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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 
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, No. 31,817 




PARIS, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


Soviet Is Resisting 
U.S. Conditions for 
Mideast Conference 


By Jim Hoagland 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
is certain to reject conditions the 
United Stales has laid down for an 
international conference on the 
Middle East but is prepared to seek 
accommodation with Washington 
” on Arab-Israeli questi ons, a lead- 
ing Soviet expert said Thursday. 

In the first ’Soviet response to 
U.S. demands Iasi week that Mos- 
cow revise a number of its policies 
to clear the way /or an mtemation- 
■ al conference, Yevgeny M. Prima- 
kov predicted that the Soviet 
Union would not accept “one ride 
setting preconditions for tbs other 
to meet. in order to hold the confer- 
ence.’' 

The State Department, listing 
conditions for Soviet paiticrpafion 
. in the Middle East talks, said last 
^Thursday that Soviet Union would 
have to resume relations with Isra- 
el ease restrictions cm emigration, 
stop anti-Semitic propaganda and 
halt arms shipments to man. 

Mr. Primakov, whose position as 
• director of the government's Insti- 
tute of Oriental Studies makes him 
an authoritative voice on Soviet 
views of the Middle East, also criti- 
cized the agreement reached by 
King Hussein of Jordan and Yasser 
' Arafat, leader of the {destine Lib- 
eration Organization, for a joint 
approach to Middle East peace ef- 
forts. 

“Not everything Arafat has done 
. in recent months has benefited the 
^P alestinians, " Mr. Primakov said 
in an interview. His criticism of the 
PLO chairman focused on the Feb. 
11 agreement with Hussein and 


“the enmity Joward Syria** he said 
Mr. Arafat had shown. 

U.S. .officials said the U.S. Em- 
bassy in Mioscow had not formally 
relayed to the Soviet government 
the conditions for an international 
conference the White House out- 
lined during Hussein's visit to 
Washington Iasi week, and Mr. Pri- 
makov said be was not a ware of the 
specifics of the proposaL 

But his reaction left no doubt 
that the Soviet Union would find 
the U.S. offer unacceptable, thus 
throwing into doubt a key compo- 
nent of the program worked out by 
the Jordanian monarch and the 
Palestinian leader. 

The Kremlin had already indi- 
cated its unease with that agree- 
ment, which is intended to lead to 
the fo rmati on of a j oint Jordanian- 
Pakstinian delegation to negotiate 
with Israel on the return to Arab 
sovereignty of the occupied territo- 
ries of the West Bank and Gaza 
Strip. 

Mr. Primakov voiced concern 
that the a grawngiit “could open the 
door to a separate deal” with Israel 
that would not lead to the forma- 
tion of a Palestinian state. The 
agreement speaks instead of a con- 
federation by the Palestinians with 
Jordan. 

He also noted that the proposal 
for a Joint delegation “dilutes the 
question of the representation of 
the Palestinians” and said the 
agreement “could be made a 
text to be used by some anti-P 
tinian forces.** 



George P. Shultz, right, thelLS. secretary of state, talked 
Thursday with NATO’s secretary-general. Lord Carrii 
ton, at a two-day meeting of NATO officials in 


Reiners 


ro- 


of Palestinian rebels who are chal- 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


ESTORIL, Portugal — The Eu- 
ropean members of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization nr^ed 
Washington on Thursday to abide 
by the restraints of the SALT-2 
arms limitatio n treaty, British and 
West Goman officials said. 

They said the consensus surfaced 
after the US. secretary of state, 
George P. Shultz, discussed the is- 
sue at a session of NATO foreign 
ministers and asked for their views. 

“Everyone spoke and the con- 
sensus on SALT-2 was to keep the 
restraints,*" a British official said. 




Jordanian Outlines 4-Step Proposal 
Toward Direct Arab-Israeli Talks 


V 




• •••! 


+ -- -*■ 


By David B. Otcaway 

Washington Post Semis 

WASHINGTON — Jordan’s 
i foreign -minister has detailed far 
die asst time the proposal King 
«?Iiisseiu made last wcdrtoRBagan * 
administration officiabfor a direct, 
meeting between American offi- ' 
rials and Palestine liberation Or- 


Tbe „ 
ask Congress fftr further mili- 
tary aid to Jordan- Page 4. 


.tv >• 


ganizaiion representatives who 
would be part of a joint Jordanian- 
Palestinian delegation. 

The king envisions a four-stage 
process leading to direct Arab-Js- 
raeli peace talks , the Jordanian 
minister, Taher al-Masri, said 
Wednesday. 

The first step would be a prelimi- 
nary session between the United 
Slates and a Jardanian-Palestinian 
delegation with no PLO represen- 
tatives, Mr. Masri said. 

He said Hussein told the admin- 
istration that Yasser Arafat, the 
PLO leader, would be prepared 
.then to mate a formal declaration 
A readiness to recognize and nego- 
tiate with Israel, but would want a 
U _S. concession in return. The 
United Slates has refused to meet 
with the PLO until it recognizes 
Israels right to exist. 

As the concession, Jordan has 
asked Washington to state pubBdy 



Taher al-Masri 


state for Near Eastern and South 
Aidan affairs. 

The United States would then 
bold a second meeting with a joint 
Jordanian- PaJes linian delegation 
that wouJd inrir.de PLO officials. 
Participants would discuss the de- 
tails for an international confer- 
ence at which direct Arab-Israeli 
negotiations would take place, ac- 
cording to Mr. Masri. 

The conference and then the di- 
rect negotiations, which Mr. Masri 
suggested would get under way al- 
most immediately, would consti- 
tute the thud ana fourth steps of 
the Jordanian plan. 

But he said Jordan had not yet 
received an answer from Washing- 
ton on its idea of two preliminary 
meetings. 

In explaining Hussein's current 
view or the peace process, Mr. 
Masri was highly optimistic about 
the prospects for starting a new 
round of Arab-Israeli talks. 


The United States has dropped 
efforts to get the NATO foreign 
ministers to endorse President Ra- 


gan's research program in space- 
drench op- 


that it supports “self-determina- 
tion*’ for the Palestinians within 
the context of a Jardanian-Pales- 
tinian confederation that the king 
and Mr. Arafat agreed upon Feb. 
1 1 in a joint statement. 

Details of such an exchange of 
statements would be the main topic 
of a first meeting bang arranged 
between a Jordanian- Palestinian 
delegation and Richard W. Mur- 
phy, the U.S. assistant secretary of 


“I feel the atmosphere is the 
same as before Sadat's trip to Jeru- 
salem,” he said, referring to the 
1977 visit by President Anwar Sa- 
dat of Egypt that opened the way 
for the Camp David accords on 
Middle East peace. 

“Something is going to 
Mr. Masri. 
is approaching.” 

Bui the foreign minister said he 

(Continued on Page X CoL 6) 


-based weapons despite Fr 
position to it Ratters reported 
Thursday from Estoril 
A semor. U.S. official said the 
French were only wiling to note 
the existence of such research in 
Friday's final communique from 
the ministers. “If it was impossible 
to get it endorsed, it didn’t make 
much sense to have any reference 
to it," be said. 

Diplomats said France was cot 
the only country reluctant to give 
public approval to the space pro- 

g am. Denmark. Norway and 
reece also had reservations, they 
said. 

■ Senate Backs Treaty 
The Senate has overwhelmingly 
adopted a resolution urging Presi- 
dent Reagan to continue adhering 
to SALT-2, The New York Times 
reported from Washington. 

The resolution, by a vote of 90-5, 
was attached to a 1986 mi litary 
spending authorization bill that 
calls for 5232 billion in programs 
for the Pentagon in the fiscal year 
beginning OcL 1. The entire bill, 
which would call for an increase in 
military spending equal only to the 
inflation rate, was approved on 
Wednesday, 92-3. 

The resolution on the arms treaty 
has no force of law. 


Bern Warns Israel of Attacks if Pullout Is Delayed 


X 


Nora Boustany 

Washington Past Service 

BEIRUT — ■ Nabih Beni, the 
chief of Lebanon’s dominant Shiite 
Moslem miifHa, has warned Israel 
£u guerrilla . attacks would be 
launched across its border if Israel 

main t ains a security strip in south- 
ern Lebanon. 

The threat coincided with re- 
ports that Israel was delaying the 
final phase of its withdrawal from 
Lebanon and keeping several hun- 


dred troops to support the Israeli- 
’ ~ h Lebanon Army in 


equipped South 

a strip along the border. .Hnniday 
tvas the thud anniversary of Israels 


f.A-". 
„ i- 


was the third anniversary of 
invasion of Lebanon. 

[Israel withdrew its last troops 
from Lebanon on Thursday, ac- 
cording to Major General On Orr, 
the commander of Israeli troops in 
Lebanon. But he said seme soldiers 
would continue to pass in and out 
of the southern part of the country, 
- The Associated Press reported 
Tram Achviz, Israel.] 

In an interview published Thurs- 
day in the newspaper AI Haqkja, 
Mr. Beni warned : *Tf IsraeTs in- 
transigence for staying is increased, 
Amal will have to revise its equa- 
tion. As long as Israel is violating 
Lebanon's sacred land, there is ab- 
solutely nothing sacred in the 
usurped land," by which he meant 
Israel. Amal is the Shiite militia 
controlled by Mr. Bern. 

“If one inch of Lebanon remains 
occupied, this means that the entire 
^.sinirv is under occupation," said 
Mr. Bari, who is justice minister. 

“This will impose new alliances 
on us with the forces desirous of 
fighting Israel " he added. 


He said tins could mean asking 
hdp from Palestinian forces. 

Since May 18, the Amal move- 
ment has been fighting Palestinian 
guerrillas in refugee camps on Bet- 
rut’s' outskirts. The Suites hare 
sought to prevent the Palestinians 
from reconstituting their guerrilla 
bases in the country. 

The continued control by the 
South Lebanon Army, which is 
predominantly: Christian; of the 
town of Jezzme appears to have 
prompted Mr. Bern’s warning. Jez- 
zme is a Christian town overlook- 
ing Shiite Moslem villages. 

On Wednesday. President Amin 
Gemayel of Lebanon summoned 
the ambassadors of the permanent 
members of the United Nations Se- 
curity Council — Bri tain, China. 
France, the Soviet Union and the 
United States — to ask their sup- 
port for prdssuring Israel into re- 
moving the South Lebanon Army 
from the border strip. 

The fighting over the Palestinian 
refugee catnps, though less intense 
than in its first few wedcs, has led 
to a rise in street shootouts and 
robberies in Beirut's streets. Thurs- 
day. for the second straight night, 
gunmen fired grenades at Amal po- 
sitions in the Modem sector and at 
checkpoints manned by the Leba- 
nese Amy 6th Brigade. 

annel 

7 of 


sumac attack. Four rqckd&irere 
fireqvjp to 1 a 6th Bris^posM^n 
Fff&g the to the im- 

tiofl;' which Ae^nih>coutroDed 
Voice of Lebuqggnio quoted the 
sdf-styjfi Forces of 

Beirut as clamnng^ responsibility 
for rite raid. X . r. 



An Israeti ordnance unit celebrated its withdrawal Thurs- 
day from Lebanon at the Israeli bonier, town of Metrifla. 


I 


IRS Alerts 

Taxpayers 
To Cutoff 


Income Exclusion 
For ’ 82 and ’ 83 
Is Due July 23 


NATO Envoys Urge U.S. 
To Adhere to SALT-2 


Earlier Thursday, at the opening 
session of NATO's 16-nation min- 
isterial council, Foreign Minister 
Hans- Dietrich Genscher of West 
Germany appealed to both the 
United States and the Soviet Union 
to respect the 1979 strategic arms 
limitation treaty and the 1972 anti- 
-balhstic missile treaty. 

Mr. Genscher said cooperative 
arms control required that “exist- 
ing treaties are respected and that 
what has been achieved through 
arms control should in any case be 
preserved.” 

President Ronald Reagan is ex- 
pected to deride this weekend 
whether to continue adhering to the 
SALT-2 treaty after Mr. Shultz re- 
ports on the allied views. 

■ U.S. Drops Appeal 


By Robert C Siner 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Americans 
abroad who have not filed U.S. 
income tax re tur ns for 1982 and 
1983 must do so by July 23 to claim 
the foreign eamed-income exclu- 
sion for those years, the Internal 
Revenue Service has warned. Those 
who fail to do so may face back 
taxes and penalties, it said. 

“We want this to be understood 
as a fair warning," said Robert J. 
Kobel an IRS spokesman. “Hie 
loss of benefits could be substan- 
tial" 

After July 23, most taxpayers 
who seek to reduce their tax liabil- 
ity in the United Slates for those 
years could still apply for the for- 
eign tax credit. But this is a much 
more complicated formula than in- 
come exclusion, and cannot be tak- 
en if no taxes were paid to a foreign 
country. 

The IRS deadline also is aimed 
at increasing the penalty for Ameri- 
cans abroad who evade taxes. Any- 
one who is caught having failed to 
file by that may also have to pay 
taxes, interest, and penalties on full 
income. 

Richard Van Ham, a tax accoun- 
tant in Paris, said that in effect, the 
IRS “is giving taxpayers an amnes- 
ty” until July 23. 

He said that until the IRS pub- 
lished regulations governing the in- 
come exclusion in December, ques- 
tions remained about the measure's 
interpretation. 

Those eligible for the exclusion 
can exdude up to $75,000 in for- 
eign earned income for 1982, such 
as wages, salaries, and self-employ- 
ment income, and up to 580,000 for 
1983. 

The exclusion does not apply to 
the salaries of U.S. government em- 
ployees, diplomats and military 
personnel stationed overseas. How- 
ever, any income that they or iheir 
families earn from work not con- 
nected with thdr U.S. government 
employment may qualify. 

Returns for 1984 and thereafter 
must be filed within one year of the 
due date to qualify for the income 
exclusion. The filing date for 1984 
returns was April 15. 

Overseas taxpayers receive an 
automatic 60-day extension be- 

(Coutmued on Page 3, CoL 6) 



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ESTABLISHED 1887 


The Anoootod ftera 

Liverpool police collate data in a computer room about the 
riot in Brussels. A team of 50 officers are involved in an 
investigation and search for those who started the violence. 


England’s Soccer Teams 
Are Banned Worldwide 


INSIDE 


■ Witness in Aquino slaying tri- 
al admitted she spent rime in a 
mental hospital. Page X 


■ Soath Africa threatened re- 
prisals if the United States im- 
posed sanctions. Page 3. 


■ Nicaragua said it shot down 

two unidentified helicopters 
that entered its air space from 
Honduras. Page 3. 

■ Josef Mengete’s body may 

have been found in Brazfi, po- 
lice said. PageS. 

WEEKEND 


■ One trip from Paris that no 
visitor should miss is the visit to 
nearby Champagne. Page 9. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ Britain’s building societies, 
which resemble U.S. thrift 


units, are to be given bank-like 
powers. Page 13. 


Kong dosed a leading 
bank after it declared itself in- 
solvent and said police were in- 
vestigating its books. Page 13. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ZURICH — The Federation of 
International Football Associa- 
tions banned English soccer teams 
indefinitely Thursday from all in- 
ternational competition. 

The ban was imposed because of 
ihe riot May 29 at the European 
Cup Final in Brussels between Liv- 
erpool and Juventus of Turin in 
which 38 persons were killed and 
more than 450 injured. 

It does not apply to the English 
national team, which is competing 
with Mexico, West Germany ana 
Italy in a tournament in Mexico 
City. 

The ruling meant that English 
teams were barred even from 
friendly games against teams 
whose national associations are 
among the international federa- 
tion’s 150 affiliates, and were 
banned from international club 
competitions and tournaments. 
Friendly soccer games are the high- 
est level of international exhibition 
soccer. 


Joseph Blatter, general secretary 
of the federation, said that its emer- 
gency committee had thus made 
worldwide a ban imposed Sunday 
cm English competitions in Europe. 

Mr. Blatter said that the federa- 
tion ban would be of the same 
duration as that imposedSundav 


tritely. Hie ban does not affect 
teams from Scotland, Northern Ire- 
land or Wales. 


The international federation did 
not specifically mention Liverpool 
whose fans have been blamed for 
inciting the riot 
The F-ngfch Football Associa- 
tion has voluntarily withdrawn its 


professional teams from European 
competition for one year, and Bel- 
gium has imposed an indefinite ban 
on all British teams, from school- 
boys to professionals, including 
these from Scotland. Wales and 
Northern Ireland. 

The federation's ban does not 
apply to nonprofessional or youth 
teams. 

Mr. Blatter said that whatever 
happened in Brussels, it was clear 
that security precautions were in- 
adequate, given what he called the 
“well-known hooliganism of En- 
glish fans." 

The secretary-general of the Eu- 
ropean soccer group. Hans Ban- 
ger ter. was quoted as saying 
Wednesday that further sanctions 
were planned because of the Brus- 
sels not 

“There will be other sanctions, 
not just against Liverpool but 
against Juventus and the organiz- 
ers, the Belgian Football Union," 
be said, according to the Swiss 
newspaper Sport. 

The European group’s Control 
and Disciplinary Committee is to 
meet in Zurich on Thursday to de- 
cide cm further action. 

(Reuters. AP) 
■ Belgium Begins Investigation 

The Belgian Chamber of Repre- 
sentatives set up a special commis- 
sion Thursday to investigate the 
May 29 violence, United Press In- 
ternational reported from Brussels. 

The commission of nine, which 
has the same powers as an investi- 
gating magistrate, will produce its 
report within a month. 

The chamber made the decision 
after its Committee for Domestic 
Affairs listened to an explanation 
by Interior Minister Chari es-Ferdi- 
nand Nothomb of how the deaths 
occurred. 


U.S, May Have to Revise Sea Detection 


Experts Fear Spies Exposed Submarine Surveillance 


By BiU Keller 

New York Tunes Service 
WASHINGTON — Submarine 
experts say that as a result of the 
Walker family spy case, the U.S. 
Navy may have to rebuild portions 
of rite undersea network of sound- 
detectors that are a crucial early 
warning system against a Soviet 
nuclear attack. 

Some experts, including former 
navy officers, said Wednesday that 
replacing the Sound Surveillance 


fidential nature of investigations 
by the Justice Department and a 
navy intelligence team, declined to 
comment on the case. 


In interviews Wednesday, ex- 
perts in naval affairs said they be- 
lieved reports of possible military 


The former wife of an accused 
spy for Russia explains why she 
contacted the FBL Page 3. 


dear navy faces and with a sepa- 
rate communications network. 

So far, the experts said, the only 
suspect with experience aboard 
submarines carrying nuclear mis- 
siles was John A. Walker Jr. His 
experience in the 1960s as a radio- 
man aboard two submarines carry- 
ing Polaris missiles, experts said. 


U.S. Tells 
EC of Plan 
For Grain 


Block Forecasts 
Further Sales 
With Subsidies 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

MAASTRICHT, The Nether- 
lands — John R. Block, the U.S. 
agriculture secretary, warned the 
European Community on Thurs- 
day that the Reagan administration 
would continue its new export sub- 
sidy program aimed at what it 
terms unfair trade practices by 
community members and some de- 
veloping countries. 

Mr. Block urged the European- 
Community to start negotiations to 
liberalize world agricultural trade. 


Defending the community's agri- 
Andriessen. 


cultural policy, Frans 
commissioner for agriculture, said 
at a conference in Maastricht that 
he did not believe in “megaphone 
diplomacy." 

He was alluding to Mr. Block’s 
announcement in Washington on 
Tuesday that the administration 
would release government stocks of 
surplus wheat for sale to Algeria in 
an effort to compete with subsi- 
dized European Community ex- 
ports. 

“I prefer to discuss matters in a 
calm and rational way ” Mr. An- 
driessen said, adding that “adjust- 
ment of policy in the community, 
the U.S A. or elsewhere is painful 
and politically hazardous.” 

He said the commission was still 
evaluating what action to take that 
could include retaliation as part of 
a list of options. 

Both Mr. Block and Mr. An- 
driessen said that they planned 
talks in various community cities 
during the next several days' to find 
some Basis for discussing what offi- 
cials have warned could develop 
into a trans-Atlantic trade war. 

The two-way trade, with each 
representing the largest partner for 
the other, totals $100 


JL 


Failure to solve the dispute over 
farm exports could result in direct 
European Community retaliation 
against the U.S. move in Algeria, 
possibly by action against UJ>. ex- 
ports in other markets, commission 
sources said. 


However, Mr. Andriessen ruled 
out the creation of an emergency 
fund, as was reportedly suggested 
by one commissioner. 

In what U.S. officials called a 
(Continued oo Page 2, CoL 1) 


Agca Details 
His Training 
In Syria 


probably would have given him ac- 
cess only to a limited 


System, called Sosus, was poien- 
idcoi ‘ 


dally one of the difficult and costly 
measures that might be needed to 
restore confidence in the U.S. sub- 
marine fleet’s command of the seas, 
if (be allegations of a 20-year spy 
network prove true. 

The navy itself has not complet- 
ed its appraisal of what steps might 
be needed to compensate for secu- 
rity breaches that may have result- 


damage from the alleged spy ring 
might have been exaggerated. 


Several experts said the wont 


ed from the puipone^^^ring. 


Experts interviewed 
emphasized that it was too early to 
be sure what countermeasures 
would be required. 

Navy spokesmen, riling the coo- 


ral experts .. ____ 

danger would be that the Soviet 
Union had gained information that 
would help them track American 
submarines carrying ballistic mis- 
siles. The submarines are consid- 
ered the least vulnerable portion of 
the U.S. nuclear a rsenal 
Four former and current navy 
personnel have been charged with 
espionage in the case. The experts 
said they bdieved none of the sus- 
pects arrested so far had access to 
recent information involving the 
submarines, which operate under a 
command independent of nonnu- 


onJy to a limited amount of 
information useful to the Russians. 

The Polaris class of vessel was 
succeeded by Poseidon subma- 
rines, which are now being replaced 
by Trident submarines. A number 
of Polaris submarines are still in 
service, but they have been mod- 
ernized extensively. 

Stansfield Turner, a retired ad- 
miral and former director of cen- 
tral intelligence, said Wednesday: 
“My alarm focuses on John Walker 
and his experience in the ballistic- 
missile submarine force," 

Bui Admiral Turner said Walker 
would probably have had access to 
little information that would 
threaten more modem submarines. 
“It isn’t going to make our subs 
(Con tinned on Page 2, CoL 4) 


By John Tagliabue 

.Veir York Times Service 
ROME — Mehmet Ali Agca, the 
Turkish terrorist who wounded 
Pope John Paul n in 1981. said 
Thursday that he had been trained 
in the arts of terror, including the 
use of guns and bombs, at a camp 
in Syria run by Bulgarian and 
Czechoslovakian experts under the 
direction of the Syrian secret ser- 
vice 

He also said that Turkish orga- 
nized crime figures, working with 
the Bulgarian authorities, had 
helped to finance terrorist activities 
aimed at destabilizing Turkey's 
government in the late 1970s. 

Of his experience in Syria he de- 
clared: 

“I learned that the political and 
financial center of international 
terrorism was the Soviet Union." 

Mr. Agca’s remarks were in ac- 
cord with previous assertions that 
Soviet-bloc governments were in- 
volved in his terrorist career. But 
much of his testimony differed 
widely from accounts of his previ- 
ous activities, recorded in hours of 
earlier testimony to Italian. Turk- 
ish and Bulgarian investigators 
over the last three years. 

Mr. Agca. 27. is on trial with four 
other Turks and three Bulgarians 
accused of conspiring in an inter- 
national plot to murder the pope. 

Mr. Agca has contended that the 
men were commissioned and fi- 
nanced fy the Bulgarian state secu- 
rity service, which was prompted 
by the Soviet Union to try to elimi- 
nate the Polish-bom pontiff to help 
restore social peace in Poland. 

Both the Soviet and Bulgarian 
governments have denied involve- 
ment in plans to murder the pope. 
In sewsal hours of questioning 
fay Judge Seyerino Santiapichi, Mr. 
Agca. speaking slowly and distinct- 
ly, partly in Italian and partly in 
Turkish through an interpreter, de- 
scribed how he joined a group of 
extreme rightist Turkish youths 
while be was a university student in 
Ankara in 1977. 

After switching to a university in 
Istanbul the following year, Mr. 
Agca said, he helped set up a' kind 
of terrorist chib, with a nucleus oT 

seven or eight persons and as many 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 




*4 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


Aquino Slaying Witness Says 
She Was in a Mental Hospital 


77w Associated Press 

MANILA —The only witness to 
testify that she had seen a soldier 
shoot Benigno S. Aquino Jr. ac- 
knowledged in court Thursday that 
she had been charged with crimes 
and had twice attempted suicide 
while in a Hong Kong jaiL 

“I may be the most wicked per- 
son in the world, but it does not 
change the fact I saw a soldier kill 
Senator Aquino,’' Rebecca Quijaoo 
said in Tagalog in the crowded 
courtroom. 

Miss Quijano, questioned by at- 
torneys of 23 military defendants, 
including General Fabian C. Ver, 
the armed forces chief, and one 
civilian, confirmed that she was 
confined in 1982 in a Hong Kong 
mental hospital after she had twice 
attempted suicide in jaiL 

“I will never forget my experi- 
ence in the airplane as long as 1 
live." she said when asked By the 
presidmg judge. Manuel Pamaran, 
if she had any recollection of what 
she had witnessed. 

On Aug. 21. 1983, she was 
aboard the airliner that brought 
Mr. Aquino on the last leg of a 
flight to Manila from the United 


States, where the critic of the . 
eminent of President Ferdinant 
Marcos had lived in voluntary ex- 
ile. 

She waited 20 months before 
publicly testifying to what she had 
seen. 

Asked by Judge Pamaran if she 
could state with certainty that a 
shot had been fired by the soldier 
escort she saw holding a gun to Mr. 
Aquino's head as they went down 
the ramp from the plane, Miss Qux- 
jano replied only, “I heard a shot." 

The witness said she did not ob- 
serve what happened after the shot 
because “I got rattled," and left the 
window seat from where she had 
been watching as Mr. Aquino left 
the plane with soldier escorts. 

Miss Quijano' s lawyer said dar- 
ing a recess that her testimony 
made her an even more candid and 
believable witness. 

She has been dubbed the “crying 
lady" because she was seen weep- 
in gin videotape scenes taken at the 
Manila airport at the tune of the 
shooting. 

Miss Quijano has testified that a 
presidential security officer, one of 
the accused, warned her not to re- 


veal what she had observed. Under 
questioning by the defense attor- 
ney, Rodolfo Jimenez, Miss Qui- 
jano aid she was arrested and 
jailed for six months by Hong 
Kong authorities in 1982 on 
charges of forged checks and pos- 
session of stolen goods. 

Asked if she had been convicted 
on the charges, she replied: “I be- 
lieve I was not convicted because 
the judge said I was free." 

“Didn't yon attempt to commit 
suicide by slashing your wrists?" 
Mr. Jimenez asked. 

Miss Quijano lowered her head 
and began to cry. “Yes,” she said. 
Asked why, she said, “Because I 
was desperate. I was innocent and 
they detained me." 

She also confirmed in court that 
11 criminal charges had been filed 
against her, but the prosecution 
said that all but one charge had 
bear dismissed. 

More than 400 people packed 
into the small courtroom, which 
has seats for 200. Dozens of people 
who could not get into the court- 
room sat on the pavement outside 
and applauded the witness as she 
ent 



Tha Anodoted ften 

Rebecca Quijpino crying on the witness stand Thursday. 


U.S. Warns EC It Intends Soviet Gives 

To Sell More Subsidized Grain Position on 


Spy Case Said to Jeopardize 
U.S. Tracking of Soviet Subs 


(Continued from Page 1) 
“hard-line" reaction, a senior com- 
mission official said: 

“If the Reagan administration 
thinks that we will somehow 
change our basic policy of subsidiz- 
ing our farm exports, it is wrong, 
because import levies and export 
refunds are the backbone of the 
Common Agricultural Policy, and 
that is not negotiable." 

The administration's action in 
Algeria and steps planned else- 
where could threaten new world 
trade negotiations to be discussed 
at a three-day meeting of about 20 
trade ministers in Stockholm, be- 
ginning Saturday. 

The U.S. grain decision “is cer- 
tainly not going to help matters," 
said Willy de Gercq. commissioner 
for external relations, who will rep- 
resent the community at the Stock- 
holm meeting. 

Mr. Block and other administra- 
tion officials emphasized that addi- 
tional export sales would take place 
where unfair trading practices were 
damag ing U.S. farm exports. 

Referring to the $2 billion in sur- 
plus commodities authorized for 
the program, which some members 
of the U.S. Congress have called a 
“war chest," Mr. Block said: 

“I prefer to call it a hope chest. 



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because I hope it will help our 
fanners, 1 hope it will bring some 
international agreement on tr ad i n g 
rules, and 1 hope it will hold back 
growing protectionist sentiment in 
the United States." 

Mr. Block declined to say where, 
when, or how the next sales trans- 
action may occur. 

“We are not going to use a shot- 
gun approach with our plan by 
spreading bonus commodities 
across the board in the world mar- 
ket." he said. “Instead, we will take 
careful film targeting areas over 
the next three years where the pro- 
gram can do the most good for our 
farmers." 

Aides of Mr. Block said that the 
administration would focus its re- 
taliation against exports to third 
markets, particularly in the Middle 
East and Asia. 

“The immediate goal is to in- 
crease our farm exports while 
working for fairer trading rules 
which should involve movement to 
phase out EC subsidies," said Jo- 
seph O’Mara, a senior trade policy 
adviser. 

Some commodities not currently 
stocked, such as eggs, could also 
benefit from the program if the 
a dminis tration decides that com- 
munity subsidies have harmed U.S. 
producer*. “We used to be the larg- 
est exporter of eggs in the world: 
now it is the EG mainly in the 
Middle East and the Far East," Mr. 
O'Mara said. 

Mr. Block said that he was hope- 
ful of obtaining agreement to start 
farm trade liberalization talks both 
within the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade, the Geneva- 
based trade agency, and in bilateral 
accords with the community. 

“The United States is still pre- 
pared to talk, but talk is not 
enough,” Mr. Block said. 


Middle East 

(Continued from Page 1) 
longing Mr. Arafat’s authority, has 
also sharply condemned the Feb. 
11 agreement 

Mr. Primakov emphasized that 
the Soviet Union would participate 
in an international conference that 
would seek “a comprehensive set- 
tlement in the Middle East" and 
was ready to establish “working 
contacts with the United States to 
prepare" for such a conference. 

“It is not true that we propose 
that all of the problems have to be 
resolved in a package deal simulta- 
neously. like thaC he said, snap- 
ping his fingers. “We believe there- 
can be interim solutions along the 
way as long as they are not separate 
deals. The conference could gp on 
for a considerable time, and certain 
specific questions dealt with specif- 
ically. but within the framework of 
a general solution." 

Mr. Primakov said it was prema- 
ture to ask the Soviet Union to 
recognize Israel as a condition for 
the holding of the conference. 

“In my opinion, the work of the 
conference would give some possi- 
bility to advance in this direction, 
but there is much precedent on the 
American side of working with 
countries in the Middle East in 
Such a situation without having 
diplomatic relations,” he said. 

He specifically mentioned U.S. 
contacts with Egypt, Syria, and 
Iraq before diplomatic relations 
were established. 

He'also dted the resumption of 
U.S.-Iraqi relations this spring as 
an example of the possibility of 
Washington and Moscow finding 
accommodation in the region. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
totally vulnerable tomorrow,” he 


A forma - submarine commander 
with wide experience in the Penta- 
gon and the shipbuilding industry, 
wbo spoke on the condition that he 
not be named, said in an interview: 
“I can’t picture any serious loss of 
strategic submarine security. That's 
a totally isolated command, and I 
think rightfully so." 

Dr. Harlan K. I HI man, a former 
navy officer and Pentagon consul- 
tant, said it was his “understand- 
ing” that the balUstio-missfle sub- 
marine force “remains silent on 
patroL" 

Nonetheless, several experts said 
they assumed that, because of the 
Walker case, the navy had changed 
the travel patterns of the subma- 
rines and had altered codes and 
radio frequencies. 

Several submarine experts with 
experience in the US. Navy and in 
the shipbuilding industry said they 


believed the gravest possibility 
posed by the Walker case was that 
the Soviet Union learned d etails 
about the navy’s ability to detea 
Soviet submarines, including sonar 
systems on American ships and the 
Sosos listening devices. 

■ Need to Rebuild Denied 

The Defense Department said 
Thursday that the spy case had 
damaged US. security more than 
or igin all y believed, but the navy 
does not plan to change its devices 
for detecting Soviet submarines, 
Reuters reportecL 

Tbe assessment of damages “has 
gone up. If you want to say even 
more serious, that's fair enough,” 
said Michael L Burch, a depart- 
ment spokesman. 

But Mr. Burch termed “flawed" 
The New York Times report that 
the navy may have to rebuild some 
of its detectors. 

There is no consideration being 
given to that, " he said, adding, “We 
don't know what the total loss is.” 



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Blastat London Toot Agency 

Agence France-Presse 

LONDON • — An Israeli-owned 
travel agency in northwest London 
was heavily damaged by the explo- 
sion of a bomb thrown through the 
letter box at dawn Thursday, police 
said. No one was hurt. 


Agca Describes His Training 

specific examples of such terrorist 
acts, he described an attack on Tur- 
key’s constitutional court) which he 
said, in lan guage echoing Turkish 
rightist jargon, was “contrary to the 
Turkish nation, to the personality 
and the national aspirations of the 
country.” 

Mr. Agca said that he had ac- 
quired basic skills in the use of guns 
and explosives at a terrorist train- 
ing camp run by Bulgarian and 
Czech experts, under the direction 
of the Syrian secret service, near 
Latakia, Syria. 

“In this camp there were also 
Western terrorists,” he went on. 
“French, Italian, Spanish and Ger- 
man. But I knew no foreign lan- 
guage, so I could not communicate 
with them.” 

It was there, he said, that be 
learned that the Soviet Union was 
“the political and financial center 
of international terrorism." 

But he did not elaborate, and 
was not questioned further on that 
point by Mr. SantiaptchL 


(Continued from Page 1) 
as SO supporters, with the aim of 
destabilizing Turkey’s government 
system and shaking its ties to the 
WesL 

The ideas and organization of 
these groups, be said, were linked 
to the Gray Wolves, the youth arm 
of the rightist Nationalist Move- 
ment Party of Colonel Afrasian 
TQrkes, which was banned follow- 
ing the coup in September 1980 
when pro-Western military leaders 
seized power in Turkey. 

Questioned by Judge Santiapidri 
about the activities of these groups. 
Mr. Agca said, “Their job was to 
spread the nationalist idea, to help 
the MHP,” a reference to the Na- 
tionalist Movement Party. 

But he described the group as a 
“c riminal organization, that used 
criminals," and said its activities 
also included “attacking violently 
with bombs and guns" and “mak- 
ing collections or money by rob- 
bing banks and post offices.” 

Asked by Mr. Santiapichi for 


McNamara 
Charges U.S. 
Lacks a Plan 
To Cut Arms 

By Walter Pincus 

Washingtar Past Saxke 

WASHINGTON — Rflben S. 
McNamara, the former US. de- 
fense secretary, has charged^ that 
the Reagan adminis tration “does 
not have a plan" for arms control, 
and “has not thought .out" its at- 

S t to reduce offensive weapons 
: permitting the development 
of defensive systems. 

“No one know how to wnlc a 
treaty that both limits offensive 
arms and permits defensive arms,” 
he said. 

Mr. McNamara called on the ad- 
ministration to drop its Strategic 
Defense Initiative of space-based 
missiles defeases in exchange for a 
“large reduction" by the Soviet 
Union in the number of its inter- 
continental ballistic missile war- 
beads. , , 

Mr. McNamara, who was de- 
fease secretary under Presidents 
John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. 
Johnson, made his remarks in dis- 
cussing an article be wrote with 
Hans A. Bethe. a nuclear physicist 
at Cornell University. The article is 
to appear in ihe July issue of Atlan- 
tic magazine. 

Mr. McNamara, wbo returned 
recently from the Soviet Union, 
said, “The Soviets will never sign 
another agreement limiting offen- 
sive nuclear arms” as long as the 
.United Stales pursues the Strategic 
Defense Initiative. 

That view was reflected in an 
article in Tuesday's edition oT 
Pravda, the Communist Party 
newspaper, by the Soviet chief of 
staff. Marshal Sergei F. Akhro- 
meyev, who said pursuit of strate- 
gic defense by the United States 
would endang er “the arms control 
process." 

In their article, Mr. McNamara 
and Mr. Bethe said the Reagan 
administration should continue 
missile defense research but at the 
mint time strengthen the 1972 an ti- 
baflistic missile treaty to prohibit 
tests associated with development 
of such systems. 

They wrote that if the United 
States was unwilling to refrain 
from such tests, “the Soviets will, 
with good reason, assume that we 
are preparing to deploy defenses." 
The Russians, the authors added, 
“will assiduously develop their re- 
sponse, and the prospect for offen- 
sive arms agreements at Geneva 
win evaporate." 

The authors say that “each ride 
mus t recognize that neither win 
permit the other to achieve a mean- 
ingful superiority." 



- / 


WORLD BRIEFS 


ti 


ih 


Reuters Abandons Effort to Buy UPt 

a™™* 1 hSml appKcd "requested inrortMnoa.- 

but that' “UP* did not wtatmte^to* 

R w« Close to a commiuee of UPTs 
owSTmOTc Sn S30 mfflion. have raid 

amounted to about S5 roiflion in initial payments, which the creditor 
found inadequate. 

Gandhi Arrives in Paris for Talks 

parts (API — Prime Minister Rqiv Gandhi of India arrived hot 
fJi^Eevri w ’ Thursday for a five-day visit aimed at improving French- 
let* recently doutW.bylte.Bepd m*mm 

Of five meetings with President Francos 

in recent interviews that he admires France s mdepCBdeni foreign policy 
and its sympathetic stance toward developing cwmtnes ra economic 
£ue£ farixtos recently played an increasingly huge nfc ■ to 
deretopment and is interested^ providing technology that India uefeto 

modernize, French officials said. A 

Rgragsm Aide Withdraws as Nominee 

WASHINGTON (UPI) — Donald J. Devine, a strong coararawjvc 
supporter of President Ronald Reagan, abruptly 
Thursday for renomination as director of the Office of rersoanei Man- 

aS SfoDevine appeared before the Senate Government Affairs Comnat- 
tee. gave a prepared statement denying he had done anything wrong by 
keeping controlof his job after his four-year term ended 1 this spnng, and 
then announced his decision. “I can count the : votesi and I dontbefeve 
that I can be confirmed by this committee, and therefore I withdrew my 
. . . request for reconfinnation,” he said. 

Mr Devine, 48. has been a staunch ideological supporter o f M>. 
Reagan but has been criticized for his tight-fisted pohercs in handle - 
civil servants and for campaigning for Republican candidates. He can* 
under fire from the committee for contmning to cxcre sc the p oycg oi 
director after his term ended and for not telling his suocosor, Loretta 
Cornelius, of his actions. 

Delors to Propose Curb on EC Vetoes 

PARIS (Renters) — Jacques Delors, the president of European Com- 
mission. said Thursday that he wanted to cut back the vetoes that 
members of the European Community can use to block poficy changes. 

He told a business symposium that he would put forward a proposal it 
the EC s ummi t meeting in Milan later this month to change the commu- 
nity’s 20-year-old tradition of unanimous derision making. 

At present, minis ters of the EC’s 10 member governments can veto 
almost any policy under the so-called “Luxembourg compromise," which 
was worked out in 1965 to strive a dispute involving President de Goalie 
of France. But Mr. Delors predicted that majority voting would sow* 
times be indispensable when the EC is enlarged to 12 members with of 
entrance of Portugal and Spain next year. 

FortheRecord 

The US. State Department has ordered the expulsion of FarintHbar, 
a diplomat attached to the Libyan mission to the United Nations in New 
York, following a report by the Federal Bureau of Investigation that he 
was linked to a plot to assassinate Libyan dissidents in the United 
States. 

A leading Inman politician, Hashemf RafranjanL who is speaker of 
parliament, is to head a delegation to Beijing next month to buy arms and 
to boost trade, the Far Eastern Economic Review said Thursday. JAFP)_ 
General Oscar Humberto Mejia Vittores, Guatemala's brad of state, 
scheduled national elections Wednesday for Nov. 3 that wifl end 31 yean 
of military dominated government . . (UPI) 


Jordanian Details Hussein’s Han for Talks 


(Continued from Page 1) 
was perturbed by the resolution in- 
troduced Tuesday in the U.S. Sen- 
ate that calls on the administration 
not to sell Jordan arms until it 
enters direct talks with Israel 
“It’s not fair what they are doing, 
especially at this time Mien we are 
showing by all possible ways that 
we want peace," he said. 

■ UJS.-IsraeK Differences 
Thomas L Friedman of The New 
York Times reported from Jerusa- 
lem : 

Remarks by senior Israeli offi- 
cials indicate that sharp differences 
are developing between Israel and 
the United States over the merits of 
Hussein's peace initiative. 

“To say that we were enthusias- 
tic here would be a vast exaggera- 


tion," said an adviser to Prime 
Minister Shimon Peres, when asked 
how the Israeli government viewed 
Hussein's proposals. 

Another senior official directly 
involved in foreign policy, who 
agreed to speak an the condition 
that he not be named, said Israel 
could not see anything in the king’s 
initiative (hat justified the “eupho- 
ria and optimism” expressed by 
Secretary ot State George P. Shultz. 

He referred to a letter Mr. Shultz 
sent Monday to Mr. Peres and For- 
dgn Minister Yitzhak Shamir. 

In the letter, the secretary cited 
Hussein's recent statements in 
Washington that be had won back- 
ing from the PLO for negotiations 
with Israel on the basis of United 
Nations Security Council Resolu- 
tions 242 and 338. 


The resolutions have long been 
regarded as providing for Arab rec- 
ognition of Israel ana the principle 
of exchanging Israeli -occupied 
land for peace. 

Mr. Peres and Moshe Arms, a 
minister without portfolio who was 
sitting in for Mr. Shamir, hern 
Wednesday to draft a formal cabi- 
net response to Mr. Shultz's letter 
and Hussein's proposals. 

[Mr. Arms questioned Thursday 
bow fast peace negotiations were 
advancing, and said he doubted 
Hussein was ready for direct nego- 
tiations with Israel, United Press 
International reported. 

[“My guess is under the best of 
circumstances it’s going to be some 
time yet before King Hussrin ap- 
pears on the scene and starts direct, 
negotiations with us,” be said.] , 


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U) 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


Page 3 


i:ff ori x South Africa Threatens 
? Reprisals if U.S. Adopts 
■ Economic Sanctions 


W:. 




: Compiled by Our Staff From (kspatcher 

‘ JOHANNESBURG — Faced 

■ ■ ’• ■, with U.S. economic sanctions over 

, • . its aparthdd policy of racial se^re- 

' 1 -..i Ration, Sooth Africa is threatening 
. ' -retaliatory measnies, which could 

* v tit ( p include an embargo cm exports of 

i.: 1 M»r ’r_ji strategic minerals and metals. 

The U.S- House of Representa- 
lives voted overwhelmingly 
Wednesday for economic sanctions 

• against South Africa. 

, ' .. The 295-127 vote by the House 

■demonstrated broad bipartisan 
y.’,.' support for the bill The sanctions 

>. in the House bill, which would take 

- ... effect imme diately' if the measure 

• ’ . ' becomes law, would ban; 

. • New US. bank loans to' the 
• South African government 

* • New US. commercial invest- 

\l ilitili... perns in South African businesses. 

' •*»* s V , • Importe of Krugerrand gold 

flit coins into the Untied States. 7 
' (. •Computer . sales to. the- Booth. 

... African government. 

• Sales of nuclear fud, equip- 
- ' mem and technology to SonthAm- 

-• ca. 

The Republkan-dominated Sen- 
ate Foreign Relations Committee 
1 • • • . approved a s imilar bill, .16-1. .• 

‘• 's- For sanctions to become law, the 
Senate must approve the bill, then 
•- -r:-. the House and Senate must com* 

* v- c J' . : promise on language and the result 

-■■'-1 ... " signed by President • Ronald 

‘ .^Reagan. Congressional leaders said 
the broad support for sanctions 

• made il imlikdy that Mr. Reagan 
would veto such a ML 

1*"~ < nrb ,,n KCV e « 


Willi, I,.. 


meeting of the governing National 
Party that South Africa was consid- 
ering steps 'to protect itself from 
any U.S. sanctions and to demon- 
strate that it cannot be pushed. 

*If legislation goes through the 
US. Congress ihu week, our ene- 
mies win be back neat year pushing 
for more,” Mr. Nd said. ‘There- 
fore, ii is necessaty.ro put our foot 
down new. The. Americans must be . 
made to realize that if they go 
ahead with disinvestment. South 
Africa will have to defend itself, 
and it vriH have toeonsider defend- 
ing itself in a way that shows the 
woddjhat Smith Africa is a region- 
al power hi Africa." . 

One of South Africa’s returns, 
Mr. Nd said, was the expulsion of 
about one million, blacks from 
neighboring countries who work in 
Sooth Africa without government 
permission: Their /breed repatria- 
tion would cause severe soda], eco- 
nomic and perhaps political prob- 
lems, in Botswana, Lesotho, 
Mozambique, and Swaziland. 

“One £tep. taken try a govern- 
ment or private organization may 
have little or no effect,” he said. 
“Butfor the organizers of the cam- 
paign. each one provides a new 
base from which other, more far- 
reaching measures, may be 
launched?' 

. But government offidals sought 
Wednesday Co playdown Mr. Nel’s 
threat, describing it as a step that 
would have to be weighed carefully 
against South Alika's desire for 
better relations with its neighbors 
in black Africa. 


[. * X ‘ *■- .za V% ^ : i 



Nicaragua Reports Shooting Down 
2 Copters Crossing From Honduras 


V K \’f • • • ■ 
■ 


The AkooomkJ Prwi 


Representatives Wiffiam H. Gray 3d of Pennsylvania, center; Howard E. Wolpe of 
Michigan, right, and Stephen J. Sotarz of New York, aB Democrats, celebrating after the 
U.S. House voted by 295-127 for wide-runging economic sanctions against Sooth Africa. 


South African stale radio said 
Thursday that the economic sanc- 
tions bong debated fry the US. 
Congress could herald harsher 
measures. 

Another retaliatory option avail- 
able to South Africa, according to 
Raymond Parsons, chief executive 
officer of the South AfricanAssoti- 
ation of Chambers of Commerce, is 
economic countermeasures, partic- 
ularly trade restrictions, boycotts 
and embargoes. - 

14 AO the big overseas economies 
rely heavily on South Africa for 


supplies of vital strategic miner- 
als,” Mr. Parsons said Wednesday, 
“and several would have serious 
problems if the pipeline were fro- 
zen.” 

The United States depends on 
South Africa for industrially im- 
portant minerals and metals such 
as chrome, platinum and molybde- 
num. Bat business sources pointed 
cut that the United States has sub- 
stantial stockpiles of many of these 
materials ana there are alternative 
sources. In addition, they said. 
South Africa needs the foreign cur- 
rency il earns from these exports. 


Sentiment in South Africa is 
dearly rising nonetheless for a 
stronger response from the govern- 
ment of President Pieter W. Botha 
to the campaign for economic sanc- 
tions, in Western Europe as well as 
in the United States. 

A week ago. Prime Minister Lau- 
rent Fabhis announced in Paris 
that France would apply sanctions 
if South Africa did not end racial 
discri minatio n wi thin 18 months to 
two years. The Scandinavian coun- 
tries have also taken trade mea- 
sures. 

(LAT, AP, Reuters) 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Nev York Times Service 

MANAGUA — The govern- 
ment has announced that its troops 
shot down two unidentified heli- 
copters that had entered Nicara- 
guan air space from Honduras. 

An army spokesman said 
Wednesday that the helicopters 
were among three that attacked an 
observation post Monday in the 
border province of Nueva Segovia. 

He said it was not known who 
had been aboard the helicopters or 
whether any of them had been 
killed or captured. 

The incident cam? at a lime of 
tension between Nicaragua and 
Honduras, which is on its northern 
border, and Costa Rica, which is to 
the south. Nicaraguan troops pur- 
suing rebel guerrillas have operated 
dose to those borders in recent 
days. 

Captain Rosa Pasos, the army 
spokesman, said the two helicop- 
ters that had been shot down were 
hit while operating over Nicaragua 
but managed to cross back into 
Honduras before crashing. 

Honduras and Costa Rica have 
both charged that Nicaraguan 
troops have crossed into their terri- 
tory. Nicaraguan leaders hare de- 
nied this. 

Officials said the Foreign Minis- 
try had sent a “formal and energet- 


ic protest” to Honduras after the 
helicopter incident occurred. The 
next day. Honduras denied that 
any helicopters had flown over 
Nicaragua from its territory. 

In its protest note Nicaragua 
said it had repelled three helicop- 
ters. But until Wednesday there 
had been no claim that any aircraft 
had been shot down. 

President Daniel Onega Saave- 
dra was quoted Wednesday as hav- 
ing said that government units, 
supported by helicopters and other 
aircraft, had been engaged in con- 
tinuous combat with U.S.-support- 
ed rebels along both borders. 

"We are going to continue these 
operations, he went on. "even 
though we know that the United 
States is trying to take advantage of 
these confrontations in order to 
create greater tensions between us 
and Honduras and Costa Rica.” 

Since soon after the beghxniiig of 
the American-backed insurgency 
three years ago, government lead- 
era have maintained that the strate- 
gy of the United Slates is to send its 
ground troops to Nicaragua if the 
rebels failed to overthrow the Ma- 
nagua government 
■ Speakes Denies Report 

Larry Speakes, the chief White 
House spokesman, has assailed as 
“foolish an article in The New 
York Times on Wednesday that 
said administration officials had 


begun openly discussing contin- 
gency plans involving the" dispatch- 
ing of U.S. combat troops to Nica- 
ragua. The Tunes reported. 

The original Times account said 
that no one in the U.S. government 
viewed an invasion as imminent or 
desirable. 

Mr. Speakes said The Times 
“needs to review recent history” 
and the public record of documents 
and speeches by President Ronald 
Reagan. 

“The president has no plans to 
use U.S. military forces in Central 
America, period." Mr. Speakes 
said. 

“To raise the specter of direct 
U.S. involvement is wrong, wrong, 
wrong." 



IRS Reiterates July Deadline 


AccusedSpy 'Loved the Glamour 9 

His Former Wife Describes Why She Called the FBI 


2 Fibers in Tampons 
Linked to Toxic Shock 


1W, i.Aa.-;- 


t"s Plan for 


ByRobcrcLJacksoaL--- 

Las Angela Times Service ... 

% WEST DENNIS, Massachusetts.— Barbara C. 
T Walker, whose tip ro the Federal Bureau of Investi- 
gation led US. authorities to what they call the 
largest espionage ring uncovered in decades, says 
her former husband began spying for the Soviet 
Union in the late 1960s to get money to shore tq) a 
failing restaurant in which be had invested. 

In the following years, induding almost a de- 
cade of their 19-year marriage, JohnA. -Walker Jr, 
a navy communications specialist, continued to 
sell military secrets to Soviet agents for “well over 
S 100.000,” she said Wednesday. 

“I feel certain that he spent it aQ,” she said. 
“John always liked a life-style higher than he could 
afford — boats, airplanes and international trav- 
el” 

She said she believed that his need for money to 
„ prop up his investment in a restaurant and bar m 
{ South Carolina, a business that die said eventually 
closed, prompted Mr. Walker -to begin spying, for 
Moscow. • 

“But be also loved the glamour of being a spy,” 
she said. “He loved being one step ahead of other 
people, walking down the street and knowing 
something no one else knew." 

Mrs. Walker said she agonized fen years before 
going to the FBI in November. Even then, she raid, 
she would not have gone to the authorities if she 
had known that her youngest child, Michael 
would be charged with espionage along with his 
father. 

“I lore Michael so much,” Mrs. Walker said <rf 
her only son, a 22-year-old sailor. “I lave my 
country, but I never could have brought myself to 
do it irl had known he was part of this thing. I was 
devastated when I heard Michael was involved?’ 

John Walker. 47. was arrested May 20 after FBI 
agents said he attempted to give a Soviet agent 
classified documents he had received from Mi- 
chael, who served on the Ntnutz, a n n dcar- 
powered aircraft carrier. Is addition, Mr. Walkers 
brother, Arthur,'50, and Jerry A Whitworth, 45, of - 
Davis, California, a retired senior chief radioman 


with the navy, have also been arrested and charged 
with espionage. 

On Tuesday, John Walker and his son pleaded 
not guilty. 

Although Mrs. Walker insisted she knew noth- 
ing of Michael's alleged rale, she said she had 
learned from ha daughter, Laura Walker Snyder, 
25, that John Walker had tried to enlist her as a spy 
in 1979 while she was an army communications 
operator stationed at Fort Polk, Louisiana. “Laura 
told me about it soon after it happened," she said. 
She would not give other details, or say where her 
daughter now hves. 

Federal authorities have said evidence provided 

by Mrs. Walker and, her rfangjhter was instrumental 

in cracking what they have described in affidavits 
as one of the most serious breaches of navy securi- 
ty, especially involving secret communications and 
radio codes, for 20 years. 

Mrs. Walker said in the interview that she had 
. known of her husband's espionage activities since 
the late 1960s and that one day she hadpicked up 
4he telephone at their homeiri Norfolk, ytrgma, to 
alert the FBI. 

“But 1 just couldn’t make the call,” she said. *T 
thought, ‘How can I possibly survive with four kids 
if John is taken away? ” 

But several months ago, more than eight years 
after their marriage ended in divorce, she sought 
out FBI agents in nearby Hyanms, Massachusetts, 
to tell them of John Walker’s activities, Mrs. Walk- 
er said. 

“I wanted to protect my children,” die said.- 
“Was I seeking vengeance? Wcfl, a part of me 
wanted to see him get what he deserved.” 

Mrs. Walker, 47, said she agreed to the interview 
in hopes of halting the “bothersome attention” 
focused on her by the news media since the case 
became public last month. 

. Mrs. Walker refused to proride details about 
information she gave to the FBI saying that the 
bureau had asked her to remain siknL 
; She was also guarded in discussing the money 
she said her husband had received from Soviet 
agents. She did, however, say she knew of one 
instance when her husband received 535,000 and 
that the total was “wdl over SlOOjOOO.” 


N.Y. Starts Homosexual High School 



By Larry Robter . 

Netr Tima Service 

NEW YORK — A public high 
school for homosexual students has 
been opened in Manhattan. 

The school, which began classes 
in April in a Greenwich Village 
churcte is named the Harvey Muk 
School, for the homosexual activist 
and San Frandsco ciry supervisor, 
who was shot to death in 1978. - 

Its organizers said it was the first 


prospobote 


be geared specifically to homo- 
sexual adolescents and their prob- 
lems. L 

“For the most part, the males are 
overtly effeminate, some are trans- 
vestites, and the girls are all tough?* 
said Fred Goldhaber. a teacher at 
the school. “All of them would be 
targets for abuse in regular 
schools.” 

The New York City Board of 
Education is operating the school 
in conjunction with the. Institute 
for the Protection of Lesbian and 
Gay Youth, a homosexual advoca- 
cy and counseling group financed 
in pan by the city and the stale of 
New York. 

Twenty students — 14 boys and 
/ girls ranging in age from 14 to 
— are enrolled AB oTthem say 
they are homosexuals who have 
had difficulty fittiite in at conven- 
tional high schools because of their 
sexual identity and' who have 
dropped oat of school aid Steve 
Ashkinazy. director of clinical pro- 
grains for the institute. 

Since its financing" from the 
Board of Education began April 1, 
the school has been hading classes 
in the Washington Square United 
Methodist Church, the school's 
tuckers said they hoped soon to 
expand both the student body and 
?jff and lo move the school rato a 
larger space with better facilities. 

“A lot of kids are waiting to get 
in for the fall,” said Mr.'Goid- 
haber. who teaches all five subjects 
in the school's curriculum and who 


is, he said, a homosexual. “These 
are kids who are serious about get- 
ting an education. " • 

The program at the Harvey Milk 
School was first suggested to board 
of education officials by the insti- 
tute, which has been counseling ho- 
mosexual diopoate since Novem- 
ber 1953. 

Mr. Ashkinazy. said there was 
some - initial “nervousness” and 
"stalling" on the part of the board 
of education because of the contro- 
versial nature of the program. But 
he-said staff members of Mayor 
Edward L Koch and the office of 
the city comptroller had argued in 
favor of tite program and had 
helped smoothfits way. 

Board of education officials esti- 
mate the. teuiual cost of the pro- 
gram at about 550,000. 

Richard Oreaniaciak, on official 
of the board of education, said the 
program had been organized to 
provide a standard education to 
homosexual- teen-agers “excluded 
from the mainstream" at their high 

schools. 

“The imjxMtanl thing is to get 
them back into a -school address 
their probfcmsand get then on the 
diploma track,” he said. 

~AU 20 students in the program 
are school diopouts or truants who 
have been nearing counseling at 
thejnstitute ; ; 

“When I started woddng here, 1 
noted that we .were dealing with 
tote of gay kids 15 or 16 years old 
who had been out of school for a 
year or more," said -Mr. Ashkinazy, 
who is also a social worker. “The 
reason they gave was that when it 
became known in their schools that 
they were gay. rhey were harassed 
verbally cat even ‘batten up.” 

Oneafthe aims of the program is 
to.teach the teen-agers, who cone 
from all five boroughs erf the city, 
to be oontfortabte with their own 
hanosextu&y. .lb£i is done. Mr. 
Ashkinazy said, through the class- 


room curriculum as wdl as in after- 
school counseling sessions. 

“One of the advantages of hav- 
ing a gay teacher is that be serves as 
a role model” Mr. Ashkinazy said. 
“Many (rf these kids have never 
seat a gay adult who is successful 
and not a hairdresser or one of (he 
other stereotypes shown on televi- 
sion.” 


By Boyce Rensberger 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — Researchers 
at Harvard Medical School say 
they have discovered how high-ab- 
sorbency tampons may have 
caused toxic shock syndrome. 

The researchers said Wednesday 

that their finding ?; suggested tha» h 
might be possible to bring the, 
products back in a new form that 
would lower the risk. AD three such 
high-absorbency brands in the 
United States — Rely, Tampax Su- 
per-Plus and Playtex — have been 
takes off the market 

Toxic shock, which has proven 
fatal in about 4 percent of cases, 
flared i n to pro minenc e in 1 980. Al- 
though cases were reported in men 
and children, most cases were . 
finked ko the growing use among 
women of new types of long-wear-' 
mg tampons. 

Doctors speculated that the tam- 
pons somehow encouraged the 
growth of the bacterial strain that 
produced the toxin that brought on 
the disease. But they could" never 
say exactly why or how. 

The Harvard scientists found 
that the high-absorbency tampons 
were made erf two kinds of fiber — 
polyester foam and polyaaylate 
rayon — that have an anusual abil- 
ity not mly to absorb ffrrids but 
also to extract magneshnn atoms 
from the vagina and bind them 
• permanently into the fiber. 

In a low-magnesium environ- 
ment, they also found, certain bac- 
teria normally present in the vagina 
and on the skin start producing 
large amounts of toxin. When mag- 
nesium levels are normal, the bac- 
teria, Staphylococcus aureus, pro- 
duce little or no toxin and cause no 

harm. 

The Harvard experiments were 
done in test tubes. But Edward H. 
Kass, who led the research group, 
said the findings suggested that 
when women used tampans made 
with either of the two fibers, the 
fibers removed magnesram from 
vaginal Quids, prompting rite bac- 
teria to make toxin. 

Fibers used to make convention- 
al tampons now on the market are 
unable to bind Trmgneshim ) the re- 
searchers found. Mr. Kass sad the 


low magnesium levels did not en- 
courage the bacteria. 

The reason only a relatively few 
users of such tampons get sick, Mr. 
Kass said, is that most people are 
immune to the toxin. It is estimated 
that fry the ag)e of 20 about 95 
percent of the population has al- 
ready been exposed to “staph" tox- 
in and has developed antibodies. 

Mr. Kass, whose research was 
funded by Tambrands, which 
makes Tampax tampons, said the 
findings could lead lo a safe form 
of high-absorbency tampon. “By 
adding back magnesium to these 
fibers," he said, “we could render 
the fiber unable to take magnesium 
from the environment and prevent 
manufacture of the toxin.” 


(Continued from Page 1) 
yond the April 15 filing deadline. 
But they must pay interest on any 
taxes that are paid after April 15. 

Taxpayers who use further valid 
extensions beyond these filing 
deadlin es still will be able to claim 
the income exclusion, but there are 
few people in that category. Mr. 
Kobel said. 

He said man y Ameri cans living 
overseas are unsure whether they 
are required to file income tax re- 
turns. A recent study by the Gener- 
al Accounting Office showed that 
61 percent of U.S. adult citizens 
who were tiring and working in 
four foreign countries and were not 
connected with the U.S. govern- 
ment failed to file returns. 

Mr. Kobel emphasized that 
Americans abroad are taxed on 
their worldwide income and that 
they must file returns even if they 
owe no U.S. income tax. 

Some taxpayers who fail to file 
1982 and 1983 returns by July 23 
may have other means to reduce 
their U.S. tax liability. 

Americans abroad who pay in- 
come (axes to foreign governments 
are allowed, within timite, to credit 
those taxes against their U.S. in- 


come tax on a doUar-for-doDar ba- 
sis. 

Amer icans who lose the foreign 
income exclusion because of late 
filing and who did not pay taxes on 
income earned in their foreign 
country of residence, such as some 
who worked for international orga- 
nizations, may be taxed as though 
they lived in the United States and 
have to pay penalties and interest. 


