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V.-rq^ri . • . 



The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
.Zurich, 
^Singapore, 
rille 


INTERNATIONAL 





iTA APPEAR ON PAGE 16 


Published With The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 


No. 31,822 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


‘«V 


U.S. Considers Mideast Talks 




By European, Asian Allies 




1 'O ii 


By Bernard Gwerrzman 

New York Tima Service 

W ASHINGTON 1 — The Reagan 
administration is considering orga- 
nizing a Middle East peace confer- 
ence of allies in Europe and Asia as 
a compromise to meet contradic- 
■ lory concerns of Israel and Jordan. 

Officials hoe stressed Tuesday 
that the idea was farfrom complete 
but added that there had beat some 
' J-discusrions about it with allies. 

’ Described by an official as “a 
V good guys" conference, its purpose 

• would be to provide King Hussein 
^ of Jordan with the international 
' ‘'umbrella” he insists he needs for a 

Jordan- Palestinian delegation to 
negotiate directly with Israel 

And this could be done by a 
conference of allies without invit-. 
-• ing the Soviet Union to participate; 
' as King Hussein wants. 

Prime Minister Shim on Peres or 
' Israel outlined Monday a five- 
■- point plan as an alternative. 

- ‘ He and other Israelis have made 
''it dear that they strongly oppose 
Middle East peace t alks that would 
» include the Soviet Union. 

The United States shares Israel's 
: unwillingness to have the Soviet 
;• Union present, even though in 
~ 1973, after the Arab-Israeli war 
that year, the United States and the 
Soviet Union cochaired a peace 
conference in Geneva. 

Officials said that many ideas 
-■ were being discussed, indnding one 

• in which the United Nations Secu- 
rity Council would gjve its blessing 
to direct negotiations. . . 

But the officials acknowledged 
that the Soviet Union would un- 
^doubtedly veto such an approach. 


As for the Peres plan, the Reagan 
administration adopted a de- 
liberately positive approach, refus- 
ing to engage in polemics with the 
Israeli l eader an points contrary to 
U.S. policy. 

Bernard Kalb, the State Depart- 
ment spokesman, said the plan of 
Mr. Peres “is yet another reflection 
of the momentum toward direct 
negotiations that is currently build- 
ing, in (he re^oo, and that we hope 
will continue.” 

King Hussein has said that the 
first step should be a meeting be- 
tween the United States and a Jor- 
daniao-PaJ estinian group to decide 
cat details. 


advanced the prospects for Middle 
East peace. 

Senator Robert J. Dole of Kan- 
sas, the majority leader, and Sena- 
tor Richar d G. I-iigar of In diana , 
chairman of (he Foreign Relations 
Committee, pressed Mr. Shultz 
about the administration's plans to 
sell Jordan an advanced fighter 
plane, such as the F-20. and two 
anti-aircraft systems. Seventy sena- 
tors have signed a resolution, op- 
posing such sales before Jordan be- 
gins peace talks with Israel 


The United States has said it 
would be willing to take part in 
such talks provided that none of 
the Palestinians were members of 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion and that the meeting would 
wihwnee rhartm for direct negotia- 
tions. 

King Hussein and the PLO have 
said such a meeting should be fol- 
lowed by a conference to which the 
five permanent members of the Se- 
curity Council would be invited, 
along with Middle Eastern nations. 

The Jordanian monarch has said 
it would be better to have the Sovi- 
et Union take part in negotiations, 
rather than having it trying to sabo- 
tage the talks from the outside. 

Secretary of Stale George P. 
Shultz went to the Senate Tuesday 
morning for a closed-door discus- 
sion of. the Middle East with Re- 
publican leaders. According to sev- 
eral participants, he repeated the 
administration's view that King 
Hussein's visit to Washington had 


■ Paris Ready for Talks 

The French minister for external 
affairs, Roland Dumas, tokl the 
National Assembly on Wednesday 
that France was ready to meet with 
a J ordanian- Palestinian delegation 
as pan of the peace search,- The 
Associated Press reported from 
Paris. 

“The European Economic Com- 
munity, in the next few days, will 
decide an the request by the Jorda- 
nian- Palestinian delegation for a 
meeting." Mr. Dumas said during a 
debate on foreign affairs. 

“Everybody knows that the Pal- 
estinian question is at the heart of 
the Lebanese drama," he said. 
‘Trance, in its quality as a member 
of the UN Security CounriL has 
been asked to receive this delega- 
tion. " 




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ESTABUSHED 1887 


id, Lisbon 


Prime Minister Mario Soares of Portugal, center, welcomed bis Spanish counterpart, 
Felipe Gwzflez, left, and Spain’s foreign minister, Fernando Morin, to Lisbon. 


Russians Linked to Radio Bomb Plot 


Agca Says Turks Were Enlisted to Attack Radio Free Europe 


By John Tagliabue 

JVrw York Times Service 


■ U.S. Home Backs Israel Aid 
The U.S. House of Representa- 
tives approved Tuesday S I .5 billion 
in emergency aid for land after 
rejecting an attempt to delete $500 
million for Egypt, The Associated 
Press said in a dispatch from Wash- 


ROME — The Turkish 
who shot Pope John Paul II testi- 
fied Wednesday that the Soviet 
Union had commissioned rightist 
Turkish terrorists to blow up the 
Radio Free Europe station in Mu- 
nich that broadcasts to Soviet bloc 
countries. 

M ehm eL Ali Agca, who was con- 
victed in the May 1981 shooting, 

aim said tha i Bul garian nffiriak in 

Rome had sought to enlist him in 


to assassinate President Ha- 
rib Bourgniba of Tunisia, fanner 
Prime Minister Dorn Min toff of 
Malta, and Lech Walesa, the Polish 
labor leader. 

He made his comments Wednes- 
day as he testified for the fifth day 
in the trial of three Bul garians and 
four Turks charged with comptirity 
ina plot to IriD the pope. Only one 
Bulgarian and two of the Turkish 
defendants are in custody in Italy. 

The others are being tried in absen- 
tia. 

Mr. Agca discussed the alleged 


Syria Is Seen 
As Stymied 
In Lebanon 


F0MS 




John Kifner 

New York Jima Service 

DAMASCUS ~ Syria's efforts 
<-• #,:■:* to impose its own order on Leba- 
“ “ ''non have bogged down in that 
1 ■spun try’s intractable feuds, accord- 
to diplomats and to Lebanese, 


'Palestinian and Syrian sourras here 


Hi 


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S-. » 1 




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S i * 


it 


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.. , ..'/and in BeiruL 
_ ‘ — — There is little prospect, these 
*.:n ‘0; sources say, that President Hafez 
, \ V • al-Assad will send Syrian troops 
v ■■■-*' into Beirut anytime soon to put an 
%£’ end to the fitting, the latest in a 
decade of dvfl war. 

And negotiations conducted by 
First Vice Presideni Abdel Halim 
Khaddam and - various factions 
’■■ ■■* have been suspended. 

The Lebanese Drnze leader, Wa- 
lid Jumblat, had been attempting 
. to mediate an end to the most seri- 
- • • ous of the current clashes, the war 
between Shiite fighters and Pales- 
tinian guerrillas holed up in refugee 
settlements on Beirut’s southern 
fringe, but he has not been seen 
. here Tor days. Nabib Bern, head of 
the Shiite Antal militia, who was 
supposed to meet with Mr. Khad- 
dam last week, has yet to show up. 

The breakdown in these negotia- 
tions is clear-cut: The Shiites want 
die Palestinians to surrender all 
their weapons; the Palestinians, 
fearful that they would be slaugb- 
*■' ■' tered, refuse. 

The Syrian-sponsored negotia- 
tions have centered on the fofiow- 
, ' ; ing three issues: 

• The three-week battle for the 

- ' Palestinian refugee settlements of 

Sabra, Cbatila and Boige Barajni, 
- pining the Syrian-allied Shiites 
against the Palestinians, including 
^^some guerrillas from Syrian- 
. — - — backed factions. 

.mi’IlV • The situation in Jezzine, a 
■ 1 ‘ ‘ r Christian mountain town in south 
Lebanon, which is surrounded by 
Moslem militias and defended by 
South Lebanese Army, the 
Christian-led militia that Israel 
hopes mil police the southern “se- 
curity zone" it has established in 
that area. 

• The overall, fundamental, 
.question of political change and 
■■ control in Lebanon, which has been 

at the heart of the last 10 years of 
fighting. Inevitably, this wul mean 
that toe embattled Christian mi- 
' nority must give up some of the 
power and privilege it has fought to 
* - keep. 

Hope for a solution grew in Leb- 
anon when Presideni Amin Ge- 
mayel came to Damascus for talks 
in May. Diplomats said that those 
talks were believed to have indud- 
c ed as much as 12 hours of private 
a. sessions with Mr. Assad. 

'JY- 5 But “the summit has not pro- 
*' duced anything on a political or a 

u security solution,” said a Palestin- 

ian source, using the word security 
. : * in the Lebanese sense, as a euphe- 
. - mism for the fighting. 

An indication of the intractabil- 
ity of the situation was the com- 
•' pieie lack of information, or even 

^(speculation, about the Gemayel- 
— rf/tj Assad meetings in theBriruinews- 
CZ lr papers, which span most political 

f l positions. 

/ “i have never seen in 20 years 
h a blackout in the. Lebanese 
” a Western diplomat said. . 
Syrian officials have been telling 
diplomatic visitors in recent days 



Experts Say 
Letters Show 


Mengele Tie 


The Associated Pros 


SAG PAULO — Police hand- 
writing experts said Wednesday 
that they had found “15 points of 
similarity” in notes seized from a 


house where Dr. Josef Mengede had 
in what , 


Hijackers of a Jordanian jetliner Mew up the Boeing 727 in Beirut on Wednesday after releasing the passengers. 


Beirut Hijackers Free Passengers , Blow Up Plane 


allegedly lived and in what has 
been described as his application in 
Nazi Germany to join the SS. 

"The texts were written by the 
same person but at different peri- 
ods,” said Derio Mota, an investi- 
gator for the Criminal Research 
Institute in Minas Gerais State. 

A copy of the SS document had 
been supplied by Josef Nichtb- 
auser, a survivor of the Auschwitz 
death camp who now lives in Minas 
Gerais, Mr. Mota said. 

Dr. Mengele, known in Ausch- 
witz as the “Angel of Death,*' is 
accused of sending 400,000 Jews to 
their deaths during the time he was 
at the Auschwitz camp toward the 
end of World War IL 


The Assoamed Press 
BEIRUT — The group that hi- 
jacked a Jordanian airliner here 
Tuesday released 66 passengers 
and crew members on Wednesday 
and then blew up the plane, but the 
fate of right Jordanian security 
agents aboard the aircraft re- 
mained in question. 


A spokesman far the Jordanian 
airline. Aha, said that the marshals 
were in Beirut with the airline’s 
manager there, but airport and Red 
Cross officials -repotted (hat the 
marshals were killed in the explo- 
sion. Security sources said that they 
were taken away by Shiite Moslem 
militia men 


. *5 


In Cyprus, -meanwhile, a mao 
aimed with a grenade took over a . 
Middle East Airlines plane from 
Beirut on Wednesday just before it 
landed at Lamaca airport, airport 
sources said. The man released the 
passengers but held the crew and 


an airline official hostage, demand- 
ing to be flown to Amman aboard a 
Jordanian plane, they said. 

The man later left the plane in 
the company of police. It was un- 
clear whether he surrendered or 
was overpowered by security men. 

On the matter of (he Jordanian 
air marshals, Munib Toukan, vice 
president of Alia, said in Amman: 
“Our manager says he has them. 
They’re in good health." 

Security sources said that the 
eight marshals were taken off the 
Boeing 727 before dawn “for ques- 
tioning” by members of the Shiite 
militia, AmaL The sources said the 
Shiites were holding the men at a 
Beirut stronghold and would free 
them later. 

Bui a Lebanese Red Cross offi- 


An airport official confirmed the 
report and added that the hijackers 
had “disappeared.” 

Die Swedish pilot of the hijacked 
airliner, Ulf Sultan, said that the 
hijackers fled the plane with the 
marshals as hostages before it was 
blown up. “We have been assured 
by the hijackers that they are safe," 
he said. 

Teams of aimed security guards 
have flown on all Alia flights since 
the airline’s offices in Athens, 
Rome and Vienna were bombed in 
March. 


tried twice to land in Tunisia but 
was refused landing pennisacm, re- 


fueled in Sicily, returned to Beirut, 
d to fly to 


and then 
t on Tuesday 


dal, who watched three explosions 
apart said: “The 
dials were blown 


rip the plane a; 


, said: “lbe mar- 
up inside the 
plane. Their bodies are in pieces. 
We couldn't get to them." 


The hijackers, identified by Mr. 
Sultan as Amal militiamen , were 
demanding that all Palestinian 
guerrillas leave Beirut for T unis ia, 
where the Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization now has its headquar- 
ters. Various reports put the num- 
ber of hijackers at four and six. 

The plane was hijacked Tuesday 
in Beirut It stopped in Cyprus, 


attempted 
came back to 
might. 

Leaders of the Amal militia were 
kg' figures in negotiations with the 
hijackers after their return to Bei- 
rut. At least one Amal official was 
seen entering the plane ou the Bei- 
rut airport runway. 

One of the passengers said that 
the hijackers were armed with Ka- 
lashnikov rifles but that there had 
been no shooting aboard the plane. 

In Wednesday's incident in Cy- 
prus, passengers fled the Middle 
East Airlines Boeing 707 as soon as 
it taxied to a stop. 

The hijacker told passengers that 
he was a Palestinian and that he 
had seized the Lebanese jet in re- 
taliation for the hijacking and 
blowing up of the Jordanian airlin- 
er in Beirut. 


Dr. Mengele, who went to 
Auschwitz from the Russian front, 
made selections as Jews arrival by 
train, waving people unfit for labor 
directly to the gas chambers and 
others to barracks for workers. 


where they had at least a slight 
lined the 


chance to survive. He remained 
last major Nazi war criminal whose 
fate was uncertain. 

Police are hying to determine 
whether a man who drowned six 
years ago on a Brazilian beach was 
Dr. Mextgele, as his son, Rolf Men- 
gele, said Tuesday in West Germa- 
ny. 

Romeu Toma, head of the feder- 
al police in SSo Paulo and chief 
investigator in the Mengele case, 
said Tuesday the SS document that 
Mr. Nichthauser bad provided was 
a copy of the original, which the 
U.S. government lent to Brazil to 
aid in the search. 

Mr. Mota said the points of sdmi- 


(Continaed'on Plage 7, CoL 5) 




» »-JV 


Karen Ann Quinlan Dies After 10 Years in Coma 

She Was at Center of Debatemthe US»onD^mitioncf]^e 9 Ri^toDie 




(Continued ou Page 7, CoL I) 


By Robert D. McFadden 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — - Karen Ann 
Quinlan, 31, ' who sltoped into a 
coma 10 years ago and became the 
center of a national debate on the 
definition of life' and the right to 
die, has died at a nursing home in 
New Jersey. 

Miss Quinlan was pronounced 
dead at 7:49 P.M. Tuesday, the 
Moris County sheriff’s office said. 

{Dr. James wolf said Wednesday 
the cause of death was “respiratory 
failure following acute pneumonia 
on top of a. chronic vegetative 
state," The Associated Press re- 
ported. - 

[Joseph -and Julia Quinlan were 
daily visitors to their daughter’s 
bedside. Dr. Wolf said the moment 
of death was “one of great rever- 
ence and sense of loss I could 
read^ in Julia's face, who was em- 
bracing Karen and was weeping 
quietly." . 

[Mr.. Quinlan said Tuesday: “1 
think there are a lot of lessons to be 
learned by how far we can go to 
preserve lift Death is not so much 


to be feared. Everything in this 


world is temporary. We shouldn't 
ir death that much”! 


really fear deal 

In January, doctors said Miss 
Q uinlan, who was 5 feet 4 inches 
tall (1.625 meters), weighed 70 to 
75 pounds (about 32 to 34 kfio- 
grams), 40 pounds less than when 
she became comatose in 1975 after 
ingesting alcohol and tranquilizer 
pills. She had been fed through a 
nasogastric tube. 

Doctors expected her to die 
when she was taken off a respirator 
!0 years ago. but she was able to 
breathe without it Its removal cul- 
minated a case of great complexity 
and drama that absorbed national 
emotion and debate. People found 


tors for Miss Quinlan had refused a 
request by the parents to let her die. 
A judge m Morristown, denied the 
parents* request the next Novem- 
ber. but the decision was reversed 
in an appeal to the New Jersey 
Supreme ConrL 

The Supreme Court set several 
legal and medical precedents in its 
7-0 derision on March 31, 1976. 

The court held, in a new inter- 
pretation of the right of privacy, 
that Miss Quinlan’s interest in hav- 


nected 


themselves wrestling with funda- 
stions of life i 


mental questions oflife and death 
as well as medical and legal issues. 


In a landmark lawsuit Sept. 12, 


1975. her adoptive parents, the 
Quinlans asked that the respir 


respirator 

be discounarted and that their 
daughter be allowed to die “with 
grace and dignity," because there 
was no hope she would recover. 
Die suit was filed after the doc- 


thc stale's interest 
in preserving life, so long as medi- 
cal authorities saw “no reasonable 
possibility” that she would recover. 

Because she was in a coma, the 
court ruled that her father, and not 
her doctors or a court, was the 
authority for deriding her fate in 
her behalf, and it named him 
guardian and empowered him to 
seek doctors who would remove the 
life-support systems. 

The coart also ruled that no one 
could be* hdd criminally liable for 
removing the systems, because the 



INSIDE 


■ President Marcos held a huge 
military parade and issued a 
warning to insurgents. Page 2. 


■ Helene A. von Damm, U.S. 
envoy to Austria, announced 
her resignation. Page 3. 


I An odd ample in Congress is 
in midget 


playing a large role in 
negotiations. Page & 


■ President AHbnsfn is seen as 
pursuing the PerOnist legacy in 
feeding (he hungry. Page 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ PhBEps Petroleum has negat- 
ed contracts to deliver gas be- 
cause of problems in the North 
Sea, sources said. Page 9. 


■ Die UJS. economy will ex- 
pand at a 43-percent annual 
rate in the final quarter, the 
National Association of Manu- 
facturers said. Page 9. 


UPI Asks for Salary Freeze 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Karen Ann Quinlan 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — United 
Press International said Wednes- 
day thar it had asked its union staff 
to accept a six-month salary freeze 
as port of an effort to restore the 
news agency to profitability. 


I 


Sign EC Pact as 


Basque Rebels 
Kill 4 in Spain 


By Edward Schumacher 

New York Times Sen-ice 


MADRID — Spain and! Portu- 
gal signed the treaty Wednesday 

admitting, them to the European 


Community, but Basque guerrillas 
' y by killing four peo- 


Soviet plans to attack the radio 
station as he described a meeting 
with other Turkish extremists in 
Milan in December 1980. 

“We talked about a possible at- 
tack the Soviets wanted carried 
out," he said, “against Radio Free 
Europe, in Munich, Bavaria." 

A bomb tore into the station’s 
headquarters in February 1981, in- 
juring eight persons. , 

It was the first time in more than 
three years of testimony that Mr. 
Agca has mentioned the bomb at- 
(Continned on Page 2, CoL 1) 


marred the day 
pie in a series of auacks'm Spain. 

Heavy security was lightened 
even further after the attacks as 
seven European heads of state and 
12 foreign ministers arrived in Lis- 
bon in the morning and then trav- 
eled to Madrid in the evening for 
the separate signing ceremonies. 

In two coordinated assaults, 
gunmen from the Basque guerrilla 
group ETA killed an army colonel 
and his driver in Madrid and a 
sailor in Bilbao, in Basque country. 

The guerrillas in Madrid aban- 
doned their getaway car, packed 
with explosives, in the basement of 
a department store. One policeman 
was killed and seven were wound- 
ed, one of them severely, when the 
bomb exploded as they tried to 
deactivate iL 

Prime Minister Felipe GonzAlez 
of Spain said in at news' conference 
aboard his plane as he flew back 
from Lisbon that ETA had become 
“assassins of hope." He added: 
‘Terrorism is a fundamental ene- 
my of democracy ” 

The attacks were among the 
bloodiest in 17 years of violence by 
ETA, a Marxist group whose ini- 
tials stand for Basque Homeland 
and Liberty in the Basque tan- 


assassinations took some of 
the luster off treaty-signing cere- 
monies that still were dim with 
symbolism and history. 

The treaty expands the Europe- 
an Community from 10 members 
to 12 and pulls the Iberian Peninsu- 
la into the West European main- 
stream after decades of political 
isolation. 


The treaty must still be ratified, 
but the wide political support far it 
in all 12 countries after eight years 


of difficult negotiations appears to 
make ratification by Jam 1. as 
called for in the treaty, a foregone 
conclusion. European officials 
said. 

“By this accession. Europe as a 
political and institutional entity is 
also brought closer to the Europe 
of physical geography,” Foreign 
Minister GiuUo Andrcbtti of Italy, 
the current president of the EC 
Council of Ministers, said in Lis- 
bon. He reflected the view of many 
Europeans that the community has 
reached its limit for the foreseeable 
future. 

The Italians currently bold the 
revolving presidencies of the ECs 
ruling councils, and the conclusion 
of the treaty under their manage- 
ment was seen as a victory for Ital- 
ian diplomacy and a domestic po- 
litical triumph for Mr. Gonzalez 
and Prime Minister Mario Soares 
of Portugal, both Socialists. 

The two Iberian countries will 
become members of the EC com- 
mon market and other economic 
integration programs after a 10 - 
year transition period prescribed 
by the treaty. The two also become 
immediate members of the Europe- 
an PariiamenL 

Mr. Soares called the treaty sign- 
ing “without exaggeration, one of 
the most significant events of con- 
temporary Portuguese history." 

“We shall symbolically make a 
new departure," be said, ‘Vith Por- 
tugal returning to the European 
fold and playing its rightful part in 

its d ynamism and progress." 

Paradoxically, bis triumph 
Wednesday is to be followed by 
<me of his greatest political difficul- 
ties Thursday. 

The Social Democratic Party, the 
partner in his governing coalition, 
announced last week that it would 
wait only as a courtesy for the trea- 
ty signing before formally with- 
drawing Thursday from the gov- 
ernment. Mr. Soares will then head 
a minority government that win 
likely collapse, probably leading to 
new elections. 



Rv Auocanrt ftas 

A Madrid policeman was guided to an ambulance Wednes- 
day after a car, packed with explosives by Basque guerril- 
las, exploded while officers were trying to defuse the 
bombs. One officer died and six others were also wounded. 


Bonn Vetoes EC Cuts 


In Cereals Subsidies 


Reuters 

LUXEMBOURG — West Ger- 


many vetoed cuts Wednesday in 
» raznv 


the subsidized prices paid to 
pean Community rareals fanners, 
an EC spokesman said Wednesday. 

The west German agriculture 
minis ter, Ignaz Kiechle, blocked a 
move to cut prices by 1.8 percent, 
declaring that his country's nation- 
al interests were at stake. 

The move is likely to overshadow 
the Milan summit conference of 
EC leaders at the end of this 
month, diplomats said. 

Ii was the first time since West 
Germany joined the EC as a found- 
ing member in 1957 that Bonn had 
My invoked the veto, a procedure 
that it had never officially accepi- 

Britain, Greece, Denmark, 
France and Ireland recognized 
West Germany’s right ; to exercise a 


diplomats said there was now no 
possibility that the price cut would 
go through. 

EC farm ministers have failed 
for more than four months to fix 
the new cereal prices, due to come 
into force Aug. 1. At their last 
meeting in May, they agreed on 
prices for all other agricultural pro- 
duce. 

Participants in the summit con- 
ference, which was expected to be 
the high point of the six-month 


Italian presidency, were expected 
to debate plans for introducing 


more majority voting into EC inst£ 
to tions. 

Diplomats said that unless a 
compromise could be worked out 


before the meeting, the heads of 
ould have to deal 


veto and said they would not j3ar-' 


tiripate in a move to defeat 
Kiechle by majority vote, the 
spokesman said. 

However, Italy, which holds 
presidency of the community, said 
it intended to hold a vote, although 


government would w 
with the cereals issue: The issue 
also lies at the heart of new trade 
tensions with the United States. 

The Reagan administration, an- 


iuumuks w DTVUge im 

its prices and lower > 
has announced an offe 
wheat to Algeria. * 
French market 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 



Marcos Holds a Show of Arms 
In a Warning, to Insurgents 


By Steve Lohr 

Nn’ York Tunes Senm 

MANILA —The government of 
Ferdinand E Marcos, which faces 
a growing Communist insurgency, 
conducted a large parade of its mil- 
itary might on Wednesday. It in- 
cluded troops, tanks, armored per- 
sonnel carriers and jet Tighten. 

In a speech from the reviewing 
stand, Mr. Marcos explained the 
show of force and issued a warning 
to the rebels. 

Referring to the Philippines 
armed forces, he said: “It is time 
that we all became aware of this 
real resource for the protection and 
defense of our republic. It is time 
we convey a message to the dema- 
gogues who preach violence with- 
out undemanding what they are up 
against” 

The military parade was one of 
several political displays on this na- 
tion's Independence Day. marking 
its freedom from Spanish colonial 
rule, which ended in 1898 with the 
arrival of U.S. troops. In the room- 
ing, the largest opposition party 
selected Salvador H. Laurel, a for- 
mer senator, as its presidential 
nominee. 

Mr. Laurel is expected to be one 
or four or five nominees from 
whom the traditionally divided op- 
position is slated later this year to 
select a single candidate to run 
against Mr. Marcos. The next elec- 
tion is not scheduled until 19S7, but 
many in the opposition say that 
Mr. Marcos will call an early elec- 
tion. 


A more radical o 
group, calTql Bayan. fcda a demon- . 
strati- on, attended by . an estimated' 
total or 12,0QQr people. in front gf 
the Manila city feiU.Th£ group, 
waving placards and shotting slo- 
gans, denounced the Marcos gov- 
ernment and protested what it 
.-railed U.S. imperialism. 

The protesters wanted to march 
to the U.S. Embassy, but hundreds 
of riot police blocked their way. 
Eventually, they agreed instead to 
send a handful of representatives to 
the embassy to deliver a resolution 
cal ling for halt to U.S. military aid 
to the .government and an end to 
“Amerrcan interference" in the 
country’s economic and political 
life. 

After the resolution was deliv- 
ered, the demonstrators dispersed. 

The military parade was believed 
to be the biggest show of Philippine 
weaponry in more than three de- 
cades. ft lasted more than an hour, 
with about SO armored vehicles, 
mostly tanks and personnel carri- 
ers, passing in review before Mr. 
Marcos, his wife, Iraelda, and se- 
nior officials. 

Government estimates of the 
crowd ranged from 80,000 people 
to more than 250,000. However, 
independent sources placed the fig- 
ure closer to 30,000 people. Many 
of those in attendance were govern- 
ment employees or workers in gov- 
ernment-backed companies. 

The procession also included 
hundreds of troops, with the ma- 


rines, army rangers, navy and con- 
stabulary represented. Jets, befi- 
‘ pjpters and transports flew over. 

Mr. Marcos said the government 
would continue to pursue its objec- 
tives by nonnrilitaiy means. But, he 
added, “let no one ever imagine 
that we will hesitate to use this 
power of our armed forces when 
the danger to the nation demand 
it." 

Prospero C Nogales, a human 
rights lawyer from Davao in south- 
ern Mindanao, where the Commu- 
nists are particularly active, said 
that the costly military parade 
seemed to be an extreme step. 

“Marcos is desperately trying to 
convince people that he is still in 
control, " said Mr. Nograles said. 
“It's an act of panic." 

About IZQQO people attended 
the convention of the United Na- 
tionalist Democratic Organization, 
which nominated Mr. LanreL In his 
acceptance speech, Mr. Laurel crit- 
icized the 2Ct-year rule of the Mar- 
cos government in several areas, 
particularly economic mismanage- 
meat and h uman rights abuses. 

Mr. Laurel’s nomination was ex- 
pected, since he is president of the 
organization. Other likely opposi- 
tion nominees for the Philippine 
presidency, according to political 
analysts, indude Aquilino Pimen- 
tel, Ramon Mitra and Jovito Sa- 
longa. An opposition conference to 
select one presidential candidate is 
scheduled for late July. 



WORLD BRIEFS g 

RMMgeofUARebdAidbfteMk 

wAS^crroNtc^^«^^tS^S! 

S27 rmffion in aid « 




Fenfinand E. Marcos greets Fttitipproes officers on the nation’s Independence Day 

Karen Quinlan Dies After Years 


Agca Says Russians Plotted to Bomb Radio 


(Continued from Page l) 

tack. The day before, Mr. 
asserted, also for the tint time, 
the plot to kill the pope had origi- 
nated in the Soviet Embassy in So- 
fia, the Bulgarian capital. 

There have been no arrests or 
convictions in the Munich bomb 
case. An otherwise unknown group 
calling itself the Armed Secret 
Army claimed responsibility, but 
security officials in West Germany 
have expressed the view that it 



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et bloc governments. 

Last year. West Germany ex- 
pelled four Romanian diplomats it 
accused of planning a further bomb 
attack on the anti -Communist sta- 
tion in Munich. 

Contradicting earlier testimony, 
Mr. Agca said he was sent by the 

Bulgarians to T unisia in December 
1980Tdnring a visit there by Mr. 
Mintoff. He said he was met by “a 
person who spoke English and 
called hims elf John but said be was 
a Syrian.” 

However, be said, plans to kill 


Barry Postpones Poland Viat 

The Associated Press 

DUBLIN — Foreign Affairs 
Minister Peter Barry has post- 
poned an official trip to Poland 
next month because be was refused 
pet mi ssion to meet with political 
dissidents, Britain’s Press Associa- 
tion reported Tuesday. The news 
agency added that talks were under 
way to arrange a viat later. 


Mr. Mintoff and Mr. Bourguiba 
with a remote-controlled bomb 
•were dropped because of intense 
security. 

Mr. Agca also said that Bulgari- 
an officials in Rome had sought to 
enlist him in a plan to murder Mr. 
Walesa, the leader of the banned 
Solidarity trade union, during a vis- 
it to Rome in January 1981. 

Italian investigators are explor- 
ing charges by a former Italian 
union leader, Luigi Scricdolo, that 
the Bulgarian secret sendee had 
sought to involve him in a plot to 
murder Mr. Walesa. 

But Mr. Agca's testimony on the 
alleged plot has been marked by 
continual reversals. In December 
1982, be first told Italian officials 
that the Bulgarians had sought his 
help in killin g Mr. Walesa. Nine 
months later, however, be reversed 
himself contending that the plan 
was never more than a vague pro- 
ject. and that he had learned mast 
of the details from Italian investi- 
gating magistrates. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
woman's death “would not be ho- 
micide, but rather expiration from 
existing natural causes." 

The court invited the medical 
profession to use the guidelines 
from the case in the future, without 
seeking similar court judgments. 

Until the night of April 14. 1975, 
when she lapsed into the coma. 
Miss Quinlan's life had been large- 
ly unremarkable, although by no 
means trouble-free. She had been 
adopted as an infant by the Quin- 
lans and reared in a modest and 
religious borne in New Jersey. 

According to friends, after bang 
laid off from a job in August 1974, 
her life took a different turn. 

During the last few weeks of her 
active life. Miss Quinlan lived with 
a group in a bouse in Byram Town- 
ship. Later, investigators and some 
of those who knew her then were to 
say she drank frequently and often 
took pills of various kinds. 

On the night of April 14. she was 
seen “popping pills," and she went 
out drinking with some of her 
friends. She passed out at the bar 
and never regained consciousness. 

Investigators later concluded 
that she had been overcome by a 
combination of alcohol and tran- 
quilizer pill^. She was put ofl a 
respirator because she was unable 
to breathe on her own. 

Subsequently other machines 
were added that fed nutrients into 
her digestive system and assisted or 
substituted for other functions. 

Despite the measures. Miss 
Quinlan's condition deteriorated in 


the next few months. Her weight 
dropped from 120 pounds to less 
than 70. 

All examining doctors subse- 
quently agreed that she had suf- 
fered irreversible brain damage and 
had no cognitive or cerebral func- 
tioning. although her dectroen- 
cephalogram wave was not totally 
flaL She was, they said in a “persis- 
tent vegetative state" and had no 
prospect of recovery. 

Last January, the New' Jersey Su- 
preme Court widened its standards 
on the right to die. ruling that all 
life-sustaining medical treatment, 
including feeding tubes, could be 
withdrawn from terminally ill pa- 


tients. as tong as that is what the 
patient wanted or would want. 

The court, thereby, refused to 
draw a distinction between a feed- 
ing tube and a respirator when de- 
cisions are made on withdrawing 
life-sustaining medical core. But af- 
ter the derision, the Quinlans did 
not seek permission to withdraw 
her feeding tube. 

“It is not necessary to remove 
her feeding tube," Mr. Quinlan 
said. “She is not feeling any pain or 
anything We wanted the respirator 
removed, because it was causing 
her pain. I don’t know whether 1 
made myself dear on this, but I was 
just asking for the right to place her 
in God's hands." 


Representative 

cratic alternative 

Last week, the Republicaiw»mrollM senate 

Central Intd!igence.4iency from 1981 to last year. A& . 

Support. r 

Agreement in United Airlines Smfee 

Washington i API — United Airlines and the Air Liflc Pfloti 

A^tii^^ a^teti« «tietnent Wcthtoday 

SSjKg 

walkout was about a week old. .4*.^ 

Procedures for reluming to work had nctaM 

BsaaaaasassgiSSgs?-. 

many of whom refused to cross the picket lines. . . 

Reagan, Gandhi Exchange Greetings 

WASHINGTON (UPIl-Presidotl Ronald Reagan ^ . 

ister Rajiv Gandhi of India on Wednesday that the United Sami 
respected India's policy of noaalijpmwat and recognized the pivotal tele 
the country plays in southern Asia. , .. 

Both Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gandhi, who was beginning a five-day vtsrt. 
noted that there were differences between tiretr two countries but stressed 

their desire to overcome them, “Americans place great value on Inda s 
friendship,” the president said, “Our shared democratic ideals serve as a . 
bridge between us.” In his remarks Mr. Gandhi declared that 
inevitability of coexistence must propel us towards the imperative of 
Ion.” 


Vic Tanny, 73, Is Dead in Florida; 
Established Chain of Gymnasiums 


Los Ingeles Tunes Scrttiv 

LOS ANGELES — Vic Tanny. 
73. the millionaire owner of the 
first U.S. chain of gymnasiums and 
health spas, died Tuesday in Tam- 
pa, Florida, of heart failure. 

The Tanny chain, at its peak in 
the late 1950s. encompassed more 
than 100 gyms in the United States 
and Canada and grossed S34 mil- 
lion in a single year. Mr. Tanny. 
whose real name was Victor A. lari- 
nidinarda moved to Florida sever- 
al yeais ago. after the empire he 
had created collapsed because of 
over-extended finances and back 
taxes. 

He was the first to reshape the 


concept of a gymnasium from a 
room where grubby men simply 
sweated under barbells into one 
where chromium-plated, controlled 
weights were set in carpeted suites 
with adjacent spas, tennis courts 
and swimming pools. 

He also made gymnasiums af- 
fordable to the working class by 
making membership fees payable 
on the installment plan, said Rudy 
Smith. president or Holiday Health 
Spa Cubs of California and a for- 
mer Tanny employee. 

“Vic Tanny was to the gym busi- 
ness what Henry Ford was to the 
automobile.” Mr. Smith said. 


■ADVERTISEMENT- 


ALL PARTY EARLY DAY MOTION OF 158 MEMBERS OF THE 
HOUSE OF COMMONS, ON THE VIOLATION 
OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN IRAN 


ALL PARTY EARLY DAY MOTION — HOUSE OF COMMONS 369 

HUMAN RIGHTS IN IRAN 


Mr. Alfred DUBS, Sir Bernard BRAINE, Mr. Erie S. EFFER, 

Mr. Cyril D. TOWNSEND, Mr. Russell JOHNSTON. Mr. Ian GRIST. 

This house expresses its deep horror at the continuing violation of human rights in Iran, and 
especially at the list of 10,300 victims of executions by the Khomeini regime, published by the 
People's Mojahedin Organization of Iran and announced by Mr. Massoud RAJ AVI, Chairman of 
the National Council of Resistance of Iran, the list containing 18 women, pregnant at the time of 
execution, 430 children under the age of 18 years, and 54 parliamentary candidates (in the first 
parliamentary elections held by the regime); urges Her Majesty’s Government to continue its 
efforts through the United Nations Organization and other international bodies to pressurise the 
Iranian Government to respect fundamental human rights; is greatly concerned at the rising trend 
of state sponsored terrorism shown in the hijacking of the Kuwaiti airliner as well as the growing 
threat, presented by the Gulf war to the peace and stability of the Middle East; and calls upon Her 
Majesty’s Government to step up its efforts towards a negotiated solution to the conflict and 
effectively prevent any trade on lethal weapons which contribute to the continuing hostilities. 


Alfred Dubs fl'ice-Chair.. Part 
Human Rights GpJ; Brie Better 
{Ex-Lab. Party Chair., Lab. NJlC 
me mb., ex-Sec. f;Sir Bernard 
Brxdne (VU»-Chair„ Part Human 


Cons. Party Foreign Aff. Comm „ 
Chair. British deL to Inter- Pariia- 
m e nlar y Union): Ian MUtarda 
{Vice-Chair. Sodalist-Inter., Lab. 
M.P); Mrs. Judith Bart (Lab. 
MP-, exSec- of Overseas DeveL 
>J; Denis ITabcn (JttP. Chtdr. 
Hid. East Counc.): RusseU 
Johnston (M.P., Lib, Party Foreign 
Aff. Spokes.)'. Laurie Parrot (Lab. 
iWJ*., memb Counc- of Ear ., Union 
of Western Europe. UJE.1T.); lim- 
an BendaB (Sec. of Cons. Foreign 
and Commamoeaith Aff. Conan., 
ft LP.h John Evans (Lab. NJE.C 
monk. MP); Sir Patrick Wall 
(Gets. MJ \ Chair. BriL deL to 
North Atlantic Assembly); 
Mrs. Joan Maynard (Lab. MLP^ 
iVEC memb,); Richard Wairt- 
uriefu (Lib. spokes, on Eton., 
MPJt John Hume (MJEP* MP „ 
header of JV. Ireland's S.DJLPJ; 
Andrew Fealds (Lab. M.P„ man b 
of Brit. deL As Inler-ParL Union); 
Reg Prentice (Cons. MP„ ex-Eda c. 
Sea); Hugh Rossi (Cons. NLP^ ax- 
SaeJ: Sir Ceaffrrv Finsbarg fflf.P., 
nx-Gmu. party Chair J; Sir NuJto- 
las Baum (SS.P» ex-Viee Chair. 
Cans. Party Foreign Aff. Col.); 
Jama Wallace (Lib. spokes. an 
Energy, M.PJ; Paddy .Jshdosm 
(M.P , Ub. Party spokes, an Trade 
and IntL): Robert Hughes (Lab. 
M.P ., Chair. Anti. Apartheid 
Movement); Julian Antery (Cons. 
ftf.P., eX’Sec.)' Sir Reginald Eyre 


(M.P., ex-Cons. Party Chair.); 
Alex Cariile (Lib. spokes, on Heme 
Aff. and Justice. NLPJ; Cyril 
D. Townsend (Cons. MJ*.); David 
Atkinson (Cons. NLP L. memb. of 
Counc. of Ear. and U.WJL); Mar- 
lin Flannery (Chair. Lab. Party 
ParL Go. on Educ~. Science and 
Arts); Barry Shearman (Lab. Par- 
ty deputy Spokes, an Snip. MPJ; 
Guy Barnett (NLP„ ex-Lab ~ 


Hamilton (Lab. MJ \ 
Sec.): Denis Howell (Lab NLP„ 
ax-Environ. See.); Clare Short 
(Lab NSJ*„ JVJsLC memb); Simon 
Hughes ( MJP „ Lib Party Spoie t 
on Environ.); William Shehon 
(Com. MJP . ex-ParL Under-Sac- 
on Educ.); Richard Page (Cons, 
M.P . . memb Counc. of Eur „ 
U.W.E.); Michael Meadowcrafl 
(Lib spokes, on Health and Sac. 
Sea. MP.)-. Tony Bean ( NLP , 
Lab N-E.C. memb); Ceorge Park 
(ITarChau. lab Party ParL (a 
on £mpk, NLPJ; Chris Smith (Vice- 
Qmw*. Lab Party Pat Cp- an 
Environ^ MJP.)-J t gusr Hards (Lab 
MIA, memb Counc. Ear. and 
U-WJE); Stuart Holland (lab 
MJ \ Shadow Cabinet mokes, on 
Foreiffi Devela, pj; Jfeijn Rees 
(Lob MJ \ ex~Home Sea); fan 
Crist (Cot u. MJ*J; David Knox 
(Cans. MJ*.); Robert Key (Cans. 
MJ*J; Hatty Creemajy (Cans. 
SLP.R Dr. Gilroy Ream (Cans. 
#LPJ: John Carrie (Cons. ALP, 
memb Counc. Eur. and II.W.F.)- 
Donald Anderson {lab deputy 
spokes, of Farda n Aff^ MJ* J; ML 
« had Foot (Ex-Chad, of Lab Par- 
M-P Martin Redmond (Lab 
U*J; Tern Fields (Lab &LPJ; 
Bob Clay (Ub MJ 3 -); Robert Ki- 


£ 


lory; Silk (Lab MJ*J; Cadi Walk- 
er (Official Unionist PartyMJ 3 -. N. 
Ireland); Ray Beggs (dVJ 3 -, JV. 
Ireland MJP.); Lewis Stevens 
(Cans. SS.Pl; Mark Wolfwon (Cons. 
MJ*J; Michael Latham (Cans. 

M. P.); Geraint Howells (Lib. 
MJ*.); John Wheeler (Cons. MJ*.)-, 
Charles being (Cans. MJPj; JJ). 
Concauaan (Lab. JMLPJ; James 
Tirut (Lab HLPJ; Frank Cook 
(Lab MJ*J;John Home Robertson 
(Lab MJ*J; Kevin McNamara 
(Lab. MJ*.); Dafydd Wigley 
( Plaid CytnntrWales); David Al- 
ton (Ub MJ*.); Kenneth Warren 
(Cons. MJ*J; GwQym Jones ( Cats. 
MJ*J; .Han Howards (Cans. JttPJ; 
/an Wrigglesworth (SDP MJ*.); 
Robert Jones (Cans. M.PJ; Stefan 
Terimhi (Cons. MJ*J; Rev. WiL 
Sam McCrea (Ulster Dm. party, 

N. Inland, MJ*.); David Sumbag 
(Cons. M-Pj; Peter Rost (Corn. 
MJ*.): Mrs. Jill Knight (Cons. 
MJ*.}; Michael Girylis (Cons. 
MJ*-); Alexandra Pollock (Cans. 
MJ*.); Tan Yea (Cans. ftLPj; Rab- 
in Squire (Cons. M.P.); Peter 
Thurnham ( Cans. MJ*.); Bowen 
WeBs (Cons. M.PJ; RMn Corbett 
(Lab MJ*J; Laurence CunSffe 
(Lab. MJ\); Peter Pike (Lab 
MJ*.); Robert Parry ( Lab BLPJ; 
Tony Lloyd (Lab MJ*J; Lewis 
Carter-Janes (Lab M.P.);Tony 
Baldnr (Cans. MJ*.); NeU Thom 
(Cons- M.P.); Colin Shephard 
(Com. MJ*); Keith Best (Cons. 
MJ*4; Andrew Bowden (Com. 
MJ*.); ABan Ro gen (Lab NLP.) 
Stan Thame (Lab MJ*J; Km 
Eastham (Lab MJ*J; Ray GaRey 
(Cans. NLPJ; Dr. Keith Jjampscm. 
(Cans. MJ*.); Jeremy Hanley 
(Const M.P. ); Ivan Lawrence 


( Con*. MJP.); W. Benyon (Cons. 
M-PJ; James Coachman (Cons. 
M.P.); Ron Danes (Lab MJ*.); 
Yeff Hooker (Lab MJ*J; Dr. Da. 
i ed dark (Lab MJ*.); Roland 
Bayes (Lab BLP.p, Stun Cnmsher 
(Lab MP4; James Praasey fGons. 
NLP.); Richard Ottaway (Cons. 
NLP.); Richard Alexander ( Cons. 
MPJ-, Richard Hob (Cons. NLP.): 
Sydney Chapman (Cons. MP.); 
Peter Fry ( Cans. MP.); Reg Free- 
tan (lab MP.); Dank Fatchetl 
(lab MPJs Sean Hughes (Lab 
M.P.); Mrs. Ann Clmyd (ex- 
M-E.P.); Richard Cabem (ex- 
M£,P .); Barruy Cohan (Lab. 
MP.): Hugh McCartney (Lab 
M-PJ; Jeremy Corby* (Lab M.PJ; 
Dr. Norman. A. Ciodman (Lab 
MP.); Terry Pachett (Lab MPJ-. 
Allen McKay (Lab MPJ; Qam 

Soely (lab. ALPJ; Cecil Franks 
(Cons. MPJ; John M. Taylor 
(Cans. MP. ); Tan Ratkbone 

(Com. MPJ: m Midlie (Lab 
MPJ; Jack Ashley (Lab MPJ; 
Tom Thomey. (Lab MPJ; Ron 
Brown (Lab. MPJ ; Wabw Harri- 
son (Lab. MPJ; Erie Donkins 
(Lab Deputy Whip); Ron Lewis 
( lab MPJ; Ted Garrett (lab 
MPJ; Max Madden (Lab NLPJ, 
Gerald Bcrmrngham (Lab MPJ ; 
Norman Atkinson (Lab MPJ; Er- 
nie Roberts (Lab MPJ; Sydney 
Bidwdl (Lob MPJ; Stuart Ran- 
dall (Lab MPJ; Ken Weetdi 
(lab MPJ: Hugh £>. Broun (Lab 
MPJ; Dennis Cbmha (Lab 
MPJ; Alex. Sadie (Lab MPJ; 
Dr. John Gilbert (Lab MPJ; Bry 
an Coaid (Lab MP.); Mark jFtA- 
w (Lab IIP.); Roy Hughes (Lab 
MPJ; Harry Cowans (lab MPJ; 
Gary Waiter (Cons. MPJ 


HOUSE OF COMMONS, LONDON SW1A OAA 


IflUlJjlr 

_ _.sidc the White House about 1,000 Sikh protesters shouted slogan* 
and aimed signs opposing the Indian leader. Police lined the area but 
reported no problems. 

U.S. Senate Acts to Permit Angola Aid 

WASHINGTON (WP) — The Senate has voted to aid n ban on 
military aid to guerrillas fighting the Marxist government of Angola, 
raising' the possibility of a shift in U.S. policy. 

In a 63-34 vote Tuesday, the Senate approved an amendment to the 
State Department authorization bill that would reverse a 1976 measure 
prohibiting military assbunce to tire National Union for the Total 
Independence of Angola, ted by Jonas Savimhi. The amendment was 
sponsored by Senator Steven D. Syrians, Republican of Idaho. 

The Senate took similar action in 1981 only to have it dir in conference 
with a House opposed to new U.S. involvement in the Angola fighting. It ^ 
was not immediately dear whether the Symms resolution would meet a* 
similar fate in the House. 

For the Record 

Beijing and Washington announced Wednesday that President Li 
Xiannian would visit the United States on July 22 tit the first official U.S. 
tour by a Chinese president. (AP) 

A Tnridsh martial bra court sentenced one leftist to death and 17 others 
to prison Wednesday for armed robbery and canring explosions, the 
semioffirial Anatolian News Agency said. (Reuters) 

Spanish dock workers begat a two-day strike Wednesday to press 
demands that ports remain under state control, officials said. (Reuters) 
UjS. and Soviet aims control experts, continuing talks in Geneva, met 
for more than three hours Wednesday in a session of the negotiating 
group on strategic nuclear weapons. fAP) 

The hst members of the US. force that invaded Grenada in October 
1983 left the island on Tuesday. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


Page 3 


Pentagon Is Moving to Curb Negligence at Military Hospitals 





*C' Helene A. von Damm with Peter Goertler on their wedding 
day last Feb. 2 In the doing resort of Khzb&hel, Austria. 

v.j ” • 

^ U.S. 'Interests’ Are Cited 






As Vienna Envoy Resigns 


By Philip M. Boffey 

New York Times Serwev 

WASHINGTON — The De- 
partment of Defense has instituted 
a series of new measures designed 
to eKmiqate substandard care at 
military hospitals. 

The changes are intended to en- 
sure that malpractice is detected 
and acted cm and that doctors with 
false credentials or records of poor 
performance are not hired in the 
first place. 

The drive began after a small, 
number of hi^typubtidzed inci- 
dents in which patients were lolled 
or injured by negligent military 
doctms. 

By imposing rules that are in 
some respects more exacting than 
those in civilian overtiring, muiiaiy 

leaders hope to minimiz e such mo- 
dems, which in recent yean Have 
undermined the reputation of some 
of the most prestigious military 
medical centers. 

in the latest widely publicized 
case, a 6-year-old boy died in April, 
hours after be was treated for a cat 
lip at Madigan Army Medical Cen- 
ter in Fort Lends, Washington. In- 
experienced personnel apparently 

injected him with potent drugs by 
mistake. 

His d eath came after a number 
of incidents involving pom* or un- 
ethical care over the last few years 
in all three brandies of the military. 
The navy recently dismissed a heart 
surgeon for incompetence; the 
army is investigating a psychiatrist 
accused of having had sex with pa- 
tients or former patients; and an air 
force hospital commander was sen- 
tenced to prison late last year for 
the children of militaiy 


By Lou Cannon 

H'ashmgttm Post Serrice 

WASHINGTON — Helene A 
■" von Damm has announced her in- 
tention to step down as U.S. am- 
V bassador to Austria in a letter to 
President Ranald Reagan in which 
she said her resignation was in “the 
' interests of our country." 

Mrs. von Damm, a friend and 
. former secretary of the president, 
: was criticized in some Vienna so- 

- >ciaJ ancles this year for divorcing 

her third husband and marrying 
Peter Guertler, owner and manager 
of a fashionable hotel. 

In her letter Tuesday to Mr. Rea- 

- gan, for whom Mrs. von Damm has 

- worked since his eady days as gov- 
. ernor of California, the ambassa- 

- dor suggested that rite leave her 

- post at the end of the year. An 
administration official said he ez- 

- pected the resignation and its tim- 
' ing to be aocepted by Mr. Reagan. 

“You will recall that when 1 
7 wrote yon about ray derision to 
marry Peter I told you I was well 
• aware of the potential conse- 
. quences,” Mrs. von Damm said in 
— Jer letter. She added, “For my-own 
Jtart 1 have always been cognizant 


of the priority my official duties 
deserved." 

The letter continued: “Bong at 
all rimes aware that public percep- 
tions are as important as reality in 
the world in which we live and 
work, however, I most recognize 
there are voices that continue to 
assert a conflict of interest between 
my professional responsibilities 
and my personal situation.” 

The letter wen t on to say, “These 
rircnmstances have led me to (he 
cnwrlmann that the interests of our 
country and your own are best 
served by your appointment of a 
new ambassador to Austria." 

Mrs. von Damm, a native Austri- 
an who emigrated to the United 
States, added in a postscript that 
she would always be Mr. Reagan's 
“goodwill ambassador.” 

Mis. von Damm, 47, left Austria 
in -1959 after marrying an Ameri- 
can soldier. She worked for Mr. 
Reagan during iris two-term gover- 
norship, helped raise funds tor his 
presidential campaigns and served 
for a time as WhiteHoose person- 
nel director, where she was credited 
with increasing the number of fe- 
male appointees. 


Broad audits of medical quality 
»«nrflniy q militaiy hospitals in 
the United Stales and abroad, con- 


ducted mostly from mid-1983 to 
mid- 1984, found these faults: 

• Repealed failure to check (he 
credentials of doctors reporting for 
duty from another station or civil- 
ian practice. 

• Failure to fully investigate 
complaints of incompetence 
against doctors. 

• Failure to investigate unusual 
deaths or complications. 

• Lax controls on dispensing 
drags, allowing some doctors and 
other health personnel to become 
addicts. 

• Staffing emergency rooms at 
night and an weekends with un- 
qualified personnel, including 
nurses and physician assistants in- 
stead of doctors. 

• Missing or incomplete records, 
making it impossible to know what 
treatment or tests patients had re- 
ceived. 

A survey of more than 19,000 
patients last year found that most 
familie s were dissatisfied with mili- 
tary care, ranking it below civ ilian 
care in all respects. 


Soldiers In El Salvador 
Operating Water Service 

United Press IniemadonaJ 

SAN SALVADOR — The gov- 
ernment said that the armed forces 
has sent soldiers across £1 Salvador 
to operate the staie-nm water ser- 
vice company, which has been 
struck. About 4,000 water workers 
are on strike. 

Officials said Tuesday tha t the 
armed forces had occupied water 
installations to prevent the workers 
from pressing their demands by 
cutting off the country’s water sup- 
ply. The workers are demanding 
highw wages and the riifflrri&Mt of 
the company’s president 


The militaiy services essentially 
agreed with the findings but con- 
tended that they were a snapshot 
taken at the early stages of a chang- 
ing situation, before many of the 
latest new programs had been put 
in place. 

