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INTERNATIONAL 


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Printed 
in Pam. LondonTfurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 
The Hague and Marseille 



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Published fitli The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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No. 31,823 

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PARIS, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


Evidence 
Barred in 


v -u>^ 

'■'75k 


I’’, W 

" • -'U; ' 


Ver Trial 


-»\a 


Xsr 


•i \ 


Move h Coded 
Blow to Aquino 
Cose Prosecution 


3-^ 


Ben- 


1 1 aiil 

H. «l, 

••'■Ti 

• By Steve Lohr 

New York Times Strike , 

MANILA — The court 
■“ ing over the trial 

... igoo S.Aqomo Jr. threw ontThms- 

• t ••. ii.iQ.,^ day sdf-zacmnfoatmg testimony 
T given by Fabian C. Ver. the former 
' ^1-.- armed farces dnef of staff, and 
! seven other soldiers charged in a 
plot to agga^hune the opposition 
leader. 

; The derision is considered highly 

■ r :■ i.y;: damaging to the prosecution's case 
. v.-oj;'; ^gainst the digJjL, all of whom were 
* l charged as accessories in Mr. 



Takeover 


Accepted 


By TWA 


It Endorses Bid 
Of $793 Mffion 
From Texas Air 


Fabian C. Ver 




■■ Aquino’s killing . 

i-ifr One of the -three presiding 
■ K* v judges, Angasto Amores, said. the 
-::ok ruling was ‘‘defimtdy” a Wow to 
a [Vs the prosecution. Asked if it was a 
X'ltitL -.jTv fa*»i blow to the case against the 
- accessories. Judge Amores replied, 

• ••.^*‘1 think so." • - - 

. .. General Vet's lawyer, Antonio 
. • ... jj/Corood, said he now planned to 

. i ' Rift a nvirimi [a ifimmsq lift fihargps 

V- ? against his dimt The defense pre- 
' r sentation in the trial is scheduled to 
bc^n next week, bat, Mr. Coro nd 
said, "You don’t defend yonrsdf 
against no thing.” 

The inudimgrihle testimcaw was 
by the ei ght men. before a 
. -.citizens fact-finding board that 
. - conduded in Octooer that Mr. 
.. Aquino was killed in a mflitay 
~ conspiracy. The board report 
..'..famed the basis of the prosecution 
- j case in the trial. . . 

_ The court decision came in re~ 

: tO a defenw* motion mJcmg 

of the.accesso- 
Inadmissib le bo* 


U.S. Army 
FearsLoss 


From Spies 


M-lm si vertiWe preferred stock of TWA It 

Mil menaVY would be operated as an mdepen- -wvr | 19 Tf • J TT 1 

v w/ ittmszzz Kohl s Liability: Unemployment 

By George C Wilson ti J 1 J 

and Bob Woodward 


given 


■ Washington Pc&i Serncr 

WASHINGTON — The army 
has set up a special team, to assess 
the kisses if mav have snSered from 



An FBI agent testified against 
one of the spy suspects. Page 3. 


Jf ; - lT; spouse to a defense 
that the testimony 
‘ ries be declared in 


St* Ah 


4 .# • 


•s. 








• 1 ‘ 1 ‘'^t-S cause of the consritutional proteo- 
i,y~ -Uon against trif-mc nttiwHitinn ■ 

Mr. Aqahio was shot to death at 

-.' the Manila International Airport 
^on Aug. 21, 1983, whenheFetnmed 
'.tohishofndandaftcx.threeyeasQf 
— -i^’jlf-inqxssed exile in the United 
\ -ligates. The nffitary c&iTned thaf 
-^theoppaathu leaderwas kilted by 
. -a k«nft emman, R nhmdir fi almm, 

■ who bad been lured % Comma* 
nists. 

(1 , .7; The board’s condusons refuted 
the official verakm and found that 

; Mr. Aquino had been the victim of 
_a military plot Oat involved high* 
' -ranking officen induing General 
Ver, a cousin and dose friend of 
President Ferdinand E Marcos. 


promts 
Union ! 


(Continued on Phge 2, CaL 7) 


oompromises .to sensitive opera- 
tions may extend beyond the navy. 

Tbe anny, air force and marine 
carps, in coding sensitive messages, 
use equipment similar to the de- 
vices the navy believes were com- 
onrised, allowing the Soviet 
to read top-secret UJL com- 
munications for years, sources said 
Wednesday.; - 

{The Pentagon said' Thursday 
that the air force was also checking 
for possible damage, United Press 
International repeated. But a Pen- 
tagon spokesman said there was no 
indication that (he spy ring had* 
spread beyond the navy to include 
operatives, in other services. 

{The as force, like the army, has 
created a task force to assess possi- 
ble damage, a spokesmen for the 
service aid- The Pentagon spokes- 
man said the navy was mdnding 

(Conrianed ooPfcge 3, CoL 6) 


By Mark Potts 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Trans 
World Airlines Inc. agreed Thurs- 
day to be taken over by Texas Air 
Corn, for 5793-5 millio n is a merg- 
er that would create the United 
States* second-largest airline. 

TWA, a major force in trans- 
Atlantic service, had been seeking a 
friendly buyer for the past month 
to block a bid by Cari C Icahn, a 
New York financier. Mr. Icahn’s 
investment group bought 11.2 mD- 
lion shares, or 318 percent of 
TWA’s stock, and offered S18 for 
each of the remaining shares. 

Under the merger agreement, 
TWA stockholder will receive $19 
in cash and $4 in a new issue of 
14.5-percent cumulative noncon- 
vertible preferred stock of TWA It 
would be operated as an indepenr 
dent sdbdaaxy of Texas Air and 
would retain its present manage- 
ment and m™, the two companies 
said. 

The merger is subject to approv- 
al of TWA shareholders, comple- 
tion of financing and gov ernment 
approvals. 

The acquisition, would be anoth- 
er coop for Frank Lorenzo, chair- 
man of Texas Air, who has taken 
advantage of deregulation to build 
an anting empire that already in- 
dudes Gonttncniai Airlines and 
New York Air. 

The combination of TWA, Con- 
tinental Airlines and New York Air 
would rank by most measures as 
the nation’s second-largest airline, 
behind United Airlines and sfightfy 
larger than American Airlines. 

Together, the three carriers 
would have nearly 300 aircraft and 
40,000 employees. Combined reve- 
nues would be SS biffioo annually. 

By adding TWA, Texas Air 
would, fin many of the gaps be- 
tween New Yoft Air’s primarily 
East Coast operations and Conn- 
nentaTs coverage of tire West, since 
TWA’s primary domestic hub is in 
St Louis. 

“That builds, when you put it 
together, into a fairly strong net- 
weak,” said Geotgc James, an ana- 
lyst at the Washington-based Air- 
line Economics Inc. 

The combination of the airlines’ 
schedules would bolster TWA’s in- 



Portugnese Leader to Step Down 

Prime Minister M&rio Soares in Lisbon after telling President Antonio Ramalbo Eanes on Thursday 
night that he would resign. Mr. Soares, a Socialist, made his decision after the Social Democratic 
Party quit the two-year-old government coahtioo, leaving him without a parliamentary majority. 


U.S., in Shift, 
To Offer India 
Modern Arms 


Coalition’s Poll Ratings Drop as Jobless Rate Hovers at 9% 


(Confined on Page 15, CbL I) 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 
BONN — Unemployment has 
become a serious political liability 
for Chanc ellor Helmut KohTs co- 
alition government. 

The West German jobless rate 
has refused in recent mouths to 
stay below a post- World War II 
high of 9 percent 
It is now a matter of such con- 
cern that the chiefs of the three 
parties forming Mr. Kohl's Chris- 
tian Democrat-led coalition — Mr. 
Kohl, Franz Josef Strauss of the 
Christian Social Union and Martin 
Bangemaim of the Free Democrats 
— met here Thursday to discuss, 
among other things, ways to cut 
their vulnerability on the unem- 
pjqymeut question. „ 

"For a government that has em- 
phasized economic recovery as its 
chief goal, the inability to bring 
down unemployment is certainly 
going to be a significant disadvan- 
tage at the polls,” said Gerhard 
Herdegen, director of the Bonn of- 
fice of the AUensbach Institute, a 
public opinion research group. 

“German voters expea a dear 
connection between economic 
turnaround and the reduction of 
unemployment," Mr. Herdegen 


said. "To the government’s misfor- 
tune, it’s been more difficult to 
bring down unemployment 
through GNP growth than origi- 
nally foreseen." GNP, or gross na- 
tional product, is a measure of the 
total value of a nation’s goods and 
services. 

Mr. Kohl's coalition partners 
have been pressing the government 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


to stimulate private consumption 
by implementing a planned 19.4- 
bUli on-Deu tsche-mark (S629-b3- 
Hon) (ax cut as one lump-sum 
payout next January rather than in 
two stages in 1986 and 1988. How- 
ever, the government has stood by 
the double-payout plan. . 

The two-stage proposal, which 
would gjye an 1 1-bfltion DM tax 
cut in 1986 and a 9-billion DM cut 
in 1988, is set for a vote Friday in 
the Bundesrat, the lower house of 
parliament. It is widdy expected to 
approve the measure. 

However, the measure could be 
amended in the fall, when parlia- 
ment returns from the summer 
break. Then, any legislator in the 
governing coalition could ask that 
the tax measure be reconsidered by 


the full parliament. Some coalition 
members already have said that 
they would ask for such a reconsid- 
eration if the economy has not im- 
proved in the second quarter. 

Pointing to the defeat of the cen- 
ter-right coalition in last month’s 
election in North Rhine-Westpha- 
lia. West Germany’s most popu- 
lous state, Mr. Herdegen said that 
the government would be “kept on 
the defensive until it can show real 
success in the area of cutting the 
number of jobless.” 

There were 2.19 million West 
Germans out erf work in May. or an 
unadjusted 8.8 percent of the work- 
force. That was a drop from 93 
percent in April. But it was higher 
than the 8.6 percent in May 1984 
and was the highest May jobless 
rate since 1950. The unemployment 
rate for 1984 was 9.1 percent 

"Economic developments are 
going to be the derisive factor in 
the 1987 elections, particularly the 
problem of unemployment,” said 
Otto Lambsdorff, Mr. KohTs for- 
mer economics minister and now 
economic spokesman for the Free 
Democrats. 

Mr. Lambsdorff. charged with 
lax evasion and accepting bribes in 

(C ontinued on Page 15, CoL I) 


By Michael Weisskopf 
and Don Oberdorfer 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration, is a major policy 
shift has derided to offer advanced 
military technology and weaponry 
to India but Prime Minister Rajiv 
Gandhi said Thursday it would 
take his country time to build con- 
fidence in the United States as an 
arms supplier. 

The policy change would end a 
20-year hiatus in large-scale U.S. 
aims sales to India. The United 
States cut off most arms purchases 
by India in 1965 at the outbreak of 
the India - Pakistan war. 

The -new U.S. policy, which 
would be conditional on Indian ac- 
ceptance of stria safeguards, be- 
came known as President Ronald 
Reagan and Mr. Gandhi, held a 
"get-acquainted meeting” at the 
white House Wednesday under 
very heavy security. 

Pentagon officials said the ad- 
ministration decision to supply ad- 
vanced military technology and 
weaponry goes beyond an agree- 
ment on the simply of civ ilian tech- 
nology signed lost month. Most of 
the weapons that India inroorts are 
obtained from the Soviet Union. 

{Although the United States said 
it was willing to sell modem weap- 
ons to India, the State Department 
spokesman, Bernard Kalb, said 
that weapons sates were not a "cen- 
tral issue" during the Indian lead- 
er’s talks. United Press Interna- 
tional reported from Washington. 

{At an embassy reception for re- 
porters, Mr. Gandhi remarked that 
India did not have sufficient confi- 
dence in the United States as an 
arms supplier. He said that Wash- 
ington could change its conditions 
retroactively, and added that there 


Gandhi Voices 


Reservations 


On Space Arms 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Prime 
Minister Rajiv Gaadhi told j 
joint meeting of Congress on 
Thursday that he had “deep res- 
ervations about the militariza- 
tion of outer space." He also 
said that outside interference 
and intervention in Afghani- 
stan jeopardized stability in 
South Asia. 

On the issue of President 
Ronald Reagan's space-based 
defense initiative, he said: 

“We are concerned about any 
new dimension to the arms race. 
This only makes the ultimate 


objective more difficult to 
cnieve. 


achieve. Hence our deep reser- 
vation about militarization of 
outer space." 

Discussing Afghanistan, Mr. 
Gandhi indicated that he fa- 
vored U.S. objectives there, but 
his analysis of the nature of the 
conflict differed from that of 
the Reagan administration. 

He declined to criticize the 
Soviet intervention in Afghani- 
stan. saying only that India was 
"opposed to both foreign pres- 
ences and pressures." 


was no certainty on spare parts. It 
would take time to establish 


confi- 
dence, be said.] 

Mr. Gandhi and Defease Minis- 
ter P.V. Narasunha Rao are expea- 
ed to discuss military technology 
Friday with Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger and General 
John W. Vessey Jr., chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, according to 
U.S. officials. 

They said the Indians expressed 
interest last month in advanced 
technology for surveillance aircraft 
and fighter planes, air defense, 
anti-submarine weapons and elec- 
tronic warfare and other areas. 

The administration has derided 
in principle that it is willing to sell 


the Indians advanced technology 
and equipment, but has not derid- 
ed on any specific weapon or sys- 
tem. 

The United Slates will insist on 
Indian acceptance of safeguards to 
prevent leakage of military secrets 
to the Soviet Union or other na- 
tions, the officials said 

Stria Washington conditions on 
Indian use of U.S.-supplied nuclear 
fuel resulted in a breakdown of 
cooperation. Other conditions led 
to the fail ure of negotiations in the 
1980s on the sale of missiles, howit- 
zers and machine guns. 

In his talks with President Rea- 
gan, Prime Minister Gandhi raised 
India’s objections to the U.S. sup- 
plying of weapons to Pakistan un- 
do - a six-year, S3-2-b31iaii pro- 
gram. 

, Mr. Reagan replied, according to 
a White House account, that the 

(Continued on Page 2, Col 8) 


i. - 1 ‘ 

■ ; v. - •" “ 


.v - 


» -- -«- * 


Getty Gives $63 Million 


4" ■ ’ ' 



Compiled by Our Stoff From Dispatches 

LONDON — John Panl Getty 
the rednshtt American heir to 


ie Getty oil fortune, is giving $63 
million to Britain’s National Gal- 


S . 


r--. X*- 1 *'- ' : 


. t - : vf* *^ r ‘ 




leiy, a museum spokesman . an- 
nounced Thursday. 

. : The donation is die largest the 
v gallery has tecaved smeeits found- 
ing in 1824 and is Hkdy to trans- 
form it into a major purchaser on 
world art markets, a rival to the J. 
_>- 3 aul Gary Museum in Malibu, 
'Talifomia. founded by Mr. Getty’s 
: ^"ather. 

. Jacob Rothschild, banker and 
v V- h airman of the National Gallery’s 
» rustees, said in announcing the gift 
hat it was "more than we had ever 
’ . beamed of.” 

Mr. Rothschild called the gift 
jobably the greatest individual 
.-..■Adawment in the history of British 
public collections. 

. Mr. Getty is creating an endow-' 
nent fund worth S25 million and 
*rill increase it to $63 million “as 
uon as is practicable," Mr. Roth* 
ichild said. 

Lord Gowrie, the arts minister, 
ailed the gift “splendid and histor- 
- c" and an act ot “profound gener- 
jsity." He said the money, would 
the gallery to acquire works 


of art which mi gh t otherwise go 
overseas." , 

Me. Getty, 52, a boiefactor of 
such causes as striking coal miners, 
orphans and baby seals, said in a 
London dntic where he is undergo- 
ing treatment: “Why the National 
Gallery? Wdl, none of the Ameri- 
can galleries needs airy bdp from 
me, least of aH the J. Paul Getty 
Museum.” 

The National Gallery and other 
sinrilag i nstitutions have often been 
unable to match the buying power 
of the Getty Museum, whose trust 
di c tates that it spend 51 million a 
week on art ' 

Its director, Sr Michael Levey, 
has sod the rise in prices frir paint- 
ings on the open, market, coupled 
with restrictions in his gallery’s an- 
imal grant from the government, 
limits its -aftKty .to boy important 
works of art for die, natio n. 


INSIDE 


■ UJS. officials declined to ac- 


cept Soviet criticism of the ad- 
ministration's SALT derision 


-J- r- * ' 




rn 


f- 

* 


as the last wind. 


Page 2. 


sized labor opposed. 
President Reagan’s tax modifi- 
cation plan. Page 3. 


■ Fans hdd by Lebanese mili- 
tia said Israelis were watching 
over them. Page 4. 


■ Fotandreveded pfans to onb 
academic freedoms. Page 5. 


WEEKEND 


■ Octavio Pax's presence in 
Mexican life ranges fromj »e ti^ 


to politics. 

BUSaNESS/FlNANCE 


■ Burroughs Cup. and Sperry 
Corp. have opened negotiations 
on a merger. ; page 1L 


.The National Gallery, which 
houses Britain’ s leading collection, 
has a buying fund from the British 
government a? just $3.46 million 
this year. . 

The gaBer/s grant' this year is 

$?46^^an is f car purchasing art 
and the rest for operating expenses. 
The Geny rift m 2 enable the gal- 
lery to bid for important pictures. 

British 1 art sources said Mr. Get- 
ty had stepped in privately with 
fm a nrio g several 1 times to prevent 
the flow of art treasures from Brit- 
ain- to America.- ’ 

•J He tives beside the Rivct Thames 
in Lcndoh’s Chelsea district on an 
annual income at 535 anffion from 
the fortune oL his father, -J. Paul 
Getty, who was reputedly the 
world's richest man when be died 
in 1976, Mr. Getty was not on 

speaking tons .with his father. 

Mr. Getty'is also known for 
more u nu su al acts of generosity. 

He bought a Stemwsy grand pi- 
ano for me panic • Tnhq Ogden, 
helped orphans of a lifeboat disas- 
ter, gave $126,000 to families of 
.striking.- British miners and lured 
beficoptas to reunite five baby 
seals withtbeir parents. 

Mr.^ Gett/s donations have 
sometimes reflected.dmrians with* 
in the f arraW. He has donated moo- 



North Korea Warms Up to U.S, 


It Indies Americans and Tries, Not Easily, to Forget War 


By John F. Bums 

New York notes Service 


PYONGYANG. North Korea 
— As the train from China crosses 
the Yalu River, there is no mistak- 
ing the legacy of war. A hundred 
yards downstream stands a second 
bridge, with all six supports on the 
Korean side of the river missing, 
blown away by UJS. bombs. 

Nearly 32 years after the armi- 
stice that ended the Korean War, 
the first tiring a traveler sees on 
arrival in this tightly sealed nation 
is. a reminder of the destruction 
wreaked by American forces ini- 
tially under General Douglas A. 
MacArthur. 


Urittd Pm ItBomolmJ 

Protesting U.S. support of Nicaraguan rebels, members of a erotq> caned Pledge of 
Resistance sat outside the State Department in Washington on We&iesday. Thor signs 
bore flie names of people they said were kiBed by the rebels. The protesters were arrested. 


1,000 Are Arrested in U,S. Protests 


Of Support for Nicaraguan Rebel Aid 


ct to British art museums to 
them from 


exporting pictures 

to the ftetiy nnacorn m r* nUTn^-pia 
: ' •’ ■ ■ (Reuters, AP) 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — More than 
1,000 protesters were arrested at 

federal h nildingy and wwp wd imiil 

offices in at least 16 states as the 
House of Representatives ap- 
proved $27 nriffion in nosnriHtary 
aid to Nicaraguan rebels. 

The House approved the aid 
Wednesday in a 248-184 vote. Last 
week, the Senate voted 55-42 to 
make-S3S minion in nonmilitaiy 
aid av ailable to the rebels 
the Sandinist government in 
goa. 

President Ronald Reagan 
praised the two votes, saying “A 
dear bipartisan majority has 
shown that our nation stands with 
those wboarcdeiennined to pursue 

a poEtical solution and seek a dem- 
ocxaiic outcome of the crisis in Nic- 
aragua." 

But the House wtt was; assailed 


Thursday by Britain’s 
Labor mty as a move 
lead "to another Vietnam" in Cen- 
tral America. 

Nicaragua’s foreign minister, 
Miguel d’Escoto Brodemann, on a 
visit to the United Nations, con- 
demned the liaise action as a 
“vote in favor of death, destruction 

and suffering" 

Is Boston, hundreds erf protest- 
ers staged a “die-in,” fining s2eal- 
fy as organizers read out stories of 
alleged atrocities by Nicaraguan 
guerrillas. There were 109 arrests 
there and in other parts of Massa- 
chusetts. 

In Washington policemen ar- 
rested 67 persons who tried to 
block theStaw Department drive- 
way. 

At least 143. protesters were ar- 
rested at 1LS. senators* offices in 
Minneapolis and Sl Paul, Minne- 
sota. 


ition Fifty-seven persons in Pitts- 


burgh were arrested when they re-' 
1. Moor- 


fused to leave the William S 
bead . Federal Budding after the 
buflefing dosed: 

Demonstrations in California 
accounted for 250 arrests, and in 
New York state, the police made at 
least 1U arrests. 

At the United Nations, Father 
{TEscoto said that the House vote 
"greatly hind ers the possibility for 
a peaceful solution and encourages 
those who are intent on a militant 
soitmoa" in Nicaragua. 


In London, the Labor Party 
spokesman on foreign affairs. 
George Foulkes, urged the Conser- 
vative government, to condemn 
U.S. aid to the rebels. 

"The situation in Central Ameri- 
ca is getting so dangerous," be said, 
“that it is sow oar belief that we are 
moving toward anorber Vietnam.” 


In October 1950. US. troops ad- 
vanced to within a few nriles of the 
Yalu, and at that point Chinese 
troops crossed the river to battle 

the Ameri cans and iherr UN allies 

The evidence of war is even 
starker where the express from 
Beijing halts beside a red and white 
barrier manned by a soldier in the 
North Korean Army's olive green 
uniform. Between the shoreline and 
the first ot the concrete supports 
for the bridge is a tangled mass of 
rusted steeL On shore, workmen 
are busy dealing it away for scrap. 

It is an ironic greeting for in 
other ways the North Koreans 
seem «»ger to pot at least some 
distance between themselves and 
the war that hardened the division 
of their country. After a gap of 
several years, a few American re- 
porters are being allowed in on 
brief vials, and officials guiding 
them seem intent not to make too 
much of the war. 

For North Korea, this is a 
change. Under President Kim D 
Sung, leader of this nation since the 
Soviet Army arrived in 1945, enmi- 
ty for the United Slates has been a 
daily staple. Official booklets and 
newspapers continue to attribute 
the division of the country to 
“United States imperialism” and 
its “pro-American flunkies” in the 
South Korean government. 

Shortly after meeting a visitor off 
a train at Pyongyang’s marble-col- 
umned railway station, an official 
of the Information Department 
speaks of the country's desire far 
"greater understanding" in the 
United States and, before too long, 
an exchange of foreign corns 
deuis. He complains that the : 



"These are things that happened 
in the past," he says. 

The move away from past po- 
lemics comes as the Pyongyang 
government is pressing for broader 
contact with South Korea. 


Last month, the Red Cross soci- 
eties of the two nations resumed 
discussions on family reunifica- 


tions that have been suspended for 
, ana agreed to 


President Kim D Sung 


Hie wounds of war 
remain, but an official 
commented: "These 
are things that 

happened in the past 9 


Department has created “obsta- 
cles” to understanding by barring 
North Korean reporters. 

Later, it is the visitor who raises 
memories of war. and the North 
Korean who tries to wave them 
away. Driving out of Pyongyang 
along boulevards flanked by rows 
of modem buildings, with no struc- 
ture older than 20 years or so any- 
where in sight, the visitor asks what 
happened to the old city, founded 
more than five centuries ago. 

“Destroyed in the war," the offi- 
cial replies. 

“Bythe United States Air 
Force?" the viators asks, and the 
official moves to dose the conver- 
sation- 


more than a decade, 
continue their talks later in the 
year. Economic discussions are to 
resume next week, and the two 
tides have agreed to begin talks 
between parliamentary delega- 
tions. 

The goal, on the North Korean 
tide at least, is to move toward 
President Kim's plan to reunify the 
country under a name. Confederal 
Republic of Koryo. that hafts back 
to a golden chapter in Korean his- 
tory, a kingdom that collapsed in 
the 14th century. He has proposed 
that North Korea remain Commu- 
nist and the South continue as capi- 
talist, each with autonomous gov- 
ernments, under seen tral authority 
in which the presidency would ro- 
tate between the two sides. 

The obstacles are enormous, 
above all the distrust in the South 
of any “peaceful" initiative put for- 
ward by President Kim, who was at 
the helm in Pyongyang when the 
Korean War started. Since then, 
many incidents have served to sow 
distrust, especially a bomb in Ran- 
goon in October 1983 that killed 19 
persons, including four Seoul cabi- 
net ministers. It was dearly intend- 
ed for the via ting South Korean 
president, Chun Doo Hwan. 

Burmese authorities attributed 
the bomb to North Korea, and Bur- 
ma in April reportedly executed a 
North Korean officer found guilty 
of the attack. In Pyongyang toe 
incident is dismissed as a provoca- 
tion by Seoul designed to discredit 
the North and to further delay 
moves toward reunification. U is an 
article of faith here that the country 
will be reunited within the lifetime 
of most people now living. 



arc 


fewer references these days to Pres- 
idem Kim as "the glorious and be- 
loved leader of the 50 million Kore- 
an people" — only 18 mfflion live 


(Confirmed oo Page 5, CoL 3) 




rl *~ 


A 

l 






tdBc ‘ ••• 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


Brazilian Says More Witnesses 
Recognize Mengele Photos 


The Associated Pros 

PAULO — The head of 
zf° Rule’s federal police said 
Thursday that more witnesses had 
"cognized photographs of Dr. Jo- 
sef Mengele as a foreigner named 
“Peter who lived on farms in the 
interior of southeastern Brazil. 

“Bui we still can't sav anything 
with certainty." said Romeu Tuma. 
the chief investigator in the case. 

Meanwhile, experts continued 
tests on the bones, hair and other 
remains of a drowning victim after 
a handwriting specialist supported 
a police theory that the drowned 
man was Dr. Mengele. 

The body of the drowned man 
was exhumed June 6 in Embuu 17 
miles (27 kilometers) from S3o 
Paulo. The body was buried under 
the name Wolfgang Gerhard, ac- 
cording to the police, and the real 
Wolfgang Gerhard died in Austria. 

Forensic experts Thursday be- 
gan analysis to determine the race 
and age of the body. Police said 
they were expecting results of other 
tests on bom the body and docu- 
ments found at a S3o Paulo home 
where Dr. Mengele was said to 
have lived. 

Mr. Toma said Dr. Mengele. us- 
ing aliases Lhat included the name 
Peter, lived in Brazil for at least 15 
years. The Mengele family in West 
Germany has issued a statement 
saying the exhumed body was that 
of Dr. Mengele. 

Dr. Mengele. who would be 74. 


Utl UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 
For Work, Acodwnk. Ufo Expwiwico. 
Sand detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 

PACIFIC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

600 N. Sepulveda Blvd* 

Los Anaeles, California 
90049, Dept. 23. USA. 


was blamed for the deaths or 
400,000 of the three million or 
more Jews. Poles. Gypsies and oth- 
ers who were killed at the Ausch- 
witz concentration camp in Poland 
during World War II 
Antonia Maioenti. 74. a worker 
on a farm in Serra Negra. 95 miles 
from Sao Paulo, identified a photo- 
graph of Dr. Mengele as Peter. Mr. 
Tuma said. 

Mr. Tuma said the farm be- 
longed to an Austrian immigrant 
couple. Wolfram and Liselotte B os- 
sen. who have testified that they 
sheltered Dr. Mengele in Br azil 
On Wednesday, police ques- 
tioned two men who said they knew 
the man believed to be Dr. Mengele 
when he lived on a farm owned by a 
Hungarian immigrant who has told 
police she harbored Dr. Mengele 
for nearly 18 years. 

Basilic Silotto. 67. told police he 
met the man, whom he knew only 
as Peter, in 1964. 

“He told me he was a German 
who came to Brazil after World 
War IL" Mr. Silotto said. “1 asked 
him what he thought about Hitler 
and he said Hitler was a great and 
very intelligent man " 

■ Woman Adds to Testimony 
Gitta Stammer, a Hungarian im - 
mig rant who has said she sheltered 
Dr. Mengele. described Wednes- 
day how he became “cold" at the 
mention of Jews, United Press In- 

Office, Vehicles Bombed 
At Japan's Main Airport 

United Press International 

TOKYO — Time bombs heavily 
damaged Thursday an office and 
four vehicles belonging to con- 
struction companies working on 
the expansion of Narita Interna- 
tional Airport, the Japanese police 
said. 

There were no reports of injuries 
in the explosions, the police said. 


temational reported from Sao Pau- 
lo. 

“We did not talk much about 
Jews, but when we did he would 
not fly into a rage." she said in an 
interview on Brazilian television. 
“He j'usl went totally cold, he said 
they were a people that had no 
reason to be in Germany.” 

Mrs. Stammer said she and her 
husband. Geza. met Dr. Mengele as 
Peter Hochbichlct in 1961 and 
hired him as unpaid live-in manag- 
er of their farm outside Sao Paulo. 

Shortly after, she said, she saw 
his picture in a newspaper and con- 
fronted him with the resemblance. 

“He went white and left the 
room." she recalled. “After dinner 
he asked to speak to me and admit- 
ted his real name was Josef Men- 
gele." 

She said she told Dr. Mengele he 
had to leave. After a few days she 
repealed the request to Wolfgang 
Gerhard, who had originally intro- 
duced the fugitive. Mr. Gerhard 
said, she recalled, that it was “a 
difficult matter" and that he would 
have to consult with West Germa- 
ny. 

Mr. Gerhard, she said, reap- 
peared after about three weeks with 
a man called Hans, threatening 
that the family “knew too much” 
and that their children would suf- 
fer. 

Mrs. Slammer denied she or her 
family were part of a Nazi ring 
protecting war c riminals 

■ ‘Intermediary' De&ds Ms Rde 

Hans Sedlmeier. 72, a man iden- 
tified as an intermediary between 
Dr. Mengele in Larin America and 
the Mengele family said Wednes- 
day in GQnzburg, West Germany, 
lhat he had carried letters to the 
fugitive, but not money. The New 
York Times reported. 

He said he knew Mr. Gerhard, 
whose identity Dr. Mengele is said 
to have assumed, as well as the 
Stammers and the Bosserts, who 



Gitta Stammer, a Hungarian immigrant who testified she 
harbored Dr. Mengele, answers questions in Sao Panlo. 


purportedly harbored Dr. Mengele 
in B razil. 

“Of course I knew all of them.” 
he said, with a hint of pride. 

“But I can’t believe the things I 
read in the paper about myself,” he 
said “Today, for example, I read 
that Gitta said that I had been 
bringing money to Mengele. I 
didn't bring money, I brought let- 
ters from Ms brother. I don't know 
what was in those letters." 

Mr. Sedlmeier refused to com- 
ment on reports that an organized 
network hid Dr. Mengele. But he 
said: “I got no particular happiness 


"With Lufthansa my cargo arrives 
without a scratch.” 


This is an authentic customer statement. 





out of all this. I was an employee of 
the Mengele company.” 

Mr. Sedlmeier's position in the 
Mengele company was procurist, 
roughly translated as “manager” or 
“confidential assistant." He retired 
in 1980. 

Asked whether he had been in- 
formed that Dr. Mengele drowned 
in 1979, he replied: “Well, natural- 
ly, I knew because I got a letter, a 
letter from the Bosserts. My wife 
stupidly kept iL Stupid. I don't 
know why she did it. but that's 
what got us in the end. They came 
here and found iL" 


SALT Rebuff 
By Soviet 
Not Final, 
U.S. Asserts 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
State Department says it does not 
accept as “definitive or final” the 
negative Soviet response to Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s derision to 
abide by the terms of the 1979 
strategic arms agreement, at least 
until the end of the year. 

Mr. Reagan announced Monday 
that be had derided to abide by the 
treaty’s weapon limits, and would 
order the dismantling of a Posei- 
don submarine to stay within the 
limits. He said that future US. 
steps would depend on Soviet ac- 
tion. 

On Tuesday, the Soviet Foreign 
Ministry said that Mr. Reagan ap- 
peared intent on abandoning the 
treaty step by step and that his 
assertion he would continue to 
abide by its terms was a cover for 
“crawling out of die accord." 

The unratified 1979 treaty, 
which sets limits on numbers of 
long-range nudear missiles and 
bombers, has been honored infor- 
mally by both sides. It expires Dec. 
31. 

Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger said Wednesday that 
the Soviet response was “extremely 
disap pointin g " 

“ft certainly does not indicate 
any improvement in their behavior, 
which led to the violations of the 
treaty,” he said. 

Mr. Weinberger, who had urged 
Mr. Reagan to renounce the treaty 
because of purported violations by 
the Russians, said: “They have 
crawled out of the treaty practically 
since the day it was signed.” 

The State Department reaction 
to the Soviet statement was given 
by Edward P. Djerejian, a spokes- 
man. * 

“We hope that the Soviets will 
I respond appropriately,” he said. 


WORLD BME FS-^L 

Reagan Asks Economic Aid for 

WASHINGTON fWF) — President Ronald ggffinSnSaidy “ a 
gress to provide S2S0 million in economic aid ‘“^^T^vard direct peace 
signal of support for King Hussein's efforts to move io**ra 

talks with Israel. w Weinberger. Mr. 

But. despite a plea by Defense Secretary Caspar ■ ^ other 

Reagan agreed with Secretary of' State George JorAui 

advisers that the admimstrauon should postpone _puns mffke 

advanced arms worth up to $750 milliotL Reputiu m-clv , 0 face 
Snarebad warned Mr. Shultz that such a move was likely to race 

congressional defeat at this time. _ . _ Wednesday 

Administration sources said the decisions *” n ^rf r l p r -win should 
after meetings in which Mr. Weinberger argued that Mr. K S™ 
go forward with the arms sale. said, Mr. 

As a result of Mr. Weinberger s intervention, J the 
Shultz was instructed to call Hussein and ask whether the “grjSorted- 
administration to proceed now with the anre sak ptan. Hussem 
ly agreed that it would be better to wait backing, 

regard a request for economic aid as a sufficient gesture or u ■ *&- 

EC Pa rliament Approves ’85 Budget 

STRASBOURG, France CAP) — The Emopein 


ramamemaiy approval, uy a vote ot aja-*u, uw , . a.- 

meat by governments in the European Community to add about zouuon 
European currency nwin (about $1.4 billion) to the common treasury, 
bringing the total to 29.2 billion Ecus. 

In December, the Parliament rqected the Governing Councils pro- 
posed budget because it did not cover 2 billion Ecus m anticipated 
expenditures. The Parliament has operated on month- to- month financing 
since then. More than 70 percent of the 1985 budget will be spent to 
subsidize the production ami exports of farm products and for storage oi 
surplus food. 


“both in Geneva and by rnlrmj> 

corrective action to resolve the var- ^ g»ypi welcomed - a new T«tmrfi peace plan as an “effort to 
wgh aw^iyLt D ^T^ ) |hftrrf ^ Ce advance the peace process," but exp re s sed reservations about parts of the 

5 eoi * e f ■ Pr ^fAbdd Meguid said that Egypt would seek clarifications Cram 
Shultz had urged Mr. Reagan to a ^ out the five-stage peace pfen outlined Monday by the Israel) 

rontmireto^uiebytheMraV.and ^ Sinn^V^/lk^s plan calls for opening direct 

!£t d jj^ p eace ^ with Jonta and Palalmian within 

decision was a defeat forMr.Wtm- ^ ^ Abdd Meguid said, "means that the 

baw and a victory for hfeamltz. Israelis are considering very seriously the neccsaty of a political move on 
■■ **“ u * 4 to Palestinian front, and this is a very encouraging aspect that must be 
explored.” Mr. Abdd Meguid said thaiEgypt b^lr!er£tioiis spedfical- 
about the exclusion from peace talks of the Palestine Liberation 
Organization and the selection of Palestinian representatives. 


Caspar W. 2 Neighbors May Aid Mozambique 

"g g 1 * gg* HARARE, Zimbabwe (WF) — President Samara Machel of MazSm- 
» extremely ^ atletK j ec i a surprise s u m mi t meeting here with the leaders of 

lot indicate Zimbabwe and Tanzania amid reports that the two nations arc cemskier- 
rir behavior military intervention to help Mozambique end an armed rebellion. 

A brief, nonco mmi ttal statement was issued after the four-hour session 
nons or me Wednesday between Mr. Machel, Prime Minister Robert Mugabe of 
_ .. Zimbabwe and President Jnlius Nyerere of Tanzania. Western di p lomats 

trtSimSv said they believed that the three leaders had discussed ways in which 
ioJatirms hv Zimbabwe and Tanzania could militarily assist Mr. Machei in his struggle 
*Thev have a 8 a ^ nst guerrillas of the Mozambican National Resistance movement 
v nractioKv Tbe underscored the deteriorating security situation inside 

ypracucauy Mozambique, where Mr. MacheTs government has been locked in a frve- 
■ntrefleiion ^ ear smi 88^ e with the guerrillas. The resistance movement, winch until 
last year received support from South Africa, has forces operating in all 
tuaspokes- to country’s provinces and in the suburbs of the capital, Maputo. 

rhTsS Egyptian Is Cautious on Israeli Plaiy 


Secretary of State George P. 
iuiltz had urged Mr. Reagan to 


naals have said that the president s 
decision was a defeat for Mr. Wein- 
berger and a victory for Mr. Shultz. 

Mr. Weinberger, who said he was 
satisfied with the decision and had 


satisfied with the decision and had 
no plans to resign, said: 

“I think most of the Washington 
press corps is made up of cx-sports 
writers because they like to phrase 
things in the terms of who w on and jr» 
who losL These very complex issues F OF 
do not lend themselves to that anal- Edwh 

ysis- tosucce 

Another official. Lieutenant been nc 
General John T. Chain Jr. of the air Bolivia. 


For the Record & 

Edwin G. Corr has been nominated as LLS. ambassador to El Salvador, 
tpsucrayd Thomas R P ickeri n g , tiffiWhiteHonve s ai d Mr. P icke ri ng h as 
been nominated as ambassador to Israel Mr. Oar is ambassador to 


force, who is leaving the State De~ The United States detonated two nnrtwir devices in underground tests 
partment after having served as di- Wednesday at the Nevada Test Sle, officials said. One had a yidd of 20 
rector of the Bureau of Politico- , 0 150 kilo tom and die other was under 20 kflotons. (UPJ) 


rector of the Bureau of Politico- t0 150 kilo tom and die other was under 20 kflotons. (UPI) 

Militaiy Affairs, said that if Mr. An agreement on" easing border controls has been reached by West 
Reagan had accepted Mr. Won- Germany. France; Luxembourg, Belgium and .the Netherlands, a Bonn 
berger s recommendation, he pnw-miwpi stud Thffrwfffly The hflconw# effrfftivr 

would have “punched the bubble of immediately, he said. (AP) 


border controls has been reached by West 
wig, Belgium and the Netherlands, a Bonn 


would nave -punenea uw Ductile or 
arms controL" 

“It is awfully hard to have it two 
ways," General Chain said. “You 
cannot stand and accuse someone 
else of cheating and not complying 
with something if you also are 
cheating and not complying.” 

General Chain, who is being pro- 
moted to full general, is taking a 
position at the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization headquarters 
at Casteau, Belgium. 

Mr. Shultz announced Wednes- 
day that he was naming H. Allen 
Holmes, a career diplomat to re- 
place the general. Mr. Holmes has 
been ambassador to Portugal, a 
post to be fflled by Frank Shake- 
speare, a forma' director of the 
UJS. Information Agency. 

■ Soviet Research Reported 


Evidence Barred in Ver Trial 


(Continued from Page 1) the prosecution,” said a forma 
The board's main report named 25 member of the board’s legal paneL 
soldiers and one civilian as conspir- “But now the legal problem of the 
a tore in the assassination. decree has to be faced up to.” 

The prosecution in the trial, in its ruling, the court said: “A 
which began Feb. 22, charged the s tatute cannot take away w hat a 
same 26 persons cited by the board, comtitutionalprovisian gives. If an 
Besides the eight accessories, 17 mdividnalisgiiaranieedby thefim- 
were named as principals and the damental law the right against udf- 
dyilian was charged as an accom- incrimination, that guarantee can- 
p1 ^ . . . not by legislation be proscribed.” 

The prosecution has admitted Except for the sdf-mcriminating 
that its mam evidence against the testimony, the court accepted « 
accessories is their testimony be- evidence the rest of tl» ftto-finding 
fore the citizens board. The tesn- beard’s report 
mony included inconsistencies and 


Todenhftfer a w«t fur contradictions. General Ver, Major 
General Pro^.A. Olivas andthc 


JQigen TodenhOfer. a West Ger 
man disarmament specialist, saic 
Thursday that the Soviet Unioi 


U.S. to Offer 
Arms to India 


tafotataESTuS “ottea^ao^acoBedof TO UHer 

had given research contracts to * ■ ;to imunfcr. 

SancaJie testified befmedK board AtJUS tO III dial 
Associated Press reported from ?*. h* tracking Mr. : 

Bonn. Aquino s movements outside the (Continued from Pace 1) 

Mr. TodenhOfer was quoted as Philippine and the course of b» arms to Pakistan were Raided to 
having said that the Soviet defense protect it againsTS^SS 

minister. Marshal Sergei A. Soko- oU f ^^ice indicated that he AfghSn, Sorirt 

& JSS SKSJSS M. la expected to SSSffljttSRfi 

& a, a., April 26^10 a?s I 'S3-BS?SS: a— sSteStfS 


(Contimed from Page 1 ) 


The prosecution is expected to 
ask the time-judge conn to recon- 

sida its Tilling and^ then, if neces- i2L?2SL« t0 


sary, appeal to the Supreme Court 


nudear 
Mr. I 


The central issue in the ruling is huer that he 

Rubens Painting pSH'ESTSS* £ 

wiSS ssssSff 

ss 3£SS£ 

S,t^ cSriteS 2SJ used against tiJwitness lat- Su^^“ 001 SU, “ ble foc 

Thursday by an unidentified arson- ^al “ « landlocked and 

ist in the Kunsthaus museum. pm ?bSn ofSrokmg the U - S - offi_ 

The Zurich police said they were privilege against sdf-SSSuion SSi ^l-2f^T tt ^ SUrf ^ c Har ’ 
iKrfdmg a young man as a snspect ^ the witness, which none of the ^ 

in the the attack on the 1628 canvas mfliraiy men did. **&- 

by theFtemish pamter. Itdoricted Two pawns did refuse to testify S ^ 


in the the attack on the 1628 canvas nriUtaiy men did. 
by the Flemish p^ter. It depicted Two persons did refuse to testify 

King raihpIY of Sjxuil Guido von before the board. Jos6 Maria SJscjl 
C ast cl berg, president of the a jailed Commonist Party leader. 
Kimslhaus socierv. said the mint- : j._ 1 •' 


SWISS Hanes. crimination. Agapito Aquino, 8 r ^ uJt of 

A police spokesman, Hans younger brother of the slWoppo- &0m country's mfli- 

Huber. said that the suspect was sition leader, refused to testifv he- ilV... ■ , . „ 

drained m a check of viators afta cause his family decided imro par- 

exits from the museum were dosed, ticipate in the formal inatrirv 1185 to Penti^ 

He said that the man did not rany Ndther of them was pimishedfck 

idenuty papers and had declined to declining the board’s request » draw New Ddhi 

make any statements. -This decision is a^ SlSs for S?iSS5 


XSannps ® 

Est. 1971 

Jusi tdl the taxi driver "sank roo doe noo" 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Faikcnrurm Str. 9, MUNICH 

• M/S ASTOR ar sea . 


** to Moscow, 
“otiersecretaiy 
of defense, visaed New Delhi in 
May and was shown tight secnrifct 

deodedafte-Mr. Bde’s ramEl 
tosf°®»« items sou At by New 


• ? 


ly. 

‘i . 


¥ hv»' 

ft 


■v-St:' 


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fw, 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


Page 3 


\i ( if 

"'"St 

■ ■■■ 

' AJj 

" ,1 ">•» Mt 


v.. 




«;« | A|>i ,r „ ves . 85 

• “ ' i>!hccc S _ 

V ’-- v ™ 

- ;-• r tCtts 

.\- 1*. ■ Arthral. WaBter, left, being escorted from ft UjS. federal 

i.vr, ;M jlJJ'jJk! coart In Norfolk, Vir^ma, after a judge dosed Mm bond. 


^ Ma> Aid Mozaxnj,^ 

v \V' v 

'• , 

'• v ; • ..... N .. M *M«k 

•'. •■ ■ 

n. . ’ 1 sxurm 

- . . ", . ,: v 


Labor Calls Tax Plan 
'Unfair to U.S. Workers 


* 1 *iiuliou> on IsraeliR 

y "• ’■ =■; ’ - : Mc;2.V 

” i-2- ; 


•• « ci .j dizz 

•I'T.iIjl Jip' 

•i 1 ' iTti 

i • .. ..... 

— >\ 

•• ■ :• ■■rijros 

i • • • i . j 


ron! 


$*#-*■ «*f?.Uuirs! - • ! s .:':i!r!»<iair‘2S: 

, . . . ... .• • . rd: 

. .. : . . . iSK 


• By David E. Rosenbaum 

A few York Times Sorter 

• WASHINGTON — leaders of 
*• organized labor have called the 
R«q^ adnraristratioa’s tax icvi- 

- sion proposal lmfirirto workers and 
too gmeroos to aKporations and 
wealthy individuals. 

[But die chairmen of two of the 

- largest UJS. companies, General 
Motors Crap, and Bethlehem Sled 
Crap_ endorsed the Reaganplan 
Thursday, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. 

(“We fmri m uc h merit in the 
^president’s tax ref orm propo sa l 
and believe it is sound from a tax 
policy standpoint,” Roger B. 

' ' Smith, rtmfnrom him? chief execu- 
tive officer of General Motors 
Carpi, told die Senate finance 
'• CommitseeL Although the company 
would lose some tax benefits, hie 

- said, “we believe the benefits of a 
healthier economy, resulting from 
rate redaction and increase d fair- 

- ness can o u t w e igh these costs.” 

[Donald H. TV mIMh, efr ai r n mm 

and chief executive of Bethlehem 
Steel Corp-. disputed the idea that 
heavy industries would lose under 
the plan because of repeal of tbe 
investment tax credit. He said that 
^he credit was ‘'concentrated in rd- 
.atrvdy few companies.’*}- . . 

ThetlS. Chamber of Commerce 
Wednesday the priori- 


'Hi. -fUi.i.V , .u ,, »T' * 

; • ’ "** * 
. . .. ■ 

fas.".V" p s 

* • . V 


> Warred in 1 frTr- 


or lake a stand on particular, de- 
ments of h. ’ • 

Also on Wednesday, Senator 
Daniel Patrick Moymhao, Demo- 
crat of New York, said that B a 
proposal to efinrinate tbe federal 
deductioa for state and local taxes 
were passed, there would be a pub- 
. lie dwnor to aa local property tax- 



Conferees Fail 
To Compromise 
; On U.S. Budget 

New York Tima Scnice' 

• • WASHINGTON — Conferees 

- ;from the Boost of Representatives 
and tbe Senate have ran into the 
first snag in their effort to work ont 
■“ a comprcmnse budget plan. 

“I’m not sure we're gDffig to be 
able to get a real budget," Senator 
Pete V. Domemri, chairman of the 
Senate Budget Committee, said 
Wednesday. Senator Domenid, 
Republican ofNew Mexico, said he 
was discouraged dm the conferees 
from tbe Home did not accept Sen- 
ate proposals for fees on certain 


About 
at on 


aesand 
Petroleum 

The proposals azeretadvdy non-, 
controversial, compared with those > 
‘ ' Social Security penams, pro- 
grams far the poor, and mili ary 
spending, r 

Senator Domemri, who conced- 
. ed that he “wasn’t opdmsdc when 
we started,” said be was “getting a 
little more discouraged.” He 
*■' ■ earlier about a possible tax increase 
to cut the deficit, something Preo- 
.. dent Ronald Reagan has said be 
would accept only as a last resort. 

Mr. Reagan on Wednesday 
‘ called talk or a tax increase to cut 
tbe deficit “a joke;” Daring his 
■ .meeting with Rajiv Gandhi, the 
prime nmnster of India, Mr. Rea- 
gan said, “the fact that Pm smiling 
' means that I think ifs a joke.’* 


Mr. Moynihan at a news 
ctmference with representatives of 
education associations. He specu- 
lated that if die federal deduction 
forstateandlocaluneswereribm- 
naxed the avenge school district in 
t h e na ti on aright lose 20 percent of 
its revenues, or $606 for each efe- 
memaiy and seooodaiy school pu- 
pfl. 

popfl was 
itxm in the 
V according to 
Mr. Mkty^tan. Baiinatmg that re- 
peal of the deduction would in- 
crease the real cost of school taxes 
by 40 pocent,he contended that if 
voters accepted only half of such an 
increase, spending would fall by 20 
percent. ■ 

The administration has called 
the federal deduction for state and 
local taxes an unnecessary subsidy 
of some local governments. 




By Ben A. Franklin 

New York Times Sorter 


NORTO^vS^^Arihur Weinberger Backs Execution of Spies 

J. Walker was recruited as a spy for Sw >«i rmmStnk* 

WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger has 
proposed that a way should be found to execute people who passed 
rofliiaiy secrets to hostile powers in peacetime. 

Mr. Weinberger said Wednesday that a committee had been 
formed to study whether U.S. mHiiaiy law should allow such execu- 
tions. A change would not affect the cases of John A Walker Jr. and 
three associates, who arc to be tried in federal, not military, carats. 

[Senator Ted Stevens, Republican of Alaska, introduced iegistatian 
Thursday to make spying punishable by death. United Press Interna- 
tional reported from Washington.] 

Navy Secretary John F. Trhman Jr. said (his week that tbe death 
penalty should be imposed on those convicted of spy charges. 

Mr, 'Weinberger said, “1 like to dunk that perhaps I induced that 
thought” 

“When adrafl what 1 thought should be done if die people were 
guilty, 1 said I thought they should be shot, though 1 supposed 
hanging is the preferred method,” he said. 


ed his confession that in April 1982 
he received 512,000 from ins broth- 
er for copies of classified navy re- 
taken from the YSE Corp. 


the Soviet Union in early Isau, a 
month before he found a job in 
Norfolk with a private navy con- 
tracting concern from 'which he has 
admitted latrino docu- 

ments, a federal affni has testified. 

The agent, Beverly Andress of 
the Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion, said Wednesday that Mr. 
Walker, who retired from the navy 

in 1973 as a COmmodCT , 

was recruited for espionage by his 
younger brother. Jam A. Walker 
Jr„ a retired navy communications 
specialist. 

Both men, alone with John 
Walker’s sot MLchad, a Navy yeo- 
man, and Jerry A. Whitworth, a 
retired navy radioman on the West 
Coast, have been charged trith es^ 
ptoaage. 

Miss Andress testified at a pro-, 
hmmary hearing in federal Hfatrfctl 
coot in which Arthur Walker, 50, 
was dented baiL The agent said her 
testimony was based on a confes- 
sion that Arthur Walker made to 
her on May 24, four days before his 
arrest. 

Under questioning by Tommy E_ 


The bureau said the documents 
were classified as “confidential” 
and were reports an malfunction- 
ing equipment on amphibious 


hfiss Andres testified that Ar- 
thur Walker said he had asked his 
brother what he did^ with the classi- 
fied documents and was told that 
“he delivered than to the Rns- 


Miller, an assistant U.S. attorney. 
Miss Andress testified that Arthur 
Walker told her another » gpnt 

on May 24, when he was ~ 
in t errogated, that in January 1! 
John Walker, 47, bad “suggested” 
to his older brother “that he should 
get a job where he would have ac- 
cess to classified infonnatiou.” 

Records at tbe VSE Corps a mD- 


itaiy contractor that does classified 
research and analysis for bases in 
the Hampton Roads navy complex, 
show that Arthur Walker obtained 
an engineering job in February 
1980 and was dared for acoess to 
classified material. 

According to FBI statements 
fiiwH earlier with the court, Arthur 
Walker’s May 24 statement indud- 


Acconfing to other government 

affidavits, Arthur Walker told the 
FBI that at one print his brother 
urged Mm to “operate like Jesiy,'* a 
who was “malting big bucks” tty 
passing classified navy documents 
m California. 

The FBI said tins was a reference 
to Mr. Whitworth, a longtime 
friend and former shipmate of John 
Walker. Mr. Whitworth was arrest- 
ed June 3 in San Frandsco and 
charged with espionage as the 
fourth member of the alleged spy 
ring. 

Michael Walker, a 22-year-old 
sailor saving aboard the aircraft 


carrier Nimitz in the Mediterra- 
nean when be was arrested, was 
charged with espionage on May 23. 
He and Ms father have pleaded not 
guilty. 

Arthur Walker had an unblem- 
ished record in the navy and a repu- 
tation as a quiet but steady commu- 
nity leader in suburban Virginia 
Beach. 

But in January 1980, an antomo- 
Mle stereo radio sales shop that the 
two brothers incorporated in 1979 
collapsed financially. The Walkers 
were left with unpaid Mils and a 
528,807 lien by the Internal Reve- 
nue Service for unpaid taxes. 

Samuel W. Mc<drins Jr., one of 
two court-appointed defense attor- 
neys fra Armor Walker, told the 
conn Wednesday that the VSE 
Corp. had placed his chan cm leave 
without pay and that his only other 
income was his r et i rement pay of 
about $20,000 a year. 

Arguing for Arthur Walker’s re- 
lease on SoO.OOO bail, Mr. Medrins 
disputed arguments by Mr. Miller, 
tire prosecutor, that Mr. Walker 
might flee to the Sennet Union. 

“He could be of great value to 
any hostile power,” Mr. Mffler ar- 
gued. “He could be an analyst and 
could convey information.” 


“They wouldn’t touch him with a 


10-foot pole,” Mr. Meekins said. 
M 

Swink Jr„ sayi 


But l^S^Magistraie Gilbert R. 
-i saying i 
of tbe United Slat 


_ that “the citizens 
States hare a right to 


be protected." denied bail 


es. Such cuts “would hurt every 
schoolchild in the country,” he 
added. 

Lane Kjridand, president of the 
Americas KtKraiion of Labor and 
Congress of Industrial Oxeaniza- 
- dams, tstffied Wednesday before 
the House Ways and Means Com- 
mittee. He said that scone features 

of the mlniiiwtfatinn , !t plan 

merit, particularly the proposal to 
take most poor people off the fed- 
eral income tax rolls. 

Bat Mr. Kirkland added: “The 
key lest of a' tax xefoun proposal is 
the extent to whkh it dhninkh** 
unfairness toward people who 
work for their money and dhm- 
nates favoritism toward people 
whose money works for them. By 
that test, winch of the president’s 
program falls short.” / 

Mr. KHrlanri and other nwinn 
nffidak who appeared before the 
committee were especially critical 
of proposals to lax workers on a 
portion of the medic al insurance 
’ premiums paid by their employers, 
to reduce the rate of capital gains 
taxation and to repeal the current 
deduction for stale and local tax 
payments. 

While Mr. Kirkland was testify- 
ing, the board 'ofthe-' Chamber of 
Commerce was roeetmg with Trea- 
sury Secretary Jones A.. Baker 3d. 
Lata the board adopted a resolu- 
tion, winch staled: Tbe chamber 
will maintain flexibility while the 
difficult question of fundamental 
tax reform is discussed.” 

Many of the chamber's mem- 
bers, such as those m the service 
industries, would owe tower taxes 

nwtgtte^riimnktm y)n plan (ham 

they do now. Others, emeriaDy 
those who take advantage of invest- 
ment tax breaks in the current law, 

Ridard ^ifxeshcr, the cham- 
ber’s pretident, acknowledge^ that 
the di ffere n t t reatment of indus- 
tries matte it difficult for tie orga- 
nization to arrive at a consensus, 
bol he said that the chamber even- 
r would take a stand as the tax 
t progresses through Con- 



n*ABE>ci*ad Pm 

United Airlines employees attending the AFL-CIO labor convention in Phfiaddphta 
greet the news of a tentative settlement to end the strike by pilots of the airline- 

United Pilots Expected Back al Work Soon 


■ CrmpUcdkr Oer Staff From DdfOKka 

CHICAGO^- United Airlines pilots could end 
their strike and be back in the air within about a 
week if a tentative settlement is approved and if 
the carrier reaches agreement with flight atten- 
dants who have honored the pilots' picket lines, 
union and company officials said. 

The 30- member Master Executive Council of 
the Air Line Pilots Association met Wednesday 
after a settlement was readied with the help of 
federal mediators, but took no action. Tbe council 
was to meet again Thursday to consider tbe tenta- 
tive agreement before pasting it to the membership 
fra ratification. Terms of tbe agreement were not 
disdased- 

The council chairman. Roger HaR said be was 
optimistic that the contract would be approved. 


and a union spokesman. Don Skrados. said the 
•5,200 pitots coo kibe flying again m thrre to 10 
days. But pOols. who went -on strike May 16 in a 
dilute ova a proposed two-tier wage stale, have 
said they wifi not return to work until flight atten- 
dants have worked out conditions for tbar return. 

Industry observers said that United, the largest 
US. airline, was likely to regain its dominance of 
the national industry but would suffer some sub- 
stantial short- term losses. It operated only about 
14 percent of its scheduled flights during tbe strike. 

DeWayne Wjggms, a stoat analyst in Chicago 
with Duff and Phelps Ino, said United had lost a 
share of tbe market and that the strike would have 
“a big impact” on earnings this year. But George 
Neuman, a business professor at tbe University of 
Iowa, said that United's losses would be mainly 
short-term. «• ( UPI. Af) 


U.S. Army Fears It Suffered 
From Navy Espionage Ring 




Plan Would End Tax on Americans Abroad 


By Robert C SLner 

fi Oema&mal Herald Tribute 

WASHINGTON — A three- 
part “Export Efficiency Package” 
that would include a provision to 
eliminate UiL taxes on the foreign 
inco me of Ameri cans abroad has 
been introduced in the House of 
natives. 

introducing the legislation 
Wednesday, Representative Bin 
Alexander, a Democrat of Arkan- 
sas, praised overseas Americans as 
“a valuable trading and strategic 
asset in selling and marketing 
American goods and services 

abroad." 

Currently, Americans who are 
residents of foreign countries can 
exclude 580,000 of forago-earned 
income in determining their tax li- 
ability. 

Tbe package indudes bills that 
would: 

• Base U.S. taxation on resi- 


dence in tbe United States. Under 
this bill American citizens living 
outside the United Slates would 
not be subject to U.S. income taxes 
on any overseas earned and un- 
earned income. The United States 
is the rally major indnstrial natio n 
that holds its citizens liable for in- 
come taxes no matter where they 
live. 

• Give Americans abroad the 
right to elect a n curveting delegate 
in Congress. The District of Co- 
lumbia, Guam, American **amr>a 
and the Virgin Islands have non- 
voting delegates in Congress. 

• Add a provision to the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act to al- 
low children born overseas of an 
American parent with a foreign 
spouse to become American citi- 
zens so long as their American par- 
ent bad lived in the United Slates 
fra at least two years. Under pre- 
sent law, the American parent must 


have lived in the United States 10 
years, at least five after age 14, for 
the child automatically to be a U.S. 
citizen. j 

Mr. Alexander, who is the 
fourth-ranking congressman m the 
House Democratic leadership and 
is a member of the President s Ex- 
port Council, died studies that 
showed “a positive correlation” be- 
tween employment of Americans 
abroad and tbe levd of UJS. ex- 
ports. 

Tbe Export Effidency Package 
drew strong support from Ameri- 
can groups overseas. Andrew A. 
Sandberg, director of American 
Citizens Abroad, a Geneva-based 
group, called the package “step No. 
I toward a return to trade equity.” 

Given the present legislative cli- 
mate, according to congressional 
staff members, it would take a very 


lobbying effort to produce 
any action on the package. 


(Combined from Page 1) 

the marine craps in its damage as- 
sessment.] 

Tbe army tram is working with 
the navy’s, which has been fisting 
what secrets the alleged espionage 
ring was in position to give the 
Soviet Union. 

This effort comes at a time when 
some U.S. officials 'are warning 
that (he damage to national securi- 
ty from tbe ring may extend to 
inlefligcDce activities as well as the 
operations erf the' military. 

The p rim e area of concern, offi- 
cials said, is what the Soviet Union 
learned from intercepting 
and breaking ihrmrgh the 
because of the information alleged- 
ly supplied by the ring. John A. 
Walker Jr. and three other present 
and fanner navy men are alleged to 
have been the members of the ring. 

Admiral James D. Watkins, & 
chief of naval operations, said 
Tuesday that the biggest loss to the 
navy was in communications. He 
said the navy “assumes” that tbe 
Soviet Union broke the codes de- 
signed to scramble me ssages trans- 
mitted throughout the fleet by tde- 
and telephone, 
said the navy was rhang m g 
its secret communications gear on 
an “ accel era ted basis.” 

Navy officials said Mr. Walker’s 
most sensitive jobs, which gave him 
access to coding equipment, were 
at the navy crypto repair school in 
Vallejo, California, in 1963 and as a 
radioman cleared for top-secret 
communications on two nudear- 
powered nrissfle-carrying subma- 
rines from 1962 to 1967. 

Admiral Watkins said the navy's 
most vulnerable period was from 
1962 to 1969, when Mr. Walker was 
in a position to pass tightly guarded 
secrets about military communica- 
tions. gear and submarine equip- 
ment to the Russians. 

When Mr. Walker retired in 
1976, be was a communications 
systems officer in the headquarters 
of the Atlantic submarine fleet in 
Norfolk, Virginia. Also charged in 
tbe case are his brother Arthur, a 
retired navy lieutenant command- 
er; his son Mkhad, a yeoman 
aboard the nuclear canter Nimitz; 
and a longtime friend, Jeny A. 
Whitworth, a retired navy radio- 
man. 

Admiral Watkins said he be- 
lieved that the navy would replace 
coding equipment as pan of the 

Steps taken to m in imize damag e 

Intelligence sources said that, al- 
though the coding equipment of 
which Mr. Walker nan detailed 
knowledge is decades old, its com- 
ponents and operating characteris- 
tics could help the Soviet Union 
penetrate current communications 
security. 

Two framer top UR intelligence 
offiriak d i s agree d in estimating the 
potential loss from com p romised 
communications. 

One said the presumed rixmage 
could have extended throughout 
the government, including top-se- 
cret intelligence channels. He said 
military services and government 


agencies used similar equipment to 
code and decode their messages. 

Tbe other forma official said the 
coding equipment was constantly 
modified to prevent compromise. 
He said that reconstructing the ma- 
chinery would not enable the Rus- 
sians to break the codes. 


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. ^ 22 Baggage Handlers 
Arrested at Heathrow 

rtte .1 mirwttrtf JYrt* 

LONDON — Police at Heath- 
row Airport have arrested 22 bag- 
gage handler, after airline passen- 
gers complained that personal 
i term had been stolen from their 
suitcases. 

The handlers, who all work for 

■ Mate-owned- British Airways at 
Heathrow. 20 miles (32 kilometer.} 

■ _ . wot of London, were being ques- 

■ x ."*iion<d in connection with an al- 

1 legal theft ring, a police spokev 

■ man Mid. The police raided three 
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’ Miarched 200 lockers belonging to 
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Finns Held by Lebanese Militia Say Israelis Watch Over 1 hem 


t 


a m 


Watch far this feature 
every 


MONDAY, 
WEDNESDAY 
& FRIDAY 


By Thomas L Friedman 

Se h York Tima Service 

MARJAYOUN. Lebanon — 
The Israeli Army bas taken foreign 
reporters for a visit to 21 Finnish 
soldiers of the United Nations who 
are being held hostage near here by 
an Israeli-supported militia. 

The hostages, looking fit but 
tired Wednesday, are being held 
about two miles (three kilometers) 
north of the Israeli border in an old 
house with green window frames 
and an orange balcony. The house 
is next to the headquarters of the 
Christian-led mili tia- the South 
Lebanon Army, on the outskirts of 
Maijayoun. 

The' militia was armed by the 
Israelis to police Lhe so-called secu- 
rity zone in southern Lebanon that 
Israel has created along its north- 
ern frontier. 

“The treatment has been not 
bad, not good." said one of the 
Finns, Sergeant Kari Vesa. 24. 
“The Israelis are always around to 
watch over us." 

The F inns said that at least two 
Israeli soldiers were on the scene of 
their confinement at all times — 
not to guard them but to ensure 
that they were being weQ treated. 

"'Now. you see. they are free to 
walk around," said General An- 
toine Lahad. the commander of the 
South Lebanon Army, who led the 





LEBANON / 

/ t 1 






/ atXAit 
f HEIGHTS 


rafWEL 


tour at the behest of the Israeli 
Army escort officers who brought 
the journalists to the site. 

The general gave friendly pats on 
the back to a few of his Finnish 
hostages as he mingled with them. 

“There is no one m prison here," 
he said. “They are our guests." 

Asked what would happen if any 
of his F innis h guests tried to es- 
cape, General Lahad said they 
would be “shot at." 

“The Finns have given their 
word of honor not to try to escape." 
said General Lahad. “But should 
they try to escape, the accepted 
military rules would apply." 


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The South Lebanon Army seized 
the Finns lest Friday in retaliation 
for as incident that day involving 
! I miltfinmwi The mili tia and the 
Israelis assert that the Finns turned 
the 11 over to the Moslem Shiite 
militia Am.il The Finns say the 1 1 
“defected" to the Shiites. 

Efforts to work out an exchange 
of prisoners, including talks Tues- 
day between Undersecretary-Gen- 
eral Brian E. Urquhart of the Unit- 
ed Nations and Israeli officials, 
have been unsuccessfnL 

In Jerusalem, diplomats from 10 
countries that make up the United 
Nations Interim Force in Lebanon 
met with the director-general of the 
Israeli Foreign Mims try, David 
Kimche. and urged that Israel exert 
pressure on the South Lebanon 
Army to free the Finns. 

The militia ori ginall y seized 24 
Furnish soldiers and was reported 
to have threatened to kill one an 
hour until its 11 militiam en were 
freed. The threat was subsequently 
withdrawn and three of (he Funs 
were released. 

A French Army colonel who 
sought to mediate the dispute was 
seized briefly Saturday by the 
South Lebanon Army bat was re- 
leased the same day. 

The F innish captives seemed 
generally bored with the episode 
and largely indifferent to the re- 
porters’ visit They evinced little 
curiosity about how the world was 
viewing their fate. 

“I just have to be out by June 19. 
when my leave starts." said Major 
Osmo Kesu. “My wife is pla nni ng 
to meet me at the Gaza beach dub. 
I don't feel anger. I just want to get 
away from here." 

An Israeli officer on the scene 
said that on Tuesday, when the 
deputy commander of the UN 
forces visited them, the Finns re- 
ceived large quantities of Finnish 
Lahden Export Beer, along with 
Finnish newspapers, magazines 
and letters from home. 

The officer said that much beer 
was consumed by the hostages in 
the hot stm Tuesday, making some 



General Antoine Lahad, right, commander of die South Lebanon Army militia, with some 
of the 21 F innis h soldiers of the UN force in Lebanon who are being held by Ms men. 


of them extremciy uncommunica- 
tive. 

All of the Finns insisted that 
except for some indiscriminate 
beatings by the South Lebanon 
Army immediately after their cap- 
ture. they were being well treated. 

They complained, however, 
about the quality of the food, most 
of it Israeli Army-issue bread, 
meats and fruit along with Leba- 
nese bottled water. The bouse had 
two dtoweis, but the Finns bad 
only the uniforms they were wear- 
ing last Friday: They had steel- 
framed army cots, lined up bar- 


racks-style in several bedrooms, to 
sleep on. 

Several militiamen wearing Is- 
raeli Army uniforms cradled Ka- 
lashnikov rifles and acted as guards 
over the compound. They appeared 
to mix freely with the Finns. 

“We talk with them about poli- 
tics and how their weapons work," 
said Major Kesri. 

Asked why the Finns did not put 


keli said: “I do not want to lose 
my life. I am a UN soldier.” 

The visit to the Finns gave the 


foreign reporters a rare glimpse of 
the “security’ zone" that Israel has 
set up in an strip running five miles 
to nin e miles (roughly eight to 14 
kilometers) north of its border with 
Lebanon — after supposedly hav- 
ing completed pulled out its com- 
bat forces. 

“I am a bit confused. Msg or 
Kesti sahL What was confusing was 
the sight of Israeli .Army officers, in 
the hills of southern Lebanon, tak- 
ing reporters to visit Finnish UN 

troops being held by an Israeli- 
backed militia that Israel says it is 
powerless to influence. 


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AUCTION 


DEVELOPER ORDERS IMMHJIATESALE 
NEW TWO STORY PROFESSIONAL BUILDING 
46,176 SO. FT. ON 2 ACRES 
8080 NORTH STADIUM DRIVE— HOUSTON, TEXAS 
superbly tooted within me Plan Del Ora Business development area in dose 
pnmimKy to the Teas Medical center and Downtown Houston, 
wtttxn a 3 Mock area of the subject property are many medJcafly related 
businesses and insatu tlons as wea as the SMeflOToata Canter, me A str odoma 
and various hotels. 

Some of the p er mitted tees under the protective coven a nts f or Plaza Del Oro 
we: office. commensal research. metical, and Btfitmanufectirtig- a complete 
copy of the covenants wffl be made manatee during the mspeedan periods. 
The aass A quality constructed budding pus land has a currant reproduction 
cost appraisal of S5.45Z.000 with room for ex pan sio n . 

ABSOLUTE AUCTION 

NO MINIMUM BID NO RESERVE 

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This offertnq has been made avaBatee By an qiuete a who is semi-ret i red 
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desire to Dqtfdate many of Ms assets, he has cnoswi the auction technique as 
the most expecS en r mann er in whfcft to sea one of ftte major hoteflngiL 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 2.-00 P.M. 

Sale On The Premises 

BROKBI COOPERATION INVTTB) 

To obtain auction catalogue and ternn of sale, can or write: 
MSdnelW. Johnson 
WTBWARK REALTY COMPANY 

3000 Wfeslayan, Suite 1T1. Houston, Texas 770Z7 
(800) 833-4353 Texas (800) 237-3579 USA (713)627-8080 

Sate Conducud By *1ir*m1t i m ftrn1tiiih 

XBMETH A. LIPTOH, BROKER HflUMIHIOE XOCIXM C0WMY 

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Reunion at the UN: 11 Familiar Faces 

General Assembly Presidents Reminisce, Look to Future 


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Two holiday cottages. Trout Loch and Roe Deer Stalking. 

FOR SALE AS A WHOLE OR IN 3 LOTS 

SAVK1S, 46 Charlotte Square, Edinburgh EH2 4HQ. Tel: 031-226 6961. 


g Cs&'jibibecnn homes/ 
}“ land, businesses 

: ?5JKK et listings wtt ptx*>* j" 

L' r-vMi’Ky jdnn d -byfc iilcut XfP** 
k currant news an ltUinajMt* 

C li=. -Mxnocrry, taxlo»w,qu*«yef®W 

L «Tio lo contact when to be — f-. 
Cur nit mrit i m also aatV *we»8* 


l; vn s-vd, hatals/ rocorts, ... 

K “T* 1 more. Send $3.00 
EJ" - MUS new bulletin: “3 blends. 

I W “ Invectmant in ’85." 

S Properties Report 

Bo. 58 HTi 2 Route 4 , 
■’■sodiiod., Vormonf 05091 


I URGENTLY NEED 
INVESTOR (S460000.-) 
to take over 
Property, Building 
& Business 
Total value SI. 000.000.- 
Nice. France 
(for family reasons) 

For details, contact: 

Mr. Mm&d 
c/o Scbldpfcr agency 
Hotiingrrsira&se 44’ 

8032 Zurich. Switzerland. 
Telex: 54311 

Transaction a g ree m ent accepted. 


ITALY 


18th century 
TUSCAN HOUSE 

Plu* 155 acres wood CHIANTI 
area. Beautifully renovated 15 
roams, 3 bathrooms, telephone, 
eentrol heating, 3 nrepfocn, in 
midst of breathtaking, quite 
landscape of chestnuts, of oaks 
and olive trees. 

U-S. 5300 Yearly taxes. 

One hour from Florence and 
Siena. Ideal for stylish country 
living and excellent investment. 

U.5. $275,000 

P.O. Box 1125, Florence, 
or coll 055/ 244456. 


MONTANA LAND 


20 Iw more) Parting at SI 2-500 with 5175 down, SI 75.05 per month. 

^ “vtitul Yellowstone Per* and national forests. Abundant wWifc — 
rJIZiSX onW °P" Blue ribbon trout stream. Guaranteed ac cess . 

D ™' T ” i ™^*“ 

Caa 1^7 TO H^. 1 -aoo^si.5263 - YH1GWSTONE BASiN PROPB1TIB 
' ' 1 WNarft 7* Avwwa, Dipt. HT, P.O. Box 3027, 

L — , Montano 59^^047 - (406)587-5469: 



MALLORCA'S NEW 
SUPER PORT 

In Sw tsar of Mno. 5 mrs. Petal 15 wns. 
arpen. £64 bells 8 w 38 n*m, rbugntO 
mom each. Infadud TV.aars. MHr/picnr 
armcm PrafeEBonct pat oaiQQeiws as 
Fid now lervcn. tar, nsda 4c. ewettrr. 
epo r. W canon, in & auxtao mv lull 
tana. Underground 3* pari. Lockn. Caicfe- 
menaxj tevoi & bsurr f jutons ra£cd, bCrSi- 
ni itaP'S naneri^, — munnvr. Celt & 
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on 13.1 71 upn. n aS Hut 31 njp-r q a e r toem 
oboni & 7B e HtxvcH bon cantfc 31 in feoff 
he dong nan pen. Too n aue i t 45% idd 
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diiw I c pB i e 

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Director Commerc i al 
C'Manna 101, Portah Nous 
Mo5orca. Spain or The. 68666 CAUU L 


||[| California 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


Eight hundred ninety 
acres prime California real 
estate tor sale. Located 
north of Los Angeles and 
in dose proximity to the 
Pacific ocean. 

Suitable far investments, 
agriculture or development. 

Price $20 million U.S. 
Please contact- 
Box GP-105 

360 Lexington Ante., tan nr 
New 'fork, NY 10017 


- SWITZERLAND • 


Montreux-Geneva Lake 
APARTHOTEL BON IV A RD 

For sale luxurious apartments, 
from 1 to 5 rooms, overlooking the 
prettiest port of Geneva Lake. 
Prices: S.Fr. T 23,000 incl. equip- 
ment and furniture. 

60% mortgage available ot 
6 Vj% interest. 

_ Please contact the Builder- 

REGIE DE LA RIVIERA S.A. 

32 avanua du Casino 
1820 Mantreui-Switserfand 
Tel.: 021/635251 

.. Tnla«- 25873 or8 dt. 


piwMRrn 

INQUE & LUXURY PROmiES 
Fairfield County, Ct., USA 

“MARGATE” 

Block Rack Harbor, Ct. 

Fabulous renavceed Brick Georgian with 
brilfecnt walavrws 18 roorm. 7 bed- 
rooms, Wi baths. 25‘kW Sving room/fpl, 
fame* dnmg roam/Fpl, paneled Sb/FpL 
Mb' equipped "SPA" area with hat hib, 
steam 6 sauna roams. 

Wografic e nl mcWleetural dead, fine an- 
tique & period pieces combine with lhe 
ukimate in modern foaknes. 

Pool 2 bedrooms caretaker's apt. 
FWnhed — $ 2 ^ 00 , 000 . 
Unfumehed— SI.BtXWOO. 