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Page 4 

U.S. Conservatives Help 
4 Rebel Groups Ally lor 
Anti-Soviet Campaigns 

By Alan Cowell But the immediate battlefield ef- 

JAMBA Angpla — Four anti- !™^^ wh , te 

Soviet insmgent movements from A gnwp of ararabvej . 
Africa, Asia and Central America, South Afhcau 
meeting here under the auspices of attended 

a group of American conservatives, ago d« acc< l5i-Jc^,hASS? 
h^e announced the formation of s^edto_^mbohzfi f South^^s 
an alliance. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE, FRIDAY, JI1WE 7. 1985 


not only for Jonas Sa- 

tatdsofi orM§Stion of an afli^ 
ance between anti-Soviet groups 
and American conservatism. 


The accord, signed this week by 
representatives of guerrillas fight- 
ing the governments of Angola, Af- 

£££«?« -Msgs® 

Sn^provisioMlSpiial. aperas of the purtopants. 

The conference was ol^tized^by 

as “a private venture" 
endorseme 


a U.S. 


of 


pilled Gti- 

zeas tor America, lei by T-swj? 

I Ainiiin, a millionaire Republican 
who ran unsuccessfully for gover- 
nor of New York in 1982. 

Jamba consists of a military 
base, a hospital, open-air schools 
and other buildings. The village is 
close to Angola's border with 
South-West Africa. 

The new alliance, called the 

niraiQK point. They described it as , ® Fmm ont- 


meetmg 

without the endorsement 
State Department. 

Mr. TAmum . who made his for- 
tune with a drugstore chain, read 
aloud to the signers a letter that he 
said President Ronald Reagan had 
sent to him before he and other 
participants arrived here on char- 
tered aircraft from Johannesburg. 

“Around the world,” the letter 



„rase Is Nearer to Seeking 
mal Anns Credits for Jordan 


% Bernard Gwenzman 

Sew Tor* Tune* Sendee 


icant steps that should be accompa- 
nied by the arms sale. 

< v « Yark Timet struct Reaaan agrees to the 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan certainly would 

SSSssEis ggSSSsSS SgSEr* 

tional military credits that would Congress wno icms facing the johmw 

allow it to order F-20 fighter planes ^re to offer JordanWore Hus- On Saturday a 
and two idvancrf jnhWt de- l °^ s with Israel White House 


sass=5SB=SS* . 

aassa ■ 



But a senior State LKparuneui theJomamaw^^rr^^ £ saiAandtoWnunuwt 
official cautioned Wednesday that toward ^ negoaanonsw^^ ^asTarashea^ 

Swe 

Reagan and that the components 
cod'd be c h a n g ed . 

Officials said, nevertheless, that 
they expected to begin briefing key 
members of Congress nett week on 


showing minor f^iThe figure 

made the dect- secunty ^ 


members of Congress ueTrt 
results of a three-month 
Middle East arms transfers. 


orare. 

bility and have not --- 
sion to negotiate with Israel. 

Administration officials also ac- 
knowledged that the move wUl 
* ■ r strain relations with isra- 


he saw no way to support the m- 
n riwisir ation at this time. 

According to a Pentagon official 
Jordan is seeking tfoee !£&!£ 


and Adolfo Catero Portocarrero, a representatiYe of an anti-Sandmist group. 

the Soviet Union, said he had not Southwest Africa, widely known 


CSS.TS* 

2r^rsyK*i s-tarfiasfss 

trLaStata "'.““TbS'.t 

30 days for formal notification. & mrtifc 

In the past, Congress could block Hawfc anti-aircraft missue. and the 
a sale by majority votes in Ixrtn g t i n «gr hand-held anu-wreraft 
houses. But the Supreme Court 

ruled in 1983 that ajch y s an( j Jordanian officials 

sional vetoes agree that Jordan faces a cratiau- 

arms sale can now be stopped oniy — o — » ™w> ««- 


licavuy miiiiAi uj —— -j-p 

presents a threat to Jordan, ana it 
offers this as a rationale for the 
sale. 

More than two-thirds of the Sen- 
ate's members are on record as op- 
posing the projected arms sale to 
Jordan at tins mm, and the House 
Foreign Affairs Committee has 
. a foreign aid bill that bars 


U.K. Soccer Fire Called Accidental 


The Associated Press 

BRADFORD, England — A 
cigarette or some other burning ob- 
ject dropped by accident probably 
caused the fire at a Bradford soccer 

smdium that killed 33 people, an 
attorney involved in the investiga- 
.don says. 

Andrew Collins, an attorney for 
the public inquiry into the May 11 
fire, said the object fell through die 


ende hnds,” it aid, “have .o .he Soviet Umon^id he Afaca, ^ it*™ a^sde can eow be stopped QtUy iteS^p. 

“iEEaSSESK SMKL'Krato JHttesSKtSS 

SS-assas: stss?— “ be.-" ” *— * £*- a =ig>as BKftasssse 

chairman. Israel, howewr. aigno 
that such equipment could be used 
against it- 0 ■ 

_ Jordan is scheduled (0 receive 

lack of visible support by Jordan demonstratii^ a ^iro^ iu 1 ^^ million in mffitwy credits. , 

f0r s«S^e^ WEfSrla*- 

par t mal t and White House offi- 
cials, however, now say that Y : 

Hussein of Jordan has taken r' 


praiseooypaii^F^^” ex to eet control of their own an airs ^ ft* rights that witn tne anu-aovua T3r*~“ — * — rr^T’ r 

3SSS3S?SSKK: hltS fand-d 

Soviet and Cuban intervention ade and one of gI S are ? ff -S?S' ; n th«r Arri* oression of the sentiments of the pledged its four participants, all of in 1981 by the ad min istration and 

ESMf^"<S3S SiSSSS--*^ wBt^ni^ority erf the Atooican peo- 

colonialism. “Those of us who live m demo- hbOTy and amsmimoiial democra- Die. ^ - ... 


cy lead us to form this Democratic 
International” 

The pact was signed by the 
Union for the Total Independence 
of Angola, led by Mr. Savimbi; die 
guerrillas in Afghanistan, repre- 
sented by an officer named Cdand 
Dastagir Wardak; the Ethnics lib- 


stands onto a pile of crash. There 
was a hose in trout of the stands 
but not en o u g h water came out to 

extinguish the fire, he raid. "--*r — ■. — 7 . 

Thirty-six persons injured in the era lion Organization of Laos, tea 
Haze are still hospitalized. Mr. Col- by Pa Kao Her, and the Nicara- 
lins said the inquiry, which is being guan Democratic Face, led by 

oresided over by a High Court Adolfo Calero Portocarrero. — 77 — , 

Se, would try to learn what Mr. Lehrman, who depicted dustve dutn^oM dramol to se- 
S 9 be done to prevent similar himsdf as a private crusader for 

disasters. It is expected to last sev- what he called the Reagan doctrine to 30,000 Cuban sokhCTS rnAngda 
Sal vSeks. of conservatism and challenge to in tandem with independence for 


pression of the sentiments of the 
vast majority of the American peo- 
ple.” 

That seemed to offer a contradic- 
tion, because for several years U.S. 
policy in southern Africa, as put 
forth by Chester A Crocker, assis- 
tant secretary of state for African 
affairs, has beat to negotiate with 
the Marxist authorities in Luanda 
agoing whom Mr. Savimbf s rebels, 
who are based here, are fight i n g. 

Moreover, Mr. Crocker has pub- 
licly excluded Mr. Savimbi from 
long-r unning and thus far incon- 


to liberate our nations from the 
Soviet imperialists.” 

“Our struggles are one struggle,” 
their declaration said, “the fight for 
independence from Soviet coiomal- 
icm " 

Mr. Lehrman also brought gifts 
to this distant bush settlement of 
12,000 people. He gave each partic- 
ipant a framed copy of the UA. 
Declaration of Inaependence and 
an inscribed copy of a bowl used in 
the home of George Washington. 
And be noted that the “American 
model of democracy is something 
for all” peoples. 


allow the president a veto on any 
binding resolution, and Congress 
would then have the right to over- 
turn it by a two-thirds vote. 

Thai is why there is significance, 
demonstrating a potential for over- 
turning a presidential veto, in the 
fact that more than two-thirds of 
the members of the Senate have 
ripngd die nonbinding resolution 
introduced Tuesday by Senators 


| UC dUUtuviiwi <r« ™ , 7 “ . 

be sought to make it caster for 
Jordan to order the new equip- 
ment. 


Taipei to Ask More U.S. Arms 10,000 Sikhs 

that it still commands military su- 11/T«n»lr AttflPlT 

periority in the Taiwan Strait but lflaJElk AU wft 

.i ■ i : in 


Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan will ask the i “* -r- ~ ~ ~ t r A , n 

United States for more advanced that this dominance is expected to 
weapons, including jet aircraft, to *“** 


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within a few years if Tai- 
wan does not acquire more sophis- 
ticated weapons. 

The official said Taiwan needed 
new and better weapons because 
rhina was developing advanced 
arms that would threaten the is- 
land's security. 

He said Taipei welcomed an 
American reassurance Wednesday 
that it would continue supplying 
defensive wwmons to Taiwan. U JS. 


counter a Chinese threat against 
the idanri, a senior government of- 
ficial said Thursday. 

The official, who declined to be 
named, said that Taiwan needed 
the weapons because Beijing had 
.not abandoned efforts to take the 
[•island by force. A Chinese Foreign 
Ministry spokesman said Wednes- 
day that giving up the option to 

invade the island would make re- — 

unification impossible. defensive weapons to Taiwan. 

Taipei hasrqertwi several proa anns sdes t^arwm thtayejr tue 
overtures from Beijing since 1979, apected to total aboutS760 aOr 
riicrriicsfnp them as propaganda bon, compared with S780 nghon 
pbyT^ last year, according to official 

The Taiwan government has said sources. 



SK/ 

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Reuters 

AMRITSAR, tofia — Thou- 
sands of militant Skhs gathercd 
Thursday at- the -Golden Temple 
here to mark the fust anniversary 
of the seizurebf the shrine by Indi- 
an troops. Attendance at ihe emu- 
mcmoratioB FcS bdow-tbe expecta- 
tions of S5kh leaders. 

About 10,000 people' shmiled 
slogans praising Jfarnaii Singh 
Bhindranwak, an extremist leader 
udio died directing the defense of 
the Skhs* revered temple The 
crowd praised the men who assassi- 
nated Prime Minister Indira Gan- 
dhi four months later. It was Mrs. , 
Gandhi who .had ordered the am» - 
to occupy the Skh shrine, which 
dates ta 1604. 

The mganizers of the rally, in- 
dutfiag Mr, Bhindranwale’s father, 
Joginder Sindi, is 83. said they 
had ejected as many as 500,000 
people to appear. They attributed 
tii slig hter attendance to tight secu- 
rity and fear of violence. 

During the meeting, reinforce- 
meats jamed paramilitary troops to 
guard roads leading up to the pe- 
rimeter of the temple complex. But 
there was no evidence in the streets 
of regular Indian Army units, 
which were on stand-by in their 
barracks. 

After a series of prayers the 
Sikhs adopted resolutions praising 
the assassins of Mrs. Gandhi and 
also acclaiming Mr. Bhmdranwale 
and hundreds of Sikhs who died 
when the army stormed the shrine. 
The purpose of the attack was to., 
flush out extremists fighting for jrf 
separate Sikh nation in Punjao 
state. 

There are 13 milli on S ikhs in 
India, which has a total population 
of 750 nriltiou. The Sikhs mu Ice up 
52 percent of Punjab’s population. 

The rally Thursday was intended 
to be the culmination of a series of 
commemorative services lasting 
from last Saturday through Friday, 
which Sikhs have termed “Geno- 
cide Week.” 

The rally was expected to be a 
test of strength between the mili- 
tants, led by Joginder Singh, and 
moderate followers of Harchaod 
Singh Lortgowal, president of the 
Akah Dal, the Silrn political parto- 

The Akah Dal plans its n raxn 
service on Sunday. 


N.Y. Targets Paint 
In War on Graffiti 

Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — Mayor Edward 
L Koch believes an answer to New 


York Qty*s pervasive 
lem may be to require 
stores to 


ib- 
tware 
it locked 


“P “ d prohibit its safe to minors. 

Mr. Koch said Wednesday that 
th *““ sur « would be included in 
a oiil be plans to introduce next 
week m the city council. The billi 
would provide for a $500 fine f al 
stiwes that faded to comply. ^ 
The mayor said most of the spray 
paint used to daub subway trams, 
stations and other public facilities 
was stolen from hardware stores. 

therefore we think it would be 
appropriate Tor those stores to keep 
those cans under lock and key and 
to only sell to adults," he said. 


OrinaOffidd lo YisftRussia 

Yhe Associated Press 
®EUjNG — One of China V 

:t and 



wISS spokesman said 



£** to ** 

<l*tsfor } () ^ Bonn,U.S. 

^ ' Differ Over 
Return of 

... 

Alleged Nazi 

■-* 1 - H ashsagtai Pm Service 

..... 1 WASHINGTON - The West 

j German government has formally 
/ , [ ’• ^ protested io the U.S. Slate Dcpart- 

; merit over tbe tfrcoxnstances under 

which Arthur' LJi Rudolph, the 
' 1 designer of tbe Saram-5.moan 

- rocket, returned to West Germany 

in March 1984 and renounced his 
■' U.S. citizenship. 

. Mr. Rudolph, 78, left the United 
; Suites rather than faeealleganons 

by the Justice Department that he 
... ■, persecuted slave laborers while su- 

’ • pervising production of V-2 mis- 

siles for the Nazis during World 
Warn. 

^ Mr. Rudolph was one -of 118 

" German rocket scientists who were 

brought secretly to the United 
i.-u .> - ^States after World War II to work 

for the array and later the National 
V. Aeronautics and Space Admmis- 

I ration. 

y . The West German consol genw- 

al. Elfriede G. Kruger, said 
Wednesday that her government 

had informed the State Depart- 

7 meat that Mr. Rudolph “arrived 

' ■ . illegally. When somebody has a 
passport it means the government 
will take the bearer back. That 
didn't happen." 

But a State Department official 
‘ said he believed Mr. Rudolph’s ac- 
( dons wert vohmtajy and gre “con- 
sistent with international law." He 
said that since Mr. Rudolph con- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 





Arthur- UH. Rudolph 

• raaiad his Nazi past when he ap- 
plied For U.S.. citizenship, an argu- 
ment could be made that he was 
never legally a U.S. citizen. 

The World Jewish Congress 
charged Wednesday that the con- 
troversy .over Mr. Rudolph was 
part of a “deliberate policy’ of the 
Boon government to block depor- 
tation of war criminals to West 
Gennany. ■ 

The New York-based group re- 
leased a copy of a 1954 agreement 
in which the West Germans agreed 
to readmit “any. person who has 
received a visa for the United 
States under the Ref ogee Relief 
Act of 1953 ... if it subsequently 
established that such person re- 
ceived the visa Through fraud or 
through misrepresenting material 
facts. 9 ■ 

The West German consul said, 
“We are not aware of such an 
agreement" ' 



njirzj 






P«r#5? 

IfliMKW * r* 


Bjifu . fl 





West German government, re- 
marked several weeks ago that Mr. 
Burt was regarded as a keen ob- 
server of European affairs and 
would be welcome if he were nomi- 
nated as ambassador. 

Political observers said that any 
prospect that the opposition Social 
Democrats would object to Mr. 
Burt's nomination appeared to 
have faded. 


Richard R. Burt 


Accounts that appeared in the 
West German press during the eco- 
nomic summit talks held in Bonn 
last month suggested that Mr. Burt 
played a key role in dissuading Mr. 
Reagan from m eet ing privately 
with WQly Brandi, the former West 
Ge rman chancellor and leader of 
the Social Democrats. Mr. . Burt de- 
nied tbe accounts. 


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ReachingMoreThan aThindofa Million Readers 
in 164 Countries Aiound theWforid 


Brazilians 
Open Grave 
In a Search 
For Mengele 

The Ajsociaiai Pros 

EMBU. Brazil — Workmen 
opened a coffin Thursday (hat the 
police believe may have rnnrained 
the body of Josef Mengele. the 
Nazi doctor known as the “Angel 
of Death" at the Auschwitz camp. 

As hundreds of police and re- 
porters looked on. three grave dig- 
gers with picks and shovels opened, 
uie grave in this Portuguese colo- 
nial town, 17 miles (27 kilometers) 
from Sao Paulo. 

The workers were unable to re- 
move the coffin, which stuck in the 
shallow grave. Police ordered them 
to smash it open with picks. 

When the coffin was opened, 
bones and shreds of clothing were 
removed by hand and placed on a 
long metal tray, which was taken 
by a morgue trade to S5o Paulo. 

The morgue director, Jos£ Anto- 
nio de Mala who observed the 
exhumation, picked up the stcnTl 
and held it high. 

Mr. MeUo said the disarray of 
tbe bones would make identifica- 
tion difficult 

Romeo T uma, chief of federal 
police in Sdo Paula said before the 
exhumation that be was “90 per- 
cent convinced” that the body was 



Dr. Josef Mengele 

that of Dr. Mengele.. He said the 
body had been buried under a false 
Tia-mt* and identified as Austrian. 

Mr. Tuma told reporters that 
federal police had documents and a 
diary belonging to Dr. Mengele 
that were seized at a German cou- 
ple’s home in Brazil, where he had 
apparently been living. He did not 
say when or where the documents 
had been found by the police. 

■ Drowning Reported 
In a Bonn report, the West Ger- 
man newspaper Die Welt said 
Thursday that Dr. Mengele had 
drowned near S&o Paulo in 1975. 

In Paris, Seige Klarsfeld. a law- 
yer and active Nazi hunter, said in 
commenting on Die Writ’s article 
that he viewed reports of the death 
of Dr. Mengde with “the greatest 
skepticism.” 


Soviet Puts 
2 in Orbit; 
Repairs lor 
Salyut Seen 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
put a two-man crew into orbit. 
Thursday, and Western space ex- 
perts said the highly trained cosmo- 
nauts could have been sent to con- 
tinue repairs on tbe three-year-old 
Salyut-7 orbital station. 

Vladimir Dzhanibekov, a veter- 
an of four missions who is the com- 
mander. and Viktor Savinykh, the 
flight engineer, were aboard tbe 
Soyuz T-13 launch craft The Sovi- 
et news agency Tass said. 

The report gave no details about 
the miggiftfr but it said Mr. Dzhani- 
bekov and Mr. Savinykh had start- 
ed work and would later dock with 
Salyut-7. 

Mr. Dzhambekov, 43, visited 
Salyut-7 in July to help the three- 
-man crew repair a leaky fuel pipe 
using new techniques and tools 
outside the cylindrical station. Thai 
Salyut crew set a record of 238 days 
in space. 

Tbe launch Thursday was the 
first Soviet manned mission since 
the Salyut team returned in Octo- 
ber after 34 weeks. 

Western space experts said the 
station had not been fully repaired 
despite several space walks made 



The A*sooo»*d Pi»j 

Vladimir Dzhanibekov, left, and Viktor Savinykh, Soviet 
cosmonauts, were sent into orbit Thursday in Soyuz T-13. 


Iasi year by Mr. Dzhanibekov and 
others. 

Salyut-7. launched in April 19S2 
and hot used since October, still 
has problems in the command or 
electrical system, tbe experts said. 

Mr. Savinykh, 45, is on his sec- 
ond mission since he began cosmo- 
naut t rainin g in 1978, after working 
as spacecraft instruments specialist 
and as a space flight controller. 

Mr. Dzhanibekov made his first 
flight that year and has become a 
leading cosmonaut, entrusted last 
July with leaching tbe Salyut crew 
how to use new tools to try to stop a 
leak that virtually immobilized the 
station last September. 


irbit Thursday in Soyuz T-13. 

He trained on an underwater 
mock-up of Salyut before instruct- 
ing Colonel Leonid Kizim and Vla- 
dimir Solovyov, two of the crew, in 
space. 

Both the Soviet Union and the 
United Stales say they aim to set up 
permanently manned stations in 
space and establish factories. The 
United Stales has concentrated re- 
cently on its short-stay reusable 
shuttle while the Soviet ’Union has 
continued making endurance 
flights. 

A Soviet shuttle exists but has 
yet to be launched because of prob- 
lems with the booster rockets. 
Western experts said. 


Page 5 

Polish Cleric 
Says Attacks 
On Church 
Are Growing 

Reuters 

GDANSK, Poland — A Roman 
Catholic bishop told thousands of 
worshipers in Gdansk on Thursday 
that attacks on the Polish church 
were increasing but that truth 
could not be suppressed by “propa- 
ganda.” 

“We have noticed in the last few 
months an intensified action in our 
country to distract people from the 
church." Bishop Tadeusz Go- 
clows ki of Gdansk said at St. Brigi- 
da's Church, in a sermon marking 
the festival of Corpus Christi. 

“This action has shown itself in 
criticisms of religious values and 
the pope, in attacks on believers 
and the clergy and even in the 
death of a priest." he said. 

Father Godowski was referring 
to the Reverend Jerzy Popieluszko. 
a supporter of Solidarity, who was 
killed by security policemen last 
October! Four policemen were sen- 
tenced to prison terms in the case. 

“We shall stick by our Christian 
values." Father Godowski said. 
“People want the truth and the 
truth cannot be suppressed.” 

In Warsaw. Cardinal Jozef 
Glemp. the Polish primate, called 
in a sermon for respect for human 
rights, including those of religion 
and education. 


' vV I 

, 4 • m 


little Things That 
Make Us Bigger. 


Every airline aims to give you a more 
comfortable flight, but at Pan Am we go one 
stage further. 

We want to give you a better travelling 
experience. 

Fresh flowers to make 
you feel at home. 

The first thing that you 
... W notice as you step aboard 
ITt your Pan Am 747 is the space. 

1 1|| Especially in Clipper® 

||^j Class where we're changing 
from eight across 
WmM HH seating to six across 
Then, as the flight 
progresses you'll appreciate the 
little touches that make travel 
ling on Pan Am a pleasure. 

Like a carnation on your 
table and silver service for 
coffee in First Class, 
or separate courses in 

Clipper Qass. 

Electronic headsets . 
^ More comfortable and 

MS better sound. 

For a bigger sound 
hB we, re providing electronic 

headsets in First 


Movie buffs will be pleased to note 
we're also installing a brand new Sony 
video system. 

Free helicopter service 
for First and Clipper Classy,, , 
passengers. 








& V ’• 




8 minutes to Manhattan and 15 to 

Newark. That's Pan Am's traffic beating 
helicopter, awaiting you at our own 
Worldport® terminal, JFK. 

In the evening there is a free 
limousine to chauffeur you to your 
Manhattan hotel. 


1 


Every 747 has a well 
stocked cellar. 



From service in the sky to service 
on the ground. Pan Am offer you so 
much more when you fly to the States . 

The little things all add up [ ./ 
to a bigger experience. I 

For more details call your 1 I 
Travel Agent, or your nearest 
Pan Am office. 



Pan Am Abu Can't Beat The Experience: 











Puff** S* 


ms 


£ » 
j 


Page 6 


FRIDAY, JU1VE 7, 1985 


Hml 



tribune 


Pu'bfaW Wit h Tbg ,Vw Yorfc Thaw and The W»dungtan Port 

Nuclear Restraint at Risk 


A. .critical battle is being fought for the 
Kf«- "n* e outcome may determine 
»*ether the Soviet strategic forces remain lim- 
ited by treaty to roughly their present size, or 
are provocatively expanded in ways that re- 
quue a further major American response. 

lue present numerical limits of the SALT 
treaties cap the strategic nuclear forces of both 
side^ but cap the Soviet Union's far more 
lightly. Before taking office. Ronald Reagan 
railed the unratified SALT-2 treaty “fatally 
flawed because it allowed s mal l increases in 
nuclear arms instead of an outright reduction. 
® nce in office, he learned the value of treaties 
that limit the more easily expandable Soviet 
arsenal, “We will refrain from actions which 
undercut them so long as the Soviet Union 
shows equal restraint," be declared in 1981 
Yet Mr. Reagan has remained ambiguous 
toward the treaties. He has let a faction in his 
ad m i nis tration loudly air charges of Soviet 
cheating, many of which are more matters of 
interpretation than clear-cut violations. For 
long he ignored the channel for debating com- 
pliance with the Kre mlin, lest he give the 
scorned SALT treaty standing. 

But the posture of half a leg over the fence 
can no longer be maintained. Mr. Reagan has 
twice postponed telling Congress whether be 
will continue to observe the SALT-2 limits 
when the treaty expires at the end of this year. . 
He must also decide bow to offset the next 
Trident submarine, soon to start sea trials. 


America will then possess 14 missiles more 
than the SALT limit of 1 .200 multi- war headed 
missiles, unless an old Poseidon submarine is 
retired and its launching tubes are dismantled. 

Mr. Reagan's hesitation about observing the 
SALT limits is hard to understand. The Rus- 
sians have always tried to offset the quality of 
U.S. nuclear arms with quantity. SALT limits 
warhead numbers but imposes no cap on qual- 
ity. Under SALT. Soviet missile warheads may 
increase from 9.000 to 11.000. Unrestrained, 
they could reach 30.000 by 1995. 

That would make American land-based mis- 
siles far less secure. Those who believe a “star 
wars" missile defense is possible should be the 
first to want limits on Soviet missiles. No 
wonder the Joint Chiefs have declined to sup- 
port Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger 
as be urges abandonment of the treaty. If the 
Russians have indeed violated the treaty, the 
right response is to urge them to desist, not to 
violate it tit-for-taL The Poseidon tubes should 
at least be mothballed until the suspected 
violations are settled, and then dismantled. 

Mr. Reagan says he has “no more important 
goal than reducing and ultimately eliminating 
nud ear weapons." The SALT treaties point 
the way. and set limits that constrain the arms 
race if the current negotiations drag on. What- 
ever flaws Mr. Reagan may perceive in the 
treaties, he had better have a better one in 
hand before he abandons them. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Sanctions on South Africa? 


Proposals in Congress to vote sanctions 
against South Africa were l agg ing until Presi- 
dent Reagan imposed sanctions against Nica- 
ragua. The case for sanctions is that white 
minority rule is at once so odious and so 
powerful that it must be moved, and yet it can 
only be moved by extraordinary economic 
pressures applied from the outside. Not to 
attack apartheid in this fashion, it is asserted, 
is moral and political appeasement. That the 
intended beneficiaries may also suffer is set 
down as a price they are prepared to pay. 

But there is a serious, nonracisi case against 
sanctions. It is that the country's economy is 
its most effective engine of social transforma- 
tion. compelling whites to grant blacks pre- 
cisely the training and education, the liveli- 
hood and personal rewards, the choices of 
where to live and work, the associations and 
organizations, the sense of their own power 
and community, that apartheid would deny 
them. And South Africa's place in the world 
economy, and especially the high-technology, 
democratic, politically responsive parts of the 


world economy, is a prime spur to this process. 

All of this ts understood perfectly well by 
the sponsors of sanction legislation in the US. 
Congress. That is why they have quietly de- 
signed the particulars of their bill to make the 
minimal impact on black jobs and opportuni- 
ties. consistent with sending South Africa a 
political message. The best thing about the bill 
is that its effect will be largely symbolic. But 
that does not make it wise public policy. 

The bill is seen by many Democrats as a 
rebuke to the Reagan administration's policy 
of “constructive engagement.'’ That it would 
be. but a poorly aimed rebuke. The type of 
engagement that widens blacks' economic ad- 
vantages and openings is the good kind. What 
deserves to be criticized in the administration's 
policy but is not attacked by this bill is the bad 
kind: the kind that lets too many South Afri- 
cans ask whether the United States is serious 
about apartheid, the kind that has .American 
diplomats seem more often to be apologizing 
for apartheid than demanding its abolition. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Greece in 'Calmer Seas’ 


II Prime Minister Andreas Pap an dr ecu 
means wtaat he says, the Greek people have 
won a handsome victory in Sunday's election. 
Foreign affairs hardly figured in his Socialist 
government’s successful campaign for a sec- 
ond term. “It's amazing.” Mr. Papandreou 
told New York Times correspondent Henry 
Kamm on election eve, “the voters want re- 
sponsible handling, they don't want adven- 
tures ... It is as if these matters have become 
tiresome.” As a result, the prime minister con- 
tends, the United States and Greece’s other 
allies can expect “calmer seas.” 

That would truly be amazing. Mr. Papan- 
dreou came to office in 1981 vowing — or 
seeming to vow — that Greece would quit 
NATO and the European Community and 
then close down America's military bases. Yet, 
despite much friction, Greece stayed in the 
alliance, won EC subsidies for its farmers and 
renewed (cues on Tour United Slates bases 
until 1988. This time around, his party called 
for removal of the bases “in accordance with 
the timetable of the agreement.” Since there is 
no agreed timetable, the game goes on. 

Such games, more than anything conclusive 
that the Papandreou regime has done, have 
caused a fair amount of leeth-gn ashing in the 
alliance. And some distressing games have 
been domestic. In March Mr. Papandreou said 


he would back a second term for President 
Constantine Caramanlis. the conservative who 
did so much to restore Greek democracy. Yet 
suddenly Mr. Caramanlis was gracelessly 
dumped and replaced, through tricky parlia- 
mentary maneuvers, with a Socialist nominee. 
Judge Christos Sartzetakis. 

Mr. Papandreou’s defense was that keeping 
Mr. Caramanlis would have been “political 
suicide." provoking a mass desertion from the 
Socialists to the Communists. Whether that 
analysis is valid, the logic is revealing. Politics 
come first, commitments second. What seems 
to matter most to the prime minister is to list 
with the winds of the moment, even adding to 
them with hyperbole. Yet in the recent cam- 
paign Mr. Papandreou called his conservative 
opponent. Constantine Mitsolakis, a “traitor" 
and a “wandering Jew” — epithets supposedly 
branding the leader of the New Democracy 
party as an opportunist 

His power assured, the prime minister in- 
sists that what finally matters most is the 
stalled economy. Inflation is at 20 percent the 
highest rate in Europe, and the jobless rate is 
10 percent Mr. Papandreou has won a solid 
majority in parliament If he means what he 
says about foreign adventurism, he has plenty 
to occupy him at home. It's a big if. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


The Moderate Sikh Majority 

[The Sikh crisis] is the most serious internal 
problem to confront any Indian government 
since independence in 1947. The only hope of 
a solution lies in (Prime Minister Rajiv Gan- 
dhi’s] ability to reach over the heads of Sikh 
secessionists and extremis is to the silent but 
moderate majority who may be prepared to 
deal with him. This means pursuing his stalled 


policy of political concessions in the teeth of 
terrorist violence and not allowing the tighter 
security measures intended to contain the lat- 
ter to wipe out the former also. Yet so far, Mr. 
Gandhi bas only implemented one half of this 
strategy. The army is out on patrol in Punjab. 
If it is lucky it may keep terrorism at bay. But 
whaL Rajiv Gandhi bas seemingly slowed 
down is his drive to win back Sikh moderates. 

— 77it? Times I London). 


FROM OUR JUNE 7 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Writer O. Henry Is Dead at 43 
NEW YORK — Mr. William Sidney Porter, 
known as O. Henry, the short-story writer, 
died on June 5 at the age of 43 of cirrhosis of 
the liver. Mr. Porter was born m Greensboro, 
North Carolina, and was one of the most 
remarkable figures in American literary life. 
Few persons knew him well. He was excessive- 
ly shy and averse to having any sketch of 
himself published. He never was a cowboy, as 
bas been reported, but did have experience on 
a Texas cattle ranch. Afterwards he wandered 
in Central America, and then branched out as 
a newspaper writer. Finally he came to New 
York and soon became one of the best paid 
short story writers in the world. He was regard- 
ed by some as a second Mark Twain. 


1935: European Youth Ask for Work 

GENEVA — A group of 250 youths from all 
countries in Europe presented petitions im- 
ploring work to the International Labor Con- 
ference here (on June 6}. The youths marched 
through Lhecity singing and carrying banners. 
There was a dramatic hush as they filed into 
the conference balL Applauded by the work- 
ers’ delegates, their leaders submitted the peti- 
tions. signed by 85.000 young people between 
the ages of 14 and 25 and headed “Give work 
to youth." The petitions asked the conference, 
among other things, “to provide the many 
millions of young people who. as a result of the 
industrial depression, are without work or 
bread, with opportunities of employment that 
will insure them a livelihood" 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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CARLGEWTRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER Publisher 

Exreunw Editor RENE BONDY Depun Publisher 

Edtltr ALAIN LECOUR Aisoaaie Publisher 

Demin ■ Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN Aaacuue Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Ducat# of Operations 

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international Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charte-dc-OauUc. 92200 NeuiDy-sur-Sdne. 
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The United Nations Isn’t Enough for the Job ^ p avor 0 f 



N EW YORK — On June 26. the 40th anni- 
versary of the signing of the United Nations 
Charter, the best birthday present for the organi- 
zation would be to relieve it of responsibility for 
matters beyond its competence. 

Despite its promise to provide collective secu- 
rity. the United Nations cannot defend the free 
world against a growing menace to democracy: 
messiamc Tar-right ana far-left ideologies and 
theologies spread by subversion and terror. To 
counter this danger to freedom, the democracies 
should organize for collective self-defense, much 
as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization was 
devised to defend endangered national territory. 
The new strategy would be a pledge that an 
attack on one would constitute an attack on all. 

This proposal is not a challenge to the United 
Nations but a sober reappraisal of its utility in 
the face of dangers unforeseen in 1945. 

The United Nations performs some tasks welL 
The secretary-general has modulated the Iran- 
Iraq conflict.* Blue berets police truce lines where 
combatants have tired of fighting. Aid to politi- 
cally sensitive flows of refugees ts handled coal- 
men dab ly by global agencies, as are communica- 
tions. agriculture and health problems. 

'While the UN Charter proclaims tbe organiza- 
tion’s purpose as being to “save succeeding gen- 
erations from tbe scourge of war.” this hope has 
not been fulfilled. Some 200 large and small wars 
later, even Kurt Waldheim, the former secretary- 
general, concluded that “some of the assump- 
tions on which the United Nations was based 
have proven unfounded." The most fundamen- 
tal, and false, of these was that the big powers 


Tax Reform 
Touted as 
Free Lunch 

By Charles Krauthammer 

W ASHINGTON — "A challenge 
to lift us into a future of unlim- 
ited promise, an endless horizon lit 
by the star of freedom guiding Amer- 
ica to supremacy ... You can al- 
most feel your shoes lifting you up. 

There was something wonderfully 
incongruous about President Rea- 
gan’s May 28 tax reform speech, 
which featured that and other rhetor- 
ical gems. Here he was, reaching diz- 
zying heights of patriotic fancy — for 
a tax plan. One might have expected 
“a great historic effort to give the 
words ‘freedom,’ ‘fairness' and “hope' 
new meaning and power” to entail 
something grander than a change in 
the size of the lax refund. 

Not manv politicians can get away 
with such rhetoric. President Reagan 
can because, well, who else could 
make an address abouL among other 
things, the deduction for intangible 
drilling costs and make it soar? His 
speeches are. in a sense, the means by 
which he conducts his presidency. 
You could write its history from the 
speeches: from the first inaugural ad- 
dress to the great 1981 tax cut speech, 
to Central America. Lebanon-Grena- 
da. the second inaugural address. 

And now tax reform — or. as the 
president would have iL the “Second 
.American Revolution.” 

This speech, although by no means 
his best, deals with the issues closest 


By Thomas M. Franck 

thai had won World War 11 would continue to 
cooperate to guard the peace. 

Unlike NATO, an international body for the 
collective defense of democracy should not be 
based on geographic criteria. Every effort should 
be made to include the widest possible array of 

Much aggression is waged 
within national boundaries, 
using random murder to 
destabilise authority, 

qualifying states without regard to their econom- 
ic policies or foreign relations. To avoid depen- 
dence on purely reactive measures, the organiza- 
tion should take imag inative economic ana social 
initiatives to strengthen the sources of liberty. 

The lest needed to determine qualification for 
membership need not be detailed. Any state that 
periodically elects its government by a secret 
ballot permitting free choice, and that has an 
independent judiciary, should be eligible. Mem- 
bers could be required to let the organization's 
observers monitor these few indicators. 

It would not be necessary to spell out ahead of 
lime what collective measures would be taken 
agains t, say, a military coup in India. Each gov- 
ernment would be free to interpret its obligations 


in light of circumstances, but there should be a 
duty to consul L take “appropriate steps" and use 
established machinery to coordinate action. . 

A false assumption in the UN Charter is that 
armies would wage future wars across national 
boundaries. Being addressed to conventional in- 
ternational disputes, the Charter specifically ex- 
cludes concern with “essentially domestic? mat- 
ters. But much of today's aggression is waged 
entirely within a nation's boundaries, often by 
shadowy armies without uniforms, using random 
murder to destabilize authority. The insurants, 
often part of an external support network, ap- 
pear as local “freedom fighters” engaged in do- 
mestic “wars of nati onal liberation. 

The' new organization would decide when col- 
lective action was warranted by tbe facts of an 
internal conflict: for example, should Sri Lanka’s 
democratically elected government be helped 
against the Tamil separatists, and, if so, how? 
Measures should be authorized collectively, per- 
haps by a two- thirds vote, to prevent tbe organi- 
zation from becoming a cover for states' self- 
interested intervention in others' internal affairs. 

The inability of the United Nations to deal 
with a pernicious new phenomenon is tempting 
America to emulate the enemy’s tactics, instead, 
it should join with like-minded states to consider 
a new forum to redress imperfections of the old. 

The writer, former director of research at die UN 
Institute for Training and Research, is adhor of 
“Nation Against Nation: What Happened to the UN 
Dream aid What die US- Can Do About It.” He 
contributed das comment to The New York Times. 






— - 

■ms©R mb' 


to his heart: free markets and taxes. It 
is thus unusually revealing. 

It contains the two classic elements 
of the Reagan speech: both a daz- 
zling vision of .America's destiny (the 
city on a hill, this time “the star of 
freedom") and a curiously pinched 
vision of what it takes to get there. 

This is not the first time that Mr. 
Reagan offers great things for mini- 
mal exertion. His promises and his 
proposed means for realizing them 
are often miles apart. 

He proposes to trim the budget 
deficit —“a rendezvous with history 
. . . our future hangs in the balance" 
— with a S56-biUion cut from a $200- 
billion deficiL He proposes to estab- 


lish the centerpiece of the strategic 
arsenal — “a message of American 
resolve to the world" — with 100. 
now 50, MX missiles. He proposes to 
overthrow the Sandinists — through 
the “contras," who are “the moral 
equivalent of the Founding Fathers” 

— with $14 million. 

Some of these reduced means, ad- 
mittedly, have been forced on Mr. 
Reagan by Congress. But tbe rhetoric 
is never recut to fit the compromise. 

- Now the president is sdimg a tax 
plan. “It will replace the politics of 
envy with a spirit of partnership” 
OK. TCI buy il How much? 

Nothing. The country is running a 
$200-biilion deficit and will soon De 



an unimaginable S2 trillion in debt, 
and the president is selling tax reform 
as a tax cut. Something for everyone. 

“Will our proposal help yon” — 
individuals, f amili es, entrepreneurs? 
“You bet it wilL” It seems that every- 
one will enjoy lower taxes. Everyone, 
that is, except a few big fat oompa- 
niesjirobably Pentagon contractors. 

“There is one group of losers moor 
tax plan,” says the president Those 
“not paying tneir fair stare." Is there 
a lobbyist — is there an American — 
who thinks Ire belongs to that group? 

The problem with the appeal to 
painless patriotism is not just what it 
ultimately will do to the economy, 
but what it does to citizenship. The 
basic criticism of “Opportunity Sori- 
eiy" conservatism is that it is so unde- 
manding. It asks not what you can do 
for your country. It asks, as Richard 
Nixon put it in his second inaugural . 
address, “what I can do for myself.” 

The rhetoric erf tax reform insists 
that it is a free lunch for almost 
everyone. (The reality is different, 
but reality comes later.) So it was for 


White Men 

By Anthony Lewis 

B OSTON — On June 21. 1963. a 
tense time in the stniggk against 
racial discrimination in the American 
South, President Kennedy caDed 244 * 
leading , lawvers to the White House 
andasked their help. They- responded 
by setting up the Lawyers Commit- 
tee Tor Civil Rights Under Law. 

I remembe r that meeting and what 
it meant. For the fust time the .Ameri- 
can legal establishment, the great pri- 
vate firms, committed themselves to 
working against the lawlessness of 
racism. And it was not just a symboL 
The committee sent lawyers into ar- 
eas where there had been just about 
no one to defend the oppressed. 

That history gives special meaning 
to an event iHk week. Eighty-four 
trustees of tbe Lawyers' Committee^, 
said they were “compelled for the. • 
first time ever" to oppose a nominee 
for federal office. They urged the 
Senate to reject tbe nomination of' 
W illiam Bradford Reynolds to tbe 
number three job in the Justice De- 
partment, associate attorney general. 

Mr. Reynolds has been the Reagan 
administration's assistant attorney 
general for civil rights. In that job he 
has wounded and outraged many, but 
I think his record has never ban so 
coolly or devasiafingly analyzed as it 
was in a statement to the Senate Judi- 
ciary Committee by the Lawyers’ 
Committee trustees. They judged hiny 
by professional standards, ana found 
in his record an “indifference to law.” 

The United Slates government has 
essentially changed sides under Mr. 
Reynolds: That is what the statement 
makes so dear. Instead of fighting for 
the blacks and women who nave been 
the historic victims of discrimination, • 
tbe Justice Department is now “em- 
phasizing die rights of white males.” 

That is even true, the Lawyers' 
Committee noted with a certain 
amazement, when Mr. Reynolds is 
talking about state troopers in Ala-, 
bama. The force was lily-white for its 
first 37 years, and the troopers were 
the enforcers of segregation. But 
when Mr. Reynolds writes a brief 
urging the courts to undo an affirma-f5 
live action program to promote more ' 
black troopers, he . talks only about 
“discrimination” against whites. It is 
as if there woe no history. 

“In increasing numbers of dvil 
rights cases throughout the country,” 
the statement said, “we are encoun- 
tering for the fust time the fervent 
and vigorous opposition of the feder- 
al government/’ Il found “even more 
disturbing” Mr. Reynolds’s “disre- 
gard for the rule of law.” 

Mr. Reynolds tends to dismiss his. 
critics as political or special pleaders. 

So the auspices of this statement and , 
its legal professionalism arc impor- 
tant It was prmcipaUy drafted by 
.Thomas D. Barr, toe great antitrust 
lawyer at Gavath, Swame A Moored 
Right now Mr. Reynolds is hying 
to undo affirmative actum plans for 
hiring of police, fire fighting and oth- 
er employees by 51 state and local 
governments. The plans include con- 
sent decrees that the Justice Depart- 
ment pressed on the parties. All this, 
is a sweeping effort to reverse special 
measures to rive blacks and women a 
toehold in jobs from which they have 
historically been cxdodcd. 

The argument that Mr. Reynolds, 
makes is that a Suprcme Court deci- 
sion requires tbe switch. He points to 
the 1984 decision in the Memphis fire 







Mr. Reagan’s tax cuts and military fighters’ esse, holding that an affir- ■ 
buildup. These are, of course, bor- mative action plan must yield to a - 
rowed lunches. The cost wll be not bona fide senkaity system, 
just the price of paying them off (with The only trouble with that argu- 

interest), but the loss of some civic ment is that the courts do not agree 
habits, such as duty and sacrifice. with it Five U.S. courts of appeals 
Neo-liberals like Gary Hart who have beard iL and all have rgectki it • 
are trying to bring back such nnfash- They said the fire fighters’ case cov- 
ionable ideas are having to tread ered wbat it said it covered, seniority, 
carefully lest in the current climate and did not affect other Supreme^, 
they be tarred as malaise-mongers. Court decisions allowing affirmativ/T 
Who needs sacrifice? Americans . action plans to fill new vacancies. 


\ 

■V 






.“V- : 


The Real Trouble Is fompetition Itself 

JL v exclusively on tl 


Gen Mg'. ** ■ dan 
S.A. an capital at 
U.s. subscription, 


1985. International Herald Tribune. All right: reserved. 


L OS .ANGELES — The deaths of 
/ 38 people in a soccer riot in 
Brussels last week have been 
blamed on everything from alcohol 
to the British character. Apparent- 
ly. Tew have considered the funda- 
mental explanation: The problem is 
with competition itself. 

There is considerable research 
not only disproving the old “cathar- 
sis" view — that watching or taking 
pan in aggressive activities blows 
off steam — but also showing that 
competitive sports promote violent 
reactions. Studies of children, pro- 
fessional athletes and fans demon- 
strate that such activities can lower 
our restraints against aggression. 

The problem, however, is not just 
with sport: hostility is a frequent 
result of competition in the work- 
place. the classroom, the home, the 
playing field — any place where my 
success depends bn vour failure. 
This is what competition means: 
mutually exclusive goal attainment 
Instead of laboring together toward 
a common end. we are obliged to 
work against one another.~Sip.ee 
competition is. by definition, a kind 
of aggression, we should not be sur- 
prised to find that it often results 
in physical violence. 

We have been carefully social- 
ized to believe that competition is 
more productive than cooperation: 
that having a good time requires a 
win-lose structure: that humans are 
naturally competitive: even that the 
desperate race to be "No. 1" builds 
character. None of these notions 
are supported by the evidence. 
More to the point this sort of 


By Alfie Kofan 

training predisposes us to believe, 
along with Prime Minister Mai^a- 
ret Thatcher, that the soccer riots 
can be blamed on a few hooligans. 
Punish the individuals but leave the 
structural forces untouched. 

This failure to perceive the un- 
derlying pattern continues when we 
come across other sorts of evidence 
of the ugliness of competition. We 
read about another college recruit- 
ing scandaL chemical self-punish- 
ment to boost athletic performance, 
frothing parents who push their 
children to win at all costs. Each is 
seen as a unique problem. 

Outside of sport, too, the costs of 
competition are high: 

• A dispatch from the American 
Association for ihe Advancement 
of Science meeting in Los Angeles 
last week began as follows: “Medi- 
cal leaders and journal editors 
agreed today that highly competi- 
tive pressures in modem science 
were provoking cases of outright 
fraud and an even wider range of 
■white lies' and deceptions." 

• A new .-ludy. reported in the 
journal Health Affairs, finds that 
distortion in news coverage can be 
traced to ihe incredible competition 
among reporters and editors. 

° Hcrben Hendin. a psychiatrist 
and expert on tjicide. argues that 
competitive pressures are a leading 
contributor to the rise in suicide 
rates among American youth. 

To be sure, not every soccer game 
erupts in violence, just as not every 


scientist resorts to fraud. Society’s 
rules and ethical standards usually 
manage to keep such abuses in 
check. Bui their frequency in virtu- 
ally every arena of our lives sug- 
gests that they represent not the 
contamination of competition but 
its logical conclusion. Arrange a so- 
ciety so that success (and even a 
good time) is synonymous with 
beating other people, and the only 
questions are: When will the next 
episode occur? How bad will it be? 

If we confine efforts to punishing 
those whose competitive spirit is 
excessive, if we install more police 
at spurting events, if we raise the 
penalties for cheating, we mistake 
the symptom lor the disease. There 
is nothing wrong with any of these 
measures, but we should not delude 
ourselves into thinking that they are 
more than Band-Aid solutions. 

The problem is competition it- 
self. and our response must be to 
devise noncompetitive alternatives 
to our mania for winning. 

Cooperative games and educa- 
tional techniques are not in short 
supply; they simply get short shrift 
because of our reluctance to see 
where the trouble lies. Those who 
propose them are dismissed as radi- 
cal. naive or irrelevant. 

One wonders how many more of 
us must be literally or figuratively 
trampled by a competitive culture 
before we get the message. 

The writer is the author of die forth- 
coming book, " The Case Against Com- 
petition" He contributed this comment 
to the Los Angeles Times 


Who needs sacrifice? Americans 
do. The Opportunity Society can take 
you only so far. Its virion of people 
engaged in unfettered self-better- 
ment is a happy and very American 
vision, but a partial virion only. 

The pursuit of private interests 
leads to general harmony only when 
things are going well When me eco- 
nomy is expanding, all private inter- 
ests can be accommodated. 

That is why the Opportunity Soci- 
ety depends so desperately on eco- 
nomic growth. If growth should stop, 
even temporarily, a society that lives 
exclusively on the idea of self wfll 
experience intolerable strains. What 
will hold it together? Since no one is 
going to abolish the business eyrie, 


Being long on the law is nothing., 
new for Mr. Reynolds. He made it ins : 
mission to reverse longstanding gov- , 
emment poScy against tax exemp- 
tions for racist private schools. 

Mr. Reynolds is an important fig- 
ure, more important than his tiiftL 
For he. demonstrates tow different ^ 
the new right is from the old conser- - 
vatisnu how ready to use the law for 
narrow instrumental ends, tow im- 
pervious to the sufferings of history. 
In short, how lawless ana heartless. 1 
. Pre s i de n t Kennedy said in June ! 
1963 that 100 years Had passed since 
Lincoln freed the slaves but their ' 
heirs were not yet fuDy free. “Thev • 
are not yet freed from the bonds /*, 


that day will come sooner or lata-, injustice; they are yet not freed from' 
Even the Opportunity Society will social and economic oppression.”" 
then have to appeal to feelings of Most of ns, white and blade, know ■ 
community and solidarity. By then, that that is still true. But William 
who will remember what they mean? Bradford Reynolds does not. ' 
Washington Past Writers Group. ; . The New York Tones. 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Missing the Dutch Point able to ignore Rome when millions of 

Regarding da opinion cohann "Since *££&£ 

When Is hat a New PnbkmT (Mm ^ consequences- 


When Is uat a New Problem. 7 ” (May 
24) by Edwin M. Yoder Jr: 

It apparently failed to occur to the 
writer that people can misunderstand 


of the pope’s repressive views. 

- ANNETTE SLOTHOUBER. 

Abidjan. 


&*£££& And Don’t You Forget It ■ 

Yoder tells of a fnend, chatting with And I say unto you — demitl* 
Dutch businessmen on a flight from William Safin* strictures iif*8n-i 
London, who caused a nnsunder- tence Non-Starters” (Mav 20) — TSi * 
-““SS by raying he was going to not only sentences, but vdU and' 


nessmen’s “genuine asto nishmen t." 
But in that event Mr. Yoder would 
not have been able to use the anec- 
dote to reinforce his argument, which 
in effect insults tbe Dutch. 

ir Mr. Yoder had been willin g to 
shift his focus away from tbe more 
sensational aspects of the protests 
during tbe pope’s visit to the Nether- 
lands. he might have understood 
what the protests were about For 
many, it is not enough that they 
themselves have tbe luxury of being 


aimi irs an Qrst-rate stuff. 
NORMAN SANDERS. •' 
Hovik, Norway. 

Editor* and must contain the writ- 
ers signature, name and full adJ£ 
dress. Leaers should be brief and 

be responsible for the return of 
•meoiiated manuscripts. 


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rfrrrnrn" 1. 


India’s Prime Minister, Mr. Rajiv Gandhi 
is on his first official visit to France , 
as the representative of the world’s 
largest democracy. His objective is to 
establish closer ties and create a better 



understanding of the emerging 
opportunities in India. 

The development needs of the 
Indian people call for progress 
through technological cooperation. 


LARSEN & TOUBRO LIMITED 

where technology moves with time 

L&T House, Bombay 400 038 
New Delhi • Calcutta • Madras 


I'M 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ITALY 


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FOR SALE 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 __ 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 




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WEEKEND 

2 Playwrights in Search of a Dialogue 


Page 9 


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N - EW YORK — When David 
Rabe’s firet play. The Basic 
Training of Pavlo Hnrmn ej," was 
performed at New York’s PubHc 
Theater, Ndl Simon was on his 11th play, 
The Prisoner of Second Avenue.'’ Since 
that year, 1971, both men have consolidated 
their reputations — Simon as America’s 
most' successful and prolific playwright, 
Rabe as one of the mostprovocative. 

Simon’s 22 d play, “Biloxi Bines,” and 
Rabe’s seventh, “Hurlyboriy,” were among 
nominees for this years Tony awards for 
best play. (“Bilan” won.) On the face of it, 
the two would seem to have little else in 
mmmnn 35 playwrights. 

Simon, 57, is a Brookjyn-bom Jew whose 
Depre ss ion rhiiHTiiwi was the theme of his 
hit “Brighton Beach Memoirs,” which 
opened in 1983. Rabe, 45, was born in Iowa 
and raised a Catholic. His “Pavlo Hummel," 
“Sticks and Bones,” “Streamers” and The 
Orphan” draw on his Vietnam combat expe- 
rience. 

But when, at the invitation of The New 
York Times Magazine, these representatives 
of different generations got together to talk 
about the theater, tbdr attitudes and meth- 
ods of playwriting tinned out to be strikingly 
' similar. The foO owing edited excerpts are 
from a conversation occasionally prompted 
by Sunuiri G. Freedman of The Hines’s 
cultural staff and Michada Wfihams, the 
magazine’s cultural editor. 

Writing for the Theater 

BABE: I grew up in the Midwest, and I 
never beard of the theater. I was maybe IS 
before 1 saw a play. I didn’t think about 
writing at that pomt, but it made a big 
i mp r Kcin n on me, There is something in the 
thing with the audience, although I also have 
a terrible persona] reaction to the audience. I 
have a very hard time going near the theater 
once they show 19. 

SIMON: I have the m™ reaction. Not 
becanse I'm afraid of the audience. 1 just 
to l os e intere st the min ute the play has 
opened. As for what attracted me to the 
theater, my background was different. I grew 
up in New York and worked in radio and in 
(devision for 10 years. Then I said, “If I 
don't start to write a play and start to get out 
soon, m be writing fay Three Sons’ tor the 
rest of my life,” which I did not want to do. 

BABE: I grew up seeing movies, and there 
was a point where 1 consciously engaged the 


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; ■ , . “Sticks and Bones,” “Streamers” an 

At Tony awards: Roger. Miller, left, composer of winning Big River orphan” draw on his Vietnam comb* 
score; Ron Richardson, best featured actor; Des McAnuff, best director. deuce. 

But when, at the invitation of Tt 
York Times Magazine, these repress 

Broadway Season Ended asSEHSSS 




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by Sffinnel G. Freedman 


N EW YORK — Despite the pro-: 

dbetion of several acclaimed dra- 
mas, Broadway is concluding its 
worst econcnmc season in a de- 
cade, as indicated by both statistics and 
.emotional reaction in the industry. What 
r emains uncertain, and hotly debated in the- 
ater circles, is whether the slump is part of 
Broadway’s, cyclical nature or the harhing pr 
of a long-term decline, 
v Attendance and theater occupancy — 
-'known in the trade as “playing weeks” — are 
-at their lowest since the mid-1970s, accord- 
ing to statistics from the league of American 
Theaters and Producers. The 33 new shows 
that had opened by May 31, the official end 
of the season, represent the fewest in any 
season this century, league figures show. 

Box-office income — ■ which generally rises 
even when other measures of Broadway ac- 
tivity decline — is $9 million less than last 
.season’s level of $227 million, the league 
says. The gross is likely to be the 

third highest in Broadway history, but it 
marks only the second time since the 1972- 
1973 season that income has not gone up 
from the previous theater year..*; . 

The slump can be largdy traced to the lack 
, of a new hit musical to stimulate income and 
public excatanent Eight musicals opened . 
this year; four arestifitunning. For the first 
time in their 38-year history, the nominatmg . 
committee for the Tony awards, which were 
announced Sunday, dropped three catego- 
ries — choreography and leading actor and 
leading actress in a musical — because of the 
dearth of competition. Even “Big River” — 
based on Marie Twain’s “Huckleberry Finn” 
— which won seven Tonys including best 
musical and best featured actor for Ron 
Richardson as the runaway slave Jim, cannot 
be considered certain to survive the summer. 

The season, also indicates the increasing 
gap between the haves and have-nots. The 
Shubert Organization, the largest theater- 
owner on Broadway, recorded gains of more 
than 10 percent in attendance and playing- 
weeks over last season. The organization's 
box-office income as of March 31 stood at 
$93 million^ compared with $81 railBon on 
that date last season. 

While the Shubert Organization has taken 
in $12 tmOion more titan it did last season, 
the rest of Broadway — smaller theater- 


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taken in $21 million less. Despite the 3m- 
bert grins in attendance and playing weeks, 
both fell industrywide. The projected sea- 
sonal attendance of 7.4 million is the lowest 
since 73 million in 1975-1976 and the pro- 
jected playing weeks of 1,082 are the fewest 
since 907 m 1973-1974. league figures show. 

. The disparity in fortunes is reflected in 
words. Shubert executives remain more bull- 
ish than almost anyone else on Broadway. 
*Tt* s the most successful season we’ve ever 
had,” said Bernard Jacobs, president of the 
Shubert Organization. “We hope all of the 
stories about bow Broadway' is depressed 
will disappear.” James Nedolander, presi- 
dent of the Nederiander Or ganization, the 
second-largest theater-owner on Broadway, 
also said he considered reports of Broad- 
way’s woes this season to be exaggerated. 

Jacobs likened the current Broadway sea- 
son to the sluggish years in the early 1970s, 
before “A Chorus Line” helped revive the 
industry. Such musicals as Andrew Lloyd 
Webber's “Song and Dance,” Tun Rice's 
“Chess" and Marvin Hamlisch’s “Smile,” 
Jacobs suggested, may arrive next season 
and similarly stir Broadway. 





n»Nn*YorfcT*r 


Neil Simon 


question of whether there was a larger op- 
portunity to be free as a writer in the theater 
or in film. And without any experience in 
either, it struck me that the theater was more 
open. Bat I think now, as I’ve gone on, it’s 
deeper than that I don’t know quite what the 
relationship is, but it's very, very deep in me, 
the theater. 

Comedy vs. Drama 

BABE: 1 thinlr that in the real theatrical 
tradition that split doesn't exist as strongly 
as people think it does. It’s an invention of 
Aristotle rather thaw of dramatists. I m^aw, 
certainly in a lot of Shakespeare’s tragedies 
there are very funny, lively moments. 

I'm not a big fan of Aristotle. 1 think he 
really did everybody a lot of harm. He inter- 
posed himself between the creative act and 
the thing itself. People actually sit around 
and say, THd Shakespeare write tragedies?” 
1 nvan that’s truly nuts. 

My impulse has been to tra to put as much 
variety of emotion as posable into a play. 
You know, like a carnival or a roller-coaster 
ride. To me, the more one play can bold, the 
better. 

SIMON: Mike Nichols and I were doing 
“Plaza Suite” in Boston many years ago, and 
the first act was too long — it wasn't that it 
was too long, we were getting too many 
laughs in a scene that we thought was basi- 
cally serious. So Mike and I started to cut out 


all of the laugh lines, and they started to 
laugh at other lines that they had never 
laughed au They just wanted to laugh! 

BABE: The laughs I get are the ones I'm 
hoping for, for the most pan. It’s mating the 
turn without getting resentment from the 
audience that’s the hard pan. If you’ve over- 
done the comedy part, they j ust want to keep 
laughing. 

SIMON: Oh, yes, I have that a lot HI 
write a scene that is really funny, and then 1 
try to switch h quickly, because I think that 
happens in life a Iol There have been a few 
occasions in plays when I’ve done that, and 
the audience is really thrown by it. Some- 
times it works, and sometimes they resent it. 

Like in “Prisoner of Second Avenue." in 
which I’m dealing basically with a semiser- 
ious situation: A man who’s 48 years old 
loses his job and is afraid there's not going to 
be a future for him. Bui in the beginning of 
the play, all of his complaints are funny. 

The very first thing he does gets a laugh. It 
is at night, and the room is dark, and he 
comes out of the bedroom, tits down and 
lights a cigarette. You could hardly see him 
— it was rater Falk. He went, “Aaaah,” and 
the audience lau ghed because they knew 
what that sigh meant. You had to do the sigh 
just right. But at any rate, he later found out 
that toe apartment was robbed, and still 
handled that comedicaDy, because the things 
that were stolen were so bizarre — they took 
his toothbrush and everything. 

And then in the second act, he has a 
nervous breakdown. He resents the fact that 
his wife is gang out and working and he has 
nothing 10 do. He goes 10 the park every day, 
and be knows that the animals know him 
They are saying, “Here he comes again. He 
didn’t get a job. obviously.” 

But it turned, it really turned, and the 
audience said, “Well, that’s not funny ” I 
said, “Who said it was?” 

BABE: Well, in that light, “Hurlyburiy” is 
very tricky for me to talk about, because the 
turn is abnqner than 1 think it has to be. The 


tion is so great that the audience will laugh 
whether you provide it or not. Bui many 
times when it's either laugh or cry, a lot of 
them don’t want to cry. And they will pick 
out a moment — a line, a gesture, whatever it 
is — to laugh at. It becomes pan of the play 
after a while. 

The Role of the Unconscious 

BABE: I go through a thing in plays where 
the play shocks me. I don't think !’ve ever 
written anything where there wasn't a mo- 
ment when I said. “Oh, I don’t want to write 
this,” or “Is that me? Where's it coming 
from?” I think my conscious mind is not as 
intelligent as my unconscious. My conscious 
mind is very much interested in controlling 
everything and making it more orderly — 
making it orderly in a familiar way. Then the 



David Rabe 


Nm York ZiMi 


expected recognition from an audience and 
gotten just shock. In “Sticks and Bones,” I 
thought people were really going to nod and 
say, “Right, that is how it is.” And instead, 
people kind of said, “Whoa, don’t do that!” 

SIMON: My experience has been that if 
you write a situation well enough, the ten- 


rehearsals all day long, so I like to feel that I 
am being well represented. 

BABE: I used to dream about a person 
who would just do every play and would 
really be on the money. Like a soul mate or 
something. But 1 don't think I've encoun- 
tered iL The plays vary, and what people can 
cope with varies. If irs a good director, it's 
coming somewhat from his own psyche 
through the play, and that varies. 