Some critics believe that the mili- 
tary services are still not moving 
rapidly enough to correct the prob- 
lem. Vernon McKenzie, who re- 
signed recently as principal deputy 
assistant secretary of defense for 
health affairs, said he had a “gnaw- 
ing, nagging sense of dissatisfac- 
tion” with both the quality of mili- 
tary medicine and with the efforts 
to improve it. 

Mr. McKenzie said ihat the Pen- 
tagon and the military services “are 
not coming to grips with the prob- 
lem” because “doctors don’t want 
to squeal on each other” and be- 
cause the militaiy snrgeons general 
and hospital commanders resent 
and oppose efforts to impose quali- 
ty control from above. 

“They’re on the road to reform, 
but they're fighting it every inch of 
the way,” he saicL 

Malpractice rlaimc filed against 
the government tor military medi- 
cal care jumped 24 percent from 
1982 to 1984, the Pentagon ac- 
knowledges, and the amount paid 
to settle claims jumped 41 percent. 
But military malpractice rates, the 
Pentagon contends, remain well 
below the soaring civilian rates. In 
1984, 854 claims were filed ag ainst 
military iwHirinK and $41 million 
was paid to claimants. 

In the last three years the Penta- 
gon and the army, navy and air 
force have issued directives and es- 
tablished programs designed to re- 
move incompetent doctors and as- 
sure that hospital commanders are 
required to pay greater attention to 
malpractice. 

In May 1982 the Pentagon’s 


Health Affairs Office created a di- 
rectorate for quality assurance, and 
the first directive was issued in July 
of that year. It required each mili- 
tary department to report to the 
Federation of State Medical 
Boards all doctors who had been 
discharged because of substandard 
or unethical performance. 

Since then, four other minor di- 
rectives have been issued. One re- 
quires the military services to de- 
velop standards for acceptable 

rates of death and complications in 
various medical treatments and 
then measure the performance of 
each doctor against the standards. 
Such norms have already been es- 
tablished for 26 surgical proce- 
dures. and the services are begin- 
ning to use them to evaluate 
surgeons. 

Another directive was designed 
to stiffen the supervision of nurses 
and physician's assistants by re- 
quiring that a doctor be designated 
in writing to supervise the care they 
deliver. A third ordered hospital 
commanders to take timely action 


to suspend, report and investigate 
doctors involved in improper con- 
duct or substandard care. 

The fourth directive; issued in 
February, sets minimum require- 
ments for granting credentials to 
doctors and Other health personnel 
to practice in militaiy hospitals, it 
requires that clinical privileges be 
reviewed at least every two years, 
and it orders hospital commanders 
to forward the files of doctors who 
are transferred, something that had 
often been neglected. 

Another directive, requiring doc- 
tors and other health care profes- 
sionals to obtain slate licenses in 
addition to their military creden- 
tials. is being prepared, as is a di- 
rective that will spell out proce- 
dures for detecting and 
rehabilitating physicians addicted 
to drugs or alcohol. 

The quality of medical care in 
the military is increasingly impor- 
tant because of President Ronald 
Reagan’s military buildup and the 
nation's reliance on an all-volun- 
teer force. 


1& an effort to recruit and retain 
high-quality personnel, the armed 
forces are seeking ways to make the 
“quality of life" of a military career 
more attractive. Recent surveys 
have shown that medical care is one 
of the top priorities of military per- 
sonnel and that most military fam- 
ilies are dissatisfied with it. " 
Active duty military personnel 
receive free care from a network of 
168 hospitals, more than 500 medi- 
cal clinics and 436 dental clinics at 
military installations around the 
world. 


Nimrods Swarm in Maine 

Untied Press Intemaiiimiil 

AUGUSTA Maine — A record 
62,843 hunters paid to enter 
Maine's lottery Wednesday to dis- 
tribute the state’s 1.000 moose- 
hunting permits. 


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Fundamentalists Strengthen 
Control of Church in U.S. 


This is the start 
of something 
very big. 




New York Tima Service 

DALLAS — Fundamentalists 
have taken firm control of the 
Southern Baptist Convention, the 
largest Protestant denomination in 
the United States, by reelecting the 
Reverend Charles F. Stanley of At- 
lanta as the national president. 

The vote Tuesday for president 
marked a turning point for the 
church, which claims 14.3 million 
members. 

F undamentalis ts have held the 
presidency since 1979, and as a 
result they have now appointed 
pearly half the members of the 
"^oards that run the church’s serai- 
naries, missions, charities and po- 
litical affairs. Many say Mr. Stan- 
ley’s victory portends a change in 
tiie denomination’s opposition to 
officially sanctioned prayer in pub- 
lic schools. 

Mr. Stanley, the 52-year-old pas- 
tor of the First Baptist Church in 
Atlanta, won by 24,453 votes to 
19,795 for the Reverend W.‘ 


Winfred Moore of Amarillo, Texas, 
leader of a moderate faction in the 
church. 

In a gesture at resolving the dis- 
pute over theological and secular 
matters that has split the church, a 
delegate immediately nominated 
Mr. Moore to be the convention's 
first vice president. Two other can- 
didales were also nominated. 

Hie fundamentalists, riding the 
crest of a national trend toward 
conservatism, say that some church 
leaders have taken a “liberal drift" 
away from the faith’s basic tenets, j 
The fundamentalists have criti- 
cized seminary professors and 
church leaders who do not take a 
literal view of the Scriptures. 

The moderates have said that the 
fundamentalists are undermining 
the historical doctrine of freedom 
of conscience by which Baptists 
can interpret the Bible as they see 
it They also say that the conserva- 
tives are trying to seize control of j 
the church’s assets. 





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Page 4 


Heralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



Eribunc 


PdbtUud TTiAH* New York Time* and The Pwl 


Unwise Plans in France 


' Opposition poli ticians make alarming 
noises. If Britain's Labor Party gains power 
: a couple of years hence, it promises stria 
controls on imports, starting with cars — 
' about the last thing the economy needs. 
More immediately worrying are revelations 
emanating from the French right, whose 
leaders hope to regain power early next year. 

Economic conditions in Fiance are less 
than briUumi; inflation, unemployment and 
the foreign debt level are disturbing. But the 
policies being discussed by the opposition 
could jeopardize what progress toward eco- 
nomic balance the Socialists have achieved 
since acknowledging their initial errors. 

Former Prime Minister Jacques Chirac — 
whose supporters are currently better orga- 
nized than those of former President Valery 
Giscard d’Estaing or those of forma: Pome 
Minister Raymond Baire — promises a dash 
for freedom from austerity, with a tax cut 
equivalent to 1 percent of France's CNP and 
a similar cut in public spending. The pro- 
gram, clearly inspired by Reaganomics, is 
portrayed as a return to the spirit of de 
Gaulle. But it could be as dangerous as the 
policies President Francois Mitterrand es- 
poused when he came to power in 1981. 

France's budget deficit is already too 
large. The idea that a tax cut of this size 
could be accompanied by an equivalent 
spending cut is dangerously optimistic. This 
is particularly so in the splintered parlia- 
ment likely to be elected under the coming 
system of proportional representation, in 
which party loyalties mil be weakened and 
more wheeling and dealing will be the order 
of the day. From inside the right, Mr. Bane 
has already condemned the Chirac package. 
But Mr. Bane will not be in the government 


so long as there is a Socialist president — 
which looks likely to be the case until 1988. 

Some other French conservative propos- 
als are more promising. An important part 
of the economy would be denationalized. (It 
would have to be done cautiously, because 
abrupt privatization could congest the nar- 
row financial market.) Industry would be 
deregulated, in particular by reducing con- 
trols on labor. Foreign exchange controls 
that still restrict the flow of capital into 
and out of the country would be lifted — but 
this is where one comes back to the weak- 
nesses of the Chirac program. 

To combine an inflationary budget policy 
with the lifting of exchange controls risks 
engendering a new outflow of capital, with a 
return to the series of devaluations that 
marred the early Mitterrand years. The an- 
swer is not to delay the decontrolling but to 
adopt a better thought-out budget policy. 
Justifying the Chirac proposals by reference 
to Ronald Reagan or Charles de Gaulle is 
naive. Mr. Reagan's 1981 tax cut is still 
exerting a boomerang effect on the U.S. 
economy, and the French economy is less 
able America’s to stand up to advene 
repercussions abroad. As for de Gaulle, he 
did not begin by a dash for growth, but by an 
austerity program thai underpinned the pol- 
icy his predecessors had put in place. 

European unity and the Western alliance 
depend importantly on France’s economic 
strength. Compared to West Germany, 
Fiance’s inflation rate is nearly three times 
as great, and its external finances are incom- 
parably weaker. The Chirac stance would 
aggravate both, with ill effects for Fiance, 
Europe and the Atlantic alliance. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


A Healthy Vote in Italy 


The scala mobile has been, until recently, as 
firmly embedded in the Italian economy as 
arias are in opera. The “moving staircase” is an 
; automatic increase in wages to compensate for 
1 increases in the cost of living. As is often the 
! case with indexation, the particular formula 
‘ used lends to become unduly generous, and its 
application a year or so after the inflation has 
; occurred tends to cause further inflation. Yet 
! indexation usually remains politically popular. 
1 How many voters are willing to give up some- 
! thing that protects them against (or puts them 
: just a little ahead of) inflation? 

.* The answer, from some 33 million Italians 
' who voted Sunday and Monday, is heartening: 
. a solid majority. Socialist Prime Minister Bet- 
. lino Craxi and his five-party government had 
r the courage last year to cut 4 percent off the 
: ‘'moving staircase." The Communists, usually 
: the second largest party and in the 1984 Euro- 
: pean elections the largest, responded by forc- 
mg a referendum to restore the 4 percent They 
| had little support; of Italy’s other parties, only 
the neo-Fasrists followed their lead. But their 
hope obviously was that the ordinary people of 
= Italy would vote their pocketbooks. 

To some extent they did: the approximately 
46 percent who voted “yes” exceeded the per- 
centage of those who have voted for the two 


extreme parties in Italian elections. Bui the 
more important fact is that an unambiguous 
majority voted “no " The Communists, on- 
about as politically attractive an issue as they 
could hope to find, nonetheless lost. 

And Mr. Craxi won. He had threatened to 
resign immedia tely if his side lost, and that 
might have been an even greater loss than the 
point-or-so rise in inflation that a restored 
scala mobile would have caused. Mr. Craxi's 
government is one of the longest-lasting in 
postwar Italian politics, and has courageously 
tackled many of the country’s major problems. 
Everyone in the coalition has held everyone 
else’s hands firmly as they all jumped together, 
cutting industrial subsidies, scaling back social 
benefits and attacking indexation. The Italian 
government now has major achievements to its 
credit: It has controlled terrorism while re- 
specting civil liberties; it has produced eco- 
nomic growth while lowering inflation; it has 
maintained its commitments to the Western 
allian ce Italy has proved to be one of the most 
stable of Western democracies- Its voters' re- 
jection of the Communists' scala mobile refer- 
endum is welcome evidence that the voters are 
willing to endure some pain in the struggle to 
bring inflati on under control. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Religious Inhu maoism? 


An amendment slid quietly into the Educa- 
tion for Economic Security Act last year. It 
prohibits the use of federal funds for “any 
course of instruction the substance of which is 
secular humanism." And a 1978 Hatch amend- 
ment requiring schools to obtain parental per- 
mission before giving pupils psychological 
tests was broadened to the point of vagueness 
at the urging of groups led by Phyllis Schlafly., 
Again the aim was to ban secular h umanism. 

Just what is secular humanism? According 
to our dictionary, secular means “of or relating 
to worldly things as dis tinguish ed from things 
relating to church and rdjgjon." Humanism 
means "any system of thought or action based 
on the nature, dignity, interests and ideals of 
man." Put thou together and you get — well, 
we don't quite know, but it doesn't sound like 
something to keep away from ldds. 

Oh. but it is. say organizations like the 
Moral Majority. Christian Voice and Pro- 
Family Forum. They say secular humanism is 
anti-God. anti-American and anti-family. The 
precise definitions are up to the individual. 

In Hillsboro, Missouri, a parents' group, 
Fearing secular humanism, objected to the 
showing in school of the movie "Romeo and 
Juliet.” In Cobb County. Georgia, the school 
superintendent circulated a memorandum to 
teachers restricting classroom discussion on 


several topics, including evolution, commu- 
nism and "valuing.'’ In Maryland, a Coalition 
of Concerned Parents on Privacy Rights has 
distributed a letter citing the broadened Hatch 
regulations as requiring parental permission 
for 34 categories of classroom practices and 
materials, including autobiographical assign- 
ments. Strictly speaking, to ask a student to 
write about "What I did on my summer vaca- 
tion” would require a letter from home. 

“I think about what I'm doing twice," a 
Texas teacher once told The New York Tones. 
“Is there anything controversial in this lesson 
plan? If there is, I won’t use it. I won’t use 
things where a kid has to make a judgment." 
Parents who put their trust in America's public 
schools may now find great holes in the educa- 
tion they provide, thanks to other parents 
waving the chib called secular humanism. 

Since definitions are so subjective, we would 
like to suggest our own. Let secular humanists 
be people who believe that ignorance is the 
poorest armor. That keeping a careful eye on 
education ought not to mean rewriting history 
or expurgating science. That religious beliefs 
should not be forced on public schools. 

No educator would have anything to fear 
from secular humanists like »h»i- Fortunately, 
they far outnumber their antagonists. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR JUNE 13 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Editor Made to Eat His Words 
RUSSELLVILLE, Alabama— Mr. R.L. Page, 
Jr„ of Red Bay, this county, has entered suit in 
the Circuit Court of Cork county, Mississippi, 
for S 10.000 against C.W. Wier and other citi- 
zens of Quitman, Mississippi, who, he says, 
several days ago attacked him in the office of 
the Quitman "Globe,” of which at that time he 
was editor and pan owner. The young people 
of Quitman bad a dance, and the next issue of 
the "Globe" contained a scathing denuncia- 
tion of those who participated. Wier, with 
others, went to the office of the “Globe," 
where they found Page, who was made to chew 
the paper upon which the attack was printed 
and forced to swallow it He was that waned 
to leave the town, which he did. 


1935: Bolivia and Paraguay End War 

BUENOS AYRES — Three years of war be- 
tween Bolivia and Paraguay in the “green helT 
of the Gran Chaco win end [on June 14}. The 
truce is to be followed by an armistice and 
peace negotiations. The annies are to be demo- 
bilized within ninety days and the military 
effectives of each nation will be reduced to 
5,000 men. Provisions of tire agreement in- 
dude: a peace conference to ratify the agree- 
ments ; solution of problems regarding the se- 
curity of armistice conditions; promotion of 
negotiations of differences by Bolivia and Par- 
aguay, it bring understood that The Hague 
Court shall be arbiter if direct negotiations 
fail; and designation of an international com- 
mission to fix responsibilities in the war. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOiStE 
Walter wells 

SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 

carlgewirtz 


Deputy Pubbsher 

Assoaoe PvbBAer 
Associate Publisher 

Director of Operation < 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Exeaum Editor RENE BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECQUR 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN 

Deputy mar STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DE5MAISONS Director at d raiian on 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Adwtuwg Saks 
inunu&fwl Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charies-de-GauDc 92200 NemDv-sur-Stiae, 

France. TeL: 11)747-1265, Telex: 612718 [Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Direaeur de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

AM Headquarters, 24-34 Heanessy StL. Hone Kane. Tel 5-285618. Telex 61170. 

Mamas Dir. UK: Robot MacKkfm, 63UngAae. London WO. TeL 3364802. Tela 262009. 

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S.A. au capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Naraem B 732021126. Commushm Paritatre No. 61337. 

US. subscription: S322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island City. N.Y. I HOI. 

*.*• 1985, International Herald Tribune. All n$us reserved. 



THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 



In Indian-U.S. Relations , Improvement Has Its Price 


W ASHINGTON —The Reagan admin is- 
iratkm made a significant gesture to 
Rajiv Gandhi in tire prelude lo his visit this 
week by n»Wng cautious exploratory steps to 
— technology to India- 


By Selig S. Harrison 



payofi - . , 

Washington rules out new commitments of 
India-focused military equipment to Paki- 
stan, after fulfillment of its existing Sli- 
billion arms aid agreement next year. 

Rajiv Gandhi's emergence offers an un- 
precedented opportunity to reverse the pre- 
sent dangerous drift in Indian-US. relations 
because it coincides with India's economic 
emergence into the high-tech age. The poten- 
tial for economic cooperation is expanding as 
India's burgeoning industries seek computers 
and electronic technology from the United 
States, Western Europe and Japan — techno- 
logy that the Soviet bloc does not possess. 

Given a favorable political climate, grow- 
ing economic interdependencies would help 
to draw India away from its Soviet-tilted 
brand of nooalignmenf. But, barring a shift in 
military aid policy, the political and psycho- 
logical distance between India and America is 
likely to grow. New Delhi will increasingly 
perceive a geopolitical community of interest 
with the Soviets and view America, in tarn, as 
the principal barrier to its ambitions for re- 
gional pre-eminence. In such a climate, while 
New Drihi will no doubt Cake as much high 
technology as it can get, the United States will 
not receive significant political benefits from 
a relaxation of high- tech export controls. 

India’s nonaligned foreign policy is not 
designed to achieve equidistance between the 
superpowers but to make use of the super- 
powers to promote Indian interests, even if 
this means temporarily l eaning in one direc- 
tion or the other. For more than three decades 
the Soviet Union has identified itsrif with 
Indian regional aspirations, while America 
has generally sided with Pakistan and Chun. 
India has adapted to this situation by fre- 
quently tilting toward Moscow. If Washing- 
ton were to give greater recognition to Indian 
regional primacy, India would gradually 
modify its posture in the decades ahead 

So far New Delhi has carefully stopped 
short of de facto military collaboration with 
Moscow, but it would tie unwise to assume 
that such restraint win continue to govern 
Indian policy regardless of the nature of U3. 
policies toward Pakistan. An atmosphere of 
xenophobic resentment is building up among 
many key Indian military and political fig- 
ures, in ume. as Indian naval power continues 
to grow, U.S. military access to the Indian 
Ocean will be increasingly affected by the 
climate of U.S. relations with New Delhi 

To some extent it was posable for Indians 
to forgive and forget after the first $ 1 -billion 
U.S. military aid agreement with Pakistan in 
the 1950s. The United States was, after all, a 
newcomer on the Asian scene and had shown 
goodwill toward India through its economic 


hd 


President Eisenhower had given a for- 
undertaking that U.S. weapons were in- 
tended solely for use against Communist ag- 
gressors, pledging chat the United States 
would not p e r mi t their use against fndia 
This time, U.S. officials are not seeking to 
justify arms aid to Pakistan soldy in terms of 
the threat posed by Soviet forces in Afghani- 
stan. They acknowledge that Pakistan wants 
U-S. help primarily to strengthen itself vis-4- 
vis India. Thejj have pointedly declined to 


dem Reagan should reassure India that the 
mission of the carrier battle group relates to 
the protection of UJS. interests in Afghani- 
stan and the Gulf region and that it would not 

be used to support Pakistan in any South 
Asian conflict limited to India and Pakistan. 


. „ .Uf. | i«a mediation efforts on Af* 

gjgasriRjasa. 

_ So far vv asm*. ^ ^ fcarc the 


Mr. Reagan should also serve notice, that oiicnj&w , resistance would automat* 
ute United States will not provide Pakistan support^ 3 ^ withdrawal H fttt ----- 
with weaponry primarily suited for use on the ly M accept the UN fonsrts. 

Indum border, indudmg. M* f-lS a to** wi ‘ bdra *»i"St 


the dispatch of the USS Enter- 
to the Bay of Bengal during the 1971 
i war, many Indians fear interven- 
tion tn any new India-Palristaii conflict by the 
U.S. earner battle group now stationed per- 
manently in the northern Arabian Sea. At the 
very least, they fear, the United States could 
share intelligence with Islamabad. 

Conceivably, some form of US. military 
involvement in South Asia could become nec- 
essary in the context of growing tensions on 
the Afghanistan-Pakstan border. But Presi- 


UTU W1U1 uMMfUVW V.g, uwp mmmm - 

the Afghan frontier in ways that do not 
threaten India, such as light tanks and howit- 
zers, mobile radar and certain types of air 
defense systems. The United Slates should 
seek, to avoid entanglement in the military 
aspects of this rivalry, especially in the con- 
text of the growing nuclear competition be- 
tween New Delhi and Islamabad. 

Such a detached posture would be difficult 

to piarntam if an fating conflict in Af- 
ghanistan led to siepped-up Soviet military 
pressures on Pakistan. Thus, both the United 
States and India should. give unambiguous 


SSi f 4 ■ 

military aid to Patiswn. In thc-ib- 


SSgtomS: Sou* Mnnrq^lfeiro- 
pcctsTor any basic improwrorti » 
American relations appear blew. 


The writer, a senior associate! rfthe Ctsmqpt 

EnSmem to $£Z£. 

tfajf of four books on Aston offal ra. He 

Comment to The Wuhmgltm Pc* 


chor 

used 


Economic Cooperation Is Worth the Trouble 


W ASHINGTON — India has been mak- 
ing substantial economic progress. 
Anyone who spends time in India realizes 
that the key to its development is the rehabili- 
tation of the villages — there are more than 
600,000 of them — and participation of the 
rural poor in the development process. That 
means unlocking India's great potential in 
agriculture, the mainstay of its economy. 

I am one of those who believe that India's 
food production capacity and Us efforts to 
realize that capacity nave been grossly under- 
estimated. During the past year, despite a 
mediocre monsoon, food gram produced by 
Indian farmers reached a record of 153 mil- 
lion tons, an increase of more than 100 per- 
cent above the 72 milli on tons produced in 
1965 at the start of the "green revolution." In 
India today the growth rate of agricultural 
output is above the population growth rate. 
The country is now capable of feeding its 
people through good and bad years; it is not 
only producing enough food, it is also storing 
and distributing it effectively and at present 
has a surplus available for export. 

To stimulate rice and wheat production, 
food policies in India were adjusted to bal- 
ance the interest of the urban consumers, who 
wanted cheap food, and those of fanner- 
producers, who wanted reasonable prices for 
their crops. A liberalized pricing policy gave 
farmers the incentives to produce more ami to 
raise productivity. The threat of mass famine 
faded as these incentives began to work, along 


By Robert S. McNamara 


improve- 
> of food 


with an expansion of irrigation, 
meats in the storage and marketm, 
and advances in agricultural research. 

The drought of 1979-80, exacerbated by 
power shortages, would have meant mass 
famine in the 1960s. Another drought bit in 
1982. Because of the impressive agricultural 
performance, those two severe droughts did 
not bring about the famines that would cer- 
tainly have occurred without these advances. 

Liberalization of the economy has begun to 
move forward on otter fronts as wed. Relax- 
ation of restriction on imports has already 
introduced new elements of competition in 
India's industry. And a higher degree of com- 
petitiveness will certainly help to strengthen 
an underdeveloped private sector ana im- 
prove the country's export performance. 
Thus, prospects for India to attain consistent- 
ly higher export growth rates are good despite 
a disappointing average growth of about 4 
percent annually during the past four years — 
due in part to the global recession. 

Recent economic strategy emphasized effi- 
cient use of energy and speedy development 
of domestic energy resources. Dependence on 
oil imports declined from 63 percent of con- 
sumption in 1979 to about 37 percent in 1983; 
this year it is expected to drop to 30 percenL 

In general, India managed its economy 
prudently and carefully throughout the pro- 


ft 


longed recession that plagued the 
economy. As a result, today it is not 
capped by a debt problem. 

It has achieved a yearly growth rate of 5.1 
percent, quite dose to the target of S 2 percent 
set in its plan covering the five yea rs to M arch 
1985. The underpinning of this growth has 
been the very high raw of investment, sus- 
tained largely by domestic saying^ 

In India’s economic performance, 

it has to be recognized that the rote of foreign 
economic aid has been modest. External re- 
sources have accounted for only about 7 per- 
cent of total development funds. But these 
and other aid funds arc crucial for the overall 
mix of development financing. With per capi- 
ta income of only S260. India still belongs to 
the poorest group of countries in the world. 

The better life that Rajiv Gandhi wants for 
India’s poor, and envisions as well for the 
impoverished peoples of other countries, de- 
serves American support, including support 
for the financing of such activities as the 
International Development Association, the 
World Bank's concessional lending affiliate. 

With such external assistance, there is no 
reason why India should not continue to 
demonstrate economic progress at home and 
be a conv incing voice persuading the world at 
large what global economic cooperation can 
do for the developing world. 

The writer, a former president of the World 
Bank, contributed this to The Washington post. 


r 


From Japan, a Lesson in Phasing Out Uncompetitive Industries 


W ILLIAMSBURG. Virginia — 
It may not be entirely surpris- 
ing that at a conference on trade 
issues bringing together American 
and West German politicians and 
economic experts, die "phenomenon 
of Japan," as one of the Germans put 
it, was a dominating theme. 

With its growing trade surpluses 
with every major nation, Japan is a 
source of envy in the United States, 
Western Europe and Asia. All accuse 
Japan of unfair trade methods as it 
penetrates markets while practicing 
closed-door protectionism at home. 
But the surplus has deeper roots than 
just the protectionism enforced by 
the Japanese bureaucracy. 

Bill Brock, who was the U.S. trade 
ambassador before becoming secre- 
taiy of labor this spring, once stud: “I 


have this bad dream in which the 
Japanese abandon ail their restric- 
tions and do everything we’ve been 
asking them to do, and they still have 
an enormous trade surplus." 

Clyde Prestowitz of the UJS. Com- 
merce Department has put together a 
theoretical list showing increased 
U.S. sales of at least S14 trillion if all 
barriers were lifted. But against a 
Japanese surplus that he projects at 
S50 billion this year, that would be 
far from a solution of the problem. 

During three days of talks orga- 
nized by the Center for National Pol- 
icy, a group supported by liberal 
Democrats and trade unionists and 
by the Friedrich Ebert Foundation, 
representing West Germany’s Social 


By Hobart Rowen 

Democratic Party, a revealing clue to 
Japanese success was offered by Mer- 
ton J. Peck, a Yale University econo- 
mist Having recently spent three 
months observing the workings of 
Japan's Economic Planning Agency, 
Mr. Peck remarked that Japan has 
developed a bold method "to handle 
the losers in industry" — something 
that the United States and Europe 
have rarely been able to do. 

In the absence of a rational way of 
phasing an industry down and out, 
the tendency in the United States and 
Western Europe is to protect it with 
quotas and other artificial means. 
Usually the effort is to shield the 
industry from foreign competition 
rather than to provide an incentive to 


adjust to a lower level of operations. 
Aid to the sled, textile, auto and 
other industries has not been condi- 
tioned on the companies and workers 
becoming more efficient. "The Unit- 
ed States doesn't have a good adjust- 
ment policy,” Mr. Peck said. "There 
are losers in international trade; and 
they are losers because of 



And Now a Minute of Silence, Sort of 


w 


ASHTNGTON — Now that 
ihe U.S. Supreme Court has 
blocked state-sponsored prayer in 
Alabama, maybe the decision will 
put the whole misguided thing to 
rest Yet in a way it’s a shame we 
can’t have prayer on an experimen- 
tal basis, just to show its advocates 
how negligible the effect would be 
on the would-be worshipers. 

I attended two British boarding 
schools where school prayer was as 
commonly accepted as geography 
class or a round of cricket, f have 
seen school prayer at work. In my 
humble opinion, it doesn't. 

I prayed at night from the age of 
7 to 17 under the covers of my 
dormitory bed. It was pretty much 
the same prayer (God forgive my 
neighbors, for the idiots know not 
what they do. And God forgive me, 
because, although I can't think of 
any instances today, Tm sure 1 
sinned somewhere along the line. 
Amen.l, but it was often a sponta- 
neous conversation with my Maker. 
There might be a brief plea for 
world peace or for universal love. 

Occasionally I was specific in my 
requests; a rugby victory the next 
day, or the love of the latest school- 
girl I had designs upon. But it was a 
voluntary act, and 1 did not need an 
officially sanctioned minute. 

There was obligatory morning 
prayer, und as a boarder 1 had to 


By Dress on Howe 


attend a 
well. The 


nightly prayer session as 
n,„. * uv religious week culminated 
in a marathon Sunday morning ser- 
vice. The Latin grace ("Bencdictus 
benedicat . . .'j oefore every meal 
should not go unmentioned. For 12 
years there was a whole lot of sup- 
plication in my life. 

The average morning school ser- 
vice be gin with a familiar Charles 
Wesleyhymn. Then, a reading from 
either Testament and a couple of 
medium-sized prayers later, the 
headmaster would take the occa- 
sion to address the latest metaphor- 
ical enemy of the British empire. 
(We schoolboys were usually that 
enemy, especially in light of some 
recently broken window in Mrs. 
Biddy’s office or similar apocalyp- 
tic events). We woe then informed 
that we had a few moments of si- 
lence to voice our own prayers. 

As some 500 boys, girls and 
teachers leaned forward en masse 
to bow their beads in prayer, you 
never heard such a cacophony of 
coughs, creaking pews and giggles. 
It was a deafening minute. 

For Richard A- the 15-year-old 
rebel, it was a chance to sit up m ms 

pew and cross his arms in a pomied 

gesture of rebellion. When we rose 
to sing hymns he sat defiantly. It 


made you son of embarrassed and 
awed at the same time to watch it, 
because you knew the headmaster 
bad to look up from his prayerbook 
sometime ana see the act 
I remember the minute well. My 
head would be tucked into the nook 
of my beat arm, my eyes pressed 
firmly against the orange dark of 
my dosed eyelids. Usually it was a 
chance to catch up on Josi sleep. 
Oftentimes my thoughts strayed 
not to scenes of the Sermon on the 
Mount but rather to thoughts of 
Jenifer or maybe a slow motion 
playback; of George Ben’s latest 
goal for Manchester United. It was 
a silence for anything but prayer. 

After 30 seconds of the “suent" 
minute, the beads would start pop- 
like so many champagne 
waiting for the headmaster's 
cue to end this agony. 

1 cannot help feeling some 
amusement when I see the passion 
that has gone into lobbying for a 
minute of silence. The ones who 
ray will certainly not be thwarted 
_ not having official time to do it 
in, and there seems little evidence 
that they would use the minute any- 
way. I can't see nonreligious kids 
suddenly seeing the light, either. I 
think most kids will use the occa- 
sion to throw spitballs. 

It’s a deafening waste of time. 

The Washington P>at. 




meats for which they’re not at fautL 
How should we deaf with them?” 

The Japanese example provides an 
answer “They have become eCfiricnt 
at creating an industry when it is 
competitive, and discarding it when it 
is not competitive.” For example, Ja- 
pan built its aluminum industry to 
the point in the early J970s where it 
became the second largest in the 
world, then "tore it down" by 1980 
when it was no longer competitive. 

According to Mr. Peck, starting in 
1978 the government developed legis-- 
lation to deal with “structurally de- 
pressed” industries. Fust of all there 
is the matter of definition; In Japan 
an industry can be desmnated by the 
government ‘‘structurally depressed” 
simply if it is in trouble. The troubles 
do not have to be the result of inter- 
national competition. 

The government can direct the in- 
dustry to reduce capacity. Thus, at 
the same time that the alnminnni in- 
dustry was told to cut capacity, it was 
ordered to raise prices, forcing con- 
sumers to share the costs of the con- 


traction with workers and the banks. 
The extra revenue was used to pay off 
hank loans and provide generous sev- 
erance pay of five to six limes annual 
salary tor top-paid workers. 

In addition, the Japanese policy £+ 
dealing with industrial losers places 
most of toe burden on the employer 
for relocating workers; with some 
government supplements in terms of 
unemployment compensation. 

"Japan has faced these problems 
better than we have, and better than 
.the other OECD countries," Mr. 
Peck said. “They understand that you 
have to reduce the size of some indus- 
tries so others can grow. But they 
haven't placed their reliance just on 
the force of toe market." 

• Such a bold industrial policy might 
not be feasible in Western Europe or 
America, where governments lack 
such control of the business commu- 
nity. But the idea of letting go instead 
of hanging on to industry when some- 
one can do it better or cheaper is 
aucial, provided that the problems 
of human dislocation are dealt with. 

Most of the Americans — includ- 
ing union spokesmen — and West 
Germans here agreed that better ad. 
justment techniques must be founiT 
But there is a problem of pride and 
"ego. For all its successes, Japan is still 
regarded, especially among Europe- 
ans, as an annoying upstart whose 
techniques and ideas need not be 
copied or adapted. 

The Washington Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Pakistan and ihe Bomb 

Regarding the report “ Gandhi Seeks 
Rapport With Washington" (June 5): 

Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
claims that Pakistan is building a 
nuclear weapon. This is not true. 
President Mohammed Zta ui-Haq 
and the government have repeatedly 
stated that Pakistan has no plans to 
make midear weapons and ihm our 
modest-sized atomic research pro- 
gram is solely for peaceful purposes. 

India, which in 1974 exploded an 
atomic bomb (euphemistically 
a “nuclear device"), is very rrmrR 
ahead of Pakistan in the nuclear fiddL 

Pakistan has time and ngom of- 
fered to India a mutual inspection of 
nadear facilities; the Indian response 
has been negative. Although India 
has not supported us, Pakistan has 
consistently worked at the United 
Nations for m a k i ng South Asia a nu- 
cleai^weapon-free zone: Pakistan has 
expressed its willingness to sign toe 
nuclear nonproliferation treaty pro- 
vided India also does sa The notear 

fuel we make in Pakistan is in 
quantity and it is not weapons grade. 

QUTUBUDDIN AZIZ. 

Embassy of Pakistan, 
London. 

Translation or Betrayal 

In response to m Uterary Murder at te 
a Word: Pitfalls far Translators* (Week- 
end May 31) by Jastf Sknredty: 

If, instead of Mr. Skvorecky’s theo- 
retical 54-a-word hack slaving to 
translate a book for a toree-mSnth 
deadline, one hired a professional 
translator at wo to three times that 
pnee and pushed the deadline wav 
back, one would get a proper job 
done But corporations that uriqd a . 
uooingly pay thousands of dollars Tor 
an advertising spread would rather 


have it translated by the "biling 
secretary in the next office than 
out a couple of hundred dollar 
have it professionally translated. 
. The s ame holds for professi 
interpretation, as your May 6 ar 
on court interpreting in Califo 
showed, and the United States is 
of toe worst offenders. Remen 
when President Jimmy Carter wei 
Poland injrn and, through his 
terpreter” inadvertently spoke 
^usis instead of aspirations? 

In- Europe, ihe current star 
price, for translation and interpr 
tom is 10c a word and S250 a. i 



or the AHC (Association I 
nahonale des Inteiprhtes de C 
rence). You get what you pay ft 
MALCOLM McFARLAE 


Your report "Pope Urges Wj 
Agftoia . Enslavement of Mankiik 
(May +0) has toe pope speaking 

French and cSmanTBe 
B « the lat 

guage spoken m the northern half < 
Belgium is Dutch {Neder lands). Thd 
is no such thing as a Flemish lat 
ghage. A icsim and a people in Be 
gium are called Flemish(Vteow). 

CJ. van GEEL. 
Hamont, Belgium. 





Page 5 





INTERNATIONAL HER AID TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


'Chemistry’ of 2 Lawmakers 
Is a Key to U.S. Budget Talks 


Letter Sent to 'Mrs. Elisabeth Regina’ 
Erroneously Duns Queen for Tractor 


Wh tin 


> I California investigators examining debris for human bone fragments. 

California Police Suspect 2 of Torture, 
Deaths of 20 at Remote Mountain Site 


The Associated Press 


WEST POINT, California — 
The authorities say they believe 
that two men, one of them a survi- 
valist who lolled himself while in 
police custody, may have been in- 
volved in die sexual torture and 
death of at least 20 persons at a 
remote mountain cabin. 


The remains of at least four per- 
sons have been found an the site, 
the police said. The Calaveras 
County sheriff, Claud Ballard, said 
the authorities have evidence indi- 
cating that the remains of more 
than 20 persons may have been 
burned and buried nearby. 


*1 hope they’re not there," he 
said, “but I have evidence to be- 
lieve that they are” 

Leonard T. Lake, 39, killed him- 
self by swallowing a cyanide cap- 
sule last week vdme he was in pdue 
custody in Sari Francisco. He was 
arrested after the police found that 
be had been driving a car belonging 
to a nmn mfering since November. 


Mr. Lake’s friend, Charles Ng, 
24. the subject of a nationwide 
manhunt, was named Tuesday in a 
federal warrant. He is wanted on a 
charge of unlawful flight to avoid 
prosecution and on loot warrants 
listing charges of kidnapping, false 


imprisonment and burglary, the 
authorities said. 

The police say they believe that 
the two men may be connected to 
the disappearances of at least 25 
persons, including Mr. Lake’s 
brother, Donald, a group of neigh- 
bors and a family of five who van- 
ished from a nearby camping 
ground. 

Investigators have found five 
bags of human bones, sexually ex- 
plicit photographs, videotapes of 
sexual torture involving Mr. Lake, 
Mr. Ng and women, charred hand- 
cuffs and jewelry at the rite near 
WHseyviile, 150 mOes (about 240 
kilometers) east of San Francisco. 


By Helen Dewar 

Washington Post Senice 

WASHINGTON — They are 
Capitol HUTs newest political odd 
couple: the outgoing, suave, self- 
confident black, clergyman from 
Philadelphia, and the intense, rum- 
pled ana often fretful son of an 
Italian-born grocer from Albu- 
querque, New Mexico. 

Except for the shared misery 
they face as chief negotiators of a 
complicated and politically tricky 
compromise to reduce the deficit, 
there is little to suggest a bond 
between Representative William 
H. Gray 3d, a Democrat, and Sena- 
tor Pete V. Domenici, a Republi- 
can, chairmen of the two chambers’ 
budget committees. 

Mr. Domenici, a Westerner from 
a small state who is generally con- 
servative, has headed the Senate’s 
budget panel since the Republicans 
took control of the chamber four 
years agp. He has carefully bal- 
anced the often-conflicting de- 
mands of the White House and his 
Republican colleagues. 

Mr. Gray, an Easterner from a 
big state who is as liberal as Mr. 
Domenici is conservative, took 
over as bead of the House budget 
panel a few months ago, earning 
high marks among Democratic col- 
leagues for his fledgling efforts to 
build a consensus within the party. 

These differences might seem to 
portend rough going for the House- 
Senate budget conference now in 
progress. 

Both the Senate and House bud- 
gets project savings of $56 billion in 
fiscal 1986, which begins OcL 1. 
The Senate verson does it with 
deeper cuts in domestic spending, 
including a one-year freeze on in- 
creases in Soda! Security benefits, 
while the House plan restricts mili- 



He said there was “room for ne- 
gotiating” on the amount of money 
the Pentagon spent each year, be- 
cause it might be using up the funds 
more slowly than planned. 

“We’re going to work on it,” Mr. 
Domenici said on a television news 
program. 

Later he told the conference 
committee, on its second day of 
deliberations, that he took issue 
with calls Monday by Mr. Gray for 
an increase in taxes. That issue “is 
not even before us.” he said. 


Agence Francc-Presu 

LONDON — Queen Elizabeth II received a letter from a credit 
company warning that she was in arrears in paying for a tractor for her 
Windsor farm, the Daily Mirror reported Wednesday. 

Addressed to “Mrs. Elisabeth Regina” at Buckingham Palace, the 
letter said that she was overdue in remitting £4,094 pounds (55,158) and 
included ibe routine warning that “unless due payment is made, steps will 
be taken.” 

The letter was returned to the credit company four days later with a 
handwritten notation on the envelope, “Not known at this address.” 

Geoff Snell, manager oT the credit company, said; “It is all due to a 
computer error. Our dealer did receive the money on time.” 


William H. Gray 3d 


lary spending more. 

Still, colleagues of the two chair- 


men say their “compatible chemis- 


Spellers Contend in Tears and Laughter 


try” may help the negotiations suc- 
ceed. 

Two years ago. when House-Sen- 
ate negotiations were near collapse 
in a dispute over spending on job 
programs, Mr. Gray and Mr. Do- 
menici got together in a back room 
over a couple of beers and a pack of 
cigarettes and agreed on a deal that 
broke the hnpaw. 

A few months later, Mr. Dome- 
niti was hospitalized during negoti- 
ations involving transporta lion ap- 
propriations, including a New 
Mexico road project that the sena- 
tor, facing re-election the following 
year, wanted to deliver to the home 
folks. 

A Domenici aide approached 
Mr. Gray, who was a House confer- 
ee on the measure. Mi. Gray came 
to the rescue, helping to assure the 
project’s inclusion in the bilL 

With this background, several 
members from both houses have 


■ Tax Changes Examined 

The Senate Finance Committee 
has begun public scrutiny of Preri- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s tax revision 
proposals, with one senator after 
another taking issue with central 
elements of the administration's 
plan. The New York Times report- 
ed. 

Questioning Treasury Secretary 
James A. Baker 3d on Tuesday, 
some senators expressed concern 
over such broad issues as the plan’s 
effects on overall government reve- 
nues and on the ability of Ameri- 
can manufacturers to compete in 
international trade. 

Other senators raised more nar- 
row questions, such as whether the 
changes would harm the life insur- 
ance and timber industries and 
would lead to rent increases. 


The tone was noticeably differ- 
ent from that of two weeks ago. 
when Mr. Baker gave the opening 
testimony at the House Ways and 
Means Committee. In the House, a 
clear bipartisan majority supported 
the thrust of the administration’s 
drive to reduce tax rates and abol- 
ish many deductions and other lax 
preferences. 


f Every piece of jewelry has a story to teii\ 



ilias LALAoUNISoJ 


PARIS - 364, RUE ST-HONORE (PLACE VENDOMEl 
GENEVA - -BON GENIE", ZURICH - “CRIEDER* 
ATHENS - 6. PANEPISTIMIOU AVENUE 
HOTEL GRANDE BRETAGNE & ATHENS HILTON 
MYCONOS. CORFU. RHODES 
NEW YORK - 4 WEST 57 TH STREET & FIFTH AVENUE 




By Betty Cuniberti 

Los Angela Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Velma 
D ekhi, a seventh-grader from San 
Diego, clutched a tear-soaked tis- 
sue as she remembered the dreaded 
agronome. 

“Tve never heard of the word,” 
she said, her head han grqg low, 
tears weQmgin her eyes. studied 
‘Words of the Champions.’ ”, 

But study is no longer enough at 
the National Spelling Bee, which 

- has gone big-tune with coaches, 

- years of preparation and, this time; 

Ja winner whose victory suggested 

Vthat previous National Spefimg Bee 

experience is a key factor. 

The winner, Bahi Natarajan, was 
one of four contestants competing 
in the National Spelling Bee for the 
third lime. Three of those third- 
timers made the final 10 this year. 

The competition has turned into 


- “Fm exhausted,” Mrs. Dekhi 
said. *Tve been helping her Ieam 
the words, -and Tve hardly left the 
house the last month and a half.” 


and be escorted off stage by a Bee 
staff member offering an enthusi- 
astic embrace or ] 


When it was all done, Balu Na- 
tarajan, 13, of Bolingbrook, Dli- 


noii. earned the trophy, the $1,000 
prize and television talk 


show invi- 
tations by first spelling “farrago." 
missed by the second-place finish- 
er, Kate Langley of Maine, and 
then spelling 


From the stage, lasas were led to 
a recovery room, where they could 
find soft drinks, potato chips and 
privacy. It came to be known as the 
“crying room." 


He was- instantly mobbed by re- 
porters in a scene that rivaled an) 
in the White House or -the 
CapitoL '•*» -••••' : 


“Some ay, some are relieved, 
and some of them run into their 
friends and start laughing," said 
one staff member who had been 
made. 


The spellas,' aged 9 to 14, had 
won regional bees and were span 1 
sored by local newspapers to cone 
to Washington, where they fell vie- . 
wn to works like “uxorious,” “bal- 
alaika,” “satrapy” and “mansue- 
tudt” . . 


To ward off a loss, the 101 girls 
and' 67 boys not only- brought par- 
ents — some of ■whom drilled mar 
children on spelling- lists in the 
Capital ffihon Hotel hallways — 
but others dntched stuffed ani- 
mals, a lucky pine cone or a good- 
luck marble, looking particularly 


trade high-five handshake as ca- 
maraderie blossomed. Several 
brought their autograph books and 
talked later about alt the friends 
they had made. 

While other childr en had gone 
on tours of Washington before the 
Bee began, Balu Natarajan had 
stayed in the bold, going ova lists 
of words for hours. He dripped his 
graduation ceremony, winch uxd: 
place mi the day be won. 

Balu, who finished 45th in 1983 
and 63d last year, said that the key 
to his w inning this year was that he 
“learned how to guess” at words he 
had not hood of, rather than just, 
disgustedly uttering the first letters 
that came to mind. Two of the 
words he had guessed at were 
“rheumatoid" and “dilatoriness.” 


child-Hke as they approached such 
ult fo 


something of a cerebral Olympics 
ne kids 


in the 60 years since nine 
spelled against each other in the 
first National Bee in 1925. 


In last week’s competition, 168 
spellers from 45 states, Mexico, 
Guam and the Virgin. Wands tack- 
led 71 9 words in a competition that 
lasted two foil days — all record 
numbers fra the Bee, sponsored by 
the Scripps-Howard newspaper 
company. 

“I don’t think the smartest one 
wins, I think the luckiest one wins,” 
said Velma’s mother, Khairiya 
„ Dekhi, who looked more exasperat- 
ed than her daughter after the 
fourth-round misspdL 


“Syllepsis” sent one three-time 
competitor off the stage in tears. 
On came diseases, drugs, codring 
terms, Yiddish, Reach and Japa- 
nese words and slang terms like 
“gnmgy” — no word was too 
weird. 


towering adult foes as “mannora- 
ceous” and “lagniappe:” 

Another speller expressed shod: 
and indignation when the official 
offered “fescue” to her. 


The winner was one of many 
spellers who were bilingual off- 
spring of immigrant parents. 


Dung Minb Le, 
Ana, Calif or 


“What?!!!" she gasped in disbe- 
lief. 


At times it seemed almost crueL 
Kid after kid — (heir braces gleam- 
ing, huge eyeglasses glistening — 
marched to the microphone in 
front of hundreds of spectators, 
three rows of television cameras, 
dozens of reporters and a panel of 
judges with earphones plugged into 
an audio and taping system, all 
them essentially waiting fra 167 
kids to hear the beH (wrong!”) 


Interminably, the spellers rolled 
their eyes, stared at the ceding and 
Tried envisioning words by tearing 
them on their palms with a finger. 
They asked for definitions, root 
language, alternate prommdations 
and use of the word in a sentence. 
And then, some of them would 
ponder the word some more. 


14,' of Santa 
Forma, is a Vietnamese 
refugee who began I earning English 
seven years ago- She was one of 
many spellers who had a coach. 

The coach drilled her fra an hour 
and a half almost every day after 
school for a month. They studied 
“Words of the Champions,” a list 
put out by the Bee, and also began 
gping through the dictionary. 

“We got through the G’s,” said 
Dung, who had never heard the 


word “precentor,” despite all ha 
(. “I memorize as many words 


After a particularly surprising 
iris would 


correct spelling, some girls 
exchange hugs or the boys would 


study. ~i memorize as many wo 
as I can. I can spell about half the 
words they gave here, and would be 
able to guess some more.” 


suggested that Mr. Gray and Mr. 
Domenici conld resolve their dis- 
putes on the deficit with relative 
ease if left to their own resources. 

But each has powerful clients: 
for Mr. Domenici.. the White 
House, and for Mr. Gray, the 
House's Democratic majority and 
leadership. 

Nonetheless, House and Senate 
sources bold out hope for compro- 
mise, partly, they say. because of 
Mr. Gray as the new factor in the 
equation. 

Senate Republicans are wary but 
hopeful 

“Bill Gray could charm a rattle 
off a rattlesnake," said a Domenici 
aide. 

. House Democrats, who have 
bom won and lost in dealing with 
1 'TKe. persistent Mr. Domeniri, are 
quick, in turn, to praise the New 
Mexico senator. 

. “He’s formidable in defending 
the indefensible" said Representa- 
tive Thomas J. Downey of New 
York, in what was apparently 
meant as high praise. 

But Mr. Downey contended that 
Mr. Gray, despite his relative lack 
of experience, would be “more than 
a match fra Domenici,” an 
meat frequently made by oi 
House Democrats. 

“Domenid’s going to have his 
hands full," said Representative 
Butler Derrick of South Carolina. 
“If he doesn’t watch out, he’ll wind 
up agreeing with Bill Gray without 
even knowing it” 

■ Hope for Compromise 

Mr. Domenici hinted Wednes- 
day that the House and Senate 
budget negotiators might be able to 
reach a compromise on military 
spending, United Press Interna- 
tional reported. 




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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


Alfonsm Seen as Pursuing Peronist Legacy in Feeding Hungry 



7 . -4 


By Lydia Chavez 

Neve York Times Servin' 

SAN SALVADOR DE JUJUY, 
Argentina i— Juan Perfm’s populist 
government handed out bread and 
cider to the masses in the 1940s. 
Nowadays, President Raul AlTon- 
siru who routed the Peranists 18 
months ago. is distributing flour, 
sugar and corned beef hash. 

The distribution of food might 
have seemed odd once in a country 
where the bounty of cattle is leg- 
endary. But growing numbers of 


Argentines, especially children, ore 
suffering from malnutrition. 

In the biggest government hand- 
out in the country’s histoty, Mr. 
Alfonsb is trying to cut the hunger 
by feeding about 16 percent of the 
population, or more than one mil- 
lion families, with monthly deliver- 
ies of 30-pound (13.6-kiIograro} 
boxes of food. 


Alfonsin's program suspect in the 
eyes of political rivals. The presi- 
dent came into office as a strong 
critic of Perbn, but some question 
whether Mr. Alfonsms largesse 
might not have similar political 


Although there is an obvious 
need for the food, the Peron legacy 
and Perin’s ability to woo the 
masses with handouts make Mr. 





Alicia Lugones, a government 
official, defended the program as 
answering a “terrible need” that 
Mr. Alfonsin recognized as soon as 
he took office in December 1983. 
The standard of living, in Argentina 
has dropped greatly since the 
1940s, and humanitarian groups es- 
timate that 35 percent of Argentine 
children suffer from malnutrition. 

Still, some opponents said bey 
believed that the National Food 


plan, known by its Spanish acro- 
nym PAN, which means bread, 
helps to dampen animosity that 
might be bribing toward the gov- 
eminent because of its failure to 
revive the economy. The annual 
inflation rate now is more than 

1,000 percent. . 

The food program, the cnucs 
said, couid be a big plus for Mr. 
Alfonsm and the Radical Party in 
the November congressional elec- 
tions. Julio Barbaro, a prominent 
Penwist, said he supported the pro- 
gram as a “palliative but was wor- 
ried that the government was creat- 
ing an institution of aid instead of. 
jobs. . . , 

Whatever the political argu- 


ments, the program's tactics of di- 
viding the connixy's 22 provinces 
into many sectors with agents in 
charge of distributing the Food en- 
ables the Radical Party to keep is 
touch with the poor, who have tra- 
ditionally voted for the Peronist 
Party. Pterin made the daarmisa- 
das, or shinless ones, his constitu- 
ency. No out in four decades has 
been able to lure them away. 

Whether bread and flour wil] get 
the poor to embrace the Radical 
Party is a heated question in pV»r»s 
like Jujuy province, which shares 
its northern border with Bolivia, 
and Salta province, just south of 
Jujuy. The program in those areas 
has caused something of a tug-of- 




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•war over the food boxes, which 
government officials estimate ffll 
one-third rtf a family's calorie 
needs. 

Although the Radicals adminis- 
ter die food program, it splits the 
distribution with the Peronists. 
There is sometimes a struggle be- 
tween the two groups over who gets 
the boxes and who gets the credit. 

Juju and Salta, with their arid 
climate, are among the country’s 
poorest provinces. Unemploymeii 
and underemployment -rates are 
higher than the national average of 
10 percent, and in some towns the 
infant mortality rale exceeds 100 
per 1,000 births. 

The political problems are more 
acute in Salta, where last week the 
food distribution was halted be- 
cause of interparty bickering. 

SUvana Natal, a Radical who 
works for the program, said that an 


^ * • 



i ifa; 1 

1 ‘ 94 ** 


A Saudi "S 

who brought her children to a ivam* 


investigation had Found that same mT« * * 

SSSSS” UN Official Sap Nmum 
*SrtSjt£S5 Bid Facts About Famine 


■■■mm 






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MODERN PAIimNGS 

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* i - -y* 


,■1* 


the Peronist workers, but the work- 
er managed to rouse support and 
the other Peronists went out on 
strike Since then, the bickering has 
been reduced to a relatively low 
leveL 

The people receiving the boxes 
seezn an disturbed by the politics 
involved, and it is hard to tell if it 
win make a difference in their 
votes. 

“It’s not political," said Irma 
Torres, who has four children, add- 
ing that sh e preferred the Peronist 
Party and intended to stay with 
them. 


New York Tima Seme* 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York —A UN official has asserted 
that General Gafaar Nimein. the 
former president of Sudan, deliber- 
ately suppressed information about 
the developing famine in his coun- 
try. aflowingtbe situation to devel- 
op to crisis proportions. 

The government of General Nt- 
meirt, who was overthrown in a 
coup in early April, “hid a lot of 
information” and ministers were 


“begging us not to publicize” fam- 
ine conditions, said Samir Basra. 




Unlawful Arrests, Torture Continue 




An explosion believed to have been caused by a grenade thrown through the window at the 
right injured Deputy Minister LuweDyn Landers in South Africa on Wednesday. 


