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U1 M 1; 


The Global Newspara^ 
Edited is Paris f - 
Printed Smuitaneousfc * J 
in Paris, London, ZurifeS . 
r>* Hons Kong, SosaporeS-^ 
the Hague and Marseille 

WEATHER DATA APPEAR. ON PAGE IB 


INTERNATIONAL 




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i( L > No. 31,821 


Published With The New York limes and The Washington Post 


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Agca Says Shooting 


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By Michael -Dobbs 

Washington Pott Service ' 

ROME — Mefinwt AS Agca, the 
Turkish gunman who sboiand al- 
most killed Pope John Paid n in 
May 1981, said Tuesday that the 
attempted assassination had. been 
, Vmmissioned by a Sonet diplomat 
in Bulgaria fora sum of more than 
Si milTifw i 

Tuesday’s testimony before an 
Italian court marked Ute most spe- 
cific charge yet made by Mr. Agca 
against the Soviet Union in connec- 
tion with the papal dot. Ir is the 
first lime that the Turk has atynyed 
a Soviet official of putting up the 
money to murder the Polish-bom 
pontiff. 

Giving evidence in the trial of bis 
alleged accomplices- in the papal 
conspiracy, Mr. Agca also acxused 
■brec former Bulgarian officials in 
_ £ome of providing logistical sup- 
port for him and other members erf 
a rightist Turkish guerrilla group 
known as the Gray wolves rtimng 
the months leading op to the assas- 
sination attempt 

Mr. Agca's testimony Tuesday 
was in contrast with his refusal 7n- 
day io give evidence against' the 
accused Bulgarians. He claimed 
then that he was tmahle to testify 
because he had received death 
threats in his prison cell from the 
Soviet and Bulgarian secret ser- 
vices. 

The Bulganans are on trial along 
with four Turks on charges of being 
Mr. Agca's accompli in the as- 
sassination attempt M r. Agca has 
been convicted in thr shooting. 

Under interrogation by Judge 
Sevetino Santiapichi, Mr. Agca 
contradicted numerous paints of 


his pretrial- testimony and - made 
several apparent emus on impor- 
tant details. He again admitted that 
he had lied during the three-year 
investigation into the conspiracy to 
kiD lie pope. 

The testimony oame after a pri- 
vate meeting Monday in prison 
with ins defense lawyer, Pietro d'O- 
vidio. Mr- Agca told the court last 
week that he wamed to consult 
with bis .lawyer before deriding 
whether to continue testifying. 

Ml Agca’s claim that the Soviet 
Union' was. directly involved in the 
attempted murder of the pope 
came when he was asked by Judge 
Santiapichi wbetherhe intended to 
continue to give evidence. He re- 
plied that he would. 

Mr. Agca, 27, then said: “The 
orders to kffl. the pope came from 
the Soviet Embassy in Sofia. We 
Gray Wolves acted with the com- 
pErity of three Bulgarian officials 
in Rome.” He added that “the first 
secretary of the Soviet Embassy in 
Sofia" paid. 3 million Deutsche 
marks ($1.2 million at the time). 

. Lata, he testified that the Soviet 
diplomat had riven his name as 
“Malenkov” or “MBenkov." He 
described him as being 1.80 meters 
(5 feet 9 inches) tall, with a “long 
and fair face, blond hair and glass- 
es with a “sporting appearance." 

' “I ask the court 'to show me pho- 
tos of all the members of the Soviet 
Embassy in Sofia,” Mr. Agca said. 
“That way, you will see whether I 
am letting the truth or not J will 
certainly recognize him. * 1 
The judge replied that he would 
consider the offer. Mr. Agca identi- 
fied the three Bulgarians who are 
cm (rial as his accomplices in a 



Mehmef AM Agca, testify- 
ing at bis trial on Tuesday. 

similar manner in November 1982 
after first describing them to the 
Italian investi g atin g magistrate and 
then being shown a photo album of 
56 Bulgarian officials in Rome. 

Contradicting earlier testimony, 
Mr. Agca said Tuesday that the 
idea to kill the pope was originally 
raised at a mating in Istanbul in 
JuneT980 between him and Abuzer 
Uguriu, a Turkish smuggler with 
links to the Bulgarian authorities. 
He said that Mr. Uguriu arranged 
Jor him to discuss the project in 
more detail in Sofia with a business 
partner named Bekzr CelenL 

Mr. Celenk, who is now in Bul- 
garia, is one of the defendants in 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


Sihanouk Asks U.S. to Use Influence 
To Help SetUp Coalition in (junbodia 


:* -iil 
i V. > 




By John F. Bums 

Sew York Tima Sorter 

PYONGYANG, North Korea 
if Prince Notpdom SStanouk has 
appealed to the United States to 
use its “great influence and pres- 
tige” to help Cambodia establish a 
coalition government of Commu- 
nists and non-Connmmists under 
international guarantees. 

He spoke in an interview at his 
residence oatside the North Kore- 
an capital, which he has made his 
home for several months each year 
since the 1970 coup in Cambodia 
that overthrew him and installed a 
pro-UJS. government under Gener- 
al Lon NoL 

The prince, 63, who ruled Cam- 
bodia for neariy 30 years before, the 
amp, suggested that creation of 
such a coalition government could 
grow out of a new Geneva confer- 
ence on the six-year conflict in 
Cambodia, which is between Viet- 
nam and the guerrilla forces oppos- 
ing its occupation. 

“For our people, tine is some- 
thing more important than dollars 
“|nd weapons, and it is diplomacy," 
be said. "The United States should 
use its very great influence and 

al of §!e Cambodian peqjl^^ 0 *" 

“l think we should go back to 
Geneva." Ik said, referring to the 
1954 Geneva conference that tried 
to bring peace to Indochina after 


the French withdrawal from Viet- 
nam. 

The prince said the Reagan ad- 
ministration should shift its em- 
phasis from the $5 nulhaa in mili- 
tary aid it has pledged to the 
non-Co mmimist guerrilla forces 
fighting the Vietnamese in Cambo- 
dia. One of the two forces that 
would benefit from the U.S. aid is 
loyal to Prince SShanout The other 
is the Khmer People’s National 
liberation Front, led by Son Sann. 

The prince is now titular head of 
state of the coalition front forged 
by the two non-Communisl guerril- 
la groups mid the Communist 
Khmer Rouge. 

The interview took place Mon- 
day in a 40-room mansion built for 
the prince in 1974 by the North 
Korean leader, Kim if Sung. 

The prince said that although the 
United States was still in a “trau- 
ma” ova its role in Indochina, it 
was well placed to play a key role in 
advandng.a resolution of the Cam- 
bodian problem. He said that this 
was first of all a matter of power, 
but that changes in the world situa- 
tion since 1970 also meant that the 
United States was better placed to 


idting ft 
iemlLas,l 


“Now, it is the Sown Union 
which is condemned," he said. “It 
is the United States which is liked." 

Although the prince spoke 
warmly of China's continuing 


guerrillas, bis appeal for a US. dip- 
lomatic initiative apparently re- 
flected his conviction that the flexi- 
huity . needsd io bring about a 
Cambodian compromise was not 
tikdy to come from Beijing. 

He made it dear that the coali- 
tion government he envisaged 
would include Communists of the 
pro- Vietnamese group, headed by 
Heag Samrin, that is currently in- 
stalled in Phnom Penh. He said this 
would be essential it there were to 

Sihanouk acknowledged the un- 
happiness this would cause in some 
quarters, including among the 
Khmer Rouge. He said that it 
would not be “a dean compro- 
mise," but that it was the only one 
possible. 

“It’s a slim chance, but it’s the 
only one we've got,” Ik said. 

The prince said he was “very, 
very pessimistic" about toy break- 
through, mffitaiy or diplomatic, 
that would end what he called the 
“colonization" of Cambodia. 

He described the guerrillas' 
strategy as one of “Mt-and-ran” 
tactics against a far superior Viet- 
namese force, and he said, the fact 
that the guerrillas had failed in sev- 
eral years’ fighting to take a single 
town or district meant that theco- 

(Omtbned on Page 5, CoL 2) 


PARIS, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


29 Freed 

la Berlin 
Spy Trade 

US. Releases 
4 to Gain liberty 
For E. Europeans 

M. 

Ratten 

BERLIN — The United States 
exchanged four convicted spies 
Tuesday in return for 25 prisoners 
from East German and Polish jails 
in what diplomats said was proba- 
bly the biggest trade of its kind 
since World War IL 

The four prisoners released by 
the United Stales were identified as 
Alice MfcheLsen of East Germany, 
sentenced to 10 years on espionage 
charges last year, another East 
German, Alfred Zebe, serving an 
eight-year tom; Marian W. Za- 
charski, a Pole sentenced to life 
imprisonment in 1981, and Penyu 
B. Kostadinov, a Bulgarian serving 
a 10-year term. 

A UJS. State Department official 
said that the exchange was made on 
Gfenicke Bridge in Berlin and that 
it was the result of three years of 
secret negotiations. 

The four spies were flown to Ber- 
lin from the United States on Mon- 
day and released at the middle of 
the bridge, which links the eastern 
and western sectors of Berlin. 

Two of the 25 prisoners involved 
in the agreement remained in East 
Germany to settle family affairs 
and wiD be allowed to leave, the 
U.S. official said. The families of 
the released prisoners will be al- 
lowed to job them. 

U.S. officials refused to say 
whether the 25 prisoners were con- 
victed spies or political prisoners. 

The most famous exchange at 
Glienicke Bridge took place when 
Francis Gary Powers, a UJS. spy 
pilot who was shot down over uie 
Soviet Union, was freed in 1961 

Witnesses said dial Richard R. 
Burt, the U5. assistant secretary of 
state for European and Canadian 
affairs who is scheduled to become 
the ambassador to West Germany, 
was present at the bridge. 

The State Department official 
said that the 23 prisoners released 
to the West "looked like very hap- 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 



Gorbachev Y © ws 
Radical Shifts 
In the Economy 


By Dusko Doder 

It’ashmgiivt Pear Service 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. the Soviet leader, said Tues- 
day that he would direct a “pro- 


equal i\ unusual for u to di>clo>c 
that u draff plan v.as sent hack for 
revision*. 

“Life demands a profound re- 
siruciuring of planning and nun- 


found restruciuriDg" of the a £ ei * en h °f, 5. nll L e V* -01101 ?! 1 - 
economy, and he provided the first mec bmi*.m. Mr. Gorbacnev MUu. 

indications of the direction m The S*.»viet leader described “the 


BnAqcqWdBwi 

AUce Mfidhdsen, an East German spy released Tuesday by 
the United States, was greeted on a Berlin bridge by 
Woff^ng Vogel, an East German lawyer and mediator. 


which these changes would be 
made. 

He called for legislation ic* intro- 
duce “cost accounting, economic 
levers and incentives" in (he sys- 
tem; to increase “the consumer's 
influence'' in general; to “radically 
improve" the process of price for- 
mation. and to curtail the role of 
centralized planning. 

Speaking aL a conference attend- 
ed by members of ihe Communist 
Party's Central Committee and top 
state and economic officials. Mr. 
Gorbachev called for changes in 
party work to “deal with the human 
factor, the decisive factor of all 
changes." 

He obliquely criticized his imme- 
diate predecessor, Konstantin U. 


mechanism." Mr. Gorbachev said. 

The Soviet leader described “the 
fundamental essence of the rejirac- 
lunng** as involving efforts to in- 
crease the system's efficients and 
“to expand "the independence and 
responsibility of enterprises, to 
mal.e vigorous use of more flexible 
Torms and methods of manage- 
ment. cost accounting and com- 
modity-moncury relations and ex- 
tensively develop the initiative." 

"The business at lund i> formi- 
dable. it is innovative, broad in 
scope and difticuh." he added, ac- 
cording 1.1 a partial text of lii> 
speeehdisiributtfd by Tass. the offi- 
cial press agency. 

The speech, judging front the 
partial leu. constitutes the most 
comprehensive account of changes 


omic preaecessor, ™m.n u. ^ ltfader , h ip is plannir.U. 1: 
Chernenko, sayang that the shaft ctoselv fo j, mve d i£gciSeraMme<ei 

.ST H ' uri V. AnJropiw. «ta ... 


years, and through the rest of the 

son Asserts Mengele ^ m i* sjeS JS 

Died in Brazil in 1979 ->sasi»:s?t 

economy and said that it was neces- bis spoilt Mr. Goroachev as- 

By William Droadiak vidi.* Vandal aid » Uk Naai ^ M SZffiSEX. 

Washington Pott Service doctor. „ nnnA1 ; r p,^i.ri v . c mm ,h+ criticized the era of Leonid I. 


Mr. Gorbachev's mentor. 

A docu men uvrv film about Nlr. 


tates that work' on the draft be Andropov was premiered here 
continued." Monday night tn what ts seen a< an 

„ . . . . .. . . unprecedented tribute to the late 

He cnucized directly a number leadt . r . 

of ministers responsible for the , 

economy and said that it was neces- his speech Mr. Gorouchev as- 


By William Drozdiak viding financial aid to the Nazi 

Washington Post Service doctor. 

BONN — The son of Dr. Josef On May 31, West German police 
Mengele, the Nazi war criminal, raided his home and found fetters 


: economic executives over the 

On May 31, West German police knuckles." 


ma Igcift UK mail war criminal, raiaea ms nome ana IDUna Idlers '‘ThieicitmectinnnfalnntT.tenrt 

saidTuesday that the corpse ex- ^d an address bc»k ita led inv«, ^‘SSSSS^iVSS 
homed last week at a Brazilian u gators to an Austrian couple, w mu5t ^ rff 
cemetery was that of his father. Wolfram and Lisdotte Bossert, liv- „ n .;i 


cemetery was that of his father. Wolfram and Lisdo 
Breaking the long family silence, mg near Sio Paulo. 
toUMcDederdascdasuiana, theBosernfflid 
Monday saying I tare no doubt lodging fora man d 

W wholater admit.ee 
1985 in the graveyard near S3o Menaele Thev s 
Paulo was that of his father. ZS?*!l e 'S'L 


knuckles." Brezhnev. 

“Thisisa question of a long-term . “9°? can ® 01 bdp seeing i Jut 
political line and none of the prob- fbe early 1970s certain diTFt- 

lems we must solve can be put off «il«« ^ l 0 ** f * mecononuc 


until tomorrow,” he said. “The die- development, he said. “The main 
mands on our economic cadres r ^ as 9 n 15 diat we did not in ume 


The Bosserts said they provided should be raised sharply, there display perseverance m reshaping 
lodging for a man during the 1970s must be no delay, no waiting be- structural policy, the forms and 
who later admitted to being Dr. cause there is no time left for warm- me tliods of management, the very 


i Tf 7?,” ^ Mengele. They said the man ing up. 
udo was that of his father- drowned while swimming in 2979 past.” 
lam sure that forenac t«ts wdl was buried al Hmu. near Sao It is i 


py people indeed’ 
WbUganfi; Voae 


Wolfgang Vogd, an East Ger- 
man lawyer who has acted as a 
mediator in many spy and refugee 
exchanges in the past, was seen 
greeting the four prisoners flown 
from the United Slates before they 
disappeared behind border fortifi- 
cations. 

In Washington, US. officials 
said that the Soviet Union had re- 
jected American overtures to re- 
lease the prominent Soviet dissi- 
dents Andrei D. Sakharov and 
Anatoli Shcharansky in the ex- 
change. 

“After it became dear that the 
Soviets would not change their po- 
sition. we decided that obtaining 
the release of 25 persons and family 
members was an important hu- 
manitarian step which justified the 
agreement," an admini stration of- 
ficial said 

The officials declined to com- 
ment on whether those released 
were U.S- intelligence agents or po- 
litical prisoners. 

Of the four spies, the most dam- 
age toUS. security was bdieved to 
have been done by Mr. Zacharski. 
who obtained secrets about several 
sophisticated US. weapons sys- 
tems. 


confirm this shortly,” Mr. Mengele 
said. Brazilian autnorities are now 
examining the bones. and teeth 
found in the grave and hope to 
reach definitive conclusions withij 
two weeks. They have already de- 
tected signs of a broken hip, which 
Dr. Mengele reportedly suffered in 
an accident in 1944. 

The younger Mengde, 41 , who is 
a lawyer in Freiburg, West Germa- 
ny, said that he went to the burial 
site in 1979 to check the circum- 
stances of his father's death. “I 


It is unusual for the Soviet lead- 


He said the government faces 
tasks of improving food supplies, 


Paula under the name of Wolfgang ersbip to disclose internal differ- services, housine. medical services. 
Gerhard. ■ ’ ^ — J 


ences about economic plans and education and other areas. 


SALT Position: Not for All Seasons 

U.S. Review of Treaty Might Lead to Decision to Scrap It 


By Don Obcrdorfer 

Washington Past Service 


lions are the expected result of the 
Defense Department review of 


stances of his father’s death. “I WASHINGTON - President ?? s ^ dd J* ^ United Sates’ 
have kept sfieui until now out of Ronald Reagan, in deciding to con- proportionate responses l oSovi- 
consideration for the people who tinue observing the numerical lim- el .^H OIL TTie review is to be sub- 
were in contact with my father for its of the unratified SALT-2 treaty, mlte£j 10 Mr - Re agmi by Nov. 15. 
the last thirty years,” Mr. Mengele has acceded to the wishes of toe A Defense Department official. 


tional U.S. strategic weapons are 
scheduled to come into service. 

At that point, new U.S. derisions 
to eliminate older weapons, such as 
more Poseidon submarines, would 
be required- to stay in compliance. 

The time between now and No- 


In an evident reference to those Congress, 
who suffered under his father at He also kept open the possibility 
Auschwitz; Mr. Mengele added: of progress in U^. -Soviet negotia- 
“All victims and their relatives lions in Geneva or at a summit 
have my and our deepest sympa- meeting with the Soviet leader, 


NATO allies and the majority in however, said the results of the re- vember, when the new Pentagon 


Dr. Mengde is considered di- 


Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

Mr. Reagan’s decision, which 


reedy responsible for the killing of surprised even some in high goy- 
400,000 Auschwitz camp inmates eminent circles, was described in 
and countless atrocities committed official statements as a temporary 


view might induce the president to study could prompt another look at 
— ■■ i ■■ the “no undercut" policy, is impor- 

NEWS ANALYSIS in several respects.' 

SB iim-rangemissUe deployments in 

S!. nrS ■“ Europe, announced by Mr. Gorba- 
Un,OT April 7. is to run out in 

continues to violate them. November 

. This official _said p ubl ic opinion Abool the same lime, the Ned.- 


U.S. Finds 11 Pollutants 
Pose High Peril Indoors 


By Philip Shabccoff 

. New York Tima Servin' 

WASHINGTON — Eleven 
common air pollutants pose a 
greater hazard m an average home 
than they do in the air around the 
plants where they are produced, a 
new study by the Environmental 
Protection Agency has found. 

A1 though there was no evidence 
of imminent threats to (be health of 
the people exposal to the chemi- 
cals, scientists both in and out of 
the agency said the results. could 
alter the focus of efforts to combat 
air pollution. Until now, the envi- 
ronmental agency has concentrated 
on outdoor pollution from 'major 
sources such as chemical plants mid 
refineries. 

The 1 1 chemicals were chosen 
, f because they are found ia house- 
' hold products such as clewim& 
agents, in building materials, is 
gasobne or in cigarette smoke. . 

Bernard D. Goldstein, the agen- 
cy's assistant adminis trator for re- 
search and devde^ment, rioted 
that the study had not included 
pollution from other chemicals 
produced by tbe plants or the wide 
array of other air pollutants. Butin 
the case of the II chemicals, be 
said, it showed that exposure out- 
doors was relatively insignificant 
, compared with indoor exposure. 

* In some cases, tbe indoor expo- 
sures were 70 times the outdoor 
exposures, even for people firing 
close to the chemical factories, the 
study found. 

Volumes* in the study, which 


took five years to complete, wore 
monitoring devices to measure 
their exposure. At the end of the 
day they toed; a breath test to deter- 
mine the quantity of tbe chemicals 
in their blood. They also filial out a 
questionnaire on their activities. 

The maiu siady was conducted 
in Elizabeth and Bayonne, New 
Jerseys because of their proximity- 
to petrochemical plants and refin- 
eries discharging the 11 chemicals 
into die aic. Identical experiments 
were conducted on a smaller scale 
in Greensboro, North Carolina, 
which contains, fight industry but 
no chemical plants, and Devils 
Lake, North Dakota, a rural area. 

The chemicals studied were chlo- 
roform, 111 trichloroethane, trich- 
loroethylene, benzene, carbon tet- 
rachloride, .perchloroethylene, 
mcta-para-dicfalorobenzcne, meut- 
pant-xylene, styrene, ethylebenze, 
and oriboxylttre. 

The original puipose of the study 
was to develop ways to measure 
individuals' exposure to toxic sub- 
stances in the air, washing agen- 
cy officials aid they had accom- 
plished. But they described the 
results of the study as surprising, 
even startling. ‘ 

The people firing in Greensboro 
and Devils Lake,- the study found, 
recorded no less exposure to the 
chemicals than the people living 
next to the factories and refineries 
in ‘ the . BayomrisEUzabeth area. 
And they>fiad- equivalent amounts 
of the chemicals m - their blood. 

The -study found a “significant 

'(Continued on Page % CoL 6) 



leased to news agencies by his step- status quo in U.S. anus control change by November as Soviet mil- 
brother Jens Hackenjos, a Munich policy during a period of important iury programs accelerate and re- 
architect whose mother. Irene, political and diplomatic sparring ports continue, or even increase, 
married and divorced Dr. Mengele. between Washington and Moscow, about Soviet violations. 

Mr. Hackenjos's wife, Sabine, Mr. Reagan’s rhetoric in a writ- . . . , . 

said that Mr. Mengele, his wife and ten statement and a White House , lts lei 7 ns 35 s .'^ ned “ 

young child were "afraid" of possi- fact sheet was music to conserva- 10 at . e 

ble reprisals from Nazi fanatics, trves in the Pentagon and Congress, £ D<1 r ? v0 countnes. experience at me 

Since Dr. Mengele’s possible death who have been calling for an end lo howwer. ^nimuai^ to qb- w ith which to n 

has stirred worldwide interest, the the UJS. “no undercut" policy on s<a y B ^ “ m,t5 SALT-1 tn- about their course. 


ig for an end lo 


l w xi v c ■ ■? key moment for NATO, 

change by November as Soviet mil- l_ 

itaiy programs accelerate and re- The summer round and an au- 
porLs continue, or even increase, tumn round of U.S.-Soviet nuclear 
about Soviet violations. space arms negotiations in Ge- 

. . , . neva is likely to be over bv Novem- 

,«« nd T lU L m ber. Thus the United Stales and its 

19 ! 9, 10 expiK al ^ "ill have nearly eight months 

end of 1985. Tbe two countries, experience at the new arms talks 
however have continued to ob- which to make judgments 


family bad received “several mur- 
der threats at their home.” Mrs. 
Hackenjos said. 


SALT-2 limits. Buthis decision to It is also possible that Mr. Rea- 

dismantle a Poseidon submarine to reucaiienmnammoaie.anaiiisan wT fiorbache ,. mioh , 

sUv^UimSALT-i Umils wm ta " a SS 


to show conclusively that his father White House officials predicted day seemed to hint that the SALT- Mr. Reagan s decision was seen 
lived and finally died near Sfio Pan- that “going the extra mile," as Mr. 2 limits were likely to remain in J? a “ ,. l ( . F 6111 ^ °* Dclen* 

to in 1979. Reagan called it, win put the presi- force after this year. Specifically, a Cas Pf{_ . • w f jnb f r S er - who had 

The latest lead on the Mengele dent in a position to ask Congress National Security Council fact ur S cd * uni to ah andon the treaty, 

trail- came from a West German for 50 more MX missiles and other sheet and statements by the nation- 

nnivecsity professor, who over- additions to the UJ>. strategic nu- al security affairs adviser, Robert 

heard a former employee of the clear arsenal in the next budget. C McFarlane, spoke of presi den- 


Mengde family company, Hans 
Sedlmder, 72. boasting about pro- 


clear arsenal in me next budgeL C McFarlane, qjoke of presi d en- 
There were hints from presiden- dal “options" few new U5. compli- 
tial aides that such recommends- ancc decisions in the future as addi- 


U.S. Hospitals Limit Alien Transplants 


IN SUSPENSE — Forty-two cars derailed Sunday at 
Pine Bluff, Arikansas, and four of them were sriB burn- 



By Margaret Engel 

Washington Port Service 

WASHINGTON — Many UB. hospitals, faced 
with a controversy over transplants of scarce organs, 
are refusing to perform transplants for foreign dozens 
or have moved to grant preference to U.S. citizens. 

Rush Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago “won’t do 
bane marrow, cornea transplants, anything on foreign 
nationals because of the problem we had" with com- 
plaints about foreigners receiving kidneys, said Paul 
Vdek, director of organ procurement for ihe Chicago 
area. 

“Americans are dying without organs,” Mr. Volek 
sad. “How in good conscience can we offer them to 
others who come to this country?" 

The American Society of Transplant Surgeons vot- 
ed last month to give preference to U.S. citizens for 
transplants, and advised the nation's 39 organ net- 
works to revise their computer lists to show which 
candidates are VS. citizens. 

Many doctors are uncomfortable in allocating life- 
saving operations on the basis of nationality, “we’re 
talking about Tngriiriw^ here, about life,” said Dr. Said 


saving operations on the basis or nationality, we re 
talking about merifo"* here, about life,” said Dr. Said 
A. Kanni, director of transplant services at George 
Washington University Medical Center. 

According to a report of a local group called End 
Stage Renal Disease Network of the National Capital 


Area, 10 percent of all kidney transplants in the 
United States in 19S2 were performed on foreign 
citizens during that year. 

The percentage is much higher in many localities. In 
the Washington area, 26 percent were foreign citizens. 

Local doctors say the nigh rate of foreign citizens 
receiving transplants in the United States can be 
explained in part by the fact that organ donation is not 
common in many countries. In addition, it is some- 
times proscribed for religious or cultural reasons. 

Tbe hi£b rate of transplants for foreign citizens has 
led to discontent in Washington, where there is a 
particular need for kidneys because the city leads the 
nation in the rate of kidney disease. 

“There is a high rate of hypertension among blacks" 
and the disease can lead to kidney failure, explained 
Dr. Clive Callender, director of Howard University 
Hospital's transplant center. About 150 residents of 
the districts, mostly blacks, are waiting for kidneys. 

Ernest Bauer, chairman of the local network's pa- 
tient action committee; described the large number of 
kidney transplant involving foreigners as “wrung and 
au affront to U.S. residents." 

Responding to such concerns, the Washington Hos- 
pital Center adopted a policy giving preference to U.S. 
citizens for transplants. The proportion of foreign 
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 2) 


Moscow spurned President 
Reagan’s decision to abide fay 
the limits of SALT-2. Page 2. 


INSIDE 


■ A Royal Jordanian jetliner 
was hijacked in Beirut. F^ge2. 

■ U.S. admiral said that a spy 

ring enabled the Soviet Union 
to decode 'secret naval commu- 
nications. Page 3. 

■ John R. Block said the Unit- 

ed States and the EC agreed or. 
the need to avoid a trade war on 
subsidies. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ US. businesses lowered their 
spending forecasts after a slow 
first quarter, the Commerce 
Department said. Page 13. 

■ The IMF's chief, Jacques de 
Larosifere, confirmed he will 
seek a resumption of a standby 
loan to Argentina. Page 13. 

TOMORROW 


While Iraqi bombs alter life in 
Tehran, there are no blackouts 
or curfews in Baghdad. 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


Pag 


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1 63 

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ii 

91 

F 

13 Y 
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14 I 
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is r 
161 
l 

18/ 

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201 

21' 

1 

22 

24 
26 

25 

32 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

45 

47 


Soviet Accuses Reagan 
Of Discarding SALT-2 



By Serge Schmemann 

V.n J'lirA rjNK'< Siwii i' 

MOSCOW —The Soviet Union 
declared Tuesday ttet President 
Ronald Reagan's promise to abide 
b\ (he SALT-2 treatv only con- 
firmed (he U.S. administration's 
intention to destroy the entire sys- 
tem of disarmament agreements. 

In a response issued by the For- 
eign Ministry and published by 
Tass. the Kremlin described Mr. 
Reagan's assertion Monday that he 
would continue honoring the pact's 
limits on missiles as a cover for 
"crawling out of the treaty" and 
discarding its provisions one by 
one. 

"It should be realized in Wash- 
ington what consequences the 

stand taken by the White House 
with regard to the SALT-2 treaty 
will lead to." the statement said, 
without specifying the conse- 
quences. 

"One should not be deluded that 
the U.S. side will be allowed to 
determine as it thinks fit which 
obligations should be observed and 
which should not. It is a dangerous 
misapprehension to export that the 
other side will be adapting itself to 
such a line of the U.S-A." 

Moscow denied Mr. Reagan's al- 
legations that the Soviet Union had 
violated the SALT-2 treaty, and 
specifically the allegation that the 
Russians were developing two new 
land-based intercontinental mis- 
siles. the SS-24 and the SS-25. in- 
stead of the one permitted by the 
treaty. 

The Soviet statement insisted 
that the SS-25 was a modernized 
version of an earlier weapon, the 
SS- 1 3. Washington made its allega- 
tions. Lhe statement said, only to 
justify American work on the MX 
and Midgetman missiles. 

“The U.S. administration, pro- 
ceeding along the lines of violating 
the treaty, resorts to a long-tested 
device: It again starts to level obvi- 
ously far-fetched accusations at the 
other side." the statement said. 

The Kre mlin also sought to play 


sphere that was created in the stra- 
tegic arms limitation field through 
the efforts of the two sides." 

OveralL the Soviet slatemenL fol- 
lowed the basic lines set out in a 
Pravda editorial over the weekend. 
That editorial called U.S. anns 
control policy “deceitful and cyni- 
cal" and accused the Reagan ad- 
ministration of preparing to 
“wreck" Lhe 1979 nuclear arms 
treaty. 

The fact that the Kremlin chose 
to criticize Mr. Reagan even after 
he had decided to abide by the 
treaty suggested to Western diplo- 
mats a determination in Moscow to 
sustain the unease caused in West- 
ern Europe and within the United 
States by the dispute within the 
administration over adherence to 
SALT-1 

Beyond that, (he diplomats said. 
the Russians have long recognized 
the basic disaffection within the 
Reagan administration over the 
various arms control treaties with 
the Soviet Union, and they were 
not prepared to give the president 
credit for restraint while the long- 
term threat to the treaties seemed 
to remain intact. 




Fate of Finnish Hostages Discussed 

Brian E Urquharu left, a United Nations undersecretary, met Tuesday in Tel Aviv with Defense 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin in an attempt to obtain the release of 21 Finnish members of the UN 
peacekeeping force in Lebanon. The hostages were being held by the South Lebanoa Army, backed 
by the Israelis. Mr. Urquhart said he hoped the Finns would be freed “in the very near future.” 


Jordanian Jet 
Is Hijacked 
In Beirut; 
Goal Undear 

United Press hnernauotul 

BEIRUT — Hijackers seized a 
Jo rdanian jetliner with 74 people 
ahnarti here Tuesday ana then 


WORLD BRIEFS 


aboard here Tuesday 
forced the plane on various 
across the Mediterranean 
returning to BdruL 
The objective of the hijackers 
was not immediately clear. The hi- 


IJ.S. Hospitals Limit Alien Transplants Agca Says 

Russian Was 
Behind Plot 


(Continued from Page 1) 

sidents receiving kidneys in 1984 
was sharply reduced from the year 
before. 

A spokeswoman for the center 
also said it had terminated a “refer- 
ral arrangement" whereby doctors 
at the Saudi Arabian health office 
sent patients to the hospital for 
transplant surgery. 

Georgetown University Hospital 
is renegotiating an agreement with 
the Greek minister of health to per- 
form transplants on Greek patients 
after encountering political diffi- 
culties. according to Dr. George 


Schreiner, director of the hospital's 
nephrology division. 

One reason for the high rate of 
kidney transplants for foreigners, 
said Dr. Karmi, is that these pa- 
tients may come from countries 
where medical care is less sophisti- 
cated than in the United States. 
Thus, he said, the patients general- 
ly have not undergone dialysis 
treatment to rid the blood oF tox- 
ins. and their bodies are less sensi- 
tive to a new organ. 

Also, foreign patients generally 
are less selectivcabout what type of 


down Mr. Reagan’s central ded- Envoy Is Nominated to Replace Burt 

sion. not to exceed the SALT-2 J * 


limits on missiles by keeping an 
aging Poseidon submarine in ac- 
tion when a new Trident submarine 
goes into service this fall. 

“The president emphasizes that 
this is a single measure which does 
not mean that in the future he will 
act in an analogous way." the state- 
ment said. “On the whole, the deci- 
sion concerning the submarine Po- 
seidon does not change the overall 
picture of the undermining by the 
United States of the positive atroo- 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan plans to nominate 
Rozanne L. Ridgway. U.S. ambas- 
sador to East Germany since 1982. 
as assistant secretary of state for 
European and Canadian affairs, 
the white House announced Tues- 
day. 

Mrs. Ridgway. 49. would suc- 
ceed Richard R. Bun, who is re- 
portedly under consideration to 
succeed Arthur F. .Bums as U.S. 


ambassador to West Germany. The 
White House spokesman. Larry 
Speakes. said he was not announc- 
ing Mr. Bun's nomination to the 
Bonn post but also said he was not 
under consideration for any other 
position. 

Mrs. Ridgway was ambassador 
to Finland from 1977 to 1980 and 
has held a variety of other diplo- 
matic posts besides serving as State 
Department counselor and special 
assistant to the secretary of state. 


match they make with a donated 
kidney, doctors say. 

“Yes. they're getting more kid- 
neys. but they're not getting a good 
quality, a good match," said Dr. 
lose Salcedo, chairman of the 
Washington area network's medi- 
cal review board. “If we don’t use 
these kidneys in foreigners, these 
kidneys would probably have to be 
thrown away. Here you have a way 
to get rid of these organs that might 
not be used" by U.S. citizens. 

Sometimes, a hospital is paid 
more by foreign patients for kidney 
transplants than local residents 
pay. 

At George Washington, a for- 
eign citizen pays S6.0OO for the 
transplant surgeon's services, ac- 
cording to Dr. Karmi. The hospital 
collects S3.SOO from Medicare for 
the same services on a U.S. citizen. 

Those interested in encouraging 
organ donation are worried that the 
issue of foreign citizens receiving 
transplants will hurl their efforts. 
In California, for example, some 
organ donors have written “resi- 
dent only" on their organ donor 
cards after news reports that some 
kidneys were being shipped to Ja- 
pan for transplants there. 


Cyprus. After being refused per- 
mission to land in Tunis, the plane 
went to Palermo, Sicily, where it 
refueled and returned to BdruL 
The Italian authorities tried to 
trade fuel for the release of women 
and children but said they gave up 
when the hijackers “threatened to 
immediatelv throw a couple of chil- 
dren onto die runway ” 

Army units surrounded the 
plane upon its return to Bdrut In- 
ternational Airport Radio commu- 
nications with the hijackers began 
minutes after landing, airport offi- 
cials said. 

Airport security spokesmen said possibility 
the hijackers demanded that lead- 
ers of Beirut’s Sunni Moslem and 
Shiite Moslem religions and the 
Moslem fundamentalist Hezbollah. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
the present case. Mr. Uguriu was 
arrested by the Turkish authorities 
several months before the attempt- 
ed assassination of the pope and is 
now on trial in Turkey on various 
charges, including smuggling. 

Questioned about his meetings 
in Sofia. Mr. Agc3 said that he 
discussed the plot to kill the pope 
with Mr. Celenk and one of the 
Bulgarian defendants. Todor S. Ai- 
vazov. between July 10 and 16. 
1980. He added that another Turk- 
ish member of the Gray Wolves. 
Oral Celik. was present. 

According to records of the pre- 
trial investigation. Mr. Celenk was 
in Sofia between these dates. Mr. 
Aivazov's passport, however, 
shows that he arrived in Bulgaria 
on July 21 from Rome and there- 
fore presumably could not have 
taken part in the meeting at the 
time stated by Mr. Agca on Tues- 
day. 

When the judge expressed sur- 
prise at the willingness of a Soviet 
diplomat to meet with a Turkish 
lerTonst who had only recently es- 
caped from prison. Mr. Agca re- 
plied that the meeting had taken 
place in a hotel room in Sofia with- 
out any photographers present. 

The judge questioned Mr. Agca 
closdy on apparent discrepancies 
over the payment of the 3-million 
Deutsche mark reward. During his 
pretrial testimony. Mr. Agca had 
said that he was io have received a 
third of the total sum. but he insist- 
ed Tuesday that he had not been 
interested in money. 

When asked why be had earlier 
claimed that Mr. Celik had actually 
brought the money to Italy, a fact 
that he now denies. Mr. Agca re- 
plied that he had been confused by 
the persistent questioning of Bul- 
garian magistrates who were al- 
lowed to interrogate him in 19S3. 

The trial continues Wednesday. 


Polish Priest Jailed in Crucifix Protest 

^ *»•« UK 

buildings, a „ w parent. «*o«I in * 

SSL’S? f * 3 

«nf 

Police Blamed in South Afriea Deaths 

__ r . p p town (Reuters) — An official inquiry into the Jailing ft 

jackra ted ordered” the pilot to fly bv^lice on March 2 1 to. McWjj 

to Tunis, where the Palestine Liter- w blame failing to carry proper riot-control equipment such at tea; 

auStoritieSere closed the airport s ^ d j n ™uS? s b ^ f J,n into the incident at SSSfriS! 

and put bands on the runway to p, n ,?inre released Tuesday , also accused South Afnaw police of fafe. 
keep the plane from landing. ^ evidence to justify the shooting It aswotei howve^dardie 

After being hijacked in Beirut. Uc * fcare< j f or their lives and thought the crow might try tok^sfeta 

the Boeing 727 refueled in Lamaca. , . . . 

• • — — in f^SmenL reacting to the report, defended dr pMonfed 

saidU ted ret up a polic? board of inqutrv to MRStfe 
findings. ' 

Reason Considering Managua Talks 

WASHINGTON (API - President Ronald Reagan, «doi£to eafa 
the support of wavering Democrats for aid to NaanpMB lA* old 
t£ 4SJ| was sianum discussions aimed at deicrmmmg Iwwand 
ISe U.S useful direct talks «W» N«» 

In' a letter handed to a congressional ddegua 
the White House. Mr. Reagan said he would Mtruct 
to meet again with Nicaracuan officials only when I deiemuar that suck 
aiSngwould be helpful" in the effort to bring peace to 
Mr. Reagan said he planned to instruct his special ambaawfo f or 
Central America to consult with governments in the region abraf & 
possibility of talks with the Sandmist government in Nicaragua. . 

U.S. Congress Opens Budget Talks 

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House-Senate committee opened neg&tia- 
or Party of God movement, be pre- tionsonafiscal 1986 budget Tuesdav as a key House Democrat calfia for 
sent at the airport They also de- a tax increase to reduce the federal deficit. . 

manded the presence of the Iranian “You cannot cut your way cut or the debt mis administration has 
ambassador to Beirut and Arab compiled." said Representative U illiamH. Gray’ 3d, Democrat oTrenn. 
and foreign reporters, the spokes- sylvania. who is chairman of the House Budget Committee. We wulhnt 
men said to face the reality of dealing with some revenues after a bttfgct 

The number of hijackers was not containing spending cuts is approved. . 
clear -Various reports placed the Senator Robert J. Dole of Kansas, the majority leader, w) Tuesdays 
number from one to six. would take the case for highs taxes to President Ronald Reagan 0% if 

Among the 74 passengers and Congress approved S50 billion to S60 billion in spending cuts terond 
— - - * ,a5 wft.it either the House or Senate has previously called for, and further 

measures were still needed. The House bill calls for $2*5 billion in savings 
over three vears; the Senate hill S259 billion. 



I • ‘5^VsS“5$I* 

i 

i 


Jp - 





crew were 51 Lebanese, two Ameri- 
cans. a Dominican, a Brazilian, an 
Italian and a Sri Lankan, a spokes- 
man for the Jordanian airline .Alia 
said in .Amman. 

Beirut radio said Lebanon's 
third hijacking this year began 
when four hijackers, fifing subma- 
chine guns, smashed through a side 
gate into Beirut airport in a taxi. 

Still firing, they drove directly to 
the jetliner, which was about to 
take off for .Amman. Jordan, and 
look control of the plane despite 
the presence of eight security 
guards on board, the reports said. 

In Beirut, a caller to the Voice of 
Lebanon radio said the hijacking 
was the work of the Imam Ali Sadr 
Suicide Brigade, made up of radical 
Shiite followers or Imam Mussa 
Sadr. Another said the hijackers 
were members of the hitherto un- 
known Abu Zuhcr Suicide Squad. 

The Imam Ali Sadr brigade is 
named after Musa Sadr, the spiritu- 
al leader of Lebanon's Shiite Mos- 
lem community who disappeared 
on a trip to Libya in August I97S. 

The caller said the hijackers, 
headed by a man named Abu Zu- 
heir. were demanding that all Pal- 
estinians leave the refugee camps of 
Beirut. The caller also condemned 
the efforts of Yasser Arafat, chair- 
man of the PLO. to join forces with 
King Hussein of Jordan in trying to 
forge a Middle East peace. 


For the Record $ 

The U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington agreed Tuesday to Knotti- 
er a ring in which it was decided that The Washington Past libeled 
William P. Tavoulareas. a former president of Mobil Chi Corp. The tram 
vacated a 2-1 decision by a three-member appellate panel that rcinstttri 
a lower court jurv’s ruling that the Post had libeled Mr. Tavoulareas, (API 

Vice President George Bush will visit Rome, Bonn. The Hqgng 
Brussels, Geneva, Paris and London from June 23 to July 3 to discus 
national security and trade issues, it was announced Tuesday, f.fP) 

Correction 

The item on London's Unlisted Securities Market in the June in 
Personal Investing section included an incorrect share pnee for Vak 
Pollen, an advertising firm. The correct price on Tuesday was 670 peace 
(about $8,501 a share. 




HcralhS&ribune 


Perils Found 
In Indoor Air 


U.S. Invasion Forces 
End Stay on Grenada 

Washington Past Service 

ST. GEORGE’S. Grenada — 
The last members of the U.S. force 
that invaded Grenada in October 
1983 left Grenada on Tuesday. 

Remaining until September is a 
30-member U.S. Army Special 
Forces team training new security 
forces for Grenada, SL Vincent St. 
Lucia. Dominica and Sl Kitts. 



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(Continued from Page I) 
correlation" between the levels of 
the chemicals in participants' bod- 
ies and their use of paint or solvents 
at home or at work, cigarette smok- 
ing. and visits to gas stations or 
dry-cleaning establishments. 

It found a similar correlation 
with the presence of these chemi- 
cals in budding materials, cleaning 
agents and other substances in par- 
ticipants’ homes. 

Many of these products are 
widely used in major cities around 
the world. 

The study did not attempt to 
deal with many of the known in- 
door air pollutants, such as radon, 
a radioactive gas that can cause 
lung cancer, or formaldehyde, a 
ubiquitous element in home fur- 
nishings and budding materials. 

Mr. Goldstein said future studies 
using similar techniques would test 
exposures to these chemicals. 

The study said “it seems proba- 
ble" that consumer products such 
as paints, cleansers, propellants, 
plastics and cosmetics and ouilding 
materials such as adhesives, fixers, 
resins, insulation and other prod- 
ucts are the major sources. 

David D. Doniger. an expert on 
toxic air pollution and a lawyer 
with the Natural Resources De- 
fense Fund, an environmental 
group, said he was concerned that 
the Reagan administration would 
use the results to ignore the prob- 
’em of toxic chemicals in the out- 
door air. He said the agency's own 
figures showed that 1300 to 2.000 
people die each year in the United 
States from toxic air pollution. 

“1 don’t like the suggestion that 
one problem is small because an- 
other may be bigger." Mr. Doniger 
said. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 






AMERICAN TOFiCS 


■mmm 


Uni i., s . 

' "“"'AIrt,- 


Editors Withhold 
Ttoonesbory* Strip 

Garry Trudeau has used, his 
comic strip to take on the presi- 
dent. the. press. Congress, the 
ami-abort] on movement, the 
drug cult — you name it But 
this time “Doonesbury” has 
gone for a tough one — Frank 
Sinatra. 01* Blue Eyes himself. ' 

The six comic strips sched- 
uled for this week haw some 
newspaper editors talking to 
their lawyers instead of laugh- 
ing. and the Trudeau satire 
won't get to ail of his readers. 

The allegations of Mr. Sina- 
tra's connections to organized 


! lion from a 1953 speech iy B- 
!• senhower decrying the.- wasted. 
! talents oT “laborers, i&egcmus 
of scientists, the hopesT’ofchil- 
dren in prpdudngjarms instead 
of feeding the hungry. She 


Enabled Soviet to Decode 
Secret Naval Messages 






| if, n M 

> Lillarr^^ 

----- - • . . 

■: ... ■ ■ ^ 

r ’’" ( V-iw HudgeiTj- 



should s e n d the ad to . their sen- 
ators and congressmen. 

By nod-1986 Alaska is ex- 
pected to reinstitute state in- 
come taxes, dropped in 1979 
when oil wealth flooded the 
treasuiy and financed extensive 
services and such things as road 
networks. State income from 
North Slope taxes and royalties 
has dropped, along with world 
oil prices, since 1982. -when it 
totaled $4.T Kffion. The 1986 
total is expected to be 519 bil- 
lion. 

President Ronald Reagan has 
reco mmende d that the Senate 
honor Major Arthur D. Nichol- 
son Jr- who was killed by a 
Soviet scatty in East Germany 
in March, ©y promoting him 
jposthumously to lieutenant col- 

said this woukfbe 3»S«3ond 
-such promotion; The first was 
that of Lieutenant Colonel 
Charles Ray, an army attache at 
the UA Embassy in Tans, pro- 
moted to colonel after he was 
killed by a terrorist in 1982. 

Catherine Costello, 17, of 
Pearl River, New York, got her 
college bachelor's, degree from 
Sl Thomas Aquinas College 
the day after she graduated 
from high school. For three 
years, to “broaden her perspec- 
tive,” as she put it, she attended 
high school during the day, tak- 
ing part in a profusion of extra- 
cuxncolar activities, and college' 
at night She will enter medical 
school in the TalL'. 


By George G Wilson 

Washington Port Servfrr 

, WASHINGTON - The spy 
ring that UA authorities say was 
led by John A. Walker Jr. appar- 
ently enabled the Soviet Union to 
decipher coded secret UA Navy 
communications for an extended 


systemic vulnerability or weakness- 
es" spotlighted by the case. 

Admiral Watkins said that navy 
communications “is the most seri- 
ous area of compromise.” 

. The design of some secret navy 
communications gear, he said, 
“probably has been lost” to the 
Russians and the service is, there- 


communica lions for an extended and the service is, (he 

period of time and to adjust their forff. bu il din g new <*mii pm cr 1 on 
operations at sea accordingly. Ad- “accelerated basis" in hopes of f< 
miral James D. Watkins, the chief jug Soviet eavesdroppers, 
of naval operations, said Tuesday. ^ officials said the navy’s 


Admiral Watkins termed the ships and weapons, including sob- 
navy’s lass of sensitive information marines carrying nuclear imssfles, 
from alleged espionage by four remain safe. 


navy men “ray serious” but “not Admiral Watkins said there was 
catastrophic.'' **po indication” thm the Russians 

Mr. Walker, a retired navy war- had broken the code of how to 
rani officer, is accused of having detect UA nuclear missile subma- 
run a spy ring for 18 years. He is rimes. He. added, “therefore, we re- 
being held with his so n, a navy main convinced” that the nuclear 
yeoman, and his brother and a submarine force is “still 100 -per- 
friend, both retired. ce nt survivable." ' 

admiral wbt_ Admiral Watkins indicated that 



Admiral Hyman Kickover, right, with Jacques- Yves Cousteau, French explorer and a 
pioneering submariner, at a party in Washington for Mr. Cousteau's 75th birthday. 

Kickover Denies Retaining Most Gifts 


Great for Tennis 

July 6-14 

International Grand Prix 
Tennis Tournament 


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tighten security. They said poly- tnfortnation on its communication WASHINGTON — Admiral His statement came five days af- 
grapfa tests wirf be given on a ran- gjf J"®“ ^ bS Hym ^ G ‘ • Ri f av ^’ ter the navy released the report of 

dom basis to navy people with ac- “J b /™ conscience is clear, says that af- A d Hoc Gratuities BoareNisting 

cess to secret infonnation at sea 01051 a11 of *e 567,628 in gifts he is hundreds of items and services that 

and on shore. In addition, the num- ship-to-shore and from ship- to- accused of receiving from General ah mi mi Rirtm-pr received from 


By Michael Weisskopf 

Washington Past Set ntv 


iphatically that no gra- 
jr ever affected any de- 


i security. They said poly- ^formation on its communication WASHINGTON — Admiral 
tests wffl be given on a ran- iSe Y fro “ “ c b* 1 " 1 “PP 1 ® Hyman G. Rickover, raying “my 

oris to navy people with ac- us ~ ec * u *P mcnt break conscience is clear,” says that al- 


and on shore. In addition, the num- , , ... _ 

ber of navy of people cleared for fgg *£ UDSCram ~ Dynamics Corp. was given to sup- 

secret information are to be re- ° led sccret le!e P ttone calls - porters of a nuclear navy, including 

duced 10 percent immediately the 


cused on the special considerations 
General Dynamics accorded him 
during its submarine sea trials, a 
ritual that became known as “rig- 
ging for Rickover.” 

Citing a “navy practice of long 
standing” for the commanding of- 
ficer to make special arrangements 


mrii 


St- 1 nomas Aquinas t-ouegc 
Garry Trudeau ^ ^ afta- she graduated 

from high axhooL For three 
crime are a primary target of years, to “broaden her perspec- 
Mr. Trudeau — the contrast of live,” as she put it, she attended 
that and Mr. Sinatra's friend- high school curing the day, tak- 
ship with the Ronald Reagans fag part in a profusion of extra- 
and his Medal of Freedom cumcular activities, and mllrgp 
award last month by the presi- at night will enter medical 
denL school in the Talk'. 

Concerns about libel and 
fairness were the reasons died 
by editors for not publishing* . . 

some or all of the week’s strips. ThotUzhtS on Change* 
Newspapers that chose not to ^ .. . . 

use at least some of them in- In the PbflCe World 
eluded the International Herald 

Tribune, the Los Angeles Tiroes Patrick V. Murphy, retiring 

and Newsday. at 65 as president of the Police 

Id a statement,. Mr. Sinatra Foundation; a Washington re- 
said, “Garry Trudeau makes his scarch gronp, and former police 

living by his attempts at homor chief in Washington, Detroit 

without regard to fairness or. and New York, says “incredible 
decency.” changes in police work” have 

Is Mr. Sinatra talking to his occurred because of the chang- 
lawycrs? He’s not saying. mg leadership of dries and po- 

lice forces. 

"■ 1 “More and more blacks and 

Short Takes Hispanics have become the 

mayors and police chiefs," he 
Joan B. Kroc, widow of Ray noted, and police “more and 
Kroc, the guiding genius of the more are finding Ways to work 
McDonald'S hamburger chain, with the comm uni ty, to spot the 

spent $400,000 to buy full-page drug dealer and burglar and to 
ads in The New York Tunes, actually prevent crime." 

The Washington Post and 21 — Compiled by 

other newspapers with a quota- ARTHUR HIGBEE 


“with a goal of 50 percent as soon ability to copy teletype ana secure gress. 


able presidents and members of Con- 


as feasible." 

Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger has made it dear that 


voice dradts ® Id an offidal rebuttal to a letter Admiral Rickover said his re- 


Gen eral Dynamics and accusing for visiting dignitaries, he said the 
him of having been the “benefiria- “provisions and supplies for those 
ry of this longstanding pattern and sea trials, alleged as gratuities, were 
practice of corporate Targcss used and consumed not only by me 
j but also by the dedicated navy men 


be considers security breaches a Jr - Admira i R«* over offcrcd - for 

problem for the whole Department STto the first nme, Jus defense that he 

of Defense, not just the navy. ^never considered or treated these 

He has ordered an immediate 10- Soviet electronic eavesdropping ' lems 35 P ersona l Sifts, 
percent reduction in the 4 J mill i on trawlers trail U A warships at dose . He said that of “certain items” 
military, civilian and contractor range all over the world. Navy offi- . he received from General Dynam- 
peironnd cleared far secret mfor- ^ presume the trawler crews re- ics from 1961 to 1977. he kepi only 
mauon and ann minced that apanel the message traffic as well as a pair of diamond earrings and a 
would be named to identify any radio back what aircraft carriers jade pendant bought for his wife 

and other ships bigger than cruisers for 51.125. 

„ --r . arcdoinfr Admiral Rickover said he gave 

Hu Feil£. Writer Gcar ? at wouW l ^ [ns 5 ram ^ e everything else away — to presi- 
^ terrxpted communications, plus deni to Members of Congress and 

DphaVllUtfltPrl m *e reports on surface ship and sub- ^eir staffs, to “dedirated and 

aeiUmUtiiUHl in marine operations Trom the spy hard-working" submarine crew 

n,* „ 09 nng, would have bem immensely members antfto his office person- 


Hu Feng, Writer 

Rehabilitated in 

China, Dies at 83 


helpful to the Soviet Union in try- ne j 
fag to determine the military inten- 
tions and capabilities of the United Ii 


Short Takes 

Joan B. Kroc, widow of Ray 
Kroc, the guiding genius of the 
McDonald'* hamburger chain, 
spent $400,000 to buy fuU-page 
ads in The New York Tunes, 
The Washington Post and 21 
other newspapers with a quota- 


rf,tih ^sTribunt 


V • ! 

I- 


m 




r 

New York Suspends Broker’s license 
OfZaccaro , Citing ^J^tivklmrihmess , 

The Associated Pita - caxx? “can’t act as a broker, collect 

ALBANY. New York — The commissions or. fees, or manage 
real-estate broket’s license of John property that is not his or Bs 
A. Zaccaro has been suspended by film’s,” for 90. days, Mr. Brown 
a state hearing officer who said the said. The suspension can be ap- 
husband of Geraldine A Ferraro, pealed. 
ibe 1984 Democratic vice presiden- Mr. Zaccaro pleaded guilty m 

iiat cnnHidait had “demonstrated January to “scheming to defraud” 


rial enndid^f g , hsd “demonstrated January to “sdmning l 
untrustworthiness." while trying to help a di 


The hearing officer, Barry Bo- 
on. said Monday he took the ac- 


tion. said Monday he took the ac- ui®* »»i jw» f ■ *rii About n,-" *tv Robe“ 

don because Mr. Zaccaro had sub- Mr. Zaccaro's attorney, John -Love fa a ManY-Solendored 
mined “a net worth statement Koegel, said Tuesday the suspen- 15 a Many ^ Jcnaorea 

which he biew was false and mi si on was an Unfair penalty for ac- ' . . . _ 

appraisal which he hmwrif al- dons that “would never have come Bw Prince, 68. one of baseball s 
tered," according to William to anyone's attention were it not best known play-by-play broad- 
Brown, a spokesman for New for the political atmosphere Lhat he castas as the voice of the rrtts- 
York’s secretary of state. was thrust inw. This is an unwar- burgh nrats for nearly three de- 

' The suspension, which takes ef- ranted actiomit’s a big deal about cad^. Mcmday of comphcauons 
^Jeci Aug. 1, means that Mr. Zac- nothing.” folkiwing cancer surgery. 


“ Broadway mua ttU of Zie^feld ^ld 

£ * Pmn ” 1 “*■ 

ac* mgs last year __ * .. Pu _« 


Kevxers tions and capabilities of the United In his rebuttal to Mr. Lehman, 

BELTING — Hu Frag, 83, a cele- states, according to military offi- Admiral Rickover, who retired 
brated writer and litcraiy critic dais. from the navy in 1982. also said. “1 

who championed artistic freedom 

in China in the 1950s and was then 
imprisoned and purged by the 
Communist authorities, died Satur- 
day of cancer. * 

• He opposed Mao's doctrine of 
1942 that literature must servepdi- 
tics. He was arrested in July 1955, 
but remained a symbol of intellec- 
tual freedom to younger writers. 

Mr. Hu's rehabilitation was re- 
vealed in April 198.1 when he was 

named to a committee of 200 set up r 
to commemorate the centenary lat- 
er that year of the birth of his 
former patron, the writer Lu Xun. 

In May 1981, Chinese Literature 
magazine gave recognition to Mr. 

Hu for the first tune since his con- 
demnation. publishing a poem he 

rXi If you’re planning 

you should look i 

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ceipt of gifts deserved to be “placed and women who served on these 
in the proper context," and he fo- ships.” 


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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


Reral 



Sribuite 


Pubtbbrd Wilfc TTie Sew York Tine* ad Tbe Wnfaiagtno 


Five Months lor SALT-2 


iljiH 

Nicaragiiati > 

A Neat War * ; ^ , 

r _ T T«Ulrolv : I 1 f * 1 


President Reagan has reached the light deci- 
sion in postponing a dear violation of the 
SALT-2 missile limits next fall He will “plan** 
to deactivate and dismantle one old-fashioned 
Poseidon missile submarine when a more po- 
tent Trident goes to sea. That buys five months 
for arms control negotiations. It also buys the 
time he would need to prove that America is 
not primarily to blame if they should faiL 

Even if the Poseidon dismantling proceeds, 
the costs would be negligible. Keeping the 
submarine in service would exceed the SALT-2 
treaty's ceiling — of 1,200 missiles with multi- 
ple warheads — by a total of 14 missiles. To 
have opted for that treaty breakout now would 
have risked torpedoing me Geneva arms talks, 
offending the NATO allies and undermining 
President Reagan's camp aign to call attention 
to more ambitious Soviet violations. 

All this emphasis on violations is peripheral 
in any case. Both superpowers have reason to 
be perturbed about the pace of the arms race. 
What truly concerns them is not this old sub- 
marine or that secret lunge for m a rgin al ad- 
vantage but their wholly open acquisition of 
huge new weapons systems. 

Mr. Reagan rightly complains about tbe 
disturbing Soviet buildup of the last decade, 
however much it is permitted by treaty. The 
Russians rightly complain of tbe alar min g 
Reagan plan for a “star wars” d e fen se, how- 
ever much it, too, is so far permitted. 

It is only a matter of time — very little time 
— before these exertions move from violating 
the spirit of aims control to destroying the core 
of the SALT-1 and SALT-2 accords. Tbe first 


li could not have been easy for President 
Reagan to decide to stick with his policy of not 
undercutting SALT-2, (he (unratified) peaty 
he had done so much to identify as the epitome 
of bad arras control. His constituents on the 
right were bound to recall, in outrage, that he 
had labeled it “fatally flawed.” Pentagon civil- 
ian chiefs were pressing him hard to scrap the 
treaty. Soviet violations are both serious and 
accepted enough to have given him a strong 
rationale. Yet Mr. Reagan accepted more 
pragmatic counsel and did the right thing — in 
part to boost the Geneva talks. He agreed to 
keep in force the policy of not undercutting tbe 
terms of the unratified agreement and to stay 
under a key SALT ceiling not by the gimmick 
of drydockmg an old Poseidon submarine but 
by dis mantling it outrighL 
Mr. Reagan has walked a fine line between 
hotly contending parts of his administration. 
In effect he said to Secretary of State George 
Shultz and other partisans of the “no-under- 
cut” policy: I am giving you five months to 
show that it will produce comparable Soviet 
restraint plus a good-faith Soviet approach to 
the Geneva talks . To Secretary of Defense 
Caspar Weinberger and others who wanted to 
scrap SALT-2, he said: Hold on for five 
months and that you may tell me what addi- 


has expired and the second was, at Mr. Rea- 
gan’s initiative, never ratified. There is not 
piflgh comfort to be found in the intervening 
Soviet and U^. pledges nonetheless to observe 
the accords until new treaties can be negotiat- 
ed. If Mr. Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev do 
not hands on something firmer before 
SALT-2 also expires in December, tiiey are 
bound to turn from constructive negotiation to 
bitter recrimination about their costly failure. 

President Reagan's decision on the Posei- 
don, right as it is, docs nothing lo resolve the 
d ig fl g f fBT pmts over arms control inside his 
own adminis tration. Defense Secretary Caspar 
Wanheraer loudly advertised a desire to _ an- 
swer Soviet treaty violations with an American 
violation. That makes Monday’s choice by Mr. 
Reagan appear momentarily conciliatory. But 
the Pentagon comes away with ample author- 
ity to plan for more significant treaty break- 
outs: for testing a Midgetman missile as a 
supplement rather than replacement for the 
MX, and also exotic technologies that jeopar- 
dize the most significant of all arms agree- 
ments, the Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty forbid- 
ding significant missile defense. 

Mr. Reagan thus plays out to the last avail- 
able months his strategy of frightening the 
Russians with an economically ruinous aims 
race for offensive and defensive weapons. If he 
has judged right, a timely offer to restrain his 
“star wars” effort may yet yield a major reduc- 
tion of both sides’ offensive missiles, if not, no 
amount of concern for old treaty limits will 
rantnin the tens e competition that lies ahead. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Hn n a I anns-building steps are an “appropriate 
and proportionate" response to the military 
consequences of unconnected Soviet violations. 

This, then, is Mr. Reagan’s response to the 
problems reused by the Soviet com pl ia nc e 
record. One need not accept every item in the 
Reagan bill of particulars to acknowledge that 
the Russians have violated in different ways 
important dements of various arms control 
agreements. Mr. Reagan had an obligation to 
show that he was addressing this special, ques- 
tion seriously, and not just to make good on a 
rampaig n pledge or to win the American peo- 
ple’s trust for further negotiated arms control. 

In the process he has given Secretary Shultz 
an extremely demanding assignment, one for 
which he will need a degree of Soviet coopera- 
tion that is har d to imagine. In the short space 
of five months Mr. Shultz is to produce new 
Soviet restraint, on violations — a sensible 
demand, although one that emails difficult 
issues of definition and verification. He is also 
to produce progress at Geneva. This may be an 
impossible condition, given the deadlock now 
prevailing and the difficulty of breaking it 
soon even if compliance were no issue. In any 
event. Mr. Reagan has contrived to ensure that 
November will be a dramatic month. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 



By Ton# Wick® ,. : 

N ew 1 YORK -For UAajJSwj 
forces, an inva«WKtfNwWJ 
would be like falling off a tag. 


A Semi- Victory for Substance Over Hard Rhetoric 


W ASHINGTON — The distribution of pow- 
er in the second Reagan administration 
finds precise expression in the decision to abide 


By Joseph Kraft 


eign policy as well as taxes and the budget — has 
passed out of the White House. Mr. Reagan has 
beenassigned the role of hanging semi-rough. 

On budget matters the point ls obvious. The 
serious work is being done by Budget Director 
David Stockman and the Republican Senate 
|«Hpr«htp under Bob Dole. Mr. Reagan has had. 
to go along with their moves to curtail military 
and Social Security spending. He will probably 
have to go further as Mr. Dole and Mr. Stockman 
work out a compromise with the House Demo- 
crats. The threat of a veto, implied in the smart- 
- aleck dare to “make my day. is rhetoric. 