SIMON: 1 was going to say that as good a 

Continued on page 10 


H IS view is shared by Harvey Sabin- 
son, executive director of the League 
of American Theaters and Produc- 
ers.- “Yes.it was a lousy season, yes some of : 
the Tony-nominees aren’t what ihey should _ 
be," Sabinson said. “But I have to believe it’s 
cyclical. We had years like this in die early .. 
*70s and all of a sudden there was ‘Chorus 
Line’ and ‘Grease’ and The Wiz.' So I don’t 
think this year is a sign of anything chroni- 
cally wrong.” 

• Many others in the theater industry, how- 
ever, disagree. Rather than an aberration, 
they say, this season was the culmination of 
years of problems on Broadway — rising 
costs and ticket prices, the decline of the 
independent producer and the difficulty of 
developing new musicals. 

“We’ve just been waiting for the one year 
when nothing came together,” said Emanuel 
Azcnberg, an independent producer who has 
co-produced such shows as “Whoopi Gold- 
berg” and “Joe Egg” with the Shubert Orga- 
nization. “Now the <* bipk<»ns - are Cftming 
home to roost. It’s going to get worse -and 
maybe it has to get worse before everyone 
drops the party Ime and works together. 1 


^owners and 


Lights Brighter Away From Times Square 


• by Frank Rich 

N EW YORK — Despite the well- 
known litany of Broadway’s woes, 
the best plays this season tdl an- 
other story The American theater 
may be becoming healthier in inverse rela- 
tion to Broadways decline. 

That health is most visible, as usual, at 
th e a tri cal institutions Off Broadway and 
around the country. To be sure, not all 
institutional work is first-rate. Yet it is hard- 
ly coincidence that three of the four Best 
Play nominees in last Sunday's Tony awards 
— arid the Best Musical winner, “Big River" 
— are the products of nonprofit theaters. 
What is more, institutional productions that 
transfer to Broadway represent only a small 
fraction erf the theatrical vitality beyond the 
Times Square neighborhood. When one 
takes in the bill panorama of American the- 
ater of the 1984-sS season, there is encourag- 
ing news on a variety of aesthetic (and geo- 
graphical) fronts. 


“Normal Heart” (by Larry Kramer) — two 
very different and complementary treat- 
ments of the AIDS epidemic — demonstrat- 
ed that writers can respond with urgent the- 
atricality to public issues that are usually 
fodder for television's movie-af-the-week as- 
sembly line. At Playwrights Horizons, an- 
other, adventurous style erf writing is reach- 
ing maturation: Peter Parnell’s “Romance 
Language” and Keith Reddin’s “Life and 
Limb" depart from both realistic and ab- 
surdist conventions as they radically re-ex- 
amine the iconography of official classical 
culture (19th-century literature) and “clas- 
sic” pop culture (vintage movies and situa- 
tion comedies) to explain the modem world. 

Some established American playwrights, 
with varying success, lit oat for new territory 
this season: David Rabe, Neil Simon, Mi- 
chael Weller (“The Ballad of Soapy Smith”). 
Some younger play writing voices found their 


it producers — has 


Continued on page 11 


- Company’s 


own, nrm pitch this year — notaoiy uaig 
Lucas (with “Blue Window,” at the Produc- 
tion Company), Stephen Metcalfe (“The In- 
credibly -Famous Willy Rivers,” at the WPA) 
and Richard Greenberg (“Life Undo - Wa- 
ter,” at the increasingly invaluable Ensemble 
Studio Theater). 


Imaginative young directors were also in 
profuse supply. If neither Broadway nor Off 
Broadway produced a fully satisfying new 
musical, Des McAnuff (“Big River”) and 
Andrew Cadiff (“Three Guys Naked From 
the Waist Down”) have the talent to help fill 
that void, provided the theater can develop 
new librettists and songwriters at their high 
level of inventiveness. 

Two other young director-actors, Gary 
Sini.se and John Malkovicfa of Chicaeos 


•r young director-actors, Gary z\caaeiny 01 music wi 
Jo6n ifalkovidr of Chicago? W 5™k*£ OWI1 “: 

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Steppeawdf Company, sustained the expec- 
tations they raised in New York with their 
1982 production of “True West” In Malko- 
vich’s staging of Lanford Wilson's “Balm in 
Gilead” and Sinise's of Lyle Kessler's “Or- 
phans," one finds a tumultuous new brand 
of American acting that bridges rock ’n’ roll 
and theatrical performance. 

The theater along the post-modernist 
frontier was also active. While I found more 
literal-mindedness than inspiration in such 
pieces as Martha Clarke’s “Garden of Earth- 
ly Delights" and Ping Chong’s “Nosferatu,” 
I was haunted by nothing so much all season 
as the three-hour fragment of Robert Wil- 
son’s marathon epic, “the CIVIL warS," 


presented at the American Repertory The- 
ater in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

In this work — . or at least this excerpt 
from it — the hallucinatory images and cho- 
reographic manipulation of actors produced 
an intensely dramatic statement about the 
horrors ana twisted cultural roots of war; to 
see this piece shortly after the revival of 
“Einstein on the Beach" at the Brooklyn 
Academy of Music was to realize how much 
Wilson has grown in a decade. 

“the CIVIL warS” will not happen on 
Broadway, needless to say. Neither could a 
“Romance Language” or “Balm in Gilead." 
If such relatively conventional works as "As 
Is” or “Joe Egg" have to fight to find an 
audience, what producer will take a chance 
on transferring a more experimental work 
from an institutional theater? Yet if Broad- 
way cannot afford to airlift more of the 
front-line excitement happening in Ameri- 
can theaters beyond its precincts, what plays 
will it use to make the street an alluring 
center of theatrical activity again? 

To retrieve its audience, especially a 
young sophisticated audience, Broadway 

Continued on page 11 


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The Perfect Day Trips Paris-Champagni 


by Frank J. Prfal 


T in Paris and slices across the flat, 
windswept landscape of eastern 
France, is lightly traveled. Pari- 
sians, like flowers and cats, turn their fades 
instinctively to the sun. They have never 
been overly enamored of the cities of Metz 
and Strasbourg, to which the. autoroute 
Tads, or of the rest of Alsace and Lorraine. 
*There is one trip on the Autoroute of the 
East, though,^ 'that no one, Parisian or viator, 
should miss: The road is a gateway, to the 
Champagne country, a region stepped in 
history, m great art, in food and in wine. 
Only 90 aula (145 kilometers) away, Cfaam- 

pa f>!^dmgan t traffic, ileims, the unoffi- 
cial capital of Champagne, is an hour or an 
' hour and a half by car ^from Paris. The ideal 
day would include a .-visit, to one. or two : 
Champagne cellars, lunch at a great restau- 
rant and a visit to Rams's cathedral, one of 
. the most beautiful in France. Or it could 
include a drive through the handsome little 
vineyard towns to Eperaay, the second city 
of Champagne and the home of the biggest 
^Champagne company, Mott ct Chaa d oa. 



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Y |T HE Champagne countryside has an 

I austere, hesitant charm that is at once 
■ B subtle ami endearing. In spring, fields 
of colzas, a cousin of mustard, explode in a 
riot of golden yellow. By summa, the Stile 
villages have decked themselves in fl o w ers; 
every window has at least a pot of gerani- 
ums. The harrow roads, windmg among die 
- vines, have a timeless quality that makes 
Paris seen a thousand mues and a couple of ' 
centuries away.. „ 

' - Among the well-known Champagne 
houses in Reims are Knit Pommeiy, Roe- 
derer, Taittinger, Verve Clicquot, BenitoC 
. Ruinari. Lansan and the three Headsiecks: 
<fcpc^Heidsieck, Charles Heidsiedfc and 
Hddsieck MonopOle.-In or near Epemay, 
Moet & Owndon, Bollinger, Pol Roar and 
Perrier-Jouft are among the famous labels. 

Most of the lmgcr companies; in both ' 
towns offer regular tours of tbdr cdlais an 
weekdays. Smmkr houscs/such as Krug and 


Yoiing Champagne grape harvesters taking a break. 


Hoty Grayawt Mcgnuoi 


Bollinger, prefer advance notice, even if only 
a telephone call from Paris; most do not 
have- the staff to handle large numbers of 
unannounced visitors. 

A thorough tour of a Champagne cave will 
last, about an hour or an hour and a half. 
: Some fanatics visit many cellars, but they are 
all pretty much alike. Tbs vast stocks of 
bottles siretdiing off into the gloom in the 
dimly lighted cellars ore an impressive right 
. but there is not much point in seeing them 
more than once or twice. 

V Try to arrange your visit to include time 
for lunch. The finest restaurant in Gr a i n - 
pagne is Boyer, at Les Crayfcres, the exquisite 
small hotel across the road from the Pom- 
may cedars in Reims. Boyer is one of the 
most, famous restaurants in France — it has 
three Stars in the Michdin Guide, so a reser- 
vation is mandatory — well in advance in the 
tourist season. Ciayfres. by the way, means 


chalk caves, and it is the chalk in the soil in 
the Champagne country that gives the wine 
its tmiqne quality. 

The Pofignac family, former owners of 
Pommery, named their home Les Craytees, 
and the name was retained when, after buy- 
ing Pommery, the owners of Lanson Cham- 
pagne decided to turn the estate into a res- 
taurant and inn 

Gerard Boyer was asked to take over Les 
Crayeres almost four years ago, about the 
time that renovation began. At the tW he 
was running a three-star restaurant in Reims 
caUed La Cnaumi£re. When he moved across 
town, he took his stars with him, but he also 


siderably lower. 

After loach, stroll a bir in the town and 
visit the cathedraL Roms, founded by Johns 


Caesar in 57 B.C., was a flourishing GalJo- 
Roman city when Paris was a village on an 
island in the Seine. Clovis, the first Christian 
king of France, was crowned in the cathedral 
in 496, by St RemL In 1429 Joan of Arc 
watched as Charles VH was crowned there. 

Through the centuries, Reims has been 
repeatedly destroyed by invading armies. 
Two-thirds of the city was leveled by Ger- 
man gunfire in World War I. Many of the 
inhabitants survived by living in the caves 
that honeycomb the chalk formations on 
which the city is buflL Damage was heavy in 
World War n as welL 

Construction of the cathedral was begun 
in 1211. It cost so much that at one point the 
oppressed citizenry expelled the bishop and 
his builders. For its effrontery, the entire dty 
was excommunicated until the work re- 
sumed. The church was completed in the 
15th century and then was almost destroyed 
in World War I. 

Reconstruction still goes on. The most 
recent addition, and certainly one of the 
most spectacular, is a series of stained glass 
windows by Marc Chagall The four win- 
dows, on the left in the nave, were executed 
by Charles Marq. a masterglassmaker. in his 
atelier in Reims. He and Chagall had collab- 
orated on other stained glass commissions, 
but these windows, installed in 1974, have 
been called the apotheosis of Chagall’s work 
in glass. 

The central window depicts scenes from 
the Old and the New Testaments. The bot- 
tom left shows Abraham blessing Isaac, and 
the sacrifice of Isaac. On the top right is 
Christ crucified; on the top left is Christ 
resurrected. Tire left window shows the Tree 
of Jesse. The right window depicts semes 
from the history of the cathedral, including 
the baptism of Govis, the coronation of Sl 
L ouis and the coronation of Charles VII. 

Partisans of Eperaay Champagnes might 
prefer to visit the cathedral in the morning, 
then lunch at the Royal Champagne, an 
attractive inn and restaurant at Cnampillon, 
on the south slope of the Montague de 
Reims. It is about 30 minutes south of Reims 
and about five minutes north of Eperaay. 
The Royal Champagne offers one of the best 
views to be found of Champagne vineyards. 
And, like all restaurants in the area, it has a 

Continued on page 11 


Banned TV Program 
Opens in French Cinema 


by Joseph Fitchett 

P ARIS — Like Marcel Ctohuls’s “The 
Sorrow and the Pity” 16 years ago, a 
documentary on France daring the 
German occupation opened this 
week in a Paris cinem a after having been 
banned by French television. 

Where Ophuls’s film dealt with wartime 
collaboration, “Des Terroristes & la retraite” 
(Retired Terrorists) accuses the Communist 
Party — which along with the Gauflists Add- 
ed the main partisan forces — 0 i cynically 
exploiting political refugees and not ac- 
knowledging their role. 

The decision by the state-run television 
underscored French reluctance to examine 
tins troubled period too closely or to ques- 
tion the Resistance’s reputation for unsullied 
patriotism. 

The heros of the film, directed by a young 
Romanian immigrant known as Mosca are 
elderly men. framer Resistance fighters. In 
the film, they get up from their sewing ma- 
chines — many still work as tailors — and 
act out how they planted bombs in occupied 
Paris. Most of them speak French with 
strong foreign accents: /til were immigrants 
who found asylum in France in the 1930s — 
Armenians fleeing persecution in Turkey, 
Jews escaping anti-Semitism in Poland and 
Romania, leftist refugees from fasdst re- 
gimes in Spain and Italy. 

These laborers and artisans became the 
shock troops of the French Communist un- 
derground, especially in Paris. Midway 
through World War IL when French men 
and women started active resistance against 
the German occupation, these refugees, al- 
ready living underground, woe ready re- 
cruits for the Communist Party, which had 
been passive until 1941 when Hitler invaded 
Russia, shattering his pact with Stalin. 

“Terroristes" focuses on (me of the best 
known of these foreign Resistance heros, 
Missak ManouchUn, an Armenian poet. He 
led a Paris network that carried out dozens 
of spectacular sabotage operations and as- 
sassinations. In 1944, he and 22 other parti- 


sans — Poles, Hungarians. Italians and 
Frenchmen — were executed by the Nazis. 

The next day German authorities plas- 
tered Paris with red posters vilifying the 23 
as foreign terrorists who tried to poison 
relations between the French people and the 
German authorities. The poster backfired 
against the Germans, however, convincing 
many Frenchmen that the Communist resis- 
tance was hurting German morale. 

C OMMUNIST Party officials, appar- 
ently worried about xenophobia in 
the French working class and already 
affected by Stalin’s anti-Semitism, consis- 
tently minimized the role of these foreign 
Communists. 

“Terroristes” suggests that Communist 
leaders betrayed the immigrant network of 
Man on chian, either to save more important 
Communists or to get rid of foreign members 
who could be political liabilities in postwar 
France. 

The film, co-produced by Antenne 2, one 
or France's state-owned networks, was made 
in 1983 and first scheduled for broadcast last 
year, to coincide with the 40th anniversary of 
Manouchian's execution. But it was blocked 
by the Communist Party, then a partner in 
the government. 

Late last year, however, after the Commu- 
nists broke with the ruling Socialists, An- 
tenne 2 rescheduled the documentary to run 
June 2, prompting cries of indignation from 
the C ommunis ts 

The protest campaign apparently pulled 
no punches. It outraged the actress Simone 
Si^noret narrator of “Terroristes," who has 
said that ha best-selling historical novel 
“Adieu Volodia" was inspired by the film 
Sgnoret sard this week that she had “crossed 
the frontier into anti-Communism" iw-an^ 
of the party’s manuevers against the film. 

The network’s ban was surp rising since 
by next year French viewers are supposed to 
get commercial television that will be ]&s 
vulnerable to political pressure. Once that 
happens, a long-postponed debate on X 
Resistance may at last get underway |J 




Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


TRAVEL 


Playwrights’ Dialogue 


Continued from page 9 


unconscious can come up with something 


The only way I can do anything that’s 
worthwhile is by not getting too far ahead of 
myself. When I first started writing, if I 
didn’t know what the next sentence was, I 
couldn’t allow myself to write the £ust sen- 
tence, so you never got started. But the truth 
is. you have to say: So what, so if you make a 
mistake you throw it out. It’s just paper. 

But you go off on tacks that you had no 
antiapanon of, and in my experience it has 
provoked the best work. The mare conscious 
brain is far more conventional. 

SIMON: I know when my unconscious is 
doing the writing, because when my con- 
scious is doing it, it seems familiar to me 
when I see it later on. Let’s say I haven’t seen 
the play in right weeks or something, and I 
go and watch it. I say, “I didn’t write that 
That has nothing to do with me. That came 
out of somebody else.** I know that’s the 
unconscious writing. And that’s where the 
surprises come from. And dial’s like mercu- 
ry. You just grab that if you can; it's really 
hard. I can’t pin it down, but I know it’s 
probably very important to nwpsyche — 
that bit of information. I say, ‘That’s what 
I’ve been keeping hidden.” It’s a dangerous 
game. If you don't grab it, then you don’t 
have it anymore. But it’s also the most ex- 
hilarating. 

"Brighton Beach Memoirs” took nine 
years from the inception of the idea. I let it 
sit for six years. It just kept going in my 
mind. I would think about it, and six years 
later I wrote 35 pages. I said, “This is good, 
but I don't know how to write the play.” I*d 
never written a play like that — sort of a 
tapestry, where everybody’s story is very 
important. I generally had written plays 
about two characters and the peripheral 
characters and how they are involved in it. 
And it took a long time — another three 
years. And then I sat down and went right 
through the play. But the unconscious is 
doing the work. It’s typing away. 


If s typing away. 


RABE: In the beginning — with “Pavlo 
H ummel " — I WTO te until fhad a draft, and I 
didn't go to anything else. Once I had a 
draft, then I started writing “Sticks and 
Bones.” When I had a draft of that, I went 
back to the other one. But as time has gone 
on, I’ve come to put them away more or do a 
note or a few lines or a page and then come 
bade and maybe work an m tense period of 
time. “Huriy burly” was like that — I had a 
note for about six years. It was literally three 
or four lines. Ana then I got kicked into 


starting it, and when I started it, I stayed cm 
it for about three or four mooths to write the 
first draft 

Directors and the Urge to Direct 

RABE: I tried to direct “Goose and Tom- 
tom," and I found that I was pretty Mod at 
some things, but once there was any kind of 
■ actor problem or personality thing I just 
went under. I couldn’t cope with it. Once 
that came up, I just got locked into it — I 
didn’t have any way to distance myself So 
the play art all muddy. 

SIMON: I’ve had the exact same feedings. 
If I have a confrontation with an actor, I just 
shut off and walk away from it But it always 
amazes me — when I get a director I like and 
who likes the play, he understands every- 
thing I mean, where the actor doesn't. The 
reason I won’t direct a play is that I will 
watch what a director docs and say, “I never 
thought of it quite that way.” 

1 have a number of directors that I work 
with frequently. I haven’t worked with Mike 
[Nichols] in a number of years, but I did do 
four plays with Mike, and I did four plays 
with Gene Saks and other people. You find 
someone that yon have shorthand battles 
with — yon know, you don’t have to have 
long discussions about it, because they know 
what you're looking for. I don't like to sit at 
rehearsals aU day long, so I like to feel that I 
am bring well represented. 

RABE: I find that, in the early part of 
rehearsal. Pm very quiet, and as time goes on 
I have more and more to say. If an actor does 
so mething I don’t understand — “How 
could be possibly do that!” — then Tm very 
upset. On the other hand, there are the times 
when they do a thing that’s so wonderful, 
that I never dreamed of. And that’s true of 
directors, too, that suddenly they bring 
something you just never thought of. 

And that s the balance. You see actors do 
their first drafts and their second drafts in 
public: So they have to be allowed time to do 
what seems pointless to me. You see how 
actors go through tremendous convolutions 
to figure out how to erect some wall, same 
character, and then they can relate to the 
audience. 

The Future of Flaywriting 

SIMON: I'm naive and optimistic enough 
to think that plays will always be here de- 
spite the fact that it’s been a fairly grim 
season, and we’re losing more and morte 
playwrights to films and to television — 
places where they’re guaranteed to make 


money. And the price of rickets makes it so 
difficult to put on certain kinds of plays that 
don’t promise to be a big smash Ml 
RABE: I have the feeding that the theater, 
since the late 1800s, has been overridden by 
an idea of a form called “realism,” which I 
think has truly run its course. 

r think the rime has came when people will 
understand that “the well-made pity” was 
developed oat of other ideas, out of Darwin 
and Newton. I mean, the well-made play is 
an idea based on how Newton said the uni- 
vase worked — like a tag dock: It said 
theater was a pictorial, scientific, objective 
form, so it invented the fourth wall. And it 
invented realistic behavior. If you had a real 
elephant on stage, then that was great 

Until theater can offer an audience some- 
thing that film can’t, it's going to struggle. 
It’s robbed itself of some of its major de- 
vices: The things that it has to offer are 
heightened language and soliloquies and 
that contact with the audience that the 
“fourth wall” makes unacceptable. It has 
somehow to reclaim this stuff, I believe. 

Whether h can ever truly compete with the 
dominance of technology is another ques- 
tion. I think one of the reasons musicals are ! 
so successful is they’re th e atrical. They’re j 
allowed to be out and big and full, and I I 
think people want that at the theater. 

SIMON: I agree that musical theater is 
still the most appealing thing to audiences. 
But we've readied the end of an era. I mean, 
we see the revivals now of “King and I” and 
“South Pacific,” but it’s another generation 
that is liking that. There are no new musicals 
that have come along in the last few years 
that have suddenly broken the mold the way 
“ Oklaho ma” did. 

If it’s difficult to draw on new play- 
wrights, you’ll find it even worse to draw on 
new compasera and lyricists and directors 
for musicals. Sondheim, in his mid-50s, Mi- 
chael Bennett, in his cariy 40s, they’re the 
“young” generation. 

RABE: As long as plays are sort of less 
effective movies and television — stepchil- 
dren, poor relations. . . 

SIMON: I thmk the question of the mon- 
ey is the most overriding issue. Morion pic- 
tures are sriO $5. If plays were $5, there 
wouldn’t be enough theaters to fiD the plays 
that were waiting to get on. I mean, double 
it, say Sll, and it would be the same thing. 
But once you get into the bracket h is now, 
it's a whole other tall game. ■ 


Stalking Delicacies 


by Mark J. Kuriansky 


M EXICO CITY —The summer 
rains came early this year, pro- 
ducing some frustrated tourists 
but making farmers jubilant 
with the promise of a plentiful com crop. 
The h umidi ty is already causing a fungus to 
appear on the com ears. This seasonal treat, 
called kuiclacoche, is the choicest delicacy of 
hundreds of Mexican corn dishes, some dat- 
j mg from pre-Columbian cultures. 

Huitlacochc soup, winch was the o rig inal 
use of the fungus, is a summer staple. Every 
year, new uses for Mridacoche are fauna . 1 
The demand has become so great in recent 
years that its production is no longer left to 
nature. When the rains start, selected ears 
are carefully cultivated in humid conditions 
to induce the fungus to overtakes the ear. 
The result looks like silvery, misshapen corn 
ke mals with black powder mside. Its delicate 
spicy taste seems to have endless uses in 
what is sometimes called here aha codna 
meydeana (Mexican haute cuisine). 

Huiriacoche can be bought canned in 
Mexico, but most people wait for the season 
to have it fresh,, So at this time of year the 
chefs of Mexico City’s leading restaurants 


■ eaten by all economy cb wi i lwt 
for wiM bc^^hmdao^ buffer, garlic ^Camts 

a ttS 5 ,r^h inferior px^JSf JSTpoor 

fasSed human beings from ioolW w* salt and ow* 

un demanding CTOp IS gTOWtl OH MjBCajJ . for 3 pOf* 1 * *? j 

mountain slopes and in ■ deserts To the poor, atofe is rfgn ggr 

forests. It is virtually an obsession of toe called atoje mixed withwater. somethfotMte 
Mexican peasant: while millions have tm- corn dough mureu Sometimes sugar fo 

^dnS City, other “‘S ST^bSfwho an aKorifiTfri 

afteUnitrfStaies,.imnynyw«™ 1 “ ff to become vtoal- 

thdr native vilkgBtwKeayear, to plant lie is stoic 

com and to harvest iL mav include tgfrluAb, 


urnra. com ana to narvesi ii. .*»_*** PrZ 

was the original There is link profit in com, most of which lareOt 
aer static. Every is grown for direct consumption. A swss ground 
oche are fauna . 1 agronomist working with the 


agronomist working with the Mazahaua In- 
dians in the mou ntains west of the capital 
said he was trying to teach them to grow 

_ ■ ■ « — 1 tndf WWW* 


bmy. have become poptto- 

addition to SOUPS. Stews anc 


have become a s ummer standby. Hm’tla- 
coche sauce on pasta is growing in populari- 
ty. Huitlacochc omelettes are considered a 
sophisticated variation, and some chefs do 
huitlacoche soufflfis. A Mexico City restau- 
rant that specializes in game makes a sauce 


Better srntea to xnc sou, ~rr ’“TV*— :« riiholv sola nos mtm 

and could improve their did- But, he sm4 ^ aadspfc. 

they sneaked rows of com into the fidds street, brashedj wthtmc* Ht™ 

where the new crops were planted Bed with grated cheese. 

A well-made com tortilla, or flat bread, jy, ILS was perhaps inevitable 
puffs out from the center Kke apillow. In the canfi wouU ssaxt making com we WWB. W 
southwestern Mayan region, fillings such ias is a creamy vamua w«ft 

eggs, beans, pork or shark are put inside the ^vied kemals mixed in. : 

puff. In the rest of the country tortillas are The Mexican urge to experiment witfrecnr 

roOed up with finings, like ertpes. seems irrepressible. Recently a “EwJS 

Tamales, perhaps one of the oldest tows M city bad to post a sign adwsfcsg 
in the world, are com dough stuffed with ^ thM the catsup and mayonnaise pm- 
meat or beaus, then wrapped in a com husk JTj. for the sandwiches sold m the 
and steamed. In the south the huskis some- ___]. -Hon and were not to be used on the 
times replaced by a ban ana leaf. There are nQDConL • ■ . 

sweet fined with nuts, raisins and ■ __________ 

coconut. Some tamales are filled with tiny ~ „ journalist tit 

fish. In the state of Vera Cruz, a giant tamal Mtrt Kurtoeky is a jountwa* m 

will have a whole pig cooked inrt- Mexico 


DOONESBURY 

VBVNKE CONTOURING 

awzADB.ourmiNKEEPm 

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A PlBASfNGSENSeOFBALANCB 
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D&£P, BUT ALL f5 IN HARMONY. 
NmXOW£ t COMRAD&^ 






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■■ -- L 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA. Konzerthaus(tei: 72.1ZI 1). 
CONCERTS — June 10, 13-15: Berlin 
Chamber Orchestra. Arnold Sch On- 
berg Choir. Peter Schrrier conductor 
(J.S.Bach). 

June 1 1: New York Philharmonic Or- 


chestra. Zubin Mehta conductor a " 

wtRti I A — 


June 13: “Cosi fan tntie” (Mozart). 

•Volksoper (tel: 53240). 

MUSICAL — June 13: “My Fair 
Lady” (Lama, Loewe). 

“Graphic Wo 

BHdPfUM LIEGE. Th< 

(tdJ3^9.I0) 

OPERA— Ju 

ANTWERP, Royal Flemish Opera senet). 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 

“Graphic Works by British Masters.” conductor, Viktoria Mull ova violin, June 12 and 13: “Henry V" (Shake- •Royal Opera (tel: 240. 10.66). 
LIECtThtau* Royal do LiOgo IvoPoson** piono (Meoddaoho. 


OPERA — To June 20: “Turandot" OPERA— June 1 i: “UM 


(Puccini)- 

•Paris An Center (td: 32239.47). 


EXHIBITION — To July 6 : “Leon cola. 


RECITALS — June 8 : Giao Cfcriai 
/Eugenio Bagnoli piano (DaHapk- 


8 -i -?3 59 10) Kavc *7- 

PERA-^-June 8 :“Hfetodiade”(Mas- J«“el3:LorinMaazdcanductor(Mo- 


zan, Schubert, Tchaikovsky). 


•Hayward Gallery (tel : 92837.08). 
EXHIBITION —To July 7: “Degas: 
The Painter as Printmaker.” 


(Bach. Mahler). 
•Staalsoper(td: 53240). 


sienne.” (Offenbach). 


Jane 9: “La Vie Pari- 


OPERA — June 8 : “ *^ 1 *^ " (R. GENT, Royal Opera (td: 253435). 

Strauss). MUSICAL— Jime 14: “De man van LONDON, Barbican Art Gallery — 

June 9: “Die WalkQre” (Wagner). La Mancha.” (Leigh). To June 30: “American Images " Pho- 


Stranss). 

June 9: “Die WalkOre” (Wagner 
June 1 1 : “Madame Butterfly” (I 
m). 

June 12: “Palestrina" (Pfitzner). 


La Mancha.” (Leigh). 

LASNE, Gal eric Beaumont (tel: 
633.38.40V 

EXHIBITION — To June 23: 


To June 30: “American Images” 
tography 1945-1980." 

Barbican Hall — London Syrup 
Orchestra— June 8 : Claudio Ad 


June 9: Concertgebouw Orchestra. •National Portrait Gallery (tel: 

Leonard Bonstrin conductor (Mah- 930.1532). 

ler). EXHIBITION— ToOcl 13: “Charlie 

RECITAL — June 10: Kathrvn Stott Chaplin 1889-1977 ” 

piano (ChqpinV «Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 734.9032). 

speare Company — June 8 and 14: EXHIBITIONS — To July 14: “Ed- 

“Hamler (Hiakespeare). ward Lear, 1812-1888.” 

June 10 and 1 1; “Richard III" ( Shak e- To Aug. 25: “217th Sumner Exhrbi- 
speare). tion.” 


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dire” (Petipa, Nurcyev, Minkus), RECITAL ■ 
“Consort Lessons (Bintley, Stravin- ano (Liszt), 
sky), “A Month in the Country (Ash- •Tbfcfltrc d 
ton. Chopin). 723J6J7V 

June 12: “La HDe maJ gantte” (Ash- CONCERT 
ion, Hixdd). Quartet (Be 

OPERA — June 8 and 13: “Cost fan RECTTAL- 
tu tie" (Mozart). berg piano ( 

•Tate Gallery (td: 821.13.13). •Tbehire 

EXHIBITION — To August 18: 24S.28.12). 
“Paintings by Francis Bacon: 1944 to THEATER 
Present/ Love” (San 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: •Thfc4tire ] 
589^3.711 261.19m 

EXHTBITIONS —To September IS: CONCERT 
“Louis Vuition: A Journey through Philharmon: 
Tunc." conductor (1 

To October 22: “Textiles from (he _________ 

Wdkome Collection: ancient and g 

modem textiles from the Near East * 

and Peru." ■ ■ 

•Wigxnote Hall (tel: 93SJ2.1.41). BCD . 

CONCERT— June 8 : Lindsay String 

piano (Iiszt, Schumann). 

June 11: Dmrsztof Sntictana vioKn, V™ , Jff 
John Blakely piano (Beethoven, Profo- 


Cesdria.'* 

•TbiatrcdelaVUlcftd: 887J4.42). 
RECITAL — June 8 : Jorge Bold pi- 


June 12: 


June 13: Fanil 
Schubert). 


Campanula phuso 
sstey piano (favd, 


•Thfefitre des Champa-Hysto (id: MILAN. Teatro alia Stall (tel: 


80.70.41). 


CONCERT — June 12: Amadeus OPERA — Jude II and 13t“Otfco" 
Quartet (Beethoven). (Ross). 

RE CITAL — Jtme 11: AlernWrissep- ' KOME AUolri b.Her, (td: 

Mlrie-Stnmrt ■ ■ (id: g?ji^£ M4 _n ) ii ne 30: “Romo: 


Marie-Smart 


aaa-^.I BaBa nWB». 

MimMVrtp Pm vie ■ 


Love" (Ssn Swpherd). 

MuS1Cftl dc Paris tlcl: VdKIBmOH—rtJmic I5:“From 
CONCERT — June 13: New York 

Philharmonic Orchestra, Zubin Mehta TURIN, Teatro R^o(ld: S4SU)Q). 


conductor (Mahler, Prokofiev). 

GERMANY 


FRANCE 

MCE. Acropolis (tel: 92.80.05). 
EXHIBITIONS— To June 25: ^ “! 
des Arts.” 


^ BERLIN. Deutsche Oper (tel: 
tnn S 341 ^ 44 , 49 ), 

irtrm OPERA — June 8 : “TTie Merry Wives 

i_ii_ June 10: “Carmen" (Bizet). 

S June II: Tosca" (Poccini}. 

June 13: “Tristan and Isolde” (Wag- 
ner). 

•Philharmonic (teL 25488-0), 

CONCERTS — Berlin Philharmonic 
Orchestra — Juue 8 aud 9: Charles Du- 

toil conductor (Bartok. Haydn). 

June 13: Christoph von DomianylocBi- 
ductor (Bartbk, Janficdc). 

Baie June 14: Bedin Radio Symphony Or- 


OPERA — Jose 8 , H. 13: “Madama 

Butterfly” (Pocani). • 

June 9 and 1 2: “Die 2^auberfl0te" (Mo- 
zart). 

VENICE, Masco CorrerAd: 25625). 
EXHIBITION— ToJuly28: “LeVen- 
izic Possibili-" 

•Palazzo Fortuny (teL 70.09.95). 
EXHIBITIONS —To July 14: “Ro- 
bot." 

To July 28: “Hont, Photography. 
1931-im" 

PORTUGAL 


ERICE2RA, Junta de Ttnismo (td: 
63122). 

EXHIBITION — June 10-161 
“Duarte Boavida and Hlipe Pereira.” 


PARIS, American Center (tel: 

335^1 JO). OFSPEOA 

DANCE — June 13-15: David Got- THE YEA! 

^SmC^N^-To June 25: “Mar- PAWS — 1985-1986 Year < 

imeAbaUfea, Olivier deBouchony, Da- Festival of India taking place acn 
vid Ryan, Anne Sanssois." months. The celebration opens in 

•OrttSlviaMotifortjtd : 53 1 .2K34). and 8 with fireworks, musicians, 
3^^’t^ rOUBhjTIne: ““ Years nances. The offiriS opening in 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: ^ ^ 

277.I2J3). CONCERTS —June 9 and 10: Tr 

EXHIBmONS— To Aug. 19: "Jean- THEATER — June 1 1-20: “Pam 

Pierre Bertrand.” “Palenao,” “David and fables). 

Trcmlett." _ For further information td: Paris 

•Gakne Qaude-Bernaid (tel: 326. 

97.07). 

EXHfflmON — To June 15: “Al- chestra. Masala Nakata conductor 
bCTto Giacometti. (Maid khn, Tom Takemitsu). 

^3atojeJaOTb(iel: 63350^6). RECITAL — June 10: Kxyszban Z3- 

EXmBITION — To June 28: “Ray- merman piano, KyungWha Chuns vi- 

monde Godin. - - * -- * 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 
THE YEAR OF INDIA u 

PAIUS — The 1985-1986 Year of India in Paris coincides with yhfff 
Festival of India taking place across the United States for the next 18 
months. .The edebration opms in Paris on the Place Ttocadero June 7 
and 8 with fireworks, musicians, traditional dance and other perfor- 
mances. The official opening in the United States is June 13 in 
Washington, The events in Paris during June indude: 

9PN C ERT S -June 9 and 10: Traditional and popular Indian 
THEATER — June 1 1-20: “Panda vanT (traditional musical hniiM 
find fables). 

For further information td: Paris 553.82.05. 


nlin violm 


•Galena Karl-FUnker (tel: 325. FRANKFURT, Alte Oper (td: 

™r^N-ToJnnel5:“Im- SSSSa - Jane 8 : European 
•Gderi^aifs et Primitifs (tel: Orchestra, Sir GemgeSSS 


yn sfi 1 st * (Mozart). 

ransSoN-ToJuneft-Cuhe 

•Galeiie Rfl ftel: 236.45.74). SSeiTAL — June 10 

EXHEBITION — To July 27: “Di SSIr umlm r 


EXHIBIT! 

Macao.” 


>H6tel Mtridien (td: 7 58. 12J0). 

I JAZZ — To June 9: Leu Benen organ. 
June 1 1-23: Buddy Tate. 


To inly 27: “Di 

lou Benett organ. THEATER — Through June: “The 

SZimut** Mbu*« P "(ChrisiiS SH 


EXHIBITION — To June 29: “Le 

Voyage duRJun.” Iftfl HHP 

• Mna6e d'Art Moderne (lei: 

DCHlSoNS— To July 8: “Marc DUBLIN, Abbey Theatre 
Riboud.” (id .7 445 .05). 

To SepL 8: “Robert and Sonia De- TOTATER- — June 1 0- July 13: “Sve" 

launay ( J -®- K«ne). 

•Mus6e de Montmartre (tel: •N® l £on a * Concert Hall (tel: 

606.61.11). , 

EXHIBITION — Through June: RECITAL— June 14: Peter Kerr ten- 

e m* iTnli nn 


ggssr 1 * -1 "- 

OPERA -June 10 and 13: “LTlisir 
d Amore (Donizetti). jc!_. 

MADRID, Bibiioteca Nadonal (lei: 

EXHIBITION — Through June: 
“Frida Kahlo, MnmdSSL Braro 
and Vicente Roga" 

,uaa March 

EKHTBITION — To June 30: “Gcr- 
&: 


EXHIBITION — Through June: KfcLii AL— June 14: Peter I 
“Montmartre, its origins, its famous of, (Schubert), 
residents." - JPoioockTheatre (tel: 74.45.05). 

•Musfe des Arts DAcoratifs (td: THEATER — June HkJidye 
260 T). 14 ). Shadow erf the Glen," “The 

EXHIBITIONS —To July 13: “Jean Wedding" (JJd. Synge). 
Amado." •Project Arts Centreffd: 71J 


SSSSMassiia 


Tinkers 


To June 21: “FdicienRqps." . . 

•Music du Grand Palais (tel: “Paintings by Denis Lonergan.” 
26154.10). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL t “Re- BCHIBITION — Through June- 
noir." “Sculptures by James McKenna." 


3SSfflS&=r(S5ffa« ! 

Paintings by Denis Lonergan." 
•Taylor Gallery (teL- TIMM 


ami. 

\ •MusSeduPedtPalaisOd: 265. 12.73). 
EXHIBITIONS — To June 30: 


'id: 265. 12.73). 


“James Tissot: 1836-1902." ITALY 

To SepL 29: “Gustave Dore.” 

•Music Rodin (tel: 703.01,34), ___ 

EXHTBITION — “Rodm, Five Con- ™RARA, Palazzo del Dmmanti(td: 

1 .41 ). BG&ITION —To June 15: “Joan 
JAZZ — Junes: Betty Carter. Miro. 

•Palms des Conaes (Id: 26620.75), FLORENCE, Teatro Cotnunal^ 
BALLET — ToJune 30: Ballet Amo- 277^2J6). ^ aie CtcJ ' 

nio Gades rCarmen." “Suite Fla- CONCERT — June 9: Turin 
menca"). Tdeviatm Orchestra. RalS 

•Palais Ommsportt de Paris Bercy beck de Burgos conductor 
(id: 342 j01^3). Stravinsky). UHacfter. 


25 L6920W 

tiSsBasaf 


wro sTAm 


tid:360J5J»L M u«um 

TpMy7:- OiuliopS^-- 

“f An (M: 

2SBS2P-- t '>»«:^ 

(tel:7D8.94Jtn\ Modern Art 


**«■ i. 


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foadn 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


Page 11 


'Xic‘0 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


or 


TRAVEL 






by Roger Coffis . 

T EE pampering starts the moment 
yon sign np for' a $500-a-day Sea 
Goddess omse to the Mediterra- 
nean, Caribbean or' along the 
South American coast Your tickets come in 
a leather Cartier wallet along with a form 
requesting your pr e f erences in food and 
wine, accommodations, sports and shore at* 
tivities and so on. This information is flashed 
by satellite to the ship, so that when you 
come aboard, the bar in your suite is stocked 
with your favorite brands of h'<mo r the 
concierge (not the pursovpleaayhas booked 
you for a sauna and massage. Perhaps guest 
membership has been arranged at a golf or. 
tennis dub at one of the peats of cafi. 

Such tender loving care does not crane 
y cheap. A seven-day arose in Sea Goddess l 
~~ : or its identical sister ship. Sea Goddess 2, 
costs about £6,800 (about $8,770) for two 
people sharing a doable cabin. But every- 
thing is included — cocktails, gourmet meals 
and fine wines, entertainment. The bar in 
your cabin is replenished and you can call . 
room service any time of the day ranigbi if 
' you crave champagne «nd caviar. 

People seem to find it good value for 
- money. Ary Zaipandy, managing director of 
Equity Cruises, the general sales agent for 
Sea Goddess in Britam, said both sh ips w ere 
almost fully booked for the 1985 season. Sea 
Goddess 1 has been chartered for January to 
visit Australia for the America’s Cup race at 
-5, a cool half-milli on dollars a week. 

This is one example of the growing appe- 
tite for aU-mdnsive luxury vacations, espe- 
cially those served up with- imagination and 
flair. Travel agents and operators , an re- ' 
spending to the market with a smorgasbord 
of upscale packages that often combine air, 
sea and ran travel People are prepared to 
pay to getaway from the. mundane tonrist 
tracks and fraternize with their own kind in 
small, adobe groups. Add a spot of adven- 
ture »nri you have a successful fammla 
The Sea Goddesses are more like private 

yachts than c mim tinm Each carries a nut- 

imum of 1 16 passengers in 58 outside double 
suites, with a crew of 80. Because of their 
relatively small size (4,253 tans, 344 feet 


ers 


either way. by Concorde (the norma] return 
fare is £2,600). 

- Luxmy charter is a profitable new field for 
the Concorde British Airways brought its 
seventh Concorde into service earlier this 
month (Air France has just taken three out 
of service) to cope with demand for super- 
sonic day trips to such exotic destinations as 
Iceland, Leningrad, Cairo and Athens. Nor- 
man Gflbam, managing director of Con- 
corde Charter, an independent, London- 
based company, said: “People just want to 
" fly Concorde. Americans, who can’t afford 
the full fare across the Atlantic, love the 
opportunity to fly supersonic. I mean, Cairo 
and back in the day is mind-blowing. And it 
doesn’t interfere with a European vacation.” 

The London-Cairo package is £835. 
There’s a steak breakfast on the three-hour 
flight, a visit to the Pyramids with a tour of 
deops’s burial chamber, then on to the 
Sphinx and the Holiday Lon for lunch. (Holi- 
day -Inn? “Because we want to live after it,” 
Gflham said.) Then to the bazaar, a dry tour 
and back, to London ax 9: 35 PJM. after a five- 
course gastronomic dinner in the air. The 
Crip to Iceland (£635) includes a Viking feast 
On the Bordeaux charter (£550) there is wine 
tasting and a gourmet hmrfi in a rhfttfwn at 
St EnriKon. 

This summer, Gilham plant a Co n co r de 
day trip to Bermuda that he said would allow 

'Cairo and back 
in die day is 
mind-blowing’ 


eight hoars on the beach. Perhaps the most 
exotic project is a July 14 flight to the Inter- 
national Air Tattoo at Fairtord, southwest 
England, at which Concorde wfll join forma- 
tion with the RAF Red Arrows display team 
to fly over the show. 

For those with a sense of nostalgia, and 
time as wdl as money, a civilized way to 
trpvd bran London across the Continent is 


P LM* V '4 1 * 1 [• -i &■ M ~w 1 1 . • • - 1 / • M ' «- v ' 


kwrm relief iTT-5il a iM 


: tPuerto Banns near Malaga, Ischia, Pratofi- 
» _iK),MontoCario, Cannes and StTnycz. On 
« . every entise there’s a special surprise. Fra 
example, when Sea Goddess 2 arrived in 
Monte Carlo on May 4 fra her inaugural 
cruise to Rome, Princess Ca roline a 
concert for passengers at theBotd de Paris. 

A larger but still luxurious cruise ship is 
the Enropa (33,000 tons and 600 passen- 
gers), operated by the German line Hapag- 
IdoydrattofBiGmen.lt is claimed that it has 
twice the space pa passengra than any other 
vessel of its kind. All public roams are aft 
and all accommodations are forward, so you 
don't have engines below and-a disco above 
you when you go to bed. It hasfive decks and 
five “entertainment points,” as they’re 
called, and has. been described. by a disinter- 


— jested air^urter,, operatin’ iy,:“o«zmg-witb . it, unrfyou c; 

fluxury, from the.eni^'ipro'to the top of extra charge, 
flve hmneLTbe caroeting. isn’t just' wail ' to Another C 


rOKTVM 


wall, it’s wall to ceding.” The Europa, whose 

- tours are marketed primarily in German-, 
speaking countries, plies the Pacific and to 
tne West Indies. New Zealand, Australia, 
Hong Kong, China, South Korea, Iceland, 
Greenland, Canada and the United Stares. 
The high point of the 1986 season is a 27-day 
cruise starting in May and costing 13,530 
Deutsche marks ($4,500) a person, double 
occupancy, not jnchiifing drinks. Passengers 
are flown from Frankfurt to Anchorage, 

- Alaska, to join the slop, riven sail down the 
coast to Glacier Bay, where the whales mate 
in the summer; an to Vancouver to visit the 
world’s fair; then via San Francisco and Los 
Angeles to Balboa in Panama and back to 
Frankfurt by plane. - 

Larger ™n is Canard’s . flagship, . the 
Queen Elizabeth 2. A 96-day world cruise 
from New York in the most .luxurious suite, 
with bath and veranda, wffl set you back 
about £55,050 a person (pound prices are for 
cruises sold in London, axufBritrsh residency 

required for booking thecas noted in tins 
<space last week, dollar pnees for the same 
cruise may be consideraibty higher)- A first- 
class round trip between New York and 
Southampton is a mote modest £3,900 a 
person. A lot of people^ one way and fly 
the other. This year Cunard is aiming a 
special promotion at the business traveler for 
its 26 trans-Atlantic sailings: Forthe priceof 
a single cabin and an air ticket you can get a 
double cabin and twp air tickets. Round-trip 
prices start at £1,565 for two. This compares 
with a return air fare of £1,024 in business 
das& For an extra 4349 a person you can fly 


luxury train, inaugurated in May 1982, fol- 
lows jrartof die route taken by the original 
Venice Adberg-Orieut-Express 44 years ago. 
The day and sleeping cars are pains- 

takingly restored origmalsdating from the 
1920s and 1930s, replete with marquetry 
■ p»ndc and refurbished brass handles, lig ht 
fixtures and l uggag e racks. The train runs 
twice a week each way between London and 
Venice via Folkestone and Boulogne (there’s 
a special lounge on the ferry during the 
daytime Channel crossing) to Paris. Zurich 
and Innsbruck. Leaving London al 11 AM. 
on Sunday you’ll arrive the next day in 
Venice at 6:50 P.M. The views and the cui- 
sine ar e sup erb. The single fare fra the whole 
tripos $770 — or £475 if bought in London 
— but there are fares quoted fra any part of 
it, andyoacan stop on fora few days at no 
extra charge. 

Another Champagne rail tour is a $300-a- 
day trip through the Highland s in the re- 
stored Victorian carriages of the Royal 
Scotsman, which starts its fust season this 
year. Carrying only 30 passengers, die train 
runs from May through September with two 
three-day itineraries, or a six-day tour for 
$2,000. Not only is the Owinpagne rniHmi t- 
ed — so is the malt whiskey. 

A great way to combine the Concorde, the 
QE-2 and the Venice Simplon-Orient-Ex- 
press is a 13-day package from New York, 
limi ted to 16 travelers. You fly Concorde to 
London, stay at theRitzfor two days (Kmoa- 
sines take you sightseeing), on to Venice by 
rail, a stay at the Danieh, backto London by 








don’t think theatefsa dead wesdd. There are 
just no good doctors around.” 

“At the rate dungs are going,” said Arthur 
Cantor, another independent producer, 
“well have to: change our name to the 
‘League of Empty Theaters.' This has been 
buildrag up fra a long time and the only way 
to reverse it is 2 people rak for less. And 
that’s practically a sin against the state.” 

This season did see two key innovations in 
reducing costs. One is the -agreement be- 
tween playwrights and producers on anew 
standard contract In essence die playwright 
gets more money before production than 
under the old contract in exchange for reduc- 
ing royalties while the show is runni ng. The 
contract is being used fra' the first time in - 
. William Hoffman’s “As Is," bringing the 
drama’s weekly brcak<vm point to a rcla- 
A lively modest $65,000 to $70,000, depending 
Oral advertising, 

“The contract sends a direct message not 
only to authors and producers, are em- 

end by it, but to dvrcctors and choreogra- 
phers and agents and unions that opera t i ng 
' costs must be putted down,” said Norman 
Kean, the producer who negotiated the new. 
- contract with Peter Stone, president of tire 
Dramatists Guild. Within the next two 


‘’-v x--- : — w - 

their three nugor timon contracts, those cov- 
ering actors, stagehan d-*; and musicians. 

The second innovation is a formula, pio- 
neered by the producer Monon Gottlieb, in 
-which a producer voluntarily Omits his po- 
fenrial income by seflmg a mated number of 
seats and by holding the top ticket price 
below $30. In return, hisshow receives cm 
cessions in salaries, royalties, work nrks and 
rant from the artists, unions and theater 
owner. This formula was used in “Dandn& 


in die End Zone,” a short-lived critical disas- 
ter, and is getting a second tiy with “Dou- 
bles,” a comedy that received mixed notices. 

“We’re trying it as an experiment," said 
Robert McDonald, tire legitimate theater 
. hngfn<»cg manag er of the International Asso- 
ciation of Theatrical and Stage Employees. 
; ^We're trying to find oat if these criticisms 
— the production costs are too high, the 
‘ ticket prices are too high — are le gi t imate .” 

- Both of the new systems arc entirely vol- 
untary. It r emains to be seen if they will ever 
bewiddy used. Their success, in any case, 
’ would address prices but not product. 

■■ . This season illustrated Broadway’s eco- 
nomic dependence on the big musical 
Broadway enjoyed rate of its best recent 
years for plays — with “As Is,” “Biloxi 
Blocs,” “Huriyburiy,” “Joe Egg,” “Ma Rain- 
ey’s Black Bottom,” “Pack of Lies,” 
“Strange interlude’' and the Royal Shake- 
speare Company’s “Cyrano de Bergerac” 
rad. “Much Ado About Nothing’ — while 
- endwring a decline at the bOX OfuCC. 

For the first time in five seasons, Broad- 
way did not have a new hit musical Last 

year it had “La Cage aux Fofles” and “Sun- 
day m the Park With George.” “Cats” 
opened in 1983, “Dreamguis” in 1982 and 
“fed Street" in 1981. Such shows generate 
anffien c e • wnTcmm i, provide a financial 
■ fo undation fra the season and bring in mon- 
ey that producers can apply to less commer- 
cial shows. 

This season, "QtriltasT “Harrigan *n 
lHart,” “The Three Musketeers" and “Take 
Me Along” dosed after brief nms. “Big 
River " “Grind” and “Leader of tire Pack* 


A Hill Town on the Road From Mandalay 


by Robert K. McCabe 


M AYMYO, Bunna — There are 
more spirits per square cubit in 
Burma than anywhere else in 
the world — ask any spook 
here — and this pretty bttte hill town has the 
strangest ghosts of afi. 

Maymyo is haunted by the British, those 
sober, long-departed colonialists who left 
their style firmly stamped on the town’s 
many government offices, its main street 
baQdin^ and, above afl, the stately timbered 
homes. There are English roses, blooming 
happily not far from the parched plains of 
Upper Bunna. There are strawberries. Even 
an 18-hoie golf coune, kept almost np to 
scratch. It’s ra a marvelous morion: Here’s a 
gmaTi qwtier of En gland, alive and thriving 
on foreign soil 

The British ghosts far outnumber the Brit- 
ish themselves- They came to Maymyo more 
than a century ago, spurred by a Bengal 
Infantry colonel named May (Maymyo 
means May’s town) who was sent to quash a 
rebellion against tire c olonial rulers and who 
saw the makings of a splendid hill resort 
They came, they settled and they built 
and the remains of their stewardship are 
testimony to their fondness for the town. But 
in 1948, when Burma won its independence, 
they began to leave. Only a few are left. 
Burma is that favored travel goal, the splen- 
did anflfhmnicm 

Fittingly, it is not easy to reach. Many 
tourists, trotting along the one-site-a-day 
track imposed by Banna’s inexorable seven- 
days-and-out tourist visa limit, choose to 
pass it fay. But getting there is put of May- 
nryo’s diann. The i wnnw m ranHad mefhnri is 
to hire a battered jeep from the fleet of 
World War II leftovers at Mandalay’s Zegyo 
marke t or at its airport. The gomgraie is 130 
kyats (about $15.90) for a chamfered jeep. 
Fnonomy.mmded travelers may squeeze m 
with six to eight Burmese and pay much less, 
but the older and wiser will hire a jeep for 
themselves and enjoy slightly more comfort. 

T HE road from Mandalay to Maymyo 
(altitude: 3,150 feet, 960 meters) 
winds upthrough the foothills of the 
Shaw P lateau T wnp wafrrrp^ fall fast, even 
during the hottest months. Our driver 
stopped at his cottage fra a jacket, rad we 


V V - -ft,: 



;A'-Y: : . it--;, . * • : 

Vv> : -A : . 


a l W - 

ft '*' - • r i - * ■■ -v w?:. 

. . i- -«r -c 


frivo Boibey. Ato^iun 

Bamboo barge near Mandalay. 

pulled on sweaters once we'd reached the 
plateau. The road is well-engineered and 
asphalted, but barely wide enough to allow 
two cars to pass. The appearance of a truck 
(and there are many) is cause for soft cirrring 
from the driver and muttered prayers from 
passengers. 

Once through the inevitable police check- 
point and into Maymyo, there are few 
choices fra hotels. Most visitors head first 
for Candacraig (officially, the Maymyo 
Guest House), which was buflt just after the 
tnm of the century to house the young bach- 
elor derks of the Bramah Timber Company. 
Known as The Chummery, it is built on the 
lines of an English country home. 

There is a large verandah, a ducal living 
room with fireplace, a monumental formal 
staircase that leads to the bedrooms. Teak 
throughout, of course. 

But the beds are stony, the furniture scant 
and shaky, the bathrooms leaky. The staff, 


friendly in Burmese tradition, tried hard to 
cope: When we asked for a bedside lamp, for 
example, our maids improvised a plug that 
consisted of two wooden pegs holding the 
lamp’s bare wires onto the mains. 

Downstairs in the bar, all that was on offer 
was the gassy, ubiquitous Mandalay beer, 
made by the state monopoly. But Peter Bar- 
nard, son of the former cook and now Can- 
dacraig’s manager, offered us a roast beef 
slipper worthy of the prewar splendors: De- 
licious pink beef, plenty of fresh vegetables 
and tasty potatoes for about $230 apiece 
(the room was about $630). 

Most of our fellow guests were in their 
20s: Canadians. Americans. Danes and Brit- 
ons. The talk is easy and the mood convivial 
— the Chummery's old friendliness lingers. 

Candacraig is outside the town itself, a 15- 
minute stroll away. The surrounding bouses 
are mostly on its comfortable pattern: multi- 
bedroomed, huge verandahs with sleeping 
porches above, long sweeping drives, big 
lawns and carefully laid-oul gardens, most 
now in need of wealing. These houses, once 
occupied bv British expatriates, have been 
taken over by the Burmese. Most remain in 
good shape, but replacement fittings, one 
hears, are hard to find. 

Maymyo’s other top hotel is the Nan 
Myaing, located , in what under the British 
was the compound of the area’s law courts. 
Occupied by the army between 1948 and 
1980, it was taken over by the government 
tourist office and transformed into a very 
comfortable, if austere, hotel, which opened 
in 1982. It is managed by the lovely Mrs. 
Happiness Ivy, who asked us to call ha 
Happy. We tried one of the suites (about $17 
a night for bedroom, living room and bath), 
and enjoyed the hotel’s Burmese curry ($4.40 
apiece, with a beer). A good Engbsb-style 
breakfast was about $2.40 each. 

Transportation in Maymyo is limited to 
jeeps, bicycles and startling little horse- 
drawn carriages that resemble half-size 
Wells Fargo stagecoaches. The dwarfish 


that we did not want (o play, we visited the 
clubhouse, a dark, hutiike building that re- 
placed the mansion built by the British and 
destroyed in fighting at the end of World 
War if. The new shed is pleasant enough in 
its way, lined with British-style shields bear- 
ing the names of club champions. The club's 
Indian pro still talks about the visit of an 
American teaching professional in tbe early 
1960s. 


M AYMYO'S botanical garden (430 
acres, 173 hectares) is one of the 
country’s best. Built around a love- 
ly little lake with a pagoda in its center, the 
garden shows off temperate- region flowers 
(roses, chrysanthemums and others brought 
from Britam) that will not grow in the not 
Burmese lowlands. Farther away from the 
lake are carefully tended stands of pines, 
poplars, oaks and chestnuts — rare in most 
of Southeast Asia. The Maymyo region also 
produces coffee beans, bananas ana pineap- 
ples as wdl as strawberries and a wide vari- 
ety of European vegetables. No wonder the 
British loved it so. 

The garden is a favorite of students, who 
flock out to picnic, and many townspeople 
visit. Transport is scanty: If you take a cab 
out, have tne driver wait. It’s a long walk 
back 

There is a Chinese pagoda in town that is 
worth a visit. It is characteristically garish; 
its memorable point for us was that it shel- 
ters four affable, elderly Chinese gentlemen 
who lie in wait for the foreigner. Nothing 
sinister: They offer green tea, then ask quite 
politely to have their photos taken. 

Their leader is Roger Wong, who speaks 
rudimentary English as well as Mandarin 
(the four came to Maymyo from Kunming, 
in southern China, during World War II). 
On the slightest encouragement, he will dis-, 
play a collection of calling cards and photos 
sent by visitors from all ova the world. 

Most tourists also find time to visit one of 
the several waterfalls near the town. We 
jeeped out to Pwe Kauk, about 8 miles (13 
kilometers) from our hotel and duly ad- 
mired the small but lovely falls. When we 
were there, at sunset, the falls were being 
used as a giant shower bath by youngsters. 
There is a small cafe near the falls, from 
which a local hunter emerged to offer us a 
very dead pangolin, a sort of anteater. That 
was the only thing we were happy to pass up 
in Maymyo. ■ 


taller travelers bump along bent nearly dou- 
ble. Fra sightseeing, we preferred a jeep. 

There is enough wrath seeing to fill a day 
quite comfortably. We wait first to the gou 
course, a nicely laid-out 18 holes, painstak- 
ingly but not quite perfectly maintained 
After convincing a horde of ragged caddies 


Perfect Trip: Parfs-Champagne 


Continued from page 9 


fimos and a seal at a London theater, it wifi 
cost about $11,600 for two. 

An alternative, 18-day package from New 
York costs about $30,000 fra two and in- 
cludes travel, meals, hotels, sightseeing and 
entertainment. Yon fly first-class on Air 
France to Nice via Paris, stay at the Hotel de 
■ Paris in Monte Carlo, board the Sea God- 
dess there for a seven-night cruise to St. 
Tjrqpez, Portofino (with a ade trip to Pisa), 
Ischea, Bonifacio in Corsica and CSvitave- 
chia (the prat of Rome), stay in Rome ai the 
Excdri or, go to Venice by the luxury train 
Marco Polo, spend a day in Venice at the 
D anicK, tdee the Orient Express to Paris for 
one night at the Meurice, and return to New 
York by air. 

It does all sound great value for money — 
if you haw the money. ■ 


on Continued from page 9 


huge list of Champagnes and specializes in 
dishes to complement them. 

Epemay, it is said, has been destroyed by 
invaders 22 times smee AJD. 533. The citi- 
zens must have tired of rebuilding; today, 
while Epemay is a bustling, affluent hole 
city, it does not have timrh charm. It is all 
business, and tbe business is Champagne. 
Mott, Mercia. Mumrp, Perrier- Jouet and 
Pd Roger are in Epemay while Boffinger, 
Deutz & Gfidermann and Ayala are in Ay, a 
small city across die Marne River where the 
first vines in the region may have grown 
more than 2,000' years ago. Lanrent-Perrier 
is ax Tours-sux-Mame, a few miles to the 
easL 

The major Champagne firms, the names 
Americans recognize, are the largest but by 
do iwmthi the only Champ a g ne makers. By 
recent count, there are about 145 producers 
of Champagne, and about 17.000 growers of 
Champagne grapes. Typical of the smafia 
producers is Albert Ricauti of Avenay-Val- 
(fOr. an attractive village on the north bank 
of the Mame about five miles east of Eper- 
nay. Ricauti produces about 50,000 bottles 
of Champagne a year, half of which he sells 
to chic of the larger companies and half of 
which he sells himself. like most small pro- 
ducera, he has a list of loyal chats who buy 
by mail order or on weekend trips from 
Paris. 

Ricduti is atypical however He was bom 
and reared in Baltimore. When he retired 
from the Army in the early 1960s, he moved 
to France and married the gjri he hfrd been 
corresponding with since he idled through 
Champagne with the American Third Army 
in 1944. His wife's family, tile Revoiles, were 
in the Otampagne business. He moved in 
and eventually took h over. The name on his 
label is Ricduti- Revolte. 

The difference between the smaller pro- 
ducers and the large ones is a question of 
style as much as size. Champagne has always 
been associated with irony, with festivity, 
with success. The large firms work hard to 
preserve this image. They sponsor high-stake 
horse races and exclusive charity balls and 
practice any subterfuge to have their bottle 


in the winner’s circle at grand prix auto races 
and pdo matches. Many of the principals of 
the large firms are socialites who convey, by 


image. The Oiandnns. the de Vogues, tbe 
Tamingers are as prominent socially as they 
are in the b usiness world. 

