Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


*u _ 



ti., 


k, TheGl 

eA 

• ' i fc? M ^ Printed Siinuhaneouslv 
■ ' . ni Paris. London. Zunch. 

, ; ; ‘ |l Hong koitjj. Singapore. 

; . ' .s& 


BNTERNATIONAL 


Tin- Hague and Marseille 



2 i * 4i w eathk data appear on page 22 


Published With The New York limes and 



une 


Afesno frSOCWt fcej U, 1.100 NolMT»— ’DO K* 

At***) urf, 159JI*. O'" — C.TJ?&* 

Baran..- 0 AttlV jmten IfCfti Pw *V^ -»bt 

w»*» — «lft «« ro _..sh.idJ» 

Cwdo — CilJO 

Crsmm Cl CTO nfi-wj Sow* Awto-W*) t 

[Mnu 1 _ & 0 j D *1 .« Q .| 5 p° ,n 

100 p. 1^ — 1 S-rf- 

jjiofm. V— s-»*™-13)sj» 


fo fr*** — _fcC0 <■ 


Madauo UB be 


-ftSWOm 


;;^No. 31,829 

VA.— 




PARIS, FRIDAY, JUNE 21 , 1985 ^ A \ 


Ctno, _UBPm Ml * n 35C«t Ib.It,. .fL 40000 

Gcal &4rv — JDP ***<*xo — 150 OH UAL fcMDih 

&«» U 5 M (£uJ_SC« 

hn. HSU Ngna • DR. MgnJowi — 2KO. 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


’■ii 


■' ■' i i.'^n 

.1.111 ■ 


• . ” “? *' 

•■ „ ,*w 

■r>& 

■ ■ ■’ 

1 ' ’“'cinr 

• .- ,|!i I*.' 

'■ ’.i; < 


GNP Growing 
At 3.1% Rate, 

U.S, Estimates 


ll - »-'T 


^■k\ 


-Hi 


ane Scabcrry 

li 'asktngton Pnu Srrritr 

WASHINGTON — The US. 
w . . 1 1 s^nomy. showing signs of picking 
up’afier a nearly flat first quarter, is 
1 11r £’ ,, fe;r growing at a 3.1 -percent annual 
' : ■ ^rate. the govenunent estimated 
. *'■ *"*i Thursday. 

, ^ ^ Some "economists, however, can- 
\~'. rnr ' 9 ' tioned that a deterioration in trade 

. . h 

- ~ ^ The dollar surged after the U5. 

, V V[ A economic report: Page 17. 


; '/«*[. 

•v-§ 

rr- 4 * 

• •»wj. 

Rj- 

'■"A: 








11 •') 'V; 


" A .;4;- 


would continue to hold down U.S. 
economic growth for the rest of the 
year. 

The department’s earlier esti- 
e of growth in gross national 
product in the first quarter was 
revised downward from an 0.7-per- 
cent annual rate to 0 J percent, the 
lowest rate since the 1981-82 reces- 
sion. the Commerce Department 
raid. 

GNP measures the total value erf 
a nation's goods and services, in- 
cluding income from foreign in- 
vestments. 

The report released Thursday 
was the so-called flash estimate of 
GNP growth. The estimate is based 
on one or two months of data and 
often is revised extensively later. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
1 Vddrige said that although the lat- 
^ figures show an increase in ac- 
tivity. “general weakness was still 
evident in manufacturing, mining 


U.S. House 


v 


Vr’i'i 


v. 


■;o :<s 


—Approves 
Nerve Gas 

.Z By Steven V. Roberts 

’ Sew York Times Service ■ 

.. WASHINGTON — Under 
. ..j * ^15 pressure from the White 
./;TfHise. the House of Representa- 
tives has approved funds for the 
. production of chemical weapons. 

' ‘ ' : i__ c-nding 3 16-year rooretorium on 
such spending. 

A \ERCB By a vote of 229-196, the House 
• • rejected an attempt Wednesday to 
-•v CAH delete from the 1986 military pro- 
‘ grams bill 5124.5 million ear- 
.. .!-• ^ marked by the Armed Sendees 
•jt j INC Committee to build a new genera- 
. s«xs»: lion of chemical weapons, using a 
binary nerve gas system. These 
weapons would contain two rela- 
tively harmless substances that be- 
come toxic only after they are 
mixed together. 

To win House approval, the Rea- 
gan administration had to make 
several major concessions. Under 
ihe legislation, the money to build 
the weapons cannot be spent until 
December 1987, at which point 
President Ronald Reagan would 
have to certify that the weapons are 
Jteded. In addition, die two chemi- 
cals that are eventually combined 
in the weapon must be stored in 
separate states. 

Moreover, supporters of re- 
newed production accepted an 
amendment that bars release of the 
funds until the European allies 
state their willingness to store and 
deploy the weapons. These allies 
have generally opposed deploy- 
ment of new chemical weapons. 
Representative Les Aspin, a Demo- 
crat of Wisconsin who heads the 
Armed Services Committee, said 
ihe requirement could cause con- 
siderable problems for the adminis- 
tration. 

The final bill will be subject to 
Vnpromise in a House-Senate 
v c&ference. Representative John E 
Porter, a Republican of Illinois 
who led the fight against nerve gas. 

< Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


and agriculture sectors hard bit by 
foreign competition." 

Separately, the Labor Depart- 
ment reported that inflation re- 
mained stable in May. 

Tbe department said the Con- 
sumer Price Index rose 02 percent 
in May as food and transportation 
costs rifgtfowt- Gasoline price in- 
creases were small, the report said. 

The index increased 05 percent 
in March arid 0.4 permit in ApriL 

Consumer prices have increased 3.7 
percent in the last 12 months. 

The chief White House spokes- 
man. Larry Speakes, sad the GNP 
estimate and consumer price num- 
bers “point to a renewal period of 
stable growth with low inflation" 
and that the growth figures “indi- 
cate we’re beaded toward a solid 
second-quarto' performance.” 