Under Obote, Bights Group Asserts 


New York Times Service 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


South African Official Hurt in Blast 


NEW YORK — Amnesty Inter- 
national has alleged that Ugandan 


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The attacks, near Cape Town, 
were the first in recent years 
against national political figures 
associated with the white-led South 
African govemmenL 


tion. It demanded that all members 
of Parliament resign because the 
legislature excludes the nation's 
black majority. 

Luwellyn Landers, who was 
named a deputy cabinet minister 
last week, was in critical condition 
at Groote Schuur Hospital after a 
grenade was tossed into his home at 
2 A.VL. the spokesman said. 


A group calling itself the “West- 
ern Cape Suicide Squad” claimed 
responsibility in a telephone call to 
the South African Press Associa- 


ted Peters, 37, national secre- 
tary of the Labor Party for people 
of mixed race, escaped injury when 
a grenade went off in his home 25 
muntes later. 

The Reverend HJ. Hendrickse, 


leader of the Labor Party, said. 
“Those organizations which, up to 
now, have been ratling for the res- 
ignation of Mr. Landers must be 
hdd responsible for creating the 
atmosphere of violence.” 

Ana-apartheid groups have criti- 
cized mixed-race and Asian politi- 
cians who joined new, segregated 
chambers at Parliament to sit 
alongside the white cham ber. 

The new South African Consti- 
tution. which took effect last Sep- 
tember, excludes the black majority 


of 22 million people, who are con- 
sidered citizens of 10 tribal home- 
lands. 


W tribal borne- 


civilians continue to be unlaw fully 
detained and systematically tor- 
tured by troops and security forces 
of the government of President 
Milton Obote. 

The Human rights group said its 
findings were based on examina- 
tions given by two physicians last 
February to 16 Ugandans who had 
been imprisoned between early 
1981 and late 1984 before fleeing 
the country. According to the doc- 
tors, 15 of the refugees showed 
symptoms and other medical evi- 
dence consistent with the tortures 
they told of having undergone. 

Reports of widespread killin gs, 
mass arrests, disappearances and 
large numbers of bodies left behind 
by unknown killers have come 
from Uganda with regularity since 


the fall of the regime of Idi Amin in 
April 1979. But the Ugandan gov- 
ernment has consistently denied 
such accounts. 

Amncsry’s report noted Ugan- 
da's denials that its army was hold- 
ing civilians and called on Kampa- 
la to take steps to prevent torture, 
ensure that families of detainees 
were notified, legal charges filed 
and prisoners promptly brought to 
trial with legalcounseL 

The report said the doctors 
found evidence that tbe former 
prisoners had been beaten with 
hammers, rifle butts, iron bars and 
pieces of wood with nails in them. 

One of the men examined, the 
report said, had been castrated 
with what be said were cattle geld- 
ing tongs. Another former prisoner 
showed signs bearing out ha - asser- 
tions that die had been raped and 
beaten. % 


chief representative for the UiM 
Nations Children's Fund (UNI- 
CEF) in the Sudan, on Tuesday*. 

Although nutritional sufvew. as 
early as 1983 showed signs of m- 
creasing malnutrition among Suda- 
nese children, the government s re- 
fusal to request aid meant that 
relief efforts were postponed. Dr. 
Basra said. 

General Nimetns government 
declared an emergency m one prov- 
ince and appealed for aid in De- 
cember only after about 50.000 ref- 
ugees from the ramine gathered 
near Khartoum, the Sudanese capi- 
ial. Despite attempts to limit press 
access to the famine victims. Gen- 
eral Nimeiri “couldn't hide it any- 
more.” Dr. Basra said. 

The new Sudanese government, 
which is headed by General Abdul 
Rahman Swareddahab. is “far 
more open" to publicizing the fam- 


! I- ' "■* 

* m 


ine and has responded raputy iu 
the crisis. Dr. Basra said. Drought 
has devastated every region in the 
Sudan, and by year's end the fam- 
ine will affect about half of (be 
nation's population of more than 
20 million. . 

If the famine continues and relief ■ 
is not received, one million Suda- ’ 
nese children under the age of eight < 
will die in the next year. Dr. Basra ' 
said. That would be five times the . 
normal number,.he added. ; 

In southern Sudan, where a re-; 


volt by non-Moslem forces has: 
blocked receipt of shipments of! 
emergency supplies for the last six 
months, Sudanese officials have 
appealed for an immediate airlift of 
supplies, accordum to a UNICEF 
report received Monday. . . . 


■«4t /**;;.*’ 

K - •# » 


: * 


G 

VkV.. . 










INTERNATIONAL GERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


Page 


While Bombs Fall on Tehran, 
Baghdad Is Spared Pain of War 


• - JSLV 
. . -7TK- ■ 


Hi- 

fin,; 

ills 




s 


“■ HI ■ 




*'«/ f; 




By Christopher Dickey 

WutegtoK i’a*/ Service 

Baghdad — while Iraqi 
bombs rain on Tehran, there is not 
so much as a blackout or a curfew 
here. 

Baghdad at night is a city of 
lights, a blanket of bright highways 
and buCT streets, and its sky Hue is 
resplendent with ultramodern ho* 
tels for businessmen extrava- 
gant monuments to the mar tyr, of 
the Gulf war. 

The only visible Homage sus- 
tained in recent fighting has been 
the destruction of an empty set of 
bleachers in a Baghdad soccer sta- 
dium hh by an Iranian mi«ili» 

In the capital where about a 
quarter of Iraqis live, the govern- 
ment of President Saddam Hussein 
makes every effort to spare the 
population the pain — even the 
inconvenience — of the war. 

The situation is said to be modi 
worse in Basra, a city of one million 
people near the Iranian border in 
southeastern Iraq. On days a 
hundred or more artillery shells 
have landed in the city, muring 
widespread da may. »n ^ panic, ac- 
cording to foreigners returning 


from there. Bat those attacks have 
gone ini reported -in Baghdad and 
foreign Journalists have bees un- 
able to visit the border area. 

Despite the efforts to keep the 
war out of sight in the capital even 
here, it is saiH, almost everyone has 
lost someone in the fighting. While 
the country has developed rapidly 
in the last five years, questions nave 
grown about why the war need con- 
tinue at all There is a certain sense, 
amid all the education and devel- 
opment, that there is ever more to 
lose. 

"This war has to end,” said a 
frustrated medical student. *71 ra- 
ins your life. You lode at uneducat- 
ed people and maybe for them ft 

doesn’t matter. They are not suffer- 
ing. But we have to bear this bur- 
den.” 

^%^’h^werw hrirnni^, with 
an ~**m»»*d 4-1 superiority m air- 
power, including sophisticated 
French and Soviet jets. Os the 
ground, unfitaiy -analysts in Iraq 
say they believe that Iraq has 3-1 
superiority in amfcs and mecha- 
nized titfiw 

Almost daily far three weeks 


Syria Is Viewed as Stymied 
la Imposing Lebanese Order 


IllUSilf 

■VM f > 


(CotUmned from Page !) - - 
that there is no quick solution for 
Lebanon. 

Editorials in the government- 
; * controlled press are taking a similar 

- line, sounding the theme that , as 
one put it, “Lebanon cannot be 

‘ reconstructed from the outside.” 

“Syria is not eager to be taken 
into the Lebanese quagmire,” a 

- Syrian source stud. He went on to 
v say that Damascus, involved in 
•’ Lebanon since 1976, had absorbed 

the lessons so painfully learned by 
-* the United States and Israel: that 

- to move directly into Lebanon is to 
be drawn into its conflicts; to be 
seen as an ally of any group is to 

- become the enemy of the others. 

Thus, although Syria is widely 

- viewed as having emerged as the 
victor in Lebanon after the Ameri- 

: can and Israeli failures, which were 
in part the result of Syrian-support- 
ed clandestine attacks, Damascus 
realizes that it would be difficult to 

- impose a mandate. 

The upshot, diplomats in Da- 

- mascus and Beirut speculate, is that 
Syria will simply mkw, and per- 
haps at times encourage, the vari- 
ous Lebanese factions to bash away 

- at one another until they become so 
weakened and demoralized that 

■4 


they are ready to appeal for Syrian 
intervention. 

The most pressing of the current 
issues, «nd one that has become 
increasingly embarrassing for Syr- 
ia, has been the battle for the Pales- 
tinian refugee settlements. 

The extended battle is widely 
seen as a miscalculation by Syria 
and has strained its ties with other 
radical states,, notably Iran and 
Libya. The battle has also called 
into question Syria's position as the 
champion of the Pales tinians 

The situation in Jezzine, which 
some Western diplomat believe 
wfl] become the next Lebanese 
bloodbath, appeals to have been 
put on the back burner. About 
8,000 Christian refugees have fled 
into the town from fighting around 
Sidon, whidrwas shelled for no 
apparent reason by Christian mifi- 
tiaroea. Moslems and Palestinians 
then overran, burned and looted 


Most difficult in the long run, 
and the key to all of the problems, 
is change m the Lebanese political 
system — an allocation of power by 
religious sect — that has been the 
sutgect of 10 years of fighting. In 
this, too, the Syrian influenc e has 
been felt but it has not been deri- 
sive in making a change. 


Iraqi planes have bombed Tehran 
or other Iranian cities. They have 
stepped up the pace of the war 
along the Gulf with reported at- 
tacks around Kharg Is land, the ma- 
jor Iranian ml terminal, and con- 
tended that they have captured 
Iranian miliuiy positions m the 
southern marshes east of the Tigris 
River. 

[At least 41 civilians were irin«t 
and 51 were wounded on Tuesday 
when Iraqi planes bombed the 
town of Sardasht in Iranian Kurdi- 
stan, The Associated Press quoted 
the Iranian news agency ERNA as 
reporting. 

[An Iraqi military spokesman, 
meanwhile, reported Iraqi air raids 
Wednesday on five Iranian border 
cities, among them Abadan, Ker- 
manshah anl Hftrinn; on the army 
camp of Rebat, and on a ship in the 
Gun off the coast of Tran ] 


Iraq is fighting a limited war with 
defensive objectives and, after al- 
most five years erf combat, several 
foreign military analysts in Bagh- 
dad say they believe that. Iraq’s 
strategy of liying to “calibrate” its 

actions ayjqft T nm may Iwiit ei ther 

to interminable stalemate or to de- 
feat 

Almost since its troops first 
rolled across the border, Iraq has 
called fra 1 cease-fires and negotiat- 
ed settlements. It has accepted ev- 
ery international mediation effort 
and in 1982 withdrew to its own 
borders. 

It now attempts to gather inter- 
national s up port as the peacemaker 

pitted jnt pmaynl I ranian 

fanaticism. 

New oO pipelines under con- 
struction are expected to renew 
Iraq’s petroleom export capacity 
ana tints shore up its economy, 
officials say, far as long as it takes 
to wear down Iran’s resistance. 

“Victory far as,” said a senior 
government official, “is to defend 
ourselves until the other side gives 
upu If s not a question at hitting the 
j ugular or dropping bombs like at 
Hiroshima. There is no jugular.” 

“Obviously we cannot occupy 
Iran or even Tehran,” the official 
said. “There is a halfway point, and 
that is to hit very hard at their 
economic targets.” 

Yet, Iran keeps pushing bark 
Ayatollah Rnhouah Khomeini in- 
sists that there cannot be peace 
until Iraq admits H was the aggres- 
sor and Saddam Hussein’s govern- 
ment has fallen. 

“What is etadmg us,” said the 
senior Iraqi official who asked not 
to be emoted by name, “is bow to 
persuade the Iranians that to ex- 
prat the revolution, to dictate the 
government of Iraqis not negotia- 
ble, not achievable/' 


■.rl >4fc.. 

§SSK. 



Tl» Anocmed hen 

MAKING A NEW REEF — A derelict Dutch freighter. Renegade, was sunk Monday 
to form another artificial reef in the Atlantic off Florida's Broward County coast. The 
sheriffs bomb and arson squad exploded 80 pounds of dynamite to sink the freighter. 


In Giinzburg, Mengele 
Still Casts a Shadow 


AntirBridsh Incidents Worry Italy 


By E.J. Dionne Jr. 

New York Tima Service 

ROME — British and Italian of- 
ficials say they are concerned about 
scattered anti-British violence in It- 
aly after the rioting at a soccer 
match in Brussels two weeks ago 
that left 38 people dead and more 
than 450 injured. 

British fans were widely blamed 
for wtaat happened at Heysel stadi- 
um — 31 of the dead were Italians 
— and British officials have 
warned tourists traveling here that 
they might run into violence. 

Since the rioting May 29. a fire- 
bomb was thrown at a British 
school in Milan, windows in British 
tour buses and cars have been 
smashed, and tourists have been . 
roughed up in northern I talian cit- 
ies. 

Dozens of British tourists have 
canceled visits to Italy, charter' 
planes have arrived with seats un- 
expectedly empty, and some tour 


pool and the Juventus team of Tu- 
rin. Many of the dead were crushed 
when a wall collapsed during the 
fighting. 

Mr. Mole said his state travel 
agency received 50 to 70 cancella- 
tions m the first two days after the 
riot, out of its annual total of 
30,000 to 40,000 bookings. 

It is estimated that 1.4 milli on 
Britons visited here in 1984, an in- 
crease of about 100.000 over 1983. 

To avert further cancellations, 
the Italian minister of tQiiritm, I e - 
lio Lagorio, said that he would visit 
Britain soon to assure Britons they 
would be welcomed. 

[Mr. Lagorio said Wednesday 


that British tourists were welcome 
in Italy and need not fear for their 
safety. The Associated Press re- 
portal 

[“Problems of security" for Brit- 
ish tourists “do not exist.” he said. 
“Security is guaranteed.” He said 
the Brussels rioting was caused by 
“microscopic social groups” ana 
not by the entire British nation.] 

British officials are also idling 
those who ask that they will be safe 
in Italy. But Gordon Pine, a 
spokesman for the British Embas- 
sy, said: “We’re idling them to 
keep a low profile and don’t wear a 
Union Jade walking down the Via 
Veneta" 


A'c*- York Tmies Serme 

GUNZBURG. West Germany 
— To many people, the signs lead- 
ing off country roads into this Ba- 
varian town have an accusatory 
tone: “Mengple-Gunzburg.” 

The reference is to the Karl Men* 
gele & Sons, a farm-machinery con- 
cern that put Giinzburg ou the map 
at die turn of the century. 

The company still provides a 
livelihood for about a tenth or the 
local population, as wdl as a 
healthy portion of the town reve- 
nues, but the name Mengele is also 
a source of intense frustration. 

“The people of this city are frus- 
trated baa use their city is forever 
identified with the person of Men- 
gde.” said Mayor Rudolf Koppler, 
referring to Dr. Josef Mengele. 

Josef Mengele. one of three sons 
of Karl Mengde. left his birthplace 
in 1930. but it has been hard for 
Gunzbtng 10 rid itself of him. 

Since 1945. Giinzburg residents 
have been interviewed and investi- 
gated on the whereabouts of Dr. 
Mengele, but never more than in 
the test six months. 

In this town of 19.000, on the 
Danube 14 miles (22 kilometers) 
east of Ulm, the name Simon Wie- 
senthal, the Vienna-based Nazi- 
hunter, slips off the tongue of the 
most apolitical citizens. As do ru- 
mors such as: Was the man in a 
beard and dark sunglasses at the 
funeral of Karl Mengele in 1959 the 
“Angel of Death” himself? 

Giinzburg residents seemed gen- 
erally skeptical this week that the 
remains being examined in Brazil 
are those of Dr. Mengele. 

“Everyone knows he was inhu- 
mane, but after 40 years why make 
such a drama out of it?” said a man 
of 41 who refused to give his name 
because he once worked for the 
Meugeles. 

There is little praise to be heard 


for Dr. Mengele in Giinzburg. but 
there is a fair amount of rational*' •' 
ization. 

"Maybe he did some had things.-' : 
some things which were bad for 
Germany." said Richard Meyer. 
50. “But what the Americans did at ’ 
Dresden also wasn't so great.’’ The 
reference was to an American and 
British bombing raid in 1945 which 
historians say killed 90,000 to * 
150,000 people. 

A man who was a young soldier - 
in Hitler’s Wehrmachi said, “When. - 
the Israelis commit crimes, no one.' 
says a word, but Mengele is fol- 
lowed until his dying day.” 

The mayor, referring to an SS' 
reunion last month, smd: “Many 
were critical of the SS meeting at: 
Nes&eiwang recently, as was 1. But I 
also know there are much worse 
Nazis in Italy.” 

GQnzburg has tried to deal with' 
the legacy of the man Mayor 
Koppler says “threw a monstrous 
shadow on our city.” 

In 1983. on the 50th anniversary 
of Hiller’s rise to power, major pol- 
iticians of the city issued a state- 
ment. It did not discuss Dr. Men- 
gele’s crimes in details but noted: 
“As long as he lived in Giinzburg. 
nothing negative was known about “ 
him. On the contrary." 

One Giinzburg defender of Dr. . 
Mengele is Josef Baumeister. a Tor- -j 
mer schoolteacher who knew Dr. . 
Mengele. He has caused heated de- i 
bate in the local newspaper with his * 
conciliatory' view. 

In a poem entitled “To Josef;’ 
Mengele.” Mr. Baumeister wrote, • 
“Your homeland will not throw ; 
stones at you.” » 

A woman who works fra the: 
Mengele company, not wishing to ‘ 
be overheard, whispered: “Why: 
pick on Giinzburg? He could have , 
been bom in Italy, in America or in 
Hamburg.” ’ 


Brazil Handwriting Experts Find Link to Mengeie 


(Continued from Age 1) 
the handwriting in the SS 


operators have raid they are wor- application and the, Sfio Paulo 


y larity in 
appheatii 

ried that the number of eventual notes mrfuded “the letters T, D. E, 
cancellations could be large. and L and the number 7." 

But Carlo Mole, president of the • The similari ty Mr. 

Italian state travel agency CIT, said Mota said, although tbe- Sao Paulo 

notes woe written “with a 
hand” and showed signs of 
jty and indecision.” 

-The Mengde affair attracted 
new attention Thursday when po- 
lice unearthed a body at a cemetery 
in Embu, a small town near Sio 
Paulo. They said they , were almost 
sure the body was that of Dr. Men- 
gele. 

In. Frankfurt, West Germany, 


predictions that “thousands” of 
Britons would cancel their trips 
were based on projections from 

otmUpt nnm hers of canrHlariqns 

that have crane in so far. 

British and Italian officials also 
say the anti-British feelings that 
swept Italy immediately after the 
riot have begun lb abate: Each side 
has made gestures to reassure the 
other. 


The rioting took place before the _ 1 1 .9_and German in vestigator s said 
European Cup final between Liver- Wednesday they would continue 


the search for the doctor despite 
the assertion by the Mengele family 
that he had drowned in Brazil. 

The Mengde family has given 
prosecutors no proof that Dr. Men- 
gele died in 1979, said Hans-Eber- 
naid Klein, the West German pros- 
ecutor investigating the case. 
“There’s a certain degree of 
that Mengde could 
died in Brazfl,” Mr. Klein said 
at a news conference. “But the case 
win rally be dosed for us when it is 
certain that he is dead.” 

■ Afore Evidence Offered 

Richard House <4 The Washing- 
ton Post reported earlier from S3o 
Pardo: . 

A third family sought as South 


American protectors of Dr. Men- 
gde has been found and has cor- 
roborated accounts of the activities 
of a man said to have been Dr. 
Mengde, according to the police 
chief of Sao Paulo. 

Chief T tima said Tuesday thai 
Ernesto Glawe, an Argentinian cit- 
izen of Ge rman extraction, and his 
son, Noiberto, had sheltered a man 
introduced to them as Peter Ger- 
hard, in need of “fraternal bdp” 
fra two mouths in 1976. 

Tbe Glawes were introduced to 
Peter Gerhard, now suspected of 
having been Dr. Mengde, by an 
Austrian, Wolfgang Gerhard, the 
police chid said. He added that 
“this indicates that all the relation- 


ships permitted to Mengde” were 
through Wolfgang Gerhard. 

Chief Tuma added that the.- 
Glawes said Peter Gerhard had-, 
.told them he had been looked after’ ' 
by a Hungarian couple. This supv 
ported testimony of Gitta Stains 
mer. who said she and her husband-, 
had aided Dr. Mengele. 

Tbe Glawes said they had cared, 
for the man believed to have been.’ 
Dr. Mengde until they noted an - 1 
advertisement in a ma gazin e by hi^ 
bedside for the Mengele farm im^ 

plement company. T his made them* 

suspect his iaentity, they said. The 1 
man had told them, the Glawe}'- 
said, that he had been a doctor in ; 
the Germany Army, tending iher 
wounded. 




Where would Bond be without Philips? 


Special software was written to enable the products to 
play their roles. 

There was Philips light when special light was needed. 
And other innovative products as the Philishave play a major 
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It’s not without reason that Philips is part of the action 
from the beginning of “A View To A Kill” to the final credit, 
as James Bond’s, impeccable taste is known around the world. 

We hope you will enjoy the film, as much as we 
enjoyed working with the film crew. 

James Bond. The sure sign of great film entertainment. 
Philips. The sure sign of innovation. 


. Probablyjames Bond would be in trouble. Because 
Philips is the only company that could supply all the advanced 
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“A View To A Kill”. 

Approached by the 007-team because of its well- 
known expertise, it was Philips that made the impossible 
possible. Both in front of and behind the camera. 

Various Philips divisions, like Communications and 
Control, Domestic Appliances, Consumer Electronics and 
Viewdata contributed to the new episode of the world’s most 
successful film series. 

Philips. Business Systems took care of the computers, 
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PHILIPS 






Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 

SCIENCE 


Costly Machines Fuel Debate on Research 


By William J. Broad 

New York Tima Senna 

B IG machines that push back 
the frontiers of science are be- 
coming so large and expensive that 
they are starting to overwhelm lab- 
oratory budgets, distort the process 
of project evaluation by the U. S. 
federal government and threaten 
the pace of progress, according to 
science policy experts, 

“We nave a crisis developing" 
said Representative George E. 
Brown Jr„ a California Democrat 
who has served on the House Sri- 
'ence Committee for two decades. 
“We need to rethink our values and 
'priori ties." 

Atom smashers large enough to 
circle New York Gty, lasers the 
size of football fields and other big 
machines — some proposed ana 
. some already in operation — baye 
become central to new findings in 
'such fields as panicle physics, as- 
■uonomy, materials science, organic 
'chemistry, molecular biology, com- 
puter science and energy research. 

• Many of these proposed ma- 
chines would cost hundreds of mil- 
lions, even billions, of dollars- But 
'some are now being delayed or cut 
outright from the federal budget 
• Will scientists, faced with insu- 
perable expenses. End less expen- 
sive ways of learning the same 
things? Some scientists are already 
searching for small-scale experi- 
ments that can produce big-scale 
results. 

* The trend toward giant macbin- 
-ery started decades ago in atomic- 

■ nkuei/w kut kiC rWWltlv 



Tta f'fcfa B<4r Library 

Ernest O. Lawrence, in 
1930, with one of the first 
atomic-research devices. 


the scientific revolution, big re- 
search equipment is needed in 
many cases because most of the 


particle physics, but has recently “easy” discoveries have already 

A (Man m'uix MvKinnv nlsnfinl hv 


;of the Congressional Office of 
■Technology Assessment. “The rest 
of science is going over the bound- 
:ary,” he said. 


bon large optical infrared tele- 
scope; a $ 160 - million synchrotron 
radiation facility for condensed- 
matter studies; a $ 185-million reb- 


uild ear physics; a $240-mfllion nu- 
clear reactor for neutron studies; 
and the Superconducting Super 
Collider, a particle accelerator that 
might cost 53 hiflinn to 56 bDhon 
andmeasure up to 100 miles in 
circumference. 

None of these is especially revo- 
lutionary in design. Their advan- 
tage is then size, viewed as increas- 
ing the chance of discovery. But the 
timing of their planned construc- 
tion may be off . 

“Science has become more capi- 
tal intensive at a time when federal 
support for research programs has 
slowed its growth,” said Dr. Don- 
ald Kennedy, president of Stanford 
University. 

Some universities have begun to 
sidestep what has traditionally 

been a cartful screening by dm fed- 
eral government of the scientific 
merits of various proposals, going 
directly to Congress to lobby. Rob- 
ert M. Rosenzweig, the president of 
the Association of American Uni- 

re treafto “the law of the political 
jungle." .... 

Another source of tension is aris- 
ing over who should finance giant 
research projects if the federal gov- 
ernment curtails its support. 

Private industry has recently 
started to join in, especially at uni- 
versities. For instance, the Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corp. 
and Floating Point Systems are 
providing Cornell University with 
about $30 million in computing 
equipment The motive behind 
such investments is often that the 
contributor will get preferential ac- 
cess to new discoveries, an idea at 
odds with traditions of open scien- 
tific publication. 

This year the Reagan adminis- 
tration reduced by more than half 
— to $70 millio n from $154 million 


its request of funds for a key 

scientific project, development c£ 
laser devices to produce electrical 
power. 

The laser cuts threaten to shut 
down two of the biggest such ma- 
chines in the world: the S62-mi2km 
An tares laser at the Los Alamos 


aiy, he said. matter studies; a Sles-muiion reia- nanon reauccu i 

Three centuries after the start of tivistic heavy-ion accelerator for — to $70 million 


Soviet Balloon Sends Data on Venus 


By Serge Schemann 

New York Thna Service 

M OSCOW — A planetary weather balloon began 
sending data on the clouds and winds of Venns 
on Tuesday after being dropped into the planet's 
atmosphere by Vega- 1, the Soviet spacecraft on its 
way to a rendezvous with Halley’s comet 
The balloon, floating at an altitude of about 33 
miles (53 kilometers) above the surface of Venus, 
jegan transmitting across the 300 millio n mites to 
cooperating radiotelescopes around the world, includ- 
ing two in the United States. 

Soviet television Tuesday showed excited operators 
receiving the first signals from the balloon. A silver- 
colored model of the balloon was shown floating 
through terrestrial air. V. T. Perinov, deputy director 
of the Vega program, told an interviewer that Venu- 
sian wind patterns seemed similar to the Earth. 


The balloon was launched into Venus's atmosphere 
last Sunday in a package with a landing capsule, which 
made the first la n din g on the planet's night side to 
perform a complex senes of tests of the soiL 

The Soviet press agency Tass said the module had 
made a soft landing in the Mermaid Plain. The 
landing module, on its way down, took readings of the 
cloud layer and the chemical composition of the atmo- 
sphere. Later this week, Vega-rs twin space probe, 
Vega-2, will approach Venus and drop another pack- 
age of instruments. Vega is a shortening of the Russian 
words Venera-Galley, meaning Venus Halley. 

The two craft were launched six days apart last 
December to lead an international armada toward 
Halley’s comet, which passes within sight of the Earth 
every 76 years. A joint West European probe, the 
Giotto, will be sent aloft next month, and a Japanese 
craft. Planet A, will follow a month later. 


co and the S176- million Nova laser 
at the Lawrence Livermore Nation- 
al Laboratory in California. 

“You can go slowly with a 20- 
percent cut,” said Dr. Erik Storm, a 
Livermore offirnL “But 50 percent 
nyans you have to drop something. 
That’s not very pleasant." 

The administration has also 
stretched out or cut bade financing 
in other areas of big science, in- 
cluding the Vay Long Baseline Ar- 
ray. a $68-miHion system of 10 ra- 
dio telescopes. This year no new 
nonmilitary research programs 
have been proposed and several 
major projects are to be slowed or 
deferred to provide funds for exist- 
ing facilities. 

Military research now accounts 
for about 70 percent of the fedoal 
science budget The government 
now spends a total of about £50 
billion a year on research. 

Dr. L. Charles Hebei, head of 
planning at the Xerox Palo Alto 
Research Center, said in a recent 
issue of Physics Today that the 
pinch on civilian research is Hkdy 
to tighten as a remit of “the huge, 
unresolved imbalance in the federal 
budget” and the “ever-laiger price 
tags for forefront physics research 
facilities.” 

The budget quandary is forcing a 
debate over the future of science. 

“Will it really hurt the national 
interest not to proceed with some 
of these big projects?" asked Dr. 
Marcel La Toilette, editor of Sci- 
ence, Technology and Human Val- 
ues, a journal published jointly by 
Harvard University and the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 

Such questions are now being 
debated by the Science Policy Task 
Force of the House Committee on 
Science and Technology. In the 
next two years the panel wili try to 
formulate a new federal policy for 
the support of basic ana applied 
research. 


“Fields like high-energy physics 
are going to be under considerable 
pressure," Mr. Brown said. “Big 
machines are not going to be fund- 
ed in the same kind of time frames 
as in the past. The years are going 
to stretch out and the rate at which 
we build these machines is going to 
level off." 

Another way out of the dilemma 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


DRYLAND CROP AGRONOMIST 

Tha Internation al Canter far Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas 

(ICARDA) 

with headwnrten in Aleppo, Syria, invites <^jpficotiors far the position of 
Dryland Crap A gr onom is t in the F un ning Systems Program (F5P). 

RESPONSIBILITIES 

1. To conduct research within a muttidacipCnary team in the FSP an 
anaiytiad and applied agronomy in roofed agricultural systems with 
special attention given to achieving improved and stable yields of dryland 
crop rotations m the wheat based fanning systems of North Africa and 
West Asia. 

2. To work with mritk&aplinary ICARDA research teams involved in the 
fallowing activities: crop rotations; crop Evestodc systems; cuitivar evalua- 
tion; on-farm and demonstration trioh. 

3. To strengthen contacts with national research pro^ams and help to 
enchance their agronomic research efforts; initiate training programs in 
applied agronomy md participate «n the general development of 
Farming Systems framing; create ways and means by which agronomic 
research results can have more general applicability and acceptability to 
farmers rn North Africa and West Asia 

The canddate would be based in Aleppo and would be responsible to she 
Farming System Program Leader. 

QUALIFICATIONS: 

A PH.D. in agronomy or related field with at least 5 years research 
experience. Exposure to raided agriculture in dry areas, aid experience in 
the third world would be benefidd. Previous involvement m training aid 
dsdity to speak Arabic or French would be usefuL Proven competence in 
spoken and written English is regarded as a prerequisite to appointment. 

CONDITIONS OF APPOINTMENT: 

International tax-free salary based on background and experience; use of 
car; allowance towards housing; awual home leave; noivcontributory 
medical insurance scheme; pension fund (TIAA — CREF in U.S.A.J. 

Canddates should send 2 copies of curriculum vitae and names of 3 referees 
by earmari quoting reference FSP/ 1/85, to: 

Perso nn el Officer ICARDA 
P.O. Box 5466 Aleppo, Syria. 

Appficaioro should be received by July 31st 1985. 


i««nru4V YOU ARE 

1/VIPELLSC A MECHANICAL 
l HRANChTr engineer 

Your English is fluent, you ore about 25 years old, and you have 
2 or 3 year's experience in: 

— Software Development, CAD/CAE Application; 

— Fortran language programming (a must], if possible G 
You are familiarized with the following equipment: 

-—Digital (VAX), General Data, IBM, IBM/PC, (DOS). 
You are willing to travel. 

Motivating salary. 

Then: you are interested in our firm. 

Please address your resume (handwritten letter, CVJ 
under the box Number D-l 10, to the Internationa! Herald Tribune, 
181, Ave. Char tew fa-Gauflg. 92521 NeuflyCedex, who w9 forward. 


"INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS” 

appears every Thursday A Saturday 

TO PLACE AN ADVBTTISEMENT contact your nearest 
Intematiofld Her old Tribune representative ar Max Ferrara: 

181 Ave. Charies-de-tjpulle, 92521 Nwflty Cedex, France. 

Tel.: 747-12-65. Telex: 613 595. 



!H 


NEW SOUTH WALES 
GOVERNMENT 

MINISTRY OF 
EDUCATION 


DIRECTOR 

New South Wales 
State Conservatorium of Music 

Sydney, Australia 

The N.SW State Conservatorium of Music was established in 191 G 
and is the most prestigious music school in Australa Tertiary and 
post-graduate couses are offered in Practical Stixfias, Opera, Music 
Education, Composition and Musicology. In-Service Courses and 
part-time tutfon are also provided 


acme 50 countries throughout the world. 

As Head of the Conservatorium, the Director is primarily responsive 
tar the aitistic leadership ol Ihe Conservatorhxn in Sydney. HtUSha is 
the executive member of the Board of Governors and receives 
support to academic and administrative tastes horn the Deputy 
Director and Secretary . 

Further detaBs concerning the position and details of qualifications 
rerpared of the successful appfcant are available from Mr. J. Phelan. 
!«-!'8 ta, Y; NSW State Conservatorium of Music. Macquarie Street, 
Sydnev. NSW 2000 AustraSa (Telephone (02) 2301257. Telex 

Applications dose an 12ih of July. 1 985. 

^u^^Empk^rrwrnOppoiliriityis 
PubBc Service PoRcy. 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


Aft 


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IN BRIEF 

Aged Chimps Perform WeU m Tests ^ 

SiSviiv. BuSpammt. famte m to-md ^paiei some 


... \i.. * 




jin' 


involving ddayeTrcspoass, ^ three like ones. Aey 

er. mjraiig. selection of an odd ob|e« jraoflg 
pofonned twice as well as the L Maple of the 

me researchers, S3°SSf^d3iat aSne in memoiy ind 

tdogisis in Niagara Falls, New YorL 

Device Permits Personal Eye Check 

NEW YORK (NYT) - A ^ 

makes it possible for viewers to check thar own vision. 

manufactured by Sdentifica-Cook Ltd. of L°n d0 .^ has a screen 
The device, which resembles a portable television seL Ms a 
called a multiple diffraction grating — a plate of gk** P ^ n - e 
qytctnwn of dots when red laser light strikes tL The dots 

■SSSaSS appear . 

^ » SL m SSu I astiematism. the viewer 


Hw K4i Bchr Iteray 


Hans A- Bethe fleft), Boyce D. McDaniel rufing in the 
funnels of a nuclear acceieator in 1968. The latest models 
may be Large enough to circle an area the size of New York. 


may be through pure creativity, ac- 
cording to scientists. At tire Law- 
rence- Berkeley Laboratory in CaH- 
fomia, for example, physicists look 
two old atom smashers and hooked 
than together in a novel fashion to 
form the Bevalac, which can accel- 
erate heavy atomic nuclei to nearly 
the speed of light and slam them 
together to create superdense states 
of matter, such as those found in 
the core erf collapsed stars. 

The Stanford Linear Accelerator 
Center in California is experiment- 
ing with a 5114-million atom 
smasher (inexpensive by today's 
standards) that works in short 
st raig ht Htmk rather iban hny* cir- 
cles. 

. “Physics has always readied its 
frontiers by finding ways to go to 
higher energies more economical- 
ly,'’ said Dr. Sidney D. Drdl depu- 
ty director of the center. 

The success of such efforts is 
crucial for tire progress of science. 


according to Dr. Kennedy of Stan- 
ford. At many universities, he said 
in a recent issue of Science maga- 
zine, “our environments are signifi- 
cantly worse than they were a quar- 
ter century ago.” 

Some researchers, although sym- 
pathetic to the crisis posed by the 
continuing growth of big machines, 
say the importance of large scien- 
tific tools can be overstated. 

“Small-scale physics is where 
much of the scientific action takes 
place if the Nobel Prize is a guide to 
what’s important and enduring,” 
said Dr. Daniel Kleppner, a physi- 
cist at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. “Little physics and 
small groups of physicists are what 
most frequently have the most di- 
rect impact on industry. They pro- 
duce a large fraction of our best 
science, tram over 70 percent of our 
graduate students, and generate 
much of our new technology.” 


Slow^novemeni means a slight defect; fast movement! a more pro- 
nounced one. 

Proof of Black Hole in Galaxy Grows 

BERKELEY, California (UPD — Astronomers have reported^ con- 
vincing evidence of a black hole four million times the mass of the sun 
near the heart of the Mflky Way. . 

After 10 years of research, right physicists and astronomers at lire 
University of California, Berkeley, said they observed a vast Mnount at 
material concentrated in tire galaxy’s center. They reported in tire British 
science journal Nature that Litis finding indicates tire presence of a DiacK 
hole, an object so compact, its gravitational pull allows nothing to escape, 
not even light. 

“With this strong new evidence, the case for a black hole new seems 
quite convincing,” said Charles Townes, a Nobd physics laureate and 
head of the research team. “In the past there have been a number of 
puzzles about tire galactic center. The pieces of the puzzle diat arc finally 
falling into place with this key discovery are quite impressive.” Scientists 
have long tncdlo explain vety high velocities and irregular motions erf gas 
swirlin g around the galactic center as well as intense and unusual 
radiation from the region. 30,000 fight years from Earth. 

Japanese Develop Artificial Heart 

OSAKA, Japan (AFP) — Japanese researchers have developed a 
battery-powered artificial heart that can be built into a recipient's body, 
enabling users to circulate freely, a team at the national cardiovascular 
disease center said. 

The new heart has plastic ventricles on both sides of a stainless-steel 
cylindrical drum, with a motor and piston rods that push and pull 
compression plates in the drum, pumping blood in and out as in a natural 
heart 

The recipient would carry a large storage battery on a belt lo charge a 
smaller battery botit into the body that would drive the motor. The 
interior battery could drive the motor for only a few hours. The new 
artificial heart can automatically control its rue, depending on whether 
the recipient is motionless or walking, by measuring enzymes in the Hood 
with an optical sensor, the ream reported 




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o r , , 


iiiit'sv 


^esawyom’GrowGroi^advatiseinentsmthe 
International Herald Tribune,” 


CEO of Grow Group, says, “The Tribune appears to be theestahKdied source for 
European business people when they travel outside thezrfaome countries.” 

For International Herald Tribune advertising inf camatioii, call Paris, at - 
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(tribune 


Pobfabed WMi The New Yorii Thaw md Hie Wxrtiogiaa fart 

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Statistics Index 


■ BHlKp 

IttiK IVvf 

■. * * ’ turn. u 


amex prices P.13 EomiflK reams p.n 
AMEX NfllBAMSP.13 FIMB rote notes P.13 
NYSE price* p.in Cow mcrtttt P. 9 

nyse M*s/taws p.19 imphi rates p. 9 

Cmwiloii stocks P.l* Mart* summary P.l- 

Currenerrota P. 9 Options P.12 


Co«vi module* 
Dividends 


P.13 OTt stock 
P.12 Other nnrkds 


rrf gh # g 

licralo^a^ (tribune. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10. 




" IJ H 


THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


Page 9 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Europeans Remaining Cool 
To the Lure of U.S. Shares 


r-niiit* |\ r . ,, 
* f ? w ^nal K 




In 1984, Europeans 
were net sellers on 
Wall Street for the 
first time since 1966. 


iW.n'kU.,| l . ilI(ialatt 


■= : i* Vftifiriid Heaii- 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

. International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Everybody loves a parade, brn so far the big one 
marching op Wall Street now has not done mu ch more 
than inspire American spectators to wave a few liny 
flags. That has been the reaction of investors in 
Europe, even as U.S. stocks have strutted to record highs this 
spring. 

“Nobody here is excited, nobody's getting carried away” said 
James Kuhn, president of a consulting fxnnxn Brussels that twice 
a year polls 250 major European institutional investors, such as 
the leading banks, about then holdings in 35 blue-chip American 
companies. 

What he sees is a continuation of European coolness toward 
Wall Street that began about five years ago on the Continent and 
more recently the reserve has — . 

fourth qiLita^of 1983* they In 1984, Europeans 

were netsefflers on 
wboe in Europe in the early Wall Street for the 

1 B9Ac 

But in 1984, U-S. Treasury first time SUICe 1966. 
figures show that Europeans ' 

were net sellers on Wall Street 

for the Gist time since 1966 — to the tune of $2J billion. In last 
year's third quarter, the flow of funds back to Europe was a 
record $1.7 billion, with more than half that the result of selling 
by Swiss investors. 

Latest unofficial readings indicate that Europeans were only 
modest net buyers on high volume early in 1985 when the market 
rallied sharply and since then their participation has been neu- 
tral, even over the last month of the rally to record high levels. 

Yet, there has been an intriguing phenomenon taking place 
during recent weeks of the rally that would seem to be attribut- 
able to activity by overeeas investors. Salomon Brothers’ Laszlo 
Birinyi Jr., who studies money flows into the market dosely, 
pointed out that almost half the net buying in recent weeks on 
Wall Street has been compressed into the first hoar of trading. 

“It’s been our observation over the years that meet European 
buy orders are put in feu the opening,” he said, noting the time 
cushion of almost a full working day ahead of New Yonc, phis the 
fact Europeans, less performance conscious, will not quibble over 
an eighth of point in what they pay to get into a stock, since they 
also tend to be longer-term investors. 

“1 wouldn't hang my hat on the contention that foreign 
investors have been making the strongest contribution to the 
rally,” Mr. Birinyi added. “But other than overnight orders from 
the West Coast, that seems to be explanation why such an 
optimistic, positive force has been operating the Gist hour of 
trading.” 


A CC URATE figures are difficult if not impossible to obtain 
t\ on the foreign sources of funds Bowing into Wall Street, or 
-L A. where outside-the-U.S. money goes after these stocks are 
sold. The U.S. Treasury statistics, which attempt to track the 
flows, suffer a long time lag and are sketchy, so everyone’s 
entitled to an opinion. 

Bryant Boyd, manager of the Merrill Lynch office in Frank- 
furt, which ernes the firm's heaviest business an the Continent, 
said he had detected an upswing of stock buying among retail 
accounts in the last week. 

“There’s been a lot of profit taking in bonds, and some of it has 
been reinvested on Wall Street into equities,” be said. ‘This could 
be the start of a shift to stocks.” 

Favored areas, he added, are the “depressed technology sector, 
chemicals, and we’re still doing business in utilities.” 

However, Gary A. Neuser, Merrill Lynch’s director of interna- 
tional retail marketing services, emphasized from his vantage in 
New Yak, “The real rally from Europe has been taking place in 
the U.S. fixed-income market” 

He expects that European investors will show a big appetite 
next wedt when a new mutual fund is launched of U5. govem- 
(Cootimed oa Page 15, CoL 4) 

j Cmrency Rates 

Oom Hates June 12 


. i ( £. 

r v ■* ’tV 

\A 

*4t^ v y' S, '' 


„ - V. > 

* * ! fiA. 


Milan 

mm York tc) 


Gatinas in London end Zurich. Hklnat *1 other European oMtn. Nmr York rat** at 2 PjH 
(a) Commorrdat franc fW Amounts needed to bay one pound (c) Amounts nemtad to buy oar 
dollar CJ Units odOO(x) UiHUotUHO rvJ Unttsot MOMMA.- not woM; fLA.: notavahabto. 
(at To Our one pound: 

OtbsrMUarValaM 


• 

* 

OJA. 

FF. 

ILL. 

OMr. 

OF. 

IF. 

Y*n 

3X725 

439 

11233 • 

1499 • 

01773* 

— 

559* 

13U9- 

W9.UY 

42.12 

7235 

20154 

43175 

7. UN* 

VSK 

— 

225495 

31325- 

1H2 

UN 

— 

nm • 

L573k 

B32* 

4341* 

TUN* 

13745* 

lam 

— 

17073 

1U91 

237330 

UH 

7171 

22992 

31532 

U40JM 

247472 

43400 

30135 


54439 

315ft 

75127 

73ft 

— 

17*99 B 

199 

9312 

WON 

14775 

<140 

2302 

34932 

tJM 

11372 

1M71 

' 

43MX 

23027 

13L119S* 

16205 

33411* 

24MS 

31532 

ion 

3432 

T2J1 * 

7134 

40132* 

9635 

__ 

23222 

33792 

21175* 

Z7345* 

oua* 

74325* 

4.177* 

— 

1JD82* 

17B5 

05754 

not 

41371 

132432 

25391 

453709 

13889 

111391 

UM 

072435 

32434 

9321 95 

IM30 

usn 

<13491 

25783 

303B9 


X 

% 


comma pa 

r U*J 

Comma par MSS 

Curranor n 

r UAS 

comma mr UJJ 



Aram, paso 

7MLQ0 

Fin. marUco 241 

MaknMtna- 

24475 

LICgr.wn 

27490 



AotfraLS 

1_5093 

Oraakdrac 135.95 

MHC.MM 

22000 

Span, peseta 

17545 



Amtr.aeML 

2149 

Haw Kona* 73425 

Marw.kraaa 

095m 

Swed. krona 

09995 



Bda.fla.fr. 

4239 

imflaanM* 123222 

PM. mm 

1730 

TWni 

3937 


.. 

Brazil eroz. : 

261000 

ladaL rupiah 1,1T730 

PortracMte 

17400 

Thai Ml 

27415 

r w 

^ \ 

Canadian 2 

13695 

Irish K 9.9252 

Saadi rival 

3451 

TOrktefcflra 

52745 



Danish knBM 1U515 

taratfiML 141430 

Stno.1 

23235 

UAEOrtun 

34725 

;/ i - 

^ * 

EoraL pound 

03519 

Knnflldm- 03034 

SbAfr.raatf 

2994 

Vraax.aeBv. 

1X00 


i- "' "V* 

t~* a- 


V ^ 




C Sterling: 13465 Irish! 

Sources: Bonouo du Benelux < Brussels}; Bom Commoreta# rtoBona (Mllont : ftfmian 
Bank (Mew York}; Bam# Nationa# de Porta (Porta); Book of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); 
BAH l dinar, rtyat tOilkiiul. Other ckzta from Rautors and AP. 


Interest Rates 




B w c ar r reey P c y o dte juar 12 

Swiss . Rnoi 

Dollor Mart Franc Sterling Franc ECU .SDR 

1 month 7v?w 5MhSW ’. 5 Write 12H-12* 10HHB1* Mt-Wk 7 6k 

2 month* 7 *,7*. Sfc-3te Ste-Ste 17te-12W lOte-lBw. v 16-9H 7M. 

Smooth* 71 W 7 6 V SW*I 5 Wh l?te- 12 te 10 te-Wte Yit-YUt 7te 

6 month* 7V7W 5te-5te 5te-5te I2te-12te IS te-W hi 9K-FM 7 » 

1 year 8W-SV. 5te-5*> Slb-SH llte-Ute IDte-lOte 9te4h S 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty (daUar. DM. SF. Pound. FF); Uardt Bank (ECU): Reuters 
tSDR). Poles apoiicabte to interbank dwxattsol fl oilman minimum (or eautvatad). 


StertiM Franc 
12*4-12* IMb-lOM 
\tv*-u* ts Erie * 
12 f-72 %, totirwn. 
12 nr 12 hi -10 vie iii 


Key Money Rates JueJ:? 


- .• < A" 




jbute* 


united stole* 
DtecoantRota 
Fed*m1 FYnd* 

Prime Rote 
Brow LMO Rato 
Com Paper *MTf days 
Smooth Tmo Mir MB* 
unman TraanrvBIBt 
CD* 3039 days 
| CMMtMl 

aaegrag 
Lmhara Rote 
oomtaht Bate 
On* Month Mmfeaa 
jHnenth Intertmik 
*m*aM latertank 


■nterranttan Rate 
CnBMBMf 
O w n mh l u mtaft 
Kmortth lulu Him* 
frnanBi Htertat 


Cna Manor 

tiowitmanM 

SMomtntemoaft 


Cion Piw. 
‘7» m 

10 10 

8h 

M7 7 JO 

7JI 7 Lie 

731 7.15 

735 739 
7.18 731 


iso kin 

SJS &s 

in sat 
in ue 
its us 


16* 10* 
10 * wan* 
to* an* 
is* u* 
10 10 


12 * nv» 
in u* 

12 1131/32 

12 * m 


s 1 
*in* tin* 
4 * tint 


AsinMIarBcpMita 

June 12 

1 month 7%-7* 

lmmtehs .. 

I months . .7<*-78b 

4 months 7*W-7ok 

Ivonr 8*-«* 

Soterm: Reuters. 


II A M a aay Mntot Fa nds 

Jaw 12 

MmtW Lynch Rnmfy Aunts 
Rteiwnte tU tt *44 

Ttlarnte IntemtlWn Indtn: 7X87 
source; MerrmLvn&AP 


Gold 


cm) Mom 
itdirHMHak 


Soaas: Raters, Gomateakenk. CfMt 

LYonnoh,UurdiBmk.Baakef Tokyo. 


Jo# 12 

' AM. PJH. cave 

HaaaKnaB . 31A15 jujs +uo 

Unembanre lUflO — + qjq 

Parte 1123 kite) 1I2J7 31X0 +133 

MU 31129 atseo —nr* 

London 31X73 . jujo — 0JB 

nee York' mm _a*a 

Lmembaun, Parts and London omcfol /fit ■ 
has* Horn Kona and Zurich ooantna and 
das*# prices; Now York Comes current ’ 
eentract AM wicn tn US S aer ounce. 
Source: Routers. 


Phillips 
Gas Pacts 
In Peril 

Seabed Problems 
Off Norway Cited 

Compiled by Oar Slag From Diipanha 

OSLO — Phillips Petroleum Co. 
has said, it mil not be able to fulfill 
contracts to supply natural gas to 
Western Europe from the Efcofisk 
field in the North Sea because of 
problems with a sinking seabed, afl 
industry sources said Wednesday. 

The Ekofisk field is one of Eu- 
rope’s largest Production of gas 
from Ekofisk in 1983 totaled about 
14 billion cubic meters (495 billion 
cubic feet), the equivalent of about 
240,000 bands of oil a day. 

A Phillips spokesman deefined 
to confirm the reports that the 
company bad declared force-ma- 
jeure on its contracts, a legal term 
used to nullify contracts because d 
an “act of God.” But be said that 
satellite measurements showed that 
the seabed below the Ekofisk drill- 
ing complex was sinking at a rate of 
40 centimeters (16 inches) a year. 

An unstable seabed could en- 
danger the comp any's drilling plat- 
forms and the workers who man 
them. The company said it would 
not resume gas shipments until the 
problem is resolved, the sources 
said. 

The spokesman said the field 
had sunk by 15 meters since pro- 
duction of ofl and gas began in 
1974. He said Phillips, which oper- 
ates the field, was preparing a 
1 .4-billion N orwegi&n krona 
(5157-mifiian) project to ensure the 
stability of the seven platforms that 
make up the complex, as wdl as the 
safety of hundreds of workers. 

Vital equipment on production 
platforms would be lifted to higher 
levels and the rigs woold be stream- 
lined to reduce the risk of huge 
North Sea waves damaging or top- 
pling them the spokesman ^id. 

The industry sources said Phil- 
lips had in formed Western Europe- 
an gas suppliers they would receive 


Investing in the Wealth of the Gulf 


New Bank Is Filling Gap 
In Services for Region 

By Olfac Tohamy 

huaiwrional Herald Tribune 

BAHRAIN — An investment bank, financed 
and sponsored by investors in Gulf countries, was 
farmed two years ago to bring .more financial 
services to the region. Since then, it has sought to 
fill a gap in services that before had been offered 
mainly By foreign companies. 

The idea to fonn Arabian Investment Banking 
Carp., or Investcorp, was floated four years ago by 
Nemir AKirdar — an Iraqi national, who was vice 
president and representative far the Gulf for Chase 
Manhattan Bank of New York. It stemmed from a 
feeling of financial experts in the area that the vast 
surplus funds accumulated during the oil boom of 
the '70s required investment outlets. 

1 ‘ “There was a gap in the market, and we felt that 
we could fiD that gap, or participate in filling it by 
! * creatine an organization — an investment bank,” 
said Mr. Kinur, who later became Investcorp's 
! president and chief executive 

In the past few years, several Gulf-based com- 
mercial banks have moved cautiously into invest- 
ment banking, sometimes creating subsidiaries to 
cany out these activities. Rich individuals have 
also been forming thdr own investment companies 
and seeking advice from Western companies or 
individual experts. 

From the very outset, Mr. Kirdar faced big 
challenges in developing sophisticated investment 
twnlring services in the Gull's oil-exporting coun- 
tries: Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab 
Emirates, Qatar , B ahrain and Oman. He identified 
the challenges as: attracting and retaining high- 
caliber expertise, having access to customers and 
gaining their confidmce, and covering the time lag 
between the acquisition and tire placement or sale 
of an investment. 

Investcorp, based in Bahrain, was created with a 
dozen top executives, half of whom were formerly 
with Chase. The plan calls for them to acquire a 
share in its equity over a 10-year period. 

Mr. Kirdar managed to persuade 335 of tire 
peninsula's richest and most influential figures to 
become tire company’s founding shareholders. 



Faster Growth 
In U.S. Is Seen 
For Late 1985 



Nemir A. Kirdar 


“and that’s how we strived the accessibility prob- 
lem.” The list of shareholders includes members of 
the ruling families in the six Gulf countries, a 
select group of businessmen, and such major finan- 
cial institutions as the national b anks of Bahrain, 
O man and Qatar. 

The time lag between the acquisition and place- 
ment of investments necessitated that tire compa- 
ny, with authorized capital of 5500 million, create 
its own financing base. This would enable it to take 
the initiative and seize investment opportunities 
on behalf of its clients. Mr. Kirdar said the compa- 
ny was currently operating with a quarter of its 
authorized capital and more than $300 million in 
deposits from banks. 

With tins money at its disposal, Investcoip has 
been able to accomplish such transactions as the 
purchase of the prestigious New York jewelry and 
silverware retailer. Tiffany & Co., from Tiffany's 
management last fall Investcorp' has paid S135 
million in cash for the Fifth Avenue store, whose 
(Condoned on Page 15, CoL#l) 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
economy should pick up and grow 
at about a 43-percent annual rate 
in the final quarter of this year, the 
National Association of Manufac- 
turers said Wednesday. 

