monday that be will form a 20- 
member temporary cabinet. 

The cabinet is to be sworn in 
before President Christos Saraeta- 
kis on Wednesday and will remain 
in office until the new parliament 
meets. 

Returns from 14,650 of 14,738 
polling stations showed that Mr. 
Papandreou's party gamed 45.82 
percent of the vote and 161 seats in 
the 300-member, single-chamber 
parliament. 

The conservative New Democra- 
cy Party of Constantine Mitsotakis 
won 125 seats with 40.84 percent of 
the vote. The pro-Moscow Com- 
munist Party won 13 seats with 
9.89 Percent and the small Euro- 
communists obtained one seat with 
1.84 percent. 

The Socialist victory was maned 
by the loss of 13 seats and their 
share or the vote was reduced by 
2.25 permit from the 1981 voting. 
The conservatives increased their 
share by 4.97 percent, gaming 12 
seats. 


stored after the fall of the military 
dictatorship in 1974. 

The 66-year-old prime minister 
and the challengers held daily and 
nightly rallies throughout the cities, 
towns and islands of fhi« nation of 
10 million people. 

Mr. Plapanareou pledged far- 
reaching programs of social welfare 
— higher minimum wages and pen- 
sions, expanded public health ser- 
vices, wider access to higher educa- 
tion and improvements in rural life 
in this largely agricultural country. 

Mr. Mitsotakis warned of stale 
encroachment in all phases of life 
and promised that his party would 
set free creative and productive 
capital stifled by socialism. The 
New Democracy leader also prom- 
ised to remove the import duties 
that make cars about twice as ex- 
pensive in Greece as in the rest of 


ihe European Community. 

ktmntie alli- 


Mr. Papandreou, 66, said Mon- 
day, “I believe this vote is a tri- 
umph." 

“It's a great defeat for the reac- 
tionary forces, whether they’re 
Greek or foreign," be continued. 
“The Greek people don't expect 
anything from anyone." 

In Washington, Lany Speafces, 
the White House sp okesman, said 
that President Ronald Reagan was 
sending congratulations to Mr. Pa- 
pandreoo and expressed hope for 
unproved relations with Athens. 

Despite Mr. Papandreou’s vow 
to close four UA bases, the spokes- 
man said that the United States 
expected to discuss the issue with 
the So cialis t government in hopes 
of main taining U.S. forces in 
Greece. 


Margaret Thatcher 


apply to teams from Scotland, 
Wales or Northern Ireland. 

Mr. Georges said the committee 
had based its dedaon on a prdimi- 


(Coatirmed on Page 2, Col 1) 


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He have died and more than 
have been wounded in (he 
fighting. 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres erf 
Israel said Sunday that Israel 
would complete its withdrawal 
from Lebanon by Thursday, the 
third anniversary of the Israeli in- 
vasion that was intended to crush 
HltW' Palestine Liberation Organiza- 

‘•-■ Vi EC# Jtiaa. 

On Monday, Israeli troops raid- 
ed a Shiite Modem village in south- 
ern Lebanon, blew up three houses 
and seized 40 men, a United Na- 
tions spokesman, Timur Gfiksd, 
said. 

The crackdown on Majdal Salim 
was the first major raid by the Is- 
raelis since late April, when they 
completed the second stage of their 
three-phase pullback from Leba- 
non. 

Elsewhere, the Christian com- 
mander of Lebanon’s main air 


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Americans , Tired of Computers 9 Grab for Video 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Tima Service 

CHICAGO — The International Summer Consumer 
Electronics Show has opened amid a finny erf new evi- 
dence that US. consumers cannot buy video cassette 

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longer find much use for home computers. 

The magnitude of Lhe c h an g e, a complete reversal from 
two years ago, was evident in figures released Sunday by 
the Electronic Industries Association, which sponsors the 
sqwnwmiiMl display of gadgetry. 

The trade group increased its sales projections for video 
recorders by more than 20 percent, e s ti m ating that con- 
sumers would buy 11-5 milli on machines this year. It also 
predicted that, with prices dropping sharply, 600,000 
compact disk players would be sold tins year, about three 
times the number sold since the laser-driven systems wear 
introduced two years ago. 

The group projected that home computer sates would 
dedme 10 percent from last year's krvds, to 45 milli on 
units — a figure many regard as highly optimistic. It 
predicted that software sales would be cut m half, with 
factory sates dropping to 5675 million from a previous 
estimate of $1.2 biHioo- 

But the shift was even more pronounced on the floor erf 


McCormick Center, the convention center on edge of 
Lake hfiebigan. Retailers and manufacturers crowded 
arocoad the Technics booth, for example, to catch a 
glimpse of smallest compact disk player yet — a Walk- 
man-sized model that will sell for S300 when it comes on 
the market this summer. 

“Our biggest problem is going to be figuring out a way 
to make them fast enough," said Ride DdGmdice, prod- 
uct manag er for Technics, a unit of Matsushita Electric 
Sales Co. of Japan. 

A quarter of a roDe away, however, in the separate home 
wwipirtgf hall that an industry executive called “the leper 
colony,” there were relatively few people viewing the new 
machines and software. 

“Last year this whole bmkhng was filled," said Robert 
Botch, director of marketing to Epyx, one of the few 
surviving computer game software companies. “Now 
there’s all kind of space; and the bottom floor is half filled 
with the people who make X-rated movies.” 

Some industry experts say, in retrospect, that the sud- 
den shift in consumer tastes should have been expected. 
White the computer industry struggled to find uses for 
home machines beyond playing games, makers of video 
recorders and compact disks had no difficulties explaining 
the advantages erf their systems. 


Just beneath the surface, though, there is evidence that 
not every maker of video recorders is enjoying the boom. 
A year ago, the three makers of Beta systems — the first 
vkfeorecoitier taping format, since surpassed by an in- 
compatible system called VHS -— said they were uncon- 
cerns that only 25 percent of video-recorder buyers were 
purchasing their systems. They insisted that they would 
never abandon the Beta technology. 


At this show, however. Beta seemed doomed, Sony 
Corp_ the leading Beta maker, last week introduced its 
Oral right-mLQimeter system. Industry experts said the 
move was both an effort to break into a new market to 


lightweight, portable video cameras and recorders, and to 
boost dwindling video- recorder sales. Sony officials have 


insisted, though, that they would continue to market Beta 
machines. 


There has been no such promise from Toshiba Corp„ 
which two months ago threw in the towel and introduced 
its first VHS models. “It was not a decision easily 
readied,” raid J. Paul Michie, executive vice president of 
Toshiba America Inu, a unit of the Japanese company. 
Bui Beta lost popularity in Europe last year, be noted, and 
“there were Mhcrfe markets in the U.S. where we were pre- 

1 i iL. 1 AI ^ M 


empted; if s unfortunate, bul the best system lost. 


Turgut Ozal, the prime minister 
of Turkey, a fellow member of the 
North. Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion, reacted coolly to the Greek 
Sodahsf s re-election. 

“If Papandreou shows the same 
attitude against Turkey, he gels 
what be deserves,” Mr. Ozal said 
Monday. “Then we wfll also treat 
him differently and we will not of- 
fer him an olive branch.” 


Greece's rote in the At 
ance and its membership in the 
European Economic Community 
were expected to be prominent is- 
sues at the outset erf the campaign 
but were nearly ignored. 

Mr. Papandreou, who in his vic- 
torious 1981 campaign emphasized 
Greek independence from the 
West, particularly the United 
States, limited his declarations on 
foreign affairs this time to stem 
condemnations of Turkey. In an 
interview, he said voters found for- 
eign issues “tiresome." 

’ Mr. Papandreoo campaigned in 
1981 on what were generally inter- 
preted as pledges to withdraw 
Greece from NATO and the EC, as 
well as to dose four major U.S. 
military bases. Since then, the 
prime minister has denied that he 
committed himse lf to withdrawal 
and he has set no deadline for dos- 
ing the bases. 

The events that brought on the 
early elections played only a minor 
role in the campaign. In March, 
Mr. Papandreou suddenly dropped 
his expected support for a second 
term for President Constantine 
Caramanlis. Mr. Caramanlis angri- 
ly resigned, and the Socialists 
pressed through Parliament the 
election of them candidate. Chris- 
tos Sartzefakis, and moved for con- 
stitutional amendments to limit the 
president's power to stay any gov- 
ernment's hand. Papandreou then 
called elections. 


Relations between Tnrkey and 
Greece have been strained for years 
over territorial disputes in the Ae- 
gean and the fate of Greek and 
Turkish-speaking populations on 
Cyprus. 


■ A Solid Victory 

Henry Kamm of The New York 
Times reported from Athens ; 

Even with a reduced margin, Mr. 
Papandreou’s showing was inter- 
preted as a solid victory. New De- 
mocracy had counted on a vigorous 
campaign by Mr. Mitsotakis, and 
disflluskmmeni with 43 months of 
socialism to bring about a conser- 
vative victory. 


But political analysts intopreted 
the results more as a rejection of a 
return to the right-of -center poli- 
tics that dominated Greece for 35 
years after Worid War n than as an 
expression of faith in Mr. Papan- 
dreou’s version of socialism. 


Political analysts termed this 
year’s election campaign the hard- 
est f might since democracy was re- 


EVSIDE 


■ An employee of a U.S. mili- 
tary contractor was implicated 
in a spy ring. Page 5. 


■ Philippine officers launched a 

movement to improve morale 
and halt abuses. Page 6. 


■ Three SoSdarity ifisshfents on 
trial in Poland asserted that the 
judge is biased. Page 7. 


■ Sri Lanka and India agreed 
on Lhe need for a political settle- 
ment to the ethnic conflicts in 
Sri Lanka. Page 8. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ Europe’s auto industry move 
into international markets to 
win economies of scale. Page II 


■ With o3 prices in disarray, 
OPEC advanced the date to its 
next full ministerial meeting to 
June 30 from July 21 Page II. 


1; 




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As Weinberger’s Power Wanes, Regan Emerges as the Dominant White House Aide 


After Strains, EfrTreamty Chief Takes Charge 




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% Lou Cannon 

Wash in gton Past Service 

WASHINGTON— When Donald T. 
the White House chief of staff, rat down 
with President Ronald Reagan on May 13 to 
make final derisions on the administration's 
tax-simplification plan, it was dear evidence 
that be had become the strongman on the White 
House staff. 

Mr. Regan's assumption of power has not 
been without its missteps. Along the way, the 
-■ former secretary of the Treasury and onetime 
L v \ head of a Wall Street brokerage firm had to 
« [earn some of the lessons teamed by his pnxteT 
V.- •''Jassos. 

'He acknowledged in an interview last week 
that be was “still on a teaming carve," 

* There is widespread agreement that Mr. Re- 

gan, after a shaky period, has pul a distinctive, 
stamp on White ILKye operations. 

“Regan boarded a flying airplane, and it took 
him n while to find the oantrok" White House 
official commented. “Bat he is deajy the pflot 
now." •• 

What remains unanswered at this msiy stage 
is whether he has not just the strength but the 
skins to guide President Reagan successfully 
through n potentially perilous second term. 

Mr. Regan has been at wok four months, bat 
■%ais power has been asserted most ckariy since 
'mid-May. ' v 

One reason is that the first part of Me. Re- . 
gaa’s tenure was dormnatcri In large part by 
controversy over the president’s visit to the 
Bitburg military cemetery in West Germany, 


where 49 Nazi Waffen SS members are among 
the dead. 

Another reason is the departure of the former 
deputy chief of staff, Mkiaad K. Deayer. Since 
Mr. Denver's reamatto 
control of White liouse 
and he makes a point of reviewing 
pceridenfs speeches 


FmaHy,the tax plan that the president pit to 
ingress last week originated last fall in Mr. 


Ragan’s Treasury Department. And, as While 
House chief of staff, Mr. Regan was mstrumen- 
tal m fthopi ng the final proposal. His advocacy 
of a provision that would allow c omp a nies to 
n>ki» a 10 percent deduction for dividends pre- 
vailed over Treasury opposition. 

: Mr. Regan admirers say that he has brought a 
st reamlined corporate-management style to a 
White .House frequently marked by high-level 
feuding during President Reagan's first tom. 


* His critics complain that he lacks the dtft 
political touch of his predecessor as Treasury 
secretary, James A. Baker 3d, and that he does 
not delegate responsibility adequately. 

- TWy tikft «ay snip ing continues betwrtat Mr. 
Regan and both the coannumications director, 
Patrick J. Tfryfranan, and the national security 
affairs adviser, Robert C. McFarlant 
But Mr. 66, has shown the ability to 
Jam firm his mistakes. “You get isolated in the 
White House,” said Stuart K. Spencer, a long- 
time Reagan poiirica] adviser imtialfy skeptical 
about the new White House team but impressed 
with its recent performance. “But Regan and the 



Spending Scandals Hurt DefenseChiefs Credibility 


By George G Wilson 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — five years into the big- 
gest peacetime military buildup in history, De- 
fense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and his 
defense budget appear to have worn out their 
welcome in Congress. 

Interviews with legislators across the political 
spectrum show that Mr. Weinberger has lost 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


credibility and clout this year, and suggest that 
President Ronald Reagan’s military spending 
wave has crested. 

Two Democratic senators, David H. Pryor of 
Arkansas and Lawton Chiles of Florida, said 
that if they were advisers to Mr. Reagan, they 
would recommend that Mr. Weinberger resign, 
so the Defense Department could regain credi- 
bility. Other senators said the same thing pri- 


winds and said, ‘Let's move together.’ He’s tak 
en a very hard line," Mr. Chafee said. 

Other critirisms of Mr. Weinberger by sena 
tors on committees that oversee the Pentagoi 
were that, he has developed no strategy to gi 
with the money he has raised, has overstated ihi 
Soviet threat, has faded to build the infrastruc 
ture needed to spend mQitaiy money wisely ant 
has padded the Pentagon’s budget. 

Mr. Weinberger, in an interview, said he hat 
no intention of quitting because he has “a k* 
more to do.” He brushed aside criticism, saying; 
“It's like bring a judge in a beauty contest. The 
longer yon do it, the more people you disap , 
point” 

But as the Senate prepared Monday to re 
sume debate on the military authorization bDl, i 
is dear that altitudes about the Pentagon budge 
and its chid advocate have changed sharply. 

Mr. Pryor is a moderate Democrat from i 
state' that traditionally has favored increases iz 

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vatdy bul not to b e quoted by nape. militaiy spending, ni factor that recently It 
Ska* Republican cOTgreaMri leaders are mm stn^y influenced both him and ScLt 
said to share the view that Mr. Weinberger has ~ ... 


Donald T. Regan 


BntarvUPI 


Caspar W. Weinberger 


others are listening. They’re very open, which is 
good. This is not a dosed shop." 

Without announcing a change of policy, Mr. 
Regan appears to have mated the confronta- 
tional approach with- Congress and administra- 
tion adversaries that he and Me Buchanan were 
celebrating only a few weeks ago. 


Mr. Buchanan also has changed his approach. 

For several weeks be declined to talk to report- 
ers, a practice he now “lmreahsiic- 


StiH, the new has yet to acquire the skill 
of its predecessor in orchestrating “media 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


be« too inmnagent on tbe imUtaiy budget and JbfaSlSieAS” 
too tardy m qwtlighung waaeful spending at vies Committee who is a snpponTS M 

Weinberger, were constituents’ complaint 
about waste and abuse in military contracting 
The two have joined forces with other polit 
nans to restructure the military buildup. 

On Monday, Mr. Goldwater was managin 
the militaiy authorization bill for fiscal 198 
that was being considered in the Senate. Thi 
bill calls for limiting the Pentagon’s budgt 
(Continued on Page 2. CoL 2) 


the Pentagon. 

Senator John H, Chafee, a Republican of 
Rhode Island who is a former secretary of the 
Navy, praised Mr. Weinberger for raising the 


money' to buy ships, army tanks and to raise 

r out critid 


•mil! 


pay out criticized him to giving “in- 
leeway to the individual service secre- 
taries to proceed with any kind of development 
they warn, without realizing the cost." 

“He dearly hasn't recognized the changing 


I 




-.T- 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 198S 


Bill Would Ban Alcohol at Stadiums 


(Continued from Page 1) 
nary report by three of its mem- 
bers. Nine committee members, in- 
cluding the representative from 
Scotland, were present; two, from 
the Soviet Union and Italy, were 
absent. The Italian delegate did not 
attend because an Italian team had 
been involved. 

In London, English soccer offi- 
cials said the ban was deserved. 

“You can't measure financial 
loss against loss of life," said Bon 
Millichip, bead of the English 
Football Association. 

»i think it is a very sta t e sm a nli ke 
decision,” said John Smith, chair- 
man of the Liverpool club.” And I 
am sure that before taking it* they 
have considered every aspect not 
only of the appalling tragedy of 
Brussels, but also the background 
and record of English dubs. 

“I like England," Mr. Georges 
said in an interview. “But unfortu- 
nately. every time we have big trou- 
ble, it involves English fans. 

Mr. Georges also said the federa- 
tion planned to introduce new mca- 


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sures to increase security in and 
around stadiums during soccer 
matches. 

•‘Organized football alone can't 
solve the problem,” Hans Ban- 
gerter, general secretary of the soc - 
cer union, said in an interview, as 
long as the British government 
doesn’t Step in to make sure there's 
little chance for change in fan atti- 
tude:” 

The FngKsh Football Associa- 
tion voluntarily withdrew its pro- 
fessional teams Friday from Euro- 
pean competition for one year. 
That day7 Belgium imposed an in- 
definite ban on all British teams. 

In Brussels, a British reporter, 
Paul Fry of the Mail on Sunday, 
said he saw a man dressed in Liver- 
pool colons fire a gun al least once 
at a group of fleeing Juventus fans 
during the riots, police said Sun- 
day. 

Officials said none erf the victims 
showed bullet wounds. Most were 
crushed or suffocated. 

In Italy, a bottle filled with gaso- 



line was thrown ( — „ 

Cambridge Studies Institute In Mi- 
lan. It missed the building, police 
said. Tires were slashed cm a car 
with British license plates in Gen- 


oa. 


■ EC Steps on Vkrfeoce 

European sports ministers wifi 
adopt measures ag ains t football vi- 
olence at a special meeting in Sep- 
tember, the Council of Europe said 
Monday in Brussels. 

Reuters quoted council sources 
as saying the ministers are likely to 
endorse a ban on sales of alcohol 
around football stadiums and fast- 
er legal procedures for dealing with 

rowdy supporters. 

They may also call for restricted 
ticket sales and improved safety 
standards. 

The officials said the 21-nation 
coundTs Committee for the Devel- 
opment of Sports would complete 
the measures later this month for 
minis ters to adopt for the 1985-86 
season. 


Tho Asodoted Pro* 


MARCH IN MANHATTAN — Striking hotel workers march pMt New Yorift 
Sheraton Centre hotel hi nridtown Manhattan. At least 45 of New York 5 b»gg^ ho t els 
have been strikebound since Saturday. Employees want more dot and benefits; 
management wants to hire new workers for less. Talks were scheduled to reanme. 


WORLD BRIEFS 



Pretom (^nipletts Troop WIlMrawal 

PBFTORTA /Reuters) — South Africa said Monday that it had 
rtS^uSShdrawal of its last troops MAagtaim 

T3BFES** ^ «* *** to move them back if 

ne ^mtement was issued after a mating 
RFBothaand the U* ambassador. Herman McULMr- 
Mr Nicked that if Luanda allowed a return to ihe situation m 197s, when 
"tdtaaM** south Africa M* MMAa tod* 


Spending Scandals Hurt Weinberger’s Credibility in Congress 


Congress to reduce the military 
buildup. Others are: 

• The menacing cloud of grow- 
ing federal deficits. 

• The growing realization that so 
much military money has been ap- 


(Contimied from Page 1) 
growth to only enough to cove r 
inflation, instead of the 6 perceni 
after-inflation increase that Mr. 

Reagan had sought. 

“It has begun to slick up here,” — _ _ - - . .. _ 

Mr Pryor said, pointing to his propnatedj but not spent that the 
head. Mr. Weinberger “never did Pentagon budget wodd grow by ai 
meet a weapon be didn't like. He least/ percent for the rest of the 
has suffered*) many body blows decade even if it received only 
— the coffee pot, the loflei seat, enough additional money to offset 
Allen wrenches, the daw hammer, inflation. 

all this stuff — that his credibility t — 

has suffered severely.” Mr. Pryor 

*5 900 Romanians 
Awaited by Bonn 

body in long ago to deal with all 
these problems and said, ‘You've 
got it’ Then call everybody in and 
read them the riot act and say, ‘This 
is the guy you're going to be dealing 
with.' 

“He didn't do that- He has no 


Reuters 

BERLIN — West Germany is 
expecting 900 Romanian refugees 
to come into the country through 
West Berlin in the coming months, 
the city authorities said Monday. 

A grou p of about 30 Romanians 


• The “fairness issue,” or tire 
conviction that the Pentagon must 
take a larger share of the cuts in 

government programs. 

Mr. Weinberger has tried but 
failed to extinguish the criticism. 

Last week, when it was revealed 
that the government was paying 
Grumman Aerospace Crap. $659 
for ashtrays, Mr. Weinberger ap- 
proved the transfer of three top 
navy officers. 

Two of the officers protested 
publicly that they had ass umed 
their posts after the purchases and 
decried their treatment Navy offi- 
cials have said the officers could be 
reinstated after an investigation. 

“He’s been a strong and success- 
ful advocate,” Mr. • Pryor said. 
“Weinberger can selL but he 
doesn't inspire. So he's not a 


Churchill, who could not only in- 
spire in his country but the whole 
world. He's a salesman and, I imag- 
ine, a pretty good poker player. 

“If 1 were White House chief of 
staff, Td keep Weinberger around 
until this app ropriations cycle was 
over. To move him out now, we'd 
have to start all over. Td let it be 
known that by Thanksgiving we'll 
have to make a change, but would 
ride with him on (his last wave to 
the bach.” 

Mr. Weinberger has his support- 
ers. Mr. Goldwater said Mr. Rea- 
gan's rearmament program is in 
deep trouble, but not because of 
Weinberger. 

“Gap isn’t the problem,” Mr. 
Goldwater said. “Ils the manufac- 
turers; the problem is wrapped up 
with these manufacturers. It’s just 
not a good season for defense" be- 


cause of excesses in biffing that 
have come to tight. 

Mr. Goldwater and two other 
Republican senators, Strom Thur- 
mond of South Carolina and Ste- 
ven D. Syxnms of Idaho, said Mr. 
Weinberger should receive high 
praise for raising record amounts 
of badly needed money for the 
aimed services and alerting the na- 
tion to the dimensions of the Soviet 
threat. 

Mr. Weinberger, responding to 
the criticisms, said, “The longer 
one’s tenure, the longer the list of 
people who didn’t get what they 
wanted.” 

“We’re more or less a victim of 
our success over the last four years 
in that some people say now it’s 
time to call a halt," he said. “But 
the threat hasn’t diminish ed- It has 
increased.” 


££££££ HSSSS After Shaky Start , Regan Takes Firm Control 

pendent inspector goural and an border with East Bertin if they were J J ' u 

independent operational testing of- not admitted, a West Berlin Senate 


flee. His credibility is at its lowest spokesman said. The Romanians, 
point" who said they were political refu- 

The stones of Pentagon waste ^ ^owed to leave 

are only one dement of the shift in their country and fly to East Berlin, 

the Senate spokesman said. 

He said that West German Inte- 
rior Ministry officials were expect- 
ing up to 900 more Romanians to 
reach the West through the city, 
where there are no border controls 
for incoming visitors from East 
Germany. 



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DOOtCSMJKY 
DAIS iv THE MT 


(Continued from Page 1) 

events” to create a single, definite 
impression of presidential activity 
and purpose. Mr. Baker and Mr. 

Deaver tried, often successfully, to 
focus coverage on a single event 
that would advance the White 
House “theme of the day.” 

In the second- term White House 

there often are many events and w 

many themes. On Memorial Day say they hope to limit the number 
last week, for instance, an official of major issues they take on at any 
said one time. 

the White House team expected “I think anyone, not just Rea- 
that reporters would emphasize gan, is better off when he’s focused 
Mr. Reagan's wreath-laying cere- on one thing a; a time instead of 
mony at Arlington National Ceme- uying to do several major thin g s,” 


tery because “so much was made of 
the visit to Bitburg.” 

Instead, much of the news cover- 
age focused on a remark Mr. Rea- 
gan made in Miami, where he ac- 
cused the Democrats of 
“segmenting America into waning 
factions-over the years pitting 
white against black, women against 
men, young against old” 

Mr. Regan and Mr. Buchanan 


Mr. R egan said last week. “1 think 
that one major theme should be 
struck at one time.” 

Although conflicts in the current 
White House do not approach the 
dimensions of the battles between 
Mr. Baker and Edwin Meese 3d, 
now attorney general in the first 
term and later between Mr. Baker 
and W illiam P. Gaik, then the na- 
tional security affairs adviser, sev- 
eral officials say that relations be- 
tween Mr. Regan and Mr. 
McFarlane are cooL 

“Regan wants to be prime minis- 
ter, and McFarlane sees himself as 
the guardian of the national securi- 
ty portfolio," a administration offi- 
cial remarked. 


of the territory and its people. 

Afghan Guerrillas Abandon Valley 

i?5SC of^vmciMSovia mfanny.tat Bhavil, 

officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said that all 
nJ^^^^t^cwjw^^wthdrawn from the valky after more than a^ 

gone now." one official said.* 

-n£J (SdffiSoSa^nlt theRussjans/Mjuerrilla units are Ightiy 
annS with rifles and semiautomatic weapons, a sprinkling of heavy 
machine guns and a few portable anti-aircraft missiles. 

Costa Rica limits Links to Nicaragua 

MANAGUA (WP) — President Luis Alberto Monge of Costa Rica 
said that his government will cut back diplomatic re lations with Nicara- 
gua to a bare ntidmura following what he called a pnmittlitated attac k 
by Sandinist soldiers on Costa Rican territory last week during which at 
least one Costa Rican Gvil Guardsman was killed. 

But Defense Minister Humberto Ortega Saavedra of Nicaragua denied 
Mr Monge’s charges Sunday, insisting that he has proof that the Costa 
Ricans were ambushed by Nicaraguan rebels trying to provoke a diplo- 
matic incident between the two countries. 

FortheRecord j 

A venfict in die Norwegian spy trial of a former diplomat, AmeTrehdt, 
will be announced in Oslo on June 20. the chief judge said Monday. Only 
a portion of the verdict is to be read in open court. (AP) 

Police in Belgium hare arrested five persons suspected of involvement 
in a May 1 car-bomb attack that killed two Firefighters and injured 13 
other persons. Interior Ministry sources said Monday. The attack was 
Unit ad to the clandestine Fighting Communist Cells. (Reuters) 

Pennsylvania was declared a major disaster area by President Ronald 
Reagan on Monday as a result of the severe storms and tornadoes in the 
state Friday night, the White House announced Monday. The declaration 
will permit the use of federal funds for relief. A similar declaration is 
expected for Ohio. t A P) 

Robert Lafla, a meter reader accused of slipping into the White House 
during President Ronald Reagan's inauguration ceremonies in January, 
pleaded guilty Monday in Washington to unlawful entry and was placed 
on one-year supervised probation. Mr. Latta, 45. will serve the sentence in 
Denver. 

Groondwtates for Alaska Airtines voted Sunday in Seattle to end then#! 

three-month strike, agreeing to a contract they had overwhelmingly 
rejected last month. Mr! 


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Page 4 


Ifcralb 


PoblUicd Wirii Tbe New York Time* "Hk Waahiaptoo P<**» 


(tribune. 


Three Soviet Prisoners 


This is how it goes for three Soviet dissident 
scientists, aO political prisoners: 

Andrei Sakharov may have gone on another 
hunger jOnte this spring, perhaps for five days, 
for the same reason that was behind his earlier 
strikes: to make the Soviet authorities choose 
between letting bis extremely sick wife seek 
medical care in the West and taking responsi- 
bility for his death. By one account he was 
force-fed at a hospital and has since returned 
to his home in internal exile — in illegal exile, 
according to Soviet law, such as it is, since he 
was never tried and sentenced and has now 
been exiled longer than the longest allowable 
term. The most recent news received by rela- 
tives in the United States came in a postcard 
signed by his wife. Professional analysis 
showed it was a forgery, which raises the 
disquieting possibility that the routine and 
r eass uring news it contained was transmitted 
on the assumption that the Sakharovs might 
not be in a position to tell the truth. 

Yuri Orlov continues to live in appalling 
conditions in the remote Siberian village to 
which he was exiled after completing a harrow- 
ing seven-year prison term for “slander’’ — be 
had been working to hold the Soviet Union to 
the international human rights commitments it 
formally undertook in the Helsinki accords. 
The Kafkaesque prospect now looms that his 
wife, Irina, woo lives in Moscow, will be tried 


For "slander" — for doing what she can to 
maintain tines to her husband and to those 
concerned about him. To avoid going to jail 
she may have to ask to emigrate, in which case 
she would be cutting the lines. _ .... 

Anatoli Sbcharansky, a scienpst and dissi- 
dent and also a Jew, is in the ninth year of a 
term in a Urals labor camp, having been put 
away on a palpably phony spy charge. A 
period of relatively good treatment in the 
camp was followed by renewed isolation and 
severity, the effect if not the intent bong to 
demonstrate the government's continuing in- 
difference to humane international opinion. 

The three men are, of course, merely among 
the nyy* familiar in the West of the many 
hapless individuals on whom the Kremlin is 
practicing its characteristic Stalinist abuse. 
The Western information network can keep 
track of only a relatively few victims at a time. 
You would think that the Soviet authorities, 
realizing this fact, would exploit it by allowing 
these conspicuous names to leave the country. 
The point would be not so much to end their 
misery as to reap political credit. This would 
be a cynical policy, but one making political 
sense, especially in a period when a new Soviet 
leader is taking curtafn strides toward a refur- 
bished relationship with the United States. 
How will Mikhail Gorbachev play it? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Positive but Improvable 


When first elected. President Reagan pro- 
claimed that the power to tax "must not be 
used to regulate the economy or bring about 
social change." Four years wiser, he now pro- 
claims a tax program to achieve nothing less 
than “the second American Revolution "Such 
hyperbole aside, his proposals point toward 
significant progress in tax policy. Since its 
social goals are now acknowledged, the nation 
can clearly debate what they should be. 

Mr. Reagan's premises and commitment are 
admirable. As many have long argued, the tax 
code has become unfair, complex and a drag 
on economic growth. The president's remedies 
head in the right direction. But he is wrong to 
put tax rate reduction ahead of fairness, and he 
strays too far from the goal of taxing all forms 
of income in essentially the same way. 

The best feature of Mr. Reagan’s plan, and 
surely its main purpose, is its sizable reduction 
in tax rales, both personal and corporate. That 
alone could remove many distortions from 
economic life and get people back to reckoning 
in real rather than tax dollars. 

Also admirable is the extent to which the 
president would strip away deductions, ex- 
emptions, credits and other fancy gimmicks 
that warp America’s spending and investment. 
He would remove the federal subsidies for 
expensive business meals and football tickets 
and the building of shopping malls. He would 
at least reduce the artificial lure of much real 
estate investment and other shelters. 

But in redesigning the purer reform pro- 
posed by his Treasury, Mr. Reagan injects 
some dubious political objectives. By repealing 
the deductibility of stale and local taxes, he 


would begin to starve die budgets of local 
governments as be has tried to starve federal 
spading. Yet he would spend sizable revenues 
for a big increase in personal exemptions, a 
larger benefit for big taxpayers than for small 

Downright unfair are some of the special 
lures that Mr. Reagan holds out to influential 
constituencies. Although he would kill the oil 
depletion allowance, he retains special deduc- 
tions for oil d rilling . Most distressingly, he 
would give still more favorable treatment to 
capital gains, preserving the huge distinctions 
between income from wages and the apprecia- 
tion of stocks or paintings- The president con- 
tends that this favoritisn is necessary to stimu- 
late investment and growth. But his hardly 
socialistic Treasury thought otherwise just a 
few months ago and offered the much better 
idea of discounting capital gains for inflation 
and then taxing it like all other income. 

Especially worrisome is the proposal to tax 
monies paid in taxes to state and local govern- 
ments and thus to attack their services, even as 
Washington sharply reduces aid to those ser- 
vices. As former Senator Jacob Javits observes, 
the inevitable losers would be the poorest 
Americans who depend on local services. 
Washington would honor the deductibility of 
taxes paid to Saudi Arabia or Japan, but not 
those paid to Minnesota or New York City. 

The administration has now produced two 
stimulating tax revisions, proving that many of 
the components are interchangeable, without 
enlarg in g the deficit Mr. Reagan’s paAaga is 
impressive but far from ideal by his own stated 
objectives. Congress can make it better still. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Opinion 


No Real Change in South Africa 

An intense study of the situation in South 
Africa by Los Angeles Times reporters and 
outside experts indicates that new initiatives 
and an alternative to President Reagan's pol- 
icy of constructive engagement are required if 
the risk of a bloodbath is to be reduced. 

There has been no fundamental change in 
the policy or apartheid. There may be no way 
to contain the spreading violence, but if there 
is a way. it is by ending apartheid. 

American businesses operating in or with 
South Africa should probably r emain for the 
time being, but they must do more to persuade 
Pretoria to dismantle the apartheid system. 
The Sullivan principles, setting forth appropri- 
ate workplace conditions and committing 
companies against apartheid, will remain little 
more than a screen designed to justify remain- 
ing in business with South Africa unless they 
are used aggressively for fundamental change. 

There is a susceptibility of managers to 
stockholders, but too often stockholders have 
not used that authority to prod the managers 
into full and aggressive compliance with the 
Sullivan principles. Divestment is an appropri- 
ate reaction only if managers refuse. 

There are now proposals for legislation 
to bar new investments, limit bank lending 
and control trade. That is premature. Econom- 
ic sanctions have rarely if ever been an effec- 
tive instrument for bringing about peaceful 
change. It Ls better at tius stage to test 


the leverage still in the hands of those doing 
business with South Africa. 

For more than four years now the Reagan 
administration has opted for soft talk in public 
and tougher talk in private to win concessions 
from South Africa. This has served to encour- 
age nothing more than superficial change: The 
change that really matters, ending racism, is 
as distant as ever. The blacks are not im- 
pressed with the lifting of segregation rules in 
some public places when they remain without 
political and economic rights. 

The depth of American revulsion would 
become clearer if the polite rhetoric of the 
administration were reinforced. One step 
would be tighter trade restrictions on sensitive 
items, including high technology. There are 
items on the list of exports with strategic 
implications that should not be permitted, 
given the risks to South African stability 
brought on by the stubborn pursuit of racism. 

Nothing may be accomplished by pursuing 
the full implementation of the Sullivan princi- 
ples, by tightening strategic exports, by mak- 
ing sure that the American commitment to 
peaceful change is not seen in Pretoria as 
license to perpetuate racism. But if change 
does not result, the issue of divestment may be 
academic. The opportunity for investment 
most likely would, along with the opportunity 
for peaceful change, be lost in violence made 
inevitable by an dire blinded by its privileges 
from seeing the options that still exist. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 


FROM OUR JUNE 4 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Socialist Plot Foiled in Japan 

YOKOHAMA. Japan — A great Socialist plot 
against the Government has been discovered, 
with ramifications so extensive and interests so 
enormous that the newspapers are forbidden 
to publish details. It is known, however, that 
several notorious agitators disguised os labor-, 
era employed in the Government factory near' 
Matsumoio. in the Nagano Prefecture, have 
been secretly manufacturing bombs for the 
purpose of killing Count Katsura and other 
members of the Cabinet The ringleaders, one 
of whom is Shusui Kotoku, an educated man 
and an excellent writer, have been arrested in 
the Amanova Hold near Hakone. Two wom- 
en were among the prisoners. Count Katsura is 
the special object of hatred owing to his drastic 
measures against the Socialist party. 


1935: Baluchistan Quake Kills 49,000 
QUETTA, British Baluchistan — It is estimat- 
ed that forty thousand persons lost their lives 
in the {May 30J Baluchistan earthquake. Six 
thousand who were injured are now bring 
treated in hospitals. Another shock was felt [on 
June 3] but beyond shaking down a few build- 
ings already ruined it did no damage as far as 
can be learned. A previous secondary shock, 
which was more extensive, damaged the rail- 
road and caused a re-routing of refugee trains 
leaving the stricken area. Over 3,000 troops 
have been engaged in Hearing out the Indian 
quarter of the city and there are 5.000 survi- 
vors encamped near the railroad Searching 
the wreckage for bodies is not expected to be 
completed for many days. Thousands of the 
dead still lie buried in (he ruins. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chaimm 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM & PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
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CARLGEW1RTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PMshtr 

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Et&iur ALAIN LECOUR .tooo mr Piddabtr 

Damn Editor RICH ARD H. MORGAN Assocuu Publisher 

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TUESDAY, JUNE 4s 1985 



U.S.-Soviet Relations: The Grim Horizon 


N EW YORK — Sometimes on the Great 
Plains of America you can see a tornado 
coming from a long way off- Thai is the situa- 
tion the United States faces in its relations with 
the Soviet Union just now. 

Unless something changes, we are in for a long 
period of unregulated military competition and 
consequent higher tensions. Neither country 
wants il Both countries will face tough domestic 
problems as a result In addition, America wfll 
have increasingly difficult alliance problems. But 
each country thinks it is up to the other to move. 

American public opinion, preoccupied with 
taxes and budget-cutting, is confused first by 
mixed signals on U-S--Soviet relations, and also 
— to the extent that it is giving any thought to the 
shift in strategy to a ‘'star wars” defense against 
missiles — by the mistaken belief that a decision 
limited to research will postpone the problem. 

What keeps the public from seeing the dark 
doud ahead is that the relationship is moving in 
different ways al different levels. 

The atmospherics have been better ance Presi- 
dent Reagan delivered a speech of somewhat 
more conaliatoiy tone in January 1984. At the 
level of secondary issues, there is talk of trade, 
new consulates, regional interests and so on. 
There is even a minuet going on about a posable 
Reagan-Gorbachev meeting in the faK 
But on the most important issue, management 
of the nuclear military competition, the positions 
of the two countries seem to be irreconcilable, 
with no sign of movement as the second round of 
negotiations starts up in Geneva. 

Before long it will be dear to all that even if the 
talks continue as a public relations exercise, both 
countries will be deploying new weapons systems 
now in their pipelines: ballistic missiles, cruise 
missiles, submarines and bombers. 

This will beget tension, from which the atmo- 
spherics and the secondary issues will not be 
insulated. It will brighten strains in the Atlantic 


By Marshall D. Sholman 

This is the first of two articles. 

alliance and in Soviet and American societies. 
This outcome is not foreordained- It will depend 
upon choices that are waiting to be made in 
Moscow and in Washington. 

On the Soviet side, the new leadership faces 
major decisions. In anticipation of the 27 th Com- 
munist Party Congress next February, the lead- 
ership is drafting a new five-year plan that in- 
volves calculations about trade,, military costs 
and domestic goals. The Kremlin is also at a 


crucial juncture in one of its regular five-year 

ISJfSKSS- ta. £ 

priority is to concentrate oo modentmOg tM 
economy. Logically, this gives him an interest tfl 
better relations with America if possible, not 


Humiliated 
By Violent w 
Offspring 

By Flora Lewis 



m Ettovton (Amsterdam). CAW Syndicate. 


avoid still higher drains into the nwitaiy sector. 

Although the incentives for Ihe Soyiet regime 
to agreements with the United States to 
<wvi»ra te the military competition are strong. 
Moscow is also determined not to appear weak. 
It is a mistake to believe, as some in America do. 
that Soviet domestic problems and the pressure 
of new U.S. militaty programs will compel me 
Soviet leadership to capitulate and accept agree- 
ments it regards as inequitable. 

The crucial obstacle to agreement in theGene* 
va negotiations is the proposed Strategic Defense 
Initiative, or “star wars/ To Moscow, the SDI is 
a Hjwniwl way of fracing the pace of 
tion in advanced-technology weapons, m winch 
gn v rinr technology gives the United States an 
advantage. By no conceivable logic can the Rus- 
sians be expected to agree to reduce their offen- 
sive ml ogles while America is moving to gain 
militar y control of space, in addi t ion to the new 
bombas, missil es and submarines that the Unit- 
ed States is building under a nearly doubled 
mili tary budget — which will continue t o m - 
crease for the next several years even if Congress 
were to grant no new spending authority. 

The knenans will instead build more missiles 

and more warheads. And America will make it 
easier for them to do this if it derides no toagpr to 
abide by die limits of SALT- 1 and -2. 

The writer, professor of international relation* 
directs the W AvereN Harriman Institute for Ad- 
vanced Study of the Soviet Union at Columbia 
University in New York. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Tones. 


y.ARNA. 


To Be Lebanese Means to Keep On Coping 


W ASHINGTON — Lebanon is 
so good at making do amid war 
and chaos that its upheavals seem 
capable of going on forever. 

It is not so long since I lay flat on 
my back in the American University 
Hospital in Beirut with a severe infec- 
tion. Shells crashed a few blocks 
away. Hospital staff tried to maintain 
their routine. 1 was via ted drily by 
doctors and a white-starched entou- 
rage of serious-looking medical stu- 
dents with clipboards who took notes 
and nodded gravely at me. 

All around was bardy contained 
chaos. Crowds milled around the lob- 
by seeking to be admitted. A few days 

Keen calculation is at 
the core of the Lebanese 
psyche, whether in 
trade and finance or 
in tear and politics. 

before, armed Shiite fighters in 
tag fatigues had held up hospital ! 
in the packed intensive-care unit to 
force them to remove a critically ill 
man and make room for the ailing 
father of one of their guerrillas. 