Mr. Baktrige said that “the worst 
of the slowdown probably is be- 
hind us, and we should be back on 
a higher growth path bv summer's 
end." 

.Private economists were less san- 
guine, however, saying that the 
huge influx of imports would con- 
tinue to hinder domestic produc- 
tion. 

A major reason for an improve- 
ment in output in the second quar- 
ter was that tbe trade picture did 
not deteriorate as badly as it had in 
the fust part of the year, one ana- 
lyst said. 

“Tbe good news is that the bad 
news wasn't as bad as it could have 
been." said Roger Brinner. chief 
economist for Data Resources Inc, 
referring to the U.S. trade perfor- 
mance. “I really don't think we’re 
in for a conventional recession. But 
I also can't see a bloom in the 
second half." 

The economy “is fallowing the 
same uneven pattern as in tbe third 
quarter last year and it is likely to 
continue in the second half this 
year," said David Jones, chief 
economist for Aubrey G. Lanston 
finan cial analysts. 

■ After-Tax Profit Falls 

After-tax corporate profits fell a 
revised 2,8 percent in the first three 
months of the year, marking the 
fourth consecutive quarter that 
profits declined. The Associated 
Press reported Thursday from 
Washington. A prdimmary report 
issued last mouth had pul the first 
quarter decline at 0.7 percent. 



5 Hostages 
Appear, Urge 
U.S. Restraint 


Five American hostages appeared at a Beirut news confer- 
ence Thursday night Seated left to right are Vicente 


Garza; Dr. Arthur Toga; Peter Hill: Thomas CuUms; an 
Amal militia official, Alt Hamdan; and Allyn Connell. 


The Alienated Prat 

BEIRUT — ■ Five of ibr Ameri- 
cans taken as hostages from the 
hijacked TWA jetliner in Beirut 
were brought by Shiite Moslem mi- 

On Page 2 

• Pentagon says the media may 
have aided the hijackers. 

• Greece appeals io Americans to 
ignore travel warnings. 

litiamen to a packed airport news 
conference Thursday evening. 

They appealed to President Ron- 
ald Reagan “at all costs, that no 
direct military intervention take 
place" to rescue them. 

One of the hostages, Thomas 
CuUins. said at the news conference 


In Hostage Crisis , Reagan Adopts Policy Like Carter’s 


By Gerald R. Boyd 

He*' York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — By estab- 
lishing as his p rimar y goal the safe 
return of U.S. hostages held in Leb- 
anon, Resident Ronald Reagan 
has turned to a policy of restraint 
along the line followed by Jimmy 
Carter in tbe Iranian hostage crisis, 
foreign policy and congressional 
officials say. 

Tbe parallels were being widely 

NEWS ANALYSIS^ 

commented upon throughout offi- 
cial Washington on Wednesday, 
for Mr. Reagan finds hims elf rely- 
ing on an approach that be criti- 
cized as a presidential candidate in 
1980 and that he promised to 
change immediately upon being 
sworn into office in January 1981. 

Setting aside that 1981 promise 
of “swift and effective retribution" 
against terrorists. Mr. Reagan 
enunciated publidy what amount- 
ed to his new posture at a national- 
ly televised news conference Tues- 
day night. He said be had rejected 
immediate retaliation “as long as 
the people are there and threatened 
and alive." 

That was what UR officials 


have been saying privately since tbe 
hijacking of a Trans World Airlines 
plane Friday set off a foreign policy 
crisis for tbe president 

Foreign polity and congressio- 
nal leaders say in at at the center of 
Mr. Reagan's restraint is the reality 
that a response to the hijackers 
could cost the hostages' lives. 
Moreover, they say that retribu- 
tion, whether immediate or after 
the hostages are freed, is complicat- 
ed by tbe difficulty in identifying 
tho^e responsible for the crime — a 
point that Mr. Reagan made sever- 
al times Tuesday night 

As a result of these factors, the 
leaders say that Mr. Reagan is 
echoing a line that Mr. Carter ex- 
pressed during the 444 days he was 
hamstrung by Iran, which held 
Americans hostage during the last 
year of his presidency. 

“When you listen to the adminis- 
1 iratiocu the president has found 
that the options are very limited, 
the same thing President Carter 
found.” said Senator Patrick J. 
Leahy, a Democrat of Vermont 
and vice chairman of the Senate 
Select Committee on Intelligence. 

**I think the president finally has 
realized tiiat il he had been where 
Jimm v Carter was, he would have 


The president has 


found that the 


options are very 


limited, the same 


thing President 


Carter found.’ 


— Patrick J. Leahy 


Democrat of Vermont 

lis 


un 


done exactly the same thing Jimmy 
Carter did. Mr. Leahy said, “be- 
cause tbe options available to him 
are the same available to Jimmy 
Carter.” 

Senator Daniel Patrick Moyni- 
han, a Democrat of New York, said 
Wednesday morning on a televi- 
sion news program that he believed 


there had been a “kind of leakage 
of reality in the last four years as 
people fantasized themselves into 
situations of power that they can't 
have and don’t have.” 

“Last night the president accept- 
ed reality and did it manfully, did it 
with grace," Mr. Moynihan said. 

At his news conference, Mr. Rea- 


gan said that the current situation 
was distinct from the one Mr. Car- 
ter encountered because the latter 
involved a government and thus a 
“direct source there for the evil." 

White House officials made a 
similar assessment Wednesday. 
The incident in Beirut, they said, 
stemmed from an unexpected hi- 
jacking and had as central players 
members of a divided Shiite Mos- 
lem community. 

■‘Somebody was in control in 
Iran; nobody is in control here to 
deal with or to threaten." Mr. Rea- 
gan said. 

Mr. Reagan came dose to a 
threat, however, when he said that 
Nabih Beni, the leader of the main- 
stream Shiite group Amal. who has 
assumed the role of mediator, 
would be held responsible for the 
safety erf the Americans whether 
they were under his control or not. 