But growth will remain sluggish 
until then at about a 12-percent 
migupl rate in the current quarter 
and at 2.4-pereent in the third 
quarter, the association's chief 
economist, Jerry Jasinowskj, said. 

Mr. Jasinowski said that he 
lb ought a recession was unlikely 
either this year or next and that the 
economy could grow in the 3-per- 
cent to 4-percent range for much of 
1986. 

During all of this year, inflation- 
adjusted gross national product 
will grow about 14 percent, Mr. 
Jasinowski predicted. GNP is tbe 
value of a nation's total output of 
goods and services. 

He said he expected the Federal 


But be said rates would begin to 
rise modestly in ihe year’s final 
months. 

He said rates could fall another 
percentage point if Congress ap- 
proved a budget reduction package 
that included some cuts in entitle- 
ment spending. But he said he 
doubted that it would do so. 

He predicted that the dollar 
would decline somewhat for the 
balance of tire year and would drop 
nearly 12 percent over 1985 as a 
whole. But be said the drop in the 
dollar would not help the United 
States close its trade deficit, which 
he projected at 5130 billion this 
year, compared with SI 23 billion in 
1984. 

Mr. Jasinowski said President 
Ronald Reagan's tax-reform pack- 
age would bun capital-intensive in- 
dustries and would, if enacted, alter 
tbe composition of economic 
growth. 

He also disputed some analysts 


Reserve to continue to loosen mon- who said uncertainty over tax po- 
elary policy until the economy liev might hurt investment and said 
bounces back from its recent weak- the shift of attention to tax reform 
ness - had diluted the political emphasis 

The Fed is “going to put enough on reducing the budget defiai. 


money into the economy to gel it 
going again,” he said. He said he 
expected the Fed to raise its goal 


Repons on major indicators on 
the economy are expected soon. 
Figures for May retail sales will be 


for money growth when it makes its announced on Thursday and May 
midyear report to Congress m July, industrial production on Friday. 

Mr. Jasinowski also predicted The second-quarter GNP 
another decline of 50 basis points “flash” estimate is due next week, 
in interest rates in the next few Tbe Federal Reserve has predicted 
months. A hundred basis points an annual growth rale of 2 percent 
constitute 1 percentage point. to 25 percent in the period. 


Japan Opens Door for Banks 9 Securities Dealing 


Rouen Ger man, Swiss and British banks, issue, the sources said. Talks are representative offices can su 

TOKYO — Tbe door is open for have been pressing Japan to grant scheduled for June 22 in Tokyo, information about U.S. bond 

foreign banks to create Japanese tbe same buriness freedoms in Ja- they added. Japanese customers, 

branches of their securities subrid- . pan as Japanese banks and securi- Foreign securities industry Trading in U.S. bonds in Tc 


Japanese customers. 

Trading in U2S. bonds in Tokyo 


less than 50 percent. Finance Min- 
iitiy officialssiid Wednesday. 

contract. Thqt said some of the gas / ^ ,fc, t „ /nno- 


being extracted in the area wfll , 

slow U^rajeu winch uusmkmg SSotoib- 

Invoking forco-m^eure and ex- g diaries to do business in securities 
empting itself from its o bl iga tio ns if the restriction on capital stake ii 
would give Phillips an escape respected, they said. 

(Continoed on Page 15, CoL 1) Foreign banks, particularly West 


iaries, as long as the capital slake of ties bouses enjoy elsewhere, foreign sources in Tokyo said represent^- by Japanese securities houses, com- 
tbe parent bank and its affiliates is banking sources said. live offices of foreign banks' securi- ponies and banks has been active 

less than 50 percent. Finance Min- In Japan, securities and banking ties subsidiaries outside Japan are for some weeks, and has had a 
isuy officials said Wednesday. businesses are strictly separated by showing increasing interest in major impact on U.S. credit mar- 
Japanese law says that in prind- the securities and wrriwngp law, over-the-counter trading here of kets, U.S. securities bouses here 
pie foreign banks engaged in bank- they said. U.S. fixed-income securities. said. 

ing in Japan cannot operate a secu- West Germany excluded Japa- Representative offices are not al- Active trading with erratic U.S. 
rittes business, the officials said. . nese banks from participating as lowed to engage in trading, but bond price movements has provid- 
But the law does allow their sub- _lead_managers of Deutscae mark- recently they have been getting ed representative offices with op* 
sidiaries to do business in securities .denominated Eurobonds begin- around the law by passing orders to pon unities to panicipate, ..they 
if the restriction on capital stake & fining May 1, when Germany liber- branches outride Japan, one US said. An active day means dose to 
respected, they said. fahzed bond market rules, in an securities boose bond trader said. SI billion of U.S. bond trading, 

Foreign banks, particularly West ‘effort, tp get Japan to discuss the Finance ministry officials said they said. 


pie foreign banks engaged in bank- they said. U S. fixed-income securities, 

ingin Japan cannot operate a secu- West Germany excluded Japa- Representative offices are not al 

lines business, the officials said. . nese banks from participating as lowed to engage in trading, bu 
But the law does allow their sub- _lead_managers of Dentscae mark- recently they have been gettin 
sidiaries to do business in securities .denominated Eurobonds begin- around the law by passing orders i 
if the restriction on capital stake i4 fining May 1, when Germany liber- brandies outride Japan, one Ui 
respected, they said. fabzed bond market rules, in an securities boose bond trader said. 

Foreign banks, particularly West ‘effort, tp get Japan to discuss the Finance ministry officials sail 


New Zealand’s Lange Adopts Conservative Economic Policies 


By Steve Lohr 

New fffirb Tima Service 

AUCKLAND, New Zealand — 
New Zealand has been thrust into 
the international spotlight in recent 
piontbs because of hs acute case of 
nudear allergy: The government of 
David Lange refusedin February a 
port call by a U.S. naval vesd 
unless it was assured that the ship 
carried no nudear arms, an assur- 
ance that Washington would not 
give. 

But, at home, the economic poli- 
cies of the Lange government re- 
ceive more attention, and may wdl 
have more lasting significance. Mr. 
Lange’s Labor Party government 
— which broke the nine-year rule 
of the conservative National Party 
led by Sir Robert Muldoon — ts 
shedding the Socialist-leaning poli- 
ties that have marked the Labor 
Party by embracing free-market 



form is needed. The country has meats we need to make to earn our 
long lived beyond its means, pro- living.” 


meats we need to make to earn our For example, lamb, beef, butter 

living.” and other animal products still ao 

The time frame for a solid recov- count for 70 percent of New Zea- 
ery. however, is short, because the land’s export earnings. Yet many 


leering home markets, paying for Tbe rime frame for a solid recov- count for 70 percent of New Zea- 
costly social-welfare benefits and ery. however, is short, because the land's export earnings. Yet many 
borrowing heavily to do so. Today, government faces another election foreign markets for these products 
New Zealand’s foreign debt of in mid- 1987. are shrinking. New Zealand seems 


New Zealand’s foreign debt of in mid- 1987. are shrinking. New Zealand seems 

about 57 billion has, in relation to Economic growth is expected to perilously dependent on the few 
its small population, a disturbingly drop to 0.5 percent in the current markets that remain (men to it. 
Latin American look. fiscal year, ending March 1986, Half of the nation’s lamb exports, 

Despite all the borrowing, this compared with about 4 percent last for instance, now go to Iran, hardly 
once-wealthy nation, with rich year. And inflation has jumped, a model of stability, 
farmlands and a California climate, with most economists predicting a “Tbe threat to our agricultural 
has declined steadily. Measured by 15-percent rise in consumer prices exports is very serious, said Sir 
income per person. New Zealand’s this year. Alan Hellaby, a leading New Zea- 

global ranking fell from third-high- The Labor government wants to land business executive. “Our 

est in 1955, to 16th by 1982. make New Zealand more compete economy is on a knife edge. I don’t 
w Yet even corporate executives live inter national ly, and to do so. it think people here realize the risk we 


r _ “The threat to our agricultural 

15-percent rise in consumer prices exports is very serious, said Sir 
this year. Alan Hellaby, a leading New Zea- 


tms year. Alan Heuaby, a leading New Zea- 

The Labor government wants to land business executive. “Our 
make New Zealand more compel!- economy is on a knife edge. I don’t 


and economists who generally feds tbe country's economic struc- are running to our standard of liv- 


2 U.K. Banks 
Reduce Base 
Rate to 12.5% 

Reuters 

LONDON — Two British 
banks — Barclays Bank PLC 
and Midland Bank PLC — cut 
their base lending rate Wednes- 
day by 0.25 percentage point to 
12L5 percent effective immedi- 
ately. 

With Midland's announce- 
ment which followed Barclay's 
lead, ihe four major British 
clearing banks all offer a 12.5- 
percent base rate. The other two 
banks are National Westmin- 
ster Bank PLC and Lloyds 
Bank PLC 

Barclays is quoting interest 
on seven-day deposits at 7 per- 
cent down from 7225 percent. | 
Midland cut interest on seven- i 
day accounts to 6.75 percent 
from 7 percent 

A Barclays spokesman said 
the money markets have stabi- 
lized since last week's money 
supply figures were released, 
which showed a broad measure 
of the money supply. M-3, 
growing at 0.5 percent in May. 
The pound remained steady on 
the news of the cuts. Dealers 
said the drop was unexpected 
but was too small to make an 
impact A cur of half a point 
would be needed to affect the 
market they added. 


The New Tort Tim 

Prime Minister Lange 
Three months ago, Mr. Lange 


tidewith Jane Fonda's, but his eco- 


... Mri m[ «_ imn r.m Ku fly market forces, not government 
normc programs are in sympathy 

with Adam Smith’s. ““** ^ presents his program 

Right after he was r lin M last New Zealand’s embrace of mar- as one that trades a few difficult 
July Mr 42, who is a law- ket discipline is, to be sure, an an- years erf adjustment for long-term 
yer, devalued the New Zealand dol- tipodean echo of a worldwide pbe- economic salvation. “I can tell you 
lar by 20 percent a corrective step nomenon - However, the now that we are not going to have 
most economists considered long liberalization process is going fast- an economic recovery in New Zea- 
overrfue. Since then, he has begun er here than it has elsewhere, and land this year or tbe next but eco- 
to deregulate the finance industry, the big changes are aimed at a tiny nomic recovery there win be." the 


Right after he was elected last 


agree with the drift of the govern- tore must be recast 

merit's polities are worried that its 

liberalization may be too swift and ^ 
too sweeping a prescription for tbe 
fragile economy. 

, “Tbe question now is whether B 
tbe medicine administered will kfll H 
the patient” said Don J. Turking- 9 
ton, a private economist B 

Mr. Lange presents his program fl 

as one that trades a few difficult B 
years of adjustment for long-term B 


Lug and way of life.” 


SPA 


an economic recovery in New Zea- 
land this year or the next but eco- 
nomic recovery there win be," the 


to deregulate the finance industry; ute tug changes arc aimed at a liny nomte recovery mere win oe. me 
dismantle a decades-old import li- economy with a domestic market of prone minister said in his state of 
racing system that sheltered do- 3-2 million people. According- the nation message at the begin- 


rr^vino system that sheltered do- 3-2 million people. According- the nation mess: 
mestic manufacturers; restructure ty- economists say, both the effect mng of this year. 


tbe tax system; cut farm subsidies; “d risk of the government's pro- 
trim the federal budget, and tighten gram will be magn i fi ed. 


monetary policy. 


It is widely agreed here that re- 


“Our standard of living cannot 
improve,” Mr. Lange admonished,' 
“until we have made the adjust- 



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Joel G. Lacourte, Vice President 
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are joining the European Officer Group: 


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Charles E. de Carbonnel 
Vice President 


Francois E. de Carbonnel 
President 

Karl H. Dannenbaum 
Vice President 



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up 





^JPage 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 




NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Hitt Low Lost dm. 


IBM 

RCA 

Nkwp 

Cl Da la 

Kaneo 

Sperry 

MilUSUl 

Litton nd 
JJobscB 
PortGE 
Am Exp 
Houlnd 
Uni To) 
WmCin 
Cet0p«| 


Open Hitt low Lnq an. 


w, 

Uito 

120ft 

121 

— 1 

! 


4*ft 

45ft 

46ft 

+ 

% 

pi 

19ft 

19*6 

1916 


to 

-VJ 

20ft 

27 

27ft 


i 


Bft 

8 

8ft 



ft 


57ft 

55ft 

Sift 

+ 

% 

aw8 

14% 

14% 

Mto 


to 

0041 

06*6 

84*6 

86% 



9740 

01ft 

81*6 

Sift 

+ 

% 

9747 

21% 

21 

21% 


% 

9743 

47 

46ft 

47 

+ 

V. 

9600 

Z7ft 

27% 

27*6 

+ 

% 

8730 

23*6 

2J% 

23ft 

+ 

to 

0461 

30% 

28% 

29ft 

4- 

ft 

0324 

Uft 

ZSft 

26ft 

+1 


Indus 1 3 TUK Uiajl 1300.74 1304J4 — 7J0 

Trara 6SL73 45X44 6J9JS MU1 — 9.12 

Util 14157 16A55 1 4145 163.78 + OJS 

Comp so.15 54472 53A51 530.97— 130. 


Prewioos _ Today 
Hitt Low Close 3P-M- 
conwsiie 109-82 10M6 1WJ9 ID924 

uvftKt^als 12455 13434 13437 133.97 

tSS£ 104M 10X51 l^g U4J9 

UHlMca 5930 59.13 5930 9914 

pinElS 1 10.97 11071 118.71 11016 


Wfetkiesda}^ 

mse 

Qooig 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


-^EXMg rtAjDgi^ 


Adranusl 

Mbwd 

Un tto nart 
Total tsooM 
New Hton 


318 332 

an 380 

s 1 

9 10 


Composite 

IndutMcU 

Finance 

Inwranoe 

Ultima* 

BOOKS 

Transp. 


SS Att AW 
290.1* 290.99 287.73 

- 

! = B3BS 


££ S £ 


<’ \r 

2045 l£» '? 

S£ £? 5 .u 

!$ ‘IS 1 . 

US ri< li'i 

!0S0 «■* 




NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


VoLotSPjH 8141 LOGO 

Pref.3PJM.voL_— MAH) 
PmcwttoMafHJdOH) 1W2VO0 


SJ -s«- 

S? »•» ,JW 


Standard & Poor’s index 


AMEX Soles 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages E 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
. unchanged 
Total issues 
i New Hlorn 
New Lows 


527 744 

968 825 

449 476 

2044 3fi£ 

114 120 

23 31 


Bov Soles ■Sffrt 
I9DA4 450,153 UM7 


-Included In the sales ttomS 


199,864 450,153 1-007 

200J05 484632 .942 

20IJZ31 «J07 1JM 

2D8J07 512-142 2.1tt 

34-904 534257 1231 


Tables Indada the nationwide prices 

op to the dosfiM on Well Street atm 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Previous Today 
Hitt Low Close 3 PAL 
inaaunats 20949 ms uui 200.18 

Transp, U7J5 U4D1 H4J4 I64J4 

Utilities 8659 8533 8629 85.15 

Finance zuo 21U 33.13 ns 7 

Composite I8MI MTS 189.04 18036 


~AMexstoj£j^S- 


3PJ9Lvalunw 
Prev.3PJM.vohm 
Prew. cans, vaiuaie 


■ ™ To«o» 

I™?* 1 Clot* 

ivu ;»n 


■ .TJMenfli 
1 NWiLow Stock 


Dte. YM.PE TflhHMlLaw 


^?| Declines Lead NYSE Advances 


u Morn* 

H Ml Low Stock 


Dte.YM.PE BOtHttUr* QrtCkte I SakLow Stock 


Dlv.YMRE MBs Mull Low OMtCM* 


-.,*..'23% 16 AAR HUM 16 IWfc 19 19 — 5 

• , 18IA 9ft AC5 12 114 14% 14 1«V. + ** 

- 461k 919 AMCA 26 IIP* 10% 104 + % 

. 21 V3 13%. AMF JO 2560 393 1** 

- 484 24% AMR 10 3242 ft% 44ft 45%- % 

- 22ft IBft AMR pi 218 96 4513 22% Sm 234 

254 234 ANRpf 247 11.1 '» “* 3S si. 

-.23 19 ANRpf 2.12 107 I 19ft IWfc IgJ— « 

. MU 7V, APL __ 16 84 .8* 8* 

• 63*9 444 ASA 200 4.1 21 f!?? f?* £ 

27 M AVX J2 23 11 287 141k 14 14 — I* 

■2*Vi 16 AZP V2 105 B 638 26*9 36 34. ... 

57% 36ft Apt LOb 140 25 16 2140 54W 55 55% —'to 

2a 171k ACCdWM S M 20 17 104 22ft 22% g% + ft 

.WPfc 1W. AansC M 27 9 W If* 

lOVk 79h AcmcE J3b 40 10 H 8 0 ■ — * 

tm is AdoEa ij?iij S I 2t IL. 

20 11*9 AOrnMI 02 21 6 57 » 15V. 1W>- ?* 


lOVb 79h AcmcE -32b 46 
!7Vk IS AdoEa 1J»1I2 
20 11*9 AomMl oa 21 


■19*1 B4S AdvSvs 631 49 17 IOC 19? 1QW< If* + £| 


41V9 24tk AMD 11 6807 26M WJ » — J 

12*. a Advesl .12 M 49 a Mk JgJ— * 
-jdh 9 Aerflox 1? 15B TZ% IW ffjf 

47 9th MnU 2-M Af 33 ‘}S JL SIS SsZ’ia 

5719 STM AefLPf *2»186 1M 5«k 54JJ S4}k— » 

371* 171k Annins <20 25 14 382 JSM. 34tk 3*2 —1» 

J* JSSiSS. « U .2 Si Si s + » 


m ZVa AIM 


54 38*9 AlrPrd 1^ 2J 12 ia g mg4 + . v 
24*9 13 AlrbFrt AO ID 11 §03 Zl_ 19*. 20 —1 


. 2 T AIMOOS 248 1*1 1*9 .. 

• at* 21 AtoPPf 1WJ7 1150 -nvi m wi* + *9 

'.. 33*9 25*4 AloP PfA 3-92 123 II » 31* 31ft— U 

8 6U AtaPdol -87 113 30 TH 7*6 7M 

179*. 6IV9AIOPPI 960 116 2 «? ZL. 2L. iu. 

' W3'6 85Vi AlaPpf 1160 11.1 50l 99tk 99V2 99V3 —TVs 

1 Hh 43V> AMP Pf 964 113 10Z 84 84 B4 — I 

.. II AMCS 1JJ4 68 9 11 1516 14?h 15*. + Vt 

25U »U AwSfr .1* J 10 IBS 241k 34 24lk- M. 

19*i ItHaAlbrtoS OB 22 19 M IW 17 rTV.— J9 

33 'A 231k AIMsns 74 24 13 259 31*. 311* 3116 + Ik 

319. 23U Alcsn 1-20 46 12 1759 24*9 2416 24V. — U 

-T7I* 37Ve AlcaSid 1J0 36 12 1« W6 341* 35.. —1.. 

32 17 AlexAla 160 14 1765 SVk W» »**— ^ 

26Vi 20*9 Ahncflr ZB 43 23*9 23*6 23V,— V9 

. 'Bvih ITU AIIdCd 206f 25 25 48 82ft 81*6 B2*9 + ft 

' 26*6 23V9 AMCPPl IN 107 ’S2 2S* S'* ± w 

' 25*6 18*. A (aim 160 58 4D9 24U 24 2416 f * 

301k ISU Atoinpf 219 10.9 10 rn M + {* 

90 8116 AMI PfCllJS 116 7 Mt « W* + 1* 

• 34*9 24*9 AIMPw 270 21 10 1033 33Jb BV9 ffljj 

. 20ft 15*4 AllenC -60b 3-2 14 101 TW« 18J; If** 

44*6 20'A AnaCp 1JB0 43 I 209V 42V. 41ft «3 + ft 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — The stock maitet was lower 
late Wednesday in moderate trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 
3 M to U 10.48 shortly before 3 pin. 

Declines led advances by a 4-3 ratio among 
the 1,997 issues crossing the NYSE tape. 

Eve-hour Big Board volume amounted to 
about 80.81 million shares, compared with 
84.93 million in the same period Tuesday. 

The market drifted lower in early trading but 
by midday was trading near unchanged. About 
two-thirds of the way through the session, 
stocks turned down again after IBM President 
John Akers said the company is ‘unlikely’ to 
show solid growth in earnings and revenue in 
1985. . . 

Analysts said IBM’s report exacerbated 


Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 P-M. 


U 53ft AMCpuf 4J4 W6 
113U 99 Aktcpemoo 10.9 
104*9 IDO*. AICC pi 12JI012B 
ZJVi 14*9 Alld Pd 


74 64H 64ft 64ft 
4 102ft 10949 10?ft + *9 
30 10249 102ft 102ft 
38 18 17ft 18 + ft 


weakness in the already faltering technology 
stocks, a sector which has recently weighed on 
market performance. 

‘The market is definitely in a defensive 
mode," said Dana Stewart, market analyst at 
Bear Steams. 


®V i 40*6 AlldStr 212 17 8 1701 58ft 57ft 58 

12ft 5ft AHbCIi 332 ^ J?* J? 

3419 24 AltsCof 13 33*6 13ft 33*6 

SS 3 aLlTL 164 46 9 24 28 27*6 27ft- «■ 

37 27ft ALLTpf 285 56 3 34ft 36ft 36ft- ft 

39ft 29*6 AlCOQ U2D 3J 16 1211 32*9 32 32ft 

15*9 Amax JO u 449 15*6 15ft 15*9 

32ft Amax Pl 200 9ii 3 33ft 33ft nft 

22*6 ArnHes LID 46 20 2322 20*9 27*9 2?* “1? 

98ft AHmpI ISO 29 2 12214 12216 122ft —1*6 

116 AmAOC 264 1ft 1*6 1*9 

1SV9 ABakr 9 49 21ft 20ft »»— ft 


22*9 15*9 Amax JO U 
48 32ft Amaxpf 3JOO vjj 


140ft 98ft AHmpI ISO 29 
2*) 116 AmAtr 

21ft 15ft ABakr 
70 5316 ABrand 35B SJ 

2916 24*6 ABrd pt 275 96 


251 40*9 48 48 

1 28*6 28*4 20*6 + ft 


Dttpite the market’s hesitancy, some analysts 
remain optimistic. 

“The market has been expanding and con- 
solidating the beachhead it readied in late May 
above the 1 300 area on the Dow," said Joseph 
Binder of Stuart, Coleman. “The next major 
move really appears to be up," Mr. Broder said. 


56ft ABdOf 160 16 17 143 1 lift 11 Ift 111*9 + ft 


26*9 19ft AHUM 66 3J 13 
27ft 2DU ABiaPr 64 27 13 


58*9 40ft AmCan 250 56 II 147 58*9 58 


2616 25*9 25ft— '6 
24 23ft 23ft— ft 


12 Matt 
Utah Low Stack 


SiS. LJD96 ■ 

Dte. YW. PE lOSs HWi Low Qurt-OTBe 


51 37 ACanpr 300 5.9 

114 103 ACcmpf 1X75 122 
20ft 14*6 ACootM 260 107 
30*9 25ft ACopCv 261a BJ 
■ II 6ft A CantC 225 


I 51 51 51 

67 113 113 III 
128 20ft 2016 20ft + ft 
34 30ft 29*9 30ft — ft 
30 9 9 9 


54ft 43*9 ACvun 1.90 36 13 1242 S3ft 52ft 52ft— ft 
29ft IB*u ADT Si 4.1 23 706 77*9 72ft 27*9 + ft I 


14ft AElPw 7L2ta 9J 9 200 23ft 23 


47ft 25 Am Exp 138 2.7 16 9742 <T 46ft 47 + It 

22ft 9*6 AFamJ ■ AS 23 14 192 21*6 21M 21ft— ft 

35ft 19ft AGflCP 14» 30 10 837 33ft 33ft 33ft— ft 

15ft 6'AAGnlwt 400 14*9 1416 1416 + 16 

55*6 51*9 AGO! pfA4-24ell6 1304 53ft 53*9 53ft + ft 

94ft 58*6 AGnl pfB 5J7e 66 10 89ft 89ft 89ft 

7116 40V6 AGO pfD 264 -L0 BOO 44ft 4416 4416 — *4 

3416 25*9 A Hetil 130 15 10 2 34 34 34— ft 


334 7.9 8 
888 113 
1.17 105 
166 1&$ 

32 U 8 
160 56 II 
138 11 17 
14 

130e 63 7 


M16 25*9 A Merit 
I Oft 7ft AHoJM 


400 14*9 1416 1416 + 16 

1304 53ft 53*9 53ft + ft | 

10 89ft 89ft 89ft 

BOO 46ft 4616 6416 — *4 

2 34 34 34 — ft 

83 10 9*b 9ft 


44*6 AHome 230 43 13 2133 64ft 43ft 44 —1 


92ft 64ft Amrtdl 460 73 9 527 91 ft 90ft 9116 + ft 
8716 52 AlnGra 64 5 23 B38 83ft 82ft 82ft— 1ft 
28ft 18ft AMI 


5ft 2ft Am Mot 
29 16ft A Prods .121 


lift lift ASLFl'pf 2.19 146 


64 3 23 B30 83ft 82ft B2ft— 1ft 

32 10 12 1354 24ft 24*9 24ft— ft 
425 3 2ft 2*9— Ik 

.121 6 455 19ft 19ft 19ft + ft 

6 153 7ft 6ft 7 + ft 
LI 9 146 57 15 14ft 15 + ft 

m 63 9 47 lift lift lift— fti 


132 S3 22 
3.12 73 8 
267 9.9 
335 11.1 
30 13 9 
136 43 II 
138 23 17 
13 17 I 
32 13 14 
30 43 9 


I 16 10*9 AShlp JSJ 63 9 47 lift lift lift— ft 

25*9 22*9 AmStd 160 53 10 49S 38*9 30 30 

. 44 27 AmSIor 64 13 12 484 65ft 42ft «ft +1*9 

\ 73ft 46ft ASlrpfA 438 S3 242 75*6 7316 75ft +1 

■5716 51 ASfrpfB 630 113 74 57*9 5716 5716 


2416 18 

40ft 30ft AT&T Pf 364 63 
-41*i 31ft AT&T pf 334 93 
27*6 ISft AWOtrs 130 43 


130 5.1 17 78SB 23*6 23*9 23ft— 16 


-52 13 14 
30 43 9 
2.16 113 

12 

164 63 73 
160 23 8 
35 81 
536ell.1 
64 36 13 
260 46 11 
32 26 98 


12ft 10 AWatpt 1-25 103 
28ft 19ft Am Hot! 260 11.1 

71ft 55*9 ATrPr S64 81 

17 4*k ATrSc 

86*9 6016 ATrtJn 564 66 

3& 26ft Amaran 160 46 

40 22ft AmasDs 30 A 


S 40*6 40*9 W*6 
569 41*6 41*6 4TW + ft | 
234 25*6 34*9 34ft— ft 
2002 12ft 12ft 12ft 


1044 27*9 22 
13 716 1 

182 41 40ft 
20Qz 79ft 79ft 
226 11*9 I* 1 * 
20 13*6 13ft 
889 71ft 21ft 
144 28*6 28*9 
1535 40ft 4016 
55 41fa 416 
250 27 34ft 
228 18ft 18 
124 3*6 3ft 

38 23*9 23 
44 39ft 39ft 
4 25 24ft 
29 35ft 15ft 

2 SI 31 
435 20ft 28ft 
971 49ft 48ft 
440 38*9 37*6 
605 31ft 31 

3 17*6 17ft 

4 1916 19 

5 18ft lift 
170 24ft 25ft 
653 57ft 54ft 

4 4ft 6*6 
204 58ft 50ft 
209 12ft 12ft 
4928 41ft 5916 
49 20ft 19ft 
67 2 1ft 
78 4*6 4ft 


27*6— ft 
716 + 16 
41 + ft 

79ft 

lift + U. 
13ft 

21ft— ft 
28*9— ft 
60ft — ft 
4*6 

26ft— ft 
IBM — ft 
3ft— 16 
23V* + ft 
39ft— ft 
24ft 
35ft 
21 

2016—16 
4m + ft 
3716—116 
31 + ft 

17*6+16 
lVft 

18ft + ft 
24ft— ft 
54ft —lft 
6*6 

50ft + ft 
12ft 

S9ft -7ft 
19*9— ft 
2 

4ft + *4 


207 21*6 20ft 21ft + ft 

29 49ft 49ft 69ft + ft : 

93 16 15ft 15ft— ft I 

V 85ft 85ft 85ft 

99 34*6 34ft 34ft— ft I 


A 24 1263 50 


2JftCBIIfl l-4Qa 60 11 
48ft CBS 1M 26 20 
52ft CBS pf 1JU U 
Aft CCX 9 

27 CIGNA 260 47 68 
Zl*k CIGpf 275 18 
50ft CIGpf AID 80 


29ft 22ft AmoMk 80 23 13 280 24ft 24ft 2416— *fc 
27ft 18ft Am foe 77 27*k Z7ft 27ft 

16 4ft Am lose 5 118 7V, 6ft 716 + *9 

69 50ft Amoco 380 SA 8 1934 61*9 61V9 41ft— ft 
38ft 26ft AMP 72 Z4 1S 432329ft29ft29fe+ft 
34 lift Amoco JO 25 16 27 1216 12ft 12ft + ft 

12*9 Airtrcps 8 1 18ft 18ft 18ft 

»*k 19*6 AmSttl MO U f 12 32ft 32*9 32*9 

43ft 2S*k Amsted 180 48 13 175 40*k 48ft 40ft— ft 


34 lift Amoco JO 25 16 

28*9 12*9 Antrcps 8 

33*9 19*6 AmSttl 180 43 9 

43ft 2S*k Amsted 180 48 13 

4ft 1*9 Anacmp 

24ft 16ft Ankxj j 17 

30*6 19V. Anchor 188 58 

42*9 25*6 AnCtay 1J2 38 34 

12ft 9*9 AndrGr 70 17 IS 

J*ft 17 AnoelVc 80 14 11 
93 62ft Anhws 2410 22 12 


23*9 CIGpf 275 18 
50ft CIGpf AID 80 
2*6 CLC 

21ft CNAPn 16 

8ft CNAJ 1700187 
35ft CPC Inf Z2S 5.1 11 
14ft CP Nil 180 65 9 


Anocmp 402 3ft 3ft 3ft 

Anions 17 649 19*9 18*6 19 —ft 

Anchor 188 58 1382 25*9 24ft 25ft +1 

AnCtay 1J2 38 34 35 39ft 38ft 39 + ft 

AndrGr 70 17 IS 4 lift lift lift 

Annette 80 28 « *57 23 22*6 22*6— ft 

Attain 24)022 12 1203 89*689 89 — ft 


31ft 20*6 Anlwuwl 
65 47ft AnitalPf 380 58 
19*6 13ft Anlxfr 78 1.9 
16ft 8ft Anthem 4M 8 
1516 10*9 AnttmY 84b 3J 
13 9,6 Amcht 78 25 


„ 41 30 29*6 29ft— ft 

58 43 42*9 42 42 —1 

1.9 16 113 14ft 14*9 14ft + ft 

8 12 127 10*6 1016 10ft— ft 

3J B a 12ft 12*9 12ft 


»9 ft AochP wl 
me 15ft ApctlP 1WC.IQ 11.1 
72 55ft ApPw pl 812 115 
5 27V. ApPwpf 4. IB 127 

30ft 24 ApPwpf 380 128 


78 Z5 11 181 lift 10*9 11 — 16 


39ft 17ft API DM l J4I 57 18 299 34 


SJ 116 1 lft + ft 

302 18ft 18ft lift + ft 

Ate 7019 70ft 70ft— ft 

4 33 33 33 

1 30V. 30ft 3D14 


JS 8 A ppIMa ~ ~ 47 13*9 13~ 5* — 16 I 

23*9 15ft ArchOn ,14b 8 15 2780 22*6 22ft 22ft— *6 

^ ’H** 1 .!-? 401 91ft 9116— 2ft I 

.K* S’* 7-® 12-1 39 29*9 29ft 29V»— ft 

’£L. w 1070 108 150z 99ft 99ft 99ft 

23*9 14 ArkBst 80 18 8 411 22 21*6 21ft + ft 

,6 . 1JB U 70J6 19ft 20ft + ft 

* rlnRt . 75 S K + 

JSS ’IS 3 lift lift lift 

14ft 5*6 Armen 454 8*9 B16 816 

25*9 15ft Amur Pi 2.10 108 28 20 19*6 20 

Mft lift ArmsRb 88 27 0 159 17*4 17*9 17*4 + 16 

3» W16 ArmWIn 1J0 34429 150 37*4 3716 37*6 + ft 

34V9 19 AroCp 170 47 7 6 28ft 2Mb 28ft 

!?* 5K5S E -2 32 13ft 13*9 13*9 

Oft 14ft Arvtns 80 38 8 S 29 »I W 

450 185 4 43V. 43 43 — *U 


27*6 17*9 
31*9 20*6 
4**, 33ft 


4219 31ft 
49 48ft 
110 7715 

24*9 10*9 
29*9 20*9 
44>m 40*9 
434ft 284 
386, 3 2ft 
153 97 

1815 lift 
32ft 18*6 
49 32*. 

5 4V. 

29*9 15*9 
29*9 2419 
I5H 10 


25*9 1719 Avon 
30ft 18 Aydln 


3-« 98 5 41ft 41ft 41ft— ft 

280 37 II 933 47 4416 44*9— 16 

475 *5 J04 M7V. 104 104 —lft 

180 78 ID 14 21*6 21ft 21ft 
2-50 08 10 182 29*9299929*9+19 

480 6.9 274421 Sift 56V9 58W — 16 
MS -1 394 296 294 -14ft 

9.9 3Rte 3»ft 27ft 38 — ft 

280 20 4 139*9 139*9139*9- ft 

„ , _ .15 12ft lift lift— ft 

80 18 IV 193 22*6 22V5 22ft— 16 

88 18 21 425 48*6 48ft 40ft 

„ ,, * 17 4ft 4*6 4ft 

80 2.1 14 4 29 2B*6 21*6— *9 

80 18 13 2B4 33*6 33*6 33*9- <6 

7 54 14ft 13*6 13ft 

50 18 IS 071 27*6 27ft 27ft— ft 
280 108 9 1743 19*9 19ft 1916— ft 
12 15 18*9 18V. 10*9— ft 


ISft 10 
3515 20 
21ft 15 
»*■ 10*9 
215 ft 
55*9 W. 
2Tk lift 
13ft 7ft 
4 a<« 31ft 
4615 37'- 
34ft 21ft 
5»k Jft 
62 43*9 

51'6 29 
51ft 43 

44ft 24ft 

3Cft li 
22*. 14ft 
47 40 

77*. 46 
16ft lift 
22ft 23-9 
75*9 30 
13 715 

22ft 19 
24ft 10 
41ft 23 
33ft 10(5 
13*5 B*. 
32ft 18 
18ft 11*. 
25ft 17ft 
34 22t* 

38*. 29*6 
33 24ft 
44ft 
15ft 12 
Sift 30*. 
8ft 4 . 

11 7ft 
17ft 1315 
33ft 2219 
33 Lx 22 
93ft 67ft 
33 W5 
?r* ivft 
47V9 7716 
57 4115 

33 21*9 

45ft 24 

39*9 aj'i 

43 32 

195VY tlOft 

22ft 17 
6ft 3'- 

a aft 

15ft 10ft 
2Hi 14U 
491e 37ft 
Wft ljft 
37 23ft 
24ft 19ft 
23 13ft 
24ft 17ft 
33ft 21ft 
40 14ft 
58*9 30ft 
47 27ft 
49 JTft 
61 44 

15*6 
<0 20 


.121 

80 1.7 12 
.92 58 IS 
JA 18 13 


1JB 2J 12 
JO 13 

11 

380 78 0 
480 98 
1.10 3J II 


130 2.1 12 
280 48 S 
4.9|* 9J 
344 U 7 
1.00 3J 10 
1J2 7.7 II 
5,12*123 
627*128 
288 

280 U 13 
2-JO 38 7 
JO* 3 14 
84 18 12 
80 M 10 
134 28 
40 13 13 
■12D VS 11 
J8 15 W 

37 28 43 

a i« 

380 73 V 
180 28 12 
180 57 6 
338 58 
84 3.1 55 
1J0 28 14 


l.» 318 
80 19 9 
36 1J 11 
87 m 
4JW 73 9 
z:m 

J2 13 14 
280 69 9 
30 18 37 
130 38 II 
230 48 11 
43S IW 
650 118 
5l5D 29 
150 113 
371 

79 

34 18 38 
80 15 
1530 128 
f!50 128 
32 .9 IV 

80 38 17 
35 

84 U II 

in sj t 

M 15110 
280 43 U 
130 28 16 
1.90 60 20 
K30 88 
.10 8 36 
133 3.9 11 


112 12 
28 2016 
675 17*9 

23 20*9 
90 lft 
101 5516 

1194 16ft 
34 W, 

130 44ft 
ISO* 45ft 
3*2 32*9 
117 3*6 

120 at* 

809 50ft 
78 51ft 
201 4446 
429 20 
2129 19ft 
29 42ft 
310 49ft 
104 15ft 

si m 

1S5 73 
14 13V. 

330 33 
153 22ft 
521 40ft 
1107 ISft 
300 12ft 
879 31ft 
3184 15ft 
47 2416 
2 33ft 
II 3SV9 
2S23 31ft 
S 891k 
447 14ft 
404 51ft 
373 4ft 

24 8 

13 13ft 
720 33ft 

5 32ft 
288 91ft 
45 32M 
I 31ft 
772 48ft 
119 56ft 
16 29ft 
1052 43ft 
1 38ft 
4301 J9V9 
10H92U 
10s 21ft 
169 4ft 
. 32 7ft 7 
159 13ft 1316 
507 1616 16 
5 40ft 40ft 
49 Wk 19ft 
1942 35ft 35ft 
1743 14 23 

62 20*6 20ft 
6125 19ft 1916 

14 32ft 32ft 
216 22ft 21ft 

51 55ft 55ft 
3797 45ft 44ft 
871 47V. 44ft 
II S9ft 58ft 
100 25ft 24ft 
853 39ft 39 


lift— ft 
30U + 16 
17 — *6 

20ft— ft 
Ift— ft 
5516 + ft 
16 — ft 
9*6 + 16 
441k + ft 
45ft + ft 
33ft + ft 
3ft— ft 
50ft + ft 
50ft + ft 
Sift 

43*4— ft 

30 + ft 

19*4— ft 
42ft + ft 
40*6— ft 
15ft + ft 
30ft + ft 
71*4 —lft 
12 — ft 
31ft— *i 
22ft- ft 
391k— ft 
10ft— ft 
12ft 

30ft- ft 

ISft + ft 

34 + ft 

33ft 

35*9 + ft 

31ft— ft 
50ft— lft 
14*9 + ft 
50*4— ft 
4ft 

7ft— ft 
13*6 + ft 
33*9 + ft 
32ft + ft 
9114 — ft 

31 Ik — ft 
21ft + ft 
40ft + ft 

16ft 

2P*k— 14 
43ft + ft 
38ft — ft 
39ft +lft 
192ft— 3ft 
21ft- ft 


19ft CRIIMI 5L07e 94 
ink CSX 1.14 48 9 

24 CTS 1J0 XI 

7*6 C 3 Inc _ 28 

22ft Cabot -92 38 9 

Bft Caesar 15 

lift Cal Fed 88 XI 8 
32*6 CalFdpI 435 98 
13ft CflIOm -25b 14 
lift Camml .12 S 
15*6 CRLkg M 
3 CmpRo -I4f 
10ft CpRpfo 2-50 
56 CarnSp £50 38 12 
9*6 CdPOCl 80 
14ft CanPE 0 J« 

1 Capote JO 22 
15ft CapHdi JJ 32 11 
10 Carings 88 
27ft Carltato 1JB 30 10 
15ft CaroF! 80 1J 11 
1916 CorPw 280 9 J 7 
19ft CarP pf £57 WJ 
35ft CarTec £10 5J 9 
7ft Carrol 87 8 12 

33ft CnrsPIr 1 JO 28 9 
10*4 CartHw .132 43 10 
20 Canw 42 13 14 
VftCaKMG 130 68 8 
»ft CasnO, 

15*6 CsfIC Pf 105 
20*9 CatroT JO 1J 
16 Coca .74 X2 12 
62*6 Celarae 480 If 11 
34 Colon pf 450 105 
7ft Geneva JUa 8 23 
33ft Cental £30 55 10 

1 17 Centex n 11 

■ 17V. CoraSOW £02 00 0 

1 17ft CenHud 284 KM) 6 

. 20V. CHudpt £07*113 
36 CnlUpf 4J0 10J 

> 14ft QUIPS 184 SJ 10 
17ft CnLaCI 280 78 7 
29*9 CLaEI pf 4.10 115 
0*4 CeMPw 180 128 6 
13 CVIP3 150 10.1 6 

2ft contrOt 

7*4 entry Tl 80 7J 0 
1816 Certain £40 118 9 
15*6 Crf-feed JO 15 13 
lew cassAir 80 i.v i| 
16ft Chmpln 80 1 j 
1« Cbm 1 of 130 48 
43V. Cbm I pl 480 00 
b cnamsp 80 4J 13 
1 vlChrtC 
lft vlChrtpf 

35*9 Cbaae U0 U 1 
60ft Chose Pf 780 10.9 
36ft Cbaae pf $35 11.1 
« Chose pf 68M1X1 
51 Chase pfllUOeZU 
lsv, Chelsea n u 1 
34ft awmed 1J2 5J 13 
23ft ChmNY £48 6.1 6 

23*6 CANYPf 1-57 48 
40 OlNYpt 4J9e 08 
46 CbNYpI 444* 08 
31ft Owst* 1J4 38 10 
31ft ChoaPn ZOO S.9 10 
29ft Chrvm £40 68 0 

14ft CNWst 48 

177 OllMlw 45 

53ft ChlMIpf 
16ft ChlPnT JOe 8 8 
7V4 ChkFull 331 4.1 203 
36ft ChrleCr 80t .9 
215 ChCflPf 180 J 
5 Chrism 

9ft Chroma 177 

23 Chryslr IJX U 1 
34ft Chubb s 2J0 3J0 M 
50*6 Chubb Pf 425 09 
12*6 Church s 84 2J 15 

1 Cllixrn 2J2 07 9 

, 35ft Cln Bell 3.12 68 0 

1 9ft anGE £16 13-0 7 

24 ClnGpf 000 1X0 
26ft OnG cf 4J5 I2J 

1 SO ClnGpf 9 JO 13.1 

1 40 ClnGpf £28 1X4 
50 ClnGpf 9-52 115 
50ft ClnG PI 10JO 1X7 



23ft 

117 +1ft 
79ft *116 
5*9 

55ft— 4k 
31ft— ft 
51 —ft 
31k + ft 
52*6— ft 
lift 

43ft + ft 
21ft— ft 


31ft— *4 
8 — ft 
27ft + ft 
13ft 

27*4— ft 
49ft— ft 
16*6 + ft 
13ft 
19*6 
3 

10ft — ft 
73*6— ft 


21ft 

227 —116 
23ft 
lift 
34 

23ft— ft 
20*6 + 16 
25ft + ft 

36ft— ft 

9 

47 - ft 
28ft 

29ft + ft 
17ft— ft 
10ft + ft 
22ft + ft 
33ft— ft 
24 + ft 

113 + ft 

43+16 
Bft— ft 
43 — ft 

W} + ft 
M 


20 OnMIl 72 14 24 
23ft OrcJIC J* £1 15 
16*6 ClrClly 80 J 14 

1416 anus is 

ZTft Cllferp 2J6 47 7 

73ft aiCOPfAV-EO 95 
33ft CltYlnv 7S,k 8 

6ft CiOWr 72 09 7 
5ft CtalrSI .10 8 44 

23ft CtarkE 1.10 40 20 
6ft davHm 13 

17 ClwCII 1J00 01 I 
in* cimei 2J2 n j 6 
46ft CtuElpf 780 1X1 
47 CIvElpf 7J6 1X0 
10 Ctavpk 80 SJ 
14ft avpkpf 184 II J 
22ft Cloro* 1J6 17 12 
14*6 CtubMn -10e 8 22 
34 CluettP IJOO 11 13 
16 Cluetpf 1J0 49 
1216 Caachm 80 M M 
23ft Coastal 80 J 13 


7ft 

13ft + ft 

16ft 

40ft 

19ft + ft 
3516 

23ft + ft 
20ft + ft 
19*9 + ft 
32ft 

22-16 
55ft— ft 
44ft— Ik 
47ft + ft 
59 

24ft— 16 
*9 


23¥s Coastal 80 JS 13 
24ft Csttpt 1J3 33 
55*6 Cocoa X»6 4J 14 
91k Cotoca 

25ft Goldin, 1 JO 38 19 
30ft CalgPal 1J8& 48 36 
39 ColgP of 425 9J 
14ft ColAlka 84 38 7 
11*6 CalFUl .16 J 16 
24ft ColPen 180 58 9 
391k Colllnd XSO 4J 10 
26*6 CalGee HO 108 
48 CofGs Pf £88 11.1 
45ft Col G* pi £96elXl 
2216 C50pf 385 
15ft CSORf 283 128 

96 CSOpf elSJS 142 

97 CSOpfnlfJS 141 
Z7V, Contain £16 44 9 


32 
50 

29 

30 
SS2 
xn 

l 

745 
566 
29 
142S 
7660 
83 
86 
24 
392 
14 

87 
1 

22 
37 
2309 
131 
5 

7270 

501 
5 

4564 
20z 
150* 
l«t 
3002 70 
1000* 70ft 
4000* 60*9 
419 21ft 
64 36ft 
520 2479 
60 24ft 

1911 aft 

40 9416 
1113 3516 

88 Oft 
1049 2716 

5» 2816 
87 12*9 
139 19ft 
ion 21ft 

200: 61ft 
102 63 
99 lift 
4 16 
645 38ft 
96 »ft 
2460 33ft 
8 20ft 
491 13ft 
2396 50ft 
1 55 

3033 69ft 
2930 161k 
68 32 
B334 24ft 

502 46 
526 19 
226 22ft 
450 20*9 
559 39ft 
691 32 

71 50 

13S 46ft 46 


19ft— ft 
26*6+14 
3Sft 

lift + ft 
18*6 
3 

IDft— la 
20*6 
27ft 

21 + ft 

22ft 

26ft + ft 
S2Vj — ft 
Bft— ft 
2ft 
2ft 

58ft— ft 
«9ft— ft 
47ft— ft 
53*6 + ft 
52*6 + ft 


3ft + * 

ft 


40ft + 14 
54ft + ft 
52ft— ft 
34ft— V. 
33ft + V. 
36V. + ft 
lift 

132*6— 3ft 
62ft— 2ft 
25*6 

Bft + ft 
54 +114 

407 +40 

10ft 

10ft + ft 
36 — ft 

72*6— V. 
Olft 

1 7*9— 16 
25ft + 16 
40ft— V. 
16ft + ft 
30*6-1 

38 +1 

71ft. 

09 -1 
70ft— ft 
80ft + 'A 
2116- ft 
35ft— ft 
26ft— 16 
26ft- 16 
48ft— ft 
9416- *6 
351k 

8ft- ft 
26*6 +141 
27ft— 1 
121k— ft 
19ft + ft 
31ft 
61 

63 + ft 

lift + ft 
U - ft : 
3716—1 
24ft + ft I 
32% + ft 
2016 


§ft=’ft 
16 +16 
31ft + ft 
26*6 +1 
46 

17 — ’4 
211k- ft 
7$ 

57ft— ft 
31ft— ft 
49ft + ft 
46 —1 


4 27*6 27*6 27*6 
12 2016 20<4 20% — ft 
I00d07ft 107ft 107ft 
12fe10M6 I07ft 103% + ft 
371 49ft 40ft 49% + *6 


Mr. Broder said interest rates wiH stay flat, at 
worn, or decline slightly. 

The money the Federal Reserve is pumping 
into the economy should be reflected in better 
corporate earnings in the third and fourth quar- 
ters," he 

The market is going to drift down to 1,280- 
1.290,” said Harry Villec of Sutra & Co„ Palo 
Alto. This is not a disturbing wave,” he said. 
The market is only testing its new support 
level." 

Mr. Villec said interest rates will continue to 
ease and expeoations of further prime and 
disco tin L rate cuts wifi stimulate more interest in 
equities and push the market to new high 
ground by late June or early July. 

American Express was up fractionally. 

IBM was lower, after it said 1985 shipment 
growth was below 1984's level. Digital Equip- 
ment, one of Tuesday’s biggest losers, was low- 
er. Control Data was off sharply. Burroughs 
was lower. Sperry was up. 

UAL Inc., the parent company of United 
Airlines, was little change! Mediators an- 
nounced settlement of the pilots’ strike against 
the company. The strike by the 5200 pilots 
forced the ainine to operate at nearly 14 percent 
its normal capacity when the walkout began on 
May 17. 

Pan American World Airways and AMR 
Corp., the parent company of American Air- 
lines, were lower. 

Bell South was up slightly. ITT was lower. An 
ITT subsidiary accused of deceptive practices in 
adding insurance policies to marry customers’ 
loans, has agreed to refund S6.7 million in 
insurance premiums to Minnesotans. 