On tax reform the work is being done by the 
Treasury under James Baker. In malting accom- 
modation with oil and gas interests, Mr. Baker 
turned Mr. Reagan around, and also the White 
House chief of staff and former Treasury secre- 
' taiy, Don Regan. Similar adjustments may be 
worked oat as the legislation moves through the 
House and Senate. Talk about a “second Ameri- 
can revolution” is also rhetoric. 

In foreign policy, the heavy input comes from 
the State Department under George Shultz and 
from the National Security Council under Rob- 
ert McFarlane. The Defense Department, under 
Caspar Weinberger, and tbe CLA, under William 


on Soviet “violations” of SALT- 2. Mr. Weinber- 
ger’s chief guru on strategic matters. Assistant 
Secretary a Defense Richard Perie, had adver- 
tised his views in a public speech on the subject 
The rhetorical side of the White House had 
backed up the hard-line view by recalling that in 
the 1980 campaign, Reagan had attacked the 
SALT-2 treaty as “fatally flawed” 

But Mr. Shultz fought hard against a formal 


in the direction of the previous 'assertion that 
SALT-2 was “fatally flawed" The key proviso, 
announced on Monday, is to deactivate tor six 
months a submarine due to be scrapped under 
SALT-2. Thus Mr. Reagan awaits Soviet perfor- 
mance on arms control before finally going along 
with the treaty by retiring the sub. He reserves 
the right to react in response ro any actions by 
Moscow perceived to be violations of the t reat y. 


tunnel eren before the Ututeti State* 

stride iiuo a new iiuagtrart; 
fJo sweat, a 

tary officer m rregntW to W. 

Joel Brinkley and . - 

New York Times: “TheU.5. wttjW- 
come in heavily Scr a mwm ***■; : 
mostly with air strikes aptnx nupx 
Sties- Then a wrgff*.. • 
would be put into place. ££****-. 
come with its own 

whatever resistance ntight . . 

If that sounds fanauax. . uL 

tar? air power with te \u uyui . %/» 
strikes" was supposed 
wort of the primitive VwttHWasK 

the North Vietnamese. totKftohJat \ 

American cawaititt froiE a jm - . 
ground war. For a long decade Of 
death and destruction,, the United; 
States searched for a potmtar *** . 
effective KJvernmcnt to “put mto , 
place" in aaigpn — otter gt aaotof 
Oat a goverwxwu, hand^t^te - 
Washingtou could haw brae topo- - 
macy in Vietnamese eyes. And the 
South Vietnamese army that 
United States organized supplied 
and trained in the Aroencan military ff 




The upshot is postponement 
of a deliberate effort to destroy 
the Geneva negotiations. 

Council in Lisbon, allied foreign ministers to a’ 
man supported him in resisting an overt breach 
of the rales. Earlier both Houses of Congress had 
pncwi by overwhelming majorities resolutions 
opposing' formal denunciation. The implication 
was that Congress would make the already sticky 
going on the defense budget a lot stickier if Mr. 
Reagan departed from the terms of tbe treaty. 

The national security adviser, Mr. McFarlane, 
deftly appropriated the military. The Joint 
Chiefs were asked whether, from a strictly mili- 
tary view, it would be better to honor SALT-2 


Casey, are consulted of course, and their posi- tary view, it would be better to honor SALT-2 
tions tend to be amplified by the While House and its mechanism for chairing violations or to 


noise-makers under Pat Buchanan. But Pentagon 

f iroou emenl scandals and defense budget prob- 
Mins have sharply reduced the Weinberger clout 
The big losers in the decision against renounc- 
ing SALT-2 were Mr. Weinberger, Mr. Casey 
and Mr. Buchanan. All three had laid great stress 


kick free of the treaty restraints. Their judgment 
was that the military outcome was inconclusive 
— in the words of one senior official, a “wash." 

With that mandate in his pocket, Mr. McFar- 
lane drafted language that made it possible to 
honor the treaty for the time being while nodding 


process. With a little progress in tire Geneva 
raiies, the treaty can be kept intact. 

Moreover, it is not as if the United States was 
leaving arms control success up lo something the 
Russians could not.ddiver. It will be enough for 
Moscow to agree to a summit in the near future. 

Mr. Reagan’s decision is a technical victory for 
Mr. Shultz and Mr. McFarlane. Those hoping for 
an of Soviet-U JL tensions have reason to 
sound two cheers. For the betting in Washington 
is that Mikhail Gorbachev will agree to a summit 
before his party congress in February. 

But if substance saved tire day; Erma rhetoric, 
rhetoric is not nothing. There is a difference 
between saying the wrong thing and saying tire 
right thing, ana it matters in Rational leadership. 

By saying the wrong thing. Mr. Reagan has so 
far marred nis second terra. He has alienated tire 
Democrats and much of his own party. He has 
put off America's allies, and handed cheap pro- 
paganda openings to the Russians. He has failed 
to seize unambiguously the historic opportuni- 
ties for a second term. Instead of rising to the 
statesman's role, he has made himself tire falter- 
ing leader of an embattled, ideological faction. 

Los Angeles Times Syndicate , 


hard but essential lessons — jntfn 
not just in Vietnam but in AlgpiftK,..* 
M n* well — - that political P roHcgg 
do not necessarily havemitilary solu- 
tions, and that military and techno- 
logical might cannot always over- 
come a politically o t patriotically 
motivated populace. . 

But Nicaragua would be anicrcm,.-- 
Mesas. Brinkley and Keller have 
been told. For cue thing, tire popula- 
tion would “rise up” to support tire ^ 
invaders — an ex pect ation that ig- “ 
notes the history of gringo rmfitaty 
intervention in Centra America *®! . ? . 

assumes that Nicaragians so hate the 

Sandinist government that they • 
would welcome another intervention 
and a new U.S. oocamttion. 

If so, would the Sandmbts have 
armed Nicaraguans so efttegstafy . 

training to so- 


spun li 


E : M' 


pOUIUUIW 

Poland Moves in Reverse Third World Centrists: Denying Them Can’t Help 


General Jaruzdskf $ Warsaw regime speaks 
softly to the West of amnesties and reconcOia- 
tioiL To Poles that same regime constantly 
speaks with the big stick of repression. 

A year after an amnesty that led to the 
release of 650 political prisoners and the relax- 
ation of Western sanctions, more than 100 
political activists are back in prison. Three of 
the most prominent ones are-now in the dock 
at a crude show trial in Gdansk, facing sen- 
unices of five years for inciting public unrest. 

Today's Poland is a civil rights disaster area. 
Activists continue to he hounded and, as the 
kidnapping and murder of Father Jerzy Popie- 
luszko showed, tire hounding is not just judi- 
cial Bravely, tens of thousands of Poles con- 
tinue to demonstrate resistance, but their 
demonstrations are being forcibly suppressed. 


The repression has worsened in recent months. 

The trial of Wladyslaw Frasyniuk, Bogdan 
Lis and Adam Michnik is an even cruder farce 
than last year’s trial of Solidarity advisers. 
Polish and international observers have been 
forcibly barred from the proceedings and some 
have been detained. The defendants are denied 
private conferences with their lawyers; they 
may talk only across a distance of 10 meters in 
the presence of government agents. 

It 1s dear that last year's amnesty was just 
another maneuver, a refinement of repression 
mostly aimed at impressing the outside world. 
The modest thaw that it inspired needs to be 
reconsidered. Polish human rights policy has 
again gone into reverse. It may be time for 
Western diplomacy to follow suit. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


W ASHINGTON - In recent 
years, U.S. foreign policy in 
the Third World has been based on a 
despair of the center. There is no 
third way, Americans concluded, be- 
tween the extremes of fascism and 


Bv Leon Wieseltier 


tary machinery that was resisting it 
The liberal insistence on such an ave- 
nue was scorned as "soft.” 

To thwart Moscow, which was ex- 


communism. But that may be wrong, pertly exploiting instability in places 
Jose Napoledn Duarte has eslab- pertinent to U.S. security. Washing- 


Other Opinion 


Keep SALT-2 and Belter It 

The Reagan administration has solved its 1 
internal difficulties ova the SALT treaty — 
for that is what they chiefly are — by sticking 
mare or less to the treaty's terms but doing so 
with minimum grace. The fan that the argu- 
ment has been won, for the time being, by 
[George] Shultz and the State Department is 
offset for presentational purposes by heavy 
hints of retaliation Tor Soviet misconduct 
of the kind which [Caspar] Weinberger and 
the Pentagon like to hear. 


The value of SALT-2 is not in the limits 
which are imposed on both sides. Those limits 
are ridiculously high. The value is tbe existence 
of a framework, however crude, which pro- 
vides each side with reference- points in its 
dealings with the other. As an arms control 
treaty, SALT-2 is almost threadbare in its 
loopholes and inadequacies. (SS-20s and 
cruise missiles fall outride its scope, for exam- 
ple). But as a focus of such political agreement 
as exists between the two sides it is essential to 
keep it in place until it can be improved upon. 

— The Guardian ( London L 


Jose Napoledn Duarte has estab- 
lished, for the good of Salvadoran 
peasants and U.S. policy-makers, the 
new plausibility of the center. He 
deserves much of tbe credit for the 
success of moderation in his country 
— and so does Washington. 

Still before the Reagan adminis- 
tration swells in self-congratulation, 
it is worth noting that tbe progress in 
El Salvador did not follow from the 
administration's foreign policy for- 
mulas. Quite the contrary. Tbe frus- 
tration of Salvadoran extremism was 
achieved precisely by the violation 
of those formulas. 

Ronald Reagan came into office 
with a principled readiness to soil 
American hands in tbe defense of 
freedom. He argued that the hour was 
late, in developing societies in which 
revolution had begun, to hope for an 
avenue between the tyranny of Le- 
ninism and tbe savagery of the mill- 


ion would have to swallow its disgust 
and make alliances with murderers, 
who were craftily called “authoritar- 
ians." Poverty in El Salvador not- 
withstanding, the emphasis of U.S. 
aid would be military. This was a 
foreign policy for which the time was 
always twilight, for which the task 
was always to traffic with lesser evils. 

According to the president's analy- 
sis, in short, Mr. Duarte was an im- 
possibility. a figment of the liberal 
unagination. The United States, it 
was quietly and not so quietly sug- 
gested, should ride instead with the 
authoritarians of ARENA Roberto 
d'Aubuisson's lethal party of the 
right. Indeed, Americans flirted with 
such a choice, until it was discovered 
that this authoritarianism was not 
above an attempt to assassinate the 
U.S. ambassador, Thomas R. Picker- 
ing. Then Washington came to its 


senses and acted on the advice it had 
rejected. It helped the middle. 

To be sure, Mr. Duarte's rise to 
power would not have been possible 
without the support of an enlightened 
echelon of the Salvadoran army. But 
its enlightenment — in effect, its po- 
licing of itself — was a result of the 
conditions that the U.S. Congress 
placed on military aid. (Many in 
Congress were more against military 
aid than for the emergence of the 
center, but the effect was the same.) 
Anyway, the anti-Communist, anti- 
fascist Mr. Duarte was never an ene- 
my of the war against the guerrillas. 
He was an enemy only of the war 
against his own population. A serious 
moderate can be perfectly compati- 
ble with a serious military. 

How much encouragement should 
be taken from the improvement in El 
Salvador? As one U.S. official re- 
marked, U.S. help “would have been 
useless without good raw material” 
The Third World is not exactly teem- 
ing with Duanes. There are places 
where “tough choices” may have to 
be made. Still a lot will depend on 


One Country Editor’s Last Deadline 

JT ARTHA'S VINEYARD, By James Res ton welL He thought the thing was 

I X/nccnnlnirAHe a/ ika * Art cirrmln thivinr* I 


FROM OUR JUNE 12 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: U.S. Income Tax Is Unwanted 
NEW YORK — On the federal income tax. 
The Hartford Tunes says: “It may now be 
regarded as certain that tbe income tax amend- 
ment will not be ratified by three-fourths of 
the Suites in its present form. Every New 
England State may be safely counted against 
it, and opposition of rally twelve States is 
needed to defeat it.” The New Orleans Pica- 
yune odds: “When it comes to giving the 
national government a club to break down our 
State's credit and tax our taxes, that would 
convict the Southern people of a submission 
that emulates the lowliness of the dog that 
licks that hand which smites him." The Sl 
L ouis Post- Dispatch remarks: “We should not 
tax poverty. We should tax wealth. There 
would be no danger of Congress imposing a 
crushing tax upon [our] incomes.” 


1935: Intermarriage in South Africa? 

LONDON — Returning from South Africa. 
George Bernard Shaw has proclaimed himself 
an advocate of intermarriage between blacks 
and whiles. “The question is beginning to 
arise,” Mr. Shaw declared in the Daily Tele- 
graph. “whether white people can survive in 
South Africa. Mr. Oswald Pirow, Minister of 
Railways, made an appeal for immigrants, 
who were 'necessary to keep up the white 
population.’ But South Africa doesn't fill up. 
The mixture of two colors may provide the 
solution. It is not question of black and while. 
There is no such thing as a white man on the 
face of the earth: the Chinese call us the 
‘pinks,’ very properly. Hie Zulus are a superior 
type of person, and all attempts to keep them 
in an inferior position seems to break down 
before the fact that they are not inferior." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chatman 1958-1982 

Katharine graham, william s. paley. Arthur ochs sulzberger 

Co-Chairmen 


M ARTHA'S VINEYARD. 

Massachusetts — One of the 
most interesting thing s about jour- 
nalism in America is that so man y 
of its memorable characters have 
been country editors. From Tom 
Paine to Mark Twain, and the Bal- 
timore crowd from Henry Mencken 
to Russel] Baker, it has been the 
hicks from the sticks who took over 
the big dry crowd. 

Nor have tbe television news be- 
rocs of recent years been dominated 
by city slickers or Ivy League types, 
but by Walter Cronkile out of the 
Middle West and Texas, Eric Sevar- 
dd of Minnesota, Tom Brokaw of 
Kansas, and, among others, David 
Brinkley and Roger Miidd of the 
University of North Carolina. 

I mention this merely to note the 
passing of a great country editor, 
Henry Beetle Hough, who died the 
other day on Martha's Vineyard 
Island at 88, after 65 years as editor 
of The Vineyard Gazelle. He is, in 
my mind, a symbol of this country 
journalism that has been and still is 
the school where most prominent 


Boston, or to check in at the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital in Bos- 
ton when he was in trouble. 

A young colleague on Tbe Ga- 
zette asked him one day if he didn't 
long occasionally to see the world 
beyond the waters of the Vineyard. 
“Not often,” Henry Hough said, 
“but when I feel the urge coming 
on, 1 collect a bunch of cud Nation- 
al Geographic magazines, climb up 
to the attic of The Gazette and stick 
my feet in a bucket of cold water 
until the feeling wears off." 

He worried about death and re- 
tirement. In his bode ‘'Country 
Editor ” he suggested “that death is 
the most characteristic of all the 
forces in a country town, because 
there are always so many old people 
living there, and the passing of an 
individual is so much more impor- 
tant than h is in tbe city. Besides, a 
town has time to mourn. 

"The obituary is a distinctive sto- 
ry-forum for the country weekly 
htvauc* it has to tell not only tbe 



LEE W. HUEBNER. ftdfefcr 

Exeanat Editor 
Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Dtptay Editor 
Associate Editor 


modern reporters got their training, because it has to tell not only the 
Mr. Hough was an old-fashioned stark facts of somebody’s life, but it 
man who believed that sticking to has to tell also a little of what that 


Depwy Pubtisktr 
Associate Publisher 
Associate Publisher 


Dtrraer of emulation 
rector afAdmtisng Sales 

Inlemoiima] Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charles-de-Gaulle. 92200 NonUy-OT-Srine, 
fSStSl: (I) 747-1265/Tdex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 02944052. 

Dirmeur de ia publication: Walter N. Thayer. .Jfj fflB- . 

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5 4 au capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Santerre B 732021126. Commission Pantaire No. 61337. 

U.S. subscription: S322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Lang Island City. N.Y. 11101. 

6 1985, International Herald Tribune. All rights roerrai ■SSd 


pie news of the island was more 
important than worrying about the 
confusions on the mainlan d He re- 
ported- on the central questions of 
life here — birth, marriage and 
death — but he was not interested 
in divorce unless it was an unavoid- 
able island scandaL 
His main concern was the preser- 
vation of the unity, privacy and 
beauty of this island. In 65 years he 
seldom left it except once in a while 
to meet his responsibilities as the 
head of the Thoreau Foundation in 


somebody was Eke, and what his 
career seemed to stand for. It has to 
tell even what a nobody; was like, 
for the poorest citizen is in the eyes 
of the town a man." 

It amused Mr. Hough when one 
of our old newspaper buddies hwe 
on the Vineyard, Red Smith, ra the 
old Herald Tribune and The New 
York Times, made a speech, saying: 

"Death is no big deal — almost any 

of us can manage it. living is the 
trick we have to team." 

Mr. Hough learned that tnck 


well. He thought the thing was to 
concentrate on simple things: his 
family, his paper, his community, 
and nothing else. He made some 
enemies in the process, for he want- 
ed to limit the growth of the island, 
while others wanted to get more 
people, more houses. At (he end he 
thought be was losing. 

In some ways he was wrong, and 
too pessimistic. Thirty-five years 
ago he worried about retirement 
and death. In 1950 he wrote the 
following in a lovely book railed 
“Once More the Thunderer”: 

“How to resign the duties of a 
country editor — that is what we 
should like to know . . . Apparently 
tiiere is no way to taper off as there 
is in some worldly occupations. It is 
all or nothing, until the end, what- 
ever the end of country editorship 
may be, presents itself like the press 
time of a Friday afternoon. 

“How to sweep the papers from 
the desk that have been there so 
long, and leave the heap at ex- 
changes unopened, and near tbe 
telephone ringing but let it go un- 
answered as one steps through the 
door as an editor for the last time, 
into a street of mellow twilight — 
twilight of course because quitting 
time must be fall with the white 
houses of the town early in shadow 
and the stores already lighted as 
one walks home through the creep- 
ing, aromatic New England dusk.” 

Mr. Hough wrote that 30 years 
ago, but he continued on until a few 
days ago when he wrote his last 
editorials. Always b punctual man, 
he died at 4 o'clock on Thursday 
afternoon just before deadline on 
his Friday paper. 

The New York Times. 


the reading of “good raw material." 

In El Salvador there existed the 
social and political basis for demo- 
cracy. Mr. Duarte is the product of 
an urban middle class committed to 
dvil liberties and the economic blan- 
dishments of an open society. 

Moreover, the ILS. part in the 
modern history of the region, wink 
not exactly one of its finest chapters, 
bad the ironic consequence of im- 
parting democratic ideals, if only by 
honoring them in the breach. Latin 
American democrats frequently in- 
voke Jeffersonian principles. 

Such conditions for the center may 
be found in other roots of tnnnoti, 
most notably in the Philippines. 
There, a Duarte-like figure exists in 
the person of the opposition leader, 
Salvador Laurel Yet tbe United 
States, in defiance of all the rules 
for a Duarte-like success, continues 
to encourage the extremism of Presi- 
dent Ferdinand Marcos. 

The United States cannot invent 
democrats around the world. But 
sorely it can help them when they are 
there, it will not help them if it de- 
cides at the outset, out of a kind of 
conservative defeatism, that the only 
work that remains to be done is dirty. 

The nriter, literary editor of The 
New Republic, contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed ‘'Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er’s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


and given muitaiy ' tnmilig to so- 
man ft Why doesn't this armed pro- . 
pie rise now and iain the "contras” 
that the Reagan iwiitantetrati on ocg^ .• . 
nized and amportsHsa't if sslikoy 
that a VS. mvxsion would increase 
patriotic support {of theSandimso? 

And if thegovcmmciti that Wash- 
ington would "put tap place" were . 
denvwTas is probable, from the samtffr 
'‘contras,” tint ehaitents of thc So- - 
moza regime thaiNicaragpans really 
did rise against would be restored to . 
power. Wouldsuch atainted govern- 
ment, or the airoy thal the Untied 
States wraddtrainandcquip.be Ho- 
ly to gain sufficient popular support 
to win a quick war over the Marxist 
tart nationalist guerrillas that The 
Sandinists would send to ihejunglcs? 
Experience in Vietnam and Afghani- 
stan argue against that 

Tbe Times reporters were assured 
that the Sandinists would have no Ho 
Chi Minh Trail and that Nicaragua 
could be seated off “tighter than a 
drum” by air and sea power — tech- 
nology again. But guerrillas are not 
totally dependent on outside sup- 
plies. They can live off the popute- ' 
lion, and — as in El Salvador and 
Vietnam — they can arm themsdvea 
with captured U.&. weapons from the 
h al f h earte d armies that puisne than. ~ 

Suppose it did not turnout to bea \ 
“splendid little war”? As onc cau- j^ 
tious colonel warned: “I’ve been in 
the army 24 years and I’ve never seen ' 
anything neat” The army says it - 
should not be asked to fight again . 
without public support; but in a tele- 
vision age. with American families 
watching body bagp again coming 
home from a frustrating war in which 
firepower and technology cannot 
find an emany to pulverize; how long 
could public support be maintained? 

Even without a war, polls show no 
majority _ backing for overthrowing 
the Sandinists. Even the Reagan ad- 
ministration concedes that aU.S. in- 
vasion would be a political disaster in 
the rest of the hemisphere. And it is 
not necessarily true that the United 
States soon may have no other choice^' 
but to send in its troops. ■ W-, 

The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Toward an Army Apart ■ f 0 ”* 87 w*® budgets are drawn up. 
In response to the report “Study r n tu m *® lons ! assigned, forces committed 
Reporters a ’Necessity’ When U.S SJjff S! dll -i? bl ® n,e , assessed, how 
Troops Are in Combat (May 31 1 - . . “Jmtaiy institution interact 

SAsiasseS 

the military and ihen-stT^A These are some of the questions 


the military and the rest of American <uhUi T!,., 01 Questions 

society. The aU-volunte£^S T* 1 a “ reB U U 

forces, m spite of some positive quali- « to remain a democracy, 
ties, will inevitably be ihe source of a 8JX SCHULLER, 

“gap" in American society. Estoril Portugal 

section of the population^ NoD »a*ninaiionatAn 

Cross-femlration between thTmifi- ingtaft! 
tmy and the rest of society is severely confuse; the issue. He D 

limited, as militanr personnel tend to prin^StSwStKSL*?^ 4 
their careers and other Americans people likTw 
struggle m tbe marketplace. SmW to s^«rf™2^ nil,atl0fi “* 

Career military personnel „l ^ * sometimes 


i, 

l, -U j- x 

\. . 

■* r »* -i 


?% 110 ta'gb government Sficidftr 

influential amaa — Congressman mvStoSZZPJf* 

or corporation __executivtiu^S dtarSwSL 6 !! L 10 . 1 "™ « is 


of mutual understanding will exist 
between the elites of American sol- 
ely and the leaders of teJSS* 


Peteaa. not their 

WILL,A M C DOWLING. 

Cologne. 






\ i( a % • ___: 

,/’S *■ Block SaysU.S. andEC 
s ' *ilik 'Agree on Need to Avoid 
v ,!; "" ^ in ; Trade War on Subsidies 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 , 


Page 5 


Roam ■ . ■ were in Paris for the aamwl jninis- 

PARI5 - The US. agriculture ^ me^ie 
secretary, John R- Block, said ' turns WoddFood Council, which 
Tuesday that he and European started Monday. 

Community farm minis ters hwd Mr. Block said that both the 
a grwffd on ipavnid 9 t pirif. United States and the community 

») war over yifaidipa to their food - recognized that subsidies had to be 
\ exporters. rediKed.“Atradewaronlybenefits 


1 he said that there coold bc the buyer^noi thesdlers, so we 
tide reversal bv Washinsztoo of most find ways to avoid a trade 


Mr. Block said that both the 
United and the community 


no quick reversal by Washington of must fihd'w^s to avoid a trade 
its recent 52-bffikm export boms war,” he added, 
plan to increase the sales of Amen- The French. agpqutura} mnns- 

can surplus farm produce. ter. Head Kallet, rmd the minister 

In the first announced iwV . of foreign trade, Edith Cresson, 

the plan, the United States wiD sdl ' said earfiff this weekthat the UJS. 
One. mi Ifinn -mptrir Imre nf whgflf tn bOCQlB export plan n&fid piOVQk- 
Algeria, induding an unspecified ingretalialiOTtrom Bnope. 
quantity of surplus wheat to be Tha-United States and the EC 
released from U.S. government disagree over how to deal with agri- 
stocks »nd given to U-S. exporters cultural issnesin die proposed new 



Gandhi Aides Fear a Shift From Domestic Priorities 


John R. Block 


He al&n 
food trade 


By Steven R. Weisraan 

' New York Tuna Serna . „ 

NEW DELHI— Prime Minister * 
Rapv Gandhi continues to enjoy 
popularity at home; but some at . Ins P 
associates arefrastrated at the slow 
pace of progress in solving India’s 
problems. 

More than one political com- 
mentator in India has noted that 
Mr. Gandhi's recent travels reflect 
the standard practice of political 
leaders to shin their attentions to 
global concerns as a respite from 
problems at home. 

Mr. Gandhi has been spending a' 
lot of time rat the road. Two weeks 
after returning from a six-day trip 
to the Soviet. Union, he was off 



that government actions in the cri- In the interview last week, Mr. said he was aware that many people 
sis were being held in abeyance. Gandhi said he saw ethnic and sec- had advised India to pay less atten- 
“We’ns waiting to see a response uarian violence as a product of pro- lion to outer space and computers 
from them," he said of the Sikh gress in India, rather than the lack and more to the povertv of hun- 
leaders. “We’re not talking to any- of it dreds of millions of Indians, 

one at the moment.” “I see it as really part of the ,u„i. „„ » 

Many of the prime minister’s as- development process, trying to do Latin^Am^^Tave Srid for uw 
sodares have expressed fnwizuon things in waybe 30 or 50 v£rs that 
over the fact that concessions by other countries have taken hun- d auenuon 10 
the government have failed to per- dreds of years to do." he said. ’ .... 

suade Sikh leaders to negotiate a “Whenever there is such rapid ,l * 001 I P cr *b’ a mallCT « 
peaceful resolution of their de- change in society, tensions are technology’s improving Indian 


“1 think the people in Africa and 


such rapid ** 001 merely a matter of high 
peaceful resolution of their de- change in society, tensions are technology’s improving Indian 
man/!* But Mr. Gandhi said he bound to come up." sen-sufficiency in agriculture and 

had bem encouraged, at least, that Mr. Gandhi continues to push °*) ier areas. wct J l on - addiD S: 
most Sikh leaders deplored the for the importance of high tecnnol- Apan from that, there has to be 
bombings by Sikh extremists last ogy in his country's future. In his something that we are building up 
month, Die bombings killed more visit to the United States, he and l0 ' >' ou *0’ and B el Jhe lowest 
ihan 80 people in northern India. President Ronald Reagan may for* denominator for every 

Some of Mr. Gandhi’s other ini- raalize an accord permitting the “““&• wt j K 10 ** ra ® r S 
natives also have recently seemed United States to export computers, backward, and not progress at all. 
bogged down. lasers and other nigh- technology The prime minister's aides sav 

A long-promised package of items to India. Mr. Gandhi also the one breakthrough Mr. Gandhi 
educational changes is reportedly plans to visit the space center in has made was in changing the polii- 
stm being studied by officials. And Houston to signal the increased co- ical process itself. Thcv~note with 
many experts have wondered if the operation between the two coun- satisfaction his removal' of manv of 
recent reaffirmation of socialism tries in space exploration. his mothers' old-line political ad- 


rosed that world again for visits to Egypt, France 
d be organized to and Algeria before arriving in the 




at no cost.- 


The United States and the EC 891(1 Tuesday that he opposed Mr. India next Monday, 
disagree over how to deal with agri- Mitterrand’s suggestion. Mr. Gandhi's aides, meanwhile, 

cultural issnesin the proposed new Mr. Block denied thal the bonus acknowledge that much erf the ur- 

„ round of international trade nego- program amounted to the United grncy has gone out of their efforts 

[ “If I was convinced bymore than tiations through the General State s dumping surplus grain on to save what most agree is India's 

X. just that "greCT v m t c riu ld be Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, world markets. He said (he pro- biggest domestic crisis: the turmoil 

■.I i • . ■ . j. -vm rv- n-f o ro. M aza n/rf ez A T-r — - - 


Rajiv Gandhi 


Mr. Gandhi continues to push olber areas. wcm on - addin S : 
for the importance of hi gh technol- "Apart from that, there has to be 
ogy in his country’s future In his something that we are building up 
visit to the United States, he and 10 - u > ou and get the lowest 
President Ronald Reagan may for- rommon denominator for every- 
raalize an accord permitting the thing, then we’re going to be more 
United States to export computers, backward, and not progress at all." 
lasers and other nigh- technology The prime minister’s aides sav 


Government officials feared 
there would be renewed bombings 

and killings by Sikh extremiststo effort to free the economy of gov- 
commemorate the Golden Temple 011111601 txmtr0 ^ s - 
raid. Even the less militant Sikh The prime minister's gpvein- 
leaders had eatl wt for amtatioos menl proposed a new textile policy 


■ renrfn»«t tn i vsci w . nnr trade ^ diffw- .or GATT::'.. gram did not contravene GATT surrounding the demand by Sikhs cn mmgmnH Hc ih<» f fai dffi Tem p le 

■ ■ .yi, QKcs,” Mr. Block said.- “over ape- The? EC farm commissioner. noes - for greater antonomy in the Pun- raid. Even the less militant Stkh 

'■* nod of. time, Tve could bade 'away - Frans Aridnessca, tdd the World ^ jab. leaders had called for aviations 

_ from this program.” - Food Coundlon Tuesday that the ■ Ministers Discuss Cereals Last week marked the first anni- and demonstrations in honor of 

^ But he said the plan was also community was ready to negotiate EC farm ministers returned versary of the army raid on the what they called “genocide week.” 
. - U t- supported by Cot^ess, and that m the GATT framewodc provided Tuesday to negotiations in Luxen^ Sikhs’ holiest shrine, the Golden B nerf, anc u™ Ilo . nf a hrteihl 

; the administra tion could not move that talks cm agriculture woe not bourg to try to agree on cuts in Temple in Amritsar, in which him- a . 

- ‘rr. away from h unilaterally. just restricted to EC farm policies, cereals prices, Reuters reported. dreds of Sikhs were killed. The raid lh “ 10 ?^| r 


In the interview, Mr. Gandhi visers 


his mothers' old-line political ad- 


eems prices, Reuters luxated. dreds of Sikhs were killed. The raid 
West Germany has blocked was ordered by Prime Minis ter Id- 


3. leaders had entled for flotations ment proposed a new textile policy 

Last week marked the first anni . and demonstrations in honor of last week, saying a range of regula* 
rsary of the army raid on the what they called “genocide week." tions .would be reviewed. The po- 

khs’ holiest shrine, the Golden D *. «. . . . . licy calls cm greater latitude by in- 

mple in Amritsar, in which hun- But perhaps because of a height- cfostry leaders to determine what to 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE S THE UK VIA SATELLITE 

"Europes Best View" 


the administration could not move that talks cm agriculture were not bourg to tty to agree on cuts in Temple in Amritsar, in which hun- ~ 

away from h unilaterally. just restricted to EC farm policies, cereals prices, Reuters reported. dreds of Sikhs were killed. The raid i 

He was briefing reporters on a On Monday, Presideni Francois West Germany has blocked was ordered by Prime Minister In- 
workingdmner Monday ci^jt vrith Mitterrand, of France told the moves to bring the community’s dira Gandhi, Rajiv GandhTs moth- w 
some farm ntinisters from the World Food Council dial France guaranteed nnm nnnn prices more er, in response to bombings and anie wcuence - 


esed army and police presmee 
throughont northern India, espe- 


1 0-nation Euro p ean Community. 
He hiUhI the meeting “construc- 
tive and very ireful ” T^ie mnristers 


Portugal 9 


would expose pressure for free into line with lower wodd prices, kiHi 
trade inagricaltmal produce in any threatening to veto even modest had 
future w«»dd trade talks. cuts. sant 


Skh extremists, who In an intoview last week with 


produce, based on their view of the 
market. 

Increasingly, the army has been 
used to qudl disturbances. It was 
called out 175 times in the last year 


sanctuar y and arms depot. 


tiny* *•>**' •*»**»••.*• 

- "..TT: y- 

- --me ■ 


using the temple as a reporters from U.S. news organiza- and a half, twice the number of 


PROGRAM WEDNESDAY 12th JUNE 

1335 MOVIN' ON 
W 30 WAYNE & SHUSTER 
1500 SKY TfiAX I 
IS 45 SKY TRAX 3 
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WITH ME’ 

IP 30 TRAIN RIDE TO HOLLYWOOD 
?1 00 INT MOTOR SPORTS 
2205 SKY TRAX 


tions, Mr. Gandhi acknowledged tunes in the previous two years. 

Some Arabs Are Critical 
Of Peres Plan for Peace 


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BRUSSELS— Spain and Portu- 
gal will sign Wednesday a treaty 
c? allowing them to join the European 
i* Comm unit y. 

Their membership in the bloc 
- will start formally tin Jan. 1, bring- : 

jving to 12 the number . (tf member , 

' natiwiy Sr nations g gnwi the ’ 





The Assodtued Pros the Gaza Strip, areas Krafl cap- 

CAIRO — Some Arabs reacted tured in the 1967 Arab- Israeli War. 
cooQy Tuesday to the Mid east • “Convening an opening con- 

peace proposal outlined Monday ference within three months, at a 
by Prime Minister Shimon Peres of place to be agreed on in the United 




■ -H 


. Spain in Madrid in the afternoon. 

The signing comes after more 
than right years of negotiations 
r and is seen by EC leaders as a 
political act, bringing the two ooun- 
tries formally into the fold of West- 
ern democracy. 

The prime ministers of Italy, 
which currently bolds the c ornmo - 
'.1 mty’s rotating presidency, Briginm, 

Denmark, France, Irdand and the 

V Netherlands will attend the cere- . wmymama r« 

’.’ monies. The other memhaswBl be DEATHS ON ISRAJXJ BUS — Police and volunteers remove dead and injured from 
. , Represented bythax lardffi maos-. a crossing sooth nf Haifa, where a ttafastruck a bos carrying driklren to the beach. The 

• *ii l-j J t pH 4e*Rd ( nN^rty cKWreiij inf faifing the hns driver, and 17 injured. The acchient~ 

: ocCTKicd an .Dummied crossng where IIictc iras oply > s^n CHUfioiuiig iMycra. 

Margaret Thatcher of Britain aiuld 1 •. . ■ 

. not leave London during a viat by n tw* • i i i 

Report Sees a Europe Divided by EC 

Chazterilor H rinna K ohl of West Jl A » 

• Germany also drx^ped ooL The Aetodaud Press -Wednesday, says that separating wdcomes the entry of Spain and 

. As it jrreparcs to expand, the STRASBOURG, France — The die EC countries from flie rest of Portugal into the fiC, but says this 
commuiuty is en^a^q maoj atcon enlargement of the European Com- Western Europe could have “very may lead to the isolation of non- 
wfaether it should fa^ a more overt nraruty to 12 members with the serious” consequences. It suggests members, induding Sweden, Nor- 


IsraeL States, Eo 

Slate-run new^xipers in Egypt In Ann 
refrained from comment, but other a spokesn 
Arab newspapers criticized the Peres pn 
plan because it ignores Arab calls new” an 
for an international conference and points” j 
excludes the Palestine Liberation rales tmia 
Organization from a role in negoti- The sta 
ations. paper A1 ! 


Stales, Eorqjc or the Middle EasL” 

In Amman, Jordan, NabQ Amer, 
a spokesman for the PLO. said the 
Peres proposal offered “nothing 
new” and was “a g ainst all the 
prints” proposed jointly by the 
Palestinians and Jordan. 

The state-inflnenced daily news- 
paper A1 Iltihad, published in Abu 


Mr. Poes outlined his five-print I%aln, said the Peres formula was 
proposal in a speech lo the Knesset, aimed at avoiding “unanimity on 


the Israeli padiamenL 


the idea of an international confer- 


- He rg'ected the Jordanian idea of eace” and showed that the Jewish 
a conference among the five perma- state was “dearly prevaricating” 
nenl members of the United Na- on peace moves, 
lions Security Council — the Unit- A1 Raya, published in Qatar, 

ed States, the Soviet Union, said the p lan showed tha t Israel 
Britain, France and China — and “rejects all Arab proposals for a 


the PLO. 

Mr. Peres countered, however, 
with a proposal to “enlist the sup- 
port” of the five powers for direct 


just solution to the Palestinian 

r stioaT by ruling out a role for 
PLO. 

{Israeli political commentators 


talks between Israel and a Jordaai- said the Peres plan appeared to be 
an-Palestmian delegation. It was an effort to put forward a peace 


[The purpose, they said, is to try 
eoruar y to shift to the Arabs the onus of 
disputing arrangements for the 
2® peace talks.] 


The Aoodmed Press Wednesday, says that separating wdcomes the en 

STRASBOURG, France — The die EC countries from the rest of Portugal into the 


‘ f Hkdy to dominate a community 
summit meeting at tire end of June 
” to which the Spanish and Portu- 
guese prime ministers have been 
•“ invited. - - 

• Diplomats sad NATO leaders 
were confident that membership in 
the community would convince re- 
luctant Spaniards to remain within: 
the Western , alliance when they 
vote in a referendum cm continued 
. NATO membership in February. 

-■ The two new members will tilt 
' the EC balance toward the south- 
ern stales, altering much riits char- 
•' acter, style and conceals, many 
diplomats and officials be&eve. 

“From now on you’re going to 


signing Wednesday of the treaty ways to bridge the gap. 


way, Switzerland, Austria and Tur- 


admitting Spain and Portugal TTie document was written by a key. 

could widen the gap with nonmem- committee of nine headed by End- The sources said the report rec- 
ber countries and exdude some of KoColombo, a former prime minis- that the community it- 

tbem from mainstream political life ter of Italy. The nonpartisan com- self become a member of the 21- 
in Western Europe, a report sub- nritlee includes members from country Council of Europe,- that 
mitted to the Coimtal cf Europe France, Bri tain, Norway, the Netb- the EC adhere to council conven- 
says^ extends, Spain and Austria. tions and, in tom, that all council 

The report, to be released Counctf sources said the report membera consider incorporating 


Council of Europe,- that 
adhere to council conven- 


tions a n d in mm, thal all council committing themselves to support 

v • j ■ __ iL. .1 »L. l» 


the first tune Israel had offered its proposal that the national unify 
own set of proposals since Prea- government could agree on, 
dent Hosni Mubarak of Egypt set j-jhg purpose, they said, is to try 
^removmmm^mFebniary shift to t^Arabs the onus of 
by railing for direct talks. disputing arrangements for the 

Mr. Peres’s five points were: talks.] 

• Continuing tire talks between 

the United States -and Israel, Jor- 
dan. Egypt and Palestinians who 

are not PLO members. 

• Creating IsraeE and Jordan!- 

an-Palestinian teams to set an V><ULIU11 dl 

agenda for a peat* conference, . 

first and f< 

• Enlisting the support of per- -g 

manent Security Council members 1 fDl 1 C 

for direct talks, “without their pre- vrlwl. a ■ 1-I 4J 


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aKjwmobor T9 Wdono Street. Pa kn nent Squat 
TeL 723 DCs. "A onto h£ of weiet. a btdwn hj 
of deas." Mon -fa and Sunday lundi. 


LONDON SMO 


BEWICKS RESTAURANT 

S7'W XAUkaiSdeeL London Td^SM 671 1.Opanlo 
*a 7 nighn and Midi Mai to Fa Cosy French 
rcstounn rtc by Go4 el Mlcai. Egan Korop, aid 
Fhfeefn guda. toon mem «dbbb. 


KERVANSARAY 

MONSIEUR THOMPSONS t-v-h t M aate, 

Unntodl Te L- 727 9957. _ leftor. MMmWr. 9. TdU S28SO Ae entoned 

GaMnane nrnpn Abnuphtre taam. A BDdl Opera. NaonUpm & dpnu-1 am, tmt 
moftf abechncf * 29 Kereevai Koad Suiday. 


1 sources said the report membera consider incorpora 
I EC directives into their laws. 


Sihanouk Makes Plea to U.S. 


West European countries except 
Finland are council members. 


the stand of one of the rides.” 

• Appointing “authentic Pales- 
tinian representatives” from the oc- 
cupied west Bank of Jordan and 


(Continued from Page 1) 


action's ret 
Nations as 


hear more about tomatoes than - mentof Cambodia could eventuaf- 


about herrings,” a diplomat said. 

Claude Cheysson, a former 
French minister for external rela- 
tions, said reemdy that he expected 


ly be withdrawn. 
He said dm anl- 


milit ary 

tions, said recently that he exposed jf fmces to conduded that they were a greater 

1 the Spaniards eroedaBy to - bring ■ pmtirii Hanmwmh an assault danger flan Pd Pot, the Khmer 
with them a more fively and aggres- aero® the two copntnes common Roage leader. He said there was no 
sive style. . . - . ’ frontie^^t sought to do m a brief prospect of p 0 l Pot’s ever becran- 

Diplomats said it was unclear warm 1979... .’: mg the dommant figure in Cambo- 

wfaere Spain and Pomteal would , said it was dear ^ a gain 

stand within the EC’s flnetnaring his ccm^ts wi± C ni rtes e *7 love my people and I love ay 

alliances. ka^era faat B<mng had de^ed country,” the pnnee said. “Bat I 

Their economic rivalry with Its- uiat tbe second lessOT far Viet- be realistic, I cannot be 

— ly, France and Greece over Medi- nam^ of wnKh^emor Quaese ont- blind to fads. As a Buddhist, I 
rterranean products was expected to “*ls spoke^ earner this year, nan mnsi get rid of haired and ven- 
prevent the emergence or a cote- beoi set aride as too costly at a time geance.” 
sive southern front, they added. w ^ ien Cteia s. engaged in a pro- He added: “By staying with the 


removal 


Lge 1 ) had died, among them five of his 
. children and 14 of Ks grandchfl- 
he United • 

legitimate govern- The prince said be originally re- 
1 eventual- gained the Vietnamese inv asion as 
the lesser of two evils. But later, he 
3 3ect “ a said, when it became dear that the 
le tnames e Vietnamese in tended to remain, he 



the Spaniards eroeamly to bring 
with them a more fively and aggres- 
.- sive stjde. 

f- Diplomats said it was unclear 
-- where Spain and POittteal would 
stand within the EC’s fluctuating 
- : alliances. 

> Their economic rivalry with Ita- 


Rooge leader. He said there was no 
prospect erf Pol Pot's ever becom- 
ing the dominant figure in Cambo- 
dia again. 

T love my penile and I love nry 
country,” the ponce said “But I 
have to be realistic, I cannot be 


prevent tne emergence oc a col 
sive southern front, they added. 


ft 4 - I 


pirt'K 


But being 
hkdy to be i 


poorer states gram of economic modemization- 
sneficteries of ^“Cturia will not invade Viet- 


geance. 

He added: “By staying with the 
Khmer Rouge, I try U) persuade 
them not to create more offerings 


the community's farm largesse, SSiaiioak said “They have fa ^ people. If I deride to 

they would probably want to see their own nuerests. If Chin a cannot thran ch - denounce them, I can have 
more cash contributed by northern, stfordt ogp to w ar with Vietnam, I jnfingneft, no opportunity to 

states, brin g in g them into ennflief cannot -compel -them to* on the persuade them to d eal reasonably 
with WestGennany and Britain. grounds that .we are in difficulties ^th the Cambodian people.” 

The treaties of accesskmmnst be^ ” the baEtkfidd” _ 


mtified by »he national pariuunema 
of all 12 countries. - 


Ai^rt from geting to war, be said 
. Qiina had gjven the gnwriTlas ev- 
dytiting they could ask for. 

- He was at his mcstpHlosophiral 
in dirimanip the Khmer Rouge, 


East German Flees to Wert . 

Reuters;- 

HANOVER, West Germany — ■ 




FYench Test Nadear Device - m dfccoaaag the KhmmRouge, HANOVER, West Germany — 
United Press international whose po&aes o£ mass execution An East German laborer dimbed 

W ELLIN GTON, New 7 ^nA and fomed imettlement of urban over border fortifications near 

Prance Tuesday its ’ dwdkss m-thc countryride led to Hanover late Monday night _ and 

fourth nuclear device of the year in Ac deatisirf alarge proportion of tacbeA West Gem^^occed, 
r the Pacific the New Zea- the Canbofian pqjnitetiou from border ponce said Tuesday. The 

4 land Sdsmological Stathm reports J975 ; untfl 1979. fife said be be- man was working wilh othn set- 
^ -lieved about two: miBinn people ung up fences ataig the frontier. 


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-V V 




Page 6 


international herald tribune, Wednesday, june iz, 1985 


INSIGHTS 


-T-: , 1 - 1 - 


U.S. College Tuition: It’s an Auto Dealer’s Mix of Discounts, Lures 


By Edward B. Fiske 


Stw York Tuna Service 


N EW YORK — When Laura Hurwitt. 
opened her letter of acceptance from the 
College of Wooster in Ohio last month. 




JL 1 College of Wooster in Ohio last month, 
she found that she had been offered an unsolic- 


ited scholarship of $I,00Q a year. To her father, 
who heads the breakfast foods division of Gen- 
eral Foods, it struck a familiar chord. 

“It reminded me of how we give out coupons 


Hannah H. Gray, president 
of tbe University of 
Chicago: ""We were 
underpriced by $1,000 to 
$2,000. We're still lower 
than our competition.” 


good for 25 cents on the next purchase of Post 
Raisin Bran." said David F. Hurwitt, who lives 


Raisin Bran," said David F. Hurwitt, who lives 
in Darien. Connecticut. “'Laura was offered a 
10 -percent discount on a college education.” 

The Hunvitts' experience reflects the recent 
blurring of differences between tbe pricing poli- 
cies of higher education and those of other 
highly competitive industries such as automo- 
biles and airlines. 

Most colleges and universities have an- 
nounced tuition increases Tor next autumn that 
range from 7 to 10 percent- The tuition hikes are 
lower than those of recent years but are sull 
twice the rate of growth in the Consumer Price 
Index, which measures the average change in 
prices of U.S. goods and services. 

To justify the increases, institutions cite fac- 
tors ranging from the labor-intensive nature of 
teaching to cutbacks in federal aid for students. 

But interviews with economists, college finan- 
cial officers and others across the nation suggest 
that the real reasons are far more complicated 
and involve assumptions and practices that go 
largely unn otic ed . Among them are the follow- 
ing: 

• Many colleges have few incentives to keep 
cosu low and set official tuition rates as high as 
the market will bear. 

■ Discounts of various kinds are routinely 
offered to certain categories of students. 

• Officials of competing colleges frequently 
share financial information in ways that some 
concede would be illegal in the commercial 
sector. 

• Tuitions are structured so that undergradu- 
ates subsidize doctoral candidates, wealthy stu- 
dents help poor ones, and students in certain 
majors, such as philosophy, subsidize those in 
others such as engineering. 

As competition for able students increases, 
colleges are foregoing efforts to keep tuition 
down and are trying to spend as much as possi- 
ble on academic quality, redistributing their 
resources to offer discounts to selected students. 



ik 


EamonM. Kelly, president of 
Tulane University: "Tuitions 
go up because we have 
become a discounting 
industry .” 



■ n the la»! three years 

violation of anu-tni* laws " SSSm*"* nw i 

that -tuition onlyjays a small fraction of ln recent ^Jum iotai . 

cost-of education. only more widespread 11 l,«RUC anloliw . 


To maintain Of improve qu 
leges have developed a variety- 
dies that affect the amount of 


lar student will 
Many researt 






fellowai 
that are 


udents pay turnon. ” Tly?, ^ princmJ. •> pww «ww - 

or holdjobs as teaching assistanK mil a senior at The r fUc ^ ff>i and 

tded partly by undergraduates tu- » Sl positive!) to it. "E*erY ; 

I eriidffltt in 2TtS father Said RC rKMtfU I*™" ■ -.i 





father said 

and sciences get a free ride,” said Mr-KjjH' of industry \ t have etttpons. 

Tulane. “The overhead costs are paid by under fares. CoUcgMlI H • 

* r ’ "*■ 


m 




Arnold R. Weber, tbe president of 
Northwestern University: "If you 
define the pool of students who met 
our academic standards and had the 
money to pay , you're only talking 
about 18,000 people in the entire 
country 


^Katharine H. Hanson, executive director of scholarships." »,• Km>ls rcccMly fac ta n - 

the Consortium on Financing Higher &Juca- Even some J ‘ ** Jifferenaif pack- 4 
don, aid that among 30 selective 10 Uravcwff*- ■■ 

unions, the cost of a year at undergraduate aging of niwnaai aw. . vdynmneA - 

tasr — ■ ^ Mlh 


students in socn low-cosi acaocnnc i uc w t- . • 

arts and humanities arc used to pay for instnic- includes an option aik* inj, FJ™* ; 

tion in science, which is much more expensive all four years rate.' A fiualv • 

“There's a correlation between high nunon and ***«! funds at . 

high commitment to srience," aid Mr. Starr of Ou, accepts the offer ^ * *** 

Oberlin, a liberal arts college that has tradiuon- deductions; on the interest pavmcma. . 
ally been strong in the natural sciences. , iwm. in ■ 

Finally, colleges arc increasingly using m- -m If AN\ college*. 
come from wealthy students to subsidize the [%/| highly competitive - 

educktionof poor and middle-class students. ±YJL todeselop as many *^£*£2* . 


a high minon and ftmds at die fiedwuipw ^ wbj 

stud Mr. Starr of accepts the offer can ® 


education of poor and middle-class students. wunt«r «*-• - ; - 

Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania has an- ^ possible. “Were very t^i worn- 

nounced an 11-penSt tuition increase for this pete with the University of ConnrtW rad Aw . 


to develop as many 




nounceo an li-poccm. mmou uiuw* ^ pew wuu«is . .. , kll „ iv - 

fall in onto to restructure its fin a nc ia l aid ^ tuition ts a.x »nws mui tnvirs i\ » were 
packages. “We decided we have fewer studenc doin g everything we can to reduce ; im« WtM 
tom low-income families than we should, said tuition.” said Lelami Myles, the 
David Fraser, the president, “so we are lowering University or Bridgeport in the same swe. , 

tbe amount of loans we offer and increasing the ; never would, have; 

aiwxmt of omight grants.” dreamed of 10 years ago: charging ' 

Kl tuitions m diff™.. P»>.'T “ ' 


approach is unfair to students who pay the full 5 ^.. dental bvgicnc than engineering and k» ; 

.mnmt rnUMtsnffinilUTMhrthal mitionme* >lUU ” . ... . II. coirl 


T HE new discounts range tom merit 
scholarships for middle-class students to 
fortigD-saideot tuition indexed to the 
strength of the dollar in home countries. Like 
automobile dealers, colleges are attracting cus- 


Jonathan F. 
Fanton of the 
New School for 
Social Research: 
"There is no 
reason why 
colleges without a 
big commitment 
to science can’t 
offer lower 
tuitions. ” 


F. Frederick Starr, 
the president of 
Oberlin College: 
"People say, ’Boy, 
that’s a high-priced 
place, but people are 
tripping over 
themselves to get 
into it. They must be 
terrific. ’ ” 


amount Cc 
nues cover 


!y a portion of 


. turnon reve- 
erating costs 


anyway: even studraB who pay the full tuition p^bly w« ; 

are receding a subsidy tom endowment, pfts - ■ n students* tuition rato to reflect the , 


to study liberal arts.” Mr. Mvlo said- , 

Bridgeport also is freezing turnon forjtf»ws * 



9- 


m+X 



they offer. And it would be impossible, they say, 
to recruit top students without pouring substan- 
tial amounts into financial aid. “If you define 


to recruit top students without p< 
rial amounts into financial -aid. 
the pool of students who met 
standards and bad the money 


tomers frith sophisticated financing arrang 
menu, many of them designed to hop wealt 


menu, many of them designed to help wealthy ' i v 

families use the tax code to ease education J '^j 0 | 

“We are all trying to outsmart each other in ’ s Y 

what is probably the most competitive industry 
in the country, said Eam on M. Kelly, thie 
president of T ulan e University in New Orleans. 

“Tuitions don't go up at the rate they do be- for examp le, where tuition has risen by 16 per- 



are receiving a surauy man foreign students tuition rutev to IQ KM ux 

andother income. . strSiof thedolUr in their home wnintnek he* 

They also argue that socioeconomic diversity 1 1 ... * 

is intrinsic to toe quality of the experience that “ . an. • 

they offer. And it would be imposable, they say. Some coUeges have 

to recruit top students without pouring substan- proachairfhavet^tor^ SSuffS 1 

rial amounts into financial ^jdT^lf you define Bard College : deaded several years ago that M > 
the pool of students who met our academic relatively high tuition was reducing us appeal to ; 
standards and bad the money to pay. you’re middle-class students. By raiMng tunas, toe o ot-^- . 
only rating about 18J300 people in toe entire lege reduced the proportion of the opettW^ 
country.” said Arnold R. Weber, the president budget sustained by tuition from «G pciccmiQ^ 
of Northwestern University in Illinois. 82 percent. “Wc are still , more a P c ^^ *•*■ * 

Erra i pwikts specializing in hi gher education . Vassal," said Leon Botstem. the prcsiufltt, "put - 

say the tuition rise cpo be deceiving. A we are less more expensive jhan we u?eu to be , 
major trend that mirigatex the tuition increases The New School for Social Research in New > 
is the widespread prance of “discounting.” Yorkcunently has a poHcvof reducing the i»fc] 


country, said Arnoid K. weoer. me presweni 
of Northwestern Univrraty in Illinois^ 
Fmnnmkn specializing in hi gher education 
say that the tudion rise can be deceiving. A 
major trend that mitigates the tuition increases 
is the widespread practice <rf “discounting.” 


7>w Ntw Yurt Tta 


sty ot mmsyivama, s 
whirgtinn increasingly 


cause we're labor-intensive. Tuitions go up be- cent over the last two years, applications have 


cause we have become a discounting industry. 
The process of setting tuition is complex. 


been up by one quarter. 

Given the choice between lowering tuition 


image of high academic quality in the absence of institutions with which they compete, and a 
high tuition. “This isn’t something they will tell primary goal in setting tuition is to stay in line 


industry. “You have to look at college tuitions president. , , , 

the way you look at a car,” be said. “You haves Public attitudes remain an a&prcuH;taraefic> t 

sticker price, a discount price and a cash price, (or. Ms. Hanson of the consortium said (here •' 
and most people get some kind of a deal* was a “percetod diminution in ^ihe value of > 


Although they face the same general costs, and increasing quality, top aryH^mir instito- 


you on the record, but there is a kind erf macho with that competition. 

attitude,” said F. Frederick Starr, the president Bernard R. Carman, spokesman lor La/ayette 


Mr. Zemsky traces the concept of discounting 
to the federal student assistance programs in the 


private colleges and universities as a group can- 
not match the price of public institutions. In- 


tions are tempted to choose the latter. Most 
colleges that have large endowments, and tbere- 


slead, they base their appeal primarily on quali- fore amid lower tuition if they chose fo, tend ro terrific. 


mid-1970s. Poor students canid have almost ties for major purchases. 


: education” in same Quartets and out- * 
that families today bavc different prion- 


ping over themselves to get 


ty, a principle that also applies to competition in charge the highest tuition, 
private industry. “Tbe basic operating theory is to raise all the 

“Overwhelmingly, students and families money you can and then spend it aU,” said 
choose an institution on the basis of academic Howard Bowen, a leadii 


College in Massachusetts 10 nearby Susoueban- 
- na College, and used the data as a benchmark. 


their entire education subsidized, but even “ 
wealthy ones paid a lower “cash price” because she 


People 

said. 


are more worried about retirement.' 


quality and not price,” said Neil L Rudenstine, 
the provost of Princeton University in New 


Howard Bowen, a leading expert on higher 
education finance a the Claremont Graduate 
School in California. 


For many years Bennington College in Ver- na College, and used the data as a be nchm a r k, 
moot, which had no endowment, made a point Mr. Starr said there was a “tremendous un- 
of bring the nation's most expensive college. In dern round communications network between 

I-.a 10m-. tU. T «*r Pk,Mi«n aam. aoIImo oHtwivitetmrAK** in nh'ttA «K#» 


they had access to loans that vat interest-free kid needs to go locoUege, but idoa'l want to rc 3 


, Alto A|(V«&to WiqilWU uwupi IVIUSHIVMI, . 

A tot of people serin to be «ytng: 
to so locoUeae, but I don't warn to be j 


Jersey. 

Recent statistics show that applications to 
many of the most expensive and selective 
schools have been increasing at an even faster 
rate than tuition. At Bowdoin College in Maine, 


Timoth 
Stanford 1 


iy Warner, an associate provost at tuition at a faster pace 
University in California, said planners by SI ,000 to S 2,000.” sa 


for as long as four years ami were repaid in , eating < 
inflated, and therefore cheaper, doilaxs. wflfingoess to 

“Go bad: to the automobile analogy,” said Sorm 
Mr. Zemsky. “It didn't matter what the sticker current 


a ftomriowulhere’s less 
then tri m tom e." : 


Some people fear that Ore tnqor effect of 
irent trends wifl be to price the poor out of. 


said. It was the monthly payments that mat- quality higher education. H I( tasicaRy means 


VAlUVUUt.'U VIIWUI^ UUVi — 

tuition at a faster pace. “We were underpriced Sheldon E. Sirinhach. general counsel of the 


red.” tost you get a lot mote btfa from Scaodak,* - 

According to the American Council on Edu- said Liz Kashner. a freshman al Brown Um*er- ’ 


said Hannah H. Gray, the American Council on Education, the major na- 


there build an annual 2-percent "quality in- president. “We’re still lower than our comped- cionai coordinating body for higher education, 

n ! _ i. i ‘ f. . , . _ l i t : - -tf t i ' »«- j 1 


crease” into the budgri- 
Some officials say it is difficult to project an 


tion, but we had some room for increases.” said. “If Ford, General Motors and Chrysler sat 


cation, two-thirds of undergraduates in 
colleges and universities and one-third < 


rivate s>ty in Rhode Island who is from the wealthy 
those dry of Sct n di te i New York- “There's nine in 


Most private colleges have a group of peer down and did what colleges do, they would be in 


in public institutions receive some sort of asris- the freshman class right now. How manYuiorc . 
tance. The levding-off of federal student asas- doweneed?" 


Arab Intellectuals Bedeviled by Fundamentalism, Sense of Impotence 


By Judith Miller 


v-s, New York Times Soviet 

v_^AIRO — Each Arab country has its sym- 
bol of intellectual malaise. 

• On a sunny, warm morning in January, 
Mahmoud Mohammed Taha was publicly 
hanged in the main square of Kober Prison, 
near Khartoum. His crime was “heresy." Mr. 
Taha. 76 years old, had distributed a pam- 
phlet that opposed the way in which Islamic 


Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran, have 
used ofl revenues to spread their conserva- 
tive religious and political ideas and to si- 
lence Arab critics of their regimes. 

“In the Arab world today; intellectuals are 
either beaten down by the stick or seduced 


silence, an eerie silence everywhere, even in 
the din of Cairo. How can we explain it?” 

Cairo was a vibrant cultural center under 
the British (1914-22) and under Kings Fuad 
and Farouk following independence in 1922. 


a vulgarization of culture. “The nightclub 
replaced the concert hall.” he said. “Frank 


Sinatra replaced La Scala.” According to 
Mr. A wad and other leftists, Egypt's “Hilton 


by tbe carrot.” says Fouad Ajanri, a Leba- 
nese-born political scientist and professor at 
Johns Hopkins University, who, tike many 
Arab intellectuals, has chosen to live in the 
United States, where be can express himself 
more easily. “But many more have been 
bought off by the men of finance than de- 
stroyed by men of the sword.’’ 

Among the region's intellectuals there is 


law was being implemented in Sudan. The 
amputations, lashings and other harsh pun- 


amputations. lashings and outer harsh pun- 
ishments of criminals had distorted the spirit 
or Islam, he argued, and had damaged Su- 
dan's international s tanding s 


A national secular university (now Cai- 
ro University), the Arab world’s first, 
was founded in 1925 with seven main 
faculties and colleges. By the late ’30s, there 
were nearly 200 Arabic newspapers and jour- 


economy,” as the exit of the Russians and 
entry of Western business interests became 
known, had no place for culture or intellec- 
tuals, roost of whom then were, and still are, 
left-of -center. 

Sadat's 1977 trip to Jerusalem, which 
made him a hero in the West, sent shock 
waves through Egypt’s, and the- Arab 
world's, intelligentsia. 

“Egyptian intellectuals had an Arab mar- 
ket.” said a newspaper editor, who requests 
anonymity. “So the Arab states' intellectual. 


nals in Egypt, plus 65 in foreign languages. 
Writers called for greater political freedom, 
fewer restraints on women, a more equitable 
division of the country’s resources. Newspa- 
pers carried lively accounts of struggles 
among the British, the palace and the Wafd, 
toe major political party and champion of 
the prevailing liberal ideas and values. 

Issues of the day were debated in tea 
parlors and caffe. Egyptian plays dominated 
toe Arab stage. Egyptian films were toe rage. 
Cairo was toe Arab world's publishin g cen- 
ter, turning out and importing thousands of 
books a year in Arabic, French and En glis h 

Yet, intellectual life was reserved for a tiny 
elite. The vast majority, the fellaheen, or peas- 
ants, lived in ignorance and squalor. Egypt’s 
1952 revolution ignited hopes of a better life 
for all Egyptians, a vision that particularly 
inspired toe intelligentsia. To this day, many 
Egyptian intellectuals speak almost nostalgi- 
cally, reverentially, of Gamal Abdel Nasser. 
Egypt's authoritarian ruler, father of politi- 
cal pan-Arabism and a leader of the 1952 
nationalist revolution that overthrew King 
Farouk. His promotion of secularism also 
enhanced his popularity among intellectuals. 

But critics and victims of tbe Nasser era 


Last month, an Egyptian court fined three 
booksellers for violating the country’s por- 


nography laws byseUing a new, unexpurgat- 
ed edition of “A Thousand and One Niehts.” 


ed edition of “A Thousand and One Nights.” 
Egyptian officials also seized 3,000 copies of 
the Arabic classic. “We want to expurgate 
from this book toe dirty words, sentences 
and tales which have bad effects on toe 


and tales which have bad effects on toe 
youth and push them toward deviation and 
corruption^ said Brigadier Adly d-Ko- 
sheiry, head of toe Interior Ministry depart- 
ment that prosecuted toe case. 

Whether dramatic or little-known, such 
incidents point to tbe fact that toe Arab 
intellectual — toe heir to a 1,300-year-old 
culture that was once open to other civiliza- 
tions and which accorded its poets, philoso- 
phers and scientists high public esteem — is 
increasingly being isolated and threatened. 

The reasons differ from country to coun- 
try. but Arab intellectuals face some com- 
mon foes. 