Several senior aides said that 
that point was one of the main 
messages the president warned- to 
deliver. Another was that the Unit- 
ed Stales would not make conces- 
sions. • 

Those points, one White House 
official said, represented a con- 
trolled response on the part of Mr. 


in a transit lounge at Beirut Inter- 
national .Airport that the hostage* 
still held in Beirut "definitely fear" 
a U.S. rescue mission. 

Another hostage. Allsn Conwcll. 
started to read a statement but did 
not finish. According to a CBS Ra- 
dio tape of the news conference, 
played in New York, there was 
some scuffling involving militia- 
men and reporters and the news 
conference ended. 

Mr. Conwell said he was elected 
by his fellow hostages to speak at 
the news conference. 

“The purpose of our agreeing to 
talk with you tonight." he said, "is 
primarily ’involved with assunng 
our families and fellow country- 
men and our loved ones and friends 
that we arc all in gevd health, that 
we are being cared for." 

Mr. Conwell said he had talked 
to all of the hostages and then read 
a list of names. 

“These 37 men 1 have met with 
and can verify beyond am doubt 
that they arc primarily in A-num- 
ber one health, they arc getting ade- 
quate shelter, food, water, et cet- 
era," Mr. Conwell said. "In 
addition to these 37 people who are 
being well cared for, is the pilot the 
co-pilot and the navigator on the 
plane, but I did not personally meet 
with them today. It is my under- 
standing that the press did meet 
with than yesterday. 

“We as a group do most impor- 
tantly want to beseech President 
Reagan, and our fellow Americans, 
to ref nun from any form of military 
or violent means as an attempt no 
matter how noble or heroic, to se- 
cure our freedom. That would only 
cause, in our estimation, additional 
unneeded and unwanted deaths 
among innocent peoples. 

“It is also our hope, now that we 
are pawns in this tense game of 
nerves, chat tbe governments and 
peoples involved in this negotiation 
will allow justice and compassion 
to guide their way. We understand 
that Israel is holding as hostage a 
number of Lebanese people who 
undoubtedly have as equal a right 
and as strong a desire to go home as 
we do.” 

Before he was cut off, Mr. Con- 
well had said: “We're obviously 


(Continued on Page 2, Col. 4) (Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Car Bombing Kills 60 
In Lebanese Port City 


;-e 








The A ssocuued Pros 

BEIRUT — A car packed with 
explosives blew up Wednesday 
night outside a crowded candy 
store in the Lebanese port dry of 
Tripoli, lolling at least 60 persons 
and injuring 100. Rescue workers 
were searching the harbor Thurs- 
day for more bodies. 

The police reported that the blast 
left 60 dead and wounded 100, but 
the state- run Beirut radio reported 
75 dead and 150 wounded. Other 
Beirut stations said that 65 died. 

Tbe store was crowded with peo- 
ple buying candy to celebrate tbe 
end of the Moslem holy month of 
Ramadan when the bomb explod- 
ed. 

Officials said the death toll could 
go higher as rescuers searched Trip- 
oli's harbor in fishing boats and 
rowboats. Several muiualed bodies 
have been pulled from the water, 
they said. 

Beirut radio said that scores of 
people lined tip outride hospitals 
after urgent appeals for blood do- 
nors. A team erf high- ranking police 
officers arrived in Tripoli on 


V‘! 


A^ 




Ante Treholt, a Norwe- 
gian diplomat, was sen- 
tenced to 20 years in 
prison for spying for the 
Soviet Union. Page S 


INSIDE 

■ Spain was felt by a Commu- 

nist-organized strike that para- 
lyzed much of the country's in- 
dustry. Page 2. 

■ Mario Cuomo, the governor 
of New York, emerged as the 
leading critic of President Rea- 
gan's tax reform plan. Page 3. 

WEEKEND 

■ Meyerbeer’s “Robert le Dia- 

ble” is bong revived by the Par- 
is Opera for the first time since 
1893. Page 13, 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Signs of a rebound in West 

Germany's economy are seen in 
the . monthly report ■ by the 
Bundesbank. : . Page 17. 

SPORTS 

■ Angelo Sp&gnolo won a title 

by losing a goir “tournament" 
in Florida. Rage 23. 

SPECIAL REPORT 

■ 'Ihe campatga has begun ear- 
ly in Sweden Tor the general 
election in September. Page 7. 


Thursday to investigate tbe bomb- 
ing. the radio said. 

The automobile rigged with 275 
pounds (125 kilograms) of explo- 
sives was detonated at 9:20 P.M. 
Wednesday, leveling the six-story 
bull ding in which tbe the candy 
store was located. 

Many of tbe casualties were re- 
ported to be women and children. 
At least 50 cars were destroyed or 
set ablaze by the blast, which show- 
ered g lass over buildings and dam- 
aged nearby stores. 

There was no immediate indica- 
tion of who was responsible for the 
bombing or what the target was. 

(The Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization issued a statement in Am- 
man. Jordan, accusing Syria erf be- 
ing behind the • blast, Reuters 
reported. 

[Tbe PLO deplored “these ugly 
crimes which cost the lives of so 
many innocent citizens of Tripoli" 
It linked the bomb with the activi- 
ties of pro-Israeli and Christian 
Phalangist militiamen whom it said 
were cooperating with tbe Shiite 
Moslem Amal militia in southern 
Lebanon.] 

Sheikh Saeed Shaaban, leader ot 
Tawbeed, or Islamic Togetherness, 
the dominant Sunni Moslem fun- 
damentalist militia in Tripoli, ac- 
cused Americans. Israelis and Leb- 
anese Christians of responsibility 
for the explosion. 

“There is no doubt that this is the 
dvflizaiion of the West, America, 
Israel and the Phalange," Sheikh 
Shaaban told a Dnize Moslem ra- 
dio station. 

■ Beirut Cease-Fire Holding 

Fighting has virtually stopped at 
the Palestinian camps in Beirut aT- 
tcr a peace accord sgned in Da- 
mascus on Monday between Amal 
the pro-Syrian' Palestine National 
Salvation Front and a coalition of 
Dnize and leftist militias, Reuters 

reported 

Haitham Jumaa, who represents 
Amal on a security committee set 
up to implement the Damascus 
agreement, raid that food supplies 
soon would be sen! in for trapped 
civilians. 