■08 J 26 
JO 5.7 IS 


JO 23 U an 32ft 31ft 31ft— ft 
135 98 473 34% 3416 24*9 + ft 

175 125 24 2916 29 29ft + ft 

B 28 20ft 20ft 

JS* .1 M SB2 18ft I7ft Hft + ft 

■36 17 7 Mk 9% 9% 

17 4*9 4ft 449 

J> J 26 13 24ft 34% 24ft + ft 

JO SJ 15 15 Wft 14ft 14ft 

221 7 6ft 4ft 

280 3J 13 1344 71 70 Wft— ft 

J# 7J& 15 311 12% 12ft 12ft— ft 
JO 25 12 795 17% lift 17 — ft 

180b 48 ® 40* 29 35*6 29 + *6 

1J6 U S 323 32ft 21ft 21ft— ft 
J1 ns 400X lft Bft 0*6— ft 
232 ft ft 

J2 X810 461 26ft 25*6 26ft + ft 

J6 1J 13 21 37 36*6 35*6— 16 


J* XS 13 21 37 
180 4J 17 S37 36ft 
160 30% 


1.87*11.2 87 17 

1J0 7J 11 228 IBft 
I.U 16 17 56 31ft 


122 *_ 
456 A 
U1 1X9 . MkIVHi 

1J7 3J I 510 47 

.12 J 9 329 14ft 

JO £5 15 10 12ft 

84 IP 14 Ml 23 

JOb £9 14 21 27% 

S3. 42 10 147 17% 

J6 25 TJ 21* 22ft 


IJ2 46 10 
IJtarlLl 


180 05 0 4401 52*6 


24ft + ft 
14ft 
4ft 

Wik— ft 
12ft— ft 
17 —ft 
29 + ft 

21ft— ft 
■ft— ft 
ft 

26ft + ft 
36ft— ft 
25H- % 
30ft— % 

lift 

M*k— ft 
18% + ft 
31ft + ft 

19ft 

46ft— ft 
Uft— ft 
12ft— ft 
22*6- ft 
27ft— ft 
1746 — ft 
37*6— % 
2 — Ik 
Zft— ft 
4 + Ik 

371k— ft 
16*0+ ft 
53% + ft 


Holbm 80b 28 13 
Hauls 80 18 15 
Htenz 180 XI 14 
HMltC 25 

HttwP -34 M 22 
names 

Ham lac 1 85*153 

H*mm lb o ii 
Italics JMI 25 
HtrttCpfUO 48 
Htmnn 16 

Marshy 180 XI 13 


aoft-% 

20ft— % 
Sfft— % 
lift + ft 
19ft— ft 


H*wtPK XL A U 
Hmnl 80 £3 15 
Htthaar JO 2J 13 
HtVOff .17 15 8 
HIMrd 54 13 11 
Hilton 1J0 V 14 
Hitachi J3g 1.1 IQ 
Holiday 180 1 3 13 
Honrs 186 18 17 
HomaD 32 

HmFSD 7 

HnwGpf 1.10 128 
HnutM JO A 55 
HmstFfl 80 17 4 
Honda 8k i f 
HOrtwofl TJO £2 II 
HrxnBn 1.13 40 f 
Hartai 

HaspCp 80 1J 13 
HoMln 280 9J 13 
HauttM M 15 15 
HouFah 81 14 n 
Houaln 131 U f 
HolntcT 435 7J 
Houma X64 98 7 
HouNG 2.12- £0 
HauOR 1590198 
HMCp 80 2J 21 
Hubfird ZJ* OJ 13 
Huffy 89 37 f 




12ft + ft 
34% 

IBM 

32*6 

»ft 

4S - ft 
6 — ft 
33% - ft 
24ft + % 
23 + ft 

lift- ft 
23%+ % 
65ft— » 
291k— ft 
Eflk— ft 
72 —1*6 
Uft— ft 
24ft— ft 



6EN6VE 


HuafiTl 8B 17 


12Mordti 
High Law Stock 


Piv. YM. PE HUH HMl Law 


11 1334 

10 T70 

14 74 
3 550 

7 2966 

17 

5 

2 

1 

ante 

200Z 

6 375 

12 1269 

24 405 

9 16 

8 793 
45 1584 
16 456 

13 10 

9 5 

9 3 

6 22 

8 1473 

2901 

11 763 

9 948 

15 2337 

1S0X 

lOOx 

2tth 

flSBte 

Jiior 

2142 


28 

17 
5 

13 
11 
76 

18 

22 670 44 
m 7% 

613 2 

440 *i 

9 132 11*6 lift 
9 558 23ft 23% 
16581 28V. 27 
ltflx 38 37 

11 87 31 30% 

199 1ft Ift 

14 2573 35ft SA'U 

90 38 3«ft 

8 79 19ft 19ft 

17 1353 25% 24ft 

12 12ft Uft 

10 21 21 

15 18 23% 23% 

11 499 lift lift 

IB 532 41*6 40ft 

161 46*6 46% 

23 5 74% 74% 

20 9 8% 

10 49 34ft 33% 
17 1063 80ft 78ft 

24 IBft 18ft 
612 50*4 50ft 

11 70 22ft 22ft 
14 154 41% 60ft 

16 518 4116 40ft 

M 40ft 40% 
12 6016 * lft 

9 111 28 28 

30 4346 23ft 22ft 
4 259 69ft 69 

28 10ft 10% 
14 94 34ft 33*4 

10 17 51% 50*6 


32*6 + ft 
14*4— k. 
16% — ft 
9ft— % 
30*6 
17% 

18—16 
23*4 , 

26% + ft 1 
73ft— 1% 
61ft— 2 
27 - ft 
34ft— % 
33ft + ft 
25% 

16W + % 
12%— M 
35% — 14 , 
24% 

18ft— ft 
28% + % 
Uft 

36% + ft 
44ft— 16 
48 — % 
32 — VI 
43ft 

+ft-% 

30 

32ft + ft 
50ft— % 
50ft 

53ft + % 
27ft— ft 
22ft— ft 
24ft + ft 
50*4— ft 
ZSft + ft 
25ft + ft 
25 

16%— ft 

ISft 

25ft 

Uft — ft 
43% + ft 
7ft— ft 
l%-% 

11% 

23*6 
27*6—3 
37 —I 

31 +1 
Ift 

35ft +1 
30 +1% 
19% — % 
24ft— % 
12ft— ft 
21 

23ft + ft 
11% 

41 — ft 
46*6 + ft 
74% — % 
8% — % 
34 + ft 

78ft— 1*6 
Uft 

SBt-a 4- ft 
22% — % 

41 + ft 



.159 1J 3 15 

£20 38 39 131 

£25 20 2 

136 U I go 
J* 26 24 66 

7 » 

JO 5J 239 
U0 M 10 
.U U 9 73 

JO 9 25 37 

60 V U 1371 

J8 46 ■ 63 

JO 2J 17 70 

JU 8 0 1U 

181 47 I 15 
31 2430 
1J2 41 If 46 
.16 J 33W 
JO 32 7 175 
TJO 14 I 

£31 14 95 

184 46 14 55 

JO 45 15 22 

£54 <n 9 7412 

12a m M 257 
£00 78 12 29 

■051 000 

40 1X7 14 

46 If! 198 219 

91 

JO as U 574 

61 17 n iii6 

417dlil I 

180 4J 9 272 
US £5 12 26 

1JD 1J 12 1639 
1-32 58 20 402 
5J39I1J 109 

5.30 103 9 24* 
UMU 40 

9 26 

JO* 1J 5 402 

£00 SJ B JIT 
250 4J I 400 
2J7 78 168 

54 £0 0 160 
14 43 

537 

£62 49 126 

1.96 68 TS 49 
58 38 11 99 

1J0 43 9 65 

425 110 lOCta 

1D0 £3 304 31 

JS* 5 4 

122 JS 9 160 
84 ZI 9 7139 
1jD0 28 14 105 
JO 2J 13 205 
141 1X3 17 

22 V0 
14 255 
.160 8 U 36 
2.16 7J If; 535 
80 30 IS 550 
70 

82 25 U 719 
40 28 504 

£20 40 12 30 

280 £J 3 6949 
136 100 41 


9% 

64ft + ft 


J2 15 11 
M £0 14 
50 1J 17 


10% — ft 
12%— ft 
15ft— % 
37 + to 

13% 

22% + K 
15ft + % 
19ft— ft 


HurtfMf 50 1J 17 
HotreP * 23 14 
HvdTOl XM 65 ID 


23%—% 
14*6— ft 
52%-% 
59% — % 
20ft + ft 
l*k — ft 
45% 

20 — % 
30ft— ft 
14% — M 
37ft— 1*6 
79ft— ft 
27% + % 
69% 

10ft— % 
17*6— *k 
36*6 

10*6 + % 
13 + % 

21ft— *k 
33% + % 
27ft— III 
34ft— % 
31 + ft 


■.w* rr 




/ si"v4 


5% 

39% 

41% — *6 
36*6— ft 
19ft— % 
If + % 
49 +3% 

27% — ft 
21% + % 
17*6 
63% — 1 
30 

27% + % 
7% + % 
5ft 

34% + ft 
5ft— % 
21 — % 
25% + ft 
Uft 

30 + ft 

35ft 
70 —1 
24% — ft 
50*6— ft 
12%— to 
37*6 + ft 
9%— % 
23 +1 

S7ft + 1 m 

52 — % 
32% — ft 

Ift + % 
22% — H 
6%— % 
39% + ft 
29ft + ft 
24% 

30%— *k 

53 

an*— % 
9ft 

38 — ft 
20% — % 
30ft— ft 
3214 + % 
13% + ft 


Clod 184 43 
cm o ja » u 
ICN 

CN Pf £70 95 
NAU1 153 110 
PTlm n J7* 11 
RTPf 1JO 15 


TTCP 150 11 10 3663 33*6 


TTptK 450 60 
TTpfO 550 88 
TTMI 450 7J 
Ulttt 1 JO £3 
doboP* 
doom 


1 Paw Of 254 10.* 
IPOMQf XU WJ 
llPawpf 4.12 TU 
iPawaf 170 UJ 
I Paw of 553 100 
llPawpf 487 115 
TW 84 15 U 
mpaun 259 b 35 0 
mnlCp 7 

NCO JO 15 
ndIMpf 750 115 
ndlMBf 7.74 125 
nalMpf 488 128 
ndIMpf 1250 1U 
KttMpf XIS 1X1 
ndIMpf £25 122 
ndIMpf 353 1X6 
ndIGss 150 78 6 
Inaxco 571 
infmtc 31 


noarR £60 58 U 346 49 


35ft— 1% 
43 — ft 


30 + % 
lift— ft 


136 100 41 

FtHowd 144 2J 17 90S 
FteUfWti 84 38 13 243 

foxsip 41 un a 

Faxaro 154 19 92 57 
Faxxnyr 17 2M 

FMEPh 272 

FMOG 2J2 » Z3J 133 

FratMC 80 XI 14 704 
Frtatrn 40 28 U 35 
FriMttiS 40 24 5 160 
Frutlfpf 250 75 29 

Fuaua 80 13 9 31 


416— ft 
Uft— % 
If*.— ft 
54% + *6 
45% + % 
12% 

73ft + % 
Uft 

10 * 6 - % 
26*6 + % 
34% + *6 
21ft— % 
9% + ft 
19ft— ft 
25 —ft 
23% — ft 
28% 

33%— ft 


184 43 12 711 34 
JSB U 103 16% 
96 132 9% 

£70 94 Z 20 

153 115 37 17*6 

.77a 3.1 74 25*6 

10 U 7 9 19% 


33% — % 
16%— % 
9*6 


3 S9 

5 60ft 

4 <2 
1414 14% 

491 22 
3*7 13% 


Poor 244 UJ 7 5293 25% 


17ft— ft 
25 —ft 
19*6 

3H6— % 
» — % 
59% —4 
61% + ft 
14% 

211k + ft 
13ft 





lOttr 18*6 
unooEiwiv 
408* 37 
900*34% 
132 53*6 
900* 30% 
U OS 34% 
I 3J3 ink 
7 301 9% 

1300 13% 
130*60 
300* 4SU. 
SIS* 70ft 
lftdU 
37 18% 
TO Uft 
64 23*6 
6 13 25ft 

557 5ft 
31 731 34 


JZtSA* 


inaRpf 2JS 60 4 35ft 

ingrTae 54 45 22 9 13 

fnusil JO £1 119 34 

I nkist pf 4J5 105 39 45ft 

rotten 150b 58 10 152 Uft 
nwRi 339 5ft 

inlaRsc 9 1«3 90 

fntgR of 103 t£0 2 35ft 

InfaRpf 4JS 1X0 9 32*6 

InIRFn 13 81 12% 

itcoSa XIOalOJ 54 19ft 
Infareo IN 44 12 W 66% 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


Page 11 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


y. 


7^4 




Beecham Chrysler Will Incrcflsc Japanese Bridge Consortium Rejects 
Reports Rise Stake in Mitsubishi Auto British Appeal &n Bosporus Project 

The Associated Press 

|H fife . fie**** member firms of the Mitsubishi, TOKYO — A Japanese consortium has rejected a British request 

TOKYO — Mitsubishi Heavy group with the aim of listing Mitsu- that its firms be allowed to participate in a 5551-million project to 
" Industries Ltd. said Wednesday bight Motor shares on the stock :,J 1 ♦*“ n ~— — a*--. — ~«~-i — :a 


Reutas 

LONDON — Beecham Group 
PLC on Wednesday reported pre- 
tax profit for the 1984-85 year of 


tax profit for the 1984-85 year of 
£30o.l million ($385.7 million), a 
143-percent increase from £267.9 
million the previous year. 


(hat h has agreed to sell part of its 
equity stake in Mitsuhiaii Motor 
Corp. to Chrysler Corp. 

Mits^^K^S^sen' 1 Chiyslcr 


irt of its exchange, the spokesman said. The 
i Motor Tokyo stock exchange’s lis ting cri- 
teria call for ghwrphnidin^hy ft 
said that number of companies or persons. 
Chrysler Mitsubishi Heavy Industries 


Analysts had estimated that pre- 
tax profit for Beecham, a pharma- 
ceuticals and toiletries manufactur- 
er, would be higher, in the range of 
£310 mfllum to £320 mflliop- 

Beecham shares slipped Wednes- 
day to 358 pence, down 20 pence 
since late Tuesday. 

Christopher Marsay, an analyst 
with the slockbrokerage Grieveson, 
Grant & Co, said the year ended 
March 31 had produced no signifi- 
cant profit growth from pharma- 
ceuticals if recent acquisitions were 
excluded. Price cutting in Japan led 
to lower profits there. 

Mr. Marsay said he rated Bee- 
cham shares a hrilA for the rime 
being. Investor enthusiasm could 
rebuild if the company gains offi- 
cial approval to maricet a new ar- 
thritis drug that it wants to sdl in 
Britain, the United States and ulti- 
mately elsewhere, he added. 

PennzoO to Drop Gold Firm 

The Associated Pros 

HOUSTON — PennzoQ Co. said 
Wednesday that its board has .ap- 
proved a tax-free spinoff of its Bat- 
tle Mountain Gold Co. to share- 
holders as part of the company’s 
previously announced withdrawal 
from the metals mining business. 


175,885 shares in the auto compa- plans to reduce its holding, and 

_ - - ny, or 5 percent of the total shares, that of its affiliates, in Mitsubishi 

P ,'~ V ^ C P ercent > fr 10 ® for 15.51 bflEcn yen ($62 million) Motors to 29 percent and to raise 

£ 1.94 mill on to £2 39. later this month. He said the sale the stake of Cnrysler and its affiE- 

w 0 U kl I ^Chiysler’sstakemMIt- ales to 24 percent of the total, the 


subishi Motor to 20 
Mitsubishi will se 


Mitsubishi is also negptiat 
sale of some of its shares 
automobile, subsidiary to 


L spokesman said. 

3 ares to Mitsubishi group member firms 
are, he hold shares in each other. Mitsubi- 
shi wants members to hold the ic- 
ing the naming 47 percent, with Mitsubi- 
in the shi Corp. bolding 10 percent and 
other Mitsubishi Bank Ltd. 5 percent 


percent 


The Associated Pros 

TOKYO ^A Japanese consortium has rejected a British request 
that its firms be allowed to participate in a 5551-million project to 
build a second bridge over the Bosporus Straits, an official said 
Wednesday. 

An official for Istakawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co, one of 
three Japanese companies involved in the consortium, said the British 
group, led by Trafalgar House Investment Ltd, would be informed of 
the decision by letter. 

The Japanese group, along with a T urkish- ! tafran consortium, 
signed a contract on May 10 with the Turkish government to build the 
1.48-kilometer (0.88-mfle) bridge to link Asia to Europe over the 
Bosporus Straits in Istanbul. 

Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and the British consortium 
protested the awarding of the comma to the Japanese, saying that 
Britain lost the award because Japan heavily subsidized its bid. 
Britain won the contract for the first Bosporus bridge. 

Latex in May, Mrs. Thatcher lodged a complaint in a letter to Prime 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone, asking Japan to reconsider the partici- 
pation of British firms in the project. 


f The Real Thing’ Isn’t, Diehards Say 

Pepsi Gloats as Controversy Over Coke Formula Spreads 


By James Barron If longtime Coke drinkers are her oF Coke drinkers will cease buy- 

.Vm- York Tima Semre not, Pepsi is. “It’s a tremendous ing Coca-Cola.” he mid . “and the 

NEW YORK — Seven weeks opportunity for us." said Kenneth real opportunity is outside the 
after the Coca-Cola Co. changed its Ross, ^spokesman for Pepsi-CoJa United States, where Coke outsells 
longtime recipe, many frustrated USA. “They're Hying to move clos- Pepsi in those markets 3-to-l. 
Coke drinkers are comolainine that er in taste to us. and ! don't think There, the anoearance of less car- 


Coke drinkers are complaining that 


real opportunity is outside the 
United States, where Coke outsells 
Pepsi in those markets 3-to-l. 
There, the appearance of less car- 


die new taste is just not the real they've succeeded. Obviously, the bo nation and a sweeter taste prob- 

i - _ -nuit itiino 1 ante in rml ImnklA " .LI.. 1.. 


thing. 

“It's a taste tragedy." said Rob- 


‘real thing* was in real trouble." 
But Coca-Cola maintains that 


ably works to Coke’s favor." 

Bui in Seattle. Gay Mullins, a 


en Hester, a writer in Jacksonville, the reformulated drink is catching retired businessman, says he can- 
Florida. on- The company says that sales not sec how any change would 

“It’s fiat and too sweet," said have doubled since last year and work to Coke’s favor. He switched 
Kathy Kapture, a Detroit waitress, that 1 10 million consumers have to beer after tasting the new Coke 
“It doesn’t have the m™ fizz, it tried the new drink since its debut and has set up a group called Old 
doesn't quench your thirst and I’m April 23. Cob Drinkers of America. Mr. 

not buying it.” Of those. Coke says, 75 percent Mullins says he has received 60.000 


rt buying it.” or those. Coke says, 75 percent Mullins say s he has received 60.000 

•‘Completely devoid of any char- would buy it again, which works calls from people who think the 
ter at all." declared the humorist out to roughly twice the 40 million new version is “the real bad thing." 
an Shephard, who has been lac- consumers who bought old Coke He is considering taking Coke to 


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12 June 1985 



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acter at all, declared the humorist °ui lo rougmy ™ 

Jean Shephard, who has been lac- consumers who bought old Coke He is considering taking Coke to 
ing his one- man shows with Coca- 011 3 typical day. court to try to force it to go back to 

Cola jokes. Pepsi, which has been chipping the old recipe or license its secret 

From Montreal to Monterey, away at Coke's lead in the market, formula to someone else, possibili- 
Califomia. diehard fans of the old counters thal nearly half of those ties the company says it will not 
Coke are angrily denouncing the w ho tried Lhe new Coke prefer the consider, 
idea of tampering with their favor- pveeter taste of Pepsi. And it says Mr. Mullins is preparing a mass 


Lower Net Seen 
By IBM’s Chief 

Raders 

YORKTOWN, New York — 
International Business Ma- 
chines Corp.’s earnings for the 
first nine months of the year 
probably will be lower than 
1984’s 57.22 a share, IBM’s 
president, John Akers, said 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Akers told securities ana- 

£ that if- the company is to 
.higher earnings for the 
full year it needs a “particularly 
strong” fourth quarter. 

Mr. Akers's projections were 
more negative than his state- 
ment al the annual meeting in 
April when he said IBM should 
have a “strong year." 


United, Pan Am Optimistic on Route Sale 

By Sam Tameson after the U.S. government desag- commence operations instant 

Las Angela Tima Service nates United as Pan Am's replace- the very day after approvai 


after the U.S. government desig- commence operations instantly — ite, hoarding whole cases and pay- 
nates United as Pan Am’s replace- the very day after approval has ing up to SI .25 for a 6 1 5-ounce 
meat on the Pacific routes. been received.” bottle. A bottle usually sells for 40 yea* history. 


Mr. Mullins is preparing a mass 


Although neither Japan Airlines to 45 cents, 
ar the Japanese Government has And the 


JJy Jameson Mm UJC fcUVW illllA.HL UU» 5 “ iAHiimon,L UpuaUUiU UUUUiUJf 

lJ A ngela Tima Service nates United as Pan Am's replace- the very day after approval has 

^ meat on the Pacific routes. been received.” 

TOKYO — The chairmen of Pan Mr. Ferris added that United Although neither Japan Airlines 

American World Airways and would not volunteer to give up any nor the Japanese government has And the company 
UAL Inc. say they expect President of its current routes to a third air- publicly opposed ran Am’s sale of Coke says it has been j 
Ronald Reagan and the U.S. De- line as a condition for getting U.S. its Pacific routes to United, news- phone calls a day, mosi 
partxnent of Transportation to ap- . government approval of lhe sale. papers here have reported that both pie who dislike the ne 
prove United Airline's planned “We would vigorously defend are concerned that United’s ex ten- “Obviously, it is an 

purchase of Pan Am’s Pacific our right to operate all existing sive routes in the United States cem," said Brian Dyst 
routes by September. routes we now operate,” be saia. would give it an unfair advantage dent of Coca-Cola USi 

C Edward Acker the Pan Am “As won as aU government ap- over Japan Airlines in attracting 
.chairman, denied that the Depart- provsh “® secured ’ Umted ^ ^Pacific passengers. 

ment of Justice has described the 

$750- million transaction as and- COMPANY NOTES 

competitive. ^ — 

With UAL’s chairman, Richard 

J. Ferris, at his side, Mr. Acker said Abbey LHe Group PLCs £243- institutions before the state’s bank- 
that the Department of Justice only milbon ($306 million) offer of 135 ing crisis in March. The six thrifts 
suggested “certain areas that million shares was heavily oversub- were bought by Chase and changed 
should be looked at in terms of the scribed when application lists to commercial banks. 

| overall consideration by the De- opened Wednesday, the bankers Oden IXL lid. and Mungana 


its sales rose 14 percent in May to mailing offering memberships in 
their highest in the company's 87- Old Cola Drinkers at S5 apiece and 


says he expects to spend 530,000 of 


Jeffrey Weingarten. an analyst his own money on the group's tele- 
,y tha t make* with Goldman, Sachs & Co., noted phone bills and printing expenses. 
q getting 1.500 that Pepsi's increase covered all its He has received less than 51 .500 in 
Kdy from peo- products, not just the Pepsi Cola donations, 
lew taste. brand. He estimated that the Pepsi Do things go better with the new 


papers here have reported that both pie who dislike the new taste. brand. He estimated that _ _ 

are concerned that United’s extra- “Obviously, it is an area of con- brand’s gain was probably in the 5 Coke? Not to Duane Larson, who 
sive routes in the United States cem," said Brian Dyson, the presi- percent range and said that Coke's owns Nick's Hamburger Shoppe in 
would give it an unfair advantage dent of Coca-Cola USA. “We want decision jo introduce the new fla- Brookings, North Dakota. “1 don't 


As soon as all government ap- over Japan Airlines in attracting everybody to be absolutely vor was “a sihart gamble." think it's very compatible with 

u provals are secured, United will Lrans- Pacific passengers. pleased." don't t hin k a significant num- food,” he said. 


partment of Transportation.” 

“We look at it as a positive docu- 
ment,” he said. 


Both executives, -who flew to P 31 ™ 11 "™! 
Hong Kong after spending two 


Abbey life Group PLCs £243- institutions before the stale's bank- Storage Technology Cup, reor- 1 
millio n ($306 million) offer of 135 ing crisis in March. The six thrifts ganizmg under Chapter 1 1 of the 
million shares was heavily oversub- were bought by Chase and changed federal Dankruptcy code, reported 
scribed when application lists to commercial banks. a loss of $29.6 million in the first 

opened Wednesday, the bankers Qders IXL Ltd. and Mungana quarter of I9S5, on revenue of 
S.G. Warburg & Co. said The Mines Ltd. will join to Form a listed $161.9 million. In the first quarter 
dares, representing 48 percent of resources company with assets of of 1984, the company lost S16.6 
Abbey Life, woe offered by (he about 230 milli on Australian dd- million on revenue of $17925 mil- 
parent company, ITT Corp., at 180 lars (S152 million). Elders win ac- Don. 

pence each. quire up to 49 3 percent of Mtm- Trafalgar House PLCs building 


approval of the transaction as early „ ‘riv 

as September, though the Depart- as part 


J - ■ TrtV-un thou AT&T Information Systems wfll gana, which will become Elders subsidiary and the government of 

efimmate 1,200 jobs in Western Resources Ud_ Oman have signed a SI 17-million 


cutbacks in the I/Orferi, the cosmetics and phar- contract to buOd a 500-bed teach- 

il business sys- maceuticals group, expects net ing hospital in Oman. 

r&T said some profit to rise 13 percent to 14 per- Viag AG, the energy, al umin um 


president is not required 
til 60 days after thiti. 


Mr. Acker and Mr. Ferris side- Brotrn, Boreri & Ge , 
stepped questions about possible new ordos increased 22 
opposition to (he sale from Japan and revenue 4 percent in 


some retrained and some offered chairman, said at the annual meet- perns to increase its dividend for 
eariy retirement. ing. Consolidated net profit after 1985 from 4 Deutsche marks 

Brown, Boreri & Ge AG said minority interests was 709 million ‘ (SI JO), Werner Lamby, a board 
new orders increased 22 percent francs ($75 million) in 1984. member, said. The Finance Mmis- 

PfBdngton Bros. PLC re 


try, which bolds 87 percent of 


Air linfts and the Japanese govern- five months compared with the pre-tax profit for the 1984-85 year Viag’s shares, says it win sell at 
mem. They said that a U.S.-Japan same 1984 period. The managing of£]16imllion($146imIlionXa31- least 25 percent and have the shares 
aviation agreement specifies that board chairman. Herbert Gassert, percent increase from £88 J million publicly listed. 

Japan must allow any carrier desi“- gave no figures but said new orders the previous year, on revenue of Xerox Corp. said its previously | 
nated by the U.S. government to fly from abroad showed stronger £1.23 billion, compared with £121 announced letter of intent for In- 


approved routes 


growth than domestic orders. 
Canon Inc. has signed an a 


i“TKic 5c mirolir Q rrflncf-r viiuun uiu an ag itt- Jiauao rau sklj wvu axi uiuu ill iu v 

mentfinalting it the only supplier of for 60 million Deutsche marks fishing companies 
nghis that already exjst. Mr. Fer- reader-writers for opted ckrds to ($19.4 mfflion) from Kuwait’s Min- ed to exdudeKR 

Bine Cross/Blue Shield of Maty- istry of Electricity and Water for rox has signed a I 


[lion. teraatiooa] Thomson Organisation 

Siemens AG has won an order PLC to acquire three Xerox pub- 
r 60 rajHinn Deutsche marks lishing companies has been amend- 
19.4 rmfiion) from Kuwait's Min- ed to exclude R_R. Bowker Co. Xe- 


Mr Edouard de Royere 
appointed PresideiA of L'Air Liqoide 

Mr Edouard de Roy&re Joined L'Air liquids in 1966. He was in 
turn appointed Secretary to the Board In 1968, Deputy Chief 
Executive Officer in 1979 and Deputy Chairman and Chief 
Executive Officer in 1982. 

At the Board meeting of June 12 1985, Mr Jean Delorme infor- 
med the Directors that he did not wish to renew his term of offi- 
ce as Chairman and moved that Mr Edouard de Royhre be 
appointed Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. The propo- 
sal was accepted. 

All the Directors having joined Mr Edouard de RoyAre in 
paying tribute to Jean Delorme's outstanding contribution to 
the growth of L’Air Liquids since 1927, the Board, acting on 
Edouard de Roydre’s proposal, unanimously conferred the 
title of Honorary Chairman on Mr Jean Delorme and entrus- 
ted him with the chabmansiiip of the Consultative Commit- 
tee 

Mr Alain Joly, previously a Director and Vice-President, was 
appointed Deputy Chief Executive Officer. 


LAIR LIQUIDE 

World specialist in Industrial Gases 


istry of Electricity and Water for rox has signed a letter of intent to 


2D0D00stereholilen 
25000 emphiysBS in 
5> countries 


1964 comnBdaietl flgurm (FF) 

Salas : 20 Mfion 
Net result: 1 Ufflon 


Mr. Acker, however, said that land Inc. Canon will sdl 60,000 -delivery and laying of specialized sell Bowker to Reed Holdings Inc. 


the sale agreement would not be reader-writers for 10 billion yen ' high-tension cables. 

“activated* until the Japanese gpv- ($40 nriBiou). Optical cards memo- p 

eminent accepted United as a re- rize and replay information using a 
placement for Pan Am on routes laser ray. 

Into and oat of Japan. Mr. Ferris Chase Bank of Ohio has opened 
said the two executives had asked 22 branches in b uildings that were 1 

Japanese officials to move quickly the offices of six savings and loan I 


MONTANO SECURITIES PLC 

presents 


for an undisclosed price. 


Fund, Inc. 


NOW YOU CAN WATCH 

THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION OF THE CBS EVENING NEWS 
IN YOUR OWN HOTEL ROOM THROUGHOUT FRANCE 


• At least 80% of the Fund’s assets must be invested in obligations 
'■ backed by the full faith and credit of the US. Government or 

guaranteed by its agencies. The balance o£ the Fund’s assets may 
be invested in high quality money market instruments. Currently 
100% of the Fund's assets are in US. Treasury Securities. 

• Monthly Dividends. 

• Minimum initial investment ot only SL000 and 5500 thereafter. 

• Shares redeemed any business day without charge- 

• Available for personal accounts, retirees. ERA'S. Keogh's, Pension 
and Profit Sharing Plans. 

• Current distribution is computed by annualising the total dividends 
from net investment income and distributions of net realised short-term 
capital gains from option transactions for the three month period from 

• March 1 through May 31. That figure is then divided by the offering 
price as of I une Xthe er -dividend date for May. Future distributions 
xpilt eary beomse of dumges in the Fund's income and ofltnng prices. 
Shares may be redeemed at more or less than their cost. 

MONTANO SECURITIES PLC 

Corjvmtr Financiers & International Equities Dealers 
No. 1 Royal Exchange Avenue, London EC3V 3LT. 
Telephone: 01-283 7671 

Member of: USA. — National Association of Securities Dealers. 
Securities Investors Protection Cop., Securities industry Association 
U.K. — The Association of Stock and Share Dealers 

r Please send me a Prospectus containing more complete information 

1 about the YES US. Oovemment-Securiiies Income Fund, including all 
sales charges and expenses without obligation. 

I Name: — ^ 

Addr ess; 








JL 


-c* 




Sij&a—A 


TeLNo: 


. (day/evening) I 

^ ufTaa \ 


This advertisement is not an invitation to invest. For further information and 
die Prospectus Rack mciudmg an Application Form, please complete the 
coupon and return to the above address. 


The Global Newspaper. 







KEEP UP WITH DEVELOPMENTS IN 
THE UNITED STATES AND AROUND THE WORLD 

TUNE IN TO DAN RATHER ' 

IN ANY OF THE FOLLOWING FOUR STARS HOTELS : 

PARIS : Club Miditerranee. Commodore * Concorde Lafayette, fieorge V. 

Inter Continental Lancaster. L *H6teL Montparnasse Park. Nikko . 
Meridien. Novotel Paris-la-Defense . Royal Monceau . Scribe. 

Sofitel Bourbon. Sofitel Paris. 

DEAUVILLE : Chib 13. Normandy. 

NICE : Beach Regency. Meridien. | 

CANNES : Carlton. Frantel Beach. Gray d' Albion. Cannes Palace Hotel. t 

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ADVERTISERS CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS EXCLUSIVE CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION a 
_ SERVICE BY CALLING : BRIGITTE CATTAN. F-F.E..0 ) 202.25 JO. 202.01 .60 IN PARIS. O 








COFFEE C (MY CSCE} 

37500 Un.- cants par lb. 

149.40 121 DO Jul U525 14750 1 

148X2 127X0 Sap 14725 14940 1 

14ELB2 12925 D« 147 JO 149.7® 1 

14755 T28J0 Mar 14675 14045 

147.13 131.09 MOV 14850 14050 1 

1 45X10 13550 Jill 

14300 13225 SOP 

Est Sotos 3X0 Ptw.WH Ml 5 
Prev. Day Open lilt. 13.144 off 2k 
SUGARWORLD 11 tNYCSCE) 

112X00 lb*.- cents per lb. 

955 225 Jul 2D4 251 

935 2» SW 1H Uf 

9JB • 254 Oct 1X6 3X9 

725 . Ml Jm 343 343 

U3 325 Mar 3J5 XB5 

7.15 359 Mav 4JJ7 4X8 

059 422 Jul 431 431 

&M 42ft SOP _ 

45ft 452 Ocf 453 457 

Eat. Sales 10X50 Prev. Sate* 10064 
Prov.DavOponliit.92Sn up 229 

COCOA (NYCSCEl 
10 motile lorn- S pot Ion 

2400 1990 Jul 2028 2121 

3415 1987 Sop 2075 2075 

2337 1945 DOC 2045 2049 

2190 1955 -Mar 204ft 2046 

Est Sates Pr«v. Solos 3LB79 

Ptav. Dov Oponlnt 20270 up 55 


14550 14532 
14780 14848 
14720 14841 
14445 UTDB 
14750 1475B 
14650 
145.13 


184 250 

254 257 

351 359 

332 3X2 

324 un 
35ft 451 
4.13 422 


2018 2050 
197ft 2815 
1980 1985 
2025 2025 


W YR. TREASURY (CBT1 __ 

5100000 prln-pta 8.32nd* of 100 pet 
89-18 1M Jim W U-U 

88-21 75-18 3W 87-2 87-13 

87-13 75-13 Doe Oft 06-3 

85-31 75-14 Mar 

85-7 74-30 Jun 

Esi. Sates Prey. Sal os 12208 

Pmv. Dov Oponlnt. 53.902 off* 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
(OPcMIKUWflts & 32nd* at 100 P«> 
80-11 57-20 Jun 70-23 79-2 

79-12 S7-1B Sap 77-23 78-3 

78-13 57-8 DOC 74-24 77-5 

77-12 57-2 Mar 7ft-2 7ft-7 

704 56-29 Jun 75-10 75-12 

7531 54-29 Sop 74-18 74-18 

74-24 5A-25 Dec 7»M 7M0 

74-15 5427 Mar 72-29 72-29 

73- 11 43-12 Jun 

72-27 63-4 SOP 71-12 71-13 

72-18 42-34 DOG 

Eat- Solos Prev. 50(08150279 

Prov.Oav Opon lnt3D7D85 ofllJW 
ONMACCBTI 

SiOOOOO prln- pis 0. Skids of laopci 
77-4 57-17 Jun 76-12 76-16 

74- 14 59-13 Sap 7530 7530 

75- 25 59-4 Doc 75-2 75-2 

75-4 SB-20 Mar 

74-23 58-25 Jun 

6S31 45 Sop 

Est Solos Prev. Sales 748 

Prov.OcyOpen n& UH o#t5i9 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM1 
SI million- Pis Of 100 Pd 
9289 85JQ Jun 9284 *284 

9240 85X0 Sop 9Z3B *2J8 

92.13 0534 DOC 9185 *185 

9181 8686 MOT 

91.19 86X5 Jial 91JJ2 9145 

91X8 0784 Sop 

E99 0834 Doc 

Est Sates Prev. Sates _ 251 

Prev. Day Open Hit 3800 oft 82 

EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mllHon-frtsof 100 pet 
9259 62.49 Jun 9234 9238 

9224 *453 SOP 92X3 9207 

9182 mm Doc 9134 9L50 

9142 84.10 MW 91.13 91.14 


78-7 704 

77-5 77-8 

76-5 744 

75-10 75-12 
74-14 74-17 
73-23 73-24 
73-77 73 

734 724 

mo 

71 71 

70-13 


75-26 76-2 
754 75-W 

74-24 74-24 
744 

73-23 

73-11 


925* *240 
*230 9234 

9138 9IJ4 
9139 
91X2 mss 
*8 M 
*830 


9238 923* 
9185 9151 

9137 9181 
9054 *057 


(Interns complied s ttortl y before market close 1 
SP COMP . INDE X (CMEJ 

polnte and cards 1BflB 1*9.35 187.95 188X5 —130 

19580 14000 5«P 192X0 193X5 19140 19135 — 1 JS 

199.10 17SJM DOC 19455 19440 195X0 195X0 -LC 

mate 190.10 MOT 199-90 19950 199 JO 1*985 —35 

Est. Sates Prev. Sales 51524 

Prev. DOV Oponlnt. 00437 Off 335 
VALUE LINE (team 
points and cent* 

21940 17300 Jirn 19125 19840 WAS W73U —50 

21230 18535 SOP 20230 20230 201 JO 20140 —40 

Est. Sates Prov. Sales 2473 

Prev. Dov Oponlnt 7563 off SM 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
paints and cents 

111.15 90X0 Jun 10*40 10945 108.95 10935 —55 

11340 9135 SOP 111.90 11580 11130 11140 —85 

11580 10130 DOC 11380 11380 11380 11340 -40 

Est 5a tea Prev. Solos 11319 

Prev. Dov Open I m. 13403 off 344 


Close 

Meeuty* NA f 

Reuters 1.787 JO 

DJ. Futures HJK. 

Com. Research Bureau. NJV. 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; I - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Janes : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


NY CSCE: 

NYCE: 

COM EX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 



London Commodities 

Jane 12 


Claae Prawhms 
Hteb Low Bid Ask Bid Ask 

SUOMI 

stem no par metric toe 
An 91X0 8930 9020 9040 8940 0*80 

Oct 9330 91X0 9228 9240 9140 9180 

DK 98X0 97X0 9740 98X0 *4X0 9740 

Mar 10940 107X0 10840 10U0 10830 10840 

May 11340 11340 112X0 11330 113X0 11240 

An 120X0 119J0 119X0 120X0 11940 11*40 

pet N.T. N.T. 124X0 12530 12430 12450 

Volume: 884 lots of 50 tans. 

COCOA 

StarllM per metric tea 
Jhr 1832 13*0 1823 1823 1X00 1801 

SOP 1397 1375 1304 ]30S 1382 1383 

Dec I3S4 1345 1344 1347 1351 1354 

MOT 1364 1353 1355 1357 1359 1360 

Mav 1371 1344 1365 1366 1363 1366 

Jly 1370 1370 1347 1373 1365 1378 

Sep N.T. N.T. 1376 1381 1373 1385 

Volume: 4324 lots at 18 tons. 

COFFEE 

Siertteo per metric tea 
Jhr 2X85 2X56 2X78 2X82 2X68 2X49 

SCP 2.140 2.108 2.139 2,140 1117 1118 

NOV NJL N4L NA NA 1156 Z157 

Jan 2315 2.102 2313 2315 il*l X195 

Mm N.T. N.T. 2.190 2306 Z181 1190 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1185 2308 1170 7300 

Jhr N.T. N.T. 1172 2305 1160 1200 

Vote me: 1,983 lots of 5 tans. 


Paris Commodities 

Jane 12 


Hie* low aw Asa arn. 

SUGAR ^ . 

Frnck francs per metric ton 
AUO 1358 1355 1358 1360 —19 

Oct 1370 1356 1361 1363 —16 

DOC 1370 1399 1358 1363 —20 

MOT 1321 1307 1300 1313 —15 

May 1351 1349 1350 1355 — 13 

An 1426 1419 1418 1425 — 19 

Est wot: 066 lots of 50 tans. Prev. actual 
sates: 1827 loll Open Interest: 18356 
COCOA 

FrencJi flraDcs per 100 69 
Jly N.T. N.T. 2X7S 2.119 +35 

Sep 2X97 2X00 2X84 2X06 +4 

Dec 2X45 2840 2jM S 2X41 +4 

Mar 2X49 2X45 1040 2X46 —2 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2X*» — +5 

Jhr N.T. N.T. 2X40 — +5 

Sap N.T. N.T. 2X40 — +5 

ESI. vol.: 96 lots Of 10 tons. Prov. actual 
sates: 133 tofiOaen Interest: 736 
COFFEE 

French francs par 100 ke 
Jlv 2440 2440 2430 2450 —7 

Sop 1504 2472 1502 2X04 +3 

Nov 2530 1530 2555 2878 + 10 

Jon N.T. N.T. 2870 1600 + 15 

MOT N.T. N.T. 2560 1600 + 20 

Mav N.T. N.T. 2550 1600 + IS 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2540 2400 +10 

Est. voL: 04 lots at 5 tons. Prev. actual soles: 
48 lots. Open bnierest: 375 
Source: Bourse dv Commerce. 


Asian Commodities 

Jane 12 


GASOIL 

UJ. deltara per metric tea 
Jlr 21235 21135 21135 212X0 21235 21280 

Ana 21135 20935 210J5 211X0 210X0 21075 

Sep 21235 211X0 21135 212X0 211.75 212X0 

OCf 21450 213X0 21335 214X0 214X0 21450 

NOV 21*50 21450 214X0 TI7X0 215X0 21750 

Dec 22150 21950 219X0 220X0 2)735 221X0 

Jan N.T. N.T. 22050 223X0 21735 221X0 

Fek N.T. N.T. 211X0 220X0 716X0 223X0 

Mar N.T. N.T. 222X0 22780 212X0 228X0 

Volume: 0921atsof 100 tans. 

Sowers; Be ut en and London Petroleum Ex- 
change' foasaH). 


'New affirm# 
CBOT 


London Metals 

Jane 12 


IJCMl 


FUTURES 

ESZI] & tesa 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 
Futures Options on 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 

teCmumftiW 

c T BOUWTIUN 

i) / ^ (Ml 1 AND 

JLxJ WEJWHUHT 

* Appt/n nwfriu mu/et 

JWauitructr ftr 
mlmtur mmtb Fins jfn 
t tut trued SIS new tern 








DM Futures Options 

June 12 

WGenraMft-lOTfnro^ 


Strike Ceth-MMi Pnts-S 

Pries sip Dec Mar sen Dec 

31 l.ts 240 — 044 037 

E 131 1X1 - 0J9 1.14 

33 0JS 136 137 1-31 US 

H 081 0*0 137 1.95 231 

3S ax 061 1XS 173 2X1 

X a.17 059 — 157 US 

Estimated total ML 4306 
CMb: Tue. «el 1417 open let 20304 
Pud: TW.ntLW m* 0675 
Source: CME. 














































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


Page 13 



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lift n — ft 
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5ft 5ft— ft 
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3ft 4 

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199ft 203ft 
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23ft 23ft — ft 
13* 13ft— ft 
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4* 4* + ft 

4ft 4* 

2ft 2ft — ft 
31ft 31ft 
58* 58ft— lft 
56 56 4-1 

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lift 11^-ft 

4ft 24ft 24ft 
2ft 12ft 13ft 
7ft 17 17* 

5ft 15* 15V. — ft 
Oft 10ft 1012— ft 
6ft 6ft 6* + ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 
Oft 30 30 — ft 

1ft 2 + ft 


1ft UNA 

Oft UHifilB 9 

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lift unicppf 75 14 
8ft Unlmr n Tie 84 
14V. UAlrPd -54ft 27 12 
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lie. U Foods 15 

10ft utMad 15 

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168 n * 

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190 10ft 10ft 
40 20ft 19* 
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12 1ft 1ft 
130 14ft 14 

11 Mft 20 

1 100ft 106ft 
6 5ft 5* 
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30 13 12* 


106 10ft 
5 18ft 
77 7ft 
7 7 

1 18 
30 3* 

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47 10* 
173 3Ki 
1 Tft 
27 14ft 

4 8* 

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tft 

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14 —ft 
10ft + ft 

20ft + ft 
1* 

Ift— ft 
14 

20 — ft 
108ft +2* 
5ft— ft 
19* + ft 
12ft— <M 
6ft— ft 
17 — ft 
13 — ft 


10ft 10ft— ft 
lift 18ft 
7ft 7ft 
7 7 

18 18 
3* 3*— ft 
ft ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
Zft 3ft + ft 
Tft 7ft— ft 
14ft 1491— U 
8 * 8 * 
lift lift 


Protect Your Short-Term 
Gains With The Long-Tkm 
Security Of Gold. 

Hie spectacular rise of the dollar and 
of many paper investments has brought 
substantia] profits. The wisest investors 
now convert part of their gains into 
Krugerrands. 

Why? 

Krugerrands ore legal tender bullion 
coins. Tne most widely circulated - and 
widely recognized ■ gold coins in the world. 
And because they contain 1 oz. 1/2 oz, 
1/4 oz and 1/10 oz of pure gold • with just 
a touch of hardening alien* - you can be 
certain that in the long cun. they will 
secure the value of your investment profits. 

Ask your bank or broker today or 
write for your free corn of the "European 
Guide to Gold and Krugerrands" to: 
International Gold Corporation 
Coin Division - 1, rue dels Rotisserie - 
CH- 1204 Geneva - Switzerland. 




KRUGERRAND 

- Money you can trust. 

Plea*? note that 1 niernatkmal Cold Corporation 
does not provide a buying or setting service. 



wsttaro .20 12 

wdioiii I* 

wiHimn is 

W1RET 154 7.7 16 
W5MSL 48C >J 17 
WnEnl 6 23 

Wiener n 40 14 V 

WillnG 4 

WliutB 

i Wlnlln 2J4 9.4 
WllPpt 450 1DL5 
WfcWeor 52 16 7 
wwoeE no 

i wwoepf 1 50 11.7 

Wortlm 351 
wralhr JE I 
WrSIH a 05c- 30 


1 I>4 5ft YankCo 13 115 7V. 7' 


lift 6 T Bor J3t 56 IB 35 

13* 7ft TeC .16 U 21 8 

15ft 5 TIE 4U0 

14* 6* Til 37 31 

18* 13 TobPrd JO 1.1 12 29 

18ft 6* TandBr 76 

15V. 9ft Tostv 40 38 U 9 

5ft 2ft Team 1 

4ft 1* TchAm 28 

27* 13ft TchSvm 14 « 


6* Sft 5ft— * 
12 13 12 

5ft 4* 4ft— ft 
9ft tft 9ft + ft 
18ft 18* 18*— ft 
6ft 6ft 6ft + ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft 
2ft 2 3 — ft 

16ft 16 16 — ft 


r 


AMEX Highft-Lows 


June 12 


I 


17ft 12ft Jachm 58b 17 9 II 13ft 13ft 13ft 
7ft Sft Jocota 16 6ft 6ft 6ft + ft 

Sft 2* Jet Am 6 69 3 3ft 3 + ft 

2 ft JetAwl 6 * ft ft 

7ft 4ft JstTon Jit M 14 W 7* 7ft 7* + * 

6ft mjanoPd <o » W »- ft 

lift 7* JotMAm JO 14 13 37 B* B* (ft 

lift 4* Jalmlnd 3 83 6ft 6ft At— ft 


Sft 1ft KapokC 

12* n Knyjn 

Mb 14ft Kamdn 
27* 10ft K*tdvn 
9ft S* KevCo 
17ft B KWPb 
lift 5ft Ktvco 
9ft 7 ■ Kavcaun 
4ft 2ft KIM* art 
4ft 3ft KHcrn 
5* 3ft Klnork 
5* 3 Ktrtnr 


4 67 3 2ft 3 

.108 <9 90 lift lift lift— 16 

■BOB 19 10 3 20* 2JJ* 20ft — * 

-S» 25 83 21* 20* 28ft— ft 

JOe 35 12 Bft 8* Bft 

JO 11 16 343 9* 9ft 9* + ft 

8 18 5* 5* 5* 

13 7 7 7 —ft 

59 4ft 4* 4* 

36 2 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 

23 4ft 4ft 4ft 

262 . 3ft 3 8 — ft 


AmCapCP 
CltvOasRc 
Holtv Carp 
MUnPL MB 
PGE 196ptM 
PSvCol 425p 
5DI» 247pf 
SCE870PT 


B5N «ri 

MicMEna 

Tidwell 


AmMadBH 
Crowley Mil 
Jetronk: Ind 
NewMexAr 
PL»oCS6pf 
P»SPI pfE 
Soft 2£6pf 
SteriSoft 


Brown For A 

DtomndBotfi 

AtorcFOSLn 

PGE 137efB 

PLh>764p< 

RKkomy 

Scurry Rn 

Unitlln 


NEW LOWS 9 


CetecCorp vlComdreCp 
S ow Cnr w T Bar 


Brown Fur B 
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MlnPLpfA 
PGEUBOpfY 
Peer* Tub# 
RoyPalmCoJ 
SCE 271 Pi 
Wlntlmpln 


HlfSfcvOG 
TIE Comm 


10V. 5ft inner .10 1.7 


NYSE Hi^js-Loftg 


June 12 




High Style 

FINE SERVICE IS ALWAYS IN FASHION 


30ft 10 QuoObs J6 


109 30* 28ft 29ft 4-1* 


»ft 5 RAI 
5ft 3* RMS El 
7ft 1* RTC 


M U 12 43 Oft 6ft 6ft 

11 3ft Jft 3ft 

34 2 1* 2 + 


Floating Rate Notes 


June 12 


•jw/moL 
. ^ I run 95 
AM IrtWi 92 
jHed 1rtsfiB7 
JNedlrMiPerii 
Mb Bbo Coro 91/96 
.nontlc Fbi 89/M 
olMtaftS 95 
m Comm I In 96 
VaNmLwmn 
KD D1 Romo 89/91 
XoDI RatB92 
■coSoMloSoirmn 
mpkak Bk IBUItO 
loaCorpT? 
lkGr«Ke9U« 

Ik Greece UW 
uiratandW 
in I reland W _ 

Ik Montreal " 

ikMoMranw 
* Montreal 91 
ik iftwYori* 

■Ik Mova SoUoavft 
lkNmaScano94 
» Tokyo « 
ik Tokyo 89 
ik Tokyo P 
ik Tokyo Frtajjl 
Ik Tokyo Dicn/tl 

larkfanBfftoIVSft 

l«*«r»TrM» 

koUere Tnjft M 
mcopHaj* 

Mil F In 07/91 

SjjniW 

■hSmm 

HliKtaauazw 

. 11168 ? 

IUO _ 
doBOdn — 
«ai»« 

I fee 99 

»g„ 

UM 15/18 
WbUM 
, IwK 
.**•» 

WB 88/91 
bioJlflft 
HW06 _ 

seaRr 

todays B 
to day* 0/5 90 

tardoysO/SM 

ftMvBi PWg 

MMwn DKI9/84 

“WiSgn 

™s 

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»»90N5 

j690 

W* 

ScMtWVIv) 


yv. 

9* 

8* 2M7 






9* 2M6 
7ft 1M9 
9ft 2546 
k ms 
10* 3049 
Nk 1741 
» 1MB 

8* 17-19 
9* 1547 
Hh 349 
«* 3006 
Ift 2W 
9* SMB 
fft 2347 
10* 309 
9ft 0641 

M 

7* I 








rr*r 






•ift 


"ll 




m 










AT AIR FRANCE , THERE'S ONE 
THING THAT NEVER GOES OUT 
OF STYLE: OUR ATTENTION 
TO THOSE IMPORTANT DETAILS 
THAT MAKE YOUR FLIGHT 
A TRULY UNIQUE EXPERIENCE 
FROM THE WARM WELCOME 
ON BOARD TO A SELECTION 
OF THE BEST IN FRENCH WINES 
AND FOOD ; WE BRING A TOUCH 
OF 'LA VIE FRANCA1SE’ 

TO EVERY TRIP YOU TAKE. 

AND AT AIR FRANCE, THATS 
SOMETHING THAT WILL NEVER 
GO OUT OF FASHION. 


- r 7 a \ 


WE’RE AIMING EVEN HIGHER 


Non Dollar 
























































* « Page 14 


EVTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUIVE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 



Over-the-Counter 


June 12 


Nasdaq National Market Prices 


SmaiB Hat 

10M High l#> 3PM.CHW 


V 

5 1** 


3i 

3D 


.9 




ASMRI 
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AEL * 

... AFG 
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Acodln 
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AmSrta 
ASotar 
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Amrllrs IX 
Amnnt 

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AfnxfcS J7 29 

Amort 120a 10 

- Amends «0 IS 
Anodtto .10 1.9 
An topic 

■ - Anotvi 
Ananwi 
Andovr 

- Andrew 
Andros 

. *MSN .12 IJ 
• - AroatoC 
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AMBIOS 

- - AMdCm 

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Archive 


JOa IJ 


JO 1 A 
J9e A 


IJOO U 
X L6 

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JSe I* 

JOB t.l 
IX If 


JSe 3 
AD 21 
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AO 16 


JO 41 


» M M 6 « 
tim mi im 
372M 2m 23V. 

13821 20% 21 + % 

53611% Htt lift- U 
550 UV. 14% IM 

ms io «* m- id 

2NM ft 

3032m 2216 32% — 1* 

13 it* 616 610 

41 7* 714 m 

14 7* 9% 9* 

85231% » 231% + ft 

31 16 1514 13* — 1% 

315* 15* 15V. 