Suddenly one day, a writer I knew 
from the Rigoleito, an elegant little 
Italian restaurant in my neighbor- 
hood, bum into my room. Learning 
that I was in the hospital, the owner 
had derided to send up a little sur- 
prise. The young writer balanced a 
tray of pasta, salad and pastry with 
one hand and carried a bottle of wine, 
a wineglass and a corkscrew in the 
other. He had walked 10 blocks up a 
steep hill from the seaside restaurant 
to bring me dinner. 

' The Lebanese are master improvis- 
ers. They even improvised a decep- 
tive semblance of a nation in the 
calm, glorious three decades after in- 
dependence from France in 1943. 

They take a perverse pride in being 
able to cope — indeed, often to thrive 
— in dire adversity. They bear up 
against trouble with a dignity that is 
often surreal in the circumstances. 
They dismiss disaster with a wave of 
the hand and a one word utterance — 
“malesh" (“never mind"). I always 
thought of that as tbe national motto. 


By Herbert H. Denton 

This is the first of two articles. 


I never thought that tbe Lebanese 
woe innately bloodthirsty. Indeed, 
outside Lebanon they have always 
worked hard, prospoed and lived 
peacefully. On me west coast of Afri- 
ca, for decades, they have been the 
merchant class. In the Gulf region, as 
the oil states modernized, they and 
the Palestinians formed the core of 
the professional class. 

The Lebanese continue to be su- 
premely confident that whatever they 
destroy they can q uickl y rebuild, and 
that in the interim they can cope. 

A joke told by all factions is that of 
the 11 -year-old boy wbo has just emi- 
grated with his parents to New York 
and is being tested in the neighbor- 
hood elementary school. “What’s two 
and two?" the American schoolteach- 
er asks the boy. He pauses to think 
for a moment, then responds. “Are 
you buying or selling?" 

Keen calculation is al the core of 
the Lebanese psyche, whether it is in 
matters of trade and finance or war 
and politics. 1 recall an aide of Robert 
G McFariane, President Reagan's 
national security adviser, telling how 
the Americans replaced a large win- 
dow in the ambassador’s residence 
that had been blown out by shelling. 
They discovered that a former presi- 
dent of the republic who always re- 
sponded agreeably to their appeals 
for national reconaliaiion had put 
his money on war He had cornered 
the market on pane glass. 

When I arrived in Beirut in Janu- 
ary 1983 I discovered that even poor 
Shiites, existing in the most miserable 
of human conditions, displayed the 
Lebanese national way of coping. 

The grand old waterfront hotris on 
the northern tip of the city had long 
since been battered beyond recogni- 
tion and were serving as crude shelter 
for some of the hundreds of thou- 
sands of country folk who had fled to 
the capital from the cross fire of tbe 
Pales Unian-Israeli wars to the south. 
In these bombed-out shells there was 
□either electricity nor running water. 
Yet a telltale sign of the squatters’ 
presence was the lines of freshly 
washed clothes hanging out to dry. 

There was even a routine to the 
war. Housewives would scurry out to 


shop in the early afternoon because 


rhany thf cardinal rules of the game. 

The Suites, dominant in the capi- 
tal now, under stand the dynamic all 
too well, although they are al a loss to 
see how to gel out of their current 


they knew fighting would taper off predicament erf superiority. They np- 
while tbe Guerrillas ate a big lunch, pear to have prevailed in their battles 
^ ' ” ,0 from establishing 


guerrillas 

Everyone knew there would always 
be at least one day late in the month 
when hostilities ceased — payday. 

If Lebanon is unfathomable and 
bruising fra outriders like Israel and 
the United States, it is not because 
there are no rules to the game there. 
Rather. I believe, il is because behind 
tbe Western veneer, the democratic 
institutions, there were social ar- 
rangements that stood Western un- 
derstanding of logic on its bead. 

In a nation of religious minorities 
vying for position in a violent, vola- 
tile atmosphere, (me such rule is that 


to keep the _ _ 

itself in Beirut, but they are painfully 
aware that their successes in combat 
have come at the price of appearing 
as the heavy, which sets them up for 
similar counter- treatment later on. 

When Lebanon has worked — 
which has not been for the last 10 
years — it has not been because of 
any consensus on national purpose, 
says Jamil Mroue, editor of tbe En- 
glish-language Beirut Daily Star. The 
equilibrium meant merely that op- 
posing forces were finely balanced 
and agreement had been reached on 


and agreement had oeen reacnea on youtn. wnenyoaasxwnaioaeann 
rules for doing business. This favored that means, the vague answer is to 



style of dealing is universally known 
as “the Lebanese solution." 

A reporter fra the National Geo- 
graphic, on a trip to Lebanon in the 
late 1 960s as the fragile calm began to 
fall apart, found “transactions of 
such complexity and boldness as to 
give pause to even the roost auda- 
cious of entrepreneurs ... Consider, 
for example, the Lebanese trader who 


teach them how to behave and be 
useful to society. 

That is meaningless — or worse, 
deliberate obfuscation by a 


system imposing its demands for en- 
thusiastic 


ic obedience. But it leaves an 
unspoken question about what is go-, 
ing wrong in the West M 

It seems obvious enough what 5 
going wrong in the East There isn’t 
sold some French- made pianos to a any sparkle room. People are sup- 
Brazilian merchant, accepting a ship- poised to be "socialized," which 
moit of peanuts from Senegal as pay- means repressed in a way to guaran- 
tee dint regimes cannot be challenged 
and individuals cannot dissenL the 
result is a drab pecking order. Right 
is what each superior layer says is 
jerry-built arrangements and espe- right And there are certainly layers 
dally revel in ones with hidden built- here, organized by money when it 


otpean 

menu He then sold the peanuts to a 
German firm with the stipulation 
that he be paid in U-S. dollars." 

The Lebanese are fond of these 
j 


T Maybe we could take oul 
a second mortgage 


in weakness there is strength. The 
corollary of this is that to be tempo- 
rarily strong and dominant is to be in 
a very precarious situation. Others 
inevitably band together against you. 

Ariel Sharon failed to understand 
this when he tried to rewrite the polit- 
ical map of Lebanon. Isradis still 
bemoan the assassination of their 
chosen leader erf Lebanon, Bashir 
Gemayd. as if it were a cruel accident 
of history. They still do not see it as 
the likely outcome of their efforts to 


How Americans Learn Not to Read 


D OBBS FERRY. New York — 
The US. National Institute 
of Education, a federal office, says 
that 27 million American adults are 
wholly illiterate and that 43 million 
more are near- illiterate. Why is this 
the case? America has had compul- 
sory education for 100 years. How 
come millions can’t read? 

The only answer is that schools 
do a poor job of teaching reading . 

For centuries, the reading of al- 
phabetic l a nguages has been taught 
by phonics — by teaching the 
sounds of letters. Other alphabetic 
langu a ges are taught this way. Why 
do Americans do it differently? 

Six independent studies have 
shown that English-speaking chil- 
dren enter American schools with 
an average speaking vocabulary of 
at least 24,000 words. When pho- 
nics is used, children are taught the 
sounds of the 26 letters and about 
100 letter groups like AU, CH, 
E1GH. NG, Or and WR. In the 
few schools that still use systematic 
phonics, pupils learn those stan- 
dard spellings by Christmas of their 
first year and can then read any- 
thing that interests them. 

However, some 50 years ago 
most schools abandoned phonics 
and switched to tbe whole-word 
method. Instead of teaching the 
sounds of letters, tins leaches chil- 
dren the meanings of whole words. 
The process takes six or eight years 
and, as illiteracy statistics show, 
is extremely inefficient 
Professional literature on the 
teaching of reading shows that 
American educators treat it like the 
leaching of a foreign language. The 
ability of first graders to speak and 
understand 24.000 English words is 
ignored, and the child is taught a 
second language that might he 


By Rudolf Flesch 


called “visual E n g li sh." The child is 
shown a picture of a cat, a dog, a 
house and told that the letter group 
underneath means a cat, a dog, a 
bouse. The child is then shown ad- 
less repetitions of the letter groups 
so that he or she wiD remember 
what they look like. 

By the same token, a child who is 
wholly ignorant of German could 
be *gngnt “visual German." The 
child would repeatedly be shown 
certain German words and told, for 
i nstan ce, that the letter group 
PFERD under a picture of a horse 
means ahorse. In this way the child 
would presumably in several years 
attain a reasonable command of 
"visual German" without ever hear- 
ing or speaking a German word. 


Note that this method completely 
ignores phonics. PFERD is pro- 
nounced pfairt, but the student is 
not asked to learn that 

With the whole- word method, 
phonics becomes a wholly irrele- 
vant MIL And that is precisely how 
it is treated in American schools 
and in the so-called basal readers 
used throughout the country. 

From 1911 to 1980 there were 
124 studies that proved that sys- 
tematic phonics is tbe best way to 
teach reading. A recent report of 
tbe Federal Comnrisson on Read- 
ing agrees. Something should be 
done about it Now. 


The writer is author of "Why 
Johnny Can't Read" (1955) and 
“Why Johnny StiU Can't Read ” 
(1981 ) L He contributed this comment 
to The New York Tunes. 


Parents Have a Decisive Role to Play 

F OR years, American parents were advised to leave all reading 
instruction to teachers, on the ground that parental efforts to 
introduce children to reading would only confuse them. Research now 
shows (hat informal instruction at home powerfully contributes to chil- 
dren's interest in reading and to reading achievement in school. 

The single most important way to help children become good readers is 
to read to them — even when they arc infants. As children grow, parents 
should talk with them, discuss their children’s experiences, dafly activities, 
favorite stories or names or television programs and urge mem to tell 
stories about trips to the zoo, museum, store, library, park. Children must 
learn tbe importance erf words as conveyors of meaning. 

Good readers, researchers find, have access to pms, pencils and chalk 
boards at home, and are encouraged to write stories. Their parents are 
informal teachers, cot competing with school but supporting its mission. 

Parents should see that children have time to read- indepen de nt reading 
contributes directly to reading achievement, yet few children read outside 
of school. One study found that fifth graders spend about a third of their 
free time watching television, compared to 1 percent or less in reading. 
Parents should restrict tdevision-watching to one hour on school days. 

— Diane Ravitch. a historian of education and 
author of “ The School* We Deserve." wrung in The Nr* York Times 


in parts. One of the less complex of 
those I encountered was a deaf struck 
between the Christian commanders 
of tbe U.S.-built Lebanese army and 
a brigade of Moslem soldiers that 
defected to the Shiite militia, Amal. 

Akaf Haidar, an Amal leader, re- 
called lata that once the impover- 
ished militia had gained control of 
tbe brigade, they were faced with the 
problem of paying, feeding and arm- 
ing iL Thor solution was to request 
provirions from the Christian com- 
manders against whom the brigade 
was in revolt The commanders ini- 
tially refused, but militia traders re- 
minded them that the Central Bank 
was in the area controlled by the 
rebels, trim could seize it So a deal 
was struck to allow paymasters and 
supply trucks through the lines. 

If the Lebanese are good al these 
kin d s of arrangements, they never 
seem to exhibit any patience with the 
drudgery and detail involved in the 
profitless art of governing. 

Ministries were often filthy and 
raized, in contrast to the im- 


comes to whether payment is in solid 
Western currencies or only the local 
tender; organized by rank when it 
comes to privileges. 

Back to the football syndrome, and 
die radio. Violence for wild tribal 
reasons is widespread. There are tbe 
Tamils and the Sinhalese busily mur- 
dering each other in Sri Lanka. There 
Ls Beirut full of heavy arms ever being 
turned against yesterday’s ally to get 
the jump on tomorrow's enemy lest 
he manipulate an advantage. 

No doubt there is much more dis- 
tress that does not get on the radii^ 
because there is nobody around wilr 
tit for people who 


boos are so easily acquired. Sane 
parts of the world can be expected to 
do awful things Other parts can be 
expected to hide them. 

The shock comes with compulsory 
recognition that we harbor tbe capao- 
ity to be dreadful in the part of the 
world we think we know. 

All those other bloody fights and 
. surly relations seem to be about 

peccable dranhness and_ efficiency of grievances that are understandable if 
private offices. Corruption was bra- not a justification for the wav nmole 
jg-LA dot o„ K de- behave. But a foo.ball 


m a iK teo a i-w bribe to process my 
application for a work permit He 
explained that be had plowed all his 
savings into a little gift shop, but 
because of the war, business was 
poor. “All I have is what I take from 
tbe ministry,” he sighed sadly. 

The writer was The Washington Post’s 
Beirut bureau chief in 1983 and 1984. 


. .... . aw 

does that acquire the status of substi- 
tute target for the lust to identify on 
enemy and wreak harm? 

There is a lot to ponder, in iff 
excesses of order and disorder. It is 
irritating, but bumbling, to hear in 
the East that the West doesn't do any 
better in bringing up its children to 
make tbe world less vicious. 

The New York Times. 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

Amateur in tbe Embassy Tbia presupposes arduous training in 
The International Herald Tribune SPSS'S to 


political ambassadorships rAmctiM 

ry European tradition of naming ground for the v-wh* < ? um P* n £ ^ 
ambassadors.^^ 8 

Professional diplomats accept that w£ 7tf? Amencans - 

sp^draimsSramv^fwi ™*?I£Li Spcak ^ lan- 

political appointee, and l few out- 

standing nonprofessionals are re- sodal cHmh^^;' J b W prov,dc 
taembered. These few however all °PP ortu °dy to 

had exceptional qualifications and "«pf fanSamS 3 

preparation, from extensive public S J? addlZ J ^ 
service or closely related experience, with suESJa . 10 ^ resumes 
Career diplomats ke^ hidden in the 

their honor stories aboutthe gaffes. °SS!fp^!!S country- 

or wora^of many STa^S ^ 

aess of the Herculean efforts profes- 1 to car 7 0X11 our 

riorajs frequently make to liShthe SSStfflSrt&ISi * ^ 

S3SE* SfaSSES [ 

wealing U.S. policv ih e capacity to reform ,s now - 

r «T“n eveni* , n (h c h».M c.*untr\ ROBliRT F 1LLING. 

P'Hlo. Portugal 


If * 1 

jin* 


ria — Moscow ra- 
« dio, which dominates the air in 
all languages hereabouts, has had a 
lot to say about the murderous foot-Jp 
boil riot in Brussels last week- . 

Football — that is. soccer —* is one 
thing Eastern and Western Emraje 
have in common- Bulgaria beat Yu- 
goslavia a few days aw and it eras a 
g w?* for national celebration. Rus- 
sians arc passionate about thar tom. 

So the mad behavior of English fans 
attending a match with Italy, tearing 
3 $ dm d ami hundreds injured, was a 

matter of special interest 

Moscow’s commentator daimed to 
have the explanation. English youths, 
he said, arc driven craw by unem- 
ployment, by a decadent society that 
offers them neither hope nor ouiv 
pose. They go berserk to expressthoiF . 
revulsion at the Western system. 

In response, it is of courc easy 
OT yniEh io denounce the abuse erf 
freedom in a part of the world where 
freedom is limited to accepting au- 
thority. Still, it is disturbing that 
some western youths bold so low the 
values of ciril behavior, appreciate so 

little the right to travel where they 
please, to speak and dress and think 
as they please. These rights are de- 
nied in much of the worm. 

To her credit, Prime Minister Mar- 
garet Thatcher neither male nor ac- 
cepted any excuses for her country^ 
British football teams will be kepi out 
of Continental competition for a year 
and Parliament will be asked to i 
through much stricter laws to 
order when games are played. 

But there is something more nag- 
ging at the back of the mind, some- 
thing missing in our understanding of 
our social problems. It is sharpened 
by hearing all this from the other side 
of the East-West divide. 

Here, on what has bees called the 
Red Riviera on the wide beaches of 
the Blade Sea. there is utter calm. 
Young people are decorous. They 
have to be, or they risk bad trouble. 
Family ties are tight, by necessity as 
wdl as tradition, since it is so hardtop 
get a place to live, to win some indrt9 
pendence and achieve some mobility. 

A Westerner feds a reflex of dis- 
taste for so much external constraint, 
so much policing, so much deliberate 
organizing and mobilizing to cast the 
individual in an iron mold erf confor- 
mity. He is told about “scientific pro- 
grams’’ for the “socialization of 
youth.” When you ask what on earth 







PageS 


* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4» 1985 


Arms Concern Employee 
linked to U.S. Spy Case 


'fw York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — An employ- 
ee of a mOitaiy contractor in Cali- 
fornia has been implicated in a pur- 
ported Soviet spy ring, government 
officials said. 

Hie employee, a former US. 
Navy worker who lives near Sacra- 
mento, California, has been ques- 
tioned by federal agents, the offi- 
cials, who asked not to be 
identified, said Sunday night. They 
said he was suspected of smuggling 
secret material from the Alameda 
Nava] Air Station near Oakland, 
but declined to be more specific 
about (he type of material. 

A retired navy commimicatkms 
specialist, John A. Walker Jr„ and 
his son, Michael Lance Walker, a 
seaman aboard the nuclear carrier 
Nimitz, have been indicted on 
charges of espionage for the Soviet 
Union. John Walker’s brother, Ar- 
thur J. Walker, a retired navy lieu-. 

tenant remmantirr and engineer 
for a defease contractor, has been 
arrested on similar 

The officials also saidthat John 
Walker, who has been accused of 
being the leader of the purported 
ring, was hired by the navy to give 
polygraph, or lie detector, tests to 
sailors charged with misconduct, a 
post that may have given him ac- 
cess to highl y classified informa- 
tion. 

According to the officials, classi- 
fied military documents were 
found in the office of Arthur Walk- 
er, who worked most recently for 
VSE Crap, a military contractor 
based in Virginia. 

The documents, the officials 
said, included information about 
desipis for ships that would be 

ters at sea. 

The sources said that the Califor- 
nia man, who has been identified in 
affidavits only as “D," had permit- 
ted federal agents to search his 
home. 


Mother of Trial Witness 
Dies in Bombing in Italy 

Reuters 

NAPLES — The mother of a 
man who has been testifying 
against co-defendants in a large- 
scale trial of suspected members of 
the Camrara. or the Naples Mafia, 
was killed by a bomb explosion 
early Monday, the police said. 

Francesca Pandico, 65, died 
when the bomb went off under the 
cabin in which she and other family 
members lived in a camp near Na- 
ples for victims of a 1980 earth- 
quake, Her son Giovanni is one of 
3bout a dozen witnesses on whose 
evidence the state based its case 
against 640 suspects. 


They would not say what was 
found made, nor would they de- 
scribe the ties between “D rf and 
John Walker. In a secret message to 
a Russian diplomat, Mr. Walker 
used the code name H D" to de- 
scribe the California man, the offi- 
cials shid. 

A framer employee of John 
Walker's private detective agency 
in Norfolk, Virginia, said that Mr. 
WhOter had made frequent trips to 
San Francisco to visit a business 
partner. 

The officials have. stud that at 
least three California men who 
worked with Mr. Walker in the 
navy are under surveillance by law 
enforcement agents. 

■ More SwvelBaiice Urged 

Ronald J. Ostrow of the Los Ange- 
la tones reported from Washing- 
ton : 

Bobby R. Inman, a retired admi- 
ral and a framer deputy director of 
the Central Intelligence Agency, 
called Sunday for an increase in 
survefflacce of Soviet bloc agents in 
the United Sates. 

Following the charges of spying 
activity lodged against members ctf 
the Walker family, Mr. Inman said 
that the Naval Investigative Service 
has three times as many agents 
lo oking for waste, fraud and abuse 
— “the S600 ashtray cases" — as 
agents hooting for spies. 

“Frankly, we tend to allocate the 
talent we have against the problem 
that’s got the current headline,” he 
sad on a television interview pro- 
gram. 

Mr. Inman said the government 
could not put the 4 J nation Amer- 
icans who hold security 
nnHer survetihtnee. “So you begin 
with absolutely blanketing every le- 
gal, accredited prospective case of- 
ficer in this country," he said. 

Case rfficent, as they are called 
in the intelligence community, are 
nffidalg that Soviet bloc countries 
send to the United States as part of 
their embassy or United Naums 
staffs, protected by diplomatic im- 
munity, their real mission is intelli- 
gence-gathering and recruiting 


In the early 1970s, the United 
States moved to improve trade and 
foreign relations with Communist 
countries, and in the process ^more 
thaw doubled the number of pro- 
spective case officers," Mr. Inman 
Mirf At the samg time, the Federal 
Bureau of Investig atio n and mili- 
tary services were reducing the 
number of counterintelligence 
agents they had. 

Since then, however, al 
Mr. I nman did not mention it, 
FBI’s counterintelligence budget 
has increased sharply, and the ratio 
has improved, intelligence sources 
said. • • • 


De Lorean Announces Plans 
To Build a New Car in Ohio 


The Associated Pros 

LOS ANGELES — John Z. 
De Lorean, the automaker whose 
venture to make a luxury sports 
car in Northern Ireland failed, 
says he will set up a plant in 
Columbus. Ohio, to produce a 
new high-performance car. 

Mr. De Lorean said in an in- 
terview that he has been working 
on the car fra about six months 
and that the assembly operation 
could be established soon. 

The Los Angeles Herald-Ex- 
aminer quoted Mr. De Lorean as 
saying late Sunday that his role 
in a new company, if one is creat- 
ed, has not been defined. 

Sources in Ohio and in North- 
ern Ireland said Mr. De Lorean 
hoped toproduce a car similar to 
the DMC-12, which was built by 
De Lorean Motor Co. from 1979 
until the company failed in 1982, 
the Detroit rree Press reported 
Sunday. 

Marvin Katz, vice president of 
Kapac Co„ an auto pans distrib- 
utor based in Columbus. Ohio, 


whose company acquired most 
erf De Lorean Motor’s parts in- 
ventory, said the new car would 
be a modified DMC-12 "with a 
larger engine and tr ansmiss ion 
and wheels." He would not iden- 
tify other companies and indi- 
vidnals he said were backing the 
latest effort. 

The DMC-12 was built in 
Northern Ireland, with the Brit- 
ish government contributing 
about £77 million (more than 
5140 million at 1982 exchange 
rates). The British government 
and a large n umb er of other 
creditors have filed civil suits in 
Detroit to recover some of their 
losses, and the legal implications 
of a new De Lorean car venture 
were not immediately dear. 

De Lorean Motor filed for re- 
organization under U.S. bank- 
ruptcy laws in October 1982, but 
was placed liquidation af- 
ter a nearing in a Michigan court 

Mr. De Lorean remains under 
investigation by a federal grand 
jury in Detroit, his lawyer has 



JlmZ.De Lorean 

said. The grand jury reportedly is 
investigating Mr. De Lorean’s 
business activities, including al- 
legations by creditors that he had 

misappropriated millions erf dol- 
lars in the Northern Ireland ven- 
ture. 


For a U.S. Bureaucrat, a Life of Spice 

Price and Supply of Condimenis Are the Esoterica of Work 


Raids End Salvadoran Hospital Strike 


sought to show that it could use 
force without resorting to the kind 
of brutality that the three mOitaiy 
security forces — national police, 
treasury police and nati onal guard 
— have been accused of in the past 

“We’ve tried to do everything 
with the professionalism that the 

than 100 mOitaiy security agents 


The government said that pa- 
tients who had left the hospital dur- 
ing the union takeover had report- 
ed that the strikers had pistols and 
possibly a murhini? gmi, but the 
strikers denied it 
At General Hospital, where the 
government ca2bd a group of most- 
ly American reporters to be present 


By Robert J. McCartney 

Washington Post Service 
SAN SALVADOR — Hundreds 
of Salvadoran military policemen 

and national gnarHcmen retrying 

automatic weapons burst into five 
hospitals and 20 clinics trf the state- 
run health system around the coun- 
try to end a four-week takeover by 
sinking health workers. 

The armed forces repeated that 
four police “observers” — un- 
armed and not in uniform — were 
shot and killed in the action before 
dawn Sunday at San Salvadors 
General Hospital under uncertain 
circumstances. 

One patient was reported to have 
died of a heart attack during the 
raid, but neit her the military nor 
the strikers reported that any rivil- 

and fragmentary reports from out- Embezzler in Tennessee Gels 20 Year Term 

side die re phut fisted no casualties. 


bio, who commanded the units that 
entered General HosprtaL 

Neither Colonel Rubio nor wit- 
nesses provided a clear account trf 
how the “observers" were killed, 
ahhoogh strikers suggested that 
they had been shot by other police- 
men. 


bound the h«ntk erf several 
dred hospital workers with twine 
and forced them to lie on the floor. 
The workers, including doctors and 
some nurses, were released after 
their identification documents 
were checked. 


By Ward Sinclair 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Sooner or 
later, someone will wonder about 
the world edety-seed situation, so 
here’s some of the news crossing 
the desk of Rex E.T. Dull, the man 
at the U.S. Agriculture Department 
who keeps tabs on the spice trade. 

The good news is that prices ear- 
ly this year were down from last 
year’s exceptional highs, which 
were caused by dvQ strife around 
Amritsar, India. India produces 
most of the world’s edexy seed. 

The bad news, according to late 
intelligence, is that unrest is boiling 
up a gam, and nobody knows what 
mil happen to edery^eed supplies. 

The nutmeg picture, on the other 
hand, is a bit dearer. 

Indonesian nutmeg is doing 
wdl; nutmeg from Grenada, how- 
ever, is doing poorly in general, and 
in the United States in particular, 
because it contains metre fat than 
buyers want. 

After the U.S. invasion of Gre- 
nada in 1983, the Soviet Union 
canceled a contract to buy 500 ions 
of nutmeg a year, and the island’s 
warehouses now hold a huge sur- 
plus, Mr. Dull said recently. 

Arcana like these are the spice of 
Mr. Dull’s life. He has been the 
Foreign Agricultural Service's 
keeper of data on tea. spices, cocoa 
and essential oils for 24 years, and 
never, he says, has it been a bore. 

Mr. Doll’s reports and market 
analyses, published periodically by 
the Agriculture Department, ap- 
parently are snapped up eagerly by 
people who have a need to know 
about his subjects. 

As a result of his immersion in 
the esoterica of spices and the lie, 
Mr. Dull has become a walking 
encyclopedia of thing s you proba- 
bly never cared to ask about. 

For example, Mr. Duffs data 
disdose that U.S. oregano imports 


The police actions apparently 
were designed to crack down on 
what President Jose Napoleon 
Duarte charges is “subversive" use 
of the union movement by El Sal- 
vador’s leftist guerrillas to' destabi- 
lize his government 

The state health workers' strike 
technically was illegaL But officials 
acknowledged that such stoppages 
have been tolerated since 1979 
without use trf force. Mr. Duarte 
lashed out al unions in his state-of- 
the-nation address Saturday in a 
wide-ranging criticism of the Salva- 
doran left. 

In addition, the government 


The Associated Press 

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee — 
Jake F. Butcher, the finander 
whose theft of 520 million from his 
banks led to their financial mm, 
was sentenced Monday to two can- 
current 20-year prison terms. 

He will be required to serve at 
least a third of his sentence. Twenty 
years was the maximum Mr. Butch- 
er could receive under a plea-bar- 


Oniy the maximum vntnira will 
“provide the necessary punishment 
and serve as a deterrent to others," 
U.S. Attorney John W. Gill Jr. tokl 
Judge Thomas. 

Mr. Butcher was indicted twice 
on bank fraud charges in Knox- 
ville, once in Memphis and once in 
London, Kentucky. The cof 


llapseof 

United 


bargain that guaranteed he would 
not recdvtf more than 20 years in 
prison. The bargain also covered a 
subsequent tax evasion charge and 
allowed Mr. Butcher to avoid as 
many as five trials on bank-fraud 
and tax evasion charges. 

Defense attorneys, describing 
Mr. Butcher as a “land and caring 
man." had asked for mercy, seeki 



3 


Judge 

to sentence Mr. Butcher to the 
maximum term on the first of three 
bank fraud convictions. 


American Bank of Knoxville, led to a three-year term and three years 
failure of eight banks in Ten- public service work for him. 
nessee. Eleven otter banks in Ten- Jndge Thomas ^ ^ hoped the 

nessee and Keptudcy had to be sold sentence would restore “a badly 
or merged. shaken public confidence" in 

- - The financier accepted a plea banks. 


continue moving right on up on the 
charts. “Oregano has become very 
popular, due to the popularity of 
pizza, spaghetti, the Italian foods," 
he said. "Same thing fra basil, 
which is increasing.” 

Or consider the sesame seed. 
U.S. imports were 36.759 metric 
tons (40,434 short tons) last year. 
The largest user in the United 
Stales probably is the McDonald's 
fast-food chain, which offers a ses- 
ame- seed bun. 

Die hot item in the spice busi- 
ness happens to be pepper. Mr. 


Dull’s last circular reports that 
tight supplies and rising prices have 
bit the world pepper market with 
production having fallen below 
consumption. 

But pepper, like so many other 
fann products, is an up-and-down 
commodity. Brazil boosted plant- 
ings and exports to record levels in 
1981 and 1982, but when prices 
dropped, fanners reduced plant- 
ings, Mr. Dull reported. Some Ma- 
laysian farmers switched from pep- 
per to cocoa; bad weather spoiled 
much of India's 1984 pepper crop. 


Wove captured the flail- 
of Rodeo Drive. 


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At 9am each day the board members of James 
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That’s the time when they sample and 1 nose 1 the 
previous day’s distillation of Beefeater London Dry. 

They like their toast to be clear, brilliant and subtly 
balanced. With a dry softness that doesn't overwhelm 
the palate. 

Only then is it allowed to leave the distillery 
bearing the proud name of Beefeater. 

Invariably it meets the required high 
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Which is undoubtedly what prompts 
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A man who, just like them, was 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


Philippine Officers Organize in Effort to End Abuses 


By "William Branigin 

K 'Oihiagion Past Service 

MANILA — A group of young 
military officers has launched a 
pavement within ihe armed fortes 
-o halt what the officers see as 
growing demoralization and to ira- 
r-rove their effectiveness in com- 
pa 1^6 Communist insurgents. 

The movement emphatically re- 
iccis any idea that it might engineer 
H cou P- and insists on respecting 

Inc millf-i—. 1.: i_ n ° 


been announced, but an officer has 
estimated publicly that the move- 
ment has the support of 70 percent 
of the more than 3,000 Philippine 
Military Academy graduates in ser- 
vice. A legislator bas estimated that 
40 percent of the 16.000 officers in 
the armed forces, which has 
113.000 members, could be sup- 
porters or sympathizers. 

The movement has been wel- 


tne miiiiurJ h- 1 ™ 1 ! c ' n _ re sP CCUn S corned by some leaders, including 
J Bul ,lcle y- Minister Junn Pon« En- 

; in the rile and the acting armed forces 

««• grow- chief of staff. General Fidel V. Ra- 
“S^inst mos. But it appears to have been 
U 1 -9 00 guerrillas of the New Erected with susnicinn or ambiva- 


Pwple s Array, the military arm of 
the Communist Party of the Philip- 
pines. 

Among the movement's griev- 
ances. according to published 
statements and interviews with 
member officers, are corruption in 
the military, favoritism in promo- 
tions. generals who retain their 


mos. But it appears to have been 
greeted with suspicion or ambiva- 
lence by others. 

The coast guard commander. 
Commodore Brilliante Ochoco, a 
former chairman of the Philippine 
Military' Academy’s alumni associ- 
ation. said in a speech Saturday 
that the group’s aims were worthy, 
but their methods “deplorable.” 

He charged that the movement’s 


functions after they reach retire- complaints “crucified members” of 
meat age. military abuses against the armed forces “before they even 


civilians, inefficient distribuuon of 
supplies and loss of public support 
The group is known as “We Be- 
long" or the “Reform AFP Move- 
ment,” AFP standing for Armed 
Forces of the Philippines. It says it 
is expanding rapidly- and winning 


had a chance to protect their good 
names” and gave a false impression 
that nothing had been done to cor- 
rect flaws. 

Instead of disregarding military 
tradition and using “propagandist 
venues” to air their grievances. 


support in various pans of the Commodore Ochoco said, the offi- 


e.nmtry. 

The number of members has not 


cers should go through channels. 
In an interview last week. Presi- 


w 

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Fidel V. Ramos 

dent Ferdinand E. Marcos tended 
to dismiss the movement's griev- 
ances as “griping.” although he ac- 
knowledged that complaints may 
have some basis. 

“Griping is traditional in the 
armed forces, but they've just 
called it by an esoteric name.” Mr. 
Marcos said. He reminisced about 
“gripes" he had heard about food, 
clothing and shoes while an officer 
during World War II. He added, 
however, in a reference to the 
movement’s officers. “We should 
listen to them." 

Asked about Mr. Marcos's re- 
marks. five members of the move- 
ment indicated in an interview 
Thursday that their grievances had 
gone well beyond such griping. 
“We don't like to use the worn 
’gripes.' '* a colonel said. 

Mr. Marcos conferred Friday 
with about 30 officers in the move- 
ment who had graduated from the 
military academy classes of 1971 
and 1973. according to the presi- 
dential palace. 

A statement said Mr. Marcos 
had promised to prosecute prompt- 
Iv any military men accused of dis- 


Juan Ponce Entile boxes” and “terrorizing voters’ 
into supporting certain candidates 
honesty or corruption, and to en- He ^9 the movement aimed tt 
courage the group to help gather “generate enough awareness tha 
evidence of irregularities. But he young officers would refuse sud 
warned against “trial by publicity.” orders in the future. 

The statement also said the offi- The officers, who represented 
cers. who were accompanied by 9ie Philippine constabulary, th< 
General Ramos, had assured Mr. anriy. the air force and the navy 
Marcos that their movement had were interviewed at Camp. Aguinal 
ncu been instigated by any military do in Manila, site of the Ministry a 
or political leader and that they National Defense, 
would press Tor change within the a Marcos to Run Again 

President Marcos announced 
R-, Monday that he would run for re- 
movement s concerns. General Ra- deafa in 1987, United Press In- 

leroaiional reported from Manila, 
martial of two officers and six en- j release, Mr. Marcos 

listed men m connection with rr.* j”, iiM r “ r " 

crimes that included murder and 
, l_, term to enable him to cany out s 

aT 7L , n™. pledge to lift the Philippines fron 

Ai me same time, in a move r ° n4 «^ wl , i 

, , w w 1 its economic crisis, loe nations 

Cffi' «* 125 «<*■ 

manders whose units in the prov- 
inces of Negros Occidental and Sa- 
mar were recently attacked by T_„ _ T1 
Communist rebels. General Ramos fl I cill XlClJUri 
said the two colonels had been re- M. JT 

lieved for having failed to supervise 

security measures in their units. The Associated Press 

In other disciplinary measures, NICOSIA — Iraq said that itr 
the presidential palace reported jets attacked “a large maritime tar- 


that 40 officers had been dismissed 
and six reprimanded as of May 15 
in what it called “an ongoing effort 
10 weed out incompetents and un- 
desirables in the officer corps." 

So far. however, authorities have 
said nothing about what an officer 
in the movement denounced as the 
“dishonesty" of some officers who 
he said were painting a “rosy pic- 
ture” of the military's fight against 
the Communist guerrillas. 

Another officer described how 
guerrillas can lie in ambush for 
days “and nobody will inform the 
military about them.” But when the 
military tries to ambush the guerril- 
las, he said, people often warn 
them. 

The officers said military abuses, 
including torture and summary ex- 
ecutions, had contributed to the 
lack of public support. 

An officer said, “Some of us on 
occasion have been ordered to get 
involved in massive election irregu- 
larities,” such as “carting off ballot 
boxes” and “terrorizing voters" 
into supporting certain candidates. 
He said the movement aimed to 
“generate enough awareness” that 
young officers would refuse such 
orders in the future. 

The officers, who represented 
the Philippine constabulary, the 
army, the air force and the navy, 
were interviewed at Camp Aguinal- 
do in Manila, site of the Ministry of 
National Defense. 

■ Marcos to Run Again 

President Marcos announced 
Monday that he would run for re- 
election in 1987, United Press In- 
ternational reported from Manila. 

In a press release, Mr. Marcos 
said he would seek a new six-year 
term to enable him to carry out a 
pledge to Lift the Philippines from 
its economic crisis. The nation's 
foreign debt is about S25 billion. 



BUSINESS TRIP — Than Zryang, China’s prime min- 
ister, arriving in London for a one-week visit, was met by 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, Britain’s foreign secretary. Mr. 
Zhao, seeking joint ventures and technology transfers, 
also wiD visit West Germany and the Netherlands. 


Iraq Reports Bombing Gulf Targets 


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main oil ter minal 


firmation of the at tael 
“maritime target” — Iraq 
for an ofl tanker — or on 


A military spokesman in Bagh- 


doned Bandar Khomeini oQ com- dad said that jet fighters struck 
plex. twice Monday at the Iranian mdi- 

lr M also said that Irani planes 

had fired rockets on Tdnin on a ^ n “ mbcr rf 


twice Monday .1 <ka Iranian mfc- E S m 

untcarnpofKhaneh.msoinhcm ^ ^ roads leading In Basra and 
Iran, killing a large number of JXi;™, „ f I™,-. 


Vatican, 

Italy Put 
New Pact 
Into Effect 

Reuters 

VATICAN CITY — The Vati- 
can and Italy exchanged docu- 
ments on Monday ratifying a re- 
vised church-state accord that 
ended Catholicism's role as the 
state religion and Rome's status as 
a “sacredaty.” 

Prime Minister Beitrao Craxi 
and the Vatican secretary of state. 
rnrriinai Agosiino Casaroli. ex- 
changed the documents on the sew 
concordat at a ceremony in the 
Vatican. 

Mr. Craxi, making his first offi- 
cial visit to the Vatican since be 
a ssumed office nearly two years 
ago, later met with Pope John Paul 
IL 

The ceremony formally put into 
effect two agreements on the revi- 
sion a gnaH last year and ratified by 
the Italian Parliament 

The concordat is a revision of 
part of the Latenra treaties signed 
between the Vatican and the gov- 
ernment of Mussolini in 1929, and 
guarantees religious freedom for 
noo-Cathodcs. 

Mr. Craxi described it as the for- 
mal realization of an article on reli- 
gious liberty in Italy’s Constitution 
of 1948. 

Cardinal Casaroli said that the 
accord should not be seen as a 
break with the past bul as the prod- 
uct of a continuous maturation. 

He noted that although Catholi- 
cism is no longer the state religion 
the pact acknowledges that Catho- 
lic principles are an important part 
of Italy’s historic patrimony. 

Rome loses its status as a “sacred 
city,” a title that in the past had led 
to the banning of plays or books 
considered offensive to Catholi- 
cism or thepapacy. The new pact 


The Associated Pnss [The raid Sunday night on Teh- dering ashes,” the Iraqi spokesman 

NICOSIA — Iraq said that its ran was the heaviest in the renewed said in a broadcast monitored in 
iets attacked “a larae maritime tar- bombing and was assumed to have Nicosia. Iran’s chief oil terminal is 


get" and a petrochemical complex caused many casualties in densely on Kharg Island. 

Monday in the Gulf near Iran’s populated districts, although the The official Ira ni an news agency, 

• _ 1 T : ,l 1DXIA nnnnart Inlnr of Tranim 


official Iranian media said the IRNA. reported later that Iranian 


_ .... death toll-was 1 1, Agence France- gunners had poured shells onto the 

There was no independent con- quoted sources in Tehran as Iraqi border city of Basra over the 
matron of tha attack on the sourKS “ 24 hours, wrecking the rail- 

mntifTtf TartiRf If-a.n rvarlAni'P J r ... . . . r « • 


past 24 hours, wrecking the rail- 
road station, a hold and a branch 
of the Central Bank. 

The IRNA reports, monitored in 


Iran also said that Iraqi planes cut off roads leading to Basra and 

had fired rockets on Tehran on ^ n g a laise nambcr °* severed the supply lines of Iraq’s 
Sunday. Earlier. Iraq had made the so ^ dlcrS ' Third Army, 

same report. Iran said later that its Iraqi fighter planes set fire to Seven other Iraqi border towns 

gunners had been shelling the Iraqi targets on Kharg Island. Bandar were targeted by Iranian gunners, 
city of Basra in retaliation for air Khomeini and Khanefa oil termi- IRNA said. There was no immedi- 
a nicks on Tehran. nals and “reduced them to smol- are Iraqi confinnation. 


lt establishes stricter criteria for 
state recognition of church institu- 
tions eligible for tax benefits and 
will gradually phaseout stale subsi- 
dies of salaries for clerics. 

Beginning in 1990 Italian bish- 
ops are to pay the salaries of clerics 
from funds to which Italians can 
contribute and claim income tax 
relief. 

Catholic schools maintain full 
freedom but religious education in 
public schools becomes optional. 
The state win continue to recognize 
church marriages bul civilian 
courts now will review church mar- 
riage anrmiments. 


V s 

s 



Lord George-Brown Is Dead at 70 


* A 


'SSr 

- > 




The worlds fastest growing international brand. 
It's a whole new world. 


LONDON — Lord George- 
Brown, 70, a former British foreign 
secretary and one of the most col- 
orful and unpredictable politicians 
of the 1960s. died Sunday after a 
long illness. 

Lord George-Brown, who died 
after an operation to stop a hemor- 
rhage. was deputy leader of Brit- 
ain’s Labor Party from 1960 to 
1970 and Labor foreign secretary 
from 1966 to 1968. 

He was defeated in 1964 by Har- 
old Wilson for the post of leader of 
the parly bul he stayed on as depu- 
ty leader. He resigned from the 
party in 1976 over its support for 
union closed shops and jomed the 
Social Democratic Party after it 
i was formed in 1981. He was made a 
lord in 1970. 