Mr. Jumaa said that the next 
phase would be to remove heavy 
weapons from the camps and get 
gunmen off the streets. Shiite 
forces would pull back to their orig- 
inal positions and the police would 
take control of security in the 
camps, he added. 


Koreos Seek 
To Re-Open 
Commerce 

By Young Ho Lee 

rfimbftgAAi Peu Service 

PANMUNJOM. Korea — Offi- 
cials from North and South Korea 
agreed Thursday to set up a com- 
mission to oversee the reopening of 
commercial ties between the two 
countries. Economic links between 
the North and South were suspend- 
ed shortly before the outbreak or 
the Koresm War in June 1950. 

The agreement was viewed in the 
South as significant progress in the 
economic cooperation talks that 
began last year as pan of a general 
thaw in relations. 

The hour-and-a-half. closed- 
door meeting seemed unusually 
cordial. Frequent laughter was 
heard from inside. 

A meeting last month ended in 
deadlock as the North proposed 
setting up a commission and the 
South said the sides should instead 
concentrate on specific programs, 
such as sale of coal by the North to 
the South and the reopening of a 
rail line between their capitals. 
Seoul and Pyongyang 

South Korea's chief delegate. 
Kim Ki Hwan. shifted positions 
and accepted most of the North’s 
proposals concerning the commis- 
sion. Tbe North gave ground by 
promising to consider the South's 
condition that the commission 
have two subcommittees rather 
than the seven the North had want- 
ed. 

The two sides agreed to resume 
the discussions here Sept. 18. 

Mr. Kim said that he was “much 
encouraged" by the results. The 
North's chief representative. Lee 
Sung Rok. said: “We should make 
these talks successful like Red 
Cross officials from the two sides 
did in their recent meeting.” 

Mr. Lee was referring to talks on 
the reunification of families sepa- 
rated by the Korean War chat the 
two sides' Red Cross societies held 
in Seoul last month. They agreed in 
principle to organize visits by sepa- 
rated family members and ex- 
change folk artist troupes. 

Following a meeting on the fam- 
ily issue in Panmunjora in July, the 
South is scheduled to send a -Red 
Cro« delegation to Pyongyang to 
resume the talks Aug. ’27. 

Meanwhile, the two govern- 
ments are working toward opening 
a third channel of contact, meet- 
ings between parliamentary delega- 
tions. 





Salvadoran soldiers inspect one of caffe, where a victim remains on the floor. 

Gunmen Kill 6 From U.S., 7 Others 
In Assault on Cafes in San Salvador 


Confuted by Our Stuff Fn*n Dnpotchei 

SAN SALVADOR — Gunmen 
disguised as Salvadoran soldiers 
sprayed two crowded outdoor cafes 
with automatic weapons Wednes- 
day night, killing at least 13 per- 
sons, including four U.S. marines 
and two other Americans, officials 
said. 

In response to the shooting, Presr 
idem Ronald Reagan said Thurs- 
day that “our limits have been 
reached." He pledged whatever as- 
sistance was needed to strike back 
at those responsible and called for 
a worldwide campaign against ter- 
rorism. .. . . _ . , 

Describing the attack, Donald 
Hamilton, a spokesman for the 
U.S. Embassy, said: 

“A pickup track with anywhere 
from six to 10 men in camouflage 
uniforms pulled up beside a cafe in 
one or San Salvador’s nightclub 
districts, and these terrorists 
opened fire with automatic weap- 
ons across what amounted to near- 
ly a block of wall-to-wall cafes. 


“Obviously, when terrorists open 
up with automatic weapons toward 
a crowd of several hundred people, 
you’re going to have this many ca- 
sualties." 

A waiter said that when he first 
saw the assailants, he thought they 
were checking military documents. 
The gunmen said nothing and cus- 
tomers did not react until the 
shooting began, he said. It lasted 
about 15 minutes, he added. 

All the marines at the cates were 
embassy guards wearing civilian 
clothes, said another spokesman. 
James Williams. 

Officials of Wang Laboratories 
in Lowell, Massachusetts, said that 
two of its employees, both Ameri- 
cans. were killed. 

A Guatemalan, a Chilean and 
four Salvadorans were also killed. 
Mr. Williams said. A military 
spokesman said 12 others were in- 
jured. all Salvadoran civilians. 

Mr. Williams characterized the 
gunmen as "a squad of guerrillas 
dressed os though they were mem- 


bers of the Salvadoran armed 
forces.” Some witnesses said they 
were wearing civilian shoes. 

The spokesman said there was 
no evidence that ihfr marines, had 
been the intended target. “At this 
point it appears to haw been an act 
of random terrorism." he said. 

However, in Washington, the 
chief White House spokesman. 
L a rry Speakes. said that the “first 
fire was directed to where our ma- 
rines, off-duty marines in civilian 
clothes were." adding: “They 
sought out the Americans and fired 
at them first." „ , . 

U.S. personnel in El Salvador 
had been alert to a threat of in 
creased attacks and had been ad- 
vised to take precautions, he said. 

Mr. Speakes added: “We have 
under review the possibility or ex- 
panding or accelerating our mili- 
uirv assistance." adding that a deci- 
sion would be made "as quickly as 
we can." 

Even without approval of addi- 
fCootinued on Page 2, CoL 8) 


Bomb Blasts 
InNepalKiU 
6, Injure 16 

The AuocimcJ Press 

KATMANDU, Nepal — Six 
persons were killed and 16 wound- 
ed in a series of bomb blasts Thurs- 
day in what was believed to be a 
coordinated attack. 

Five explosions struck the royal 
palace of King Bircndra. the na- 
tional parliament, the main govern- 
ment office complex and a hotel 
lobby. Home Affairs Minister Jog 
Mehar Shrcsh said. Two of the 
blasts occurred at the palace. 

Two other explosions Thursday 
wounded three people in the town 
of Bhairabwa near the border with 
India. 