279 1 % 1 

11820* im 77* — 1% 
1451 31% 29k 3 4-1% 

78 7V, 6* 6* 

5029 29 29 +14 

312114 3ffU 20*— W 
174 avk m> m 
117 ia u n 
38 M 3 31%+1% 

15 1114 10* 10* — 14 
268 614 524 5*— 2% 
145 5 47k 476— 1% 

97 31% 2 21% 

719 18 18 + * 

11417* 17 17* + 1% 

12032* 321% 32* 

1 51% 51% Sl% 

43 596 5* 596 + ft 
37 1» 12* 1314—14 
23416* 19* 1614 + * 
5 576 5* 5* 
891614 IS* 15*- * 
151374 13* 13* 
11837* 27 2714 + ft 

5136 351% 35* + * 

13420 IB* IB*— I* 
24 57% 5* 5*- ft 
341 24 2314 2314 + * 

13 7906 19* 19* + 14 
X6 1293231% 23* 231% + * 

715 s* 5 5 — W 

115 3* 3* 3* 

2111* 11 11* + 14 

23 6* 6* £14 + * 

14 s* m m + % 

71 B 7* 776 + * 

19710 9* 9* 

1610% 10% 10% - % 
21915% 14* 15* 
64610% 9* 10 

mu* ii* it* 

15 7* 7* 7Vl— 14 

61121% 12% 1214 
5812% 12 12% + * 

63 7 646 646— * 

123 27 24% 77 

5 5* 5* 54* — * 

2716% 15* it* + 46 
530 79* 29*— % 

42 BV% 8 8% + % 

218 26 25* 26 + % 

_ 45 121% 12* 12* + * 

IJ 1139 37* 36* 3646— * 
12 22212* 12* 1246 

22518% 17* 17*— * 

70 6 % 4 6 

47 7* 7* 7*— * 

2916* 161% 16* + % 
13617% 17 17 

169 * W ft — 1% 

138 32* 37* 32* + M 

£* 4 £ ^ + * 
1226% 26 26 — % 
3017% 17 77* 

306 3% 3„ 3 

1877 * H. * + 1% 

O 186037* 36* 37* + * 
25918* 17* 18*— * 
671 7* 6* 7 — * 

250 25* 25 75*— ft 

4*0* 40 48* 42* 

90316* 15* 16 
1 5* Sft 5* 

203 12* 12% 12% — * 
63 10* 10 m 
SOU* II* II*— U 
1 7 7 7 — * 

174530 1946 20 

24 4* 4* 4* 

55 9% 9 9 

2725 10* 17* 17* — * 
9224 16% IS* 1591— * 
88727* 26* 2646— ta 
571 II* 13 ka 13*— % 
18722* 20* 71*— 1 
6 10 10 10 

. 70 5* 5 5 

•• ArooSv 3120* 19* 20* 4 * 

ATUB Mb 29 3230 28 27% 38 + * 

ArowB 2.12b 4 A 34* 4* 48* 42 
Artel 70 8% 7* 8 — % 

296 9* ■* 9* + * 
231 30 30 — * 

2 6 * 6 * 6 * + % 

4717 11* 12 + * 

47 446 4% 4* 

37 M% 10% 10% — % 
235 7% 7* 7% + * 
36 17 16* 17 

2812* 12% 12* 

£ 7% 7% 7% 

3330 29* 29*— * 

10 25 24* 25 + % 

196 35* 34* 35* + * 
11913* 12* 13* + 46 
2D 18* 10* 10* 

23 7* 7* 7* + % 
1535* 35 35% 

7717 16* 17 + % 

66225 24* 25 — * 

) 3* 3* 3* 
t 24 7* 7* 7*— % 

14 46 4 4 — * 

25 9% 9 9% + * 

40 7* 7 7% 

t 23 9 8* 9 + % 


JDb 3J 


.16 .9 

ua 33 


19 


Sate* ta Net 

ISO* High low JP-M-CWge 

Auxtan 61 61A £ 6% 

Auger* 147 4* m 3*—* 

AvntGr 68 8% 7* 8 — * 

Avntek 69328* 19* 19*— * 

Avatar IB718* 18* 18ft + * 

AvtatGp 4617% 16* 16*—* 

AztcM JO AD 10 5 4* 5 

AUdl 35 2* 2* Z% + % 


B 


220 43 


.IDe A 
124 46 
JBa 12 
.90 47 
134 19 

20 93 
120 42 
20 14 
IJOo 19 
34 22 

134 32 


AsMon 
AsdBCP 
ASSdCO 
AsdHst 
— - Astrcm 
• Atfrons 
Astrmv 
Atcor 

•• AHwyS 

• AtlcoFn 
AIICsLt 
AttAm 
AttntBc 

— AUnFd 
•>. All Fin 

AHPrm 

7®, 

AudVM 

raw 

AutMed 

— 

• Autmtx 
AutoCp 


JO 27 

.12 1J 


.44 23 

t 

252 83 
.-Mb 13 
30 23 


Me J 


BBDO 
BPISy 
BRCom 
BoJrdC 

BaKrFti 130a 22 
Bdloks 
BaltBcp 
fin Pane 
BanePs 
Bancokl 
BcuHw 
Bonder 
BanoH 
BkDolB 
BkGran 
BKNEb 
B kSous 
BnkesrtB 
Bktoma 

BkMAm 130 1U 

Burtkwt 

Bonta s 

Bartcko 

Barns 

Barton 

BsTnA 

BasAm 134t 77 
BMtF JOa 21 
BavPac 

BayBks 322 33 
IcvtV .12 12 

Bavou 
B1 Fuses 

BeltW ,10b 13 
BtidiCf 
Bonbon 
Brnmnwi 
Bertletr 22 2J 
Berfdne 30 4.1 
BorkGs 112 87 
Bert Ha 
BetriCp 

Betz Lb 120 XI 

Bibbs 30 23 

BfoB 

BtaBear 

BiilMas 

BlndlvB 

Bio Res 

Bloaen 
Blomet 
OlatcR 
Blrdinc 
Birtdir 
BMlGr I 
Blcfclnd 20e 
Btaslue 
BOssAT t 
BRdoun 

Boat Bn 130 3J 
BobEvn 20 13 
BollTc .W 32 
BaoleB 

Bean El 35t 93 
Boetbln 

BoolliFn JO 17 
BaUBc .40a 12 
BstnFC 20e 1.1 
BradRE 

BrodvW ,10e 2 
BraeCP 

BmcfiC 120 32 
Brencn .12- U 
Bril Lee 
BnmRb 
BrWTOdl I 
Brunos .14 
Bwfftan 
BulidTr 
Brnhm 20 
Bumps 

BurrBr 

Burrlt I 
BMAs 134 

BusJnkt 
ButtTMf 122 43 


1650* 50* 5W4 
46 3 2* 7*— * 

3 8 % 8 % 8 % + * 

100 7* 7* 7*— % 

637 37 37 

14 8% 7* 7*—* 
7534* 24 % 24* 

149 49 49 —1 

222 * 22 * 22 *— * 
4719% 18* 19% 
7131* 30* 31* +* 
70 8 % 7 th 8 *— * 

39 B* 8* 8*- * 

1128* 27* 28* 

1 25* 25* 25*— 1* 
33446 45 46 +* 

211 29* a* 28* + % 
17413% 13% 13% + % 
947* 47* 47*— * 
19010* 9* 10 + * 

3012 11% 11% 

44716% 16 16 — % 

422 1 % 1 

20424 22* 23* + * 

24 3 3 3 — tt 

19 9* 8% 8%—* 
32813% 13% 13* + % 
8739 38* 38*— 1 

35 7% 7% 7% + * 

4759% 58% 59 + Vh 

40 7 6% 6*— * 

1 4* 4% 4* 

S3 6% 6* 6* 

56 9% 9% 9* 

5 8* 8* 8*— M 

16021 19% 19% - % 

2413* 13* I)*— * 
23313* 15V. 1546 

58 12* 12 12% + % 

324% 24% M%- * 
900 865 8*5, „ 

33 ft % ft + ft 
664 32% 31* 21* 

3224 23* 34 

8017% 16% 17 
77915* 15* 15*— 1 

36 4* 4% 4* + * 

11114% 14 14% + % 

61 6% 6* 6% 

260 7* 7* 7% 

2116* 16* 16*—* 
9 7% 6* 6*— * 

'40 4% ft ft- ft 

80 5% 5 5 

29 9* 9* 9* + % 

isilt t ft 

215* 15* 15* 
14339* 39 39 — * 

1713* 20% 20*— U 
» 7* 7* 7* 

6 6 * 6 * 6 *— % 

4 6% 6* 6* + M 

53 4* 4% 4% + ta 

TO 17* 17* 17* + % 

15523* 22* 23* + * 

■9 18* IB* 18* + % 

n 13 10* 12% +1 

334 33 34 + * 

22612* 13* IM -V U 
11436 35% 36 + « 

123 4% 4 4* 

5510* 10% 10* 

2515 14* 14%— ta 

1724 1* 1* 1*W — ft 

TJ 150313* 13* 13*— * 
400 1ft 1* 1* 

492i 35* 25* + % 

717% 17* 17*— * 
87 7* 7* 7% + * 
7317* 16* 1616 — * 
133 10* IS 18* 
16527% 27* 27* 

2750 7* 7* 7*— <A 

1226* 26* 26*— % 


£1 


l.l 


17 


CCBs 
C COR 
CPRhb 
CBTBs 


J8 17 


U 


CCXNt 
CML 
CPI 
CPT 
CSP 
CoblTV 
Cache 
GACl 
CbrySc 
Cadmus 
Calibre 
CalAmp 
CoUky 
CatMIc 
CalSlvg 
CalWtrs 260 
CallonP 

corny 

Calami 
CananG 
Canon I 
CapSwf 
CapFSL 
CapCrb 
CardDls Mr J 
Cardin 1 
Career* 

Card Is 

CareerC JM 2.1 
Carotin 


AS II 
36 17 


35m 23 


.16 13 
.14e IJ 

21 r 3 
.160 S 
30 2D 


17 9% 
16 4* 
32 2% 
164 4* 


632* 32* 32* + % 
26 0 7* 7* 

477 5* 5% 5% — % 
4020* 20* 20* + % 
134 46% 48% 46% +1 
4519* 18* IB*— I 
2 9* 9* 9* + * 
62717% 17 17 — * 

S5S 6* 6* 6*— * 

8% 9 
4 4 

2* 2% 

...... 3* 3*— % 

22520* 20* 20* 

220* 20* 28*— * 
32 2* 2* 2* + % 
1 2 * 2 * 2 *— * 
537* 35 35 

ft ft-% 

4546* 45 45*— * 

95 3 3 3 

6212 II* 11% 

5 7% 7% 7%— * 
102720* 19* 20% + * 
2423 22% 23 + % 

40 17* 17* 17*— % 
17710% 10 10 — ta 

171 2 1* 1* + ft 

1216* 16* 16* 
20011* II* 11*—* 
43210* 10* 10*— % 
7 8 7% 8 

mm n n 
79 1% 1% 1% 


Carter! 

Cosen 

Censor a 

entree 

Centcor 

CenBea 

CnBshS 

CFdBkkO 

CJerBc 

CltPUSv 

CFttvLi 

CWisBn 

Centran 

Canturt 

CntyPs 

Cerdyn 

CerbfA 

Cermtk 

Cetut 

ChncCp 

Chapral 

CliaPEn 

OwrCn 

OirmSs 
OirtFdl 
Otarvaz 
GhaOiM 
aikPnt 
OikTcft 
ChLwn 
Chemeu 
QiFato 
Qteroko 
OiryE 
aiiOd 
diiPacs 
Oillta 
aittmd 
owner 
Chranr 
ChrDw c 
Qrvrn s 
OntiFs 
OnMk 
Ontas 
Ciptier 
CIprlcD 
Clrcor 
Ctzsau 
CtxSGa 
CtiFid 
ChGtP 
CtzUtA 
CIzUIB 
Cl tv Fed 
CtvNCp 
atvr 


1J0 &9 

zon 43 

132 4.9 
J4 32 

ua 43 
30 U 
.18 1.1 
J4b ZJ 
M 2J 

J9I J 


In Net 

180s Hlah Low SPJH.arge 

4212* 12% 12%—% 

6526% 26* »ft— * 


126 9* 9* . .. 
6330% 30* 30% 
48417* 17 17% + % 

245% 45* 45% + * 
1231 30* 21 + * 

122 2546 25% 35% + 46 
1624* 24* 24* 
8012% 17% 13 
1291646 16* 16*— % 

531* 31* 31* +1* 
97Binb 11% 11% + % 


JO IJ 


JOa 17 


J8 U 


ua 4.9 


ja 22 
.I0b 13 
1J4 33 
Jir 

■I2e A 


ClasIcC 

Cleordi 

ClevtRt 

Clthtme 

CoastF 

Cstsav 

CabRac 

CobeUb 

CocnBtl 
Coeur 
coaenic 
Cohmr 3 
CaiabR 


UO 11 

76 

3J 

AM 23 
i 

136 5-7 
^0 16 
J8b 14 
IJM U 
A 37 

2J0 10J 


Coll 
Collins 
CoiABn 
CBCOPA 


AKb 23 
Me 33 


CO In Gas 136 83 
CotGspf I JO W» 
Col Li AC UO 29 
Col me 

Co to Ml 34 16 
ColuFd 
ColSov 
Co mors 

Comarc J2 .1 
Carnots -12 A 
Comcoa 

Comma .16 t3 
Comdial 

Comerc 110 52 

CmdAir 

CwnBpf 

ComBsti 108 33 
Comar 2.12 27 
CmceU IJM 16 
CmBCol J6 23 
CmdBn 2JOO 42 
Cmc/Fd 


.. ... 14 14% + % 

3 7* 7% 7* 

18 2% 2* 2% 
20211% 11 11*— % 

st St-* 

453 4* 4* 4*_ * 

2 4* 6* 4* + H 
40019% 19* 19* 

5 9 9 9 + % 

1316% 16% 16% — * 
2621* 21* 21* 
20820% 20* 20* 
imiO 9* 9* 

62 SB* 28% 20* + % 
41 6* £ 6* + M 

5 6% 6% 6% + * 
3618 18 18 

1613 11U 12 + * 

33710% 10% 10%— % 
35330 29% 30 + * 

3736% 26% 26% 
3420% 19% 20% + % 
23731% 31* 31*- % 
si m 7% « 

40617% 17* 17* 

139 7* 6% 4ft— % 
2949% 49 49% 

1Z1 19% 19 19* + ta 

134 34 34 — % 

11X17* 16% 16% — * 
20 7* 7% 7* + % 

46 5% 5* 5% 

... 6238% 38 38%— % 

£6 187721 20* 21 +% 

9831% 31% 31%—% 
218 18 18 
37X 3B% 38% — % 

3334* 34 34* + * 

29411% 11% 11% 

69 26% X 26% 
8338* X X 
2524 X* 24 + % 

1 6% 6% 6%— * 
1018 18 18 
920 19* 19* 

50623% 22 23% +1* 

5014% 14% 14ft— ta 
5015% 14% 14% — % 
IB 3* 3 M + ta 
7716* 15% 15% —1 
12641* 41% 41% 

’oft 

17219 18* IB* — * 

68 4% 4* 4% + * 

371346 13% 13% + * 
4922% 22* 3346 
417 4* 4ta 4ta— % 
618% 18 18 + * 
25417* 16 16* + % 

92 18% 18 18% + % 

1 18 18 18 + * 
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610* io* 10ft + ft 
36611ft lift lift- ft 
144 Oft Ota Oft 
3 6* 6ft £*+* 
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1J2I10J 8311 10 10ft- % 

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51 6 ft 6 ft 6 ft 

13 .1 BOS* KB* 105* — % 

20119ft 1«6 19ft- ft 
31011% Tl* 11% + % 
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10 2 % ZV 2 %— ft 

54 79 18ft 18% — % 
54 3ft 3ft 3ft- * 
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140 7ft 7* 7ft— % 
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16625ft 25 SU 
25333ft 31ft 33ft 
1020* 20ft 20* + ft 
116% 16% 16% 
5216% 16 16 — % 

31 25 24% 24% 

10312* 12* 12*— ft 
12012* 11* I2ta— ft 
37225% 24 24% — * 

13117* 17 17%—% 

48319% 18* 19% +1 
90016* 16% 16ft 
63023 22* 22% + ft 

7624* 24 24 

X 19% 19% 19% 
2640% X* 39*— ft 
B lift 10ft lift + ft 

11 17* 17% 17%—* 

811 10 % 10 % + ta 

3 7* 7* 7* +1 
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210% 10% 10% 
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1 -LIAM LAWSON DISl 
1 ' COATBRIDGE AND 
SCOTLAND 
100 % SCOTCH 





‘lled Matured and 

,|)E 0 BRmsH GOVERf®i 



The measure of excellence 


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756 B% 7ft 716— % 

31 3* 3* 3* + * 
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6513ft 13* 13* 

1550 9ft 8ft 9ft +1 

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13 3ft 2* 2*— % 

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4336 35* X + 16 

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713% 13* 16* — % 
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318% 18% 18% 

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119* 19ft 19ft 
2121 20ft 20ft— * 
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1412% 12* 12ft— % 
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1435ft 35ft 35ft — % 
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20 8* B* 8*— % 
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1713* 13* 13*— * 
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128ft 28ft 28ft 
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149 3ft 3* 3* 

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21 18*6 187a 15ft — * 
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Belgium Targets Speeders 

Reuters 

BRUSSELS — Foreign motor- 
jsiscaught speeding in Belgium will 
he subject io spot fines of up io 
4,000 francs ($651 beginning My 1 
and iheir cars will be confiscated if 
ihey refuse to pay, officials said 
Wednesday. 


Isi 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on June 10, 1985: US. $125.92. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Infomntlon: Werson, Hddring4Ple»wmN.V, 

Herengradht 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 


Gold Options (^,.4^1. 


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(Continued on Page 15) 


so 

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GdU 31370. 31 420‘ 

ValcarsWUteWeM SjV 

l,:Q«oi *1 Moot-Btanr 
1211 Cam I. SaicnAnd 
TeL 316251 ■ Trim 28MS 


Spot Oil Prices 
Continue to Fall 

Jltwm 

pJ5S^^ M a| - Cmd. oil 

°f poor demid, fell furthpr^ty 

stores of gasoline. b J P thc,r 
bv ^ JP* 5 "' published Tuesday 
twe. showed "u.S SaSS^ 

mg ihat demand indicat* 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


Page 15 


Investing in the Wealth of the Gulf 


(Continued from Page 9) 
market value was estimated by 
Morgan Stanley & Co. at $160 mil- 
lion, according to Mr. Kirdar. 

In line with its policy to act as a’ 
“financial intermediary,” Invest- 
corp plans to gradually build up a 
portfolio. It plans to retain only a 
small part of its outright total cor- 
porate acquisitions and to sell the 
rest to its own shareholders or oth- 
er clients, lnvestcorp has complet- 
ed a restructuring plan for Tiffany, 
with some help from the New York 
investment banking firm of Leh- 
man Brothers. Kuhn Lodi. 

lnvestcorp has also beat active 
on the U.S. real estate market and 
has recently bought the Packard 
Building in Philadelphia. A deci- 


sion has yet to be made on whether 
part of Investomp's ownership of 
the office building will be privately 
sold, or whether the Investment will 
be held for its capital-gains poten- 
tial. No price was disclosed for the 
building. 

investcorp’s first acquisition in 
real estate was made two years ago, 
when it acquired for S52 million a 
50-percent freehold interest in the 
Los Angeles Manulife Plaza, a 
prime office building in the heart of 
the city's district. 

Investcoip's top executives hope 
to continue the past two years’ per- 
formance, in spite of the region’s 
economic difficulties. 

The company’s assets almost tri- 
pled during its second year of oper- 


Phillips Gas Pacts in Peril 

(Continued from Page 9) 
clause on compensation demands 
from customers, sources said 
The sinking has been caused by 
the extraction of oil and gas from 
the reservoirs in the seabed. 

A gas expert at a major interna- 
tional oil company in London said 
be doubled the reduced flow would 
have any agmfkant effect in the 
short term. “There's plenty of gas 
around at the moment,” he said. 


mentioning suppliers such as the 
Soviet Union and the Netherlands. 

Peter Gaffney, a senior partner 
at the London energy consulting 
Aim of Gaffney, ume & Asso- 
ciates, said bis “gut reaction" was 
that the Ekofisk problem would 
have little effect on European sup- 
plies. “We've gpt plenty of surplus 
gas in Europe at the moment," he 
said 

(Reuters, IHT) 


a lion, reaching $236 million by 
Dec. 31, 1984. The return on assets 
was 7 percent, and the return on 
shareholders' equity was 20.1 per- 
cen l About half of its gross income 
of $20 million cama from returns 
on its direct investments, including 
outright acquisitions such as Tiffa- 
ny; almost a quarter from money- 
market activity; a fifth from real 
estate investments, and the rest 
from portfolio-man a gemeni fees. 

lnvestcorp will introduce a range 
of new services to its clients, in- 
cluding personal-portfolio man- 
agement. It also plans to test a new 
product, aimed at enabling Islamic 
banks to benefit from international 
investment opportunities. 

Although it is unclear what lo- 
ves Leo rp plans to offer those hanks , 
its regional investment director, 
Michael Merritt, said it would be a 
new formula to get around the 
problem of “a number of institu- 
tions that have raised capital to 
invest in qualified projects, but do 
not have the international n*4mtcni 
expertise to translate the opportu- 
nity that exists in a financial mar- 
ket to an acceptable investment 
from the point of view oS the reli- 
gious committees that study these 
in vestments." 

Under Islamic law, riba , which 
literally means usury and practical- 
ly means interest, is banned 


Europe Cool 
To Wall Street 


(Continued from Page 9) 

mem-backed fixed income paper, 
called Merrill Lynch Federal Secu- 
rities TrosL 

Jod Levy, European equity man- 
ager for Smith Barney in New 
York, confirmed the view that 
than has been no major participa- 
tion in the Wail Street rally on this 
side of the Atlantic. But he ob- 
served: “The decline in U.S. inter- 
est rates has helped Europeans a lot 
lately to be more positive about 
Wall Street stocks.” 

On the negative side, be said the 
principal new concern among Eu- 
ropeans is a recession in the united 
States. “But they're still receptive 
to good ideas," he added. 

Emman uel Luissinotte, manag- 
er of the Moseley Hallgarten office 
in Paris, said stronger buying on 
Wall Street has been noticeable 
among bis institutional cheats for 
the past three weeks. 

“Part of the reason is they fear 
the Paris bourse is too high," he 
said “Also, the gradually improv- 
ing looe or WalT Street has given 
investors here a good chance to 
evaluate and appreciate the mar- 
ket’s upside potential. It hasn’t 
been like last August when the rally 
happened so fast almost everybody 
missed iL" 


Over-the-Counter 


June 12 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


■UTVAI 

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TOM HU LOW 1PM. am 

(Continued from Page 14} 


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LET THE TRIB BE YOUR GUIDE, 



UU GUIDE TO 
BUSINESS TRAVEL & 

ENVBnAJNMENT: 

EUROPE. 

Theres never been 
a guide quite Hoe ft. 

THb business readers d 
across Europe shared 
their most treasured 
travel secrete with 
journalist Peter Graham. 

The result: a book for 
busftiess travelers with - 
contributions from business traveler. 

Turn cm otefroy business trip hta a pleasant, more 
efficient journey. Guide cavers Amsterdam, Brussels, 
Copenhagen, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt, Geneva London, 
Lyon, Milan, Munich, Peris, Stockholm, Zurich. Over 
200 fact-fled pages, this Hcrcfoover edition is a great gift 
idea for cofleagues, business contacts, or yourself. 

Seven subdwisions far each eftyindude: 1. Basic dly 
overview with vital information. 2. Holds, with emphasis 
on business services. 3. Restaurants, for on- end off-duty 
pleasure. 4 After-hours suggestions. 5. Diversions, from 
grand opera to jogging. 6. Shopping. 7. Wfeekencfrrg 
ideas . 

Rave reviews from the travel mdusfry experts: 

"Where to slay, ctrie and revet in firrope*. a bendy 
companion." 

Travel and Leisuro, American Express. 
"„a good deed of information in compoct easf)' 
as simi cried feim* 

Signature, Diners Oub frrfemafonai 
Tyer Graham and IHT have produced a smal 
masterpiece T Execufhre Travel 



FOOD LOVER’S 
GUIDE TO MRI5. 

As restaurant critic 
for the Trib, Patricia WbBs 
has explored the 
treasures of food . 
shopping and eating in 
Paris, from the bistros, 
cafes, cheese shops end 
outdoor markets, to the 
classic feasts. 

The gastronomic 
defights of Paris ere 
varied, historic, abundant - and too delicious to be left 
to cherae. Food Lovers uncovers the many defiohts to 
be found al over this extraordinary dfy, and takes an 
up-to-date look at some of Paris' intemationcly known 
restaurants. 

Wfefc indudes critical commentary, anecdotes, 
history, local lore - as well as basic facts Eke business 
ham's aid nearest metro station. To recreate the taste 
of France at home, 50 recipes ore included, cleaned 
from the notebooks of Paisian chefs. 

Paperback, over 300 pages featurftig a French/ 
English food gJasscry and 140 evocative photogra p hs. 

"Bound for France? Don't go without fbtoab VVfefiss 
Food Lover's Guide to farrsT 

Houston Cfironide 

spHs the beans here-. No serious hedonist 
shou/dgoto fbris wtihoutit" 

Gad Greene, New YbHc Magazine 
"An Susfrated tour through^ one of the great food 
effes of the wodd' 

Philadelphia Da ly News 


International HeroW Tribuna, Book Division, 

181, avenue Qwies-de-Gcarfe, 

92521 NeuSyCedex, France. 

Please chedc method of paymetti: 

Enclosed is my payment (Payment con be made in any 
l — I cxwMBrfible European currency at current exchange rated* 
' * Please charge to my - /ZZWk 

™ s “ ani r.n n H 

I □ HI Dssasw 


Name. 


Mease send me 

copies of LHX GUIDE TO BUSflSSSS 
TRAVEL & ENTBtBUNMBtT: HJROPE 
at US$16 each, phis postage 

add $150 each in Europe, $4 each outride Europe. 

copies of FOOD LOVERS GUIDE TO NUllS 

at US$T1.95 each, phis postage: 

add $150 each in Europe, $4 ewh outside Europe. 


N°. 


— Exp. date. 


Signature ' — 

(necessary for card purchased 


Gty^Dxte/Country_ 


13-6-85 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


MWWOBCEaniV* nn^ 61 

E"gWi, Frandi, German, with 15 

yews tafrinem m financial a«4y», 
praise appraaal & finaraa, imed- 
■nem nnrwsian indading board 
nvrnbersr^ii, used to negodAng 
with gouenunenfc & mtorndtonal at- 
sWutioi*. MVh wibbivb knowfedgn of 
developing counkias, ueks new pod- 
bpr fGmwvo/Zjricht Box 2406, hv- 
old Tribune, 72521 NeuOyCadn. 
France 


AMBHCAN SA1B / MARKETING 

manager, a active, dynamic, with a- 
arflent trad record of s>uccea wda 
curopeoibaedpoudon icBng your 
prockich to the LB market Age 35, 
ungie. Conunwiion barad an re- 
s**v Write Nk. D.W.O. feddenoe 
Consteldion, fll Ch de Vuarrera, 
lBfl Mortreux. 5wtort»id 


ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. 27, 

m&ten m mfL pubic admndrafari 
background in nil finance & (rode, 
Frendi & eannutor fluert, wel trav- 
eted. srrong Tniid World e ju xa i enaL 
mable. DwgkE Colder. iOSaifaxcC 
Colorado Springy CO 80706 USA. 
Tet 303471^027. 


MARKETING EXECUTIVE 41, many 

years atemalicncJ mporiene (5 
was asaenerct manager] in Kverd 
mdutfrias podudng N-SiJ, nMv 

gud. is welting new poassjn Europe 

a overseas. Wlile fiox 2164. LH.T, 
Fnediidatr. 15, 6000 Fra6Ajrt/A4am, 

W. Germany. 


MARKET RESEAROI ipedddt. man- 

agemenl level, mduarid/c o raumer 
praduds, seeks portion v«i#i US im*- 
nabavj or Dutch firm m Amtexbm 

after Aug. 1. Write km S. Vai Kaon, 

Vqn^Wmd wipairfrna ntoan 10. IlfiS 


HSNQ1 EXECUTIVE 34, with wariang 

papen in USw 3 years expenence m 

K55, East, fluent Spowh. 

Arofakj re nil pCSAOa m prefect fi- 
nancing diha ei a bank or a pubfic 
works^ffshore c o mpany. Tet Paris 
006 85 26. 


32, Dutch imtionot. ipads En^ah, 
French, Spanish, Germoa. Esperma 
teiecomniunicahons + awoiioa 
Saaks new chcfenge. Rriocoaon no 
problem. Write Box 2404. Herald Trv 

Buna, 92521 NaJ y Codec. Fraia 


34, MPS4K3R9BI 

Hotel Mmqgement. dodoratoPditi- 
ed Sdenoe -Sorbonne. Esmerience in 

manaBemenl. human retahont Work- 

mg papers. LacAwa hr Pans based 
porifiaiOT 1953/ S/5 0311 Ftarit. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


IMPORTANT MTL MITOMOBBE 
imnwcwwy idt 

USA & EUROPE 

CAR BODY DESIGNERS 

Goad hww M np of 
B 6 QUSH IMPHAT1VE 

Send CV, photo la 
Ref: 8316 

PUBUTOP, 29 rue Bfawe 
75009 Paris 


(Continued From Back Page) 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


„ OH tM A N AMHBCAN 

LLS.Otben.ogB 6 Lmoiebachebr.ro 
lies, hedf Jewish, nnandbSy indepen- 
dent, tri lingual, wiCna to relocate / 
Irani, just retired a PR-coordnAv or 
mter na tiond corporation. West 
Germany. Am seeling position of trutf 
bo sales job} a responsible / mature 
rawtmJ with permanent adefress prer- 
•r^iy outside the Federal Repybfe. 
Wul consider philanthrope activities. 
Own ratable car. 

Write m confidence ta 
IHT, Bos 2162, Fnednchsa. 15. 
D40QQ Frorikfitft/Mam. 


AMSUCAN WOMAN M 8 A, capable 

ft refistie. free to trend. Auert Itcdaiv 
wftna to learn Genero, experimtf 
with US government, large toion 
company, monoge mcn c o» 
sufcngftrm m Europe, & marketing for 
US co nsumer goods company in foty. 
seeks chaflenang posmon ® Atomdi 
or Mkm. Wmewl Herald Tt4«*. 
Box 133, Torre S, Wikmo S. Pekoe. 
20090 Searoe, hdy. 


ABHANDUNGSTSTUAMroubctie 

er seeks Frandi'Engfiih/Geniiarhos- 
tes, good p eienJaUdn, 170 m. rare- 
mum, bland, for Stand Unckma ■ 
Porte de VerccSes. Nov. 12- 17. Send 

CV. photo to Best 2388. Herald Tit- 

bun*, 92521 Neuily Cedes, France 

who <w3 fofwnrd, oppfc cft om 
chosen vd be reurrea 


CAPABLE LADY, All ROUM» am- 

doGzmg m putting A to B. CaiadEan 
origin, UK resdera. umertfy gradu- 
ate, artistic with outgoing pmanoKfy. 
AdnmSiohw) experience. No bet. 
Would suit exeartve l entrepreneur 
v«4h very busy schedule. Exodlent ref- 

erences. Bax 41152, LH.T„ 63 Loro 
Acre, London. WC2E 91H. 


BIO ADVANTAGE. 1 HAVE FR& air 

travel wortrhwde. Experienced Greek 

rado operator seeks to co-operate 

with businessman / com p any world- 
wide in any field or job. Taka Gn&o- 
poulas, 74 KaumDundourou Street, 
Aga Sofia, Pimm Greece, tet Ath- 
ens 961 6tSX) 


DYNAMIC SWISS ft French pumafiit. 

30, PS. drploma. Bachelor of Arts, 

Ei#sh, Frandv German, Jtakan seeb 
rhaSengitig odniiy «i Para or USA- 
Free to travel Avrxlabki Sept. 85. 
Write Bar 2385, Herald Trior*, 
92521 Neuily Cede*. France 


ATTRACTIVE ft ELEGANT LADY, 26. 

Sw»s native, used to represerkneon al 

Wl bud, seeks PA pashon, travef- 
fing w elco me. Plaase write to Bos 
2155, IHT. Friedrkhtir. IS. D6DG0 
Frankfurt /M. 


AUSTRALIAN JOURNALIST, 30, 
seeks Ewopean band posMon. Eskt- 

ingctpenMOB in New ZealandL Au> 

tria, UK. Write C USBECK, Sdivws- 

tarhaiKstrasse TO. 3000 Hannover 1. 

W. Germany. 


&KM5 HMAN 39, Fo rm er Gfl inti ath- 

lete, experienced 

B BOd w tg ft organization «i Tenure, 

Write 11 Sto^^S > Road, < Hou^w 

West. tCkiiifei.gr., 


SALES 

USSTOOlOOO Mr YEAR 
GOMMBNON 

Must speak Engfish ft German 


Mr. Gde - Austria 064127021-0 


Masmeraiee Tresrae. Mud be US citi- 

zen, age 17-34. No experience re- 
ifwad, wil tnan. Goad pay. esseilete 
benefits. If you puakfy , speaol educa- 
tion fund and up to $3^00 bonus. 3 or 
4 yea- ARMY enh l in er t Cal HeicW- 
b^^ 06221-131 B8. England 494 - 


TRAVEL OPPOKTIMTY- Looking for 

yoang miaEgent woman that^teda 
Frendi ft poaibly other language to 
art as guidts, mterpretar ft companion 
curape ft Greece. AS expen ses paid 
+ salary. Send ranime ft photo to set 
up irfci vi s w. Bom 2389, Herald Tri- 

buna. 92521 NasJy Ccdm, Friro 


HOH SCHOOL GRAD. Badvraa 

Trainea Must be LG onztn. age 17- 
34. No experience retwired, w* tresn. 
Good pay, atcelent benefits. If you 
quofify specid educofian fund (via up 
to 54JM&bonw. 3 or 4 year ARMY 

enfatment Cal HetdeRwrg 06221- 

13T88. England 494-2609B. 


HGH SCHOOL GRAD. Mask Syv 

tern SpedaEp. Must be US atiwi. 


age 17-34. No exporience required, 
wl tram. Goad pay, exceUeni bane- 

Fhsd*rtg^0S221-13iaa Englond 


MGH SCHOOL GRAD. Field Surveyor 

Trainee. Mot ba US citizen, age 17- 
34. Ffigh school grad. No experience 
required, vnl trim. Good pay, excel- 
lent benefits. If you quaefy, up to 
$2500 bonus. 3 or lyeor ARMY 
a fct i u eie. Cdl Hoidetoerg 06221- 
13188. Enrfond 494-2MWL 


TRANSLATMG EDITOR, perfect En- 

gKsh, worlang French, German. Fncuv 
ad badwaund. Pappn. Box 2372 
Herald Trtoune, 92S21Neui8y Cedex, 
France 


DYNAMIC AMHOCAN LADY wot* 

position Paris. SUbd ceAfienHtrator- 
/ux en tiiivIv’iMd to any office. 

Position wcrtivL oHjctart to enncutiun 

/ company, PX WMng to naveL 

Cortod Cuny. ltd: 8138^-8266 USA. 


IRBiCH HGH EA5MON MODEL 27, 

history of Art graduate, looks for 

burinras apenen. Attractive, arixu- 
late, well-traveled London bated. Tel 
London 225-03 6 ft 3 PM - 8 pm. 


ENGLISH LAW GRADUATE with U5 

green cod ft work experience in US, 
seeb statable empknimeirf in Paris. 
Bax 41136. LKT7fl3 Long Acre. Lon- 
don, WC2£9]R 


ASSISTANT, HKH LEVS, German / 
Engtdy in inti otMranmera. educated, 

VenaMe French lady. Good oortods. 

Free to travel Paris 548 80 47. 


DUTCH FEMALE, 26, language teadv 

mg experience, seeks pent m Paris. 
Serious offers. Tel: R10835974/ 
HeBond 6 pjm, dt 8 pja. 


EGYPTIANS, EDUCA1S, Arabic 

ritnLTekftra 227 64 97. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MIMPDVF SSCS for AMERICAN 

mincxvc firms in pah& 

Engfish, Belgian, Dutch or Garmon 
secretaries, knowfedgo of French re- 
qdrad, Endbh shotmand. BSngual 
Mlndds. Wnte or pharet 138 Axeiwe 
Vidor Hugo, 751 16 Pbrw, France. Tet 
727 61 (fT 


CIVIL WORKS CONTRACTOR seeb 

for hie Pros export office, tody bfin- 

gud Engfish/Frendi seonhvy. Mni- 

mum 5 mars experienen. Free to trov- 
eL Pubfc RdtAorts. Requre initiathro ft 
refiabftty. Krowledgs of a 3d k»- 
guage would be an advantage, 
mane 359 37 20 Reis. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


AU PAU/HOUSSSEPER G>» for 2 

1/2 year old girl New York, South 
Shore of Long and Driver's license 
ft Engfish speabng readred. Start July 
7. Mat stay mnmum 1 year. TeL- 212- 
354-1011 doyi ; 71B431-4926 mm & 
weekends Write with photo to Mrs. 
ftegler 209-39 23d Am. Bayade, 
NYTi560USA 


UVE-IN COURL Cootong, watf at 

table & housekeeping. Septxate 
houta. n Eve mChcxIcitiesvik, vran- 
kl Sand famdy of adults & fu nr te d 
ertertanmnL Hope to HI poutsm by 
Sept. Please reply with references to 
P ST Bax 660 U QurUtewh, YA 
22906 USA 


HEAD HOUSEKEEPER or couple wad- 

ed pnmedieee t y far imal mold in 
Pboona Morotrnm. Boor 39, 5. Staffing, 

PA 18460 U5A 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


EXCELLENT FRENCH CHEF 
39 yean. French, Lebanem cutrine. 
Free e nm etBatriy. Seed post with pri- 
vate, Tux i ce or abroad. Guy Gregare, 
la Lmoudne. 83340 Le Thoronet, 
Fimas ’let (94) 73 B4 71 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE - AU PARS, 
chddreni nanny, mum's helpers ft Ml 
branches of 1 st doss five-in domestic 
help worldwide Cat Stone fltrecu, 
Lcmdon 730 8122/5142 D4 houd U- 
CEMPAGY. Tin 895fl67feLOAN£ G. 


ABOVE AVERAGE POSITIONS for 

ab ov e average staff. Col Air Far and 

Domestic Appamtraerfi m UK - 01 57V 

2040. r*W»9241 INTREX G (kill 
teauiment Consuttanfc] 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE LONDON ante 

babyranders. Id dass dcriy mads & 
dniffeuri. Stoss® Bureau, 730 6122 

/ 5142 licenced employment agency 


EATON BUREAU NAPNB - ft cdl 
profarional domestics avalcfcfe now. 
Loodon 730 9566. 1 36 Soane St, SW1 

Licenced UK Employment Agency. 


AUTOMOBILES 


1958 OCVROIET CORVETTE- One 

of 246 speaaUy made. Fuel infection, 

power wmdows, 4 speed trroumuon. 

100* completely restored. Finest in 

USA ft very rare. Col or write for 

aAx porffoSo. Ptntp Ramey, 1174 
ntufield Lane, Suite A Ventura, CA 
93001. BQ54£t-153a 


MASaATl WTURBO, 2500 cc, bor- 

deeux, Ji4y "84, 6000 kns, brand new 
cmfition, natural leather, Homer ro- 
ifio/oatotle wffi lour 60 wSI speak- 
ers, P7. Geneva 022 479 717 or Ftea 
645 41 75. 


FB 8 ARI 400L 1984, 14,000 KM, 

metallic black, special leather interior. 


tax pad. TeL Geneva I 
45 21 or 84 36 25 


MG B GT 1968. Ameriam 

about 180,000 W Engine 19BI 
20^00 Ion. to be checked. Body rspar 
needed. F20JM Pros 5508844 office. 


1983 CAMARO T— TOP, loaded, 

AM4+A cncrtle, OH-aarxktirxmd. low 

nateage, W, Germany. 0615^121 


CHAUFFEUR 

SERVICES 


UMOU5ME WITH OlAfreUR. For 

vow stay in Europe, you can etwy a 
Rab Royce or Mercedes ft a rauhSn- 
gual chauffeur from S150 - $250/day 
wShurririnted kms. Qtf (93) 30 57 52 
France 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

THE CAR SHPHNG 
SPECIALISTS 


J ) 225 64 44 
3) 39 43 44 
1 07) B0 51 
TBI 212921 
31)88081 
93 10 45 


PARS 

CANNES/ NICE 
FRANKFURT 
BONN / COLOGNE 
STUTTGART 
MUMOt 
BREMERHAVBM 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
L05ANGBES 

MONTREAL L _. ^ 

AGENTS WORLb WIDE 
Leave it to us to bring it to you 



AUTO CONVERSION 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


ENGLISH SPEAKING satesari wrotod. 

Tdj7708069, or prefera^y vidtuixi . 
person at lunchtime, PARFUMBBft 3 I 
rue du FWder, Pros 9, Metro Opens. | 


RB4CH AU PAIR fB» in USA, 

Boston, Massachusetts stortraAupst 

1 for 9 months. Dufes to mdidt 

hora ek e ep ng, arokeig + dogwaKh- 

nft Must haw driw« Scense. No 
ctvldrvn to core for. I would Bob to 

learn French cooking os wd as the 

Frandi Iroguoge. Own room & bath 
provided, non-smoker. Must be rsfi- 

idde. Arrive pad + $50 o week To 

apply please send letter, references ft 


Me rredei - P otxcIta-JaquroftMW 

DOT/EPA 

EwDfKxn Cor linports 
QucAty Service ft Rroain 
IMPGUUM AUTO INC. 

442 Smith Sl. Penh Amboy, NJ 06861 
Tet 201-82^-1122. Tlx. 5)1)1010268 


DOT/ S' A CONVBB30NS to US. 

Ktecs. Acceptona guaranteed. VIA 

Corp, 6200 Freepari Centre, Bahir 
mote. MD 21224. Tet 301-63^161 1. 
Iks 4995689 VIA LG. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

Area 1972. experienced cor enter tor 
Mercedes, Porsche, BMW. Immediate 
dafiwnr. Ful service import /exped, 
US. DOT ft B*A, draping fo.^ tourist 
rod deafer. Omarmnde Motors GmbH, 

Tesrrtagmir. ft 4 Duroeldorf. W. 

Germany fq 211434646. tk B5B7374. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

THE MSICEDE5 SPECIALISTS 
fiwrtnrland. Wed German ft En^and 

jmtoean i 
US EPA/DOT^ 

Shippmg by the axpem. 

tet STOOL SDOSL'L- Block, Gray, Blue 
380 SEC- Block, $3ver 
280 SE/l- Block, Bto 

DIRECT FROM SOURCE 

Tiokd London Ltd. 

11 Hawarrien HBL London NW2 7BR. 
Tet 01-208 0007. 

Triex 8956022 TRAS C. 


COOPQl ST JAMES 

OFFICIAL. AGENT 

OF BMW (GB) LTD 

WVile you tre in Europe, we can offer 
conuderable savtnp on brand new 
BMW oars to imt spedfieemons. FuD 
factory werranty. 

We con also wpptr right or left hand 
dnve in free BMws at tounst prices. 
We alio supply factory buk bdfct- 
froof BMWi ond the AJpna BMW 
range tax Free. 

Gaff London (0!) 629 6699. 


10 YEARS 

We DaOvar Cora la the World 

TRANSCO 

■Cnspeig a constant stock of more thro 
300 brand new con, 

jMu tor too rntutiDDkv calaoQ- 
Tamar SA. 95 Noordetaro. 

2030 Antwerp. Belgium 
Tel 323/542 62 40. iG 35207 TRAhG B 


NEW MERCEDES 

FORSOE, for xnmetfrae dehvery 

FROM STOCK 

Beet earwice, ibippaig, mmrimre. 

n USA 


RUTE INC 

TAUNUSSTR. 52,6000 FRANKFURT 
W Germ., tel (007-232351, tU 411559 


NEW/USB) TAX RB CARS 
BMW, Merc eri es, Porsche, Aurfi. 
Saab. Volvo. Jcmn- Petnect. 
Eurap^rJlfiA Spocs 
(Worldwide Shpciro. hsuronce, Bondi 
INTRACAR UftOCFORr GmbH 
Ke e n hj eMlaa 82-84 
4000 Doene&orf 1, W. Garmny 
Tat 49-1021 1>13 39 44/5 
Ito 8584458 Aoto D 


• •BUY YOUR CAR TAX FREE** 

(La. Mertadet, Porsche, BMW, FerrenJ. 
Direct from eeatce - Cram Europe 
Cal SHECTION - call arrpananco. 

SoMens fur deolera & touriM. 
SELECTION fanport-Ewort GmbH, 
Mou-Plonck-Str. lT 280BSyfce, West 
Germany. (Of 424260458^. TxJ4109 


JAGUAR, MBLCEDIS, PORSCHE 
BMW. SAAB, VOLVO. Bed Prices 
Immedate aefivfo. Cal Holland 

VAN LAARHOVEN B.V. 

PO Box 2178, S600 CDEndhoven 
40-424055, Ifat 51213 HBLA NL 


EUROTO 8 T TAX IRS CARS 
Cell for free catalog. 

Ben 12011, Rpriardcm Airport. Holand. 
Tet 010623077. Tfo 25071 TCAfi NL 


ROUS ROYCX HO 1980 S2w Short 
ow n, 34JXX) km, white / b ra w n . Abe 
LHD 19ffi Saver Sdnt, 23.000 km. 
vrivte / red. Both rmnioculaie. Cal 

John in London, 01 JOB 0D07, or telax 

8956022 TSAS G 


TRANSMUNDI BELGAIM, 31 Gestet 

sebaro, 8-2241 Zoerad. Antwerp. Tet 

03384.1034 TU 32302 Traram ft In 

stock; Mercedes, BMW. A5Q. 


EXCAUBUR. Sm our ad m Wednu- 
day’s editioa 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US UHMGRAT10N vtsca, Attyv. Spikn 

ft Rodney. 1925 Bridal Av, Momi FL 
33129. Tet Q05> 6439600, tx 441469. 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


NYOCWAYS150. Everyctev MY. - 

West Coast S145L Paris Zo 92 90. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


CHARia A YACHT IN GRBCE. Di- 

red from owner of largest fleet. 
Americro mroaromanL ExcaBent 

crews, govt banded. Vote! Yachts, 

Akti ThenetaUeaus 22C Piraeus. 

Greece. Tet 4529571.139486 TU: 

21-2000. USA offices: Fir Road, Am- 

bler, PA 19002. Tet 215 64) 1624. 


SERVICES 


*★ PARIS 553 62 62** 

FOR A REAL VJJ». YOUNG LADY 
Distingwhed. Elegant, MubinguaL 


SERVICES 


YOUNG IADY 

PA 'Interpreter & Touram Gvde 

PARIS 562 0587 


YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 


VIP Y OUNG L ADY GUSE 
Educated, attractive and tnfingual 
fro days, everxngi ft hcvBL 
PARIS 530 02 84 


* PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY TRILINGUAL W-ftA 


PAMS 704 80 27 
W PA YOUNG LADY 

MuihbiguaL 


♦ PARK: 520 97 95* 

UST1NGUKHB3 YOLMG LADY PA 


PAMS 111 CLASS GUtDES 224 01 32 

Yeung tote, etegroi. educates, 
fnemrify. mJtiingroC for doyi & r.T- 
nwgi ft Iraveh m Pent ft mporw. 


R4IERNATK3NAL BEAUTIFUL Ftofte 
UMTD. USA ft WORLDWIDE, fa. 
212-765- 7?93 / 765-7794 


SOGETE DIANE PARS 260 87 43 

Men & women gudm. tecunry & rerr- 
ing ay moixb, 8 am ■ 12 pn 


LONDON, aEGANT muU.«te«! 
French lady companion, well rrave&d 
ft veraante Tel 821 0364 flU. 


NEW YORK, YOUNG CARIBBEAN 

Lady PA, bfaguol, will travel. *•- 
ports. TeL 718jM-i793 


N B4GUSH. B4 SPANtSK ■" French. 1 
wil help you to find your way m Pan 
Tet 531 3666 Pros. 


PARIS NOTE THIS PHONE AT ONCE 

757 6 ? 4 8 Trustful V.LP. bdy. Hovel 

cofiyaipii 


FRANKFURT. Young lady companion. 
Engfish. French. German spafien. Free 
to Travel Qtfi-Ai 77 75. 


747 59 S 8 TOURIST GUIDE. Proa, 
au pons. Young, elegant, atPadive, 
educated. 7 an ‘ 12 pm. Inti XaveL 


NEW YORK - Young elegrot Etteoocn 

model mUnfingjaf componon. f?I 2 ] 
777-5543 


LOMDON SOPHISTICATED German' 
French lady contpaman. MrMngud 
ft wtniorMift TeL 01-381 6852. 


SINGAPORE 1NTL GUtDES- Caft Sm- 
(sapor e 734 96 2ft 


RBKN RIVIERA. I n te r prefer Travel 
companion |93} 61 78 63 


PAHS YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. 

VIP PA ft bdmpuol introprnter. 


HONG KONG (K-3) 723 12 37 

QprmnH - cfagcmt PA 


FRANKFURT YOUNG LADY caamn- 

& travel gude. 069 / 62 B4 S 


HONG KONG K-671267 VIP lady 
{Oia«ed/Eroopero) compantorv 


TOKYO LADY COMPANION, PA 
Personal Assam 03-456-5539 


TOKYO COMPANION 586 4674: 
TeL now for the best. 


LOUDON EDUCATES LADY Com- 
proBoni'Guide. Tet 961 01 54. 


TOKYO 645 2741. Touring ft shop- 
png quAs, interpreters, etc. 


YOLMGSOFHKT1CATB) LADY For o 
London VV ioson. 01-630 0757. 


LONDON-YOUNG IRISH LADY PA. 

01-245 9002 days, evewgi & travef. 


LONDON SOPHSTICAIH) LADY 

companion. Tel 01-555 2117. 


FRANKFURT 069/233380. Yoang 
lady. V.I.P. - PA. - enow— on 


TOKYO 475 5480 Young Lody Com- 
ponon. 


PARK UJNGUAL ASSISTANT to 
buonen awcuttees. 500 58 17 


HONGKONG 5-7954823 European 

young lody companion. 


PARK YOUNG LADY, tourist guide. 
Tet Paris 807 84 95. 


WEST NMAN LADY Gompanro Tel: 
London 381 9847. 


ATHENS ft ISLANDS. Begrot. penon- 
obte tody PA. Tel 923 7642 fert 5 


PARK, YOUNG FRENCH EDUCATH) 

Lady compowan, guide. 574 71 41. 


ATTCNS. Lady companion and person- 
al assatanl. Tet B0M194. 


Reserved 

icryou. 

For price 
details call these 
numbers or 
your nearest 
IHT advertising 
representative. 

Paris: 747.46.00 
London: 836.4802 
New York: 7513890 
Frankfurt: 7167J5 
Hong Kong: 5.420906 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 
ESCORT 


USA R WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 56th SU N.Y.C. 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CTHXT CARDS AND 
CHECKS ACCEPTED 
I Vin te Merabeniript AvaiUb 

Tbtea 


ne mward we in tn j service era 
been featured ae fin lap ft rad 
axdtnrire Escort Sarvke by 
USA B ertera a Mcrad newi maefia 
mdtxfiag radm rod TV. 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

E5CORT SERVICE. 
EVERYWHERE YOU AEE OR GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Cad free from US= 1-800-237-0892 
Cal Free from Florida: 1-800-2820892. 
Lovreri Eadarn un duo m DS you back] 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 

M NEW YORK 

TEL: 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

BOGRAV1A 


Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 
Perlman Escort Agency 

67 auBera Street, 
London WT 

Tofc 486 3734 or 486 1158 
LI major <mSi ante ucrepteri 


LONDON 
KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SERVICE 
10 MEN5MGTON CHURCH ST.W 8 
m.- 9379136 OR 9379133, 
AK nafar ndk conic a m p wd , 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


★ LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


LONDON 

DAY/EVEMNG ESCORT AGENCY 

TEL 724 2972 


AR1STOCATS 

L ondon Escort 5arvica 

128 W^nore SJ, lrodon W.l. 
Afl meior Credt Crob Accepted 
Tot 437 47 41 / OST 
12 noa 


London Tops 

HEATHROW / LONDON 

Eeeort Sarvka. Tel: 01-381 1950 


SHADOWS 

MADRID ESCORT SERVICE 

CSHXT CARDS. TBs 2509603 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK ESCORT SERVICE 
212-888-1666 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GLIDE SERVICE from 5pm 
ROTTERDAM (Oil 0JS4155 
THE HAGUE (0) 7040 79 96 


MADRID INFL 

ESCORT sawiCE 
TBi 2456548. OBXT CARDS 


ZURICH 

CAROLINE ESCORT SHtVICE 
Tab 01/252 61 74 


ZURICH-GBMEVA 

GINGERS ESCORT SOVICE. 
TBl 01/363 08 64-022/3441 86 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ZURICH 

5araanJha l i Escort ft Garde Service 
Tab 01/57 75 96 

* GENEVA - FIRST * 

DAILY ESCORT SHtVICE 

Tab 022/32 34 18 
+ Weekend ft Travel 

ZURICH 

ALEXIS E5GORT 5BV1CE 

TEL: 01/47 55 82 

JASMINE 

AMSTERDAM BCORT SERVICE. 
T&: 020-366655 

ZURICH 

JeaRv’t Eeeort ft Travel Sarvka 
Tab 01 / 941 49 88 

* ★ KITTY * 

Madrid Eeeort Savior 250 34 96 

* AMSTERDAM* 

5ff Escort Service. 227837 

ROUS CUB EUROPE ESCORT 
ft Grate SwwcnM06/a9KS-589 
1146 (tram 4 pm to 10 pm} 

GMVA BCORT 
SERVICE Tefc 46 11 58 

GENEVA • BEAUTY* 
escort samcE 

TO: 29 51 30 

HYDE RARK BCORT SBnWE 
LONDON/HEAIHROW/GAIWICK 
Tab 01 890 0373 

GBCVA - BEST 

ESCORT 5BVKE 

TH_- 022/86 15 95 


MBAN BCORT 

SERVICE: 02/685035 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


FRANKFURT + SURROUNDMG5 

Crookna'x Esaxt + Travel Sennet 
Enabh, French, Spansh ft German 
gxAen. Please phone Wen Germany. 
069AG5763 


AMSTHEDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SStVKX. 020-954344 


** MADRID ESCORT ** 

SERVICE. Tel; 233.03.19 


VBMA-BCOET-AGSiCY. 
Tet 37 52 39 


FRAMOFURT AREA. ISABELLE'S Fe- 

mate rod male bSngucd Escort and 
Travel Service. (Setae telephare: 62 
68 05. 


GENEVA - HBB4E ESCORT SOV1CE 
Tet 36 29 32 


DIANA ESCORT SERVICE London / 

Heathrow / Gotwfi*. Ring 01-381- 
0608. 


DUSSBDORF - COLOGNE - BONN 
+ area Pams Eicnrt ft travel ser- 

vkx. AH credt cords. 0211-395066 


PETROESJKA'S Escort Somce. Hague, 

Ratterdom, Antwerp, Brussels, Diraet 
dorf. Tel: Amsterdam 260629 . 


LONDON ESCORT AGENCY. 

Tet 935 5339. 


LOMX3N ESCORT «VICE Teb 937 
6574. 


VIENNA CLEOPATRA Escort Service. 

Tot 52 73 88 or 47 70 35. 


VBNA ETOttE ESCORT SERVICE. 

Tet 56 78 55. 


MADRID IMPACT escort rod guide 

' MuMnujoL 261 4142 


FRANKFURT -f- SLSROLJNDMGS Gs- 

■oort Serves. 069/364656 Vao ft DC 


VBJNA - DESKS ESCORT Samite. 

Tet 52-30-355. 


Engfish Escort Serece 0271/ 38 31 41 


vice. Tet 01-229 6541. 


+ hovel service. Tet 069/55^2-10 


Haathraw/Gawict Tet 834 7945 . 


TeL 712-581-1948. 


TeL 2S3G97 


The Hogue ■ Hollmd. 070601823 


vice. Tel- 069/63 41 59. 


Tet 01-930 3041. 


e. Tet 01-730 1840 


«e TeL 4011507. QkU 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


MU»BCH - BLONDY ft TANJA Escort 
Service. Tet 31 1 79 00 or 31 1 79 36 


VIENNA VIP ESCORT SHtVICE Tel: 
(Vietmol 65 41 58 

LONDON BAYSWATB ESCORT Ser- 
vian W. 01 229 076. 

LONDON LUCY ESCORT ft Guide 
Service. Tet 01-373 0211 

MUNCH 5UPREME ESCORT Service. 
Tet 069/4485038 

ZOE WEST Escort Agency. Tel London 
579 7556. 

BRUSSELS. CHANTAL ESCORT Ser- 
vice: Tet 02/520 23 65. 

VIBMA YOUNG ESCORT SSWKE. 
Contact: 83 33 71 

BRUSSELS OEO ESCORT SERVICE. 

