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The 'Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed SimultaneousI y 
in Paris, London. Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, v- 
The Hague and.Marsd)lt 
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WEWtffiR DATA AITEAE OtfttQvftg 

No. 31,825 ^ 


INTERNATIONAL 




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"* ZURICH, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


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§§ Raids Seen 
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Unrest Spills ' . 
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African Borders 



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•tS By Glenn Frankel . 

,ji Washington Past Service 

su ; ^ HARARE, Zimbabwe — Sooth 
cj3 Africa’s commando raid- on sus- 
r Ls * ; pected guerrilla bases in Botswana 
k has dealt another blow to the Rea- 
[ gan administration’s already weak- 
' **■ ened regional policy. of “construc- 
live engagement.” 

l The raid Friday, which left at 


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Lands for Third 
Time in Beirut; 
Passenger Slain 


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' *’ir-.? r-iin( ^'c Mozambique. Angola and Sooth 

" 1 ‘ : ^ Africa itself. It also illustrated bow 

escalating violence made South 
13 t^frica can spill over its borders to 
x '•• ;i:; .a-iy. * ""feidanger even the most stable of 
Ij'cnhuwi-r !h, the country’s black neighbors. 

1 >.v.:: i -i w.‘ During the recent escalation of 

1 \ i lx .; , :. > . ir i Jta - congresaonal criticism and anti- 
J V tofc ' apartheid demonstratio ns, in the 
‘ ‘ "■ \V? "“t United States, Reagan admimstra- 

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N tion oflirials have argued that their 

■iVilJ:" " **' pdicy has succeeded in measaraUy 
lowering the level of riderice in 
Z southern Africa. . . 

B j 5 v . The somhera Africa region now 
h ti !, Ch ' u r “^ has less video* than at any time in 
iz; r - ^ the past 10 years," one se4r Ui 
- ... .* diplomat said earlier this year, a 

" : v * r;nn &• *atement echoed ■ lepraietfly by 

• ‘ rAf ^s:Vbte Department officials. They 
.V ' ai ^ contend that the U-S. policy of 

• '• seeking wanner ties with all coun- 

• '• Be; tries in the repon, including South 

• ' r.-.?j N£; Africa, Has played a rde. 

" r '* But recait events, indndiQg the 

• " f raid, have undermined this argu- 
■ ■ ' • * • “..i- i ..'p meat and been used by critics who 

contend that constructive engage- 

1 mvr* ment has pven South Africa a freer 

— '• lvl{n w hand in threatening its neighbors. 

>’.»uvnw[ Last month, Angolan forces 
"■♦ MttuNMtg,- jdued two South African comman- 
i-nV.cs. : >: dos and captured a third inride 
‘/.. ’.V Angola just weeks after Pretoria 
u -T.^annouiK*d that allof its troops had 

' .“■.“withdrawn from that country. 

, -^^South Africa said that the com- 
r ‘ "^^iMioshad bccn ^thcring aittffi- 
...... .'.V^nce against anti-South African 

— — — ; ,’j guerrillas operating from Angolan 

r. iwiVvw^r territory, but Luanda presented ev- 
fil s ” idence mdiealing thattibe comman- 
, ? **■ ' L .' ; , dos were plannn^to sabotage oil 

• /;.installationsjomtlyQwnedbyAn- 
, ’ ^ gda and Gnn CHI Corp. . . 

Last week, Angola’s Marxist 
government accused South Africa 
' i $ of preparing for a new invasion of 

• ' ' territory.' A government coni- 

'• 1 muniqii6 said. that South Africa has 

massed four motorized brigades 
and IS battaiioos totaling 20,000 
l. » . ‘ ,. r men along the border betwea An- 

", .. .. •' gola and South-West Africa (Ha - 

-- — - mibia), supported by 90 fighter' 

V . ■■ • planes and heKcopteu. The Pre- 
1 . , < - : J- ioria government has not com 1 

u * ’ mented on the report. 

In Mozambique; escalating -vio- 
■ - ' - ■ lence between the Marxist govem- 

. ment and guerrillas of the Mozam- 
4 - pique National: Resistance 
- ••■■ jwvemcnt has caused more than’ 

• ITO deaths in the last two months, 

• according to news reports. In an 
‘ v emergency summit in Harare last 
Wednesday, President Samara Ma- . 
■ chel requested new mffitary assb- 

(Contmued on Pi®e S> CoL 1) 





hostages 
S leased theShiii, 




Armed hijackers of the TWA Boeing 727 at the jet's rear 
drirs in Alters, above, before it flew to Beirut on Sunday 
for the third time in 48 hours. At Beirut airport, top left, an 
official of the Amal militia, in turban, joins in negotiations 1 
•with the hijackers from the control tower. A freed passen- 
ger, lower left, embraces a woman relative in Athens. 


New Argentine Currency Meets Mixed Reactions 


By Lydia Chavez 

■ • New Yah Tones Service 

BUENQS AIRES— Argentines, 
have been forced to begttThinffing- 
in a astrals, their new currency, and 
that reaction has been one of out- 
rage, hope and bemused resigna- 
tion. 

The new currency, replacing the 
peso, took effect on Saturday. 
Gone, the government has said, are 
the days., of indexing the economy 
to keep pace with a LOlO^ercent 
inflation rate. Salaried wll be fro- 
zen as of July 1, and prices are 
locked mat those set last Thursday. 

The government, accustomed to 
printing money to cover its costs, 
fledged to keep the hew austral at 
a bed exchange rate equal to 
S135. Hie official exchange rate 
for 1,000 perns has been about 

$ 128 . 

“It is the week of australiz&tion 
that could ' be,ithe begiimmg of a 
new .era in Argentina,” one radio 
newsman proclaimed. 

Even the name chosen for the 
new currency evoked pioneers and 
undharted territory. Austral, which 
means southern, refers not only to 
Argentina's location but to its 
southernmost region, Patagonia, 
■where Argentines'- have struggled 


with the dements to make a home. 

“It is a profound reform of our 
economic system with the objective 
_of reconsttuttirig 
Argentina," President Raul Alfon- 
rin said on tdevision Friday. The 
plan represents a reversal of his 
former view that the country could 
painlessly recover from ks econom- 
ic decline. 


interviewed Saturday seemed ready 
to give the plan a try. Business 
leaders sard that if the government 
could sand by ihetaeasures, some- 
thing they expressed doubt about, 
the package could wort. 

On Friday, when the measures 
were announced, banks were closed 
by order of' the president of the 
central bank. 


The plan reverses President Rani Alfonsm’s 
earlier view that Argentina could painlessly 
recover from its economic decline. : 


‘it is a program that shows tre- 
mendous Political courage,” said 
Alberto Gnmoldi, an investment 
banker. Tf Alfonsln gets the confi- 
dence of the people and sticks to it, 
it could be a historic step.” 

Labor leaders and Peronist legis- 
lators have consistently denounced 
government austerity measures and 
so far have been able to make the 
government back down. Officers of 
the Peromst-led General Labor 
Confederation, the largest labor 
group, announced a “state of alert” 
to protest the measures. 

But shopkeepers and consumers 


The government began a broad- 
cast canmaign Saturday to explain 
the details and urge compliance. If 
the psychology of inflation, is not 
broken, it argued, shopkeepers 
would raise their prices despite the 
government's ban and unions 
would be able to win support fra 
crippling strikes. 

“Public confidence is every- 
thing," an economist said. 

Angling for support Friday, Mr. 
Alfonsm seemed aware of the im- 
portance of breaking the psycholo- 
gy of inflation and the every-mao- 


fop*umseIf attitude that is rooted 
in Argentina after decades of infla- 

hadTo*^6ften that there is 

ty, tStfoSe is no toble weflSSg 
when national ambition is lost," he 
said. 

Puchi Rohm, owner of the Banco 
General de Negodos, said of Mr. 
Alfonsra’s speoh: “He said the 
most important things ever said in 
this country, things I never 
dreamed 1 would hear. The presi- 
dent publidy committed himself 
not to allow the Central Bank to 
print money ” 

The government expects to cover 
its expenses with increases in taxes 
and tariffs, which have to be ap- 
proved by Congress, and external 
financing. If these fall short, Mr. 
Alfonsln will have to chose be- 
tween layoffs and printing money. 

After rumors last week that a 
drastic plan was imminent, many 
shopkeepers marked up prices by 
about one- third. Economists said it 
could be impossible to get mer- 
chants to reduce their prices to 
those set on Jupe 13, as decreed, 
but that the shock of the plan and 
the consequent drop in demand 
could help to bring the prices 
down. 


Experts Say 
Letters Were 
By Mengele 

■ By Ralph Blumenthal 

New York Tima Service 

SAO PAULO — Two American 
handwriting experts say that they 
have positively identified letters 
found in Brazil as having been writ- 
ten by Josef Mengele. the fugitive 
Nazi war criminal 

The finding is the first scientific 
evidence to back up testimony that 
the former Auschwitz death camp 
donor lived in and around S3o 
Paulo from 1961 until 1979, when 
friends say he drowned. 

The results of four days of hand- 
writing analysis were announced 
Friday by the federalpdice chief in 
.SSo Paulo, Romeu luma; David 
A Crown, of Fairfax, Virginia, for- 
ma- chief of the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency laboratory, and Gid- 
eon Epstein, an analyst at the 
Forensic Document Laboratory at 
the U.S. Immigration and Natural- 
ization Service 1 in McLean, Virgin- 
ia. 

“We made a thorough examina- 
tion and are definitely convinced 

(Controlled on Page 2, CoL 2) 


Reuters 

BEIRUT — The hijackers who 
look over a TWa airliner on Friday- 
ordered the plane back to Beirut ob 
Sunday after killing a passenger on 
Saturday. It was the third lime that 
the Boong 727. which had been 
bound from Athens to Rome, had 
landed in Beirut after two stops in 
Algiers. 

The hijackers, who are demand- 
ing freedom for abouL 700 Shiite 
Moslems being held by Israel, had 
released about 100 people during 
previous stops. Bui more than 40 
passengers and crew remained on 
board Sunday os hostages. 

Upon landing Sunday in Beirut, 
the hijackers asked Nabih Bern — 
Lebanon’s justice minister and 
minis ter for southern Lebanon and 
the leader of the Shiite Moslem 
Amal militia — to negotiate for 
them with three Western diplomats 
and other officials, airport security 
sources said. 

The hijackers called for water, 
fuel, food and newspapers, and re- 
peated earlier refusals to free any 
more hostages unless Israel re- 
leased the Smite prisoners. 

One passenger, so far identified 
only as a U.S. serviceman, was shot 
to death Saturday on the second 
landing in Beirut. His body was 
thrown onto the airport tarmac. 

A passenger released later in Al- 
giers said of the killing: “We all had 
our heads down with our hands on 
our heads. We heard the moment 
but did not see.” 

A U.S. Embassy spokesman in 
Madrid said that the body would 
be flown to a U.S. military installa- 
tion on a Spanish base for delivery 
to the man’s next of kin. 

Hie U.S. State Department said 
Saturday that it was investigating 
reports that eight Americans with 
Jewish-sounding names were spirit- 
ed off the plane after the second 
landing at Beirut International Air- 
port 

Kathy Fiedlib, a spokeswoman 
for a special hijacking task force set 
up by the State Department said 
that TWA had passed on a report 
by a released flight attendant that 
the eight had been taken off by 
accomplices of the hijackers after 
the hijackers examined their pass- 
ports and saw their names. 

“It seems to be a very credible 
story," she said. “In addition to the 
stewardess; several passengers have 
told the same story.” 

Trans World Airlines Flight 847 
touched down Sunday in Beirut at 
150 P.M. after the captain report- 
ed be was running out of fuel. As 
the plane circled Beirut, the Leba- 
nese authorities reversed a decision 
to prevent it from landing after its 
four-hour flight from Algiers. 

The hijackers asked Mr. Beni to 
negotiate with the British, French 
and Spanish ambassadors and offi- 
cials of the International Commit- 
tee of the Red Cross, the United 
Nations and Lebanon’s Interior 
Ministry, the sources said. 

Sources at Mr. Beni’s home in 
Beirut said that be had agreed to 
negotiate on condition that no hos- 
tages were harmed during the talks 
and that the' hijackers give him a 


*.£ i'*i f ’« ’ ’» 1 




East Bloc Tug-of-War: Desire for Autonomy vs. Need for Moscow’s Aid 


‘-I** • 






. - • *' \r-i 









. . «-ie •* 


GustavHusak 


Wojdech JaumzelsJd 


Erich Honecker 


As economic cooperation in Eastern 
Europe becomes more necessary, political 
cooperatum may be more difficult. 



Nicolae Ceausescu 




a- - ”‘r- 


■ ' . . * , 5 *. 





H* Anoooied fteu 


\ Todor Zhivkov 


. . . 1 - Mikhail S- Gorbachev 


CcnwaPim 

Janos Kadar 


By Bradley Graham 

Washington Post Saner 

WARSAW — Two powerful and 
opposing forces are tugging at 
Moscow’s allies in Eastern Europe 
with growing intensity. 

Although most of the Warsaw 
pact nations are continuing to 
strive for greater autonomy from 
the Soviet Union in Lheir national 
affairs, they are falling into deep- 
ened dependency on the Kremlin 
because of economic slowdowns 
and breakdowns in the region. 

How to manage these two trends, 
which may make political coopera- 
tion within the bloc more difficult 
as economic cooperation becomes 
more necessary, is one of the major 
challenges confronting the new So- 
viet leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

The air of uncertainty and paral- 
ysis that surrounded Kremlin rule 
auTing the drawn-out final years of 
President Leonid L Brezhnev and 
the abbreviated terms of Yuri V. 
Andropov and Konstantin U. 
Chernenko had its benefits for the 
Soviet satellites. East European 
leaders took advantage of the peri- 
od to promote national interests 
and ambitions. 

East Germany flirted more vig- 
orously with West Germany. Hun- 
gary launched another wave of eco- 
nomic reforms. Romania 
continued to draw attention to its 
foreign policy differences with 
Moscow. These moves highlighted 
the continuing struggle of Soviet 
diem states to assert greater au- 
thority and more individual foreign 
and economic views based on na- 
tional considerations. 

That Mr. Gorbachev might trv to 


reimpose a Stalinist type of unifor- 
mity on the bloc is dismissed by 
East Europeans and Western spe- 
cialists alike as something that he 
would neither contemplate nor be 
capable of achieving. 

But undercutting tire East Euro- 
pean nations’ hope of attaining 
wider independence of Moscow is 
the failure of its economies. 

The strategy of the 1970s, based 

In the Soviet Shadow 

Autonomy vs. Dependency 

First of three articles. 

on an opening to the West and the 
belief that Western credits and im- 
ported technology could revitalize 
the region’s economies, avoiding 
the need for structural reforms, 
proved disastrous. So far, the 1980s 
have yielded no bold alternative 
strategies for the Eastern bloc’s 
long-term recovery. 

Meanwhile, Moscow, beset by hs 
own economic difficulties, is hard- 
ening trade and investment de- 
mands mi its allies. It is insisting on 
better-quality East European 
goods in retain for the oil and natu- 
ral gas it supplies tire bloc. It is also 
seeking greater East European par- 
ticipation in the development of 
Siberian energy reserves. 

, The expected effect of these re- 
quests will be to pull bloc members 
into tighter orbit around Moscow. 

“In the 1970s the East Europe- 
ans looked as if they had credit and 
trade Jtjlematives. which don't look 
so feasible any more, and they are 
falling hack on the Soviet*” luid j 




Western ambassador with long ex- 
perience in Soviet bloc affaire. 
“The other side of the picture is 
that national questions are becom- 
ing stronger. So while cooperation 
at the economic level becomes 
more necessary, cooperation at the 
political level becomes more prob- 
lematical.” 

Always a worry for the Commu- 
nist elites is how their societies win 
accept the vanishing prospect of 
economic growth. Public support 
for socialism was won with prom- 
ises that residents of the captive 
nations or Eastern Europe could at 
least look forward to more affluent 
lives. 

Last month Eastern bloc govern- 
ments marked the 40th anniversary 
of the end of World War II in 
Europe with boasts of socialism's 
achievements in rebuilding the na- 
tions of the region. There was much 
to look back on with pride. From 
the war’s debris arose roads, homes 
and factories, and a mass migration 
took place from the depressed 
countryside to the cities, creating a 
new urban proletariat 

But the large majority of East 
Europeans have been born since 
1945, and their reference points are 
the 1960s and 1970s, when the So- 
viet bloc was striding toward a con- 
sumer society. Measured against 
these benchmarks, the reality of the 
present, burdened by shortages of 

(Confirmed oo Page 4, Col 6) 

Hungarian officials stress their 
determination to liberalize the 
country's economy. Page 7. 


public mandate to negotiate. The 
hijackers agreed, the airport 
sources said. 

Airport security officials said 
that the French ambassador, Chris- 
tian Graff, had said he was ready to 
negotiate but that the Spanish am- 
bassador, Pedro Manuel Aristegui. 
and the British envoy, David 
Miens, first wanted to contact their 
governments. 

President Ronald Reagan re- 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 

Greece Bows 
To Demands 
Of Hijackers 

New Ytvk Tutus Sen he 

ATHENS — The Greek govern- 
ment gave in to the demands of the 
hijackers of a Trans World Airlines 
jetliner by freeing one of tire hijack- 
ers’ associates in exchange for the 
release of S3 passengers, including 
eight Greek citizens. 

The TWA Boeing 727 was hi- 
jacked Friday after taking off from 
Athens and has since made two 
stops in Algiers and three in Beirut, 
where more than 40 persons were 
still being held hostage Sunday. 

The government said that the 53 
passengers were released Saturday 
by the hijackers in Algiers after the 
hijackers’ accomplice had been 
flown to Algiers in the company of 
Foreign Ministry officials. One of 
the Greek passengers was said to be 
Demis Roussos. a popular singer. 

The associate of ihe hijackers 
was identified as Ali Atwa, a 21- 
year-old Lebanese Shiite who was 
taken into custody Friday after he 
was left behind at the Athens air- 
port because of lack of space on the 
Boeing 727. 

. In a separate statement, a gov- 
ernment spokesman, Dimitrios 
Maroudas, said the other hijackers 
had managed to escape X-ray de- 
tection devices by concealing two 
small pistols and two hand gre- 
nades in fiberglass insulation mate- 
rial. 

The Greek spokesman said the 
exchange was negotiated through 
the night after the hijackers threat- 
ened to stan killing the Greek pas- 
sengers. 

■ Israelis Discuss Demands 

The Israeli cabinet met in secre- 
cy Sunday to discuss the hijackers' 
demand that Israel release Shiite 
Moslem prisoners. The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Jerusalem. 

A variety of sources said there 
had been no U.S. request to free the 
Shiite prisoners and that none was 
expected. The sources also said that 
should such a formal request be 
made by the Reagan administra- 
tion, Israel would have little choice 
but to comply. 

Although Israeli officials have 
said they intend to release all of the 
Shiite prisoners soon, they were 
clearly reluctant to contemplate 
freeing ihe prisoners under the 
threats oT the hijackers. 

U.S.-Israeli contacts on the hi- 
jack incident began Saturday and 
were largely conducted by Defense 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Rob- 
ert Flaten. the charge d’affaires at 
the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv. 

Mr. Rabin reported on the situa- 
tion during Sunday’s weekly cabi- 
net meeting. 

The cabinet convened itself as a 
“ministerial defense committee ” a 
forum in which secrecy is required 
by law. This was reinforced by 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres, who 
formally requested that there be 
“no public comment by govern- 
ment ministers or representatives 
on this subject." 


INSIDE 

■ Twenty-one UN soldiers 

from Finland were released by a 
Lebanese militia. Page 2. 

■ Hie countdown for the space 

shuttle Discovery' continued in 
preparation for Monday's 
launch. Page 3. 

■ Helmut KoM, ignoring heck- 

lers, told a rally ofSUesians that 
Bonn accepted its current na- 
tional borders. Page 4 

■ Rajiv Gandhi's US. visit has 

been viewed in India as a pre- 
lude to better relations between 
the two countries. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ World energy supplies are 

likely to tighten in the 1990s, 
the International Energy Agen- 
cy predicted. Page 7. 

I The strong dollar is seen bv 
many U.S. manufacturers as the 
main reason for idle capacity at 
their plants. Page 7 . 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


21 Finnish UN Soldiers 
Are Set Free in Lebanon 


By Israeli-Backed Militia 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli- 
backed: South Lebanon Army mili- 
tia has freed 21 Finnish soldiers of 
a United Nations unit after bolding 
them hostage for eight days. 

The Finns, who had been held in 
a small house next to the militia’s 
headquarters in the south Lebanese 
village of Marjayoun. were driven 
away Saturday morning in a bus 
belonging to the United Nations, 


ion. but they had not shown any 
hard evidence to support the con- 


tention. ■ 

In general, however, Israeli ofn- 


according to Israeli radio reports 
i is about 


from the scene. Marjayoun 
Gve miles (right kilometers) north 
of the Israeli border. 

The Finnish, soldiers, members 
of the UN Interim Force in Leba- 
non, declined to comment as they 
left the house in single Ole and 
boarded the bus. 

"Goodbye and gpod luck.” the 
commander of the South Lebanon 
Army, General Antoine Lahad, re- 
portedly told the Finns, shaking 
their hands as they left. 

They had been sleeping on cots 
and had been crowded into three 
rooms but had been kept under 
light guard and allowed beer and 
mail. 

“They are in good condition, 
only bored." the chief of staff of the 
UN force, Colonel Kari Korttila. 


said in Marjayoun. 
General Lahad aj 


: agreed Friday to 
release his captives after a repre- 
sentative of the International Com- 
mittee of the Red Cross convinced 
him that 1 1 South Lebanon Army 
militiamen whom the Finns turned 
over to the Shiite Moslem militia 
Amal on June 7 had defected — as 
ihe UN soldiers had contended — 
and bad not been forced to leave 
their own militia. 

The Red Cross representative 
hod interviewed the U militiamen 
in Amal 'g custody, aO of whom are 
Shiites, and had delivered to Gen- 
eral Lahad written statements by 
the men that they did not want to 
return to his force. General Lahad 
is a Christian, as are most members 
of the South Lebanon Army. 

The Israeli radio quoted General 
Lahad as saying after the Finns had 
been released that he still could not 
believe that the 11 men had left his 
militia of their own free wtiL 

Senior Israeli military officials 
continued to insist that the Finns 
had not behaved in a neutral fash- 


had been resolved. Became of the 
Israelis’ links to the militia, the in- 
cident caused them embarrassment 
internationally and soured their re- 
lations with Finland and other 
Scandinavian countries. 

Israel’s relations with the South 
Lebanon Army are ambiguous. 
The force was created by the Israeli 
Army and is armed, trained and 
funded by it. On Saturday, the Is- 
raeli Army brought reporters based 
in Israel to Marjayoun to witness 
the release. Israeli military officials 
said privately that if they wanted to 
they could order General Lahad to 
do whatever they demanded. 

But they added that if they did 
that. General Lahad probably 
would refuse to act any longer as 
Israel’s proxy in southern Lebanon. 
Before he derided to release the 
Finns, the general had threatened 
to resign as bead of the militia if 
Israel forced him to free them. 

Because the Israelis believe they 
need the South Lebanon Army to 
take the burden of patrolling the 
border area off their own troops. 
General Lahad has a good deal of 
leverage. 

After withdrawing most of its 
troops, Israel continues to main- 
tain several hundred soldiers in a 
security zone to patrol and to ad- 
vise the South Lebanon Army. The 
zone, just north of the Israeli bor- 
der, is five to nine miles wide. 

Israel and the South Lebanon 
Army had hoped that, as a result of 
the capture of the Finns, the 5,900- 
member UN force would agree to 
establish de facto relations and 
lines of communication with the 
militia. But there was no indication 
that such an arrangement was part 
of the deal to release the Finns or 
that it could be expected. 

The UN force has informal con- 
tacts with Amal, whose leader, Na- 
bih Beni is minister for southern 
Lebanon in the Lebanese cabinet 

The United Nations has been 
conducting an inquiry into how 
and why the Finns transferred the 
1 1 militiamen to Amal Timor 
G&ksd, a spokesman for the UN 
force, said that the results would be 
made public soon. 



U.S., Hijackers Turn 
To Algeria as Mediator 


WORLD BRIEFS 


U.S. Factory Death Is Ruled Murder * 

,«.< . rnMRin have hem 


Diplomatic Role in Iran Hostage Gists, 
Third World Stance Create Confidence 


By David B. Ortaway 

StisfcKgraH Pan Serene 

WASHINGTON —The United 
Suues and the Shiite extremists 
who hijacked a Trans World Air- 


lines plane Fridav both appear to 
have a great deal of faith in the 


second time in Algiers, issued a 
communique hailing Algeria as the 
only country that understood their 
cause and thanking Algeria’s lead- 
er, Colonel Chadli Bendjedid. 

-How we wish that the Arab 


CHICAGO (WF> —Two business executives and a *** 

convicted of murder in a case stemntiqg*fro» the death of "*o 
inhaled evanide fumes while working in a stiver SvQ _ 

* convicted Friday in the death r 


foreman, were 


Gdab, 61. a Palish immigrant employed at the plant. 


klUU 

Feb. 10. 198?, of Stefan 


employed at tot . 

The company recovered siJverby bathing u*d phcuograpja c film .in 
— w. «rked over the < 


chemical vats. Duringthe 


great 

government of Algeria. 

The United States, which turned 
to Algeria in 1980 to mediate the 
release of U5. hostages in Iran, 
once again has found itself heavily 
beholden to Algeria for a similar 
mission. Tins time, the incident 
reached Algerian soil. 


countries would follow the example 
he defeat 



of Algeria for unity, for the 
of world imperialists and the liber- 
ation of Palestine,” they said. 

In late 1980, it was the Islamic 
revolutionaries in Tehran holding 
52 U.S. hostages who set the prece- 
dent of turning to Algtan as an 
acceptable intermediator with 
Washington. Algeria negotiated re- 
as wril as a 
on claims filed 


cyanide solutions. Mr, Golab worked over 

trial, former employees testified that the, - — -- - , 

bums and voKgwhhe working at the plant. 
that the firm deliberately hired iifcgol aliens and f*" 
little command of English so they would not complain about hazardous 
conditions. 

Ver Vows to Resume Post If Acquitted 

MANILA (UPI) - General Fabian C-Yer 

’Js post as chief of staff of the Philippine armec **■ ' “■£ 

if hTis acquitted at the trial forthe murder of 
i he urnuld retire at the proper tune, 


resume his 

of honor if nc » atqimiGu un. uuu «»• - - - - -- ,-v.; 

Jr. But the general, who is 65, said he would retire at the proper um. 
/m vniirtiqi cMMt libeiv after the court last Thursday threw oat ft 


The commander of the South Lebanon Army, Antoine 
lahad, left, says goodbye to one of the 21 F innish soldiers. 


ordered back to Beirut for the third 
time Sunday. 

US. officials pot heavy diplo- 
matic pressure an Algeria to allow 
the hijacked plane to land in Al- 
giers because of their confidence, 
based on the Iranian hostage expe- 
rience, in that government’s diplo- 
matic slriBs to wiih ihe crisis. 

In addition, there was consider- 
able concern m Washington that 
the hijackers might otherwise set 
down in Libya, whose leader. Colo- 
nel Moamer Qadhafi. is a sworn 
enemy of the United States. 

The hijackers, upon landing a 


by Iran and the United States. 

U.S. officials from Jimmy Car- 
ter, then the president,, on down 
hailed the extraordinary negotiat- 
ing skills and “creative mediation'’ 
of the Algerians. 

In this incident, it is the hijack- 
ers’ respect for Algeria’s revolu- 
tionary past — an eight-year war 
for independence from France and 
the championing of numerous 
Third World causes — that appar- 
ently explains their derision to fly 
there in the first place and then to 
to Algiers. 



mam h>nn«M. „•••* — ■ — — ■ ■ 

Aquino, the opposition leader. «■ -- — — - ^ 

tiial Ahport onAug. 21. 1983. The evidence.; bagf « 'General Vn£ 
testimony to a civilian commission lost year, was ruled to violate ms tight 

ag W«era f ^^maKhave said that General Ver might return toWspCb r 
for a month and then retire, but he said in an interview that % days 
would be too short a time." General Ver has been on leave smee October 
when the commission named him. 24 other soldiers and a cninan 
b usinessman as indictable for Mr. Aquino’s murder. 


Talks Set on European Fighter Plan 

LONDON (Reuters) -—West European defense ministers pjan ned to 
Monday for talk s that could deride the fate of a proposed European 


return again 


recently has been draw- 
to the Uni] 


Hijackers Land Third Time in Beirut 


(Continued from Page 1) 
turned Sunday to Washington 
from his retreat at Camp David in 
Maryland and issued a warning to 
the hijackers. 

"They themselves will see for 
their own sake, they’d better turn 
these people loose.” Mr. Reagan 
said. “There have been instances 
when hijackers have found that ac- 
tion is taken that resulted in their 
death or capture.” 

He refused to say if the United 
States was contemplating action 
against the hijackers. 

There were unconfirmed reports 
thai units of the UJS. Della Com- 
mando Fence, elite anti-terrorist 
troops, left thrir base at Fort 
Bragg, North Carolina, on Satur- 
day for the Mediterranean region. 

The U.S. Secretary of Defense. 
Caspar W. Weinberger, would not 
confirm the reports, noting that the 


group has always operated in se- 
cret 

Mr. Reagan said that the U.S. 
government had been in contact 
with the governments of Lebanon, 
Syria and Israel over the hijacking. 

The airliner was seized Friday by 
two gunmen as it was en route from 
Athens to Rome. Since then, its 
pilot has been forced to fly three 
times to Beirut and twice to Al- 
giers. During the first stop in Bei- 
rut, several other armed men 
boarded iL 

in Paris, a TWA spokesman said 
that the hijacked plane was nearing 
its mechanical limits. 

"The plane reaches its physical 
limit after a certain amount of 
time,” said Stephen Heckscber, the 
airline’s international communica- 
tions director. “These planes are 
serviced as regularly as possible 
when they are on the ground.” 


Aftermath in Liverpool: Where to Put Blame 


By Jo Thomas 

Nett York Tunes Sefrice 

LIVERPOOL — "You’ll Never Walk 
Alone,” says the wrougbt-iron motto over the 
gates of the Liverpool soccer club. After 
Brussels, that sense of shared euphoria has 
been replaced by other emotions: shock, cha- 
grin and anger. 

In the pubs and narrow brick homes of a 
city that has been brought to its knees by 
fleeing industries and unemployment, these 
new emotions are hard to bear. For a long 
time, Liverpudlians have been living on 
pride. 

Their two soccer dubs, Liverpool and 
Everton, were both champions this year. 


Everton, the League Cup winner in England, 
Hatches 


played five matches on the Continent before 
winning the European Cup Winner’s Cup. 
All went off uneventfully, including the final 
match in Rotterdam on May 15. 

As the Liverpool fans set off for Brussels to 
see their team, the national champions, play 
the Italian champions, the Juventus team of 
Turin, for the European Cup on June 5, they 
look with them a 21-year record of good 
behavior. Then came the honor of the vio- 
lence. seen by millions on television. 

"Liverpool will be remembered for the fact 
that 38 people died,” said Debbie Salters, 22. 
“It cancels out 21 years.” She and her hus- 
band were outside the stadium when the 
deaths occurred. 

“What’s annoyed me the most is they 
haven’t even fined Juventus," she added. “It 
takes two to make a fight.” 


Many Liverpool fans in interviews blamed 
outsiders and agitators, the bad condition of 
the stadium, the failure to make sure fans had 
tickets, poor policing and crowd control lar- 
dy rescue efforts and the Juventus fans. Now 
and then they blamed themselves. 

The Liverpool Echo asked for letters from 
fans and had 120 replies. Some were pub- 
lished last week, including one from a sup- 
porter who confessed anonymously to fight- 
ing with the Italians. “Oh God, I’m sorry," he 
wrote. 

As they try make sense of what happened 
in Brussels, the citizens of Liverpool arc try- 
ing to make amends. They have set up a 
Brussels Disaster Appeal fund, and city lead- 
ers and two fans who rescued badly injured 
Italians wfli visit Turin next week on a peace 
mission. 

“I have lived next door to the football 
ground for 15 years,” said Jean Cawley, who 


“We had a lot to drink in tfae.pub before 
the game,” he said. “That’s always pan of it” 
They went to Brussels without tickets, be 
said, hoping to buy them at the match. But 
the fence had been knocked down, so they 
just walked in. 


the 


We started getting punched and spat at by 
Juventus fans,” he said. “There was one 


was sitting in The Albert pub with a group of 

is. “I\ 


friends. “I've never seen anything like that 
disgusting mess in Brussels. You get noise, 
people and mess, but never any trouble." 

“It’s the National Front," she said, refer- 
ring to the white-supremacist group. “They’re 
ignorant. They’re bored out of their skuR 
That does not represent UveipooL Everyone 
is disgusted. I bad a bad background, but it 
didn’t make me grow up evil" 

Sean Herithy, 27, an unemployed carpet 
cleaner having a pint of beer at the King 
Harry pub in Airfield, near the Liverpool 
stadium, said he went to Brussels with eight 
friends in a van. > 


lad, about 14 years old, he must have lost his 
dad or something, and the Juventus fans 
started beating him up. Others went to help 
him. and all hell broke loose. If you see 
someone getting attacked, you help. 

“What’s happening now is scandalous. 
We're scapegoats.” 

John NeiU, 17, who is out of school and 
unemployed, said, “I’d never go to a Europe- 
an Cup final again.” He went to Brussels with 
a ticket and was frightened by the fighting. 

Soccer, he said, is a big part of his life. “I’d 
like to have a job, anything,” he said. 
“There’s nothing to do here but just walk 
around. That’s why I like going to a match. 
Whenever the season ends. I’ve got nothing to 
look forward to.” 

Frank Cassidy, a timekeeper at the Hus- 
kinson Docks, said: “When I came to (he 
docks 35 years ago as a laborer, there were 
27,000 dock laborers. That’s down to 3.000. 

“This is a country of two nations — north 
and south — and the north end has been 
ruined since Mrs. Thatcher took office. The 
people who have the capital will not invest in 
the north. 


“Economically," he said, Liverpudlians 
“are battered. Physically, they retaliate." 


Thousands Hear Nicaragua Cardinal Call for Peace 


By Robert J. McCarmey 

Washington Post Semce 

MANAGUA — Nicaragua’s 
newly elevated Roman Catholic 
cardinal, Miguel Obando y Bravo, 
has called for national reconcilia- 
tion and peace at an open-air Mass 
attended by 30,000 people. 

Cardinal Obando, the most 
prominent critic inside Nicaragua 
of the country's government, gener- 
ally sleeted clear of politics in a 
brief homily. But many people at 
the gathering appeared to consider 
it an anti -government rally. 

The cardinal was returning home 
for the first time since his May 25 
investiture in Rome. He flew to 
Managua from Miami. 

He pledged Saturday to share his 
country’s “happiness, its suffer- 
ings. its difficulties and its aspira- 
tions.” and urged his listeners not 
to lose hope despite the civil war 
and a stumbling economy. 

“Let us construct a peace, a true 
peace, where we Nicaraguans see 
each other os brothers,” be said. 

The head of the National Bish- 
ops Conference, Bishop Pablo An- 
tonio Vega, made several veiled 
criticisms of the Sandinists in an 
address shortly before Cardinal 


Obando’s homily. Occasional 
shouts ol “Down with commu- 
nism!" were beard from the crowd, 
and some participants made anti- 
Saadinist comments to reporters. 

Cardinal Obando is the first car- 
dinal in Nicaragua's history. 
Church officials, diplomats and 
Nicaraguan opposition politicians 
say this new prestige wul give him 
additional clout in criticizing the 
government on such issues as the 


military draft and what the church 
views as the Sandinists’ efforts to 
build a regimented society. 

Church officials were disap- 
pointed in Saturday's turnout. But 
at least 100,000 people turned out 
Friday night to welcome Cardinal 
Obando bade to Nicaragua. 


av a 

procession Friday from the airport 
were generally peaceful. But the 


Interior Ministry reported Satur- 
day that 1 1 policemen were injured 
during a confrontation at the air- 
port with people awaiting the car- 
dinal- Eight youths were detained. 

Both the procession and the 
Mass were broadcast live on Cath- 
olic Radio and on. radio stations in 
Costa Rica and Miami. Managua's 
morning newspapers, which are 
both pro-San dinist, ran from page 
stories on the cardinal’s return. 


U.S. Experts Identify Letters as Mengele’s 


(Continued from Page 1) 
beyond a shadow of doubt that 
they are written by Josef Mengeie.” 
said Mr. Crown, referring to docu- 
ments found this month at the 
borne of a couple who say they 
sheltered Dr. Mengeie in the 1970s. 