The son of an Irish truck driver, 
his political and personal life was 
seldom out of the public eye. His 
liking for strong drink was legend- 
ary. 

Another former Labor foreign 
secretary. Denis Healey, paid trib- 
ute to has courage, drive, imagina- 
tion and idealism, but added: “The 
trouble with George was he lacked 
a degree of self-discipline which 
would have taken him to the top.” 



Lord George-Brown 


Robert Douglas Coe, 
Veteran U.S. Diplomat 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Robert 
Douglas Coe, 83, a former U.S. 
diplomat, died Wednesday in 
Cannes. 

Mr. Coe was posted in Brazil, 
Peru, Turkey, India, Britain, Italy 
and the Netherlands, and after 24 


years of service retired in 1952. The 
next year President Dwight D. Ei- 
senhower » pp nintffri him ambassa- 
dor to Denmark, a post he held 
until 1957. 

• Other Deaths: 

Richard Greene, 66, the actor 
who was the original Robin Hood 
on British television. Saturday at 
his hone in eastern England. He 
also appeared in more than 40 
■films, including “Hound of the 
Baskervilles,” “Forever Amber” 
and “My Lucky Star.” 

Henry Kearns, 74, who served in 
the Nixon administration as prea- 
dent of the Export-Import Bank 
and in the Eisenhower administra- 
tion as assistant secretary of com- 
merce for international affairs, of 
cancer Wednesday in Washington. 

Mrfcohn Norman Smith, 66, a 
former editor of the Rhodesia Her- 
ald who opposed white minority 
rule in his African homeland. May 
17 in Brighton, England, The 
Tunes of London reported. 

Sarah M. Cfedbonie, 19, Thurs- 
day in New Delhi, where her father, 
William L Claiborne, is a corre- 
spondent fra The Washington PosL 
Her parents said that preliminary 
reports showed she died of appar- 
ent respiratory failure after con- 
suming alcohol and drugs at a par- 
ty. 


Tonight could be 

the night 


e -J- 



EC Tries to Define Technology Role 


LUXEMBOURG — European 
Community ministers met Monday 
to discuss ways or competing in the 
development of new telecommuni- 
cations systems and of gaining a 
leading share of world technology 
markets, diplomats said. 

They said Lhe talks would pre- 
pare EC leaders for their summit 
meeting June 29 and 30 in Milan. 

The talks, which continue Tues- 
day. complement the debate over 
Eureka, the technology initiative 
proposed by President Francois 
Mill errand of France. 

Eureka, which is aimed at pool- 
ing resources to develop competi- 
tive high-technology industries in 
Europe, has drawn support from 
raosL EC member countries and is 
expected to dominate the summit 
conference, the diplomats said. 

In Monday's talks, industry min- 
isters and telecommunications au- 
thority officials tried to define what 
role industry and public authorities 
should have in efforts to compete 
with Japan and the United States in 
technology, the diplomats said. 

The discussions resulted from an 
EC Commission proposal for a ma- 
jor drive in research on telecom- 
munications. 

Diplomats said smaller countries 
ravonad a strong EC role in orga- 
nizing research and developing 
joint technical standards for tele- 
communications over a wide vari- 
ety of frequencies. 

Bui some countries, such as Brit- 
ain and West Germany, have 
shown skepticism about the pro- 


posed role of the EC in such areas. 
They have argued that industry and 
the European Conference of Tele- 
communications would be more 
appropriate forums, the diplomats 
said. 

To finance the first 18-month 
stage of its proposal the Commis- 
sion wants 42.9 million European 
Currency Units (S31.4 million) in 
investment from the EC budget, 
national research organizations 
and industry. 

Diplomats said that, in order to 
help speed up research, the EC was 
also seeking mutual recognition of 
lest results of telecommunications 
equipment try all member states. It 
also wanted information on new 
iprhniral s tandar ds to reach EC 
offidals more rapidly. 

■ French Chemical Venture 

Three major Frmch pharmaceu- 
tical groups have joined with the 
government-run space research 
program in a venture aimed at de- 
veloping biotechnology in outer 
space. The Associated Press report- 
ed Monday from Paris. 

The accord, signed Monday at 
the Paris Air Show, was described 
by the National Center fra Space 
Studies as the first cooperative ef- 
fort between industry and govern- 
ment in Europe. 

The companies taking part were 
Aerospatiale, Rh6ne- Poulenc SA, 
Roussel Uclaf SA and Sanofi. 

They will pool their resources in 
a program to grow crystals in space 
for eventual medical and space ap- 
plications. Until now. this area has 


been restricted to academia in Eu- 
rope, said the secretary of stale for 
research and technology. Hubert 
Curicn. U.S. researchers have been 
actively pursuing the field. 

Askai about the cost of the ven- 
ture, Aerospatiale’s president and 
general director, Henri Martre, 
said the budget has not yet been 
defined. 


U.S. Homosexuals Sue 
Magazines in Ad Reiasal 

The Associa t ed Press 

LOS ANGELES — Sponsors of 

an annual parade of homosexuals 

in the newly incorporated dry of 
West Hollywood, California, have 
sued four American tnapCTTw* 
charging discrimination because 
advertisements for this year’s event 
were rejected. 

The sponsors, the Christopher 
Street West Association, allege in 
the lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles 
County Superior Court, that the 
publishers of Newsweek, Time, 
Sports fflnstrated and U.S. News 
and World R^xwt conspired to re- 
ject an advertisement for tire June 
23 Gay Pride festival and parade in 
West Hollywood. The caty has a 
large homosexual pop ulation 


YOUR GUOETODMNG WELL 
PATOGAWBJ5 
IN HflOWSWEBCB*} SECTION 
OFTHEtHT 



Spielcasino 

Aachen 


: r 



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Bremen 


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Messieurs, MescJames - 1 
Faites vos jeux. 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985. 


Page 7 


l,sS . N *‘m 

v " IV 

h ^\ ^ 


U.S. Envoys 
Find Fault 
With Steps 
For Security 

The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — A new sur- 
vey suggests that most U.S. Foreign 
Service officers bdkve their gov- 
ernment has not done all h could to 
prevent terrorist attacks at Uil. 
embassies. 

A majority also appear to have 
doubts about the effectiveness of 
the State Department's policy of 
retaliating militarily against ex- 
tremist groups or a gainst nations 
that sponsor terrorism. 

The survey was taken by the For- 
eign Service Journal, a monthly 
magazine published by the Ameri- 
can Foreign Service Association, 
an organization of serving and re- 
tired career diplomats. 

* A questionnaire about the ade- 
quacy of the State Department’s 
security measures was included in 
the Journal’s March issue. Of (he 
8,000 subscribers. 182 responded. 

The sampling stowed that al- 
most 80 percent of the respondents 
believe that the bombing of the 
U.S. Embassy annex in Beirut last 
September could have been pre- 
vented with reasonable security 
measures. 

According to the survey, 30 per- 
’ cent of the respondents disagreed 
f strongly and 42 percent disagreed 
with the proposition that foreign 
affairs agencies have done all they 
could in recent years to safeguard 
employees against tenorists. Six- 
teen percent were undecided, leav- 
ing 12 percent in agreement. 

Asked by the Journal for com- 
ment. the assistant secretary of 
stale for security and administra- 
tion. Robert Lamb, said: “We 
think thal protection of our embas- 
sies and employees is among the 
highest priorities in the depart- 
ment. We are doing more today 
than we ever have at any time be- 
fore. Bat it is not just the derart- 
4 meat's responsibility; tire imuvid- 
• - uni also has responsibilities.*' 

The principal extremist activities 
directed against U.S. diplomatic in- 
stallations over the past two yeais 
include bombings at the embassy 
and annex in Benut and the embas- 
sy in Kuwait. 

Reagan ad minis! rarinn officials 
have said that Lebanese Shiite 
Moslem extremists with dose links 
to Iran were responsible for each 
incident. Secretary of Stale George 
P. Shultz and the national security 
adviser. Robert C. McFarlane, 
have said that the United States 
should use force against govem- 
w menis that sponsor terrorist acts. 



Prison Gangs 9 Clout Grows on the ' Outside 5 




Wladyslaw Frasyniuk 


Bogdan Lis 


Adam Midnrik 


Solidarity Dissidents on Trial Assert 
Judge Is Biased, Should Be Changed 


United Press International 

GDANSK, Poland— Three Sol- 
idarity dissidents accused of trying 
to organize an filegsl strike asserted 
Monday that the »ciuef judge at 
their trial is biased and one defen- 
dant dwnaTidefl that the judge be 
replaced 

The demand, which the court re- 
jected, came as the founder of the 
Solidarity trade onion. Lech Wa- 
lesa, accused the Polish govern- 
ment of intensifying repression of 
dissidents. Homan rights activists 
said that the defendants were being 
prosecuted for exercising basic hu- 
man rights. 

Wladyslaw Frasyniuk, 31, Ber- 
dan Lis, 33, and Adam Mrchnik, 
38, are accused of trying to orga- 
nize a 15-minute national strike in 
February 1984 to protest price in- 
creases proposed by tire govern- 
ment. 

The strike was canceled when tire 
government revised its price plan. 

Mr.Lis and Mr. Frasyniuk have 
pleaded not guilty. Mr. Michnik 
ifid not enter a plea, saying that he 
did not understand tire charges. Afl 
three men face prison satences of 
up to five yeais. 

Tire press and tire public are 
barred from the proceedings, but a 
lawyer said thal Mr. Lis refused 
Monday to answer pointed ques- 
tions from tire court, questions the 
lawyer said implied that Mr. Lis 
was guilty. 

Mr. Frasyniuk protested tire con- 
duct of the trial by Miring to be 
removed from the courtroom. He 
was escorted to a jail near the 
courthouse and refused to attend 

tire proceedings. 

Mr. Michnik filed a protest as- 
serting that Chief Judge Krzysztof 
Zmiiirh was “partial” and de- 
manding that he be replaced. The 
court recessed for an hour, then 


announced that Mr. MichmV s pe- 
tition was rejected. 

‘’These is no progress in the court 
proceedings." he said after the 
court was adjourned for tire day. 
The trial was to resume Tuesday 
with testimony from Mr. Walesa. 

In a letter to the International 
Conference an Human Rights in 
Ottawa, Mr. Walesa said Monday 
that a law adopted fay Poland's par- 
liament, tire Sqm, last month “has 
led to increased penal repression in 
Poland. 

“The human ri ghts situation de- 
picted by tire Polish representative 
cannot reflect a true situation in tire 
country," be said. 

■ Jarozelski Assays 'Martyrs’ 

Poland’s leader. General Woj- 
dech Jaruzdski, said in an inter- 
view pnMfohwl Monday that his 


country does not want to have po- 
litical prisoners, but is faced with 
what he called a small group of 
professional “martyrs" threatening 
the state. The Associated Press re- 
potted from Paris. 

Human rights abuse “is the chief 
accusation brandished » ff»n<r us 
by the means of Western informa- 
tion and propaganda," General 
Jaruzdski told the French Commu- 
nist Party newspaper I ■’H umani ty. 

“Political prisoners? We don't 
want to have them in Poland," tire 
general said. “That is the sense of 
the wide amnesty that we have pro- 
claimed. Nevertheless, there is here 
a small group of so-called ‘martyrs 
of the re gim e,’ professional mar- 
tyrs, really. Then- number is in- 
versely proportional to tire fuss or- 
chestrated about them by Western 
propaganda." 


Doctor Tells Papal Plot Trial 
Agcak 'Cunning,’ 'Not Crazy ’ 


Agavx Frtmce-Presse 

ROME — Mehmet Ali Agca, 
who was convicted of attempting to 
km Pope John Paul IL is not men- 
tally disturbed, an expat said 
Monday as the trial of eight ac- 
cused plotters in the shooting en- 
tered its second week. 

Mr. Agca’s assertion in court on 
May 27 thal he was “Jesus Christ 
reurarnate!" and that the “end of 
the world” was near had raised 
strong questions as to his mental 
condition — and as to whether and 
why he might help the defense by 
pretending to be mad. 

In the East bloc, which views the 
trial as a Western bid to link it until 
terrorism. Mr. Agca's claim 
brought calls for chaiges to be 


dropped against three Bul garians. 
One of the three, Sergei I. Antonov, 
a former Bulgarian Airlines manag- 
er in Rome, is in custody. Five 
Turks, including Mr. Agca. also are 

rhaq>flri 

But on Monday, Dr. Giancario 
Cupperti, tire fiist doctor to exam- 
ine Mr. Agca after his arrest follow- 
ing tire shooting of the pope on 
May 13, 1981, called him a “cun- 
ning calculator." His comment was 
consistent with those of other ex- 
perts. 

“He is not crazy," Dr. Cupperti 
said of Mr. Agca. “On this point, 
doctors are categorical. Ali is per- 
fectly healthy of mind. He is sure of 
himself, he controls himself welL" 


By Robert Lindsey 

New York Tima Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Prison 
inmates may be cut off from most 
contacts with tire outride world, 
but law enforcement officials are 
blaming penitentiary gang s for vio- 
lent crimes, many erf them related 
to drug trafficking, committed in a 
growing number of U.S. cities. 

In Califor nia . piiw-h of the g&ng- 

directed crime is said to stem from 
an especially virulent alliance. It 
includes the Black Guerrilla Fam- 
ily, many rtf whom are middle-aged 
and serving long terms, which was 
formed as a kina of prison auxiliary 
to the tnih'lani Black Panther Party. 
Another power in the alHaxtce is a 
more structured gang of younger 
Made inmates, most of whom were 
convicted of violent street crimes. 
They call themselves “Crips” be- 
cause they have a reputation for 
crippling their victims. 

According to participants at a 
recent meeting of law enforcement 
officials in Los Angeles, leaders of 
the Black Guerrilla Family are di- 
recting a growing effort to take 
over part of Southern California’s 
lucrative cocaine trade by using the 
Crips as their soldiers. 

The Crips, they say, are recruited 
in prison and after being paroled 
are attempting, often with violence, 
to push out other cocaine dealers 
from the predominantly black 
south-central area of Los Angeles. 

W illiam French Smith, a former 
U.S. attorney general, has called 
the influence of prison gangs be- 
yond prison walls a problem that is 
“serious and spreading” 

Investigators say the gangs now 
are involved in a wide range of 
criminal pursuits on tire outside. 
“Drugs, loan sharking , extortion, 
contract killings — they’re into ev- 
erything," said Tnnis TVn tirj assis- 
tant director of law enforcement 
for the California Department of 
Corrections. 

According to officials, inmates 
began forming ethnic gangs in the 
late 1960s, starting in California. 
Initially, they operated only behind 
bars, battling for dominance of tire 
prison turf. But investigators say 
that paroled gang members are in- 
creasingly joining together in orga- 
nized criminal activities outside 
prison. 

Philip Arnold, a specialist for the 
U.S. Bureau of Prisons says the 
gangs are now represented 
throughout the country. 

At many prisons, nffiriwls say, 
gangs control homosexual prostitu- 
tion and the manufacture of weap- 
ons. “Whatever illegal activity 
there is, they're in it," Mr. Arnold 
said. Often, officials say, gang 
members force inmates to make 
their girlfriends or wives smuggle 
drugs into prisons. 

As prison gangs became more 
organized and learned how to keep 


other inmates in line through force 
and intimidation, their guards, of- 
ten worried about survival in the 
volatile atmosphere of overcrowd- 
ed prisons, have increasingly con- 
ceded to them the power to rule the 
cell blocks. In some cases, accord- 
ing to the inmates of some institu- 
tions, they have conceded not only 
a franchise of self-government but 
certain concessions to in pris- 
on contraband 

in October 1983, two staff mem- 
bers w ere murdered at the federal 
penitentiary at Marion, Illinois, de- 
signed to be the most secure prison 
in tire country, a place where tire 
most troublesome federal prisoners 
are sent. Officials blamed the mur- 
ders on senior members of the 
white Aryan Brotherhood. Since 
then, they have imposed a stringent 
“lock-down" that has blunted tire 


power of tire gangs inside the pris- 
on. 

Corrections specialists say that 
New York state has done an effec- 
tive job of limiting the power of 
prison gangs. But elsewhere offi- 
cials say prisons are so overcrowd- 
ed that this is extremely difficult. 

The first California gang, the 
Black Guerrilla Family, had an 
ideological doctrine that held all 
blacks were political prisoners. Af- 
ter weO -organized blades began to 
impose then will on other inmates, 
ethnic strife erupted and, officials 
say, three other groups were bom, 
largely for self-protection: 

The Mexican Mafia was formed 
by urban Mexican-Americans, 
many of whom were products of 
the Hispanic street gang culture of 
Los Angeles; Nuestra Familia was 


organized by less sophisticated 
Mexican-Americans from rural ar- 
eas; and the Aryan Brotherhood 
was formed by whites who, accord- 
ing to prison administrators, ad- 
hered to a vague doctrine of white 
supremacy that included for some 
members the wearing of swastika 
tattoos. 

These gangs and a much smaller 
Hispanic group, the Texas Syndi- 
cate, now rule inmate life at many 
state and some federal prisons even 
though, officials estimate, fewer 
than 20 percent of prisoners are 
members. 

Authorities say they first realized 
that the gangs posed a law enforce- 
ment problem outside prison dur- 
ing the late 1970s. In one case, ex- 
convicts who belonged to the Black 
Guerrilla Family were arrested for 
a series of what appeared to be 
related robberies. 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


INTERN ATTONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


UIXURK3U5 MMSHS RAT. iuiy / 
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9IH CHARJWNG CENTRAL tfafriei. 2 
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30TH. SHORT RENTAL. June Ihm 
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Sept, luxury alRt : 

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SHORT THM <i Lfltm Quarter 
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NEWLY, STUDIO July.-' Aug. Metro, 
canwwt. 51.100. Tel 747 46 IB. 


MONTPARNASSE. Surmy 
race, JdyAug Tel 541 03 


fer- 


PAR1S AREA UNFURNISHED 


ST. CLOUD. Oxsrjung he**. 5 bed- 
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BUWgy TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 . 1 

Sri Lanka, India Agree on Need for T ^ ^ 

„ „ 1 ..SSL, nnfranK- cd to a solution to n „ spaprt LeW- _ 


By Steven R. Weisman 

Hew York Times Service 

NEW DELHI — The president 
of Sri Lanka agreed with Indian 
leaders Monday that ‘immediate 
steps” should be taken to achieve a 
“political settlement" to the ethnic 
conflicts in Sri Lanka. 

But after two days of talks here, 
President Junius R. Jayawankne 
of Sri Lanka left withoui specifying 
what steps were being contemplat- 
ed. 

Mr. Jayawardme reiterated his 
longstanding willingness to grant 
amnesty to Tamil insurgents in Sri 
Lanka if they agreed to lay down 
is. The Tai 


teirwi and asserted that no “frame 
work or strategy” was developed 
for taking the steps. 

Mr. Bandhari again insisted that 
India had no role in enabling any 
he south to as- 
in Sri Lanka, 


conflict was for Sri Lanka w 

out , ^ 

B Gandhi on Pakistan Arms 

Mr. Gandhi smd man •mem^ 


India had no role in enao^g ~ . al 

Tamfl miKianis in the south to as- published Mmiday 
sat the insurgency in Sn Lanka, has or soon ^ a 

although other Indian officials ac- weapon and thai ii ^ J 

knowledge! that the Indian gov- occupahon of toe ^ inman s 

probably cut off mot. The Asooatcd Pres report 

sucb assistance. ^wftStey are very near to 

“To the extent that our good “wc mm y jbeady have 
offices can be used, they are avail- “ n^nfSan one.” Mr. 

able.” Mr. Bandhan said. He add- one, in fact. _ 


He said that India had not mode 

a decision on pr^ucing n^ 
weapons. “But « «e tobng 
about it,“ he saju. 

•■Understand that for India, the 
possession of a oucto wwporbv 
?iki>ian is vay wominfr Mr. 

Gandhi said. -Islamahadlalr^ly 
has attacked u> three ttto- Tto 
Sev have the bomb »ould ctaage * 

jlthe rules .tflhe same. Wtemmt ^ 

think about it «eiy scnously. 


Tamil militantc 

the offer several 







r-jiJ 

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their arms, 
have rejected 
times. 

Mr. Jayawardene said his talks 
with Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
were useful and would produce re- 
sults. Asked if India could help 
solve the crisis, be said, “Yes, very 
much,” and added: “We have 
reached agreement cm thaL” 

But a Joint statement by Mr. 
Jayawardene and Mr. Gandhi of- 
fered no details on a more specific 
agreement that could lead- to nego- 
tiations to cod the increaringly vio- 
lent insurgency by Tamils in the 
northern and eastern parts of the 
inland nation. 

The joint statement by the two 
leaders also reaffirmed their sup- 
port “of the unity and integrity of 
Sri Lanka” —a statement implicit- 
ly rejecting the demand for an inde- 
pendent state by the Tamil insur- 
gents. 

Rome&b Bandhari. the Indian 
foreign secretary, said that this 
statement did not rule out a move 
by Mr. Jayawardene to grant great- 
er autonomy to the areas in which 
the Tamils predominate. The Tam- 
ils, who are mostly Hindus, are a 
small minority on an island domi- 
nated by Sinhalese, who are mostly 
BuddhisL 

In recent days, sources dose to 
the nmuaial t nlks of the two leaders 
said that a framework was dis- 
cussed in which Mr. Jayawardene's 
government might nuke conces- 
sions to the T amils in return for an 
agreement by them to lav down 
their arms and negotiate their de- 
mands. 

Under such a framework, these 
people said, the government of Sri 
Lanka would offer some autonomy 
to the Tamil-dominated areas and 
offer to withdraw troops to their 
barracks. In return, the Tamil mili- 
tants would refrain from attacking 
police and army facilities, and 
would eater into some type of talks. 

India is presumed to have some 
leverage in the matter because the 
Tamil militan ts are believed to be 
using bases in southern India for 
sanctuaries, training camps and 
arms supplies. 

Briefing reporters Monday eve- 
ning. Mr. Bandhari said the meet- 
ing was “positive,” “sincere" and 
“useful” He also declined to say 
what “immediate steps” might be 


Party Lines Blurring in U.S . South 

J . . ... .-.instint trouble, financia 


By Phil Gailey 

New York Times Senice 

ATLANTA —The emergence of 
a two-party system is the South is 
already producing some strange 
side effects — “a dizzy spell" as 
one Democrat put it — and no 
where is the confusion more strik- 
ing than in Georgja. 

The Democratic and Republican 
parties in this state are acting more 
ffloc kis^ n g cousins than feuding 
dans. 

The state’s top Democratic of- 
ficeholders, Governor Joe Frank 
Harris and Senator Sam Nunn, 
have made it clear that they intend 
to keep tbeir distance from next 
year's Senate race, in which Demo- 
oats hope to recapture the seat 
held by Mack F. Mattingly, the 
Republican incumbent who in 1980 
defeated Herman E. Taimadge. 

Mr. Mattingly, a transplanted 
Yankee from Indiana who worked 
for IBM before entering state poli- 
tics. endorsed Mr. Nunn for re- 
election in 1984. 

Now, Mr. Nunn, who hardly 
needed the boost in view of his high 
approval ratings, says he will sup- 
port the Democratic nominee next 
year but does not intend to cam- 
paign against Mr. Mattingly. He 
rites the importance of maintaining 
“comity” with his Senate colleague. 

Senator Nunn is largely correct 
when he says that senators tradi- 
tionally have been reluctant to join 
the political fray against home- 
state colleagues. But the way the 
Georgia race is shaping up, the sen- 
ator could find himself in an awk- 
ward political situation. 

A prominent Georgia Democrat 
said: “There’s gong to be only one 
issue in the Senate race: help Dem- 
ocrats regain control of the Senate 
so Sam Nunn can become chair- 
man of the armed services commit- 
tee.” 

Governor Harris appears even 
more reluctant to lend his political 
influence to efforts to defeat Mr. 
Mattingly. The governor is up for 
re-election next year, and Republi- 
can leaders have indicated that 
they do not plan to run a candidate 
against him. 

The governor said a few weeks 
ago be would not commit himself 


io supporting his party s Senate 

nominee until he knew who the 
candidate would be. 

The governor has gone to unusu- 
al lengths to put distance between 
himself and his party s nauona^ 
leaders. In the 1984 presidential 
campaign, he refused to meet with 
either Walter F. Mondale or his 
r unning 'mate, Geraldine A. Ferra- 
ro, when they visited Georgia. He 
did see fit, however, to publicly 
welcome Vice President George 
Bush to the state. 

Alex Lamis. a political science 
professor at the University _ of 
North Florida, said of the situation 
in Georgia: “You have to remem- 
ber that they’re new to two-party 
politics and are without a long tra- 
dition of thinking in partisan 
terms.” 

Bill Shipp, a columnist for Tne 
Atlanta Constitution, is less gener- 
ous in his assessment. “No wonder 
the state Democratic Party is in 


constant trouble, financial and loth- 
efwisc.” he wrote recently. Most 
of its principal patrons are ekiset 
Republicans.” 

Some Democrats worry that this 
political accommodation not only 
improves Mr. Mattingly's chances 
for re-election but could open the 
way for Republican gains in other ^ 
races. 

Conservative voters in the South 
are looking for a home, and many 
of ibetn are finding it in a Republi- 
can Partv that is riding a wavt of 
political realignment in the region. 

The movement of a large major- 
ity of Southern white voters into 
the Republican column last year in 
the presidential election was the 
most dramatic evidence of shifting 
party allegiances. The party that 
was almost nonexistent in the 
South 20 years ago now holds 10 of 
tbc region’s 22 Senate seals and 42 fa 
of its 166 House seats. 


leaching More 
Than aThird of a 
Million Readers 
. in 164 Countries 
Around the World. 

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it Leaders Vow to Pasb. 
an Economic Recovery 





2 FORI 


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we’ll give you an extra month of Tribs free with a one-year 
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Page 10 


•INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


AETS/ LEISURE 




New collection 


ESCAD& 


at European 
export prices 

Marie-Martme 


Prague Spring Festival Offers 
Microcosm of East Bloc Music 


a Ball 


By Andrew Cbrk 


8, Roe de Sevres, Paris 6th. 
TeL: (1)2221844. 


P I RAGUE — The annual music 
festival here, known as Prague 
Spring, is one of the rosier exam- 
ples of festival activity in Commu- 
nist countries. Behind all the offi- 
cial propaganda linking the 
festival's 40th birthday with the an- 
niversary celebrations for the end- 
ing of the German occupation in 
1945, this year’s event has proved a 
fair guide to the strengths and 
weaknesses of state-controlled cul- 
ture in Eastern Europe. 




115 

!i-\(:c4RAT«sr a 


30 bis Rue de Paradis 
75010 PARIS 

(thru the archway) 

Tel.: 770 64 30 


When in Paris... 
visit our Museum 
and showrooms 

Open Morula) - Friday 
V un. lo b pan. 

Saturday JO- 12a.m. - 2- 5 p.m. 
Also in Klccied stores 
near your home. 
Catalogue on request 


The festival, which began May 
12 and ends today, is one of the few 
occasions when the Czechoslovak 
authorities are prepared to spend 
foreign currency to import Western 
musicians, giving the festival a gen- 
uinely international flavor at a 
price the average Prague music lov- 
er can afford. This year's visitors 
included the Vienna Symphony 
and Royal Philharmonic Orches- 
tras and the conductors Christoph 
von Dohn&uyi and Lorin MaazeL 
The concerts by Western artists are 
the events the local audience — fed 
exhaustively during the season on a 
diet of Czechoslovak and Soviet 
musicians — seem to value most. 
For the Western visitor, however, 
the festival's appeal lies in the con- 
centrated helping it offers of 
Czechoslovak musical culture. 


the younger generation of Czecho- 
slovak composers receives a hear- 
ing. One of the most promising is 
38 -year-old Vaclav Riedlbauch, the 
youngest by more than 20 years of 
10 composers commissioned to 
write music for celebrations mark- 
ing the recent reopening of the Na- 
tional Theater. His output, includ- 
ing the ballet "Macbeth" at the 
Nova Scena, breathes a healthy en- 
ctgy, firmly grounded in Czecho- 
slovak tradition but with an excel- 
lent concentration of form and an 
astringent approach to harmony. 


The contemporary musical scene 
continues to be dominated, howev- 
er, by the older generation of com- 
posers, whose music often seems to 
get played more by virtue of their 
seniority in the composers' careful- 
ly regulated hierarchy than by con- 
sistent merit. Works such as the 


“Musica Concertante” by Jan 
Hanus and Jan Gkker’s "Ode to 


Almost every concert program 
contained a work by a living 
Czechoslovak composer, as well as 
the usual selection of Czechoslovak 
classics from (he Smetana- Dvorak 
school. Occasionally this proved 
worthwhile, especially when one of 


Hanus and Jan Cvkker’s "Ode to 
Joy" are likely to confirm the lis- 
tener’s worst fears about contem- 
porary music. They illustrate a dat- 
ed approach to instrumentation, a 
lack of experiment and the doseted 
world that postwar Czechoslovak 
composers have been forced to in- 
habit. Yet the principle of provid- 
ing a regular and wdl-rehearsed 
forum for new music in the same 
program as familiar repertory re- 
mains a good one. 


Baroque music is another area 
where Czechoslovak musicians suf- 
fer from being isolated from wider 
international trends. The authentic 
movement has barely penetrated to 
Czechoslovak musical life, leaving 


a wide range of baroque compose** 
the victim of old-fashioned inter- 
pretation or sheer neglect There is 
some compensation to be had in 
the continuing tradition of sono- 
rous performances of the Romantic 
symphonic repertoire and the 
championing abroad of early mod- 
em composers like Martinu, hut a 
slight re-adjustment of priorities is 
required. 

Operatic life also shows mixed 
signs of health. The Czech National 
Opera tends to pander to, rather 
than educate, its devoted audiences 
by performing a seemingly endless 
succession of patriotic operas, 
many of which have new been 
heard outside Cretfralovakia and 
which are given in cheaply staged, 
badly sung and badly acted pro- 
ductions. No doubt, the company’s 
limited financial resources, the 
drift of good singers to the West 
and the obligation to share out 
parts among a large ensemble of 
aging singers are partly responsi- 
ble. A festival staging of ‘The Dog- 
Heads" by Kara Kovarovic, the 
conductor and composer who 
thwarted Janacek's c a re er in the 
early years of this century, proved 
especially disappointing. 

The company's morale and inter- 
national reputation have been far- 
ther dented by the decision of its 
director. Zdenefc Kosler, to resign 
because of the impact the compa- 
ny’s administrative problems were 
having on his conducting career. 
Kosler will however, be conduct- 



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ing all 14 performances of “Don 
Giovanni” and “The Bartered 


Bride" on the company’s tour of 
Japan he gtnnin g June 6. 


Amongthe unmasked goests last week at a charity ball held 
in the Paris Op6ra bonding were, clockwise from the top, 
Catherine Deneuve; Mane Hfefene de Ro thschil d aim 
Rudolf Nureyev; Princess Carofine of Monaco and Fran- 
foise Sagan; and Baron Alexis de R£d£ and Liza MbmeffiL 


'.'At' > 



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On a more positive note, the gov- 
ernment has provided funds for a 
new c hamb er opera that is expect- 
ed to start work this summer and 
tour abroad — on the tines of the 
Warsaw and Moscow Chamber 
Operas — once a reasonable stan- 
dard is achieved. It wiD employ 
young singers and aim at a more 
consistent and unified mosico-dra- 
matic style than the country’s es- 
tablished operatic institutions. 


huomarkmal Herald Tribune 

P i AR1S — After the social week 
that was, one thing is sure: Paris 
still loves a party. 

Every evening, Pa risians, joined 
by international jet-setters, were 
back at their favorite sport: seeing 
and bring seen. 

The highlight of the week was a 
dinner Wednesday night at the Mu- 


Another healthy development 
has been the success of two new 


Hebe Dorsey 


large-scale operas by living com- 
posers. “Copernicus" by Jan Fi- 
scher and “Master Hieronymus" 
by Ivo Jirasek are conservative in 
their mnriral lan guage, but theatri- 
cal, dynamic and well-crafted in 
form, characteristics that are re- 
flected in the imaginative and so- 
phisticated stage productions. 
These are among the best visual 
presentations at present on UST 
Prague stage, partly becaosp the 
operas make more demands on the 
soloists as actors than singers, but 
mainly because the two production 
teams have been forced to workout 
an intelligent abstract setting for 
the metaphyseal content of each 
work. 



The Director & English speaking staff of 

Mappin & Webb 


INTERNATIONAL 

warmly invite you to their salon to view 
their prestigious collection of fine jewelry and watches. 

We are the # 1 of the rue de la Riix.750G2 PARIS .TeL: 261.50J 3 


see des Arts Dtcoratifs, master- 
minded by Baroness Marie Hriene 
de Rothschild, which raised 2.4 
million francs (about 5255,000) for 
the museum. 

Among the glitterati were Prin- 
cess Caroline of Monaco, who was 
looking forward to her son's fust 
birthday party, and Yves Saint 
Laurent, still reding from a trip to 
_China.“One does not come back 
quite the same," he said. 

The stunning decor, provided by 
Jean-Frangois Daigre, included nu- 
merous refined details, including 
specially woven pink tabledotbs 
with a dainty ISth-centniy flower 
pattern. 


The party, which opened with 
violins, also bad the 18ih-centuxy 
divertissement flavor of other fam- 
ous affairs that Daigre has orga- 
nized in ihe past 

The next evening, tireless party 
goers met again at the Opera for 
another charily event, a masked 
ball to aid the French National 
League Against Cancer. It was 
sponsored by Van Geef and Aipels 
and G. H. Mumm and Cie. After 
watching Verdi’s “Bal Masque” the 
guests, who had donned feathered 
masks and colorful capes, had sup- 
per in the foyer and on the landings 
of theOpfira. 

Earlier in the week, Pierre Car- 
din had launched his perfume 
“Maxim's" with a Belle Epoque 
evening, opening with a presenta- 
tion of the musical “Gig?" at the 
Thriltre des Nouveauifs and fol- 
lowed by supper at the real Max- 
im’s. 

The Rdais Plaza restaurant, stra- 
tegically located on the Avenue 
Montaigne, the heart of couture, 
was declared the favorite restau- 
rant of the couturiers. The honor 
was sealed by an award from Veuve 



-A * 


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"Jr' 


Clicquot Ros6 champagne that was 
handed by Jacques Mouclier, presi- 
dent of the French Couture Cham- 


bre Syndicate. 
June wiO be 


June win be equally busy. On 
Wednesday Marc Porthanlt, maker 
of luxurious bed linens, is having 
an exhibition honoring the poetess 
Louise de VBmorin, whose blue 
and white salon at Venteres-te- 
Buisson was famous after World 
WarlL 

This weekend, the Hridsteck 
Monopole champagne company 
will celebrate its 200th anniversary. 

On June 12 Houbigant will have 
its own perfume launching of 


“Quelques Fleurs” at the a large 
greenhouse near the Porte d'Au- 
teuti. 

June 14 will be Vogue day, with 
the magazine and Mayor Jacques 
Chirac joining forces for another 
charily gala, this time for 2,000 
people, which will feature a retro- 
spective of French fashion and j 

automobile. Proceed? will go to the If 

Claude Pompidou Foundation, 
which aids handicapped children 
and the elderly. 

On June 27 the duke and duchess 
of Mouchy will celebrate the 50th 
anniversary of the Chateau Haut- 
Brion vineyard. 


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Although both composers reach 
their goal with independent pur- 
pore —Jirasek displaying the more 
individual voice and a more inte- 
grated sense of musical structure 
and thematic material — the simi- 
larities between the two operas are 
uncanny. Each unfolds in a swift 
succession of scenes and tries to 
bridge the gap between a series of 
medieval events and today's audi- 
ence through alienating devices, 
such as a spoken commentary and 
Greek, chores in “Copernicus” and 
the Fool's appeals to the audience 
in “Master Hieronymus." Both are 
parables about the trials of individ- 
ual conscience: Copernicus and Hi- 
eronymus were historical figures 
whose knowledge and moral cour- 
age led them to question the ortho- 
doxy of a society caught in the grip 
of a self-perpetuating and hypo- 
critical oligarchy. 


Modernist Set Sells for Record Price 


DOONESBURY 


< IIITY 


By Sourcn Melikian 

huenuokmol Herald Tribune 


F | ARIS — A historic sale of Art 
Deco furniture and nhiets d’art 


A Deco furniture and objets d’art 
was conducted at Drouot on Fri- 
day by the Audap-Godeau-Solanet 


groujp.The betterjpart of the works, 
auctioned by Luacn Solanet assist- 
ed by the expert Ffelix Mardllac, 
came from the Paris townhoure of 
the late Madeleine Vionnet, a lead- 
ing fignre of Parisian haute cou- 


Both composers leave the audi- 
ence to draw their own conclusions 
about the relevance of these themes 
to life in East Europe today. 


Andrew Clark is a journalist and 
music critic based in Bern, Switzer- 
land, aid a regular visiter to Czecho- 
slovakia. 



Games table and chairs sold for 3.7 minion francs. 


... 



. >;><r 


■ •- . •/ 

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ture between the two world wars. 

AH the pieces had been commis- 
rioned or bought from the avant- 
garde designers of the day to fur- 
nish a house in the Paris 
neighborhood of Passy into which 
she moved in the fall of 1930. 

The most important of these was 
a games table and four armchairs 
with sliding backs that slot into the 
space left between the legs. The 
streamlined set, made of black lac- 
quered wood and zinc, is devoid of 
any ornament and illustrates the 
-Modernist style at its height. 

Designed, executed, and signed 
by Jean Dtmand in 1930, it rose to 

3.750.000 francs (about 5400,000) 
— 3,985,330 francs with the sales 
charge -—setting a world record for 
20th-centay furniture. 

Several other pieces signed by 
Dunand sold for extremely high 
prices. A low rectangular table in 
coral red lacquered wood, of which 
Dunand made several specimens 
differing only in their color and 
decoration, was knocked down at 

200.000 francs to Michael Chow, 
the New York restaurateur and Art 
Dfeo collector. A nest of four U- 
sbaped tables in honey-colored lac- 
quer went up to 180,000 francs. 

A globular vase of hammered tin 
sheet decorated with red lacquer 
and black lacquer spirals and big 
black lacquer discs was relatively 
inexpensive at 500,000 francs. Mar- 
cflhac pointed out that although 
this is arguably one of the finest 

vases ever executed by Dunand, its 

price was far below the 571,500 
raid at Onistie’s in New York in 
December 1983 for another vase of 
lacquered mwsl 


6000 mtm, class. v§ 
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Statistics Index 


AMEX prion P.14 Eflfitep reports P.14 
amex hMn/bwiP.u Fttnp rate notes P.17 
NVSE pritos P.12 OeW nwfceto P.S1 
NYSE hieM/iew! p.14 infomt rates P.it 
Cnxrfkmstoeks P.1B Market summary P.12 
Currency rates P.tt Options P.14 


* j^ommwHTtes 
Dividends 


P.M OTC stock P.I7 

P.14 Other market^ p.» 


TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


licralb^^^Sribunc. 

BUSINESS/ FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 12. ; 

Page ll 



FUTURES AND OPTIONS 


Bond Index Could Reduce 
The Odds Against Investors 



Hie tax-exempt bond 
market is basically 
an affair between 
investor and dealer 


By HJ JflAI DENBERG 

Nmr York Timex Service 

N ew’ YORK — Investors in tax-exempt bonds have 
always been speculators. Not only have they always 
gambled that the interest and' principal would not be 
eroded by inflation, but aim that they would be able to 
get a fair price for their bonds if they had to sell them before 
maturity. 

That the odds on both speculations have been heavily weighted 
in favor of the issues over the years is without question. The 
inflation rate since 1980 alone has been 18 percent, which is about 
what most bond investors in the highest tax bracket can expect to 
earn today. 

Because the tax-exempt bond market is basically an affair 
between the investor and the dealer instead of a continuous 
market auction process, as 

Tbe tax-exempt bond 

gaming than on intrinsic val- . market ifi basically 

But the odds traditionally an affair between 
faced by bond investors, as ,, . 

well as dealers, could improve investor and dealer 

dramatically after June 12, * . 

when the Chicago Board of 

Trade starts trading futures on an index of long-term municipal 
bonds. 

1 They will be traded in a pit next to the Qa c agp board’s 
' Treasury bond futures market, which is by far the most actively 
traded of all futures. Indeed, the two markets are expected to 
trade off each other's prices, as both are influenced by interest 
rates and related money-market developments. 

i.iVft the Treasury bond futures, the tax-exempt index contracts 
will have a face value of $100,000 and have the same delivery 
months — March, June, September and December — and the 
minimum price move will be 1/32-pomL 
But there are also vast differences between the two futures. 
Unlike the Treasury bond futures, for example, the tax-exempt 
index contract’s price at any time would be $1,000 times the 
index. 

Also, the tax-exempt index futures w31 be settled in cash, not 
through the delivery an any underlying bond. The reason is that 
the new tax-exempt futures are not based on any bond, but rather 
on a price index of 40 top-grade municipal bonds. The index used 
will be that of The Bond Buyer, the industry’s leading publica- 
i tion. The index is the most respected in the industry. 

At expiration, the settlement price of the contract will be set by 
five major dealers: Cantor, Fitzgerald Municipal Brokers, Chap- 
delaine & Co.. Clifford Drake & Co., JJ 7 . HartCdd & Co. and 
Titus & Donnelly Inc. 


’A’ «... 


■ H • i • ** 


JLY-L and other factors so as to maintain the quality of the 
index. 