Tel - 537 73 37 

WATHHOW LONDON ESCORT Ser- 
wce. TeL 994 6681 

FRANKFURT SOKIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tet 069-68 34 42. 

MUNICH WELCOME Escort Service. 
Tet 91B459. 

BBUSSBS MiOBlE ESCORT rod 
gwde seniok Tek 733 07 98 


UWRX3N. French escort service. 
llam-lOpm. TeL (Oil 589 4900. 


STUTTGART — LADY Escort Serves. 
TeL 0711/64 9B 415 


COLOGNE / DUESSELDCWV BOM4 

■Engfish Escort Service 0221-524757 


HAMBURG ESCORT + GUIDE Ser. 
woe. TeL 040/54 17 42 


NEW YORK are - Mademoiselle Es- 

axt Service pi?| 757-6254. 


AMSTERDAM XANEt Escort Service 
Tet (0201 325420 or34Ql 10 . 


DUSSBDORF/ COLOGNE/ 80t#| 
Drowia Escort SeraioB 0211/ 3531 41 


FRANKFURT/ MlflffCH Male Escort 
■ Srovice. 069/386441 ft 089/3518226. 


HAMBURG - SABRINA Escort Ser. 
wee. TeL 040/58 65 35. 


HOUAMUB ESCORT SERVICE. 030- 
■2227B5. 030-944530. 02997-3685 


MUNCH - PRIVATE ESCORT + 
Grade Service. TeL 91 23 14 


N.Eu. 


AJOTHDAM D»KA*S BCORT 

Se™c«. 8820-976272 


AMSTERDAM. CA£MBJTA*5 Camel 

EtoOrtSerwee. TeL {0120905036 


AMSTERDAM FOLK RQZS Escort 

Scnece 10120-964376 


BRUSSELS, ANTWERP NATASCHA 
Escort Service. TeL 02/7317641^ 




FRANKFURT “TOP TB>T &axi Ser~ 

wee. 0W/39-60-52. 


l WP M TWJ«E ESCORT ServiaT 
TeL 01-373 B849. 


LONDON GHffb ESCORT Senito 
Tet 370 7151 ierv,ce 






































































































urn ■ 




Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 



lHiiH wHi 
■■■■§■■■■ ■■■■ 

IHiliUHaSSSS 


PEANUTS 

IT'S BEEN RAINING 
EVK SINCE i)JE GOT 
HERE TO CAM? 
CHARLIE BROWN... - 


IT'S KIND OF | I WONDER HOW ALL 
(7EPKE55IN6, ISN'T IT? ? ™ OTHER CAMPERS 

' -rt ARE TARING IT._ 


HERE'S THE WORLD WAR I 
FLYING ACE STARING 
GLOOMILY OUT OYER THE 
WIN-SOARED AERODROME 


BOOKS 


■.TKi 




'vSI 


pjflillU 


BLQiVDIE 

CW30VS 6MCX9INS SO 
LOUD WE CANT DO »— 
OUR HOTAEWORK , ) 1 


H3W'D SHE I IT “TAKES 
|do THAT wp years of 
Um ? n— /^ r A\ APRIAGE 


ACROSS 

I Scan of a 
quotation 
5 Type 

9 "Whither 

thou?": John 
16:5 

14 Dismounted 

15 Locks material 
lfi Suit for 

Lancelot 
17 Quotation : 

Part 11 
29 Kaye and 
Thomas 

21 Conger 

22 Orderly 

23 Mapabbr. 

25 Playful 

mammals 
27 Quotation: 

Pan III 

33 Family 
member 

34 To the point 

35 Patient 
r biblical 

character 
38 Field of action 

49 Mil. mail depot 
41 Hang loosely, 

as cloth 
43 Guided 
44"Aeneid" 

- language 
48 Brainstorm 
47 End of 
quotation 

50 Pour out 

53 Sleeper, e.g. 


■IU 


n 

■■ 




a 

■ 

■ 



H 

■ 




TO 




7 

n 

n 



54 Dr) 

6 13. 85 

f 19 Blobs, as of 


55 Faucet 

58 Used a si raw 

63 Author of 
quotation 

66 Baited 

67 Stravinsky 

68 Public 
disturbance 

69 Arnold and 
Duchin 

70 Word form 
with space 

71 Otherwise 


1 Homophone 
tor lade 

2 Ingrid's 
"Casablanca" 
role 

3 Norwegian's 
neighbor 

4 Scholar's 
collar 

5 Calif, peak 

6 Western 
Hemisphere 
gp- 

7 Mature 

8 Playhouse site 

9 Rcscoe 

10 Praying 
female figures 

11 Show 
announcer 

12 Kind of system 

13 Allowances for 
waste 

18 Phoenician 
city 


^HacYvkThn^edited^Ei^me 

DENNI5THE MENACE 


cream 
24 Sight at 
Beverly Hills 

26 Even 

27 Gemstone 

28 Steak order 

29 Mimicked 

30 Summer 
cooler 

31 Lukewarm 

32 Sarcastic, in a 
way 

35 Nephrite 

36 Bet first, at 
poker 

37 Trounce 
39 European 

resort area 
42 Edge 
45 Manly virtue 

47 Actress 
Hepburn 

48 Batista's 
successor 

49 Melody for 
Mallinger 

56 Bald 

51 A colleague of 
Jung 

52 Norwegian 
inlet 

56 Large 
land mass 

57 Singer Patti 

59 Burning heap 

60 Milking item 
61 A son of Seth 
62 Jujube's 

cousin 

64 Mdse. 

65 Negative 
conjunction 

JfoJes&a. 




! 

BEETLE BAILEY 



REMEM&EJ? HOW 
THEY BOUMCEC? 
STRAIGHT ANP 
TRUE? 




ANDY CAPP 

SiAWEK DOWN-NCLfRE 
SHOWING ME UP ' ’ 


\TV / AiCCTS CurinttSiG. I SHOULD KNOWTHlS BLOKE SV NOW 

you NctP SHCMIN5 —the only y>wtos«»/eb8CE is to . 
UP- THE MET THINGS keep Twesanw half shut --ZJ 

you cme out with:: v — \r&r*s ' ^ 


THE YEARS OF MACARTHUR: 
Volume HL Triumph and Disaster, 
1945-1964 

By D. Clayton James. 848 pages. $29.95. 
Houghton Mifflin. 2 Park Street, Boston, 
Mass. 02108. 

Reviewed by Gay Blair 

■p IGHTEEN years ago. D. Clayton James, a 
Lj young history professor at Mi ssiss i ppi 
State University, cast a fly into academic wa- 
ters and reeled in a piece of Douglas MacAr- 
ihur arcanum. Intrigued by this catch, be 
fished broader and deeper. He soon discov- 
ered, to his surprise, that while Douglas Mac- 
Arthur was*one of the lowering figures of U. S. 
military history, and indispuiedly the exist 
controversial, there was not an authoritative, 
objective biography of the man extant or then 
contemplated 

James decided to invest some of his consid- 
erable intellectual gifts in filling this void. 
Believing that MacArthur's post- World War II 
years as “proconsul” in occupied Japan, then 
only thinly researched, would prove to be the 
most “important period" of MacArthur's long 
and illustrious career, James began there, he 
said later, with the modest goal of producing a 
“scholarly monograph’' on the occupation. 
But, lucky for us. by then Clio had fir m ly 
hooked James and the proposed monograph 
ultimately grew into a magisterial 2,496-page, 
three- volume MacArthur biography of which 
the present book is the third and final volume. 

This enormous project, entitled “The Yean 
of MacArthur," has been so long in the making 
it may be useful to briefly recall its earlier 
phases. Volume I (740 pages), published in 
1970, covered MacArthur’s life from his birth 
in 1 880 to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. 
Volume II (939 pages), published in 1975. is 
devoted to MacArthur’s campaigns and con- 
troversies in World War IL The new Volume 


WIZARD of ID 
r WILUPR 

jwmnAx 

Accom^r 


Qom 

WWY0UP 

0USNIS5 



%.mwuAn? 

m WB&rA 

9 m 

ftCweswAiL 

j\ m i*saw? 

B \qdt&?avL' \ 
m mvs J 


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TH4TVWS 

idose ■ 



ram 

6&J 


REX MORGAN 


CLAUDIA, YOUR 
HUSBAND CALLED t 
HE'S AT HOME, 
WANTS TO TALK . 
7 TO YOU' rs^l 


.THANKS, JEAN l 
IU PHONE HI AN 

L FROM mv k r 

H OFFICE / N 




War and MacArthur’s final years as a more or 
less private citizen. 

Based on adose study of James' work, 1 can 
say without reservation that the James biogra- 
phy of MacArthur is oue of the most valuable 
works of American military scholarship I have 
ever seen. The research James has amassed is 
prodigious and will be mined by historians for 
decades. 4£s presen tan on through all three 
volumes is consistently readable and interest- 


Sofotionto Previews Puzzle 


H03E2 naaon □nan 
deed aansci □ass 
□EnBcinansn □□□□ 
QGOiBnEDaa ennaao 
Dnsa QQana 
□□□qqq annaanQ 
Hcnia □□□□sa nos 
udegei aas aaana 

□EH QQI3E1EU3 0303 
EHaaaaa □□□□□□ 
nnnna annul 
GBQQH0 aamannsa 
□nam sanenansnas 
ddod aaaas nana 
□Bnci maaaa aaan 


ing, fair and responsible. The work wjU : «tuain 
the definitive portrait of Dc ^ a Lj. a ^Sap- 
for decades to come: no can 

proach the sutg'ecl without "gW’SeJSies 

James's modesty is also admirable He 
in the third volume: "The mam thmgs * gave 
learned during this interesting anna**** 
been three: *w little I know about 
thur’s inner self, how much material there u on 
his public life that no single researcher urn 
cover, and bow many people who MJ*** 
him in life or research speak with great certain 
ty about his traits as a commander ana as a 
man. My nearly two decades of iracking hun 
have led me only to a few fasonaung sheus 
along the edges of a long beach and a wide 
ocean, but the quest was worth it. . 

He has deliberately and. J think, wisely re- 
frained from a final summing up of uus com- 
plex, Homeric character, who has drawn so 
much praise and condemnation. Thus James is 
□either pro- nor anti-MacArthur. He lays out 
the facts; they speak for themselves. B° £ 
overall effect is to whittle MacArthur down to 
human proportions. Some military scholars 
Ronald H. Specior in his recent “Eagle Against 
the Sun,” for example — relying on Uw new 
material in James, have raised some profound- 
ly disturbing questions about MacArthur s 
generalship in World War IL 

Years ago, reviewing Volume I. the military 
historian and journalist Hanson W. Baldwin 
suggested that if the later volumes lived up to 
the promise of the first, James "may .richly 
deserve" a Pulitzer Prize for “indefatigable 
research and balanced judgment." Inasmuch 
as James bag more than fulfilled the promise of 
the first in the second and third volumes, it 
now seems appropriate to enthusiastically sec- 
ond that Pulitzer Prize nomination. 

I have just one quibble — with the publisher, 
not James. Volumes I and IL although never 
technically out of print, are hard to find. 
Houghton Mifflin ought to publish all three 
volumes, independently or in a boxed set, in 
trade paperback format so that James can 
reach the wider audience he deserves. 

Clay Blair’s “Ridgway's Paratroopers: The 
American Airborne in World War II” will be 
published this summer, and he ls now researching 
a history of the Korean War. He wrote this 
review for The Washington Post 


Beq ing Opens Institute 
For Study of Confucius 

The Aisoacted Press 

B EIJING — China has formally established 
a national research institute that will ex- 
amine the philosophy of Confucius (551-479 
B. C), the sage and scholar. 

“The age of blind worship and criticism of 
Confucius are both past.” toe institute's direc- 
tor, Zhang Damian, said at a ceremony Mon- 
day at the Ben ing Confudan Temple, reported 
by the official news agency Xinhua. “Our task 
is to discard the feudal dross and extract the 
democratic essence of Confucianism." 

The news agency said 240 specialists belong 
to the institute, described as a nongovernmen- 
tal establishment that will“scieoufically evalu- 
ate and dialectically analyze Confucius and his 
thought." The English-language newspaper 
China Daily said the institute is sponsored by 
several unriersties and the county government 
of Confucius's birthplace, Gufu in Shandong 
province. 


i m 

! M' 
I fife 

■3 

a 

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f 


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‘Mr. Wilson s^s if we ever move , he's gonna give 
ME THE BIGGEST GOlN-AWAY PARTY ANYBODY EVER W 

T?* that scrambled wono same 
ijyi Igvj P y a aJ W by Henri Amok! and Bob Lee 

Unscramble these lour Jumbles. ( To my beloved cousin ^ 
one letter to each square, to harm I Abernathy, l bequeath the 
lour ordinary worda | sum ol ten million dollars 

r rezip i hi* -A 


YALLD 


GARFIELD 


90 VOZJ KNOW WHV 
l I LOVE FOOKV? _ 


IT 15 5AIP WE WERE GIVEN 
TWO EAR5 ANC? ONLV ONE < 
MOOTH SO THAT WE CAN , 
<- TELLONLV HALF OF < 
M WHAT WE HEAR... S 




> POOKY MAS f 
TWO EARS ANF 
\ NO MOOTH < 


mm s 






| *5 1965 United Fmn Syndicata.mc 


By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal the 
defease succeeded in 
making two trump tricks from 
a holding that seemed worth at 
most one. East opened with 
one diamond, a light action 
based on the fact that he was 
using a strong-club method. 
West tried Tour hearts over one 
spade, and North’s four-spade 
bid ended the proceedings. 

The singleton diamond lead 
allowed East to take two win- 
ners and play a thud round. As 
it happens. South would now 
have made his ga me , and won 
the match, if be had ruffed low 


BRIDGE 


or not ruffed at alL But that 
would have been foolish play, 
(or it would lead to defeat m 
neatly all the situations, in 
which East, the opening bid- 
der, held the spade king. 

South therefore ruffed with 
the queen, and was unhappy 
with the result: West over- 
ruffed with the singleton king, 
and East eventually scored a 
trump trick to defeat the game. 

In the replay East-West 
pushed to five hearts and were 
doubled for a 500 penalty. This 
would have cost just two 
points, and left East-West a 
one-point winner, if the four- 
spade game had succeeded. As 


it was. North-South gained 11 
and advanced to the qnarterfk 
naL 


NORTH 

♦ A«S 
VA12 
OJU7S3 
*92 

WEST EAST (D) 

4>K * 10 B*4 

OKJ9S7B3 9 Q 39 

«« 4AK9S3 

* J 109 4 * Q 8V 

SOOTH 
*Q J873J 
9* 

4Q8 

* A Jt7 J 

Mte side nt lOwnMfc Tbo 
UdOar 

East Mb mm North 

14 1* 49 4* 

PHI Paso Pmo 

Wcot fad On i floramrt tour. 


YELUK 


NOWWIN 


1 A LEGACY 
\3 ONEWAY 
OF PROVING THAT 
POVERTY CAN BE 
OVERCOME BY THIS. 


Now arrange ibe circled letters lo 
form Ihe surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Wirfd Stock Maifete 

Via Agence France-Presse June 12 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Answer here: 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomonow) 

Jumbles; KNAVE UNWED JUNIOR WOBBLE 
Answer. What an artist's model doesn't always 
I eel — IN THE "NUDE" FOR WORK 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


«tone 

Amsterdam 

Athena 

floret Toea 

Be lorode 

Berlin 

Brussels 

BUCbOMMl 

Budapest 
CopeBbaoM 
Costs Dal Sol 
Dublin 
Edinburab 

Flwnocc 

FranKftirf 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

istaabul 
Los Palmas 
Lisbon 
London 
Madrid 


MaMi 

Nlo* 

osta 

Paris 

Ptowm 

Rorklavlk 

noma 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 


HIGH LOW 
C r C F 

2* 75 19 4* fi- 

ll 5S TO 50 d 

28 83 32 72 Ir 

S3 73 14 57 fr 

» 48 I It Cl 

U 57 10 SO r 

U S II E r 

ao AO 14 57 fr 

IP td 8 4i el 

12 54 7 45 r 

27 61 14 57 fi- 
ll 54 i a it 

IS 59 6 43 O 

24 75 14 57 Cl 

IS 59 10 50 r 

31 76 5 41 d 

13 55 6 44 D 

30 46 17 U sh 

35 77 21 70 fr 

S5 77 14 57 fr 

15 SP IT 52 fr 

30 66 13 55 (r 

31 76 13 55 o 

H 70 11 55 cl 

17 U 7 45 o 

31 70 15 S9 tr 

14 57 « 48 o 

n 63 12 54 d 

12 54 7 45 r 

16 50 6 43 Cl 

24 75 14 57 Ir 

11 52 6 43 r 

IB M II 59 o 

21 70 13 55 d 

19 56 9 a o 

15 59 6 43 a 

17 53 4 43 a 


aonokok 

Belling 
Hans Kona 
Manila 
New Delhi 

Seoul 
Sbanabai 
Sima pore 
ToJpoi 
T okyo 

AFRICA 

Algiers 

Cairo 

Cape Town 
Casablanca 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
33 91 27 61 
31 B& 19 66 

31 68 27 81 

32 90 25 79 
39 102 27 61 
79 B4 17 53 
23 77 21 70 
30 M 24 75 
32 98 » 79 
21 70 17 53 


AtlODLE EAST Womfem 32 N) 30 58 ec 

ffllHH . tF Lorn Anaele* 29 B4 19 55 la 

Ankara 2 S 77 8 4* d Miami 32 90 36 79 pe 

Beirut — — — — no Mtauwapolls 20 58 9 48 ec 

Damascus 28 82 IP 45 Ir Montreal 20 56 9 48 d 

jeruMMam 27 81 16 M fr Nassau 32 90 23 73 pc 

TaiAvfv 30 8 ft 20 58 o New York 22 73 15 « r 

nrCAUIft San FrsmcHce 25 77 13 S5 tr 

SwBgFtfl SmUHn 39 72 II 52 ec 

AMCktaml 15 57 10 50 a Toronto 14 57 9 48 r 

Sydney 18 54 8 45 cl Washington 30 85 14 61 e> 

d -cloudy; to- to ggy : IrHalr; Mali; oavercasl: ec-«arllv cloudy; r-roln; 
sb-sboworsr suMttoat; sl-stor mv. 

THURSDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Sltghllw choeoy. FRANKFURT: 
cloudy. Tone. 14 — 10 (57 — 501. LONDON: Showers. Terms. 14—9 (57—481. 
MADRID: Partly doudy. Temp. 31— 14 188— 57). NEW YORK: Rdnv. Temp. 

29— 19 (84 — 65). PARIS: Showers. Tema. 17—11 163 — 521. ROME; Ffllr. 
Temp. 25 — 13 177— 551. TEL AVIV: Rjlr. Tema. 31—19 (88 — 561. ZURICH: 
Cloudy. Tema. M-7WI— «l. BANGKOK: Sforvnv. Tema. J3 — 27 (96 — 811. 
HONG KOH6: Fair. Temp. 37 — 26 (90 — 821. MANILA: Showers. Temp. 33—94 
(91 —75). SEOUL: Foot/. Tema.2S — 10102 — 66). SINGAPORE: Fovov.Temo. 

30— 94 (84 — 751. TOKYO: Showers. Tamp. 21 — 16 170—611. 


Algiers 29 84 16 61 Ir 

Cairn 37 99 21 70 h- 

Cape Town 15 59 10 50 r 

Casablanca 24 7$ 17 O cl 

Harare 20 68 8 44 fr 

Lagos 26 82 24 75 st 

Nairobi 25 77 II 52 d 

Turn* 25 77 15 59 fr 

LATIN AMERICA 

BUMKM Afros 13 55 5 41 lo 

C aracas 25 77 21 70 cl 

Lima 22 79 16 61 a 

Mexico COv 27 *1 10 SO pc 

Rlode Janeiro 23 n 15 59 tr 

NORTH AMERICA 

Anchorage 19 55 8 45 pc 

AIIOPfB 29 79 15 59 oe 

Boston 21 70 17 53 r 

Chicago 14 57 6 43 r 

Denver 26 79 11 52 fr 

Detroit 17 53 6 43 r 

Honolule 31 88 22 72 fr 

Houston 32 H) 30 68 bc 

Los Anaele* 39 B4 19 56 to 

Miami 32 90 26 79 pc 

MtonaapoU* 20 68 9 48 oc 

Montreal 20 68 9 48 d 

Nassau 32 90 23 73 pc 

New York 22 77 16 61 r 

San Francisco 25 77 13 55 fr 

Soatlto 29 72 II 59 oc 

Toronto 14 57 9 48 r 

Washington 30 86 16 61 e> 

ftauercasl: oc -partly cloud v; r-raln; 


ABN 

ACF Holding 
Aegon 
AICZO 
Ahold 
AMEV 

A-Dam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buehnnmn T 
Co land Hide 

Eisevier-NDU 
I Fokker 
GIM Brocades 
Helneknn 
Hoogovens 
KLM 
Naarden 

Nol Nedder 

Neditord 
Ooe Vander G 
Pokhoed 
Philips 
Rubra 
Radamco 
Rollnea 
Roronla 
Roval Dutch 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VMF Stork 
VHU 

ANP.CBS Ganaral laden : 
21148 

Previous : 2lxao 


Heedisi 

Hoesch 

Horten 

Hussoi 

IWKA 

Kan + salr 

Karstodi 
Koufftaf 
Klaeduier H-D 


Close Prev 
223JQ 224 

[II 10930 
ISO 180 
284 2SD 
350 3*3 

264 263 

230 23B 

242 24140 , 
261 263 I 


Kloof 
Ned bonk. 
Pres Stern 
Rvsilai 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasoi 

West Holding 


7550 7450 
1340 1340 
5200 5150 
1510 ISIS 
800 790 

3375 3400 
695 695 

5750 5750 


5TC 

Sid Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tale and Lvle 
Tesco 
Tnom EMI 
t.i. Group 
Trotahoar Hse 
THF 

UUramar 
Unilever t 11 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
Waolworlh 


144 15? 

462 459 

440 465 

511 510 

255 255 

432 437 

276 278 

361 3A4 

136 136 

216 221 

1373211 11732 
193 193 

283 285 

3»a 395 


F.T.3D Index : 98U0 
Previous : 998.48 
F.TJ.E.I60 Index: 1291.48 
Previous : 1306.10 


Klaedcner Werke 71 JO 70J0 


KrwpSlahl 

Unde 

UifHxmsa 

MAN 

Mannesmann 
Muench Rued: 
Ntxdarf 
PKI 

Parscne 

Preuuag 

PWA 

RV9E 

I Rhemmeiaii 

5c her Ing 

5EL 

Siemens 

Thvssen 

Veba 


106 107 JO 
*83 486 

199 19? 

158 157 

1B2 111 

1749 1730 
595 S91 

593J0 592 

1290 1257 
278J0 278J0 
149 JO 149J0 
1 49 JO 149 JO 
305 296J0 
47HJ0 477 

35® JO 358 

57 5 JO 5e4J0 

T11S0 1 11 JO 

206JO 22400 


Composite Static index : 107-UD 
Previous : 1O96J00 


iHUan 


Cold Storase 
DBS 

F noser Neove 
Haw Par 
• Incteape 
6601 Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

Shangri-la 
Sime Darby 
S'nore Land 
S-para Press 
S Sieanuhip 
Si Trading 
United Overseas 
UQB 

; Straits Tines lad I 
Previous : 797.97 


149 2J51 
, 6 4JH 
5.15 5-25 

224 225 

2J8 238 
5.90 4 

9 938 

114 2.U 

260 262 
N.Q. 2J0 
167 2 

zeo ua 

4JB 6.10 
166 169 

462 464 

166 166 
4.12 4.16 


London 


Valkswagenwerk 779.90 27BJ0 

wella 59* s »2 

CDmmerzbank Index : 1,38860 
Prevlou* : 166960 


Bnw i ch 


Arnea 
Bekaarl 
Cockerlll 
. C.O&EOO 
EBES 

QB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

Gevoerf 

Hoboken 

Intercom 

KrcdiethanL 

Prtroflna 

SocGeneraht 

Salim 

Sohrav 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

Vleille Mon loon* 


ffVgaakfanl 


AEG-Telehinken 

Allianz Vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Saver 

Bev Hypo Bank 
Bay Vernlmbank 
BBC 

BHF-Sank 

BMW 

Cummer: bar* 
Coni Gununl 
Dumler-Baiu 
Deoussa 

I Deulsctto Babcock 
CMulstiie Bonk 
Dresdner Bank 
GHH 

Harpener 

Hoaitlel 


>36 13560 
1397 1352 
344 344 

1W.M 79144 

232J0 23260 
346 349 

379 381 

2I2J0 217 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kong 
China Lfghr 
Green island 
Hang Seng Bank 

Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Really A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK 5hano Bank 
HK Telephone 
HK Yaumatei 
hk wnari 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hvsan 
inn Cliv 
Jardlne 
Jardlne See 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
Ne~ World 
. Orient Overseas 
SHK Proas 
5 to lux 

Swire PaeHie A 
Tal Cheung 
Utah Kwoaa 
Whoelock A 
Wing On Co 
Wlnsor 
World Inti 


23 23.90 
154* 1SJ0 
IS I4.9B 
860 B- 40 
46J0 4675 

1.94 1.93 
KUO ICAO 

760 775 

HAD 11 JO 
35 3S 
5J5 5.30 

?M 7M 
95J0 94J0 
3J5 3JB 
t 5 90 
23.10 2280 
155 DJ5 
Hr) DJ7 
11 11 
10.90 10 40 
HJ0 8J0 
34 37. 

A40 4J5 

2.125 2.10 

10.90 1060 1 
2475 240 

2160 20.90 

1-74 I7S 

l-M. tja 

7 2D 725 
2 1.98 

4.95 4.90 

168 1.90 


Hang Seng Index : 160264 
Praviaai : 1^72.13 


318 

321 

AECI 

800 


-421 4I9J0 

Anglo America^ 

?S47 

2865 


Anglo Am Gold 

17000 







827 

818 


1275 


341 

340 


7300 

7350 

15a 

16/ 


ion 

1050 

. SSJ 

5*9 


4725 


277 JQ 




15SJ0 151 JO 

GFSA 

J 1 CQ 


336 

xn 

Harmony 

2590 

2625 

560 

560 

Hiveid Steel 

455 

460 


AACorp 514', S149'| 

Aliied-Lvom 197 |«8 

Anglo Am Gold 58SL. XJJl. 

An Bril Foods 220 220 

An Dairies 158 154 

Barclays 379 jflj 

Bass 547 547 

BA-T. 373 321 

Beecfiom 353 378 

BICC 220 225 

9L 33 33 

Blue Circle 533 S3I 

BOC Group 29a 298 

Bools 199 192 

Bowsler Indus 7BS 294 

BP 525 528 

srif Home SI 294 297 

Bril Telecom 1 U 189 

Bril Aerospace J ?1 378 

Brlloil 216 223 

BTP. 3o8 373 

Bgrmah 269 777 

Coale Wireless 530 540 

Cadbury Schm lo3 143 

Charier Cana 184 138 

Commercial U 221 23 

Cons Gale 524 5J1 

Courtaultts 13 8 tdB 

Dalaelv 438 428 

be Beers : 520 52 ; 

OiSlIllcrs 291 291 

Drielonleln 523 'o S23^a 

F 150 ns 253 345 

Free Si Gcd S24'.» 

GEC 172 176 

Gen Accldonl 421 423 

GKN 233 237 

Glora t 13 13. 44 13 13*64 

Grand Mel 288 TBS 

® RE 720 7?3 

Guinness 273 291 

GUS 940 Hid 

Han-jOfi 702 515 

Howl er 433 417 

ICl 754 744 

imperial Group 199 192 

JOBuar 28 7 290 

Land Securities 284 2£7 

Legal General 754 

Lloyds Bant 507 597 

Lcnmo 170 171 

IJJCn? . 315 315 

AtorvsonaSp 135 135 

Melol Box 45 s 47 } 

Midland Bam 359 354 

Mgi wesi Bans mj 444 

P ana O 341 T-| 

Pllk.nglon 200 ^ 

Plessev 124 ir 

Prudential 71, tto 

Pacal Elect I7 t i«* 

Panalontein S94'« SO,', 

Pan* 33» u_, 

Reed mil s» Si 

geutere 359 343 

Roval DuleH t 4353 / 44433/33 
PT2 577 5«2 

saaitiii 725 715 

Samshury 31 6 31 * 

Seers Holdings 93' ; op-- 

She" 485 4li 


Banco Comm 

Centra le 

Ctotfmtofs 
Cred I tal 

Erldonra 

Formllalla 

Flat 

F Insider 
Generali 
IFl 

Halestnemi 

iiaigas 

UalmabJIlarl 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rtnascmie 

SIP 

SME 

5n/a 

5tanda 

Slal 


21500 21700 
340# 3350 
(W1D 9200 
2300 2300 
10200 10210 
14340 14400 
3430 3445 
Susp. — 
49500 49980 
8370 6430 
95400 94700 
1489 1491 
84350 85600 
109950109975 
1821 1779 

4799 6790 
2485 2480 
73000 73100 
876 885 

2250 2255 

1511 1550 

3450 34 SV 
17460 18000 
3215 32225 


StoeblmfaH 


aGa 

Alta Laval 

Aseo 

Astra 

Atlas Copco 

Boltoon 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Esselte 

Handatsbonften 

Pftarinacto 

Saab- Scania 

Sandvlk 

Sftansha 

SKF 

SmedlstUMaich 

Volvo 


375 380 

186 182 
337 334 

385 385 

105 104 

180 N.Q. 
242 243 

296 298 

385 385 

150 150 

>86 IBS 
N.Q- - 
370 N.Q. 
87J 88 

303 204 

198 198 

20S 205 


AtfoersvaerMen Index : 368.48 
Previous : 361 JQ 


S23*s 52T^ 

353 345 

934V* STi'.e 
172 174 

421 423 

233 237 

13 13.MI3 13 64 
288 TBS 
720 723 


MIB Current Index : Ml* 
Previous : 1422 


Air LtquLde 

dlsfhom Aft 
Av Dassault 
Bancalre 
BIC 

Bonorabi 

Bauvoues 

B S.v-OD 

Carrol our 

Cnorgeurs 

□ub Med 

Party 

Dumez 

Eff^wutlame 

Europe I 

Gan Eaux 

Hadwtie 

Lafarge Cop 

Lag rand 

Ltoleur 

i-OraaJ 

Mariell 

Matra 

Merlin 

Mlchelln 

Mae! Hennessy 

Moulinex 

OccfefHiitale 

Pemod Ric 

Perrier 

Petroln (»se) 

Peugenl 

Prlnlemps 

Radlatotim 

Redaute 

Roussel Uriel 

Sarwfl 

SUs Rosstonol 
Tetomeeati 
Thomson C5F 
Aged Index: mil 
Previous : HU* _ 
CAC1MM!«L»»A» 
Previous : 238J0 


AC I 
ANZ 
BHP 
Baral 

Bougainville 

Castlemalne 

Coles 

Coma lea 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlap 

eiders (id 

ICl Austndhx 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Cora 
N Broken Hill 
Poseidon 
Old Coal TruU 
santos 

Thomas Nation 
Western Min big 
Wftilpac Bonking 
Wuedslde 


248 2M 
4J7 4.44 

6.18 6.16 
130 125 

sm 2 JD 
SiM 9BB 
165 365 

2J77 2.10 

5J4 5lM 
2.71 2J1 

118 2.18 
2.90 ZBS I 

urn im I 

NJL 240 1 

2.78 2B1 

1.96 1 J6 ' 

OO 4J4 
7A0 740 

US 238 
170 378 

1-59 1-57 

5-54 156 

170 IBS 
180 a SB 
&2B 

IAS 142 


Fulltou 
Htfocflt 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
Kaiima 
Kansas Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubola 
Kyocera 
MqtsuEtoC Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Own 
MUaubMil Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NlkkoSaC 
Nippon Kogaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yu*en 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Ptaieer 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Shlmazu 

Shlnslsu Chernlcol 
5anv 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sum Romo Chem 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sum Homo Metal 
Taise 1 Carp 
Taboo Marine 
Takeda Chem 
TDK 
TWin 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tokyo Morin* 
Toppan Printing 
Torav Ind 
Tatiilba 
Toyota 

Yomaichl Sec 


Mkkel/DJ. Ihdex : KL74U1 


Gnadum suds aa AP 


3230 AMI Prat 
2KH Aonlco E 
Agro Ind A 

35 Alga Cant 
297AlsaaiaSt 
400 Andre WAF 


aU> 


rT, ^ 

fc: 


6®o 

14041 

Bratorne 

Bramatec 


S1«S 16 16 

MJ4 8 MS + 16 

SWe 19b TW6 

tm* lSVh+Vk 

__ 2 ™ W 

522H m 228k 
S2SW 2515 2S1A— Vs 
SJ716 168k 169k — VS 
STfe TOO » 

ssm 3 m 3us+ta 
S5«k 5V5 516 — lb 
SI 3% I3V5 1316 + lb 
138 133 135 — 3. 

sat* spa ■ m 


14400 BruruMkl 
IMBBuddCtoj 
■41300 CAE H 
300CCLA* 
5&7SO CDhtb B 1 
58000x1 Fr* I 
31740C Nor West 
SUeCPackrp | 
38SB41 Can Trust 
ftOOCTun^W 

5980 Cl Bk 

2S80CdnNfl| 
158369 CTtreAf 
_ 400 C Util BN 
tBffllCora ■ 
UMCelaneael 
PKpiCDlstbAl 
[79740 CDJsfh 8 
HJ497 CTL Bank 
_ 2900 Convent n 
.' JSJ Casefca R8 


All Oral paries Index :834JSf 
Pr«v loos : B56J0 


Altai 

Ayahi Chem 
Asahl Glass 
Ben* of Tokyo 
Bridgesto n e 
Canon 
Casio 

Cl toil 

Dal N la Don Print 
Dahma House 
Dahwa Securtttos 
Fanoc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 


411 4151 

1000 1010 

910 885 

533 B35 

534 530 

1140 1140 
1610 1410 
430 419 

HID 1160 
66j m 
888 B80 

0030 8040 
1410 1600 
1830 1858 


Zarieh 


Adia 

Ahauissa 

Autophon 

Bank 1 ei 

Brown Baveri 

CftaGetov 

Credn Suisse 

ElgUiUHJll 

Geare Fischer 

Hektorbank 

IntprtBscount 

Jacob Sucharo 

Jefmotf 

Landis Gyr 

Meevti U HCfc 

Nestle 

Oarilken-B 

Roche Baby 

Sanaoz 

Schindler 

Suiier 

SBC 

Survelltance 

swmair 

Swtos Vattsbonk 
Union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich In 

ind ex ; 466,18 
Previous : 46UB 


Hi-®:: "bated.- *LA. : net 

ovgUgble; U: ex-dividend. 



1933 Kerr Addl 
■sniLONNBl 
34B77 LocMnrb 
UWLOwtCenil 

H7LLLOCH 
7090 LabtowCo 
■5D0MD&HAI 


460 450 460 +10 

S19W 1916 19V. + Vx 
SS* SPA ■ S* 

»■ s*.a 

30 30 + to 

u* tm 

15 1516 — W 

fvo law §wTS.; 

tiis* 

30 M Rk 

S18W IMh Irtb 

«Vi an 6W+ vx 
S6tb 4 6—16 

sum urn unb-w 

S6V Mb 6V 

%?£*£«+* 
4QQ S9S -mo +10 
naib 13 13 

SWfc 12 1 »+ v> 

S6W 6V 69h 
Wl « 6 6to+ Vk 
“'*«**« 

22S 230 225 
V 26 — lb 

Sw ae-aa-*: 
m A 

t* r 


Sl«6 16V US*— to 

s& ^ 

gm 34 S 2 SSL 16 

sMw 2 m nw + 1 

¥ M 

40 39V 40 

53714 3744 3m 

S S 2 +* 

S3 52 52 — I 

Ol 20 Vi 20W— V 
03 31VU 33 +1VX 
23 25 — V 

.»» W 8k 
162 168 160 — 5 
0016 saw Vi 

m amj ■miZ. g 

I mm 

afv i?* n; 

#* C-SEit 


ua»Micc 
03625 Metal HX 
Z1B77 Meriond E 
11904 MotoonAt 
5700 Mo (son 8 
100 Murphy 
JSODNtibtenL 
18616 Norandp 
29661 Nor cm 
1W20 NvoAnAf 
300 Noumea W 
29484 NuWsf spA 
2KM OakWQod 
23750 Oshawa Af 
lOOPamowr 
2720 PanCan P 
108 Pembina 
4800 Ptionl* OH 
568 Pine Point 

4£» Pleat GOa 

8430 Placer 
1480 Pravtoa 
1125 Quo Store o 
1500 Ram Pet 
2®$S Krayrackf 

2^Rd%whsA 
3432 Revn Pro A 
4K«RmtorsA 
5800 Raman 
300 Rothman 
2780 Sceptre 


IMH sears Can 

15 Stoma 
2280 Stator Bf 
3S0SauttUn 
4200StBradcst 
KBBWStolca A 

2700 Sutotro 

IBM Sleep R 
leswxoarpr 
45717 Sydney a 
9000Talcorp 
4950 Toro 

2$?52&f A 

IKITccfcUf 
.4775 Tex Can 
14105 ThamN A 
TorDm Bk 
6701 Tarafar a t 

23oo Traders a f 
652STrnsM 


340 340 —JO 

14V 14* 

415 410 418 - 5 

7VI T7 171b— Vb 
79h 17V5 mb 
*31 W 21% 211b— Vi 

'S5S“* 

v, *as 

W* Wb+W 

4S 43» 44 — 1 

w « » 

29Vf 29W+ 16 
7V 7V 
32V 33 
17 17 

N6I SV 
27V8 27VS— Vi 

-visa** 

Wf 6 V 6% — V3 
_W6 71» 7V + U 

*1216 12 7216 

HIV 21 21 -w 

jj4 190 1M — 5 / - 
*|«b 10 11 +ivf 

|iovi low icw+ th 

W7 B 37 + Vb 

J£Z sv+ to 
27w,+ ^ 

Hfflk 2 m 241b— V. 
S7V 7Vh 7V+ 16 
-57*4 7V 7*6— to 
filto mo 1119 + to 
^ 53V + m 

& JJ9- 12‘ +w 

w* ipb-to 

™ as + s 

23D 320 — 5 

g%~}h 
66 2 3? ™ 1 

S 

i3to-S 

*139h 13V 1 :5V 4- u. 


15500 Trinity Res 
47818 TrnAfjg QA 


g»b 13V 13V + to 

3E is ^5 

msu M . 

ISSUTrinttu Dm iG^aSO 350 ^ 

_ 2«6 26V 

‘ HsatrhreK “ iye™ ]£*' 

saiTS* f | 

mmusisoSe S i 

3 i» ™ *1 * 1 ' 

iiga^s. 1 ■ 

WOO Westm in S1 i ft* 12 

519 84V 84V— V 

jwi m near yfe % *5“ }Jj 

ratal saleanjaUNUifiSSs % 6V+ to 


logno westtar to 

’SSSSS" 

.5 372 Woodwd A 


TSE 308 index: 


, P r e v l e M 

tnrsa tjtsm 




2«lB*mkMcnt 


Htoh Law ciaxe Cbse 

mfWH 


6 nonBatti 
<^ NahBk Cdo ISS ^ 4 '^ 

rSPSsSi 3£us»,5* « s**-, 


I m 


I m 

m 


in 




i . t . 




VAYi-ftsiv 

;>i: .e 


r • 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 



Phils Win, 26-7, Breaking Marks and Mets 


At 77, Robert Trent 
Jones has designed 450 golf 
courses in 34 countries 
around the world, including 
the layout at Oakland 
Hills, Michigan, where the 
U.S. Open was to begin 
Thursday. Why, asks Jones 
(who, at left, is standing at 
the fourth hole of the Bal- 
tusrol course he designed in 
Springfield, New Jersey), 
should not a golfer be pun- 
ished for a poor shot? 


i960 F*«*)."by Hi, 


Prc*j 


The Avuncular Demon of Golf 

Robert Trent Jones Designs Courses the Pros Curse 


By Hugh A. Mulligan 

The Associated Press 

MONTCLAIR, New Jersey — Robert Trent Jones 
. I ;is a golf course architect, the most famous or infamous 
in the world, depending on how you-view this amiable, 
avuncular-looking man 

If you saw him on a country club veranda, say in 
. O aklan d Hills, Michigan, from across a lush, verdant 
■ green, rolling true towards an inviting cup, Jones 
might be mistaken for anyone's favorite uncle: 

If your view is from die depths of one of his 

diabolical sand traps, which look, like something left 

over from a B-5 2 strike, then he comes across as the 
devil incarnate. 

fHnitf- Contrary to the opinions of many — if not most — 
'‘golf pros (the exceptions perhaps being those also in 
< , the business of designing golf courses), this dean of 
lllL golf course architects does not kick his dog or heap 
abuse cm his caddy. 

But it never will be forgotten among practitioners of 
esport ~ 

■the IS 


this royal and ancient sport that when Jones modem- 1 


" • ized Oakland Hills for the 1951 U.S. Open, by stralegi- 
* caHy dumping 400 tons of sand about the premises in 
120 agonizing heaps and hollows, only two of the 
world’s greatest players manag ed to break par in any 

- of the four days of the tournament The rest were 
■ ; calling for Jones' head, preferably on a tee, 

Ben Hogan, wbowon by finally breaking par with a 

- then-course record of 67, called the place “a monster.” 

Others complained the bunker- 

' flanked fairways were so narrow 

"-JESSSE**** 1 * The immortal Bobby 

Jones said, "Landing 

world, can and does, at age 77, . , , • 

smile through the tears and lamen- M A DHHitcr 18 like 
tations and score-card shreddings . a , 

.of professional golfers who came to being ID All' . .... 
'grief in the sand traps and water 

hazards that have become his arebi- automobile accident; 

— tcctural signature. Once a scratch 

or par golfer himself, he does, also, pl unking into water is 
confess to a bit of chagrin and some r 

_ guilt feeling when one of Ms own Rke a plane Crash.” ’ 
shots lies buried m a trap on a ? r 
course he created. — Robert TVent Jones 

“Why shouldn’t I or they be pun- 

ished for making a poor shot?" he 


the Canadian Open, but by that time Jones already 
had found bis career and practically created the aca- 
demic discipline or golf architecture by taking courses 
in four different schools at Cornell University. He 
studied agronomy and horticulture in the agricultural 
school; design and landscaping in the architecture 
school; construction, surveying and land drainage in 
the college of engineering, and accounting, public 
speaking and journalism in the arts curriculum. 

Although old Tom Morris, of St. Andrews fane, 
was engaged to design Royal County Down in Ireland 
“for a sum not exceeding 4 pounds sterling" and the 
sou bland for the famed course at Hnehurst, North 
Carolina, was bought for a dollar an acre, it takes 
upward of $2 million to build a golf course today. The 
figure is not firm. Jones brought in Ballybumon at 
S 500,000, but some of his rivals have gone as high as 
S30 milli on or what architect Pete Dye calls “a bunch 
of zoos" in devising private golf preserves for Texas 
and Oklahoma millionaires. 

“You can spend 5900,000 just pushing sand around 
to build synthetic dunes and recreate a Scottish links,” 
scoffs Jones, whose forte always has been U.S.-style, 
park-like courses that follow the “natural line rtf the 
land." He claims also to have invented the water 
torture hde, like the perilous 7th at Pebble Beach in 
California, stock out an a tiny peninsula in the Pacific 
and so dear to the histrionics of TV commentators. 

“Forty years ago," he recalls. “Doris Duke, the 
tobacco heiress, went to Europe on 

vacation and her second husband 

got me to transform her estate in 
Somerville, New Jersey, from an 
Italian garden full of statues into a 
golf course. I pot a 90-yard (822- 
meter) long hole on a small islan d 
in a lake on the property. When she 
got back, she was a little upset” 
Some of the.pros turning up for. 
the Open may be more than a little 
upset when they find that Jones has 
been up to his old deviltry. 

‘They wouldn't let me put traps 
on the fairway at 280 yards," he 
says, “but it’s ridiculous the way 
the livelier ball, metal woods and 
graphite shafts are changing the 

gpme. It's rrnning all the great 

courses in the world. 

“A par 5 is no longer a par 5 if you have three putts 
for a par and two for a biraie. 1 thmk the powexs-that- 
be in golf, the Royal and Ancient Society and the 
PGA, should check the ball so it won't go more than 
280 yards, and the more dots or dimples they allow on 
it, the longer it stays up. Baseball got rid of ns hot ball 
and now golf should too. 

“A lot of the contracts I get today are for modemiz- 



Montreal's Vance Law got hung up atop Chicago’s Davey 
second Tuesday in the first inning when teammate Ryne 


who was forced out at 
I hit into a double play. 


Complied by Our Staff From Dupaidto 

PHILADELPHIA — Von 
Hayes and the Philadelphia Phillies 
gave the New York Mets more grief 
Tuesday night than a transit strike 
ever could. 

Hayes became the first player in 
major league history to hit two 
home runs in the first inning. The 
second homer was a grand slam 
that climaxed a nine-run fust in- 
ning and started the Phillies on 
their way to a 26-7 victory. 

“It's embarrassing,'' said the 
Mets’ manager. Davey Johnson. “It 
was like being in a street fight and 
being on the bottom." 

The Phillies went into the game 
with an average of 230, a mark 
better than that of only two other 
teams, the Mets and the Sun Fran- 
cisco Giants, but they then scored 
more runs than any other National 
League team had in 41 years, f See 
Scoreboard) 

Ironically, Hayes did not think 
he was going to play. When he 
came to the park he looked at the 
middle of the lineup and did not 
see his name. 

“My bead drooped a little biL" 

Then he noticed he was in the 
leadoff spot for the first time since 
coming to the Phillies from Cleve- 
land two seasons ago. 

T thought they must be kiddin g 
me," Hayes explained. Two days 
ago I was cleanup hitter." 

Hayes had the only home runs 
among the club-record 27 hits. But 
in also selling a club record for 
most runs in one game, the Phillies 
had 10 doubles and two triples. 

Their 27 hits raised the team's 
baLting average 8 points lo 238 and 
the 26 runs represented 8 percent of 
their output for the season. 

Hayes went into the game in a 
terrible slump. He was benched last 
week and had only 2 hits in his 
previous 33 at bats. 

But he now is one of 21 major 
leaguers to hit two homers in one 
inning. Willie McCqvey did it 
twice: 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 



■ '■w 






Von Hayes 


now 

Cin cinna ti Reds in 1980. 


Nouvelle Cuisine Loses Battle to Ancient Sumo 


says with a righteous smile, looking up from the 
drawing board in his office in Monldair, New Jersey. 

■ He might be defending the Scottish Calvinist view of 
golf as pan of the dmne purpose to punish human 
; frailty and mold character through suffering. After all, 

' golf held up to nature’s mirror spells flog. 

Pride goeih before a fall an your typical Robert 

' Trent Jones bole, which can be played a numbs of _ 

ways: heroically by the pro going ail out for birdie, mg courses I designed years ago to accommodate the proclaimed after arriving atthe steak house and wrestler is 
daringly by the low-handicap amateur trying to beat new equipment and the new balls." ***“ 1 — * v — 4i -- " “ * ,a - 1 

For the long-hitting pro launching the latest subor- 


By Dave Anderson 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Every so often during din- 
ner, Salevaa Atisnoe. his 484 pounds (2193 
kilograms) bursting from beneath a blue-and- 
white kimono with a multicolored sash, would 
stretch his arms across the leather ledge of the 
semicircular booth. As a sumo wrestler, the 21- 
year-old Atisnoe, known as Ko rrishilci to his 
Japanese idolaters, had his black hair tied in a 
topknot- And now, after having turned a platter 
of fried shrimp into an eodange " 
stretched across the booth again, 
spreading chestnut tree, 

“If we dressed proper and didn’t havethe 
hairdo," be said, “we’d bejust an ordinary guy." 

He may even believe that This “ordinary" 
Hawaiian of Samoan ancestry, known as Sally 
to his friends, is the largest sumo wrestler in 
captivity. But none are undernourished And 
beginning Friday night, three dozen honorable 
and honest wrestlers in the ancient sport of 
emperors known as Grand Sumo will be on 
display at Madison Square Garden for the first 
time in a three-day weekend tournament. Until 
then, Atisnoe will be preparing for his appear- 
ance by bench pressing as much as 500 pounds 
in bis workouts and by fading hims elf with 
food, not necessarily in that order. 

“May this meal be a good one,” he had 


tiers. He is not yet a grand champ ion who can 
earn about 5250,000 annually, not even a cham- 
pion. But he ranks among the top 10 in skill, and 
in the top 1 in girth. 

T don't see myself as big," he said Tn my 
background, everybody is so big.” 

His background is traced to the band-chest- 
ed warriors m Polynesian lore. 

“But in clothes. I'm too big for everything," 
he said as the fried shrimp began to disappear. 

“Some of the sumos don't have long legs, but 

endangered species, be I'm 6-2 [1.87 meters], and my l^s are longer. I 
th again as if he were a would wear a 58 or a (SOjackct, and a 54 pants." 

At that size, living life is not easy for a sumo 
wrestler, especially when traveling. 

Tn a hold, it is better to take the mattress off 
the bed and put it on the floor to skqj,” Atisnoe 
explained “And in Japan, a sumo is not allowed 
to drive; a stablemale of ours got into an acci- 
dent once:" 

Tf the airlines are not full,” Takanriyama 
said, “it is easier for two of us to at across three 
seats in tourist than it is to sh in one first-class 
sear. But at movies, the seats are too small.” 

Takamiyama speaks in a yoke hoarse from a 
chop to his vocal cords during a sumo match. 
And his left ear is caiiHflowered 
Although there is much staring and posturing 
in the moments before a sumo match, the bout 
itsdf usually lasts only a few seconds before one 
out of the 1 5-foot cirde inside 


» green should be satisfying or at least scenic enough 
to keep the daily duff er from kicking in the door of ms 
locker or savoring his most satisfying shots back-to- 
back at the clubhouse bar. 

To Jones' left on his office wall hangs a portrait of 
> the treacherous No. 3 hole at Mauna Rea on the big 
island of Hawaii which Jones carved out of volcanic 
nxk and perched on a verdant precipice above the 
pounding Pacific. 

“Water is the ultimate penalty,” says Jones, admir- 
ing the tropical vista from his swivel chair. “Today's 
top pros have no trouble blasting out of sand The 
imm ortal Bobby Jones,” no relation, but a lifelong 
friend “said Tending in a bunker is like being in an 
automobile accident; plunking into water is like a 
plane crash.’ ” 

On the opposite wall is a lovely oil painting of tbs 
short and same say. sadistic 16th hole Jcmes created 
for Augusta National in Georgia, which the other 
famous Jones laid out with the hdp of Afister Macken- 
zie, a Scottish physician who gave up curing people 
.with medicine to rormtaii (hem with his golf architco- 
fore. On a kidney-shape green beside a bewitched, golf 
ball-gobbling lake that this Jones' dark magic created 
from an innocent creek. Jack Nicklaus is seen putting, 
flanked by Arnold Palmer and George Archer, while 
Gary Player lurks in the shadows of those menacing , 
overhanging trees. No picnic on the grass, this genuine 
old Masters. 

The telephone rings in the middle of an anecdote 
about Royal Rabat, which he designed for KingHas- 
san II of Morocco, on avid golfer who gave refuge to 
the exiled Slab of Iran and urged him to take up golf 
to get his mind off his vanished empire. 

The Cunard company is put on hold with a request 
for designing a course on the Caribbean island erf $l 
Martin, while 


ittingi 

bital golf bails, Jones’ solution is the “shock treat- 
ment" be has just administered to the monster at 
Oakland Hills. 

The top score will be about six under for the four 
days,” he predicts with a sly smile, while bracing 
himself for the anguished screams that are sure to echo 
about his chair on the veranda overlooking the 18th 
hole and ihe leader board. 

The tears of grown-ups do not bother an artist at 
creating disaster, who looks upon a fairway wood as a 
dowsing rod sure to find water, and who loves sand 
tike a Bedouin. 


settling into the booth. T feel like eating.” a 28- by 28-foot square of clay 2 feet high. 

Alongside him was Jesse Takamiyama, 40, a “Your timing has to be right," Takamiyama 
framer sumo wrestler from Hawaii who is now said. “It is like two trucks coming at each other, 
his mentor, if not his baby-sitter. Takannyama, The truck with more speed and better strength 
once Japan's most popular sumo wrestler, is would win. But sometimes you can use his speed 
down to 380 pounds from 440 two years ago. v and strength to your advantage to spin him." 

Soon Atisnoe was munching on a Caesar The meal finished. Takamiyama eased the 
salad, then he dug into a chi cken-and-cashew table away from the booth. Almost 
salad slightly smaller than Mount FtijL ly, Atisnoe stood up in his kimono 

He is so big it is difficult to think of him as a sandals and waddled out of the restaurant on to 
young man who only a few years ago was the sidewalk, where a limo was parked, 
hanging around WaikUri Beach in cut-off jeans. T am worried about him,” Takamiyama said 
In two years, this wunderitind of Wmkuti has on the sidewalk “He is bong careless, he is 
developed into rare of Japan's better sumo wres- eating too much." 


“After hitting those two home 
runs. I was afraid it would put me 
in another slump.” Hayes said. 
Tra not really a home run hitter 
and I have to keep myself from' 
swinging for the fences.” 