Donna Safcano, Mg-. 203^556841 

“RIVER VIEW” 

Westport# Ct. 

15 rooms Gone English Tudor af store 
wbh a sk*c roof. 4 Eandy bedrooms, 41e 
baths. 5erwrff'j wng of 4 rooms, bath. 3 
car garage. BeouafuAy landscaped pool 
omidsf a waBed formal garden & sumr 
terraces. Magnificent wrought iron, 
pegged floors & mned pareGng. 
$1,225,000 

Joan OHwrfer. Mgr. 203/2274341 

BROCHUBE5 ON REQUEST 
Jessie G. Ferris, Director 
2537 Post Rood, FaifieU. O. 06430 
203-2556841 

WL1I0 MB4I/EB1 

■■ PFW. ESWF 1 


Our next rubric on 

REAL ESTATE 
in the South 
off France 
& Monaco 

will appear on June 21. 
For infnrnution. pleatie contact: 

Dominique Bouvet, 
International Herald Tribune, 
181, Are. Chuies-dc-GaoIle, 
92521 Ne Hilly Cedex 
Tel. (1) 74-7.12^5. 
T^les. 513 S9-". 


By Elaine Sciolino 

New York Tima Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — “There was no south, there 
was no north, no east and no west 
— just the 11 apostles," said Paul 
J.F. Lusaka, president of the Gen- 
eral Assembly , as he surveyed the 
scene with satisfaction. 

Mr. Lusaka, a Tamilian, was re- 
ferring to a conference that 
brought together the present and 
former General Assembly presi- 
dents for the first time in United 
Nations history. 

For a two-day meeting that end- 
ed Monday, be and 10 of his prede- 
cessors talked about old times and 
plotted strategy on bow to make 
the much-maligned forum work 
better. 

At the end of their sessions 
reached what is becoming a fi 
iar conclusion as the world organi- 
zation approaches its 40th anniver- 
sary on Oct. 24. Despite its 
shortcomings, they derided, the 
General Assembly “has become a 
true mirror of the world.” giving 
nations a necessary forum to speak 
their peace. 

The presidents recommended 
leaving the UN Charter un- 
changed, but called far theoiganizr 
ing of assembly sessions so that 
heads of state could hold summit 
meetings on specific subjects dur- 
ing the general debate. 

They suggested that the assem- 
bly's general debate concentrate on 
one or two broad global issues, 
such as preventing nudearwar, dis- 
annaxnenu north-south coopera- 
tion, work! debt, famine, the envi- 
ronment, population control or 
ways to improve the functioning of 
the United Nations. 

Twenty-three of the 39 presi- 
dents are still alive, but some were 
unable to attend because of ill 
health and others because of com- 
mitments, Four did not reply to the 
invitation. 

Participants said that the confer- 
ence, winch was attended by three 
West Europeans, three East Euro- 
peans, one Latin American, two 
Arabs and two Africans, was 
marked by elements distinctly Lack- 
ing at General Assembly sessions: 
short, dosed meetings, an absence 
of tension and a warm, familial 
atmosphere. 

In the hall outside a basement 
conference room, a former Italian 
prime minis ter, Amint ore F anFnni, 
embraced a former Algerian for- 
eign minister. Abddaziz Boute- 
flika. 

During their one-year terms, 
these diplomats steered the Gener- 
al Assembly through some of its 
stormier debates, and some of their 
decisions still reverberate through 
the General Assembly halL 

For Mr. Bouteflika the year was 
1974-75. His memories included a 
decision that South Africa could 
not mkg pan in any subsequent 
assembly proceedings <a ruling still 
in force), the assembly's appeal for 
a new international economic order 
and a visit by Yasser ArafaL 

Mr. FanfanL who presided over 
the 20th anniversary of the United 
Nations in 1963. said that many of 
the criticisms of the assembly had 
□ot changed in the last 20 years. 
“So we’re celebrating the 40th an- 
niversary not with champagne but 
with the identification of ways to 
make (he UN even more effective," 
be said. 


LLK-, Mexico Set Trade Deals 

Reuters 

LONDON — Britain an- 
nounced Thursday trade and in- 
vestment deals with Mexico worth 
about 5115 milljon in what was 
described as a show of confidence 
in the economic policies of Presi- 
dent Miguel de la Madrid, who is 
visiting nene. 


The 77-year-old- Italian, who is 
still active in politics at home, remi- 
nisced about the meetmg hrid in 
his office between the Soviet for- 
eign minister, Andrei A Gromyko, 
and Pope Paul VL 

West Germany’s cu rre nt ambas- 
sador to Britain, Rudiger von 
Werfmtar, recaDed taking part in a 
decision daring his term in 1980 
that was nnpanttteied in UN histo- 

ry- 

When a regional caucus reached 
an in its search for a candi- 

date for assembly president, he was 
asked to settle the dispute by pick- 
ing his successor’s name from a 
sealed envelope in a box. 

Assembly presdeots are sop- 
posed to remain completely neu- 


tnd, and Mr. von Wechmar wou ■ 
far as to withdraw from his post as 
West Germany’s UN representa- 
tive and arited to receive no official 
messages from Bonn. 

The group agreed that the Gen- 
eral Assembly W a useful func- 
tion. although there was talk of a 
need for improvement 
Mr. Bouteflika said, “It’s stiH the 
only place in the worid where small 

rY Bm frTgy ran mm* .-»tv 1 yfft»rn p f (g 

explain fa” 1 problems." 

The biggest problem, said Mr. 
ion Wedunar, is “a loo-kmg agen- 
da, too many resolutions, too midi 
paper, too long speeches — too 
much of e vgythiu g." 

“Cut the fat,** he counseled, “cut*, 
the faL” 






mi . l.w-i ;■ . 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


Page 5 


JBB? 


• 


Polish Plan 
Would Curb 
Academic 
Freedoms 


gpf : v 


i « k 
2 «vv.. 4,u, 


V? By Michael T. Kaufman 

/ _ AW V«i Tuna Service 

,'-.V iS . " WARSAW — The Polish gov- 

Ly'.; ££■£’ : 1 ernment has announced proposed 

-V. .. £ : 53*xz\_ _ -i steps to curb academic freedom, 
’-'i |* and the minister of higher edoca- 
r , ft tion has defended them as neces- 
*• [| sary retreats forced by the “anti- 
T H s jF ■ state” and “anti-Socialist” 
TWlkgr w I activities of souk university circles. 

Amendments in the tmivercity 
ff law, aD of which arc virtually cer- 
™ t° be approved by parliament; 
t B call Tor greater supervision of uni- 
S™^2ggq| versity life by the Ministry of ffigh- 
JM er Education, fimhafion of tenure 
~ junior faculty members, re- 

duced participation in univershy 
self-government by students and 
non teaching imiveraty employees 
and the reuuroduction of loyalty 
‘■ St,!!S * * in, ijuiiti. „■ * oaths to Communist precepts. 

1 jr ‘‘ The amendments to the Higher 

''J Education Act, over the opposition 
of university senate resolutions and 
• j:i . ^ disapproving petitions, represent 
■ i one of several tough new measures 
’ •.-:.r-|? introduced by the government 
- -A kS since the visit to Poland in April by 
. • Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
leader. 

■ • «. - ,v‘ u J? \ Since then, the penal code has 
"* ^ ' k ooen made more stringent, food 



Italian Referendum: Shift in Party Power 


mm 


The Solidarity activists at the beginning of their trial in Gdansk. They are Wladyslaw 
Frasyirink, branded in (he foreground, Adam Micfanik on the right, Bogdan Us in the rear. 


some of the academic rights guar- 
anteed in a law governing universi- 


if not the details, of the proposed membership in campus Comma- 
changes, the onrvenatv senate over- nisi organizations fell- 


lies that was passed in 1982 after whelming] y 


senate over- nisi oiganizauons ieu. 
a resolution ■ Unionists State Innocence 


• .. -j J c 1 ^ Since then, the penal code has the introduction of martial law. at the end of last month declaring solidarity leaders made 

J ^cceo made more stringent, food ^ ^ time, the university law changeswere intended to de- losing statements to a court 
.... prices have been increased, diss- was rxwted to by the Polish leader, pnve the unrversity of “its rtgftt to saying they were not 

•' .Indents now on trial have been General Wmdah Jaruzelski, as formulate subjective perceptions, goaty of charges of inciting unrest 

\rr;‘5. threaten £ d with much harsher sen- proo f that liberalization would Under ihe 1982 law, university -and illegal union activities and they 


• ^ ‘ threatened with much harsher sen- 
i. ... j V' : v tences any handed down in 
. V- p*’ the last two years and a historian 
. >. has been. dismissed from his job for 


proof that liberalization would Under the 1982 law, university and illegal union activities and they 
continue despite the crackdown on self-government began to cover called their trial unfair, The Associ- 
the Solidarity union movement. « p>»»h as curricula and univer- ated Press reported from Gd ans k. 


Also, a Communist Party confer- 
ence began Wednesday to discuss 
■ ways of spoiling recruitment of 


« i , > , party workers m a com 

r aimhar Face rMK 


ist two years and a histman ^ s 0 |j ( j ai ity union movement. such issues as curricula and univer- ated Press reported from Gdansk, 

, j at dismissed from ms job for ^ a>w*> disclosed sitymanagemenL Students were no Poland. 

, his political views. tniimwmitvdianaffloKafewdavs |n n H^ iVKlSftrf m inky courses in After hearing brief statements 

*■ ^ nfer " am. at a meetina with the deputy Marwsm-fenmism, but could from the defendants, Adam Micb- 

pSic Mieczyslaw r 2 choose any of several philosophy mk, Bogdan Lis Md Wladyslaw 

of spurring recruitment ett f ‘ u “^’ 3 ootiOTS. Frasymuk, Judge Krzysztof Zien- 

workers m a country where kowskl ■ _ mk said the verdict would be an- 

ything people prefer the Ro- According to sources m the War- Similarly, students were given 

Cathofir. Churtm to the mime saw Universitv senate, the changes choices of several economics dec- a •w.in/wi 


party workers in a country where kowsh. 
most young people prefer the Ro- According to sources in the War- 

man Catholic Church to the ruling saw University senate, the changes 
Communist Party. ■ were read a few days earlier to the 


several economics dec- 


Bv E.J. Dionne Jr. 

iVcw VofA Times Service 

ROME — The victory of Prime 
Minister Bettino Crari’s govern- 
mem in a referendum this week 
marked an important shift in the 
balance of political power in Italy 
and the rmhght of a period of 
Communist assertion, Italian polit- 
ical leaders said. 

As they maneuvered to take what 
advantage they could, politicians 
said that the victory was likely to 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

give the government a freer hand in 
economic policy, a belief that sent 
the stock market here soaring. 

They said that the result would 
force the Communists to reassess 
their strategy of confrontation and 
would strengthen the five-party 
governing coalition led by Mr. 
Craxi, a Socialist, and dominated 
by the Christian Democrats. 

The 54-to-46-percent defeat 
Monday of the Communist-spon- 
sored referendum on Italy's system 
of indexing wages for inflation is 
likely «o have its greatest effect on 
the Communis l Party itself, offi- 
cials said, since the Communists 
also lost ground in nationwide local 
voting last month. 

Mr. Craxi exulted Tuesday night 
that the result of the voting was the 
paradoxical product of the aggres- 
sive policy by Communists against 
him and his government. “The gov- 
ernment is stronger, thanks to 
those who wanted to weaken it," he 
said. 

“It's the second defeat in a row 
for the Communist Party” said 
Antonio Del Peunino. deputy 
chairman of the centrist Republi- 
can Party. “And it's a defeat for the 
hard line the Communists have 
chosen in these past months." 

The referendum was seen as a 
Communist attack on the political 
weak pant of the government's 
economic policy. The Communists 



V;;i y 


j. 




* ' v. 



tnfti 

Bettino Craxi 

were seeking 10 restore wage in- 
creases cut by the government from 
the system of automatic pay raises 
— known as the serin mobile, or 
escalator — designed to compen- 
sate for inflation. 

The government had reduced the 
increases in an effort to control 
inflation. The Communists said 
that the cuts were unfair to workers 


and that they expected to ride pop- 
ular discontent to victory. 

“When the scab mobile was cut, • 
the protest was really enormous 
and popular opinion was on our 
side,” said Mauro Casi&gno, a 
spokesman for the Communist Par- 
ty’s economic department. “When 
we designed the referendum, we 
were sure of a victory. Tbe problem 
was that the referendum was de- 
signed six months ago.” 

The government, by winning 54 
percent for what was once thought 
of as an unpopular decision, estab- 
lished clearly that it has a strong 
base of popular support, according 
to its supporters. The victory came 
on top of a 58-percent showing by 
the five coaliuon parties in last 
month's local voting. 

Two events turned the tide to- 
ward the government, according to 
political leaders in Rome. 

The first. Mr. Castagno said, was 
a improvement in the economic sit- 
uation. The second was the declara- 
tions by Communists that they 
would seek a share of power if they 
did well in the local voting and the 
referendum. “That scared people,” 
said Mr. Del Pennino. 

The Communists, according to 
Mr. Del Pennino. do best as a pro- 
test party in alliance with other 
groups. But a majority of voters 
'still are wary of allowing them into 
the national govern ment 

The Communist Central Com- 
mittee met Wednesday to discuss 
the results, and one member said he 
expected the party to enter a diffi- 
cult period of reflection. The Com- 
munists have publicly pointed to 
the substantial affirmative vote as 
providing a lai£e base of support 
for their opposition to the govern- 
ment.. 

They have also noted that their 
side, partly because of high rales of 
abstention, managed to win in sev- 
eral southern provinces that are 
among Italy's poorest- These tradi- 
tionally conservative areas voted 


strongly for the government parties 
a month ago. but may have been 
making an economic protest in the 
referendum. 

Still. Communists and their sym- 
pathizers have acknowledged that a 
change of strategy is in order. 

The referendum results were es- 
pecially heartening for Mr. Craxi 
himsdf. who promised to resign if 
the referendum was approved. In 
the view of his supporters, his vic- 
tory immenselv strengthened his 
hand. 

On the labor from, the referen- 
dum divided the Communist-led 
General Confederation of Italian 
Worker* from the other two big 
union federations, and even the 
confederation found itself split. 



210 bis Rue de Paradis 
75010 PARIS 

(thru the archway) 

Tel.: 770 64 30 

Mien in Paris... 
visit our Museum 
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Open Monday - Friday 
9 a.m, to 6 p.tn. 

Saturday 10- 12 a.m. -2-5 p.m. 
Abo in selected Mora 
near your home. 
Catalogue on request 




ft ill j w - ? - / j tt »/■ * L'lih.w Benon Miskiewicz, the minister chancellors by Mr. Rakowsb, but “Socialist economy as a required ^ Frasyniuk and four Years each ttv r* i n 1 p ti r rt 

mtllM i . 1 dttil, [o rut\ift of higher education, conceded they said Ihe text was read so fast course. There was also a dechne m jJ^Enik and Mr. Lis. ID Card FrODOSed IOT OlltlSh r-BIIS 

.k., ik. ~r ik. ,h,t tVioimn>n>nnihlFfnrnVf>nnipt ihp mimtvr nf ^ndenls lakinE Rlis- _ . , , , ... IT 


Wednesday that the effect of the that they were unable to take notes, the number of stndents lairing Rus- ^ defends are charaed with 
: >nendments would be to restrict After being told of the direction, sum language courses, and the union activities and inciting 

— — dvfl unrest by issuing a call for a 

15-minute strike in February to 

Agca Says P-2 lodge Tried to Free Him EtHySSS 


. .l'“‘ By Michael Dobbs 

" ~ Washington Pan Service 

■ ROME — - The Turkish gunman 

■ -?who shot I^)e John Paul uin May 

■ -1981 said Thursday dial a rightist 

Italian Masonic lodge had attempt- 


aUesed Bulgarian and Turkish ac- -j „ .- , 

coSuces in the papal plot ended Agca marked the first time that the Western reporters were barred 

its third week. Mramet Ali Agca pope’s assailant has mentioned the from the courtroom. Family mem- 
h* a«c mnvtnrwt that the Masonic lodge known as Propamn- bers and legal sources dose to the 


sh ac- Thursday’s testimony by Mr. ed to increase prices gradually. 
widfd Agca marked the first time that the Western rqjorters were bai 


said he was convinced tiiat the lad- Masonic lodge known aj 
napping victim was still alive. He daDue,<x P-2, which ga 
wm referring to the Emanuda Or- to one of postwar Ital 
landi, 15 , who disappeared June 22, political scandals. The 


Masonic lodge known as Pmpagan- here and legal sources close to the 
da Due, or P-2, which gave its name case briefed correspondents on the 
to one of postwar Italy's greatest proceedings. 


The Associated Pros 

LONDON — Britain’s miflisler 
of sports. Neil MacFarlane,.said 
Wednesday tbe government would 
encourage the country’s 92 profes- 
sional soccer clubs to require iden- 
tity cards for fans as a way to 
identify hooligans and stem vio- 
lence. 

The proposal was in response to 
the rioting May 29 at Brussels m 
which British fans attacked Ital- 


ians. causing panic, the collapse of 
a wad and the trampling of specta- 
tors. Thirty-eighi people were 
killed and 454 injured. 

British soccer officials met 
Wednesday for 90 minutes with 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher 
and other government ministers. 
Mr. MacFarlane said he would 
meet with soccer officials next 
week to discuss an ID plan. Parlia- 
ment can legislaie ii if necessary. 


GIVENCHY 

GENTLEMAN 

1985 Collections Sale 

Large Sizes A/ailable Too 

Boutique 

29 avenue George V- 75008 Fferis 
Telephone: 720 9013 


sizing the kidnapping of the 
.'daughter of a Vatican employee 
• - -because this organi z a tion knew 
with certainty that I am Jesus 
c?*risL" . . 

Giving evidence as the trial of his 


1983. 

Despite a series of mest 
from a group calling itself 


described by an Italian parliamen- 
tary co mmis sion as a land of “stale 
within a state” that exercised great 



Toridsb Anti-Christian Liberation influence until its leading members 
Front demanding her exchange for were uncovered in 1981. 

Mr. Agca, there is no firm evidence Soviet bloc propagandists and 

that the gjri is still alive. leftist Italian newspapers have sug- 

' gested that Mr. Agca might have 

been persuaded to name the three 
Bulgarian defendants in the pre- 
sent trial by circles connected with 
P-Z 

Testifying on his sixth day in the 
witness stand, Mr. Ag*» said: “It is 

, " certain that OrlandS is alive. She 

j?i was certainly kidnapped by the 

v : powerful Masonic organization, P- 

*•; Z of Lia’o Gefli, because this orga- 

'! . aeration knew with certainty that I 

d am Jesus Christ 

*j ‘They wanted to insert me into 
! the Vatican and use me as an in- 
strument But I am for all of hu- 
manity. I am not an instrument I 
respect Italian democracy and 1 am 
not in favor of any exchange. This 
* is tbe truth.” 

Judge Severino Santiapichi inter- 
rupted: “Let’s leave aside your di- 
vine powers.” He did not seek to 
v • explore Mr. Agca’s allegations 

about P-2. 


North Korea: 
War’s Legacy 

(Continued from Page 1) 

in the North — but publicly, at 
least, there is total confidence that 
his plan will prevail 

At the same time, officials here 
seem aware that a burden of dis- 
trust must be cleared away if the 
72-year-old Kim or Kim Jong U. 
his son. 4Z whom he has nominat- 
ed as his successor, are to see the 
country reunited. 

Bringing American correspon- 
dents hoe seems related to this. 
North Koreans who do business in 
the West say they are hoping (hat 
trade with the United States, cur- 
rently nil, will develop to fadp 
break down “hostile feefings.” 

A visitor can see quickly that the 
distrust is not all on one side. Sus- 
picions of foreigners, especially 
Americans, are dose to tbe surface, 
fostered by decades of propaganda 
that have told Noth Koreans to 
watch fa foreign subversion. Hotel 
waiters, tourist guides and shop as- 
sistants' make efforts to be friendly 
to visitors, but conversations are 
restricted to routine affairs. 

When a viator asks about crime 
in the capital, an official replies 
that there are no thieves but that 
the security police still occasionally 
catch “spies.” The remark is made 
with a smile, but seems intended to 
make its mark. 

Establishing contact with the 
people seems virtually impossible. 
Daily itineraries are tightly sched- 
uled with little free time, and the 
hotel at which Westerners are 
lodged sits in a willow-fringed park 
alongside the Poien River, a long 
walk to the city center. Even walks 
to the river bank to watch fishing 
and canoeing are escorted, and it is 
plain that any attempt to head for a 
solo trip into town would not be 
welcome. 


The Intemationaf Herald Tribune's daily paid circulation continues to break records, up 5% in the 
past year and 24% in the past four years. More than a third of a million people in 1 64 countries 
around the world now see each issue. And latest figures indicate that this rapid grov/th continues. 


International Herald Tribune circulation 
figure prepared for OJD audit for period 
from January 1 , to December 31, 198-4. 



















31 iKj 


Page 6 


FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL 



■— and TV ffaJuagton Pot 

Inhumanity in Congress 


tribune, Most Wars Seem a Good Idea at the Time 


Anyone truly concerned about reducin g in- 
fant mortality and other suffering in the devel- 
oping world knows how important a contribu- 
tion voluntary family planning programs can 
make to that effort. Unfortunately, under cov- 
er of protesting against reported instances of 
infanticide and coerced abortion in China, 
oppo nents of family planning progr am* have 
been promoting vaguely worded amendments 
that would effectively block U.S. support for 
this essentia] humanitarian aid. 

Concerned legislators in both Houses — led 
by Senator Nancy Kassebaum and Represen- 
tative Olympia Snowe — know that the 
amendments pushed by Senator Jesse Helms 
and Representatives Jack Kemp and Chris 
Smith are neither necessary nor suitable for 
preventing U.S. aid from flowing to any such 
coercive programs. Senator Kassebaum and 
Representative Snowe are sponsors of amend- 
ments that would block any U.S. money from 
flowing directly or through other agencies to 
Chinese population programs. Senator Daniel 
Inouye is offering proposals that would deal 
still more directly with any abuses in China. 

Foes of family pl anning will not settle for 
these strong but straightforward measures. 
Senator Helms has already succeeded in add- 
ing language to the Senate foreign aid reautbo- 
mationbUi that would end all support for UN 
population programs despite the fact that the 


Reagan administration has twice reaffirmed 
that no UN money is used for any abortion- 
related activities. Representative Smith will 
attempt to add even more damaging amend- 
ments to the House reaulhorizaiion measure. 

Representative Kemp has added seemingly 
innocuous language to a House supplemental 
appropriations bill that, according to his stat- 
ed interpretation of its meaning, would also 
cut off the LIN programs that are the main or 
only source of population aid for many of the 
poorest countries. Still another Helms ploy, 
unsuccessful thus far. defines abortion — not 
jusL coerced abortion but any legal abortion as 
practiced in the Linited Slates. Europe or any- 
where else — as a human rights violation that 
the president could combat with the full force 
of his constitutional powers. 

Most senators and representatives under- 
stand that U.S. aid for foreign population 
planning is actually one of the best ways of 
reducing traditional reliance on abortion and 
infanticide. But. through a combination of 
inattention and fear of being branded as baby- 
killers by the religious right, many have looked 
the other way while Senator Helms and his 
allies have tacked on their destructive amend- 
ments. These legislators may find this behavior 
convenient but their consciences should re- 
mind (hem that it is also cowardly and crueL 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Finding Mengele Matters 


Does it really, matter whether some bones 
and teeth are the remains of Josef Mengele? 
Forensic studies may or may not confirm his 
son's claim, which is suspiciously convenient 
that the Nazi criminal died six years ago in 
Br azil. They will not resolve the wider ques- 
tion: Why keep hunting for the old men who 
once ran Hitler's murder machine? Tba( evil 
empire lies buried and its former servants pose 
no further threat Even if Josef Mengele. the 
barbarous "angel of death" at Auschwitz, is 
still alive, it is as a reclusive fugitive. Yet they 
should be bunted down, ft does matter. 

To take the question at its narrowest. Dr. 
Mengele is a fugitive from justice in West 
Germany, subject to deportation from Brazil 
or wherever. But he is not simply an escaped 
murderer. He butchered tens of thousands and 
performed gruesome so-called medical experi- 
ments on his vic tims . To shrug him off as a 
harmless old man shrugs off the crime and the 
world's debt to his victims. 

The United States bears a special obligation 
because it lei a number of war criminals slip to 
safety through its refugee programs after 
World War II. In 1979. after that sorry story 
became known, the Justice Department creat- 
ed an Office of Special Investigations to give 
chase. Under Allan Ryan, its first director, the 
office tracked down and deponed former Na- 


zis living under assumed identities. It exposed 
the shameful postwar recruiting of war crimi- 
nals by American intelligence agencies, among 
them KJaus Barbie. With strong congressional 
support, the search continues. 

Some people argue against the program, 
saying that the former Nazis have led quieL 
productive lives and probably suffer with pun- 
ishing memories. Mr. Ryan argues otherwise: 
**l see no evidence that any of these men have 
been slightly discomfited, let alone tormented, 
by their actions in the past ... I know of 
ao Nazi war criminal who has come forth to 
say, 'At last you have found me oul Let me 
unburden my conscience.' " 

Should there not be a statute of limitations 
for crimes of so long ago? No. As Mr. Ryan 
rejoins, that would dimmish (he nature of the 
crimes. As long as the war criminals survive, 
they need to be confronted with their deeds, 
reinforcing memory- That need is dramatized 
by the residents of Dr. Mengele's hometown in 
Bavaria: He may have been a bad man. they 
say. but that was 40 years ago. and besides, 
didn’t the Americans kill a lot of people by- 
bombing Dresden? The pursuit of justice is not 
just a service to the pasL Present and future 
generations will benefit if butchers are hunted 
to the end of their days. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Love and Common Sense 


When she was four weeks old. a baby named 
Mary Anne Monahan was adopted by Julia 
and Joseph Quinlan of Morris County. New 
Jersey. They christened her Karen Ann. She 
lived for 31 years, the last decade of which 
entailed nothingness for her and an extra- 
ordinary ordeal for her parents. 

The Quinlans —mother, father, Karen .Ann 
and two younger children — lived what might 
be called an ordinary life until Karen Ann was 
20. Then she was laid off from her job. began 
to drift a bit and drink a biL Plenty of 20-year- 
olds do that: it is often pan of growing up. 
Karen Ann never finished growing up. One 
day she mixed alcohol and tranquilizers, and 
her life, at least her sentient life, was over. 

When Karen Ann entered her fifth month of 
irreversible coma. Mr. and Mrs. Quinlan asked 
that their child's respirator be disconnected. 
Let her be allowed to die. they asked the court 
“with grace and dignity." A Superior Court 
judge refused their request but the New Jersey 


Supreme Court upheld it in a landmark deci- 
sion. As long as medical authorities saw “no 
reasonable possibility" that Karen Ann would 
recover, the court said, her interest in having 
her life-support system disconnected exceeded 
the state’s interest in keeping her alive. Nor. 
the court added, could anyone be hdd crimi- 
nally liable for removing* the respirator, be- 
cause the cause of Karen Ann’s death would 
not be homicide but natural causes. 

Karen Ann did not die; she lived nine more 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Quinlan, having found the 
courage to ask for their daughter' s release, now 
had to find the courage to live with what was. 
in effect her shell. They did. Karen Ann Quin- 
lan has come to the peaceful death her parents 
wanted for her. And because of the suit they 
brought so will many other terminally ill 
■Americans. To a tragic, difficult debate. Mr. 
and Mrs. Quinlan brought two invaluable 
qualities — love and common sense. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Loss Now for What Gain Later? 

A line, less detectable than a thread of light 
across the sky, divides research on and deploy- 
ment of a “star wars" defense system. The 
administration has adamantly refused to put 
[this matter] on the table in Geneva, where the 
Soviets have made it thdr number one issue. 

It is an issue that may never be resolved. The 
proposed defense system will prove difficult, if 
not impossible, to test fully. But much of the 
laboratory for the research is in the skies or in 
the hearts of yet-to- be- in vented or yet- to-be- 


programmed computers that must reach far 
beyond the current state of the technology. Il 
has been estimated that it will lake some JO 
million lines of program instructions, the writ- 
ing of which would require years of work by 
thousands of technicians, to get close to devel- 
oping a Strategic Defense Initiative. 

NATO allies have justifiable concerns that 
Mr. Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative will 
lead to an arms race and that it is a major 
obstacle to real progress toward getting arms 
reduction agreements at Geneva. 

— The Oregonian i Portland). 


FROM OUR JUNE 14 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Republican Party in Disarray 
WASHINGTON — No political divining rod 
can point to the word "harmony” in the Re- 
publican party. Senators Aldrich and Hale, 
who have decided to retire, appear to be the 
only happy persons in the organization. So 
deep has become the resentment between the 
three or four factions into which the organiza- 
tion has been ripped and so widespread has 
grown the fratricidal strife that to bring about 
even a semblance of party unification is be- 
yond the power of any one man. A great many 
Republicans who have about abandoned hope 
of success at the approaching Congressional 
and State elections have but one "anchor to 
windward.” They say that if Theodore Roose- 
velt shall get behind the party and the adminis- 
tration there may be a chance to win. 


1935: Factoiy Explodes in Germany 
BERLIN — Hundreds of men and women are 
believed killed or injured in a series of explo- 
sions lasting five hours {on June 13] and which 
wrecked one of Germany's principal explosive 
factories, situated near Rheinsdorf. near Wit- 
tenberg. about 60 miles from here. About 
3.000 workers employed by the factory were 
on the premises at the time and were trapped 
by the early explosions. Many are believed to 
be either dead or mutilated. All that could be 
teamed with certainty was that 20 bodies have 
been recovered so far. The first explosion 
occurred at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, when 
the factory was working at full capacity. It 
is believed that a fire then started and that 
other explosions occurred at intervals until 9 
o’clock, rendering approach impossible. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairma n 1058-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PuHaher 

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WALTER WELLS Editor ALAIN LECOUR ABoriaw Publisher 

SAMUEL AFT Depun Editor RICHARD R MORGAN .toniffMfahr 

ROBERT ic McCABE Demin Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

CARLGEWIRTZ .-I suESetSSZ FRANCOIS DESMA ISONS ftaw^CSnrfiiwi 

CAKLUtWIKii nuaaate cottar ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dmxtor Saie 

International Herald Tribune. 181 Awnue awte-d^Ga^t 9HW PMy-^Srinc. 

France TeL: til 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Pans. ISSN 029*405*. 

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OS. subscription: $322 vearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island City. S). I HOI. 
© 1985. International Herald Tribune. AH ngko resend 


P ARIS — The Israeli army, defeated, has 
pulled its last units out of Lebanon three 
years and 634 Israeli deaths after it went in. No 
one b.-is counted how many Leba n e s e and Pales- 
tinians are dead, wounded or homeless as the 
direct or indirect result of Israel's invasion of 
Lebanon, it seemed tike a good idea at the lime. 

As the final Israeli units crossed the border, for 
the first time in three years rockets from Leba- 
non began to fall on Galilee. Israel is digging a 
huge trench to separate the two countries. 

In Baghdad, the nights are interrupted by the 
explosions of surface-to-surface missiles from 
Iran. An Iraqi array of some half a million men is 
entrenched in the delta of the Tigris. Using 
mustard gas. as well as the best available Europe- 
an weaponry, it has. by gross slaughter, thus far 
saved Iraq from the mass onslaught of sacrificial 
and suicidal Iranian Revolutionary Guards in- 
candescent with religious conviction. 

To invade Iran was something else that seemed 
a good idea at the time. President Saddam Hus- 
sein thought he could throttie the threat of Shiite 
iaieerism in its cradle. He calculated that it 
would be a simple matter to overrun a disorga- 
nized Iranian army and topple the reactionary 
religious regime that had just taken power in 
Tehran. Today no end to his war is in sight 
There are a good many wars which, at the time 
people began them or when they rashly inter- 


Bv William Pfaff 


veiled in them, seemed to be good ideas. In 1914 
Rupert Brooke could write, “God be thanked 
who has matched us with His Hour, and caught 
our youth, and wakened us from sleeping.” Three 
years later he was writing about the blood that 
“at every jolt . . . comes gargling from the froth- 
corrupted lungs, obscene as cancer ...” 

In 1940 there were traumatized Germans who 
thought a new war a good idea. Intelligent men 
were terrified “Havoc is in the air,” one Prussian 
aristocrat, Friedrich Reck-Maileczewen. wrote in 
his diary in April 1939. "I have no doubt that 
immeasurable suffering is coming.” 

Consider some other good ideas and how they 
worked oul Japan's aggression against China 
and quest for Asian empire ended in Japan’s 
atomic defeat, with China, become Communist, 
awakened from its long sleep. The Spanish 
army's successful revolt against a left-wing gov- 
ernment produced civil war, 40 years of Spanish 
alienation from Europe and the eventual return 
to power in Madrid of a left-wing government. 

The Russian pact with Germany and invasion 
of Poland in 1939 Treed Germany to defeat 
France and turn on Russia with an invasion that 
eventually left 20 million Russian casualties. 

The American intervention in Vietnam ended 


tdm Mj 

► mem 


i > 







in panicky scrambles from the embassy roof in 
Saigon, and in Communist rule over Vietnam, 
Cambodia and Laos. Had the Linked States done 
nothing in 1965. Cambodia, al least, might have 
preserved some measure of autonomy, and it 
would certainly have been spared genocide at 
the bands of the Khmer Rouge. 

The Russian invasion of Af g h anist a n ? One 
can almost hear the planners telling Leonid 
Brezhnev: "All it will take is a short, sharp shock. 
They’re no thing but ignorant tribesmen.” The 
Argentine invasion of the Falkland Islands? 
“The British are only bluffing. In any case, they 
could never bring a force all that way.” 

Obviously there are wars that succeed. But 
there are few, if any. that go as planned. The odds 
are safely rat the side of unpleasant surprise, 
confusion and a final outcome never imagined by 
those who decided to go to war. Good ideas 
about war are not to be trusted. What is to 
be misted is what the Russian soldier said to the 
Yugoslav peasant who welcomed him with gifts 
in 1944: “Father, keep your bread and salL Don’t 
you know that I bring death?” 

The United States is conducting a war of 
nerves against the Sandinist government in Nica- 
ragua. The aim is to topple that regime. It is an 
aim that a war of nerves is insufficient to achieve. 
Real war is what overturns governments. The 
logic of this is makin g its way in Washington. 

The ability of the United States to invade 
Nicaragua and seize control of its cities and 
communications is beyond serious doubt. The 
disproportion of forces is flagrant. The U.S. 
Marine Corps done is twice the size of the total 
active and reserve armed forces of Ni c ar a g u a. 
Would the operation, then, be “like falling off a 
log,” as some American planners say? 

In 1910, when the marines last invaded Nica- 
ragua (to remain until 1933), there was no Cuban 
complication or Russian engagement in the 
Americas, impe rialism was respectable. It was 
thought inevitable. Small nations and thdr peo- 
ple expected to be dominated by big ones. The 
powers of Europe looked on with approval as the 
United Stales assured that foreigners and thdr 
property were respected in Nicaragua and that 
the country paid its debts to New York bankers. 

Times have changed. There nonetheless are 
those in Washington who still believr in small 
wars as good ideas. What, after alL could go 
wrong? Ask Menachem Begin. Ask Saddam Hus- 
sein. Ask Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon. 
Ask that peasant, with his bread and salt 
C 1985 William Pfaff- 


South Africa: U.S. Opinion Leaves Reagan Behind 


B OSTON —Why is the U.S. Con- 
gress in such revolt against Presi- 


By Anthony Lewis 


dent Reagan’s policy on South Afri- 
ca? Administration officials say the 
whole thing puzzles them. If they 
mean that here is a clue. 

On March 21. police in Uitenhage 
shot into a group marching to a fu- 
neral and killed 20 people. That night 
Mr. Reagan bad a press conference, 
and Sam Donaldson of ABC News 
asked him about “what appears to be 
a continuing wave of violence by the 
white minority government against 
the black majority population* The 
president answered, in part: 

“I think to put it that way. that 
they were simply killed and lhai the 
violence was coming totally from ihe 
law-and-order side, ignores the fact 
that there was rioting going on on 
behalf of others there . . . There is an 
element in South Africa that do not 
want a peaceful settlement of this. 
who want a violent settlement, who 
want trouble in the streets, and this 
is what’s going on.” 

Where did Mr. Reagan gel the idea 
that there was “rioting” before the 
police fired? Presumably from South 
African officials who claimed that 
the marchers threw stones and gaso- 
line bombs. But the government itself 
appointed a judge. Donald Kanne- 
roeyer. to investigate the massacre. 

He reported this week. He found 
no police officer wrongfully responsi- 
ble for the killings, but his report is a 
devastating comment on the facts. 

The claim of stone-throwing, the 
judge concluded, "was fabricated" in 
an attempt “to justify the shooting.” 
Of 47 blacks lulled and injured, 35 
were shot in the back — a “disquiet- 
ing” fact, he said. He found that the 
police had "deliberately” been 
equipped with weapons that kill in- 
stead of crowd-control devices such 
as tear gas and rubber bullets. 

Ronald Reagan's decisive instinct 
was to side with the doers of official 
violence and to blame the victims. He 


was ready to assert as “fact” what not 
even the South African government 
would maintain without an inquiry 
— and which turned out to be a lie. 

Thai is the reality underlying the 
Reagan policy toward South Africa, 
and people know it. They do not want 
the United Slates to be on the tide of 
racist governments that oppress the 
majority of their citizens and shoot 
unarmed people in tbe back. 

Mr. R eagan said on March 21 that 
he opposes apartheid and is urging 
change. But what realists see is a man 
whose instincts are on tbe tide of the 
white govemmenL That certainly is 
what South African blacks see. And it 
is what Pretoria sees, so it believes it 
can continue its oppressive policies 
without worrying about serious pres- 
sure from the Reagan administration. 

South Africa's record since the Ui- 


am told. Some as young as 9 or 10 
have been hdd in cells with adult 
tenbage massacre has been of con- prisoners. Families were not in- 
tin uing official violence. In one week formed for weds of the arrests, 
in May three blacks died while in Tbe Uitenhage marchers were go- 
police custody or hours after being ing to a funeral for six blacks killed 
released. One was a union official, by tbe police. The funeral was sched- 
Andries Raditsda. whose colleagues tiled for March 21, a Thursday, but 
in tbe union said police beat him the right before, thepolice ordered it 
whea they detained him. When fam- put off till Sunday. Toe people derid- 
ily members saw him in custody a few ed to go ahead on Thursday, 
hours later be was almost comatose. Why did the police order thefuner- 
Authoritative reports from the al postponed? Judge Kannemeyer 
Eastern Cape speak of a new twist in said the officer in charge was afraid 
official cruelty. The police post men there would be a disruption of ootn- 
at hospitals and arrest any black ad- mercial activity if workers went to the 
milted with gunshot wounds. The funeral on a weekday. Let the serfs 
fact of such a wound is considered bury thdr dead on thor day off! 
evidence of riotous behavior — al- The patience of most Americans 
though Judge Kannemeyer’s report for the official racism, inhumani ty 
shows that unprovoked police vio- and violence of South Africa has run 
leoce may wound innocent people. ouL That is why President Reagan 


there would be a disruption of com- 
mercial activity if workers went to the 
funeral on a weekday. Let the serfs 
bury thdr dead mi their day off! 

The patience of most Americans 
for the Official racism, inhumani ty 
and violence of South Africa has ran 
ouL That is why President Reagan 


Large numbers of children have has lost control of the issue. 


been arrested in the Eastern Cape. I 


The Sew York Tones. 


- __ . The Jackson-Vanik amen 

But What Do the Protests Encourage? £&££ 

C7 Since 1975, Romania ha 


L OS ANGELES — On television. 

/ in a recent report on protests 
outside Port Elizabeth, for one brief 
moment the screen filled with the 
image of a smiling Bantu youngster, 
no more than 13 or 14 years old, his 
face and body alert and tensed with a 
child’s exciternenL He was waving a 
revolver. I found it hard to breathe. 

The mobs, the police, the sounds 
— they were all there just as 1 had 
known them 50 years ago when 1 was 
a child in that country. 

We lived on the edge of our small 
town, and beyond the town limits 
was the “compound” — the ’Town- 
ship.” it is now called — for blacks. 

1 would lie in bed at night listening 
to the music that repetitive rhythm 
sound typical of the music there, that 
drifted in from the compound. In the 
nights when there were police raids to 


By Vonne Godfrey 

confiscate liquor or drugs, I could 
hear the shouts and argument noises 
as clearly as if they were in the next 
street. The African has a way with his 
voice that sends it purely across the 
air. It can reach over fields in the 
country or over a mile of city blocks. 
There were times when I recognized 
the tension and frustration in the 
music and the drums and the singing 
chat rose and fell suddenly and final- 
ly. The quietness that followed was 
not a satisfied one. Even as a child I 
knew that, and I was afraid. 

But those days came and went and 
the moods of a U the people came and 
went, and nothing changed much. 

And for many years of uprisings, 
censures, jailings, physical punish- 


Romanian?* 

w Could Use 
Some Help 

night have ... 

ny, and it Bv iStllfl MCa 

enocide at 

N EW YORK — President Rea^ 

-an bas recommended renews*" 
w*huu - Romania's most-favorcd-nalion 

arp shock. “ m that is. ncndiscr.mmaiory 

The foment on its exports to America 
i Islands? !!Tfj?anoiher 'ear. Congress ought 
I ** to hinge, approval of bluest or. 

oceed. But ^^Rofea^mnan rights take a 
L The odds ^dissent is allowed No 

t surprise, “j^deat labor unions, citizens 

** SSups scientific and legal or other 
^ d*” mSkmal associations can func- 
“ » KSlNoi even underground presses 
“4.“ ft survive. Ruling by decree, the regime 
1 W1 *g> fts mmmis virtual! v all aspects of life. 

sa!LDont intruding deeply into personal family 

„ . .. . and religious matters. j/F 

a . Yet Washington is soft on this Sta-^ 

linism. It rarely questions Romania* 
human rights abuses. Instead, it 
grants Romania trade pmflegesand 
toudly praises its relatively radepen- 
hjn ? ton - dent foreign poliev. This prompted a 

SoSHS Xc^iby David Funderburk. 

3? who reoentiv resigned as the U.S. 

X im? ambassador to Romania,. accusing sew 

‘ ; nior administration officials of over- 
rating Bucharest’s independence 
riSnEE from Moscow while downplaying the 
i in ® 011 3 harshness of its internal practices. 

.. N - Romania does not hesitate to use 

brutal tactics to suppress dissent.^ 
°° Usually it uses more subtle but n ■& 

less efficient administrative sanc- 
“LJJ lions. It punishes without the pretext 
of a trial and coerces citizens simply 
*!" by administrative order. Such mea- 
sures include exile, forced labor, dis- 
i ^ri missal from jobs, eviction and denial 

i of wages, food and medicine. 

hSSiS Romania suppresses religion. It 
bans religious education for the 
young, regulates distribution of Bi- 
Wn _ H Wes, requires licenses for places of 

worship and presses believers to work 

ltci ruxon. qq Christmas and oihor religious 
531 holidays. It is demolishing historic 

churches and monasteries. Dissident 
Roman Catholic, Protestant and Ro- 
manian Orthodox leaders have been 
• j imprisoned, even lolled. » 

I inn While Romania maintains dipk£ 
a il i . v t. made ties with Israel and permits 
steady emigration of Jews, a recent 
ig as 9 or 10 decline in that emigration and tbe 
h with ndnlt appearance of anti-Semitic pnblica- 
rere not in- tions have evoked concern. 

: arrests. Thousands of Romanians have 

sers were go- been denied the right to emigrate, 
Mark* vilfrH including those seeking medical 
al was sched- treatment abroad or family reanifica- 
ImrsdaY, but tioo. Merely rcouesting exit permis- 
ice ordered it sioatriggpssuch reprisals as job de- 
peoplederid- motion or dismissal, eviction and 
sday. denial of essential goods and services, 

der the f uner- Ethnic Hungarians, the largest mi- 
Kannemeyer nority, are persecuted. 

»c was afraid Condition have been deteriorat- 
ition of com- ing alarmingly. Wnh the media under 
ts went to the direct govonment control, anewd^L 
Let the serfs cree requiring police registration of 
•day off! private typewriters former restricts 
st Americans information. In 1984. West Germany 
, inhumanity uncovered a Romanian bombing plot 
Jrica has ran against Radio Free Europe, 
dent Reagan Mast-fawared-natRn stains pn> 
ssue. vides important leverage that should 

ana. be used to obtain significant conces- 

sions in human rights performance. 
The Jackson-Vanik amendment links 
I cxcxf trade status with rights guarantees, 
particularly the right to emigrate. 
KD Since J975, Romania has had most- 

favored-nation treatment without 
were “under having to conform to Jackson-Vanik 
standards. Residents annually waive 
■al” families, the provision and Congress acqu- 
ired to make 3sces after hohfing perfnnctcayhear- 
:of what the ings. Last year the House md not 


■i ££ 

:Sk & 


5 $1 "I 
S t 
9 * f 


Uf 


: 7>- ‘-r - 


s . 1 • 

. r f- “ 


a /• . .. 

i" / - 

t 


ment, threats — things were “under having taconform to Jadcsor 
control,” we were told. standards. Residents annnaff 

Those of os in “liberal” families, the provision and Congress 
the ones who honestly tired to make sees after htAdinz perfnnctar 
things better, were aware of what the ings. Last year the House c 
future might bring. We had seen the even bother with this gesture, 
arbitrary raids, the anger and some- Negotiations on enhancing the 
times the bloodletting rights of Romanians who choose not 

1 sat there and watched the news to emigrate ought to precede renewal 
and thought about my father. of most-favored- nation status. The 


If he were alive and looking at the Reagan administration should re- 
news, would he have felt that all tire quest specific reforms in diverse area|(f 


political fighting he did over tbe years and establish a definite timetable, 
for the rights of the Indians in our and should temporarily suspend fa- 
community never had a snowball's vored stains until the talks are satis- 
bope in hdl? That his admiration for factorily completed. Congressional 
Gandhi and the quiet way of forcing trade committees would do weD to 
change was all for no thing ? review -Romania’s rights record in 

Or the brother, a journalist, who hearings, and press for reforms. 


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T 


Vegetating in Half-Life for How Long? 


kept in print the plight of those less Few Americans advocate severing 
fortunate, and who had to leave and an important link with Eastern Fu- 
se trie far away from there to protea rope. But Bucharest is unlikely to let 
himself and his family from retribu- that happen. President Nicolae 
tion. How will he fed, J wonder, if he Ceausescu personally sought trade 
views tbe same piece of film? benefits in ly75, and no doubt during 

We march to exact punishment, to his nation's current economic crisis 
denounce apartheid for the cruel and he still prizes them, 
in h u man thing it is, to ay for change. Faced with past threats to most- 


B OSTON — The million-dollar 
courtroom drama bad finally 
closed. The jet-setting Dane, the 
raven-haired mistress, the German- 
bom maid, the vengeful steochil- 
dren had taken their curtain calls. 
Life had changed for ail ihe casi 
members of the von Bulow play 
except for one: Sunny. 

She spent the day after her hus- 
band's acquittal like all the others, 
in ihe half-life of irreversible coma. 
She lay in bed behind the guarded 
door of the S725-a-day room in 
Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in 
New York. For the 1.63 2d day she 
did not see anything or hear’anv- 
thing or fee! anythin® or taste any- 
thing. The physical therapist came 
in io exercise’ her limbs and lura 
her from one side to the other to 
prevent bedsores. Her hair was 
combed, makeup applied, teeth 
brusbed. Her 80-pound 136-kilo- 
gram) body was fed through a tube. 

But that Tuesday evening, in an 
eerie bit of theatrical timing across 
the river in New Jersey, something 
did change. Karen Ann Quinlan 
died of pneumonia. 

For the past decade, ever since 
the 21-year-old woman lapsed into 
a coma, ever .since her parents sued 
the state of New- Jersey for the right 
to lum off her respirator. Miss 
Quinlan has been tne symbol of 
what we call "the right to' die." 

The judge who ruled in the land- 
mark Karen Ann Quinlan case in 
1976 freed others who might have 
been tethered to machines, forced, 
as he wtoic. to “endure the un- 
endurable only to vegetate a few 
measurable months.” Bui. in a curi- 
ous twist of fate, the judge did not 


Bv Ellen Goodman 


really free Karen. When her parents 
turned off the machine, she contin- 
ued to breathe on her own. 

For the past 10 years Karen w-as 
what Sunny is: one of some 10.000 
patients in' the United States in a 
“chronic vegetative stale They are 
not on machines. They are in hospi- 
tal beds at an average cost of 
$150,000 per person per year. Their 
life-support system is food. 

These patients have raised a se- 
ries of questions abouL medicine 
and mercy that make the original 
Quinlan case look easy. We are be- 
ing asked to decide if there is a 
difference between “pulling the 
plug” and dosing die feeding tube. 

These issues were argued again 
last month in a courtroom less than 
an hour’s drive from the Provi- 
dence. Rhode Island, stage for ihe 
ron Bulow drama. The central fig- 
ure m Dedham. Massachusetts, was 
Paul Brophy. a former fireman and 
emergency medical technician, now 
also in a chronic vegetative state. 

At 47. Mr. Brophy had seen 
enough accident victims to tell his 
wife. Patricia. “IT I ever gel that 
way. pull the plug." Now. more 
than two Tears after an anerv in his 


thinking, feeling, what made him 
Paul Brophy, is obliterated. 

The hospital argued that food is a 
basic and natural h uman right. It 
was noL in tbe patient's best inter- 
est. they said, to be starved to 
death. The doctors testifying for 
Mrs. Brophy argued that artificial 
feeding is no different from artifi- 
cial breathing. They see irreversible 
coma as a kind of prolonged dying, 
and food as a medicine that makes 
the patient “endure the unendur- 
able only to vegetate ..." 

The Brophy case — all these 
cases — present a choice between 
two repulsive options: deliberate 
starvation behind closed hospital 
doors or endless unconsciousness 
behind those doors. Usually these 
matters of life and death are re- 
solved quietly, in hushed confer- 
ences between doctor and family. 
The Quinlans chose to feed their 
daughter. But surely, when the 
wishes of the patient are known, 
when the family agrees, it is equally 
moral to let Paid Brophy die. 

The long dying of Karen Ann 
Quinlan is finally over. Tbe verdict 
in the Brophy case wffi come next 
month. As for Sonny von Bulow, 
suspicion and money are bra* life- 
support system. In their mutual 
mistrust, husband and children will 


der. is it possible that ’ 
ing we are also en 
children there in some 


on emigrants, increase emigration* 
and free political prisoners. It serv& 
American interests to press for im- 




’* i’'V 


' .«* K. • 

-4 

* %».;;■ . 
i-x*'. v a 


by so doing, do we unknowingly provements that will strengthen Ro- 
mock those who have traded their martian pluralism and institutions. 


lives for a belief in peace on Earth 
and for each man his inalienable 
rights? Was it all a waste for them? 


The writer, a lawyer, is 
director of the Iittenuttioac 


Can it be possible for a child with a for Human Rights. She contributed 


gun to set a whole country on fire? 

So many questions. Fewer and 
fewer definite answers. 

I am afraid for relatives and others 
I know who still live there. Fire can 
spread so rapidly. There may be no 
way to recognize a friend, and no 
time to wony about that 

Vonne Godfrey, a writer in Los An- 
geles, contributed this comment to the 
Los Angeles Times. 


this comment to The New York Tones 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed "Letters to the 
EdUor" and must contain the writ- 
er’s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible far the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Polite Man, Rude Visitor Council had to rive up thi 


brain burst, he was slill “that way." sustain her in this h all-life. 
and there was no plug to pull, just a But hers is the horror story now. 

feeding tube His wife went to court Noi as sexy a drama as the one told 
to force the New England Sinai in the Providence courtroom but 
Hospital to stop giving food and more common, and destined for a 


Regarding “ The Presidency Again: 
Time for Common Sense" (June 8): 

William Pfaff suggests reduced se- 
curity measures around President 
Reagan and reduced media coverage 
of his movements. He overlooks the 
most obvious remedy: a reduction of 
tee American president's power. Oth- 
erbeads of state need less protection 


Council bad to give up their May 8 
hoUday lest the building look empty. 
WILLEM F. KORTHALS ALTES. 

Amsterdam. 

Some Soccer Remedies 


Even Rob Hughes (in “One En- 
glishman s Reaction, " May 31) miwH 
Uie obvious sanctions after the 38 
deaths in Brussels. 


■ .■ , ****** ma in Di uaPK 

more P° wer "to to ^ English sc 
other branches of government nlauin» ~ 


waier to her husband. 


longer ran. There are flowers in 


Mr. Brophv. like Miss Quinlan. Sunny von Billow’s hospuai room, 
like Sunny von Bulow. is not brain- And music. I am raid that ft -has 
dead bv current definitions. But the a beautiful view, 
pan of his brain that controls Washington Post Writers Group. 


aS 

was baWed frera parking her car near 
the enft-ance. The ridicule was com- 
pounded by the faci thai staff at the 


to require spectate 
“round the outridi 
Wore admittance. 


S33w 




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Mi 


June 14, 1985 


WEEKEND 


Page 7 


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""’Hi. 




•-IJ , I-' 


Hector Guimard and His Art Nouveau Paris 


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By Steve Sifldn 


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P ARIS — The ornate, greenish plant- 
like forms of the iron arches and 
railings that still decorate man}/ en- 
trances to the Paris M6tro remain as 
symbolic of the dry as the Eiffel Tower. 
Interest in Hector GuimardL the man who 
designed them, has been rekindled by a cof- 
fee-table book published this year by the 
Biblioih&que des Arts, presenting a chrono- 


It was the Castel Bcranger at 14 Rue La 
Fontaine, Guimard’s undisputed master- 
piece; that is considered to have introduced 
the style to France. 

The wrought-iron entry gate, with its 
graceful grin of curves opening onto the 
entry hall lined with sculpted stone panels, 
might alone have been enough to merit the 
prize for best facade of 1899, in a competi- 
tion sponsored by the newspaper Le Figaro. 
(After the prize was awarded, Guimard an- 
nounced his three guiding points of design: 
logic, harmony and sentiment. He also had 
postcards printed of the apartment and gave 
personal tours.) 

The rest of the building is unusual as well: 
The window railings — usually black on 
Paris apartment houses — are turquoise, as 
is the rest of the building’s ironwork and 
trim. The painter Paul Signac was one of the 
first occupants. “You’ll love the blue stair- 
case,” he wrote to his friends. 


results of the competition, as well as Gar- 
nier's suggestions, and hire Guimard. 

One of the most striking remaining exam- 
ples of Guimard’s Metro work is the en- 
trance to the Porte Dauphine station. The 
arch is crowned with glass panels held up bv 
thin iron beams; the effect is that of a trans- 


parent Tan spread open at an upward angle. 
Salvador Dali called them “divine entran- 


ces ... by the grace of which one can de- 
scend into' the subconscious region of the 
living, kingly aesthetic of the future.” Not 
everyone was so enthusiastic. In the late 
1930s many of the entrances were removed. 
The New York Museum of Modern An 
acquired part of the Bastille station entry. 
And in Paris, many of the entrances remain 
in good condition and others have been 
restored. 


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Art Nouveau houses heoesignecL 

Guimard is generally regarded as the fore- 
most French Art Nouveau architect; roughly 
to Paris what Antonio Gaudi is to Barcelona. 
His work, a reaction against the convention- 
al apartment-house style of the late 1800s, 
gives many streets of the Auteui! quarter in 
the 16th Ammdissement (he designed 32 
buddings in the area) their tura-of-the-cen- 
tury fed. 

In the new book on the architect, the 
photographer Felipe Fort states that Gui- 
mard’s architecture is currently known only 
to the “initiated.” After the book’s publica- 
tion, the Paris transit system, in coordina- 
tion with the Association des Amis de Hec- 
tor Guimard, organized free daily tours in an 
old-fashioned bus that drove by Guimard's 
major works around Paris. 

Guimard's earliest structures in Paris — 
the picturesque Hdtel Jassed£ at 41 Rue 
Chardon-Lagache and theHdtel Delfau at 1 
Rue Mob tar — foreshadowed Art Nouveau. 


Also on Rue La Fontaine, at number 60, is 
a charming, three-story, asymmetrical pri- 
vate home Guimard HreigrmH and at 17, 19 
and 21 is a block of apartments with Mack 
window railings of t wining tendrils as intri- 
cately detailed as spider webs. The windows 
themselves, close e xamina tion shows, have 
slightly rounded comers. Guimard built his 
own home (1909-12) at 122 Avenue Mozart. 
The walls are never straight, but bend and 
Qow like a sheet of paper in the breeze. It 
stands across from the Villa Flore, built 
more than a decade later, which shows Gui- 
mard moving in the direction of Art D6co. 

Those buddings came at the tad end of the 
An Nouveau movement (1909-191 IV The 
peak of Art Nouveau design, the one that 
elevates ornament to symbol, was the Metro 
entrances. 


petition had been organized for the 
the Metro entrances, and even 
before this, there had been considerable de- 
bate over the designs. Charles Gamier — the 
architect of the Paris Optra, warned against 
anything that would suggest industrial de- 
sign ana proposed entrances with antique- 
style pillars, preferably in onyx, bronze or 
granite. 

But the head of the Compagnie Gen&rale 
du Metropolitan! de Paris had been so smit- 
ten with the elegance and originality of the 
Caste! Bfiranger that he decided to ignore (he 


G UIMARD also designed many other 
buildings in the Pans area, from Le 
Vfisinet in the west to ViUernoisson in 
the easL The stone house in Vlllemoisson, at 
2 Avenue de la Mare-Tambour, is one of his 
most original creations, with its abundance 
of arches of varying sizes, curves and angles 
and topped by an oddly shaped tower. He 
also designed Art Nouveau-style houses In 
Lille and Lyon. 

The concave, arched facade of his syna- 
gogue at 10 Rue Pavde, in the part of the 
Marais that has been Paris’s Jewish quarter 
from medieval times, is more sober and less 
ornate than his private homes. Its shape 
suggests an aliar. and is impressive for its 
solution of a difficult situation: a tall, sacred 
building on a narrow street, squeezed be- 
tween two apartment blocks. 

But his last houses in Paris, at 18 Rue 
Henri-Hdne. and 36-38 Rue Greuze, built in 
the late *20s as Art Nouveau was going out of 
style, lack warmth and show little of the 
personality and originality of his earlier 
buildings. He withheld his signature from 
the brick building on Rue Greuze. After the 
decline of An Nouveau he continued to 
design, but without great recognition or criti- 
cal success. He moved to New York in 1938. 
and died there four years later. 

Not all of Guimard's houses have sur- 
vived. One of his most lauded creations, the 
Castel Henriette, was destroyed in the 1970s. 
Maurice Rheims, who wrote the text for the 



The home Guimard built for himself. 


t*Vtnpaph\ t>> Frhf* Flint lion' Hrtki Ov'TOd 


book of Ferre’s photographs, went to Cul- 
ture Minister Andre Malraux to protest the 
planned destruction. “You like Guimard?" 
the celebrated author of “Man’s Fate" re- 
plied. “No accounting for bad taste.” 

In addition to houses. Guimard also de- 


signed chairs, tables and lamps for his cli- 
ents. His favorite clients, after having had 
him design their homes, had him design their 
tombstones, and his funeral monuments dec- 
orate graves at the Montparnasse, Pere La- 
chaise and Auteui) cemeteries. ■ 


7-. 'I'’*- *■ 


Mexico’s Poetic Conscience 


by Mark J. Kurlansky 




M 


EXI CO CITY — “Man, tree of 
images/ Words which are flow-' 
era become fruits which are 
deeds.” wrote the Mexican 
poet Octavio Paz in a 1948 poem called 
“Hymn Among the Rums.” At 71, by act of 
words, he has become Mexico’s foremost 
voice, its leading writer and inteflectual and, 
as he now says of Jean-Paul Sartre, whom he 
knew m Pans in the 1950s, “a kind of moral 
consciousness." 


v 

SIP* 


In Mexico City his presence is felt every- 

txithly 


1 where in (he intellectual world. His morii 
magazine: Veulta. is a leading source of artis- 
■* tic and political commentary. He has won 
more awards than any other Mexican writer. 
His name is regularly mentioned and Some- 
times nominated for a Nobel Prize. He has 
published more than 30 volumes of poetry, 
essays and criticism. 

His face is known to any Mexican televi- 
sion viewer. He is interviewed on subjects 
from history to politics, art and literature. 
Some subjects he now brushes aside in his 
pleasant, self-effacing voice, saying, “Do I 
have to talk about that again?” because last 
-j week he talked about it on television for an 
hour. 

And while one of his most famous acts was 
resigning the ambassadorship to India after 
24 years in the diplomatic corps in 1968 as a 
protest against the Mexican government’s 
massacre of hundreds of students in Mexico 
City, last year President Miguel de la Madrid 
honored him on his 70th birthday, calling 
him. “the pride of Mexico.” 

Paz. one of the few celebrated Mexicans 
who still lives in the center of the capital, 
where traffic and pollution run as thick and 
redolent as a Mexican mole sauce, sits in his 
comfortable study, sealed off from the noise 
of the nearby Pasco de la Reforma and 
explains that it has all been an accident. 

He was born across the street in what is 
now a shop-lined Disneyland of a tourist 
center called the Zona Rosa. All he ever 
' -^wanted to do was to be a poet He says he is 
not a Sartre. “Sartre was mainly an ideo- 
logue. a man of ideas. I am a man of sensibiJ- 
ity. 1 hope 1 am a man of sensibility. I have a 
few ideas. I want to be a poet not a philoso- 
pher.” 

He says he dislikes the Latin American 
idea that a writer should be politically en- 
gaged. “1 suppose that politics can sterilize a 
literature. It is happening now with Latin 
American literature. 



rary Japanese novels, “It’s one of the litera- 
tures that is alive for me.” 

He was struck on a recent trip to Asia to 
rind a resurgence , of traditional Japanese 
theater. “This is not only continuation but 
revival of traditions. You cannot find, for 
instance, in Spain or Latin America, Lope de 
Vega or Calderon so easily." 

“For the Spanish Catholic tradition ideas 
are always black and white — totalities. His 
ideology is always compact. Totally. And his 
life is the same: The Japanese and the Chi- 
nese are the masters of the conjunction of 
positions ... I think Latin Americans 
should learn more about this experience 
. . . this capacity to embrace opposites." 

But it was his 'European experiences that 
made a mark on Latin America, especially 
his contacts with Andre Breton and the Sur- 
realists. Paz says of his native Mexico, a land 
where artisans dress fleas in tiny costumes 
and picnics are bdd with dead relatives on 
cemetaiy lawns; “It is one of the few sponta- 
neously surrealistic countries. I suppose you 
can be surrealist when you don’t know you 


Octavio Paz. 


are surrealist. As soon as you know you are 
'"lam to be surrealist." 


write poetry.” At first he turned to essays on 


poetry. Bui he went far beyond that partly 

Unitec 


because of his experiences in the United 
States. : 

He lived several times on both coasts as a 



rude” to explain why he fell so different from 
Americans. “Everything was different,” he 
recalls. The book was an attempt to explain 
himself. 

The former diplomat finds that dialogue 
between the United Slates and Mexico, to 
which be says both countries are “con- 
demned,” is difficult and often bitter be- 
cause of historical differences, “We were 
born in different moments in history." he 
says. “The U. S. is a true modem country. 
Mexico is a very old country with a pre-mo- 
dem past Not’a Western past. The past is 
still alive.” 

“We are modem and we are not modem,” 
be says. “It isa country of we are and we are 
not. We are Western and we are not- 
. . . Mexico City is a modem city but it is 
not very modem. The attitudes of the people 
are often 16th-, 17 lb- and 18ih-cemury atti- 
tudes.” 


surrealist , it’s very diffu 
Paz acknowledges a great debt to Europe. 
While he still admires some contemporary 
European writers, especially from Eastern 
Europe, such as Czeslaw Milosz and Milan 
Kunaera, he says, “I don’t suppose a 25- 
year-old Mexican today would have the 
same inspiration as we had in the ’30s from 
European culture. But that’s a fact In the 
United States I don’t find great writers such 
as Faulkner, Eliot or William Carlos Wil- 
liams.” 


H E also sees this as a quiet moment in 
Latin American literature, but he 
does not mourn the so-called boom 
that made literature of his region fashionable 
in the 1970s. “This period of silence in Latin 
American literature is good because 2 don't 


believe very much in publicity,” he says. 
“I think it is very bad for a 


T-I 



«“■ l ‘ * 




A LTHOUGH a noted political connnen- 
l\ unor. this was never his ambition. 
IX “For me the basic thing is poetry and 
from poetry I pass to aesthetics and poli- 
tics.” 

He recalls learning as a child a story of 
Alexander the Great being asked, “What do 
you want id be, Homer or Achilles?” Paz 
says Alexander replied, “This is absurd. You 
ask me if 1 want to be the hero or the 
trumpeter of the hero. 1 want to be the hero." 

The poet's gentle and, in spite of some 
lines, almost youthful face, with narrow, 
kind, elfin eyes, expands with delight “I 
found this answer absurd. I found that to be 
the trumpeter was much more interesting.” 

“And since this time 1 have found that., 
writers, who are not the heroes of histoiybut 
rather the witnesses of history, the witnesses 
of life — well it’s important to be a witness,” 
Some of the books for which he is best, 
known, such as “Labyrinth of Solitude” 
(1950). an essay on the Mexican character, 
are not poetry. Paz says he never intended to 
write these books. “No, no. That was an. 
accident,” he protests. 

“When 1 was really young I wanted to 
write poetry. Then I found more and more, 
that there were periods when T could not 


~W%fT HOLE he feels these differences 
11 / ni« ice it “impossible for Mexico to 
Y Y deal with the modern world out- 
ride,” he also thinks Americans for different 
reasons are unable to deal with foreigners. 
The United States “is a country that can 
accept all foreign things, that is why il is an 
open country, but when they try to talk with 
foreigners, they are unable to do it 
“From a material and political point of 
- view, the United States is an empire. Bui 
they don't want to be. They want to be 
outside of history.” 

Paz says he even became a diplomat “by 
accident.” His friend, the Chilean poet Pablo 
Neruda, who was in Mexico as the general 
consul first suggested it “He said to me. 
“You don’t have money and you work too 
ranch. You should try to find a place in the 
foreign service and you will work less.’ ” Paz 


. work of art. 
One of the bad things in the United Slates is 
that they sometimes kill their own writers 
and their own artists with too much success. 
Success is as bad as indifference.” 

Bui he also says that Latin American liter- 
ature is quiet because of a change in genera- 
tions. “A changing of hands,” he calls it. 
“This is a moment when our best novelists 
and poets are now between 45 and 55 and 
must do their best work. Thai we will see in 
five years,” he predicts. 

“Perhaps the idea of thinking in terms of 
Europe or Latin America.” he says thought- 
fully, sinking into a weH padded chair, “per- 
haps all this is a thing of the past. Perhaps we 
ore going to have good literature in different 
places. I mean one of the fans is that there 
are no centers now of world civilization. For 
instance, the last center for art, especially 
painting, was Paris. Then New York was a 
center, but New York in some way has 
different characteristics than Paris. The New 
York painters are very good but they are not 
the center of the world.” 

“Where are the gods, the corn-god, the 
flower-god, the water-god, the blood-god. 


the virgin? Have they all died, have they all 

oil 


departed, broken watojars at the edge of the 


aitneedge 

blocked fount?” be wrote in a celebrated 


But with 24 years of foreign service behind 
him. in tbe Untied States, Geneva, Japan, 10 
years in Paris and six years as ambassador to 
India, he says, “It gave me another educa- 
tion.- J suppose that every man must re-do his 
own education many times.” Paz feels he 
reeducated himself twice; first in Europe 
then in Asia. . . 

He is particularly impressed with Chinese 
and Japanese culture and says of coniempo- 


1955 poem “The Broken Waterjar.” 

He points out in a rare moment of self 
indulgence that he was one of the first to talk 
Of the end of modernity as early as 1966 in 
Paris. “That’s why it is very difficult at this 
moment to discern a movement in Paris or 
New York or in Mexico.” 

“We are in the age or diversity and indi- 
viduality. not movements, not dries, not 
great centers but individual creators, and 
that is important” ■ 


Mark J. Kurlansky is a journalist based in 
Mexico City. 


The Wild Horses of Merfelder Moor, 
Or Rodeo as a Princely Tradition 


toy David Galloway 


.ULMEN, West Germany — The 


thunder of 800 hooves Guilds the 


TT 

H M dramatic prelude, and then the 
^ panicked animals surge into the 
arena. While the mares pirouette to shelter 
their newborn foals, men dart among them 
to separate the male yearlings from the herd. 
In teams of two and three the broncob listers 
wrestle the colts to the ground, bridle them 
with hemp, and lead them to the black- 
smith’s forge for branding. 


Any resemblance to Buffalo Bill’s Wild 
West Show is purely coincidental. The annu- 
al roundup on the Merfelder moor in central 
Germany began long before W illiam Cody 
was born. Europe’s last genuinely “wild* 
horses can be officially dated to the year 
1316, when a patent for hunting and fishing 
rights first made written reference to the 
nnimaU- like the game that thrived on this 
gentle plain, the hozses had presumably ex- 
isted here for centuries before, and they were 
prized as a delicacy for the hunter’s table. 



Part of the Merfelder herd. 


Zoologists confirm their prehistoric ances- 
try, and art historians have noted an uncan- 
ny resemblance to the shaggy ponies depict- 
ed in cave paintings at Lascaux and 
Altanrira. Signs of interbreeding with run- 
away cavalry mounts or farm horses emerge 
from time to rime, but the dominant types 
descend from the Mongolian pony or the 
Russian taipan. Dun or mouse-may, they 
bear a dark stripe from mane to tan, and are 


both shorter and stockier than their domesti- 
cated cousins. 


The woods and marshes of Westphalia 
once sheltered numerous herds, but most of 
them vanished as land was cleared and 
drained for farming. The Dolmen breed 
owes its continuing existence to the dukes of 
Gray, who settled in the area in 1836 and 
immediately created a refuge for the remain- 
ing wildlife. Today the tract encompasses 
more than 600 acres, and there are plans to 


incorporate additional woodlands as a buff- 
er against increased traffic from a new auto- 
bahn spur. 

The ease of access has dramatically boost- 


ed tourism in one of Germany’s most idyllic 
irut of i ‘ 



landscapes. Situated due north of the smok- 
ing chimneys of the Ruhr district, the lush 
MOnsterland is dotted with romantic manor 
houses, moated castles and wide-gabled 
brick farmhouses. The capita] city of Mon- 
ster, northeast of Dflhnen, is celebrated for 
its medieval town center and Romanesque 
cathedral, but the charm of the region is in 
its natural bounty. The market town of Dol- 
men is ringed by game parks, woods and 
rhododendron gardens, and tourists are en- 
couraged to rent bicycles to make the pictur- 
esque tour. 

On Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, 
from March through October, as many as 
3,000 visitors pay a call on the wild horses. 
The animals are herded onto a hillside on 
those days and enclosed by a temporary 
fence, but that precaution is among the few 
concessions to their well-being. Windmills 
fill water troughs in the dry months, and hay 

r«r oil ik. . 


is provided for all^the local game when the 
~ ‘ ' , the herd 


snows are heavy. Otherwise, ^ 

free in winter and summer, without shelter 
or special feeding or the services of a veteri- 
narian. 


O NLY the sturdiest foals survive the 
rigors of winter, but they regularly 
number 40 colls and 80 fillies. To 
prevent inbreeding and territorial conflicts, 
the yearling colts are auctioned off before an 
enthusiastic audience of 30,000 spectators. It 


is part rodeo, part carnival, pan old-fash - 
; j clubs and trick 


ioned Volksfesi , with pony cl 

riders who perform before the herd makes its 
dramatic entrance. Local farmers and 
woodsmen drive the animals toward the fun- 
nel-shaped fence that mills them into the 
arena promptly at 3 P.M. on the last Satur- 
day in May. 

Easily lamed and pul to harness, the long- 


lived Dulmener was once prized by fanners 

licai, broad- 


The Duke of Croy. right, and Prince Rudolf. 


Lea, Fwenyi 


and draymen for its economic—, ... 
shouldered service. Today few of the colts 
are bought for hard labor, but are ridden by 
children or hitched to cartloads of tourists 
taking the air of the MOnsterland. As a 
result, the price has fallen from a high of 
5300 in the postwar years to an average of 
$150 at the most recent auction. One Ameri- 
can visitor, unable to resist such a bargain 
was discovered trying to wedge her newpet 
into the back seat of a Cadillac 
“It’s strictly a nonprofit enterprise,” ac- 
Continued on page 9 


1 


— — ' .i m £ Syj3 






Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


TRAVEL 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA. Konzcrtiiaus(fcI: 72. IZ.I l). 
CONCERTS — Jane 15: Berlin 
Chamber Orchestra, Arnold Schdn- 
betft Choir, Peter Schrekr conductor 
(Bach)- 

June 17: Vienna Philharmonic Orchcs- 
tra, James Levine conductor (Bach, 


Strauss). 
June 19: 1 


Vienna Symphony Orchestra, 
mnsioph von Dotwanyf conductor, 
Oleg Maisenberg piano (Brahms, 
Zeauinsky). 

June 21; Alban Bere Quartet. Hanrich 
Schi/f cello (Bach, Bos). 

RECITALS — June 17: KyungWha 
Chung violin, KLrysztian Zirncrman pi- 
ano (Beethoven. Schumann). 
•Staatsoperftd: 53240). 

OPERA — June 15: "Die Zauber- 
fiOte” (Mozart 1 

June 16: “Cost fan tone** (Mozart). 

BOGfUM 

ANTWERP, Royal Flemish Opera 
(tel: 233.66.85). 

OPERETTA— June 15: “La Vie Pari - 
sknne.** (Offenbach). 

BRUSSELS. Op£ra National (tel: 
218.12.11). 

OPERA— June 16: “DieMcistrrsing- 
ervon NOrnberg" (Wagner), 

GENT, Royal Opera (id: 2524.25). 
MUSICAL — June 16: “De man van 
La Mancha.” (Leigh). 

LASNE. Calerie Beaumont (tel: 
633-38.40L 

EXHIBITION — To Joae 23: 
“Graphic Works by British Masters.” 

ENGLAND 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
62637.95) 

EXHIBITION — To June 30: “Ameri- 
can Images’* Photography 1945- 
1980.” 

CONCERTS — June IS: London 
Orchestra, Larin Maazd 
iiclor (Mozan, Schubert, Tchai- 
kovsky). 

June 16: London Concert Orchestra. 
Bramwefl Tovey conductor (Tchai- 
kovsky). 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 

GRANADA INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL 
GRANADA Spain —This international festival of music and dance 
is in its 34th year and runs from June 16 to July 19. Events inclu d e: 
ram FT — Jane 23-25: Spanish National Ballet. 

July 6-8: Dflssddorf Opera BalleL 

CONCERTS — June 16 and 17: London Symphony Orchestra, Lorin 
Maazel conductor (Schubert, Stravinsky). June 18: Edmon Cotamer 
conductor (Ravil Brahms). 

June 21 and 22: Netherlands Chamber Orchestra, Antoni Ros Marb& 
conductor (Bach. Haydn, Tchaikovsky). 

June 28 and 30: Spanish Radio Television Orchestra, Miguel Angel 
Gomez Martinez conductor (Beethoven, Falla). 

July 9 and 10: Spanish National Orchestra ana Chorus, Jesus Ldpez 
Cobos conductor (dude. Handel). 

RECITALS — June 26: Rafael Pnyana clavichord (Bach, Scarlatti). 
July 1: Jessye Norman soprano (Brahms, Ravel). 

July 2: Daniel Barenboim piano. 

July 4: Plena Obraztsova soprano (Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff). 
The Festival also 'takes in the 16th Internationa! Manuel de Falla 
competition (July 7-19). 

For further information tel: Granada 2234.4!. or Madrid 429.24.44. 




DIJON. Maurice Magma Museum 




gd: 67,11.10). 