Foremost are the high priests of Islamic 
fundamentalism who give tbe most literal 
interpretation to Islam’s holy scriptures. 
These ultraconservative sheikhs are the new 
inquisitors, the self-appointed navigators of 
“aJ-Sirai al-Mustaqiin,” or “toe Straight 
Path.” a phrase from the opening chapter of 
the Koran that is repeated five times a day by 
devout Modems. To challenge or even ques- 
tion ‘‘the Straight Path” is to risk being 
branded a heretic. Few choose to do so. The 
ascendancy of fundamentalism implies the 
rejection not only of Western culture and 
values, but also of modernizing trends and 
traditions within Islam. 

The Arab intellectual has other enemies. 
In “socialist” Arab states, such as Syria, 
Iraq, Libya and South Yemen, leaders who 
espouse revolutionary creeds have imposed a 
“Straight Path” of their own secular, au- 
thoritarian invention. The price of deviance 
in these regimes is exile, imprisonment, tor- 
ture or death. 

Another potent enemy is the glittering 
‘‘petrodollar culture” of Saudi Arabia and 
sheikhdoms of the Gulf. Throughout the 
Gulf. Arab rulers of deeply conservative 
bent, although not of the extremist stamp of 


'What does it mean to be an 
intellectual in a country like 
Egypt, where 70 percent of 
our people are illiterate and 
wretchedly poorr 


Boutros Ghaii 


gnawing self-doubt. “What does it mean to 
be an intellectual in a country like Egypt, 
where 70 percent of our people are illiterate 
and wretchedly poor?” said Boutros Ghaii, 
Egypt's minister of state for foreign affairs, a 
former professor and one of his country’s 
most reflective officials. 

Egypt is one of toe few Arab countries in 
which such questions arc still routinely 
posed and debated. In fact, there is no better 
way to understand the current crisis in Arab 
thought than by tracing the intellectual de- 
cline of Egypt, long the cultural capital of toe 
Arab world. 

Egyptian intellectuals have a long and 
distinguished tradition. They are a brave lot 
.Almost all have spent time in jail during the 
past 20 years; some have been forced into 
exile. Under President Hosm Mubarak, a 
democratic trend prevails. But the greater 
freedom has served to underscore toe Egyp- 
tian intellectual's sense of loss. 

“The Cairo of old was a constantly stimu- 
lating place," says Youssef Idris, one erf 
Egypt's most widely admired playwrights 
and novelists. “It was toe Arab world's cul- 
tural tnecca. Last week, a friend of mine, a 
poet, came to Cairo and wanted a night out 
on the town. He proposed taking in a good 
new play, a new Egyptian film or a fine 
concert. But here in this city of 14 million, 
there was nothing much of value to see. You 
know where we wound up? In a nightclub.” 

“The Arab world ms once a culture of the 
word,” said Professor Ajami. “Now there is 


Islamic extremists have come from this 
group, says Mr. Baha d- Din- 

Urban universities are flooded with stu- 
dents. Still understaffed *»nH ^^erftnannwl 
the universities turn out graduates barely 
literate in any language. Books are too ex- 
pensive for many students to buy. 

Official censorship still exists on state-nm 
television and cinema, and is widely de- 
fended by many intellectuals. There is no 
longer official censorship of the press. Mo- 
hammed Sid Ahmed, an en g j gmf> aristocrat 
who writes political commentaries for AI 
Ahali, a leftist newspaper, said that the press 
was “freer than at any time since Farouk.” 


started with Iran?” said a newspaper editor. . J 
“Or that the Palestinians were also to blame 
for the mess. they are now in?” 

There is an equally disturbing silence 
about the slowly growing strength of Islamic 
fnnriampntaWym m Egypt. 

Many see the Arabs* future as one.Ora?- 
struggle between religious and secular forCe&J" 

J *L‘ . 


economic and political boycott of Egypt af- 
ter Sadat’s peace .with Israel in 1979 was i 


ter Sadat s peace .with Israel in 1979 was a 
particular blow to them. They were cut off 
from the pot of gold: the Gulf. There was too 
small a market and too little money in Egypt 
to sustain them.” 

Mr. Sadat reacted badly to their growing 
crindsm. He initiated his ownpurges. Oppo- 
sition pa p ers, whose revival 1 he had sanc- 
tioned. were toe first casualties. Then came 
tbe massive arrests of more than 1.000 critics 
of all stripes, including Islamic fundamental- 
ists, in September 1981 — less than a month 


before his assassination by the Islamic mili- 
tants, whom he had earlier mobilized and 
unleashed against leftists and other foes. 

Few of Egypt's intellectuals mourned the 
death of “pharaoh Sadat,” as they called' 
him. “The intellectuals hated Sadat not be- 
cause he was against them,” said Professor 
Wahba, “but because he was indifferent to 
tiiwn Nasser had given them a role: they 
were the purveyors of pan-Arabism, of Arab 
socialism, servants of the stare. They never 


The Arab world was once a 
culture of the word. Now 
there is silence, an eerie 
silence everywhere. How can 
we explain itT 

——Fouad Ajami 


that favor sending Egypt on “tbe Straight 
Path into the past. 

At present, the few who dare cballengp toc 
fundamentalists do so at their periL L 
“No one in I sl a mi c societies wishes to be . 
reused of being ‘anti-Islam.' " said P. J. 
Vaukiotis, the London-based historian. 

ine Koran contains the Words of Godand - 
are. hence, perfort. It cannot be questioned; 
it outlines a perfect pattern for toe uni verse 
Anyone who does not follow it is a heretic, 
arantoat s a powerful charge against. Mo&- : 


assert that tbe burst of cultural creativity was 
primarily a response to the growing political 
repression. Culture took on twin functions: 


But, said Martin Ochs, a professor of jour- 
nalism at the American University in Cairo, 
the “external censors have been replaced by 
informal guidelines and auto-censorship.” 


Ty7" EALTH from oil has also rcin- 
Wf forced the Egyptian and Arab inrel- 
T ▼ Actual’s inherent antipathy toward 


first, to spread Nasser’s orthodoxy through 
state-sponsored institutions, and second, as 
a safety valve. 

“Our cultural renaissance coincided with 
the rape of the mind,” said Magdi Wahba, a 
deputy minister of culture during the Nasser 
era. now a professor at Cairo University who 
is compiling a definitive English- Arabic dic- 
tionary. 


forgave Sadat for making them uselfes.” 
President Mubarak has promoted a demo- 


Nasser ruthlessly stamped out opposition. 
He regimented toe previously haphazard 
system of censorship, arrested and tortured 
hundreds of leftist critics and Moslem fun- 
damentalists. and exiled liberal critics who 
challenged his military regime. 

The 1967 Arab-Israeli war marked toe end 
of the Nasser era. The succession of Presi- 
dent Anwar Sadat after Nasser's death in 
1970 resulted in a tremendous relaxation of 
political tension and a far freer intellectual 
dimate. But 'few intellectuals credit Mr. Sa- 
daL 

Louis A wad, one of Egypt's finest writers 
and critics, says that the Sadat era produced 


era tic trend in Egypt, similar to the one 
Sadat initiated but abandoned. Since coming 
to power in 1981, Mr, Mubarak has permit- 
ted toe re-establishment of opposition politi- 
cal parties, and emphasized ms commitment 
to freer expression. 

.Ahmed Baha eUDin, one of Egypt's lead- 
ing newspaper columnists, says that Egyp- 
tian intellectuals are now reaping a legacy of 

the Nasser years that has harmed cultural 
life: pressure from the bottom of society, 
from toe “masses.” 

Nasser opened the schools and universi- 
ties to all Egyptians, but be did not suffi- 
ciently increase funds for toe schools, teach- 
ers or bodes. The revolution betrayed the 
people by producing millions of semuiter- 
ates, said Mr. Baha d-Din: “These newcom- 
ers, with superficial education, came to Cai- 
ro, alluredbut frightened by what they saw 
here They could not enjoy, or afford, what 
Cairo had to offer. They have been incorpo- 
rated into the system, but they have lowered 
its standards.” Many of the most virulent 


J — : — — j r* » vuuu ua- 

vid peace accords with Israel and the peace 
treaty signed in 1979. 

There are Egyptians who feel that any 
contact with Israelis, indeed, any political 
activism, would disqualify an Egyptian from 
a lucrative post in toe Gulf or from writing 
for Saudi papers. However, even without 


»wuju. ua*c mu amy accep ting 
peace with the Zionist nation. Arab intellect 

male esneaflllv thnu> in ■ . 


“Israel's and Zionism’s victories are so 
deeply resented because, subconscious! v 
tircy are viewed as more victories for the 
West, said an Egyptian professor. This, he 
^has served to further undermine Arab 
confidence m their own civilization, ereatlv 
eroded by centuries of decline and coloniza- 
tion by the West. 

“Whra was the last tune you read an Arab 

eduonal recommending that Iraqi President 
Saddam Hussein resign to end the war he 


fundamentalist call for. the adoptim^' 
I ^ an $ tow * “ EgypCrontendingl 
011 a rmstnterpretatiOTM 
Warn and toe concept of Sharia. Several - 
Jtedtos responded by declaring his hlood - 
? 7 “ him would not be ; 

fuS»'^g n f hmawi - a schote. ^ 

* vided wr how Islamic 

^ handled. Many Egyp. • 

pnvately that fundamentalists : 

mder religious ShSSi 

^m^mentalism proliferates and intend , 
»«when the central government iTper- . 
coved as weak, said 4 senior Egyptian i 

however, believes 

«fc£ : : 

of Islamic militant 
m«l violent 

York Tutia Magnus The #** 




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£. *VT» 
8« Sl\f 


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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


e§ , 



D 


Trade and Investment Opportunities 


Trading Difficulties with the West 
- But Still a Healthy Balance 


A Milestone in Management 


The aim is dear, and has 
been expressed several 
times: to improve the exter- 
nal equilibrium of Hungary’s 
foreign trade. Purists might 
object that it is impossible to 
have a better than perfect 
balance. As far as convert- 
ible currencies are con- 
cerned Hungary last year 
showed a healthy' trade sur- 
plus of US? 600 million not- 
withstanding a deterioration 
in the terms of trade. Let us 
add to this U.S. $285 minio n 
arising from tourist trade out 
of which however U£.fl60 
was allocated to Hungarian ■ 
citizens travelling abroad to 
the West When adding the 
U.S. $164 million we get a sur- 
plus of UJ5. $764 mflEoxL This 
made it posable to reduce 
the country’s short-term 
debts in 1084 as well as to 
increase the foreign ex- 
change reserves of the Na- 
tional Tfemfr of Hungary. What 
the Hungarians have in mind, 
though, is an easing of the 
restrictions imposed by nu- 
merous Western countries in 
trade deals with Hungary, . 

Some Facts ami Figures 

In 1984 Hungary transact- 
ed 53% of its total foreign 
trade turnover with countries 
belonging to the Council for 
Mutual Economic Assistance 
(COMECON), with the Soviet 
Union alone accounting for 
32% of the total foreign trade 
value. The share of OECD 
countries in Hungarian for- 
eign trade turnover re- 
mained at around 35%. White 
the developing countries 
made up the remaining 12%. 
All in all, it would seem, a 
fairly reasonable distribution 
- but Hungarians thfailc it 
should be more heavily 
weight^ towards the west 


And could be, were it not for a 
few adverse factors. 

Foremost among these are 
what the Hungarians see as 
the protectionism exercised 
by European Economic Com- 
munity countries. These ac- 
count for 45% of Hungarian 
exports to Western countries. 
Further negative trends in in- 
ternarional: trade have been 
stre ngthened by the introduc- 
tion of stricter criteria in the 
export licensing procedure of 
the United States, above all 
.the mdusion of additional 
items on the prohibited list 
drawn up by COCO&L 

Unequal Treatment 

Hbar Antalptter, Director 
General m the Hungarian 
Ministry of Foreign Trade 
said it was important to ap- 
preciate the fact that there 
was no central Hungarian po- 
hcy decision regarding what 
OECD countries should hold 
in Hungarian foreign trade. 
Hungary was more than win- 
ing to buy from them but this 
depended onxaisrng the mon- 
ey by exporting to convert- 
ible currency countries. And 
here Hungary ran up against 
difficulties. 

There was a time - in 1978 
and thereafter -when Hunga- 
ry itself had to take “auster- 
ity" measures because of a 
rather heavy balance of pay- 
ments deficit. This ted to a 
decrease of imports in con- 
' vertable currencies. At the 
same time Jtt became obvious 
that there was a dose rela- 
tionship between the rate of 
growth and imports:, if you 
slow imports you hamper the 
growth of the economy. 

By 1983 Hungary was able 
to begin lifting administra- 
tive import restrictions. 
Membership, of the interna- 


Ini! h>1 m 


The Hungarian 
Chamber 
of Commerce 
is at your service 
if you want: 

• contacts to the Hungarian market 

• information on buying or selling new 
products in Hungary 

• a concise and precise program of 
visits and negotiations tor incoming 
missions 

• contacts for making any kind of pre- 
sentation. like holding iectures : dis- 
playing products and many more 

• as a journalist specialized in economy, 
any kind of economic information, 
contact to interview decision-makers 
in business and economic policy 



Address: 

Budapest V., Kossuth Lajoster§-8 
Letters: Budapest, P.C.B. 106, H-1389 
Phone: 533-333 Telex: 22-4745 


Read the HOC publications 

— Hungaropress Economic Information 

— Hungarian Business Herald 

— The New Hungarian Exporter 

Details: Information Service of the 

Hungarian Chamber of Commerce 
Budapest, P.O.B. 105, H-138S 


tional Monetary Fund made 
It possible to regularize ex- 
ternal borrowing facilities 
which eased the parameters 
for foreign trade, and rela- 
tionships with commercial 
banks returned to normal. 
And as from 1st January 1985 
the remaining import restric- 
tions have been abolished. 
Hungary is willing to do un- 
limited busin ess The obsta- 
cles are ail on the western 
side. 

On this issue Mr. Antal- 
p6ter makes a clear ctivision 
between protectionism and 
discrimination. What Hunga- 
ry objects to, above all, is the 
discriminatory policy pur- 




Hungary would like to see 
tte way . out of this dilemma 
by the conclusion of a bilater- 
al agreement with the Com- 
mon Market in Brussels. 
Some preliminary discus- 
sions have already been con- 
ducted at expert level with 
the EC Commission. Mr. An- 
talpfeter is confident that 
such an agreement would 
represent an important step 
in the normalization of trade 
relations between east and 
west. 

Another desirable, and fea- 
sible, improvement would be 
for the United . States Con- 
gress to drop the need for its 
annual review of Most Fa- 



• Wi » ~ t •• • • j 



■ „ ..... : 




The busy Danube cuts right through the heart of Budapest 


sued by the European Com- 
munity in its dealings with 
eastern Europe, and only 
with eastern European coun- 
tries. This means, in effect 
that only 2-3% of total EC 
imports are affected, 97-98% 
are free. So the protectionist 
effect is almost unmeasur- 
able. The discrimination Is 
felt noticeably by Hungary, 
though. 

Questionable MFN Status 

Under the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade 
(GATT) to which Hungary 
acceded in 1973, it is clearly 
stated that discriminatory 
quantitative restrictions are 
inconsistent with Article 13 
and should be eliminated. AH 
the contracting parties to 
GATT, with the exception of 
the European Community, 
have fulfilled their commit- 
ments in this respect, so that 
Hungary enjoys full GATT 
treatment in all parts of the 
world outside the Common 
Market 


voured Nation status for 
Hungary. This would amount 
to an assurance for the busi- 
ness communities in both 
countries that their respec- 
tive governments were in fa- 
vour of promoting and facili- 
tating trade cm a long-term 
basis. In any case the Ameri- 
cans would stand to benefit 
more from this than the Hun- 
garians, Mr. AntalpCter 
thinks. 

Whatever happens 1985 is 
going to prove a most inter- 
esting year for the Hungarian 
economy. The foremost need 
now is to increase invest- 
ments so that vital structural 
changes in the economy can 
be completed. This can only 
be accomplished though 
within a reasonable period if 
understanding is shown by 
partners abroad. In this re- 
spect it may be of certain 
interest that joint ventures 
established with Hungarian 
enterprises as partners can 
bring many comparative ad- 
vantages. 


1985 may well be seen by 
future generations as a turn- 
ing point in the Hungarian 
economy. After years of aus- 
terity necessitated, in part, 
by circumstances beyond its 
control, Hungary can be said 
to have emerged from the 
dark tunnel of the liquidity 
crisis. F lans which were un- 
der contemplation for sever- 
al years have begun to be 
implemented aimed at con- 
solidating the national econo- 
my. 

- As MiklOs Pulai, Vice-Pres- 
ident of the National Plan- 
ning Office in Budapest, put 
It: “The crisis forced ns to 
think about the possible steps 
for proceeding with our eco- 
nomic reform, even if we 
were only able to contem- 
plate the future in-between 
periods of dealing with acute 
day-to-day problems such as 
taxes and regulations." 

What has emerged is a 
three-pronged initiative 
which, it is hoped, will give a 
dynamic impetus to produc- 
tion and make Hungary a 
shining example of what can 
be achieved by a centrally- 
planned, but not dogmatical- 
ly controlled, economy. 

The essential elements 
are: 

L To increase the autono- 
my of enterprises, utilis- 
ing their full potentials 
but also exposing them to 
risks; 

2. To extend the scope of 
market influences and en- 
courage the application 
of market mechanisms; 
and 

3. To increase the efficien- 
cy of management by 
taking into account the 
previous two factors. 

Hungarian-Style 

Self-Management 

Hungary commenced eco- 
nomic plannin g on a national 
scale nearly four decades 
ago. In line with a resolution 
passed in April 1984 by the 
Central Committee of the 
Hungarian Socialist Workers’ 
Party (the Hungarian Com- 
munist Party), planning has 
been made a more open and 
flexible process and targets 
brought closer to realities. 

Broadly speaking the ob- 
jective of the 1968 manage- 
ment system was to combine 
a planned economy with mar- 
ket mechanisms. 

In this spirit, two new 
forms of company manage- 
ment have been introduced in 
Hungary as of 1st January 
1985. 

• The first is the Enter- 
prise Council exercising own- 
er’s rights in the case of me- 
dium-sized and large 


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enterprises. It is entitled to 
pass decisions on major ques- 
tions of organization . and 
business policy. Furthermore 
it appoints the general man- 
ager (subject to ministerial 
approval) and exercises em- 
ployer’s rights with respect 
to the manager. The Enter- 
prise Council consists, in 
equal numbers, of delegates 
of the workers (employees) 
and representatives of the 
firm’s management 
• The second form applies 
to enterprises with a work- 
force of less than 500. In this 
form it is the General Assem- 
bly of workers which exer- 
cises ownership rights. The 
executives and the manager 


are elected - and if necessary 
recalled - by the workers' col- 
lective without any interven- 
tion from a supervisory body. 
Hitherto, in Hungary, only co- 
operative societies have had 
elected managers and offi- 
cials. 

It is Important to call at- 
tention to these changes be- 
cause through a more demo- 
cratic planning system they 
will enhance the status of en- 
terprises within the state ad- 
ministration, local councils 
and other bodies, and in- 
crease their autonomy. 

Henceforth the Enterprise 
Council, or the General As- 
sembly of Workers, can de- 


cide on policy questions. 
These decisions have been 
taken away from the rele- 
vant ministry but not from 
the scope of the managers of 
the enterprises. 

Under these circum- 
stances the question arises as 
to whether a manager will 
continue to put purely busi- 
ness interests in the fore- 
ground or just make an effort 
to please his workers, to be - 
as Mr. Pulai put it - a “good 
boy". On the basis of experi- 
ence gained in similar cir- 
cumstances at agricultural 
cooperatives no problems 
are anticipated in this re- 
spect. Hungarians prefer a 
tough, efficient boss who 
makes them work hard to get 
good results and help them 
make more money. 



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Page 8 


ADVERTISING SUPPUEMEWT TO THE INTERNATIONAL H EBATJV l^ftJOBUNE^W^DNl^^AY^jfUWE 12^ 1985 



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- Introduction to the town of Eger 
which is rich in historic buildings and 
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- Convalescence holidays in Eger, 
Farad and Matraszentimre. 

- Mountaineering in the National Park 
on the mountain Bukk. 

- Holidays on the romantic mountain 
Matra. 

- Country holidays in our mountain 
villages. 

- A great choice of tourist excursions. 

We offer lodgings in hotels, motels and 
camping sites with a full range of 
services. 

Our travel-offices: 

Egertourist 

Eger, Bajcsy-Zsilinszky u. 9. 

Telephone: 36/11-724 
36/13-249 
Telex: 63378 

Mdtratourist 

Gydngyos, Szabadsag ter 2 
Telephone: 36-37/11-565 
Telex: 25285 


RultubA 


It means also 
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for you! 

We are exporters of Hungarian 
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★ Books in Hungarian and foreign 
languages 

★ Newspapers, periodicals in 
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★ Sheet music 
★Teaching aids 

★ posters, postcards 

★ master tape video cassettes 
★works of art 

RultubA 

offers BOOKS in ENGLISH 
for all kinds of readers: 

CORVINA KIADO 

★ Masterpieces of Hungarian 
literature 

★ Art books 

★Guide books, color photo albums 
★Music ★Sports ★Gastronomy 

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HulturA 



Hungarian Foreign Tracing 
Company 

H-1389 Budapest 62. 

P.0 Box 149 


H ungar y’s Joint Ventures 
A Socialist Speciality 


During the past decade 
there has been a pronounced 
swing in the Hungarian econ- 
omy towards the formation 
of joint ventures. More and 
more foreign firms are 
gr asping the opportunities of- 
fered to them for producing 
their goods and offering their 
services in Hungary. The ad- 
vantages are mutual, and 
Hungary is encouraging tins 
form of participation with an 
the means at its disposal. 

Whereas the conclusion of 
co-operation agreements and 
licencing arrangements have 
long been a feature of Hun- 
garian business life and 
trade, the switch to joint ven- 
tures only really began in the 
mid-1970s. The turning point 
came after the pubUcaton in 
1972 of a Finance Ministry 
“Decree on Economic Asso- 
ciations with Foreign Partici- 
pation’', subsequently amend- 
ed, and extended, in 1977 and 
1982. 

What was it that prompted 
this significant opening to the 
west on the part of a loyal 
member of COMECON? Be- 
cause it is the West (in the 
sense of the advanced indus- 
trial nations) which is being 
sought as a main partner for 
joint ventures with Hungar- 
ian enterprises. 

Hungarian economists are 
quite willing to bare their 
breasts in giving the answer. 
Whereas there have been 
rapid developments in Hun- 
gary during recent decades - 
with new industries emerg- 
ing and agriculture being 
modernized - the level of de- 
velopment, they say, still lags 
40-50% behind that registered 
in the industrialized coun- 
tries of western Europe expe- 
riencing similar mnriitinns It 
was therefore seen as an ur- 
gent necessity to dose the 
gap. The country’s policy 
makers devote considerable 
attention to making such 
structural changes in the na- 
tional economy as will im- 
prove its international com- 
petitiveness, while at the 
same time aiming to satisfy 
domestic demand for a wider 
range of products at a higher 
level of quality. 

The most promising field 
for this expansion was felt to 
be the formation of economic 
associations in Hungary with 
foreign participation or, in a 
nutshell, joint ventures. 

Two Priorities 

Right from the start two 
priorities were set: 

• To encourage companies 
from abroad to provide 


machinery and techno- 
logical know-how; and 
• To step up Hungarian ex- 
ports against convertible 
currency payments. 
Neither of these, it was real- 
ized, would be easy to 
achieve. The success has 
nevertheless been thoroughly 
satisfy ing: nearly forty joint 
ventures have been licenced 
in Hungary, more than half of 
them in the past two years. 

Gerd Bird, Director-Gen- 
eral of the Hungarian Cham- 
ber of Commerce, one of the 
prime movers behind this 
Joint Venture campaign, as- 
sesses the situation as fol- 
lows: 

“The joint enterprises es- 
tablished in Hungary by 
western firms and Hungar- 
ian companies afford the 
foreign partner a series of 


Hungary's fine reputation 
for Research and Develop- 
ment” 

Both the Hungarian Cham- 
ber of Commerce and the 
Hungarian Foreign Trade 
Bank, which is also actively 
engaged in promoting joint 
ventures have published 
booklets (in English) outlin- 
ing the legal situation in con- 
cise form as it affects pro- 
spective partners abroad. 
Furthermore, "Hungarian 
B usiness Herald”, the Cham- 
ber’s quarterly published in 
English, deals with new 
trends in this field. 

Stress is laid on the fact 
that in Hungary an associa- 
tion with foreign partners is a 
matter of cooperation be- 
tween companies based on 
mutual benefit, and it is not 
an inter-state matter. Hun- 


^§g 







Hungarian parliament building by day. 


comparative advantages. 
In calculating production 
costs, for example, it is im- 
portant to remember that 
services are cheaper in 
Hungary, and that land, foe 
charges for water and elec- 
tricity, for building materi- 
als, the raw-materials origi- 
nating in Hungary and 
semi-finished products are 
generally also cheaper than 
in the highly-developed in- 
dustrialized countries. 
“Compared with developing 
countries or with the so- 
called threshold countries 
Hungary, as a possible part- 
ner, likewise has several 
comparative advantages - 
such as its central geo- 
graphical situation in Mid- 
dle Europe and the resul- 
tant low freight costs, or the 
high level of skills among 
the labour force, as well as 


garian governmental organs 
win only consider whether 
the proposed association is in 
harmony with general eco- 
nomic policy targets and pre- 
vailing Hungarian legal stat- 
utes. Associations, it is 
pointed out, can be estab- 
lished and function with a 
wide range of entrepreneur- 
ial possibilities. They can 
have as their aim joint pro- 
duction, the provision of ser- 
vices (hotels, transport tour- 
ism etc.) or even the 
transaction of financial activ- 
ities (e.g, banking). In each 
case the state leaves it to the 
Hungarian enterprises to de- 
cide in what field, industry or 
form they wish to set up asso- 
ciations with a foreign part- 
ner. 

Among the guarantees giv- 
en are that: 

- employees of foreign na- 


tionality may transfer 
abroad 50 percent of any 
kind of the incomes paid 
by the association in a cur- 
rency stipulated in the 
founding memorandum; 
and 

-in the event of the with- 
drawal of the foreign part- 
ner the N ational Bank of 
Hungary will transfer 
abroad the foreign part- 
ner's share doe in propor- 
tion to his contribution. 

Profitable Examples 
Generally speaking the 
share of Hungarian owner- 
ship in foe joint venture has 
to be at least 51 percent and 
that of the foreign company 
cannot exceed 49 percent. 
However the Minister of Fi- 
nance has foe right to grant 
permission for a higher share 
of foreign capital. A signifi- 
cant example of this is foe 
Central European Interna- 
tional Bank (GIB) With its 
seat in Budapest (but func- 
tioning as an offshore institu- 
tion). In CIB six western 
banks (two from Japan, and 
one each from France, Italy, 
West Germany and Austria) 
each have an 11 percent 
share, leaving the National 
Bank of Hungary with only 
34%. The success of this bank 
(founded in 1980; and still 
nwiq nA in the Socialist World) 
is shown by its growth statis- 
tics. CIB assets went up from 
US$247.7 million in 1983 to 
US$322£ million in 1984; its 
pre-tax profits over the same 
period from US$69 million to 
US$17.2 million. 

Among the other success- 
ful joint ventures over a wide 
range are: 

• Schwarzkopf-CAOLO, for 
foe production of cosmetic 
articles, with a majority 
Western holding; 

• The Budapest Gambling 
Club (which runs two es- 
tablishments in Hun gar y in 
conjunction with the Aus- 
trian Caano Company); 

• Olympos, (manufacturing 
fruit juices) with a Greek 
partner; 

• Hungarokork, (making 
cork stoppers and other 
products) with Amorin & 
Irmflos of Portugal; and 

• APV-UNGARO, (for the 
production and sale on 
third markets of food pro- 
cessing plants) with Brit- 
ain’s APV ParaeaL 

A significant addition to 
the list last year - Hunflex- 
bau, producing Danish-type 
heat-insulated wooden cot- 
tages - has made use of a new 
ordinance whereby joint en- 
terprises can, if they wish, 
operate in a customs-free 
zone, thereby enjoying ex- 
emption from duty and the 
resulting competitive price 
advantages. 


Importance of the Chamber 


Ever since 1981 the Hun- 
garian Chamber of Com- 
merce has played a signifi- 
cant role in the preparation 
and formulation of the coun- 
try’s economic planning pro- 
cess. The Chambers Presi- 
dent, Tam As Beck, himself a 
well-known industrialist and 
winner of the State Prize in 
1985, is proud of the fact that 
it not only acts in the purely 
commercial sphere, protect- 
ing and furthering the inter- 
ests of member companies, 
but is also a much used medi- 
ator between the govern- 
ment and individual entre- 
prises. 

This co-ordinatory func- 
tion, he says, is probably the 
most difficult of the Cham- 





Tamds Beck, President of 
tiie Hungarian Chamber of 
Commerce. 

ber’s tasks but it does suc- 
ceed in bridging the gap be- 
tween the political system 
and the economic structure. 
In pratice this means that the 


Hungarian Deputy Premier 
and other members of the 
government attend Chamber 
meetings, and the Presid e nt 
of the Chamber sits in on go v- 
erament meetings, at which 
economic matters are dis- 
cussed and can pass on com- 
ments and complaints from 
enterprises. In effect no im- 
portant decisions about the 
national economy are ever 
taken without prior consulta- 
tion with the Hungarian 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Bede is already deeply 
involved in discussions over 
the next Five Year Plan for 
Hungary which is due to 
come into effect in 1986. The 
Hungarian Chamber of Com- 
merce is committed to doing 


The Hungarian National Oil and Gas Trust/OKGT/ is able to carry out activities 

in the following fields: 


■ geophysical exploration 

- drilling for oil and gas, hot 
water or steam, workover, 
well completion and services 

- up-to-date methods of 
exploitation planning, 
reservoir prediction, field 
developing and production 
with EOR methods /secondary 
and tertiary/ based on 
reservoir engineering 
research 

- underground storage of 
natural gas 

■ complete crude oil and natural 
gas collecting systems 

■ construction of pipelines for 
the transport of crude oil, 
crude oil products, natural 
gas, chemical feedstock and 
other liquefied or gaseous 
substances 

■ complete pump and 



Twr _7.. • ■ j; 




compressor stations 

— pipeline gas supply, complete 
gas distributor systems, 
pipeline gas pressure 
reducers, pressure regulators, 
gas receiving stations 

— storage and service tankage 
system 

— crude oil processing 
capabilities 

— propane-butane gas supply 

— designing of asphalt oxidation 
plants 

Our machine factories produce 
packers, rock bits, gate valves, 
ball valves, needle valves, 
Christmas trees, separators and 
tanks, heat exchangers, box-type 
gas pressure regulators, 
odorisator for gas transfer 
stations, drilling rigs and special 
tools for hydrocarbon 
exploration and exploitation. 


HUNGARIAN NATIONAL OIL AND GAS TRUST 

^ H-1117 Budapest, Schonherz Zoltan u. 18. 

Tel: 664-000. Telex; 022-4762 OKGT. 


Intercooperation 

An Enterprising 
Enterprise 

"The Enterprise Enter- 

pnse" is the slogan by ' WtadJ Sports to l* *** m | 
Bitercoope . " known. <tt*nu*ns ls sis* S 


its best to help maintain the 
links between domestic, com- 
pany-level planning and the 
medium-term nation-wide 
plan. 

On the international plane 
news reached Budapest re- 
cently that the Hungarian 
Chamber of Commerce had 
become a full member of the 
World Trade Centres Associ- 
ation at the WTCA council 
meeting in Tokyo. The Cham- 
ber will accordingly now 
have access to the Associa- 
tion’s vast data bank on world 
trade and international busi- 
ness relations. It has been 
agreed that the WTCA wifi, 
hold its 1987 annual general 
meeting in the Hun garian 

oapital 


S2SPE?£ * *n£~**~ m '"* 

And “LC ”, for short, reall> us ^ whpn ^contact «®jj 

a go-ahead unit doing much published in w 

more for Hungary than its ^ ^ gfcnitritf computers 
modest size and unassuming [he whole of Hungary. B> 
office premises would lead ^ end of this year there wiB 

one to suppose. be 35. The fact that Sucemtart 

IC has a wide and flexible . m Hungary and 

brief: to bring ^ carrv out the servicing 

from abroad. This is L ’ ., decisive advan- 

achieved on a strictly un-bu- - if cXC iusivity can- 

reaucratic basis by a small ^ assured, 
but dedicated, staff who wiD Returning 

foDow up the least whiff of Benefits *»“*”■* 
1— tun. it to good wlIh * 

advantage. intercooperju 

In foe field of joint-ven- ‘enterprising t r.-innimr 

. . - 


In foe field of joint-ven- emerpriau.* ^ lapping 
tares - which every company iy m L^ 1 ^. ot JS 

* Hungary isentitledtoen- of 


Ui xuiugai; » w* . — 

ter into- IC has a good record 
pulling such plums out of the 
pie as Sicontact (with Sie- 
mens AG of West Germany) 
and BCR-Ully (with Eli Lilly 
Inc.), as well as three or four 
other major cooperations, ei- 
ther with share capital or just 
as an organizer on behalf of a 
Hungarian enterprise. 

Foreign Trade 
' However, Intercoopera- 
tion Is also one of the Hungar- 
ian companies authorized to 
engage on its own initiative in 
foreign trade. Its services 
are frequently made use of 
by all sorts of enterprises 
which do not have the requi- 
site know-how about foreign 
trade practices, or the com- 
mand of foreign languages, 
which IC staff have at their 
fingertips. 

IC’s financial director, 
Ivin ToWy-Osz, says it is not 
always easy to convince 
would-be foreign co-opera- 
tion partners about the true 


Former Hungarians *«nu «, 
whom have been living 
abroad for thirty years 
more, are being enenuragpd 
to come back and spend the g 
evening of their days in the g 
home country. They are of- 
fered the chance - otherwise 
impossible for foreign citi- 
zens - of buying a house or 
flat in Hungary', and certain 
other benefits. About 200-250 
letters have been received 
enquiring about the condi- 
tions. Five flats haw already 
been sold and about 20 others 
are under negotiation. Not 
big business, says Mr Toldy- 
Gsz, but interesting all the 
same. 

Another idea which Inler- 
cooperation is developing 
aims at helping the foreign 
tourist who comes to Hunga- 
ry by car and has a break- 
down. There are plenty of 
Hungarian mechanics who 
are ready to repair western 
cars, but cannot afford to 


tion partners about the true cars, but cannot afford to 
advantages of getting a foot keep a big stock of spares. 

In the Hungarian market It is The intention is to co-operate ' 
wrong to suppose that this with dealers in Vienna (only 
gives unlimited access to all 240 kilometers away from 
the other Socialist countries Budapest) to supply parts at 
of eastern Europe, because short notice and get them to 
there are special regulations Hungary quickly, with the as- 
governing Hungarian trade sistance of rootorii\g organi- 
in that direction. It is seldom rations in the two countries, 
easy to fit the products of so. that generally there will be 
joint ventures into the “so- a delay of no more Bun a day 
cialist pattern.” However in getting on the road again. 

• v;. X V Vt . * 


OUR FLEXIBILITY !S OUR STRENGTH 


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FOR GRAINS AND OTHER 
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Budapest V.. Gpszev u. T " 

Letter-: H-1 364 Bu^ape^r p f\ 


Management 
■■be Telex. ?' 







. ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


Page 9 


SILOS 


;aAiNS A NO OTH£ h 

p« 0 £KJCTS 


anning 

IaCTORIES 


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Fair Weather 
for Banks 


A “speD of rainy weather"^ - 
that is bow Hun garian finan- 
ciers refer to the two-year 
period up until mid-lS83 when 

full confidence was restored, 
in the Hungarian economy 
among the international 
banking community. During 
the worldwide recession of 
1981 and thereafter Hungary, 
quite unjustifiably, was made 
to pay for the shortcomings 
of two or three other Socialist 
countries which had Jet down 
their creditors and had to re- 
schedule their . co nsider able 
debts. Hungary, which has 
never had to re-schedule, 
suddenly found that all the 
financial taps had been 
turned off, and suffered ac- 
cordingly. 

Since the autumn of 1983, 
with Hungary a member of 
the International Monetary 
Fund, credits axe flowing 
normally again and the coun- 
try’s foreign currency re- 
serves are up to a level 
matching, if not already 
above, that recorded at the 
start of the Bqnicfity crisis. 

The IMF assessed the post 
tion earlier this year by say- 
ing: “The progress made by 
Hungary in recent years in 
the direction of economic ad- 
justment was sustained in 
1984 si gnificantly and in con- 
trast to the record in many 
other countries this adjust- 
ment was also achieved in 
conjunction with a. positive 
and steady growth in output 
[Hungary has] helped re- 
verse a weakening of credi- 
tor confidence in eastern Eu- 
rope generally, and 
subsequently enjoyed an im- 
proving credit-standing in in- 
ternational financial mar , 
kets.” 

Lfiszlo Karczag, General 
Manager at the National 
Bank of Hungary, is certain 
that membership of the IMF 
has been beneficial for Hun- 
gary. “They also helped us at 
a crucial moment Our rela- 
tionship with the IMF and the 
World Bank has always been 
very smooth and co-opera- 
tive. Now we are to have the 
third co-financing deal with, 
and through, the World Rank. 
In 1983 when the first one was 
concluded it was considered 


in banking circles as the busi- 
ness deal of the year, a kind 
of “Tony" Awaird- really very 
sophisticated. In practice it 
was a new type of fi na ncing 
where the Worid Bank and 
members of the international 
hanking communfly got to- 
gether to finance a- project in 
a country." - 

The National Bank of Hun- 
gary has been fundamentally 
restructured, with its com- 
mercial activities separated 
from its central banking sec- 
tor: : • 

To meet the need for bet- 
ter services to companies in 
Hungary two units have been 
set up within the National 
Bank, one mainly in charge of 
financing industry and ser- 
vice institutions* the other for 


‘ esfrafrfi ph ed (tee baa already 
been set up to finance innova- 
tions; another is engaged in 
the venture capital business. 
And a certain part of the Na- 
tional Bank of Hungary has 
been turned into the indepen- 
dent Budapest Commercial 
Bank. 

1985 has also seen the open- 
ing of a- bond market in Hun- 
gary. Not only the state but 
also individual companies 
are now empowered to issue 
bonds. These can be pur- 
chased either by other com- 
panies or even by the general 
public. 

Question of Convertibffity 

For several years now 
there has been talk about the 
desirability of conferring 
convertibility on the Hungar- 
ian currency, the Forint The 
First Vice-President of the 
National Bank of Hungary, 
J&nos Fekete, has repeatedly 
let it be known that tins is one 
of his aims. Now the idea has 
been revived in the form of a 


The Power Problem 
and How Hungary 
Is Tackling It 



ji , 

"is 

t H IS 

H ftg 


New Budapest Convention Centre. 


finatiring agriculture and 
food processing plants. 

The other existing banking 
institutions continue mean- 
while to carry put their com- 
mitments unaffected by the 
changes in the National 
Bank. These institutions are: 
the Hungarian Foreign Trade 
Bank which- is fully autho- 
rized for doing business in 
foreign exchange and all 
types, of international trans- 
actions; the State Develop- 
ment Bank which distributes 
funds from the national bud- 
get to state-owned compa- 
nies; and OTP, the National 
Savings Bank with an the 
usual services of such an in- 
stitution. 

Now the way is open for 

“ frnnwrial - to be 


sort of central banking con- 
vertibility. In other words, 
the Forint might be consid- 
ered as a currency for inter- 
national settlements in bank- 
ing, financing and trade, but 
Hungarian citizens would not 
be free to go to a bank and 
ask for foreign currency. The 
sort of time-scale now envis- 
aged is that by late 1988, or in 
1987, partial convertibility of 
the Forint wfil be introduced. 

Credit Cards and Cheques 
Of mare immediate impor- 
tance to visiting business- 
persons and travellers is the 
fact that through an arrange- 
ment with the National Bank 
of Hungary all the major in- 
ternational credit-cards are 
widely honoured in the coun- 
try. * 


CONSOLIDATE 

YOUR COMPUTER NEEDS 

WITH SZKI ! 


RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT APPLICATION 


M/ 


In 1984, when the second of 
its four blocks was starting 
operation, Hungary’s first nu- 
clear power station at Paks 
accounted for 14% of the 
country's annual electricity 
output of 26^00 kWh. By 1990, 
if all continues to go well at 
Paks, the other two blocks 
will have become operational 
and the plant will he in a 
position to supply one quarter 
of the nation’s electricity re- 
quirements. 

What these requirements 
will be is still a matter for 
some conjecture, however. If 
the government has its way 
the country will have to slow 
down its appetite for power, 
and if possible actually re- 
duce its consumption of ener- 
gy. The aim is to reach a 
situation where a 1% Gross 
Domestic Product increase 
win only require additional 
energy supplies of 0.4-0 A 
government- sponsored 
scheme has been initiated to 
tackle this problem from 
both ends, by rationalizing 
production and st reamlining 
energy consumption. 

Sw ing In Rmpharis 

Generally speaking the 
trend is to move away from 
hydrocarbon sources of ener- 
gy (and within that category, 
from oS to natural gas) and 
to step up utilization of do- 
mestic coal (particularly lig- 
nite) and nuclear power. 
Whereas in 1978 oQ and natu- 
ral gas accounted for 66% of 
Hungary's energy require- 
ments, .in 1983 this had 
dropped to 60%. The govern- 
ment’s energy management 
scheme makes funds avail- 
able from the national budget 
mi favourable credit terms 
for projects which substitute 
ofl with other sources of ener- 
gy- 

In this respect the major 
indigenous source is brown 
coal (lignite). As Robert Tfir- 
jan, Departmental Chief for 
Electricity in the Ministry of 
Industry said, the plan is to 
rely heavily on lignite in the 
years to come. A tot of this 
can be won in open-cast min - 
rng. Thanks to sophisticated 

. ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★'A 


methods of preparation and 
enrichment environmental 
hazards connected with it 
have been significantly re- 
duced. In recent years, for 
instance, coal washing facili- 
ties have been installed at 
Tatab&nya in western Hun- 
gaiy and in the northern 
county of Borsod which re- 
move from the material 
mined a large proportion of 
the waste material 

Environmental consider- 
ations are always taken into 
account when planning new 
power plants in Hungary. 
This is one of the reasons for 
the gro w ing tendency to sub- 
stitute natural gas for cal in 
firing power plants. 

As an outcome of various 
measures to reduce petrol 


consumption petrol produc- 
tion in Hungary has not risen 
since 1979 and this despite the 
fact that the number of mo- 
tor vehicles has gone up by 
an additional 100,000 cars 
each year since then. 

Leadless Petrol 

In order to meet the needs 
of an increasing number of 
car-borne tourists from west- 
ern Europe a number of fill- 
ing stations - particularly 
around Lake Balaton and in 
the Budapest area - have 
started from 1st January 1985 
selling leadless petrol With 
environmental consider- 
ations in mind the plan is to 
lower the lead content of 
standard petrol by 1988 from 
the present 0.7 gramms per 
litre to 0.15 gr/L 


TIMES ARE GETTING BETTER 
INVESTMENTS GAIN GROUND 
AGAIN 


30 years of experience 

20 countries where our plants are in 

operation 

1 0 branches of industry 
1 company 

all these speak in favour of 

INDUSTRIALEXPORT 

HUNGARY 


STATISTICS ON HUNGARY 

(For 1984 unless otherwise stated) 


Area 

Population: 

life expectancy: 

Work-force: 

Visitors from abroad: 

Hungarians travelling abroad: 

Motorization 

(per 1000 population): 

Telephones 

(per 1000 population): 

Pigs: 

Cattle: 

Horses: 

Total farmland (sown area) _ 

Output of natural gas: 

Output of coal: 

Output of crude ofl: 

Average annual growth-rate 

of GDP (1981-1983): 

Real income/consumption: — 

Currency: 

Exchange-rate (May 1985): — 


Budapest V, Apacrai Cse»e J u 12- 14 
POBox 231 H-1368 Hungary 
Telephone (361 > 17&-08G 
Telex 224l78tcrumh 


SZKI (Institute for Co-ordination of 
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Telephone: 1 361) 260 000. 650 122 TeW 22 5381 


System*, Computers and Infor ros tka laborator y Co. 
anrrHHEaite of SZKI' 

H- 1011- Budapest. Iskola u. 10. Hungary ’ 
Telephone; (361 ] 260000 .T«te*'r22 4599 



93,033 km 2 

10.658.000 

65.6 years (men) 
73.5 years (women) 
4^40,000 

13.400.000 

5.400.000 




9.84 million 
L91 million 
0.11 million 
4.62 million ha 

6^00 million m s 
25 minion tons 
2 million tons 


L8% 

+ 1 . 0 % 

Forint = 100 filler 
1US?= 50-51 Forint 
1 f St = 63-64 Forint 




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1 May, 20 August, 7 November, 25 December, 26 December. 


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Telex: 027-262 






Page 10 


ADVERTISING 


SUPPI EMTCNT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


Provincial Portrait 


New-Old Budapest 



The City of Eger 


Heading north out of Buda- 
pest for a day in the country 
you could hardly do better 
than to choose Eger as your 
first destination. Not only is it 
the main town in the northern 
county of Heves, the flower 
garden of Hungary, hut it is 
also the birthplace and home 
of one of the country’s most 
famous wines - Eger Bull’s 
Blood. 

Today Eger owes its fame 
mainly to this rich, deep-red 
elixir, known locally as Egri 
Bikaver, but there was a peri- 
od when its name resounded 
throughout Europe for quite 
another reason. In the 16th 
century a small garrison at 
Eger successfully withstood 
a siege by a vastly superior 
Turkish army. Today, more 
than four centuries later, you 
are frequently reminded of 
this heroic resistance to the 
Ottoman invaders. 

For better or for worse the 
eastern invaders were more 
successful on their second In- 
cursion into Hungary. In 1596 
the Eger garrison surren- 
dered to the Turks on the 
promise of a safe conduct 
The fortress remained in 
Turkish hands for nearly a 
century. For the most part 
the medieval city was de- 


stroyed in the course of the 
battles which took place dur- 
ing the Tu rkish occupation. 
What remained though were 
the casemates hewn in the 
rock underneath the fortress 
and altogether 130 kilometers 
of cellars used then, as now, 
by the citizens for storage 
purposes as well as by the 
state wine co-operative for 
the barrels of maturing Bull's 
BloodL And whereas the other 
famous Hungarian wine. To- 
kaj, is often referred to as the 
“King of Wines”, the vintners 
of Eger lay clain to the appe- 
lation the “Queen of Wines” 
for their product, which is ex- 
ported to S3 countries. If you 
prefer a white wine while in 
the region then try a bottle of 
the sweet, but not cloying, 
Egri Leinyka (Maiden) or 
the drier OLaszriking- 


Eger every year putting it 
qfaH-gHrqBy in fourth place 
(after Budapest, Lake Bala- 
ton and the Danube Bend). 


The Budapest Opera 
House threw open its doors 
?g a<n after a five-year clo- 
sure, on 27th September 1984, 
exactly 100 years after the 
building's inauguration dur- 


Trees and Horses 


Above ground present-day 
Eger is characterised by its 
wealth of Baroque buildings 
many of which have been, or 
are being, restored. This is 
part of a long-term policy 
spearheaded by the Presi- 
dent (mayor) of the local 
council, Vflmos Varjfr. Mr 
VarjU acknowledges the vital 
rOle played by tourism in the 
local economy. No less than 
L5 million visitors come to 


Apart from grape-growing 
the main industry in Heves 
County is forestry. 

Of growing importance - 
and already famed world- 
wide - is the nearby SzDvds- 
vdrad stud-farm, spe cializin g 
in the breeding of L ipizzan 
horses. Unlike the studs at 
T.i ptea itself (in Yugoslavia) 
and at Piber (in Austria) 
where the emphasis is on 
mounts for riding and for 
haute 6cole performances, 
the SzilvAsvfirad breeders 
aim to develop the best possi- 
ble horses for the local sport 
which is carriage-driving. 
JenO Kovacs, the Forestry 
Director In SztivAsvirad, 
maint ains that his stock is 
genetically the best in the 
world at the moment When, 
last year, the Spanish Biding 
School in Vienna was deci- 
mated by a degenerative 
form of equine herpes Szal- 
v&svarad was able to step 
into the gap and send ten Li- 
prtTzan stallions to Piber to 
h«»ip renew the highly-strung 
Austrian stock. 



mg the days of the Monarchy. 
No less t hfln 13 bn Forint 
(more than US. $25 million) 
had been spent on an exten- 
sive reconstruction pro- 
gramme. The Opera House 



with its. wonderful frescos 
and gilded auditorium, has in- 
deed been restored to its for- 
mer gkny whfie at the same 
time numerous modern im- 
provements have been made 
to itS technical tnqftallattfl ns , 
such as- lighting and scene- 
changing. A reduction in the 
number of seats; from 1415 to 
the o riginally foreseen 1250, 
has also increased the com- 
fort of .spectators in the 
stalls, who have been given a 
better view of the stage. The 
renowned acoustics, . have 
been preserved unaltered. 


The acoustical properties 
were a main consideration in 
the design of the brand-new 
Budapest Convention Centre, 
on the other side of the Dan- 
ube: With the main hall seat- 
ing 1750, and total meeting 
space in the various Rooms 
(Bartdk, Palma, Cbrvina 
etc.) amounting to 2500, the 
Convention Centre fills a 
long-felt gap in the city's fa- 
cilities. 


The first major interna- 
tional event scheduled, in au- 
tumn 19K, for the new Buda- 
pest Convention Centre will 
be the European Cultural Fo- 
rum summoned in accor- 
dance with the Madrid Re- 
view Conference of the 
Helsinki Final Act 



Hungarian Records — Abel to Zipoli 


One of the great success 
stories of Hungarian industry 
in the 1980s has to be heard to 
be believed. Hungaroton 
which - since the beginning of 
1985 - has been renamed the 
Hungarian Record Company, 
now sells about half a million 
r-iaarirfli records (including 
LPs, musicassettes and Com- 
pact Discs) abroad every 


year. .This is more th an half 
of total sales in the field. 

By 1981 a significant tech- 
nical step had been taken. 
Whereas previously records 
had been pressed as a side- 
line in a Budapest cable fac- 
tory, a major investment led 
to the construction of a large 
tailor-made plant at Dorog, 
near Esztergom on the Dan- 


ube Bend. This bas an annual 
capacity of between eight 
and ten millio n LPs and cas- 
settes . 


Thermal Tourism 


The New Generation 
As from 1981 the majority 
of H ungaro ton’s classical re- 
cordings are now made using 
digital means, suitable for 
the production of Compact 
Discs (CDs). Of these, 26 ap- 
peared last year and almost 
twice that number are sched- 
uled for 1985. 


Hungary may not have 
much crude-oil, the country's 
apologists like to say, but it 
does have plenty of “white 
or. They are referring to the 
abundance of thermal-water 
sources which increasingly 
are coming to play a rble in 
Hungarian tourism. 

Balneo-therapy is a clumsy 
word but it spells relief for 
thousands of rheumatic suf- 
ferers who come to bathe in 
these healthgiving waters, 
either taking a formal "cure” 
or simply swimming in one or 
other of the many pools 
which are kept open through- 
out the year for visitors. 
More often than not full spa 
hotel facilities are also avail- 
able nearby. Take H6viz for 
example. This small resort 
only a few kilometres away 
from the largest expanse of 
inland water in Central Eu- 
rope, Lake Balaton, boasts a 
thermal pond with a surface 
area of 47,500 sq. metres. The 
spring delivers an average of 
36,000 litres of water per min- 
ute which means that the 
whole of the lake's water is 
renewed every twenty-four 
hours. During the summer 


the temperature of the water 
is 33-35°C, and even in winter 
it never drops below 26°C. So 
even those suffering from 
rheumatism are aide to bathe 
in the open air the whole year 
round. 


Whereas Hfeviz, until less 
than ten years ago was al- 
most exclusively used as a 
trade union recuperative 
centre it is now a thriving 
tourist resort Two large 
four-star hotels have been 
built there, one almost ad- 
joining the original pool, but 
a ten incorporating up-to-date 
treatment centres. The earli- 
er of the two, the Thermal 
Hotel, has its own indoor pool 
served by the same thermal 
spring as feeds the open-air 
lake. 


Whereas Hungaroton is the 
name to look for when buying 
classical records, the Hun- 
garian Record Company has 
a number of different, labels 
for the other groups in its 
catalogue: Qualiton, for in- 
stance, for the big-selling 
range of operetta and gipsy 
music and Pepiia for pop. 


Skala 


The same chain as runs the 
two H&viz hotels, Danubius, 
also manages two spa hotels 
in the capital, Budapest They 
are the five-star Margitsziget 
Hotel (on Margaret Island in 
the middle of the Danube) 
and the traditional Hotel GeT 
lfert with its own Roman-style 
thermal hathg, using the Gel- 
l&rt Ttm min eral hot springs. 


Everyone in Hungary 
knows Sk&la Coop. It is a 
countrywide chain of depart- 
ment stores and retail shops 
for clothing, sporting gear 
and food. The most recently 
launched flagship of the prof- 
itable public enterprise is 
Sk&la Metro, a five-storey 
glass-fronted building, right 
opposite the West Railway 
Station in Budapest, where 
30,000 customers can be 
served every day. The well- 
known Italian fashion-house 
“Benetton” has now opened 
its first boutique in a Socialist 
country in Sk&la Metro sell- 
ing knitwear, T-shirts and 
other leisure-wear for young- 
sters. 


HoMay + Hungary- 




Hungprinn Hotel and. Kstuurant Company 

Ask someone who has been to Hungary when to stay. where to eat and when to have a nicetime. 
Invariably and Jar good reasons the answer i riff be - MungarHouU. largest hotel-chain . . 

Fmm small family hotels to the best luxus-hoteb we nm aB over the coanay 48 hoases. YoawOfind 
Hungarian spedafities in our restaurants, higfr-tfr in our night-dubs, friendly atmosphere in our coffee-shop. 
Our Staff- /a OOOO experienced specialists are proud of vmrklngjor ow company to sern you. 

Be our guest and your answer mH be - HungarHotds 


HanzarHotds in Budapest: Hold Dtina Inter-Conii neraal ^ 

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Reservation: 

Budapest V„ Pteiofi Sandor u. 16. H-1052 Tel: (361) 658 72 

HungarHoteli-PentalOTire in the USA:Norwal>: 06857, P.O.B. 305 TeL: (800) ^43 42 31 Tx.. 239 658 72 

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~Jv ate* d the otmi 

Mdcv. ***E*t!^ 

Obvious exwnpte. ^ to ^ ^an** 
travellers and ^ ^ Mag^ 

SSS^SSs^s* 

n-w- - * ** own '* 

Hungarocamion. AH flana # 

MAUV, th. Hungarian “^’eounlrw " dud- 1 * ^ 
of As operations serves 38 crt*» m EmtftxhA 

NoveX^TW) Dub® Tupdov T-!34s°nd 

pa»ng» (ted at pr«nt 

15.800 tore of bA W* h* bw 

Ka=Sss:s3 

make the Hungarian economy . j obn30C j by water 

shipping fries when ft comes h* except d 

Mahart ships ply to port «n afl ecrf1 ^V W f n Danube - 

America and Australia . . occagnt fer o 

inducting hydrofoils — and Lake Bdaton) only accou™ 

proportion of the company's turnover. „-*«sfu!!y. 

MA5PED end HUKGAROCAMI !££ 
for haulage contrads. service on the 

firat company to run a cofed-and-dwvertr^^ various fine* 

Bu ^ apest ^ X>n ^ 0n ^ t ^ L!lj^fono8y as one of the 

on a regular basis, and is regarded intenvAonaoy ® 
best companies in the field. _. « OA o u 

MAHIR is the oldest advertising ^ 

has been doing advertising for forexjn efienis too. I H 

HUNGSXPOspeoafiaesinlheaigcwazatianof Wwnatwndws JL 
and exhbSons inducing the dud Budapest 
-investment goods. Autumn F«r for 
qeneraly the afEwd organizer of die Hungarian 
S abroad As a M-service odvertong agencyrt 
tnxfitionoS partner of foreign efierts wdung to advertae « 
Hungary. 


Among the other service industries promoted by 
KERESKEDEIMI KAMARA (the Hungarian Chamber cr 
Commerce, of Interview withTamas Beck] are: 

NQVEX. active « the field of technology transfer, ond ow wing a 
selection of Hungarian licences gvaaable for foreig n compare* 
(N«ws-Sheet “Irmovation - Inventions - Know-How avottobtoon 
request from P.O.R. 62, 14-1364 Budapest). - 

UCENCIA, avcdoble for advice an patmfing pwjucbjn 
Hunoary. os waits (free of chorge) for voiuiwitkawg teoMiology 
and marketing ± Has prodixed "an irttiesSng mf"ber of 
mflBoncwes" (quite legal -in Hungary) and was rosponsfola for the 
lensafiond success of die Body haintonit 
AUANU BlTTOSITd. the dale insurance company, wWch 
insists the ody remaricable fMng about it is that it T* 

insurance companies everywhere else in fre vrond. odenng ttw 
same services and accepting the srnne risks. Generoles an 

... r .1 ■ ■ ■ - tl- tMiknamim 


same services and accepting the srnne risks. Generoles an 
appreciable part of the courfry^ invisfcle exports. Bmphaorw thrt 
this unremarkable status is very importan* fromthe poWof vwwof 
w nhn o fa** m dedcSna whether a countfy 


this unremariabto aatus e w*y lmpanam 

joint-ventures; and is often a fbdor in decking whether a counny 

enters into business with ffimgary or not. 


And not forgetting: - 

MAVAD. company for hunting eacunioro- and gome 
which now has an ed&le-snail processing ptam 





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fo, 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


Page 11 


ARTS /LEISURE 


*Life in a Parisian Stairwell 




w * AHAiCA 


i • - .- s . 




"T ■ — " 



By Thomas Quinn Curtiss . 

International Herald Tribune 

P lARIS — Jean-Char! es Tac- 
chella sprung to renown with his 
second full-length feature after 
long apprenticeship as a scenarist. 
His breakthrough came with 
“Cousin. Cousne.” which on its 
release in the United States was 
nominated for an Oscar and rose to 

MOVIE MARQUEE 

be the most profitable French film 
ever imported, a record it held until 
“La Cage aux folks’* made the At- 
lantic crossing. 

“Cousin, Cousine” pleased 
Americans with its informal 
glimpse of middle-class family 
ways in France. 11 was. folksy, 
friendly, pa supi and fanny, almost 
a home movie in its approach. 

For his new film, EscaEer C,™ 
Tacchella has chosen a lower social 
stratum than the provincial parlor 
types of “Cousin, Cousin e.* lie 
characters are tbe inhabitants of a 
Parisian ten ement, United only by 
the fact that they dwell under the 
same roof. The plot — derived 
from a novel by Qvirc Murad — 
has been through die tlw y tri ba l min 
in countless boarding-house farces. 
The cross-section here is loosely 
knit, but it is not the over-all device 
but the portrayal of the characters 
that distinguishes the proceedings. 

The central figure, played per- 
fectly to the last spiteful sneer by 
Robin Reoucd, is a vicious art crit- 
ic whose savage verdicts on snug- 
gling artists have brought him no- 
toriety. He meets his 
co me-uppance when thepublic re- 
lations secretary of a gallery, en- 
acted with fine flair by Catherine 
Leprince, defies his bogus author- 
ity- 

Tacchella has drawn each char- 
acter in his script' with remarkable 
in sight Among theboarders of 
“Stairway C” are an eternal cadger,’ 
a hardened boozer, an obsequious 
homosexual a would-be author 
who cannot get to his writing table 
because of the nagging of the shrew 
with whom he lives, a lonely tittle 
girl and a suicidal woman who fi- 
nally hangs herself. The director 
has individualized th«n all persua- 
sively. Tbe non-residents, too, are 
tellingly portrayed, with Jacques 
Weber as a painter indifferent to 
judgment of his work and with 
Claude Rich as the critic's disdain- 
ful father. 

Tacchella has achieved an arrest- 
ing crazy-quilt of contrasting tem- 
peraments, brilliantly coined and 
rounded, as they cavort before a 
disturbingly macabre setting. This 
curious and absorbing comedy- 
drama discloses its director's origi- 
nality and versatility. 

□ 

“Parking,” yet another French 


film to masquerade under an En- 

S title, is the/latest work by 

ular "Les Jrarfipliues de Cher- 
bourg” (Tbe Umbrellas of Cher- 
bourg) and Lhe unpopular 
“Chambre dang & VUIe” (Room in 
Town), a flop of last season in 
which tbe paitidpaats sang songs 
of social significance to empty 
pews.' 

The new Demy does not trade in 
politics but in modernized mythol- 
ogy, retelling the Orpheus-Euryd- 
ice legend with Orpheus as a pop 
crooner k la Michael Jackson and 
with his lady love a Japanese sculp- 
tress. In two showings, the bouse 
broke into uncontrollable mirth at 
the right of Us star rendering siDy 
lyrics in a squeaky voice, mean- 
while screwing up his face as 
though he had just been prescribed 
a dose of castor 03. 

Since, lhe star is Frauds Huster, 
an alumnus of the Combdic Fran- 
chise who is acting ably on the 
Parisian stage at the moment in 
“Le Sabliex,” a hit, explanations 
are in order. 

' Huster, like many stage actors, 
requires guidance in his choice of 
screen roles. He has been cata- 
strophically miscast in “Parking,” 
and be is the victim of directorial 
mistreatment to boot. Even a Caru- 
so, a Chaliapin or a Callas would 
haie been at disadvantage had they 
been photographed in dosettp as 
they sang. Nor has he managed 
most (he nonmnsical episodes any 
better. The scene of the pop idoTs 
dispute with his Japanese mate sent 
the audience into further gales rtf 
derisive glee. Indeed, Demy’s direc- 
tion only rises once above incom- 


petence: in his mise-en-sc&je of the 
rock concert in Paris’s Bercy audi- 
torium, when the cameras are 
turned on the enthusiastic mob and ' 
not on the star. 

Tbe decor and shadowy lighting 
of Cocteau's “Orpheus” have been 
appropriated: the garage by night 
with its sinister corridors represent- 
ing the descent to Hades. The ante- 
chamber of the nether regions — 
with Jean Marais in a scarlet robe 
in charge of arrivals — is a comput- 
erized hall resembling an over- 
crowded airport, with the passen- 
gers lining up for check-in, a 
Dame-esque vision that adds new 
fears to the prospect of going to 
helL The movie is dedicated to Coo- 
teau. a honor that would probably 
have embarrassed trim. 