“We nude independent exami- 
nations and then compared our re- 
sults.” Mr. Crown said. “We have 
no doubts. It’s a definite identifica- 
tion. We're staking our reputations 


would be disclosed in a report by 
the chief of S3o Paulo’s federal po- 
lice laboratory, Valmir Joaquim da 
Silva. 

Mr. Tuma said that other experts 
were studying die results of finger- 


print tests on objects said to have 
beloi 


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An analysis of the ink in the 
documents was made by Antonio 
A. Cantu of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, but his findings were 
withheld pending additional tests 
of ink samples in Washington. 

The documents found in S3o 
Paulo were compared with forms 


Dr. Mengeie completed while with 

Lite Nazi SS in 1938 and 1939. 


the elite 

The doctor was charged with the 
murders of 400.000 people at the 
Auschwitz concentration camp in 
Poland during World War II. 

Mr. Crown, Mr. Epstein and Mr. 
Tuma declined to specify the na- 
ture of the papers. They said this 


longed to Dr. Mengeie. He said 
some that prints that experts had 
hoped to connect to him proved to 
be unrelated. 

The documents, Mr. Tuma said, 
left “no doubt about Josef Men- 
gele’s stay in Sao Paulo,” adding, 
“So. we don't have any doubts that 
Josef Mengeie came to Sao Paula, 
that he was in S4o Paulo.” 

■ ‘Mengeie’ Saleton Examined 

Forensic experts rebuilt the skel- 
eton of a man believed to be Dr. 
Mengeie and examined the skull 
and hair samples. United Press In- 
ternational reported Saturday from 
S3o Paulo. 

“We have completed assembly of 
the skeleton and can now begin 
detailed studies aimed at identifi- 
cations," said Ramon Manubens. a 
member of the Brazilian team of 
forensic experts. 


“Today we begpn an examina- 
tion of hair found on the skull and 
we have already made some helpful 
observations,” said Dr. Marcos de 
Almeida, a forensic pathologist 
who specializes in hair studies. He 
provided uo details. 

The Brazilian team already has 
made some positive identification 
on the remains, including matching 
the man’s height and weight with 
Dr. Mengele's. 

Dr. Wflmes Tdxeira, head of 
Brazil’s forensic pathology team 
said that the approximate height of 
the man whose skeleton he exam- 
ined was 1.75 meters. German war 
records show Mengelewas 1 .74 me- 
ters tall, or 5 feet 814 indies. 

He said that the Brazilian ex- 
perts have that the remains were 
those of a white male about 65 to 70 
years of see. Dr. Mengeie would 
have been 68 in 1979. 

The skeleton also showed “an 
abnormality in the pelvic bone,” 


i a motorcycle accident i 
1943. Dr. Tdxeira said. 


r 


Mr. Heckscber said there were 42 
passengers and three crew mem- 
bers still aboard the plane. The 
number of hijackers was undear, 
he said, adding: “Tm not sure even 
the pilot knows.” 

Mr. Heckscber said that the hi- 
jackers had forced passengers to 
put tbdi heads on then 1 knees when 
the plane first landed and gave 
them karate chops on the back of 
their necks. 

He said that the violence had 
occurred mainly during the early 
part of ihe hija&mg. The hijackers 
treated men and women equally 
badly, said Mr. Heckscher, who 
traveled to Paris from Algiers with 
16 of the passengers released there 
Saturday. 

Mr. Heckscber said that a TWA 
flight attendant. Uli Derickson, 
was punched in the chest. She was 
released in Algiers. 

“She stood up to ihe hijackers 
and was very firm with them.” be 
said He said that at one point they 
tied up a man with cord and that 
she cut it and threw it away, asking 
them: "Why do you insist on beat- 
ing up people who are dang what 
you’re telling them to do?” 

Ms. Derickson became a heroine 
for the passengers, said Mr- 
Heckscber, adding: “She gave them 
something to hang on to.” 


mg closer to me united States. Col- 
onel Bendjedid’s visit to Washing- 
ton in April for talks with President 
Ronald Reagan was a milestone in 
the reorientation toward the West 
that the Algerian l eader has been 
slowly undertaking since costing to 
power in 1979. The state visit was 
viewed as a trig success by both 
sides, and it opened for the first 
time the possibility of U.S. arms 
sales in Algeria. 

Having acceded to Washington's 
entreaties to allow the hijacked 
TWA plane to land at Algiers air- 
port, reversing its initial decision 
not to become involved, the Algiers 
government found itself in the mid- 
dle of an extremely delicate situa- 
tion. 

An Algerian diplomat in Wash- 
ington described the negotiations 
held Saturday on the plane be- 
tween two Algerian diplomats and 
tbe Shiite hijackers as ’’very 
tough.” 

He described the Islamic extrem- 
ists as “very young, very suicidal 
and very tough" and stressed tbe 
use of psychology in dealing with 
them and “keeping them talking.” 

According to television and ra- 
dio reports, the Algerians relied on 
the Koran and various religious ar- 
guments in their bid to persuade 
the hijackers to release tbe remain- 
ing passengers. 

The Algerians avoided any coer- 
cion. such as shooting out the 
plane's tires, partly out of what was 
seen as concern for maintaining 
their good relations with both the 
Lebanese Shiites and Iran. 


^Thc European Fighter Aircraft was proposed in 1983. but negotiations 
have stalled in arguments over its size and role and over project teaUQ-- 
ship. British officials have said that the venture could collapse if progress 

is not made during the two days of talks. 

Britain, France, Italy, Spain and West Germany agreed last month r— 
weight and engine requirements lor the plane. Monday s meeting was tef 
to consider expert opinions on whether those specifications could i 
all parties. 


Afghan Rebel Blast Is Said to Kill 140 

■n, iwinm n.i Mil rvimli- were killei 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) — About 140 people wore killed 
this month when a rebel bomb explosion wrecked a building in Mazar-i- 
Sharif in northern Afghanistan, guerrilla sources reported Sunday. 
They said the blast destroyed the top two storys of the three-story Haji 

. , m L L.yj: i j.u, kOW .mii rtf thi* rl^hric rrvr nn tn 


Mwuujwv — — - # 

Saieem Shah building and rescuers dug bodies out of the debns Tor up to 
tie bio ~ ’ 


four days after iheblast June 5. They quoted witnesses as saying most of 
those killed were members of the ruling Communist Party who were using 
the building as a hostel. No independent confirmation of the report was 
immediately available. ■ 

Mazar-i-Sharif is the capital of Balkh province, which borders the 
Soviet Union. An estimated 115.000 Soviet troops are stationed in 
A fghanistan to help President Babrak Karmal's government fight the 
guerrillas. W 


2 in House Assail Billings for Copters 

WASHINGTON (UPI) —Two Democratic congressmen said Sunday 



billings to tbe Defense Department 
Representative Bill Nichols of Alabama, who is chairman of the House 
Armed Services investigations subcommittee, and Samuel S. Stratton of 
New York, tbe procurement subcommittee chairman, said the company’s 
records were “in a deplorable state” when subcommittee and Pentagon 
investigators examined billings for tbe years 1979-1983. 


For the Record 


Police in Italy began a nationwide anti-Mafia sweep on Saturday with 
the arrest of 26 people in Palermo. Milan and other cities, the authorities 
reported. (AeA 

A gunman in Northern Ireland killed a part-time police officer ear/ 
Sunday as he sat next to a woman in a car parked outride her home ip 
Kilrea, 36 miles (58 kilometers) northwest of Belfast, the police said. (AP) 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


Page 3 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


RaimgliieTV Appeal 
(H Modern Presidents 

Jack Valenti, president of the 
Motion Picture Association of 
America and once a special as- 
sistant to President Lyndon B. 
Johnson, is considered an ex- 
pert on public speaking. He 
says that Mr. Johnson was a 
great speaker in small groups. 
Fan Las tic era the campaign trail. 


in Hr 


'•mu 


«n Kuiojk 



a 


K„ . t - 






fin*! ^ asf I* Said to K| 


\ ■■ ■ ■ . 


\P*dtd 

iicj- 


r ."ll 




but bad on television. And, he 
says, if there had been televi- 
sion when Roosevelt was presi- 
dent, “FDR would have been 
elected Jong." 

But the best of all on TV, Mr. 
Valenti says, is Ronald Reagan, 
who never loses eye contact, 
even when reading a speech. He 
rates John F. Kennedy a dose 
second and gives Richard Nix- 
on and Jimmy Carter low rat- 
ings for their television person- 
alities. 


w* \**ai! !ti 


InrC^i 


* 


• • * • *2% . 


trurd 




Short Takes 

Two thieves cau. 
the Civil War battleground 
Richmond, Virginia, for bullets, 
buttons, bayonets and the like 
have been sentenced toa year in 
jail. The National Farit Service 
used to “seed” historic grounds 
with metal shavings to con- 
found metal detectors, but 
modern devices pmeirafe this 

The US. Forest Service has 
been using napalm drops for 
years to set fire to scrub lands. 
Now it also is setting lire to 
standing timber in an effort to 
regenerate aging forests. The 
aim is to burn out dying, para- 
site-infested trees and litter on 
the forest floor, both of which 
are fire hazards. 


The lumbar of federal, state 
and local elected officials who 
are black readied 6,056 at the 
start of this year, according to 
tfae Joint Goiter for Political 
— .Studies, a Washington research 
Wgroup dealing with black issues. 
.. :?Tn said that despite the guns. 


'■ -'r.d 


“blacks stiD bold only 1.2 per- 
cent of the 490,800 elective of- 
fices in. the country." It added, 
“Blade elected officials contin- 
ue to be concentrated m blade 
majority districts and generally 
depend on the black electorate 
for victory.” - 


Tree-Hnggersvs. 

Industrial Tourists 

The dry, mountainous Colo- 
rado Plateau centered on south- 
ern Utah is ^lhe least populat- 
ed. most remote" portion of the 
contiguous 48 states, says Mike 
Scott, Washington lobbyist for 
tfae Wilderness Society. Envi- 
ronmentalists want , the plateau 
declared a wilderness area, pro- 
tected from permanent human 
presence or motorized incur- 
sion. 

Calvin Black, chainnan of 
the San Juan County Commis- 
sioners. replies, “We want de- 
velopment, within reason, that 
will open this land up to more 
- visitors and to metre of the kind 
of traditional energy develop- 
ment” that makes jobs. 

The fight goes on, with some 
mifld name-calling. For environ- 
mentalists, visitors who travel 
in house traders, motorcycles 
and boats, who buy gasoline, 
iftuy at supermarkets and stay 
at moteLs, are “ industrial tour- 
ists." For the development- 
minded, hikers who cany their 
own -tents uni sleep on the 
ground are “wind-kissers” and 
“tree-huggers.” 


Notes About People 

Back from die ultimate jun- 
ket, Senator Jake Gam, a Re- 
publican of Utah and the first 
la wmaker in space, told mem- 
bos of the' Senate Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation 
Committee's subcommittee on 
science, technology and 
of the “absatoldy incredible' 
and “absolutely limitless” fu- 
ture be senses for space. “We 

gram” the senator testified 

Colonel Harry Summers Jr., 
whose book, “On Strategy: The 
Vietnam War in Context,” criti- 
cized the policies that led to the 
fall of South Vietnam, is retir- 
ing from the U.S. Army, where 
he has been teaching military 
history at the Army War Col- 
lege. to become senior military 
correspondent for U.S. News & 
World Report magazine. 
Among his chief theses were 
that the UJL government never 
mobilized public opinion and 
that the U.S. military went after 
the Viet Cong insurgents when 
it should have concentrated on 
the North Vietnamese Army. 


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Space Shuttle to Conduct Test of Laser for SDI on Wednesday 


By William J. Broad 

New York Tima Service 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida 
— The countdown continued 
zhroogh the weekend Fa- a week- 
long mission of the space shuttle 
Discovery that will include the first 
shuttle experiment to develop 
weapons for President Ronald 
Reagan’s proposed shield against 
nuclear 

The shuttle was scheduled to 
take off at 7:33 A.M. Monday with 
seven crew members, includin g a 
Frenchman and a Saudi prince. 
Plans caQ for the crew to release 
four satellites into orbit. 

The missile defense test is sched- 
uled for Wednesday, when a low- 
powered laser in Hawaii is to 
bounce its beam off a rm'r - 

tor dial wfj] be mounted on a win- 
dow of the Discovery. The goal is to 
see if computers on (he ground can 
adjust the hw h«nn to counteract 
the distorting effects of the Earth’s 
turbulent atmosphere. 

Dr. George A. Keywanh 2d, the 
president’s science adviser, has lik- 


ened such feats to “talcing the twin- 
kle out of a star.” 

The test is viewed by Pentagon 
officials as crucial to determining 
whether heavy, powerful lasers on 
the ground can be used to fire at 
enemy missiles in space. 

Critics of the president's Strate- 
gic Defense Initiative, which is 
widely known as “star wars,” have 
argued that some of its planned 
projects -might violate the 1972 
treaty that bans the construction of 
large-scale defenses and the testing 
of prototype anti-missile systems. 
But the laser test with the shuttle, 
which involves research, is seen by 
Reagan administration officials as 
wefl within the treaty’s limits. 

Removing the “twinkle” from a 
laser beam requires the use of a 
flexible mirror on the ground 
whose shape can rapidly be 
changed by computers, the atmo- 
spheric turbulence is measured and 
Lhen the minor is flexed to try to 
compensate for distentions in the 
laser beam. 


But critics say that such a tech- 
nique would draw an enor mous 
amount of electric power and could 
be severely hampered by poor 
weather. 

-The small laser for the shuttle 
test is at the UJ5. Air Force Maui 
Optica] Station on the Hawaiian 
island of Main. The success or fail- 
ure of the test will be announced. 
Pentagon officials said, but details 
win be kept secret. 

The laser experiment is viewed 

by critics as a new stage m the 
militarization of the shuttle pro- 
gram. On previous missions, the 
Defense Department has played a 
rote in performing pure science ex- 
periments or launching s^trfKtes. 
But this mission apparently is the 
first in which the shuttle is to be 
used directly in the development of 

arms 

Discovery's mission also in- 
dudes the launching of three com- 
munications satellites They are 
owned by Mexico, American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. and Arab 


Satellite Communications Organi- 
zation, or ArabsaL 

The fourth satellite, which is to 
be returned to the cargo bay after 
two days in space, is for experi- 
ments in X-ray astronomy. One of 
its goals is to scan the core of the 
Milky Way galaxy for evidence cf 
black boles, stars theorized to be so 
dense that even tight cannot escape 
their graviiationaJgrip. 

The commander of the mission is 
Captain Daniel C, Brandenstein 
and the pilot is Commander John 
O. Creighton, both of the U.S. 
Navy. The other crew members are 
Colonel John M. Fabian and Lieu- 
tenant Colond Steven R_ Nagel of 
the US. Air Force; Dr. Shannon 
W. Lucid, a mission specialist; Pat- 


rick Baudry, a French astronaut: 
and the first Arab astronaut. Prince 
Sultan Salman al-Saud, a nephew 
of King Fahd of Saudi Arabia. 

The mission occurs during Ram- 
adan, the holiest month of the Mos- 
lem year. The prince said that he 
would observe the holy period with 
prayers three times a Bay. 

[NASA security agents used wa- 
ter ran n on Saturday to blast apart 
a suspicious package for Prince 
Sultan, only to find they bad 
soaked a calculator and a manual 
intended to help the prince locate 
Mecca from space; The Associated 
Press reported from Cape Canaver- 
al. The unsolicited gift came from 
an unidentified Californian.] 

The shuttle is scheduled to re- 


turn June 24 for a landing at Ed- 
wards Air Force Base in California. 

■ Pnbfications Praise Flight 
Publications In Mexico and Sau- 
di Arabia have written enthusiasti- 
cally about Monday's flight. The 
Associated Press reported from 
Cape Canaveral 
“Allah willing, the kingdom en- 
ters the space age,” the Saudi news- 
paper Okaz wrote in an editorial. 
“Let the trip be the harbinger of a 
revival of the Islamic leadership of 
sciences and knowledge.” 

Magazines in Mexico have called 
the $150- million Mexican satellite 
project “a symbol of indepen- 
dence” and a sign of the country's 
“driving force" in the world. 


United Air Pilots Ratify Agreement 

Carrier’s Return to Full Operations Will Take 3 to 4 Weeks 


By Richard Witkin 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — The 29-day 
strike of 5,000 United Airlines pi- 
lots has «* n d ed with the ratification 
of a tentative agreement by union 
leaders. The airline said it would be 
back to full operation in three to 
four weeks. 

The last obstacle was removed 
Friday when the Association of 
Flight Attendants agreed that ihn« 
honoring the pilots’ nickel tine, a 
majority of its 9,000* members, 
would return to work without a 
contract The pilots’ union leaders 
approved the contract early Satur- 
day. 

The flight attendants, saying 
they would pursue the matter in 
court released the pilots from their 
pledge not to end the strike until 
the cabin crews had settled their 
differences with the airline. 

Both sides in the pilots’ strike, 
which curtailed the airline's opera- 
tions to 14 percent of its pre-strike 
average of 1.550 flights a day. 
claimed victory. 

Richard J. Ferns. United's chair- 
man, said the airline had won a 
two-tier wage scale that would 
make it “cost competitive” with its 
rivals. . 

Roger Hall head of the United 


unit or the Air Line Pilots Associa- 
tion, said Mr. Ferris had failed to 
break the union, which Mr. Hall 
said bad been a lop company goal 
He noted that a federal district 
judge in Chicago was being asked 
to decide critical back- to- work is- 
sues, including the question of 
whether nonstrikers could obtain 
cockpit assignments at the expense 
of strikers. 

Sources at the airline said United 
would begin to restore some service 
in the coming week. 

The strike began May 17 after 
negotiators in Chicago reached an 
impasse on a critical economic is- 
sue, the introduction of the two-tier 
wage scale, under which newly 
hired pilots would initially be paid 
at levels substantially below the 
wage scale provided in the previous 
contract. 

The union insisted that the newly 
hired pilots reach parity with previ- 
ously hired pilots in five years. The 
airlme insisted that parity should 
not be reached until a newly hired 
pilot had achieved captain's status, 
which in the past has taken 18 to 20 
years. 

A week after the strike began, a 
compromise was reached on the 
economic package. Under it, the 
two-tier system would be estab- 
lished for five years and, if the two 


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sides could not agree on an exten- 
sion, the issue would he submitted 
to binding arbitration. The union 
agreed to a company plan to pay 
newly hired pilots 34 to 50 percent 
less in that iwrw than employees 
hired before the strike. 

For instance, the old contract 
provides that a second officer 
would have yearly pay of $43,750 
in his second year with United; 
under the new agreement, that pQot 
would earn $26,400. A second offi- 
cer, also called a flight engineer, 
holds the lowest-ranking position 
in the three-pilot cockpit. 

But achievement of the econom- 
ic compromise did not end the 
strike, as many had hoped. The 
negotiations broke down over rival 
demands on conditions for getting 
back, to work. 

The most critical issue was Unit- 
ed's pledge that it would fulfill its 
promise to nonstriking pilots that 
they would retain advanced cockpit 
assignments at the expense of sink- 
ers with greater seniority. The 
union was adamantly opposed. 

Finally, last Wednesday, a com- 
promise on most of the back-to- 
work issues was achieved with the 
hdp of Helen W. Witt, the head of 
the National Mediation Board. 

Both rides agreed to let a federal 
District Court in Chicago deride 
whether nonstrikers could retain 
rights to advanced cockpit assign- 
ments, the status of the 570 train- 
ees, and the status of new!} hired 
experienced pilots. 


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Kohl Says Bonn Accepts Present Borders 

t 


By William Drozdiak 

Washmgtm Post Scmoc 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl, ignoring hecklers Sunday ai 
a rally of German exiles from areas 
thnl are now part of Poland, said 
lhat West Germany accepted cur- 
rent national borders. 

Speaking to a crowd estimated at 
10,000 in Hannover. Mr. Kohl in- 
sisted that West Germany bad re- 
nounced all territorial claims 
against Poland and wanted to re- 
vive the spirit of detente with the 
Soviet Union and its allies. 

Mr. Kohl's conciliatory tine to- 
ward East bloc governments drew 
whistles and catcalls from the gath- 
ering of Silesians, part of the large 
bloc or Germans whose roots trace 
back to homelands that are now in 
the East bloc. 

More than three million Ger- 
mans were driven out of Silesia 
after World War 11. while other 
German families fled homes in 
East Prussia and the Sudetenland 
that were later incorporated into 
the Soviet Union and Czechoslova- 
kia. A third of Germany's territory 
was ceded to East bloc govern- 
ments after the war. 

The exiles and their offspring, 
who are mostly supporters of Mr. 
Kohl's Christian Democrats, have 
been embittered by the chancellor's 
pursuit of belter ties with East bloc 
governments. 

Mr. Kohl stressed Sunday that 
the goal of future German unity 
through peaceful means "can only 
be solved with the help of our 
neighbors in East and West.” 

He said that the "German ques- 



Moscow has led a fierce propa- 
ganda campaign accusing the Bonn 
government of nurturing political 
forces lhat seek to regain lost Ger- 
man territories in Eastern Europe. 

Communist Party newspapers /”* * 

have kept up a barrage of cmid&m COIHWIMHISIM 
aimed at Mr. Kohl for indulging 
the “revanchist dreams” of Ger- 
man exiles purportedly ready to 
invade Eastern Europe and recover 
their former homelands by force. 

While conscious of the staunch 


Reagan Says Strains Growing in East Bloc 

l .5. tO &um Desires for Autonomy Conflict With Economic Needs 

How to Resist 


Chancellor Helmut Kohl told Silesian exiles that West 
Germany wanted to increase cooperation with Poland. 


uou has long been a source of tur- 
moiland instability” in Europe and 
that West Germans must under- 
stand the anxieties of the people 
around them. 

Thus, the chancellor argued, it 
was important for Bonn to accepL 
presen l frontiers and to reassure 
neighbors such as Poland chat “we 


have no territorial claims on each 
other and will not have any in the 
future either.” 

Mr. Kohl. Lhe first West German 
leader to attend the Silesians' annu- 
al convention in 20 years, was as- 
sailed in the Eastern European 
press for consenting to speak at the 
rally. 


political support his party enjoys 
among German exiles, Mr. Kohl 
clearly sought to use Sunday's 
speech to reiterate Bonn's adher- 
ence to reconciliation treaties 
signed in the early 1970s with Po- 
land and the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Kohl declared that bis gov- 
ernment was determined to deepen 
cooperation and understanding 
with East European nations. He 
advocated greater exchanges 
among West German and Polish 
youth groups so that the next gen- 
eration “will grow up as friends 
with one another.'* 

But he also sought to placate his 
audience, saying that he would do 
all he can to increase the number of 
exit visas granted to ethnic Ger- 
mans in Poland and other parts of 
Eastern Europe. 

Mr. Kohl repeated Bonn's de- 
mands lhat Poland should grant 
full minority rights to the estimated 
one million Germans sub living 
there, including the chance to run 
their own schools and speak their 
own language. Poland denies that a 
German minority exists in Poland. 


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"SW, w 


By John M. Goshko 

Riafoi-iiia Pm! Semce 

WASHINGTON — PresidenL 
Ronald Reagan has told the people 
of the Soviet Union and Eastern 
Europe that the United Stales in- 
tends by its example to “demon- 
strate that Communism is not the 
nave of the future” and to “show 
the captive nations that resisting 
totalitarianism is possible.” 

In an interview broadcast Friday 
by Radio Liberty and Radio Free 
Europe, Mr. Reagan appeared to 
be deponing from the conciliatory 
lone of his recent remarks about 
the Soviet Union and reverting to 
the view of the Soviet system that 
characterized his first term in of- 
fice. 

Mr. Reagan said lhat the free 
nations of the world should “pre- 
vent the fun her expansion of totali- 
tarianism throughout the world.” 

“If we succeed and we send a 
message to the Soviets that Com- 
munism can in fact be reasted.” he 
said, “then the Soviets will find it in 
their self-interest to accommodate 
the desires of their people who will 
see by the patterns of international 
politics that their own rulers are 
not omnipotent.” 

He also assured his listeners that 
Americans were “not Russophobes 
preparing for war” and added: 
“what 1 would like to tell the peo- 
ples or the Soviet Union is lhat the 
United States wants peace and 
wants an enduring, true peace, a 
peace where all people can live in 
freedom.” 

But Mr. Reagan’s main emphasis 
was on accusing the Soviet leader- 
ship of pursuing aggressive policies 
around the world and denying peo- 
ple “access to the truth." 

He died the need to overcome 
the “artificial” division of Europe, 
pledged continued efforts to win 
greater freedom for the people of 
Poland and said the revival of reli- 
gion in the Communist bloc “is one 
of the most hopeful signs on the 
horizon.” 

The State Department issued a 
statement Friday asserting that So- 
viet officials appear to be conduct- 
ing a “campaign against the current 
revival of Jewish culture." It de- 
tailed several instances of Soviet 
lews being arrested and persecuted 
and added: “Continuation of litis 
campaign constitutes a real obsta- 
cle to the constructive relations 
with the Soviet Union that the 
United Slates seeks.” 

Department officials said that 
the statement was not connected to 
Mr. Reagan's interview and did not 
foreshadow a shift toward a tough- 
er attitude in dealing with Moscow. 
The statement, they said, was 
prompted by concern that the 
plight of some Soviet Jews might be 
serious. 

They added, however, that there 
were no plans for Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz to caned bis trip 
to Helsinki next month for the 10th 
anniversary observance of the Hel- 
sinki accords, intended to provide 
greater human rights safeguards in 
all European nations. 

Radio Liberty, which broadcasts 
to the Soviet Union, and Radio 
Free Europe, which is directed at 
the East European satellite coun- 
tries. jointly claim an audience of 
55 million listeners. They ori^nally 
were controlled covertly by the 
Central Intelligence Agency but are 
now funded openly by the U.S. 
government. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
such simple baric goods as tooth- 
paste and toilet paper, poor or non- 
existent telephone service, lengthy 
waiting periods for cars and home 
appliances and a scantily of boos- 
ing. appears grim and depressing. 

Some countries suffer less than 
others. The East Germans and 
Hungarians are better fed and bet- 
ter supplied. So are the Czechoslo- 
vaks, though downhill drift is 
strong in their country. The Bulgar- 
ians are agriculturally sufficient 
but industrially pour. The Roma- 
nians are poor and are undergoing 
severe austerity measures. The 
Poles ore bankrupt. 


halation or Marxist ideology arc 
signs of a religious renewal. 

The pattern is as uneven os the 
patchwork of Roman Catholic. 
Protestant and Orthodox faiths 
that crisscross the six junior bloc 
partners. 

But particularly in Czechoslova- 
kia. East Germany. Hungary and 
Poland, clergymen and Westerners 
report growing numbers of people 
turning to, or turning back to, 
churches that under Marxist theory 
should not exist. Even from Bulgar- 
in and Romania come reports or 
increased churchgoing, though not 
amounting to major revivals. 

Some people arc seeking the 


Overall statistics cottfinn the church tut always «t «fnag» 

motives but to find political shelter 

for artistic expression or to protest 
the cabinin' buildup. Others go to 
find answers to questions of exis- 
tence that Communism does not 
provide for them. 

Perhaps the most alarming as- 
pect of the religious renewal for the 
Communists is the involvement of 


general sense of economic si 
tion evident on the streets of East- 
ern Europe. Except in East Germa- 
ny. national incomes in all the 
states grew more slowly on the av- 
erage in the last four years than in 
the 1976-SO planning period, when 
growth rates were, in turn, signifi- 
cantly lower than in the 1971-75 
period- 

“The mood on V-E Day this year 
was much different from 10 years 
ago.” said a 36-year-old Polish 
writer and father. ‘Today, food is 
rationed, housing is in short sup- 
ply. health service is poor. The bst 
of calamities is countless. 

“Is that the position someone 
who claims a big victory is sup- 
posed to be in? I don’t think so. 

This year was a big holiday only for 

the war veterans. For my genera- y OUn g people. East European 
tion, which grew up during improv- youth are turning toward unvfhing 
ing times, dungs are getting worse.” M d everything, it seems, except the 


Romania if governed by Nicola* 
Ccausescu more autocratically and 
ncputLSUcjlh than anv other bin; 
state. Yet Cciuwmju appears to rel- 
ish tweaking the Russians by sag- 
getting on numerous occasions that 
his country is a reluctant member 
of the Warsaw Pact 

Bulgaria, long regarded as one of 
the Soviet Union's most docile al- 
lies. has introduced a senes of eo?4 
noink- experiments involving a 
more flexible organizational struc- 
ture and it greater role for financial 
incentives. It has also expressed in- 
terest in expanding economic Iks 
with the West, inviting foreign in- 
vestors into joint vent arcs. 

Onlv Czechoslovakia adheres lo 
orthodox Soviet lines in all major 
respects. The Prague leadership re- 
mains traumatized by the Soviet - 
led invasion of 1**6N that ended its 
last reform movement 
Bloc officials readily ackhonl- 
edge that differences exist between, 
them in economic planning. 


'Revolutionary illusions 4 have to be 

wP 

discarded, because the path to socialism has 

turned out to be 'bumpier' than expected. 

— Ferenc Kami 
a Hungarian Central Committee secretary 


Admittedly, the economic slip- 
page in Poland has been the most 
pronounced in Eastern Europe. 
Warsaw borrowed more from the 
West in the 1 970s than other bloc 
states, and it wasted the most on 
uncompleted industrial projects 
and ill-advised licensing agree- 
ments. 

But even in Hungary, which is 
affluent by Eastern bloc standards, 
the official rhetoric is being toned 
down in recognition of harder 
times. No longer is the talk of unin- 
terrupted progress and the triumph 
of sooalism over capitalism. 

At a congress in April of the 
Hungarian Socialist Workers Par- 
ty. Ferenc Havasi, a Centra] Com- 
mittee secretary, declared lhat so- 
cialism in Eastern Europe was 
shedding its “revolutionary illu- 
sions.” 

He said lhat Communists used to 
believe that socialism meant “un- 
broken economic development" 
and a steady rise in the standard of 
living, immune to the effects of the 
political and economic “crises of 
capitalism.” But such illusions have 
to be discarded now, be concluded, 
because the path to socialism has 
turned out to be “bumpier” than 
expected. fuD of doubts and set- 
backs. 

It is not only the economies that 
have lost their verve. Among the 
biggest challenges facing East Eu- 
ropean leaderships is 10 instill a 
renewed sense of energy and excite- 
ment in their Communist parties. 

Gone is the ideological fervor 
that attracted some of the best and 
the brightest of the Eastern bloc to 
national Communist movements in 
the 1950s dnd 1960s. The primary 
argument heard nowadays to justi- 
fy the continued supremacy of the 
party is raison d’etat, code for hav- 
ing to live in the shadow of the 
Soviet Union and the need, there- 
fore, to pledge allegiance to Com- 
munism. This kind of argument at- 
tracts chiefly opportunists. 

“It’s hard to find a real Marxist 
anywhere to have a good argument 
with,” said Ernest BiylJ, a Polish 
writer who left the party in 1981 
when about one million others dkL 
Reflecting the intellectual ex- 


party. Many of those not interested 
in the church are involved with sex, 
drugs and rock music. They eagerly 
seek. Western literature arid films 
and desire fashionable dolhes, ra- 
dios, cassettes and so on. 

Only \\ percent of Poland's 
young people have enlisted in the 
party, according to official figures. 
In Hungary, a recent sociological 
study sponsored by the party's 
Central Committee confirmed that 
Communist ideology retained little 
influence on most youth, who pre- 
ferred indhiduality and indepen- 
dence to the party's collective 
ideals. 

“We used to believe that the gen- 
eration growing up under socialism 
would not be infected by national- 
ism. anti-Semitism or a petit bour- 
geois outlook or be influenced by- 
religion and bourgeois ideas." Mr. 


p roaches toward the West and tol- 
erance of internal dissent. 

To a certain extent, diversity aurr 
experimentation in Eastern Europe 
are being welcomed by the Rus- 
sians as a testing ground for new 
ideas and methods that may even- 
tually be absorbed by the Commu- 
nist motherland. Mr. Gorbachev 
himself spent time in 1983 studying 
Hungary's cooperative farms, 
which rent plots for private cultiva- 
tion. 

Some Western specialists detect 
loose coalitions of East European 
states at work attempting lo mod- 
erate Soviet actions and policies — 
Hungary, East Germany and Ro- 
mania in the foreign policy field, 
for instance, and Hungary ami Po- 
land in economic reform. Etui Et# 
ropean officials deny that much 
overt scheming of this sort lakes 
place but concede that things 
sometimes appear lhat way. 

“There is no declared intention. 


Havasi told Hungary’s party dele- no plan, nothing explicit," said 
gates. He imptiecT that this was far Wojciech Multan' deputy director 


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MONDAY, 
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from the case. 

As East European governments 
look for ways out of their economic 
and social predicaments, they buu 
up against certain constraints. One 
is Soviet hegemony. A second is 
what is referred to as “the leading 
role of the party,'* meaning the 
Communist Party's monopoly cm 
power, which remains inviolable. 

But within those bounds. East 
European slates have followed 
their own paths of development. 
Since the end of the period of Sta- 
linist conformity 30 years ago, each 
has found important points on 
which to depan from Soviet think- 
ing. and each has been doing so 
more assertively. 

Poland under General Wqjriech 
Jaruzelski has permitted the Ro- 
man Catholic Church to become a 
virtual junior partner in running 
the country, largely out of weak- 
ness but also in hopes of gaining its 
assistance in subduing what re- 
mains the bloc's most restless na- 
tion. 

The Polish stale is also resigned 
to leaving most of the country's 
arable land in the hands of private 
farmers rather than trying to col- 
lectivize them. It has adopted 
sweeping economic reform legisla- 
tion. though in practice the reforms 
are now largely stalled. 

Although genuine political plu- 
ralism seems out of the question, 
the authorities do tolerate the 
broadest airing of opinion found 
anywhere in the bloc, even if the 
public debates tend to focus more 
cm nuance than substantive princi- 
ples. 


of Warsaw's institute of Interna- 
tional Relations. “But it happens. 
It goes on by itself." 

Presumably to help smooth over 
growing differences. Warsaw Pact 
members have decided to hold 
more frequent top-level meetings, 
A Hungarian party official dis- 
closed that rather than waiting for 
formal gatherings of the pact’s p 
titied consultative committee —ft 
council of pony leaders that con- 
venes once every two years — East- 
ern bloc leaders now plan to sched- 
ule additional meetings when 
needed. 

For the East Europeans, tile 
prospect of extra discussions with 
Mr. Gorbachev carries the hope of 
exerting greater influence m Soviet 
bloc policy-making. But the meet- 
ings could have the opposite effect, 
giving him added ojqwrtutiities to 
rope nis allies into common stands 
on international and economic is- 
sues. 

Despite the external and internal 
pressures on them, the govern- 
ments of Eastern Europe stiU by 
and large exude considerable confi- 
dence about their bold on power. 
This derives in great measure from 
the stability and longevity of their 
leaderships. 

Bulgaria’s Tod or Zhivkov and 
Hungary’s Mr. Kadar have gov- 
erned for three decades. Romani# 
Mr. Ccausescu tins year celebrated 
his 20th year at the top. Czechoslo- 
vakia’s Gustav Husak has titled for 
16 years. East Germany’s Mr. Hon- 
ecker has consolidated his portion 
since taking charge 14 years ago. 

But most of the East European 


Hungary under Janos Kadar is leaders are old men. Mr. Zhivkov 
the region’s leading economic re- and Mr. Kadar are 73, Mr. Husak 


former and has instituted a second 
major round of decentralizing mea- 
sures moving in the direction of a 
free- market economy. The initial 
reform push was slowed by hard- 
line opposition in the early 1970s. 

Budapest officials have cultivat- 
ed the most privileged relations 
with the West in trade, tourism and 
scientific exchange of any Eastern 
bloc state. 

East Germany copes with (he 
pain of division by nurturing trade 
and financial ties with West Ger- 
man while constantly reaffirming 
its loyalty to Moscow. In a dramat- 
ic standoff with the Kremlin last 
year that tested this balancing act, 
the East German leader, Erich 
Honecker, openly toyed with the 
idea of going ahead with a visit to 
West Germany over Soviet objec- 
tions. 

Eventually, Mr. Honecker can- 
celled the trip, but the drama 
showed an emboldened East Ger- 
man leadership committed to pur- 
suing rapprochement with Bona 


and Mr. Honecker 72. Mr. 
Ceausescu, physically the most vig- 
orous, is 67. 

Throughout the region, a new 
generation of leaders is coming to 
power. In this sense, the Soviet 
Union is ahead, having already 
passed the torch to a man who was 
too young to fight in World War It 
The new East European crop 4* 
plays much of the same pragma- 
tism. the same technocratic inter- 
ests as Mr. Gorbachev. 