June 18: Chamber Orchestra of Lon- 
don. Philip Simms conductor (Mo- 
zart). 

June 19: London Concert Orchestra 
Barry Wordsworth conductor (Bizet. 
Tchaikovsky). 

June 20: London Symphony Orches- 
tra. Barry Tuckwell conductor (Bee- 
thoven, Mozart). 

June 21: Ptaflharmooia Orchestra, 
James Judd conductor (Handel, Mo- 
zart). 

THEATRE — Royal Shakespeare 
>.19,20: “Hamlet" 


June 17 and 18: “Richard Mistake- 
!)• 


ro July 7: 

The Painter as Primmakcr.” 
•National Portrait Gallery (tel: 
930.15J2). 

EXHIBITION— ToOct. 13: “Charlie 
Chaplin 1889-1977.” 

• Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734.90.52). 

EXHIBITIONS — To July 14: “Ed- 
ward Lear, 1812-1888." 

To Aug, 25: “217th Summer Exhibi- 
tion." 

•Royal Opera (tel: 240.10.66). 


BALLET — June 19and21: “La Baya- 
dere” (Petipa, Nureyev. Minkus), 
“Consort Lessons” (Bintlcy, Stravin- 
sky), “A Month in the Country” (Ash- 
ton, Chopin). 

June 18: “La FUle mal gardfe” (Ash- 
ton, Hiroid). 

OPERA — June 15: “Cos! fan uiUe” 
/Mozart) 

June 17 and 20: “Ariadne auf Naxos” 
(R. Strauss). 

•Tate Gallery (id: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITION — To August 18: 
“Paintings by Frauds Bacon: 1944 to 
Present. 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITION — To Sep [ember 15: 
“Louis Vuitton: A Journey through 
Time.” 

•Wigmore Hall (tel: 9353L4I). 
CONCERT — June 16: European 
Community Chamber Orchestra, Ni- 
cola Snxnaie conductor, Yitkin Scow 


piano (Haydn, Mozart). 
RECITALS— June 15: 


into piano 
June 18: 


Martino Tir- 


vid Surer harpsichord 


JXHIBITION — To Nov. 18: 
“Trench Portraits of the 19th Centu- 
ry" 

NICE. Acropolis (td; 923035). 
EXHIBITION — To June 25: “Bale 
ties Arts.” 

PARIS, American Center (tel: 
33531.50 or 831.1 1.45). 

DANCE — June 15.18-22: David 
Gordon/ Pick-Up Co. 

EXHIBITION —To June 25: “Mar- 
line Aballia. Olivier deBouchony. Da- 
vid Ryan, Anne Saussois.” 

•Carre Silvia Monfort (td: 5313834). 
DANCE —Through June: “50 Yean 
of Tap Dance.” 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
277.1233). 

EXHIBITIONS —To Aug. 19:“Jean- 
Pierre Bertrand.” “Palermo.” “David 
Trcmlea." 

•Galerie Jacob (tel: 63390.66). 
EXHIBITION — To June 28: “Ray- 
moode Godin-” 

•HdteJ Mfcridien fid: 758. 1 230). 
JAZZ — To June 23: Buddy Tate. 

•Le Montana (id: 548.93.ln). 

JAZZ — June 17-22: Mike Zwerrn 
trombone/ bass- trumpet, Paul Breslin 
guitar. Marten Ingle bass. 

•Maisonde Victor Hugo (272. 16.65). 
EXHIBITION — To June 29: “Le 
Voyage da Rhin." 

•Musie d’Art Moderne (tel: 
723.6 127). 

EXHIBITION —To Sepu 8: “Robert 
and Sonia Delaunay." 

•Music de Montmartre (tel: 
606.61,1 1L 

EXHIBITION — Through June: 
“Montmartre, its origins, its famous 
reridatts.” 

«Mus£e des Arts Dtoxatifs (td: 
260.3Z14L 

EXHIBITIONS —To June 21: “Felt- 
deaRops.” 

To July 13: “Jean Amado.” 

•_Mus6e du Grand Palais (tel; 

EXHIsffioN — 1 






Farmers on muleback in the Sicilian back country. 


ratdmxnd.- Soflnfa, dkyno 


Sicily’s Rich Mosaic of Cultures 


dr i 


by E. J. Dionne Jr. 


To Sept. 2: “Re- 


June 2 1 : Timothy Hugh cdk>, Kathron 
Sturrock piano. Chi-chi Nwanoicn 
double bass (Brahms. Rossini). 



ROTTECAVENETA 


roma salita san sebastianeHo 16/b 


OUR MASTER ARTISANS 
HAVENT LOST THEIR TOUCH SINCE 
THE 18th CENTURY 

I n a world which is losing fts sense of real values, ft’s reassuring 
to know that there Is a place in the heart of Paris which keeps 
up traditions handed down from an age whenworicmanshlp 
was an Art In fts own right: 

At the EDITIONS PARADIS you will thus find 
extremely rare pieces such as fine LE TALLEC 
gold-gilded pedestal cables, fabulous lamps 
with hand-painted silk lampshades. SEVRES 
and HEREND pieces and bisque, SAXE and 
CAPO DJ MONTE porcelain collections, 
porcelain or Bohe- 
mian crystal 
chandeliers- a laige 
choice of gifts 
such as boxes, 
cases, ashtrays, 
vases, bowls, 
silverware: and 
hundreds of other 
pieces like they 
used to. make”. 

ARTS DE LA DECORATION’S unique pieces can be found ati; 

Editions Paradis 

29, fue de Paradis -75010 Paris - T6L : 523.0534 



HOLIDAYS 


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If acter with mooring on the edge of the City, 
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Bridge, London. 

One of the few remaining or these tradition - 
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contender in the yearly barge races. 

Built in 1908, or pine on oak, 91 ft* 21 ft, she 
is well-known for her unusually beautiful 
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HOTELS 



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Tefe.f9T)733 71 11 -733 90 11 
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WEEKEND 

appears every Friday 

For iaformatloa —tt Domini que Bouw( 
in Paris on 747.12.65 or yonr local EHT representative 
(Lut in Qattifiad Section) 


26134.1 
EXH 
000:” 

•Musteda Ffctit Palais(td: 265. 12.73). 
EXHIBITIONS — To June 30: 
“James Tissot: 1836-1902.” 

To SepL 29: “Gustave Dora." 
•Musce Rodin {teL 705.0134). 
EXHIBITION — “Rodin. Frve Cfin- 
tcmpoi ary Photographs." 

•New Morning ( td;523_5 2 .41). 

JAZZ — June 15: Tan Pepper and Pow 
Wow. 

•Palais des Congrts (id: 26630.75). 
BALLET — To June 30: Ballet Anto- 
nio Gades (“Carmen," “Suite Fla- 
menca”). 

•Palais Oaanspons de Paris Bercy 


F 


gd: 342.0133). 


PERA — To June 20: “Turandot” 
(Pucctni). 

•Salle Gavean (td: 5633030). 
RECITAL —June 19: Magda Talia- 
ferro piano (Beethoven. Schubert). 
•TMfi trade la Vffle(td: 88734.42). 
DANCE— June 18, 19, 21: Compag- 
nie Francois VerreL 
•Thefltre Marie-Stuart (tel: 
24538.12). 

THEATER— T 
Love” (Sam Shqiherd). 


GERMANY 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341 . 44 , 49 j. 

OPERA — June 15 and 18: “Madams 
Butterfly” (Pucrim) 

June 16: "Tosca” (Pucdni). 

June 17: “Tristan und Isolde” (Wag- 
ner). 

•Pfril hartn onieftel: 25488-0). 
CONCERTS — Botin PbUhannonic 
Orchestra — June 15: Christoph von 
Dohnanyi conductor (Bart6k, Janfi- 
cek). 

June 20 and 21 : Seiji Ozawaconductor 
(Bach, Prokofiev). 

FRANKFURT, Alte Oper (tel: 
134.04.00). 

CONCERTS — June 15: Cologne Ra- 
dio Symphony Orchestra, Gary Bcr- 
tini conductor (Handd). 

•Cafe Theater (td: 77.7466). 
THEATER — Through June: “The 
Mousetrap” (Christie). 

MUNICH, Deutsches Theater, 
(tel:59: 34:27). 

THEATER — June 18-29: “Halldu- 
jah Broadway” Israel National Music 


EW places in the world are asunder- 
rated as Sicily. To many people, 
and perhaps especially to Ameri- 
cans, Sidly is the land of the Mafia, 
of poverty, of women in black shawls and 
taciturn men, of violence and clans and un- 
certainty. But Sidly may be the most attrac- 
tive, most culturally privileged place in the 
complicated, recently established country 
called Italy. 

To begin with, few places have been occu- 
pied by more foreign powers — that is one of 
the reasons the Mafia came into being. Bui it 
is also the reason why Sicily has some of the 
best Greek ruins in the world; why it has 
Arab and Norman buildin g s , and why parts 
of Palermo look like Bourbon Spain. And 
whatever damage they did, the occupiers 
usually — although not always — respected 
what had been built before they came. The 
dialect is as much a pastiche as the architec- 
ture, with Greek words and French words, 

Arab words and Spanish. 

There are many approaches to Sicily. It 
can be, like Cyprus or parts of son them 
France, a place to relax, read and stare 
peacefully into a sunset. It can be a lesson to 
be learned, a place that contains pieces of the 
history of so many other places as well as its 
own. it is an island where you can eat and 
drink well, swim and. hike up in the moun- 
tains. Yon can even skL Whatever you 
choose to do, you can be certain that Sicil- 
ians will be warm — although the friendli- 
ness toward outsiders can be matched by a 
certain reserve. 

You will hear stories of robberies along 
the roadside, and some of them are true. It is 
best to adopt a certain caution that the 
Sicilians practice themselves. But there are 

cathedral square — a lively pi 
ton Whim to Trapani, ay. car brdte evemue ~ offer a serics of i 



•National theater, (td:22,l 3. 16L 
OPERA — June 18 and 21: Ta- 
baxTo" (Puccini). 

June 19: “Carmflac” (Paul Hindes- 
mitb). 

June 20: “La Cenerantola” (Rossini). 
•S c htessfaahner Castle (td: 315.14.47 
or 3 15.4838). 

CONCERTS — June 16: Leipzig 
Gewandhausquartett (Mozart, Wolf). 
June 17: Harlan Blues and Jazzband 
of New York. 


down. The car stopped near the exit for 
Datiflo, a milk farming community that lays 
claim to being the home of the rich pastries 
called cannoh. I shared a ride into town on a 
small truck with a newborn calf; the local 
fanners, the owner of the singlecafe in town, 
the children gathered for their afternoon 
candy a D seemed to want to do whatever 
they could to get my car moving again. And 
the cannoh were great 
What follows is one approach, with some 
variations. You can fly to Palermo, Trapani 
or Catania; then, where you choose to start, 
how fast you want to go, depend on which 
Sicily you are seeking. 


T 


HONGKONG 


HONG SONG, Oty Hall Concert 
Hati (td: 790.7531). 

— CERTS— June 15: Hong Kong 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Kenneth 
Schama horn conductor, Gary Karr 
.Henze). 

i Scncrmcrhorn < 


June 21: Kenneth Scaicrmcrbora con- 
ductor, Hoag KOT^Choros and Hong 
Kang Philharmonic Chorus (Beetho- 
vaa). 


ITALY 


FLORENCE, Tcatro Comunale (id: 
277.9236). 

CONCERTS — Jane 17: New York 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Zubin Mehta 
conductor (Bach, Strauss). 

June 18: Maggio Mustcale Koran tino 
Orchestra. Christian Badca conductor 
(Scarlatti, 'Wagner). 

ROME, Alinari Gallery (tel: 
6793933). 

EXHIBITION— ToJune 30: “Rome: 
Her Monuments. Streets, and People.” 
VENICE, Museo Conor (td: 25625). 
EXHIBITION— To July 28: “Le Ven- 
iziePossibili.” 

Palazzo Fortuny (id: 70.09351 
EXHIBITIONS — To July 14: “Ro- 
bot-” 

To July 28: “Horn, Photography. 
1931-1984.” 


UNTIED STATES 


NEW YORK, Guggenheim Museum 
(td; 36035.00). 

EXHIBITION — To July 7: “Giulio 
PaotinL” 

•Metropolitan Museum of An (id: 
535.77. fOL 
EXHIBITIONS — ' 
and the Horse." 

To SepL 5: "Revivals and Explora- 
tions in European decorative arts.” 
•Museum of Modern Art 
(tel.-708.94.00). 

EXHIBITION — To Ocl 1: “Kurt 
Schwitters.” 


-To Sept. 1; “Man 


AORMINA is carved into a hfllsiri « 
that drops 675 feet straight down into 
the warm, blue Mediterranean and 
looks up to snow-capped Mount Etna. Its 
well-preserved Greek theater, set into the 
hills, dates from the third century B.G The 
best approach is from the Taormina North 
exit from the main highway. The drive up the 
mountainside at times cuts through the 
rocks. To one side are the hills that rise up to 
the ruined walls of the village of Castelmola; 
on the other side, a drop straight to the sea. 

The city has been amply discovered by 
others, notably Germans and Scandina- 
vians, and it can be crowded, in season and 
ouL Bui if you are not obsessed with getting 
away from other people, Taormina amply 
rewards a visit Some people spend hours in 
the terraced gardens behind the San Domen- 
ico Palace Hotel in the late afternoon and at 
dusk, scanning the sky from Mount Etna to 
the sea. It is the sort of sunset you are 
unlikely to see anywhere else. 

Taormina bears a certain resemblance to 
resorts in southern France, partly because of 
the quality of the food and accommodations 
available. Two hotels bear particular men- 
tion: The San Domenico Palace is a convert- 
ed 15th-century monastery. The hallways are 
wide and the room doors are tiny, giving the 
impression that you are about to enter a 
monk’s spare cell, although the some of the 
rooms are in fact huge. Access to the hillside 
garden is worth the price of the room, though 
the food can be uneven. The Hotel Timto is 
a good choice for staying, eating, or both. In 
addition to the view of the mort main and the 
sea, the terrace looks directly down into a 
well-maintained garden. 

South of Taormina, on the way to Syra- 
cuse, leave the main readjust north of Cata- 
nia to explore some of the area’s small sea- 
ride towns. Ad Trezza, for example, ispart 
Atlantic Gty, part Sicilian -s mall town. There 
is a series of winding back roads through 4 
rich countryside that leads to the sea. In 
Pozrilo, you can drink one of Sicily’s most 
famous mineral waters at ihe source and 
watch the fishermen repair their nets. Cata- 
nia itself can be passed by, though its cathe- 
dral square is worth a look and there are 
some good restaurants. 

Syracuse, 65 miles to the southeast, is a 
singular reminder of the extraordinaiy com- 
plexity of Sicily’s past. In its heyday, the city 
had little to do with Rome or Italy: It was 
founded by Corinthian colonists in eighth 
century B.C. and became one of the wealthi- 
est ana most powerful cities of Greater 


Greece. (It was also the home of Archime- 
des, the geometrician.) For this reason, Syra- 
cuse has some of the finest Greek ruins in the 
world. Its theater dates from the fifth centu- 
ry B.C., and Aeshylus' “Persians’' had its 
opening night there. The theater is in the 
middle of an archaeological park — it doses 
an hour before sunset — that also includes 
the Paradise Quarry, a series of remarkable 
grottoes and caverns. 

The old town (Ortygia) is in some senses 
the new town. The cathedral is built on what 
were the foundations of the Temple of Mi- 
nerva. The cathedral and the palazzos on the 

in the early 

evening — otter a series of journeys out of 
the Greek and into the Baroque. On Sunday 
afternoons, the whole region seems to de- 
scend on the waterfront for a passeggiata. 
And, as Cicero said, “There’s not a day 
without sun in Syracuse.” 

If you return to Taormina and then jour- 
ney north toward Messina the next day, you 
are in for one of the world’s great coastal 
drives, Keep a map of Italy in your head and 
watch as the toe of Calabria gets closer and 
closer until it seems you can almost jump 
across. The road is a remarkable alternation 
of tunnels and dear seaside driving. At Mes- 
sina, you can take a look at the straits; the 
town itself has suffered badly from earth- 
quakes over the centuries and most of it has 
been rebuilt since the great tremors of 1908. 

The northern coast between Messina and 
Palermo is a long run of small towns and 
quiet beadles. Two in particular are worth a 
visit Cefalfi is a small fishing town with a 
Norman Romanesque cathedral In his fine 
book on Sidly, “The Golden Honeycomb,” 
Vincent Cronin reports that the cathedral 
the votive offering of King Roger II to God 
for saving him from a storm at sea. Accord- 
ing to legend. Roger promised to bitild a 
cathedral wherever be was brought to safety 
and was miraculously brought to what was 
then the Arab town of Cefalti. “Both the vow 
and its fulfillment are worthy of a man who 
combined faith and works, love of beauty 
and love of battle,” Cronin wrote. 

Battle is about the last thing this peaceful 
town would bring to mind, although its 
beaches have spurred a hotel building boom 
which has not quite gotten out of band. 

The town of Cotlesano, between Cefalfi 
and Palermo, seems like a large bazaar spe- 
cializing in Sicilian pottery. Some of its Irifn.i 
have been working since the 16th century. 


the Ntw fcA TmH . 

Chapel, built by Roger II. is regarded as one ' 
of the most remarkable architectural 
achievements in all of Italy. Its mosaics are 
Greek-inspired,* its eating is of Arab work- 
manship, and its marble work is Norman. ^ 
The inscriptions are in Greek. Latin and 
Arabic. 

Palermo is a dty that knows poverty, but • 
also extremes of wealth. Its modem center 
boasts a fashionable shopping district, and 
Palermitans who talk about the profits of the 
illegal (hug trade point out that while, on 
paper, the town has one of the lowest average 
incomes in Italy, it also has one of the 
highest rates of consumer spending. 

Palermo is one of the best places to try- 
Sicilian food. There is fish of all kinds, and 
the shellfish is excellent (though many would 
warn that the initial pleasure is not worth the 
stomach trouble the lobsters and clams 
might cause you later). Sicilian wine is also 
worth trying. As throughout Italy, decent 
wine is remarkably cheap, good wine hardly 
expensive. 


inland road from Palermo to- 
to, on the southern coast, 
you through what might be 




ALERMO 


finds its way into the 
for organized crimt- out- 
rages of all sorts, yet it is both a most 
modern city and a place where a noble old 
downtown and rambling outdoor markets 
beckon. It is a mad collection of blood lines, 
traditions, architect lira] styles and sensibil- 
ities, a jumble of N orman, Spanish Baroque, 
Fascist and modem buddings. The Arab 
influence is still fell, no more so than in the 
thriving street markets that go on for blocks 
in the center of town. 

Palermo brings home the cyclical nature 
of history, the rise and fall of one civilization 
after another. Palermitans are often said to 
be cynical, a cynicism that arises from the 
need to adapt to a bizarre range of occupying 

powers. Hus was once an entirely Arab dty 
with scores of mosqnes, far closer to Tunisia 
than Milan. Islam was replaced bv Chris- 
tianity, the Arab style by the Norman, die 
mosques by churches. Then it was a Spanish 
dty and now it is Italian. At certain times in 
its history, it was one of the important cul- 
tural centers of Europe. 

The extraordinary contradictions of Paler- 
mo are brought home on almost every block, 
in almost evoy building. The Palace of the 
Normans, cm the highest point of the old 
dty, was built by the Saracens, expanded bv 
the Normans, restored by the Spaniards. It is 
still the seat of government Its Palatine 


expect 

Clint Eastwood riding off into the sunset 
(which he may well have done, since (his is 
the land of spaghetti westerns). The drive, 
which takes a couple of hours, takes you far 
away from beach resorts and through some 
truly wild terrain. 

Agrigeato, like Syracuse, offers a remark-' 
able view of ancient Greek civilization. The 
Valley of Temples rightly draws visitors 
from all over the world- The Temple of; 
Concord is the best preserved and (he Tetri- : 
pie of Hercules is believed to be the oldest," 
dating back to the sixth century B.C. Other 
temples in various slates of preservation in- 
clude those to Juno Lacinia, Jove and Castor 
and Pollux. The area is especially striking air- 
sunrise and sunset. * 

Southeast of Agrigento is an area non* 
often visited but worth a day trip. Ragusa 
has two fine Baroque churches, the cathedral 
of San Giovanni Battista and the church of 
San Giorgio. Nearby is the castle of Donna- 
fugata, a well preserved manor house built in. 
the 1300s. Comiso, now the home of the 
NATO missile base, has a rich artisans! 
tradition; Scicli and Modica are pretty 1 8th-. 
century towns. 

Another trip from Palermo very much 
worth making is to Trapani and especially to 
Erice, perched atop Monte Son Gtuliano. 
Erice is perhaps the best preserved medieval 
town in Sicily. Going back many centuries, 
the town was a religious center to the god- 
desses of love and fertility of the various, 
leading powers: Astarte of the Phoenicians, 
Aphrodite of the Greeks and Venus ctf the 
Roman. It reached its height of prosperity 
and importance in the 13th and I4th centu- A) 
ties, and then steadily lost influence to Tra-; 
pani. Its charm lies in its long neglect; today 
it stands as a beautiful relic to another era, 
overlooking its now busier rival. 

Sicily, associated with bright colors and 
large gestures, is deceptively subtle, a subtle- 
ty related to ihe Rococo and the Baroque 
and perhaps also to that sense of the absurd 
associated with Pirandello, who came from 
the Agrigento countryside. The people can 
be just as subtle: a mixture of circumspec- 
tion and openness, of cunning and warmth. 

But however Sicily's contradictions are 
turned around — whether you choose to 
regard it as the Orient’s gateway to Europe ^ 
or Europe's door to the Arab world, as the 99 
conquered island or the island that absorbed 
something from everyone — it will reward 
those who try to understand it. those who 
keep searching. ■ 

O 1985 The Not York Tuna 


i 


I •, *' 













*•*«** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


Page 9 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


TRAVEL 








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On Bringing the Airport 
Closer to the Passenger 


by Roger Cotfis 

T HE problem “of providing a suitable 
landing platform for Dying ma- 
chines in large cities has always 
puzzled engineers," wrote the aviar 
don correspondent of The Ehstrated Lon- 
don News of Oct. 18. 1919. A f ut ur istic 
solution at that time was an elevated curcnipr 
landing strip that wottld allow jrilots “to 
start and alight dead against the wmd as they 
always mnsL r A neat example of lateral 
thinking even if the thing never got off the 
ground. 

But finally, modem technology has come, 
up with a better idea: the City of London 
Stolpon (short takeoff and landing airport), 
which will be built in a derelict dock area in 
the east of the artv specifically to serve the 
business traveler. The government gave the 
go-ahead three weeks ago after a rancorous 
four-year debate with environmentalists and 
local authorities. The Stolport, which wi0 
cost around $15 million, should be operating 
by mid-1987. It is a seminal idea that may 
have a cascade effect. There is a proposal for 
a similar installation in Sheffield, serving a 
population of five million in the north of 
England. And according to some insiders, 
pressure may be budding up in France for a 
downtown Stolport in Paris. 

“We believe we can cut an hour off die 
journey time to Paris from the center of 
London. Our passengers win be landing at 
Charles de Gaulle before they would take off 
from Heathrow or Gatwick,” says Charles 
Stuart, chairman of Plymouth-based Bry- 
mon Airways, whidi will be (me of the mam 
carriers to use the Stolport. He asserts that it 
is only a 20-minute taxi ride from the Bank 
of En gland pins 15 minutes to check in and. 
board the plane. Bankers from the Continent 
could arrive on the morning Sights before 
their counterparts in the City have had time 
to furl their umbrellas. 

Brymon plans several flights a day to 
Paris, Amsterdam and Brussels, with the 


Rotterdam and Frankfurt, as well as destina- 
tions in Britain, such as Aberdeen and Bel- 
fast. Jersey European Airways is hoping to 
fly from the Stofport to Paris, and Manx 
A» Hm« has applied for routes to Paris. Brus- 
sels and Amsterdam. - 

The Stolport is an example of hew region- 
al or commuter airlines are responding to a 
growing business market by developing a 
comprehensive network of services across 
Europe. According to Robert Bonhoff, sec- 
retary-general of the European Regional 
Airlines Association in Geneva, regional 
traffic is growing at a faster rate than that on 
major ainroes. Certainly, many regional car- 
riers report significant increases in traffic. 
For example, Crossair in Zorich, which car- 
ried 286,000 passengers in 1984, reports a 53- 
percent increase so far this year; RFG in 
Dortmund, in northern West Germany, pre- 
dicts a 50-percent increase in 1985; wmle 
Cannectair, which has. 1,400 passengers a 
month between Gatwick and Antwop, re- 
ports a load factor of 65 percent (“As good 
as you’re ever going to get without turning 
people away at peak flights”). And Brymon 
expects to carry nearly half of the estimated 
l 2 milli on passengers who will use the Stol- 
port in year five or six after its completion. 

What the business flier wants is choice, 
convenience and comfort. This means choice 
of a convenient airport as well as airline. The 
so-called national carriers go some way to 
providing this with business-class cabins, 
priority check-ins, executive lounges and so 
on. But you still have the hassle of getting 
out to far-flung megaports and fi g ht i ng your 
way through crowds less dedicated than 
yourself. For short-hanl flights within Eu- 
rope between major hobs, a ct u a l flying time 
can be as little as 20 percent of total door-to- 
door journey time. 

The solution is to bring the plane to the 
passenger, either by linking thinner markets 
to the major hobs (nke Plymouth to Paris) or 
to other small airports (Hke Plymouth to 
Cork). After all, how many people who fly to 

Paris actually want to gp to Paris? Regional 
airlines perform both these roles, providing 
customized business service almost as if they 
were scheduled corporate aircraft 

Regional airlines (which typically operate 
9- to 40-seat planes) are themselves well . 
served by advancing technology. The new 
generation of pressurized turboprops are 
quiet fast and comfortable and up to 30 


recently with Crossair, the 30-seat Embrace 
Brasilia (from tins folks who make the Ban- 
ded-ante, the DC -3 of commuter planes); the 
64-seat Bae Advanced Tuibo Prop, winch is 
scheduled to make its maiden flight in Au- 
gust 1986, and the 50-seat four-engined de 


Wild Horses 

cording to the present duke of Gray, but it is 
also far from being a ample hobby. For him 
as for his elder son, 30-Year-old Prince Ru- 
dolf, it is a family tradition whose validity is 
never questioned. Indeed, a history of dis- 


HavUland Dash 7 — a plane that is not only 
uhra quiet but has an excepti onal short 
- takeoff and landing performance, being able 
to descend ai a. steep seven -degree slope 
compared with two or three degrees needed 
for a conventional approach. 

It is for these reasons that the Dash 7 is 
thought to be the only plane capable of 
operating from the City of London Sup- 
port's 760-meter (828-yard) runway. The 
Dash 7 has set the limit for noise levels, 
• ? which are of major environmental concern. 
Night flights have been banned, weekday 
flights are limited to 120 a day and 40 on 
Sundays and public holidays. This will m ean 
an effective limit of about two minimi pas- 
sengers a year. 

• Moreover, for the Stolport to be really 
effective, you need a similar Stolport at the 
other end. Untfl this happens, Stuart is push- 
ing for “STOL” procedures for airports like 
Charles de Gaulle. “We don't see why we 
shouldn't operate outside a conventional 


London Stolport 
linked to growth 
of regional lines 


. pattern; we only need a marginal strip. But 
this will take a couple of years. I'm sure,” he 
says. Large European airports are far less 
hospitable to small aircraft than those in the 
United States. 

This highlights a problem for regional 
carriers. In order for them to develop feeder 
routes into the major hubs, they need to 
come to terms with the hegemony of the 
nariormi airlines, such as Air France at 
Ghariesde Gaulle, British Airways at Heath- 
row and British Caledonian at Gatwick. But 
marry have established a symbiotic relation- 
ship, when it is in the national carrier’s 
interest, either by flying regional services 
under their auspices or “interlining” through 
lhar computerized reservations systems. Far 
example. Crossair operates regional flights 
from Switerzland to DQsseldorf and Paris on 
■ behalf of i uftfaansa and Swissair; RFG car- 
ries British Caledonian colors on flights be- 
tween Dortmund and Gatwick as does Con- 
n eclair between Gatwick and Antwerp; and 
Air UK, from Norwich to Amersterdam is 
linked to the KJLM reservation system. 

Bonhoff believes there is a danger that 
some national carriers may move in mid grab 
regional routes once they have been buiJt up 
iriines. (Lufthansa is already in 


by smaller airlines, 
the business with a 


them to ding to such customs with particular 
intensity. 

The dukes of Croy trace their title to 12th- 
century Picardy, but subsequent ties to Prus- 
sia prompted Napoleon to seize most of their - 
French holdings m 1803. In 1836 they settled 
in Westphalia and were later granted prince- 
ly prerogatives by the emperor. A remaining 
chateau m_ northern France was con fi scated 
at the end of World War I as “enemy proper- 
ty ” and the castle in DQtmen was fire- 
bombed in the final days of Work! War IL 

The family resettled in a former foresters 
bouse, and Prince Cad Fraannd Ludwig 
Petrus Eleonora Alexander Rudolf Engel- 
bert, now the 14th duke of Croy, named 
Princess Gabridle, granddaughter of the last 
king of Bavaria. Under Allied occupati on 
there was talk of redistributing the ducal 
lands, but the greatest threat was a ndiiary 
order to dispose of the wild horses as a 
useless luxury. The prince promptly de- 
manded an appointment with the British 
authorities, ana luckily discovered “an offi- 
cer who understood such things." 

Today, when the overseer ceremonially 
informs “His Grace” of the year’s catdi, the 
old duke’s eyes glisten with sentimental plea- 
sure. At such moments it is difficult to pic- 
ture this shy, gentle presence as ane of rite 
shrewdest (and least known) speculators of 


the business with a 40 percent share in DLT, I 
Germany's largest regional airline:) “Wei 
need regulatory instruments to identify and 
stop predatory behavior and abuse of domi- 
nant positions. That goes for airports as well 
as amines,” he says. . , 

Ph3 Chapman, a director of Air UK, is 
also apprehensive, especially about the Brit- 
ish proposal to deregulate ns domestic ser- 
vices except for the busy routes to Heathrow 
and Gatwick, which means that only the 
regionais will be exposed to competition. “It 
cmly needs a dilution of 5 percent in traffic to 
make our routes unprofitable. A privatized 
British Airways could become a monopoly 
. operation in a year. Ninety-four percent of 
U. S. revalues come from five airlines. God 
help us over here,” Chapman says. 

However, deregulation in the United 
States has spurred the growth of regional 
airlines, which carried a record .26 million 
passengers in 1984, an increase of 20 percent 
on the previous year. And in Europe, moves 
toward par tial dere gulatio n are having a sim- 
ilar catalytic effect 

First has been the liberalizing effect of the 
recent bilaterals between the Britain and the 
Netherlands, Belgium and Germany, epito- 
mized by the “open skies” policy in the 
Netherlands. It is significant that there are 
now more flights from British regions to 
Amsterdam and Rotterdam than there are to 
London. Second has been the inter-regional 
directive of the European Community, 
which allows free entry for aircraft carrying 
up to 70 passengers on routes between “cate- 
gray two* airports. This has met with deri- 
sion by some regional carriers because it 
excludes the major hubs (“It's a lousy piece 
of legislation,” Bonhoff says). But it could be 
the thin end of a deregulation wedge. The 
directive is due for review in 1986 and there's 

a good chance that free access wifl be extendr 
ed to “category one” airports. 

Whether or not this happens, it is to re- 
gional airlines that the business traveler will 
be looking for choice, comfort and conve- 
nience. ■ 


Continued from page 7 

the Wirtsdiaftswunder. The business career 
be gan with his first sip of Coca-Cola in 1945, 
and he was soon collecting franchises far 
Belgium and West Germany. One was fra 
Hamburg, where his colorful partner was 
Max Srhrneling , the framer heavyweight 
boxing champion. 

The duke’s children have inherited the 
■work elhic that now complements a sense of 
noblesse oblige. Like his father. Prince Ru- 
dolf studied law and be has completed an 
apprenticeship at company headquarters in 
Toronto. Prince Stefan works for a London 
stockbroker, while Princess Mari e-Theresa is 
studying Spanish at Munich University in 
preparation for examinations as a simuha- 
. neons translator. 

Not surprisingly, even the “loring busi- 
ness” of hoisebreeding is m a n a g e d with 
strict, no-nonsense professionalism. Before 
the buffer zone protecting the herd can be 
extended, complex reallocations of land will 
have to be negotiated by the 20-man team 
that administers “Croy and Co.” Only on the 
last Saturday in May, when relatives gather 


is paraded round the arena behind a brisk 
span of DOlmenere, are the workaday reali- 
ties temp orarily forgotten. 

■ (The horses can be seen 10 AM. to 6 PM, 
March I through OcL 31. Reservations for 
■ the roundup can be made through 

Herzog von Croy’sehe Verwalnmg, Schloss 
Park 1, 4408 DOlmea, West Germany.) ■ 

David Galloway is a writer and professor 
based in Wuppertal, West Germany. 


D ining in Chateauroux: Lost in the Salt 

C HATEAUROUX, France — Great selection of goat cheese, a restaurant full of oreilles (forme mushrooms, was equally bor- giboulce de censt 
restaurants do have a way of pop- locals having a good lime, but 1 can’t say that ing. unimaginative and salty. simple combinatii 

ping up in the oddest, most out-of- 1 ever really got to taste the food. Five out of tj^ C ] K3Tt positive note of the meal came ^PP® 1 b - v a ver > 
the-wav soots. So a year or so ago. six dishes sampled were so camouflaged with Jn ,u. fnrm .-.r m.tv- nnukitf rivet de hnmard cnemes 


C HATEAUROUX, France— Great 
restaurants do have a way of pop- 
ping up in the oddest, most out-of- 
the-way spots. So a year or so ago, 
when Parisian restaurant critics began beat- 
ing a path to this dreary city north of Li- 
moges. to feast on the creations of Jean 

Patricia Wells 

Bardet, it was impossible not to take notice. 

Restaurant Jean Bardet captured a second 
MicheUn star this year, and the Guide Gault- 
MiUau awarded it a rating equal to that of 
Taill event in Paris and Trots gr os in Roanne. 

So soon everyone began Heading for the 
Berry region in search of the freshness, the 
creative regionalism, the great wine list, the 
incredible farm goat cheese, the warm and 
refreshing atmosphere that was putting the 
hometown of the actor Gerard Depardieu on 
the culinary map. 

Well, I drove to CMreauroux, and J did 
find a marvelous regional wine list, a nice 


selection of goat cheese, a restaurant full of 
locals having a good lime, but I can’t say that 
1 ever really got to taste the food. Five out of 
six dishes sampled were so camouflaged with 
salt it was impossible to fathom what the 
chef might have had in mind. One main 
course was so salty it paralyzed the palate, 
and there was no choice but to send it back 
to the kitchen. 

The chefs wife, Sophie, could not have 
been nicer about the request, but her imme- 
diate, and flippant, response — “It must 
have been salted twice in the kitchen, you 
know that happens” — makes one wonder. 
Was anyone in the kitchen tasting what was 
prepared? 

The salt question aside, the meal was un- 
exceptional A safade croquante — billed as 
mixed fresh greens in a truffle vinaigrette — 
included moderately fresh lettuce and thick 
slices of totally tasteless truffles, and any 
him of truffle in the vinaigrette was lost to 
the salt shaker. 

A daily special — a feuitiete of wild 


oreilles (forme mushrooms, was equally bor- 
ing. unimaginative and salty. 

The clear, positive note of the meal came 
in the form of truly exquisite civet de homard. 
a bright fresh blend of lobster, sprinkled 
with slivers of lime and a him of ginger, 
flavors that were brought together with a 
full-flavored Sauiemes-based sauce. With it, 
the friendly, chatty sommelier offered a sin- 
gle glass of Sautemes to complement the 

lobster preparation. 

The dish sent back io the kitchen — a 
fricassee of delicate fresh eel — had terrific 
promise. Eel is certainly a culinary challenge, 
and this one was lovely, young and lender. 
Bui the second time around, the oversalted 
sauce had been removed, and all that re- 
mained were rather dry. unappealing strips 
of eel. 


I HANK goodness Bardet’s pastry chef 
has not yet discovered the wonders of 
salt. The single dessert sampled — a 


giboulce de censes — was a marvelously 
simple combination of pistachio ice cream 
topped by a very hoi compote of fresh red 
cherries. 

It’s a shame that some very positive quali- 
ties of the restaurant — cheery service, the 
remarkable wine list that included neighbor- 
ing Reuilly, Vouvray, Quincv, Chinon. and 
even the rare. Vouvray -like Jasnieres — are 
marred by the restaurant's location, over- 
bearing decor, and inaitcmivenes* in the 
kitchen. 1 would love to give Bardet another 
try. but 1 doubt that I’ll be heading toward 
Chateauroux again anytime soon. 


Jean Bardet, 1 Rue Jean -Jacques Rousseau, 
36000 Chdieauranx; icl: f 54) 34.82. f>0 Closed 
Sunday from July through September, closed 
Sunday evening and Monday from Oa. I to 
June 30. also Sow 25 to Dee. 4, and three 
weeks during February school holidays. Credit 
cards: American Express. Diners Ciub, Euro- 
card, Visa. About 3b0 francs a person, includ- 
ing wme and service. ■ 


Shimoda: Japan’s Opening to the West 


by Christine Chapman 

S HIMODA, Japan — For Westerners 
traveling to Japan, going to the port 
dty of Shimoda is a romantic jour- 
ney into the history of Japan's for- 
eign affairs. Fact, legend, pomp and pageant 
mingle in this lovely town on the southeast- 
ern tip of the Izu peninsula, about 100 miles 
from Tokyo. Its setting is reminiscent of 
views from the Grande Corniche or, as some 
Shimodians say. of Monterey in California. 
Unsatisfactory from the beginning as a trad- 
ing port, Shimoda was the symbol to the 
raring Tokugawa Shogun that, for better or 
worse; Japan's isolation had ended. 

Japan’s 200-year-old posture as an inter- 
national reduse was abandoned when Com- 
modore Matthew C. Perry arrived in Uraga 
i harbor in Tokyo Bay on July 8, 1853. Al- 
1 though Russians and English had tried to 
establish trade agreements with Japan, they 
failed. Rebuffed by the Japanese and refused 
support by their own governments, their 
ships withdrew. The Portuguese were ex- 
pelled from Japan in 1638; from 1641, only a 
few Dutch merchants were allowed to re- 
main on Deshlma Island in Nagasaki Bay. 

Perry was the emissary of a U. S. govern- 
ment determined to force the issue. Ameri- 
can whaling boats were the object of ill 
treatment The Americans wanted respect 
for their seamen, a port of call for supplies, 
and the promise of Japan as a trading part- 
ner. When Perry entered Uraga, be not only 
beat out the Russian expedition ordered by 
Czar Nicholas n, by one month, be also 
flaunted four men-of-war and an insistent 
letter from President Millard F ill m ore. He 
warned the Japanese that he would return to 
resume negotiations, and he did half a year 
later with more ships. On March 31, 1854, 
Perry signed a treaty with the Japanese that 
opened the ports of Shimoda and Hakodate 
in the north to American ships. 

Japanese treaties with other nations fol- 
lowed in quick succession: Britain in 1854; 
Russia and the Netherlands in 1855. 

With his fearsome kurofune — “black 
ships” — Perry was the first to force Japan to 
open its ports, and his countryman Town- 
send Hams was the first foreign consul to 
make Shimoda Japan's laboratory in inter- 
national diplomacy. A thoughtful man, the 
52-year-old Harris showed his mettle during 
a year in Shimoda while he waited to meet 
the shogun in Edo, later Tokyo. “The Com- 
plete Journal of Townsend Harris,” pub- 
lished in 1930, then in a revised edition in 
1959, could serve as a manual for Western 
diplomats to Japan. Harris’s resolute ap- 
proach and his sense of fair play won the 
respect of the Japanese. He was noL overly 
patronizing and he had his zeal in check. He 
knew what he — and the U. S. government 
— wanted from Japan. He got it, not without 
some qualms of conscience. 

On Sept. 4, 1856, after he hoisted the U. S. 
flag before his headquarters in the Gyoku- 
senji temple, he wrote in his journal: “Grim 
reflections — ominous of change — un- 
doubted beginning of the end. Query — if 
for the real good of Japan?” 

Perhaps Shimoda would admit today that 
Harris’s intrusion was for the common good, 
but in 1856. the town fathers tried to dis- 
suade him from settling there. When be in- 
sisted on his right as granted by the treaty, 
they did “civilly ask me to go away.” But he 
unloaded his gear and invited Shimoda offi- 
cials cm board his ship to watch the men 
“exercise at the gtms.” 

The Japanese installed Harris and his in- 
terpreter in the temple and began a series of 
delaying tactics that presaged future con- 
tacts between the two countries. 

To any request, Japanese officials ex- 
plained (hat “(hey had to reflect on every 
new proposition a long time; that they could 
not decide as quickly as the men of the 
West.” Experienced in living in the Orient, 
as a trader on his own merchant ship; Harris 
had completed a U.S. commercial treaty 
with the king of Siam before arriving in 
Japan. He knew and loved Asia and consid- 
ered as be neared Shimoda that this “may be 
the beginning of a new order of things in 
Japan. 

As soon as he was at home in Gyokusenji 
temple, today a major tourist ate, he started 
to ramble over the hills. He wrote that “a 
more genial climate than that of Shimoda. so 
far, is not to be found in the world.” 


H E appreciated the weather, the flow- ' 
era, the crops and, finally, the peo- 
ple. He was often exasperated, but 
he was patient By November 1 857, when he 
was allowed to gp to Edo, be was convinced 
the Japanese were a “singular people." The 
journal details his growing affection for 
them, and theirs for him, but he shows his 
anger when be writes: “I wiD cordially meet 
any real offers of aunty, but words will not 
do.- They are the greatest liars on earth." 

When the Japanese tried to amuse him, be 
commented: “The lubricity of these people 
passes belief. I was asked a hundred differ- 
ent questions about American females.” 

One of the officials was in charge of pro- 
viding Harris, a bachelor, with a woman. He 
said, “if I fancied any woman the Vice- 
Governor would procure her for me.” 

A popular Shimoda legend is the stray of 
tiie abandoned Okichi, Harris's alleged ge£- 
sba-mmed-coocnbine. The 16-year-old girl 


supposedly gave up her true love, a simple 
carpenter, to serve the American. The legend 
is so imbedded in the popular consciousness 
that Japanese visit the 350-year-old Ryosenji 
temple not to see where Perry signed the 
Shimoda treaty, but to gape at the sedan 
chair that earned Okichi to Harris. On the 
walls of an annex are sentimental paintings 
of an ill-matched love affair, and under one 
of OkkhTs trip to the consulate is this de- 
scription: “Since then diplomatic relations 
between the two countries went smoothly.” 
Harris does not mention Okichi in his jour- 
nal. 

“There was nothing between Townsend 
Harris and Okichi,” resisted Satoshi Fur- 
ufcawa, chairman of the Shimoda Historical 
Society. “It was a story concocted for public- 
ity about 60 years ago. Actually Okichi was a 
laundress who served Harris as a nurse for 
three days once when he became ifl. When he 
recovered, she was rifomiwrf We have a 
document from her mother saying Okichi 
was fired and deserved a pension.” 

Each year from May 16 to 18 Shimoda 
holds its Black Ships Festival to commemo- 
rate Perry’s arrival in the painted vessels. It 
has all the hoopla of an American Fourth of 
July. American ships, now steel-gray, lie at 
anchor in the harbor; thousands of sailors in 
uniform roam the town; American and Japa- 
nese dignitaries make speeches and ride in a 
parade through the dty; high school and 
mflitaiy mar ching bands strut their s tuff 
and elaborate fireworks explode over the 
harbor at night. 

Last month U. S. Ambassador Mike 
Mansfield rode in an open car with Mayor 
Kyoshi Iketani of. Shimoda, waving to the 
crowds lining (be streets, grasping hands. 


and patting babies oo the head. From his car 
Rear A dmira l Gerald W. MacKay handed 
small American flags to outstretched hands. 

Shimoda’s population of 30,700 (it was 
3,924 when Harris arrived) swells during the 
summer as swimmers and surfers descend on 
its white- sand beaches, and other tourists 
come for the views, the walks, and the hot 
springs that attracted President Jimmy Car- 
ter in 1979, when he attended the festival. 

Tourism is Shimoda's principal industry, 
with fishing its second source of income. The 
wharves of the island city are lively to stroll 
along and tourists can go fishing or at least 
sailing in the harbor in an up-to-date black 
ship. Apart from the three-day festival in 
May. July and August are Shimoda’s busiest, 
and most expensive, months. But the weath- 
er is good in spring, fall, and early winter. A 
telephone call to the Tourist Information 
Center in Tokyo (tel: 502-1461) will inform 
you about weather, hotels, t rains 

From Tokyo station an express train 
reaches Shimoda in two hours and 40 min- 
utes. The one-way fare is about 3,000 yen, or 
S12. At Shimoda station is an information 
counter for tourists who want hotel or ryo- 
kan, inn. booking. You may arrange a trip 
through a Tokyo travel agent or by calling 
the Tokyo office of Shimoda Tokyu. The 
Tokyu. near the town, has a view overlook- 
ing the bay. The Prince, three miles (about 
five kilometers) from town, is on Shirahama, 
the white beach. There are modestly priced 

inns and pensions and man y restaur ants in 
Shimoda. ■ 


Christine Chapman is a Tokyo-based writer 
. who specialized in die cultural field 




vS*., Ti*. ■ x '* " «!* 


4i 



h-jS’;, 



Iro-zaki Point . near Shimoda. 





THE BUSINESSMAN’S 
TRWELKIT. 


Get more out of y pur next business trip 
Take "The Kit'- (he American Express* Card 
and tout Iberia ticket. 

After all. it was Iberia who broke the 198* 
on-time performance record at Inndon Heath 
row. And so outstanding is the service- in 
Iberia’s Business Class, it was voted one of 
the woiW s top three by the tfiseeming readeis 
of "Executive Travel . (April 1984) 

What's mom you'll find Iberia's schedules 
and connections are often more convenient 
That's because Spain's position on the map 
makes it the natural link between Europe 
and Africa, the Middle East and. of course. 


rhe Americas around the world, w^uung «j neip vuu wun 

And while you are looking after your bus- reservations and emergency cash. Thev can 
iness. why not*let the American Express Card even replace your ^ if :, ‘ v — -‘- , — 

look alter you? ' 

The Card makes it so r y wy TTTrrp 

simple to pay for your JlUI I V 1 J[ 


around the world, waiting to help you with 


The Card makes it so 
simple to pay for your 
airline tickets, car rental . 
hotel and entertainment 
as you go 

Its comforting, too. 
to know that there are 
over 1.000 Amoican Ex- 
press Travel Service and 
Representative Offices 


£JM 


ESS 


e your card if it's lost or stolen, 

B usually within 24 hours. 
So on your nexl 
business dip. don’t forget 
your Travel Kit Ask your 
secretary to call Iberia or 
your travel ageiu. And 
take the American 
Express Card. Don't leave 
ESS home without it. 

® Eepstned Trade Mark of 
American Expres Company. 


FOR BETTER BUSINESS TRAVEL 




Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14-, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Hlvfl «r“»» O* 


43740 5 " 

Jtfrll IXU 
Ifi 968 B1V 

164 S 9 l=V 

14260 23 ** 
13764 27 * 
1 M 14 im 
13047 ax. 

12641 W% 

11924 301 * 

11 X 0 MM 

mu n** 
10354 Ota 
mi <m 

9174 40 V* 


feta — "4 
1114 . —7 
014 

17 ta — * 

a — in 
254 . —2 
1? — ?« 
X +1* 
felta —7% 
30 U. — * 
X* — 3 ’.* 
52 - 1 % 

4 — ft 

44 ta — 1 % 
57 V* — 1 % 


m*» 120120 imia laisj; mx 

T rafts 439.43 6436 ? 424-77 Jfe-68 — 12-S 

util 14147 144.14 T6ZM “Ml— 097 

i Coro 53725 SHOT S 2 M 1 9 MJS — 1X8 


caiwKii* 

incusirtal* 

Tramp. 

uimiin 

Finance 


men Low Close am 

108,58 107.49 10749 — 1.18 
12194 122 J 0 12200 — 163 
104 JS 1 KL 09 10 X 09 - 1.43 
si.io sail 5 sji — c*o 
1176 ? 11664 11666 — 1.58 


Hwrsdail 

MSE 

Closing 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index. 


AMEX Most Actives 


Mvaad 
DcaKMd 
DncfKjnPCd 
Total Issues 
M* HIM 
Now LOWS 
Volume UP 
Volume down 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Bonus 

Tronsp. 


Weo» TW 
Am 

391.55 21 S« 
XX« 34 lg 

3£2 1&! 


:r£» 19 X 71 
5 # 9 J 1 3 BJ» 


NYSE Diaries 


VUmaB 
fox AH’ 
rcnoBs 
OAT ID 
; C'MO 
\hl»1p«l 
Masers 
nt 

■nirnrn 

LQrlmr 

0o9flW 
MlPatflt 
OOatu 
Musa At 
• tCnnlA 


VOL HMB VOS Ust Q, 

.IB »4 «■» IJi, . . 

3 «M mi. i:u m, .. 

42 M »Mfe 10'k is* ^P. 

3 X 70 4 r» 4 .(f - 4 -, _ r* 

2 me ?*- i 3*, 

mi ih. iti. iIC * T 




l»I feta Mfei iS»* „% 

IS* 5 47» 5 * 

llA* t 4 Si f * 

1017 3 ’ta ill* tTh — 

9 (» m* W* II 

■75 U 14 1115 S 3 * 

r«V l.»8 1414 Its*--., 


141 t.*‘8 1414 IPAW-^f. 

714 M 9 * ? 

Ml 12* im »!** _ 


! u?''. 
.1 1 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


On* Prav. 


f Dow Jones Bond Averages | 


Bonds 

UiiMila* 

industrial* 


1 Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 

I Total Issues 
Now Hiatts 
New lows 
volume up 
volume dawn 


1133 945 

410 453 

2041 3044 

84 115 

34 a 

15 J 89 . 77 U 
79,491410 


-included In tnc soles Howes 


Buy Sales * 54 Tt 

201*36 435*40 Z 4 J 4 

199*44 440.143 1 JC 7 

200304 484433 947 

201,231 495*07 1*24 

203*07 512.142 2100 


VnlnfAPM 1 57 * 30*00 

Prw.BPXwL 777 BQ*ee 

Pm aMBoimateo dose 12 & 73 &SU i 


Standard & Poor's index 


AMEXSales_ 


Tables I ltd ode the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Ptcss 


industrials 
Transp. 
u unties 
Finance 
composite 


HMIl Lpe Close CM* 

307.18 204.19 20453 — TjtS 

144.19 141.14 141.04 — 119 
84*2 8 X 76 B 5 J 7 — 040 


AMEX Stock Index 


22.93 ZL 4 T 2254 — 0*9 
1 * 7*1 185*3 185*3 — 128 


4 P.M. volume 
Praw. 4 PAL volume 

Prev. con*, volume 


Low OM Qrw 

334*3 73489 _| S 


iJiwnm 
rnanuw Stoe* 


SO. Dow 

Dlv. Vld PE HHhHMiUwr Qunt.Cli'oe 


231,3 14 AAR 
IB>» •% AGS 
14 *» 9 H AIWCA 
3 |>. IJ* 4 MF 
OH* 14 ta AMR 


A U 14 SO 19 IB** 18 **— % 
13 T 27 144 * Mta 14 % + % 

Id 101 * I 0 V* 104 * 

-SO 25 41 573 Xta 19 "* XU + Vs 


Dow Average Skids 16.24 Points 


llnilej Press huemuW»ta! 

NEW YORK — Stocks finished broadly low- 


10 t °Mxai* a** av* + ta cr Thursday, with the Dow Jones industrial 


M-l Rises $800 Million 


2 - :,j^r V 2 j_, 99 Six 22 % 21 ** Sw * V* « i uuipuj. niui uiw t»un .vuw uiuwiiiui 

ata ANRpf i47 iij ife CTta 2»* 23 w— % average closing below the 1,300 benchmark for 

HU 7 ta APL —P . 5 “ . .. j ; .. L i i 


The Associate*! Press 


h 44 a* asa 2 *o 4.1 2*2 f£> if* + JS only the second time since it broke that record NEW YORK — The U 

£., K 'i a May 20. ply, known as M-l and 


NEW YORK — The U.S. basic raonej- sup- 
y, known as M-l and representing funds 


fri m* Accawusfl v» u *» 22=* 22»* ata + v* International Business Machine Corp.’s con- 
w 5 " ’tJ ^SJISb ^bio io °j ’S 'a* i" tinuing slide set the mood for the market Tech- 
S e, L'i i « isw isv* is*- v* nology issues tumbled and the Dow Jones in- 

jn ’ “ n 8m 2^“ jK 2^-m diu5iriaJ average dropped 1624 , to 1 * 290 . 10 . 

•» M g in* iSS— v* Declines led advances 1,146 to 481 among the 

*4 ,5.; 33 3040 «v. «»* 44>*- v* 2,028 issues traded. Volume increased to 107.03 
T 4 57 i 34 i* 34 3 «« + ta million shares from to 97.7 million Wednesday. 
*0 2* 12 24 i a 5j** gta- u Analysts said the market was still reeling 
“ I’ S “u “** “5 from IBM’s announcement that its profits 

;92*i§j 3ix! 3^2— i* would decline in the first nine months of 1985 . 

-£ IH 2te tT* t ? 1 "The market has been in a little bit of a 

lj I'd tT* “ w* + ”* consolidation phase, but the last two days has 


10 ' : 71 * AcnwE - 32 b 4.0 

17 f> 15 AddE* 1 . 93 ellJ 
30 1 T* AdmMI J 2 2.1 

19 '^ B*» Adv 5 V 3 jjt 5 * 

41 ' ■ 34 '* AMD 

12 *. 6** A 0 WST .12 U 

14 ** 9 AerHcr 

47 3T« AelnLI 144 . 5.9 


7 I AIMH 5 

J 7 V, 21 AlaPm 

33 J » 24 s , AlaP PlA 5-92 12 * 
B 8U AlaPdPf *7 IIJ 
79 *. 41 '* AloPpI * 00 I 1 A 
BS'-a 43*7 AlaP Of *44 11.1 
74 57 AlaP pi 8.16 II* 

71 5 * AloPpI 5*8 12* 


ply, known as M-l and representing funds 
readily available for spending, rose S 800 million 
in early June, the Federal Reserve Board report- 


12*4 6^ Atfvnf .13 ,52 - 5 at LL 

i ij, 9 Aprflar 70 12^0 12 H VSfc - VS 

47 J 7 »- AelnLi 264 5.9 33 V 60 ISVi 44*0 44 H— Vi 

nb Ota AriLpf i 79 e 1 (U 2 D 54 lfe 54*4 54VZ 

A*mm 1*0 3 * T 4 STl 3417 34 34 ta + ta 

54 H 38 ta Alrpra T *0 2 * 12 241 S 3 SX* 52 ta- 5 

341* U* AlrbFrt 40 U II « 30 U 20 20 V* + V* 


53 IL I** I** 

358 27 U 27 VJ Z 7 VJ V* 
70 32 31 *4 31 ta— 1 * 

73 77 * 72 * 704 

20 z 79 79 »9 

74 X 2 855 * 85 85 V* + 19 * 

44001 74 73 74 


in early June, the Federal Reserve Board report- 
ed Thursday. 

The Fed said M-l climbed to a seasonally 
adjusted $ 585.6 billion in the week ended June 3 
from a revised $ 584.8 billion the previous week. 
The previous week’s figure originally was re- 
ported as $ 584.9 billion. M-l includes cash in 
circulation, checking-type accounts at banking 
institutions and non-bank travelers checks. i 


7 i 5 * aioppi b*s 128 *• *» w — u been dominated by the weakness in IBM," said 

JK ’iu SKr* ft *5 .5 loS Xta Alfred Harris, of Josephthal & Co. 

18 V 10 *. Alhrlos *8 22 19 X T 7 U 17 V* 17 U .... ■ - ■ ■ i ... ■ a ,, 

33u 73ta aimsh *4 Z4 is 230 3i9» 31 '9 Jr** — v. “We think the market will certainly rally up 

S'. 23 U Alcan 1*0 <9 12 171 B 34V* 34 V* 34 U - , m u .a .u t 


bu jjta AioTsns *4 xa 13 m 3 i 9 » si;* no*— v* “We think the market will certainly rally up 
37>* ?7ta aISsw i-S i 4 I? '^S It* ftS from here,” he said, with the same positive 

S', Mv* 1-00 M i, m a* a*- u factors — lessening inflation and improvement 
Si; SISgfp, | 3 ? iB 55 ” Sh lita- v* price-earnings multiple — still in force. 

Sta Isu Atam'pi u? i£§ ” ^ T , “ Il ’s a very ragged market, with Uule distinct 

98 el'* Aim we lias iij n w i**+ ta leadership, said Eugene Peroni of Bateman 

feta feta A taPw 2.70 LI 10 4 « yy* Hh + !? lt.h d;a.^ i _ . t_ 


from here,” he said, with the same positive 
factors — lessening inflation and improvement 
in price-earnings multiple — still in torce. 

“It’s a very ragged market, with Utile distinct 


is£ SIEoc Too 54 B fS law iK- 2 Eichler. Hill Richards. Los Angeles. 

tt *4 feta AlltSCp 1.BB 4 * 8 <319 42 418 * 41 A*— V* - . ” . . 

M 53 »* Aiocopi 6.74 i 0-5 73 , 649 * MW AAfe— ta “There is a bit of panic among the insutu- 

t 044 * iSta awc oM2*?ei2* la loSta i§fe*iQ?ta + v* tions,” he said, sparked by IBM's announce- 

S9W Jffta AlKiSIT 2.12 17 8 2785 58ta 57V* 57V* — 9* 


12 ta Sta Alllsdl 
feta 34 AlltCPf 
feta 20 ALLTL 1*4 6* 9 
feta 29 ta Alcoa 1*0 U 16 

22 ta I 5 ta Ame* *o 1-3 

34 7 ^, AmHes 1.10 4.1 19 

214 Ita AroAor 

Tiv-s if.* ABokr 9 

70 S 3 1 - A Brand 1*0 5.7 9 

feta 7 «ta ABrdpf 2-75 9 * 


85 Sta Sta 59 * 

1*4 6 * 9 m S 5 * m*- i* Sperry led the actives, falling Vi to 56 ! 6 . It 
’io i* w ^ wvi in* ilta~ w announced it was in merger talks with Bur- 
i.io 4.i i9 4248 feta 249 * feta- ta roughs, which plunged 3 % to to 56 */i on the 
9 29 20*5 rota aw news. 

vs 9* 9 **b Sta sta ata- ta IBM followed, giving up 2 % to 1 18 & 

] l ’SI ’ 5 ^* '»* - ta Other technolopes also languished, with Dig- 


Mta 19**2 ABUM B U 11 
77 V. feta A Bus Pr M 16 14 


4348 279 * 26 ta feta— ta 
144 lta 19 * lta 
29 20 ta 28 ta 20 ta 

440 6flta M 48 

8 28 ta feta feta— ta 


S6V> ABdcsi i^o u I? 186 uitanmmta 


65 2 STV 25 V* 25 ta— ta 
41 249 * 23 ta 24 ta + ta 


585 * 40 V* African 2.90 5.1 II J 32 feta 56 ta 56 V*— lta 


51 37 ACanaf 3*0 6* 11 51 in <Vta— lta 

feta 16 ta ACapBd 2*0 105 46 feta 20 V* 20 V*— 9 * 

30 ** 25 ta ACudCv 2 JIo 14 11 feta 29 ta 79*.— ta 

11 6ta ACentC 222 3 Bta Sta 8**— ta 

561 * 43 ta ACvan 1.90 17 12 861 52 5 Tta 519 *— 9 k 

29>4 lBta ADT *2 4.1 22 188 22 ta 22 22*4— V* 

23 V* T6ta AElPw IMa 9 * 9 32 Z 7 23 V* 27 ta 23 

47 1 * 21 AmExp 1-28 28 16 6501 46 ta 45 ta 45 V*— lta 

22 ta 9 ta AFamls M 13 14 274 71 V* 21 21ta— V* 

35 1 * 19 ** AGnCp 1*0 3 * 10 1587 33 ta 33 33 ta 9 ta 


12 Month 
H Mi Lon Stock 


Sh. OasB 

ISOiHMlLiin OuoC.OTh* 


25 ta 149 * Bowrafr 
feta 25 ta BrtoSt 


15 V* 6U AGrilwf 
KVi. 519 * AGniPtA 6 * 4 * 11 * 
96 ta 58 ta AGnl p*B 5 * 7 e 6* 
75 ta 4414 AGn |pf US 45 
71 ta 40 M, AGn PfO 2 A 4 4-0 
feta 25 V* AHerll 1*0 3 * ID 
iota 7 ta A Holst 


475 feta 14 14 — U 

11 53 ta S 3 ta SPA — ta 

1 89 ta 89 U. 89 <A— ta 

1 72 ta 77 ta 72 ta — 196 

78 669 * 66 66ta 

7 feta feta feta + t* 

48 9 ** 99 * 99 * 


66 > 4696 A Home 2.90 46 13 2668 63 ta 62 V* 62 V*— 19 * 

38 feta AH 05 B 1.11 14 10 1667 33 V» 32 V* 32 V*— V* 

92 ”* 64 Vi Am rich 660 7 * 9 1261 919 * 91 ta 91 ta — V* 

B 7 ta 52 AlnGra 64 * 23 659 82 V* 81 V* 8196 — ta 

144 112 W AIGppf 5*5 42 6 l»tal 38 139 W— 

feta I8ta AMI .72 ** 12 I 4 M feta 2 fe* 23 ta— ta 

5 ta Tta Am Mot 716 3 Zlh 3 + V* 

29 16 V 9 APrwda .121 6 811 19 V* 189 * 19 — 9 * 

I 3 ta 5 ASLFIa 6 82 7 


Sta n AmNst 
29 1AV9 APrwds .121 6 
135* 5 ASLFIa 

I8ta I2'A ASLFIplZH 146 
U 10V* ASM Ip *0 7* 

ISV* 229* AmStd 160 56 

65ta 27 AmSIor 64 I* 

75VV 46V* AStralA 4JB 5.9 

57ta 51 ASIrotB 6*0 11.9 


.121 6 811 19 V* 189 * 19 — 9 * 

6 S 3 7 69 * 7 

Z 19 146 265 15 14 V 6 15 

*0 7 * 9 U 5 llta llta lita— V* 
160 56 10 376 feta 29 V 6 29 V*— v* 

64 I* 11 818 64 V 6 63 63 V 6 — 1 V 6 

4 J 8 5.9 214 75 7496 7 «V 6 — V6 

460 11.9 19 57 ta 57 57 V. 


4 ta Jta BrltLnd 14 8 4 V, 4 ta 4 ta 

29 21 V* BHIPI 1600 66 7 833 269 * 269 * 26 *«— ta 

21 ta 9 ta BlflTpp 258 ISta I 7 V 6 17 ta— ta 

54 * 19 * Brack 265 3 ta 3 ta 3 ta 

2 «V» ISta Brdcwv 1*2 58 22 86 50 ta 229 * 229 *— ta 

40 ta 28 BkyUG 3.12 76 8 115 3 « 9 * 39 V* 39 ta 4 - V* 

25 I 9 ta BkUGPf 267 96 14 25 249 * 24 ** 

feta 29 BkUGPt 195 116 20 36 3 Sta M + ta 

26 ta 13 BwnStl *0 16 9 3 20 ta 20 ta 209 b— ta 

299 * 22ta BrwrtGp 1*6 46 18 131 feta 28 % feta 

50 % feta BrwnF 160 2* 17 621 489 * 48 48 — 9 * 

40 % 27 BrftMffc 160 23 B 450 38 ta 36 ta feta— ta 

40 V* 27 % BrshWI J2 1* 14 72 31 ta 309 * 31 

1994 131 * Bundy 60 46 9 19 18 17 V* 18 4 - ta 

20 15 ta BunkrH ZIA 11* 20 19 % 19 I 9 ta— ta 

feta feta BortnCI 12 45 ll%* 18 % 11% — % 

28 % 23 BurllKl 164 66 71 231 26 % 2 Sta 25 % — ta 

5916 35 BrINIfl 160 2* 8 1042 56 % SSta 5 S 4 b— 9 b 

79 * Ata BrtNopf *5 86 I Ata 6ta Ata + 1 % 

22 V* If BrIN pf 2.12 9 J 1 22 ta 22 V* 22 ta ♦ ta 

51 V 6 449 * BrIMpf S 5 Aell.l 28 50 ta sota 50 ta 

1816 llta Bumdv 64 36 13 49 12 % 12 % 12 % * ta 


409* 30Vj AT AT pi 364 96 

41% feta ATATpf 3*4 96 

27% is** AWafr* 160 A1 

69Vi HtaAWafpf 163 Z2 
IT* 10 Awolpl 1*5 106 

125* 10 AWQSPf 1*5 10.9 


1*0 5* 1716360 23V* 227* 23 — ta 


206* 12V* Buflrin 
Bta IV* Buttes 


28ta I9ta AmHott 260 116 
feta SSta ATrPr SJA 8.1 
17 4»* ATrSc 

86% 60% ATrlfn 564 6.7 
36 26ta Ameron 160 -6 
50 feta AmesDs X A 


34 40 % 40 ta 40 »— % 
4 41 ta 41 % 41 ta 
210 feta 24 % feta — 9 * 
?0i 64 66 66 - ta 

5001 I2ta 12 12 — ta 

5002 12 llta llta— T 
153 21 *k 21 ta 2194 + ta 

31 69 % 69 W» 69 V* — ta 
151 ISta 14 % 1496 — % 
12 B 5 ta 844 * 84 V*— V* 
7 34 V* 344 * 349 *— V* 


3Vk Buies Pf 1651 


*2 26 IB 338 20 
70 7 


6 23 1700 4894 47 ta 47 V*— IV* 


29V, a ta Amefek JO 36 12 256 24 ta 23 ta 2394 — ta 


122 iflta CB 5 
Bta 4 % CCX 
57 % 27 CIGNA 
JIVj 23 % CIO Pi 
51 % 50ta ciGPf 
79 * 2 V 4 CLC 

54 219 * CNA Fn 

llta 89 * CNAI 


77 % IT.j Am tac *8 27 % 27 27 — ta 

16 tfn Amtesc S 635 8V* 7 % 8 + % 

69 50 ’ > Amoco 3 J 0 56 ■ 23 * 4 x 10 % 59% 59 % — % 

Mis 261 * AMP .72 2 J 18 3547 29 % 29 V* 29 % — ta 

24 11 % Amoco *0 15 16 21 12 % 13 ta 12 V* 

ro’-n 12% Amrn s 8 12 18 % llta 18 ta 


27 - ta 
8 + % 


24 11 % Amoco 

20 '.* 12% Amrep s 


32 % 19 % AmSth 160 4 J 


12 I8ta llta llta 
15 32 % 32 ta 32 % — V* 


43 % 25 % Anwtad 160 46 13 245 < 0 % 39 % 39 % - % 


4 % 1% Anocmo 

24 ’* 14 '- Anloe s 
30 % 19 % Anchor 168 5 * 


42 % 25 % AnClav 1*2 36 34 
12 V. 9 % AndrGr *0 1 J 15 
M 77 13 


12 V. 9 % AndrGr 
24 % 17 Anpellc 


235 3 % 3 % 3 % 

17 904 19 % 18 % 19 

921 26 % 259 * 26 + % 

M 9 39 38 % 38 % — % 

15 8 11 % 1 T% 11 %— V* 

13 58 22 % 22 % 27 % - V* 


27 % 1 H% CSX 1.14 4-7 
40 % 24 CT 5 160 3 * 
12 % 7 % C 3 Inc 

31 % 229 * Cabot .92 14 

14 % 8% Caesar 

23 % 11 % Col Fed 68 Z 1 
50 % 32 % CalFdpf 4*5 96 
20 % IJta Collfm 35b IS 

17 V* 11% Commi .12 9 


36 % 15 % CRLkS 60 
8 3 CmpR a .141 

feta 10 % CpRBlB 3_50 


62 >* Anhein 260 2 J 12 1040 89 % B8ta 88% — % 76 % 56 Cam So 150 14 12 344 73 % 73 % 74 % + 1 % 


31 % 20% Aniwuwl 
65 47 * Anheu pt 360 58 

19 % I 3 ta Anlxlr 38 1.9 
16 % 8% Anthem 64 6 


IS'. I Ota Anttmv 64 b 36 
13 9 % Apache 38 26 

2 % V* AnchP vrt 
19 ”* 15 % AoetlP unZIO ll.l 
73 55 % AnPwpi zi 2 11 * 

33 27 % AaPwpf 4.18 125 

30 % fe ApPwpl ISO 126 


32 30 30 30 + % 

IB 21 62 % 62 62 

1.9 16 193 14 % 14 % 14 % 

6 13 90 11 10 % 10 % + % 

3 J I 6 12 % 129 * 129 * — ta 
26 10 Ml 10 % 109 * 109 *— % 
100 IV. Ita 1 % + % 
1.1 309 1 * 18 % 18 % 

1 * 61 CH n 70 70 — ta 

25 11 33 % 33 33 ta + ta 

26 9 30 % 30 30 V. 


15 % 9 % CdPKS 68 
22 % 14 % CanPE* 60 
228 V* 150 % CapOts 30 


14 V* 10 COrlM B 68 


20 llta 11% 11% 


3 «ta 17 % AptDta 1.761 5 * 18 IM 33 % 33 % 33 ta— 'A 


15 8 AppIMB 

23 % 15 % ArchDn 


8 % 23 ta ArIPpf 368 11 J 
% 14 ArXBU 60 19 


24 % 16 Arkla 168 56 
'■ ', ArtnRl 

16 ' ■ 6% Armen 

25 % I 5 ta Armen! Z10 106 
24 ' • 161 * ArmsRb 68 28 


127 13 V* 12 % 129 *— ta 
. 14 b 6 15 1118 22 % 22 % 22 %— V* 
361 IIJ 34 30 % 29 V* 30 % + % 

60 IJ 8 650 11 % 21 % 21 W— V* 

168 56 17 1342 20 % 30 20 — ta 

34 — 

762 8% Bta Bta — V* 

Z 10 106 8 19 % 19 % 19 % — ta 

68 2 J 7 28 * 17 % I6ta 14 % — ta 


24 % 159 * CaroFI 60 1 J 11 173 23 % 23 % 23 %— % 

29 % 19 % CarPw 260 9.1 7 480 * 28 % feta 28 ta— % 

35 % WW CorPPl 267 IBS 9 * 25 % 25 2Sta + % 
48 35 % CarTec ZIP 56 9 132 369 * 36 % 36 % — ta 
111 * 7 % Corral 67 J 12 36 Bta 8% 894 —% 

48 % 33 ta CarBPIr 160 26 9 34 47 47 47 

30 % 15 % CarfMw 1*7 4 * 10 384 289 * 27 % 28 %—% 

39 % 20 CartWl S 3 I* 14 327 39 ta 389 * 38 V— % 

lita 9 H CascNG T *0 61 9 62 17 ta 17 V* 17 V * % 

16 % 9 V* CastICk 245 10 % Wta 10 % 

29 15 V CstlCpf 10 J 94 23 V* 23 23 % + % 

40 % 28 % CafroT JO IS 905 33 T* 33 % 33 ta— V* 

27 % 16 Ceco 30 3 * 12 16 24 % fe 24 


fe'. 16 % ArmsRb 68 2 J 7 289 17 % lata 14 %— ta 
38 23 ’. Armwin 1J0 33*25 322 37 V 37 ta 37 ta— % 


115 ta 62 % Cakplto 460 46 10 725 112 % 109 109 % — 3 % 


34 ' « 19 AraCP 1*0 4.1 7 

25 '. 12% ArowE *0 IS * 

29 16 Artra *j 6285 


fell 14 ’* Arvlns JO 36 
27 V 17 % ASarco 
33 V 20V AshlOU 160 56 
42 % 31 ta AshlOpf 396 96 


116 29 % 28 ’.* 29 % + % 
155 13 ta 13 % 13 % — 1 * 
24 28 % 2 i% 2 Sta— % 
178 22 % feta feta 
837 23 % 23 % 23 % — % 
161 32 % 32 32 % — % 

5 4 lta 41 % 4 l%— % 


44 % 34 Colon Pf 430 106 1 42 V* 42 V* 42 Vj— ta 

15 7 ta Certuvn 63 e 6 23 48 8 % 8 V* (% 

43 % 33 ta Cerrtel 238 15 10 5 B 43 ta 43 43 % + % 
26 % 17 Canfexn 11 201 25 % feta 24 V— ta 

S ta 17 % CenSOW 262 86 7 13 » 25 % 25 V* 35 % — ta 

5 * 17 % CenHud 264 10 * 0 129 28 U 279 * 27 %— 9 k 

36 % 20 % CHudpf 267*116 640 26 ta 26 26 % + V* 


129 28 U 279 * 27 *. — 9 k 
640 26 ta 26 26 % + V* 


20 % 14 % CnllPS 164 S 3 10 1995 19 % 19 % 19 % 


48 '.* AsdDG 260 A0 10 402 t*ta 65 % 45% —1 


110 77 "a AMO Pi 6 . 7 S 4 S 

74 J. 18 % AIMon* 160 73 10 


l 3 W 6 taW 6 106 
3 31 % 21 % 219 *— % 


29 % 20 % AlCvEI 368 37 10 174 29 V 29 % 29 % + % 
64 'i 401 * A II Rich 460 6.9 27 3980 58 % SI 58 — % 


434 t> 3 B 4 AlIRCBl 360 J 
MV 33 i* AIIRepf 3 J 5 10-0 
153 97 AIIRepf 260 26 

18 ' > 11 ~a AlUnCo 
37’ 1 18 V AllBOt A0 1.8 19 

49 32 V AutoDI 68 16 20 

5 4 '. Avalon n 8 

29 % 15 % AVEMC 60 11 14 

39 % 24 ‘n Averv 60 16 13 

15 % 10 A«lall n 7 

41 71 Avne! SO 16 15 

25 % IT-** Avon 260 10.6 9 

30 % 18 Avdln II 


3 395 395 29 $ —1 

S 002 37 ta 37 ta 37 ta— V* 


269 * 179 * CnLaEI 268 73 
35 V* 29 % CLaEt Pf All 116 
llta 8V CeMPw 160 116 
19 % 12 CVtPS 1 J 0 106 
Wta 2% CenirDf 
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“CONTRARIAN INVESTING”; 90% RIGHT 


Entera 

ERNEa 1 J 7 .il J 


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Eoumkrr as* ita % Ji— ta 

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Eq> R 03 1*2 3 * I 658 46 % 45 % 46 — % 1 

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wiEvanP 11 2% 3 2 ! 

vie wan pf 17 2 % 2 % 2 % + ta , 

wfEvnptB 13 4 3 % 3 % — % 


Last week, the DJI closed around 1315 : 
when the sacred "Average" was hoyenng at the 790 level gjjg^lh ^ 


EOBbnk 
Eoimkrr 
Enmk pi 2*1 iij 
E m Res 1*2 3* 8 
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wiEvanP 
vtevanpf 
vfEvnpfB 


7 ?% 1 6 c^ BEFORETOUCHING 750"0uroptimism 

w^wi^id^^theTet^E^evenBARFOrSweeWy.inmirrQnngthemalflisealong^e 

"StreeL" wrale;“the market seems lo be saying that rl s seen the future and rt doesn t 


ExCeto 1*2 4 * 10 184 37 ta 36 % 36 %— V. 


33 16 V 16 % 16 V 


350 65 810911 57 % 51 % 52 — % 


ital Equipment dropping 2'/, to 91 U. NCR 
Corp. ^ to 28 ^. Data General l’« to 32 li and 
Control Data 1 V 4 to 26 . 