David Bowie, as a genuine pop 
singer, would have been a more 
likely candidate for Demy’s Or- 
pheus, but Bowie in “Just a Gigo- 
lo,” a German production in En- 
glish. has suffered miscasting of 
another sort As British as fish- and- 
chips, a NoH Coward ditty or Sa- 
vfle Row tailoring, he has been se- 
lected to impersonate an idealistic 
young officer of the Kaiser who, 
narrowly escaping death on the 
battlefield, lands broke in Berlin 
after the armistice. Amid the city’s 
wreck and rmn he earns his bread 
by selling his favors to predatory, 
well-heeled women and tn disgust 
enlists in the rising Nazi ranks. 
These activities leave Mm no time; 
to -rin g, His acrirw romps ninns in- 
clude Kim Novak, Maria Schell 
Curt Jurgens, Marlene Dietrich, 
and, last and least, Sydne Rome, 




Robin Reamed (left), Jean-PJenre Bacri in “Escalier C 



who, alas, takes the floor for some 
jazz yodeling. Dietrich has a cameo 
part, as the directress of a male 
escort service, and delivers the song 
of tbe title in deep-throat, sultry 
tones. Bowie, deprived of Ms spe- 
cialty, must be assassinated and 
have a swastika-decked funeraL 

David Hemmings, Hirartinp this 
pish-posh, strives for period flavor, 
but his research appears to have 
been limited to listening to dd re- 
cords and seeing “Cabaret” 

□ 

“Drfite de samedT is from Swit- 
zerland, but its clockwork is faulty. 
It appears to be an attempt to do 
something in the manner of Jac- 
ques Tati, but Bay Okan. its Turk- 


ish manufacturer, has an odd sense 
of humor. Its jokes are frequently 
so obscure they fall flat A butcher 
who, like the demon barber of Fleet 
Street commits multiple murder is 
nothing to laugh about and the 
mixture of comic-strip cartooning 
and horrors results in a very sour 
cocktafl. Francis Huster smiles his 
way through, roped into another 
durf Among Mi companions in dis- 
tress are Jacques villerel as tbe 
bloodthirsty knler with a meat ax, 
the Zurich mime Zouc, the Canadi- 
an ingenue Carole Lame, the dead- 
panned Michel Blanc, Jean- Luc Bi- 
deau, usually a straight actor in 
problem pictures and Okan him- 
self, who is responsible for the di- 
saster. 


^Secret Honor’: An Imaginat ive., Funny Film Monologue 

C APSULE reviews of movies imaginative and most surprisingly two things; Lan don’s father and quite so infuriatin g , SKwia B 
that have recently been re- affecting movies of its very odd Landon’s hair, Janet Mashn writes writes in the Los Angeles Tii 
leased in the United Stares: kind. in The New York Times. The Superficially it is about si 

With “Secret Honor,” adapted q young Gene Orowitz (Land on's scale morality in journalism i 


C APSULE reviews of movies 
that have recently been re- 
leased in the United Stares: 

With “Seem Honor,” adapted 
by Donald Freed and Arnold M. 
Stone from their monodrama, the 
director Robert Altman recoups his 
reputation, Vincent Canby writes 
in The New York Times. Surround- 
ed by the land of nmn-tderirion 
cameras that hanks use to photo- 
graph thieves, plus monitors so that 
he watch his p^ r^ n r marf|r ^ — 
and oil portraits of Washington, 
Lincoln, Wilson and Kennedy, and 
one large photograph rtf' Henry 
Kissinger, acting as witnesses — 
Philip BakerHall, as Richard M. 
Nixon, delivers a 90-minute mono- 
logue that mixes fact with fancy, 
and self-serving explanations with 
genuine insight into the American 
way- A one-character movie, set 
entirely within a single set, unre- 
lieved by flashbacks, fantasies or 
cutaways of any sort, it is one of the 
funniest, most unsettling, most 


Made under the aegis of Steven 
Spielberg, and crammed with every 
pop cultural artifact from Mad 
Magazine to Michael Jackson’s as- 
ter, “The Goonfes ” doesn’t even 
pretend to court the grown-up seL 
Janet Maslin writes in The New 
York Times. It was directed by 
Richard Dormer, who succeeds in 
incorporating his own boldly car- 
toomsh “Superman” style into 
Spielberg's foolproof formula. It 
has erodes, bats, cobwebs, skele- 
tons, a lovable monster, an under- 
ground grotto and a treasure hid- 
den by some of the most 
considerate, clue-loving pirates 
who ever lived. 

□ 

“Sara’s Son,” written and direct- 
ed by Michael Landon, is about 


two things; Landon’s father and 
Landon’s hair, Janet Mashn writes 
in The New York Tunes. The 
young Gene Orowitz (Landon 's 
real name), played chiefly by Timo- 
thy Patriot Murphy, is a javelin- 
throwing athlete and aspiring actor 
who inadvertently falls under the 
influence of Cecil B. De Mille. 
Watching De Mflle's “Samson and 
Delilah,” Gene decides that any 
“Sam's son” ought to think twice 
about habcure, so be devises a 
number of tricks to keep his real 
coiffure a secret. As a director, 
Landon has a way of pre-empting 
tbe emotional strength of his story 
well before it has a chance to assert 
itself. The film offers such frequent 
cues about what to feel that there's 
very little for the audience to da 


If “Perfect” did not have a germ 
of an idea tucked away in afl its 
posturing «nin«s, it would not Ik 


quite so infuriating. Sheila Benson 
writes in the Los Angeles Times. 

Superficially it is about sliding- 
scale morality in journalism today, 
a not uninteresting subject. Howev- 
er, any dahn its makers, producer- 
director James Bridges and co-writ- 
er Aaron Latham, have to 
seriousness dissolves as the film be- 
comes more voyeuristic and manip- 
ulative than the profession it in- 
dicts. 

It stars John Travolta as a self- 
assured Rolling Stone reporter, 
while the proper journalistic atti- 
tude is laid out as Rolling Stone 
editor Jann Warner, playing him- 
self under a fictitious name, barks: 
“When you sit down to write, for- 
get you’ve got a mother!” 

Travolta performs with no edge 
to his character whatever, and the 
direction further confuses thin g; by 
never letting us understand wheth- 
er be is generally unprincipled or 
just a regular guy who from time to 
lime does lousy things. 


Strindberg’s Full f Dance of Death 
A Rich Marathon of Marital Loathing 


By Sheridan Morley 

huenuaionat Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Four hours of Strindberg's “Dance of 
* Death” is about two more than usual, but in 
giving us the uncut version Keith Hack, the director, 
(who recently gave us “Strange Interlude” and is 
dearly a man who believes in never leaving a theater 
much before midnight) has, at the Riverside Studios in 

THE LONDON STAGE 

Hammersmith, produced a rich and rare theatrics 1 
marathon in which Alan Bates and Frances de la Tour 
play out the 20ib century’s first great black comedy of 
marital loathing. 

In what is turning out to be a vintage summer for 
great male performances (Anthony Hopkins in 
“Pravda,” Antony Sher in “Richard III.” Kenneth 
Branagh in “Henry V,” Michael Gambon in “Old 
Tunes!*’ Ian McKellen in “Coriolanus,” Daniel Mas- 
sey in “Waste,”) the London theater now has Alan 
Bates challenging the memory of Olivier’s captain, 20 
years ago at the Old Vic. Olivier came on a lot 
stronger, but Bares paces tdmsdf better across the four 
hours so that by the end we are with him in the hell 
later conceived by Sartre's “Huis Dos,” the hell that is 
only made up of other people. 

At first he and de la Tour seem to be in a mild 
domestic comedy of mismatched marriage: Ted 
Whitehead’s new translation is nothing if not colloqui- 
al, and tbe games that the captain and his appalled 
wife are playing have never seemed closer to those of 
George and Martha in “Who's Afraid of Virginia 
Wooff perhaps the only 20th-cenmry play that truly 
challenges this one to tbe sound of its own ghastly 
music. But by the end of the evening there is no doubt 
that these games are for real and in the rarely seen last 
act, in winch the battle is carried on into the next 
generation. Hack gives us sexual warfare on a global 
scale; Unable to live either apart or together, the 
captain and his lady are condemned forever to leading 
roles in a marital pantomime of which they are neither 
authors nor directors, merely stars. The Riverside 
Company has had the intelligence and the courage to 
realize that one of tire many strengths of this play is 
that it is often very Tunny indeed. 

The fact that if is also a resounding hymn of haired 
to the notion of marriage gives it an everlasting topi- 
cality. Bates offers us $ figure at once magnificent and 
pathetic in his evil loathing of those who once made 
tire mistake of liking or manying him, and both de la 
Tour and Michael Byrne, as the appalled onlookmg 
cousin, manage to suggest that they too are something 
less than perfect. For those who have always wondered 
how the “Dance of Death” ends, now is the time to 
find out: a savagely black comedy of appalling marital 
bad mann ers ends with a co me-uppance which would 
delight the writers of any contemporary soap-opera of 
the “Dallasty” variety and the thought that the sins of 
the fathers are not so much visited on the children as 
relished by them. 


At tire beginning of “The Overgrown Path” by 
Robert Holman (at the Royal Court) a Japanese girl 
jumps into a river and thus escapes the atomic devas- 
tation of Nagasaki in 1945: at the end of it an English 
girl on holiday in Greece in 19S4 takes shelter under a 
tree during a storm and is killed by lightning. Global 
and personal history, Holman seems to say, is as much 
a matter of random accident as of destiny or science. 

But here as in his haunting “Today” (the Spanish 


Civil War play still in the Barbican Pit repertoire) 
Holman shows a novelist's interest in character rather 
than a stage manager’s need for events. An old physics 
professor is living in Greek exile with a wife who once 
nursed at Nagasaki but is now herself dying of leuke- 
mia. With them for the summer are his stepdaughter, 
mourning the recent loss of an artist lover who lived to 
66 without ever baring his voice break, and a sweet- 
shop proprietor from Yorkshire who has come to ask 
tbe old professor if he feels much guilt about hydro- 
gen-bomb invention. 

The play strongly echoes Bren ton's “The Genius” 
and Louse Page’s “Salonika” in its mix of nuclear 
guilt and sunburnt wartime memories: tire trouble is 
that although it is more tightly constructed than Hol- 
man's earlier work, “The Overgrown Path" lends to 
ramble through the undergrowth of individual memo- 
ry without getting much beyond tire notion that 
chance is all. and not always a fine thing at that. Bui 
there are some marvelous performances, not least 
Peter Vaughan as the old professor and Stuart Wilson 
as his young interrogator, and it is not often one sees a 
character hit by lightning on a stage. Les Waters is the 
director. 


At the Phoenix, “Strippers” is all too evidently a 
play that didn't start oui as a play at all. It started but 
as a sociological article in Tbe Guardian about tire fact 
that in northeastern England, several housewives had 
taken to removing their clothes for the hard cash that 
their husbands were no longer making in more regular 
employment. That then became a local television doc- 
umentary, and only then <vas Peter Terson commis- 
sioned to turn his playwright's attention to an already 
well-worn theme. Stripping in the theater has of course 
a long and honorable tradition: the big number in “Pal 
Joey" and much of Stephen Sondheim's “Gypsy” are 
concerned with the removal of clothes, but Tenon is 
not in this for the celebration of the female body, 
although his play has already attracted some doubtless 
welcome attention from the protests at the box-office 
on opening night of a group of feminist campaigners. 

What they should perhaps have been campaigning 
about is the absence of a coherent play here; clearly 
Terson has tried to do for “Strippers” what Trevor 
Griffiths did for “Comedians.” which was to give an 
old Vaudeville tradition a social and political context. 
“They've stripped the Northeast of men ships, money 
and jobs,” says one of the women midway through the 
evening, “so they might as well strip it of tire clothes 
off your back as wdL” On that level this might have 
been an intriguing evening, since no other dramatist 
has yet got around to considering striptease as a 
branch of Thatcherian economics. 

But Terson has had to build so much into a two- 
hour script (five complete strip routines, a solo spot 
for a club comic and some lumbering situation-co- 
medy sequences to establish family backgrounds) that 
there is no time for sustained commentary. 

“Strippers" tries to offer something for everyone: 
social comment, domestic comedy, hare flesh and a 
few jokes. But Terson is no Osborne, and this is no 
“Entertainer”: it is a ragbag of impressions which 
lurches from backstage melodrama to instant psychia- 
try without ever working out whether its customers are 
readers of New Society. The Stage or Page 3 of The 
Sun. AH of which is a pity, because there are some very 
good performances, notably those of Bill Maynard as 
the dub comic who doubles as tbe women’s cynical 
and seedy agent and Lynda Bellingham as tbe strip- 
pers' head gut 



Dow Jones Averages 


ONM MMl Uw LM OK. 

Indus 1319.00 132151 13QM2 131154 — *JH 

Tram uui «su4 M7JS tsia — im 

Util M357 1*455 14275 1*173 + MS 

Como 5445* S47.lt SOMli S42J9 — Ml 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


KIM taw Clan Croe 
Composite 109X2 109.41 18959—024 

imntrtata 12445 12421 

Transit. 1B4M TO5S3 IKS —OSS 

Utilities S9JO 59.13 SOS— ftK 

Finance 11497 1»71 11858 —009 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y 


>1 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Utilities 

Industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Isaues 
Now Highs 
Now Laws 
Volume up 
Votumodown 


747 451 

£35 920 

473 -4M 

2049 2(01 

119 100 

21 20 

39,4X7,320 
45582525 


■or Sates •SHY* 


June 10 200306 4S4532 

June 7 201-01 495307 

June 6 204507 511142 

Janes 240.904 53X257 

Jane 4 199311 502568 

-Included In the odes figures 


Tuesdays 

MSE 

Closing 


VoLoM PJH 182MMM 

PtW.4PiA.V0L B754M80 

Prw coao U datwl dost 1 *7,27181# 


Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing an Woll Street ond 
do not reflect iota trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanaed 
Total Issues 
New Mteho 
Now Lows 
volume up 
VMwnedbwn 


232 208 

200 331 

2SS 252 

770 791 

25 23 

10 13 

2J74A2D 
159256 a 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

utilities 

Banns 

Transp. 


Week 
■ cove Abo 
l —0.14 29i99 
I — MS 30252 
I +3.10 3620 
I —143 34070 
1—294 200.95 
I +170 275.93 
r — Ml 247.32 


Standard & Poor's Index 


High Law Owe art* 
Industrials 209.49 20&53 206JJ9 — CL43 

Transp. 157.95 1647, 16434—173 

Utilities 8459 8423 M79 — QJO 

Finance 2370 23.10 23.13 —006 

Composite 18941 18478 1B9JM -047 


AMEX Sales 



4 PA*. volume 
Prev. 4 P.M. volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


AMEX Stock index 


Lew Close arae 

22477 22774 +079 



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Pa§e 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


Hiesdass 


MSE 


Clo$iii£ 


Table* include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect (ate trades elsewhere. 


U Month 
Hoc Law Stock 


Dlv. Yld PE 


Sfe. Close 

IMsHMtUwt OMrt.ChV 


(Continued from Page II) 


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142 28*. 28Vb 201b— *b 
1B6 28*b 2B*b 28*4— lb 

17 331b 32*# 324b + lb 
10 34 33*b 331#— 16 

2 >7} 713 173 

22 2D*b 2016 20*# + 4b 

It? 20V, 2DVb 204b + Va 

64 15*# 15W 15*b + lb 

6 29V. 29V. 2P1* + V. 

3120 It 15*. 16 

56 17 364b 3646 + Vb 

429 44k# 44 44tb + lb 

12 9744 98*6 94*. 951#— 21b 
M 57 1024 «7V> «** 874* + » 

7 93 24«b 2Mb 2416 

4 28 5*. 5*. 54i— M 

gJ7 « 7V 7*# + Vb- 
85 9 6434 33 311b 31K + lb 

89 8 211 171b 17 17 — Wi 

26 17 184 « S9U 59*6- Mi 

46 13 134 30*# M *7*4 + 1# 

25 13 233 38 37*4 38 

&4 12 J745 331# 33 MU + (b 

76 24 583 49*6 49 491* + lb 

4.1 18 12V# 12*b 121b 

36 16 2104 21V. 2W4 21 — lb 

260 95 75 2) mu 21 +16 

50 1.1 14 415 56 V. 55 55 —1 

82 II 1965 5714 57V. 57*b— «■ 


160 


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106VS 89>6 Duke Pi 1160 105 

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80-2 851b DunBrt 3L20 26 22 1469 7*8 77*b 7SV»- Vb 
17 11*4 DuaLt 2.04 125 8 4* '«lb 164* I6Wr 


10 381b 38*4 » + 1b 

11 481b 47Vj 471b —3 

8 985 33» 33*4 331# + lb 
40BI0Z 83*. S3 83V# + Vb 
4850z 781b 78 781# +2*4 

175001 741# 74*4 74*1 +1V4 
233 2«*b 24Ht 26*6 + U 
41 35 34*4 35 +Vb 

10x104 104 104 —2*4 

44200Z 791* 77 7916 +2V. 


IBlb 14 DuaPfA 2.10 115 
16*b 1 1 Va DUQPf 167 116 
17% 12*b DuaerK 2.10 116 
lBVb 141b Duo PT 2JI 126 
9914 431# Dim Pf 
1414 H4 DvcoPt 
26V4 171b DvnAm 
414* 26 <b EGG 
17*4 14*4 EQKn 
31*4 22*4 ESvst 
.2816 20 Eaalap 
19 --C0 

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20 irpf 1.18k 

23*4 .ir PfB 150k 

2716 EAirpfC 

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52 4116 EsKaa, 

40 <6 40 Eaton 

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20 Eckerd 
3714 37W EaisBr 
1BH 13 EDO 
'3416 19V# Edward 


lb 17ib 18%— lb 

4 151b 16ib 

k 17*4 17*4 + lb 

Im. .0*4 18 10+16 

lOz 59 59 59 — 1b 

9 35 10% UH& 10*4 

12 30 2» 2SV4 25tb— lb 

194 497# 401# 40*4 

6 171b 17 17 

50 15 16 1622 32*4 3116 31V4 + V4 

164 4.7 1 44 2214 22*4 2216—14 

M 23 44 79*6 1994 19*4 + kb 

2374 9 8*6 896 

74 «b » 4 fta 


720 122 
50 5.7 
20 6 
1 2 21 
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2414 19*4 EPGdpf 225 93 

29 lb 2574 EPGBi VS 129 

291b 24Mi EPGnr 

1916 9*6 EIToro 

12*4 Bib Elcor 

51b 2*b ElecAs 

28*4 16lb Elctwi 

171b llVi Elgin 

25 5*4 EHCtnt 


59 EmrsEI 25037 13 220372 71 71 -H 


j«4 EmRod Mt 74 IS 40 12 1# 1» 12*4 + to 


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113 981b Emhtpf 2.10 26 

£ IS EmpOs 1.74 86 

5 3t4 Emppf 

5 4 Emppf 

916 7 Emppf 
' lb _ EnExc 

32U 221# EnalCp 

48% 1B16 EntaBu 

29*9 171b Eraord 

HQ** 97 EraChpflOM 10.1 
211b 201b EiuEan 
21# 19b Ensrw 22 

IB 9V» Entera 
20 15*4 EntxEn 157el16 

21*b 16 Enfenln 1J0 7.1 10 

32*4 17*6 Equfxs 1.14 35 17 

49# 2% Equlmk 

116 IV. Eaumkrt 

20 Hi* Eamkaf 2JI 115 

49V4 2BV4 EqlRes 1.72 17 B 
15 9*4 Equhcn .12 5 10 

I**# *v. ErtHimt * " 

23** 12*4 EuBm 

204. 18*u EUSxC 

Hlb 161# Es trine 

4* 10% Ethyl, 

6% U. vIEVanl 

2'6 wIEvanpf 
3#b vIEvn PfB 
30 EkCtle 172 45 10 

.17% 13*# Etcelv lJUelU 

54% 38 Exxon 340 45 

11 4V. FH ind -15e 15 3 

-48 44 FMC 220 34 » 

-M S7V. FMCpf 2JS 

.2514 17*4 FPL Go IJB 

1H# 9»# FatiC It 68 

•I4*b a*. Facet 

"20*1 If 4 Fairchd 60 
J91b 33-# FaJrc Pt 350 

lft*. 10 Falrfd .18 

!«'' # 12 FamDI 9 

19*1 13*. Farrs tel 

»■-. 23 FrWWF 

23'. 14*1 Farah 

13 B*# FayDro 

t*. 4'. Feaen 

« 29*i Fed) Co 

45*1 3V. FedEkP 

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20*1 101 Fen kM .1* 6 

2. 14*1 FWPB S .70 37 7 

7; « 2S*. FPappf 231 83 

.23, 14 FcdP« 1 44 4.7 13 

19*1 ir# FOSonl 60 45 IS 

M^a *4*# FedDSI 254 46 9 

32 22'. Ferro >20 46 14 

r 25'. FWral 2.00 75 JJ 

1^1 4 FlnCpA .051 

4r» 14’. FlnCPPl A 73*206 

5% 2*; FnSBar 

£»i 14* a Firevtn 60 36 10 

74*. ir*e FfAfli *0 2.7 * 

57'> 50% Ft Allot «.17ell6 

3S*# 21% FtBkSv 150 4J 8 

35 2SM FBhFla 165 35 12 

78 J6»a FBasI IJO 1J 12 

.2* 18*m FUCMe 132 54 21 

541 44' I FCh<aalU3#l)3 
83*. 70 FCR>PfB863ell6 
18": 11 V. FIBTea 1J0 103 9 

54 J7% FfBTlpf 5.94c 15.9 

21 B*1 F icily 9 

23% 101 FF«JA4 60e 14 7 

57*. 35*1 FFB 288 5.1 8 

531. »>. Flntslr ?_M) 4.7 fl 

33 21 Flntsl Pi 137 73 

11*# 71# FIMIn J4 

24% 14 FtNamn 
7"i 4!b FstPD 

30'. 70% FStPaof 252 

311 24% FlUnRI 1.94 

25*4 141 FtVoBk 68 

29": 17"# FtWisc 

53’ i 30% Ftsdib 

ll># 8% FIsnFa 


157 11# lib 114 + V# 

97 20*4 20 20 

105 22*4 22V# 22% 

70 267# 24 24*4 + 74 

55 80 1061 24 23% 23% — *6 

96 7 84 21% 21 2Ub 

(2 3476 *Cfk 44<# 4416 + U 
140 25 7 1174 55 54*4 54*6 

68 35 12 1482 2SV# 24*6 24*fe— Vb 

164 35 14 2832 W# 29*# 291# + 14 

150 44 U U 36Vb JAM) 34V# 

38 16 12 17 151# 15*4 15*4 

~ 346 32*4 31*4 321b + *4 
9 24% 14% 24% — V# 

19 2914 29 29 — lb 

5 28*4 28*4 281# 

116 17*# 171b 17*#— Vb 
7 914 914 9*4 

31 4H 4M, 4*# + V» 

12 244. 2flb 24*6 + 1b 

1 141# 14Vb 141b 

7 494 ST#— 1# 


52c .1 17 
36 17 


68 3 26 

60 57 15 


959 17% >7% 171b— Vb 
208 29 28% 28*6 + 14 

1 10Tb 102% 1MW +1V# 
127 221* 211# 221# + 1* 
IDz «Vb 4% 41b— % 

9% 1% 

V4 14- 

+ lb 


30 


26 
75 9 
25 24 
7 

S3 

96 

13 9 
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50 19 13 


39% 20% FlfFnG 9 132 IS 
48*# «2'b FIIF pf 464# 96 
a*. 1414 Fleet En 36 12 


i0z 5 
ldOOz 9% 

113 

5B4 241# 25b. 26 

n u , 7 U S. r £.-# 

NXKlinto 102% UBM, +1 
153 »% 2014 20% + % 
28 2 2 2 
M0 11*4 11 11% 

BA 17 1t% 17 + % 

194 18*# 18% 18% 

58 31% 31% 31% 

226x 4% 384 4 
689 1% 1% lib— lb 

42 20% 20 SO 
113 47% 44% 47 + *b 

152 15 14% 1414— % 

279 12% 12 12% 

93 23% 221* 23% 

45 27% 27% 27% + % 
74 10% 17% IS 

380 231b 229# 23 — Sb 

54 2% 2 2V# + V# 

82 2% 2% 2% + % 

9 4 3T# 31b 

140 37*# 37 37*# 

29 141b 16% 16% 

8 6631 ST# 51% 51% + ** 

28 10 9% 9T# 

341 64*6 44 64 — % 

I 80 Si so +1H 

1457 Zf*b 25% 2S* 9- H 
21 10% %*# 10*#— V# 

30 13 129b 12*4 + lb 

SB 153h 15V# 15% 

25 361# 3*1# 36% + % 

.90 14 13% 13% — *4 

184 22% 22% 22*4— % 

106 15% 15% 15% 

1 29% 29% 29% + U 

156 IW* T9V# 1916— U 

52 9% 91# 91#— % 

90 5*# Sib 5*#— % 

147 39*# 39% 79% 

33 1534 43% 42% 42% — 9# 
IJ2 4.1 11 72 37% 37 37% 

2441 20 194# 19% + % 

275 19% 18*# 18% 

101 27*fc 27% 27*# + VI 
52 211# 211b 21% — V# 
125 17»# 1799 17*#— v# 
2302 44*4 43% 64% — % 
331 30% 2914 30 + % 

IDO 36% 24% 3*1# 

1954 7*4 71# 7*. + V# 

62 33*. 33% 33*# — *4 

55 5% S% 51b— % 
.720 21*6 2014 21% + 9b 
(849 25 }4lb 249# +1 

4 54% 54% 54% 

«Q 38% 37*# 37% — *# 
M 35»i 35 35% +1% 

m 79 76*4 7V +21# 

953 24*. 24% 241b + 1# 
1 SI SI 51 
90 7B>* 78% 78% — 14 
279 12Tb 12% 12*. + V# 
73 38 37% 37% — % 

47 9% 9 9% + 16 

124 22% 22 22 

I* 57 54*6 57 + % 

SO a 52% 52TV + 4# 
54 32% 32 32*# + % 

147 B*t 8*# 8*#— % 

TO TlVk 22*# 22*#— V# 
918 4% 4% A%— I# 

241 29% 29 29 — % 

244 30% 29 29 — *# 

334 24*# 25% 2614 + 94 

94 30% 39% 10% +1 

*7 31% 30*i 3W#— 9b 
25 9% 914 9% 

144 38% 37% 38% + 1# 
800 47*# 47*# 47*#— 1 

9 2107 21% 20% 2190 + 14 


73% 32V. GnF* 
71# 5% GGtnn 
9% S*. GfiHm# 
tJVj 9*6 OHMfS 
U*b 8% GnHous 
27*6 Id# GnliKt 


JO 

J4 

35 


250 36 11 1013 72% 7114 71*6— 14 
J0a 8J 80 7*# 7% 716 

13 97 4*6 44# 4*#— W 

USix tshi M *4 

51 10% 10 10 

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391 589# Se% SB%- % 
400* 74% 74% 74% — J 
2305 3fk 38% W4 + J# 
4 43 43 43 +44 

3 56% 5616 56% +1 
85 6 ST# ft 

948 13% 1344 13*6 
J04 8394 8294 82» + 2* 
14% 5 GnStofr " 7 173 13% 13 13% + *» 

5344 4014 GnSHml 160 4J 11 3M4 «*4 41% » 

12% 10% GTFIPt 1 JO 106 tOttf 14 14 « — ” 

BV# 4 Gensco 17 3P «# 41# *4# 

28% 139b GnROd .10 A 29 174 17% 17% 17% + % 

23% 15 Gande 160 

43*4 16*4 G5lPf 168 76 

36 Wa GenuPt 1.18 JJ U 

274# 18 GaPac 60 34 25 

37% 3396 GaPcnt 224 63 


2.1 3 

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. . . _ _ 16 

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■S AT GlVIOf A«r JJ 4 
40 16% CM E a 651 .1 

43*4 34*6 GMOtpf 3J3 BJ 

54% 449# GMOt pf 560 86 

9 3t5 GNC .16 2J 18 

14% 84k GPU 7 

65*6 4616 G«n R* 166 16 52 


5 

62 14 20 

240 46 12 


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13% 

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30 2516 GaPwPt l*4e 4.1 

30% 22% GaPwpfJA* 122 
31% 25% GaPwaf W6 115 
23% 17% GaPnPf ZM JJJ 
2316 17 GaPwPf IS JJJ 
26% 21% GaPwsI 235 11.1 
47 52 GaPwPt 760 126 

67% 51% CaPWPf 7.£ 126 
34% 20% GertFd 1J2 W 13 
23% 1216 GerftSl -12 3 12 

12V4 8% GlantG 
171# 54> GarFn 
27 16% GWHIU 

63% 44 Gillette 
14% 11% G leave 
>3% **» GtenFd 

2% GloUM . , 

7*# GtabMnflJSI 
8% GWNua 
1*# GldNwt 

34% 11 GWWF 30 A 8 
34 24% GdrtCh 166 4J 15 

30% 23 Goodvr 160 JJ J 
1116 13% GordnJ -32 W IB 
3216 19 Gould AS 18 II 

44% 38% Grace 200 66 11 
34% 23% Ora nor s 14 

20% 8% GIAFrt M 25 10 
IBVta 1440 GfA tPc 
MU 27% GILfcln 
21% 15 GNIrn 
40% 31 GtNNk 
2914 77 GIWFft 
199# 11% GMP 
DR# 18*0 Grrvtl 
6% 2% Groller 


17 


449 27% 22% »%- «> 
2 22V. 27% g%— % 

,sssr§H^-2 

J3S SioS ** 

450 27% 27V# 2% + % 
230 28% 27% 28% 

3T 30% 30 MJ# + % 

M 22% 31% + J? 

7 22*# 22 72% + % 

4 24% 24*4 M»-% 
Mr 44 65 66 + % 

S& 1» 1S?T5 
2S T- ™ i» + g 

S 62% 419. 61**— % 
03 12*# 12% 12% — * 
455 13% I2B im 
261 2% W* 7» + ^ 

111 7% 79* 7% 

271 12° 11% 11% 

138 2% 2% M* 

90 32% KS *» 

384 33% £*# XZ%— % 

IOC 29% 29% 2?% , 

M 16*4 16% 16% — % 

749 33 22% £%- % 

820 43% 43% 42%— % 

™ 33 33*4 32% - % 

250 19*4 199b 19%—% 

*57 1*16 16*6 169b— Jb 

19 52*# 52% 32S + % 

22 15*4 159# 1599— % 

782 34% 36 % 1M# + % 

«B 28 Z71b 27% — % 

91 19 18% VKb 

«WllN “S-* 

135 5% 5*4 5% 

473 11% 10% 11% + % 


5*h 5% + % 
23% 24 + % 


S% SKrot S S .2 *284 «% g% 2%- % 

«%SSSff “flu 140 £ 


160 16 15 
165«U6 6 
163 <3 9 
M 13 10 
1J2 9.1 9 
U0 4J*. 

13% 0% GrowGs JO 36 15 — - 

st^sss 

26% 24% Gram Bf 260 105 10 2Wb 36% 2«4 + % 

81b 414 Grunfol .14 2J 22 5% 

27% 20 Gulltrd 60 26 9 149 24 

42 

6* .. 

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30 14% Gu HR pf IJO 4J> 

ssis 7 

m 55% SlfluS&S ^ im Jot Saw m% is% + % 

issirsx 

29% 19% HallFB 160 36 444 291# 2B% »*»— *b 

371# UU HaWtn 160 5.9 IT 1630 31 30% 30*#— % 

>% *t HOtlwa M *4 M 317 1% IV# 11* 

U2 Si SSISf i3 Si. ™ 36% ^ jSS-i 

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64 2J 14 5485 25% 24 2494 +1% 

36 19 573 10% 1B9b 189# + U 
2.1 23 42 18*4 18% 18*4 

10 17 302 61% AO*# 61*4 + *# 
13 21 in 3«M 32V 37*fc — M# 
21 10225 91# 916 9% + 1b 

26 13 54 28** 28** 28% — % 

33 12 

46 IT 


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1596 15*# IB# 159b + U 

34 31% 30% 31. — % 

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00 

160 

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164 4J I 


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1J0 4J 9 
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33'x 73V FleilV 
13>. 1QV FlealPf 
38 14% Flpnt&f S 

31 W Mb FloalPl 
45': 29*. Fla EC 
78*. IB*. Fla Pro 
lB*b IIS FloSII 
**# 3U FAvGea 
71 11"# Fiowrs 

50 1 # I4'b Fluor 
58% 47'* FooleC 
51*# 341# Ford Ml 
13»# 10’* FiDear 


15% 10 Fasiwti 
IT* 4% FfwSIP 
33% 25% Faxtiro 
77 24 Foxmvr 

»% 21'b FMEPn 
11% r-t FMOG 
'22' a 131'i FrpiMc 
34% 21% Frl»lrn 
aii 19 Fruehf 5 
£% 35 Fruhtot 200 
34% 22% Funua M 


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133 

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19* 

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48'. 


GAF 
GAT X 
GATXaf 
CCA 
GE ICO 
GED 

GFCp 

GTE 

GTE Pi 

DTE pi 

GaiHou 

Gannett 

GaPlne 

Geartit 

Gcfcp 

GemliC 

Gem 1 1 1 

GnCorp 

CAlmr 

GnBCtt 

GCinms 

GCnpf, 

GnData 

GnDrn 

Gen El 


304 A 12 1 23 

130 44 13 U 

260 M 1 

8 1376 
160 14 12 234 
138 


368 7.1 
260 7.7 
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108 20 
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160 24 
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20 196 

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248 
315 
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19 


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3 70 36 


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12 3435 


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391# 39V# 
17 14% 

79% 78% 
3% 3% 
7 7 

43% 43% 
» 25% 

34 23% 

4 4 

41% 40% 
77*i 27% 
10% HWb 
20 19% 

11% II# 
12'A 11% 
51% 50 
17% 17 
*3V 43 
37% 34% 
34% 34 
13V 11% 
74 V 739b 
41% 41% 


34% + % 


391# + % 

SS-’* 

3% — % 

43lb- U 
24 + % 

2* + v# 

4 

61% + lb 

5? - w 

UFA 

19% — % 
n% + % 
ns- v# 

50 

17% 

43% — % 
17*# +1% 
34% +1 
13% — % 
7JS- % 
41% 


10 15 
20 IS 
34 


3 8 26 
a i2 n 
08b 20 IS 
10 15 


100 


32 

AO 

60 

.17 

64 

160 


20 13 
16 9 
20 13 
27 15 


160 


10 17 
33 


00 

200 

Si 

08 

1J5 


212 


20% 16'A HonJI 
30 14% Hondl* 

201* 15% HandH 
21V# 14% Hanna 
44 27 HarBrj 

3$ 19% Marina l 

129# 7% Hcrntah 

33% 14% HrpRw 
35 22*# Harris 

18* il»* HartSrn 
29 19 Harteo ._ .. 

39% 24% Hartmx 1JB 10 1« 
17** 13% HattSe 160 10.7 11 
23% 151# HawEI 104 4.9 10 
139b 8 Kayert 30a 36 8 
34% 23% Hade In 

S % 9 Hazuab 

13*# HrthAs 

g va 27 HltCrPn 
% 10% HIHJSA 
15% 9% Hecks 
18*# 13% HPdaM 
23Tb 14% Hellmn 
30% 15% Hellla 
55% 34% Helm . 

1114* 77% Heinz bf 1J0 
30 12*# HetneC 

249b 18 HefmP J4 
4% 3% HcmCa 

071# 27V. Hercuts 100 
18*6 18% Her 1 1C s 641 
39U 19% HerlfCpfUS 
191b 14% Herman 
49% 29% Herstiy 100 
10% 5V# Heutan 

44% 31% HewIPk 
30 20% Hexed 

239# 12% Mishear 
13% 8% HIVoll 

2Mb 17% Hllnbrd 
73% 45% Hilton 
37% 27% Hitachi 
57% 35% Hal Wav 
83*1 58% HollyS 
27% >2 HomeD 
2a Vs 11*# HmFSD 
9U 7 HmeG pf 1.10 120 
3D<4 201% Hnutke JO 6 54 
IB 8*# HmitFn 00 27 5 
40% 43% Honda 0Oe 6 10 
447# 44% Honwell 1.90 

29 19% HrznBn 1.12 

7*b 39b Horizon 
48*# 34% HospCp 
30% 22 Hateiln 
39 23% HouBfiM 

19*# 13% HouFab 
38% 24% Hounlnt . 

79*# 41 Halid pf AJS 

28% 18% Houlnd 204 
70 39% HouNG 

17% > HpuOB 
23% 14% Howl Cp 
27% 20% Hubbrd 
13% 9% Huffy 
IB 12% HtUhTl 
23% 17% HugfiSe 
34% 21% Human 
V 19% HuntMf 
41% 239# HuftEF 
31*# 1SV# Hvdral 
15% 22% ICMKl 
19% 16% lawn 
11% 6% ICN 
30 22% ICWPf 

t M tNAIn 
IPThnn 
IRT Pr . 

ITT Cp 160 
ITTpfH 460 
ITT pfj 460 
ITTpfK 460 
61% 44% ITTpfO 560 
44*# TO ITTpfH 2J5 
i 43% ITT pfl 460 
*# 13*# mint 1J0 
1% 16% IdahQPs 

19% 13% IdealB 

26% 17% IllPowr 204 1 Dl 3 7 
19% 13% llPowpf 264 110 
19 15 llPowpf 221 110 . 

20% 15% llPowpf 235 T10 
37% 271# llPowpf 4.12 110 
34% 251# llPowpf 308 116 
361# 21U ITW 04 1.9 14 
4014 27*4 HnpOim 269» 50 8 
10*# 5% IrriPlCP 7 

14% 8% INCO 00 10 
62 45 IndIMpf 768 110 

49 MdiMpf 708 110 
104% 91% IndIMpf 1200 11.9 
19% 14 IndIMpf 215 110 
19*6 14% IndIMpf 205 122 
38% 17% indict 168 7 A 6 
131b 51# Inexco 671 
26*6 131# Irtfmtc 32 

50*# 33% ingorR 200 5J 16 

37% 2# InaRpf 2J5 4J 

15% It ingrTcc 04 40 22 

2S% 19% InMStf 00 21 

481# 38% InldSfpf 4JS 100 

21*6 14% Insllco 160b 5J II 
9% 3% injpRj 
26% 11% IntgRsc 
2B 19 IntgRpf 263 11.9 
511# 42 IntgRpf 603el40 
35% 251# IntgRpf 425 110 
131# 71# IntRFn 
19*# It l tens* 

70% 55 inrerco 
13% 9% Intrfst 
53% 4i infrtk 
15*# 8% intmed 
24% 14*# IntAlu 
1381# 99 IBM 
29 isv. Intern 
30*4 23% inIFIau 
111# 5Vb Inf Marv 
7% 2% inrHrwf 
52 23% InfH pfC 

42 Mu, InfH of* 

34*# 17*# intHnfD 



441 27*# 27*# 27*#— % 

116 14% 13% 14% + % 

269 29 28*# 28*4 

418 37% 37% 37V#— % 

IB 17*# 16% 169#— % 

411 24 23% 23% 

56 1094 9% 10 — % 

52 25% 25% 25% 

157 12% 11% 12% + % 

563 23 22% 22% — *# 

322 33’# 23 23% + % 

76 21 20*4 21 + 1# 

87 14% T4M 141# — % 

205 14% 16% 14*#— % 

436 21% HR# 20*#— % 

386 28% 28% 28*# + % 

36 14 1964 541# 53 53 — 1% 

10 4 120 158 120 +6*4 

25 97 1M# IB 18—4# 

13 23 3013 IW# 19% 19% + % 

53 6% 6% 6% 

47 10 1071 34*6 34% 34*# 

25 202 18% 18% IBVb — *# 

40 10 33 33*# 32*6— % 

16 814 19% 18*# 191# + % 

11 13 4M 45% 45% 4516 — % 

53 4% 4% t<# + % 

0 1614457 344# 33% 34 

23 14 171 24 25% 25*# 

377 22*4 21*6 21*6— *6 

51 11% 111# 11U 

30 23 22% 23 + % 

. 286 67% 66*6 64*#— H 
J3a 1.1 10 3156 2*% 29V, 29*k + % 
160 1.9 14 412 541# 53*# 53% 

12 73*# 73% 73V— V# 

195 16% 141# 16% + 16 

296 25% 25% 25% — U 

S3 8% 8*6 8% 

697 24*# 24% 341#— % 

_ . 142 151# 14% 14% — % 

0 10 464 53% 53 53*6 +1U 

30 11 1687 40% 59% 40U + U 
40 9 32527% 271# 27*#+% 
43 41# 4% 4% — % 

10 13 2753 45% 45 45% 

90 13 45 28% 27*# 281# + % 

112 38*4 38% 38*6 + U 

81 141# 14 141# 

534 39% 38% 39 +1# 

11 8016 79% 80% + % 

9221 27% 27*6 27% + 1% 

79 70 69% 6*%— % 

39x10% I0U 10ft 
11 1SU 18% 18%—% 
46 27% 26% 26*6- % 

108 10*6 10% 104b- % 

957 1316 12% 12%-% 

29 21% 21% 21% — % 

20 16 2738 33*# 33% 33% + Hi 

10 17 23 27% 27V# 27% — % 

569 34*4 34*# 34% + % 

101 17 16*6 16*6— U 

99 sT + * 

34 17*6 17% 17% ♦ 1# 

10 237S am 32% 32% + Mr 

2 64 64 64 — % 

4 61 61 61 +1 

1 59% 5S*fc S9%— 1# 

0% 60% 40% + 1# 
4% 4Mb 44% 

3 61*6 611# 611# 

1093 14*6 1416 14% 

445 2116 20% 21U + % 
686 14 13*# 13%—% 

■*047 25% 25% 25*6 

lOz 18 V. 18V6 18*# 

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20 15 
30 10 
40 9 
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90 7 
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36 9 

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100 

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20 14 
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270 90 
162 106 


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4060Z34U 33% 

64 15 Ml# 34%—% 
207 38*6 38*6 38% + W 
708 9% 9*6 9*4 — % 

1376 13*4 13% 13% — 1# 

2010z 6016 HI# 601# + 1# 


3000a 45% 45% 45% + lb 
■ 100% 100% 100% -3% 


10 


UOolOJ 
368 40 
M &S 
240 S3 


12 


02 36 9 


ItttlL.. „ ... 

38 18% IB*# 181#— 1# 
25 18% 18% 18Vb — % 
10 25*u 25% 25% + 1# 
744 5% 5% 5% — % 

410 26*# 25% 261# + % 
365 49% 40% 48*6—1% 
2 351# 35 35 

14 13% 11% IT%— % 

593 24% 23*6 23% + % 

27 4516 4SU 451# + % 

813 18% IB*# 10*6 + I# 

533 51# 5% 51#— % 

438 20*# 1W# 20 V# — *6 
7 25*6 25% 25%— 1# 

101 44% 44 44% + 16 

540 33 32 32%— *4 

74 IM 11% 12*6 + *k 

45 191b 19% 19% + V6 

82 46% 44*6 4ft*# 

232 11 10% 10% 

50x JOV# 49% 49% + % 

59 9% 9U 9% 

2 19 11% 19 


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... .19 18% 19 + U 

15 1314144 1281# 124U 124% —1U 
10 10 71 24*4, 24% 24% — 16 

1* 16 1737 29% 2B% 29 — *6 

1405 8*6 Bib 81# — % 

284 3*# 5% 51# + % 

45 51% 51% 51% + % 

T 30*4 30*4 38*4—1% 

73 25*6 25*# 251# + V# 

43% 32% Inf Min 200 60 II 845 40% 39*6 40 — % 

39 30V. InfMn Pf 460 10J 1 38 38 38 

3T# 33 IntMuJf 104 50 12 IM 32 01% 01% + % 

57*# 44 lntPapr 200 49 33 1100 49*6 49*# 49%— % 

17% 9% intRc, 19 913 14*6 1416 14% + % 

64% W*4 inrNrtn 208 50 9 1743 44% 44% «4%— % 

43*6 28*6 intpbGp 166 24 14 — — 

19V 10*# fnfBokr 
20% 15% InhPPw 1.90 90 9 

211b 16% inPwpf 228 10.9 

21*# 14% lDwaEI 1.90 90 10 

31% 22 lowllG 274 86 7 

23 17 lOWlll pf 201 100 

36 75 lowaRs MW 8.7 9 

37*6 24<# Ipqico MM 80 * 

13% 9*# IPCoCo J4 17 13 
AX* 239# IrvBk, 194 50 7 

51 42*# IrvBk pf S.llel02 


031 34 


277 41*6 41 41*6 + % 

75 18% 18% 18% + % 
250 20% »*# 20% + V. 
400= 71 S 21 
94 2046 20*6 20*# + 1# 
44 21 30% 31 + *6 

200z 22 22 22 + % 

41 IK 35% 15*6— % 
112 34% 14*6 34% 

27 12*6 12% 12*6 
61 37% m# 37% + 16 
40 50 50 50 — % 


1.12 30 
04 16 
■ 12 0 
10*9129 
102 10 
800 120 


100 26 
164a 40 
100 19 
.80 21 
100 £6 
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100 


34% 20 JWT s 
34% 23% Jftlver 
28% 14 Jni ni wv 
13*# 10*6 JapnF 
45U 24*6 JPffPff 

M 47 JerCpf 

101 78% JerCpf 1160 11.1 

18*6 13 JerCPl 218 121 
10% 5% JSwIcr 

47% 38 jahmJn 
44U 37% JafmCn 
27** 21% Jargen 
24% 15*6 Jos ten i 
27% 2IU JOvMfo 
10% 7*6 KDI 

18% 9*6 KLM s 
41% 28% Kmart .... 

40’# 28 KN Ertp )0B 
14% 12*# KolsrAI .151 
S9W 51 Kol S9pf 4.75 90 
42% 52 KaltApf «JS 90 
2116 14% KolsCe 00 1.1 

19 15'# KolCaf 107 76 
IS B% Kanch 00 40 
95% 87 Kaneb Plll4&el30 
24% 14% KCIvPL. 236 106 
33*# 25 KCPL Pf UO 122 
37% 29 KCPUPf 40S 11.9 
18*6 141# KCPLpf 230 11J 

20 15% KCPLpf 203 111 

54% 38% KCSou IJffi 26 
19% 12% KonGE 204 11S 
39*6 28% KanPLt 294 70 
22% IB KoPLPl 202 100 
22% 1714 KoPLpf 203 103 
45 18% Kertyln 

115 49*6 KatVPf 

20 IM4 KgufBr 

18% KoufPf 
08 48 Kaufpf 

59*6 29% Kef km 
30% 22 Keltwd 
3% f# Kenat 

24 1946 KMimf 

20 20% KvUUI 

14** 9*4.KerrGI „ — 
34% 17% KerCPt l.» 90 
33% 241# KerrMC 1.10 17 
29U 171# KevBk 
4% 2% KevCon 
1S% II Kpyliff j 
J7% 24% Kidd* 

59% 3916 KlmbCI 202 
39% 23% KngMRd 36 
29 17*# Koger 200 

29*# 1546 Kolmar 
22% 17 Kepera 
14 12% Korean 

4S<# 31 Kroger 260 <4 
22% 7% KuMmf 

47% 34% K voter 
73U 13 Krar 
29 22% LN Ho 

17% 12% C.LE Pv 219elS4 
41# 2 LLCCp 

1? • L.LC Pi 

II*# 7"i LTV 


106 II 
00 20 
100 86 
BJ5 106 
174 11 
100 13 


6S 17 
244 80 
04 46 


1 30 40 I 


08 

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03c 9 
60 40 
277* 90 


17 122 32*# 

10 304 30% 

12 431 24% 

77 11% 

6 402 47V 

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10*99 
23 18% 
21 58 10% 

14 3324 444# 

9 345 411# 

18 16 25*# 

15 125 25*# 

14 229 23% 

10 54 746 

8 4141 1846 
10 2294 38% 

14 44 37% 

314 13% 

1 51 
5 51 

23 » 

12 17% 
374 B% 
lOOOOz 93 
5 74| 23 
340z 32 

42101 37% 
31 IB*# 
5 19% 
8 471 51% 

4 S£0 17% 
8 151 38% 

1 22% 
30 211# 
Ml 19% 
4 49% 

5 <12 17 

2 17% 
234 81% 

H 1031 58% 

7 171 37*6 
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15 191 Jl% 

10 (MS 28*6 

89 10% 
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30 744 30 
104 29% 
14 2W 
115 13% 

« 1§8 Wb 
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57 SI 28% 
15 279 17 
24 9S1 18 
243 M% 
12 109 43% 
14 214 19% 
17 12 35% 

< V 18 

11 SO 29 
238 f4<# 

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3 9*# 
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32V. 32V# — Vi 

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11 11% + Vb 

414# 42 — % 
43% 43% +1% 
99 99 —1 

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M* 10% + % 
45% 46 — *# 

40*6 41V# + % 
25*6 25% + % 
29% 25*6— <# 
23 23*6 + % 

7% 7% + % 
17% 18 — 16 
38% 38% — % 
344# 344# — *# 
13% 13% 

51 51 

51 SI —3 
77*6 17% — % 
14*6 17% + 4# 
8% 846— % 
93 93 +4% 

2)1* 2116 
311# 311# — 1% 
34% 36% — 1% 
18% 18*# 

19U 191# — % 
50V. 50*6— % 
171# 17% + % 

»£»*# + % 
22% 22% + % 
71*# 214# 

IB IB -li# 
47 1 # 47V#— 2*i 

14% 1Mb— % 
17% 17% 

81 81—1# 
54 54% — % 

34’# 3C%- 7a 
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21% 21% + % 
27*# 28% + % 
10*6 10«b 
18 18 - % 
2«*# 29*#— U 
28*6 29%— lb 

2* 4* 

13% 13% + M 
351# 15% — I* 
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37 371#— 1*6 

28 281# + % 
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17% 17% 

14% U\k 
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18% 19% + V# 
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28*# 38% - % 
14 14% — % 

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364 M0 
305 1L9 
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SS 41% CTVPf 

34% 16 LTVPf 

49 4216 LTVPf 

MU 10*# LTVPf 

17 10% Lflwnl _ 

29% 14U LOdG* * JJ ’ 
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21% 23 Lotrtlff 5? w 

a fcsss* 3 34 “to 

14% 10*6 LPWtIW ■§* « 

2f1# 70% LoorPf ■» '•< ” 

28U 20% L WFP * ^ 

54% 38% Learjg, MO 3J 

iS 98 LeorS Pf T3& 1 J 

77 14 LMIMS 69 23 n 

34% 25% Ijw+Tr U Hg 

41 W a LceEPt 2 “S 

16% 9 L-PfJE 2 
31*4 I Kb LogPJd* ■“ 

4% 2 V# LefiVoi 

15*# 13% Lehmn 


i l* » ta - 

3 421# <2 42% + 4# 

225 18*6 18% XM— % 

5 44% 43*# 44% + *6 
19 It* 11% 11% — % 
7S7 I486 U% 14% + % 
27 331# 22% 23% + *6 
ii* » n# 7u- % 

4 an# 33% 23% 

16 9*6 m 9*6 
53 3% 3% 3%— % 
139 12 11% 11% + 1# 

* m 2& 

93 18% 18% Mb— % 
203 31 30*6 21 +14 

9* 42% 40% 42% +1% 
31 14 lHlAtK 
44 21% 28*6 21 + % 

<5 3 2% 3 . 

108e110 280 K% M% 10% — Ya 

10 21 2M Vfl# 13*6 13%— % 


10 23 
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12? iSS SS3t. 30 '0 "74 19% 18% W + % 

mu IM M 30 1104 35*6 35% 35% + *< 

SS 2% LOF lS S ■ » s* « 

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Sb LtnO 02 23 17 7 31% 31% MU— % 

If* LJHT W 04 13 1W M 87*5 — % 

3SS ?7» U ml led s. 3 2* S92 4% 47*6 CTb-% 


5o7 17*6 l imited 02 3 3* 3» va— vj 

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HSSrt M0 1J 3 173% 173% 173% — 5*6 

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mS 345# LACkM* 2 M* 10 * 32W 51% 51% OT*4 + % 

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30 

25 

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22 

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3*6 LI LCD 
It LILPfB 
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21% LILrtJ 
8% LILPfX 
9 LILpfW 
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24*6 11% ULPfU 
21 0% LILPjT 

14*# 4 LIL Pf P 

19% 7 LILpfO 
29% 17*6 LongDs 
331# 22V# Loral 
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38 22% La Load 

SSSttfEWdria 

»» fS* LoPLPf 3.16 UJ 
31% 22% LPUwGa 204 73 
SO 34 LOWS! 260 AS 
31% 16U Lowe* ,-3} 

19% Lufend 1.16 
32% 24 Lutnat 
33*# 15% LucfcvS 


03 51 50% 51 . .. 

2 2152 I 7*6 8 — % 

6taX X 30 
170827 27 27 +1 

50Z44 44 44 — 1 

81 19*4 79V# T9%— % 
19 19% mb mi— % 
49 19*6 19% 19*6 + % 
42 23% 21% 23% — % 
13 18*6 18% lHb— % 

44 14% 14% W%— *6 
5 18% 17*4 18% + % 

m sm* 27*6 28%-.% 
574 31% 31 21% + % 

45 12 11% 12 +% 

1X0 33 9 . 05 37% 31% 31*6 

000 30 41 350 22 21%21%—*b 

144 32% 321# 3Z% + % 
31 23% 23% 33*t — *6 
77 30% 30% 30 % 

__ . 4 44% 441# 44%—% 

L3 17 1441 29% 28*6 28*6— *6 

50 13 491 22% 22% 22% 
if 16 20 Via 3Kb 30 30 — fb 

1.1* 50 12 991x22% 22 22 — % 


J2 25 IS 
01 16 18 
JAb A7 10 


ix iql# i ..veils 08 1 4 10 20 14 13% 13% — 1# 

rtlb M MAcSw Sum 592x 19*6 19% 19*6 + % 

555 JJSl 68 iS 29 226 544b 5K6 54 — *6 

SgS MOOT* IM 63 7 34222M21*4 2Z%+*b 

fit ’5% {wdT 26 9 154 11% 11% 11*6 

37*6 24 MDU 2^ AJ 9 

42 34 MEI 0° 13 If 

T7% 9% MGMGr 04 

13% 9% fWGMGr Pt44 

151b 10 MGJWUo JO# b, m. — ^ ,v 

Sj 17%MGMH^^»??g <5 ^6 27% 2m 

3£ a»85p s iS 

18 11% MotiRas 

3M# 94 MadCJ IM 26 7 

2»% 1*# MgtAal 1060C 

33% 12% Monhln 30b 26 48 
S% 13% Matddyt 32 1.9 
2716 H*4MonrCB .14 0 26 

43V# 22% JWfrHon 8-1 

5t% 41 NUrHPf *-5O«120 
51% <0 MlrHof 567C120 
9% 5% viMonwl 


26 43 
20 
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31 

45 

516 

137 

443 


34% 24% 34% + % 
38*6 30% 38% 

17% T7 17 
13% 13% 13%—% 
14% 14% 14%—1# 


10 20 153 


2.9 8 


200 

104 

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160 


46 9 
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20 
16 18 
14 17 
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35% 21 MAPCO 160 
5 3 M oral* 

2% «, Morale 

38% IMi MorMid 160 
39*b 16% Marlon s 30 
12% B*6 MurkC 63 
11% 13*h Market 100 
95% 44% Morrtol 04 
72*# 40 MTSflM 
S9 30V. MOrtM 
U 8% MoryK 
35*6 22% Masco 
15% 8 Maa/Hr 
20 15% M asM 

3% 1% MasevF 
29% 20% Marta* 

12% 9% Moslnc 

47% 51*4 Matsu E 
14% 7*6 Mattel 

11 4*6 Motet wt 

15% 9% MOiam 4 

58% 34% MOVOs 168 30 II 
55% 34*6 Mtrytg 240n46U 
31% 25% McDrpf 20S EJ 
24% 20% McDrpf 240 102 
31 23% McDarl IM 73 49 

11*6 61# McOrl wt 
10% 6% Me DW 00 

69*# 43% MCOnlS 
04 V# 531# McDnD 
52 37% McGrH 

39% 19*4 Mclnta 
50 33 McKess 200 

15% 9% McLean 
6% 3 McLeawt 
29*6 20 McNeil 160 
43*6 29 Mead 100 
24*6 13% Mewin' 04 
33% 24% Medtrn 36 
54% 33% Mellon 248 


34*6 34*6 34*4 

20 13 1300 52% 51*6 52 + % 

1GB 11% 11% 111b + % 
296 39% 39% 39% — % 
54 2 1% 2 + % 

83 15 14% 14% 

15 17% 17 17% — % 

493 27*# 27 27*6 +% 

5 4059 39% 39 39% + *i 

51% 50% 50% — 1 
47*# 47 47%—% 

4*6 <% 4*6 + Vb 
_ 20 19*6 20 

247 35 34% 34%— Vb 

30 4% 4*# 4% + V6 

1804 *# *6 7» 

136 3746 3716 37% + % 

127 39*6 38*6 39 + % 

9% 9% 9%— % 
15 15 15 

94% 93% 93%— % 


4 

58 

188 

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33 

20 

201 


30 20 1473 71% 70*6 7M6 +1% 


113 
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55 

540 

14 

71 

174 


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164 

100 


2.1 22 


50 13 
10 


27*6 22*6 Met km Pf2J0 10.1 


104 

130 

100 

160 


109e 54 
■74e114 


48% 34*# Metvtll 
70 44*6 MercS/ 

113% 78V* Merck 
80 41*. Merdm 

34*6 22 MerLyn 
3% 3 MesoOf 

22 13% MaOPt 

35*6 28*6 MesOR 
7*# 5% Meson 

4% 2% Mctfefc 
32 22 MIEpfC 350 12.9 

62 44 MIE PfF 8.12 130 

S9% 44% MIE pfG 748 136 
3*6 2% MoxFd 01* 80 
20% 17 MDCnpf 265 94 
IB 12*6 MchER 100 B0 IQ 
7% 4% Mlcklbs 64 U 29 
55% 33% Mldeon 2J4 A9 
1496 9% MJdSUl f0l 125 
22% 14% MldRas 
30% 22*6 MWE ■ 

15% 11% MlltnR 
06 73% MMM 

34% 24% MlnPL 
15% 4*6 Mlsnins 
B 4 Mitel 
34% 23% MOtM 
3% % ulMOblH 

9 % 5% ModCat 
32 16% Mahasc 

15 2*6 MobkDt 

19% 14% Monrch 
51 40% Moman 250 

24 14% MonPw 260 

19% 14% MonSl 
10% <*& MONY 
19% 12% Moores 
24% 1BH MOCH-M 


12B2 57% 54% 54*6— % 

12 % 12 12 — % 

35*6 34% 35 — % 

74% 14% 14% 

19% 19% 19% 

2 1 % 2 + % 
28% 28% 2S%— % 

12% 12*6 12% — 16 

.. 50 57*6 58 + *6 

4027 I4T6 14*6 14*4 + % 

20* 10% 10% 10*# + % 

380 15% M% 15 — *6 

987 54% 55*# 55*4— Vb 

178 53% 52% 53% +1*6 

4b 24% 26 34 — Vb 

1331x25*6 2S*6 25%— lb 
UlSx 2516 25 25 — % 

39 4*6 6% 4%— % 

_ 25 9% 9% 9% 

10 15 2426 68*6 68% 68%— % 
20 9 417 78% 78*6 78%—% 
27 1« 438 51% 51*6 51*# 

16 28% 27% 27*6 — % 

92 48% 48% 48*6— % 

241 IK 10% 10% — W 

125 3*6 3% 3*6 

47 28*# 21% 28% + % 

111 41% 41 411b + % 

148 19% 19% 194b 

289 31*6 31*6 31*6— % 

2833 54 53*6 53*#—% 

40 27*# 27% 27*4 + % 

36 14 1210 47% 47% 47% + % 

1.9 II 38 <8*6 <7% 48 
29 16 1059 110*6 139*# 110*6— *6 
10 17 72 75% 74% 75% + *# 

25 23 3084 32 31*6 31*6— *6 

1D3S3 2% 2% 2% 

3 2419 13% 13 13%— *6 

14 33% 33 
7 94 7 4*6 

4 3% 3% 

Mlz 13% 30 

IOOj 61% *1% i!% + % 
3001 59% S*% 59% 

344 2% 2% 2% 

1B9 21% 20% 71% +1% 
12 14*6 14% 14*6 + % 
4 5*6 5% 5% 
910999 40% 40 48%— % 

S 3507 Ml# 14 Mb + '# 

A2 54 14% 14% 16*e— % 

UA 90 1| 44 ®S*6 30 30% + % 

04 30 IS 57 12% 11% 12% + *6 

050 45 13 157* 7j*u 78 78 — *6 

274 75 8 293 34% 35% 34% +1% 
AS 7*4 7% 7*6 + % 
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6*6 


35 7 
20 9 
10 12 
20 II 
50 9 


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44 52% 

01 25% 

90% 15 

M9% 98 GhPpUU n ni 
KSl^gSESr 60 46 9 

52 jgb gH eOK 254 U W 

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13% 7% Oriinoo SB 49 13' 

12*# 8% prtoaP 08 

9% 6% Orton pt JO AJ 
31*# 24 Orton Pf 2J5 9fi 

31% l**6OUT0dM 06 25 9 

33% 18% OrrnTr J2 23 U 

19 U OtfSMs 50 XI- 11 

37 25% OwenC 100 46 * 

■*go g*yiw 10EO20 » 

15% 10% Oxford 04 U 13- 


KNtoa • 44 AS 
2 32 B 32+1 
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41% 31 PanhEC 230 4J 11 

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39% 25% PatMl 1.12 30 W 990 31% 30*# 30% + % 

62 29 54 10 UBb 1796 IS — lb 

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39 30 POPLM 4JD UJ 

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906 81% PaPL.MTlJOO 116 
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5496 30*# PWMBM 200 42 3* I108 52*4 52 52% 

18% 9% PeopEn 130 63 7 6U2 IM 17*4 17*6 + Mr 

44 24% PepBoy 00 6 18 413 42% 41% 43% + % 

40% 39% PepsiCo 108 36 24 3B0 59*6 5B% 59 — Va 
3W& T7% PerkCI 64 20 12 438 Zt*6 33% 33*6 

10 7*6 Prndcm UWI U 375 n* B*6 **# + V6 

22% 13*4 PervOr 08 10 15 90 28% 196* 28% + 16 

44 38 PMrie 100 30 M 323 411# 41 41% + % 

2W6 24*6 PefR* 173e1A3 30 206 24 24 —46 

17 it pefRspfur tJ a w, ui# u% + % 

7% 4 PtrllW 100*315 33 41# 4% 4% + % 

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22% 12% PnetoO 1506 UM 17% 17%— « 

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43% 30*6 PfetorS J* & 2* 3148x4)% 4m 414* + I# 


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29*# 23 PttflE pf 360 tU 

35 25 pnriEpf 400 126 

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644* 50% PfltlE of 805 US 

114b 9% PtlREpf 101 U0 
10% 4% PMIBpf 103 123 
to 43 PhflEpt 765 120 

RNb 49b PhflEpf 138 138 

TO 97 PM p| 17.12 140 

71% 51 PtlQEpf 9 JO 130 

60% 44 PMIEpf 76D 130 

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23% 15% PhUSuto 103 AS 12 


B 302 U 


14*4 IS 

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33Qz» 34% 34% + % 

. MOxassb asw as% + % 
*•00x43% 45 45 — 1b 

112 1)% 10** 10% + % 
214 Wb 94* 1016 + 46 
*40x99 99 59 

239 WT# 9% 936 + 1* 
140023 131% 121% —1% 
43mz73% 704b 71 +46 
54*0x60 59 99 

14Ctt» 58 39 

48 71 38% 20%—% 


9SV6 64% Pbm*- ADO 40 T1 2*61 M% S7 87%— ** 

25 WW PhDoki 08 Z1 12 ISA 2216 334* 32**>— % 

60*# 25 PMInpfUO 16 1 54*# 54*# 54**— W 

54% 33*6 PtlHPet 360 73 029093916381639% + % 


184b 11% PtJflP wf 
23*6 23 PlllPtpf 

28% 14% PNIVH 00 10 11 

34*6 23% PlfOAs 01 6 10 

34 23% PfcNG 203 76 H) 

23% 14*6 PlerT 14 

56% 34% P Usbry UI U n 

34 21% Pioneer 104 A7 5 

21*# 13% Ptanrf-I .I7r 1.1 

44*6 27% PIRWB 100 20 U 

84 55% PltnBpi Z12 20 

13 9% Pimm 

15*6 8*6 Ptonlts 00 10 16 

13% 7 Ptanfra J4b 1J 13 

13*6 8% Playboy B 

30% 19% Plcsey JM« «A 10 

2 TV. 15% PbgoPd 00 10 IT 

32% 24% Poiorld 

>1% 11 Pondrs 

21% IS Po® To; 60 AO 

79% 14% Portae MUM 
31% 13% PortGE IM U I 

105*6 90 PoGof 1100 11.1 

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34% 28% ParGof 4*0 120 

34% 38% PorGpf 402 US 

30% 25*# Ponte* IS* 40 U 

13% 19% PotmEI 1U 63 10 

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38% 25 Prtmrk 360 50 8 


30% 114. PrimeC 
33*# 13*6 PrimMs 69 
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16% 7% PrdRsh J2 
47% 31% Protor 100 14 
73 14% PSwCol Z00 86 

20% 16% PSCofpf 210 103 
9% 4*6 PS Ind 160 UJ 
8% 6 PSIn pf 

4% PSIopf 


1901 in li*# 11*#—% 
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23 33*6 23*6 23% + % 
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129 23*6 2H6 32% + H 
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16 15V. 15 15% + % 

444 44*6 44 44%— % 

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9B 9% 8** «*#— *6 

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24 34% 34 34% + H 

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1233 31% ao% 31% + % 
950X 44 44% 45% + % 

25* 19*6 19 191#—% 

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Tot just nuts about Grow Group products . l 


.r 



For our 1984 Annual Report, wrirc: 

Grow Chemical Europe N.V., Oudescraat R 
B-2630 Aanselaar. Belgium. Dept. G 


Grow Group 

ru, kituuHnna Ana nf nr ir iMuJWmrKffirl hTHfltl 6# (W 


Amrigrip. Devoe, Ameritone, ttweo of our wefl-known brand ■ names- 


UMomh 
Htaobm Stock 


Dto.YM.FE 


Sis. 