“They are a generation who have 
grown up under socialism,” said 
Ian Pucuak. director of Prague’s 
Institute of International Rela- 
tions. “Their thinking has been in- 
fluenced by that fact They haven’t 
the sentimental feelings or the same 
kind of frustrations my generation 
has had.” 

How these “little Gorbachevs" 
stand up to die main one in Mos- 
cow will go a long way toward 
determining the future of Eastern 
Europe. 

NEXT: Masco*.' stiffens trade terms. 


C H A N N E L 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


Page 5 


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After Success ful Gandhi Trip, Indians Look Forward to Improved Links With U.S. 


By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Past Service 

NEW DELHI — Tnrtiwrre arc 
looking forward to a new era of 
improved relations with die United 
States following what was seen here 
as a successful U.S. visit by Pome 
Munster Raj iv Gandhi 

But the recently retired Indian 
foreign secretary, Mahar^ Krishna 
Rasgotra, cannoned against pot- 
ting too much emphasis on posable 
arms sales that would attempt to 
wean India frtxn its nnKtaiy supply 
relationship with the Soviet Union. 

He said Mr. Gandhi was unlikely 
to enter into larawcale arms pur- 
chases that would jeopardize New 
Delhi's relationship with Moscow, 
which he said was important be- 
cause the Soviet Union is an Asian 
power with kmgbordcrs with Chi- 
na, Iran and Afghanistan. 

Mr. Rasgotra and other com- 
mentators tee said that Washing- 
ton’s arms supply relationship with 
Pakistan remains a maj or imtant 
between the United Stales and In- 
dia. Mr. Gandhi focused in his 
tflUrs with the Reagan administra- 
tion an what his country sees as the 
danger to h from a Pakistan armed 
with sophisticated UiL weapons. 


. V. ^ t 



- *•••••■> •• • • • & % tv- 

' r. ‘ i £ - 

: -.C- < 





. f ;* ' f ■ v v*.’. 




Prime Minister Rajiv Gamflii tours a space shuttle mockiip at the Johnson Space Center in 
Houston with Vice President George Bush, left, and the astronaut Robert L Crippen. 

However, Mr. Rasgotra, who (hat the visit went wdL Almost of a prime minister's visit to the 
laid the groundwork for the meet- every event of Mr. Gandhi’s trip United States has been available in 
ing between President Ronald Rear was seen live cm Indian television. India. 

ganand Mn Gandhi, concluded the first time such broad coverage Leading newspapers also earned 


four to five daily articles on the 
trip, including ones on how die 
US. press treated the prime minis- 
ter. 

The papers have not yet made 
any editorial comments on the im- 
part of the meeting between die 
leaders of the world’s two largest 
democracies, which have main- 
tained a trembled relationship for 
most of the last 25 years. But two 
respected journalists, H_K- Dua of 
the Indian Express and G-K. 
Reddy of the Hindu, in separate 
interviews, called the trip a success 
and said it should lead to better 
U.S.- Indian relations. 

K. Subrahmanyam. director of 
the Institute for Defense Studies 
and Analysis, acknowledged that 

Mr. Gandhi had mad* a good im- 
pression on the Reagan administra- 
tion. “Such trips are always good," 
be said. “We mil have to wait and 
see what concrete good emerges." 

"He is moving a little closer to 
tire United States, but gingerly.*’ 
said Mr. Dua, a columnist mid 
head of the .Express News Service: 
"His price is definitely Pakistan." 

Mr. Rasgoffa said that Mr. Gan- 
dhi was attempting to head off a I 
new round ofU.S. anus sales to i 


Pakistan following completion of 
the current Reagan administration 
commitment of §1.6 billion in cred- 
its for U.S. weapons, inrinrimg 40 
F-16 fighters partly paid for by 
Saudi Arabia. “A bigger package is 
bound to come." he said. 

India and Pakistan have fought 
three wars since they gained inde- 
pendence in 1947. 

India is especially concerned 
that Pakistan might be able to buy 
the Hawkeye airborne early-warn- 
ing radar surveillance plane, which 
was used by Israel in 1982 to con- 
trol its jet fighters in their attack on 
Soviet-made Syrian MiGs. 

According to U.S. and Indian 
sources, the Reagan administration 
told New Delhi that the best way to 
keep Hawkeyes out of Pakistan’s 
hands was to persuade the Soviet 
Union to ease its troops* pressure 
on the Pakistan-Afghan border and 
to stop its jets from a Hacking Paki- 
stani border villages. 

Mr. Gandhi, in a meeting with 
US. reporters here before his trip, 
said that the increased tension on 


tire border worried him. and that 
India would like to see it eased. But 
he blamed U.S. aid to Pakistan- 
based Afghan resistance fighters 
for much at the tension. 

Pakistan reacted to his attack cat 
its arms relationship with the Unit- 
ed States by accusing India of try- 
ing "to drive a wedge" between it 
and Washington. 

Mr. Rasgotra said that better re- 
lations between the United States 
and India were likely to come from 
an agreement allowing the sale to 
India of U.S. high technology, in- 
cluding sophisticated computers. 
The Indians persuaded Reagan ad- 
ministration officials, inchiaing the 
undersecretary of defense, Fred C. 
IkJe. that they would not allow that 
technology, which has potential 
military uses, to slip into Soviet 

handy 

"The technical opening can be a 
very big thing," said Mr. Rasgotra, 
who. as foreign secretary, played a 
major role in negotiating tire UJ5.- 
lndian agreement. 

The Pentagon sees the agreement 
as a way to sell India tire technol- 


ogy to build its own high perfor- 
mance weapons, thus reducing its 
dependence on the Soviet Union. 
On a recent visit to New Delhi. 
Senator Orrin Hatch, a Utah Re- 
publican, and Michael E Ptilsbury, 
assistant undersecretary of defense 
for policy planning, brought a let- 
ter from Lockheed officials offer- 
ing to help India design and build 
its own light combat jet fighter, a 
goal that defense specialists in In- 
dia have been aiming for with liule 
success. 

But Mr. Rasgotra expressed con- 
cern that Mr. Gandhi's strong op- 
position to Mr. Reagan's Strategic 
Defense Initiative, his space-based 
weapons plan, could sour relations 
between the two leaders. 

He dismissed some U.S. reports 
that Mr. Gandhi had made a major 
policy change on Afghanistan, say- 
ing that the only new dement in the 
prime minister's speech to a joint 
session of Congress on Thursday 
was a comment on tire need to get a 
government in Kabul that the three 
million Afghan refugees in Paki- 
stan could return to. 


View From the North: Korean DMZ Is 'Dangerous Place’ 

By Tohn F Bums an obser va tion post a short dis- tension abend comes suddenly, explains the workings of the arm- be seen on the telephone, the North 

No* York Timex Service - tance farther east says, “tins is a Crossing a river, the bridge is cut to slice agreement over a model of tire Korean officer says that heavy 

panmi in tom ifr™, p„ r , very Han g ei wMi place," few would one lane by huge concrete blocks John Security Area at (he heart of weapons, including machin e guns 

wS2S*2 ^ « tank barriers, rirezon* barred I by *e accord, are stored in 

about eni*"" 0 *** A-rfwJE-Ti -Two oowerfol Korean armies Large rocks stretch along the over With his handsome features, red a bunker below. He says protests 


about enuring the demilitarized -Two powenui Korean armies 
zone betweenSre two Koreas from iace each other aoossa DMZ only 


the Communist side. two and a Iffllf miles (four Irilome- ther side, barring movement oe- dcji, capram ca nas uic sum iot 

At the painl where North and ««) An American force of tween two hills. ; starring role in one of lew mo 

South meeLiust across a three-inch about 40,000 is arrayed with tire Further on, beside tire anny post les dominating tire bill m Pyon 

(seven-Sa-half centimeter) con- southern anny. Behind North Ko- that guar* the “trance to tire yaia theatera. 
crete ridge that marks the demarca- «» stand the Soviet Umon and zone, a 20-foot-high billboard The low-lymg butldmg with 
tion fine'U.S. soldiers in helmets China. shows a powerful young man m corrugated roof where the anmst* 

ringed with tire twin blue bands of 

^d^Gimings English A North Korean officer says his country has protested U.S. violations 

from a distance of 50 yards (46 a __ . , , ln - ft 

meters) bring only sQence. 407,000 times, or 35 times a day, since 1953. 


Large rocks stretch along tire river With ms handsome features, red a bunker below. He says protests 1 
hunk for hrniHrpris of yards on d- and yellow collar tabs and leather over such matters have beat made 1 
ther side, barring movement be- belt. Captain Zi has the stuff for a 407,000 times since 1953, without 
tween two hills. starring role in one of the war mov- result. North Korean protests, at 

Further on, beside the anny post ies dominating tire bill in Pyong- that rale, would average 35 a day. 


southern army. Behind Ninth Ko- that guards tire entrance to the yang theaters. 

rea stand the Soviet Union and zone, a 20-foot-high billboard The low-lying building with 

n mm shows a powerful young man in corrugated roof where the anrristi 


that rale, would average 35 a day. 

The captain seemed eager to dis- ! 
cuss two mri dents raised by bis 1 


meters) bring only sSence. • 407,U00 times, or 09 

Within moments, half a dozen ' 

soldiers have binoculars trained on 

P annmn Pavilion, the three-suny The few Westerners admitted to 
structure built by tire North Kore* North Korea are brought here by 

a ns av an gdtm'nig trafrey rm ter and train fiODJ Pyongyang, 125 mOes 
viewing point- north. At Kaesong, a de&pidaied 

A U.S. officer appears in sun- city of 200,000 that was bitterly 
glasses watching as the visitors contested in the war, a chauffeured 
from the ncath survey the scene in car competes the final six nnles to 
the company of an officer in the the demOitarizEd zone, out of the 
olive-drab tunic of the North Kore- city along cobbled streets into a 
an Army. vista of hah green paddies. 

It is here, for mare thim 30 years. Along a road where most of tire 

that two worlds have confronted traffic consists of ox carts and 


firing shows a powerful young man in corrugated roof where the armistice guests. One, in 1976, involved two 

• : - United States officers who were 

• , axed to death in a dispute with 

A North Korean officer says his country has protested U.S. violations North Korean soldiers over the an- 

J J r ting down of a tree: In a n othe r 

407,000 limes, or 35 times a day, since 1953. “ nd ™. a™ 

, ’ . 5 /’ North Korean soldiers were shot 

— * — — ..... '■■ ■ dead after allowing a 23-year-old 

The few Westerners adtrrittp-d to shirt-sleeves thrusting a rifle butt at was signed in July 1953 passes rap- Soviet tourist to limge across the 
North Korea are brought hoe by two frightened U.S. soldiers kfly by, closed for "renovations," demarcation tine. Captain Zi s ac- 
tnm from Pyongyang 125 nxOes sprawled on the ground. Behind according to Captain 25. On a low count to both cases was malter-of- 
north. At Kaesong, a drfapirfwtpd them, (he Stars and Stripes lies in hill at the center of the zone, the feet, d iff e ring from tire American 


In Hong Kong 

we are in die Central Business District. 
And yet just minutes from Kowloon. 
You should be, too. 

HOTELFURAMA 
INTER- CONTINENTAL 


10 that was bitterly shreds. The legend, in Korean, pro- cars halt l 
ic war, a chauffeured claims. "Make haste in reunifying building 1 
the final six nnles to our country." use to loc 

red zone, out of the It is one of the few reminders of non Hne. 
bbled streets into a North Korean attitudes toward the Casual! 


cars halt before the white concrete versions just enc 
building that the North Ko reans blame to the Uni 
use to lode out over the demarca- In theNovemb 


versions just enough to shift the 
blame to the Uni led States. 

In the November incident, he ac- 
knowledged that North Korean 


North Korean attitudes toward the Casually, and without rancor, soldiers crossed the demarcation 
United States. At the maid post. Captain Zi offers a synopsis of line in defiance of the rales, but 
the officer deputized tognidev? what North Korea lists as U-S-vio- said they “had" to try to bnng the 
ykHinWtTth* Tm. 7i Xivrtno IfltinnR nf the armistice agreement. Russian back. Told that U.S. re- 


each other. younj 

When a North Korean major at their 


> women with babies slung on 
hades, the fire* rign of the 


lore th roug h the zone, Zi Myong lotions of the armistice agreement 
Choi a 31-year-old captain, offers Pointing to an observation post 


greetings in a cultured English and where a fair-haired U.S. soldier can 


U.S. Questions South African 'Conduct and Policy’ 


New York Times Service 


meat spokesman, said Friday that "But this latest Sooth African He said that South Africa had 
the raids raised "the most serious action comes against a background not yet "provided a satisfactory ex- 
question about lirat government's . that raises the most serious ques- plana doo of the evidence that has 
recent condurt acd policy." dons about that government’s re- oome to light that the ream mtejxf- 

In diplomatic practice, tire recall ' cent conduct and policy," he said, ed to sabotage the Cabinda -Gulf 
or an envoy from a country whose Senior South African officials Oil Co. facility." 
policies had just been roodemned haw defended thae actions he Mr. Kalb srnd that tire attack in 
is tantamount to a public statement satd,_ even those feat jdaced at Bots^^-parti^jydeplor- 
that relations are extremely phyaail nsk_U5. fives and proper- 


n,iAVTTVT/VFA\f V n- Clio i fllUO lOUCU UIV IUU34 

A ^ itat.govemnKnt's 

AmbMSftdor Herman W. Nickd ^ ceaC 

from Pretoria to pitnnt &uthAf- indjptonuw paS^the recall 
ncan military raids mtoBotswmu of anSvc? fro* a countiy whose 
on Friday and into Angola hut prides had just been condemned 
mouth, toe Stare Department said ^ tantamount to a public statement 
that the UmtedStaiK“Tg^ are lhat re i at j ons are extremely 
gonrally rach a policy whi^ is stnine(L 

antithetical to the goal of wmfang ^ Kalb said that the United 
Tor negotiated pultons mid an end States ^ Mt coa6ont nceDt 
to southern Afncas cycle of vio- wd other acts of vio- 


tioos about that government’s re oome to fight that the team intepd- 
cent conduct and policy." he said, ed to sabotage the Cabinda -Gulf 
Senior South African officials Oil Co. facility." 

have defended those actions, he ., 

■ - ii_ruuA .u_. a- 1 - j , Mr. Kalb said that the attack m 


ports said the tourist was defecting, 
the captain smiled and replied, 
"They presented him as a defector, 
but it u not right." He offered no 
alternative description. 

The North Koreans also seemed 
eager to place on the record other 
U.S. actions that they described as 
hostile, though not banned. Ac- 
cording to Chptain Zi. the north- 
.eoiera would like to exchange 
“friendly greetings’* with thar 
"compatriots" in the south. Bat be 
said the Americans had forbidden 
this. “This makes os sad,” he said. 



THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 8 

WINTER-CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

One Connaught Road, &255U1, Telex: 73081 


Far reservations call: Tokyo: 2150777 
Singapore: 2202476, Osaka: 26 40666, or call your nearest 
Inter -Continental sales office. 


Bernard Kalb, the Stale Depart- government. 


lence in South Africa against the installations jointly owned by An- 
eovemmenL gda and a USL company. 


South African Raid Seen Hurting U.S. Policy 


(Confimed from Page 1) bican rebels was i 
tance from his closest African at- lwt year after Pre 
lies, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. signed a nonaagi 
In South Africa, the homes of fcrti&Hiberebe 
two pofitidans were damaged last m ®uuy pans of Mozam 
week in grenade attacks] rretoria a blow to that pact and t 
said that tire assaults were carried United States, which helped b 
out from Botswana by guerrillas of the acoad. 
the banned African National Con- To honor the 


bican rebek was supposed to cease foreign affairs to a loose coalition 
last year after Pretoria and Maputo of Mack and white pofitidans that 


Mozambique tosafeg 
tet and to the plan fo 
helped broker elected 

• have di 

reemeat, Mr. new so 


grass and led to Friday’s retaliatory Machei forced Ms longtime ANC and without SWAPO. 
raid. Official figures saythat nearly J^ies to abandon Ms country a base South Africa has conducted sev- 

400 people harc beta killed since of operati®s i and seek other pomts ^ cross-bender attacks in recent 
September in racial violence that of gitiyuito South Afnta-Becanse a gains t insurgents based in 
rimed again Sunday on the anni- oftts ^®g,sparKiy guarded border Mozambique, Angola and Lesotho, 
versary of the 1976 Soweto npris- South Africa, Botswana has g„ t Friday’s raid marked the first 
ing. become a pmne replacement de- as ^ ult agfl m S r Botswana, 

AD of these incidents have their spite eflorts by that government to j^g considered the region’s most 
origins in the internal situations of bang en tangl ed in the con- poetically stable state with one of 
South Africa'and Nanntrifl. The at- “CL its smallest armies. 


tacks on Ai 
response to 


nd Namibia. The at- ffict 

la are in large part a South Africa planned to install 
at government’s har- 80 interim government Monday in 


war to oust South Africa from the 
former German cokmy that it has 
administered since 1920. 

Similarly, Pretoria funded and 
guided the Mozambican rebels for 
several years to pnmsh Mr. Ma- 


SorietftndearTestRepurted 

The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — The Soviet 
Union has detonated a midear de- 


™ S control cross-border violence and 
problems by disc^ 

gola and a UK company. SML 

“Mechanisms had been put in 

place to handle security concerns 
i j Q -w-* i M of both sides,” the spokesman said, 

| fl OT I ^ Pnhf*V “and South Africa's action calls 
Ulg L.O. J. UUtJ imo question its smeerity and seri- 
, . _ . . , 1; . ousness in dealing constructively 

foragn affm to » looK coateKin ay» mailers.' 
of black and white politicians that 
does not include SWAPO. ■ UN Debate Sought 

Western i gowmnHi& mixious d ^ 

to safeguard a 1978 United Na^ns Lswana said Saturday that his na- 

tion would sedc a United Nations 

sjsrjfS wssssasKts 

p«rptedred. Remcrr reported froro 

South Africa has conducted sev- _ 
eral cross-bcader attacks in recent I Crowds Riot in Soweto 
years against insurgents based in Sooth African riot police fired 
Mozambique, Angola and Lesotho, shotguns and rubber bullets Sun- 
But Friday's raid marked the first day at crowds throwing gasoline ' 
major assault against Botswana, bombs at borne in Cape Province • 
long considered the region’s most on the ninth anniversary of riots in 
politically stable state with one of tire blade ghetto oT Soweto, Reuters 
its smallest armies. reported. 

The raid followed two recent Clashes between police and ; 
bomb att ac k s in Gaborone, the blade crowds have broken out in i 
Botswanan capital, against black the past on the anniversary of tire 
South African refugees beheved to start of the Soweto riots, in which < 
be linked to the ANC, and it is seen 575 people died during eight 
likely to incite fears that Botswana'' months of protests against tire I 


§liMi 


r-. !» ••• , Jggt j* 


mm 


western governments, anxious 
to safeguard a 1978 United Nations 
plan for independence and alredy 
elected government in Namibia, 
have deplored the formation of a 
new government without elections 






its smallest armies. 

The raid followed two recent 
bomb attacks in Gaborcme, the 


OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 


could be torn by opposing outside 
forces stronger than itsdf. 


teaching of the Afrikaans language 
in black schools. 


chefs government for harboring vice near the Chinese border, ac- 
members of the ANC. cxnxiing to the Swedish Defense Re- 

Official support far the Mozam- search Institnie. 


IF THE LADY 
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Page 6 


MONDAY, JINE 17, 1985 


Ttcral 



Published With The .New York Timex and The Washington Pool 


Sri b Utt t A Reagan- Gorbachev Initiative 

I The Washington Post f 7 


A U.S.-Indian Beginning 


It was good to have Prune Minister Rajiv 
Gandhi in town. His maimer was winning, and 
his approach to America relatively sympathet- 
ic. It remains true that the democratic charac- 
ter of the two countries is mutually gratifying 
and an advantage in working out the subtle 
and not so subtle tensions between them. 

These tensions arise from real differences in 
culture and development and, more, from an 
abiding disagreement over the political struc- 
ture of the Asian subcontinent. 

India's view is that South Asia is a region 
in its own right, that India is dominant in it 
and that lids dominance, specifically over Pa- 
kistan. should be acknowledged by alL That 
Moscow makes this acknowledgment fully and 
that Washington dots not encourages “non- 
aligned” Delhi's familiar pro-Soviet till. 

Washington has seen South Asia not just as 
a region but also as an arena of the East-West 
contest This is the basis of the U.S. military tie 
to Pakistan, a country that successive U.S. 
administrations have regarded as a useful 
friend and that India regards as an ups tan 
craving revenge Tor three lost wars and per- 
haps tempted by a fourth, this time with a 
(stealthily built) nuclear bomb in hand. That 
India has already exploded a (stealthily built) 
bomb is taken by Indians as something of a 


natural right that they need explain to no one. 

This abiding disagreement extends to Af- 
ghanistan. India has politically comforted the 
Soviet invaders. The United States has sup- 
ported the resistance. In Washington Mr. 
Gandhi spoke somewhat more emphatically 
than before about the urgency of a political 
settlement But it would be a surprise if India, 
coo tent with Moscow’s policy in the subconti- 
nent were to push it much harder on Afghani- 
stan. There may be solid geopolitical grounds 
for doing so: India's need to keep Pakistan a 
sturdy buffer against Soviet encroachment and 
strategic encirclement But Delhi is not guided 
exclusively by this larger view. 

Rajiv Gandhi's relative youth (he is 40) and 
his technological bent fit nicely with the devel- 
opment requirements that India was already 
perceiving when he took office. Spoiling the 
opening, the United States has moved briskly 
to offer the requisite high technology and 
encourage mem to free enterprise. This is im- 
portant The Indians are chary of buying 
weapons from a source likely to Vie tighter 
strings on their use than do Delhi's Soviet 
suppliers. buL over time this, too, could be- 
come a larger area of Indian- U.S. cooperation. 
It is worth both countries' striving for iL 
— THE H ASHINGTOS POST. 


Remember the Deficit? 


Reality has begun to intrude on the discus- 
sion of federal budget deficits. This healthy 
illumination makes the problem even more 
difficult than it appeared last month. It also 
forces attention back to raising taxes. 

The reality is that both the Senate and 
House overstated the future savings in their 
projected budgets for fiscal 1986. The errors 
occurred largely because both blithely accept- 
ed the administration's optimistic forecasts for 
growth and interest rates. Both houses recently 
estimated in budget resolutions that the deficit 
next year would be reduced by S56 billion. 
Already, the administration and the Congres- 
sional Budget Office agree that the 1 986 reduc- 
tion will be smaller, possibly by one-third. 
Moreover, they now predict a 1 988 deficit of at 
least $149 billion — a long way from the 
advertised target of S100 billion — and maybe 
even close to the present 5200 billion. 

Higher taxes will be needed after alL Taxes 
cannot be raised unless President Reagan 
changes policy and leads the effort. But the 
president remains adamantly opposed and has 
now distracted the country by devoting him- 
self entirely to a tax reform plan that, by his 
own estimates, would enlarge future deficits. 


The administration has pretended all year, 
and Congress pretended to believe, that sub- 
stantia! deficit reduction and tax reform could 
be accomplished in a single year and kept 
discretely apart. That might have been possi- 
ble if Mr. Reagan had contributed to deficit 
reduction with a tax that is unaffected by 
reform — a sales tax on gasoline, for example. 
But neither project looks feasible If he offers 
no new taxes and insists on reforming taxes in 
a way that would reduce future revenues. 

Impossibly, the president contends that 
both projects have “priority.” That sounds 
suspiciously as if neither has. A priority takes 
precedence, and there should be no question 
that deficit reduction is essential, whereas tax 
reform is desirable. I*, has been possible all 
along that the reform debate would in any case 
run over into ne.xl year or even the next Con- 
gress. starting in 1987. The new estimates im- 
ply that even then only a tax increase can 
achieve enough deficit reduction to permit a 
shift of attention to reform. 

Everyone's priority seems to be wishing that 
real problems would just go away. They won'l. 
If neglected, they will gel worse. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Free Ethiopia’s Farmers 


The rains are coming in Ethiopia, but since 
drought was never the major cause of famine 
they are unlikely on their own to lead to 
plenty. The real problem lies in civil strife in 
the countryside and in the junta's Soviet-type 
farming policies. These twin disruptions have 
been focused in the north, where the prospects 
remain grim. In the south. less aflhctai by 
violence and the junta's heavy-handedness, 
conditions are better. This is the critical point 
to bear in mind as Ethiopia and its would-be 
rescuers turn from a necessary preoccupation 
with relief to an effort to rebuild. 

Much still needs to be done to improve the 
distribution of relief. Hie government has to 
unclog ports and release army trucks for food 
transport — and be denounced for its continu- 
ing reluctance to let relief missions enter rebel- 
held areas. But the main requirement is to 
recognize the emerging priority of enabling the 
country to grow more of its own food. 

For years, the Ethiopian armed forces and 
their assorted challengers have ravaged the 
countryside, forcibly recruiting peasants for 
military campaigns or treating them and their 
fields as the enemy. Meanwhile, the govern- 


ment destroyed the country’s agriculture by 
enforced collectivization, price manipulation 
and other administrative means. If Ethiopia is 
to feed itself, all of this must be reversed. 

The fighting and the political rigging must 
stop. Farmers must be left alone to grow their 
crops. They will have problems of seed, fertil- 
izer. credit, transport and the like, but these 
are the sort of problems that they have tradi- 
tionally solved. They do not need a big state 
apparatus or foreign network. They never had 
these things, and they grew a lot of food. 

There is no wand to be waved to make 
officials and rebels leave the farmers alone. 
The two groups — especially the government, 
which has the first responsibility to care for the 
people it claims are its citizens — have long 
since shown they are ready to pul a quest for 
power ahead of considerations of human life. 
But they, all of them, need to be made account- 
able for their policies. They need to be held to 
a standard of responsibility. Nothing heroic or 
technical, nothing beyond their resources, is 
being demanded of them. They should just be 
expected to get out of the farmers' way. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Stop Dealing With Hijackers 


Hijacking takes a random set of people, 
most of whose contact with political causes or 
armed struggle has been no closer than their 
television screens, and projects them into an 
anarchic hell where there are suddenly no 
limits to pain and humiliation and no rules to 
ensure they will survive. Their fate depends on 
screaming fanatics whose motives and lan- 
guage they barely understand, and on the 
actions of distant governments over which 
they have no control. There is nothing they can 
do except keep their heads down, and pray. Is 
there any way to prevent such outrages? 

In ream months. Iraq gave sanctuary to a 


family who had purloined a plane (200 passen- 
gers) to escape from Iran. Taiwan awarded a 
suspends, sentence to a young Chinese who 
redirected a British Airways fiight(355 passen- 
gers) on its way from Hong Kong to Beijing. 
Havana, .Algiers and many others have been 
prepared, on occasion, to turn a blind eye. 

Only when such behavior brings total diplo- 
matic ostracism will Lhe sky-pirates be defeat- 
ed, Of course, there will never be complete 
insurance against the airborne suicide bomber. 
But civilized governments must give no quar- 
ter and do no deals. Those foolish enough to 
give encouragement deserve to be regarded as 
no better Lhan hijackers themselves. 

— The Sunday Times (London!. 


FROM OUR JUNE 17 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Armed Miner Calls on Tail 

NEW YORK. — An insane man armed with a 
loaded revolver called at the White House [on 
June 16J and was entering President W.H. 
Taft's of fire when he was arrested by a White 
House attendant. He had presumably intend- 
ed to shoot the President. He was taken to jaiL 
where it was learned that his name was James 
Stricklin, a miner from West Virginia. He 
stated that President Taft had advertised in the 
newspaper of his city that he wished him to go 
to the White House. There was no Intention on 
his part to do the president any injury, bur he 
was fully convinced that it was the President's 
intention to talk over the miner’s grievances 
with a view to having them remedied. 


1935: Protection for British Steel 


LONDON — Thanks in part to the govern- 
ment's willingness to employ the tariff blud- 
geon. the British steel industry has obtained 
favorable terms from the Continental steel 
cartel. Lost week an agreement was reached 
which will come into fora on August 8. replac- 
ing the arrangement patched up in April after 
the British tariff had been hoisted from 33!ri to 
50 percent. The new agreement prorides that 
for the first twelve months imports of all iron 
and steel products into this country from the 
cane! territories shall noL exceed 670.000 tons, 
while thereafter the maximum is to be 525.000. 
British industry will enjoy something ap- 
proaching a monopoly in the home markeL 


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el- 1985. International Herald Tribune. All ngfus reserved 


L OS ANGELES — The long im- 
/ posse between the Soviet Union 


Bv Armand Hammer 


and the United Slates may possibly 

now- be resolved. The unfolding of 


now be resolved. The unfolding of 
recent events may make the ume 
right and ripe. .An opportunity has 
arisen that will enable the present 
antagonism to suddenly melt into a 
cooperative spirit- 

why has inis "impossible event" 
now become possible? 

President Reagan, whose prior 
pronouncements were bitter and 
sometimes belligerent, has been 
turned by events into a cooperative 
spirit He is presiding oxer the Unit- 
ed States Tor the last time. His eye is 
no longer on political consider- 
ations. He can have only one ambi- 
tion — the noblest kind: to gp down 
in history as a peacemaker. 

His second, although subordi- 
nate, consideration is that if he can 
achieve a verifiable agreement for 
the reduction in armaments, the 
only mark that would be against 
bun. now that he has gone a long 
way toward solring inflation prob- 
lems. would be the deficit. But if the 
United States could free itself from 
devouring military expenses, the 


The writer, chairman of Ocddemd 
Petroleum Corporation, has had fre- 
quent business dealings with the Sovi- 
et Union in lhe past and is visiting 
Moscow this week so meet General 
Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev. 


deficit could disappear. 
Mikhail Gorbachev's 


Mikhail Gorbachev's motivation 
for peace is similar to Mr. Reagan's. 
He. too. would be balled by genera- 
tions to come if he couia end the 
strife and its resulting menace to all 
— and bv such an achievement 


tested because there would be noth- 
ing left to test, agreement is made 
more difficult. Thus we must reach a 
point that goes beyond mditary 
mathematics. and both sides most 
recognize that there is little to lose 
in trusting the other. 

The growth of mutual trust, in 
torn, involves psychological de- 
ments, not merdv deeds. The cre- 
ation of a psychological momentum 
is itself the greatest deed. 

Oneway to achieve this would be 
a meeting before rite end of 1985 
between Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gor- 
bachev. If. in the meantime, both 
shks refrained from rhetoric con- 
demning each other, that would set 
the stage for a successful mating. 
Mr. Reagan could win over the Rus- 
sians by offering to go to Russia for 
the first mating, with a return rial 
by Mr. Gorbachev next spring. 

Neither leader has bon m the 
other's country. What is there to 


eachother? IMx)ih sides could de- 
clare to the world, at such a meeting, 
that neither would be the first to use 
nuclear or conventional weapons in 
an attack upon the other and. fur- 
ther. that the two leaders intended 
to hold additional meetings at regu- 
lar periods because they were deter- 
mined to achieve friendship, good- 


But Gorbachev’s Options 
Are limited by the System 


By Robert D. Hormats 


will and good progress in the ne- 
gotiations in Geneva, there would 
then be an electric shock of gratifi- 
cation throughout the world. 

Such a mutual announcement 
with an earnest handshake .might 
cause celebrations and d a n cin g in 
the streets. like the declaration of a 
cease-fire at the end of a war. And 
from this, in turn, would flow such a 
flood of approval and stimulation 
that the process of reconciliation 
would be accelerated beyond any 
possible anticipation. 

There is an opportunity for Ron- 
ald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev 
to achieve immortality. There is an 
opportunity for a better world. The 
cynics and doubters on both sides 
must be ignored. 

Pindar, the Greek poet. said. “We 
must exhaust the limits of the possi- 
ble." Everything is possible. 

The New York Times. 


N EW YORK — Few people, in 
the Soviet Union or the West 
question the need for Mikhail Gor- 
bachev to initiate significant eco- 
nomic reform. Much less certain is 
how far he will go — and what will 
be the consequences for Soviet rela- 
tions with the rest of the world. 

Ncarlv 300 years ago. one of Mr. 
Gorbachev's predecessors, Peter the 
Great, journeyed incognito through 
Western Europe and found it in toe 
midst of an industrial revolution 
that had barely touched Russia. The 


on the free market. The Russians 
could do likewise, but Hut would 
violate orthodox ideology. A more 


gradual approach is likely. K must 
he recalled that before be became 


experts and new technologies that 
he brought home launched Russia 


be brought home launched Russia 
on the path of modernization. 

Mr. Gorbachev's Soviet Union is 


he recalled that before he became 
general secretary Mr. Gorbachev 
had parly responsibility for agricul- 
ture ami could make little pvgress. 

Second, industrial moderniza- 
tion. This would require cuts in re- 
dundant jobs, greater autonomy for 
factories and. ultimately, sale of 
many goods at nourequlated prices. 
Such" measures would likely he re- 
sisted h> part v officials and the vast 
bureaucracy fearing a loss of infill- 


lii'*’ *“ 


encc. Less ambitious steps, stressing 
at first productivity bonuses and 
discipline, are more likely. 

Third, broader use of information 
technologies. Military and research 
facilities have taken advantage of 
computers, but access has been re- 
stricted for most industries. The 
Kremlin will have to confront the 
fact that modernization will depend 
on expanding the use of computers 
and related technology. There will 
be much party resistance. 

But even should Mr. Gorbachev 
launch major reforms, we most 
guard against assuming that they 
would automatically lead to more 
moderate Soviet intonation ai be- 
havior. More rational economic de- 
cision-making could strengthen de- 
mands for more trade with the Wed 
and for channeling resources to the 
nonmilitary sector. But these devel- 
opments are unlikely to end the nril- 
iiaiy's first call on resources. 

Moreover, the party might try to 
offset a loss of economic control by 
strengthening its influence in other 


could take his place alongside Lenin 
in Russian history. The burdens of 


armaments weigh heavily upon the 
Russian people, just as U.S. expen- 
ditures do upon Americans. 


There is no public bookkeeping 
stem to reveal this in the Soviet 


system to reveal this in the Soviet 
Union, but books are not necessary. 
The standard of living of the Rus- 
sian people is far lower than the 
dream of revolution envisioned. If 
Mr. Gorbachev could relieve his 
treasury of the exhausting expenses 
of the arms race, the Russian people 
could enjoy a higher standard of 
living. Mr." Gorbachev would he 
blessed by his people not only for 
peace but also for giving them a 
better quality of life. 

The rewards for establishment of 
a genuine friendly relationship are 
so immense, and the time is so right, 
that both sides must dare to make 
concessions previously considered 
impossible. The technical problems 
in disarmament are so involved and 
complex that the greatest experts on 
both sides may honestly differ. 
When one is doling with nuclear 
weapons, which can never be fully 



of course a far different place from 
Czar Peter's Russia. It is highly in- 
dustrialized and capable of impres- 
sive technical achievements. Bui its 
economy overall has failed to inno- 
vate and has fallen seriously behind. 
It is on unattractive model for the 
rest of the world and generates little 
domestic enthusiasm. 

Soviet technological development 
has lagged. The Kremlin continues 
to lightly control production, prices, 
computers and information. In con- 
trast, in recent years, the West has 
experienced dramatic technological 
progress and a spurt of entrepre- 
neurial energy. Many industrialized 
and developing nations have re- 
duced government regulation and 
increased market incentives. 

China's success in reiving more 
on market forces must raise disqui- 
eting questions in the Kremlin. Chi- 
na has farm surpluses. It has loos- 
ened state controls and embarked 
on promising industrial reforms. 

But the Soviet Union is nor Chi- 
na. The Cultural Revolution and 
other upheavals weakened Chinese 
party structures likely to oppose 
reforms. The Soviet party and bu- 
reaucracy are more entrenched and 


areas. Improved economic growth 
would undoubtedly mean increased 


insistent on maintaining their pri- 
vileges. The Kremlin may also fear 
that decentralized economic deci- 
sion-making could spur pressures 
for greater autonomy in Eastern Eu- 
rope and among non- Russian peo- 
ples in the Soviet Union. 

Nevertheless. Mr. Gorbachev- 
doubtless sees the need at least to 
loosen some controls. 

First, agricultural production. 
China has permitted a growing por- 
tion of farm production to be sold 




Drawing bv Valentin Anesta. 


would undoubtedly mean increased 
vigilance in guarding against a de- 
cline in Soviet power in Eastern Eu- 
rope. It could also nuke the Rus- 
sians a more formidable adversary. 

We may soon get some indication 
of whether Mikhail Gorbachev's re- 
forms will do for the Soviet Union 
today what Peter's did for Russia. 
But we may have to wait much long- 
er to sec how (hey affect Moscow s 
foreign relationships. 