Nabisco was third-most active finishing un- 
changed at 81 

AT&T fell to 23 in active trading. 

In. media and entertainment stocks, CBS ad- 
vanced IU to 1 181 - 4 . The company denied re- 
ports that it was on the veige of a stock buyback 
program. 

MCA Inc added 1>4 to 58 * 4 . Capital Cities 
Communications dropped 5 to 222 . Disney lost 
2 -S to 875 k and Time Inc. decreased 2 ^ to 56 Mr 

Trans World Airlines Inc. tacked on H to 20 4 ! 
in active trading. It agreed to be acquired by 
Texas Air Corp. for $23 a share 

General Electric fdl l l 4 lo 595 k. 

Some drug stocks were under pressure with 
Upjohn falling 4 Ik to 103 k» and Eli Lilly losing* 
to 84 . 


x% 

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2-20 14 

39 

243 64 

V 64 

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1.96 76 

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ft 29 % 

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Die -law of contrary" reason triumphed, belittling dour PJ^tiets » vho l o para- 
phrase. Oscar Wilde: -know the price ol everything andthj Jjjj* 
late 1981 . approximately 90 % of our "buy" recommendations subsoquent^ a*an- 
ced. with 92 % of CGR's, select, "short sales." buckling, among them APPLE. TOl^- 
CO. COMMODORE and TANDY. During lh e crazefor high ’°“ r 
mused “Short APPLE $ 56 . COLECO S 51 . COMMODORE S 58 . and TANDYS 47 . the 
Quartet is not in hannony with reality. “ Since then ^eQuartet hassou «l APR. rot- 
ted to $ 18 . COLECO collapsed under S 10 , COMMODORE C *P S ***: ’ 
and TANDY toppled to $ 24 . There is no Dusk without Dawn, no deatni yvrthotd birth 
Th edemise of bloated equities will not abort the DOW vaultingover^WW-Thepkisha- 
ty of achievement will thrust mankind to horizons i undrearned l of . 

The market is telling us. in the eloquence of the Tape -that the stadia Monel 
East and West, of confused and chaotic societies, is inevitable: lhat In mis decade, 
thedrre warnings of Orwell’s “ 1984 ";will prove of-course; that in flying to the Moon.we 
saw the face of God, of theGalaxies; that the silence of Space that enwombs the earth 
was not totally void, that the eternal spirit of man was resurrected. Our current letter 
reviews the “gestalt” of the market: highlighting a "senior^ secunty that may be 
digested by a major predator, 50% above current levels: in addition, we discuss a 
low-priced, emerging equity, that could levitate, emulating the success of a recently 
recommended: “special situation"; that escalated 800°i>in a brief time-span. 

For your complimentary copy; please write to. or telephone: 


R CAPITAL 
_ GAINS 
RESEARCH 


C.VLC. Capital Venture Consultants 
Amsterdam B.V. 

Kafverstraat 112 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Telex: 18536 


Name: 


Address: 


1 


| Pho ne: wm-sj 


Pau performance does no! guarantee future restAs 


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358 76 I 1653 fe*. 
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200 73 12 X 

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250 64 1 37 % 

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14 327 13 % 13 % 1316 — ta 
150 16 8 852 73 ta 72 % 70 — % 

220 17 12 9176 M% 59 % S 9 %— 1 % 

2 J 0 IS II 1070 71 % 70 % 70% —1 

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34 26 44 ID Ilk 8 | 

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224 XT 35 I 860 5 Bta 57 57 %— 1 % 
5 -OOr 68 6 5466 73 % 72 % 73 — ta 

- 05 ! -1 2 X 7 39 ta 3 *V 39 — ta I 

X 75 8 J 4 42 % 42 ta 43 V. — ta 

550 8 * 19 57 % 56 % $ 7 % + ta 

.16 27 18 124 6 5 % * 

A 250 13 % 13 % 12 % 

156 IJ 51 721 Blta M 8 lta— % 

7 108 13 % 13 % 12 % 6 % 

IX A 6 II MSI 41 % 40 % 41 %—% 
1*0 10 * 1100 : 12 % 12 % 12 % + 16 

17 41 4 V 4 % 4 % 

.10 6 X 440 17 V. 16 % 16 % + ta 

150 71 22 % 22 % 22 V + % 

168 73 24 22 % 22 ta 22 % — % 

1.18 X 7 M IX 32 % X 32 % 

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12% 

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21 % Human 
19 % KuatMf 
33 % HuffEF 


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50 26 14 S 25 



Wta Hydro! 250 66 10 


X 22 % LN Ho Z 770 95 11 44 X% 38 % 281 *— ta 

17 % 12 % U.E RY 1190156 168 1 A* 13 % 14 

4 U 1 % LLCCD 63 1 % 1 % 1 % 

12 8 LLCpf 3 9 % r.t 91 *— ta 

13 % 7 % LTV 8848 8 7 ta 71 *— % 

SS 41 % LTVpf I 42 fe 42 — W 

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49 feta LTVpf 5 33 11.9 673 45% 44 % 44 % + ta 

Mta IOV LTVpf IX IM 1286 11 % llta llta— >, 

17 10 % LQllM 38 XI 14 ta 13 % 13 %— IS 

29 % lita LocfG* MB 75 7 141 23 % 22 % 22% — % 

UP* 6 V Lafanw 30 28 49 7 ta 7 % 7 % 

14 % fta tamur« 34 75 2 30 0 % 9 % 9 % 4 -ta 

4 % IV LmnSK 173 39 3 % 3 % 3 % 

Mta 10 V Lowtlnt 30 AB IS IN 11 % 11 % 11 % — I* 

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15 % 9 % Lennar 30 16 19 51 

24 % 10 % LtucNtS 4 342 

37 % 73 Lori 51 US 56 29 1001 

50 % feta LOF 15 U I 61 

79 % 68 % LOF pi 4*5 66 1 

feta 22 % UMVCP *2 Z 3 17 7 

90 % 53 Lilly 3*0 35 » 1155 

50 V 17 % Umltad *2 3 28 412 

2S% 8 % Umtdnri 8 

44 % Xta LtncNW 1 J 4 A 2 11 119 
33 % 18 % LlncPI 2*40105 W 


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63 % 40 ITTPIK 450 6 * 147 59 % 

61 % 44 % ITT pfO 550 83 6 59 % X X 

46 % X ITTPfN 2*3 5.1 7 44 44 44 

65 42 % ITT pfl AS 0 76 3 6116 61 61 

21% 13 V mint ix a* 251 m* m% m% 

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19 % 13 IdralB _ 3 X 13 % 13 % 13 % 


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51 % 2516 Looms* IX XI 12 954 

35 21 Lankan 30 J 18 39 


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82 % B 3 ta- 2 % 
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IJ 9 1575 50 % 50 ta 50 % — V 
27 12 IM 291 * 29 % 29 Va 
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6 W 39 feta 31 * 31 V— V 


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05 21 Logical 30 6 18 39 32 ta 31 * 31 V— % 

36 % 21 LomFIn 1.16 23 13 206 35 * 35 % 35 % + ta 

27 % 16 % LomM s 264 9.1 11 290 27 % 26 % »%— % 


26 % 17 % mPa-rr 264 10 * 7 1036 25 V 25 % 2 SH 


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70 14 % IIPovv pf Z 10 105 

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19 % 14 IndlMpf Z 15 11 J 
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100 : Wta Wta WU— % . 
58 : 20 20 TO 9 % 

1200 : 19 % 18 * 18 *— % 
1050 Z 37 % 37 37 % 9 % 

20 nz 33 * 33 V 33 V 
1 X X X + % 
79 34 * 34 % 34 % — % 
825 38 % 37 % 37 % — % 
<77 10 9 % ft*— % 

1452 13 % 13 % 13 % — 16 
1000 : 60 % 60 % 60 % + % 

11 18 ta 17 % 18 % 9 % 

6 18 % 18 % 18 % -f W 

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Ml 5 % Sta 5 % 

258 25 % 25 V 2 SV 


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51 % 44 Lonospf 5*7 106 
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279 3 % 3 3 % 

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202 25 li 25 * Xta— V 

100 : 44 44 44 

200 : 46 46 46 —1 

13 19 % 19 % 19 %—% 
77 19 % 19 * 1914 + % 

13 20 ta 19 % 19 %— ta 

19 23 % Xta 23 % + ta 
19 W* Wta 18 % + % 
10 60 80 60 —1 

14 14 % Mta 14 % 

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29 % 17 * LongDi 32 26 14 209 28 27 ta 27 % — it 


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50 36 Umtt 250 46 6 7 44 43 % 43 % 

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11% 12 + Vfe 


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(Continued on Page 12) 











I 

*■ -rv ; 
•J“ 



Statistics Index 


^MEX Pflcst p.U Enmbes reports P.T7 
amex rngtt/iow»p.i4 nmo rate me p.i7 
NYSE onus P.1Q Gt*d mena* P.ll 
NYSE niphs/iom P.U iirimsf rerta p.ll 
ConocHon stocks PIS MorkrtJwnmwyP.nl 
Currertor raw p.ll Option P,1J 


CwwnodUles 

Dividends 


P.W OTC stock P.U 
P.12 Other markets P.U 


»' " c 


r,l r • 

: a~»: .5 • 


^-■-1 l vT* ? \ 1 ' .v 

1 W •* <i r- 

1 :C ' . 


N( 


FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


TECHNOLOGY 


U.S. Adopts Laser Method 
In Uranium Enrichment 


' e s t «hg-^o> N 


By ERIC N. BERG 

Nen- York Tones Service 

N EW YORK — It is billed as the state-of-the-art 
technology, in uranium enrichment, a step that will 
create jobs, help restore the U.S. government’s domi- 
nance in uranium sales and possibly reduce energy 
costs for thousands of households and businesses. However rosy 
it may sound, that was what the Energy Department was saying 
last week when it announced that it was abandoning two long- 
standing techniques for enriching uranium for unclear power 
plants and weapons and would concentrate on a newer, 

more efficient, less costly technique. 

. Although the new approach, called the “atomic vapor laser 
isotope separation" process, - 


has many problems that must fA , 

be overcome and although it Om* CODCinaOD is 

would not be used until 1995. j . j» • 

department officials are confi- tllilt HUB 18 

4e way Of the 

“Our conclusion is that this next CCHtHry. 1 

is the way of the next cento- 

ry,” said John R. Longe- 
necker, who is the deputy assistant secretary of energy far 
uranium enrichment “It’s the world’s best way of enriching 
ur anium " 

As it comes out of the ground, uranium ore cannot be used as 
fuel for nuclear power plants and weapons. The ore contains two 
isotopes of ur anium, but only one of them, nraninm 235, can 
support a nuclear reaction. And U-235 occurs in tiny quantities 
in ore — less than 1 percent of a given sample. Enrichment, which 
in the United States is performed only by the government 
because of the costs and risks involved, raises the U-235 content 
in uranium ore to about 4 percent 

The current technique for enriching uranium was developed 
during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project Known as 
the gaseous-diffusion method, the technique worked, on the 
principle of passing nraninm ore in gas form through a filter that 
would collect the U-235. Although the method worked well, it 
required a tremendous amount of energy to force the gas through 
the filters. Another enrichment technique used today, called the 
gas-centrifuge process, requires far less energy than the first 
method but is extremely costly because of the large number of 
huge, high-speed centrifuges that must be purchased. 

O O THE government has been seeking a cheaper, more 
efficient way to gather U-235 for enriching uranium, and it 


S O THE 
efficient 
thinks it 


k J thinks it has found such a process with atomic vapor laser 
isotope separation. 

The technique, which was developed a decade ago by scientists 
at Hughes Aircraft Co. and Exxon Carp, and has since been 
refined at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, starts 
by vaporizing u ranium ore through the application of intense 
heat. 

The vapor is then placed in a “separation chamber," a shooting 
gallery of sorts, in which it is bombarded with laser beams. They 
ionize the U - 235 in the ore — that is, they give it a negative 
charge. Thai causes the U-235 to be attracted to positively 
charged metal plates inside the separation chamber. Scientists 
can then draw off the U-235 to enhance other uranium ore. 

“You are just separating out the various components, and 
you've got enriched uranium,’* Mr. Longenecker said. 

The attractiveness of the method is its cost While an enrich- 
ment plant based on centrifuges would require 2$ acres (1 1 
hectares), Mr. Longenecker estimates that one based on lasers 
might occupy only one-fourth that space. The equipment far such 
a plant, he says, would cost roughly one-third as much as for a 


Thai bring the case, the government hopes to save hundreds of 
millions of dollars annually on the cost of producing nuclear fuel 
That could go far, uranium experts say, toward restoring its 
leadership in the business of sefitng enriched uranium. Although 
(Continued on Page 16, CoL 8) 

Currency Rates 


from Rates 


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Source: Merm Lynch, AP 


Gold 


Seams: Rruten. Commerbeak COdtr 
L«mo& terns amfc Bonk el TOkya. 


June 13 

. KM PM. diVe 

HOBBKw 3059 314.10 + 115 

U redw n 31450 — UndL 

Paris 015 kilo} 3023 21243 -9LW 

31355 SKIS —UK 
CMBaq IK 10 31175 — DOS 

Mew York __ 314X1 +U0 

LiWwrft Parts and London oHlaO) ftf- 
Aw Heap Kona Ond Zurich opening ant t 
riostne price*.- Mew York Comeat current 
contract ab orices Ja US. Seer nance. 
Sauna: Reuters, 


3teralh«a&s*fcribttttc, 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10. 

Page 11 


CJosJtvs in London Ota Zurich, fixings to After European eentmx New York rates at 4 PM. 

to) Commenkri franc tb) Amount* needed to buy one pound (ctAmoimts needed to tuvene 
dollar (-) Units of HUM UnttstdUMM UomoflimNa.:ntdouotad; MJL: notavontddo. 
(O) To bur one pound: MS . ISM 


OtherMUarlalnc* 

rmimcY oer 034 OorrencY per U88 Currency our USS Currency per USS 

Ame&peso 751.7? FMmoridm 54075 Motor. Hop. 1472 S.Kor,wo« WS.W 

1XVI2 crertdme. 13500 Mu* peso 38400 Sw-peerta I7SU 
Ausrr. schlL 2148 HoneiCenpS 7J70S Norw. krone U775 SwuA krona *-93 

Belafin.fr. siifl IwUou rupee 1244 PBILpese T745 Taiwan f 

BrSieno. 544500 lad&nmtah UMJD PWlescoKo 17550 ThalheM 77AS 

UMUanS 137 Irish* 0.9857 SaMBrtyal 34901 TaiJchuHra SDJS 

Daalsli krone 11.0975 IsmeBshek. J.1T450 Slre,$ ■ 2224 UAEUfctoi 3A72S 

EpvpI. poantf 07519 . KuwcttH«nnr 03034 lAfr.taad 1.9841 Vsrer. body. 1330 


U.S. Sales 
Fell 0.8% 
For May 

April Figures 
Revised Upward 

By John M. Berry 

Washington Pea Serrkx 

WASHINGTON — Retail sales 
in the United States feU 0.8 percent 
in May, but the figures for the pre- 
vious month were revised upward 
sharply to show a 2.4-percent gim, 
the Commerce Department report- 
ed Thursday. 

The large upward revision for 
April primarily the result of a 
much higher figure for automobile 
sales, means ihat the average level 
of sales for the two months, SI 14.2 
tuition, was 22 percent higher than 
the average for the first quarter of 

theyear. 

The May deetine left sales 53 
percent higher than they were in 
May 1 984. The figures are adjusted 
for seasonal variations and differ- 
ences in die number of selling days, 
but not for inflation. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baldrige said the figures indicated 
th«t “consumer demands are grow- 
ing at a healthy pace.” 

“Large increases in disposable 
incomes, boosted by tax refunds, 
should stimulate spending in 
June,” he said. 

Some analysts, however, inter- 
preted the retail sales data much 
Iffss bultisbly. Among other things, 
part of the hi ghw consimw de- 
mand is being «»Hcfied increasingly 
with goods produced abroad, add- 
ing to the nation's trade deficit 
rather than to domestic production 
and payrolls, analysts said. 

Sandra Shaber of Chase Econo- 
metrics said the erratic month-to- 
month change was due in part to 
delayed distribution of income-tax 
refunds. The end of formal quotas 
on Jap anese auto imports has also 
affected the figures, she said. 

The advance report on April 
sales showed only a 0.9-percent in- 
crease over the month before, with 
auto sales, which account for about 
20 percent of total sales, falling 2.7 
percent. Those advance figures, as 
usual were based on reports from 
only about 2^00 companies. 

With more complete information 
f rom a sample of 15,000, the April 
figure was revised upward. 


Dollar Higher 
biNewYork 

United Pros International 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
dosed higher Thursday when a 
disappointing May retail sales 
report was offset by a sharp 
upward revision in the figures 
for April. 

The dollar was off following 
a report lhat retail sales slipped 
in May, but turned upward 
again in response to a revision 
to a 2.4Hpercent gain in April 

The British pound was at 
$1.2660 in New York, down a 
notch from $12676. 

Other New York prices and 
Wednesday rates mduded: 
3.0930 German Deutsche 
marks, up from 3.0905; 2.6070 
Swiss francs, up from 16035; 
9.43 French francs, up from 
9.4125; 1,968 Italian tire, up 
from 1,961; and 249.40 Japa- 
nese yen, down from 249.78. 


•* — SiBp 1 

M Will 


Latest TV Option: Pay-Per-Show 

U.S. Cable Firms 

See Salvation - ^ 

J. .- Sales 

In New Venture :-v* ■ ■ -A- . 

Richard W. Stevenson * •LTy’//?- ' e ' :y, ‘ : / V - 

New York Tunes Service • ^ ,T ” * - ■ ■■/'. \ - / 

NEW YORK — The cable o :* "ibri/yCf I ‘ V - 

television indnsuy feels under "><• ■ : r .' • ■/' *" VL 

si^e. It isfadng growng con^c- ^ ..A 

titian for viewer alien non from ' ■>■. C V A . \ • 

the boom in video<»ssetie re- 1 ry. '. - \. 

corders, and as fewer new cable ‘ 

systems are buflt h is having 

trouble wooing and holding new : ‘ ? "* ? • 

subscribers. r 4 . . - . !• 

Those problems have cable 

programmmg networks reeking :•& , • : 

another way to attract audiences, ‘ ,;k 

and some erf than thank they '*?», rwt-Jtt i- .' ■ .*82 -ea 

have found it in pay-per-view rvmmsumr; . 

tdeviaon. ‘ - 

Two networks, Showtime/The 

Movie Channd and The Playboy ...... 

Channel annrainced nt»nc last ued expansion and growth,” said gramming to those sul 
week for pay-per-view opera- Que Spakfing, president erf the who had called and reqi 
tions, and a third company, Playbc^r Programming Dislribu- The viewer would be 
called The Ex chan ge, is devdop- tirmCo. to $5 for a chance to see 

ing a -qmilflr offering . Not everyone is so optimistic. __n w orc ;# : s ^, own 

Pay-per-view allows cable sub- Cable industry skeptics say that ^ al a 

smbers to pay a small fee to see a pay-per-view will just draw v^w- Mtwt Hm>,i becomes ; 
speaSc movie or other special era away from pay cable. Others m vWco Ev 

programming. Subscribes can contend that the nec«sary tedt- ^,^,. 1 ;,^, 
get pay-per-view instead of, or in twlogy is not yet widely avail- ^Ja^ecials might ali 
additi on to, the continuous pro- able, and that getting sufficient 

p— “ g ^ 

raWe hetrorts such as s£J- The systems would work tike pay^er-vww as a neces 
lime or Time Inc/s Home Box this: The network would advo- 

Office. tise its offerings to cable sub- subscriber gro«Th. In ad 

“Of all the new developments scribers, and would broadcast « a reaction to the ana 
gne mpg in the ever-changing the prog ram m in g via satellite to the vKteooassette recor 
Mdd pay televiaon, we red loadcable operatora at sched- “JJJ 7 
that pay-per-view offers the tiled tunes. The cable operator in meal and a direct nval 
greatest opportunity far contin- mni would transmit the pro- (Continued on Page 16 


Sperry Opens 
Merger Talks 
With Burroughs 


By Tim Bovee 

The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Burroughs Corp. 


which is based in Detroit, is limited 
almost entirely to computers. 

The combination of Burroughs 


and Sperry Corp. said Thursday and Sperry would create a compa- 
they were discussing a merger ihat ny with 1984 dam-processing reve- 


V^ 2 . "8a a>< 

C\pedttau:^U^pet^skiefsf'Psy tv . 

It* Nm Yo>k Tmi 


ny with ty»4 dam-processmg re\ - e- 
would create the world's second- nue of $7.97 billion — making it 
largest computer maker, but ana- the world's No. 2 computer maker 
lysis were skeptical the mulli-bD- behind International Business Ma- 
lien-doUar marriage would work. chines Corp.. whose 1 984 daia-pro- 
“It will probably make them cessing revenue was S44J billion, 
more competitive, but it is not cer- Second position now is held b\ 
tain that one and one is going to Digital Equipment Core., with 
make more than two. It may in fact data-processing revenues totaling 
make less than two " said Dave S63 billion Burroughs ranks ihi 


ued expansion and growth,” said 
Que Spakfing, president erf the 
Raybc^ Programming Distribu- 
tion Co. 

Not every chk is so optimistic. 
Cable industry skeptics say that 
pay-per-view will just draw view- 
ers away from pay cable. Others 
contend that the necessary tech- 
nology is not yet widely avail- 
able, and that getting sufficient 
hig h-quali ty programming will 

The systems would work tike 
this: The network would adver- 
tise its offerings to cable sub- 
scribers. and would broadcast 
the programming via satellite to 
local cable operators al sched- 


gramming 10 those subscribers 
who had called and requested it. 

The viewer would be billed $4 
to $5 for a chance to see a movie 
wed before it is shown on pay 
cable, and probably at about the 
same time it becomes available 
an video cassette. Eventually, 
sporting events, live concerts and 
mhw specials "tigh t aim be of- 
fered. 

Some industry executives see 
pay-per-view as a necessary re- 
sponse to the slowdown in cable 
subscriber growth. In addition, it 
is a reaction to the emergence of 
the video-cassette recorder as a 
major factor in home entertain- 


Tcrrie, senior analyst with The 
Yankee Group, a Boston-basal 
market research and consulting 
company. 


at $4.5 billion and Spem is seventh 
at $3.47 billion. 

One difficulty in a merger of the 
two companies is the lack of an 


ssssass-ii^ 


ukd times. The cable operator in “Ml 20(1 a diract rival to cable 
turn would transmit the pro- (Continued on Page 16, CoL 5) 


announcement, said the}’ were “en- 
gaged in negotiations with respect 

““ Pg mo™°i^^ i -' 0 N 1 nto 8 Smp^y l™> : or Spcm and Burrou^iscom- 
daboraZ oTlhcslalemenl. P > pulers ar e .ncompaublc, Mr. Temc 
™ a A transaction merging the two . 

Eventually, companies could beworih nearly l ° ha iV° ^ su ‘ 

$6bSlion, based on the value of the perceded by the other, he said 
Lalsobeof - common stock shares of each. ° t f^ ,8 L B L hn ^ 

Burroughs stock dosed Tburs- P®™h e J™ er & Ct J;, ,n 

aainves see day al $5625, down $3,125. Speny ^ ^ “J er 8 er ^ oesn 1 , seem 1° 

lecessary re- , ra ded at $5625, off 50 cents. make ^ ^ much sensc t0 “«■ 

xwn in cable Sperry, with $5.2 bOhoo in sales “You’ve got two incompatible 
1 addition, it last year, is the larger of the two product lines." Mr. Elling said, 
mergence of companies. But part of its business r You 08,1 566 some synergy in try- 

scoider as a is in non-computer fields such as hig to compete for government 

te entertain- military electronics, aviation con- business, but what do you do after 

ival to cable irols and farm equipment. The firm that?" 

: 16, CoL 5) is based in New York. The discussions with Burroughs 

The business of Burroughs. were Sperry’s second recent at- 
tempt at a merger. Sperry and ITT 
__ Corp. in March announced they 

jrxwB I ntAl»PCt KnfAC ^ hdd raCT P^ discussions but 
r C/X XXXIXyX ilXI-lXyO were unable to reach an agreement 

Mr. Elling said the announce- 
inges, most of • American companies could be- meat of merger talks now had little 
aduding these: come -more competitive in world to do with the state of the computer 
, would contin- markets to the extent that lower industry, which this year is facing 
with it sales of interest rates in the United States the prospect of reduced profits, 
and other fur- discouraged capital inflows and “it seems like Sperry has been a 


How die Economy Reads to Lower Interest Rates 


Bv Robert A. Bennett Most economists, business exec- some d ram a tic c hang e s , most of 
J New York Tuna Serna: utives and bankers, however, are them to the good, including these: 

NEW YORK— Americans are stffl cautious, their optimism tern- • Home bmldiiig would contm- 
enjoying the lowest interest rates P*** 1 *9 P 3 ^ ^ suffered flourish, and with it sales of 

they have seen in five years or &om the inflation of the 1970s and apphances, carpets and other fur- 
more. Mortgage rates are down. the disinflation of the 1980s. Some nishmgs. 

Car loan ratesarc down. The cost fear that today’s low rates could be • Car sales would probably 


more. Mortgage rates are down, the disinflation of the 1980s. Some nishmgs. . forced down the value erf the dollar, live one. so to speak, Mr. Elling 

Car loan ratesare down. The cost fear that today’s low rates could be .Car sales would probably Not everyone would be a wrnner, said. “They obviously made H be 
of business borrowing has fallen. a hnriwnger of recession. Others surge, buoying a host of related °f «»«*■ payments ac- known that they were talking to 

Even te Troany Department's “ .‘5 * ^ ^ intemias fmm stel to rnbber. «■ 


borrowing costs have plunged. 

The decline has come relative!' 
quickly and spread pretty mud 


inflation once again could begin to 
posh interest rates to lofty levels. 


Nonetheless, there seems to be a • Corporations woald be able to 
growing consensus that for a cob- strengthen balance sheets by selling 


_ , _ . ’ sonal income, and people who de- Burroughs employs 65,000 peo- 

• The cost of financing the fed- pgod heavily on interest for thor pie in the United States and 12 
eral denat could drop sharply. financial well-being could see their foreign countries. Speny has a 

• Corporations would be able to incomes shrink. workforce of nearly 78,000 people, 

strengthen balance sheets by selling “A lot of families have gotten Burroughs’ 1984 profits totaled 

rods to replace short-term debt used to living off interest income, $244.9 million. Sperry's profits in 

• Pressures on deeply indebted and that part of thor income could its fiscal year en din g March 31 io- 


rsrs teTpS 

points below a year ago and l«s * " 

than half of what they were as re- — — — — 

cently as 1981. 

If the rale relief persists — and 
many economists expectable or 

industries as and automo- 


bonds to replace short-term debL used to living off interest income, $244.9 


urtoughs’ 
4.9 mulior 


be cut in half.” Mr. Hyman said. . taled $286.7 million. 


was weak, but because people sud- 
denly have become confident that 
inflation has been beaten. I don’t 
know why." ' 

Philip Braverman, economist for 
Briggs, Scfaaedle & Co„ agreed. The 
dec! m e in interest rates represents a 
“wringing out of the faflatirwi fears 
that had dominated the credit mar- 
kets in recent decades,” he said 





MM 


S»A«t9 






mm 


*SrwUop:1JSl4trbht 

sources- Banaue du Benelux (BrvsseJs); Banco Commentate itafttma tMOan); Bunuue Ho- 
Nonale de Paris {Parts); Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAD (dfrar. rivet tDrbam). 
Other data from Reuters and 4ft 


Argentina Pays Creditors 
$250 Million in Interest 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Argentina paid 
$250 Bulli on in overdue interest 
Wednesday to its creditor banks 
around the world, as the United 
States and other governments pre- 
pared to lend Buenos Aires about 
$450 mflficti more. 

The payment makes Argentina 
current on interest payments up to 
Den 30. 1984, and reduces its inter- 
est arrears to commercial banks to 
about $1 bTPion. The bridge loan 
by the various governments will al- 
low Argentina to make further pay- 
ments. 

“The payment is another posi- 
tive step by the government erf Ar- 
gentina,” said William X Rhodes, 
a Citibank official who leads the 
committee of banks negotiating 
with Buenos Aries. Be said it 
woul d betp the bai^put kno place 

gentina’s foreign debt fbe re- 
scheduling agreement will provide 

Buenos Aires with $42 fauHon in 
fresh loans, which will help it pay 
off its older borrowing. 

The payment will also improve 
Argentina’s position before an in- 
teragency committee of American 
hank regulators tha t is niagthig in 
Washington. The regulators are re- 
viewing whether to downgrade Ar- 
gentine debt, winch could require 
banks to set aside substantial re- 
serves against their loans to Argen- 
tina. A tower credit rating for Ar- 
gentina would also make h more 
difficult to arrange the new loans 
by ihe co mmerci al banks 

David C. Molford, assistant 
Treasury secretary for inlemation- 






For the man with excep tional goals, 
a new dimension in private banking. 


WOfiam R. Rhodes 

al affairs, said that 10 to 12 govern- 
ments probably would participate 
in the bridge loan to Argentina, 
which would be repaid after the 
International Monetary Fund pro- 
vides new credits to Buenos Aires 
later this summer. The $12 bilHrar 
in IMF credits were made possible 
by an agreement, announced Tues- 
day, on a new austerity plan far 
Argentina. 

Mr. Mnlfor d declined to identify 
thecoontries Bkdy to participate in 
the bridge loan, but the Treasury 
said Wednesday in a statement that 
it expected the loan to be approved 
in the next few days. 

Swiss and West German hanking 
officials said Wednesday ihat their 
countries were reluctant to partici- 
pate in the bodge loan. Bui Mr. 
Mulfond said that was not a blow to 
die plans for the loan 


W ’hat makes TDB exceptional ? 

Ib start with, there is our 
traditional policy of concentrating 
on things we do unusually well. 
For example, foreign exchange, 
precious metals — and, very im- 
portantly, private banking. 

Today, as part of American 
Express International Banking 
Corporation, we offer you private 
banking with a totally new dimen- 
sion. This includes access to the 
broad range of asset management 
services and global investment 
opportunities provided by the 


American Express family of com- 
panies. And for certain clients, we 


also offer such valuable “extras” as 
Gold Card® privileges and the ex- 
clusive Premier Services,™ for 
round-the-clock personal and trav- 
el assistance. 

While we move with the 
times, our traditional policies do 
not change. At the heart of our 
business is the maintenance of a 
strong and diversified deposit 
base. Our portfolio of assets is also 
wefi-diversmed, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a conser- 
vative ratio of capital to deposits 
and a high degree of liquicnty - 
sensible strategies in these uncer- 
tain times. 


If TDB sounds like the sort of 
bank that meets your require- 
ments, visit us on your next trip 
to Switzerland. Or telephone: in 
Geneva, 022/37 21 II, in Chiasso, 
091/44 19 9L 

TDB offices in Geneva, London, Paris, 
Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monk Carlo , 
Nassau, Zurich, Buenos Aires, Sao 
Paulo. 

TDB, the 6th largest commercial bank 
in Switzerland, is a member of the 
American Express Company, which 
has assets of US$ 64.5 billion and 
shareholders' equity of US$4.8 billion. 



Trade Development Bank 


li The Trade Development 
ft at 96-98, rue du Rhone. 


tiding in Geneva, 

An American Express company 









Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE. FRIDAY, JUNE 14. 1985 




Thursday ^ 

MSE 

Closing 

Tables Include me nationwide prices 
up to ttw dosing an Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


11 MonM 
Him Lew Slock 


Sis. Cm 

Dtv. no. pe Wh hwi ton Quot-OfOe 


(Continued from Page 10) 



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Z76 

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% 


30 12b 

12 

12 


9 

236 43te 

42b 

43W 


5 

3184 15", 

15b 

15% 

■ % 


223 53b 

53 

53% - 

% 

7 

336* 34'a 

34 

34% 

% 

10 

175 17 

16", 

16’,— % 

6 

1790 16% 

16% 

16% 

■ ", 

9 

917 11% 

11", 

11% 

% 

R 

455 49b 

48b 

4$b— % 

25600:41% 

40% 

40", +Ib 


400: 83te 

83", 

B3te + ", 

: 

2800: 69b 

68 

68 — b 


1194 35% 

35% 

35 •— ", 


2 3% 

3% 



13 

5545 52b 

50% 


■ % 

19 

84 52% 

51% 

52% - % 


34 52b 

52b 

52b 

• % 


15 9b 

9V» 

9V»— % 

11 

9* 35% 

34% 

34%-lb 

16 

272 26% 

26% 

26% 


13 

401 30% 

30 

30 - ", 

10 

227 34b 

33 

33% — % 

104 3b 

3% 

3b 

■ % 

a 

1333 87% 

86% 

86% — 

% 


17 Mai lb 
Him LOW SWO 


Dtv. YkL PE 


SI*. cw* 

I00i Him Law ft* Pi pe 


ttMontn 

Him LOW HOC* 


Div. Tlfl. PE 


5lv Claw 

itos Him lc* Omt.Ci'Bt 


34V 28V PcrCpf 400 120 

34V 20% PurGpt 432 127 

30V 75v Polltcn 15* 40 12 

32% 1«V PolmEI 2.1 a ID 

44 34 PolEI Of 450 100 

40 31 PolEI pi 404 10.1 


5 6 MV 34V 35 + V I 302V 205 ToiUVfl 

30 34V 33V 347, I 3i 13V Telrote 

- ■ 40-.. 22V Tclo* 


89 34V, 34’, 347.— v. 

JIB 31% 30V 31% + % 

50: 45 45 45 

150X 40 40 40 + 7, 


257, 10V Pram I * J4 1.9 M 200 IJV 19 19 — . 

30V 25 Prlmrk ZOO 5L2 8 67 38V 37V 38V + % 

20% 11V PrtrrwC IJ ^3 «g, 1*- VV — % 

32V 13V PrtRiMl 0» J 2?^ V 

59V 497, PraaG Zta 4.9 13 1938 W ST* 53V— V 

14% 7V PrORm 02 Zl 20 232 15V 151, 15V V 

47% 31% Protar 100 17 9 1 38% 38% 3*“— % 


33 14V PSvCOI 200 80 

SO 1 ., |6% pscaipi "10 ioi2 
9V 4V PSind U» IZ9 8 457 
0% 6 P5lnpf 1.04 130 

8 6V PSInpl 108 119 
4T, 37 PSlnot 7.15 15.1 
437, 50 PSIn P< 90* 152 
57 44'.- PSInol 852 150 

551, 43V, PSinpf UB 15J 
5V 31, PSwNM 
11V 4% PSNHPl 

12 77, PNHolB 
IT, 107; PNHpK 
15 BV PNH P»D 
IS'- 9 PNHBlE 

13 7V PNH pIF 

14 7V PNH pIG 

27V 19'5 PSvNM 208 I0J 
31V 21 PS»EG.iW ’I 
14 10'., PSEGpt *00 *05 

38 28 PSEGPf 408 11.1 

40V 2?> PSEGpl 4 JO 110 
47V 33V, PSEGPl 505 1017 
20V 15 PSEGPf Z17 189 
42V 4*7, PSEGpl 400 11-2 
22V 14V PSEGpl 203 114 
10AV V PSEGPflZZS 110 
70% S3 PSEGPI 7 JO 110 
697, 55 PSEGpl 800 110 
40 ST PSEGpl 700 110 
84% 6SV PSEGpl 902 110 
4', 2V Public*. 

13V 97, Pueblo .14 10 

9V, 6 PR Cent 

15V 9% PugetP 1.76 115 


3Q4 22V 22V 22% 

10 20V 20’, 20V + % 

To 7V 7V 

lOQz 0 0 8 

IBODz 79, TV 7V— V 

1S»X 47V 47 477- + V-. 

40; *r 42 42 

lOOz 5* S5V 5S”J— IV 
leOOz 55 5«V 5*V — % 

: 25fl 4V 4% 4*1+7, 

2340s 10% 10 10*4 + % 

11 II u 11 1174 + % 

71 16VJ 14 167, + Vi 

9 14V 14 V 14V + % 
38 14V 13V 14% + V 
58 12% 12% 12V + % 
64 IJV, 13 13V + 

9 924 27% 27 27 — % 

8 3440 31V 31 3171— V 

9 13 13 13 

T3I0Z34V 36V 36% + % 
7B02 397. 30v, »% —17, 
4204 47V 45 47V 

7 19*, 19V ISV + 7« 
■ Ox 60', «■, *07: 

8 71% 21 71 — 1, 

2Htel0e 104 104 +1 

3120s 69V *0 69V +2*. 

210S 49V 69V 69V 
TOOr 45 45 6S — 3 

130s 847, 84% 84'., + % 

84 2 V 2V 2V — 7* 

8 7» 11V 1 1 1 • 11%— 

5 20 *V 6% *V 

8 454 ISV IS, 15%—’* 


| U.S. F Utures June 13 


Gpcp H>oh l«w 


Grains 


10 109 253 250+ 251 —2 

JS Zl 21 1422 14V MV IKi— IV 
10 2933 37V 34 5 34V— 1% 

J9-, 25', t'cmpin M 10 8 482 3M 34', 34 V l Sr ..„ 1 . 

<5% jzv Tcrmco Z92 13 11*7 4ft «■-, «T:— % j 5+wan s^wi 

^% 20 Tordrn 10 3558 7TV 2t. [ *•«’ -*■ 

13V m, Tosara 00 41 W •; « •** **• , | — 

32% SOV TeMTPf Z16 W . J B% ?• 

40% 31: T0.dc* 300 0.1 35 3482 JT - * T» 377,— — | I 

3B% 3V.« T4ABC 131 U I 47 J2 31V 3SV — *9 I —h F . T f C BTl 

31% TexCin 156 A8 6 1439 31% E % E.-l^, rcBTi 

39 24 Te.Ent 2J0 70 0 804 17% 31V 3.V— l. S 

S7 S2 T-ETpl MV110 7 55*. 55% W. , 

«V 25 T0» ind 00b Z9 14 48 27V 27 27V * W 

147V 86". TP4>nst 200 ZS 9 13e4 93% 91% V 

JV l Tqelnl 1049 2% 2% 2% , , 

26’. 1«% To*QGb .18 1.1 10 553* 14V 15"* + Is J r . £4 im-. 109 

29^ 20ta TMUIH 252 i? 7 981 301, 29 29. 1 E?t.&:*4 B^.|£ , || 1« 


5*o»an Season 
Hleh Low 


Open Hlon LAW Close ChO- 


Oam Ntoti Low dom Ch» 


Food 


CtaM CJw- 


S«CBumir.i-rj.-n. eai i Gr , BerC u4.-.oj 
1» 212% Ju! 337* •; Z2SV 325% 33T — 

3 '{•: 115 sen 309 3J1% 127% 309% — 00% 

IU-) 115 MC 13S - -: 132% 3JI’, 134% 

174 i 12 r, <wc.- Uo 3J8% U5% 1*4% — jOOV 

4C3 1% Mai 1S3 ZIFs Ui% 326.: 

30T 3 108% »0Oo 


Torll in 


4-. 


57% 2SV t e»rm zos xs 

10V y« mock 94 

27 MV TBermE 32 

43% 23% TtimBIs 1J4 19 M 

13% 12V Tnomln 00b 40 9 

25V 13*4 TWbNWd 00 05 B 

22", 14% Tnritf, 

I6-% 15 TIOwlr 
10% 5V Tlmrln 

4PV 33V Time 

104% OOVj.TIml olB IS7 10 

S’ 4 12 Tlmplx IS 299 16V iuV ItrV 

Sy-o 34% TimnM IS* 20 15 43' 52V 51 51V— 1’., 


4*4 1 

r* SU=w er** 40% — V , * - 

6 S4% S*’» 54”*— V 1 CORN icon 
i5 P? " 

49 25% 2SV 

3*8 35 347 

JJJ ISV IT- 15V ♦ Z’S 20T 
38 15". ISV ISV 1 2 13 U 

“■* "" .•+ i 


r» 54 •— V ■ CORN ICBTl 

"■z 9H + Sm bum in! w urn-aonar, per tTijnel 

=w 2SV— % ] J.Ji L72 jyl 2J3% ZJT-: 

'• 34% J 331 : Z5S=. SAP 2*2% 203% 

% 15% ♦ Z’S 201 OAC Z53 Z58% 


Me Z53 

_ _ - _ - . f/ar 207 _ 

00 20 % 250 21% 21% 21 V— % j Ul% 204', -tat Z49V 2-70 

.90 40 35? ISV 15* 15%—% .' Z>4 2*4 ; Jtf | 3.73 IJO 

854 T.S frV 7 — *., -is : 2_5'.% SAP Z55-.: 205’ 

100 10 17 153* 5T, 54 s*> —2‘. Eli SOW Pr e ,. Soles l«*99 


ZJT* 279 +01 

ZAP, 203 
257% 207V —01 

Zt*'L 004' -- —01 

Z0BV 209 —01V 

20BV 208V —02 

20* 2-54 — JOT-* 


Zita 101, PufleHm .12 J 24 344 177, 1* lt%— 1 
35% 22V Purolot 1-28 4.9 41 292 26% 2S*-* 24% + % 
10% 5V Pvro 8 994 B 7% 8 + % 


51 i.l 29% Ouo+Os 134 20 1* 854 49% 48V 482b— % 

22V 15 OuokSO 00 30 24 81 MW 20% 20’, 

11% 4% Ouorw* 20 55 TV *1 7% 

34 V 73 Questor 100 51 10 107 31% 31 31% 

25% 14 Ok Rail J4a 10 15 90 20% 20 20',— l. 


141, »% RBInd 0*1 0 2 #? Ft Ft 

44% 2914 PCA 104 2J 13 4527 44% 44V 44% —1% 

3* 34% RCA pi 2-12 *0 742 33% 32V MV — Vs 

J7% 2?V RCA pf 305 90 18 37% J.' 3T, + % 

9% 6% RLC 00 20 ID 537 7% 7', 7% — % 

JV 3 RPC 41 JV 3% 3% + V) 

IBV 12% RTE 04 XI 10 37 10% 18% 18% 

11% 7 Podlce 9 44 11% 11% 11% — V 

449, 25V RalsPur 100 2J 16 998 44V 44% <4% — 

8% 5% Romod 78 1279 crV 6% 4% 

21% 16'., Ranee 04 43 10 15 IB IT, 17*9— la 

7% 21a RanorO 184 5% 3% J% — % 

*4 47V: Ravcm 04 .7 30 257 *2 61% 4IV>— % 

IT, 9% Rcrvmk 323 It 10 10', +1V 

4T, 35 Ravi tin 100 30 le 25% 48V 47% 47% —1 

127, 7% ReadBI 00 50 449 S'* 8 £ 

21 'k 14), RdBatpf ZI2 11.9 12 1B7* 1T ( 1T»— 

10V 11 R11RM 1XM 93 10 2 13% 13% 13% — 7, 

17% 9 RecnEq 

12% T-, RBdmn 
9v, 7% Reece 


ID 

00 30 16 
21 


1% % Reoai 

43i, 23 Reicne 
SV 3% RapAlt 
2 11, RePAnt 

12V 4V RpG.CS JO XI 10 
49V 317, Rep NY 1-64 X* 


255 

78 

40 


27% 70V RN7ptCXI2 11 J 
531; 40 RNY pf B 5.44*100 
34% 21 V; RenBt 104 50 
30 20% RepBkptXT? 70 

24 15% RshCdl J2 IJ 


97, 8% BV— % 

8 % BV* 0%— '•» 

t 8% 9 + ta 

V % %— 

00 XI 10 224 407, 37% 37% —2'-. 
10 11*9 8V« 7% 7%— % 

53 1 % it, ;% 

144 97i 9% 9V 

34 4574 44V 45 — V 


4 24% 24V 24V— 7. 
1502 52% 52% 52V— 7, 
587 32% 32% 32V— % 
14 28% 21V 28V — % 
117] 24 23V 23V — 


32V 22V, Pcvco JO 12 13 913 25% 25 2S< 

14’, r% wIRober 117 11V 10V 11V— % 

*0% 321, Revlon 104 4.7 13 627 39’., MV 39 — V 

24’, 217, Revlnpl 2 24% 24% Mb — % 

24’.. 17V Rextim .70 X2 IS 44 22 21V 21 V- % 

17% 11V Ro.nrd 04 XI 9 37 13V 13’.* 13% 

877, 57% Revnin 300 40 7 21N4 77% 74% 76*,— % 


9$ 47V 47 4?%— V 

SC I, Ft i‘-7— 

11 10% 107 j 10% + % 

50 30% 30% 30% + 

34 17% IT* 17% * is 

742 18% 18 16’, * % I S'; 

14 2*V Ia% 2*% ♦ ', 5 - is 

54 27 
30 25* 


M% M's + % 


4Ts Timkon 100c 10 15 
•’.« 4% THan 

lOih TV man pi 100 4.9 
39', 2 av* ToaSbe 1J2 40 7 

21% MV To»hm s M ZB 9 

Ifl’a 13% TalEdls 202 1X9 5 

TP* liV; TalEdpt X72 14C 

28% 22 TolEdnt X75 119 

26'. 20 TolEdpI 307 1X9 

31V 25% To I Ed el *28 1X9 

IS'; 14 TolEdpI 136 IX* 

10% 13«: TolEdpI Z21 1X2 

45V I’M) Tonkas JD -5 7 

53V 20% T00IR0J 48b 10 14 _ _ 

52% 20' t T/erwnl I.OO Z2 13 541 47 45’., *5V — 1 

IT J 10 ToroCa 00 ZB 9 47 14% 14% M%— 'a 

3V 1 Tosco <78 27; 2% 7% 

19% 8% Towle HI Fl « 9% + , 

11% « Towle pi 04 7J 14 6* 

*0% 25%TovP.U» a Wll 38’» 37", 37%—% 

28% 17’a Tracrs Jt U 352 26\, 25% 26 — % 
7V TWA 10 12&S7 20V 19V 73 + % 


102 V 102V 107V —IV | pi*/ Co Goen irf.131 040 ucslj 
SOYBEANS ICBTl 
50C? Ci'm.r.imu-1- dollar, oer busbeJ 


105 "7 Jul 504 5 W 501', 509'., +04 

Si: : AuP 5J7% S03V US’, 503% +04 

S.M : Sen 5JT: SJ6V SJO'a 5J4V +3M : 

f - NO* 574% 5J9V X72% 5.79% +03% 

502% J*n 507, 508’, 501', 500', +04% 

509 NWr 592 V%'.: 5.9; 590% +04% 

5.77 Atav 400 *.04 400 406 +03", 

£02 Ju' 6X5 411', 60S All', +.04 

Prov. Soles *3.173 


P'e-«.Ot»CocnInt. 47053 ot; *12 


12 1S% 18% 18% 

7 17V 14% !*%— •.! ! SOYBEAN NUEAL ICBTl 
95 39% 38% 38V— % I K2 renj. dollars per ten 


72 44V 44% *a%— % 


15% 11% TWA Df Z25 150 
30’ * IT* TWAPIBZ2S 70 


310 151* MV IS + % 
97B 30% 30 30j* + V 


31% 20V Tranvn 1A4 5J 13 791 31% 30% 30V— I* 


21V lev Tron Inc Z22 1X6 
12, 10V TaRHy 100 50 15 
Ti 1 ., 20% rmCdoni.12 5J 8 


X] 21'., 21 21 — % 

• IT., 12'., IT, + '» 
20 2tPo 19V 17% — % 


STu 30% Transco Z140 40 10 449 48% 48 


— % 


2 57V 57% 57V— 
3J9 22', 21% “ + •* 

22 r, 8% 6%— % 

50z 7S% 78% 78% + % 
170*100% *8 « — 4 

lOz *5% 95% «% — % 
14 25 25 25 

110 1DV <0% 10V + % 
371 30% 29V 30% + V 
338 38% 37V 37V — 

20 21 20% :o%- 

BA 34% 33% aw— •-» 
75 1T% 1T^ 171,— • 


64tr 4S>. Trn5i at 187 57 

» I9», TranEr Z3* 10J 

IS’, 4', Transcn 5 

79% AJ TrGPel 6 AS 80 

102 80 TrCol 10J2 100 

94 77 TrGPcI 8A4 9.1 

25% 70 TrGPnf 200 100 

13% el, TrnsOh 10 

34% 7°', Tronwi 100 40 9 
3* 25', Trnwld .48 IJ 12 

:iv 9-, TwtdwTA 
3*'; 74 TwldCf ZOO 60 

17V lTt Twldef 1.90 11.1 _ 

43% 25', 7 roller X04 40 10 1380 44% 45V J4',— % 
5J% SOW Trow Pi 4.14 70 71 5* S5V i4 + % 

27% 19V Tricon 302 El 3-5 344 26V 2a 3 26' g— % 

32 13 Trialnd 00 10 21 a X% 29% :«%— 1% 

31% 70V TrtoPc 1-00 30 fi B 24% 26 54 — ’* 

40% 24% Tribune « 15 17 B8 44% V 44% + % 

08* 40 7 15 5% S'* 5% — 

JO 12 15 30 4% 4% 4%— V 

-50 10 250 13% 13 13 — ’» 

. . .IM J X SI 21V 20** 20% — V 

14% S% Trite of 1.10 56 442 12% 12V 12V—'., 

41% ?9V TuesEP 100 7J 10 144 41', 40V Jl + "m 

IP* 9% Tulle* 04 15 11 2 12% IT, 12'., + ', 

1* 1* TmtnOs 00 4J 10 12 IT-* 17 17 

<1 30 T.coLb -SO Zl 9 154 30'i 37% 37", — % 

ira. 11': Triers 00 Z7 7 50 MV 1«V kv— % 


Jul 123-30 125.00 1 72 JO 12470 4 ZOO 
Aab t2SJ0 17700 12500 12700 +Z» 
Sop 128J9 13100 127.90 13050 +2-00 

Oct 13070 13200 13QJ0 112-30 +100 

Sec 1 1500 13800 135-20 13800 +Z30 
Jon T38J3 14100 138J0 MO0O +200 
tear u3*o u*50 uxsa 1*400 +ijo 
MCV 14700 15150 14750 14900 +70 

15Z70 +170 


—.16 

—.10 

—.15 

—05 

+J»S 

+.13 
+.W 
+05 
+ 05 


61, 4 Tridltr 

8% 5% Trim 

37% 13 TrlnlV 
25% 11% TrtlEno 


U 


Mb 29% Ro.lnwi 
50 46% Rev In Pi 4.10 05 

112% 1001, Revlnpl 
*1% 26 Re VMM 100 Z9 ft 
87 58% RevM pf 400 4.1 

35 25 RchVcfc l.<0 40 10 
29 IT* RleoelT 100 89 


M7 31% 31 Site— Vi 

6 48% 40', 48% 

112 109% 109V 107V + '■ 
601 34% 34 34',— % 

t 74 73% 74 — % 

233 33V 33b 33% — V, 

16 20% 30 20% + \ 


5% U« Oak Ind 361 1% 1% 1% 

34 23% OoklleP 102 *S 11 4 3> 31 31 + % 
34V M% OccIPcI Z-50 80 10 206* 31% 31% 31%— % 


15 W* OCClPwf 
23% 20b OccIPpf 250 100 
21 17% OccIPpf Z12 102 

22V, 10% OccIPpf 2J0 103 
57 48% OcclP pf AJ5 110 

113 105% OcclP PT150O 14J 

108% 101% OctJBf 1402 1X7 
110 100 OccIPpf 1400 120 


5 13% 13% 13% 

11 23% 23% 23% + % 

10 20% 20% 20% + % 

5 22% 22% Mb — b 

40 54% 56% 54V 

170 100% 107V 108% + % 

1 104V 104V 104V + V 
100x109 109 109 - % 


32% 20% ODECO 100 4.9 15 2a9 20W 20 20% 

S°*E? I - 80 43 u 47 28% 28% 18% - 

15% *V OhloEd 100 1-7 4 1275 14% 14% 14V — % 

31% 22% Oh Ed Pi 190 1X4 200z 29% 27 2* —1 


35% 25% OhEdPt 400 1X1 
57 41 aflEdPi 7.24 113 

57Vr 43 Oh Ed of 7J4 1Z7 
44 45 OhEdpf 8 JO 1X0 

281, 10% OtlEdPf 300 120 
31 21 OhEdPT 172 120 

15V 11% Oh Ed pi 100 11.9 
44% 47V, OhEdPf BA* 1XJ 
mi 11% OhMdlr M X2 14 
69”; 54 OhPpI 004 1X0 
67% 51% OhPpfB 7 a 0 115 
64 52% OftPpfC 7 A0 110 

72 58 OhPPfE L40 110 


1Q(b33Va MVj 33% —1% 
60z 54% 54% 54 W— % 
2fi40z 58 57V, 58 + % 

801 63 63 43 -2 

M 2B% 27% 28 + b 

41 31% 30% 30% — % 
6 15% 15% 15% — % 
200a 45 45 45 + Vi 

15 12V 12% 12% — % 
lOOz 67Vi 67% «Tu + % 
lib 6* 64 66 —lb 

MIOl 471, 46% *6% +1% 
10z 73% 73% 73% +2 


33% 18% Rile A Id 50 1.9 16 3447 2T% 2*% 26V— 1% 

7% 3% RvrOkn 9 47 4'., JV 3% — l g I 

34% 27'4 Rotetiw 1.12 16 7 44 30 '0 30 XV + V I 

44% 2BV Robtm 1*0 5.4 17 74 29% T>''. 37'.-. 

24% 12 Robins 1054 17 161* 14V + >t 

23V 13% ROChG ZJ0 9J a 842 MV 3% 2i>. + l, • 

39V 77% PoenTI 2*4 40 10 BX 3EH 38 38'..— ', > 

»% 26% Roclwl 1.12 11 9 977 3* 34V 35V * ’« I 

71% 401* RohmH 2-00 13 10 85 42% All, at'.— 1’* I 

55% Kb Rohrln 9 25 53b -3'* S3** — I 

25% 10V PolnCm .40 lA 15 61 25 Z4V 24V ! 

27% Bb RollnE 1 07, J 28 903 25% 23V 24% - V | 

13% b V Rollins <46 4A 16 519 10% 10% 10% — b 

4% 2 Ronson 2b ?V, I 2 

19 12V Racer .*4 40 14 100 14% M<« i*i,_ % 

15% 24 Rorer 1.12 12 17 1053 35 34% 34% — '* 

13 l>* Rowan .12 1 A 44 455 BV BV BV— b 

60% 4]|, RaelD 307e iS 3257 54% 54% 54% — V 

32 13b Roylnts 17 2344 14% 13V 13V —1 

51V 35% Pubrrnd 04 1.7 IB *9 50% 49V 4«V— % 

26 14V RussBr 13 459 20V 1*V )«%— Jb 

W% 15% RusTos 3t 4.1 9 20 16% 10b IS% 

38Vi 1TV RvmH \,00 3J IS 359 2T, 27 27b — % 

0 23 1 1569 2*V Z»'* 26%—% 

AO 2A 17 177 25'. 14', 25b + b 

5 76 IT, 16% 14V + % 


ST% 32'. UAL 10Oe 10 8 5472 55% 52% 52% —2V 

34% 24% UALPt Z*fl 7J 1530 33V 33 33b— 1 

15% r, UCCEL 16 95 12V IJV 12V— 'i 

24% 16% UGI ZM 17 10 96 23% 23% 23% — % 

25 W"* UGlCf X7S 110 1001 X 25 25 + % 

1<% S% UNCRes 63 via 9b 9% 

M 10 UPS 40 U 15 27 11% 11% 11V— b 

3SV 17% U3FG Z20 60 228 440 37 b 34% 36%—% 

J°% 22% USGS 10 U 7 1017 J9% 38% 39V - V 

19% 13 UnlFrSt JO 10 11 5 13% 13b 13V*— % 

102V 75 UnlN'/ 5J6e U I 121 R 97'-; 97V —11, 

41’* 31% UCcmp IA4 40 10 1714 34% 36% 34'A — % 

57 • 37V UnCarO X40 80 10 4554 32 ~M 41% 47% + % 

7li 4% UnlcxiC 40 S'; S- ?*— b 

1 q . 12 unEleC 1.92 9* 6 2097 10% 18 18 — % 

X .- 21 unEIpl 300 UJ 370: 31 31 31 + % 

34’* 25% UnEIpl *0011.1 300x 36 3* 34 +1 

M 28’ » UnEIpl 400 110 «»i 37% 37% 37% + % 

SB 40% UnElPf 6.40 11 a ISO: 54 55% 55% — % 


1*450 11705 

iMjo 

17900 12X60 

is: 00 1740C 

:s*M 13103 
laJJO 13403 
:«0O 139.1c 

14203 I430C 

167.K T475C Jul 

EsJ. Sales Prey. Sales 1X4*1 

Prt*. Dav Oocn InL SCATS oil 1081 
SOYBEAN OIL CCBT7 
4O0CO lev do 1 ■ or, oer TOO Ids. 

M.J7 22J0 JIM J102 31.13 3005 3tW 

3195 ZZSO Aufl 39.75 MOD I9J2 3907 

31.10 2ZM SCP 2005 2900 2BJS 2808 

333? 2Z9C Oct 77.95 7505 7701 S.9C 

2° 05 2.90 Dec 2701 Z“.T3 3605 27.17 

29.37 2X6.1 jan 2145 2608 2*45 1*08 

li*0 ICC Mar 76 OC 76J0 10.90 1620 

27.45 2433 MOV 2S0C 2500 2500 2500 

25.25 23.95 Jul 24.95 25.10 24.95 25.18 

25.1 5 24.72 Aud 24.95 2495 ?4«S 24.95 

Es! Sales Pm. Seles 23J87 

Prev.DarOner.ini. 61039 UP 33 

OATS ICBTl 

5000 ou m.itimum- dollars cer bustuM 
■«J*% 1.47V Jul 103 103% 103 103% +01 

1 ’9 10T, Sea ij<9% 100 1.J8V 100 +0OW 

102% 103% Gee 104 105 104 105 +0OV 

l.eTV T0T., tra 109 109 109 109 +0OV 

103 10C .Vo* 100% +00% 

Est Soles R rev. Sales 132 

Prev.C*arOpenirJ. Z 932 up 6 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40030 lbs.- cents Per ID. 
6900 5 Ba 2 Jun 

6707 ,045 Aufl 

45.90 eats Oct 

6705 6100 Dec 

A?A5 62.10 Fab 

6707 6X50 Apr 

4625 6525 Jun 


«U0 6000 *0.10 60.17 

6200 6162 6X07 6Z1S 
*Z*5 6Z65 *3 77 43 17 

6X57 *175 4X45 6100 

64*0 6400 6410 4420 

*5J0 6505 6517 6520 

6500 4500 6500 6560 


J7% 74' ; Uriel pfMCJM IZ4 

6?': 49'. UEipfL 8.00 110 

27% 18V UnEIpl 198 11.1 

■«b 13% UnEIPf Z13 110 

26% 1 9' a unEIpl Z73 100 

(6 4« unEIpl 70* IU 

(6% <9V UE'PfH BOO 110 

52% 3*'- 


36 31V 31% 31V — 
250:69% 49% 69% 

214 V 26% 2i ; , + b 

10 19% 19% 19% + % 

3 76% 24% 24% 

1290x 65 44b 65 

300: 68 47 5B +1% 

UnPoc 100 19 II 1609 47b 45V <4%— 

! 114% 82 unPCPf 725 70 110 106 IW 104 —2b 

20V ?V Unlroyl .10 .9 13 M50 704, 30% 20% 

70 » Unrylpf BJ)0 MJ TMz St SSI a 56 + * 

5i. 3b UnllDr 34 3V 3% 3% 

17=. I Ob unBmd 11 181 14 V la 16b — % 

14b 9V UBrdpf 195 14V 14% 14*1 + '.* 

45b 22% UCBITV .14 J 45 45 41% 41% 41% — W 

32% 77% UnEnra Z4B 9J 19 573 26V 26b 24V — b 

17V 9 Ullluin ZOO I1J 3 173 17% 17% 179, + b 


28% 199, Riders 
26V 12% Pvlana 
16V Bl, Rimer 


509, 35V, SCM ZOO 4j 13 6X 47% *6b 4aV - % 

12V 89, SLInd 22 10 10 SS 17% 12b 13% + •* 

31b 19% SPSTec 00 20 15 13 31 ]l 31 

21V is Sabine ZeBelJA 30 1 15% 15% 15% 

Jl% 16 SaDnRv Z71el 57 40 17V, 1A* 17b—"* 

10b 11% SfodBs JO 10 15 242 k 14% lob- 14% — b 

TO SVj SlpdSc 34 1*3 9% 9% 9% + % 

34V 21b Sal Kins 00 12 73 80 331; 33% Mb . 

34% 21b Scfewv 100 50 10 809 33 37% 32%— > 

35% 24% Sooa 02 1.9 11 13 27b 27b 27b 

22% 14', SIJOLP 1.72 50 7 <0 21% 21% 21% 

11% 9 SPaul 1J0 1X7 52 lib |1 lib + «. 

10% 3% * l Salon t 33 5% 5% S%— •» 

34% 22% SolfleM .14 0 14 1342 30% 291, 29% — 1% 

54 50% SolIMpI X99e 7J IW 52 5J 52 

28% 17% SDIeGs 2J4 8 0 9 2*04 28% 27V X + b 

9V 6% SJuonB 09e 9J 11 J7* 9V 9% 9% 

Ub 0% SJuonR 24 37 lib 11% lib 

51 31 5andr 06 10 15 288 M 34% 34V* - % 

25% I8V SAnHRl 1.94 70 13 87 15b 24V U V— b 

31b 20% SFeSoP 100 30 12 STM 29% 28% 29-3 + % 

43% 28 5araLr* 104 30 11 4X 40V 39% 40 W— W 

34b 26 V* SfllWel 100 40 15 ' “ ' 

18% 14% Soul RE JO 15 43 

22b 15 SovElP 1A0 70 8 


24% 19% OktaGE 200 52 11 732 24% 24% 24% 

8% 7 OfciaGcf 00 9A 910: 8% 8b 8% 

34V 267, CHln 100 40 10 539 M’i 32b 32% — V 
17V 5V Ornncre 138 6% 6% 4%— l, 

1?% 12% OiX-kla 00 62 9 741 13'. 13 13 — % 

33V 76% ONEOK 206 51 10 *8 32% 31% 31%— % 

24% iw, OranRk 204 7.7 10 2M 26V 26% »% + % 

13% 7% Oranae 031 4.9 13 39 I0V 10% 10V 

28% 19% OrlanC .76 Z9 82 W* 26% 26% 

17V 8% OrlonP 35 *14 10’, 10'. TOb— b 

9b 6% Orion of 00 47 42 7V 7% TV,— % 

31V 24 Orion nf Z7S 9A 33 29 28', 28% — b 

31V, 18% OulbdM 04 20 9 459 Mb 22% 22% — % 

33V, J8b OwmTr J2 20 12 SB* 30b 29b 29% —1% 

19 13 OvShIP JO U 10 109 157a 15% lji*_ % 

T 5J 1 , OwenC 100 *0 B 791 35”i 34% J4V— % 

48% 31] » Owen I II 1 6Bb 30 10 1081 47b 46 b 44%— b 

'S’- 13% 0*forfl 04 X2 13 182 13% 13% IJV 


34 18b PHH 08 27 13 499 33 32% 32%— % 

H 'A0 19 9 2053 41b 40% 41b + % 

E? 5 ^^A_ .A® 2J 57 210 27% 25V 24b— IV 

21V 13b PSA do* 1.90 90 173 20% X 70 —1 

M% 1Tb PocAS 104 U.1 40 16% 13% 13% — b 

20b 13 PocGE 104 9.9 7 3101 19V 18', ?8%— '* 

45V, 30% POCLIB 3JJ 7J 12 414 43% 43b 43% — % 

2* 21V, PcLum 1J0 40 15 40 J4% 24V 24V 

JO PocRes 0Sr A 28 im 9 8% -7 

19V 12V; PocRsPlZOO 11.1 S3 18% 18 IB — ’<■ 

17’T J? PQC5d 00 Z7 11 18 l^A 15 15 — b 

ZD* 5f. PBCTele X72 7 a 9 BS* 75‘» 75’, 75b + % 

29% 21b Pocilcc 2J2 8-0 8 644 29b 29 29% 

33V 27V, PoclfPl <07 120 97 32 31 ’■ 31%—', 

43% ? PalnWO A0 1 J 50 103 3P, 35 38% — b 

34% 24% PalnW Pi 205 70 45 30V 29b 30 —1 

39 27 PalmBc M0 30 IS lOl 34% 34% 14% ♦ % 

29% Mb PanABk TO 20 9 47 29V 29b 29% 

4 PonAm nan 4% 5% s%— % 

3% IV PanAwf 321 2'» 2V 2% 

21 13’ i Pandck n 00 M 21 643 16% 16' i 16b + b 

41', 31 PaWiEC 2J0 <2 II 003 37% J7V* J7I,— V, 

3 PanlPr 28 3774 6 — b 

19% 13% Paprcft 00 4J IJ 498 18% IB’, 18% 

lBb 9’jPardW 28 427 IQi, 10% 10b + % 

;2'.* ’U’ PortcES 8 64 IS nv 11V— b 

10,* P-' ParkDrt .16 10 1862 5% 5b 5b— V* 

Si; E 01 *” I.H X* 10 910 31% 30% JIM + % 

’J? 1 ’??* Poi^P" 02 Z8 57 1355 IBV IB 18b + U 

2% 1% Pol Phi 4 64 2b 2% 2V* — % 

17% 11% PaiNP AQ <1 13 294 T*% 14% 14V:— % 

3*9 1J’» PavCah .1* .9 15 4077 ig*, 17 IT.,— 1% 

10% 4b Peo&dy JO Zl 23 2B3 9V 9V, 9% 

I’, Pen BO 340 b V a V, 

58% 4l'e PenCcn II 242 54% 531, 51 — b 

JTi 44% Penney 23a 40 9 11 38 49% J5' 1 «9i»— b 

' "" *■ * 1065 24% 26 26'*— % 


23 14 SOvEA 1J4 LD 

12% 9% SovEnf MB 100 
9% 4V Sovln 
13b 9b Savin pf 100 1Z0 
28 17% SCANA Z16 A0 


la 32 31% 32 + b 

11 16% 16% 16% + v, 
63 31% 21 21% + V, 

9 22b a 22U. — b 
3 12b 12b 12b 
325 7V: 7% 7% 

9 12% 12% 12% - b 
244 27 26V 26% 


47b 33 5chrPk> 108 3J 13 817 *5% 44% 44%— % 
S0V 34% sctilmb Mfl 12 9 3997 37V 1 37 37% — V; 

13% 7b SdAH .12 1.1 IB 511 11% lib 11% 

32% 22% scoalnd .7* Z4 13 703 32", 31 31 Vo— V 

601, 4a% SCnlFet 10 *2 59 58% 587, 

40% 25% SCOItP M4 3-2 10 1331 J9% M% 38%— V 

16% 11% Scortyi 02 30 10 OT M", 13V 13V 

43b 20% SCDvlII 14 " ' 

45 21% Sea Cnt <2 1.1 


13% V?, seoCfpf 106 117 
16% 12% SeaCpfBZfO 1X1 
16% 12% SeoCpICZIO 1X1 
27% M% SeaLna 08 25 » 
5% 3% SeaCo 
44% X Scaarm 00 ZD 12 

21% 12% Seopul 17 

I8V 20 SeolAtr M 10 14 

32% 2lb SealPw IW X6 8 


IS 42 417« 42 + la 
21* X 37% 37% —IV, 
IS 12V 12% 12% 

38 16b 1* la — % 

37 la% la la — b 

50« 19% 19b 19% 

521 4% 41, 4%— V, 

387 40’, 40% 40 b 

«8 I6'i la", 14V + '.» 

149 25% 25 25 — % 

74 3*b 25% 35", — 1 


29' a 19% Ulllupl 197 119 

17V; 11V UlllUPf Z20 120 

29’; ;i'k Ulllupl 400 1X9 

M% 10 Ulllupl 1.90 14.1 

21% Mw Unlllnd AO Z0 0 

3] 35V Unlllnn 72 0 36 

42'. 2a UJerBf 106 17 


16% «V 'JldMM 
27, 2% UPVMn 
M% 22 UsoirG 

B’S 5'* USHom 
42% 79' ; USLOOS 
40‘* 23 USShoe 

7? IIUI^I 


e 28% 28% 2B% — % 

20a 17% 17% 17V, 

12 29V, 28% 28V — V 

63 13% 13% 13% 

115 21b Ztt. 21 b + '« 

2 47 42% 42b + % 
95 42 41V. 4\V + V, 

II 41 1J% 1J% 13% — % 
1 67 2% 2% 2% — % 

.12 0 a 3969 XV 34 34b— 1% 

1623 7% 7 7% — % 

10 21 8 93 36% 36% 36% 

_ 06 23 14 183 37% 37 37—% 

29V a USSteel 100 17 19 2323 37V* I»v 77*> ♦ '« 

50’ 0 49V USSIIpf 40101X2 300 52% 52b ST- + "a 

135% 115V b SSI I pr 12-75 100 42 127b 126% 127 — % 

20 22% L'SSHpl Z2S B0 >22 281, 78% 20% 

MTj 37V L'STotl »J2 4.7 12 734 36% 3*% 36% - b 

57b US Wes! 5.72 7 0 9 095 79% 78% 78% — % 

13 4 UStCin 19 17 7% 7V TV— % 

45 29', UnTom 100 3J 9 4785 43% 42 a —lb 

39b J*', 'JTchol 205 70 640 37V 34% 36% — % 

25 17% UnlTei 1.92 XI • 1520 ZJV 23% 239,- % 

36b 27 UnITIpl 100 O 4 34% 34% 34% -I 

21 14', UWPS MS 60 12 ISO 19% 19V 19V 

33-i 2i Unffrde 00 .9 1 4 429 22 21% 21% — Vj 

20% MV Unlvar 00 <3 7 22 |9 19 n 

37 7% UnvDtv JOe .7 (8 MB 24-b 26”. 26% + % 

28 17V UnivFd 1.12 4.1 12 79 27% 27% 27% 

23% 15b UnLeot 100 SO 7 159 20% 19f, 197,— v 

53 27V Unocal MO 40 7 778 30% 27V 30 - b 

34b 29% Unocfwd 1066 30% 29V J7%— % 

113% 45 Uniahn 206 IS 20 MaO 107V 103 103 —4% 

a 2 3% USLIFE 104 Z9 10 1018 36 35% 35%— b 

10% 0% UsIleFd 1JJ4DIO0 34 10% 10% 10% 

25b 20% UloPL ZJ2 7.1 14 575 25% 25b 25% — % 


Esf. Sales »037 Prev. Soles 1Z07S 
Prov GcvCOenlm. 4S<20 0M46 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMS) 

44 JC0 lbs., cents per ID. 

7170 64*7 A us 6X25 6305 67 JO 6700 

7X00 64aQ See a'.is aejo 6700 470S 

7ZJ7 6*05 3d 6700 6X00 6700 6700 

7X20 6SJ5 Now 6BJ5 6X80 6&0O 6802 

7900 66J0 Jon 7QJ5 70J5 70 JO 7X20 

9050 66.1S Mor 7635 TtUi 7ZI5 7UX5 

7000 730C Apr 7005 7005 7005 7X35 

EsI. Soles 577 Prev. Sales 7S1 
prer.DavSPen mi. S0*3uPl24 
HOGS (CME) 

33000 ibi-centsper is. 

5500 4403 Jun 

55.77 4705 Jul 

507 47J7 6uo 

51.75 41X0 oa 

5085 46J0 Dec 

5X10 4605 Feb 

4TJS 4400 Apt 

49.CS 46.90 Jun 

49 75 47.75 Jo! 


4700 48.10 4708 4722 
£040 5005 49JS <902 

5030 5067 49.90 4905 
4707 *7J7 46-90 44.92 

4800 4X72 422 *X22 
49-60 5032 *9 AO SOW 

4600 40*5 4*35 4*00 

4X62 4X75 *a_SS 4X75 
4950 49 AO 4900 <900 


—05 

—.10 

—05 


—05 
—JO 
— -35 
+30 
+J8 
+.10 


EM. Salas 5099 Prew. Sales 507a 
Prev Dav Open 1 ni. 2Z67« oH 122 
PORK BELLIES (CMEI 
38000 ibs.- cents per it. 

8X47 al.12 Jul 6700 4*70 69 J5 

£005 6030 Aua 6735 67 90 6X35 6602 

76-20 6X15 Feb 7300 7*35 7X40 7X55 

7500 6400 Mar 7*«j J 400 7X*0 7300 

75A0 70-10 Maw '400 7400 7305 73-97 

76.CU 69.70 Jul 7435 7409 7435 T40B 

ESI Sales 6.755 Prev. Sales 5004 
Prev. Dav Open im. 110*7 up 179 


COFFEE C(NYC3Ce> 

37 Adorn*-- cents ow ». 

M90O 12700 Jul M7.90 14X45 I47JS 14709 +1.17 

14*00 12700 S «p 14*00 15000 lef.10 t*e.73 +105 

V»S Dec 14900 men iwjs iw.ts +t.m 
T4A65 12S0O Mar 14X50 149.25 14800 14900 +103 

14UO 13100 Mav MATS 14X75 l*X» WJ» +M0 

14500 139J8 Jill 74700 14800 14700 147.70 +1.70 

14X00 132.75 Sen 14700 14700 14700 14700 +107 

EsI. Sales 3050 Prov. Sales 3 <043 
Pr+w. Dov Open tnt 1300* up£4} 

SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYCSCB1 
112000 Its.- cenrs per ID 
9.95 
9.75 
90S 
7-75 
9J3 
7.15 
6.69 
620 
<94 

Esi. Sales 12.150 Prev. Soles IM6I 
Py+y . Dav Oaen mi, 9U42 UP 761 
COCOA CNYCSCE1 


Z7S 

Jul 

an 

300 

Z*7 

300 

+.18 

20S 

Sop 

3.1: 

1)8 

107 

307 

+.10 

Z94 

Ocf 

110 

X26 

114 

X16 

+07 

3J3 

Jon 

360 

362 

U 

X48 

+01 

334 

Mar 

189 

194 

306 

Zee 

+08 

196 

MOV 

409 

4.15 

608 

613 

+.11 

4.0 

Jul 

631 

637 

630 

60S 

+.13 

4.76 

4.43 

SOP 

Oct 

460 

6*4 

+59 

461 

663 

+.18 

+.11 


Season Uoten 
Htoh low 

CERT. DEPOSIT IJmM) 

Vrnimon-BHMlrtrcf 

*~PJ W30 Jun 

es gs & 

9101 #006 Mcr 

«-i* SS jST 

*188 8706 In 

_ 88.99 004 OK 

g8W w ^ Prev. Soles 310 

Prev. Dav Opbq Ira. XM oH5l 

R URO DOLLARS IU6M1 

umiiuea+nerioopct. 

8U9 M Jun 9ZS 9134 9X77 9136 

930* HO *184 9102 MJf *149 


9206 9260 9253 9309 
tin >Ut 92.14 9Z23 
9 MB 9104 9109 9203 
9104 
*006 
9803 
9003 


*101 

§U0 D9C *104 91*19 9101 


=fi 


+01 

-a 

—.04 



9101 *007 9X93 —05 


90LS4 9003 90lK 4004 
9020 9008 9006 9001 


—09 

-07 


10 metric lon+ S per ion 

7400 1948 Jul 

2X35 

1052 

2012 

33 


2415 

1976 

Sep 

1995 

2010 


+12 


13 


197S 



19« 



Mor 

T94S 

2003 

1974 

1*9* 

—24 


I960 

MOV 

1995 

1000 

1995 

2010 

+1S 

2110 

19*0 

Jul 




2017 

+15 

Est. Sales 

Prev. Sates 6544 





Prev. Dav Oaenlnl. 30017 up 57 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCSI 
ISJW0 lbs.- cents per lb. 