IMt High Law 


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44% 30 Seaorm 60 Z0 10 430 40% 40 40%— % 

21% 12% Saaavl 17 130 17 MV, 14%—% 

28*4 30 SoalAIr 00 10 14 121 25% 25% 25*4 

32*6 21% SeotPw 160 30 8 71 24% 34% 24*# + % 

45% 40% SeorteG 160 1J 14 2434 53*6 SJJ6 WJ- % 

39% »% Bears 104 40 9 3740 61* 3796 3716 + % 

31*6 19 SecPoc»104 40 7 450 39% 28*# 3M6— % 


20 11% StooLt 

34% Mb SwcCpb 
18% 1316 Shakkw 
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14*6 11 MutOm 
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21% 14*6 NAFCO 160 &1 11 
33% 2D NBD, 

23 12*# NBI 

22% 17% NCH 
43 23% NCNB 

30% 20*6 NCR 
14% 10% NLInd 
34*# 25% NUI 
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48% 33% NWA 
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28*6 71% NalCO 100 
29*6 31*6 Nashua 
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2D 11% NotEdu 14 

29% 18% NatFGs 108 
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33*6 2316 Nil 
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15 11% NevPpf 100 106 

21 IF NevPpf 2J0 105 

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12% 8% NevSvL 00 40 9 
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37*# 211# NEnP Pt Z76 100 

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7«6 19*# NYSpfA Z 990110 
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44*4 31 Newmt 160 20 40 
4% 1*6 Nwpark 

20*6 13% NIOMP 260 WJ 7 

30H 22 NlQMpf X40 110 

41% 31 NIOMpI 465 116 

44% 34 NlQMpf S25 UJ 

27% 34% NlQMpf Ale 20 

24% 19% N HiM ol 202el10 

45*# 48% NftiMpf 7J2 126 

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17*6 096 NwSIYf 
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29% 21% Norwst 160 46 16 

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8% 3 NutrlS Ml 

89 40 NYNEX 600 70 S 


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32 224# 22% 22% — % 

132 201# 19% JO — I# 

SfiS 33% 33 33*6— % 

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102 14% 13% 141b— % 

138 2% 2*6 3% 

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306 33*4 33% 33*fc +*# 

10 1254 15% 15*6 IK— % 

30 13 11 21 21 21 

XI II 942 43% 43 43V# + % 

36 9 2444 30 29*# 29*4— % 

1.9 480 10*6 W% 10*6 

76 8 1 33% 33’# 33% 

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30 1411024 81*6 81% 81% 

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442 241# 24 2Mb 
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385 33 32*4 32*4 

181 15% 13 15% + % 

44 30 29% 30 + % 

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86 71 57*4 57 57 +1 

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30 12 240 30*# 3016 30% — % 

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103 311# 30*6 31 — % 

50* 14*# 14*# 14*# — % 

2*0* 72 22 22 +11# 

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17x11% 11% 11% + % 
288 44 43% 43*6 

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737 36 2S*# 26 

16& 72 72 72 +2 

152 26% 24% 24% + % 

9 19 19 19 + % 

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178 44 43*# 43% — % 

144 1*4 1*6 1*J 

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2000x45 45 4S +% 

260 271# 24*6 27 + % 

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2*4 45*# 48 48*6 + 2 

110* 381# 37% 381# —1*6 
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199 51*4 5196 51% - % 

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507 30% 00% 00% 

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47% 51% PSEGpf 742 174 
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85% 65% PSEGpf 902 11J 

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15*6 9*# PupcfP 146 110 

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10% 5% Pyro 

511# 29% QuokOs 104 

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11% 6*6 Quanex 
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4oaz4m 4* 44 — 1% 

740X42 42 43 

130x54% 55% 54% +1% 
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130x40% 40% 40% + % 
38Q 4% 4% 4% 

100X10 10 10 — % 

27 11% 11 11%— % 

12 14% 14 U 

13 14*6 14% 14% + % 
11 MV# 1416 14*6— % 




■ 

5 
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20 14 
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1251 27% 27 27% 

1751 30% 30% 30% 

17D0B 34% 3*% 34% + % 
3130X 40 40 40 +1% 

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115 19% 19% 19% ♦ % 
980X 40% 41% 41% + % 
5 21% 21% 7IW— U 
110x106 105 104 +3 

100X 68 68 48 

2790X 71% 70** 71 ♦% 

HOz 45% 45% 45% + lb 
20z 44 44 44 — *6 

STOx 84% 84% 04% +4 
18 2% 2% 3% + % 
12 11 10% 10% — % 
21 6% 4% 6% + % 

1001 15% 15% 15% 

119 17% 17 17%— Vb 

942 29 27V# 2746— 1% 

244 20*6 » 20%—% 

140 7*4 7% 7*4— % 
US 32% 3T*6 31*4— V 
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1.95el28 
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364 90 


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36*4 23% 
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31% 22% 
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15% 11% 
44% 47% 
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Oak Ind 
OokfteP 102 
OcdPel 230 
OedPwt 
OccJPpf 300 
OcdPpf 208 
OeelP of Z12 
OcdPpf 200 
OodPpf 405 
OcdPpf 1530 
OcdPf 1402 
ODECO 160 
Ogaen 160 
OtdeEd 168 
OtiEdPf L«0 
Otl Ed Of 400 
OtiEdPf 704 
OhEdPf 704 
OnEdPf BJA 
OfiEdpf LSI 
OfiEdPT 3.92 
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OflEtfPf 804 

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OhPpfB 700 


58 11 
70 10 


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116 
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124 
120 
130 
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125 
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1833 1*6 1% 

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1050 54% 56% 
295M8 107*4 
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494 22 21% 

67 29% 29% 

1930 15% 14% 
50x31 31 

3Mz 36 34% 

2090* U 54% 
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490x 45 49% 

51 9*6 27% 
22 30% 00% 

2 15*6 15*6 
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1050 13% 12*# 
250x67 17 

5410x44*4 45 


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44*6 29% RCA 
104 71 RCA pf 

34 2«*6 RCA pf 

37% 29*# RCA pf 
9*6 6% RLC 
4*6 3 RPC 

18*4 121# RTE 04 
11% 7 Radio? 

44% 25% RatePur 160 
8% 5% Ramod 
21 % low Raneo 64 
7*6 2% RanprO 
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164 30 13 8618x45% 45 45% +_% 


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21% 14*6 Rdfiattrf Z12 11 J 
34% 20 RdBal pf 329el5J 
14*4 11 RHRef 102s 93 

17% 9 RecnEa 

12*6 7% Redmn 00 

9% 7% Reece 
1*6 *6 Renal 

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8*6 3K ReMlr 
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12*6 6*6 RpGyp* 00 
49*4 31% Ron MY 104 ... 
27*6 20*4 RNYpfCLU 11 J 
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53% 40 RNYpfB JAftelOA 
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32% 22% Rha M 
14% 9% vi Rover 


61 104*6 103 104 +2% 

714 33% 37*6 32*6 + *6 
7 34*6 34% 14% + % 
31 7% 7*6 7% 

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34 18% 18*6 1816— % 

. 121 11% 11% 11*6 
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10 4818 4% 6% AH- % 

AJ 10 * 18% 18 11 — *6 

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31 9*4 9*6 9% 

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36* Trcnwjr .100 A0 8 

3» »b Trnwld 08 U 13 

21* 9* TWrtdwfA 

32% 24 Twtdpf ZOO 60 

IS 5ft I*!** W0 11.1 . 

4M 25% Trawler 764 A3 W 

fl* 50% Travpf 4.16 70 

37* 19* TrlCon 303eUL1 

30 20* TrlQipf 200 96 

S 13 TrtoinO 00 1J 2] 
31* 20* TrfaFc 160 3J 8 
Wb 34* Tribune 04 IJ 17 
Mf 4 Trienfr 0ta BJ 11- 
8* 5* Trice jd 17 U 
37% 13* Trtnfy 00 JJ 
25% 11* TrttEna .Mb S 39 
14* 8* Trtifipf V.1S 80 


21* 31% 21%— » 
fl 12% - 12% 12% 

50 20* 20* 2D*— * 

n? % 

41 fl . 5796 38 + * 

217 22 31% 21* 

9* .9% 9* 


320* «% 9S*'95M + * 


10% W# 10V# 

JH 30* Sflb 30 — % 
871 am 3SM 3896 + % 

'S 2L 2* ZL + % 

39 BM » 33% +1 

771 17* 17 17% + M 

631 47% 47 47 - * 

. 14 5496 559#. 55*— S 
« ® »*-M 

18 27* 27 27 — Vs 

174 ST* fl* 71% + vL 
9 26* I6M 24* + M 
427 47M 44% 

26- Sfi -596 5% 

SA 4% 4U 4% 

IU UM 13* 13% 

1* 32 21% 21 K— vb 

51 U* 12* T2%- 


im S% 

W 34b 

271* WtxEP ZM 47 1 i*2 JJ* Mi a# 

Of 2% WrUAr TO <5* 65 TS? % 

10OB2J 12 




«H 49* Wrlply 

J* 11% WYteLb 

17 wynn. 


32 

00 


u 12 

30 7 


4dS J* 


,s. 


»* M* W 

29 19 


r™ M « 10 Tin §£ g 



= IOmISS Y m 74 2 ,S Sfl# 29* awT 

um fSIme M ■’ u iom ^ 0% u% 

*• "s ne S hi* 




Statistics Index 



AMEX nrlrn P.14 EnmtOBl resorts P.14 
*MEX Mohs' tows P.14 Film rote noin P.14 
MTSE actus P.11 Cold markets, P.13 

nyse nigia/tewj p.14 imwwr rates pis 
C onoawn stocks P,1B MartuH lommorv P.ll 
Currency rain P.13 OMfent P.M 

P.14 OTC Dock ' P.« 
P.14 Other marfeate P.ll 


Hcralb^^Sribunc 


— *** line 

^Commoollte* 

^ptmdQTKb 


BUSINESS/ FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 11 . 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


** 


Page 13 






"Whenlliave 

an idea,Istick 
with it until 
die very end.” 



s 



x-- 

.t. 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

Champagne by Mail Charts 
New Way to Secure Capital 

. By SHERRY BUCHANAN \ 

Intenunianul Herald Tribune ■ -. 

ARIS — If you want to start a small busmessin France, 
venture-capital firms may not be your best beL For some 
entrepreneurs, there may be better ways of getting start- 
up money. Marc Bungener and Jfcr&rae de Rryqyre, 
creators of In ter Magnum, had. an idea bat needed fi n a n c i ng. A 
Paris-based group of American veniure capitalists told them they 
would be interested only if- they could retain, majority control of 
the new company. Mr. Bungener and his partner declined. 

Instead, the two partners raised 34 percent of the 1.4 million 
francs ($148,936) in stan-up costs from French companies not in 
the venture-capital business, and 25 percent from a qtmsi-govem- 
* mental agency. Another 18 jperceni came frodi the “fonds de 

^placement k risque.” in which • ■ ■ ' - 

a bank, usually govarnment- 
con trolled, takes equity in 
start-up ventures. The rest of 
the shares are divided among 
small, individual investors. 

Through buy-back agree- 
ments — which give the two 
partners the Hist option to 
buy the shares — the two part- 
ners were able to retain majority control of Present International 
SA, the new company, which has been operating for six months. 

In ter Magnum, the service offered by Prfccnt International, is 
to wine and spirits what Interflora is to flowers. Customers can go 
to their local liquor store .and send 10' bottles of champagne 
g anywhere in Francein 24 hours for a 60-franc service charge, plus 
the cost of the champ ag ne: / ■' 

INCH last December, Inter Magnum, through 380 stores, 
has had 6,000 orders, a figure they hope to increase to 
% _ t 150,000 orders for the first year-by enlarging the liquor- 

s' store network, starting a new advertising campaign and improv- 
~u l ing delivery. 

Hi - - The two partners have just added 381 liquor stores to thtir 
^ network through a contract with Etablissements Nicolas, the 
\ i largest French chain of-liquor stores. To build up a large network 
j: fast, the service was offered free to the liquor stores. Only the 
'customer pays. 

•V Without fees from liquor stores, Mr. Bungener and Mr. de 
S- -Rivoyre had to start from scratch to find the money. U I didn’t 
« ! "have a cent after my U.S. venture, so it wasn't obvious to find 
*■’; capital," said Mr. Bungener, a veteran entrepr eneur at 28. At 23. 

'Mr. Bungener launched Gty Magazine in New York, a U.S. 
■^version of Pariscope, the weekly Pans entertainmem guide. When 
; , -^one of his investors did not come up with 50 percent of the 
‘investment aS promised, the magazine folded. 

- Always searching for new ideas, Mr. Bungener stumbled on 
; _'- 5 ‘InterMagnum when a friend mentioned how wefi Interflora did 
*, in France with relatively low capitalization. In 1984, the Sodfett 
. 'Fran^mse de Transmissions Florales SA achieved 35.1 million 
, ''francs in sales of services and 937,608 francs in net profits on 1.5 
t - million orders a year. 

‘ 1 ‘ Mr. de Rivoyre, 34. who has eight years of corporate experi- 
- a 1 .ence in the food and drink sector as well as a two-year stint as an 
•entrepreneur, was the ideal partner. “I was bom in a winebottle,** 
' l "be said. His father is awine producer and distributor in Bordeaux 
:• and his mother has a vineyard in Burgundy. After being product 
' ‘ manager with Etablissements Nicolai, Mr. de Rivoyre set up a 
. cash-and-carry wine business in Brussels. Later, he went to work 
' - *for Cusenier.a subsidiary of Pemod Ricard SA, the French liquor 
■ ‘concern/ as product manager.- . 

. ; 3. . Lqst Apifi^fluit hisjob taset tip InterMagnnm. “It wajta big 
„ . r^risk but wheal have an idea, Istick whhit till the very end,'’ Mr. 
t de Rivoyre s aid. * ■*■';• ** 

. . ■ The investors were sold on -the idea and on the two partners’ 

. ’ v entrepreneurial flan and managing capabilities. Bernard Roux, a 
.self-made man, and chief executive of Roux, SiguHa, Caysac & 
-Goudard (RSCG), <me of France’s largest advertising agencies, 

' . i was the first to believe in the project and .bought 10 percent of the 
•. -company. 

Pernod Ricard Entrepreneur, a subsidiary of Pernod Ricard 
• (CoetimndoiiPagen,CoL3) 

"j Currency Bates 


CramlKaies 


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09OTSI 

L7HS 

UM873 

MCW 

L9S221 

usn 

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M2K 


Other Dollar Values 


Cummcv war UU 
Arvta-PUO 75026 
AntraUS UT 7 
“Aintr. kML 31 JV 
Bol8.Ha.fr. 4136 
BrazHonn. 554000 
Canadian V 13713 
Danfeiikrtme 11375 
EflYPtNUOd 07443 


Currency per UAS Cwrepar per IUU 

Fin. mama M2B Many. imp. 2471 

Greek tone 156.70 Max. ntss 3«OJOa 

Hons Kooo 1 777 Hone, krone U81 

RHOmi rupee 125630 PNlpwo Wj446 

ImkLrwiab 1,11730 Portnaxta 17430 

iridic 0.TO* Saadi rfytri. . less 

Israeli Du*. 131030 Stae.1 1327 

KiMOBI Oner 03034 SuAfr.rwid 230 


Cm i nut n 
S. Kor.wua 


Swed. krona 
■Tohmi 
Thai baht 
TortOSBUro 


Venn. both. 


■ LIAS 
87535 
17530 
1R 

5977 

27X55 

537X5 

3X725 

1330 


tStarfina: 13*58 Irish f 

Sources: Boms Do Benelux (Bntsseli); Banco Commercials ttaHenir fMDaa); Banoue No- 
rtonate ao Ports /Ports); Bank of Tokyo t Tokyo); IMP I SDR); BAH fcflnor, rlyaL dirham). 
Other oata from Routers and AP. 


Interest Rales 


Fraeck 
SterUwi- Ftnec- 
1294-13*. lOMt-IOIfL 

i 2 ih-i 2 <H, iov.-um 

131W-12H. iUMlHi 
1214-121* 10 ‘BrIO O, 

12IV12H. 10ek-UHb 


Jane II 


. ECU SDR 
9W-9H 7% 

tv, -we re. 
w.-Mh 7U 
?K rim 79k 

♦ MrOK, ate 


Key M ouf y Rales Jan* u 


. mmed smte» 

Dtaceent Hate 
Federal Fvedl 
Prime Role 
Broker Lora Rato 
Cem paper S-nt den 
S-roafii Treacenr BOH 
- t^ponHi Traoeerv Wilt 

CfftMUn 

CDtaadm 

wa« Owimw 
uunOonl Rote 
OvsrdoM Rale 

one Moult) tnltrtwpk 

3-mam uienieaft 
i-monlli U U ertwo* - 


cioce prev. 
7Vj m 
74k 7% 

10 W 
B'-WW 8VWH i 
730 745 

7.10 770 

1.15 739 

735 7.15 

• 735 - 770 


MB 430 
US 5J55 
U0 SJO 
170 STB 
575 .175 


Front* 

liuenmnDee Halt 1 BH 

-Coll Money 103^4 It VV> 

OnefliMttinleitink W'-» HRe 

j.moefli MKrtaok Wl 1 M 

Hrwelti interoeek Ml M 


OritoUi 

Bonk Bose Ret* 
"CaUMoaer 
‘fl-dor Treaunr Mi 
34MH1IB imertaek 

-K 

1 JBPBB 

‘Ubtw*** 411 * 

Call Meow 
H-der krterte** 


i>h ills 

.11^ Qi- 

u ji/n u ji m 

no i*i 


5 S 
4VU 4-1 
4$/14 4VU 


Sources Baden. Canrnemank Cretiti 

L*aanaa.lto>dtBa*.BtmkolTokra 


Asian BoUar Befri to 

June II 

1 mentis J .• 

3 moults TT.-7W. 

3 months .. 7 b-7b 

tmoaiM - 7W-R - 

inter 

Source; Reuters. 


OXMHpyViirkpt Fawb 

■- June.ll 

MBTtm lyMi Rcwtr Assets 

Mdarincraoe rkW B48 
TMerate laltmt Rot* Index: 7349 
Source: Mar Itt Lynch, ap 


f Gold 


• ’ - " ' . Jane fl 

. -"AM.- PM CUM# 

Haag Kona : 333^S _ 31115 +050 

LmemiMiuni " 3U75- — +U0 

Parts nUMtot 3112 * 3 |U 9 4 064 

* 0 rtci«-- 31335 ' 31525 +250 

' 31135 r 315 JD 0 . +300 

Mew York , nm — 0 -W 

.LHMimoum PurtssnuUMitan oHtcbri Hx- 
Ingsi ;Ha»- Kono jmu Zurich opening and 
doth* prion; New. York Cowan current 
contract. All prices in tis. Spar ounce, 
Source: Reuters. 


Argentina, 
IMF Set 

Loan Pact 

Way Is Cleared 

For New Credits 

By lames L Rowe Jr. 

Washington Pau Service 

WASHINGTON — Argentina 
and the International Monetary 
Fund Tuesday reached a tentative 
agreement on a tough Argentine 
austerity program that wiD pave the 
way for a Sl-2-biDion IMF loan 
and unlock S4.2 billion in new bank 
loans for Buenos Aires. 

The U.S. Treasury said it is 
working with several industrial and 
r.atin American governments to 
put together a temporary loan to 
Argentina to enable the country to 
pay some of the $1.2 billion in 
overdue interest owed to commer- 
cial banks. US. regulators are 
meeting this week to examine the 
quality of the roughly SS billion of 
Argentine loans from US banks. 

.On Friday, President Radi Al- 
foosin announced that an accord 
with the IMF bad been readied on 
a standby loan, but Tuesday’s an- 
nouncement came only after fur- 
ther tfllfcs at the fund's headquar- 
ters in Wariungton. 

Government and banking 
sources said the IMF has demand- 
ed that Argentina take tough steps 
to reduce inflation, make its ex- 
. ports more competitive and slash 
its federal budget deficit before the 
international agency's executive 
board will formally approve the ar- 
rangement. 

Argentina agreed to an IMF pro- 
gram last December, but failed to 
meet the fund’s terms. Its economy 
has since worsened, and its latest 
monthly inflation rate of 25 per- 
cent works out to an annual rate of 
1,300 percent. Domestic invest- 
ment has virtually dried up and 
output is declining. 

On Tuesday. Argentina an- 
nounced an 18-percent devaluation 
of its peso. The move will make 
imports more expensive and ex- 
ports cheaper and is designed to 
help Argentina build tip foreign 
currencies it needs to pay its $48 
billion in foreign debts. Some $25 
billion of this is owed to banks. 

Last week the country raised en- 
ergy prices 30 percent and is ex- 
pected to announce a large increase 
in public-utility rates soon. Both 
these actions will reduce govem- 
. meoL subadjes and, as a result, its . 
budget defuaL’ r ^ ' 

The devaluation and the price 
increases initially will worsen the 
country’s inflation rate. Over the 
longer run, they are supposed to 
have a beneficial effect both an 
Argentina’s international and do- 
mestic financial crisis by reducing 
its need to borrow from abroad to 
finance its debt payments and cov- 
et its federal deficit. 



TtwNcwVloi Tin 

An automobile rolls off the line at a plant run by Hyundai Motor Co. of Sooth Korea. 

Korea Seeks a U.S. Toehold for Cars 

Its Formidable Edge: $2-an-Hour Labor, vs. $24 in U.S. 


By Susan Chita 

Near York Times Service 

ULSAN, South Korea — With its first foray 
into the U.S. car market less than a year away, 
Hyundai Motor. Co. is 'a company in a hurry, 
pushing its workers to improve the way they build 
cars. 

At each stage on its assembly line here hang 
multicolored diagrams of car parts and assembly 
techniques, with a large red X marking the wrong 
way to perform that station's task. The factory in 
this southern industrial city is strewn with banners 
calline on workers to achieve 24- hour production 
and (marts plotting the number of error-free vehi- 
cles made every day. 

The stakes are high for Hyundai and other South 
Korean car makers. After years of relative obscuri- 
ty producing cars for a small domestic market and 
exporting them mainly to other Asian countries, 
South Korean companies are getting ready to 
break into the United States, the largest market of 
them all. 

First win be Hyundai, which plans to ship a 
sleekly styled front-whed-drive car with a price tag 
of between $5,000 and $6,000 to the United States 


early next year. Daewoo Motor Co. will follow in 
early 1987, with a front- wheel-drive subcompact 
designed somewhat like the Opel. 

Kia Motors is also setting its sights on the U.S. 
market for 1987, with help from Japan's Mazda 
Motor Cop. And government officials, who have 
closely regulated the auto industry here, say they 
may allow the Samsung business conglomerate — 
which recently established an auto pans supply 
joint venture with Chrysler Corp. — to enter the 
automobile production business at about the same 
time. 

The opening of the automobile export market in 
the United States comes & the South Korean 
government is scheduled to end in 1987 a reorgani- 
zation it imposed on the an to industry. Under the 
reorganization, put into effect after the oil crisis of 
the 1970s had left the industry in disarray, auto 
companies were assigned different niches. For in- 
stance, Kia was prohibited from making cars, 
while other companies were forbidden to make 
trucks. 

South Korean auto executives are optimistic on 
(Continued mi Page 17, CoL 3) 


U.S. Businesses 
Shown Lowering 
Spending Plans 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — U.S. busi- 
nesses now plan to spend a little 
less on expansion and moderniza- 
tion this year than earlier anticipat- 
ed. mostly because of a slow first 
quarter, the government said Tues- 
day. 

A survey conducted by the Com- 
merce Department in April and 
May found business p lann ers ex- 
pecting to spend 6J2 percent more 
in 1985 than they did ra 1984. after 
accounting for inflation. 

A similar survey conducted from 
January through March found 
businesses expecting that 1985 
spending would increase 73 per- 
cent over 1984. 

However, the new survey Indi- 
cates that much of Ibe downturn 
may have already occurred, with 
relatively ambitious capital-spend- 
ing plans reported for the rest of 
the year. 

“When you look at the rest of 
1985, it still looks pretty good," 
Edwin Warren, economist for 
Chase Econometrics, said. Busi- 
nesses “have a pretty strong in- 
crease slated." he added. 

However, possible drawbacks 
could be continued weakness in 
profits and any increase in interest 
rates, Mr. Warren said. An added 
problem could be uncertainty over 
the passage of a tax-overhaul plan 
and what effects the plan would 
have on capital investment 

The manufacturing sector, strug- 
gling to compete with a wave of 
imports, reported a 13-percent up- 
ward revision in its spending plans. 

Nonmanufacturing industries, 
meanwhile, revised their spending 
plans downward 0.3 percent 

Capital spending soared 14.9 
percent in 1984, the biggest gain in 


Hong Kong Stocks Fall Amid Banking Concerns 


Reuters 

* HONG KONG — Stocks fefl 
sharply Tuesday in Hong Kong 
amid renewed concern about Over- 
seas Trust Bank LuL, the local 
bank rescued from collapse by the 
government which blamed the fail- 
lire on a major fraud. 

- -Brokets blamed the decline on.tr 
loss of confidence in local banking. 
Thai following the decision late 



•uy u 

62-percent share in Hong Kong In- 
dustrial & Commercial Bank. 

Meanwhile. OTB’s former man- 
aging director was charged in court 
with conspiracy to defraud. Patrick 


Chang Chen-isong, 34, was ac- 
cused of establishing a number of 
shell companies which received un- 
secured or improperly security 
loans. 

Leow Tshun-lin, former bead of 
the bank’s credit-card operation, 
appeared in court Tuesday as an 
alleged co-conspirator to Mr. 
Chang. Mr. Leow bad been 
charged Monday with conspiracy 
to defraud. Both men were denied 
bail. 

Prosecutors said that when Mr. 
Chang was taken into custody 
Thursday at Kai Tak airport, he 
was carrying three passports and 
cash and securities worth 12 mil- 
lion Hong Kong dollars ($13 mil- 


lion). Two other OTB employees 
have been charged with banking 
law violations and released on bad 
of 10,000 dollars each. 

On Tuesday, the Hang Seng 
stock index ended at 1,492.13, 
down 79.74 points. It was the first 
time the index had dosed below 
1300 since April It plunged 86.95 
points on Friday after OTB de- 
clared itself insolvent, but recov- 
ered 2932 points on Monday. 

There was heavy selling across 
the board. Cheung Kong Holdings 
fell 1.10 Hong Kong dollars to 
1530 dollars, Hutchison Whampoa 
slipped 130 to 22.80 dollars, Swire 
Pacific “A” fril 130 to 20.90 dol- 
lars, China light & Power was 


down 70 cents to 14.90 dollars, 
Hong Kong Land fell 40 cents to 
530 dollars, Hong Kong Wharf 
was down 35 cents to 5.90 dollars 
and Jandine Mathcson fell 60 cents 
to 10.90 dollars. 

Brokers said that speculative 
selling in the banking sector, espe- 
cially of secondary banks, was the 
feature of Tuesday's stock trading. 
• They also noted big selling orders 
from overseas fund managers, 
which triggered small investors to 
follow suit. 

Foreign exchange dealers report- 
ed increasing demand for the Hong 
Kong dollar as some local banks 
were replenishing their local cur- 
rency funds. 


. aosJnm In London amt Zurich, fixings In other Eunwean canters. New York rates at 4 PM. 
(o) Commercial franc (b) Amounts noeded to buyanoaouad fc) Amounts netted In bur one 
- doUar C) Units afWOlxJ Units of IJ 80 (y) Units of THOOONJL: not quoted; KAv not mo) table. 
tw)Tobovoaa pact*: WAS. 12 H 


Burogwr coc y P e p a a its 

- - Swiss 

Dollar . D-Atart . Franc 
1 moato 7 ■fc-7 *> SM-SHi sw» 

> mantas SVrfl* 5tfe5V> 

Jmontta 7W-7W 5V*-5to SfoSto 

t tmxUOS 714-8 »» SWr5W 

1 roar OW-Mi 5*45)4 5'i-SW 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM, SP. 'Pound, FFi: Lloyds Bank (ECU); Reuters 
tSDR). Rates a w W /e aoto Id hdartonk deposits otst mUUoa minimum tar eaal valent). 


BP Forecasts 
Stability for 
Oil Demand 

By Bob Hagerty 

International Henan Tribune 

LONDON — British Petroleum 
Co. expects worldwide oil demand 
this year and new to be about even 
with 1984*5 level a senior BP exec- 
utive said Tuesday. 

But the official Russell Seal 
who heads BP’S ofl-supply and 
trading operations in Europe, said 
at a news meeting that he saw ho 
ago of a “precipitate" decline in 
prices. BP has made dear its hope 
that such a decline will not occur. 

In the past two months, oil prices 
on the spot, or ncracontract, market 
have fallal considerably. Brent 
blend, (he most widely traded 
North Sea crude, was quoted Tues- 
day at about $26.60 a barrel down 
from $2830 in mid-April 

That decline has put pressure on 
the Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries, which is due to 
meet in Geneva on June 30 to dis- 
cuss pricing and output policy. 
Saudi Arabia, OPECs most power- 
ful member, already has suggested 
a price cut .for heavier grades of 
crude oil' 

Overall OPEC production “is 
dearly under control" Mr. Seal 
said. He estimated that the group's 
output averaged 15.8 million bar- 
rels a day in the first quarter and 15 
million or less in May, well below 
OPECs self-imposed ceiling of 16 
million. 

in 1984, according to BFs annu- 
al energy review, wold oil con- 
sumption rose 13 percent, to 284 
billion metric urns (2032 billion 
bands). That was the first rise in 
.five years, but consumption was 
still 9 percent below the 1979 peak. 


U.S. Court Decision Seen as a Blow to Bigger Banks 


By Robert A. Bennett 

Near York Tima Sem’re 

NEW YORK - The biggest 
U.S. banks have been dealt a blow 
by the Supreme Court's decision on 
Monday to authorize regional in- 
terstate banking, a ruling that al- 
lows banks in many slates to merge 
and keep out bigger banks from 
other areas of the country. 

Ultimately, the decision could 
lead to a fundamental restructuring 
of the U3. banking industry. 

Banking experts said that the rul- 
ing could jeopardize tbejprcdomi- 
nance of New York’s leading banks 
and predicted that it would squash 
efforts in Congress to allow bank- 
ing on a nationwide scale: 

As a result of the decision, re- 
gional banks — some of them al- 
ready among the largest in the 
country — would be allowed to 
expand through interstate mergers 
while the New York banks would 
remain confined to their home 
states. 

The major New York banks and 
their law firms bad hoped that, 
even if the court had ruled against 
them, the decision would have left 
leeway for legal maneuvering. 

"But H. Rodgin Cohen, a partner 
in the law firm erf Sullivan & Crom- 
well and an authority on banking, 
said that because the court’s deci- 
sion was “simplistic," it left no 
chaHenge. “Ii ^ut 


room far 


iienge. "li mits the 
definitive imprimatur on the valid- 
ity of the regional statutes:'' 

The New York banks — particu- 
larly Citicoip, Chase Manhattan 
Corp. and Chemical New York 
Corp. — are now very much isolat- 
ed- The major California banks, 
which also are locked out of most 
regional measures passed by states 
in the West, have been less eager to 
’ acquire out-of-state banks. 

“We’re obviously taken aback,” 
said Hans H. AngcnnuDer. vice 


chairman of Citicorp, who said he 
would begin seeking a new strate- 
gy. Citibank, the largest U3. bank 
with assets of $152 billion during 
the First quarter, had challenged the 
regional laws. 

“Obviously we're disappointed," 
said J. Carter Bacol chairman and 
chief executive officer of the Bank 
of New York, which had been seek- 
ing to acquire Northeast Bancorp, 
in Connecticut. That was not possi- 
ble because Connecticut's law does 
□ot allow entry by New York 
banks. 

“The worst thing that can hap- 
pen now is that Congress does 
nothing and we have a Balkaniza- 
tion of banking,” said Mr. Bacol 
adding that be was not optimistic. 

The immediate effect of the Su- 
preme Court decision wifi be to 
allow several pending interstate 
mergers among banks in the North- 
east and Southeast. 

The Citicorp suit aigued that the 
Federal Reserve Board was wrong 
in approving the ranger of CBT 
Corn, of Connecticut with the 
Bank of New England of Massa- 
chusetts because the regional bank- 
ing compact between the states was 
iHegaL 

Citicorp asserted that because 
the compact excluded banks from 
outside the region, it violated the 
Constitution by discriminating 
against other states, by restraining 
interstate commerce and by not 
recognizing the supremacy of the 
federal government 

But bankers predicted that the 
ruling would also quickly lead to a 
spate of interstate mergers among 
other regional*, especially in the 
Southeast, where nine states have 
already passed enabling legislation. 

“It’s going to open up the South- 
east for sure; there are a lot of 
excited people down here,” said 
Edward E. Crutchfield Jr., chair- 


ton, with assets of $22.6 billion, has 
mergers pending with Rhode Is- 
land Hospital Trust Financial 
Corp., which has assets of $2 bil- 
lion, and Colonial Bancorp of Con- 
necticut which has assets of SI3 
billion. 

Like many other regional bank- 
ers, Ira Step anian, president of 
Bank of Boston, said he believed 
(hat nationwide banking eventually 
would emerge. But like many of his 
colleagues, he thinks it should 
come slowly, although he declined 
to offer a timetable. “Regional 
, , — . , banking," he said, “is what will 

has mentioned a three-yearperiod p^fl^-rm not sure that’s such a 
ome into effect bad thing." 


man of First Union Corp. of North 
Carolina. 

William K. Dabaghi, general 
counsel far the Coalition for Re- 
gional Banking and Economic De- 
velopment which was formed by a 
group of 18 regional banks to pre- 
vent nationwide b anking , hailed 
the decision and predicted that it 
would kin bills in Congress (hat 
would force the states to allow en- 
try eventually by banks outside 
their respective regions. 

Paul A, Vokker, chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, has urged 
adoption of such a “trigger,” and 


before it would come 

But Mr. Dabaghi said Monday 
that the Supreme Court’s decision 
authorizing regional compacts re- 
moved any incentive for regional 
banks to support this. “It's clear we 
don’t need any national legisla- 
tion," he added. “The New York 
banks have no chance of winning in 
Congress and we recommend they 
-retire gracefully." 

Mr. Angermuiler, however, 
stressed that Citicorp had no inten- 
tion of retiring. Acknowledging 
that the ruling could lead to a re- 
configuration of banking in the 
United Stales, Mr. Angermuiler 
said: to At the moment, I can’t tell 
you what our strategy is — we don't 
nave one. Bui I'm sure somehow we 
can slow down the regional merg- 
ers. Someday there'll be national 
banking and we'll be part of it." 

One regional bank. Bank of Bos- 




In 

□! 


□ 


Tho 

Carlyle 

Morel 


Mad bum Avenue 
a*7Ctb Street 

Mew Wartt 10021 

Cable The Cartyfe New York 
International TMex 620B92 
Telephone 212-744-1600 

A m emb e r Of the Sharp Group 
Since T967 


18 years, as the economy grew at a 
robust 6.8 pereenL 

Analysts have long expected that 
capita] spending would cool notice- 
ably this year — in line with an 
anticipated growth rate of 3 per- 
cent or less. 

In dollar terms, businesses re- 
ported planning to spend S3S6.1 
billion for new plant and equip- 
ment. That is SI. 7 billion higher 
than reported in the previous sur- 
vey, but the rise is more than offset 
by inflationary factors. 

The department, which uses a 
capital-goods price deflator to cal- 
culate inflation, said that measure 
rose 03 percent in 1984 and is 
projected to increase 2.9 percent in 
1985. 

After discounting for inflation, 
spending was flat in the first quar- 
ter of 1985 after a 1.1-percent in- 
crease in the fourth quarter of 1984. 

The department said estimates 
indicate a 3-percent increase in the 
second quarter of 19S5. a 1.1 -per- 
cent rise in the third quarter and a 
0.2- percent increase in the fourth. 

Current dollar spending, which 
does not take inflation uito ac- 
count. declined 0.4 percent in the 
first quarter in the manufacturing 
sector following a 2.9 -percent in- 
crease in the fourth quarter of 1984. 

However, such industries now 
report a 12.7- per cent increase in 
current spending in 1985 compared 
to an 1 1 -percent increase reported 
in the previous survey. 

The sharpest increase, 117 per- 
cent is anticipated by durable- 
goods industries, including 31.1 
percent in motor vehicles. 

Nondurable goods industries 
plan on 1 13-perceni increase, with 
the largest rise of 20.9 percent in 
the rubber industry. 


Dollar Declines 
In U.S., Europe 

United Pros Iniernativnal 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
edged lower Tuesday in lacklus- 
ter trading as markets awaited 
the release of new U3. econom- 
ic data later this week 

In New York, the British 
pound eased to $13660 from 
$1.2655. The dollar ended at 
3.0780 Deutsche marks, down 
from 3.0845; at 93825 French 
francs, down from 9.40; and at 
16010 Swiss francs, up from 
16001. 

In London, the pound dosed 
at SI 3625, up from SI. 2575. 
The dollar ended at 3.0898 DM 
in Frankfurt. 


ir= CHARTER =ii 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE" 

123 Fl 12 persons go anywhere. 

Wc arc the best in Greek Islinds. 
Mediterranean Cruses Ltd. 

3 Stadiou SL, Athens. 

TeL: 3236494. Tlx.: 222288. 


ffilftPAIAN 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTREND II 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded the lot lowing 
after at charges: 

IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983:— 24% 

IN 1984: — 34% 

AOf 

JUNE 6, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U 3. $94,623.25 


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TAPMAN, Trend Analysis and 
Rxtioto Management. Inc.. 
Wafl Street Plaza, New Vbrk. 
New *xk 10005 212-269-1041 
Telex BMI 667173 UW. 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 , 1985 


U.S. Futures June 11 


Season Season 
HW LOW 


O oen High Law Ooso ctT3 - 

Food ... i — - 


“Sh 1 5 tSS" open H«*» LOW «*• 

CERT. OEWSSITUMMi 

MmJlIUwiWaJWOPg ,253 «J 9 »»«»+« 

as H £ » ss *3 h t* 

^ ES §? W3a waa *“ "« SB 

y gg«“ ss 

Ert&to pSSseJes^SO* 

IS^xJSopwitn. iWeHW 

CURO DOLLARS iOMJM 

iimiiHoivprionooptf. «ai ** +M 

SS dS *ixr w 9us +.is 

SJS Sij 7 jnSj tom SMI +H 

lJ“£ STn mot «M flU Afl TUB 2 +.17 

£■£ £5 Jun 5 S *048 90 J 7 KfjSfi +.17 

SI'S S 5 90 S *85 9025 MA +. 1 i 

£■“ SS 9005 BKM 9003 +.15 

9020 8/5 Mar *U 5 WJJ 0 B 9 JS « 9 JS +46 

E4|.sd« prev.Solw 

P?wTDwOiienrm.l29j23 wp*» 

BRITISH POUND <IMM 

* i 3‘3rST3sfta! ss as =s 

is s sssisiiss 3 

u£S ijwjSs^b,™ ™ r« 

C si. Soles 

Prev. Dcrv Open Int 45£74 atl2SQ4 

CANADIAN DOLLAR C1MM) 

i ^ ir -' p ^ e x , % SB ts es tn 
35 35 g S3 35 S *g £ 

JL ® Aru« *" * 

Prev. Dov Open Ini. ILW ottoU 
FRENCH FRANC CMAjjW 

*?f»^j^ rt ^w te W 6 S 0 10*15 - 10 * 0 G .INN +30 

■ >S» -ESS sSp 16543 .10545 .TCSS 5 .10540 +15 

J iSns xw8 dS - 1 «W -ios» .10500 .iono +20 

Est. Soles PrtV.MB 3 

Prae. Boy Ooen Mil. 7*6 
GERMAN MARK (IMW 

"wr sm & n s s ii 


Season Season 
Hlati Low 


Open High Low aose Clio. 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 
PJMI09-- cents per IB. 
149.40 12 IjN Jul 

14062 12700 Sen 


fill !S 3 IBS SB 3 * =3 


{£g IBB & as H a as =s 

147.93 r205t Mar MW JffiS Ifios |2£S +■?? 


Groins 


WHEAT ICBT) 

94)08 bu minimum- doi tar* uerbwhal 


3.00 

3.76Vj 

au 1 ! 

3.74ft 

4X7 

177"2 

EsI. Soles 


jul jm. las 341 341 t-XIft 

Sep 344ft 146ft 122ft 344ft +01 ft 

d£ SJIft U4 Wl~ uift +£ 

MOT 3431-4 3J4ft 3JI*i U3 

May 343ft 3414ft 342 M2 +-J0 1 * 

Jul 110 110 SLBTft 108ft +40ft 

PrAv. Sales 4400 


147.93 13150 Mar WW» jr* 14563 

147.13 131 AO Mev J4UH IJJg {SS 14+00 

mm 15540 Jul 16AM 1* 4JW lam *“ ,4x75 

14100 133.73 „5oP 

Esi. Sales p rev. Soles »« 

Prev. Day Open inL 13470 up'* 

SUGARWQRLD 11 INYCSCEI 


112400 Hs^ cenn per m. 


Prev. Day Open ini. 38477 up 23 
CORN (CBY) 

$400 Da MMnmuin- dal lore per Bushel 


131 173 Jul 176 2.77 . 175** “■“H" 

341ft 2-S5ft Sep 141 162V4 2M't 2X2 — M* 

4oi ST n+r 2Mt 158 1S6 2-57ft —XOft 

“10 2X0 Mar 165** 266* 2X5ft 2455 

Siii _ "44*>> Mav 169*. 178ft 240ft 2.70V! — -01 

JM 1 «4ft 2S 24W 240 168ft lg*i 

Itoft Mil* Sen 156 <a 257 1S6 2 St -41 

E&v.Sol9a Prev.SalM 19 m3 

Pr^VDovOPeptrtf.W74 otfl.viA 

SOYBEANS ICBT) 

S4XXI bu minimum- itolkirtPef bushel ^ <Mh +_ 0 l 

3 -.“ sj “ ‘ s - 

Prev. Day Open Inl. 6&BS7 off 1.189 
SOYBEAN MEAL (COT) 

Is '“Ira 1^*833 

illlllii 

ass as j?m iss is!M +m 

Ce| SoleS PfW*Soto5 1DJQ3 

Pre»?Om Onen mi. 51496 up 77 
SOYBEAN OIL tCBTl 

Tr"f”f m » s h a 

31.10 21 S IS 7HO xul *■& 

3UT SlW Oct WAS jSJl +i4 3 

29 07 23JS0 .HWI 26A0 »» 2(05 +40 

Bfi BS SS PI BS g ss ts 

25.15 a« JUI 3M0 3*J» 2W0 MAS £» 

iSs-ja-jr 

Ink-f'f j« 

if-’ if ; ssj^ ^ ^ - 4 i 

cei sain prev. Sato® 134 

Prev. Oav Open Inf. ZBtfi up 25 


i S fi | 1 

g as £ I | 

tu 4J2Z Jul 646 647 

KKo^.ruraJR 

COCOA IN YCSCB) 

■«“^b £ as as 
gjs s sk g a 

H a as 
*S5» r-wisajp* 


■a““S" , £ as sg a a 
as ||s» 

IS 1 W 0 MW 

pS^DwOPenint. 20^15 oH113 

ORANGE JUlCEINVeSJ 

ISJJOOlfctt^ cmfioef 10. laA 143A0 166M 

1NM 138JB J“L £2 K lS» M190 


cenllBOl’IO. i «x 9(i Him 14+00 +1.10 

13840 Jul 16A» {S« 1425*0 +.W 

ISm 3 £ 60 M IJJg t£go tf 

{^gg s {BS isa ass mu 

13640 MOV 1^75 +40 


14240 JU> 
17945 S CP 


Nov 

Prev. Sales. 


10040 

179^0 

18040 

moo 
143.® 
206JV 
16150 
167 JJB 
Esi. Sales 


PS^[>Sopenlnt. SJUO oH12 


Metals. 


Over-the-Gounter 

NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


Saiecta mt 

nos wan Leer iPJft arve 


A&MFO 
ADC Tl 
AEC 


Sfififi.il g£Si 


ASK 

AST 

AT&E 

ATE 

AamRt 

Abram 44 M 
Acad in 40 24 
AcaaRs 
Ac elrtB 

AcuRar 40 3 

Acefos 
Advsn 
AefmdB 

n ^l fTct.h 


MW* 12 £ S*T» 

2310 9* 10 +n 

SZMt Wk 23*— * 
sa on am am— u 
Son ii w iift-ip 


_ . 1 CMPMS 

Jane II cmpR* 

CmTs*.* 
OnpuPi 

ices cpiefi 

— empire 

Onsrue 

alula NOf CwnsW 

Hto HW L4- JPJLOm cSnrfch 

73 746 7 ft 7 H S 2 ? 5 ?I 

3417 1 W 17 Canltra 

S M 3ft 2ft— Vi 

41 716 6ft 7 - ft 

70 aw aft ays .. Mast 1 


HP* ' 

WHS In id«lC 1 iiP* i 

WPS Htafl l0 *„? P '^ + -.» | to-iitl* 

60 7ft r,i ! : Iforartl 

"i I’m *<■»*• . 1 mill HI 


1 I'l * l * ,v* 

-sa '£ 

5 P fe ? :■ * 


I f(jr3ilL 

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F rmf jO 


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31 »*■ Oft * »_ I FrDl 5 !' ' 

02 12 "e »V 12 .J Ll ■» Fere lv 

15 I mi »■■ *•’ !r .».■*' 

« P J J ' 4 -?* +1 iHSSSi 


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twrotn 11 |I] r « ■ .1 lai;.* ■ 

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nh- h ClHWlWf I M ^ TVv 77*6 ^ ^ ^ ^ 1 H-ilcTlfCC 

vt* Ift r-B Scip. MS’K ’Swi Pft ]«■*_. 

n aw aft au cnCopl jMo.H mu’-] is, m.. + ; Jmiiiit 

5? r P=s c® MTffll i^T-J^iiMSSE 

. 1 ^ t a® H ■ W ® 3 ai'-lR« 


II M 61ft 

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m i s 

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Vl +.ft- 

Sft-a 


169013 lift IE*— I" mCht 

2 S 1 SS '££ 8 «doon 

ZHNft 9ft 9ft— ft Booms 


; r- 


’sift *» ? H t 2 
-;«> ”2 if: 2 

J 16 '« 


“>Vi » ^ BobEvn 40 

a 24 aasn » J-n SSSe, as. 
15 6ft J£ £“ Boanua 

90 W Bb f* B iMijik jA 

JD J 912391* 23 33ft + ft St 

J 1 ? W ft H * ft SSSpe.Mi 
« 1 JL. 2 BmdRe 

24121 2flft am— ft BradvW .W 
543 3 2ft 3 + ft BraeCs 

J? 7ft 7 7 — ft BrndiC 140 

40 24 3720ft Nft W6 + * Brenea .12 

Are A waft aft ajft- bthlh 
ns * 55 55 " BnmRD 

6 3W SW BmTont 

52 3Vt TO TO— n pngto t -14 

mhw m lift gSfta 
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agO S 6ft 6ft Brawn JO 

102 2ft 3 2 BurnoS 

1,00 54 217W 17W 17ft _ .. KiU+i? 


52 3ft 7ft »B— ft nrinoi 

M«ft Brflton 

435 W n n BmUOTT 

ago 5 6ft 6ft Brawn 

102 2ft 3 2 BurnoS 

100 54 217W gft gft BurrSr 

M 44 2« Dft W W +W BurrU 

r g£& 

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315ft 5ft 5ft + ft ^ 

35* 1i srw U K I 

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140 19 4t3Sft » „ CCBm 


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Courart 


BanrJ Me 4 
ButlrMf U2 +9 


.14 14 529914 13V> 13H— ft 

60 Y6 l 1ft 1ft + »■ 

19426 2SW 2S! 

40 LI 238517ft l?ft 17ft 

no 7ft 7W 7ft . CBureri 
418ft 17ft 17ft- ft caurou 
1 9B17ft 17ft )7W + ft CoasP- > 

1A4 34 W»Wi»ftaN6 + ft 

79 7ft 7ft 76 + Jiu.u.. 
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143 44 19*7 2S» 27 + ft Cramer 


2 M IS S-iJ *f* + 

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FFMM 


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S?"5L- S ■»* 619116 I5H l 5»* + » | cicnCii 


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r-v* St * H 


^ SSs^IgBSSSSSIo A^in 5 aiS av. Sftift SK 1 iS 34 

Jiio ^71 Dec 4273 -3384 4273 ^1 -^1 JjJgSi 11 WOWW 1«J 19W— ft OTCt LN *0 

J415 M40 _M»r ■»• —1 auwwv j- ^ ^ a* B + ft CML 


j COPPER (COME X) 

as ss as ffi 

S»M 2-5 ^ 61* *1.70 6143 614? 


n5s 5700 jm 6HAu +jo 

g B S H a a 9 g 

S75b <wAa Jan . 4- is 


4545 — M 

*5A5 4570 4545 ^g 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMEI 

^"STa as as as as a 

g i g 1 g g 1 g 

g g g g g g g a 

EstSalm fTS-fSi'SrM 64 

Prev. Oav Open Int. 4A.WI off 568 

FEEDER CATTLE CCME) 

TBngn& B B B B 4 

1 g a as as b b g 

tSjS 6*30 /US- TOM TOM 7040 +.15 

70i» 7840 APT 70X0 78X0 70X0 70X0 

Fit soik Prev. Sales 796 

Prev. Dav Ooen im. 8 AM up 77 

HOGS (CME) 

aoAooiBs.-wmsp.rib. A17 +xn 

+T 75 45JQ0 Oct *7-40 *7 JO 47.15 *7-*2 

i 8S SS STo S S t| 

47J5 4+50 Apr 4648 4+M 46X0 4465 +45 

4490 Jun 4«* 9< 4850 4845 48X2 +42 

47)75 jUl 4948 49.40 44J0 49A5 +.1S 

Esi. 'Sales 5,160 Prev. Sales S.147 
Prev. Day Open inl. 21581 up 23 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

M^oito.cjntaperib. ^ ^ mm mo -» 

50+5 iAl^a Auv 68-10 «40 67X0 **X7 +.1S 

%% — s il H il il li 

Sfi 3 ^ 7 ^ ™ ™ » 


Currency Options 


jMjjd 59 A0 Jan „ AT4S +45 

Soxo 59A0 MOT 6345 4345 63.1U +J5 

iijX 41.10 May MK um +J0 

fifi as a ss as — «s *g 

7840 44X0 Dec s5 ^7 +45 

7840 “40 <§90 +45 

e^Shs “* Pesetas TAN 
pSuTd^ Open inl. B2A40 UP222 

ALUMIliUMfCOMEXI 

Tr 3 ^| - - - 1 et§ 

S 3 as g as S 3 35 gj J 

7450 5L7S Jan «_45 _.T0 

7360 4840 Mar «1< .10 

J4J.5 Si« MOV —.10 

4345 SAM Jul 50X5 -^10 

S2 -'° ^ =;]g 

J- §S 8 -.10 

Eat Soles Prev. Soles 242 

Prev. Dov Ooen inf. 2460 off 12 
SILVER (COME TO 

l a $”?nnhnug || 

!gs w E » a » g « 

i OB g £ - - - 1 || 

g ffl a -u -* <“ sss + 1| 

mo 6£X Dec M.9 +14 

JS,i Sgf iSSr ms +w 

77QJ) 706J) war 

Est. Sales Frev. Sales 14442 

Prev. Day Open Inl. 77458 oft 794 

PLATINUM IMYME) 

50fravi«.-«Uajsnerlniyia. 243.90 +140 

I || 

275X0 Aer 277X0 2B1X0 27740 279.10 +« 

EsL Salas Prev. Sales ,1*** 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. 12^1 up 195 
PALLADIUM (HYME1 

lOOtravai-ctaiiorBPerai ,c + « 

<nai Dina jun 9545 9+8-5 95X0 vba; 

I g E 1 1 1 1 I 

114X0 94X0 Jun 9645 97,:* 9+3 9+30 +-“ 

Est Sales Pnev. Sales IBS 

Prev. Dav Open inf. A938 oH36 

GOLD (COM EX) 

T1S40 313X0 3J3X0 -40 

S 291X0 MR 316X0 31848 314X0 314*0 -40 

493X0 297X0 Ocl 3MX0 MJ0 M0X0 3MX0 -S 

489X0 301X0 Dec mao 324X0 mflO K4X0 — 

- a«qi 306X0 Feb 329X0 330X0 329X0 32840 — JU 

MR S53) APT -S 

435J0 320X0 Jun --» 

mm 131X0 Alta *4240 


eaShd * IP 1 

Pre^Day Open int. 55674 up 34 

k g Ssssissasssi 

n * 250 - 55 ^- PS; xoSI 

eT£i« Peseta* moo 

PravDav Onenim. 27433 o«5ii 

4882 4842 4854 

S I g * M 3S a 


ST fl B S££2 23S* + 5 SL & « ... 

S , * ,4? £ a k*»T 8 -% SV S^^^ + ft r 

TOSg 75 eft aft 4ft— ft rich, 168 2ft 2ft 2ft + ft DBA 

JSS 363 3W 3ft 3ft- ft CAC1 ft 4ft 4 4ft + ft DCMY» 

23 8 7ft 8 + ft ^ySC AH 11 Wfflft 20ft 20ft DO I 

19010ft 10 M 36 14 1321ft 20W 21ft + ft DEP 

aUSSf M 26 1801?+ {St S2 + ft CoffiJS* 17 Ift 2W » + * DNAPI 

sES ^ u .»» +v. g» sssrr-t ss 

S it’s % i a + -* gs& « % s& - gaar 

U» 44 122 % 22 ft 22 ft— W cStaaP 14 3 ft 2 » 3 — ft OobvSy 

igS" jo 41 lgW£ ™ ft c amv_ M 1 A MOM lift Dnmgta 

nmCorr 8712ft 12 «2ft— ft ConottG S22l9ft IMS 19ft + ft uBnGJ 

7£~i| 18 7 7 7 + ft Cononl 41 r .9 12622ft 22ft 2Zft + ft DofcrdS 

SSSd 101279, 24W S«2-£ cXt 46e 3 4217ft 17W TJfc gtalp 

VS-a ao 31 IS 14ft 15ft 15ft — ft OmFSL JO 20 1441Mb 10_ IBft + ft DtSwieh 

apm— 1 -n *x 20 3D 29ft 30 — ft CapCft 178 1ft 1^* 1ft + ft Dalmor 

^mrn 142 « I 8 -ft cSS^s JNr X 3 14ft 14ft 16ft + ft Dmpwr 

APMcs 29925ft 25V, 25ft Cardiol 24012ft lift lift— ft Datocp 

1 AFurn 48 24 10 lift 12ft T2ft— ft caremk • 1151 IBft lav, 15ft msun 


SX* is? 13 * j S 5 W' 

^ A »ft + ft|S« 5 w fi'g ^ jh & 

94 MW s. Sft+’s ar a. a a ® 1 : 1 1 - 


st: « *\:± :: 'n^Bb « 

W ES9T 5 ;■ 


ss »* 

sja k ® 
*33 v?h 


■MMW 45 45ft + ft CUlP_ 
15 9ft 9ft «L- lb CvprSv 
27317ft 16ft 17ft .. Cyprus 


75 4ft 69* 6ft— ft CBdM 
363 3W 3ft 3ft- H Sri 
23 • 7ft 8 + ft QtfVSC 

wSIOft » W , _ codEnux 


JOB 23 130 9ft 
JWMft 


AIMS TOJHW. ® M Cadmus 46 14 

aSSSu j* 0 26 180 is* Kft Wt + ft cauSnw 

jss2s «« +* aw 's.s 

s 

jtmSrs L00 *5 1*P* W » CBHooP 

X0 41 IHHS S'HS Colny 

8712ft 12 12ft— ft CononG 

18 7 7 7 + ft cononl 


1716W 14 M^-T, 

13438 37J; +l 

36 317 3'1 

2H 10 <0 


; HMlIVi 
1 1 t-NlCas J* 
It 4Nirlns 
FNICB 

FN»5 l, » VS 13 
I FHHQ iZ 


5-. 5»** 

?jU 27ft + % 


ABkCTS 1X0 4X 
ABnkr xo 4.1 
Am Carr 
ACeafl . 


DNAPI 

DOC 

DSC 

Dafttaro 

DalrMI LB2f K3 


mi u 1 '* iS 

,39 Bft 8- 0ft Flghon ^ 

vis- 1- jlgg ■ v ' 
«Sft2 fe»-ry Ebfv n 4i| 


•Sy? 55 #tS-3 

S re jh? ^ 1*5 


, 0 Mi» i;:* «5 • 


4 ev, • b — ft 
3992Sft 2SV, 25ft 
1012 ft 12 ft Wft— ft 


Jch 144X0 14740 143X0 165X0 —1X0 
Star 17140 17140 148X0 16940 —140 
Stay 174X0 174XO 174X0 173X0 —1X0 
Jul 101X0 1*1 -IW 179X0 181X0 +1X0 
Prev. Sales 1 JO* 
t. 10A44 UP 44 


M2DW 20ft »W Carelhi 
24718ft 17ft 18ft + ft carter! 
1 6 A 4 Cm irt 

73 a _7>2 * ^S? 


1 6 4 4 rmwA 

73 I 713 7ft- ft tews 

4i*w i*ft i*ft— ft mac Lao ax 
617 17 17 u Cenicor 

179 U ft Tb+ ft CenBcs 2X5b 46 
271ft aft aft + ft CnBshS 1X2 4 3 

2632ft 32ft 3m CFdBks JB4 3J 

100 4ft 4 4ft + ft CJarBc 140 A9 

102 ft . ft ft . „ CnPdSv JO 36 

170 36'A 26 2£f. + '4 CRSVLI .18 LI 


AFIHrn U2 *6 2B30 29ft M — ft CopCrtJ _ _ 

C=I=Z3^^s — Z2 as-. ,•» ^kk-l & ~ s 

£ ias jss {ss ss =§ • 

,76X0 I74XO 174X0 17100 —1X0 AMdSv .16 3 * ,7 t 17 r . u tno, 

jS'vuo wixo 179X0 1*1X0 +ixo 17 | nr ? mtn ggS i S’" 

prev. Sales 1JN Ajnind i.i* 32ft sm rMSks X4 3J 

t. 10644 UP 44 AKMM 1X0 13 4 _ 4ft + ft S 

COTTON 2CNYCE) 1X2 34 1N26A + '* SSKlI 5 LI 

M ^i bs " t iss, o *’JS ss ss as sfi =s ioS^ % *?r sr? * u 

77X0 60X7 Oct 6TX0 61X5 4140 61^ “J* SIot 7* '* > J* CnfyPS XN J 

i iSygll!^ S s “°'“ 

wS Oct 6045 6050 6045 6042 -i!3 JJ^JS J7 23 35225ft 2Jft »* + ft aSrtTh 

Est. Sales P rev Sales L* 7 AmneSs M 26 1015ft 15ft 15ft— ft CHnpPt .W 1J 

Prev. Day Open im. 14464 off 84 Anocnh! .10 14 13 5ft 5ft m— ft ctmcCp 

Antoaic 44513ft IM* lift — ft Chacnal 

HEATING OIL CHYME) Analyl S»“ Its* n +U 

*%T , - e *£sr js nub og g- g« zszr {K ass; ^ i. 

ss g$ig ss? || g || Sr ^‘s^+ft ass xoai 

ISfi SS 8S SS S3 as M +| ^ iSv. + ft SKS 

Si ta SS 3B.JS « H » SSS? 5 . 8SS, - 1 


CoaSvW .lie > 4217ft 17ft 17ft Dla lO_ 

CoSfsl. 40 20 1441Mb I0 n lOlfc +, W DtSwieh 
CapCrb 1JB In lUi 1% + n J Dafmar 


!Si $?“ + « • 

2s£ ; ift ff A i J5 


17D lft I9i» 1* + ft Datmar 
314ft 14* 16ft + ft Dafnwr 

24012ft lift 11ft— M Datjcp 

n snow ibw im«* „ D*««i 

94 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft D«um 
3 ■ 8 8 .— w Daucnn 1.96 XX 

182 1ft 1ft 1ft + ft DavlWS 
•8412ft raft »ft Dawson „ 

16426W 24W 24W DebSn 40e X 

7 TO fto 9W- ft DedxO 
25430ft 30ft 30ft Dccom 

■017 16ft 17 + ft DefctaA J2 19 

1245ft 45 45 — w Delclm 48 L5 

«M1 »ft 31 .. Delta Dt 


»» j" r* +,, » 
■« “ gf 5 u ?tft?ri:-: EQB- 
m. x ^2^ 1» + ft fSSS 

- 20 * 3 iSSllft Uft ffi! - 2 ™1n 

__ 2^ aK" - Flucarn 

m H mW! wj I8%- ■*• FklPrtl 

■“ u T? i® hS ift + \* ?! NH r ! 