No one claimed responsibility, 
but police suspected involvement 
of the 39-year-old king's political 
opponents! They have been calling 
since last month for the revival of a 
democratic political system in the 
Himalayan kingdom. 

The minister said police arrested 
some political activists for interro- 
gation and were hunting for others. 

A national lawmaker, Damber- 
jang Gurang. and a legislature offi- 
cial were killed in the blast in the 
parliament. Three others were 
wounded. 

Four people, including an Indian 
woman, were killed in the explo- 
sion in the luxury Annapurna Ho- 
tel near the palace. 

The government- run national 
press agency. Rashtriya Samadiar 
Samiti, reported that a man carry- 
ing explosives was killed when a 
bomb accidentally exploded late 
Wednesday in the PokJiara valley, 
west of Katmandu. 

Radio Nepal announced that 
King Bircndra was ordering an 
emergency session of tbe Rashtriya 
Panchayai. or national assembly, 
to discuss the blasts. 

. The attack occurred the day after 
the king, in a speech opening the 
assembly, said his people were de- 
termined to discourage any “at- 
tempt to undermine peace and or- 
der" in Nepal. 

He said it was “the bound duty” 
of all supporters “to counter those 
who seek to create an atmosphere 
of instability in the country by 
spreading unnecessary confusion 
about the system chosen by the 
people themselves in free exercise 
of their will." 





bStffc.—*-*-** 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 




Iran Urges 
International 
Tribunal to 
Resolve War 


By James M. Dorsey 

United Press International 

TEHRAN — Iran has proposed 
the creation of an international 
corn to open the way for resolving 
the war between Iran and Iraq. 

Diplomats said that the proposal 
seemed to be an effort to resolve 
the conflict without explicitly de- 
manding the overthrow of the Iraqi 
president. Saddam Hussein. In the 
past. Iran has consistently demand- 
ed Mr. Hussein's removal as a con- 
dition for peace. 


The latest proposal was made 
Wednesday by Ha ' 


lasbemi Rafsan- 
janu the speaker of the Majlis, 
Iran's parliament He summoned 
foreign diplomats unexpectedly 
and said he was speaking on behalf 
of Ayatollah Runoliab K 
the country's leader. 

In a reference to Iraq. Mr. Raf- 
sanjani told the diplomats that if 
certain conditions were fulfilled, 
“it would make it possible for an 
international court to be set up to 
determine the punishment to be 
awarded to the aggressor." 

He said that the establishment of 
an international court would “pave 
the way for ending the war" that 
began in September 1980 over bor- 
der disputes. 

The Iranian proposal was made 
less than a week after Iraq an- 
nounced a halt in its air and missile 
strikes against Iranian cities, in- 
cluding Tehran, for IS days. Iraq 
said it was taking the step to offer 
Iranian leaders the opportunity to 
rethink Lheir conditions for peace. 

Mr. Rafsanjani urged the inter- 
national community to acknowl- 
edge that Iraq had begun the war 
and “had violated international law 
by attacking Iranian towns and em- 
ploying chemical weapons." 

He also asked the diplomats to 
convey a letter containing the Ira- 
nian proposal to their govern- 
ments. “We ask you to convey this 
message to your governments and 
we await an official reply." he told 
the diplomats. 



Greece Urges Americans Spain Is Hit 
To Disregard Warnings By Strike 


WORLD BRIEFS 4 


Khomeini, 0 f ^ hijackers aboard the TWA airliner in Beirut 


mackei 

fired over the beads of reporters and photographers Thurs- 


day to beep diem away from die plane. He began shooting 
after a Lebanese newsman tried to sneak aboard die plane. 


ConfUed iy Ow Staff From Dfjpoidio 

ATHENS — Fearful for its tour- 
ist earnings, a principal source of 
foreign exchange, Greece appealed 
io Americans on Thursday to disre- 
gard President Ronald Reagan's 
warnings against travel to Greece. 

Officials in the Greek tourist in- 
dustry bave reported a wave of 
holiday cancdlatioos by Ameri- 
cans in the aftermath of the hu act- 
ing Iasi Friday of a TWA flighl 
from Athens to Rome. 

“We would like to appeal to our 
customers, and more particularly 
the Americans, who unfortunately 
are bearing the exhortations of the 
president of the United Slates not 
to come to Greece, to ignore them," 
said Nikos Skouias, secretary-gen- 
eral of the National Tourist Orga- 
nization. 

“We reassure them once again 
that there is absolutely no danger 
in Greece, certainly no more din- 
ger than there is in F rankf ort, in 
New York, in Detroit and in Mi- 
ami." 

Mr. Reagan has advised Ameri- 
cans not to use the Athens airport 
after the hijacking to Beirut of a 


U.S. Media 
Criticized 
In Hijacking 


5 Hostages Meet Press, 
Urge Restraint by U.S. 


Colombian Strike Fails 
Under Police Pressure 


Los Angela Tima Service 

BOGOTA — Colombian securi- 
ty forces throttled a national strike 
Thursday against the economic and 
political policies of President Beli- 
sario Be tan cur. 

Most stores and offices were 
open and buses ran in Bogota, 
which was under virtual mwtaiy 
occupation. When crowds gath- 
ered. the police arrested hundreds 
of people and held them in deten- 
tion centers. The protest was called 
by the Communist-led labor con- 
federation and backed by leftist 
guerrilla groups. 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


BACHaCRS • MASTBTS •DOCTORATE 

For Waft Acndwl c Ufa C xpaitu * . 

Send detailed resume 
for tree evaluation. 

PACIFIC WESTERN UWVBtSITY 
600 n. Sepulveda Blvd. 

Los Anoetos. California 
90049, Dept. 23, UAA. 


WORLDWIDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 


U.iv.flwjeV Wl.721.3Z.32 

PARIS “FRANCE 


fiappg c •tarty '85 



MY HORSE 


far and away 
th« bast nuda ravaa 
In the world '* 

...Ilf* th» prni 


at the bar only ZAOfn 
+ ivtvUv charse 


Get the 
right feeling 
about 

Amsterdam 


Yab Yum 


Tffl'i 


Srngel 295. Amsterdam 
All motor credit cards accepted. 


