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INTERNATIONAL 



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VEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 14 


o. 31,827 


Published 'With Hie New York Tunes and The Vi 

PARIS, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


fop U.S. Banks Cut 
Prime Rate to 9.5%, 
Lowest Since 1978 




» *»?*■: . v; ■■ 


• ; .v. -■ v • 1 ■ 
. *• 


By John M. Berry 

Washington Part Service 

WASHINGTON — U.S- banks 

- i their prime lending rate Tues- 
•• L'y by one-half of one percentage 
, to 9.5 percent, ratting the 
. . nchmark rate at its lowest level 

" almost seven years. 

. ' The action, initialed by Morgan 
laranty Trust Co. of New York, 
s followed almost immediately 
Citibank, Bankers Trust and 

' ’* dollar fell as {Rime LLS. 
riding rates were art. Page 9. 

‘ tase Manhattan. By midafter- 
; on. the lower rate had been 
opted industrywide. 
j'7 The last time major banks cot 
7 rir prime rate was May IS, when 

- #as lowered to 10 percent from 
‘ '- -5 percent. The rate has not been 

Vow 10 percent since it was raised 
>‘.m 9.75 on Oct. 13, 197ft • 

,^>rhe prime rate, which is a bench- 
-irk against which banks measure 
' Hr interest charges on business 
-v jis and some personal loans, was 
■ i as low as 95 percent for two 
eks in September 1978. 

- The prime lending rale, which 
— „d to be the rate banks charged 

ir most creditworthy customers, 
.. become something of a “refer- 
rare” lo which the rate 
irged on many business and 
ne consumer loans is tied. 

- : Vhile most crasumer loan rates 

. not directly tied to the prime 
.1 therefore not necessarily af- 
ted by Tuesday’s drop, the gen- 
I decline in interest rates has 
sed some banks to begin to re- 
. « their consumer loan rates, too. 

' Tie prime rate also is important ■ 
Turd World borrowers, many of 
ira pay interest charges pegged 
— ^he prune rate — usually a per- 
'.iv .iage point or more above h. 
-r-^he cut had been expected by 


most analystsbecause of the gener- 
al decline . in short-term money 
market interest rales in recent 
weeks, a drop that has reduced 
banks’ cost of obtaining funds. 

Analysts sad that the overall de- 
cline in interest tales is a result of 
slower growth and actions by the 
Federal Reserve to provide suffi- 
cient money to the nation’s finan- 
cial system to try to bolster the 
economy. 

Market rates for financing are 
now low enough, compared to a 
prime rate of 9J> percent, that if the 
Federal Resere should cut its dis- 
count rate, the interest rate it 
rfmrge s On (name tO finanrtal insti- 
tutions, from 15 percent to 7 per- 
cent, another 'redaction in the 
prime rate could follow. 

Sentiment among money market 
participants appeared to be divided 
Tuesday, acconiing to one analyst 
at a .uugor dealer in government 
securities, between those who 
thought rates would continue to 
decline and others who thonght 
they could rebound somewhat. 

As the Federal Reserve tightened 
its monetary polky'm the fastball 
of 1984, in the face of very rapid 
economic growth, the prime rale 
moved from 1 1 percent to 13 
percent. After the growth slowed 
ab rupt ly in the third quarter, the 
rate dropped steadily to reach a 
level of lOJ percent at the end of 
January. 

The last prime rate cut to 10 
percent came on the heels of a re- 
duction in the Federal Reserve's 
discount rale on May 17. 

The Federal Reserve stepped in 
Tuesday to reduce the availability 
of bank reserves when the federal 
funds rate — 1 the rale financial in- 
stitutions charge one another when 
they lend reserves — fell below 7 
percent Normally it seeks to keep 
the federal rale at least slightly 
higher than the discount rate. - 





7 - 










' . ■■ ' * 




j Chinese Shift Continues 

■ EV 1 . 

rend to Young Leaders 






r-im* •’ * '■ ■•••**■ 1 1 ■ 


c-.V - 1 


■**•;*■ • ; * ' 


•_ 'Ll By Jim Mann 

„ ,. 7 Lm Angela Tuna Service 

u ‘•"’EUTNG — fiwnfl announced a 
ce-up of cabinet ministers on 
• • sday in the latest step of a far- 
ming effort to put younger offi- 
> in charge of the central gov- 
ment, the provincial 
- eraments and the army, 
he standing committee of the 
ional People's Congress, Chi- 
. legislature, disclosed that it 
approved Prime Minister Zhao 
mg's appointment of eight new 
- eminent ministers, whose aver- 
age is below 55. Six of the eight 
.isters they replaced are over 65, 
, i; £*,ch has now been set as the gen- 
retirement age. 

*■' : “ he official press agency, Xin- 
. said the government was try- 
v • “to make cadres more revdu- 
ary, younger in average age, 
__^er educated and more prrrfes- 
- . tally competenL" 

7 - - he agency also said that Vice 
ne Minister Ii Paig, who is 56, 
r 1 1 .*ild head the newly formed State 
’ ^ omission of Education, whidi 
* “■" aced the Education Ministry in 
lift announced last month. 

.he new ministerial appoinl- 
its announced Tuesday reflect- 
*nme Mi&ister Zhao’s prediJec- 
for engineers and technocrats. 
J Tieying, the new minister of 
•! 4 * Electronics Industry, was for- 
ty the chief engineer of a re- 
uh institute. The new minis ters 
ailroads, tire pardeam indus- 


try and the aeronautics industry are 
also engineers. 

China Iras more than 40 cabinet- 
level ministries and commissions. 
None of the most important minis- 
tries, such as the Ministry of For- 
eign Affairs, the Defense Ministry 
and the Ministries of Justice and 
Public Security, were involved in 
the shake-up, and some of their 
leaders have so far been exempted 
from the retirement rules. Both De- 
fense Minister Zhang Aiping and 
Foreign Minister Wu Xueqian are 
over 75. 

Nevertheless, when combined 
with recent changes at the provin- 
cial level and in the army, die ap- 
pointments represent the most con- 
centrated attempt so far by the 
government headed by Deng )Gao- 
ping to groom younger leaders wbo 
can run China for the next two 
decades. 

Over the past few weds, the 
press has been filled with the an- 
nouncements of new C ommunis t 
Party secretaries or governors for 
many of China’s 29 provinces. On 
Sunday, for example, die province 
of Jiangxi disclosed that Wan 
Shaopen, 54, had been selected to 
be the first woman to hold the pow- 
erful post of secretary of a provin- 
cial party committee. 

Last week, Chinese authorities 
announced that a number of 
“younger and more competent" of- 
ficers had been appointed to head 
the army’s regional military com- 
mands. 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

New York Tones Service 

WASHINGTON — Reagan ad- 
ministration officials have said 
they hope to prevent the hijacking 
of a TWA plane from turning into 
“another Iran,” a hostage crisis 
that proved embarrassing for the 
United States. 

There are similarities 10 the Iran 
crisis of 1979-1981. But a White 
House official noted Monday that 
there were also differences. 

The main one, he said, is that the 
Iranian demand s, including the re- 
turn of Shah Mohammed Reza 
Pahlavi from exile, were impossible 
to fulfill, while the Shiite demands 
— the freeing of more than 700 
Shiites held in Israel — are not so 
difficult to meet Israel had pledged 
before the hijacking to eventually 
free the detainees. 

What is troubling U.S. officials is 
the recognition that, as happened 
in the I ranian hostage case, the 
longer the crisis persists, the less 
important (he issues become ihat 
brought it about. Even after die 
■diah died, the Iranian crisis contin- 
ued for five months. 

“Any time you can h u m il iate the 


United States, there wQ] be those 
interested in perpetuating this phe- 
nomenon," a State Department of- 
ficial said. ‘The problem is to bring 
rationality to bear in an inherently 
irrational situation." 

He was alluding to the difficulty 
of persuading Nabih Bern, the 
Lebanese Shiite leader, that it made 
no sense to hold on to (he hostages 
since their captivity only postpones 
the release of the Shiites in Israeli 
custody. 

An additional factor that con- 
cerns officials is the perception that 
the Reagan administration has 
been long on talk about dealing 
with terrorists, but short on action. 

On Jan. 27, 1981, after being in 
office one week. President Ronald 
Reagan greeted the returned Irani- 
an hostages, and said: 

“Let terrorists be aware that 
when the rules of international be- 
havior are violated, our policy win 
be one of swift and effective retri- 
bution. We hear it said that we live 
in- an era of limits 10 our powers. 
WeU, let it also be understood, 
there are limits to our patience." 

Nevertheless, there has been no 
retaliation for any of the attacks 


against the United States in Leba- 
non. * 

As long as the Americans are 
held hostage, the likelihood of any 
military action is slim, officials 
said, especially since the hostages 
have most likely been moved to 
inaccessi ble places. 

As in the Iranian crisis, the prob- 
lem has been to find someone with 
whom to negotiate. 

In Iran, the United States went 
first to moderate government lead- 
era. Prime Minister Mehdi Barza- 
gan and Foreign Minister Ibrahim 
Yazdi, confident that they would 
order the radical young people 
holding the embassy to end their 
siege. Within days, Mr. Barzagan 
and Mr. Yazdi were forced to re- 
sign. in part because they were per- 
ceived as too pro- American. 

In the current situation, the 
United States cannot go to Presi- 
dent Amin Gernayd of Lebanon 
because he is a Christian and has 
no influence. When the hijacked 
plane was in Algiers, the United 
h uiies hoped that the Algerian gov- 
ernment would use its ability to 
free the hostages, but had to settle 
for the release of half the passen- 
gers. 


Israel Offers 
Red Cross Talks; 
3 More Hostages 
Are Released 


R«M>frUrMid ft*» bncnsMonol 

Freed American hostages arrived at Boston's Logan Air- captives, Sharon Barnes, in bat, and Dorothy Tressier 
port to an emotional reception. At left, two of the released embrace wh3e Agnes Leber, right, is hogged by a child. 

Lurking Behind the Hijack: Another Iran ’ 


This led Robert C. McFariane. 
Mr. Reagan's national security ad- 
viser. to telephone Mr. Bern, who 
also is minister of justice in the 
Lebanese government. Mr. Bern 
has long been regarded as being 
pragmatic enough to negotiate 
with. He has agreed to try to work 
out an accord, but he said Monday 
that he was committed 10 the hi- 
jackers not to free the hostages un- 
til Israel agreed to release the Shi- 
ites it has m detention. 

Mr. McFariane, according to of- 
ficials. made the point that Israel 
had said earlier that it would free 
the Shiites, but tnat neither Israel 
□or the United States could appear 
to give in to terrorist demands. Mr. 
McFariane. therefore, is said to 
have asked Mr. Beni to arrange to 
have the Americans released now, 
and to trust the United Stales and 
Israel to free the Shiites in a short 
period of time. 

State Department experts are 
not sure whether Mr. Bern has any 
desire to do more than be hailed as 
the liberator of the Shiites in Israel. 
He is not viewed as willing on his 
own to order the freeing of the 
Americans in the expectation that 
Israel will release the Shiites. 


Compiled by Ovr Staff From Dispatcher 

. JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres said Tuesday that 
Israel has weed lo see representa- 
tives of the Internationa] Commit- 
tee of the Red Cross over demands 
by hijackers of a TWA airiiuer lor 
release of Shiite prisoners in return 
for freedom for about 40 Ameri- 
cans held hostage. 

In Beirut, the hijackers freed two 
Americans and a Greek pop singer. 
Demis Roussos. Mr. Roussos, his 
American secretary, Pamela Smith, 
and a Greek- American hostage, 
Arthur Targomsitis, were present- 
ed to journalists by the Lebanese 
Shiite Moslem leader. Nabih Bern, 
who has taken responsibility for 
negotiations over the release. 

In Washington. Larry Speakes, 
the White House spokesman, said 
that the United States welcomed 
the release but added: “We believe 
that the piecemeal exploitation of 
the captivity of innocent people 
heightens the anguish of those who 
are victims and the anxiety of their 
loved ones. This is uncivilized be- 
havior is its worst form.” 

President Ronald Reagan was 
scheduled to hold a news confer- 
ence Tuesday evening, which was 
expected to be dominated by ques- 
tions about the hijacking. 

The hijackers are demanding the 
release 01 about 700 Shiites held by 
Israel in exchange for the lives of 
the TWA hostages. 

Mr. Peres’ remarks did not ap- 
pear to signal a shift in the Israeli 
stance in the hijacking Israel has 
said it would consider a ILS. re- 
quest for release of die approxi- 
mately 700 Shiite prisoners taken 
to Israel from Lebanon last April 

The prime minister’s office later 
issued a statement saying that 
while Israel would meet with Red 
Cross representatives “out of cour- 
tesy," it “has no intention whatso- 
ever to negotiate over that matter." 

Senior Israeli officials in Jerusa- 
lem have sought to distance them- 
selves from the incident by empha- 
sizing that the decision on whether 
to bow to the hijackers' demands 


rests solely with the Reagan admin- 
istration. 

Israeli officials, who are under 
considerable domestic criticism be- 
cause of a controversial prisoner 
exchange lasr month, do not want 
to be seen as negotiating with the 
Red Cross over a matter that they 
have portrayed as an American 
problem. 

In Beirut, Mr. Beni said at a 

Nabih Berri emerges as the pow- 
er in Lebanon. Page 2. 

U.S. cautions Americans on 
traveling to Athens. Page 2. 


press conference called 10 publicize 
the release of the three hostages 


1,000 GIs Who Fled War to Sweden 
Dwindle to an Assimilated Handful 


. By Bamaby J. Feder 

New York Tima Service 

STOCKHOLM — One day a 
few years ago, as David Smith was 
driving the No. 52 bus here, a 
Swedish passenger and a Yugoslav 
immigrant got mto an argument. 
The driver stopped the bus and 
tried to break it up. . 

The Yugoslav started shouting at 
him. “You Swedes all stick togeth- 
er!" he screamed. Mr. Smith, an- 
noyed at the insult to his fairness, 
threw him off the bus. 

He recalled the incident with an 
ironic smile. With dark, only hair, 
brown eyes and a gold earring in 
his right ear, he could hardly look 
less Swedish. 

Mr. Smith. 39, now a bus dis- 
patcher. deserted his unit at Fort 
Ord, California, to avoid being sent 
to fight in Vietnam. Like many of 
the hundreds of Americans who 
made their way to Sweden during 
the Vietnam War as deserters or 
draft resisters, be remembers well 


the days when he fdl what a fdlow 
American called “the intense desire 
to be a super Swede.” 

Those days are gone. Nearly 
1,000 Americans came here during 
the Vietnam years. The 50 to 75 
believed to remain are aD but in- 
visible members of Swedish soci- 
ety. Few of them see other Ameri- 
cans regularly. 

Some have become Swedish citi- 
zens. Bruce Mayor, who came here 
from the San Francisco area in 
1968, just before draft age, has 
served in the Swedish Army and 
has run for parliament. 

Those who fled to Sweden were a 
small part of the 27 millio n draft- 
age Americans who faced tough 
decisions during the Vietnam War. 
Almost nin e mnlirm did their nriti - 
taiy service and of those 3.4 million 
spent time in Southeast Asia. Tens 
of thousands fled to Canada.. 

Unlike the Americans who went 
to Canada, more than two-thirds of 
those in Sweden were deserters, not 
evaders. 


Steven Ktnneman. wbo grew up 
in a what he describes as “a typical 
working-class famil y in Indianapo- 
lis," decried from the army in 
Thailand in 1967 and wandered in 
Laos for five years. 

He and his companion, Bitte, 
have three children and have saved 
enough money from their jobs at a 
day-care center to make that most 
Swedish of all investments — a 
summer cabin in the Baltic archi- 
pelago. 

“Let’s face it," said Herbert 
Washington, a blade who deserted 
in West Germany. “Ijxcept for 
Vietnam, I would never have seen 
Sweden in my life, not even as a 
tourist” 

Today, he said, probably fewer 
than five of the 75 blacks who went 
to Mahno remain there. 

To endure in Sweden, Americans 
like Mr. Khmeman had to learn & 
new language, adapt to a different 
culture and eventually establish 
themselves as independent adults. 



The New Tort Tn 


Herbert Washington and Ins wife, Birthe, in Malmo. 


in nearly every case without having 
previouriy lived on their own. 

In many cases they were isolated 
from relatives and friends who 
could not afford to travel to Swe- 
den. Although some had wives or 


companions who joined them hoe, 
interviews and published studies 
indicate that none of the relation- 
ships survived the move. 

Although the exiles, as they ini- 
(Cootinuedou Page 2, CoL 7) 


that “the matter now is on the 
American side of the table." 

Saying that the remaining Amer- 
ican hostages were in good shape, 
Mr. Bern added: “They are here in 
the capital They are' not in the 
plane. 1 cannot tell you every thing 
now, but they are not all in one 
place.” 

The Wall Street Journal said 
Tuesday that Mr. Beni had warned 
U.S. officials before the hijacking 
that continued Israeli detention of 
the 700 Shiite prisoners could have 
dangerous consequences. 

The newspaper quoted one Leb- 
anese source as saying that Mr. 
Beni telephoned Reginald Barthol- 
omew, the U.S. ambassador to 
Lebanon, last week and urged him 
to help obtain release of the Shiites. 

Mr. Peres discussed a possible 
Red Cross role in ending the hi- 
jacking ordeal while answering 
questions from high school stu- 
dents in Kfar Haroeh. 

"As of now," he said, “the .Amer- 
icans have approached us and told 
us it is possible the Red Cross will 
approach us. If the Red Cross ap- 
proaches us, we will receive them 
and hear what they have tosay^ No 
request has been made by the 
American government for Israel to 
do anything or declare anything." 

(HT, Reuters, UPI) 


U.S. Will Allow 
Twin-Engine Jets 
To Cross Atlantic 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Aviation Administration, citing 
“much higher reliability” of mod- 
em jet engines, has said that it will 
approve flights across the Atlantic 
Ocean by two-engine airliners on a 
case-by-case basis. 

The FAA said any airline want- 
ing to fly two-engine craft across 
the Atlantic must prove that its 
planes and crews meet new criteria. 
These criteria seek to ensure that 
such flights are at least as safe as 
those of planes having three or four 
jet engines. 

Airlines meeting the criteria may 
fly routes that may be up to two 
hours’ flying time' on one engine 
from the nearest airport able to 
accommodate the aircraft- Howev- 
er, at least half of each route must 
be only 90 minutes away. 

The’ FAA rales previously said 
that two-engine airliners could not 
fly a route that at any point was 
more than one hour's flying time on 
one engine from a suitable airport. 




•7.: . « 


iri Lanka Says Rebels 
.Agree to a Truce, Talks 




By Rone Tempest 

j Los Angela Tuna service 

Sri Lanka — Un- 
. . pressure from neighboring In- 
die five largest Tamil separatist 
rrilla groups and the govern- 
, ^Vu have agreed to a “cessation of 
’ . ence" as a prelude to political 

^ alia lions, Sri Lanka's national 
,-i' jrity minister said Tuesday. . 

^ f the truce bolds 19, it win be a 
uficant achievement for Prime 
lister Rajiv Gandhi of India, 
) has been trying for several 
... iths to resolve the violent con- 
: on the island. 

■. V : he announcement of the cease- 
. a . said to include the two most 
ve guerrilla groups, the Libera- 
1 Tigers of Tamil Edam and the 
oil Eelam liberation Ora&niza- 
i. was matte by National Securi- 
Ainister Lalilh AthulathmndaU, 

. 1 has directed government ef- 
s against the separatists, 
lelam is the name of the inde- 
dent nation the Tamils in 
them Sri Lanka are d emanding 
The government has been reff- 
1 informed,” said a spokesman, 
it major terrorists groups would 
. -rve a cease-fire beginning n> 
'. and the government has 


agreed to cautiously go along with 
iL” 

[A guerrilla spokesman denied 
that the trace had gone into effect. 
The Associated mss reported 
from Madras, India. “It is a mis- 
chievous report from Colombo 
aimed at confusing people in our 
land.” said a representative of the 
Tamil Friam Liberatio n Organiza- 
tion.] 

No major fighting has been re- 
ported since Saturday, when a gov- 
ernment raid on a Liberation Tiger 
stronghold near Mannar resulted 
in 18 deaths, officials said. 

The worst episodes of mass kill- 
ings in the two yearn of steady vio- 
lence has occurred in the past two 
months as Tamil insurgents and 
undisciplined government forces 
engaged in atrocities, according to 
independent press accounts and a 
report from Amnesty Internation- 
al. the human rights organization. 

The Indian government's at- 
tempt to resolve the conflict accel- 
erated in February with a meeting . 
between Mr. Gandhi and Mr. 
Atbulatiunudali in New Delhi, on 
Feb. 9. The meeting was encour- 
aged by Vies Pftsdral George 
Bush of the United States. 



Human Rights Struggle in East Bloc 
Still Vigorous Despite Intimidation 


J Th* AooocMd 

Sri Lankan troops examine a weapon captured from rebels. 


By Bradley Graham 

Washington Port Service 

PRAGUE — Every Wednesday afternoon in a 
cramped two-room apartment, several hundred sup-, 
porters of the banned Jazz Section drop by to pick up 
the latest clandestine news bulletin and demonstrate 
their support for rate of Eastern Europe’s most defiant 
underground groups. 

On sate under posters of John Lennon. Frank 

IN THE SOVIET SHADOW 

Autonomy vb. Dependency 

Lout of three articles. 

Zappa and other Western rock and jazz stars is an 
eclectic assortment of publications featuring informa- 
tion about modern music, lithographs by abstract 
artists, an anthology about experimental theater in 
New York, uncensored prose and poetry and cassette 
recordings of illegal bands. 

The Czechoslovak regime has tried nearly every- 
thing to run the Jazz Section out of business, short of 
locking op the organizers, ft outlawed the group. It 
dissolved the mustdans’ union that was the sponsor. It 
intimidated printing houses that were publishing Jazz 
Section materials. 

it launched a virulent propaganda campaign against 
rock music. It eliminated die job the group's leader, 
Karel Srp, held at a state-run printing company. It 


Croze the dub’s funds and demanded back taxes and 
penalties for alleged financial irregularities. 

Still the group manages to survive. How? 

“This is very important for us,” explained Mr. Sip, 
earnestly waving a booklet containing the provisions 
of the Helsinki declaration on h uman rights. 

The document, signed in 1975 by the Soviet Union, 
the United Stales and East and West European stales 
at the Conference on Security and Cooperation in 
Europe, became a kind of bitile for dissident move- 
ments throughout the Soviet bloc, establishing a stan- 


dard by which Communist repression could be judged. 

In self-defense the Jazz Section joined the Interna- 
tional Jazz Federation, a branch of the United Nations 
Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, fig- 
uring that the Prague regime would be more reluctant 
to suppress the group if it had an international affili- 
ation. So far the ploy seems to have worked. The Jazz 
Section has beat crippled badly but not totally 
quashed. 

Today, the human rights struggle in Eastern Europe 
goes on. After the military crushing in 1981 of Po- 
land's Solidarity trade union movement, expectations 
for change were narrowed, and lime spans for reform 
extended Bui to varying degrees, the spirit of resis- 
tance lives on in all six East European stales. 

As economic growth in the region slows, disaffec- 
lion wiih the Communist system deepens, tn Poland 
particularly, the failure of the regime of General 
Wqjriech Jarazelski lo mount a substantial economic 
recovery since the banning of Solidarity has given rise 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 4) 


INSIDE 

■ West European defense min- 

isters have failed to agree on 
plans for a jointly produced jet 
tighter. Page 2. 

■ A US. commission has re- 

jected basing pay on compara- 
ble worth. Page 3. 


■ A Japanese broker suspected' 

of involvement in a gold fraud 
was hacked to death in front of 
TV cameras. Page 3. 

■ Colombia's year-old peace ; 
plan has broken down, rage 3. ! 

■ Mehmet Afi Agca has denied 

that he invented a “Bulgarian 
connection.” Page 4. 

■ African sodafism. the off- 

spring of independence in the 
1960s, has been rejected in the 
squalor and turbulence of the 
1980s. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The United States and the 
Soviet Union signed a new agri- 
cultural agreement s imilar l0 


one canceled in 1980. Page 9. 

■ Four big New York hawit^ 
agreed to pay civil penalties for ! 
failing to report thousands of ■ 
international currency transac- 
tions. Pom. a , 


■' : W* 



■ ■ t x., ; ..... -i*W» •. 


ka.V-*. - 


Page 2 


USTERISATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19. 1985 


degree 51 ™ Afghan Rebels Said 

22£!S222 To Destroy 20 Jets 

\ detailed nsuma » 


W DEGREE 

aft£ ^0K a MASERS • DOCTORATE 
** WWfc Academic Uh bpon*-*. 

Send detailed resume 
»r free evaluation. 

PACIFIC WESTON UNWBSITY 


600 N. Sepulveda BtvcU 
Los Anaeles, California 
9WM9,D*Pt.SaU.SA. 


WORLDWIDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 


Compiled by Our Suff From Despatches the talks in Washington with 0kg 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -Sab- Sokolov, minister counselor at the 
oteurs have destroyed about 20 jet Soviet Embassy, 
fighters at Shindand, the largest The State Department is charac- 
and best protected Soviet air tee terizmg the talks as an exchange of 
in Afghanistan, Western dipl omats views aimed at prevailing mtsun- 
said Tuesday. derstandings on regional issues, 


They said the planes, mostly rather than as negotiating sessions. 


MiGs belonging to the Afj 


I2.QV. g?or5fV U1.7Z3.22. 3Z 

PtfRlS -FRfiNCE 


Is other reports on the progress 


Force, were destroyed on June 12. of the fighting in i Afghanistan, dip- 
Some aircraft had recently been tomatsmlstobadalsoestmated 



shifted to Shindand from Herat that more to80Q Sovietso^ 
and Kandahar after air bases there w era wountral in Moscow s off en- 


carae under increasingly heavy 
rocket fire from rebels, the diplo- 


sive earlier this month in theKunar 


du,ld- Valley bordering Pakistan. 

^ The wounded were airlifted to 


mats added toe wounaea were ainurea to 

Guerrillas sav Shindaud, nor hospitals in Kabid land I in rthe .Sonet 
UwlSbtSr.^eB guard- ones ufTaJkmt and Mhanbfj 
!.h»L Xr they said They had no estimate of 

S d .^iS±Sf. ofh,1U " s Strict deato hr the successful 



Security 

At Athens 
Airport Is 
Criticized 


WORLD BRIEFS 

: — • r ~" “ 

Walesa Summoned for Questioning: 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration, citing the “poten- 
tial danger of terrorist acts,” 


WARSAW (Reuters) — The leader of the banned Solidarity 'trade 
union. Lech Walesa, said Tuesday that be had been summoned fa 
questioning on the same charges under which three other activistsof the 
trade union were jailed last week, - v-. 

The summons, delivered by messenger to his home in the Baltic pon ^ 
Gdansk, ordered Mr. Walesa to appear at die office of the provincial 
prosecutor on Wednesday. Wladyslaw Frasynuik, Adam Mtchnik aod 
Bogdan Iis, ftP Solidarity militants, recrivgd prison terms for taking pan 
in the leadership of an illegal trade union and fomenting disorder. 

The news of Mr. Walesa's summons came shortly drier the Jtoif 


waned Americans on Tuesday of CaiboHc primate of Mud. Ordinal Jozef 

the dangers of traveling to the Atb- wih General Wbpedt Jtandda. the Polish leader, far the first tnae 

ens airport, where hijackers since January 1984,The meeting was the first since the murder of the 

boarded Trans Worid Airlines Rcvercnd *ny Popieluako by security police last October. 

flight 847 on Friday. 

Alleged Mengele Photos Are Printed 

con was “aimed only at improving MUNICH (AP) — A West German m^azzne published Tuesdaywhat 


hospitals in Kabul and in the Soviet 
dries of Tashkent and Dushanbe, 


1 it accurately with rockets. 


drive to relieve a 


The diplomats, who asked not to ghmi Army garrison at 


The AuotinteJ IVe5S 

Demis Roussos, a Greek singer, and Ms American secre- 
tary, Pamela Smith, leaving the boose of NaWh Beni, 
which is protected by sandbags, after hijackers freed them. 


It” about his victims « 


be named, said the Shindand at- The envoys reported at least 


tack, which resulted in the angle two rebel setbacks near Kabul as 
largest loss of aircraft since Soviet soviet forces ambushed guerrillas 


Mr HORSE 


troops entered Afghanistan in 
1979, appeared to have been the 
work of saboteurs among Afghans 
at the base. 

The disclosure of the attack 


pa buiwcu ruguauuuui ui preparing to attack the capital. 

appeared to have been the fonjes ^ mn Jtg] e r0c k- 

: of saboteurs among Afghans ^ launchers, artillery and attack 


In Crisis, Beni Emerging 
As the Power in Lebanon 


Athens. “We arc alerting them that 
there is an above-average potential 


for terrorist activity there.* he said. War n. 


Dr. Mengde is held responsible fra: the deaths of more than'400,000 
inmates at the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland during World 


The Munich-based 
41, had provided hunt 


iters to scatter rebels Dying 
tnue the city's security cor- 


far and away 


the best node revue 
in the worid 


aune as UJL and Soviet officials dons from the north and possibly 
prepared to meet Tuesday to talk attack the airport on June 12, they 


about the continuing Soviet occu- said. 


By Elaine Sa’olino 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK —His sodden pro- 
pulsion into the vortex of the latest 


Sorbonne in. Paris. prove conditions at the Athens air- 

ffiSSKSSA- Nicaragua Confiscates land of Critic 

MANAGUA (NYT) — The government has confiscated properties 
“We have no choice but to warn belonging to one of its most outspoken critics, Enrique Bolaflos Gejw, 
*£"? BC, S ■. our citizens of the potential danger m^dmt of Nicaragua's prmdralbuaijess federation. The government 

ilSnOn 1 IS rf tmoiist 3015 there,” he add«L L'd the land vrasneeded toSibnte to peasants. But Mr.. Batatas 
“U.S- anzens and aircraft can characterized the confiscation on Monday as a reprisal for his political 


„.sayi th* preii 


pa tion of Afghanistan. Soviet The diplomats said the incidents hijacking drama has confirmed open a law 


forces intervened in Afgha n istan in showed that Moscow’s more active what Beirut watchers have known mass Shiite movement 


i with a inadequate." 


at the bar only ZAOfrs 
+ 15% service charge 


1979. The United States supports defeny-of Kfthgl. initiated after the 


the Afghan resistance. 


capital came under repealed rocket 


HUimmoton— — i 

traditional cnsiNE ■ SEAFOOD 

OYSTER SPECIALIST 
7<». j»«. awh^fewCaaOc 
•*2200 iVEULLY . PORTE MAILLOT 
TeLi ”47 43 64 Wflu 130 ¥ 


Richard W. Murphy, assistant attacks last autumn, appeared to be 
secretary of slate for Near Eastern at least partly successful 


and South Asian affairs, will bold 


s — that Nabih Beni, a 
ten, 46-year-old lawyer, is 
the mast powerful man in 


“We have no choice but to warn 


Movement of the Dispossessed our citizens of the potentir 
shortly after it was founded in of terrorist acts there,” he 
1974. Die movement, led by Imam “U.S. dozens and airc 


(Reuters, AP) 


Moussasa Sadr, the Lebanese Shi- use the airport at Athens at their activities, 

ne smnrual leader, was ihe rnw j;, _• <t w. ir.n. u «*» 


Rncsito fur pnvule plrtto, 
tui parking Cloned SaL S Son. i 


Inquiry on Soccer Riot 
Hears Reports of Errors 


His faujerdrip over the main- jw spiritual leader, was the first discretion, ,r Mr. Kalb said. “How- The confiscation came after several & 
stream of the Skite Moslem mwe- that eroresly addressed the grwv- ever, the Umted States is acting to province of Masaya, where Mr. Bolaflos 
mem gives him pdiural power that ancraof ^what is now the oountnfs advise them of the previous terror- owners of a 3,000-acre (1212-hectare) < 
outstrips lhatof the Christian pres- largest religions grouping, the Sin- & problem and the potential for Mr. Bolanos, who heads the Superior 

ident. Anon GemayeL His position *1^, additional incidents in the future," charged that the marchers were orsanizi 

as bead of the Amal zmlitia gives 


lies. 

The next year Amal, which 


The confiscation came after several demonstrations by peasants in^b- 
province of Masaya, where Mr. Bolaflos and two of his brothers arej+Hs 
owners of a 3,000-acre (1212-hectare) cotton plantation called Sanaa. 
Mr. Bolanos. who heads the Superira Council of Private Enterprise. 


t °i, Ct n2 l! /riiTwA agrarian F rrfram, said that the 'decision had been madTbecaose the 

MJSSSSfif MSS 


Mr. Bolanos, who heads the Superira Council of Private Enterprise, 
charged that the marchers were organized by Sandinist agents. 

In a speech Friday in Masaya, Jaime Wbedock RomAn, minister of 


ZURICH'S BEST 


The Associated Press 


They said that many of their re- 



BRUSSELS —A Belgian par lia- quests mule before the match had 
tnemary investigation into violence been refused, that (he police had 


fighters of Walid Jumblat meat Mr. Ban 

Mr. Bern, who retains a resident P°k£baro. 
permit entitling him to work in the . tWD 3 


permit entitling mm to wore in toe ^ ^ i rears after the mys- rmnwic Haralambonoulos called in 

United States and whose first wife tonous disap^ranceof thc imam 
and six children five in Dearborn. °n a viat to Iibya, Mr. Bern took siLmf t^Sdaf to 
Michigan, long plotted a steady, ^r as hcad of Amai despite oppo- orotest ovw^the State De- 
modenue coime. It was not until ««*» from sotc of the elders of me btate ^ 

Tempi invndwi I /»hnnnn m <h^ aim- the Lebanese Shnte movemenL parraent acoon. 


at the Eure 
on May 29 


Cop soccer final failed to seize fans' "weapons" and 
reports Tuesday that when they realized something 


Boeing 727 on a flight Jrom Athens Bolaflos family had refused to negotiate with the government aver land 
to Rome. tenure arrangements. Mr. Bolaflos said Monday be had nova been 

In Athens, Foreign Minister invited to such negotiations. i 


Michigan, long plotted a steady, 
moderate course. It was not until 


U.S. Puts Arab Satellite in Orbit 


CAPE CANAVERAL. Florida (UH) -Astronauts aboardthe 
TTte Ui nktemHit ms de- Discxmjy launched a dvffian commmiaLtions sattffilton 


of a series of mistakes that contrib- was going wrong two hours before Israel invaded Lebanon in the sum- “C Lebanese Shnte movemenL tTk- 1 I S trmmf was de- buttle Discovery launched a civilian communications saleflhe on Incs- 
luted to the tragedy that left 38 the match, they could not find po- mer ofl982 that he came into to L Fcr ^ Mr. Branrepresented day for an Arab League communiattion network. i • 

persons dead and more than 450 lice officers. own as a political force. *** newJ y emergent first generation fJiTrP 1 ™ Prmce Sultan Salman al-Saud of Saudi Arabia watched the satellite sail 

injured at Heysel stadium here. -t 9ccen t oinhal noKti«,l His monb cam* in of . Shii*® participant in politics, out of the caigo bay_220 miles (354 kilometers) above the Atlantic and>* 




injured at Heysel stadium here. 

I , “ e c efl t and secre ury-gen- sibiiity," Interior Minister Charles- February of last year when to mili- 
eral of the Belpan Football UniOT FerdinnndvNothomb told the com- tia overpowered Lebanese soldiers 
gave the longest testimony to the mittee. Bui he added that it was not in West Beirut, destroying the cred- 
comnuttee of inquiry. his role to intervene in police orders ibility or the Unbacked Lebanese 

nor to go to the stadium to take government and proving overnight 

charge of the situation. that he also could perform as a 

^ . ' -The notch was wdl prepared •"“f-mindol mlBniiy n 

Ml J/StZ — * and aU measures had been taken Now the cautious lawyer, who 
fOf KyWr considering what we knew." Mr. was a reluctant rebel and an untike- 


“lao 

sibiiity,' 


iitical respoo- His crowning success came in 
isier Charles- February of last year when to mili- 


I committee of inquiry. 


while the religious leadership be- 
lieved only they could symbolize 
religious legitimacy. 

Mr. Bern also has been opposed 
fay radicals among Lebanon's esti- 


ISLJ? 011 001 of ^ 220 miles (354 kflometeis) above the Atlantic and!** - 

agmnst the Gredc government. thanked the crew. Saudi Arabia owns the major share of the sat£^ ; 
The foreign minister told Mr, system, 29 percent, and the balance is held by other Arab LeSfae 

Mpne that “th- Anwrlnn nortv i T. J" 1 _ n.i , h • ... , , _ ° 


WtyQ 


that he also could perform as a 
tough-minded military man. 


i Administration said ns sgree- 
for the Arab Satellite Cramimni- 


maied 1J1 million Shiites, primarily duced by the U.S. statemenL a nrin- cations Organization **dn« not constitute rec og nition im p ly prrfb fa ] 


such figures as Hussein Musavi, 
who founded an Iranian-backed 


istry statement said. 

On Friday, armed Moslem ex- 


endoraement by the United States of either the PLO or Libya." 


XOMOONWH 


Nothomb told the investi gating Jy leader in a country where politics 
committee made up of nine mem- •* traditionally dom in ated by war- 


L 'ENTRECOTE CAFE DE PARIS 

Bib ueofc Hwoahy to v«f wuh m (dikm " Qrf* 6a 
fan low liw Ftandi immueon. 1030 dsu>. 
Ifl fc* Frydnai [Write de b Sounel (|| 23410.? 
Oo»ed on SunklfV 


MONSIEUR THOMPSONS 

l* niri TJ_ 727 9957. 

Gaoraoome Fto^om. A e mt iHie I S i —». A 
enayer ^Bakmert. 79 Ketsngm Perk Ibal 


LONDON WO 


IS DAUPHIN . u 6 Uh SUZUO hmbndKiaee< 
•» Inn Idich & Ckn> Mrtnw fi* & Baqee 
5 nnta V«*Bf UOwv nd CmhCa& 


BHATTTS 

Nerrfy opened fin dost (mfcro iwm imvmg 
North Inrfonpjoron (ataanafah pm & north airy. 
Co-ni Garden. 37 Guo Owen Si Ti 831 08 17. 


committee made up of nine mem- 
bers of the House of Representa- 
tives, the lower house of the Bel- 
gian parliament. 

It must submit a report to the 
government by July 6 on the re- 
sponsibilities for the deaths that 
resulted from a charge by Liver- 


Now the cautious lawyer, who splinter group named tslamir Amal onanists c omman deered the plane „ „ , • nw ^ ^ 

was a reluctant rebel and an unlike- m Baalbeck, and the head of the and began criss-crossing the Medi- SMlteS Battle FLO UeSDltfi a IrUCe ’ 
fy leader in a country where {»bucs Islamic fundamentalist Hezballah, terranean between AIhcts and Ba- prior rr iapi cwiip u™u, ^ E«w p,!^ 

is tradmonaDy dominated by war- or Party of God, Sheflch Moham- rut, demamfing thatbrael release BE»UT (AP)-- < State Moslem forces ^ttied Palestine [Liberation 

lords and hereditary leaders, has med Hussein Fadkllah. more thmTOSbnte Moslem pris- Organmti<m gnerrillas trapped in Bemit refugee camps mthootroipite 

maneuvered himself into the poa- Although Mr. Bern was able to oners as a condition for the release throughout Monday night, «nonng_ a Syrian-sponsored cease-firt ao- 


maneuvered hwnaalf into the posi- 


lamic fundamentalist Hezballah, terranean between Algiers and Ba- 
Party of God, SheQch Moham- rut, demanding that Israel release 
ed Hussein Fadkllah. more than 700 Shiite Moslem pris- 

Although Mr. Bern was able to oners as a condition for the release 


tion of the pivotal figure in the fate strengthen and expand AmaL it of the passengers, 
of the U.S. hostages from the TWA was not until after the Israeli inva- Mr. Kalb, 


JOGOLDBttERG 

T . Bur dn Ktsm. Bff’JOlri or BP,D39 Bruajror* 
iMctfraei oo™ kmdi lor Uone <* goyne fw. 


STR1NGFELLOWS 

Iri'dari'i kmu Supnb Atudi icttuo* 

ml i tel ma A fa ok B pn>l30 oun B mAfaa 
I JO cun^SOam Sw party Dm 1 10B pmaBO ora. 
Lfapar Sl Mom Ion 7«L 3«0 553*. 


sionof 1982 that it became a fonni- 

SSSic b ro^^H^*hTih!l ^ 6 rafldson 01 ^ shdkhs Md dable force. 

« r r SLf^?i “n “ a moderately successful Mr. Beni expected to help bro- 

trader, Mr. Bern was bora in Free- ker a new settlement for his feHow 
IWhan fans of town. Sierra Leone, in 1936. He Shiites. He had hoped that the Is- 
juvenms or i unn. returned to his parents’ hometown radis might leave southern. Leba- 

The sudden attack led to panic, a of Tibnin in southern Lebanon as a non cleansed of Palestinian rmfitia- 
stampede and the death of 38 soc- child and attended the Lebanese men and that the Gemayd family 


asked to itemize what 


to reports 


.Pobcesaid 11 persons had been killed and 25 


, at . Shiite militia men and members of the Lebanese Army hit the Brace 

Bar^m camp with tank-gun fire and mortars. Pakstimans in the hflk east 
he was referring to, said that on . ^ 


danian airliner andescaped. He de- h “ v X w ^°“ “f vStaumn from the icranps, llm return .of refugees 


cer enthusiasts, most of them Ital- University of Beirut, where he was would bring the Shiites into the why, if an American team found 


daman airiiner and escaped. He de- “A. ‘ au P 
dined to identify oS^nddents. ?*“ traflsfer ^ sccont > *“» 10 a Lebanesc ^ ^ «* 

He also dedmed comment on ^ 


ian, who were trapped in a comer president of the Student Assotia- govemmenL 


of the stadium where a wall col- tion and a member of the Ba'ath Neither event happened and Mr. 


Arab Socialist Party, a secular pan- Beni’s middle course contributed 


[The part of the Brussels stadium JSfJS L?SSS braDcte 


LA PETITE CHAISE 


Drtoovi on^v or lh« dUbT rnkwam n Pa n. 
Mm F7A30 tktf. 36 (AOmh 221113$ 


METHUSHAH’S BRASSERIE 

ondxmehor 39'lfioonaSrroW, Parfanwnf Squve. 
T* 227 OCA "A cater M of wawv a UKton M 
“f «ba«.~ Mcn.-Fn aid Swiday fandv 


where \he 38 dicd laS momh ^ Syria and Iraq. He currently is mmister of jns- 

looked like a potential trouble soot !963 - graduated from the rice, of South Lebanon and of wa- 

Univereit y of Beirut Law School ter and electricity. 


security problems at the airport in 9 TT C C nv 6 ncr w 
February and there was an inddeut A °P; 

in April, the Rap adnrinistra- SAN FRANCISCO (Combi 
tion waited until Tuesday to make and Arthur J. Walker, two su 
the warning, with thousands of pleaded not guilty Tuesday to fi 

TIC tk. — .1 1 J.A • j ■ 


Spy Suspects Plead Not Guilty 

INCISCO (Combined Dispatches) — Jerry A. Whftwortl 


(Combined Dispatches) — Jerry A. Whittrortfa 
two suspected members of a Soviet spy ring 


id members of a Soviet spy ring 
espionage charges. Mr. Whitworth, 


more than an hour before the riot, 
the president of the Belgian Foot- 
ball Union said, Reuters reported. 


U.S. tourists flocking the dty on wbopleaded here, is charged with conanring to pass U.S. Navy secrets to 
vacation-. . ... . the Soviet Union. Arthur J. Walker, who pleaded in Norfolk, Virginia, is 


Over the weekend, the London- charged with espionage. 


IONDONSW3 


LA CALAVADOS 


40 *,r Saito 7M3V 3? Ope** 

J»*« At to po» Jtw Tibitoi T'odtonol Cynm 


BEWICKS RESTAURANT 

B7' B9 UUni Sm, Lonkn. T.L SB« fiTl 1. Open fa 
*w 7 oil W< Atai w fn. Cor Fiwdi 
rnawonf roc by Co# « Mlau. E»>" tenor, md 
Matotegudo Aiuaa roan auatebit. 


PThe official, Louis Wouters, 
said he noticed on entering the 
Heysel stadium that many Juven- 
tus fans were on the Z-sector ter- 
races, which were supposed to be 
reserved for local soccer enthusi- 
asts. 


» 4 

Ministers Fail to Agree 
On European Jet Fighter 


based International. Union of Pas- In an interview broadcast Tuesday, Laura Walker Snyder, the daughter 


[He said that Albert Roosens. LONDON — West European 


GOLDEN CARP 


KERVAN5ARAY 


l.wk-n i nvnl .vgynil crod a.onng unload arfa 
r.-.’r- t>* j, to hejrl ol Mail or ^MCiMd 

•rel cs-*!;mj bta te Wwl Si f«1 MW 33K 


foiW* & W1 *<raal*ai hep Mafaad 

tea MtMtrOr 9. TaL: 52880. *» emtonad. 
80 m Opm. NxroJpm & 6 pm I am map 


secretarv-general of the Belgian defense ministers failed Tuesday to 
Football Union, had agreed with ?° P*ans for a jointly pro- 


! ig)f If i A-lif/ir Lhat it wopld declare a boycott of "First he'd break you down,” she said of her father. “He’d tdl you that 

' ol/ M- VEL I I/l/Cvl Greece if tbe situation continued, yon would never amount to anything in life. Then he would say, Txt me 

° rsJ*I! cc “ ^ the help you make a lot of money.' He tried to make you think everybody was 

disagreements, mainly between V 1 ® 0 *. gove rnm ent has dismissed doing it, that this is the way countries were run." (UPL NYT) 

Britain and France, over the size of tta cntiasm and implied that air- 


le plane. 
With aii 


air forces and defense in- 


Hnes were trying to avoid their r? _ .1 rj 1 

share of tbe responsibility. Govern- J- Of tu.6 JLlGCOrCl 


him then that the presence of such 
a block of Juvenms fans beside tbe 


duced jet fighter. 

Defense Secretary Michael He- 


dustries in the five nations pressing “ent offidais said the internation- 


U man m jureuws iaaa «aiuc me for a decision, the talks had been guffltisman on To 

main body of Liverpool fans in ^tine of Britain said after two called a last chance for agreement Jj®*. ^ Grceccs A Trieste corn- 

sectors X and Y posed a risk of of btiks that the five- nation on the aircraft. tonnsm interests and i\s eccmax&j snmqrimo nlastici 


INTERNATIONAL 
srsiNEss opponniNmEs 


crowd trouble.] 

■ Chinese Rioters Sentenced 
la Beijing, five participants in a 
soccer riot received sentences Tues- 


group had postponed until next 
roonth'a decision on tbe S30-bfllion 
project after failing to agree on a 
design. 

He said (hat they had referred 


MtAfW t\vf srvfV'l 


Container investment 


day ranging from four months to °Ptions for the European 
two an da half years in jail and ^ghicr Aircraft to their national 


AN OPPORTUNITY THAT OHWS A HIGH INCOME PLAN 


fines as high as 570, United Press dcfcnse industries, which would re- 

Intcrnational reponed. P «« J** nexl 

We have narrowed the gaps but 

The defoidants were charged there are still gaps,” he said. 



Mr. Heseltine, who chaired the _ (UrI, AtP 

talks, said: “For the moment there : 

is not the basis on which we can 

10 Damn, £anes Urges 

the options 00 technical details," O 

he said. “We are now able to in- |? „ mmm - - ^ ■ * . .. 
struct industry to prepare a report J; O rfflR |lOTl QI 


A 5 “^ iecled Basra* separatist shot and killed a paramditary aril 
‘ guardsman on Tuesday in the Spanish Basque town of Santurce. (AP) 

>c A Trf este court convicted three Lebanese citizens on Tuesday of 

/ijStabI i snra 8^ in S explosives into Italy in an operation linked to a terrorist 

(un, Arr) g^ip in Lebanon. (/J>) 

- French rdrwd unions called a one-day strike from midnight Tuesday j T . 
over layoffs, wages and working hours. More than half tfie country’s Jjj M/., 
railroads were expected to be disrupted. (Reuters) ' Willi 


with participating in a May 19 riot Begun two years ago, the project, 
foflowing China's 2-1 soccer loss to grouping Britain, France, west 


Hong Kong in a World Cup quali- Germany. Italy and Spain, has 


Tying match. 


been stalled for several months by 


for mid-July. 