The small er champagne bouses, the ones 
that tardy export, are much Hke modest 
wineries all ova France: They may mate 
3,000 cases or 30,000 cases a year; their 
business is by mail ordfr within Europe and 
through direct sales to customers who drive 
from Paris (and, before they bey, sample a 
few bottles ova the winemaker's kitchen 
table). Quality at these smafia houses can 
range from execrable to superb. Much de- 
pends an the grapes. 

In Champagne, grapes are rated on a baas 
of 100,-The great firms, such as Krug and 
Bollinga, use only grapes rated in the high 
90s. The smaller houses will use grapes rang- 
ing in quality from the high 70s to the low 
90s. Their prices are usually half what the 
grandes marques charge. 

About two minutes’ drive northeast of 
Epemay is the village of Hantvinera. the 
home of the Benedictine monk Dorn Pirig- 
non, who is gaierally credited with inventing 
Champagne. Wine had been produced in the 
Champag ne, region arnoc Roman rimes but it 
was a still vintage and, as late as the Middle 
Ages, basically red. Dam Pfaignon. who 
lived from 1638 to 1715 and was the cdlar- 
masterof tbe Hautvillers Abbey, is supposed 
to have perfected the process of bottle fer- 
mentation that creates the bubbles. 

What he really did, according to Gerald 
Asha, a wine merchant and writer, was 
come up with the idea of blending wines 
from different communities to achieve bal- 
ance and consistency in the wine. The idea of 
bottling Champagne under pressure, the 
methoae champenoise, did not came into 
wide use until the middle of the 18th century. 
One of the principal innovators or tbe meth- 
ode champenoise was the Widow (Veuve) 
CTicquot, whose name still graces her fam- 
ily’s wine. ■ 

© 1985 The New York Times 



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Champagne in the rough: Grapes await pressing. 


Hony Gniyoert. Mogourn 


Times Square 


Continued from page 9 


Many theater experts, both from labor 
and management, express concern about 
Broadway’s reliance on musicals that are 
aging and ultimately must be replaced. In 
April for example, “Cats,” “La Cage,” and 
“The King and I” represented only 13 per- 
cent of the shows on Broadway — three of 
23. But in that month, the three big musicals 
accounted for 25 pe r ce n t of attendance 
(149,973 of 592302) and 32 percent of its 
box-office income ($53 nufiioa of $16.9 xml- 
lion), according to figures from the league 
Broadway also leans heavily an such stand- 
bys as tbe 4-year-old “fed Street," 10-year- 
old “A Chorus Line” and 2ft-year-oJd 
“Dreamjaris," which is advertising its last 
weeks. Tne oily hit to replenish Broadway 
this season, exdndmg the seven-month en- 
gagement of “The King and L" is tbe Neil 
Simon comedy “Biloxi Blues.” 

“When you evaluate the health of Broad- 
way, you have to ask how many dollars were 
contributed by new shows,” said Meric De- 
buskey, the president of the Association of 
Theatrical Press Agents and Managers. 
“You have to look at the road a gns to see 
whaf s ahead How much longer can the old 
shows contribute?" 

Broadway leaders give several different 
reasons for the dearth of new musicals. Ger- 
ald. Schoenfeld, c hai r ma n of the Shuberi 
Organization, said the organization’s large 
musical booses were already occupied % 
such shows as “Cars,” “fed Street” and 
“Dreamgiris." Azcnbergsaid none of Broad- 
way’s usual sources far shows — London, 
Off Broadway and the regional riv ete rs — 
had fertile seasons for musicals. 

But Sabinson, among others, rites a mare 

^^rirtnallymaS"such tryoms obsotetefbr 


developing new musicals. Workshops rou- 
tinely cost $200,000 to $400,000, a high price 
fra speculation. The noncommercial the- 
aters, which have provided Broadway with a 
stream of notable plays, have yet to prove as 
successful with musicals. 

“The nonprofit theaters have never paid 
attention to developing musicals,” Sabinson 
said. "There’s no place for young directors, 
young songwriters, young singers to leam.” 
In addition, few noncommercial theaters can 
afford the stagecraft demanded of contem- 
porary Broadway musicals. 

Musicals like “A Chorus line,” which 
began at the New York Shakespeare Festi- 
val and “Sunday in tbe Park,” which began 
at Playwrights Horizons, remain much more 
the exception than the rule. More typical 
were “Qnilters" and “Harrigan *n Hart,” 
which won enthusiastic reviews in small re- 
gional theaters but faltered on Broadway. 
Thus the financial hopes for next season rest 
on Eng lish vehicles such as “Song and 
Dance,” “Chess,” Terry Hand’s “Poppy” 
and Lloyd Webber’s “Starlight Express. 

With the increasing cost of mounting a 
show, Broadway’s theater-owners have be- 
come Broadways major producers. Their 
rental fnmme gtyes than the money to invest 
in shows. As landl ords, they have a strong 
interest in keeping their theaters occupied. 

Few younger producers have been able to 
enter Broadway. Allan Carr of “La Cage” 
and “Grease” and Fred Zofio of “Huriybur- 
ly” and “Ma Rainey,” both in their 30s, rate 
as the young generation. “There is no train- 
ing fra producers, and the costs of starting 
up are incredible.” ZoDo said. ■ 

S 1985 The New York Times 


will have to convince the public that it is 
what it was in its heyday: A neighborhood 
full of occupied theaters, with a sizable num- 
ber occupied by fresh creations at the fore- 
front of the art- It is indicative of what has 
happened that the most widely produced 
contemporary American playwright, Shep- 
ard, has never had a play done an Broadway. 
It is hard to imagine that the Broadway of 
the 1940s and ’50s, for all its boulevard 
entertainments, would have flourished with- 
out the plays of Eugene O’Neill Tennessee 
Williams or Arthur Mifia. 

Who will bring Broadway a Shepard play 
— or find the new Shrouds who might 
recharge the street? Fra the first time in its 
history, the commercial theater is almost 
entirety bereft of the entrepreneurs who have 
normally filled that rale: producers, not 
merely money-raisers but people capable of 
uncovering worthwhile new scripts and nur- 
turing them from first draft to opening night. 

The absence of creative producers also 
partially explains the decline of stageworthy 
American musicals. The periodic “Big Riv- 
er” (or “Sunday in the Park With George” or 
“A Chorus Une”) excepted, musicals cannot 
be imported frpm institutional theaters — 
because institutional theaters cannot afford 
to stage them. As a consequence, American 
musicals are about the only remaining theat- 
rical works that Broadway still has to manu- 
facture by itself. The steep decline of Broad- 
way producing expertise can be seen by 
studying the dim creations that result. 

To remember what Broadway producers 
once woe — and might be again — one need 
only look at the most active institu tional 
theater major domos, of whom the most 
prominent is Joseph Papp. Part fund-raiser, 
pan promoter, part showman, Papp very 


much fits the profile of the old-time Broad- 
way producer, working in the less expensive 
arena of the nonprofit theater, he was able to 
assemble the type of season at the Public 
that Broadway producers routinely used to 
mount 40 blocks north. 

He produced large, elaborate American 
plays by significant writers (Weller’s “Soapy 
Smith,” Christopher Durang’s “Marriage of 
Bette and Boo, 1 * Albert Innaurato’s “Com- 
ing of Age in Soho,” Kramer’s “Normal 


Heart”); he imported a collective theater 
piece that, in spite of its difficult subject (the 
Vietnam war), proved to be a crowd-pleaser 
(“Tracers”); he brought in some convention- 
al London plays (“Virginia," “Tom and 
Viv,” “Salonika”) as wdl as a London-fringe 
political firebomb CRat in the Skull”). He 
also concocted a cynically commercial musi- 
cal (the updated “La BohfemeT) and gave his 
andience stars (Jessica Tandy, Kate NeHi- 
gan, Linda Ronstadt). 

Was every production terrific? Of course 
not But every one was staged as skillfully 
(and lavishly) as the materiaf could warrant, 
and, in one case (Innanrato's play), Papp 
shut down a production in previews so that 

the writer could rewrite and recast the entire 

work to improve iL How many active Broad- 
way producers would be capable of exercis- 
ing that patience and editorial judgment, 
even if they could afford to do so? 

Broadway wifi not renew itself as a theatri- 
cal hub until it again finds such producers 
and until it makes tbe economies that in- 
oease production and lower ticket prices. 
When that happens, the audience may re- 
tnm, too. g 

Exempted from an artide in The New York 
Junes, 


Page 12 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1935. 



Some Royal Occasions during 
the London Season . . . from 
Ascot to Antiques. 


dar, as the course where the 
best horses can be seen in 
surroundings possibly un- 
equalled anywhere. 


buys a new Volvo between 
now and June 21 will be. 
offered a train journey aboard 
the Venice Simplon Orient 


The four day royal meeting Express, probably the most 
was inaugurated by Queen sumptous train in the world. 
Anne in 1711. Since then the Overseas buyers of Volvo 
races have been attended re- become members of the new 
gularly by the Sovereign and London Qub and receive 
members of the royal famil y regular copies of the maga- 
driving in state carriages from rine, Watergate, as well as a 

VVI._ -3 — - ltMt /if fnr him in/I 


nearby Windsor Castle. 

The pageantry begins each 
afternoon with the royal 
procession of five open lan- 


hy Ad OSS Murray The pageantry begins 

T his is the time of year when many a man’s fancy should, if he is sensible, turn towards — procession of five open lan^ 
antiques. Antique fairs are held in many parts of Britain throughout the year, but the most daus driving up the course be- 
prestigious are in London. One of the most important is the Antiques Fair which Process fore racing starts. Outriders 
Alexandra will open at 3 o’clock on Wednesday, June 12, at the Grosvenor House Hotel in Park Lane. m_s=ria eous uyl gold tad 
It will remain open until June 22. Traditionally one of the highlights of the London Season, the Fair “P “* •““‘k 

follows the Derby, but precedes Ascot and Wimbledon. ✓ 

A new antioues dateline of clocks and scientific instru- the living model so life like value will be exported to the y' dkgdNl 


host of 'goodies’ for him and 
her, plus a voucher worth 
$500 which can be redeemed 
when purchasing another 
Volvo. 

However yon decide to 
travel to Ascot for the royal 
meeting you mil return to 



A new antiques dateline of 
1914 is being introduced this 
year for paintings and sculp- 
tures, but the one hundred 
year rule applies to all other 
items. For the first time 
visitors to Grosvenor House 
will be able to buy a 
Fantin-Latour, a Pissaro or a 
Tissot. 

The Great Room at the 
hotel, Europe's largest ball- 
room, is the perfect setting for 
this famous Fair. The hotel is 
built on the site of the old 
London home of the Dukes of 
Westminster which housed 
one of the largest private art 
collections in the world. 

Taking part in this year's 
exhibition are 87 of the best 
known dealers from all parts 
of the United Kingdom. They 
will exhibit furniture, carpets 
and tapestries, paintings and 
prints. Oriental art, sculp- 
ture, glass, gold and silver, 
jewellery, arms and armour. 


ments, ikons, antiquarian 
books, and coins. Prices range 
from £50 to £1 million. 

A stringent vetting proce- 
dure takes place to ensure 
authenticity. Every item for 
sale, down to the smallest 
thimble, will be checked by 
one of 16 panels of experts, 
almost all of them members of 
the respected British Antique 
Dealers' Association. 

This year the Victoria and 
Albert Museum in London is 
loaning two important Rodin 
bronzes. ‘The Prodigal Son’ 
and ‘The Age of Bronze’ are 
regarded by experts as 
excellent examples from the 
intellectual modern move- 
ment which will be a theme at 
Grosvenor House for the first 
rrmg this year. 

When ‘The Age of Bronze’ 
was first exhibited in the Paris 
Salon in 1877, the artist was 
accused of taking casts from 


Antique Silver 


The finest 
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LNICL'I 1 SAMlIVftl Ufc- SAMhCONlH I ION 
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DeBghtfiJ restaurant tucked away 
In St. Jamart. NauweBe cuUne plus 
other favourites. Wvate member- 
shfa dub downstair*. 

6, Ormond Yard SW1, off Duke of 
York St. Closed Scdurday lunch and 
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KEN LO’s MEMORIES 
OF CHINA 

Probably the most prestigious 
Chinese restaurant in Europe. 
Hqhty though! of by over 150 
Chinese and Far-Oastem delega- 
tions who dne here. The arty 
restcwiml featured by "New York 
Times'. 'Goumner and ' People's 
Daw ’or Beijing. CuttJne features a* 
A ciitncry regions of China Res. 
essential 67-09 Ebuv St.. Belgravia. 
SW1 Tel: 01-730 7734 


94 Growenar Road Westminster. 
Casmapoflttn food from Far and 
MdrJe East Europe and the 
Americas. Rec. by Mlchela Gau» 
lW®ou Ronay and N.Y. Times. Mon 
- Sat resavatlons. Tefc 828 6560. 


Green’s 

CHAMPAGNE BAR 

Champagne, oysters and cold 
I seafood, h heart of St. James's - 
now we haire a new section s&v- 
Ing traditional hot Eng&sn dttfres. 

36 Duke St. Tel: 930 4566 


For the serious gourmet... 

MONSiEURThoiVipSONS 


Restaurant Francais 
29 Kensington Park RoadWII 


mi 


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-,-ZONS N-'Gfi! CL JB CLPZOM \ ;GnT CLUB .MAYFAIR 



CJRZCNS: -LONDON S EXCLUSIVE NIGHT CLUB 
No exDe~'-.f- re;, tec- itirsd ;n cr-c'-.ng the 
-ricor. f ce-v iw"-''Cw:'cl r 'g> of C'.nsn; Cvo, which is 
■deciiy Sitw’Cfoc r 'hr- heorf of Mcyfcir. 

D.nc: s-,5 dcn.;o n oiejonoe a-d enjey wr chef's 
exq-jivK; ir’/vr.y p'c.'pcr^o *o the Tgnn'! :"tornc!iora! 
itcnca.'d: end rcrmeTiented fcv the ?-rse r A wnts 
CLTio-'s-iomelh.ncve-rysawici. 

. i r 

'M M.e-nof;. '-nip T 
Lor. don vVi Y " ; °F. 

-5 Lc-h- 'or- nor V."Y 3LD. Toif-ohcno: Cl -629 6665 


■ 3 -iC^C Uorr. Rcocptior. or 
:aer 6'cck Street. 


was the sculpture. His repu- 
tation, however, was vindi- 
cated in 1880 when the State 
bought a bronze cast. 

Later in the summer the 
West London Antiques Fair 
takes place at Kensington 
Town Hall from August 
15/18. This is one of the few 
gatherings in high summer, 
but dealers have learned that 
there are sometimes more 
potential buyers from abroad 
in London at that time that 
during the rest of the twelve 
months. 

At this Fair the concen- 
tration will be on porcelain, 
furniture, clocks and silver- 
ware with some rare examples 
of 17{h century jewellery as 
well as Indian watercolour 
miniatures ... even Eskimo 
carvings. As at Grosvenor 
House, everything is vetted 
by experts. Most items will be 
dated prior to 1870. 

Later the 61st Chelsea An- 
tiques Fair at Chelsea Old 
Town Hall, from September 
10 to 21, heralds the begin- 
ning of the autumn season of 
antique shows. Most items 
here will be pre-1830. 

A few weeks later an event 
of international importance 
takes place when works of art 
from Britain of unimagineable 


Dining 1 

Out 


value will be exported to the 
United States. The occasion is 
an exhibition at the National 
Gallery in Washington called 
‘The Treasure Houses of 
Britain: 500 years of private 
patronage and an collecting’, 
beginning on November 3 
and con tinuing for more than 
four months. 

Items to be displayed are 
coming from 200 properties, 
owned either by the British 
National Trust or by mem- 
bers of the UK Historic Hou- 
ses Association. 

As David Coombs, editor 
of the Antique Collector puts 
it: ‘The opportunities pre- 
sented by this exhibition are 
stupendous. Scholars will be 
in a stare of happy delirium at 
the chance of examining, 
assessing and discussing such 
a range of incredible objects; 
while the various owners are 
acutely aware of the potential 
commercial value of the 
exhibition, which is bound to 
attract more visitors to their 
bouses, and more tourists will 
mean more jobs, as well as 


Rodin’s ‘ The Age of Bronze \ presented to the Victoria and 
Albert Museum by the sculptor in 1914 , having already been 
shovm at the Royal Academy in London in 1884.. 


more prosperity. 

Back, in London an imri- * carriage in which the Queen town excited and s t imula ted, 
guing centre for antiques of sits. In the following landaus whether you have beaten the 
every kind is Gray’s Antique are otbe royalty and guests bookies or lost some' money 
Market at 58 Davies Street, invited to stay at Windsor by a short head. Such a day 
close to Claridges. Here you Castle for race week. Each demands a fitting finale, 
can find Solveig & Anita Gray landau is drawn by four The setting has to be 
who individually and as a horses with bewigged post- Mayfair and within this 
team are among the most illions in purple, gold and crowded square mile few 
knowledgeable dealers in fine scarlet livery. places are more elegant than 



The 

Elephant 
on the 
River 

DINNER & DANCE 

Opan Tunday to Sividay 
im&MM. Gourd Monday. 

129 Gtomnor Road, London S.W.J. 
Tal.< 834 16 21. 


every kind is Gray’s Antique 
Market at 58 Davies Street, 
close to Claridges. Here you 
can find Solveig & Anita Gray 
who individually and as a 
team are among the most 
knowledgeable dealers in fine 
Chinese porcelain in London. 

While I was at their shop 
close to the entrance of Gray’s 
Antique Market, a dealer 
arrived from Portugal ... not 
to buy or sell, but to seek 
advice from Anita and 
Solveig, this rare mother and 
daughter combination. Ten 
minutes after he had departed 
a buyer from Germany app- 
eared to discuss the purchase 
of a 15th century rare Ming 
celadon vase. 

But there is more going on 
in Britain at this time of the 
year than displays of antiques. 
One of the most famous, and 
historic parts of the London 
Season begins in a few days. 
This is Royal Ascot from June 
18 to June 21. As a royal 
spectacle it has few equals, 
and has always held a unique 
position in the racing calen- 


This is the scene that sets Curzons, die new, exclusive 
the magic that is Royal Ascot dub in Park Lane, between 


where hundreds of beautiful 
and extravagantly dressed wo- 


the Dorchester and Hilton, on 
the corner with Curzon St- 


men provide a backdoth of reet. You can choose whether 
fashion that has few equals, to dine in the restaurant, with 


Tax Free 


Your’ejusta 
couple of 
blocks away from 
a small part 
of Sweden. 

Based in Mayfair W. 1. 

Volvo Export have a direct 
computer link to Sweden and are able 
to sell you a fabulous Volvo at 
Tax-Free factory prices! 

We even include FREE shipment to the 
States plus the customs hassle dealt with 
and a factory warranty that is truly 
international. Call and check out 
our prices; we could save you 
1000‘s of dollars! 

■VOLVO EXPORT 


youosnkotrttha futility 


Volvo Concessionaires LtcL, 

28 Albemarle St. London. W1X 3FA Tel: 01-493 4954. 


The kaleidoscope of colour 
they create balances the more 
formal grey and black top hats 
and morning coats of their 
escorts. 

Getting to Ascot need pre- 
sent no difficulties. You can 
travel there in both style and 
comfort. Town & Country 
Car Rentals has a range of cars 
to suit every taste and need, 
but for Royal Ascot many 
prefer the luxury of a 
chauffeur driven car. They 
have a choice of a Rolls 
Royce, Bentley Mulsanne 
Turbo, Mercedes, Jaguars or 
Daimler. 

Alternatively, buy your 
own car and drive yourself to 
Ascot ... or anywhere else. 
Volvo Export, at 28 Alber- 
marle Street, London Wl, 
have thought up an unusual 
and attractive incentive deal 
aimed at US military per- 
sonnel in Britain and overseas 
businessmen. Anyone who 


its choice of excellent cooking 
to satisfy every international 
palate, and views across to 
Hyde Park, or walk down- 
stairs for a light snack in the 
night dub where you can 
dance the hours away in 


Furnished 
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KNIGHTSBRIDGE, 
BELGRAVIA, MAYFAIR 
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Apartmenu and houses of 
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Long or short term lettings 
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London SW1A 1RB 

Tel: 01-49*8222 Telex: 25341 


Shopping 


Home 

Finders 


FACING SOUTH 

The Spcvi alerts for 
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TeU 01-789 9549 


D. L. LORD 

Knitwear. Cashmeres. 
Shirts. Tics. Scarves and 
Leuthcrgoods. 

70 Burlington Arcade, 
London W.l. 

Tel: 0M93 5808 


Jewellery 





VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 

— WORLD FAMOUS jKWKl.LKRS — 




153 New Bond Street 
London Wl 
Tel: 01491 1405 
Tlx: 266265 VLC G 


Exclusive Jewellery 
Gift Items 
and 
Watches 


surroundings chat are exat- 
ingv yet relaxing. 

Designers Ezra Aitia & 
Associates have transformed a 
basement area into a dramatic 
scries of intersecting circles, 
including curved walls with 
reflective surfaces that pro- 
vide the illusion of infinity. 
Wherever you turn the drama 
of their design is reflected 
through colourful mirrored 
floors and ceilings. For those 
who fancy only a sandwich 
there , is a choice of crab, 
lobster, smoked salmon, stur- 
geon, foie gras or Sevruga 
caviar. . 

For those not travelling to 
Ascot for every day of 'The 
meeting, London shopping 
provides -a thousand ways to 
spend thf winnings of the 
previous day. 

Both men and women can 
enjoy a mouth watering 
experience at 66/70 Burling- 
ton Arcade, the double 1 
fronted shop of D L Lord. 
Here is possibly the finest 
collection of exclusive cash- 
meres in the capital. 

For women the range 
includes twin sets with the 
soft murmur o'f discretion, as 
well as cardigans and jumpers 
plus the attractive and ex- 
clusive scarves .of Georgina 
von Etzdorf. Fox men there 
are warm-as-toast dressing 
gowns in cashmtre at £585 
and an assortment of sweat- 
ers, slipovers and cardigans in 
from one to eight, plv. The 
range of colours is often as 
many as a dozen. There arc 
also lightweight alpaca pull- 
overs at £62. 

For sheer discreet sump- 
tuousness few salons can 
compare with Van Cleef & 
Arpds at 153 New • Bond . 


Street. They have rccreatod 
rhe chic of their Ians shop 
and their pieces have U» 
glamour vou expect troth one 
of the world’s great jewellers 
where everything is inventive 

and original. . - 

From June 4 there BW 
exclusive exhibition ft their 
finest pieces in a price range 
from around £250 tor a uni- 
que pistol grip lighter to an 
emerald necklace with a price 
dckci of almost £2 million, j 
Admission is by invitation. 

Another jeweller in Bond 
Street catering for discri- 
minating at No 29 is Holmes, 
whose speciality » antique 
and splendid secondhand jew- 
ellery and silver. On view 
recently was a George III 
silver, rectangular fruit or 
cake basket with a swing 
handle, created by Samuel 
Home! in 1SL? and priced at 
£950. 

Equally rare and unusual 
was a silver mounted and 
decorated coconut cup dated 
1795. Price: £350. 

Another salon where there 
is always an inviting display of 
the finest silver is Marks 
Antiques at 49 Curzon Street. 
Here visitors seeking distinc- 
tive canteens of silver, or 
silver plate, . cutlery will find 
as enormous choice. Nor 
surprisingly, they flock here 
in their hundreds, i have 
never seen the shop-empty. 
Last time I was these l was 
intrigued by a .'pair -df solid 
silver hand cur crystal candle- 
sticks at less than £5?, and by 
a rather more expensive set of 
four .George II sah cellars. 

There is only one problem 
about a visit to ; Marks 
Antiques. You don’t want to 
leave. 


Oriental Ceramics 





} Solveig & Anita Gray , ' 

Ijk . FINE OMENTAL CERAMICS 

•ffi \ Our stock is taterestkig. di fferent, 

fp : constantly changing and -we 

»2 _ fcliiflw hope - utterly desirable. 

We are located right in the centre 
qf town. 3 minutes from Claridges 
JpWl ^ Bond Street. 

GUAYS 

58 DAVIES STREET LONDON Wl 
Tel: 01-727 1655 01408 1638 
Telex: 268312 




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Antique Fair 


THE 
GROSVENOR 
HOUSE 
ANTIQUES 
FAIR 


GROSVENOR HOUSE. PARK LA\T 
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Statistics Index 


AMEX prices P,\4 Eomtaas-renorrs P.14 
AMEX Ugtas/knoP.w Fung rata rafts R.l* 
NYSE prices ■ P.74 Gold markets PJ3 

NYSE nfttanon KM [mens! rates P.13 
Canadian stocks P30 Market ssmrwrv P.u 

Carrancv rates >.13 Ortas PJfl 
VI Canroomnes P.M ore stack ' P.tt 
V DivWmi p.n outer markets P» 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. St ocks 

Report, Page 14. 


FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


** 


Page 13 


TECHNOLOGY 


Advances in Robotics Yield 


More 'Intelligent* Machines 


Insolvent 

HJELBank 


By JOHN HOtCSRA V: - 

NewYorkTbnaSenke .\.V- 

N EW YORK — Two robots arc working together in a 
manufacturing c el l agwwihltng rifl-pi npp units for an 
automobile engine. One uses a rcmotdy moTmted tele- 
vision camera to ‘‘look" at the small castings *h at are 
the top and bottom of the pump housing as" they move along a 
conveyor belt. When it recognizes a bottom part, it readies out, 
picks it up and places it on a fixture. 

Then the other robot, which has acamera mounted on its arm, 
looks for one of the two gcarsthal make up the internal mecha- 
nism of the pomp. Placing one inside the housing, it reaches for 
the other gear and attempts to mesh the two together. - 
If, as often happens, the teeth do notslide together smoothly, a 
senses 1 in the robot arm’s 


“wrist" detects the resistance. 
The robot then wiggles the 
gear, the way a human assem- 
bler would, until the teeth line 
up and the part slips into 
place. The robot “knows” the 
two pieces are fitted together 
property when its arm is ex- 
traded enough for the gear to 
be all the way into the . 

The robots, pirodticed by j 


"A robot is. not a. 
toaster dial-, can * 
be plugged in right 
oat oftbe box.” 



** & 3 C»?.n 


’ V. > 


Technology Inc, are part of a 
demonstration’ at the robotics industry's Robots 9 conference 
held this week in Detroit. '-They are an example of how the 
robotics industry has advanced in just a few years from produc- 
ing relatively simple machines that readied put blindly to move 
an object from place to place or wdd a point in space, to 
sophisticated de vices that are increasingly imitating human 
senses such as sight and touch. 

R OBOT manufacturers hope to convince potential industri- 
al customers that they can add robots to their factories 
without having to tear up their existing processes. 

“In the past, robots were simple, dumb machines,” said Frank 
Bibas, an engineer with Adept, which is a spinoff from Westing- 
house’s Unimation division. “Now if yon go the next slip and 
add vision and force sensing the robot can solve its own prob- 
lems to same extent," hue added. ... 

By having the vision system focused on the conveyor belt, the 
first robot can “recognize" the parts it needs and pick them up, 
no matter winch wot they are pointed. Older, “blind” systems 
required elaborate fmuring systems to present the part to the 
robot at just the right location andwith just the right orientation. 

Putting a camera on thc arm of the second robot helps it place 
the gears accurately. Hie sensor makes sure they fit together 
property and also prevents cross-threading of the scre w s that 
hold the two pieces of the housing together. In the past, robots 
simply went through their routines and if so mething was oat of 
place they either bashed into it or missed it entirely. 

Vision systems and touch-sensitive arms malm robots more 
costly and complex. Bat they also make them much more flexible. 
If a company decides to make something new, all it has to do is 
reprogram the system to recognize and assemble the new parts- 
New fixtures and conveyor lines arc not required. 

Flexibility and adaptability are among the major themes run- 
ning through the robotics industry this year, with many compa- 
nies showing new robots in which grippers or tools on the end of 
an aim can automatically be changed so that multiple tasks can 
be performed unattended, The emphasis is on providing solutions 
to manufacturing problems, rather than just demonstrating a 
; . robot and leaving it up to eaid-aseis to figure out Imw it can be 
V used. - .-.-r v . ' -‘*v- 

Indeed, much of U.S. industry’s hesitancy at moving rapidly ' 
into robotics stems from the difficulty in adapting basic machines 
to individual processes. “A robot is not a toaster,” said Peter A 
Cohen of International Data Gap. “It cannot be phiggedin right 
out of the box and perfonn effectively.” . 

As a result, the robotics industry appears to be splitting into 
(Cootinncton Page 17, Cot I) 


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Markets Qosed 


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Korea, Spun and Austria fw hoBdays. 


Is Oosed 


Action Follows 
2-Month Audit 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — The govern- 
ment on Thursday dosed one of 
Hang Kong’s leading financial in- 
stitutions, Overseas Trust Bank 
Ltd., after the bank declared itself 
insolvent and said police were in- 
v eari paring its hooks. 

SnS H. Bremridge, the fi- 
nancial seoetaiy, said that the ac- 
tion ^ was taken after the bank said h 
was unable to cany on baseness. 

0TB has a widespread branch 
network in Hong Kong and right 
offices abroad, including London, 
San Francisco and Bahrain. 

Sir John said that the Executive 
Council, Hong Kong’s ruling body, 
would meet Friday to discuss the 
bank’s future and measures to pro- 
tect depositors. 


“The bank’s problems go beyond 
4 —. 3 t or misfor- 


tune,” he said. “There are serious 
matters which warrant investiga- 
tion by the Commercial Crimes Bu- 


reau. Thai investigation has al- 
ready begun." 

Sir John said that tire closure 
followed an intensive audit of 
OTB’s books daring the pasL two 
months. The number of OTB de- 
positors was not immediately 
known. 


GM Takes Another Step to Diversify 

Purchase of Hughes Reflects Emphasis on High T ech 


By John Hohisha 

New York Tima Same 

DETROIT — Genera] Motors Corp.’s acquisi- 
tion of Hughes Aircraft Co. is being viewed by 
students of tire auto industry as a major step in 
GNTs long-term plan to diversify into non-auto- 
motive Odds and to improve its competitive posi- 
tion by embracing new technology. 

“GM is redefining the concept of what its indus- 
try is,” observed Professor Malcolm Salter of the 
Harvard Business School “This is a form of relat- 
ed. complementary diversification that makes 
seise. Hughes brings into GM a storehouse of 
useful resources. It’s not US. Steel baying Mara- 
thon 03.” 

The takeover will continue the transformation 
of GM from the technically sluggish, essentially 
one-product company it was at the beginning of 
the decade into one 1 that wfil have about 9 percent 
of its income lmnplmpri to car and truck sales. 

It also underlines GNTs quest for sophisticated 
technology to improve its products and manufac- 
turing efficiency. 

All three of the major U.S. auto companies have 
been eagerly looking to the aerospace industry for 
growth and expertise. Chrysler Corp. announced 
last week that it had purchased an option to buy 20 
percent of the stock of Gulf stream Aerrance 
Corp. and was diseasing a full merger. Ford 
Motor Gtx, one of the losing bidders for Hughes, is 
expected to seek another acquisition in the field 

Auto sales have been strong for the last three 
years, and the record profits of the Iasi two years 
have erased much of the effect of the losses of the 
early 1980s. With bfflions in cash cm hand, the ante 
companies are in a position to boy what they think 
they need 

Among the technologies GM could borrow from 
Hughes are its experience in electronic systems, 

od oontfA nunmals and nranmimi«atinn< aitrilifgy 

GW’s Electronic Data Systems subsidiary, for ex- 



Roger B. Smith 


ample, which it acquired last year in its first big 
diversification, has plans to build a worldwide dm 
communications network. 

Hughes, as one of the world's major producers 
of communications quriiites, could supply the 
essential hardware for the system. 

Advanced composite materials, developed for 
light weight and strength in aerospace applica- 
tions, could end up in automobiles in a relatively 
short time. And Roger B. Smith, the chairman of 
GM, said Hughes would assist in "redefining the 

(Coothned on Page 17, CoL 1) 


U.K. to Widen 


Banking Role 
Of Thrift Units 


. Hong Kong’s stock exchanges 
halted trading in OTB shares short- 
ly before the announcement. 

OTB’s operating profits plum- 
meted to 53 million Hong Kong 
dollars ($ 6.8 million) in the finan- 
cial year ended June 30 from 106 
millio n dollars the previous year. 

The' bank’s ul timate holding 
company is International Consoli- 
dated Investments Ltd. of Hong 
Kang, whose board mainly com- 
prises Singaporean businessmen, 
stock market analysts said. 

Hong Kong does not insure bank 
deposits. 


British Surplus on Trade Narrows 


The government was forced to 
step in to save the Hang Lung Bank 
in September 1983. Banking indus- 
try officials said that they believed 
the government might take similar 
action to protect OTB depositors. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Britain’s seasonal- 
ly adjusted current-account surplus 
narrowed to £123 mOHan ($153.7 
miflioii) in the first quarter of 1985, 
from a revised £373 million in the 
fourth quarter of last year, the Cen- 
tral Statistical Office reported 
Thursday. 

It had been estimated earlier that 
the current account, winch mea- 
sures trade in goods and services as 
weO as interest, dividends and cer- 
tain transfers, would be in deficit 
by £86 million in the first quarter. 

The first-quarter surplus for 
non-merchandise items such as 
toorism and banking was revised to 
£1.47 tnllkm from an initial projec- 
tion of £1 36 billion. 


The statistical office also revised 
die 1984 current-account surplus to 
£624 million from £51 million. This 
compares with a revised 1983 sur- 
plus of £3.25 billion. 

The deficit on merchandise trade 
totaled £1.35 billion in the first 

r ter of 1985, little changed from 
fourth-quarter level of £133 
billion. 

The deficit on non-oil products, 
however, widened to £331 billion 
from £2.79 bQbon. 


The capital account is an ele- 
ment within the balance or pay- 
ments which measures the inward 
and outward flow of investment 
capital 


British portfolio investment 
overseas rose to a record £42 bil- 
lion in (he first quarter, from £2.94 
billion in the fourth, the statistical 
office said. There was a particularly 
marked increase in investment by 
residents other than financial insti- 
tutions, it added. 


Based on preliminary figures, the 
capital account deficit widened to 
£1.05 billion in the first quarter, 
from £845 mill in n in the fourth. 
The figures are not seasonally ad- 
justed. 


Direct investment, both by the 
British private sector in overseas 
affiliates and by overseas residents 
in British affiliates, was unusually 
high in the first quarter, according 
to the statistical office. 


By Bamaby J. Feder 

New York Times Sen-ice 

LONDON — Britain's nonprof- 
it budding societies, the savings- 
bank-Iike institutions which have 
traditionally dominated the coun- 
try’s home-mortgage business, are 
to be granted the power to incorpo- 
rate into profit-making enterprises 
listed on the Stock Exchange and 
engage in a wide variety of banking 
activities, the government said 
Thursday. 

The new activities open to the 
societies will indude tne granting 
of personal loans, ownership of 
land, real estate services, insurance 
broking, securities dealing, money 
transmission, foreign currency 
dealing, credit cards, bill payments, 
structural surveying services and 
the opening of subsidiaries in other 
European Community nations. 

. The changes are intended to 
make it easier for the societies to 
compete with commercial banks, 
which have snapped up an estimat- 
ed 20 percent of the home-mort- 
gage market since 1980, a Treasury 
official said. 

Nevertheless, the government 
wants the societies to continue to 
concentrate primarily on the bo roe- 
mortgage market and has set limits 
on bow much they may risk in 
other activities. Ninety percent of 
their loans wiH have to be secured 
by owner-occupied properly. 

“We are not about to rush bead- 
long into wholesale deregulation," 
said Ian Stewart, economic secre- 
tary to the Treasury, in a speech 
outlining the govemnrent's plans to 
baflding society officials at a con- 
ference in Eastbourne, England. 
Mr. Stewart said that legislation 
allowing the proposed changes to 
go into effect Jan. 1, 1987, would be 
introduced late this year or early in 
1986. 

One impact of the changes could 
be the takeover of budding societ- 
ies by British or foreign banks at- 
tracted by the societies’ large retail 
base and reputation for being clos- 
er to consumers than commercial 
banks. 

The Halifax Budding Society, 
Britain’s largest in terms of assets, 
has over 640 outlets, and second- 
ranked Abbey National almost 


680. In total the societies have over 
38 million savings accounts and sl\ 
million borrowers. 

Such U.S. banks as Citibank, 
Bank of America and Chase Man- 
hattan have set their sights on Brit- 
ain for an expansion of their retail 
banking operations. All three have 
a growing stake in the British 
home-mon gage market. 

Before any takeovers could oc- 
cur, the societies would have to 
convert from the mutual society 
form they have developed over the 
past 150 years into limited liability 
companies with publicly traded 
shares. Analysts here say that such 
conversions are inevitable given the 
increasingly bitter competition for 
funds between the societies, the 
banks and the state-owned Nation- 
al Savings Bank. 

The proposed changes generally 
follow those outlined m a govern- 
ment discussion paper last July. 


t/.S. Dollar Slips 
InNewYork 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
drifted Thursday in New York 
to dose mostly lower as dealers 
watched for unemployment fig- 
ures and any move by the Fed- 
eral Reserve to reduce its dis- 


count rate. 

Currency dealers said that if 
U.S. jobless figures to be re- 
leased Friday show a weaken- 
ing in unemployment, the Fed 
might be prompted to reduce 
the discount rate K-ptnnt, to 7 

percent. 

The British pound, which fed 
to $12685 Wednesday after 
Britain announced a cut in 
crude oil prices, recovered 
slightly to $12750 Thursday. 
Other late dollar rates in New 
York, compared with Wednes- 
day's rate, included: 3.056 
Deutsche marks, down from 
3.057; 9330 French francs, up 
from 9315; 2372 Swiss francs, 
up from 2569; and 3.448 
guilders, up freon 3.4475. 


OECD Doubts Welfare 


Destroys Will to Work 


By Carl Gcwirtz 

. International Herald Tribute 

PARIS — The widespread view 
that overly generous government 
welfare programs are eroding the 
will to work, save and invest was 
challenged Thursday by the Orga- 
nization for Cooperation and De- 
velopment. 

Its 240-page study, “The Role of 
the Public Sector,” does not openly 
attack the “supply-side" theory of 
economics — introduced by the 


increased acceptance in Western 
Europe — but dearly challenges 
basic assumptions about the effect 
tKjit an ever-increasing public sec- 
tor has on the capitalist ethic. 

Supply-side economics holds 
that a government can stimulate 
the economy and thus raise tax 
revenues by cutting taxes. 

The rMHXt asserts that: 

• While the evidence indicates 
tendencies for higher unemploy- 
ment benefits to create problems 
through sane flle^iiimate dainut 
and some increase m the duration 
of unemployment, the magnitude 
of these effects is too small to have 
been a major factor in the rise in 
mtematoyment after 1979. ' 

• The minority of empirical 
studies suggest that the work be- 
havior of many types of workers is 
httle affected by tax consider- 
ations. The group shown to be most 
sensitive to tax changes is married 
women, who rep resent the fastest- 
growing segment of most nations' 
Labor forces. 

• The bulk of evidence does not 
support the view that increased 


Japan GNP Seen 
Topping Target 


Routers 


TOKYO — Real growth in 
Japan’s gross national product 
far -the year ending March 31 is 
estimated to have slightly ex- 
ceeded the government target 
of 53 percait, a senior Eco- 
nomic Planning Agengy official 
told Parliament on Thursday. 

Aldnori Martuno, counselor 
of the agency’s coordination 
bureau, said that GNP data for 
1984-85 are expected to be re- 
leased later this month. GNP 
measures the total value of a 

nation’s gpods and services, in- 
cluding income from foreign In- 
vestments. 

The 53-percent goal com- 
pares with real growth of 5 ? 
percent in the 1984 cal^ndai 
year and 3.9 percent in the year 
ending March. 31, 1984. The 
government has estimated 
GNP- growth of 4.6 percent for 
the year ending March 31, 1986. 


spending on public penaons has 
substantially reduced household 
savings for retirement 

• Analysis of the effects erf tax- 
ation on savings and investment 
decisions points to only modest 
disincentive effects. 

On taxes generally, the report 
says that middle-income people 
“broadly receive back” in benefits 
what they pay in taxes. 

The think of the report, howev- 
er, supports the view that the gov- 
ernment share of tire economy in 
the major industrial narirmy has 
swelled beyond their means to sup- 
port it. 

Public sector spending in 1982 
averaged 47 percait of gross na- 
tional product in the major Indus- 
trialized countries, a rise of more 
than 20 percentage points since 
I960. The report says (his rise is 
partly due to deuMgraphic factors 
and rex control GNP is the widest 
measure erf a nation’s output of 
goods and services. 

But with tire sharp decline in 
economic growth, fina n cing of the 
public sector — largely through 
government borrowing — has be- 
come a major constraint on eco- 
nomic policy. 

The OECD says “structural” 
budget deficits of a sustained na- 
ture “appear to have affected fi- 
nancial market expectations and 
put considerable upward pressure 
on interest rates.” This in turn has 
redneed longer-term output expec- 
tations of business. 

“The resulting direct and indi- 
rect crowding-out effects have then 
been accompanied by rising gov- 
ernment interest payments, which 
put further upward pressure on the 
deficit,* the report says. "This in- 
teractive process tiros 


financing difficulties and nas im- 
peded the flexibility of overall bud- 
getary and fiscal policies to a de- 
gree which is a matte of concern.” 

While the OECD supports 
streamfining of the public sector, H 
also says it is “extremely difficult” 
to assess objectively the economic 
consequences of the broad range of 
public sector activities. Tbis, the 
repot says, “it would be regretta- 
ble if the future role of die public 
sector were to be decided soldy on 
the basis of those more quantifiable 
economic effects." 

On average, over half of govern- 
ment spending goes to redistribut- 
ing income through such items as 
subsidies, social security benefits, 
social assistance grants and interest 
payments. Investment spending 
has remained constant at just be- 
low 15 percent of total outlays, 

The study says some gover nmen t 
programs “may simply have out- 


lived their usefulness"* and other 


services may better be provided by 
tamin g to private enterprise, al- 
though “the gains from privatiza- 
tion may be smaB or nonexistent.” 



For exceptional service 


in private banking 




i 





Page 14 


usternational hebald tmbuihe, Friday, june 7, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 1 

VoL High Low Lost Oe. 


30V. 3 0* 

34 Vu 334b 
74b. 72% 

am mw 

x* im 

454k 44* 
34% 33* 
31 30 V> 
129* 1374k 
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5114 aiVk 
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101 971* 

514k 51 
im 284b 


X* -M 

34 +14 

7444 +2% 
3114 + tk 
20 

45% + % 

3414+44 

30% — 4k 
129V +114 
8544 -3k 
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M04h +1H 
514k — 14 
29 - » 


Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 1317J0 133053 131154 132750 + 472 . 

Trans 0S179 6*351 64756 *59 X3 + 4X3 

UNI 14X21 16*39 16124 163X8 + 006 

Comp 54355 3*950 54056 511.12 + 286 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE index 


CMumnt 

industrials 

Tranw. 

UNI1H4* 

I Fhana 


High Low CM® CW* 

im 

11J73 110JS 119J2 +M7 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y^ 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages] 


Bonds 

UIIHtlM 

industrials 


12 Month 

High Low Slock 


23% 1* 

18% 9% 

16% 9% 

21% 13b. 

481k 24* 

21% 18% 

33 19 

A5U 46% 

27 14% 

25% 16 
57* 36% 

2S% 17% 

19% 12% 

10% 7% 

17% 15 

20 11* 

19% 8% 

2Slk 
6% 

9 

Z7* 

52% 

17% 

2% Allocfl 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total issues 
Now HKtfn 
New Lows 
volume up 
votatnodawn 


896 990 

706 633 

438 430 

2040 2055 

ZB 322 

20 19 

65.7711 1 1 ** 

37«W» 


*vt Sates ■SD'rt 


JunoS 

J .**i — KSw l«3» 

jjS?A — S£l7D 460® 

V|^ud4ta lit 1h» sales Mures 


Hursdio|_ 

N1SE 

Closing 


VoLatOPJA 117, man 

Prc9.4PJA.voL mow* 

Pm conMlWoted doe T7139MN 

Tables Indude the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall street and 
do not reflect late Trade* elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 

DaCflnod 
Unchanged 
Total lwn 
Now Highs 
New Lews 
VUunwim 

vokmodown 


Composite 

Industrial 5 

Finance 

insurone* 

utilities 

Banks 

Trcw* 


MA SDAOindex. 


WNk Ytar 
c b v Abo a»o 

illl 

iriii 


- 7^ x fltojt Acwy^ 


BAtin 

g5S?5 

SJchg" 

SSoh' 

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SwCra, 

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Tuscan 

Ptat-w 


^ H»h W- ^ CB * 

SS £ 'K 

*5 fS ^ Iw 

iS’S Ti !« - 
!S •! -» S •>* 
i ” S *»- » 




Standard & Poor’s Index 


KMI Law daso CVM 
Industrials 211.13 XUS 211-73 +1 M 

TwSSl IJO.13 16MJ 170.13 +M3 

umttles 5H5 5KS toflT 

ciwmm Tin nil ZU6 tMr 

g£S£ta I9L06 139.13 IflJdk +090 


AM EX Sales, 


iPJVLVOhKTW 

prov.4PJ«.*»IWW 

Prow. eons, vataune 


Bjoaaoo 

,B8B 


tmex stojkia^- 


sis. a%* 

Olv. YIH. PE HSttHtah LOW Quat. 01*00 


M 2X 15 146 20% 19% 19* + % 
12 50 13% 13% }3%-% 

4 10% ink 10* + % 
JO 16 55 BM 1914 18% 19% + % 

11 3726 47% 46 47% +1 

111 95 -a 22 21% 22 + * 

2.12 107 2 19% W6 I** 


uiu -n = »+ « siroogucarui 

’S 2M im S% ** day, overcom 

3^ idj 'a ™ ™ t £ Analysts s 

.’A + & coming as it 

m 23 nia i-j* ’fS been getting I 

jib 3.9 io i ffi £? ,|£ e*^“**s 

6 32 !Sir™-» TbcEtoW 
■sot lo 17 96 10% io% ta% + ^ which was ofi 

W 1J „ •% ,SS nSttS going, closed 

254 SJ 34 1723 469. 45% 4614 UUK on the N 

1S ^ SU S* »%=% 117.2 million 


NYSE Rebounds FromWeak Start 

. US. Money Supply Bines 


12 Month 
Utah Law ■ Slot* 


Dlu- YM. PE wmmnbLowQuot.Oitae 


NEW YORK — The stock market came on 
-^^»Kp.Hrw^fnnnsL«eordhiehsTliurS' 


SrSSwrwSlypn>r.i-t*ing. nrA T^JT- 

isAsswis? SmsssS' 


losco wim a v.t a &uu , r - .i,.^ cuneocY 


38% AlrPrd 150 25 12 
13 AlrbFrt 40 17 « 
I AIMOOS _ ... 73 
20% AUPpfASg 125 
6* AlaPdot ^ Jl.l 
61% AWPrf 9X0 11 J 
illjAloPPf 9A4 11X 
57 AlaPet J.16 115 
56 AlaPPt 858 120 


E 4M -m* o% s% + % Wednesday. 


117.2 millioa shares, down from 143.9 million 


*7 23 22% 22% — 14 
T2 J2* 31% + % 


checks and checking deposits. 

For the latest 13 weeks, M-l has averaged 
$575.7 billion, a 9.4-percent seasonally a^rnted 


6i% SiS'ppt' 9X0 iix ^ g? si 7 S markets early Thursday. Interest rates on Trea- bewera 4 percent ana / percent mnu iwiounn 

Aggg XI \}i ^ mt 73% 2 * sury bills and bonds rose slighUy. Dedimng quarlcr 0 f 1984 through the fourth quarter of 

S’ ^ ^ ^ ^ K SSt^nStet^SjSi-l^Se. 0 ™* 

I ^'ipjiS! U a— - -a—aaajraj- 

ul & Bt W% BX + a . _t ro^tl% to 1»%, Hewlen-Packardm 


Analysts said traders were apparently intent rate 0 f gain from the previous 13 weeks, 

i taking profits in both the stock and- bond has said it would like to see M-l grow 


t and 7 percent from the fourth 
through the fourth quarter of 


17% 1114 Etatn X0 15 16 17 14% 

15 5% Etodnt 1C1 7 

7814 59 EmnEI 260 36 13 1401 7W 
14% 6% Era Rod JMt 7X 14 455 1»> 

20% 11% BrnryA A 23 13 293 17% 

32* 24% Entart IXOb 5X 9 84 2t 

22 15 CnwO* 1JS U J » 21% 

5 4 Emppf JO 103 600r 4% 

% EnExc 106 

32% 22% Eng IQs J2 23 9 312 Vtk 

38* 18* EntsBu 36 13 13 20 3714 

29% 17% ErawXh 1J0 63 18 44$ 26% 

Its 91% EmdipfllJBallJ 144 101% 

Zttfc 20% ensExn . 3M 2C% 

2 % mEnnt M OT 2 * 

K 9% Eotara 73 HM 

20 15% EntxEn TX7M1J> 58 17 

21% 16 Entocln 130 74 11 304 18% 

32% 17% Eoufxi \M U 17 5 31% 

« 3* Equlmk 102 6% 

2D 11% EqmkBf 2J1 TU 16 19* 

49% 28% EdtlkBS in U 8 1664 47% 

14* 9% Earn ten J2 S V 376 W 

14% 9* Erbttht JO 24 13 X m 

22% 12* EnBan X U « Ml * 

28* 18* EsnxC ' XOb 28 15 33 28* 

31% 1414 Estrta* 32 W 11 220 17% 

24 10* Ethyls J6 24 13 315 23% 

6% I* YlEvtmP Q 2Jk 

9% 2* vIEwanpf ® »k 

41* 30 exoto L72 *4 10 176 37* 

17* 13* Cxculsr 1X401&9 26 17* 

54* 38 Exxon 340 64 1 10159 51* 


14% 

6% 

71 * 

12% + * 
17% 

28 + * 
21*-% 
4% — * 
Vt 

24%—% 
J4%— * 
26% + % 
101 % + * , 
2D% I 
2% 

10 % 

17 + * 

18 % 

31% + % 
6V. — * 
T9W— % 
47*— % 
14 + * 

12 *- * 
22% + * 
28% + * 
18 %— * 
23%- % 
2% 

2% + % 

37* + * 
17 % 

51* — * 


gSSlSSfp. STig - J as s* ^k + % my tha 
«8!5'-, IT, & *2 3% »* a decline. 


12 97% 97% 97% + * 


jpksis 

iff* Alglnl ijo « *2 w. M S*_ * 

ESM.'MiBS:** 

aSS’p. is iu 8 .Ss,^ iSs= S 

aa AJdCDDtl2X0 10.9 31 109% l yf" JzSzT It 

%5as ”” 8 

20 fflSf 1X4 63 9 25 ^ + £ 

WkAHnpl X50 2X 1 «4 TV 124 -% 


technology 


‘i£^%1%^* + % U99J6 they reached in early March. From the shares rose # to 15 3 A 
, ^ S5 T 5 * start of the bull market in August 1982, the I]V4 . 

i as* 36% 36*- * averaee has soared 5 SO points, or more than 70 RetaHinz issues wer 


and Dataproducts M to 


a?* 3i*= % average has soared 550 points, 
^ T P«^L 


«*• !■*“ rr vSi Til 121 % VJCUCI«U muiutj WUJ a JI461UHIUI 

•RE®? 150 “ , IkiS trading, junqjing 2% to 74%. On ^ 

53 * a Brand 3xosj9OT48b.68 *8% + + company was declared the wmn 
ISiSSSS “ .. J.K?.HS.®Ta drag lo acqmt Hughes AircrafL 

56% ABdcsl 140 14 17 'llS’JIft ’ll*— * 

IS i? « B S S-* , 2 M«ta 


Retailing issues were steady to slightly higher 
as major companies in the industry pasted 
mixed sales for May. Sears Roebuck added 'A to 
39 J.C. Penney % to 51% and Kmart % to 39%. 

H&R Block rose £ to 58V&, trading at record 
highs. 


¥, SSSrt xoo 6X J SB* 32a ££ + * 86 1» 


SK CJosa 

Dlv. YkL PE loaaHtah LowOunt. Chge 


17 Month 
High Low Stock 


Sts. Close 

Dtv. YM. PE IQQsHIntiLowOiMtOrtie 


16% ACoeBd 2JO 107 
25% ACopCw 231e 83 
6% ACmtC 222 


76 20* 20% 20% 1 

11 30* 30% 30% + % 
17 8% 8% 


43% ACvon 130 IS 13 861 54* 52* 54* +1% 

18% ADT 32 33 23 « SS 55£ n£ + * 

1A AELPw 7J26a 97 9 3U9 23% 23W Zm + w 

25 AmExO L2B 2J 16 4988 47* 46* 47* 

9% AFanllS M 22 14 468 21* 21* 21% — % 

19* AGoCp 1X0 W 10 1794 34* 34 3flk- * 

6* AGnlWt 194 14% 14% 14% + * 

51% AGnl P<A 6J4all J 6ffi OT; 5Mk 53% + % 

58% AGnl pf B 5X7e 6J 999 «k »1* m— % 
44% AGn ipF 3J5 4J S JBt Wk jSS + 5 

. . _ 40* AGn pfD 144 19 274 60* 68* 68* — * 

33% S* SSrit I JO 15 10 3 34 34 34 + * 

64* Am%) 6X0 7J 9 1773 92% 91* 92* + % 

^ 4.1 24 *SlS*l5f fc l8» + * 

M M AMf “ « 12 13W 24% 24% 2AJ- * 

■&* 1 ii%APmds .12, X g lklg-S + | 
13* 5 ASLFIn 7 594 8% .7% .7* + % 


3V, 2% AmMot 3 62 3 

29 16% APtwd » .121 4 B47 IWb 

13% 5 ASLFIa 7 594 BV. 

12* ASLFIptl.19 147 183 15* 

10% AStllU JO 7X 9 104 11* 
22* AmSM 1X0 5.1 10 210 31* 
26% Am Star X4 IX II 692 61% 


46% AStrplA 4J8 62 

G AStrafB 6X0 1L9 15 

AT&T 1JD SX 18 9073 

40 30% AT&T Of 3X4 9J> SSI 

41 31% AT&T pf 3J4 9.1 1220 

27% IS AWalrs 1-fi B « 
12% 10 AWatPt 1-25 10X 320 

12% 10 AWaSof 1.25 ma 20a 

28% 19% AlhHotl 240 11 J 9 246 
71* 54% ATrPr 5X4 6.1 37 

17 4* ATrSc M 

84 59 ATrUn SXJ 6X 10 

36 26% A moron 1X0 4A 8 6 

m 20%AmoaO* JO A 23 270 


847 19* 10* 19* + * 
594 8% 7% 7* + % 

181 15* 14% 14% — * 
104 11* 11* 11%— % 
210 31* 30* 31%-* 
6192 61% 60% 61% + % 


15 57% 56% S* + % 

SJLSSSJ:!! 
iKPIta I ~ 

lffaS=i CW 

10 86 86 86 J, 1 ? ** 


.10 A 26 372 
IJ2 19 11 716 

.92 40 10 2504 

124 7.9 8 194 
8X8 no nm 
1.17 18X 59 

1X6 10J 32 

J2 3J 8 1584 
1X0 SX 11 150 

1X8 3.1 17 3095 
1X00 66 7 201 
749 
■ 458 

1J2 55 23 157 

8.12 7X I 89 
355 11X 34 

JO X 9 12 

IJ6 4X 19 669 
1X0 2J 17 627 
1J» 2X 9 11« 
-52 IX 15 274 

» « 8 8 

2.16 MX 41 

13 55 

1X4 62 74 385 

1X0 2X 8 682 
JS BX 3 
112 9X 4 
5u56all.l 86 

X4 15 13 «0 
260 4.1 11 4294 
X2 2J97 iTJ 

1JH 265 



24*— 1* 
39% — * 

*7% + % 
41% + % 
79% + % 
ID* + % 
13% — % 
22 - % 
20 * + % 
60% — Hi 
27% 

19* + M 
3% + * 
34% + * 
40 + * 

36 + * 

21 * 

29% +1 
49*— % 
38 + % 

32*— * 
17*— % 
19* +* 
18*— * 
26% — % 
58* + * 
6* + % 
22* 

50% 

12* + * 
£2% + * 
19%—* 
1%— Vk 
3*—* 


13 CwEpf 1X0 11.1 
13% CwEPt 2X0 10X 
18* CwE pi 237 10X 
20% CwE Pf 2X7 11X 
54% CwE P< 8X0 11 J 
46 CwEpf 7J4 11J 
17* CamES 3J2 BX 


44 17* 
23 IB* 
1 23* 
1 36 
90Qz 73* 
280z 62 
27 27* 


am Comsat 1J0 15 11 1577 34% 

21* CPsvc S 29 -B 36 1215 34% 

26 Camper XO 2J 9 n 27% 

11 CompSc 8 M 16% 

13% CPMfl ,, « » 13* 

22% ConAs b SO 25 16 139 35 
13* conalr J4b IX U 72 24* 
IM cSSe 1X0 BX 9 20 IB* 

19% CnnNG 2X0 BX 9 X JO 

1|M Conroe M 3X 6 4 13* 


24* Com Ed 2X0 4J 8 I3S[ 36 


17% + % 
18M + * 
23*— % 
36 + % 

73* +1* 
63 +1 
26*— * 

34 +1% 
34*— % 
36*— % 
16* + * 
13* + % 

35 — % 

*U3& 

iB% + % 
29* +* 
13* 

35% 35* 


38% ConEpt 500 104 


<3 48% 48% 48%—% 


20% CnsFrts 1.10 34 11 404 32% 31* ^*— % 


IXOa 5X 11 239 23% 23% j 

300 2X 19 12« 113%U1%1 


8 6 34* 3«k 3«fc 

23 270 48 47% 47* + % 


48 20% AmOSOS 20 A 23 270 48 -OW 47* 

29% 22% Amatak XO 30 14 90 M% 2gk 

27% 18% AlffltaC . ,2 “£ Bg* 

16 6% Amtasc . 4 W 6% 6* 


50* Amoco IX U I 2191 


38% 26% AMP 
24 11% Amoco 

20% 12* Amreps 


31% 19% AmSIh 1X0 4J 


.72 2J 17 9860 


“*5^^ + * 
§%^g -% 
m io% m* 


32% 23% CIGpf 
51% 50% CIGpf 
7% 2% CLC 
54 31% CNA Fn 

11% IlkCNAI . 


CIGNA 2X0 47 68 1184x55* 54* 


62x31 3K* 30% 

850 51% 51 51 

5 3* 3* 3* 

16 224 53 52 53* 


51*- % 
3* + * 
53*—* 


31 CnsNG 232 SX 9 KB 43 

4% ConsPW IS 527 4* 

13 CnPpfA 416 139 41te31 

25% CnPpfE 772 14X 95? £> 

25 CnPpfG 776 149 57Dz 

11% CnPprV 4X0 1SX 81 28% 

9* CnP prU 360 15J 50 24 

10* CnPprT 378 15.1 J* 

25* CnPpfH 7X8 14J 600r 53 

11* CnPprR 4X0 15.1 I™ W% 
10* CnPprP 358 15J 29 26* 

10V. CnPprN 3X5 14X 45 26 

7* CflPprM2XD 137 13 18* 

7 CnPprL 233 1X6 X 1* 

11 CnPprS 4X2 153 39 26% 

7* CnPprK 2X3 130 21 ink 

21% CntICp 240 U 22 417 45% 
4% Conti II 92 7% 

* Conti! rf S3» 

12 CntlllPf * 

* CtllHdn _ 235 

4% Cntlnfo 9 1S90 

18* ContTP l 1X0 7J 9 965 
24% CtOota 72 23 1J» 

25* Canwd 1.10 3X 11 146 


9 6S8 43 42* 42% + Vk 

15 527 6* 6% 6% 

410X31 m 30 +1% 

WeS3 52V. 53 

^^s*s%=S 

rjfe53 52% S3 +1 
110 25% 26 26% 

29 25* 26 26 

45 26 25% ~ 


5* FH Kid .15P U 9 11 

«6 FMC 22D X4 39 115 

17* FPL GP 1X6 7X 9 99* 

9* PabCb- J8 ZX 25 177 

9% Facet 7 21 

14% PalrtM X0 SJ 138 

33% Fatrcpf 3X0 9X 45 

10 Fnlrfd X U U 1B1 

12 FamDIl JO X 25 1158 

13% Fbnstal X0 19 a 3* 

23 FrWstF * 3 

14* Forth M 46 8 M4 

ff% FoyOrg JO 10 17 »0 

4V. Fodors IHe J 8 337 

29* FedlCo 1X4 47 8 312 

31* PedExp 34 IBS 

31% FdHmpf 24 

29% FtfMoo 1X2 4.1 11 » 

10% PpdKM JO X 2970 

16* FodPBl 70 37 7 52 

25% FPnppf 2J1 «X 157 

16 FodRU 1X4 &6 14 46 

13% FdSgal XO 4J IS 68 

44* FedDSI 254 2J 9 1172 
22* Ferro TJD 40 14 41 

25* FMat 2X0 7J 12 73 

4 FlrrCpA X51 1874 

3% RnCppf M 11X 1® 

U* FlnCnpt 673P19X 49 

2% FnSBar 125 

16% Ftrasta XO 18 10 1887 

12* FtAHS X8 3J 8 341 

21* FtBkSy 1X0 4J 8 136 

25% FBkFla US 37 12 8 

36% FBost 1-20 IX U OS 

IB* FstChlc 1-32 5X 28 366 

70 FCMpfBSXSallX 
11% FtBTex 1J0 10X 9 MB 
37* FtBTlcpf 5X60157 3 

36% FtBT* Pf 5X8elS7 1 

lOTk FFedAx JOC U 7 160 

35 SS S 3 

21 Pltastpf 2J7 7J 596 

7* FTMCa 24 17 t 3° 

16 FlNotnn 15 177 

4% FstPa 764 

20U FstPa Pf 2X2 9J 2 

26* FttlnRI 1X6 6X 16 78 

14% FtVaSk. X8 15 W lg 
16 FlWtac 1 JO 45 6 23 

45% FVYteciH 625 11X 1200: 

3SS% Ffachb 1X0 3X419 37 

8* FBhFcl jOS« J IK 

20* FltFnGs 1J2 35 9 if 

42%FhFpl 4560 *X _ 2509 
14% FHtalEn J6 17 9 120 

23% Ftanna 1X0 24 14 im 

23% FlexlV JO 15 13 18 

10* Flexl pt 1X1 12X U 

14% FtohtSf 3 72 325 

14* FloatPt 15 4SJ 

29% FtoEC .160 X 14 3 

18* FloPrg 2.16 7 A 10 852 
11* FlaSR XO 2X 16 15 

3* FlwGan <g? 