IB* 05 13X70 Jul 14533 1*5.75 14410 144*8 —105 

I8Z0O 134J0 SOP 14X50 MX50 141.10 141.15 —105 

18100 13600 Nov 14000 140.70 17900 19900 —I0O 

ISO 00 13400 Jon U90O 13900 UX90 13X60 — 100 

17700 13600 Mar 19900 19900 13905 13800 —100 

14X50 13470 MOV 13500 —1*0 

15700 1*200 Jul 13X00 — 100 

18050 179.75 Sea 138JM —MO 

Nov 19X90 —M0 

Ear Sales 300 Prev. Sales 271 
Prev. Dav Open inf. 5013 oHS 


Metals 


8X25 

5900 

BZIfl 

B425 

8400 

winn 

7*00 

74*0 

7X90 

7030 

7X00 

6700 


S90O 


6X15 

6L30 6L3Q 6X10 60J5 


—05 


COPPER (COMEX) 

350W lbs.- cents per (b. 

6X55 6X25 Jun 

57.00 Jul 

5900 Aug 

5700 Sep AXIS AXIS 61.10 6 MS —00 
5XSJ Dec 9X30 6X23 6205 6Z30 —.70 

59 A0 Jan 6200 —JO 

59 AO Mar *305 6X90 6110 4295 —.70 

61.10 MOV 6X10 6X80 6X48 4305 —JO 

6100 Jul 64*5 6470 «XM 4X75 —.70 

62J0 SM *505 6505 6425 *420 

6400 Dec *49Q 

ASJO Jan A*n ti 

6400 Mar 6U0 — A* 

Est. sales 9000 Prev. Sales 7060 
Prew. Dav Open InL 8X6*1 uoASB 
ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

*0000 lbs. - cwrts ne r ID 

*905 4435 Jun 4500 

4S0S Jul 4505 4500 4SOO 4515 —A0 

Aua 4500 

4400 Sea 4420 4620 4S05 4X85 —A0 

4720 Dec 47.45 4700 4600 4490 


74JQ 

70*0 

7*00 

7300 

6*05 

6X45 

5X10 


5U5 Jem 
40-70 Mar 
5X95 Mow 
5400 Jul 
5100 Sea 
Dec 
Jan 
Mor 

Est. Sales 106 Prev. Sales 313 
Prev. Day Open inf. ZT63 off 76 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5000 Irov oz- cants per trev ox 


4725 
*705 —A0 

4005 —JO 
49 JS 
5X05 
51.15 -.40 
5109 — A0 

9SSQ 


9103 

H.V0 Mar son 

S-S £2 

9X71 B70B Sap _ _ _ 

55 >728 DK 89.96 8*09 Mu MN 

W20 87 A4 Mar 89.64 89.64 *908 (Ul 

Prev. Sales 5La» 

Prev. Dav Oeen I rti. 1 24824 off 3031 

i BRITISH POUNOOMM) 

Jpew* equals SXBWl 

DM 14m» Jun L3615 12*70 12410 12650 

1 +4M lJPOp SOP 12465 12550 12460 125t5 

{Jy° Law Dec taw moo 129*5 12*10 

1200 L060O Mor 12325 

12305 1.I90S Jun 12345 

121*91“ il-f? Prew.Sotai 1X3*9 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 44.761 up 101 

CANADIAN DOLLAR {DMA) 

tow dir- ipouitoauotasxaoin 

£% ^ S 

5S? 2K ■*“ 5% 

J350 JO70 Jim .7195 0195 0195 0116 
EM. Sole, MJ0 Prev.Sobn 1016 
Prev.Oov Open im. VUG* oH 173 
FRENCH FRANC OMM) 

* pe+wone- 1 »PlM eeuols RUIOBOI 

sas ss ■ ,weo » jgg 

I Es?*5QtaS ■ 8W ?. P^^r 8 v “ 

Prev. DovOwm lot. *96 off 41 
GERMAN MARK(IMM) 
is per morn- 1 Mint ioimm moooi 

J7M JTO Juo 2235 2345 2223 2231 
2545 3930 Sep 2343 2 140 2U1 2UB 

2*0 3971 Ok 2364 2371 2360 2341 

2415 2040 Mor 2293 

EM. Soles 19233 Prev. Sotos 17069 
Prev. Day Open IM. 49,188 off 1,930 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S par yen- 1 point eq uals SC 0000 0 1 
0M45O 203*3* Jun 207992 004012 203*60 00*000 

0M1S1 203870 Sen J»«I0 20403920*002 20*025 

0043SD 003905 Dec 0 O4B2 S 00605 0 204817 20*045 
0M16O 26*05 Mar 004070 

ESJ. Soles 9013 Prev. Sales 8273 . _ 

prev. Day Oatn in*. 2uw u>97 
SWISS FRANC (HAM) 
sperfrqwc-lpeinl equals 800 00* 

J9aa 24» Jun 209 Mt\ JOB 2834 
-4B30 0480 Sep JX50 0070 0843 0819 

.4360 Dec 0887 0894 0875 JM1 

. 2825 2835 Mar 0*30 2930 0927 0922 

Ess.Saies 16077 prev. Satas TOM? 

prev. Dav Open ini. 27260 oHUO* 


Industrtois j 

I LUMBER (CME) 

[ 13Xp00bcttf.-SPerlJlWbd.fi. 

23020 12928 Jul 15Z0S 15X40 14X10 14*30 —400 

Sep 1500 1S5JD 15X30 1S030 -BOO 
NOV 15600 15600 15170 1510D —450 
Jan 161-5Q 16150 15700 15720 — S0O 
Mar 16520 1*520 14200 16Z60 -X70 


u> 




— 5 
—3 


+H 

+5 


197J0 

MAW 

T870O 

19500 

I7AA0 

18X00 


13520 

13700 


15000 

151OT 

17X40 


6162 6162 6162 6170 
6180 63)0 6IS0 6190 
6332 

*3A2 6290 *232 62L9 

63X5 64X0 6372 63X9 
6432 


2*260 


27 21% UIPLpf Z80 1X7 

27’.-: 71% UIPL Pf Z90 1X6 
22b 17% UIPL Pi 10* 1X4 
20 15% UIPL Pi 104 1X6 

24% 15% umiCo 1026 52 
72 18 UlllCopi Z44 IM 

23% Iflb U'llCo pr 2*1 11.1 
35 I«b UIKCapf 4.12 120 


16 zab 26% 36b + 

27 27b 27% 27b + b 

12 23 23% 22% — l, 

10 19b 19b 19b — b 

34 34 23% 24 

15 22 21% 21% — b 

24 23% 23% 23% 

18 34% 34% 34%— % 


^Currenc^Option^ 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option & Strike 
Underlying Price Colls— Lost 

Jun Sep Dec 

TZSOi British Pounds-cents oer unil 


June 13 


Puts— Lost 
Jun Sip Dec 


BPDUTKl 

12*03 

126.63 

116.63 
126 A3 
176 A3 
126AJ 
12603 


100 

ICS 

110 

H5 

120 

125 

130 

135 


2150 

IAJ0 

11.70 

600 

100 


1200 

XI5 

500 

r 

1.40 


r 

f 

17.00 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 


SAW* C □ nod ra o Do L/art-cedfi Per unit. 
•7Dollr m W - 


72.97 

7Z9J 

«Z92 

72.9! 

7Z*2 

729} 


10B 

005 

004 


0A0 


.93 O * 


06 
JO 30 14 


TO'-s PoPL Z5* +0 _ 
» 30\; PoPL Pi 4A0 110 

£' » OT PqPLbI 450 IU 
78b STb PoPL Pi 6A0 1)0 
3'i 23b PaPLdpTMZ IZ0 
P'~. 20 PoPLdP>Z90 IU 
M’T r% PoPL dpOJS 110 
30% 25b PoPl dpr3.7S 1ZS 
«ge 81% PaPLarll.W Uj 
70% 54', PoPLpr XO0 11.9 
•7’ - M'T PoPLpr 8.70 I2J 
40b 311; Pcnwir Z20 60 12 
-5% 20 Ponwul 1 AO 6.4 


20z » 34 r> 

3tOl 39% 34 J4 
5® 73 73 7] 

61 28% 28', 28% + b 
J9 25% 25 25b + % 

39 Ml, 26 ’a 27% 

21 30% 29% 30 — b 
700r «5% 94% 95% + l. 
Mi 67% 67% 47% 

I «£ 70% 70’, 70S; — 5, 
112 3*% 36 36% — % 

_. 6 23% 23b 23b 

ft?* J S?‘ PcmniDi 2J0 40 74 538 52^ 52b 52b— b 

• „v"- PrdoEn '00 70 7 32% 17b 16% 14%—% 

sit; 5 W ’ B .2' . fi ■* 19 21 * 43b 425, 43’, + b 

*2 * 5'5? ,Co *■? 30 24 an set, so% six 

» l > '£2 S"*. 61 ,-Jf 7a 12 1324 ax’, 23% 23’,— ’, 

•*, Prrnlwi I01el*0 387 8% B% 8%— ", 

H £!I2 Dr ,- 2 2 ’ - 1 '5 82 20", 14% 20 

i-S . 3J w no 40b 40 40 — 1% 

2® ^ 7*y, PelRi XTTeK* *4 26 25% 2S5, + b 

•* PftRspf J57 f* 6 16% 16% 16% 

E!r lnv !-«»el4J 4 *b *% *lb— % 

S.“ f??' £i ,: * r 1-40 3.1 IS 6523 47% 47b 47% + b 

22b 12., PheloD 1035 17% ITu IT,— % 

J' Pholoor 500 1X8 39 46% 46 46b 

20% PnlDrS it 10 26 5571 *1% 40 40b— 1% 

— nHi“ EI 147 * 3753 ,r * l4 ^ 15 + 


39 21% VFCorp 1.13 30 

12% 5% Volero 
TV* 14 Valerpf 3M 14J 
4% 2b Vale, In 
28b 19 VtmOm 
«"■ 2b Varc« 

13b 57, Varcapl 

*6% 27% Vartan 
13% 9', Varp 

257, \o veeca 
B% 3% Vendo 
11% 8% Vests, 100a 100 
48% 26% Viacom J2 .9 20 

72 54 VoEP pf 703 100 
78% *7% VdEPpf BA0 110 
er« 67% VaElpf BA0 108 
91% *9 VaEPpf *05 10.7 

73 52% VaE stj 703 1X8 

67b 50% VaEPpf 700 1X9 
68% 51% VoEP Pf 70S 110 
23b 11% visitors 14 

41% 23 Vomad 11 

78 bl VutenM 2-60 X* 12 


w 


65% 40b SeartoG 100 10 16 *54 S*% 54% 54’,— % 

59', 29% sears 106 40 « *950 37% 36% J7%— % 

106% 97 Sear* M 9036 90 130 103 101% HD + V, 

31% 19 SecPoc s 1 J4 40 7 BOO 237, 28b jy, + % 

31 11% SelDLt 142 17% 17V, 17%— 

36% 24% SvcCPS A0 1.1 17 91 15b 34% 35b + •« 

18% 11% Shaklee .73 50 33 120 13% 13% I3%— % 

251, 11 spawln AO ZS 8 *5 ZJ% 23% 73b— % 

38b 28", StiellT 2076 6.9 13*0 34% it'd 14" i— % 

30b Kb She/GIo 00 30 6 492 36% 26b Sab— % 

39-« 24 Sftrwln .*2 Z4 13 167 Ml, 38b 38 

8b 4% 3 hoe hum 6 172 6% a", 6%— % 

17", IJ snowM A0 4.7 13 295 13 12% I2%— b 

18% )3% SlerPoc 1A0 80 0 151 I8'i 101* 18»«— ", 

47 241, Signal tJX) Z4 1* 8989 tlL 41b 41% — % 

a 486. Sign) p) 4.12 *.9 *0 60 JRf 59% + % 

38% 15b Singer .40 10 9 494 35% 34% 34% — % 

32b 26b sinurpl X5D 11.1 6 31% 31’, 31% + Va 

18 12b Skvllne A8 X7 19 157 13% 12b 13%—', 

16% 20% Slollenr 0Oo 30 15 1 2*% 34% 24% — • i 

l*"fc 9% smith in .32 3 0 83 10 9% 9b 

70b 50% smka ZOT 40 11 2ta0 41% 46% 67 — % 

67% 38 Snivel r IM 1.7 17 7 64b Mb *4'.— '., 

*1?* Sr** 5hO">On 1.1* Z9 14 TU «’■ 39% 39?;—!% 

43", 27 Sonal 105 50 7 12*3 36% 35V; 35%— lb 

l*l, 12% SoovCp .lie 10 12 1*33 16% 16', 16b — b 
30b 22b SoPLIn 100 4-4 13 174 27b 27 77—1, 

37% Source X20 80 24 3*b 38% 38',— ", 

23 IB SrcCooi z*o 100 15 — i, J2'»— 

23% 20 SCrEof Z50 110 J 23b 22b 22% — b 

29% 22 SoJerin ZM BA II 61 28b 3% 2B% + \i 

49b 41", Saudwn 1.W I* 10 58 42 41"; 41b — % 

33% 22 SocrBfc M0 3 8 10 413 32*j 37 32 

1£ : 5% SaelPS Z13I3X4 41 «, - 7 + ", 

77b 18b SCOlEs Z04 70 « MJ?4 ZT* 7fp« pj+ % 

21b 14", SaulhCo I+: 9.0 7 si9l Si'; 21b 21% 

26% 17 SoinGss 1.80 7.1 S IB 25% 25b 2S%— ", 

43b 29 SNETI 2.73 *0 11 477 43>, «■, «T; + % 

38% 31'-; SoNEnt 302 9.9 im jp, 33'; 33% 

69', 41% SoNE Dl 4A2 9.4 104 4° 49 49 +1 

3) 23 SoUnCo n 59 lgj 391- jv. , 

36. 23 So.j)1nd 1.00 Z9 11 65* 34% 34 3* — b 

I4-, lib SoRov .11 4 IB 430 U', i2», IT',— 

8% 4b Soumrk 00 XI 5 290 7 *% 

27b 14% SwAirl .13 J 18 989 Z7'z Mb 27 — 

*}b Jib fwlFor 30 54? 14b 13% 13%— ", 

17b 10% SwIGas 10* 7 a 7 155 14’j i*ii 1^., ». 

82", 55", 5i»0ell D00 7 4 J 2458 7**. 79 T9 _ % 

2? 19% SwSnr 02 1.9 11 22* 77 25b 269. + 

7fb JT* SwlPS 108 ?A 9 592 24’, 24% 24% + 

5 O0 ‘l!?^ , -82 40322 73 ij', 12% 13 ?,— l. 

SS IS* SoeciP . _ . 217 j*b is% 15% — 1 

57% 33% Sporrv 1 .92 3 4 11431*8 59 SS 1 : 5a — b 

38 30" 1 Spring, 1.JI *6 10 30 13 32% 12", , - -- - 

43*» 31% SauatD lit l.i II 450 40 3«:. 39?,— »«{ «. 45 WtCNA pf 705 16.4 

64% 41 Sauihh I0e i« I* e01 61% *$b 60% — % IJi’1 91 WPocI 10 

£4% J7V. siaiev 40 M It 5+J 71% J1", 21b—', 1 o.. uui.^i— 

23% I*’ 1 SIBPnl if li 12 4*1 2]', 22% 22';— % 

■O'* n SlMoir 07 20 10 418 IV, 11% 11% — % 

»% SloOOh 200 *.1 S 1557 AM, I S’, 48 — b 
21 T» SIPocCs II Ml 20% 20% 20% 

«*• J *; 1 J* 0 ^*®* 52 30 9 64 13% 13"; 11% + 

31 19b 5 ion Wli .9e 30 11 153 30 1 29’: 39%—': 

35rt 23% STarrch l.M 04 10 2 J2 31% 31% — 

11 8% SlaMSc I0Ool 1 3 *9 10% 10% 10% 

3% 21, Sleodo -- -- — 


539 35% 35 35b 

723 11% I OH 11% + % 
41 23% 23 b 23% 

25 3% Z% 3% 

21 21% 21b 21V,— % 
39 2% 2% 7% — % 

IS 9% 9 9% 

J 14 681 30 29V, 29b— % 

47 10% 10", 10H + !, 
Zil 13 577 19% l*b "9% — V, 
160 166 8 7% B -> % 

9 11% 11b 11% + V* 
488 47% 45b 45% —2b 
801 72 71b 71b— b 

71% 78b 71% +3 
6Qi OT 80 80 +2 

15<fc 91b 91 91b + b 

270: 71% 71 71%— b 

100: 66% 66% 66% + % 
200: 67% 67% 67% — % 
62 21b 21% 21b— b 
II 43 41% 42 + b 

31 77b 77 T> 


630: 2+, 28b 2S'»— % 
250: 35% 34", 35b +lb 
40 11% lOb 10-,— b 
305 10"; 10b KH, + b 
940i SO 59 60 +1 

82 "O'. 9'- 9V : _% 

UMilll 110 111 +3 

610; TI'; 70 70—2 

1600= 60 59 40 + b 

IOOi 58 58 58 —I 

69 20% 20". 20% + "; 


_ PhllE pf 300 115 
36 », PhllE pt *A8 130 

11% *b PfillEpi 1.41 130 
10’, tb PhllE Pt 103 120 
40. *3 PhllE el 705 13.1 

10b *H PhllE af 1.2S 1X5 
110 8? PhllE Pf 1505 117 

]2> s ' PhllE Df 900 13* 

44 PhllE ol 700 1X0 
M 43 V, PhllE Df 7.75 1X4 

a;, is’, pnnsuf us l* 12 .... 

S * 52l!' V y 4 -°9 *0 II 779* 07% 85% 86% —lb 

1®** SU ?' n , . « =■) 12 2701 22% 22’, 22% — 

60% 26 Pnlilnof 100 1.9 3 54 5J 5* — % 

fti* ???* 5DiJE c * 300 ’ 9 8 6035 38b 37% 37% — b 

12 9 PJIIf w! 4159 lib 11% Jib 

23 PhiPtel 3217 S, at, 32,- b 

781? PhllVH A0 1A II 247 24% 2* )*b + '.. 

;3b Fed*, 08 0 10 1224 Mb 33b 33%—% 

— . a N F 7-72 4.9 10 5 33b 33b 33b + b 

11 13 7B 21b 21% 21%—% 

S - fti -5 E lS ,rv “9 II 404 55% 54b 5*%— b 

if, 2)% Ftanejr 10* *0 S *43 36% 3*b 2*b— b 

26% 131 1 FlonrEI 1?r 1.1 8 |<", 15 is — b 

ft 1 * S!! n S B . i-?S J* 13 1379 At 42% 42% —lb 

“ S*’7 Df i, 7 14 1 87 87 87 —1 

1*. Pl'fShl „ 379 II A II", 11b 

Bb PlonR, 00 lA 13 HI 13b 12% 12% — b 

J3!* -wb 1.9 i3 i» ffb •% a%— % 

13% a t PloyteJv g 5? |ni„ jo id 

S. 1 * 15, '* .60 la 31 2e l*% 16', 16% + b 

J; . 24b Pelorld 100 10 181 1493 31b 10% 30%—% 

= ' ‘ !! JO .4 24 355 lib 10% 11 — b 

III; 15 PoeTal 00 *.] A 19% 19% ]D% % 

* 91 » J 4 ^* A0 24 *1 28 17 le% 17 + b 

?!.’ 13b ?°rtGE 1.90 8 9 s 8915 21% 21b 21b 

PoG_Df II0OIX9 530=165', 10* 105b + lb , 

8 74 23% 23% — 


105% 90 

34?» I,': PorGnt 2>0 110 


20b 

14b Slcrcni 

.7* 






9% SrrKJcp 

-74 

7.1 » 48 


"0% 









J4b 

?4 Steel Dp 

! 70 

30 13 1489 






MB 

14 11 1J7 


19’- 









45% 

32% StencW 

I.BO 

39 8 24 




39 

24b SloncC 

-aO 






3*% staoSfW 

1.10 






I5"» SlorEa 

104 

8.9 15 iso 

21 




7 vlSiorT 



5> g 




36" i Slorer 

.40 

0 340 





18% SlrlMln 

60s 

11 % 

i+i 




14". SlrldP! 

00 

40 M 91 











40’V 

23% SunBks 

1^0 

3.0 14 81* 





25", SunCn 

68 





■ 4 

4% SwiEf 


III* 

104, 

}' - 



43% SwnCo 

ZOT 





109 

90b SunCof 

125 

13 4 




49", 

34% Sundslr 

100 

4.0 12 29] 

44’ : 



12% 

7"! SurtMn 



Tlj 



JBb 

26 SuptVI 






4+b 

22% SuoMkl 

61 

.« 14 1#> 




17b 

14 Swank 

.90 

5J 14 4 

15- : 




5»bron 

108 


IS - . 




11% 5vmsC4> 


20 le 

is 1 - 




39- 1 5vnte> 

1.92 

31 15 2315 





27% Svsc* 

OT 

10 15 116 

35'-. 

ZS' > 


c 



T 



rz 3 


SO', 34% TDK 
33’. 34 TEC O 
IJ*, rb TGIF 
W I lb 1 N9 
25% 17 TRE 
81b 50% TPW 
ISO 110 TRW pr 
8% 2% Tacsoar 

77% 52"; TaltBrd 
19% IZ'.-i Toiler 
21% 15 Talley pi 
77 49% Tumbrd 


06e 3 18 
ZJ6 7.2 9 

16 

MS *0 


26 J?% 3?% 37?-. — 
108 33'; 12% 3J + 
02 W 10% 13?.— 
35 18'. >8% 


*9% 22 WICGR ZOT XO 1 33 28% 28% 28% — % 

J8% 21b Wochvs 100 27 11 237 37% 36% 37%—% 

SV. Irt Wacxnl AO 10 13 18% l«Vh 18% — % 

10% Wolnoc 291 7% 7% 7% + % 

56% 3 e", WalMrt 33 0 27 2397 53% S3 S3b— % 

Mb 16b Wnlgm s II 595 39 27 27% —17, 

M", 15% WkHPiglAO 157 21b 32V. 22% 

2!- Wo ICS v .45 IJ 17 110 3616 15% 35% — b 

OTb 22 WoltJm 1A0 IJ B 315 37% 37% 37% — % 

26% 17% Women 08 36 13 47 34% 2*b 24b— b 

OT": 17 WmCm 2414 29% 2*V> 29V.— b 

«b 28% WomrL 1A8 X» 14 1009 41% 40% 40%—% 

22 74% WmliGl IA4 7.7 8 101 211, 21% 211, + % 

28b 15% WshNot 108 40 7 199 24% 24% 24b + % 

2% 16b WNiWI 2A8 107 8 163 ZR, 23% 3b + % 

28*, Wade 97 1A 18 1270 51% SS% ss%— 1% 

3% 20 WatkJn 0 IJ II 2S7 26% 26% 26% — te 

12% 8% VVavGos 00 23 9 14 8% 1% 1% 

26 20 WavGpf 1A0 80 10 19% 191, 19",— te 

IT: Jb Weanu 53 5% 5% 5% + % 

ZPh 1T-, WrtDD 006 10 14 423 20% 30% 2BH— % 

40 297, Wei, MV .70 IJ 14 26 39% J9 39 — b 

Cb 30?, WellsF Z40 40 B 861 61% S*% 5*%— 1% 

40 W6IF pf 407B1OJ 130 47b 47", 47%— 1 

28b 23", WelPM 20O1OA 12 *4 27% 27 27— % 

WJ» l)% Wentfr j J| M 19 1424 18% 17% I7%— % 

27b ltb West Co 04 10 14 S3 24% I*% 24% — b 

44b 34 WPonPpUJO 1X3 220:44 43 44 +1% 

*3% Jl% WBPfP 200 50 "3 34 39% 39 3*b 

13"; +t WildT, 1JM 31 ?0 12% 13% 17% — b 

7 2% WnA/rL W 1285 6% 6% 6%— % 

2b % WlAIr wt 341 2 1% 2 

22 =t Bb WAIrpI 200 9.9 27 22b 20 "i 20b — % 

a% 8% WAIrpf 114 1X1 45 71% Zlb 2tb — b 

?% * WCNA 69B 5% 5% 5b + % 

6 44% 44b 44V« — 1 

7 1251,125 125 — ", 

_ . S% WUnlon 2103 I3b 12% 12?,— V, 

58 2*.-, WnUnpf I 35 35 35 

*1. -2. Wr "U Ptc 1 OTb 38b OTb + b 

8 » 2b WnUptS 180 7b 67, 6% 

IS J% Wnu PIE 390 12% 11% 12 + b 

18b 5": WUT1 atA 159 14", 13% 14V# + te 

35". 20b WshjE MO X7 10 4095 33b 32% 32% - V, 

41% Jte wnhc 10 14 1 Ml 37% 36te 36",— I 
H. 25% Weverh 10O <5 19 1191 29 2Bte 28% 

*4% 34b Weyrpi 200 6.7 » 41% 41% 41%— % 

MV, 43% VVe.T pr 400 9.1 44 49% 49", <9% + % 

**■* *% vlWhPIt 79 8% ■ 8 — b 

*0 14% vlWPItplB 200: 19b 19b 19b 

OT 10% vlWnPil pf HD 16% 16% 16% + b 

36b Whlrlpl xoo 4J 10 1827 47% 46% **% — !% 

OT;, 24", While Up SJ 551 28% 27% 28% + % 

48", 47% WhllC P1AOC 63 I 47% 47% 47% + b 

*2b 36% While PiajM 7.1 2 42% 42% 47% — b 

J" 17% Whtlehl 12 264 » 29% 29b— b 

3% 1*', Whlrtdk A0 2A 11 189 ZIU, 23 33 — V. 

12b *% wleoim 4j 6* iova 4% 10% + % 
]4b a Wiftrdn 11 8 11b 11 11 — 

31% 22% William 100 40 7 1 368 OTb 29% 30 + b 

Ste 2 WllmEI 282 5% 4% 4% — % 

BV, s', WrIMirO .10 U IS 9B 6% 6% 6% + "• 

36b 25b WinDl. Ia 8 50 II 128 33% MW 32b— 1% 

20% 7b Wlnnda 30 1.9 9 1475 lib 10% 10%— % 

"3% 5% Winner *1 141 7 *% *%— 

7b lb Wlnlerj 11 6% 6b 4b— % 

OT% 27% WISCEP 208 6.7 8 333 37b 36% 37 — ", 

* 6f% WISE pf X90 1X1 210: 86% 87 88% +1% 

59% WISE pf 7J5 1X0 8100: 77b 75% 77% +1% 


63J09 West German Marks-cents 


DMork 

a 




3X30 

30 

ZOT 



32-W 

31 

128 

1.97 

X44 

3X20 

32 

037 

133 

103 

32-30 

33 

001 

005 


32-30 

34 

r 

X53 


3X30 

Si 


032 


125068 French Frnncs-HHhi of a coot per u 


8 


007 

).I6 

XM 


001 

001 


FFronc 100 X7S 6-B0 > T 

"0404 105 090 r r 0.10 

10604 110 r r r xio 

4.2580W Japppese Yen-1 OOT Its pf a ami per unit. 


X15 

OJO 


180 

US 

700 


mo 

X62 


0J6 


005 

100 


l.M 


125 

r 


X1B 

r 


JYefl 

4O0< 

4009 

4009 

4X09 

*009 

4009 


205 

103 

0.13 


lie 

135 


X58 

0J3 


41580 Swiss Francs-cents per anil. 
5 Franc 3* 133 1 

38-36 37 M0 r 

3X36 38 002 r 

3X36 39 002 r 

3X3* *0 r X73 

3X36 41 r 007 

Total call voL 1025 
Total put VOLX783 


0A2 

000 


170 

1.19 

X9S 


003 

045 


007 

0M 

10T 

1-54 


Call open Inf. 229054 
Put open lot. 171938 


r— Not trodex. v-No onUon oHptcX.i>-OIX 

Lost Is premium (purchase orlcal. 

Source: AP 


66Z5 5980 Jun 

14610 5620 Jul 

Aw 

118X0 5730 Sep 

123X0 5900 DCC 

msa 59Ln Jon 

119XO 6070 MOT 6530 6540 6530 6510 

10480 6210 May 6*00 

9450 6330 Jul 67X0 6700 6700 67X0 

9400 6410 Sep 48X2 

7990 6670 Dec 69X0 6930 6910 6916 

799.0 7210 Jan 7070 707J 7070 TOM 

7700 70*0 Mar 7180 7180 71X0 7120 

Est. Sales 1X000 Prev. Sales UZD 
Prev.DayOaen Int. 78068 up 3*4 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 fray ax.- dollars per trev as. 

28700 25100 Jun 

449-50 24100 jui 26400 24400 26150 26X50 

39300 25000 OCt 26X00 24X70 IA7-7B 26X30 

37X50 26000 jan 27X00 27X50 27200 27300 

32950 27550 APT 27X00 27XW 27100 27X30 

si. Sale, 1021 Prev. Sales 1,174 
Prev. Day Open int. 11030 oft 3*5 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

M0 tray ar- doi lars per oz 

15*50 9400 Jun 9700 9700 94JS 96.70 

141J5 9350 Sea 9*00 96.75 9SJ5 9630 

14150 9300 Dec 9650 9700 9650 9600 

12750 9450 Mar 9*30 

11400 940Q Jim 9455 

Est. Sales 111 Prew. Soles 266 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 6064 off SB 
GOLD (COMEX) 

100 troy a*.- d 0 1 lars per troy an 
51800 28700 Jun 31X40 3K70 31X40 31400 

31350 Jul 3155V 

29108 AUB 31700 31 7 AO 31600 31700 

29700 OCt 32X10 32X90 31900 32100 

301.50 DOC 32500 32500 32X00 32500 

30600 Feb 32X00 32900 32800 32900 

314.70 Aar 33X40 

32050 Jun -T OT or 

33100 Ado 34200 

39SJD 33300 Oct 347-70 

39100 34200 Dec 352,70 

3*400 36200 Apr 36X80 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 12548 

Prev.Oov Open InLU&KI oH321 


— IJ 
— IJ 

— 1A 
— 10 
—17 
—10 
—10 
—1.9 
—1.9 
—1.9 
—1.9 
—10 
—1.9 


+A0 

+J0 

+50 

+50 


MOV MUD 109.98 16700 144.10 —170 
JUI 17*00 17900 17*00 17700 -300 
E^- Soto X766 Prev.SoJe, 3021 
Prev.Dav Open InL IDA13 up *8 
COTTON S (NYC*) 

3XW0 lbs,- conn par to. 

79M 6X90 Jul 6X60 6X74 6240 6X23 +03 

2t£ “ * ,J0 a - , ° * 1J0 4]jM +M 

7300 *x4 Dec 6173 6220 41JS 62.00 +J1 

61A0 Mor 6075 *X1* 4275 6X01 +.43 

7X00 6106 Mery *300 6320 4300 6X33 +57 

7X05 6XQ5 Jul 6X65 6355 63A5 6X60 +JJ 

■ lULK 1140 S£S +M 

Est Satas 4000 Prev. Sates 3040 
Prev. Day Oden Int 15001 oft 403 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

42000 aai- cents per sol 


75OT 

6X3S 

Jul 

*9.10 

6960 

<un 



7500 

66M 


6068 

AR CD 

<705 

MOT 



67.10 

Sep 

<605 






<700 

Oct 

6960 

<938 

6933 

6901 



<800 

Nov 

70-20 

7X20 

6905 

7005 



6900 

Dec 

7100 

7100 

70165 



7+90 

71*0 

7300 

7408 

7X75 

7X79 

7X00 

7600 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

7100 

71 JO 

7L35 

TL65 

7205 

7105 

ALU 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

Est. Soles 

Prov. Sates 5609 



9ft 


CRUDE OIL (NYME) 
VOW HR.- denars per Obi. 


Jul 2700 27.43 27.15 
Aua 2600 26.90 2X29 
SOP 25.98 2608 2509 

2575 2506 25.73 


49300 

40950 

48150 

49*00 

43170 


+JO 

+90 

+30 

+30 

+30 

+30 

+30 

+30 

+J0 

+00 

+00 


2954 24.10 

2*57 2425 

2950 2400 

2950 2465 OCt 

2950 24.49 Now 

29 JO 2X90 Dec 

2950 2475 Jan 

2*06 24AS FeB , „ 

2*05 2492 Mar 24*3 2100 2408 2400 

, Esi. Safes Prev. Saha 14171 

Prev. Day Open int 62J31 up 74 


2740 
2651 
2603 

2501 

2544 2SA5 2544 2555 

2544 254S 2SJ5 2144 

2SJ0 2SL32 2120 2129 

2120 2120 211S 2105 


-H39 

+J4 

+26 

+22 

+.12 

+.16 

+.13 

+03 


Stock Indexes 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI ml Ilian. pfsoTIWpci. 

2-1) 8X94 Sen 9X70 *202 9X70 9204 

92.79 8X77 Dec 9Z39 9256 92J8 9247 

9249 8468 MOT *208 9X06 9206 9111 

9119 1701 Jun 9102 9102 9102 91J7 

*101 8800 tag 91 S3 9153 9153 9150 

9IAS 8905 Dec 91.29 *151 9X2* 9US 

9159 8958 Mar 9103 

Est. Soles 14.200 Prev. Satas «J*B 
Prev. Day Open Int. 33051 off 312 
]• JR- TRHASU RY (CRT) 

sioaoooprw-Pts&SMsot 100 pet 

■9-18 70-9 

88-21 75-16 

87-13 75-13 

85-31 75-14 

83-7 7+30 

EU^ales Prew. Sales 124U 

Prev. Dav Onen ini. $4694 up 792 
US TREASURY BONDS (CRT) 

18 Pd-S1OO0OO-pts &32ndsof 100 oct) 

B0-11 57-20 Jun 78-1 78-20 77-22 71 

7*-12 57-10 Sep 74-31 77-18 76-19 7630 

2-13 57-8 Dec »01 7+1? 75-20 75-30 

77-12 57-2 Mar 7S-10 73-20 7+24 73 

7+6 5+29 Jun 7+10 7+23 73-29 7+6 

5+29 sen 73-10 73-30 73-6 73-11 

72-17 72-1* 72-13 72-19 
71-28 

71-1* 71-19 71-1 7V7 

71 71 70-1* 70-1* 

70 


+07 

+05 

+03 

—JO 

—03 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
p oints and cents 

191.95 15410 Jun 187.10 187A0 IMS) USJ0 —115 

195 AO 16X00 Sep 19X60 191.15 18800 WJS — Z25 

199.10 175.70 Dec 19X85 1*430 19200 19178 —2-15 

202X5 190.10 Mar 19X90 193,90 19500 196J0 —230 

Est. Spun 69343 Prev. Sales 57.743 
Prev. DayOaen Inf. 79471 off *44 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
paints ond cants 

21*00 17X00 Jun 1*600 19705 195J0 T9SA5 — U0 

71X30 18575 Sep 28X70 20X73 198-JO 19X75 —US 

21300 20000 Dec 20X90 20300 28200 20X25 —115 

EsJ. Sales Prev. Saks 3,970 

Prev.Oov Open Int. 7081 up 18 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYPE) 
points and cents 

111.15 9000 Jun 10X60 10X75 WTJ5S "07.75 —103 

11X60 9IJ5 Sep 11X93 11103 10960 10900 —M0 

IISJO 10M0 Dec 11200 11200 11100 11100 —MS 

1 1 7 JO 109 JO Mor 114*5 1U0S 11X00 11X90 —130 




Est. Soles 15.140 Prev. Sale* 9366 
Prev. Dav Oaan Int 13403 


Jun 

87-17 

07-29 

87-3 

07-12 

Sep 

B+16 

B+2« 

8+1 

0+11 

Dec 

85-7 

0+28 

8+2 

8+11 

Mar 
Jun _ 

84-19 

8+19 

8+5 

0+14 

03-21 


commodity Indexes 


75-31 
7+24 
7+15 
7*11 
72-27 
77-18 

g»f. Sales Prew. Salesl 53039 

Prav. Day Open InURUO* up 924 
GNMA (CBT) 

svoajaa prtav - pis X 32nds at loo pet 


5+25 Dec 
5+27 Mar 
**•12 Jun 

»4 SOP 

62-24 Dec 


77-4 

57-17 

Jun 

75-24 

7+26 

75-22 7+22 
75 7+3 

7+16 

59-13 

Sep 

7+2 

7+W 

75-25 

7+4 

7+23 

6+31 

59-* 

58-10 

5+25 

<5 

Dec 

Mor 

Jun 

Sop 

7+20 

7+21 

74-13 74-U 
7+27 
7+12 
73 

Esi. Soles 

Prew. Sates 

213 



—10 

—IT 

—13 

—12 

—13 

—13 

—13 

—13 

—13 

—13 


—12 
—11 
—11 
—II 
—11 
— U 


Moody's. 
Reuters - 
DJ. Futures. 


Previous 
909 JO f 
1,787 JO 
121.07 

moo 


Close 

909 60 f 

1.794,10 

120J1 

Com. Research Bureau. 233.10 
Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


Prev. Dav Ooen int. XS4S up 47 


CBT: 

CME: 


NYC3CE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME; 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


Chicago Board af Trade 
Qdcoso Mercantile Exctamae 
hrieraatlena) Monetary Mamet 
Of CMcaso Mercantile Ekcharm 
New Y ork Cocoa, tear, Coflee Exctionee 
Now York Canon Exchange 
Commodftv Exchonue, New York 
Mew York MercantUe Exchange 
Kansas city Board ot Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


& 


London Commodities' 

June 13 


close Previous 
5UGAR M,fB Un * bw *** bw As* 
Sterling per metric tan 
Aae 9420 «160 9300 9X40 9X20 9060 

OO »6j) 9X* J4A0 95.00 9X20 9X60 

Dec 9900 9X20 100.20 10100 97 AO 9800 

Mar 11X40 707.40 111^0 11100 103AO 10800 

MOT 115.60 I [loO 11500 11560 11X80 11120 

Aug 121.40 1OTJW 1 70 AO 12100 11900 11000 

Od 12500 11460 12460 12500 12400 12500 

Volume: 2258 tots ol 50 Ions. 

COCOA 

Starling per metric ton 
Jlr 
Sep 
Dec 


1000 1J73 1J73 1.774 1022 1023 

MM 1.733 M33 1.735 M84 1,785 

■21 ,Jtw 1J44 V 49 


May 

JW 

5W 


1.725 

1-J40 1^20 1.720 I.WJ MSS 1^57 

.755 1^35 l.na Mas 1,766 

WS5 MB ,7*3 1.750 1047 1373 

N.T. N.T. 1,751 1.775 T.776 1,781 
Volume: 3006 lolsol 10 ions. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric too 

Jly 2123 7090 XI IQ ZD) 2078 2082 

Sep 21 B0 XI 43 ZlaJ 1165 XI 39 XUO 

Nov 2224 zm 2.3)6 2210 NA NA 

Jon 


act 

Nov 

Dec 

Jaa 

Frt 

Mar 


3*0 35b 35V, 35%— b 
9 so X^ 35% 35% + b 
9 8 35% 35% 35% + % 
3 105 10b 10% 10% 


i 

75’ _ 

JV, 25b WiscPL Z*4 7A 

37", 2*% WhcPS 25* 7.1 

JO’7 27% Wlfco 1A8 42 

15‘. 9’.: WalwrW 24 20 

7*b 18% Wood PI Ml 17 It 98 21% 21% 21% 

4Ti 32 Wolwlh 2W 44 10 394 45% 45% 45% — % 

Mb 4V-. ttolwpt X20 3A 2 64", 64b 64b— b 

4% 2% wridAr 16 3b 3% 3%— % 

*9% *»H Wlglv 100a 27 12 13 67% 64% *7% 

5% 2% wurltrr 22 3 3 3 + % 

18_ 10% WrteLb 02 Z9 12 11 II 10% II — % 

23% 17 \vwui3 ■ 


NT N.T. 2J00 2240 2172 2205 
Volume: S.98S lots ot S tons. 

GASOIL 

UJ.dpIkars per metric Ion 
Jly 21X7S 71X50 21300 2IX2S 21 M5 21200 
AW 21275 211^ 71200 21X3 21X75 71100 
Sep 21150 21X50 11X75 21300 21 M5 21X00 
~ ' SKS 315® 2)3.75 31400 

718.OT 31800 21700 21760 116.0 21700 
N.T. N.T. 11900 22X00 71900 770.00 
N.T. N.T. '21800 22X00 22060 2X500 
N.T. N.T. 21500 22400 21100 22800 
N.T. N.T. 21X00 22400 22200 227 JO 
volume: 7 aj lolsol 100 tons. 

Scvrart: Pewters and London Petroleum Ee- 
cnanoe toasoill. 


London Metals 

Jane 13 


Previous 

Bid Ash 


close 

Bid A* 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling Per metric ton 
spot 81700 HI 800 81800 81900 

forward 83900 84000 84100 84200 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade! 

Sterling per metric ton 
spot 1.13160 1.13X50 1.12700 1.12800 

forward 1.14960 1.15000 1,14*00 1,14660 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling per metric too 
soof 1.12100 1.12400 1,11800 1,12000 

forward 1.13700 M4O0O 1.13300 1.13500 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric tan 
seal 31400 3160 31700 31900 

forward 30200 30260 30&00 30900 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric tan 
snot 40900 460000 438X00 439000 

forward 434000 43450 401500 436000 

SILVER 

Pence per trey ounce 
Spa" _ 48500 <8700 48800 

forwa r d 50000 50160 50300 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric lor 
seal 9J250O 9.73000 968000 968100 

forward 966500 968600 966200 966500 

ZINC 

Sterling per metric tea 
soof 57X50 57160 57300 57400 

forward 58000 58060 58400 58500 

Source: AP. 


49X1X1 

50500 


Paris Commodities 

June 13 


Clowt 
Bid Att orge 


DM Futures Options 

June 13 

*r. German Un-tZiDG norti cents ner mart 


AO 36 


31 17% 17% 1Tb — b 


1.00 

300 

650 

4.0 16 
61 10 
u 

330 

545 

1 

IBS 

3S' : 15 
94% 73b 
136b 136b 
2-1 2% 

3. * ', 

73*5 —1 

136b b 

2 1 * — % 

50b OTb j cram 

44 , 45b .- ora. p 
29 1* XT PA 

3JK 

S6S 

44 

6.1 21 
1X1 

ZS 10 

5072 SDH 49 49% + % 

929 53% 53b 53b 

234 26b 25% 25", — % 

10c 

6 13 

S4 

19% itb 

17' 

H 


z 

I 

3 JO 

46 14 

117 

73b 73b 


«'• loleCp 


40 9 

36 29% 29% 29%— b 







23 10 l : Zosola 

84 


194 11 10b 10% 



38 

13*e 


54 25 lavrr , 






7B2 

55% 54'., 





1937 20% 19% 19b— b 




3'-» 

3% 


51 IS Zero- 


is 

103 18% 17% 1B%— b 


sirac CA-setne pptvsem. 

Price sea Dee Mcr Sep Dec Mt 

30 265 104 — 13 0*3 — 

31 I.5 2J* - 04* 0.76 _ 

32 1JB 109 - DOT 1,15 |A 

33 001 IJ! 1.74 Ij; i*j _ 

3* 068 MS 13, 1% 121 — 

IS 02 Dm IX U| U - 

Estimated total voL 1175 
Cans: Writ V0i.29te0P« 1,1.2X770 
Puts : Wed. vol. 1 970 open kd. 1*021 
Source: CME. 


U.S. Treasury Bill Rates 

Jane 13 


BU Yield Yield 


High Low 

SUGAR 
French franc* per metric ton 
Aup 1373 1.255 1359 UM Unch. 

Oct M75 MAS MtO MAS + " 

Dec N.T. N.T. 10*0 1.2*5 +3 

Mar U35 1015 1J20 1023 +13 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1060 U*5 +11 

Aup NT. N.T. 1^30 1640 + 14 

Est. vdl.: 715 lots ol 50 Ions. Prev. octupl 
sales: 9*4 lots. open Interest: 1868* 

COCOA 

French francs per 1W kg 
Jlv N.T. N.T. 2050 2100 —10 

Sen 2057 2047 2045 204S —38 

Dec 2015 20T5 2003 Z010 —34 

Mor 2034% 2020 2020 2025 — 73 

Wqy N.T. N.T . 3JBB — —15 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2025 — —5 

Sep N.T. N.T. 7025 — — 70 

E .* 1 " X&Li? I?* 3 °? - 10 1°"^ frew. actual 
soles: id* lots. Open interest: 756 

COPPEE 

Preach Manes per 108 ka 

Jhr 2675 2675 2650 X*85 +27 

tap 2653 2616 2647 2645 +gl 

Nov 2695 2682 2680 2687 +18 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2685 2615 + 15 

MO r N.T. N.T. 2690 2620 +25 

May N.T. N.T. 2680 2600 +i< 

JtV N.T. N.T. 7050 2600 +| 

E . sl - s JS n bJ^ m actual 

sales: 95 lots, open Interest: 392 

Source: Bourne ou Commerce. 


3-man ih 
+mgnlf> 
One rear 


tw 

7.11 

139 


*92 

799 

737 


7J0 

768 

7*2 


Source: Solomon flnwnws 


fOentlATST WOR7CN 
HJ7060NDS 
. KAEiCAB-GBIWlZ 
EAQfMcrPmiynEwr 


Asian Commodities 

June 13 


HONGKO NG GOLD FUTURES 

High LOW BM°*ASk wT'mc 

r- teRSWVSSW 

*UP- N.T. N.T. ZI60O 31800 31600 31800 
Oct - N.T. N.T. 31900 32100 32000 32200 
Dec - JtT. N.T. 32300 32SJM 32300 
Fet> «. OT90O 32900 32800 33000 -Tmnn 
API — 33X00 33X00 32200 33400 33200 
Volume: 25 lots of 100 oz 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
ttUr 


Jun _ 
Aug. 


. Prev. 

High Low Sente Settle 
N.T. N.T. 31410 31360 
314.90 31490 31490 31660 

N.T. N.T. 31X90 31860 

Oct N.T. N.T. 32X90 2OTA0 

veiuma: 113 lets ef 100 ol 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
MWaysloa cents per Mlo 


Jhr. 


Bid Ask 8 5 W ‘°Sk 
20100 70200 20X25 20400 


19*60 19700 1990Q 

19700 79XW 1*900 
TWJW 19900 2OO0Q 
OT060 20260 2CZ5D 

20260 20450 20450 


I 1*960 
200001 
20100 
20450 
28660 


Volume: 30 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
S ta ge pare certs per Idle 

Gate Previous 

Bid Ask Bid Mk 
RSSIJIv— 18160 18X50 18X50 1BX75 

R5S I Aug- 17400 17450 17700 17760 

RSS2 Jly— 17400 17500 17560 17660 

R3S3JIV— 17200 17300 17X50 17460 

RSS4 Jty — 16600 17X00 1*900 17XOT 

RSS5 Jlv 16X00 16500 16460 16660 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian rt egg l tsper 25 tans 
One 

BM Ask 

Jun — 1320 MOT 

Jhr 1,190 1040 

Aug 1,110 1.160 

Sep 1080 1.130 

Oct 1060 1,100 

Nov 1040 1080 

Jan 1030 1070 

. r 10OT 1070 

May 1030 1060 

vat time: 0 lots of 25 tans. 
Source; Reuters. 


Prev lea* 
Bid Ask 


1070 

IJOO 

1.128 

1090 

1070 

1050 

"040 

1040 

1030 


1010 

1040 

1,170 

1,140 

1.110 

10TO 


Company 

Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, 
are in local currencies unless 
otherwise indicated 


Britain 



Radand 


1984 

1,250. 

H*2 

0.28 


1983 

1,180. 

930 

0248 



Cam mpdnv ood Unit 
Coffee 4 Santas. R»- 


PrkTfCfolti 64/30 38 te. yd 

Steel billets IPfrt.l, Ian 

Iron 2 Fdry. Phi to. tan _ 
Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pin. _ 

Lead spot lb — 

Copper atocf.lb 

Tin ISlralts). lb. 


Zinc, E. St. l_ Basta lb . 
Pallpdlum.aa - 

Silver N.Y.01 - 

Source: ap. 


Ttai 4n 
100 108 

060 0J6 

47X00 45X00 

2UW 21300 
70-71 180-101 
19-21 27-30 

— W-70 *7%-71 

— 40133 66012 ‘ 

_ 06+^7 063-63 

— 9+100 153-154 

— 414 804 


Dividends Jane 13 






02 9-15 8-23 

12 8-1 MS 


Company Par Amt Pcrv Rec 

INCREASED 
Owens-Illinois Q 

5vpermcurketi Geni Q 

STOCK 

North Areer Natl - 5 PC 7-19 7-S 

Porker Pen - 3 PC 7-17 +25 

STOCK SPLIT 
Emett A Chandler — 2-tor- 1 
Pep Bovs — 24ar-l 

USUAL 

Boston 5 Os Bk 
Campbell Red taka 
Enoelftord 
Elite* Energy Devi 
First nod dnclmrtl 
Gem RE Coro 
Hein: Co 
Hailwood Group 
Hoi Fdov Cora 
Hosphal Corp Amer 
Houston Natural Gas 
Justin Indus 
Mchort Schw ui idler 
Maroon (JJPJ Co 
Morfoooe Grw Inv 
Ntaar 

Nih Amor Non Cora 
Rtaos Nan Carp 
Saoune 

5 mem New Enol Tel 
Super Food Services 
Telephone Data Svs 
Thompson Medico) 

Trcnsco Energy 
Transco Exptara non 
urs com 


8 -IS . M 7 S 

.10 +26 7-22 
B 18 +28 +24 

Q 62% +30 7-1 

Q M 7-15 +OT 

O J9 +28 +24 

JO 7-10 +34 
02 7-16 +28 
35 +1 +31 

.15 +1 7-1 S 

63 7-1 +24 

.10 7-10 +2 
04 +J1 8-30 

65 7-15 +24 
09 7-8 +24 

TS 7 -2 

.10 7-19 7-5 

® J-1S +OT 
08 7J1 7.5 

6f 7-1 S +24 
.11 *-IS +20 

00 +28 +14 

£ VS U 

- 51 -» n 






a ,io 7-15 

a -A nnual; M Mo u iBlv; Q-Quarterly,- S-SeniF 
AanuaL 

Source: UP!. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

June 13 


Co!)* Leu 
Price Jot Jty Aag S«p 

W - - - - 

U", - 17ta — 

*% 11% t»» IS 

4% 6% lit BL 

I I fl, » 

to 1 1/16 2b 3b 

1/1* V iyit 1 v. 

- I/H 5/14 A 


US 


_ Prt+Urt 

6b « Am Id 

- 1/14 - - 

- i.n* 1/1* - 

$ r \ w. 

m 2 S/16 3% 

4 6 6 

III* 11 II 


IK 

TOMsaantaea 1 am 
TMal ctfl ante M.66&719 
Total pw yafcnm z maa 
tawpel *>te W.S7UKI 

HRaW57 L6WT78JD Oeninji-ui 
Source: CBOE. 


lto 

3"li 

417 

n. 






» _ ' ' V*,. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


• V 

*» - • - 



UNDUP 

1 





Page IS 


blouse Panel Approves 
Interstate Bank Bill 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — American 
banks could spread across more 
s tale lines while gelling less compe- 
tition from outride the industry on- 
^der legislation approved by the 
House Baulking Committee. 

The committee voted Wednes- 
day to replace regional banking 
compacts with fall interstate bank- 
ing In five years, only states that 
bar any interstate banking could 
avoid opening their borders to all 
other states. 

The panel also approved a Ml 
closing a loophole in the law that 
has allowed non-banking compa- 
nies to operate limited-service 


Hongkong Land 
To Sell Excelsior 

Rogers 

HONG KONG — Hong 
Kong's leading prop ert y com- 
pany. Hongkong Land Co., 
agreed on Thursday to sdl one 
of its hotels to overseas inves- 
tors to ease debt liabilities total- 
ing about 12 billion Hong Kong 
dollars (51.5 billion). 

Martin Spurrier, a company 
spokesman, said the sale of the 
950-room Excelsior, to be com- 
pleted by the end of the month, 
was above market value. Stock 
analysts estimated the market 
value at about 830 miTKrm dol- 
lars. 

Hong Kong Land tried to sdl 
the Excelsior in October but the 
response was unsatisfactory. 





banks, circumventing rules de- 
signed to keep the banking system 
separate from other industries. 

The biH would require divesti- 
ture of all so-called non-bank 
banks created after May 9, 1984. 
The 109 such operations approved 
before that date would be allowed 
to but could not expand. 

The interstate banking bill, ap- 
proved 3 l-to-l 8, would aBow states 
to band together to exdude outside 
banks only through July 1, 1990, or 
for two years after joining such a 
compact, whichever date is later. 
After that, a state allowing any out- 
side banks could no longer ban any 
bank based on geography. 

The vote was a victory for big 
banks in New York and California, 
who were lasers in a Supreme 
Court ruEng on Monday that sanc- 
tioned a pact between Massachu- 
setts and Connecticut aime d at pre- 
venting major New York banks 
from moving in. Similar multi-state 
compacts have been formed in the 
Southeast and the Northwest 

The Supreme Court’s decision 
was similar to language passed by 
the Senate last year. As a result, 
Soiator Jake Gnu, Republican of 
Utah »nd rh airman of the Senate 
Banking Committee, has taVgn in- 
terstate banking “off the table” as 
his panel works on an omnibus 
banking Ml, a committee source 
said. 

But Representative Fernand J. St 
Germain, Democrat of Rhode Is- 
land, said a ban on big-bank merg- 
ers and consumer protections in the 
House bfflwooMbdp get the legis- 
lation through Congress. 

“I don't think yon can rule oot 
this tan,” he said. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTER3NATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
13 June 1985 

The nWaMrt»oliit>tUBftUWn « «a e wql>e»Wi ant foppO ed by me FBndiBPtawUStliB 
exception at mm reeds whose quotes are baaed oo lam prices. The teHnerl— 
maiotoal symbols hMBcate freeman at notations ssppOtd for too ■ HT : 
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AL 1WAL MANAGEMENT — Mw) Lloyds lari PoctfJc. SF 13*70 

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— (d I Baertxjnd SFW&SD — (d)OassA S9U4 

— <d ) Cootoor «t«i" — » -ha.- 

— (d 1 Ecnribaer America S 1144JM — (w ) QdB C - Japan $79X7 


—Id 1 Ecnribaer America. 
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— Id) Grebpr . .. 

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BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
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Ipimro 

SFiMan — twi MuMtamuncf 

sf i«aojn 


wl Dollar LanoH 
wl Japanese Yen I 
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—Id) Asian Growth Fund $1057 

— Iw) Dlverband - SFS47S 

-lw> FIF — America— 118X4 

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britannia^ 0BZ7L St. Heller. Jersey doiip 

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— (d I Brit. World Te«*»l FuM—. S0L725 ROYAL B.OFCAMAOAPOB244GUEHNSEY 

SSKEgfSEStffer-.liS? 


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FL 107194 

$97X4 

— 111291 

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— <w> Capital Inti Fund 

— (w) Caattat ItaHa SA — 

(ISSUE PRICES 


CREDIT SUI 
id) Actions 
Idi Bond voter 


RSCFarMSfacm 
ROC Inn CootM FdJ 
RBC Ml Income FB 




—<o> Bond Valor 
—ld» Bond valor 


SKANDI FOND INTL FUND 1464-23*273) 
— (w)lnc-: Bid RZ1- Offer 55Sr 


I AD CIMB — iwkiiu. u m— .. .i wnw — w.g T 

-Id) Band Valor Yen— ^" yS, TO7MC0 -WAec: BM softer SUI 

-(d)Xeowi Voter 5wt- 5F 115X5 SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

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~~ ia 1 **'** - J » _ SF 14425 dS i jSSTpSrtSczzrr 

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SF 32050 
SF 1700 


SF 11&2S — M ) IntCTOfc* 

— (d i 

□ REXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC —Id ) 
Winchester Home. 7 7 Lond on WaH —Id) 

LONDON EC2 (0) 9209797) . Jdl 

(w) FTrabarv Group LfcJL_ *123JI? —id ) Universal 


(m) Winchester DhwsMeftw. 

(ml Winchester Financial LNL 
(w) Winchester Hofcflnas 


■ i - i . i I 


SF 12291 
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I w> Worldwide Securities S/5 Tfi— , MAS 
iw) worldwide Special S/S Zlfr _ $1432.17 


- STLW —id ) Unhmsal . . 

ffibm? — (« * Ten Bond Selection 

- $1222 UMIOM BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

I uUs — Id) AmcoUASh SF 4150 

$1432.17 —id) Bond-1 


DIT INVESTMENT FPM —Id ) 

— tld ) Concenlro : DMU59 — id 

— Hd ) Inn Rantenfond DMKL85 _«j 

Pwei 4 Hofotf* I Uord George. B russ els 
— lm) DBJd Commodltv POOL. S3Z7.19 

— (m) Currency A Gold Port %XKL6t 

— (ml Winch. LHeFut. Pool— SJ92J1 
— (m) Trans Worid Fut PooL. $829.14 


>4000 

■bu o 

SF 197.50 


WjONI NVT^ TMENT FrmUurt 


FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
). Lourence Pountv HHL EC4.01-SZM4S0 

— lw)FACAi)anHC — $13 

— Iw) FAC European $11 

— iw) F8£ Oriental $2£ 


— (d)UnMonds 
— WtUnkuk 

— id > UNIONS 

Otiief Funds 


DM 4520 
DMZ4J0 
DM74JS 
DM11230 


11239 <w) AaB w nde Investments Fund- S2149 
1 1124 iw) Acffvast inti .... SllJt 


— iw) FAC Oriental $2622 

fidelity FOB CU Hamilton Bermuda »r 1 Arm Finmce LF 

-<m) American Votes Comrooa_ $9457 jb)Ariam $145526 

lm) Amer Values CumJ :, r*l__— S10L94 ( w t teater mfl Misnid sun 


id ) Fidelity Amer. Assets _ _ — 

— Id) FiiteTOvAusIrDflo Fund SJL42 

Id ) Fldelltv Discovery Fund 


« twj Truatcar inH FiLtAEIF) $10.19 

- ■ ■ - iw) BNP InterUond Fund $11050 


[Band selwx-lssue Pr. — I 
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win) os on Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


ToyotatoPay 
A 5 ~for -100 
Stock Dividend 

Reuters 

NAGOYA — Toyota Motor 
Qxp. will pay a 5-for-100 stock 
dividend and hopes to raise its 
cash dividend to 16 yen (.06 
cent) for the year ending June 
30, 1985, from 14 yen. Shoi- 
chiro Toyoda, ihe company 
president, said Thursday. 

He said p areal company cur- 
rent profit this year would ex- 
ceed the estimated 600 billion 
yen ($2.4 billion), an sales of 
about 6 trillion yen, higher than 
the estimated 5.9 trillion. 

This compares with the re- 
cord 521. 77-billion current 
profit on record sales of 5.473 
trillion a year earlier. 

Mr. Toyoda said the upward 
revision is due to the dollar’s 
strength against the yea and a 
sleep rise in sports to China. 

The slock dividend will bring 
the capital to 2.67 biHian shares 
valued at 13330 billion yen. 


McDonnell Douglas Speeds 
Plans for DC-10 Derivative 


By Ralph Vanabedian 

Las Angeles Times Service 

LONG BEACH, California — 
McDonnell Douglas has signifi- 
cantly accderateaplans to develop, 
a derivative of its DC-10 commer- 
cial jetliner and hopes to launch the 
program as early as the first quarter 
of 1986, company officials said 
Thursday. 

If McDonnell wins sales com- 
nritments from airlines and suc- 
cessfully continues production of 
the aircraft, it would represent a 
remarkable comeback for the DC- 
10, which has been a multitmllioo- 
dollar loser for the company’s 
Douglas Aircraft subsidiary. 

The company said it had held 
ex tensi ve with to 

determine the design that appeals 
to the largest number of potential 
customers. It plans to seek approv- 
al from the McDoosdl Douglas 
board in August to make formal 
sales offers to customers. 

The plan calls for adding about 
53 seats to the aircraft’s 277-seat 
capacity by stretching the fuselage 


AMC Sets June 28 COMP ANY NOTES 
Aft T alks D eadline BaakAmeska Corp. said it di 


Reuters 

CHICAGO — American Motors 
Corp. said it set June 28 as a dead- 
line for starting to dose its D3. car 
manufacturing operations if it does 
not reach a cost-cutting labor 
agreement whh die United Auto 
Workers union. 

AMC told the union it would 
dose its Kenosha, Wisconsin, as- 
sembly plant and a smaller parts 
plant in Milwaukee if the two sides 
do not agree to lower labor costs, 
which it says are the fn gfwa in the 
UJL auto industry. The two plants 
employ 7,000 people. 

AMC which reported a $2 9- mil- 
lion loss in the Gist quarter, is ask- 
ing the rrainn for wide-ranging cats 
in wages, benefits and work rules. 
The company produces the Re- 
nault Alliance and Encore subcoin- 
pacts at the Kenosha plant 


BaakAmerica Corp. said it does 
not plan to dumge its quarterly 
dividend of 38 cents, despite mar- 
ket speculation of a cat after last 
wedrs forecast of flat profit growth 
in the current quarter. 

Grand Metropolitan PLC of 
Londoo said h has entered into a 
defini tive «gw*™ent to sell its Pin- 
kerton Tobacco Co. unit to 
Svenska Tobaks AB of Sweden for 
undisclosed terms. Pinkerton is 
based in Owensboro, Kentucky. 

Honda Motor Co. of Japan has 
announced it win invest an addi- 
tional 540 mil Wo n to expand its 
motorcycle engine plant m Anna, 
O hio, to tnakR wi gjnpy for the Civic 
automobile by late next year. It has 
been importing its engines. 

Kraftweric Union AG of West 
Germany has been chosen by 
Sooth Korea as a major supplier of 
equipment and technology for its 
first nuclear-fuel fabrication plant 
due for completion by 1988. Offi- 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 

Saatchi Co. | 
Reorganizes j 


By Brenda Hagcrty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Saatchi ft Saatchi 
Co., a big London-based advertis- 
ing compa ny that has matte dozens 
of acquisitions in recent years, is 
remgamzing its management to 
cope with the hectic growth. 

To head a new cormmmi cations 
division, Saatchi has recruited 
Tony Simon ds-Goodin^, group 
managing director of Whitbread ft 
Col, Britain’s third-largest b re wer. 
The new division has responsibility 
for advertising, public relations, 
design, direct marketing and sales 
promotion. 

Another division win oversee 
management c onsulting and mar- 
ket research. Saatchi has not yet 
named an executive to lead that 
division. 

Whitbread said Peter Jams, 
managing director of its trading 
division, would be promoted to 
succeed Mr. Simon ds-Gooding. 

Although Saatchi wrested Ml 
S imonds-Gooding from Whit- 
bread, it apparently will not obtain 
Whitbread’s advertising account. 

Mr. Jarvis issued a statement 
saying that the brewer was happy 
with its aizrsai agency, Lowe How- 
ard-Spink Campbetf-Ewald, and 
did not want to be “inundated with 
offers of *hdp’ from other advertis- 
ing agencies/ 1 Lowe Howard-Spink 
recently recruited one of Saat- 

dn’s executives, Tim BdL vdio is an 
adviser to Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher. 

European BrszSan Bosk L&L, a 
London-based consortium, has 
named MaDson Ferreira da No- 
brega deputy managing director. 
He succeeds HeUnml Wimrntx, 
who becomes execu ti ve director, 
foreign exchange operations, for 
Banco do Brasil SA, a shareholder 
in European Brazilian. Mr. No- 


brega was secretary-general of the 
Ministry of Finance of Brazil Hie 
bank was founded in 1972 to pro- 
vide capital for projects in Brazil 
and other countries in Latin Amer- 
ica, as well as to promote direct 
investment in B ran! Other share- 
holders are Bank of America, Dai- 
Iciri Kangyo Bank Ltd, Deutsche 
Bank AG and Union Bank of Swit- 
zerland. 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. of 
New York has appointed Jorgen 
Wagner-Knudsen general manager 
of its Paris office. He succeeds Eric 
Bonrdais de Owboumfere, who, as 
previously reported, has become 
head of the bank's European bank- 
ing grotm. Mr. Wagner-Knudsen 
was in Morgan’s New York office, 
where he was responsible for liabil- 
ity management. 

Dow Chemical Europe has ap- 
pointed Bernard Sntch regional 
general sales manager for West 
Germany, based in Frankfurt. He 
succeeds Fernand Kanfmann, who, 
as previously reported, was named 
c omm e r ci a l director for the agri- 
cultural chemicals department of 
Dow Chemical Europe, which is 
based in Honan, near Zurich, and 
is a unit of UJS.-bascd Dow Chemi- 
cal Co. 

BICC PLC, the London-based 
cable-making and construction 
company, has named Roger Bexon 
a nonexecutive director. Mr. Bexon 
is deputy chairman of British Pe- 
troleum Co. and chairman of BP 
Exploration and BP Gas. 

L’Air LJqriUe, the Fiend) maker 
of industrial gnsgt, I 


I Gold Options (pfeafeSTaZ) 


3J0 IS2M&75 

320 XUML50 1X251975 2553970 
337 425 -77S 1275-1525 21752225 

3® 375 525 HUGHS) 14751825 

390 275 425 725 875 0251475 

30) LOG 225 15G 7JD HUGOS) 

-_33_l .275 535 775 925 

OoU 3373-3)425 

VsfcanWUteWeU&A. 


1211 Cfcia 1. Stelnirteol 

Td. 31 >2 51 - Tctex 2*305 


/// GCWERNO DO EStADO DO RtOC&IANDEDOSUL 

HI SBCRElAMADeBIEnGIA, MINAS ECOMUMGM#BS 

n I I COHMMTflARIOaiUNDENSEDEmM&IUlGAD 

INVTTAnON TO TENDER 
Nr. 002/85 

The CXJMPANHIA RJOG RAN DENSE DE MINERA- 
located in the city of Ftorto Alegre^ state of Rio 
Grande do Sul, Brazil, at Botafogo street, 610, will pur- 
chase the following equipment Throug an Internatio- 
nal invitation to ‘fender. 

This acquisition has the financial support of the In- 
teramerican Development Bank, IDB, by It’s loan nr. 
73/IC-Ba 

EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION 

9 off road coal haulers composed by trucks and bot- 
ton dump trailers. 

Instructions to bidders and complete specifications 
of the equipment will he available at Auxfliadora 
street 215, RxtoAJegre, Ffio Grande do Sul, Brazil , un- 
til june, 24 th, 1985 at the c»st of Cf|5BOOOOO (five mik 
lion cruzeiros). 

Proposals will be received at the above mentioned 
adress on august, 12 th, 1985. 

Ftorto Alegre, 14 de junho de 1985. 




MHARRMin. 


22 feet (6.5 meters). It would also 
introduce new engin es and update 
the cockpit with the latest digital 
electronics technology. 

The new aircraft, whidi would 
be nanud the MD-l 1, would cost 
about $70 minion A typical new 
DC- IQ costs about $65 million, ac- 
cording (o Lew Harrington, Mc- 
Donnell Douglas vice president for 
advanced products. 

The program would require an 
investment of several hundred mil- 
lion dollars, he said. It would add 
several hundred engineering jobs in 
its early years and several thousand 
manufacturing jobs later. 

James Worsham, president of 
Douglas Aircraft, has said that the 
company plans to double its size by 
J 9 m and add 12,000 jobs. The DC- 
10 program would be included in 
the employment yins 

In 1984. the Douglas subsidiary 
posted its first annual operating 
profit since it was acquired by Mc- 
Donnell in 1967. It had earnings of 
$57 million, compared with a loss 
of $52 million a year earlier. 


riwlo in Seoul Said financial details 

were still being discussed. 

Lloyds Bank PLC of London 
said it is reviewing areas where 
costs can be trimmed, but does not 
expea to make cuts as drastic as 40 
percent, a figure quoted in a pub- 
lished report. The bank said the 40- 
percent figure had been discarded 

as Tmprwrtiral 

Mazda Motor Corp. said Mazda 
Motor Manufacturing Corp^ its 
subsidiary in Flat Root. Michigan, 
would produce mid-sized cars be- 
ginning in the fall of 1987. A Maz- 
da spokesman denied a report pub- 
fahed the Japanese daQy Sanirri 
Shimbun that said 60 percent of the 
240,000 cars produced annually - 
would be shipped to Ford Motor 
Gl, which owns about one-quarter 
of Mazda’s stock. 

Ninon Ofl Co. of Tokyo said it 
is studying an invitation from Tex- 
aco Inc. to take part in offshore and 


Edouard de Rqyeie chairman, suc- 
ceeding his father-in-law Jean De- 
lorme, who ran the company for 40 
years. Mr. de Rqyere, who was vice 
president, is the third chairman of 
L’Air liquide, which was formed 
in 1902. 

Sperry Corp. has named Antho- 
ny J. Hobson financial director, 
Europe, and Richard C. Close trea- 
surer, Europe. They w31 be based 
at the company's office in Cobham, 
England. 


Chrysler to Shift 
More Work to 
Mexican Hants 

The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Chrysler Corp. 
plans to shift medium-duty truck 
production from Mexico City to 
Monterrey, making room for it to 
build the Dodge Ramcharger in 
Mexico instead of the United 
States. 

The move of Ramcharger pro- 
duction to Monterrey has drawn 
protests from the United Auto 
Workers union, which claimed the 
change threatened jobs at Chrys- 
ler’s trade plant in Warren, Micm- 
ean. 

A Chrysler spokesman said 
Wednesday that b eginning in No- 
vember toe medium-duty trades 
would be produced in a joint ven- 
ture between Chrysler of Mexico 
and a Grupo Industrial Ramir ez 
subsidiary. Trailers de Monterrey. 

The spokesman said the plant 
would employ 1.250 workers and 
produce trucks for Latin America 
and Aria. 


□aland oil exploration projects in 
the United States. 

P ap ercr af t Corp. of Pittsburgh 
said it reached a definitive agree- 
meat on a 5240- miIh rm leveraged 
buyout with company managers 
and other investors. Shareholders 
can ndiung t »irh erf their shares 
for $18 in cash and securities with a 
face value of $4.12 but a market 
value of perhaps $2. 

Victor Go. of Japan said it has 
signed an agreement to provide 
Daewoo Etaxronics Co. of South 
Korea with technical aid for pro- 
duction of VHS-farmal video tape 
recorders. A JVC spokesman de- 
clined to disclose the royalties 
Daewoo will pay. 


STOCK U5S US* 

DeVoe-Hotbein 

International bv 5H 696 

Gty-Qock 

International nv 234 3 % 

Quotes as oh June 13, 1985 

Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 

First Commerce Secnriiiesbv 
Herengracht 48 J 
1017 BT A ms ter dam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3120 260901 
Telex: 1 4S07 firro nl 


NOTIFICATION TO ALL PERSONS WHO 
RECEIVED COMMON STOCK OR 
DEBENTURES OF SAXON INDUSTRIES. INC- 
IN EXCHANGE FOR COMMON STUCK OR 
DEBENTURES OF STANDARD PACKAGING 
CORPORATION BY REASON OF THE 137(1 
MERGER OF STANDARD WITH SAXON AND 
WHO SOLD SUCH SAXON SECURITIES AT A 
LOSS OR WHO CONTINUED TO OWN SAID 
SAXON SECURITIES ON APRIL IS. 19*2 AND 
HAV E SUFFERED DAMAGES THEREBY. AN1) 
_ TO ALL PERSONS WHO PURCHASED 
DEBENTURES OF SAXON INDUSTRIES. INC. 
AFTER APRIL 15. 1982 

An action in pending in the United St.-iton Ui-t- 
Wirt Court for the Southern Ditrtnrt of New York, 
83 Civ 37fiU (S.D.N Y.i iMJLi >lhe 
Artion’' , . on bahnlf of all persons* »h» received 
curities or Saxon Industries. Inc. l"Siixi>n"> in ex- 
change for sccuritioK of Standard Puck.-tRinc Cor- 

F ioration > “Slu nd.ird" The parties to this* 
itigation have entered into a Stipulation of Settle- 
ment, dated March 21. 19S5. and the Court in ihe 
Lewis Action has scheduled a hear inn on Aui;u»t I. 
1955 i the ’’Hearing*'), to determine, among other 
things, whether the proposed settlement should be 
approved as fair, reasonable and adequate, plain- 
tiffs application for attorney* 1 fn-a and eipenwr- 
and any assert iomt of interest by anv persans Mho 
purchased Saxon debentures after April 15. 1982 
■ “pcnrt-pelitinn debenture nurrh.iKi'rs i. as .i^ipn- 
eea ur transferees of the claims of any member t»l 
the Class. 

A form of notice describing the Lewis Action, the 
settlement and the matters to be considered at the 
Hearing (the "Notice” i. together with a proof ul 
claim form uhe "Proof of Claim"), has been mailed 
to all persons whose names appear on Lhe .nock 
transfer records and debenture liMs of Saxon as 
having received Saxon common stuck or deben- 
tures in the 1970 merger of Saxon and Standard ur 
as purchasers of Saxon debentures alter April IS. 
1BB2. at the addresses specified therein. If you are 
or were a beneficial owner of Saxon common slock. 
Saxon 6^ Subordinated Debentures due 1990 and 
or Saxon S'/il Convertible Subordinated Deben- 
tures due 1990 so received and wish (o participate 
in the Hearing, or object to the proposed settle- 
ment, or submit claims for participation m a fund 
created in connection with the proposed settle- 
ment. but have not received the Notice and the 
Proof of Claim in the mail, vou should first obtain 
copies of the Notice and the Proof or Claim bv writ- 
ing to: 

Lewis v Lurie Liligaiiun 
P.0 Box 92*J 
Wall Street Station 
New York. New York )U00f< 
or telephoning 715-236-2337. Alternatively, if you 
are a member of the Claas but wish t<> be excluded 
from the Class isuch exclusion would prevent vuu 
from* participating in any xcitlemcni fund but 
would also mean that you would not be bound lit- 
any judgment entered in the Lewis Action i. you 
should submit a request for exclusion In: 

Clerk of the Court 
United Stales District Court for the 
Southern District of New York 
Foley- Square 

New York. New York luuuT 
re: Lewis if. Lurie. M3 Civ. 37dU tMJL' 
postmarked on or before July 1 I. 1955, at the 
above address, stating your hu mi-, uddn-ss. the 
number of Saxon common shares and nr deben- 
tures owned (and, in the cose of debentures, identi- 
fying the debenture iamje). the dotes of exchange ol 
such shares and debentures, the amount received 
from any sale of such Saxon shares or debentures 
(net of commissions and transfer taxes* and your 
wish to be excluded from Lhe Cluss. If you pur- 
chased Saxon debentures after April 15. 1982. and 
wish to assert an interest in connection with the 
proposed settlement, as assignee or transferee ol 
the claims of any member of the Class, but have 
not received the Notice and Lhe Proof of Claim in 
the mail, you should first obtain copies of the No- 
tice by writing to: 

Lewis v. Lunc Litigation 
P.O. Box 922 
Wall Street Station 
New York. New York 10005 
or telephoning 718-236-2337. 

Objections to the proposed settlement or the as- 
sertion of an intereal in connection therewith will 
not be considered unless filed with (he Court and 
served on those counsel listed in the Notice on or 
before July 1 1 . 1985. Failure to comply with the in- 
structions contained in the Notice will preclude 
subsequent objections or assertions of interest. 
Failure of Class members to file the Proof of Claim 
on or before October ] . ] 985. or such other date as 
the Court may fix. will preclude Class members 
from participating in the fund created in connec- 
tion with the proposed settlement. The Stipulation 
of Settlement, if approved by the Court, will deter- 
mine and resolve the claims or all members of the 
Class to whom this notineation in addressed met? 
above', except those requesting exclusion, whether 
they participate in the settlement or not. and will 
also determine and resolve all claims, if any, ol 
post-peLilion debenture purchasers, as assignees or 
transferees of members of the Class. 