He did not say whether the min- 
isters would meet again to discuss 
the report, to be drawn up tty a 
committee representing the avia- 
tion industries of die group mem- 


- r j — . ■ "7 ■n'J uu lfi uui; i uwuoi 

m federal courts in Norfolk, Virgima, and San Francisco. Arthur J. 
Walker has been indicted on seven espionage-related counts, and Jerry A 
Whitworth has been indicted on one count of conspiracy. (UPI) 
Bodies believed to Jbe those of a U.S, Drug Enforcement Admimstra- 


Nfliir fokiviAt agent and his pilot, also an AmericanTwoe found Tu^^r 
it GW l ilDlTiet Guadalajara, police said. The two are thought to have been killed by 
port, to be drawn up by_ a Mexican narcotics traffickers. nmn 


Reuters 

LISBON — President Amdnio 


xr. in j#.. pohucal parties Tuesday to agree 


Con’amonwoitd S»Mco5 LvnkKj. txnoa n Saumamoxm 
'i\moga arta opimis a fiisl ckiii »ortd>«d« cacifarter leaing 
imicf Thov OrtW vou ino oocortiinrty to oam O Higrt foeea 
mcomo wcufflv pw* manv oitor cKJvenrogos 

• A GUARANTEE Of PFTUHN Of CAflTAl UNDHWWNH) BY 
SECUB1T1ES HELD IN RUST • HIGH FIXED INCOME UP TO 1 7% FEB 
ANNUM ON INVESTMENTS OF 1 9320 (monffifa and M mourn* 
*imi owanawoj* OWNEBSMP OF A FUUV INSURED FIXED ASSET 

* TAX BENEFIT5 • MINIMUM INVESTMENT f 2790 

Fc» mere ad o*i d this mnwimofll oopatumiy. fdeonone 
Soutnamoron ,'0703) 33S372 ck ou> London once. QI-jos SSfli 
f?4 t*cu» sconce) or sand of coupon lo 


SLTTSWSnK 

light, cteap airoraft salable for '"SSflK^Balini 


Mexican narcotics traffickers. (UPI) 

Scientists declared the current volcanic activity at Mount Sl Helens in 
Washington state officially over on Tuesday. They said that sweUitr of 
the lava dome in the volcano’s crater had stopped. y 


wr- 


“We have repeatedly made our The Munich-based magazine Bunte said that Dr. Mengde^sai^ildf, 
q (5 concerns known to the Greek gov- 41, had provided hundreds of photographs and letters from his^hes'*- 
. -m- | emment m the. past and a UJS. pAUcaDco in an attempt to clear up the case. Last week, Mr. Mei^atr 

• -aym m /"Y rj/TFl /">!'! airport security team viated Atb- said that his father had died in Brazil in 1979. B razilian authorities have 

Iff Ms JjDC/LCI IMJa §/ ens in February," Mr. Kalb exhumed a body that is believed to be th** of Dr. Men^de. Experts from 

“Although the Grok government Brazil, tbe United States and West Germany are cra m ming the remains 
and the following year attended the has expressed its willingness to im- to determine if they are those of Dr. Mengele. 




- ' 

vgur.i « . 
wih Irdi.’ ■ 

S ' iiLiii.-; . • 

io;r: * . 
tHOtfllA*’ 


.AaiK r- •: 
tandiir> •. • 
jbJ mu' -v. 

xidti jrsjr* -■ 
' tfti ttu'-y.c 

haul) .* : 
mllu.7 a. ; 

Ha to,,*-..*- 
■qifJiia: 
iUr. a:; . 

joenlL iv.!-. ’ 

flflrj&iv 
i » lit 

■wffLV.- - 
.■'ttitf.T" 


fak 


er.ir 


wiinj. 


^Hiln _ - 
tnhp-.T • 


v^'V lu . 


Sweden's Assimilated GIs 


1 


July, “We will have a choice to M P 0 ^ refugee status, they carpenter, 

make withm a range of spedfica- were welcomed far more hen* rhafl Most a 


STS . „ from Page 1) one of the othera, Midiael Lindner, 

is left **?“? uaD®*! themselves, were dc- is still here; he works nearby as s 
' - mod political refusal status. th« carnenter. 


%v, v ‘ • 


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if M onii iv* " make every tttort to find a sola- 

see if we will be successful ^ don. The president has only six United States is no longer 

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Most of the Americans who 


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“The United States is no longer livi “ 3L . ^ Americans also got bad 




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the European Community, set for 
Jan. I. 

He said that be was proposing 
the formation of a government 
based on a consensus between tbe 
parlies in parliameni that would 
allow it to govern effectively. 

“The president js convinced that 
the dissolution of parliament 
would be costly for the country." 
the message, addressed to tbe par- 


ungrams, an epic uc 
journey of 19A-cen 


•tc novel about tbe 
‘-century Swedish 


Stockholm 
id to what 


ea,"K - 


called “an odd type 


peasants to the United Stales. “Jnst P 0 ^” 

tins category of people are instead ™ than 100 blacks xfr: 


great heritage of their country: in 
reality they are faithful to this heri- 


“It all seems like such a 1 


iiamentaxy speaker, Fernando ago," said Richard 


Amaral, said. 

The Social Democratic Party 
withdrew from the government af- 


mventory 'control manager faf j 
small electronic components oom- 


. the militanr as ranch as the risk of 
«■ in w Vietnam — had a particu- 
heri- tough time. The southern port 
of Malmo, where most of the 
j- blacks arrived and settled, turned 
i fln out to be the dty least receptive to 
the deserters. 


Nearly all die Americans who ■kj 


fcV, 

A ? ■ . .. 


ter a dispute over agrarian and la- deserted from Southeast Asia in 
bor reforms. General deaions are November 1967 with three other 


pany m suburban Stockhdra. He ~ d have visiied back, home, 
deserted from Southeast Asia in “ ut “ e Question of retnming pa^ 


w, 


not normally due nnril 1987. 


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Ow» in Sweden, the four be- 
come prominent as activists against 
| U.S. policy and encouraged other 
American soldiers to desert Only 


to get us to move back,” said"*. , ** * 1 

Washington, who married a Dane * \* •' 


and has two children. “But they 
aren’t living any better there than 
we are here." 


r 


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AMERICAN TOPICS 


: V*S 

■ .:v T *>1(5 

ih*5i 

■ ■ 

--3V 


Sea, Sand, Salt Air . 
AndBHsgfiri Silence 

Two New York beaches. Jones 
Beach oh Long Isl and and Or- 
chard Beach in the Brace, have 
special tones where portable ra- 
dios cannot be played. Joseph . 
Ijcsrindd, the Jones Beach su- 1 
perinteudent, marvtis: “All you : 
hear is the wind and the oaan. It 
is fantastic!” . . 

But for satat people. The New 
York Times notes, it just 
wouldn't be snnimer without 
popular music throbbing from a 
transistor radio on a beach blan- 
ket. One such is Michael Asher- 
off, deputy raanagerfor the Long 
Island State Fade .Commission. 
The new zones are fine for those 
who want than, he says, but “I 
land of get used to the cacopho- 
ny of sounds — the -hit songs of 
summer, the Copportone com- 
mercials." 


Short Tabes. 


DVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 

~ U.S. Commission Rejects Pay 
Based on Comparable Worth 

By Robert Pear The Civil Rights Act erf 1964 said that the jobs held mainly by 

New York Times service bans discrimination in compensa- women required at least as much 


Page 3 


CIAO 


By Robot Pear The Civil Rights Act of 1964 

New York Times Service bans discrimination in compensa- 

WASHINGTON — The Equal tion. Mr. Newman said. And the 
■ Employment Opportunity Com- Supreme Court, without explicitly 
mission has rules uoammdusly that addressin| the issue of comparable 
federal law docs not require era- worth, said in 1981 that the 1964 
ployers to give mien and women law could apply even where jobs 
equal pay for different jobs of com- were not identical, 
parable worth. Monday's decision concerned 

The five-member federal com- tite Housing Authority of Rock- 
mission said Monday that if jobs fend. Illinois. Female employees 
were comparable, the fact that they charged that the Housing Author- 
paid different amounts was not in ity paid less to people on tite ad- 
and of itself proof of dUcrimina- minis ira live staff, such as secretar- 
tion. ies, than it did to people on the 

Jobs are said to be of comparable maintenance staff, such as janitors 


tion. Mr. Newman said. And the skill effort and responsibility as 
Supreme Court, without explicitly the jobs held mainly bv men. 
3dd ™ s " ! f Ihf f romparablt - We fonnd m Mence lhlll j* 

; M d "V 981 ,tal J he pay difference was due 10 Mr. 
iL 1 ?*.™ where jobs ^ .. Md Umforc « 

were not identical. could not infer that sex was a factor 

Mondays decision concerned „««-«;»■ 


employees 
ing Author- 


worth if they require comparable and custodians. Women accounted 
levels of knowledge, skill and effort Tor 85 percent of the administrative 
and if their responsibilities and staff, while men accounted for 88 


in wage setting. 

The other members of the com- 
mission are Tony E. Gallegos. Wi- 
liam A. Webb, Fred W. Alvarez 
and R. Gaul! Silberman. All were 
appointed by President Ronald 
Reagan. 

The U.S. Commission on Civil 


working conditions are compara- 
ble, 

Labor unions and women's 


ror 85 percent of the administrative Rights, an advisory body led by 
staff, while men accounted for 88 Reagan appointees, has also reject- 


percent of the maintenance staff, ed the doctrine of comparable 
The women, represented by the worth. But Mr. Thomas said his 
American Federation of State, agency had arrived at its position 


i have embraced comparable County and Municipal Employees, independently, 
as a way to reduce the differ- 




* Arab S; 


.... . 

"MlileinOitl 

- “ - Ui 

; r “^ • 

.... V. v’-*"® 


Mtirl’I.OlWpitraTn 


" ■ .-2 e=ar- I 
? " k y •'a 1 

' •- 

• . '! r . 

• •’ .-'"vc 

1 


(ikes to give people good news, 
has made a habit of personally 
teleph oning those be intends to 
nominate as ambassadors. Until 
he telephones, no would-be en- 
voy knows for sure. There is only 
one when diplomats- in- 

waiting ask each other, “Did you 
get the phone cafl?" 

The makers of high-priced 
Boar’s Head Ham are running 
ads c laiming that their product is 
on display in (he windows of 
some New York delicatessens, 
but cheaper brands are- being 
served. Boar's Head urges con- 
sumers to ask the countoman to 
see the company brand on the 
ham before it is sliced, then 
“make sore the ham he just 
showed yon ends np on the slic- 
er." 

A campaign is on to refurbish 
the Federal HaH National Me- 
morial on Wall Street in New 
York. Built in 1842, it occupies 
the site where George Washing- 
ton was swore in as president, 
and his statue stands in front of 
iL The white-columned building 
is often mistaken for the New 
York Stock Exchange. In fact, it 
was first a customs house, then 
the U.S. sub-Treasury and now is 
a mnswim 

Washington officeholders re- 
ceive a constant stream of party 
and dtntifr invitations. How do 


The Anooand Prw 


DANCE ENTHUSIASTS — Nancy Reagan, left, the 
wife of the U.S. president, attending the opening of the 
Dance Theater of Harlem at the Metropolitan Opera 
House at Lincoln Center in New York. Next to Mrs. 
Reagan is Reginald Herrera, chairman of the event 


cnees in pay between jobs held 
mainly by women, such as nursing 

mainly by men, such as truck driv- 
ing and warehouse work, which 
(aid to pay more. 

Clarence Thomas, the chairman 
of the commission, said Monday’s 
ruling was the first decision by the 
agency on the issue. He said it 
would apply to ail public and pri- 
vate employers with 15 or more 
employees. 

Mr. Thomas said, “We are con- 


Reagan Calls for Review 



il'-ByHSc rald-SL Boyd of titis, a misconception bora, at 
JZ York-thm Sen m teas* “ port. of a drumbeat of pro- 

WASHINGTON — President paganda and demagoguery that de- ; 
Ronald Reagan has formally an- “"“s foe real accomplishment of | 
uounced that die administration is lost four years.” i 

forming a bipartisan commission The commission is to make rec- 
for a broad review oT Pentagon ommenda lions on management, 
procurement. The action follows organization, decision-making, and 
congressional and public concern procurement at the Pentagon, Mr. 
about waste in the military. sa, “- 

Mr. Reagan, who ann ounced the It s my expectation that the 
creation of the commission on commission will send us an rvernu- 


they cope? Attorney General Ed- 
wmMeese 3d and nis wife, Ursu- 
la, use a fthrype W ashing ton so- 
cial maneuver that Mrs. Meese 
. calls “the DA," the drop-by. 
While car and driver wait, they 
pop iiv greet the host and host- 
ess, dick; the room, 'exit and 
head for the next affair. 

A generation or two ago many 
a huddle Western farmer got a 
free paint fob for his bam which 
included & legend “Chew Mai] 
Potich Tobacco — Treat Your- 
self to the Best” in letters several 
feet high. The last Mail Pouch 
sign painter. Hariery Warrick, 60, 
no longer is employed by the 
tobacco- company, but keeps 
busy: T do about 30 or 40 a year 
far people who just want a sign 
on then hare or living room 
walL” ; 

The French Embassy in Wash- 
ington is distributing a large (1 1 
by 14 inches, or about 28 by 36 
centimeters}, slick quarterly 


magazine called “France” to a 
nonpaymg list of 75,000 people 
considered to be influential. The 
number is to grow to 150,000 in 
September. Paid for by French 
corporate advertising, the- maga- 
zine is in English for American 
consumption. It will promote 
tourism and tell its readers more 
about France. 

Phyffis Sehfafly, the conserva- 
tive activist who opposes the pro- 
posed Equal Rights Amend- 
ment, and Representative 
Patricia Schrocder, a Colorado 
Democrat, who is for it, have had 
several sharp dashes. When they 
found themselves at neighboring 
tables in a Washington restau- 
rant last week, Mrs. Schlafly 
asked to .be moved to a table 
further away. Mrs. Schrocder got 
in the last mud: “I was shocked 
she wasn’t home fixing rtmnrr 
for her husband." 


ARTHUR 


vinccd that Congress never autho- forming a bipartisan commission 
rized the government to take on for a broad review of Pentagon 
wholesale restructuring of wages procurement. The action follows 
that were set by non-sex-based de- congressional and public concern 
drions of employers, by collective about waste in the military, 
baigaimngorby the marketplace.” Mr. Reagan, who announced the 
Tnermuts was bailed by the creation of the commission on 


Chamber 


was bailed 
Commerce 


Baume & Mercier 

GENEVE ^ 
1830 / , 


nonneed by unions and women’s 
groups. 


? thc creauon or me commission on 

the Monday, said.tiwl it would operate 111 bluepnni for action, he stud. 
United States and the National As- independently, iisf the adminislra- Larry Speakcs, toe White House 
sedation of Manufacturers, but de- tion. HesaidiUtould be headed by spokesman, said that the panel 
' - men’s David PackariJ, a fooner deputy would operate ror about a year and 

secretary of defense wbo is die co- would probably make interim rec- 




Jerry Jaanowski, executive vice founder and chairman of the Hew- 
president of the National Assoda- lett-Packard Co. 
tion of Manufacturers, saw the de- The president said he would 
cision as u a signal that the whole name 15 other members shortly 
movement for comparable worth is and added that they will include 
diminishing ," He said “employers business, law, and academic lead- 
should rest easier knowing that era. 


would probably make interim rec- 
ommendations next spring and is- 
sue a final report in June. 


House Expands 



the commissian “will not get into The commission is being created U.S. Water Act 
the business of determining the in- at a lime of unfavorable publicity 

hermit worth of jobs.” about Pentagon purchases of items New * ar * r,ma Service 

Winn Newman, a lawyer who such as $7,622 coffeepots and $400 WASHINGTON — The House 
has represented the American Fed- . socket wrenches. Three weeks ago, of Representatives has unanimous- 
era tion of State. County and Mu- Defense Secretary Caspar w. ty voted to renew and expand the 
niejpai Employees and other Weinberger relieved three U.S. Safe Drinking Water AcL 
unions in similar cases, said that Navy officers of their duties after Among the amendments adopt- 
with the derision, the c omm iss i on- reports that a supply depot under ed by the House on Monday was a 
was “perpetuating sex discrimina- their command had paid the provision requiring the Environ- 
tkm mid playing into the hands of Grumman Aerospace Corp. $659 mental Protection Agency to de- 
sex bigots.” for each of seven ashtrays for navy cide in the next three years whether 

— planes. and how to regulate a list of more 

Mr. Reagan said that the admin- than 60 water pollutants. Since the 
rii 11 istration, under Mr. Weinberger’s law was enacted in 1974, the agency 


Year-Old Peace Plan in Colombia Is in Shambles 


J& 


Weinbei 
Navy of! 


relieved three U.S. 
i of their duties after 


New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — The House 
of Representatives has unanimous- 
ly voted to renew and expand the 
Safe Drinking Water Act 
Among the amendments ad opt - 


viYfkr 


Quarts wttarinWafti 


Tax-free for export 


reports that a supply depot under ed by the House on Monday was a 
their command had paid the provision requiring the Environ- 


sex bigots.” 


By Juan pe Onis 

Los Angela Times Service 


The truce has not held. The ntiB- day of protest,” with work stop- consult with congressional leaders 


taiy has blamed the guerrillas, who 


71V BOGOTA 7 —- A year after the “““J opraetioas. The Thursday. 

" Sgning of cease-fire agreements gWrOtos have blantod the military. 


and protest marches, for on his peace promises. Such conception, has developed from all 


lursday. changes, as the expropriation of 

The armed forces and national land for distribution' to peuants 
dice hove been placed on full and the direct popular election of 


direction, has done a “tremendous has provided standards for control- 
job at ferreting out waste and ling 22 pollutants. The House also 
fraud.” voted to require states to develop 

But he said that “a public mis- programs to protect underground 
conception has developed from all sources of drinking water. 


-with leftist ojeixflla troops, the vigflantes, thc traditional police have been placed on full and the direct 

v*. zi s oaafication nroeram snwtsorad bv P° Ulical 'pwtw* in Congress and alert. The defense minister, Gener- mayors are hig 


President Befisario Betancur has 
broken down. 

'■iflsna'rN \n ( (jt Anned political violence and 

t l> I U ,1(1 TOIWE continue in both urban 

-• - . -.n i f - and rural areas. Three army bri- 

• wf.?. gades with hdicopter gunships and 

v - .- , - . s ... \<;r . odd artflleiy were battling this 

• : > Vi»f - week Mairtst cdumns of up to25Q 


Mr. Betancur’s mmisier of govern- al Miguel Vega Uribe, has called 

mem, Jaime Castro. the protest the work of a “terrorist the traditional political parlies 

Mr. Betancnr, who made politi- movement.” Some protest enganiz- form a “national pact" to approve 
cal peaoe the great cause of his era have been arrested, and security a package of reforms was rgecled 
administration when he was elected forces have announced the seizing by the Liberal Party, the moderate 
in 1982. is blamed by everybody, of explosives and the uncovering a? opposition force in Congress. 

His popularity has plunged in re- plans to sabotage transportation, Mr. Betancur, a maverick Con- 


ire highly controversial. 
»osa] by the president that 
itional political parlies 


by the Liberal Party, the moderate 
opposition force in Congress. 

Mr. Betancur, a maverick Con- 


Dew arauery were tatuing uus caJt ^ di^. communications and electric ser- servative Party member, tries to 

- against columns ot upto^J content over rising inflation and vices. govern on the basis of personal 

heavily armed guerrillas in the cen- re^^ uj^nipioyincnl of 14 per- When the government an- popularity over the heads of the 
tral Cauca Ktver vattey. cent. nounced on May 21. 1984. that a major parties. But with his popu- 

' The cease-fire agreements were 


vices. govern on the basis of personal 

When the government an- popularity over the heads of the 
nounced on May 21, 1984, that a major parties. But with his popu- 


i- negotiated directly by Mr. Beian- the Colombian 


“The peace process has divided cease-fire agreement had been fantydeefinmg ire has little support 


cur, and the major Colombian Rei 
guerrilla groups signed them last bid 
spring and summer. They called for ital of.HpOa department, a center there was hope that the road to for a new president next May. 
the armed insuigaits to lay down or recent violence, peace had been opened. The Revo- On the left, Mr. Betancur is no 

their arms and Offered amnesty on- To mark their displeasure with hmonaiy Armed Forces was the longer viewed as reliable. The guer- 


Reverend Rmnulo 1 
bishop of the diocese 


ibian People,” said the reached with the Colombian Revo- in Congress now. He is barred by 
Rnmuii) Trujillo, acting lutionary Anned Forces, the armed the constitution from running for 
he diocese reNava, cap- wing of the Communist Party, re-election when Colombia votes 


•: . i osp, der the supervision of a national the current situation the 


displeasure with hmonaiy 


*or<l 


peace commissicai. Mr. Betancur grot 
also promised major political and nisi 
social reforms. tioq 


groups, together with the Commu- 
nist Party’s labor union confedera- 
tion, have schednled a “national 


largest of the four active guerrilla rillas whom he used to court al 


forces, with 9,000 anned men. meetings at the presidential palace 
Prospects for peace seemed to now say be has betrayed them, 
strengthen in August, when the seo As a result, Colombia's violence 
ond largest gnemlla group, the has not been slowed by the padfl- 
April 19 Movement, generally cation plan. Rightist death squads 
known as M-19, signed a similar linked to the local police are lolling 
peace agreement. As a result, some union leaders and political activists 
of its most important leaders were of the haft, and leftist guerrillas and 
released from i ail criminals are extorting money from 

But many of the freed M-19 lead- business me n, kidnapping wealthy 
era quickly rejoined armed groups landowners for ransom and Jailing 




Broker Accused of Fraud 
Is Stain in Japan on TV 


Agcnce hmce-Presse 


exchange their certificates for real 


TOKYO — - Two men wielding %}* success ' 


in the bilk - .suspected informers. 

According to Alvaro Fayad, the l *The violence that had been con- 
" icipal leader erf M-19, “Peace fined to remote areas by the mili- 
not begun yet because peace is tary before the so-called peace plan 
social reform promised by Be- is now being brought into the ch- 
air, which have not yet come." ies,” said Enrique Santos .Castillo, 


h» bemBedto . S jSd ®«»q,laink mew* and po- tancur, which havtS not yet cohte" L . . 

Traud. os tdevision fiinwl reports across the country. One reason for the lack of re- editor of El Tiempo, Colombia’s 
the incident through a window at defrauded forms is that Mr. Betancur did not leading newspaper, 

the man’s home, the police said. ! — 


.=MT l K3i- . . - — — 

ALLS WELL THAT BEGINS WELL 

n d *&r bl K^ Sy SitfiS fc). The excellence of BeefeaterGin'springs initially 


ssirniluh’tl 0b 


Televiaon taws had been 5tek- pohee at his homc Monday. from the water. 

In factfrom the Burrough family's own artesian 

ny was suqiected erf being involved last week titet the affair “would well, a mere mile or so awayfrom the Houses of 
-w a fraud casemvdving more than involve a criminal and inhuman act p- r ijamon+ 

$800 million in fictitious gtrfd sales, if it turned out that people with no raniamenL _ 

TTie TV tape showed two men financial knowledge or dderiy peo- It is the singular quality Of this water that is 

^^ or ““ C so importantto thedistillationof really fine London 
' -and rushing in, follqwed by. — : > — ■ — — Dry Gin. 

■. And a ingredient in the original reope 

-pfiiy hharaj iraqgffi rif fh f> passed down by James Burrough in 1o20. 

- the inside of the room was party Upon which, youcouldsay, Beefeater's 

sawnrf by , curaxo m tte |H succks has been... well-founded. 

After a few minutes, the two men I. 5 jC 

• emerged, their anns covered in 

Jblood. stffl carrying their blood- H »~r~? ' ^Pah M lx 

'/stained swords. . J? / V\ 

■ The polte canfixmed that the 9 

' Great for Swimmers ff 

Olympic site bested outdoor pod . — , _ 

the two men, a 30-Year*ojd con- and teriih indoor pool ^ Irl— i ^ 

■ strucuon worker and the 56«year- | , * K vtbsza . . H 

. ^l^owMcrf a smUbtra wtai^ 

^ brakes and jJ 

’Aceoding to the authorities, the PALACE HOTEL l/UfflMtf Bm" 5 W ' 
company soHits diems, reportedly ' 'GSTAAD {^DnGit Nf^ R 1 

SWITZERLAND Lls_fi 1 



Great for Swimmers 

Olympic sire bested outdoor pool 
and lavish indoor poo! 






The authorities said that after an 
■' investment of wvmd years, thndi* 
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SWITZERLAND 

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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 


lurts: Portable Homes Spur Feud on U.S. Range 


w. 


By T.R. Reid 

uningion Past Service 


KELLY, Wyoming — The bit- 
..teresi political issue in Teton Coun- 
ty these days is the yurt and teepee 
.advisory committee, which is vari- 
ously seen as a boon to orderly 
development and a threat to the 
‘frontier ethic. 

“It’S a question of personal free- 
dom," said Colleen Cabot, 33, a 
‘/resident who has followed the com- 
mittee closely. “People think they 
’Should be free to choose a structure 


without a lot of hassle from some 
government board." 

The structure that Ms. Cabot 
chose as her home is a yurt — a 
portable, igloo-shaped, wood-and- 
ean vas affair that was pofected on 
the Mongolian steppes in the days 
of G enghis Khan and has found ns 
way to this splendidly scenic coun- 
ty of 11,000 people just south of 
Yellowstone National Park. 

Ms. Cabot’s one-room home is 
pan of a small community of yurts 
perched like white cupcakes on a 


sw 


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green meadow beneaih the majestic 
peaks of the Teton range. 

"I think all of us were attracted 
by the economics of the yurt,” she 
said. Her home cost about $6,000, 
including built-in furniture. 
Monthly utility bills run about J6, 
■ and the yurts, which are 20 feet 
(about 6 meters) in diameter and 
rise to 22 feet at their center, ran be 
kept worm in the subzero winters 
here on about 520 worth of wood a 
month. 

Land is scarce here. Ninety-eight 
percent of the comity is owned by 
the federal government and half of 
the rest by a clique of ranchers. 
Housing is also expensive, so econ- 
omies are important. 

But Ms. Cabot and her neigh- 
bors say the real attraction of their 
homes is the kinship with nature 
that yurts provide. 

“There’s only the minutest mem- 
brane between you and the out- 
side,” Ms. Cabot says. “I hear the 
wind rustling and the birds flying 
by. I hear the river rushing after a 
rain. And the light; the light! It’s 
just really exquisite through that 
white canvas walL” 

“That's what just about every- 
body says after they’ve been in 
cue," said Dick Simmons. He built 
the first yurt in Teton County six 
years ago and lives with his wife 


and two children in one near Ms. 
Cabot’s. 

“We’ve always felt that if we 
could just get everybody to try it, 
just for one night men, there 
wouldn’t be any questions about 
us,” he said. 

But important forces in Teton 
County nave raised questions 
about the yurt. 

Vicky Brndoup, a legal secretary 
who lives near the yurt meadow, 
sent a formal query to the county 
commission Hang in g the yurt’s 
status under the zoning code. 

The county attorney launched a 
study of the yurt and anotha tradi- 
iinn.il structure that some residents 
of Teton County call home, the 





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attorney ruled last fall that 
neither yurts nor teepees complied 
with the zoning law. The county 
board banned yurt construction. 
And the p lanning commission es- 
tablished a yurt and teepee adviso- 
ry committee to deal witb existing 
unauthorized structures. 

To many residents of (his Bve- 
and- let-live region, where individ- 
ual freedom is a proud and cher- 
ished possession, those actions 
reeked of the rankest Big Brother- 
ism. 

But otheis were pleased with the 
crackdown, because the yurt does 
not fit the imay- that some b usiness 
people want to create for Jackson 
Hole. 


Traditionally a ranching area, 
the valley is turning into a glitzy, 
upper-bracket vacation resort simi- 
lar to Aspen and Sun Valley. 

It is feared that if tbe ihe yurt is 
not restricted, the county might be 
forced to be equally open to anoth- 
er alternative structure — the mo- 
bile home. Mobile homes are strict- 
ly controlled by t be county as to 
numbers, fad&ties and appearance. 

When the board sought volun- 
teers for tbe yun and teepee adviso- 
ry committee, only five persons re- 
sponded. One was Mis. Binderup, 
who had first challenged the yurt*. 
Tbe other four were present or for- 
mer yurt or teepee dwellers. 

As o. result, as Mis. Binderup 
says, the committee resembles an 
advocacy group. In fact, tbe com- 
mittee's final report recommends 
that yurts and teepees be permitted 
in communities 11** the one rat the 
green meadow. 

That proposal is to be offered to 
the commissi oners this week, and 
the yurt and teepee people are opti- 
mistic that it wul be accepted. 

“It would just fed awful to be in 
a place where the government de- 
crees that you can’t even live in a 
teepee,” says Mr. Simmons. “If 
that's all the freedom we have, we 
might as weD live in some dty in the 
East where everybody gets ham- 
mered into the same mold. Who 
need s that?” 



» 


A pucaw d Pun _• • 

team of Tibet's govenunent-to 
exile, which is based in India, were in Hong Kong on Tuesday en route to Bering. Tbe 
delegation, led by Kpn-ngo W.G. Kundffing, right, is to spend two mouths in Cmna to 
see how Tibetans are faring under communist nie. Tibet was annexed by China in 1951. 


TIBET ASSIGNMENT — Members of a fact-finding team ol 

kg on Tuesday 


Italians, Agca Deny Deal to Implicate Soviet Bloc 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Tima Service 

ROME — Former Italian intdli- 
gence officials and tbe Turk who 
shot Pope John Paul II denied 
Tuesday that there was ever a deal, 
involving organized crime figures, 
to concoct testimony implicating 
Bulgaria and the Sovu£ Union in a 
plot to kill the pope. 

Testifying in cram, Mefamet Ali 
who was convicted in the 
ly 1981 shooting, said; “I have 


never met any member of the Ca- 
morra.” the Naples gang! 

Giovanni Pandico, a confessed 
Camorra member now testifying in 
a major- trial against tbe mob, has 


accused the former deputy head of 
e, Pietro Musu- 


military intelJigen/y, 

meo, of using organized crime 
leaders to assure Mr. Agca that be 
would be freed if he implicated the 
Soviet bloc in the shooting. 

General Musumeri and other se- 
nior officials of the Defense Minis- 


try’s intelligence unit are cm trial in 
Rome accused of subverting the 
service to enrich themselves and to 
create a network to binder the 
Co mmunis t Party from coming to 
power. 

Luigi Bacberini, a lawyer for 
General Musumeci, dismissing the 
charge of interference in Mr. Ar- 
ea's testimony, said the general was 
suspended on June 6, 1981, after 
investigators uncovered a spurious 
Masonic lodge suspected of coordi- 


acti vines. Mr. Pan- 
dico fias said that General Musu- 
meci met Raffale Cutoio, the 
Camorra head, on March 1, 1982, 
to arrange the deaL 
Reports have surfaced of con- 
tacts between crime figures and the 
secret services in the shooting of 
the pope. 

Tbe intelligence services have 
confirmed that they sent two 
agents to question Mr. Agca in De- 
cember 1981, but have denied they 


sought to influence his testimony. 

For over a year after he shot the 
pope. Mr. Agca claimed be acted 
atone. He only began implicating 
others, first Tbrirish extremists and 
later Bulgaria, in May 1982. i T 


In his testimony Tuesday, largely 
about the number of gunmen in St 
Peter’s Square, Mr. Agca contra- 
dicted earlier paints and made er- 
rors on details. He again admitted 
he tied in pre-trial investigations. \ 


Straggle for Human Rights Still Vigorous in East Bloc States 

tolerating some degree of unsuper- groups, often on taboo subjects, 
vised individual initiative. take place frequently, and imdcr- 


f+rC. 


speak to the Rus- 
d be firm about the 


(Continued from Page 1) East- West lines to be redrawn m er one begins to 

this spring, in the face of the third the foreseeable future. But some sians about it and 
round of price increases in three fed obliged to raise tbe issue, espc- need for a discussion, the earlier 
yean, to wildcat strikes and other dally in tins year of 40th-anniVer- they'll be ready to listen." 

saiy celebrations recalling the de- 


signs of renewed worker restive 
ness. 

International tensions over the 
continued deployment of nuclear 
missiles also have served to pro- 
mote dissent. In East Germany and 
Czechoslovakia the recent station- 


ing of nuclear-tipped Soviet-made 
battlefield weapons has provoked 
unofficial attacks on Warsaw Pact 
policy. 

Some East European dissident 
groups, searching for common 
ground witb West European peace 
movements, are hoping to enlis t 
those movements in pressuring So- 
viet bloc regimes to honor commit- 
ments to human rights. This was 
the underlying message of the 
Prague appeal issued in March by 
some members of Czechoslovakia’s 
best-known opposition group. 
Charter 77. 

The general idea is that peace in 


feat of Hitler’s tyranny, and tbe 
spread of Stalin's. 

Tbe 45 signatories of tbe Prague 
statement described their appeal 
simply as “an opening for discus- 
sion.” They urged East and West to 
pursue cooperative arrangements 
that could erase Europe's spliL 

Among the suggestions put for- 
ward were the start of talks be- 
tween the Atlantic alliance and the 
Warsaw Pact about the dissolution 
of tbe two military blocs and the 
withdrawal of U.S. and Soviet 
troops from the territories of their 
European allies; the es tablishm ent 
of nuclear-free zones in Europe; an 
accord between the European 
Community and tbe Council for 
Mutual Economic Assistance (Co- 
mecon); and the reunification of 
the two Germanys. 

While clearly utopian, the appeal 


t to reform 
within 


Europe is inseparably linked to ob- drew some supportive echoes from 
servance of human rights." said Jui other parts of the E 


Hajek, a former Czechoslovak for- 
eign minister, who signed the ap- 

P«i 

The appal went on to address 
another topic that is a current focus 
of dissident thought: tbe division 
of Europe. No one expects any 


Eastern blot 
“Nobody thinks the Soviets are 
ready to discuss the issue.” said 
MIklos Haraszti, an editor of a 
leading dissident journal in Buda- 
pest “But the logic is that the earii- 


The last major an 
a Communist system 
was Alexander Du beck’s sweeping 
but short-lived “Prague Spring” in 
1968, which the Russians strangled. 
Since then, opposition movements 
have stayed outside Communist es- 
tablishments and o fficial struc- 
tures. 

The rise or tbe Solidarity move- 
ment, however, added a new di- 
mension in Poland. 

“Solidarity was tbe first to stand 
up and demand a Hinlngm with the 
authorities and respect for itself as 
a player in tbe game,” said Mihai 
Botez, one of Romania’s most cele- 
brated dissidents. “Far the first 
time, there were two real actors.’’ 

The elimination of the union 
dashed hopes that a new model of 
pluralistic politics could take hold 
iu the Soviet bloc. When searching 
now for an optimum model of rela- 
tions between a Communist regime 
and society. East European and 
Western analysts pant to Hunga- 
ry* 

There, Janos Kadar, the party 
leader, has done well in generating 
a high degree of confonnity while 


Parliamentary elections just held 
in Hungary required for the' first 
time that at least two candidates 
run for each seal. More significant- 
ly, a rules change permitted the 
nomination of candidates from tbe 
floor at neighborhood caucuses. 

Party officials proved adept at 
blocking dissidents who tried to 
test the real openness of thcdector- 


grotmd cabarets and other artistic 
productions are not uncommon. Il- 
legal literature circulates widely. 
Opposition activists operate 
throughout the country, attempting 
to bold professional and artistic 


grotto parallel the official ones. 


underground operation is 
much more developed than it was 
before the rise of Solidarity.” said 
al reform. Nominating caucuses in Krzysztof Sliwioski, a Raman 
Budapest’s 5 th District were Catholic intellectual “Now it’s fe 
with party loyalists on the business, like the black markets. 


sition figures, the philosopher' 
spar MIklos Tamas and me archi- 
tect Laszlo Rape, were seeking 
election. 

Nonetheless, the formal invita- 
tion to nonoffitial candidates to 
participate seemed to be a way of 
giving various interest groups a 
chance to express contrary views. 

Although all the East European 
governments are hostile to dissent, 
they vary in the harshness with 
which they deal with opponents. 
Poland and Hungary are toe most 
restrained; Romania is the most 
oppressive. 

Poland remains the most restless 
case in the Co mmunis t camp. Un- 
official lectures and discussion 


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CLASSIFIEDS 



This ensures it wiB stay.’ __ 

At the moment, the contest ,(Z. 7 
Poland appears stalemated. The 
‘authorities concede that they are 
not winning converts, but they say 
Solidarity's popularity has worn 
thin, leaving a growing middle 
ground of uncommitted Foies. But 
some opposition activists insist 
that society's patience with the Jat- 
uzdski regime is running ouL ' 

In Czechoslovakia, the hanh ex- 
perience of the 1968 Soviet inva- 
sion and subsequent normalization 
process has caused tbe public to 
recoil from political involvement. 
Most have chosen withdrawal into 
private activities and consumerism 
over resistance and dissent. 

Yet the Charier 77 movement 
carries on. It is a constellation of 
people, now numbering 1,200 sig- 
natories, from various political ori- 
entations and religious back-, 
grounds pressing the Prague regime 
to comply with international com- 
mitments to human rights. 

In Hungary, dissident activity 
confined to a small group of intel- 
lectuals and is centered around an 
array of underground journals, 
most notably, A Hirmondo (The 
Messenger) and Beszdo (The Talk- 


Molmittw 

\ 

baTriiim/!/; 


fi\ 1 i . 


B £Kll\ - 

Awsj: ■ 

111 uTCKi..: • . 

t} the hj-.V? .■ ■ 
in lift; k-' 

JUalBfcj.n.-," 

HKT' 

KniGttn:*..." 
Wki uii';.r.- 


er). They have drawn attention to 
allei 


egations of mistreatment of 
Hungarian minorities in Romania 
and Czechoslovakia. They also 
have called for a public reassess- 
ment of the factors behind the So- 
viet suppression of Hungary’s 1956 
rebellion. 

In East Germany, Protestant 
churches shield a movement that 
questions tbe nuclear military poli- 
cies of the Warsaw Pact as wdl as 
the Atlantic alliance. Some Protes- 


tant synods have denounced 


ll l' .v . 
and ft, • 
*iih ms'i'rur . ; . 

“knucr, . 

usaa! ir , 
IWt Djiiy " •’! 

kOcUKT,..-., 

-V**aiL 

wnini,.,. 

JLr -v- 

• 

2 s »i-:- 


r 


stationing of new Soviet baitiefieH ' 
weapons m the country. 

In Bulgaria, there is little sign of 
dissent, although several mysteri- 
ous explosions last year were wide- 
ly believed to have been politically 
motivated. 

In Romania, where living condi- 
tions are the harshest in Eastern 
Europe, there has been no major 
reported worker protest since a 
1977 strike Ity coal miners in the Jhi 
Valley over food shortages and 
poor conditions. An attempt twd 
years later by a small Bucharest 
group of intellectuals and wattes 
to form a free trade union was 
quickly smothered by the jailing of 
the leaders of the initiative. 

Mikhail S. Gorbachev’s election/- 
as the Soviet leader has stirred: - 
hopes of al least technocratic re; 
trams throughout the Woe, possi-I 
bly with some democratic ekt* 
menis. But in the region’s dissident! 
«wununities,' there £ little expected 
tion that he will promote political 
liberalization. 

It seems inevitable that the bloo 
will continue to be marked by arf 
peace, with small opptsh 
hon groups carrying the banners of 
human rights and a united Europe; 
against their undented govern-: 
meats. 6 

“We have no illusions for anC 
baveaiepetiikmor 
^ Spring,” said Mr. Ha* 

wise. 


Cr-, • 


weary but soundh® 





































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 


Page 5 


ARTS /LEISURE 




?!• 




<• t. 


i»U:?L 


a**-**-! 



m 


^Electric Troubadour’ 
Builds His Own Market 


By Michael Zwerin 

Intemathmat Herald Tribune 

F I ARIS — Chris Dc Burgh has 
_ sold out the Royal Albert Hall; 
bl$ latest album. “Man on the 
JLine,** weal platinum in West Gex- 
'-vody and Swazeriand-ahd gold in 


Soviet Bloc 

v : r 

•• •: ,V‘ >y. \l'. 

r.- r. 

• • 

• cit*- 
‘ /. ■— v-tt 

! ■ -■ i ■ ( 

East Bloc State 


Britain; be CDs 8 , 000 * 0 ! Canadi- 
an hockey rinks; the single “High 
On Emotion” sold 500j000' copies 
m France; his album “Easton 
Wind” was the second-hugest se&er 
in Norwegian history, and he re- 
cently performed for 30,000 people 
in Basel Chris who? 

De Burgh is an electric trouba- 
dour, a Celtic rocker, one of those 
rare performers whose success does 
not fit into preconceived molds. He 
built his own market on lhe periph- 
ery, parallel to “Top of the Pops” 
and MTV, not a lot of visibility all 
, wt once, but when the .Celtic mist 
T&at seems to eazvdop him dears it 
comes to rnDHous of albums «nd 
hundreds of thousands of doQars 
gross per concert A&M records' 
cans him their “worst-kept secret” 
Like Phil Coffins, one of rede's 
b igges t name^ Dc Burgh is a small 
unimposing figure atfirst sight — 

even a fan mig fit pa« him hy qq the 

street without a double-take. But 
you soon sense a powerful inner 
force, a giant dose of confidence 
th^i frees Mm from the outazed 
egos that usually dominate stars of 

^ proportion. For example he 
ogizes each time he mentions 
his salts figures. He chalks this up 
to the fact that he lives in Ireland: 

“My closest friends are my old- 
est friends. I don’t know anybody 
in the music business back home. 
Ireland is a country where to be 
successful is almost not acceptable. 
If you walk into a pub out of a 
Rolls-Royce wearing a flashy suit 
and buy everybody a drink they 
absolutely hate yon because you 

tbey > ^)ulll» l ^'.there working 
harder. So I’ve gotten in the habit 
of bang quiet about my career.” . 

Then he stops for a' minute and 
adds, “3 hope that doesn't come 
Jjcross as false humility." / 

The humility is no more false 
than his songs, which come right at 
you without tricks or pomposity. 
He sings them with a sort of neces- 
sity that overcomes what otherwise 
might be a rather ordinary voice. 
They are about jealousy, loneliness, 
the night, terrorism. H you listen 
several times you might find other 
levels. He exptoms it like this: 

“I like to present a picture that is 
full of most of the reality of con- 
crete objects, but the colors have to 
be filled in by the listener on the 


basis of their own interests. If you 
look difier there’s usually another 
texture. I like a bit of ambiguity. 
Maybe that's because I studied En- 
glish." 

His father .was working for an 
«w v fwio ving company in die Con- 
go in W5RDeBorghwasilaithe 
time. When the political situation 
deteriorated, die family “made a 
dadi for it” -His mothers father 
lived in Ireiand amf invited them to 
share a 12th-century castle he was 
ihinfriAg of buying- They made a 


. Young De Bmgh “Carried the 
bags, poured the wine and spilled 
the soup." .He was “one of the SO 
. rmTKrm kidswfro picked up a guitar 
after the Beatiesr By the age of IS 
he wpald play and sing far the 
guests in the evenings — songs by 
Bob Dylan, Irish, folk tunes, what- 
ever he had learned that day. 

After attending an English pub- 
lic school, he majored m French 
and. at , Trinity College in 

Dublin, then went to London to try 
and write songs: “It seemed like 
such a wonderful way to express 
oneself" Meanwhile, he defivered 
flowers to “attractive ladies in neg- 


a whed-barrow in Covrnt Carden, 
went to the market at 6 A. M. to 
pick up turkeys; for a butcher in 


The first time he played one of 
his songs in public, agin “came up 
to me scad said how much she bad 
loved it It made me my. She 
opened the door to a completely 
new werid. I had communicated to 
someone. Every' time I thought 
about music I got excited, I just had 
to give h a shot*’ 

By the 1970s he was the opening 
act for S n p^ t ffi i wp , singing solo 
with Ids guitan Once in Omaria, 
“SO impatient rowdies began to 
boo me. I thought. ‘No, Tve crossed 
the Atlantic to do this, I'm not 
going to stop.' To succeed in this 
busmessyonneed alot of neck. Tve 
never believed it’s the most talent- 
ed that necessarily succeed. You 
have to have a combination of ter- 
rific confidence and strength to 
tft frf- the lumps.” . 

So far henas not penetrated the 
U. S. market But he tours Europe 
with his rock group and three trail- 
er loads of equipment. He has a fan 
dub. There arc gold and platinum 
records on his wafl. But fortune in 
this business is fickle, Supertramp 
has fallen cm hard times. De Burgh 
has offered them the opportunity 
to open for him. 

Explaining his suocess,-he says: 


fiolond Petit’s 'Blue Angel’ 
Isa Triumphal West Berlin 


By James Hdme Sucdiifc 

B ERLIN — The newest ballet 
choreographed by Roland Po- 
ut, commissioned and performed 
by the ballet of the Deutsche Oper 
in West Berlin, earned a 20-mnmte 
standing ovation at its world pre- 
miere A triumphant success in reti- 
cent Gramany, this ensures that the 
ballet will eater the company’s per- 
manent repertoire. 

U is based on. Heinrich Mann's 
novel “Professor Unrat,” which, 
with important alterations in char- 
acterization and story line; was 
turned into the landmark Marlene 
Dietrich movie “The Blue Anger 
in 1930. Petit’s two-act, two-hour, 
ballet, with a new score by Marins 
.Constant, goes back to the {dot of 


$he novel white retaining the better 
known title of the film. 

SleazHjy atmospheric night-dub 
scenes with an Art Nouveau ambi- 
ence alternate with student high 
links in the classroom and in the 
streets of a s mall medieval German 
town, briDiamly evoked by the 
Czech designer Josef Svoboda_The 
towers and gables of the town are 
conjured up by dupes cut out of 
the lower edge of a white backdrop 
that bangs over the empty stage 
against black velvet drapes. Act 2 
takes place in the professor's stuffy 
home, to which his mght-dub-fioo- 
zy wife, Rosa Frthnch (the Die- 
trich role), now bored to death with 
respectable middle-aged hus- 

POONESBURY 

so mate PterrYcusHf. 

TH&lAPOF 1 COULD 6ET 

: U 


band, invites characters from ha 
past 

Peril’s choreography for “The 
Blue Angd” is a compendium of 
everything that has made him fam- 
ousasa choreographer — that in- 
imitable mature of sassy jazz 
twists and steps, with its aura of 
show-biz, effortlessly bound to ele- 
ments of classed bdlefs leaps and 
pirouettes, often endmgin an rare*- , 
peered angle that places lhe move- 
ment squarely in modem times. Pe- : 
tit danced the professor, a 
compelling portrait of a middle- 
aged classroom tyrant unable to 
live his own moral precepts, infatu- 
ated by the surface glitter of the 
variety “artiste.” 

Rosa was danced by Natalia Ma- 
karova. Hem was the difficult task 
of conveying superficiality via 
dance without being superficial, 
and she did so admirably. As the 
older student Tohmann who unwit- 
tingly leads his professor to Rosa 
then, breaks up their mahiage by 
reappearing at its moment of great- 
est strain, Jean-Pierre Aviotte ef- 
fortlessly conveyed the artless ago* 
centridty of youth. Constant's 
eclectic , music gathers dements of 
every 20th-centmy style and wdds 
them into a score perfect for danc- 
ing. Barbara Schezier sang his cab- 
aret songs — reflections of Knrt 
Weill — with appropriate 1920s 
hardness.' • •' 

James HehrurSuzdiffc is a Berlin- 
based critic: 


25 SH&flU&PfGOte 
IfiCBf OBnUMMZt&t. 

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justjhogtd semnsio 
WBtzaxm am. « 
/ 



Restoration Romp at Versatile Lyric Hammersmith 


OriMfl Boa 

Chris De Burgh 

“I fed that Cdtic melancholy very 
strongly. Those mists come out in 
my songs. When 1 go to the west of 
Ireland, 1 get the shivers s tandin g 
on the moors looking at the moun- 
tains on one side ana the sea on the 
other. It’s raining over hoe, the sun 
is shinfng over there and there's 
always a rainbow somewhere. It 
takes me back to the dawn of Euro- 
pean civilization.” 

After listening to De Burgh per- 
form, the singer and poet Leonard 
Cohen told him: “Nobody rings 
Hke an Irishman." 

Chris De Burgh: Poitiers, France. 
June 19; Toulouse, June 2(£ Mar- 
seille. June 22. 


By Sheridan Motley 

InUrmaonaf Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Though bv no 
/ means exempt from the finan- 
cial crisis facing most subsidized 
London theaters, the Lyric Ham- 
mersmith under Peter James has at 
least managed not to lock itself into 
restrictive artistic policies designed 
for richer and easier times. 

Indeed, one of the attractions of 
this West London playhouse is its 

THE LONDON STAGE 

unpredictability: James seems to 
pro g r am it much after the fashion 
of an art-house racism a, taking in 
whatever appeals to him. 