“We expect the tax-exempt index futures to radically change 
the municipal bond market,” said A. Theodore Palalucd, rice 
president and national wnmag pr of municipal debt trading and 
underwriting at Merrill Lynch Capital Markets. "That is why we 
are fo rmin g a new department just to handle the mumdpal index 
futures.” 

Douglas W. Hamilton, who heads Merrill Lynch’s new depart- 
ment, said the new futures will become a major hedging tod for 
issuers, dealers and investors. Issuers, for instance, will be able to. 
lock in interest rates ou new issues by selling the futures short; 
Investors will be able to hedge their portfolios and dealers their, 
inventories. 

Will the new index futures narrow dealer buy-sell price 
spreads? “That depends on whether the dealers learn how to use 
them to hedge inventory," Mr. Palalucd said. “Selling bands is a 
(Continued on Page IS, Col 7) 

| Currency Rates 


Interest Rates 


E i w anwcy P e pad ta 


Dollar D-Mor* 

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May 31 


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U-S, Maney Muiet Fnmto 

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IWaiw* Manat Rota Index: 7387 
Smece: Merritt l men. AF 


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*‘i.ra«wk Uords Bank, Bonk of Tokyo. 


June 3 

AM. PM. Ctee 

I *— 16 — WM JIMS +45B 

mas — +*as 

PmJiraSMIOj 31730 31 AM +U1 

y? MW 3142* +1.11 

MmYark — mj» +DJD 

f uww * a “W Arts and Ltwdon afficteJ Ok- 

ioo*; Hoag Kona ontf Zurich oo*nkts> and 
antaeariem/ Me York Coma* current 
contract AO wfcoa in US. iMTavtK*. 
Swea.-R Mkn 


m 


MarketQosed 

Financial markets were closed Monday in Singapore for a local 
holiday. 


Building 
Spending 
Up in U.S. 

1% Rise After 
2 Flat Months 


Carptied by Oar Susff From Daptadtes 

WASHINGTON — New con- 
struction spending in the United 
States rose about I percent is April 
to an annual rate of $325.7 billion, 
the Commerce Department report- 
ed Monday. 

Spending had been essentially 
flat from February to March, at an 
annual rate of just above $322 bil- 
lion both months, after a 2-percent 
jump from January to February. 

April spending ran about 6 per- 
cent higher than in April 1984, the 
report said. All the figures are sea- 
sonally adjusted. 

The bulk of the April increase 
was attributed to private, nonresr- 
dential budding. It was up 4 per- 
cent from March, to an annual rate 
of $88.6 billion, compared with 
S85.2 billion the previous month. 

Private residential construction 
rose from $134.7 billion in March 
to $134 bdlion in ApriL PubBc con- 
struction rose from $58.4 billion to 
$58.7 bilHon. 

But the bureau noted that most 
of April's increased spending was 
caused by higher prices. The total 
adjusted for inflation went up just 
03 percent. 

Office budding construction, far 
vored by some generous tax breaks 
that would be reduced under the 
latest tax reform proposal, saw an- 
other 23-perceat increase in AgriL 

Office building construction 
spending has gone up a spectacular 
283 percent in the past year, 
growth that analysts find even 
more impressive in view of the fact 
many large cities already are over-, 
built and cannot fin many of the 
new buddings with tenants. 

Overall private construction 
spending was up 1.2 percent, in- 
cluding a 53-pereent increase in 
private-hospital construction 
spending that had plummeted 183 
percent m a year. 

Construction paid for by taxpay- 
ers was up 03 percent. Sewer sys- 
tem construction, which had 
jdunged 13 percent in the past year, 
did not change in April. 

. (AP, UPI). 


London’s Exchange Would Trade 
Its Traditions to Retain an Empire 

By Bamaby J. Feder 

New York Tima Senna 

LONDON — Because of its 
relatively free regulatmy envi- 
ronment, its record as Europe’s 
most active stock market and its 
preeminence in European hank- 
ing and finance, the City of Lon- 
don has a long lead in the race to 

ru minate im wnarinnal securities 
trading in Europe; 

Whether Bn tain’s financial 
center retains that lead, however, 
could depend to a large extent on 
the results of a vote Tuesday and 
Wednesday cm rules affecting 
ibe ownership of London's Stock 
F-trlmng e and the firms that do 
business there. 

The nearly 4300 brokers and 
traders who own the exchange 
will be asked by their governing 
council to dear the way for shift- 
ing the ownership of the ex- 
change from individuals to firms, 
and to allow outsiders to own 
member firms. 

Leaders of the exchange see 
these changes as key steps in a 

revolution in securities dealing Tha AoeoMd Press 

here that wiU have gJotelmpacL TUe London Stock Exchanger's busy trading floor. Whetb- 
Without er it retains its dominance in securities trading in Europe 

may depend on votes this week on the way it does business. 



OPEC Ministers 
To Meet Early, 
Yamani Reports 


Without the proposed changes 
and others related to them, how- 
ever, the security trading could 
move off the stock exchange and, 
eventually, away from the City 
— London’s financial district 

According to John Young, di- 
rector of policy and planning for 
the exchange, “The whole es- 
sence of it is to keep the bulk of 
securities trading in this country 
within the stock exchange, and to 
expand London’s role in Europe 
and the rest erf the world.” 

The centerpiece erf the plan is 
the aid of fixed commissions, 
which is expected in October 
1986. In anticipation erf that 
change, plans are being made to 
allow member firms to act both 
as brokers representing investors 
and as dealers in their own right, 
a dual function that has been 
forbidden since 1908 as a protec- 
tion for investors. 

At the same time, the Bank of 
En gland is setting up a network 
of primary (balers to handle the 
sale on the exchange of govern- 
ment bonds and notes, known as 
gOts. 

The projected fin ancial de- 
mands of the new structure, 
c ombined with increasing cam- 


have led to a wave of mergers, 
involving almost all of the large 
firms active on the exchange- 
U.S. acquirers of exchange 
members include Citicorp, 
Chase Manhattan, Security Pa- 
cific and Shearson Lehman 
Brothers Inc. Other overseas in- 
vestors range from Hong Kong 
& Shan ghai Rank to Union Bank 
of Switzerland. Almost all of 
Britain’s large commercial and 
merchant banks have found 
partners, in some cases two or 


The changes at the two-centu- 
ry-old exchange involve not just 
London but trading in such pro- 
vincial cities as Bir mingham, 
Glasgow and Dublin. They come 
at a time when the international- 
ization of investment has al- 
lowed traders in New York and 
the Far East to capture a large 
part of the foreign-investment 
activity in well-known British 
multinationals, such as British 
Petroleum PLC and Imperial 
Chemical Industries. 

It is estimated that up to a half 
. of the daily dealing in the top 


five British stocks occurs in New 
Yak, where investment banks, 
such as Morgan Guaranty and 
Goldman Sachs, deal in instru- 
ments known as American De- 
pository Receipts, or ADRs, that 
represent shares in British com- 
panies not listed on U.S. ex- 
changes. 

Meanwhile, British pension 
funds and other investment insti- 
tutions have been tempted to 
deal with U.S. brokers and oth- 
ers operating outside the London 
exchange when investing in the 
more than 500 overseas compa- 
nies listed here. 

According to a recent Bank of 
England telephone survey of 
fund managers, the dealing in 
listed British equities off the ex- 
change is not yet advanced. But 
exchange leaders are warning 
numbers that major firms will 
leave the exchange unless the 
rule changes are adopted that 
will aUow them to compete more 
effectively internationally. 

“The commercial changes that 
are taking place in securities 
(Continued on Page 15, Cot 3) 


Compiled by Our Siqff From Dispatches 

TAIF, Saudi Arabia — The next 
full ministerial meeting of the Or- 
ganization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries has been brought for- 
ward to June 30 from July 22, 
Sheikh Ahmed ?a ki Yamani, Saudi 
Arabia’s ofl minister, said Monday. 

The meeting is widely expected 
to consider further cuts in OPECs 
production and in sane of its offi- 
cial prices in view of sagging world 
demand. 

But Sheikh Yamani. speaking af- 
ter a meeting of OPEC's Ministeri- 
al Executive Council said: “I think 
the possibility of improving the sit- 
uation is much better now than 
before. Production should stay as it 
is.” 

Before the meeting, Oil Minister 
Mana Said aKHeiba of the United 
Arab Emirai.es was quoted as say- 
ing that OPEC was prepared to cut 
its self-imposed production ceiling 
of 16 million barrels a day if neces- 
sary to defend prices. Late last 
year, the ceiling was reduced to 16 
million from 173 million. 

“The problem is one of surplus 
in supply, and the cure requires 
sticking to the production quotas 
and prices decided by the last 
OPEC meeting," the minister told a 
UAE news agency. 

Sh eikh Yamani was quoted in a 
Saudi newspaper last week as say- 
ing that OPEC should reduce 
prices of heavy crudes but maintain 
those of lighter grades. Heavy 
crude prices were raised by 50 cents 
a barrel last December, but since 
then demand for such oil has di- 
minished, partly because the end of 
Britain's 12-month coal strike in 
March allowed that country to re- 
duce imports of fuel ofl, large 
amounts of which are derived from 
heavy crude. 

At the center of the meeting in 
this resort rity were members of the 

executive council: Saudi Arabia, 
Nigeria, Venezuela, Indonesia and 
the United Arab Emirates. Four 
other OPEC members — Ecuador, 
Iraq, Iran and Kuwait — also were 
attending the talks, as was Mexico, 
a large oil exporter that does not 
belong to the group. 

The oil ministers were seeking 


Europe’s Struggling Auto Industry Arrives at the Crossroad 


By John Tagliabue and Volkswagen — operated in the and shipbuilding, the European 
New York Tima Semce blade in 1984. automobile industry stands in dan- 

BONN — Volkswagen werk AG, Chronic overcapacity prevents ger of going down the path of other 

the West German automobile gi- any European auto company from industries that have shed their abil- 
ant, is negotiating to build all its making real money. Economists ity to compete." Wolfgang KHab- 
Polo subcompacts in Pamplona, say that production must be cut by bel chairman of Volkswagen’s 
Spain. To the south, near Saragos- 20 percent, or an estimated 12 mil- profitable Audi subsidiary, warned 
sa. General Motors Corp. makes lion units, to restore industry prof- recently. 


Cr aw Rates Jam 3 

I C DM. FJF. I1X. OUT. BJ=. SJ=- YBB 

Aimtantaffi i4DS M43 11X75 • JfcMS- IIWS* SSH- HU0* TOMy 

BrWHWo) 4132 7M2 20.14 4M23 US' 17J4 21*11 U524- 

Fronkfurt U» IM -— JU1* IMS* BUM 046* 11132* 1514* 

London (b) 13MS MU 11014 U1U5 *ACS 1UM UM3 32UTS 

Milan 1.MLU 2J1X0Q UMB MM3 547 JS IU7 7SU1 7312 

Mow Yorfc(C) #3774 » 3M Wl 1MU9 141 *1.55 UBS 24BJ5 

Ports 12725 128215 1051 437Sx 17847 15.154 * U2 37M3* 

, TBkva 25030 32U0 BU6 2430 1230* 7X80 40#10* *97.44 — - 

Zurich 2371 UUS MW* 27-54* 8.1214* 74445* 42955 * UD1S* 

r 1 ECU (7X4 03302 HA. 40502 143534 33221 4U22 2344 14*51* 

1 SOU #9*MI 0371 UJU4 93*277 1,94133 24242 41.1422 25544 250JW 

CfasAws In Lenten ant Zurich. Axlnss to other European centers. New Yart rotes at 2 PM. 
(at CommareM none (Ol Amount* hhsW fti Dm one pound (cl Ammmts needed to Our one 
i donor (’> Units onoe (el iMtsaf JJSOOir) Units on&aXHtQ.: nafmotarf: NJUnotmoUam. 

r i— , (ml To tor oat pound: SUS.VM 

Other Dwllaur Vahes 

J. ’ cwrrmcy par U3J Carrancy par U31 Cwiwcr par UJU Currency par UJJ 

Araao.pa» 54230 Fin. markka 4M Malay, ring. 14415 LMor.wea XI2L45 

Austral S 1309 nraakdrec. U6.15 Mn.pug 20000 Spen.MMlB 17140 

Aurir.ccbU. 21 AO HomKaanS 7J7 Non*, kraut 0336 SwatUcrano W79 

Bota.An.fr. 4130 India* ropta 1234 PtHLpen 1B3< TWwcnt 2937 

Brazil crux. M frIW iBPo-roptah 1,114230 PartHCMto 17*00 TWWlt 37395 

Canadian S 1J475 btahC 0.9857 Saadi nyal 33102 TirUshilra 527 JO 

DauMKraa* 105195 Wrofilhak. 1A03S Sbw.t 231 UAE dfalnai 33725 

EpvaLaeand #74*3 Kmralli dinar (UOt5 S.Atr.rand 137B4 voat*.boNv. 1235 

cstartug: 1341 Irish* 

Sources: Banouo t tu Benelux (Bruaeis); Bona ComnardWt UaBano (MBanJi Cteufeal 
Bank (New York): Banouo NaNonUede Paris (Ports); Bank ol Tokyo (Tokyo): IMF (SOB): 
baii (dinar. rtyahiKrteen). outer data tram Beo ten andAP. 


and shipbuilding, the European its Sierra model in Belgium, where Renault has begun a major cost- 


automobile industry stands in dan- wages and benefits are high, to fo- cutting effort, including sharp in- 
ger of going down the path of other cus on its big factory in Cologne, creases in layoffs and Peugot was 
industries that have shed their abil- Renault might puli out of Belgium expected to announce on Tuesdays 


ways to prevent further steep de- 
clines in free- market oil prices, 
sucb as the one that occurred in 
April. They were expected to criti- 
cize both Ecuador and Nigeria for 
widely exceeding their production 
quotas. 

A persisting glut or erode oil and 
the normal seasonal decline in de- 
mand have depressed prices on the 
spot, or noncomract, market, 
where Saudi light crude traded last 
week at around 526.80 a barrel 
compared with the official price of 
S28. 

Industry analysis in London ex- 
pressed doubt that OPEC would 
resort immediately to general cuts 
in its official prices. But they said 
the group might need to do so if 
demand remains weak. 

Both Britain and Norway, which 
are outside of OPEC and recently 
have begun adjusting their prices 
from month to month based on 
spot market trends, are reducing 
their prices this month, industry 
sources say. Richard Saville. an an- 
alyst at the London stock brokerage 
of Phillips & Drew, called these 
price cuts “a reflection of what al- 
ready happened" in the spot mar- 
ket this spring. 

(Reuter, AP, VIT) 


Dollar Declines 
bi Europe Trade 

The Associated Press 

LONDON -- The U.S. dol- 
lar fell Monday in foreign ex- 
change trading in Europe tn 
what analysts said was a re- 
sponse to slower economic 
growth in the United States. It 
finished above its lows for the ■ 
day, however, afier the U.S. 
government reported that con- 
struction spending had risen 1 
percent in April. 

In Tokyo, the dollar fell to 
250.70 Japanese yen from 
251.77 yen Friday. Later, in 
London, the dollar was quoted 
at 248.87 yen while the British 
pound rose to S1.2945 from 
$1.2740 late Friday. 

Other dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with Friday closes: 
3.0392 Deutsche marks, down 
from 3.0892; 2.571 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.595, and 
9.2725 French francs, down 
from 9.4210. 


ity to compete," Wolfgang R. Hab- or Spain to save jobs in France. 


substantial reduction in its consoli- 

bel, chairman of Volkswagen’s Some companies might yield the dated 1984 loss, 
profitable Audi subsidiary, warned i ow end of the market to the Japa- Faced with slumping sales, some 
recently. _ f nese and concentrate on the larger, companies poured billions of dol- 

In many ways America 5 two more expensive cars that specialty lars into modernizing factories and 
biggest automakers, GM and Ford, producers such as Daimler-Benz updating aging model lines. Fiat’s 


Opel Corsas; it concentrates motor liability. But government subsidies 
production at Kaiser slautern, in to ailing companies like Renault in 
Germany. Ford Motor Co. ships France or Alfa Romeo in Italy are 
transmissions from Bordeaux, hurting the reknvely healthy auto- 


2 «x France, to plants throughout En- makers, such as GM*s Opel and car industry, capitalizing 
mo- rope and is discussing jaini ven- Rat, depriving them of market worldwide ties and th 
1ZT. tnres with Fiat ransrinp from narts share and e arnin gs. btflion-dollar investments 


tores with Fiat 
production to s 


fiat ranging from parts 
to a possible merger. 


rare ana earning ^. 

Beyond their internecine battles. 


worldwide ties and the multi- countries with low labor costs, 
hillion-dollar investments of their T . ^ , hp Ka «■ 

p«nu in recent years. Ford to ."MS 


are at the industry’s cutting edge. 
And to a degree, this investment 


This dealing across national lines European automakers are nervous- moved into the No. 1 spot among 


excepting Renault and Peugeot, has paid off. Last year, as Europe’s 
have recovered from the immense economies consolidated their mod- 


manufacturers are moving interna- across the Atlantic of major links Opd, too. has moved ahead. Tra- 
tionally to win economies of scale, between the giant automakers of ditionaDy the also-ran of theindus- 
low-cost production sites and ac- Japan and the United States — try, Opel Last year moved into fifth 


duced a deep European recession as the economy continues to ex- 
and the Japanese invasion shook pand, sales in major markets like 
the industry. Germany are picking up ag a in . 


cess to protected ™arW»»c most recently General Motors with place with II percent of the mar- 

Tbe volume manufacturers that Toyota and thtysler with Mitsubi- tajijpl from8A2 protmlMO. 


nJ^V^.^ourthTof^ shi- The Europeans are shaken to Despite overcapacity among the 

** ** ****** ****** automakers, someW 

Renauh and forma vibat are percejvod as f or- lysts feel that govenummls cannot 
Eraooean urnfc of Ford and alliances to challenge the penmi a major player to drsappwr. 


Volkswagen, Peugeot, Renault and roiaux wum are ^ ijm* nu mat govenunan* «uuu* 

Ford and “wirabte alliances to challenge the permit a major player to disappear. 

Europeans at home and in tfiiri AiomoMe pridirion in Vkcy 

economy IflieW of West Genni 

marVrt ^^ aSC There is a sense that America ny accounts for nearly 15 percent 

manca snare. . __ and Japan are ganging up, pooling of jobs and roughly 10 percent of 

While up to six percentage their technical expertise and fonni- overall mdustriaTrevenues. 


.. Dollar D-Mor* Freac SBkDim Franc ECU SDR 

l ^Imeam TVs-Vn 5tt-59fc 5 -5VH ISfe-lMi lOta-HU 9»w3»w 7% 

^flSOOlbS TVS- 7*4 ni-M 5 W 12 Hr 12 IV IlfW-IBK. l*r 9 Bi 7 % 

Imaolha 7!W* 5 >V-5W. 5H*59W 1I1W-QH. IDW-XQK VMh 7^. 

4BNjan» Ttr-m 5VS-5% 5 Vn5 Tu 12 Hr 12 V* Iffta-IOft f HrV h 7 Vs 

1 rear BHrSlV 5*-5* 5-M llVb-lSM Wh-lOH. IM* ON 

Sources: Moreau Guartrrtr (denar. DM. SF. Pound. FFI; Uovds Bank (ECU): Reuters 
(SDR). Rates asotiaMe la I n fv m an k deposits of SI mBttonmtntBm (ormndvtdeath 


mam* suaie. . and Japan are ganging up, pooling of jobs and roughly 10 percent of 

While up 10 six percentage their technical expertise and fonni- overall industriaTrevenues. 
pewts separated the first and last financial dour to deal Eu- Thus, some economists say that 

of the Big Six volume producers as rope a deadly blow. realignment and shrinkage are 

recently as fiw years ago, woay iccreasn^y, industry executives more realistic solutions. They pre- 
they all cirde wiuun one pmntor ro are wondering whether same once- diet contraction, as European auio- 
of an 1 1-percCT.t share ot tne tu- p rou( j national manufacturers, makers concentrate production in 
million-car market. such as Volkswagen and Renault, fewer factories, either to gain greal- 

This bunching has led to savage retain the vigor to defend their er economies of scale or, in the case 
price discounting and ballooning market shares in a world automo- of slate-owned companies, to save 
advertising budgets — both of bile industry where (he rules of the jobs on the domestic market, 
which depress profit margins. Only game grow tougher day by day. For tramp le, some consultants 
three of the Big Sx — Ford, Fiat “After coal mining, textiles, steel think Ford might stop producing 


vvuiiw their technical expertise and fonm- 

points separated the first and last Hah ^ financial clout to deal Eu- 
of the Big Sx volume producos as rope a deadly blow. 


The Royal Oak 


market shares in a world automo- of slate-owned companies, to save 
bile industry where the rules of the jobs on the domestic market, 
game grow tougher day by day. For example, some consultants 
“After coal mining, textiles, steel think Ford might stop producing 


South Korea’s Booming Steel Industry 


By John Burgess 

Washinpon Past Sendee 
SEOUL — The industrial age is 
coming in & hurry to the fishing 
village erf Kwangyangon the south- 
western coast of the Korean penin- 
sula. Graves have been moved, 
land reclaimed and foundations are 
being dug for a grant steel plant 
that eventually could expand South 
Korea’s production capacity by al- 
most 40 peicenL 
It will be the second integrated 
plant of Pohang Iron & Sled Co, 
known here as Posco, the state- 
controlled enterprise that in a liule 
more than a decade has turned 
South Korea into the world's 15th- 
Isrgesi producer of sieeL 
Posco has undertaken expansion 
dfsnite five-year quotas imposed 
on its exports to the United Stales 
and a 10-percent downturn expect- 
ed this year in South Korean sted 
exports as a whole. 

Officials in Seoul say that a 
steadily growing market at home 
will absorb most of the new plant’s 
output. 

Nonetheless, the new plant ex- 


pected to begin operation in 1987, 
has been condemned abroad as an 
unwelcome addition to an industry 
dial already is plagued by overca- 
pacity worldwide. 

The Koreans have an answer for 
that. The problem "is not an over- 
supply of effidem sted capacity," 
sard Kye Moot Inn, director gener- 
al of the Ministry of Trade and 
Industry bureau concerned with 
the Sooth Korean plants. 

According to Iron Age maga- 
zine, Posco was the worm’s most 
efficient producer of sted on a per- 
sonnel basis in 1983, turning out 
582 tans per employee. 25 percent 
more than the No. 2 company, 
Kobe Sted of Japan- 

In the 1960s, South Korea’s sted 
industry was a collection of back- 
yard-stjde tyeratiom mdting down 
scrap raft from Japanese colonial 
times and the Korean War or 
bought from foreign countries. 

But late in the decade, govern- 
ment leaders decided that modern 
steel production was indispensable 
to their plans for the economy. 
Turning aside objections tbai other 
developing countries had made this 


decision and Failed, they decided to 
use Japanese war reparations and 
low-interest loans to build the 
country’s first integrated facility, or 
one that could nun iron ore into 
finished steel under one roof. 

In 1973, officials christened the 
first phase of the plant, situated on 
Pohang Bay on the peninsula’s 
southeast comer and furnished 
with siate-of-lhe-ari Japanese 
equipment. 

The Pohang plant’s capacity be- 
gan at a modest 1 million tons a 
year. By 1983. in three major 
phases, it had expanded to 9.1 mil- 
lion ions. 

Ity 1984, Smith Korea was ex- 
porting $2 billion worth of steel a 
year, which is 5.6 milli on tons, or 
about 40 percetu of its total pro- 
duction. Inc United States and Ja- 
pan were Its most important for- 
eign customers. 

This success provoked resistance 
in the United States, where aging 
plants and high wages had helped 
put the sieeMndusiry into serious 
trouble. 







Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 





NYSE index 


om mti im Lsa Cta. 

Indus 1321J4 132544 130*31 'SJSt 
T ram utJS 45580 60.15 *474} + MJ 

utu loan i«6» wig >«?*” &2S 

Comp 544J5 SOM 53743 »1.I3— M4 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 
umit In 
Industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total Inuo* 
New Highs 
Now Lows 


929 1057 

<92 MB 

Ol 03 

3052 3035 

25J 203 

M M 


HMD Pr Low** Close IpSI 

jj K3& K8 ISIS B3 

fflS iffil i5S? .SS tBE 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Bus Soles ‘SN'rt 
2(7.170 <60893 1J92 

187^29 42X907 lfl 

17ZBW S-S J-ZE 

16X827 07431 21JW 
161493 3WJ44 14750 





maspaQ index. 





dan 

Prav. 

Advanced 

274 

318 

DacnnM 

386 

343 

Unchanged 

346 

m 

Total inues 


7*4 

NOW HiQtU 

How Lam 


V 

12 


Oxnpasne 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Trans*. 


aSS 225 wo 

29040 »1.13 292.U 3»90 

w - sksss 

ai-S “ §740 m3? 

20744 


BAT In 

HRHIOB 

g&z 

am mn 
NY Tim* 

TIE . 

orortH 

DOmeP 

CWMA* 

AOnJtw 

TexAJr 

ALU* 

AEJtawt 

CntCrd 


VOL HW 

1SS09 ,4ft 
2306 17M 
M» U» 
1173 IJ% 
IMS <9* 

S3 «*■ 

■02 4 % 

|4) W1 

a aw 

OH »» 

782 32ia 

7W W% 

(fl 179k 

£a ** 

642 «* 


4% ♦ * 
Mil 

IX* — % 
II - % 
4* + % 
48% - % 

u ♦» 

21* 

23W +1* 

11% - 4* 
Kl* 

llkk ♦ * 
31V, +5 
?» * % 


■Included In Hm sales figures 


Tables include Hie natiwiwMt prfcos 
up to tbe doslna on Well Street and 

do not reflect late frodes elsewhere. 

I'm The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's index 


pn nrta a TWw 

Hied Low case 3PJA. 

industrials SMJ8 20745 209* ma 

Tramp. WJ3 14128 lgJ2 WJM 

utilities BB BUg K 21 

naanc* nM 2260 HJ3 2X05 

CoRMOftt W9J8 18744 1BVJS 1B9J7 


AMEX Sales 


3 pm. volume 
Prav. 3PJM. volume 
prev. cans, votunrt 



JOKr 7W AOJXC J3b *0 

17V* U Ada Ex 182*11.1 
aa It'S AdmMi 42 2.1 

IM B4k Aavsvs J3I 54 

41% 35% AMD 

17*. 6«k Advert .12 14 

144k 9 Aarflex 


464* 2716 AetnLI 244 5J 34 3520 46U 45*. 46 


57*. S2% A«tl.Pl 543O10J 


59 56 Vj 56% 54V, 


36 17* AftmS 140 34 14 1579 34* 3fk 34% +11* 
34k 2% Alleen . „» 22 3 3 1 „ 


33 17 AlexAlx 140 M 2159 »» 26% % 

261* 2D*k A lexdr 20 22 23% ZM* CTk + % 

Will 7 2V. AllaCp 2461 16 24 271 7V 77% 78% +1% 

IM 23% AlaCOPt 246 114 5 26 86 26 + % 

Z» 1646 A lalnt 140 54 140 « 24£ W% — J* 

20 15*. Alain pf 219 114 M I«k If* 19» + % 

97V, Bit. Alai ptCHJS 114 EE 5L. 55? 1 £ 

33% 24% AllvPw 170 AllO S37OT*OT*m. + V* 
20tk 1» Altaic AOb 12 14 26x 187b 18% 1 Jgk + JJ 
464. 28V. AlldCp 140 44 a 4*W 43V. 41% Oik + Vf 


66 531* AldCPPt 674 104 

113% 99 AldCPPnZOB 104 
106% 100V AhfCPf 1231*120 
2393 14 AlUPd 


80 63% 631k 63tk + 16 
3 111 1101* 1 10% + % 

60 1021* 1021* 1021* *■ Vi 
67 IK ISH 1B« + l* 


591* 40% AlldStr 112 16 * 2026 59Vk 58 


12% 51k AIIIsOi 
34% 34 AUsCpf 
27% 20 ALLTL 144 67 
3*% 39% Alcoa 1J0 18 
33% 151* A max JO 1J2 
40 321* Am ax pf ma M 


589 61A 5% STh— % 
48 341* 33 33 —It* 

144 67 9 58 27V* 27% 27% — Vk 

1J0 34 16 2623 33 31% 31% — V* 

JO 17 604 16% 16% 16% — % 

US M 3 33% 33% 33% — % 


22% Am He3 1.10 3 4 20 2034 39% 28 


1401* 981* AHeSPf 340 24 
2% 1% AmAsr 
211* lSVfc ADakr 
70 53V. A Brunt 340 54 

28% 24%ABrdpf 275 94 


3 124% 124% 124% —2% 

86 17k 1% 1% 

178 21 20% 70%—% 

909 67% 66 67% 4-1 ! 

226 28% 28% 281* 4 % 


561* ABdCSl 140 14 17 2281 111% 110 110%—% 


26% 191* ABMM 46 13 13 
27% 20% ABusPr 44 24 14 


45 26% 26% 26%— % 
5 25% 25% 25% — % 


57% 40% Am Can 190 XI 11 420 57% 56% 56%— % 


25% 21% A Car pf240 117 2Sx 24% 23% 24 — % , 

501* 37 ACanpf 100 tW 41x49% 49% 49% I 

114 103 ACon pf 1375 I2J 5>011%111 111% +1 

20* 16% ACaaSd 120 114 107X20% 3ffl 20 

30% 25% ACapCv 24Te U 21 Wft » 

11 6% ACentC 219 9B 9 8% 8% — % 

56% 43% ACyon 148 35 13 949 55% 54 54%— % 

29% 1|% ADT 42 39 24 109 23% 23% 23% + % 

23 16 AElPw 2260 94 9333423%22%23 +% 

46% 25 Am Exp 1J8 24 16 7273 46% 46% 46% + % 

32% 14% A Fam] I 44b 24 14 194 32% 31% 31%—% 

21% 9% AFamlnl 5 21% 21% 21%— % 

35% 19% AGnCP 140 10 10 299B33%33%33% + % 
15% 6U AGnlwt 53 14% 13% 14 

55% 51% ACnl p<A6JMellJ 626 55 , *i 54% 55 4- % 

96% 58% AGn[p»5J7e 64 7 92 91% 91% — W. 

71V, 40% ACnpfD 244 39 1311 67% 67% 67% 4- % , 

12% 7% AHobt 49 9% 91k VH— % | 

65 46% AH orm> 240 44 M 3738 65% 65% 65% + % 

38 26U AHotP 1.12 15 10 2718 37 U. 31% 32% + % 

90% 64% AtnrMl 640 77 9 1035 91% 90% 91% +1% 

87% 53 AlnOrp 44 5 23 816x84% 82% 83 + % 

144 112% AlCppf 545 47 3 140% 140% 140% 

28% 18% AMI 72 24 12 1386 25 24% 24%- % 

5% 2% AmMot 1004 3 2% 3 

29 16% APresds .121 7 1298 17% 16% 16%—% 

13% 5 ASLFKj 5 333 6% 6 6% + % 

18% 12% ASLF1 pi 2.19 144 113 15% 14% 15 + % 

16 10% ASJito JS 6S I 24 11% 11% 11%—% 


5% 2% AmMot 
29 16% APmdt .121 J 

13% 5 ASLFTa 
18% 12% ASLFI pi 2.19 144 
16 10% AShb) 50 64 


35% 22% AmSM 140 5.1 10 7445 32% 31% 31%— % 

40% 26% AmSter 44 14 11 1024 61% 60% 61% + % 

70% 46% AStrplA 438 6.1 47 72% 71% 71% +1 1 

56% 51 A Sir p<B 640 1X1 101 56% 55% 56% + % 

24% IS AT&T 170 57 1710064 23% 23% Z3% 

40 30% AT&T pf 344 9-2 41 39% 39% 39% + % 

40% 31% AT&T Pi 374 93 1519 40% «% 40% + % 

27% 15 AWtotrs 140 34 9 67 25% 25% 2S% + % 

® T0 A Wat Pi 1-25 104 SOI 12% 12% 12%+% 

10 AWo5pf I -25 104 330x 12 11% 12 — % 

28% 19% ArnHoft 240 114 8 154 20% 20% 20% + % 

71% 54% ATrPr 544 8.1 72 70% 69% 69% 

15 4% ATrSc 133 15% IS 15% + % 

85% 59 ATrUn 544 64 19 85% 84% 85% +1% 

36 26% Ameren 140 47 8 im 34% 34 34%—% 


40% 40% 40% + % 

!3% 3K »% + % 
ssri£+% 


28% 19% AmHotl 240 114 8 154 20% 20% 20% + % 
71% 54% ATrPr 544 8.1 73 70% 49% 49% 

15 4% ATrSc 133 15% IS 15% + % 

85% 59 ATrUn 544 64 19 SS% 84% 05% +1% 

36 26% Arneron 140 47 8 101 34% 34 34%—% 

48 28% AmesDS 30 4 22 297 45% 4fit 44%- % 

29% 22% Ametek 40 3.1 14 242 36 25% 25% - % 

27% 10% Amfac 241 25% 26% 26% 

16 7% Arnfknc 5 489 7% 7 7%- % 


8 7% Amfnsc 5 

5ffl% Amoco 330 53 B 
38% 26% AMP 72 24 18 
24 11% Amoco 30 24 16 

20% 12% Am reps 9 

31% 19% AmStti 140 44 0 


241 25% 24% 26% 

489 7% 7 7%— % 

2372 61% 62% 62%—% 
6390 31% 30 30% — 1% 

25 13 12% 12% 

97 19% 18% 19 
18 38% 30% 30% + % 


43% 25% Amstnd 140 37 14 178 42% 42% 42% + % 


4% 1% Anacmp 
24% 16% Africa s 19 

30% 19% Anchor 148 6S 
42% 25% AnCIOV 132 34 34 
12% 9% AndrGr 30 17 15 

24% 17 Anoellc 40 27 13 
w 62% Anheus 230 12 12 
at 20% Ameuwi 
62 47% Aflftetipf 340 54 

19% 13% Anlxtr JB 13 18 
16% 8% Anthem 34 3 14 

15% 10% Anttmv 44b 33 0 
13% 9% Apache 38 24 II 

2% % ApenPwt 

19% 15% ApOlPulfi.10 11.1 


378 3% 3% 3%— % 

19 662 22% 21% 21%— % 

4863 486 24% 23% 24% + % 

32 34 34 88 39% 38% 38%—% 

30 17 15 275 11% 11% 11H— % 

-60 17 13 68 23 22% 22%— % 


62% Anheus 230 U 12 2299 91% 90% 91% +1% 

20% Anheuwl 88 30% 30% 30% + % 

47% Aflftetipf 349 54 1J 63% 6J* d3* + % 


19% 13% Anlxtr 38 19 18 42 14% 14% M% 

16% 8% Anthem 34 3 14 283 T2% 12% 12%— % 

15% 10% Anttmv 44b U 8 7 12% 12% 12% 

13% 9% Apoehe 38 24 II 640 11% 11% 11% 

2% % AncnRwt 144 1% 1% i%— % 

19% 15% ApcnP wfi.10 11.1 378 1B% 18% 10% 

32% 27V. ApPwnf 4.18 12.9 8 32% 32% 32V* — % 

39% 17% ApIDta 176t 53 19 51 35% 35 35% + % 

15 8 ApptMo 78 13% 13% 13%— % 

23% 15% ArehDfl .14b 4 15 3056 22% 21% 22% — % 

30% 23% ArlP pf 158 113 16 30% 29% 30% + % 

102 79 ArlPef 1070 104 W20z»»% 100% 100% + % 

23% 14 ArKBsl 40 13 B 90 ZZ% 21% 2116— % 

24V. 16 Anna 138 53 21 1538 22% 21% 21%— % 

% U ArfnRI 173 % S 1ST— 

12% IUk Armada 7 11% 11% 11% 

16% M6 ArmcD 736 8% 8 8% + Vk 


atk 15% Armc pi 2.18 114 28 18% 10% 18% + % 

24% 16% Arm Rb 48 24 8 36 19% 18% 18%— % 

38 23% ArmWln 130 34623 283 37% 37 37% 

36 291* Armw pt 375 104 IHta 34 35% 35% — % 

34% 19 AroCfi 1 JO 42 7 20 28% 20% 28% 

25*. 12% ArowE JO 14 9 IS 121k 12% 12% + % 

27% 16 Artra ja 4360 37 26 36 36 — % 

23% l«l* Arvln a 30 X6 8 161 22% 23% 23% + % 

54U 35V. ArvHi Pt 230 38 2 51% 53% 53% + % 

27% 17% Aierco 1127 241* 21% 24 + % 

31% 20% Asnl Of I 140 53 736 31% 30% 31% +1% 

41 31V* AxtilOet 196 97 96 40% «% 40% + % 


681* 48V. ASTDG 240 19 IT 2218 tfln 47% 67lk— % 

109 76V. AsdOpI A 75 44 754 108% 107% 107% —116 

24% 18% Atnlone 140 7J 10 21 23% 31% 22% + % 

Ik 19% AtCvEI 1% 87 9 58 28% 28% 28% + 16 

95 68 Alice Pf 537 63 4 98 91 98 +3 

64U 40% AlIRkft 430 67 282642] 60% 60% 60%— V* 

153 97 AlIRCPl 230 1.9 3 144% 144 164 —1 

181* 11% AlloxCp 5 12 11% 11%— M 

231* 18% Auoot 40 13 19 337 22% 22 22% + V6 

47 33% AuMDt 48 13 20 499 46% 46 46% — % 

5 4% Avotain 8 33 4% 4% 4% 

29% 15% AVEMC 40 11 15 12 29% 28% 29% + % 

39% 24 Avery 40 U 13 1035 32 311* 31% + Vk 

15% 10 A violin 7 10 12% 12% 12% 

41 27 Avnet 30 17 13 676 29% 28% 29 +% 

35% 17% Avon UDIU I Jin 19 u% ran 

30% 18 AvdM 10 77 1* 18% 19 + Vk 


i VO BMC 48 19 

i 30 Bolrncs 30 14 17 

, 15 Bkrlntt .92 11 IS 

i 18% Polder J6 17 13 

i % vlBotuu 

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■ 11% PullyMf JO 13 

■ 7% Dolly Pk II 

30% ftaSIGE 340 74 > 

r 37% BottpfP A50 103 

i 21% BiKOiM 1.10 15 II 

i 3% DanT.x 

43% Bonoaa 1 JB 2.1 12 
29 BkBas 240 4.9 5 
. 43 BkBbSPf 4.910 93 
49 BkNE OPt54Bel03 
i 26% UK NY 104 47 7 
15% Bn* Vox 130 13 10 
. 141* BllkAm 132 73 12 
40 BkAm Of 1138113 
66 Ilk Am Pt 677x114 
I 11% BkAmpf 288 
I an BfcARty 2.40 7.9 13 
i 38 BankTr 270 13 7 

> 19% BftTrpf 130 99 
35 BkTrpf 472 93 

7% Banner A3e J 16 
19 Bard 44 14 U 
IS BamCP 30 37 9 
22 Barnet i 1A4 24 
19V* Barnrwr 40 33 13 
I 8% BASIX -12b 13 12 
18 Bouscn 78 15 18 
11% BaxtTr 77 14 64 
17% Bar Fin X> .9 42 
21V* BavStC 240 7.9 9 
39% Bearing 130 23 12 
24% Banco 130 57 6 
12 Decor M 3J $3 
30% BeCtnD 1 JO 23 IS 
4% Baker 

7% Baker Pf 170 204 
121* EtoWH 40 23 9 
3% BefHkri 36 17 11 
22 BdHwPf 47 11 
67% BellAtl 630 73 9 
221* BCE a 2J8 
19% Beilina 32 14 14 
27% BdllSOV 230 63 9 
41% BetaAH 30 14 Z7 
21% Bern Is 130 U «1 
24 HoAfCp 230 43 10 
30% Benetnf 4J0 11J 
17 Benefpf 230 123 
17% Benearn 
3% BenatB 37] 

3% Barker J2 

10% Boot Pfl 74 14 29 
14% Bette II 40 23 
37% BettiSI pt5JQ 124 
18% BariiSI Pf 250 124 
231* Bewerlv J2 .9 19 
19% BluThr 30 34 W 
13% Btecftn 

17% BlackD 44 11 12 
21% BkfcHP 1.92 57 9 
14% Blair Jn 36 24108 
38% BfCkHR 240 <U U 
37% Baetna 143 24 IS 
26V* Bacnawl 
32% BofseC 1.90 43 19 
46 BalwCPfiOfl 87 


57 12% 
83 304k 
1905 18% 
43 30% 
186 1% 
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71 51% 
1562 18% 

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2362 66% 

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132 3% 

207 56% 
234 48% 
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40 30 
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112 33K, 

2161 311k 
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195 Slk 
108 41k 

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519 32% 
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2866 20% 
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5043 67% 
44 45V, 
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S 51 


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30% 30V, — V 
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Silk 51% — 

54 54 

43% 43% + 
29% 39% 

21 % 21 % + 
44% 44% -F 
71 71 + 

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30% 30% + 
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25% 25% + 

43 43 

12 V« 12% — 

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31% 31% — 
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31% 31% + 

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20% 20% + : 
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B*eft -“B i } kiSiss-s 

jBSS=S 

m* 18% AMRpf 2.18 10.1 171 21% Wk W % + % 

25% 22% ANR Pf 147 11.1 I 24 24 . 24 

14% 7% APL — S JS JP 6 J?Z is 

&CV. iito aca 2DQ 411 288 5m 50 SIM ^ VI 

27 141% AVX X 2.1 12 99 IM T5Vi W* + JJ 

25tt 16 AZP 2.72 1W B 2275 25V« 25 25 — m 

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25% 17% AcceWdB M 10 17 S2 22V4 72JA 22V4 

m* 12% AemeC MV *! ^ 

ia% TWAoneE J2&40 If 11 .?% 8 I ^ 


Volume Turns Higher on NYSE 


531 14% 1414 14% + Vi 

)B 11 8% 8 8 

76 17% 17% 1 714 — W 

6 10 15% 15% 1514 + Vk 

17 44 10% 10% 10% + % 

11 4236 24% 25% 26%—% 

157 8% 8% B%— % 

12 224 13V. 13% 13% + % 


United Prea International 

NEW YORK — The stock market was mixfid 
late Monday in active trading. The Dow Jones 
industrial average was down 4.48 to 1,310.93 
shortly before 3 pm. EOT. 