Thursday^ 

jmex 


Closing 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
ua to the dosbia on Wall Street 
and do aot reflect late trades elsewhere. 

i 'ia The Associated Press 


rJNtontn 

HtahLow Stock 


TZKxdh 

na*Low saa 


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JO J 

19 

8 

72 % 

729 b 

721 b— 46 

3>4 

Diodes 


7 

2 

3 % 

3 % 

Mb 

8 

DlrAct 

n 

8 

16 

6 % 

64 b 

6*6 

5 % 

1 % 

Olxko 

DomeP 

.10a 18 

10 

144 

618 

10 

* 

2 Ki 

'k 

% 

OmeP* 

<rt 


CIS 


mmm 

22 % 

Domtr 

1 J 4 


109 

26 % 

36 % 

269 b— tb 

6 % 

Dawnev 


4 

400 

21 % 

a 16 

20 % -f % 

1 % 

Driller 



12 

146 

14 b 

T*b 

9 

DrlvHS 


22 

51 

12 

11 % 

« 

25 *t 

% 

Xicnm 

Dunlop 

80 38 

II 

25 

1*0 

"ft 

*%*%-% 

22 % 

Duplex 

.92 28 

11 

40 

35 % 

344 b 

3 «*b— 74 * 

13 

OurTsl 

JOa 2.5 

16 

25 

16 

15 % 

15 % 

946 

Dynict 

Ha 1 9 

12 

127 

14 % 

M 4 * 

14 %—% 

18 % 

Dyneer 

80 18 

9 

30 

21 % 

31 Vb 

211 b— 9 b 


S3 91 

2 45% 
43 6Sh 
45 Of* 

4 A 
32 ai» 
92 l» 
10 3S»> 
97 10 
31x19 
254 114 

3 at 

S UV. 

1 I» 

179 » 

4 4 

13 7V» 

2 X% 
2 7 

1104 7 

X 41 * 

70 1 

25 334* 
32 1444 


901*— li 
*5 Mi 
44 b 

UPh — V. 

— «■ 

2 »» 

»li + lb 
354 b— Vb 
9 It — lb 
19 4 - ’« 

14 b— !b 
2% + >.b 
11 % 

M 4 b 

31 b 

4 b 

7 -’i 
3 % — 1 * 
4 % — *4 
7 + Vi 

«• 

1 

371 V— »» 

34% + V* 


1*'- OEA ^ 
14 % Ooicwd 80 b 
4 OdctAn 
44* OdefB* 

17 VS ODaUM 40 
KF* Otsren* 2* 
34 b Oeentin SSm 
S ’6 Or HUM* .U ■ 
54 b OrUMB 20 


154. OStrtvns 42 
bib OirtrOT 221 
7% OzorfcH 20 


31 20% 

54 in 

24 4 

3 9th 
3 19 
42 20V. 

3 44b 

4 sn 

5 54* 

u i% 

4 23** 
12 10 *. 
179 94b 


3 B% — % 
IWk- Vb 
S4b— 9ft 
94k + Vt 
» —lb 
»%— % 
44b— 1b 

m 

S»— lb 
Mb— lb 
33 * 4 — lb 
104b 

91b— 4b 


174* 124b JOClvn JOB 32 9 
744 Sib Jacobi 

5% 21b Jet Am * 

1 Vi JetAWt , _ , 
74h 4 th jctraa 31* 92 14 

Of* 2% JcftnPd „ „ 

lib 71b jofmAm JO 34 13 

1114 41b Johnlnd 3 

71b MbJmpJkn 5 


3 134* 139b 131b- V, 
7 41b 6*. 4V.— lb 

T02 3 tb 1 

43 44 1b 4b 

34 71b Mb 74b 

16 3% 3b. 3% + V. 

76 9 8*4 04* — lb 

m n w n 

11 4V. 44b 41b— V* 


164b 
74b 
34b 
234* 
a 

Vb 124* 
Vb 3 
Vi 231b 
5*b 


4 % 

246 

2196 

12 % 

39 b 

1*6 

161 b 

101 b 

13 % 

7 % 

94 * 

7 % 

6 % 

2 % 

26 

21 

91 b 

6 % 

4 % 

3 % 

4 % 

2 % 

6 % 

4 

13 % 

10 'b 

946 

446 

22 V* 

11 V. 

39 % 

19 

304 * 

21 % 

12 % 

99 b 

34 

194 b 

349 b 

14 

34 % 

14 Vb , 

269 * 

11 % 1 

29 b 

% 

194 * 



124 b EE CO 
3 th ERC 
21 b E 091 C 1 
174 * EstnCo 
31 Vi Estop 
61 b EcrtaB 0 
14 b ELAjjdD 
15 *b EICAm 
214 ElecSd 
5 % EWnor 
1044 EMlMdil 
34 b EmGar 
i 04 b ESOn 
544 Era In s 
10 Vb EbPbv 
1 % ESPrtl 
3 Mb EsqRd 
221 b El* Lav 
4 % EtfTJ B 
7 Excel 
2 Vb EXPlSv 


J2 22 39 
16 
14 

TilO 45 8 
696019.1 3 
.17 


52 

JJ3e J 

W 

4 bU 9 

11 

JO 2D 7 


J2e 2.1 30 

If 

.10 12 M 
43)53 I 
TI 


13 14U. 

m 5 u 

647 2% 

2 224b 
X 37 
4234 111b 
3* 14b 

19 2214 

13 Oh 
IX 44* 

17 lZVb 
e si* 

14 1 Z»b 
34 IN 
19 201b 
17 1 * 

2 344* 
51 309b 
1 Mb 
7 74 b 
13 55 b 


14 Vi 144 b 
51 b sib - 
21 b 24 b + lb 

224 h 224 b + lb 
36 V* 364 b— 4 b 
10 % llVb + lb 
14 b 14 b 4 - lb 
lift 221 b + lb 
44 * 4 *h— lb 
44 b 64 * — Vh 
ii 4 b im— n 
49 b 49 b— Vh 
121 b T 24 h— V. 
12 th 124 b— lb 
2 Dlb 201 b— 4 h 
lib 19 b 


344 * 344 * 

30V. 70V. — lb 
64 i Vb 

7 Vh 71 b 
SH SV* 


39 % 

» KnGs pf 4 J 0 12 J 


140 * 38 % 

37 % 

3794 

3 

3 % 

IVh KOookC 


4 

36 

3 

2 fh 

a 

1 

16 % 

10 KoyCp 

J 0 18 17 

X 

14 

13 % 13 %— % 

a 

12 % 

11 Koyjn 

.ioe J 


160 

1116 

11 

n% 

ii 

204 b 

141 b Kertwin 

800 81 

9 

10 

20 % 

19 % 

19 % — % 

i 

m 

18% Ketdtm 

-581 U 


15 

20 % 

20 % 

20 % — *6 

v 

9 % 

5*6 KeyCo 

JOe 14 


32 

8*6 

8 % 

841 + 94 

41 

17 % 

■ KevPI, 

20 2.1 

16 

587 

9*6 

9 % 

9 %— ll 

z 

11 % 

S'u KeyCo 


a 

32 

S» 

5 % 

5 %— 4 h 

• 

2 % 

1 % KevCoWt 


S 

1 % 

1 % 

1 %— % 

2 

4 % 

216 Kidds wt 



101 

4 % 

4 % 

4 % — Vi 

j; 

4 % 

3 % Kiiam 


35 

12 

49 b 

4 Vi 

4 Vh— Vh 

V 

5 % 

3 % Wnork 



11 

4 % 

4 % 

4 % 

i 

54 * 

3 Kirby 



104 

3 

2 % 

2 % — ■ V* 

2 

34 b 

2 KieerV 

82 r 18 


65 

21 b 

2 

2 — % 

If 

15 % 

9 % KIMOO 


15 

83 

13 % 

13 % 

13 %— % 

to 

15 % 

8 % Knon 


15 

466 

13 % 

13 % 

13*6 + Va 

*6 

29 % 

21 KoeerC 

2-32 88 

97 

76 

29 % 

29 % 

29 %— % 



134b IXb 
12 *b 12 *h 
1246 QV. 

si in* im 

202 1 Mb 11 V, 
70 114 * 11 th 
9 341 b Mb 
36 324 * 324 V 

65 39 W 204 * 
19 23 H 2314 

66 214 * 20 th 

19 23 zm 
45 24 234 b 

14 WVj 1046 
62 22 2144 

34 19 UP*. 
» IK UK 
72 lB 4 h 1 * 

35 20 Sb 194 * 

us 19 rs« 

i 20 VL 20 V. 

u in* i«b 

27 2191 21 b. 

414 b 
3Mb 
43 
731 b 
4 CV| 


m 


« 14 

«s 

22 

M 

■U ? 23 

2 

!U 

II J • 

IB4 

n* 

■04 
45 10 
34 7 
iai m 
17 7 

44 7 
I 1 > 


16th Fablnd JO V 
Pu Fldato 

fW FTConn IJOo SJ 


FVWmB JH 60 11 


20 fh Fstcrpn 7 

nth FlscftP J» SJD 9 
64 * FttcGE 4 

23>4 FltGE pf 400 1 it 

OMi FlonEn 

25 Vj FklRck 40 U 8 
224 b Fluke 1JBI 53 10 

aU Foodm. 10 

29 Vi Foote pi 
4V, FltllllG » 

704* FerdCndkine 
15 ForsiCA .IS J n 
11 V* FaresIL 36 

4b Fatoml 

XU Frantz IJOa 29 11 
4 lb FrdHIV 

14 FreqEl 16 

74 b FriediT J8b 3 J 11 
5 FrtesE n 

114 b Frkma JO 24 15 
13 Frucht 42 .9 X 
9 FmtHd 

104b FurVH n 23 


33 19V. 
42 54b 

16 114b 
33 1346 

5 214b 
22 1344 

7 Mb 

8 26 
15 9Vh 
33 40V, 

17 36 

4 104* 
2 32 

283 015 

20z 994* 

1 219b 
306 m* 

27 T4h 

2 3446 

5 5A 
41 

12 79k 
46 1D4* 
7 1B4b 
10 24ib 
m i 44 b 
97 224* 


1915 19V5 
SVh SVh + Vb 
111b 114b— lb 
131b T3tb 
214h 214b + lb 
134* )34h 
846 BH 
2S4h 254b + lb 
Mb Mb— v* 
394b 394b — ta 
251b 254b— Vh 
1015 1015— lb 
32 32 + lb 

81b 81b— 4b 
9996 *94* 

219b 219b + Vb 
364b 2615—1 
lVi Mb 
3446 3446— V* 
set 39b + lb 
1915 19*h— 15 
7* 79b— Vb 
10 M. lBb— W. 
184b 184b 
239k 24 
MVS 141b 
224b 229b— 4b 


11th 74b 
17*5 I Mb 
215 14b 

SV. 3 V 5 

215 


,•* - 1 S 33 ' 

2 J 8 1 U J 96 V, JB 5 

® 4 i: 4 an >M 

44 JJ M Ubln 
■44 19 7 U IF* ME 

JO* *3 !* - *** *»: 

J91 6i 3 WM 8Mb 
H Mb . 49 b- 

- n m 9* 




3 USftlnt 
•M IHhPte a 

V* IMoarp _ 7 

im Unkapt JS 3.1 
44k iMtmrn ,*>• U 
14lb UAVW MV H 
l*b UfOOOA .» 62 U 


■ 5 * 


’S S5 iS 

S3 14* Mh 
4» tut fie 
443 14V. J4 
. 9 1944 ff-. 
>1 « 5 bs 

3* « tm 

34 * 36 . 4 * 

4 Ig. W*h 

29 in im 


UFoOffl 

mi utmta ts 

IW USAGwt 
Sib IMWV .94*13.7 31 
84* IMwCn. 14 

steunthRa . 19 

154* UMsrRa JOe 44 12 


ran- -94b 1 

279* 1716 ' 

7U 24b 1 
33»* 14**' 
4 Vb 34 *' 
141* 9V5 ' 

7W 24b 1 
Mb 4*h ’ 
9 SM-I 
SV. 74b 1 
18%. 92. i 
6Mb 531b I 
94* M 1 
1915 8 1 

19% 13V, 1 


54 Wb J0!h ' 

14 « mi* m, 

13 7 44b 

♦ *5 V^b 

10 » 9% 94b 

■ 7 * or 

14 8% .ana 

10 14 71* 4M 

1 7 3 

14 • 14% -MU 

2 60 , 164 % 
W I* 84* - 346 

o - M nib in* 

X 1 bl 7 %;«M 


7Vh 71b 
71b 71b 

1 % 1 % 
S4b 546 
14b 14b 

2BV5 JDV, 
171b 171b 
91b 9% 
19 % X 
51b 5% 
1 % 

15% 

10 
21b 
79* 


> 5% T Bar J3T 5J 18 
715 TEC .16 1J 21 
44* TIE 

6% Tli 36 

13 TaOPrd JO 1.1 12 
61b TOndBr 

9% Tasty JO 10 12 
lib TehAm 

13V* rcftSrm 13 

33% TechOp 13 

3% TeoiTp 11 

715 Trcfrfrl JO 13 7 
TVS T econo 

n Teton R JOe J317 
2 TetecBn 

211 b Tel flex 4i Ua 
81b TetDW J6o X3 14 
7V5 Telsd 27 

2Vi Tete*pt 

3% Tennev 12 

5t b TekAir 4 

5Vb TexAE J9T 7.1 X 
16W TexAE pC2J7 9Z9 
215 Txscon 46 

2 ThorEn 76 

m TWDB M W 14 
34b ThrD A M 22 14 
2% TkfweU 
24% TodEOPt 4JS 116 
<7 T<460pt BJ2 119 

434b TMEapf 7J6 14L1 
564* TolEdPfllUn 74J 
5% Tartel Jft 7J1S3 


X Sib 5% 546— lb 
7 11% 1Mb 114b— 4b 
132B 5 49b 4% 

17 9% 94b 94b— % 

32 1*16 10% 16% 

3 64b 64k 6% VII 

2 13% 13% 131b— Vb 

IX 2% 2 2 

» 16 15% 15% — 15 

4 Silk 86% 9615 

211 4M 3% 4 

1S2 13% 129b 124b— 1% 
12 1% 14b 9% 

175K202 19715200 -3% 
32 2% 2V5 2% — Vh 

16 28% X% 18% + lb 
396 10% 104b 10%—% 
2 8% 8% 8% + M 

IX 4U 4% 4% 

6 49b «% 4% 


8*6 
274b 
169k 
31 % 

32% 14*6 
24b % 

11% 3% 

M0 74V, 
26% 17% 
mb 6 % 
11 % 6 % 
6% 3% 
415 115 

5% 3V5 

17% 119b 
6% 34* 

1IV5 7 
U 6 % 
10% 4% 
4% 2% 

4% % 

im. 7% 

13% 81b 
144b 39b 

HV6. 7% 
49b 


1146 5 % VonkCa 13 IX W- TH % + A 

5 % 4 Vnrrtnv JS IS 14 (»» 5 % - 


AMEX Higta-Lovs 


June 13' 


5906 14% 1246 139b— 15 
11 M M 5%— lb 
M 20% 19% X 
119 2% 2% 246— 1% 
41 2% 21b 29b + Vb 

10 44b 4% 4H — % 

8 4% 49b 4%—% 
83 2% 2 2%— lb 

3001 31% 31% 31% — % 

1SB*60 60 «0 +VA 

2002 55% 55 S5 — I 

250, 7115 70 70 — t 

544 8% 4% 5»— 4b 



HEW HIGHS tl - 


AC Lob» 
DowneySL 
NewMenAr 
PLtD 434pf 
PpSPL pfD 

CoroPLpf 
Holly Corp 
HewprtEI 
PLtaTsept 
Wintnrosin 

Crawl*, MU 
Hotel Prop iff 
PGEHSpfC 
PHtwoyCp 

OtamndBolb 

MercFdSU, 

PGEtSbdv 

PSwCHttp 


NEW LOWS 12 


CetacCorp 
Qtaouoos 
Spencer Cos 

Chonta Ho 
HUSfcVQC 
TBor 

ChtafDevo 

KlrtvEup 

CompCon 
MSI DOtaCp 
Tort*!. 


X% 10 Quet.9* 36 


392 29 % 29 % 29 V* — 


6% 

6% 

6% 

3% 

3% 

3% 

2 

i 

t 

1546 

15% 

15% 

16 

15% 

15%- 

1% 

IV* 

1% 

n 

12 

ia 

Vb 

89b 

B9fc 

16% 

18% 

18%- 

1% 

3% 

Vh- 

45*6 

44% 

45 

8fb 

8% 

Vk 

4% 

4% 

4%- 

10% 

10% 

10% 

% 

% 

%- 

15% 

151b 

159b. 

% 

% 

% 

30*6 

29% 

29% 


25% 

ru 

25%- 
29b • 

5% 

5% 

5% 

20% 

34% 

24% 

6% 

6% 

6%- 

1* 

15% 

16 

34 

33% 

24 


Sales Howes are urtoHIckiL Yeartv biota and lew* reflect 
the Previous 52 weeks ulus me current week, but not tnelatut 
Inxflns day. wnere a split or etpcfc dividend amouattns to 25 
percwit or more has been pafcl Hie recrt Mah-law ronoe and 
(fivVhmd are mam lor me new deck only. Untem atMrwla* 
noted, rales of dividends ore annual dhbmements Meed an 
Ihe latcsl dectarotton. 
a— dividend dn extra (6). 
b— annual rate of dividend plus stack OvMend. 
c— Bouktortno dhrWend. 
dd— called, 
d — new yearly law. 

a — tftvtdand declared or paid In precadbw 12 month*, 
a— dtvidtfal In Canadian funds, sub led to 19% nonresidence 

^ [ ^dividend declared after wIIMip or slack dividend. 

I— dhHdend paid mis year, omitted, deferred, or na action 
taken at taWs, dividend me nta l a. 

k— dividend declared or paid this year, an occumuiafly* 
tarn with dMdends in arrears. 

n— new Bsup In in* past 52 u i tas . The tueft-tawiooe* bantam 
wbl» start <rf nwS no. 

nd — next day deflvery. 

P/E — prfci. euininai rallaL 

r— dfwtere) declared or aaU In praaedtas 12 mantas, pfen 
stock dividend. 

e— neck SSt OMdend beam wttn data of wilt 

1 —dividend paid In slock In preadOnp 12 ManthA estimated 
cash value an ex-dMdcnd or e»dtairibMk)n dote, 
u — new yearly Mob. 
h — tradlns boiled. 


NYSE HIghs-Loitrs 


Jane 13 


% — In bankruptcy or receivership or betas reorovUzed un- 
der the Bankrupto. Ad. or Mcurlltas osnened by such aem- 


der Ifie Bankruptcy Act, or securli 
ponies. 

wd — when tastrlbated. 


ww — with warrants, 
x — •x-djv'dend or exylebta. 
xdle — ex-dtstrtauttan. 

XW— without warrants, 
y — ex-<Svidand«id solas In fuL 
vtd— yield, 
z— sales In full. 


Over-lhe-Counter 

Jane 13 

NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 




Sale* lo 



Net J 


1ft* HW* Law IPJACh-e* 

Burros 


98 7*6 

7% 

7% — % 

BorrBr 


1317% 

10% 

17% 

Burnt 

t 

45 18% 

18 

18% 

BMA3 

184 17 

584 X 

27% 

27% + % 

Bvilnld 


581 7% 

6% 

6% — % 

BuHrJ 

86* J 

599*6 

19 

If — 9b 

BuftrMf 

1J2 4.9 

126% 

26% 

26*6 


X 

47 

t 


.10* 

0 

JSe 

18 

l 


JOe 

1.1 

I JO 

48 

JOa 

S 

JB* 

J 

JO 

11 

if 

37 

180a 

4b 


206SD4* 49V5 4915—1% 
X 715 7V, 715 — % 

8 6V5 6V* SV* 

40 24, 24* 24*— % 

V 74* 7% 746 — «5 

5« 7% 7 7% + Vb 

231 37% MV* 37 — V* 

4 65 64 65 —1 

12 8 % 8 % 8 % + % 

355 24% 24% 24% — Vb 
1122% 22V* 2215— % 
IX m* 19 T»% + I* 

41 32 31 31% 

SO 8 7% 74*— % 

X 8% 8% 8% + Vb 

20B28H 2715 28% — lb 
76*6% 45% *5%— Vh 
1X29% 27% 27% —IV, 
14 13% 13% 13% — V* 
1148 47 47V*_ V* 

51 10 *% 9% 

124 16 154* IS**— % 

5* H% B% 8% — Vh 
140 1 1 

102124% 23 Vh 24 + % 

5 3% 3% 3% + % 

TI 84* 8% 846 


10513% 13% 13% — % 
8838% 37% 3715—1 
2*2 TVS 7% 7%— % 

5838% 58 58 — 46 

43 7 6% *%— % 

31 7 64b 6*6 

» 10% 946 10% + 4* 

102 W, 8th 8% 

137199* 19% 199b 4- V* 
21 14 13% 13% 

30 15% 15% 15% 

512% 12 12 — % 

WO B65 900 

39 ■» % **— *« 

H»31*b 31 31% — % 

1723% 23 U. 2346— lb 
817% 16% 16% — W 
5916, 15% 15% — M. 

25 4*, 4% 4%— % 

11014% 13% 14 — % 
» 61b 6% 6%— 1b 

207 7% 716 7% — % 

3317 16% 17 + 15 

7 2% 2% 2% 

18 6 % 6 % 6 % — % 
ITS 8% 8% 8% 

14 4% 4 4*b 

4 446 4% 496 — % 

18 9% 9% 9% 4- 1b 

114 Vh % V* 

4 16 14 16 +■ *4 

5239 38% 3846— % 

1X20% 20% 20% + % 
51 74h 74b 74* 

15 6 % 6 % 6 %— % 

3 6% 6% 6% 

31 *% 4% 4% 

104 23% 23 33 — Vh 

1671846 10% 18% — 1ft 
1333 33 33 — 1* 

45 13% 13% 13% — % 
9236 25% 35% — % 

106 4% 4 4 — lb 

I 346 3*6 3% 

2310% 10 10% — lb 

72 IS 1% 11b 


rtchC IX 3J 
.12 10 
i2e 3J 


SO 1% 1% 1% + Vb 

9826 25% 25% — lb 

54817% 1/ 17 — W 


DBA 
OCNYS 
DDI 
OEP 

OSC 
% Dahlbrs 
»b DalrMf 
% OoJrvSy 
OimBla 
Vb DarlGp 
4b Dcrterds 
Ota 10 
Dtswteh 


19215% 14% 
9439% 39 
X 34b 3% 
2810% IB 
27711% 11% 
173 8% 8% 

6614179* 16*6 

294 7 % 716 

1104b 10% 
221622% 20*6 
1U 64b 6% 
6806 105%) 

10519% 19% 
36411 10% 

3 X 4 . .?•» 


36411 10% 

2X 4 3% 

« 

*239% 391b 

VUs 'ss 


Softs Bl Net 

1180 KMI tow 3PJM.aree 


14% 13% 13% 
13 1246 13 

17% 1696 17% 
U 12% 13 
8% 796 8% 
7% 7% 
14% 14% 
3%- X* 

B n 

8% 

28% 20% 
1246 12% 


11 % 

6 % 6 % 
a«k 22 
85 IBS 
5% 5% 

13% 13% 
134b 12% 
7* 74b 
5% 596 
13% 1346 

UK 

7% 

15 % 

1 % 

1 B 6 


291b + 9b 
16 42 


JamWTr 

JeffBsh 

JeffNLs 

JefSmrf 

JSfMOrt 

Jertco 

JhnanE 

JanaVs 

Jonicbl 

JonelA 


.16 1J 1109139b 
30 616 
4217% 

na 746 

51334% 
J8 LB 222846 

. 5 1714 

U0 4J0 6 489b 

J4 2.1 IX 

JOn 2.1 nl 9 V* 


13 % t 344 • : fX: 

17 *1715 + 

7%. 71b- IT 


V 


33% 33%—% 
X 28 + V 

1796 17% 4- % 
40 W. 401b— % 


.12 A 1475209a 

.10* 2J 13 5 
f 212 6 % 
t 40 6% 

90 9% 
717V* 

jo u rax 


&tt 3 % + % 

20% 20% — * 


5 % 6 +% 
4% 5 + % 

6 % 6 %— % 
6 % «*— W 
9 * 

17% ITVb— Vk 

io% wy* 


PM Not 31 U 4 ZHS 23% 33% + % 

FDP 5 9 9 9 + % 

FMI 290 6%. 6% 64b 

FelrLn .M U 16.6% 4% 6% 

PoIrPln 111 M 18% 10*6 4- U 

PomHI s 28Z % % % + Vh 


J8b 1J 2714*6 14% 
39 64i 6% 

4 12*6 13 % 

87 W 9 

.10 1.1 X 9% 9% 

23* m 7% 

66 2 % 2 % 

19844*1. 44 

J* 25 V 1446 1496 

10* A 225 24 

-B5* S 14 114* 11 

JK 45 316% le% 

18 1% If* 

* 34* 3% 

„ 38S 7** 715 

.10 J 749% 49 
2421 3% 2% 

. 10 * 18 12 M N 

.030 18 2 5 5 

52315 14% 






































































** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


Page 15 


Jobless Rate is Now 
A Liability lor Kohl 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ihe Flick political bribery case, is 

• scheduled to go to trial Aug. 29. 

Analysts said that a key question 
for the next national elections in 
.^February 1987 would be whether 
: -«he government could push unem- 
ployment below .2 millinn, a level 
reached in 1983 during Mr. KohTs 

• first full year in office and one 
riewed as a critical psychological 
threshold among voters. 

A recent survey by the Infas rc- 
search institute found that since Ms 
•• party’s poor showing in the North 
„ Rhine-Weslphalia election, Mr. 

< KohT s popularity has dropped sig- 
nificantly below that of the Hans- 
Jochen Vogel, the Sodai Democrat 
candidate Tor chancellor in nation- 
ai elections in March 1983. 

During the last week of May, Mr. 
■i^ogel pulled ahead of Mr. Kohl by 
o percentage points, the first time 
■\ that the opposition has overtaken 
Mr. Kohl a margin larger than S 
;■ percentage points, an Infas analyst 
. said. For a head-to-head race, the 
response was 42 percent for Mr. 

• Vogel, 36 percent for Mr. Kohl and 
<-i 22 percent undecided. 

Such losses of support have left 
. Mr. KohTs coalition, partners un- 
’• settled about their own electoral 
/ prospects, particularly in regional 
elections next year in Lower Saxo- 
, > ny and Bavaria. They also are con- 
^cemed about other negative eco- 
: ■/yomic factors. 

For example. West Germany’s 

• GNP fell 1 percent in the first quar- • 
';■> ler of I98 d from 1984’s fourth 

quarter, although that drop could 
^ be partly eacplainedljy severe win- 
^ ter weather. That decline has raised 
some doubts about whether, the 
< economy would be able to grow at 
the 23-percem annual rate predict- 
ed by Boon. Mr. Bangcmann has 
____ said that 23-percem growth could 
reduce the number of unemployed 


by 100.000 by December from 
year earlier. 

But Otto Schkrin, senior econo- 
mist in the Economics Ministry 
acknowledged that after asses sm j 
disappointing /irsHjuarter devd 
op men is. me government has 
backed off from Us earlier projec- 
tion that average unemployment 
this year wouldbe lower than the 
231 mfllion is 1984. . 

“Average unemployment in 1985 
will be as high or possibly higher 
than last year,** Mr. Schlechl said. 

Mr. Kohl defended his austerity 
program this week in West German 
newspapers. . 

“A tax cut in one step would not 
be financially sound," be said, add- 
. ing that any retreat from stable 
pnee -and interest-rate policy 
“would only create a shon-Lerm 
ignition" of growth with no lasting 
effect.. . • 

Despite die economy’s uncertain 
start in. (he first quarter, Mr. Kohl 
and Finance* Minister Gerhard 
Stohenbetg have: ngected opposi- 
tion calls /or job-creation programs 
and suggestions for the one-stage. 
8-percent tax ait , from coalition 
- partners and leading economic in' 
stitutes. 

The government also plans to 
propose legislation to increase 
spending during next month's cabi- 
net debate on the 1986 budget 

Despite the proposed spending 
increase, (he Kohl government has 
said that it would not expand the 
25-billiOD-DM budget deficit pro- 
jected for 1 986. The fear is that any 
riefiot expansion could trigger a 
loss rtf business confidence. 

Mr. LambsdojfE, . Mr. Strauss 


remain frustrated that the govern- 
ment's tight fiscal polities seems to 
give tite impression that it is not 
suflfr^tfy concerned with the per- 
sistent high unemployment rate. 


TWA Agrees to Takeover 



(Continued from Page 1) 
teroatkmal service by provic 
feeder flights from the Unit 
States into New York for imeroa- 
- tional flights. . . 

On the New York Stock Ex- 
" change Thursday, TWA closed at 
-• 520.625, up 37.5 cents. Texas Air 
was off 37 5 cents to 513375 on the 
American Slock Exchange. 

Mr. Icahn, who had been offer- 
j ing 5600 millio n for TWA stands 
: : to nuke nearly 5100 mfllion on Ids 
stock. 

TWA’s board agreed to the Tex- 
.. as Air offer just a day afiera MIs- 
-. souri judge had lifted a restraining 
reorder that had barredMr. Icahn 
r v?ronj pursuing hisSl 8-a-sbaretake- 
V over bid. That action came after the 


defeat of another TWA defective 
tactic; on Tuesday, the Depart- 
ment of Transportation declined a 
TWA request to consider lifting the 
airline's fitness certificate in the 
event of a takeover by Mr. Icahn. 

TWA had been rerching for a 
merger partner since Mr. Icahn 
took an interest several weeks ago 
and reportedly had been negotiat- 
ing with Resorts International Inc* 
a hotel and casino operator, which 
was said to have offered 522 a 
share. 

Texas Air began life as Texas 
International Airlines, a regional 
carrier that took advantage of de- 
regulation in the late 1970s to grow 
dramatically beyond its Texas 
base. 


Electricity Supply Commission, South Africa 

Highlights from Ihe Chairman's Review and Financial Statements for the year 
ended 31 December 1984 . 


The fltedrtcBy supply todusny to Smtfi Africa h 1964 was subject to tour 
major infcjWMs: the state of ttia economy; Escan's flnancioi pasttr: the 
periomance of me eteefcidty a*pty sysent ond a proposed nw 
management oral control stracture for &corn. 

HECSMOTSUmjWKBXMNir 

Rdmrinfl ne*. barer esBmafes of fang^rm growth In gross domosDe 
product Eworn adjusfcd tacopM expansion projeefions downwards tram a 
tongftnn annual awaogegrowOi rate of 7* 10656, and may even go below 
tMa deperxfing on future economic conditions. 

For near* ts ywreteom tvs prmWad IteaffitBy hi is power station 
coftstrucifon programma rtowtog fcrffis deferment, or cancelation. of Ww 

11* poUcy ms (Mowed bl984wtnn a nunber of such generating sets 
art other prnjBGfewtiadafWraa In prw« Raid wki«tt» deferments 
represent a reductfan in coOta axpeodture of R8 BOO mHon war the next 
ten yeas. ToW copaot axpendSuB forms pertod is now esttnolad at 
R55 400 mHon. 

ntMKWLPOSireM 

Hemal frwncfcig generated by ihe Coptal Dwetopmert Fund has 
d0dndd«fBadfysfnc8 1980. *17384 if tapnsami28jB% at copea 
expendth** compared web a Mgh oi 4ljx h 1980. The presort carnage oi 
copra expendHura by me Capra Devetopmeni Finl Is na regmed as 
eaUactoty ta the long term. Bean has {flowed 0» coverage to dmp 
ten ^o rtlytotwiicpedctiteHng'aonwsliort-temi economic gnln far trie 
courtly. However. in me longer temi * wti be necesray to Increase Wemd 
flnoixiiptortlead30*aBjpraeapereJtoire. rnvestora wffl bewotcning 
the aftiaitan caraMy and I is dou«M wlwfher the presert tower rates al 
Wenri anonchfl wtt be accepted as sound pmefca. 

VKsumrs nx m 

A major acNenmeni In 1984 waslhe oommtaionlng at the lira 
generating set ttf Koebeqj. Airtco's ftsi nuctoor power stoiloa V performed 
wai in 1984 am mBsflnrsfeunortiis generated 4 OQO mBlonKWtL 

ifw i wnft i w n mr turn nwnrnt itifurntr 

Tl» naw Bectrfdty Counci as tegtsUed Mr m 1985 wffl. Bra the present 
BecttdJy SupfW Commisstoa (tefermlne Escom’s paBcy and odjectlm ond 
long-term plairatg. ff wl abo cortrai performonce by Etcam at ts (unctions, 
the exercise oi Is powere and tt» tuBBmwi oi Rs duties. The Management 
Boon) wO maicge Eacom’kaiTalrs In ocavdancs w» me pdey aid 
abjectimi detamlned by the Bedridiy CouncL The Management Boart wH 
be appointed byttw Bedrtciiy Couica 


Souih Afrfai is going through a efifita* phase of adjasimenl to seam 
aouid ecoKUWc daveiqjment The eioctrtcfly aupply MusKy tas responded 
wdlD the atuottan by. on the aw hand. Hying to conjoin lUng cose and, on 
the other hand. odopikgaflexMe approach mis copMagntston 
programme TbeotyecMraormsrasponseisnBliherBbufrieniuiure 
consumaa with unduly Wgh caste nor to prepdee Mira economic growth oi 
the RepuUc by Inadequam pnnMons fw eteancSy demand. 

JANHSMTTH 
CHMRMMi 
30 Apr! 1985 


HlG4flJ6HTS0FTHEYEAR 




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680913 

1686294 
BIO 063 


70UIMAM 


590O6B& B2KS*e 
6775838 5*71030 

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INCOME STATEMENT tawwmd 8 daiiitsit *Bw 


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1909 097 

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CattMoiHliaNMiiH 

1822616 
15® *7? 
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_l_eP3n^ 

ISO 587 
170580 
60000 
347007 

<50000 

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03658 

746852 


STATEMEN T OF SOiRCt AND APPUCAHON 
OF FUNDS 


MStaienMOiaa DNMMflBX 



I2BBW 
300300 
38 7* 
18731 


4 377 cno 


1277*72 

27366® 


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3 891815 


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Fu»OMS.IlO 

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2 767106 

mo son n am ana manno* 

41695 

224107 

tmoiMnlounMHUaiiiMi 

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448300 

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33087 

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Copies of Escort's hi amici report and 
dnaicfaisiatameniiarBobtofnabteon 
request tram me Mflc Rotations Officer. 
Escorn. PI). Box 1091. 2000 JohonnesPura 
SotftiAJricc. 



GREWHLUPS BUNION MUNOB. & aJW 7B928 


NOTIFICATION TO AI.J. J*K»SONS WHO 

. . I’Ukchased common stock or 

DF.bENTliRES OF SAXON lNlltiSTHlKS. INC. 
IHIKINO THE PEKIOI3 MAKCK :»!. 1»7« 
THKOUCiH APRIL IS. IMKi. ANil WHO 
SUFKERFJJ 2MMAt;E.S AS A KF.Sl’l.T 
THEREOF. AN1) TO ALL PF.RSONS WHO 
PllRCHASEII DEBENTURES OF SAXON 

INOHSTR1ES. INC. AFTER APRIL 15. 1WC4 

A consul idutod uctipn is ptndMkK in the L'niu-d 
SlAtcs District Crturt for th*-- South.-rn District of 
New > ork. H2 Civ :iH»a «MJL» Uhe “Cuiwinlidulcd 
Action 1, ah KohiHf of perMins who purchu>ti > d 
common stock or dvbcnturm- of So nun InduuLnes, 
Inc. ( Saxon" i during the pmud March 31. IU76 
thruuiih April 15. 19H2. and »hn sufU-rt-d danuKiv 
as a result thereof uhe "Clnsari The purties to the 
Consol idutod Action have enu-n-d into a Stipula- 
tion or Settlement, dated March 31. J9H5. and the 
Court in Lhe Consoliduled Action has scheduled a 
hcarjnK on August I. 1985 Uhe “Hvurint; ,, i i Lu de- 
termine. omunu other thinus. whether the pro- 
posed settlement should be uppruv«>d as fair, rra 
Konahk- and adequate, plaint iff*, 1 application fnr 
attorneys’ fees and expenses. ;ind a>wnmns of in- 
terest in donnociion with the prupnMsJ seUlemenl 
by any perNans who purchiiM.-d S.ixun debentures 
idler April 15. 19H2 i posl-peiitmn di-hunturv pur- 
chusefti i. as assj^neen nr Iransfens-s of the claims 
of nnv membi-r of the Class. 

A form of notice describing the Cnnsolidnled 
Action, the w-ttlemenl. and the mu tiers to be con- 
sidered al the Hearing uhe "NuliCe"i. LoKclher 
with h proof of claim form Uhe ‘‘J-’niof uf 
has been mulled U« ail persons whose names ap- 
pear on (he slock transfer records and debenture 
lists of Saxon ns a purchaser of Saxon common 
stock or debentures between March Ul. 1976 und 
April 15. 1983 ur u*. purchasers of Saxon deben- 
tures lifter April IS, 19812, at the addresses speci- 
fied therein. If you are nr were u beneficial owner 
ofSuxon common stock. Sasun S : M r '< Convertible 
Subordinated Debentures due I9H7. Saxon 6*i 
Subordinated Debentures due J990 nnd or Suxon 
■‘> ,; 4 r » Convertible Subordinated Debentures due 
1990 ond purchased between March 31. 1976 and 
April 15. 1983. inclusive, and wish to participate 
in the Hearing or object to the proposed settle- 
ment. or submit claims fur participation in o fund 
created in connection with the proposed settle- 
ment. but have not received the Notice and the 
1‘ronf or Claim in the mail, you should first obtain 
copies of the Notice and the Proof of Claim by writ- 
ing to; 

In Kc Saxon Securities Liti|*utiun 
P O. Box 5fJ2 
Wall Street Station 
New York. New York IlKHlfl 
or telephoning 718-236-2337. A llcrnu lively, if you 
are u member uf the Class but wish in be excluded 
from lhe Class i such exclusion would prevent you 
from sharing in any settlement fund but wo'utd 
also mean that you would hot be bound by any 
judgment entered in the Consolidated Action i. vou 
should submit a request for exclusion to: 

t’lerk of the Court 
United States District Court far ihe 
Southern District of New York 
Folcv Square 

New York. New York 10007 

Alt In Hr Sax nw Struritm Litigation. It! Cu . 3103 iMJLl 
postmarked on or before July 1 1. 1985. at the 
above address, stating your name, yuur address, 
the number uf shan-s of Saxon comnion slock und-' 


from the Class. If vou purchased Suxon debentures 
after April 15. 1982, and wish to assert an interest 
in connection with the proposed settlement, an as- 
signee or transferee or tnc claims or tiny member of 
lhe Claus, but have not received the Notice and the 
Proof of Claim in the mail, you should first obtain 
copies of the Notice by writing to 

In Rv Suxon Securities Litigation 
P O Box 922 
Wall 5trce< Station 
New York. New York 10W15 
or ’telephoning 718-236-2337. 

Objections (n the proposed settlement or the as- 
sertion uf an inlercxt in connection therewith will 
not be considered unless filed with the Court and 
moiled to (hose counsel listed in the Notice on or 
. before July 1 1 . 19HS. Failure to comply with the in- 
structions contained in the Notice will preclude 
subsequent objections or assert ions of interest. 
Failure of Chum members to file a Proof of Claim 
on or he fore October 1. 1985, or such other date as 
the Court may fix. will preclude Class members 
from participating in the fund created in connec- 
tion with the proposed settlement. The Stipulation 
of Settlement, if approved by the Court, will deter- 
mine and resolve the claims of all members of the 
Class l" whom this notification is uddress«.-d isec 
above i. except those who request exclusion, 
whether or not they participate in the settlement, 
and will also determine and resolve ull claims, if 
any. or post-petition debenture purchasers, as as- 
signees or tiansfens-N of members of the Class. 



When you fty on business to the Orient, 
what would you like mow: from an airline? 

An airline that links six major European capitals with the heart of Asia 
onboafrd the worlds most popular aircraft, the B-747? 

A First Class service that offers you a choice of a comfortable seat 
plus a foil -length bed upstairs or a stretch out tecKner sear? 

A gourmet menu that offers you a choice from seven Asian and Continental entrees, 
of course compfemenned by a selection cf fine Champagnes, wines 
and spirits? Stace-of-d^e-art inflight entertainment? 

Or a Business Class, in its own private cabin, where you’re no more than 
one seat from the aisle? A . choice of four entries, complementary wines, spirits 
and entertainment? True Business Class standards at only a foil Economy fore? 
And, of course/ an airline that can get you around Asia with 
convenient schedules, whether you're going to Tokyo or Kota Kinabalu? 

Philippine Airlines’ Brk Cbes, and Mabuhay Class offer all this and mote, 
with the traditional REpino warmth aid hospitality renowned throughout the world. 

Next time ycxi take a business trip go the Orient Dt|9|Vl|%i>%£| 
discover why. everydingfc righr here. i~ N • 

Airlines 


n 



i 



re on Philippine Airlines* 



4 


rs-w-ossiB 




Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUWB, FRIDAY, JUNE 14> 1985 





INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED ! Pay-Per-SIww Is Newest TV Option 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 

DO YOU WISH - 

• TO BUY AN APA*TM&rr 
OB A HOUSE? 

• TO RETWf IN SWITZERLAND 
“ TO INVEST IN SWITZERLAND? 

CONTACT Ut a YEARS Of EXP33- I 
ENCE IN BUK0NG AND SEEING 
SNS SWISS BEAL ESTATE 

SODIMSA. 

P.O Box 62, 

1B84 VJhn. SwiteerW 
TK 456273 GeSE CH 

, MONTREUX - SWITZERLAND 
LuMvy apartm e nte 150 - 180 jqjn. dW 
wtoahfe to fortogw^ in resdenas 
GOID&J 805E5VFofaace m Inina, 
SPOOOU* bedrooms & brthj. tufy 
eqiuea kitchen, spectacular men. 
over Lake & Alpt Mortgage* awxlable 
up to 70% of purchase price. 
ReiifHul Funtcshed Apartme n t 
„ 8 Bede . At Disposal 

Free of charge tor summer habdbn rf 
deaxon a taken before July IS. 1985. 
Direct from owner 'dewaper. 

B.G. FtOMOnON SJL 
Ipar Stravinsky 4 
1920 Monfreox, Switzerland 

Tel: 21/63 57 27 - Tfe 453161 BGSPR. 

LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely epreimenB with m agnifi c ent ; 
views at Lake Geneva and maunUxe. 
Mantreux, V, 1W»S, Verier. In Drabfer- 
ets. Chateau cfOe* new Gstoad. Ley- 
sin- Ture fle nt OppartumRle* For 
Fddpwa 

Prices from SFT 23.000. < 

liberal momma* at 615% interest 
GLdSrRAN S.A. 

Av Man fepos 24. 

CHI 005 Lauvrre. Switzerland 
Td- 121) 22 35 11 Tlx- 251 85 A4CUS : 
&*rfbG*hed Since 1970 1 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

USA 

COMMERCIAL 
A IMDUSTBIaL 

IMOUE OPPORTUNITY. For Jo* 
buy on American mock exchange 
company, a 62,000 acre ranch prop- 
erty m sun belt stole of Ancona. Uxia 


erty m un belt date at Ar 
pnee SS0 per acre or SICK 
rrxnercrf nates inducted wi 
tceni n g 5% over-ode row 


motion to. EM fledewt, 2810 North 
3rd 5ft M?. Phoenix. Arizona 85004. 
USAar tefc 602266 5455. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


ROME OLGLATA. hi a typed Roman 
vfta with swimming pod, there cue 3 
unepre opportunities o! renting a su- 
perriy furnished flat Rat A approxi- 
mately 6.000 saA. S3.50CL Hof B op 
mrumately 1500 bah 52JOQ. RatC 
approumatdy 1.SJ0 Kp). 51.000. 
Each flar has 3 bedrooms with at- 
toched beduoona. frnng/cSixng 
roams A Mtdien. Please write to Wy; 
KOLA 84/D. C6X3 ATA, Born e ar 
Phone; 6-37B9557 a 3788531 or ei 
Kang Kong; 5-230231 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


next to unspa4t hd area for unque 
hoMay. 13 rotaries from beach. 15 
■mule* from luxury resorts of Sato 
Grande. 3 bedrooms. 2 baths. FJJy 
1 equipped tew U5S300 weeMy. Tel 
Haflretd 354QB14 nr write PO fe» 
681 Htfiwjum. 


AUTOMOBILES 




AUTO RENTALS 


U.S. Chooses 
Laser Method 


(Continued from 

jovermnent supplwdesseati*^.' 

tit die Weal's demands forQr A- 





USA at tefc 5*55. CHARMMG 3 BBMOOM. 3 b*.. ^ 

REAL ESTATE ZeSZi 

TIME SHARING ^"85^^^*' 

"S^uJ“ShSetc.' y !wS? SANTA RORA, TUSCANY. 2 sedud- 
"®°"- USA, V"™ ” 1 , r I ed farmhouse apartments. 2 & 3 dexr- g*?*"?. 3 TOY hator* Jondmort 


or HAMPTONS, NEW YORK. PRE5TT- meters. DtRGY. let flj 587 27 04, -60 
531 w n GtOUS BESCBT AREA. Luxurious re- Ed- Sr. Moral. 75005 Pens, France, 
treat near water. Fabulous mam " " 

3 l,* hewe, pad house, petal, dock, exdu- CHAUFFEUR 

services 

Wb^t* 5166514390; weekdays UMOUSME WITH CHAflFBA. Far 
m airf-MflWiiJl. veur sW» in Eorooe. vou mn eraov a 


neon, USA, Caribbean etc tod Bar- 
gains. D.GI, 9 faisto ne Road, 
Foote. Doner. Engtond 0202 6B0804 

REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

FOR RENT. AUGUST '83, caste in 
Provence. 70 bedrooms. 5 bathrooms, 
swimming pod, sauna, Irene shaded 
pari, colored sides avadafcje, JStma 
From Aa en Provem, 20 nuns from 
Avnsion far W b n iMtion. Please ocxv 
trier. Tfdddng, P.B. 41. 13410 Lambese 

France. 

MBtTON. OWN® KBITS, June 15th 
- July 15th, then by month from Sep- 
tember. CMiy for 2 people without 
children or pats, luvurious fomshed 
opartmete. rod terrace, ganne. Td 
P6H-421 9259. After /pin. 

20KM. LOURDES. Beounfol house, 
250 sq.ni, 5 bedroom, 5 traths, 1 
duvraroamr 2 Kvma, 2 gcroges. 3ha 
prrk.S15007month.Tefc « 26 40. 
Lunch and tinner lime. 

I COTE D’AZUR, 1 5 mu Comes, beau- 
tiful mBa with krae pad, lovery edm 
place. Manmum 8 persons. Awl >5 
days - F22.000. month ■ F42flOT let 
{93)42 37 44. 

CANNES MARINA. Smafl stuefio m 
hgh doss bUkfng with pocJ, near 
gdf dub. tenms. sea. Free July/Au- 


bte bedrooms avertable Jufy ■ August 
from S25Q per week, let Rome 

3767813. 

MILAN FURM5HB) APARTMHtfT to 
let VXa tnornWy. Vandon 8700511 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Gorgeous 3 story hatone l omk i iur k 

row h«ri. All rtnenmes & front 8- w#i un*m«a nm Utu PO) 3U ! 
bods gnrdaiB. Subway on block, 10 ftqncB 
mm. Monhattpri. J18M ,ma«h. VKIT PAfitS WITH KY CAR 
Jufy A Aug. CaH NY: [718) 596^626. nfopiel 1*1 mroedctdy 704 8 


I (Confianed from Page ! t) HBO, which os the largest of ihe A l (he moments only about 5 lafiftl* 

' for the trm*. nnd P^-caWe networks has the most to milUoa of the 38 oallk« homes in • Tr V7 , . cT-T ; 

lose fm™ an ttodus of mbsenbers the United Sums that iwehtoMt ' 

scac&r said sSuKmniL ’oecudS 10 “presses skepti- have addressable systems. Many of (Controued ftwEue ll> 

rfSE" ™ aboui P !ans - “It’s an im- those are the Qube systems operat- the Rovemroem supplied cssraiu^-, 
ume^^^c^ie^Mr-itions &*** bu - v rhat *«<* to *awn*- ed by Warner Araex CaWeXom- ly aU of the Weal's demands for tfee -A 
“We canratE? JSVrS'nti* of haKze *** slead >' m 'to\}C flow of iDuoicatioos Inti, wlrich pioneered f«d m T974.U caiwndymeiasoiiljr-; ; 
ihai xevolntioQ and bnnsiifnio the W able" said Alan Levy, a that area of cable technology*, half the demand because compel f 
^ spokesman for HBO. ' Warner Amex owns a 19-perc^L tors have already found cheapen 

rndnsirv analvsts asree Ihat Ihc' Playboy plans 10 start its service slake in Showtime. production methods. - ■ ' ’ 

svsiem has roient^ htTwam that month . U will ofTer its package Showtime and Pteybqy are opti- M«h expcrtsjhinic lhe gown |ft 
it will not the P nraari, y to «bie systems mam- mistic that the addressable systems ment stan& a chance of regaining 

decuomcvHsjcJ^SJ'odrtiJ ^ munities that do not want to offer will become the industry standard, its sdlizigedge, and that would a*; . 
the laoe-rental store ^a& d Alan J ad “ Jl P r og« n,i nin& such as the “The first generation of hardware ate jobs inthe United States. But ■'* 
Gostesmsm m^^aivS^iiLF" Playboy Channel, on a is wearing ouu and ca«c operators not everyone is asoptimistic ss 

SS UmSS? Ttmbin regularbasis. are gom* to be rqplad^it, we Energy department ofW ;V.v 

•There win f* D dteSme k?nd 5 Shcwume expects to start its op- ihink. »*h addressable systems," Industry experts outside the. (to. * 
eround sudL If dhevrmrkw and eration b > September with access said Mr. Kumit of Showtime. He partment note that, m any Wgfri 
arias it right v£«iS wit! 10 about ^ a "a 1 ** 0 " subscriber^ said that an addressable boa costs wchaotogy projecl. it » one thmg> ) 
HBO in 3£ai£ tSvs^ and savs that movie studios seem about $100 10 51 10 per home, be- to perfect a process — which the-?' 

J - generally willing to supply it with tween $35 and $50 more than a government says it has done — flnd 'X 

Proponents of ure pum argue ibe needed programming. Show- convcntionalhox. . quite another to have a process,-' 

r a k pnee u time's plan calls for the cable eper- “We think we will benefit from *cork consistently weS in large- •; ; 


munities that do .not want to offer 

the tape-rental storersud Alan J. ^^1 suchas the 

GotSST an'anaiyS'atLF. fSSSt!^ ' * 

RmhscWW TnMr, regular MBS. 


Embassy Service 

8 An. « Marina 
75008 Pori* 

Tel** 237696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
562-7899 

HATS FOB RENT 
SHORT -LONG TBIM 

RATS FOR SALE 

OffKES FOR RENt/SAlE 


A PAD OF TOUR OWN M Beverley 
Hfe, double bedroom, sitting room, 
kitchen, both, telephone & tfwagt 
space. Bent L! SSI, 000 pgr m farfj r 
iwNtior USS275 per week. Tti USA 
070 1 878 763 OTODeiue Nghnm. 


SS^d^yjSmi) R othschild, Umerbcrg. Tawbin. 
Bd. St, Moicri, 75005 Pora, France. There wiB be the same kind of 
CHAUFFEUR ground swefl. if they market and 
SERVICES price it right, as there was with 

iMOUSRg WITH OlATO. fa ™0 in the early days.“ 

w *»!*»«* ? toe plan aipie 
guoi S3f*ur from 5150 - Eso/do* that even though a 54-to-S5 price is 
Wi imfarmed kim. Coo (93j so 57 52 a few dollars more than the cost of 

AlTTQ-SHimNG 

IOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN nlov ’ cs - 
. car wto tteu-sa Bui, Mr. Gottesman warned, the 


TOT PARS WITH MT CAR QT. 
people). Tel, i mn wiu triy 704 80 27. 

AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR WTO THE UAA. 


MANHATTAN. BaoMifui luxury East- 1 mutt do to bring 1 
trie rental 1 bedroom, terrace, ( and tegoty. 


The document explore fuBy what one r ’ - mr . - 

mua do to bring a or mto the us novelty factor of pay-per-view IS 
safely and legoiy. it ncWoiieii & likely to wear off, just as it has for 


SSrte^dS^'bX^ I ««* VCR's. “Look what’s 


foe. 212-532^660. tom deoronoe & d* p p mg p>oc edurfi happening to tape rental," he said. 

“People aren’t wiQing to lake just 
us$iB.(®o when hiymg oMenaKfes.o'. any old thing anymore. There ISO [ 
^ w To^^SrSSid to *Sd toAi mnditMi's worth paring for.” 


hoh doss balding with 
got dub. tenm*. sea. Fr 


GENEVA COUNTY 
(FRENCH FRE ZONE 



NEAR LAKE GENEVA) «g^roi =Sr- 

vate. opartiwrrts & buUng tardV 

xto. No .tftridWH for foSffWi 2 bedroom^ 1W lx4hL Smmrwig / 


gelt dub. tenms. sea. Free July/Au- 
gug. F4QQQ. Tafc fait 524 6393. 

74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 

gMSSi * u- %iaf?sgr* 

L£ CLARDGE 359 67 97. 


HBVE 5UNBHJ SJL 
POflox 40 
157 Bin rfHetmance 
CH-1245 GJIonqB-fldlenve 
SOCVA - SWITZERLAND 


2 bedrooms, IM both*. Swimming / — — ■ 

tennis. July 4 Aug: Sl HX) month. June MONTPARNASSE 14th. Modem doo- 

B. Sept: £700 morth. [65) 410318 We Bvina sftxfo, 55 sq.m., forge btrfv 


52500 per month 212751 -8811. 
MANHATTAN Furnished 1 -bedroom, 
24 twws sunnsllonce. Free now. 1 1 
year / mare. (212) 679 50 64. Leave 
menage on answering modme. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

SEEK VILLA TO RENT IN FRANCE for 

two weeks m August, with 4 bed- 
rooms, pool oases to terns. Cat 
London 01987-5441 collect 

EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


SALES 

US$100,000 per YEAR 
COMMISSION 


ISS1 850 [add USS1 to for panne) to 
P.L Sdxmdf. Ro*ifacn313i 
7000 Stuttgart I. Writ G ermany 


iHilfi 


AUTO CONVERSION 

EMISSION 

ENGINEERING 


MODIFICATION OF NEW MODEL 
CARS IN GOOD RUNNING 
COHJmON. MOST: 


The plans face a number of tech- with VCR's," said Richard Sown, said Emanuel Gordon, a consultant 
polemical and other hurdles before an executive vice president for on uranium activities to the Atomir^ 
toey can become widely available, Playboy Video Corp. Industrial Forum, aJVashingion--;. ' 

however. Pay-per-view is not a completely based trade group. _ • jv 

Pay-per-view requires that the new technology. A few -cable pio- Other experts say that ccunpeti- - ' 
local cable operator be equipped neers dabbled in it as early as the tors are also in hot pursuit Qf'wayi " - 
with what the industry calls an “ad-' 1950‘s. More recently, the Warner to drive down the cost of uranium 
dressahle"jystem. Thai means that Atnex Qube systems and others enrichment. “With enthusiasm, ^.j 
the operator can communicate with that have addressable hardware in both West Germany and France *- 
the box in the subscriber’s home place have created their own limit- ere actively pursuing their own iso- . 
and instruct it to unscramble a sig- ed pay-per-view offerings, usually lope-separation programs,” saidp j‘ 
nai being sent to iL enabling the by giving Hollywood studios about - Richard N. Zare, the Sbril (fistin- , v 


that modi that s worth paring for." and instruct it to unscramble a sig- ed pay-per-view offerings, usually 
The industry itsdf is somewhat nai being sent to iL enabling the by giving Hollywood studios about 
divided over the prospects for this program to be seen only by viewers 50 percent of the revenue from spe- 
newest programming option. who have requested iL dal screenings of movies. 


both West Germany and France -- 
are actively pursuing (heir own iso- 
tope-smaration programs,'’ said 1 j 
R ichard N. Zare, the Shdl cfistin- . . -' 

a ed professor of cfaennstry at - , 
ord Univeisjty. . % 


GOEVA 

net ( 

Trie* i 


152 35 95 
603 FMS CH 


I AUTHOR’S spooous beamed vtoage 
home, near sea, Mw, PeTtro. 
MflOfaeriL Tri |y) 24 6^ 90 am 
I COTE D'AZUR, fa rent luky - August. 


MERCEDES 

Must speak Engfish & German omui/ 

Afl events come to in by u p p o irtu i ai t. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

Cars of 
Copenhagen 

TAX FREE 

• luMriKAond Saks 

• WoHdwrfe DeSuery 

• European Prate Leaders 

• Tefc rt45 1 37 7B 00 

- Tdex 19932 CX 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


tw & brfrroom, phone. UncLreffaund AwJrmj lorgesJ & oewMlmwhare DTlDerUE 
® nr P*k nxTBsfied Aeifjippeti resort. You must have o strong one cdl PORSCHE 

tw ^BlIromortMy. W: 589 MS ^.'foS^ASsrio 06412-7021 a JAGUAR 


r.'^^A^iria 06412-7021 a JAGUAR 


foety Cormet). Tefc |93) 73 43&I. 

LAKE G8NEV A/ LUGANO balk w pkwto.b^j mm. 


In these exc eptional regions, inducing 
Montann, Vulon. Gooad-Voley £ 
many cftWer fanous mourtan resorts, 
we henm a vary hag choee of mocnifi- 
cent APARTMtN75'VlLLAS/CHAlET5 
Very reasonably paced but also the 
ban & nx» exdcane. Pnce from about 
USS40.000. Mortgages at 6hX inrerest. 

Please visit or phone: 

H. SEBOLD S.A. 

T«* Gnse 6, OilOQ7 Lausanne. 

Tel 2)725 26 it. Tls 74298 SESO CH 


oat badegraund. Papers. Box 2372, 
HWaidTiW. 9^fNeuBy Cedex, 


Very reasooablv nnred hui nka the foBy servioad .sJtxfas, 1 i 2 bedroom 


^76 47.0^0^. 

SW3. Tefc 0LM9 1 105, Tb »5817 G. 161H MUETTE JULY, AUGUST. 
- Apartment cxxnplewhr equpped, 250 

IfltnnH mrj&Hn ta™.. bedrooms. 2 


„i^ssasi s 

ST. LUC, VAL D’ANMVlfflS able. 21 2-689 I5WUSA. 

Flats and chafob 25 K- 150 sq.ia, I to 5 

rooms. Credit 60%. Interest rale 675%. CB4TRAL IOWXM - Executive sar- 


VTtSSntSSSii FBWARi 308 

tgror Connm). Jiifc [93) 73 43W. (Voi exaamve Svirw. Y ar lease. ***** TECTA DACCA 

AUX DE PROVENCE. Beautiful mos, S2m^on^Tek 31 2^9000^312- ^ baefawnd^e^ Box ^2. IOIA KUS3A 

Irege propyty. Tri 325 B) 70 Pcm 441^209 USA Wrgbo Morgon HWdd Tntone. 92521 Neufly Cedex, • 

GREAT BRITAIN SHORT IBM STAY. Advantages of a — ■ — — 

^ iCfcA1 hotel without tnaonveiienc^foel at GENERAL 

JXUBfY EXECUTIVE APARTMENTS, home m nice stucias. one beefcoom POSITIONS WANTED 

KrvghfsbridgeATieLna Over 100 tod more m Paris. SOREUM: 80 ruB 

FuBy servtofld sfixfas, I 4 2 bedroom de lUriuersita. fans 7lhj 544 39 60 AIR HANDLING SYSTEM Manufodur- 


Hooo - Tetex 19932 DX 

$4,000 55 VcxSraffevej DK-ICOO 

H000 

*500 ENGLISH EXPERTS 

^'* 1 **^ W * Cr^ JAGHM^F^ hrH* ^ 

$6,000 porsoe, emu nous nova 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

TAX fflff CARS 
P.C.T. 

Afl makes, afl models, brand new 

TeL 2 : 73\% m , TU^46 f W^TB 
Send LS$5 for catalog 


BOATS & SERVICES 

RECREATIONAL * 

VEHICLES SINGAPORE INTT, GUIDES. CaB: Sm- 

-;^T - flopoic W* 96 28 ' 

H®404 RnnBtA. fat ai BeonGeu. 40 TO«H HV«A. W^tete Trove* 
it. fioyesfcotf for safe. GaS compoafln (93) 61 78 63 
212J92«n9 USA weekdays; LONDON-YCXWG BUSH LADY PA 

FOR SAIJf & WANTRTk - S12£ WQ&fl. wmgs Stroyri. 
rUK & wAIyiEP LoraXSN SOfHHTICATED LADY 
1900 MBlRY-GCUtOUf® for sale, u wp j xoo. Tri 01-555 2117. 


PARIS 

YOUNG LADY 341 




13TH, SOUTH PARK foty / Aug. 82 
SS, l? *9-™- 3 bedrooms, fstfi fk»Toarfc- 
iEji >"9. 9Pe" *"■* RO^OO 7 moritfinei. 

™»L2S T*5l 76 47. morning only. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 

AIR HANDLING SYSTEM Manufactur- 
er seeks French/ Enqfoh/Germcmh% 
less, good presmAMon, 170 m. mns- 
mum, bfond, for Stand Undone: - 
Pane de VerwiUw, Nov. T2 - 17. Send 
CV. pfao to Bar 2388. Herald To- 







U3NDOK ENGLAND 


CV. photo to Bar 2388. Herald Trv USA (714) 89B-2182 
tone. 92521 NemTy Cede*. France 

who wrtl forward, applications not ^ 704356 FBtAM COM UD 
chosen wil to returned. "— 1 11 - 


PORSCHE, BMW. X ROUS ROYCE 
LH/RH dme New & Pre-Owned. S 
years experience in hnpert.- bpext. 

Doaimentanon, shparg eta. USA our 
specialty. Take aavanage of our 
experience. 

HUGHES MOTOR COMPANY OOEANWIDE PA. Interpreter & Tounsm Guide 

*115^1^ motors GmbH PARIS 562 0587 

Tlx 41254 HUGHS G. Smce 1972, experienced car voder for *^ W , 

— -■■■ - ■ ■ — I. Mercedes. Porsche. BMW. Immediate ■ 11 1 ; 

delivery. Full service nnport.'exprxl. 

CARS FOR EXPORT U5. DOT & EPA. shpp^fc* ijunsi *4 PARK 553 62 62 ** 

, and deder. Oceanwide Molars Gn*H. A , xrw 

MB 2E0S. 28Q5c‘L choice of 6 urm Teeisteaensft 8. 4 DurtseUorf W. 

MS 2fBSL Bed 360 SE. 500 SL Oue Germany^ 21 1 -43464dl£ 8587374. Distinguished. Begant, MiAitoguri. 


1900 HSW MBCEDE5 FROM STOCK 

fa immnAote dehnery: 1 

— - .. 500 5EL Smokesihar/ Black leather. 

Nautical bfuc/Bhie leafier 
X.UTC 500 sa AitrcfeMr/Blue teofher 

500 SEC Notified hkWBtue leather 
: of Tax -free 500 SEC SmcfiesOver/Black leother 
SCHJB ZOET CARS 

3US ROYCE Westemde 91 

5eO«ned S 2275 AC Vavburg / Holland 
npert.- Export. Phone fD) JUMH55 

eta. USA our TU 20010 n the name of Zoel Cars, 
age cf our — - 




FOR SAIJf & WANTRTk u| -^^ QCr ^ 

rUK jALJ. & WANTED touooN SOFMST1CATH3 LADY 

1900 MBlRY-GO-ROUM) for sole, u wp a aio a Tri 01-555 2117. 

10 m. tomato. Tel- 4&'41-17-li — 

Ftmt fare* oskinFrenS for foore «*f«WT 069/ 233380 . Young 
dftob. Photo upon requed. tody. V J P- ■ PA • oompmon. 

TOKYO 475 54 SO Young Lady Cbm- 


FOR SALE COMRETE fomsten 2 
bedroom Bat, indudrs washer -dryer. 
# tw bed far, 578 20 33. 326 U I8 

SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

Pa. Interpreter & Tamai Guide 


HONG KONG 5-7954623 Europerei 
young lady cotmomon. | 




P ^f S pI?^ G 0 ,^? Yl tou,lB ***■ ATHB4S l ISLANDS, 1 


Tel; Peris 907 84 95. 

WEST INDIAN IADY Companm Tefc 
London 381 9847 


sum. recephens. 3 bedoare. 2 cfawn wit to returned. MB 2E0S. 280SE/1 dna 

bajfo. TelTPI 45 26 DUTCH COUPlf, 40, badtery tech- rtOT/CDA mv CDCinwC ^ 

TSANOUUEGARDB4 SETTING, fer- & «*» "genofnc" DOl/ffA CONVERSIONS Porsche W8S. 930 Tirbo. 

race, modern 2 todroom s . Conw- S'™™; 'mmetottely anywhere in to US specs. Shipping, borefing, ireur- jt ^ uor uctc V J n^r 

ment Nation laoakon. F7000/ month ™ •ropd 1* veari experience in once. European automotive eonoi- ,_j n Sr' . 

Tefc 348 9259. Evenna Africa Whin or phone Afl. Ekeim. 


able lody PA Tel 923 7642-off S T X 

PARIS, YOUNG TRQ4CHEDUOOBk> 
Lody eomponmn. gmda. 574 71 41. . v . 


PARS BILINGUAL A5SSTANT to HAMBURG - YOUNG French lody 


badness executives 930 5B 17 


. T*L- 220 W 28 


P AR/S 562 05871 PARS YOUNG S0PHBT1CATH> VIP HONGKONG 3-420000 Ycm? £5*' 


PA 25605 95. 


n/V/wterel Compomon 

i LONDON LADY COMPANION, to 
acagmons. Please tri. (01] 821 0»3 ■ 


wofton 15 Mars. Owners bunder 
Direct id& 

VAL PROMOTION SA 
10 Ave. du Midi. 04-1950 Sian, 
Tel: 41-27-23 34 95 


SWITZERLAND 
FORBGNBS CAN BUY 
apretmefits on (fie Ltoe Lucerne ond at 
Zurzodi (famous spa Tar rheumafoml. 
Bank loan auoWe. Write; farfodi 
406, 4102 Bmnmgen 1. Sunfcerknd. 
Tefc 061/44 5Q 9Q. 

USA GENERAL 

1M0 ACRES ei the heart of Vermont 
ski country mdudes mountain lop. 
Half woods. Large log home plus 
barn. Beautiful view for files 
$650,000. M. Ovation, RD3 Bax 3410 
Montpelier. Vermont 05602. 


6TH. BeoutdU 1 bedroom in courtyard. 
8/ 85-6/ 86. F4500 4- urilifies & imd. 
Prefer American woman writ refer- 
ences. Tefc 354 02 14. 


opean automotive conpl* 


Africa. Write or phone Afl. Ekemo, mes. Europe u> ika auoromwd. 
W,^W,JS VN ZrWxiv 117. 

/Holland 75163262. Hrexie. HaBmd Phone 8» 7Q.5SM45 


W mod levct (Mm. 20TH, 3 room apartment. Jriy ore) 
. — .. .alar TV. Phone for bo- August. Ctee to morker and metro, 

chute (01)388 1342 or wnta Prejideri- FI SW/week. Tab B97 2827. 

RgJ^OOU^HO^re, 

UMDON NEAR BUCKINGHAM Pol- University cente.m TelMW 


hofcdoy iwvd4500/week intototgl ■ fe^d-.fvPO P» month. Tefc 
Irmspuitation to & from anpart 7 


Let & metro. F4 JOO per month. Tefc 
London (Oil 637 3940/3626 Ref BS 


transportation to & Fran {xrport a 

requwedMad service ovafoble. Tefc NEURIT. House with kxge Sving. 5 


Mr. Knight on 0935 74753 or 0935 
B62120. 


■null. House wan targe kvmg. 5 
bedrooms 100 Stfcm. garden, July / 
Aug. P2O.0O0- Tefc 624 06 88. 


AMERICAN GUO, m Loolang for 0 
job with on American firm in northern 
Ifoiy or southern Switzerland area. 
Speak fluent haSan. high school grad- 
uate. Please col Lugcmo. Swit a ytmd 
091 / 541Q38 Be mob 

B4GU5HMAN 39. Former GBrrtlMh- 
fete, experienced manognnenr. 
coach ng & organreahon in leeure. 
seeks new aunmnenl anywhere. 
Write 11 Surefield Road. Hounslow 
West. Middfesex. Engtcnd. 


AUSTRALIAN JOURNALIST. 30. 
speda French, seeks European boced 


$650/000. M. Christian RD3 Bax 341CL 5?® n *l llW 5k 2 l !5£°SS!! l f iai t' 
Mon tpelier. Vermont (15602. x lj%O50/weefc 

ALKrH^TCXA5.50boauftfJw>»ded - 


oerden. 3 double bedrooms 20ft x ^--.,.1— 1 | T ,,' — T — 

Wt eadi, 3 an suite bathrooms, 20ft 


house, 5 bedrooms. Ii5 1 
forts. Fl 3,000/ month, Tel 

IB HAUB (near). Nn 


Zroforri Al^tiAo, UX Write to C 
USBECX Sdtwesterhausstrasse 10. 
3000 Horwover 1. W. Germany, 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AV All ABLE 


B HAUB fireorj. Nru 100 sqm. MIIUDsyp SEEKS for AMERICAN 
apartment fix month c4 August. , E1RWS m PAWx 

BOOO. Tefc 261 1290, Bigfcsh, Beta™. Dutch or Goman 


USA RESIDENTIAL 

LONG ISLAND ESTATE I 
_ _ MW. NECK 

uanc 20 s En^sh bnck monor house 
umh sweepmg urotennews over Long 
UmT Sound on W oaes. Btot for Searf 
) US fonriy and n 


ftoy»n^ S eaetixnl / teie; 10 MINS. CHAMPS ELY5EE5 2-room ^d&wSrSnfSLd 
faafees, W50/CKW per week. 3 apwmwnt dwocto. to fadmev S^sts. wS 

Tel- 758 8=89. • ffipHaETSnfflS 

XXlK 10TH CENIHJ OF PARS, beautiful 3- 727 61 6T 

Jwnvuu _ room aparttmw. redeaxaed. 70 


Ige of French re- 
mand. BiKngiul 
hone: 138 Avenue 
Paris, France. Tefc 


LONDON HOLLAND PARK. 2 bed- w 
room flat with garden, all modern rru 
cameaeaou. Mod’s service. Avail- 
tole June 22 thru August. 2-B week 


Hui DOT, Kn 


3 rooms: Evna 2 bed- 
kitehen, ootartV, ter- 
ixet. F8000; 296 82 Id. 


baths an suite, servoits' wing, separate 
gatehosee. Heated pool, tennis, formal 
gardens. I hour NYC and arpam. 

S3 .000.000 
Ufa H Hwlps Inc. 

9 Oyster Bay Rood, 

Locust VoBey NY 11560 
Tri- {516) 6764)600. 


for autstarxfing apartment St 3 ftaori _!!"«»: ^ IO. tw. 873 31 09. 

behind Harrods. 3 receptforis, 4/5 SHORT TBIM m Latin Quarter. 


pemna narroas. 3 receptrora, 4/5 
bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 40ft terrace 
etc Quite unque 085.000. Tele- 
phone 101) 581 $360 or 351 5461 


.Tel: 329 38 83. 


MONTMARTRE Jufy 15-Aua 31. 
rooms. F3500/iuortfv Tel: 26J IflC 


and houses, ^reto** PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 1 


5764)600. FhRpj. Km ond Lewis. Tefc Sourti erf 

Ptark 352 81 f 1. North of Peek 722 

5135. Telex 27846 RESPE G. 

«fcStofy CONDO BB{R A BUTCHOFF. A Icvge sefeaion 


5135. Triex 27fj46 RESPE G. BAC CHARCTB? 

BBfR A BUTCHOfF. A targe selection „ in towriiooie, 2 re c eptions, 
of propertMS m St. Jotot Wood, 3 bedrooms, newly redone. F15, 
Regoits fak. Swiss Cottage, Harms- Tefc 563 68 33 

stead & environs. 6 months 4-. Tri — 

01-586 7561. Th B83168 ACO G LBTH, Penthouse type apartment. 3 

to rent *1 oentrri London areae. Spe- 

oofofsinjettinarncnawrnemflsafes. TROCADBIO AREA. 2 roams, to 


n? U ^Stwy COJDO B&» A BUTCHOFF. A Icvge selection 

Dog Hommarskfola Tower of " St. Jotos wood, 

, bS M«} » SSL W5 

^feAajLAR?^ O 1 - 5 ^ 7 »»- jh 883166 ACO G 
1. 2, 3. 4 4 Bedroom Apartments HILARY POTTER and partners for 
Immediate Occupancy good qutohy furohed Rats & houses 

New Full Service Suiting With to rent «i centre/ London areas. Spe- 
Swrmmmg Pool Health Oub and ocflsfs in letrina, maiageinem & sales. 
HowduMpng Sen-xes AvadaUe 01-493 202a Iti A ID 267994. 

^AL5o’ma«A8l 1 “ttUJY APARJMffnS / Houses 

fa Info CaB 712-759-8844 ^ 

Sot. Sun H-4; Mon to Fn 9-5 £ , 

week. GABS dig Ltd 01 493 5299: 

NYC 79TH ST. CffF 5TH AVE. JOHN BIRCH has 20 yecn experience , 
Exceptional 9 room CO-OP for side by <n Batuah. long or short tenancies. | 
owner. Prestige hil service bulking. 4 Centred & suburban London & Aber- , 
exposures. Liwng room & hbrary. 2 deen. Brch fl Co. 01 -499.8802 

roomweh bat\ guest room with both. fe s ^£|75^T' 

084^71 2204 or 01^6 


Don't min 

WTBRNATKJNAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

In the WT OossRfod Swdian. 

EDUCATIONAL 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

ATTENTION: Qualified Faculty m 
fields of iberol mb. computer S sec- 
retorid stories sought for estabfehed. I 
ecamitea American college in Augs- 
burg / Munich fry faM semester 1985. 
Doctorate preferred, Master s degree 
jewed for to libercJ arts course*. 
Sand resume immefiatriy tec Gty Cot- 
fog** of Chicago. Postfoch 1467. D- 
6a» Wiesbaden, West Germany 

DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Hogue. Hafond Phone (0) 70-539245. 

AUTOS TAX FREE 

ROUS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

- RJL Spur limousine 

■ RJL Camagua “Unwed Etfown" 

- R.R. Sflver :™t 

■ RJL Silver Spur 

- Bentley Turbo 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHERS 

Monte-Carlo 
PrinaftoSty of Monaco 
Tefc {93 50 64 84 ! 