The current double is a fair indi- 
cation of Hammersmith's breadth 
of interest: Whfie a new American' 
two-hander plays in the Studio, the 
main stage is given ova to a pro- 
duction from the Haymarket 
Leicester of “The London Cuck- 
olds.” Written in 1681 “by Edward 
Ravenscroft, Gent,” the play has 
had only one London staging since 
1782, that at the Royal Court five 
years ago. Then as now, the direc- 


"Seraglio’ in Istanbul 

The Auoaacd Pros 

ISTANBUL — Mozart’s opera 
“Abduction From the. Seraglio” 
wfll be Staged in th e irma court- 

the 13th 

Festival, beginning Thursday. 
Among those taking part in the 
festival are the New Yodc PhiThar - 
znonic and Munich Radio Orches- 
tra in their Turidsn premieres, the 
Soviet-bom pianist Vladimir Ash- 
kenazy and the Czech Trio. 


tor was Satan Burge, who has 
made the discovery of tins Restora- 
tion romp s omething of a personal 
crusade. He now has a new adapta- 
tion by John Byrne that cats at 
least two major characters and 
pulls the whole affair a lot close to 
Feydeau than Wycherley. 

This is a period bedroom farce 
principally concerned with a cou- 
ple of aldermen obsessed by tbe 
honor of their wives, honor that is 
swiftly lost to a couple of urban 
rakes in a plot of infinite complex- 
ity. It is built like a steam engine; 
once fueled, it gathers speed and 
finally runs away with itself. Along 
the track there are some marvelous 
diversions: Lovcday (Malcolm Sin- 
clair^ in love with one of the wives 
but knowing ha to have arrotha 
lover and a cooked dinner hidden 
away in a cupboard, convinces ha 
husband that by witchcraft he can 
summon re&ty-coakcd. meals out 
of thin air. He gets fed, the other 
lover escapes and the. wife eventu- 
ally has to show Loveday her grati- 
tude. In these gnnn»s husbands are 
not the oaly losers; one hopeful 
lover (Michael Maloney) gets mm- 
sdf wedged in a ground-floor win- 
dow whue chamb er pots are inad- 
vertently emptied ova him. Asked 
later to relate his adventures, he 
murmurs, “Fire, rape, confusion 
and misfortune,” as though these 
were daily occurrences, which in 
Ravenscroft's London they pre- 
sumably were. 

□ 

It is difficult to be quite so en- 
thusiastic about what is going on 
downstairs in the Lyric Studio. 
William Mastrorimone is chiefly 
known in Britain for “Extremities,” 
a play that required Helen Mirren 


to trap a rapist in a fireplace: his 
“The Woolgatberer" suggests at 
best one of those student dramas 
that used to win awards on Ameri- 
can eampmy* in the days when 
everyone thought the future of dra- 
ma lay somewhere in Albee’s “Zoo 
Story” 

The ritual odd couple here are a 
girl from the five-and-dime store 
and a long-distance truck driver 
she has taken to ha boarded- up 
Philadelphia attic, whose previous 
tenant committed suicide. “She 
died of an overdose of rope.” que- 
ries the truck driva, “and left a 
poem behind? Suppose she’d been 
a novelist?” 

The dialogue from there is all 
downhDL while the plotting is re- 
markably uneventful. The girl 
keeps a large collection of men's 


sweaters in ha cupboard and may 
amply be in search of another win- 
ia woolly, which would ai least 
explain the title. But woolly is the 
word for this lethargic duologue, 
though Kate Lock and George' Ir- 
ving play the couple endearingly 
enough. 

□ 

Tom Gallagher's “Mr. Joyce Is 
Leaving Puis” has returned to the 
King's Head. 13 years after its first 
London production there. It re- 
mains an imriguingly bitchy por- 
trait of tbe artist as a young aha old 
man, and is concerned not so much 
with the literary achievements of 
James Joyce as tbe destruction he 
wrought on his family. Tbe show 
opens with Joyce at 26 in Trieste, 
already drunk and in debt and 


leaning on his "bled-bloody-dry" 
brother Stanislaus. Urged to stick a 
knife in his integrity and sell some- 
thing. if only “Dubliners’' to Dub- 
liners. Joyce — craggily well played 
by Simon Roberts — is seen as a 
rundown akobotic cripple desper- 
ately envious of Synge and enraged 
by the notion of all those critics not 
yet even bom “who will grow fat 
and windy on me." 

The notion of “Finnegans 
Wake" as “the most complicated 
insurance policy ever devised by a 
writer" because its constant study 
will keep the author alive in the 
textbooks, and the rage Joyce feds 
at a God who “could give me such 3 
brain in the body of a lavatory 
attendant." give Gallagher's bio- 
graphical entertainment much of 
its energy and interest. 


Pergolesi Double Bill in Florence 


By William Weaver 


compose an impressive number ol works, ana in ms 
posthumous popularity an even lamer number has 
been attributed to him. A muddled Italian edition 
some decades ago only complicated the situation. But 
tbe Pergolesi research center in New York, under the 
guidance of Barry Brook, is bringing order out of 
chaos and critical editions are beginning to appear. 

Luckily, this scholarship has not remained confined 
within the walls of academe. A fewycars ago, a revival 
of Pogolesi's “Flammio” in a critical edition was an 
international success. And this year’s Maggio Musi- 
cale includes a Pergolesi double biB, “Adriano in 
Stria” and the intermezzo “Uvietta e Tracollo.” It has 
just opened at the historic Teano della Pergola. 

The 18th-century custom of performing the two acts 
of a comic work to separate tbe three acts of a serious 
opera has long since disappeared, so its resuscitation 


here was interesting in itself. After the noble arias of 
Hadrian, Sabina and the Oriental princess in Metasta- 
sio's lofty, elegant, serious libretto, the coarse Neapol- 
itan jokes and knockabout farce of the intermezzo 
were a welcome change, and it. too. had delightful 
music, thematically linked with the other work, mak- 
ing the two pieces'a coherent, fluent whole. 

They also made a long evening, but the committed 
conducting of Marcello Panni and the stylish rin g in g 
of the largely young cast dispelled any threat of 
boredom. Valeria Baiano and Sitvano Pagliuca were 
vivacious and musical as the comic Uvietta and Tra- 
collo. In “Adriano,” Eleonora Jankovic brought digni- 
ty and authority to the title role. Danicla Dessy. the 
future Empress Sabina, was meltingly sweet and' lech-' 
nically impressive: her long, lyrical tines were beauti-. 
fully executed. 

William Weaver is a writer and translates who fives ui 
Italy and writes about the arts. 


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Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 


Herat 



PabUabed With The New York Time* and The WarfringUM PM 


♦ |_ r" The U S Presidency: 

enbunt In Beirut, Retaliation Is Not the Answer ^ 


Hostages: The Fine line 


We hope we are wrong, but it loots as if it 
will take time to free the last of the hijacked 
Trans World Airlines passengers, now held 
somewhere is Beirut. They have become the 
prisoners of powerful interests in three societ- 
ies. President Reagan’s effectiveness in arrang- 
ing their release depends on how well be 
can resist impatient demands for force or 
hasty resort to ransom. 

There are crimes aplenty here. The hijackers 
ore guilty of murder as well as kidnapping. The 
authorities in Greece are guilty of incredible 
laxity in letting diem board the plane and in 
their supine negotiations. The United States 
itself is guilty of having failed to punish Iran 
for sheltering the killers of two Americans in a 

hijacking last year. But the necessary retalia- 
tion and preventive measures must wait until 
the current victims are safe. 

They are now the acknowledged prisoners of 
Nabih Beni, leader of Lebanon’s large Shiite 
population. Recently his militiamen have been 
slaughtering Palestinians in Beirut while col- 
laborating with Israelis in the south, thus in- 
curring the wrath of Arabs throughout the 
region. To restore his militant credentials, he 
cither planned or exploited the TWA hijack- 
ing. claiming responsibility for the hostag e s 
and vowing to bold them until Israel frees 766 
prisoners it took from Lebanon in April. 

Israel had planned to appease the resentful 
Shiites by releasing the 766 starting last week. 


but was delayed by the kidnapping of some 
Famish United Nations troops in Lebanon. 
With the TWA hijacking, any release suddenly 
acquires new significance in Israeli politics. A 
Labor government already under fire for ex- 
changing 1.150 Arabs for three Israeli captives 
in Lebanon now refuses to yield to a new act of 
terrorism unless Mr. Reagan asks it to do so. 

Mr. Reagan will not ask, and it is hard to 
quarrel with him. The issue is aw whether the 
766 are released — the Israelis want to be rid 

of them — but how. If delivered as ransom in a 


leans, and not only Americans. Now that Mr. 
Bern has guaranteed the hostages’ safety, the 
president has at least gained time to find a way 
out, for himself and for Prime Minister Shi- 
mon Peres of Israel, whose survival he values. 

The White House is “talking" with Mr. Beni 
and a ss uri n g him th&i the 766 Lebanese would, 
as scheduled, be quickly freed if he relents. But 
it will not ‘'negotiate” a direct exchange. Thai 
is cutting matters very fine, but preserving the 
distinction is a worthy aim. 

The solution may require involving still oth- 
er parties, such as the International Red Cross. 
Bui it could take, a long time for all rides to 
define the indicated compromise in acceptable 
terms. Hie proper course is to respect Mr. 
Reagan's fine distinctions and, with patience, 
let him make the best oF a bad situation. 

. — THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Sanctimony on Food Aid 


Hungry Africa may be hungrier because of a 
quarrel between the United States and a dozen 
members of die Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries. At issue is which should 
contribute how much to (he valuable Interna- 
tional Fund for Agricultural Development. All 
agree that the fund significantly helps small 
farmers, especially in Africa, where it spends 
nearly half its budget The Reagan administra- 


tion approves the program but is seriously 
thinking about withholding support if OPEC 
countries do not contribute more. 

The fund was established in 1974. in pan to 
coax aid money from the then oil-rich nations. 
Its performance has been outstanding, lire 
loans have aided 40 milli on peasants; over- 
head is held to 5 percent, and the recipient 
countries match every SI with S3 of their own. 

OPEC members together were supposed to 
match the contributions of 20 industrial na- 
tions, but that promise was never kept. When 
neither Iran nor Libya contributed a dime, the 
OPEC members’ share fell to 42 percent of a 
three-year budget of SI . I billion. As oil profits 


declined, that meant a heavier burden for 
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the United Arab 
Emirates. The replenishment for the next three 
years was therefore cut to $600 million and the 
OPEC members want their share reduced to 40 
percent. Since Kuwait now pays about as 
much as West Germany, and Nigeria about as 
ranch as Britain, there is merit in the plea. 

Some administration officials, however, 
think it outrageous for wealthy oil producers 
to shave their agreed contributions, especially 
considering that their former cal prices had 
their most devastating effect in poorer nations. 
But the United States, originally pledged to 
$150 million over the next three years, is now 
the only holdout against a new funding formu- 
la. Other Western donors are even offering a 
bonus contribution to mollify Washington. 
Even without that, the OPEC shortfall would 
mean only a few million extra for America. 

By all means keep presang the oil producers 
to honor their pledge. But for Africa's sake, 
don't disable this program with sanctimony. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Wrongheaded Subsidies 


When farm-state senators insisted last 
month that the Agriculture Department begin 
an export subsidy program, the Reagan ad- 
ministration said it was a bad idea. The sena- 
tors prevmled — die export program was their 
price for supporting the budget resolution — 
and the department announced plans to subsi- 
dize a first wheat sale to Algeria. But the 
administration was right; the program goes in 
the wrong direction. It puts the government in 
the absurd position of paying simultaneously 
to support and to reduce farm prices. 

The supports are the familiar kind; they are 
achieved through loon rates. These are mini- 
mum prices set by the government each year 
for basic farm commodities — the prices it will 
pay for products put in its storage bins on 
loan. The loan rate is the lowest price for which 
one can buy a supported product in the United 
Slates; no farmer will sell for less. 

The problem with the loan rates is that they 
cannot take account just of domestic circum- 
stances — how much food American consum- 
ers wont, what they want to pay for it, what 
they think is a fair return for farmers. A great 
deal of U.S. farm production is now for export, 
and the loan rates must also be attuned to 
buying power and prices abroad 

In the 1970s this was easy. For the most part 
world food demand was high, world prices 


rose well above the loan rates and U.S. farm 
exports and world market share both soared 
Americans bought foreign oil and autos with 
grain, and American fanners prospered 

In the 1980s, however, the problem has 
become more complicated The world econo- 
my has been weak; there have been fewer 
buyers. The dollar has been strong; in inter- 
national terms, U.S. prices have been high 
Foreign producers, some aided by export sub- 
sidies from their governments, have bon able 
to undersell U.S. fanners. 

The subsidy program agreed to last month, 
which authorizes the department to give UJL 
exporters up to $2 billion in surplus commod- 
ities free to help than meet foreign competi- 
tion, has no chance against these fundamen- 
tals. It could even have the reverse result if 
foreign governments step up their export sub- 
sidies in turn. What Congress should do in the 
farm bill it is now writing is what the adminis- 
tration wants: It should tower loan mica. UR. 
fanners will be less protected but more com- 
petitive. Those who are hurt can be helped as 
necessary by other means — raising the sepa- 
rate payments the government already uses to 
shore up farm income. The U.S. taxpayer 
ought not be put in the business of financing 
two contradictory farm price policies. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Alfonsin Goes to Battle 


President Raul Alfonsin has begun the ardu- 
ous battle of trying to save Argentina from 
economic chaos — freezing salaries and prices, 
creating a new monetary unit, dismissing some 
civil 'servants and reducing state investments, 
— ail in hopes of cutting the inflation rale, 
now at 1.300 percent, to 150 percent by 19S6. 

When he announced his “war economy” in 
April, violent reaction followed from the Per- 


onisi-led General Labor Confederation. Most 
Argentines have reacted with surprise and con- 
cern to these latest austerity measures. Mr. 
Alfonsin needs the help of all Argentines. 

Argentina has a foreign debt of S4S bQlion. 
Latin America's third largest, after Mexico 
and Brazil The bankruptcy of just one of these 
countries would set off a global monetary 
crisis. Latin American leaders agree: They can 
pay no longer. It is a tragic, absurd situation. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


FROM OUR JUNE 19 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Suffragettes March in London 
LONDON — Londoners, ever eager for a free 
sight, had a fine spectacle in the parade of ten 
thousand Suffragettes who marched from the 
Thames Embankment to the Albert Hall [on 
June ISL The procession stretched for three 
miles, and the proceedings were enlivened by 
forty bands. At the Albert Hall, Mrs. Pank- 
hurst, founder of the Women’s Social and 
Political Union, presided over a meeting which 
filled the great building in every pan. The 
speakers included the Earl of Lytton. When 
Mrs. Pankhurst made an appeal 'for funds in 
support of the movement she announced that 
Mrs. H. Aynon. the distinguished scientist, 
would open the list with £1.000. Afterwards 
further subscription promises rolled in. 


1935: ILS. Treasury Protected Franc 
WASHINGTON — Secretary of the Treasury 
Henry Morgemhau Jr. confirmed [on June 18] 


the statement by M. Jean Tannery. Governor 
of the Bank of France, that the American 


of the Bank of France, that the American 
Treasury had lent its support to the franc 
recently, when (he French currency was the 
target of an extensive speculative attack. Sec- 
retary Morgratiuu said: “What I did was ao 
more than an act of elementary courtesy as 
between one nation and another.” M. Tan- 
nery. in a speech to the heads of the principal 
central European banks assembled in Basel 
disclosed that the American Treasury took 
steps to restrict credits during the franc 
crisis, and that Mr. Morgemhau kept the mar- 
ket liberally supplied with dollars. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1 938- 1*82 


By Helena Cobban 


Re 


W ASHINGTON —Once again the United States Could the hostages and the Shiite prisoners all be 

is beset by a hostage crisis. Once again voces are .sent to one or more neutral countries for liberation? 


beard — most notably that of Henry A. Kissinger — 
arguing for an Hi-denned “retaliation” against those 
deemed responsible. But is retaliation really the an- 
swer? Will it succeed in rooting our die terrorism that 


the retaiiators deplore? 
In the case of tneLefa 


In the case of the Lebanese Shiites, retaliation most 
probably would not have the desired effect There are 
a host of reasons for. this: 

• It would be impossible to identify clearly defined 
targets, and then to devise a plan that would strike 
solely at the hostage-takas without risk to the hostages 
or to other civilians. 

• Retaliation would undermine the relative moder- 
ates who, under Justice Minis ter Nabih Bern, provide 
the leadership of the Lebanese Shiite community. Mr. 
Bern and other Shiite moderates have been undo- 
heavy pressure from fundamentalist radicals with ties 
to Iran. By associating himwlf with the hostage negoti- 
ations, Mr. Bern is taking & political ridL If the 
negotiations fail, the moderates will be weakened, 
along with the chances for a reasonable settlement 
to Lebanon's civil war. 

• Retaliation would escalate the cycle of destruction 
in Lebanon, and would strengthen and- American and 
anti-Western feelings. Who could last longest in such a 
poker game of violence? History shows that the Leba- 
nese have much more staying power in advexse drcuxtt- 
stances than any outsider. 

What are the alternatives to violenL retaliation? 
Reduced to its basics, the problem looks simple. The 
hostage- takers want the release tit 766 Lebanese Shiite 
prisoners held in Israel. The Israelis have said they 
planned to release the prisoners anyway. 

But Israel and the United States do not want to 


Could the two acts of liberation be phased in some way 
to give the appearance that they wot not directly 
linked? Finding such a solution is precisely the sort of 
task far which diplomats and negotiators are trained. 

As to the longer-term prevention of terrorism, there 
is no easy answer. Bui one thing seems dean If terror is 
no longer to have a secure home base in Lebanon’s 1 
Shiite community, then members of that community 
must have a realistic hope that their most urgent 
grievances are being addressed. Those grievances in- 
clude Israel’s continued backing of the Christian mili- 
tia in southern Lebanon, and urgent issues of social 
andtxrtitical equity in Beirut. 

The Shiites will be important is Lebanon's future. 
Numbering about one million, they are the largest of 
Lebanon's 17 religious groups and make up about one- ' 
third of the national population. Their educational 
level and social expectations have soared in recent 
decades. Yet when the United. States made its enor- 
mous commitment of military and political support to 
the Lebanese government from 1982 to 1984, it seemed 
to ignore the Shiites, and was seen by them as bolster- 
ing Christian extremists against the Modem majority. 

Yet. even without a presence in Lebanon, the United 
States casts a huge shadow over (he Middle East It 


N EW YORK — The more you 
study the wealth of statistics 


could stiD play an important behind-the-scenes role in 
nudging the Lebanese toward political equity and 


nudging the Lebanese toward political equity and 
social stability. In this way the environment in which 
the terrorists thrive could be eroded. 

Nobody is saying that such a political approach 
would be easy, either to plan or to implement But in 
the long ran it is the only way the problem of Lebanese 
terrorism can be resolved. 


JLN study the wealth ol statistics 
and anal yses now available on recent 
American elections, the more one 
particular conclusion scents warrant- 
ed _ that the Republican Party has 
virtually claimed the presidency as its 
own, winning it in four of the last five 
elections— three times by landslides 
—and in 6 of 10 since Worid War II. 
‘ That is not quite the same as a 
“party realignment,'* since the Dem- 
ocrats still control the House, have a 
reasonable chance to retake the Sen- 
ate in 1986. count 34 governors in 
power, and form the majority in 59 
state legislative chambers. But in die 
only national election, to fill the sin- 
gle most powerful American political 
office, the Democrats have been of- 
fering little competition for the last 
20 years. They might not have won 
the presidency even once in that peri- 
od had not the Watergate scandals 
significantly aided Jimmy Carter. 

Stuart Eizenstat. a Washington at- 
torney who was Mr. Carter’s chief 
domestic affairs adviser, lamented in 
a recent speech that except for Lyn- 
don Johnson in 1964, no Democratic 
presidential candidate had won a ma- 
jority of “the white middle-dass 


By Tom Wicker 
note you And it is in the South — a Dcm>, 
statistics cratic stronghold for most of ti* 
on recent years since the Civil War— that the 
nore one party's presidential plight can be 
warrant- most dramaucaUvsetam toeksins 
Party has campaigns of 1968, 1972. 1980 aid 
aevas its 1984. Democratic presidential cazufi- . 
e last five dates, “have won a grand total of ®a^ 
andslides Southern states." as Ml. Eizenaat ' 
dWarll noted. The party is even worse off in 
une as a the West, where by his definition of 
the Dem- that region, its national candidates 
e. have a have carried only one state since 1964 
the Sen- — Texas, byMr. Carter m 1976. .: * 
•roots in John Kenneth White, a political 
ity in 59 scientist at Potsdam State University 
tut in the in New York, studied returns hat* to 


The Democrats have 


since 1964. They might 

not have icon at aBhadr 

__ . - ; * 

it not been for Watergate 


appear to be caving in to terrorist threats, and do not 
want to encourage future hijackings. 


The writer, a farmer Middle East correspondent, con- 
tributed this comment to the Los Angeles Times. 


vote since 1948. Among such voters, 
he said, “onlv one in three uation- 


he said, “only one in three nation- 
wide supported Walter Mondale last 
year — one in four in the South." 


Silent Subs, 
Torpedoed 
By Congress 

By George F. Will 




Get Somebody upfie*^ 
■frtbc -that Settee n dear. 


A board the uss henry m. 

JACKSON — Sometimes when 


Captain Ralph Tindal is crouched 
atop the bridge of this Trident sub- 
marine; heading out of the Port Ca- 
naveral channel, porpoises play with 
his boat, surfing on the bow wave, 
and it is a toss-op who is having more 
fun, the ca ptorn or his companions. 

A Trident on-station spends 70 
days submerged and silent, 155 men 
packed in a tube 42 feet (118 meters) 
in diameter, carrying 24 multiple- 
warhead missiles ana more destruc- 
tive power than was used against 
Gennarty and Japan. This is fun? 
This is an acquired taste. 

Someone once asked a baseball 
umpire if time is such a thing as a 
“natural umpire.” He replied, “Yes, 
but no one starts out that way.” Sub- 
marines are like that. 

The wonder is that there are 
enough men with an aptitude for this 
service. A lot are needed: As many 
UJS. warheads are deployed on sub- 
marines as the combined total on 
bombers and land-based missiles. 

Navy captains know Joseph Con- 
rad’s words about a ship at sea being 
“a distant world in herself,” a de- 
scription true of Trident submarines 
to a degree Conrad could never have 
imagined. In any ship, Conrad wrote, 
there is one man, the captain, who in 
an emergen cy can mm to no other 
man. A Trident on peaceful patrol is 
constantly receiving communica- 
tions; but, although it can, it does not 
send messages. During a conflict, any 
communication with the command 
authority ashore could be problemat- 
ic. Firing missQes requires the boat to 
be stationary and noisy; it becomes a 
airing target for any Soviet attack 
submarine that has shadowed it. 



Submerged, a submariner is more calendar. I asked an admiral, “Is the 
limited regarding communications bock a good portrayal?" His terse 


than a man in space. Submariners 
cannot call Houston control and ask, 
“What do I do next?” A submariner's 
life is isolation, sBence and avoidance 


reply: “Too good.” 

Forty percent of Trident’s cost is in 
a special quality. The expense buys 


a special quality. The expense buys 
quietness so the boat can be a Mack 


of detection, 24 hours a day. hole in the ocean. For example; to 


A captain, as his reward for service mini mire water disturbance, there 


away from family and with responsi- 
bility for 155 lives and a SlJ-billion 
boat, is paid less than a mid-level 
executive of a pretzel company. But 
he gets the public recognition in- 
volved in congressional complaints 
about his pension, which is not as 
generous as congressional pensions. 

Few Americans can visit a Trident 
to see the sophistication of the sys- 
tems. and the crew’s unfailing grace 
under unrelieved pressure. But thou- 
sands of Americans are reading Tom 
Clancy’s novel “The Hunt for Red 
October,” a thriller about the hide- 
and-seek game that is no game, 
played around the dock, around the 


can be no more than a quarter-inch 
(6- millimeter) deviation in the plates 
along the 560-Iool-kmg hulL 
A high-technology Trident is like a 
handmade pair of shoes: Much of the 
cost is in handwork. Every pine and 
fitting must be wrapped in silencing 
material. To economize space and 
minimize noise, a tool box must be 
custom-fitted to a particular nook. 


secrets that help defeat U.S. subma- 
rines' sophisticated systems for 
avoiding detection should receive 
punishment as serious as the damage 
they do: capital punishment. 

Yet, in order to comply with poli- 
cies set by Congress, the navy has 
more investigators worrying about 
overpriced ashtrays than about trea- 
son. That is not a cost-effective allo- 
cation of energies, given the cost of 


the quality built into Tridents, and 
the ability of espionage to devalue it. 


and made rattle-proof. This Hole de- 
tail helps keep the deterrent secure, 


(ail helps keep (he deterrent secure 
and enables exhibitionists in Con- 
gress to throw rug-chewing fils about 
tool boxes that cost more than the 
ones sold at the local hardware store. 

Traitors who sell to Soviet agents 


the ability of espionage to devalue it. 

It takes 44 months to move a Tri- 
dent from the laying of its keel to its 
commissioning, at which point the 
crew, itself a well-tuned instrument, 
learns what it would be like living 
inside a fine Swiss watch. Captain 
TindaTs boat the fifth Trident to 
enter service, has a motto: “The Fifth 
and Finest." Bearing the name of the 
late Senator Jackson, it should be, as 
be was, the finest. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


those of 1968 and found that is'jbe 
period's five national elections the 
Republicans had won 2j07S electoral - 
votes (77 percent of the totaI).ioanly 
567 (21 percent) for the Democrats, 
with 47 votes going to candidates 
from neither of the major parties.’ 

In a survey of numerous ejection 
studies, Mr. White also dud One by - 
Everett Car 11 Ladd showing dial a . 
the same five elections. Republican. - 
presidential candidates carried ‘ , 

states with 202 electoral vote* (only- - 
68 short of a majority) eveiyitime, 
inducting the Carter vnamy of 1 197a 
But in the same five elections the aohr 
constituency the Democrats carnet 
every lime was the District at Cohot 
bia, with three electoral votes. 

As all these studies suggest, die 
national Democratic Party is in dan- 
ger of becoming what Stuart Bust- 
slat called “a narrowly based regional 
party of the Northeast-Midwest, - the 
slowest growing areas of the nation, 
without a broad national dimen- 
sion.’' Such a party could hdp to dec? 
a president only when the governing 
Republicans encounter disaster.^ . , 

Mr. Eizenstat's explanation ot- 
what went wrong for the party 
Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy arid 
Johnson is that Democratic policies, 
or policy statements, caused voters to 
lose faith in the party's ability tplead 
at the presidential level— to promote 
prosperity through stable economic 
growth, provide equal not preferen- 
tial, opportunity for all Americans, 
and use U.S. power to defend free- 
dom around the world. 

Most Democrats seem to agree 
with this view, which obviously has 
much validity. But it seems to me to 
leave out one major factor the Dan- 
ocratic candidates. In 1968, party 
leaders engineered the nomination of 
Hubert Humphrey, who was <fisa%i - — 
trously associated with Lyndon Job/T^, 
son and the war in Vietnam but very - ' 
nearly won anyway. After that, namn | 
Dating reforms resulted in the choices 
of George McGovern, Jimmy Garter 
twice and Waiter Mondale — weak 
candidates all, in hindsight- : 

Don’t presidential candidates do 
more to establish voters’ impressions 
of a political party than anyone but a 
president in power? If that is so, the - - 
Democrats win not be much helped 
by study groups writing new position 
papers no one will read. They need a 
presidential candidate who in 1986 
can both embody and articulate mote I 
appealing policies, persuading the 
party to follow by the prospect of 
regaining the White House. j 

The New York Tunes. 


Reagan (or Is It McCarthy?) on Nicaragua 


M UNICH — President Reagan 
has won another round in the 
battle over U.S. policy in Central 


By Abraham Bromberg 


America: After yet another major de- 
bate about whether to fund the “con- 


tras.” Congress changed its mind and 
voted to support aid to the anti-San- 
dinist guerrillas. How are we to ac- 
count for this capitulation? 

Thirty-five years ago, an obscure 
politician from Wisconsin sprang 
into prominence by charging that the 
U.S. government was infested by 


The president seems 
determined to portray 
those he wishes to 
destroy in the most 
reprehensible colors. 


“Communist agents.” Joseph R. Mc- 
Carthy had little hard evidence, but 
many Americans were either mes- 


and fundamentalists in Nicaragua.” 

The Sandinists, he went on, are 
conducting “3 rampafg n of virtual 
genocide against the MIsJtito Indi- 
ans” Furthermore, “thanks to the 
Sandinista Co mmunist s, the PLO, 
Libya and Lhe followers of the Aya- 
tollah Khomeini have now a foothold 
in Central America.” 

If any of these charges were even 
partially true, we should indeed con- 
sider taking measures against the 
Sandinists. But none is. There is no 
evidence of persecution of funda- 
mentalists, most of whom are in fact 
rather sympathetic to the Sandinists. 
The Haim that the Sandinists are per- 
secuting Lhe 20 or so Jewish families 
in Nicaragua is pure humbug: that, 
anyway, was the conclusion of a spe- 
cial report issued in 1983 by Rabbi 
Marc H. Tanenbaum of the Ameri- 
can Jewish Committee. 

True, the Sandinists are engaged in 


the Indians over the question of who 
controls the Atlantic coast region. 
The killing s were odious and deserv- 
ing of condemnation. So may be the 
Sandinists* apparent inflexibility to- 
ward the Mis kites' demands. But 
how could anyone with any sense of 


UEKPODJSB 

mU-MOTS} 

Wmcw_t®m3 

UNOE^Wv.. 


8S 


history or moral distinctions com- 
pare this with the systematic slaugh- 


pare this with the systematic slaugh- 
ter of six million Jews and millions of 
others during Worid War n? 

Whether the president knows U, his 
tactics are borrowed from Lhe totali- 
tarian arsenal: He is determined to 
portray those he wishes to destroy in 
the most lurid and reprehensible col- 
ors. Convinced, apparently, that the 
end justifies the means, be is pre- 
pared to use untruths, quarter-truths 


M 


and travesties of histoiy to topple the 
Sandinis ts And then he rinhns that 


Sandinis ts And then he rinfrns that 
be “remains committed to a peaceful 
solution in Central America. 


Joseph McCarthy fomented and 
thrived on a climate of hysteria in 
which dissent came perilously dose 
to being identified with treason and 
rational discussion of Communism 
was virtually impossible. The net ef- 
fect of Ronald Reagan’s anti-Sandm- 
ist crusade is likely to be exactly the 
same. In an aLmosphere of extrava- 
gant mendacity and pressure to “fall 
into line,” it becomes increasingly 


merized by the sheer audacity of his 
onslaught or fearful that a refusal to 
take him seriously might expose them 
to the dread suspicion of being “soft 
on Communism.” It took four years 
for Congress to curb his power, and 
by that time, the damage to Ameri- 
cans' moral and political sanity — 
not to mention to the livelihoods and 
reputations of thousands of innocen t 
people — bad already been done. 

Comparisons are odious, but it is 
bard not to detect similari ties be- 
tween Senator McCarthy’s methods 
and those used by President Reagan 
in his relentless crusade against “to- 
talitarian” Nicaragua. Mr. Reagan 
has not called his domestic critics 
“dupes" or “Co mmunis t agen ts" — 
although he came dose to it earlier 
this month when be claimed that 
those who oppose his Nicaraguan po- 
licy suffer from “illusions about 
Communist regimes” Bui what is 


KATHARINE GRAHAM WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-C/narmen 


PHILIP M, FOISIE 
Walter wells 

SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

Exeunt Editor RENtBONDY Dam PubEdtn 

Edutw ALAIN LECOLIR Auauue Pvbiaker 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Aaaaau Pubtuher 

Dtpun Edwr STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Dnacr of Ottomans . 
Associate EAm FRANCOIS DESMAISON5 DmteurofGmdadan 
ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Aditnuu ^ tii* 


laiernauau! Herald Tribune, 1SI Avenue Charks-de-GaoIk, 92200 NemUy-ttr-Sdiie. 
France. Td: i I ) 747-1265. Td»: 6I27IS (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8031 


a struggle with a \ 
Roman Catholic Jto 

one.^and'boS 1 ^^ 
resolve it. Several 
priests have been ! 


)d part of the 
uchy. Bat this 
not a religious 


seeking to 
ositiomst" 
ly treated, 
rain 1983, 
«I with the 


Director dr la publkation: Walter N. Thayer. 

Arm Headquarters. 14-34 Hennesrv Rd.. Hong Kong. TeL S-285618. Telex 6)170. 
•Imaging Da U.K: Rubai MacKkhan. 63 Long Acre. London WC2. TeL 83&4802. Te/ex 262009. 
CM Mgr. W. German: W. Lambadt, FrietMatr. 15. dOODFrankfuttM 71 (069)726755. Tbc. 416721. 
SA asi capital dr 1.200.000 F. RCS Nanterre B 732021126. Corranuston Pariudre No. 61337. 
US. svhscnpnon: S3 22 yearly. Seamd-dau postage paid at Long Island Cay. N.Y. 1 1 101. 
ti 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 



Carthys tactics is the flood of distor- 
tions, exaggerations and plain unvar- 
nished lies about the Sandinists that 
issue forth from the administration. 

Consider what President Reagan 
said recently: There is “incontrovert- 
ible evidence,” he asserted, of “reli- 
gious persecution of Catholics, Jews 


Pope John Paul U. who sided with the 
church hierarchy, was subjected to 
offensive jeering and hooting by San- 
dinist mobs. But to see this as a 
concerted attempt to “eradicate” the 
religion of 95 percent of the Nicara- 
guan people is to lake leave of reality. 

So is the d-tim that the Sandinists 
have provided international terrorist 
organizations with a base from which 
to launch attacks against the United 
States. If there is any evidence to 
support such a choree, the Mute 
House has yet to produce it. 

But nothing is more shocking than 
the ease with which Mr. Reagan and 
his associates bandy about & term 
“genocide,” mentioning the Miskito 
Indians in the same breath with the 
Holocaust What in fact has hap- 
pened to the MiskitOs? According to 
the human rights organization Amer- 
icas Watch, about 70 Misltitos (out of 
a total of about 70,000) lost their lives 
in skirmishes with Sandinist troops 
some three years ago. Managua has 
repeatedly come into conflict with 


By Dona Summers fTH* Orlando SenfTnelJ. 


difficult to arrive at an objective as- 
sessment of what is happening in 
Nicaragua or to discuss what the 
United States should do about iL 
The blame for this lies not only 
with the president, but also with 
those — whether Republicans or 
Democrats —who now so fear hwng 
branded “sdft" about Communism. 


It is, after all, they who permit Ins 
contempt for truth to go unchal- 
lenged, they who are allowing the 
United States to drift ever further 
from a realistic foreign' policy. 


The writer, a former editor of the 
journal Problems of Communism, con- 
tributed this to The New York Times. 


Silence, Mr. Will 


UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Regarding “ When Six Justices, and 
lshmad. See Harm in Silence ” (June 
11) by George F. Will: 

Mr. Will's elegant allusions and 
tortuous reasoning do not obscure 
that what he and others really want is 
for the government to promote reli- 
gious belie! among schoolchildren. 
Mr. Will ought, as I have, to live for a 
while in a country where the govern- 
ment forces rdigion on the people. 

Let us leave the inculcation of reli- 
gious belief where it belongs —in the 
home and in church. 


morning? Or if booths were installed 
' on all highways and motorists were 
required to stop for meditation? 

Alabama schoolchildren who need 
a God will find one. If they want to 
pray, they wflL But kids, if left alone, 
aren’t reaBy interested in praying. 

Even a fourth-grader can see that 
the Alabama legislature is whistling 
in the dark. 


GRAHAM BETTS, 
London. 

Thanks, but. . . 


V-?- Pfcdge is the equivalent 
of 800 of the $659 ash trays or 1^00 of 
the $404 wrenches the U.S. Navy, 
recently bought — about $2 for eacn 
of the estimated 250,000 people made 
homeless by the tidal wave. 

A nation of 100 million struggling, 
not without success, to providebasc 
rood and shelter does not need offers 
of aid so small as to be humiliating. 
farhana haque rahman. 

Rome. 


WARREN R. DIX. 

Athens. 

Mr. Win, bow would you like It if 
your legislamre approved o! editors 
who asked all newsroom staff to ob- 
serve a moment of silence every 


Regarding “ Following Tidal Wave, 
Bangladesh Braces for Possible Sec- 
ond Cyclone" (May 30): 

How gratifying to learn that .the 
U-S. government has pledged the 
huge sum of 5525,000 to help victims 
of Bangladesh’s latest disaster — or 
that Britain has pledged 562,000 


An item in your June 13 “People” 

column says ^any Belafonte and 

crew delivered 60 tons o£ niafame , 


— aaa r/e Arc liTC 

World T-shms— 15,000 of them—/ 
to Ethiopia for the starring. Is there e:. 

l-shirt 


tmenria for the starring. Is there i 
ut famine as well? 

ROBERT N. STURDEVANT. 

Juan-les-Pins, France. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 3985 


INSIGHTS 


Is to Return to France 


if, 


. - . . '** 

..... * • '-‘X’.-,. 

- './i '.^ae 

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‘•'••“•Ssse; • 
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1 ’ l -s*-*- 


By Joseph FItchett 

Imtmational Herald Tribune 

$ ■ W ARIS — Fiance’s most famous ftmigrfe 
r* from sodafism says he is coming home. 
JL Baron Got de Rothschild, 76. a banker, 
horse-fancier ana socialite, moved to New York 
in 1982 after the French government national- 
ized his family’s century-old banking business. 

In a stylish, Utter “Dear John 3 letter to 
France, the baron enmpifrined dial his family 
had been persecuted in wartime France as Jews 
and by the current Socialist government as capi- 
talists. 

“A Jew under Petain, a pariah under Mitter- 
rand — for me it's enough,” be wrote on the 
front page of the newspaper Le Monde. He 
concluded: “To rebuild an rains twice in a 
lifetime is too much.” 

His letter, headlined “Adieu Rothschild” ami 
doming from the usually circumspect doyen of 
the French Rothschilds, sounded like a door 
bong slammed. COinridmg with a wave of 
French and foreign residents departing into tax 
exile, its echoes have not yet died away. ■ 

. Bm now the baron says he plans to resume, 
residence in Paris next year, presumably just 
after the parliamentary elections, scheduled for 
March 1986, which the Socialists are expected to 
lose. He candidly says be hopes so. 

Hit annnrniwmffl r tlMit ftprUawt in m y ntftin 

Paris is being read by many French people as a 
sign that matters expect greater tolerance for 
great wealth in France in contrast to measures 
taken by the Socialists when they came to pow- 
jr. such as a wealth tax, that were aimed at 


jr, such as a wealth tax, that were aimed at 
' squeezing the rich. 

The Rothschilds, who have got it and flaunt it 
elegantly, "have never dreamed of feding 
ashamed of their wealth or of disguising that 
Hfestyle. no more than they have ever faded to 
assume their roles and responsibilities as Jews," 
says the baron. 

. But the usually urbane baron bridles at sug- 
gestions that he & returning because of calcula- 
tions about the future French political dimate. 
, “1 didn't leave France for political reasons.” 
he said in a telephone interview, “I always said 
that it was only te m po rar y.” 

. His motive in moving, the baron said, was to 
keep the French Rothschilds visible on the 
world banking scene. “I didn’t want us to wiped 
off the map because of what happened to us in 
France,” he said. 

N New York, he looked (Hit for his dan’s 
I interests in Rothschild Ino, an investment 
_L bank founded in 1967. Small by Rothschild 
standards, it provided a vehicle for the baron to 
try to re-establish the international standing of 
the French Rothschilds after their setback in 
France; 

The House of Rothschild has a record of 
surviving crises. It arose in the early 19th centu- 
ry when five brothers, sens of a Frankfurt mer- 
chant banker, established themselves in various 
capitals, forging a.European network that spe- 
cialized in loons to govanments and industrial 
ventures. Rothschild solidarity when my of the 
gilded clan gpt in trouble was legendary. 1 

Since Wodd War II, the family has shrunk to 
its French and English branches, with occasion- 

T^the British Rothschilds are financial 
powers in the Gty of London with extensive 
inter national interests and devote their spare 
family brains to becoming intellect u als and £1- 
a-year government advisers, the French Roth- 
schilds have been smaller and less innovative in 
finance and have tended to devote their spare 
family talents mainly to glamorous living. 

The blue-and-yellow s3ks of the baron’s sta- 
bles are often in the winner's circle at French 


racecourses. The vineyard Chateau-Lafhe, 
which the baron partly owns and which is run by 
another Rothschild, produces one of the world’s 
great Bordeaux wines. Few private homes areas 
elegant, few art collections as celebrated, as the 
French Rothschilds. 

Proving “that French Rothschilds are as ac- 
tive as the FngHsh half of the family” was one of 
the. baron's self-proclaimed goals in moving to 
New York and ta kin g an active role in Roth- 
schild Inc, which is jointly managed by the two 


branches of the family. Financiers give mixed 
reviews about the outlook for Rothschild Inc, 
but the French role has been recognized with the- 
appointment of the barm’s son David, 44, as a 
co-chairman of the New York enterprise. 

In! the meantime, David and his cousin Brie 
have started a new Rothschild bank in Paris, a 
ToothoM for restoring the family’s business — 
P.O. Banquet. 

' Still small, it is a private investment bank that 
specializes in portfolio managgny»n t for big in- 
vestors. Without personal nhw-kmg accounts or 
other commercial services, it is not a direct 
.successor to the Rothschilds 5 nationalized com- 
mercial bank. 

The baron has ruled out resuming crnm^n i i 
even if the nationalized banks axe returned to 
private ownership, as conservative French op- 
position po liticians have promised 

But he acknowledges hoping tint France will 
get“a political change next year, and 1 hope that 
the new leaders will make wise use of the experi- 
ence of the French people in the last couple of 
years.” 

C ERTAINLY no grass grew undo 1 his feet 
in his self-imposed exile. In 1983, he 
published his autobiography, which was 
-a besi-sefler in France. It has just come out in 
English as The Whims of Fortune," and Baron 
Guy has promoted it in both Britain and the 
United States as energetically as a professional 
writer. 

Now, he said. “Fm coming back to France to 
resume life where my personal ties are — my 
racehorses, my stable, my grandchildren.” 

And, of course, his wife of 28 years, Marie- 
Hfttine, 58, the daughter of an Egyptian cele- 
brated for her charm and ‘a handsome heir of an 
aristocratic Dutch dynasty, the Van Zoykas. 

An internationally publicized hostess with a 
passion, for collecting beautiful things and ;peo- 
pk. Marie-H&toe stayed behind in Pans to 
preside over what survived of social Kfe under 
the Socialists. 

But the couple have been frequently reunited 
over the last foor years, spending about six 
mouths a year together in their homes in France 

and elsewhere. 

Despite his trips to France, he said, his emo- 
tional exile was real after the French govern- 
ment took over the main Rothschild holdings. 
“Our House, oar name, oor historic identity was 
taken from its,” he wrote in the book. 

Thirty-five other French private banks were 
n wrinnafft iyl at the same time, but the baron 
said he felt that, in his case, the deris'oc was 
motivated as much by the symbolism of “Roth- 
schild” as by the bank’s weight in the national 
economy. 

(This view is shared by some Socialist govern- 
ment officials who contend that Banque Roth- 
schild, the commercial bank created in 1968 to 
replace the old Rothschild Frcres holding bank, 
was not prospering when it was nationalized. 
The baron, with a kind of urbane sniff, noted 
that government compensation — reportedly 
$70 million — was less than the value of the 
bank’s building in Paris.) 

Today, his bitterness has mellowed into a 
philosophical tone. “The French Rothschilds 



Baron Guy de Rothschild 

may have a certain capacity for survival because 
they have become conditioned to the ups and 
downs of French history,” he said recently. 

Talking to a British interviewer, he said that 
France, unlike Britain, “suffers from what I like 
to call bouts of measles — when sometimes 
Jews, often capitalists and always bankas be- 
come the special targets for attack." The after- 
math of the Socialists* victory in 1981 is viewed 
by him as one of these fits. 

The root of these spasmodic upheavals, he 
asserts, is money. He has elaborated that view in 
his book and in interviews. The French love 
money more than any other people, he said, 
adding -, “It’s different from the Americans, who 
are obsessed with making money. The jealousy, 
tlie pettiness of the French are very specific 
regarding money.” 

In France, he wrote in the opening pages of 
his book, “people eKng to a pathological distinc- 
tion between their own possessions, which are 
sacred, and anonymous aches labeled ‘ finance, ’ 
which are suspect.” This ambivalence about 
wealth, he suggested, has bedeviled the comfort 
of the Rothschilds in particular and the eco- 
nomic development of France in general. 

A SKED whether France is heading for re- 

f\ covery, the baron answered indirectly: 
XJL u The problem actually is not a French 
one. It’s a European one, about whether we can 
effectively surmount the problems of unem- 
ployment, poor adaptation to changing compe- 
tition and national rivalries that prevent unity." 

Tm too old to live long enough to see the 
answers, and I regret it intensely because Tm an 
intensely curious person," he said, promising 
that if he were granted enough time to see 
through the crisis, he would write another bode 
about it 

What is certain, the baron has said, is that the 
Rothschilds, who have survived setbacks in 
many countries, will revive the fortunes of their 
French hank and its tahsmanic name 

Not “Banque Rothschild.” That name, he 
seems to feel, has been nationalized plong with 
the rest of the bank. Now, he said, it has “lost its 
soul, and its best staff.” He goes out of his way 
to avoid driving past it now. He expects that the 
family’s new French bank, whatever its final 
form, win resurrect the name of their original 
enterprise, Rothschild Fibres. 


African Socialism Loses Its Allure 

As Dreams of 1960s Fade, Leaders Look to Private Capital 


By Glenn Frankel 

Washington Pm Service 

H ARARE, Zimbabwe — The African 
continent, strewn with the human vic- 
tims of economic failure, now is claim- 
ing an ideological victim as wdL 

African socialism, bom and raised as the 
privileged offspring of the independence decade 
of the 1960s and grown to maturity in the 
Marnst-Leninist states of the 1970s, has been 

dispossessed and increasingly rejected in the 
squalor and turbulence of ibe 1980s. 

Three weeks ago. President Julius K. Nyerere 
of Tanzania, one of the founding fathers of 
African socialism, announced the lifting of his 
country's 14-year ban on private ownership of 


rental hocusing and a plan to sell off many state- 
owned fa rming estates to private businessmen. 

The self-proclaimed Marxist state of Mozam- 
bique recently drafted a new private investment 
code, lowered taxes and eased imparl and ex- 
port controls in a bid to attract foreign capital- 
ists. It is one of several African states se ek ing 
investment from multinational companies they 
once viewed with open hostility. 

Similarly, Prune Minister Robert G. Mugabe 
of Zimbabwe, who calls himself a Marxist- Le- 
ninist, mentioned socialism only twice in his 
annual address to the nati on in April, and then 
only to assure his audience that his goals would 
be achieved “by education and persuasion and 
not by imposition and compulsion.” 

Many reasons lie behind the retreat from 
socialism One is the raflure of socialist-oriented 
governments, such as the ones in Tanzania and 
Zambia, and Marxist states like Ethiopia, to 
meet their people's basic needs. 

Another is general disenchantment with the 
Soviet Union, which has not been able to supply 
sufficient funds and other resources beyond 
arms to allies such as Ethiopia, Angola and 
Mozambique and which often has treated those 
nations as well-meaning bat impressionable 
children rather than full-^pdged partners. 

But the most compelling reason is sheer sur- 
vival. Many countries practicing socialism, 
whether of Mr. Nyerere’s “humanistic" variety 
or the more ideological Marxist mode of Angola 
and Mozambique, are facing economic disaster 
and groping for new ways to stimulate growth. 
Increasingly they are feared to turn to the West 
for capital and for ideas. 

About 10 of Africa's SO or so nations call 
themselves so cialis t and eight refer to them- 
selves as Marxist. But the list includes such 
anomalies as Zimbabwe, whose leadership con- 
siders itself Marxist even while the country 
functions under a mixed, often capitalist-domi- 
nated economy. 

Like Mr. Nyerere, many of these leaders 
turned to socialism in the late 1960s and early 
1970s after the first decade of independence 
when they decided that capitalism had pro- 
duced “growth without development,” that is, 
increases in the grass national product but not 
better living conditions for the vast majority. 

Few leaders are wining to concede pubKdy 
that they now are retreating from the socialist 
model. But the impact of the steps many are 
taking is dear. 

" “We've been hying beyond our means,” said 
Finance Minis ter Qeopa Msuya of Tanzania, 
one of those overseeing his nation’s policy re- 
forms. “Cutting costs is neither socialism nor 
capitalism; it’s just common sense." 

But, he added, “Those who are realists can see 
the country is moving in a new direction." 

A key feature of that new direction has been a 
move away from economic centralization. Once 
a prime goal of the newly farmed countries of 




Julius K. Nyerere 


Robert G. Mugabe 


"We’ve been living beyond our means. Cutting costs is 
neither socialism nor capitalism. It’s jnst common sense." 