Advances led declines by a 9-7 ratio among 
tbe 1,989 issues crossing the NYSE tape. 

Five-hour Big Board volume amounted to 

Although prices in tables an these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. dose in New York, for time reasons, 
this article is based on the mantel as 3 PM. 


as 3 PM. 


53V* 30% AJrPnJ 1JD SJ 12 21B 52% 52)4 % 

24% 13 AlrbFrT jM 18 12 ?19 22 21% 81% + « 

7 1 AIMoaS 23 155 1% 1% 1% 

33% 24% AlaP plA 3J2 I2J 6 32 32 32 + % 

B 4W AtaPdPt J7 114 1 » 7% 7% 7Vk— % 

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33 17 AlaxAlx 1 JBO 17 21S9 26% 26% 2rt.- % 

26% 20% Atautr 20 22 23% 23% 23% + % 


about 112,119,500 shares, compared with 
107,060,000 in the same period Friday. 

Prices were mixed in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

Analysts said the market was stronger than 
the Dow industrial average seemed to show. 

“The action is better than it looks," said 
Michael Metz of Oppenheimer & Co. Although 
some blue-chips stocks were subject to profit- 
taking, throughout the day more stocks traded 
higher than lower, he noted. 

Mr. Metz said the market was continuing to 
respond to expectations that interest rates axe 
go ing even lower than they are now. Also, 
declining oil prices are assuaging inflation anxi- 
eties, he said Such an environment gives the 
Federal Reserve more leeway to ease credit 
without having to worry about aggravating in- 
flation. he noted 

Atlantic Richfield near the top of the active 
list, declined Under pressure for a decrease in 
oil prices, so were several other petroleum 


Bond Prices Up Sharply 

The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — Bond prices rose sharply — 
by nearly S20 for every S1.000 in face value — 
Monday amid speculation that ofl prices and 
interest rates are headed lower. 

The market had advanced sharply on Friday 
as some traders anticipated a reduction in the 
Federal Reserve’s discount rate, its interest 
charge cm loans to hanks and other financial 
institutions. 

Tbe Fed had cut its discount rate May 17 to 
15 percent from. 8 percent in an effort to 
stimulate! the economy. Several economic re- 
ports since than have indicated that the pace of 
economic growth has remained slow. 

Tbe bond price rally continued more force- 
fully Monday as reports circulated that some oil 
industry analysts expected weak demand would 
lead to declines in oil prices. 

stocks. Exxon, Mobil and Phillips Petroleum 
were lower. Texaco was up fractionally. 

Nabisco, trading ex-dividend, was lower in 
active trading. RJ. Reynolds has agreed to 
acquire Nabisco for 55 billion- RJ. Reynolds 
was higher. 

Phibro-Salomon was slightly lowo-. Salomon 
Brothers said it had acquired 5.1 percent of 
Multimedia Inc.‘s 16.7 million shares outstand- 
ing. 

Diamond Shamrock was lower in active irad- 
ing. 


.S'&kSl 1 
A rf* 

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50% 50% CIO I 
7% 2% CtC 
54 21% CNA 

11% 8% CNAI 
44% 35 CPC 

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27% 18% CSX 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


Page 13 



...... 


US 

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Seehowlhe]McxM9001vzsrnet-andexceeeledr- 
the requirements of pilots and executives alike, while its closest 

competitor remains a list of paper promises. 

1 FALCON 900 1 GULFSTREAM IV L 


Program Announcement 

)/ 

May 27, 1983 


March 1983 

Rollout 

i/ 

May 18, 1984 


To Be Announced 

First Flight 

\/ 

Sept. 21, 1984 


December 1985 

Complete Interior Installed 

t/ 

Nov. 13, 1984 


To Be Announced 

Flight Envelope Expansion Completed 

i/ 

Nov. 28, 1984 


To Be Announced 

Guaranteed IFR Rang e Verified 

S 

Dec. 5, 1984 


Only a "theoretical range 
is guaranteed 

Engine Certification 

S 

Dec. 12, 1984 


June 1986 

First Customer Demonstrations 


Jan. 29, 1985 


To Be Announced 

EAA Certification 


March 1986 


October 1986 

First Customer Deliieries 


Late 1986 

( certified , with interior ) 


Mid 1986 

(wicertifieti. "green ") 


1 ‘In late January, just eight 
months after the wide-body, three- 
engine business jet rolled out . . . 
and only four months after the 
aircraft's first flight ; the produc- 
tion prototype underwent five 
days of extensive evaluation 
by three aviation publications 
and 25 customers of the new 
aircraft ..." 

"The apparent ease with 
which Ihe Falcon 900 is living up 
to Dassault's predictions of sched- 
ule, weight ; and performance is a 
tribute . . . destined to please even 
the most conservative executive 

Business and Commercial Aviation, 

Mav 1985 


"Dassault's unUingness to 
put its newest and most expensive 
business jet into the hands and 
under the scrutiny of press and 
customer pilots at such an early 
stage certainly makes a more em- 
phatic statement than mere words 
of its confidence in the airplane's 
integrity and performance . . 

"...the Falcon 900 is an ex- 
ceptionally well designed air- 
plane... ivith a great amount of 
mission flexibility. ..a viable alter- 
native in the choice of a big cabin , 
truly long-range business jet — 
something they never had before. ” 
Aviation Convention News, 
March 1, 1985 


For long range, fuel efficiency 
and functional comfort, no busi- 
ness jet can match the Falcon 900. 
And the 900 is flying today (in fact, 
has flown some 300 hours!), while 
its closest competitor has yet to 
be rolled out. 

In conception, the 900 prom- 
ised everything pilots and 

CEOs said they wanted in a "W 

business jet: worldwide ^ 

range, widebody comfort, 
three-engine safety and low Fc 

operating costs. In flight, the Cor 

900 has already exceeded ^ 

these promises — months £n 

ahead of schedule. Pai 


Data as of 
May 2". 1985. 


While several mockups will be 
on display at the Paris Air Show, 
Falcon Jet will be flying the 900. 
While our competitor talks, 

Falcon Jet will be demonstrating. 
And for those who have not yet 
seen the 900 in action, 1983 should 
prove a noteworthy year indeed. 


Falcon 900 

For more information. . . 

Contact us at Chalet B-2-i during the Paris Air Show, or at the 
appropriate address below'. 


EL' ROPE - AFRICA • MIDDLE EAST 

-VO AMERICA • Sfl AMERICA • ASIA 

Paul Delorme 

Roy E. Bergstrom 

Director. Civil Aircraft Sales 

Senior Vice President. Marketing 

Dassault International. S.A.R.L. 

Falcon Jet Corporation 

24 rue du Pmfcsseur Pauchei 

Teterhoru Airport 

92h 2U Vaucresson. France 

Teterboro. NJ inn* ISA 

Telephone: ~-i l-'V-JJ 

Telephi «ne. t2«)!j 2HH-H-TV 

Telex; iiijW-nF 

Telex: i.4-^r 








•.-te- 








* 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


v ' l 


Monday 


MS8E 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the doshig on Wall Street 
and do not reflect fate trades elsewhere. 


12 Month 
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new yearly Low. r — dividend declorttlor tarkHnorecefflnB 13 
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/“"BrdSJSPf 

sassa&. 






jjjMW 

SrnkBH 


PoPLfl 
FetrieSlr 


MMHOA m* 

a»r 

OhSTlbfC 

OflrW npiw 

^SSpf mM 

Ear ssasr , ra r 

vwinoGEe Sge Weji 
Taxi ran TeKhlBtaPf 

Trionaf ina UAL inc 
UnEI 4PfRl Until 198*4 . 

UCaMTV UBtot 
US LIFE inc UWtoMta 
VoEPffSpf nOtlTM 

woman W am u rfpf A 

SS?r2*t 




UALUfil _ 

UnflinMf 

U5We« 
VttMF 77301 


WnAirapf 

Zemind 


wii Spi ric! 


ffirnCPL844P 

Un3i k 744af 

UntaDeul 

WMfllHI I 

Whiter An 


HIM LOWS 16 


Amtssce 
Hitachi 
Martin 
TDK CP 


B fP hdV .. 
Karntto 
Fetto S t 
Tfterlntsd 


Buttes One 
Kyocera 


Unocal wd 


FtBTxedJpf ^ . 

JttfKL f 

zapata c» 


V T 

o 

n 


FlltU176S June 3 


Season 

High 


Oeen Htah Low dose On 


Grains 


928 

26 

97 

41 

33 

20 

8 


29 


■s 


76 


1 




30% 20% Traram 164 i4 13 1575 30* 


21* M% Tran Inc Z22 WL7 

12* 10% TARlty 120 XI 15 

21 20* TntCdan 9 

57V 37* Tnaaca Z16b 42 10 

66* 45V Tmecpf J87 6J 

25% 19* Tran Ex 220 TOJ 

13* 6* Traracn 5 

94V 77 TrGPpt 864 93 
24% 30 TrGPpt Z5D 182 
13* 6ft TmeOh 9 

36V 29* Tranwy 1 JO 51 9 




2V 12* 

20% 21 + V 

51V 51V— * 
61* 61*— * 

.... » Wfc + * 

2b 94* 94* 9«* + * 

4 24* 24* 24*— * 

U 18* 10* 10*—* 

56 31* 31 31 


25* Tmwtd 48 IJ 12 1197 38* 37% 38 — V 


21* 9* TbrtdwtA 
31% 23 Tbrtdpt ZOO 63 
17% IS TWIdpf 120 IM 
48* 25* Travfer ZM O 10 
5BV so* True pf +16 7 S 
27V 19% Triton X53e1X1 
30 2BV TrtCnpf Z50 82 
38* 13 Trtalnd 40 14 21 
31V 28% TrlcPc 1X0 IJ ■ 
48 24* Tribune J4 is 17 

6* 4 Trtcntr 4b 8J 11 


+ * 


183 21 20* 

4 31* 31* 

17 16* 16* .... 

992 48* 47% 47*+ * 
125 55% B* 55V— * 
191 27V 26% 26*— * 
2 28 28 20 
222 29* 27* 29V +1* 

112 36* 26V 26V 

388 45* 45 45% +* 

50 5% 5% 5% + * 


London Commodities 

June 3 


Prey toe s 
BW Aik 


Oct 

Dec 


OCT 


Dec 


May 

J* 

SCP 


G09V 

SUGAR ** ** 

Start (ng par metric ton 
»n «« 952D 9500 96X0 NA NA 

10XM Q0JO 99X0 100X0 — — 

10860 104X0 105X0 106.00 — — 

122JW 116X0 11K40 11 HXO — — 

IT.. 00 1-2X0 127.70 17760 — — 

131-40 17740 177X0 178X0 — — 

N.T. N.T. 132X0 133X0 — — 

Volume. 1.9SI lots or SO tans. 

COCOA 

StarttBp per metric ton 
Jly 1.743 1,777 1237 1228 NA NA 

1.731 TJ70 1T70 1221 — — 

1-719 1.700 1.700 IJ10 — — 

1.733 1.723 1223 1225 — — 

1.746 1,742 1242 1,743 — — 

1.757 1250 1252 1,753 — — 

I2» 1261 1.761 1267 — - 

Volume : 1391 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

SterUna per metric tan 
Jly 1034 ZDI5 7X78 7X73 NA NA 

SOP 1C0S 2X65 2X69 2X70 — — 

NOT 7.176 7.105 3.112 2,114 — — 

-Cm 7.153 2.144 X150 2.152 — — 

Mar ZI45 7.178 7.130 7.1*5 — — 

May NT. N.T. 7.110 -1« — — 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1100 1140 — - 

volume : 1.103 tors of 5 tans 
GASOIL 

US. denars Per metric tan 
JO" 2i;2S 711O0 217 -S 21750 219JS 2I9.7S 
21750 71500 71100 71525 717X0 717 JO 
71953 314 75 717.00 2172S 719X0 21950 
770.75 71850 218.75 21950 32050 22125 
N.T. N.r. 720X0 721X0 221X0 224X0 
N.T. N T. 772X0 224X0 223X0 227X0 
N.T. N.T. 774X0 220X0 224X0 230X0 
N.T. N.T. 223X0 230X0 224X0 230X0 
N.T. N.T. 220X0 233XD 220X0 234X0 
Volume. 791 kilsaf 100 tans 
Snrrcot: Jtruters and London Potraltvm Ex. 
eft enge ipmOi. 


J»y 

Aua 

Sc* 

OCT 


Dec 

Jan 

Feb 


Xbir ctferau} 


CBOT 


BOND 

FUTURES 

ri— ] & c 


3 


FUTURES 

OPTIONS 


Also Fumres arid 
Futures Options on 
COMO-GOLD & SILVER 
LNLM-CL’RRENClES 


k+W L P" 

s 15 


R( A'NP TV BN 
ll\V ASJ* 
OVERNIGHT 


* f/i/Mirt imfr ni Irittln 

ourtiff t J4n owUructs /irr 
i\ilmUiir munlb. Fir s? JfB 


i immji is I.t nnnttt turn 


(jillnrtritf nu r pmfasii nulls: 

212-221-7138 


REPUBLIC CLEARING 
CORPOBAT20N 


4531405 IbtH. ST. Nl I 
ta/ISwrrt 


■■pnhllrf. Henri I>b> el Rewttak 


4 4 1 J Hillhn I iBiinimlX IML 


Asian Commodities 

June 3 


HONG- KONG GOLD FUTURES 
ujj per ounce 

Owe Previous 
Ntab tow bm Aft Bid Ask 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 316X0 318X0 312X0 314X0 
Jly _ N.T. N.T. 31800 320X0 314X0 316X0 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 320X0 322X0 316X0 318X0 
OCT 324X0 324X0 323X0 325X0 319X0 321X0 
Dec - N.T. N.T. 327X0 329X0 324X0 326X0 
Feb _ 332X0 332X0 332X0 334X0 320X0 33008 
API- N.T. NTJVOO 330X0 332X0 334X0 
Volume: 29 lets OI TOO oz. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Me tarskm cants per kilo 

Close Prevloui 

bw Mt tif id 

Jun 195X0 19550 W4ja 194J5 

Jly 193X0 194X0 19353 19175 

AUU 19175 19450 19350 19450 

Sep _ 19SS0 19SSB I955D 19650 


London Metals 

June 3 


Pwrieas 
Bid as 


819X0 


Volume: 12 lets 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Metayslon rtneelwjer 25 ton 

Bid Ask 

Jun Uio 1J70 

Jiv 1.170 uio 

Aug 1X80 1.130 

Sen 1X50 UoO 

OCT — 1X40 1X80 

Nov 1X20 1X60 

Jon — 1X1D 1X50 

Mar 1X10 1X50 

May 1X00 _ 1X40 


Prey too* 
Ask 


Vol ume: 0 lots el 25 tons. 
Sooreo: ftauten. 


1J60 

1,100 

1X80 

1X60 

1X50 

1X30 

1X20 

1X20 

UIO 


IJOO 

1J2D 

1.130 

1,110 

1X90 

1X70 

1X60 

1X60 

1X50 


t)M Futures Options 

June 3 

W. German Mot-t&u mats arts c 


mark 


sna Cofb-SetttB Pub-Scttfc 

Prtca Jw S« D« j* Pl Sr%c 
31 IJ 235 1H — 037 »4 j 

37 U9 157 Z19 0X2 0J5 057 

33 a JS 7.17 I5S o " 

34 007 9J6 1 2D L14 154 

35 — 0J7 105 2.13 7.T1 

a# - 829 057 - 35 


14, 

156 

150 

12B 


BW 

ALUMINUM 
SMrttae per mefrtc ten 
soot _ 825X0 026X0 010X0 

tarword 84650 847X0 83950 

COPPER CATHODES (HtOB Grade) 

Start tag per metaic ton 
SM 1,112X0 1,113X0 1,121X0 1,122X0 

forward 1,121X0 1.122X0 1.126X0 1.127X0 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling per metric ton 

1,183X0 1.104X8 1.117X0 1.118X0 
1.107X0 1.109X0 1.117X0 1.IIBX0 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric toa 

taCT 293X0 294X0 29050 291X0 

forward 39750 298X0 298X0 29850 

NICKEL 

Startleo per metric tan 
taCT 4J6QX0 4X65X0 4J3QX0 4J4QX0 

forward 4JQ2X0 4X05X0 4312X0 4315X0 

SILVER 


471X0 


472X0 48050 48150 

487X0 495X8 496X0 

TIN (Shttted) 

Startine per metric tea 

wot 9550X0 9560X0 9J75X0 9J8SX0 

tarwara 9510X0 9515X0 9550X0 9551X0 

ZINC 

Starttna per metric ten 
wet »aoo 595X0 595X0 

forward 6(15X0 606X0 607X0 

Source: AF>. 


S&P 100 Index Options 
May 31 


EtHnottd total «gl. 4301 
Crib ; Frt wt 4J» open lot. 47559 
Pets: FUbtL 1JS dpeelnl. 37X39 
Source: (me. 


Japan Is Said lo Consider 
EmergencvIniportPlan 

United Press International 

TOKYO —Japan is considering 
emergency imports valued at 52 
billion to S3 billion this fall in an 
effort to ease trade friction with the 
United Stales and West Euro pea n 
nations, a leading ecQnomicjnum.il 
reported Monday. 

The newspaper, Nihon Kdzai, 
said the government has begun 
working on a shopping list, both 
for official and private sectors. The 
new plan is aimed at reducing Ja- 
pan’s record 537-billion trade sur- 
plus to avoid possible retaliatory 
measures by the United States. 


To Our Readers 


Floating Rates Notes were not 
available in this edition because of 
computer problems. 


PrtaJm Jhr an tap 
MS**- — - 

171 H* % _ _ 

175 Bir 1) 12 _ 

£ L. S? 7% M 

® ft 3% ft 58 

2 ft 17/14 tV 3% 

PS 1/16 7/1* ! 1% 


Pvtaiod 

* A BHo 

1/16 1/14 I/M — 
VHVHt % 
I/M 5/14 9/M « 
% 1 1/11 1 9/16 1ft 

n R A in 

ft 81 ft I 


torttoflwtea. M09t3 
TjWtnD «Mtat B4675 
ToMwl rtfuaw 99J65 
ToMyyt wmbUtUBl 


IW8U43I LOP 18231 

source: coce. 


CNN 10488 + 153 


Company 

Earnings 


Revenue and profits, in mi Sons, 
are in load currencies unless 
otherwise indicated 


South Africa 
Anglo- Amer. Corp. 


Per Share. 


1084 

au 

2X36 


1983 

556.1 

Z446 


United States 


3rdQuor. 

Revenue, 


Litton Industries 


Net income. 
Per Shore _ 
SlMte 
Revenue. 


198S 
1.180. 
81 X 
1.91 


1984 

i^ia 

755 

1.77 


Net Income. 
Per Shore 


1905 

1870. 

2214 

5J4 


1984 

145a 

2015 

475 


1784 nets rtetude both of sta million from 
wiewUMwrf aee i ’a fuMt* . 


Cash Prices June 3 


Commodity ood Dolt 
Coffee 4 Santos. Ib_ 


Prbrtclotti 64/30 38 *. yd _ 

Start billots (Pitt.), ton 

ironlfWY. Phifa. ton 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pin. _ 

Lead Spot, lb 

Copper elect, lb 


Mon 

138 
060 
471X0 
213X0 
79-80 
2D- 71 


1X8 

0J7 

4S3XD 

211X0 

10D-101 

26-28 


Tbi (Straits), lb . 


Zinc, E. SI. L. Basis, lb . 

Palladium, dz 

Silver n.y.cz ____ 
Source.* AP. 


69-73 69*- 72 
6X267 6X884 

0J6-47 053-53 
98-101 155 

6X7 9 JO 


Paris Commodities 

June 3 


wheat tom 

5X00 bo mirdmum- doOare per buihrt 
190 Z17V Jul Z15% ZU* Z14V 116 +JI 

176* X15 Sep 118 V 119 117 119 +X1* 

3X3* HI Dec 128 3JM 037 130 +A0% 

X74* 3J7V MaT 329* 130 320% 330 +X1 

4X2 ZU May Z19 320% 3)7% 310V +X2V 

Z72* ZfS JUl 239 axi* 239 ZOO +J1 

6«. Sales Prey. Softs 4619 

Prev.Day Open InL 4QJT8 us 108 
CORN (CBT) 

5X00 bu minimum- dollars Per bushel 
331 272 Jul Z74* 233 2J4 Z74V — J0V 

321* 256* Sew 257* 258* 256% 257V —XIV 

ZfS 251% Dec 253V 254% 257 252% —XI* 

ZU 2X0% Mar 7 47* 2X3* 2X1 2X1% —XIV 

321V 2X4* May 266% 2X7* 2X5* 2X5% — X0% 

216 ZM* Jut 2X7% 2X8% 2X4% 2X6* — XO% 

2X6* 251% Sep 253 253* 257% 253 — X0* 

Est. Sales Prey. Sotos 17X31 

Prev. Day Open lnLl0i577 offU87 
SOYBEANS CCBT1 
SjcObu minimum- doU are per burtiel 
759 556* Jul 5X5* SJ0 5X3* 5X4* — X3 

756 5X1 Aug 551 5X4 £57 557% — X4* 

471 5X1 SOP 557 159% 552 557* —34* 

6X8 5X1 Nov 5X0 5X2 5X1* £54% —57% 

6J9 5X1* Jon SJO £71* 5X4 5X4 —58* 

7X2 £75 Mar £39* £81* 5J4* £74* 

739 £03* May £JB £89% £02 £02 — X8* 

658 £08* Jot 5X3* 5.95* £87 £87 —39 

EsI. Sales Prev. Sales 30342 

Prev. Day Open I nt 64X17 off 902 
SOYBEAN MEAL CCBT) 

1 00 tans- Italian per tan 
19650 117X0 Jul 12028 120X8 119X0 11970 —JO 

19030 120X0 Aua 12310 12340 122X0 12270 

17950 123X0 Sep 12£0D 12630 T2SJ0 12£50 

1B05Q 12650 OCT 13800 12000 12820 12830 

18400 13150 Dec 134X0 134X0 13320 13330 

16300 13450 Jan 137X0 117X8 13500 135X0 — IJ0 

20650 139.10 Mar 14150 14151 140X0 MOJO —1X0 

$6250 145X0 May U4X0 MSJ0 14400 M48C —2X0 

167X0 148X0 Jul 15820 15020 148110 148X0 —050 

Est. Sales Prev. Safes 11013 

Prev. Day Open int. 54103 off 35* 

SOYBEAN OIL cam 
SQX00 1 bs- drilara PW 100 Ibe. 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open High Low Close a». 


134X8 


Nov 141X0 14)50 MOJO 140X0 —1X0 

Jon 140X0 140X0 13950 1V-7S — XS 

Mar 13958 13950 12950 139XS -55 

May 13975 —25 

Jul 13975 — JS 

S«p 139.75 — JS 

Nov 13975 

EsL Solos 380 Prev. Safes 557 

Prev. Day Openinl. S08S qp40 


181X0 

1B0JX) 

17750 

16250 

15750 

18850 


T36X0 
1387D 
14220 
179 JS 


Metals 


COPPER (COOIEXI 
2£OOD Bn.- cents per lb. 


3272 

3230 

Juf 

3080 

30X0 

2985 

3087 


3185 

22X0 

Aua 

2000 

29.10 

2070 

2077 

-vW 

31.10 

225D 

Sop 

2780 

28X5 

27X5 

Z775 

— -17 

3037 

2280 

Oct 

2675 

Z782 

26X0 

3680 

—35 

29X5 

2280 

Dec 

2580 

26.10 

2SX0 

25X3 


29X7 

23X0 

Jim 

25X0 

25X5 

25.15 

2£17 

L H 

20X0 

26X0 


2£X0 

2585 

247S 

247S 

—85 

27X5 

24X0 


24X4 

2475 

2436 

3430 

—33 

2515 3430 Jul 24JO 2445 

EaL Solas Prev.5cft* 1U40 

Prev. DOT Open IM. 58X39 off 1X00 

3419 

2400 

— X2 


+X0% 


OATS (CBT) 

£000 bu mini mum- dal lore par bushel 
171* 1X7% Jul 151 152* 1JD% 151 

179 1X7* Sep 150* 151* 150 158 

102* 157* Dec 155 155* 154 154% +X0V 

1X7% 158* Mar 15® 

1X3 1X3 May 1X0 1X0 1X0 1X0 

Bst-SolOB Prev. Soles 428 

Prev. Day Open Int 2894 op 119 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMEJ 


i; 


SUGAR U ~ ** 

French francs par metric too 
Aup 1J10 1277 1277 

OCT 1J25 1290 1290 

Dee 1,345 U3S UIO 

Mcr 1X00 U45 1J41 

MPV XSB Ixso 1X05 1X15 —17 

^ , .t®? , j2l0 _L«70 1X90 -23 

E ,ri- VOL: ?S0 Iris of 50 Ions. Prev. oCTwal 
sotas: 1X64 tots. Open Interest: 18334 
COCOA 

Preach francs per leeks 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2X01 — _ tq 

Sea 2X35 2X23 7JW* 2JQ5 —8 

Dec 2XQ5 2X05 2X06 2X00 I 

Mar N.T. N?T 2XOT W -7 

Mcv N.T. N.T 2X30 — —S 

Jly N.T. i£t zra — 5 

Sap N.T. N.T. 2X30 ' — — J 

Esf. voJ.: K tats of 10 tans. Prev. octual 
solas: 242 lotsOpan interest: 637 
COFFEE 

FreniJi fraacs per IM ka 

JIV N.T. N.T. — 2X50 UnctL 

2X60 2X60 tes W 

Nov iSO* 2508 2505 2515 +7 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2520 2^0 +25 

Mar NLT. N.T. — 2550 + 25 

Mav N.T. N.T. — zSo +S 

Jly N.T. N.T. - 1544 New 

5 Wiot S tans Prev. actual sales) 
14 lots Open Interest: 265 


arue 

4Q800 tas.- esnto per lb. 
69X0 59X5 JWl 

5970 

6080 

59X0 

60.12 

+83 

67X7 

60X5 

Aug 

6275 

4115 

4Z32 

6283 

+85 


6£90 

60.10 

Oct 

62X0 

62X0 

62X2 

6287 



6785 

6136 

Dec 

6160 

4400 

6255 

4Z90 

+70 


67X5 

ELIO 

Feb 

6430 

4480 

6415 

6477 

+72 

— 19 

6787 

63X0 

Apr 

45X0 

45X0 

65-10 


— 14 

— 18 

6685 
EaL Sal* 

6573 Jun 

1987B Prev. Sales 34709 


6580 -70 


Source: Bourse *t Commerce. 


j Dividends June 3 


Company 


Par And Pay Rec 


USUAL 


arete K Core 
Duckwoil AlCD 
May finergy Purl 


Q -IB* 

Q X0 
Q XS 

A-Annual/M Mo nt h ly ,-p-Qgartsfty/ 5-5enU- 


6-24 

6*27 

6-20 


Prev. Day Open Int. SUM up 41 2 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
44X00 tos- cents per lb. 

7Z70 64X7 

73X0 64X0 

72J2 642 S 

7120 6575 

79X0 64X0 

70JC 64.10 

70X0 70X0 _ . _ 

Est. Softs 1571 Prev. Sates 1X01 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8174 up 152 
HOGS (CMC) 



6785 

6835 

67X0 

6012 

+85 

Sen 

6780 

4400 

67X0 

6785 

+85 

OCT 

67X5 

6780 

6775 

6777 

+.17 


68X5 


4425 

6070 

+.15 

Jan 

Mr 

Apr 

6985 

6985 

6985 

6985 

6985 

4980 

—.10 

+85 


JtLOOO fbi- cents per lb. 
S160 44X0 Jun 

4780 

4058 

4775 

48X7 

+X2 

5577 

47JB 

Jul 

5090 

5185 

5073 

51X2 

+72 

5477 

4777 

AUP 

5075 

51X5 

50X0 

5172 

+X2 

5175 

4cna 

OCT 

4775 

47X5 

47.10 

47X7 

+.10 

5085 

4670 

Dec 

4830 

48X0 

4088 

4027 

—88 

5080 

4675 

FOB 

4065 

4930 

082 

4075 

-^02 

4735 

4450 

Apr 

4580 

46.10 

4370 

4160 

-M 

4985 

4490 

Jun 

4025 

075 

4035 

4035 


4975 
EsL Sate! 

4775 

£428 

Jut 

'TOT.SMes 4448 


4980 

+.» 


Prev. Day Open mt 22519 off 365 


PORK BELLIES (CMS) 

38008 lbs- cents par tb. 

82X7 61.12 Jut 57.10 

00X5 60J0 Aua 6670 

7420 6119 Fob 73JS 

7530 64X0 MOT 7Z15 

7SX0 KLM MOT 7Z50 

76X0 4PJ0 Jul 

Ect. Sales 6X33 Prev.5gtas 7756 


MM MM 


68X0 

7125 

7X15 

7090 


72.1 B 
7223 
7X10 


6&X2 

67X2 

71*2 

7170 

7Z70 

7009 


+57 

+X5 


-55 


Prev. Day Open Int 11555 i 


Source: UPI. 


U A Treasury B3I Rates 
May 31 


Offer 


Bid Ytaid Ylaid 


Bmunffl 
6-mantti 
One year 


7X9 

7.19 

729 


7X7 

7.17 

137 


731 

756 

756 


7X1 

723 

612 


Source: Satomea anthers 


Republic Buying BaC Planes 

Agence Fnmtce-Presse 

LONDON — British Aerospace 
PLC announced Monday that it 
has received a 558- million order for 
2) of its 18-seat Jetstream 31 air- 
craft from Republic Express Air- 
lines of the United States. 


Food 


COFFEE COrrCSCE] 
37 J00 tt«8- cents Per Rl ■ 


149 JO 
14758 
146l 70 
14&50 
14550 
min 
142X0 


121X0 
127X0 
129 JS 

12 

131X0 

13S50 

13229 


JWl 


M8M 14495 144.10 144B0 
„ !«50 146X0 145X0 143X3 

DOC U£30 14S75 14630 14550 
MW 14450 14450 14450 14450 
MOV 14173 14325 14175 14325 


420 

+50 

+J4 


Jul 

s«p 


Est,SaM 630 Prev.SolM 1X77 


14208 

142X0 


+.13 

—.13 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 12X06 up 8* 
SUCARWORLD If (NYCSCE) 


9X5 

92S 

9X5 

73S 

OJ3 

7.15 

449 

«ja 

4X6 


272 

JUl 

Z12 

ZU 

270 

386 

— M 

ZM 

Sap 

129 

UD 

116 

130 

—M 

Ztt 

Oct 

Z46 

3X7 

330 

132 

— .13 

360 

Jan 

380 

370 

373 

173 

—.10 

191 

Mar 

430 

473 

415 

420 

—St 

420 

Muy 

4X9 

4X0 

-435 

439 

— 80 

4X5 

JM 

487 

489 

45a 

4X9 

— JJ* 

476 

47V 

Sep 

OCT 

495 

475 

488 

472 

490 

— M 
— JK 


sjl softs wm pw. soft* 9M2 
Prev. Dav Open Wfc 9*570 up 1422 


COCOA tNVCSCBi 
» metric tora-* per ton 
2400 1990 Jul 

2415 IJB7 Sap 

2X17 1945 Dec 

2190 iw Mar- 

zoo i960 May 

2110 I960 Jul 

Eri.Srias Prey.Satas.jJSW 


300) 2804 2060 EPS 


204S 

2060 


2030 

3046 

2060 


SDH 

2036 

2060 


2040 

2853 

2063 


prev. Day Open rm, tiXW offf 


ORANGE JUICE (NYCEi 

'tSk*”" ffi^Jur 14645 14850 142X0 142X0 —1X5 
lSS 136X0 Sep 14ZSS I44J0 14050 148» -1A5 


65X5 

60X0 

Jun 

■025 

5780 

Jul 

Aup 

82.10 

57X0 

Sep 

■425 

5050 

Dec 

0420 

5980 

Jen 

8080 

5980 

Mar 

7400 

61.10 

Mot 

74X0 

61X0 

Jul 

7070 

6230 

Sep 

7070 

6400 

Dec 

7020 

6570 

Jon 

6780 

6480 


Est. Sates 11, 100 Prev. S 

Prev.Day Open ML 8276 


6030 

40J5 


6030 

S*S5 


50X5 

IBM 


41X5 

62X5 


61X0 

62.90 


6090 

41X0 


— s5D 
-XS 
— 50 


6190 

6350 


6390 

6350 


—55 

-55 

—.*0 


65X5 

6570 


6805 

6870 


65X5 

6SJD 


— 30 


6425 
*4X0 
6610 
6555 —1X0 


ALUMINUM ICOMEX] 
40X00 B».- cents P«r lb. 


49X5 

4085 

Jun 

4780 

+XS 

S9X0 

4573 

Jul 47.10 
Alta 

47X5 4495 47X5 
4785 

+XS 

+75 

7430 

66X0 

See 4780 

4080 4770 4880 

+70 

7080 

47X5 

Dec 4080 

49.15 4670 4985 

+70 

76X0 

5175 

Jan 

49X0 

+20 

7380 

070 

Mar 

5085 

+15 

4675 

5385 

May 

5075 

+.15 

6JX5 

54X0 

Jul 

51X5 

+15 

SZ10 5180 Sep 

Dec 

Jon 

Est. Solas 235 Prev.Satas 
Prev. Dav Open int. 2X64 up 3 

52.13 

53X5 

5160 

5438 

318 

+.15 

+15 

+.15 

+.15 


High 


horn 

LOW 


OMR Hfcjh Low OMR Ota. 


BRITISH NUNO(IMM) 


Spot ponaB- 1 Print awtatolOMOl 

“ Juolj 


1X235 Jun 1J930 1XO80 U79I 11*43 -55 

1X900 Sea TJffDO UMO U43S 12719 -50 

12000 1JQD0 Dec 12735 £5» 1XH0 12*13 — 45 

12800 1X680 Mar 12525 -30 

12250 1.H0S Jun . • • 13450 -30 

ESL Solos U.9W Preu.StOM 37X33 . 

Prov. Day Open u* 50437 upztis 


CANADIAN DOLLAR OMM) 
Spardtr- 7 yaffil eaueta 50X001 
.7035 .7054 Jun 39* 

3505 JOS Svp .7244 

2544 2006 Dec .7250 

2554 4881 Mar 

2350 2070 Jun . 2330 .7230 

Est. Sales 1646 Prev, Softs 1405 
Prev. Dov Open W. lZ47v offl97 


2323 

2294 

2273 


& 

jm 


.7230 


•7319 
306 • 
.7345 
.7390 


-1 


FRENCH FRANC NMMI 
5 par franc- 1 aoMaavois soxoooi 
.11020 XM10 Jun .107717 .10770 .W00 .10754 

.10940 .096*0 Sap .WOO .10700 .10700 

.10615 29670 DSC 

EsL Softs 353 Prev . Softs 339 

Prev. DavOpen ltd. 846 off 195 


35 


+M <■, 
—X • 
-30 


SILVER (COMEXI 


5.000 fiuy bl* cants per tro? OL 
4623 STOjQ Jun 4204 

6208 

6108 


+.1 

14*18 

5628 

Jul 

6240 

6205 

5940 



11818 

5738 

AUB 

Sap 

4318 

6368 

6010 

22 r - 

— >.1 
— 3 

12308 

5908 

Dec 

£3 

6498 

6298 

" T 

—J 

12158 

5958 

Jan 

6268 

6268 

*~’T 

—8 

11938 

6078 

Mar 

6618 

6618 

6158 

SF 

—1.1 

10488 

018 

MOT 

6608 

6400 

6608 

^ X 

—IX 

9458 

6358 

Jul 

6458 

6438 

6410 

~ r ~T 

—17 

9408 

7998 

6418 

6678 

Sep 

Dec 

7028 

7020 

6998 

T '7T 

r 

—10 

—23 

7*98 

7708 

7258 

7078 

Jan 

Mar 

7158 

7150 

7158 


—ax 

—27 

Ert. Salsa 21800 Prev.Satas 18856 
Prev.Day Open lot 76X73 off 334 




PLATINUM CltYMRJ 
58 Irey op- dot lari par trey ac. 

307X0 351X0 Jun ZTtkOO 37800 27800 27860 

44 ? SO 241X0 Jul 27886 27Z5D 367XB 271X0 

391X0 23800 OCT OT80 Z7L50 27100 27L30 

37ZS0 360X0 Jan 279X0 26080 27780 3S1J0 

EsL Sales 2.155 Prev.5afts 1X03 
Prev. Doy Open lnL 11860 off 15 
PALLADIUM CHYME) 

1 00 troy az<- doHcrs per az 

15980 9425 Jun 973S 9925 9725 99.15 

14125 9525 Sep 99X0 10175 99X0 100X0 

14180 95X0 Dec 9925 WL25 9925 10025 

12780 97X0 Mar 9925 101X0 9925 100X0 

IT COO 9873 Jun 700X0 

Est. Softs 543 Prev. Sales 1X70 
Prev. Day Open lnL 7X17 off 114 
GOLD (COMEXI 
190 frovaz^ dollars per frov at 
510X0 387X0 Jun 317X0 01920 3IZ00 317X0 

T7S VI 31380 Jul 31840 

«SX0 291X0 Aug 320.18 IBZ40 31450 32020 

49X00 297X0 OCT SOXO 3Z6X0 320X0 M4X0 

48980 30180 Doc 32880 330X0 m00 

48580 30600 Fril 33380 33480 2289 33Z30 

496X0 31470 APT 334X8 334X0 33400 3J4M 

43520 .121150 Jun 33850 33880 33880 JfUP 

42840 331X0 Aug 34620 

39520 335X8 OCT 351.10 

393X0 342X0 Dec 356X0 

Apr swjdo 

Est. Sates 34X00 Prev.Satas 30JBS 
Prev.DavOpmlrrf.mJM rtf 4X22 


+440 

+160 

+4X0 

+4X0 


+120 

+1X0 

+1X0 

+U5 

+25 


+J0 

+X0 

+80 

+20 

+80 

+80 


Ftnoncfal 


US T. BILLS (1MM) 





9Z95 

9X04 

+.13 




9296 

9106 












9236 

92X0 

9276 


+.18 




9ZW 

92 M 

9Z10 


+21 




91X4 

918* 

9UM 


+71 




91X9 

91X9 

91X9 



91.15 

98X7 

*985 

B9X* 

Oae 

Mar 

9179 

9T79 

9139 

91.17 

+20 
+ 17 


EsL Softs 13809 Prev.SCTe* 11811 
Prev. Day OPib Ini 36873 Off 1827 

M YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

5100X08 Orta- pta A 32rxls BTW0 ptf 
06-27 7M Jon p-M 

15-26 75-10 SOP 8+7 

0+24 1S-H Ok Wl 06-W 

03-29 75-14 Mar 058 8S-W 

83-7 7+00 Jftl 0+17 0+18 

E3L Softs Prev. Sate* 1AgA 

Prev. Day Open lnL 60745 affU» 


87-8 

*5X1 

05-3 

8+12 


80-1 

P 

■HI 

854 

8+12 


+19 

+110 

+19 

+» 

+1* 


US TREASURY BCWDSCCXj)^ 


repctaioaxo+pts & »xfa of iu 
77-13 57-70 J»te 77-30 

7+16 57- K) SOP 77-2 

7+3 57-3 Dec 744 

7+22 5M WW J* 

73-21 5649 JlXI 7+M 

73-7 3+29 Sep 7M 

72-20 S+25 Dec 7* 

7M 5+27 Mar 73-14 

71-19 6+12 J«n 7M4 

71-5 63-4 -ftp 7MJ 

70-24 6344 DOC 7V36 


Ce*. gates P/OT. 5cftsl?4jfl 

Prev. Day Open lRt2Mai7 offtoM 


79-10 7740 
78-12 77 
77-13 76-2 
7+1* *1 
75-17 7+30 
7A-V 744 
74 7M1 

73-15 7M 
TVS 7WD 
73-23 73 A 
7I46- 71-24 


78-11 

7740 

76-22 

» 

7+2 

74-14 

73-27 

73-9 

72-25 

72-6 

7146 


+17 
+17 
+17 
+4 12 
+W 
+J8 
+19 
+» 
+11 
+13 
+14 


GNMA (CBT) _ _ . . 

SM0X00prtn-PliA3Msri MOpc) 

7+6 57-17 JUI> 

73-23 59-13 SOP 73-25 75-4 

ST SM Dec 734 7+11 

72-20 50-30 MOT 7*4 7+6 

IM 50-25 Jim 72-29 73-26 

jul 65 Sen 

EsL&ries Prev. Sale* V0 

Prev. Dot Open lit 480 i»R 

CERT. DEFOSITOMM) 

51 million- Pis of IM pet 
9160 Jun 9X65 9Z75 

%% • SS .g ^ w 

nSi 8+S Jn nxo 9W0 

E*f. Softs Prev.satos 296 

prev.Day Open lnL UBWH7 
EURODOLLARS (I MM) 
si nrf«ton4»rfl80rat 


74-22 

73-25 

739 

73-26 

72-28 


W-15 

7+41 

7+D 

73-28 

73-14 

73-2 


*114 

+113 

+112 

+m 

+112 

* 1)2 


9245 

All 

9L75 


91X0 

9074 


9Z71 

92X4 

9L77 

91X8 

91X4 

9076 

908? 