11* Ftawrs a 14 17 » 


n it* m nj-b 


57 12* 17 
394 19% 18 
91 31* 31 


43% 25* Amitaf 1X0 3X 14 221 42* 42 
4* I* Anaonp M 3% 7 

24% 16* An logs 17 840 19% IB 

30* 19* Anchor 1X8 63 353 23b. 23 


42* 25% An Clay 

12 * 9 * AndrGr JO 17 15 « n% Mb 

24 % 17 Anaollc XO 16 13 743 23 % M 

93 62 % Anhaua 2 X 0 Z 3 12 2550 91 % 90 % 

31 % 20 * Anlwuwrt « 30 % mvi 

65 47 V, AntwuPf 3 X 0 SX 552 

19 * 13 % Anlxtr -28 1.9 18 B 7 14 % 14 * 

16 % 8 % Anthem X 4 X 13 296 11 lMfc 

15 >A 10 % Anfhny X 4 b 35 8 8 l»k 1 » 

13 % 9 * Apoctw J 8 25 11 126 11 * 11 * 

2 * % ApchP wt 2 W 1 % 1 % 

19 % 15 % APCflP UTT 2.10 11.1 321 19 IBM 

70 % 55 % ApPwpf 8.12 1 IX MS£t 71 70 


64% SO ApPwpf 7X0 11.9 
32% 27* ApPw pf 4.18 12X 
30% 26 ApPwpf 3X0. 17X 


15 9 91 31* 31 31 * + % 

LB 14 221 42* 42 42 — * 

242 3% 3* 3% + * 

17 840 19% 18* 19% „ 

63 353 23% 23* 23% + * 

1J2 3X 34 276 » 38* 38*— % 

JO 17 IS 43 11* 11* 11% + * 

2X 13 24323*23 23% + % 

22 12 2550 91% 90% SIS - 5 

63 30% 30% 30%—* 

SX SB7 64% 64* 64% — % 

IX 18 S37 14% 14* J4%— * 

X 13 294 11 10* 11 — Jk 

15 8 8 12* 12* 12*— Mi 

2J 11 126 11* 11* 11* 

293 1* 1% 1% 

11.1 321 19 IBM 18% 

I IX ifflU 71 W Ti +1 

11.9 l«ta44 62 62 —2* 

I2X 9 32% 32% 32% + * 

I2X 2 30 29% 19% — * 


11% B% CNAI 1JM107 51 ink 11* 

44* 35 CPC lilt 2JD 5.1 11 1»® «% 

23* 14* CP Ntl 1X0 6J 9 56 21% 21% 

22* 19% CRIIMI 2X70 9J 336 22 21* 

27* 18* CSX l.M 44 * »«> 


«!% 24 CTS 1X0 3A 

12% 7* Cline 

33% 22* Cabot .92 3X 

14* 8* Coosar 

23* 11* CalFod XB 2.1 

50% 22* CalFdpf 475 9X 


1X0 65 9 56 21% 21% 21% % 

2X7o 9J 336 22 21* 21* — % I 

1J4 44 9 6644 26% MM 34% + * i 

1X0 XO 122 34 33* CTk— % 

28 179 8* 8 8* 

.92 3X 9 578 27* 26% 27* + % 
15 1105 13% 13* 13% — * 
XB 2.1 8 1230 OT4 K OTA— * 
475 9X 26S0%50*5W + * 


1 viCoOkU 
27 Caapr 1-52 
30 Cooplpf 2X0 
12% CaapLb 


85 

S 14 1578 

63 36% 
3 7110 13% 


20% 1 3V* Collhn 2Sh 33 Wk jjk- JJ 

17* II* Canwnt .12 3 SZ7 }3Vi 13* IgA + * 

28 15* CRLkg ^30 m 2Wk 20% 20* + % 

8% 3* CmpRo .161 77 3* 3% JJk— 

14% 10* CPRpffl 11 IWi Igft lWk— * 

76% 56 CamBP 2J0 33 12 2249 76 75% «*— * 

47* 28* GdPoca 1X0 m W 4«4 47 

15% 14* CdPOCWf 72 lHk 15% 1» 

22* 14* CanPEg XO 

223 147% CaoCtti JO 21 IM 225 221 2WVJ -Wlji 

15% cSldS 77 3-1 « + 9 

iiib in carl no 0 jtf 33 IUI !• 

40* 26 Sriffio" w u 10 w M EE “ + * 
26% 15% CdrtFt XO 17 II « 23* 24_. +* 


33* 34 + * 
23* 34 +* 


39% IT* APIDta 1761 5J 18 yo 34 _ 33% 33%—% 


513 13% 13* l: 


23* 15* Arch Dn ,14b X 15 1819 OTk mj 


30* 23% ArlPpI 3X1 12X 

102 79 AliPpf 1070 107 

23* 14 Ark Bet XO IX 

24% 16 Arxta 1X8 5.1 

A, % ArtnRt 
12% 11% Armada 
16% 6* Armco 
Bit IJVj Armcof 2.10 11.1 


13*— % 
23% + % 


9* 19* CarPw 2X0 9X 7 1097 2% »k 2B4 
2S% 19* CarP Pt 2X7 105 7 25* 25* 2SH + * 


351 13X 44 30* 29% 29% 

070 107 SttrtOO 180 WO — 1 ! 

X II I 112 21 * 21 % Zl* + * 
1X8 5.1 70 1925 21* 20* 21% — * 

282 5k 5k 

13 11* 11* 11% + % 

761 0* 0* 8* 

110 11.1 25 19* 19 I?.. .. 


25% 19* CarP Pt 2X7 105 7 25* 25* 2S* f * 

M ££ SJt« 2.10 5J 10 777 OTA 37% 38% + % 

11% 7% Corral X7 X 11 B 8% B% 

48* 31* CnruPIr 1J£ « * ’S 22 S S? + £ 

30* 18* OortHw 1J2 4J 11 453 29* » 2K — 14 


12* COprTr XO 2.1 8 153 19% 

15 Coopwtl XO 1J 19 1151 M 

11* Copwld X4 IX 18 iMk 

19* CpwMpf 2X8 lU 1 » 

17% Cordure X4 3X 16 200 24 

10* Cataln -M 47 1 12 12 

30* CornGs 1^ JO 18 1371 «% 

s%s; B cS. »s **23 

32* Cram IXOb 4X 10 97 

41 CrayRi 17 971 

is* CrtkNpfaia 11X i 

50% CrekN pf , , „ Bff 
18* CrmoK 1 JO SX II 36 

35% CrwnCk „ }4 IB 

27* CrwZol 1X0 2J 16 614 

43* CrZelpf 4X3 9X 198 
SO CrZelpKXSO 7X 28 
2D* Cul bro XO 27 W 7 

15% CulbMlO __ 33 19W 

60% Cum Ed 2J0 12 4 503 

a* Currlnc 1.100(107 24 

30* CurtW 1J0 3X 13 10 

27% Cvdopa 1.10 2J ID 4 


?r 

17* + * 
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rts 

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18% — * 
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60% + * 
40* 

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60% — * 
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800 % PROFITS andthe“gK ^^H^^^ 

sSSSSSjf ' §« 

America's “Lost Generation"; romantic malcontents wr u. . 

^ Th^quatted, noton motor-bikes. but on benches In the "Bois“; contempt ^ 

P lSl S infinrtdy more diverting it 

Balzac, instead of listening to the purrmgs of ^nerono y essing the Crazy Horae 

,riumph ^ M 

swallowed up inthe cement quick-sand of the New yotk ©roc* 

Great Depression. lA . ..,„ 9r the nji were under 200 , when 

They matured after the second WoiWflter^^n opjnion as aivwrya, 

prevailing opinion scorned a market ntetemojpnojis. j^ e DOW to 1300 . 

was wrong; the “revolution of ih e DOW was under 800 . we 

enroute, in our contrarian view J? or berterjflmen^ HiTTlNG 

defied the “Street" predicting that the OM JMLL touuji.uw negation of 

situation", that vaulted 800 % in a brief time-span. 

For your complimentary copy, please wnteto.^or telephone- 

CAPITAL” “ “^ 1 ^r u " ,COTre, ‘ ,,a ” te | 

H GAINS * i 

RESEARCH Phone: (020) 27 SI 81 Telex: 18536 


Name: 


- -t 


Address: 


I Phone: 


Paa paifomtanca does not guarartoo luluro raouHs 


12 Month 
HtahLaw 

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1 






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BUSINESS ROUNDUP 




s "CRA 2 y 




By Dinah lie’ 

*1 International Hertdd Tribune 

HONG KONG Jardine 
^ Matheson Holdings plaosto auo- 
^ lion off two properties in Hawaii 
s. next month as part of its efforts to 
improve earnings, the cennpeoy’s 
x. chainnan, Simon Keswick, told 
, ' shareholders Thursday. 

Jardine also nayscDprepcrties 
\>n London and Bong Kohg later 
this year. Mr. Keswick said at the 
giant shipping and trading compa- 
ny’s annual meeting. ' •, 

Since Jardine announced In 
March that it would withdraw from 
uF all shipping operations, it has whit- 
tied its fleet to. 16 ships from 20. 
Mr. Keswick - said : that Jardine 
would hold only 10 ships by the 
■ end of this year ? n d complete the 
pullout in about two 


• Vr- 

" . 

«-i-4 t'j a*'. ■ . . 


"'«■ Si*:\ .... 


wo years. 
1984 results 



teoffs of 554 mJEcu-Hohe Kona 

J.11 /km nn _i - w 


J«S assets,. 159 nuffiondoBars for 
ub Hawaiian hohGogs and 125 mfl- 
lion dollars in ' foreq’trexch&iige 


The chairman sand- Thursday 
that be could not predict what 
prices the Maul U plands and Coro- 


ICJ Confirms 
That Job Cuts 


An Under Study £SK“ 

t ' -Mr. Keswick 


$ Raters 

LONDON — A spokesman 
for Imperial Chemical Indus- 
tries PLC acknowledged Thurs- 
day the existence of an interna] 
company document on poten- 
tial job losses that was Leaked to 

a British newspaper. 

. The confidential report iden- 
tifies 2,700 jobs IQ could cut, 
saving just under .£50 mOtion.. 
($63 million) by the end of the: 
decade. 

The spokesman said that the 
report is for discussion pnr- 
poses and that no decisions on 
jobs had been made. He added 
t that (here were no plans to re- 
Jtiuce the work force except 
through early retirement and 
voluntary departures. That po- 
licy allowed IQ to reduce its 
work force by 3,200 last year. 

The IQ spokesman said the 
rate of jobs being lost through 
such natural reasons was slow- 
ing. But he added that he saw 
no need for the conpany to 
introduce a policy of dismissing 
workers. 

He emphasised dial the re- 
port leaked Thursday was a 
long-tom view and that any 
plans would be discussed with 
the unions involved. 


Simwlesnidt 

modore CoDdarriffrinm properties 
in Hawaii would bring at auction. 
But he said fee believed that the 

ISOu wifllinn -dringT fignre was still a 
“farrand reasonable provision-” 
The two XJS. properties will be 
auctioned July 2/ ana 28 in several 
cities twiVwl by satrilhe, Mr. Kes- 
wick said. - - 
The writeoffs on shipping and 
UJS. properties in 1984 contributed 
to a total 873-xmHkHi-dollar ex- 

fra ^ Q ffi^ar Y rfinT PW agamcr fiiTI-year 

eamings. Excluding the charges, 
Jardine earned- 80 milliou dollars 
for the year. 

Mr. Keswick said a t Thursday’s 
meeting that operating results were 
improving, but he gsve.no figures 
Or details. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


One Chinese broker later de- 
scribed the meeting as reflecting 
“renewed confidence in the compa- 
ny,” which has reported declining 
operating profits far the last three 
years. 

Jardine, founded in 1833, owns 
just less than 40 percent of Hong- 
kong Land Co„ Hong Kong's larg- 
est property company. Both con- 
cerns have suffered from their 
heavy involvement in Hong Kong's 
deflated property market and 
Hongkong Land has sold off 6 bil- 
lion dollars worth of assets in the 
last two years to meet debts. 

“There’s no point in our affiKart- 
Hongkong Land Co. disposing of 
its unprofitable property assets and 
Jardine’s holding onto theirs,” Mr. 
Keswick said in reference to the 
planned property sales. 

Stock market rumors that Mir. 
Keswick has been negotiating with 
KhooTeck Puat, a Singapore prop- 
erty entrepreneur, or Angjo- Ameri- 
can Corp., the South African in- 
dustrial and mining group, for the 
purchase of control of other Jar- 
dine or Hongkong Land have fu- 
eled share trading in the two com- 
panies since March. 

Mr. Keswick confirmed on 
Thursday that he had had tattrs 
with Mr. Khoo “an a regular bar 
as,” but denied (hat these were 
negotiations for any share pur- 
chase. He declined to c omment on - 
any other possible discussions and 
said that there woe no negotiations 
under consideration “at the mo- 
ment” 

Jardine shares dosed Thursday 
in Hong Kong at 12J0. dollars, up 
freon 12 dollars on Wednesday. 


French Bank 
To Buy Stake 
In London 
Brokerage 


U.S. Court Rejects Icahn Bid 
To Resume TWA Purchase 


The Assockned Press 

ST. LOUIS. Missouri — A state 
appeals court has rejected a request 
by a New York investor, Carl C. 
Icahn, to Hft a court order tempo- 
rarily bailin g^ him from buying 
more stock in Trans World Airlines 

Inc, 

Lawyers far Mr. Icahn, who 
wants to acquire TWA. had asked a 
three-judge panel of the Missouri 
Court of Appeals on Wednesday to 
quash an order issued Monday by 
Judge Bernhardt Drumm of the St 
. Lotus County Grant Court. 

His order stopped Mr. Icahn’s 
bid to take over the airfare until 
June 17, when he has scheduled a 
hearing in the dispute. 

; “TWA is trying to buy time to 
prevent Mr. Icahn from doing what 
is his right, buying common stock,” 
the investor's lawyer, Robert Hoe- 


mdte, told the appellate judges. In 
a one-page rabng, the appellate 
panel rejected those arguments. 

Mr. Icahn’s investment group 
owns 32 percent of TWA stock 
and has bid $600 million, or $18 a 


share, for the rest 
TWA closed Thi 


TWA closed Thursday at $19 a 
share on the New York Stock Ex- 
change, up 50 cents from Wednes- 
day. 

{Meanwhile, a Transportation 
Department official said Thmsday 
that the department opposed any 
special l egislati on intended to dis- 
courage Mr. Icahn’s bid for TWA, 
Reuters reported from Washing- 
ton. 

[Matthew Scocozza, an assistant 
transportation secretary, told the 
House Public Works and Trans- 
portation Committee that existing 
regulations were adequate to pro- 
tect the public interest.] 


PARIS — Crtdit Commercial de 
France said Thursday it agreed in 
principle to acquire 80 percent of 
the London stockbrokeragc, Laur- 
ence Prust & Co., and 25percent of 
Frarnfingion Group PLC, a British 
investment concern. 

Both firms mil be restructured, 
according to a statement by the 
French state-owned h ank. 

The equations will cost CCF 
“tens of nnHions of francs,” CCFs 
managing director, Michel Peber- 
ean, said. He declined to give the. 
exact price. 

A new limited company will take 
over Laurence Prusfs institutional 
broking, economic research and 
corporate-finance drviskras. 

F ramling mn, which is quoted on 
the London Stock Exchange, will 
acquire Laurence Prusfs discre- 
tionary fund fnanagflnwn l busi- 
ness, doubting its total portfolio to 
around £600 million ($750 million). 

A new partnership will takeover 
Laurence Prusfs private fund man- 
agement activity. 

CCF is the first bank to lake a 
major stake in a London stockbro- 
ker since the London Stock Ex- 
change changed its rules on 
Wednesday to permit banks to 
hold more than a 30-percent stake. 

It is also one of the Gist leading 
French banks to take an interest in 
a London broker. The Paris-based 
Banque Aiabe et Internationale 
dTnvestissement agreed last Feb- 
ruary to acquire 29.9 percent of 
Sheppards & Chase. 

The Prust transaction will fur- 
ther CCFs aim of acquiring a Eur- 
ope-wide capacity in broking and 
asperate finance, Mr. Pebereau 
said. The firm’s research arm win 
complement CCFs research activi- 
ties and its experience in share is- 
sues will broaden CCFs merchant- 
banking activity, he added. 

InterNortfa Inc. to Divest 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — InterNortfa 
Inc. of Omaha, Nebraska, has 
agreed to divest itself of four Texas 
gas pipelines in the next 12 months 
to settle federal antitrust questions, 
the Federal Trade Commission an- 
nounced Thursday. 

The consent agreement settled 
commission concerns stemming 
from InterNorth’s $2J-bfftian ac- 
quisition of Houston Natural Gas 
Gx, the agency said. 



TTw Ntv» Vort 


Depositors waiting outside Banco de Italia last month. 

Citibank Discusses Possible Takeover 
Of Troubled Argentine Private Bank 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — The chairman of Citibank, John Reed, said 
Thursday that his bank has discussed with Argentine authorities the 
feasibility of the U.S. bank acquiring the Banco de Italia e Rio de la 
Plata, which has been taken over by the government. 

However, Mr. Reed said he is not optimistic about reaching an 
agreement as new legislation might be required to permit its acquisi- 
tion. Mr. Reed was in Hong Kong to attend the International 
Monetary Conference earlier this week. 

He added that a takeover would also require acceptable terms and 
conditions, but did not elaborate. The Argentine government has said 
it might liquidate the bank. 

Banco de Italia, Argentina’s third largest private bank, closed on 
May 10 following what the Argentine central bank described as 
serious insolvency and liquidity problems. 

The closure, and an ensuing decision by the central government to 
freeze all f oreign-currency-der ominaied bank accounts for 60 days, 
brought threats from several UJS. creditor h anks to withdraw from a 
$4 .2-biIlioo debt-restructuring package for Argentina. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Affied Corp. said it will be seek- 
ing acquisitions in Western Eu- 
rope, the Far East and the United 
States after completing its pro- 
posed merger with Signal Cos. in 
the early autumn. Allied’s chair- 
man, Edward L Hennessy Jr., said 
that acquisition targets will be in 
the electronics, aerospace, automo- 
tive and cbonicals sectors. 

British Aerospace PLC has won 
an order valued at £40 million 
(S50.4 million) for five ATP ad- 
vanced turboprop aircraft from 
British Midland Airways Ltd. The 
company said the sale brought to 
£75 million its sales of the aircraft 
announced at the Paris Air Show. 

Cipher Data Products Inc. said it 
signed a European distribution 
agreement with Entre Computer 
Centers undo- which Cipher’s mod- 
el 5210 personal computer tape 
backup system is to be distributed 
in Europe. 

Ge. Franfmse des Petroles-Total 
will begin pumping crude from 


Page 15 


Hitachi Internal Memo 
Suggested Undercutting 


China’s first South China Sea oil- 
field in June 1986, the official Chi- 
nese news agency reported. The 
Wei 10-3 oilfield in the Gulf of 
T onkin is expected to have a peak 
annual yield of 4 12 million to 4.9 
million barrels, the agency said. 

Gulf Oil Sumatra Ltd. has re- 
ceived approval from Indonesia's 
stale oil company, Pertamina, to 
develop the Anoa oil field in the 
Natuna Sea in northeast Indonesia, 
Gulf officials said. 

Habitat Mothercare PLC said its 
sales so far in the financial year 
ending next March 31 are comfort- 
ably ahead of the year-eariier peri- 
od. For the year ended last March, 
the British household-goods retail- 
er’s pretax profit rose 19 percent, to 
£36.5 million ($46 million), from 
£30.6 million a year before. 

Hongkong & Shanghai Ranking 
Corn, and the Chiu family have 
sold a 25-percenl stake in Far East 
Bank Ltd. to state-owned China 
Merchant Steam Navigation Co., 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Hitachi Ltd. 
Japan's largest electronics compa- 
ny, on Thursday condemned a re- 
cently uncovered internal memo di- 
recting its semiconductor 
distributors to undercut rivals’s 
prices to gain market share. 

Earner m the day. Hitachi said 
that its fiscal 1984 profit climbed 
26 percent from the previous year 
on a 14-percent sales gain. 

UJS. Undersecretary of Com- 
merce Lionel Olroer said Thursday 
that he learned of the Hitachi mem- 
orandum. which instructed its dis- 
tributors to undercut competitors’s 
semiconductor prices by 10 percent 
in order to raise Hitachi's share of 
the market 

Mr. Olmer. meeting with Hitachi 
executives in Tokyo, complained 
that such price-slashing went be- 
yond the cuts that market forces 
would dictate and that Hitachi's 
action would injure U.S. makers of 
semiconductors — the tiny drcuiis. 
or chips, that power computers and 
other electronic products. 

Tsuneo Tanaka, the president of 
Hitachi America Ltd!, Hitachi's 
U.S. unit, said Thursday in New 
York that the memo was written 
Feb. 2) by an employee of Hita- 
chi's semiconductor marketing of- 
fice in San Jose, California. He did 
not identify the worker. 

Mr. Tanaka said that the memo 
was “unauthorized and unap- 
proved.” and that within a week of 
iu discovery. Hitachi management 


Far East’s manag in g director, Dick 
Chiu. said. Banking sources esti- 
mated the sale’s value at about 90 
million Hong Kong dollars (SI 13 
million). 

International Technology Coqx, 
which provides hazardous waste 
disposal services, filed a registra- 
tion statement with the Securities 
and Exchange Commission cover- 
ing a proposed offering of three 
minion common shares and war- 
rants to purchase 530,000 addition- 
al shares. National Can Coro, 
would offer 1.9 million of the 


Olympia & York Holdings Corp. 
of Canada and a Canadian uni t of 
Rio Unto Zinc Corp. are to sell 
73.2-percmt of Brinco Ltd. to Dor- 
set Resources Ltd. in a share ex- 
change, Dorset said. The transac- 
tion would leave Olympia with a 
21-percent stake in Dorset. 

RCA Coqx, whose stock price 
has risen sharply this week, would 


“rejected it as being contrary to 
corporate policy.” 

"Thereafter" Hitachi America 
took steps to make sure that the 
Feb. 21 notice was disregarded by 
its distributors.” he said. ‘'Hitachi 
America regrets any misunder- 
standing this error may have 
caused in the interpretation of its 
marketing policy.” 

The U.S.-Japan conflict is in- 
creasing now because the world- 
wide semiconductor business has 
hit a severe glut. Demand is weak, 
and the market is awash with ex- 
cess production, which has acceler- 
ated the decline in chip prices. 

Meanwhile. Hitachi reported 
Lhat consolidated net income rose 
to 210.16 billion yen (SS44.2 mil- 
lion), in the year ended March 31. 
from 167. 10 billion yen a year earli- 
er. Group net sales passed 5 trillion 
yen for the first lime, increasing to 
5.013 trillion yen from 4.400 tril- 
lion yen, the company said. 

The company attributed the im- 
provement to sales gains in semi- 
conductors. consumer electronics, 
computers and office equipment 
Worldwide sales of videotape re- 
corders. for example, jumped 76 
percent last year to 4.4 million 
units, Hitachi said, adding it ex- 
pects to sell 5 million units in the 
current year. 

The Japanese electronics group 
said group net and sales would in- 
crease much more slowly in the 
current year. 

Group net sales are expected to 
rise 5 percent. 


not confirm rumors that it had 
found a buyer for its Hertz car- 
rental subsidiary or was about to 
make an acquisition. “If we were 
talking to anyone or even close [to 
an acquisition or sale] we would 
have to make an announcement.” a 
spokesman said 

Royal NedDoyd Group NV has 
ordered a cargo- ferry capable of 
carrying 30,000 passengers from 
Nippon Kokan Co., the Japanese 
steel and shipbuilding company 
said. Nippon Kokan said the ferry, 
due for completion in 1987, is the 
first it will build for a European 
owner. 

TVacmda Corp., headed by Kirk 
Kerkoriam said it is offering to 
acquire the 7 million shares, or 30 
percent, of MGM Grand Hotels 
Inc. that it does not already own for 
$18 apiece. The company said 
MGM Grand's preferred stock, 75- 
perceni owned by Tracinda, will 
not be affected by the proposal 


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Page 16 


DVTERNATIOJVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


Thursday ^ 

MSE 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
oe to the dosing ad Wail Street 
nod do noi reflect tote trades elsewhere. 


13 Moran 
High Low 


Stock 


Olv. VM. PE iteHtati LQwqSSarae 


27% 

4s% 

ID 

tm* 

7SV0 

36ft 

3% 

32 

3Sft 

7ft 

4ft 

32 

SB 

41% 

63% 

3ft 

IB 

7ft 

35% 

lift 

H% 

SOU 

15 % 

BA 

34*. 

13% 

*ft 

32 

IS 

wvs 

SI 

2S 

19% 

10% 

19% 

26% 

31 

53% 

84% 

43% 

2S% 

21 

35ft 

44% 

2ffk 

13% 

34% 

23% 

14% 

11 % 


(Continued from Page 14 ) 


1.30 X? 
120 21 
1JD0 1J 
JO 25 


1J to 46 
J4tm 


22% AM bn pf 210 103 
34 Melvui 1*44 3LD 
46% Vmrttt 
78% Murtic 
41% AMTHh 
22 iwerLvn 
2 MuaoOf 
131k MUfaPf 
28% weaaR 
S% Meat* 

2% Mustek 
22 Miepfcimiu 
44% MiEpfG 711 131 
49% AWE pfl 8.12 1X1 
41% MIEpfH U2 1X2 
2% MexFd 31* M 
12% MChER 110 35 
4% MldclbS M 1.1 
33% AAMeon X36 41 
9% MMSUt 1JB 1X6 
16% MldRus 110 61 
22% MWE 276 M 
11% MlltnR 
73% MMM 
24% MftlPL 
6% Mlsnlm 
4 WUt«i 
29% AMU1 
% wIMaUH 
5% NMtCPt 
16% Mahon: 

3% MotUcDf 
14% Manrcti 


3S 27% 27% 
19 1490 4B% 47% 
11 70 67 *6 

17 4MS II3M 109% 
10 61 79 75% 

29 5906 32% 31% 
406 2% 2% 

3 1110 13% Uft 
17 33% 33 
7 165 7 6% 

1 3% 3% 

00*31 31 

20*99 59 

150*62 61 

16% 
S% 


M 15 
XSO 45 
276 7J 

220 72 

AO 17 
10 45 


40% Munson 250 SJ 
16% MonPw 210 71 
14% Munst 110a 9L4 
AM MONY M 04 
12% Moores 72 37 
15% WW«* 1*1 41 
23% MorM of ISS 07 
2U% «W» Z2» 4.1 
75M A«orsfiP#777a M 
24% MerKnd 140 35 
IIM MamS X X4 
12% MIORtv 17fi« 07 
23M Mortons 14 17 
29% Motqrij 14 21 
17% Munfrd 54 13 
7% Munsos ... 

23% MurpO 110 37 
14% MurryO 50 M 
11 MuKXn 110a 75 
1% Mnrtn 



TU 

3ft 

10 

7 

16% 

39 

34 

5ft 

9 

1606 

49% 

5 

7796 

14% 


99 

16ft 

11 

94 

30% 

IS 

38 

12ft 

13 

3845 

77ft 

1 

101 

Mft 


154 

7ft 


457 

7% 

10 

SOW 

39% 


11 

ft 

10 

18 

7 

u 

2H 

30ft 

461 

3 

25 

12 

14ft 

IT 

1345 

47ft 

10 

346 

35ft 

49 

19% 

9 

314 

10% 

13 

157 

19% 

14 

63 

26ft 


43 

30ft 

9 

3366 

53ft 


363 

52ft 

10 

94 

43 

14 

34 

23% 

11 

74 

30% 

9 

1134 

34ft 

11 

4671 

31U 

13 

36 

2J% 


88 

13ft 

11 

544 

27 

10 

14 

18% 


37 

14% 


67 

3ft 


7% 

7% 


2 % 

16M 

47 


41% 


Mft 


2% 


27% + % 
40% 

a — % 

113% 43% 
79 +3% 

32% 

£-» 

3% 

59 +1 

g 3 

z% 

14% + % 

sw— % 

46% —1% 
14% 

14% .. 

30 — % 
12ft- % 
77% 4- % 
35%- % 
7ft- % 

3M + % 

m-% 

2Sft 

19%- % 
10 % + % 
19% 4- % 
2A — ft 

DM + % 
41% + » 
DU + % 
20ft + U 
34 4- % 

31ft + % 
DU — ft 

14%-ft 
2 % + % 


N 


21ft 

33ft 

23 

22 *. 

43 

3PM 

15% 

14% 

1% 

45ft 

83 

28% 

29ft 

18ft 

34 

20 

29ft 

23 

45ft 

4ft 

33% 

31 

lift 

■B 

14% 

30W. 

IB 

13 


18 

17% 

I2U 

44% 

27ft 

29 

24% 

34% 

19ft 

31 

19 

59ft 

17ft 

44ft 

4ft 


14ft HAP CO 
20 NBD* 
12M MBS 
17% NCH 
DU NCNB 

20% NCR 

10ft NL I ml 
25% NUI 
% NVP 
33% NWA 
40 NObscB 
71% Kkricn 
21% Nashua 
10% NfCnvs 
27ft NoTOW 
lift NartEdu 

18% NatFQl 

19% NFGpT 
27 NntGvp 
2% NIHam 
23% Nil 
17% NMedE 
6% KMInsS 
22% NIP rust 
9ft NtSml 

22 NtSvcIn 
11% NStand 
10 N8TC0I1 

23 NcvPw 
11% NUkPpi 
14% NuuPpf 
14ft NuvPpf 

8% NevSwL 
sift AiEneei 
21ft NERPOf 
22% NJRsc 
14% NYSEG 
19M NY5 p(A 
13% NY5 pf 
2414 NY5frfD 
13ft Newell 
32ft Newhal 
lift Newtill 
31 Newml 
1% Nwoatfc 


72 35 
152 11 
JB 38 
70 15 
272 69 

.90 15 
250 X3 
170 47 

74 25 
270 55 

1 J8 65 
270 TOO 
250 45 

75 15 
52 15 

156 XI 

150 13 
.40 29 
■64b £4 
254 19 
150 18.9 
154 95 
1.95 115 
50 47 
350 XI 
254 95 
270 75 
254 95 
259flll5 
X12 11J 
375 125 
50 11 
9JM17J 
150* 55 
150 27 


18 

65 

19ft 


48S 

33 

10 

7V4 

16% 

13 

176 

21% 

10 

849 

42ft 

9 

4338 

39ft 


469 

11 

8 

1 

394 

*£ 

30 

910 

48ft 

U10MD 

81% 

13 

968 

25% 

7 

56S 

26% 

15 

478 

13ft 

34 

1344 

33% 

14 

51 

16 

7 

7B 

29 


635 

24 

7 

434 

45ft 


ISS 

4% 

61 

289 

24% 

16 

2545 

20ft 


5 

Sft 

12 

153 

26% 

13 

7986 

11% 

13 

It 

346 

38% 

13ft 

7 

7 

lift 

10 

sSz 

31% 

15 


200z 

17ft 


32ft 


15% 

28% 

23 


14% 14% 


9 54 11% 11% 

7 113 44% 4414 
10 Z7M 27 
O S » ffift 
7 1149 24% 24 
27 Z6ft 24ft 

3 IBM IBM 

21 3)14 30% 

0 2? 14 14 

14 48 5S» 55% 

57 17ft 17ft 

a MS 44% 43% 
492 1H 1ft 


19% + % 

33 + ft 

lift— ft 

s -ft 

29% + % 
10% — % 


4S%— % 
81% — ft 
2S% + ft 
24% — ft 
13% +% 
33ft— ft 
15%—% 
29 + % 

23 + V» 

45%— % 
4ft 

24% — ft 
30% + ft 
8*4— ft 
26ft— % 
lift + % 
30% + % 
13% + ft 
11% + ft 
31 + ft 

14% — ft 
17% + % 
17% + ft 
11%+ ft 
44% + ft 
27% + % 
2B% + ft 
26ft- ft 
24ft + % 
18% + % 
31ft +1% 
16 


UMonHl 
High Low 


Stock 01% VM. 


sb. ' Close 

pp loos High Law Quot.Ch’pn 


20ft Uft 
31ft 9% 
33 24ft 
14 24 

43% 34 
31 38ft 
24% 24ft 
101 75 

18ft IS 
18% 10% 
33% 24% 

18 12ft 

49% 48ft 
31 14 

<2% 29% 

19 12 

56% 43% 
45ft 28ft 
20ft 13% 
17% 10% 
15ft 10% 
49 34 

35ft a 
72ft Sift 
68% SI 
CU 31ft 

f% 2% 
49ft 27% 
(2ft 40% 
52% 51% 
17% 8% 
38% 30% 
29ft 21ft 
54ft » 
50% 20% 
38% 27 

8ft 3 
B9 40 


NtaMP 250 105 
NlOMPt 350 1X3 
NlaMot 350 115 
NkiMPf 4.10 117 
NIOMpf STS 127 
NlaMFf 4.J0 11J 
NLaMpt Ale 27 
NIMlrf 1050 105 
NtoflSi 1.9%TX3 
Nlcoiet .12 A 
NlCOR XM 95 
NoWAf .120 J 
NorflcSo 350 45 

K 57 

S® >5 A 

NEurO >5*8 « 
NoeStUt 1 X 95 
NindPS 154 114 
NnStPw XB 77 
NSPwrt X60 JM 
NSPwwf 7J4 ]05 
NSPwpf 7 B 0 TIM 
NorTel 50 
NllWotB 

NortrpB 120 14 
NWtlnd 250 XI 
Nwttnwd 
NwStW tJ 

Norton 150 55 
Norwit 150 75 
Nwotpf S54e115 
Novo 76c 5 
Nucor 50 1-1 
NutHS 581 
NYNEX 650 75 


Sr r ri* 

1130*42% 42% 42%— ft 

w ™ , * , s = s 

17 M6 OTh Sft ft 

ID 13% 1»% WJ— % 
9 64 42% 42% 42ft— ft 

5 374 14% UU 14%— % 

7 M 53 S3% 53 

9 ■£> 43ft 42 43ft + % 

10 26 17% 17ft Hft— % 
4 70 14% 14% I}* 

9 3413 11% 11% lift „ 
I 224 49 48 48ft— ft 

230* 35 * 35 +2 

lta 74 74 74 +lft 

34®te 47ft on an — m 

3M1 M 35ft- ft 
72 W M 3ti — w 
13 1379 4W 4«ft 4W4 +lft 
19 205 52% S2ft Bft 

^ *9 

9 iS assays 

iso 53ft 52% 53ft + % 

■wrsc*! 

9 TOT BBft Wk + ft 


3% 1ft 
34 23ft 
34ft 23ft 
14ft *ft 
103% 80 
23% aft 
20ft 17ft 
72 10% 

54% 40% 
113 105% 

108ft 101ft 
32% 22 
31% 24ft 
90ft 71% 
15% 9% 
44 45 

31% 29ft 

27% 18ft 

31 21 

15ft 11% 
89% 77 
17ft lift 
a 54 
20ft 15 
24ft 19% 
34% 24% 
19 5% 

19ft 13 
33M 26% 
26% 19ft 
13% 7% 

28ft 19ft 
T2% Bft 
9% 6ft 
31% 2* 
31ft 18% 
33ft IHft 
19 13 

37 251* 

48% 31ft 
1516 10ft 


OPWnd 

OoklteP 152 XI 
- tod Pot 250 77 
OedPwt 
OcdPpt 340 X3 
OCdPpf 250 105 
OcdPpt 2.12 104 
OcdPpt xa 104 
OcdPpt 675 115 
OcdPpflSSO 14J 
OcdPt 1442 135 
OOECO 150 45 
Ooden 150 6.1 
Oodnpf 157 22 
0 too Ed 150 125 
OtiEdpf 070 125 
Oh Ed pi 2J1e 77 
OhEdpf XSO 124 
GhEd pr 352 127 
OhEdpf 150 115 
OhEpf 1076 124 
OltMotr M XO 
OftPpt 854 125 
OhPpfO 277 1L1 
OfctaCE 2.00 
Olln 158 45 
omnet 

Onrlda 50 5J 
ONEOK 154 XI 
OranRk 25* 77 
Ora no* -53t 49 

OrtanC Ji 25 

OrtgnP 

Orton Pf 50 67 
Orion P* 275 95 
OutbdM 44 27 
OwmTr 72 27 
OvStoP 50 XI 
OwenC 150 45 
Owen III 148b 35 
Oxford M XI 


IVb 1U 


h "B W ? 

2 1W 110 110 +4ft 
O 28% 22% aft + % 
S a 19% a +% 
“ n* 2J% a» 

3284 57 56 S7 +2% 

TS5106U 107ft 108ft 

,4 

" WM 30 30%—% 

a wt im + » 
100*85% B5U 85% —3% 
IS 77 W 13% 13ft + ft 
510* 49 67 47 +2 

, 0 ^ SSSSSS-ft 

-ft 


1C03 lift uft 13% + ft 


■5 ^^1^26%-% 

u £ a 

36 5« 10% 10% 10ft + ft 

ii a > o 

13 29% 29% 29ft— ft 

ft ss ss sa + s 

13 392 32ft 32ft 22% — 1* 

11 3iS lift IS MU +lft 

9 3» W% M W4— % 

10 246 47ft 47% 47ft + ft 

13 » 14ft 14 14 


56ft— % 
17% +% 

44% + ft 

IN 


33ft 18ft 

40ft 2SM 
29U 15 
21% 13ft 
14ft lift 
HU 13 

45ft JUft 
29 21ft 
10 5% 

19% 13ft 
17ft 12 
77% 54 
13 9ft 
29ft 21M 
33% 27ft 
43ft a 
34ft 26ft 
39 27 

2Bft aft 
4% 4 
3% 1% 
21 13ft 
41ft 31 
7ft 3 
19% 13ft 
18% 9% 
aft lift 
lift 5U 
39ft 25ft 
17% 13% 
2% 1ft 
17ft lift 
23% 13ft 
9% Aft 
1% 

58% 41% 
55% 44% 
27% 20% 
38% 30 
28% 23ft 
27ft a 
71 54ft 
28ft 22% 


PHH 58 24 
PPG 140 19 
PSA 40 XI 
PSAdPf 1.90 BJ 
POCAS 174 107 
PocGE 154 97 
PocLtB X32 7J 
PcLum 170 45 
PocRm 55T 4 
PocRSPf 200 107 
PoOd 40 27 
PocTefe 572 73 
PocTIn 40 X5 
PodtCP 272 7.9 
PocHpf 457 127 
PdnWb 40 14 
Pits ftnWPf 275 77 
PalmBc 170 X5 
PanABk 70 27 
PanAm 
PaiAet 

Pandcfcn 70 17 
PanhEC 270 6.1 
PantPr 

Poprcit 50 44 

Parrfyit 

PorkE* 

PorkDri .M 25 
ParkH 1.12 37- 
PorkPn 52 29 
PafPtii 

PavHP JO 47 
PavOh .14 7 

Poobdv 70 20 
Pengo 
PenCen 

Penney 274 45 
PoPL 256 97 
PaPLpf 450 1X1 
PaPLdMXD 125 
PaPLdnr270 114 
PoPL pc 040 115 
PaPLdMITS 115 


!3 75? 3* 

9 1433 40% 

44 144 29% 

m a% 

177 M% 
8 13170 20ft 
12 392 44% 
15 63 25% 

a 115 9ft 
14 18% 
11 33 15ft 

■ 9 1426 76ft 

9 1 im 

■ 655 29% 
45 32% 
S3 360x 37ft 
39 31 ft 
15 150 34% 

8 154 24ft 

42» 6% 

334 3ft 
21 190 14% 
11 1326 a 
24 2232 7. 

IS 491 lift 
Xt 2066 10 

9 88 12ft 

347 4 

734 30% 
124 18 
214 2ft 
1B2 
247 

971 

143 % 

444 57ft 
9 1976 aft 
B 2051 26ft 

39 25ft 
20x71 
11 27ft 


33 33% + % 

40ft 40% + ft 

38% 29V. + ft 

a% aft + ft 

14 14% + ft 

19% 20 
44ft 44ft— ft 
25ft 25ft + ft 
8% B%— % 

18% 18% 

14% 15 — ft 
75% 74ft + % 
11% 1T%— ft 
29ft 29% + ft 
32 32ft + ft 
34% 27ft + ft 
31 31ft— ft 

34ft 34%— ft 
24ft 24ft— ft 
6ft 6% 

3ft 3% 

14% 16ft + ft 
37% 38 
4% 6%— ft 

IBM 18ft- ft 
m 9%- i* 
12ft 12ft + ft 
5% 5%— % 
30ft MU — ft 
17% 17%— ft 
2ft 2ft 

14ft 14%— ft 

20% a% 

’s 

56% 57 + ft 

50ft aft + % 
36 36% + ft 

37ft 37ft + ft 
28ft 28ft + % 
25ft 25ft— 2 
a 7i 

77 27ft + ft 


12 Month 

HtahLow 


Stock 


Dlv. VM. PE totemghLowaStCWW 


S** g* lal ldSte m m a + ft 

Sit n£ Ep^5 B7D 124 220a aft 70 TO — 1% 

S %Sg 3 a i 'B a a *« 


10% 7% pnrtw l-2T»^ 
22ft 13% PeryDc 1* 3? 
44 SB WrJ* 140 34 1* 
30 24ft PeTRS 372*1 4-1 

7ft 4 Ptrlnv 15P«9 


338 0% m 8ft— ft 
ia 19% 18ft 19ft 
212 <2% 41ft cm— ft 
57 24ft 26ft 26% 

73 16ft 14 M 
61 4% 4ft 4% + ft 


12 Month 

High Low slock 


SK. ^ 

Dtft YkL PE lOOaHtgh Low 


s 


OlW 


iss ss as^ais 

5 % %4 R 3 ST g s * ® «» f» + » 

16ft if pnlloEM 270 HB 


34 

lift 

1QM 

59ft 

Iff* 

122 

a 


y nunibii 

aft Phlie pf 430 124 
eft ptdlEPf 141 125 
PMEot m 
43 PfllJEpf 7JS 135 
6% PtillEPt 17# 135 
97 Phil Of ij-JJ j*® 

SI PhUEpfO^JH 


60ft 44 PWlEpi 750 )M 
59 43ft PWlEpf ' l1 


4070 IS 14% 149k— ft 
108* 34 M 34+1 
« lift 10% 11 + ft 

271 10% Iff* 10ft 
Kta 58M 5B% 58ft— 1ft 

JS H % n 

30U122 122 1» 

969* 71ft a 71% +lft 
489* S9ft 58 59ft + M 
28* 59. » 59 +1 


St, mi s£ 172 67 13 ii» 2125 21% aft- % 

PfiSESS 4S>BfttE£i 

irsiss 

21 * P^L 1 <6 25 1J 1044 36% 55ft 56ft + M 

3fS E !”!?. Ss 4 ais 27% 26% 27% + % 

34 a% Pioneer it* 52 U* 14 Uft 

170 27 12 AM 44 43% 44 + % 


art 4 

43% 27ft PBnyS 
13% 9% Plttstn 
15% 0% Ptanw 
13ft 7 Pinntm 
13% 8% MoytwY 

30% 19ft p^r, 
22% 15% PogoPd 


1259 lift 11 11% + ft 

167 13ft 13 13% + ft 

217 Bft «% 8% 

143 10ft 9ft 10 + % 

J 20% 20ft 20ft 
157 17ft 14% 14%—% 


70 1J5 14 

,14ft 1J8 13 

tSSEfS^’MIKEiS 

21ft 13 PWT" 1 Sum 

19% 14ft Potto: ti ■ 

n% 13ft Parfpe iJg 8 
2 a% 17% Porort YfL JH 
34M 28% PorGPf 440 127 
|iul nm, parfSvOff UB 1U 

is if » 


4S" 36 P«E»Pf 4if 9 J> 

40 31 PotfilPf 4J4 107 

25ft 17% PremiO ^ 

WU » PC n’t* *■** M ,1 

20ft 11% PrlmeC . h 

32ft 13% PrtmMO J9 7 » 


18 20% 20% 20% — ft 

23 18 17% 17% — % 

480 21ft 21% J":fc + M 

2 24ft 24% 24% + % 

3404 34% 3444 + ft 

S5 34ft 33ft 33% — ft 

234 35ft 34% 34% + ft 

434 31% HI* a »— ft 

620*45% 44% 45% +2ft 
350* 39M 39% 39ft— ft 

156 22 21% 21%—% 

250 38 37% 37% — ft 

1977 14% 15% 14 — M 

422 32M a% 32% +11* 


££ 12 S SSSS’sS 47 S sHl 3 S «s SS + * 

16 7 * PrtS 72 2J 21 m MM !«. 15% - ft 
47ft a Prater 140 X5 9 


25 19M PSln pf 340 144 

8ft 6 PSIOPf JJJ 11» 
8 6% PSInpf 1JM 137 

0 50 PSInpf 944 14J 

55 44% PSln P| 

55 43% PSln nt X3S 157 

46ft PSln pi 874 1£4 
S% 3% PSvNH 
12 7» PNHpIB 

17% 10% PNHpfC 
15 B% PNH pfD 
ISM 9 PNH pfE 
U 7% PNH BfF 

14 7% PNHptG 

27% 19% PSvNM X88 184 
a% a PSvEG 2J4 97 
38 28 PSEGpf 4J08 117 

S S% PSEGBf 470 10J 
*5% 33% PSEO P» S« 114 
47% 35% PSEGpf 578 11.1 
20ft 15 P5EG Pf 2.1? JUS 
61 46% PSEG Pi 640 1X1 

22% 16% PSEGPf 243 1U 
1M% 96 P$EGpfl275 117 
69% 53 PSEGPf 770 117 
71 55 PSEGpf 7J0 114 

67ft a PSEGpf 740 1TJ 
85% 65% PSEG Pf 942 11 J 
4% 2% Public* 

13% 9% Puebla .16 14 

9% 6 PRCem 

15 9% PbgetP 176 114 


2 289 


S 39% 39ft 29% + M 
449 22% 22% 22ft 
12 20ft 28% 

1374 6 7H 8 

30x 24 24 24 — % 

5001 7% 7% 7W— % 

He 7% 7% 7ft + M 

1309* 63% 40 63% +1% 

200* 54% 54 54% +1 

500* 53% 53% 53% + M 
ltd 58 58 5B +1% 

J89 4% 414 4% 

X 11% 11 11M 

7 16% 16% 16%— ft 
42 14ft 14% 14ft + ft 
48 14ft 14% 14ft 
19 12% 12ft 12ft— ft 
5 13% 13% 13% — M 
5463 27% 77 27ft— ft 

1282 30ft 30ft 30ft 
40(36 36 36 

1000* 39% 39ft 3944+1 
730x45M 45 45ft + ft 
19670* 40% 47% 47% + % 
88 aft 19% 19% + % 
130* 61 61 41 + ft 

7 22ft 21% 21% — ft 
10*103 103 ID —ft 

20* 61 48 6B — 1% 

6900*70% 70% 70% + % 
ITS* 67 67 67 + % 

900* 85% 85% 85% +2U 
59 2% 2ft 2% 

16 Mft 11% 11% 

12 Aft 4M Aft 

1263 15ft 14% 15ft + ft 


21ft 109b PutteHm Tl2 * 3 26 2441 17* 17" 7706 4-46 

36ft 22ft Purekd 17B 4.1 49 1101 31% 30 OTk + % 

10ft 5M PYro 7 14B 7ft 7M 7%— M 


r~ 



Q 





3 



25 T4 

1)79 

5 Oft 

4*ft 

son 




9,56 

9J 

320*1 02ft 101 

102% +lft 


15 QuakSO 

JO 

23 25 

54 

21% 

21% 

21ft 





21 

115 

BVk 

8 





M0 

43 ID 

174 

33 

32ft 32% — 

% 

25% 

14 QkRell 

3*a 1.1 17 

36 

22% 

22% 

22% 


tz 



R 





3 


14% Aft RBInd 
46% 29ft RCA 
39% 29 RCA pf 
104 71 RCA pf 

34 24% RCA pf 

37% 29ft RCA pt 
9% Aft RLC 
4% 3 RPC 
IBM 12ft RTE 


JMj 

1JM 

XSO 

470 

Z12 

34S 

70 


S 614 9 

27 13 7305 45 
97 
19 
44 
93 

73 11 


56 XO 10 


8ft 

44% 44% 
7Qz 38 38 38 

5 103 102 102 

3m 33ft 32% 33 
13 37% 37% 37% 
ID 7ft 7% 7% 

a 3M 3M 3M 
O 18ft IBM 18ft 


— ft 

— M 


—1ft 


+ M 
— M 



Usoer/MaL 
Allied Irish 95 
ADM Irish 91 
AlHMIrhbO 
Affled Irish Pho 
A rab Bks Carp 91794 
Atlantic Fin 89/94 
Aulootatos9S 
BcsCommlMM 
BeaNa*Lowvo9l 
8a>DI Roma 89/91 
Bcs Df Rama 92 
Bco5aitDSpirho9l 
BongkokBk (Bbl) 00 
Boa Corn 97 
Bk Greece VU94 
Bk Greece 91/97 
Bk Ireland 89 
Bk Ireland 92 
Bk Montreal 90 
BkMmireo<9« 

Bk Montreal 91 
Bk New York 94 
Bk Nava Scotia 8^ 
Bk Nova Scotia M 

BkTakTon 
Bk Tokyo 89 
Bk Tokyo B 
Bk Tokyo FehBOTl 
Bk Tokyo Dednm 
BoikamoriaaQ/SH 
Bankers Trust 08 

Banker! Trust 94 
Ml Capital 9* 

Ball Fin 87/01 

BU95 

BMim«9 

BMlnt91 

BalndOCMzH 

Baindasue*99 

Hue (9 

Ble»B7 

BtcrOctU 

BtorJoiH 

BtC89? 

Bnpss 

Bnp»57M 

Bnpu/96 

Bn»*9 

Bno*9 

BnoN/TI 

BnpjutH 

BWK 

BQPontwPcro 

Bn Wooro 89/94 

BardavsO/595 

BarctaysO/590 

BardonO/5Perp 

BorctovsO/SBl 

BvtotumPwo 

Belgium 0ec99/04 

BetotumN 

BetghjmDO/U 

Bergen Bk 09 

Bergen Bk IB/91 

fleta/umW’W 

Betnlum OC199/OI 

Ccce« 

CccetH 
Cncawm 
emm 
cm no 

CtocRhU 

CtocWIWVtVl 

Ctoc94 


Coupon Next BM Askd 
7% - 9953 HUS 

9ft. tWfl 10840142® 
9% CM7 ML1B1U2S 
1% 30-11 17a 9120 
lOh 1609 10030)0138 
9 27-88 1HMS10US 

91k 17-119948 9978 

9M 2B-H HUSlSS 
7% - 9958 9988 

7 SIS 2+06 99 Jfl 9941 
8% 29-11 99.13 9933 
891. 11-H 9B4S 9880 
7% 090* 9945 9955 
VM 1B-1D 9858 99.13 
9U 13089854 9884 
BM 3808 W0301BUS 
9 2507 9950 10025 

9% 2006 1004210052 
Bft 2907 teaifneaiO 
9i* a-io iflUAiaau 
9M 15079984 9954 
9 % ii-m laijniouo 
9% 11071007710887 
9ft 2+10 100*18843 
Bft 2907 10O25MU3 
8% 29071801210022 
9ft OHM 1002418834 
9% 13061001510035 
9ft 28041800210012 
9% IMA 9949 99J4 
9ft 2506 1QQJBN048 
Oft 1308 U0UKR71 
IQlk 3809 98J7 99 J7 
9% 1706 1005710067 
fjk 1M0 10W010020 
8ft 17-10 9938 «JI 
9ft 1MJWOMWL* 
10ft 2349 lOOWniiA 
fft 3M6 IKJMIULO 
8% 2907 1001211022 
9ft 30-101004010030 
9% 23071003418034 
10ft 13091006010070 
Oft 0600 1005910189 
1% 3707 100.7270822 
*% 13041005110068 
7% • 1008010010 

1% 12-11 1015510845 
10ft 06091013410144 
91. 2207 7901010020 
tft 17-10 9940 99.70 

% 1104 100J7B047 
0+01 UD.I4H024 
Vft a-07 1BUS10X98 
9M 170(10800 

rn-ii Hunooa 

Mft 0+09 1005410044 
*V3 noi 1083010040 
Ift 1306 HQ77100J7 
■ft 2808 MU0H0.M 
8 2300 99 JJ 99.45 

(ft 3Mi nojotexu 

9 1807 1MU2H027 

9ft (M7 MWIBBa 
9% 11-10 M0561HL66 
9% 1201 1US51M45 
Ift 150H008BHn.n 
1 - HD52W42 

9ft 2+101014510055 
7.725 - 99.75 9935 

Ift 2+0* 19a 99 .90 
7% 3801 9855 9028 
99k 1107 MIU2M0J2 


Issuer /Mot. 

Ctxterel5+L94 
Central Int 97/00 
Chase Mon O/S 92 
Chase Man Carp 09 
Chase Man Core Oa 
Chemical 94 
ChankomiWklv) 
QyWkjda Bfc91 
Oir1st tmta Bk94 
atkoreAusWlWklv) 
attoomScPM 
attoreocm 

Ottcnrp94 

atlcorp Perp 

Ottcnrg Plop 97 


Comment* Nov89 
Canm Urh Montreal 91 
CompFlnCjLC-97 
Council Ot Europe 93 
Ccf B6/9B 
Cd 98/95 
CriFu09A 
Cd97 

Cepme 87/92 
Cepmolt 
Cr Do Nani 89/92 
Or Fonder 81/99 
Cr Far Export 92 

S Lvrmoa 93/96 
Lyon not. 87 
Cr Lyonnais 90/97 
CrLvanKits 89/94 
CrLyamon 91/95 
Cr Lyonno>s?9 
Or Lvoanab Jan92/94 
CTLyomKits Jun92/9A 
Cr National ■ 

Cr National 90/91 
Cr HattanM Q0 
CmfllanstoltM 
Creditanstalt 96 
□allcht KangyuH 
OanOflNatGasff 
Den Norik* Nov*] 

Den Norake DectO 

Danmark Jw 88/90 

Danmark Oct to/90 

Denmark 99JM 

Denmark Pent 

Die Ernie Oest 92/94 

Dmdnrr Bk93 

D m iner Fin 89 

DresdnerF1n92 

Eldorado Nge 89 

Ed/99 

EOI 90/95 

Edt97 

Enel 05 

Enel Oo 

Eeb»3 

Got 9° 

Eccaum 
Exterior im 91/94 
Ferre* It 95 
FemMe 92/e? 

Finland 90 
Find* Pooer 90/95 
First Boston 94 
First Bk Svst96 
First chknoa 97 
First Chicago 92 
First CMcoaaM 
First City Texas 95 
First inter K 
Ford 91 
Full Ini 94/94 
Genflnance 89/95 


Coupon Mont BM Askd 

8ft 29-11 10077100.12 
8512572-11 9973 9943 

5% 

Ift 0988 9945 9975 
9% 27-06 100421082 
7ft 2+889840 9875 
Ift 1308 100.7270042 
10ft 0+89 10S2S10IU5 
7ft 1+86 ML55 9870 
9ft 1M& 99J5 9955 
Bft 31-07 MOTOlOLh) 
9ft 1384 101,1310123 
Bft 1+87 99.50 10040 
Bft Jl-07 lfflUBiaa.12 
8ft 21-88 99.97 111187 
8% 20-11 100361 0046 
10ft 1IH9 1003210047 
Ift 12-11 99a 99J8 
Bft 21-10 9957 ltT " 
9ft 2449 10— I 
9ft 09-10 108848 
9ft 2241 1003411 
Ift 2249 9939 9! 

101k 1244 KUAS100J5 
7ft - 100.1210022 

M 27441008010830 
9ft 09-18 1004310833 
Oft 01-87 WU0ULH 

Oft li-io lounaas 

1BU 23491883510860 
Oft *9-10 1008610054 
Oft 08471003910049 
Ift 29-11 1085810133 
9% 2744 1003010830 
9 1847 1082810838 

9ft M-04 1C3JSS19045 
9 1*47 1881310823 

10ft 114* 1087310883 
935 2040 lOBJJSmifi 

9 n-07 10O3BM838 
Oft 27-01 1 00311 HUH 
8ft 13-11 1004610856 
M 0947 10185T0LI5 
Bft 048 99.95 10850 
Oft 1944 99a 10030 
9% 09471803118041 
Oft IS-H 1DQM18BW 

19411087210082 

._ ana mjmos 
8ft 19479955 10805 
9M 2+U I818010L10 
8ft 2*40 9952 10082 
ID 7140 1085119041 
Oft 3041 1083510850 

10 2748 10884)8856 
9% 12481002510035 
8ft 1349 9986 995* 
8.1 1122+06 99.13 W23 

11 DV09H042M852 

Oft 1744 99.94 MBM 
10 2449 1004810038 

91k 0847 1008310813 
«k 7146 10802M812 
Ilk 2549 1008110811 
18*. 304ln04518S3S 
U 25-10 9781 7751 
Ift 30-87 79.95 10B85 
an 2+uwa*7J0 
Sft 1340 7735 99J9 
Ift 874818080180.18 
141251+41 7732 7742 
IV9 21-08 1080810818 
V 2247 9100 «j00 
72) - 97J6 

Ik 1+11 MOOD! DOM 
8ft 1547 1081410824 
n. 2344 1081610824 


9U 

Mk 


tssnr/Mot 

Gcnftncnca 92/W 
GAB? 

Gdj92 
Gib Pore 
Gib 94 
Giro 91 

GtWesfani 92/95 
Grtodton92 
GrlndhiysBa 
Gi Western 19796 
Kill Samuel 96 
HID Samuel Pern 
Hhoanaa/95 
Hydro Quebec 9/ 
Hydro Quebec BS 
Id 91 

Indonesia 08/93 


I retold 94/99 
Ireland 97 
Ireland 96 
Italy 99 
Italy 89/96 

w 

K0PMUV92 
Kendra Oy 95 
KWnwariBain 
KWnwort Bon 96 
Kta ta mrt Ben Pure 
Korea Dav Bk86/B 
Korea ExchBk8&/n 
Lincoln S+L 99 
Lloyds Bk Perp 
Lloyds 91 
Uoyds 92 
LtovdsM 
UcbJuBS 
LtcbBS 
Ltd) Jun« 

Ltch *6 
Ltd) 92 

Mataysta*«/n 
Maiavsta 80/15 
MotavsfciAprt9/92 
Mtatavsta Ded9/V2 
Motavdaivm 
Man Han 84 
Moa Han ft nutty) 
Mar Mid 74 
mot Mid 09 
Mar Mid ft 
MehimBkft 
Midland Bk Pets 
NMtandlpfn 
Midtandimar 
NUdkmd tni 92 
Midland Ini 91 
MMtaod ini 99 
MBsatFtaft 
MonGrentoBM 
MHBk Den 90/93 
Mia Bk Don 92 
Nat Bk DehuH 96 
Nto Comm Bk89/W 
Nat West Pern Sir A 
Hat West Pare SerB 
Not West Fin 91 
tod Wm) Fin 05 
Not West 90 
Nat Wat 94 
Nat West Fin 92 
Nat West FtaPere 

Neste Or 94 

NewZoakmdl7 

Ni Sleet Dev 72 

MpponCrTO 

NtaoonCrK 

HtaaanCrU 

NonKioi9I 

Okhli 

atb«t 

otoTsn? 


Cannon Next BM ASM 


99k 


2247 1882310031 
1341 KM.14IDB.ft 
1144 10848101178 
U-ll 9138 9980 
118871 


29-11 100417... 
27-44 mWW3« 
9 UO 97J5 
ion. D09 ID16Z10872 
Bft n4t 1081518825 
KM 23499936 992K 
10ft 2788 1081SHB25 
8ft 29-11 9*30 9638 
2+1 » 9972 9932 
2247 1081618024 
8+11 9954 10006 
1547 99J5 10075 
8+10 1084010850 


7ft - 


9ft 

91k 

Ift 

99k 

9ft 


Ift 20-1] 1003310843 
H 1449 1005410066 
IDlk 3M8 100411315$ 
9ft 1047 N0161UL26 
lift. 04491005410844 
Bft 12-11 1881910024 
7ft 2+44 9934 9944 
IBU 2299 108151080 
Bft 2048 18O2DM8I0 
8ft 01-04 1803410036 
9ft 12-11 HI 381 01 30 
lOlk 2549 1HU4H034 
Oft 2048 looanooft 
Mft 2749 1083810068 
2*11 9955 9945 
•ft . 99JTO «HJM 
9ft 09-10 99 J5 K#2S 
9ft 12469954 10004 
B-129958 HMB 
3V18 1085010101 
1003818080 
1*18 HMTnOUl 
ZMJ 9951 10840 
U-ll KMJOI 


9U 

Bft 

9ft 

9ft 


1146 108DL. 