The writer, an ecommuc ifficial in the 
kur four U.S. a&nmumuiiiiu, u a wee 
president at Gekhnjn. Sachs A Compa- 
ny. investment bankers. He contributed 
this common tu The Sew York Times. 


And Reagan Seems to Prefer Talking Big and Thinking Small 


W ASHINGTON — On the two 
major issues before the U.S. 


VV major issues before the U.S. 
government today, the control of 
the budget and the control of nucle- 
ar weapons, President Reagan has 
recently ban uying to avoid a break 
with Congress and the Russians. 

Against the opposition of some of 
his supporters in the cabinet and on 


By James Reston 


tus supporters tn the cabinet and on 
Capitol HilL he compromised on the 
military budget and on Social Secu- 


rity, and he agreed to stay within the 
limits of what he had called the 
“fatally flawed” SALT-2 treaty in 
order to keep the arms talks going. 

This was typical. There is a lot of 
“go” in Mr. Reagan, but be usually 
pulls back before he hits the waif. 
What he does is to buy time. 

But it is not at all clear that these 
tactical maneuvers will suit the two 
momentous issues on which his ad- 


ministration is likely to be judged. 
The Economist of London asked 


The Economist of London asked 
the other day, “What will Reagan 
leave behind?" What indeed? Some- 
thing for the future security of the 


nation? Or just anything that gets a 
laugh or a vote for the day? 

He has left no doubt about his 
-dfe&ectives^ which are not modest 
He wants to reduce the authority of 
the government at home and in- 
crease it abroad. So he wants to 
decrease domestic spending and in- 
crease military spending; and he 
wants not only to come to terms 
with the Soviet Union on the reduc- 
tion of nuclear weapons on Earth, 
which they say they are willing to 
do. but to experiment with nuclear 
weapons in outer space, which the 
Russians say they will not do. In 
short, Mr. Reagan deals with every- 
thing except the contradictions. 

Even when Mr. Reagan and Con- 
gress agree on the midget, which 
they will do after a lot erf fussing and 
posturing, they will still have the 
most spectacular budget and trade 
deficits in American history. 

And even after buying time to 


keep lhe Geneva talks going, Mr. 
Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev will 
have to deride whether they want to 
go on damning one another about 
the things that divide them or begin 
to think, for a change, about the 
things they have in common. 

Mr. Reagan says he is presiding 
over a “second American Revolu- 
tion.” and this is what he wants to 
leave behind But he is not really a 
revolutionary man. He is a wobbly 
conservative who believes that more 


progress can be made tty stopping 
bad things and backing into the fu- 


ture than by risking new things. 

When he gets S38 million for the 
“contras” in the Nicaraguan war, 
and a compromise on bis military 
budget, and more time to lalk to the 
Russians about arms control, he will 
still be in a bind He compromises 
with everybody but convinces no- 
body who looks even occasionally at 
the military and economic facts. 


And so, for the time bring. Presi- 
dent Reagan and General Secretary 
Gorbachev are fencing with one an- 
other, playing tactical . games. 

If Mr. Gorbachev were to come 
forward with specific proposals for 
a 25- or even 50-percent cut in the 
military budgets of the two coun- 
tries or in nuclear arsenals, with 
guarantees of continuing verifica- 
tion, it is hard to believe that US. 
public opinion would prefer Mr. 
Reagan’s theoretical "star wars" de- 
fense to practical cuts of that size. 

There has long been solid scientif- 
ic support for a comprehensive nu- 
clear lest ban — almost achieved in 
the Kennedy administration. But 
when Mr. Gorbachev endorsed the 
idea again the other day, it was dis- 
missed without explanation 
The main argument is that there is 
nothing new about Mr. Gorbachev, 


measures at home to control alco- 
holism and to face up to the facts 
of the Soviet Union's staggering 
economy, there is some reason for 
thinking that maybe, just maybe, a 
.new pragmatism is emerging at the 
top of the Moscow government that 
is at least worth exploring. 

Maybe, too, as many officials in 
Washington say, this is all smoke 
and mirrors. But the magnitude of 
the economic and military problems 
requires more than dreamy talk 
about “star wars" and “a second 
American Revolution." 

President Reagan talks big but 
thinks small. He waves his bat like 


Babe Ruth and points to the right- 
field bleachers, but then he bunLs. 


just the same old one-eyed leader. 
But wfaen-be is seen taking strong 


field bleachers, but then he bunLs. 

If the budget deficit and the trade 
deficit and the arms race are not 
tackled soon with much bolder poli- 
cies. it is fairly clear what Mr. Rea- 
gan will leave behind — not only a 
wave and a smile, but a more unbal- 
anced and dangerous world. 

The New York Times. 


Economies in Peril: The Bonn Summit Failed to Point the Way 


B ONN — Last month the leaders 
of seven nations met in Bonn to 


By Helmut Schmidt 


confront dangerous trends in the 
world's economies. Although this was 
the 1 1 th such economic summit in as 
many years, it may have been the 
least successful. It was characterized 
by three failures: 

First, neither the Europeans nor 
the Japanese seemed able to adopt 
policies to help offset a decline in the 
American economy. The Reagan ad- 
ministration's effort to cut the budget 
deficit for 1986 makes some sort of 
slowdown in the U.S. economy inev- 
itable. A decline in the purchase of 
Japanese. European and Third World 
exports in the United States could 
destabilize those economies as well. 

Second, there was little significant 
discussion about the key economic 
problem in the world today: the over- 
valuation of the U.S. dollar brought 
on by a large budget deficit and re- 
sulting high interest rates. 

Third, no agreement was reached 
on fighting protective tariffs and 
heading ofT trade wars by setting a 
date for GATT revision. Nor was 
there agreement to link a GATT 
mating with currency reforms. 

What will happen to the world’s 
economy before the next economic 
summit is held in Tokyo next year has 
mostly to do with what will happen to 
the American economy. The United 
States faces a double dilemma of def- 
icits: a serious debt load in its domes- 
tic budget and a growing debt in its 
international trade. 

The chairman of the U.S. Federal 
Reserve Board. Paul Voleker. was 
correct when he said that the United 
Slates is financing its deficits with 
savings from elsewhere in the world, 
causing a drag on spending in other 
nations where the savings are no 
longer available. And he was correct 
in saying that America is moving 
from being the world’s largest credi- 
tor to being its largest debtor. 

Right now it can still afford its 
deficits, but by 19S6 it may find it 
more expensive to borrow to service 
its foreign debts. A lot ol foreign 
capital is invested in the high-value 
dollar, but what if those abroad wish 
to have that interests transferred 


The writer, an economist and politician, was West German chancellor 
from 1974 to 1982. This is the first of two articles. 


average value over the currencies of 
America's 13 most important trading 


partners by 40 percent since 1980 — 
has made the United States an El 


•<N\V v i 

* * 


into their own currencies? From 
where would America borrow then? 

To many American politicians the 
crisis seems overstated, especially 
when U.S. deficits are measured in 
relation to GNP. Using that yard- 
stick. the budget deficit does not look 
bad compared with other industrial 
countries. According to the OECD, 
last year the UJS. deficit was 4 2 per- 
cent of GNP. West Germany’s was 
2.5 percent, France's was 3.4. Brit- 
ain’s 3, Canada's 6, Japan's between 
6 and 7 and Italy’s 13. 

A more important measure, how- 
ever, is the extent to which a govern- 
ment sucks In private savings to fi- 
nance its deficits. If the private sector 
does not save more than it is invest- 
ing, no savings will be available on 
which the government can draw, no 
matter what percentage erf GNP the 
deficit is. If a government borrows 
money anyway, the credit must come 
from a central bank such as the Fed- 
eral Reserve System (which would 
then have to print more money) or it 
could come from abroad. 

Countries with low private-sector 
savings rates thus have less room to 
maneuver with their debts. The Unit- 
ed Stales has the lowest savins rate 
of all the industrial countries: In the 
last two years, 5 to 6 percent of dis- 
posable income of private households 
went into savings. Bv comparison, 
personal savings in West Germany 
amounted to 12 percent of disposable 
Income, and in Japan they were 18 
percent. Assuming approximately the 
same relative corporate capital re- 
quirements in the three economies. 
West Germans could have permitted 
themselves a relative budget deficit 
twice as high as America's, and the 
Japanese three times as high. 

Id 1982 the Japanese government 
drew oft about 25 percent of private 
savings to finance its deficit and in 
1983 less than 22 percent. The Figure 
for 1984 will doubtless be similar. In 
1982 the West German government 
used 40 percent of private savings; in 


1983 it used 30 percent The trend for 

1984 is again toward a lower figure. 
By comparison, the UJS. government 
consumed about 70 percent of pri- 
vate savings in 1982 and 1983. Recent 
data indicate that the number for 


1984 there was a net inflow of more 
than SI00 billion, and estimates for 

1985 inflow are similar. 


Dorado for Japanese, European and 
even Latin American exports. 

Last year Japan increased its ex- 
ports to the United Stales by about 


A reduction of (he budget deficit 45 percent Western Europe by about 
for 1986 of S50 billion and another 30 percent OPEC members by about 

lmi: t nan l v r j ■ • _ ■ « 


1984 will be slightly better. 
Because the Federal Reset 


Because the Federal Reserve under 
Mr. Voldcer has consistently refused 
to increase inflation by printing more 
money, only 30 percent of domestic 
savings were left to provide money 
needed for industry and commerce — 
not nearly enough for economic re- 
covery. Therefore, a large volume of 
capital and credit has bon imported 
from abroad, pushing the U.S. for- 
eign debt into ever higher figures. In 


550 billion for 1987 are the minimal 
amounts necessary to stem the swell- 
ing of American debt. Additionally, 
tax incentives for savings will be 
needed to lower interest rates and 
exchange rates. The consistently high 
value of the dollar, however, seems to 
indicate that miernaliooal markets 
have little faith that Mr. Reagan’s 
deficit proposals will Ik applied. 

Meanwhile, Japan and Western 
Europe have largely benefited. The 
high dollar — which has increased in 


15 percent and Latin America by 
about 25 percent The United Stales 
had a trade imbalance with Japan 
alone of 537 billion, triple the 1980 
figure. The biggest single deficit, 518 
bilticm, is in automobiles.. 

No matter which country benefitrf£ 
for now, an unbalance in trade of 
such proportions will hurt all the 
trading nations in the long run. 


This comment has been excerpted 
from The Washington Post Magazine. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Computers Cost Jobs 


T. Stonier, bead of the Science and 
Regarding the reports “ Job Loss to Society Department at Bradford 

Computers a Wide Fear, Poll Finds" Tnfol^ninn 10 . ^ ^ fCCt 

(May 30) by Nancy Beth Jackson and lhai . . ^onpnuon technology 
"Unemployment Is Still Primary Wor- would create new jobs but that “the 


Competition Is Human 


"Unemployment Is Still Primary Wor- 
ry " by diaries D. Sherman: 


I read the results of the survey 
sponsored by the International Her- 
ald Tribune, the Atlantic Institute 
and Louis Harris International with 
interest. Unfortunately, however, 
Nancy Beth Jackson’s report gives 
credit to the elitist nonsense that the 
true problem of unemployment is the 
general public’s “short-term view " 
pie average person is seen to live 
in ignorance about the information 
revolution, refusing to retrain in com- 
puter know-how and therefore be- 
coming “unable to function in an 
information economy.” The writer 
contrasts this public shortsightedness 
with the so-called long-term view of 
the “policy-makers” who envision a 
post-industrial society. 

The public's reaction seems to be 
more sound than that of the policy- 
makers of the OECD countries. In- 
deed, the writer paraphrases Thomas 


new opportunities will not mean an 
increase in employment” 

That means that the total number 
of jobs available will not increase in 
the future, either. In these circum- 
stances. why should it be expected 
that a soundly reasoning person re- 
train himself for professions in which 
employment is not assured? 

We should admit with some nessi- 


In response to the opinion column 
“ The Real Trouble Is Competition It- 
self (June 7) by Alfie Kahn: 

Every so often competition is 
pulled out as if directly from Pando- 
ra’s box. and blasted to" hell and back. 
But competition can be rugby players 
drinking together in America, eating 


Jin> 1s 


together in France and singing to- 
gether everywhere. It is Martina Nav- 


geiher everywhere. It is Martina Nav- 
ratilova and Chris Evert Lloyd walk- 
ing off the center court at Roland 


^ should adnut with some pess!- Garros arm-in-arm. congratulating 
nU ? n V one another warmly before a rapt 

1 f n£ ^ Monopoly So- audience. It is being able to say. after 
Cambridge, having done ooe'sbest, without hu- 
Massachusetts, 1 978) that the pre- miliation; Wait till next year. 

Sent Crisis IS a i-nci« nT niir eiviil r. J , . 


sent crisis is a crisis of our social 
system and that the high unemploy- 
ment is not a catharsis by which capi- 
talism soundly reacts to the challenge 
of the so-called technological-scien- 
tific revolution. To believe this would 
be wishful thinking about the “com- 
ing bright future.” as in Marxism — 
unsubstantiated by factual analysis. 

G.C. ANKERL. 

Geneva. 


Competition is here to stay. It is a 
very natural product of a creature 
who combines imagination with 
thinking and feeling. So whatever the 
drawbacks, the problem is how to ^ 
reform iL not whether to allow iL The-* 
issue of competition is serious: it$ 
demons are crucial targets. But we 
must lake aim and aim straight 
LEE A. ARCHER 3d. 

Paris. 






7 





&"f !>r „> 


% OVm j 

* ln,,t !f *». U 4| ‘ MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


Hcralb^^Sribmic, 

BUSINESS/ FINANCE 


Page 7 


U 


FRNs With lids launched 
Under an Improved Formula 


v : ! ByCARLGEWIRTZ 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — A Hd on how high a floating late coupon coold 
rise was introduced last week into theEnrobond market. 
The concept comes close to the ill-fated “nmn-max” 
FRNs of last February, which had a fixed range of 
minimum *md n ^nrin Tu i n coupons. The four issues marketed 
V I? *■; under the eaiiiex formula failed to attract much support because 
r V ' %■. the high mmimtim coupon of 10 percent, which was attractive 
; '.y relative to the 5 to 514 percent offered on standard floaters, was 
”-p not enough to offset the relatively low caps of 1B4 to 11% 
' . percent 

\ That upper range just about coincided with the rate those four 

borrowers would have then , _ , , 

.■~‘ ; >fhad to pay for fixed-rate- is- Eurobond Yields 
“'k sues — a situation Which in- W eak Ended June 12 

" *£i« vfisr/ire PAncid^rMt Ttisdn- U«5 lS E 9 toon, bill hist — ^ 

• « > - i vest 4 ors considers made- uss ^ lerm# ^ _ — 7731 % 

..... quate protection against the ujs $ medium term, ind. _ uu# % 

. v '*■. possibility erf a sadden in- ewix medi um te rm iw * 

. v/. crease in shrat-tenn interest — 2H? 5 

- i;- Sterilns medium. team — 11 J 1 % 

ral^ in addition, the margm Yeo medium term, inn insi. 634 % 

paid over the London inter- yen is term, inn inst. — 7ja % 

bank rate — which ranged ecu short term — ~ 174 % 

^to-^peix^t — prev gj g J 

i.~;' wded no special added mcen- eua long term ■■ 9re % 

■' live to investors. LuxF metf term InTI Inst 9J7 % 

' ’'"3f The new maxi- bonds — LuxF medium term 9.48 % 

$200 milhan for Banque In- o— +*»**—*-•*- *■ 

•„* - dosuez and $400 million for 
;r yx Banque Franijaise da Com- Market Turnover 
. merceExt&riear — have been For vtak Ended June 13 

: f* tailored to. take account of " # u A 

these drawbacks. Indosuez 

^^ ^maxiinmncou^^ g^eor 2SK KJ IBS 

? - 13 1/16 percent and BFCE 

’ 13 percent, dose to 3 points more than these French state-owned 

. . banks would currently have had to pay for fixed-rate money. 

. . In additio n, the marg ins — %-point over the average of the 
J three-month London interbank bid-offered rate (Iixnean) for 
‘.yy three-month Eurodollars paid fay Indosuez and %-pomt over the 
. three-month bid rate (Iibid) paid by BFCE — are attractive. 

Credit Lyonnais, farexkrxqrie, aweek earlier paid ]/l(H>Qmtover 
. ax-month libor for a classically structured 15-year JFRN. 

"J* ASSUMING that normal ft-point difference between bid* 
: l\ offered rates remains stable, the interest Indosuez is pay- 


Eurabond Yields 

For WmIc Ended June 12 

USS is term, ltf*l tnsL _ 1M1 % 

USX Iona term. End. - — T1J31 % 
UXJ medium term, lnd. _ 1048 % 

CanJS medium term 11.07 % 

French Fr. start term — 1172 % 

Sterilns medium imrm 1W1 % 

Yen medium term, inti Inst. 634 % 
Yen is term. Inti Inst. — 7JB % 

ECU short term = 174 % 

ECU medium term — ; — 9J2 % 
ECU Iona term 9X1 % 

EUA hew term 9X6 % 

LuxF metf term lnt*t Inst 9J7 % 

LuxF medium term 948 % 

Calculated by the Luxembourg StoOc Ex- 
eho oml 

Market Turnover 

For Week Ended Jam 13 

tMIHoaa of. U-Su OoHars) 

Him rtnflw 
ToM Mkr EqhlvalMt 

Cede) 227797 18J0L1 37784 

Eurodear 41,397.7 38782.7 3,1154 


ASS 

y\? Z\ offered rates remains stable, the interest Indosuez is pay- 
| - JL JLing is equal to 5/ 16-point over Libor while BFCE is 

i paying W-point over Libor. 

• ... In today’s market, these levels look rich and institutional 

. . ~ investors responded by racing for the paper. FRNs usually op® 

trading at a discount from the par offeimg price, in the region of 

' ‘.the front-end fees paid to undowritersilnese two issnes, Eowev- 

i . - . . er. ended the week at a premium with investors offering to pay 

10033. 

Why these two issues were so rk±ly priced is explained by the 
i-gtM « | • ■ r fact that the cost of money to the issuers was substantially bdow 

I iff m|# » ■ B5 c i' S tn/if what thw seemed to be paying. In effect, the issuere ^were sharing 
M fclnfUH^ their savings withinvesUMS to assure solid placeman of the notes. 

Tbe cost sawng is directly related to the maximum coupon. The 
.. rate caps, which should be viewed as an insurance policy against 
short-term rates rising beyond 13 or 13 1/16 percent, have been 
sold to some companies or financial institutions looking for that 
1 land of .protection for 12 years— the life of both issues. There is 

- ' no product available in the financial futures markets that could 

" ' .offer that tod of coverage 

• “> • ' y- What exactly Indosuez and BFCE did is not- being revealed 

■ • *■- 'either by them or Lehman Brothers, the investment bank that 

• developed the package- But, in effect, Indosuez and BFCE have 
either agreed to provide their counterparties with fixed-rate loans 
- at any time over the next 12 years;, or the banks may have agreed 

; to compensate their counterparties for the difference between the 
_ fixed maximum cotroon rate and the three-month interbank rate 
. 1 " any lime that exceeds the coupon rate. 

The cash received for selling this option effectively cuts the 
borrowing costs of the banks. Indosuez, after including the front- 
■. .. ! end fee to underwriters of V4-pcrcent (or 50 basis points), is 

paying 2 basis points over Tinman for its money. BFCE, includ- 
ing its front-end fees of 30 basis points, is paying 2J basis points 
- ... over Libid. 

Elsewhere, Hydro-Qnfebcc’s attempt to revive the mismatch 
"... .. coupon formula was not well received. It offered S200 nuffion of 

1 7-ycar FRNs with interest pegged at six-month Iibid set month- 
ly. If the one-month rate is nighex than the. six-month rate, 

1 ' interest will be set at the ono-momth Limean until the normal 

yield curve is reestablished. Currently the six-month rate is 3/16 
point higher, enabling lenders to pocket that as profit. But as 
total remuneration, in addition to a front-mid fee of 35 basis 
'* — ^points, that was deemed too thin and the notes ended the week at 

a discount of 40 basis points. 

The Bank of Greece, which offered 500 million Deutsche 
3 Tf /marks of 10-year FRNs, also traded outside its front-end fees of 
flit'" 1 (Confinaed on Page 9, CoL 1) 


I to IViiit 


LastV’Vfeek’sMarkeis 

AnnouretaretaoiaoeeottTaOIno Friaor 


Stock Indexes 

Unhed States 


MoneyRates 

Unted States 


C TSE 1(ML_ 177240 
T30 97050 


Hona5eno- 14077 


Nikkei OJ_ 124B57S 1Z4SUM -1-025% 


Bank base rote__ - 12K 1216 

17CL55 —658% coll money _____ 11* CM 

34tionfhhrtart)onfc_ TgWi mb 

+025% WOK. ' 

Bk Engl Index __ USflO NA. — % 

Gold 


, Comment* 17X190 U6S40 +OS% 

Samxx:JaaesOMKlStO>.ljain. 


London Miu fix. S 31025 31470+176% 

MNnWttofaahHistomJonBCtnt 


THiTTHTT^ 


Currency Rates 


fw«l Rates June 14 

S E DM. FJ% HJ_ ■ ■ SWT. . BuF. SJ=. 

Amstenlain 14H5 4411 11271 • 31945* 0.1JW* Un> m«* 13W5T 

Breudcto) I1BU5 7192 20I5U 64125 3J6J* 17.KR 241123 M92* 

FraHkfurt uu x*n — 32Ja* una auss* un> ia95 • loss* 

London fb) L2MS 29111 1V9SJ? IWJO 44073 7U3 1291 3KXB 

Milan LK34B 249SJ8 *37.10 2BU7 545R 31JI3 7391 74W 

mnrVarkfcl 07JW* IMS Ml LOOM r : 3451 - Aa IB MU 0 

Paris MR 1IM 1DOI ZAm ULUS* 3428 37105* 

Tokyo MU5 315JS 4041 2647 Btf* TUB 4WJ1* 5573 

ZUTKB 2S73S 1217 8*025 ■ 274»* 01319* 7*445- 4 . 1 * 6 - UOO* 

1 ecu 07M1 osnt uu 6Mu 14SUD is* ' emu mm huh 

I SDR OWJSTt 077792 1 MU 9JS8S M5044 34185 £13785 Z5££5 M8JH ' 

Oa&ima In Lonr*mon(tZvrkA.ftxln» in other Eurap«wj cwm New Yotk rates oft PM. 
lal CamtnenMl franc fb) Amounts netOtdto 6vy#m paam (el Amounts ncctfn/te 
dollar fl units ot HO (xi UtfisoflMM Units of WOO HA; naf Quoted; NA; natmamU*. 
(a) To top MB MOIKf. HML12U 

Other Dolbur Vaiaeis 

Omm nor USS Currency w USS CWTWKV POT USS Ctmmcv B* USS 

Aiwa. Peso 77400 Ftm markka £41 Motor, rtnm 1471 S.Kor.wno 875.15 

AuoiraLS ISI 2 £ Srookdroc. D02I MaxMfla 2H01 Soon, peseta 17SS0 

Avttr. SAIL 21J3 HaagKoaaS 7772 ttan^krooe US Saed. kroon 3M 

Beto.fto.fr. £262 todtonnmoo 125* PMLpom 17J0 TatanaS 39J7 

Brad cm 547000 iMtanmUi 1,11000 port. ontoo TM bam 27405 

Cmwdtaol UM Irtsac QSST7 smtalrtval. 34505 TarkWinra 52745 

- DanMi krone 109079 imaBtfiek. 1.13J.1Q Bob.E 1230 UAC iBHmu 34725 

EOTVt-PWM* 07519 KbwoHIlHBor 0JD34 lUT.imd 1JB1 VkoaMIv. 1111 

t Sferflitfl: 1 J508 Irtst) C 

Sources: Banawdu swam t&vssdsj; Banco CommerelMt ttoftofia (Milan/.- Bonoua Ma- 
ftonole Ob Parle {Parish Bank at Ta*m.(Tokva/; IMF (5DB)t BA 1 1 (dinar, rival, dirhem). 
Other data from Revlon ana AP 


Idle Plants 
Are Tied 
To Dollar 

US. Survey Cites 
Currency’s Rise 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar's 
strength has been died by nearly 10 
percent of the largest U.S. manu- 
facturers as the main reason their 
plants are not running at capacity, 
according to a survey released Sun- 
day by the Conference Board. 

Among the hardest hit are pro- 
ducers of noudectrical machinery, 
iron and sted and paper, the US. 
business-research group said. 

“Where the dohai is damaging 
American industry, survey remits 
strongly suggest that the impact is 
severer said Roger Knbarych, 
chief economist of the board. ‘T'or 
those industries being hurt, mean- 
ingful relief would involve a major 
realignment of exchange-rate raa- 
tionshtps.'* 

The dollar has surged more than 
70 percent during the 1980s, re- 
bounding from depressed levels, 
according to the Federal Resave 
Board's index of the d ollar against 
the currencies of 10 other industrial 
countries. That increase has made 
U.S. goods more expensive to for- 
eign Buyers while mating imports 
more affordable for Americans. 

A third of the 1,000 hugest man- 
ufacturing com panies questioned 
in the Conference Board's spring 
survey said they bad more than 
adequate plant capacity. 

CM those operating below capaci- 
ty, 28 percent said the high value 
dollar was the major reason. 

Sixty-three percent of the non- 
electrical machinery companies 
blamed the dollar for idle capacity, 
followed by 43 percent of the iron 
and sted companies and 38 percent 
of the paper-product businesses. 



Norsk Hydro’s president, Torvfld Aakvaag, and an ammonia plant in the Netherlands. 

Norsk Hydro Focuses on Fertiliser 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Henna Tribune 

LONDON —Fertilizer execu- 
tives are fond of arguing that 
their industry is bound to recov- 
er from its present slump “be- 
cause, damn it, the world’s got to 
be fed,” as one puts iL For all 
their pious udk, however, most 

VMgWBS tfim rhem ica] rrmip atries 

view fertilizer as a savagdy com- 
petitive, low-profit business and 
are looking elsewhere for growth. 

Three northern European 
companies see it differently: 
Norway's Norsk Hydro A/S, 
Finland's Kendra Oy and Den- 
mark's Superfos A/S are buying 
the fertilizer plants and sales out- 
lets that others find unexciting 
and unprofitable. 

Norsk Hydro has been the 
most ambitions If it completes 
recent agreements to acquire op- 
erations in France and West 
Germany. Norsk figures it will 


be the world’s largest fertilizer 
company, surpassing even Inter- 
national Minerals & Chemical 
Coro, of the United States. 

“We believe there is a big po- 
tential for improving results in 
this industry by investing in 
more efficient processes, by im- 
proving productivity," said Tor- 
vild Aakvaag, Norsk’s preadenL 
To be more efficient, Norsk be- 
lieves it needs to be large enough 
to continue building state-of- 
the-art plants, which can cost 
hundreds of millions of dollars. 

Others agree. “There will not 
be many small companies 
around," predicted John Mar- 
shall head of fertilizer opera- 
tions far Imperial Chemical In- 
dustries PLC, Britain's biggest 
fertilizer producer. 

Unlike most big chemical 
companies, Norsk always has 
seen fertilizers as one of its mam 
businesses. The company, which 


is 5 1 -percent-owned by the Nor- 
wegian government, was formed 
in 1903 to take advantage of 
Norway^ hydroelec trie power in 
producing fertilizer. Today, 
Norsk is taking advantage of 
Norway’s oil and gas resources. 
In 1984 it derived 70 percent of 
its operating profit from oQ, 
compared with 17 percent from 
fertilizer and other agricultural 
products. 

Instead of tempting Norsk to 
forsake the farm, the oil riches 
have made the company finan- 
cially strong enough to build a 
global fertilizer business. And 
Norway’s gas reserves are likely 
one day to provide feedstock for 
Norsk's production of ammonia, 
the most important input for ni- 
trogen fertilizers. “The fastest 
growth is in nitrogen, where 
Norsk is strongest,” said Jeremy 
Qian try, a chemical analyst at 
(Cantinaed on Page 13, CoL 6) 


Despite M-l Fears, Fed Is Easing Monetary Policy 


By John M. Berry 

Washington Pan Sendee 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Reserve, worried about what some 
offi cials regard as unusually high 
dangers associated with allowing 
slow economic growth to continue, 
apparently is continuing to ease 
U.S. monetary policy. 

The earing is occurring even 
though the most dosdy watched 
measure of the money supply, M-l, 
is far above target and is nkdy to 
slay there for some months to 
come. The major issue faring cen- 
tra] bank paheymakers at their 
next meeting July 9 will be whether 
to combine to ignore the target for 
M-l, change it or still ny to hit it, 
several Fed officials say. 

Implicit in that choice probably 
wQl be a decision about whether 
the rapid rate of money growth wfll 
mean Mgher inflation m the future, 
or a willingness to accept that pos- 
sibility because the alternatives — 
such as more failures of UJS. finan- 
cial institutions and companies or a 
Third World debt crisis — would 
be worse. 

Another important concern at 
the meeting will be the value of the 
UJS. dollar on foreign exchange 
markets. 

“The key varia Weis when and by 
how muc h the exchange rate de- 
clines,'’ says one senior Fed offi- 
cial who does not believe economic 


growth will pick up very modi until 
the dollar’s value starts to fall and 
the international competitive pori- " 
lion of UJS. manufacturers im- 
proves. 

Market participants are so cer- 


makers are concerned about the 
posable inflationary consequences 
of a sustained rapid expansion of 
M-l, the measure of money that 
includes currency in rirculation 
and checking deposits at financial 


"Tlie state of the woMrnak&h difficult to take 
substantial risks on aslowmg of the economy.” 


tain about the immediate course of 
Fed policy toward earing that both 
short- and long-term interest rates 
fell sharply last week. However, the 
discount rale, which the central 
bank charges on loans to financial 
institutions, remained at 714 per- 
cent. The Fed lowered it from 8 
percent on May 17. 

The federal funds rate — the 
interest rate institutions charge on 
loans of reserves to one another— 

end dftbe week, antfS^Fed did 
not intervene in the market to 
boost the funds rate. Many market 
participants saw the failure to in- 
tervene as a strong sign the central 
bank was setting the stage for an- 
other ent in the discount rale. 

Even if that cut does not crane, 
many analysts believe the 10-per- 
cent prime lending rate at commer- 
cial banks will fall to 9% percent 
shortly, probably this week. 

Some Federal Reserve policy- 


institutions. But more of them are 
worried about the potential conse- 
quences erf slow economic growth. 

In a New York speech recently, 
Henry C Wallich, a Federal Re- 
serve governor who has often dis- 
sented from policy derisions out of 
a concern about restraining infla- 
tion, described the central bank's 
dil emma this way: 

“The current pace of inflation 
obviously is not good enough — in 
a better age, it would have been 
regarded as unacceptable and 
would have brought about immedi- 
ate strong action to curb iL Today, 
the state of the world makes it diffi- 
cult to take substantia] risks on a 
slowing of the economy. 

“Monetary policy, today more 
than usually, is beset by constraints 
on all sides," he said. 

Mr. Wallich ticked off some of 
those constraints: the high value of 
the UJS. dollar in foreign exchange 
markets, unemployment, inflation, 


Hungary Stresses Trade liberalization 


Energy Market 
Seen Tightening 
In the 1990s 


the fragility of financial markets, 
the situation of developing coun- 
tries. problems of the farm sector 
and pressures on financial institu- 
tions. 

At the moment, with inflation 
showing only a Tew signs of acceler- 
ating, the Fed has clearly chosen to 
focus on the other problems, rather 
than inflation that might be gener- 
ated in the future by the rapid 
growth of M-l. 

Paul A. Volcker, chairman of the 
Federal Reserve, defended in a 
speech at Harvard University the 
May 17 discount rate cut against 
some criticism that it could be in- 
fiationary. 

He said there was “no inconsis- 
tency in my mind between a con- 
tinuing priority concern about in- 
flation and our recent decision to, 
in the jargon, ‘ease money' by low- 
ering Lhe discount rate. 

“That derision took place under 
particular circumstances — a 
strong dollar, ample capacity, and 
slow growth, all of which tend to 
reduce inflationary pressures," Mr. 
Volcker said. 

Lawrence A Kudlow, former 
chief economist of the Office of 
Management and Budget, bad 
written critically after the May 17 
rate cut: “The discount rate deri- 
sion dovetails perfectly with the 
prevailing Washington view that 
monetary policy can have its cake 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 8) 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — The world's non- 
Communisi industrialized nations 
should guard against a false sense 
of security by abundant energy 
supplies because the market is like- 
ly to tighten in the 1990s, the Inter- 
national Energy Agency has 
warned. 

The Paris-based agency, in its 
latest review of energy policies of 
member countries published Mon- 
day. also said that the West could 
once again become vulnerable to 
pressure from the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries as 
it was in the 1970s. There could be 
substantial increases in the price of 
gasoline if supplies are disrupted, 
the agency noted. 

Commenting on the survey's 
findings, the agency’s executive di- 
rector, HeJga Slecg. said the market 
for oil, coal natural gas and elec- 
tricity are being influenced by sur- 
plus production capacity. She not- 
ed that “paradoxically, the Tact that 
things are getting better could 
make matters worse in (he future." 

The total primary energy needs 
of the 21 IEA member countries is 
projected to rise by one-third in the 
next IS years, she said, and oil 
demand will rise much more quick- 
ly than expected if oil prices remain 
weak. 

The annual report predicts that 
while the energy market will re- 
main “easy" through the 1980s. 
sustained economic growth in the 
last decade of this century coupled 
with declining oil production in the 
industrialized world means that the 
net oil imports of IEA’s member 
countries will rise to around 18 mil- 
lion barrels a day by the end of (he 
century. 

The IEA said such a level of 
imports would imply that sources 
outride the Organization for Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and Develop- 
ment “would again play a major 
role in balancing supply and de- 
mand. There could again bean up- 
ward pressure on oil prices and a 
risk of massive price increases in 
the event of even a slight disruption 
in supplies." 

Western governments must con- 
tinue and in some cases strengthen 
energy policies, the IEA said. It 
noted that the present softness of 
the energy market “may lead to a 


Saudi Cautions 
About Discounts 

United Press InKmanoKvt 

NEW YORK — Sheikh Ah- 
med Zoki Yamaiu, Saudi Ara- 
bia’s oil minister, has warned 
OPEC that world oil prices 
could plunge below S20 a barrel 
if his kingdom raises oil output, 
according to a report Sunday. 

Sheikh Yamani. in an inter- 
view with Petroleum Intelli- 
gence Weekly, an oil journal, 
said Saudi Arabia, whose oil 
production shrunk to a 20-vear 
low of less than IS million bar- 
rels a day in May. has no alter- 
native but to step up produc- 
tion because of a serious 
shortage of oil revenues and 
natural gas. The gas is a by- 
product of oil production. Sau- 
di Arabia, ibe largest producer 
in the Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries, bos 
the capacity to pump more than 
10 million barrels a day. 

Sheikh Yamani said that if 
Saudi Arabia increases its pro- 
duction, oil prices will fall un- 
less other OPEC members re- 
duce output to official quota 
levels and stop offering illegal 
price discounts. Official OPEC 
prices range from $26.50 to S29 
a barrel 


relaxation of efforts by govern- 
ments. energy producers and con- 
sumers to achieve further progress 
toward improving the overall ener- 
gy security of IEA countries." 

It recognized that efforts to im- 
prove the efficiency of energy’ use 
may “be hampered by stable or 
decreasing energy prices and a lack 
or political will to set a framework 
for continued efficiency improve- 
ments.” 

The agency said operators in the 
oil market “will have to adapt their 
capacities to changing market con- 
ditions while coping with uncer- 
tainty about future price develop- 
ments" and also will have to be 
prepared for the potential conse- 
quences of political instability in 
major oil-producing regions. 


Panama , Bank Panel Agree 
On Refinancing Package 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Panama and a 
working committee of internation- 
al banks have announced an agree- 
ment on a multiyear refinancing 
package that includes a total of 
S267.4 million in new loans and- 
credit facilities. 

Bank of America, which heads 
the 13-bank committee, said on 
Friday that in addition to $60 mil- 
lion in new money, the package 
calls for 556.4 million in credit 
lines, a 51 33-miIlian money-market 
facility and a 528-million petro- 
leum-import facility for Banco Na- 
tional de Panama. 

The banks have agreed to refi- 
nance $603 million of 1985-1986 
maturities. Bank of America said 
the agreement was being sent to the 
180 creditor banks for approval. 


Panama’s total foreign debt, S3.6 
billion, is small compared with oth- 
er nations' but is one of the highest 
per capita in Latin America. 

The refinancing and loan follow 
Panama's agreement on an eco- 
nomic program with the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund, which in- 
dudes a 5120-raillion. two-year 
standby crediL 

In Panama City, President Nico- 
las Ardito Barleua said that the 
agreement “has been an been an 
important step." 