Telex: 469475 MC 
Official Direct Factory Dealer 
Esakibfcshed smce 1925 


NEW 

ASTON MARTIN 

hnnedefe Debvery 

• Loganda 

• VoW 

NEW JAGUAR 

• Sovereign 4.2 L 

- Sovereign 5 j L 

- XJS convertible 

• XJS HE 

- XJS 36 L 


Porsche 9Z8S. 920 Tirbo. 911 Coupe 
Jaguar 42 t 53. BMW M625. 
MS5SCAT13Y 

Land' Range Rover 2 + 4 door Voque 

Serving latisfied dents smce 1961 
Sl*p worldwide. EPA DOT if required 
ROFAK 

PO Box 4171. Rotterdam HoBcnd 
Tefc H 31.10 525682 The 24418 


DOT A EPA 
CONVERSIONS 

Dan* In Tire U.SJL 
The Kohl Way) 

W6 P8CMW BONDING. 
Ufl. CUSTOMS OfAiANCE & 
PO-UP SaMCE FROM PORT 

EUROPEAN FINE CAR 

Imparts & Conversions 
3641 31st Sl. U.C. W 
718-7292407 Hr 5101009922 


TAX FREE CARS: MERCHS, Rots 
Boyce, Audi. Vc*va. fasthe. BMW. 
We keep a targe stock of brand new 
and good used can. We do the 
D.O.T. and EPA an our own are- 
times. We also take care of the snp 


YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 ) 


Q5Q.71SFl.teLU.SA 3Ql.'63S2ill, * PARIS 527 01 93 * 

UwXKWfo YOUNG LADY mUNGUALVlWA 

10 1 International. Komam Astndoan r ’ 

* -ZURICH 558720** 

EHDrftDrtDTYAY Sopfosneaied V.l.P. lody PA 


EUROPORT TAX 
FREE CARS 

Can ar writ* for free catalog. 
Box 12011 

Rotterdam Aestat, Haloid 

TriJOl 10-623077 
Tefex 2M71 ffCAR NL 


PARIS 704 80 27 
VIP PA YOUNG LADY 

MrifclmgudL 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Eas$y ■: 

biths f. ^ 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Pharm CUT your facto MT representative with your text You 4 
will be mtemed of the cast immeciatriy, and once prepayment.* J 
■node yaur ori wrtl appear within 48 hours. 1 

Cod: The bracrate a S9fl0perlne per day + facto Im. Tfae are 
25 fatten, sigre and spaces m the fost few ond 36 m foe following Snes. 
Mewiwm spare a 2 Snes. No abbrmationi accepted. 

Credit Carat: American Express, Dinar's dub. EurocorcL Mstre ! 
Cond, Access and Visa 


10 YEARS 

W. Defiver Cart fa the World 

TRANSCO 

Keesxng a osnstont stodt of more than 
300 bond new core, 
mefong 5000 hoppy efients every year. 

Send tor free mulhattacoralog. 
Tronsco SA, 95 Noordriadn, 

Tri 323^542 ^MTIANS B 


Tele. 25071 EFCAR NL *PARl$; 520 97 95+ 

~ D1STINGUJSHB) YOUNG LADY PA 

TAX FRB AUTO SAIB ■■ ■ — — - — 

Order your turopeem iFfoto UR PARS let CLASS GUIDES 22AQ1 32 


automobiles. 

Car rental in+tnled nrieage 
leasind new car 1 to 6 months. 
Tttax 200572. Tel- 651 4342 
fawn, 2 Ave Porte de Stont Ooud 
Pad. 75016. 


SYMBOL 

AGENTS REQUIRED 
to distribute then range of luxury 
speoafitf oars in 
PARK A CANNES 
Tefc London 01-491 8845 


mL ecfcicated. 
for days & eve- 


IN1WNAT10NAI BEAUTIFUL Fearfe 
UNLTD, USA S WORLDWIDE, fa 
7177657793 ! 7657794 

SOCIETE DIANE PARIS 260 B7 43 
Man & women guides, Monty & renfr 
mg cor services. Bom - 12 pm. 
LONDON, ELEGANT muM«dueoted 
fanch tarfy tiomponan, wefl ftavrifod 
& versceh. Tri. 82J 0364 |P1L 

MW YORK, YOUNG CARIBBEAN 

PAWS NOTC1WS PHOra AT ONCE 
757 67 48. TrustW V.IP. lady, travel 

mill(XJfKJCl 


NEW MERCEDES _ WM>W ' WIW ^ 

PO " S ffl^f 57 oat** P gHE T ^^ k ^ 1 ^ 

RUTfc INC w hovel 069/44 77 75. 

TAUNUSSTR. 52 6000 FRANKWRT ■“JS Y47 59 58 TOUJBST GUDE. ftro, 

W Germ., tri 0169.233351 rix 41 15W Aha oimorH. Youna. rieremt. tetm&v* 


rrauranee. Afl asuslanoe reven for U5. — — - . 

exportation. TOANSWO&D AUTOS ^ANKRSTT. Voung t«Jy axi^oiwi. 
Tri: 32I50J363454 Tlx.- 82184 TWA-UT-B Engfch Frendfc Gennqfnwtan. Free 
to hovel 069/44 77 75. 


atoojs m l ettina. meng^mem & wfe. 1ROCADGRO AREA. 2 roams, oil conv 
01-493 2020. Tu ALP 267994. forts, hdy equipped [»«: htehen to 

UXURY APARIMG4TS / Houses £n Mtn/rnAjlu* eharS “ 
available cenftd London Far rent / , 61 B9 / 722 63 64. 

safe, lung -short term ooranmodo- SAKCELLK. 3 bedroom, uflkfra nducfc 
hoo avtoahle from £80 - E3.000 per «L FSD0 unforaishad; F7500 for 
week. GABS [l*] Lid Ol 493 5299^ <v±H!d Pans 9907478 US 40U32443* 


Jure, ra rancy. Ccft 524 03 18 TRA1NHJ fl EXPB9ENCH) NANNY, 
Between 6 S7 pm. Start Jufy I. Qxb of ywxig chiw & 


! cWdien'i bedrooms with connecting 
wth. 2 servants' bedrooms with bath 


Large rooms, fegh ceilings, central ax FOR FURNISHED LETTINGS IN S.W. 1 
conShoninfl. ST' nvlnn Bex 904 London, Surrey & Berkshire. Cortaa 
Southampton. NY II968 MAYS, Owhatt (037 284] 381 1 UK. 

— - — — - Trim B955112 

* CO. Excellent Selection of 

sSfB& si;T« 

quofched buyers, brokers Bets «■ - - — 

Feder E E. 30o-fi<h Ave San Mateo. LUXURY 1 BEDROOM APARTMENT, 


CA 944Q1 USA [415) 342-91130. 
SUMMIT. NEW JERSEY. EueOent 
NYC commute. Executive homes Get- 


man & French roaken-W.* for bro. ANSCOMBE 6 RINGLAND with of- 
diure: LOTS SOfhfiDER (SALTiDR. Rt« «i St Johns Wood 8 Kemaigtan 
e41 Stxmgfietd Ave . Summe, Ml offer the best senne* m residcnnl 
07901 Tefc 201 -277-1 398. fortinq. let 722 7101 [QH UK. 

NYC APARTMBfT. Stunmng 2 bed- UIXLHQOUS HATS to let afl over oen- 
roam condo opposite Lmeoln Career. ftd London. Tel: SAL Ud, London Oil 
Spectocutai mews, year found pod & 935 7440 

hetotfi dub Low .Wi 212-5959695 =r=gV,- ■■ ■ 

or 212-227 IS?® GREECE 


diure: LOfS SCHNSDER REALT-DR. 
041 Sprmgfirid Ave . SwMtt, Ml 
07901 TeL 201277.1398. 


roam condo opposite Lmeoln Career. md London. Tel: SAL Ltd, London Oil 
Spectoculai mews, year found pod & 935 74#? 

heahfi dub low -Ws 212-5959695 =r=gV,- ■■ ■ 

or 212-227 1579 ^ GREECE 

DARIEN t NEW CANAAN Omnecu GRHEK ISLANDS On«a from owner in 1 
cut. Executive type ftamet far rent & me lovely aland of Peace, Corfu creo. 
sole Pleasant NY Gry suburb. avartabJe August, newty ren-xvaied 
French ipolen Mtfionvtrie ccrmec- hixeal lorfi century mormon with 
nans. Cto Tibbem 9 E. 203+557724 pnvcee i»roees & garden 

onidu olive orchards. Fufly funsshed 

I !C. 4 double bedrooms, shower & toilet 

rmn.V.^.,1 «« mm. xeiii for mmmun permd of 2 

COMMERCIAL woeK USS2.000 week indurim 

A INDUSTRIAL mad & fealty fry use of pivate 



WATERFRONT ho UZnT> 

CONDO DEVELOPMB'/T 

lf-Vhir KlflMn MV KJTQI HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 

LONG ISLAND, MY. Umb rereab. Vatertussft. 174 
tos acres grooved tar 500 coretos. 4m ««dam. 020621234 or £>73222. 


WATERFRONT 
CONDO DEVELOPMENT 
LONG ISLAND, N.Y. 

t05 oeres oopoved tor 500 condos, 
marina & hotel motel, 575.000.000 
Apponumert* thru JudUh Midsddk 

MERRILL LYNCH REALTY 
CARU. BURR, INC. 

44 Mx*i 5* CoW 5pfinq Harbor, N Y 
Tel 15 1 01 6923400 


BRONX. NY. 3 nvnr drop hvuig icon 
pre war efovatcr bu-Idings ?I0 man 
mere* S950OWrem Pnee S4 rrrton 
Terms. ;t7«S2*08’. «I4?73*400 
455 Cenirat Po t Ave Suite 21 T 
Scarsdale. NY 10583 USA 


JOHN BIRCH has 20 yecn e xp enence 'fill- SO. MOZART. 2 rooms, cku. 
m Senttos. long or short lenanctes. F5800 net. Tefc 397 19 87 

aaRsaw"- iaawr ** 

DNTEJL London. Luxury funrxshed " " ™ ■ — ■ 

floh. Amencon kitchens. £280/wBrii- SWITZERLAND 

London, Surrey & Berkshire. Gnoo SWITZERLAND 

MAYS, Owhoti (037 284) 381 1 UK. 

Tefer. B9SS112 %# I I I An#* 

GRra** fl CO. Excellent Selection cl V I L L A R b 

Howes & flats for rereto in ftarth, «. 7 , , 

Northwest & Central London. Tefc 01- ™«from Geneva Airport 

625 8611. rii - terexs - golf and sun 

LUXURY 1 BEDROOM APARTMENT, JUAT5MIR/TMT ru AI ET 

deeps J. off Ktrenaion Ugh Street, ™s6NlnCENT CHALET 
London. October 19-26. STDO/'week. mn BEKrr 

Tri: Allan |0tt0) 63Sb K/R RH*IT 

ANSCOMBE A RINGLAND with of J f , 

fees n St Johns Wood 5 Kensington * Tisrev, 2? ** 

offer the best terete* m reudSiri P ^T"l P ^* .1??^ * q -' a 

lerftn^ Tefc 722 7101 [PH UK. 

LUXLfiDOUS RAIS to let afl over t*n- ' 

™ L ,°,l4 sa 7b,! ^ W london fl’l 1 mon * USS20.000 + dfaroes 
y-LS 7449 special rote for a longer penS 

GREECE Far Information: 

SRHiK ISLANDS, {filed from owner ,n 
the Ipsraly island of Ffexot. Corfu creo. P ' 0, ^Sl 

ovarlaWe August, newty renowned Tj!*. «e r 

• yporf 10th century nvraon with Trie*. 456 213 GESE 

Wide prrrtXe terraces & garden 

anxdsi olive orchards. Fufly fonxshed 

4 double bedrooms, shower & toilet eiiflTTFBi a. xm 

'S ! 5iS"S p< r^ SWITZERLAND 

V I L L A R s 

HOUAM) Qdy 75 nuns from Geneva Airport 

- — — - ■ ■■ da - r emi i . goff red sun 

DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. MAGNIFICENT CHALET 

Define rentals, Vafonusstr. 174. ryHn n _ 

Amsterdam. 020621734 « 023222. FOR R&tT 

— - with wonderful view over the Alps. 

I^MUINMAIcaAAJroiJ ^t.S2nfl2 5 £Ste 

TTAI.Y tmm nbi fi w da VUore SA 

- -r ■■■ P.O. Ban 62, CH-1S84 Villen 

BRCE FLAT. 2 room-, bath, kitchen- Tel: 25/35 35 31 

rite, ledy icsiared, huury fotnqhcd, Talnu 4S6 213 GEE 


arts, to com- Posikit: ^ 

Stlatahetto 

— — tored. ffiotofl references- 11330Sa 

bkfies indud- Gfon Bd,, Potomoc, MD 20854 

iSSUr, CMff RffRESYTAnVE of Afttenccm 

— — S- firm m Pans seeks hard working reid 

loams, doss. experienced housekeeper l axS i. Re- 

7 _ un* end refarenees dearad. Coll 

UIL Stadia fa» 256 10 70 for mai address ond 
7 deftats. 


AU PAIR GIRL Start lore August. Care J? 

NY 10994 USA — 

«!8S^rd buy your next car 

TAX FREE AMD USE OUR 

39 S'fiSTS i^Lru, buy-back program 

Free immethaiely. Seeks aoet wdh pn- t* m a awm 

and SAVE 

France. Tri: (94| 73 84 71 

ALWAYS AVAILABLE - AU PAUL 
cWdren s nanny, mums helpers fl ali 
branches ol Ifl doss kve^n domestic 

neip nnxldwde. CaH Staane Bureau ■ — 

London 730 BI22/5T42J24 hours} IT 5H1PSIDB Int, 576 Fifth Avenue. 

CEMF AGY. Tlx: 8950670SLQAfg G. 7th Ffoor, New YreL MY. 10036. USA J 


ROUS ROYCE 

- S*rer Spur 

■ Bentley Turbo 

ASTON MARTIN 

- Loganda 

OTHER MARQUES 

- Excnfcbur limited Ution" 

- Lmeoln Lntausine 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHERS 

Monte-Carta 
Prmeipafoy of Monaco 
Tefc (93) 50 64 B4 
Triei «9475 MC 1 

Official Diiea Factory Deafer 
Can supply Woridwide 
EsotabSed pnce 1925 

BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX REE AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 


W Germ., tel PJ69-233351. At 411559 

NEW PEUGEOT, Land Rover. Range 
Rover. Toyota 4*4. tropicto speev 
Britov Zonneboan 18, Maarisen- 
broek, HaBand KS30445492. hr 47D82 


BMW, PORSCHE, RHD 

0933) 76099. 


LHD 1982 Shrer Spun, 21000 bn, 
whae 1 red. Both immocutate. Cafl 


airports. Young, riegcnl attraOve, 
educated. 7 am / 12 pm. WI Hovel 


John m London, 01 -2081)007. or lefe* NEW YORK - Young riegart Erhropan 
8956022 TEAS G modeli mufebiguaC eon^anioa (21 2) 

TRANSMUNDf BELGIUM, 21 Gestefc 

sebaan. 85241 2oe««L Antwerp. Tefc U3NDON 50PWSI1CATH> German/ 
03384.1054 Tlx 32302 Transm fl bi French lady t o mwnw a MAflnguol 


HtADoma 

Ports; (fa datoffod only}: 
747^601 

EUROPC ' 

A m toe wkwu 2636-11 
Attorns: 361-8397/360-2421. 
Btxxxab: 343-1899. 
CapenhaBinr (01} 329440. 
Franfcfert: (069] 72457-55. 
Lodsoom: 29-58-94. . 
Laban: 67-27-93/66-25^14. 
London; (01 1836-4802. 
Madrid: 455-2891/455-3306. 
NOok (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (Q3) 845545- 
Ronw: 679-3437, 

Swodon: (081 7569239. 

Tol Avrus 03-455 SS9. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. : 

UUBTH) STATES 

Now York. (212J 752-3890. 
WeriCotafc (415) 363-8339. 


LATW AMHUCA 

Buono* Aim: 41 40 31 
(Dept. 312] 

CaracDc33 1454 
Goayaqafi: 51 45 05 
Urm: 417852 
Panama: 69 05 11 
San Jam: 22-1055 
Smtiagoc 61 555 
Sao Paolos 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 


Woofer. 246303. 
Kuwaiti 5614485. 
Ubanon: 341 457/879. 
Qatar. 416535. 

Saudi Arabia: 

JetMtou 667-1500. 
UJLE. Duba 224161. 

FAR CAST 

Baaghak 3904)6-57. 
Hong Kbnm 5-213671. 
Mmdlm8t70749. 
Seoul 735 B7 73. 
Stagapora: 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 752 44 2S/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 


Mefbounw: 690 8233. 
Sydnoyt 929 56 39, 957 <3 20 l 
P orths 320 98 33. 

Pe d^ ^ tan, Queo n ehufc 




ALWAYS AVAILABLE LONDON only 
babymi refers, Ig cJass doty mods A 
efiaufteurs. Stareie Bureau. 730 8122 
■ 5142 Licenced engjggnert agency 
EATON BUREAU NAMrflES - & to 
reofesuanal dxiala cmalabfe now. 

London 7309566. 136 SfooreeSi.SWl , 

Utewced UK Emyfcoymern Agency. , 
GENTLEMAN'S GENTLEMAN: Ere 


Pho ne 12) BW44&4. Trie.: 43 7966 

SHIPSID6 SA. Choussce de Wane 
465, 1040 Brusseh. Betamm. 
Phone: (02)6499062. Trie? 6X90 


T R A S C O 

THE MBICEDGS SPEOAUSTS 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

- USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in Flew Yrefc 
330 W. 56fh Sr.. N.Y.C. 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CBHHT CARDS AND 
CHECKS ACCEPIB) 

Private Members hi p! Avaflable 

Tht» Dward-wlmting sanrica has 
been Featured at fiw tap & maxi 
oedatnre Escort Service by 
USA fl in tem aii cmdi newt madia ! 
indttding radio and TV. 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

BCORT SERVICE. 

EVERYWHERE YOU ARE OR GO!. 

1-813-921-7946 

Cto free from Ui- lflOO-237«92 
Cto free from Honda- 1800.^24)892. 
LoweS Eastern welcomes you bodj 


| stock: Mercedes. BMW, ASO- 

ESCORTS & GUIDES ' 

LONDON l 
KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SERVICE 

70 KENSINGTON CHURCH ST, WB 
TB: 937 9136 OR 937 9133 
Afl major credit car* accepted. 


* LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SBTVICE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


LONDON 

DAY/ EVENING BCORT AGENCY 

Ta: 724 2972 


ARISTOCATS 

T endon Excort Service 
128 Wi^nwe SL londwi W.l. 
AH ireear Credit Cords Accecred 
Tef. 437 47 41 / 4?4t^ 

12 noon - nudraght 


glih bkxi lervrew 39. Prefer travel - 

Passible srennvs poo. Bax 41165, Wefl fc**" 1 " 11 / « Engfond 


WOE | T „ f,« lhd . Eur paean deEvery - 
H'fGIISH NANNIES & Mother's Helps I US EPA/DOT - 


free now. Mash Agency. 53 Church Shppng by the experts. I 

Rood, How, UK. TA K)Z73| 29044/5 ! 

IN STOOL: 500 SE/l- Block. Gray, Hue 

AUTOMOBILES ^ *bE 

958 CWVIKXET CORVETTE- CVie 

^ ipB ?‘* y modr fa* mjecfion. DIRECT FROM SOURCE 

5S5T wnpksS* iSwed Rr^°ui TraKn Ionian Ud 

USA & very rare. Call or wme fre * * Hawreden HR. Landrei 7/W2 rBR. 
color partfoSo: Ptvfco Ranwv. 1174 Tel: 01-308 000’. 


: 53 Church 
73| 29044/5 


PETER BRUIN MAKHAARDU 
Inti Homing Seniee-Rentdi 
Am st ardo m . Tel: 020-768022. 

~ TTAI.Y “ 


AUTOMOBILES 

T958 CHEVRtXFT CORVETTE- Che 
of 24i- speoaOy made Fuel mjerian, 
power wxxtaws.4 speed ftaremasion. 
IOW completely restored. Finest ui 
U5A & vmr rare. Call or wme for 
Pretfofay PKLp Rwmey, 1174 

MEW 500SI, OfD METALLIC lealhet. 
“/ OO ^L ,O ™10. ^mediate drihrery. 
Ais ° /SSSi. *6 valve and new 
model 730E. Tri: UK Wuidsre 61547, 


VBflCE FLAT. 2 toon.-, bath, blchem Tel: 2S/3S 33 31 Aba 190E. 21 16 vohe'and new 

«Re. nwiiy icuored, hflAurf Hjtn^hed. Tabu 4S6 113 XSSSE Windsor 61547. 

*«*> nc-i» Son Mnrro Squore Lwra- - Tu ; 849*62. 

"Oui. WhfiWflt vw. fuly LOCARNO - BRISSAGO. BmuhU Pfma w inm iop7 i a ivvi via 
•^■oped pmi 31 October USS375 position ove r looking Lxiggo Vogreo. metojic M^Csoecierf ’lenrfi?iSJ«^ 
f*« ■*"-?* p ' c *n NMinfot H! Ecntei •». fane 5 looms, nnoce. ga&n. oetfea oondnJS^um>!^S^T £am' 
USSSM rtrwixrii 3 weefe Phone Wfr formshed, long orsfat 6T Alro 

06 4751160 Tl.. 42ia0'» I W ODortm^London &54 \2U jTrt Ce ' W1 022/86 


perfect condtron. unmorfced $48 Doo! 


Tele. 8956022 TRAS G 


EUROPE AUTO BROKERS 
POB 214. 3430 AG hfieuwegein Htoand 
Tel- P) 3402-41346. TV. 76W EAfl NL 


CAPRICE 

BCORT SERVICE 
IN NEW YORK 
TEL 212-737 3291. 

LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Sendee. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Fortman Escort Agency 

67 CMtem Street, 
London WI 

Tel: 486 3724 or 486 1 158 
Afl maj or eredfo cards accepted 


SHADOWS 

MADRID ESC042T SERVICE 

CREDrr CAROS, ra: 2509603 


] & entertaining. Tefc 01-381 6852. 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

MADRID INT'L 

ESCORT SERVICE 
TO : 2456548. CREDIT CARDS 

ZURICH 

CAROUNE ESCORT SOVKX. 
Tefc 01/252 61 74 

ZURICH-GENEVA 

GtNGBTS BCORT SERVICE. 
1H: 01 / 363 08 64 - 022/ 34 41 86 

ZURICH 

Scenanttar'c Escort fl Guide Service 
Tefc 01/57 75 96 

* GENEVA - FIRST * 

DAILY ESCORT SERVICE 
TeL- 022/32 34 TB 
+ Weekend fl Travel 

ZURi CH 

ALEXIS ESCORT SERVICE 
TBL Ql-47 55 R2 / 69 SS 04 

JASMINE 

AJMSTERDAM ESCORT SERVICE. 
TO: 020-366655 


ESCORTS & GUIDES ] ESCORTS A GUIDES 


OGSEA ESCORT SBIVTCE. 

51 Beouchrenp FVjce. London SW3. 
Tefc 01 SB4 6513/2^49 (4-12 pm] 


MILAN ESCORT 

SERVICE: 02/685035 



i AMSTERDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SERVICE. 020-954344 

** MADRID ESCORT +* 

.SERVICE Tel: 233.03.19 


WENNA-ESCORT-AGENCY. 
Tel: 37 52 39 


CHA«B«i GBKVA Grebe Sorao. 

Tefc 283-397 ■ 

DOMNA'S ESCORT-GUIDE leruioe. 
The Hogue ■ Hoflond, Q70dfll823 
MADWO fflJEajONS ESCORT Ser- 
vtoe TeL4QI15iy. Crwfl Cmfe. 
MOflCH-Bt£»OYflTANjAEKort 
Service. Tefc 31 1 79 00 or 31 1 79 36 

VJWNA VB» ESCORT SBCVKE Trifo 
IVienncj 65 41 58 jj£ 

WNDON UJCY KC08T & g 3P 
Seance. Tefc PI -373 0211 

MWRCH SWSME BCORT SCS! 
Tefc 089/4486038 

^^W^^wAgmcrilrildneirei 
yv / -op- 

«»SaS- CH4NTA1 ESCORT Ser- 
wee; Tefc 02/520 23 65, 

YOUNG BCORT SSTVICE 

Contocf 33 33 71 

* ATV ??)S>^P ON BOORTS*’' 

wee. Tri. 9H 6682. ■ 

WANIOTRr S«OA ESCORT 5er- 
we. Tel: QjS9flB 3d 42 


fRAFOCRBrr AREA. ISABHiFS fo . 

male and code hlrngud Eiowt ond .AJWS1BMAM ESCORT 

t- — i ~ - - - ■ — Gwda Service. Tefc F*~“ ■»*—— 


Travel Service. Phase telephone: 62 
8805. 


WNDON- French escrei arnce. 
Horn- 10pm. Tefc |Q|| 5B9 490a 


MAMA SCraraOER ESCORT Seance STnrraABT __ itny ~ 

Utodon 402 4000/402 dOOfl/dd 0282 Tri- 07VLM 9B 4T5 S *^ e 

~T C^ff/DUESSELDORF/BONN 

GENEVA -HaBE ESCORT SERVICE En 9 v * h Escart Serwce 0221-52 4757 

Tefc 36 49 32 


Dt/^rkirv hi -w . ROME CUJB EUROPE E5CORT 

KEGcNCY NY ^.^ttrie Serwce.Tefc 06/589 2604- 5B9 

■tk.Wkll\4 I 14 I H46 thorn 4 pm to 10 peril 


WORIDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 
212-838-8027 or 753-1864 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK ESCORT SERVICE 
2T 2-888-1 666 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GUIDE S ERVICE from 5pro 
ROTTERDAM IO) 10-254155 
THE HAGUE (01 70-60 79 96 

(ONDON BAYSWATBt ESCORT S*> 

wee Tri 01 229 Q776. 

WhfflON 1WDIE ESCORT SrivKte 
Tri. 01 373 8849 


1146 (ham 4 pm to 10 pm) 

GENEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tel: 46 IT 58 


GB4EVA .BEAUTY. 
ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL 29 51 30 


HYDE PARK ESCORT SBIV1CE 
LONDON/ KcATraOW/GATWICK 
Tel; Ol 890 0373 


GENEVA- BBT 
BCORT SERVICE 
TB: 022/ 86 15 95 

LONDON GORE ESCORT Service 
Tefc 370 TI5I 


Li 1 -vl ; « 1 Jj W . ’ r, ;c ; , J3 .T»l A 




AGWCf 

LONDON ESCORT SBTVICE Tefc 937 


HAIAWRG BCORT + GUIDE Ser 
wee. Tri 040-54 17 41 . 


I«W YORK CITY Mademresefl.fe^ 
- oort Surwue 1217) 757 6J5A 


AMST1SDAM J6ANCT fecort Serrice 
Tef; (020) 326420 re 34QI10, 

MUSSBa. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

Escort Service. Tefc 02/731,76.41. 

W^IDMF/ COLOGNE/ BONN 
Doema Escort Serwce 0211 • 3831 41 


VB4NA CLEOPATRA faort Sere<e. 
Tel: S2 73 88 or 47 70 35. 


Senate, 06° '336441 fl 069. 3SI W?A 

HAMBURG - SABRINA Exon fa. 
w. Tri.040-566S3fi 5er- 


VlfldNA ETOUE ESCORT SERVICE. *Jj*KK - PRTVATE BCCKT + 
Tefc 56 78 55. Credfo Sfrexte Tefc 91 a 14 

MADRID IMPACT evxxt reel gude AMSTBEDAM POUR ROSS firan 
jterewe^Mubknauo'. 261 4|4? Servic* ffl 30 JbON, 

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L orayu rf ZARA ESCORT favxte. COPB4HAG04 TOP CLASS E sSi 
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19 4V. 4V» 414 

m 4 320103* M 1014 + 1* 
1504 1134 ». 1034—1 
351 27* 2m 234 — I* 


AVIS D* APPEL D'OFFRES INTERNATIONAL 
POUR FOURNITURES DE MATiRIEL 
DE TRAITEMENT DE SCHLAMMS 
DE PHOSPHATE 


Le»n i ^DUSTRIE5CHIMIQUES DU S£N£G AL (ICS) rtalMenHarfinoncp- 
meal de la BANQUEMONXHALE one usine de valorisation de rEnd» Gno 
de phosphate au SenfgaL 

Mirniw mnrmie la fnt n -wit n n», In mmfay M lea MMW innvant 
la formnie "clfi en main", des deux lots tf£qmpemen! cmvaitto: 

— LOTI: un hpusBuseur de 120 m de dwmitre; 

— LOTS: dm ayaperoemsde clarification tTemietfepaiaoMBeniem 
des bo ues. 

Leo aociAes intfrusees par la found tare (Tun mi deux de ces loo po er ront 
rciircr le dossier (Tappet d 1 off re correspondant, mdre remise (Tone 
participation de 500 francs frangm par dossier a Tune des adresses o- 
dessoos i partir du 17 join 1985. 

EUes auront a remettie Kur offre dans les condition* et rax dflais indiqnea 
dans le dossier <f appel cf afire. 

— INDUSTRIES CHHHQUES DU SfiNfiCAL 
Undenn Sevdoa Nonrtra Tall 
66* Boulevard de la Repnblknte, BJP. 3835 
DAKAR (Stated) 

Telex i 3346 ICS DKR SG. 

— INDUSTRIES CHQdQUES DU S&ffiGAL 
62, rue Jeanae-d*Are 
75646 PARIS Cedes 13 
Telex ; 200X91 FEMC. 


Non Dollar 


An Bkg97 

Q7L 


ne 

1. 

1234 

1 Tm* f ' x 1 1 

Ufa 

1 m 1 [**^7 T ■ J* 

m- 


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m * 

DounorkVins 

121* 

inw 

12* 



UnBEmN 

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CTfc 

Bass 


sndwn 

123* 









The Accounts for the year erkfing . 

31st December 1984 were qpprwed at the 
Shareholders’ Meeting held in Genova 
under the Chairmanship of Mr Alberto Boyer. 
The 1964 financial year dosed with a pre-tax 
figure of L554w4 bflfion_ After a taxation 
charge of L151.1 bHfion, L3143 bWon was 
set aside for. depreciation and allocations, 
leaving a net profit of LBRMBoh; of 


this L35 bffiton was assigned to reserves 
and L54.4 billion to the Shareholders. 

It was decided to disbfoute a dividend of 
L85 per share, as in 1983, on a company 
capital which was doubled during 
the course of the financial year, and this 
dividend may be collected from 
17th May 1985 against presentation 
of the share certificate coupon No. 25. 



SPAIN 




AN ENTIRE 

COUNTRY 



In Spot, THJEFONCA has for sixty years been ■§ 
making the telephone something more Than just a 
oonvrujniciatjon nstrument ReoentlyTH^FCXsJICA 

and its youp of companies* have made an enormous 
effort in research and techpotogcaJ developments. 
This has paid handsome cSvidends. Today every ■ 
business sector h Spain benefits from TELEFONJCAs 
advances in teterammunications. 


THE 


The telephone is a powerful force for progress 
and TELEFONICA is already looking to the 
needs of the next century. TELEFONICA 
s now also present h the major htematjona) 
stock markets. Every step TELEFONICA takes 
in Spar is a giant leap for the progress of its 
I society. That's why in Spain there is an entire 
country behnd-the telephone. 


TELEPHONE 


As regards the B&ard of Directors, 
the Sharrtioklerar4uleeting nominated 
MrPJer.Cftrio Marengo Director and confirmed 
MrAftwrto Boyers Chairman of the Board, 
ssweflasMrLjeoSofariandMrSefgia Fdrentf 
' DoputyChalrmen. Mr Lucio Rondelli and 
Mr.FteCwto Marengo are Managing Directors. 
The Extraordinary Shareholders' Meeting 
delttierated oh the Incorporation 
;bi O«fit0 tta&uio ofSAMPOOM S.pA, Milan, 
previously a property sharehokJIng. 


The dividend may be collected 
at ati branches of Crecflto Rafiano, 

Banca Cornmerdale Itafiana. 

Banco di Roma. 

Banca Nazfonate del Lavoro. 

Banco di Napoli, Banco di Sicilia, 
Isfituto Bancauio S. Raoto tfi Torino, 
Monte del Pastin' di Siena, 

Banco di Santo SpMto. 

Banco di Sardegna 
and Monte Titoli S.pA 


Telefonica 


TEUsFOMCAOlOtF* Anper Cables deComurtMOpnes-OifawlEI^^ 
kit«grado(THM)- Eha - Emd - Craflxr - Hspmo Rado Marityna - Inddec tnuisa - Sec ansa - 
Sntel ■ TeWonca Wemaocral ■ lelKtra Espart* - Standard Bectrica ■ TeWbna y Djuos - 
■fttecenkrttamones Mdryus 


cc fUmUf st 1 s fs ffe ftts r * ese# 9 sr- ff f fv sc* 













































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1985 


i 

2 

3 

4 

14 




17 




30 






PEANUTS 


jftkwTtW 0 w 6 &ad>, 

xyea. a**cl m*t 
J wtJ* COmjar. 


0M- tkx. tvrfo-MxJL 
Upafifukufr A'Juad-X# 

\ /fcwLi*Ltfa/uoeL' 
jto <&*$'■ 


HAUAHAHAjj 


SO SO WRITE W UR 
OWN LETTERS! 




BOOKS 

4 


I H'SS 


ACROSS 


1 Unrelenting 
5 March sound 

10 Get the 
groceries 

14 On the Indian 

15 Fibber 
McGee's 
medium 

16 Court cipher 

17 Publication for 
servicemen 

20 Mel Blanc 
"role" 

21 Will 

22 Road-sign 


59 Post or Hahn 
63 Patriotic 
ctdors 

65 Cassio's rival 

66 Managed 

67 Muscovite gal 

68 Oodles 

69 Snare 

70 Salacious eye 


DOWN 


24 


X Fastener 

2 Anent 

3 Raise 

4 Becloud 

5 La's 


the nose 


25 Cambridge 
lent, for 


student. I 
short 

28 Invent 

33 La's 
predecessor 

34 Final, e.g. 

36 Impish Norse 
god 

37 Old Glory 

42 What tholes 
hold 

43 Hay unit 

44 Boob 

45Dada 

49 Skimpy, in 
Sleaford 

51 Tea, e.g. 

53 Cenozoic or 
Archeozoic 

54 Rigid 


6 Verbal 
extravagance 

7 Calculating 
person 

8 Overlooked 
9011a maker 


10 Not very thick 

11 Road man of 
Hollywood 

12 Kiln 

13 Gadfly 

18 Structured 
procedure 

19 Sway with 


23 German duchy 
name 

25 "Yankee 
Doodle Boy*' 
composer 


ZSOnlhequi vive 

27 Estop 

29 1936 loser 

30 Bicuspid's 
neighbor 

31 Czarist 
proclamation 

32 Kin of 20 
Across 

33 Classical 
colonnade 

35 Taw 

38“ was 

saying . - 

30 Wheel 
projection 

40 Not windward 

41 Came hard by 

46 Eastern nurse 

47 Call it quits 

48 Call to 
quarters 

50 Frolic 

52 Stay 
stationary, 
naudcally 

54 Flower girl 

55 Actress 
Patricia 

56 Brink 

57 Former Polish 
department 

58 Hacks 

60 That one, to 
Cato 

61 Racing sled 

62 Four seasons 

64 Humorist who 

sounds dose 



THE POST-MODERN AURA: The 
Act of Fiction in an Age of Inflation 


By Charles Newman, with a preface by 
Gerald Graff. 203 pages . Hardcover ; 
$ 18.95 i 

Northwestern University Press, Box 1093* X, 
1735 Benson Avenue, Evanston, IIL 60201. 


Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 


BEETLE BAILEY 



yVHEN I GOT HOME 
FROM THE PARTY LAST 
HIGHT 1 PUT THEM iH 
THE GLASS LIKE I 
ALWAYS 
PO 




ANDY CAPP 


© jVetr Yank Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



IS THERE PROOF IN THIS PUDDING?' 



I N THIS dazzling yet penetrating study of 
contemporary an — by which be unabash- 
edly means almost nothing but contemporary 
fiction — Charles Newman would seem to 
have committed the ultimate vulgarity. He has 
reduced contemporary literature in all its vari- 
ety to nothing more or less than a consumer 
commodity in the economic marketplace. And, 
having done so, be has gone on to argue that 
Eke ail other current commodities from soup to 
nuts and bolts, literature has been devalued in 
the past 40 years. 

That's why there are no more literary giants 
towering over the landscape, be argues. That'S 
why we cannot with any conviction point to 
any fictional masterpieces from the postwar 
era. That’s why there are no more colossal men 
(or women) of letters, Thai's why despite there 
having been published in the last 30 years more 
novels “than in any comparable period of 
- Msuxy." no age “has been less sure about what 
a novel is, or more skeptical of the value and 
function of ‘imaginative’ literature." 

Is Newman — a novelist himself, as wdl as a 
critic, a teacher, and the founder and editor of 
the literary review Tri-Quarterly — merely 
speaking metaphorically? In certain respects, 
yes, and the metaphor serves him powerfully. 
In the marketplace where literature is traded, 
competing interests make powerful and con- 
flicting demands. Since these demands drive 
the pnee of fiction up (awl the value down). 


Newman takes the opportunity to excoriate 
, whether they are formalists 


these competitors, 
or realists, avant-gardists or neo-conservatives, 
neo-realists, structuralists, decoustructiouists, 
Freudians, believers in the anxiety of influ- 
ence, or criers after a revival of moral fiction. 


ty as Reality." he asks whether William H. 
Gass's war against pwudo-an hasn't posited 
“ib'ierature as a dosed organism, a factory in 
which curiosity about what is fabricated and 
what is the goal of its labor are apparently 
questions outside its design." In response to 
Saul Bellow's competing endorsement of tradi- 
tion, Newman argues trenchantly that desrdc 
“its dear limitations," Gass's formalist jRfe 
“can no longer be countered by a simple appeal 
to admisswc content ' 1 

Elsewhere, be delivers an especially cogent, 
critique of perceptual relativism: The bierary 
"enthronement of the poedver" who says "U 
all depends cat your point of view" is "of course 
only the most egregious Humanist misreading 
of Modern physics, which ignores not only the 
elegant and excruciating step-by-step method- 
ology winch char acterizes the true sdenlifle 
method, but also the horror which always ac- 
companies the discover}’ of new evidence 
which cannot be explained in an old context.” 

Yet Newman also means it literally when he 
treats contemporary fiction as a marketplace 
commodity; or, to put it another way.lfe 
metaphor is as serious as any description of 
reality. In the rebellion of Modernism against 
Tradition, the New unquestionably pined it- 
self against entrenched authority, be argues. 
But in the transition from Madennsm to Post- 
Modernism — a “Second Revolution" that 
began about the time of World War II — the 
nature of the competition changed. The snug- 
gle between the left and the right became lost 
in the bigger game of oligopoly, or the market 
condition that exists whoa there are few 
enough sellers to Gx prices irrespective of sup- 
ply and demand. The object of the game be- 
came to buy both guns and butter, (he price 
was rampant inflati on, devaluing even tbc^p- 
tegrity o{ serious fiction. *■- 

The foregoing summary, of course, is a vast 
oversimplification of Newman’s exquisitely 
complex argument, whose prose can be daunt- 
ing enough to beg comparison with Hegel. In 
this elementary version, h may seem to echo 
every variety of soda! critic from John Ken- 
neth Galbraith to Herbert Marcuse to WiBiam 
Irwin Thompson. But Newman delivers the 
goods; His anatomy oT the comen^wrary pub- 
lishing scene is as deadly as his evisceration of 
the decoustructiouists. 



Hp is by no means merely playing around 
with his metaphor. In a chapter called “Opari- 


Sohdion to Previous Puzzle 


If "The Post-Modern Aura" has any major 
foiling besides its suffocating verbal density, it 
is a lack of concrete examples of what the 
author considers promising in current fiction. 
But even this lack of illustration has its bene- 
fits. Newman is so evocative that the mine 


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pressured willy-nilly to play with possible® 
One is eventually remi 


reminded of a talk that the 


poet Reed Win ttemare gave a few years ago in 
ofYcat' 


□□□□□□□□□□□a 

□□□□a Q0D3 
DQQQE3 QQQ 

dob annum 

□□□BOD 


which he concaved of Yeats's "rough beast" 
slouching "towards Bethlehem" as the emer- 
gence of new and hitherto unimagined literary 
forms. 


MC 

ujsTpBEE 

DMT 1A IP MSI 
r|gM 


In “The Post-Modern Aura." Newman, de- 
spite his sometimes inhospitable prose, 
ceeds in evoking Yeats's “sands of the dej 


suc- 

csert." 


of jhe rough beast as ugly 
DSt-MO' 4 — *““* 


and threatening, fa The Post-Modem Aura,' 
Newman, as Wtaitemore did in his talk, makes 
its arrival an event to be anticipated with 
something almost tike hope and relief. 


heedei □□□□ ansa 
oebds aaniE 


ElLlSlEi 

6/14/BS 


Christopher Lehmann-ffawit is on the staff of 
The New Yak Tones. v|r 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


SQTH1S IS THE 0£J7TW\E 6T0R9 

VOO WANT TO HEAR,HOH? 


Unacrambio these four Jumbles, 
one hater to each square, to form 
four anfinvy words. 


FAHFC 



nr 





DUESE 


□_ 

_u 


'toANGORTHE ENFORCER SCtiEAMEf? 
'THE WORD? IS OURS/' AT THAT 
VERV MOMENT TEFPV BEARS 
EVERYWHERE CRAWLEP OUT OF 
THEIR TO V CHESTS ANPARMEP 


THIS 15 A SIP£ OF TEPPV 
BEARS IT? AS SOON NOT KNOW 


RITHEM 



'JL 



A huge number of points 
hinged on the opening 
lead on the diagramed deal. • 
North and South were 
pushed by opposing spade bids 
into six brans, five spades 
would have failed bjr just one 
trick, so it was certainly right 
to try six hearts. This appears 
to stand or fall on the finesse 
for the trump king, and this 
was due to fail 
But after the normal lead of 
the spade ace from West, 
South was able to bring home 
the slam. 

He ruffed in the dummy, 
cashed the heart ace and devel- 
oped dubs. He cashed the king 


and the ace and led the jack. 
When East played low, he did 
not need lo guess the location 
of the queen. He simply ruffed, 
ruffed a spade and ruffed an- 
other dub. Because West was 
unable to overruff, it was a 
simple matter to ruff another 
spade and discard the angle- 
ton diamond on the estab- 
lished dub winner. East could 
score his trump king whenever 
he pleased, tut that was the 
only trick for the defense: 

In the replay. South was 
doubled in five hearts and 
made the same 12 tricks after 
identical play. East West lost 6 
points, but would have gained 
13, if West had led the dia- 
mond ace — a choice that 


could wdl have been fata] with 
a different layout 


NORTH (D) 

VANS! 

V J9975 
*A J1043 


WEST 

4AJHS7 

91 

O AQ*3 

• K ‘ 


EAST 

9X4 
0 X J64 
*Q7«3 


SOUTH 
«XSS1 
VQJ8783 
0 2 
♦ X 3 

Netther ride was vntaaratafc. THa 

tabular 


Norik 

Em 

Sea* 

Wot* 

Pxaa 

Pm 

1 O 

2 ft 

3 * 

DbL 

*0 

4 ft. 

Pm 

Pm 

so 

2£ 

FW 

5ft 

Pm 

to 

Pm 

Pm ■ 

Pm 


West led ibe spade ace. 


GLUNOE 


znz 



WHAT THE 
SOPRANO'S 
•SOLO* WAS. 


Now arrange the dretad Utters to 
toon the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer hem 


•■-m m rr 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: PFHZE DALLY LIKELY WINNOW 


Answer: A 
can 


legacy is one way or 

m be overcome ' 


ay or proving that poverty 
by this— "WILL POWEIFr 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 



HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 

Atoarve 

22 

72 

15 

S9 

Amsterdam 

13 

55 

10 

so 

Athens 

27 

81 

18 

64 

Burcrlesist 

24 

75 

19 

59 

Belgrade 

27 

11 

12 

54 

Benin 


59 

8 


Brussels 

13 

55 

10 

58 

Bucharest 

20 

48 

8 

44 

Budapest 

11 

64 

11 

52 

COPcubsssst 

13 

55 

8 

44 

Caste Del 5®t 

21 

82 

17 

43 

DabUn 

14 

57 

8 

44 

Edict ernrgb 

11 

52 

3 

37 

Florence 

27 

81 

14 

61 

Frunfclurt 

14 

57 

8 

46 

Geneva 

21 

70 

14 

57 

HeUtoki 

16 



41 

Istonbul 

23 

73 

14 

S7 

Las Palmas 

24 

75 



Lisbon 

22 

72 


57 

LcatfiSit 

17 

43 

9 

48 

KSBdrW 

38 

84 

13 

55 

Milan 

22 

73 

17 

41 

MOSCOW 

16 

61 

14 

57 

Munich 

18 

44 

B 


Nice 

21 

73 

15 

59 

Oslo 

ra 

44 

B 


Pari* 

19 

44 

9 

49 

Premie 

17 

43 

9 

41 

Rrvklavllc 

10 

50 

5 

41 

Rime 

25 

77 

14 

57 

Stock hotns 

13 

55 

4 

43 

Strasbourg 

17 

41 

11 

S3 

Venice 

22 

72 

16 

61 

Vienna 

16 

61 

9 

a 

Warsaw 

17 

43 

10 

50 

Zurich 

17 

43 

12 

54 

MIDDLE 

EAST 




ASIA 


Bona task 

Benin* 

Han* Kan* 

Manna 

Now Delhi 

Scad 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


HIGH 
C F 

31 BS 
27 It 
30 M 

33 90 
39 102 

34 79 
37 81 

32 90 
26 79 
17 43 


LOW 
C F 


34 79 r 

19 44 O 

34 79 Cl 

34 75 d 

37 81 fr 

17 43 <r 

19 44 fr 

34 79 cl 

34 75 r 

« SI 91 


01 


AFRICA 


Ala tan 
Cairo 

Capa Town 


Harare 

Loom 

MaireM 

Tonis 


34 93 IS S9 

33 9D 93 73 
17 43 II S3 

34 75 19 44 

31 70 8 44 


— — — — no 


77 11 S3 
91 14 41 


LATIN AMERICA 


Buanas Aim 17 43 4 

Caracas 3S 77 20 

Lima 23 73 14 

M»xlco City 34 79 14 

Ms da Janeiro 34 73 14 


39 fr 
41 r 
57 d 
37 Cl 
41 lr 


NORTH AMERICA 


An choreas 
Atlanta 


Babul 

Damascus 

Tel Aviv 


33 71 10 SO d 

— — — — no 

14 97 17 43 lr 

27 81 10 44 lr 

X » 19 44 ir 


OCEANIA 


Auckland It 61 11 S3 cl 

Sydney it 41 1 <1 u 

d-ctoudv; fo-loggv. Ir-lwr: n-hail-' 
uvuv-cfs. so-inow: sl-stormr. 


CMcoaa 

Daavar 

Detroit 

Haaolula 

Houston 

Las A metes 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Montreal 

Nassau 
Now York 
San Francisco 
Seattle 
Taranto 
wash! naton 


n-avarcnsl; pc-oarHv 


57 8 

77 14 
73 11 
7* 5 

84 II 
64 s 
84 33 
88 19 
B4 18 
80 34 
73 7 

57 t 
88 34 
48 11 
73 1« 
48 13 
SS 9 
75 9 

clouavi 


44 r 
57 fr 

53 PC 
41 lr 
52 fr 
41 PC 
73 fr 
44 PC 

44 Cl 
73 ST 

45 fr 
41 Cl 
75 d 
SS PC 
St fr 

54 Cl 
48 d 
48 fr 
r-roln: 


FBIDAY-S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Smooth. FRANKFURT: OouOv Temp. 
14 - 10 161 - SOI LONDON: ctovffv. Temp. 14 -8 ui -«). Madrid; % & 
Temp 29-14 1B4 — 57) NEW YORK: Fair. T*ma 23 - 1 1 172-- S3), PARIS: 
Fair Temp 30— 10148 — 501. ROME: Fair. Temp. 27 — I4IB1 — S7). TELAWIV: 
fair. Temp. — 19 188 — Ml ZURICH: Cloudy. Temp. 16 — 11 (61— S3). 
BANGKOK: Thunderstorms Temp H-JJ 191—811. MONO KONG: Ooud*. 
J"T D ”~ 3S ,B *~ 77 > MANILA: Thunders forms. Temp. 33 — ZS (91—77). 

: Showers Temp. 34- 17 (79 -411. SINGAPORE: Fair. Ttivo. II -26 
188 — 79). TOKYO: Roln. Temo It — 17(44 — 43). 


W)rid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse June 13 

Casing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Anon 

AKZO 

AhoM 

AMEV 

A 'Dam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buohrmunn T 

Co kmc Hidu 

Elsevier -NOU 
Fokkar 
Gist Brocades 
Helnekrn 
Haaaooens 
KLM 


HOI Nedder 

Nedllovd 

Oce Vender G 

Pakhoed 

Philips 

Robeco 

Rodomeo 

Rotinco 

Rarenfo 

Royal Du fen 

Unilever 

Van Om moron 

VMF Stork 

VNU 


449 45X50 
210 214 

197 JO 19950 

108.10 11030 
239-10 23X50 
245.90 34ItSB 

830 850 

78J0 7930 

20030 3)1 

92J0 9X10 
M 9t1 3*40 

121 12170 
T2730 128JO 
18630 187 JO 
MUD 149 JO 

40.10 6140 
6130 4330 

47.10 48J0 

4520 66.10 

14OJ0 143 

31950 32X40 
61 43 

51. 10 5420 

7X40 75.70 

141.10 1 40.70 
49.40 49-70 

4420 44.10 
19030 191 A0 
344A0 347 

2830 *170 

194 19650 
19930 205 


ANP.CBS Gen era l Index : 308J1 
Previous : 11U0 


Close Prev 


Hoesdi 
Horten 
Mussel 
IWKA 
Kail + Sate 
Karsladt 
Koultaof 
Kloockner h-D 
Ktoecfcncr Werfce 
Kruan Stahl 
Unde 
Lufthansa 
.MAN 

Mannesmcm 

Mjtench Rueck 

Nixdarr 

PKI 

Porsche 

Preussu* 

PWA 

RWE 

Rheinmeloll 

Sdartnt 

SEL 

Slemons 

Thvssen 

Veba 

VBitem mmm k 



Hive Id Stoat 




■ill 

Kloof 




180 

Nedbank 



283 

284 

Pres 5leyn 




340 

Rimikrt 



240 

264 




22150 

230 

St Helena 





5asol 



257 

241 
71 JO 
104 
483 
199 
158 
182 
1749 

West Holding 

5800 

5750 

104 

<73 

199 

Composite Stock index : 109380 
Previous : 199U* 

17760 

1800 

i Landau 

Z] 


Wo I la 


587 593J0 

1270 1290 

27X50 27X50 

145.10 14930 

IT* 1 49 JO 
305 305 

. 477 478J0 
3S5J0 3S9JO 
S48 57X50 
11X50 11X50 
20250 304JD 

275.10 379.90 

588 594 


Commentxmk l.„ 
Previous : 138X30 


iMtex : unjo 


I »«gKM« | 


Artwd 
Bekaert 
Cock drill 
Cobena 
EBES 

GB-limo-BIW 

GBL 

Gnaan 

Hanot en 

IntoroMn 

Kredlelbank 

Petrol ina 

Sac Generale 

Sahna 

Solvay 

Trocftan Elee 
UCB 

unora 

Vtellle Mantoone 


1695 1490 

6040 4040 


m M 


3165 

3005 XI5 
3480 3480 
1870 1885 
3870 3755 
SSI0 5520 

mo S3 

S9M 5990 
1885 1930 
7300 7380 
4400 4590 
3850 3870 
5300 £300 
169S 1490 

6900 4950 


Currant Stock Index : 
P rav to u i : 233443 


>34X27 


Frankfurt 


A EG- Telefun ken 

Amaru Vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Bayer 

Bov Hvoo Bank 
Bo^VerntnstxmV 

DHF-Bonk 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Cant Gumml 
Dalmler-Baiu 
Ocousm 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bmk 
Orasdnwr Hank . 
GHH 

Haraener 

Haetifief 


131 

1380 

344 

2TX5D 
23X70 
333 
372 
215JO 
315 
*14 
197 JO 
'4X20 
817 

345 

. 155 
S44J0 
221 JO 
154 
3*9 
940 


136 

1397 

344 

72750 

23250 

344 

379 

2T2J0 

318 

421 

203J0 

14850 


341 


227 30 

I CC <31 


334 

560 


Bk East Asia 
aieuna Kona 

China Light 
Green Island 
Mono Seng Sank 
H enderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 

mk Sima bm 

HK Telephone 
HK Ypumaiet 
HK Whorl 
Mutch Whampoa 
Hrsan 
inn City 
JanMna 
JanJlne Sec 
Kosrioon Malar 
Miramor Hotel 
New World 
Orfeiit Overseas 
SMK Praps 
SMut 

Swire Pad lie A 
Tal Cheung 

Wah Kwong 

Wtwetodi A 
Wlna On Co 
Wlnsor 
World Ml 


2240 23 

15J0 1140 
1480 15 

&30 X30 
44 465Q 
1.92 L96 

9.95 1IUO 
7 JO 7 JO 
11 11J0 


Claw Prev 


AACarp 
All had- Lyons 
Anglo Am Gold 
Ass Brit foods 
ass Dairies 

Bardavs 


BAT. 


34 

35 

£35 

535 

7M 

760 

9X50 

9550 

360 

333 

580 

6 

2130 

23.18 

054 

BJ5 

on 

079 

1090 

17 

1090 

ID. 90 

030 

860 

34 

M 

6JD 

6M 


2.10 X125 
HUB 1X90 
2575 7575 
2IJ0 21 JO 
158 IJ4 
1 JS 1 JS 
7JS 7 JO 
1.9S 2 

4J0 X95 
157 1J8 


Hawo Seng laaex : 
Previous : 154254 


148251 


4ah 


fdonryc 


AECl 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am Gold 
Barlows 

Blwoor 

Bullels 
De Bears 
Drlehmlein 
Elands 

GFSA 


785 tOO 
2835 2840 
1 7300 17000 
1200 1200 
1280 127S 
7250 7300 
1025 1020 
472S 4725 
1700 1700 
3075 3100 

2585 2590 


BICC 
BL 

Blue Circte 
HOC Group 
Boots 

Bawater Indus 
BP 

Brit Home Sf 
Brit Telecom 
Brtt Aerospace 
Britall 

BTR 
Bunrafi 
Cable Wireless 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Cans 
Commercial U 
ConsGaW 
Court au Ids 
Datoefv 
De Beer>< 
Distillers 
Driafanfein 
Fteans 
Free SI Ged 
GEC 

Gan Acc Idem 

GKN 

Glaxo C 

Grand MM 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

imperial Group 

Jaguar 

Land Securi lies 
Legal General 
Ltovds Bank 
Lanrha 

Lucas 

Marks and So 
Metal Bax 
Midland Bank 

ttal west Bceik 

P and O 

Pt Ik melon 

Plessev 

prudential 

RaaH Elect 

Randtomekt 

Rank 

Reed in 1 

Reiners 

Roval Dutch c 

RTZ 

SaatclU 

5amsbury 

Sears Holdings 

Shell 

STC 


S14M| 514 ‘A 

197 J97 

»8gi SBSki 

220 , 

154 158 

374 37V 

544 547 

318 323 

340 

223 220 

XI 33 

SS S2 

297 298 

IS 18f 

273 284 

521 525 

289 294 

IS 183 

373 371 

713 2U 

341 348 

2 S 2 S- 

532 530 

140 143 

1 “ IS? 

35 S 

13? « 

SIS “ 

787 291 

5734k S23kfc 
„34* 353 

Wh 124kk 
174 172 

414 421 

234 233 

13 57321313/44 
293 1_ 

716 720 

274 273 

M » 

435 433 

IS ® 

185 189 

as s 7 

290 294 

7*4 754 

587 577 

148 170 

318 315 

128 133 

440 448 

22 359 

AJ9 664 

£! SI 

zaa aw 

707 714 

178 I7» 

VUV. SM'li 

340 338 

434 449 

355 359 

43H.43S3/44 
572 577 

715 72S 

J Ii J 1 * 

90 93l*i 

490 485 

144 144 


5M Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tale and Lyle 
Teeca 
Thorn EMI 
TJ. Group 
Trafalgar Hse 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilevers 
untied Biscuits 
vtefeers 
Wool worm 



FT. 38 index : 977 JM 
pravkHH : fttAO 
F.Ti-EJOe index : 1278J0 
Prevtoas : 129M8 


HfitaB 


Banco Comm 

Centrota 

CHtohotels 

credlfal 

ErWanla 

Farmllalla 

Flat, 

PbaMer 

Generali 

IFI 

Hawementl 

Itolgos 

ItafnWbUiOTl 


713Sa 21500 
3 475 3409 

3SJ SIS 

2270 2300 
70180 HOOD 
13900 14340 
.3370 3430 


Medlobaico 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

pirein 

RAS 

Rinascento 

SIP 

SME 

smo 

Stenda 

SteT 


49290 49300 
8259 8379 
94300 95400 
1474 1489 

ICTtfltl 843SD 

110000 1099S) 
• 1889 1921 

030 4799 
2420 2185 

71500 73000 

870 874 

3239 2250 
1448 IST1 
3405 3450 
19300 17440 
3225 3215 


4MB Currant ledcx : 1410 
Previous : Hit 


Farb 


Air U Guide 

669 

655 


319J0 317JI 

Av Dassault 



Bancaira 

645 


BIC 

550 


Bangroin 

1970 

1971 

Bouvaues 

BSNriSD 

■05 

2528 

821 

2(00 

Corretour 

2150 

2145 

Charpeurs 

588 

515 

Chib Mss! 

515 


Oortv 

1388 

1388 




Eir-AOultoine 

2)4 


Europe 1 

827 





Hachette 

1901 


Lafarge Cop 

541 


Legnmd 

2275 

2285 

LesleiK 

740 


TOreal 

2431 

2631 


1750 

1755 

MOTTO 



Merlin 



Michel In 

1017 


Moot Hetmessy 

1941 

2000 




Occ toon tale 






Perrier 

541 





Peugool 



Prlntemas 



tadMKhn 



Redouta 






SanofJ 

718 


Skis RHSigAal 

1541 

UN 

Telemecon 



Thomson C5F . 

517 

537 

AaeK indetr ; 2I7J2 


previous : 228.18 

CAC Index : 2247b 
Prerlam : 23MD 




Cold Storage 249 151 

DBS . 4 6JH 

Fraser Neave 5.15 525 

324 225 

228 238 

550 6 

9 9^® 

XW 118 
2JH JJO 
220 220 
157 2 

280 280 
6JJ5 4.10 
LOB 1j09 
4A2 4X4 

186 U 8 

4.12 ill 


Haw Par 
Inchcape 
Mol Bonking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

Shangri-la 
Sime Darby 
Stoore Land 
Stoore Press 
S Steamship 
St Trading - 
Untied Overseas 
(JOB 


Straits TMMilad index : 77122 
7T7J7 







Alta Laval 

18? 

1*4 

Nissan 

630 


335 

337 

Nomura Sec 

1178 

Astra 

392 

385 

Olympus 

rwo 

Atlas Copco 

104 

ns 

Pioneer 

I860 

Bollaen 

ISO 

in 

RiCOh 

MO 


261 

262 

Shorn 








390 

385 


810 






Pharmacia 

183 

MI6 

Soml anuk 

1870 

Soefe-Scanki 

390 

N.O. 

Sum Kama Chem 

261 






Skanska 

87 

S7J 

Sumitomo Metal 

155 

SKF 

201 

203 

TateeiCarp 

253 

SwedbhMalCh 

199 

198 

Taisho Morfaie 

583 

Volvo 

210 

205 

TakedaCncm 

870 

Affw&vufrtaen 

Index : 367 JO 

Teflln 

447 




AO 

2A4 

248 

ANZ 

4.44 

452 

BHP 

A14 

A1B 

Borol 

338 

330 

BeuaainvUto 

2 

202 

Cosilernalne 

4j02 

5JM 

Coles 

X65 

365 

Comnlca 

2 

237 

CRA 

SJO 

534 

CSR 

US 

271 

Dutlaa 

X16 

2TB 

Elders Ixl 

238 

290 

res Australia 

. 138 

LS8 

Magellan 

NA 


MIM 

2-74 

238 

MW 

V97 

U* 

Hal Aast Btx* 

432 

4J8 

Mews Care 

7A0 

740 

N Broken Hill 

232 

235 

■ 1 -p - 

Mxioon 

360 

330 

Old Coal Trust 

L53 

1-59 

Santas 

5^46 

556 

Thomas Notion 

138 

130 

Western Mining 

330 

188 

Westpac Bonking 

4.T2 

430 I 

Woodskte 

1 -43 

145 


ah Onfinartes Index : 84700 
Previous : 8SU0 




Altai 

Asahl Chem 
ASMII Glass 
Bank ol Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

Tiyffn 

Cltoti 

Del Nippon Print 

Dalwa House 
Dam Sacurltha 


Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 


410 411 

990 1000 

899 via 

825 B3S 
548 534 

1140 1168 
1698 1610 
*35 430 

1170 1178 
662 661 
890 888 

7910 6030 
1420 1410 

IBIS MM 


■MMII Air unei 
Kaihna 
Konsal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 

Kvacera 
Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Etoc Works 
Mirsubtahl Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi caro 
Mitsui and Co 
Mlfsufcoshi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Mlkko 5«c 
N teaan Kagaku 
Ntaoi Oil 
Ntoaon Steel 


TO 

625 

1180 

1180 

1900 

958 


894 

734 

SIS 

4120 

1880 


no 

153 

250 

505 

845 


451 


Tokyo Marine 
Toppoti Printing 
Toruv ind 
Toshiba 
Tavato 

Yamakhi Sec 


911 

889 

440 

342 

1240 

761 


920 

870 

448 

372 

1210 

775 


IMdM/Dul. Index : U717.T4 
Previous : 1J70M1 
New Index : M9XH 
P revt eas ; UHA 


Adla 

Al usuis sc 

Autaatwe 
Bank Leu 
Brawn Bawtri 




Credit 

Etectrowatt 
Georg Flsriier 
Haiderbanlc 
intortuscaaal 
Jacob Suchard 
JaUnall 

UndbGtr 

Moevenpk* 

Nestle 

Oerllkan-B 

Roche Baby 

Sandaar 

ScMndfer 

Sutler 

SBC 

Sarvelllanco 

SwtssMr 

Serin Reinsurance 


Swiss VMksbank 
Union Bank 
WhHeribur 
Zurich ins 


2978 2990 
802 807 

M75 &S® 
3775 3750 
1774 1750 
3155 3200 
2450 2675 
2770 2785 
876 871 

740 740 

2340 2230 
4070 4078 
2250 2250 
1825 1830 

4350 4375 
6180 (070 
1540 1548 
9075 9250 
1390 1480 
4325 4350 
377 IBS 
408 408 

3945 2995 
1175 1180 
1990 1995 
16M 1460 
J97S 3970 
SOSO 5075 
3150 2270 


SBC Index : 4MJ9 
Previous : 446.19 


wtritabtei xd: n-dhridend. 


CeawtSan sOxks via AP 


Jfloh Law Close Ot^e 


100 AaralndA 
5845 Aft Ei 



3500 C Nor West 
ancpackrs 
34717COO Trusl 
MDOCTuna 
ISO CGE 
42731 Cl He Cbm 
no Obi Nat Res 
329419 CTIreAf 
260CUHIB 
T2U0 Cora 
1312 Ce tones# 
7MCantriTr 
31780 ClnepVtk 
4050C Dlstb A 
13090 CD tstb B t 

195BCTL Bank 
1346 Co n in n I i s 
loocanwesf A 
15300 CoeekaR 
300 Conran A 
USSCrawnx 
15400 Cw Res 
15245 Dam Dev 
10740 Denison A P 
9260 Denison Bf 
3000 Devgtam 
«>CTDlcknsnAl 
30000 Dlcknsn B 
IKK Daman A 
37792 Dnfancp 
Bn DuPont A 
109*0 Dylex A 
iHOEtcthanX 
VOO Emco 
9250 Etoiity Svr 
1450C FolcanC 

^Ftoibrdge 

200 Fed ina a 
12800 F City Fin 
34000 GendlsA 
4900 Geac Coma 

laeGoldcoraf 
300Gaadvaar 
„^OL Forest 

T I25fi , S vt, w> 

1573HGraua A 
SMOHrdtogAI 

215m Hawker 
7SM Haws D 

arao Hoes inti 
,«S,HBavCo 
15735 Imogen 
WOlndol 
12 1 nulls 
2305 inland Gas 
124100 ImtThonT 
3034 Inter Pipe 

846 1 vacs B 
fttOJonhack 
1400 Ketxev H 
2DW Karr Ada 
12M7 Lobatt 

447ULacMnrli 

3"g{-°MCem 

iSOOLocana 

wlllS 


518* 18* 18* 

*14 15 16 

SISk 15k, 15% 

_M l S» ST*+ Vk 
5191k 191* 1W4— Vk 
S15J(i 15*7 15ft 
*22ft 2214 2214+ ft 
5251* 25ft ZH,+ ft 
*1714 17ft 1714+ ft 
Sim lift lift +lft 
J91b 9 V — ft 
S3H4 31ft 31ft + ft 
S» Sp 5ft— ft 
*1314 Oft 13ft— ft 
133 138 133 + 1 

117ft 17ft 17ft+ ft 
395 385 390 -5 

490 465 490 +10 

XlVft. W14 19ft 
S * 9 + ft 

19 Bft 9 + ft 
245 20 243 — Z 

323ft 23ft 2314— ft 
TOft 12ft 12ft— ft 
*3716 31 31 — ft 

«6ft 16ft 16ft— ft 
Sim 15ft 15ft— ft 

Sf 1 ISi 15^— Vk 

*25 24ft 25 
S22U 22 22 

» -ft 

H7ft 37ft 37ft 
22 Uft 12ft 
*70 JO 70 +2V5 

*35 34ft 34ft 
38 28 29 

SlOft 10 lOft+ft 

ass hs ,W| 

*J«k 1« 14ft 
S7ft 714 7ft— ft 
*7J* 13ft 1 Jto 
*8ft *1 h 8ft 

SS s % 

*8ft Bft a ft + ft 
310 2SS 300 +ta 

22« ’7ft 12ft- i 

*» 19ft 19ft— ft 
170 165 148 — a 

410 405 4)0 +S 

S14 sa 4 7 ft + ^ 

^“■23S W 23^+10 
M4ft aft aft 0 
]7ft 17ft— ft 
SP* « « -VI 

*l»ft 1814 19ft + w 

57 6^1 7 4- u 

!!?■ ,8 ft 

*i3ft m. 13V. 4 . ft 
S* « ”9ft+ ft 

&-'• 
SSt 2 !. ft 

«4ft 24ft 24ft— ft 
W Bft gft 

’Sft ’Sft- ft 

IB 

Bjsar s 

Sf* T v. 

16ft left— 

Wt 77ft— ft 


l 


gy* §* ifisr 

541 40 «hi 


2700/ 

40001 


HSSLOWOWCO 
4700 LumMlICS 
12DOMDSH A 
6300 MICC 
78700 Melon HX 
3400 Meriond E 
9680 Motion A f 
900 Motion B 
— i Murphy 
HobKcoL 

Norxmda 

Narom 

mj, HvQ AIIAf 
5050 NtnHCO W 
12814 NuWeV SP A 
14 Oakwood 
455D Oshawa A < 
6570 Poc W Alrtn 
lOOPumaur 
2270 PonCan P 
M0 Pembina 
4300 Phon/x Oil 
300 Pine Point 
j^£tac*GOa 
77200 Placer 
1440 Pravhto 
«Q4QueSturao 
180 Ram Pet 


OB* 20ft 20ft 

* 21 ft 21 ft 2 T 1 k 

- 

So Jf 

S17ft 17 
*I7ft 17ft 


18ft ft 

« -5 

4D0 

wr* 


gift 21ft 21ft +lft 


C7ft 27ft 

SUft 15 

S6ft Oft 
S19V. 19ft 
45 43ft 
S81b Sft , 

SSOft 29H. 2914— 1 

131*+ ft 

7ft + ft 


ft 

151h+ ft 
15 — H 
61k 

Wk- ft 
45 + 1 
8ft- ft 


300 RoyrOCk I 

DRedootEs 


45e0kcanqnj 
35070 Rd sienhs A 
RoaersA 
3790 Roman 
610 RaJ I unun 
14940 Seeptra 
,1150 Scans 1 
1TOT9 Sears Can 
17119 Shell Con 
89T7Sherrltt 
W0 Slater B I 
3«a Southm 

54®S 51 Brwfcst 

30467 Stolco A 
MOOSulptro 
344W Sydney O 

.1500 Tecx Car A 
35728 Teck B 1 

16175 Thom N A 
■0221 Tor Dm Bk 
Tartar Bf 


S13ft 13ft 

833 ft 321k 

s iSS « 

^ ”5 

S7H 714 
S12ft 12 
527 ft 2 | 

Stoft link 

— 

Vl/v, Ck 37\k 
S'* 5ft— 
Sgjft 27ft Z7ft— 


ft 


JM*- ft 

8ft— U 

- 

'Ut 

345 

ft 

12 . — ft 
21ft + ft 
10!k— ft 
ft 


soft 

J25ft 
S7ft 7 


2484 Traders A f 

rttsMf 


•0700 TntSw- 
,{?* Trtniry Res 
UJOTrnAliouA 
W070 TrCon PL 
37664 Trlmoc 
7915 Triton A 
MOOTrhec Af 
95900 Turaol 
TCOUMcerpAf 
8492 U Entprise 
1202 U Kano 
1 UStscne 
5100 Venn A 1 

200 Vmgran 
poowesHorio 
5454 Wes! min 
210 Weston 
31444 WoodwdA 

2300 Tk Bear 

Taiol soles 


25ft 2SdiS 

s|w m ft 

gft Mft 

29ft 30 +1 
89—3 

31ft— ft 

vs? 3L — ^ 

Sft 22ft— ''i 
25ft 25Vj+ ft 


13ft 

13ft 


» 

92 89 

SI 3ft 
*l3ft 
nift 31ft 
*21ft 20ft 
*23 

*25W 

*?2ft 22ft 22ft 

512ft lift |)»fc 



'»-2m3*79Ik5Js 


TSE 308 Index: 


Close 
2699 JO 


2.789.10 


Wwiwa I June 13 


IMIS Bank Mont 
VS™ Can Both 
JM9DomTxlA 
MOOMntTrst 
CttSHalBkCdg 

? SI sar* 

•ilsMik 

,560 RovTr ilea 
Total Sotos 1087644 sh^aL 


Htgh Low Close Chge 
S2t'k 29ft 29ft— 


116 16 14 *-.V% 

J!5|! toft id- Mi* 

*]4ft uft taflrv: 


no 19ft 2D + v* 

SIM* 18ft I 8 V 1 

w 25 » +» 

» 20*. + ft 

*30 L# 30 39 — U 

S21ft 214* 211V— ft 
*40ft 40*« 40ft- W 


■hduHriab Inin: 


Ctose Pravtoas 
11234 11337 




[jfl/i- 


SC0REB0 


’ftrtiiii—ti.:’ • !: r 


U’U* 

-V 


••.1 


tun* 

il r; v».- 


Ts.»f 

*«» • r 

•J* 

■W .• 

*T. : 


i.xi 


"nil 

C.L4— 

v.,~ 

?.V=T 4 

Vft 

QiOnu 

Ptfle 
*k- » 





^' 4 ^, 

,* 1 1 t/fm 
>L. , ' 


f- : 

t. . 


-ir , 

■■X.. 




fe- 




v 



V. 








? A 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE- SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


Page 19 


SPORTS 


Chiefs Crown, Once Vulnerable, Putts Away from the Pack to Become Derby Favorite 


No.) J 

A 


By Steven Gist 

New York Tuna Seme* 

LOUISYILl.E, Kentucky - Last 
week. Chiefs Crown looked like one of 
at least half a dozen colts with about 
u eqnal fiances of winning ihe lllthKen- 
lucky Derby Saturday, and most of the 
racing world considered him a vulnera- 
ble favorite. 

Now he is the strongest Derby favorite 
m six years and a legitimate aspirant for 
a sweep of the Triple Crown. 

It took the small, bay-colored colt one 
nunute 47 3/5 seconds to change the 
Derby picture — his running timg in the 
Blue Grass Stakes on April 25. He bad 
been expected to win the race easily, but 
not to run in sizzling time or to get 
stronger with every furlong, running his 
last splits faster than bis early ones. 

_ Suddenly, instead of bong a profes- 
v sional little colt who had racked up vic- 
r^ijries without r unning much faster or 
' ‘ more impressively than his Derby rivals, 
he was something really special. It was as 


if he had finally justified his record and 
reputation, and exceeded iL 

A headline in The Louisville Tunes the 
day after read: “Now, disbelievers, kind- 
ly get off The Chiefs back. 

While the revisionist view of Chiefs 
Crown is probably closer to the truth 
than the cloud of doubt under which he 
had raced until the Blue Grass, the Der- 
by is still no walkover. What bad looked 
like the worst crop of 3-year-olds in a 
decade is beginning to blossom, and 
Chiefs Crown still has a few things to 
prove. He is bettable at odds of 9 to 5, 
but not unbeatable. 

About the only people who were nei- 
ther surprised nor impressed fay Chiefs 
Crown's Blue Grass were those closest to 
him, the trainer Roger Laurin and the 
jockey Donald Mac Beth. 

“With his breeding and the way he 
acted in the mornings, I knew he was a 
good colt," Laurin said. “But I had no 
way of knowing he could be a champion 
until he'd been to the races a few times. 
The fust time he ran as a 2-year-okl, 


there was a fast horse in the race who 
won by nine and another horse threw his 
rider, got loose and bothered this edi 
The tune after that, he took awhile to get 
settled on the track and then he closed 
big to get second.” 

Since that defeat. Chiefs Crown has 
won 9 of 10 starts. He went to tbe front 
to win a maiden race at Belmont by five 
lengths July 5. then won tbe two premier 
2-year-old stakes at tbe Saratoga meet- 
ing. the Saratoga Special and the Hope- 
fuL In both of those starts he came from 
slightly off the pace; turned in a strong 
l3te run and won going along. 

He then went into the fall season, in 
which champio nships are won. and lost, 
as the premier 2-year-old in the East. IBs 
next start proved to be bis only defeat in 
the past 10 months, but it was also the 
race that convinced laurin just how 
good the colt might be. It was the Futuri- 
ty at Belmont, and the track was sloppy. 
Chiefs Crown broke sharply but then 
began dropping back steadily. MacBeth 
could teQ that the colt hated the track. 


and swung Mm to the far outside to 
avoid (be slop being kicked back in tbe 
face. 

“Thai he began running, picking off 
those horses one by one ukc be didn't 
want to lose." MacBeth said. “It really 
showed a character.” 

The coll fell a length short of catching 
Spectacular Love, but he had been more 
impressive than ever before, and be has 
not lost since. He came back to drown a 
weak Cowdin field by six lengths. 

Chiefs Crown struggled a bit to win 
tbe Norfolk at Santa Anita, but was dead 
sharp for tbe Breeder's Cup race, bulling 
his way through a large Geld to score 
over Tank's Prospect and Spend A Buck, 
two Derby rivals. 

He was almost a unanimous selection 
as the champion 2 -year-old, but there 
were doubts about how he would fare at 
3. He had never run an impressive time 
and his one race around two turns, tbe 
Norfolk, bad been his weakest 

There was also the virus in January. A 
Hlv in La min’s barn wbo caught tbe 


same bug died, but Chiefs Crown recov- 
ered after missing three weeks of train- 
ing. 

Laurin now thfnlrc it may have been a 
blessing. Chiefs Crown got a late start, 
delaying his debut until the Swale Stakes 
Marcbi but he is coming into the Derby 
fresher than many of his rivals. Laurin 
thinks the ooit is peaking at just the right 
time. 

His races this year support that the- 
ory. In tbe Swale, he dm not have to 
work bard to beat a moderate Field going 
seven furlongs. He ran back four weeks 
iar»»r in the Flamingo. He was disquali- 
fied and placed second for possible in- 
terference in a call so controversial that 
the decision was reversed 10 days later. 

Then earne the life-mile Blue Grass, in 
which the colt again went to the front, 
and instead of drifting and tiring he got 
stronger, as if he were fitter and improv- 
ing. The time of 1:47 3/5 was only one- 
fifth off tbe trade record. 

“It was about what we expected,” 
Laurin said. “It wasn't a big jump up or 


much different from his other ra c es. Hrfs 
won five in a row. He just keeps on 
winning.” 

The one thing he has missed this year 
is real competition or any adversity of 
any kind. Although all his victories last 
year were earned from off the pace, this 
year he has found on the lead 

without a straw in Ms path every time. 