Cleopa MUuya 
Finance Minister of Tanzania 


Africa, centralization was designed in theory to 
mobilize all of a nation’s thin resources for the 
push toward development. 

I N practice, centralization often led to 
bloated and corrupt bureaucracies and 
state-controlled companies in national cap- 
itals run by poorly trained officials who had 
hole or no idea of needs and priorities in the 
countryside, where most Africans live. 

In many countries, central planning started as 
a watchword and soon became a farce. Mozam- 
bique offi cials never even bothered to publish 
their last five-year plan, which was designed in 
1981 ami scrapped the same year. Planning 
offi cials here were conceding that Zimbabwe's 
last three-year plan was out of date even before 
it was announced In 1983. 

Part of the problem with socialism m Africa is 
that no government has ever defined it firmly. 
The early rulers of independent Africa, includ- 
ing Mr. Nyerere Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana 
and Kenneth D. founds of Zambia, sought to 
create a special brand of distinctly African so- 
cialism that was classless, agrarian and noncoer- 
dve, harking back to the precolonial days when, 
it was damieri, a sort of pastoral communism 
flourished in Africa. 

But while Mr. Nkrumah moved increasingly 
toward a Marxist model, Mr. Kaunda tried to 
build a massive welfare state based on the earn- 
ings of one industry — copper — while Mr. 
Nyerere eventually opted for a complete over- 
haul of Tanzania's countryside by compelling 
peasants to relocate in collectivized villages. 

All three models failed: Mr. Nkrumah’s when 
be was overthrown, Mr. fotznda’s when the 
copper wealth dried up and Mr. Nyerere’s when 
peasants rebelled against forced moves and low 
farm prices by withholding their crops from the 
official marketplace. 

In other nations, socialism began not as a 
program but as a response to perceived repres- 
sion. Since white-minority governments in 


countries such as Angola. Mozambique and 
Zimbabwe called themselves capitalist, (heir 
black guerrilla opponents quickly identified 
themselves as socialists. 

But after independence, translating libera- 
tion-movement slogans into governmental reali- 
ties proved difficult. 

Orthodox Marxism, with its belief in a broad, 
functioning working doss and a small, vanguard 
revolutionary party as prerequisites for socialist 
transformation, often seemed less than relevant 
to an Africa that lacked industry and resources 
and whose political parties generally were mass 
organizations embracing many social classes 
and ideologies. 

Even the' Soviet Union, which encouraged the 
spread of communism in Africa, could not bring 
itself to call its new Marxist proteges “socialist.” 
Instead they were labeled “socialist-oriented.” a 
tag that many African Marxists resented. 

A FRICA’S economic agony has led even the 
most doctrinaire Marxists to rethink 
-LA. their policies. Angolan officials have 
said that their Soviet economic advisers have 
encouraged them to turn to Western transna- 
tionals such as Gulf Oil for new capital during 
what they describe as the “transition period" 
between the colonial past and a socialist future. 

Marxists and other radical analysts defend 
themselves in part by denying that socialism 
ever goL a chance in Africa. 

Paradoxically, some analysts suggest that the 
country that has the greatest tikehnood of be- 
coming genuinely socialist is the last holdout 
against black rule — South Africa. There the 
reasoning goes, easts the hugest, best trained 
and most politically sophisticated black work-' 
ing class and industrial base in Africa, some of 
the continent's fastest growing trade unions and 
a readily identifiable class enemy. 

Thus, if ever there is a workers* revolution in. 
Africa, some Marxists contend. South Africa is- 
where it wffl occur. 


In Iowa, Indebted Heartland of U.S., Wave of Suicides Is Adding to Farm Stress 


A.THT -v* 
\ 
-w V'** 


By Paul Hendrickson 

' ' Washington Post Service 

A MES, Iowa — The freshly turned earth 
, - rolls right op to the edge of the inter- 

' -LJL state, theroasbud trees are bleeding into 

\ pinks and magentas; the evening rain is soft, 

i And yet five students from Iowa Stale Urd- 
■ *fcr$ity here kffled themselves during the past 
academic year. Why? Nobody really knows. It’s 
; almost as if acute stress were an infectious 

disease in Iowa. 

In March, in Strawberry Point (population 
1,463), men with mud on their boots sat in St. 

- Mary’s Raman Catholic Church and wrote 
y , i names on pieces of paper. Maybe it was the 
' name of the person in the Federal Land Bank 
* who denied their loan. 

'' ■ . Maybe it was the auctioneer who sold off the 

iTwf, family possessions as if they were bingo cards. 
Maybe it was the fellow from John Deere who 
had said, sorry, this time he’d just have to have 
cash. How areyou supposed to get your cwn in 
' | S- when they won’t give you credit? 
i m •* • One by one, these proud, humiliated men got 

^ Lw up from their pews mid walked to the ahar and 
I put their slips of paper in a coffee can wrapped 
kJ, ^Vtin/oiL Then they set it on fire They were 
r CS . lining to bum away their bitterness and anger 
V.*yf*e7 ’ before something worse happened. 

• Yes, it was symbolism, out it also was an 

/ expression of community grief. The priest who 


oversaw it said it was an effort to find a spiritual 
dimension to SO much su ffering and loss. 

A month and ahalf ago, a man near the town 
of Osage told his wife he’d be bade by supper. 
He had recently sold oat, and the sale didn’t go 
wdL He and Us wife were renters on the land, 
and die land had turned soar. All five of his 
cWIdren were dead. (Four of them were killed in 
the same automobile crash years ago.) Maybe it 
was die sale; maybe it was the world. A priest 
said he just walked out into an open field and 
shot himself. He was in his 60s. There was no 
note. 

A. fanner near Mason City was digging a 
coffin-sized hole behind Ins house a while back. 
His wife/rushed up. 

• “Oh, my Godr she cried. “What are you 
doing?" 

“It’s not forme," he said and kept on digging. 
“It’s for onr banker.” 

They got him psychiatric help. 

- A LL over the state, it is happening, and has 
f\ ■ been happening, and few want to talk of 
IX it. Neighbors avert their eyes. But it isn’t 
only suicide and murder, or the threat of it Less 
savage gods are loose here, too: wife beating, 
alcoholisn, child abuse. - All of it is up, say social 
workers, psychologists and ministers. 

What is the emlanation? A strained economy 
is much of it. The rest of it is seems devoid of 
logic., But violence, self-directed or otherwise, 
isn’t chained to reason. 


Statistics won't tefl the story, but here are 
several chilling ones: 

•A farm goes down in the United States 


every six mmoles. 

• In Iowa, according to a poll in Farm Jour- 
nal last winter, 42 percent of all farmers are 
thought to be “sliding toward insolvency.” 

• Ono-tfnrd of all Iowa farmers are facing 
foreclosure. What this means, in the jargon of 
agricultural economists, is that their debts are 
70 percent or more of their total assets — owed 
to a pale figure in a slack suit behind a big desk 
in a bank who will not lend them any more 
money. About 420,000 of the nation’s 2.4 mil- 
lion farmers have debts amounting to 40 percent 
or more of their assets. They are regarded as 
“financially stressed” Anything less then a 40 
percent debt ratio seems to amount to success. 

• Acooading to a sodologist at the University 
of Missouri, (he suicide rate among Middle 
Western fanners is 30 percent to 40 percent 
above the national nonfann rate, and rising. 

Paul Lastey, director of the Iowa Farm and 
Rural Life Poll at Iowa Stale, said: “We know 
suicide is happening. AD the signals I get teD me 
it’s happening. There's a lot of despair. I don’t 
know — mane it from (he last 18 months. But 
how do you count? Let me give you an example 
of the problem: Occupation is listed an Iowa 
death certificates, but they don't put them in the 
computer that keeps track of vital statistics. 
You’d have to go through by hand and try to 
figure out which ones woe farmers.” 


The first Iowa State suicide occurred last fall 
He was a good kid from good German stock. He 
shot himself on his parents’ farm in a little spot 
at the top of the state named Buffalo Center. He 
was in love with things coming up out of the 
ground. He left his dorm one night, rented a 
room in a motel drove home several days later. 
The neighbors spotted his car by the side of the 
road. 

“He was just lying out there in the com,” said 
his academic adviser. 

Bnt here is the mystery: His parents' farm 
wasn’t going under. It is doing fine, in fact The 
flash point- was elsewhere. 

Last year, three teen-agers in Storm Lake 
committed suicide. One was the basketball 
coach’s son. They say he just walked part his 
parents into his bedroom and shot himself. A 
psychiatrist was broughtin from the Meuninger 
Foundation in Topeka, Kansas. He talked to a 
lot of people and ran some tests and told the 
town its problems were pretty normal. What 
happened might have been just a quirk. 

In Harlan (population 5,357), on the western 
edge of the state, three farmers killed themselves 
in 18 months. The American Psychological As- ' 
sodation sent a writer out earlier this year and 
residents hinted darkly that the actual number 
was higher than that. 

Until recently, medical examiners in Iowa 
have been reluctant to pul the word “suicide” on 
death certificates. They’re still reluctant. The 


word cancels life insurance policies. But it is 
more than that People want to respect their 
neighbors. The word was, and is, such a taboo. 

To the naked eye, much of Iowa is doing just 
fine. Many farms are fat and healthy. So are 
some city dwellers. The temptation is to say the 
problem doesn't exist. It’s the hard-io-see bot- 
tom tier that’s hurting 
There are no easy answers to any of this. The 
five Iowa State suicides this past year, none of 
which occurred on campus, are thought to be 
the highest number of self -inflicted deaths at 
any college in the country. That resort went out 
cm National Public Radio in ApriL The univer- 
sity would like to think it is an isolated phenom- 
enon, freakish as lightning in a rainless summer 
sky. And, in fact, maybe it is. 

B m several weeks ago, the Office of Stu- 
dent life at ISU released the final results 
of a March “Student Stress” poll. More 
than half of the 212 students polled — 54 
percent — said that their anxiety indeed was 
related to the farm crisis. One m every four 
polled said “life was not worth living." 

Maybe the questions were phrased wrong. 
Maybe you'd get that response on any campus 
in the 1980s. 

“It would be a mistake to think that ISU is an 
island of psychological depression,” the univer- 
sity president, Robert Parks, told The Des 
Moines Register. The Register broke the suicide 


story. “This may be part of a sad nationwide 
condition." 

The university is in the town of Ames, in 
Story County, in the richest agricultural belt in 
one of the richest agricultural states. The land is 
so black it almost hurts your eyes. You stand on 
the steps of the massive student union and 
watch kids fishing in Laverae Lake, right on 
campus. The bells in the carillon toll every 15 
minutes. Lovers drift along head to head. It feels 
like a 1940s movie starring William Holden as 
Biff Baker, with June ADyson on his handlebars. 
In the library, students sit near a mural en- 
graved with words from Danid Webster: 
“When Tillage Begins, Other Arts Follow." 

Lisa Biinbach, author of “The Official 
Preppy Handbook,” came to Ames a while back 
and called it “Silo Tech" and “Mule U.” 

In Agronomy 600. there are lectures entitled 
“Water Relationships in Alfalfa" and “Effect of 
Residues on Maize Growth." The University of 
Iowa is two hours away, in Iowa City, and over 
there they like to style themselves as the Left 
Bank of the Mississippi. 

Iowa City is where the artists are. Ames is 
where the hayseeds are — never mind that Iowa 
State has a huge engineering college, that it did 
some of the earliest atomic energy research in 
the nation, that its National Public Radio affili- 
ate plays Liszt and Mozart. Things are never 
quite whaL they seem. 





Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 


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United Prea International 

NEW YORK — Cuts in the prime rate most 
majors UJS. banks helped propd the slock mar- 
ket higher in active trading Tuesday. 

Through the day, banks lowered their prime 
lending rate to 9.5 percent from 10 percent, the 
first time this benchmark rate has been at sin- 
gle-digit levels since September 1978. Morgan 
Guaranty Trust Co. took the lead and was 
followed by Citibank, Bankers Trust, Chase 
Manha t tan, Chemical New York and most 
large banks. 

Stocks of utilities, banks and savings and 
loan companies, which draw the most direct 
benefit from lower interest rates, showed 
strength. Technology stocks continued to falter. 

The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 
6.38 at 1 ,304.77. 

Broader-based indicators advanced. The 
New York Stock Exchange composite index 
rose 0.47 to 108.75 and the Standard & Poor's 
500-stock index was up 0.8 1 to 187 J4. The price 
of an average share increased 15 cents. 

Advances topped declines 955-646 among the 
2,053 issues traded. 

Composite volume of NYSErlisted issues on 
all U.S. exchanges and over the counter at 4 
P.M. EDT totaled 106.9 million shares up from 
the 82.1 million traded Monday. Big Board 
volume increased to I26J million shares from 
99.4 millioa 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department said housing starts dropped 13.7 
percent in May, the steepest decline in more 
than a year. 

The drop in house starts was disappointing 
because it indicated weakness in another part of 
the economy, said George Pin cme of Dreyfus 


Corp. But he said that the stock market’s next 
big move would be up and would be based on 
the prospect of companies being able to con- 
duct business in an environment of lower inter- 
est rates. 

Harry VUlec of Sutro & Co. in Palo Alto, 
California, was slightly more cautious. “The 
market is not responding strongly to the latest 
prime rate cuts.” he said. 

He said that the Federal Reserve Board 
would cut the discount rate this week or next 
But he said that the absence of leadership from 
any one sector of the market means that it may 
be some time before' the market moves to the 
075-1,400 area. 

‘The market wffl trade between 1,290 and 
025 uniQ one group of stocks takes the lead.' 
Mr. VUlec said. 

Commonwealth Edison was the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, up % to 31& Pan American 
World Airways was second, easing ft to 6%. 

IBM was third, down ft to 119ft. The compa- 
ny said that it was reducing the purchase prices 
for selected models of its large processors and 
intermediate system computers. It also intro- 
duced a new processor and three new work 
stations. 

Honeywell fell 1ft to 55ft. The company said 
that it expected second-quarter earnings to de- 
cline sharply, tislso said it would buy up to two 
million of its common shares in the open mar- 
ket. 

Among other technology stocks, Cray Re- 
search. Data General, Control Data ana Sony 
all were lower. Digital Equipment dropped a 
sharp 2ft to 88ft. 


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664 17ft 16k 17k + ft 

121 10ft 10ft 10ft 

5 581 11V 11V Uk + V 

S3 £5 If 559 21 20V 31 + V 

2J04J11U58 57V 57 57k + V 

43 12. 11V Ilk— k 

4 ’9S 13V 13k 13V + ft 

■111 037 3 29% 3 

.. W0 W » 096— V 

17 522 11V UV 11V + V 

88 29* 29* 29% 


S3 45 KolAlpf 6.12 
21ft 14V KabCS X0 1.1 
17 15ft KalCaf 1X7 73 
uv a Kaneb JO <0 
24k 14k KCtVPL £36 KL7 
37V 27 KCPCpf 4X5 11X 
W 14ft KCPLpf 2X0 11X 
20 Uk KCPLpf 2X3 UJ 
547% 36k KCSee 1X0 20 
Uk UV KCSdPf 1X0 BX 
1*V T2k KanGE 2X6 130 
3794 28V KanPLI £76 7J 
SV 18 KoPLPf 2X1 10X 
17ft KaPLPf £23 7X 
45 15k Katvln 

115 41V Kafypf 

20 10V KaufBr 

10k 12ft Kaufpf 
88 6B Kaufpf 
97V 29V Kelleaa 
T BV 72 Kellwd 
39% V Kenal 
26 19V Kenmt 

. _ 20k KyUlll 
16V TV KerrGi 


3792 14V 13k 13V + V 
1 47 47 47 —40* 

22 17V 17V 17k 
1 17V 17V 17V + ta 
4B3 8k BU 89* — ft 
289 22k 21ft 22k + ft 
10001 37 36V 36V- ft 

IS IBk 10k IBk — V , 
4 17k ITU 17k— k, 
47 51 50k 50V + k 

50* 12k 12k 12k 
774 17k 17k 17V + U 
152 39k 37 37 — k 

0 22V Ok 22V 
3S 22V 22k 22k— ft 

177 19ft 17V 18 —1ft 
14 <994 46k 48V— 3ft 
170 15V 14V 15V + k 
20 16ft 16k 1694 — k 

1 77V 77V 79V 

126 £3 15 1054 55k 54k 54V + ft 
1X0 £3 7 178 37V* 36V 36ft + V 

46 W k ft 
X0 £9 14 721 20V 20k 20V + k 

£44 OS 10 *55 » 28k 289* + k 

J4 <J 171 11 IDA 10k- k 


. . 21k Nafco 

29ft 219* Nashua 
IBk 70k NtOtvs X6 
34 22V NatOtsf £20 

07k 83k NDtotpf <25 
to 11M NatEdu 
30k 18k NatFGs 2X8 
M 17k NFCpf £30 ._ 

V NafGyp 2X0 <0 6 
4k 2k HtHcm 
33V 23k Nil 
65 52k Nil pf 

31 17V NAVtfE 

Uk «k NAAlneS 
27 22V NtPresf 1X6 

UV 9k NIScfnJ 
30V 22V NtSvcIn 1X0 
Uk NS land 
!0 Nerco 


124 17k T7k 17U - 
605 35ft 35k 35V +V 
709 17V 16ft 17V + fk 

137 21 20k 30V— ft 

162 43V 42* 4294— V 
W MMM 
649 Uk 7k M — W 
3 33V 33V 33ft + ft 

157 V K 0% ■ 

*43 47V 46ft 47k— ft 

£3 1610137 81V 81V 81V + ft 


XS 

5X0 

£2 


13 

7 

2J 15 
«X 35 
£0 

16 
6J 7 
7X 


IX 65 

80 


i—V 


1J6 £0 
JO 20 
ISO 90 

BJS 11X 


4 J 7 


31k 23V NevPw £70 0J 10 

15 Ilk NevPpf MO itL7 

]8 14V Nevppi 174 ia.1 

33 I7k NevPpf £30 11X 

7 14k NevPpf US 105 

JSft Bk NjvSvL SO 4 J 

3M* NEiwEI £60 £3 
29 229* NJRsc £20 7J 10 

27 16V NYSEG 244 M 7 

74 Sflk NYS a 0X0 IU 

27 19V NYS RCA 2X9B11J 

19V 13k NYS pf £12 U4 
31ft Ml* NYSpfD 323 12J 


33V MU KerrMC 1.10 £B 39 1622 39U 28ft 28V— ft iL. IS* j** 1 *^ 1 .i.H J 

30V 17ft Keys* MO AJ 9 121 29V 29ft 27V + V* fP* ??5S EJSSS? 17 

4ft Zk KeyCon 16 ft ft » ’L. MSS 1 ' 1 I-S9" J* i 


34V JI OMWF J30 J 0 2007 34 flit MV + V 


-1ft i 


35 24V Gdrteh 1X6 47 15 103 33V 3296 

11 8U GdrChpf 37 Km 20 te 7ft TV TV , 

51? S??2r; ’-SS SJ 0 34M 29V 2Sk 29V +lk 

J? 6 9°^ ■£ H >1 . 7 * 1? MV 17 + k 

1!.^ S 0 ** 1 3X 62 2447 33 22V 22k + k 

2® Vl 2J0 4J II 524 41V 41U 41V 

34U 34 cranprs 14 117 33 33 32V +1 , 

JB £4 ID 1130 20U 19V TO + V 

0 356 16V 15V 16V + k 

1X0 1.7 19 405 52V* 52 52 — V 

6 17 15V 15V Uk— ft 

*19 »9 37 36V 37 + V 

» J5 II *407 1W 28V 27k +1 

123 92 t J If* 18V 10V— V* . 

1X0 4.1 11 1261 27k 289* 29 + k 

ID 646 5*% 5V 5V + ft 


143 11V Ilk 11V 
“ 10V— ft 

31 V + k 


20V Ik GtAPet 
Ilk UV GfAtPc 
B6ft 27k GfLkln 
21k 15 GNIrn 
40ft 31 GfNNk 
27V 17 OTWTtn 
179% lift GMP 
30V iav Grevh 
61* ZV Grofler 
139* 09* GrotvG s JO 20 15 

125 GTObEI XB J 16 28 109* WV 

33ft 24 Grumn 1X0 11 9 457 319% 31k 

0k 4ft Gfimhll .16 3X 33 5V 5U 

27V 20 Gullfra J0 £8 9 7 23ft 33ft 

42 25H> GIIWjI ,33 24 12 2267 3BU 38 

66 57 GlfWpf 5JS 9.1 ' ~ 

23V Ilk GtfHIV £4 17 

It 10 GIRlUt 164 103 7 

30k GHSUpT 6J0 1£1 
_ 32k GlfSU pf A53 111 

40k 34k GlfSU pf 5X0 no 
47V 37 GlfSVI Pf CJtelZJ 
31V 24 GlfSU pr 3X5 l£4 
35 27 GlfSU PT <40 l£0 

lfk 12k GAero J3e 4J 30 

” >< Gul ton 00 10 10 


15V 12 Key Inf 1 J8 £7 

37V. 26k KMde 1X0 £4 7 

57k OT* KlmtaO £32 4.1 11 

37V 23V KnphfRd 26 21 17 

~ 17V Keoer £30 0.1 57 

1* Kotanor J2 il 14 

22k 17 Kami JO <5 TO 

36 30k Knprpf <X0 1IJ 

16 12V Korean 

45U 33k Kroger 2X0 <5 12 

22k TV Kuhtois u 

A7Vx 33ft K voter X3e IX 16 
toft 13 Knor JO <5 6 


2k TV 2ft 
3« 13ft 13 13 — V* 

5M TO* 35 35 - k 

m 57V 57 57k- k 

879 361* 36k 369% + k 

TX TO* 2BU 2BV + V 

490 )5U K* 15 __ u 

447 17V 17k 17V 

Wt 35ft 35 35ft 


Jft NnftIRs 2X0B21J 
4W4 31 Newmt 1X0 £3 
4ft IV Nwcark 
3BVi 13k NIaMP 2X8 |£5 
31ft 23k MlaAAof 3J0 12X 
W* 24ft NlaMpf 190 1|J 
“ NWW AW 11.1 
411% 31 NlaMpf 4JB3 1TJ 
WL 75 NIAApf 10X0 10J 


2 is § m- s £S Sv SEE! 


* 3TA 
73 18 


33ft— ft 1 
171% + k I 


__ |«| 

2 63U 63 63k +lk 

416 15U 19k 15k— ft 
1925 16 ISV 15V— k 
IBOcUk 36k 3ik— Tk 
Ufa 34k 34k 34k +lk 
Ufa 39 37 37 -4k 

1 50k 30k 50k +lk 
57 31ft 30V 31 
24 34k -34 34V + ft 

722 Wt 17V 18 + k I 

a 15V 15k 15ft + M 


29 22V LN He £77* 92 11 

17k 12V ULE RV £17elSA 

4ft IV LLCCP 

Uft 7ft LTV 

» 41k LTVpf 

2594 15k LTVpf 

69 42ft LTVpf 

IBft 10k LTVpf 

17 10U LQufnf 

29V lau LadGs 

1W% 694 Lafarge 

20k 73 Lafrepf 204 104 
1<V% 9ft Lamurs 24 23 2 

4k iv LomSee 775 

Uk 10V Lowtlnf J6 £0 14 

Mft 13k LeorPI 20 M 11 

28ft 20k LecrPpf 2J7 125 


£06 103 
SXS 1£2 
MS IM 

19 

1X0 7X 1 
SO 20 


Bft 3>V LeorSe ton 16 

is 40 u 


M0 

.92 

X0 


H 


41V 26k EGG 
1714 161* EQK n 
32k 22k ESvst 
m 20 EOOtof 
tok 12 Eases J4 
TV 3k EastAir 
IV EALwtO 
Vt EALwtA 
6k EsAIrnf 1.18* 
»V EAlrpfB M0h 
TV EAlrpfC 
28V 21ft EasfGF MO 
a 12k EastUfl 2X6 
52 4!ft EsKode £20 
60ft *0 Eaton M0 
30k 20k Ecfrtln JB 
32k » Edcefd TX4 
37k 31k Ed bbr M0 
18V 13 EDO X8 
34ft 17k Edward JO 
24V 17V EPGdpf £35 


4V 

IV 

tok 

23V 

27V 


x un 

1X6 70 
30 IJ 16 

IX* 4S 1 

.44 72 


17 77 
9J t 
U 12 
20 7 
£5 13 
£7 U 
<J 14 
IJ 12 
20 16 
70 


713 

4096 

40 

40 -ft 

a 

16V 

16V 

16V— ft 

116 

a 

30V 

30V 


136 

32k 

av 

32k +1 

137 

17V 

17V 

17V 


1387 

IV 

iv* 

n% + mi 

67 

39* 

3V 

3V 


107 

IV 

Ik 

IV 


*5 

20k 

209* 

20k + ft 

95 

22k 

22k 

22V— ft 

56 

36V 

26ft 

26ft 


263 

23V 

22V 

to 


106 

a 

31V 

av + k. 

3425 

44 

43k 

<4 + V 

1274 

53V 

53ft 

53ft — ft 

167 

25V 

3496 

24% 


14*7 

27V 

27V 

27V 4 

■ ft 

612 

36ft 

Mk 

36ft -1 

h V 

55 

15k 

ISV 

WV 



27k 1«V HoKFB MO 17 IU 27V 26V 27V + k 
36ft 26ft Halbfn UO6Xll 645H29M20k29 - V 
IV V Haired XS £8 17 m IV 1ft IV 

m* Halwdpf -5% £7 14 7k TV 794— V 

37k 25V HamPi 1J6 £8 11 193 36k 35k 36k— ft 
Ilk 11k HanJS Mm TJ B7 15 Uft uv + S 

1X6 a BJ 72 21 20V 20V + k 

£6 3X 16 1049* to tok 27V + V 

06 30 19 17 ISV Uk Uft— k 

jo £i a “ — — — 

1x0 T0 17 

S6 IJ 3) 

31 


37ft 251% EPGef £75 l£0 
29k 24V EPGor 
17ft 79* EITgre 
17k Bk Elcor 
5V 2V ElecAi 
38k 17V Elens I 
17k lift EMn 
u 5 Ebdnf 
TBft Sf EimEl 200 


XO 


157 av 31 31 V + s% 

2 2*V 24V 349% 

30 39 28V 28ft— k 

41 27 2BV 29 

61 WV 18 IBft + ft 

5 TV TV W%— 1% 

IS 4V 4ft 4ft 
136 to Z4k 24V + 1* 

6 14k IJ 14 — I* 

.. 1035 1 49* 49* _v . 

£7 13 1333 TOW 49V 67k + V 1 


20V lift HOUI 
30 Uk Handli 
20V 15k HondH 
toft 16V Hanna- 
64 27V* HarBrJ 

35 17k Hartals 

129% 79* Hamisb 

2Sk 25 HamPfBSJO 135 
25V* 23 HoroPFC 
tok 1»* HrpRw X0 £7 10 

35 3716 Harm JB U 19 

UV 10V HarGrn 7 ._ .... . 

» it Hana 1X8 <4 12 1930 27u 29 27ft 

1W* Wt Hartmx ut U 11 B1 26V> 36 36 

17V 13V HpftSe 1^70X11 - 

24 Vk UV MawEI 104 60 II 
uv 6 HavMA xoeax a 
34V 23k MaxJefn JO 10 14 

" a 20 is 

38 


71 101% 18V 189* + ft 

372 6T 57V 60V— ft , 

HD 33 32V » +ft 

704 9k 7ft 7k + ft 

11 25ft 251* 25ft + k 

*32 25V* 241* as 

21 281* 31 3B — ft, 

33B 36V 36ft 26V + k 

72 14V 14V 14V— k 

----- fc 


X3e .1 IB 

36 IB 


J 26 
£7 15 


Uk 7 HodJOb 
31 1S9* HlthAs 

33k 31 HltCrPn 
32V 19V HitUSA 
15V TV Heeu 
18V 13ft HecHM 
23V 14V Hellnwi 
30ft 1« Heim 
SSI* 34k HehtE 
to 12V HetaeC 
24V IB HefniP 
6V 3V HentCa 


48 17V 17k I7k 

89 24 23V 24 + ft 

a ev tv «v + k 

62 25 24k 34k— V 

50 12k TO* 12k 
356 aft 32V au + V 

332 73 av a + ft 

si 20V to » — 1* 

XB U 9X1 15 MV 15 + k 

X0 M 25 0*9 17ft 16V 17ft + V 

J8b2JU 281 20V 17V 20—9% 
JO M IS 55 toft 20 to — ft 

100 3X M 3443x53V 52V 52V + I* 

24 33 II 17V 17V— ft 

J4 1.7 a 117 199% 17k 17ft— k 
U 6V 6W 6k 


24 284* 259% 28k— ft 
377 14 13ft U 
47 IV 14% lk— k 
’*4 TV TV 7V 

2 42ft 42 42ft V 

J**- 1H4 + V 

11 43 424* 43 + iK 

7 10k 10ft 109% + k 
344 12V 12V 12V— k 
J* OT% 23k + V 

’IS -2? 2* + u 

18 23k SV 23k + k 

J £ 3k + Ml 

V£ Ug ]JS BS-* 
S' S3; + » 

55 ^ to* + v 

66 16 17a* 17H + k 

“I toft 30ft — V 

32 41ft 41 41 

210 16ft 15ft ]6ft + ft 
436 21V toft 21V— k 
163 3k ZV Z 3W + ft 

117 UV Uft 149% + ft 

>M nv 12V ira** 
» JJ5 i7v isv— k 

Jto TOy 34V 3494— V 

“ VV 46V 

I M. 2J? 74 + k 

90V S3 UHv 3X0 3X 12 1697 |m kS mST.S 

nru X » 5 43 47k Sift <n* +196 

25 Hl M Umttf wl 27 * 1 * 9 ^ *«. "f‘ 3 r 

4WJ ttVi UflOill 1 JB4 43 11 lS SE + 

23 k IBk LbtcPl 2 X 40 90 • S! ™ V 

88 61 V Litton 1 JD 1 12 

5 * 9 * Blk ufenwd 

is; hus"* mb 92 

SSk 30* Lockhd jfle u 9 
m 27 LocfttB JO £0 12 
51V tok Loewis 1X0 £] 12 
L Molren X0 0 10 
36V 22 LMIFH 1.16 3J U 
30 16V UmMI.Ul u 11 

3V 2 LomMwt 
27_ 17k LnStnr i.fo 72 6 
51k 44 UateSpf £37 1&7 


18 V ] 04 J Nicolet .12 

ESg® % x 

r u 

439* 30 Narotr £40 5J 

w 12 H°n«k Sa S 

St* NACool l.w XT 
1 X 0 £0 


205 a a*k a** + 1 * 

1 38 26 k toft 26 k + ft 
187 13 V 13 k 13 V + ft 
373 32 V 33 32 k- lk 

30 X 85 85 IS 

467 15 V 15 H 159 %—’ 

132 30 k 27 k 30 V- 
5 23 ft 23 ft 23 ft- _ 

416 «V 43 V 43 V— L- 
8 4 th 4 k 4 k-- T'-- 
920 26 ft 25 V 26 ,+ N 
— „ 1 58 58 58 : + 6 

IX 15 3930 279 % 27 U 27 k+V 

25 8 7 k TV— k 

4.1 12 M 36 ft 26 26 . 

13 2816 Ilk lift UV + t% 

„ 13 12 168 29 k 37 k 39 k + V 
JO 27 11 160 13 V Uft 09 % + ft 

04 a 50 7 43 lift 11 U + k 

MB 214 % 30 k 314 % + k 
30 fa 15 15 U +U 

«Jta 18 17 ft 17 ft— k 
37 fa 71 71 21 —ft 

5 IM IM IM . 

„ » Ilk lift nv __ 

7 1467 43 V* 429 * 43 k + ft 
7 27 k 274 % 279 % + k 
817 Z 7 k toft 77 +ift 
20 fa 74 72 k 74 + 1 . . 

5 26 k toft 26 ft — 96 
7 19 ft 10 ft 19 ft 4 ft 
2 30 V 30 k 30 J%— V 
1 ISV 1596 JS* 

42 559 % SSk 5 B% + 4 % 

12 16 % 169 * 16 V— « 

e 4 8 k 8 k Ok 

» 505 43 k 42 V 43 V + V 
„ 34 IV lk n% 

"swssjrt* 

KSS 

35 te 41 40 41 

230*100 78 k 100 ... 

I 35 fa 67 64 ST .13' 

m isv isft isv — v 
to 13 12 V nv— V 

827 33 k 32 k 3 S» + V 
1273 15 k UV 15 k 
672 67 V 60 ft 45 V— » 

263 10 k 109 * WV +J% 

102 44 V <4 4 V% + J% 

7 529 * 52 k Bk + V 
a 36 34 V 36 +1 

211 16 k 15 V 16 V + k 
78 B 17 16 V 17 + k 

6 M 1 12 119 * 12 + ft 

234 479 * 49 V 49 V . „ 

Ufa 35 k - 34 k »k 1 1 ? 
TOfa 37 V 27 V 37 % + V 
300140 40 40 

ite 40 m 40 
Ifa 43 43 43 +1 

• 3 k £k Jk + ft 


ml*' ' - 

V-llu .'- ’ • 
-\t: ... 

Btlfw'-i 1 

itur-L”' •' 
a h.--s ' 

mit’ir. 
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pfi+l'.::.'- 
for i’t.iiv;- 

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cultural 
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34k 25V MwvTr 
42V 22t% LMEnt 
10k 9 LeaMas 
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15V 13k MtKTM 
15k 9k Lennar 
249 * 109* LeucNtS 
ny. 75 Lev 151 Ml SJ 27 
5M* 42ft LOF M2 U 0 
79Vi MW LOF pt 4JS 6 A 
toft tok UMyCp 72 2J 18 


45ft 2Bk NAPMI _ 

13V NEurO lJBp yj jg 
!2i 11 NaagHIt MB 93 6 
159% 109% NlndPS M6 i ll a 

IS S K 2S?" W “ » 

5* 3 KSE?"* iB-i 

37 30 NSPwpf 4X8 10J 

« 3JV NSPwpf 4.10 IU 

r 

4» T* N moots 

SJJ 52* Nortros 1X0 23 M 1489 S3 SZU 
SiS *4* £1 17 176 52ft 57 


MBellX 
XO 10 17 


Si? 515? ffwtln wd 
toft 199* NwtP pf 236 10J 
25* JV NWSfW 

30V Norton £00 50 12 
21 k Normt 1X0 6J U 
«w Nwlfof &07elO 
S? S>. !' w8,pf £06elOJ 
SW* »** Nava 26m .9 w 

*3 -5, » 

Bk ,3 NutrTS JMI 

B* MV NYNEX 6J0 73 0 


13 5Zk 52k 
WO 23k 229% ZM "Ht% 
4 Bk 8V fk . „ 
48 26 35k 359* + k 

273 77 26k 

1 53k 53k — , T . 

X47 539* 83V 539* + W 

166 27A 27k 2fl% 

160 34k 34k 34k j- 
40 3k 3V 3J% f f 

752 Wk 87ft «ra+» 


7k 

30 

63 k 

<7 

a 

72 

31b 


. 39 * ULCO 
M LILpftt 
£5 LILptl 
2 W ULpfK 
8 k ULpfK 
7 LILPIW 
, 7 k ULpfV 
36 V lift ULpfU 
a 8 k ULofT 
61 V 27 ft LILpfS 
WV i LILpfP 
W* 7 LI L PfO 
21 V II LonpOc 


■33 27 14 


3 tol% B 239* + ft 
,nS OW 129* + ft 

1077 83U Cft igu + t 
3 21k zik m*— ft 

a S* sS P 

Sc 7? + *4 

60S Uft 48ft 40ft 
17 32 ]]% t|v 4. ft 

» ^ lS 34ft- 5 

12 ^7 ZWS 

402 3V 3ft 3ft 
UT 24V 23V toft + ft 

ia ?25 S? v 1 

U $k 1« 1 5ft— ft I 

3 ? 179k 18 + ft 

304 26k Z6V ZCV 


M* IV Oofclnd 
£6 OH OoMteP 
34V 23k orcIPrt 
14V 7t% oSpkt 
29k toftOcdPpf £50 MX 

S*i 3 i§F 3 a« 

IMtolDIVi 0«Sof uS 13X 

S* Su. SPF. 60 1x0 <4 y 

24k O0d6n 1x0 6£ 13 
7ft OMoEd 1X0 123 4 
SJJ Of] Ed M £90 125 

SS Su, 9S5SH 440 ,S -7 
#« OttEdpf 4J4 117 

3T“ ohea pf *5* 12* 
«» « wJldm 7 js i£* 

8 r b iT b stRrisi 8 S 


TTU. lift OtlAAotr ZA U 

SJ* flk OfiPpfB 7XJ jij 

BTV Sk OhTtfC 700 na 


4X U 3 31ft TO* 3® + JJ 
73 10 1386 375* 32ft 32V- » 
704 Uk 73ft 13k + W 
a 24ft 24 14j% t V 

a 20k 20V 7t£0— * 

4 22ft 22ft Bft „ 

46 S6ft 56k 56k- * 
75 10«* 108ft 
11 RMklOAklOBk + V 

aa a 20v 2g%-» 
,571 Sift 27% 27»— » 
2876 Uft 15 Wf> +S 
tofaMft 30 30ft — » 
a 34 a 34 — 1 
30te 33ft 3Zk 35ft— V 
20te2Sk 35k 35k 
Ufa 55ft SB* Sift 
5to SBk BH£ 3U* 

370C64 62 64 -Mg 

46 20ft to 28k- ft 
37 31k 30V 31 + 

- U ISV Uft 15ft— I 
34te66k 66 6fl*+f’. 

toz H7 17 St +• 

M 149 129% 12k 12ft- “ 
ISOte TO . 60 . 68 *7 
6500x68% 60 68 Mk 


(Continued on Page 10) 










m 


J . I J 


_ ■ K : 




Statistics Index 


amex ericas' MS WrtawfaiQrtsP.- 
amex HBMtosP.U Fins rale IMn Ml 


NYSE Driest 

ff.S 

Com markers 

P .9 

NYSB hMli/toM PJO 

t meres roes 

P. 9 

Canodon stodts 

P.U 

Market summarv P. B 

CurrMev row 

P. 9 

OpttMS 

P. 1 B 

ConimM&ns 

PJO 

OTcsoa 

;P.n 

Dividends 

p.n 

Othsr markstt 

P.U 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 

1 NTBRWATI 0 WAL MANAGER 

Bosses Learn to Smooth 
Cultural Kinks in Office 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN . 

- . IntematiOall Heraid Tribune 

"'■"'V ARIS — Anybody working in an intamadonal office 
i t 1 6 J enviro nme nt experiences nani-culture .shocks every day. 

! cj; I The most common way to cope with other peoples' 

■ ?. . unfamiliar ways is to let off. steam at the bar or crack 

^ i . jokes about particularly annoying cultural quirks. The topic often 
; is taboo daring office hours — and for good reason: National 
: I stereotyping is often synonymous with outright prejudice. 

1 jj, ^ But a number of academ ic s and consultants argue that multi- 
■ nationals should train their managers in cross-cultural coxmmmi- 
cation to minfmbg potential conflict within the corporation. 
‘‘What strikes me most in dealing with international m a n a g ers 
* : f is that they enjoy cultural dif- — 

U Few corporation* 

prepare managers to 

^ of Business Administration deal With Cultural 

(Tnsead) in Fontainebleau, 

; f^s France. “Bat curiously aineKnoes. 

•;»% enough, when it comes to 

‘tl\ manngmg, they still dream 

v;C they’re could be a universal style of management with a capital 

jjjr M.” 

J> 1 Based on empirical studies conducted at Inseadand the Insti- 
tute for Research on Intercultural Cooperation, executives of 
different natio nalities perceive authority, org aniza tional stxuc- 

* • tune, motivation and communication differently. - 
•hi i For example, Mr. Laurent’s study found that French and U.S. 

J J, . .executives make different assumptions about how to deal with 
Q':% the boss. 

'j: l • • Reporting to several bosses is a no-no for the French: 83 

percent of French executives interviewed said it should be avoid- 

ed at all costs, only 52 percent of UJS. executives agreed. 

• Fifty-nine percent of the French executives agreed that the 
*. (| boss should have all the answers, but only 13 percent of the U.S. 

s! j executives expected as much from higher-ups. 

k i • Bypassing the boss is more acceptable to U.S. executives: 68 

^ * percent of Americans believed yon could bypass your immediate 

boss to get the job done, while only S3 percent of French 
executives agreed. . ; 

Many rniiltmati/mals SUCh as Sh fR, Philip s and EXXOD, help 

managers adjust to cultural differences outside the corporation 
'* ? through expatriate briefings or training in international negotiat- 

ing skills. 

■ ‘ ‘ . 

*. v . T l UT few prepare their managers to deal with cultural 
<1 b ■ » differences within the corporate family. Most multmation- 
J— r als believe managers of different nationalities will blend 
‘ into the company's own corporate culture — its basic set of 
=, j - values and assumptions about motivation and reward, commum- 
;>« cation, control and authority. . . 

“We accept the idea that national identity h«« an impact on 
.'l _ manager s’ way of doing things,” said Lutz Reuter, director of 
;j management development at Digital Equipment Coip/s Europe- 
an headquarters in Geneva. “But we put a cultural alternative 
r* " . into the pipeline, that’s our company culture. 

/!■ “The overlay of a strong company culture minimizes the 
** problem of national cultures,” be said. “At Geneva headquarters, 
for example, it’s not socially acceptable to ask what nationality 
m .‘i you are. We have 75 nationalities, it’s a non-issue for ns." 

!>, c Digital Equipment, a computer company based in Maynard, 
Massachusetts, runs three-day corporate culture seminars. 

Other multinationals are starting to sensitize managers to 
\ cultural differences within the corporation, sometimes through 
! ; i ^the use of culture-shock consultants.' 

-? For the past three years, Pari^based IBM Europe has conduct- 
ed three-day, cross-cultural communication courses on a vohm- 
(Continnedofl Rage H, Co L2f 


Currency Rates 


1 

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June 18 

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V HrAth 7V> 
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Federal FIMA 
Prime Rate 
EinHr Loan Rate 


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MU «MVi 


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moanr vm AM «Jl 

tmoatt TraararyWH 677 6M 

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Lombard Rate 

t m eraHwmo 

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Fraace 

lanryaAHaa Rate 
■ CaUMaaer 
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tmeattlaHrMt 


«JD UO 
SJO SS 5 
1*6 SM 
571 570 

575 SX 


10h W7» 

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! VJSL Md i ey Mntot Bn* 

Jaae 18 

Harrin Lmb Readr Assets 
ID day average yield: 841 

Teitrata intent o ula Ww: . na 
Source: Merrill (,ync* AP 


Cold 


Brttata 

Bank bom Rate \ th UVS 

Can Money » 1» 

SHfay neararr BS 115 m 12 

ImuM interaatt 1» 12 W 


OUcoaaMtott 
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• . AM PJbL CkW 

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Fori* reMJttoJ WM WM 4- 183 

ZwWi ■ ■ - ntX ' 3 S 35 +475 

^MHoa TO 45 32375 +ASS 

. - — ’ . 32770 +880 

-UMerntaww Path and London otfidat fix- 
hwei Ho tm Kong and Zurich opening and 
***** F*Ofc’ -Hew. York Comae attend 

contract ah orietg m ujs, s per ovnee. 
Source; Keaton. 


^Markets Closed 

Financial markets in Malaysia will be dosed beginning Wednesday 
because of a holiday. They will reopen next'Monday. ' 


Bcralb^^Sribunc, 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8. 

Page9 


Cies/we M London and Zurich. fUlnes bt other European atrton. New YDr* nrte* at * PM. 
in i commercial franc (bl Amounts needed to buy one pound (cl Amo un ts n eeded to buy one 
Honor /-) Units of roo lx> UnHsoftMO tr) Units of UUOONJl: not oueOed: AI 7 U notwmftabte. 
ftr} TP Hmnme pound: SUJSASn 

OtherDaDarValMs 

' Corrmcy per UM - Currency per IASS Corraocy per uu . Co r ranor per U 85 

u Arwa.awtrat 080 FI*. markka 6 J 675 Mar. Hem- 24655 MKpt.wm 875.15 

lAralreLf 1.5175 Graekdrac. 135 l 5 D Mn-PMO 29125 Spaa.paMla 17545 

VuMr. UML 21-50 • Hanp Kanos 77485 NarakteaM .1801 Mrad-lcrano 8457 

Bpl 0 .fln.fr. 4110 Mbanipap I 2 SB FMLpm OJO TaMaaS 3977 

Brazil on. S 72 B 80 Indo-rapWi 1,11840 Parf.aecada 17375 TUrfbaW 27795 

Canadians U 474 Irtzti C 1977 Saudi rtyal 14307 TOrKMiara 52745 

OaMdi krona 1093 HrarilWek. 1,13445 Stas.* 27253 UAEdMmm 34735 

Egypt pound 1 J 3 KMraW dtew 03031 S.Afr.rond L 979 Venttbofly. 13.10 

* SMrttop:17SS5 IrtdlC 

Sources : Banouo do Benelux (Brussels); Banco Commercbk r ttafkxia /Milan/; Btxme No- 
Nonofe do Parts (Parts); Bonk of Tokyo (Tokyo!; IMP (SDK); BAtt (dkrar. rtyert. dirham), 
amor dote from Reuters and AP. 


Soviet, 

U.S. Sign 
Farm Pact 

Carter Canceled 

Similar Accord 


Compiled by Ota Suff Front Dupadies 

MOSCOW — The United Stales 
and the Soviet Union fign rd an 
agreement Tuesday on agricultural 
cooperation similar to one broken 
off by the United Slates in 1980 to 
protest the Soviet intervention in 
Afghanistan. 

Daniel G. Amstutz, U.S. under- 
secretary of agriculture, said the 
two sides had agreed to cooperate 
in 20 agricnltura] areas, induding 
the exchange of specialists, young 
fanners and technology. 

A similar 1973 agreement was 
abrogated by President Jimmy Car- 
ter in January 1980 after Soviet 
troops entered Afghanistan. 

A year ago. President Ronald 
Reagan said he wanted doser links 
with the Soviet Union in some ar- 
eas, including agriculture. ' 

Since then, Agriculture Minister 
Valentin K. Mesyais of the Soviet 
Union has visited the United States 
and U.S. Commerce Secretary 
Malcolm Baldrige has been in Mos- 
cow, where the two nations agreed 
to cooperate more closely on trade 

in general 

Such agreements have been criti- 
cized by some Americans in the 
past as helping the Soviet Union 
more than the United States. But 
Mr. Amstutz said, “A plain objec- 
tive of this agreement has been to 
ensure it is balanced." 

When asked whether helping the 
Soviet Union increase agricultural 
output would not hurt export- 
minded U.S. farmers, Mr. Amstutz 
said he believed that Moscow 
would continue to import Ameri- 
can grain and other farm products 
if trade channel g stay open. 

“1 am confident that economic 

erpanoinn will mn tinnr to OCCUT 

hoe.” he said. “Buying power of 
individuals will nrauimie to im- 
prove, and that buying power will 
continue to be manif ested in great- 
er demand for food products." 

Moscow has had to impart huge 
quantities of grain in recent years, 
induding record supplies from the 
United Sates, to hdp make up fra 
poor harvests. 

So far in the 1984-85 fiscal year 
that started last October, the Soviet 
Union has bought 20 mfflion met- 
ric tons of U.S. grain, mostly com 
for livestock. 

Mr. Amsnnz’s visit to Moscow 
marked the first meeting since ] 978 
of the US -U SSR Joint Commit- 
tee on Cooperation in Agriculture. 

A pastU-S. complaint about the 
farm agreement is that the Soviet 
Union was unwilling to provide 
economic information that would 
permit more accurate forecasts of 
harvests. 

Mr. Amstutz said the Soviet 
Unicn stiff will not provide as 
miyh data as the United States 
would like, but said there will be 
new information that will hdp UJ>- 
offidals predict the impact of Sovi- 
et harvests on world markets. 

Mr. Amstutz said that beginning 
in June, 1986, 15 young fanners 
from each nation will spend three 
months in the other country and 
that U.S. grain experts will visit the 
Soviet Union. (Reuters, AP ) 


JapaneseCaptureti&Market... As Sale&Takea Tumble 


Share of market lor ttMMMMlfMia of 

OynanticfttiMcdps . . 

16k -PeakycariaSd, sfies$840mSlipn 

60% . 

4dic ^ 


O Japan 


Sgieaofaff&pesaf memory eftfes. 
b^msca detere ■ 


256 k :* 1984 aatee$ 7 ian» 8 | 9 q 

jg8% - ■/ 

So iw&BWfcjaMf . 



U.S. Banks Fined 
For Violations 
Of Currency Law 


By Michael Isikoff no1 S ivm a h*&h priority by the 

Washington Pm Srnice banks," Mr. Walker said, "but the 

WASHINGTON — Four major 5“* of B*? 011 changed that." 


k banks have agreed io Non^mpliancc. be added, “does 
penalties of S2 10.000 io l ““ 1 00 “» of banks as a 
each for failing to report ™ te J “> manage their own opera- 
- ~r tions. 