Mr. Ardito Barletta, who was an 
official with the World Bank until 
he was elected president last year, 
said his government had imple- 
mented a series of austerity mea- 
sures to lower expenditures and 
had increased government income. 


Umted States maea sores lmwil ptkjw. 

Laawk. PrM.Wk. arte Discount rata 7.SU 7S0 

■■ DJ Indus — 1,30096 UtMZ — U9% Fattoral funds roto_ 7Snt 79/M 

DJUtil M44P 1088 +0 M% prime rat*. 10 10 

DJ Trans. „ 63S94 6S345 —243% 

* 5B.PI00 18093 18348 —143% 22E2 

S&P500 187 JO 18947 —140% Dtaeount 5 S 

NYSECe— 10056 109.97 — L36% Call money - 6 63/16 

Simn:PntbamBaclRSscai«B. 40-donr Interbank — 6U MU 


Lombard 

101040 -249% Ov*mfc*t_ 

IOOUO — iM% i-month lntartxmk_ 


By Henry Tanner 

International Herald Tribune 

BUDAPEST — Leading Hun- 
garian officials have stressed tint 
their go v ernm ent is determined to 
accelerate the liberalization Of the 
economy and to make conditions 
more favorable for trade and joint 
ventures with Western enterprises. 

The officials spoke at a two-day 
conference sponsored by the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune in Buda- 
pest Thursday and Friday. The 
conference, which was attended fay 
more than a hundred Western boar 
nessmen and by about 80 managers 
and deputy managers of Hungarian 
cooperatives and enterprises, was 
believed to be the first erf its land in 
an Eastern European country. Zt 
appeared to be an indication that 
Hungary wants to improve con- 
tacts with Western businesses. 

Joszef Maijal the deputy prime 
minister responsible fra: the econo- 
my, said the government was intent 
rat increasing the number of joint 
ventures with Western companies, 
“especially in the field of technol- 
ogy development." 

He said conditions fra foreign 
investors would be made “more fa- 
vorable" and added that there were 
plans to allow Western companies 
to repatriate more of their profits. 

Hungary has 44 joint ventures 
with Western companies, an in - 1 
crease from 25 ai ue start of last j 
year, according to Mr. Maijai. i 

Another speaker, Janos Fekete,i 
first deputy chairman of the Na - 1 
tional Bank, said that the govern- 
ment recently made a derision to 
proceed with "a gradual step-by- 
step modernization" of the coun- 
try's banking system and that spe- 
cialists in the ministries and the 
National Bank were now develop- 
ing practical steps. 

“A competitive hanking system 


can work only if we have realistic 
prices and wages," Mr. Fekelesaid, 
and Hungary has made progress in 
that direction. “We now have 
wages that are adequate to perfor- 
mance [of the workers] and prices 
that are in keeping with the value erf 
the goods.” 

Among the measures under con- 
sideration is the creation of com- 
mensal banks with nationwide net- 
works that would compete with 
each other and the estabushment of 


some banks “with foreign coopera- 
tion.*' 

The government’s objective is (o 
make the Hungarian currency, the 
forint, convertible for commercial 
transactions, he said. He added 
that this would not be fully con- 
vertible; it would not apply to capi- 
tal transfers but to trade and prof- 
its. He declined to predict a 
timetable, but said it ^certainly” 
would occur within the second half 
of the new five-year plan. 


■■ v- >.‘:V .... ' i ildHM'-U-.t ' .• • £ . \ • s- . • 


The First Boston Corporation 

is proud ro announce the opening 
of our new 

Zurich Office 

and the appointment of: 




GEORGE E. BAUMANN 
Vice President and Manager 


EDUARD P. KAUFFMANN 


RALPH P. SIGG 


m billions of Belgian francs 

1984 

1983 

Peirofina's consolidated proto* 

15.5 

14 1 

Dividends 

6.9 

6.2 

Safes and other revenues 

597.9 

544 9 

Snarehoidere' equity * 

82.4 

75.9 

Net working capital 

16.5 

16.5 

Long-term debt 

36.5 

348 

Investment expenddure 

45.0 

36.0 

Nei yield on shareholders' equity 

22.9% 

23.6% 

Cash flow to shareholders equity 

67.2% 

684% 


KANZLEfSTRASSE 57 
POSTFACH 707 

8026 ZURICH, SWITZERLAND 
TEL.: 01/242 5204 
TELEX: 814390 


"Over the pest IByears results Ime Increased regutarty 
and by an annual average of more than 1 3.5%. 


English edition ot the lutt Annual Reoori avaflabte 
on apolication lo Petfofina S A 
Pubic Relations, rue de r Industrie 52 - 1 040 Brussels 



The First Boston Corporation 


NEW YORK ATLANTA Bns-niN CHICAGO CLEVELAND DALLAS 

GENEVA HOUSTON LONDON LOS ANGELES MELBOURNE MONTREAL 

PHILADELPHIA SAN FRANCISCO SAN Jl’AN TOKYO TORONTO ZURICH 


Jink 17. 1985 





Pajjr K 


INTER N 4TION A I- HERALD JRJBl NE. MONDAY, JUNE I' 


International Bond Prices - Week of June 13 

Provided by Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel.: 01-623-12 1 7 

Prices may vary according to market eooditioiw and other laaora. 




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MISCELLANEOUS 


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13 Barales Df CaAKe 
175 Cewlas B» Sinmere 
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NETHERLANDS 



niTi F*B ns tut 113 

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m.W«oB TOO Q71 M3 
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T.-.T7 Hr. 9A IU9 RU7 781 
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r-WFed 914 1005 40 

K^Wtta MBVa M7I MJB 
9*. 87 Jul 99 'j 951 9 JO 

9-.WJU- 9Ti I01J KLI! 958 




HIGHEST YIELDS 

to Average Life Below 5 Years 


NEW ZEALAND 


Wllrt Foods O's Capita 
Venezuelan Tetostant 
VeoeanKa 
Aaiemda Has X7»r 
BmH 

BouJifMOeGotnee 
Howden Ales Rnon X/w 
Pori Auiftonties 
Owner CbrmiW 0/5 
Pom-ATOousain 
Omenls Lofaree 
flhtnw-Poulwe 
Bet inn Finance 


HOW 
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m. 87 Dec 
R.97CW 
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V- 87 0« 
I WDK 
Vi 91 Jifei 
9 f(l4o* 
TVS 83 00 
TVj 87 Aua 
7*487 Jul 
Tfl 87 AB 
T4 87N0* 


UK 1438 7157 93 
73K 1454 1434 737 
BSV: 1392 I7J3 9JJ 
|1 123 1447 UK 

91K 1143 1SJ0 3JH 
919] 1139 TAX 907 
UK 1224 UN 9iS 
I7W 1248 U07 IU6 
a 1173 IJi* W73 
S3 1759 113B 9 IS 
98 1114 173 123 
HVj 1434 17.44 147 
89V) 14J4 1553 BJS 
194 1275 USJ 13J 


115 NewZannW 

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*15380 K ewltc-tatf 

1 103 newZecwiri 

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ecu 103 NewZcoiaad 

ecu IK NmZvdcnd 

19} Book 01 Me* 2eebrs 
ITS Mi Foml Prcduas 
125 Mz Feres Products 
153 CMm KWona 


115 SKcerC.lr 
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8- 86 Ere «8i. 9.T2 UJ 

t'-a-UCeC 134 45b IBS 

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7.91JIB K1 10 9.14 

T'tWiin m--s 93 93 

:r< Tutor ici lots ms 

• 8A*Sor 13 IK 900 

1:198 cv ICI IU8 1263 

K-8SCGC 9BS52 1ST t2l 


HIGHEST YIELDS 

to Average Life Above 5 Years 


WS& 


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ansa Canadian I maerlal 
ad 75 Canadian Iniiww 

460 


Th 


914 8SDK 
77)87 See 
mWAas 

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14ft 70 Aue 106 1251 1271 UM 

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0 73 Mot 95ft W*7 ll ?a 10X7 
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*31 Karen KamoMnaftant 


-HIGHEST CURRENT YIELDS— 




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85 Od lOZft 9x5 

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Mar 87 
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Dec ira 050 

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Jan IMft 3454 
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m. 


ZERO-COUPON BONDS 

^ ££*, M-ISS, 0 ® 


SSD E 
ISO E 
ISO Elb 
VlSDOC EJb 
ecu 75 EW 
SIM E» 
125 Elb 
*106 EC 
*08 EJB 
*10 Elb 
1142 

ecu 50 Elb 
ecu 10 Elb 
ecu UM Elb 
*10 Eft 
eeuffl Elb 
ecu 158 Elb 
S» E6> 
*09 Elb 
STS Elb 




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Rfe- 

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7ft 85 MOV 
lift -95 Mar 

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l lb. TI Jan 
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3ft L? may 
lift 87 Sep 
»«■ W May 
IBft WM09 
12ft 87 Od 
MftWAPr 
4ft 72 Jpn 
9ft 73 F6b 

lift 74 JOT 


(Coadnued on Page 10) 




Od 

oec IMS. 

Dec Wft 

MO 92 
Mar iffl 
Mar TO 
Mar ills 
Mar 0 11X5 

Jin 101 113 

imft 1148 

to ne 

114ft TXT9 
MiS. 1BJ0 
101 11X9 

9(ft 1L05 
M 113 
KBS. 727 
tOWti 9X6 
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92 
Kft 
IDtft 


WestLB 


Eurobonds ■ DM Bonds • Schuldscheine 
for dealing prices call 

PflSSH-DORF 

V^WeutechBljndtebaT*. Hmd Offices. PO. Box T128. 4000 Dito5Srfi 

TKSS8wSfm1& n9 ^ Teteph °™ i 8263122/8263741 

London 

Lu 2 Cflmbou 




Luxembourg, Telephone 44741-43 -Telex 1678 

Hong Kong 

Westdeutsdre Landesbank. BATbwer. 36th Root. 12 Harcourt Road 

Hong Kong. Telephone 5-8420288 - Telex 75142 HX ' 

Marketmakers in DeutschmarkBondsWSSt 1 R 

^festdeutsche Landesbank 


































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


Page 9 



-/ s 


'll 


-5 a ■ 

• ij : 

■■ s : 


T i 


: ;■ r 


issuer 


Amount u . Coup. 

(millions) Mot % Pn “ ^ 


Terms 


FLOATING RATE NOTH 


i , 

■'ll 

- ■%,. 
.. & 


Banque Indosuez 

$200 

1997 

% 

100 

100-33 Ow Staonh Lmwon. Mopw, coupon 13 1/16%, » 
Bwaan. Noncdidjl* Few QlSOK. Dencmnabons $10,000. 

Bankers Trust GmbH 

$175 

1990 

Vt 

100 

99.90 

Owe 6-mtwh Libor. Noncdk44* 5Mdng fund » start in 
1986 to pradxa a 172-yr aerage We. Fees Q.16%. 

Banque Fran^ntse 
pour le Commerce 
Exterieur 

$400 

1997 

ft 

100 

10033 O" Smonfh Ubid, Mmawum coupon 13%, no nmimum, 
Noncdoble. Fees 050%. 

BNP 

$ 600 

1995 

0.05 

100 

— 

Over 6-fnenlh Libor. Coflobta ot per in 1988. Irrtad tranche 
$100 nJm Feet 0.275%. Denominutiore Sl-5 talon, of 
whieh S250DOO ■ itw ntiei trade. 

ComxSan hnperrd 
Bank of Commerce 

$300 

2084 


100 

9930 

Dw 6-mcrot* Libor. foBr^tr at par in 1990, Fmc 0.94%. 

Hydro Quebec 

$200 

2002 

libid 

100 

99.60 

1 ntarasf pegged to &mamh Libid, set monthly, but may switch 
to iimaan 3 IwnerWi Ubd b higher than 6-raerth Libid 
Cdfableat par in 1988. Feet 055%. Denomncdions $10,000. 

Royd Bank of 

Canada 

$350 

2005 

1/16 

100 

9936 

Over 1 -month Libor. Cnlrftln a par n 1990. 9 ms 0l 75%, 
Denomnaborts $10JXB. 

Abbey National 
Building Society 

£50 

1986 

1/16 

100 

— 

Chw 3-moaih L2 okL Rooting rate e*rt fertt of Jepaat 

Bank of Greece . 

DM500 

1995 

ft 

100 

98.90 

£>«r froionth L3x)f. Ccfdbte « par in 1990 and redeentefete 
W par in 1992. Fees 070%. 

FIXED-COUPON 

Alcoa of AustraSa 

$80 

1992 

17 

m 

9788 

Calotte at 101 >• ?99U 

Equitable Life 

Fmanang Corp. 

$100 

1992 

10ft 

100 

98.00 

Gdfabte a 101 m 1990. 

Federated 

Department Stores 

$T00 

1995 

lOft 

100 

— 

NoncoBofate. 

Japan Air Lines 

$100 

1995 

10 

100ft 

9883 

Cofloble at 101K in 1992. 

New Zealand 

$200 

1995 

10ft 

100 

98.40 

CoHobfe a 101H in 1992. 

New Zealand 

$150 

2000 

10ft 

100 

9775 

Colette a 10116 in 1997. 

Queensland 

Government 

Development 

Authority 

$100 

1995 

10ft 

99ft 

9883 

Hn,i. ■ JliJhl 

iwaatoc. 

Export Import Bank af 
South Korea 

DM 100 

1990 

7% 

100 

98.25 

NancdlabCa. 

Int'l Finance Corp. 

DM 90 

1995 

7ft 

100 

— 

Private placement. 

Oesterreidiische 

Industneverwdturtgs 

DM150 

1995 

7 

99ft 

98.00 

G4atte a 10116 an 1992. 

Soctete 

Luxembourgeoise de 
Centrales Nud&xres 

DM150 

1995 

7ft 

99ft 

9830 

Cdktta at 101 in 1991 

Bank Mees & Hope 

ECU 50 

1992 

9 

open 

9938 

Noncttuble. Price to be set June 21. 

Cltoh 

ecu 60 

1992 

8ft 

open 

9835 

Noncolable. 

Umon Bonk of 

Norway 

ECU 70 

1995 

9 

100 

98.63 

Cttabte a 10116 in 199Z 

Mafina 

DF 100 

1990 

7 

99ft 

— 

iNonoxiasie pnvtue pattermera. 

Gticorp Au5traSa 

AU$40 

1988 

13ft 

100ft 

— 

NoncoNabte. 

CSK FinanCB 

Am$40 

1990 

13ft 

100ft 

— 

Nancalatte. 

BderslXL 

AU$45 

1990 

13ft 

100ft 

— 


Soctete G&terale 
Australia 

AU$30 

1988 

13ft 

100ft 

— 

Nana. Ude. 

Soctete Generde 
Australia 

Aus$20 

1990 

13ft 

100ft 

— 

Noncciabb. 

BP Capital 

nz$50 

1988 

16 

100 

9? m 

Nonadotte. 

Compagnie Fran^otse 
des P6troies 

NZ$55 

1990 

16ft 

100 

98.00 

Noncallphh 

Gasunie 

NZ$50 

1988 

16 ■ ' 

100 

9835 

NooaUis 

Mortage Bank of 
Denmark 

NZ$50.; 

1990 . 

toft 

'too* ? 

-9750 

fi In hi rlre 1 *— *~* 4 • - 

noncoBoraa. 

Nonke Industribank 

NK200 

1993 

io •: 

open 

— 

CaSatte a 10116 in 1990. 

WARRANTS 

Bergen Bank 

0.05 

1990 

— " 

$15 

— 

Each warrant it emroKtoie d pa Mo a $1(000 note of 
balk's lOtts of 1992, ccActfe at per in 1990 if less Ihan $10 
miSon worth of notes are rased 

EQWTY-UNKH> 

Nippon Kongyo 
Kakumaru Securities 

$50 

2000 

3 

100 

10030 Cciobk o* 103 in 1990. Coovertfcte o* 920 yon per thcx«, a 
337%prariunL 

Nippon Mining 

$50 

1990 

7ft 

100 

10335 Nonmlnbk. Eorfi $SJX)0 nole wflh one worranC oxardscUe 
■4o shotiB rt 477 ytai pw dwre and af HI DO y*n per 
dolor. 

Scmdoz Hokfings ■ 
Nederland 

$100 

1997 

open 

100 

9930 

Coupon rncicated a 4IM16X. Cdbtie at 10316 in 1990. 
ConvartibieMo participation oertificataettoa eepededlOX 
premium. Terms to be set June 21. 

Thomson-CSF 

$75 

2000 

7 

100 

— 

CoUsle te 104 in 1988. ConvartUr at 600 frana per share, 
a 9.9% premium. 

Fujitsu 

DM 300 

1990 

2ft 

100 

— 

SetniaraxJy. Ccflatte tt 101 in 1999- Convertible at 1J305 

yen per «t*re ond S2J0 yen per mert 

Tricentrol 

£35 

1992 

11 

100 

9835 

Noncdtofale. Abo 135 ftreitaor warrants, priced te 3*024 
pence oodt, emcisttte into dens at a 1676% preneum. 


FRNsPlay 
r 1 Substitute 
For Some 
Bank Credits 


£ 


Improved Formula for FRNs With Lids 

(Continued from Page 7) 


70 baas points, ending the wed at 
a discount of 1.1 percentage points 
as the ft-poml margin over six- 
month Libor was deemed too 
skimpy. 

In the stating market. Abbey 
National issued the first floating 
rate instrument to be offered by a 

in 

tutions to tap tbe medium-term 
FRN market m numbers later this 
year. Meantime, Abbey is offering 
t one-year floating rate certificates 
*J| of deposit with interest sa at 1/ 16- 
a point over the three-month inter- 
bank bid rate. 

The feature of the fixed-coupon 
market was the continuing empha- 
sis on fonger-dated paper — mostly 
10 years. Bankers noted that the 
cost of shorter-dated funds in New 
York was much cheaper than the 
Eurobond market could offer, 
while the intermediate-range rates 
in the two markets were about com- 
parable. 

But Eurobond investors were in 
no rush to buy as the coupon levels 
asainwt a farther cut in the dis- 
count rate. While most analysts are 
convinced this is immin ent, the an- 
ticipatory pricing makes the new 
issues vulnerable to sharp setbacks 
_ if the Fed fails to acL 
$ One way to mminrae the risk is 
through the options market and 
Bergen Bank last week offered 
50,000 warrants at SIS each. The 
warrants hare a life of five years, 
during which time holders can lay 
out SI, 000 to buy lOft-percent non- 
callablfi bonds mattumg in 1992. 
Thus, for an immediate outlay of 
$15 investors gambling on farther 

rate declines can lock in the right to 

buy the bonds. 

The latest issuer to tap the classic 
straight market was Federated De- 
v partment Stores Int, whose U.S. 
* debt is rated double- A. It offered 
$100 million of 10-year non-call- 
abfe bonds at par bearing a coigxm 
0 r 10% percent — about 25 basis 
points over theyidd levd of com- 
^rably dated Treasury bonds. 


Also in the n»«Vet with 10-year 
offerings were Japan Air lines Co. 
with a coupon of 10 percent priced 
at a premium to yield 9.86 percent; 
New Zealand at 10% parent, and 
Queensland Government Dcvdop- 
ment Authority at 10% percent of- 
fered at a discount to yield 10.29 
percent. 

The favorable comparison of in- 
termediate-range rates between 
New York and the Euromarket 
could easily evaporate with New 
York pulling sharply ahead, some 
bankers beheve, as a result of Ja- 
pan’s liberalization of its securities 
marirfi The latest measures in- 
clude permission for securities 
houses to sell domestically stripped 
U.S. Treasury securities. These are 
home-made zero-coupon bands, 
with banks boyine Treasury securi- 
ties and then selling each coupon 
payment and the final maturity 
payment as separate zero-coupon 
issues. 

A change in the tax law on Jan. 1 
making the gains earned on zeroes 
considered as income rather than 
capital gams, has dampened Japa- 
nese demand far zeroes. Bat bank- 
ers believe there may be consider- 


able appetite for 20-to-30-year 
zeroes which put repayment after 
an investor’s retirement — when 
fricomc is sharply reduced — and 
tins could drive Japanese securities 
houses to buy large blocks of long- 
term Treasury paper. 

Concerning the Euroyen market, 
the Ministry of Finance informed 
bankas last week that they may 
now market floating rate notes, 
zerocoopcn bonds, deep discount 
bonds, dual currency bonds and 
securities with currency options. 

While the gams on zeroes are to 
be subject to income tax, gains on 
deep discount braids are consid- 
ered capital gains, which are not 
taxed. Information was not imme- 
diately available on what levd dis- 
count separates a zero from a deep- 
discount bond. 

The high-coupon bonds denomi- 
nated in New Zealand and Austra- 
lian dollars suffered a set bark last 
week, as an overflow of issues 
caused prices to drop sharply. The 
excess resulted from borrowers 
swapping these issues —which are 
low cost compared to what domes- 
tic borrowers in those countries 
have to pay — into floating rate 
dollars. 


MicheUn Considers Proposal 
For Tire Plant in Gulf State 


' A aaen 

MANAMA, Bahrain — Gulf in- 
vestors are negotiating with 
France’s MkfaflSn & Qe. to set lip a 
joint-venture tire phut in Bahrain 
or Saudi Arabia, business sources 
said Sunday. 

They said private investors meet- 
ing last month provisionally chose 
Mkhehnfrom a number of manu- 
facturers and were now discussing 
several issues with the company, 
including shareholding arrange- 
ments and technology. 

The cost of the plant bad not 
been fixed, but rate source said h 
Bright be around $300 ™ninn. The 


Gulf Organization fra Ind ustrial 
Consulting, a Qatar-based group 
funded by Gulf govranments, con- 
ducted a study suggesting a price of 
$500 million, but the sources said 
that was now thought loo high. 

After negotiating with Mkhelin, 
the businessmen will still have to 
commission a feasibility study be- 
fore launching the factory. 

industry sources said Michdin 
was likely to build a plant in joint 
venture with Saudi Arabia's Na- 
tional Industrialization Gup. to 
produce bntadiene-isoprene, used 
in the manufactur e of synthetic 
rubber. 


By Carl Gcwirtz 

International Herald Tribune 
PAR/S — The role the floating 
rate note market plays as a substi- 
tute for syndicated bank credits 
was made more transparent lari 
week when the West German 
branch of Bankas Trust tapped the 
market on behalf of lsveimer, Ita- 
ly's regional development agency. 

The bank issued $175 million of 
five-year notes bearing interest at 
an eighth of a percentage point 
above the six- month London lnier- 


SYNDICATED LOANS 


bank offered rale. But responsibil- 
ity for the payment of interest and 
principal is entirely Isveimer’s be- 
cause it is the guarantor. 

The agency could not issue notes 
in its own name since the borrow- 
ing would have been subject to Ital- 
ian withholding taxes on interest 
payments. Thanks to a (ax agree- 
ment between West Germany and 
Italy there is no lax liability on this 
so-call e d “pass- through" construc- 
tion with the issuer being a West 
German entity. 

Officials at Bankers Trust say 
this structure of syndicated loan 
creates a more negotiable instru- 
ment ihftfi {he transferable loan 
certificates that are now used on 
standard syndicated credits. There 
is no active secondary market in 
TLCs »nd trading is l united to the 
roll-over dates of the loans, where- 
as Isveimer’s loan can be traded 
irifft any other floating rate note. 

The lsvenwr notes have an aver- 
age life of 2.7 years as a sinking 
fund starts in November, 1986. 

The continuing trend to trans- 
form bank commitments into mar- 
ketable securities was best illustrat- 
ed last week by the S600-nrillion 
floating rate notes issued by Ban- 
aim Nationale de Paris. The aim of 
this operation is to create a $500- 
mifiinn standby credit that under- 
writers are obliged to provide but 
that they can immediately sell off. 

This is achieved by having un- 
derwriters pt op only one-sixth of 
the face value of the notes, or $100 
million. The n o t es are denominated 

immitsnfSl S milKnnmd th^ wwh 
outlay of underwriters is $250,000. 
They are paid 0.05 percent, or five 
baas points, over Libor on the total 
amount, which means they win be 
earning 30 basis pints over libra 
on actual initial disb u r se ment. 

Earnings bn subsequent cash 
outlays will bean effective IS basis 
points ova Libor as BNP will issue 
its paper to the banks at a discount 
of 99 during the first year, rising by 
10 basis porn ts each year during the 
10-year life of the facility. 

The BNP notes are registered, 
meaning BNP knows which h anks 
are committed to providing the 
cash for subsequent drawings. 
Holders of the registered notes can 
sell that paper only to banks named 
in a list supplied by BNP. Subse- 
quent drawings by BNP will be in 
the form of barer FRNs, winch the 
banks can then immediately sell in 
the FRN secondary market. 

The criticism of ibis formu- 

la is that it is less flexible than the 
standard standby credit, which al- 
lows a borrower to draw, repay and 
draw a g ai n continually during the 
lifetime of the fariHiy. In this case, 
once BNP draws on the backup the 
remaining co mmitmen t of the un- 
derwriters is permanently reduced. 

And once the bearer notes are 
issued they remain permanently 
outstanding unless called by BNP. 

One critic disputed labefing the 
operation as a backup facility, ar- 
guing that it really is a loan with a 
10-year drawdown period. 

The other criticism is the rela- 
tively low cost. Underwriters are 
reluctantly willing to provide low- 
cost backup credits to companies 
or state agencies with wfacm they 
hope to do other, mere profitable 
business. But low-cost backups fra 
other banks are just seen as unprof- 
itable This means that some very 
large institutions have dcclnn»H the 
invitation to join the BNP facility. 
However, Credit Suisse First Bos- 
ton, managers, say the overall re- 
sponse has been quite favorable 
and (he fatality will be syndicated 
without any difficulty. 


Consoli dated Trading 
Of AMEX listing 

Week ended June 14 


£&» H i» \BL HA 

UOTJOC U £ 14Vt 

*4*180 5H 4* 4W 
M3J00 3* 1H ' 

aosoe iih wwk ... 

eons im n* uv. 
WUBC 11% IIWj 11* 

ms)o a* a 
w* ■m 


WOngB 
BAT 
TeeAIr 
TIE 
CrrsfO 
DolaPd 
wDfum 
Echos 
DomeP 
Started 
Volume: UUH shores 
Year to Date: NMD&000 shores 
Issue* traded In: 983 
Advances: 2tt ; deeflnes: 441 
Uoehcnaed : 154 
New Highs: 72 : im low: 37 


£ -3 


— * 
4* 


im 


I Treasury Bills 


. Bid 
7.23 
*25 
US 
441 
ua 
441 

ft 

*71 
*72 
*73 
*74 
*70 
*70 
*47 
6J9 
437 
4X2 
*14 
MS 
MS 
434 
Mt 
MS 

£ 
MS 
IM 
*W 
43V 
731 
733 

733 

Source: Federal Reserve Bank 


4-20 

«7 

7-S 

MI 

Mi 

7-2S 

*■ 1 



MS 

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5- 15 

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*40 

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*47 

*41 

*49 

*70 

448 

*44 

*43 

*75 

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430 

411 

431 
*82 
*83 

412 
4X2 
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*81 
MO 
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US 
*97 
499 
731 


7X9 

*29 

*41 

*44 

*44 

*48 

*75 

*33 

*84 

4H 

437 

439 

437 

*85 

*98 

*99 

733 

737 

739 
7.10 
7.13 

7.13 

7.14 
7.14 

7.14 

7.15 
7X4 
7J2 
7X5 

740 
745 
7 JO 


The activity 
of BFCE in 1984 


Results for the 1984 financial year 
Annual SharehoJders'Meeting 
May 14, 1985 

The balance sheet total for “France and 
foreign branches” rose to 288.3 billion francs, 
an increase of 26.4 billion francs ( + 10*3 > in 
relation to the total recorded at the end of 
1983. 

• institutional activities comprising the 
bank's specific involvement in export financ- 
ing increased slightly (4.7 billion francs or 
+ 2.8%) due to a fewer number of short and 
medium-term credits while long-term buyer 
and supplier credits on the contrary progres- 
sed 45.2% similar to the expansion during 
1983. 

• commercial activities, which comprise 
all interbank lending and loans to customers, 
expanded at the rate of 25.8*3 . 

- The operating income from banking ac- 
tivities rose to 1893 million francs, an in- 
crease of 1L2%. Ihking into account an in- 
crease in general expenses, which was li- 
mited to 7.5%. operating income came to 
699 million francs, progressing 16.2*v . 


After appropriation of 608.9 million francs 
to provisions for “sovereign risks” and “cus- 
tomer risks”, the financial results for 1984 
showed a net profit of 56390,000 francs, 
compared with 53436,000 francs in 1983, or 
an increase of 7%. 

- Allocation of the net profit included 
distribution of the statutory dividend of 5% , 
to which was added a complementary di- 
vidend of 1 %, the legal and general reserves 
having been allocated an additional 13 mill- 
ion francs. 

- As a result of these allocations, total 
shareholders' equity and long-term resources 
of the bank rose to 5.6 billion francs as 
compared to 4.9 billion francs reported at the 
end of 1983. 


The Annual Report from which to above 
figures have been extracted may be obtained 
from the Dcpartcment Information, Etudes et 
Develuppement, Banque Franqaise du Com- 
merce Exterieur, 21 Boulei>ard Haussmann, 
75009 Paris. France. 


Loans to resident and 
non resident enterprises* 


ftt Dec. 3 L 1984 in'; 

/ 



A 


Agncataurr 



ElWTpi 

// 


// 



// 

tu 


// 



/ , 


AnuenobiEu 

s' 

FTH 

Othertrenepai equipment 

S’ 





Pnaunjt 





AW". 

Nonfood wlwlrrelr Iradr 

/ / 


IVadr rnirrmrdusnr. 

7 , 

til-. 


/ 

Other 







rxdudinje buff twin huvrtVrmlili- 


Buyer and supplier 


Credits outstanding* 


by geographic areas 



in 19*4 



\lm.i 



lailm Ann-ma 

|i»*» 

I ! 

KiMrrn Kurapr 


I 

Far tUlM 

la*. 

a 

Middle Km 'I 

■Cl 


OKI'D nninlrin. 

12te 

1 

inriudine bilaietal meheduhnp mnenniu 


This advertisement 

appears as a matter of record only 


New Issue 
May, 1985 





PHILIPS INTERNATIONAL FINANCE S.A. 

(Established in Luxembourg) 

R.C. Luxembourg B 7334 

ECU 75,000,000 
9 per cent. Bonds due 1993 

Unconditionally Guaranteed by 

N.V. PHILIPS’ GLOEILAMPENFABRIEKEN 

(Established at Eindhoven, The Netherlands) 


BANQUE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG S. A. 


CREDIT LYONNAIS 


KREDIETBANK INTERNATIONAL GROUP 


ALGEMENE BANK NEDERLAND N.V. 

BANC A COMMERCIALS IT ALLAN A 
COMMERZBANK AKHENGESELLSCHAFT 
DRESDNER BANK AKHENGESEIXSCHAFT 

SOClftrtf GfiNfXALE 


AMRO INTERNATIONAL LIMITED 
BANK BRUSSEL LAMBERT NV 
CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON LIMITED 

GENERALE BANK 


Henry Ansbacher & Co. Limited 
Banco di Roma S.pA 
Bank Mees & Hope NV 
Banque du Benelux S A 
Banque Indosuez 
Banque Paribas Capital Markets 
Baring Brothers & Co n Limited 
Caisse Centrale des Basques Populaires 
Paws* d’Epargne de l’Etat (Banque de l'Etat), Luxembourg 
County Bank Limited Credit Agri cole 

Cr£dit Industrie! d' Alsace et de Lorraine 
Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft 
Dominion Securities Pitfield Limited 
European Banking Company Limited 
Gol dman Sachs International Crap. 

Istitato Bancario San Paolo di Torino 
Mitsubishi finance International Limited 
Nededandsche Middenstandsbank nv 
Nippon European Bank SA/LTCB Group 
Pierson, Heldring & Pierson N.V. 

Sanwa International Limited 
Soti6te Europteme de Banque S JL 
Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited 
Westdeutsche Landeshank Girozentrale 


Julius Baer International Limited 
Bank Cantrade Switzerland (CJ.) Limi ted 
Bank of Tokyo International Limi ted 
Banque Frangaise du Commerce Exterieur 
Banque de Luxembourg S A 
Banque Populaire Suisse S A Luxembourg 
Bayerische Veremsbank Aktiengesellschaft 

QBC Limited 
Creditanstalt-Bankverem 
Credit du Nord Daiwa Europe Limited 
SADewfic NV 


Banca Nazionale del Lavoro 
Bank Leu International Ltd. 
Bank 3. Vontobel & Co. AG 
Banque G6n6rale du Luxembourg S.A. 

Banque Nationale de Paris 
Barclays Merchant Bank Limited 
Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter ttanfe 
Caisse des Depots et Consignations 
Citicorp International Bank Limited 
Credit Commercial de France 
Den Danske Bank af 1871 Aktieselskab 
DG BANK Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank 
Drexel Burnham Lambert Incorporated Eurumobiliare S.p A 

Girozentrale und Bank der Ssterreichischen Sparkassen Aktiengesellschaft 
Hambros Bank Limited HOI Samuel & Co. Limited IBJ International limited 

F. van Lanschot Bankiere N.V. Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 

Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited Mragan Stanley International 

Nederlandse Credietbank nv The Nikko Securities Co., (Europe) Ltd. 

Nomura International limited Orion Royal Bank Limited 

Rabobank Nederland Salomon Brothers International limited Sal. Oppenbeim jr&Cie. 
Sarasn International Securities Ltd Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. Incorporated 

Soti6t£ Industries de Banque Sumitomo Finance International 

Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) Limited S.G. Warburg & Co Ltd 

Yamaichi International (Europe) Limited 




y 


















Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


International Bond Prices - Week of June 13 


(Continued from Page 8) 


IS 

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S* Pocrfle Goa Electric 

*« PooHe Gas Electric 
*60 Paetflc Gas Eledrlc 
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J7» PadHc Gas Electric 
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125 Pacific LiahtMo 0/s 
165 Pacific Lighting Inti 
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1150 Praefwr I Gambia 
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111 Prudwiftal Really 5ec 
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125 Rattan Periiu 
IMD Ration Purina 
1150 Pension Purina 
1 M Reliance rnjnscoatlne 
1 100 Rmfed O/i Financa 
1 12S Revlon Inti Finance 
led Reynolds Metals Eurap 
1 100 Reynolds Ri O/s 
120 Rtchardsomuerren 
1125 RIcronBan- Vicks Q/3 
1105 Rockefeller Gnun 
130 Santa Feintl 
5 30 Scott Patter On 
*Hg Sears O/s Finance X/w 
1125 Sews Ort Finance 
1M Sears O/s Finance 
S ISO Sears G/s Fhtancs 
lisa Sean O/s Finance 
1150 Sean Oft Finance 
y 1290 sears RoMuck Co 
SIM Seajrlly Ppcll Hat Bk 
SIM Security Padr Not Bi 
sne Security PocH O/S FI 
l» Security Poctt O/s FI 


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dm MO Austral la 
dm XB Australia 
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dm 150 AustRAa 
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dm 200 Australia 
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dm 1D0 Mount I sa Fhrance 
dm MB Mauai Isa Flnanca 
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□dm TO Dud industries Bat* 


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5 75 South Cdikm Edison 
ITS Souttt CaAfent Edison 
its South Cal Horn EtHsan 
IIM South comorn Edbon 
ISO South Caiifoni Gas 
160 South CalHom Gas 
160 South Caradni El Gas 
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ITS St Paul O/t Ftnonce 
120 Stumhud Oil Indiana 
SB StondmdCfl Indiana 
5150 Standard OH Ohio 
125 Su uus ti ui id Finance In 
S 125 Superior Q/s Finance 
SMO Superior o/s Finance 
sis Svoron O/S Capital 
USD TennecoCaro 

1150 TemtctnCorp 
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135 Tenneco Inti Nov 
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1300 TtwacoCaiufM 
S7M Texaco Capital 
siM Texaco Cooitnl 
1200 Texaco Qxiiioi 
1250 Texaco CopHa I 
ITS Texas Eastern Finance 
160 Texas Eastent Finance 

1IM Te»os instruments Ini 

130 Textron Inti 
SMO Time- Life O/s Finance 
540 Trailer Train Finance 
SH Transamerlca Fetancta 
120 Transomerka Q/s FKio 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


Page 11 


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Probably James Bond would be in trouble. Because 
Philips is the only company that could supply all the advanced 
electronic technology needed for the newest James Bond film 
"A View To A Kill". 

Approached by the 007-team because of its well- 
known expertise, it was Philips that made the impossible 
possible. Both in front of and behind the camera. 

Various Philips divisions, like Communications and 
>Control, Domestic Appliances, Consumer Electronics and 
Viewdata contributed to the new episode of the world’s most 
successful film series. 