40 i> i|* 21 In 4*1 u 

: 3L^ Sira*- 13S *SS • fr? 


33 II** 'jJJ •+_ % •' 
I*- ^ + 


I D2 '■! ‘9 W 

17026ft 26 26ft + ft 
9112ft 12 12ft 
1007 M ® 1. 

» '« > Jft 

a 7ft 7 7ft _ _ 


*^ U ‘ SS +, 5lb '** ” *S ’i2 + *• 

ffiffp-’ 8 SE. is» «-» ibs» - 


aSu s u Bi«b wb lift- mi dSSs 

ax? ^ 4 I* {in {{ iu+ v, ssgi „ 

CerBrA .12 16 28 M 7ft 7W DvITXC 148 U 

temtt 2 aw a i 2W Dewev 

Cato* • 29411W lift lift- ft DlWjPr 

33 » ft ft— lb DioCrys JO IX 


10 15V, ICTt 15W— ft ClwnpPt .10 IX 
13 5ft 5ft 5ft— ft ctmcCp 
«45Mft 12ft 12ft- ft Omen* 

8310ft 10 10 -ft asss 

92 12 lift n + !“ CMrair 


12 SW 5 ft S£— ftioftwic 


83 5ft Sft 5ft 

1027 2ft 2 2ft- ft 
477 S 4tb 4fb 

a tow , id ioii + w 


10 Tw ,»b Ift- ft |p?7£* « X 

k + £ - 

ir*ft ^ t >:« m 

10 |W 3V» 31'4— V* Forms 
23 M Mft lift— ft Forum M ■* 

9427W 27 27 — ft Foster .10 2* 

9005 Mb 2ft 2ft + ft FiWkCp I4» *- 

UK, 35ft 38ft— ft Frr*ei j* 14 


?£ £ ga^f r 

6li»J‘B iT” , 

•g^SS :.i 

’Si 31 ft 31 ft JJj* ii, ,. 

“*K V. » ■**■ 

305 3ft >{*■ TO ‘ 

3»1 «ft ** • 

JoiE y„ 122 ^ 


m a SKT* 
.to 3i *!?.L 


92« lift n + ft SSwit 2810W.10 + ft DtotoO 

^ isft s*-* ass? w ss {K+xtea 

If tt 4*k +U> + W ChattiM JOa 17 1021ft 21ft 2IW „ I Dkjne* 

CWtPnl 


St' r '12 

20 Aft 4ft . 4ft , I FrwSL 


m + * 

■u» ift 8 < i eft 


1023C1 23ft 23'^* — ft ! FtenS* 


Esi. Sales Prev. Sales LI 13 

Prev. Day Ooen inl. 10.168 ua 2 Q« 


| 43 Y'd 9 9 cbkPnt 

4971 18 ft MVi lift + ft OrtcTch 

1168614 ft 1 F 1 Mft ChLwn 

33727 ft 2 M* Otemeti 

! 40 Uft «ft 13 ft- ft ChFab 


7 H If 
175 *' , 34 


in 

36 ft + ft 


ifllift 2ift aw dwjw --j; ~ 4V2 r^., 

=S a W “K ^ft- 4 8S&£? JM 10 25W lift IVb }1ft + ft Funtme 


3*9 6 ft 0 ft TO ’ 

2^:1 .gSBrolfc: 
« >SS-S 

i 4'u 4*« 4*4— * 


CRUDE OILfNYME) 

»J» 27.10 2687 2697 
9957 2445 AuP 26.10 2645 26JD 26X8 

^9X0 UM SW M64 2SX2 2SS4 2561 

2?X0 jIS Oct 25X2 25A5 2538 »-3B 

29X0 2A40 MOV 2535 25.44 2&2S 25 75 

79^ 21TO Dec a-1* g^4 ^X5 25.15 

29X0 2+85 Jon 25X1 25X1 24.95 2*» 

14X5 Feb 2490 24.90 34.90 24.90 
Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 17.492 

Prev. Oav Ooen mi. 63.I1S up I JOB 


14221 JTf 2T— b 

1410 19 M ChryE .I2e IX 

94 FA 5 5 — ft chesUI 160 8X 

M 2 D>* im 20 ■*■ ■+ aitad 

JOB 2.9 44227-7 2T b aft + ft CWPOCL 

J12b 4X 246ft <4ft 44ft + ft qHIIi 

108 Ift 7ft « + '-• Chi fend 1X0 SJ 

784 ft Bft ift— ft cnomcr 
X0 26 3331 M 31 +!?*■ chronr 


13SI7 lift 12 + ft cnrOws 

1510 9ft 9ft—ft ciivras 
28 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft ClnnF 1 


m* m “m unw a 

4311ft «n 195- W CHlMlC 
165 T'w 7ft 7ft ChllOS 

a raft 17 17 —J 1 * Cipher 


32BXD 
405X0 
493JB 
489X0 
485X0 
498X0 
43530 
428-40 
39570 
393X0 
36430 
Est. Sales 


araft 17 17 — ft 

67 TTt 12*i 12*11 + ft 
I Ti. 7ft T. — 
6430'* 2*+. 30 
1 24ft 24ft 24ft — ft 


m j j a, 7815 28ft 28ft DMH 

191 6ft 4 *V» + ft DIxnTl 

I 5ft 5ft 5ft— V» DoCuOl 
27I8W 18 18 DlrGhl 30 1 

I2e IX 511ft lift lift DomB 130 14 

IA« 4X 1134ft 24ft 24ft Donavn 1X6 *6 

5M mfb 10W imn — ft Drew 20 14 

t^3fl 29ft 39ft OalLrnn X0 U 

ISO 26ft + v» DoylDB N 36. 
1X0 56 1420 IMS 39 Dnmtt 40e IA 

9731ft JIW 31ft + W DTMW8 
120 8W 8 8ft — ft DresBf 
J8 11 2081Mb 17li 17ft— ft Drr,lr 

10b 16 144 7ft 7 7tl DfivGr 
,J4 JJ 8849Vd 4|ft 49*i DuCXW JS M 

Xlr 2819ft 1* K DanhDi 4< LI 

I2e 4 61 34ft 34 34ft + ft Dm&ys 

•'* * MU 17ft 1T4 17V; + ft Qurttn 

1 29 7V1 T* 71s + ft DiKlron J6 I] 

| J0 3.1 271 40 36 38W +2J“ DUf FB .18 M 

7* it lorowi 20* am— dvbRs 

iX4 3J waft a»* a*- + '» 


6413ft 13 lift v 
16 14W 13ft Oft — ft 
133 Sft V* y.v 


90 16 10434ft 34 


Ocl 34760 34760 34760 

Dec 

Apr 

Prev. Sales 25779 


Prw- Dav Open Hit. 126,172 w>«94 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMEI 

pojnls and coni! ,fan5 188.90 Wf^ -M 

{esaa 160X0 S«P 19360 193.70 19260 193X0 —Si 

19970 17570 Dee 197X0 197U 1J4g 1*445 —70 

20225 190-1 0 MOT M0J5 200X5 199J0 20020 —65 

Est. Sales 50J3S Prev. Sal es 47J93 
Prev. Oav Open int. 80J72 up 1.710 


3112ft raw ra-js + ft ciiutA 

21311 10ft Wft— ft CIzUfB 


7 r-s r-v tvs — 


CKGtP 48e 17 
CUUt A t 
CIzUfB 1.96 U 


6835ft 35ft CtyNCP 

n!7 16ft ftft— ’« CitV Hep 


iS{L S.. £■. 

AB 34 IsJnW lift ML. + W 
SSO 34 5926ft 26 24 


DvbRb 

Dvracn 

DVfiKBC 


3934-.1 24W 24' > + ft IGrni^S 

4 19ft 19ft Wft- lilsnrm 

14ft Id's [fSSL 

•5% 'R -*55 iSSmS 

7J Uh i;» *'■ 

61 :« JT.-Z 34 :0(09? n 


Financial 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option * Strike 
Underlying Price Colto— Losf 

Jun Sep Dec 

11580 Britten Pwjnds-amtsper unit. 


Pots— Last 
Jun Sen Dec 


■S3? }fo fJS r r r | ** 

l“j4 ISO 'IS AM r r 3J5 SX 

{^ ]£ til 5^ iS Sfi r r 

12434 135 r 1J5 r r r r 

50X00 Caaad Ion Oollon-centi per aiut. . 

CDollr 71 1.« r r r T 048 

73X1 72 1X2 r r r r 1X8 

73.03 73 r OJQ t M 1X1 r 

73X3 74 r r r 1X6 164 r 

42X00 West German Markfrcents per unit. 

Diuiarlc 28 4J2 r r r r r 

3142 29 3X3 r r t r r 

2142 31 '63 127 _£ r OX0 r 

3Z42 32 e.42 161 1.9S 0X6 OXj T 

31M 33 0X4 0.94 165 r 1J5 r 

3262 34 r 0X7 1X7 T T T 

IM2 35 r 035 0.77 r 174 T 

125X08 French Francs-ioms of a amt Mr unit. 

FFnwc 100 r r 8.15 r r L 

106.49 105 1J5 r r r r 

10*69 ns r H® r r r 

usexoo Japanese Yen-iootns of a cent per noil. 

JYen 37 r r r r 0.1D 

«Lir? 38 zoo r T r 020 

4002 39 1X0 r r r r 

40X2 m 0.10 1.00 r 0.11 0*3 

40X2 41 r 060 099 r r 

42600 Swiss Francsceotj oer unit 
S franc 35 3X3 r r r 0.18 

38X4 Ji r t r r 0X8 

MX4 38 0X8 1.72 131 0X5 r 1 

3854 3< Q.Oa Uf 1X7 0X8 163 1 

3854 40 0X1 0X2 164 r r 

38X4 41 r 0X3 1X6 r r 

Total call voL 4698 C«M open 

Total PUl vo L 5657 Pal open lnt.l74J0B 

r— Hof traced, s — No option offered, o— OWL 
Lost is premium 1 cur chase price). 

Source: AP 


US T. BILLS (IMM1 

, SI million- PKoflOO pci. _ 

L- 93.11 86J4 Sop 9275 WX2 9273 9179 

DflC 9179 8577 Dec 9262 W68 92J9 9265 

, 9269 B4.68 Mar 92X5 9112 92X5 9110 

nno «.1» BIX! Jun FI 77 91.79 9177 9 79 

“S 91X1 88.00 SOP J]-§4 

5 aJ FI65 89X5 Dec 

r 91 J9 89X8 Mar w.12 

L Esi. Solos Prev. Sales 4.920 

f Prev. Dav Open Int. 31651 off 570 
to YR. TREASURY teen 
068 a08X00Pi1n-ptiA32ndsDf lOOpci 
1X8 89-18 70-9 Jvn 87-28 88 87-21 87-30 

r 88-21 75-18 Sep 84-M 87-2 BtM 84-31 

r 87-13 75-13 Dec 85-22 84 8M1 M-31 

85-31 75-14 Mar 8+25 BS-3 8+25 85-2 

r 85-7 7+30 Jufl 8+9 

r esi. S ales Prev.Sales 11015 

r prev. Dav Open Int. 53,982 up I J51 
t US TREASURY BONDS (CBT3 
r |8pet-SlCOX(K+Pt»A32ndsoll00pd2 
r 80-11 57-20 Jun 7 M 7|-a 78+ 78-19 

' 79-12 57-10 Sep 77+ 77-23 77-7 77-20 

r 78-13 57-8 Dee 7+12 7+25 7+8 7+21 

\ 77-12 57-2 Mar 7+12 7+g 7+11 75-« 

r 7+6 5+29 Jun 7+15 74-M 74-12 7+29 

r 7+31 5+29 Sec 73-20 7+5 73-18 74-3 

r 7+24 5+25 Dec 72-31 73-11 ^-31 73-H 

r 7+15 5+27 Mar 72-13 72-20 g-13 72-20 

J. 73-11 43-12 Jun 71 -a 71-36 /J-70 71-30 

* 72-27 43-4 Sep 71 71-16 71 71-10 

r , 72-18 42-24 Dec 70-17 W-23 70-10 70-23 

Est. Sales Prev- So I esi 60.171 

r Prev. Dav Open inl J09X92 off 1657 

, r GNMA(CBT) 

IJS si «:«3 or In- pfs A JZndS Ofioo pel 

1X5 77-4 57-17 Jim 7+2 7+14 74 7M 

r 7+14 9+13 Sec 7+14 7+28 7+8 7+23 

r 7+25 5+4 Dec 74-30 

35^» 7+4 58-10 Mar W-12 

74J08 7+2J 5+25 Jun »-29 

-OW. 68-31 65 S*P „ ™- U 

Est. Soles Prev. Sales 45* 

Prev. Dav Ooen I nt 4J 17 off 70 


EsLSales MJ3S Pre^Sajes 47J93 
Prev. Dav Open int. 80772 up 1.710 tUtTr? 

VALUE LINE CKCST) AutMed 

potnlsand mAO 19965 HEM 1 9R M -I.W hutmm 

m jss fes 3 j»ssa»-ds ^ 

Est. Sales Prev^?'” 3J54 Avocre 

Prev. Oav Open Int. 8X87 off332 AvntGr 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFEI Avrt^ 

peintsand cento 1D9 <ts ,10X0 109 JS 10960 -JS AvWIGp 

j 1 ,vln 91 JS Sep 11120 1I3L25 11160 111X5 —JO AzIcM 

{{^ W1J0 ^ 1m| 114JO I14JB 114* Z * A 8WI 

I17JS 109X0 Mar H6J011+2P 11A7S 114X5 JO . .. - ■ 

Esl. Sales 1U19 Prev |m« 1972 | 

Prev, Dav Open int. 12L747 alt 303 


S432S-U 3ft Clara J 

T 3ft Ift 1ft— '■ ClasKC 

4 16ft I4W 16ft + ClearCn 

204 7ft 7ft T.= aevtm 

93 4ft 4*4 «ft Clihtme 

173 +-J 8ft fw— ft Coast F 

74 7 •« 1 J. CstllBl 

3 * Bft »ft— • CstScv 

2a 4*- * *ft CotwLb 

4* 4ft 4ft ft Cacaan 

94 Bft 8ft Ift + * Coevr 

64120* 19W » ft CooenlC 

618ft I8W If 2 ternts 

177 ITU l*ft 17 - ft CotabR 
33 4A. 4ft 4ft Colooen 

3 2 2 ! CtHFdi 


S2S7 * I? i m? 


JfT M + ft EIL IN 

1434 23* 93*- -r;* EJJ£. 

39 7>m 4ft 7ft 4 ft EMPI 
Mins 17ft MW + ft EIEM 
719ft mi ffil- ’> CMM 


6 Ift 1ft 1ft 
n y ■* 4ft fft 


ClevtRI 2* 103 
Cinume 


tr ;*! :^i ufi .► *u 'c-dtoua 


OMN. ..IB* IX 
SSi * TJ8 

j atom’s .3* li 
(rilbrtA 130 v* 
GecUnr* ** 
[CidLorr 618 A* 
uahte* J * IX 


543 K 7ft » 4 . 

11 <TO I7»i IHl **■ 
la 5ft *ft r« ** W 
jt Mb 8ft »ft- 5 


Ml lift lift 
m tro 7** 8ft * s. 
niS yw wi- w 


I|umS 9B'« UKk ^ Ur 


H F4 HW 

raw Im- ft 
raw lift . 


ST 

S ^ “ iSi+2 lift i&- J » ^ 

as?" " ,J fBffiSJ®-* i™ « 

SKI*. si| 

rolabR 70 4Vro 4U| 

Mu ^ sjft + 

S3S. « Z& iSlffiStS 

CBcwA 60e 33 JJ {■"* + ** 

lss “ 3te fc hr* 

as “BH- 


* *W 6*7 

14X11W lift *1.-1 

384 ft \ .* 


Commodity indexes 


Cose 

Moodv's ,JS54®* 

Reuters. 1,7 ^P 

DJ. Futures 

Com. Research Bureau. NJL 

Moody's : hose 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f • final 
Reuters : bose 100 jSep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : bose 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Previsus 
913.40 f 
1,774.70 
121.15 
232-40 


385 Ift tta «ft- * JCiNCO - 


van •*. 

M ta ft Vb— Ml 
7*8 14TO Mta Uft— W 
TTS.il.’K ♦ ft 
81 17 - if* row — ft 

2K. 35 u . 


IB 8 n )GrmK» 

B 17ft raft tHfi + ta a rant' • 
3*v 3^3 37ft ' w j»-.rnun< _ 


•tin 1 
44 97 531 IS 


6VJT- 3 33‘* Jift » ft jGrrow' 

SnS ii il'* !si«? 
Ilik MS !k ISSS 


x* is ■ * b as a & ik jl-. %g 

!) ft SS: gr.^ .» « !Sf: T ^ fgS- 

4837W J7W 3T-e— ft CowFd 58 BW 8ft 8ft— ft ECPiiTt 

X7*r.P 1 1 -H £££!, , W SJJ »l-1h « 

M' s* s* " “ is- jf it* t, 1 * IKS' 


iGsnf 1X0 WJ 
taNt* .74 X7 


7W‘, 10ft 10ft- ft jGtLkFd 


418ft rojr lift 

sri?t« row i^a ♦ ft 

121 l 1 j SW fs 

I I ift v * 

i jft *s» r 

,35* left 14U Ii'i-I 

auisft ri is - ft 

MU': 1*»» J4J* . ' 

J1 17 16' . hfft + ** 

, JL SW V* 
5712ft Wiv 13:- » 


■Kiro «: 

ihh 

4« im »% 


; Green T 

l G*tnfd 


.GfCB 

'C-uqrFn 

Goo'df’ 

(Guevt* 

. UvUlfid 


iti 


raw ij . v 

LL+t 

S 

5ta H *r 


5.12ft lit I2-- y .wiiio 

362 11W ML. lift + ft luHAPHl -» M 
45J5W 35ft 3Mb * M IGMOdC _ 

loam? ti n--'* [cuir J*5e 6 


«j m » s% 

# T Tz% 
» ffi . ' 


Market Guide 


2JU 45 ISO g ™ . ** Comare X2 .1 

,s ^ 

- ttovns a •« M 
,s 2 MfifU,. ffi 

1X00 lx afro "ft gy* +, ‘ 4 ComC1r f 2.12 2.7 

" ” -SSBia ass. ’a s 

1X0 95 12818ft ,«* + *1 CntClBn. 2X0 43 

9672 ltW 11** , , CmcIFd 
579 16ft 15W 16ft + ** CmlSnr JOa 48 
161 Bft 8ft 8ft CwfttiB 1X4 45 

519 ,r * 2. Jh T.ii CirfltiF U4e1i7 

*s^5ftftrs ss^r ,60 « 

1X41 7X " *» ” + * Camtad J8 1 J 

Mo ZX 53 391* 39ft 39W CaaiSv > 

211 Tta 7*.b 7TO (Sr A0 42 
2J2 19 324581* 57ft 5BJ +1JJ CmpCdS 

.12 IJ 35 7ft 6ft CmpUS 


NY CSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

MYME: 

KCBT: 

nyfe: 


OiIcoop Board of Trade 
CMcaao Mercantile Enc l itawe 
Intoi national Monetary Market 

Of Ollcoao Mercantile Ewtowe 

New York Cocoa. Susar. Coffee Excnonoe 
New York Cotton Exdtanae 
Commodity Exchanoft New York 
New York Mercantile Exchange 
Kansas City Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exchanoe 


« ■' ss u *v 

■ ra J =»■?! »=S 

■“ « Z'St ’ft 'K=M e ««» 

no sj 48401* 3?a * + w gwgoLJs 

^ " ,319 II IB -I l^ 5 160 58 

712 2.7 2278ft 71 78ft + '1 EltanlTl lXflb 5X 

1X4 2.7 10539 38ft 39 + Vi EiWCrtv 

s 3^ li a 


io r» «* .P* 
not r* •'•* m— '• 
n n 3 3^> 


I ComHir 60 42 


35 7ft 6ft J QT1PU5 

48 7 **• ftT £ Com poo 

28 7ft 9J6 Yft + «• CmaoT 
77 9 , 8ft 9 + ft CmpCr 


London Commodities 

June 11 


London Metals 

June 11 


Asian Commodities 

June 11 


Cash Prices June 11 


27 9 8ft 9 + J* CmpCr 

2W29* TOb 19ft— ft CmprsL 
89 M 13ft 13ft — J* CmpSv S 
JJ 10 317 15ft I5W 15ft— ft Como us 
SO 4X 712% ra 12W + ft CCTC 


Close Prevtam 
Hloh Low BUI AS o Bid Aik 

SUGAR 

Sicriinp Per metric ton 
Aue 9060 08. JO 8960 89X0 8780 88X0 

Ocl 9240 91.00 91 A0 9160 9040 90 JM 

Dec 9*00 9?00 9*80 92 40 96.OT W.40 

Mor 109X0 HB.2U 108 30 108 40 108.40 Ills 80 

Mav 11180 llJJM 11300 HIM 113X0 1U60 

Ain 130X0 13000 119(0 11940 tTOJM 12040 

Od 175 00 12500 124X0 124 40 124X0 12560 

V olume- 1 42* toll ol SO ions. 

COCOA 

Sietling per metric ion 

Jly INK 1.785 1X00 1X01 1.783 1,784 

See 1.78* 1.773 I.7BT IJB3 1.772 1.774 


Clew Previous HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES Eofi wTsiitai ta__— 160 168 

BW Ask Bid Ask UXJ per ounce prtrffctattrM^ M vs, vd — . O+o 0J6ft 

ALUMINUM _cjose Previous steel all lets iPllt.l.ion, 473.00 45100 

StarllnoPermrhlcKW^^ 834X0 827X0 Jun _ N$ N.T. 312JM 314X0 312X0 314.00 staSl^aTN^l 'hw'p I tTZ 2 7MO lM-^01 

•nrward m+do iusjo 84* jo bsojm Ji»- N-I- n.t. suxo aisoo 31300 iisxo ”5BgB l, .g 01 Bvv __ 19-71 77.30 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
UJW per ounce 

Close • Previous 


Commodity ond Unit 

Cotiee 4 Santas n»- 

Prlnlctalti 64/30 38 VL vd . 


Year 
Toe Ago 
160 168 
060 0J6'* 


R*5 a® Mt. JR cSiAS 

252 IW ft “Jft + J* CptAwl 
1X0 3X 288 321{r B ® ~ U CmuOt 

60 25 2424ft 23ft 24 CptEnt 

5817ft l*ft 7ft— J* OnplH 

10114ft 14 w — S Cmaldn 

21 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft CnwLR 


B71 310 822X0 834X0 B27JJ0 Jun _ N.T. N.T. JI2X0 314JB 312J10 314.00 «--■ --J-X V—' 

USJ» HUD ISUH J1V - N.T. H.T. 31AX0 316X0 313X0 315X0 EES WJh ° 1 ...__ 

wuAisee «u!.h F*Aitni Auf — N.T. N.T, 3 1 5.00 317.00 31SHQ 317JJQ »- > ik 

2SS5Sl ,Mlrt Gr00e ocl _ 321X0 321X0 319X0 321X0 318X0 330 XS SgygHS!-.!? 

Tj 25-00 1.136X0 1.123X0 1.124X0 gjg - JJ^f* [j, OTXO moo S DB ZJnc * E - St - L - Bcclfi ' lb 

1.143X0 1.14350 1.143X0 L143 ^ 3EX0 3&00 Wiw OT 00 3t3 33300 — 

— " Volume : 23 lol3 ot 100 «. 5,l,,er Y - 05 


COPPER CATHODE5 fHigk Grade) 
Sterilna per metric tan _ 

ml 1.135X0 1,136X0 1.123X0 

forward 1,143X0 1.14350 1.143X0 

COPPER CATHODE5 (Standard) 
Starting per metric tan 


T!mX0 >a "l 14.00 1.115X0 1.117X0 gMjS" 8010 "™ 1 * 

1.131X0 1.13150 1,177X0 1.129X0 UJ5 per ounce 


Silver N.Y,a: 
Source: AP. 


79-80 100-101 
1+71 77-30 

67-70 6*ft-72 
55885 +3944 

0A+A7 052-53 
9+100 1 53ft 

+16 834 


28414ft 14 14 — ft 

604 4ft 6ft 4ft 


3814 13ft 13ft , 

JOa 4X 1510ft 10ft WVb— “ _ 

JM Aj 422ft 22ft 22ft + [A EntPV* 

““ SiSiHS ig-S ^ 

M “ 4*ft *ft ^ l^Tt 
J8 14 979219b 28ft 28TO +-ft EnvrTsl 
10 914 9ft 9ft — V. EiaoBI 
60 64 1310 9ft 9ft Eosfln 

17421). 19ft 20VS + ft 
6 Bft 8 8 Eanlai 

Xlr 1 ^taft 10* 1^=ft ISotf 

■-» ,;i ^"sSS^a BEf 

■SP 5 S |g 

15310 9ft W4— ft EkDvfr 
28224ft 33ft MU + ta 

- 'lfCCs 

33 & » ST 5 S«- 

11 “ n i itS ^ 


32 «ty 6ft HBO 

9]7nft ijft iiro + ro jja- M u 

IS? 160 58 2S38 27‘i 371v — ** HEI T» 

IS {fib 55 *»ft W }’>; ♦ - SSoSBn 
EnDOrv 73 n >2 ia»i Mft— ft Ho ch Ca .3* LB 

4k rj> 8ft r,b . Haber 
pmRov J59 9, ■ ft + ft HOtfCO 

!??sn * u ,15 15 15 + ft HadMn 

30 415 15 IS —ft HO»V 

lift lift + ft Halml 
59 5ft Vl 5ft + W HWnOH 
iSST- MlTft 17 WV».+ ft. HonvCa 

IS5 tI 410 10 M + Jk HanvlR 

3923W 23W 23ft- W HotoU 

1^ r ’K=i5 Mf* 

WT'?’* ffiSV' 

oAmro Xtt 23 8229 28W 3BW-+ Vb Hamer 

B ^ mCP x 3X 47S 7ft 7l» !k-VMrnv. 

■Jt 24 134833ft 33 33L. + ft HOMffcB 

PrleLBc 301 101 KM- HlfhCSl 

Er " rt - BC ,1615ft 15ft 15ft— ft Hltldn 

12 3ft'2li 3ta-W Htfbdvn 
10 91* 9ft 9ft- HeCfKlA 


w- ft i . I 

iSr JO U 33x5ft 3ft 5ft— ft 
tJ£, T . 3814ft 15ft 13ft- ft 

nllnta • . • 35,S iSS lSS“ s 

ass?* » 

So 

H£r .10 + » 

ISvvCo 5711ft 11 II — ft 

fgg: J H 5ISS s»7£ 

U?rmt 160 5X 443 32ft 311* 32ft Y ft 
{JtSrv U8 36 B4W 4*ft 

Marvin* ’S'Sl **£. ’SS * 

Haftr* t 40 98b Mb Mb 

Hauser 60v 2J 215ft 15ft ISW— / 
Havrtv J2 2J 3421 - 3fK. 21 + if 


224 2* -. W . +ft 

12 Bft Bft 8ft— ft 


HlthCSb 

— ft Htthlh 

— ft Httbdvn 

HecfiaA 
, — _ HecftpB 
. I Helen T 
— * 1 Helix 
+ ft HenraF 

— ft HoniFd 


453 "TO iHertov 


JB 

U 

18 * 

M> 

avj— 

ft 



60012 

114, 

13 




37 4 

3.1 

3ft — 

ft 



430 3Vb 

Jft 

3ft 


.M 

A 

7127 

JSft 

»V — 

ft 

M 


71 26Vi 

TSVi 

25ft — 

ft 



10 4ft 

4ft 

4ft- 

lb 



155358k 

25 

25% — 

ft 

.92 

IS 

1838 

JTVl 

27\l 




WTSta 

1* 

IBV» + 

ft 



4 5ft 

ift 

5ft — 

ft 



20 2ft 

2<a 

2ft- 

ft 


n Sw£ iS 5 i»b ->4 I (Continued on Page 16 ) 


Floating Rate Notes joneii 


. Iwwtr/MOL 


Coupdo Meta Bid Askd I taoer/Mot. 


Coupon Next BM Askd 


INK 1.785 1X00 1X01 1.783 1.784 

1.786 1.773 1.787 1J83 1.772 1.774 

1.758 1.747 1.751 1.754 1J48 1.749 


1.747 1.749 I.7S9 1.740 1.7a 1JS9 

1.710 I.7S9 1.743 1.744 1.7*9 1.774 

1.773 1.773 1.7*5 1.778 1,770 1.784 


tat N.T' NT L773 1.785 1.746 1X05 

volume. 3AI2 lols of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Starling per metric Ion 
Jly 2X8S 2X6$ 2X68 2X49 2X70 2X75 

SOP 2.1H 3.110 2.117 2.11B 2.121 2.12) 

Nov 2173 2.1M 2.IM 2157 2155 115B 

Jan IXOI 2.181 3.191 2195 2183 2189 

Mar 3.19J 2193 2181 21*0 3.180 2185 

Mov N T. N.T. 2170 2300 2.170 2,385 

Jlv NT N.T 2.140 2100 1140 2180 
Volume 1631 lols Of 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

U+. aoflars per metric ton 
JIV 31250 210.75 21225 2I2J0 210X5 31075 
Aug 313X0 IW* 75 21050 210-75 20*30 209.75 
Sen 21375 711 25 211.75 212X0 21150 211.75 
Oct 21*00 2IL40 214 00 314.50 2 13 JO 214X0 
Nav NT. N.T. 215.00 31750 215X0 71700 

Dee N.T N.T. 217.25 23100 219X0 225X0 

Jan N.T. N.T. 21725 721® 215X0 225X0 

Frt N T N T. 216.00 731® 215® 225.00 

Mar N.T N.T. 21200 72BXQ New New 
volume: 1.981 ioisdI 1 00 tons. 

Sovrtts. Scoters ants London Petroleum E*- 
chonae igosoili. 


lorwara 1.131X0 1.131 50 1.127X0 1.129X0 — 

LEAD 

Starting per metric ion 

spot 302X0 303X0 300X0 30050 Jun 

forward 302X0 30250 302X0 30250 Aug 

NICKEL 5*5 

Sterling per metric ton _ w J.L'i r. 

spat 4A1SOO 4 A 35.00 4A0000 4AI0X0 VOfume . ft iu.a u. 

forward 4570X0 4575 00 4580X0 4590X0 KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
SILVER Matavsian cents per kilo 

4B7.00 48150 48350 J|v 

forward 501X0 503X0 *97X0 498X0 jta. 

TIN (Standard) Sep 


Pre*. 

low settle Settle 

N.T. 313-50 312.40 


31*50 31650 31SA0 31560 

Sea N.T. N.T. 318J0 317.40 

OC1 — N.T. N.T. 32050 31960 

VOfume : 83 lols of I® oz. 


Close 

BM Ask 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


19*55 19950 196X0 19+75 

194+0 1*755 1*450 125X0 


Starling aer 
spot 
forward 
11 MC 

Sterling per 
spat 
forward 
Source: AP. 


I 964a00 h *670.00 9 649.00 9651.00 Mrni 
95SSX0 *5*0X0 9540.X 9545X0 


1*7+8 IS6J0 195X0 
198+0 199 JO 1 97.00 


volume: 23 lata. 


201.00 Ittl.OO 200X0 202X0 
2X100 205X0 202X0 204X0 


metric ton __ SINGAPORE RUBBER 

580X0 5*1X0 582X0 XIOD sbieaaore ceals par kilo 

490+0 S91X0 592« 593X ■ riot* 


Close 

BM Ask 


Previous 
Sid Aik 


Company 

E arning s 


.RSSUIv— 177 +0 177.75 17300 174X0 

R5S 1 Aug_ 17)50 174X0 170X0 170+0 

R5S2 Jly I723B 173+0 170.00 171.00 


RSS3JIV*. 17050 171+0 148.00 I4*X0 

RSS4JIV— 146+0 168+0 144X0 WAB8 

RSS S Jlv — 16150 16250 159X0 161X0 

I KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian ringgits per 25 tons 

Close Previous 


I Dividends June 11 *— 

Issuer/Mat 

Company Per Amt Pay Rec AUtodlrtaiU 

INCREASED S^«??I796 

Fleetwood Em O .11 8-M 7-S Allanfic Fai 897*4 

Fsi inirsiate Bncro Q 62 ft +30 +21 Autop<5f099S 

REDUCED ISSSTS^ 

Irwin Tov S .10 7-31 7-12 BcbDI R emo WN1 

CTnrK BcoDHtaMW „ 

STOCK bco Santa SPlrHoll 

Forum Grouo _10 PC +5 7-15 Banrtnk |k IBMIBQ 

Boa Cant™ 

USUAL BkGrwce917M 

Bunker HI I ncm Sc Q 54 +12 +28 K£22SS m 

Cox Cofnrrmlcallons Q X8 ft 7-14 +28 gjSESn 

Energy Air Fre+ght O 12 ft 8-16 +2 

Forum Group Q XI ft +5 7-15 glKKwSjS 

Frisch's Rstronls O X5 ft 7-15 75 5£ 222S5SS5l 

Holly Corp Q X4 7-2 +21 KSSTyS*** 

IP Forest Resources Q J7 +15 +28 5T E iSSto no 

Nail atv Corp Q 50 +1 7-T 

A-Annval; 4+MontMy; Q-Quarterty; S-58ffl+ B» Toll ro 93 

A 8888 1 Mil BV Tdkvaff 


Dollar 


Coupen Nnf BM Askd 


Coupon MM BM Askd I axse Man 0/S93 


7V. - 99X4 9*56 

9tu 17-101805410044 


... *07 100.1210022 
B*b 2D-11 *7.10 W.10 
HP. IWJ 101131*23 

9 27-a 100.1010046 

95b 07-11 99X0 99J0 
a am TOM 10665 
9i« 2+iowLaioaa 
7ft 0M2 5*8 2-2 
7.WS 34X4 «J9 T9J9 
Bn. 29-11 99 O 99.23 
J 1M0 9US9880 
7ft OWN 99 J0 TOM 

n. rowajowxs 

92. UX6 98J0 9UB. 
tft 3048100301^ 

9 25-87 99J0 W025 

pv 3M4 nsuswoss 

ff& 29071005010140 
9ft X-MW0J2W6p 
9ft 1S07WJ399OT 

«ft 3 no inamniip 
9ft 1147 T0BJ0T0M0 
9ft jmnoograow 
EL 2947 10025105® 

aft a*®w“2!K2 

9ft 0448 loumouo 
Ift . B0.1415Q74 

9V2 2806 WO f if 
7ft • 9962 99 J2 

9ft 2S06 10U8WW8 
Bft 13-08 W0.HW024 
Ulft 30-09 *8J7 9U1 
9ft 17««05S™X5, 
vis lwonoimu 

8ft 17-10 WX8.9M0. 
9ft 1+87”- 
Wft 2 m 

9ft 2046 1_ 

Oft TUD H.-3WI 00.17 
9ft 3+lfl WMS18DJS 
9ft 224710021111033 
10ft 

9V1 0641 100.9)101X3 
89v 31-07 100.121002 
mo - ifloamoi* 
7ft. 0+0*990 100X0 
8 ft IM1 1004410054 
10!* aw man»54 

9ft 2207 100.1218022 
8ft 17-10 99X4 9926 
7ft - 1005 

9 1 - (W8I001 
9k. 3147 nOJ 
' 9ft 1M6 100X0 
914 BUI mjmms 
10ft 0449 10052100X2 
Vh 1248 1002110033 
Ift 13-13 UOJItOOLn 
Bft 2848 10BX0100U 
B 2341 *951 9951 
Bft 304+108X010015 
9 1841108.131002) 

9ft 0947 100131002) 
9ft 11-H 1005910040 
9ft 1248 1005HD06J 
Ift 1548 9957 10097 
| 0+121005710857 

9ft 34-10 1005810048 
7J2S 49X99970 99X0 
Bft 26419 99X0 W.*5 
n, 3MB 98X0 9073 
9ft 1847 W03SHB6S 
+1 29-11 100X010011 
mSB-ll 99-41 995B 


Fsl Inirsiate Bncrp ' Q 6?'ft 

REDUCED 

Irwin Tov S .10 

STOCK 

Forum Group -10 PC 

USUAL 

Bunker Hi Incm Sc Q 54 


Bunker HI Incm Sc 
Cox Commnicatlons 
Energy Air Freight 
Forum Group 
Frisch's Rstronls 
Holly Corp 
IP Forest Resources 
Nall aiv Carp 


AiximL 

Source; UP I 


S&P 100 Index Options 

June 1 1 


Revenue and profits, in millions, 
are m local currencies unless 
otherwise indicated 


Wilt wvi.ni [ rvruai 

Pnct Jon Jit «w Sw Jun Jh auq Sn 


Britain 

Guinness (Arthur) 



Bid 

Ask 

Bid 

Ash 

Jim 

— 1XS0 

1X«0 

1X50 

1X00 

Jlv 

_ 1.145 

1X20 

1.190 

1X40 

*u* 

1.100 

1.150 

MOD 

1.150 

Scf 

- 1X70 

1.1W 

1X70 

1.120 

Ocl 

_ 1060 

1.1G0 

1X60 

1.100 

NOV — 

— 1X60 

1X80 

1.W0 

ixn 

Jon 

— 1X30 

1X70 

1X30 

1X70 

Mar __ 

_ 1X33 

1X70 

1X30 

1X70 

MOV 1X20 1X40 

volume :0 tots of 25 tons. 

Source ■ Reuters- 

1.020 

1X60 


Paris Commodities 

Jane 11 


Bk Tokyo** 

Bk Tokyo 87 
BkTobveFeMNI 
BkTokWgKWJI 
BWkomerta>0/5*6 
emurs Trust n 
Bonkers Trad 94 
BK Cants# % 

BoD Fin 87/91 

BH95 

Mil Inl 99 

BBIM93 

BOIndOMin 

Ba lndoauct*9 

BueB* 

Bice 87 . 


- - M4 l.'li - 

lift I 16 l.li 5' 16 SM6 


II hi: JL h*. 7 f i 
I la r., ) t ft 6'i 
i it • t. i .-l- - 


1st Half 

Revenue 

Pretax Net. 
Per Share _ 


DM Futures Options 

June 11 

W.Gennai Msfc-I 2 UQ 9 mcrtecenB tm ranrt 


SUGAR ^ B “ J “ «* |gSS“ 

FrenMi fron«S Per motrlc tgq 
Aug 1280 1570 1576 1580 +9 m95 

Ocl 1588 1575 1576 1580 +2 S™> 85/88 

Dec 15B0 1^5 1579 1280 +7 MI6N6 

Mar 1X34 1523 1523 1524 +1 SSI* 

mov 1573 1J70 1540 1570 +3 nvB9 


total ran «u amt 10(522 
Trial nil Dpmirri.kriJTS 
letaiBut miurui Tl33* 

Trial pul oom iH 521 447 

man. 

HNfllUID Low 19311 Ow 1055 — 614 
Seme: C BOE. 


Metal Box 


Year 

Revenue - 

Proton Net 

Per Share 


Sen 

Dec 

Mar Sea 

Dec 

MAT 

2.73 

112 

m 

046 

— 

1.99 

344 

- 0.® 

075 

— * 

1 Ji 

1X7 

076 

1.12 

!v» 

0X7 

U* 

1.79 1X6 

1X0 

— 

0 54 

103 

IJ9 1.91 

2.19 

— 

032 

073 

107 ZM 

2X4 

— 


■™t 1*11 j irt.w ■_» ,-iru r J mb 

Aug 1640 1645 1635 1645 -10 mHNI 

Esl. voi.: 1590 lols ol 50 Ions. Prev. actual BraJUfW 
sakrs: 1.995 lots. Open inlerest: 1B£79 BivU 

COCOA BcPortoasPnrp 

French franca per 108 ta go Worms 89/94 


l',S. Treasury Bill Rales 

June 1 1 


United States 


Estimated total voL 1.963 
Colls: Mon. vaL 2532 OMO nit 30.2SJ 
Puts : Mon. val. 1X48 aaen int. I3£>7 
Source: CME 


Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2X30 

3X80 

Sep 

2X8S 

2X74 

2X80 

7 ran 

Dec 

2X40 

2X30 

2X35 

2X37 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

3X43 

2X51 

Mav 

N.T. 

n.t. 

3X40 


Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2X40 



Sac 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2X40 

— 


+i ws- n !5-. 


Atv.-lT Soioe'oo 3'Oirc’i 


2nd Chtar. 

1*85 

J7WJ 

1984 

30U 


.... 1105 

1135 

Per Share 

_ OJW 

046 

1st Half 

490 

198* 

Revenue 

... 631.4 

509.9 

Net Income—.,.. 

.. 14.60 

1+76 

Per Share 

044 



K 


FOR Trt LATEST 'AORD OfJ 
EUROBONDS 

READCAaOEWIPTZ 

EACH AACMDAY INTHEHT 


COFFEE BetoWnH 

French francs per 100 Kg Bristoma 

Jly 2650 2650 2640 2655 —12 Ccee« 

5e© 25T7 2XN 2698 2X00 —5 CcaeOS 

Npv NT. N.T. 2X40 USD —15 C«0»NS 

Jem N.T. N.T. 2+40 2X80 —15 Ctrl 90 

Mar N.T. N.T. 244ft 26B0 -12 Od08 

Mov N.T. NT- — 2480 —12 Ohe»SAB 

Jly NT N.T. 2480 — HI CHC*6(W 

Esl. vgl.; 47 lols of 5 lan& Prev. actual sola- ChcM 

■ ID Into IVWI Mlvaci' 329 fnrtan 


GbeK/tt , 
cmctatvridvl 


119 tots. Open inter act: 372 
Source: Bounc tfv CMVWW 


ConareiS+LJ* 
centrol Inf WAS 


Close Man Com « 
Chase Man Carp Oo 

aSSSwrogdv) 

QHtstlonki Bk 91 


OllairpSgW 
CM kora ad** 


OikorpOcm 
OlicareM 
cmcorpPerp_. 
Oitcarp PtoP 97 
Comrrwrjpfc F(*4 


Comm LHP Montreal 71 

CoiffFJjCJX.W 
, Ounc»01 Europe 93 
Ccf 86/98 

CdTONS 

CdPaM* 

CUB 

Ceonwg/W 

Cr^toftard 89/92 
Cr FanCtor 18/93 . 

Q Fo r E«» g.W 
crLyamwnNi 
CrLronnoisg 
Cr LVPnnotoWN) 

Cr Lyonnais JJ ^4 
Cr Lyotmah 91/95 
CrLVPBnidsW 

Cr Lyonnais JaH2/96 

ai««»b 

Cr Lvumwta J*«N* 
Cr Notional S 

Cr Notional *6/94 

CrNoiKmoiflO 

CrediMiwtaifM 

oooiiamwiro 


Doucw KoFBjro* 

Don Oil Not G«9? 

Dm N*rsM Nav90 
(tan Norske DM* 
OemnorkjDnJ/w 
DMriWtOdaBND 
Dwunork 99/84 

KSSfijI 

DrwkWN'FHW 
Eldorado nuc 89 
£d« 

EdiWNS 

Edfri 

End US 

EfWiOO 

Eonn 

EolM 

EeC 88/90 
EK W 

leieriorinfOlNl 
Fom>vla95__ . 

FriTaweTlW 

USSR-, ms 

First Boston 94 

Flry Bk Sysl 94 
F6rslCinca9097 
FMCtucagan 
First OUcow M 
Firp CtvTewN95 
First litlar 95 
Ford 91 _ 

Full IM94.<ft 


&K 31X7 1086818070 
7*. 054)9 99.90 10000 
8ft 0948 9962 9U2 
9ft 27-06 1003810068 
7ft 2frX8 9867 98X2 
t% am isnraioiua 
im 0*0* 100-25100-75 
7ft 1*0898559870 
9ft IM699J9 9U9 
Bft 7V07 99JB IOM 
1ft ■ WI.11N15I 

8ft 15X7 9940 1050 

Bft TOB 99X5 »&£ 

Wfc roaimjraLfi 
7ft imimm, 

Bft 2140 99X7 100X7 
9ft *64)9 1 
9ft 09-10 1 

8ft 224B9M0 99J8 
Ift - lOCLWlSSJ 
7ft D+09IOI1.13UU] 

V\ 77-04 lOOffiUKUB 

to o»-|0 

9ft 01-07 99575 100X5 

9ft u-io bojnguf 

10V. 23-89 1002019055 
ta 89-10 100X010098 

» om/iwutioilu 
m im iamtsij» 

WL 27-06 IQOJOIOOJO 
f 1041 1003810038 
1041 99X6 99.96 
9ft 1*06 1004610866 
9 1847 rnniaim 

Wt IMP 10H6S180J5 
9J5 2088 WEMMO-H) 

9 11-07 1005310031 
9ft 2J4B IMNigOto 
Ift 13-11 10B621U52 

K mi iw.ifnw.i 8 

|ft 13X899.95 MOJO 
9ft 1946 9955 108-50 
9ft 09471005810851 
m I5M 1087310U3 
9ft 1948 1804710057 
nt 0808100.1610034 
Ift J947 99.92 WUD 
9ft 21-U WJflOIXI 
Bft 2MB WX8 99J8 

10 27X8 1D063M04S 

9ft 3M8 100331003! 
18 2748 180X4100X4 

9W 134M 10MB10WO 
8ft 1309 99X8 «9.«8 
111122606 48.95 99 JSS 
10 H« W35TO45 
9ft 17X6 998* *9.*9 
10 2109 10000052 
9ft 0807 100X0100.15 

0M1 97 J5 *9X5 
9ft 71-04 100X218012 
8ft 2S4H 10008100.10 
Wft 304810060111050 
BJB 2+1# 9178 99X8 
H JO07 99X4 100X4 
SV: Ml 99JS 99X5 
Ift U4M99JS 99 JB 

gft ar-ea w 95100.15 

S.4I25U4S 99JB 9940 
8*1 214*100X710117 
9 220)93X0 95X0 

7ft 060* 99 JO '99X8 
8ft 15-11 1080018018 
Eft 1547 W.RH052 


Gwtflnance 89/92 

GonfbwnaaWM 

Gib 19 

Gta 92 

Cab Pare 

GzfaM 

Giro91 

Gt Westam *2/95 
Gf1raSova*2 

6rindtoys94 

Gtwwemro/w 

HtUSomuelft 

HHISamoelrtfp 

HHDOP9 91/95 

Hydra BuabKM 

Kvdro Quebec 05 
id 71 • 

ie*hma9S/97/« 

Indonesia 88/73 

IraSid 96/89 

KSSS 

IWivT* 
ltafyto/W 
itataBS . . 

C lion 87 _ 


aft 2806 ioe.l6j0656 

9ft 2207 «M1 '10027 
Bft 1308 10B.Wig0.2j 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


Page 15 


business roundup 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 



£riYJ- 


By James Risen 

*s iff Angdet : TI»Ut* Service >•' 

DETROIT — General Motors 
. Corp. has pressured New United 
, Motor Manufacturing, GM’s joint 
venture with Toyota, to increase hs 
Juio-production schedule for 1985 
'by nearly 35 percent to get the 
venture's new small cars to all 5,200 

■ Chevrolet dealera before the end of 
pe year. Chevrolet officials say. 

Chevrolet’s general manager. 

■ Robert D. Burger, said Monday 
-.that the GM division h*d been dis- 

lppcanted by the joint venture’s 


lit 


■nitial plan to produce just 43,000 

- Nova models this year , 

- n Fremont, California. The - ven- 


al its plant 


Mure, which built its first cars last 
December, has been overly cau- 


tious in its plans to gear up to full 
production. Mr. Buiger said. . 

Rut after GM pushed die joint 
venture to accelerate production. 
New United complied by increas- 
ing its schedules be ginning in die 
second quarto;.- Mr. Burger said. 
Now, the joint venture expects to 
build 58,000 units this year, and 
Chevrolet has moved up its nation- 
wide introduction and distribution 
of the Nora from early 1986 to 
September or October, 1985, Mr. 
Bwger added.: 

Tne Nova is the only one of 
Chevrolet’s ' three Japanese-based 
products being assembled in the 
United States. Mr. Burger said that 
70 percent of the pans and material 
used m the car — including the 


Goldsmith WimSeatonZeUerboeh 

9 meeting n«ng prdimi- 


The Associated Pros 

'■ SAN FRANCISCO — Gown 
* Lellerbach Coro, reported that 
1 ^areholder resolutions offered by 
wr James Goldsmith were soundly 

■ Jefcaied at this year's annual meel- 
.ng, but that the. British financier 
■lid gain enough votes to put him? 

■ elf on the board. 

.; Although the vote was made offi- 
cial Monday. Crown management 
'disclosed the outcome soon after 


the 1 

naiy. tallies. . 

Sr James owns a Bole more than 
25 percent of the forest products 
company’s s Urffr- Hie and Crown 
ZeSerbach announced May 26 that 
they had reachcd .a truce and that 
the company had granted Sir James 
a seat on the board. 

Sir James's shareholder propos- 
als asked Crown to do away with 
an anti-takeover plan. 


CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC 

INVITATION TO PREQUAUFY 


Contractors interested in being praqualifkd' for the BANGUI MTOKO 
AIRPORT project, should obtain aga ast payment oT 50.000F.CFA to RI- 
LE HALT OOMMISSAIRE CHARGE DU PLAN ET DE LA COOPERA- 
TION ECONOM1QUE ET-FTNANOBRE Trow the addnas pwai bdow the 
M prequalification form” and submit it, according to the instructions accom- 
panying the loon, BEFORE AUGUST 3, 1985. The project' basica ll y 
involves civil works related to the strengthening ondresurfaclng of .the 
runway (2600 Mx 45 M), faraway (320 Mx 22 M). and the apron 
(350 Mi 90 M). -and is expected to be pgrtiaD r fanded from the loans 
granted by the Suxfl Fund for Devdqnnent (SFD),.tbe~Ar«b Bank br 
Economic Development in Africa (BADEA), and the Opoc-fund- 

LE HAUTCOMBUSSAIRE AU PLAN ETA LA COOPERATION 

ECONOHZQUE ET FINANOERE 

BJ*. 696 - BANGUI 

REP. CENTRAFRICAINE 

TELEX: No 5208 RC 


O.T* INVESTMENT FUND 

Soottt Aitonyme - 

Registered Office: Luxe mb ourg, % BkJ Royd 
R.C. Lncaboarg B-7443 • 

Shareholders axe hereby convened u>: . 

THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEEI1NG 
of Shareholder* of G .T. INVESTMENT FUND to be held ar ils : 
of Coe al Luxembourg, 2. boulevard Royal, on Friday, June 21st, 19fi5 at 10 
o'arbckajzL bribe putpose of consiaeriqgatid voting upon the following 
agenda; 

1. To hear and accept the Reports of: 

(a) The Directors, ■ ■ . 

(£) The Statutory Auditor; ... 

2. To approve the Report of the Directors far year: ended December 31st, 
,4 Ktftl i nrhi«fing i hi- Shitwnrim rrf Net AwO» aa at December Slat. 1984 

■nft Statement of Operations br the year ended December 31st, 1934; 

3. To discharge the D ir ect or s and the. Statutory Auditor with respect of 
thdr performance of duties from January 1st. 1964- to December 31st; 

4. To elect Directors to serve until the next Annual General Meeting of 
shareholders; . 

5. To elect a Statutory Auditor to serve until the next Annual General 
Meeting of shareholders; , ■ 

6. To approve the declaration of a dividend of S0.10 per share to be 
payable an June 28th, 1985 to registered and bearer shareholders at tbc 
close of bosiness on June 21st, 1985 and that the shares be traded ex- 
dividend after June 21st; 1985; 

7. Other business. 

Resohrtiona on the agenda of Ordinary General Meeting will remnre no 
quorum and will be adopted if voted by the majority of the shareholders 
present or represented. 

In order m tike pari at the Meeting of Jane 21st, 1985 the owners of 
bearer shares will have to deposit t h e i r shares five dear days before the 
meeting with one of the following banks who are authorized to receive 
the shares on deposit 

— Barmne b i t e mat to n n l o k Lux embourg SA. 

2, boulevard Royal 'LUXEMBOURG 
— Credit Industrie! et Commercial 

66, rve de la Vietafa* - 75009 PARIS 

— Baca della Svizxera Indiana 

2, Via BL Magatti - 6900 LUGANO 
— Bwc ri s d ie VgremsbanhAXr. 

Kardinalr-Fadlhabct-Strasie. 14-8000 MUNICH 2. 

- THE BOARD OF E8RECT0RS 


fNTKRNA nONAl 
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engine and power-train — will be. 
imported from Japan. 

GM officials nave repeatedly 
promised that the car will have a 
50-percem domestic content, but 
Thomas McDaniel, director of in-’ 
temational marketing programs for 
Chevrolet, said Monday that this 
level will only be reached by in- 
cluding the value of American la- 
bor used at Frcmom 

The GM push to speed up pro- 
duction at Fremont underscores a. 
basic difference between the U.S. 
and Japanese auto industries in 
their approaches to manufacturing 
sew products, Mr. Burger noted. 

Traditionally, U.S. automakers 
optimistically promise their dealers 
that they will have an Adequate 
supply of new cars by a preset date, 
while the Japanese tend to set more 
pessimistic initial production ffwig 
and are less concerned about im- 
mediate, nationwide availability 
for new cars, he said. 

Meanwhile, Chevrolet afo has 
accelerated its plans for the start of 
the nationwide distribution of its 
two new Japanese-built small cars, 
the Chevy Sprint and Spectrum 
models. GM began selling both 
cars last year, but because of strict 
quotas on Japanese imports, it has 
not had enough to distribute them. 


Douglas, Fluor 
Join to Revamp 
China’s Airports 

The Associated Press 

.LONG BEACH, California 
— Douglas Aircraft Co. said it 
has joined forces rath Fluor 
Corp., the U.S. engineering 
concern, to look into revamping 
China's airports. Neither com- 
pany put a price on the poten- 
tial size of the Chinese work. 

“They (the Chinese) appar- 
ently have decided that it is bet- 
ter to develop air transport at 
this time than it is to oevdop 
highway and raB systems,” Don 
Hanson, a spokesman for Long 
Beach-based Douglas, a unit of 
McDonnell Douglas Corp.. 
said Monday. 

Gareth CC Chang, presi- 
dent of McDonnell Douglas 
China Inc, said: “ China offers 
a tremendous market in the 
area of commercial and indus- 
trial projects, and we’re certain 
this joint venture will help Chi- 
na move forward with its mod- 
ernization efforts.” 

Douglas and Fluor said they 
will study the feasibility of all 
phases of airport . projects. 


Finland Bank Reorganizes 
Its Operations Into 3 Units 


By Brenda 

International Heraid'Tribmc 

LONDON — . Union Bank of 
Finland has reorganized its opera- 
tions into three business areas. 

The Helsinki-based bank's chief 
general manager, Ahti Hjrvonen, 
said the reorganization will be ef- 
fective Sept 1 and wiB allow the 
UBF group to adapt to recent rapid 
changes in domestic and interna- 
tional banking. 

The international banking oper- 
ations and corporate banking sec- 
tor will be beaded try Paavo Lai- 
Unen, currently head of 
international banking operations 
and deputy chief general manager. 

Erik Stadigh was named deputy 


ability for the finance operations 
sector, which will include foreign 
currency and short-term money 
market operations and accounting. 

The branch network and retail 
banking sector will be beaded by. 
Kurt S ten val deputy chief general 
manager. 

Apple Computer Inc, the Silicon 
VaUey-bssed maker of personal 
computers, has appointed Jean 


Sanyo Securities Co. of Tokvo 
has opened a representative office 
in Paris. Hideo Mizutani, previous- 
ly m a n ager of ibe bond department 
of Sanyo International Ltd. in Lon- 
don. was named the representative. 

Tenneco Inc. has appointed to its 
board David Plastow, who is chief 
executive of Vickers PLC, which 
makes Rolls-Royce automobiles 
and has engineering interests. Ten- 
neco is bared in Houston and has 
interests that include oO, natural 
gas pipelines, shipbuilding and 
construction and farm equipment. 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. of 
New York said Enc Bourdais de 
Charbonni&re. senior rice presi- 
dent and bead of the bank's Paris 
office, was named head of the Eu- 
ropean banking group. He suc- 
ceeds David Band, who has been 
appointed head of the funding ser- 
vices group at Morgan. 

European Brazilian Bank LttL, a 
London-based consortium, has ap- 
pointed CamiDo Calazans de Ma- 
as chairman, sucomting 


m iinica lions at UTC. Before join- 
ing the company in 1975. he was 
vice president, operations, for 
McGraw-Hill International Publi- 
cations Co., based in London. 

Union Bank of Switzerland (Se- 
curities) Ltd. in London said Ber- 
nard Woodford, formerly with 
Chemical Bank International Ltd. 
in London, will be joining its ranks 
to trade French and supranational 
fixed-income securities. 


Gold Options (print la S/oz.). 



Am 


-&fa 

II M 

1 515-1 ATS 




fll 338 

KUDUS 

1BS19S 

— — 

II 330 

62S 7Ji 

I3S15JB 

J02M175 

El 34 

400- 5S0 

KU51I7S 

17JSJ&SD 

II n 

Vf i. im 

72> VS 

I33UA 

3a 3«j 

ua 125 

US- 675 

10I»1 IS 

II so. 

— 

ZKVS- 

800-93) 


Cott 31175 31125 

VakmWUteWeM&A. 

I. Oa Ah MoM-Blaac 
1211 Ccam I. 5»*nft»d 
TcL 310251 - Trim 2*305 


Roberto Cotin. Mr. Cala- 
zans recently became chai r man of 


Fra^ Banco do Bmsil SA. one of Europe- 
Cahnon as bead of Apple France. ■ ^ 3^.5 shareholders, 

cm Mr. Colin’s retirement. Mr. Car 


Guinness Lifts Net by 26% 


Reuters 

LONDON — Arthur Guinness 
& Sons PLC said Tuesday that net 
income rose 26 A percent, to £25.4 
million (S31.7 million), in the first 
half ended March 31, from £20.1 
million a year earlier. 

Sales increased 28 percent, to 
£562.6 million, from £4383 million 
a year earlier. 

On a par-share bass, net rose to 
112 pence a share from 9.6 pence a 
year earlier, the company said. 

The diversified British brewing 
concern attributed the earnings in- 
crease to substantial benefits from 
a development program begun last 
year with the acquisition of Martin 
the Newsagent PLC. 

Announcing the results, Guin- 
ness said it is on course to achieve 
profits as good as any in the indus- 


try, with retailing an area of major 
growth for the group. 

In traditional markets, the posi- 
tive impact of the campaign to revi- 
talize, the Guinness brands contin- 
ues, the company said. Draught 
Guinness volume sales in Britain 
and Ireland continued to improve 
in the latest period 
In the United' States, Guinness 
Import Co. continued to outper- 
form its sector and the growth rate 
in West Germany accelerated. ■ 
The results announced Tuesday 
included acquisitions made after 
the end of the last financial year. 

The company said these pur- 
chases will substantially contribute 
to future growth and development. 
Substantia] progress has been 
made in integrating these compa- 
nies, it 


COMPANY NOTES 


American Express Co. said it 
signed a definitive agreement to sell 
its Warner Amex Cable Communi- 
cations Inc. to a group made up of 
American Television & Communi- 
cations Corp^ which is a unit of 
Time Inc, and Tele-Communica- 
tions Inc. for 5850 million and as- 
sumption of Warner Amex debt of 
about $500 million. 

Argyll Group PLC of Britain said 
pretax profit rose 33 percent in the 
year ended March 30, to £53.1 mil- 
lion ($66.9 million)- Volume rose 
16 percent, to £ 1.68 billion. The 
company said it expects to open 20 
new Presto food stores in the cur- 
rent fiscal year. 

CRA Ltd. and a unit of Mitsubi- 
shi Crap-. Mitsubishi Development 
Pty. Ltd. said they would begin an 
13-month feasibility study of a 
large coal deposit m New South 
Wales, Australia. 

Electronic Mail Corp of America 
said it agreed with Luxembourg to 
form a new subsidiary. Electronic 
Mail Europe SA. The Luxembourg 
government is putting up S5 mil- 
lion to fund the venture over the 
next three years, the company said. 

Fupsawa PtarmaretiticalCaand 
Mitsubishi Chemical Industries 
Ltd. will each form a joint venture 
tins fall with the Synthelabo unit of 
L’Orial SA of France, the Japanese 
concerns announced. Both ven- 
tures will produce drugs. 

Harveys of Bristol, the British 
sherry company, is to buy two sher- 
ry vineyards, Fernando Terry and 
Palomino y Vergara. The sole will 
nearly complete the dismantling of 
the defunct Rumasa SA, once 
Spain's largest, private holding 
company. 

Hyimdai Heavy Industries Co. erf 
South Korea is seekingcredlt facili- 
ties totaling $158.6 million. Hyun- 
dai officials said. The money would 
be used for construction of four 
semi-submersible drilling rigs for 
Odeco Inc. of the United States. 


Pernod Ricard SA, the French 
liquor company, has agreed to take 
control of the Italian liquor pro- 
ducer DistiUerie Fratdli Ramaz- 
zotti SpA. No additional details 
were announced. 

Petro-Lewis Corp. of the United 
States said it agreed definitively to 
self a group of producing oil and 
gas properties to Consolidated Oil 
& Gas Inc. for cash and stock with 
a total value of $17.4 million. 

■ SamsBng Prerisioa Co. is to take 
part next year in making a uew^ 
fuel-efficient jet engine under a 
joint venture agreement with the- 
Pratt & Whitney Co. subsidiary of 
United Technologies Corp., Sam- 
sung officials said. 

Schneider & Mnenzmg, a private 
Munich bank temporarily closed 
by banking authorities in May. 
probably wifi be dosed for good 
because no buyer has been found, 
according to a spokesman for the 
West' German Banking Associa- 
tion. He said that a decision should 
be made this week about the bank’s 
future. . 

Technology Corp. idd 
fders that it eroects to re- 
port a loss of about $30 million for 
the first quarter of 1985. -A year 
earlier, the company earned $16.7. 
million, or 48 cents a share. 

Saznki Motor Co. said it agreed 
with three Chinese companies 
through China National AeroTech- 
nologv Import & Export Corp. and 
Shandong Foreign Trade Corp. to 
assemble motorcydes in China. 
Production eventually is to total 
150,000 units a year. 

Tr ttrKflifaniir ins u rance Holdings 
Ltd. said it is making an offer of 
225 pence ($2.83) a snare fra- Capi- 
tal & Counties PLG The offer 
would value the company at about 
£173 miHi on. Transatlantic, a unit 
of Liberty life Association of Afri- 
ca LuL, already holds 343 
of Capital’s shares outstan 


Mr. Calmon, who was commercial 
manager of the French unit, suc- 
ceeds Jean-Louis Gasset. Mr. Gas- 
see, as previously reported, moved 
to Apple's Cupertino, California, 
headquarters as head of marketing 
worldwide for the company's Mac- 
intosh personal computer. 