53332535 
LANCASTER 

£To/np*'Eh 
An unit of caha 
in the heart of Ports 

mi m mm saswt 

B! C8 REfJUffiMT. um 

cr mat mm 

pfeK "Ri:.-ArBc-TTiS c 




By Alex S. Jones 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — A Pentagon 
spokesman has charged that a ma- 
jority of U.S. news organizations 
are providing information that 
might be useful to the Shiite Mos- 
lem hijackers in Beirut. 

Michael I. Burch, assistant secre- 
tary of defense for public affairs, 
said that the news organizations 
were doing this by reporting the 
movements of American military 
units and by speculating on mili- 
taiy and diplomatic moves the 
United States might make 

“For the price of a 25-cent news- 
paper or a 19-inch television, a 
group of hijackers who only repre- 
sent the back pew of some mosque 
have a very elaborate intelligence 
network," he said 

Mr. Burch, who is leaving the 
Pentagon this week to become a 
public relations executive with Mc- 
Donnell Douglas Crap., the air- 
craft manufacturer, made the com- 
ments to a group of reporters called 
to his office Wednesday. 

He said that reports by ABC 
News and NBC News regarding 
deployment of an anti-terrorist 
commando group known as the 
Delta Force were examples of dam- 
aging information. 

In response, some news execu- 
tives said that their policy was not 
lo report informal! cm that might 
harm the approximately 40 Ameri- 
can hostages. 

Seymour Topping, managing 
editor of The New York Times, 
said. “If we felt in the case of the 
current hostage crisis that publica- 
tion of certain information would 
endanger the hostages, we would 
certainly consider withholding 
such information, but to date we 
have not seen any need to do so." 

Walter Mears, executive editor 
of The Associated Press, said. “We 
should all behave responsibly, but I 
don’t think we ought to halt the 
free flow of information for terror- 
ists any more than we should cater 
to them on other fronts." 

Virtually all news executives said 
that decisions regarding whether to 
publish information were made on 
a case-by-case basis. 

They said that information re- 
garding military and diplomatic 
moves had come from officials who 
provided it with the understanding 
that it was to be revealed 


(Continued from Page 1) 
distressed. We're all under a tre- 
mendous amount of strain. We do 
not fear Cot out lives.” 

The leader of the Shiite Amal 
militia, NabQi Beni, had promised 
to produce some of the hostages for 
the news media to demonstrate that 
they were not being 01-lreated. 
Akef Haidar, a spokesman (or 
Amal, said earlier that the hostages 
were “in a very good situation/ 


hijacking rests with the Americans. 

In an interview with the ABC 
television network. Mr. Rabin said: 
“The problem is an American 
problem. The hostages are Ameri- 
can. They were caugni on board an 
airline that carries the United 


Trans World .Airlines plane on Fri- 
day soon after it left Athens. About 
470,000 Americans visited Greece 
last year. 

On Wednesday, Pan American 
World Airways suspended its daily 
flight to Athens, and many Ameri- 
cans canceled vacations to Greece 
after Mr. Reagan warned of airport 
security problems there following 
the hijacking of TWA Flight 847. 

Evangdos Kouloumbis, a Greek 
government spokesman, said that 
Athens airport security efforts had 
been praised recently by UiL West 
German and international dvil avi- 
ation officials. He said that the 
ireatmoil Athens was getting now 
was unjusL 

Referring to what he called the 
“terrible tragedy" of Wednesday’s 
bombing at the' Frankfurt airport, 
which killed three people. Mr. 
Kouloumbis said that “no one will 
now suggest that we isolate that 
airport/ 

He said that among 211 hijack- 
ings around the world from 1978 to 
1984, two bad been on flights de- 
parting from Greece while 43 had 
starred in the rest of Europe. 62 in 
the United States and 104 in other 
countries. 

TWA, the only U.S. airline' other 
than Pan Am serving Athens, has 
continued its twice-daily nonstop 
flights from New York to Athens. 
But the airline said Wednesday 
that it was considering Mr. Rea- 
gan’s request thaL it “review the 
wisdom" of continuing service to 
Greece. 


Called by 
Communists 


New Restrictions on Liverpool Team 

ZURICH (Reuters! — The Europan Football Union anopons^ 


By Edward Schumacher 

Sen- Yarii Times Sen-ire 

MADRID — Much of Spanish 
industry and transportation was 
shut down Thursday by a one-day 
general strike called by Commu- 
nist-led unions. c 

Police arrested dozens of people, 
mostly in clashes with pickets in a 
stoppage in a protest against pen- 
sion cuts and other austerity mea- 


Thursday that it was banning the English dub Liverpool from compgj. 
lions for three seasons after the indefinite ban that it already Ms impost# 
on all English clubs. ->i 

The sanctions, which would apply to the next three seasons ax-mfo 
Liverpool mav qualify after the end of the ban on all English tttq&aen 


imposed as a result of the riots at the European Cop final in 
Mav 29. which killed 38 persoas. Liverpool fans 



were widely 

the worst of the violence. ... 

The soccer authority's Control and Disciplinary Commitieeaboria^ 
that Liverpool's opponents, the Italian team Juvcmus of Ttnn. .*^ 
have to play (heir next two home matches in an empty stadium 
Belgium would not be permitted to be host to finals erf the European C® 
and European Cupwinners' Cup for a period of 10 years. 


UN Pressures Pretoria on Namibia: 



It was the first national strike in 
Spain since the first free elections 
were held in 1977 after the death of 
Francisco Franco. In many ways, 
the strike pitted the Communists 
against the Socialists. 

Marcelino Camacho, secretary 
Coramunist-Ied 


efforts to establish an independent South-West Africa (NamiKaX 
The United States and Britain abstained on the resolution, which jsajj 
compromise negotiated by France. . 