Philips Business Systems took care of the computers, 
wordprocessors, telephones and other office automation 
systems for the film’s numerous office scenes. 





■iEvVOOD STUDiOS 


Where would Bond be without Philips? 




Special software was written to enable the products to 
play their roles. . 

There was Philips light when special light was needed. 
And other innovative products as the Philishave play a major 
part in the film. 

It’s not without reason that Philips is part of the action 
from the beginning of “A View T£> A Kill" to the final credit, 
as James Bond’s impeccable taste is known around the world. 

We hope you will enjoy the film, as much as we 
enjoyed working with the film crew. 

James Bond. The sure sign of great film entertainment. 
Philips. The sure sign of innovation. 


Z? S JAf/ES E0ND Ar-i) VAF": AT/YviN AS KlfvXUu i JONES IN’ A SCAVE -ROM ’A VfEiV TO A K!Li 




PHILIPS 





























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American Exchange Options 

For the Week Ending June 14, 1985 


OMIon & price Calls 


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Chicago Exchange Options 

For the Week Ending Jane 14, 1985 


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BANQUE NATIONALE DE PARIS 

Floating rate note issue of US $225-,000,000 
June 1981/96 

Hie rate of interest applicable for the peri ode beginning 
June 13, 1985 and set by the reference agent is 8V6% annually- 


COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT 
AND RECONSTRUCTION 

BEIRUT-LEBANON 


The Council for Development and Reconstruction is calling for a 
restricted tender for the project 

"Provision, installation and eoznmhaaning 
of a folly automatic, cornpmer-bssed tele- 
graph message relay system'". 

Starting June 3, 1985. interested firms may obtain lender docu- 
ments and specifications at the following address 

Council for Development and Reconstruction, 
Rayese Street, Rayess Bldg. - BAABDA. 

P.O. Box: 116/5351, 

Telex: 42490 CDR LE, 

TeL: 420695^2092^421045-421490/1, 
Beirut-Lebanon. 

Bid due date is June 29th, 1985 at 12 bourn. 

A firm, specific proposal for fin anci n g over a period of at least ten 
years should be submitted along with the bid. 


Rates Fall 
Amid Signs 
OfaWeak 
Economy 

By Michael Quine 

After York Tuna Smee 

NEW YORK — Fresh evidence 
of a weak U.S. economy and low 
inflation have sent interest rates 
plummeting, leading many econo- 
mists and traders to predict that the 
Federal Reserve would soon ease 

U.S.CREDrr MARKETS 

monetary policy and encourage 
lower interest rates. 

According to many analysts on 
Friday, the decline of 0.1 percent in 
industrial production during May 
provided the Fed with a motive for 
eating monetary policy, while the 
slight rise in producer prices erf 02 
percent was a comforting reminder 
that the central bank could stimu- 
late the economy without reviving 
inflation. 

The decline in industrial produc- 
tion was especially important, ana- 
lysts said, because Fed officials 
have cited the problems in the man- 
ufacturing sector as a reason for 
easing monetary policy. 

‘The Fed’s focus is clearly on the 
economy and there are enough 
signs of weakness to warrant a 
move to lower rates,” said Kath- 
leen Cooper, senior vice president 
and economist at Security Pacific 
National Bank. 

Speculative demand for Trea- 
sury notes and bonds was augment- 
ed, securities dealers said, by good 
demand from institutional inves- 
tors, especially early in the day. 
Part of the day s gains were lost in 
afternoon trading as some traders 
took profits when they decided that 
the Federal Reserve was not going 
to immediately cut the riwenunt 
rate it charges on loans to financial 
institutions to 7 percent from 7% 
percent. 

Optimism remained high enn» gh 
for ewe trader to say: ‘Tbe ques- 
tion is not will the Fed cut the 
discount rate, the question is 

when.” 

In the Treasury market, inves- 
tors must now buy issues due in 
more than seven yean in order to 
earn a yield of 10 percent- Among 
actively traded issues, the 1 1 ^-per- 
cent bonds due in 2013 were of- 
fered late in the day at 108)6 to 
yield 1036 percent, up ft-point on 
(he day, but lower than die morn- 
ing's top price of 109. 

The 9ft-perceni notes due in 
1990 were offered at 101 13/32 to 
yield 9.49 percent, and two-year 
notes scheduled for sale on 
Wednesday were offered at 833 
percent 

In the Treasury bill market, rates 
fdlnearly a quarter of a percentage 
ppint, with the three-month issue 
tnd at 6.72 percent down from 6.95 
percent One-year bills were at 7.0S 
percent, down from 738 percent. 

Securities dealers said rates on 
Treasury bills were unusually low 
relative to other short-term securi- 
ties became many investors were 
willing to sacrifice yield in favor of 
the extra safety and liquidity pro- 
vided by Treasury bills. 

Hopes for an easier Fed mone- 
tary policy were augmented as ibe 
overnight rate for bank loans in the 
federal funds market averaged 
about 735 percent and traded be- 
low the 7%-percent discount rate 
for the third consecutive day. 


U.S. Consumer Rotes 

For WMc Endad June 14 


Passbook Savinas £50 % 


COMMUNITY 


Discord Erupts Once More 
Over Car-Emission Standards 


By Steven J. Dryden 

I Hitman cm! Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The dispute 
among member states over commu- 
nity-wide car emission standards 
has erupted again after the an- 
nouncement of proposed guide- 
lines by the community's executive 

Commissi on. 

In March, the community over- 
came disagreements on a timetable 
for the introduction of the stan- 
dards, and directed technical ex- 
perts to draft the standards. 

But when the proposed Europe- 
an standards were announced last 
week. Britain said they were too 
severe, and West Germany said 
they were not stria enough. 

Britain believes (be Commission 
proposals will damage the Europe- 
an car industry by discouraging the 
development of so-called “lean 
barn” engines as an inexpensive 
alternative to the catalytic conven- 
er. 

Environment ministers w3J meet 


June 25 in an attempt to agree on 
the standards. 

Staffs Right to Data 
On Companies Disputed 

The controversial proposal mi 
workers* rights to information and 
consultation, known as the Vredd- 
ing Directive, suffered another set- 
back last week. 

Community ministers of social 
affairs discussed the five-year-old 
proposal at their Luxembourg 
meeting, but took no action, com- 
munity officials said. 

Britain and Denmark indicated 
they would vote against the direc- 
tive even if it was put forward as a 
non-binding recommendation to 
member states, as bad been sug- 
gested by some supporters, com- 
munity officials said. 

The proposed directive would re- 
quire companies to inform employ- 
ees about their corporate financial 
and economic situation, and em- 
ployment and investment pros- 


Norsk Hydro Sees Growth 
In Fertilizer Production 


(Continued from Page 7) 
the London stockbrokerage of 
Grieveson, Grant & Co. 

Last month, Norsk announced 
an agreement in principle to buy 89 
percent of Cofaz-Sogag, France’s 
second-largest fertilizer maker, 
from Cie. Fran$aise des Ffctroles- 
Total and Banque Paribas. The 
price was not disclosed, but a rival 
executive estimates Norsk would 
pay around S60 million. The 
planned sale is still subject to 
French government approval, 
which does not seem assured. Mr. 
Aakvaag said the government has 
asked Norsk to clarify its inten- 
tions in the industry. 

If the purchase goes through, the 
British industry ma gazine Fertiliz- 
er Internationa] says, it will be a 

2 \" France is Western Eu- 
s largest fertilizer market, and 
foreign companies have been 
blocked in previous attempts to 
man ufacture there. 

In West Ge rman y, Norsk agreed 
last month to buy smaller fertilizer 
operations owned by Veba AG. 
Norsk also recently reached a mod- 
est technical cooperation accord 
with Fertimont, a unit of Italy's 
Montedison SpA, after failing to 
agree on terms to buy a major stake 
in the uniL 

Together, the French and Ger- 
man acquisitions would add the 
equivalent of around SB50 million 
of sales for Norsk, whose fertilizer 
sales last year totaled about S1.13 
billion. In Europe, Norsk would 
have a market share of about 20 
percent. 


Mr. Aakvaag argued that, rather 
than posin| a threat. Norsk is 
merely making the industry more 
efficient. Besides, he said, “we will 
not be No. 1 in any major Europe- 
an country." 

Acquisitions are nothing new to 
Norsk. Since 1973, it has taken a 
25-percent stake in a new fertilizer 
company in Qatar and bought fer- 
tilizer operations in Denmark, (he 
Netherlands. Sweden and Britain. 
In the United States, Norsk has 
distribution interests and says it is 
the biggest importer of fertilizer. 

On a smaller scale, Norsk's 
neighbors are following a similar 
strategy. Superfos last autumn paid 
SI 12 million for Royster Co., a fer- 
tilizer maker based in Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. The Danish company says 
the purchase will about double its 
fertilizer sales and leave it well- 
positioned for exports to the fast- 
growing markets in India and Chi- 
na. 

Finland's state-owned Kemira 
last January bought a nitrogen fer- 
tilizer plant near Rotterdam from a 
unit of Exxon Carp, for an estimat- 
ed S7S million. In 1982, Kemira 
bought a small British fertilizer 
maker. Though the Finnish compa- 
ny has a tiny home market, it bene- 
fits from huge sales to the Soviet 
Union and has its own phosphate 
mine. Fertilizer “is not a gold 
mine," said Pekka Suppanen, tech- 
nical director of Kemira’s fertilizer 
division, “but it's a steady buti- 


pects. Consultations with employ- 
ees would be required of companies 
for decisions that would Have a 
significant impact on workers. 

British Envoy to Leave 

w 

Brussels Post and Retire 

Sir Michael Butler. Britain's per- 
manent representative to the com- 
munity for six years, is leaving the 
post in October and retiring from 
the diplomatic service British offi- 
cials said. 

Sir Michael, 58. is best known in 
Brussels Tor his tenacious advocacy 
of Britain's demand for a larger 
rebate on its contribution to the 
community budget. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher launched her campaign 
for an overall reduction of £1 bil- 
lion in the contribution in Novem- 
ber 1979. the month Sir Michael 
took up his position. The budgetary 
issue was not resolved until June 
1984. 

Sir Michael will be succeeded by 
David Hiinney. 49. the second- 
ranking official in the British Em- 
bassy in Washington, who previ- 
ously worked in the European 
Community's executive Commis- 
sion. 

Fed Easing 
Money Policy 

(Continued from Page 7) 
and eat it, too. In other words, as 
this reasoning goes, faster money 
growth will stimulate the economy, 
but it will not stimulate inflation." 

In late 1982 and the first half of 
1983, monetarist economists 
warned that rapid growth in M-J 
would generate higher inflation by 
early 1984- This did not happen. 

Will the monetarists be wrong 
again? The stage is being set for 
another lest. M-l rose at a 13.6- 
percent annua] rate in May and at a 
10.4- percent rate over the last seven 
months. That compares with a Fed 
taiga for M-I growth of 4 percent 
to 7 percent from the fourth quar- 
ter of 1984 to the fourth quarter of 
this year. 

In the week ended June 3. M-l 
stood at S585.6 billion. If it grew 
not at all for the rest of 1985. its 
fourth quarter average would still 
be above the midpoint of the Fed's 
target range. 

At its July 9 meeting, the Fed's 
policymaking group, the Federal 
Open Market Committee, will have 
to reaffirm or change its M-l taiga 
for 1985 and set a tentative target 
for 1986. 


I *'**■"'" | 

I WjUungsm. 1>C | 

* iWrimrai * 


House of Beef 


AJptrTH hi ihr *'.nhin£hin Murrain 

■ III OUR 39th YEAR. 


zl ) 




Bonk Money Market Accounts 
Bank Rate Man Mar Index 


Home M nrt aa a e 
PM LB overn»e_ 


Nedlloyd 


Worldwide Transport & Energy 

Nedlloyd Group, Houtlaan 21, 301 6 DA Rotterdam, The Netherlands 
Telephone number: (01 0) 1 7791 1. Telex number 27087 ndgr nl 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 



Oranje-Nassau Groep B.V. 

established at The Hague, The Netherlands 


Dfls 125,000,000 

6'/z per cent Guilder/Oil-Bonds 1985 due 1990/1993 


Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. 


Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank N.V. 


Generale Bank 


June, 1985 


Bank Itec N.V. 

Bank Mees & Hope NV 
Banque Paribas Nederland N.V. 

Cooperatieve Centrale Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank B.A. 

Nederiandsche Middenstandsbank nv 
Pierson, Heldring & Pierson N.V. 

Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited 


































Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


i 

3 

3 

4 

14 




IT 




20 





PEANUTS 



BOOKS 


THE DANGEROUS SUMMER 


28 

27 

28 


34* 




38~ 




43 



■ 

ST 



3 


By Ernest Hemingway. Introduction by 
James A Michener. 228 pages. $17.95. 
Charles Scribner's Sons, 597 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 10017. 


Reviewed by Michiko Kakucani 


2 Bang preceder 
5 Some 
Menn onii.es 
10 Hita fly 
14 1 nsh Icings' 
home 

25 Yule visitor 
10 Cartoonist 
Peter 

17 Sharif or 

Bradley 

18 Electrician, at 
times 

IS Kind of edition 
20 Defense fence 
22 Hung loosely 

24 Fork part 

25 Fissionable 
unit 

26 Form of 
. protest 
29 Beginner 
34 Future M.D. 

36 Woman, juris- 
prudent i ally 

37 Group of 
whales 

38 Letup 

39 Bizarre 
41 Sidekick 
42AOA.B.A. 

member 

43 Radial, e.g. 

44 Tempestuous 
46 Ratiocination 

49 Park. 

Colo. 

50 Energy units 


51 Talk wildly 

53E.B. 

Browning 

work 

56 U.S. ballistic 
missile 

60 Trudge 

61 Opus set in 
Troy 

63 An attendant 

on Cleopatra 

64 Candy striper 

65 Minister's 
abode 

66 Baseball's Say 
Hey Kid 

67 Active one 

68 Glacial ridge 

69 Otherwise 


12 — meridiem 
13 Nailed 
obliquely 
21 Triangle ratio 
23 Routine 

25 Affirm 

26 Blade of grass 

27 Angry 

28 Seed covering 
36 Frequently 

31 Estranged 

32 Singer Mel 

33 Mary Baker 
and Nelson 

35 Up the river 
46 “Exodus” 
author 


BEETLE BAILEY 


I T is immediately dear why bullfi ghting ex. 

cried such a visceral hold on Ernest Hem- 
ingway's imagination. Bloody yet ma gis t erial 
the sport dramatized his own obsessions with 
violence and death, and it also struck him as 
one of the ultimate tests of- a man's ability to 
sustain “grace under pressure.” Like big-game 
hunting, boxing and combat, bullfighting 
seemed to peramify the aggressively masculin e 
values that he cham pioned in his fiction and 
his life, and he came to regard it as an art — ■ the 
art of “killing cleanly," with courage and with 
style. 


about bullfighting were edited out, leaving “an 
honest rendering of what was best in this 
massive affair.” 

Michener himself admits to feeling ttai 
Hemingway “tried to hang far too muchon the - 
deader, esoteric thread of one senes of butt- 
fights.*’ and he strains to find reasons wjustify 
this book: he quotes a punctuation-less pas- 
sage that, he says, “reminds us of the sparse 
way [Hemingway] worked and of his ref ustu to 
use commas 8 and argues that “these pages are 
instructive regarding a minor brouhaha that 
involved his friend A £ Hoichnw." Certainly 
this discursive, flaccid volume offers the reader . 

■■ , • ■ .i i ^ _#rnmf tin 


ingway 
aung u 
of language 
A few of the action sequences in “The Dan- 
gerous Summer” — paniailariy those desenb- 

! .1. flvot frtrtb nloTAttl 


1 UUdLIUUI^ w***w*»- — - 

Tu ring ; bis fine, spare use . 
ig into empty mannerism.. 


Log the fierce, balletic contest that lode pjaceia 

Malaga — * ” " 


demonstrate Hemingway's old gift 
stretches of this bock 


DOWN 


1 Octagonal sign. 

2 Mongolian 
monk 

3 Soviet sea 

4 Nautical 


5 Syene, today 

6 Kind of race or 
voyage 

7 As to 

S Sault 

Marie 


9 Dickens novel: 
1854 

19 Garlicky 
sausage 
11 Shawl 


41 Exciting 
moment at the 
track 

43 Ran hastily 

45X's 

47 One making 
dispatches 

48 Give under- 
the-table lucre 

52 Viper or 
summer 

53 W.W. I plane 

54 Mixture 

55 Stem joint 

56 Gretzky's 
milieu 

57 Evangelist 
Roberts 

58 Some votes 

59 To be, to 
Brutus 

62 Palmas 


£' ISew York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




“Any man can face death,” be wrote in “The 
Dangerous Summer,” “but to bring it as dose 
as posable while performing certain classic 
movements and do this a gai n and again and 
again and then deal it out yourself with a sword 
to an animal weighing half a ton which you 
love is more complicated than just facing 
death. It is facing your performance as a cre- 
ative artist each day and your necessity to 
function as a skillful killer.” 


Hemingway, of course, had already written a 
big, detailed chronicle of bullfighting, pub- 
lished in 1932 as “Death in the Afternoon,” 
and in 1959, Life magazine asked him to return 
to Spain, return to the scene of so many of his 
youthful exploits, and cover a spectacular 
mono a mono dud between two matadors — - 
Antonio Oiddnez and his brother-in-law, Luis 
Miguel Dommgum. Although the assignment 
was for a 10,000-word article, Hemingway 
turned in a rough draft of 120,000 words — out 
of that sprawling manuscript were edited the 
Life piece and this current volume. According 
to an obtuse and oddly self-serving introduc- 
tion by James Michener (who spends several 
pages reminiscing about how he once “stuck 
his neck out” by vouching for the aging Hem- 
ingway’s talent), the more technical passages 


for narrative. But vast stretches 
are laid down in painful pastiches of the writ- 
er’s famous style. 

“Mary bad a really bad cold ” be writes at 
his wife. “She tried to get rid of it but Uae/eria 
bad been too mixed up and the hours too crazy 
the fights starting so late had given the . 
smal l wind that comes down from the Sierras 
that they say will loll a man but not blow out a 
candle too many chances at her.” He almost . 
invariably describes the matadors as bravp and 
good and courageous; the bulls, as either fast 
and fine, or slow and cowardly. There are 
inriipcc descriptions of food and drink and the 
weather; and dashed-off sketches of the land- 
scape that have none of the i mm ed ia cy of 
n.mrw hi “Death in the Afternoon." 



Even more embarrassing are the sections 
where Hemingway gives vent to the bullying^ 
bigoted ride of his nature. He puts women m 
their place — “Its a man's fiesta and women at 
it make trouble." He makes demeaning ethnic 
cracks — “If you want to travel gaily, and I do, 
travel with good Italians.” And he glamorizes 
dumb, dangerous games — “At the party An- 
tonio held cigarettes in his mouth for me to 
shoot the ashes off." 


K m 


!*-■ 


Solution to Friday's Puzzle 


The objectivity that made Hemingway's ear- 
ly writing so load is gone; indeed the narrative 
is thoroughly skewed by his willful riding with 
Ordbfiez over Domingum. Apparently Hem- 
ingway himself, worried that tied been unfair 
to Domisgnin. Carlos Baker notes in his biog- 
raphy that Hemingway “regretted having 
made ‘such a mess'” of the stoiy — and be 


sIhIoIpI 


□BOB 



wouldjiave, undoublably, opposed publishing 


nmnaaanHnnQnns 


REX MORGAN 



AS CLAUDIA 
BISHOP APPEARS 
AT DR. MORGAN'S 
Of PICE FOR HER 
FIVE O'CLOCK 
APPOINTMENT, 
SHE IS 
(5REETEP BY 
JUNE GALE. 


I'VE BEEN IN 
PERFECT HEALTH/ 
i HOPE MY 
HUSBAND HASN'T 
LED VOU TO 
BELIEVE 
v OTHERWISE i 


'foTOJMffiONTVQOR ,J3ET t AND^KMYAtoAK(W 
JM FEEUNjTHEHCCWE BACK AND TEILA/1E." 


GARFIELD 



D 

n 

□ 

a 

□ 

□ 

□ 

Cl 

D 

c 


h 

□ 

K3 

□ 

c 


“The Dangerous Summer” as a book, 
the reader, too, must question the decision, on 
the pan of his estate and his publishers, to 
issue a volume that does little but underline, 
again, the degree to which Hemingway's talent 
and psyche had come unraveled. 

In the end, though, it is unlikely to have the 
slightest effect on the author's reputation. 
■Hemingway believed that a writer is judged on 
the sum total of his wort; and even such a 
flimsy book as this cannot detract from the 
achievement of “The Sun Also Rises” and his 
glorious, early stories. 


Bom 

: 0 


if 

> fr 




M 

li‘ r :- 


‘ i. 


Michiko Kakutani is on the staff of The New 
York Tunes. 


L.:. 
I ' 


BRIDGE 


.IL- 


By Alan Truscott 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
» by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, «o tone 
tour ordinary words. 


SWEYN 



UL 


WYSOH 




□ 

□ 


DEFILD 


n 


TAISER 


ll n J 

L 

□ 




O N the diagramed deal 
when Sooth overcalled in 
dubs, his partner raised hhn to 
game with a nearly worthless 
hand. 

This was presumably meani 
as an advance sacrifice, on the 
assumption that East-West 
could make a game in hearts. 
The assumption was wrong, 
for North-South had four 
tricks available in defense. 

Hast doubled, perhaps to 
prevent any thought of five 
hearts that his partner might 
have. West led the diamond 
king and. continued with the 
queen. This was an error, for it 


suggested that he hdd three 
diamonds rather than four. 
The lead of the five would have 
made it easy for his partner to 
win and cash the heart ace. 

East could now have taken 
charge by overtaking with the 
ace and settling matters by 
cashing the heart ace. But that 
would have been wrong if West 
had held three diamonds and 
six hearts — admittedly not 
very likely. 

West innocently played a 
third diamond, and that was 
all the help South needed. He 
ruffed high and ca&heri six 
trump tncks. On the last 
Bump. Hast was uying to 
guard both major suits and 


could not do it South had 
made a doubled game contract 
that was beatable in lop tricks. 


WEST 

♦ 7 as 

* ms 

0XQ79 

*«S 


NORTH 

♦QS 
V U2 
0643 
•> 10BI 7 43 

EAST (D) 

• J 10 9 2 
^ A Q 985 
0 A 1 109 

* — 

SOUTH 

♦ ash 

VS7 

*83 

♦AKQJ3 

Both n de* were vtdnereM*. The 

*•* S««> «W Norlll 

19 i* 2 9 3 * 

ML PM Pm Pm 

Wok lad the «*«»■»— t Hng 


SHE BEGAN 
TO CALL HIM 
3Y HIS FIRST 
NAME WHEN SHE 
WAS AFTER THIS. 


SCOREBOARD 


r- 


Tennis 


Baseball 


Now arranoe the drdftJ letiars to 
lorm I ho surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Friday's 


prtn ' ans “' w u rn am 

[Answers tomorrow) 

I JumbKKK CHAFF SUEDE HERMIT LOUNGE 


Answer What the soprano’s ''solo" was— 
"SO HIGH" 


WEATHER 



HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 

Alearve 

26 

79 

|f 

66 

Amsterdam 

10 



3* 

Altwas 

11 

M 

22 

77 


:i 

75 

15 

59 

•etomde 

31 

70 

11 

S3 

ttorlto 

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Brunei* 

17 

a 


43 

tomwimra 

2T 


17 

43 

Bcwtei nest 

18 

74 


46 

Cfwntotw 

14 

57 

ID 

SO 

Cosm DwiSa 

23 

73 

17 

61 

Oomifi 

14 

57 


43 

cainpuiuti 

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SV 


19 

Fterencs 

38 

83 

15 

» 

Frankfurt 

lb 

61 


39 

Geneva 

la 

61 


46 

Helsinki 

16 

41 


«1 

Hti-Uul 

27 

91 

20 

69 

Les Palmas 

24 

75 

» 

a 

Ustesn 

25 

77 

17 

63 

Leaelan 

17 

63 

10 

50 

Moartd 

79 

93 

13 

U 

Milan 

19 

66 

17 

63 

Moscow 

20 


8 

46 

Momch 

15 

59 

5 

41 

Nice 

21 

70 

■ 7 

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Own 

30 

69 

10 

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Parts 

18 

44 

11 

K 


IS 


4 

39 

Revkievik 

n 

SS 

9 

46 

Rem* 

2 * 

79 

17 

63 

Stock Itoim 

17 

63 

10 

50 

Strasbeere 

18 

64 

7 

45 

Venice 

21 

70 

16 

61 

Vlemso 

IB 

64 

9 

48 

Wonqio 

11 

S3 

7 

45 

ZUrrcn 

16 

61 

7 

45 

MIDDLE 

EAST 




ASIA 


Ml ON 
C F 


MJIM 
Moon Kona 
MUh 
MWOMII 


Taipei 

Tttva 


LOW 
C F 
33 VI 31 79 
U 77 II M 

28 82 25 77 

32 90 26 79 
40 104 31 99 
57 91 30 69 

29 79 19 66 

» • a n 

33 90 29 8? 
23 73 17 93 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cam 

Com Town 
CaseManca 

Harm 
Law* 
MairsM 
t uni* 


39 79 10 At 
U 93 33 M 
IS 59 7 43 


— — — — IW 


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2A 7V 21 70 
23 73 10 50 
fi 90 II U 


o LATIN AMERICA 


Ba nd Aim 14 57 10 SO 

Caracal 29 79 21 70 

Uma 30 61 15 99 

Mexico City 33 73 15 99 

Ntode Janeire 3S 77 IS 99 


NORTH AMERICA 


CMcaaa 


Ankara 
BMrul 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Yet A*tv 


38 B 7 45 fr 

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MON DAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Smooth. FRANKFURT: Fair. Tamp. 
18- S CM— 4H LONDON; Ram. Toma. 14— U (41 — 341. MADRID; 
Thi ^ drotooriS Tgmp 35— IS 177 - 591. NEW YORK: Fair. Tamp. 35—17 
<7 -«Lf ARI5: Fair Teme. 3—11 (73— S3*. ROME: Thunderstorm*. Toma, 
s— 17 (73-431. TEL Avtvr Fair. Tomo. 29—19 184—44). ZURICH: Fair. 
Terns 19 — 7 104 — 451. BANGKOK: Thunderstormi. Tamn. 33 - 35 <91 — 77), 
HONG KONG: Ctouh. Tamp. 77—34 (81—751. MANILA: Showers. Tams. 
33 - 73(84— 731 SEOUL: Fooov Tamo. 28- IS 182-59). SINGAPORE: Fair. 
Toma 39 — 34 (84 — 751. TOKYO: Cloudy. Tama. Zl— 14 (70 —57). 


OAVIS CUP QUALIFYING 
EUROPEAN ZONE A 
Second- Reaad 
Danmark 1 Betgfaim 0 
(At nolle. Denmark) 
Peter 8ai Women d of. Bernard 
BoltooU. 4-2. 5-7. *4. 4-3. 

MJcnaei Moriertsen del Jan 
von Lapnandonck.5-7. l-a.4-l.4-l. 
0-3 

Bosllonsen and Merten jet oef. 
Alaki Brlchanr amt van Lanaea- 
danck. 

BasIMnsan del. von Langen- 
oonck. 4a 4-1. 

Morrcnsen Oef. Bateau. 4-3. 6-2. 
EUROPEAN ZONE B 
Ir e ne rbmm 
B rifaiR s. Portugal 9 
IAI Nn ni nun ara . England) 
Jeremy Bales and Sreehvn 
Shaw oef. Paaro Cordeiro and 
Join Silva. 4-3. 4-4. 4-1 
Shaw del. Cordeira 4-e. 84. 
Bates del. Silva. 6-4. 6-4. 
Austria X Greece 3 
(M Aihenoi 

Alexander Antomtsch and Po- 
lar Pieai. Austria, def Gonslan- 
ifne Efraimogiou and Geerae 
Kafovokmls. Greece. 9-4 6-3, 7-5. 

Fori* Vareat, Greece, def. An- 
tanliscn. 3-4 4-4, e-4. 

Katovetonis mrt. Benhera Pits. 
Awdrla. 6-4. 6-s. 

Switzerland S. Zimbabwe 9 
IAI weggis. Switzerland) 
Hein: Guenlhordl def. Horeon 
Ismail. *4. 4-1. 4-1. 

Jakob Hlaiek def. pnilie Tuck- 
"l»S. M.HW. 

Guenlhordl and Hlasek del. Is- 
mail and Tucknls, 6-1. 6-1. 61. 
Romania 3. Turkey 9 
IAI inuantwl) 

Florin ScoarcearA* del. ybvus 
E rkanalL 6-3. 442, 4-1. 

Amman Marcu del. Nacvet 
Demir. #.2. 4-2. 4-1 
Sooerceami and Dim Andrei 
def. Erkdrtgll and M matter Ar- 
pocloolu. 4-4. 4-1 4-2. 

Seuerceanu del. AlaoWn Kcro- 
9U. 6-0. 4-1. 

Marcu def. ErkangiL 6-X 0-2. 
EdTPf X Hungary 2 
IAI Calrol 

Baku* Torocxv. Hunsarv. oel 
Tank ei-saqaa Ebvm. Mh6 
Ol 

Aimed ei-Maiwimv. EovbI, 
def. Ferenc ZaaiaL Huneorv. 4-1, 

«. 6-4. 

Sanaa and al-Mehelmv del. 
Torocxv and Robert Mpchaa 
Hungory. 5-7, 7-S. IIA. 3-6. 10-8. 

EI-SMMi deL Zenoli, 4-4. 4-4.6- 
4. 

Taracrr do*. cM4aftaknr.7-L4- 
4. 

Iraiend 1 Monaco l 
(At Mania Carlo) 

Mori Davie. Ireland, Oe(. Glim 


Ganerato. Monaco. S-7, 4-6, 6-L 4- 
0. 6-4. 

Soon saransen. Ireland, del. 
Bernard Ba Herat. Monaco. 57. 4- 
2. 7-5. 4-1. 

Ballerer mm Jacguds Vince- 
•cm. Monaco, del. Davie ond Sor- 
ensen. Ireland. 44 3*. 4-4.6*. 6-4. 


U.Se Open Golf 


BOLOGNA GRAND PR1X 
Sam Wools 

Claudio Panattsk llolv, del. aj- 
berlo Touv Spain. 7-4, 6-1 
Thierry Toutaww. France. deL 
Oanlr Keretlc West Germany. &- 
0144. 


Friday's and Saturday's Major League line Scores 


MEN'S TOURNAMENTS 
QUEENS CLUB 
IAI London) 
QBorterAnal* 

Berts Becker (1 1) West Germa- 
ny, del. Par Cam (31 Australia 6- 
4. *4. 

Paul Me Name*. Australia, del. 
Tim Mayotte (5). U.5, 74, 7-S. 

Siaciodan Zhmilnovle. Yugosla- 
via def. Paul Annocone (9), US. 
7-4. 4-1. 

Johon Kriek ML Ui. def. Rus- 
sell Simpson, Australia, 64. 7-6 
(Ml. 

Semlitnalt 

Becker de«. McNamee. 4-1,44. 
kriek dot. zivaiinevic. 44. 64. 
Plsai 

Becker def. Kriek, 4-2. 6-1 


Tulasne def. Panafta 63. 6-0. 


W044SNS TOURNAMENT 
EDGE ASTON CUP 
(At Birmingham. England) 
QuarierDnab 

Pam Shrtver, Ui. def. Am» 
Hobbs. Britain. 64. 6-1 
Susan Mosearin. Ui del. AJy- 
C*a Moulton. US. 7-4, 44. 

Betsy Noeeisen, JA. del. Ann 
Henrlcksson. US. 4a 4a 
E«se Burgln. US. def. Robin 
White. US. 4-7. 64. 64. 

Semmaah 

Shrtver def. Burgln, 44. 4-2 
Nagelsan def. Mascorm. 3-6. 7- 
S 4-1. 


Shrlver def. Nagelsati. 6-1. 4-0. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
Amaricau League 
Chicago— R ecalled Juan 

Aaosfo, oftcPar. from Buffalo of 
the American Ascdoiwi Oe- 
ftaned Brvan UfHe. infieidar. to 
Buffalo. 

MILWAUKEE — Reactivated 
BUI Schroeder, catcher. Op- 
tioned Ray Sewage, pilCtMT, to 
Vancouver of Ihe Pacific Coast 
Leooue. 

Natuoal Laaeue 
NEW YORK— Signed Greg 
Jeffries, shortstop and Stephen 
WelOom, Mark wutoughbv. and 
Mark Banner, pitchers, to frea- 
auenr contracts. Assigned Jot- 
tries. Wlltoughby M Sghpgy M 
KJnespgrl at Ihe Appalachian 
League and wetbom fa Utllg 
Falls ol the New Yerk-Penn 
League. 

PITTSBURGH— Named Willie 
Siargeil firs! -base coach, 

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS— 
Staled Joe Mograne, Pifefier. to 
tree-noetit contract. Stated Jhn 
Freoasl Jr_ and William Janes, 
snort steps; Mike Henry. Stevr 
Petars. JOO Farmer, and Carry 
Griffin, pitchers; Natehn S'maia- 
tarv. Mark JockaacLMfte Rabin- 
aan, end Shawn McGlimls, out- 
BHderi and Anthony Borigliong. 
cotcher. end assigned I hem to 
Johnson City at me Aaoalochtan 


League. Signed David DeCor- 
dovo. Howard Hilton. Stephen 
Fruaa end Mike McNeal y. pitch- 
ers; Carl Sleahettb James Pu> 
tar, and James Fo*. m t a tar s : 
Carev Nemeth, and Aloe Oieo. 
■nflelders. ond Rob Knowles ond 
Ken Worm Wer. outfielders, and 
nslaneo them to Erie ol the New 
York -Penn League. 

SAN DIEGO— Seal Greg Book- 
er. pitcher, to Los Vegas ol me 
Pod fie Coast League. Recoiled 
Ed Woina Pilcher, from Las Ve- 
gas. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Assoc 


MILWAUKEE— Stoned JM 

Bomr Carrei^centor. la an after 

PORTLAND— T raced Bar- 
nard Thompson, guard, to Ptioe- 
nlx tor g second-round draft pick 
in 1987. 

FOOTBALL 

•Wtowrt Football League 
HOUSTON— Signed Stove 

Tasker, wide receiver. 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 
51. Leals 090 tfl 496— 11 II I 

CWcnao 012 111 312—19 15 5 

Annular. Campbeii (61. Lahti (TLFanch |9> 
and Nieto; Ruttmen, Sorensen (6). Brusstor 
(71, Frazier (91 and Davis. w-Andular. 12-1. 
L— Ruthvm.3-5.5v— Farech (1). HRs— SI. L. 
Van SlvkB (41. Oil. Lean (51. 

PMtodelpeta 990 CM 390—2 S 8 

Pittsburgh 909 OH 28*— 3 I 1 

K. Grass. Carman (7), Andersen (71. Te- 
kulve 181 end Virgil; DeLeon. Rebineon (I) 
and Pena, w— DeLeon. 2-9. L— Cormon. D-l. 
Sv— Robinson 111. HRs-PIM, Rory (2>, Laz- 
cone (31. 

OlWlnaaH 931 999 Wl— 4 7 I 

Atlanta 399 BN Ux-4 4 9 

Sate and Knicelov, Van Gordor (91; Smith. 
Suttor(s>aiidOwen.CBrana(9).W—Sultar.3- 
I. L— Sete.9-5 HR4— Cn.CancsPcton (Sl.AII. 
Obarkfell 111, Homer (7». 

NOW York 099 901 919-4 19 9 

Montreal 999 HO 992-9 9 j 

Gooden. Sisk (91. SchlraMI (91. Orosco (91 
and carter; Heskefh. Lucas (9) and Flfnter- 
ald. Butera (91. W— Luaoa. 3* 1 — Ssk. 14. 
HR — Man. Law (21. 

Los Aageles dm B1 103—10 13 1 

Houston IN 909 009— 2 I 1 

Rectos end Sdopcto; Nlekru. Mathis 151, So- 
torn (71. Oavctoy (41 and Baliey.W-Reuss.4- 
S-l — -tikkro, 3-7. HRs—L, A. Guerrero 2 111), 
Brack (». 