The Phillies knocked out starter 
Tom Gorman in the first i nning 
and continued their assault on Cal- 
vin SchiraUi. who gave up 10 rims 
and 10 hits in 1 1/3 innings. The 
Phillies sent 12 men to the plate in- 
ihe first inning, 11 in the second 
and tapered off, barely batting 
around when they scored five runs 
in the fifth and four in the seventh.- 
Not since 1944, a year in which! 
most or the good players were in- 
the military, had a team scored 26 
runs in a game. 

Pirates 13, Cardinals 2: In Puts* 
burgh, Rick Reuschel drove in 
three runs with two singles in aa 
most recently, Ray Knight, 18-Wl onslaught and. with Ai Hoi- 
of the Mets. hit two for the £“*■ hdd , Sl “«n hits to 
help end a seven-game losing- 
streak. : 

Cubs 5, Expos y. Leon Durham 
hit an eighth-inning grand slam in, 
Montreal as Chicago won its sixth 
straight. \ 

Astros 11, Padres 0: Mike Scott- 

S 'lched a four-hitter against San," 
iego while Mark Bailey hit & 
grand slam and Bill Doran drove in: 
three runs in Houston. •? 

Giants 5, Braves 4: Bob firenlv" 
singled in David Green, who with, 
two out in the 18th singled and; 
stole second, to give San Francisco 
its victory in Atlanta. ; 

The Giants had lost five straight,- 
scoring only two runs in 46 innings; 
before getting three in the seventh.' 

Blue Jays 4, Yankees 1: In the- 
American League, Louis Thornton, 
scored from third with one out 
when second baseman Willie Ran- 
dolph dropped a posable double 
play throw and Toronto scored 
three times in the ilth to win in 
New York, ending a three-game 
losing streak. The Yankees’ Dale 
Berra had made it 1-1 with a two-; 
out homer in the ninth. .* 

White Sox 7, Mariners I: Chica- 
go took a half-game lead in the 
West Division standings, winning 
its fourth straight with the help of 
Rudy Law's two-run triple during a 
four-run second inning in Seattle; 

Brewers 5, Red Sox 3; In Boston!, 
where the Red Sox had an eight- 
game winning streak ended. Mii^ 
waukee's Ted Simmons broke a 3-3, 
lie with a two-run double in the' 
seventh. 

Rangers 6, Angels 4: Larry Par- 
rish hit his sixth home run in his 
last 10 games as Texas won in Ana-. 

bmia. Teammates Pete' 
O’Brien, Cliff Johnson and Oddi be 
McDowell hit bases-empty homers. 

A*s 4, Royals 3: In Oakland, Cal- 
ifornia, Carney Lunsford singled, 
home Rob Picciolo from second 



T>* N«* Yurie Tima 

Sumo wrestler Salevaa Atisnoe. 

At a morning stop at a radio station, he had 



of a New York hot-dog vendor. He reached 
through tiie window, purchased four hot dogs. 

“And when he gets back to his hold," Taka- 

miyama said, shakin g his bead, “he will eat with two out in ihe ninth to brat 
some cookies. He will eat whatever is around." Kansas City. (LAT, VPl, APy 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Football 


Tuesdays Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE . . 


m m 306—5 ll ■ 
8 1 


Donwln. Gftsn (91 and Moore : Clemons. 
Hurst [«). Stanley 19) and Sax- W — Darwin. 6- 
4. L— Hurst. 2-5. 5w— Wbson (3). HR— Boston, 
Evans (AI. 

Toronto 011 M0 MB 03-4 0 0 

Nsw York 000 000 001 00-1 9 I 

Ksv. Acker (8), Lavsile (81. Lamp (101 and 
Whitt. Mart Inez (10): WMtson. Fisher (ID). 
RJWwttl (ll), Bordl (11) and WYnnar. W— 
Lsmx so. l— fmmt. 3-1. HR— Hew York. 
Berra (I). 

Tran 010 201 101— 4 11 3 

Caffloraia 000 301 010-4 10 t 

Rouma. Harris (A) ond Gkwuht; Lugo, Cor- 
bett (51. album (?) and Boone. Natron (B>. 
W— Rnzema.3-4. L-Luoo, 0-1. Sv— Harris (41. 
HRs— Texas. O'Brien (A). JUMSMI [01. Par- 
rbh (111, McDowell (2). 

CMcaSD 040 Ml ns— 7 IB O 

Seattle MOM 100-1 C 2 


LoHar, Spinner (7) and Fisk; Swift, V crate 
Bara (A). Lane (9) and Kamaev, w— Collar. 2- 
2. L — Swift VI. HR— Seattle, Presley (14). 
Kansas atv BBO 210 90S— 3 9 ] 

Oakload 100 011 10V— 4 9 1 

Block, Locoes (9) and Sumatra; Sutton, 
Howell (81 and TtttMon. W— Howell. 6-1 L— 
Black. M. 

{Baltimore of Detroit, nod. rata) 
(Minnesota al Clev ela nd, ppd, ratal) 


Jones gets to the point of the stray, 

Major League Standings 

unable to concentrate because 20 ofhis gmerals had 


unable to concentrate because 20 of his gmerals had 
been shot that morning. ” 

. . A secretary sticks her head in to confirm flight 
(reservations the next day to Ireland, where he w£D 
attend a meeting of the American Society of . Golf 
Architects and unveQ his 450th creation, t he new 
course at Ballybumon on the breathtaking headlands 
of Kerry, where the wide mouth of the River Shannon 
r meets the wild Atlantic. Dunes 120 feet (36 meters) 
high form a natural links, like the old Scottish courses,' ' 
meaning the duffers cannot blame all the sand hazards 
on the architect. 

“Peter Dobereiner, the British golf writer, says ifs 
the greatest links course in the world," Jones murmurs : 
in pardonable seif-awe at having been accused of 
outdoing St Andrews and Carnoustie, where nature 
(las been at work for 500 years. 

Bora in Inge, England, Jones was taken to the 
v United States at age 4 by his parents. He grew up in 
/Rochester, New York, caddied at the local country 
club for Walter Hagen and was good enough with the 
sticks by age 14 to finish second, one stroke behind the ■ 
leader who broke the course record, in a pro-amatem 
tournament 

His high point as a golfer was a lOtb-place finish m 


Toronto 
Detroit 
Haiti mot* 
Boston 
Now York 
AMtwoukaa 
Clove Iona 

Chteaoe 
CotHomlo 
Kansas City 
OaUond 

Mmosata 
Seattle 
Tew 


East Division 
« L 
37 19 
30 24 
29 25 

29 2A 
20 U 
27 2A 
19 37 

West DMstofl 
V 34 

30 2 i 
2fl 27 
2B 20 

24 30 

25 32 
22 35 


Pet SB 
461 - 
JSB6 6 
SO 7 
SO 7VS 
419 8 

409 BW 
J39 18 

447 - 
S36 to 

sat 3 

500 2to 
Mi 5to 
439 A 
JOi 9 


Chicago 


NATIONAL M»6UB 

east DMlloa 

W L Pet. GB 
34 19 443 — 

31 23 574 3)4 

»*■*«« 

St. Lari* SO 2i -SJ6 5to 

PhltodetoWa 

Pittsburgh 10 34 J3J 16to 

West DivUIn 

San Diego 33 22 M0 - 

Hcus*r 30 26 ^A 3to 

Ctnctnnoll 29 24 527 4 

.Los Anodes “ » 500 5» 

Atlanta a 31 ■*** 

Son Francisco 21 34 -*2 w 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
SL Limit BOO Oil BOD— 17 1 

PttttOurgO 134 loo rax— n IS s 

Allan. Horton (31. CcanoboU (5). Lahti (71, 
Day lav (8) and Hunt. Niela (61; ReuscbaL 
Honan! (81 ond Pena. Ortb (61. W-ftausdwI. 
-3-0- L— Allan, V4. HRs— PUMmroti, MxUocfc 
(3). Pena (3). 

oh on MO— 6 A i 
DOS MB MO— 3 A 0 

Edkarstev. Fr oxter (7), Smith <9J and Davis. 
Lake (0); Mahler. St. Clalro (Sl.Lucos (Bland 
Flfworald. W— Frazter, 3-1. L— SL Claire, l-l. 
Sv— Smith (15>. HR*— Ottawa, DOViS 16). 
Durham (6L 

Son Dtoao 004 M0 OGO— o 4 o 

Hamfcn IN 014 <Hx— 11 n 0 

Thurmond. Leffarts (A). Booker IS] and 
Koabnodv. Bachv (7); Scott and BaJley. W— 
Scott. 54. L— Thurmond, M, HR*— Houston. 
Baitav (4). Doran 15). 

San Fran MB OM 3W ON 000 001— A 17 0 
Atlanta 3M M 0M MO BIO 080-4 I 1 

Krakow, Minton (a), Garretts (B). MJDcnttt 
(10). Blue (in. Williams (17) and B rooty : 
Bedresian. Sutter (71. Dadmon (10). Camp 
(121. Gartwr (151 and Owen, w — William, M, 
L—Gartser, T-2. HRs-Attonta, Homer 2 (6). 
Hew Tor* 003 220 MB- 7 0 2 

PUktafelpMa 978 Ml «x-U 27 1 

Oonnonjdilmltfl (D.SJsk Ql.Seonbtto (5). 
draco (81 and Carter. Reynolds (3); Hudson. 
Rucker IAL Andersen (9) and Dlaz.Wodcwv 
luss (55. w— Hudson. 2*. L— Gorman. 3-X 
HRs— Pbflodehihia Haves 2 (5). 

(Las Annates at Cincinnati, ml nsifl) 


total bases breaks mark o( 43 set va. Reds an 
May 15. Wit. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE CLUB RECORDS 
—14 extra bam hits ties rocortl set bv Pitts- 
burgh In 1970. 

—34 extra bases on lena hit* sets malar 
league record breaking 32 set ov Boston Rea 
Sax vs. SL Louis Browns hi 1950. 

—40 extra bases bv both dubs ties NL re- 
cord set la 1954 bv Milwaukee (27) ant Brook- 
lyn (131 on July 31. 1954. 

— » runs ora most scored m Notional 
Leaouo since April 30. 1944 at the Polo 
Grounds In New York when Giants beat tt» 


United States Football League Leaders 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Team OHeam 


PHILLIES INDIVIDUAL RECORDS 
—Seven at bats bv Ridk Schu and bv Juan 

Samuel breaks old mark of six Mdbv many 

and ties malar league record. 

OTHER RECORDS 

—The nine runs In the first Lmlng ore the 
morn bv PtilUies since Aug. 2U im, at Son 
Francisco when they scared 10. 

Phillies batted araund (our times. In fl rst (9 
runs), marnt 17). «Mh (5) and seventh mi. 



Yards 

Rush 

Pass 

Tampa Bay 

6115 

1822 

4293 

New Jersey 

MSB 

3443 

2015 

BlrmlnoJiain 

52® 

2247 

2993 

Utanwhh 

5434 

MIW. 

501 B 

BaltlmarB 

5058 

1973 

3095 

Jacksonville 

4894 

1788 

3105 

Orlando 

4018 1626 

Team Doteaso 

2392 

Birmingham 

42B5 

1563 

2733 

Memphis 

4636 

1809 

2827 

Baltimore 

4676 

1856 

3820 

Tampa Bay 

5075 

2041 

3034 

Now Jorsev 

5122 

1726 

3396 

Jacksonville 

son 

2198 

3099 

Orlando 

6051 

Qnrtiftedu 

29» 

3079 


An Com 

Yds 

TD Int 

Lewis, MEMP 

176 93 

1496 

15 

5 

SloudL BIRM 

408 243 

3074 

32 

15 


Fuslna. BALT 
Reaves, tb 
K el lev. MEMP 


Walker, NJ 
Raster, JACK 
Anderson G, TB 
Brvant. BALT 
Cribta. B1RM 


Smith j, BIRM 
Alexis, JACK 
Fftlkee. BALT 
Anderson G. TB 
Crowfrd. MEMP 


444 267 3097 
516 291 3900 
227 141 185S 


Att Yds Avg LB TD 

387 2129 15 88 20 

286 1223 43 21 9 

247 1065 43 AS 15 

210 1012 4B 82 TO 

233 937 40 28 7 

R e ceivers 

No Yds Avg Lg TD 

72 1139 15J 56 17 

70 800 124 51 4 

49 838 111 37 3 

AA 643 9.7 41 4 

64 1018 15.9 46 9 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Transition 


Ybc Philade l ph ia pblHfas set Bed or brakes 
mottifude of dab and Notional Lemma n- 
cants Tuesday ntsht ta tts 2W arte over the 


CLUB RECORDS 

— U rant breaks recntl 4(33 uttn July IS, 
190B, vs. Pittsburgh and Ued hi 1922 against 
Cubs. 

— 27 Mts breaks record of 24 set vs. Cubs on 
Aw. 25. 1922. 

—10 aouMes breaks previous mark at nine. 
—14 extra base tuts breaks old record, a 


BASEBALL 
Amtrtcon 1 nm 

Chicago— P laced R (chord Dotson, Pitch- 
er. an the 15-day disaaiad lb*, refrooettvo tn 
June X Moved AI Janet. Pitcher, from the 15- 
dov disabled list ta the 21-day (fettled list. 
Recoiled Bruce Tanner, Pitcher, from Buffalo 
pi Km American Association. 

CLEVELAND- 5en( Dove Von OMen. 
pitcher, to Maine oft he international League 
on a2ft-denr rehabilllotion option. Started Andy 
QwHLoiteher.imd assigned him toBatavtool 
the New York-Pewi League. 

MILWAUKEE— Signed Cart Moraw, Jeff 
smith, and Richard Boslev. ettdwrei Stwi 
Athtov. Todd Brawn. Mario Monica, Ed 
Grama, Frank FaxdnJ, ond Joe Hanev,out- 
Hetdera; Robert Pintey and Russ McGkwls. 
Infleidera. and Charles McGrew and Daman 
OBoenheimer. catchers, to fraecBent con- 
tracts. 

OAKLAND— Placed Tom Tellmtinn. pitch- 
er.anttw 1540V disabled US. Recoiled Steve 
Ontiveros pHcher, from Tacoma of the Pacif- 
ic Coast League. 

SEATTL E Ac tivated Gorman Therm 
BoNgnofed Mtttr. Designated Mike Stanton. 
OUOher. for assignment: 

TEXAS — Shined Darrin Comer, second 
baseman,- Stephen Wilson. Daniel OIssmlaj- 
vtnWesL Joseph Narmterollo, Steve LonkonL 
ond Paul James, pitchers; Chad Kreuter, 


catcher; Robert Stanley, catcher -first base- 
man; Kevin Retaner. first bas e man, and 
Gearae Van Cleve. outfielder. Assigned Gar- 
ner. Stanley, West, NamUerelia. James, ond 
Lankan) to Sarasota of the Gulf Cota] 
League; Wilson. Kreuter.Olssen.ond Retailor 
to Burlington at the Mid west League, and Van 
Cleve ta Davtona Beach of the Florida state 
League. 

national League 

MONTREAL— Waived Doug Flynn, second 


Houston 

Denver 

Oakland 

Artasona 

Portland 

Los Angeles 

San Antonio 

Oakland 

San AMgnio 

Denver 

Arizona 

Houston 

Las Angeles 

Portland 


Yards 

6140 

5876 

5427 

5045 

4295 

4226 

40J7 


4036 

4804 

4940 

4924 

5648 

5575 

5*24 


Rush 

992 

1869 

2062 

1844 

1827 

1038 

W5 

1520 

1763 

1861 

2839 

1928 

1905 

2173 


5148 

4007 

1545 

3201 

2468 

2388 

24S2 

3316 

3042 

3079 

2885 

3720 

3670 

3451 


baseman, for the purpose of giving film hit 


AH Com 

Vta 

TD IM 

unconditional release. RacaUad AI Newman. 

Kelly, HOU 

567 

360 

4623 

39 

19 

biflofder. Iran) indtanaaallBOf the American 

Hebert, OAK 

412 

22) 

3349 

28 

17 

Association. 

Gobi tana. DEN 

312 

100 

2328 

13 

15 

FOOTBALL 

williams DARI 

441 

231 

3076 

17 

14 

Natla«d Football League 

NeuhefseL 5A 

365 

204 

2605 

15 

23 


ATLANTA— Signed Regale Pleasant, de- 
fensive back, ond Bob Penning, ptocek taker. 

san DiEGO— Signed Tim Pan. defensive 
bock. 

united states Foetbd! League 
Portland— W aived Koony NalL defen- 
sive end. Stoned Frankie Wilson, defensive 
end. 

HOCKEY 

Mafioaal Hacker League 
BUFFALO— Announced the retirement of 
Scotty Bowman, coach- Named Jtan Schoecv 
feid coach. 

Philadelphia— A nnounced the retire- 
ment of Miroslav Dvorak, defenseman. 


-WuMon a DEN 
Berdiev A. OaK 
Brawn R, AR1Z 
Jordtt. PORT 
Williams J. OAK 


Johnson. HCHJ 
Harris L. D£M 
vorain, hou 

Conor A. OAK 
Lewis, DEN 


Rushers 

AH Yds Avg Lb TD 
T9f 1171 4,1 36 M 

170 927 55 57 3 

ItO 927 17 44 18 

US 748 &2 41 5 

196 673 A3 26 7 

R ec s l v trs 

No Yds Avg Lg TD 
91 1)95 111 S3 13 

M 1225 11.9 U S 

78 926 IL9 74 8 

U 1225 1U 69 14 

66 992 lib 34 6 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Albeck May Quit Nets 

EAST RUTHERFORD. New Jersey (NYT) — 
Stan Albeck, coach of the NBA’s New Jersey Nets, 
confirmed Tuesday that he had been interviewed by 1 - 
the Chicago Bulls for the post left vacant by the r ami 
di smissal of their coach, Kevin Loughery. 

Albeck, 54. has one year left on his contract with the . 
Nets, but the Bulls' opening is attractive because hur< 
parents, both over 80 years old, live in Cbenoa, UK-" 

. nois, 100 miles southwest of Chicago. 

Miami Wins College Series ; 

OMAHA, Nebraska (AP) — Behind Greg EUena’s ’ 
four hits and Rick Raether’s shutout relief pitching; ’• 
Miami brat Texas, 10-6, for the NCAA College Work! I 
Series baseball title Tuesday night- .--j 

It was Miami's second championship in four year^-- 1 ! 
Texas finished second for a second straight year^- 

For the Record \s 

Bernard Taylor of Knoxville, Tennessee, earned ab\ 
October title oout against Worid Boxing Association* 
featherweight champion Bany McGuigan byscoringa' 
tough, 10-round unanimous decision over Trinidad'-s. 
Tyrone Downes in Atlantic City, New Jersey. (Ally. 

Fast ffirisoo dub Aston Vffla, facing a Sl 25,000" 
loss if it has to caned next month's soccer tour of the* 
United States and A ustralia , has aslreH the Fnaticti p^;; 
to again seek to have the world-wide ban on English"' 
dn bs lifte d. (TSpjS.-* 

. the top seed, was upset, 7-5, £l by ' 

Mate De Palmer in the first round of the Queen's Ooi- 

grasscourt tennis tournament in London. (upn 1 
_ Wayne Gretzky broke another NHL record, win- 
ning the Lister B. Pearson Award for the fourth ycau- 
m a row; Guy Lafleur had won the award, voted hv'. 
peers, three times. (UPlf- 

Quotable 

Tf you have trouble with insomnia, von shrmM > 
to our dogouL Nobody would bother^ 






Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Pass the Tar and Brush 


Sonia Gandhi: India’s ’Italian Connection’ in a Sari 


people 


W ASHINGTON — When I 
read that John Walker, the 


▼ V read that John Walker, the 
alleged Soviet spy, was a flaming 
conservative, I immediately called 
up Bubba Peterson, who speaks for 
tne right when Pat Buchanan is 
sleeping. 

"How come Walker turned out 
to be one of your guys and not one 
of ours?” I asked him. 

“Where do you get that stuff?” 
Peterson retort* 
ed. “We can’t 
take responsibil- 
ity for every 
right-wing nut in 
the country." 

“Well, he's 
definitely one of 
yours, and we 
don’t like it 
when someone 
allegedly sells R 

this country's nadactnU . 

most vital secrets. How could you 
have let it happen?" 

“Why should we take the blame 


“I never heard of John Walker or 


his family until the spy story 
broke.** 


m 


m 


for what Walker supposedly didT 

“Because you laia it on all the 
liberals when the Rosen bergs and 
Alger Hiss were caughL We still get 
blamed for what they did.” 

“I don’t blame you." 

“Nixon does. The right has bean 
painting us red for years. It's about 
time they got splattered with a 
brush or their own." 

“The Walker family has no con- 
nection with the right-wing move- 
ment," Peterson protested. 

“You can tell that to Robert No- 
vak. but we neo-socialists aren’t 
buying it. How many more spies do 
the right-wingers nave biding in 
sale houses around the country?” 


“Then you’re twice as guilty. 
Don't ted me the conservatives 
don’t check the backgrounds of 
their members.” 

“We’re a political faction. Why 
should we give anyone a security 
check?” 

“Because they could turn out to 
be spies. Do you think we limou- 
sine liberals would have let Walker 
sign up without making sure he 
wasn't working for the Kremlin? 
Why don’t you just come out and 
admit your people were duped? 
Your mistake is that you think be- 
cause a guy denounces abortion 
and the Equal Rights Amendment 
that he’s a 100-pcrcent loyal Amer- 
ican. I hope the Walker case teach- 
es you a lesson.” 

“What lesson?” Peterson wanted 
to know, 

“That the guy who screams the 
loudest against gun control could 
be the one closest to Gorbachev.” 



By Elizabeth Bumiller 

Washington Pat Seme? * 


N EW DELHI — Indians aren’t even 
sure what to call her. They’ve come up 


“Why are you doing this to me?” 


“Because, Peterson, every tune 
we ram! out against, the B-l oomb- 
er, you said we were on the KGB 
payroll. You claimed anyone who 
was for the arms talks was a victim 
of Soviet disinformation. You have 
coupled people who don't want to 
go to war over Nicaragua with the 
Politburo. Why shouldn't we make 
you feel bad about John Walker?” 

“How do we know Walker 
wasn't one of yours, pretending to 


1 could tell I was getting to Peter- 
son. "I ought to come over there 
and punch you in the nose.” 

“Sure, that’s the way all you peo- 
ple behave when faced with treach- 
ery in the ranks. Why don’t you 
admit you made a mistake by let- 
ting Walker into your dub?" 


U. S. Music Grants Awarded 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — More than 
$9.3 million in federal matching 
grants has been awarded to 157 
U. S. symphony and chamber or- 
chestras and their service organiza- 
tions for the 1985-85 season, the 
National Endowment for the Arts 
announced. 


wasn't one of yours, prelending to 
be one of ours?" 

“Because he allegedly did it for 
money instead of for Mother Rus- 
sia. Don't you understand, Peter- 
son, we can no longer depend on 
your people to keep us safe from 
communism. You've been infiltrat- 
ed by the Russkies and until you 
clean house we can't let you have a 
monopoly on waving the American 
flag. How many more Walkers do 
you have on your rolls?” 

There was a lot of sputtering on 
the other end dtf the -line. never 
believed you'd stoop this low. 
Don't you have any shame?” 

Tm not questioning your loyal- 
ty," I said. “And 1 certainly don't 
blame you for what the Walker 
family is alleged to have done. But I 
do have something further to say to 
you." 

“What’s that?” 

“Don’t let it happen again." 



sure what to call her. They've come up 
with “first lady,” although they aren’t hap- 
py with that because it sounds so Amen- 1 
can. Their difficulty is understandable. For 
the first time during the Nehru dynasty 
that has dominated India since indepen- 
dence 38 years ago, the prime minister now 
has a spouse. 

Jawaharlal Nehru was widowed, as was 
his daughter, Indira Gandhi But her son 
Rajiv has taken office not only married, 
but married to a 3&-year-oId Italian Catho- 
lic be met in a Greek restaurant while 
studying at Cambridge, England. Born So- 
nia Marno to solid rmddle-dass parents in 
Turin, Sonia Gandhi is now most often 
simply referred to as Soma . — a very tradi- 
tional wife who is also considered one of 
the most powerful people in India. 

Currently in the United Slates with her 
husband on an official state visit, she is an 
elegant woman who carries her sari so wdl 
that she has even impressed Indian women. 


tough critics of any Westerner who tries to 
wear a garment tmu takes a special walk 
a nd a lot of practice. 

Sonia Gandhi speaks fluent Hindi as 
well, and the talk in New Delhi is that she is 
even better at it than her husband. For 
years, since ha 1 marriage to Rajiv in 1968, 
she expertly ran her mother-in-law's house- 
hold at 1 Safdaijang Road, the supreme 
housekeeper who oversaw the kitchen, the 
large stair and her own son and da ug hter. 
Rahul and Priyanka. 

She is the picture of a devoted Indian 


“I am not interested in a role as first 
lady.” she answered. “I do not really have 
much time. The children are at home and 
arc still young, but whenever I can be with 
my hosfanri I am with him at many of the 

public functions and a good number of the 

dinners. My husband's duty is to the coun- 
try* and mine is to the family.” 

There is some tumbling from those who 
see Sonia Gandhi’s attitude toward her rote 
as a lost opportunity to make a difference, 
but most Indians do not crave public per- 
formance and personal information about 
tiie prime minister's wife. Fashionable 
women in New Delhi know that she buys 
her saris at Sona. a private showroom. Mil 

how much they cost and what style tiwy are 

is not a matter of consuming public inter- 
est. Some women in New Delhi social cir- 
cles win say that she has not yet acquired a 

personal style like her mother-in-law had, 
but for the most part. Soma Gandhi is 
admired for her ability to adjust to India. 

“I am a person who easily makes adjust- 
ments, and the Italian feeling for the family 
has helped me," she said through Prasad. 
“Both my mother-in-law and Rajiv made it 
easy for me. I feel very Indian and am not 
conscious of being an Italian in India. I do 
not recollect even a single incident when I 
had any difficulty in making an adjust- 
ment. I was never pushed into doing things 
I did not want to da” 

But in hex interview with the Hindi 
weekly, she talked of how often she 


Sonia and Rajiv have moved *® a JJJJS 
like home on Racecourse Road proteew 
by a concrete outer 

security guards. The children have bear 
taken out of school to study with a wjj* “* 
home, and Rajiv Gandhi usually wears a 
bulletproof vest in public. 

Sonia Gandhi makes a sufldng 
with her sister-in-law Maneka 


USA Africa Team*, 
flies Aid into Ethtoffa: 

An 1 1 -member 

li n£ "WeAretta 


Africa. cue group V ' 


Worur has tanw* '""KY'” 
famine relief 
pia with the 
The team. 

Betafonte and the pw «** 
Kraeeo, arrived »« Adds Ababa 

World- T-shirt*- * 

shipment was the first « sn&yw 
Africa, where the Umwi Nations 
estimates that up to 
people have been affected by 
v r*tn;n#> The mam will 


with aa ~ c,*iw 

widow of Rajiv’s younger brother. Swyay. 

who w« Indira Gandhi s 

heir to the family dynasty- ^er gjgg 

death in a plane crash in 1980. 

tried to become a politteal force in her own 

right. GaA thr»' lw oui 46k 


null. luoira VJ.UUUM - 

house, but Maneka formed her 

cal party. Last year she ran for parliament 

in Rajiv’s district, losing badly. 

Sonia has never thrived on the passwns 
of iSTpolitics. When Indira Gandh 
tot the dSn of 1977 Soma is smd o 
have panicked, ready w > fly *»ck tone w 
Italy with her two children and tartoj 
band, then an airline pilot. In » 

Indira Gandhi, as reported by Amowwk 
magazine in 1982. Maneka complain** 
towshe and Sanjay had “fought so bitter 
ly" for her mother-in-law during the rule or 
the Janata Party “when the rest of your 




A | * 
11 


J fiil 


projects in nnuopo. gw 
Sunday, then visit Tanzawt and 
Sudan! 








family was packed and ready to go 
abroad” 


thought of Italy during her early yean in 
India. “In the beginning I used to fed it a 
Ira." she said “Kit then I took a decision. I 


wife, and was an obedient, loving daugh- 
ter-in-law. intensely dose and loyal to In- 


ter-in-law, intensely dose and loyal to In- 
dira Gandhi, or “Mummy.” as she called 
her. 

It was Sonia Gandhi who rushed out on 
the lawn after Indira Gandhi had been shot 
on Oct. 31 last year, and who cradled her 
bleeding mother-in-law in her lap in the 
back seat of the car as it sped to the 
hospital. Rajiv Gandhi was in West Bengal 
and heard of the assassination over the 
BBC Sonia sobbed outside Indira Gan- 
dhi's operating room, then later kept on all- 


lot.” she said. “But then I took a decision. I 
cannot keep both. And until I establish a 
deep root and until I identify fully with my 
family here, I decided to keep myself cut 
off from my parental home. 

Now there is talk in the Indian press 
about her “Italian connection” and her 


family’s ties to Snamprogeiti, the Italian 
multinational firm that often wins Indian 
government contracts. She has never com- 
mented 

Friends, none df whom were willing to 
be identified, describe her as a serious, 
thoughtful and shy person who exerts a 
moral influence on a husband who pays 
dose attention to her opinions. For this 
reason. Imprint, a respected Indian news 
and features magazin e- named her the sev- 
enth most powerful person in India — 
ahead of the president. Zail Singh, as well 
as tire influential industrialists K. KL Bitia 
and J. R. D. Tata. 

Still she says she has little influence over 
her husband on specific policy matters. “I 
am interested in what happens, but 1 am 
not the sort of person who politically inter- 
feres.” she said through Prasad. “My hus- 
band spends the whole day in politics. I 
make it a point not to discuss politics with 
him when be comes home." 

Since her mother-in-law's assassination. 


night vigil by the body as it lay in state. 

Seven months later, for all her presumed 
new power, Sonia Gandhi has yet to make 
a significant impact She is only seen in 
pubic in India for tire occasional large 
dinner or political event she decides to 
attend with her husband. Her first and only 
interview as the prime minister’s wife was 
with the Dharraayug weekly, and she has 
turned down all other requests. Friends say 
she never wanted her husband to enter 
politics, and has not yet come to terms with 
her new life. For this article, she agreed to 
answer some written questions submitted 
through the prime minister's press adviser. 
H.Y. Sharada Prasad. 


' ^ * V "kd 
. . *,v; V M 






Sonia Gandhi 


Sonia these days buries herself with her 
children and her work in art restoration. In 
addition to English, Hindi and Kalian, she 

speaks French and Spanish, as well as some 

Rusrian. Before the new security restric- 
tions, she used to go to Amcihi. the district 
in Uttar Pradesh that Rajiv Gandhi still 
represents as a member of parliament, dis- 
tributing medicine, blankets and food to 
the villagers. Asked what struck her most 
about India when she first arrived, she said 
through Prasad that it was the “cheerful 
people — in spite of iheir circumstances.” 

It was while she was studying at a Cam- 
bridge la n grage school separate from the 
university, that she met Raiiv — and Indira 
Gandhi She told the Hindi weekly that her 
future mother-in-law was sympathetic, re- 


calling her own controversial marriage to 
Rajiv’s father, Feroze Gandhi, a Parsi from 
a middle-class family. The Nehrus were 
Kashmiri Brahmins! 

“Sonia, 1 am a mother." she recalled that 
Mrs. Gandhi told her. “You need not be 
afraid of me. I was also a girl like you in 
love with a boy from a different communi- 
ty and religion. I can understand your 
love." When Sonia was preparing to leave 
her first "voting with her future mother-in- 
law. Indira Gandhi beckoned to her. took 
out a needle and thread, asked her to turn 
around, then mended a loose hem on her 
dress. 


publisher, paid SI *0 IBHtiPtiTuCfc 
dav for a jeweled East CTjcgg qta Md 
in 1900 hv P«w Cari Fttergf far 
Oar Nicholas It The otto mam 
collector of Fjbcrg* eggs b So- 
viet government. whidR diadayi 10 
of the eggs at the Armory Museum 
in Moscow. Forbes has exhibited 
10 of the eggs at his own auueumol 
art and collectibles, annexed to the 
offices of Forbes Magazine. “The 
score new stands at the wtmha. 
10. Forbes. 1 1.” tire auctioneer »d 
after the sale at Sotireby s m New 
York. The egg, 8 inches [20.5cemK 
meters) high and encrusted with, 
gold filigree and pearls, is one of 58 , 
made by tire Russian goldsmith foe 
the imperial family. Some were tot 
during the Russian Revolution, 
and only three had been auctioned, 
none in the United Stares, The. 
“Cuckoo Egg.” presented u 1900 
by the czar to nis wife. Empress 
Alexandra Feodorovua, has a dock 
on its face and a fine gold screes.ai 
the top. Each hour, the serettfaps 
open on the hour and a tiny rooster 
emerges. After the Rusvian Revolu- 
tion, the egg Tound its way into 
private hands in London, and then 
to a private U, S! collection. 




“I was really touched." Sonia udd the 
Hindi weekly. “Indeed, thus was the first 
gift I received from Mummy." 


Mfltoo Bede, 76, one of the first 
television superstars, was reported . 
recovering from quadruple heart 
bypass surgery, a hospital spokes* 
man in Los Angeles said. He 
checked into Cedas-Sanm Hospital 
for tests last week and underwent 
four hours of surgery Monday. . 


MOVING 


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E*ceptwnd oporfment 350 sgut, 
justifed high pnoe. Porfcmg. 
Doressoy. t£ 548 43 9€ 


ANTMC5: Hotel du Cap [neol 3 bed- 
room duplex. PboL Tn (931 99 44 14 


MONTAIGNE 

DEAL BED A THUS 

68 ig/n, 2 roam. 380 26 08 
AGB4CE DE L'ETOOE 


CHAMP DE MARS 


MAISONS LAFFflTE. 15 mm. Erode 
SNCF, RBI, inti schools. Char noon 
vfla, mceSent concitrarv lovely 1600 
tqm. aarden. quest house. 09123505 


PhAps. Kay ami Levms. Tel: South of 
(*9* 352 Bill, North of Pa* 722 
5135. Tele* 27Wo RESIDE G, 


MADBBML LOR. Hdi chu. «h 
floor. 80 ***, otmoMK beams. 
ock parquet, bedroom. 2 


Ism AMJ. 742 80 22. 


AGB4T W PARIS 
562-7899 


TIN ST DOMAIN. Sup«b Msw 
Hutai tag, 4 bedrooms, 3 batflt 


HATS RX *BVr 
SHOUT- SOW JOM 


ilSOO'mpmh. Key 

money raowred Bm 2400. Honda 
Tribune. 9B21Neoiy Cedes. France 


When m Romes 
PALAZZO AL VOABRO 
Luxury upu mws home with fumishsd 
flats, awridble far 1 week and more 


HAJSfOKSJUC 
OfHCBS HX K&n/SAIE 


626 27 64 eves. 


kkd sumy piedotorre. 72 : 
old 3 rooms. 480 26 OS 

AGB4CE K rETDQJE 


>. 72 sqm. 


METRO JOURDAN, 1962 fauUn. 
3/4 room u p or tme n t + torn** 25 


3/4 room u p or tme n t. + tenuee 25 
sqm, double e x position, 10th floor, 
view aver Park F800,(XM. 797 39 6^ 


SURBITON/ KINGSTON elegant 3- 
staray townhoase m exdusive Ciil-de- 
Soc Four bedrooms, twp bathrooms, 
garage. UK£600/weet Rx Jeddah: 
*0559 or Tet (2} 6825826. 


Phone; 6794325. 679345a 
Write: Via del Vefafare 16, 
€0186 Rome. 


STAYING IN PARIS? 


16TH. Penthouse type apartment. 3 
rooms, equipped kitchen, avnlotaeut 
Arne, no agency. CtaL 524 GO 18 
Between 6 67 pm 


WHO BSE FOR YOUR 
NEXT MTBtNATlONAL MOVE 


PERSONALS 


International Business Message Center 




Between667pm 

RUE ST. LOUS B4 Lltf, la floor. 


stuck*, comforts. F4000 4- cfexots. 
Tel: 730 27 95 


164b. SQ HENRI RATE. Mogntoui 


opartment 110 sqm, tocepdon, 2 
bedroon*. F85007 Tb1: 577 95 14 , 


AUiv 


FOR A na ESTIMATE CALL FRANCOiSE Twos my one gkx 
, it ba/remembered/l was cwme 

AfblucMM: 1071} OT.W.M Thee". Hoppy Birthday, Ronokl 


HMNCOiSE: "Ywos my one glory /to 
■t be /remembered/ 1 was aimed by 



ATmmON EXECUTIVES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


BUSINESS - 
OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


SWITZERLAND 


VILLARS 

WINTER A SUMMER 


m the Liton i ot ioi ie/ Hendd fri- ! 
buna, when mm than a UM : 
of a rreBSon readart worid- ! 
undo, most of whom ora ut . 
bottom and Industry, wX 
nod it Just ' tatax « {Paris \ 


CHINA 


OFF5HORE&UK 


613595) baton lOani. on- 
sartoa mat wn eon trdax you 


ARTS & CRAFTS 


LTD COMPANIES 


bark, and yowr mettm witt I 
eppatr within 48 ho in. The 
rata it US. $9.80 or load 
n^Mvsdant par Ona. You must 
todjada cam p i tW and vorifr- 

, J,|, *- iv -l-» 

MMiy uw 


PARADISE, 20 MINUTES 
FROM LAKE GENEVA 


KLRAN ARTS A CRAFTS (FACT 
MAIL ORDEK 
SatVKZ DEPARTMB4T 


CONTMEX Costbutfen to 300 ahe% 
wotldwxfa • An 'Sea GA Charta 
281 1881 Pam (near Opera) Cart too 


ApullweilL rangmg from iluta 
to Trooms. Ayngtaifn Far Salt To 
r ureionen. FtettSK vew, tagh oudi- 
tjr. unacted resxtamd areas. Price* 
horn SH 95.000 to SF635.0OQ. Morl- 
pofl os^ovowble a» only 65% interest. 

rOp hJo irtflfKW: 

GLOBE FLAN S-A. 

Av. Mon-Repos 24, 

CHI 005 LAUSAlStit Swifcerfcxm 
Tel (21) 22 35 12 Tbi 2185 MHJS CH 
Ctto bUdred Store 1970 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


FASHION ADVISOR & personal shop^ 
pn ham Haute Couture to Les Nou- 
veau* G/atours. From A*e Mon- 
bngne to Si. Germam dmhH Lode 
o* gentlemen by appomtmeni only. 
Very exdusnrc service. Col Veroncrue 
Mover at Mr. Mo> boo 22^ 97 57 Pmo 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BROKOS 

INVESTMENT ADVISORS 


PAWS ON THE RUN. See Ihe world* 
moil beautiful oty m the comfort of 
your own than. For togging tours or 

ram, CoB 567 12 57. 

WIMBLEDON TICKETS available. Se- 
res Fnak. Bock now. Call Tidtel 
finder* UK 0 1 -629 8633 / mabfle 0836 
202722 Telen: 261376 LOFBNP G. 
ALCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS in 
EngkK^Ftais {dody} 634 59 65 Rome 


ITS YOUR DECISION 



Your cfrsnls can mvejt in one of Amen- 
ca's most exciting technofcxjed break- 
through* m a Mion dollar nut industry. 
30,000 tree* already Honied A 
Dividend* Raid. Hgh arumd ecnwtgs 
auuted For many, marry y*rxi Gen e r - 
aue cqrm nifi iont and Bornw. Mtden- 


Whole & ratal anqumre nvitad for: 
Begont. hotonc Fuzhou Locquewa e. 
BeduiifiA unque at design, yal fxodi- 
cd. troys, bowti &axtomBnino wide 
*andy of style*- Exquisite maraaturei 
tarlptured in cork from cypress tree*. 
Mare *pn 1 .000 decorator item cnexh 
able. Shoushon Slone Carvitgs and 
Sec4s- ancient an curved horn Ihe 
«<w. Among them, a Ihe most precious 
Yeilow Tian Stone, wfedi is mare ex- 
pensive ihan gold Offer authentic Fuz- 
hou arts & crofts indude the fixnous 
Dehua Porcelain, wood-ajrvmg, wary 
carving, braderLgrass products 
aw barabna product*. 


Incorporation ond rnonooflnwrti irt UL 

We of Man, Turk*. Angufta, Choreto 
Wands, Panama. Libena, Cxfandtor and 
most other ctffsnare areas. 

• Confidential odviGe 

• bimdale ovafabflity 

• Nominee services 

• Berne r shore* 

4 Boat regstrahons 

• Accounting & odm in istroli o n 

• Mol, telephone & telex 
Free Mudiexd ore booldet Enoot 

s5kt cortoratb 

SHIWCES LTD 
Head Office 

Ml Ptaamit, Daugkn, We of Man 
Tel: Doeglm (8624) 23718 
Telex 628554 SELECT G 


COMMISSION AGENTS 
wanted inmasl Middle Ea^ European 
& Afrian cauWrms far USA's finest 
police & emergency vehide lgfe/*iren 
systsrre. AAnmum mvestmeni or S2JXX) 
required far samples as produa mart 
be told via fire demonstration to unrig 

UShtwbghts bed not apply 

Contact Lory Stewart, 

Wbefen Engmeomg/LN. Stewal & 
Associates. Ave Lawie 368. Box 10, 
1050 Bassets, Belgium. 


WANTED HE AGENTS FOR THE 
promotion of o new woy or comrrtuni- 
cation, leadetship of internqtiand 


pubfc dty in 3 tfimereions. Write toe 
6ax 2399, Herald Tribune, 92521 | 
NeuMy Cedex. Froitce 


COLLATERAL ovtxfabie from Prime 
Baris. A comp ri« one senna for 
uiitiuye purposes. We nipply / w- 1 



MASBaiA HUL CUIB, My staffed 
An ancepeond vflo sol m edendM 


gro un ds vnfh a nmrnmng poof and 
access to tome courts, superbly fee- 
rushed and ftannouify eq«pje± 
oo mprian g e normous fivmg roomrifr : 
mg room, 4 bedroom suites raid soft 
quarters. AwaifaMa for reft tar the 


Nali 


range: a) dan co mpany shas, . 
statements af purpose at rabitruga 
toons, c) fiduciary bank accounts, d) 
eoflaterd. e) collaterd notification by 
letex or hard copy, fisase contact our 

London Mas - tfl 244 9592/01 385 
5492 / 01 930 8926, Tlx 8951622 
TARRCQ G 


UFEI1ME FRANCHEE BRBMd. wear 
lots. Andable far whale of USA. UK 


Director, Brian Hack, w® be at Mori- 
son Towers Hctd, 3«h Street, Mod- 1 
son Avenue, NY. June 16 - 21 

PANAMA LIBERIA. CORPORATIONS 
from US$400 owricfcfc now. Tel 
0624] 20740. Telex; 628352 SLAM3 
G.lviaUK). 


81 AVE FOCH 

Luxurious Stucfios 


month of August. U5S25,000. Tefc. 

London (0U23S 


Phone, color TY, totdmn, short term 
faa*o- No agency fees. F4500/mcxitK 


^apar 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


London Seraasenlivo 
2-5 Old Bond London W1 
Td 01-493 <244, Tlx 58247 5C5LDN G 


ol ovofabie m bigUvPrendi. German. 
CcnfocJ: 


PJbom aantod us at: 

Mai Order Seraoe Depralment 
Oxna Natmnd Arts & Crofts hport 
i Export Corporation, Fufon Brands, 
Foreign Trade Center, Wu St toad, | 


GLOBE PLAN SJV. 

Av Mon-Repos '.'A. 

CH-1005 Lousann* B«ritzarlcnd 
Tek (21 1 22 35 1 2 . Tlx.- 25 1 85 MEUS CH 


Fuxhqu, fupon, Qvno. 
able AOTCRAFT Fl/ZHOI 


(Fenonri purchases welcome too) 


OFFSHORE TAX SHELTER 

COMPAMB 

IX. Ue of Mem, Turks. Channel Wands, 
Panama, Liberia and most offshore ar- 
eas. Complete support faakhas. Very 
strict confidwSssSfy. 

Free *unnJtatxan: 

Roger Griffin LLE, F.CA 


INSURANCE COMPANY. 
SeBrig insurance mvestmenf inked 
poicies to gold + grid mines or to Ui 
gawmere backed smaxmes. All 
assets infer trustee in Switzerland. 

SEBONG AGBH5 
w«h safes groups in Larin Americq 
African, Untied Arab Bmraees & Gulf 
Countries. For East. Profassfanph only. 
PIkm contact with CV. & reterenns: 
Snrwplan SA, 348 B*vd du Souverom, 
Box 52/1160 Brussels, Bd^un.. 

Tlx: 2564® 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


«n 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED R4C 
IUJL A WORLDWIDE 


US $10 MILLION NKDGD 
HTHER AS SECUHH) LOAN OR A5 
INVESTMENT FOR 1» PRODUC- 
TION « MARKBMG OF PROVH4 
CANCB4 CURE METHOD. 
PRMOPAI5 ONLY. KKYIHTBOX 
2165, LRT W FriedricMr. 15. 
Drt&000 Frankfurt/ Mom. 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSSES 8th 


Studw,2 or 3-room oprat me n t. 
One month or rnare. 


C4ie month or more. 

LE OARIDGE 359 67 97. 


EUROPEAN DBECTOt of US caqxt- 
mr seek* Inpo qpurtmeut n canto 
PonSjPrWer unfurreshed, madman 
FlQjOOO. Tel 221 4094/354 8048 


EMPLOYMENT 


TAX SERVICES 


AGOKE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

764 03 17 


FOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSTONS 

LOOK llNDBt 

“INTERNATIONAL POSmONS" 
PAGE 8 


A oonqsleto pertond & business service 


HLED YOU! US TAX RETURN? Paris 
based US CPA wil help. 359 63 01 


OFFICE SERVICES 


NLEBK 


EXECUTIVE .. 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MTERNAilQNAL BUSSNBS operrt- 
iog 5ucaashJky worWwme for over 25 

[ - — Ml refRm Ml few kmMM 


y«n with mom office in tax haven, 
far sofa: 5F1A mBGaa This mdudm 
eSsa know4«w. Crai be operated 
from almost orw pral of the worM. 
emef is •xtendawfl- for intonr&ion 
write to: Box 3163, LH.T, Friedridtsir. 
15. 6000 Frarirfurt/Moin 


JOANNE'S IBSONAL SHOPPING. 
Women/ ™n foshtan service. Fun & 
wonderful stares. Pons 703 4667 


EMERALD-HOME LTD 

Dorfctr., CH-8872 Woohm 
T eh CH-5 8-431778. 

Tl» 876062 HOME CH 


HAVE A f«E DAY! fatal Haw a 
mce day! Bokel 

SUN. NY. TIMES - Euroto dekvery. 
WnteKeyier. P08 2. B100Q feusseb. 


USA GENERAL 


AUSTIN. TEXAS. 50 beautifii wooded 
acres with lake. Tet UK ROSQ 23120 
or US 512-237-2688 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADE EASY 

Busraimenl Temporary & permanent 
residence v«n set up business in USA. 
transfer key personnel, expand your ex- 
Btng business- Write far free mfa to 
Attorney David Hrson. 14795 Jeffrey 
Rd. -206, Iryirw, CA 92714 USA. 
714/651-8020; tbe 990194. 


COMPUTK PORTRAITS 


Brochure: Corporate Management Ltd, 
Weifen t Ho ue, Victoria Street, 


T-SHOCT FOTOS 
^ WWW HAL COLOR 

jmojMMii i examess that cat earn you 


Douglas, Ue of Mm,J0624| 23303/A 
Telex 627389 ORMAN G 


promoaond Affiift iura. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C 10019 
5enme Representalrws 
■ Neadadwbriffenefe. 


Your Office in Gennany 

we are “At Year Service" 

• Complete office services at two 


Sumptuous recapbom + 3 bedrooms, 
4 baths + matfs ream 

EMBASSY 563 68 38 


$8000 ■ $10,000/ manJh. New end used 
systems from $9500 ■ $26,500. 


RETAIL STORE, EXCELLENT locator 
m center of Zwieh, goad turncrwsr, 
high efficiency, low runring costs, of- 


± 1 ! ?■* I ■** miHiew un nan gu 

nrteed or stoddmldership paS 
I: 069-747808 11* 412713 KEMA Please retay to Box 2394.tliSdTl 
— — I fe™, 9252i Nealy Cedex. Franca 


f« opportunity to overseas investors 
to parhdpete. Interest on loan gua-- 
arteed or stoddmldership pc 


1 US MARKETING HRM 
Seeks unique auto Ahudwora items to 
sril m US. Strong rash position S con- 
tacts enaUcs us to now quay on 

4656 Tlx: 428511. 


COMRETE AND CONFIDENTIAL 
BUSINESS SHVKX 
NowovofaUetoaMrdlyour profes- 
sional needs m Suterkma. 

For Fut debris conta ct: 
Competence Service OM 217366 
8, Charles Humbert Ch-1205 Genera 


■ fully equipped offices far the short 
tarm or Ifie long lerm. 

• Internahancriy trained office cmd 
pnofaaiifmd staff at your ifapocaL 

• Can be legcriy used as your corpo- 
rate domiale far Gennany /Europe. 

• Your breiiiess aperorion am stert 


aoup. Roden** 

tSiWSafta: 

ratang, new on gordan. F6000. 


16«i VICTOR HUGO 


ZSXSL** 

***Ming fbofty ^far Cobfelkv & Stvw 
Coro. Egypt A1 1 plant muipmani a of 
™°P®an mareifoctrae. Should haw 

asaw/sssas- 

tagwge a. plus. Mninwti of 5 to 10 
“ production manaB- 


lletfdessi&uUimauxqudfawit'wit' 


i b 




Urea Bumneec Servkss CmbH 
Lurco-Uouj ran Hobhousenprak 
Jnstmion sl i u s sa 22 
6000 Rraddurt am Main I 


— --to.vn 8 8WW 

Magnificent 2 roan*. F7D00, 
Tel: (1} 326 85 06. 


Teh 0611-590061 
Tefa* 414561 


of a 

now without imsnvcmeraxi, feel qt 

SasSSaaite 

_de aWra rost. Paris 7ltv 5 44 3iJn 
mi 1 ■ i 


mg eqtapment: 

tales from 


2. Strcxring, ramouring A aaenifal 

Mir Ml fritM A-- L 


(mnUnff 


Geneva France Border 

UBA MKHEL BUIIEAU 

AGBKE SERVICES 

Yora fa By equflpsd office m France. 
Dati c fatxxi (tefa. Ptej, gfionei trade 
tales. tronslariarB. ui ini stnrii on and 
secretarial services. Legd end auebor 
advisere. Short or tan term. M&A. 86 
ISe tfe Geneve, 7424uGei8ord, France. 
TeL (5q 92-1341 The MBA 309078 F 


Central, Hong Kong. 

commercial" 

PREMISES 


"fSSSflBUsS 

^S!^ We 3»N.Daw.a 


benefits apply: 


n lTT 11 

retoeaban aflowanoe, nfedirat 

•>.‘^ 8 sr y “ 

n>a» mcri resume tac 
faduarial Imt. he 

G | * r ™li^Sn5MUSA 
Telex. 21/4442 AAOTNC 




Prinapafity of Monaco 

For aB u anvneranl aapany & 
rveriewnis, pfeose ran fad 

AGBX 

26 bit 8d Prinoese Chortotte 
Munte Carta, MC 99000 Maaora 

&:' S] 


YOUR RiBOSHB) OfflCE 
Oi LONDON 

7doy 24houroccBn8.an sw Brpho n a 


— rajtran li 

COUftnw HOUSE 

"fci ftchonl uonr 1 aS? 


Avenue 
POflOn with sense of 
Jga^ofanmtok.Tri.W»g,? 

A ^f f j 1 3THPO4TH0USE, 3 tad 


• fan support services indudng- 

I 

• Corporate bpemin Serene 

• Short or long term autriabftfy 
World-Wide Swmh Cenfres 

llOThe Stored tandea WC2ROAA 
Tab Ol 836-8918 Tic 24973 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


ROME - Short /long term rent Yotr 
own prestigious business office lead- 
ed between Via Veneto & fazza d 
Spagna. At your dripnnfc ■aetary, 

&l SSSsSSS* 1 ,lam - 


\an Cleef & Arpels. PARIS 22,PlaceV:nd6iiic.Td:26L5&5& - GENfey^E 31, Rue du Rhone. Tel: 28.8L66. “Id bOUtlQUC KS-£' 


HAVE US. DOUARS TOexrfotgc 
far Swta Frontt. Lira. Wil afao bor- 
row large sum of Swiss Primes. 5« 
10 years. Have P io miMn y notes. Td 
Sw&md. Zurich 361 6500 or 
065/491 3& 


fOUR OFFICE M CENTRAL MADRID 
4- meewg room & telex. Al services 
■a start taw i ess. Lead & finraidal 
consibing. GAP A. VaUehermaro 16. 

28015 Madnd. Tfe 44977 GAPA I. 


■»°a i >g w . -v.- 

opening m IQIWAIT for a nmmSoBri 
wytyrocdbtoriiea lawyer, famtar 

wowa be an asset Kesume wt»i »Mi- 

SKtesisssaiss 1 ‘ ■ ■ - 


wy comfort- Whig Mr. AflDUMOhW V 
W; POB K555. SAFAT, KUWAIT "fa. 




IMPETUS • ZURICH - 282 76 21. 
Phone / telex / maAo«. 


studio, ai 

SBMs'i "**■ fWW- Tet 


Printed by gdz in Zurich (Switzerland) 




PAGE 15 
FOR MORE 
classiheds 


‘*4* : l 


-V 


N