Banco (fi Napoli has named 
Gianpaolo VigHar managpr of the 
international department Mr. Vig- 
fiar moves to the bank's Naples 
head office from Luxembourg, 
where he served as managing direc- 
tor of Banco di Napoli Internation- 
al SA. He is succeeded in Luxem- 
bourg by Carlo Arcari, who was an 
assistant maing w of the interna- 
tional department in Naples. 

Davy Corpk the British engineer- 
ing and construction group, said 
Lewd JeUicoe has been appointed to 
its board and dec led deputy chair- 
man. effective July 1. Davy said it 
intends for him to succeed the cur- 
rent chairman, Peter Benson. 

W estates Ends 
Talks With Total 

Reuters 

HOUSTON — Westates-Italo 
Co„ a UJk energy concern, said 
Tuesday negotiations for the sale of 
the company to Compagnie Fran- 
qaise des Petioles (Total) have been 
terminated. 

Westaces said it received a pro- 
posal from another major oil and 
gas company to acquire all its 
shares under terms deemed more 
advantageous ihan those of previ- 
ously considered transactions. 
'Last Mari*. Westates said stock- 
holders woqld receive about 51830 
a share under an agreement in prin- 
dple approved by its board for its 
acquisition by an Italian unit of 
Total. Westates also said it agreed 
in principle to buy additional re- 
serves from Unocal Corp- 


lazans was president of Banco do 
Nordeste do Brasil SA and prior to 
that served as president of the In- 
stitute Brasil dr o do Cafe. 

United Technologies Corp. said 
Chet di Maura has been appointed 
vice president of its United Tech- 
nologies International Business 
Corp. unit. Mr. di Mauro previous- 
ly was director-international com- 


CNEDIT NATIONAL 

Public Company with a capita! of Fr.F. 351.427,400 
Rogattrod office: 45 rue Saint-Dominique, 75700 PARIS 
RCS PARIS B 542.044 J 24 


Floating rate notes 1978-1988 of U.S. 81,000 


NUMERICAL LIST: 

1°) Of ihr scries including (be 15.000 bonds which were drawn on the 
second drawing by Ini dated May 28th, 1985. representing the total 
annuity of U.S- 315.000,000 to be redeemed on Julv 18th. 1985: 

1 to 5£U 
50312 to 57.672 
72^73 to 75.000 

2 s ) Of the series drawn on the previous drawing including securities not yet 
presented for redemption 

Drawing dated May 28th, 1984- - Redemption July 18 th. 1984 

57.673 to 72.672 

These bonds will be redeemable at U.S. SI .000 at FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANKING CORPORATION - NEW YORK and at the offices of the 
following Establishments 

— BANQUE NATIONALS DE PARIS (LUXEMBOURG) 

SJL LUXEMBOURG 

— BANQUE INTERNATIONALE i LUXEMBOURG - LUXEMBOURG 

— BANQUE NATIONALS DE PARIS - PARIS 

— MORGAN GUARANTY TRUST COMPANY OF NEW YORK - 
BRUX ELLES 

— SOO£T£ DE BANQUE SUISSE - RALE 

— SOCIETE GEN&BaLE - PARIS 

— UNION DE BANQUES S HISSES - ZURICH 

Outstanding amount: US. 345,000.000. 


Correspondent Banking 

IN THE FINEST 

Royal Tradition 


A commitment to mutually re- 
warding correspondent banking. 

Headquartered in Munich, the 
hub .of Bavaria's -growing tech- 
nology -based economy. 


Consolidated assets of some 
DM I Of) billion. 

Southern Germany's most exten- 
sive branch network. 


air) 

wmm 

Haymche HypoWetoi- und Wechsel-aint 
MmnQMtaohiA 

Head Office: Ttieatineretrasse 11. D-8CSO Munich 2 
Tel.: 10 89) 2366-1. Tx: 5286525-27 


DISCOUNT STOCKBROKING 
FOR U.S. SECURITIES 


Commission discounts of up to 50% 

One rate erf discounted commission is now offered by 
Montano Securities PLC to investors in US. Securities. 
High speed computer electronic execution from London. 
Accounts insured for up to S2!6m and held at a major U.S. firm. 

Start saving commissions today, on listed and unlisted 
securities and bonds. Contact Montano Securities PLC for 
an Account Application Form today. Call U1-2S3 7671 or 
return Ihc coupon to: 

MONTANO SECURITIES PLC 

- - Corporate tnuuh lent* UUm*ltiHuiIhlUftiivt\tiJfi* 

No 1 Royal Exchange Awnut*. London FOV 3LT. Tdrv HKS4S1. 
ViiiiNrMii'Lt - IN- AwnMIkmid Vmt ■uxiMun-lfc-jliv'. 

ISA SdltiMlAv»Vh«ailVi«rtii^[li'jln\ 
Snwilii-'hiKMiifdtoCM'fnntivp Viwd a * hVmln- Awiurm 


neawiend me, without obligation. a New Account Application Form, ""! 

I Name: 1 : ; 

I Private P.rnjuiry: □ Corporate Enquiry: D Institutional Knquiry: □ 
Address: 


Country*- 
1 Tei No-" 


ItatCodc:- 


| All tTAlr-- ■■ut’jii I b'l s Iv-oJk-.-, nM h. -,K j rvi 1 .-^. M,uiun,> 

I Sfiiinltrit«w>r | llv<i|iWMh'iliil | a- ii w.iillliaiwiar WM?& 



All of these securities have been sold. This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


May. 1985 


1,545,000 Shares 



mmmm me 

Common Stock 


Alex. Brown & Sons 

Incorporated 


HambrecKt & Quist 

Incorporated 


Bear, Steams & Co. 
Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette 

Securities Corporation 

E. F. Hatton & Company Inc. 
Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 


He First Boston Corporation 


Drexel Bomb am Lambert 

incorporated 

Kidder, Peabody & Co. 

Incorporated 

- Montgomery Securities 


PaineWebber 

Incorporated 

L F. Rothschild, Unterberg, Towbin 
Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. 

Incorporated 


Prndential-Bacbe 

Securities 


Allen & Company 

Incorporated 

Oppenheimer & Co., Inc. 

Arnhold and S. Bleichroeder, Inc. 


Kleinwort, Benson 

Incorporated 

Banca del Gottardo 
Grieveson, Grant & Co. 
Pictet International . Ltd. 


Dillon, Read & Co. Inc. 
Goldman, Sachs & Co. 

Lazard Freres & Co. 
Morgan Stanley & Co. 

Incorporated 

Robertson, Colman & Stephens 
Salomon Brothers Inc Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. 
Wertheim & Co., Inc. Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. 

A. G. Edwards & Sons, Inc. 
. Thomson McKinnon Secnrities Inc. 
Cazenove Inc. Robert Fleming 

Rothschild Inc. 


Banque Indosuez 
Samuel Montagu Sl Co. 

Limiled 


Credit Commercial de France 
Morgan Grenfell & Co. 

Limited 

J. Henry Schroder Wage & Co. 

Limited 










June 11 


220 7 Mb 04 — 4 
51 m n. Mb 
30174 17U 17*— 4 
10 74020V. int 194 





| [IjU 


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12 

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*08 ?ib fw ph — 4 
705 Mb 64 04 + W 

12 1*. i* iw + w 
40 TO ?W 94 + * 
217204 204 204 + 4 
2 5 6 6 

577 J4 3Vh 3* 

75 64 64 64 + 4 

264 10W 10 10 

103211 104 104 — M 


■H, 


117 34 34 .34— 4 
2HM M W 
1403 134 124 124— 4 


YtowR 

IX 

25 

943404 

39 

39* +1 

YartcFd 

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45 

916 

19 

15 

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TI0 4 

34 

3* 

TenUbB 



142 414 

40* 

40* 

ZonHK 

X 

4J 

294 16* 

16* 

16* 

Zantac 



44 24 

2* 

2* 

ZtonUt 

IX 

36 

935 

244 

344 

zn«i 



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24 

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Ztyod 



46 44 

4 

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XI 

5 

151 W* 

M4 

104— 4 

Zycad 

Zvmoa 



2270 13 
576 3h 



luesda^s 

wii^x 


Closing 


Tables Include me nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


34 ADI n 
■4 AL Lob 
12 AMCn 
24 AM Mil 
594 ATT Fd ! 
24 AcmePr 
B4 AcmcU 
94 Action 
24 Acton 
4 Adnwt 
14 AdmRs 
174 AdRusI 
15 Aoabe 
284 AHIPb* 
54 AlrExp 
54 AlrCal 
94 ArColpf 

I Atamco 
554 Almiron 

64 AlbaW 
54 Aloha 
94 Alpha In 
4 Altox 
284 Alcoa of 

II AlcaCp 
94 Amdohi 
64 Amedeo 
44 AmBUt 
4 Am Cap 
124 AEjrpwt 
54 AFnic A 
54 AFnic B 
74 AHIttlM 
4 Alsrajl 
124 AMZOA 

4 AMBIti 
3 AmOll 
534 APett 
4 AmPIn v 
64 AmRItv 
114 ARovin 
3 ASdE 
14 Amocd 
44 Andal 
24 AndJcb 
54 Annies 
4 vlAnglv 
34 AruoPI 
54 Adorn 
64 Armtm 
TU Armrta 
74 AitowA 
64 Aimr o 
BW Astras 

1 Astratc 
74 AStrotof 

% AHsCM 
24 Alloa wt 

2 Audiolr 
134 Awondl 


26 37 54 

16 177 194 

15 10 194 

199 44 

1*2 844 

1 3 

19 37 1 04 

3* 182 124 
383 34 

S >4 
3 41 24 

19 60 234 

12 19 174 

22 5a 514 

28 64 

14 43 94 

144 124 

28 32 14 

9 32 914 

31 53 * 

>6 7 

2* 15 124 

66 4 

300* 334 
45 285 25 

15 1514 124 

51 64 

7 83 124 

17 2 8 

409 394 

1224500* 64 
I1 10000* 54 

10 219 84 

2 18 64 

33 15 154 

335 A 

18 9 34 

21 11 584 

2 4 

3 49 64 

368 144 

1 2 34 

7 4 K 

13 4 54 

TB 34 

84 5 84 

* 14 

109 44 
6 18 64 

14 72 64 

15 194 94 

11 9 84 

77 74 

12 3 114 

915 14 

11x114 
187 4 

3 24 

1 34 

13 4 15* 


5 5 

184 194— 4 
194 19W + 4 
44 44—4 
MW 844 — 4 
3 3 

10 10—4 

124 124 + 4 

^ 

274 274— 2 
174 174 
504 504 + 4 
64 64 
94 94— 4 
114 12 
1 14 + 4 

904 904—1 
7* 8 + V. 

334 334— 4 
744 244— 4 
124 174 + 4 
64 64 

124 124 
74 74 
384 384— 4 

6 4W + 4 

54 5* + 4 

84 IW — 4 
64 64 

’I* PL + \ 

34 3% 

584 S84 
4 4 + 4 

64 64 + 4 
134 134— 4 
34 34 

24 24— 4 
54 54 

34 34—4 

84 84 — 4 
14 14— 4 
34 34— 4 

64 64 

64 64 + 4 
94 94 — 4 

84 84+4 

74 74 
114 114 + 4 
14 14 + 4 

114 114 + 4 
4 %. 

24 24 

34 34 

154 154 


395 

27* 

27* 

27* 

5 

0* 

64 

64 + * 

4 

18U 

1BU. 

18W 

19 

8* 

8* 

aw 

X 

26* 

20* 

264 + W 

902 

304 

304 

30*— * 

14 

27 Vi 

27 

V - * 

11 

70 

26 

26 + W 

10 

30* 

39 

39W- * 

40 

374 

.17* 

J7W 

a 

17 

16* 

17+4 

3 

£* 

5* 

SW + * 

X 

9 

84 

84- * 

11 

fi* 

6* 

6W 

994 

214 

19%i 

204+2 

3 

»4 

9* 

94— V. 

166 

S* 

aw 

aw — * 

7 

a* 

a* 

B* 

195 

6* 

0* 

04 + 4 

4 

7* 

7* 

7* 

3 

10 

10 

10 - W 

12 

7* 

7* 

7* + * 

7 

I1H 

11* 

11* — * 

a 

23* 

234 

23* + * 

119 

84 

a* 

B* — V. 

62 

44 

4* 

4*- W 

207 

7* 

7* 

74 

277 

* 

hi 

h. 

008 

12V. 

12 

12W + * 

4 

IS* 

15V. 

1SW 

21 

X* 

20* 

304— 4 

57 

4 

f. 

4 + * 

33 

3 

24 

24— M 

12 

H 

* 

*— 4 

224 

9* 

8* 

9V. — W 

4 

a* 

n* 

•* + 4 

Z7 

35 

X* 

34* + * 

21 

39* 

MW 

394 + 4 

79 

14* 

14* 

144— 4 

21 

12* 

12 

12—4 




17 

IX 

4 

* 

St 

775 

7 

J* 

2 + * 

36 

X* 

X* 

X*— W 

W 

27* 

2/* 

27*—* 

100 

I* 

* 

1W + 4 


194 Gould T unr 3J 7 
16 GmdAu .40 11 12 
84 Grant 8 

1 Grant wt 

10 GrTecil 14 

264 GIAml 10 

27 GrtLfcC M 1.1 U 
TVs Grown s 16 

44 Greiner 13 

84 GrdCh 50b U 10 
104 GllCdo 53 
224 Gllatr .40 1.2 14 


13 84 

1 14 

I 114 
I 344 
XI 394 
IX 304 
29 114 
17 114 
823 124 
26? 337b 


36 76 

184 184 
•4 84 *■ • 
14 14 

114 114 + '■ 
344 344 
M 394— 4 
294 30 - 4 
11 11—4 

114 114 
124 124 + 4 
334 334 + 4 


HiQh Low 5 fod 



0 

9* 

94 

94 

0 

16* 

104 

16*— 4 

15 

su 

aw 

8W- 4 

7 

2*4 

294 

29* 

540 

364 

364 

36* + * 

10 

404 

40 

40 

56 

73 

22* 

23 

472 

*4 

9* 

9* + W 

38 

94 

94 

94 

3 

124 

12* 

124—4 

76 

84 

B 

8* — * 

34 

164 

10* 

16*— 4 

0 

3 

3 

3 

144 

IX 

54 

* 

** nt-J 

X 

S 

5 

5 

5 

2* 

2* 

2* 

2 

14 

13* 

134— 4 

1 

2* 

2* 

2*— 4 

91 

12* 

114 

12* + * 

4 

344 

344 

344— 4 

1B4 

104 

9* 

*4 

B 

24 

24 

2* 

121 

Iff* 

184 

18* 

X 

5* 

5W 

54- 4 

380k 

34 

3* 

3* 

15 

164 

lye 

10—4 

f 

>04 

104 

104 — W 

208 

43 

42* 

43 

13 

42* 

42 

42 — * 

6 

57 

57 

57 — W 

mi 

7W 

7W 

74 


12 84 

27 134 , 

70 534 , 

864 65W i 

«4 r* , 

214 134 , 
10* 84 , 
174 104 , 
174 104 , 

171*, 164 , 
44 34 i 

194 124 , 
14 % , 

64 24 I 
21 134 i 

94 44 I 
94 34 i 

sw I 

134 74 i 


MMArn 44 43 II 
MJdlnd M ID 8 
MfnPpf ?J* 106 
MlnPof 650 UL6 
MissnW D4e 13 12 
Ml Cft IE 34 13 72 
MonMo it 57 7 

MoOflB 30 14 15 
MOOOA 38 10 15 
MMedn 
MtaRtwt 

MtvGlil 13 U 7 


3 104 
17 254 

47D0V7UW 
1000VB34 
5 74 

456 134 
1 104 
I 144 
36 144 

4 164 

12 34 

377 IB4 

5 14 


19 84 

1021 94 


104 104 + 4 
254 254 + 4 
094 694 +24 
B34 834 + 4 
74 74 

134 134—4 
104 KK-j + 4 
144 144 
14 14—4 

164 164— 4 
34 34 

184 184 

14 14 
SV6 54 

144 T5 +4 
■4 84—4 

15 V 

114 114 + 4 


74 4 ROW 
164 114 Russell 
»« 114 RYkoff 


7 3 64 64 64— 4 

13 12 404 >64 154 >64 + 4 
2.1 14 91 244 244 244— 4 


77 >44 

9 54 

144 114 
27 124 

14 4 

194 114 
164 II 
X4 13 
494 284 
64 44 

174 >04 
154 12 
7 6 

134 54 
134 10 
174 134 
364 294 

ss ^ 

114 74 

124 84 


NRMlt 

Natick 

NtGaO 

Nt Point 

NelsLB 

NMxAT 

NPInRt 

NPrac 

NYTlme 

NewbE 

Newter 

NwpEI 

Nhftinn 

Nichols 

NordRn 

NoCdOe 

NIPS pf 

NuHrzn 

NuHrwt 

NudDt 

Numoc 


16 

-40b XI 9 
.10 .7 X 

•791 4D 12 
1J>2 65 16 
IJOo 63 10 
60 14 17 
256 44 5 
42 27 IB 
1JD 94 ID 


80 >54 154 

41 84 84 

3 12th 124 

217 164 144 
39 4 X 

X 194 194 
35 154 154 
21 194 194 
486 « 474 

18 54 54 

24 12 114 

11 154 154 
II 6th 64 
254 134 124 
17 114 11 
14 144 144 
200/354 354 
21 3 3 

2 4 4 

27 74 74 

42 9H 94 


154 

14 

124 + 4 
144— 4 
4 

194 +1 
154 

194— 4 
474- 4 
54 

114— 4 
154 

64 

134 + 4 

114 

144 

354 + 4 
3 
4 

74 + 4 
94 


84 «4 SFM 9 

84 7 SFNpfA 

114 7 Son 

104 5 Salem .10r U 7 

84 0’« SDaopf J8 IQJ 

84 tVz SDpoof JO TOO 
94 74 SOoopf 7 DC T8.I 

694 524 SDffOpf 7D0 112 
234 174 SDbopT 2X7 185 
394 31 Vj SOsopf 455 1L8 
25 184 SDuo pi 268 107 

654 344 SanJW 250 65 10 
31 234 Sandgtt 80 13 7 

54 34 Sonmrk XMllI TO 
7 44 Sound B .15 27 7 

104 94 Sound Pf 150 116 
>44 11* Starred 
2Z4 164 Sch6R» 56 27 11 
84 34 SdMpt .» 15 
35 124 SdLsa I 

404 344 Scope 36 15 W 
62 34 SbdCp 50 5 S 

24 14 Seaport 
154 104 SecOx .16* U 8 
54 24 SebPro 
34 4 SedOtt 

84 34 Setas 3 

54 34 SellaAs 14 

44 24 Semtcft 
154 94 Srvfaca X 27 19 
114 74 Servo 22 

11 4% Sorvotr 561 L2 17 


104 74 TrtSM Xo 43 
454 m, Trtdax 
4 24 TobBBw 

314 X TurnrC IX 45 
34 i* TyHrwts 


1 94 94 94 
20 6* 4H 6* + 4 
S 34 34 34—4 
S 304 304 304— 4 
65 2 14 14 


■ 10 74 74 

% & 5 

6 54 54 

’if £ a j*:s 

"“t* 234 234 234—4 
» 394 394 394—4 
I 25 25 25 + 4 

6 64 634 66+4 

4 364 244 244 + 4 
19 44 44 44 

5 54 54 54 

45 104 184 104 

IIPP 

156 iK iffi iK 
12 24 24 24—4 
IS ■ 14 14 14 
97 44 44 44 + 4 

3 £ % SJ-* 
i !$2 3a!St=Ji 

3 HAS 104 104—4 
^ 11^ 114 11^ 

6 184 184 184 + 4 
31 144 M 14+4 
6 124 124 124—4 

4 104 104 >04— 4 
12 5* 54 54— 4 


144 84 ShoerS 1D00 14 6 
Wi ft Shornn 
184 94 Shopwt .16b 3 

15 124 SlorHSn 48 

U 10 SferSpn 571 22 31 

154 104 Slercn X 1? » 

74 54 Site® 20 35 X 


77* MW 

9?^ 
594 15* 
6 344 
2 56 

» B A 


111 

29* 

ICH 

25 

5 

10 

IX 

91* 

91 

91 — * 

* 

4* 

ICO 



088 

18 

04 

6* 

6* 


1 0* 

24 

IPM 

eat 

tJ 


11 

3 

2* 

24— W 

IS 1 * 

»* 

IRT Cpn 



31 

1 

13* 

134 

13* — 

-4 

2* 

1* 

HhpGp 

.Ho 

45 

9 

IS 

24 

2!% 

7..- 

■ It 

2* 

14 

Imolnd 




268 

1* 

1W 

14- 

- 4 

40W 

25* 

ImoOfls 

IX 



4a 

36U 

35* 

36 


10* 

64 

Inflow 



11 

29 

104 

10 

10 - 

- W 

194 

11 

Instrn B 

20 

1.1 

76 

IS 

184 

184 

IB* + * 

2* 

1* 

InstSy 



9 

244 

14 

1* 

14 + 4 1 

3* 

24 

insSypf 

251 

105 


3 

24 

2* 

24 


11* 

64 

inrCtyff 

A0 



59 

114 

104 

114 


16 

HU 

intmk 

.12 

J 


16 

M* 

144 

14* 


4* 

3* 

IniBknf 




173 


3 

Jib 


1* 

* 

IntBk wt 




70 

* 

4 

*- 

- 4 

17W 

64 

intHyd 



17 

22 

TV. 

74 

7\i- 

- 4 

114 

SW 

IIP 

.909 

85 

68 

IX 

104 

10 

104 H 

■ 4 

6* 

34 

mtPwr 



100 

7 

4 

4 

4 


10* 

6 

InlThrn 



19 

457 

64 

6* 

64 


10* 

4 

inThrpf 




S 

6* 

0* 

6* 


4* 

1 

Intotc 




4 

14 

1 

1 


34W 

Iff* 

tonka 



14 

54 

X 

32 w 

33 4 

■ 4 

41 

IB* 

IrooBfd 



18 

1» 

36* 

36W 

36 V. 


44 

2* 

iso tv 

X 

2 A 

31 

a 

34 

3* 

3*- 

- 4 


164 OEA 
144 Oakwd JBt 
4 OdeiAn 
4* OdetBs 
174 Ollalnd JO 
10* Olmen > m 
34 OOWOP 
3* Openhrj jbo 
S’A OrtelH A .15 
I Ormond 
154 OSutvns M 
64 OxfrdF X2t 
7* OzorXH JO 


37 214 
V 194 
35 6W 

1 94 
5 194 

M2 X* 
17 4* 
4 6* 

2 5V. 

1 14 

10 24 
31 11* 
3*9 9* 


214 

16* 

5* + 4 
94— 4 
1*4— 4 
204—14 
44— 4 
<*— 4 
5* 

14 

234— * 
11W— 4 
9* + 4 


SJkesAa 2 U 11 111 15 144 144+4 


17* 

12* Jocim 

JOb 17 

9 

2 

13* 

134 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 


Page 17 


Koreans Seeking a Toehold 
For Autos in the U.S. Market 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued from Page 13) 
the revival of the industry. Whang 
Byung-Joon, general director in the 
pres id ent’s office of Daewoo, said 
that he believes Korean cars will 
pose a tough ehniiwiy. to Japan in 
the small, low-priced car market. 

“Whal used to be a nichy. that 
went to the Japanese more or less 
unchallenged is going to be differ- 
ent by 1988," he said 

Mr. Whang’s confidence is based 
on South Korea’s considerable cost 
advantages. A University of Michi- 
gan study estimated that it costs 
only $2 an hour to ™ir* a car in 
Korea, compared with $12 an hour 
in Japan and $24 an hour in the 
United States. Korean workers axe 
well-educated and accustomed to 
long hours — the average shift at 
Hyundai and Daewoo is 10 to 12 
hours, with overtime. 

To succeed in their preh to enter 
the U.S. market, however. South 
Korean auto companies must over- 
come consumers’ suspiciou that 
any low-priced car, and particular- 
ly an unfamiliar Korean entrant, is 
shoddy said unsafe. They must 
compete against Japanese compa- 
nies that are no longer bound by 
export quotas, and a y*™? t LLS. 
companies that have tw» piwd up 
with Japan to produce lower-cost 
gmaj i cars. 

Nor do they have much of a 
domestic base to build upon. Car 
registrations passed the one milli on 
marie last month, in a cou nt ry of 
mare than 40 milli on people With 
a Stiff gov ernment tax on automo- 
biles and per-capita income of 
about $2J)00, the domestic market 
will not grow quickly. Thus, Ko- 
rea’s auto makers must look to ex- 


ports for the volume that is essen- 
tial for profitable manufacturing. 

The two companies that are clos- 
est to entering the U.S. market — 
Daewoo and Hyundai — have so 
far adopted different strategies. 

Daewoo has chosen to team up 
with a U.S. partner. General Mo* 
tors Corp, list year, the company 
a $426-mdHon agreement to 
build a front-whed-drive subcom- 
pact in South Korea. The produc- 
tion technology will be GM*s, but 
the car will be built m a Daewoo 
factory by Daewoo workers. Con- 
struction of a new factory is under 
way at Daewoo’s site in Bupyong. 
about 45 mumes from Seoul. With 
the factory, Daewoo will have an 
annual production capacity of 
240,000 cars. 

■ The oompany plans to introduce 
the car in the United Stares by early 
1987 and to ship between 70,000 
and 80,000 can a year. The car win 
bear the Pontiac name, not 
Daewoo’s. 

Hyundai, however, has chosen to 
make a solo entry into the U.S. 
market Hyundai executives say 
that nfrw years of has 

given the company the technology 
and experience to go it alooe. They 
point proudly to the success of the 
Pony, a frcool-whed-drive model, 
fh»t bu rst onto the Canadian mar- 
ket, selling 25,000 can last year, 
four times Hyundai’s initial expec- 
tations. 

Hyundai dominates the market 
in Smith Korea. Its woridwide sales 
last year were $938 nriHioo. While 
it exported only 50,000 cars last 
year, it plans to leap to 100,000 this 
year. Its annual production capaci- 
ty is 300,000 vehicles. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 





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FOR SALE 


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ENA SUCHET MAUNOUH 
THBC 612906 
TH. 727 34 65. 


(Confirmed From Back Page) 


AUTO SHIPPING 


Renthouse International 
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Nate rhoran 19-21, Amterdam - 


PARIS AKEA FURNISHED 



PARC MONCEAU 

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GENERAL 

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The EnoSbur a a cnraptetely had 
bufe. anted production awreoMe 
fcrty 5 per were) ond hoi been hccbo- 
fufly mawfuou ra d for over 20 yean. 

A teneles dedga redoed superiority 
coupled with Hni Hon u l erohwnonitup 
utdmna the moo rwmfuout finahtng 
maMriak, ora wthia make de EnoCbur 
Otnd out oi die moo phoreradnd 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE MAGNIFICENT 
STEUA 
SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUSES 

To the Greek Ucmdk Turkey, 
Warn Ew^Kondoy°Wn Proem 
aid 

the yacht-like 

STELA 




3 AND 4 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek Jtknfc & Turkey, Sakna 
every Monday ft Fndoy from haem 

niTui« n ^' s,0rt,x ' 

2. Knr. Seneai St. Mm 10562 
Total 315621. Phone 3228883. 

Paw lot 265 80 36 
Mndi ret. 39S 613 

Geneva refa 327 1 10 

Zurich tel. 391 36 55 


Cruise in Begance 

to the GREEK ISLANDS 
EGYPT, L5RAE& TURKEY 

CHOICE OF 7-44-0.1 DAY 

cubes a mu. isvwm) 

AJKSAkD 


Rooting Out Venture Capital 

(Cootimed from' Page 13) funds, we hope we will hit the jack- 
SA, has a 14-percent share, with an pot. But we aren’t banking on that 
RtJTwmwit tn <3*n »h<* hart tn for our corporate strategy or prof- 


(Cootimed from' Page 13) 

SA, has a 14-percent share, with an 
agreement to sell the shares to 

InterMagnum. “If InierMagnum 
goes bust .we lose everything, we 
have do iBnaaus, M says Christian 
Dddanx, a director of Pernod Ri- 
cand SA, who is overseeing the in- 
vestment- “Like venture-capital 


Richardson Savings & Loan 
Bank and -Trust Company 

Cayman Minds, vifest MM 
ottering 

n% 

180 Day ' 

Eurodeposft 

amounts over 

$100,000 U.S. 

Member 

«g»" d )c=raB 2- 

MMnMvUw 
Fere cuumm. Lock Bee a 
«mo M CenM Doo. Bute 1500 
_ Mae, ltae 75251 

wcS^cSreu. 

lUCCSMI 9W-2441 idW 


Lobbies Hungary 
yoa never go Hungry 
in Hungary 

for tnumeu if yon contact 

CARLTON - LESLEY 


for our corporate strategy a- prof- 
its. We are doing this because we 
think its important to keep the 
entrepreneurial spirit alive and 
wefl.** 

Luderic, an innovative company 
that provides corporations with a 
variety erf such services as seminars, ruiuDc avcax an. 

catering, and chauffeurs, owns 10 
percent of InterMagnum. And Sfcxfc &£ 

Idianova, or the Institnt de Dive- ie twBBf 359 67 97. 

loppement des Industries Agio- ; 

Alimentaires, owns 25 percenL PASSY 

Idiaiiova, whoe sharebrita are fux ^ ^ 3 bodroooo. noma 
nationalized banks and insurance tI 563 68 36 

companies, was set up to develop 
small and medium-sized compa- 
nies in the French agri-business 
sector. A semi-government agency, 

Idianova takes minority equity po- 
sitions in start-ups. In two and a 
half years, the agency has invested 
in 40 new agri-business companies. 

"We take the Anglo-Saxon view 
dial it isn't because you don't suc- 
ceed once that you wouldn't suc- 
ceed the second time." says Guy 
TJfcbot, president of Idianova, re- 
ferring to Qty Magazine. Mr. Bun- 
gene r’s U.S- magazine venture. The 
lack of entrepreneurial ventures in 
France has often been attributed to 
investors’ fear of risk and failure. 



YOUNG LADY 

PA/hterprater ft Toumm Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 


** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

NEW MERCEDES f Mi^u^^ 9 ^ ( f!k!lSSi^S Y 


bond, cmvankm in USA 

RUTEINC 

TAUNUS511. 52. 4000 RANKRKT 

W Gam, tel (0)69-232351, ttx 411559 


YOUNG B£GANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 


VO* YOUNG LADY GUfl* 
EduccOed, irt r o onre and trilnoud 

u »nsiwr r 


* PARK 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG UOV TBBJNGUAJ. WM 
























































































































. 

---- - - 

p ^ 

18 

S.YrKRKATIOMAL HERALD TRIBLNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 , 1985 


1 K>5.' 


igi|5SSRSHB 

li!ESS 55 a l »■■■ 

■■■!!■!■ iaMll 


OHHBBB 9BBBBBB 

iSS5r hhbbbb hbJ 
hbbbh___ibbb hbbbB 


ACROSS 

1 Gooseneck 
5 La Crotf 

10 Deportment 

14 Ripley’s 

"Believe 

Not” 

15 A Mercer 
vollaburaior 

16 Suffix wuh 
persist 

17 Sleep-inducing 
medicament* 

19 . .she bare 
Gen. 

4 ' US 

20 Wielded the 
frivol 

21 Cuv in Minn. 

23 P. W R. is one 

24 Obscure 

25 Antique ' 
owner's 
concern 

28 First name of 
'■ rhe Blue 
Angel" star 

30 Great Persian 
poet 

31 Thinly 
populated 

33 Seme sight 

35 Director 
Mervyn 

37 Puker player’s 
■•bullet" ' 

38 Sewer 

40 Ref. book 

41 Birch-family 
members 


44 Cicero's V III 

45 Bills passed by 
all Congress- 
men 

47 They hustle 
after rustlers 

49 Singer Frankie 

50 Stream at 
Leeds 

51 Spied 

53 Historian 

57 Coleridge’s 
"sacred river" 

58 Sleepiness 

60 City NNEof 
Livorno 

61 Kin of Dakotas 

62 In the distance 

63 Uneven: Abbr. 

64 Nightingale, 

*-e- 

65 Ritual 


1 Say “th" for 
"s" 

2 Suffix with 
comment 

3 Dawdle; brood 

4 Caliban's 
master 

5 Super Bowl XI 
champs 

6 Some fishbowl 
occupants 

7 Glissaded 

8 Dry, as wine 

9 Replies 
10 Villain 


11 Morpheus's 
resisn* rs 

12 A social sci. 

13 Seuora’s baby 
girl 

18 Laughier. m 
Lyon 

22 Loafed 

24 Less furnished 

25 Field mouse 

26 Correct lexis 

27 Tendency to 
deep sleep 

28 Clubs 

29 Creme do la 
creme 

32 G. I.' '$ chaplain 

34 Biblical 
oldster 

36 An Ivy 
Leaguer 

39 Shade of pink 

42 Criticizes 
sharply 

43 Armed like a 
porcupine 

46 Huweits hero 

48 Viva-voce 

50 Baxter and 
Boleyn 

51 Haydn's 
nickname 

52 Sice of the first 
Olympics 

53 Ovid topic 

54 Lowdown 

55 Steep cliff 

56 Something to 

serve 

59 Start of a Verdi 
aria 


PEA MTS 

OUfc TENT LEAKED ALL 
NlbhiT.. NOLO UJE i-UXVE 
TO STANP IN THE RAIN 

B LON DIE 

—l IC I! jil A BAB OP 

AND A 

© |j~\ SAJ-cvwvrn 
AND ;'.vt 

£-*5*5335 CEADV SOI 

/ J 



BEETLE BAILEY 


Att HAIK 15 WET... - 

my clothes ake wet...| 

MV SH0E5 ARE WET... f 



!l EVEN HAVE Y WHY DON'T N 
RAINWATER/ Tt5U KEEP 
IN MY | VDUR MOUTH 
MOUTH.. ACL05EP7 J 


it wouldn't help., r 

THINK. MY HEAD LEAKS... 


BOOKS 


, err up. 


>*- u ^ 


v S e.eHqw <4 i 


I? I MUST HA/E V 
( MISSED MV J 
»-iVT>lM >J 
( SOM EW HEQE ] 


X THIHK 
YOU 'LL FihH? 
THIS 

lNTERE5Tlh/G 


in ms I 

HAP TO 
WORK IZ 
HOURS A... 


PLEASE/ 

HO MORE 
STORIES OF 
THE OLC? PAYS 


YES, 

SPARE 

US 


X SAIP YOU 
WILL FIHPTH/S 
INTEREST) N© . 


zrr 

is? 


ys | | 


DOESN'T 

ANYONE 

FOLLOW 

ORDERS 

ANYMORE 

v -2/ 


,/Uoff 

Uba&Z. 


ANDY CAPP 

| SOUCANTCES'OFPAGAIN, 
tOU'K= OUR STAR PLA^K ! 
NOU'RE ALlvAVS PUTTING 
ROMANCE BEFORE CHARTS .' 


DONTSTART, ANDY. THIS IS 
A HAPPY NIGHT FOR ME - ■<, 
SHE'S JUST ACCEPTED MV 
S PROPOSAL OF MARRIAGE 



r x a 1 

SORRV, )?! 

> son. < = ; 
f THAT’S \ *3 
SUPER H 
V NEWS / : i 
A — IT < i 
REALCVIS) 


NOTHING LIKE CARRIAGE 
- — —TO BREAK UP ---> 
(A ROMANCE, EH? ) 


.Y«-ri- Ytirk Time*, etiinti by Eufu-ne \lnU*>ka. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



WIZARD «>I ID 




' WiO 
ISTHg 

om- 

a\~m 


REX MORGAN 




WS SEMT YOU TO SAW DIEGO 





FOR ONE REASON ONLY— TO SELL MR. MARLOWE/ f E 
IF IT MEANT YCU HAD TO WAIT TEN HOURS TO SEE I- A 
HIM. YOU SHOULD HAVE DONE SO, MRS. BISHOP/ 
you SHOULD HAVE NEVER LEFT HIS OFFICE .' 


JEAN, THIS IS BRADY 
AGAIN / IS CLAUDIA 
FREE TO TALK WITH 
ME FOR A MOMENT? 
IF NOT, HAVE HER 
PHOJE ME AT HOME/ , 


TF&fOF- \ 

•m « 
T/te-r wees s 


SHE'S STILL IN 
Tompkins* 
office/ I'LL 
TELL HER AS 


THE OXFORD COMPANION TO 
ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Edited by Margaret Drabble. 1,155 pages. 
$35. Oxford University Press. 200 Madison 
Avenue, New York. N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by Hugh Kenner 

L ATE IN the reign of George V. a retired 
/ civil servant named Sir Paul Harvey put in 
five years making the first of the many Oxford 
Companions. He knew things gentlemen were 
supposed to know, notably the Bible, the clas- 
sics. and literature (English and French). The 
idea for a Companion to English Literature 
had come from an Oxford editor. It would put 
Oxford lore at (he disposal of folk less system- 
atically educated — “ordinary everyday read- 
ers." the preface said. 

So if you were puzzled when someone in a 
Victorian novel got driven to the next town by 
a “Jehu," Harvey could explain how “Jehu 
meant “a fast and furious driver, a coachman; 
in humourous allusion to 2 Kind’s IX. JO." 
Victorian jocularity was often BibhcaL 
Yet Harvey stays in prinL revised and re- 
revised. The British novelist Margaret Drab- 
ble. in her preface to the fifth revision (a five- 
year labor like Harvey’s) draws a long breath 
and tries to redefine its purpose. Alas, that’s 
nut definable. Though she quotes the old 
. phrase about “ordinary everyday readers." I’m 
sure she can’t help feeling that it means rather 
less than in 1932. when it could stiil designate 
worthy folk beyond the circle of leisured gen- 
tlemen with good libraries. 

But here at last is an edition 1 expect to find 
useful. New entries, revised old entries, are 
tightly informative alike. Sir Paul in 1932 gave 
T. S. Eliot five lines. The new Eliot entry be- 
gins. correctly, “a major figure in English liter- 
ature since the 1920s." ft proceeds for 700 
words of admirable summary with no fewer 
than 23 cross-references including Lear (Ed- 
ward) and “dissociation of sensibility." I don’t 
know how you’d do better in that space. 

Making room for the new. Drabble has 
weeded ruthlessly, sensibly. Victorian jocular- 
ity being now remote. “Jehu" was no longer 
helpful, and he’s gone. 

Adieu, much trivia) clutter. Take Harvey’s 
first nine entries, from “A E, ‘see Russell; 
(G. W.)’ " to “Abbey Theatre. Dublin, see 
“Yeats. 1 " The firet of these. “A E’\ was a 
mistake for AE. so Drabble has moved it to its 
proper alphabetic place, seven pages on. The 
next six. from “A Beckett, Gilbert Abbott" (a 
forgotten Victorian cut-up) to “Abbassides" (a 
dynasty of caliphs) have all been ousted, and a 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


ediiq raaaH nnmn 
dche saan anann 
□EstnciacioHE ntsaQQ 
DEE H0EIO caaaaQ 
□□□□□□ □□□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□□nn 
□EHannaaona naa 
□□as ana aama 
ego aaaQEDEiDaaa 
□EHBUQa QGQD 

□anaa naanaai 

IEEEE0O □□□□ nan 

rinnnn nnremnmnnm 


good thing. That makes room for Aartns 
Rod." the D. H. La»«n« JtoveL and -J D ^ 
Theatre" no longer says see Yeai& 

500 nuggety words on own. A lean 

of .he .Oxford «diSgj^ 
too late- c „i .h 

For “The Oxford Companion to En&isn 
Literature" to have bewme. desptie ghwneaL 
both more readable and more useful, 
the star for Margaret Drabble s jersey, a •' 
er for her cap. a credential for her assault upon 
Helicon. 

Hugh Kenner. Andre*- Mellon Professor o) r ihe 
Humanities ai Johns Hopkins, a the author c i] 
“The Pound Era” and other studies of moaern 
literature. This is excerpted from a revie n Jor 
The Washington Post. 

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4 THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, by 

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5 CHAPTERHOUSE: DUNE, by Frank 

6 IF TOMORROW "COMER by Sidney 

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7 THINNER. b> Richard Bachman 

S THE CLASS, by Erich Segal 

9 INSIDE OUTSIDE. Herman Wouk 

10 QUEEN IE. bv Mkfaad Korda 

11 THE LONELY SILVER RAIN, by John 

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14 GLITZ, bv Eln»re Leonard — — la is 

15 PROOF, by Dick Francis 14 I- 

NONFICnON 

1 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Tom Peters and Konev Amlin - 5 

2 IACOCCA: An Aut o biogra ph y, by Lee la- 

cocca with WQJiam Novak — 1 32 

3 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES. 

by Cotroefl Cowan and Melvvn Kinder — 3 10 

4 MY MOTHER'S KEEPER. "by B.D. Hy- 
man — — 4 4 

5 LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Buscag- 

lia - — 5 41 

6 MOUNTBATTEN. by Philip Ziegler — IS 2 

7 BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 
kady N. Shevchenko 6 13 

* CONFESSIONS OF A HOOKER, by Bob 

Hope with Dwaven Netbnd i I 4 

9 THE SOONG DYNASTY, by Sterimg ^ r 

10 ON^EUroNA^rLMEr^GteraVan^- ? ^ 

11 A LIGHT INTHE ATnCby SsTsdsw- ** 

Mein 14 133 

12 THE COURAGE TO CHANGE, by Den- 

nisWhcdey 9 17 

13 THE BRIIXiE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

? Richard Bach 10 40 

14 METMAGICAL THEMAS. by Dougtu 

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15 THE HEART OF THE DRAGON, by 

Atedair Ctayre — 1 

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i N 


• . . . . 

A 


'Theaiwnomtvsaidafool 

AND HIS MONEY ARE $00K 
FARTED.’ 


Unscramble ihese lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
tour ordinary words. 









































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 198S 


Page 19 


SPORTS 


*V 


In Pursuit of Italian Basketball Player Marco Baldi, the Drama Becomes Comedy 





WasUogum Fast Sen ice 
WASHINGTON— When Marco Baldi announced last 
week that he would play basketball at St John’s Universe 
ty next year, one of the most bizarre iterating wans in 
recent memory aided. The pursuit of tins 6-foot-ll (11- 
meter) Italian schoolboy with a nice outside shot reads like 


V 


Ask the St, John’s coach, Lou Camesecca, whose tongue 
is still tied from speaking Italian. Or the University of 
Southern California coach, Stan Morrison, who had Baldi 
land on his front doorstep two years ago only to see him 
defect to New York. Or toe University of Maryland coach, 
Lcftv Driesefl, who also came up empty, but did return 
from Europe with an armload of Gum bags arid a 7-2 
German player. 

The courting of Baldi, an Italian, exchange student at 
Long Island Tjfthmn High School 1 in BrookwDei New 
York, spanned two continents. It inducted' secretive over- 
seas phone ealfe; p lane trips to Milan, meetings in airports. - 
Baidu. was far from the best high school player available 
tins year, but Iks fit everyone’s need for a rag man — and 
that meant a free^for-alL- . 


“It’s been unusual,” Camesecca said. “Blit he's 6-11, 
and everybody chases big guys.” 

Baldi is an intelligent, weS-bnfli 1 8-year-old who aver- 
’ aged IS points and 12 rebounds. A banker’s son, be has a 
4.0 grade-pomt average and is fluent in French and 
Bng S s h , with a smattering of German. 

He also was uiterly bewildered by U.S. recruiting. 

“I never saw anything like it" be said. “It was crazy." 

He is the first Italian player allowed oat of the strict 
Ita l ia n club system to play for a U.S. university. That ma y 
have made him more of a catch than his physical creden- 
tials and accounted for some of the craziness. The Luther- 
an co a ch. Bob McKiDop, never thought Baldi would be his 
most recruited player. 

“The thing is, I’ve coached a lot of players who were 
more talented,” McKiDop said. “Marco is a good player, 
but he's no great talent* - 

Baldi narrowed his choices to St John's, Maryland and 
’ " Ion 


jiui 5 oecanss uc can piay as a rresnmaiL 
“If s the best situation for me," said Baldi, who lives a 


half-hour from campus with an American family “I fed 
comfortable with the coach, and it's a chance to play right 
away." 

The pursuit of Baldi came to a hilarious head recently at 
JFK Airport in New York. During spring vacation, be 
returned to Milan to play for his dub in a tournament. 
Just before leaving, he ran into Camesecca, who just 

1 never saw anything like it,’ said Marco 
Baldi, 18. 'It was crazy. 9 

happened to be strolling around the airport When Baldi 
boarded the plane, he saw a Maryland assistant coach, 
Ron Bradley. When be arrived for the tournament Came- 
secca and a USC assistant coach, David Spencer, were 
sitting together in the stands. Spencer had played for Dan 
Peterson, general manager of Si mac 
“It was intrigue, cloak-and-dagger stuff,” said McKil- 
lop. ‘To see aD the leg work was remarkable. One coach 
started going to Italy, and then they all did. School A 


would do something, and then School B would follow." 

When Baldi became somewhat upset by all the atten- 
tion, McKUlop all but sequestered him with his host 
family, cutting off contact with the press and asking the 
competing schools to restrict fhdr efforts to letters. 

Baldi postponed his derisi on until long after most 
American prospects had made their choices this spring. 
He spent long hours consulting his parents and general 
manager during his trip to Milan. 

if Baldi was naive about the recruiting process, it is 
because there is nothing like recruiting in Italy. The Italian 
dub system is completely separate from the school sys- 
tem; a player signs with a club at an early age and is bound 
to h the rest of bis nicer. 

“It’s a funny thing about that," McKiDop said. “They 
think schools are for learning." 

The coaches' J et-setting “wasn't as glamorous as it 
sounds,” said USCs Morrison, who first saw Baldi when 
heplayed his sophomore year in nearby Irvine, California, 
before transferring to Lutheran. “When you go on Tues- 
day and come back Thursday, it's not much fun. Gyms 
smell the same all over the world.” 


DrieseD spent most of his three-day visit meeting with 
Baldi’s parents or shopping “It was no big deal" he said. 
T just watched him practice. I went around Milan a little, 
bought some Italian shoes, some china, some Gucci purses 
for my wife." 

Although he lost Baldi. he did sign Christoph Wdsheit. 
a 7-2 exchange student from Cologne who piaved at 
Effingham High School in Illinois. Wdsheit is the' tallest 
player ever to sign a letter of intent to Maryland and 
averaged 20.1 points and 63 rebounds at Effingham. 

“1 don’t think there are that many good players over 
there.” Drieseti said. “Marco is not a'Pairick Ewing," the 
Georgetown University star. “He’s just a big kid who 
needs to play. If he was that good, he'd be playing for his 
club already." 

Another twist to the stoiy is that Baldi 's club could call 
him back to Milan any lime. He probably will play at least 
two seasons at St. John's and could stay for the full four, 
but that depends on how quickly he develops. 

“It's better to have loved and lost, than never to have 
loved," Camesecca said. “Well prepare him. and then 
hell go back. That's where his future is." 


Lessons in Mexico Are Painful 

Europe's World Cup Teams WiD Need Some New Skills 


Inimuaional Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Quick, pass (he 




•* *} 




: or the top European soccer 
players there is seldom time to con- 
sider tomorrow as another tiay, let 
alone buDd on aspirations a year 
hence. They are run into, the 
ground 11 months oat of 12, run - 

oiiMhe (testic and The 6 freedom to 
property leam the skills of their 
fathers.* 

Suddenly, these angle-minded ■ 
competitors are asked to switch 
track, to be guinea pigs. Italy, west 
England and West Germany have 
plucked their nations’ finest out of 


them into Mexico City and 


Rob Hughes 

them to try but a whole new way of 
movement, of conserving energy. 
Of breathing in a strange atmo- 
sphere. 

Irwould be like. Shuttlin g astro- 
nauts into outer space after five 
mfmrtes m a w eight less chamber. 
Players are flown from Turin, from 
London and from Frankfurt to see 
winch of them can. — at fractions of 
the time scientists advise for sensi- 
ble acclimatization — cope at an 
altitude of 7*500 feet (22,606 me- 
ters) muter the midday sun. To see 
who can nm until he drops and 
then run on, who can gram a new 
ooncept of Areadungfootball that, a 



SPORTS BRIEFS 

-•* Evert Regains No.I Tennis Ranking 

BIRMINGHAM, England (UFI) — Chris Evert LI 
Martina Navratilova as the women's No. 1 tennis player i 
the new world r anking * were issued foDowing the French Open final. 
Navratilova had hdd-ihe No. 1 spot since June 1982. 

Gabrida Sabatini, 15, of Argentina, withdrew from competition in the 
women’s grass tournament in Birmingham, which is the final tnnenp far 

.. Wimbledon, and was fined £550. Sharing who made it to the fienrifinaU 
in Paris, said, T have never seen a grass court before, let alone played on 
one.” She will play doubles. • 

Wimbledon Reports Ticket Forgeries 

LONDON (AP) — Hundreds of forged tickets to the Wimbledon 
tennis championships have been sold to the public, most far favored 
* Center Court seats where prices range from $8.80 to $21.40, officials say. 

, The All-England Chib, which runs Wimbledon, said the forged tickets 
^were of high quality, compared with forgeries in previous years that often 
were easy to idsitify. 


< : : 


\ i* 


Wiggins Qeared to Hay, Padres Say No 

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Second bas eman Alan Wiggins received approv- 
al Monday frombasebairs Joint Review Council on drag abuse to resume 
playing. But the San Diego Padres' president, Ballard Smith, said, 
“Nothing has changed. I don’t see him coming back at alL” 

That may lead to a confrontation with the players union, which has 
said Smith’s decision to suspend Wiggins for the season violates tbe drug 
agreement between union and teams, underwhich no punitive action can 
be taken against a player who voluntarily seeks ana successfully caum- 
’ pletes rehamhtatioa and was not arrested. 

Wiggins was arrested and suspended for cocaine possession in 1982, 
but the union considered him a; first-time offender when he be 
treatment in April because the drug agreement was not in fbree in H 

For the Record 

Henschd Walker of the New Jersey Generals of the U.S. Football 

t bi*r«iTM» prn fMEKWiiil fnotb^D’s »D-tPTV* tending rmbw far a single 

’ season, gaining 162 yards for a total of 2,129 that surpassed the 2,105 
gained last season by Eric Dickerson of the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams. ' 
Scotty Bowman stepped down as coach of die NHL’s Buffalo Sabres, 
.. giving the job to veteran defenseman Jim Scboenfdd. Bowman w31 
.JFremam the team’s general manager. (AP) 

Miroslav Dvorak, 33, the veteran Czech defenseman, is retiring from 
the NHL’s Philadelphia Ftyers, the team said. (AP) 

Brian McRae, 17, tire son of the Kansas City Royals’ designated hitter, 
Hal McRae, and the baseball team’s top pick in last week’s amateur draft, 
signed with the dob. (AP) 


year from now, will win the World 
Cup in Mexico’s heat, altitude, pol- 
lution and hysteria. 

The Italians came, drew with 
Mexico, beat England and returned 
to earn their fire in the domestic 
cup competition. The English ar- 
rived, spent eight days fending off 
hostility aroused by the deathly 
hooliganism of Brussels, lost to Ita- 
ly, lost to Mexico and, with a third 
game in six debilitating days, await 
West Germany on Wednesday. The 
Germans, presently the world's 
leading goalscorers at sea level, 
have just 48 hours to convert from 
their exertions at Bundesliga to 
high altitude experiment. 

And they say h is only a 
although They” categorically do 
not indude the pitifully few Mexi- 
can spectators who brave noon 
temperatures to shriek in disgust 
when the pace dwindles to a stand- 
still. 

Not that Mexico's own potential 
heroes have h easy. Sure, they can 
more sensibly space out matches 
from Sunday to Stmday, picking 
off foreigners who need to cram 
three games into a week. But the 
Mexicans, too, are being hanled out 
of a lifetime’s habits. 

A year is hog enough in the 
world’s most overpopulated capital 
for 146,000 new births, but few of 
tbe national soccer players will 
have much time to add to that 
swdL Their World Cup already has 
begun. 

They have been seconded from 
dub duties to concentrate for the 
whole year on next summer's tour- 
nament Their squad, 40 strong but 
to be reduced to 22 in February, 
will receive at least 25 matches and 
the nearer the event comes the 
more their task — expected to cul- 
minate in Mexico's finest sporting 
hour — will breed tension. 

Mexico has taken partin 8 of the 
12 World Cop finals, but has won 
only 3 games and lost 17. Even with 
aD the advantages of playing in 
Mexico in 1970 the team did no 
better than reach tbe quarterfinals. 

A man named Vehbor (Bora) 
Milutinovic has been hired to 
change aD that. Appointed amid 
disparaging Mexican disapproval 
in January 1983, the Yugoslavian 
immediately preached an alien lan- 
guage . “I trust nobody but those 
players who know what teamwork 
means and its importance,” he de- 
clared. 

T don’t like superstars or big 
names but team players. Also, I 
want good results. It’s not enough 
to shrag off a defeat and says it's 
only a friendly” match. 

Critics sneered a year later when 
Milutmo vic's chosen team was hu- 
miliated, 5-0, in Rome by the rclgn- 

They ca^T^WtCTd, they 



Reardon Fails Expos 
And Cubs Win, 5-4 


togtaft- Un i nd fraa Irflefflnfcond 

Tom Brookens of die Tigers took a dive Monday night, beating the throw to the Orioles’ 
Cal Ripken at second fora stolen base. Moments later, Brookens stole third, then scored. 


called for cash to go out and per- 
suade foreign players to seQ their 
nationality for the Mexican cause. 

The Mexican FA stood up to 
them as never before. MDutinovic 
was to stay, and to be supported 
with “radical new preparation.” 
Hence the year long training camp. 

Before the doors reopened, the 


coach had shuffled 7! players in 31 
matches. And before this month’s 


In a trice the player was up, the 
free-ltick taken and little Miguel 
Espana was darting forward with 
toe balL He sped through tbe space 
where W ilkins should have been, 
ran at the heart of England's de- 
fense, drew left bade Kenny San- 
som to him and released a perfect 
low pass behind Sansom. 

Striker Luis Flores, whose preda- 
tory instincts are likened to those 
of It 


influx of Eu ro p e a n guinea ' pjgyhc-— of Italy’s Paolo Rosst on -a good 
talked of the 3-5-2 strategy un- 


Tf I kept him on today 
he’d have been like a 


veiled by several nations at the 
1984 European championship. 

Seeing 10 Mexicans retreat be- 
hind the ball, waiting patiently to 
airing a counter, is remarkable. 

Rather as Dr. Johnson observed of dried out raisin by 
a woman preaching, it is not yet J 

done well, but it is surprising to see Sunday.’ 
it done at alL 3 


Last Sunday, while the F.nglish 
in toe first half, 


s con taming policy worked 
after a fashion. Its defense did offer 
up eight chances, its theatrical 
goalkeeper was particularly suscep- 
tible to crosses, yet all proved too 
difficult for an opponent that has 
scored but twice in five internation- 
als. 

Mexico’s winning counter in the 
20th minute was a stunning lesson 
for all who intend to succeed there. 
It preyed on a moment’s lapse from 
England's most experienced mid- 
fielder, Ray Wilkins. His fool an an 
opponent was innocuous but, as 
toe Mexican lay as if poleaxed, the 
nice Mr. Wilkins reached out an 
apologetic hand. 


day, needed one touch for control, 
one more to drive toe baD fiercely 
into goal off tbe far post This was 
controlled explosiveness from two 
gifted Mexicans in their early 20s. 

Even England's premier gentle- 
man player of toe 1960s, Bobby 
Charlton, observed on BBC televi- 
sion that “it’s very nice” of Wilkins 
“to be sporting, but you’ve got to 
be professional as wdL” Winners, 
in other words, do not leave them- 
selves open by a show of contrition 
to a wily opponent 

Maybe, when the English get 
over refereeing decisions that, on 
paper, cost them both matches, 
they wfll learn. The performance 


against Italy, conditioned by toe 
pact to play in exemplary spirit in 
the wake of toe Brussels tragedy, 
also caught out an experienced En- 
glishman. 

The acceleration and deviation 
of the ball that deceived goalie Pe- 
ter Shilton for Italy’s first goal — 
whether it was. as the scorer, Salva- 
tore Bagni, claimed, a deliberate 
lob, or„ as the English believed, a 
nns-hit center. — it demonstrated 
the affect of altitude, “It creates an 
artificial pitch in toe air,” suggest- 
ed Engtand’s retired midfielder, 
Trevor Brooking. 

Also, for all toe care in selecting 
lightweight, ventilated cotton 
shorts, in avoiding ice cream and 
unpeeled fntit, in sipping fresh oxy- 
gen at halftime, England must 
know its normal “pressing” style 
cannot be sustained 

After 75 minutes against Italy, 
England’s manager, Bobby Rob- 
son, withdrew front runner Trevor 
Francis. “He was our best player,” 
Robson said. “He took defenders 
on, twisted and turned them, but 
Trevor is 31 and if I kept him on 
today he’d have been like a (hied 
out r airin by Sunday.” 

It wHl be interesting to see how 
Franz Beckenbauer’s resurgent 
young Germans adapt. Bui the 
conditions are fixed and, as Pele, 
Gerson, Tostao and Co. indelibly 
proved in 1970, soccer is not only 
possible bat toe aits of shooting 
and dribbling can be heightened in 
this ratified air. Fifteen years back, 
and one year forward, where 
there's a wfll there’s a way. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispaicha 

MONTREAL — Jeff Reardon, 
the National League leader with 17 
saves, finally blew a save opportu- 
nity. and it cost his warn the game. 

In toe eighth inning Monday 
night, with a man on first and one 
out, Reardon relieved Dan Schat- 
zeder, who had allowed Just two 
hits and* had struck out 10. 

Then the Chicago Cubs’ Richie 
Hebner pinch hit for pinch-hitter 
Brian Dayett and singled. Dave 
Lopes popped foul for the second 
oul But catcher Mflce Fitzgerald's 
passed baD moved up both runners 
and both scored on Ryne Sand- 
berg’s single. 

Sandbag, back in the lineup af- 
ter missing eight games with sore 
ribs, took second on the throw 
home and sewed as Keith More- 
land singled. 

After toe Cubs had won, 5-4, the 
Expos’ manager. Buck Rodgers, 
said Reardon “just had an off- 
night, but the way he's pitched this 
year, he's entitled to one.” 

Padres 9, Astros 1: In Houston, 
LaMair Hoyt scattered 1 1 hits and 
Tony Gwynn and Terry Kennedy 
each drove in two runs during a 
five-run second inning that gave 
San Diego its victory. 

Dodgers 7. Reds 4: Greg Brock's 
two-run homer, Los Angeles’ thud 
of the game, climaxed a five-run 
rally in the fifth in GnannatL 

PhflBes6,Mets 4: Glenn Wilson 
tripled, doubled and drove in three 
runs in Philadelphia to help beat 
New York. 

Braves 7, Giants 0: In Atlanta, 
Larry Owen doubled in two runs 
during a five-run first that doomed 
San Francisco. Rookie left-hander 
Zane Smith pitched the Braves’ 
first complete game this year. 

Cantab 6, Pirates 1: Jade Clark 
bomered for Sl Louis and Danny 
Cox singled in two rims, plus pitch- 
ing a four-bitter in Pittsburgh. 

Yankees 4, Blue Jays lz In toe 
American League, Bob Shirley, in 
his first start since December, held 
Toronto to six hits for 6 1/3 innings 
in New York. Teammate Don Bay- 
lor singled in two runs. 

Red Sox 4, Brewers 2: Tim Rice, 
having twice failed to bunt in the 
ninth, hit a three-run homer off 
Milwaukee reliever RoUie Fingers 
in Boston, which extend its winning 
streak to right. Tbe Brewers’ Ted 
Higuera had retired 18 of 19 batters 
until running into trouble in the 
ninth. Rice has not succeeded on a 
sacrifice bunt since 1980. 

Twins 6, Indians 4: Tom Brtm- 
ansky’s three-run homer, during a 
five-run second inning, helped 
Minnesota win in Cleveland. 

Angels 8, Rangers I: In Ana- 
heim, California, rookie Kirk 
McCaskfll held Texas to seven hits, 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


Latest Specialty: 
An UnswungBat 

The Associated Pros 

MERRILLVILLE, Indiana 
— Many baseball teams have 
designated hitters who do nor 
play m the field but go to baL 
Andrean High School has one 
who does not play in the field, 
goes to bat and dares not swing. 

Freshman Brian Bujdoso. 
who is 4 feet 1 1 ( 1.49 meters), is 
Andrean’s designated walker. 
His job: stand in the batter's 
box and draw-a base on balls. 

“He’s walked about 50 per- 
cent of toe time," said his coa- 
ch, Dave Pishkur. “Even when 
he doesn't walk, the player that 
comes in for him usually does 
something.” 

Bujdoso stays at toe plate 
only until be draws a walk or 
gets two strikes. Then toe player 
for whom he has batted returns 
under a rule allowing a player 
to re-enter the game. 

Last week, Tom Richter. An- 
drean's tallest player at 64, 
walked on a low pitch after Buj- 
doso left with a 3-and-2 count. 

Bujdoso, who varies his rou- 
tine by standing in as either a 
right- or left-handed batter, 
could just as easily be watching 
these games from the stands. 
After he was cut from thejunior 
varsity team, he requested and 
received the job as varsity man- 
ager. 

“We were gening new uni- 
forms. Hewasdoingagoodjob, 
so we got him one," Pishkur 
said. 


striking out seven, for his first ma- 
jor-league victory after Mike 
Brown drove in three runs. 

Tigers 8, Orioles 7: Barbara Gar- 
bey’shomer tied the score in the 
1 1 to in Detroit and Lance Parrish 
singled in Lou Whitaker to beat 
Baltimore. Tbe Orioles' Lee Lacy 
had hit his second homer of toe 
game in toe top of toe inning; 
teammate Floyd Rayford's homer 
with two out in the ninth sent it 
into extra innings. 

White Sox 9, Mariners 4: Tom 
Paciorek, Greg Walker and Rudy 
Law each hit bases-loadcd singles 
to help Chicago win in Seattle. 

A’s 2, Royals 1: In Oakland, Cal- 
ifornia, Mike Heath raced home 
from third when Kansas City sec- 
ond baseman Frank White erred on 
a bad-hop grounder with two out in 
toe 10th. { AP.UPI ) 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


GoK 


Transition 


Padres’ Hawkins Is Now Perfectly Tougl 


Monday’s Major League line Scores 


PGA Leaders 


NATIONAL. LEAGUE 

stxoob mi na m-< n i 

Plttlbmtl mo no ne— i « o 

Cox and Nlata; Rtadsn. HoBdnd (V) and 
Pena. W— Cox, 7-2. L— Rhoderv M. HR*— St. 
>. -tools, Clark 112). Pittsburgh, Thompson (7). 
■jLo* A — lM 8M29B8M-7 V 0 

'aodnaaM 3M Ml ISO— 4 t 2 

Honeycutt, NJKtaiftier ML Hawed IVJ and 
ScioecJaj Stoner. Past ore (S), Franco (B) and 
Knlaely. W— Honeycutt, L-Sfoswr. 5-5. 