San Dtoge 2M 009 Ml 99-4 18 9 

San Frond »co 090 391 901 91—5 I I 

Hawkins. Gassaae (91, DeLeon (III end 
Kemwav; LaPoint. M. Davis (10) and 8r*nlv. 
W— M. Davli 34. L— DeLeon. M. HRs— L D. 
Nettles (7). S.F. Green Cl}. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Oakland 190 aaa 990— I 5 • 

Ctowrfand M9 099 9toc— 4 * * 

Knto oar. Langford (2). Ontiveros 17] ond 
Heath; B Ivloven and Willard. W - -B iy tevgcwS- 

A L — Kruever. 67 

Tbreuto 919 m DD9-1 11 0 

Badea 911 oh otx-4 8 1 

Clancy. Mue e elntan (I) and Wftllt; Boyd 
and Gfcdman. w-6onL 84. L-CJancv. S4. 
Milwaukee 399 OH 004—3 4 1 

Baffliaare *5 M Bto-f 11 I 

vuekovtch. Cacanower 131, Ladd (71. Fin- 
gers (81 ond Sfanmens; Oavls and Dempsey, 
w— oavkL 4-2. I — Vuekovkh. 34. 

Mbmesata 901 an 009-3 19 3 

Takes 21D lot tax— 4 8 ■ 


Filson. E uremia 131, Warcue (4), Davis (7) 
ond Seips: Heaton. Schmidt (71 and Stoaght. 
W — Ito a ton. H l— F llsan. M. Sv— SdimWt 
ID. HRs— Minn. Brunanskv (15). Texas. Har- 
reh (4|. Parrish (T2). 

Dstrelt 901 111 904-4 10 9 

New York see on 909— g s 1 

Terred, Hernande i (»> ond Parrish; Ras- 
mussen, Borxfl (71 and Wvneoar. W— Terroil, 
7-2. L — Rasmusssrv 24. Sv— Hernandez 112). 


hm; H eaton. Schulze (31, Barkley (3), Clark 
14). Waddell (9) and Benton. Banda (5). W— 
Blrtsav M. L— Heatoa 4-4. Sv How e ll (13). 
Toronto 900 90) 949-5 II 0 

Boston ON 911 22r— 7 11 9 

Alexander, Acker (0).LavsHe{S).Lantolt) 
ona Mart toes. WWtt (9); Disda Stanley IB) 
<ma Gedman. W— Stanley. 2-2. L— Acker. 3-1. 
HRs— Tor. Bell (13). Bos. Easier IB). 
Cfttawo 919 BN 104-3 8 8 

CaOtornto BN OM 090 — 3 s 9 

Barmisrer, Sollinar (4). ABOSto ((7). Juntos 


t -o ndlo o third -road scorers In Ihe ILS, 
Oaea. at Ike 4,794-rard, par-ra Oak toad Hills 
«or*e to Btrmtogbam, Michigan: 


HRs— Del. Breokens (2). Gerber (3>.Gtosurt . L BI p,l,L ‘^5 Ca3UU ' Ciem * ,irs m 


111). Herndon 15). 

CMcogo 003 09) 894—4 II 1 

California 390 ON 094-3 3 0 

Seaver. James 18) and Fisk; Ramcnick. 
Clements (7) end Soane. W— Seaver. 74. L— 
Romanic*. 70. Sv— James (IS). HR — CW. 
walker (9). 

Kansas City 911 OH 304- 5 7 9 

Seattle TJ» 971 JBx— U IS 4 

Jackson. LoCoss (51. Jones (si and Sund- 
bere, Wathan (I); wills. Best I7J, Nunez «l 
and Kearney. Scott (9). w — wiihl 3-a L— 
Jockeoa, 44. HRs— k. C. Sheridan (31. Sea. 
Kearney (3). Thomas (101. Davis (4). 


SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Las Angeles 929 I 


Basketball 


HorslUser and Yeaaar; Kneposr. Rass (7) 
and Bailey. W — ftore h h er.4-L L— Knoooor, 4- 
1 HR— L. A. Guerrero (121. 

SL Loots IN 9N M4-2 7 0 

Chicago 900 0N OOP— B 4 0 

Cox and Htoto; Fontenot, Sorensen (8). 
Smith (91 and Davis. W— Cox. 9-i I Fon- 

tenot- 1-2. HR— SI.L. Clark (Ul. 

Sau Diego ON 011 900—1 5 8 

Sai Prendsca 909 M0 SOS-4 s I 

Hoyt and KtoMSdy ; Goff. Garretts (4). Min- 
ton (*) and BrenJv. W— Hovt 8-4. L — Gatt.34. 
Phnodstmilu IN 133 ass— » is o 

Pittsburgh PH 901 BOB— 3 19 1 

Denny and Diaz; Rhoderw Goode (6), Scur- 
ry 181 and Puna. Ortiz (7). W— Dmny.A-L L— 
Rhoden. 4-7. HR — PUt. Thomason m. 
aachmon 9N NO 099-0 4 1 

ftWwii. OM 910 n«— 7 9 1 

Pr1ce>RubiRsaa(5l,Stupar(7)andKnlceiv; 
Badrestan,Oedman (B) aid Owen. IN— ftadra- 
slan. 3* l— P rice. 2>L HR— AtL, Harper (5). 
New York 911 MB NO— 3 4 9 

Montreal ON IN Ml— 3 7 I 

F ern an d ez toid Carter; Sdiaizcdor. Burke 
(9) and Fitzgerald, w— Burke. 2-0. L— Far. 
nandes,l 4. H Ri— Mon. Low (3l. Driessen (s 1. 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 


Boone. W— SPlIiner, M. L— McCaskJIL 1^. 
Sv— -tomes (14). 

'Detroit 412 ON 291— 10 14 2 

Now York 040 119 834- 8 18 1 

Morris. Hernandez [J l ond Parrish; Nlekra 
Fftftor (31, Bora (8), Rtohettt (9) and WYne- 
gor.w— Morris. 4<5. 1 — Nlekm, 7-s. Sv— Her- 
nandez (131. HRs— Oet„ Evens (12). N. Y. 
pogllaruio (3). 

M to P SM Oa BOB 902 Mb— 2 4 1 

Texas 371 m 42k— 11 J7 > 

BuMier. Lyssider f7). WWtohouso (7). Eit- 
lemlo (87 and Laudner; Mason. Stewart (7) 
and Sloughf. W— Mason. 5*. L — Butcher. 44. 
5» S tew art (4). HR— Mlrm. Bnmansky (14). 
Kansas CRy SOI ON see— 1 4 S 

019 IN 90k— 2 4 1 
Letbramn. Beckwith (9) and Sundberg; 
yourtg, Nunez (9), vamto Berg (9) and Kear- 
ney. W — Young. 54. L— Leibrmtt. 64. sv— 
vend# Berg (3). 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 


T jc. On n 
Andy North 
Dave Barr 
Rick Fetor 
Tam Kite 
Denis Watson 
5eve Ballesteros 
Pavne Stewart 
Larmv Wtadkins 
Fuzzy Zoelier 
Kav Floyd 
Jay Haas 
Jack Renner 
Carey Poviti 
Johnny Miller 
Joey Slndekjr 
Andy Bean 
Danny Edwards 
Greg Norman 
MBte Rekl 
Scott Simpson 
Mark O'Meara 
Curtfs Strange 
Lorry Mize 
Hale Irwin * 

GO Morgan 
Don Pooler 
Jim Thorpe 
Scott Hack 
Tam Stockmann 
Warns Levi 
Tony Slits 
Peter Jacobsen 
David Frist 
Bill Gtassan 
Bobby wodfclns 
Rennie Black 


Toronto 

Detroit 

Boston 

Battfanore 

New York 

Milwaukee 


CMcogo 

CoUtornla 

Kansas City 

Oakland 

Seattle 

Minnesota 

Texas 


W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Skeeter Heath 

38 

23 

£33 

— 

John Mahcffev 

33 

24 

sn 

3*9 

Fred Couples 

33 

26 

539 

ft 

Rafael Alarcon 

32 

26 

£53 

5 

Fred Funk 

38 

39 

491 

9*9 

Bruce Ltotzke 

27 

30 

474 

9W 

Lee R Hiker 

30 

38 

-345 

17 

BJU Jsraebon 

rt Nan 



Tim Simpson 

32 

35 

Ml 



Hal Sutton 

33 

38 

sa 

|V9 

David Graham 


30 39 jn 3 
39 3D 493 4 

27 34 MS 7 
25 32 JOB 7 
34 37 XI » 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EB9 Division 


Loren Roberts 


4549-49-203 

70- 65-70— 2B5 
7048-70—308 
6547-73—209 
49-7971—310 

72- 45-73—310 

71- 70-49 — 310 
70-70-71—111 

70- 7349-211 

71- 49-72—112 

73- 47-73-212 
6944-77—212 
7249-72-313 
7349-73-313 

74- 7148-213 

72- 7249—313 
49*72-73 — 214 
7249-73—314 

72- 71-71—214 
69-75-70— 214 

73- 7348—214 
7347-75—314 
7149-76-215 
73-73-70-215 

73- 73-70— US 
71-72-73—215 
7*49-73-215 
7349-74-314 
7*73-71—714 
7*7*70—314 

75- 71-70—216 
75*70-71—216 

71- 7*73-276 
7448-74—216 
TO- 71. IS— 216 

7249-75-214 

7149-76—316 

70- 70-77—217 

72- 70-75—217 
64-78-73 — 217 
7*72-73 — 717 
75-7073-217 

72- 71-74-217 
7449.75—no 

71- 72-75— 21 J 

74- 72-72—218 

74-71-74—219 

73- 72-74—2)9 

74- 71-74—219 


A 




/>:• 


r- 


Soccer European Tournament 


I NT-NATIONAL FRIENDLY 
(At Mental city) 
Maries X W»! Germany 0 


(At Sfeftgsril 
SEMIFINALS 
' Czechoslovakia 95. Spain 95 
Savtot Union III Italy 9b 


Milwaukee 920 in Ml— 4 II I 

BNH mere ON 2D 82x-7 9 8 

HtouerevGEmm (4) and Schroeder; Dixon. 
Snell (4L T -Martinet (91 aid Dempsey. W— 
Soeil, 1-1, L— dbeoo. 54. 5v— TAtortinej 13). 
HRs— MIL Schroeder (7). Riles (2). Bait. 
Murray (■). Ripken (ID), Roenicke (5). 
Oakland 218 4N 091—8 14 1 

Orvetond 918 983 029-6 9 8 

Blrtsav Atherton (6). Howell IB) ml Tettle- 


Chicaga 
Montreal 
St. Louis 
New York 
PlUtodelpnlo 
pinsburgn 


San Diego 
Houston 
Ctorinnan 
Los Angeles 
Anon la 
Sen Francisco 


W 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

34 

23 

39t 



36 

25 

-590 



33 

26 

£91 

2 

32 

24 

5S3 

m 

23 

36 

OK 

12 

19 38 
fctolBO 

333 

15 

35 

34 

sn 



31 

29 

S3S 

4 

30 

28 

sn 

4W 

30 

28 

£17 

41 h 

26 

37 

*48 

5 Vj 

23 

37 

-373 

13 


Faltod Ig Qualify 
Dan Halktorsan 
Tam watsan 
DJL wel bring 
Lee Tryvlno 
Mark McNulty 
Jack Nieklow 
John Cook 
Rex Caldwell 
CRM0 Sladtor 
Ben Crenshaw 
BtoTfhard Longer 
Lau Grah a m 
Don PoW 
Cory Hollberg 
David Edwards 
Hubert Green 
Don Shtrev 
t*icv Price 
Jerry Pale 


76-71—147 

75- 72-147 

*49-147 
74-72—148 
71-77— 141 

76- 73-149 
74-75-1 « 
71-79-150 
78-80— ISO 

78- 73-150 
74-76-150 
76-75-151 

79- 72—151 
76-76-152 

>7-75-152 
7*79—153 
8*72—155 
82 74-154 
78-81-159 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 



Scrambling, Chen Widens to 2-Shot Lead in Open 


~ Pfnklon Thomas wanned up for Ms eighth-round knockout. 
■ by decking Ms WBC challenger, Mike Weaver, In the first. 


' Thomas Retains Crown 
On 8th-Round Knockout 


Compiled by Our Staff Fmm DqmUha 

LAS VEGAS— Hatton Thom- 
as, displaying a light-handed com- 
plement to his fine left jah. scored a 
one-punch knockout of Mike. 
Weaver at 1 annate 42 seconds of 
the eighth round Saturday night to 
retain the World Boring Conndl 
title and establish himself as the 
finest heavyweight champion this 
■„ side of Larry Holmes. 

** Thomas, who has balded back 
from heroin addiction, broken 
- hands and an eye iryury, weathered 
some rough spots in the scheduled 
. 12-round bout before landi n g a 
booming right that sealed matters. 

Both men had missed with nu- 
merous jabs and seemed to be look- 
ing for the big punch in the eighth 
when Thomas suddenly came op 
with iL As Weaver moved forward, 
Thomas caught him flush with a 
overhand right to die left temple. 
Weaver was felled instanlty. 

Weaver was hurt so badly that 
after the boat he insisted the 
punch, which he admitted he had 
not seen, had landed on Ms chin. “I 
still feel it, too,” said Weaver, rub- 
bing his chin. 

But the punch, set up by a short 
jab, cleariy landed high. Weaver 
went over on his bade. He rose on 
his heds as Referee Carlos Padilla’s 
count readied 9, then toppled over 
backward again. 

“My head was dear” Weaver 
said. “But when I said, *Get up,’ my 
legs said, ‘Stay here.* ” 

The sudden ending ruined 
Weaver’s dream of becoming only 
the third man to win at least a share 
of a heavyweight title more than 
once (he is a former World Boring 
Association champion). Floyd Pat- 
terson did it twice, said Moham- 
mad Ali did it three tiroes. 

“1 was more concerned with his 
left jab,” said Weaver, a distant 
cousin of Thomas’s wife, Kathy. “I 
didn't know about (he right hand. 


Don’t nobody tdl me he got no 

ri ght hand * 

“I’ve always had a good rig ht 
hand,” said Thomas, who had been 
criticized by some as a one-handed 
fighter. “Irs just never been ex- 
posed. 

The undefeated Thomas, who 
won his title from Tim Wither- 
spoon last Aug. 31, showed great 
courage after taking Weaver's best 
shots in the third, fourth and fifth 
rounds. 

The 27-year-old champion had 
floored Weaver for a 4-count in the 
opening round, but Weaver came 
roaring back in the third and was 
even on two of the three offical 
cards after seven, rounds and a 
pbint behind on the other. 

But it was perhaps while the 33- 
year-old Weaver was having his 
finest moments that Thomas, who 
has never been off his feel, was 
winning the fight. Weaver ap- 
peared to get discouraged that his 
best punches were having little ef- 
fect. 

“Pink! on Thomas fights back 
when he gets hurt,” said Weaver. 
“That’s the mark of a great champi- 
on. I hit the guy with two, three 
shots, and he’d throw four, five. 

The victory in his first title de- 
fense kept Thomas unbeaten with a 
26-0-1 reooird with 21 knockouts. 
The draw came in a 10-rounder 
against Genie Coetzee an Jan. 22, 
1983. 

Afterward, Thomas said he 
would “bury the hatchet” and stop 
calling Holmes a moose. Holmes, 
the 35-year-old International Box- 
ing Federation champion who 
signed here Saturday to fight Mi- 
chad Spinks, the undisputed light- 
heavyweight champion in Septem- 
ber, has decreed he win no longer 
meet top heavyweights. 

“If liny don’t want to fight me, 
that’s fine,” said Thomas. “But I 
think I proved to the world who the 
real champion is.” (NYT, AP) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

BIRMINGHAM, Michigan — 
Alfred Hitchcock would have loved 
Tze-Qmng Chen. 

The only suspense left in a damn 
and dreary United States Open golf 
" i at the Oakland Hills 


Country Club is being provided by 
the slender. 26-year-oIfl profession- 
al from Taiwan. 

Although he threatens to 
the first wire- to- wire winner since 
Tony Jacklin in 1970, Choi is still 
keeping fans — among than the 19 
million Taiwanese he says are root- 
ing for him — on pins and needles 
as he escapes from one precarious 
spot after another on this legendary 
course. 

Playing in a steady min that be- 
came colder and windier as dark- 
ness neared, shot a 1- under- 
par 69 Saturday to extend his lead 
to two strokes over former champi- 
on Andy North. 

If Cben bolds bis lead, he wfD 
join Walter Hagen (1914), Jim 
Barnes (1921), Bea Hogan (1953) 
and Jacklin as winners who have 
led after every round. 

Chen’s 54-hole score of 203 
equaled the Open record set by 
George Bums m 1981 at Merion 
outride Philadelphia. Burns did not 
win, however, which provides more 
suspense for Sunday. 

North, who sank a 60-foot (18- 
meter) putt on the 16th hole for his 
only birdie of (he day, shot 70/205. 
North won the 1978 Open at Cher- 
ry Hills in Denver, but has not 
come close to winning anywhere 
since. 

Dave Barr, with a 70, was three 
shots behind North. Ride Fehr. the 
mini-tour player from Seattle, shot 
73/209; they are the only other 
players under par after three 
rounds. 

Still in the hunt for the 85th U. S. 
Open crown are a strong group at 
210: British Open champion SeW- 
iaao Ballesteros of Spain, following 
a third-round 69; Tom Kile (71) 
and South African Denis Watson 
(73). 


Chen, who has dol won in two 
years cm the U.S. lour, although he 
recently look both the Korea and 
Japan opens on (he Asian tour, has 
led from the second hole of Thurs- 
day’s opening round. There, he bit 
a three-wood shot from the fairway 
that carried 256 yards (234 meters) 
and rolled into the cup for the only 
double eagle in U. S. Open history. 

Friday, Cben maintained his 
one-shot lead with a second 
straight subpar round, a 69 putting 
him at 134 for 36 holes after an 
opening 65 that tied the course re- 
cord. 

He started the second round 
without hitting a drive into any of 
the first six fairways but still wept 
two par in that stretch. On 
the first two holes he drove into 
fairway bunkers, but brilliant re- 
covery shots left bum with a short 
putt for par at each. “These,” said 
Cben, “were great pars” 

He parted the par-3 third, hitting 
the green and Lwo-puitmg. Then be 
missed the fourth fairway, going 
into deal rough behind a tree. He 
managed to hit an iron over a tree; 
but left his ball short of the green 
and 20 yards from the hole. No 
problem: Char chipped the ball 
into the cup for bis first birdie of 
the day. 

At No. 5, be again missed the 
fairway, going into the right rough, 
then hit a three-iron shot short of 
the green, pul a pitching wedge 
shot seven feet short and dropped 
the putt for par 4. Another drive 
into the right rough, at the par-4 
sixth, was followed by an eight-iron 
shot to the green and a 12-foot putt 
fora birdie. 

His tee shots straightened out 
after that. Despite bogeys at Nos. 8 
and 16, Chen birdied the 15th with 
a 40-foot putt to finish one under 
for the round. 

For a time Saturday it appeared 
that the 5-foot- 10, 140-pounder 
(1.77 meters, 64 kilograms) might 
run away with a tournament al- 
ready denuded of most of its 
would-be celebrities. He quickly 


made two birdies and led by four 
shots as first North and then Jay 
Haas Fell back. Haas, who started 
the day one shot behind Chen, 
struggled home with a 77. 

□ 

But Chen made two bogeys on 
the back nine to drop back closer to 
North. With Jack Nickiaus, Tom 
Watson. Craig Stadler, Bernhard 
Langer, Lee Trevino and Ben Cren- 
shaw all having missed the cut at 
>46, the 85th LLS. Open needed all 
the final-day drama it could find 
Niddaus bad not previously failed 
to survive an Open cut since 1963. 

Chen began his third-round es- 
capes on the 527-yard, par-5 sec- 
ond. He drove into the rough — 
Heavier, thicker and welter than 
earlier in the week — and had to lay 
up with his second shot. Still in the 
heavy grass, he chipped up and 
sank a three-foot putt for a birdie. 

“That was good start,” be said 
later. “But on the next bole, I was 


lucky.” He hooked his three-iron 
tee shot at the 199-yard par-3, the 
ball landing in deep grass and be- 
hind a low-hanging branch. Cben 
hooded an eight-iron and punched 
the ball toward the green. It bit in 
the grass, but skipped onto the put- 
ting surface and rolled up next to 
the hole to give him an easy par 
putt. 

“When I saw my ball, all I want- 
ed to do was get it to the green and 
make two putts and take a bogey.” 
Chen said. “1 wasn’t even thinking 
of making a par. I was very lucky.” 

From then on be displayed a 
variety of recovery shots that pro- 
duced par. On one hole he lifted a 
seven-iron shot from the rough and 
over a huge weeping willow tree. 
On another he nearly holed out 
with a punched shot from a bunker. 

“After the sixth bole. I started 
hitting my driver good,” he said. “1 
hope J won’t have such a slow start, 
like I bad Friday and Saturday, on 


the first four or five holes Sunday. 
It is hand on ray nerves” 

On No. 8. one of Oakland Hills' 
monster par-4 s — . 439 yards and 
uphill — Chen hit a driver and 
eight-iron that left him with a four- 
foot putt for his second birdie. 

The magic disappeared momen- 
tarily on the 10th hole, when he 
came up short on the 454-yard par- 
4, then chipped long for his first 
bogey. He got the stroke back on 
the next hole by rolling home a 
double-breaking 35-foot putt for 
birdie. 

His margin was four strokes until 
North made an even longerputt on 
the 16ih hole. “If it didn't find the 
hole, it probably would have gone 
15 feet by,” North said. “I just 
lagged it down over the hill with 
about a three-foot break when it 
got on track. You get some like that 
once in a while, and it came at a 
good time.” 


At the 17th hole, with water drip- 
ping off his white cap. Chen made 
another great shot, a long sand 
wedge blast from :he bunker that 
pulled up los than two feet from 
the hole for a likely par. He missed 
the putt. 

“I could see the water dripping 
off my cap. but I thought, 'Why 
stop, it’s such a short pun I can't 
miss.’ 1 guess 1 lost my concentra- 
tion." 

Chen was hoping for rain again 
Sunday. “In Taiwan, it nuns like 
this from November to April, and 
we play all the time.” he said. “If 
the weather is too perfect, someone 
might shoot 60 or 61. ir it is not so 
perfect, it would be imne difficult. I 
think rain would be nice.” 

Ballesteros, one of a handful to 
break par in Saturday's rain, com- 
mented to a reporter: “Anybody 
can play in the sunshine — «*ten 
you- tLlT. .VI Tt 


Orioles Win a Third, on Weaver’s Intuition 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Alboreto Takes Canadian Grand Prix 

MONTREAL (AP) — Michele Alboreto of Italy drove to victory 
Sunday in the Canadian Grand Nix, taking the lead in the Formula 1 
point s tanding s 

Alboreto; posting his fourth career victory, heal Ferrari teammate 
Stefan Johansson of Sweden to the finish line by 1.957 seconds. 

The 28-year-old Alboreto, who started third on the 25-car grid, moved 
past the Lotus of pole-starter Bio de Angdis of Italy and into the lead on 
the 16th lap around the 2.74-mOe (2. 8-kilometer) Gilles Villeneuve 
Circuit. He stayed there for the rest of the 70-lap, 191.80-mile event. 

Alboreto earned nine points for the victory, boosting him into the 
points lead after five races with 27 points. De Angdis. who finished fifth 
Sunday, is tied for second at 22 with Frenchman Alain Prost, who drove 
his McLaren-TAG to a third here. 

Ludwig’s Porsche Wins 2d Le Mans 

LE MANS, France (AP) — Klaus Ludwig and John Winter of West 
Germany and Paolo Barilla of Italy, driving a private Rdnhold Joest 
Racing Porsche 956, dominated the factory teams to win the 53d Le Mans 
24-hour auto race Sunday. 

Ludwig won last year m the same car. It was his third victory overall, 
the first for his teammalcs. Despite new fuel restrictions and 30 minutes 
under yellow flags for accidents, they set a distance record of 3,153 miles 
(5,074 kilometers). 

Second was the British-crewed Porsche 956 of Jonathon Palmer, James 
Weaver and car owner Rickard Lloyd, 25.4 miles behind. The factory-run 
Porsche of Briton Derek Bell and West German Hans Stuck finished 
third, 33.8 miles farther back. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BALTIMORE — The genius 
was back at work, even though the 
rehired manager, Earl Weaver, did 
not recall immedia tely after the 
game why be had used rookie Larry 
Sheets as a pinch hitter. 

Sheets was in a 3-for-23 slump 
Saturday when his RBI single 
capped a three-run rally in the sixth 

SATURDAY BASEBALL 

inning that put Baltimore ahead to 
stay in a 7-5 victory over the Mil- 
waukee Brewers. 

Weaver relies heavily on statis- 
tics, but after checking them he 
said they were not involved in his 
decision to use Sheets for switch- 
hitter Mike Young. 

“It was just one guy [Sheets] had 
been playing and the other hadn't 
been playing too much,” Weaver 
said. “That’s what it boiled down 
to, and it tamed out all right, didn't 
iiT 

Sheets confessed he was a little 
surprised to be used in that situa- 
tion, but contended: “1 haven’t 
been swinging the bat that badly." 

The victory was the Orioles’ 
third in a now since Weaver ended 
2 Vi years of retirement to rejoin 
them as a replacement for the fired 
Joe Altobew, although Weaver was 
not in the dugout for the first game 
of his new tenure. 

Fred Lynn began Saturday’s ral- 
ly with a single and scored on Ed- 
die Murray’s eighth homer for a 4-4 
tie. Murray’s homer, his first this 
. . year as a right-handed batter, fin- 
dished starter Ted Higuera. 

Reliever Bob Gibson issued two 
walks- around a sacrifice bunt be- 
fore Sheets singled to center on a 2- 
2 pitch, scoring Cal Ripken Jr. 

Ripken hit his 10th homer and 
Gary Roenicke his fifth for Balti- 
more’s final two runs, in the eighth. 
* The Orioles had not won three in 
a row since May I, while Milwau- 
kee lost its fourth straight. 

Roenicke said the players are in 
good spirits because of Weavers 
return. 



Earl Weaver on Saturday 

'It turned out all right, didn’t it?' 

“We are much more relaxed 
now,” he said. “Everybody on the 
t«tm is excited and looking for- 
ward to coining to the ballpark. 
That hasn’t happened here in a 
while. It’s a playoff or World Series 
atmosphere. 

Tigers 10, Yankees & Dared! 
Evans had five hits, including a 
two-run homer, and drove in three 
runs as Detroit won before a Yan- 
kee Stadium regular-season record 
crowd of 55,605. It was the Tigers’ 
sixth straight victory; New York 
has lost four in a row. 

Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 5: In Bos- 


ton, Rich Gedman and Marty Bar- 
ren drew bases-loaded walks off 
reliever Gary Lavelle in the eighth, 
breaking a 5-5 tie and beating To- 
ronto. It was the Red Sox's 15ih 
victory in their last 17 games. 

WUle Sox 3, Angles 2: In Ana- 
heim, California, Harold Baines 
doubled home Rudy Law from first 
base with two outs in the seventh to 
give Chicago its dghth victory in 
nine games. 

A's 8, Indians 6: In Cleveland, 
Dave Kingman drove in four runs 
and Jay Howell recorded his 13th 
save for Oakland. Kingman raised 
his RBI total to 38. 

Mariners 2, Royals 1: In Seattle, 
Jack Perconte’s fourth-inning in- 
field single with the bases loaded 
drove in the winning run against 
Kansas City. The Mariners' infield 
had 21 assists to tie a major-league 
record last accomplished by the 
2935 Brooklyn Dodgers. 

Rangers 11, Twins 2: In Arling- 
ton, Texas, Larry Parrish drove m 
four runs in leading a 17-hit attack 
that buried Minnesota. 

Padres 1, Giants 0: In the Na- 
tional League, in San Francisco, 
LaMarr Hoyt scattered five hits 
and San Diego teammate Tony 
Gwynn drove in the game's only 
run with a bloop single in the fifth. 
It was the fifth lime m their last 10 
games that the Giants had been 
shut out. 

Canfinals 2, Cubs 0: In Chicago. 
Danny Cox struck out seven and 
walked four in pitching his fifth 
complete game this year as St 
Louts handed the Cubs their fourth 
straight loss. Previously this sea- 
son, Chicago had not’ lost more 
than two in a row. 

Dodgers 3, Astros 0: In Houston, 
Orel Hershiser pitched a three-hit- 
ter for Los Angeles and Pedro 
Guerrero hit his third homer in the 
last two games. Using 94 pitches. 
Hershiser got his seventh shutout 
in only his 33d major-league start 
The Dodgers have won four of six 
games on their current road trip, 
hitting 13 homers. 

PHEes 13, Pirates 3: In Pitts- 


burgh, John Denny struck out a 
career-high 13 bailers and Glenn 
Wilson drove in four runs for Phila- 
delphia. 

Expos 3, MeLs 2: In Montreal. 
Hubie Brooks singled in Andre 
Dawson with two out in (he ninth 
to beat New York. Dawson dou- 
bled off starter and loser Sid Fer- 
nandez with two out, and Brooks, a 
former Met. singled over left fielder 
George Foster's head. 

Braves 7, Reds 0: In Atlanta. 
Terry Harper’s three-run homer, 
during a five-run third, backed the 
four-nit pitching of Steve Bedro- 
sian and Jeff Dedmon. Cincinnati's 
Pete Rose went 0-for-3 and still 
needs 48 hits to break Tv Cobb's 
record of 4.191. (AP. I P!) 


Yanks 9 Martin 
Tape Measure s 
His Interviewers 

The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — New York 
Yankee Manager Billy Martin, 
claiming he's being misquoted, 
lias starred taping h is interviews 
with the media. “This way 1 can 
sue if I'm not quoted accurate- 
ly.” Martin said following his 
club’s 10-8 loss to the Detroit 
Tigers here Saturday. The Yan- 
kees have dropped four 
straighL 

During an off-day workout 
Thursday. Martin reportedly 
criticized General Manager 
Clyde King and the former 
manager. Yogi Berra, for their 
alleged mishandling of spring 
training. He has since said that 
he “never said those things." 

On Saturday. Martin placed 
a switched-on tape recorder on 
his desk after the game. Said he 
of the tapes: “Maybe I'll sell 
them to a newspaper one day 
for a million dollars.” 


Guokas Hired as Coach of nba 76 er§ Cards Edge Cubs, 11-10; Aridujar First to Win 12 


deiphta 
the l 


PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Matt Guokas signed a multiyear contract 
Friday to become coach of the National Basketball Association’s Phila- 
’ ' ‘ua 76ers, a team he served for 3% years as assistant coach. 

le team’s general manager, Pat Williams, announced the appoint- 
ment at a news conference ending two weeks of speculation on a 
successor to Billy Cunningham, who resigned May 28 after right seasons 
and one NBA championship. 

Guokas. 41, whose father. Matt Sr „ was a member of the 1946-47 NBA 
champion Philadelphia Warriors, spent 10 seasons in the league as a 
player, broadcaster and coaching assistant He reportedly wall earn 
$300,000 a year; the team's owner. Harold Katz, said the contract is for at 
least two years. 


For the Record 


Mom’s Command took an early lead for a 516-leogth victory over Le 
L’Argent in Saturday’s Mother Goose Stakes for 3-year-ola fillies at 
Ehnont, New York. Mom’s Command now has won two-thirds of the 
New York Racing Association’s filly Triple Crown, with the Coaching 
Club American Oaks coming up July 6. • (AP) 

Ivan Lend, Mfloslav Mear, Tomas Smid and Libor Pimek have been 
chosen to represent Czechoslovakia in the Davis Cup quarterfinals in 
Ecuador on Aug. 2-4, the state-run news agency, CTK, reported. Pavel 
Stool and Marian Vajda were picked as reserves. (AP) 





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Th. 


ROUGH GOING — Marie-Francofee Grange of France almost capsized as die passed a gale at the 1985 World 
Whitewater Canoe and Kayak Slalom Champtoiiships, held dining the weekend in Augsburg, West Germany. Grange 
finished second to Marat Messdhauser of Augsburg in die women’s single kayak finaL Dave Hearn, runner-up to Jon 
LugbiO for three years, finally edged bis U.S. teammate in men’s single canoe; West Germans Thomas Hem-Impelamaim 
and Stephan Kueppers won in men’s double canoe, and Briton Richard Fox took his third straight men’s single kayak title. 


Corrplkd bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

CHICAGO — Joaquin Andujar. 
becoming the first 12-game winner 
in the major leagues, doubled in 
two rum and Andy Van Styke hit a 
three-run homer Friday as the Sl 
L ouis Cardinals beat the Chicago 
Cubs, 11-10. 

The Cubs got 15 hits, but they 
also made five errors that led to 

FRIDAY BASEBAIL 

three unearned Cardinal runs, in- 
cluding the decisive one in the 
ninth inning. 

“We didn’t play well,” said the 
Cubs’ manager, Jim Frey. “We 
didn’t gpteh the ball, and we made 
mistakes defensively. We gave 
them too many at bats.” 

Jody Davis drove in five runs for 
Chicago with two two-run doubles 
and a ground out 

Andujar, 12-1, won his eighth 
straight game. But the right-hander 
was lifted with one out in the sixth 



Jeff Lahti took over to start the 
seventh and gave np two runs in the 
ninth when pinch-hitter Richie 
Hebner singled with two outs and 
Dave Lopes homered. Ryne Sand- 
berg doubled, charing Lahti, and 
Bob Forsch relieved, getting Keith 
Moreland on a fly ball to right field 
that Van Slyke grabbed with a sHd- 
ingcaich in foul territory. 

The f-awHnala had scored four 
runs in the seventh, taking a 10-4 
lead on a single by Vince Coleman, 
a walk, a run-scoring single by Jack 
dark and Van Slyke’s homer. 

The Cubs c«me back with three 
in their half of the seventh, keyed 
’ a two-run double by Davis. Ron 
singled in another run in the 
_ th to dose Chicago to IBB, but 
the Cardinals added a run in the 
ninth on two walks and a wild pick- 
off throw by reliever George Fra- 
zier. 

“The pickoff play in the ninth 
was ill-timed, but if you picked the 
guy off it would have ban a heck- 
uva play," said Frey. “As it turned 
oat, it was the tag ran.” 

Andujar refused to talk to re- 
porters after the game but his 
pitching coach, Mike Roarke, said, 
“He never got loose from the very 
stan. 

“He was struggling all the way. 
We almost piBChhit for him in the 
sixth inning. No, he won’t lose a 
turn." 


Expos 5, Mets 4: In Montreal, 
Vance Law and Dan Driessen sin- 
gled in runs in the ninth to beat 
New York. Mets starter Dwight 
Gooden allowed six hits and struck 
out 1 1 through eight innings, but 
was relieved by Doug Sisk to start 
the ninth. Sisk immediately got 
into trouble by walking Jim Wohl- 
ford and Tim Raines. Calvin Sdnr- 
aldi took over, and Law singled to 
left to drive home the tying run. 
After Andre Dawson hit into a 
double play. Jesse Orosco relieved 
and Driessen drove a 3-2 pitch into 
center for the game-winner. 

Pirates 3, PtnBSes 2: In Pitts- 
burgh, Bill Madlock’s bases-loaded 
single in the seventh supported 
Jose DeLeon’s 11 -strikeout pitch- 
ing against Philadelphia. 

Braves 6, Reds 4: In Atlanta, 
Ken OberkfeO scored from first on 
an eighth-inning throwing error by 
Cincinnati’s Nick Esasky and Bob 
Horner followed with a two-run 
homer. 

Dodgers 10, Astros h In Hous- 
ton, Jerry Reuss scattered right hits 
and drove in three runs, including 
the eventual game-winner, and Pe- 
dro Guerrero hit two homers for 
Los Angeles. 

Giants 5, Padres 4: In San Fran- 
cisco, David Green’s one-out 
homer in the 11 th bear San Diego. 
The Padres' starter Andy Hawlons 
was looking for his 12th victory 
without a las and entered the bot- 
tom of the ninth with a 4-3 lead. 
But he left the game after yielding a 
lead off ring)e to Bob Brenly, and 
the Giants tied the score off Goose 


9, Brewers 3: In lhe 
American League, in Baltimore, 
Storm Davis survived a rough start 
to pilch a four-hitler against Mil- 
waukee. Davis gave up two hits and 
four walks in the fust inning, then 
held the Brewers hi dess until Rick 
Manning broke the string in the 

seventh. 

Red Sox 4, Blue Jays 1: In Bos- 
ton, Dennis Boyd scattered 1 1 hits 
in posting his league-leading ninth 
complete game and Mike Easier 
drove in two runs against Toronto. 

Indians 6, A’s 1: In Gevdand, 
Bert Blyleven pitched a five-hit! a 1 
for his 200lh victory in the majors 
and Brock Jacoby drove in three 
runs to help beat Oakland. 

Tigers 4, Yankees 0: In New 
York, Detroit won with the help of 
bases -empty solo homers from 
Tom Brookens. Barbara Garbev. 