8ft 


■Bimi5H03S 
25-11 1006(010870 
- 9931 995T 

15-)0 9972 99 JD 
•W0 1085010863 
WM- U807M817 
Wft 2848108/618053 
^■JHlIUOd . 37 

VHxnmnjB 
baanoTsmox 
mawoTJ 

1080410814 

^■Hmoibhoto 

17-n»9+4 7934 
9 2M7 10812)0072 

9ft 2+84 1085310863 

8 - 10877188® 

9ft 31-10 HI J219L22 
10ft 0+49 H84II0851 
18U 0+09 10045UA75 

9 IMP 9958 1081] 
lffft 1149 WL05M1J5 
9ft 1944 H8201D8B 
9ft 2844 995510818 
9ft 2146 9955 10805 

0941 9932 9942 

OTOe 9938 99a 

■1+07 loajsms 

UW8 1002710037 

2746 10800 
1+101004410054 
2+1810U3MU5 
13-11 10O90IOUB 

274S Wtt5<MB64 

89-10 100451082 

2496 10)7210032 

1241 1DD3DUKL40 
2*44*950 10045 
1+47 lttHURH 
D-ll 9*75 19675 
Ift 20-11 H8241B844 
lift 29-11 1007010065 
9ft IMO KM3D10848 



Int FlnBS 

Ira Fin 94/04 


Scandl FlnAprt3 
Scania Fin Dec93 
Scotland Ini 92 
SecPodticW 
SbOMout Carp97 
Sndffl_ 

Seat *0/93 - 
Ste Int 89 
Sfelnl9t 
Sac Gen 90/95 

SocG*nMtr94 
SocGenNavW 
Sac Gen 97 
SncbVT 
Spain 91/97 
stoons 
spamaami 
SOOln 99 

Stand Chart AusfO 
Stand Chart 94 
Stand Chart 91 
Staid CTurf Alarm 
Stand Chari Mismatch 
StoM Chart Pore • 
State Bk Indio 87 
Sumitomo Tst 92/94 

Sweden 00 
Sweden 90/05 
SwedBt 92/85 
Sweden 89/99 
Sweden 73/03 
Sw e d en Peru 
Tdvo 92/04 
TakwdftWW 
Total Asta 94/99 
Tarawa 92 
TUvo Tst 92/99 
Ub Norway 99 
UMO/SBkV 
Wrib Fargo 97 
mm Gtyn 91 
World Bk Pere 
World Bk *4 
Yokohama 91 /% 

91 


Comhm Next BM Askd 

9ft 2347 M80BI08H 
Ift 0+12 1MJ0M04. 
10ft 2HB 9*40 UOJU 
n, 1944 1086070855 
9 12-11 1085810068 

10ft 27-4* 10865t007S 
05. 2043 9U7 9937 
9ft 1+07 HIU 71 0027 
| - UU451B855 

9ft 3449 MUD 
1% 2947 U836KBAA 
9ft 1948100.1510075 
9ft 15-U 99.75 10030 
9% 21-06 9945 9955 
10ft 2449 1089010140 
0% 21-48 99JD 9*60 
9M 0740 WOO 9*38 
Ift 30471080010811 
9ft 244» 10800108(0 
Ift 82-12 1081514038 
fft 1946 9*75 10825 
10ft DUS 10025101-3 
lift 1*49 M8M18854 
9ft 87-11 1DGJ3HQ83 
10U 18491005510863 
1ft 28-11 1806810858 
U 2748 1006810878 
Bft 2049 9947 9937 
Mft 3048 M8BZ1005Z 
(ft 29-11 1007818030 
fft 194010050 
9% 0*471082510835 
Bft 20-111084510855 
Mft 1149 1HL3 
0M1 9*35 9945 
9U 07-n 1003410044 
Ift 29-119930 10880 
9ft 040 10031108..; 
7ft OS-12 99J7 9*32 
9ft 1047 9972 9937 
8ft 18-10 9928 **a 
flU 29-11 9941 9944 
Bft 20-1110038111843 
fft Q947 SS81910834 
Bft 20-11 108451 0855 


MI4 1849 M06BW078 
fft T246 1083ai«14* 
91k 14481004510075 
fft 1+04 MBJ21D04Z 
9ft 2141 9130 9930 
9% 2846 99 J5 10835 
Oft Off (MS #35 
Mft M4910U44HU4 
9J7 15449932 9972 
7J 3048 *65 9885 
fft 02-10 1885710047 
fft 15471085510878 


Non Dollar 


-mat 
Aim Bfco97 
Bk Montreal 94 

BkTokvn 80/98 

Bqindasuezfl 
Oltcoro Ht/91 
On GoM Fta 95 
Cam* *6 
Cr Fancier 80 
Cr National 91/95 
Denmark 91/98 

III 94 

BotatamM 
Ltavds Eure 96 
MW 18 
RbsOS 
Snd 9l/*3 

Stand ami Sta Perp 
Yorkshire Int 91/W 


Caapoaltext BU AmU 
12ft 1+01 1881018028 
13ft 2746 M813SBJ55 
Uft 2+881888n0UB 
lift 2i4( munooa 
12ft 1548 99a 99a 
17ft - 9835 «U5 

U% 7146 M02BMUI 
13% 09471083810810 
131k 1*44 1(03010848 
12ft 224B 1003710847 
12ft 15-07 99.97 10007 
UU. 1047 100.12)1822 
12ft 2148 9*35 10045 
Wk 0761 99J4 10004 
12ft tn-aa *972 »a 
12ft 2+071084010850 
1*49*830 9*00 
13ft 2744 99a MODS 


Source : Credit Sulsae-FIrst Boston Ltd . 
London 


National Westminster Finance B.V. 


< I'hurjiiiniM/ 11, rti.-.V.-lfti-flann . n if/i hnntiil liabilitf 


U.S.$400,000,000 

Guaranteed Floating Rate Capital Notes 2005 

Unconditionally and irrevocably guaranteed on a subordinated basis as to payment of principal and interest by 

* National Westminster Bank PLC 


Ci# 


■ /ii.. j71.ru fn/ in Enuionit :i ids ?ii-i:tn: lh,Mit\ 


In accordance with the Trust Deed dated 
ISth April, 1985 (the ‘Trust Deed 7 ’! made 
between National Westminster Finance B.V. 
(the “Company”), National Westminster Bank 
PLC and The Law Debenture Corporation pic- 
constituting the Notes, the Company hereby 
gives notice that completion of the distribution 
of the Notes took place on 20th May. 1985 and 
that accordingly 19th August. 1985 has been 
determined as the Exchange Date (as defined in 
the Trust Deed). 

Persons entitled to delivery of any of the 
Notes are accordingly advised to obtain from the 


specified office of any of the Paying Agents, ihe 
office of Cedel S. A. in Luxembourg or the office 
of Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New 
York as operator of the Euro-clear System 
(“Euro-clear'i in Brussels, the form of the 
certificate to be completed stating that such 
Notes are beneficially owned by persons who 
are not U.S. persons (as defined in the Trust 
Deed). Completed certificates should be 
delivered to the office of Cedel S.A. in 
Luxembourg, or to the office of Euro-clear in 
Brussels within the 1 5 days prior to. on or after 
the Exchange Date. 

June l.9cS5 


lift 7 - RoOJco 9 40 111* 11% iw— % 

«% » RotaPor XM 2L2I71S72 4«k«%46Y, + % 

31ft tmt iSS? Ji G M “ 7*S 18* 18%—% 

iP-JMS? eta ’S+f* +&.?* + * 

17% -9% Rsynk 41 WIU 9% *%•— M 

4gfc H Rsvttwi UO MM 1919 47% 4AM 47% +1% 
18% ?% RvOtfSt JO 43 194 *ft 8% 8% 

22% 1A% fM8atp*2J2 TLS 1* JW4 11% 11%-- % 

lAft 18% RttRcf U2e MU 4 13% 13% 13% + M 

17V. 9 RucnEd 10 ~ 

12% 7% Rodmn JO U 16 

•M 9% Reece 31 

1% % RUPM 

4T% 23 RoldhC JB 
Bft 3% RusAlr 

2 in roam 

12ft 4ft RpGypg JB 

* 31% ROOMY 144 



gVi 20ft RNYpfCXK IU 
57% 52 RNYplAAASollJ 
34% 21% RffpBJC 144 43 
30 20% RppBkftfXH A 3 

22% 15ft ftftCot JB 13 


9% 9% *% + ft 

506 CM 7% 8% 

21 12 9 9 9 . + $ 

as ft ft ft— H 

LI Tl 145 Oft 41% 43ft + M 

1 "w S » w 

“ ? „m «ft 4» 4ft 


35 27% 27ft 27% + M 
150 56% 36% 36% — M 
2B 33% 33ft »+. 

9 29% 29% 29% 

■3 21% 21% 21% 


32% 22 % Roved JO 34 13 2001 26% 2S 26ft + ft 

MM Mb vIRovor 10 12 11% 11% 

40% M% Rovloa 1J4 44 U 1972 40% 40 4M— % 

23% 21% Rrvktpf 1 24 24 24 + % 

Mft 17ft Rcxtm JO M M M 21% 21% JIM— ft 

17ft lift Ruxnrd 44 XI 9 191 14 1W. M + ft 

87% 52% Reyn Hi 130 43 7 1W JWTHiJW+J 


32 29% Reylnvrl 

50 4%% Roylnof 4.T0 83 

41ft 216 RuyMtl UOt U t 

57 58ft RfyMPf 430 63 

SS n Rc&vck 148 44 11 

29 17ft RteodT 1JQ 87 

33% 1M Wt9Akt 30 U 17 

7% S% RvrOk q .. to 
16% 27ft RobSlm 1.12 34 7 

44% 29% Robtat 140 33- 17 

2«% T2 Rreura 

21ft 13% RactiG 

39ft 27% RwtlTI _ 

39% 26% Rotawt LT2 23 10 2036 


137 97 RfclntPt U5 W 

71% 4M RotwwH 26)8 XI 30 

55% 31ft Roftrhl 9 

25% 10% RslRCin 40 14 M 

29% Bft RoHaEu 77* J 30 
13% 6% Rattfaw 46 44 16 

19 12ft Rarer 44 4J 16 . 

35 24 Rorar LB 27 17 11(9 

13ft 8ft Rowan .12 14 47 1574 


269 X1% 31ft 31%+-% 
3 4|% 48% 48% 

(99 M 33ft 34 +% 
31 73% 71ft 73% — % 
302 3M 33% 33% + M 
13 30% 30% 20ft ^ 
713 29% 29% 29%— M 
,12 flb 4% J*- 2 
31 31 30% 308b— M 

2S7 30ft 20ft M —1 
5» 17% 16% 17 — ft 
220 9J 6 '.233 OTkfflft W + tt 


1 134 134 134 

311 44% 63% Mft + ft 

330 53ft 52% 53ft + % 

154 Mft 24% 2flb— 1J 

W9 OTb TO, J7 — % 

4X1 UM TOM 10% . 

44 2% 2ft 4%— % 
396 14% 13% MM + ft 

35 34% 34% — M 

“ ' 8% + ft 


60% Oft RovID 3 jD 7 o 54 4295 57% 56ft » — ft 

22 Uft Raytiri * 20 149 16% 16% 16% + JO 

51% 35% Rvbrmi 44 14 10 
26 14% RtmBr 15 

19% Uft RaiTao Ji 41 I 
28% 17% RyanH 1JB 34 13 
28% 19% Ryders 40 23 9 
26% 12% Rytona 40 £4 17 
15% 1% Rymer 5 


S63 Sift 51 51ft— ft 

U4 23ft aft Mft- ft 

67 27% 27ft 27% 

330 26% 26 26%— % 

7S 25% 25% »+ + ft 

128 16% 15ft 16% + % 


97% 

12ft 

3Mb 

22% 

22 

Mft 

10 

3% 

24ft 

Mft 

35% 

22 % 

n% 

w% 

34% 

54 

28 

9ft 

nft 

51 

25ft 

31ft 

42% 

34ft 

ISM 

22ft 

12% 

9% 

1311. 

28 

47ft 

50% 

13ft 

32% 

6DM 

40% 

15% 

43ft 

45 

12 % 

16% 

16ft 

27% 

5% 

44% 

Z1M 

28ft 

32% 

A5M 

39% 

hm% 

31ft 

30% 

36% 

11% 

25% 

60 

38ft 

30ft 

32% 

104% 

37% 

Bft 

17% 

18ft 

42 

62 

38ft 
32 ft 
18 
19% 
70% 
67ft 
41ft 
43% 
19% 
30ft 
40% 
23 
29ft 
49% 
31 

Mft 

27ft 

21ft 

26ft 

41% 

38ft 

2Sft 

31 

36 

16% 

8% 

53 

27ft 

20 % 

17ft 

S!'* 

29 

Mft 

17ft 

27ft 

56ft 

38 

43ft 

24% 

50ft 

21 

Mft 

30% 

35* 

3% 

20U 

n% 

34ft 

21ft 

34 

T 

SIM 

21ft 

12ft 

79M 

21ft 

18ft 

8M 

36ft 

28ft 

14 

53 

189 

49M 

12ft 

37ft 

47ft 

17ft 

21% 

351A 

15ft 

65 

38ft 


35% KM 2M 47 13 443 481& 48 48%— % 

8% SLInds 72 17 11 180 lift TIM lift + ft 

W% SPSTec JO 26 15 W6 31 30% 31 + ft 

15 SofabW J04 J 30 1757 15ft 13ft ’a*— JJ 

16 SobnRy 2 7MM 593 17ft 17% 17ft + ft 

>»R^ u> ju-t 

's a??^ss 2 sasa+s 


133 U 
170 M 7 


.16 J M 


31ft Sofowy 
34% Sago 
Mft SUoLt> 

9 5Pau) 

3% vlSataO 
22% SalltaM 
son SallMpf 399o 73 
17ft SOtaGs 374 75 9 
Aft LhmB JB* 97 11 
8% SJuanR 23 

31 Sandr 46 U 15 
Mft SAnURt 1/94 BA 13 
20ft SF*5oP 1/00 
27ft SaraLec 144 ... 
26% Sgtvvei 140 44 14 
14% SouIRE JO 17 44 
Mft SavElP 140 74 ■ 
9% 5avE pf ITS HU 
4ft Savin 

9ft Savin pt LSQ 12A 
17ft SCANA ZM U 9 


26 21 ft 21 ft 21 %— % 
111 lift 11 % Uft + M 
12 5 ft 5 ft 5 ft _ 

871 33 ft 32 ft 33 + ft 

400 S 3 52 ft 52 ft — % 
618 29ft 27ft 28ft + ft 

750 eft *ft 

10 10ft 10ft 10ft 
857 34ft 33% 34M + ft 
70 25 24ft 34ft— ft 
X3 1311988 31 30% 30ft — ft 

34 12 *50 42ft 41ft 43ft + ft 

3 31% 30ft 31% + ft 
9 tTft 17 17—14 

149 21ft 20ft 21ft 
1 12 ft 12 ft 12 ft— ft 
200 7ft 7% 7ft + ft 

9 12% 12% 12% „ 

230 27% 27 27ft— ft 


33 SehrPIo fii 34 n w 47 — ft 

34% Scbhnb 170 33 9 6329 38ft 37% 37%—% 

.12 10 18 627 11% lift 11% + ft 

76 14 14 Z10 32 31ft 31% — ft 

10 22 58ft 58ft 5Bft 

17+ XI 10 *26 40ft 39% 40ft 

42 37 » 85 M )3ft 13%— % 

U 38 41% 41ft 41ft— % 
9 4098 38ft 37% 37ft— % 
34 12% 12% 12% + M 


42 1.1 


7V> SclAll 
21% scoalnn 
48ft scotFef 
25% Sen MP 
17% Soottrt 
30% Swill 
Zlft SeaCnt ... 

9% SeaCtpt 144 T14 
lift 5eaCt»fBZ10 UO 
Uft SeaCpfCZlO 123 
14% SsaLad JO 24 6 

30^* Iwnii JO 10 10 

AO 1J l! 
20 SealPw 1J0 37 0 
40ft SearieG 1J0 17 77 
29ft Sears 176 45 10 
97 Sears of 9J2o 9J 
>9 SucPacs IJ< 45 
lift sngLt 
24% Sweeps 
11% Shaktaa 
11 Shawm 
52ft HwSSO 

28% stretrr 
17V* She Ido - 
MMt ShetGat 1A0 
66% StoetGnf 3J» 


33 16ft 16 Mft + ft 
70 16ft 16 16ft + % 
1051 79% 19Vk l*ft 
41 4ft 4% Aft + % 
509 41% 40ft 48%— % 
576 17% 17% 17% — Vb 
21* 25ft 26 26% 

163 27 26% 26ft + Vi 

812 57ft 57ft 57% 

6SB2 39 37% 3* + % 

861 imft SftTO —ft 
7 2579 30ft 39ft 30 + % 

72 17ft 17ft 17ft + % 
JO 1 J 17 291 Mft 34 34%+M 

73 57 33 43 13ft 13ft 13% 

ii U I 186 25 24ft2*ft + % 
200 3J 11 30 59ft 39ft 39% 

377* 67 578 35ft 35% 35ft 

JO 33 6 170 27% 27ft 27ft— % 

47 2 38 30 20 

37 2 96 96 96 +3% 


24 STirwfn 32 Z* 13 250 3Kk »ft 3»k + ft 

if US ST 60 45 14 ^ tS ig 

w» hSST 1 in 24 14 zrn 4i 41% 

48ft Stgnlpl 412 73 44 60% 59 59 —1ft 

Sft Strew AO U 9 395 3644 36ft 36ft- ft 

SU^Pf 350 11.1 29 31% I'M 31% + % 

Uft Skyline 68 X3 21 237 Mft 13ft 14ft + ft 

9ft Smtthln 72 X3 111 58ft W W 

50ft SnikB 2J0 42 11 3413 64ft 4» 64%— % 

36ft Smuckr 1J8 L7 17 30 65 64ft 64ft— ft 


176 XO 13 
1A G 1 
.160 1 J 12 
170 44 14 

3J0 87 

5rcGPPf 260 UL5 
SeJtrln 268 87 n 


2*ft SnapOn 
27 Sanot 
12ft SanvCP 
22ft SaaLin 
27ft SaureC 
IB 

22 _ 

41ft Soudwn UO 


22 SortBk 170 18 10 
5% SootPS ZU3L0 40 

IBft SCalEt 2J4 76 8 
Mft SouHiCo 1J2 XI 
17 SotnGlS 1J0 45 
29 SNETI 272 6J 11 
31% SoNEpf 182 97 
21% SoRypf 260 107 

23 SoUnCo 172 53 

23 SouHnd 1J» XB 11 
lift So Roy .12 3 20 

6ft Soumrk 70 Z7 5 
47 Somk pf 7680143 
14ft SWAM .13 J 


II 

26 

6/00 77 9 
-52 U TT 
US 73 9 
S 2 47316 


349 39ft 38 39V* +1ft 

s^sa^-ft 

4 42 % 43 ft 42 % + M 

» »*■ "Sift 

. 27 S 4 in 2 *ft 27 
7 6761 21 % 20 % 21 % + ft 
B 31 26 % 25 % 26 

35 % 3515 .— ft 

't% ’t% * 7 %— ft 

49% an an + ft 



174 77 


lift SwtFtar 
18ft SwlGns 
55% 9wMI 
19ft SwEnr 
17% SwtPS 
11% Spartan 
15ft SpoctP _ 

31ft Soerry 172 
30% Spring* 152 
31% Square U4 
39% Stoitbb 1J6 
17ft Statay JO 
16% Stapnf 56 
11 StMotr 32 15 11 
39% SWDOtl 2J0 AO 8 
6% SJPocCs „ I? 
11% Stondex 52 36 * 

19% Sfonwk 5A XI 12 
23% Starred LOB 37 10 
Oft StaMSe 170011 J 
2% Sta upo 
Mft 5iurchl 
fft StriBCP 
StrScrT 

24 Sturt Dg 
15% StavnJ . 

27 SfwWnr 168 AO M 

32% SteneW UO U I 

25 StonuC 60 22 10 
36% StOPShP 1.10 Z1 11 
15% StarEa 1J4 9J M 

2 vl Start 
34 Mr Starer 
18% SlrtNUn 
14% StrtdRl 


wmk-: 


1481 (Q 81 ft 81% + ft 

40 24ft 26 26 —ft 

343 24% 24 24ft + ft 

702 12ft 12% 12% + M 

147 17% 17ft 17% + Vb 

XB 10 45W 52% 50% 51 — ft 

45 10 16 33% 33% 33% + ft 

47 11 700 39% 38% 39% + ft 

2J 17 1546 (2ft 68% 42ft— ft 

33 W 1330 22 21ft 21% t _ 

2512 534 22ft 21ft 27M + % 

' 160 12ft 12ft 12% — ft 

1790 46ft 46 46% + ft 

156 20% 28% ZDM— ft 

' 13% 13ft 13ft — ft 

30% 30ft 30% 

32ft 32ft 32ft + ft 

10ft 10% 10% — M 

3ft 3% 3ft J- <4 
19% 19ft 19%— % 
10% 18ft 10% 


471 


170 


2J0 


3% SuovSh 
Oft SunBks 
2SVb Sunoi 
6% SwnEl 
43% SunCo 
90ft S«lCpf 275 
34% Sundstr U0 
7% SunMn 
25 SuprVI 68 
21ft SUBMM 62 
14 Swoik n 
16% Svtmn 1/OB 
28ft Svfampf 240 
11% SymoCp __ 
38% Syntax 152 
27% Sysco 76 


68 J 
60o U 
JO 48 30 


.12 36 

J4 35 10 3 

73 9 *22 

170 XA 14 10W 33% 33M 33% + % 

170 67 11 363 19% 19ft 19% 

’ II 38 27% 27% 

83 41 41 41 

366 27% 27 27ft— ft 

748 51M 50ft 51M + ft 

f 21 20V. 20% — ft 

2% 2M 2M 
75% Z5M 75% + ft 
124 19% 19M 19% 

187 15ft 16M Mft + ft 

W 5% 5ft 5ft 

445 JSM 34ft 35 

31 38ft 38 38% 

1496 Sft Oft Sft 

46 11 1022 49% 47ft 49% . ... 

<34 7ft 7% 7ft- ft 

1J 13 1152 38ft 37ft 38 + ft 

3 U 312 47% 47 47ft + % 

S3 16 3 15% 15% 15% 

56 11 375 19ft 18% 19ft + M 

66 13 3Sft XI 35% +1 

21 23 15% 15% 15%— ft 

XI 15 1415 (2% 62% 62% 

1/0 16 389 36% 35% 35ft— M 


36 12 
1J 11 


27 
X9 12 
64 


i±a 

t +ivc 


soft 34% 
33% 24 
13% 7% 

19 11% 

25ft 17 
81% 50% 
fib 2ft 
77% 52% 
19% 12% 
21% 15 
77 49ft 
35ft »ft 
15% 12% 
68ft SIM 
5ft 7M 
302% 196ft 
84 UMr 
4SK 22 
39Vb 2SVk 
45ft 32% 
82M. 65ft 
35ft m 
U% 9% 
32ft 20% 
40ft JIM 
38ft 31% 
46% 31% 
39 26M 

53 32 

34% 25 

MTft BAU 

3% 1 
24% Mft 
39 28% 

29% 20ft 
J 2 
26M 


5M 

27 T4M 
43ft 28ft 
18% 12% 
26% 13% 
2% Mft 
26% 14% 
10% 5% 

57Tb 33ft 
va 40% 
23ft 12 
33% Mft 
58% 47% 
9ft 4% 
10% 7ft 
39% 26% 
21ft 14ft 
18% 13% 
27ft 24% 
3ft 22 
26ft 20 
31% 25% 
18V. 13% 
Uft 13% 
45ft 13% 
53ft 3DM 
32% 20% 
TTft TO 
4M 1 
19ft Bft 
12 6 
40% 2Sft 
28ft 13% 

Wft 7ft 

15ft 11% 

sssa 

S% ijJft 
21 % 20 % 
37ft 37% 
25ft 19M 
13M 6M 
95ft 77 
24ft 20 


TDK J6U J 17 
TECO 2JA 7J 9 
TGIP 17 

TNP U5 TO 9 
THE in 46 M 
TRW 3J0 47 » 
TocSoat 

TattBrd 1.12 L5 M 
T alley .10* 6 14 

Tdtaypfin 43 

Tambrd U0 43 » 

Tandy 17 

Tndyeft 12 

Tektnix in U 8 
Tel com 7 

Trttfyn 10 

Tetratr 72 U 24 
Totex 11 

TuiraMn 64 17 9 
TarniCD 272 43 13 
Tone or 760 8J 
Tardyn 10 

Ttaora 60 33 
Tutor pf 2.W 9J 
Texaco an s.i os 
TxABc 1-2 47 • 

Texcm 1-54 47 7 
TUkEOI 23 U * 
TxETPf 6n*U6 
Tex Hid Mb 2.9 U 
Texlnxt ZOO 37 9 
Toxlnt 

TkxOOs .18 U 10 
TxPoe 60 U 21 
TexUtll 2/52 8.9 7 

TejrfJ In _ 

Tuxtron in 3J 13 
T*KtrPf 160 36 
Thocfc ^ 99 

TlwrmE JJ 

TUmatS U4 36 M 
Tttontln Mb 43 9 
TtWflMea J 15 

mss « a 14 

fiK' 0 1* 17 18 

TlmlP»)-S7 1J 
Tbnplx 14 

TIimM 1-34 16 16 
Timken Ufa 36 15 
Than 

Titan Pf in 96 

TarfShP in 4 A 7 

Toktmrs 68 27 10 

TolEdta 152 1X8 5 

Tal&Jpf 172 119 
TOIEdPf 17S 1W 
TWEdPf 367 137 
TdEtf Pf 4J8 1X8 
TolEdPf 2J6 1X1 
TolEdpf 271 118 
Tanka g 70 3 7 
TootRo) 68b U 14 
Trahmk U0 11 M 
TaraCo M 23 9 
Tasts 
Towle 

Towle Of 64 77 
TratfV 79 1J 
TY/APf 1^ IS3 

T ranine 1» 1X1 
TARHV U0 8.1 

10 

TtSBT 270 106 
Transcn 5 

TrOpS|« « 

TrGPpf 150 MJ 


97 36 
359 33 
67 11% 
55 17% 
IIS 21% 
046 71% 
130 3M 
530 75ft 
114 10M 
22 20% 
287 7< 
4047 35 

33 2* 

19 3% 

27S6 42% 

97 83 
1727 22 

256 Mft 

46 23ft 
2986 37ft 

98 32% 
503 33% 
955 34 
145 55ft 

23% S 
707 2% 
3789 17 

4 34% 
3220 28% 

47 4% 

702 51ft 

1 46 

. 2 ** 
156 27 
346 37ft 
31 1616 
725 Mft 
516 22ft 
199 17 
454 7ft 

6539 60ft 

3106 
72 17ft 
488 53 

30 50 
83 8% 

8 Uft 
76 3Mb 
64 17% 
1050 Uft 
43 27 
70 27ft 
74 26ft 

31 31 ft 

5 ISM 
7 17ft 

414 »b 
10 49% 

S 47M 

474 2ft 
16 9 

35 (M 
3905 39% 
179 3f% 
9174 19ft 
199 14% 
1472 29ft 
343 30ft 
57 2T9b 
33 12ft 
> 21 
675 49% 

sw am 
180 10 
IBB* 96 
25 as 


3SM 35ft— % 
3ZM 32% — % 
lift lift 
17ft 17ft 
21% Z1%— M 
7Mk 7TM + ft 
3 3 

74ft 75% +1 
17ft 17% — ft 
20M 20% 

73% 74 
33% 35 +ft 
12% 13 + M 

57ft 50%— ft 
3ft 3»+ M 
256 257ft + ft 
17ft 17% — ft 
37. 38% + ft 

36% 36% + Vb 
41ft 42% + % 
Sift 88 + M 

20ft 21ft +lft 
10 10ft + ft 
23M 2Jft + ft 
36ft 37 — ft 
31ft 32% — ft 
32ft 33ft + ft 
32ft 34 +114 

55 55ft + ft 
27ft 28 —ft 
B8% 92% +2% 
2ft 2ft— M 
Mft 17 + ft 

! 

4ft 4»— M 

51 51% + ft 

46 46 + % 

9% 9% 

26ft 27 + ft 

37 37% — M 

Wft 15ft— M 
15% 15ft— ft 
21% 21% — M 
16% 14M— ft 
7 7 + M 

57ft 60 «ft 

103 106 +3 

16% 17M + Vb 
SZft 53 
49% 49ft— ft 
fib Bft 
10% 10% 

29ft 30ft + V* 
17ft 17% + ft 
17% 18% 

26ft aw * M 
25% 27 fft 
25% 26ft + ft 

30% 31 
18 18 + M 

T7M 17ft + % 
37ft 37ft— 2ft 
48% 48%—% 

47 47M + M 

74 14ft— lb 

2% 2M— M 
8% 9 + M 
A 6ft 

S 39% +1 
24% + % 
ink 19 AM 
14% Uft— ft 
28 29 + % 

30% 30% 
aift + % 
rata 12 % + m 

31 27 

4Mb 49ft , 

20 20% 4- M 

9% 10 +ft 
96 *6 + % 

23 23-+% 


36ta are* TreoSr U0 .{ jjj stta jp» 3* — ** 

u ""3*“8 sa*+e 


£ui! 

70 S IS 
JO Ji „ 
Mb A n 

1.W 87 


_ 19% TriCon 

t ft 13 Trialed 
ft ag% TrlnPs 
48 34% Tribune 

6% 4 Trtcntr 

8% 5%. Tries 
37% Uft TriirtV 


25% lift IrilEig 



G% »S 5^** IS 11 

ink *% Tuhex J “ 


IS »% 21% »+ * 

^ uta »» S* t M 

ITjs'Sss a jgrra 

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15M *% Tulto* 


55 % + ft 






25 19% UQlPf . 

lift 7% UNCRO* 
M 10 UB 
37ft 17ft USFG 
39% 23% USG* 
69% 40% U9Q of 
19ft U UiHFnt 
60% 45 IW tar 
HPK 75 UnINV 


270 £7348 IW »% i*% 30 ft + 1 % 

a *3 5 £ %:='* 


367 

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10 ^ft '»% 
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70 L5 II 

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129 100% 100 


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ga-ss is « a « 4«b 

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pf 4J0 
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32% 24% WElPfMfOO 12J 

J7ft U% UnElPf MS 11.1 

19% 13% UnFIPl 2.13 11 J 

26 19% Unfit Pf 272 JM 

65ft 45M UrtEl Of X44 11J 

+6% 49% uei ofH an izo 


766 19% VI W -Vb 
IDDZ 37 37 » 

=3 IS 25ft ^ 




1U% K UjiPcpr 7j| 6j ft 

T u"ito? IS 111 " ®1 


28% 19% umupf 357 1+0 

17% lift UlltoPf X» 128 

284+ 21M Ulllupf fW IA? 

Mft 10 UllhIPf UO 114 

22ft 14% Urtfind M RJ 

43 35ft Unrtirei 72 J 

42ft » UJurBk 1/56 37 

15% . fft UtdMM 

21b 3M UPkMn 
38% 22 UnlrG .12 J 
Bft Sft USMOcn _ 

42M 29% USLUOU n 27 

40ft 23 USStwe J6 

39ft 22 USStaul m 


..... jB” 274k — 1% 

?i St SS 2 » + % 

^S* 2fib 2*M 2*ft + M 

■ n zi% a aft- % 
^ ^StogftSftig 

10 1722 13M l» « + ft 

_ i 1* Mft 35ft 26 
27 15 809 29% 3Hb M 

X6 19 1762 27% 27% 27% — M 


36 52% 52% CTk + % 

67 129% 127% OTft 

® ® +Vi 

n-'jit ’"“SSS&ift 

ijo+a’i aSaSaftaft + ft 


32% USTOb* ^ 44 13 
79% 57ft U Sweat S72 73 * 
13 6 USIckn 19 

45 29% UnTUdi UO U 

39ft WVk UTCh dt 255 43 
25 17% UnITel 1J2 73 

21 14% UWRl 178 

33% aft Unttrte 70 
21 Mft UnWcr JO 
27 7% UnvDuv 

TTft 19ft Un/vFd 
23% 15ft UnLMd 
53 30 Unocal 

* s « 


23% 


32ft 30% USLFPl X33 10-5 
10ft ten UsUUFd 1 J4a 9J 
29% 20% UtaPL 1M 97 « 
27 a% UlPLPf 2X0 107 
27ft 21% UtPLpf 230 107 
»% 17% UtPLpf 27* 106 
19ft 15% Utf»L Pf 2J4 10J 
24% 15% UtttfCO 1720 5/6 7 
21ft 17ft UtHCoPt Z44 11 J 
23% 18ft UIUGOPTZ61 1X2 


5 n% aft 3i%— ft 

“i£pp + + ; 

105 22% 22ft 22ft + ft 
87 19% 1* 1*% 

TO 23% 22% 23% — ft 

9 aft am a%— % 

4 23ft 23% 23% + to 


39 fift 
12 % 5 % 
23% M 
4% 2ft 
28ft 19 
4M 2ft 
46% 27% 
13ft 9M 
25% 19 
8% 3% 
lift Sft 
47% 36ft 
raw 54 
B1M 60% 
89% 69 
70% 52% 
65ft 49% 
23ft lift 
41ft 28 
78 60% 


VFGorp 

Valero 

Volar of 

vaievin 

Van Dm 

Varco 

Vartan 

Vara 

Vceco 

Veflda 

VestSe 

Viacom 

VVEPOf 

VaEPpf 

VoEPnl 

VoEPU 

VaEPPf 

Vtahay 5 

vamad 

VMcaM 


LT2 Z9 ID 1067 38% 
308 11% 

3-1 *** 91 ^% 

92 47 4 188 21% 

JS J 15 381 30ft 

JO X 7 14 57 talk 

J U 19 138 20 
145 65 7ft 

1700107 36 mb 

jQ 3 21 315 48ft 
732 m 3 S8W 71ft 
IW 185 IOOeH 
975 HL7 289Kb 91ft 


772 llJ 

770 HU 


230C TO 
1810c 66% 
U 36 22% 

II 38 41 

280 17 II 41 7Sft 


37% 

11% 

22 % 

ZM 

21 % 

Zft 

29% 

10 % 

-19ft 

4% 

iita 

47 

49 

81 

■9% 

48% 

A4% 

aw 

40ft 

74% 


3SW + ft 
iita— ta 
22%—. % 

a 3 !*"* 

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30ft +1 
10ft + ’ 
30 
7V> 
lift 

48% + ft 

71ft +1% 

81 + ft 

91% -W 
70 +2 

64% +1 
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41 

73ft +1 


W 


29% 22 WICOR 2J0 75 • 53 29ft 28% 29 — ft 

38% a% wacftvs UO 27 IT 14* »% OTb OTA— ft 

aft 14% WBCkM J U 54 ’St ’i, 'SJ t 5t 
10ft Aft Wo l npc 214 7% 7ft 3ft + ft 

55% 36% WBIMrt n J 29 2684 Mb Mb 36ft 41ft 

30ft 15% Wo toms 20 4» 29% »h »% 4 ft 

23M 15% WkHRspUO 140 22% 22% 22ft 4 ft 

38% 25ft WPfCSv A5 UU » 34% + % 

39ft 22 WolIJra U0 U I 442 39 38% 39 — ta 

26% 17ft waracp A U 13 43 23ft 23% 23%— % 

38% 17 WntCm 3442 39ft 29% »% 4 ft 

42ft 28ft WamrL 141 U H 2235 4IH 41U flta— % 

22 Mft WtuhOs 166 73 8 SJ Mil »%— ft 

2SU 15% WtoNtaf in 44 7 33 Mb 34% 34ft 4 M 

52% 30% WtaMpr Z30 5A 2 . . 

U% Mft WWWt 248 108 I 344 23% 22ft 23 — Jh 

33 14 IT 1301 5|ft 58 58ft— ft 

J6 1J 12 368 3+ft 36% 36ft 
70 27 f 7 * 9 9— % 

4 4M 44k 

70u 3 IS' 156 21ft a% aft 4 % 
JO 18 Ii 80 39% 39% 39% + ft 
Z40Z9 9 2U62V.A2 62 4ft 

2 4* 49 49 4 % 

MS 22ft 2£9k aw 4ft 


59% 27U mat* 

28ft 20 W attain 
12ft ift wayGoe 

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49% 40 WUIPpf 487C 9-9 
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m% t 2 wpoci M *ra *i 

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Sft Tflta 70 35 It 9017 *4* 3JJJ * J* 

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fift «3% wuyrpr 450 95 
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42 36ft White PfOJQ 
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SAW 23ft WnDbc 188 48 13 
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36% 25ft WtacPL Z64 78 9 

37% 2A WtocPS UA 7J • 

40% 21ft Vinteo 188 47 f 

15Vi 9% WtatwrUV 34 U • 
25% lift WUOdPf JO XT ft 
47% 32 Vta to ft 288 47 U 
(Aft 44% WWW Pi Z» 13 

49% Wt Wripy Ufa U W 

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M 4312 43% 

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15 9ft fft' fft * ft 
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187 ^ *5% *S5+ 4 

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66 166 7 Aft 7 

ITT 3816 pn 37ft- ft 

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81 S% 31 35 — % 

IU toft KM tota A ft 

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X TTft 17ft T»ft— Vi 


sow 33% Karan MO M 
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29 19 XTRA 64 VM 


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36 25 Zayrei 

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19 to 1116 Wendy a 31 XI I* 2338 184+ 18% Mft + to 

27% 16W WUICo A4 U M 12 25% 25 25 

43 34 WPunPpILSO 1IU 100c 4J% 43% 43% + % 

43ft 34% WstPtP 270 5J 11 265 39ft 39ft 39% + Ml 

I3M *%W99JdT#U4 a 6 12ft Uft 12ft— ft 

7 2ft WnAtrL 06 1241 4% Aft 6ft 

2ft ft WtAJrw* MM2 3 —lb 


U.S. Retailers Post 
Mixed Sales in May 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK —The major U.S. retailers on 
Thursday posted mixed sales results for May 
compared with a year ago. 

Sears Roebuck & Co n the largest American 
retailer, said that its sales for the four weeks 
ended June lfdl 1.7 percent from a year earlier. 

K man Corp„ the second-largest retailer, said 
that its sales jumped 11.8 percent, but sales for 
stores open more than a year rose a much more 
modest 32 percent 

J.C. Penney Co., ranked third in the United 
States, said that its sales fell 1-8 percent 

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said that its sales spurt- 
ed 30 percent, but same-stems sales rose by 8 
percenL F.W. Woolworth Qxsaid that its sales 
rose 4.7 percenL 

R.H. Macy & Co. said that its sales increased 
6.4 percent 

“In general, the May sales reports were disap- 
pointing and in our opinion reflected the con- 
tinued slowing economic environment,” said 
Jeffrey Fedner, an analyst until the investment 
firm Merrill Lynch, Fierce, Fenner & Smith Inc. 

Mr. Feiner said that waning consumer confi- 
dence in the economy and a slowing in employ- 
ment were adversely affecting retail sales. 

In addition, the sales comparisons were being 
made against strong results in May 1984, he 
said. 

Mr. Feiner said that “despite some potential 
benefits from tax refunds, we still look for a 
continued generally slow retail picture.” 

However, the analyst added that companies' 
profit gains would outpace their sales gains 
because they have reduced their large inven- 
tories of earlier this year. 

Bernard Fauber. chairman of K mart, said 
that good weather in March and April spurred 
consumers to buy early what they would nor- 
mally purchase in May: summer clothes, lawn 
mowers, patio furniture, barbeque griDs and 
car-care products. That caused last month’s 
sales to slacken, he said. 

Sears, based in Chicago, said that its sales for 
the four weeks totaled 31.75 billion compared 
with $1.78 btffion a year ago. For the first four 
months of the fiscal year, sales edged up 05 
percent to £6.94 billion from $6.88 billion. 

K mart, of Troy, Michigan, said that its sales 

for the mouth totaled S1.8 billion compared 

with $ 1.61 billion. For the year so far, sales rose 
15.2 percent to $ 6.8 billion from $55 billion. 

New York-based Penney said that its May 
sales came to $864 million compared with $880 
million last year. Year-to-date, sales rose 1 4 
percent to $3.45 billion from $3.4 billion. 

Wal-Mart, of Bentonville, Arkansas, said 
(hai its sales for the four weeks came to $653 
million compared with $502 million. For the 
four months, sales rose 33 percent to S? 3 1 
billion from 51.74 billion. Samesiore sales rose 
11 percent. 

New York-based Woolworth said that its 
May sales came to $444 million compared with 
$424 million. Year-to-date, sales rose 3 cement 
to $1.71 billion from $1.66 billion. 

. Macy, headquartered in New York, said that 

its sales last month totaled $323.9 million com- 
pared with $304.5 million. For the 17 weeks, 
sales rose 5.8 percent to $128 billion from $TU 

billion. 




Maw HIGHS 338 


AMRGPP* AZCGrau* 

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Company Earnings^ 


Canada 


OBC 


rraimt- 

Per Share 


IMS 

BU 

1J1 


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ProHI, 


WJ* 1984 

'fig 12S.9 
257 2X6 

££F**rtas 


United States 

Brown Group. 

im Halt ms nil 
6U — . TOX7 WJ3 

X97 9-18 STw 

H * r Share-*. (M* IJ7 


Japan 

Hitachi 


Year 

Revenue, 


»83 


Pw Shore 

T; trillion. 


1*14 

SX1 T 4J7 T 

31 Tn« I^IX 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


Page 1' 



GE,SNEGMA 
^ ^Pickedby Arnett 

Rtwert ' 

^ PARIS — . General Electric 

>. Co, of the United State? and 
■ France’s SNECMA group said 
Thursday they have won a $75- 
million contract Id install tbcir 
r, ’*■ engines in European-buHt Air- 

- ~ N - buses to be suppled to Aastra^ 

lia's Ansett airiine. 

. The engine manufacturers 

y said their jointly designed CFM 

C "*s. 56-5 turbofan engine.wooid be 

Nt ! installed in the Aubus A- 320 to 
a be delivered to Ansett from 

a \ : July, 1988. 

| Last week. Airbus Industrie, 

J the European consortium that 

builds the Airbus an- 

\ onunced (hat Ansett had con- 
I t jT* traded to buy eight of the 

^ ^ •. short-haul. A- 320 aircraft, with 

*s ^ ■ options on another nine. The A- 

• .. 320, the latest member of the 

‘ •“ Airbus series, is dne to fly in 

August, 1986 and enter service 
a year later. 


TUT 


jin- 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 


By Nancy L Ross 

• I* 'adtiagtoafastSenkc- 

- WASHINGTON — The House 
subcommittee cm financud < institu- 
tions has approved legislation that 
could lead to.fixQ imerslaw banking 
byJnJylMCL 

It alb voted Wednesday to dose 
the locqibole that has -spawned so- 
called non-bank banks, while per- 
mitting 109 of these limiiabpnr- 
poser institutions to continue 


The M cooW come np before 
the full House Banking Committee 
as soon as next week, an aide said. 
The scdoDS of the 30-QWQ)ber sub- 
committee are important because 
they usually foreshadow the vote 
by the full 49-monber Banking 


Representative Doug Barnard 
Jr., a Democrat of Georgia, led 
efforts to fashion a tall that would 
encourage regional banking with- 
out a trigger for nationwide inter- 
state banking- Butthe committee 
voted 18- to-T2 to require states that 


opt for regional accords to go to. 
full interstate banking by 1990 at 
the latest. 

At that time, states would nofbc 
able to exdude any other states 
from their interstate banking pacts. 
In current regional a rr ange ments, 
states have exduded money-center 
banks in New York and California 
to give smaller regional bank s a 
chance to develop. 

- To avoid excessive concentration 
after full interstate banking is 
adopted, the bill would prohibit the 
25 largest banks in terms of depos- 
its from acquiring each other. A 
bank holding company conld not 
acquire another bank if it would 
control more than 25 percent of 
total U.S. deposits or exceed a per-, 
centre of deposits set by any one 
state. The restriction would not ap- 
ply to purchases of new banks or 
those with less than $100 millio n in 
assets. 

The subcommittee approved by 
a voice vote the biB to allow non- 
bank banks established as of May 


9, 1984, to remain in existence. But 
no further expansion of the institu- 
tions would be permitted. 

Non-bank banks have been used 
to get around federal restrictions 
on interstate banking or on who 
can own a hank. Federal law de- 
fines hanlcs as institutions tha t 
both take checking account depos- 
its and make commercial loans. 
Non-bank banks offe one service 
or the other, but not both. 

■ The committee also dealt with 
cancans raised by Federal Reserve 
Chairman Panl A. VokAer about 
what be called non-thrift thrifts. 

At issue are thrift institutions 
taken aver by commercial firms 
that want to tkke advantage of fed- 
eral insurance hut usually are inter- 
ested in using the thrift’s assets for 


GW s Purchase of Hughes Continues Diversification 


(Continued from Page 13) ; 
basic car or truck from a mechani- 
cal product, which includes afew\ 
electrical subsystems, to - one with 
major electromechanical and elec- 
tronic dements." 

' But according to some analysts, 
the technology flow may. be two- 
way. Some ot the cost cutting and 
production efficiency terfimqnes 

ifiat Detroit has learned over the 
last few years may well apply to 
Hughes operations. These have 
been “on cost-plus basis for years 
and are inefficient,” observed Ar- 
thur G. Davis, an analyst with Pres- 
cott, Ball & TnrbexL “GM could 


Big Advances 
In Robotics 

(Continued from Page 13) 
two groups. Larger companies have 
.j resources to seD not just robots, 
6m application solutions to end- 
users. Smaller companies seem to 
be concentrating on supplying ro- 
bots to the larger ones. 

Vision and force-sensing systems . 
. for robots are available today. On 
the horizon is a development that 
could add new dimenrians to robot 
adaptability: artificial intelligence 
programming. 

‘ With artificial intelligence prt> 
g r ammin g, a robot facing an obsta- 
cle would try different solutions. 

- “An intelligent robot learm bow 
-to adapt to its environment and 
continue its task,” Leslie D. Inter- 
rante and John E Biegel wrote in a 
^jxa* delivered at the conference. 


apply its mamifactnring technol- 
ogy and maybe make Hughes a 
low-cast Udder -for -future con- 
tracts," he sad- 
Mos( analysts expect GM to 
treat Hughes somewhat differently 
than EDS. Hnghes wdl be an inde- 
pendent sabsknary of a new corpo- 
ration,. GM Hughes Electronics, 
which win also incandeGM’s Delco 
Electronics and Ddeo Systems di- 
visions. 

corporation, GM has luma? over 

most; of its internal rnfn rmnHrv n- 
proccssing operations to EDS, 
winch means the subsidiary is gain 


ing control over the nervous system 
of the entire corporation. 

Hughes, however, is expected to 
continue to operate its business as 
before, sharing technology with the 
rest of GM but not beaming deep- 
ly involved in the management of 
unrelated parts of the corporation. 

The Hughes takeover continues 
'a remarkable series of acquisitions, 
joint ventures and reorganizations 
that have come since GM was shak- 
en to its foundations in 1980 with a 
loss of S763 million — -‘its first since 
the 1920s — at the realization that 
Japanese companies conld make 


GMaadEgyptian OjficiahPtanTalks 
On Production of Small Automobiles 

- The Associated Press 

DETROIT — General Motors Corp. has said it plans to begin 
discretions with Egyptian officials on proposals for a second GM 
prodnaxm venture m Egypt. 

■ GM received a letter of intent from Egyptian officials to “initiate 
negotiations for production of passenger cars of two-liter or less 
displacement far the local Egyptian market," the U.S. automaker said 
Wednesday. 

GM and Isuzu Motors Ltd of Japan are completing a plant near 
Cairo that will produce small trucks. GM owns 31 percent of that 
. operation, Isuzu 21 percent and private Egyptian investors die rest, 
said Jack Hamed, a GM spokesman. 

Mr. Hamed said that the new plant, at a site not yet determined, 
probably would be a joint venture between GM, private Egyptian 
investors and perhaps that country’s government, although that, too, 
has not been determined. 

, The plan also calls for the development of a new component 
industry supported by several major U A. and European corporations, 
GMsakL 

The Egyptian market imports 70,000 to 90,000 small- and medium- 
sized vehicles a year, primarily from Europe, Mr. Hamed said. 


high-quality cars at a lower cost 

Since then, GM has duninated 
entire divisions, such as Fisher 
Body, in an effort to streamline its 
manufacturing, and grouped its 
five car divisions into two super- 
groups to speed new model devel- 
opment. It has framed a joint ven- 
ture with Fannc Inc. to produce 
robots and one with Toyota Motor 
Crap, to make Chevrolet Nova sub- 
compacts. 

GM has also invested in small 
companies that are developing 
computer programs with artificial 
intelligence and those that m»w» 
vision systems for automated 
equipment 

According to securities analysts, 
the immediate financial impact of 
the Hughes takeover on GM will be 
modest, because of the automaker’s 
giant size. “GM is going to have 
dose to SI 00 billion in sales this 
year,” observed David Healy of 
Drexel Burnham Lambert. 
“Hnghes is 5 percent of that" 

Nevertheless, he said, the profits 
of Hughes, if combined with EOS’S 
outride earnings, would give GM 
an «ddiri«nal annual income ap- 
proaching $1 bilfion, which could 
be quite useful when auto sales next 
go into a cyclical downturn. GM 
earned $4JoDHon in 1984. 

Mr. Smith has said GM may be 
as much as 30 percent diversified 
by the end of the decade, but said 
he was not looking for acquisitions 
simply for soarces of earnings. 
Anything GM buys, he has said, 
wifi have to bring in new technol- 
ogy, as with Hughes, or improve 
operations, as with EDS. 


s. 

Salomon Picks U.K. Brokers 
To Work on Japan Equities 


The subcommittee voted to cre- 
ate a qualified thrift test, meaning 
that for an institution to remain 
chartered as a savings association, 
it must keep 65 percent of its assets 
in housing-related activities. 


By Colin Chapman 

International Hernia Tribune 

LONDON — - Salomon Brothers 
International Ltd. has joined the 
growing numbers of fund managers 
beating a path to Tokyo to take 
advantage of recent liberalization 
in Japan's financial system. 

The firm wifi establish a Japa- 
nese equity research and distribu- 
tion business and has lured two 
Japanese experts from a London 
stockbrokerage to cany out the 
plan. 

They are Nicholas Bedford, a di- 
rector in charge of Japanese buri- 
wss activities of WJ. Can Sons & 
Co. (Overseas) Ltd. since 1982, and 
Christopher Mitchinson. also a di- 
rector, who has served as a portfo- 
lio strategist with responsibility for 
Japanese research. 

Morgan Grenfell & Co, the UJC 
merchant bank. H as recruited John 
Holmes to be head of a new equi- 
ties division to be formed as a sub- 
sidiary of Morgan Grenfell Securi- 
ties. Mr. Holmes has been 
president of the U.S. subsidiary of 
Hoane, G overt, the British stock- 
broking concern. He will be assist- 
ed by Geoffrey Collier, formerly 
president of Vickers da Costa Secu- 
rities Inc. in New York. 

Amax Inc. of the United States 
has appointed Hans Imgrund as 
senior vice president for metals at 
Amax Europe, based in Paris. He 
will continue his present responsi- 
bilities fra coordinating sales and 
marketing fra all metals. 

The UJC. Oil and Pipelines Agen- 


cy, which is to replace the British 
National Oil Corp., is to be chaired 
by George Dtmkerley, the British 
government announced. Mr. Dun- 
keriey is to undertake the job on a 
part-time basis after retiring this 
fall from his position as deputy 
senior partner of the accounting 
firm Peat, Marwick. Mitchell & Co. 
The Department of Energy has also 
announced the appointment of 
Kenneth Vaughan as chief execu- 
tive of Lhe agency. 

Intercontinental Holds Corp^ a 
subsidiary of Grand Metropolitan 
Hotels' PLC, promoted Hans G. 
Sternik, formerly president and 
chief operating officer, to chief ex- 
ecutive officer, based in New York. 
Mr. Sternik succeeds Pan! C. Shee- 
line, 63, who is to retire but will 

re main chairman and a member of 

the operating executive committee. 

The Bank of En gland announced 
that Roy Croft is to be chief execu- 
tive of the Securities and Invest- 
ments Board and the Marketing of 
Investments Board, two bodies set 
up by the British government to 
issue licenses to those wishing to 
work in securities and investment 
industries. Mr. Croft is a deputy 
secretary in the Department of 
Trade and Industry. 

Qantas Airways Ltd, Australia's 
international airiin e, named John 
F. Ward deputy chief executive. He 
was formerly general manager, 
marketing, a position now filled by 
Peter Stainky, director of corpo- 
rate planning since 1983. The air- 
line has also announced that John 


JUXOR 


ACCOR 1984; AN OUTWARD-LOOKING STRATEGY. 

Hie Annual Meeting of Siockholden held May 28, 1985 approved the 
financial statements for the year ended December 31, 1984. 

Good growth was achieved' in 1984 as evidenced by the fofienring key 
figures: 


Consolidated sales 

(F.Fr. millions) 9,861 8430 +2141% 

Consolidated net income 
before exceptional items 

(F.Fr. millions) 142 924 +534% 

15.95 1323 +20.6 % 

A net dividend of F.Fr. +90 per abate (pfoa F.Fr. 2.45 lax credit) wifi be 
paid on each share on or after Aneust 5, 1985. Th» represents a per share 


paid on each share on or after August 5, 1985. This represents a per share 
. increase of 16.7 % over the dividend paid out of 1963 income; it will be 
paid on all shares outstanding, including the 27.5 % share capital increase 
which took place hi 1964. 

The Co-Pmndenu, Paul Dubntle and Gerard Peliseon, said that the Group 
met or exmded most of the year's targets and that the outlook for 1965 was 
very promising. 

During a meeting of ihr Board of Directors held immediately alter the close 
of die Annual Meeting, it was decided to issue F.Fr. 350 of bands 

with warrants. 


R. Ward is to become regional di- 
rector fra Europe and the Middle 
East, replacing D J. HHliger, who is 
retiring. In another move Jim Brad- 
field has been appointed director of 
cargo. 

Bankers Trust Co. of the United 
States has appointed Chris Corri- 
gan, presently managing director oT 
BT Australia Ltd, to head its Asia- 
Pacific operations, based in Hong 
Kong. Ahead of this move, due to 
take place later this year, Mr. Cor- 
rigan has resigned as chair man of 
the Australian Merchant Bankers' 
Association, and is to be replaced 
in this role by P-R.W. Rownson, 
managing director of Commercial 
Continental Ltd., owned by Sanwa 
Bank of Japan. 

Chemical Bank of the United 
States has appointed Chun Chqy 
Tang as general manager of its Sin- 
gapore branch and country manag- 
er. He is a vice-president of the 
bank and was previously on special 
assignment in New York working i 
on the bank’s Asia, Middle East, 
Africa and Treasury divisions. 


STOCK USS US8 

DrVoe-Holbein 

International hr 5% 6% 

Chy-Qock 

International qv 2% 3 Vi 

Quotes as of: June 6, 1985 


5% 6% 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 

markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekiy 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Hereneracht 483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (Q)3120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firco nl 



Registered Office: Luxembourg - 2, Boulevard Royal 
R.C. Luxembourg B-6734 


Notice to Shareholders 
PAYMENT OF DIVIDEND 1984 

The annual general meeting of shareholders held on 
June 5, 1985 resolved to pay a dividend of U.S, $ 1.20 
per share for the year ended December 31, 1964. 
Since an Interim Dividend of $ 0.60 per share was paid 
on December 18, 1984, a final amount of S 0.60 per 
share has to be paid. 

Such final dividend mil be payable, subject to the laws 
and regulations applicable in each country, starting 
June 14, 1985, against surrender of coupon no. 15 at 
the offices of the paying agents listed below: 

— in Luxembourg: Banque Internationale a Luxem- 
bourg S.A. 

— in Italy: all the leading banks; 

— in Switzerland: Credit Suisse; 

—in France: Lazard Fteres & Cie.; 

— in the Federal Republic of Germany: Commerzbank; 

— in Great Britain: S.G. Warburg & Co., and Lazard 
Brothers & Co.; 

— in the Netherlands: Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank; 

— in Belgium: Banque Bruxelles Lambert. 

The Principal Paying Agent 
Banque Internationale a Luxembourg S.A. 
Societe Anonyme 








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SUN KING KERZNER GOES 
INTERNATIONAL 

Mr. SolKerzner, Managing Director of Sun Hotels International, talks to 
David Carte , Editor of the a Sunday Times Business Times? 



Mr. SolKersner, Managing Director of 
Sun Hotels International 


S un Hotels International is a 
string of 17 amazing pleasure 
palaces dotted across eight 
countries in sunny Southern 
Africa. 

In Mauritius, alongside azure coral seas, 
the Saint Geran has been rated by the 
Daily Telegraph of London as one of the 
top five resorts in the world. It is one of 
three Sun Hotels International resorts on 
the spectacular white beaches of this 
palm-fringed Indian Ocean paradise. 

On the banks of the Chobe River in 
Botswana, half an hour from the^ Victoria 
Falls, Sun Hotels International’s Chobe 
Lodge offers every comfort in Africa’s 
richest game country. Here are found the 
biggest herds of African elephants in the 


In the Pilanesberg mo untains in 
Bophuthatswana, glittering Sun City 
draws two million visitors a year from all 
over theSub-Continent and the world. 
This sophisticated US$I00-m£Ukin 
hold-casino complex in an extensive 
Eden-like garden in the Bushvdd has 
been the scene of million dollar golf and 
tennis tournaments, as well as world 
heavyweight title fights. 

Frank Sinatra, Liza Minelli, Rod 
Stewart, Elton John, Queen, Olivia 
Newton- John, Julio Iglesias, Shirley 
Basscy, Liberace, and many other stars 
have appeared in this glamorous African 
answer to Las Vegas. 

The 244-room Cascades Hotel, linked to 
the rest of the huge complex by overhead 
monorail, opened recently, bringing the 
number of four and five sur rooms avail- 
able at Sun City toabout 900. 

In Transkd, on one of the most rugged 
and spectacular beaches in Africa, there 
is the breathtaking Wild Coast Sun. 
Lesotho and Swaziland are two other 
African states fra: whom Sun Hotels 
International resorts are an important 
source of foreran exchange. 

Occupancies for most or the resorts top 
SO per cent year-round. New main- 
million, dollar holds and casinos are 
planned for the Wild Coast Sun , Thaba 


Nchu in Bophuthatswana, and at Port 
Louis Mauritius. 

This far filing string of dramatically dif- 
ferent resorts, together with declining 
Southern African currencies, enables 
Sun Hotels Inte rnationa l to offer irresist- 
ible packages to Europeans and Ameri- 
cans at incredibly low prices. 

. The only countries in Southern Africa in 

which Sun Hotels International does not 
boast international four and five star 
resorts are the Republic of South Africa 
and Zimbabwe. 

Sun Holds International was founded by 
legendary South African hotd king, Sol 
Kexzner, in October 1983. 

Mr. Kerzner has been one of the world’s 
most successful hoteliers. Starting with 
his own small hotel in Durban 22 years 
ago, Mr. Kerzner, with South African 
Breweries as a majority sleeping partner, 
established and built up Southern Sun 
Hotels. This chain of 26 large, luxurious 
four and five scar hotels spanned South 
Africa and its neighbouring territories 
and has been hugely successml . 

Mr. Kerzner introduced large 
Hawaiian-styled hotels to Southern 
Africa, each with its own distinc t 
architectural theme. They came to 
dominate the industry. 

Mr. Kerzner’s most outrageously 
imaginative and daring scheme was Sun 
Qiy. He spent many millions of dollars 
creating a veritable Kubla Khan pleasure 
dome miles from civilisation in me Afri- 
can bush - and has been richly rewarded, 
for Sun Gry is one of the world’s most 
profitable hotel casino complexes. 

Under Mr. Kerzner, Southern Sun’s 
earnings and dividends grew ai an aver- 
age compound rate of more titan 30 per 
cent per annum in a 14-year period. It 
owned nearly all its hotels aim casinos 
and kept debt at low levels -even though 
it paid out 70 per cent of its earnings In 
dividends. Its share price quintupled in 
four years. 

In 1983, following a change in control of 
S A Breweries, Mr. Kexzner and SAB 
parted. SAB took all the South African 
hotels. Mr. Kerzner and partners took 
Sun Gty and tire rest of Southern Sun’s 
interests outride South Africa. 

Gaming is not permitted made the 
Republic, so all Southern Sun’s casinos 
came into Sun Hotels International. A 
few months later all Holiday Inns’ inter- 
ests in Southern Africa, but outride tire 
Republic, also came into Sun Holds 
International. This brought the lucrative 
WOd Coast Sun into the portfolio. 

This complicated series of takeovers 
brought the powerful Saftnarine and 
R ennies Holdings gmnps info an allianre 
with Mr. Kerzner. 

Growth of Sun Hotels International has 
been even more spectacular than that of 
high growth Southern Sun. 


Had the various unics making up Sun 
Hotels International been together in 
present form in the five years to June 
1984, profits would have grown at an 
average rate of 36 per cent p.a. com- 
pound. The company today turns over 
US$150-miDion and earns about 
US$40-million before tax. Assets, at his- 
torical cost, rotal US$200-million. 

“By any standard, we are a major force in 
tire hotel and gaming industry,” says Mr. 
Kerzner. “In the next phase of our 
development, we intend to take the 
expanse we have developed in Southern 
Africa and employ it in Europe and 
perhaps the U.S.” 