Iha NowYoifc Ti« 


In the Volley of the Chip Makers 

Japan’s Dominance Keeps U.S. in Worst-Ever Slump 


By David E. Sanger 
Mew York Tima Service 

NEW YORK —Just a year ago, the makers of 
computer chips rode atq> the high-tedi world. 
To supply parts fra a seemingly insatiable com- 
puter industry, giants like Texas Instruments and 
Mostek raced to retoot (heir plants for a new 
generation of memory chips. And three Silicon 
Valley stalwarts. National Semiconductor, Ad- 
vanced Micro Devices, and Intel, spent hundreds 
of millions of dollars adding plant capacity — 
sure of a quick payback. 

- This summer, in hindsight, those grand expan- 
sion plans look like they were assembled by 
brash river explorers who discovered too late that 
the noise ah*art was Niagara Falls. 

The industry’s strategy of overcoming Japa- 
nese competition with a combination of new 
technology and greater manufacturing musde 
has gpne dramatically awiy. A huge How of 
Japanese-made chips, combined with slow com- 
puter sales and wild price-cutting from Japan, 
have plunged UJL semiconductor makers into 
rtwir deepest slump ever. 

More importantly, the downturn has perma- 
nently damaged one of the few manufacturing 


industries whose rapid growth had raised hopes 
of supplanting the declining rust industries. 

Even when the slump lets up, experts agree, the 
United States will have permanently ced e d the 
biggest angle pratian of the market to Japan: 
dynamic RAMs, or Random Access Memory, 
the tiny memory chips that store data in electron- 
ic equipment of all soils, from computers to 
video cassette recorders. 

Already, several U.S. companies have aborted 
plans to manufacture the newly developed 256K 
RAMs, which, will set the standard for memory 
chips over the next five years. And only a handful 
have made prototypes of the next generation of 
chips — the megabit RAM. four times more 
powerful. Meantime, half-a-dozen Japanese gi- 
ants are racing ahead on the megabit RAM. 

“The battle in the RAM memonr market is 
over," said John J. Lazio Jr., technology analyst 
at Hambrecht ft Quist "The Japanese won." 

Boom-and-bust cycles in semiconductors, of 
course; are hardly new. But for the fust time, a 
deep and l/wg depression has been accompanied 
by remarkable gains in Japanese market share. 

The big Ja panese rp /nnames — Toshiba, Mat- 
sushita, Hitachi, Mitsubishi and others — axe 
(Continued on Page U, CoL 3) 


New York banks have agreed to 
pay civil penalties of $210,000 to 
$360,000 each for failing to report 
thousands of international curren- 
cy transactions in violation of fed- 
eral law. the Treasury Department 
said Tuesday. 

In addition. 140 other banks are 
under criminal investigation for 
posable violations of the same law 
as part of an ongoing campaign to 
crack down on alleged money- 
laundering at financial institutions. 
Treasury officials said. 

Three of the banks dted Tuesday 
— Manufacturers Hanover Trust 
Co_ Irving Trust Co., and Chemi- 
cal Bank of New York Corp. — 
voluntarily disclosed the violations 
discovered during internal audits 
last spring. The fourth bank. Chase 
Manhattan, was fined $360,000 for 
1,442 reporting failures involving 
more than $852 millio n. 

Manufacturers Hanover was 
fined $320,000 for U93 transac- 
tions involving nearly $140 million. 
Irving Trust Co. was fined 
5295,000 for 1,242 transactions in- 
volving nearly $310 million and 
Chemical Bank was fined $210,000 


Mr. Walker said that he had 
written to every chief executive 
bank officer io the United States to 
underscore the government's deter- 
mination to enforce the law. 

Bui one New York bank official 
said that there was a feeling in the 
industry that "there is some real 
grandstanding" by Treasury oxer 
the issue. "These transactions were 
all perfectly legal." said the official, 
who asked not to be identified. 
“There's a bit of bank-bashing go- 
ing on." 

Spokesmen for two of the hanks 
said that the violations had not 
been intentional. 

“Some clerical people did not file 
reports here and there,” said Fraser 
Scitel, a spokesman for Chase. “We 
agreed to pay the fine to settle the 
thing, but we don't believe if we 
hod chosen to contest the matter, 
there would have any penalty. 
There was nothing wiilfiu about 
i his thing." 

Charles Salmans, a spokesman 


for 857 transactions involving near- for Chemical Bank, said "We made 


ly $26 million. 


a business decision —we elected to 


John M. Walker Jr„ an assistant pay the fine to avoid legal and 
secretary of the treasury, said that other expenses. For an institution 


the fines were less than 25 percent of our size, it was not going to 
of the maximum. He said that the break the hank " 
reduced penalties were “appropri- Mr. Salmans said that virtually 
ate" because there was no evidence all the violations for which it was 
of wtHful or knowing violations by dted occurred because it farted to 


reduced penalties were "appropri- 
ate" because there was no evidence 


Paris to Seek Steel Aid 
Beyond an EC Deadline 


senior bank officials. 

But he said that the banking in- 
dustry as a whole had been negli- 
gent m heeding the Bank Secrecy 
Act, a 1970 law that requires banks 
to report to the Treasury Depart- 
ment all cash transactions in excess 


Uon) in aid that it has promised the 


PARIS — France will ask the industry through 1987. 
European C ommuni ty this week They said that Fn 


Dollar Tumbles 
Amid Hopes For 
More Rate Cuts 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar 


report about $25 million in Europe- 
an currency purchases made to 
meet demands from American 
tourists planning to travel abroad. 

The fines usually are based on 
the number of unreported transac- 
tions. The Treasury could have 


of $10,000 except where waivers are fined each bank up to $1,000 for 


obtained. 

The apparently widespread non- 
compliance with this requirement 
first came to light in February, 


each unreponed transaction, but 
- because the banks cooperated, the 
t Treasury reduced the fines by as 
r, ranch as 75 percent to as little as 


uusuy unuugn iyof. , A H group of mostly Swiss banks. 

They raid that Fnmce would staged a sharp and brmd retreat 


propose that it pay the additional Tuesday as the prime l«dmg rate 
amount of aid to its steel industry “d as quickly as possible, but that at mqor US. banks reteroedto 

beyond Dec. 31. 1985, the /fearilim- it could not do so before the EC first 

- - J ! — *'• - smee October 1978 and expecta- 


when First National Bank of Bos- $250 for each transaction, 
ton was fined $500,000 after plead- Before October 1984. the maxi- 
ing guilty to fading to report about mum penalty for an unreported 
$1.2 billion in cash transfers with a transaction was $1,000, but Con- 
group of mostly Swiss banks. gress increased that maximum fine 
Compliance with the act “was late last year to $10,000. 


fra such subsidies agreed upon by 
EC members,' government sources 
said Wednesday. 

Government and industry 
sources said the request was likely 
to bring strong resistance from the 
Commission and other EC mem- 
bets, especially West Germany, 
which had agreed reluctantly to ex- 
tend the deadline to the end of 
1985. 


deadline expires Dec. 31. 


Industry sources said the addi- for further interest-rale * 

SSSSH 14 %; Steepesl 

ifaggg^i.^d sg-f-jfx “S 3 ? 

to penm investment aid rad nita- 'mx trtte risLlt to starts in the United Stoles dropped 

SJjSS 1 ” mpa “ H unfl ffltalSK IW|«o« “> May. the 3* 

M "A. diplomats smd dm Ita d* M be ^ 

agreement had paved the way for ondwlrttnt ;kmt interest rates to yesfs ’ of 


Housing Starts in U.S, Drop 
14 %; Steepest Fall Since ’84 


couraged by lower interest rates 
that made both construction loans 
and mortgages for buyers less ex- 
pensive. Many analysts had fore- 


“It appearsthat the Fed may be ^ ZL'JSL ' ““ *” hOU5in8 


. . - x , agreement nan pavea me way jot However this year's nace of 

Aspolres^forl^meNfimstff to ils sla _ weabm the dofiar to protect US. 

LaorentFahiia ratd France would tMwne d industry with $1.1 billion manufacturers from overseas com- 

tbs guidel in e s . Under thi^ war without retaking naidiing petition,” said Gary Dorsch, a nir- rjinvimh u nv sn*«tor itun iiw ion 
these guidelines, EC aid is to end in SnSv rutT st at - , 0ppenheimcr diro^ May.greater Jan the 1984 

1985 and the industry is called on Rnt^lndustrv Minister Edith Rouse Futures Inc. inOucago. P® 1- 


starts by now. 


, . - tnoe But Industry Minister Edith a uiu.^ .uu in mils rose 1 nenxni in Mav 

i^T ht a ^ Pled&ed f°° l f ^ Y ?^ “Starts are^ng very wril," an 

But other sources said Tuesday tunes that amount to the industry compared with late rales Monday, economist. Michael Sumichrast 
that there was no way the French for 1985, 1986 and 1987. included: 3.0020 Deutsche marks, saidlSnEfor d£ NatSS- 

gowemment, which is stnigglmg to The higher figure, past a dead- down from 3.060; 2J155 Swiss soriationofHome Buildeis. “Over- 
control spending and hmit us bud- line already extended once, is likely francs, down from 2.5730. and aji jv, decline doesn't mean too 
get deficit, could provide by year- to bring a West German protest, 9.1700- French francs, down from 


for 1985, 1986 and 1987. 
The higher figure, pas 


end the 20 billion francs (S2.2 bH- industry sources oid. 


Sources: Morgan Guaranty tdatqr. DM. SF. Pound. FFis. Lloyds Bank f ECU l; Reuters 
fSDR). Rates opottcobte to tnttnank denastts ofst mtHlan mtaknvm (or eautvaierJ). 


Industrial Output 
In Britain Rose 
0.6%mAprU 

Reuters 

LONDON — Britirii indus- 
trial production rose a provi- 
sional 0.6 percent in April, after 
March’s upwardly revised in- 
crease of 12 percent, the gov- 
ernment said Tuesday. 

The index of industrial out- 
put was set at a seasonally ad- 
justed 107.4 In April, 5 percent 
higher than a year earlier. The 
March year-to-year increase 
was 3 5 percent 

Manufacturing output fell 
12 percent in April, after the 
March increase was revised up- 
ward to IB percent The April 
index was 101.7, fra a year- 
to-year rise of 1.7 percent, com- 
pared with a 3.5-pcrcent in- 
crease in March. 

The increase in April partly 
reflected the continued recov- 
ery in coal output foUowmg the 
end in March of the 12-manib‘ 
coal miners' strike, government 
sources said. 

Those sources attributed the 
drop in manufacturing output 
in April to erratically hi£h pro- 
duction in March and some 
added holidays around Easter. 
Manufacturing output has been 
basically flat since the third 
quarto- of last year, after grow- 
ing strongly in the earlier part 
of 1984. 

The underlying trend in in- 
dustrial output the past few 
months is at best slightly up- 
ward, the sources said. 


— CHARTER =j 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE" 

125 Ft. 12 persons go anywhere. 
Wc arc the best ui Greek Islands. 
MefSterranean Cruises Ltd. 

3 Stwfiou St, Athens. 

| TeL: 3236494. Tlx.: 222288. 


Mr. Sumichrast predicted a 
strong summer for bousing because 
of declining interest rates and the 


New Saudi Devaluation Is Predicted cotdcMhnii tax-exempt financing 


Reuters 

MANAMA, Bahrain — Saudi 
Arabia, faced with significant 
shortfalls in government revenue 
because of low levels of oil produc- 
tion, is likely to increase its spend- 
ing power by devaluing its currency 
again, according to foreign ex- 
change traders. . 

Last week, the riyal was deval- 
ued 1.1 percent, to 3.65 riyals to the 
dollar. Many traders said they be- 
lieved that more devaluations 
would come. 


next year. 

enunent revenue of 200 billion ri- the rate at which it sells dollars to 

yals (S54J billion). 3.65riyali. EgS Si a - pHOT1 *°P “ 

Expectations among traders var- Saudi officials have said the riyal *5JJra ”5* hmi7 „ . 11CW . 

ied as to the likely extent of the b set ostensibly againstihe Spoil *** in 
devaluation, but they were unani- Drawing Right In this area, trad ere ISSSS?* hJSHSmq 0 ! 

raons in considering further down- also raw more room for devalue- dweflln S3 dropped 19.1 


ward adjustments likely. 

One foreign exchange expert 
ventured a Saudi target of 3.75 ri- 


IS&toZr SZmbrlS ^E! e dro PP fid 


percent 


budget deficit and the drop in oil 
prices, it’s an inevitability," said a 
chief trader in a Bahrain bank with 
ties to Saudi Arabia. 

Since the kingdom derives its in- 
come almost entirely from dollars 
paid for its oil, the government can 


wajU ilUJUbUlJUUU 1 1 B uy. uui|. m - _ _ , _ . _ _ 

One fordgn exchange expert “Ifyoulookat the SDR. the riyal 

ventured a Saudi uraet of 3.75 n- should be around 3.80 or 3.9b," ^ Sa^ SiS a rSmiL 
yals tothe dollarby therad of the said Mr. Best of Chase Manhattan. drop^Sth^^Stes al5J-S- 
year/That would give than anotb- The riyal has gained steadily dodinS 
er 2%-percent spendmg power and against the SDR, to about 3.63 ?5 7 n^m Ml 
it ought be enough .io. curtail the from 4 J in 1971. The^Sw Bureau said that 

SSaWST re " Almost all traders said they were 68R9W h%SR^M 

Barrv treasurv manager at a fall to at least 3.70 by in the first five months of this year. 

OuS^rSTBank^BSin. ? ^985, and some predict- This compared with 730,100 units 


Mild come. government repatriation of re- 

“If you look at the economy, the serves abroad,” he said. 


Best, treasury mr 

anhaffan Rank in 


siuwfeuu 


j®TAPMAN 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTREND II 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

ywklecl the foHowing 

after aO charges: 

IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983:— 24% 

IN 1984: —34% 

Wal 

JUNE 13. 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $86,985.20 


CaN or wide Hawaii Frazier at 
TAPMAN. Trend Analysis and 
Portfolio Management. Inc., 
WW Street Plaza, New Vbik, 
New Mxk 10005 212-269-1041 
■fetexBMI 667173 UW 


too reticent" about a new devalua- 
tion, and added: "They are faring 
up to economic realities." 

Traders also said that by histori- 


Builders were apparently en- 


boost its riyal-denominaied income cal standards and by comparison 
by devaluing the riyal against the with other currencies, the riyal is 


dollar. 

“It appears to give them extra 
spending power in local currency,” 


overvalued. 

The riyal strengthened after the 
collapse in 1971 of the Bret ton 


said the vice president of an Arab Woods fixed-rate exchange system, 
bank. when il was quoted at 4 J riyals to 

Economic analysts in the Gulf the dollar. It reached an average of 
said that Saadi Arabia’s current oil 3327 riyals to the dollar at the peak 
production of about 23 miffio D of Saudi oil production in 1980. 
barrels per day, if continued for the It has since dropped gradually in 

rest of the fiscal year, which started value, and on June 10 the Saudi 
in March, would mean a subs tan- Arabian Monetary 
tial shortfall in the budgeted gov- the market off-gua 


cy caught 
adjusting 



Bneguet: 

Precision mastery since 1775 

Abraham Louis Breguet (1747-1823) 

was one of the most phenomenal watchmakers 

history has ever known. 

His genius was an overriding influence 
not only on watch making techniques 
bul also on the beauty 
of ihe finished object. 


AEROLEASING GENEVA 




Your Swiss Connection 

to professionalism and reFabillty In business aviation 

Our own fleet of 10 modem Jets is ready to serve you anytime, 
anywhere. All Dassault Falcon and Learjet models available. 


For further dsaiis, pJezseeafi: 
Head Office: Geneva 
Ph (22) 984510 Tlx 289 166 


Zurich Pft (1) 814 37 00 Tlx 56192 
Milan Ph (2) 278432 71x335475 
Madrid Ph (1)2593224 Tlx 44192 


CS Since 1775 

Available at 

CHALJMBT 

Jeweler since 1780 

Paris: 12 place Vend&rae 
London: 278 New Bond Street 
Geneva: 2 rue du Rhone 
Brussels: 82 av. Louise 
New York: 48 East 57Hi Street 


mi 


■"'■'2k 

•e. Efl-jptp 


v ■ 






Tuesdays 

]\l SE 

Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to me desina an Wall Street 
and do net reflect Into trades elsewhere. 



new lows a 

AMD Aimnlnc AftasCe . AvdfnCP 

BrHT#4 2 CLCAm CamebRspf . Comdmint 

Qxnpfvsn EtoCfef FfBTxoOiPf Faxbort* 

GertData HomMhpfC ICMPnvn IMBalc 

KoWnor Kyaaro Mcomunf wt MUmoRau 

NL Indust OneMa Parodvne Pmn r litjt 

Rowan Smlltilntl . SouiMun SndPtn 

Unocal Unocal wd Vegca wvnnaint 


Close Previous 

sugar"*" HW « B “ - 

Star lino per metric ton 

AUB WXO 9720 9JJ0 *140 9320 *3X0 

& ,EJ 8 £58 33,2$ 

MOT 11220 11040 111X0 111 All 1 HUB 111 JO 

5 teT JUS 321-52 i!* " s -« umo ns.40 

Ah IMXO 11*20 1 70 JO 130X0 130X0 12140 

Oct N.T. N.T. 17s. 40 l Kao 174 «0 1264)0 

Volume: 1.558 Inis ol SO ions. 

COCOA 

Starting per metric Ion 
Jly 1.788 1,770 IJ71 1272 1.785 1 JB4 

Sep 1.742 1217 1217 1.718 1.736 1,737 

!■•* '-*51 '•«« U»7 1J05 1J0A 

**or 1.718 1.700 1XW 1.700 1.715 1217 

mot 1733 1216 1,718 1.71* 1.728 1.730 

JIT 1238 1.72* 1.77S 1,730 1.737 1.743 

Sep N.T. NT. 1.730 1.740 1.740 1,755 , 

Volume- 1X12 toll ol K hmv 
COFFEE 

Starling per metric tan 
JIT J047 24CJ 74C3 3074 10M 74)54 

Sep 7.100 ion TOD 1073 £lfi) 2.115 

No* 7.143 2.115 2.11 a 2.13] 1154 2.158 

Jon 7.18* 7.150 2.151 7.153 11*5 1203 

Mnr 11*0 1145 1148 1152 1200 2J03 

MOT 1145 2.160 7,150 2.1&0 1180 1200 

Jta HI. N.T. 1140 2.170 7.1*0 2200 

volume. 3.908 lota of 5 Ions. 

GASOIL 

U 6 donors Mr metric ton 
Jlv 71335 71100 211.00 71325 311.25 211 JO 
AH 21115 2104B 7114)0 JII3S 708.75 70*00 
SOP J112S 31000 211 00 211.75 70* M 20*25 
Oct 71325 71725 71300 21125:1140 211.25 
No* 71550 71500 :15_S0 775.75 7134» 7144M 

Dec 2>600 71600 71t4» ?1« 00 71o4»?174M 

Jon M.T N T. 716 00 21*4)0 7)4 DO 319.0C 

Feb N.T. N.T 71500 31*00 710.00 2190C 

Mnr N.T N.T. 21000 71*20 21000 71*20 

VOtume- tlO lots ol 100 Ions. 

Sources. Rfutrrsand London Petroleum p« 
.-non or loataii) 



I'j. Treasury Bill Roles 
June 18 


Pm 

Offer BM Yiefe Yield 
J-nvmm 667 615 AJ( 6*6 

t-monlh 680 678 7.14 ?2S 

Crw rear 6** 6*7 7 48 734 

Secrrc: Sal o mon S/ut.Vrj 


BANQUE 
DE L’UNION 
EUROPEENNE 

U.S. 850,000,000 
Floating Rate Notes 
1979 - 1989 


In accordance with the 
terms and conditions of 
the Notes, the rate of in- 
terest has been Fixed at 
T-U^i per annum for the 
interest period running 
from June 20th tu Sep- 
tember 20th. 1985. 


CUM Previous 

BM Ask BM ' Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Starting per metric tan 
SPOl 7*420 7*520 804411) 80520 

forward 81520 8164)0 8254)0 82520 

COPPER CATHODES (him Grade) 

Starting per metric tan 
SPOt 1.12*410 1.1304)0 LI 2700 1.13800 

forward 1.13620 1.1374)0 1.13*4)0 1.13*20 

COPPER CATHODES (Sfaodartf) 

Sterling per metric tan 
»»rt 1.11120 1,11300 1.1104)0 1.1120 

forward 1,1314)0 1.1364)0 1.136410 1.1284)0 , 

LEAD 

Starling per metric tan 
SPOl 38400 3064)0 3044)0 30600 

forward 303X0 an at 30320 30420 

NICKEL 

Starling per metric ton 

VXX _ 481080 481SX0 438040 488580 

forward 42604)0 42654)0 429040 480080 

SILVER 

Peace per trey egace 

wet 4*020 4*120 48740 48*40 

forward SOajOC 50740 50340 50440 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling Mr metric ten 

Spat *2*0 JM *40040 921040 9.73040 

torwara *>4840 *X*04D *23040 92J540 

ZINC 

Starling per metric fen 
wot 5684)0 57040 57740 57840 

forward 56640 56740 I7B20 57*40 

Source: ap 


Coca-Cola Buys 
2 TV Companies 

■Vor York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Coca-Cola Co. 
said that u has reached definitive 
agreements Co acquire two televi- 
sion production companies, Em- 
bossy Communications and Tan- 
dem Productions, for cash and 
stock amounting to $485 million. hw low su* a* ow 

Analysts said that the iransac- per metric foe 

uons announced Monday had been J-3*o ira 1® 1230 —is 

rumored and represented a further Dec n.t. J 35 Jig zj{ 

expansion into the eniertainmem n’t. VlE }jgs Hg Zl? 

industry by Coca-Col^which al- *&. ^ ^ S ad! 

ready owns Columbia Pictures In- W3,ra: £■* mis. open interest: 10439 
d us tries. cocoa 


Cash Prices June 18 


54X0 bu mini mum- doaan per bushel 
4 _ u, 72* 526V5 Jul 524 56SV, 520 525V. +X4V8 

51 to 0 . 1 " 726 522VJ Aug £74* £77 £71)8 5J*to -64)416 

II 671 524% Sep 524% 527V. 522V. S27 +JXVi 

gto l u, 628 529% Nov 525% 52816 523V. 528W +4*to 

to 679 526% Jon 575 £78 573 578 +4)5 

gvS—iS 722 529 Mar 525 5JB 521 £88 +25% 

^ 77* 577 May 5X4 £M £91 5JM +06 

£+_ to 658 522 Ju! 526% 600 52* 5J*V» +4M 

31 + to Est. Sales Prav.SMes 29284 

14% + to Prev.Day Open litL 66326 up 261 
»- % SOYBEAN MEAL(CST) 

.S' 4 !?? 100 tans- dot tars per ton 

103 . + v> 19650 11740 Jut 12240 12120 12L10 12328 +120 

>«*— % 10000 12020 Aug 12540 12440 12370 12528 +120 

2% + to 17920 12160 Sep 12720 12850 12640 12240 +120 

*7%— to 18050 12650 Oct 12920 13000 12690 13070 +140 

TV. + to 1M40 13120 Dec 13600 13630 13440 13440 +170 

+ to 163X0 13420 Jan 13720 13840 13650 13840 +170 

»%— J4 20620 139.10 Mar V4120 M2J0 V4L50 14190 +40 

|Mfe— 14 16220 1434)8 May 14440 14800 14*40 U600 

1*S4 + to 16740 14720 Jul 150.10 —120 

2£ + S Eta. Sales Prev. Sales 11.104 

St ti£ Pr »v- Dor Oa*n ln». 51400 Of»397 
n — to SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

40400 eta- dot lari per loo Da, 

3272 22.70 Jul 3CLB3 3025 3020 3042 — JO 

3125 2150 Aug 2920 2970 2920 2923 -J4 

3U0 2150 Sep 2645 2825 28.16 3BJ0 -J» 

3037 2220 Oct 2720 2725 2720 2730 —40 

2925 2190 Dec 2650 2629 2625 2634 — J» 

294)7 2360 JOn 2600 2610 2630 2533 —.04 

28-60 2440 Mar 2560 2565 2540 2540 

2745 3420 MOT 25.T5 25.15 2540 2 W +4)9 

2575 2395 Jul 2471 3*78 3478 3*70 +40 

25.15 3460 Aug 3470 - 3470 347) >465 

Eat. Saloa Pnev.Scta* 94H7 

Prev. Day Open Int. 61406 eft *85 


Commodity and Unit Tug Age 25.15 3460 Aug 3470 -3470 3470 >465 

Coffee 4 Santas, lb 140 146 Est. Sale* Prwv.5ctax 94H7 

PfinWolti 64/30 u w, yd _ 020 076 Prev. Day Open Int. 6140* efl *05 

SUM bllteta (Pltt.J.tan <7100 45100 OATS(CBT) 

s£<H 3 <o£oNo’i l hvvPltt — ’ ^07? 3, m8 £000 bu mlnimum-dollanper Mhef 

?22S2 P ik lhWPItT " ^5 147M Jul 122 162 160V. 16Cto -61 to 

I? Tfi 179 14* Ml Sep 14* 14886 145 145 —ill*. 

IJOto 1-50^4 Dec 160 160 14114 149 -^77* 

TlmF qiL LtE (life? 147to 160M Mar 162V. -into 

S2^2;t. Bo,ta ’“ 143 167 mot 165—62 

tS J8 Eet.Saie* Prev. Soles .40 

fcuree-AP “ Prev. Day Open Int. 3039 us 21 




Wen High Low dose Qta. High Low Open HIM Low Close 

14MC IS* CERT. DEPOSIT (UMM) 

1675 1*755 14*75 UJ2S —.15 n mflUon-ptaeflMpct 

"^2 *289 85.® Jun 9240 9285 9284 9288 

'«-“2 ^2 *265 8540 Sep 9240 9274 92JB 9271 

— , _ TMJ5 — %2S 92.76 8534 Dec 9215 9222 9215 9224 

l ?3,, 2 ^ 2, • *177 866* Mar *1.75 *175 9175 9181 

91.19 0643 JUO 9140 *148 *140 9145 

SUGARVMHtLD 11 (ITT CSC!) *lfl* 8786 SdP 91.14 

1 12000 its. -earns per tx „«8J9. 0834 oec *uu 

965 275 Jul 267 269 261 268 +62 EsUSoto* PretoSMoi 157 

975 285 Sep 3417 3i» 229 x07 +4n Prev.Day Open laL 3689 off 31 

90S 264 Oct 21* 218 207 217 +61 EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

^ “? +Ja SlmlMlofvptamioopcL 

4 nt fS m *279 8463 SeP *211 9242 9228 9231 

^ »L90 8480 Dec 9162 9164 9160 9161 

££ 4.13 Jul 429 429 421 <79 91 M 8610 Mar 9183 9161 9140 9189 

rE 4* A« * M ,, ‘ W Jun ,l -°* 9L15 9185 91.13 

tT °^ > - , rt .* g nm ^ 55 *•’ 9070 B78R SdP *073 9081 9074 *062 

Es-Softs WiAM Prev.Satej 7.5DB 9033 rv*C 9046 9052 9Q45 

Prev.Day Open Inf. 92334 ual2B B7M *U7 TOT? 9017 m!? 

COCOA (NYCSCH) Est. Sales Prw. Sotos 514127 

TO metric Ions- 1 per ton Prev. Day Open lnt.123.lM 0(92725 

If* ISiiiSSSSSSS^ JS British pound cuumi . j .. 

?rir !!!? 5SE. ?2S ?2I? t? SPOT POUnd- 1 POfeteauotaJOJJTOl 

12S 2SS 122 JSS ',S ^ ' 44S0 ' aa ® *«* laess 12900 i2*s> iznn 

ZIVO T955 Wcr T998 20(77 1990 1994 +16 IJ900 7.0200 Oc 1 JS S50 IMM i wk 1 

%% JSS x “ 151 '3S ijSS mSt ™ i3m ™ 1^0 

1P “ pilJ o— 2038 ** 77305 L1905 Jun 12680 

Est.Saiee Prev. Sales 2130 

Prev. Day Open inL 20.918 oft32l Prev. Day Open Int. 42220 oN14B7 

SSftfg* m CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

iSm Suer dir-1 point equo i» 508001 

JStS KI5 1S5 tig 75B3 -7025 S*C 7273 7294 7*0 J2»2 

1 2280 13630 Sec 137 75 13070 13775 13620 +.95 75*6 2004 l>£ 2257 7944 29S2 rvn 

10140 13600 Nov 13660 13780 13650 13740 +85 mm iffl ^ 

10080 13540 Jan 13630 13630 13425 13635 +25 jjS ySJ j?S ,2? 

ISIS 13^ '3625 13*65 13425 13*80 +25 ^ P^! Soles 572 

JgS ^ Sg tM Pn~-OWOP«lnt.nL499off2S4. 

10060 -17925 Sep .... ‘13460 +25 FRENCH P8ANC (IMMJ . . - — * 

Nov imp +85 Spot franc- 1 pa] rrtomrabttLOOWI 

Est. Safe* Prev. Safes 6*6 .10940 89M0 Sep .10410 .107*0 .10*00 .10790 

Prev. Day Open ltd. 5853 a«a <0615, 89670 Odd. .10715 

Est. Sales Prev. Safes 51 

Prev. Day Open InL 60S aft 55 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Spar mark-1 POtateauali 508001 
254$ 2930 See 2305 2342 2300 2331 

2410 2971 Dec 2325 2340 8320 2357 

2415 JMD Mar 2363 

Est. Sales Prev. Safes 12234 

Prev. Day Open InL 5*2(0 oft 379 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Soerijn- IpaM equals 80800001 
SKIS - “g? 2“ ■£«« -ONTO 8MN78MB71 . 
004350 803WS Dec 8MM 404090 804064 404008 
KW160 80035 Mar 8008* 804064 404086 XMU8 
Cri.Salm Prev.Safes 3690 

Prev. Day Open Int 27702 up 629 
SWISS PRANCIHMU 
3 pec trana- 1 paint equals MUOOl 

-3400 Sep :m* 89*1 2928 8991 

■SS Doc 2961 8018 J9S3 80H 

■4025 2835 Mar 8 045 

Sate Prev- Sol m 8736 

Prev. Day Open ln|. 2B817 up 1*0 . - 


Industriols 




Livestock 


DM Futures Options 
Jane 18 

W.Gsmon MEMBMMfb artswr om 


Orike CaU+seMfe 
Pies Sep Dec Mar 

31 265 251 — 

32 161 227 — 

0 122 17* US 

H 078 123 183 

35 on 194 186 

3* 1127 045 — 

Estimated total mi Li** 

Com: mem. tol 1251 open Ait 22,192 
Pets : Mea *eL *32 epm tat 1M7 
Source: CMC 


Pot +a ei n e 

a 

«i a 

181 177 - 

107 20 - 

184 IK - 


1 CATTLE (CME) 







1 AtOQQ Bxl- cants per 1 b» 






*960 

5862 

Jun 

5090 

5*40 

5767 

5797 

—160 


6045 

Auo 

61X0 

*1X0 

4035 

4047 

—1X5 

45.90 

*0.10 

Oct 

6205 

*210 

*182 

<1X5 

— X7 

6765 

6160 

Dec 

6385 

63X2 

*246 

*225 

-JO 

*765 

*110 

Pob 

6387 

*397 

6335 

5b67 

— v43 

6767 

6360 

APT 

65J0 

6540 

6430 

6420 

—JO 

_442S 

6525 

Jun 




<&10 

—AS 

Est. Safes 










FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 





44400 tofc- cents om- to. 






7170 

64X7 


ass 

ass 

<7.10 

6722 


7340 

64X0 

See 

*730 

*730 

*673 

<740 

— JD 


6425 

Oct 

67.15 

*780 

6667 

S3 

—S3 

7320 

6525 

Nov 

60B5 

6012 

<767 


7960 

*6X0 

Jan 

69X5 

6*25 

49X0 

*960 

+25 

7TL55 

«O10 

Mar 

7000 

7020 

4990 

7020 


70*5 

7040 


*9X5 

6965 

*9X5 

70.15 

+30 

Eet. Safes 



67* 




Prev. Day Opon Int. 8611 on 5 





HOGS [CME] 







3M0P tt»r c«rrt» pw Ul 






SL*0 

44X8 

Jun 

48X5 

49.10 

4820 

«m 

+.13 

55J7 

474)5 

Jul 

51X0 

51.10 

5aa 

5092 

—.10 


<7J7 

Aug 

5060 

5055 

5010 

6085 

—27 

51.73 

4540 

Oct 

4785 

47X0 

47.15 

<735 


5065 

4630 

Doc 

4690 

4940 

48X0 

4827 

+415 


4*25 

Feb 

5025 

saxa 

5020 

5005 

—.31 

4785 

4660 

APT 

4650 

4650 

4635 

4465 

+.15 

4940 

46*0 


40*7 

48X5 

48X5 

4805 

+.18 

4965 

47.75 

Jul 

49X7 

4960 

49X7 

4*36 

-J5 

Est. Sales 

£2>5 Prev. Sales 5,115 




Prev. Day Open Int. 22832 off 229 




PORK BELLIES (CMC) 






V" 

cents Per tb. 

4040 

40X5 

4720 

4836 

— vTO 

8065 

4020 


6765 

47X6 

am 

4732 

—25 

7680 

6315 

Pri> 

7460 

7540 

74X5 

7465 

—OS 

7360 



74X0 

74X0 

74X0 

74X0 

+35 

7340 

7600 

7010 

May 




££ 


Est Safes 

£835 

•rev. Safes 4J01 




Piwv. Day Open Int n,M> upsz 

S Food 



SI 




[CTyi f iji BI) 






To Our Readers 

The S ft P 100 index options 
wens not available in this editon 
because of transmission delays. 


Honda Plans Factory 
For Mowers In France 

Reusers 

PARIS — Honda Motor Co. 
plans to invest 40 million francs 
($4.27 million) for construction of coffee corrcscsi 
a factory near Orleans, France to ^S) P * r jui u*jo usso 144*0 ms67 +.17 

produce lawn mowers and small 15038 1Z7J " *"• 14 ^s m*8s m 6*5 -a* 






6535 JuJ ■ 
6635 Aug 
4660 See 

taxc 

67X4 

*7X5 


18X0 

•0.15 

6800 

<785 

67X5 

4850 

Oct 

NOV 

60X0 

6090 


HL55 

19.10 


*9X0 

Jan 

10.10 

19X0 

O10 

69X0 

70X0 



[INVESTMEWTSTRATEGIES '85| 

II.. III. AND IV. Quarter f 

I with G0RBATCHEV 
»hp REAGAN 


Wbor feftmam wfl the manta of 
CocbaTdiBE 

kosg as ftmndal ata fame ty morkeb? 
Hm Hw wdi p m gwm d plea* of 
l ofl nrt eiM E flariop- 
MM M iM bsgsn? 


QPREOOUS MHMS 

Oonamss 

W NMMwIMM. 

OSSOMNDBC^ 

QmgmiSs 


COCOA 

Frtracn (mo per 100 kg 

JIV N.T. N.T. — 2405 —15 

SS I5S? RS HS as -1 

K £l a?: K: ISS a» % 

& 2.t: K;T: ISS z V4 

a^Saajsjfsv 1 * ccrun ' 

COFFEE 

French francs per 100 kg 

& H& 32 is zg 

» Iff. W. i& “■ zl 

2SC K £?: Wr° z zi 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2505 _S 

i7&3«S ZZ 04 J t ' 0 £; pr • v ■ oc1uo, ”**■ 

Source: Bourse du Como wre* 


Currency Options 


motorized plows, according to an 
official of the Japanese group. 

The plant will have a capacity of 
85,000 units a year and will start 

rafaajvafias .1 a«™.— . 

Honda group vice president, said V"** 1 ** 

Monday. K5?“. rt, ** h p*«MM8nti p*r «il 

7- SPnuna no s r 

131-S US ■ r r 

JI-2 120 s 1060 r 

J412B 125 1 740 UO 

130 • 525 665 

_W-» 135 S 125 <60 

5MW CantaUnfl OoUarpcwt* par antt. 
CDollr 73 s r r 

73 o 073 r 



Stock Indexes 


More W. German Firms Fafl 

Reuters 


565 060 

r r 


Prov. Day Open int uaaa upV*2 




WIESBADEN, West Ge rman y 73 S o^g r 

— The rate of corporate insolven- eenmm MoAu-cSm per mit. 

cies rose 13.1 percent, to 4,571, in S l ib r l 

the first four months of this year 5J * ij 7 I 

from a year earlier, the federal sta- g » iS * 

tistics office said Tuesday. *s I §5s iw f 

62 SM 0 B Japans Yvn-nomsofa emtf paronlt 


■”75.1*25 I 

ns U 75.1125 S7S3235 I — 

m 725 875 1 £75-1725 | 2U54125 

3® 4» 400 1175- I32S 

125- 4J5 0751025 

M 125 Z5B *25- 7S 


Gett 3I8J5 -3I6ZS 

Wnu»WMt«Wri*S6 

1, Qni Ai Mam-Btaar 
1211 Genera L *~ tmilmil 
T«L 310251 - Telex 21305 


alien >n 

Wjduncfja DC 


T 7 ^ 


«U08 Swia Froncfrcuti psr naif. 

SPronc 33 I r r 5 C 
3* t 320 r 8 

37 « 172 r . s 0 

38 > r 1*0 S 0 

39 5 173 220 St 

40 8 161 173 » 

ySSSSU- 7,271 ' 133 *" W Go»W*"l 

Trial wt traL 5j8i Put open 

. r —t*ri traded. s—MoopHafi offered. o—Old. 

LflS IB premium f purchase price). 

Source: AP. 


U9 T. BILLS (IMM) 

si million- pta of 100 per. 

JOT* 06S4 5eF 93.14 *12* 9113 *363 +.14 

June 18 *209 8577 □«: *270 92*0 9270 9260 +15 

9250 8660 MOT 9268 9254 9240 9263 +15 

- - r - 5-19 H^l JUP 9217 *223 9214 T2Z2 J 

Put*— Lari 9161 SSjH Brno 9164 *16* 9164 916* +i| 

Jon sea Dec 9i6S b?4» dm 91 jo *170 918* *ij 3 rl* 

. .. *169 89JB Mat 9i89 +15 

075 200 Otwi I rd'xL'im’rtf 1^ 

i f§ wssgpssBs^mps 

* ? n Is & %% k ss, a 

060 r *^-'3 75-13 Dee 84-13 17-1 S+T3 B6-30 IS 

gg I 8W1 75-14 MOT 85-19 66-2 S5-T3 85-31 +13 

DC r -*^ 7 - J“" «+75 05-7 84-21 05-4 +13 

^ Prey. Sales L534 

K r Prev. Day Ooen Int. S4A4* up 769 

037 U5 TREASURY BONDS (CAT) u— 

S-3 i «£rif“w»t?«.3andsqnMpcn MOB 

aw r 79.12 57-to Sw SIS 7M0 S?* SIb ^ib 2 J - Future T ^|] - S 

1 ; ™ si ss lii si ug IS ^ Sts 

r *» || S IKS Sf »“ gg I 

r 74-34 s*-2S Dec 73-20 7*-0 73-23 74-2 +4 Reuters : base ion - qj n ie 10-11 

» r r ^ ss jsr ^ ™ » st, 3 

,J ? f ^ n '“ £? 3 

AM iri-Sofoi Prev.S*ita»i5i844 ^ 

061 r Prev. Day Open IIR2D7692 aH2673 


Commodity Indexes 


Woody's 

Reuters 

+» F v fures - 


aw r Prev. Day Ooen 10(207693 off 2673 

035 068 DUMA (CBT1 

060 168 510000 Prl»-«s«3»**ril00pci 

140 r n~f 57-17 Jim 3+20 77-10 74-28 77-7 

r r 7 *-Ji 59-13 Sep 76-M 74-34 7+6 76-20 

r r 75-25 »-* Dec 75-T7 75-29 75-10 35.30 

lot.142229 »+ a-a Mar 7« 75-W »4 75-10 

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ENTEKNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 


Page 11 



*■ * 
.■ , * , 
-I / i 1 

u r « jS; 

? 4 , " 

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Tenneco Buys Sony Group Net Rose 8.8% in Half 

Ml/TOV I Aodwf 14.6 percent, to 496l03 b3Bon yen, Umax VTRs during the sbc-n 

TOKYO — Sony Cap. said from a year earlier, while domestic period, down from 128 mill 
/i j Tuesday that group net profit in sales were up 4.9 percau, to 183.85 year earlier. As a result, the cc 

l/T (yOOrt'VfiOJ* the first half rose percent from a billion yen. ny said, Betamax sales of 191 

J . J year earlier, hot-, that; growth was _„ e are unlikely to reach the yea 




The Associated Past Stowed IT 

AKRON, Ohio — Goodyear 
Tire & Rubber Cap. and Tenneco ! 

Inc. said Tuesday that Taneoo is 
buying some operations of Good- (J* 53 P 
gear’s Celeron group of energy-re- ™ 

lated companies for about $500 152 1 

million. 

included m the proposed sale are 1984. 
all gas transmission,, processing a spot 
and certain related production fa- tromcsct 
cOities making up some of the Cer 3)50 


Roam - 14.6 percent, to 496-03 billion yen, taraax VTRs during the six-month 

TOKYO — Sony Cop. said from a year earlier, while domestic period, down from 128 mil Hon a 
Tuesday that group net profit in sales were up 4.9 percon, to 183.85 year earlier. As a result, ihe compa- 
the first half rose &£ percent from a billion yen. ny said, Bexamax ‘sales of 1984/85 

year earlier, bm-. that; growth was ^ CXDOr ^ h - h Bcayamei{ are unlikely to reach the year-ago 
W*J£E^**** for32^rf S^s^SS ^ of 15 million. 
Jn p^¥^b^™ihsendm 2 ^ “creased 15.5 percent from a But Sony expects sales of other 

*** earficr - spokesman said. products to reach target levels, the 
^ ? ifflS S ***** 10 *»>™tcd ^ company’s spokesman said. 

51? bQSon I6>8 P^xnt of overseas sales and Sales of color television sets rose 

chare. Sales rasTlLS feU 0 6 percent, mainly because of to 1.9 million units in the Erst half 

SSSfiWMHESmfreo to ycaS strength against Europe- from 15 unlike. Sooy expects lo 


607^8 yen in the 

1984. 


half of ancnrreDafiL 

Video-equipment sales rose Q.1 


A spokesman for the giant dec- percent from a year earlier, to lhan last year ‘ 

■ * j -i g- -ICO cc Lm: n.t a t. - 


sefl 3.6 million color television sets 
in the current year, 450,000 more 


said the net profit 258.55 bflHon yen. Sales of tekvi- 

ernues making up some at the Ce- was affected tar foreign ex- son sets jumped 24.9 percent, to million Walkman portable cassette 
i 011 - “ c k K ™_~ om change losses of 2Jo.bflBtm yen. 175.46 bflKon yen, and audio- players in the six months, up from 2 

sale is All- American Pipeline Co, Them was a L94-hiDiou gain in ihe equipment sales rose 77 s percent, million last year. The annual sales 


The con 

milli on We 


said it- sold 105 
portable cassette 


to 153.57 biDion yen, Sony said. target for 
Sony said it sold 1.1 million Be- unchanged 


71 

_ ' c ‘: IK 


which is building a crude-oil pipe- like period last year. 

line from Calif ornia to Texas. Sony overseas climbed 

Also excluded are the company’s — - 

onshore cal and gas properties oth- 
er than those in Ihe Monroe, Lon- « • . - -raja g 

siana, gas field, its exploration and I /kniTIff w llll 
. production business and its exten- ” 1111 

^jave offshore California interests. g-y ' 1- 

The find purchase price wifll* J\0W LUltUTCS 
deter mined at the dosing of the 

sale. The agreement calls; for Ten- f Continued from P*ee 9) 


sale, ihe agreement cans tor lea- (Confined from Page 9) coarse. But they are more dxversi- 

nccou>a°qiMe all stock in certain mry basis for ks managere. As in fied than their US. counterparts 


it year, ihe annual sales 
the current full year is 
1 at 4 million. 


TWA Employees 
Oppose Merger 

United Press int emotional 

NEW YORK — The TWA 
Employees Committee said 
Tuesday that early responses to 
a survey- of union and non- 
union employees of Trans 
World Airline Inc. indicate 
strong opposition to Texas Air 
Corp.’s proposed S7933-mil- 
lion takeover of the airline. 

Texas Air, the parent of Con- 
tinental Airlines and New Yak 
Air, last week agreed to pur- 
chase TWA for S23 a share: 

The committee said a major- 
ity of the employees responding 
expressed a ^willingness to 
make short-term financial sac- 
rifices" to implement an em- 
ployee buyout of the airline. 


Elf Profit Narrowed 28.9% in Half 


from ‘‘favorable .trends" that in- lion francs, a slight increasr from 
eluded a strong dollar and the the 1983 loss of l.Sb billion francs/* 

• U : i . > -l . I. .L. I Cmlj. nllPM PIT - 


Bv Axel Krause from “favorable .trends that m- 

Jnitriiawaal HmddTabmc dudc< ? 2 *«■» dollar and the — - -- — 

PARIS — First-half net profit S rou P s worldwide mcreases in oil In the JJnil«l Smt*. where ELL. 
for Socfere Nationale Hf Aqui- and gas prodwupn. has established indutrul and fi- 

taine, France’s largest oil company, , La* 1 JW net profit grew nanaal interests ic more than .0! 

»jM5.TS£ 

Marxist 

Tuesday. * percent, to 93 bilbon francs, from executives said. 

They attributed the anticipated 91 .3 billion francs in the period in The cash flow from Tcu>gulf 
decline primarily to larger losses in ,984 - ^ hae S”* 1 ? M,es - “eluding Inc., a large phosphate producer 
the company’s refining and distri- internal transactions, rose II per- acquired in 19S1 . will drop to about 
bution operations in France. 4X111 from 331 “bhfbs of S170 million this year from S183 

Michel Pecq ucur . fb airman dc- ,984 » execunves said. million in 1984, execuu'ves added, 

clined to estimate net profit for the Last year, Elfs sales grew 23.5 Responding to questions. Mr. 
state-controlled company for all of percent, to 177.4 billion francs, Pecqucur said that group invest- 
1985. But be said in a meeting with from 143.6 billion francs in 1983. men is in plant, equipment. c.\plo- 

repo nets that Elfs losses in refin- Company executives said they ration and production facilities 


for Sodtbie Nationale Hf Aqui- and gas proawuon. 

taine, France’s largest oil company, Jf* 1 year ; nel 

fdl 28.9 percent, to an estimated 74.5percem, “ a record 6.49 bil- 

32 billion francs (S3412 million). *“» frorn 3 72 billion francs 

from 45 bifliem francs in the 1984 m 

period, compinv esecuiiMa saM Fim-lulf sate this year |re» 1.9 
Tuesday ' percent, to 93 bilbon francs, from 

They attributed the anlidpaled period m 

• ■ >■ i * QKi wnilE mun uIk errlnriino 


cent from the first six months of S170 million this year from S183 
1984, executives stud. million in 1984, executives added. 

Last year. Elf’s sales grew 23.5 Responding to questions. Mr. 


reporters that Elfs losses in refin- Company executives said they 
ing and distribution could narrow expected ElTs losses from refining 
in the second half. and distribution operations this 

He also said Elf was benefitting year to amount to about 1.95 bil- 


Pecqueur said that group invest- 
ment* in plant, equipment, explo- 
ration and production facilities 
would rise lo about 18 billion 
francs in 1985. from 14.6 billion 
francs in 19S4. 


Coping With Japan Holds Chip Markets While U.S. Firms Still in Slump 

New Cultures (C0Oim>edfromPa8e9) ! late 1970s. when Japan grabbed .Many doubt tiiat the Rc 

US. Begim Dumping Investigation =S£SS 


:r Goodyear subsidiaries. 


^ & 

r*- 


' r' s.' 

..C. »l>. 


Goodyear stock closed Tuesday cuss what 


can ms- 
ec about 


and they; 
the Josses, 


wfiLmg to absorb 
they are offsetting 


at 829.375 per share on the New certain national groups, then move wiih portable ra£o-tape players, 
York Stock Exchange, up 81.125. on to more positive awareness of televisions and VCRs. Thor goal is 


York Stock Ex 
Tenneco shares 
down $1275 


up 81.125. on to more positive awareness of 
at $41,125, cultural differences and how to ad- 
just to them. 


to gain market share and perhaps 
discourage low-cost Korean pro- 


Tenneco will be baying the intra- “For instance, it is not tmcom- duemfrom entering the memory 

slate gas pipdine system operated aHMtoseepgSetothe eriy “P tey. 