The resolution urged voluntary measures, inducing prohibtUaxcr 
investments in SoutnAfrica. but dropped portions of an eaifaerdrafrtfca 
had suggested that nations sever diplomatic relations with South Afrkt 
and impose an oil embargo. •• 


general of the 

union confederation, tbe Workers' , . „ , ^ p n • ex. 

Commissions, said that nearly golldantT RrOftClCaSlS tall IOT OUlkC 
three million workers joined in the * ..... , , ; • . 

strike, e xceeding the confedera- WARSAW (UPI) — Solidarity has broadcast a dandesime.adio 
lion's eSfiwprSiictioas. He said appeal f or a 1 5-minute strike July 1 to protest a 15-penxnt increase njthe 

that 75 percent of industrial work- P*** of meat. . „ . . J- 

■ - - - - The three-minule broadcast Wednesday was badly jammed and barely 

audible in central Warsaw, listeners said. It was the first broadcast appey 
by the underground union movement since February. 

Poland’s official news agency. PAP, also announced that a leader of the 
outlawed union’s coordinating committee. Tadeusz Jedynak, Was am? 
ed June 17. He had been in hiding ance 1983. Union sources caBe, 
arrest a serious blow to Solidarity. :‘V - 


States flag. The United States gov- 
mt has to ~ 


The plane was hijacked Friday 
Athens to Rome. 


on its way from Ai 
The hijackers lolled an American 


passenger Saturday, but have since 
freed mos 


Cosmos- 1.662 Is Launched 


Vnnetl Press International 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
launched a satellite Thursday, 
bringing the total to 1,662 in its 
Cosmos series, the press agency 
Toss said. It is the 46tn Cosmos put 
into space this year. The press 
agency said equipment was funo- 
laily. 


most of the 153 passengers 
and crew members. The re maining 
passengers were removed from the 
plane Monday, and taken to loca- 
tions in BdruL 

The hijackers, who have been 
identified as Lebanese Shiites, are 
demanding that Israel release 700 
Shiite prisoners who were taken 
from southern Lebanon during the 
Israeli Army occupation that ended 
early this month. 

Mr. Beni the Lebanese justice 
minister, who is sympathetic to the 
hijackers' demand, said be had ac- 
cepted a Swiss offer to use its terri- 
tory to exchange hostages but that 
the United States and Israel would 
have to agree first to any exchange. 

The White House said Thursday 
that Mr. Reagan was asking all 
governments with influence in the 
region to do what they could to 
persuade to resolve the incident. 

Mr. Haidar said that the 37 pas- 
sengers from the Boeing 727 were 
being kept in “eight or 10 places." 
He declined to say where the hide- 
outs were, but he said that all the 
hostages were in good condition. 

“They’re eating well and have 
TV sets in their rooms," Mr. Hai- 
dar said. “They are getting good 
food. There’s always a menu in 
Arabic and in English. They have a 
taste for Lebanese food. Every- 
thing for them is fine. 

“They talk all the time with the 
hijackers, talking politics and ask- 
ing questions about the Shiite phi- 
losophy and the Shiite religion. 
Some of the discussions are of a 
very high level.” 

[Mr. Haidar also said that the 
few passengers with Jewish-sound- 
ing names who were separated ear- 
ly in the hijacking were being treat- 
ed no less well than other hostages, 
Agence France-Press reported. 

[It was the first time that the 
existence of a separate group of 
hostages has been recognized by an 
Amal offidaL That group of six to 
12 passengers is believed to have 
been taken off the plane Friday in 
Beirut.] 

An Israeli government official 
said Thursday in Jerusalem that 
Israel might release some of the 
prisoners before the American hos- 
tages were freed, bui he insisted 
that there was no linkage to the 


eminent has to make up its mind. 
What do (hey want to do? It's first 
and foremost their decision." 

■ Congress Ads Quickly 

The U.S. Senate and House of 
Representatives, venting their frus- 
tration over the hijacking drama, 
swiftly passed measures Wednes- 
day to improve airport security, 
and members of Congress Hoed op 
with additional proposals to tough- 
en safeguards a g ainst air piracy. 
The New York Tunes reported 
from Washington. 

■ Spain Firm on Prisoners 

Spain is not ready to free the two 

Shiites it holds as prisoners, as the 
TWA hijackers have demanded, 
and has not received any request 
from Washington to do so, Reuters 
quoted Prime Minister Felipe Gon- 
zalez as saying Thursday in The 
Hague. 

Questioned about the two Leba- 
nese being tried in Madrid for the 
attempted murder of a diplomat, 
Mr. Go nzffl ez, who is visiting the 
Netherlands, said there had been 
no contacts between the United 
States, Israel and Spain on their 
possible release. 

The two, Mohammed Kahir Ab- 
bas Rahal and Mustafa Ah' Kalil, 


Pan Ain’s flight to Athens is on a 
small twin-engine plane from 
Frankfurt, where it connects with 
flights to the United States. Pan 
Am said it is booking its Athens 
passengers on other airlines and 
would continue to evaluate safety 
and security to determine when ser- 
vice could be resumed. 

WJL Brown, bead of the largest 
U.S. travel agency, AAA Travel, 
said that “there is a trend toward 
heavy cancellations on Greece," 
despite the fan that many vaca- 
tion ere are booked on package 
tours with cruises that carry high 
cancellation fees. 


Joseph H. Stall baum, an execu- 
tive with another large travel com- 
pany, Bartlett TravelService in 
Philadelphia, said: “We’ve had 
people canceling their travel plans 
all weekend, and the president's 
message has precipitated more can- 
cellations. There’s no question 
about it." 


ers and 65 percent of service and 
transportation workers slopped 
work. 

“The response has been massive, 
much higher than we had hoped 
for," Mr. Camach o said at a news 
conference. 

Labor Minister Joaquin AI- 
munia said that the number was far 
lower. 

“It can be unequivocally stated 
that the strike has failed in its ob- 
jective," said Manuel Chaves, a 
member of the executive commit- 
tees of both the Socialist Party and 
its allied union confederation, the 
General Workers' Union. 