+.* 

+.10 

+.19 

+J0 

+41 

*33 

*M 


713S 

7131 

7U4 

9002 


82X9 

MX 


Jon 

Sop 




0989 

mojjM 

EsL Sales 


86JB 

87JS 

8784 


Mar 


9Z31 

9180 

HE 

90X8 

90X5 

90X5 


Sop 
D ec 

Pre*5ri*4 3SXB4 


9240 92J1 
9US 9UI 
91X9 91X7 
9180 9085 
9074 90X0 
9CAS 90X5 
90.14 90X5 


9U9 

91-42 

91X2 

90X8 

9040 

9013 

0987 


+.14 

+19 

+20 

+81 

+J3 

+24 

*25 

+25 


prev. dot Open ini.130830 often 


GERMAN MARK OMM) 

Spar mork- 1 poinfeoueft 18X001 
2733 .2905 Jon 2290 2305 

2545 3930 Sep 2312 2302 

2610 2971 Dec 2333- 2343 

2415 2040 Mar 

Ext Sates 38835 Prev. Salas 34X35 
Rrev. Day Open Inf. 52809 upZ6W 


+3 


2327 

2352 


+1 


JAPANESE YEN (HUH) 

3per yew- Ipoki t equals saxuOOOl 
804450 803826 Jtwi X64C03 804036 X04BB2 JXM032 
004150 X03870 Sep 204022 804052 804017 804047 
004350 803MB Dec 804MS -004000 204043 804068 
004140 20*035 Mar 804WO 804108 804)80 804100 
Est. Soles 18836 Prev.Satas 9X82 
Prev. Day Open lnL 18251 op 1X43 


+33 

+37 

+• 

+47 


SWISS FRANC (1MM) 

Spar franc- 1 palnteaaais 108001 
3900 2439 Jun 2913 2998 

-552 122 Sr J9S3 

•2SS OK JIB JW 

-4025 2B3S Mar 

Est. Softs 19844 Prev.Satas 26-491 
Prev.Day Open lnL 32.175 upZ902 


2860 

2912 

2961 


2918 

2970 

8015 


+4 

+5 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130X00 bd-tt-SperUMObd. ft. 

230X0 13920 Jul 19350 15980 15250 156-40 

197X0 135X8 SOP 1*1X0 16130 I5£0O 15BS0 

106.10 137X0 Nov IfilJta 141.90 15620 16020 

187X0 144X0 Jon 14L50 14SX0 1*2X0 1HN 

195X0 150X0 Mar 14820 1<W.00 167X0 16860 

17+40 inxo May T7030 17020 17020 17Z50 

133X0 17140 Jill 173.90 

Softs Z768 Prev. Softs 2224 ^ 

Prev. Day Oxen lot 9264 up 6 


+.90 

+180 

+2X0 

+180 

+1X0 


COTTON 3UIYCW ■ 
30000 cents par Rl 


79X5 

6090 

Jul 

8222 



77X0 

6082 

Oct 

4090 

6180 




Dec 

6U5 

6270 




Mar 

62X0 



70OQ 

61X6 

Mery 

6125 

6380 





6340 



EsL Soles _2XOO Prey. Sales 2339 

60X0 


*194 

61X0 

61X6 

6Z8B 

63X0 


6025 


+27 

+30 

+21 

+X8 

+X7 

+21 

—85 


HEATING OIL OfYME) 

42X00 bo I- cents ner oai 
7£20 45X5 Jul 7TL70 

75X0 4825 Aug 7120 

76X5 6980 Sen 7280 

77.10 7120 OCT 72X0 

7LSS 72X0 NOV 73X5 

7825 7280 Dec 74X0 

7690 74JD Jan 13X6 

74X0 74X0 Apr 

Est. Series Prev.Satas 7X37 

Prev. Day Open int 17X60 off 1893 
CRUDE OIL WY MCI 
LOao bbL- oollare per bbL 


71.15 

71X0 

72X0 

7Z70 

7420 

7520 

75X0 


W25 

7tt£S 

7125 

7Z15 

7325 

7480 

74X0 


7180 

S3 

7240 


“JO 


S8 =3 


29X4 

29X7 

29X8 

29X0 

29X0 


3465 


24X5 

26X2 

34X2 

2482 

3482 

3471 

2175 


Jul 

AUB 

Sep 

OCT 

NOV 

% 

Frt> 


27X0 

2720 

36X7 

3625 

26X1 

MM 


27X4 

2723 

26.91 

2425 

26X5 

2625 


273& 

26X7 

26X5 


29X6 
29X5 
29X5 
27-96 
2670 
27X0 

Est Sates Prev.Satas imm 
P rev. Day Open im. SO«9»aff22l 


2620 

2588 

2585 


Apr 

May 

Jun 


P 

2636 

3% 

25X7 

2587 

25X7 

25X7 

25X7 

2520 


i 

!• 


-Stack liMtezpt 


(index* 


——— 

H B SHBhm 

Prev.Day Open int. TZ^^Sm 
.™ Jun 

Est. Sales 


+X0 

+X5 

+X5 

+120 


iss is 

SSS5.S ggywtNTFE) 


— 3S 


m 


Pr£ D^Opm uSj° 


B B IB! M B w 


UP 1833 


—85 

+.13 

—.15 

-.10 



Woody's 

Reuters 


OJ. Futures ______ 

com. Research BureJT M 
Woody* : base too - rw 
P - preifmlnary; f! hroT 3 * 1931 ‘ 


Previous 

I.7V9J0 

moo 

23130 


IMM; 


g!£5; of Trade 


HYCSCE: 

tovcE: 

COMER: 

NYME- 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


Olftaao fytarrn Tl. raae 

WKSBgp 


EkCTxmua 


i 



......... : 'V :• 

. T- -7+ ..... V Sfyrr-- 

: r:— 


■■■■ 't- 


















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


Page 15 


i i BUSINESS ROUNDUP 

'V 


Unocal to Cut Spending 
But Will Not Sell Assets 


By Nancy Rivera. 

Lot Angela Tima Service 

„ LOS ANGELES — Unocal 
'Tp. has no plans to sdl assets to 
pto off the $4.15 bfflkm in new 
debt that was the price of fending 
off the takeover bid of T. Boone 
Pickens, but capital spending will 
be scaled bade, according to Uno- 
caTs chairman, Fred L. Hartley. 

Unocal, which has been Mr. 
, Hanley’s employer for 46 of hia 68 
years, will “keep right on going” 
now that the Mesa Partners n in- 
vestor group Led by Mr. Pickens has 
, agreed to end its three-month at- 
tempt to take over the company, 
Mr. Hanley said in. an interview 
last week. 

Unocal, parent of Union (Ml of 
vjifomia, is still evaluating how 
• much It will need to reduce capital 
; spending because of increased debt 
expenses. Mr. Hartley estimated 
that the 1 985 investment program, 
originally set at $2.1 bfflian, will be 


• trimmed by an estimated J200mil- 
lion to S3d0 nwirirm. 

"r-. His anger at the attempted lake- 
•- over was unabated. "It may be that 

'"T- 

p Orders at 8-Year High 
^ For Firms in Britain 

- Reuters 

' LONDON — British firms have 
~-5-‘ more orders on their books than at 
“■“’any time in the past .right years, 
■,x according to a survey pobfished 
Monday. 

The Confederation of British In- 
vdustiy*s survey of 1,596 companies 
found the highest level of orders in 
the electrical, instrument, and engj- 
-oeering industries. 


das is a new day” and if “the laws 
of the land are not enforced to the 
degree required to stop this kind of 
behavior; then maybe maintaining 
Ugh debt becomes a way of life,” 
Mr. Hartley said. 

“It would scan that we have a 
real failure in our capitalistic sys- 
tem and a real failure ctf our morals 
and n ww ? an< f ethics and integ- 
rity in our. society if one has to 
main tain a heD of a Ugh debt m 
order to protect oneself from the 
financial barbarians.” he said. 

Last month, Unocal settled with 
the Mesa grow by agreeing u> in- 
dude 7.7 mini on shares of its Uno- 
cal shares in ah expensive stock 
bny-bacfc plan that wm raise corpo- 
rate debt by $4.15 bilKcm. 

Mr. Hartley said Unocal mil be 
able to pay the interest on its debt 
out erf company cash flow, adding 
that the fewer number of shares 
outstanding wU reduce the compa- 
ny’s quarterly dividend payout by 
about $70 million after taxes. 

In a few yean, presuming that 
the company's stock price rises. 
Unocal may sell -new common 
stock to repay some of its debt, he 
«riif “It won't be this year for dang 
sure,” he said. U occurs stock price 
plummetcd from $46 the day of the 
settlement to S33.25 on Friday. 

Mr. Hartley — - who character- 
ized Unocal's battle with Pickens 
as “mad dog bates man; man bites 
back; man, with superior intellect, 
defeats mad dog” —is not tempted 
to forgive and forget. 

If arch raids atm takeovers con- 
tinue, he “we’re going to see 
further deterioration in the ability 
of the United Stales to survive as a 
viable competitive society.” 


Semiconductor 
Plans Layoffs 

The Associated Press 

SANTA CLARA, Calif ornia 
— National Semiconductor 
Corp„ citing a year-old slump 


SME Sale Is Not Selling Well in Italy 


Bond Index Set in Chicago 


in the semi conductor industry, 
said Monday that it will lay off 
1300 workers in tbe United 
States and Europe and is can- 
celing plans for a new plant in 
Portland, Oregon. 

The layoffs will involve 600 
workers at the company's head- 
quarters in Santa Clara, as well 
as workers at facilities in Salt 
Lake Gty, Utah; Danbury, 
Connecticut; Maynard, Massa- 
chusetts, and in Europe, the 

company said 

National Semiconductor, 
which employs about 37,000 
people worldwide, said the lay- 
offs at the domestic plants wul 
occur over the next few weeks. 


Reuters 

ROME — A political row has 
broken out in Italy over an attempt 
by the state-owned giant Istituto 
Ricostrozione lndustriak, or DU, 
to sell its profitable food subsidiar- 
ies to private interests. 

After agreeing in April to sell 
those subsidiaries to Carlo de Ben- 

edetti, the chairman of Olivetti 
SpA, IRI still is waiting for the 
minister of state industry, Gelio 
Darida, to approve the transaction. 

Meanwhile, three higher bids 
have been received for the subsid- 
iaries, which are grouped mostly 
under Sotietd Meriodionale Finan- 
riaria SpA, or SME. 

The Christian Democrats, tbe 
largest party of the centrist coali- 
tion, are openly dissatisfied over 
Mr. Darida’s h-imfling of the affair, 
and political sources said be might 
be asked to resign. 

The Socialist prime minister. 


Bettino Craxi, does not oppose the 
principle of private ownership but 
has resisted the sale to Mc.de Bene* 
detti on the grounds of inadequate 
consultation. 

With the outcome still far from 
dear, businessmen and bankers say 
the affair has damaged the credibil- 
ity of IRJ and sown the seeds of 
further discard within the five-par- 
ty governing coalition. 

- An influential newspaper, Cor- 
riere della Sera, commented that it 
“places in jeopardy the entire po- 
licy of privatisation.” 

Ccsare Romiti, the managing di- 
rector of Flat SpA was quoted by 
the newspaper as saying: “No pri- 
vate group will be able to ne«>tiaie 
with IRI m safety after this.” 

In a further complication, a 
Rome public prosecutor, Luciano 
Infclisi, has confiscated IRI files 
relating to negotiations with Mr. de 
Benedetti to investigate a possible 


conflict between public and private 
interests. 

The chairman of IRI, Romano 
Prodi, originally agreed to sdl to 
Mr. de Benedetti’s Industrie Bm- 
ton! Perugma a controlling interest 
in SME and another IRI food sub- 
sidiary, SocietA ItaHana Dokaario 
Alimentare Milano SpA or SI- 
DALM. for 397 bfflion lire ($201 
million). 

Under tbe terms of the sale, the 
state-controlled merchant bank 
Mediobanca and medium- term fi- 
nance house Istituto Mobiliare 
Italian would pay IRI a further 100 
billion lire fra- minority equity 
stakes. 

SME became an attractive prop- 
osition only recently when, after 
years of often heavy loses, it an- 
nounced 1984 net profits exceeding 
550 million on turnover of SI -57 
billion. 


(Conthmed from Page 11 ) 

labor-intensive business. Because 
there will always be a sales force to 
be compensated and supported by 
the house, there is a cap on how 
narrow dealer spreads can be- 
come." 

Further, he and Mr. Hamilton 
noted that, in the past five years or 
so, individual investors had ac- 
counted fra about 80 percent erf 
the tax-exempt bond market. 
“Aside from the funds, institutions 
have been largely absent from tire 
municipal bond market," Mr. Pak- 
luoed said. “It is always more ex- 
pensive for a dealer to handle indi- 
vidual accounts." 

Having said this, however, he 
added that he expected the new 
tax-exempt index futures to even- 
tuality namsw spreads because tbty 
“wilf definitely increase the houkf- 


iw of the municipal market." Why? 
“Simply because the major dealers 
will be able to use tire futures to lay 
off some of the risk in carrying 
large selections of bonds on their 
shelves. Anything that reduces risk 
will eventually narrow spreads” 

Given the recent sharp rise in 
prices of tax-exempt bonds, which 
is the direct result of falling interest 
raxes, who would be taking the 
short side of the index futures? Af- 
ter all, one of tire fundamental rales 
of futures trading is never to buck 
today’s market trend, no matter 
what the trader thinks will happen 
tomorrow, 

Mr. Palalucd agreed. “But there 
is another phenomenon that also 
obtains," he said. “Trends always 
become exaggerated; if current 
prices become too rich, it will un- 
doubtedly provoke a swing to the 
short side.’' 


^ Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 
k i Tokyo Pacific Holdings (Seaboard) N.V. 


One-Third of U.S. Thrifts Will Disappear, Analysts Predict 


The Quarterly Report as of 31 st March 1985 has been 
published and may be obtained from: 


By Nathaniel Nash 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Govern- 


ead of the decade, the experts esti- 
mate. 

Tbe thrift units that are effec- 


federal ages 
oversees tire 


that regulates resembling big mmmMrial banks. 


industry. 


The rare ray of hope in recent 


He added that the survival of has been the substantial 


ment statistics show that the num- tivdy bankrupt bnt still doing busi- another third of the institutions drop in interest rates. Some ana- 

berofU.S. savings and loan associ- » 10 ^dependent “on the ludt of the ^ predict that as a result of low- 

ations that are effectively banket open by federal authorities to avert draw on interest rates, whfle the CT ^ 1985 will be Lhe thrift in- 

— with liabilities exceeding assets an abrapt shakeout that couldde- rMn^mgon^third had ’very dusu/s most profitable year on 


bnt still open — hasincreased five- P**® *0 fcdcraI insurance fund good prospects.” 
fold since 1981, to more than 400. and might also, by disrupting pub- The plethora of troubled thrifts 
Industry leaders and government he wmndencc, trigger runs by de- ^ reflective of an industry that is 
regulators expect most of them will positars on smaller institutions. now highly fragmented, in tbe pro- 
be forced to dose or merge. “Losses at these thrifts since cess of dramatic change and stnig- 

Moreover, another 400 thrifts 1981 have so eroded their assets glmg to survive. Analysts antio- 
whose assets barely exceed tbrir that a third of the industry willjust pate widespread consolidation 
liabilities wfll also have a hard time not survive,” said Richard Pratt, ahead, as the industry — once corn- 
surviving. In all. perhaps one-thud chairman of Merrill Lynch Mort- posed of many small institutions 
of the 3,150 federally insured sav- g a g e Capital Inc. and head of the making residential mortgage loans 
mgs and loan associations .sow Federal Home Loan Bank Board — evolves into one dominated by 
open are likely to disappear by the from 1981 to 1982. The board is the mnlti-biDion-donar financial giants 


record with possibly 90 percent of 

the narinnB thrifts earning money. 

But lower rales will provide little 
help to the worst cases. “Any SAL 
with a negative net worth that is 
losing money today wffl probably 
not survive,”said one analyst 


PI arson, IMAIn p a Pierson KLV. 
Herengracht 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam 

National Westminster Bank PLC 

Stock Office Services. 

3rd Floor, 20 Old Broad Street 
London EC2N 1EJ 

NJU. Rothsctdd & Sons Umitad 
New Court, SL Swtthln's Lane, 

London EC4P4DU 

rEropAermedeBanqne 

21 Rue Laffitte, Paris 9 

THnkauBA Burkhardt 
KflnlflsallM 21-23 
D 4000 DusseJdorfl 


SaL Oppenhdm Jr. & Cte, 

Unter Sachsenhausen 4. D 5000 Kaln 1 

Bonque Parttas Belgique S A. 

Boulevard Emils Jacqmam 162, 

B 1000 Bruxelles 

Bimqua Paribas 

3 Rue cTAntin, Pans 2 

Banqua Paribas (Luxembourg) SJL 
10a Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg 

UanU Lynch International A Co. 
al European Offices 

RothscMd Australia Limited 
17 Bridge Street. 

Sydney NSW. 2000 


. NEW ISSUE 


May.tU.19K5 


ADVERTISEMENT — - 

INTE3RNATICMNAL FUNDS 

Quotation s Supplied by Funds Listed 
6 June 1985 




Wr 


mrr 






m 


tm 




.yyy 


TfV 


m 



m 


Abbas Industrie, the European 
aircraft consortium, announced it 
has received firm orders valued at 
S200 million fra three A-300-600 
wide-bodied commercial jets from 
Korean Airlines. Korean Airlines 
also took options on five more A- 
300s. 

American Telephone A Tele- 
graph Co., Bank of America, 
Chemical Bank and Tune Inc. said 
they plan to form a joint venture to 
provide electronic financial ser- 
vices to consumers and small busi- 
nesses. 

British Petroleum Co. PLC is 
still interested in exploring for oil 
off China’s coast, although results 
so far have been disappointing, Pe- 
ter Walters, the c om pany chair- 
man, said. 

Eastman Kodak Co. said it intro- 
duced its first stand-alone 8-nun 
video cassette recorder, the 
MVS-5380. 

Hongkong Land International 
Ltd., a fully owned subsidiary of 
Hongkong Land Co., said it is re- 


LSE Facing 
Big Changes 

(Continued from Page 11) 
markets cannot be stopped,” 
warned Sir Nicholas Goodison, 
c hairman of the e xchange , in a let- 
ter this month calling on members 
to support the proposed changes. , 

A 50-percent majority is re-; 
quired for passage of the resolution 
hacking plans to eliminate the CUT- i 
rent 29.9-percent limit cm the share 
an outsider can own in a member 
firm. A 75-percent majority is. 
needed for the constitutional 
change that would create shares in 
the exchange that can be trans- 
ferred from individuals to firms, 

for how many sSwes 
dividuals may hdd. 

Polls suggest that die first vote 
wm pass handily but that the sec- 
ond may be very dose. 

The main opponents are small 
firms and individual members, who 
either oppose tbe changes altogeth- 
er or believe that they are being pal 
into effect too quickly fra the ex- 
change to control the results. 


doxnmgan Aug. 1 all its outstand- 
ing S75 million, 7-3/4 percent guar- 
anteed debe n t ur e s due in 1988 for 
about S22JI million. It said the re- 
demption is part of an overall debt 
retirement program. 

Hoagkoog&Kowkxm Wharf and 
Godown Co. Ltd’s offer of 1 1 Hong 
Kong dollars ($1.41) a share has 
been accepted by shareholder s con- 
trolling 1431 percent of the equity 
of Allied Investors Corp. 

International Business Machines 
Crap, said it introduced a new 
modular processor with expand- 
able storage capacity, the IBM 
4702, to hdp meet the increasing 
automation requirements of banks 
and other financial institutions 
with remote locations. 

Lloyds Bank PLC said it has a 
mandate from Atlantic Southeast 
Airlines of Atlanta to arrange $30 
million in finandng for the pur- 
chase of six BrariUa aircraft tram 
Embraer, the Brazilian aircraft 
manufacturer.* 

Magellan Petroleum Crap, said 


its board authorized a rights offer- 
ing of about 4.9 mini on common 
shares. It said shareholders would 
be able to buy one share at $1 for 
each three shares held under terms 
now contemplated, which are sub- 
ject to change. 

News Corp. Ltd. announced 
plans to double its authorized capi- 
tal to 200 miTli on Australian dollars 
($131.6 million) through creation 
of an issue of 199.% million 50- 
cent ordinary shares and 10,000 re- 
deemable one dollar preference 
shares. 

PHB WeserhBtte AG, a West 
German engineering company, ex- 
pects 1985 group turnover to be 
little changed frean 1984’s 972m3- < 
Hon Deutsche marks (S3 1 4.6 mil- 
lion), Peter Jungen, the managing 
board chairman, said. 

Sony Inc^ which has the ccmces- 
sron fra Aerospatiale in Japan, or- 
dered five Ecureil single-engine he- 
licopters from the French 
company, bringing to 100 the num- 
ber of AS-350Bs sold in Japan. 



This a njujun cement appears as a matter nf record only. 

$10,000,000 

The Republic of Ecuador 

Floating Rate Notes Due 2015 

Guaranteed by 

The United States Agency 
for International Development 


The undersigned acted as principal m the placement 
of these Notes. ' 


The First Boston Corporation 




,i-TT7.TTTij Ci; 


1^.- t*l i 


S3 


1 


ed commissions,” said Derek 
Greenwood, the chairman of a 
steering committee of seven small 
firms. “We don’t Hke ownership by 
outside firms because we don’t see 
how we can control them. We think 
that the proposals for ownership of 
the exchange are wrong because 
they would allow 20 big films to 
control the market” 

Most of all, the traditionalists 
are opposed to the end erf “single 
capacity," the enforced separation 
of brokers and dealers. They claim 
that “Chinese walls” — the mea- 
sures that firms take to Veep their 
brokers separate from their dealers 
in U.S. firms — offer too little 
insurance that investors will be giv- 
en the best deal posable. Many 
worry, too, that they will not be 
able to afford the new technology 
that win be required to operate tbe 
sew trading system. 

The stoat ex c ha nge is develop- 
ing a new information network, the 
Stock Exchange Automated Quo- 
tation System, or SEAQ, to elec- 
tronically display competing bids 
and to offer prices as wdl as infor- 
mation on the size of transactions. 
However, it soon may face compe- 
tition from private vendors for list- 
ing? of the nug'ra stocks. 



FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

PHCB AT29-&B& 
Ai US. DOtLAR CASH 510? 

St MULTCUBENOrCASH $1029 
G DOLLAR BOWS SH3I 

Di MULTOJSWJCr BONDS (MTS 
L 51B8JNG ASSET £1074 

. PCBBGN & CCLONAL 
JMANAGSVBkrr pBESEY) UNITED 
14 MJLCASIBt STOffT^TieLBySBEVja 
TBiQS3Q735l . TEBL4T9ZM3 

ponatmPAcruMs.m 








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dosing 


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dp to Hie dosing on Wall 5lrert 
and da not reflect kite trades etsowtier*. 

Via The Associated Pnss 



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Hcr alb3Suerib imc 


PERSONAL INVESTING 


Five succinct reasons 
why theNX^Idorf =Astoria 
is Newark's 
finest luxury hotel 


Comfort. 


The kind of comfort that comes from 
investing $1 10 million in our hotel over three 
years, including our Park Avenue lobby, all 
public and private function rooms, our restau- 
rants, and our new, luxury guest rooms 

Entertainment 

The choice of entertainment you get 
from three of New York's finest restaurants, 
offering haute cuisine and live grand piano music 
nightly at Peacock Alley, hearty steaks and 
fresh seafood at the Bull & Bear, or gourmet 
Japanese fare at Inagiku, Sir Harry's unique 
safari lounge, the Terrace Lounge, die popular 
Oscar's restaurant, and more. 


Innovation. 


The kind of innovation regarding our 
guests' unique needs that makes us the only 
hotel in the world which hosts a nation's 
embassy, and enables us to offer privacy and 


security to visiting heads of state, as well as 
helping each of our daily guests who need the 
impossible done immediately. 

Elegance 

The unparalleled elegance of a priceless 
collection of Art Deco treasures which adorns 
our hotel. And the Waldorf Towers, which has 
been die celebrated residence of a former 
president of the United States, the leaders of 
our corporate industry, a great national hero, 
and those most prominent in society and 
international diplomacy. 

Wue. 

The value that comes from staying in 
New York's finest hotel, but not New York's 
most expensive hotel You can spend more, but 
you can't gd more. 

When business or pleasure brings you to 
New York, stay at New York's finest luxury 
hotel 




9 


Without theWildorf; it isn’t Newark 

Park Avenue at 50th Street, New York Gty 1 0022 -(212) 355-3000 Telex.- 666747 

A Hilton Hotel 


In the world of investment, 
nothing is certain except change. The 
rules of the game in the second half of 
1985 will be significantly different torn 
those in the first halt How different? 

To find out. Personal Investing talked to 
dozens of professionals in major financial 
centers about stocks, interest rates 
currencies and commodities. 

Find out what they said in the 
June 10th Personal Inves ting ^ the 
International Herald Tribune’s monthly 
report for the individual investor with an 
international perspective. 

JunelO. 


atiasrrvwea oetrativss. 


— I Prtv.Dovcmflinr.raa.MD-Biram" - ■ — ■ 


fl 





























































Over-the-Counter 

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| -H 



Animation 
to Oxford. 

The International Herald Tribune and Oxford Analytics 
present a Special Conference on . 

The In ternation al Business Outlook. Christ Church, Oxford, 
September 19-21, 1985. 


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PortBsfi 5 2% 2% 2%4-M 

Form 164 23% 22% 23M— % 

POWbll 382 3* JM 3%— M 

Powrlcs 1111 18% 11 + % 

PwCorrw 10 9 9 9 

Pratts <3x3* 3 3 

Pracest .12 X 27060% 29% 30% +1M 
PfflFna 4 fib fib fib 

PMRsk JO 26 831% 31* 31*—* 

PfctSav 45 7* 4% 6%— * 

PrpdLO M 5* 5M 5M 4- * 

PrwUl XO X 87 34 JIM 22% — 1% 

PrstnCp SB 14 432 M* 74% 14* 

Prawav 124 4% 4% 4%— % 

Priam 207 3M I* 3% 

PrlcCms 24510 9* 10 4-% 

Prtecos 51460M 59* 40 +% 

PrtnvO .14 27 1210 6* 6 4 — * 

Prtronx 2794 11 M IB* 10*— * 

Protflor 1 4% 4% 4% 

PrortOP .16 XI 124 5* 5M 5M 

Proflnw 4 5* 5* S* 

Profits X0 36 1211 11 II - M 

ProaS vs 1 5* 5* 5* 

PrBOCS 16335* 34M 35 — % 

Procrp 8 5% 5% SM + % 

Prplnv 7 4* 4* 4*— % 

ProptT r IX* 88 44 TOM 13% 13% — M 



9* 9* 

Mb 7 

11M 11M— M 
5* 5% 

n n— * 

10* 10M— * 
15 15M + M 

26 26* 4- % 

17 17% 

6% 6% 4-% 

46 46 

36% 37 
26 26%—% 
19* 19* 

6 6 — % 
23* 23B4 + M 
TO* TO* + * 
9* 9*— % 

8* 9 

CM 6% + % 
11% 11M— M 
M — 

8* 9* 4- % 

j% 3% 

30* 30*—* 
14 16M + % 

* * 4 ft 
2% 2%— M 

27% 27* + M 
23 23 

2 % 2 
6% Mb— M 
9% 9A— % 
11 * 11 * 

16* 17* 4- U 
7* 8* +1 

* *— % 
9M 9M— M 
4% 4%4-M 
16% lb* 

26* 2fib— M 
TO* 11 + * 

6% 6% 


Proflnw 

Profits X0 XA 
PtdbSvs 

ProoCQ 

Procrp 

Prplnv 

ProptT r 1X0 8J 


TENDER NOTICE 


Tbe Cofnpaenie Malienne pour Ir D&vdoppement dos Textiles (CLM.D.T.). 
&P. 487 - BAMAKO (MAli) hereby rives notice of invitation to lender for 
the supply of insecticides in three indivisible lots as follows: 

LOT N° 1 300.000 liters 

LOT N°2 25a000 " 

L0TN°3 150.000 ” 

PLACE OF DELIVERY 
CAP on trade al CM.D.T. warehonas MALL 

DELIVERY DEADLINE 
50% before January 31, 1986. 

50% between January 3L 1986 and March 1. 1986. 

PARTICIPATION 

Open to all suppliers tram IBRD member countries, from Switzerland or 
from Taiwan. 

BIDS 

Kds, written in French, must be sent to CMDT, BJP. 487, BAMAKO 
(MALI), or handed in a! their office in BAMAKO by July 6, 1965, 2 p.m 

TENDER NOTICE FILE 

May be obtained against payment of F.CFA. 100.000 from: 

CJLD.T. — RP. 487, BAMAKO (MaE). 

CJFJJ.T. — 13, Rue dc Monretu, 75008 PARIS (France). 

M AIJ EfllbttSCSt 

• ILIA. — S13 R Streep Washington D-C* 

• BELGIUM — 487, Avenue MoUere, 1060 BRUXELLES. 

• FRANCE — 89, Rue dn Cfaerdw^Vidi, 75006 PARIS. 

• WEST GERMANY — IxdaenatmBe 54, 53 BONN RAD GODESBERG. 


PTMLfS 66 33 36620 TO* IV*— * 




Options frwftaSrt*). 


MW I Wx 


» 

JO 

m 9SOV9 I 14251775 
2fl 575. 7X5 I BSlUflO 
350 375 525 

aa 20B-2S 
SB 






STOCK USS USS 

DeVoe- Holbein 

Internationa] bv 5% 6% 

Gty-Qock 

Internationa] nv 2H 3% 

Quotes as of: June 3, 1965 


1 nvestors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone (0)3120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firco nl 































































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 




j'm mad, and umen 

I’M MAD, I'VE GOTTA 
KICK SOMETHING! 


mumum aau bihhb 

HiiiiHimaiiii 




BUT IT SHCVL0NT 
WWEBEENABEANBA&.. 




II 111 III 

1 111 



BLONDIE 


CARE to SAMPLE oug 
avows? SAUSAGE?r" 


!■■■■ ■■■■ HHH 

5ii ihhhhibib 



ACROSS 


i Clown 
6 Waits 
11 School of 
whales 

14 City near 
Silver Springs 

15 Be very hot 

16 Ram's mate 

17 Seafood treat 

19 Newt 

20 Alpine stream 

21 Jot 

22 Outflow 

24 D-l connection 

25 Parts over 
doors 

27 Handsome 
young man 

30 Freight 

31 Gogol's "Dead 


51 Middle East 
bread 

52 Word with 
back or 

blanket 

55 Finis 

56 Seafood treats 

60 Past 

61 

depressive 

62 Ancient region 
of Asia Minor 

63 Anderson's 

•■High *' 

64 Hide the loot 

65 Fertilizer 
ingredient 


23 Warehouses 

24 Joined the 
armed forces 

25 Tamarack 

26 Iranian 
neighbor 

27 Kind of prof. 

28 Capital of 
Qatar 

29 Belonging to us 

30 Scoters 

32 Heat almost to 
boiling 

34 Publicizes 

35 Narrow valley 

36 Concerning 





I'LL. PICK H1M UP 
S' ON AAV WAV . 

. l w-^txfrr 


BEETLE BAILEY 


SARGE SAYS I HAVE 
A LOT OF QUIRKS/ 
6ALONEY/ ^ 


HE HAS TWICE AS 
MANY QUIRKS 
AS I POt ^rvvy 


32 Rail 

33 Shankar 
specialty 

37 Seafood treats 

46 Russian news 
service 

41 Framework 
for plaster 

42 Heron's cousin 

43 Lobster 

(seafood 

treats) 

45 Saroyan's city 

46 Made tough 

49 Contends 

50 Harpsichordist 
Landowska 


1 Actress 
Imogene 

2 Western inst. 

3 Arabian 
Lambourine 

4 Einstein's 

birthplace 

5 Opposition to 
use of force 

6 Part of 17 
Across 

7 Hawkeye State 

8 Mom’s mate 

9 Japan follower 

10 Kind of quartet 

11 Silly ones 

12 Appalling 

13 Allots 

18 Gluttons 


38 Ballet 
movement 

39 Seafood treat 

44 Tocsins 

45 morgana 

(mirage) 

46 Word with 
band or box 

47 S. American 
dance 

48 Where Saul 
met a witch 

49 Hoisting 
apparatus 

51 Greek letters 

52 Departed 

53 Part of 
HOMES 

54 Despot 

57 Consume 

58 Genetic mtrl. 

59 Luau treat 


0 New York Time s, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



'Margaret is always good, but 
1 DON'T THINK SHE CAN HELP IT. * 


THAT SCRAMBLED WOOD GAME 

• by Henri Arnold and Bob Laa 


Unscramble these tour Jumbles. WHERE CAN YOU BUY 
one letter to each square, to tom CAMEL'S MILK? 

four ordinary words. . \ 


DANAP 


RIMON 


YENKOD 



CREEFI 


Now airange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Answer. Y' 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow] 

Jumbles: IRONY WAGER BEHOLD FARINA 


Answer What accordion music might sometimes 
be— LONG DRAWN OUT 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Ai’veng 

Amtlaroom 

Athens 

Barcelona 


Berlin 

Druiuh 

Bucharest 

OtKkmnl 

Copea haven 

Cinta Del Sol 

Dublin 

Edtaooroti 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Genova 

Helsinki 
Ittonbui 
LSI Pal mat 
CJlMl 


11 52 fr 

17 a Ir 

10 61 d 

M 17 a 

IT S3 lr 

11 S3 If 

14 57 O 

15 59 O 

II B Ir 

15 5» fr 

9 48 Cl 

4 39 d 

13 SS fr 

9 48 fr 

II S f 

7 45 lr 

16 61 fr 


awnekak 

Milne 

Hens Kona 

Manila 

MewDemr 

Seed 

saooabai 

Singapore 

TaM 

Tokyo 


LOW 
C F 

34 79 a 

19 66 fr 

36 79 sll 

36 79 sf 

23 73 fr 

16 41 d 

« 48 a 

35 77 d 

24 75 O 

20 48 O 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Cone Town 

Cmattaaco 


Madrid 24 75 

Milan 28 83 

Moscow 30 48 

MunJcn a 73 

Mice 34 7? 

ONo 21 70 

Part* 38 B2 

Prague 21 7D 

Reykjavik U 50 

Rente 29 81 

Stockholm 17 43 

SfnnMtars 29 82 

Venice 29 82 

Vienna 20 48 

wanner 35 77 

Zurich 33 73 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 33 73 


10 50 fr 

V 48 Cl 

<7 43 Cl 

13 54 Cl 

10 50 fr 

17 43 Cl 

12 54 tr 

14 41 lr 

9 41 d 

4 3? fr 

14 61 fr 

I 8 Ir 

10 SO H- 

18 41 fr 

14 57 o 

14 57 fr 

HI S fr 


37 91 17 63 
39 102 25 77 
17 63 8 46 

25 77 14 57 
14 51 9 48 

30 B6 24 75 
22 72 15 59 

31 8S If 44 


LATIN AMERICA 


Bueno* *lr«* 

Cornea* 

Lima 

Mexico City 


14 57 7 es 

26 79 22 72 
21 70 17 43 
25 77 12 54 


Rle 86 Janeiro 29 84 23 73 

NORTH AMERICA 


Ankm 

Beirut 

Oanvucin 

Jc nnn l m i 

felAvh 


J 45 Cl 

— — no 

12 54 Ir 

20 48 lr 

21 » fr 


OCEANIA 


AMhoraoe 

14 

57 

7 

45 

O 

AUWltB 

34 

97 

15 

W 

fr 

Boston 

34 

75 

15 

99 

DC 

Chicago 

29 

73 

S 

44 

PC 

Denver 

U 

75 

9 

48 

PC 

Detroit 

22 

72 

10 

50 

PC 

Hanelalu 

30 

84 

71 

70 

tr 

Hwstan 

34 

93 

23 

73 

DC 

un Anoerti 

73 

73 

14 

57 

fr 

Miami 

34 

93 

23 

73 

fr 

Mine eo noil* 

IB 

44 

7 

«S 

PC 

Montreal 

35 

77 

12 

54 

fr 

Nestaa 

30 

Bi 

20 

48 

fr 

New York 

24 

79 

18 

64 

PC 

San Francisco 

21 

70 

11 

52 

a 

Seattle 

21 

70 

III 

50 

d 


Auckland 13 55 4 43 Cl 

sran*r >7 63 w so o 

ei -cloudy; fo-looav: fr-fofr; h-ftolli 
sh-showars; swenw*: if -stormy- 


Toreata 

WaMagiva 


6 4wr t M l; oe-oamv i 



i 

iHi 


PARNt Z MUST 
HAVE BEEH OH 
LEAVE WHEN THEY 
PASSED THEM OUT 


tor 

Ufa#, 




ANDY C4PP 


AKWNOTY, THERE WE ALL S 
WERE, WW? SWXJLb] 
WALK IN* — 


awcz'iOU'RE intwe' 


'same ' 

AGAIN. 

. DSAR J 


WOULD YOU 
> MIND -< 
' CSRINKirtSJ 


AGCOD STORY -1^ 


WIZARD of ID 


r \A#T A £00* ..-lit 

'oh -mws&efi' 


\ r'krfvecM 
~m mat, my 

, m&r > 


V OFF, HZ WCHt We 

eoFAZTo mx- 




Y?7T*l\\m 


REX MORGAN 


GARFIELD 


REMEMBER, AS WOO 


SNIFF 


WALK DOWN THE J J 
PATH OF UF£...J^L-' 


STOP ANP EAT THE FLOWERS i 
ALONG THE WAV j 


i ' 







WiridStockMarkete 


Via Agence France-Presse June 3 

dosing prices in load aurmda unless otherwise buEaued. 


Ckne P 

Tote end Lvto *46 

Tosco 241 

Thom EMI 479 

T.l. Group 212 

Trofctokir Kse 374 

THF 140 

Ultramar 22B 

UnUwrf Htolll 

United Biscuits 193 

vk*era 300 

Woolwerlti *18 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 


Alka Capca 

Botkton 


isssr 


ABN 

ACF HaldVnn 

Aegon 

AKZO 

AhokJ 

AMEV 

Axiom Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buehrmann T 
Co land Hide 
Elsevier -NDU 
Fakker 
Gist Brocade* 
Helneken 
Hoooavens 
KJJU 
Naarden 
Nat n adder 
Nediiovd 
Oco Vonder G 

Pah hoed 

Philips 

R abaca 

Rodnmco 

Rolioco 

Rarenla 

Rovol Dutch 

Unilever 

Van Ommyrii 

VMF Stark 
VNU 


Morten 
Hum 
IWKA 
Kail + Sail 

Kormlodt 

Kautfiaf 
KtoacknarhK) 
KJoeckner Works 
Kruaa Stahl 


Lufthansa 

4AAN 

M an nesmonn 
.Muanch Rueck 
Nbrdort 
PKI 

Porsche 


PWA 

hwe 

Hlt at nwialoll 

Sdwrtno 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thrssen 

VatM 

Valkswasenwert 

Welle 



F.T.30 index : 161 US 


Handelebanken 


Pres Stem 
Russia! 

5A Brews 
St Helena 
Sasol 

West Holding 


1390 1380 
5500 5500 
1640 1405 
7SS S10 1 
3700 3700 I 
495 495 ; 

4500 4300 


p.tae. in index : 132U0 
Previous : U1SB9 


MBn 


Saab-Sconla 

Somhrfk 

Skimska 

SKF 

SwedtshMatdi 

Volvo 


I. Composite stock Index : 113270 
Previous ; 113120 


aa Caro 
Alltad-Lrans 
Ando Am Gold 
Ass Brtt Foods 
Ass Da tries 
Barclays 


6 ICC 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 


Commerzhaok Index : 125580 
Previo u s : 134531 


AN P C 05 General index : 
Previous : 211 A0 


Arbed 
Bakaert 
Cocker! 1 1 
Cobeaa 

ebes 

.GB-lnno-BM 

GBL 

Gevaert 

I li iTiiiIi ii 

™wwai 

inter cu m 
Kmflettxmk 
Pefntflnq 
SocGoneraie 

Safina 

Solvav 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unera 

Vtoill* Mniluwe 


Bk East Asia 
ClwunflKana 
China Gas 
China Uoh! 
Green tstand 
Hans Sm Bank 


At 

I 


HK Electric 
HKReaHVA 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK 5tx»a Bank 
HK Telephone 
HK YautnaM 

hk wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 


Correa! Stock Index : 2373J0 
Previous : 234*71 


ft a B kfa ri 


AEG-Telefunken 

Allianz vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Boyer 

Bay Hypo Bank 
Bov Vrrslmbank 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
CantGununi 
Daimler -Benz 
OeBuiHO 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
Brtsdrier Bonk 

GHH 


12450 12370 
1268 1297 
253 357 

220.9021850 
23050 229 

353 348 

370 375 

22170 21950 
328 329 

394 395 

21050 m 

142-50 14020 

932 825 

344 34450 
130 148 

548 554.50 
536 23150 
153 15420 
331 332 

541 530 

239.70 28570 
1 10.90 109X0 


inn aiy 
Jardiiw 
JardUw5ec 
Kowioen Motor 
Miramar Hofei 
New World 
Orient Overae as 
5HK Praps 
Status 

Swire Pacific A 
TaiChwnO 
wah Kwana 
Whedock A 
WtnftOnCO 
Wtossr 
World inti 


Bowotar Indus 
BP 

Bril Homo Sf 

Brit Taledo m 

BrnAoraspoes 

Brllull 

■TR 

Blirmah 

Cable Wireless 

Cadbury Schw 

Charter Cans 

Commercial U 

Cons Gold 

Caurtaulds 

Dalsety 

De Beene 

Distil lore 

Drietontabi 

Flsoni 

FreeStGed 

GEC 

Gen Accident 
GKN 

Gtaxoc , 
Grand Mat 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 


Hods Sees Index : 144155 
Previow: 141347 


AECl 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am GoW 


Drtofontabi 

Elands. 