5 v Howell (tt.HRs — Loe Angeles. Guerrero 
(»». Marshall tlOI. Brock W. Cincinnati. Kru- 
cotv (51. 

New York M MB ltt-4 II 1 

pMKtfefpnki MS Ml Xx— 6 » • 

Fernanda*. 5lek (Sl. SotnbUo Ml and Car- 
ter; Denny, Carman (9) and Viren Dka IB}, 
w— Oennv.W. L— Fernandes, M HRe-New 
York. Carter (71, Christensen ni. 

Son Francisco IN MB NM 7 1 

Atlanta (M Ml BOX— 7 14 1 

G0tL Blua nj.WUHam* (fl.Doris C79, Gar- 


rett* MI and Traufaor Smtin and Owen. W— 
Smith. 3-4. L— Gath 3-3. . 

BM MB OT—4 « 1 
. 1MWI Ml— 4 « I 
FontenoUmitti Ml and Davit; Sct wfa eder. 
Reardon W), Bark* (V) and Fttzsenrid. W— 
Fontenot. W. L— Reardon. 31 Sv— SmWi 
n4I.HR»— Cfclfopo, Davis (S.Cev HZ). Mon- 
treal. Watloch til. 

MS Ml 210 — B IS • 
V MS Ml MB— 1 11 B 
Hoyt and Remedy, Bedty Ml: Knepaer. 
Solano CU. Ram (St, Pawley (7) and Boltov. 
W—Hewt W. LrKneoMT. 6-2, HR — Houston, 
Mwttohrey MI. 


AMCR 1 CAN LEAGUE 


BBS BOB BIB — 3 7 I 
- BIB BN 103— 4 t 1 

HtouerthFInpeni (9) and Moons; ORWo ond 
SaurGedmon M). W-0tada,4-L L-HInuera, 
■*■*« hr* — M ilwaukee, Cooper (31. Boston, 
Hartman CO, Rice (121:. 

: 150 Ml 000— 4 » 1 

Major Leagne Standings vwh.M..m om mk. uusmt u>; 

# ’ ° Cra#LEMtt^t»dndW1ltanl.W-VlDta.74 

L-CpMtdASvHBBvH Ifl. HRs — Mlnneso- 
!“• Brunorakv rui. Oevekmd, Jacoby Ml. 
Hsranlo MM BM ill—* ? 1 

Mew York 1W MB ttfr-4 12 B 

Atmumtor.caudm m and Martinez; 5Wr- 
toy,FI*her m. Mgtwtti (8) ond Wynesar. W- 
Shlrtey, Vti T .Ale x ander. 7-i Sv— RkJhettl 

tm. ..... . . 

.T“W* - Ml IN BOB— 1 7 1 

Gamrnln JJB n* ItN— S n 9 

■ M«oaikjrrlkS«ivn*<#(7Wtewart llJond 
StaaaM; Mt&ikm and Boone. W-McCtn- 
WU, 1-*. L— Moan. M. HR— ColHomJa, WII- 
fanp (11. ‘ . . 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cast Wvfcton -■ 

W L 

Taranto M 19 

Detroit 30 34 

„ Baltimore 29 25 

v Boston 29 25 

" New York a a 

Milwaukee 25 34 

Cleveland 19 V 

west JX vision 

CoMtornlO 30 25 

Chicaao 2S 34 

Kansu* CHy 38 21 

Oakland 27 21 

Seattle K 31 

Minnesota 34 3B 

Tern* 21 35 - 


Pet 08 
ASS — 
.456 SVt 

so an 
so -an 
j* 7 
JOB Ih 
m9 rrvs 


■50.— -• 
-531 ...» 
jot in 
jn i - • 
jus sn 
^44 SHr 
SOS Wx 


NATIONAL LEAGUE ' • 

Coat DtvtNao 

W L Pet. GB 
33 19 jOS- — 

21 23 595 

32 34 571 3 
38 25 J45 . 4n 

2D 34 J7D . .14 
-17 » JH Wft 
WaetDtvMea . 

San Dleao *l 31 .-JM1' ■— - 

Cincinnati 29 2* SO 4ft 

Houston It 26 . SB 416 

Lae Anodes SKI .4 

Atfcyito . 8. ■ JU4 M 

5*0 FrandscD 3Q 34. J30 13 


Oikasa 
New York 
Montreal 
SL Units 
PtifladelAhla 
ePHtstwrati 


IN MU Ml n— 7 13 2 
BOW! . . Ml 0 M It* 03—1 13 t 

DABort matt Martinez ( 71 . S t e w ar t (91 and 
DemoMK. navtant a ( 9 )j' Maorts. Hernandez 
m. uwtz ro j ad Panto, W-Lopez. w. 

HR*— Bnttimore, Lacy 3 (3), 
SiMto (D, Rayfor d nj. Detroit, Parrtdi (91. 
GarteytJ).. 

“SS 1 * ’ 4 M 1 M MM 12 • 

.. N 2 181 IM- 4 W 1 

Sannlstw.Nebea ML Pollen (7].JamecM) 
and Ftokj yoamuLaa m.vande Sera iw, 
Stontao (W and Keanw, Scott (9j. WL-Ban- 
nMor*.M. L— YautUL a*. Sv-%iamaB fU). 

H»— aeatti*, Pitoey (13L 

Kna*a* Ob'.. . -. . Ml MB MB *-l II- » 
-IRMtBWlI 1 
Leli> randt43 ui «eni> wry M> and SundOerw 
WHO*. AHteHM.«Q r Hewed 118} ad Tettto- 
tan, Hean WJ. w Ho w U, U L-Oiilsen- 

fr3-L-_- .... 


Leader* on Hw Pratfenloaal Goiters Assod- 
aBoe Tear threw* the Westchester Classic 
which ended Jane 9: 

EARNINGS 

1. Curtis Straw S42X993 

2. Lannv Wadklns 5308406 

X Calvin Penhi S29164S 

A Roy Floyd S282.1M 

1 Corev Povln S277M9 

A Mark O’Meara 5277,167 

7. Craig SJadtor 537X699 

A Bmt4i urd Lancer 5267435 

. *. Tom Watson 5179,80 

10. Fussy Zealtor 5169.193 

SCORING 

1. Da Pootey, 7036. X Crate Stodtor. 7047. X 
Corev Pavtn, 70 l 49 A. Leery Mize, 7IU8. 5> Ray 
Floyd. 7X75. A, Tam Wotwn, 7UC. 7 (He], 
Lannv Wndkln* and Keith tereus. 7092. 9, 
Mark O'Meara, 7DJ6. IX Curtis Sirrmae, 7LB0i 
AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
LAmty Baa, ZTOJt Greg Norman. 27A.LX 
Fred Couoles. 375.1. 4. Mac (yGrody. 274A. 5. 
Bill Ck>ssan,Z7L7.A Scmdy Lyiu,27X6.7, Gres 
TwtBBVZim A Jim Dent, 27X5. 9, BotfeV Watf- 
IdMb 2722. 18, Da PaM. 272.L 
' DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
1. Coivta Peete. JBL 2, David Ednwite, J9L 
X Hale l rwlivJ82.4. Lomr Nehoa,7M. 5, Tom 
KH& m & tUkM Rakt J». 7, Daua TtwefL 

25*8. Tim Norris. -757.1, Jock Rmr, 731.10 
Bruce UMxka. 745. 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
1, jack Wckknn. J28.X Bruce Utotzke. 718. 
X Al Gdberaer, JKL 4, Corey Pmtin, 711. X 
John Maattey. 710.6, Don Petti, 765. 7 (fie), 
CahlB Paeie ad Roaer MoltWh, 781.9. Daua 
Tewed, job. IX TwOiuna Chen A99. 

' AVERAOB PUTTS PER ROUND 
l.Frank Conner, 2SL73.Z Nick Price, 2X73.3 
(tie), Crato Stadler end Morris Hotatdnr, 
2BJU Bodby Oamwtt, &M.& Rra CtddmU. 
2822.7. Da Poatov SOX. 8. ROV FiaviU(L97.9, 
Loren Robert*. 2922. ia Mike Donald. 2M3. 
PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1 (He), Grata Slndler and tom Watson, 224. 
X Tzs-Oiune Own 211 4, Uvmy Wadklns, 
■2T0JL Hal Sutton 2B7. APtma Blocfcmar.286. 
7 (tie). Da Pootov, Bernhard Lunger. Larry 
MU* and Fred CaualeE. 205. 


BASEBALL 
Ame ric a League 

BALTIMORE— Placed Dan FonLdesfonol- 
ed bitter, on me iSday disabled list. Recalled 
John ShettrViOuHMder. from Rochester at tne 
Intern al he ml League. 

CAUFORNIA— Stoned AAark Ben. outfield- 
er: Jerorrw Nelson, third baseman; Bob Rose 
ad Gary Nads, ttu rt t t uu t: Jim McCodom. 
first ba se man; Kendall Walling, InfleWer; 
Tim Arnold catcher, and Frank DIMkheie. 
Chris Cod InvJ lm Morehouse. Steve McGuire 
and David Johnson, pitchers, to free agent 
contract*. Desi gna ted Tommy John, pitcher, 
tor release or racaatgnnMnt. Reactivated Rod 
Caraw.flrsi boeema. Recoltod Ltds Sanchez. 
pdcher.framln{uryrahabnitettonot Edmon- 
ton of the Pacific Coast League and knot him 
an the disabled mt. 

National Uknm 

ATLANTA— Signed Tom AbralL ottcher. 

NEW York— P laced Terry Btockor. out- 
aeMtor. on Itw isnay (Ssabtod OsL Recalled 
Rick AeuUera,ottcher,fram Tidewater of the 
IMernatlomd 


HAWpT ltAI I 

Nufloeai Basketball Assoctatloo 
PHOENIX— Reached aaraement with 
jama* edMirds, center, on a three-year con- 
tract 

FOOTBALL 

HoBbuuI FfwtbaQ Leoeoe 
GREEN BAY— Traded Rich Campbell, 
quarterback, to the LA. RnMerr far undfe- 
dased draft choices. 


Football 


USFL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

W L T POL PF PA 


1, PMUP Bloekimsr. ML 2 (tto). Core/ Povln. 
Lorrv RMw and Joey Simwar. 9. 5 (tie). 
Craig Stadler, Curtis Strange, Fred Couples, 
and Buddy Genuer, 8. 9, Four tied wftii 7. 
BIRDIES 

l, Craig Staator, 298.2, Fred ComtiBL 246.3 
(ttat, Hal Sutton and Joey SJndelar. m 5, 
Curtis Sfronaeu si 6. Buddy. Gardner, SCO. 7, 
While Wood, 2U. A Rav Ftovd.212. 9, Coray 
Pavla. TIL 10, Two tied udtii MX 


x-Blnnlnatrn 12 4 

x-New Jersey ll 5 

Memphis 9 7 

Tampa Bay'. 9 7 

Baltimore 8 7 

Jacksonville | * 

OTtando 4 12 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
X-Oakkmd 11 4 1 >19 408 309 

n-Denver 11 5 

Houston 9 7 

Arizona 7 9 

Portland 5 11 

San Antonio 4 12 

los Anodes 3 13 

(x-cOnched o&nwfl berth) 

MONDAY'S RESULT 
New Jersey 3L Jack so nville 24 


750 488 274 
AM 383 329 
443 359 309 
443 377 370 
431 389 240 
480 385 345 
758 201 433 


488 410 324 
443 474 336 
438 30 357 
413 239 384 
■25B 254 374 
.188 244 418 


>h Durso 

New York Times Service 

SAN DIEGO — The biggest 
success stray in baseball this season 
is probably Andy Hawkins of toe 
San Diego Padres, who lost his job 
as a starting pitcher a year ago 
because his manager said he 
pitched “like a pussycat” 

He was wild, tentative and in- 
consistent. Bnt this season, Haw- 
kins has astounded people by start- 
ing 11 games, winning all 11 and 
allowing no more than 3 runs in 
any ofnis 10 games, and no more 
than 2 in 7 of them. 

Not only that, Hawkins was the 
first starting pitcher in the Naticai- 
al League in nearly 20 years to open 
a season with 10 victories and no 
losses. In 1966, Joan Marichal of 
toe San Francisco Giants won 10 
games in his first 11 starts, and 
went on to a 25-6 season. In toe 
American League, the best start in 
recent years was made by Rem 
Guidry of toe Yankees in 1978, 
when he went 13-0 en rente to 25-3. 

Mdton Andrew Hawkins has be- 
come a mown jewel with (he Padres 
after straggling to stick unto the 
team for three years, during which 
time he won 15 games and lost 21. 
After he beat- the Cmrinnati Reds 
on Monday night, he owned 11 of 
his team's 32 inctories. 

“How do I fed about this?" he 
said toe other day in the Padres’ 
locker room. Tm stunned. 

“Tm getting a lot of help. The 
guys don't make errors. And 
tbty*ve been averaging six runs a 
game for me. I was doing all right 
in toe second half of last season, 
but I'm stunned tbe way it’s going 


6 feet 3 (1.9 meters), 205 pounds 
(92,9 kilograms), and decidedly 
laid-back in temperament. He was 
widely recruited as an exceptional 
punter in high school football but 
be chose baseball and was picked 
by toe Padres in the first round of 
the amateur draft in June 1978. 

Dick W illiams , the managw of 
the Padres, says he thinks that 
Hawkins turned from a pussycat 
into a tiger when he stopped being 
so nice on the mound. 

“Hawk’s coming after the hitters 
now,” Williams said. “He's a very 
nice person, he’s a gentleman, but 


enough. And 1 sent him to toe bull- 
pen to get straightened oul" 

“I was already on a pretty shaky 
bridge,” Hawkins said. “They 
didn't have any options left on 
sending me bade down to toe mi- 
nors. They weren't going to trade 
me. I just 'had to tough iL out.” 

So, he went to toe bullpen and 
toughed it oul While he was there, 
Rich Gossage watched him wann- 
ing up frequently, and one day sug- 
gested a change: Hawkins was tak- 
ing a huge windup motion, and was 
probably sacrificing some control. 
“My motion was getting higher 


'He did it in the playoff and World Series, and 
now he thinks if he can do it there, he can do it 
anywhere.’ — Catcher Terry Kennedy 


Hawkins, 25, is a 1 
id right-hander from Waco, Texas, 


when you’ve got that ball on the 
mound, you've got to he a little 
mean now and then. 

“Last year, 1 called him the ‘tim- 
id Texan,’ and there are no timid 
Texans, including my wife. He was 
so tentative, ana he lost so many 
batters, that he lost his job in toe 
rotation. He was afraid to pitch 
inside, and you’ve got to come in- 
side because power hitters like to 
extend their arms and take toe big 
suing. Norm Sherry was our pitch* 
ing ooadi tom. and he'd be out 
drew by the third inning every time 
Hawk pitched. 

“I took him out of a game one 
day, and he was waiting for me in 
the runway behind the dugouL 
'Why?’ he asked. I said: ‘Because 
you pitch like a pussycaL’ We 
dosed the door to my office, and I 
told him he wasn't being aggressive 


on the backswiiig," Hawkins said. 
“When 1 was separating my hands, 
1 was swinging my arm in too low 
an arc. It made me very erratic. Bui 
I modified my delivery, and began 
to stay within myself a lot more.” 

“The bullpen helped him," Wil- 
liams said. “He pitched long relief, 
sometimes he’d be the spot starter. 
We had a lot of doubleheaders, and 
we’d lose toe first game, then Hawk 
would come in ana win toe second. 

“He was turning things around 
in toe second half of the season, but 
people didn't notice it until we got 
into tbe playoff and World Senes. 
Our starting pitchers had a lot of 
trouble, you remember, and we 
wait to toe pen early and often. 
Our relief pitchers did the job, too, 
and Hawkins was one of toe best." 

Teny Kenned; 
it this way: 


sdy, his catcher, put 
He just got to toe 


point where everything came to- 
gether. He stopped walking guys 
the way he used to. Maybe it was 
new confidence. What be did in the 
playoff and World Series definitely 
helped him." 

What he did in tbe playoff and 
World Series was this: In tbe sec- 
ond game of the playoff against tbe 
Chicago Cubs, he came out of the 
bullpen and retired four of toe five 
men he faced. In tbe fourth game, 
be came in with two men on base, 
and got Gary Matthews to hit into 
a doable play. In the fifth game, he 
retired all four men be faced and 
kept the Padres alive until they ral- 
lied to win the pennant. 

In toe World Series against the 
Detroit Tigers, he also pitched 
three times and was toe winning 

won. His totak^fboth events: 6 
appearances, 15 innings, 4 hits and 

1 ran. 

“Was that a factor in my turning 
things around this year?" he said. 
“You bet it was. 

“But 1 actually got my chance in 
long relief, in games we were al- 
ready losing big. No kidding, it 
relaxed me. If 1 got bombed, tiie 
game wasn’t on toe line, anyway." 

Hawkins felt even more relaxed 
after Sherry was dropped as the 
pitching coach not long after toe 
Series. He had not been talking to 
Sherry, anyway, and he welcomed 
the new coach, Galen Cisco, toe 
onetime pitcher for the Mets and 
the pitching coach for the Montreal 
Expos when Williams was the man- 
ager there. Cisco taught him anoth- 
er pitch: a “cut" fastball that 
breaks a few inches like a slider. 

“He has Tour pitches now,” Wil- 
liams said. “And be has command 
m all of than. This is no nuke." 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1985 



OBSERVER 


Barton IV on Nabuttsco I 


Bv Russel] Baker 



merging 

and-crackers outfit The obvious 
name for this new corporate mon- 
strosity is Nabuttsco. I have al- 
ready proposed it to the Committee 
on Nomenclature, whose couch. 
Barton B. Barton IV, assures me 
that the suggestion will be given 
serious consideration. 

This means it will be rejected out 
of hand, which is a pin. I expected 
better of a committee boss with the 
nerve to call himself a couch. 

□ 

Most people who head commit- 
tees nowadays call themselves 
chairs, believe it or not, and you 
probably don't believe it unless you 
follow the kind of news that in- 
volves committees, which would 
make you a very dull person in- 
deed. 

If you were that kind of person, 
you would not be reading this. You 
would be reading the latest emis- 
sions Tram President Reagan about 
the tax bill's being the greatest 
boon 10 humanity since penicillin. 
So believe me: "If you were in 
charge or a committee these days, 
you would be called a chair. 

Naturally, when I phoned the 
Committee on Nomenclature I 
asked to speak to the chair. “We 
have no chair.” said the telephone. 
“Would vou like to speak to the 
couch?” * 

A few years ago, suspecting that 
somebody was twitting me. I would 
have said, “No. but I would like to 
leave a message for the escritoire.” 
Not nowadays, though. 

All right, having said that for 
lack of a chair I would speak to the 
couch. I was connected to the tele- 
phone of Bunoa B. Barton IV, who 
said that my suggestion for calling 
the huge new organism Nabuttsco 
would get serious consideration. 

“I'm sorry to hear it." I said. 

“Weil, you know how it is: A lot 
or kids nowadays may not know 
that cigarettes used to be called 
butts, and it wouldn't help sales of 
either butts or biscuits if kids 
thought we were mired in the past." 

□ 

I did not point out that kids who 
didn't know’ that butts were ciga- 
rettes certainly wouldn't know 
what mire was. It is useless to argue 
with corporate couches about the 


MOVING 


best way to exploit American 
youth. 

In any case, I was interested in 
bow this man liked being Burton B. 
Barton IV. Names, as you probably 
now realize, interest me. I like to 
see a thing or a person well named. 

And people whose names in- 
clude Roman numerals were once 
so enviable in my eyes that I de- 
spaired about not having one. Ro- 
man numerals meant class. 

That was before ‘‘Rocky’ 1 movies 
took the gloss off Roman numerals. 
Until then the Roman numeral I 
had always wanted as part of my 
name was MCMXXXTV. This was 
because MCMXXXJV would be 
indecipherable to most people, if 
they are as bad at Roman numerals 
as 1 am, and this would have made 
me seem mysterious and romantic. 

Them, silting stupefied in a mov- 
ie house one night watching 
“Rocky UT or possibly “Rocky 
XVII,” I suddenly realized that if 
rd been named Rocky and granted 
my prayers for a great Roman nu- 
meral. I would be Rocky 
MCMXXXTV. 

Burton B. Barton IV said, some- 
what testily, that he did not intend 
to give up his IV. It said something 
unflattering about him, I think, 
that be did not realize that the 
Roman numeral isn't what it used 
to be. It explained why he was 
uninterested in ren aming the new 
cigarette-and-crackers combine 
Nabuttsco. 

He typifies the unimaginative 
mentality that rules the nomenda- 
tured committees of today's corpo- 
rate world. Recently, for example, I 
notified General Electric that it 
was afflicted with a colorless name 
that gave little idea of what the 
company was up to. 

Here was an outfit that had 
mad e billions out or Pentagon con- 
tracts yet had paid no taxes for 
years. Instead ot calling itself Gen- 
eral Electric. I maintained, it 
should change its name to General 
Fleecing. If the bulk of its tax-free 
profits stemmed from navy con- 
tracts, so much the better — it 
could be called Admiral Fleecing, 
which the public, after a little tax- 
deductible spending by the public 
relations department, could surely 
be induced to think of as “Admira- 
ble Fleecing.” 

My suggestion has not been ac- 
knowledged. 

Alien’ York Times Service 


The Keeper of the U. S. House’s Door 


By Martin Tolchin 

Ness York Times Serrtcf 

W ASHINGTON — He is a large, rotund 
man who stands in the rear of the House 
chamber during joint sessions of Congress 
and bellows the titles of those entering the 
chamber, ultimately proclaiming. “Mr. 
Speaker, the President of the United States." 

That is what the world sees and hears of 
James T. Molloy, who rose from ward politics 
in Buffalo. New York, to defeat William 
Miller of Mississippi in a vote by the Demo- 
cratic caucus and become Doorkeeper of the 
House of Representatives. 

He is a gregarious man, with the same zest 
for politics as the House Speaker. Thomas P. 
O'Neill Jr., who recently walked to the House 
chamber with an arm draped over the Door- 
keeper's shoulder and said to a reporter: 
“They don't make them any better. He's one 
of my great friends and a beautiful man.” 

The Doorkeeper, nominally in charge of 
keeping order on the floor, oversees more 
than 400 employees and a budget of $6.8 
milli on His jurisdiction includes such seem- 
ingly peripheral responsibilities as the House 
document room, the Office of Photography 

and a Publications Distribution Service. 

.“I’m a political creature,” Molloy said in 
an interview in his tiny office cluttered with 
memorabilia. “If something involves politics, 
it ends up here.” 

A genial man. Molloy is nevertheless 
known to have flashes of temper, which he 
has occasionally expressed in writing, to his 
regret 

He recalled the anxiety of his maiden ap- 
pearance on the House floor when President 
Gerald R. Ford delivered his first State of the 
Union address, on Jan. 15. 1975. “I don't 
know who was more nervous," Molloy said. 
“Ford wanted to show that he was in charge, 
and so did L” 

Molloy introduced “the Justices of the Su- 
preme Court" and was gently told by Chief 
Justice Warren E Burger that the proper 
introduction was “the Chief Justice and As- 
sociate Justices of the Supreme Court.” 

Molloy also recalled that moments before 
he introduced “the President's Cabinet," 
which was lined up outside the chamber. 
Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger poked 
his head inside the door and playfully told 
him, ‘Tell the world that Henry and the boys 
are here.” 

Molloy, 48, a third generation Irish-Ameri- 
can, grew up in South Buffalo, which he 
recalled as “a hotbed of politics." 

The son of a firefighter, he worked as a 
marine firefigluer, a teacher and in the Dis- 
trict Attorney's office while earning his un- 
dergraduate and law degrees. 

The turning point in his career, be said, was 
joining the South Side Democratic Gub and 
being elected its chairman at age 27, “the 
youngest ward chairman in the city's histo- 



Oowgo Tomo-lhe «*<• York T* 

James T. Molloy, Doorkeeper of the House of Representatives. 


ry.” At that time he worked as a loan officer 
for a local bank, but used an alias, “Mr. 
Alois,” so that his constituents would not 
recognize their ward leader as the man who 
was pressing them to pay their bills. 

Molloy became a protege of Joe Crangle. 
then as now leader of Buffalo's Democratic 
organization, who worked with Representa- 
tive John Rooney, a Brooklyn Democrat, to 
send Molloy to Washington. His fust job 
here, in 1969, was as the House's chief dis- 
bursing officer. He then served for two years 
as the House's chief finance officer. 

“There were people happy to get me out of 
Buffalo,” Molloy said. 

In 1 974 he mounted his challenge to Miller, 
who had held the job for more than two 
decades. Molloy and some veteran House 
members agree that Miller had developed an 
independent power base, courting the com- 
mittee chairmen but largely ignoring the rank 
and file. 

“He forgot that we're just hired help.” 
Molloy recalled. “It's a service-oriented job.” 

Carl Albert, who at that time was the 
Speaker, remained neutral in the vote by the 
caucus, as did CNetlL. then the majority 
leader. Molloy was also aided by some of the 
younger, antiwar members and some South- 
ern delegations. 

The current consensus is that Moilov is 
attentive to members’ needs, from an extra 
ticket to a State of the Union address to 
appointment of a House page to distribution 
of a newsletter. 

“He tries to make the members' job as 
pleasant as possible.” said Representative 
Henry J. Nowak of Buffalo, an old friend and 
ally. 


Molloy’ s greatest crisis occurred in 1982, 
with the' reports of sexual misconduct and 
drug abuse involving House and Senate 
pages. 

“I told the Speaker we had to move quick- 
ly,“ Molloy recalled. 

He had previously urged stricter supervi- 
sion of House pages, high school students 
who were largely left to their own derices off 
the House floor. He then successfully argued 
for conversion of a House office building into 
a dormitory for pages and for an over haulin g 
of the school where pages attend classes while 
working in the capital. 

More recently, Molloy has crossed swords 
with the staff of the House press galleries. 
Although he serves as paymaster of the staff, 
its control is in the hands of committees of 
reporters. 

After only 15 reporters turned out to hear 
Garret FitzGerald, the Irish prime minister. 
Molloy fired off an angry letter to the press 
galleries superintendent directing that all 96 
seats be Filled for a forthcoming visit by 
President Francois Mitterrand of France. 
Molloy now says he regrets sending the letter. 
Bat when Mitterrand appeared, there was 
standing-room only in the press galleries. 

Molloy has witnessed the dispersion of 
power in the House, and an increase in the 
number of younger members. 

“You’d think therc’d be a lot more camara- 
derie, but there isn't,” he said. “When we 
used to have late-night sessions, you'd see 
those small airline whiskey bottles in the 
cloakroom and hear some singing. But now 
they're all business. They take themselves too 
seriously.” 


people 

New York Toasts FeUhu 




Federico Feffini, the Italian di- 
rector of such classics as “S'i 1 and 
“La Dolce Vita." was honored 
Mondav for his role in the creation 
of neo-realist moviemaking by the 
Film Society of New Yore's Lin- 
coln Center' "You are truly a sun* 
potico people: as I always expected 
cinfi* I was a child and fust knew of 
vour existence through Felix the 
Cat," Fellini said after hearing 
dewing tributes to his wonL Dc _ 
scribing the movie house m his vil- 
lage. “with one seat and five sianu- 
ingroom." he said. “I believe I owe 
to those flickering shadows from 
America ray derision to express 
myself through films." Alfred 
Stem, president of the society, 
called Fellini “a truly gnat film 
artist-" Clips from 17 Fdliru mov- 
ies were shown in the two-hour 
tribute at Avery Fisher Hall. 

□ 

Lynne Frederick, widow of the 

actor Peter Setters. won an extra 
$475,000 from the makers of a 
-pink Panther” film that she de- 
scribed as an insult to her late hus- 
band's memorv. Last month Judge 
Jobs S. Hohhonse awarded Freder- 
ick SI million in damages in a 

breacb-of -con tract action in Lon- 
don against United Artists Film 
corporation for “Trail of the Knk 
Panther” The film was released m 
19S2, two years after Sellers died, 
and was crafted from discarded 
clips from the five previous Pink 
Panther movies in which Sellers 
played the bunding French detec- 
tive Inspector Clouseau. On Mon- 
day Hoohouse ordered the corpo* 

■ ration to pay S400.000 interest oa 
the damage award. They must also 
pay an extra $75,000 following an 
investigation into the contractual 



gal costs estimated at $250,&J. 

□ 

President Habib Bourguibe of 
Tunisia on Tuesday welcomed 
France’s intention to name Eric 
Rouleau, Middle East specialist for 
Le Monde newspaper, as its am- 
bassador to the North African na- 
tion. “We're going to have a Le 
Monde editor-ambassador,” Bour- 
guiba. on a visit to France, told 
President Francois Mitterrand at 
the beginning ot a 30- minute meet- 
ing at the Tunisian Embassy in Par- 
is. Informed sources had said earli- 


er that Rouleau would be named 
ambassador to Tunisia, but ibe in- 
formation was art i offiepuy con- 
linned. Rouleau. *« ! » la 

July, has worked for U Monde for 
a quarter century, covering rite 
Middle East and the Arab world. 
He will replace Gilbert Wnd as 
ambassador. .* 

□ 7 

The Staffer Brother won a re- 
cord-breaking six trophies Monday 
night a! the fan-voted Music City 
News country music awards in 
Nashville. Tennessee The former 
<y«pel group also, won the ciweted 
Entertainer of the Year award. Bui 
Barbara Mandrefi, making her first 
live appearance since an auto acci- 
dent last September, stole the show 
whet she was given the “firing leg- 
end" award, an accolade given to a 
performer who has been in the in- 
dustry for 25 years or longer. It was 
the fust public singing appeuau#: 
for Mandrel!, who is expecting her 
third child in September, sun* she 
was hospitalized with a broken le& 
severe concussion and other inju- 
ries. Mandrril 3ft. has been an ac- 
tive professional country music 
performer since she was 11 years 
old. “I promised a whDe back I 
would never ay ill was ever nmi- 
to win another award," Man- 
drel! said in a tearful acceptance 
speech, “But I didn’t expect it. This 
is a wonderful gifi and show of 
love,” she told the audience at the 
Grand Ok Opry House. Otto* 
multiple winners included lltv 
jodds, who were named Star of 
Tomorrow and Duo of the Year, 
and Lee Greenwood, who was 
named male vocalist of the year 
and won Single of the Year for 
“God Bless the U.S.A.” !Ww 
McEntire was named Female Vo- 
calist of the Year. 

□ 

Betsey Cushing Whitney, widow 
of the late John Hay WhirncjyU. S - 
ambassador to Great Britain in 
1957-61 and chairman of the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune, Ims do 
nated 58 million to Yale Utmost* 
for construction of an addition to 



is the daughter of the kite Or. Har- 
vey professor of neurosur- 

gery at Yale medical school. The 
library addition will be named for 
both men. both Yale graduates. 


WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 

FOUR WINDS INTL 

CALL US FOR YOUR NEXT MOVE 
PARIS (31 036 63 11 
LONDON (6l] 57S 66 11 


MOVING 


DEMEXPORT 

PARIS • LYON • MARSBUE 
ULLE a MCE 

Inti mawng by speoaks from motor 
ate m France la cl cite in the wood. 
Tafl free from France 16 JOS 24 10 82 
HIS ESTIMATES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


MOVING 


CONTOCX Combustors to 300 ate 
worldwide ■ Air/5ea. Cdl Chcrfe 
281 1861 Paris (near Opera] Cara too 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


HAVE A MCE DAY! Bold. Hove a 
nice day) Bote) 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ANNOlfNCEMENTS 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

PARS ON THE RUN. See (he world's 
mast beautiful aty in the comfort of 
your own shoes. For togging taura of 
Fans. Gtil 567 12 57. 

WIMBLEDON TICKETS avalahie. Se- 
ims / Finds. Book now. Can T-cke: 
Findera UK 01 -629 B633 ■' mob4e0826 
207722. Telex: 261376 LOWD G. 

PRODUCTION COMPANY seeks boy 
12-14 & 01(113-14 for film Aug rnd- 
5epi. Must ae peneetty Huent 

Eng’.vi & Frencn. foa - -? eraerience 
an'cssel. Apcicstiars w.s; cecteniiab 
£ photo !o Cas'ng e cur Fresh Co. 2° 
rue Veract. 75CCa Pans. Fiance. 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

CANNES MARINA. Smofl sturfo in 
hwh dres bwkkng with pool, near 
aSS dub. term, sea Free iufy- Au- 
gust. F4000. Tel- Para 524 6391 

JOANNFS PERSONAL SHOPPING. 

Women/men foshian service. Fun & 
wonderful smres. (fora 703 4667 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS m 

Engfrsh. Fans (dativl 674 £9 65 Ecmj 
6780320 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


ST. JEAN DE LUZ. July. House for 72 
people. 3 ha paric. All comforts. I km 
rromsea. FXffJQ Tel Sftl 00 96- 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


VAR IS mns. Si. Tiapex. Very beautiful 

• OOUOME Dcoroacns 4 DCRnL MOO 1 
room vrth shower. 500 sq.m, terrace. 
Large poaL Teim. 3 ha smock. Jufy; 
FSOjOOO. first 2 weeks of Aunt: 
3SJOO. fans 62241 81 moriwsT^ 

6AUX OE noVINCE. Beautiful mas, 
largo property. Tel 32S 81 70 Pons. 


PAGE 17 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


P 


ATT&mON EXECUTIVES 


i a third 
of a nuffibn mate vrarid- 
i wide, most of whom tot hi 
bittiness and industry, mtt 
toad B. Jot! fate us (Paris 
613595) Before 10a. m, en- 
suring that wo am fete you 
back, tmd your massage wtt 
appear within 48 hours. The 
rate is US. $9M or load 
aguiue imri par Urn. You must 
indude eamphta tmd varifr- 
able biffing address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


International Business Message Center 


BRAND NEW 
THE SUPHt GAME 
The Super-Seler blowing Rubiks 
Cube. Ev er yone con ploy if, on ras own 
or together with ceverd persons. For 
sole or toy mid gift shops, gas stations, 
deportment stores as wefl as promotion 
piece. For worldwide efatribution, we 
look far euxilert , first das 

• Licenced far selected markets or 

TTTOTt COJ 

• Minimum base cnprtd US$150,000 

• Turnover estimates, worldwide 

US$2 UEan 

• 601X000 tens dready said in 
Europe 

• Worldwide distribution through^ 
Inr'l Concept & Manageme n t AG 

Head Office- He^teuz 52 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES ? 


YES Invest in one of America's most 
exating tedwajogical fcrecddfetjugta in 
a bSon dollar industry. We tarn plant- 
ed me nut trees in 198* than any 
other developer in aw Site. 

High annual e tu nings assured far 
teWf W t- 


CHINA 

ARTS & CRAFTS 

HJJAN ARTS 6 CRAFTS (FAC) 


FI ■'9490 Vcdw 
T* 075-28155, Thu 719056 euro fl. 


INQUIRIES IWITHJ. 

Materidi avaiabte ft Engfrsh, French, 
German. Box 2358, Herald Tribune, 
92521 NeuiOy Codex, France 


SBMCE DEPARTMENT 

Whole & retail enquries invited for: 
Elegant, historic Fuchou Uxtftewore. 
Beajttful. unique in design, yet practi- 
cal, trays, bawls A oartomera ei o wide 
variety of styles. Exqumle mi matures 
sculptured r cork from cypress trees. 
More than 1 ,000 decorator items avail- 
able Shoushan Stone Carvings and 
Seats- ancient art carved from the 
stone. Among them, is the mast preooui 
YjSow Tan 'Stone, wfveh is more et- 
pemive than gold. Other authentic Fu:- 
hou arts & crabs include the famous 
Dehuo Porcofom. wrexLcrevma n«ry 
earwig, bnsded-grass products 
arid ba mboo products. 

Please contact us ah 
Mai Oder Service DepartmefS 
Chma NaMnoJ Arts & Oata Import 
& Export Corporation. Fuxcffi Brandt, 
or wan Trade Center, Wu S Rood. 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 

Meibng - Telephone - Telex 
Fvd secretarial services 
Isle of Man, Jersey, Guemesy, 
Gibraltar, Pcrama, Liberia, 
Luxembourg, Amite. LBC 
Ready made or speed. 

Free explanatory booklet. 

Baal reparations 
London representative 

Aston Company Formations 
Dept n, 8 Victoria St.. Dounfcr 
Isle of Mai. Tel: 0624 26591 
Telex 627691 SPIVA G 


CAUFORNA REAL ESTATE 

We provide die expertise in reserxeh. 
planning and oanonidion. Other avrd- 
able services can be provided in real 
estate law, management & loan etfor- 
matkxi. Send a brief statement of your 
interest and needs to- 

US Real Estate 

Investment & Development Services Inc 
500 Cteham House, ISO Regent St 
London W1R 5FA 
Tel: 01-734 5354 


Foreign 


Cable 


Fuzhou. Fu ion, Omta 
ARTCRAFT ' ' ' 


FUZHOU. 


(Pcnond purchases welcome too) 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LIB COMPANIES 

Incorporation and management ith UK. 
Isle of Mon. Turia. Angullo, Channel 
blonds. Panama. Liberia, Gibraltar and 
mew orher offshore ixeos. 

• Confidefind adno* 

• Immediate avaflaWrly 

• Nominee services 

• Bearer shares 

• Boat registrations 

• Accounting & odrr> narration 

• Med telephone & telex 

Ftm explanatory booklet from 
SELECT CORPORATE 
SBtVKES LTD 
Head Office 

Mt Pleasant Douglas, Me at Man 
Tali Douglas (0624) 23718 
Tate 628554 SELECT O 
London Represent™* 

2-5 Old Pond S., London W1 
Tri 01 -«j 4214. TU 50247 SC5LDN G 


PANAMA 

Consider operating uwemanorolfy, 
oarngMdy tax-free on a stnet eonfiden- 

Wrrte for informative, free brodure 
about the advantages of Panama cam- 
panes, convenient ship regsiranon, 
trail services, company management 
rhe advantages of Panama's finemdd 
center and i m m i tmert opportunities, in- 
ducing the Carftjbean Basrt Initiative. 
Wo are Panama's largest management 
company. 

wramsusT 

P.O. Bax 7440 

fo ia na 5, Republic of Panama 
Telephone: 63-6300 
Cable: INTERTRUST 
Telexes: 31S1 - 2708 INTRUST PG. 


INTERNATIONAL OFFSHORE 
COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 
ROM £110 

Comprehen si ve AdmniETratian. 
Nominee services. Powers of Aimnwy. 
Registered offices. Telex, telephone, 

moJ forward ng. 

Island Resources 

BaOaajrrie House. 
5ummerhiB, 

Isle of Man. 

Teh (0624) 28020-20240-28933 
Telex 628352 Island C-. 


YOUR SECOND NATIONALITY. For 
information write to; P. Oleseh Paste 
oemd. CR4003 Basel 


BUSINESS ASSISTANCE 
FINANCING. REAL ESTATE in 
foe PHUADQPHIA area USA 

WE PROVIDE 

Co n tac t. Universities, corporations 
PRIME loc u tions: urfaai/rard 
tnqh-ledi or business incubators 
NfcAX in ternational arport, rod, 
riverfront or major highways 
HHP YOU enter USA mortal 
reiocte or Start up Kpt coart 
cfo$e to New York & Washington 

Outey frying, superb tremsporfation 
cultural centers. 89 u ravera rties t 
colleges nearby WRITE TO 
Cari Russel, President. 8DC Inc 

3rd 8 Ave of States. Chester PA 19013 


COMMISSION AGENTS 
wanted m most Middle Ecs, European 
8 African countries for USA’s finest 
poke & emergency uetede kfljVi seen 
lyrterm. Mnmum rvesimenr of 52.000 
required for samples as product mist 
be sold via live demonstration to using 

UGHrWHGHTS NS) NOT APPLY 
Contact Larry Stewart. 
Wbelen Enjyneemg LN Stewart & 
Assootes. Ave Louse 368. Bax 10. 
1050 Brussels. Belgium. 


INFORMATION 

1 . Your bank with awn n 
in a country of Europe 

2. Your own insurance company oper- 
aUng m a country of Europe (USS120I 

3. Need money, to put an aaiviry on 
the market, to reactivate a sectar_o 
posubfty to be quoted in th e interna- 
tional stack exchange USS9S. 

Won + amount.'s & number • s infor- 
mation to 


16i rue Voltaire, 


PROVES (USA) 
altaira, CH-1201 


Geneva. 


FOR Offla FAaimB or tepresen- 
lotion in Europe Contact' Switzerland 

Th:sn.r 


2ND PASSPORT 35 COUNTRIES. 
GMC 26 UiHmcnow 5t.. 106 76 
Ainum. Croooe. 


WANTS FREE AGENTS FOR TIC 

promotion of a new way of commure- 
ctfton. leadership of ini emotional 
pubboty ii> 3 ctimensions. Write to 
Box 2399. Haudd Trtwte, 92521 
Neufly Cede*. France 


DISTRIBUTORS & AGENT5 

wan e d worldwide for ACOPEN. a 
brand new etecTrgnc pomJaBer, smell 
lire o gen & inex p ens i ve, con be used 
easily & safely by everyone to relieve 
body pans without meadne. 

Sates points: Pharmacies. Drugstores. 
Tax-free. Gift Shops, Betrorao, Beau- 
ty Shops. Department Stores. Pease 
write ta ACGPEN, Apartodo 754, 
Ibiza, Bctieores. Spam 


-SAINT LAURENT 

rive gauche 

Women’s shop 


19 ct 21 avenue Victor - Hugo 
75116 Paris Tel. m StHLfrl.fid 



GOLD 

Private owner of goldfield concession & 
looking for financing pa*1nnr. Put- 
tecud situation. High return n Ij.Si or 
iflAu metal, ta* Free, Confidential infor- 
mation only by a peraaod interview in 
Please write to: Box 


central Europe. 

2148. LKT., Fnednefotr. 15. 
Frankfirt/Man 


tiCQQ 


JEANS AND TROUSERS 
(STONE WASHED} 

Monufoctwors and exporters. 

MOOS FASHIONS Ltd 
5*h Floor, Sdoa Avenue Centre, 
RA lines, Karachi, Pe tfo qt 
Tafox: 28079 JEANS PK. 

Teh 525216. 525217. 52521 B 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T-SHIRT F0T05 
NOW IN BJU COLOR 

m allcash busmen thot can earn you 
$8000 - SI 0,000'' month New and used 
systems From $9500 • $26300. 
fata, Detf. J12, Postfadt 170340, 
6000 Frartidurt/W. Gecmcny. 

Tel: 069-747808 TLc : 412713 KEMA 


ACQUISITIONS 

Funds-Trusts-Incfividuids or Companies 
searching for ooguattians of <*gos- 
gold-%4ver producing ventures, contact 
Mr Angle, British Contnanweanfi Secu- 
rities, TO Bax 396. Point Roberts, Wmh 
98281 USA grieng datois of your rfflur- 
te) in first liter. AD injuries oonfiden- 
hoL Td: 206-945 8973. 


YOUK OWN COMPANY tN 

SWITZERLAND 

ZURICH - ZUG - LUZERN 
From SF500 per annum - up. 
Confidesa Baaierstr. 36, O+O300 Zug 
Teh 0041 42 Zl 32 88, ^hu B6 49 ll 

A Present for Your Son 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADE EASY 

Busnessmenj Temporary 8 permanent 
residence visas; sat up business in ISA. 
transfer key personnel, expend yaw ex- 
isting business. Write fix Free info to 
Aitomey David frfirson, 14795 Jeffrey 
Rd. —208. Irvine, CA 92714 USA. 
714/651-802(h Ibu STO194. 


IN U.S. - FOR MULTINATIONALS 
CPA REM 

Inrl & US. tax planning, accounting, 
fmanod & business serytaes - red es- 
tate. HTvertments. operating companies. 

HAROLD GOUXTHN 1 CO. 

225 W. 34 SL, New York. NY 10122. 
TK- 226000 ETUCUR Ref. Gddeagle 


MAIL ORDSl SBTVtCB 

• YOUR MAILING ADDRESS 

• MAIL-FORWARDING SERVICE 

• PACKAGING 8 FULTUlMQiT 

SB! VICE IN RJROPE. 
tVM AG. Weintergctr. 72 
8042 Zurkh. Tel: (Oil 363 38 44 
Tlx 59140 Telefax (01) 3633018 


SOUTH AMBUCA INFORMATION 

Disaee), re table consulting fer 
2nd Svefihood. rmidtmce penal, 
naturdization in a stable country. 
Indvidud wishes can be considered 
Please write to: Box 2154, LKT, 
Fnedrichstr. 15. 6000 Frankfurt / Man 
or tel: fcXT-22 1/551 822. 


SOAP AM> DETERGENT 
MANUFACTURING RANT 

Re-condmoned. 


, . . of medum copaaty, re- 

quired far export to a West African 
counrry. Please contact: 

SHAREN AG, 


. 94 

6300 Zua Swberiand 
Tel: W2/31 74 34. Tlx 065429 ASTR CK 


PANAMA COMPANIES with nominee 
directars and confidential Swiss / Pan- 
ama bonk account formed in <3 hours 
or teody-made. Offshore bants 
formed for S70QD. Currenoas or funds 
moved mto Evxocwrency time deposit 
cceounts with m free interest and 
guaranteed ananytmty fiat depositors. 
Monet, 10 PorV Place, St iontes's, 
London SWlA 1LT. Tek 01-408 20QT. 


YOUNG FASMON DESIGNER look 


uig for financial partner to open a 
fosfwn shop m Pun 8th, Faubourg St. 
Honort, to sell her dmgrs Good 
potential dtemele. Hoh quality range 
of custom-made modek at t eady-fo. 
wearcnces. Far inf or nation, cah (U 
738 28 45 after 8 pm write Mme. C 
Bouqu'n, 1 1 rue Soyer. 92300 NeuJSy 
s/Sane. France. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

US MARKETING RRM 

Seeks unique auto ft hardware items to 
set hi US. Strong rash position & ohv 
tarts erxfotes. us to move qrndety an 

pnnapalae taint venture baas. NCZ. 49 

W. 57»„ NT NY 10019. TeL 212-371- 
4656 Tlx: 428511. 

U.S. WVESTMOIT RRM wiU provide 
Funds for any worth while venture for 
the US. market Ta arrange meetings 
in Europe between June 21 and Jixy 
30, contoa Gould and Assoaates. 
Suite 600, 255 AKxnbraGrele, 33134 
Carol Gables, Ra Tel: (305) 441 13 
33, telex 750 595 NVESTIAW 

BROKERS/INVESTMBn Advisors re- 
quired to represent Investment ftw- 
aon SC InsurmcB Gxnpcny offcrmg 
high return investments. Contort 
Rayco, Keceregradw 62, 1015 CS Am- 
sterdexn. NelfwrlandTtei: 31 (0) 20- 
231804. Tlx 16183 (NL] or Tel London. 
01-437 6384. 

MANUFACTURER SfflCS REGULAR 

importers, eufuave agents in oil coun- 
tnei for prafitifola cosmetic line. Rock- 
bottom pnees. super Quality Write 
now: PO Bax 2733, 08080-Barcelcna 
Tb 97606 (Spain). 

MONTPARNASSE. Paris, magntertf 
restaurant-cobarot, garden terrexe. 
F2J00.0D0. For detexts write flax 
2366, Harold Tribune. 92571 Neully 
Cedes. France 

LADY 1ST CLASS references PR. high 
level contacts m Midde Eost, Criraibe- 
an, Europe, seeks resodate with capi- 
tal, Ruent EngSsh. French. Serious c6- 
Fen ortiy. TetPoris 288 48 2ft 

UK CO. SSL* OUTLETS Waridunde 
fix large quantities of new Mercedes, 
BMW & Porsche to my spec, ft imme- 
efrote dekvery. Howk Industries Ltd. 
Td (07421 701589. Tb 547554 Cbuce 

COMPUTERS for busnwss and pencxx- 
ol use. Authorized dealer for IBM. 
Apple, others. Best pnees. Col Mr. 
Lawrence, Pons 563 2989/ 348 3000 

WORLDWIDE VB4TURE CAPITAL 

Please write your requirements m axv 
hrience ta Box 2316. Herald Tnbune, 
92521 NeuRy Cede*, France. - 

TOP PARIS DESGNBTS HEIN oofl ac- 
tion 'dagriffoe'. Boutigue Encore. Pre- 
sage Zurcher, 45 Ave du Caano. 
Montreux. Swfraeriond 

PANAMA LIBERIA. CORPORATIONS 
from US$4» owrfobte now. Tel 
(0634k 20240 Telex: £28352 ISLAND 
G. fvn UK). 

GSCALOGY, FAMILY UNE tracing 
Belgiuin. coot of arms, tides. nobSty 
adoption. Please write PVM. Chateau, 
87907 Grandmefz. Bekyum. 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

WTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC 

UiA l WORLDWIDE 

A complete personal ft business service 
prewiring a unique coHeaian of 
t^wted, veraatfle & muhtfirnud 
indfoduab for ail saod ft 
promotiand ocasians. 
213-765-7793 
212-765-7794 

330 W. 56th St., N’r.C 10019 
S*wce Kepresentativa 

Needed Worldwide. 

OFFSHORE SERVICES 

UX non resident compemes mth 
wnenee efireetara. barer shorn and 
confidential bank accounts, Full bocteup 
ft support services. Panama ft Ltencm 
companies. Bn* ran confidential 
professional services. 

J-P-C.IL. 17 WMegota St., London 
E?7HP. Tal: 01 377 U7A Tly.- §93911 G 


OFFICE SERVICES 


OFHCE SERVICES 


INTERNATIONAL BUSHES operar- 
teg successfully wcrldwide for over 25 
yean, with main offioe in tax haven, 
for sole: SR 6 mJSan. Thu includes 
oho knowhow. Con be operated 
from ofrnmJ rety pan of the world, 
and 4 nxhndarrfe. For information 
•wife to-. Box 2163, IW,T„ Fnedndtjtr. 
IS. 6000 Frankfurtr'Main 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


PROMOTIONS SB? VICES 

PubScrty ■ Adverting - MorLwng • 
Technical Editing for compare seeking 
to do business m USA. Ojr 1 0th year re 
fat. refroble sernse. Cor-taC* ttobjrt 5. 
Wcxx. President, War 1 PuHishmg Com- 
pany. 1571 K S:.. tJ.W.. Wcshmgton, 
DC 20005. 

(2021 783-1887, Washington D.C 
J212J 925-1997 NYC 
lUrec 3725487 AO U 

YOUR OF»a ADDRESS IN 

SWITZERLAND 

Fuly mtergrated busr*ss services, 
phone.' telex/ mail services, trgnskaicra 
/ adm miration. Kurmann Business Ser- 
vices. Santanfnre. CH-1713 ST-Anlwi, 
Switzerland. Tlx.- 942661 0(rei Kurmannl 

BaekuKs Ssnrire In Luxembourg 
ArraurSing/compreiy formations + 
manogemert/secretanal.' phone/ te- 
tec mol Ctxma finsre. 12-14 Bd. 
cTAvranches, 1160 Luxembourg. Phone: 
(+35-2} 492153. Tbe 1433. 

OVERSEAS EMPLOYMENT Newslet- 
ter. tt-mortWy with hundreds of |Ob 
operxnre m A4idde-Enst, Asia Europe. 
Amen & South Amancn. For free 
Niformreion write: Myderet CansJ- 
Ksrds Lid, 8 Vienna St. Dougkn, hie 
af Mai, UX. 

PRIVATE DETECTIVE SCANDINAVIA 
ft Finland, col Norway: 24 hours 02- 
42 72 14. Tlx 18949 Agent. Manager 
G. IteUev, former poeca.- remy on- 
cer, contacts worldwide. Past to Jem- 
benetorget 4, N-0154 Oslo 1 Norway 

SW (UK] MANAOEMBIT ft Person- 
nel, ski Bed British tabor applied for 
the offshore aanstrochon industry 
worldwide. 576 Warwick Rd. Trfey. 
Bvtnngtiam 11, England. Tel: (321) 
707 0910 

HONG KONG, YOUR TAX Shelter. 
re-invoKmg center, nonitwas, trade 
rea, bridge for Cfwia marker, at Roam 
923. Star House. T.5.T. Hong Kong. 
TU, 39644 DSMGT Tet 3/72(1833 

HOW TO GET a Second Passport, re- 
port. 12 ooixitries analyrnd DetaSs: 
WM\ 45 Lyndhurar Terrace, Ste. SOI. 
Central, Hang Kang. 

TAX SERVICES 

US TAX - Ml paying aver S50M to RS 
re cansany hypo tax^ Leoafly abate 
by tJalmjf tax Ftexxm NOW. Write 
LLS.T.C Inc, Darra 17:28002 Madrid 
Telex 47645 

US MCOME TAX rehirns ad audri 
by froksaonds. Paris 563 91 23. 

HUD YOUR US TAX RETURN? Paris 
based US CPA vriB beta. 359 63 01 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

180 Days-9.40% 

WGHEST YtaD5 ON CD's 

FOR VARIOUS MATURITIES 

FULL FHJEEAL INSURANCE 

ON EVERY AMOUNT DBOSTTH) 

CUSTODIAN-TRANSFER AGENT 

Chose Manhattan Bank 

FOR INFORMATION CALL- 

MASTSRJND 

INVBTMENT ADVISOR 

575 Madison Aw, NY, NY 10022 
Td: 212-888443) Tlx.- 125864 

CCXiATEBAL available from Prune 
Sonia. A comprehensive service for 
arbitrage purposes. V* supply J re- 
range: a] dean company sheds, b) 
statements af purpose or arbitrage 
loans, d fidudrey bank accounts, d) 
coHaterd, e) caHaterd notification by 
tdex re hard copy. Please contact our 
London offices - 01 244 9592 ' 01 385 
5492 / 01 930 8926. Tlx B951622 
TARRCOG 

USA SNTHTTAWMBNT COMPANY 
Seeks investors ($10,000 - $250jQOOI for 
Utahan Square Garden events. Atkwi- 
fcc Gty shows, rock ft roll taws. Short ft 
longterm projertsavadeble. Jam others 
freexdmwfuri investing. DETAILS: RME 
Op, 71x131113 TTCOR/71 Lake Rd, 
Ste. 100, Atenhasset. NY 11030 


PANAMA N IAN co rporations provide 
the adwntaget of cor^tiete conficUn- 
noity, zero fa* tafoirty & US ddkr 
currency ertvirormem We offer conn 
pony formation services an a fast, 
refabie and oompatitive bests We 
are pcenculnriy interested in lotting 
up wrth offshore business consuliaRii 
m other countries. Contact H !. Dor- 
btgtan, FOB 1327, Pcrana 9A, Perns- 
ma Thu 3121 KUtKA PG. Tef. 23- 
0834 or 234819 (eves 236779). 

Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de i'Evangle, 75018 Paris 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


HAVE 05. DOLLARS TO exchange 
for Swiss Fraro> Lira Will aha bor- 
row large sums of Swiss Francs. 5 or 
ID yeara. Have Pronxssory note. Tel 
Switzerland. Zurich 36 1 6500 ctf 
065/491 362 


US AGWOimilAL investments 
$100,000 minimum, i» tnemmum. 
Contact.- Agborfc tec., P.O. Bax 429, 
Boudette. MN 56623 USA. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Fine dkxnands in any pnoe range 
at lowest wholesale prices 
cfirect from Antwerp 
center of the efianond world. 
FiA guarantee. 

For fan price Kst write 
Joachim GaMenetein 


Established 1928 
Pefikaanstroot 62, B-2018 Antwerp 
Belgium - Tei & 3) ZJ4 07 51 
TU: 71779 syl h. At the Dtancmd Gub. 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

D1AMONDLAND 

The largest showroom in 

Antwerp, Diamond Gty 

Appebnanstr 33A. TeL 323/2343612 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Your Offioe in Germany 

M are “At Your Servica" 

• Complete office senrices at two 
piestiga odAessw. . 

• Fully equipped offices far Ihe short 
term or the long lartn. 

■ biternobonoOy tiyined office and 
’ ' 1 swf at your aspaati 

used as ytxr corpo- 
tr Germany/ Europe. 

• Your bumes operation can start 
immedately. 

Lairus Busness Savins GmbH 

Lorco-Hous om Hotdiausenparic 
Justimanstrosse 22 
6000 Frankfurt am Mew I 
Gentxxiy 
Tet 0611-590061 
Telex: 414561 


profcMiond Stan 
• Can be legally u» 
rate domicile far ' 


KARSTENS BU5BOSS 
SERVICES 

r ._ offices fo rent. Domidfi- 

. telex AphoneJ. Trade. sties 

odmimbcfkxi & seaetond lervces. 


G04EVA 

FuOyi 


Teh (22} 


5 foe de Chene, 1207 Geneva 
B6 17 33, At 


428388 KBS 


ROME - Short/loog term rant. Yow 
own prestigious business office locat- 
ed between Via Veneto & Pkma efi 
Spogna. At your tfepasaL secretrey. 
Itx. iranslasora, arniptnera, phones. 
Can N.Y. 212-5058772 


COLOGNE / BOM4/ DUSSHDORF. 
Your office service inducSng interpret- 
ing & busmen consultation. Brjaite 
LOpez Corona, Sdteffebtr. 41. SXX) 
Kaeh 41, West-Get many Tek (0} 221 
43 47 Bl, everxngs 


WORiD-WIDE 
BUSINESS CENTRES 

Famhhed Executive Offices 
ComaWe with SecratoM, Tdex 
AAw in ii tr afive, Carporato 
Representation 6 Other FacWiee 

AMSTERDAM Eura Business Center 
Kazeragr. 99. 1015 CH Amsterdam 
227635. Telex: 161 B3 
ATHENS Executive 5erwces, Athens 
Tower B, Suite 506. Athens 610. 

TeL GOT] 7796 232 Tele*: 216343 
BOMBAY: Rrfoeja Chambers. 213 
Normal Point, Bombay 400 021. 
TeL 244949. Tete* 01 1-6897. 
BRUSSELS: 4. Rue de la Presse 
1000 BrassA. Tofc 217 83 o0 
Telex: 25327 

DUBAI: P Q Box 1515. DNATA 
Airline Centre Dubai, UAE 
TeL 214565 Tete 48911 
LONDON: 110 The Strand, 

London WC2R OlAA, 

TeL nil 836 8918, fbu 24973 
MADRID: C/Oensa N> 664, 

28020 Madrid Tel 270 56 00 or 
270 £6 04. Telex: 46642 
MILAN: Vfa Baccacao X 
20123 Milan. Tel 86 75 B9/B0 59 279 
Telex: 320343 

NEW YORK 575 Macfaon Avenue 
New York. NY 10022 TeL (2*21605- 
0200. Telex: 125864'/ 237699 
PARIS: BOS, 15 Avenue Victor Hugo 
75116 Paris. TeL 502 18 00 
Telex: 620893F. 

ROME: Vn Savaia 78. 00198 Borne. 
TeL 85 32 41 - 844 80 70 . 

Telex: 613458 

SINGAPORE: 111 North Bridge Rd 
#114)4/06 Perxnsufci PlamTS'Fbra 
0617. Tel: 3366577. 1W 36033. 
ZUIBCH- Renmwg 32, 8001 Zurich 
Tet 01/214 61 TT 
Telex: Bl 2656/81 2981. 


AN OFFICE IN LONDON'S 
MAYFAIR ANY TIME YOU 
Nffi) IT 

Began!. comptefoV vmccd offices 
and meeting rooms, by the Saw. dov 
week. For farther detail of menfafship 
and a color brochure, contact 

NGHTV4GAU No 3. Berkeley Squwe 
London W1 

Td- +44 1 629 6116 p4ln| 
Tete: 267383 p4 hours) 


OtGLAltth EXECUTIVE fur nahed w 
viced offices one hour from London ct 
a fraction of London costs Secreton- 
. aL vwxdprossEsang, telex, Fox, pho- 
tocopying etc Short dr long term 
from CIO per day. Bioofce Hcmm Busi- 
ness Centre, Market Square. Ayles- 
bury Bucks Telephone 0296 
or telex 838811 fer tfrpfo. 


YOUROfflGE IN CENTRAL MADRID 
+ m eeting roam & telex. Af services 
ta dart business Lend & faanad 
cansdfaog. GAM, VoSehemsBO 16, 
28015 Madnd. Tlx 44977 GAP At 


PAHS ADDRESS, 

Smce 1957. liP, provides mid, i 
telex, meeting rooms. 5 rue d Arturs, 
. 7500ft Tet 35> 4704. The 642504 


RUSSB5 ADDRESS. Mol offices. 

& latex, secretarial tennees. 

Men Butiras Center. TeL 
517 92 11(12 hnesinx: 61344 B 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


MONVBBjGIUM. Rcm + or • 200 
sq^t, of 1st daa fumrshed offices 
kwoted «i renter of active town. Tele- 
phone, telex, secretarial services. Tel 
Betpium 32 65/347*42. 


Our container owning clients shared in earnings of 

£4.80 Million in 1982 
£4.45 Million in 1983 
£5.80 Million in 1984 
£7.40 Million in 1985^^ 


As a growth industry containerisation continues in 
an uptrend and SHDLLS1AR is ai the forefront in 
magimieirig this advantage for the benefit of in over 
2,000 CLIENTS. 

The lay to profitable contains* ownership is 
management — not frivolous claims of fixed income 
return. As the facts prow - Shirlstar management 
delivers and these are the facts: 

SHUtLSlAR has over $36 mSlkm under 
management 

s hirt /S TAR has an annual turnover in excess of 
$15mfllku 

SfflRLSTAK is the 6th fastest growing independent 
U.K. company according oo a reviesfr conducted by 
"four Business' m a g a zin e in Sept. 1984 

SHIRLSTAR has the strength of 12 years of 
profitable operating experience 
SHIRLSTAR has a computerised reporting system 
providing ; regular location analysis of its over 1^500 
container TEU's under management 


SHIRLSTAR has subsidiary companies and agencies 
in Germany, France, Italy, Holland, Norway, 
Sweden, Brazil, Panama, Bahamas, Nigeria, 
Portugal, Ireland, UJV.E, Australia and leading 
international ports 

SHIRLSTAR pays its clients quarterly a gross 
rlnllar income 

SHIRLSTAR'S directars are> 

Sir Beniamin Slade, Bt, 

The Hon. Robin Cayzer 
The Hon. John Sfceffiflg&w, 

CA.E. Braithwahe, MA 

SHIRLSTAR delivers ro yon bankable profits whilst 
protecting your capital investment 

A trade in container leasing can have very substantial 

tax benefits for both companies and individuals 

depending upon your country of residence. 

SHIRLSTAR 



If yon would like to learn more about container ownership contact: 

SHIRLSTAR CONTAINER Name - 

INTERNATIONAL SALES OFFICE rt*. 

KEIZERSGRACHT 534 Td. Umce 

1017 E* AMSTERDAM 
TELEPHONE: (020) 272822 Address. 

TELEX: 14663 WESCO NL 


IHTS 


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