I 

*■ *v. 
X-'-' ^ 


by Loumana Intrastate Gas, which 
■is more than 1,800 miles (2,880 ki- 
■Rjmeters) laig. the 970-mile intcr- 


■fcmeters) lreig. the 970-mile inter- 
state gas t ransmissi on sys tem oper- 
ated by Mid-Louisiana Gas Co., 
three gas processing plants, and in- 
terests in two other plants. 

Goodyear acquired Celeron in 
June 1983. 


part of the asagnmmt pek on the U5. industry officials said that 
wit " add fiMW fi fim man - they garnered solid evidence of the 
ager of education programs at IBM strat^y two wedcs ago, when they 
S™ jwhI tfw-inSfttnrnf thftnm. came mlo possession of a memo- 


Europe and the imtiatar of the pro- 
gram. 

Managers’ acceptance of these 
cultural a wareness courses has 


miiw min possession of a memo- 
randum from Hhachfs field office 
in San Jose, California, urging all 
Hitachi distributor s to imdocnt 


/ '• l .f 


; Lis-:. 


Plessey Sees Lower Profits *&ieParis 

Reuxen pany, InteP 

LONDON — The chairman of A ssoc i ates, < 
Plessey Co. said Tuesday that die doctor. The 


been usually Met he said, except competitors’ prices by 10 percent 
far one exercise winch simulates a — no matter what the cost, 
primitive culture to see how well “I wasn’t surprised at aH,” said 
people adjust to foreign customs, Dave Gale, a salesman for In id in 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — The United States told Japan on Tuesday that it win 
begin an official investigation into alleged “dumping" of Japanese 
semiconductors on the U.S. market, a U2. Embassy official said. 

The official said the acting U.S. Special Trade Representative, 
Michael Snath, would review the claim of U.S. semiconductor makers 
that their Japanese competitors have priced their exports to the 
United States below proauction costs. 

Under U.S. law, such action would be an unfair trading practice 
that could result in retaliatory action against Japanese products. 

Mr. Smith on Tuesday handed Japanese officials a petition filed by 
U2. semiconductor makers on Friday urging the Reagan administra- 
tion to force Japan to break up an alleged cartel of Japanese 
semiconductor makers and further open its market to overseas com- 
puter chips, the embassy official said. 

If the administration found the claims true. President Ronald 
Reagan could take such steps as scrapping some trade benefits 
accorded Japan or taking antitrust measures against the U.S. subsid- 
iaries of the companies. 


On* P«ri«u Haijfd rawaiiting r^ rt- Denver who was the first to obtain 
pany, InterCultiiral Management tbe document and who has 


late 1970s. when Japan grabbed 
about 40 percent of the market for 
16K-memory chips, which can 
store about 16,000 pieces of infor- 
mation. based largely on U2. cir- 
cuit designs. 

When the Japanese share shot up 
to two- thirds of the market for the 
next generation, 64K RAMs de- 
signed largely in Japan, industry 
executives swore that they had 
learned their lesson and began their 
expensive revamping efforts. But 
after a year of shipments of 256K 
chips, which have four tiroes more 
storage capacity, the Japanese mar- 
ket share is a whopping 92 percent 

The danger is not that the whole 
semiconductor industry is lost 
RAMs accounted for only S3 bil- 
lion of the $26 billion in sales last 
year of all integrated circuits. But 
memory chips are a cornerstone of 
semiconductor technology. Be- 


tes as a cultural 
intervenes when 


the documen t and who has Advanced Micro said last week Gamble, acting chief of Mostek. cause they are a high-volume prod- 
watched the prices of some of his that it was forcing all its workers That is a big change for a company uct, th*y serve as a tamig ground 
memory chips drop 75 percent in into a four-day work week. that made us name in commodity ^ designers who nrcd to pack 


profit drop posted in fiscal, 1984 internal comranmcatians in the eight months. “Its exactly what The downturn has hit virtually chips. 


more and more circuits on a tiny 


probably would continue into the corporation have broken down bo* Wv© seen happenin g. I wa s only every segment of the semkonduc- 
first quarter of 1985. But John cause of real or perceived cultural a maz ed they put it in writing." tor industry, even U.S. strongholds 
Hark said in the electronics ccm- ntisunderstarKfiags. Hitachi immedia tely disavowed such as logic chips, which process 

cany’s annual report dial *1 would To re-estahdsh a common Ian- the memo, saying it did not reflect information stored in a computer's 


first quarter of 1985. But John cause of real or perceived cultural 
nark said in the electronics com- rrngnnderataTTdTwy 
pany’s annual report tiiat “I would To re-establish a enmmrm lan- 
. 'toped to see improvement in our gn a g e costs the company 200,000 
perfo rmance in the second half of to 300,000 Reach francs ($21360 
the year.” to $32jQ51). 


every segment of the semkonduc- The bigger question is where the °f silioon md for man uf a cun- 

tor industry, even U.S. strongholds Japanese growth will end. Tradi- F 5 tf y* n B 10 delicate manu- 

nw4t ae lteoic r4irr*e ojhirh rimrMC tinnnllu Innan Vine n rtf Kt™ ctrrmo Factunnc processes that can be QIS- 


company pobey. But already, the memory chips. But while those 
Japanese inroads have prompted sales are expected to come back. 


Floating Rate Notes 


pleas from UjSl companies to the large-scale memory drip produc- which actually do the prt 
Reagan adminis tration for quick non seems a thing of the past. and number crunching — 
trade action, perhaps through quo- No one doubts that Texas In- heavily on the quality of s 


higher. These microprocessors — detail like malting memory drips,” 
which actually do the processing said Charles E Sporck, the presi- 
and number crunching — depend dent and chid executive officer of 


June 18 


trade actum, perhaps through quo- No one doubts that Texas lo- 
tas that would linrit Japanese mem- stnnnents. Motorola, Intel, Na» 
oiy chip shi pments or tariff in- tkmal. Advanced Micro and others 
creases that would drive up with diverse products to sell will 


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i Japanese their costs. 

In the past mouth alone, the 
shrinkage of the U.S. industiy has 
been dramatic. Texas Instruments 
has laid off 2,000 enqiloyees and 
forced its president into early re- 
tiremenL Two thousand employees 
have gotten pink dips at Natio nal 


No one doubts that Texas In- heavily on the quality of software National Semiconductor. “They 
stnnnents. Motorola, Intel, Na» available to exploit their power, are the basis for technology used in 
tkmal. Advanced Micro and others and on the number of computer every pan of the industry." 
with diverse products to sell will designers willing to build a specific The Japanese excel at manufac- 
sorvive. Increasingly, though, they chip into their systems. turing technologies and their skills 

will -be heading into such specialty Memory drips, by contrast, are are growing rapidly in circuit de- 

areas in chip manufacturing, where interchangeable, so price becomes sign — the talent that has kept U2. 
design is more important than pro- a much bigger selling factor. For makers ahead in the more complex 
d action techni que. this reason, it should not be sor- chips. Thus, next to cats, sexmeon- 

“We know very well that the em- p rising that U.S. manufacturers ductors have become a major bal- 
pbasis has to be on adding value, in lost the war so easily. tleground in the growing trade dis- 

specdal niches," said Richard F. Early warning signs came in the pules with Japan. 




How Amro’s North Sea ex 
makes us experts in energy 


xpenence 

ynnancing 


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Hie great energy resources of the North Sea basin were first tapped in the 
Netherlands. Ever since then AMRO has been deeply involved in oil and gas 
financing - in Europe and all over the world. 

In feet, we are the recognised Dutch leaders in this field. 

What this means to you is a unique source of expertise and creativity in every 
type of energy finance. Add to this our native business acumen and the effective 
working partnership with our clients that results from our relationship 
management. And add, as well, our keen sense that to remain leaders, 
we have to keep on leading. 


Non Dollar 


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know beieg Dutch is not enough 


ASTA9.Hr UMi: UJDJN »XSL BUN'S <«»A> UJIJIMM, IHB« IH'SAMJjmr KHANS n'BT IISHWIR: IBHSKIS IM.VKU UIN1VA 

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Many doubt that the Reagan ad- 
ministration will do more than 
voice strong protests to Japan’s 
Ministry of International Trade 
and Industry. And U2. industry 
executives have hardly stood shoul- 
der-to-shoulder on the trade issue. 

But no matter what the outcome 
of the debate in Washington, the 
semiconductor slump seems un- 
likely to abate soon. The industry's 
critical “book-lo-WH ratio" fell 
sharply again last month, to 0.72. 
meaning that companies were get- 
ting only $72 in new orders for 
every $100 in orders shipped. 

“Worldwide, it doesn’t look like 
the 1984 shipments will be sur- 
passed until 1987," said Mr. Lazio. 
“We have IS more months of 
pain." 


— A DVERT1S 

INTERNA 


IBM Cuts Prices 
Of Some Models 

The Ass.viii:nJ Press 

NEW YORK — Internation- 
al Business Machines Corp. cut 
prices Tuesday of some of its 
older medium- and large-scale 
computers, but analysis were 
split over whether the cuts were 
in response to the computer in- 
dustry’s current slump. 

IBM also introduced several 
products, including a version of 
its Sysiem/36 minicomputer 
that is attached to an IBM PC. 

IBM said it lowered prices of 
its 4381 minicomputer by t> per- 
cent to S percent, its 436 i model 
by as much as 6 percent, the 
System/ 3 8 processors by 7 per- 
cent to 20 percent. 


Quotations 


18 June 


(d)- doily; (I*) - weekly; 


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— (w) FBiC Europeoo S1LBB 

— (w) FSC Oriental S2SJS 

FIDELITY FOB Ot. HomHIon Barraudo 
—{ml Amerloan VohMf Common. S9A57 

— Im> AmerVatuesCumPref S10LM 

— <d l FMellty Anw. Assets *4902 

— jdl FldeWy A imr aH a Fund SS.M 

— (d ) FktaUty DiKoverr Fund S 10.19 

— (d) Fidwity Dtr.swuo.Tr S12422 

— M 5 FkloOTY Far East Fund S 19.95 

—id > Fktailtv Iran. Fund *40Ai 

— <d ) Fidelity Orient Fund *2057 

— (d ) Fidelity Frontier Fund *1010 

— id) FktanryPflcincFund S 131.10 

— Id) FJdeUrvSoct Grown, Fd. H4fl 

—td I Fidelity tvoru Fund B32JS 



GEFINOR FUNDS. ... „ 

— (w) Eat iRvastmont Fund B 339X1 

— (w) Scottish World Fund 11072 

—Iw) Stale St. American S 1*471 

CapILTfU StU dLO B A— U1-49142M 


— (w) Scottish World Fund. 
— (wi Stale St. American _ 




JAROINE FLEMING. FOB 70 GPO HO KS 
— <D1J.F Mona Korn Trust—— *32X5 

-(b) J.F Japan Trust Y4M5 

—fb j J.F Jopan Te cw n ol epy — Y19J18 

—to ) JJ= Pocfflc SeeJS-IAcc) JSC 

—lb J J.F Australia *375 




DM — Dmtsdta Marie: BF — Betahim 
Lu xe mbourg Francs; SF — Swiss Francs; 
rtianae P/V S10 la SI nt unit; NJL— N«» ‘ 
N«w; 5 — suspended: S/S — Slock 9 
Grass Performance Index Mev; • — 
Worldwide Fund Ltd; @ — oh*t Price 
Price as on Amsterdam Slock Esehwvo 





Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE,. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 


Tu esdays 

AMEX 

Closing 


□ Month 

I wan La* Stock 


nhi YM- PE Wfc H» Low 


n Month 
wan low Stodt 


Sti. 

nstHWiLow 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

k'ia The Associated Press 


12 Month 

Wgti Low Slock 


Sb. ciote 

Dlv. YHLPE MOS High LOW OootdltW 


3* ADI A 
8k AL Lob 
12 AMCn 
2% AMintl 
59ft ATT Fit 
2W AcmePr 
8% AcnwU 
9* ActtflA 

2* Acton 
1% AdmRa 
17% AflRusI 
IS Adobe* 
4Vb Aerone 
au. ampd, 
5ft AlrExo 
STD AirCcrt 
TO. ArCcd of 

1 Alomco 
45% Atm Han 

ift Alba* 
9% Alpha In 
% Aitex 
2SH Alcoa Pt 
II AlBjCP 

tv, Amdahl 

6% Amedeo 
AmDIlt 
36 'A ACanrrl 

13% AEnpwt 
5ft A F ruC A 
Sk AFfuC B 
7% AMllhM 
0 Aisrool 
int AJUUoA 
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3 Am Oil 
sr-t APett 
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4% AmRltv 
lift ARnvln 
3 ASdE 
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41, AlMOl 
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« Andrea 
5* Angles 

ft vlAnalv 
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Si, Anevn 
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7ft Armids 
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131, Arundl 
6% Anmr a 
8% A51TOX 
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7% Astral Pf 
ft ARsCM 
2 VS Attas Wt 

2 Audloir 
13ft Avondl 


A U It 
33 


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224 2ft 
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174 4S96 
74 4ft 
48 9ft 
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140 1ft 

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17 7ft 
119 1ZU 

87 ft 

200z 33ft 
305 24ft 
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32 7ft 
1S4 13 

5 44 
1BJ 39ft 

2£0Ql 4 
1101b 5ft 
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12 15ft 
338 2ft 
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15 59 
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412 14ft 
21 3ft 
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23 5ft 

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245 3ft 

18 4ft 
18 6* 

14 9ft 
4 8ft 

« 20ft 

IK 7ft 
25 lift 
Ml 1ft 
4 1J. 
100 ft 

3 3ft 

15 3ft 

9 15% 


4ft 5 + Hi 

21 W 32ft + ft 
19% 19ft— ft 
3ft 4ft 
HU 84ft + ft 
7ft 2ft— ft 
9ft 9ft 
lift lift- ft 
7ft 2ft— ft 
2 2ft 
27 27 — ft 

17ft 17ft— ft 
5ft 5ft 
40ft 48ft + ft 
4% 5ft— ft 
9ft 9ft + ft 
12 12 - ft 

1ft 1% + ft 
90% 91% + ft 
7ft 7ft— % 


18ft W 
6 4 
2 V, Zft 
14% 14% 
27% 27 
37ft 27 
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19 19 

a a 

aw 

31ft 30ft 
27 24% 

an, a» 
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10% 10% 
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20 ft 30 % 
10 10 
5% 8ft 
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Sft 5ft 
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8 7% 

22 % 22 ft 
Bft Bft 
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’ft \ 
13ft 11% 
15ft 15ft 

*£ "I? 

9ft Bft 
-1%. 1% 
8% 8ft 
3«ft a% 


13 - % 

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15% 4* ft 
37ft + ft 
27% — ft 
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19 + % 

a 

24% , 
31% +1 
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KM— ft 
35% — ft 
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BW — ft 
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10 + % 
8% + ft 
Bft 
5% 

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22ft — ft 
Sft— ft 
4ft 


MW 18ft 
37 23% 

4 3% 

21ft 13ft 
Bft 3 
1% % 
27 19% 

31% a 
34% 14ft 
12 Bft 
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40ft 37 
1SW 7ft 
12 4% 

13% Bft 
15% 10ft 
34% aft 


Gtafflt 
Gbwnr 1 
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GoWW 
GMFM 
GCUWT 1 
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GrndAu 
Grant 
Grant wt 
GrTtch 

GrtLXC 

Grams 

Greiner 

Grach 

GHCdg 

CMfstr 


3&SS 

3W 3% 
19% 19ft 
3% 3ft 
ft % 
aw 24ft 
an 30ft 
rau IB 
BW Bft 
1% 1% 
II 10% 


sssa 

lift lift 
11 10% 
13% 13 
33% 33ft 


18 9% 

10ft 7ft 


XOo 34 11 
.93111.4 7 


12 + ft 
I Sft 




12ft 12£- ft 


ft % 

33ft 3» +1M 

2* a + % 
10% 10%- % 
6ft 7 

12ft 13 +% 
44 44 

38ft 39ft + ft 
Sft 6 
5% 5ft 
B Sft 
Sft 4ft 
U 15ft + k 
2% 2ft + ft 
3ft 3ft + ft 
59 99 + ft 

14ft UVl 

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I3ft 14 — ft 

3ft 3U 
2ft 3ft 
Sft Sft 
3 3ft 
13 13 + ft 

Bft Bft — ft 
1W Ift 
3% ' 3ft 
Bft 6% + ft 
4% eft— ft 
9% 9U 
8% Bft 
30ft 20ft— ft 
7ft 7ft— % 
lift 11% 

1ft 1% 


12ft 12 
11% lift 

% \ 
2% Ift 
3} 20ft 
24% 20% 
Ift 1 


i% + K 

8% + ft 
34% — ft 
4646 — ft 
12%— % 
lift— % 

\ 

2% 

21 

Mft- ft 
Ift + ft 


30ft 14% 
38ft 15ft 
43W 22ft 
44% 28ft 
a ism 

99k SW 
T9ft 8% 
ISft 10ft 
17ft «• 
4% 2% 
14% 3ft 
7% 4ft 
15% 9% 
13ft 4ft 
35% 2Sft 
17ft 8% 
4% 2ft 
19ft 12% 
4ft 1% 
7ft 3W 
18ft Bft 
43ft 29 
57% 39W 
21ft 17 

id n 


AS 23 13 
J5 A 12 
2X0 SJ 
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21 

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14 14W 

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41 2B% 
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124 35% 
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144 9% 

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44 5% 
17 49k 

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158 13 

9 33ft 
287 9% 
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159 19% 

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8 17ft 
93 7ft 


"5 12 n±% 

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3 3 

15ft ISft— ft 


3 1ft 
15% 12W 
15ft 12% 
7% 3% 

30% 18 
24% 19ft 
23% Ift 
8ft 3% 
8% 3% 
4% 3ft 
15W lift 
7VS 2ft 
7 4ft 
10W 7ft 
14 10ft 
10% Sft 
10 Sft 
18% Bft 
5% 2 

74% a 
4% 3% 

9V3 4 

N) 5% 
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3% 1ft 
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1 ft 

aw 23 

17ft 13 
14% 9ft 
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22 

1AB 11J 9 


J3t 5A 10 
X2M1A 11 


27 

JO 1.1 10 


JO J 18 
7 
11 

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2 lib 
13% 13% 
13ft 13 
3ft 3% 
18% 18% 
20% 20% 
11 10ft 
4ft 4 
4ft 4 
3% 3ft 
15 14ft 
Zft 2% 
4% 4% 
Bft Bft 
12W 12% 
5% 4% 

SVt Oft 
19 18% 

2ft 2ft 
TOW 70 
3W 3W 


13% — ft 
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3% 

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II — ft 
4ft 
4ft 

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2% 


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8 


22 

JO 3J 10 


.92 2A 11 
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•Z7* 1A 12 
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7 7 

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24% aw 

21ft 20% 
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n & 

15ft MW 
22% TIM 


19 +14 
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3W — ft 
1 + ft 


Til 2996 

CH 

45* 4546 

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15* 44b 

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40k 25ft 
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mpind 

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3% aw 

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lift 6* 
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ntBknt 

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ntHvd 

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41 1846 1 

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4% a* I 

soty 


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352 

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11 

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18 11 
At 25 30 St 


92% 91 
44% 44 
4% 4ft 
M 2% 
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2* 2ft 
1% 1% 
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19W 19ft 
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M% MW 

r 3 * 

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7ft 4ft 
7 6ft 
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37 aw 
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26ft + % 
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17ft 12% JdCfvn 5817 V 

7ft Sft Jocobo 

5% 2ft JetAm 6 

7ft 4ft Jerron _71t S3 15 

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11% 7ft JohnAm JO 13 13 

11% 4ft Jotmlnd 3 

7ft Sft JmoJk n 4 


3 17% 13% 13% — ft 
52 fift Sft 4% 

a3 21k 3 + ft 

80 8ft S 8ft + ft 

11 3ft 3% 3% 

41 9 Oft 9 + ft 

212 4ft 6% 4% 

5 3% 318 3% + ft 


Sft BAT In 
12ft BDMS 
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7W BaldwS J2a 3A 
ift BalrMwt 
21 BanFd 2.7BC11A 
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eft BnkBM A0 4.7 14 
3% Bares 
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4 BaryRG 

10% Baruch J4t 27 20 


4ft Board 
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21% BfcCp 


32 1.1 18 
A2I12A 
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19% BldkMf 1X0 43 11 


14ft BfoRA 
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ft OtockE 

121, BtounlA AS 29 
12W BkMjnlB AO 2A 
22W BolarP A5 .1 
lift BomVOI JO 
2W Bowmr 
12% Bowne A4 23 
left Smug 1A0 
lift Brauns 


3 % BmFA 1X0 10 10 
ft BrnFB 1X0 2A 10 


3ft BrnFnf A0 103 
2% Bucfchn 
3% BucUipf 30 10X 
23ft Buall A0 2.1 6 
9 Bush n 9 


9249 4ft 
154 20ft 

7 3 
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3 9% 
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99 8ft 

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6 MW 
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43 15% 

14 15% 
43 38V. 

3 11% 
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185 21% 

7 17% 
53 33% 

152 a 

9 4% 

7 3% 

13 5 
3 28% 
40 10% 


4% 4ft + % 

19% am— % 
2% 3 + % 
10% 10% — % 
9% 10 + % 
9% 9% — % 
3ft 3% + ft 
25 25ft + ft 
7 7 — ft 

aw 8% + ft 
3ft 3ft 
3 3% + % 

ift 4ft 
12% 121k— ft 
7% 7%— ft 

aw 29 +% 

3% 3W— ft 
34% 24% 

21% 22 — ft 

24 24% + % 

23% 23% + % 
14% 14% + ft 
Tft 1ft + ft 
15ft 15% + % 
15 15% + % 


9ft 


EAC A0 SJ 

— 

14 

7% 

7ft 

7% 

+ 



eeco ss 2 a 

34 

7ft 

13* 

13% 

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— 

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ERC 

16 

33 

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5% 

5k 

+ 




13 

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36% 

34ft 

36ft 


12* 

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EchoBa .IZ 
EIAudO 


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1ft 

lift 

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12 

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ElocSd 


9 

4ft 

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51 

239 

m 

ift 

ift 

+ 


11W 10% 
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ft ft 
3 % 

17ft 10% 

4ft 2% 

m 5% 
32% IBM 
5% IW 
35% 29% 
34% 22% 
10 4% 

9% 7 

4% 2% 


12 11% 111b— ft 

4% 4% 4% 

ft ft ft— ft 

WWW 

12% 12 12% — ft 

3% 3ft 3% 
raw 12% 13W 
20% 20ft 20%— % 
1% 1% Mb— ft 

35 35 35 + ft 


39% 30 
3% 1% 

16% 10 
12% 11 
14% 9% 
30% 14% 
22% 10% 
9% Sft 
17% 8 
lift 5% 
Zft 1ft 
4ft 2ft 
Sft 3% 
5% 2% 
5% 3ft 
3% 2 
15ft 9% 
15% 8% 

SOU 21 


KnG*pf 4J0 122 
KopohC 4 

KovCp JO U 17 
KovJn .10* A 
KoorNn AO 3A 13 
Konwtn AOa 4.1 9 
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KavCo JOo 3J 
KeyPh JO 20 M 
ICrvCa B 

KdvCawt 
Kfcfcfewt 
Klnarit 
Klrtnr 

Kit Mid M 

Kteerv JQr 3 
Knaoo 15 

Knoll _ 15 

KooerC 234 77 100 


120*37 a 

47 3% 3 

15 13% 13% 
31 11% 11% 
25 11% 11% 

1 19% 19% 
127 Z1W 20ft 
a 9% Oft 
877 10% 9% 
30 5% 5% 

18 1% 1% 
33 4ft 4% 
80 4% 4% 

ia 3% 2ft 

1 4% 4% 

317 3 2ft 

15 13% 13ft 

48 13% 13ft 
152 30% Z9% 


37 +lft 
Jft + ft 
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19% 

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ST* 

3% + % 


Zft + % 
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30 


30% 30% 38% 

7% 7% 7% + ft 


35% 35ft 

% a= 


w 

22* 

16% 

w 

lift 

3*4 


12ft 

9% 

w 

M 

11 


23k 

2D% 

ft 

lift 

11% 


18 

6% 

w 

27* 

2Z% 

w 

Ilk 

8% 


43% 

25% 

Vb 

30ft 

22*6 

k 

13% 

6k 


18 

7k 

1 

9% 

4% 


F_ 

A0 21 7 


I AOa 8J I 
A0 5.9 12 
8 

A8t 5J 9 
4 

I 4X0 152 


JO IX B 
1J0I 54 TO 
11 


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4% 1% > 

19% 13% 
19ft 9% 

8 ft 4% 
14% 10 ' 

au IBM ' 
6% 3% ' 
1% % ' 
10% 7% 
lBft 9% 
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22% 13ft 
23ft I8W 


M M 15 
19 


1J8 9.1 11 
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501 105 4 

22 M 11 


Mft 7% 

13% 7% 


11% Sft 

48% a 


17 

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ISL00 11X 
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a 21% 

31 8ft 

9 2% 

74 18ft 
57 12ft 
6 4ft 
183 14 

4 24% 

a 5% 
17 % 

16 Tft 
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a i4« 

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5 31% 
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52 12% 

4 12% 
4 10% 
1002 45% 
4 4ft 
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It I 
II IW 
200X29% 


21% 21% + % 
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18% ISft + W 
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13% M + ft 
34% 24% — % 

"K 

7% 7% — u 
14% 16W— W 
ZVk Zft— % 
14% 14% + M 
20% 20% + W 
7B% a% 

1ft 1ft 
1ZW 12% + ft 
12 % 12 % + ft 
10 % 10 % 

45% 45%— 1% 
4ft 4ft 
4ft 4ft 
1 1 

1% JW— I* 
29% 29% + ft 


30 lift 
2 ft 

a 14 
11 s 

25% 13ft 
15% 9 

7ft 4% 
24% 10ft 


20 

1 .15 3 88 


a 19% 
91 5% 

5 lift 
88 139b 
2B 23% 
5 13 

7 8% 

8 26ft 
» 8% 
43 39W 
69 25ft 
79 lift 
5 8% 

544 •% 

4 21% 
294 2Bft 
30 1% 
a 20% 
463 lift 

12 a 

42 14ft 
8 5ft 
12 23% 


19% 19% + % 
5% Sft— % 
lift lift 
13% 13% + % 
23% 23% + % 
13 13 

8% 8%-M 

36% 34ft— Vb 

8% b n 

39U 39% 

25% 25ft + % 
10% 11 + % 
8% ■% 

8% 8%— % 

21% 21% 

27ft 27ft + % 
1% IW— % 
19% a + Vb 
10ft lift +1 
23% 24 — % 
14% 14% — % 
Sft Sft— ft 
23ft 23% + % 


1% IW 
3% 2% 

7% 2% 

a 23% 
15ft 11% 
17% 11 
14% 9% 

13 8ft 
4% 4% 

27ft 21% 
9% 2% 
31% 13 
6% 3% 
8% 5 

20ft m 

3% 1ft 
3% -2% 
3% 1ft 
39% 23% 
14% 8% 
14% 6% 
16 9% 

14% 10 
39% 14ft 
TOW 8% 


6 

.15o 

54 3A 9 
J2 1.9 17 

a 


3X0 12A 

12 

.W J 11 
4 
9 

A0 20 8 


19 

AS 5 a 

17 

is 

4 

50 LI M 
JO U 15 


2 1% 
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5 4* 
148 55 
17 14% 
2 17 
a 11% 
■ 9% 

5 4% 
44 34% 
144 Sft 
20 29ft 
53 5% 

13 4% 

5 am 

X 2ft 

5 3 

a 1% 
411 37 
101 15ft 
1 12ft 
M4 10ft 
7 13% 
305 25% 

14 9ft 


1% 1% 

Zft 2ft 
4 4 

53ft 55 +1W 

Mft Mft 
17 17 — % | 

11% 11% + ft 1 
9% 9% 

4% 4% + Vb 

24 24% + ft 

5% Sft— ft 
28ft 2»tt +% : 
5% 5% 

6% 4%+ ft 
20% 98% + ft 
2% 2% 

3 3 + % 

1% 1%— % 
aft 37 + ft 
Mft 14ft— % 
12ft 12ft 
10ft 18% + ft 
13% 13%+ M 
2Sft 26% + % 
9% 9% 


4ft 2% 
14% 9% 

3 2 

18% 7% 
13% 9ft 
17% 12% 
5 2% 

17ft 12 
7% 3% 
14% 9tt 
13ft 7ft 

4 1% 

11% au 

21ft lift 

18ft 8 


GotUI 
GmlmS 
GOofnm AS 
OnEmn JO 
GnMIcr .10 
Genlsco 
GonvDr JO 
GdORu 
GcoRet 
GeaRspMXO 
GkmFs A0 
GfltYIp 


a 44 zn 

8 28' raw 

50 2JT 2% 
41 9% 

a 11 11ft 

SJ 9 1059 17ft 
4J 14 52 4% 

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47 10ft 
112 lift 

a 3M 

V 11 
237 20ft 
4K 9% 


2% 2% + % 

12ft 12ft 

2 2 — lb 

9 9% + % 

VMb lift + % 
17 17 — ft 

4ft 4ft — % 

Mft 14% + % 
3ft 4 

10% 16ft + ft 
11 lift * % 

3 3ft + ft 


low 11 + ft 
19ft a — ft 
9% 9% + % 


14W 12 
3W 1% 
9% 7% 
14ft 4% 
4% 3 
15ft 7 
17ft 8% 
3ft ft 
18ft 10% 
ISft 8% 
31ft 10% 
9% 4ft 
13% 3ft 
22% 21ft 
24% 15% 
Bft 5 
22% lift 
19ft Bft 


A8o 7A 66 
11 


MocSch .16 1.1 23 
Mncrad 

MOPS SS] 23 2 


MOPS A51 23 
MOMrtg JOe 
Mono d 
MrttiOi 
MrkIVa 

Morm p» 2JB 10A 

Mratiln 

Matoc 


MatRsh .13 3 11 


29 13M 
100 1% 
6 9ft 
98 7% 
70 3ft 
171 12ft 
227 14H 
XI 1% 
18 13% 
45 10U 
3 15ft 
11 4% 

1 10% 
757 21% 
77 17ft 
3 Sft 
56 13ft 
100 17% 


13% 13ft— W 
1% 1ft 
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3ft 3ft + ft 
12% 12% + ft 
14 Mft 
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13 13% + % 

9% 10U + % 
15ft 15% + % 
4ft 4%— % 

10ft ?tm 
Zl% 21ft 
17 17% 

4U 6ft— % 

12% 12% 

15% 17 +1W 


Over-the-Counter 


June 18 


Sates la 
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NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Met 

aw 3 P.M. Ortm 
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Solas in Met 

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MS IS 

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a% 2*4— % 
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lift 151,— I, 

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10 10ft + ft 

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12ft 12ft 
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6*4 TV, 4 l, I 

27 27 — ft 

Sft Sft — ft i 

ISft 16 4 ft 

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a% 37i, 4 % 

12ft 12ft 
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19 19% 4 % 

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25% 25% — ft 

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11 111b 4 lb 

12ft 13 4 ft 

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41, 4% 

lift 11%— ft 

ft % 4 ft 

Bft a, 

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23% 34% 4 ft 
12% M 41% 
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5 5 

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28 S8ft + % 
s a — v. 

Bft 9W 
31ft 31%— ft 
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9W 9% + ft 

4 4ft— ft 
10 10 — W 

4ft ift — ft 
14% 14% — ft 

12% raw + % 

8ft Bft + % 


Sates In 
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Avacns 
AvntGr 
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52425ft 24*4 
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1419% 19 
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30 Sft 3 
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294 7*4 7% 

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717 14% 

1615ft 15% 
29 4% 4% 
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199 4 5% 

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41 17 14% 

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50 7% 4% 

43 BW 0% 
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1 5 S 
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315 14% 

3239 38% 

184 ZIW 20% 

4 Tft 7% 
11 4% 4% 
16 4ft 6% 

31 4W 4% 
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3313 13 

13034 33 

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m**. w* 

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% &+* 
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19% 9% 9% + ft 
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314 15% 14% 15 — % 
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65 Sft 5% 5Vb 
70 4 U 4 6 + ft 

245 2 lb 1% lib— % 
539 4% 4% 4%— % 

33 9% 9ft 9ft— % , 
628 19% 18% 19% + ft 
2314% M 14% + ft 
5217% 17% 17% 
11419% 19ft 19% 

1110 9% 9%— % : 

828% Mft 28*4 + % 1 
140 4% 4% 4% 

3017 16% 17 + % 

1111% 11% 11%— % 
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624% 24% 26% 

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54 aft I Sft 
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IS 1 4% 7 + W I 

8 47% 47ft 47%— ft ; 

11115ft 17 17% — % 

31 34ft 35ft 35ft + W 

94815% l*ft 15 — % 
17 Tft 7ft 7ft I 
40 5% 5ft 5ft — % 
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011 22 V* 21 ft lib + ft 
16232ft 31ft 32ft + ft 
5 19% 18% 19% + % 
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43* 35 3* +% 

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924 23% 24 

a 7 4ft 7 + ft 


10 

31% — M 
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1% 

2% 

9% 

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9ft 
4 


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lift 

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9U.— A 
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12% 


49924% 
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17% 18 + ft 

19% 19% 

23% 24% +lft 
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16% 16% 

40 40ft 

13*fc 13% 


\ 

14% — ft 
39 * ft 

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4% 

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4ft + lb 
17ft + ft 
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7% + M 
19% + ft 
13 

Mft — ft i 

13ft 

MW + W 1 
3ft- M 
10ft + ft 


bra 

IrMt 1X21 9J 


113% 13% 
112 IW IS 
425% au 
1 17 17 

159 Tft 7ft 
4317ft 14% 
784 a 21 
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68$ 7ft 7 
1019% 19 
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1%— V, 


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17 

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16% 

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B33 37% 33 + % 

18 8 7V. Tft— ft 

184 5% Sft Sft 
41ZI 19 Z1 
202916 » 39 — ft 

2719ft 11% I Bft — W 
387 10W 9ft 10% + % 


CotLfAc 

CotrTle 

CotoNI 

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CoLuMU 

Comors 

Comoix 

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Comdtar 

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CmwTI 

ComAm 

Comind 

ComSy s 


A8b 17 21 14* 

AOs 3X 34817 
L54 8A 1$U8 
1X0 10 1531* 


.16 IA 2472 lift 
89 1ft 
2.10 U 14339% 
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518ft 

2X8 16 251 

in 23 4 78% 

1X4 24 20739ft 
M 24 4713% 

2X0 4.1 11 4814 

28415ft 
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1.12,0* 38 Sft 

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M SJ 2311 
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2ft 2% 

17% ir%— ft 
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4ft 4ft + » 

17W ia + % 

16ft 17 + ft 

17W 17% + V. 
33% 33% 

T7ft 17ft 
20ft 20ft— ft 
-8ft Bft + ft 
lift 1IW— W 
MV) 33% 

Mft MW + ft 
15ft ISft 
29% M. 
lift lift — ft 
1% 1%— ft 
39ft Mft + ft 
17 17 +1U 

16*4 16ft + W 
58 58 * U 

78 78ft— ft 

39V, 39ft + ft 
13% 13% 

4% 48% 

raft isft +iu 
lOu 10%— u 
22 23 + U 

.Sft Sft— ft 
W 12 — ft 
30W 30% 

Ift 2 + ft 
28ft 3SM 
9ft 9ft 
WVi 10W— % 
20 20V, + W 

7ft Tft + % 


pmnBk) 

Dotwr, JOe IA 
DnIArc 

Patent 1 
ptaiO 
PtSwtcti 
Dated. 

Dttttft! 

Datum 
Dautem 1.96 SX 
DavlWs M A 
Dawaan 

DabSh JOe X 


CMtlbA 32 19 
[ Oetdun 33 IX 
DvHtNG 1X4 PA 
Delia us 

Detwlcr 

DentMO 

OdOGtV 230 4 A 

Dnsnti 

DetecEl 

DatrxC ia 38 
OotNHi 
Item 
DtanPr 
Dkaone 

DMl 30 3A 

Oteean 

Dtcmad 


□talCm 

DUmrOI A0 38 
Diene* 

DtonJc 
DftttaO 

DvfOpd J4 3X 
DJvIH 
oeeuoi 


15V. + 14 
40 
3U 

1 10U— U 
1 lift— ft 
8U— ft 

6 — ft 
17 —ft 

7% + ft 
11 

> 33 +16 

6U 

MV, +1 
5 V. + ft 
18W— ft 
I ITU + U 

> 3% 

10 

3ft 

Sft— ft 

39% 

Ml,— ft 
_S% + ft 
24U — ft 

I Oft + ft 

Sft + ft 

24V, 

18ft + ft 

II 

IW 

IW— ft 
7ft— W 
47W + W 

7 + ft 

4ft + ft 

33 — fa 
7% 

JW 

13% + ft 
2ft— ft 
22*4 

11 — W 

4% 

4W— W | 
ZIW + w 
10ft + ft 
Sift + ft . 
4 — ft 
4ft— ft 

JJW + ft 
Mft 
Sft 


□Month 
HIM La* start 


Ss. 

Ute High Low 


□ Month 

man Low start 


- SB. Oat* 

Dlv. m PE lDOt HW> La* DuBLOW 


Bft— 1 
30%—% 

3W + ft 
T9U— W 
3% + .ft 
n + V» 
MW— ft 


BW— W 
tft 

10*— ft 


am + ft 
n% + % 
10%- *k 
raw— ft 
33ft 


18ft I4W— ft 

no aw 
a sow 

39ft 2PW + ft 
35W Ssft— ft 
38% 38% — W 

32 32 — ft 
32% 22ft 

9% m— ft 

9 fft 
11% 11% + W I 
16 16 — W 

2% 2%— ft . 

Sft 5% 

4ft 4ft 
MW 14ft + Vb 
13 13 1 

33 33 - ft 


29W 18 
T7% 12ft 
24% IP* 

7ft 4U 
3ft 1% 
3*4 1ft 
Bft a 
JB% raw 
Tft 5W 
SOW Bft 
20V, lift 
BW +U 
12 BW 
71ft Aft 
JW 7W 
20ft 12% 
18ft Bft 
39 31% 

17W 10W 
17V> 1QW 
17V, lift 
4ft 3ft 

w% ran 

6% Zft 
21 T3W 
9% 4ft 
Sft ZW 
9% 3% 
Zft ft 
13U 7ft 


23 

200 tax 34 
JOB 19 9 

,10a 43 


91 34 
38 14% 
1040 20% 


23% 22% + ft , 
MW MW— W 1 
SOW SOW— ft; 

SS ss-* 1 

2 .ZW + » 
J 2 

E5W 8SW— W 
17W 17% 

BW 9 +% 
I9W 19% + ft 
11% 12 + W 

M Sft— U 

10% 10%— n , 
My. 71ft 
■w aw + ft 
12% iz%— % 
n% m% + ft 

40% 4M +1% 
MW 14V, — ft 
MW MW 
MU 14ft— % 
3W 3ft 
18ft 18% * ft 
4W 4%— ft 
IS U 
BVb Bft + W 
2% 3%- ft 

* ^ 

11% lift- ft 


IS 8% 
3 4% 
11 2ft 


1.16 IA 14 
JO 1J 14 
ATI 4.1 14 
.15 A 248 

19 

A* 43 13 
7A4 HL3 
A4B3X 13 
JM IX 21 
AO 56 7 
4A0 VOX 
JO IA 15 
J8 IX 15 


1X6 SX 7 
14 

.151 8 


4 2 
1 B5ft 
7 T7% 
101 9 

94 19% 
7 12 
99 5% 
1 10% 
1«S 71ft 
4 Ift 
203 12% 
7 10% 
100x 40% 
3 14W 
87 Mft 
18 14% 
14 3W 
205«U1« 
2*1 4ft 
45 H 
1 Stt 
11 M 

a » 


Sgi 27% 

8% Sft 
,4ft 3ft 
M 9% 

4 * 

r r 

38% 20W 
7 1ft 
6% 3% 
»ft 23ft 
7ft 4 
MW lift 

34% ra 


Rtbiwp 

Rrtrrcv 

RchTpfv 

gf» 

Bdonr 


18 

.IOoZA 13 
jo ia a 


A0 23 
M IX 24 
.12 A 11 


RsonPn 
BoyPtnt . 

^rtpt J4 3A 

RU8M1I A0 IX 12 
Rytnff A0 11 14 


^ Si 

351 lift 10% 

45 ft ft 

S 4W 4W 
22 15 14ft 
62 31« 30% 
10 25ft 25 
210 1ft 1% 
493 4W *W 
1 34 34 

27 4% 4ft 
179 Mft lift 
183 24% 23W 


44k + ft 
Ift + ft 

1^ + W 

4ft— te 

a — w 
Ift— w 
aw + % 

*w + }* 


; K Back' M..YVLPE ^HicftU te Sgorttt ■ 

» ^ 3SL 1JB 57 “ iS “m 

Mft 4ft SvMnV .» M I ■ Tft 7ft 7U— W . 


* M 

[«'*, f .u ' 


T 

J3t 4X 17 


8*4 4% 
8ft 7 
5% Zft 

sis r 

* 

lf% 

25V, 


9 9U— ft 

9k Zft + ft 


19 19 — W 

Sft 6 

3% Mb + W 
15)6 15ft— Vb 
40ft 401, + ft 

55 a -1 

17% 17ft— ft 
71b Tft 


92 +1ft 
44W + % 
6ft 

a%— w 

I3W— w 

i%— w 
35W— W 
10% 

19% + ft 
1% 

a% + ft 
Tift + ft 
14ft 

3 — ft 
T 

4%— ft 

4 + ft 

2ft— ft 
7 + ft 

7 + ft 

32*4 + % 
36ft— ft 
3U— ft 


17 MW 
.» 5W 
1 4*4 11% 
27 12% 

23% lift 
Mft II 
SOW 13 
49U 28% 
6% 4U 
17ft 10ft 
15% 12 
7 6 

raft m 

3W 2U 
13% 10 
17% 13ft 
36M 29ft 

ft * 

11% 7 

12% 8% 


16 

A0b 3.1 9 

,10 J 43 
J9I 15 U 
1X2 6J 18 
lJDe 6J 10 
A0 1J 17 
J5*4A 5 
AS 73 119 
1J0 9A ID 


47 Mft 
18 8% 
13 13 
303 15 
18 22% 
lie 15% 
40 T9U 
548 44 
39 Sft 
29 11% 
29 Mft 
82 4% 

ms rate 

21 Zft 
93 10*6 
26 MU 
lOz 35ft 
50 3 

m ft 
10 7k 
28 9 


15% 14 — ft 
Bft 1% 

12% 13 +% 

14ft VH) + ft 
ZZW 22W— % 
1SW im 
19ft 19ft 
45W 44 +% 

5k 5ft 

lift n% 

15% 16 + w 

6ft 4ft— ft 


13ft I3U 
29b 296— lb 
MW 10ft— ft 
14k MU — U 
35ft sm + ft 
Zft 3 
ft ft- ft 
7ft Tft 
9 9 — k 


MU 
8% 

40U 
17 

*2W 1ft 
15% I Bib 

4% ZW 

9% % 

Sft 3% 
5% 3% 
4ft 2U 

at 

0% 

% 
9W 
Zft 


7 JO 11A 
£47 10A 
4X5 m 
2A8 10J 
2X0 4J 10 
JO 13 7 

A3110.1 10 


S Z7 7 
3A 7 


J U II 
AS 4J 17 
.10 IA 

A6 IX 10 


,14a 1J 9 
75 


21 

Ail SJ 17 

*J2 3 12 

LOOe 8A 6 


24ft Mft OCA 12 

22% 14ft Oa lewd JBb A 12 

12 4 OttetAn 33 

am 10% Otetan a J4 1 j n 

71b 3ft OOMep 
7W 3% Openhn JB, J 64 

8 5k OrkXH A .15 X71C3 

Sft 1 Ormond 

35* 15* OSutvn 1 AZ IA 16 

12% ift GxtndF m 7+ W 

11 7% OzorkH J II 1 


19% 20 + ft 
181b 18% + U 
6k ift + % 
20k 20W— U 
4*4 4*6— ft 

ift 4*4— ft 
Sft Sft 
ik in + ft 
23ft 23% 

10% Mft— ft 
9% 9W— 1b 


.Mb X 

50 

J71 23 30 
A0 U n 
JO IA 18 



a*- ft 

3k + ft 
Sft 
SW 
1% 

42% + ft 
23% - ft 

25ft + % 

24W + ft 
4U 

JW+ ft 
5ft 
10% 

13%— ft 
ao% + % 

11ft 

15% + ft 
35V, — ft 
lift— ft 
55% + k 

1% 

13% + ft 
3 

tft 

4*4 + ft 
5*6— ft 
3ft 
10U 

10W „ 

17ft— ft 
11% 


31% 21ft 
3% ■ 1ft 


T8«r A3* 48 17 
TIE 

T <' .. 3S 

TdbPrt JO 1.1 « 

TondBr 

Tory . A0 3X 12 
Team 

tehArt ,, 

RSS? 

Twlw A0 2X 8 

TeffiST 14 W w 
TaUTta J4o 3J M 
Toted 2* 

Te tenth 

Tenney 12 

Tensor 
TaxCdp 1J0 
ToxAJr 4 

tSaB A9f 7.1 20 
TbJCAE PIZX7 12* ^ 
Txecan 48 

Tbaren 

ThrD A .10 Z2 13 
TMwbU 

TolEdDf 7J4 US 
TdlEd PflDXO Ml ■ 
TOrM AN 7X183 
Totl Pt a 31 . „ 

TnwLx XSr A 13 
TmsTec A* JJ 
TrliM MM «J 
TrlaCd 491 4X 
TrtHme »0 

TrWex 
TkibMax 
TueMxrt 

Turns n 45 

TurnrC 1J9 *X 10 

Tvtrwt * 


39 5% 
1444 4% 

M 9U 
M lift 
43 7. 

5 « 

’SiSS 


15 7U 
13 22% 
3148 14% 
» SW 
22 20% 
100 2 
7 2U 
30 4W 
54 2% 

14002 57 
60x71 
67 5% 

438 11% 
39 13M 
IS 17ft 
54 9W 

3 10k 

4 5 

s & 

^21% 
44 30ft 
288 2 


5% ^3— if' 
iw 4ft— a,- 
9W *» . 

u ilk + n - 

4*4 7 +■% ■ 

>3% 13% , 

3% 3%'+ ft. 
2 Zft + W ’ 
*5% 1SW 
57*4 5BW +1 > 
4 ■* - 

M% U +% 
2% S%— ft 
27% 29 

Mft □ - ^ ■ 
Tft Tft— %. 
41b 4% ‘ 

4% 4ft 
7W Tft + W< 
32% 22% — H , 


&' 0 ‘ 


14ft 14% +W 
SW SW 
30 20% + 

2k 2% m 

<1.. eu. te 


2U 2k . , 
4W 4ft ^ 
2U 2% + ft’ 
56 54 +1 1 
70k 70k— ft. 
S 5te— te 
lift 11% + ft 1 
isk ran + ft 1 
17% 17V* + w . 
9W 9W + t%, 

10* io% + ft 

5 J — ft 
au 4k 
3ft 3% 




211, 11% 

39*4 39%—%' 
Ite 1% 


18k + ft 

14W + k 

11% + U 

10» + lb 

is* + k 

3% + Vb 
18*4+ lb 
17% 

4% + W 

-S 

18 Mte + W 

10% row — ft 


4* 2 
24% Bft 

is£ 

Ilk 8% 
21 14k 

3 1% 

3 1ft 
16U 10W 
22% 10W 
8% Sft 
19% 14W 
141b SW 
18% 5% 

23% 15% 
15*4 9ft 


U8R Md 

UltTnte a 

iinlan) 7 

UfttoPt AS SJ 
Unhnrn 'Ala 9.1 - 
UAtrM X4B 27 11 
UFOOdA .10 SX 20 
UFOOtJB . 19 

united is 

USAGwt 

UnMalV .W1SA Z2 
Unnun AOa ZX 
UflVGm M 

Unhrfte 19 

UnlvRu JOe 4A 12 
UavPat 


14 ZW ?W 

» ^ ”% 

36 14% M% 

^ r % 
■8 ?% 15 

105 14V* Mft 

10 raw 19 

3« ek 4 
3 19% 19% 
8 12 IT* 
3* 7 4% 

1 16% Mft 
71 12* UW 




ft- Hi 
14*6— Vb 
10 — ' ft' 
19% + ft. 
2 +U. 




MU— 1 
19% + * 
4k + . 
W%— k 
12 ‘ 

7 + W 

1*%— W 

raw . 