GFSA 

Harmony 

HivekJ Steel 

Kloof 


800 800 
2840 2839 
17800 17500 
1215 1220 
1875 1875 
8100 8200 
1075 1080 
5050 5025 
1790 1790 
NjQ. 3550 
2725 2050 

as 445 

NA 7525 


Hawker 

ICI 

imperial Group 
jaouar 

Land SecorlHes 
Leoal General 
Lloyds Bonk 
Lonrfio 
Lucca 

Marks and So 
Metal Box 
MMtoad Bonk 
Not west Bonk 

PondO 

puunoton 
P lesser 
Prudential 
npeoJ Elect 
mxxUu ntm 

Rank _ 

Reed inti 
1 Reuters 
Royal Dutch C 
RTZ 
I SaotcM 
! Sokrtturv 
Sears HokHngs 
Shell 
STC 

5M Chartered 
Son Alltonce 


51 4 Vi $14 

199 201 

S 89 587 

224 222 

160 154 

394 279 

569 569 

310 303 

394 383 

230 230 

35 35 

535 531 

J1J 309 

US 194 

274 248 

333 520 

307 30t 

m 194 

393 395 

231 220 

368 363 

284 2B4 

555 SSS 

158 157. 

1*0 I* 

221 220 

559 547 

Ml 144 

428 425 

X 58S 

29 5 29? 

OS* H5Vk 

345 345 

5261* 526 

186 182 

998 996 

227 222 

13161245744. 
306 m 

494 49S 

277 277 

an aa 

239 234 

431 425 

747 774 

191 m 

274 245 

298 291 

703 490 

582 573 

173 174 

311 303 

138 136 

413 415 

357 347 

449 444 

308 200 

144 142 

483 448 

194 190 

5100V!] SI DOW 
351 343 

•28 402 

345 365 

449/33*4 37744 
509 5» 

473 673 

324 338 

98 97W 

493 493 

174 170 

477 474 

458 454 


Banes Comm 

Cmtrate 

aaahoMx 

Cnedltol 

Erldania 

Farm! la] hi 

Flat 
Ftmlder 
Generali 
I FI 

Uotcrnnoati 

Itatoca 

ItaimaMllari 


MOrtB^son 

Pirelli 

RAS 

RhOKUltC 

SIP 

SME 

Snto. 

stcxxla 

Stef 


19450 19900 
3239 3200 
7950 8215 
2150 2210 
9950 I 0020 
13800 14020 
3127 3170 
Sum. — 
46300 44950 
7940 8010 
91250 92100 
1399 1425 
78990 82220 
96450 99000 
1444 1690 
6499 6550 

2539 2S45 
68800 49750 
795 79930 
2130 2234 
SUSP. — 
3U1 3264 
15610 15990 
2979 3048 


Previous : 373 j» 


HERBERT CROLY OF T® NEW 
REPUBLIC* The Ule and Thonoh 
of an American Progressive 

By David W. Levy. 335 pages. Illustrated. 

f^eton l AW PK*. * » 

Street, Princeton, N. J. 08540. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

H ERBERT CROLYS name survives asthe 
author of a book, “The Promise of 
ican Life.” and the founder of a magaz^,The 
New Republic. As an mtdkctuai “ 

isas^ofaplaceinevereresiwnabkfa^ 

r, of Ameri^npoUfc m 


^JaSv untoppj- 

sssA^^SSSS 

w? tamed 

N rS to fS. and David Mv. 

?" d ^dHer^rt. as soon as he wb og ■ . 
“^^inStocutS companion, waffi- A 


20 yeareaftcr his father's death, whenfee 
m Sit the older man's precepts wore 
£^™^h^his mind. “The origins tf 1 


Srreat century. But few people wda^Y* 
mudi sense of him as a personality, and 
his time he was difficult to get to know, fns 
most obvious trait was shyness. aD ^_ ne T®* 
notorious for his paralyzing silences. Tnere a a 
family legend that one dav when he was a boy 
of 14his mother said to him, “Herbert, you are 
very silent,” to which be replied: 1 have noth- 
ing of importance to communicate. 

h is much to David W. Levy’s credit that be 
should have produced a lively and engaging 
book when gray abstractions stretched all 
around. His account of Croly is both sympa- 
thetic and generally persuasive. Bui for human 
interest, it is Ckhjts parents who steal the 


UW. A 

His mother, who wrote under the name or 


“Jenny June,"' is usually credited with having 
been the first syndicated columnist in the Unit 
ed States. Cn 


J l4w M4>4 ij UMUura V “ 

id ic atcd #wmLst in the Unit- 
’s father, David Croly, was also 


Solution to Previous Pirate 


HDDS □□□□Q nat§E3 
EDOE1 B3HHD E3E3DIE3 
C3BQB Htaasataaniss 
EEQannaa naaaa 
□aa aanna 
□nsEa0 □□□ aasa 
bob aanatiQ aacia 
nBOBasa ciB^naas 
PBiuQ cenaana □□□ 
beeo oaa Bioiaaaa 
aiaaaa a aa 
oEnma aaaaaaaa 
□Damanaaao □□□□ 
□eqe □□□□□ aaaa 
Edna naoHd Qaan 


economic thought of 

thought was applied to AmencaniCTramoiB . 
S/David Goodman Croly. 
though there were, of course, otlor sources is 
- it was David Cro^ teadungtol ky , . 

5^bissoa’sadI^amorep>*«Ww 

mi government, which would assume idMD- ^ 
SS?Twclfan: of society ' 

tS? arojunt of Croly’s background and to - 

more famihar ground, 
man y intfiresting things to say about 
tion of “The Promise of Amencan fefe and 
Croly’s subsequent role in the - - 

.nwineni, bduduvg to rdauwu wi . 
dore Rooscvdt (and the complicated question 
of who influenced whom). . ;r1nrvnt .. 

immiaTs badeere. who had read “Tbe Proo^ 
of American Life” while they were in Chma • - 

and been enthralled by it - not fte 

chapter advocating “A Nauonal ForeraiPo- 
licy. (It is sometimes forgotten mat Cray’s 
enBehteaed nationalism contained a i oistoct 
i v ie ■ --»■ — > in mnrtff The New Rc- 


stidss a litlie too oosciy vu 
exposition; his account lacks the bite of Uim- 
topher Lasch’s treatment of the same subject m 
to book “The New Radicalism m .America. 


i k r - 


k i 4 


Jo/ut Gross is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 

I F we take a close 1 
finely played posit 



I F we take a close look at a 
finely played positional en- 
counter as that between Grand- 
masters Viktor Korchnoi of 
Switzerland and Jan Timman 
of the Netherlands from the 
second round of die Linar es 
International Tournament in 
Spain, we will uncover White's 
attack relentlessly sweeping ev- 
erything before iL 


As a reply to the Red Open- 
ing, 2 . . . P-Q5 is the most 
argumentative: If White will 
yield space in the center, blade 
wiD grab iL 


It was not possible to inter- 
fere with White’s attack on the 

J ueenside by playing 
) . . . P-QR4? since 11 PxP, 
PxP; 12 K)2, N/1-B3; 13 Q- 
K1 wins a pawn. 

Korchnoi's 11 P-R5 created 
the positional threat of 12 P- 
R6. B-QB3; 13 P-N5, BxN; 14 
BxB, which gives White the 
bishop-pair and dominance of 
the light squares. After 
II . . . R-Nl; 12 PxP, RPxP; 
13 R-R7, While had begun in- 
filtration of the seventh rank. 


Timman could have tried to 
shoo ton off with 13 ... N- 
QB3?, but 14 RxB!, RxR; IS 
N-Kl !, Q-B3; 16 B-N5!, <W?3; 
17 P-N5, N/2-N1; 18 PxN, 
NxP would have given White 


two minor pieces for rook-pl os- 
pawn. 

Korchnofs 17 KR-R1 solidi- 
fied to grip on the QR file, and 
it also threatened 18 
N/B3xQP!, BxB; I9N-K6. 

On 19 Q-Bl, Timman could 
ootplayl9 . . . PxP?; 20 PxP, 
QxQ; 21 RxQ, R-N2, since 22 
RxBl, RxR; 23 KNxQP wins 
materiaL Thus, Korchnoi had 
gained an important tempo to 
swing to queen into the attack 
with 19 . . . K-R2; 20 Q-R3! 

Timman could not play 
20 . . . P-B4?, since 21 
NxKPl.BxB; 22 NxN wins ma- 
terial for White. So he played 
20 . . . R-Kl, which tet the 
white queen invade with 21 Q* 
Q6!, subjecting the Made posi- 
tion to crashing pressure. The 
immediate threat was 22 RxB!. 
RxR; 23 RxR. QxR; 24 
QxN/Q7. 

After 22 N-R4!, Timman 
could not get free with 

22 . . . PxP; 23 PxP, BxB be- 

cause of the annihilating 24 R- 
B7! His 22 P-B4 encoun- 

tered a beautiful refutation in 
Korchnoi's 23 B-B6! Now 

23 . . . BxB would have lost a . 
piece after 24 PxB. Moreover, 
23 . . . NxB; 24 QxFch, K- 
Rl; 25 NxKBP, R-Nl; 26 N- 
Q6! — simultaneously threat- 
ening 27 N-B7mate and 27 
NxQ — is unanswerable. 

Accordingly, Timman had to 



HOHCMtOk'MNnX VWU 

Pashto alter 23. . ,P4M 


drop the exchange with 
23.. i N-B3; 24 BxR, QxB. 
The quideest way to win was to 
return the exchange, as Korch- 
noi did with 25 QxNP!, N-Bl; 


26 Q-B7, NxR; 27 RxN. 

The only way to saw a piece 

would therrhave been to play 

27 . . . Q-QBl, but 28 Q-B7, 
P-N4; 29 Q-N6ch, K-Rl; 30 
NxKBP is just a total mess for 
Blade. Timman read the signs 
and gave up. 


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375 NGK Insulators 
146 Nlkko Sec 
191 Niooon Kaaaku 

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— Nippon Steal 
90 fripcon Yusen 

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202 NaRiura Sec 
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Tcllln 

Tokyo Elec Power 
T okyo Marine 
TOppan Pi lull ! hi 
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MUM/CLJ. Index : 1397141 
Prevtoas : IZTSXjU 
Hew index : 9*442 


All Ordfasartei lad 
Previous .- 973:59 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


Page 19. 


SPORTS 







viEfcsp* 





Lakers Muscle Past Celtics, 136-111 





t*#, . . y 



wsarert 


Said Kareem Abddklabhar (right-cente*, above, gabbing an oppooeafshead during a Game 3 melee): ‘Eraybaty jnst wants to whl’ 


Compiled by Our guff From Dispatches 

| - INGLEWOOD, California — From the onset 
say.**- *be playoffs, the Los Angdes Lakers have 
de nied that their motivation stems from re- 
venge. But they played here Sunday with the 
kind of fire that contradicts such an assertion. 

The result was a convincing 136-1 1 1 triumph 
over the Boston Critics that gave the Lakera a 2- 

NBA FINALS 

1 lead in the best-of-seven National Basketball 
Association championship series. The next two 
games — Wednesday and Friday — will be 
played here. 

Three altercations broke out in Game 3, one 
resulting in the ejection of the Celtics' Ray 
Williams in the final period. The others oc- 
curred in the first half and both involved Bos- 
ton’s Kevin McHale, who kd aD scorers with 31 
points. 

“I don’t know if if s anger,** stud James Wor- 
thy, whose 29 points led the victors. “But we 
remember the kind of things they used against 
us last year. We can’t let that happen again. We 
can’t back down.” In the final series list year, 
the Lakers lost two games after victories had 
seemed assured, and eventually lost the series, 4- 

Now, not only because of tbdr magnificent 
‘if play, the momentum has swung to the Laker's, 
who were routed in Game 1. They have succeed- 
ed in erasing their all-finesse imag e, replacing it 
with one of physical and mental toughness. 

“Those lands of thing are going to happen, 
unless one team harks off,” said Kareem Aodnl- 
Jabbar of tbe shouting matches and beneb- 
dearing episodes. “Everybody just wants to 
win.” 

"dfe* Abdul-Jabbar, whose b rillian t play in the 
I win.’ second fl»me i gnited his team, continued tuS 


pace. After scoring 16 of his 26 points in the first 
half and making such uncharacteristic plays as 
diving to loose halls and dribbling upcoufl to 
lead a fast break (“I make those kind of plays in 
my dreams all the time, ” he said with a smile), 

be played spectacular defense in the second half. 

The 38-year-old center held Robert Parish with- 
out a point or a rebound after intermission. 

Abdd-Jabbar also had 14 rebounds, 7 assists, 
2 steals and 2 blocked shots. Parish finished 
with 17 points and 8 rebounds. 

“I think what happens in the regular season is 
that players tend to play naturally, doing what 
comes easily For them, said the Laker c oach, 
Pat Riley. “When it rets to the playofTs, they go 
beyond that. They do things they don’t do all 
the time.” 


A skyhook in the third period pushed Abdul- 
Jabbar ahead of Jerry West, the former Laker 
guard, as the NBA’s leading playoff scorer. He 
now has 4,459 points in 16 seasons. 

Worthy, in his third season, has finally found 
his niche on a talent-laden team — as a second 
low-post scoring threat and a menacing wing on 
the break. It has not hurt his motivation that be 
is mostly guarded by Larry Bird, generally re- 
garded as the best player in the sport 
Worthy exploded for 15 second-period points 
that helped the Lakers overcome a 48-38 deficit 
10 hsbum a 65-59 halftime lead. 

Los Angeles took command in the third peri- 
od. After Boston had pulled to 7 1 -67, the liken 
went on a 27-13 surge for a 98-80 m argi n . 
Worthy had 12 of his 14 third-period points in 
the run, capping it with a nifty steal from Scott 
Wedman and a Dying fast-break dunk. 

By then Boston Coach K.G Jones could see 
the inevitable and benched many of his starters, 
inrhiHing Parish and Bird. Bird sowed 20 


K * ts, but he hit only 4 of 1 3 shots in the first 
and finished S-for-21. 

The Celtics bit only one of their first 10 shots 
in the fourth quarter, allowing Riley to replace 
his starters. After having been beaten, 12- 10. on 
the boards in the first period, the Lakers fin- 
ished with a 49-37 rebound advantage. 

Tbe rough stuff started early. In the first 
quarter. Laker Bob McAdoo traded head-high 
elbows with McHale and then aimed an open- 
handed slap (it missed). Both received technical 
fouls. 

Los Angdes trailed. 26-23. at the rime , and 
still trailed by 48-46 midway through the second 
quarter when McAdoo pushed McHale into 
Earvin Johnson, and Johnson pushed McHale. 
Johnson got a technical, but the Lakers soon got 
the lead. 

The Lakers’ Kurt Rambis began hit ting the 
floor with regularity. Tbe first time, in the third 
period, it was with Danny Ainge on top of him 
as they were chasing a loose ball. They scuffled 
briefly before bang separated. 

In the fourth quarter. Rambis was ridden to 
the floor by Celtic guard Williams. They were 
contesting a rebound, but Williams fell with 
Rambis against some folding chairs near the 
Los Angeles bench. Williams was ejected. 

After last season's title-series loss to the Celt- 
ics, the Lakers have realized that they have 
elbows too, and now a whole different light is 
being shed on this series. Suddenly the Lakers 
are the baddies. 

“The misconception abom this team is that 
we run up and down the court and don't play 
physical, McAdoo said. “The closer a team 
gets to a ring, aD bell could break loose. You 
don’t get to the finals four straight years without 
being physical We’re tired of being called the 
patsy team from the West,” (NYT. LA T) 


Mandlikova Upset by Kohde-Kilsch; 
Edberg, Connors and Lendl Advance 


Pirates’ DeLeon Finally Shows Right Stuff 


1t.it E 

1- *4 i, 

i ■■■'■ Jj 

* 11 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — West figraum Claudia 
Kohde-Kilsch upset third-seeded 
Hana MandHkova of Czechoslova- 
kia on Monday, and Stefan Edberg 
surprised his Swedish compatriot 
""Anders Jarryd in the French Open 
tennis chatmaonship s 

Kohde-Kilsch’s 6-4, 6-4 victory 
moved her into a semifinal mewing 
against defending rhampipn and 
top-seeded Maitma Navratilova, 
who downed Anna Maria f>ra4rini 
of Italy, 6-2, 6-2, in another quar- 
terfinal match 

Playing in the fourth round, Ed- 
beig’s 6-3, 6-7, 64, 6-2 victory ad- 
vanced him to a quarterfinal pair- 
ing against third-seeded Jimmy 
Connors, who stopped Italian 
Francesco Canceflom, 3-6, 6-0, 64, 
6-1 

Meanwhile, the defending men’s 
Angles title-holder, Ivan Lendl of 
won his foUTth- 
round«, a 6-2. 6-2, 6-0 thrashing of 
American Aaron Krickstein. Lendl 
will next meet Martin Jaize of Ar- 
gentina. who defeated Switzer- 
land's Heinz Gunthardt, 6-1, 6-2,6- 
3. 

The 32-year-old Connors, stiD 
seeking the only grand-dam title 
that has eluded him, lost the first 
set against the unseeded Cancd- 
lotti by spraying forehands practi- 
cally everywhere but in the court 

But Connors needed only 34 
minutes to level the match; the Ital- 
ian could manage only six second- 
set points. 

Cancell of ti rallied in the third 
set, but Connors was fircd-up. He 
broke tbe Italian in the fifth and 


FRENCH OPEN TENNIS 

seventh games of die fourth set and 
closed out the victory on his first 

match point. 

Connors said he dropped the 
first set because T was r ushin g 
myself — I kept going for much too 
good a shot,” he said. “I felt so 
good out there and I had to slow 
myself down.” 

Connors’s best performances 
here have been reaching the sramff- 
nals in 1979, 1980 and last year. 1 
would love to make the final,” he 
said. "Bong in the quarterfinals 
doesn't make my day.” 

Edberg. seeded 14th in the 128- 
player men’s tingles field, posted 
his third victory in seven career 
meetings a gainst his Swedish Davis 
Cup doubles teammate. 

As temperatures again went over 
38 degrees centigrade (100 degrees 
Fahrenheit), the normally placid 
Janyd boiled over in die opening 
set when the umpire called a ball 
out even though the linesman made 
no signal 

The point gave Edberg a service 
break to go up, 4-1, and Janyd 
stormed: “Why did you call that 
for the linesman? You have done it 
twice now. What do you need lines- 
men for?” 

Janyd said later he was “disap- 
pointed" that the umpire overruled 
die linesman on' the paints, but 
stressed that the incidents did not 
affect his performance for the rest 
of the match. 

Kohde-Kilsch used a steady 
serve arid repeated cross-court 


backhand and forehand winners to 
keep just enough of an edge to pull 
the march opt m straight sets. Hach 
time, the 6-foot-l (1. 85-meter) 
West German broke Mandlikova 
in the ninth game to take a 54 lead, 
and then hddserve for the victory. 

“I served well and I mixed it up 
well.” said Kohde-Kilsch, 21. *T 
think I have a chance against [Nav- 
ratilova] because I have nothing to 
lose.” 

The semifinals of this day-court 
event at Roland Garros Stadium is 
the farthest Kohde-Kilsch has gone 
in a major tournament. She has 
won only one of her 1 1 previous 
career meetings with Navratilova. 

Mandlikova, who never looked 
consistently sharp in her earlier 

matches hm , admitted she bad nni 

been playing her best tennis. “I was 
tired," she said. “I thought I was in 
good shape, but maybe I should gel 
nr better shape.” 

Lendl had few problems dealing 
with Kricksion’s main weapon, a 
powerful forehand. The Czech 
light-hander started sluggishly, 
however, losing his serve m tbe 
sixth game. But the 25-year-old 
Lendl won the final four points of 
the first set and didn't allow Krick- 
stein another opening thereafter. 

Said Navratilova, after her easy 
triumph over Cecchini: “Here I am 
in the semis, and I still haven’t 
really been tested. Perhaps it’s be- 
cause I am playing wdL 

CncrJimi. 20, said she was de- 
lighted to be the fust Italian wom- 
an since Sflvana Lazzarino in 1954 
to reach die quartern here. 




Baseball 


Major League Leaders 


NATIONAL LBAGUE 



G 

AB 

R 

H 

Herr StL 

46 

172 

30 

64 

Cruz Htn 

43 

166 

22 

55 

McGoo StL 

41 

154 

32 

50 

Murphy Alt 

47 

174 

33 

56 

Parker an 

48 

W 

24 

59 

Gwynn SO 

46 

113 

22 

56 

VanSIVke StL 

43 

123 

22 

37 

Garvev SO 

46 

TO 

38 

58 

Clark StL 

47 

17D 

32 

51 

Hay*» Pt»l 

47 

178 

21 

51 

Walling Htn 

43 

140 

20 

42 


lor. SI. Loutef-L JOft UO: Com. SI. Lout* M. 
sst. 256; A am Med wttti 533. 

SUBuumU. Goadan. ilw York. 89: Avon. 
Houston. 74: J. Ooloan. Pittsburgh. 75; Volrn- 
zuakL Los ahbwIba w: Sara. ancbmatL 69. 

Saves: Raordoa. Montreal. IS; Gassose, 
Son DNBO.U; UkSrmm.CWcoBQ.i2; Sutter. 
Atlanta, 9: a Smith. Houston. I; Power, Cin- 
cinnati. & 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 


Rnai: Murphy, Atlanta, 33; Sandberg. Chi- 
cago. 33: Cotonou SLLDU&, 32; Gwynn. Son 
Diaao. 32; JCtork. Si. Louis, 32; MoGe* 
St. Louis. 32. 

RBls: Nerr.SL Lnrts.41; J. CMIlSL Lout*. 
41; Murphy. Atlanta 21; Porker. Cincinnati, 
35; KMwwtfy,SwtO|gaa3l;McR»ynoMLSan 
Dtogo. 31. 

- Hits: Harr.SL Louis, 6<; Parker. anchmofl, 
Ji Garvey. San Otago. 58: Grama, San Diego, 
sot Murphy, Atlanta, 56. 

Donates: Parker. OndmatL U: WUIach. 
Montreal 14; Grama San Dtaga. 13; J. Clark. 
Si. Louis. 13: Modlock. Plmnurwv 12; Ray. 
Ptrtsburoh, 12. 

Trtotas: McGee, St. Laois. 6. Raima, Mon- 
treal S; Gladden. San Frendcea 4; Gwynn, 
son Dteaa 4; M. Wilson. New York. A 
Home Run: Murpftv. Atlanta, 13; J. Clark. 
Si. Louis. 10: Cey. Chicago, V; MorrtioU. Los 
Angela* 0; Porker. CtadanalL 8. 

Staten tea: Common. 51 Louis, 34; 
McGee. Si. Louis. 2D; Dernier, atfcnm 17; 
Gladden. San Fitucteca 16: M. Wilson. New 
York, 16. 

PITCHING 

Wan-Last/Wteatae Pd/ERA (4 deCL 
sMh): Hawkins. San Diego. 1H. UHL 271; 
Hvrshlser, Las Angeles. 5-0. UHL 1 JO; Andu- 


Major League Standings 



G 

AB 

R 

H 

pa. 

Break* Sea 

- « 

116 

29 

63 

339 

BacttteOak 

48 

116 

14 

39 

-336 

Hmotrua NY 

33 

126 

34 

41 

■32S 

Cooper Mlt 

43 

UB 

17 

54 

an 

Brenonskv Mfn 

48 

TO 

31 

56 

aa 

WMtafear Dot ' 

---43 

M9 

33 

54 

aa 

Brett Kan 

48 

178 

32 

56 

ais 

Boom Bm 

- 47 

193 

18 

68 

an 

Mattingly NY . 

44 

aa 

24 

56 

an 

Bucknor Bra 

48 

194 

M 

60 

309 

Hatrtwr Mo 

4tr 

207 

38 

64 

JOB 


Rum: M. Davis, Oaklmvvtt; Rft*zn,BoM- 
more.40; R. H enderson . New York, 34; WIiL 
taker, DetrrtL33f Brett, Kansas Cttr.32; Rica 
Boston. 22. 

RBtoMartWr.NewYDrkX; Fh*. Chico- 
do. 36; Bayiar.NtwYork.3S; Brwanskv, Mia 
nosoia 35; Ripken, BaUhnara SSL 
HBk Hatcher, Minnesota 64; P. Brother, 
Seattfa 63; PucketL Mkmsztto. 63; Garda 


Toronto, 61; Beeas. Barton. 60: Buckner. Bas- 
ina 6ft, 

Doubles; Buckner. Bastaa 14: Matttaalv. 
New Ytort. 14; GaeflL Minnesota ra; MaseDv, 
Toronto. 13; 6 ora Hed wtth 12. 

Triples; Wilson. Kansas City. 9; Cooper. 
Milwaukee. 6; Puckett, Minnesota 6; Butter, 
CtovetaneU; PBradtev. Seattte.4; Pettis. Col- 
Kamta. A 

Home Root; Armas. Barton. 14; Brun- 
anskv. Minnesota 13; Fisk. Ottawa 13; 
M. Davis. Oakland, 13; KlnamaaOaldana 11. 

Staten Bam: Pettis, California 24; CoIUns. 
Oakland, IS; Butter. Ctavutand. 16; Garda 
Toronto. IS; Mostoy, Toronto, M; R. Hender- 
son. New York. 14. 

PITCHING 

WOO-Lsst/WteutoB PcUERA (4 dad 
■tees): Clements. CaWertHa 4-a lma 141; 
Loma. Toronto, 4*1 JOB, 148; TendL Detroit 
6-L JS7JJ6; Kemandez.D«trolL4.1, 500,1 M: 
5 are tied wttti J3R 

Strikeaais: Morris, Detroit, 72; Ctenwa. 
Boston, 62; Bcvd. Boston, 61; F. Bannister. 
CMcaoa 61; Blylevea Ctevetand. 53; Stlea 
Toronto, SI 

Saves: Hrmnda Detroit 11; J.KoaalL 
Ooklonail ; a JamoaCMcnoa IS; D. Moora 
Calltomla 10; Quhenterry, Kansas City. 10; 
Rkmetti Now York, HL 


Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN LGAOUS 
East DMsWn 



W 

•L 

Pd. 

GB 


32 

16 

M3 

— 

{Baltimore 

27 

20 

-574 

4 Vi 

'wintt 

26 

20 

J65 

5 

Now York 

. 35 

91 

SC 

6 

Mllwauko* 

32 

23 

m 

tVl 

Barton 

23 

25 

an 

9 

Ctowtand 

17 

22 

J47 

1M 


West Dtrbkw 



California 

27 

21 

.563- 

— 

Chicago 

24 

21 

J33 

TVi 

Kansas Cite 

25 

23 

azi 

3 

Oakland 

23 

25 

J09 

4 

Minnesota 

22 

26 

AS9 

5 

Seattfa 

31 

27 

AX 

4 

Texas 

17 

31 

aw 

10 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Cart DMsloa 




W 

L 

per. 

GB 

New York 

29 

U 

4H 

p- 

Ctocago 

27 

IB 

-MO. 

2 


a 

21 

.571 

3 


34. 

S 

an 

6 

mttsaurgh 

17 

V 

an 

12te 

PWKxJofaWa 

17 

X 

M 

u 


Want DtoMn 



San Dtaao 

27 

» 

SO 

— 

Cincinnati 

26 

33 

so 

3 


35 

a 

J21 

3 


M 

as 

AfO 

4ft 

Atlanta 

It 

a 

Mi 

>ft 

San Frandsca 

19- 

a. 

Mi 

1* 


;Ci; 










AMERICAN LEAGUE 
First Qoaw 

devoted MB M0 M3— 6 7 1 

Toronto .Mean Me— 4 9 1 

Heaton.Woddrt mood Bente. Banda (6) j 
SWrtLLnvoHe IVInndMortlnoc . W— I lt otan.4- 
4. L — St lnfr S t V » W WM s n (6). HRs— Cleve- 
land. Jecoter (61. Toronto, Bell |9). loro <21. 
SecoadOame 

Cteetaad 1M oh oio-2 W • 

Tetaato 4MM190M-6 $ 9 

Bohemia, T h o mp so n (6t Bariuty (U and 
WIRord; loot LaveUe ( 61 , Lamp (71, Coudlll 
Wt Acker TO OndWHtt W— Loot M L- 
BtteaU fr A cker fll.HR— Oerdand. 
Jacoby 171. 

CaWornla M0 111 0M— 3 9 * 

DdTOO 2M NO (11—4 » 1 

John, cnhurn pi, Moore a> and Norrav 
Boom 19] ; crt|eoUSdiWT»r (A Bair U), LO- 
PM (7), HsntOAte (01 and MoMa W-Her. 
Iteds*. 4-1. L Moor s. ^Z. HRs— Coltfornfa. 
Grk* (4). Detroit Pontth (U, Evans 19). 
Mhreskeu' eiumm 5 2 

Mte n s tei o ■ «30 MO Us— 5 M 2 

Haaa Gtaeon (7)and Moore; Scwom and 
lsn*m. W Sdwu n, «. L—Glbscn, 5-2 
HRs— MRMoakea Mofitar 03. Mhineaota, 
OTvOwaky TOLStetoouss (3). 

OoMoM OHMS UO— 1 6 2 

- . on on m»-io a o 
Vtorrea fCataer Ql. TsOmm IS) and 
Heato. (TBrlen W. McGrwor and Rayford. 
w-McGremr, 44. t-Wwren. yt, HRs— 
Oc*hm4Mori*yf7J.Bctna>ort.Gre»2 (». 
KMMCBv . Ml IN Ml— 1 7 a 

CMtnaa ’ 4M ow Ms-4 4 • 

GMilraa Itetun and Waftm; Dotson. 
N*te>n(71.J Mrts6 l9)ondHKLW— Donnn.3-3. 
i > <teta% V4.W— JussoftthR— oecp- 
■o, WoBnr tn. 

Tewm Ml M0 NO- 3 » 0 

Btem 2MM4un— nn a 

Notes. Rreema (41. Welsh Its and Stauau: 
Hurst. Clear W and (Mnm w— Hunt. 2* 
L rwwsma n, HRs— Turns. Parrish 2 (71. 
Boskbi. Rica (U). 


Seattle *04 HO Ut-9 9 0 

New York 011 MB *08—6 f 1 

Snvder, Nunez 15). Best (7>and Sam. Kear- 
ney (5); Rasmussen Cooper (31, Bans IS). 
Rtahetti t«) and HobSV. W— None*. 30. L— 
Rasmussen, N. Sv-Bert (31. HR— Seoffle. 
Rtanos ID. Cawww 151. New York. Mattingly 
( 6 ). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Atlaata OM MO MB— D 3 2 

pH Ntenv b m no oex— s tj o 

Bsdnnte. Dedmon (4), Smith (6). Cam* 
in and Cerone: DeLeon. Holland 163 and 
p«na w-OeLoon.l-7. L-Bedreste.2-4.su— 
Holland (41. 

Cinctiteofi tm no tio— i a i 

SL Loots 2MSMan— 3 0 B 

nw» «md KMcrtv; Forsch. Horton (4). Al- 
len W, Lohll in and Porter. Nieto IS). W- 
Tftbs. 4-7. L-FuML 4-1 
New Tart: m3 (82 020—7 10 0 

San (Novo 2M Ml M0-S 5 I 

SddraML Sisk (6) and Carter; Show. Stan- 
dard (6), Booker ui and Kennedy. W—sour- 

aWt Show, ax Sv— Sisk 03. HRs— 

New York, Carter U). Heap RJ, Son Rm 
Gwynn (2). 

p wte d Btoh te BOB oh got-) T 2 

Sen Frond*® no MB ita-J 7 D 

Rowtey, Andersen (7t Carman m end 
Din; Bhte. WU Items M}. MJ3ovte (7) end 
Brenlr. Trevino (7U W-BtaaM-t-Roiite*. 
64. 5v— MjJavIs (2). HR— San Frandsca 
Daw (21. 

Montreal 0M 126 1BS— 7 12 2 

Los Angela BN HO EM » • 

Smith, Luca 151. 5L Claire (51. Mahler 16) 
and Bufero; Castilte, Horn (6L Nleduttaer 
(S) and Yeoner.W-CaslHibM.t-Sadta.5- 
2. HR— Montreal, Brooks (4). 

Clrtengg SMM2M3-2 4 2 

Haartoa ill BSD Six— 4 9 2 

Cure, Brusstar (5), F o nte no i (6). Fretto 
1 9) and Davte; ALScsti. DJmlth 19) ondSsl- 
Wv. W— MScott, 31 L— Gura. M. Sv— 
Dim tin u). HR— Houston. Doran 14). 




Claudia Kohde-Kilsch 

*. . . Nothing to lose . ’ 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PITTSBURGH — Jos* DeLeon, 
who had been worried about his 
future, can rest a bit easier. 

After going 13-7 over his first 
year and a half in the major 
leagues, the 24-year-old right- 
hander was on a 1-16 streak. Last 

BASERAIL ROUNDUP 

year he flirted with a no-hitter sev- 
en times, but only had seven vic- 
tories to show for his 30 starts; this 
year be was 0-7 and had a string of 
1 1 starts without a victory. But he 
took a load off his mind Sunday, 
combining with A1 Holland on a 


two-hitter as tbe Pittsburgh Pirates 
beat the Atlanta Braves, 5-0. 

In his most recent outing against 
the Astros on May 27, DeLeon had 
lasted 1% innings and wandered if 
that would be his last start. The 
Pirates had sent two other strug- 
gling pitchers to the minors. 

“I was really thinking they’d 
send me down," DeLeon said. *T 
went to bed that night in Houston 
and only slept a couple of hours. I 
was thinking about it because I 
knew 1 hadn’t been doing the job." 

Manager Chuck Tanner called 
him that night, “I wanted to teD 
him not to worry, that his season 


Rose May Climb Charts 


The Associated Press 

NASHVILLE, Tennessee — 
Pete Rose, tbe Cincinnati Reds’ 
player-manager who is zeroing 
in on the record for major- 
league hits, is lionized in a new 
country-music song by Ken 
Scott. “The Ballad of Pete 
Rose" is due to be released Fri- 
day. 

“It’s fitting that Pete have a 
tribute record,” said Scott, a 
singer-songwriter. “When he 
breaks the record, it’ll be a 
on ce-iu-a-lif crime thing. I don’t 
think well ever live to see it 
broken." Rose needs 54 hits to 
break Ty Gibb’s aB-time record 
of 4,191. 

The song — written in 15 
minutes this spring — leads off 
with: 


Golf 


top Bobbers oadearatoas InLPGACham- 
PtonttoPi compute SoaOcy at tbe 6842r ord. 
per-n Jack Mlddoas Sports Center course Hi 
Mason Obio: 

Nancy Lopez. SJ7J00 65-71-72-65—273 

AHre MiTer. 521.125 71-7IW7-73-2SI 

Lari Gartaaez, SISMO 73-724071—304 

Pat Bradley. SUMO 65-73-69-74-304 

Allban Finney, SK7I7 73-74.7140-306 

Ayafco Oleomata. HS17 71-73-72-76—366 

Cindv Flam. SL916 74^0-71-71—256 

Chrb Jetineoa. S6.1H 73-76-69-60— 2W 

Amy Alcott, *6187 74-7V72-70-2S7 

JerRvn Brltz. SU13 69-76-72^1— 288 

Betti Daniel. S&011 71-70-74-73—288 

Kathryn Youaa. 53L703 79-71 -70-70—299 

Sfterrl Turner. *1702 74-75-7079-389 

Dawn Coe. ORB 70-787971—389 

Vot Skinner, 53702 74-79-74-71—289 

Aiav Benz. 53701 73-7173-73-389 

Boante Lower. $3701 7172-74-72—289 

Robin WOttm. SUM 7173-72-73-389 

Hooey Scra n ton. 0721 75-74-70-71—298 

Janet ftnd eruo n . 52771 7374-71-73—290 

Jody dark. S2J71 72-7372-73-290 

Sue ErtL *2771 72-72-7371—290 

Jone B io lock . *2/21 7174-7174-290 

Rode Janes. 1 172D 70-71-7374—290 

Jto S t eatiensoo. SL112 7374-73-71—291 

JUU Inkster, *2.112 74-737273-291 

c. RevnakteDerax. 53112 44-77-7373—291 

Morns Stacy. 52.112. 73637373—291 

Cindy Hitt. 52.ro 7374-7174-291 

Colleen Warner, S2.112 09-7771.74-391 

Sitvio Benatac dn L *2.112 737369-76—291 

Dot Germotn. 52.112 70-736349—291 

Salhr Quintan. SM73 73737471— 292 

Alice RJtanan. S1J73 64-72-79-73-292 

Nanev Rubin. SL673 737373-73-292 

CWttY Kratzert, SU73 73737375-292 

Donno White, SU72 72-7371- 75-292 

JO Ann Rtastemv 51 J36 7376-7363-293 

■ton Flym, 5? J3* 74237273-293 

Patty Sbartmn, XU35 74737373-293 

M. Snen rer-Ocvtin. SUSS 7371-7374—293 

Pennv Pub. «JB 7373-737S-2PJ 

Atwko HDCOOA *1335 737671-74-293 

Tea Raitoers and earateps la Ibe Kemper 
Opcw GORsMcd hater as tte 7A739erd, 
pom CettEresteMBl CoDstnr Ctab envm to 


Loony Wodklns, Ste.125 
Jett Skiman, *16,125 
Dove Berr, *11500 
Robert Wrena S13JOO 
Gaorpe Arctier, *1X500 
Roanle Btack. *10500 
John Matmftev, S1&500 
Crate Stadtor, SMlSM 
Hal Sutton. 09000 
Chip Beck. 57 .750 
Jim Simons, 57,750 
Pat McGowan *7.750 
Loo Htnkteu *7,750 
Dan Haitaorton, SAC 
Bab Twav.S&OO 
M. Cakavacrtila. SSAC 
Baddy Gardner. SUMS 
Mike DonokLa&Ba 
Jim NeHord, S4MJ 
Lonnie Clements. 5&0C 
Donnie Ham mond. S&JM3 
Don PahL *2.9*6 
Mike RekL 51986 
David L un dstr u m. *2986 
Russ Cortiran, 52986 
Jedte Mudd. S2M6 


73737363283 

71-737373-283 

71- 737368-284 
737372-68-284 
6869-7372-284 
7377-7345-285 
69-737368-285 
69-77*71 -68— 285 

72- 71-71-72-286 
71-76-7368-287 
737371-70—287 
6377-69-72-287 
71-70-7373—287 

737374-73289 
75-68-76-70 — 289 
7371-7369—289 
72737473-289 
747371-73-289 / 
69-74-68-68—289' 
73736978—20 
60-747376—289 
73737370—290 
73747373-290 
63746870—290 
69-737469-390 
7371-7372—290 


There’s a man in Cincinnati 
and we all know his name. 

They have a place reserved for 
him in baseball’s Hall of Fame. 

What keeps him going on no 
one really knows. 

He’s got aha of courage, the 
man they call Pete Rose. ” 

Earlier this year, Soott wrote 
and recorded “The Ballad of 
Bobby Knight.” Knight is the 
basketball coach at the Univer- 
sity of Indiana. “Instead of 
singing about bar rooms and 
women, I felt we should pay 
tribute to a couple of good fel- 
lows,” he said. 

“I hope he likes country mu- 
sic,” said Scott, who has never 
met Rose. “This is a country 
song, not Doran Duran." 


Basketball 

NBA Tide Series 


29 M 26 26— in 
25 49 35 36— 136 


SOI Glosson. 590000 
Lorry Mbs, S410GB 
Corey Povtn, S4400Q 
Curtte Strauss, 521000 
W! Ota Wood. 522406 
Gres Normoa, Muao 


73737366—278 
73686373-279 
72736369-279 
7372-74-65—31 
697W4-67— 31 
73737366-282 


Soccer 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
Sorts American Grasp 3 
BofMaa Brazil 2 

Points steflass: Brazil a Paraguay l, Bn- 
Buta 1. IT Sl Wlllttl l U ASMS K JOM 9. PtCfO- 
wav «*. BaByia; Jiao 16, Pansoay vs. Bre- 
zB: Jung 22, Brail vs. Parowav; June 33 
Brazil vs. Bolivia, 

Swlb Amarteoa Grasp 3 
Vmmta ft Pgra I 
Ca tom Ma 1, Araorttea 2 
Mats stoodbgs: Arseattno 4, F*ra 2. CO* 
tempta 2. veuenzela ft Rsmofnlag tauMss: 

Jime9.Psruvs.CetaRibiaArggiifinovs.vso- 

ezueto; Jane 1*. Peru vs. Venezuela 

mexico errr tournament 

Mntca 7 . izrtv l 


j Tennis | 

French Open Results 

MEWS SINGLES 

Ivan Londl (2). CxocMstovakta, del. Aaron 
Krickstein 110). ILS- 6-2, 6-2. 64L 

Jimmy Conn 13). U5. dot. Francetzp 
CacsUotli Italy, 34. 6ft 6-4. 32. 