Sun Hotels Internati onal aims to be a 
truly international company. It is regis- 
tered in London and has established a 
. headquarters and saks office there. 
There are sales offices in Germany and 
the U.S. as well. 

Deputy Managing Director, Peter 
Baron, a long-time colleague of Mr. 
Kerzner, is based in London with a 
specific brief to expand the group aggres- 
sively outside Southern Africa. 

Sun Hotels International’s parent, Ker- 
saf, recently acquired 40 per cent of the 
fast growing Kunick Leisure Group in 
the U.K. This provided a foothold in 
European leisure and brought the 
dynamic Mr. David Hudd into the 
Kerzner-Baoon team. 

Kunick’s present interests are all per- 
forming well. The company has more 
than £ 10-million of cash and the ability to 
issue highly valued shares in future 
acquisitions. It will expand present oper- 
ations and look for further opportunities 
in leisure in the U.K. and Europe. 

Mr. Kerzner’s reputation for perfor- 
mance went before him, for Kunick’s 
share price on the over-tire-counter mar- 
ket in London almost doubled fron 
to 66p on news of the deal. 

“Son Hotels International’s next major 
project,” says Mr. Kexzner, “is likely to 
be a casino hotel costing more than 
U S$100-million . We are investigating 
several proposals and hope to make an 
announcement before the end of the 


Investors are already anticipating the 
success of Sun Hotels International’s 
drive into Europe and America, for Ker- 
saf, the holding company, is one of the 
highest rated stocks on the Johannesburg 
Stock Exchange. 


□ 


Sun International 














8 


Thursdays 


Table* Income the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect tale trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


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10U AU CatHf SB 2.1 9 

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1* 0 Comtpd. 6 

14a ta ComdrC 
111b 6* Camw 

12U AV> CorapP 

19» 6U CmoCn 

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20V. 14H Cnctim 40 b 2J 15 

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1714 Ota Crown I JJ71 ID 
31b 4b CryteR * 

1214 11b CrwtO 

2314 13V. Cubic 2 1J 12 

23 219b Curlier 37 15 » 

4 Ob Cost Eh 


20 « l5 
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1 Jl«4 3114 ! 

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24 141b Wb 
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32 7U 7fc 
16 16VS 16V4 

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25 23U 23W 

1468 Wb 8U 
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364 121b 12V, 
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235 ID W6 

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69 331b 339b 
10 36U 3&U 

2 Kta 2214 

47 "U "Ob 
107 194 1U 

366 31U 2114 
19 26V. 2»ta 
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179b — 14 
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h 36U + U 
6 14U— 54 
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17 

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WM 

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Mta 

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18 

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14ft H 

2ft 

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381b 

14 H 

42ft 

2ZVb H 

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17ft 

81* H 

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15ft 

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13 

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29ft 

17ft 

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1794 12U Jadm JBb W 0 

7U 51b Jacobs 

51b 254 JBtAO) 6 

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BM 40b Jstran ” 

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lib 714 JahnAm SO 33 12 

ITU 41b Johmntf i 

714 3U Jnmdkn * 

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3414 
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433 Mb b M£— » 22U 

S It i a 

17 4* 30b gj-jj 70b 

n Ota 9 Wb + Jb 23ta 

BO 6ta 654 6lb + ta m 

3 414 454 4U— » 11 

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1414 OEA 
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171 s OUalnd 

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90b 10 


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12U 1114 
2U5b 14V. 
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175b B 
II* 514 
4* 214 
45b 35b 

59b 30b 
5V. 3 

594 3* 

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KoyCP JO 1A 17 

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109 lita 
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381 219b 
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3 594 

495 4* 

4 414 

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191 35b 

5 494 
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27 1414 
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9ta 99b 
5U 5U- Vb 
49b 4ta— 54 
4V, 454 

dU 614 
3 3 — ta 

41b 4U + ta 
25b 25b— ta 

V4tb M14 + 14 
139b 1396 — Vb 
2894 28ta— U 




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32 
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9ta iota 
396 31b 

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Ota lOVi 
1914 1BU 
Bta Bib 
15b lta 
Iita lita 
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389b 
31U 
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490 12* 12U 
137 33U 33U 



23 

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1ft 

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24 

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4 

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16 

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105 

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23 

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3444 

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U.S. Futures Jane 6 


Season Season 
Misti Low 


□nan HSon Law Ckwo Clw. 


S HSh 1 S u5" Open HKjh Low Oos. Cho. 

17750 136J0 Mar 1J9JS 1»J5 13840 1MM 

16230 136J0 Nov __J15 

15750 142J0 Jul 5^ 

18050 17924 ^ ]Stf -4i 

Est.satas 300 Prev. Sato 276 
Prew. Dav Open Hit. 5,907 ertti 


WHEAT 1CBT) , , 

SJOOOu minimum- dollars per bushel 
X90 112'A Jul 322 U3^ 

174’- 3.15 SOP 1246. 124ta 

1 A-. .-. ns Dec 231U X32ta 

IMta 12716 War 13314 33396 

IE 116 Mav 122 123ta 

IHta 235 Jut 1B7V* lOJta 

' Est. Sales Praj. Sales 10j« 

Prev. Day Open int. 383S2 oH VJ® 
CORN tCHTl 

SM0 bu minimum- dollars pot busnet 
331 2.72 Jul 226 178 

3Jlta 25SU Seo 260ta 161U 

2.95 151 Dec 15614 158 

110 2.60 War 166ta 167 

3JI'a 164ta Mav 17154 27114 

286 264 ta Jul 171 17114 

TJS'.b 15IU Sep 1565b 1561b 
EH. Salas Prav. Sales 21362 

Prev. Day Open lnt.103334 up4il 

SOYBEANS ICBT1 
5J00 bu minimum- dollars aer Cmanw 
7,99 5361b Jill 5.7Dta 5371b 

736 S52ta Aug 562Vb 5.70 

671 S46ta Sep 560 566 

668 569VV NOV 564 570 

679 5J8U Jan 573ta 57Bta 

762 569 Mar 563 SBBta 

7.79 5.77 MOV 5-23 SOT 

658 54B JUl 5.99 6J)3ta 

Esl. Sales Prey.SatBS 27OT* 

Prev. Dav Open im. 61110 up36» 

50 Y BEAN MEAL(CBT) 

100 tons- dollars Per tan 
19650 11760 Jut 12870 


119 33016 — J214 

3JT14 33214 —IS 
3J9U 33094 -J1 

33114 332 — JH 

371 ta 37196 —30 V. 
3JS14 3J7 +J1 


27514 27796 +J2 

258ta 261 ta +JBta 
2549b 25796 +J2ta 
264 167 +J2 

2681b 171 +J0ta 
269 170 +JXKb 

254ta IS —SSfh 


5 69ta 57714 +JVta 
562ta 569ta +J9U> 
559 566 +JN4 

563Vb 5691b +J0896 
5739b 577ta +J61* 

183 567 +J6 

5.92 ta 577ta +J0B 
559 6X3 +J8ta 


160 00 12060 Aug imao 17370 

17950 12360 Seo 26J0 12650 

18050 12*50 oet 12870 129J0 

1B4J0 13150 Dec 134X0 13470 

163X0 13450 JOT. 13670 1950 

“0450 139.10 War 142X0 14250 

14250 141X0 Mav 14570 145.90 

167X0 14770 Jul 

Est. Sales FW-lrtN lMXi 

Prev. Day Open IrU. 52X54 uHlJBl 
SOYBEAN OIL CCBT) 

40X00 IDs- Ooltorsper 100 lbs. 

3272 2270 Jul 3055 3139 

31.95 22S> Alia 29^ »-94 

31.10 2250 See MJ0 IB 

3037 2298 Ocl g.H “OK 

7955 2270 DOC 2620 2665 

29X7 2360 Jan 25X0 24.15 

3860 24.40 MOT 2575 2575 

2765 2A30 MOV 24.W »H 

25.15 23.95 Jul , 2460 a00 

Es». Sales Prev. Sales 12908 

Ptc^TDov Open ini. 57J8S 011131 

OATS(CBT) 

5X00 bu minimum- dal Lars MT buyAol 

1.78! i I479« Jul 57X. l^U 
1.79 167V- Sep 152 J52 

isri IJTi Dec 150 156VS 

1679. UFi MOT 

163 160 MOV 

Esl Sales Prev. Soles 114 

Prev. Dov Open Ini. 2X37 upl 


119 JO 12QJ0 
12270 12370 
12570 126J0 
12850 129 JO 
13160 133.90 
13&J0 136.10 
140J0 14088 
V4590 14550 
149 JO 


3179 +1X0 

29.94 +1X0 
2883 +51 

2767 +72 

2663 +60 

26.12 +57 

2575 +55 

2SJ8 +53 
24X7 +53 


152U 153 
1J0U 15114 
155V. I56ta +X0U 
160 

160U +J014 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICME1 
40X00 lbs-- cents per b. 
jOJO 5863 Jun 59J5 4065 

a’6? *0*5 Aug 6iM 63S 

6* 90 M.IO Ocl 6275 *130 

*7X5 4150 OBC 6367 64J0 

67J5 6110 Fob 6460 6AH7 

J75 7 6350 Apr *555 63.90 

06.25 *575 Jun 

Esl.Salcs 17J51 Prev. Saks 19,1*0 
Prev. Dav Open Ini. 50579 Off 761 
FEEDER CATTLE ICMEI 
+JX30 lbs. -cents per lb. 
n.70 4467 Aus 68.15 6850 

nxo 44 60 Sen 67.95 *875 

*333 4475 OCt 47 JO 4807 

7370 4575 Hov 4860 48X5 

79j» *460 Jon 49.75 6*50 

TIJO 44.10 Mar 49.90 4970 

70X0 70.00 Apr 

Esl. Solos 1752 Prev. Solos 92» 
Prev. Dav Open Int. B512 up17 
HDGS ICMEI 

30600 IDS -cents per lb. ___ 

5560 *460 Jun 47.10 47.92 

55 T 47 OS Jul 50.10 50.92 

5477 4777 Auu MXO 51.15 

5175 4500 OCI *4X5 4767 

58X5 4470 Dec 48.17 *60 

WOO 4o75 Feb *860 4960 

47 35 4470 Apr 4530 45.90 

C9 OS U.90 Jun 48X0 4870 

4°. 75 47.7S Jul 48.95 4960 

Esl. Sales 77J7 Prev. Sales. 7J94 
Prev Dav Oacn Ini. 23602 oH244 
PORK BELLIES (CME1 
38.000 lbs.- cents Per lb. „ 

036 7 61.12 Jul 48J0 4865 

8065 4070 Auo 44X0 47JSS 

7470 63.15 Feb 71X5 7367 

74 *0 *4X0 (War 7270 7370 

7540 70.10 Mar 7X45 7J6$ 

7400 49.70 Jul 72.90 74X0 

Es*. Sales 8634 Prev. Sales 7.15* 
Prrv DnY Open Ini. 11,739 up 113 


5965 40.17 
A2.50 43X5 

*260 4X10 

*367 *4.10 
*4X0 *4X2 

6X50 65X7 
*5.95 


66.15 48X2 
47.95 48X7 

*775 68X0 

68.75 68X0 

69.75 49X0 
69X2 69X2 

*975 


47X0 4762 

50X2 5060 
50X0 50X7 

46.77 47.17 
4810 4860 
4840 49JS 
45-27 45X2 

48X0 48-50 

4890 4960 


**65 *8-35 +188 

65X5 4737 +1X0 

71X5 7167 +2X0 

72X0 73X0 +2X0 
BJS 7175 +2X0 
7260 74X0 +75 



Season Season rh -_ , 

Higti Law Open Htoh Low Close 

BRITISH POUND (IMM) _ 

S per pound- looInlBtiiiaisSOXOOl ..... , — — , 

i iwi 1J235 Jun 1J675 12750 1-2660 17720 

i^o ix2M seo ij» i2»o KK5 I-S5Z2 

IJBOO 1X200 Dec 0400 1J53S 0*00 1J4M 

0800 lJtaa Mar 

1J2S0 1.1905 Jun 1.2200 

Es*. Sales 12630 Frev.Saka M6M 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 47X90 off 1,187 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMMJ 
S per dir- 1 dotal equate ttl»i 
7835 7054 Jun .7295 72OT 7N* -7293 

7585 7025 Sep 7247 7267 7257 7262 

7566 7006 Dec 7702 7246 7232 7233 

7504 69B1 Mar 7205 7205 7205 7214 

7350 7070 Jutl 7195 

Est. Sales 1.153 Prev. Sales 1,396 

Prev. Dov Open lta. 11770 off 341 

FRENCH FRANC tlMMl 
Sorr Ircmc- 1 potal equals 50X0001 

Tiirto JfrflG Jutl .10720 .10720 .10710 .10710 
:!«M0 X9M0 siS .10*75 .10675 .10675 .10^ 
.10415 X965U DOC „ -I®**® 

Esl. sales 74 Prev. Sate 55 

Prev, Dov Open Int 749 oH63 

GERMAN MARK(IMM) 

5 oer mart- 1 paint equabSOXOOi 
J733 -2905 Jun -3278 J2B1 JMT ^0 

J545 J930 Sep 72?3 7298 7778 J® 

X610 J971 Dee 7310 7310 7303 730* 

7415 TOffl *6ar S3 27 

Est. Sales 17708 Prev. Sales 1A50I 
Prev. Dav Open ml. 55715 up 433 
JAPANESE YEN 

‘SSiSriSmTun^ SMBMHJriBi; 

0041» XDN Seo X040H. 004056 X04027 X04^ 
0043» XraSS Dec X04O?5 X04075 XO40&4 X04055 
(KMISS3 J9M035 MOT __ X04075 

Est. Sales 11790 Prev. Sales 8797 
Prev. Dav Open Hit. 28.9*7 up 1719 

SWISS FRANC CIMM) 

S twr Irnnc- 1 point (ffliab SCMSli 
-4900 7429 Jun ^97 7909 -Ml JM 

jmn *1480 SOP -3922 -3933 Jajo JTid 

Si 5^ JW® 

6025 7835 Mar J991 7991 7991 7981 

Esl. Sales 15654 Prev.ScOes M.167 
Prev. Dav Open Ini 33.951 up Ml* 


Financial 


LUMBER (CMC) 
l30XOObd.lt.-SperlXOpbd.il. 

129J® Jul 156.®) *2-10 

13370 Sop 15BX0 1*470 
137X0 NOV IMiffl 16AM 
14460 Jan 1*4X0 16*20 
150X0 AMT 16960 17220 
157X0 Mar 173OT 1755B 

17140 Jul TJUD 179X0 

Fst Solas 3799 Prev. Sales L914 
Prev. Dav Open I id. vjm oft 153 

COTTON H8TCSI 
SUMtas-cgtewrJb. 

7770 *0X2 OCt 61^ 6170 

73X0 *068 Dec «267 

7*75 6160 Mar *363 4750 

7UX0 *1 X* Mav &3M, *364 

7865 *2iM Jul 4195 64X2 

&5X0 9960 Oct 4S7D 61X0 

Eat. Sales 2X00 Prov.SOte Z6» 
Prev. Dav Open In!. 16686 UP 271 

HEATING OILtNYMJEl 

TT'ST S? 6870 *895 
7330 mss A»P 4890 *9.10 

MX5 ».I3 Sea «J0 *9X0 

77.1B 49.75 OCt *9X8 70.10 

7465 7061 MOV 70-50 TtM 

7825 72X5 Dec 7160 71* 

7&.«B 7168 Jon JMB 7X® 

7190 7190 Feb 7275 7275 

73J3® 73X0 Mar 72X0 72X0 

74X0 7*00 Apt 

Est. Sales Prev. Sides 13X77 

Prev. Dav Oaen int. 19J22 imlJOT 

CRUDE OIL CHYME) 

1X00 bbi.-dotlara per bbL 

2964 94.10 Jul 27.10 27.18 

2967 2435 Auu 2*30 3438 

29.50 24XB Sep 2190 26.10 

2960 2465 Oct 2560 25.97 

2960 3460 Npv 2140 25J5 

2960 23JO Dec 2560 2560 

2960 2465 Jan 3525 3535 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 2*625 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 403*0 up 6350 


15*30 161.90 
15060 1*170 
159X0 1*120 
1*430 168.10 
1*960 172.10 
172X0 175LS1 
17870 17*60 


6276 *107 

41-55 6165 

4230 4264 

4130 4151 
4372 4365 
6195 44X2 
6070 MSB 


6960 4879 
70X0 70X0 
7065 7168 

7260 7260 

7275 7275 
72X0 72X0 
71X0 


2*65 27.12 

MU? vln 
2563 3*63 
2570 25.90 


Currency Options 


June* 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

underlying tartc* Cnlfs— Last Put *- *- 0 ®* 

Jan Sep Dec Jun Sep Dec 
11500 British Pounds-sents per natt. 

B Pound Hfl r r r r r l.vo 

127 Jl US 1170 I2J0 r r 160 T 

12731 128 ?-TO LB 9J0 r 110 t 

127J1 125 270 r r r r r 

127JT 1» (U5 3JS 530 110 7 JO r 

12731 135 r 230 365 T r r . 

50X00 CmuKltan Donars-amt* per imIL \ 

CDollr 72 1X0 T T T r t 

719* 73 UJ M T ?79 r r 

729* 74 r 05 r 1J1 UO r 

7296 r r 

*2608 West German Marks-cents per ond. 

DMork 27 T T r T 0.13 r 

^68 30 269 r 36 9 r ®25 r 

32A8 31 168 124 r ib>) 065 f 

m3 M 0.75 139 r 0J7 061 T 

rw/n 33 0.20 1.13 163 r US X 

S3 « m 074 1J4 r IS r 

3368 35 r U67 066 X T X 

t256M French Fraacs-iotbs of a cent per writ 
F Franc 95 X X X X 065 X 

*759608 Japanese Yen-1 BOtbs of o cent per wUi. 
jYen 38 r , r r r 0.17 r 

40 19 39 1.16 170 r r r r 

40.19 48 033 1X3 165 r 660 r 

0J.19 41 0JB 867 1.11 r IJ1 r 

4RI9 42 0J31 062 r r r 118 

£26*0 Swiss Fnancpccats per enlt. 

S Franc 35 190 r r r r r 

36 262 r r r 831 r 

37 1X7 268 124 r OS5 0|i 

38 094 264 r r 065 136 

3? ffljy r 110 0J7 US x 

40 0JB5 1X3 1X7 r r 2JI 

3864 41 0J1 071 r r r r 

Total can vo*. 560 open Int 2MXO 

Total pot voL3XN Pul open Int 174451 

^-Not traded. opNon oHorad. o-OW. 
Last Is premium l purchase price). 

Source: AP 


4U lta 

5 2 

m si* 
* ta 
T5U lift 
llta BU 
21 14U 

23 169b 

a ita 
3 lta 
lita TOb 
am iota 
«ta su 
MW ita 
Wk Sta 
1594 9ta 


UNA 

USRInd 

Ultmte * 

umcora — r 
unteppt .]8 M 
Unhnrn SVb 87 
UAIrPd J»M 
UnCnsFs JB 17 II 
UFoodA .10 W W 

assf » 

Sj^Sv* .941157 *1 
i unvCm IS 

i unlvfti 22 

i UmrPol 


3 L. 

18 2tb 
157 im 
201 U 

19 let* 


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30Vb 10 Qwebos J6 


216 30ta 29ta 2*ta— ta 


10U 990 VST n 30e It 

UU lOta VottVNl 160 76 14 
Z7U MtaVWEPrs 64 16 15 
im 4U Verblm - 

23% lflbvSwiC 60b 27 9 

UB nv S ^ 17 11 
7ta BU verms .10 7* 
lOU 4b* Vlatnch •_ 

9 . Sta VI con • 10 

lita lita Vtrco «r J M 
9ta Sta VteuotO XB 11 15 

121b I Voptex J6 32 13 


72 Wta 
U 18 
37 25 
147 7ft 

rt ? 
3d 18 
• 13 4 
82- 18ta 
2 39» 
7 Ota 

42 m 

7 14V. 
21 «U 
4i iita 


lta 2 + ’* 

29b 2U + U 

n * "lit 

U 14 ♦ ta 

Wta rtta— ft 
mb 1(ta + ta 
u«h nu- u 
ita m + te 
lta lta * ta 
l*ta Mta + te 
lOta 309* + *b 
Sta • -ta 
nta lita— ta 
Tta Jta- ta 
U Wta +i 


Mta Wta+ u 
179* 18 
34b* 25 — H 
Tta Tta , , 
4ta 7 *■»* 

1794 U, 

34* 3* , 

Nta lOkb+Jte 

5S 

ISta 14^2 + ft 

tta 9U + ta 

n tite-ta 


99* 5 RA) 

Sta 39* RMS El 
79* 19* RTC 

1BU 14ft Ragan 
20 12ft Rarabv 
199* 17ta RllSoun 
4ft 19* Redlaw 
159* 10ft Regal B 
509* 279* Resrt A 
52ft 30ft Resrt B 
Sta Sta RestAsc 
4ft 3U Rex Nor 
14 89* RlWotP 

4 ft ROiTC v 
9ft 4 RdlT pfV 
lift 10W. RlaAl B 
39* ft RfaGDr 
28ft 16 Rdcwv 
3096 20ft Rogers 
7 2 RoonPn 

5ta Sta RovPIm 
34 XI Rudkk 
33ft 24 Rudckpf 
7ft 4 RBW 
lift lita RuS»U 
24ft 10V6 Rvkoff 


894 49b 
8Vb 7 
59* 3ft 
119* 7 
10ft 5 
89* 6ta 
Bft 6ft 
8396 67ta 
6594 49 
23ft ITU 
39 31ft 
25 IBft 


.13 J 24 
72 46550 


17 

.10e 26 13 
XB IX 28 


54 15 E 

.12 6 W 


Ma 13 9 
J6 Z3 7 

JO IX 12 
-50 10 14 


IS 6ft 
II 396 
3 196 

6 16 
134 16ft 
23 lita 
26 39* 

13 13ta 
397 4596 
5Br 48 
IN 896 
8 4ta 
148 11 
S ft 
S 4 

137 28ft 
7* 2B9* 
89 29* 
15 Sta 
43 2494 
1 31 

21 4$ 

62 1*9* 
181 34ft 


69* 6ft 
39* 396 + ta 
196 196— ft 

1616 lift + 9* 
IBft 18ft 
3ta 3ft + ta 
Uta 13ta— * 
44ft 44 ft — 194 
4* 48—96 

ift sft— ta 
4ft 4ta 
18ft 11 + ft 
ft ft 

h htt 

28ft 281b + 9* 
289* 2*9*— ft 
29* 2ft 
Sta 5ft . . 
24ft 2494 + 9b 
34 24 

,r iss+ft 

34 349* + 9* 


9 17 7» 796 79* 

,9 4 XM 3ta 31* 

7 ? & SK SS + £ 

16 Bta 8 Sft— ft 

io n* as* m + ta 

4£teB7ta 84 879* +3U 

lOOz 45 45 45 - 9* 

8 239* Mta 239* + lb 

” MU 249b 2496 + ta 


London Commodities 

June 6 


Asian Commodities 

June 6 


KONC-KONG GOLD FUTURES 

UXX per nonce ^ prwJo ,^ 

Jgn _ *»?. N?t! 314N1 3HX0 3lSSl 31&M 
Jta - N.T. N.T. 316X0 318X0 315X0 317X0 
Mt~ H.T. N.T. 317J0 319X0 317X0 315Jf 
Ocf — 322X0 32ZJ0 321X0 32U0 321X0 32100 
Ok" NX N.T. 325JJ0 327X0 324X0 32AfflJ 
Fen _ 330X0 33080 OTX0 glXO X3M M1X0 
Apt — N.T. N.T. 333X0 335X0 3 31 00 33500 
volume: 23 lots of 100 oz. 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UXLsneroaocr 


Stock Indexes 













5P COMP. INDEX (CME1 

poMjyuidnnts 18975 19170 189-55 191X5 

194X0 160X0 sea 193X0 195X0 19320 19560 

198X0 175.70 Dec 194X0 19875 190X0 19880 

20120 190.10 Mar 201X0 20225 200.10 2D2XS 

ESI. Sales 6U6OT Prev.Sales 41-1M 
Prev. Dav Open Ini. 96X56 up 20683 

VALUE LINE(KCBT) 

points and cents 

21960 173X0 Jun 19960 20160 19965 201 50 

212J0 18575 Sep 204X0 205X5 2KL75 20570 

213J0 20400 Dec 210X0 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 1994 

prev. Dav Open int. 8Ji6eH7 

NYSE CO MF-. I NDEX (NVFEJ 

p fiaSi a,rte «S) Jun iw.95 mja ioms in jo 

113J0 9175 Sep 11260 11365 11370 11360 

115.15 10170 Dee 115-50 11550 11A» J15J0 

117 JO 109 JO Mar 11A90 116.90 11670 U7x0 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 11.922 

Prev. Day Open int. 13657 up3M 



Prev lees 
BM Art 
195.50 177 JO 

I93JO 194X0 
1 93-50 19SJ0 

18SJ0 196J0 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody’s , WSjW t 

Reuters L77&.90 

DJ. Futures 1M-21 

Com. Research Bureau. 23100 

Moody's : base 100 : DOC. 31. 1931. 
p- preliminary; /- final 
Reuters : base 100 jSea. 18* W31. 
Oow Janes : base 100 : Dec. 31# 1974. 


Previous 
90130 f 
1,776X0 
IM 
231J» 


U^. Treasury Bill Rates 
June 6 


Prev 

Offer BM Yield Yield 
Urvntfi 6.98 63* T -» 7 - U 

ZZZ »■« 7Ji 7JB 

ZZZ 7.17 7.U W 7X3 

S^tvrjr. 1 Salomon Brothers 


S&p 100 Index Options 

June 6 


Sbffe CuJa-Las 
Price M Jbr am See 


High Low Settle Setae 

Jun JLT. N.T. 315.10 JlilO 

i Auo 318J0 31B70 31850 318J0 

SfP N.T. N.T. 32050 320J0 

Oct N.T. N.T. 322.50 322-50 

Volume: 119 lets of 100 ax. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cents per kilo 

Close Prev lost 

Bid Art BM Art 

Jun 19550 mjS 195J0 17750 

Jhr J93J0 19430 19350 194JI0 

Aug 19350 19450 19350 19SJ0 

Sep. 19430 19550 I9SJ0 19650 

volume: 12 tots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Sinaimora cents per kilo 

dose Previous 

BM Art Bid Art 

HSS I Jun 17250 17139 11250 173X0 

R5S1JIV— 17050 13DJ3 149 JO 17800 

R5S2 Jun_ 16925 im23 168-75 169.75 

RSSSJun- 16755 16E2S I66JJ 167J5 

RSS4 Jun 16375 14075 1*175 14475 

RSSSJun— 1S87S 16075 .15775 15975 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MakrntaartmltiperlStoas 

Chne Previous 

BM Ask BM Art 

jun 1730 ITS) 1710 1770 

jlV 1.180 172S 1.140 1710 

j.Va 1.100 U50 1.M 1,130 

fig WMO 1.110 1XS8 1.109 

Od 1XM 1X90 1X« 1XTO 

Nov _____ 1X30 1X70 1X3D 1,0*0 

Jort_ 1J3C 1XM 1X|0 

Star 1X20 1X40 1X10 1X50 

MOV 1X10 1X50 1X00 UU0 

Volume: 0 lots of 25 tons. 

Source: Reuters. 


Paris Commodities 

June 6 


Close 

High Low BM Art i 

5UGAR , _ 

French francs per metric tog 
Aug 1780 1775 1 777 1 780 

Ocf 17« 1790 1787 1790 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1702 1710 

MOT 1759 1753 1.K3 1758 

MOV 1610 1605 1797 1608 

Aug 16M 1685 1675 1680 

Est. voL: 900 lals of SO tons. Prev. □ 
soles: 646 MIL Open Interest: 18790 
COCOA 

Fremdi francs per MB kg 
Jlv N.T. N.T. 2X30 2X80 

Sen 3WK9 2X40 2X49 2X54 

Dec 2X30 2X12 2X20 2X30. 

MOT 2X56 2X50 2X30 2X44 

MOV NT. N.T. 2X40 — 

JIY T4.T. N.T. 2JM0 — 

Sep HX. N.T. 2X40 — 

Esl- vol.: 80 lets of 10 Ions. Prev. c 
soles: 17 tots. Open Inter ost: 649 
COFFER 

Frauen francs per IN Ha 
JfV N.T. N.T. — 2600 

Sep 2670 2645 2643 2653 

Hov N.T. N.T. 2685 2JOO 

Jon N.T. N.T. 2680 2J30 

MOT N.T. N.T. 2635 2X25 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2683 2J2S 

Jty N.T. N.T. 2680 2X20 

Est. voL: 5 lots of 5 tons. Prev. actual ■ 
30 lots. Open Interest: 278 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


London Metals 

Jane 6 


Oow Previous 

ALUMINUM ^ 8W 

Starling per metric tan 

SLom S & SSJS SES 


Cash Prices June 6 


Commodify oad Unit 
Coffee 4 Santos, Bx 
Print doth 64/30 38 ft- Vd _ 

Steel billets (PltU. ton 

iron 2 Fdrv. Ptnia. lor, 

Steel scrap No 1 hw pin. _ 
Load Spot, lb _____ 
Cooper elect- lb - 

Tin (Straits), lb 

Jtnc, E. St. l_ Basis, lb 

PalKxHum. oz _______ 

Sliver N.Y. oz 

Sowed.- AP. 





DM Futures Options 

June 6 

R.CaimMorti-n^inmiBtaperinrt 


I 


Market Guide. 








r'ffffrft! 




HteLed 


Jee Jtr Mb 

sw 

1/16 1/16 — 

— 

1/16 1/16 3/M 

ft 

int an* ta 

ft 

3H6 11/16 U* 

IK 

IN 7ft M 

Jft 

fflr » 4 

6ft 


Strike 

CotB-SeM? 


Pote-Settte 

Price Jen 

te 

Dec 

Job 

tag 

OK 

31 IJO 

223 

U3 


062 

0J0 

32 5-71 

168 

2X4 

0X1 

OJS 

1X1 

O 0X5 

L07 

1J5 

OJS 

1.19 

168 

34 — 

068 

1.14 

IX 

1J9 

2X4 

35 — 

067 

0X2 

230 

269 

268 

It — 

026 

0J9 

— 

129 

361 

Ertttnatrt total nL4JB4 




CMH: Wed. vei. 1886 9P#a M. 


nib : Wed. veL U21 open ML J8J» 


Source: CMC 






SSLara & SSJS S3 

S5K R p^ffi?S, lMWl0 ^ 7 

SOTS 1,140X0 1.141J)0 1,14450 1.145 JO 

tanrarg 1.1SUB 1.1SUD LlsSS 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling per metric 

»ot 1,12X00 1.12SX8 1.143X0 L14S1U 

forward 1.135X0 1,137X0 1.148X0 ftSQXO 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric fen 

'Stem HI-S 301 XB 

forward 301W 304X0 304X0 304JQ 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric ton 
SPOf 4740X0 4750X0 4630X0 4 4»i 

tart"*™ 4720X0 4725X0 4380X0 L^KJO 

SILVER 

Peace per troy nonce 

gg*. SSH *25-59 *81X0 484X0 

femaam onto 49&50 478X0 

TIN tStandom 
Ste+ing per metric toe 

E2L#, 9J90jg 9600X0 

terawwd 9JOOJO 9J01J0 9X50X0 

zme 

Starling pv Bfftrk; ton 


Ss„ ss sas ms & 



rr#] 





EC Opposes Pari&' 
Over Textile Aid ■ 

Reuiers 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission ha told France w 
drop a 150-million-franc 
|»on) subsidy plan for its iexj§ 
industry on the ground dial iC©. 
contrary lo European Community 
rules, officials said Thursday. j 
Hie French government warned 
to use the money to give cheap 
loans to textile and doihing com*- 
panes to e^uip themselves wiih ad*-'- 
ranced equipment and iechnologi : 
ine commission, noting the large 
amounts of aid given to the French 
industry over the past two years, 
said that was no justification for 
further hdp. J 

France has received 50 percent 
of total subsidies paid to the idS&f 
munny s textile industry 3Sw‘ 
officials said. The conums- 
“2™. blocked similar British! 
and Belgian aid plans and told the 
rjuicti government to restrict aa‘ 
aw program it was planning. j 

















































Page 19 






























































Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE, FRIDAY. JUNE 7, 1985 



PEANUTS 

I PASSED, MARGE! 
I RA55B? ALL 
MV SUBJECTS! 



I -Also think i 

LEARNS' SOMETHING.. 


tfXJ CANV WIPE AW/tf 
TEARS wrTH 
NOTEBOOK PAPER l : 

3rr 


ACROSS 

1 Begone I 
6 Zest 

10 Rope material 

14 Muse for 
Pindar 

15 Pitcher 

16 Hodgepodge 

17 Foot lever 

18 Oz canine 

19 Shore bird 

20 Japanese fish 

21 Operatic 
prince 

23 Start of a 
quotation 
25 Quotation: 
Part II 

28 Rainbow 
goddess 

29 Sea creature 

30 High degree 
33 Source of 

quotation 
36 Detained one 

38 Voyaging 

39 Summer drink 

40 Young salmon 

41 “ War 

Cabinet”: 
Hendrick 

44 Menotti 
heroine 
46 Small boy 
, 47 Clamor 
48Knievel 


B. J 


49 End of 
quotation 
55 Point one's 
finger at 

57 Pop 

58 Theater sign 

59 Vice squad’s 

action 

68 Pecking-order 

position 

62Twangy 

64 Stake at cards 

65 "Of 1 

Sing" 

66 Garbo 

67 Inlets 

68 Fenced area, 
often 

09 Corroded 

DOWN 

1 Clans 

2 Napoleon 
center 

3 Circle parts 

4 loss for 

words 

5 Poquelin’s 
stage name 

6 Wyo. 
mountains 

7" to the 

wise ...” 

8 Court divider 

9 Stable brush 

10 Resting place 

11 Basic 


6/7/05 


12 Star LnCetus 

13 Kind of tail or 
express 

22 Stride, e.g. 

24 Cairo's river 

26 Popular scent 

27 Wizened 

31 Actress Garr 

32 Zeus’s wife 

33 Sentry’s word 

34 Large land- 
mass 

35 Untruthfulness 

36 Some are 
classified 

37 Witch’s 
Incantation 

39 Shakespeare’s 
wife 

42 Vegas term 

43 Word on a 
dime 

44 Alacri toils 

45 Mixture 

48 Called forth 

50 Some Renoirs 

51 Lou Grant 
portrayer 

52 Pecuniary 
resource 

53 Fuming 

54 Lloyd or Kathy 

55 Riyadh 
denizen 

56 Galilee town 

61 Eureka! 

63 Parseghian 



books 


NOTES OF AN ANATOMIST 

By F. Genzalez-Crussi. J 34 pages. $1195. 
Harcourt Brace Javantnidu 1250 Sixth Av- 
enue, San Diego, Calif. 92101 


omen, now as* 


— F 


^ rrob^ of *»■ 

rity it posts. ■ M effort ro 

js-sasassasa 

ssaesSsa'a’Sf 

“A* "“£& Sc mnnmg. *»> 
exceptional ■*“ ® uo w ith -lie 
mearahefelaigdy^jy.^- 
of sibling rivalry Wore bint ^ ^ 

From ^ appear in 
_jrvqy 
myth. 


BEETLE BAILEY 


© jVewT York Times, edited by Eugene Malabo. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



* taN cm GRAPES HAVE SUCH BIG FAMILIES 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
9 by Henri Amok) am) Bob Lee 


Unscramble these tour Jumbles, 
one latter to each square, ta form 
faur ordinary words. 


TUQES 



III 


EKSSS-*— 

GYKAW 






TOENED 


□ZQ~ 




RELUSY 


un 



WHAT TO WEAR 
WHEN WORK1N© 
OUT POOR©. 

Now arrange the circled totters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


" a nxmu 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow; 

Jumbles: PANSY DUMPY FRUGAL JOCKEY 
Answer What she said about that disap pointing 
letter carrier— JUNK "MALE"! 


WEATHER 


.EUROPE 

Algarve 

HIGH 
C F 
21 70 

LOW 
C F 
14 57 

d 

Amsterdam 

23 

73 

11 

52 

a 

Atneos 

29 

04 

19 

66 

fr 

Barcelona 

22 

72 

14 

57 

a 

Belermte 

M 

M 

15 

59 

Ir 

Barba 

20 

64 

16 

61 

e 

BrasMts 

22 

72 

15 

59 

d 

Bucharest 

29 

•4 

14 

57 

d 

. Budapest 

23 

32 

IS 

59 

fr 

Cepenhogew 

17 

63 

14 

57 

el 

Carta Dei Sal 

28 

82 

19 

64 

o 

DuMta 

11 

52 

9 

48 

r 

Bdtnburah 

ID 

SO 

7 

45 

Ml 

FTorence 

12 

90 

14 

57 

tr 

Frankfort 

» 

75 

14 

57 

cf 

-Geneva 

24 

75 

17 

63 

Cl 

.HCtttRKI 

13 

SS 

5 

41 

n 

Istanbal 

24 

75 

16 

61 

d 

Los Palmas 

28 

82 

17 

63 

tf 

Ltsben 

21 

70 

16 

61 

0 

London 

14 

57 

12 

54 

r 

Madrid 

22 

73 

12 

54 

a 

Milan 

21 

02 

19 

66 

fr 

Moscow 

16 

61 

12 

54 

r 

Munich 

76 

TV 

16 

57 

d 

WOO 

74 

75 

17 

61 

ct 

'Oita 

13 

55 

8 

46 

r 

■Porta 

34 

73 

IS 

59 

d 

.Prague 

22 

72 

14 

57 

Stl 

Rtvklavik 

9 

48 

6 

43 

r 

RWta 

31 

88 

16 

61 

h- 

Stockholm 

13 

59 

8 

48 

tf! 

' Strasbourg 

25 

77 

18 

64 

d 

Venice 

36 

7V 

18 

64 

cl 

Vienna 

2t 

*4 

16 

61 

(r 

JfiTanaw 

26 

79 

K 

64 

d 

Zurich 

25 

77 

14 

57 

ct 


ASIA 


Bangkok 

Belling 

HmKNg 

Mullo 

New Delhi 

SMoi 

StMoglxd 


HIGH 

c r 


LOW 


TOM 
Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Algiers 

Cairo 

Can Town 
CetoBlonc o 


32 

90 

36 

79 


27 

81 

20 



31 

88 

28 

82 

d 

32 

90 

27 

01 


40 104 

31 



a 

(2 

21 



20 

68 

18 



29 

84 

25 

77 


27 

HI 

23 

73 


29 

84 

24 

75 

fr 

28 

82 

16 

61 

tr 

33 

91 

20 

68 

fr 

18 

64 

14 

57 


23 

n 

16 

59 

G 

U 

55 

a 

46 


29 

84 

26 

79 


23 

73 

12 

54 

0 

34 

94 

19 

66 

fr 


NamM 
Tone 

LATIN AMERICA 

Beenes Aires 13 55 a 37 

Con te nt 28 S3 21 TO 

Una 20 68 16 61 

Mexico City 34 75 II 57 

Rla do Janeiro 25 77 16 61 

NORTH AMERICA 


Altanle 


Chicago 


MIDDLE EAST 


23 73 10 50 d 


— — — — no 


Is 61 
U 55 
20 M 


An Kero 
Beirut 

Damascus 32 W 

■Jennatefn 25 77 

Til Aviv 26 W 

OCEANIA 

Audi land 16 II 11 S in 

Sydney 13 55 1Z St tfl 

cJ-ctoutfy; tp-foggv; fr-talr; Midi; 
jh-showers; sw-mow; st -wormy. 


Detroit 
Honehita 
Hontea 
La* Angolas 

MJtanl 

MtaneoMMla 


Noisaa 

NtwVorW 

Son Fraadsce 

S eattle 

Toronto 

Washington 


57 6 
95 24 

51 » 

75 9 

82 10 
73 e 
M 21 
90 24 
83 16 
n 24 

75 10 

65 10 
75 I* 
70 12 
TO IS 
70 11 

66 13 

52 15 


frewerCesl; pe-portiv eloodv: 


70 
75 
61 
75 
50 
50 
66 

54 PC 
59 PC 
52 r 

55 cl 
59 ei 
r-raln; 


FRIDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Sltahf. FRANKFURT: Rafn, Toma 
22-14 172 - 571. LONDON: Show* rv Tome. 14— 12 (57 — 541. MADRID: 
Cloudy. Temp. 2t— 15 (75 — 59J. NSW YORK: Fair. Temp. 24— 13 (75—551. 
•PARIS: Showers. Tem*. 22—16 (72—57). ROME: Cloudy. Temp. 29—16 
(84—611. TEL AVIV: Fglr. Tom 20 —20 (B2-U). ZURICH: Cloudy. Toma 
SJ — 12 (72— 54). BANGKOK: Thunderstorm. TkmO. 34 — 27(93— 81). HOK6 
KONG: aouav. Tema 31—20 (18—821. MANILA: Cloudy, Temp. 22 — 2S 
(H — 771. SEOUL: Rain. Toma 29 — 17 tit — U). SINGAPORE: shower*. 
.Temp. 29 — 2S (14 — 77). TOKYO: Fair. Toma 30 — 19 (86— Ml. 


HOW POES A 
GUY EVER GET, 
PROMOTED 
THIS ARMY 

'Jr 


&Y HARP WORK, 

stupvaup 

PEVOTIOH 




H&O'tGEH. halftrack: 

SIR,X WAS JliSTREAPlMS 
YOUR V*WHPERFUL MEMO 
ft GOOO INSPIRATIONAL. 
ITS AN HONOR TO BE 
SeRVlNS UNDER 
SUCH A.— 


.fOff 


Reviewed by John Gross 

i RANK GONZAUEZ-CRUSSI, who w e 
* bom and reared in Mexico, is catreotly 
professor of pathology at Northwestern Uni- 
versity.- AE the essays in “Notes of an A iiflio- 
nrisf are colored to. a greater or lesser otgycc. 
by his professional experience, and m one w 
them. 'The Dead as a Living,* he wonders 
openly what effect years of perf orming autop- 
sies can have bad on his personality. 

Pathologists deal with mortrid aradrtiaas; 
they become Mhinmed to cutting open and 
cutting up. Isn’t their vision, he asks, bound to 
be conespomdingly “unbalanced, skewed and 
asymmetrical”? . 

ThcreisagooddealofiroiiymtliequesMn, Anomaoesare buub^ . „ 

however. The essay, and perhaps the whole Some Boday 

coHectum, could also have been entitled A facts regarding human Pangs 

Pathologist’s Apology” — forGonzafcz.-Onsa m 1 ^dowB? another essay is dcrowWf-, 

l oo to insist that pathology has its errno- 


m here n b> wuy - %/ihev appear in 


wrote: The tool 
than the zoology 
Anomalies are a ! 


JOIgC MW- 

of dreams is far power 
Maker.* 

i of his business, la 
” the 


ANDY TAPP 




REX MORGAN 


-OIL 

HCW ABOUT 
MY MAKING 
YOU AN EGG 
AND BACON, , 
CLAUDIA"? rm | 
ONLY TAKE A 
MINUTE— 


NO. THANKS. EMRUUGf 1 
COULDN'T EAT A THING i I 
WANT TO BE SHARP FOR MY 
MEETING WITH TCMPKINS ! Jg 


WILL YOU BE COMING HOME BEFORE 
YOU SOTO DR. MORGANS OFFICE 
FOR YOUR 5 O'CLOCK APPOINTMENT? 
OTHERWISE, 1 CAN MEET YOU T MBS 


& 


S' 


I M A 
BIG GIRL 
NOWf I 
CAN GO 
ALONE ( 



w and even poetkfqualities-” WMk almost 

everyone dse reduces the dead to an abstrac- 
tion, it is the patholorist’s distinction to be 
concerned with them lor their own sake, as 
human hangs who are sdll maintaining an 
-individual enstence — until, that is, bis job is 
done, at winch point they cease to be h um a n 
and oo longer interest hnn. 

Gonzalez-Crassi considers the contrasting 
art or craft of the embalmed His tone, as 
always, is humane; he is prepared to grant a 
certain nobility to the repulse to render the 
impermanent eternal that underlies the prac- 
tice of embalnnng even in its degraded and 
commerdaiized modem form. Yet he is polite- 
ly sardonic as wdL The striving for perma- 
nence, he seems to imply, has aways been a 
hopeless task.^ The vftoteiaiterpRse is ultimate- 
ly futile — tmfike pathology, which helps ns to 
understand life a fitde better.. 

Gonzalez-Crussi is a natural essayist, 
mg up a topic that catches his fancy, revc 
it, moving gracefully across large tracts 
experience. 

Consider his essay on twins. He begins with 
an elegant account of what happens to the 
fertilized egg, and moves on to consider why 
the folklore of different peoples should be so 
inconsistent with regard to multiple births, 


Sohxtionb) Preioa Puzzle 


□□□□ snaa 0010a 
□□EH □□aao Baa® 
edqe aonao 000a 
BanQQBanDaaaa 
01300 DO0 

QBQ000 aaaa □□□ 

□□□□□ □□□□ OQ00 

000DO000D000000 

□eod aaaa 00000 
□00 a acta 000000 
000 000a 

Dnn0a00anano0 

□000 03000 O00O 
□000 03000 0000 
0000 0000 0000 


aresoberiy wt down; another essav 

to imidoa,’ the wgnnfic sm^ or^; 
SUSS. But heis equally 
tionsmoostrousness provokes -m 
tendency to fabricate “anomalous racei tor 
instance, and to populate vast regions on u»e 
edgerfthe map withthe freaks wat are very 

is wilh the 

lnerardues we create —ennobling 
<rf the body and vilifying others, or projecung 
our own values onto’ a world we never 
and which, if it was made for us. contains 
abundant provisions for our pain and discom- 
fiture. 

The starting point of a particularly telling^ 
essay is an autopsy Ganzawt-Crussi once con- 
ducted on & derelict whose skin was found to 
be harboring larval forms of the common do- 
mestic Dy. Sef ore we shudder away in revul- 
sion, he persuades us to take a fly's-eye view of 

the encounter — not in otter to revers e our 
values, but so that we can acquire a keener 
sense of our own place in nature. 

At the same time, be recognizes that we are 

bound to have a double attitude toward our 
bodies, a tension that can be seen at its most 
majestic— bis own example —in the pain tings 
of El Greco, where human bongs are stretched 
out beyond the limits of credibility, “caught 
between irresistible terrestrial and heavenly 
puUs.” Andevtn an autopsy, he pointsout, can 
offer us some salve to cur pride. Refinements 
in technology have served to show individual 
dificreuxs maxuTcstmg themselves in a bail or 6% , 
a bloodstain; they seem to justify ore couvic- 
rion that each of us is “spwaal, tntplaooabk. 
thoroughly unique." v 

But in the rod he comes down on the other 
side. A professional life spent by the aui 

..Li. .:»i Um. m^iu. m 


a most brutal way, M oTMirsanicskss, arKlof the 
losing battle we are all fighting against ore 
eventual dissolution. Which any sound fike a 
depressing note to dose on, and would be if he 
were a lesser writer, if his honesty were not 
served up in style and reinforced by a constant 
play of wit ana curioBty. ' 


John Cross is on the staff of The Afar York 
e/7/85 Times. • 


4. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Tmscotc 

/"\N the diagramed deal 
v_/ North-South had trouble 


GARFIELD 


m 


I PICKED OP LONCH 




whether 


North-Sonl 
a 

ed three no-trump 
or five diamonds. South chose 
the latter, after the auction 
shown, fearing a spade weak- 
ness for no-trump purposes. 
He had to play carefully after 
winning the opening spade 
lead in the dummy. , 

Routine play would have led 
to defeat and did at some ta- 
bles. If the declarer attacks 
trumps at once by leading the 
ace and another. East wins and 
drifts to a heart Now the de- 
fense must make three tricks. 


South fdt sure from the bid- 
ding that the dub ace was on 
iris left and wanted to remove 
that card before East had an 
opportunity to lead hearts. He 
therefore led a low spade from 
dummy, ruffed, and led the 
dub lung. West took the ace 
and was helpless. He played 
another spade, which was won 
in dummy, and South played 
♦lie ace another tr ump to 
clear the suit 

When a heart was returned 
by East, South did not now 
have to rely on a finesse that 
was doomed to lose. Instead he 
pump the ace and eventually 
discarded dummy’s heart loser 


on the fourth round of dubs to 
score die game. 

NORTH (D) 

- 6AK87 

042 

«q*7« 

*Q «3 

#•1111 

• AI 84 - +S53 

SOUTH 

♦ 2 

VAIJJ 
O A 1 D 842 
♦ XI97 

East and WHt Hm* nrinacaMe. 
IteMddtag: 


Noctk 

EM 

Sauk 

Worn 

Pose 

P*« 

1 0 

DfaL 

Bean. 

1 O 

>B 

Put 

3 O 

PW 

Peas 

Pass 

59 

Pan 

Went 

led tbe spade queen. 



World Stock Markets 

Via Agence Fnznce-Presse June 6 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aooon 

AK20 

AftokJ 

AMEV 

A-Oom Rubber 
AmroSon^ 

Buofirmorni T 

Co land HWa 

Elsevior-NDU 

Fokher 

G(S* Brocodss 

Hoinoiutn 

Hooaovom 

KLN 

Naarben 

Nat Nedder 

Nedllovd 

Oce VanoerG 

Pokhoed 

Phi I IBS 

Roboco 

Rodsnmco 

Rollnca 
Raren la 
Rovol Dutch 
Unilever 
VonOnunerw 

VMF Stork 
VNU 


457.50 
210 

195 JO 
11030 
229 JO 
249 
8.10 
80J0 
301 
9530 
3750 
17Z40 

125.10 

187.50 

14820 

40.90 
61 JO 
49 50 

66.90 
164 

325.50 
6*50 
56J0 
75J0 

139.10 
69 JO 
J6J0 
19560 
345.90 

29SQ 

201 

206 


453 
210 
19450 
110.10 
2J8J0 
249 
8.10 
8050 
20150 
9450 
36 
12050 
125 
131 
149.20 
4080 
6240 
4950 
67 
1&3J0 
326 
63J0 
5660 
75. W 
139.10 
69 JO 
46.19 
19740 
34550 
25^0 

203 

20520 


ANRCB5 Geaeral ta 
Prcrriom : 21170 


Brussels 


ArpM 1765 1770 

Betaerl 620Q t200 

Coc*erlll 236 236 

Cabeoa 3305 1XJ5 

EBES 31 10 31« 

GB-(iwo-BM 3350 3790 

GBL 1950 1985 

Gewoprt 38S0 3840 

Hoboken 5600 5610 

intercom 2350 2335 

Kredtetbonk 9150 91SD 

Petioflna 5930 W70 

fonCeneme I960 2900 

Saflnc 7268 7360 

Satvny 4420 4550 

Traction Elec 4133 4105 

UCB S53Q 5510 

VteNIc Montane 6m TWO 


Ho”* Kop* I 


8k Eos) Asia 
Cheung Kang 
Cnma Gas 
China li oh l 
Groan Island 
Haw Seng Bank 
Menderaon 
HK Electric 
HK Really A 
HK Holds 
HK Land 
HK 5tiang Bank 
HK Teleaitone 
HK Yovrttai 
HKWmorf 
Hutch wftamaoa 
Hvsan 
Inti City 
Jardlne 
J online See 


26.10 2L4B 
1690 17 

1» IWO 
16 1550 
9J5 9JS5 
52 SI JO 
115 
UO 
1150 
37 37 

5.9Q IBS 

8.10 110 

w i3 i S 

655 U0 
2 UQ 25 
05i 
0-S7 188 

1130 12 

1140 1260 


Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New work] 
Orient Overseas 
shk Proas 
s retux 

Swire PocWc A 
Tol Cheung 
wah Kwono 
Wheetock a 
W ing On Co 
winsor 
world inn 


9JS 

3950 

720 

115 

12J0 

3.10 

2350 

155 

LSI 

725 

2J5 


IS 

'5S 

^8 

118 


110 110 


Hong Seng Index : 152953 
Previous : t 52752 


AECI 

Anoto Ametloxi 

Anglo Am Gold 

Barlows 

Blwoor 

Bulfeb 

Do Beers 

Drtefonteln 

Elands 

GFSA 

i j a r mewe 

Hlvold Steel 

Kloal 

Nedbonfc 

Pres Steve 

Rusalot 

SA Brews 

StHeteno 

Sasoi 

West Holding 


800 775 

2925 2875 
17500 17400 
1240 1230 
1330 1340 
7600 7700 
1065 1070 
4925 4950 
1745 1740 
3350 343B 
2680 Z7TJ0 
497 500 

7800 77 75 
1330 IJ50 
5325 5350 
1600 1615 
790 7 V 

3550 3425 
698 692 

6153 6203 


^Kngy- , ~ :nao * 


s, & 



Distillers 
Drlefonletn 
FMOAS 
Free ST Ged 
GEC 

Cm Accktent 

GKM 

Glaxo C 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 


Hawker 

i a 

Imperial Group 
jaguar 

Land SecurlHes 
Legal General 
Lkryds Bank 

LOTirhO 

Lucas 

Marks and 5P 
Metal Box , 
Midland Bonk. 

Nat West Bank 

PandO 

Fiiklngton 

Pr^entlOl 
Rocol Start 
Rarxrtorrteln 
Rank 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 

Ravel Dutch s 44 
-RTZ 
Saatchl 
somsbury_ 

Sears Holdings 
.Shell 

lurehortarad 
Sun Alliance 
Tate and LVl8 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
T.I. Group 
Trafalgar Hse 
7 HF 

Ultramar 
Unilever c . n 
united Biscuits 
Vickers 
W o ol w or th 


499 

764 

183 

296 

291 

721 

5B4 

173 

3T2 

138 

406 

357 

667 

371 

290 

ia 

7U3 

100 


227 

439 

772 

192 

303 

287 

721 

5*9 

172 

309 

142 

410 

359 

672 

366 

291 

142 

691 

194 


mUk J97V3 

353 355 

622 622 

366 369 

47/64 45 1/32 

579 589 

433 


695 
320 
98V9 
695 
160 
467 
463 
503 
243 
462 
278 
375 
137 
223 226 

13/3211 11/32 

193 198 

2B5 290 

AN 413 


F.T.M Index: 1837A8 

Pre v ious : 1417.14 

F.T.S..F. 100 Index :7321BC 
Prevlov* : 139L9D 


1 MM®*- 1 

Banco Comm 

2D2S0 

Tam 


3350 

33/0 

Ctoahotels 

BSC0 

8210 

Credltal 

2225 

2210 


10060 

10000 

Farm Hallo 

14050 

MQ00 

FtaT 



F Insider 

Susp. 

47390 

IFI 

8120 

8030 


93300 

92100 


1478 

1420 


8ZU0 

82050 


99300 

99030 


1726 

1700 

Olivetti 

6495 

6440 


2600 

2569 

RA5 

71100 

70000 


(30 

810 

SIP 

2160 

2170 

5ME 

1564 

NA 


3264 

3218 


16260 

15990 

5 tot 

3078 

3048 

MIB carraat leaex 

: U41 


Prevloas : 1342 



1 «•-* II 

Air Lloutoe 

660- 

656 


333 

329 


1440 

1458 


670 

-670 


S84 

527 

Bonaroln 

2045 

3078 


hsfSd* 

Carrefour 


lud Mad 
Dorly 


iritokte 

1 

Eaux 


Lafarge COP 
Leerand 

Mortrtl 

Matra 

Merlin 

Mlchlin 

MoetHennesy 

Moulinex 

ntmoa kic 

Renter 
Retro lee (Cse) 
Peugeot 
Print emos 
R udl atartw 
Redoute 
Roussel Udaf 
Sanofl 

Skb Rasstonol 


Thom s on CSF 
Aaefl index : 


851 360 

£1? 2SS 

2281 2255 

619 620 

539 54T 

TITS 1370 

708 709 

214 718 

*22 806 

709 708 

1995 1900 

578 SBC 

2341 2395 

391 680 

2678. 36*5 
1795 1795 

J55 vhs 

2200 2190 

7065 70 43 

1990 1998 
9SJ0 9650 
7M 756 
795 783 

St 547 
261 265 

363 366 

305 295 

iS 3 ^ 

1700 7*65 

737 738 

1580 13*3 

2542 2600 

545 S5B 


CAC Index : OJLft 


§BS 


Storage 


Fraser Heave 
riawPar 


l Banking 


OUE 

5»iangH-kj 

Slme Derby 
rporeLnntl 
Spore Proas 
SStaomahlp 
St TrodmD 
United - 
(JOB 

St rati* n ew led 

Prevten ■' 5TZ8Z 


ISO »tG. 
6J20 AJ5 
525 525 

234 237 
7X1 OJQ. 
bJO 620 
925 925 

326 328 
HA- 25 5 
220 Ufl. 
129 203 

253 153 
6.10 6.15 

US Lll 
Aja AM 

206 209 

624 434 


155 

NJL 


ICI Australia 
Voaelkxi 

M1M za» 

Mver pa 

Nat Aus Bank 434 

News Cora 7-SQ 

N Broken HH1 2X2 


121 

560 

U2 

176 


Santas 


Mining 

BanWns 


LS7 


122 

220 

285 

131 

424 

7.40 

223 

065 

163 

562 

104 

3J0 

420 

156 


Otympgs 

Pio n e er 

racoh 


1150 1140 
1790 T7S0 
911 909 

891 
718 713 

849 165 

3900 3980 
1840 1450 
265 243 

720 725 

155 149 

268 2SI 
at sa 
875 


AH 

Preview : 88843 


Tahya 


Asrtrichem 
Asrtll Gloss 
Bank at Tokyo 


Canon 


Shtmazu 

Shlnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tobol Carp 
Taletw Marina 
Takeda Olem 
TDK 
TeUIn 

Tokyo Elec Power 
Tokyo Marine 
Topoon Printing 
Taray tnd 
Toshiba 
Tovofo 

YtonakMSac 


MUM/ DJ. index : 12716.11 
P i ei l ees : 1369331 
' :: M9J73 





CJtoh 

Dal NL 

Data Howe... 

Daiwo Securities 
Fanoe 
Full Bank 
Pull Photo 

HttcSl . 
'Hitachi Cable 


Japan Air Unas 
KaUma 
Kansal Power. 


Atta Lnwotf 
Aaea I 
Astra 

Aflat Cooco 
Sadden 
Etactrtta 
Eriesson 
Basel te 

HoideHfcCtaMfl 
PharmocJo 
SootpSconki 
Sondvfc 
Skonsko 
5KF 

5nfld/sW»rtch 

Volvo 

A J t J er s vo ert dee Index : 3*7J8 
Preview; 388.T8 


370 

ICQ. 

176 

174 

336 

471 

ft 

107 

105 

J» 

in 

557 

267 

299 

300 1 

NJJ. 

— 

NjQ. 

147 

1S7 

187 

N.Q. 

380 

363 

360 

8U 

88 

203 

» 

)» 

205 

A, 


ACI 

AHZ 

BHP 

Beral 


263 260 
AM AM 
LX LTV 

gs«-"-lt3 

Camolca • IS 

CU • tlO 6J8 

rsV ' 271 270 

Dunlop J-Jf JJ 

Elders ixl 234 285 


Kirin L 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Etac Worts 
MilMblsM Bank 
MJtsuWsMOtotn 


Ml 


teubfcsfil Elec* 
tauSshi Heavy. 
MltsabtstdCorp 
MMndOo 
Mttwkasfli 
MflwmJ 
NEC 

NOK Insulators 
Nlkkosec 
Nippon Kagefcu 
Nippon OH 
Nippon sfeel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 



HA: not auotad: NJU not 

aval table.' xd: ex-dlyrdend 


The Daily 
Source for 
International 
Investors. 



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21 132 AH Energy 
TWO Alto Not 

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71 100 CAE 
3860 CCLA 
112400 CDMbBf 
1850 Cod Frv 
2900 C Nor West 
12S86 Con True* 

500 C Tung 
76346 Cl Bk Com 
19000 Cdn Nat Res 
605991 CTlra At 
550 C Util B 
16000 Caro 
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200Ce(anl75p 
100 CHUM 
3600 C CHstbA 
112600 CDWtBI 
17755 CTL Bank 
KHBOConventry 
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22153 Doon Dev 
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1830 Denison A p 
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39185 Fiotorta 
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2650 F City Fin 
14404 Fraser 
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39346 Geocrade 

3700 Gibraltar 
73063 GOMarpf 
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Page 21 


INTERNATIONAL HER AT J) TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


SPORTS 


Tleltics Tie 
Series on 
; Last Shot 


K 


Johnson Beats 
Lakers, 107-105 

By Thomas Bonk 

Los Angebs Tones Service 
INGLEWOOD, California — 

y Time, and perhaps the season, was 

■ nummg out for the Boston Celtics. 
Larry Bird said he was counting the 

■ seconds in bis head' just before he 
put the ball in Dennis Johnson's 

w hands. 

Five, four, three. . Then Bird 

away from the i^tof^ahnsoa 

• shot. Two, (me: The ball dropped . 
through the hoop. 

The Celtics beat the dock and 
■' beat the Los Angeles Lakers,' 107- 

• 105, Wednesday night, on a last- 
. second shot by a guy who is sup- 
posed to be stmggnng with, ms 

■ outside shoL 

“I always figure Fin gonna make 
: something when I throw it up 
; there,” said Johnson, who certainly 
'figured tight tins rime. 

Suddenly the National Basket- 
ball Association’s best-of-seven 
championship series was tied ai 
two victories each. In the brief time 


to falL the Cddcs reclaimed 
their home-coart advantage as well 
as an edge of another sort .. 