»k tDk + w 
nw 11% + w 
50 SO - W 
MW MW— ft 
88% 89 —1 
22% 22ta— te 

22 V. Z2W + ft 
81W 85% +3ft 
85W 85W +3 
S* Sft— lb 
7% 7te— % 
5% S%— W 

7ft 7ft 
7% 7% 

Ik 1U 

5% 5%+ » 


AB IA 19 
37 
30 


■Hi 
23 
11 
9% 
ZW 
% k 
iOk 6W 
1% 7% 

7k lift 
2% 1* 
»U Z% 
ZW 
3% 
4% 
11 
40 
6% 
raw 
10*4 

2k 

3% 

7ft 
13k 

raw 

SW 
11% 
6W 
4* 
ite 
3ft 
17 
30W 
14*6 
27 
2ft 


J2tr IX 18 
A2t &6 
.4*17 It 
1J0Q3J 10 
11 

JSr30J 
LBO 7X 10 
JO 3J 6 


1X5 24A 
2JB 250 
3X3 23J 
J4411X 3 


3 

4 

Xi iaj 10 

JOI 

1X0 2A 11 
IX 28 
JO 

13 


7 

27 

JOe IX 13 


M 44 9 
ASJ 

A6 85 
X 11 4 
15 

LS2 7.1 M 
4JS 1U 
ZA4 1IL9 
4A7 UX 


24 7 

24 91b 

8 14% 
M 2k 
61 3% 

25 4% 

82 4 

1 5k 

17 U 
1 73W 
57 m 
113 17ft 
22 15% 
8 2k 
252 3% 

44 9 

129 ran 

142 26 
34 6ft 
50 21 
13 7W 
5 7ft 
43 I1W 

45 4% 
138 21% 

25x38 
4 21% 
47 34 
16 3% 


14 + W 

13 +% 

lift + ft 
TZ —ft 
lift + ft 
34ft + ft 
32 —ft 
29k + W 
24 + ft 

21* 

23* + te 
34 

10ft + k 
22U 

19% + % 
1B%— % 
l«b— M 
20V, 

19% 

10 ft- w 
m*b— % 
40% +1W 
41k +3W 
44% + ft 
67JJ-1U 

34ft— Vb 
6k— W 
9H + ft 

7W + k 

9W 

10% 

^l| 

«+£ 

27ft 

12 % + W 
1)%— k 

* + * 
8ft— k 
9% 

14% ‘ 

2U 

3k 

4te— ft 
4 

5k— lb 
12 

73 W— Ml 

Sft + W 
17% + W 
15* 

2k— ft 
3W— k 
9 + k 

13ft 
24k — 2 
6% + k 
21 + W 
Tft + ft 
7ft + M 
lift— ft 
4ft 

site + lb 

38 

21ft 

33% —Ik 
3%— W 


JB IA 31 
JO 39 i 
271 


^S^ + ft 

^20^=2 
5% Sib 
2 ZW + k 
15% 14% + ft 
10% 11 +ft 
4W 4W 
7ft Tft 
4W 4W 
15ft 16% + ft 
29% 30% + ft 
1 1 

14ft 15k + k 
14% MW— % 
5% 5% + U 


18 

.18* IA 33 


A8 3X 12 
A4t IX 13 


JOo 1J U 
A4 2J 11 
6 


10W 9ft VSTn AOa £9 
18* WW VottyRS 1AO 7A 9 
27% 17ft VOIVT, A4 IX 14 
, 7W 2ft wartr 
23% 14% VtAmC AOb ZJ v 
IW % vwna 

Mft 9W VernH JO 11 ft 
7 3ft-vertPle 
10ft 4% VKzNKA 
9 5W Vtam - 10 

5% 2ft Virtue _ .. 

18% 1Z Vlroo X4r. J 16 
44% 53k ValnM __ .. 

9* 4% VbuatG AO 3X 10 
12% 8 Vdptex J4 3J 13 
19% 13W VVrioCP JO 4X 10 


MU 10ft + W 
18 18 . 
24% 24% ' 

7 7 + % 

18 18 
ft ft 
9W 9W— W 
4 4W + U 


4% Mb 
3k 3k + W . 
U* 14* 

64k 64k 
Sft Bft— ft 
11% 11% - 
17% 17% + <4' 




30% 10 Quaboi A4 


45 29k 28*6 28*4 — ft I 


9% 5 RAI 
5% 3ft RMS El 
7% 1% RTC 


R_ 

351 SX 12 


18k 15 Ratmn .12 X 24 
20 ltte Ranabo 32 4X529 
lift 6 RtincT 9 

19% 17% RltSoun 
4W l*b Redtcnr 


6% ift 4% 

3ft 3« Sft— » 

a 2 a — % 


1 a 2 a — te 

m 15k 15% 19W— U 
4! 15ft 15* 15*b— k 

1 ite 8% aw— w 

25 Ilk 17% 17%—% 
44 8% 3% 3% + W 


Sdtea nwm are unofflOcd. Yearly high, and bn reflect 
me previous 52 weafce phn the current weth. but nol the la teat 

trading day. When a split or start tflvhtend amountlao to 25 

percent or mora has been gold, the yeart MotHow ram and 

dtvktend ora shown tor the new start only. Unteu od«rwtaa 

noted, ram, of dMdanda ora anmnl dtebursemenfs based on 

Nm Mott dodaratton. 

a — dividend aUa atdrate) J1 

b— annual rate at dlv Mend phn start dMdamL/l 

c — ] touVdatlrw dMdendn 

dd— ooBodyi 

d — new yearly lawyi 

a — dividend dectarod or paid In preceffing 12 montteL/l 
a — dividend In Canadlon tends, subject In 1 5% nan-resldenca 
tax. 

I — dividend doctored after spIIMip or stock dividend. 

I— dividend paid lids voor. omitted. deterred, or no action 
taken at latest dividend tneeflnp. 

k— dividend dadarad or POkt mb year, an occumukrtlve 
liaue with dividends In arrears. 

n — now Inue M the past 52 wooka. The lUgh-tow row booms 
with Ifie start at trodtno- 
nd— next day daUverv. 

P/6 — pr ice -eorntngs ratio. 

r— dtvtdond drtnd or paid in pnecodlng 12 monttw, plus 
stack dividend. 

s— itort set It. Dividend begins with date of tpi If. 
sis— sates. 

I— dividend paid In Start W precetflng 12 months, estimated 
coon vote# on ottdlvktend or ox-dtetflbutlon date, 
u— now yeartv high. j 

v — trading balled. ! 

vt— In bankruptcy or ie<je(ver sl Hp<r being l eu t oa nl ind un- 
dar mo Bankruptcy Art, or Mairttiw asswmod by ouch enm- 
pentes. 

<ed— when distributed, 
uri— when fawned. 
ww— wtth worrteits. 
x — ex -dtvktend or ex-fishts. 
xrfl,— ex-dbtrtbutton. 
xw — vrithout warrants, 
y-ex-dtvtdend and sales In full, 
yld-ytetd. 
z— sates kt ML 



M 

A0 IX 13 
JOt 9 
.16 IX 11 
.11 J U 


11 

X2e J 15 
.14 28 6 

* 1. 


14 

JO 12 
19 
18 

1X4 7A 14 
X8e L2 T7 
23 


2X4 9A 
450 ISA 
AO 4A 10 
286 

1X0 11X 
JS 
sa 

XSe 32 


4% 
34U 
M 

15% 
15% 
W 

9 

123W 
24% 
■» 

I1W 11% 
3* 3% 
7% 17% 
Ift 1% 
3% Sft 
13% 12% 
■4ft 
7% 
9ft 
2% 
25% 
1 

8* 
18% 
12U 
1BU 
19ft 
39ft 
27k 
2*4 
10k 
IW 
23% 
42 
9ft 
3ft 
15ft 
18% 
20 
9U 


24k— MT 

Mft 

15%—** 

9W + ft 
123W +! 
24k + ft 
18 +% 
lift 

3ft— U 
i7w— te- 
le,— % 
3ft - 
12 —lb 
5 - % 
7% 

9ft + VI 
2ft- k 
25% ^ 

1 — 

9 — te 
10%— k 
12% 


am. 


39% + %. 
27ft— «■> 
2% + 

9ft— Vt 
4% + M 
15k— % 
MW 

»W + ft 
9ft + % 


*»(• , ' 
«ni ■* 

ArtV. .* .• 
IW*-, 1 ., 
teitnl ■* 

"Si J •' 
JW*' “ •• 
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wvi , ., 
tor" 3 • ^ 
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'bd* 1 

Itin'd 3 .' 
VetLtC 

VWt* ' ‘ . 

*&,* 

Wi> 


11ft Sft YankCO 


15 150 8ft 8W BW 


10k Sft Zhner .18 IX 85 5% Sft SW + W 


AMEXHigfas-LowB 


June Ift 


NEW Ml OH 5 34 


AmBlHrn 

FrinEnttrn 

KaoorCo _ 

PGESJQpfP. 

RoyPalmCot 

SCEMM 


cot Corns DtamndBath 
ICHCpwI tntrCtvGsg 


Mon Per pf A NowmiEI 
PGBIMpfM PUg440Pf 


Russell SlkasCpAs 

TotEd774pf Trans Lux 


Ftrstcoron 

jitmlcMI 

PGGxaof&J 

Rortawert-i. 

VwItSLn 


nee*. •' ■«' 
wnJ. 1.1 < 
Me 4., 

MrB?J I - ! t' 
baC, 

man 

ASA 19 • 

"eflv 

OrvOi 

tevU 

*M« i.s t 

OMi/. 

Wf» *T r 


NEW LOWS 9 


Acton Co 
PenrilCP 
TIE Comm 


CanOllGae Ducnmmun 
PomCvoii - Rooney Pee n 


Murnhylnd 
T Bar 


Sates In Mot 

TOOK High LOW 3 PJVLCttXM 


Sales In Hal 

1108 Hha Low 3PJU.CVW 


JO X 21624k 24 24 

1A0 15 1883S SOW Mft 

1J4 6A 1 21W 21W 21W— k 

JO 1J 2517k 14*4 Mft 

AO ZX 4314k 15W 15*— k 

JS 15 11 25 34ft 25 + k 

JDe L6 5312* 12k 1ZW + W 

Mllft 11% lift— W 
12624% 23W 24ft + W 

18718 17k 18 + ft 

53719ft 19W IP* + k 

J2 ZB 31 Mft 16W Mft + ft 

-24 IX 18823* 23% 23%— W 
1523W 23V. 23W— k 
119ft 19k 19ft 

1J8 3A 4439 38k 38k 

.56 5.1 45 SG®. 10* 10% + W 

.11 1.1 3417 Mft 1» 

1 4W «W 4W 
107 5% 4% 4% 

4424 23* 24 + k 


Sates In Not 

1001 High LOW IPALOlte* 

269 row 9% low + % : 
Ate IA Z1S* 15* 15ft + k 
-- ~ 9 +ft 


1008 High tom JFXLChtae 
~M ~ * 


X4 1J 
1 1X0 3X 


24 m Ik Ik— w 
5 5% 4% 4% 

34 8 7k 7W— W 

ft » 

120 7% 7 » + W 

sioft io* «m + ft 


123 fr w . .. 

119 2ft 2 2ft + ft 
38 7% 7W 7%— ft 
425 25 25 

1512*4 13k XZU 
1331% 31ft 31*6— % 
216% MW 18% 

31 18 9ft 9*4 
34411% 10% lift + W 
45515M. 14% 15% + W 
•410% 10ft W%— ft 
IW* 18* 18*4 
2618% 17* 18% + % 
2 17% 17 17 — W 

5 5% 5% 5% 

22 4% 4% 4% + ft 

63 4% 6*6 4%— W 

14114*6 lift 14%— W 
391 MVS 13U MW +%b 
1213U Uk 13k — k 
4016* 1SV6 14ft + ft 
2 Sft 5ft 5ft + k 
12ft 17ft— % 
1B% 11 » 

35* 35* 

9k 9k- % 


1X0 U 
LIZ ZJ 
I 21 U 
1X0 29 
lJOa 4A 
JO U 
JJe IX 


12W + % 
37 +W 


29% +% 
29W + % 
17% 

8 + U 
k + k 


V 


8ft 846 8% 

7% 7% 7ft + k 

3k 3 3 — k 

6ft ift 6ft „ 
10% 9 9k —lk 

5ft 3% 4%— IW 
1416 13ft 14 
20% 20 20 — W 

Ilk 17ft 18U + U 
11V6 10ft Mft— ft 
7% 7k 7ft— k 
ft % ft 
15* 15 15 — W 

15k 15k 15k — k 
10*4 MM 18k— U 
5% 5k Sft 
lift V5W 14k + k 
10 JS + k 
25 25% + U 

lift TZk— % 
Oft 9k 

13ft 13ft + k 
4ft 4%— k 
27% 37ft 
21k 23k + W 
4% 7 

32ft 324* + ft 
181 181 
4 4 

Mk 14% + k 
2* 2ft— k 
0% 8H— k 



33ft + k 
30 + k 

41% + k 

raw 

Zlft 

29W— w 
32% + k 
35* + k 
lk 

23U + W 
18% — W 

14%— w 

1ft +m 
39k +2 
25 — k | 
9 1 

22* 

24 +2 

14% + k 
11% + ft I 
42W -IZW 
42% +1% 1 
19 

34 +% 

38 + W 1 

5% + % I 
>2 

5U— % 1 
13% + % 

38%— % 
ltte + k 
15 +*b 

40W + k 
IS —46 
14 

3ft- W 
14ft 
17W 

30*— *4 
174b 

■M 

2Zk + te 

iw— w 

9* — % 
4%— W 

14 + ft 
1S% 

34* +2U 
9W— te 
1* + k 

25W + U 
11% 

4W— % 

15 



28k— ft 
io% + k 
5 

13*4 

ra — % 

19 

2k— W 


JP Ind 

•Jartpat 

JartUh 

Jac&sn 

JanWtr 

Jef/rGp 

JoHBsh 

JiffNLi 

JofSmrf 


ZW + ft 

M — w 
9 —l 
42ft— k 
28k 
31% 

Mte— % 
20 

9 + W 

15*— % 
31 + Mi 

8 —ft 
121b — W 
3 —Vi 

3 — % 
19* 

19* 

4W + W 
24 k 
37W— W 
5*4 + W 
22V, — k 
W 

231, + 4b 

4 — k 
25*— ft 
29*6 + ft 
15k + k 
13%+ W 
2DW + k 

8% — k 
28k + k 
20ft + W 
zs% + w 
«w 

4 

23 + k 

4% + 1b 
23% + W 
Ilk 
45te 
4 

23% — % 
5% 

9k + U 
7k— k 


Sates in Not 

MOs High Low 3PAfLCtra* 
77017k 17 17k + W 

800 7% 7 7U + Vb 
5134k 34 34k + k 

0 LB 3828* 28 28% — k 

10317% 17 17 + % 

718k 18k 18k 
0 39 441k 40ft 41k 

4 2.1 21 2D* 20% Mte— U 

OO £1 1219 18ft 19 

22 44b 4% 4% — W 

Z X 33520% 20*6 20* 

11 6 5* 5* 

3* ZJ II 4% 4% 4W 

I 41 6% 44b 4% + U 

t 235 4te 4U 4% + k 

184.9k 8% BW 
404 1716 14% T7% 

D 2.1 27194b 19% 19ft— k 


<Aiw 

10am 

.MOD 

Mto» 

benh .’I i 

Walt 

■Ban 

•tops 

ban 

UtoJn 

WOPII 

> . 
»«iw io 1 

XFi* 

tw» e j 
dan 1 i: 
mu 

MkUt •• 
Mfc*r 
tour U 
*%n. ijj ■; 

imt* 3 •• . 



15% 15ft 
4W 4% + k 
4% 7 +% 
30* 31U + W. 
2% 3 +W 
M Mk + % 
13W 15% — % 
8* Oft + 

ZU 2k— # 

Tt Tf 

42S* 40*— ft 
41% 41ft +1* 
54 57 +1 

3ft 3% 

TO 10 
40k 40k • 

6te 446 • J 
.5% 5lO— k 
13 13 

7ft 7%+ W 
ZIW 29 +1 

31 31 

4 4 — ft 


7% Tft +. K 
19% 20. + ft 
33% 33*'+ k 
7W 7% + k 
5 5k— k 


15% I5V6 — W 
13ft 13ft 
6W 4W— M 


JBB ZX 21 14 

240 5* 
7812* 
38 X 144ft 
7210 

.18 1.1 1» 9k 


FM Not X4 ZA 


FohWtil JO IX 
FWrUi .16 2X 
FalrFin 
FamHIS 
FaradL 
FrmHm 
FormF 
FrmHa 


Farmer JO 2.1 
FrmG 1J4 29 
FarrCa 34 ZX 
FodGas 


34 34 

7 7%- 

15U 15k 
6W 4W- 
Wk 1U%- 
W % 
3* 3ft- 
25ft 25*6 
Mte MU' 
3% 4 ■ 

37% 37% 
ilk ilk 
12 12 
22* 23 • 

4ft 5 - 
13ft 13k ■ 
25% 30k ■ 
51* 521b ‘ 
35* Mk 


20 7U 

141 Zft 
24345* 
’ 5214% 
49 BW 
11 11 % 
2011 % 
1716 

1 146 
10 4 

220 7% 
*3) 
1057 3 
31 5W 

2 5 

89214% 
222 8 % 
5 13W 
8414k 


Jd 1J 20620% 
214% 


FlrtrtC'j JO SJ 
Pin Inst .100 IA 


Flmnrru 
Fin loan 

F Ala Oh 1.12 4X 


Fit Am 5 1J0 XX 
FABPBA JD 2.1 

PtAFed 

FtAFtn JZ ZX 
PtATn 1J8 33 
FtBfiOh ZOO SJ 
FComB 

FC«mr 1J0 LS 
FtConn 1A2 ZX 


FEstC 1 1 JS XX 
FSik 
FF dMiC 
FFdCal 

FFChar 1XZ1 «X 


4 16 — W 

3% 3ft— % 
7k 7% — % 
4*4 Sft— Vb 
lift 11*6—1 
27* 27*— k 
33 33W 

9Vl 9W 
13te 13% + *6 
39 39 

31ft 34k + W 
53% 54k — te 
5% 5% + U 
96W 24W + W 
45U 4SW— w 
» 27k— k 

30* 39k + Vj 
12% 12% — te 

raw raw— w 

23ft ZIW +U 
19 19 — Vb 


X5e A 11812* 
A8r ZA 821% 


125 rate 

XOe 8X 5 4k 
38331* 
65 WW 
78 0ft 

X0 17 1023 

148 5ft 
7514 
114% 

JO 27 52 7ft 

7150515% 
10 IW 
-058 A 5412k 


M 14 - 
Sft 5% 
12% 12% 
44* 44* 
9% 10 
9 9k 
7V4 7k 

Zft 2ft 
44* 45ft ■ 
Mk 14V, 
23 Z3 
11 11 % 
11 11% ■ 

16 14 
1*6 1 * 6 - 
3% 3% 
7k 7% 
48% a 

Zft Zft - 
5% Ste 

15% 16% ■ 

8% Sft ■ 
13W 13% 
M 14k 
20% 20% ■ 
MW MVS 
28k 90ft- 
17ft 18 ' 

HW 12% 
20 20 
% ft 
13% 13% - 
12* 1ZW 

17 17k 
12% 13% ■ 

SW BW ■ 
7% 7*6 
14W 14% • 
3k 3k- 

5* 5% ■ 

8 Ik ■ 
20k 20k 

raw raw ■ 

ZTk zik 

it* n ■ 
4k 6k 
21ft 21*6 - 
12W 12% 

BU 8 % ■ 
22 22 - 
5% 5% 
14 M 
14% 14% - 
7 7W ■ 

14% rate 
iw iw 
.12 12 U 


22 4% 
4143*4 
373JS6 

' 1631ft 

Z1 a* 
19 4 
47 13ft 
57 2 
25424k 
11TB* 
mi iow 
S3S 7% 
45 Mte 

23 4 
«71 4 

1 4ft 
290 9 
sa 4 
6320% 
55 7 
8482®* 
354 5ft 
413 1% 
55 7 
BIO* 
191 7% 
W1J* 
< 4% 
438227* 
587 7W 
98 lift 


ZW— k 
3% 

446— W 
9* 

25W +te 
Ift 

mu + w 

35k 

5ft— W 
ZW— % 
6 k + te 
4k— ft 

2 *m 

3%— k 
39% 

"fc + fc 

43* + k 
33% + te 


6%— te 
13ft + W 
174b 

12., + ft 
lift— k 

wvv 

17ft lS*‘ 1 V 
9ft 9* 

IW 

14*4— te 
14* 

29% +ft 
11 + k 

19k + % 
14% 

S 7te— W 

2 -Vi 

S + Vb 
♦ k.. 
17k— k 

5b- W 

lE * 

20*6 + k . 

\\ +k 

»%— W 
IBS- te 
45k 

iSJ-u 

jst . 
5*^4, 

u* +a ^ 

2244 ’1' 

?*.«%■ 
17k — % 

iste+JS 

79b— W- 
34 

3*ft - . 
17ft -te 

20% + ft- 


2ft 

4 + k 

13ft + ft 

a 

23ft— % 
18* + k 


7ft + K 

zaft + k 

4 — W 

Zft— u 
ift 
9 

3% 

19ft— te 

23% 

5* 

Ift— W 
<W 
10* 

,71b + te 
1ZW— 1 
6ft— W 
27 + ft 

Tft— k 
Mft— ft 
,8k + W 
1» +1U 


low + 14 

13ft- % 

ia- 14 

7%- W 
1 

» -V, 
22k 
7 

9k +ft 
» + W 
*Sft + k 


13322% 22 


J5 * ft 

»« 45% 

"IzSaSg 


I V*Y. ' 


I to' S' 13 ' ^ 

-iJ J . , 

— u ft'j . - , 


1: 

c ? v 


rv, 

I' 1 - 

ite 

j>C 


SjtfC „ 11 19% 

JSH, 30428 8 

mJiTI a 5SS 

J4 1J 120* 
w IV 209'2A 

5J£««S xz IS 11123ft 
JS3JTC 9 i 

K°wTr 4AA in 

ModGE ZJ0 HA 24 Mk 

& p 

« u 27 ra* 
1J0 £9 942 

"WlRf U7 ML 

!J22!f 5917 


9 6 

44418 

U0 BA 2426k 
147 KJ* 

• I020W 

88 SA 2713* 


.16 1J ZMlfl* 13ft I)* + % 
« 5% Sft 5ft- U 


Mdlrlra 

MotSct 

iJonftw 

iManlHs 


19% W% 

7* 7ft— % 
7W 7k „ . 
4ft 4ft- ft 
20 28 +16 
25ft 25% . ' 

TW: 

24* aS + 8 

is* id* + n 
aow 20% „ ■ 
ra* wu— u .. 
41% 41%—! 

SW 8W-4 
16ft lift— JP* 
14% MW + k 
23 k zn, + k 
11- lift + % 


(Outthsaed ou Page 


V :•> ■' 

#:■ ; 

l^i 

'V ' • 




■ . 1 *'4 •**416 


V .r — 1 • - • <=> Cj 3 A 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 



Goodrich Plans 
To Sell Assets 
^Of $ 500 Mdlion 

The Amriaed Prea 

NEW YORK — BJ\ Good- 
rich Co. said Tuesday that ir 
expects to divest more than 
S500 nriBioo m assets m a re* 
structuring program winds will 
result in a one-tintc charge of 
S36S million against second- 
quarter earaings. 
v The chairman, John D. Orig, 
>iold securities analysts here that 
the overhaul will make Good- 
rich a emai ier company. The 
charge will be recorded against 
earning? in the tire and rnnrri- 

cal company’s 1985 second 
quarter. 

In the second quarter of 
1984, the company earned 
S3 2.4 million, or $135 a share, 
on sales of $883.4 millio n. 

The Akron, Ohio-based com- 
pany will shed more than a half- 
billion dollars in assets, Mr. 

. Ong said. He said that those 
assets generated nearly a quar- 
ter of the company’s revenues 




ChannelLmk Planners Name Chief 


in 1984, bat also produced an , 
operating loss of about S22 m3- : 
lion. 

Most of the divestiture will , 
occur in the polyvinyl chloride - 
— or FVC — and intennediaies 
business. Tbeccmpany will sdl 
off its Convent, Louisiana, 
chemical plant, which makes 
chlorine, caustic soda and eth- 
ylene dichloridc- Ethylene di- 
chloride is a FVC feedstock. 


U By Colin Chapman 

International fferahfTrilwte 

LONDON — T&rc Save been 
changes at the top at Euroroute 
Ltd, the MtidfrFreadt cotsot- 
litnn p rep a ring a plan for die Brit- 
ish HTuf French govtanments to 
build a road ypd nril rdote across 
the Fngtidi Channel. 

The new chief executive, effec- 
tive Monday, is Robin Bjegaza, 46, 
a director of Dunlop Holdings PLC 
and! it was taken over by BTR 
PLC 

Mr. Biggam; whose previous jobs 
included that of frp iwy director of 
ICL PLC, will be Eworouifi’s first 
full-time chief executive, taking 
over from Kenneth Groves of Brit- 
ish StecL Mr. Groves becomes dep- 
uty chairman. 

Eurorocte’s chairman, Sir Nigel 
Broakes, said Mr. Biggam’s ap- 
pointment marked a “major exten- 
sion of the management resources 
which we arc putting behind our 
proposal to budd a bridge and tun- 
nel across the Channel 

Euroroute, formed Iasi Decem- 
ber by British-French agreement, 
includes several Bridal and French 
groups, including Tra falg ar House 
PLC and several French banks. 

Kkunrart Benson .Inc, the un- 
derwriting and. securities trading 
subsidiary of Klein wort Benson 
Ltd, the British merchant bank, 
has appointed Mitchell Shivers as 
presmeuL Mr. Shivers was deputy 
bead of the international capital 
markets division of a rival mer- 


chant bank, Samuel Montagu & 
Co^in London. 

IBM Japan Ltd has appointed 
Cari J. Corcoran as senior manag- 
ing director. Mr. Corcoran, 58, now 
president of IBM Canady Ltd, 
takes up his new post on July 1. 

National Westminster Rank has 
appointed David Hewitt manager 
of its Haig Kong branch. He bad 
been assistant manager of the 
bank’s international commercial 
loans department in -London. He 
replaces David Shaw, who is to 
become business development 
m a n a ger in Hong Kong. 

AnsfraSa-Japan International fi- 
nance Ltd., Hong Kong, has rtnrorH 

Rynjjir© Y agasalri director and gen- 
eral manager. Yoshihiro Hayasaka, 
former managing director of the 
bank, joins the New York office of 
Mits ubishi Trust & Banking Cozp. 
of Tokyo, parent of Austraba-Ja- 
pan International Finance. 

Engelhard Corn, of Edison, New 
Jersey, has moved Cyrus H. HoDey 
to the new post of executive vice 
president and chief operating offi- 
cer. Mr. Holley, who had been 


ity chemicals division, wiflbe suc- 
ceeded there by Frederic M. Gnist 

Mob3 OB Nigeria Ltd. has pro- 
moted Robert EL Erickson to be 
chairman and managing director. 
He had been assistant area execu- 
tive with Mobil Sooth Inc, a ser- 
vice company of Mobil 03 Carp. 
Mr. Erickson succeeds RJVL Leon- 
ard, who is to return to New York 


as executive vice president of Mo- 
bil Land Development Corp. 

Coaanonwedth Banking C m erf 
Australia has promoted Richard 
Robertson to general manager, in- 
ternational, following the retire- 
ment of Geoffrey Johnson. Mr. 
Robertson was formerly deputy 
general manager, international. 

Johnson Mattfaey PLC has 
name d Peter C. Le Mcsuricr as 
group financial controller. Mr. Le 
Mcsuricr bad beat at Grand Met- 
ropolitan Group. 

Banco Santander de Negotios 
SA, the newly-created merchant 
banking aim of the Banco de San- 
tander Group, has hired Joan R. 
Iodarte as managing director. He 
had been deputy chief manager for 
Spain at Midland Bank PLC 

Cartel Cam the Chicago-based 
communications group, has ap- 
pointed John P. Frazee Jr. to the 
jew position of vice chairman. Mr. 
Frazee win have special responsi- 
bility for corporate planning and 
development He was formerly 
president of Ccotd Communica- 
tions Co., a subsidiary that markets 
and installs advanced telecom- 
munications systems and cable 
television. He is to be succeeded by 
a fanner astronaut, James A_ Lov- 
dL 

BankAmerica Coin, of San Fran- 
cisco has appointed Les Biller as 
director of international consumer 
markets, based in London. Mr. 
Biller had been Citibank’s regional 
mnoimfr manajyr for Britain, Ire- 
land and Scandinavia. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


RJEAL ESTATE 
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QUA! DU LOU VRE 

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e 734 96 28. 


eter Travel 



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GREAT BRITAIN 


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Gd for free Crtaloa. 

Bov 1201 1, Hotte r dotn Airport, H olland 
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AMBASSADOR PARK 

PARADISE FOR THE HAPPY ISW 

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bang JnJi right by die saa an Hie most 
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PAGES 16 & 4 




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; • . ; ; . .. ^ . : .• ,-L -'~ 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 'WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 



PEANUTS 

its still raining so 

WEta 5UfTOSeP TO GO OVER 
TO THE RK HALL 
FOR A f UWATS 
SW6-A-L0NG- / A SJJKr- 
A-LONG? 


A COUNSELOR LEAE75 THE 
SW6IN6..3CILSAY/OH. 
C0ME0N,V0U CAN SING , 
LOUDER THAN THAT] "THEN 
SHEILWANTU5TOCLAP : 
s^OUR HANDS... 


, THEN 5Uri!_ SW/CfoON, 
BCWS, LETS SEE IF YOU 
CAN SING LOUDER THAN 
THE GIRLS! C'MON.GKlS^ 
SHOW THE BW5 HOW LOUP 
_ YOU CAN 5IN6! * _ 


f I THINK IU> 
JUST STAND 
OUT HERE IN 
!OME RAlN_y 


IS 





BLONDIE 

■'V s THKTS UNCLE ' 
( MU«s« , naoio < *rNE 
EXPLORER t— 


III HHHH 


HE eXPUORSPTHE WILDS 
OP ALASKA. PDR A r" 
WHOLE VEAR BBPOtS ) 
HE MADE HtS 6KS J— iY 
OSCCTVS3Y K y \\ 


WHAT WAS HIS BKS 

k-T OISCOVERY? r 


ME SHOULD'VE HAD, 
» DOSS BUL4JNS HIS 
L >1 SLED 



ACROSS 

1 Commonplace 
8 Concordes 
10 Muddle 
14 Actress 
MacMahon 

15" .A Coat, 

A Glove," 
Speyer play 

18 Der 

Adenauer 
17 Uprising in 
Va.: 1676 

20 Paradise 

21 Actress Hagen 

22 Public-record 
books 

23 Freed -Warren 

sane 

26 Burnish 

31 "... 

forgive our 
debtors" 

32 In agreement 

33 Landed 

35 More than a 
tsp. 

38 N.Y. stage 
luminary 

42 Royal title; 
Abbr. 

43 TV's 

Piggy 

44 Condescend 

45 Coast Guard 
woman 

47 Seaport on Fyn 
Island 

48 Soft-soaped 
S3 Revere 


54 An hour in 
Roma 

55 Isaac's eldest 

59 Author of "The 

Hoosier 

Schoolmaster" 

63 Profound 

84 Christie or 
Evans 

65 Worker in an 
exec's office 

66 Station abbrs. 

67 Periods 

68 “For 

sake!" 

DOWN 

1 Zahoriasor 
Herman 

2 “When I was 

3 Fastidious 

4 Presently 

5 Actor Cariou 

6 Andrea del 

7 Bundle 

8 What treaters 
pickup 

9 Annede 

Beaupre 

18 Rock salt 

11 Excuse of a 
son 

12 Blizzard 

13 She skated to 
fame in 1928 

18 None follower 

19 Llaw 

Gyffesof 
Welsh legend 


24 Danbury 
events 

25" 

Perpetua," 

Idaho's motto 

26 Trail 

27 Neb. Indians 

28 Topsoil 

29 Dems.: 1932-52 

36 Matched pair 

33 Flaming 

34 Units ofwt. 

35 Look-alike 

36 Sacks 

37 Auldlang 

39 Great Persian 
poet 

40 Use an abacus 

41 Aberdeen's 
river 

45 Reins 

46 Equal 

47 Iridescent gem 

48 Saint Bede 

49 Cow's milk 
gland 

56 Eiffel, e.g. 

51 Church 
doctrine 

52 Spurs 

55 Ferrara 
family 

56 Procter's word 

57 Superior 

58 Ones, in 
Orvieto 

68 J.F.K-'s 
predecessor 

61 Pinna 

62 Sixth sense’s 
rel. 


BEETLE BAILEY 


EXCUSE I YOU HAVE THE 
ME--. J RIGHT J PEA BUT 
~vrT^Cl\ YOU POH'T HAVE 
V /'H\THE «EAL PICTURE 



*.* Nav York Tunas. edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


WIZARD of ID 


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la ANNOUNCE!? 

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ALL RieHT-EVBa&NE ASSUME 

THE 683/ELM& fCSiT/ON ( 


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REX MORGAN 


DR. MORGAN, 
THIS IS MRS. 
BISHOP/ ^ 


I'M SORRY TO KEEP YOU • 
WAITING / WONT YOU CCME 
_ BACK TO MY OFFICE 
tT PI FAT? 


s i i i 


5 I EXPLAINED TO YOUR NURSE 
1 THAT I'M REALLY FEELING 

6 FINE— BUT MY HUSBAND 

1 INSISTS THAT I HAVE A 

2 PHYSICAL EXAMINATION /SO 
“ HERE I AM. DOCTOR/ 


Tfati 


LAD 
l NOT 
1WDER 
EST / 


BOOKS 



THE LOVER 


By Marguerite Durax 11 7 pages, $11.95. 
Pantheon Books lnc. f 201 East 50th Street, 
New York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Eva Hoffman 

<(\y HAT Tm doing now is both different 
W and the same," Marguerite Duras 
says at the beginning; of her latest novel. "Be- 
fore, 1 spoke of clear periods, those on which 
the light fell. Now I'm talking about the hidden 
stretches of that same youth, of certain facts, 
feelings, events that I buried." 

In “The Lover." a critical success last year in 
France. Duras achieves a writing so distilled, 
that it almost defies translation. It is so direct, 
so precise and unreuoem, that it seems as if the 
novelist is idling us, perhaps far the First rime, 
the simple muh. 

Set in prewar Indochina, where Duras grew 
up. “The Lover" is a series of meditations on 
writing, memory, the relationship between po- 
litical and personal life — and on those extrem- 
ities of feeling where intimacy and repulsion. 
weakness and strength, Eros and pain Wome 
indistinguishable. 

At the center of the novel is a vivid image of 
a 15 -year-old girl dressed in high-heeled tame 
shoes and a man's fedora, from which the now 
older narrator reconstructs segments of her 
adolescent life and consciousness. 

One set of memories triggered by the image 
leads the narrator to reflections about her 
family and its “history of ruin and death." 

The father dies after going back to France; 
the two brothers are engaged in a struggle 
“unto death,” in which the younger is eventual- 
ly “martyred" by the murderous pressure of 
the elders brutality and oppression. 

The sadistic, loutish elder brother is the 
favorite of the mother, the novel's most com- 
pelling character and (he object of the narra- 
tor's most anguished knots or love and hatred.- 
Driven by the ambition to make something 
respectable of her children, perpetually fight- 
ing the family's slide toward poverty, she is 
almost deranged by her battles and her hope- 
lessness. 

“I had the luck to have a mother desperate 
with a despair so unalloyed that sometimes 
even life’s happiness, at its most poignant, 
couldn't quite make her forget it," the narrator 
writes. But her despair elicits her children's 
loyalty, because it is a refusal to lie or hide, a 
consequence of her trustfulness and candor. 


Sotatian to Prerioas Puzzle 


anna nanao aaaa 
edee naaEQ samn 
□□nEnnaasnaanaa 
□cncana □□□□□□a 
□□□□ naia 

ED00I1 333 03D3 

□nacaa □□□□ ana 
HEanasanan3aaaa 
bed naan Banana 
□edd aaa naaaa 
EC33 sinoa 
□nnBBoa anaaaan 
□□□□nnaaaHnanaa 
EE00 Haasa □□□□ 
□ebb aanns mnnm 


It is the girl's own form of candor, llw* . 
enables ter to ■'get away" — and one rautwif 
her escape is traced in u story of erotic Kate. - 
couaterposed against the family drama. - 
On a ferry crossing the Mekong River, the 
girl meets her first fovw. a young Cmne»mafl. • 
in a laigs black Rmousine. Their alliance, *ct uj. ■ .. 
an atmosphere or secrecy, shame and mutual. 
contempt of the races, has the integrity of an 
unashamed, absolute desire, leading them to 
the edges of tenderness and abandonment,- ' • . 


otgcctivity, 

menu 


lyncal pcwiiy 


EvQ'Hofmmn « on'ihe staff of The «Vevr yorS . 

Times. / -• • 


BEST SELLERS ; 

Th* N«r >ort, Ttoet f ^ 

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cowwvtfae. .• . t 

FICTION . Ll- 

Tib im .VMb . 

WM WMkWtfar. 

1 me ODER HOUSE RULES, by John ..:‘ L - r 

l/ving 2“ V: 

2 HOLD THE DREANL fay Barbara Ts\k>r -i ‘ S’ 

3 TTE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, by 

Tom Chnev 4 13 

« JURAL SACKETT. by Lome L'Anww ... 3- .4 

5 CHAPTERHOUSE; DUNE, by Frank 

Herbal 5 . 9 . 

6 IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney . 

Sheldon ............... — A .21 

7 THINNER, by Richsnl Bncbsun 7 16 

8 INSIDE OUTSIDE, by Hemum Wouk-- 9 » 

9 THE CLASS, by Erich Segal .... I. B 

JO A CREED FOR THE THIRD M1LLEN- 

1UM. by CoBeen McCuBoiah .... .... "12- * -6 

11 QUEraiE. by Mietud Korda 10 9 

12 FAMILY ALBUM, byDanietk Steel ...... 13” IB' 

13 THE LONELY SILVER RAIN, by John 

D. MacDonald it- 1 1 

14 A CATSKILL EAGLE by Roben B, :>■ ■, 

Parker 

15 THE HOUSE OF SPOUTS, by Isabel • f . 

Alknde ~ ‘ I 


NONFICTION 


1 AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY, by Lee lacocca ‘V 

with WtSJinm Norak — - — - 2 33 

2 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Tom Peters and Naney Austin 16 

3 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES. 

by CoaoeD Cowan and Mctvyn Kinder .... rJ It 

4 MY MOTHER'S KEEPER, by ELD. Hy -J 

nun — ... 4 S 

5 LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Buttug- ; ~ 

b CONF^SlONS^ _ ATtddKER,byB5i • 


kadv N. Shevchenko — 

9 THE HEART OP THE DRAGON, by 

Alnsdair Cbyrc 

10 THE COURAGE TO CHANGE by Den- 
ois Wbotey 

M ONCEUPON TTMEbyOwia^ VaK 
12 THE’^SonG "DYNAST^ by' Stali^ 


•» (. 


13 “SURELY YOIFRE JOKING MR. 
FEYNMANN," bv Richard P. Feynmans —13 

14 THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVTR. by - 

Richard Baefa — 13 41 

13 A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Sbel Silver- 

stdn 11134 

ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 DR BERGER'S IMMUNE POWER 

DIET, by Snarl M- Bener — I 

2 WEBSTER'S NINTH NEW COLLE- 
GIATE DICTIONARY t 33 

3 THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by JcTf 

Smith u "I II 

4 THE LIVING HEART DIET, by Mkhod 
E DeBakey, Antonin M. Gotta Jn. Lynne 

W. Scott and John P. Fbnyi — 2 

5 NOTHING DOWN, by Robert G. Allen 4 28 


k Unitin'" : _ . 

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•IW0Wy9WT0F-WEALPrtABEr...UKE A0C. ' 
CBS, N0C , CNN ,.V\R.T., USA , lOU- - - ' 


GARFIELD 


ENZOO 


OBOAT 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri AnxHd and Bob Lae 


Unscramble those four Jumbles, 
one tener to rach square: to form 
four cwdtruiy words. 



bmm 


k 50RPRISE» 


HAPPY BIRTH RAY, 
y GARFIFLP/ j 


I HAP A 

feeling 

THIS WA6 
COMING 


WCWflS 


By Alan Truscort 

O N the diagramed deal, 
South landed in four 


v-/ South landed in. four, 
spades and had to make two 
key plays to overcome the bad 
trUmp split. 

The first key play was to 
duck one round of hearts when 
that suit was led and win the 
second. It was dearly right to 
maneuver a heart discard on 
the dub ace, but there was a 
vital in between play — what 
chess players would call “zwis- 
chernug." 

After cashing the king and 
queen of dobs and crossing to 
the diamond king, South did 
not immediately play the dub 
ace. Instead, in his second key - 


play, he cashed the diamond 
ace and then played the dub 
ace. He threw m lus remaining 
heart and West ruffed. South 
was then in control. The spade 
ace was the third and last trick 
for the defense. 

If South had won the fust 
heart trick. East would later 
have been able to lead the 
fourth round of dubs, promot- 
ing an extra tnnnp trick for his 
partner. And if the diamond 
ace had not been cashed. West 
would have been aUe to exit 
with a diamond after ruffing 
the dub ace, leading a heart 
and then taking the spade ace. 
That would have left South 
stranded in the dummy, and 


again West would have scored 
the setting trick in trumps. 

NORTH (D) 

p«Va 

HCHkI 

*49732 

WEST HAST 

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*84 *J»«f 

SOUTH 

4 K Q J 1073 
V A 04 
9 73 
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Rmk ana Soaft mra tH —u Mb. 

XM faUBac 


Wart M Ora bant mo. 


MILGRY 


RUMIAD 


THEY WERE 
PARTICIPANTS 
IN A SHOT&UNJ 
WEPC7IN©- 


Now arrange the circled lottera to 
forni mo surprise answer, as sup- 
GtWlod by (he above cartoon. 


wmu 

ISSaSSBSSSSaB 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Yo51CTd.lv 's j JumNw SWAMP ELEGY DEPUTY BABOON 

I Answer A loa/or is always ready lo do this, to say the 
Inaal— THE LEAST 


Wbrkl Stodi Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse June 18 

dating prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated 


WEATHER 


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Allans 
BASF 

Bey 81 * 

Bov HvueBoek. 
Bov Voralmbank 
BBC 

BHF-Banh 

BMW 

Commerzbank 

MCtmnl 

Daimur-Bviu 

Dvswho 

Deutwne Bobcaek 
ocutseneHank 
Dmonar Bank 
ISHM 


GFSA 
Harmony 
HhreW Steal 
Kloof 

Nod bank 
Pros Slevtr 
Ruauiai 
SA Brows 
SI Helena 
Sasal 

Woat Holding 

Com oosHe Stack 
Pravkm : MJL 


Cleat Fra* 
3300 3130 
2700 2800 
485 440 

0015 7823 
1440 1440 
3125 HA. 
IS4S 1550 
025 020 

3788 1450 
8V0 8*3 

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Index: IIOJO 


Conrnwnbank leaox : 1770J8 
Previeui ; T14&J8 


TJ2J0 1 3UD 
1400 1375 
3 * 4 SB 3*2 
3T2V0 218J0 
531.70 227.40 
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373 370 

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14* AO 141 
COW 017 
34S 330 

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&5SA0 S41J0 
22*23 221 AD 
15*00 1 57.90 


Bk East Ada 
ctieuns Kona 
CMnaUotrt 
Oreen i iskma 
Hens Seng Bank 

Hendanon 
China Co* 

HK Electric 
hk Rnairy a 
HK Hotels 

HK Land 

HK Shane Bank 
HK Telephone 
HK Yuumotel 
HKwnort 
Hutch Whampoa 
H**an 
Inti City 
Jardlne 
Jonlln* Sac 
KOwtoon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New World 
Orient Oversea* 
SMK ptom 
S ielui 

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wah Kwano 
WtwelocfcA 
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1A0 143 

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775 725 

l.W 3 
440 440 

173 140 


Hees SOM redex : 1*2701 
Freetout : 14*U7 


A EC I BOO TBS 

Analo American 2*25 9*00 

Ample Am Cold 17100 17025 

Barlows 1220 1200 

Blyyoar 1315 1300 

Buffelc 7400 74S 

Do Beers IH 1IOO 

Onefantelh 4*75 4*23 

E tones 1780 1755 


Blue arete 
BOCOreup 


CoM Storaufl 
DBS 

Frwer Heowe 

HowPar 

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OCBC 

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5.15 5.10 

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570 545 
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143 174 

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HUOCIil 
Hitachi Cable 


Hrath ■ now lad index : 78IJI 
Previous : naos 


Steddmfan 


Mia Current index : w 
prevkHn : 1434 


1730 1750 

1043 1874 

1080 2020 




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BHF 

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Cca H ematne 
Cole* 

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N Broken Hill 
PmtdM 
Qia Coal Trust 

Thomas Nation 
Western Mining 
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134 132 
327 340 

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1.00 UP 
320 323 
4 *03 

125 M3 


CanatSm noda da AP 


All Ordinaries Index J«(LM 
Prevhws : MIAl 


Akai 

Asahiqwm 
AsSiicton 
Bank of Tokyo 
BTIdflMtOM 

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Da two Home 
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Wtoh't'Ml Jane 13 


































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EVTEHINATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 




■'C. 












South America Back in Latin Step 




® pfcM# 

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p- j.« ; •:*' rv ' t .'•)'• 1 ' ••* ' *--i» l •.. 




brinUM fteo InMrmiaad 


Ih, Anodewd Pros 


r - DOWNERS Expo pitcher David Pabner aDd New York’s Butch Wyuegar were both felled by fine shots Monduy nigjA 

■•o\ * In Montreal, Palmer, struck in the face by George Hendrick’s fourth-inniiig single, remained in the game. In toffinrore, 
Wvnpoar wac lmpofimrm rtie on-feck circle when a third-inning fool ball off the bat of WQfie Randolph caromed°off his foat- 


Wyuegarwaskned 
tinqs helmet. The Yi 


the on-deck qrde when a thmt-innhig fool ball off the bat of Willie Randolph caromed°off his bat- 
catcher, still woozy after several minutes, was hospitalized for X-rays and overnight observation. 


- «\v- 


Homer by Evans Keeps Red Sox Rolling 


RIlKiE 




V-- ±r<- ’ 

■\i • •* 


rl-« 


Compiled bp Oar Staff From Dispatches 

DETROIT — Forget about the 
Tigers defending their champion- 
ship, skip Baltimore's Tefairing Earl 
Weaver, ignore New York’s ups 
and downs with' Manager BiHy 
Martin and don't worry that To- 
ronto has the best record in base- 
, balL The real story in the American 
League East these days is the Bos- 
ton Red Sox. 

“We’ve played very, very wefl, H 
said Manager John McNamara af- 
ter theRedSox extended their win- 
ning streak to six games ty rallying 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

past Detroit, 3-2, here Monday 
nighL Dwight Evans hit a two-run 
homer in the ninth inning to give 
Boston its 17th victory in its last 19 
games. The Tigers lost their second 
straight following a six-game win- 
ning streak. 

.* Boston, m sixth place and 10 
'games behind Toronto on May 26, ■' 
is now in second place and trail the 
Blue Jays by 2 Vi games. 

Mikc Eader started the Boston 
ninth with a angle off Tiger relief 
ace Willie Hernandez. Evans then 
connected on an 0-1 pitch and put 
it just over the screen atop the 
right-field fence for his seventh 
bomenm erf the season. 

Brewers 2, Hue Jays 1: In Mil- 
waukee, the Brewers used the three- 
hit pitching of Moose Haas and a 
successful appeal day in sending 
Toronto to its fifth straight loss. 
Milwaukee l jwon 11 of its last 12 
games against the Blue Jays. The 
Brewers led, 2-0, when Lea Matus-' 
zek led off the Toronto eighth with 
a single. One out later, Lou Thorn- 
ton hit a ball that skipped past right 
fielder Ben Ogfivie and rolled to the 
fence. Matuszek scored on the play 
and Thornton reached third, but 


Milwaukee appealed that Thorn- 
ton had missed first base and um- 
pire Teny Coooey agreed. 

Yankees 10, Orioles 0: In Balti- 
more, Rickey Henderson went 5- 
for-5 and Ron Guidry registered 
his sixth straight victory as New 
York sent the Orioles to their first 
loss under new Manager Earl 
Weaver. 

Royals 10, Twins 3: In Kansas 
City, Missouri, Steve Balboni, 1- 
for-14 with six strikeouts against 
Frank Viola last season, tagged Vi- 
ola for a home run leading off the 
third and hit a three- run homer to 
cap a five-run sixth that buried 


Mets 2, Cubs (k In the National 
League, in New York, Gary Gaiter 


hit a bases-empty home run and 
came op with a fine defensive play 
to help the Mets aid a four-game 
losing streak. Keith Moreland was 
at third and Ron Cey at first with 
two cuts in the Chicago fourth 
when Ron Darling's _pilch to Chris 
Speier was in the dirt to Carter's 
right- The catcher blocked the ball 
as Cey started for second. Carter 
faked a throw to second, and New 
York was out of the inning when 
Moreland, bluffed off the bag at 
third, was nailed in a rundown. The 
Cubs have lost six straight 
Giants 4, Reds 0: In San Francis- 
co, Jeff Leonard drove in two runs 
with a homer and a single and Atlee 
Hammaker breezed to his first 
shutout since June 26, 1983. 