Stefan Edberg (14). Sweden. deL, Anders 
Jarryd 16), Sweden. 43. 47 137). 44. 4E 

Mteki Jalte. AraentlM. dei Heinz Gunth- 
ardL Switz e rl an d. 4). 67. 41 

WOMEN'S SINGLES 
QoarterfiBals 

Martina Navrottkwa 111, U.&. det A m 
Maria CacrtknL Italy. 42, 42. 

Claudia Kahdo-Kilscb 17). Wert Germany, 
dei Haaa Mamflikova (3),CMdsrtlovakla4 
444. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 

AJVMffCOT L fflil i 

BALTIMORE— Purctaed tne contract of 
ouifleklsr Terry Bogener from Miami of tne 
Florida State League. 

BOSTON — Placed More SuMtwra. CSICtter. 
on the ISrtavtEsaeled Drt. Recalled Dove Sea. 
cntrtier, from Powiuckel of tne internal loral 
League. 

CHICAGO-Opitoned Juoa Agarta Pitcher, 
to Bullata of the American Assodattan. Ac) I- 
vated Julie Cruz, infielder. 

NEW YORKp-Ptocad Ken Grttfm'.eutfteU- 
er, 0*1 Die ISday AnbM Ust, retroactive to 
May 2ft Recalled Vic Meta outfielder, (rota 
Columbus of the internal tenol League. 

National Leasoe 

PITTSBURGH— Placed Marvell Wynne, 
outttewer. on mo Urtav aborted list, ne- 
COUed Trench Davte outfteider. from HowaB 
of toe Poc HIc Coast League. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 

EDMONTQM— Announced left wtno jaras- 
tav Pouzar will D*av far iwrlotai in West Ger- 
many nest seaun 



to 

fga ft fto 

Bird 

8 

21 4 

5 

McHale 

IB 

13 11 

12 

Porlsh 

6 

14 5 

7 

Alngo 

2 

8 3 

4 

DJahnsan 

3 

14 2 

2 

Maxwell 

1 

2 2 

2 

Wedman 

4 

6 1 

2 

Buckner 

3 

3 0 

0 

Williams 

2 

S 0 

0 

Kite 

0 

3 D 

D 

Carr 

2 

4 0 

0 

Clark 

0 

0 2 

2 

Tom Rbnds 
Totals 

40 

93 a 

» 


LOS ANGRLES 


to 

fga H Do 

Rambis 

3 

7 0 

1 

Worthy 

12 

a 5 

6 

AbduhJbbr 

10 

13 6 

B 

EJohnson 

6 

13 4 

4 

Scott 

5 

12 1 

2 

McAdoo 

9 

16 1 

3 

Coooer 

2 

4 3 

3 

Kuachak 

2 

3 3 

4 

Spriggs 

2 

3 0 

0 

McGee 

1 

2 2 

2 

Lester 

0 

1 2 

2 

Halit 

0 

0 1 

2 


14 7 3 26 
9 16 2 17 
7 4 3 12 
6 0 5 19 
0 2 2 8 
2 15 7 

1114 

0 0 0 5 

0 0 12 

0 0 0 1 


Totals S3 96 58 36 43 34 28 136 

Three noint pools: Wedmtex Scott, Cooper. 
E. Johnson, McGoo. Technicals: McHalg,Mc- 
Adoo. E. Jcfinjon, L A. coach Pal Rltev. WIV 
Items {•tectedl. 

AlteadaDse: 17^85. 

May 27: Boston leu, log Angeles 114 
May 50: Las Angeles 1B9, Boston 162 
Jane 3; Lao Aaoafas 134 Boston 111 
June 5: Boston at log Angeles 
Juno 7: Boston at Lea Angeles 
x-jutm 9: Los A n geles at Boston 
x-Jima II; Loo Angeles at Boston 
(x*tt necessary) 


Football 
USFL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 



W 

L 

T 

Pd. 

PF 

PA 

Birmingham 

U 

4 

0 

JT4 

365 

2C 

New Jersey 

10 

5 

a 

JbB 

352 

305 

Tamaa Bov 

9 

6 

0 

sea 

353 

30 

Brttlmere 

8 

6 

l 

set 

283 

236 

Jaebsmvms 

■ 

7 

0 

so 

341 

334 

MHWtot 

B 

7 

0 

sa 

318 

292 

Ortaatto 

4 

11 

0 

so 

264 

392 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Oakland 

11 

3 

1 

J67 

367 

281 

Denver 

W 

5 

0 

aa 

394 

311 

Houston 

t 

S 

8 

MS 

434 

291 

Arizona 

6 

9 

0 

JUS 

299 

336 

Portland 

4 

11 

0 

aa 

212 

360 

Las Angeles 

3 

12 

a 

300 

21* 

287 

San Amenta 

1 

12 

0 

300 

223 

347 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Baltimore 17 . jocLmuiwIIM 12 
Oakland 3 ft Pori land 20 


started with his next start. He kept 
hearing he was going to Hawaii He 
heard it from everybody but me." 

Against the Braves, DeLeon al- 
lowed only one hit in five innings to 
gain his first victory of 1985. He 
walked one batter and struck out 
five before bring forced out be- 
cause of a blister on his throwing 
hand. DeLeon not only (niched 
hi merit out of trouble, he pitched 
the Pirates out of last place in the 
National League East 

Reds 8, Cardmals 3 
In St. Louis, Pete Rose had three 
hits and Jay Tibbs pitched his sec- 
raid complete game of the season to 
lead Cincinnati. 

Giants 3, Phffiesl 
In San Francisco, Vida Blue, 
Frank Williams and Mark Davis 
combined on a one-hitter — Rick 
Schu’s fifth-inning triple — as the 
Giants completed a three-game se- 
ries sweep of Philadelphia. 

Meb 7, Padres 3 
in San Diego, Gary Carter and 
Danny Heep each hit two-run 
home runs and rookie pitcher Cal- 
vin Schiraldi. just back from the 
disabled list, weathered a two-run 
homer by Tony Gwynn to last five 
innings and pick up the victory. 

Dodgers 8, Expos 7 
In Los Angeles, consecutive tin- 
gles by Mariano Duncan, RJ. 
Reynolds. Pedro Guerrero and 
Greg Brock highlighted a five-run 
fifth that helped the Dodgers win. 

Astros 4, Crfs 3 
In Houston. Mike Scott retired 
IS of the fust 16 batters he faced 
and Terry Puhl doubled home two 
runs in the fifth to help the Astros 
salvage the final game of a three- 
game sen 

White Sax 4, Royals 1 
In the American Teag ue , in Chi- 
cago, Greg Walker’s three-run 
homer capped a four-run first and 
the White Sox wait on to their fifth 
consecutive victory. 

Tigers 4, Angels 3 
In Detroit, Darrell Evans led off 
the ninth until a home run that hit 
the facade of upper deck in right 
fidd to give tbe Hgers their victory. 

Orioles 10, Oakland 1 
In Baltimore, Wayne Gross hit 
two homos and Eddie Murray 
wait 4-for-4 in support of Scott 
McGregor, who registered his third 
straight complete-game victory. 

Red Sox 12,' Rangers 3 
In Boston. Jim Rice’s four hits 
(including a bases-empty home 



Jos& DeLeon 

'... Thinking they’d send me down. ’ 

run) paced an 18-hit attack that 
buried Texas. 

Ttfns 5, Brewers 4 
In Minneapolis, Mike Sten- 
house’s two-run homer in the 
eighth helped Minnesota end a 10- 
game losing streak. 

Mariners 7, Yankees 6 
In New York, Alvin Davis drove 
in three runs and former Yankee 
Domingo Ramos hit his first home 
run and had an RBI single in help- 
ing Seattle end the Yankees' 12- 
game home winning streak. In the 
third inning, after a check-swing by 
Dave Winfield that was called a 
ball. Mariner Manager Chuck Cot- 
tier charged onto the field to argue, . 
and was quickly gected. Cottier, 
became so infuriated with first- 
base umpire Durwood Merrill — 
who had ruled that Winfield did., 
not swing — that he pulled first 
base off its peg and threw it into 
right field On his way to the club- 
house, Cottier stopped in the Seat- 
tle dugout to pick out four bats and 
four helmets, which he tossed onto 
the fidd 

Indians 5, Blue Jays 4 

Blue Jays 5, Indians 2 
In Toronto, Geveiand won the 
opener of the major leagues’ first, 
double-header of the year cm Jerry 
Willard's three-run ninth-inning 
double off Dave Stieb. Damaso 
Garcia doubled on the Grst pitch of 
the nightcap and Ranee M ull in its 
hit Rick Bebenna's next offering 
for an RBI single; Lloyd Moseby 
and George Bell added run-scoring 
singles la£er in the inning, and the 
Blue Jays coasted home. (AP.UPlf 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Lopez, on a 65, Breezes to LPGA Tide 

MASON, Ohio (AP) — Nancy Lopez swept by Alice Miller with a 7- ' 
under-par 65 in Sunday’s final round to win the Ladies Professional Golf 
Association Championship by right strokes. 

Lopez’s total of 273 came within a stroke of tbe 72-hole record in the - 
second of tbe four annual major women’s tournaments. Lopez missed an : 
8-foot birdie pntt on tbe last bde that would have tied the course and 
tournament marie set by Patty Sheehan in the 1984 championship. 

Lopez and Miller had been tied for tbe 54-hole lead at 8-under, but the 
28-year-old wife of New York Met infielder Ray Knight sewed up her 
second tour triumph at tbe year with birdies on the 13th, 14th and 15ih ' 
holes. Her 31st career victory tied Lopez with the late Babe Zahanas for 
ninth place on the all-lime LPGA list. 

IOC Group Backs 3 New Medal Sports 

BERLIN (UPI) — Badminton, baseball and women’s softball have . 
received the backing of the International Olympic Committee's executive ' 
board to be included in the 1992 Summer Olympics. 

Recommended late Sunday, the proposal would raise to 26 the number 
of medal Summer Olympic sprats if ft is accepted by the full IOC : 
membership at this week’s 90th IOC meeting. The board also recom- 
mended the addition of women’s judo for 1991 

dasson Takes Kemper Golf by 1 Shot 

BETHESDA, Maryland (AP) — Bill Glasson, who lost his tour cart- 
last year and had to requalify m the fall, rolled in a 50-foot puu on the 
final hole Sunday to win the Kemper Open golf tournament by one shot. • 

Glasson, 25, had eight birdies and two bogeys for a final-round 66 over 
the 7,173-yard, par-72 Congressional Country Gub course. .As a rookie in 
1984, Glasson was the PGA tour’s driving-distance champion but fin-' 
ished 162d in earnings with 517.845. On Sunday, he picked up S9G.000 for 
first place. 

Larry Mize, a four-year pro. Marled the day with a four-shot lead buC 
after picking up two birdies on ihe From tide he had three ho»ev> comma 
in to finish with a 7?. Cores Pa* in. on a doting 69. tied Mize for second 






Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Great Loophole War 


day going up 
the Hill to fit 



ThirhinM 

Ducowaw 


W 'ASHINGTON — Louie, the 
lobbyist, was dressed in battle 
gear. As soon as President Reagan 
declared war on the special interest 
groups, Louie loaded his Xerox 
machine and marched forth toward 
Capitol Hill to wage combat 
“It must be a bad tune for you," I 
said, as he paused on Pennsylvania 
Avenue to drink from his canteen 
of Pouilly-Fuissi. 

“It’s the best of times," said 
Louie, slapping 
me on the back. 

“Every lobbyist 
dreams of some- 

on ;5 
fight 

against tax re- 
form. We were 
trained all our 
lives Tor this mo- 
ment." 

“Aren't you 
afraid your 
loopholes will be killed?" 

"My boy. for every loophole that 
foils, well find another to take its 
place. When push comes to shove, 
well get what we want out of tax 
reform, and the president will get 
what he wants." 

□ 

"Then you’re not going io attack 
the Reagan plan head-on?" 

"That would be suicidaL He's 
raised the hopes of every taxpayer. 
Our strategy is to publicly support 
the president on his reforms and 
cheer him on, whilst we quietly in- 
filtrate the offices of congressmen 
and senators whom our people 
have been nice to over the years." 

"You mean you're going to start 
calling in your’ notes on the money 
you contributed to our legislators' 

unreasonable about 
that? They came to us when they 
were in trouble — now we're com- 
ing to them when we’re in trouble. 
That’s what fairness in tax reform 
is all about” 

“This could be a tough one, be- 
cause the people have their expec- 

Mannscript by Mendelssohn 

The Associated Press 

ROME — A 25-page handwrit- 
ten manuscript by Felix Mendels- 
sohn of a piano and choral adapta- 
tion of his orchestral piece 
"Oedipus at Kotonos" has been 
discovered in Rome, the music 
ma gazin e Piano Time reported. 


tations raised and it’s quite possible 
the con g ressmen and senators will 
have to vote for the bill, whether 
they want to or not." 

“Of course they’re going to vote 
for the Mir Louie shouted. “We 
would never ask them not to vote 
for iL That's like telling them not to 
vote for mother or the American 
flag. AH we want them to do is fine* 
tune the law so that our industry 
will still be entitled to the tax 
breaks that have made it one of the 
highest generators of capital in the 
country." 

□ 

“What you’re ask i ng, then, is 
that you continue to pay no taxes at 

dir 

Louie was outraged “There has 
been too much made of the fact 
that we don't pay any taxes. We 
pay payroll and Social Security tax- 
es, as well as taxes on all our soft 
drink machines Just because an 
industry doesn’t pay income taxes 
is no reason for our companies to 
be singled out as tax dodgers." 

“The people may not see it that 
way." I said. “Reagan has thrown 
down the gauntlet and the Demo- 
crats are scrambling to pick it up. It 
looks like tax reform could be an 
idea whose time has come. It sure is 
a lot easier to deal with than a 
$200- million deficit." 

"We’ve been through tax reform 
battles before," Louie said. "The 
trick is not to Hue your ammuni tion 
too early. Wait until everybody is 
tired and their nerves are frayed 
Then sneak in and plant your loop- 
hole while no one is watching, 
That’s the way the smart lobbyists 
work." 

"You believe you can still pull it 
off?" 

Louie put on his Stetson hat. 
“It’s a trade-off, my boy. The 
Northeast wants something from 
our people, so we're ready to deal 
We’ll give 'em their loophole if they 
give us ours." 

□ 

"How can you be so sure of vic- 
tory?” 

He opened up his pants pocket. 
“Look in here.” 

1 couldn't believe it He had 12 
representatives and five senators in 
his pocket. 

“Where did you gel them?" I 

a<lrcrf him 

“Through my political action 
committee. Got more in this other 
pocket if! need them." 



people 


Maze in Bath: An ellipse with stone paths and a Medusa mosaic in the center. 

Two Britons Sing the Praises of Mazes 


By Erica Brown 

New York Timet Service 

L ONDON — Britain is reputed to have 
t more mazes than any other country in 
the world and the number is increasing 
A BeatJesr inspired water maze shaped like 
an apple with a yellow submarine at the 
center was one of the hits at last year’s Inter- 
national Garden Festival in Liverpool. 
Kentwell Hall in Long Melford, Suffolk, is 
celebrating the 500th anniversary of the Stan 
of Tudor rule this year by converting its 
graveled central counyard into a complex 
maze representing tire Tudor rose in variously 
colored brick. A path maze designed for last 
summer's Bath Festival will be completed- 

this sprm g | qn< 1 rh^ winning design of amaze 
competition that attracted more than 500 
eotnes has been constructed at the Breamore 
Countryside Museum in Hampshire. 

Randall Coate and Adrian Fisher were 
involved in all three: They designed the first 
two and judged the Breamore competition. 
As partners in the appropriately named Mi- 
notaur Designs, they have designed a Danish 
maze laid out in the outline of a famous early 
locomotive and have also created a maze 
inspired by one seen in a dream by the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, Robert Runrie, and 
commissioned by Lady Brunner of Grey’s 
Court in Hampshire. 

The two men are an unlikely partnership. 
Randoll Coate is a retired diplomat. Adrian 
Fisher a management consultant. They 
formed their concern in 1979, having met 
through Lord Biot, who had included a de- 
sign for a maze at his home in Cornwall. 

“Once you start digging into mazes," said 
Coate, who had already designed several, 
"you quickly find yourself part of a small 
fraternity. I got to know Lord Eliot when he 
showed me his design and then be sent me an 
article Adrian had written on the subject. So f 
got in touch with him.” 


“I was still working full tune in industry," 
Fisher said. “But I'd always been fasci n ated 
by the puzzlement of mazes and the packing 
of the maximum paths into the rmnimnm 
area. The n iiiTh«*mwtTrs of the puzzle can have 
" w degrees of complexity but once you 
lerstand them you realize they are merely 
the superficial levd of understanding a maze. 
1 wanted to go beyond that" 

Coate offered that opportunity. He had 
always been fascinated by the amount of 
symbolism that could be incorporated in 
mazes Minotaur’s design for a maze at 
Floors Castle, the Scottish home of the Duke 
and Duchess of Roxburghe, for example, is 
192 feet (58 meters) square and incorporates 
a unicorn and a boar’s head from the duke’s 
coat of arms and a wheat sheaf and portcullis 
from the duchess’s. 

By comparison, their maze at Bath is sim- 
plicity itself. Built in the center of a city that 
has strong Roman and Georgian associa- 
tions, its outline is a Georgian ellipse, its flat 
paths are laid in local stone in a Roman key 
design and, at the center, there is a typically 
Roman mosaic of Medusa taken from an 
image carved in stone in the city’s Roman 
Museum. 

Mazes can take time to reach perfection. 
Brick and turf mazes are complete and usable 
when laid, but hedge mazes need five to eight 
years depending on the growth of the hedging 
used: Beech, yrw and box are the most com- 
mon. 

For example, the green and copper beech 
maze at Floors Castle was laid out in 1983 
and is expected to be in shape for the public 
in 1988. According to Fisher, "A decent maze 
of any kind can cost at least £5,000 [about 
$6,250] and after that the sky’s the limit." 

The origin and purpose of mazes remain 
unknown but they gp back to the beginning 


of civilization and almost certainly had reli- 
gious significance. 

The great palace at Knossos in Crete, 
which was destroyed about 1400 B. C-, had 
the archetypal maze built by Daedalus for 
ging Minos to contain the Minotaur. Its 
design was repeated on Cretan coins, and 
trade with the other countries popularized the 
pattern. , 

As Christianity spread through Europe, the 
twisting path of a r na7g came to represent 
such things as the thread of life, paradise 
regained, death and rebirth, and the search 
for the Holy GraiL The seven rings or the 
Cretan labyrinth can still be seen in the 
world's oldest surviving maze, made in the 
sixth century A. D. at Brandsby in northern 
Yorkshire. 

Early cathedrals had stone or tile mazes on 
their floors and penitents followed the paths 
on their knees. The most famous of these is in 
Chartres Cathedral in France. 

By Elizabethan limw the religious empha- 
sis had lessened and mazes were designed for 
pleasure. The paths were bordered by hedges 
and instead of being winding and intricate 
turnings they became a series of interlinked 
routes with hidden dead ends. The earliest of 
these mares in Britain is the one at Hampton 
Court, which was replanted in yew in 1690. 

The Hampton Court maze became the 
model for new nwes right through the Vic- 
torian era, although the 18th-century garden 
designer Capability Brown swept away many 
when creating his natural landscapes. More 
were uprooted in this century as the cost of 
upkeep and labor became too great. 

In the last 20 years, however, mazes have 
enjoyed a revival, with a numbin’ bang laid 
out in the grounds of stately homes. Ragley 
Hall in Warwickshire, Cawdor Castle in Scot- 
land and Longleat House in Wiltshire all 
boast modem mazes built by the owners. 


(Mum Prize Awarded 


lost Fegfaafi, a Brazilian native 
who first pEy3 in JJ «f, « ■*“* 
of 5 , has been named the “ 

the seventh Van Cbbum Interna- 
tional Piano Competition. Fcghah, 
24 who now lives in London, tri- 
umphed over 35 other piamse m 

■ the contest, bdd I this jm * i Fort 
Worth, Texas. He «■ ; ! 
redial at Carnegie Hall in New 
York, a 30-month concert tour of 
North America and Europe, the 
chance to make several recordings 

and a $ 12,000 cash prize. WW* 
Bteocom, 25, of France took sec- 
ond place. Barry Doagtos, 25. « 
Northern Ireland and representing 
the United Kingdom, came in 

third. Feghali chose to play the first 

movement of Tfcbaaovsky’s Ptano 
Concerto No. 1 at the awards cere- 
mony, the same piece with which 
Van CSbara won his famous vic- 
tory. N«-ynaa Hu, a 24-year 

old Taiwanese now living m the 
United Stales, has won the 1985 
Queen Elizabeth of Belgium Prize 
For violin playing, the jury an- 
aoumced in Brussels. Hu, who 
tqirlws the violin at Bloomington 
Universty, in Illinois, began play- 
ing at the age of 4. He will recaw 
300,000 Belgian francs (about 
$5,000) and will be guaranteed a 
number of concerts in Belgium. Ik 
Hwan Bae, a 29-year-old American 
born in Seoul, South Korea, came 
in second. 


Bette Darts, subject erf a scathing 
attack in her daughter's book. “My 
Mother’s Keeper," has broken a 
15-year silence with her ex-hus- 
band, Gary Merrill, to thank him 
for rh»f ending her, he says. Merrill, 
who has called the book “99 per- 
cent crap,” told the Press Herald in 
Portland, Maine, that Davis, 78, 
had sent him a thank-you note. “It 
was just a little note saying that she 
was very hurt by the book and 
thanking me far defending her," 
Merrill, 69. said in an interview 
published Saturday. The book, by 
Barham Hyman, portrays Davis as 
an abusive alcoholic. Since its re- 
lease last month “My Mother's 
Keeper” has risen to No. 4 on the 
New York Times best-seller list for 
nonfiction. 


“Big River." a musical version erf 
Mark Twain's “The Adventures of 
Huckleberry Finn." ran away with 
the Tony Awards in New York on 


Sunday night by wumin* seven 
prizes. It was naff«d the b est nn w- 
5 and also «tw 6* 

Roger Mfficr. who was making ha 
Broadway debut. The stow, which 

opened near the end of a . sown 

Sat failed to produce » angle 
emiwh hit musical also captured an 
award for Ren Richard**, as besi f 
featured actor. He pteys the iux»« f 
away slave, Tim. J *"**V^ 
the confirmed bachelor Benedick 
who falls in love mSM*spm\ 
“Much Ado About Nothing," and 
Stockard Qn&aing. as « mother 
of an incuraWy brain-damaged 
child in "Joe Egg." wot as bat 
actor and actress in a "toe 
Egg* also won the award as bett 
revival for its author. Nkh- 

ols. Ndl Stoon won his first award 

for best play with “Mpxi Blues." 
Simon’s semi-autobiographical 
World War H comedy also won for 
direction, bv Gene Saks, £ 

D 

About 100.000 rock fans invaded 
Slaoc. Ireland. Saturday, ram m 
unison as Brace Sprin&*een kicked 
off a European tour. The crowd, 
many waving the Stars and Stripes 
or the Irish tricolor in bright sun- 
shine, filled a valley outside the 
sleepy village on the River Boyne. 
Twenty fans, some suffering from 
shock and others from head inju- 
ries, were taken to the hospital, said 
a spokeswoman at Novan County , 
Infirmary. There were no arrests. > 

□- P 

Sonia fondhi, the Italian-born 
wife of Prime Minister Rȣt Gan- 
dhi, says she was first attracted by 
his "inner beauty" and now consid- 
ers him her “greatest security." She 
spake of her relationship with her 
husband and her late mother-in- 
law. Indira Gandhi, in an interview 
with the HinUi-languagp weekly 
Dharmayug. It was the first she had 
given to a non-Italian journalist 
since tor husband came to power 
late last year after Ws motiw was 
assassinated. Sonia Gandhi, 38, 
said she met ha husband 21 yean 
ago in a caffc at Cambridge Univer- 
sity, where both were students.* 
They were married m 1968. Asked ; 
whether she had anv misgivings 
about moving to India, she said, 
“When one is in love, that bve 
gives a person an extraordinary 
strength wards off any fears." She 
and her husband have two children, 
Ratal, 14, and Prfyaaka, 12. 


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JUNE lOlh ISSUE 
ON SALE JUNE 3rd 

BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 

• Super Chips: Experimental 
Silicone Chip About to 
Start A Revolution in 
Electronics 

• Reagans Tax Plan; 

Who Wins - Who Loses 

ft Oil at $20 □ Barrel 

• Japan: NTT Takes a 
Lesson From The Bell 
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Caroponies tanned UX & waffdwide 
fedidng We of Man, Tuffs & Caros, 
Angwita, totamo red Uberio. 


For further 

^^-5UpperChurehSi.[>3UcfcB 1 lsie 
of Mon, v«j Grant finttun. N Oouofes 
(0624) 23733, fc: 627W0 CCM iSTg! 


BUSIN ESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MAJOR US HEA1TH 4 BEAUTY ori 
oo. writes to uptore ban oapor- 
tunittes in SwiTJiriaid. Primorty mfer- 
ested m hotHh ad beauty ad prod- 
uch ifa am be exported to ISA 
mortal and/ or sdd in 5w ton la nd 
Anregemaih con be otfngt* por- 
chown, kerring or other orrnmge- 
menh. Rady USA HecJth ari Beauty 
Aid Co, 944 Men Pet* Rd, toSng 
H&. CoBonto USA 90274 Attenfa; 
Ml Werner. 


USA 

.BUSHNE5SE5 6 REAL ESTATE 

Bvmnw sriei; commerei d . ind u slnol & 
resdentid rod eflatMate & leases. 
Property mreagemenr & bureero de- 
wwopmmr. Wnni with your n 
mena A finrecid specs to Hnon 
& Business Brokns. 14795 Jeffrr 
^aiOJrww, CA 92714 USA. 71 
8030: Tbu 990194. 


AJ1B4TIOM SAUDI ARABIA Agents - 
Ctm you successfully represent my 
av4 defense sren syoem? Are you 
lechifaff WW you invest UMIO^OO? 
L Steworr, Av. Louin 363, 1050 Bru- 
seb, Befewra. 


FOR SALE. Restaurant tiffany's. Exdo- 

me and widely known nestaurtrt in 

Beradorm. Spain. For mfannatiore 

Cretaei Sole Agent: Pa n ne na. Cole 

Ganbo 3, Erwwo Los Pdmas, Ben- 
dorm. Span. Tet P*651 86 25 52 


IADY, FIRST OASS References PH. 
hgh level contacts Middfe-&nt. Afri- 
ca Europe, Midi associate with copi- 
td, fare DiMtfv, French ItaSan. Seri 
ous offers ony. Tel: Pms 799 8631. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


wn 

BEAUTffUl PEOPLE 

UM1M1B3MC 
UftA * WOR10WZ3E 

A complete wdd & busmen service 
Finding a uflique cdfecfea 9 ■ 
tdmted. vm. sMe & muHEngud 
nrihriduds far dl occasiorn. 
232-765-7793 
SI 2-766-7794 
330 W. 5Hi 5L HY.C 10019 

Semice Representriivei 
Needed Worldwide. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


WVE5T 2 WSQ in Better Health. 
Enter Cathx Risk ft evenb un & 

neuw _ _ 

Surrey 
qualified mmfied 
tan Mrdicd Cen- 
tro, Enton near Gaddmfeg, Surrey 
GW 5AL 45 min. London, King 
P42) 8792233. 


CDUrtrywifl, v 

supemrioa VSt 


OS.^ VISA PROBUEMS TCaniult Araro 
icon attarneys. Rome 474 4990. 


TAX SERVICES 


USA INCOME TAX ADVICE & Re- 
turns. Porn bated US CPA 359 63 01 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Fine damorris hi any price range 
9 lowest wholesale prices 
tfred from Antwerp 
center of the dumond world. 
Full M u uro nwe. 

For free price tar twite 


Estabfahed 1928 

PeSmanstrau 67B-201B Antwerp - 
Bdfan ■ Teb fe 31234 07 51 
Tk 71779 syl b. At theDanond Ooh. 
Heart of Antweip Diamond indrotry 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


OFFICE SERVICES 


OFFSHORE 5BMCES 

UX nan resident companies writ 
nommee directors, bearer shares and 
oonfidentid bank accounts. Full brefc-ap 
& support Henkes, firano & Liberian 
composts. Fkst rate aonfidnaaf 
profcssnnd services. 

EwSvTefcOl 


HOW TO IST A 2nd PASSPORT. 

fcpfa - 12 cauntna andyied 
Detaik WMA, 45 lyndhurtf Td. 
fa* 510, Central, Hang Kang. 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 
IN 2URICH 

FULY INTKHATH) 
BUSINESS SERVICES 
aQSETORNANOffLCBVrBt 
Furnished Offices / Co n f erence foam 
Telephone / Telex / Moil Services 
WfaProenwng / Tratrienwi 
Comoro Formation 
WiaHATlONAL OPRCE 
32 Reromea CH40Q1 Zurich 
Tel: 01 / 214 6n 1. T\x 012656 INOF 
MMWWORtP-WIW 
BUSIWSS CB4TRES 


YOUR FURN5HH) OfHCE 
MLOHDON 

• 7 day 24 hour aceefi & orawerplane 

• Full support smvioes Mudier. 
Mwetand, tetex, copying, et 

• Corpora* Representation Service 
■ Short or long term avritabby 

VMMNS Bauwai Cure , 
I lOIbe Staid London WCZEOAA 
Teb 01 836-8918 The 24973 


r«e.gsg a ate ■* 


ffronds, me Jbcu_ 

Td.PAt.6Q9«%. 


S9VK3. secretary. 

Sve SftVday. 


IMPETUS *ZIffKH > 252 76 21 , 
Phone / tele* { maffxu. J 


ITS YOUR DECISION 

In the famous sling and smmer 
resorts DAVO S and Maddam act* 
ST. MORITZ as wel os an the world 
ftxnore LAKE LtkltfcNE » re offer b mu- 
HfJ op artmenri in typied Stross flffed 
houses . Be st loadiom. Too puafay. 
Pnees: SF210jOOO up to SF1 rowan free 
far ide to fairig n eri. Mortgages at tow 
Swiss interest rates. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 

DoffUr, CH-8872 Weesen 
Teb 04-58-431778. 

Tbc 876062 HOME 04 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


MAhftiATTAN, NYC 

THE ULTIMATE N 
CONDOMINIUM UV^iG 
THUMP TOWS - an fifth Avenue 
MAM4ATTAN PLACE - lU Av & 38 Si 
New, elegant, prestigioui units feature 
rtadndhw. secure red ah ate Z A 5, 
bedrooms. (1330 » 3000 s q. Ft) Aw* 
able directly from ownerx. 

Coreact: Mr. M. fie i xai 

EnwEss Mreogeroert Core. 
11835 Queers Btvd. 

Forest Hfc, NY 11375 USA 
Tab 7185^-4848 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


FRENCH RMBIA, SEASONS •« , vw 
ore reding betw e en Cannes & Mono- 
co vry wduM & com f ortable 
houses a p ropertie s . For farther infar- 
matan or a ou orot m ent, pfeoae wt 
tods MorieCede Olivitre, 1610 fee 
de* Serratk 06570 SointPouL Tab (93} 
329364 


URGE CHOKE OF VB1AS TO R9IT 
tocA doss properties. Prom FSCLOOO to 
TSODJXXt. For sommer period. Promo- 
tion Mozart Nice, Place Mozart 
06000. (9318/0620. 


FRENCH RIVIERA: Rent Jdy: Typed 

aid Provengd Mas, famously reno- 

vated, I bn too, 6 bedrooms, 4 battis, 
exotic gandea pod: F320KL Motor 
boot dot F13j000. Teb 5535291 Paris 


PBDGORD-SARtAT. Old stone home, 

2 bedroom, IM baths. Tennis, pod. 
Jdy - Abb SHOO month. June- Sep- 
tember: VuQ month. Tel: 651 88 34 


GREAT BRITAIN 


EXECUTIVE SUITE MAYFAIR. Lux^ 
ry ftnrohod cpartmentx, newly deco- 
rated, fifty servio^, secret arid/ telex 
fodities. £450/7550 per weeb. 3 
monlhi to 2 yeon. Mourtcurzon Mre- 
„ London 01 491 2626 
2991 


UJfOON. For the best furrished floh 
mri howei. Gmub the Spebotots: 
Ph*wJCo/ Qnd lawn. Tet South of 
Pfa 3S2 flia North of Pmt 722 
5135. Tebax 2T&6 RE5CE G. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIiV 


LONDON KMGHTSBIUDGE superbly 
furnrited 1 bedroom flat. £250 week- 
ly. 01-589 8223 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO. LUXURIOUS fjK, 
furrished top floor cenlroly arroondL 
tianad u por tere t, 110 sqm, targe 
terrace ovmta o bng sea, umernipt- 
ed French/ Itcfton sea coast panoni- 
. Fifty equipped, all tamers endvd 
Zihour eanaetge . foundry, 
re. SMimang pooL gorage, 
. Casino & Stops 3 minutes. 
IdEle July. August Cdfc Swtoer- 
tond 01/69 19 10 office hours. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy 

8 Are. 3« 


Service 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


PAMS ST. PAUL) histone Marari tax- 
uruiaus new blftffnq. high safety m- 
tem, 34 h orn ewd and private TV 
BcrvUMigi tfi top €bor f vvh 1 mb 
vvaw, 1 hudroom. beauftfiily fir- 
rishai FSQOQ/maim Only far tong 
term Maoris wdh highest r e forms. 
Embassy or. smftcr. Td« 2Q5 10 70 
brown 6 -fftim 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SIARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


AUESlAi Modem ht w no us 160 sqje. 
atouea iiw bro L 2 bedreot iu, 2 
brohe, private aroden. poffmg. laid 
far couple. FIZaB. fan Am TSfl - 
October 15th. M541 1316 am 


r i 


CHAMPS aYSEES 

STUDIOS. Comfartable 
Bath, telephone, odor TV. short term 
lease dredfy by owner. F^SOO/marth 
dxx^BS iodudod Vbi 33 roe Morbeuf, 
Ports ft Teb 574 35 67. 


AT HOME N MRIS 

PAMS PROMO 

AMJOTMENB FOR RENT OB 5A1E 

563 25 60 


75008 faie 
Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGM IN PARIS 
562-1640 

HATS PCX KBIT 
SHQBT - LONG JBtM 

HATS POP SA1M 

OFRCB FIX KBtT/SAU 


74 CHAAAPS-B.YSSS 8th 

Stada 2 or Sreom oportment. 
One manth 0 mare. 

UE OAIHDGE 399 67 97. 


J5TH JULY - 1 SHT. Pbrii ISIh - 71h. 

IM5CO itecr Champs de Mare, to- 
vafides, superb 210 sun. mprnnc nt 
3 bfaoomt, 3 rooms UtwWuly dec- 
ora^fd^uipp-i car parity view 
re trera. USS2/M0 per month. Tab 
56/ 7o lfi 


a Iras®®* 1 ® 


SHORT TOM STAY. Adranftgnri 
hotel urihauf maumeneneei, fad u. 
home in nice. sJudcn, ana bedroom 
and more m Park SQREUM: 80 rue 
de RMvanM, fink Tffa 544 39 40 


JULY-AUGUST. For couple, 5 ran 
Ehria, 75 *qJW. nodern. wninore 
ntendd view, telephone, no oaeri. 
lei; 428 1640 after 6 pm. • • 


2ND, RUE ST. 00*5. Ateffer tTArtetB, 

maTorent S^monttaJ^^Q. Tft 
296 95 25 or 274 16 16 


TftOCADERO. 2 HATS, 2raatn, & 3- 
roam, +■ 2 mdependent roams. Ter- 
roce. sun. Teb iO 5282. 


TOCADOO - DU ROC Stadtos. 
each 40 WJft, brehen, bcthnxra. 
F300 8» F4Mwr day, 7Q4 29 27 


FARC MONCEAU. July, August, Sep- 
terober, 3 roatm, 70 sanu Cairo, fire- 
ptoce. f530Q per month. 262 34 ID 


(ROM JUNE 13 to Sept . 15. 50 re. 
fan Bare faflh new xludto My 
fanibhed Tet 747 66 94. 


PAGE 8 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


LA D&ENSE 

Mamotiand pro fan tan u l firm seeks 

EXPBUOrfCH) 

SECRETARES 

Engfah mother tanoue. Perfedty Ruat. 
French, very flmdSo and adaptable. 
Goad piiuiieution. good tew g ho ne 
manner, ireerea in word praanang & 
use of oamputen, roKrilent speftng. 

Keen to be jnvo hte dfe young , dynamic 
but damning BrrnrorinxsnL 

Please send - haxfwrinen fetter, de- 
Hfted CV photo & sdary requireroents 
under remence 55/5 ten 
MH3IA SYSTEM. 2 rue de to Taw des 
Drones, 75002 Paris , France 


INTL LAW RRM in Paris veto bfin- 
gud secrefary with tcorelent short- 
tari in Frerefi & Enrftsh. Awfa with 
CV to Bax 220, Fwdd Triune, 
92521 NeulyCedat France 


SECRETARIAL 
. POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIES 

Are you toddng fix a 
WBLPAab, HKJHLT QUAUHH} 
MULTILINGUAL JOB AM PARK?. 

PLUS 

INTERNATIONAL 

The new speod fad teroporro y 

saw. 


HOTB. NBCKO DE PARIS 
♦Toot Ddme hotel 
61, Qua da Grencfte 
7^015 Pbrii. SEEKS 

BHJNGUAL SECRETARY 

B4GUSH MOTHER TONGUE 
Mnimuro 3 years experimxe, French 
“Boccdaureat levri. Write wrii CV. 
photo to Personnel Director. 

Hotel NBdiade Pare befare Jure 8. *85 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


WE ARE AN WTL DIVISION of re 
American feshien frm located in Mu- 
nich. Our internationd dnsetor ■ 
toabng fiar re Americre/Engfirfi pro- 
famind sec reto ry with cxeelent ex- 
ecutive secreted sUl Knowledge 
of Ga rmon is de ared. EVan send 
complete i ww references red a 
reaent photo to: L GrossreSuediche 
AAmehener Strcssa 54, 6022 Groerv 
wdd. West Germany. 


MINHIVF 9EGCS For AMBBCAN 
mlNtKVt FRMS in PARS: 


Engfah. 


Dutch o r Gron wn 
af French re- 


tpfad. EngEsh 

telexare Write 

Itoor Hjgo, 75T16 Peris. France. Teb 
' 727 61 


r phone, 138 Avenue 
16 Paris. 


P-A, located in fi« travel world- 

KSBSteKffiJ 

sasEse® 1 * 

Neufty Cedex, France. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EffiOJTiyE SECRETARY/ adminsfro. 

' ra ^ d *or. Pc ™ office 

of NA fmanad msMutran, Opera 

dia^sha rthawb ffled writing not 00 - 
OBl MuU e. 5everable years experience 




LBSAL SECRETARY. ^ 
hand fade taw firm loootS central 
Pora « wta Seoeuxy to work on part 
or fax. tens boat fiOrmuri. 80 words 


, I ftARWNAN SBWKE WTBBM 
favnrae cfa^opni^mlnterii re cxxrf 

“"mantes tor Engfab mother tongue 

BBJNGUAl SECRETAtoBS 

row 156 rue Montmortre, Paris 2 o 
oft 233 17 54 


SECRETAtflES AVAILABLE 


REUABtE SECRETARY. 1 

{■need, pwfadiy trine 

EngGri Acrissri. typing <ft fay 
bocx A troratatta m, fagungre wws 

Paris exoelent sdroy. HwS! 
dd Tri bune, 9252\ N*diy 
Franca 


«*ndsiad 


NUNGUAL AG8KY ■-» -^r- 

F-V=7S.H«, T ”'^S5 


HWHLEVa BCECUT1VE SECRETARY. 
/PA. French mother tongue, - 
— some 


®M word proenson) seeks pernio- 
mnt poatioa Write Bax 2361, Herald 
Trauma 92521 Neutfy Cede* fin not 


“SPONSWE 


_ °nnte tri- 

PA/^Sixy/ 


PJt. position, Firece, Getnony c 
faembewg Gerrmjny (0654116494 



GR- IA OIBSKU CREME lore 
rnry hdp people in Paris. 758 82: 



H 


FRANCE 



Assistante 
de direction 

tree haut standing 

Le PDG d'un groupe de societes industriel- 
jes et fmancieres (C.A. : 1 milliard/an) re- 
cherche son « bias droit » pour l'as sister dans 
ses diverses activit^s,d^placements d’affai- 
res, actions de « relations publiques » : son 
r61e sera notamment d'organiser toutes les 
reunions (comites de direction/conseils 
d’administration/conseils de surveillance), 
en assurer 1'accueil des participants, le 

secretariat et le sum ; organiser et pardciper 
—* . 



ses 


anglais ou en frangais) 
ddplacements et reahser seule quelques 
missions ponctuelles a l’etranger. 

Sm^A LiptryyC 

HAY 13, rue Alphonse-de-Neuville - 75017 PARIS 


biiingue 

250 OOO + + 

sonnaiites de premfer des ***' 

de classe et crel^gance! 311 aVGC t)eaucou P 

to^ e 9Tande auto nomie et 

^to do ssi SnSTssstoj* «?c c.v.. 


l 


Printed by gdz In Zurich (Switzerland) 


i aisammuedooerenom. 


r 


%» *■— uuiul JUUL& 


~l prev. dov open hit. reo-reo o «wr- - —