Cardinal third baseman Terry Pei 

rerthrow 


Th* AaxKntad Pro 


Pendleton was left high an 

fid 


dry on a second-inning overthrow Friday from right fiekk 
Andy Van Slyke (Chicago basennmer Gary Woods got i 
and sewed on the play). St Louis went on to win, 11-10, bi 
Pendleton pulled a hamstring in the fifth inning and win 1 

sidelined for what team doctors see as “an extended period 


Kirk Gibson and Larry Herndon. 
Walt Terrell and Willie Hernandez 
held the Yankees to five hits. 

Rangers 4, Twins 2: In Arling- 
ton, Texas, Toby Harrah and Larry 
Parrish homered to help ddeat 
Minnesota. 

White Sox 4, Angels 2: In Ana- 
heim, California. Tom Seaver al- 


lowed only two hits the first se 
innings to post bis 295th victor 
the majors. 

Mariners 13, Royals 5; In S 
tie. Gorman Thomas, Alvin D 
and Boh Kearney homered to r 
a 15-hit attack that beat Kai 
City and ended the Mariners’ f ( 
game losing streak. (AP. I 











Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1985 


Shades (Lamp) of Thomas Edison! 


By Jean Rafferty 

P i AR1S — The vagaries of 
lamp design are delightfully il- 
lustrated in “Lumieres.” an 
imaginative retrospective dedi- 
cated to 20th-century interior 
lighting at the Pompidou Center. 

The art of illumination is 
shown through more than 300 
pieces, ranging from the sublime 
crystal glitter of a Baccarat chan- 
delier to the elegant geometric 
faceted glass and brass suspen- 
sion lamp created by Adolf Loos 
in 1901 (for a Viennese dining 
room) which looks just as con- 
temporary today. 


lure into an engaging view of life- 
style behind the desk. 


Grunfeld has avoided the look 
of an extended department store 
lamp display by “orchestrating" 
the lighting into an “opera of 
IighL" There is background mu- 
sic of operatic extracts and 
French love songs, and the theat- 
rical lighting, varying in intensity 
from a dawn glow to bright sun- 
light, spotlights successive pieras 
in a 50- minute cycle. 


The show was designed by the 
rJe 


novelist and former banker Jean 
Francois Grunfeld. who was re- 
sponsible for last year’s success- 
ful **L' Empire du Bureau” 
exhibition at the Must* des Arts 
Decoratifs. where he transformed 
the dreary world of office furai- 


Subtitled “Je pense a vous" (I 
Think of You), the exhibition 
also features three evocative ma- 
ddeines, so called after Marcel 
Proust They recreate three typi- 
cal French settings with their at- 
tendant sources of light: an old- 
stvie French kitchen, a provincial 
hotel room and a comer of a 
bourgeois living room. “Lighting 
is very linked with memory," says 
Grunfeld. “Proust wrote a de- 


scription of the lighting in each 
part of his works.” 

Modem classics by such distin- 
guished designers as Victor 
Horta. Josef Hoff mann. Ettore 
Sotsass, Joe Colombo and Gae 
Aulenti rub shoulders whh the 
height nf hilari ous kitsch. A 1940s 
table lamp incorporating a plastic 
flower vase topped with a shade 
in synthetic straw comes from the 
home of an unidentified Holly- 
wood actress. Two ceramic flying 
fish leaping from a glass wave 
underlii by a shocking pink glow 
was designed in the 1950s by an 
understandably anonymous 
Fr enchman or Italian. 

Even master designers seem to 
get carried away when it comes to 
lamps. That devotee of the sober 
straight line, Charles Rennie 
Mackintosh, produced a suspen- 
sion lamp for a Scottish dining 
room that looks like a Chinese 
bird feeder. Ingo Maurer is the 


author of a whimsical red web- 
footed, feather-headed chicken 
lamp. 

TTiere is a lamp on a doilar-sign 
base, one projecting a rainbow, a 
1925 lamp of a woman parachut- 
ist, the 1937 illuminated “Jobe 
mounted on the gears of a Mode! 
8 Jean Perzcl made especially Tor 
Henry Fan! the neon outline of a 
“Demi-Violon” by the French 
sculptor Arman, a safiey-pin 
floor lamp, even a Dutch light- 
house beacon. 

Grunfeld is as proud of the 
marriages of material 
and light as he is erf the examples • 
of superb design. “It is with the 
greatest pleasure that we present 
the horrors next to the master- 
pieces.” 

The show runs through Aug. 5. 


Jean Rafferty is a Paris-based 
journalist who specializes in arti- 
cles on design and lifestyle. 


■ ”. v * y'-t 


"a ttekdfr* 


kV.-v *.y*. 

ft.**: 

♦*■■■* 



From left, water lily lamp by Damn (c.1902); peacock design (c. 1925); geometric model (c. 1925). 



LANGUAGE 


Payment Ups and Dawns 


By William Safixe 

W ASHINGTON — A oo tapir 
ay that was a takeover target 
was faced, according to The New 
York Tunes, with a large debt and 
“with the prospect of shrinking its 
business to help pay down that bur- 
den.” 

“Why pay domT writes Marie 
Pearson of San Francisco. “Be- 
cause pay off has taken on sinister 
connotations?” 

In a debt-ridden world, in which 
payment is made to service interest 
rather than reduce the prmdpal of 
loans, the word down is coming up. 

St all began in 1926 with down pay- 

mem, the first money put up; more 
recently, a subsidy paid to a home- 
buyer by a builder to make month- 
ly payments las in the first few 
years of a mongage, thereby per- 
mitting the buyer to qualify for a 
loan, is called a buy-down. 

a nd! use the simple repay, if 
cans sinister? Tne reason is 
new osagp u more sophisti- 
cated than it se ems : begin to repay 
implies a plan to repay m full, and 
pay down implies nothing more 
than the beginning of a reduction 
in the money owed. How many of 
us pay down our loans to no thing , 
compared to those who refinance, 
or roll over, or go sedately bank- 
rupt, or skip town? The language 
' reflects the practice in subtle ways: 
we have differentiated between pay 
out, pay off, pay up and pay down 


to mean to sleep late intent* 

which many of us do on week 

and some of us who shall be name- 
less do during the week. . ■ 

Where did the in come from? 
Probably from to stay in, to stay at 
home sleeping. “The usage is still 
mainly dialectical." reports Sol 
Sieinraetz of Barnhart Books, “but. 
it is spreading southward." He cites 
this quotation from The Tuscaloo- 
sa (Alabama) News in 1972: “Now 
I get to stay up late and watch the 
\*te movies and sleep in. It’s great!**-. 
Keep an eye on intent: to over- 
sleep is unintentional, to slap late 
can be either planned or not, buts- 
most often planned, and is used by 
an older generation (which really 
needs the sleep, believe me); and /a 
sleep in is to iollygag in bed with 

lfl71f1Pgg * **■ 


4 


iKV 

. )/ 


i r 



Mi 


And on the kitsch side, woman parachutist (c- 1925). 


X HE ad in the Amtrak office 
window downstairs reads; “Sleep 
in and still get there first. 
. . . Takes you downtown to 
downtown wink you get a good 
night’s sleep.” 

I’ve been wondering about the 
phrase to sleep in ever since my 
grown offspring began to use my 
house as a place to crash. It bothers 
Miriam Sflverberg of Jamaica, New 
York, too: “High-powered execu- 
tive couples take turns on week- 
ends caring for the children and 
letting the other sleep in," she 
writes, wide-awake, ubviously, 
they mean sleep Uae, bnt why don’t 
they say so? Or do they mean sleep- 
ing in a bed as a special treat, as 
opposed to the floor? Is this new?" 

Since 1918. sleep in has been in 
American, and especially Canadi- 
an, use. Originally it meant to mer- 


Y SON the hacker, crafned at 
the knee of the supertanker An- 
drew Glass of Cox News paper 
reconfigured the files in my person- 
al computer — and. for a frighten- 
ing moment I didn’t know where 
anything was. 

“How do I get at the *On Lan- 
guage’ column?” I asked. 

“You mean," he replied cody, 
speaking in a language he calls “Bar 
sic," “How do you access it?” 

That's the new magic word. Now 
that all the world's information has 
been “inputted," the trick is to get 
at it, and the operative verb is to 
access. Tins is me shortened form 
of the old phrase to gain access to, 
and it has gained wide acceptance, 
rniH-h as to make contact with be- 
came to contact a couple of genera- 
tions ago. Don’t fight the verbify- 
ing: to make a withdrawal from 
your grammar-friendly data bank, ■ 
you must adopt the necessary lingo. 
If you don’t use access, you won’t 
get in anywhere. 

Sew York Tunes Service 


M 1 ‘1 

‘ 




ij-o 11 ;'; 

ttf** 

- *. 

■ . 
lill rJ \. ’ - 

l, i " 


Ike 




fl! L ‘ 


li« 

, 1*1 • 


sleep — that is, to sleep later than 
1931 had come 


intended — but by 


British Wrecks to Be Filmed 

United Press International' 

SYDNEY — An Australian film 
company has been granted permis- 
sion by the British Admiralty to 
dive to and film two British battle- 
ships sunk in the South China Sea 
by Japanese bombers during World 
War H. The HMS Repulse and 
HMS Prince of Wales, which are 
designated as war graves, lie off the 
east coast of Malaysia 


DiVil _ . . 

1?; .: i\ 
he" 1 

ik-r 

[feir . . 


Lfli.* 1 - \ 

vr 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 


OPERATION AVALANCHE, Amen- 
cm Gloom Abroad needs m ava- 
lanche of lefterc sent to W ml wwton 
NOW la support the efforts af can- 


NOW to support the effort] rrf anv 
nresanon BJ A b xtnder an betejf! of 
Americans overseas. Wrto to him & 


to vw own congressman to express 
he bate Bffl AlaMnder has 


support for the 

just introduced Address at House of 
fc e^ resentmiees. Wastengtan, DC, 


DIVORCE IN 24 HOURS 

Mutual or contested actions, low cut 
Horn or Dominican Rejxibfcc. For mfor- 

/handra to Dr. P. GotuaSes, CXJA. 
1835 1C St MW.. Wbshmrton D.C 
ret 202-452-8 


20006. USA let 


7-8331 


WIMBLEDON TICKETS avaioUe- Se- 
ne* ■ Finds. Book now. Cat Ticket 
Finden UK 01-6398633 / mobile 0836 
702722. Tele* 261376 LOFBND G, 


ALCOHOLICS 

' WuPc 
10320. 


ANONYMOUS 


^^.^ans [daily) 634 59 65. Rome 


DBVWG SCHOOL HMNBACH. 


HAVE A MCE DAYI BokcL Have a 
mu doyt Bokd 


SUN. N.Y. TIMB - Eunxel dehary. 
Write Keyset. PQ6Z, BldOQ Brussels. 


PERSONALS 


REUNION 

COMMUNITY SCHOOL TBMAN 
AUGUST 2-4. I98S 
Teachers, Graduates 1945-197B 


Contact VWjy Shohet Ezra 
213-*758r _ 


B17B 


or Georoe Abrohamian 213-7748321 
o< bvmp Isaac Foul 212-31941715 


MOVING 


DEMEXPOKT 


PARS • LYON • MARSBUE 
UUE • MCE 

Inti moving bv speaoket fiam motor 
«■*«> France to aD ones m the world. 
TdJ free fr om F rance l6[05j 24 10 82 

naenMAm 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN UNES INTL 


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USA 


ova i3oo ones 
WORLDWIDE 


Allied Van Lam Infl Carp 
(OlOT} 312-681-8100 
Office Address: 25<hAv 6 Roaseveh Ed 
Broadview, IBnas 60153 USA 


Or call our Agency offices: 

PARIS PadMrdes Infer ncrlimint 
(01) 343 23 64 

RtANKRJRT 

(060) 250066 

DUSSELDORF/ RATINGEN 

(02102) 45023 IMS 

MUNICH UA5. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON 


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(01) 953 3636 
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INTERNATIONAL 


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CAOPAW5 (3) 036 63 11 
LONDON (01) 578 66 11 


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workhnde. Cod Chtefc Faro 
81 (hear OperoL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ITALY 


TUSCANY. Beautiful old farrahouw. 
totally restored & fumrshed luxunom 
baths, with annex, 22^00 n}.m. knL 
d view. Located near Poa 
(Parol 533 689V 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNB C80I5ETTI fttrl Orta, high 
dan duplex apartment. 251 sqjn. 


pnvote gardens ISO sq.m. Sea view, 
nwng. dirwtg. 


playroont 4 bedrooms 
2 bdhx, 1 taiot. winter garden & 
poi. (1) W3 77 97. 


GERMANY 


VtUA 225 SQjM. Guea quarters, 
nouMueaper separate quartets, cav 
erod iMtmn^ pool (awnter aumeil, 
scuna, fully eqwpped kitchen (sennee 
lfl|. Living no + 7 bathrooms 
paved wot Basa Pbrtugala marble & 


oars with granite. Roars heated by 
eater bed- 


butt-m conceded lubes, mater I 


room furnished; mahogany closets 8 
pbtadtw±550fqjn. 


a 24 const gold plated 

h*y planted garden + water foun- 
tain. Price DM2JOO.OQO. Ware 
CD.C, Monte Carte, 31. Av Pnncesse 
Groce. 98000 Monaco 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


QUA! D'ORSAY 


tom- 


AGB4CE DE L’ETOflB 

REAL STATE AGB4T 

764 03 17 


ITALY 


TUSCANY, property near Pro, 450 
iqjii. entaej^ratarad, nicety deco- 


idted. land 12,000 saiiL, e »c a*onal 
v»w. mtEPCQ PAIK^533 (B 91. 


CHAMP tie MARS 

Ideal ptedoterm. surnv 
72 sqm, old. 3 twra. 380 26 08 
AG0ICE DE rEIQUE 


GBGL 


The Architeas of Time 





SELFWINDING CHRONOGRAPH, WATER RESISTANT 

Avertable in Steel, combination of steel and 18 kt gold or all 18 kt gold 


€B€L 

OfHCWWMOH 


MEISTER 

Bahnhofsfrasse 

Zurich 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


HENRI MARTIN 


16th, taceptiand sunny flaf. 260 urn, 
very hgh ckat. 380 26 08 
AGBfCE DE FETOIIE 


MONTAIGNE 

fac e p ti und pad-o-tena, 
ten. 68 sqm 380 26 0 
AGBCEDE rETOIE 


MONTMARTRE, Oupla • atefier d'ar 
hste. fine Art Deoa buBdng in beaurv 
fi< wrrqum fctgs. I ted, bwien.fciteh, 
mezzanine, ana atelier vwih 18 ft brfi 
enfag. TeL 223 90 41 


AVE FOOL Imran piedcHerre, 
withgardavraceptio 
Doressay: 548 43 94. 


SWITZERLAND 


VILLARS 

WINTBl & SUMMER 
PARADISE, 20 MBYTES 
FROM LAKE GB4EVA 


Apa He e w l s, rengina from tfucBas 
o 4 roams. AraWjte For 


Forewjnr*. FantmUC view, 
ly. seteded 


Sale To 


ty, setaded residenltel 
from SF195.000 to 


gag es ^avottab ie 
rOf irttormafioiv 


sF635.ma 
ovoBoble at only 65% interest. 


GLOBE PLAN SJL 
Av. Aton*pqs 24. 

CHI 005 LAUSANNE. SwoerimJ 
Tel: (21J 22 35 12. TU H185 MEUS CK 
Since 1970 


LAKE GENEVA/ LUGANO 

In these oaptainl regmni mdu 
Wontreuy Gitood Valej _ 

many other famous nxwrtan resorts, 
ww have a very bm (hdcs af mogrvfi- 
eent APAme^TVVUlAS/CHMETS 
Vwy reasonably priced but also the 
l»eP & mast Dtuw. Price from about 
LS$<0,000 Mortgages c* 6W% mterest. 
Plnqje vst or phonm 

H. SOOLDSA 

Tout Gnse 6, CH-1007 Lausanne. 
Tel 21/25 26 II. He 24298 5SO CH 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CAfBES. (5 bne). Old charreng Pro- 
WKaL Mbs. 6 roan. 2 baftroora, 
fitly equpped kitchen Independent 

house (huge tedtoom. bdh & 

mod July. AuaS 
'month. Tef. 553 8484 


Set. 


BAUX DE PttOVOKB. BeouftM race 

Ijge propert y . Tel 325 B1 70 Paris. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


EXECUTIVE SUITS MAYFAS. W 

ry Fumctwd apartments, newty deco- 

rated, MJy serviced, watstmvii teles 
Ibolmes. £450/ £550 per week. 3 

months to 1 yeci Mauntatnon Nan- 

ogement Ltd. London 
ife: 299185. 


01 491 2626 


LONDON. Fat the best fumshed Flats 

and houses. Consult the Spectatae 
Fhakps. Kay and Lewis. Tet South of 
PbrL 352 8111. North of Ptrt 722 
5135. Telex 27846 RESDE a 


KATMN1 GRAHAM LTD. SpedaEsts in 

tndi quality re a de nt iol property rent- 
oh. 18 Atentprfer Mews, KnigHi- 
i. tenden SW7.. SB 33 


85. tbii B956462 XLGLTD I 


ANSCOMBE A BNGLAND with ctf. 

(ices in St Johns Wood & KerangSon 
after the ted service m resderttd 
hating. Tel: 722710) mUX- 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

8 Aue. 5e M— «W ie 


75009 Ptate 

Tde* 231696 F • 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


AGENT IN PARIS 
562-7899 


RATS FOB PENT 
SHORT -LONG TBM 


RATS FOR SME 
OFROS FOR HUmStUE 


16TH PASSY. 3 rjwta ekjptex. 
FSflOO-'mamh. Owner Tel: 520 3630. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


STAYING IN PARIS? 

RMMSHED 8 UNFURNBHED 
FIRST-CLASS APARTMENTS 
Minimum rental 2 months. 
Alia Aids 8 hewai far eh. 
WTBI UUS, 1, rue Mdfan. 
Pads PV Tab 563 17 77 


IIE ST LOUS, 200 sq.m. 

In freedone biikfcw withelevteoft HJ, 
3 reception); 3 batnoms. 3 boritroorm. 
wttt modern fuB y eq uipped kitchen, 
very hmurious furritve, 

Seme. Pa” 
pnee. Tefc 


view cm Same. Parking. JustiRed high 
563 25 60 


74 CHAMPS-RYSEES 8tii 


Studio. 2 or 3^ootn opatiuent. 
One month or more. 

LE CUUUDGE 359 67 97. 


UIXURY AT BUDGET PRICES! Try Ho- 
EfHT« 


totel apartments near the tattel low- 
er. Fu»n erne «nek upwords, fu*y 
equipped stwios la 5 roemu, with or 
without hotel tentee. Contact-. FLA- 


TOTH. 14 rue du 1hfi«n- 75015 
Paris. Tefc 575 62 20. Ite 2H211 F. 


AVE MONTAIGNE 

Swmptaots piedo-terre 

moiE. jhort ten 

SSTVKte 563 


B5 lain., Wxi«n.'jhort term 

B«WSY 


38 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA. FURNISHED 

fg{g CHAMPS EYLEES 

2 roon&axribrte parting. FBOOO 

JeL p] &^1 IT 

PA1AK BOURBON. Furnidied 1 roam 
cyui tmflrt. kUdtetteUe, bath, anrtud 
rwud, with refcranoe, FSOwaxxith, 
dnrgef included. Tefc 605 2165 (of- 
fice) or 705 6595 (home). 

SHORT ISM STAY. Advantages of a 
hotel without inconveniences. Fed at 
home in rioe Bwfiot one bedouin 
and more in Peril. SOREUM: 80 rue 
de rifaveraM, Are 7lfa 544 39 40 

AUGUST M nUUS. to rent superb 
boge toerted near Concorde. 5 beds, 
terrace, Sl.500. Tefc H 1268 01 94. 

Ufa BASTILLE. 55 1 q.n 1 . + 20 iqjn. 
ferraoBL sun, beams. FkeiiocB. July / 
AubTr^OOl Tefc 338 1090 

19TH BUTTES CHAUMONT. 80 sqm. 
Art, oaten axtmimxs. Jute/Au- 
9 *. F7 < 000/mantfL Td 205 9475. 

7TH MVAUDEK, very quid studo. 

FI i)00/weet 739 37 38. officehourv 

SHORT 1BUW in Latin Oxxter. 
No asanis. Tel: XF93B 83. 

S MINS. ETOUE BO srtm. flat Jdy / 
Aug. R5roO/nKrthT&2 03 1 1. 



13th: Modern, runny, calm. 256 roam 
duplex. 5475 per rnorth. XS 2B1 7 asn. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


BAG CHARCTtX 


2 reception s , 
redone. F15JML 

~ 68 38 


OiAMP DE MARS, me 


— . . . — — bedroom, 

kitchen, hah Yearly rental. WSfii ref- 
erence. F3500/nxnai charges ndud- 


ed. Tefc 70521 23 afternoons & evm 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


AAfflKCAN SEEK5 PURCHASE of 3 
room Rat. f 


.s~- 5075 sqjn. in Paris. Cash 

sde. Tdt 758 9810L 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


mature lady, Swedish 

eri Engfeh. frntxh, g 

irf Germtm. Esperietwed n traveing, 
long working experience in Sweeten 
end Made East, argmzed and with 
a goad cense or humor. Write Box 
7419, Horrid Tribune. 92S21 Neufly 
Codta. France 


Wflffl* N 34* MPS-CQRNHL 
Hari Mcmaganenl. doctarotB-Foiti- 
cal Science - Sorixmne. Eigtericnoe in 
rmtagemerf, human rekanm. Work- 


ing papers Looking for Paris based 
1953/5750311 fttev 


pewhon. 579 ' 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


nary Wp people in Forte 7\ 


nr tempo 

56 82% 


EMPLOYMENT 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Dent miM 
WTHtATTONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

la «w WT OMriBed Sedten. 


MIBBMIIONAI LAW HIM m PriH 
•eeks bdnguri secretary with excel 
lent shorthand '« English A French. 


2397, Herald 


.92521 NeuRyCedei, fiance 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AKHANDUNGSY5TEM Manufactur- 
er seeks Frendi/Engfah/Gerraanhos- 
tess. good presantriten, UD m. mini- 
mum, blond, far Stand Uriidima - 
Pbrte da VeroaSn. Nov. 12- 17. Send 
CV. photo to Bax 2388L Herald Tri- 
bute, 92521 Neufy Cedtot, France 
who wfl^Iarwyd. ' agAcaltora not 


B9GUSHMAN 39. Former CTirtKlrikt- 

aoadwig & u i tfma al iu 
nab now iBUUinienf 
Write 11 Sta^kJ toad. Hbumktw 
West, MiddicMx, Englmd. 


AUSTRALIAN JOURNAUCT, 
speate French, web Syapeon 


Si tin u experience te ffaw 
AwtraSa/Uk. Wr 


, Write to C 

... Schwestefhausslrajse 10L 
3000 Hannover 1. W. Germany, 


FRENCH HTCH FASHION MODEL 27, 
ffatory of Art Toduale, teak for 


teriness^apBiings Altradrie, artiatj 


tote, 

London 225to 


London based. 1 
38 pm. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


SALES 

US$100000 MT YEAR 
COMMB90N 


Must speak Engfish & German 
All dieris ame n » by caprinmnL 
Austria’s largest & newest time-shore 
resort. You must tesa» a strong one cril 
tries backgrouid. 

Mr. Grie - Ans 


Austria 0641270218 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


YOUNG MTL FAMILY 
tmh 2 smal chndren seefa nappy cap» 
ble & wfeg ntriher 1 * help, pat year 
USA,pmtfimope. NoivenaHer, riming 


Bcense. good Engfish. Minimum cortroo 
Send rindt with photo to; 8ay 


1 tea. .. , 

Stepping Co Ltd, 16 non LongamaBa. 
CH-13M Geneva 


ALWAYS AVARAHE - AU PARS. 

I & J 


childrens nanny, nans helpers 

brandies of 1st doss Eve-tn domestic 
help worldwide. Coil Soane Bureau, 
Umrim 730 8122/51 42(24 haurd U- 
CfiMPAGY. Tie 8950670SlOAh2 G. 


36 TWOTO TRAffffll namie. high- 

rite. Free now. Fry 5taff CoroUroms. 
7 Kf^St.Aldwdtet. Hants UK oS 
31^89. Lk licenced 


ALWAYS AVAHABIF LONDON only 
brixynteidert, 1st dan daily mads 
chaaffiMn. Same Bureau, 730 B122 
/ 5I4Z Lieenoed empfayn ut agency 


EATON BUREAU NANNIES - & ril 
proFeistonri domestics ovoiloble now. 
London 730 9566. 136 Sloane 9, SW1 
Lkanoed LK Employment Agency. 


INGUSH NAMflB & Mother's Helps 
free now. Nosh * “ ~ 

Road, Have. UK. 


i Agency. 53 Ouch 
. TSTfOOTJ 29044/5 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBtnON EXECUTIVES 

Publish your borines mmnage 
in the hfcnxrifaiMi HvraldHt- 
bmn, where mom than a Runt 
of a mRBon ntadmrt woritf- 
widv, mart af wham ere m 
batman and inrtvrtty, wS 
read R. Jurt telex us (Paris 
613S95J before JOtuti, en- 
suring that we am telex yaa 
back, end year marmot m9 
appear wBMt 48 hours. Hie 
nda m US.S9.BO or local 
eqwhraienf per Bne. Yeu snort 
moudte campdrte end vanfr- 
rddebBSng addreas. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MOST CONTAINER LEASING 
C0MMNS5 ADVERTISE 


17% - 20% 
FIXED INCOME 
PER ANNUM 


WEDONT HAVE TO BECAUSE 
WE RHJEVE WE CAN OffiH 


MORE! 


We ore o mrior aantomer leoanp ptm- 
pony Houndad 1973] with on eaceBent 
recrird of triunt&sennce ft# our di- 
■nb. We ate ariraiily nm og ii ig over 
17JKB contc w en for amr 
WE HAVE — 


$36 MILLION 


UNDfiR MANAGEMENT 
AND AN ANNUAL TURNOVER 
IN EXCESS Of 


$15 MOWN 


If you tn ansidmng on imcstaiM m 
aswen we suggest you carted us 
before rearing your decani 


WE PAY OUR CLIENTS 

QUARTERLY 

A GROS5 DOLLAR INCOME 


SHIRLSTAR 


MTHMATIOffAL SALES 

KHZEBSG8ACHT S34 

1017 BC AMSTSSMM 


TRj fOaOl 272822 

14663 (WBCO) 


THfit 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JUNE24Hi ISSUE 
ON SALE JUTE 17th 


BUSINESS WEEK 


INTERNATIONAL 


The Computer Sump: 
Why Now? How Long? 


• The Smuggle to Curb 
Terrorism in Europe. 


• Europe: Pulling Out of 
Winter Economy Could 
Take All Year. 


NOW ON SALE 
AT AU INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


OFFSHORE COMPANES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 


Moing - Telephone - Telex 
Fill seamaid services 
We of Mfli Jersey, Guemesy, 
Liberia, 


Gfcratrir. Panama. Liberia, 
LmonWa Ant&a, UK. 
Reedy "*• or toedri. 
Free eupfamaDry boakfaL 


Bart regsbcaiote 
London r epre te nf a fae 


Astoni 

"RMBMiSh 

Telex 627691 SPIVA G 


CCM. LID 


Conponei. formed UJC & worldwide 
nduring We of Mon, Tufa & Career,, 
AnguStv Fauna aid Liberia 


For further tnfomotioruptaaie fflrtod 
k oh • 5 Upper Oureh ST, Dowlas, We 

af Mon. wa Great Britain, tefc Dotelas 
p624) 23733, tbc 6Z7900 CCM OMG 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANES 

Incorporation end management 1 in: [K 
U» Of Man. Turk* AnSSa, (W 


Wands, 


GSxaitarcmd 


• Cadvtontid adrice 

• ImmmSate awdobity 


• Beater shares 

• Bart 

' MaJ, te l e^wne & telex 

' bocJrtet fronr 


Mf 


UD 

Head Office 
" , . Me rt Mas 
Tefc Douglas (0624) 2371 8 
Tn ta»628 sk4 sa fer G 

26 W1 

Td 01493 4244, 11x28247 SCSDN G 


USA 

BUSMBSE5 1 REAL ESTATE 
Business sates; cononeiad, induslnd & 
resirientid rod estrts^ates & leases. 
Property raanogeanrt & businss de- 
velopment Write with your requro- 
mertt 8> fmandri specs to Hnon Redly 
K fiusnim Brokavl4795 Jeflm 
4ttl0^bvne^CAra714 USA 71 


B030; 


DIM. 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T-8HKT FOTOS 
NOW IN FULL COUX 
an dLcash busmess that can earn you 
S8XW - Siaooa/rwrth. New and used 
systems from $9500 ■ S 2 A 5B1 

" 1)Z Pojtfach 17D34, 


Tet 069747808 Tte- 412713 


7W. Gerroarry. 
12713 KEMA 


FOR 5AIE OR LONG TSM RBfT 
Read Conetnidfan 


fa Saudi hbort 2d(l madvmk BuUae- 
■rt, suppers, rttxten, refien, dump 
tnxfa Mercetes/Vrivo. Am 
+ oiahm ric. Moefes 19 
Triest 27435 CH 


(NTONAnONU BUSINESS apM 
ing wemUy wnricMde far aver 25 
yean, writ man offia m ne haven, 
lor sofa SF1.6 aifion. This indudas 
also ImawJia*. Ccn be apernte d 
from rites any part or the world, 
aid a extendoae. Far mformotem 
wrde to: Bae 2163L LH.T, Frte d rk drt r. 
IS. 6DQQ Foarifat/Fdain 


PANAMA 1BEHA. CORPORATIONS 
from USW) arofloblt now. Tel 
' : s40. Tela*: 62835 2 BLAND 
fvfaUKL 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


NTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLUHTH) MC 

ojla. t wanawax 


A complde personal & bwinea sennas 
of 


promoSond oooasianv 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th Sl, N.YjC 10019 
Service “ 


OFFSHORE SaWKES 


UX. nan resdert campavK with 
nOToee dkectort, becrer shares and 
cadidertid bank accounts. FuD bactua 
b wppon services. Panama & Liberian 
companies. Firtf rate cen&kntid 
profesriond sarviceL 


iBSflkai 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PMSPOW. 
Sme 502. Ccnird, Hong Kong 


TAX SERVICES 


US INCOME TAX irtoms and audta 
by profamonch. Pons 563 91 23. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


HAVE US. DOUASS TO exchange 
fri Swiss Francs, Ufa W0 c&o ber- 


row fang tins af SF, 5 or 10 yeivs. 
Hm hbmiay notes. Td 5witzer- 

tand,Zundi 361 6500 rtD6S/471 362. 


diamonds 


OFFICE SERVICES 


WORLD-WIDE 
BUSINESS CENTRES 

Frnnafaed Executive Office! 
miiibiuhuhi, Mxponjw 


■e pre i n laD n n 1 CMmt Foc9%e« 


AMSTERDAM Euro Buaness Center 
Keiaersflr . 99 1 015 CH Amsterdam 
227035. Tdex; 16183 
ATHSe Baaitne Services, Athens 

7776 232 Triaif 216343 

Mrfiii-i8n3^aSi 3 . 

JAM4949. IdSTcniW. 
B»«|LS; A. Ate cfa to Presse 
ipoo Brunet Tet 217 83 60 
Telex: 25327 

DIBAk PX). Box 1515. DNATA 



MAU PX). Box 1515, DNA1 
Arfne Centre Dubd, UAE 
W. 214565 Tele* ifell 


LONDON: 110 The Strand. 

24973 

JR I « 04. Tetex: 46642 
MJJAN: Via Bocaxoo Z 

S 123 $3SV» Tcl 86 75 W/W » 279 
Tefat 333343 

«w YORK: 575 Modem Avenue 
New York. NY 10022. Tet Qiq6Q5- 

905. li^ftvenw^Wdor Hugo 

S Sofeif' 502 ,B 00 

Tefae 61 345B 

3NOAPC%fc.il I North^Bridge W. 

W/ 2 l !rrfi ,2 - ,<,o,z -“ 

Telex: B1265WB12J81. 


DIAMONDS 


Your best buy. 

Fine dnmondt m any price range 
at fawns* whriesde prices 
dw front Artvwp 
omter of the ri a mond world. 
Fti guarantee. 

For free price fat write 
Jottc h fal GaltfnMi 


Established 

If J3., u III, li , , ^ 


928 


pfaanstraai 62M0IB Antwerp 
W ri w n - TriTp2 31 234 07 5l 
Tfcc 7177? b. At thn D r. TSjnd Cki; 

Heart af AntUterp Dfaraond industry 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DIAMONDLAND 

Hte largest showroom in 

Antwerp, Diamond Gfy 

Appefaottr 33A. Tel: 323/2343612. 


PARIS 

•or CHAMPS ELYSES 

RHVT 

YOUROFHCE 

wilh dl fadfaiee 




751 16 Acre. Tefc B3 ti 
Tden le sofa 620 


183F. 


Y °“ OWS W WUBS RWHT ON 

the champs arsas 


UflQJJff SBWKH) ORKB 

Koeoxst, 1 




Printed by gdz in Zurich (Switzerland) 


AUTOMOBILES 


MG B GT 1968. Antenom 

about 180.000 ten. , 
20JXX)km- tobedteduid. 
needed. F2OJ00Ffats‘“ 


TSBf 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAHC KNT A CAL FYesnge an 
with phone; Ifafa Spirit. Mercedes, 


SCte 1 ' 

IK-r'f;'. ■ 

nujl x ", 
ijornv-J . 

CJ« 

cfcrjii ,,p 

rL.Hv'S""' 

i[| ja&v 
SKiiV. I '■ 
Jis.!'-' ■ 

jar ihiii 

lhcpni!“i'- • • 
yTliirJ "• 

riu'iu rj' 

Ktthc pnr: : " 

[Vt'< - 

The v’«: ; • 


Joguor, BMW. hnou wiei, s mo3 cool 
non, 7500B ffora. Tefc 


46 r Pierre Charron 7S 

Trie* 630797 FCHAHjOC 


720-30-40.' Tefae t 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOWTO IMPOftr A EUROPEAN 
CAK MTO THE ULA. 

Tha document expiora frdy what one 
mast do to bring a cor trio Ate tt& . 
safriy «md legofiy. If incUte.new S 
used European aubjrieet. buying fa, 
DOT & ERA conv er si o n add resse s, cus- 


tom dnemnae & steppmg proce dures - 
pom. Because af the 


as wet as Ingd | 

strong dolor, you can save up to 
US$1 8.000 when buying a Meratdes, or 
BMW in Europe & importing it to the 
Strtes. To receive this maim, send 
“ 'Itt 


USJlBiOjnddUSSl JO for poWt 
PJL Schmidt, Pasffoch 313 T 
7000 StuHgart 1, West Germany 


TRANSCAR 

NEW ADDRESS IN PARIS 


17 Asm de fi fatad 
73008 Parte Tefc 225 6444. 


.H. 


RANKFUKT7MAM-W. 

faruxm n GmbH. Tel: 

Pitteup ci aver Bmope *ro/rodips. 


TIANSCA8_77av de Friecfcrd, 75008 
.fte 09531 


Paris. Td: 2256444. 1 

Antwerpt 233 99 8S. Carnes 39 43 4< 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


•vl 


Chinest 1 Hii 

Trend to 


bv ;••• 

L. 


BEU1NV — s. t- 


TRASCO 


„ TW AWCH3B SPECIALISTS 
SwAwrkmd, West Gentasy & En^and 


Stepping by the experts. 


■ NSraa y8 ‘MS&Ss--- 

280 M-Btari, Blue 


DUBT ROM SOURCE 
Traaj London Ltd 


II Howanden W^fandat NW2 7BR. 


Tefc I 

Triex 895022 TWS G. 


BMW .^rotSOC. BHD 


Mi-up rf • 

Tuftdji is i’-r ij . 
ittimrffvTv- . . 
aibiOtlLv:>i 
tfranen:. ’ .- 
JWBIBSi - 

flw sUrtir: - 
Naomi Pi r>i ■ ... •• 
us iKisiit-rc 
Wjjlpr, id! «. 

JTpt'LKT;-;' 

PWnUDfll! 

® e KC 5Pf;.i*' v- 

am< iV, . 

Wans;! j-..- 
Jfcifiaj pr.i. ... 

J^*SfUL-r. • 

snv: ; . . 

tv . 


>4'! 


11 Lki;-. - ■ , 

lac:.:.. 




1 


- 


PAGE 4 
for more 
CLASSIFIEDS 


VANCLEEF 

& 

ARPELS 


announce their 
SUMMER 
EXHfflmON 
4th/ 18th June 


On show will be 
their rare gems, 
latest collection of 
high jewellery and 
boutique pieces, 
with exclusive 
watches. 


is NEW BOND 
STREET - LONDONKV1 
TeL- 01-491 1405 
Open an Saturdays. 


te" 

i*ii 


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Sfe'r-' 

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