“That's just coincidence,'' Innrin 
said. “We never wanted the lead. When 
(hey Stop running such slow fractions, 
we’ll stop being on tbe lead- 1 can't see 
Mm being in front all the way Saturday.” 

That is indeed unlikely with one-di- 
mensional front-runners such as Eianal 
Prince and Spend A Buck in the race. 
Chiefs Crown figures to be slightly off 
their pace »nd then to make his move on 
tbe far turn, slightly before the cavalry of 
stretch runners, led by Proud Truth, 
Rhoman Rule and Tank’s Prospect, be- 
gins to charge. If the colt finds hnnseff in 
dose quarters, w31 he be able to pod 
away? 


“Sire,” Laurin says. “He does what- 
ever be has to do to win.” 

John Vtitch, who trains Proud Truth, 
the likely second choice, said. “Horses 
run full tilt 99 percent of the time. People 
talk about how horses could win by more 
if they were pressed, or how they do just 
barely enough to win. I don’t buy the 
idea of horses figuring out the minimum 
they have to do to wm and then doing 
only that.” 

Veitcfa gels an argument on that score 
from Eddie Sweat, Chiefs Crown’s 
groom. Sweat knows a tittle about what 
u takes to win a Derby, having been die 
groom for Riva Ridge and Secretariat, 
who won the Derby in 1972 and 1973 
while working for die trainer Ludcn 
Laurin, Roger's father. 

“This colt is no Secretariat.” Sweat 
says, “but he’s a lot like Riva Ridge. He 
acts just Tj k p htm l eats hrm i sa me 
personality. He’s a smart, quiet horse, all 
business when he goes to uie races. He's 


gpt what it takes to win races and he can 
win tbe Derby.” 


Nordiques, in Overtime, 
Win Rattle of Quebec 


United Press International 

MONTREAL — The Battle or 
t Quebec may have turned on one 
" i^oint — the Montreal fanariir»n< 
can’t beat the Quebec Nordiques in 
overtime. 

When P«er Stas toy scored at 
2:22 of overtime Thursday night, 
Quebec defeated Montreal 3-2, to 
advance to the Stanley Cup semifi- 
nals. In taking the Adams Division 

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 

championship series. 4-3, the Nor- 
i diques won three times in overtime. 

■ Quebec next meets the Philadd- 
! pbia Fivers in the best-of-seven 
Wales Conference finals. The Nor- 
diques will have the home-ice ad- 
vantage with Game 1 Sunday night 
. j/it the CoHsee. 

y _ The Nordiques have already won 
“provincial bragging rights for a 
a Vear. 

r “It won’t be tbe same feeling,” 
Quebec goalie Mario Gosselin said 
of the coming series against Phila- 
delphia. “About 90 percent of the 
people living in Quebec won’t fed 
as intense about it” 

“Both sides had chances,” Mon- 
t treal Coach Jacques Lemaire said. 

“We just didn't lake advantage of 
| ours. 

■ In five overtime playoff games 

I over three years, Montreal has yet 

L to defeat (Quebec. 

“Sometimes it seems as though 

C there’s no justice.” Stastny said. 
** Seven games and one mistake, 
and one team must lose. It’s too 
bad they both can’t win. but I'm 
AirSd r glad we came up winners.” 

*9“ Quebec rookie Bruce Bell 
opened the scoring at 3:27 of the 
Just period and Jean-Franco is 
Sauve gave Quebec a 2-0 lead at 
1:24 of the second period on a 50- 
foot slapshot. 


The Worst Way to Lose’: 
A’s Defeat Brewers, 5-4 


The Associated Press 

OAKLAND, California — It 
was a tough loss, and therefore an 
easy one for Milwaukee Brewers 
Manager George Bamberger to sec- 
ond-guess. 

“There couldn’t be a worse way 
■> jo lose,” he said after the Oakland 
A’s put together four two-out hits 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

in the bottom of (he ninth inning 
off Rollie Fingers and Ray Searage 
fora dramatic 5-4 victory Thursday 
that strapped a seven-game losing 
streak. 

Bamberger conceded that he 
might have marie a mistake when 
he lifted Fingers, the major leagues’ 
all-time save leader, after he had 
given up a two-out single to Bruce 
Boehte. 

Left-hander Ray Searage came 
in to face left-handed hitter Mike 
Davis, but the strategy backfired 
/gien Davis singled. Donnie. Hill 
followed with the game-tying single 
and Alfredo Griffin knocked in the 
winning run. 

“In the middle of the year, 1 
might not have taken Rome out,” 


Bamberger said. “Right now, 1 wish 
I'd have left him in. 

Red Sox 2, Mariners 1 
In Seattle, A1 Nipper and two 
relievos combined on a five-hitter 
and Rich Gedman cracked a home 
run to lead Boston over Seattle. 
Nipper held the Mariners scoreless 
until they punched across a run on 
Phil Bradley’s sacrifice fly in tbe 
eighth. Bob Ojeda and Bob Stanley 
finished up, with Stanley recording 
his fourth save. Gedman. the Bos- 
ton catcher, lined a homer off Seat- 
tle starter Mike Moore in the sec- 
ond. The Red Sox scored the 
winning run in the fourth on an 
RBI single by Jackie Gutierrez. 

Angels 3, Blue Jays 2 
In Anaheim, California. Juan 
Beniquez’s pinch single with two 
outs in the bottom of the ninth 
boosted California over Toronto. 
With the Blue Jays leading 2-1. 
Ruppert Jones led off with a single 
and took second on a sacrifice by 
Doug DeCmces. Reggie Jackson 
walked, and Rob Wiifong singled 
to score Jones with the tying run. 
Beniquez then singled home Jack- 
son for the game winner. 


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SPORTS BRIEFS 

Kite Takes Lead in PGA Tournament 

CARLSBAD, California (AP) — Tom Kite matched the course and 
tournament record with an S-undcr-par 64 and established a 4-stroke lead 
Thursday in the first round of tbe Tournament of Champions. 

Fuzzy Zoeller birdied the last two holes for a 68 and was second alone 
in the tournament, which brines together only the winners of PGA Tour 
events of the last 12 months. Greg Norman. Wayne Leri. Mark 
\ TcCumber and Lanny Wadkins were next at 69. 

Tulane Pulls Out of Sports Conference 

NEW ORLEANS f AP) — Tulane University withdrew from the Metro 
Conference on Thursday, bowing to the wishes of a league that did not 
want a member without a basketball program. 

Tulane's president, Eamon Kelly, canceled Tulane’s basketball pro- 
gram after allegations of point shaving and NCAA violations. At the 
same time, he said he would ask (he Metro to waive its rule requiring 
members to play men's basketball. The Metro Conference voted. 7-0, last 
week to ask Tulane to drop out rather than fighL expulsion. 

WBA Lightweight Bout Canceled 

.WEST PATERSON, New Jersey fUPI) — Livingstone Bramble's 
jrld Boxing Association lightweight title defense against Tyrone Craw- 
ley has been canceled because of a training injury to Bramble, promoter 
Dan Duva has announced. The bout, scheduled for May 26. has not been 
rescheduled. 

Bramble suffered a stress fracture of his left hand while sparring on 
Monday. Duva said, and has been advised to take al least six weeks or 
complete rest. 


Montreal scored at 7:23 of the 
second period when Pierre Mon- 
dou deflected Mats Nashind's wrist 
shot between Gosselin’s legs. Mon- 
treal struck again 10 minutes later 
when Naslund gpt the rebound off 
a blue-line wrist shot by Montreal's 
Larry Robinson. 

In overtime, after Montreal goal- 
ie Steve P&nney stopped Pat Price’s 
slapshot from the point and stunt- 
ed Stastny on the initial rebound, 
Stastny lifted the second rebound 
over the sprawled goalie. 

Gosselin was injured after tbe 
6:00 mark of the second period 
when a slapshot by Mario Tremb- 
lay hit him on the chest Gosselin 
stayed in tbe game after laying on 
tbe ice 10 minutes. 

“We’re tired.” Stastny said. “It’s 
hard to get into the conference fin- 
als from our division. It’s question- 
able whether we have anything left 
for Philadelphia.” 

In the Campbell Conference fin- 
als. the defending champion Ed- 
monton Oilers have home-ice ad- 
vantage starting Saturday against 
tbe Chicago Black Hawks. The Oil- 
era have been idle since April 25, 
when they completed a four-game 
sweep of Winnipeg in the Smythe 
Division finals. Chicago clinched 
the Norris Division Tuesday 
against Minnesota, taking the se- 
ries, 4-2. 

The Oilers, rested and with great 
depth, are favored. But the Black 
Hawks have been stunning at times 
in the playoffs. - - 

Edmonton has (he more explo- 
sive offense. The teams, however, 
are well-matched on defense with 
Oiler Paul Coffey and Black Hawk 
Doug Wilson among the league’s 
best Chicago goalie Murray Ban- 
nerman has been streaky, while Ed- 
monton’s Grant Fuhr has been un- 
beatable. 




> i$.-V 


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Sgv-L ' • 

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The Canadians' Bob Gainey, right, and Nordiques' Paul Gillis up against the boards. 

Czechoslovakia Wins Gold in Hockey 


Canyiled by Oar Surf/ From Dispatches 

PRAGUE — Leftwinger Jiri 
Sqba turned from a relatively un- 
known player into a national hero 
Friday as he banged in a hat trick 
to give Czechoslovakia a 5-3 vic- 
tory over Canada, its first world ice 
hodtey title since 1977. 

In the game for the bronze med- 
al. the Soviet Union defeated the 
United States. 10-3, in a match 
ending that included one of the 
worst brawls ever at the interna- 
tional level all 44 players from 
both sides ending up on tbe ice. 

Sejba’s most stunning goal and 
the one that turned the game (o 
Czechoslovakia’s favor came at 
13:00 of the second period with the 
game tied 2-2 and the Canadians 
holding a one-man advantage. 
Sejba stole the puck from defense- 
man Larry Murphy, was chased 
down the rink by Scott Stevens, 
pivoted around him to break free. 


then skated in on goal lender Pat 
Riggin and deked him as wdL 

The Czechoslovakians, support- 
ed by a wild, flag-waving crowd of 
14.000, won all three medal-round 
games in the eight- learn tourna- 
ment. The key game was an emo- 
tional 2-1 victory over the defend- 
ing champion Soviet Union in the 
medal-round opener. Then, they 
trounced the United States. 1 1-2. 

Canada bas not won a world 
championship since 1961. 

In the U.S.-Soviel game, play 
was interrupted for several minute 
in the third period as players lashed 
out at anyone on the opposing 
team. Teammates ran on from the 
benches in support. 

The Soviet Union had earlier 
demonstrated its clear supremacy, 
leading 9-0 before the United 
States managed to score. 

“If anyone would have told me 
before the tournament that we 


would play the Russians for the 
bronze medal I would have consid- 
ered him crazy." said Art Berglund, 
general manager of the U.S. team. 
“Even fourth, we accomplished 
more here than we expected. We 
beat both gold medal contenders in 
the preliminaries. This was our best 
showing in a world championship 
for two decades.” 

On Thursday, Finland downed 
Sweden. 6-1. and West Germany 
defeated East Germany. 4-1, in the 
final games of the relegation play- 
offs. 

Sweden played a listless game to 
finish behind Finland for the first 
time in the history of the world 
championship. The Finns secured 
top spot in the relegation round, or 
fifth overall while Sweden finished 
sixth, its worst showing since 1937. 

West Germany finished seventh, 
and East Germany last {UP I. AP) 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Major League Leaders 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 



G 

AB 

R 

H 

Pet. 

Murohv All 

20 

74 

21 

30 

J9S 

Walling Hta 

19 

40 

11 

23 

383 

Herr SIL 

20 

74 

IJ 

28 

378 

V Hares Phi 

20 

75 

11 

27 

-340 

Orsulok Pit 

14 

45 

5 

14 

•354 

Walktcft Mon 

21 

78 

9 

27 

344 

Crux Hta 

21 

84 

11 

29 

437 

Dawson Man 

19 

75 

13 

25 

333 

Corcoran Phi 

19 

47 

4 

15 

319 

Hemondex NY 

19 

72 

8 

23 

319 


Ran: Murahy. Atlanta, 21; Kommlnsfc. At- 


Basketball 


NBA Playoffs 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Ballon M 28 34 21—117 

Damn IS 24 34 27—125 

Laimbeer 10-18 7-9 27. Thomas 9-18 7-10 28; 
D-Johnsan 11-19 5-4 27, Bird 9-20 7-7 25. Ra- 
bounds: Bos ion 58 (Bird 13); Detroit 54 
(Lcrimbeer 12). As»Wv. Boston X (Bird 81: 
Detroit 26 (Thomas id). 

Utah 34 32 22 21 4—123 

Denver 32 38 34 2$ 12—131 

English 11-23 4-5 24. Nort 9.16 6-8 24; Green 
IMS *4 2S. Oanfiev 8-17 4-8 70. Wilkins 9-24 2-3 
2a Rebo u nds: Utah 57 (Donllev 14); Denver 
64 (Lever 131. Assists: Utah 2 9 (Green 10); 
Denver 2B (Eng Inn 13). 

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS 
EASTERN 

(Boston leads series 2-11 
toerr S: Boston at Detroit 
Mav 8: Detroit at Boston 
4 -Mot 10: Boston at Detroit 
v-Moy 12: Detroit at Boston 

(PBIFoOetpntcj tracts series Ml 
Mav 3: MHwautoe ol Pnli-gdatphia 
Mav s: Milwaukee at Pnlioeeipnlo 
x-Mov 8: Philadelphia at Milwaukee 
■-May 10: Milwaukee ot Philadelphia 
•-Mav 12: pnhadetoma ot Milwaukee 

WESTERN 

ILA Lakers Moos series 2-41 
May 3; LA. Lakers ot Portland 
Mav 5: LA Lakers al Portion) 

■-Mav 7: Portland at t_A_ Lakers 
r-Mav 9: LA Lakers ot Portland 
»-Mov II: Portland at i_A. Lakers 

(Denver Mads series 24) 

MOV 4; Denver at U:an 
Mav S: Denver at Uran 
r-Mcrv t- yign al Denver 
■-Mov ?: penvgr at Utah 

■ -Mav II: Uton at Denver 


lolls. 17; Samuel. Ph Itadclphla. 1 3 ; Scndbera. 
Chicago. 14; 8 ore tied with 11 
RBI: Mwrphv. Atlanta, 32; C Davis. San 
Francisco. 14: Broofci Montreal. 15; G. WH- 
son. Philadelphia. 15: Herr. St. Louis. IS. 

Hits: Murphy. Atlanta. JO; Cruz. Houston, 
29; Herr, SI. Louis. 28; V. Havas. Philadelphia. 
27: waliocn. MantredL 27. 

Doubles: Wol Inch. Montreal 8; Murohv. ai- 
lonto. 7; 7 are tied with L 
Triple*: 12 ore tied with 1 
Homo Runs; M-urohv. Atlanta 10; Straw- 
berry. New York, 4; Dawson, Montreal, 5: E. 
Davis. Cincinnati. 4; Kennedy, San Diego, 4; 
MorsnaiL Los Angeles, A 
Stolen Bases: Coleman. SI. Louis. 12: Lo. 
Smith. Si. Louis. II: Dernier. Chicago. 8; Sam- 
uel. Philadelphia. 8; E. Davis. Cincinnati. 4; 
M Wilson, New York, 4: Raines. Montreal. A. 

PITCHING 

winning Per ce nta ge (2 decisions); 11 ere 
tied with 1300. 

Strflceouts: J. DeLeon. Pittsburgh. 42; Sola 
Cincinnati. 34; Valenzuela Los Angeles, 35; 
Gooden. New York. 34; Eckerslev, Chicago. 
31 

Saves: Gossoge. San Bleep, 4; Reardon. 
Montreal. 6; LeSmiltvOilCBoaS; Candelaria. 
Pittsburgh. 4: Sutter. Atlanta, a 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

G AB R H Pet. 
Franco Cle 20 73 14 28 J84 

Cowans See 11 II It 21 

Boctne Oak 21 40 t :i JSD 

Bemzrd CJe 18 S3 9 IS 440 

Baines Chi 11 77 11 U 38 

Whttoker D*» 17 AS 14 22 .333 

Grteti Cal 2) 41 IS 22 J2fi 

RJones Cal 18 « 9 13 425 

Puckett Mbi 21 96 II 31 J23 

Toiler CJe 21 SI B 24 J21 

Rons: MJ30VIS. Oakland. 23: Carew. Cali- 
fornia- 20. Murohv. Oakland. 18; Prtlls. Cali- 
fornia. 17; Cowms. Seattle. 14. Rice. Boston. 
16 

RBI: M.Ddvfs. Oak knuL 23: Armcs. Bmlcn. 
18: P.Brodlev. Seattle. 18: Brunanskv. Minne- 
sota. 17. Dempsey, Baltimore, 17; Puckett. 
Minnesota. 17. 

Hits: Puckett, Minnesota, jl: Carmens. 5eot- 
tie. 79: Franco. Cleveland. 28; Halclter. Min- 
nesota. 20 : boots. Beslan. 27. Wilson. Kansas 
City. 27 

Doubles: Gaetli. Minnesota. 8. Leman. Dc- 
rrad.a.- MotTlngty. New York, 7 • Orta. Kansas 
Cltv. 7; 7 ore lied with 6 
Triples: Wilson. Kansas CHr.S. Petrs. Cali- 
fornio. 3; Trammell. Delrali.J.Sare tied with 
2 

Home Nans: MOavls. Oakland. 9; Prate t. 
Seattle. 7: Armas. Boston, i: Srunonsk v. Min- 
nesota e; GThomas. Seattle. 6 
Stolen Bases: Colima. Oakland. 12; Pettis. 
Californio. 11; Mnebv. Toronto, a; Sheridan, 
Kansas Cltv. 6; Garda. Tor onto. 5; GrttHn. 
Oakland. S: Lew. Chicago. 5. 


PITCHING 

Whining Percentage (2 decisions)-. 11 ore 
tied with 1X00- 

Strfkeouts: Morris. Deiroit, 34: Clemens. 
Boston. 33; BotcL Boston. 30; Hough, Texas; 
29: Nlekra. New York. 27. 

Saves: j.HowelL Oakland. 6: Rig heftl, New 
York. 4: Caudill. Toronto, 5: WaddelL Cleve- 
land. 5: 4 are lied with 4. 

Thursday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Milwaukee 380 108 008-4 IT 8 

Oakland 280 811 002-5 I 2 

McClure. Kern 161. Fingers If). Searage CM 
and Maoro; Sutton. Atherton (0) and Heath, 
w— Atherton. 2-2 L— Searage. 0-3. hr— O ak - 
land. Kingman 151. 

Toronto 081 800 818-2 7 1 

Cantorota 000 180 003—3 4 8 

SHeta. Acker (91 and Whitt. MortlmK (8): 
5 1 at on. Clements (8) and Nan-on. Boone (8). 
W— Clements. 2-0. L— Stieb. 1-3. 

Boston 818 100 808-2 9 0 

Seattle 800 888 010—1 S 0 

Nipoer.oieda (Sl.Steniev (9) and Gedman; 
Moore. Best (4). vande Bora (8). Stanton C9> 
and Scott. W Nipper, I- 1, L Moore. 3-1 Sv— 
Stanley ( 4 ). HR— Boston. Gedman (21. 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. GB 

Baltimore 13 7 050 — 

Toronto 14 8 436 — 

Detroit 11 t 570 iv- 

• 10 12 .455 4 

Milwaukee 9 12 429 4ta 

Cleveland I 13 J8I SW 

New York 7 12 J6I SV» 

West Division 

California IS 1 40 - 

Minnesota 12 9 571 2 

Kansas Cltv II 9 550 2V4 

Chicago « » J* Jti 

Oakland 10 13 .435 S 

Seattle 10 13 ^35 5 

Texas M] jso w 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. G8 

Chicag o 13 6 Mi — 

New rork 12 7 A33 1 

Montreal 13 8 A19 I 

Philadelphia B 12 J00 5Vi 

SI. Louis I I) Al !H 

Pittsburgh 6 13 Jit 7 


Pistons Stifle Bird for Victory 




United Press International 

.DETROIT — Larry Bird was 
bdd lo 2 points in tbe fourth quar- 
ter while Terry Tyiez scored 16 of 
his 18 pants, carrying the Detroit 
Pistons to a 125-117 victory over 
the Boston Celtics in their Eastern 
Conference series. 

The Pistons trail 2-1 in the best- 
of-seven National Basketball Asso- 
ciation series. Game 4 is in Detroit 
Sunday. In Denver, in the other 
quarterfinal playoff pmn Thure- 

NBA PLAYOFFS 

day, the Nuggets defeated the Utah 
Jazz, 131-123, for a 2-0 series lead. 

On Friday night, the Milwaukee 
Bucks and the 76ers were in Phila- 
delphia and the Los Angeles Lak- 
ers and tbe Trail Blazers were at 
Portland. Tbe 76er$ and the Lakers 
both lead, 2-0, in their series. 

Bird, who stung Detroit for 42 
points in Game 2, did not make a 
field goal in the final period. His 
only points in the period came on a 
pair of free throws with 1:21 left — 
the Celtics’ last points. 

Tyler, a 6-foot-7 reserve forward, 
made the Pistons’ last eight baskets 
after scoring just two points in tbe 
first half ana none in the third. 

Center Bill Laimbeer led Detroit 
with 27 points while guard Isiah 
Thomas scored 26 and guard John 
Long 20. Dennis Johnson led Bos- 
ton with 27, including 15 in the 
third quarter. Bird bad 25 awd Ke- 
vin McHale 24. 

Detroit doubled up on tbe ball 
when possible with fresh players to 
try to contain Bird. Tyler and Kelly 
Tripucka did a goodjob of fronting 
the Celtics' forward, keeping the 
ball from bis hands. 

Detroit, which broke from a 62- 
62 halftime tie and never trailed in 
the second half, led 98-96 entering 
the final quarter. 

“I cherish every game we slay in 
contention.** said Tyler. “If we had 
lost this one; our backs would have 
been against the wall Sunday. We 
didn’t want to get swept.” 

Boston Coach K.G Jones had 
little trouble putting tbe game into 
its proper perspective. 

“we picked up the shovel and 
jumped in there with them — start- 
ed helping those people (fig our 
own grave” he said. “The playoffs 
aren't a matter of life and death — 
they’re more important than that.” 

Nuggets 13L Jazz 123 . 

Lafayette Lever scored 22 points 
and Wayne Cooper hit two critical 
baskets ra overtime to lift the Nug- 
gets past tbe Jazz. 

Game 3 of the Western Confer- 
ence series is Saturday at Utah. 




WWRWV ■ «• • -V. 

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The Amsiofad Press 

Boston’s Larry Bird grabs for bis own rebound after 
Detroit center Bill Laimbeer biodeed bis first attempt 


Kentucky Derby 


Son Dteoo 
Los Anoalos 
Houston 

AHan la 
Cincinnati 
Oan Francisco 


11 9 J50 — 

12 10 345 — 

11 10 314 Vi 

10 10 300 1 

10 II Alt H*i 

7 13 354 4 


The ftaM for Saturdays 1119b Kentucky 
Darby, wttfi post raHtton. bersel same, lock- 
er's wm» out odds: 

1. Irish Flower Dor 30-1 

2. Chiefs Crawn MocBetti W 

3. a- Rhoman Rule Vasauez 5-1 

«. Tank’s Prosoect Stevens 0-1 

S. o-Etsmol Pit nee Mfeflare 5-1 

4. Sleo ho n* s OdvsMV Phtcay 8-1 

7. Encolure Arctotn 30-1 

L I Am The Game McHaraue 30-t 

9. Floating Reserve Hawley 20-1 

10. Soond A Buck Cordero 4-1 

11. Prwid Truth VWasauez 9-2 

il Skywoixer Oetahoueeayo 12-1 

11 Fast Aecoiwi CMcCorron 20-1 

la— Brownell combs 1 1 -owned entry) 

Trainers (by sett pasmoel: I. Billy Bor- 
ders. 2. Roger Lourin. 2. Angel Persia. Jr. A D. 
Wayne Lukas. 5. John Lera in L, Jr. A Woody 
Stephens. 7. Tom Morgan. & Kina T. Leattwr- 
burv. 9. Joseati Moral. 10 l Cam GombohUL 11. 
John Veitctt 12. Mike Whlttlngham. 11 Patri- 
cia L. Johnson. 

Owners (brpootoasnion): 1. ircy Prater. 2. 
Star Crown Stable- X Brownell Combs 1 1 and 
others. 4. Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Klein. S. Brian 
j. HursL Goaras m. Slelnbrenner, Browned 
Combs 1 1 and John end Pouletta Past, k Hen- 
rvk deKwlatkawskl. 7. The estate of Fred Par* 
ter. A King T. Leatherbury. 9. Robert E. HiP- 
perl. 10. Huntar Form. 11. Darby Dan Farm. 

12. Oafc aiH stabta. aw. r. Hawn. 
Weights: 124 pounds eoch. Distance: U4 

miles. Parse: S5813SQ II 13 start. FTrsi place: 
M04300. Second Mace: SlOOXOa Third place: 
ssaooa. Foartb piece: SZU0Q. Pea time: 5:38 
pjn. EDT. 


PAST KENTUCKY DERBY WINNERS 
1875 — Arlstfdes 
1874 — Vagrant 
1877 — Baden Baden 
1078 — Day Star 

1879 — Lord Murphy 

1880 — Faroe 
mi — Hindoo 

1882 — Apollo 

1883 — Leanatus 

1884 — Buchanan 

1885 — joe Cotton 
1884 — Ben All 
18B7 — Montrose 

1888 — Macbeth M 

1889 — Spoka n e 

1890 — Rllev 

1891 — Klnemai 

1892 — Azro 

1893 — Lookout 
18*4 — Chant 
1895 — Hotma 
18*4 — Ben Brush 
18*7 — Typhoon II 
1B9S — Plaudit 
18*9 — Manuel 

1900 — Lieut. GKnon 
>901 — His EnMeice 


Denver held tbe Jazz scoreless 
(he final 3:30 of overtime, allowing 
them only 4 pants. . 

Utah had the last shot in regula- 
tion, but Darrell Griffith misrod a 
20-fom jumper with three seconds 
to play to send the game into over- 
time tied 11 W 19. 

Cooper then hit a pair of jumpers 
early in the overtime to give Denver 
a 125-121 lead. Jeff Wilkins made it 
125-123 with 3:30 to play blit tbe 
Jazz were unable to score again. 

Alex English bad 26 points and 
Calvin Nait 24 for Denver. Rickey 
Green scored 25 pants and Wil- 
kins and Adrian Dantley 20 each 
for the Jazz. Dantley scored only 6 
points after halftime. 


Horse Racing 


• Ahm-o-Oal* 

• Jude* Himes 

• Ehraad 

■ AMI* 

- Sir Huon 
•Pink star 

■ Stone Street 
’ W ln t ara raen 


“I think when you shoot 24 of 33 
from tiie foul Ime in a game that 
ends in a tie, you’re probably going 
to lose in overtime,” Jazz Coach 
Frank Layden said. 

“Anytime you give up 38 points 
in a single quarter [the second] on 
the road, you’re probably gong to 
lose,” he said. knew if we got 
into a game over 130 pants we 
were gomg to lose, because Denver 
plays that type of game better than 
we do.” 

Denver Coach Doug Moe said, 
“I don’t think we played with great 
intensity until we got down 1 10- 
103, and then we sawed 10 straight. 
From that pant on, I thought we 
played great.” ■ 


- Mertaan 

- worth 

- Doneran 
-Old Roeebad 

- Regret 

- Goora* Smith 

- Omar Khowam 

- Exterminator 

- Sir Barton 

- Paul Jonas 

- Behave yo utj o H 

- MorvtCb 
-Zev 

- Block Sold 

- Flv tag Ebony 

- Bubbflno Over 

- Whiskery 

- Ralgti Count 

- Clyde Van Damn 

- Gaftant Fox 

- Twenty Grand 

- Burgoo King 

- Brokers Tip 

- Cavalcade 

- Omano 

- Bald Vesture 

- war Admiral 

- Lawrtn 

- Johnstown 

- Galtahooton 

- Whlrtewav 

- Shut Out 

- Count Fleet 

- Pensive 

- Hoan, Jr. . 

- Assault 

- Jot Pool 

- Citation 

- Ponder 

- MWdiagroend • 

- Conor Turf 
. Hill Gail 

- Dark Star 

- Determ i ne 

- & WN 

- Needles 

- Iran Uaoo 

■ Tim Tam 

- Tomv Lea 

• Venetian Way 

■ Carry Back 

- Docklodir 

■ OtaNoueav 

■ Northern Dancer 

- Lucky Debonair 

■ Kauai Kino 

■ Proud dorian 
Forward Pass 

1 Malesrtc Prince 

■ Dust Cammaader 
Cdnonera tr 


- Riva Ridge 
-. Secretariat 

■ Cannonade 

- Foonsb Pleasure 
•Bold Fortes 

■ Seattle Slow 

• Affirmed 

1 Spectacular Bid 

- Genuine Risk 

■ Pleasant Colony 
Goto del sol 

■ Sonny's Haro 

■ Swale 


Hockey 
NHL Playoffs 

THURSDAY'S RESULT 

OM« — - 1 -1 8 l-J 

- M um re al 8 18 8-4 

Beit (2), Sauve (3), p. Master CO; Moadou 
(21. Nasttmd (71. Shots on goal i Quebec l Pen- 
ney) > 440—8; M ontreal (on Gossefln) 4 - 12 - 
04-44. 

. DIVISION FINALS .. 
Ad e msi 'Quebec wins stales 4 fl- 
Patrick: PtmadeMila wins' series '4-1 - . 
Norris: Chtaago wins series 44 
santtbos Edmonton wins series 44 


Tennis 


MEN'S CHAMPIONSHIPS' ' " 

'- (at Hamburg) 
QaarlmNalais 

Mots WDarter. SwMen, del. Gumerma vi- 
tas. Argentina. 4-14-0 - 

. Henrik Sundstrob. Sweden, dot AadrvsGo- 
mtL Ecuador, u. a-0 

Jaso-Luts Clera. Argentina, dot. Jan Gan- 
norsooa Sweden. 6-4, 4-2 - . 

MBastaV Modr, Cakhaslduakia def. Joo- 
klm Nvstram. Sweden. 4-£ u - 


Transition 


OAILLAND— Sent rim Conroy, olfoier. hj 
Tacoma of Nw Pacific Coast League. Placed 
Mfchor^n the isdov tOsabled 
HU. Coiled up Ttai Urtsb* ptteber. and hum 
Oaliraa. tetwder.' tram Tacoma. 

rORK^P|be*4 Rog-fiardenttiretn. 
(Wdor. on the 15-da? disabled-list. Recalled 

^CwkstafcoutflMder..^ 

■». IntinaUuml-LiMUK -- 




-L rtUl ill 1 







S'*. . 





OBSERVER 


Madonna’s Thermal Test 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — I bad just said 
‘Madonna who?” when The 
New York Tines landed on the 
doorstep, 

“You’ve got to be kidding,” said 
the kid to whom I had just said 
“Madonna who?” 

“Shove off, Idd,” said 1, picking 
up the newspaper of record. “It’s 
tine to End out who did it to whom 
in Lebanon again yesterday.” 

Yes, that’s what I really said: 
“Who did it to whom.” 

Around civilized people I would 
be embarrassed to say “who did it 
to whom,” but this was a Idd 1 was 
addressing and kids have to leant 
how to say things right before 
they’re entitled to say them wrong 
when saying them right would 
sound silly. 

D 


must have been off the planet for 
several years. 

Why does The New York. Tunes 
arrogantly choose to ridicule those 
of us who stQl said “Ma d on n a 
who?” until we picked up the news- 
paper of record and read “Madon- 
na and her Clones”? Does The 
Times think we have nothing to 
keep informed about except the 
waxing and waning heat of rock 
stars? 

□ 


Jihan Sadat, Back in Egypt, 
Confronts a Different Land 


“Madonna and Her Clones” was 
the headline that caught my eye in 
the newspaper of record and the 
sentences that exhausted my dwin- 
dling supply of patience said: 

“She uses only one name, but no 
matter. Only those who have been 
residing on the planet Jupiter for 
the last several years need to ask 
Madonna who?” 

Why? Because she is “rock’s hot- 
test female star.” 

Well my dear New York Times, 
1 have not been on the planet Jupi- 
ter these past few years, so I know 
that rock is a form of popular mu- 
sic that is incredibly loud, has lyrics 
that are unintelligible though pain- 
ful to the ear, and breeds a steady 
supply of stars who exude high lev- 
els of heat. The rule is: The more 
heat the star gives off, the bigger 
Lhe audience. 

Thus, being “rock’s hottest fe- 
male star” means Madonna is rak- 
ing in plenty of what used to be 
called moolah, but is probably now 
called BTU, of which her agent 
takes 10 percent and governments 
50 percent of the remainder, leav- 
ing her with only 45 percent of the 
take, provided she can collect it, 
which in her line of work can some- 
times require lawyers if not people 
Iiandy with guns. 

□ 


Speaking of waxing and waning 
heat, f haven't seen anything in The 
Times lately about Prince or Mi- 
chael Jackson. What is the state of 
their heat? It is not easy to keep 
abreast of the rock-star news when 
the newspaper of record deals with 
it only sporadically, but I ny — 
heaven knows, I try. 

It seems scarcely a year ago that 
the hottest of all possible stars was 
Michael Jackson, but while still di- 
gesting that fact I was astonished to 
discover that tremendous beat was 
suddenly being exuded by Prince, a 
male rock star whose wardrobe in- 
cludes an ankle-length blanket of 
purple sequins. 

“What is this!” I exclaimed, 
“Michael Jackson has lost his heat, 
and the heat is now with Prince?” 


I was reminded or the first book 
of Kings, which tells us that after 
King David became “old and 
stricken in years” the doctors tried 
everything, but “he gat no heaL” 
Had Michael Jackson become old 
and stricken in years? The Times 
was mute, as it has been on Prince’s 
thermal condition lately. 

All we have is this out-of-the- 
blue sneer because we have been so 


busy trying to find the tempera- 
tures of Pnnce and Michael Jack- 


Admittedly I am showing off a 
bit here, but only to prove to the 
reader that I am deeply versed in 
contemporary American culture. 
For this reason I resent The New 
York Times’s suggestion that mv 
saying “Madonna who?” means I 


son that we didn't know somebody 
named Madonna was suddenly at 
maximum heat 

It is hard to bear, New York 
Tunes. Hard to bear the proud 
newspaper’s contumely, the more 
so since we at whom you sneer 
struggle daily to keep up with who 
did it to whom again yesterday in 
Lebanon. Hard to bear from a 
newspaper on which not a soul I 
wager, could lefl you, without mak- 
ing a trip to the library, how Russ 
Col umbo died. 


New York Times Service 


By Judith Miller 

New York Tima Service 

C AIRO — Jihan Sadat has 
come home to Egypt after a 
five-month sojourn in the United 
States. In many respects, the wid- 
ow of President Anwar Sadat 
said, she has returned to a differ- 
ent land. 

“1 have been shocked by the 
changes in only five months," she 
said. 


Sbe spoke of the signs of a rise 
in Islamic fundamentalism. 
“There are so ma ny more young 
girls who are veiled, so many 
more young men with beards," 
she said. “Toe television is filial 
with religious programs and their 
propaganda.” 

The latest victory for funda- 
mentalist forces was the Egyptian 
Supreme Court's abouOon a 
month ago of the women's rights 
law that Mrs. Sadat championed, 
and her husband issued by decree 
in 1979. The law, struck down on 
procedural grounds, required a 
man to leH his wife if he married 
another woman, made his second 
marriage grounds for divorce and 
gave the first wife custody of 
children in the couple’s 


To Mrs. Sadat, 51, the court’s 
abrogation of the law was a per- 
sonal as well as a political repudi- 
ation. Her husband, who was as- 
sassinated in October I9S1 by 
Moslem extremists, had been 
proud of the women’s rights laws, 
she said which were known infor- 
mally as “Jihan’s law." 

“If fundamentalism continues 
to spread at this pace," she de- 
clared is an interview, the first she 
gave upon her return, “it will be 
very dangerous in the near fu- 
ture." 

Sbe warned that the govern- 
ment’s apparent strategy of trying 
to co-opt fundamentalists by in- 
corporating them into the politi- 
cal process and meeting some of 
their demands was “a serious er- 


ror. 


“These people are fanatics,” 
she said. “They’ve been brain- 
washed You can’t change them, 
so the government must stand up 
to them.” 

Such conclusions are rarely ar- 
ticulated publicly in Egypt these 


days, but they are second nature 
to Jihan Sariai. 

Her candor, outspokenness and 
nave made her 
something of a celebrity in the 
United States, but they are quali- 
ties that have contributed to her 
unpopularity in 

Her widespread unpopularity 
at home highlights the differences 
in what westerner and Middle 
Easterners find attractive and ac- 
ceptable in political wives and 
more broadly in women in gener- 
al 

Analysts here agree that to 
some extent. Mis. Sadat’s image 
was affected by her husband's un- 
popularity at the end of bis rule. 
Although the president's break 
with other Arab nations and his 
peace with Israel made him a hero 
in the West, many Egyptians, es- 
pecially intellectuals, regarded his 
signature on the peace treaty as a 
betrayal of the Palestinian and 
Arab cause to obtain the return of 
Egyptian land. 

His critics associated bis break 
with the Soviet Union, his open- 
ing to the West and his support 
for private enterprise with the end 
of the socialist revolution spear- 
headed by President Gamal Abd- 
el Nasser. They associated bis re- 
gime with the spread of 
corruption and the rise of a class 
of nouveau riche “fat cats” who 
are detested by the majority of 
this traditional class-conscious 
society. 

“But in some respects Mrs. Sa- 
dat is even more unpopular than 
he,” said Mona Macram Abeid, a 
sociologist at the American Uni- 
versity m Cairo, one of Mrs. Sa- 
dat’s admirers. 

“When a woman becomes too 
prominent here, it agitates peo- 
ple,” Macram Abeid said. “Egyp- 
tians feel it is the wrong projec- 
tion of Egyptian womanhood.” 

Ahmed Baba Din, one of 
Egypt’s most provocative, influ- 
ential col umnist s and another of 
Jihan Sadat’s fans, said many 
Egyptians felt she gave the presi- 
dency an aura of royalty. This was 
deeply resented in Egypt, which 
had been ruled before Nasser’s 
revolution by the British in con- 
junction with King Farouk and 
before him King Fuad. 

Baha Din said critics also ac- 


cused Mb. Sadat of haring bene- 
fited financially from her hus- 
band’s position, a charge Mis. 
Sadat adamantly de nies 

She was also accused of cater- 
ing to the Western media and dis- 
torting Egypt's traditional values 
and linage to win approval in the 
Umied States. The fact that she 
was known as Egypt's first lady, a 
term that had not existed in 
Egypt, was cited as evidence of 
her Western orientation. 

“There is a fine line between 
the need to have a good image in 
the West, which Egypt undoubt- 
edly needed, and what Egyptians 
peroerved as trespassing <m Egyp- 
tian, Arab and Oriental affini- 
ties," Baha Din explained. 

Finally, Mis. Sadat’s image suf- 
fered from the fact that she 
played a p romi nent political role 
doling her badland's presidency. 

Her 20-faour-long work days 
during Egypt's wars with Israel 
her visits to soldiers’ hosp i t a l s , the 
opening of schools and nurseries 
and fund raising for her favorite 
c han' tifff were traditional activi- 
ties and hence acceptable to 
Egyptian public opinion, Baha 
Din said. 

What was unacceptable was 
her direct ami prominent involve- 
ment in affairs of state, he ex- 
plained. 

“Egyptians believe that a polit- 
ical wire’s infl uenc e should Stem 
from what yon in the States call 
‘pillow talk, * ” Baha Din said. Sa- 
dat, by contrast, was known for 
lambasting minister s she thought 
were f ailin g her husband or 
Egypt. Sbe lobbied for promo- 
tions for people she trusted and 
causes die believed in, such as the 
women's rights act. She was, in 
sum, too visible. 

Jihan Sadat knows she is un- 
popular. It is unpleasant for her, 
she conceded, and on occasion 
even painfuL 

“Pm not a computer.” she said, 
gazing out the window of her spa- 
cious white stucco mansion on the 
banks of the Nile. She could dis- 
miss much of the hatred, attribut- 
ing it to jealousy and ignorance; 
she said, but what most troubles 
her is lies. 

“They said that I became rich 
because of my husband's job ” 
she said. “But if that were true, 



Owp Tawmfflw Nk> Yat Tie 

‘‘Shocked by the <*h«ngre in only five months.” 


would I be giving lectures and 
writing to earn my own living?" 
She owns no property other 


than a home in her village in Min- 
ufiya, she says. Her gracious 
home in Giza is government- 
owned, she said. 

“I never approved of Esmat’s 
activities," she said, referring to 
one of her husband's brothers, 
who was convicted of corruption 
after the assassination. 

“la every family there are good 
and had children,” she her 
voice trailing off. “I have critics, 
true," she sighed. “But I have 
many friends here." 

Last week, about 150 of them 
gave a dinner in her honor, which 
she found “very moving, but a 
little overwhelming.” 

“I suppose HI always be criti- 
cized," she said. Bui she vowed, 
“I will never leave my country." 

. She is scheduled to return, in the 
fall to the United States, which 
she called her second home, to 
pursue a doctorate in literary crit- 
icism at the University of South 
Carolina. Until May 15, she was 
Distinguished Professor in Resi- 


dence for the spring semester at 
the American University in 
Washington. But her first home, 
she arid, will always be Egypt. 

“No matter how tough & criti- 
cism. I will not leave nor will I 
stop fighting for what I believe 
in,” she declared. 

It is when the conversation 
turns to politics that Mrs. Sadat 
becomes most engaged. Her 
greoush-gray eyes glisten; her 
faw glows; her tapping foot be- 
trays the poise and serenity that 
sometimes made her drive and de- 
termination. 

“I hope the government will 
have the courage to reintroduce 
the women’s rights law,” she said. 

Jihan Sadat recently made a 
difficult derision: not to become 
prominent in the fight to restore 
the law. “I felt it might impede 
our goal and set back the cause of 
women," she said, explaining her 
assessment of the impact her in- 
volvement might have. 

“I just hope that people will 
appreciate what I tried to do for 
Egyptian women and will under- 
stand my silence now.” 


Raand-tho- W orld Sailor 
Heads Home With Toys 


James HarikWL the lone around- 
lhe* world sailor who underwent 
right heart operations after uaring 
lus aorta while jigging, headed 
home Thursday, his boat loaded 
with cuddly toys donated by chil- 


* 


dren in Perth.' Australia, for .s|| 


children in England. Hatfield. " 
left England almost a year ago to 
sail around the world in hr* 24-foot 
(7.2-nwter) yacht, the British Heart 
of Ipswich. At each port of call he 
visits hospitals for handicapped 
children and primary schools to ■ 
show videos of his trip. HatfiekTis 
sailing home via Sydney. Auck- 
land. Chile. Cape Horn and New 
York. 

O 

The opera director Beierh S3K. 
who has lost 75 pounds (34 kilo- 
grams! m the past year on an ww.. _ 
calorie-a-day diet, said that sht _ 

“never cheated” since she begS 
her regimen. Sills, who weighed 215 
pounds a vear ago. credited her 
weight loss to an endocrinologist to 
whom she went after she “woke up 
one day and realized 1 was really 
ilL" she said in the current Ladies' 
Home Journal. 

□ 


i 

i? ; 


• i 

% 


Football comes before Bruce 
Springsteen. University id Colora- 
do officials have ruled. The athletic 
department vetoed plans for 
Springsteen concerts on Sept. 4 and 
5 at 60.000-seat Folsom Field 
cause they said the shows would 
interfere with preparations for the 
university's home opener against 
Colorado State on Sept 7. Student 
say the concert could have earned 
the school's financially troubled 
athletic department up to 5250,000. 
”] see the athletic department is 
$650,000 in debt, and yet they tum 
down a quarter of a million dollars 
in one day.” said Scott Riley, who 
will be a senior in September. 

D 


Alexander Julian, known for his 
use of vivid colors, has been voted 
outstanding U.S. designer in the 
annual Cutty Sari Men's Fashgn 
awards. The Italian designer G|t- 
franco Fern was designated out- 
standing international designer 
and the French designer Yves Stint 
Laurent was given a career achieve- 
ment award. Chip Tolbert, presi- 
dent of the Men’s Fashion .Associa- 
tion announced at a ceremony at 
the Fashion Institute of Technol- 
ogy in New York. 


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55 La Craaette 
06400 Cannes 

Tel: (93) 38 00 66l Telex: 47092 IF 


AANDOl “PtHJS DANS L'EAU". 
Very rcee on Cote d'Azur, set of 3 

oWB&fSSSSSSK 

2400 sain, pme land. actuaRy Hotel 
Fary Tate new & location m quiet 
rndenlid area near Cosmo. Opfmr- 
tuMy to tntdvup quiddy. Sold in ' ” 


goperjr. Tctahy: F9A mfion. In 3 


/ 15 / U mflfiort. IS value 
cause urgency. Write owner: Bax 
241 1. Hredd tribune, 92S21 MeuHy 


COTE D'AZUR. For sate by owner. 3 
bedroom apartment, fienihed or un- 
fumxhed, move-in conj i i o n. north- 
south new of sea & mountexm, pool, 


_ _ ran area of 

Please cdB Nrcn P3J 81-97-01,(935 86- 
3S-B2. or contact owners.- AsiatOuricm 
Properties. ^ 9465 Wtehire Btvd, S/724. 
^^0190212.^ lWWiJ 


SOUTH Of FRANCE. 40 ndes rmh of 
Montpelier, renovated 1750 farm- 
house an over {swtnmmd 800 sq. ft. 
(wng room. 4 bedtpomCWge eai-m 
kitchen. 1 bath, I shower, 2 terrace*. 
New centre d healing aid pfcmbna. 
Told 2800 sq. ft. 22 acre properly. 
US SfOjQOtLWtiH Gem oUresi. 
1415 Golf link Drive. Stone Mcutam. 
GA30088USA. 


I*«W* FRENCH AIK, baity 
tprtme** .on opff course & da 
MBK, flS ’lf 74120 Me- 
Oeve. TeL 3350/21 0282. TV 309302 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


EVERY ONE HAS TFC RIGHT TO 
eryoy the sun. Your hofiday house, in 
lhe UWs Region (Gard - France) for 
rat i hi ien> 8T hoSdoy fun - Exontenl 
inv es tment, nsntalpouibiEtias during 
your ob s ence - 100% aerfil. land in- 
cluded - Aik for on (nq/anrttxy den- 
ser indos&Bj plans, guarantees, etc. 
(ram MIMOSaT S.C1— &F. 98 - 
30700 UZES fray) TeL (fid 22 66 55 


IANS, EQUAL DISTANCE from 
Bordeaux & Bayonne, 30 to From 
sea Renovated 300 year old farm- 
house in Z5 ha land platted with 
oaks. 4 beA owns, 2 bate, electric 
heating & huge fireplaces. Pool, aid 
bans, traefitiond brick own. Bax 2407, 
Herald Tribune, 92521 Ne idly Cede*. 
France 


6KM BUMS 18th cenTiry htnne ready 
to Eve in. Luring, Hrory, kitchen, dm- 
mg 5 bedrooms, 3 baths, fitted attic, 
amtrol herfing. + 1 sndl hoteq, 3 
bedroom*, 1 Bath, kitchen. Irving on 
WX)0 sqvn. land. Urepoiabte view on 
Loire riwr. Tab Paris 172 93 71. 


SOUTH OF FRANCE. 20 to from Hy. 
eras, on £800 sqjn. land, rib 300 
tqra. Trying space, tile roof , 2 terraces, 
patio, doubts windows, very large 
firaplaae. electric shutters, hectad 
pooL Exceptional panorranc view. 
WOO.tXxTTde EB 4/401 43 office 


OWNER SELLS SnJNDID VUA in 

fiance, (12 Km Geneva, 6 Km Ds- 
varate) con^nsmg * bedrooms, 2 
baths eaufooed ftnrhea, 2 Ooraoes. 
I860 saSrEvi^ aSjOOOwKte: 
fcONWNOAWHAMro, 15 Av. des 
Alpm, 01210 Femay-VbBaiie, Frame. 


BEAUUBJ 5U8 MBl, between Monte 

Carlo & Men. Owner sells 2 room, 50 

sqm upra tment, awed 12 mnv 
terrace, m resdentid park, 5th Qost) 


Boor, beautiful, critor, garage, view 
■ - WritoHAVAS, 


sea and Cap FenaL 

SaCade* BP 346. Reh 0236 


06072 Heel 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

RtVBJA, ROGUEBRUNE. hstarkd 
vfiagq 5 mins. Monaco, typicrj m on- 
tian, 3 levels 90 sqm. + 20 sqm. 
terrace. Panaranvc sea view. 
FI ,200, QKL Td (1)551 00 63.7 om- 
10 am re vraekond all day / OudLn 
248 Bd Rasped, 73314 Prers. 

ANJOU MANOR 

Magnificent, 15th century, refined 
decoration, l ha park. 296 95 52 

BOSMESIES MIMOSAS 3 ROOMS 

57 sqm., terrace *9 sqnu, sea view, 
underground patang. fto doss 
budding, 300 m. from beach. JEM. 
Cherrin St Andre, 69760 Ljcnonest. Tel 
(7) 835 27 26 Fraxz. 

MOq COTE D'AZUR. Exdutomapan- 
ment ON 1>£ TOP, 6th floor/ftm- 
oranc 200° sea view, Inge private 
terra®, 2 rare* & btcncnw with sea 
view. Cam exxtove area 10 ninntes 
weft to sea. Price by owner fi595D0Q. 
TeL (93) 75 52 41 firmce. 

ANTHEOR - ST. RAPHAR. 30 km 
Carnes. 166 sqm. v3q 5 roams, 
kitchen, shower room, bothroom. ter- 
race, 1300 sqm, garden, opfcfl view 
an sea FL25DJOO0. For appointmeril 
ai (94] 82 83 46 after 6 pm. 

RARE. SOUTH RANCE, ARDBCHE in 
national part; protected area. 1 9th 
century strew mansion, 350 sqm-12 
rooms, 3 Irak, ofl amentites, fre- 
pieces. 2 cArs, on 20CD sqnv tend 
Old trees & sward terraces. Goad 
prioa. Paris 0)544 52 12 after 8 pm 

hEAR LORE CHATEAUX, 50 toHos. 
1900 house, certnti herema3 floors, 
comfort, fireplaces. 15juu0 sqm. 
part, century-aid trees. Smci 
tomtouse, eftaraww countryside. 
F750^0ftMl 1496 /532 19 07. Parts 

SUPERB PROPERTY, south Paris 45 
im fofect coreftioq no worit to be 
done. 2 ouftxdcEngk 6 beftaoms. 4 
baths, large hmg, dnfog, lorge gp- 
roge. Alto, ecotoed Amman kridv 

ea BeautiW gorSTftiris 260 80 13. 

YOUR CONTACT W PROVENCE 
Houses w4h chaader. Chreiren 
properties. Estates. Emile GAKOV, 
IP. 55. 13532 ST-fiEMY-DC-PBO- 
V8VO Cadmc Tefcl9B9ZOTJB +. 

CAWC5 PALM BEACH Top flare 
140 sqm. upahnent in front af the 
sea 2 bedrooms. 2 baths 1 maid's 
room, dosed tuuue. Mp4* offers 
Contact SSI, 47Lo Oobette, 06400 
Gome*. Teh (931 3& 19 19. 

SUNNY DRAGUGNAN fora) 20 
rates St Tropes. Chofoau 200 won 
rid restored 19 rooms, pod & pri- 
vate mo, 35,000 sqm. flat green 
grounds on river. Gvctxa 93-© 10 15 

SAAIT PAIR DE VH4CE RestorttiaL 
superb Proiwucfc on same level a 
room, luxurious fflinm. tod 2500 
sqm, pool, F3.000.000. Promotion 
Afexret, fiocn Mozart, hfios, 06000 
France. TeL (93) 87 08 20 

ADC EN PROVENCE. 200 sqm vSta. 
fiving, Satan, 5 bedrooms, Ktdwq. 3 
brihs, garago, pfoieed garden 1500 

TSt42|23094a 

CBOBl Of AN ARTS , CITY. South- 
west Frimoe. Spadous historic opafr 
■rant eweptionoKy decorated, afl 
axnferft targe reception, 4 bed- 
rooms. TeL (43261617: 

SOUTH LANOBL. » hour sea Cham- 
to I7(h cere, form, 300 sqm. x 2 
floors. 2500 sqm. tod/ +. rkxtteio. 
fishnq 70 Ian. fiarritc. Paris 5033432 

AUBE - 10 fans southwest Troyes. 22 ha 
wooded lend, many ode trees efil 
■ze^l 45 aMiL/ha. Cal Chant Paris 

Asm tann nowq bam, smdi txwo- 
beautiful wew, 10 ha. T«L 16(63) 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


NORMANDY, CALVADOS 
Lovely 17#t century manor. oompteMy 
restored with cate. Ttifc (3i] 2D 82 27 


GABDl GRAU DU KX neetr wo. 2 ha. 


tod. fasjbkty for curpvanqg 
Miction. Tr± 


hofiday vBoge oonSruction. T<4 16} 
920 M70 1 Boned, 18 Am.Nd6on»e, 
91300 Massy, fiance. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


CBRRAL LONDON RBiOlD 


PENCE GATE NEAR HYDE PAIR 
£3^00000 


A rare opportwsty to acquire a targe 
frecholdnouse, teamdy refirtfa h ed to 
a luxurious standard, os a iwidencc or 
cm erabany. 

Entronos hd, 6 reception rooms, 10 
bedrooms, 6 feafeoaras. 3 shower 
roevns, 2 strriT rooon 4 dockrooms, 2 
totems phis 2000 soft open plan ma. 
Weo enfryiAone, m, security system, 
gritos and etadik shutters. 


Joint sate agent: 
Chestertocs 01 *37 7244 


BaGRAVlA, a ran Mews hou 
bedrooms, 3 beshs. double r«ca| 
Oaokroorn, dining room, 2 kite 
paWcxMsefvdory, garage, uv 
moiched secure Ickiboii, recent lun>- 
ry ranovtoan. Private sale. 30 year 
lease £4751)00. Would consider yea* 
retted. TeL 01-730 2238 


BAIN/ BBSRX -Lons Court Monson. 
The tot 2 of 7 nipwbty buB luxurious 
opratroenss m briauJif J arounds with 
panoramic views. E90JXW - C125JXXL 
M3ter Estates, Brtfcxi, Avon. TeL 
326654 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBmON EXECUTIVES 

fUfidwwtvinMinocmM 
it Km brtomalional Handdin- 


hunm, utiMOMMAeiaBW 
of a mBKan reader* wvdd- 
wide. meal et whom me m 
mid industry, wtt 
A Jtatf Mb ib (Ptwii 


613395JJ>akew Warn, en- 


suring Orel we am telex you 
far**, and year njes s o pe wfl 
efyrem wahin 43 hams. The 
note is V.S.S9.BO Or load 
e mthnd wd per Una. You axed 
indude co m p l e t e aid uoriS- 
chle bBDng mhhwft. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES ? 


VLSI Invest in one of America’s mast 


o Mfondaflar industry. We have , 

od more nut irees in 1984 that any 


develapM' in ou State, 
annual ereningi n am e d for 


BROKHrf- B4QUne5 BWIIHJ. 
Mttemd mtoobte in EngKsh, FtwH 
^ 2350. Herald Tribune, 
92521 NetriDy Cedes, France 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 


T-SMBT F0TOS 
NOW M FULL COLOR 
on oZoosti busmen that can earn you 
$8000 - SI 0^00/ month. New and used 
system from $9500 - $26,500. 

TeL 069-747808 Tto 412713 KEMA 


IMMIGtATIGN TO USA 
MADE EASY 
Ehainessmeril T entaorary & p eneonent 
rrairtence vaaij set up burinto n USA, 
prawfor tor pc s orted, expand your ex- 
■Sing Inaiiiets. Write for tree edb to 
mer Dowd Hrsag 14795 Jeffrey 
#m_lrvtoa 92714 USA 
’651-3020, ifeu 590194. 


WANTS) - SUBSTANTIAL anvjuptt of 
cfccooraedSwiB Francs for USS- Cor. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SETTUNG M CANADA 
IMMIGRATION AND iWBTIIffiNT 
Contact! DABT-MVEST Ltd. 
otto: Joan Dora, (Vaktent 
mi McGJ Cotoga - State 458 
Mortrool H3A 2tt9 Conda 


SUB DEAL 
Need land series broker to lepres w it 
major developer. Fortune 500 Oeeru 
lfcwnDev*riofwi 0 rtCorp.Topcofnn«i- 
sfon. Completely developed award win- 
ring subtfemfon 7J30Q ft- from major 
metro FL ram The 568215 
TeL PQ5) 973666a 


RflHtNATlONAL 

ngmacBHfoOywoddwidefar 

with man office wi tax haver, 
mBoa TTw indwfcs 
Can be opwoted 


cm 


SF16 


frtMi cri mast on^ pori of the world. 


.... For infonnato 

wnte ta Bax 716i LKT^ Frfofocfatr. 
15.6000Fronkfurt/Mgn 


COMPUTES for Uomb end perron- 

cl as. Aoriioriisd dealer for IBM, 
Afple, others. Baft price s. G J Mr. 
Lawnnee. Pais 563 ot?/ 348 3000 


TRADE FINANCE AVAILABLE from 

Swiss bated company .Pleate write to: 
Pwcaraar SA. 16 fiooe Comovin, 
1211 Geneva 1. Telex 289262 PSL 


PANAMA UniA. CX3RPCKAT10NS 

■m US$400 avaUde now. Tel 


gS24) 20240. Tdtefc 63B35Z BAND 


f-tauq. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


MH. 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 


IMIMITB} INC _ 
UJJL A WDRUWIDE 


A complete personal & business service 
p roind w o o unique aAedto of 
tatented, veraame & mu&Saguol 
■rdrvirWv for cAsoaal & 


312-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
3»W.5«hSL,N.YJL 10019 
Service RearesfeAifaves 
nooQco wonawiae. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INVEST 2 WSS m Belter HeoAh. 
Enter Canioc Rale Prevention ' & 
Health Reooncfitionng fiograra now. 
Began! mansion, poacotul Surrey 
cmiitryocl*. teghlr qurdfied mertod 
supervisioiL Viol Erfcn Medfori Cen- 
Ire, Entan near Godcmna, Surrey 
GU8 5AL 45 nin. Lorxto. Bng 
(042)8792231 


fc w l we es Sendee to Ltreeaibeuig 
Acomtong/contarmy formations + 
BHssaffieiiifiiB/scctBSanal/ phone/ te- 
to/iwaL Contact ftreer, 12-14 Bd. 
<T Awcstdhm, 1160 Luxembouig. Phone: 
1+35-2) 4W1S3. Tbc 1433. 


SAS 6 Ex MBJTAKY pertomri avert- 
able for the best in executive persond 
pro te ction & rriatad segxity metten. 


HOW TO GET a Second Passport, re- 
port. 12 countries anohaed. Detosi 
WMA, 45 LyndhuTO Terrace, Ste. 501, 
Cantral, Ftang to"B- 


WANTS CAIRO, EGYPT MAIL & 
tefest raossttfog eervipj. Di. Malory 
Col, 22 BeJte^t^eaO^San Franc*. 
oo, CA 94111, lie 184S1 DtM. 


TAX SERVICES 


U5 MCOME TAX returns and audto 
by pre/eisionak. Pen 563 91 23. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


COUA7BAL cnicdabte from Prime 
Bails. A comprehensive service for 
atetroge purpasts. We supply t ar- 
range: a] dean oomp sg nr shels, b) 
sta te m ents of purpose of a r b itra ge 
bore, d fiduciary bate aonunti.d) 
oofiatera, el colateral not fl ic o lion by 
telex or nerd copy, Pterne cartad aor 

London offfoK- 01 244 9392/01 385 
5492 / 01 930 8926, Tlx B95T622 
TARfiCO C 


HAVE ILS. DCXLASS TO nrhxtf 
for Swiss Firana, bra WiS oho ber- 
raw Irrgt am of S*ri» Francs, 5 or 
10 peat, Have Promissory notes. Td 
Wtad^Zonch- *7*00 or 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

irw cEamonds ei any prim range 
id kmed wtutasds prices 
direct fnxn Antwerp 
canter of lhe diamond world. 
Full gu ar a ntee. 

Far free price fat write 


btabfished 1928 
PeH uneui root SL B-2018 Antwerp 
Baton - TeL (52 3)134 07 51 
Tbc 7T779 syi b. At the Diamond Ckfo. 
Heat of Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Your Office in Genrnmy 

we are “At Yoor Service” 

• Complex affk* services or two 
prewge aforesses. 

• Fully equipped offices for lhe sharr 
term or the long term. 

• IrtematianaBy traned office and 


(xofeisicnri staff of your cfopcmrt. 
'Cat 1 


. be legcrily used as your corpo- 
rate donate for Gerawny/Eurape. 
• Your business operation con start 
immediately. 


Lain Busmen Servian GmbH 
LoircoNaus an HabhaDsenpai 
JustnaetraSK 22 
6000 Fratefort am Man 1 
Germany 

Tel: 069- 59 00 61 
Tele Fax: 69- 59 57 70 
Telex: 414561 


flUTEKNAHONAJ- BUSINESS Bureau 
SA. Furrished offices. bSn^xil per- 


rwmnder _ 

9004/05. Tfc U979 ITBB, Madrid, 
Span. 


EURO BUSME5S CHYTER 
99 Ksamgrad*, 1015 CH Amsterdam 
TeL 312035 57 49 Telex 16181 
World- '•Vide Aries Centres 


PAHS AODRSS, Oxnp^Bvsfe. 
Sinee 1 957 LJLP. proiiides maLphone. 

tefarc. moetina roamx. 5 rue <F Arina. 

75W. TeL OT 47 04. Tbc 64^04. 


YOUK oma M PAH& TfifX, 
ANSWERING SERVICE, secretary, 
24H/ttay. 




Imprime par Offprint. 73 rue de rEvatgile, 73018 Pais 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


‘K 


GRO5VEN0B SQUARE. Exattag 

poriaety to oajuire probably 

most etegarit & prestigious modem 
property 71 100 *qJM in the heart of; 
dasstaai Mayfok. Quietly seduded 
with own targe terrace, gexoging and 
poking in the only private, gated CuL 
dnac in Mayfar. Award winrug 
ordvted dedgned & firobed to rip- 
est intamational standards. Ided Lon- 
don base for aompany efiredor. 86 
£244CBa TeL UK Ascot 


PRIVATE ISLAND NSa*Ws Hebri- 
des for srd*. lotto. Fishing, rough 
shooing and storing Hoff haw from 
arport USJIOO per acre asked far 
gu*k oie. Bor 41160, UtT, 63 Long 
Aae, London. WC2E 9JH. 


GERMANY 


M HAMBURG 

tadustri d, butetess 8 jubishin g 
center of Northern Germany: 

OfHCE BUUDtNG 


prestige adriess in the heat of the 
dty’j butinea 


detrict, unique norite 
opporhmity for investor saebnq sa fely 
guui intend reSutns 8 evidiond tax 
privileges, sefing at p604 mffian 
nrxtatiablfi 

■«usi®LLW>fwrr 
tang term lease contract with prim: 
tenant satog at DM5.5 mdwn. 
MSnnTGART 

Southern Germany's fastest growing 
industrid centre; 

BUSITCS5 CENTHt 
ta fate dass location, prestige object 
u nder corstTKfaon, approownaHy i 
1BM0 i«tm. to l et, orisave qw rage oa p. 
•d ran, fcjfc irwBhnnt woti wrrtwy, 
sefing re DM90 rmfcon, neopUctk. 
Doerrfioa assured; mstihiional 
imratore welcome, no brafaen. 

Far detak contact! 

P.OJL 209, 3780 GSTAAD75WTT 


DUSSHDORfi i inn torn, k 
and du ficote l y funfahad oparrment,75 
stem, barbecue, roacious terrace, situ- 
reed \s OusseWrefObSosse! (Safer 
of Desgn, fine Adi & Betras}. 2 trim, ta 
the wortouiown "Koe", 10 mra. to the 
inti carport & the trade fair carter, sold 
by lhe proier. L1SS138^50: Sbercri raort- 
ot HMWrewt 
mformation [rimsg C i ' ii6uilL 
Hcier Wehmmmbmis, 
Duestodoris 9 t7 23. 

4000 Dioseidarf-Oberfaisd. Germcxiy. 

Or CdL W. Germany 211-578030. 


MLMCH 175 SCLML Laaity Bre rete- 
denbd area dassic construction. 
Price DM6.900/ sane For dehtes con- 
tact: Herd KJuebspies, Anhur- 
KrasdwxJPIrez 1. eOOOlAJendten 40. 
TeL WB9 J4454S. 


ITALY 


TUSCANY, beauAtey restored rustic 
house near Florence for SF337.Q0Q, 
60 nun. living roam with old Tuscan 
fireplace, 6 bedrooms, 3 modem 
bathrooms. 17 s&bl cowered terrace 
sauna, centred hectoxj, phone, etc. A5 
ha land with old Tuscan trees + 
sMw nra ng pooL Phase contact also 
far other kwdy orieds in Tusccnyi 
Casa Immahtort. EUraimi Oeftin- 
cpnstr 36, 8000 f*andwn2Z West 
Germany. Tefe g9) 22 59 62 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 


PARK PALACE 


. , 116 sq. meters 

furnished ot Trek Wore, appo- 

i arena and Horn! de Peris, ■> the 

Golden Triangle of Monte Carta new 
buBdng, fith noor wW> front and rear 
terraces, color & parking. 


For I nf o nu ation: Race* ecriL 


Misa R S rfriec h W. al Ubectotg, 
~ ' “"8431 18221. 


West Germany TeL (028431 


MONTE CARLO 
finale mansion rear Monaco P nn ce 
firiooe, ponoranc view harbor, arena, 
mo un tain , with terrace. 

Td p3l 30 46 54. 


MOROCCO 


KNKXm Terpen, exeepbonal 
19«i century hone, renovreed 1980, 
exclusive raadweki quarter. 38 Jboti 
sqm. (914 ocresj superb ganlens + 
prefctod doping » beo*3 double 
hedraom* + 1 sjrdte. 3 bad*. Mray- 


. .... lunate. 3 bads. Mag- 
nificent reception reams featfiiu fo 

overlooking Strain af Gibral- 


srigwtess’aaj 

Ceofac. France 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


SEVRES-MEUDON. OuMretdnq 
apartment lO/sqm. m residential 
area. 3 bedrooms, double faring, 
equipped Ukhse. brehroams, ter- 
races. before garages plus private 
parking & ceflre. Across lhe street 
Irani norMridng school & Ohnrpic 
pool Wafcngdatonas from tafl high 
shoal, Pan; St-Good & train station (7 
inn. ban to MamparacoseL For see 
now FFI, 180,000- TeL apartment Fforis 
507.1551 Free to via in toe. 


Co- 


lette, 1521 Boyrtre, Houston, TX770R 
USA (713)464>lRy 7 973-1659 


LE VESINET 


Near RSI, center. Modem vdb, 
high quofify construction, landscaped 
frrden Living, study, 4 beuoons, 
_ 3 baths, cefiar, jgarpge. 
AG84CE MAKE (kp97S52 52 


RAMBOUIUfT 65 ton from southwest 
Fans, lovely old country house, m 
peaciriul 15ha pcsk, exaeptwid sur 


io uudwny . Main house, large «v 
1 unite, ax»‘Xv 


... , _ rveereion, indoor padL 

2 guest houses, frbaxstabla, inside/ 
outside paddock, pool tSM.OQQ. (3) 
48501 01 haw noon to 8 pm. 


TO FACING TROCAOTK) gardens 
) hi^h date 19U bu&Sng. 2lusqjn., 


16TO 

inhi^ ^ .... 

triple recaption, 4 bodroarm, 2 bativ 
roontt. TeL Pons S3 37 84 or write 
Bor 2307, Herald Tribune, 92S2I 
NteJy Geriwt France 


VERSAIUE AREA 31 KMS PAMS, 
superb estree, 3 ho, firoom home + 
Aroam annex + ootbaHn^- tenws, 
swifliriiu poaL Meresito price. 
Write tofiern, la Sorwfe, 78690 Les 
Etsorts Le toi, TeL 131 041 60 54. 


ST. GStMAM B4 lAYt 180 sqm 
haul*, W«| ganfon, 4 betegams, 3 
baths. Half war between S3 & tarl 
Lyre* F2JOWOa Tub B) 973 71 58 
office / H 4ST 43 75 cSr 8D0 pai 


MONTMARTRE. Duplex - reefer d» 
tote, fine Art Deoo bsASng in bento 
MsurraundmgL I bed. kitdvsn, bath. 
it teMM ti n e, mid ateire witii 18 Which 
ream- Teh 223 90 41 


IE VESMET. One favetok. 200 sqm 
large Wia. Sbeteoatra, 2 balte + 
200 igm basement, 2-car garage. 


i - 9‘2?B e ' 

, large aatm Direct 

an 22TB. 


RESTORE) FARMHOUSE, 45 nits, 
ac re of fa re, , beam s, firep toq, 4 


VUA MOUTOR. Duplex + gredea 
Svtag, 3 bedroom 3 baths, iwtified 
hto price. TeL w 15 99 moninp. 


AVE GEOURGE V tawtrious 65 sqm 


MNIHEON. 19lh^ 

■tawnhowe 210 sqm, 5 t 
bafe, garden. 504 86 2D 


16TH RANBAGH-MUHTE. Doctor 
_ ._ apartment, 2 
Tot ffi 920 88 70. 


PORTUGAL 


F08TUGAU Buldmg for sale lisban 
area. 3300 sq. a. an 1)9 hedrees of 

l!"* L£2? r : *“L ^7, H « r£ *l Tri- 
bute, 92521 Nuxty Cmex, France 


SARDINIA 


SMlDMA. 5hnjino the mast beautiful 
rewt m Norih east. Unique loarean 
on the shore 3^50 sqm land with fuB 
qutharrareian id build 315 sqm. 
ytl60.000.a0a. Write to GUnna 


Ifa i Wtare 45, 20100 Mtan. 


SPAIN 


MAEnLA. Superb fitiie mas located 
reudentire area near moitreafos & I 


to from mol 220 sqm construction 
attached home* 


. 2 attached houses entirety 

oqrepped & funwhed in the middte of 
a 1^00 sqm garden. Parebity for 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


SEVERAL LUXURIOUS RAIS. 200 
and 350 sqm, fitly famished Icrgr 
terraces overlooking sea. tfcgn 
rwidanoa decorated with pink >HRrea 
«i the iteddla of a beoutrfd troped 
garden. 2 pooh (1 with tea water), 
access to the uq, 4 terma courts, 
indoor and outdoor restaurants, bar, 
supermarket, fashion shops, right 
chib, kustey, hairdresser, portong. 
Price for me 200 sqm Raft: 
FI JDOffXt 350 sqm flat, negotiable. 
Far detail, a* Mn Faunm. Oitb 
Maraeul del Sor (Adeje) Tenetiffe. TeL 
134-22] 78 1000. 


BOA 


Ownm-sefc 1 . . 

duded but ony 5 minutes from 
Jasq about 40Q + swwnmg 

pool with pool house. Sofor water ■heot- 
mg, 4 bedrooms, ar-condsioned, 4 
bathrooms, telephone. 14,000 sqm. 
land with al lords of frwl trees, very 
■able Qardner and mc*d crai evertuedy 


itayvwfo new owner. 
nWlC 


Holand 31/1650/54528. 


COSTA BLANCA. JAVEA. Kgh dass. 
2 bedroom seafront kwnhoucs- 
$24200, and 1 bedroom n w e t mette s 
512^00. garden & terrace. Direct 
from bidden: Fmmodanes Goto. 
C/leparto 18, Goto de Gargos / 
Atcarte / Spam 


I*' 


IN BENDORM, TIFTANY** 

One of the firaa & best known ref ^ 
ram in Span. Sole agent taroobnbria 
Panorama. Write: Edrf Los Faknos 8. 
C/Gambo. 3/Benidorm. 3465862552. 


PAGE 16 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


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FLY TO SHARJAH, DUBAI, ABU 
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sport, 93 Reams Street, firei Flore, 
London W1ST 7TT. Tel: 01-734 9837. 
Tbc 25899 P ADAIR 


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HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


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r FROM £769 
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4 


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fo more IflXDAY & TRAVEL ADS 
PLEASE TURN 70 
PAGE 8W 

W THE TMEBOO SECTION 


ADVEWU® HOUDATS Ausbafia 
»»Wiihmg a speoafity. tarffafo 
tottpa optanti Bnreiiiei, brodxro: 
Vie Sanction Adventura Unfovtrd, 
J East Dute-ieb, Lon- 


don SS22 UK. 


116939566 


SHORT STAY ACCOMMODATION 
avrfable in South West London & 
Surrey. Self -catering or bed 8. bwA.- 
fap. Parlies of up to 10 oteared for. 
Telephone Home to Home (01) 390 
6709 / oi 390 7132 


TIME SHARE RESALES INTL From 
>1 700 deeded weeks. 5000 resort fol- 
inns ovalable worldwide. TH, 17 E. 
Weaver, Harnsanbura, VA 228Q1 
(703)4347787. 


CHARTER 65 FT. LUXURY MOTOR 

Yacht bared in Monte Greta. 3 caboa 
eadi wMi brehroam for 6. American 

to> & 2 crew. Teh (93) 30 31 80 / 

06 26 76 The: l&m Brian MC 


LUXURY VttiAS with pool and staff. 

Marbefia. South of France, Ataorve, 
.fodw. fi*n Beach. 
Goramenal Vato 38 Sireate Street, 
Londrei SW1X aj. 01-2*5 9181 


HELLAS YACHIWG. Yochi Otartere. 
Aodenvat 28. Athens 10671. Greece. 


HOTELS 


FRANCK 

PARIS -HOiaDUMINY-VBn(<jS 


• e *NN, 79 roams wflh farelv *rore- 
ly renowawd. In heart of Pans, close 
Concorde / TAnes. Cotai & comfort. 
Front F36Q. 3 roe Mont Habor, Parts 
1st TeL 260 328a TLt 213492 f. 


PARIS - Pima Mtrabeai •*•»<, 10 

Awe. E Zofo, 1-25 room Bali, bath, 
Wtehen, fridge. TeL 97 72 00. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


B3EN PLAZA HOTH, LONDON - 
Keraingtan best utuanafl for buuneu 
and ptaasure. AH rooms both / show- 
re 7 TV / telephone ! raSo / fair 
dryer, etc. Restaurant / bar / sauro - 
nwaage- Smgtos £38. doubles E52 
mdusive Engfeh breaHau, service & 
to*, Qu eens Gate, london 5W7. 
TeL 01 -370-61 1 1. Tt» ; 916228. 


E«VON«WnTS HOTR LYNTON. 
An eregont & hinnausly apprented 
eourtry house, quietly sfruated in 27 
acres bredermg tee sea Grand men- 
re, bar & restaurant noted Bor superb 
awra. hmptoty & wws. fed 
rovm with soGcsacukir sea views, 
bathrooms, TV etc. Prices from ’ 
Fre brochure lei LyWon (0598) 5 ~ 


\t 
I ‘ 


ORKCOU. HOUSE; 200 angle rev 


E55 per week, partial bored. Apr,,- 
New Kea Rood. London SeiTvi 


t? taalen SE1 

TeL 01 703 417S 


LOPOON. SWNNGDA1E MOTH, 
•amity-run bed & ireakfasi. 35 Lora 
dale Road. Ell 2PK Tel (01) 9B9 3435 



OLD ENGLAND 


Purveyors of the finest clothing toe men, 
women and children 


Old England, 12 BWL des Capodaea, 7S009 PARIS 
Td: (1) 74L8L99 
— —Old England has no branches. 



I.