Padres 3, Dodgem 2i In Los An- 
gles, Steve -Garvey doubled, an- 
gled twice and scored the deciding 
run as San Diego halted four-game 
streaks for both the Dodgers and 
Ptedro Guerrero. Los Angeles failed 
to win and Guerrero failed to. 
homer in a game for the first time 
since June 9. 

Astros 4, Braves 3: In Atlanta, 
Alan Ashby went 3-for-4 with an 
RBI and Phil Gama hit a home 
run to help Nolan Ryan to his 
239th lifetime victory. 

Pirates 5, Expos 2: In Montreal, 
Tony Pena had three hits and drove 
in three runs — two on a six th- 
inning bomer — to hdp Pittsburgh 
«nap a five-game Expo winning 
streak. (AP. UPI) 


Designating a Way to End a Deadlock 


By Murray Chass 

..... ... Nm York Times Service 

NEW YORK — If anyone had listened to Eari 
Weaver in the spring of 1981, baseball might not have 
had a 50-day strike later that year. Weaver, then —as 
now — managing the Baltimore Orioles, came up with 
a solution to the dispute between the players and 
owners ova professional compensation tor lost free 
agents, and it was a plan that had so modi merit the 
players ought have accepted it. 

Four years lata and with another strike loonring, 
another manager, Whhcy Herzog, has an idea that 
he'd like to see on the bargaining table. It wouldn’t 
settle all of differences between the two sides, but it 
does address one common concern- It would give the 
players the expansion they want and it would help the 
owners ait costs. The plan, no ample product of 
Herzog’s ever-fertile mind, was triggered by the status 
of the designated hitter. 

“They can't get rid of the designated hitter, so 
there]s no use even talkin g about it," said the Sl Louis 
Cardinals manager, aOtunog to the p la n of Commis- 
sioner Peter Ueberroth to take a fan peril on the 
matter. “Guys like Ted Simmons and Andre Thornton 
are signed for some rim& I say put the DH in our 
league, too. The National League keeps saying they 


don't like it How do they know? They haven't seen it. 

“I don't understand why the Cubs, when they had 
[Dave] Kingman, and the Phillies, when they had 
[Greg] Luanda, didn't vote for it,” 

Putting the designated totter in the National League 
would be the first stro of the plan. Then Herzog would 
reduce team rosters from 25 players to 23. “You don’t 
need 25 with the DH," he said, speaking from his 
experience in the American League. 

Lopping off two players, of course, would save the 
owners money. But the Major League Players Assotia- 
tion would never allow a roster reduction without 
getting something significant in return. That’s where 
expansion comes in. 

The union looks at expansion as additional jobs. 
The addition of six teaxns,'for a total of 32, would 
mean a net of 86 new jobs. Furthermore, by reducing 
rosters to 23, the owners would be creating a more 
talented pool of players for the new teams, making 
them more competitive and attractive sooner. 

But Herzog's plan doesn’t end there. He would 
increase the rosters to 24 in 1989 and return to 25 in 
1992. “Then,” he explained, “let the 32 dubs vote on 
the DH, not by leagues but both leagues together. But 
you have to balance out the leagues before you vote." 


Iniematwnoi Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Latin America, re- 
gion of eternal soccer beauties and 
bickerings, once again in the nick 
of time shrugs an bankruptcies, 
tales of desperation and broken 
promises. 

By Sunday, Uruguay, Brazil and 
Argentina, the big three that have 
monopolized every World Cup in 

Rob Hughes 

the 800111011 Hemisphere, will be 
back in the pole position fa the 
1986 finals in Mexico. The decep- 
tive panic that forms part of the 
Latin buildup is ova, and the 
smart money is on one of them to 
win the 24-naiion tournament next 
year. 

Between World Cups all three 
had disintegrated. AD had hired 
and fired, all had muttered about 
doing without their overseas for- 
tnne hunters, all had looked vulner- 
able and disinterested and some- 
times violent in play. 

Come the cup, cranes transfor- 
mation. Problems are shaved off 
like a two-day beard, national air- 
lines get busy repatriating the mer- 
cenary stars, traditional strengths 
are restored. 

Uruguay, q ualif yin g ahead of the 
others, sent out to River Plate in 
Buenos Aires for midfield brain 
Enzo Francescoli (voted South 
America’s player of the year) and 
to Lens in France for the speedy 
winger Venanrio Ramos. 

Uruguay then won its group de- 
spite the odd last-minute scare, in- 
cipient brawling, the stoning of its 
team and accusations of $300,000 
Uruguayan bribes to a referee in 
Santiago. 

Chileans also played unfriendly 
friendlies against Argentina and 
Brazil Indeed Chile had beaten the 
B razilians (then without their Ital- 
ian exiles) on the eve of the qualifi- 
ers, prompting yet another Brazil- 
ian managerial sacking. 

And Chile’s national coach, Pe- 
dro Morales, was so unimpressed 
by the Argentines that he predicted 
they would lose thrir group to Peru. 

- Morales, a Latin, misjudged the 
Latin factor. Argentina — 4 games, 
4 victories; 10 goals for, 3 goals 
against — is virtually home and 
dry, while Peru, baring changed its 
coach after two dreadful perfor- 
mances, is hard put even to earn a 
runners-up playoff against Chile. 

The Peruvian effort had beat 
sabotaged a year ago by its own 
government, which reneged cm a 
promised $L5 million to recall 
overseas players for a grandiose 
training camp. Eventually Coach 
Motses Brack got piecemeal back- 
ing and the late release of Italy- 
-based JuBo Ofesar Uribe and othr 
as, hat was fired when the team 
did not instantly strike form. 

Ironically, Peru promptly 
trounced mediocre Venezuela last 
weekend, but now faces Argentina 
home and away. The first of those 
encounters, this Sunday, evokes 
fearful memories of the greatest 
soccer tragedy in history. 

la Lima hi May 1964, 318 spec- 
tators were crashed to death and 
500 seriously hurt toward the end 
of an Olympic qualifying match 
against Argentina. The crowd had 
erupted when Peru was denied a 
penalty; police fired shots into the 
air and catastrophic panic ensued. 

In the month after Brussels, and 
with Peru again desperate to at 
least bold Argentina, a prayer for 
the coming Sabbath is in order. 

One answer to Argentine pray- 
ers, or so it seems on the surface, 
was flown in from Naples. Diego 
Maradona has arrived to inspire his 


An American in Britain: Jockey Cauthen Still Riding High 


By Bamaby J, Feder 

New York Tunes Service 

NEWBURY, England— Steve 
Caulhen rode two winners here 
last Wednesday, but the 25-year- 
old Kentuckian's 65th and 66 th 
trips to the winner’s circle since 
• the British horse-racing season 
began in mid-March were regard- 
ed as scarcely worth noting by 
sportwriters and fans. 

They were still buzzing about 
- his double victory earlier this 
month in the prestigious Derby 
and Gold Seal Oaks at Epsom 
and looking forward to his bkdy 
challenge this week to the legend- 
ary Lester Piggott’s record of rid- 
ing eight winners in the Royal 
, meeting at Ascot 

Six years after his arrival from 
the united States, Cauthen's 
achievements are beginning, to 
strain British credulity. Thai 
might not surprise Americans. 
They remember him as a wispy 
1 7-year-old who astonished the 
racing world by pOing up 487 vic- 
tories worth more than 56 milli on 
in 1977. The next year, he rode 
Affirmed to the Triple Crown. 

, . However, here in the nation 
A where organized thoroughbred 

■ * racing began, Caulhen had to 

prove himself all ova again. 

“He’s matured into the perfect 
jockey,” said Richard Baericin. a 
.•* raring correspondent for ova 
half a century who has Mowed 
Cauthen’s progress for .The 
Guardian. “It’s not just a ques- 
tion of adapting — he’s im- 
proved.” 

The hallmarks of Cauthen's 
style, according to observers and 
admiring trainers, are an excep- 
tional coolness . that keeps him 
from forcing horses at ibe wrong 
times, an ability to keep hoses 
balanced and a combination of 


intelligence and feeling that is 
hard to nwttrh. 

“He is always thinkin g about 
the boise and not just in terms of 
the race he is r unnin g" said Hen- 
ry Cecil, Britain’s most successful 
trainer. “He can tell you things 
about a hose that many jockeys 


Can then was lured to Britain 
by Robert Saugster, the wealthy 
owner of a string of horses stabled 
here. ‘ 

Sangster first suggested the 
move in 1978. Ihe following year, 
after Caulhen had endured a 
string of MO rides without a win- 
ner, Sangster approached him 
again with mare success. 

The deal induded a retainer — 
reported here as about $125,000 
(at current exchange rales) but 
never confirmed — but Cauthen 
has always maintained that it was 
the chance to. explore the varied 
world of British flat raring with 
guaranteed access to good bones 
that swayed him. - 

“It -was the best derision 1 ever 
made,**: he told a visitor between 
races at this grass trade in the 

gently rolling Berkshire country- 
side. , 

British flat raring is nm cm 35 
grass courses, cadi with its own 
undulations and turns (some 
diarper than 90 degrees). Unlike 
in the Umted States, courses may 
nm clockwise as wefi as counter- 
clockwise. • 

. ,*rbe variations demand strate- 
gic skills '.and experience that 
Cauthen^ having grown up with 
the American style of raring, was 
widely assumed to lade. 

He started 1 slowly enough to 
make someskeptics wonder what 
all the excitement was about 
■when he airived, but his record 
has been one. of steady iraprove- 
menL'He topped "ti« 100 - victory 


mark in 1983, became jockey of 
the year with 130 triumphs last 
year and is well on his way to 
defending the title; 

“He could win 200 this year,” 

said the journeyman jockey Roger 

.Wemham. “He is riding better 
than ever.” 

“He game ova as a jockey bui 
now he’s a horseman,” said Willie 
Carson, whom Cauthen succeed- 
* ed as Britain's winnmgest jockey. 
The chances of Carson or anyone 
else taking away the jockey of the 
year title soon diminished sharply 

Cauthen to replacebggott asdic 
main jockey for his powerful sta- 
ble, a position guaranteed to give 
Cauthen more strong rides than 
any other jockey in Bntain. 

Ca u then, who is genuinely but 
never falsely modest, said he 
might have made an impression 
sooner if sickness had not deci- 
mated the stables of Barry HQIs, 
Songster’s main trainer. But he 
was quick to add that he had 
plrnty^leam^irc 

get the hang of it here,” he said. 
wasn’t totally comfortable before 
then." 

As Cauthen movi$ toward su- 
perstardom — a status rarely 
achieved by athletes here —Brit- 
ons are becoming increasingly en- 
chanted by how well he fits m. 

His fondness for hunting and 
shooting, his appearances at ma- 
jor rural social events such as the 
Quora fox hunt, his Savfle Row . 
suits, his dates with young women 
such as Carolyn Herbert, daugh- 
ter of Lord Porchester, the man- 
ager of the Queen's horses, and 
the cottage in which he lives near 
rural Newmarket all add up to 
one thing in the eyes of Britain's 
tabloids: a young man well cm his 
way to becoming the perfect En- 
glish country gentleman. 


i • ’ ~" v 


A' £ 

**: «** 


afgg. 

T* • • • J 

- r 


v - rc i 

■ y i-W- 





people. Overlooked as a prodigy 
when Argentina won the 1978 cup, 
sent off for petulant retaliation in 
1982, Maradona returns as captain. 
He needs, his country needs, more 
of die apparently matured leader- 
ship he has demonstrated lately. 

Coach Carlos Bilardo preaches 
teamwork, concentration and disci- 
pline. He speaks, mysteriously, of 
deploying the offside trap as a 
means of attack; he seeks a squad 

that can change tactics to suit (or to 

confine) its opposition. A pragmat- 
ic ambiance for Maradona, who 
has had his problems crossing the 
line from volatile waste to man- 
hood. 

And so to BraziL The samba beat 
so graphically evident in Mexico in 


1970, so nearly restored in Spain in 
’82, bad flattened out under a suc- 
cession of coaches who droned on 
about European tactical discipline 
—which often is actually a strategy 
to hide European teams' inability 
to cope with true Latin flair. 

With Brazil's best deep in the 
Italian lire market, young, stolid, 
confused pretenders were asked to 
tackle bade, cover and deny space 
the way Europeans do. They pa- 
tently could not acquire the habits, 
the foreign nature. 

They chased and they lost, and 
even among the world* s most glori- 
ous soccer population there grew 
real foreboding that the country 
might fail to qualify. But presto — 
at the eleventh hour Tele Santana. 





flu tmaoaed ft*n 

Brazilian defender Etfinho is vrimmg prase from Coach Santana. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Monday’s Major League Line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Baton 0HDMBQ-3 T 1 

Detroit lM 1M MB— 3 7 • 

Ntooerond Gedrnan; Petrv. Hernandez (0) 
am Porrtah. w— Nlmr r 4-S.Lr- Hemond 
X HRe— Detroit. WWtaker («. Baton. DwJE- 
vom (7). 

New rode m on aot— 10 it i 

BaMroon 00O0O00OO-0 S 0 

Guidry and Wvneeor. Hassav <3>; McGre- 
aar, Stewart (21, Aon (5). TMartlnez (8) and 
Dempsey. W— Guidry. 7-3. L— McGrooor. 5-A 
Minnesota 101 010 100- 3 U 1 

Kansas City 001 MS «•*-» 14 0 

viota, LYsnnder (7). War die (7) and Salas; 
Safaerhaean. Qutssnberrv (9) and SundberB. 
W— S ot wrtwaen.7-3. L— VMa.7-4. HRs— Kan- 
sas City, BaUtanr 2 (12). 


Steve Cantben, on Sop Anchor, after the Epsom Derby. 


Tennis 

Wimbledon Draw 

M ro mwad draws for seeded Moyers In 
next week's Wimbledon Tennis OwmptnB- 
sMm: 

MEN 

John McEnroe. 1, UA (holder), vs. Paul 
McNamara, Australia 
Johan Krlek. ». U.S. vs. Victor Peed. Para- 
DUOV 

Stetan Edbarp. VL Sweden, vs. Peter Doo- 
han, Australia 

Kevin Curran. B. US, vs. Lurry StefcmkL 
UA. 

Jimmy Conors. 3. U.&. vs. Stefan Simons- 
son, Sweden 

TDtnas5mkLlS.CzechastovakJo.vs. Russell 
Simpson. New Zealand 
MUaslav Medr, 12 Czechoslovakia vs. Tim 
Guillhsan, UA 

Pal CoEtL&Ausfralla.vs. Todd Nelson. U.S. 
Anders Jarryd, 5, Sweden, vs. Claudio Pan- 
atta, Ifatv 

Aaron Krlckatetn.l&UA^vs. B_Smiltz,U.S. 
Yannick Noah. II, Prance, vs. Brad Gilbert. 
UA 

Mato Wltander. A, Sweden, vs. Slobodan ZI- 
vollnovfc. Yugoslavia 
Jaafctm Nvstram.7. Sweden, vs. Jason Goo- 
dofl, Britain 

Tim Mayotte. IS. U-.S- vs. Trevor Allan. Aus- 
tralia 

Eilat Tettocher. IX U Ju vs. Gianni Octom. 
Italy 

Ivan Lendl 9. Czechoslovak!, vs. Mel Pur- 
cell UA 

WOMEN 

Chris EverMJavd. total 1. UJS, vs. Mnrv Lou 
Piatek. UJL 

BannleGndusefc 9. U.S, vs. H eadie r LudloH. 
UA 

Coterlna LlndavIsL Sweden. 12. vs. Barbara 
Potter. UA 

Ctowfla Kahdo-Kllsch. A West Germany, vs. 
Betsy Noeeben. UA 

Hano MondlBtova. 3. Czechoslovakia, vs. 
Ivana Buderova. Czechoslovakia 
Kathy Rlnaidl u, UA vs. ouai tiler 
Wendy Turnbull 14. Australia, vs. Gratehen 
Rum. UA 

Helena Sukava, 7. Czechoslovakia, vs. Co- 
Irln m»I. S wwden 
Zina Garrlean. A UA vs. aualHIer 
Gobrtola SabltlnL Argentina, IS vs. Aman- 
da Brawn, Britain 

Kathy Jordan III UA vs. Joy Tacon, Brit- 
ain 

Monueta Maleeva A Bulgaria vs. M.WD- 
shlnton, UA 

Plan Shrfvar. 3. UA vs. Anne White. UA 
Steffi Graf, !L West Germany, vs Lisa 
Spain Shari. UA 

Carling Bassett. IX Canada vs Mercedes 
Paz. Argentina 

M art i n a Navratilova tafaif 1, UA vs Usa 
Bander. UA 


Football 


USFL Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

Vi L T Pet. PP PA 
X-Blmlnahm 12 5 0 JM <27 293 

x-New Jersey 11 4 0 Ml 4T2 30 

■-Memphis ID 7 0 SU 390 309 

■-Tampa Bay 10 7 0 JS8 394 3U 

■-Baltimore 
Jacksonville 
Orlando 



W 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

Toronto 

30 

24 

■613 

— 

Boston 

35 

24 

.574 

2V» 

Detroit 

33 

24 

-559 

31« 

Baltimore 

33 

27 

.550 

4 

Now York 

30 

29 

sn 

tva 

Milwaukee 

28 

31 

475 

BVj 

Cleveland 

20 

40 

J33 

17 


Wot Division 



Chicago 

32 

26 

4S2 

— 

CaUfomlo 

33 

20 

-541 

Va 

Kansas City 

31 

30 

JOB 

2 Vi 

Oakland 

31 

30 

JOS 

2Vi 

Seattto 

20 

34 

.452 

4 

Minnesota 

24 

33 

441 

6to 

Texas 

24 

38 

J07 

10 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East Division 




w 

L 

PCI. 

GB 

Montrail 

37 

24 

J87 

— 

Chicago 

M 

25 

J76 

1 

St. Louis 

34 

24 

J67 

lib 

Now York 

33 

27 

J50 

2Vl 

Philadelphia 

34 

34 

■400 

llto 

Pittsburgh 

20 

39 

339 

15 


Wast DtvMoa 



Son Diego 

34 

24 

JB1 

— 

Houston 

32 

29 

-525 

3 Vi 

GndimatF 

31 

29 

-5T7 

4 

Los Angelas 

31 

2* 

J17 

4 

Attanta 

24 

34 

-433 

9 

San Francisco 

25 

37 

■403 

11 


the 1982 manager, was recalled 
from the desert Zico and Socrates 
and Junior and Cerezo and Ed mho 
came back from Italy . . . and the 
qualifying becomes smooth and 
satisfying. 

Once Santana had been released 
by the Saudi club Al Ahly. and 
once he had overcome his misgiv- 
ing that the Brazilian job was “not 
for a serious and honest man." the 
mood changed. Not exactly to sam- 
ba overnight — Santana hirasdf 
chooses to praise not flair but de- 
fenders Oscar and particularly 
Edinho for their solidity — but 
nearer to the Brazilian way. 

Victories in Bolivia and Para- 
guay, both by 2-0, mean Brazil has 
only its home games to win, or even 
draw, to qualify. 

Easy when you know how. Hard- 
er will be Santana's attempt to su\ 
at his post for a whole year, three 
times the recent tenure of Brazilian 
managers. But if he leads and its 
players follow. Brazil is my favorite 
to regain the World Cup. 

It still seems rather sad. and 
rather absurd, that a population of 
the size of the United slates cannot 
muster the remotest challenge. This 
week a tired, partly- resene En- 
gland team dropped into Los An- 
geles to uy a little missionary work 
in one of 'the last remote outposts 
of the world game. 

Alkis Panagoulis, the greek coa- 
ch to the U.S. national squad, was 
embarrassed before the kickoff, 
scared that his “college kids” and 
indoor pros would be outclassed. 
Well if Costa Rica could beat them. 
England could hardly help itself, 
although at 5-0 the Brils cased off. 

Those who anticipated a quick 
buck on England's flying visit (the 
same mentality that strangled the 
North American Soccer League) 
were burned. Barely 10,000 could 
ignore golfs U.S. Open or the hi- 
jack drama on TV, although to be 
fair at least a couple more knew 
England was in town. While the 
match was petering out in the Coli- 
seum. thieves were ransacking the 
players' hotel rooms, scooping up 
$2,000 m valuables. So the English 
will remember the United States, 
even if Americans are indifferent to 
Lheir game. 

I doubt that Uruguayans. Brazil- 
ians and Argentines will be trou- 
bled by either of them a year from 
now. 


Toronto 000 OMOIO-1 3 0 

MlhmokM 001 001 0Oz-a 4 1 

Stleo and wtilfts Haa* «*nl Sdiraoder. w— 
Hass. 4-3. L — Stletx. 4-5- HR— Milwaukee 
Gantnar I3L 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Qacimwtl Hi 090 KM 4 1 

Son Francisco 100 «n OOX--4 7 1 

Tibbs. Sham- (7) and Knicolv; Hammakgr 
andBranlv.W— HatnmokorA4.L— TIUO&*A 
HR— San Francbcn, Leonard (SI. 
Pittsburg* 5M in 000-5 * • 

Muwf rool M0 110 000—2 # 1 

Wina Robinson (6) and Pane; Palmer. 
O’Connor 17) and Nicosia W— Winn. M. L— 
Palmer. 5-4. 5v— Roblnoon 12). HR— Pitts- 
burgh, Pena 14). 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
RON Division 


taricaao 000000000-0 5 0 

New York 000 110 0«*-2 S 0 

Suldltfo. Frazier (I) and Davis,- Darling 
and Carter, w— Darling, 4-1. L— 5utciMte.fr*. 
HR— New York, Carter 171. 

San Dieea ton mo 000-1 10 0 

lm AmeiM ill 001 000—2 > • 

Show. Lttterto (0), Gassagc IS) an* Kenne- 
dy? Honeycutt, Castilla (2), Dkn (S), Nleden- 
fuer (7).Hc»wo |9) and ScknclaW— Show, K 
L— Honeycutt, 4-4. Sv— Gassage (IS). MR— 
Las Angeles. Brock (10). 

Houston 001 111 00O-4 13 0 

Attanta 101 010 000—3 9 0 

Rvaa Smith (7) aid Ashby; Shields. Ded- 
mon M). Farater (7) and Ouwn. W— Rvan. S-l 
L— Shields. l-i. Sv— smith (ID. HR— Houston. 
Garner (31. 


Transition 


Cincinnati— S toned Tim Delft. Pilcher, 
ond assigned Mm to Billinas at the Pioneer 
League. 

MONTREAL— Purchased the contracts o! 
Billy Barnes. InfMder, and Jack OTonrar. 
pitcher, tram Indtanaoolks at me American 
Association. Placed Bill Guliiduon, pitcher, 
an the 15-day disabled list. 

PITTSBURGH— Ad I voted Marvel I Wynne, 
outfielder. 

ST. LOUIS— Placed Terry Pendleton, ildra 
bosamon, on the Ifrdov disabled I tsf. Called up 
D ei Font outfielder, tram Louisville at me 
American Aasodalkm. 

BASKETBALL 

Natteaal Basketball Association 

Chicago— N amed Stan Aibeck head coa- 
ch. 

PHILADELPHIA— Named Jimmy Lvnom 
assistant coach. 

HOCKEY 

NatlHal Hockey League 

VANCOUVER— Fired Larry Paneliv plov- 
er Personnel director, and George Wood, 
scout. 

COLLEGE 

LOUISIANA STATE — Named Johnny 
Jane* assistant basketball coach. 

PACE— Announced Hie resig n ation of John 
Olenowskl women's basketball coach. 

ST. JOSEPH'S/I ND.— Named Ranav Bates 
assistant football coach. 


BlancpaiN 




Cauthen is a boyishly hand- 
some man who has grown several 
indies to Ins bright of just over 5 
feet 5 inches (1.65 meiers) since 
emigrating and now wadis al- 
most 120 pounds (54.4kilo> 
grams). 

He laughs at such observations 


and describes hirnsdf as an Amer- 
ican who loves the life he is lead- 
ing in England. 

“A lot of the things I am doing 
here I used to like to do in Ken- 
tucky,” he said. “They just hap- 
pen to fit into a certain image 
here.” 


0 JOS 422 293 
0 417 471 30 

0 JU 390 309 

0 £88 394 304 

1 J89 330 250 
0 ^71 34S 394 
0 JOS 391 474 


Orlando 4 13 0 JOS 291 474 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
■-Oakland 12 4 1 J3S «2 33S 

x-Otmnr 11 4 0 .447 427 347 

■-Houston 10 7 0 SU 52J 357 

Arizona 0 9 0 ^71 340 347 

Portland 4 11 0 J53 242 401 

San Antonio 4 13 0 JUS 275 423 

Lot Angeles 3 14 0 .174 2S4 439 

(■-eu netted Playoff berth) 

MONDAY'S RESULT 
Houston m, San Antonio 2T 



JouDicr-Hoitogci; MMaillc tTAijeto <fe b ViHe doFaito. 

35. boulevard des Capudnes, 75002 Paris. T£L 26I.6&74 M 261 .75.15 


JS. : 

& ; :v i - 

*-V v 










Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1985 


OBSERVER 


PEOPLE 


'Soft on Communism’ ,llc 'Populist Palaces’ of Ricardo Bofill in Paris 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — If you follow - L J ... 

the news only casually vou toward ihe democratic line, does it? 


taiy power to thrash its Eastern 
European cheats when they deviate 


- My casually vou toward me aeraocr 

probably think Nicaragua is ‘the 111 ** sunggle to save the planet s 
greatest problem facing the world rowl n ° l *5™“ 


By Paul Goldbcrgcr 

New York Tima Service 
ARIS — If there is any dtv 


) axis — u mere is any aty 
that in the years since world 


today. Scarcely a day seems to pass 
without President Reagan warning, 
clarifying, challenging, denying, 
declaring, invoking or issuing this, 
that or the other about Nicaragua. 

When such a day does pass. Con- 
gress uses it for voting, refusing to 
vote, voting to refuse to overturn 
the result of its last vote, or voting 
to reverse whatever it voted not to 
reverse when it last voted on the 
Nicaraguan problem, which feds 
like it was just 45 minutes ago. 

There hasn't been so much pos- 
turing and braying about so little 
since I960. That was the year John 
F. Kennedy and Vice President 
Richard Nixon managed to spend a 
big part of an entire presidential 
campaign flailing at each other 
about Quemoy and Matsu. 

Everybody remembers Quemoy 
and Matsu. I hope, because there 
isn't enough space in this column 
— or in this entire newspaper, for 
that matter — to explain why the 
future of humanity hung on the 
outcome of the Quemoy-and-Mat- 
su situation. You had to be there. 

And if you were there, of course, 
you probably can't believe — now 
that you dunk about it — that 
grown presidential candidates real- 
ly thought Quemoy and Matsu 
were important. 

Well, you would not have said so 
at the time, just as you would not 
nowadays say to the president and 
Congress tha t Nicaragua, being in 
the final analysis not much more 
than a poverty-stricken Liechten- 
stein, strikes you as a problem of 
overpowering inconsequence. 

The reason you wouldn’t have 
said something similar about Que- 
moy and Matsu and won’t say it 
now about Nicaragua can be ex- 
pressed in three words: "Soft on 
co mmunism. ” 


from doing to Moscow wnal Mos- 
cow would do to the United States. 

After nearly a generation of 
gathering dust in the national attic, 
“soft on communism” is being re- 
conditioned for combat in this ad- 
ministration. It is now implicit in 
much of the criticism mounted 
against people who deviate from 
the most bellicose view of what 
U. S. foreign policy should be. 

It has been present but unspoken 
in the arguments used to press 
Congress to fund the MX missile, 
the weapon whose military value is 
so dubious that many congressio- 
nal hawks question its necessity. It 
is present out unspoken in attacks 
on Americans who want a more 
strenuous effort to restrain the 
arms race than the president has 
made. It is present but unspoken in 
the argument that Vietnam was lost 
by timidity and “disinformation." 

■ O 


The explanation for the inces- 
sant uproar about Nicaragua may 
be that the president’s party is set- 
ting up its potential political oppo- 
nents for the old “soft on commu- 
nism" attack. The papers said that 
the House vote granting the presi- 
dent S27 million more to cany on 
his assault upon Nicaragua's Marx- 
ist government was influenced 
partly by Southern Democrats' 
fears that they might be called “soft 
on communism" If they voted oth- 
erwise. 


War Q has been buQt in violation 
of all its architectural traditions, 

: it is Paris. A generation of un- 
imaginative architects, combined 
with the French preference for 
pre-cast concrete construction, 
have made the outskirts of Paris a 
dreary landscape of harsh high- 
rise buildings, as dull and as anti- 
urban as any cityscape in the 
United States. 

Against this background, the 
buildings of Ricardo Bofill stand 
as a stunning exception. Bofill, a 
Barcelona-born architect who has 
now become a co mmanding pres- 
ence on the French architectural 
scene — and whose work will be 
the subject of an exhibition at the 
Museum of Modern Art in New 
York June 27-Sept. 3 — has four 
major housing complexes com- 
pleted or under construction in 
and around the city. They are all 
variations on the theme of classi- 
cal architecture, and collectively, 
they represent the most signifi- 
cant body of architectural work 
constructed in Paris in a genera- 
tion. 

The Bofili projects are closer to 
populist palaces than anything 
built in our time. They indude 
both publicly assisted rental 
housing for tenants of moderate 
income and apartments for sale, 
and architecturally they vary 
from the rather bombastic and 
overscaled Mame-la-Vallee east 


The news that that old phrase is 
out of the attic and stalking Ameri- 
can politics again may be worse 
news than Marxists in Nicaragua, 
for Nicaragua is a very small-bore" 
operation but “soft on commu- 
nism” afflicted the U.S. govern- 
ment with a generation of political 
cowardice. 


President Reagan's case for 
bankrolling the effort to overthrow 
the Nicaraguan government is that, 
being Marxist, Nicaragua isn't en- 
titled to have Yankee opposition to 
its existence confined to diplomatic 
pressures, but may justly be sub- 
jected to open military assaults 
mounted by Washington. 

Why justly? WeU. the Soviet 
Union rarely hesitates to use mili- 


Suspirions that the Nicaraguan 
uproar has more to do with domes- 
tic politics than foreign policy are 
intensified by the trifling sums of 
money involved. The clash between 
the president's party and those op- 

fought ova- tosunfitf $27* nSlion. 

At the Pentagon that's the kind 
of money that goes for ashtrays, 
coffee pots and toilet seats. 

New York Tima Service 



of Paris, finished in 1982, to the 
sumptuous and handsome 
“Scales of the Baroque,” a bous- 
ing complex now nearing comple- 
tion near the Gare Montparnasse 
in the 14th ammtSssemeni of Par- 
is. But all the Bofill projects are 
attempts to create large-scale 
bousing that is genuinely monu- 
mental. 

In this sense; the work of Bofill 
and his finn, the Taller de Arqui- 
tectura, joins together two strains 
of French culture that usually 
have nothing to do with each oth- 
er — the tradition of populism 
and the tradition of nranumeatal- 
ity. For most of the modernist 

period, mo numental i ty and clfl5- 

sicism have been seen more as 
remnants of the past than as con- 
tinuing traditions. But it is BofiH’s 
gift to be able to unite the French 
instinct for monumentality, 
which has lain dormant since the 
days when the Beaux-Arts acade- 
my ruled French architecture, 
with France's current leanings to- 
ward populism. 

Bonn s ideas can be seen in the 
raw, so to speak, in Mame-Ia- 
VaUee and in a still earlier project, 
“the Viaduct” and “the Arcade,” 
adjoining complexes finished in 
1978 in the new town of Saint- 
Quentin-en-Yvetines to the west 
of Paris. Neither of these com- 
plexes has the finesse of his most 
recent work; . there is something 
crude about the way in which 
classical architecture is turned 
into large-scale housing there. 

But the ideas still burst through 
with a robustness that makes 

other ^housing buQt in France in 



Dance Directors Among j 
New MacArtkur FeUom- 


Md wo Sdnwan 


Model of BofUTs “Scales of the Baroque” project in Paris. 


Two choreographers and a poet 
are among the latest group ofi25 
people given five-year feDowshim 
by the John D. and Catherines 
MacArtkur Foundation. Among 
the better-known recmientsJare 
Mace Cunningham. 60 , of the 
Mere* Cunningham Dance Com- 
pany; Paul Taylor, 54, director arid 
choreographer of the Paul Taylor' V 
Dance Company; and the poet: 
John Ashbery, 57. Among the 
scholars are Gregorv SdmpaC38; 
of the University of Indiana, a spe- 
cialist on the history of Indian Bud- 
dhism, and J. RkhanfStefljv6I, 
assistant professor of archaeology 
at Texas A&M University. ' The 
Others selected are Vatery ChaSdze, 
46, a Moscow-born physicist- who 
founded the Moscow Human 
Rights Committee; John Bentoo, 

53, a medieval historian at the €ali- , . 
forma Institute of Technology; Ja- - 
Ted Dtamood, 47, of Los Angeks, a - 
physiologist and ecologist; Edwin* 1 
L. Hutchins, Jr„ 36. of San Diego,-- 
an anthropokmst: Georee F_ Ov 




ter, 45, of Berkeley, California, a 

San^^fegn^a^ i^fhwiftriQan- .Hti 

oM Bloom, 54. professor of human- 
ities at Yale University-. WBfisai 
Crown, 30, a historian at Yale J 
whose work indudes the study q{ 
colonial New England; Main 
Wright Edefawn, 46, .presdenl of 
the Children's Defease Fund;Sam 
Maloof, 69, a California wood- 
worker and furniture designer, An- 
drew McGuire, 39, executive dirre- a 
tor of the Trauma Foundation; 
Morton Halperin, 47, director of :. 
the Ceuta for National Security 
Studies and the Washington -office 
of the American Civil Liberties 
Union; Patrick Noonan, 41, 
founder of Conservation Resource^ 
Inc.; Peter Raven, 49, of St Lotus, 
botany professor at Washington 
University; Joan Abraharason, 34, 
of New York, a specialist on urban 
research; Robot Hayes, 32, of New . 
York, who founded the National 
Coalition for the Homeless; Thom- 
as Palaima, 33, of New York, assis- 
tant professor of classics at For- 
dam University; EHen Stewart of 
“La Mama,” an off-off-Broadway 
theater; Jane Richardson, 44, pre 
fessor of biochemistry and ana to-’ ~ 
my at Duke University; and Frank- 
Ed Stahl, 55, professor of biology at 
the University of Oregon. The hot- 
free awards range from $124,000. to 
$300,000, based on age. . ..... 


18-story, U-shaped building with anything tha t has been built in 
outside corridors; a Iowa, semi- Paris in modem times. 


circular wing that faces the Pal- 
ace, and a 10-story arch, also con- 
taining apartments, that sits in 
the space m the middle of the two 
larger wings. 

It is no surprise that a Monty 
Python film was m.tA» hoe, far 
this is a very bizarre place, even to 
those whose basic sympathies are 
with BofilTs approach. But it has 
a compelling power — even 
though here, alone among the Bo- 


our time. “The Viaduct" is what it fill projects, one senses more of a 
sounds like, a bnDding in the concern with making overreach- 


shape of an aqueduct, on a site ing monumental statements than 


that stretches into a man-made 
lake in the mann er of Cbenon- 
ceaux, the great chateau that is 


comfortable. 


of this is resolved suo- 


buili out over the Loire. It is five cessfully, almost brilliantly, in the 


stories high, with four-story-high 
arches cat out along its width. 
“The Arcade," meanwhile, is a 


new project nearing completion 
in Pans. It is the Taller de Arqui- 
tectura's first buil ding w ithin Par- 


complex of three-story high is itself, and it is emphatically the 
apartment buildings set m best. like “The Green Crescent,” 


Ricardo Bofill 


squares around a central piazza, another complex nearing comp le- 
an attempt to establish a tradi- tion in the new town of Cez^y 
denial urban fabric in a new town Pbntoise, northwest of Paris, this 
that, like most American suburbs, complex is more literally classical 
is oriented mainly toward the than the earlier buildings, 
automobile. The Paris complex is hairily go- 

The project at Marne-la-Valtee ing to be confused with the older 
is more daring and more grandi- buildings of Paris. But it sits more 
ose. This complex consists of an comfortably beside them than 


The section of the 14th arron- 
dissemeni in which the 300-apart- 
ment complex is built has been 
badly damaged by exceptionally 
ugly new construction m recent 
years. BoffiTs response was to de- 
sign a low budding with classical 
detailing, twill around carefully 
crafted open space — an dbptical 
courtyard, a semi-circular amphi- 
theater and a gently curving front 
plaza. It makes a gentle transition 
between the modest scale of the 
older buildings that remain near it 
and the larger, newer buildings in 
the district. 

The Bofill building is at once 
grand and serene, a physically 
comfortable place that gives its 
residents a sense of being part of a 
monumental complex and a sense 
of privacy and individuality as 
welL The apartments are carefully 
planned and, given the economic 
constraints that exist in France, 
they are reasonable in size. 

The technology here is perhaps 
Bof ill’s greatest achievement. 
These buildings are built with 
prefabricated concrete construc- 
tion, which Bofill and his asso- 
ciates have managed to tame to 
their purposes. 


There are some problems here, 
and they crane in pan from Bo- 
fill’s desire to express the moder- 
nity of the technology within 
these buildings' overall classical 
framework. He has a fondness for 
sleek glass curtain walls, and for 
using them in unexpected places; 
the inside of the elliptical court in 
the Paris project is, startlingly, 
sheathed almost entirely in glass, 
which is even used as the shafts of 
the vast Doric columns that ring 
the inside of the court. To see this 
classical form rendered in sleek 
glass is jarring, particularly given 
the juxtaposition of concrete 
bases and spirals 4 • 4 


But on balance, the new com- 
plex in Paris should do much to 
suggest that the urban fabric of 
Paris need not be a battleground 
between the new and the old, that 
there are ways in which new ar- 
chitecture can enrich a complex 
cityscape rather than dilute h. 
“The Scales of the Baroque” is 
surely the most important new 
building in Paris since the Pompi- 
dou Center was completed eight 
years ago — and given its func- 
tion as a housing project, it may 
well be even more important for 
the future of the city. 




I pen.-' 1 - ■* ' • 
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CAPITAL REQUIfiHI £1504)00 far fod. rdfable servire Contort: fobwl S. 
Icmdownnr in South From far 7 Watt, Presdert, WOnl PubSshing Cam- 


ynors. Offer far lender: 11 tone mtl pan^lSl] K St, hLW, Washington, 
fltiaraitMd oqiid 7 yean maturity, ^ 


SfeS' Highest CD Rates 

II K jCNAV/vKSt RJliTOSlAL INS UjANCE W Tdre 46642 • . 

L ix—wun, cjg EVSY AMOUNT DBP09TH) boancoo \ 

S 23 feJ (0lW75 ® / ' 

Trien 320343 


JEatsv. 

nj bi;i. 

Wfiivv. .; ' ' 

S^> 4 ’ 4 


OISTODIAN-TSANSfS AGB4T 


IN U^. - FOR MULTINATIONALS 
CPA HUM 


fNTT. TRADING C& seeks estdtkshed 
sates agents m Swterlcmd, Gerotany. 
Aiotria, Benelux & UX for vitl manu- 
facturer of lop queity project Carpet 


OFFSHORE SERVICES 


fluvut flllieiluilL... rVjuii ** YOWC 575 Madison Avenue 

uiase memnanan oank New York, ny 10022 . Tet ma as 

JpOO. Tdmt 125864 / 237ffi9 


UX non resident companies with 
nominee deodars, bearer sham and 


westing to be Hk?d_ p/us. n emendous 
mail order a»*canorv System prices 
start a> U5J°J00 la USS.Y500 
Ivrma Dept- J35. Poufadi 1703*0. 

6000 FrreiWliri W Germany 
TeL 069 747B08 Tlx 417713 KtMA 


Bow 2429. Herald Tribune. 
92521 Newly Cedav. France 


Aston Compare Formations 
Dept TI. 8 Victoria Sr.. Doucto 
Isle af Mon. Tefc 0624 76S71 
Tain 62769) SP1VA G 


VVe provide, rto expense m reseoreh. S Business Brofcv? 
darrengand oaretaKton. Other avtsfc *2to, hvme. CA 5 
BTO0; Yfc 590194. 

estoe taw. manogereern & loan mfar- 

manon. send a bnef statement of your 

interest and needs to: 


torturer of lop qurety proiect ax pet noow mn ohbcrxi, oeav more ana 
on commason boss crfc. Wntv whh ^ 'fi d e rtidbQ^orowitte.FiAbafay 
reference to 9RA.P.O. Box 433. 1211 A wpport urocn. Panama &(ibanoa 
Geneva 3, Switzerland. 


433.1211 A support servicer. Panama & ttariaa 
companies. First rote cotodenlid 
— — profee si ond services. 


FOR REFORMATION CALL 

MASTERFUND 

MVE5TM3IIT ADVOGR 
575 Modern Aw, NY, NY 10022 
Tel: 212388*00 Tbc 125864 


WnrESTOR C BROKER 
B4QUHOES WELCOME 


BUSINESSES FOR SALE USA We 


US MARKETING HUM 


GOLD 

Private owner of goldfield concession is 


« Jisi I ^ 4 towfamhemi to ^Ssnltoo^ttSIretS^Uii”" 


US Red Etfote 

tavenmeni & Dev d opmem Servm Ire 
500 Cheston House. ISO Regent Si 
London W1R 5FA 
Tefc 01-734 5354 


. jj * | jnviu Ui 

TOto Wtm A mergna rtnwiatos ted torn enables us to move que«y mi 
tope la wu CcreroBy faceted, red- prmopd cr nue venrwe bai&NCZ. 49 
SuiJ^iT w, 57a, NY. NY 10019. Td : 212-371- 


on I manon only far a 


. - i personal interview m 
lb n t i d l Europe, necne wrto to- Bax 
2148, LH.T, Fnednchstr 15. eOOO 
Fiankfurt/Mom 




UFET1ME FRANCHISE BRIDAL wear 
bts. Available far whdo of USA. UK 
Director. Onan BlpdL^ wiR be at Mad- 
son Towors HoteL 38th Street. Aitatfe 
son Avenue, NY. June fa - 21 



^ W. ,34SI New York. NY 10121 
Tin 226000 CTXUR Refc Gddet^e 


PARIS- WMLD TOURISTIC CopifaL , ’Z 

Opporiumiy to become pretner in E17W. Tefc 01 377 l47ATbci 893911 G 
hotel consortium from USS5D.00O & — — — 


EARN 95% 


BOS. 15 Avenue VkJar toga 

S 16 CssJj* 502 10 ® 

_Tetate 620B93P. 

•WMfc Wo Savoia 7ft 00)98 Rome. 
Tefc 85 32 41 - 844 80 70 . 
fetexr 653456 .. 

SWBAPOffir 111 North Bridge - 
Peninsula PlazaSV— - 
0617. Tefc 3366677. fat 36ffll 


I^V 

lift}'' ■ 

Si*.-.- 

' 

k,*:/ 


jrassstfSKsi*— 

USSl Box 63427 fas Hogua/Ncfher- 
fands. Tefc 3W0654Q«T^ 

MONTPARNASSE. Poris, magnificent 
garden hnaoe. 
F2J0(U»a For defaib wnte Bax 
2366, tonald Tribune, 92521 NeuBly 
Cedex, France 


up. Kgh retwn guaranteed + yearly 
free stay. Information: DJJ. 45, rue 
nerrertorron, Pbris ftTefc 720 II B4. 
fat 650024 JNTLF. 


auuwnramSmfr 


^**9* totmweg 32, 8001 Zundi 
Tel. 01/214 61 ft 
Tefa» 813656/812981. 


V:r . 


fwose cortad First Marine Corporate 
Irerntmenls Lid. Sute C 1st Bmt 
SfandbrokfW MOi Band St. * 
London WlX 3TD, UJC 


. 


' It is //v signature Unit counts. 


t r «N» tiff'Lvitu t»y wn 

I'itjflr i^oui ,uul iliisi/.v/uJ. 

S 'Wdl thyt'faK 





A GROUP OF BANKERS a farming a 
sufastortiol Suns PonfoSo Manage- 
ment BotIc & s inviting irnesiors la tnyettuenb LM. Suite C 1st float, 

^‘aSfcS'SSfaSE 

" tatormoton wnftb ftfadeesf Gored- from an impartial Eurocrat View. 

PKTOSlONAL PHOTOGRAPHra. to* UtL 8 VietorioTtougfas. Ue pdnL f Mot^nm«lette?LS50^ « . 

(yoduated «i US with five Owards, of Mtm. UX rear from Researcfi, 14 Mwi SfamT ! • jteenxilfcjeid law and taxes 

™YMEDETKTiVESCAfONAviA **** I ^Ul {*^ 0 ^ ft^tone and ftto 

I’S^ftSBau’s: 

grams. Low armor,*! fees from &5. 4. N0I54 Oslo 1 Norway ntiU/llunc 

HOt ^ a K P NG ' YOUR TAX Shelter, UIAMONDS 

ga Tl * :Kn Anzooq B5740. re-mvoong cenrer, noninees. trade 

D '*«£N»iAND 
BWBWlrfS Are*p, Diamond City 
41 TAXSERVItS 


GENEVA 

SWRZBftAM} 

Full Service 
h our Business 


t5r^ 
^ ,> 


TIIKinmSSSS^'nn T Tr cmloc on and eeorelarid xerviem 

SSsPaSST; urv n S2 n 5S‘ ♦ Fo f n y* 0 n, cWivjtion and 

d 5w« md farrigh 


DIAMONDS 


Shopping In Europe? Visit 

Df AMONDLAND 

Dm larged showroom in 

Antwerp, Diamond Gty 

Aff*bw*Jtr 33A. Ttfc 323/2343611 


RjS cm&fefwe red dseretion aauwd 

business advisory 
SERVICES S A ** 


7 lh« Mjmr. 1207 GENEVA. 
Tefc 36 0540 Tdtoc 23342 


PANAMA UBBOA. CORPORATIONS u ? TAX neturrs^tyd oudhs 

from USS400 oudlable now. Tel fa 1 ptafaew nob. Para 563 91 23. 


OFFICE SERVICES _dahnhoistrasses2 

TOW OfflCE AWAY TOM HOME 

• OrnovManaganM SwiCtf 

G0®VA KA * S m5JSS W6ss 1 Ccrapcmy tornatranc 
ZT ™ SBtVtCES * How » do Baenres tn/w/ 


ZURKH-ZWUCH-ZURICH 


0534] 2024ft Tetast 6 ^ 5 ; ISLAND 
G. (vwUKL 


COMPUTES far busnest and perfQn- 
d we. Authoraed deafer fiylS? 
*91** ° >h S^. Bed dre Cd Mr. 
Lawrence. Pans 56 3 2989/ 3dB 3000 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


INVESTOR/ WOWING PARTNER 
seeks menra trtwotion to partfapate 
in buMWa trade deve lo pment. Bcsc c_ ji 
2073, Rockvfle. MD 20af L^. 


F^eaustped office! to rent. DanicS- 
«■ ptotej. Trade, dies 
otoiwtrrtona! teerefand terms. 
KBS, 5Rte de Chene, 1207 Gerreva 
Tefc {221 86 17 33, *t 428388 KBS 


Van Cleef & Arpels, R\RIS Zl Place \end 0 me.Tel: 26I.5&58. - GENE\~E 31 Rue du Rhone.Tel; 28.81.66l ' Id b0UttQU € ” 


25 B irarar 35 cowmaEft 

GmC 26 Oeomnous St, 106 76 
I Athens. Grants. 



Imptime par Offprint, 73 rue de PEvanple, 75Q18 Paris. 


FOR OfflG FACHJntS or repre s en- 
Joh^&rope. Contort Swtaeifarto 
H»3®47 


PRINaPAUTY ^pf86i7? 

smavMm' 

MC mao Mpnaoa PARS ADORES, 

Tot ra 50 bS 00 M.1511 Sncel957L5J*.pn 

Tefax 4794)7 MC tefex. memma roa 


► now n do Bimness tn/tv/ 

. , _ FROM5WITZBUND 

BbAom 5ennres Cattfob Com. . 
Et Mwbkwe SLOiSm ZdiS. 
Tefc 01/211 92 07. fae 813 062 




Snce 1957 !£?. provides tndl, phone, 
5 roe dffittoit, 

7500ft TSB9 47 04. Tbs 64250A 


WfBBgS ADDRESS. Mori SffiaB, 
Mtst, secretarid tenim 
Men Business . Center- Tefc 
5179211 p2 Snesl. Tb, 613*4 B " 




s N;v 


J :■■■ • :f-Vi 

-'--'si r;-<s& 




. • 'r'* 4 f ' 41