“When it comes down to a last- 
second shot and you lose, that real- 
ly hurts,” said the Lakers’ James 
Worthy. 

But the Lakers bad scored only 
1 1 points the last sevm minutes of 
the game, had just three points in 
the last two minutes, committed 
three turnovers in four possessions 
down the stretch and let Lany Bird 
get away from them for the first 
time in the series. - 

The Lakers - blew a seven-point 
lead early in the fourth quarter 
when Bird took control of the 
‘game. Bone chips may be floating 
in his right elbow, nit Bird sent 
eight consecutive points floating 
through the basket in jost over a 
min ute, and a half. 

“For the last oonpte of games, we 
haven't had him,” mid Dennis 
Johnson. “It was nice to sec Lany 
back.” 

Bird also stole the ball twice 



Evert, Navratilova Cain French Open Final 


% Sam Abt 

International Herald Tribane 
PARIS — Experience overcame 



■ The fmao etti frta 

Lany Bird and the Lakers’ Kurt Rambis st raggl ed mightily 
for a rebound early in fourth game of championship series. 


from Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who 
had a rough time getting off his 
bode shot against a double- and 
triple-teaming defense. 

. Abdul-Jabbar made just four 
hook shots tins game, but two came 
within a minute of each other late 
.in the fourth quarter and the sec- 
ond gave the Lakers a 102-99 lead 
with 2:03 remaining. 

But for the next 104 seconds, the 
Lakers’ offense could produce only 
one free throw, by Abdul-Jabbar. 

Danny Ainge, another Critic 
guard who had bon scatter-shoot- 
ing for a couple of games, < 
in two pressurejumpers hum*! 
distance tb put Boston ahead. Wit 
19 seconds left. Magic Johnson 
made a shot after rebounding a 
miss by Abdul-Jabbar and the 
score was tiril for the last time. 

The Critics called a timeout and 



Outside, , It Was Show Time 


ri 


came in 
ednesday 


By Rich Tosches 

United Press International .• 

INGLEWOOD, California --They came in early and they 

te. But mostly they came in Smousnes and minks for Wo 
night's fourih'game of the NBA~ch5mpMfih!p sdresT' - 

From 4 PJvC until after the 6 KM. tipoffmore than 90 limousines 
— from the etxaomy models that seal ratiy six to the stretch various 
into which could be fitted all the Irish in Boston — cruised into the 
Forum parking lot 

Slowly the ftmos made their way through pedestrian traffic, 
through the oohs and ahs. And, me by one, they slowed to a hah in 
front of the Forum Gob, where the rich and famous, plus those who 
are only rich or only famous, gather for drinks before the game. 

From than the Kmos’ passengers proceed to their scats, the court- 
side seats that cost $150 each, the same amount they probably spent 
for gasoline for the trip to Inglewood in thdr mammoth machines. 

One woman popped from ber white stretch Bmo with diamonds 
flashing in the Southern California sun. Behind her came three _ 
with no necks, very obviously bodyguards. An attemptto engage 
woman in chatter faded miserably. 

’The lady does not talk,” one of the no-nedcs said tersely. 

What do you mean die does not talk? How, then, does she order 
room service? 

The parade of princes and prince»es cdntimied. limo;.after hmo. 


1 


only 10 minutes before , game ffny, the 
arrived. A blinding white limo motored through the parking lot, 
looking much like the 50 or so that preceded it 

4 that thi« limn hnH n Hoc rm it N/it 9 rttmm* tuwt nrngmnit 


cm it Not a chrome hood ornament 
dog. A flesh-and-blood dog. With glistening white fur. And teeth. 
Standing majestically on the roof. 


tried to run a play for Bird. But he 
was double-teamed, so Johnson 
wound up with the ball and a 
chance to be a hero. He did not 
miss his opportunity. 

“It was just like a bombing raid,” 
said the Celtics’ Cedric Maxwell. 
“Danny dropped a couple, then D. 
J. drops the A-bomb.” 

AH series long, the Lakers have 
packed their defease to the middle 
and dared the Critics to beat th«n 
from the outside. 

The ball went to a player who 
we probably wanted to shoot it, 
and he. buried it,” said the Lakers’ 
coach, Pat Riley. 

Johnson, who had made only 9 
of his last 31 shots coming into the 
game, made 1 1 of 20. He started off 
shooting from the inside and at 
halftime, when the Critics held a 
59-58 lead, he had 17 points, 10 
con&ngon five drives to tne basket 
“We didn’t come -out mesrin’ 
around tonight,” he said 
Johnson that finished off the 
Lakers from the outside, with the 
last 2 -of bis. 27 points. Teammate. 
Kevin McHale got 28 and Bird 27,. 
Those numbers offset the 21 rioipts ‘ 
from Abdul-Jabbar, who took-only ' 
14~shotv and- 20 -pomtv-11 re-, 
bounds and 12 assists by Magic 
Johnson. 

There were no modems of bad 
temper in either half, and that may 
not have worked to the Lakers’ fa- 
vor. Before thegame the vice presi- 
dent of the NBA, Scotty Surfing, 
met with Riley and-the Critics’ coa- 
ch, K.C. Jones, and told them to 
inform their players to cool it with 
the rough stuff. - 
Bob McAdoo said Riley told the 
Lakere to expect quick whistles 
from the referees. 

T drink that made us timid de- 
fensively" McAdoo said “We just 
didn’t go at it as aggressively as we 
did the last two games- Why, 1 
don’t really know. This team las a 
tendency to get a little soft after 
winning a game. Maybe we were 
getting too comfortable.” 

There wfll be little comfort for 
the Lakers now, because after Fri- 


end Chris Evert Lloyd, seeded No. 
2, advanced to the women’s singles 
'finals over much younger oppo- 
nents. 

“That certainly wasn’t one of my 
finest matches,” said Navratilova, 
28 , after she struggled to defeat 
Claudia Kohde-Kflscfa, 21. a West 
German who was seeded No. 8. She 
triumphed, 6-4, 6-4, despite many 
unforced errors, including five doa- 
ble faults. 

“I didn’t serve wriL I didn't pass 
weB," Navratilova admitted, “bull 
kept my cool and played wdl 
enough to win. Thai's reassuring 
for & final” 

“She didn't have a bad day, I had 
a good day,” Kohde-Kilsch said. 
“She’s very steady, she never has a 
bad. day.” 

The world's top-ranked women’s 
player and the defending champion 

in the French Open, Navratilova 
did not seem oveny concerned by 
her off day before the final Satur- 
day on the red day center court at . 
Roland Garros Stadium. 

Tve lost only 21 games so far in 
the tournament,” she pointed out, 
“so Fm not doing too badly.” She 
has, in fact, not lost a set here or a 
natch since March, when she be- 
gan wearing glasses on court. 

Perhaps because of this, Evert 
sounded distinctly unheartened 
about her chances in the final 
which vriD be a rematch of last 
year’s chanmionshm, won by Nav- 
ratilova, 6-3, 6-1. ,a Martina and 1 
play each other so many times,” she 
said, “and the last three years it 
hasn’t been, dose to even. So Fm 
hoping for tile best.” 

The start of the match was de- 
layed 45 wwmrW by a rainstorm. 
Then the players left the court 
a gain, after having played only four 



Martina Navratilova raced to return the ball during 6-4, 6-4 victory over Claudia Kohde-Kilsch in French Open semifinal 


and the No. 14 seed, was half the 
age of Evert and the youngest 
woman to reach the semifinals of 


She’s going to be a star. They were 
that way for me 15 years ago.” 

In the second set, with a 1-0 lead. 


crowd wanted her to win.” she said. 
“They were really booing." 
Despite the commotion. Evert 


S^^S^dSour • *■“ French Open, an event Evert Evert hit a ball that the baseline won tile game easily and broke Sa- 

0WD * X5Ur has won five times. At this time last judge called out. Evert appealed to baxini in the next to win eastiv. _*«]??** 


swept across the city. 

Evert had a relatively easy time 
in her nenrifinnl, beating GabrieQa 
Sabatmi, 6-4, 6-1. 

The men’s semifinals will be 
played Friday, with top-seeded 
John McEnroe taking on Mats Wi- 
lander, the 1982 French Open win- 
ner, and defending champio n Ivan 
Lendl playing third-seeded Jimmy 
Connors. .■ 

At 15, Sahatinf J an Argentine 


year, Sabatim was concreting in the 
juniors championship m Pans, and 

winnin g it. 

She was obviously the crowd fa- 
vorite, a condition that bemused 
Evert, who remembered back more 
than a decade whm she was a teen- 
ager and the fans’ darling. “It was 
strange for me,” she said. “The 
crowd is usually even or a little on 
my side. Bat not today. I think it’s 
normal that they should be for her. 



win- 


judge called i 
the umpire and was 
ning a replay. Many in the capacity 
crowd of 16,000 he g pn whistling 
and hooting in disapproval and 
Evert was unable to serve because 
of the noise. 

When the crowd finally quieted, 
Sahatini returned the serve loo long 
and the whistling resumed. Finally 
Evert was able to serve again and 
when she hit a return too long, the 
spectators applauded. “I think the 


easily. 

“The second set was a real good 
set,” Evert said, “because I was 
really concentrating. In the first set, 
it got pretty intense after I had her 
5-1 and then lost my concentration 
and she madeit 5-4. Once I won the 
first sri, I was hone free.” 

Sabatmi is fast and strong, but 
was not strong enough Thursday to 
slug it out successfully with Evert 
“I was tired and didn't really play 
well," Sabatmi said. “Not really 


tired, but I frit the match escaping 
me and 1 lost concentration. 

‘I’m very satisfied. “Even 
accom- 


Sabatim: Latest Heir Apparent or Next Burnout? 


By John Frinsttin U.S. Open at 14, plagued by injuries ai 18. Jaeger, 

. Washington Prat Service ranked No. 2 in the world at 16, a burnout at 19. 

She had<ri'thfOogb-^B*w&cpirf£reHi£re-'-TcBi£Si®n,. ranked No. 1 at 17, losing first-round. 


ass 


55# * 




hating more than half an hour, answering questions 
posed, in three langoagcs. She had posed for publicity 
pictures. 

“Now ” said her coach, Patricio Apey, “she needs 
some-drab to go and be a little girl” 

- The moments when Gabrida Sabatim can be a little 


matches at 19; her father said this week be never 
should have taken his daughter out of hi g h school 

“We are aware of all those things." said Apey, a 
former Chilean Davis Cup player who discovered 
Sabatmi two years ago during a tournament in Buenos 
Aires. “One of my jobs is to protect her. I want her to 


are increasingly rare. It is easy to forget, watching .be with friends her own age whenever possible, 


at the Forum, games 6 and 7 will be 
played in Boston Garden. 


her on a tennis court at the French Open, that she is 
two weeks past her 15th birthday. 

In women's tennis, little gals winning big matches 
has became the norm. Cirri* Evert Lloyd started the 
trend when she reached the semifinals at the U.S. 
Open in 1971, when she was 16. Since, Tracy Austin, 
Pam Shriver, . Andrea Jaeger, Kathleen Horvath, 
Rinaldi and Andrea Temesvari have made 
kmg before they were ready for proms. 

Now, there is Sabatim. She has ground strokes and 
she can serve and vdley. She is 5 feet 8 (1.72 meters), 
weighs 121 pounds (54.8 kilograms) and is a natural 
athlete. Quietly, tennis people are saying die could be 
the player who- combines the elegance and grace of 
Evert with the athletic ability of Martina Navratilova. 

Sabatmi is too young to understand words like 
burnout and burden. “Right now all I want to worry 
about is now” she said. Tm happy with what Fm 
doing. Fm not worried about the future.” 

Bat others remember Austin winning the U.S. Open 
at 16, unable to play at 20. Horvath qualifying for the 


“When she discovers boys, which will be soon, that 
too can be a problem. But I think, in the end, none of it 
win matter. She plays better at 15 than anyone ever 
has. She is going to be a champion.” 

“If I had to pick two players who have a chance to 
be No. 1 from the young ones right now, they would be ' 
Gabby and Steffi Graf, a 15-year-old West Gorman, 
Evert said. “Right now, I think Steffi probably wants 
it a little more. I sec that in her eyes. But Gabby may 
have more natural talent.” 

Sabatim has rant school and some days she is on the 
court for nine hours. She admits she sometimes is 
homesick but says it is not a problem. 

Navratilova favors a proposal before the Interna- 
tional Tennis Federation that would prevent women 
from playing full tune on tour until age 16. 

“1 think Austin and Jaeger were as good, if not 
better, at 15,” she said. “But Sabatinfs game is differ- 
ent than theirs. They were more like Chns. I just hope 
she can handle it all Others haven’t been able to.” 



Gabrida Sabatim 


plished a lot here and Fm happy.” 
She added that she did not think 
the umpire's decision affected the 
outcome of the match. 

■ Counterfeit Tickets 

Earlier, United Press Internation- 
al report «fr 

A printer and an employee in the 
city's sprats department have been 
arrested for counterfeiting as many 
as 1,400 tickets to the French Open 
tennis championships, police said 
Wednesday. 

A police spokesman, Thierry 
Boulouque, said 1,200 tickets were 
seized Monday at the home of 
Jean-Pkne Rembert, an official in 
the city’s ports services depart- 
ment. Printing plates and other ma- 
terials used to make the tickets 
were found at a local printing 
plant, and Rembert, 37, and printer 
Didier Morrison, 36, were arrested 
and charged with fraud, Boulouque 
said. 

He said that between 150 and 
200 of the counterfeit tickets were 
taken from unwitting tennis fans at 
the gates of Roland Garros Stadi- 
um where the tournament is held. 
Those tickets had been sold for 
between $22 and $45 and covered 
games from the fourth round last 
weekend to the men’s singles final 
Sunday. 

Boulouque said police laborato- 
ry technicians were able to trace the 
printer by analyzing the counterfeit 
tickets. They were sold on the street 
outside the stadium, where ticket 
scalpers do a lively business 
throughout the two-week tourna- 
ment. Although counterfeit tickets 
are often found at boxing matches 
in Paris, Boulouque said, it was the 
first time they had been found at 
the French Open. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Traxtsition 


Tennis 


Expos 9 Mahler: a Return to Remember 


i. rata) 

[Oakland nr New York. mmL, rata} 
(Chian «* Tams. mL rata) 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 


Wednesday's Major League line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
caWarnia MMMM i • 

paWmra 2 ta M» h&— «. ■ • 

McCuklli. John (7). Corbett (7) mid War- 
ren; D. Martinez and Demnm. W— O. Marti- 
naz, 54. L— McCatUTL 94 
MtaMHota m m mo- 4 ( a 

Toronto M4 Of JlX— 5 14 f 

.soiithwiv Wontto n>i L wonder (8) ond 
J£rmr>Satat ID and Enalo ID ; Alexander, 

Lavolta IV) and Whitt. W-Ataxomtor,M. L— 
smlltnan. 44. HR*— Toronto, BarfMd 2 CIS). 

Seattle - 1«1 MO MO— 2 4 B 

Detroit 299 HI Mx-S 12 3 

Lonacton, Will* 15). vonde Bom PI and 
Kaanmr. Scott (■); Mortis and MdvhW- 
Morrts. 7-5. L— Langston. 54. HRs-Ssatfle. 

Bradley (NIL Detroit, Saadwz (4L Brackens 
I1>- 

Mlheaukae SIC MI MS—lt 15 1 

Kansas C»r Ml IN MS- 2 A 1 

Hiouoro. Searaae 18). Rnoar* tn and 
Moore; Black, Janes (3), D adoet lti [7], Ou>- 
eonoerrv (») ondSundbaro. Wattwnm.W— 

Htoucro, 44, L B lock. 54. HW- MH woufcee . 

Molttor (4). . 


BASEBALL 


Ml MS ISO M-4 5 V 
M0 n MS BO— S 6 0 
Shletal* Sutter 0), Dedmn no) ond Bene- 
dict; Sanderson, Smith <ni and Davb. W— 
DedmanMlr-EmtttbS-L HRs-AltortaRo- 
unmet. CNoBMvGey til). ' 


W MB Bit— C 12 I 
- SOB BM BBS— 4 1 I 
Mabter aid Butera; Krakow, Blue (O.Gar- 
ralts [7).Oavte (VtandTrmtno.W— Moltfar.V 
a L— Krakow, 44 • 


» u l 

11 12 2 

«»«*an4kwmf (2), D.ftfcteson [5),Conde- 
tarto fU and Peno;4Unper. R. Robinson o>. 
PaetaraU), Rranco (7) and Koieaty. W— Pas- 
tora. 14, b-a Rattnuh. 3-l.sv— Franco (1), 
HRs— PHtaOurah. LoMaster (ll. anctanotL 
Portar t»>. Koteehr icj. 


BOSTON— Slsned Eric HetzeL william 
Zuoka and Grasa Maoturl. oHcbars. As- 
stoned Zwpfco ond Maoistrl to Etadro ot tha 
New York-Penn Lmouo, ond HetzH to 
G r e ens boro ot me South Atlantic Loaauc. 

CALIFORNIA— Amouncsd that Ken 
Farad), pitcher, underwent surgery an his 
rtaht elbow Wedne sd ay and apparently wtn 
be lost lor the remainder of tne season. 

MINNESOTA— Announced that Tam 
Khmttter, pitcher, underwent su cces s! ot sur- 
gery on Ms lefl oRww Wednesday at SLMarve 
HospHoL 

SEATTLE— Placed Mike Moore, pitcher, 
onttielSdaydsaMednstandSolomeBaro- 
las. pitcher, an the TLdavdtoMedltsi. Called 
up Frank Witte pitcher, tram catoorr of the 

Pacific Coast League ml BW Swift, oltdier, 

fro m Chattanooga of the southern League. 


French Open Resells 

WOMEN 

Stagles Semlffaatt 

Martina NavraHhwa {tj. ILLdeL Claudia 
Kohde-Kilsch ( 7 ), West Germany. *4 44. 

Chris Evert-Uoyd (23, Ui, det GabrWa 
SabaNnl I14L Argentina, M 4-L 


MEN 


SUomo GfieScstota. Israel, and Hans S- 
tnennarvSwadBn (MLdeLStetonEttaoni nd 
Anders JarrWL S w eden WL 43. 44 4-L 


Basketball 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
JNeWoa 



W 

L 

M 

GB 

Toronto 

34 

14 

JSW. 

— . 

Half) more 

29 

21 

J» 

S 

patralt 

27 

24 

25 

a 

22 

75 

351 

342 

1 JB0 

m 

7 

•9 

MllwaukM 

21 

24 

JOB 

9Er 

CWvotond 

’ 17 

34 

m 

Wft 


•tot DMBton 



coutornta 

. ^ 

a 

an 

— 

Koraai CHv 

24 

24 

J20 

Vh 

CMccea 

24 

a 

JU- 

2 

Oakland 

24 

a 

M 

Jib 

Seattle 

a 

a 

JB\ 

5- 

MtaAourtfl 

a 

a 

MO 

SVS 

Terae 

w 

31 

MS 

BW 


ram m-« n 1 

SOI MS sM— 3 7 1 
Koeoper, «Ftao (« and Baftav; Cox. 
Catnpboll ML Horton m. Day ley (W, Lt*n 
U) and Hunt.WMCneppar.«.L L-Cox. M. 
Sp— «PJ nHH. HR— Houston, Boltov Bl. 
PhlladtMda IN BM MO— 7 4 B 

SOB MHO BM M2 Blx— 3 I I 

Hudson, Carmen (X) and virwi; Hoyt and 
KwjKty.W— *iavtA4L— 4eudsoaL*.HR— 
San .EMggok Garvey {*). _• 

NOW.YM -• ■ BSI'MIOB— 1 3 • 

L M Axge)e» . , . ttf bib nor— 3 6 B 
Fer nand a, su t7) and cnrter; Welch, 
Jfcneyertt to. Howell <93; Vtawe 191 ond 
VKioer. W— Welch, 14 fe-Femandez. VL 
Sv-Hw** «. HR— New York. Faster Ml. 


Soccer 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East MvMen 

W L pet GO 


New York 
enksao 
Montreal 
51. Louts 
p.*9tutWphl« 


30 It JOS — 
a -19 an m 
so. 21 an 7 

2t 3t JSD S 

. .19 32-- JI0 13 
17 31 ‘ Xt U 
MMtDMMM. 

San Diego 29 M J92 - 

Cincinnati 2122 ' JStf TU 

Houston 24 2S JT0 4 

lot Angela 24 24 ‘ J» 4K> 

Atlanta 30 32 AOS 9 

Son Frandscs MX AH :Mr. 


WORLD CUf QUALtFYfNG 
, • . .*nma Grew two 

Swedw 2,Czod«staYtarta Q 
PeWs Xandtaes; west Gonnanv »j 9wo- 
dea Portugal 4: Qoeha sta roltla 3: Motto L 


Ptm ond 1, Re moelB 1 

Poita*stieidfcai!Jh»tandai Northern Ire- 
lona. Hntaod t; R«nonta *1 Turkey ft. 

R ente leleo MotMot; Aua2R Rnmonio vs. 
FtalondJ Seet. n, TwkW HoHhera Ira- 
land, Enok»xJ v». Romohla; Seo*2 % Finland 
ws. Turkey; Ott IL Romonta Vf. NutttMfn 
mriand. EBdiand vs. Turkey j now. U. En* 
gla nd vs. Nor thern H-Wond; Nov. 14. Tlittit 
vfc Ro w o nl ft- 


HOUSTON— Announced that they are sand- 
tag Joeo Cruz, outfielder, honw tar further X- 
nrrs ot a dhlecaied.tao be e u tttred May 24. 
Announced that Jeff Qdhaun, pitcher., was 
tfaonosed os having saparatod ribs on the 
rtaht side and that a d eci s ion wtH be mode 
Friday on whether he will be Placed an the 
disabled r*tf ■ 

PITTSBURGH— Signed Burry Bonds, our- 
fielder, and sent Mm !u their atfnor league 
Comdex in Bradenton, Fla. to be assigned. 

FOOTBALL 

(motitan Football l#dpqi 

BRITISH COLUMBIA— Released Laanto 
Burt. Matt Fllzpairlck, Bob Jedkke and Kesf 
Afniavo. defensive Unomen; Ralph SoUwffl 
and Chester Knria, llnobocfcars; Janes 
8auwem, stettKuh. and John Maftatt and Jay 
Chrteteneen. wide receiver*. 

K u HoimI Faotban Lbbbrm 

CINCINNATI— Slgnod Reggie WnOams. 
linebacker, to a three-year contract! 

CLEVELAND— Placed Charles While, run- 
ntno bade, on waivers. 

SEATTLE— Released Cullen Bryant, ran- 
nlng back, and Den Oufek, safety. Readied a 
contract agreement with Roy Grlfafteerner- 
bock. 

TAMPA Bay— S toned Mike Heoveadefen- 
stve bock, to a multi-year con t ra ct. 

united States Football Leagau . 

ARIZONA— Sent Trent Bryant comer- 
back, to Los Angelas to cpmpitte an oarHer 
trade. Atmwmd that they hav* gnjated o 
Ihreeshjy trvout t* RewWe AJkUte roofckt ot- 
ttraive guard. 

LOS ANGELES— WoWed AHanda Smith, 
safety. . 

HOCKEY 

W oMoael HadBH LeaBM 

DETROIT— Named Neil Smith director of 
soaut tag and player p rae u ranwnt und wmerot 
m onooer of Adtrandock of the Amerknn 
Hockey Loooue. Signed Dole Krantz. left 
wtno. and ran Friday, defenseman. 

VANCOUVER Ho me d Jock Gordon oan- 
grMmgnoger/atreetarofhoekevop watt on c . 


WBA Tide Series 


GAME 4 


Bird 

McHato 

Perish 

Ataoe 

□Johnson 


ana 25—1*7 
n M 24 21— IBS 


r « pf pts 




Midcey Mahler 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

SAN FRANCISCO — Mickey 
Mahler, in his first major league 
start in six years, missed pitching a 
no-hitter by the barest of margins 
Wednesday night. 

The only hit he allowed was an 
infield single by Dan Gladden in 
the third inning while the Montreal 
Expos were beating the Giants, 6-0. 

Shortstop U.L. Washington 
fidded Gladden's grounder in the 
bole between second base and 
third, and his throw to first base 
just failed to beat the Giants' out- 
fielder. 

Mahler, 32, the aider brother of 
the Atlanta Braves' Rick Mahler, 
was cut by the Braves in March, 
1980, then signed and released, in 
succession, by the Pittsburgh Pi- 
rates, California Angels, New York 
Mels and Sl Louis Cardinals be- 
fore he timed a Triple A contract 
with the Expos last February. Be- 
fore Wednesday ztigbu he bad not 
started a game rince 1979. 

’T owe a lot to the people in the 


IOC Moves Against Boycotts 


T tira o ftalu t Gods: Scan. Tedmtm- Los 
Aitatto* Iftogpf defenst 

runs. ■ 


May 37; Beam la. Los AsMtas TM 
Mar 3B: Los Angeles m Boston ioj 
J ma£ LM Anaetoi 134. BotaBi m 
Jana S: Boston TO7, Los Angetat 205 
June 7: Baeten at Los Angela 
J«9: Lns AngetoB of Boston 
*Jaoe Ti: Los Angeles «i Boston 
tx-if aecesoaryl 


United Press International 

EAST BERLIN — In another 
step in the battle against boycotts, 
the International Olympic Com- 
mittee made it compulsoty Thurs- 
day for all countries to c onf irm 
their entries eight months before 
the start of Olympic Games. 

The new r uling in the Olympic. 
Charter was passed cm the final day 
of the 90th IOC session and was 
heavily supported, although the 
delegate from the Soviet Union, 
Anatoly Smirnov, opposed iL 

Before Thursdays derision , oar 
tional Olympic committees were 
not bound to reply to invitations 


until six weeks before the Games. 

Tbe new rule, 58, stipulates that 
invitations mil be sent a year be- 
fore mating ceremonies, and by 
the IOC instead of organizing com- 
mittees. Replies from the national 
committees must be postmarked 
not later than four, months after the 
date the invitation was sent. 

James WonaD, an attorney who 
chaired the IOC commission revis- 
ing the charier, admitted the boy- 
cott problem still existed but said 
“now the would-be defectors wiD 
be forced to show their hand earlier 
and the offense will be seen in a 
more serious light.** 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

Montreal organization who gave 
me the opportunity to pitch again 
in the majors,” be said. “I felt I had 
a lot to prove to the dubs that 
didn't keep me. 

“No matter what I do from now 
on, they can’t take away the game I 
just pitched. It sure felt goodtoget 
back to wonderful Candlestick 
Park.” 

In three tnnmg c of relief Sunday 
against tbe Los Angdes Dodgers — 
his first appearance in the majors 
since late 1 982, when he was a relief 
pitcher for the Angels —he gave up 
three unearned runs. But ms last 
previous victory as a starter came 
at Candlestick Park in San Francis- 
co an May 28, 1979. 

_ Mahler walked two, struck out 
six and did not permit a runner 
past first base. 

Braves 4, Cubs 2 
In Chicago, Rafael Ramirez 
drove in all four runs for Atlanta; 
two with a home run that ended a 
2-2 lie with one out in the 11th 
inning. 

Reds 11, Pirates 9 
In Cincinnati, Alan Knicely hit a 
three-run homer to break an 8-8 tie 
with Pittsburgh in the sixth inning 
It was Knicdy’s fourth homer since 
joining the Reds on May 15. 

Astros8, Can&nals3 
Mark Bailey hit a two-run homer 
to help Houston win in St Louis. 

Padres 3, PhOfies 1 
LaMarr Hoyt pitched a four-hit- 
ter in San Diego to beat Philadel- 
phia for his fourth straight victory. 
Hoyt, striking put a career-high 
nine, turned in his second complete 
game in a row. 

Dodgers 2, Mets 1 
Bob Welch, coming off the dis- 


abled list from an arm injury, 
pitched five innings in Los Angeles, 
allowing New York two hits and 
striking out five in his second ap- 
pearance this season. 

Orioles 4, Angels 0 

In the American League, Dennis 
Martinez allowed California one 
hit, a leadoff single by Jerry Natron 
in the third innin g in Baltimore, 
and became the Orioles’ seventh 
pitcher to get 100 victories in the 
major leagues. 

Martinez, who struck out three 
batters, allowed a leadoff walk to 
Ruppen Jones in the second and 
the hit by Narron in the third, but a 
double play followed each time. 

The only other California base 
runner was Juan Bemouez, who 


was struck by a pitch with two outs 
in the fourth. After Beniquez stole 
second, Jones fanned to begin a 
streak of 16 consecutive batters re- 
tired by Martinez. 

Koe Jays 5, Twins 0 
In Toronto, Jesse Barfield drove 
in three runs with two homers 
again st Minnesota. It was the Blue 
Jays’ 12th victory in thdr last 14 
games, the Twins* 1 1th loss in thdr 
last 12 games. 

Barfield has hit safely in 19 of his 
last 22 games, with nine homers 
and 17 runs batted in during the 
streak. 

T^ersS, Mariners 2 
Alejandro Sanchez atoned for 

two eariier enors in Detroit with a 

tie-breaking, bases-empty homer in 
the fourth innin g that helped beak 
Seattle. 

10, Royals 2 

Paul Mdiior homered and rook- 
ie Earnie Riles accomplished a rare 

feat, by driving in three nms with a 

2 -out, 3-2 pitch tingle, as Milwau- 
kee triumphed in Kansas City, 

SOBn - (UT, UPI, AP) 







I 


& 


Page 22 


f 

A 

L 

U 

a 


CAT 

ber 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1985 


Ci * 


OBSERVER 


Let’s Hear It for Greed 


By Russell Baker 

XT ^ YORK — Kelverton 
i ^ to accuse me of greed. 

I could sec ihau and ii angered me 
uiai he was holding back 

ou ihink Tm greedy, don't 
you, kelverton?" I said, licking mv 
lingers preparatory Jo coumiag the 
stack of SIQO bills he had just 
placed m mv possession. “Sav ii- 
greedy." 

“Nonsense,” he said. 

What a prig he was. 

“You have a strange idea of non- 
sense, I said, waving the sheaf of 
SlOO bills under his nose. 

This was money I had made him 
extract from the life savings of a 
small band of widows and orphans, 
on whose behalf he bad come to 
me. They wanted to hold a garage 
sale, hoping to raise funds to pay 
for surgery on the hands of a wid- 
owed violinist so that she might 
someday play the violin again. 

Thanks to their ignorance of the 
market economy, however, they 
had neglected to buy a garage years 
ago when garages were cheap. So 
they had asked Kelverton to be- 
seech me for permission to hold 
their sale on a vacant lot that had 
been willed to me long ago. 

□ 

I gave it to Kelverton straight 
from the shoulder; 

“Kelverton. there are scarcely 10 
people on the planet capable of 
playing the violin without making 
me scream for mercy, so don't ask 
me for free rent on iny lot." 

"Callous and cold-blooded," he 
said. Being an American, he knows 
how to Hatter his countrymen. 

“That’s kind of you." I said. 
“Perhaps you’d like to characterize 
ray nose and mind with hyphenat- 
ed' adjectives modifying a noun de- 
fining me as a practitioner of 
America's favorite -ism." 

“You're a hard-nosed tough- 
minded pragmatist,” he said. 

1 loved it Why be modest when 
you nave nothing to be modest 
about? When you're the greatest, 
stand up and tell the whole world. 
“I’m the greatest." 

Same for nose, mind and -ism. 
Let the world hear from you loud 
and clear; “My nose is the hardest, 
my mind the toughest, and my 
pragmatism the praggiest!” 

What makes me wish somebody 
would punch the world’s Kelver- 
tons in their soft noses is their atti- 
tude toward greed They think 


there's something unspeakable 
about greed 

Back when Jack Poor ran the 
NBC ‘Tonight" show the network 
kept him under hawklike surveil- 
lance for fear he might say Toilet" 
on television. WclL nowadays ev- 
erybody can say “toiler on 'televi- 
sion. as well as’ anything else, pro- 
vided it's vulgar. 

Except “greed." The one thing 
no one dares utter on television or 
anyplace else is a sentence conced- 
ing the existence of greed in Ameri- 
can Life. as. for example. “Wow! 
The gFeed is so deep in Washington 
these days you might as well be in 
New York." 

□ 

So it amused me to coy with 
Kelverton when he came pleading 
for widows and orphans w ho want- 
ed ray lot for the philanthropic 
marketing of old bottles and sec- 
ondhand clothes. 

“Widows, orphans, a poor artist 
dreaming of once again being able 
to play the violin . . He looked 
ready to weep. 

“It is the market economy that 
makes our country the envy of all 
mankind." I noted. “In a market 
economy, those who want to use 
another^ vacant lot to enrich sur- 
geons must pay." 

I named an outrageous one-day 
rental. 

"Brutal, heartless, merciless." 
sputtered Kelverton. I blushed at 
praise normally reserved for the 
great Clint Eastwood. 

“I’d like to think so." I told him, 
“but the dull fact is I'm just greedy, 
and proud to be so. for an America 
where greed was dead would 
be . . .” 

I did not finish, for at the words 
"greed’' and “greedy” he recoiled 
in pain, as those NBC vice presi- 
dents must once have recoiled 
when they imagined Jack Paar say- 
ing Toilet." 

There was no way they could 
make the rent selling castoffs, but if 
you’ve a nose for the way of the 
world you know that even widows 
and orphans will dig into capital 
for a crack at the sweet publicity of 
the TV' news. And with a widowed 
violinist's future at stake, what TV 
station can resist the temptation lo 
bring a tear to the public eye? 

So what’s so shameful? Greed is 
only human, like everything else. 

.Vnr flint Twits Serrict 


Turning Mined Land Into Huge Earth Sculptures 


Bv Douglas C. McGill 

.\Vu IVA Tima Serene 

O TTAWA. Illinois — On the 
shores of the Illinois River 
here, an unusual collaboration be- 
tween a sculptor, a mining com- 
pany, a state agency and a philan- 
thropic group is transforming a 
forest destroyed by coal mining 
into one of the world's largest 
outdoor sculptures 
The work.’ entitled “Effigy Tu- 
muli." is designed by the artist 
Michael Heizer. and consists of 
five earth mounds in the shape of 
aoiraals indigenous to the region: 
a catfish, a frog, a turtle, a snake 
and a water spider. 

“My idea was to make .Ameri- 
can an. as opposed to living in 
New York and making paintings 
derived from the European tradi- 
tions.” said Heizer. who has lived 
on a ranch in the Nevada desen 
since 19"! 

“As long as you're going to 
make a sculpture, why not make 
one that competes with a 747, or 
the Empire State Building, or the 
Golden Gate Bridge,” he said. 
“Why should there be more com- 
mitment in this society to archi- 
tectural engineering than to art. 
particularly sculpture?" 

Each up to 1.000 feet long and 
25 Feet high (300 by 7.5 meters), 
the mounds will cover a plateau a 
mile long and half a mile wide < 1 .6 
by 0.8 kilometers), constituting 
perhaps the largest outdoor sculp- 
ture io be built in the United 
States since Mount Rushmore 
was completed in 1941. 

Yet the sculptures were also 
created as part of an ambitious 
environmental program to restore 
Illinois lands that were devastated 
by unregulated coal mining 
through the early 1960s, and to 
stop the pollution of forests and 
rivers caused by abandoned 
mines, whose acidic soil kills 
pJam and animal life. 

Since 1977. coal companies in 
the United States have been taxed 
to pay for the agricultural and 
landscaping procedures accessory 
to restore such destroyed land to 
life. State agencies are allocated 
funds for reclamation of mined 
land, and the building of “Effigy 
Tumuli.” which Illinois hopes lb 
turn into a tourist attraction, 
probably qualifies as the most un- 
usual reclamation project to date. 

“If this land was going to be 
reclaimed, l thought it should be 



Michael Heizer's “Effigy Tumuli.” as seen on model; from left: snake, turtle, catfish, frog, water spider. 


done in a wav that's creative and 
unique.” said Edmund B. Thorn- 
ton. the chairman of the Ottawa 
Silica Co., the mining concern 
that donated the land to Illinois 
for the project. “This is the largest 
site sculpture ever envisioned, 
and will be the largest ever con- 
structed and built-” 

By next spring, the project's 
planned completion date, the pla- 
teau should be transformed into a 
sculpture park, planted with grass 
and with walking paths weaving 
through the mounds. The cost will 
be approximately $1 milli on. .Al- 
most all costs will go toward bull- 
dozing dirt, with no need for steel 
or complex building procedures. 
The funds will come from the 
state's Abandoned Mined Lands 
Reclamation Council the agency 
that oversees such restoration. 

The Ottawa Silica Co. Founda- 
tion, a philanthropic group of 
which Thornton is president, ini- 
tiated the project, commissioned 
Heizer ana will pay his fee. which 
will be separate from the SI -mil- 
lion construction cost. 

It is Heizer's hope that the “Ef- 
figy Tumuli” will add a new di- 
mension to what he regards as the 
unsung but ancient American tra- 
dition of outdoor monumental 
sculpture, stretching from the 
Mayan pyramids of the Yucatan 
to die presidential busts caned by 
the artisi Gutzon Borglum at 
Mount Rushmore, South Dakota. 

The earth mounds of “Effigy 
Tumuli," in fact, are themselves 
inspired by the ancient burial 
mounds, or tumuli, made bv earlv 


North American Indians. The 
mounds, often built in the shapes 
of animals, are thought to have 
been used for religious and cere- 
monial purposes, and date from 
around 1000 B. C. to 1000 A. D. 
They are still found scattered 
throughout the Middle West, a 
number of them in Illinois. 

As might be expected with a 
project of such dimensions, the 
genesis of “Effigy Tumuli" has 
not been without problems or 
controversy. Heizer’s original 
plan called lor eight animal 
mounds to be built on the plateau. 
A salamander, a bird and a bea- 
ver. however, were dropped after 
cost studies. 

At a critical juncture, after 
many months of pl annin g and to- 
pographic studies, another cost 
study greatly underestimated the 
price of building the mounds, 
sparking a public outcry that al- 
most stopped the project. 

The practical and aesthetic 
challenges to the artist also 
proved difficult 

“I’m an equipment operator, 
not an engineer." Heizer ex- 
plained. ‘To build the mounds I 
bad to become an engineer. 1 bad 
to learn how to make elevation 
studies, topographic maps. I had 
to study soil mechanics and slope 
permeability." 

The aesthetic problem, in es- 
sence. was to create a form that 
satisfied at least three require- 
ments: that it be quickly recogniz- 
able as an animal- that its design 
be adaptable to the topography of 


the plateau, and that it express the 
sculptor's artistic sensibility — 
that it “look like a Heizer." 

“I tried mammals, but mam- 
mals didn't work." said Heizer 
about the early stages of the pro- 
ject’s design. “They look like 
something you’d see in a Disney 
cartoon. Then 1 found insects. 
They have a very simple and pro- 
found geometry. They are ne- 
glected thematic material." 

The discovery of insects led 
him to design the water spider, 
and then to analyze the catfish, 
the turtle, the snake and the frog 
in similar fashion. 

“To essenliaiize a catfish, volu- 
metrjcally, without distortion, 
was me challenge,” Heizer said. 

The process, however, was 
more complex than constructing a 
single animal model and scruti- 
nizing its geometry with a slide 
rule and compass. 

Instead, Hrizer collected scores 
Of photographs of each animal, 
noting the differences in forms 
between each species, and adapt- 
ing those forms so that they were 
both buildabie and matched the 
existing topography of the pla- 
teau. 

When it came time to design 
the catfish, for example. Heizer 
tried to fashion the mound after 
the species of catfish most com- 
mon m the area. 

“We were shooting for a bull- 
fish. but to make it do-able, we 
bad to use a South American cat- 
fish." the artist explained. “The 
bullfisb dorsal fin was too high; it 


wouldn't bold. So we used the 
Paraguayan dorsal" 

At first glance, “Effigy Tumu- 
li” would seem an artistic depar- 
ture for Heizer, whose best- 
known works are two 
monumental, abstract sculptures 
in the Nevada desen. 

One is a mile-long notch that he 
dynamited out of desen rock 
along a cliff; the second is a mon- 
umental work, half pure geomet- 
ric abstraction, half Mayan ziggu- 
rat, situated in a desert about 50 
miles from the nearest small 
town. 

If it is ever finished, another 
Heizer work in progress sear 
Tonopah, Nevada, will become 
one of the largest man- mad e 
works of art in the world. De- 
signed to be a mile long and 500 
feet high, it is being constructed 
from earth being removed from a 
nearby mountain by the Anacon- 
da Mining Company, which is 
mining molybdenum. 

To Heizer, the animal-shaped 
earth mounds in the Illinois forest 
are a natural artistic progress on. 

“It's a never-before-been- tried, 
difficult to manage nearly impos- 
sible project that’s had its prob- 
lems. The principle of cooperat- 
ing with people to make this thing 
buildabie was where the real chal- 
lenge lay." 

What’s more, he added, the lo- 


mid-sized sculptures in the Neva- 
da desert prepared him weB for 
the task of mound-building in Illi- 
nois. 


PEOPLE f 

Tom Stoppard to Debr ~ * 
As Director in Chicago :* : 

The playwright Tom Stoppard * 
will make his directorial debut flex* 
year a! the Chicago Theater Fes'J’ , , 
vaL directing a 17-mernber spinet , £ 
from Britain's National Theater. ■ 

The production will feature ian ^ | 
McKellen and Edward Pettier- j 
bridge, two of Britain’s most > , 
complished actors and the leader.- : 
of the new troupe. PeLherbn*.?; - ' ^ ■ 
just back in London from an -'■> j , 

pearanceon Broadway mth '■ i* 1 

Jackson in ‘‘Strange Interlude 
said the Chicago performances 
would include three works, mclud- \, - 
ina Stoppard directing “The Rea! ; i; : 
Inspector Hound." “We want V- f ,’ 
hoist a little flag for the oki-fasn- 
ioned theater company" where ac- • • 
tore are in charge. McKellen said. 

Peter Sellars, director of the ■ 
American National Theater in ; 1 
Washington, advised anyone who ; • . 
wanted to see worthwhile drama in - 
the United States to see the strong i f 
regional theater companies rM ' 
“make New York your last sts*/.” v . 
(More on V. S. ihemer in Weekend. , ,/e 
page 91 “Frankly, the problem •* ’ \ 
right now is a very scary, in fact $•; 
pernicious, absence of idealism ^ • _ 
that has "invaded every fabric of • ! 
the country," Sellars told a Nation- “ , 
al Press Club luncheon Wednes- . ; . 
day. “If you cannot be idealistic in 5 • 

the theater, where can you be ideal- 

istic?” said the 27-year-old innova- ; > 
tor. who has called theater "the ? 
most depressed an form in Amen- i 7 
ca." Sellars, the 1983 recipient of a 1 
five-year, no-stiings-aitacbed grant j a 
from the Mac. Arthur Found^n 5 ; 
in Chicago, was hired last July to »- , • 
direct the new American National '■ 
Theater at the Kennedy Center, 

° ft! 

The Reverend John Freeman 
jogged 70 miles (1 13 kilometers} for >J} 
his 70th birthday, completing 2 52 
circuits around a track an hour^j 
faster than his 69-mile run a years ,• 




£ 

t - “ 



P rince s s Ame of Britain wity* 
it famine-stricken Sudan during 


weanesaay. me J 4 -year-oic- 
daughter of Queen EXzabethUwi!!- . 
also visit Tanzania. Mozambique./ 
and Zambia. if 


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FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 

BSAUtiWl UTTl£ CHATEAU 
In good rendition, sniated m smril rit 
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COTE D'AZUR MOUGINS 

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US $90,000 ‘Write Gean fivesei. 
1-415 Grif tint Drive. Stone Moutain. 
GA 30088 USA. 


REAL ESTATE 

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Bill 

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YOUR CONTACT M PROVOKE 

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setTmq. P4.a stress. *''s rot a irencroe Aj‘ 
»ha rnoney and M profit: os 100 % 
vours Ideal far faraSes. i^ri-ndim!s o- 
ctsemee owners. Psrt-tore, hjB-tirre or 
weekends. There's no reed »3 leave 
,our present sob. Wrth the >>ma r-re-i 
yerj lake someone's pictu-» with a T.V. 
ennero and rrstand. prim 1 : - 1 “ o 

com pui OT . it's so cus-.-bjna-i ample. = 
chjd c®i .Tin rr &rt the ZtorTr. cren t 

rtur:. The Kena syshtin .s c.olptde n 
Wari ed etfe rjB ca Jar.- a cm- 
We. set*, up m 30 r*»ruies sr tea. cny- 
t«. anywhere. Tre -odd r.jovr te-n- 
'v- There ere thavsorrfs or lacphc--s 

"orr.j :□ ag fi 8 ed_ pert 
mod rdcr astol'Ca-pr. S*«r“ pr ees 
sry> a U557iC0 x 'JttsSX 
tx*mc. Cept. .15. Pjs.-bc-. 
cOGO Franiri^r • n '3eri-ipp-« 

Tel. Oc-9 1 : iTci'a 7!t JllTTj 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MOST COWTAWa LEASING 
COMPANIES ADVBTT1SE 


17 % - 20 % 
FIXED INCOME 
PER ANNUM 

WE DON'T HAVE TO BECAUSE 
WE BBJSVE WE CAN OffB 

MORE! 

We ore o mcqor conf ute/* leosng tenv 
pony ffounded 1975) with on eacelent 
record of return & service for our c5- 
ents. We ont Cuncrrtiy rnentangem 
17.000 co ntaners ioc over 2D00 dents. 
WE HAVE OVBl 

$36 MHJLfON 

UNDa MANAGEMWT 
AND AN AHMUAL TURNOVK 
M EXCESS OF 

$15 MILLION 

If yfflr ore ooradering cn ■ivesimeiu r 
contriners *« suggest you conroa US 
before maLtg your decrion. 

WE PAY OUR CUBITS 

QUAKTBtLY 

A GROSS DOLLAR INCOME 

SHIRLSTAR 

INTERNATIONAL SALS 
KHZBBG 8 A CHT 5 34 
1017 a AMSTHZDAM 
THj (020) 272822 
TH£X 14663 (WE5CO) 

A UK Ccmpony with suburicr, 
avnpcries n Frcrce. C"«manv. 
Holland. Ncrwov & S-eden 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


COMMISSION AGENTS 
wonted in most Middle East. 

S African countnm ftx USA's 
pofice & emergency vthde Srirt/sren 
systems. Minnwn mvestmert of S2JOOO 
required for sotnles as prcxhxd must 
be sold via Ive demonstrahon lo using 

iSgWWHGHTS r«B3 NOT APR.Y 

Contact Larry Stewart, 

VAtden Enmneering/LN Stewart & 
Asuxntm. Aw louse 368. Bov 10, 
1050 Brussris. Belgium. 


SETTLING N CANADA 
IMMIGRATION AM) WVBTMENT 
Contacft DAXT-tNVBT Lid. 
tifitr Jean Dor*. Prendert 
1981 McGill Cc«™e . Sute 458 
GA2W9. Canada 


Manfred H3A 

' *u 

5561023 


Tetj5^4^281 1981 


COMPDISK for hjsness and person- 

d use. Authoraed deder tar EM, 
Apple, others. Sest pices. Cdl Air. 
Lawrence. Parts 563 7*B9 / 348 3000 


USA 

BUSINESSES t REAL ESTATE 
Euvnea vdes; commerad. mdusmd & 
resdoruip red estese-sdes & lecses. 
tracer r, .■nanogerrwnr i buutess tie- 
^tooment. Write with ,-rvjr reejure- 
merrts & rinanad specs to Hirscn Redly 
& 3'jsmess Brokers 147*5 Jeffrer Sd_ 
— 210 Ir.me. CA9T14 USA. 714651- 
W30 Tl». S90VJ4. 


BUYING SWATCH WA7CHE5. sr-. 

ayW. orr/rnj salt- S^cirge'. Hjiel 

AiVeCis She'ctcn. ;_t:ci iet i.-rtn 


4*j0CC0 


LOW COST RE5IDSNTIAL ::t jS 
n-^el wtom. nc pr.^i^j presence 
-eq.^ryi Appi.. 5a> 65. Hie 


Are 


FRENCH VINEYARD 
Your own cfaatomi win*. 
Under S10.000. 


C f f»'oi 


en bortes 01 .our awn labelled wmri 

r.tic/iknvesr 82 Scone St. 
London JWJ? 9PA 


BrtGtAN BUSVCSSMAN, toudi. 40. 
multi fcngud. Sp eci d passpert. Ready 
lor (unusud) mandates woridwrie. 
Wnte Bo* 2334. Herald TnKne. 
92521 Neufy Cede*, Franca. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC 
U5JL. 8 WOSIDWDE 

A conflate soaoi & busmess service 
povidmg a ungue odleaian af 
tdwted. versatile & mu^Engud 
ndrviduds lor al occrsora. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 5o*i St.. N YC 10019 
Service Represerrtofraes 
Needed Worldwide. 


INVEST 2 Was in Better Herrih. 

Enter Cardiac Cal Prevention & 


supervision Viw Enron Mericd Cen- 

se. Enleei near Goddmuig, Surrey 
GU95AL 45 rroi London. Bna 

[04 2| a?9 2231 


Butimu Service in Ln mnbo org 

Accounting company for mutmns + 
management-'seoetanoL' phone /te- 
Je»-'n®L Corr e ct Hnser, 12-M BeL 
d'A, ranches. I IWLuvembcurg. Phone: 
[ — as-n 492151 TU 1431 


5A5 < Ea MIUTAXT personnel uwri- 

ade for rise best in e cecurve persond 
orotecrion £ related secunfy mafterv 
Bangw Security Ltd. PO Bo* 151 
Enfield. Midrine* EN13 XP. 


HOW TO GST A 2nd PASSPORT. 

Restart - 12 ajuntnes cnafyied. 
Denrij- WMA 45 lyndhunt TCE. 
Suite 510. Central, Hong Kang. 

Imp nme pur Offprint. ~3 rue de I'Evcngile. 75018 Paris 


TAX SERVICES 


US INCOME TAX returns retd writs 

by profmonah, Pora 563 91 23. 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


PRINCIPALITY 
OF MONACO 

lor rent: 

SUPStB OFHGE SPACE 

200 / 300 sqjn. and 500 sqjn. near 
Monaco hetport, snpeccobfy furnished 
and ready lo move mta. 

For further detafc contact: 

AGEDi 

26 ba Bd frinotose CharVrtte 

to Coto. MC 98000 Mm 

Tet ^.15?) 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


COLLATBAL owdobie from Prime 

Bake. A LOnp ebonsrve service for 
arbitrage purposes. We supply / ar- 
range- a) dean company ihefa, ^ 
patemerds of purpose of or b ei a ge 

locra, d fidudary bank accounts, d) 
ajUctaral, s) aJatad noehortan by 
trie* or hard any. Please oontad our 
London offices - tfl 244 9592 / 01 385 

5492 / 01 930 0926. Tb. B951622 

TAttCOG 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy., 

fine diamonds m any price rresge 
o» lowest whatexAs prices 
rired from Antwerp 
center of #w riamond world. 
Ful pjorerte*. 

Far Free price fist write 
Jooehim GaMenctobi 


Btabfahed T?2B 

Pefikoanstraof 62, B-201B Arfwera 
Setaum - Tsk&2 3 ) 234 07 51 
Tit 71779 sy< b At the Dranond Oifo. 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


MTBNATIONAL BUSINESS Bureau 

SA Fur rushed offices, Ungual per- 

so nne!, le pci addrea, meehng rooms. 
caarcSnotion of any tand af 
and corregjoreisnce. Tet 
. Tfc 4-*ri 


•>004/05, 

Spain. 


44979 JTBfl. Modnd 


BJKO 8USWE55 CSiTB 
99 KecersaadU. 101 5 CH A mi l er (inn 
Tet 312036 57 49 Telex 16181 
Wald-Wide Buanoss Caries 


PARIS ADDRESS. Champs-Systes. 
Smoe 1957 LiP. provides maJ, pnane. 
retex, m eet in g roams. 5 rue dArtaa, 
75008. Tet 339 47 04. Tlx. 642504. 


YOUR OWE N PASS: TCS. 

AN5W5SNG SSV1CE. secretary, 

rrusntk, maSbor Ewe 74H^day. 
Tet PAf; 609 95 95. 


GERMANY 


IN HAMBURG 

business & publishing 
_ Northern Germany; 
OFFICE BUILDING 
prestige eddrea in the heal of the 
city's buaness ri st iid. untaue nonsk 
oppoi hra ty for investor seeang safety 

guotaVeed returns & eagjpdnxfi tor 

prviegei, se&ng at DM24 irdfion 

wdustrSTtojpbity 

long term lease control witharime 
tenant sefingetf DM55 iriBwv 
M SiUTTOAKT 

So u thern Germany's fowl growing 
imhorrid eerier: 

BUSINESS CH4TB1 
» frri daB toco ton, pr&V* ct ff i 
under constradcn, apprassixwl/ 
15000 sqA to l et, cfco ve ave rage cop* - 
tert gm into inreituent with wmity, 
[dung ert DM90 rrJotl. negot iabie. 
Oeuetai cssured, nstrhflipnol 
imreston w«fcorae, no brokers. 

Ft* detqcj cortDCh 
P.OJfi 709. 3780 GSTAAD/SW1T 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


GREECE 


FOR SALE 5 aaa seaside property 
Hcftxfti between seexxd A third pen- 
insula. For date* telephone USA BT 8 - 
355-4454. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


STRATFORD— UPON — AVON rrw 
made nxmer home writ 6Tb river 
frontage Vi mfl» up river from town- 
center. 2 bedrooms, btrtfxoorn. Idkh- 
ev stfting room, u brx rt 16 acre. Fufiy 
htoxshed S45jD00 or nearest offer. 
Tet Leamington Spa (0926) 883756 / 
25441. 


CBfflAL iomxm aesoro 
PBMCB GATS, HYW PARK 
11 . 000.000 

A rare oRtorftnfy to uugiere a torge 
freehold house, recently refurbished to 

a toxurioui skxrkrd, os a residenCE or 


Cn k uixa bet, 6 reoepbon noons, 10 
bedtoexofi 6 bathrooms, 3 shower 
raauB, 2 sta ff roo tte 4 dookrotm. 2 
Iridiera pkis 2DOO son. open ptoi ma 
Video eriryphane. Eft, ncuriy system, 
9r9es ad riedric shutters. 

Jotof sole agenti 
Chedertons 01 937 7344 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


:::1 - 




GREAT BRIT AES 


LONDON NORDCRN OUTSKIRTS *4 
Otadeywood Hertfordshire Abraly \A 
home of character designed by tun \’.£ 
of oentary adifecL CFA Vaysey 6 t 
bedrooms. 4 fe e epiKXB. 2 bawooms, 

4 WCs, covered garaging fa 3 cars. 
Seduded gaden, grass tons coal. /- 
10 minries wcJt to uniergrauui'rrd- * - 
way to Safeef Sheet/ McBytSf,-*. 1 U : :' 
m ile N orth orbitai motorway. 20 nties S . 
dry eeria, 12 Hies Heattrow. Offers 'fit 
' of £ 2 SJJ 00 . Far free color 
UK 9278 3742. 


S .i.#: 


MAGUBKENT FACTORY « OFKE 

pnctaerty an a wperfa site overlooking 
rfefcr m Northern &gkxid. ft ooov 
prim 3 man boys each served by 
erm ranging from Store to 75 tore. 
The crea of ore 3 bays n about 90000 
st*iL with 50 ft head room & totet & 
messtoD fadSfws of obcut 6700 1 
The office btod attached to ftie 
toy ■ a modern 2 -ttorey famBcSng 
wi floor CORStttng of 

ly 4,100 sqiL uxth tJ e . 

"enciii A large had staving cor 
pari is attached to this raerfity. Res 
Rxrity is modern in styfe w^h crones 
ft structure in minuuArte oonriticn. 
For forlher dataaspleree unite to JP5 
EngineenngJJd. 210 London R 
Ooyttov OK) 21E Mv (XL ffl 




pfflrio/core e nta to y. garage, un- 
matched secure location, reewrt luxu- 
ry w nwfoi Private sole, X year 
tone £4754XXL Wbaid axvder yrer 
reriaL Tel: 01-730 2238 


LARGE PUT N 18* century mpn 
ston, presrig 8 oonverani, beige. 2 

b edrooms, nkhen, bathroom’ m 
merenri parking necr Davor: Tel 
0304 82126ft PRICE £52000 t> 
neared offer. 


ITALY 


ITALY. BLAND OF BBA. Chann- 

miag, toque XVhfa centixy, ferredted 
house tor sriev BeautiMfe. restored 
Original thestnri beams and tied cel- 
iogL Stuated m a defightfui Meritcr- 
vaksge, o few mmutes from 
L htridoyAweawow. 

HUM! 


fa sea 


halo tfHbo, Uvorrio. tterfy 


XVBIH CTOURY panorami c fur- 
rushed vBa. 18 fan (ran Pentoa, 54 

few Bocona 4 1 , Boro or cdl 
(D^ 4752077 eveangi. 


PAGE 8 
FOR MORE 1 
CLASSIFIEDS 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


ACCBS USA 

From tail On* Way Round Trip 
New York USS 149 U5S229 


las Angdre US$209 
Chicoga ' 




US$369 
199 US 359 

Z75 US 419 

309 US 449 

169 USE?? 

PARS lei: | 1 ) 221 46 94 


FLY TO SHARJAH DUEA1, ABU 
DrtABL Attractive fares one vray or 
return flights from mcsT Eurepeat rer- 

Wfcanesoay. Agon xxyxrtcs we- 
come. Bast Afnaxi Hoidays., Geniscd 
Steel Agents for Ausmon Airtran- 
sport, 93 Rraeris Street First Floor, 
London W1R 7TE, Tet 01-734 9837. 
The 25859 PAOMB 


STAND BY FROM PARS one way 

New York FI 200. 5125 Fridcw, Sat 
day. LA ft Fnsco FI 700, J176 Yhun- 
day. Your US agent. Bars 522 20 2ft 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


LOWEST FARE5 WORIDWRJE & 

Otafity short breaks to Rome. F& 

banters. London 01-370 0444 1AT 




HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


EXPBNTION OU9NG 
fN MDOME5LA 

Aboard M/V bland Explorer, the 
wntefs mad kixurious mn-cruser. 
ft 10, 12ond 15doy experitionitolhB 
(6ands <d Eotf and West Indoneso 

10 cabins and fidews o> with tde- 
[fixma end privote foafitiev SriOOffl 
telex <md telephone bi, 3 chefs, farad 
lounge and rinmg r oom, re O p uliut Ml 

9 *® bcatom dock end wtftcrsking - cn 
ax i ted on board. 

Indwidud deperttares ond dtarten of 
the entire vessel avotobie. Imxled cab- 
ins tfl av afefale for ths Berner's 


CONTACT 

M/V/ Ural Explorer 
P.T. Lunba Leekba ftomri 
P-O. Bret 98/ MT 


Far man HOUDAY A TBAVB. ADS 
PLEASE TURN TO 

PAGE IOW 

fN THE W90D SECTION 


ONLY ONE ADDRESS for a seasonal 

rento in Comes- 50MABJ. It me 
Lntour Mmbaurp. (93) 94 06 00 


CRUISE AROUND 
ITALY THIS 
SUMMS 

Luxury 7-day cruises aboard 
our flagship Ocean Princess 

■» from Vcrice Or 

thraugh On 12 

fine, Costa 
_ .alNwfei, 

Tumi, Scfiy, Corfu, Dubrovrri. 

Far i mmeriote reservations eoritact 

OCEAN CXMSE UNES 

Venice: San Marco 1497 
Tet {41] 7D9822 

P6ce> Glaude Travel 

37 Ave. Mardri Fadt 
Tet J93) 856986 


CHABa A YACHT IN GSSCE. O- 
roo from owner of largest Beet. 

- Donaea. yoo Tocns, 


Greece. Tel: 4529571. 4529486. Tbi 

21-2000. USA offices.- Fir bad. Am- 
bhr, PA 19002. Tdk 215 641 1 


TIMESHAK RESAlKWrL From 
S1700 deeded weeks. 5000 rgwrt fe- 
ovcdcite woddwxfe TIB, 17 E. 

VA 22801 


HOUDAY EXCHANGE or reried ac- 

eoranodojon offer, vegetarian narv 

smoker. Phare write with donued 


WIAS YACHTING. Yacht Chcrtos. 

Aaodeneas 28. Athens 10671. Greece. 


CAP D>AGOE. 5 room furmhed flat. 5 
fmorih 

L- 17788 /month. Td frrsxj s 
8£0 pm - (67) 39 30 45 


HOTELS 


PRANCE 


r HCTHLOUMKT-VBRJOME 

* *-*NN, 79 raoms vrith bath, entire- 
hr renfflto ed b heal of Pons, dote 
Oxiax* / Tuileries. Cdm & rjv-rforT 
frare raa 3n* Atari ThabC Pons 
1st. Tel: 260 32 B0. Thu 2134W'F. 


P * B S; p ^i«rd b «x l •••M4 . 10 
Aye. E Zoto, 1-M room fkrtv bath, 
fakhea fndne. Tri: 577 72 00 


GREAT BRITAIN 

“SSQ&we 

(Ayer, etc , jjattaurant / bre / sauna / 

asapb surszfi 


, y3t 




HOTH, lYNTON. 
& «»wriowfy appointed 

the sea Grand inieft. 

g ggj glS.Ti-TB: 


Per brochure tri Lyntan ffiCTBl 52»3' 
200 single roone. 





OLD ENGLAND 

Pun^ors of the fines, clothing fat men*. 

women and childrcaT 4 : 

Old England has no hranches _____ 


. ■.-’•w -hr-A. 

.vSfS 




, At- , :-7rrt