The focus of the strike was a bill 
that the Gonzilez government 
pushed through the lower house of 
parliament this week to reduce pen- 
sion eligibility. 

The bill, which is expected to 
pass the Socialist-controlled senate 
by next month, would require that 
Spaniards work for 15 years and 
pay into social security for eight 
years before being eligible for the 
national pensions. Current require- 
ments are 10 years' work and two 
years paying in. 

According to reports from 
around the country, the strike. 


flight Attendants Vote to Strike TWA 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (API — Right attendants have voted 
overwhelmingly to authorize a strike against Trans World Airtines in a 


dispute over wage concessions. 
Under federal la 


iw, the flight attendants must persuade federal radia- 
tors to allow a strike. The company and the union must then waitihrougb 
a 30-day “cooling off" period before a walkout could begin. One tutor 
that might delay the mediators* decision is ownership of the airQo& \ 
The move came Wednesday as three unions joined forces iaoppostng 
Texas Air's plans to take over the airline. TWA agreed last week to be 
acquired by Texas Air for $793 J million after resisting st takeover 
attempt by the New York financier Carl C. Icahn. \ 


U.S. Raises Tariffs on Pasta From 

WASHINGTON (WF) — President Ronald Reagan raised tanfts on 


European pasta products Thursday in retaliation against Eurdpean 
if fs on U.S. citrus products. 


Community tarifl 
The move also responded to domestic pasta producers’ complamtiyw 
EC subsidies to European pasta makers, principally Italians, allow (hem 
to sell their pasta products at unfairly low prices in the United States,’ The 
EC threatened Wednesday to retaliate if the United States raised tajiBs 
on pasta. 

The tariffs will be raised from their current rate of about one cent 


admitted killing a Libyan 
tilled Wedn 


diplo- 
it they 


A National Basketball Associa- 
tion all-star team, scheduled to 
leave fra Greece next week for two 
exhibition games, called off its trip 
Wednesday. Gting Mr. Reagans 
warning, Larry Flasher, the bas- 
ketball association’s general coun- 
sel, told the group's Greek host that 
“it would clearly be improper for 
representatives of the National 
Basketball Association to go 
against the wishes of our govern- 
ment." 


around ine country, me strike, ineiamrs win oeratseatrom tneir current rate oiaooui one centner 
backed by regional unions, shut pound (454 grams) to 40 percent of the foreign cost of pasta ano25 
down all of the Basque oounuy and percent of the foreign cost of pasta containing eggs. ' . 

most of Barcelona, the nation’s two ' * ■ 

For the Record 


mat, testified Wednesday that 
had been sent to Madrid under 
orders from Amal leaders. 


ReaganPoUcy 
like Carter's 


The Ocean Islander, a 225-pas- 
senger cruise ship that makes regu- 
lar one-week voyages between Ven- 
ice and Piraeus, the port of Atheos, 
canceled its entire schedule from 
June 29 to OcL 12. The vessel will 
travel instead between Venice and 
Rome. 


demands of the hijackers, 
c. the 


uoning normally. 


In New York, the Israeli defense 
minister. Yitzhak Rabin, said that 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Reagan that took account of the 
nature of the current situation 
while leaving open what retaliatory 
steps might be taken once the hos- 
tages are freed. 

“Right now we are not in the 
Carter situation." sahl the Reagan 
adviser. “There was a sudden real- 
ization that the word ‘hijacking’ 
has turned into the word ‘hostage’ 
and we have made the decision to 
deal with it as a hostage situation. 
There is no panic yet, but the grow- 
ing realization is that this issue has 
to be dealt with quickly." 

But to some former advisers to 
Mr. Carter, the two situations are 
strikingly similar, from the over- 
whelming focus on the situation by 
news organizations to tfae frustra- 
tion Mr. Reagan expressed and Mr. 
Carter encountered in trying to 
solve them. 

Although advisers of the former 
president bave generally not aid- 

^•m/I Ur r.L. 


"We were unable to cancel the 
scheduled June 22 sailing,” a 
spokesman for Ocean Cruises, the 
booking company in New York, 
said, “but we are calling all passen- 
gers and offering them the option 
of one of the later trips to Rome or 
a complete refund." 

Many travel agents said most of 
the cancellations and calls had 
come from first-time or infrequent 
travelers. (Reuters, WP, NYT) 


major industrial centers. 

Valencia. Spains third largest 
dty, was also virtually at a stand- 
still. according to the various re- 
ports. 

The atuation in the rest of the 
country was mixed. In Madrid, bus 
and train service was sharply re- 
duced and many outlying factories 
were closed. But in Madrid and 
many other cities snd towns most 
schools, banks and shops were 
open. 

Three of the country's my or 
newspapers^ including the leading 
daily, El Pas. failed to appear. The 
afternoon news show on Spain's 
national television network was ait 
from 30 to 15 minutes. 

Flights were disrupted as work- 
ers at Madrid's Banajas Interna- 
tional Airport honored the strike 
call and more than 40 flights were 
canceled by Iberia, the national air- 
line. 

The number of arrests ap- 
proached 100. Among them woe 
Communist leaders in Barcelona, 
Za ra goza and Las Palmas. Most 
were released within hours, police 
said. 


Lieutenant General Thomas F. Healy, 53. of the U.S. Army, has been 
named chief of staff at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s coat 
maud center for southern Europe, the chief headquarters of 
Command Europe in Mons, Belgium, said Thursday. j\ 

Four explosives specialists died Wednesday in Toulon, France, in a 
blast at an explosives storage depot, officials said. The cause of the 
explosion was not known. (X?) 

A two-day meeting raged by the Contadora group with representatives 
of five Central American countries failed Wednesday to convene far a 


second dav of talks in Panama City after Nicaragua's deputy foreign 

end. Participants said the 


minister. Hugo Victor Tinoco. refused to atti 
disagreement concerned the agenda. 


(Reuters) 


House Approves Nerve Gas 


Japanese Media Assailed 
For Role During Slaying 


s-E 


ANGELO TARLAZZI 


SOLDES 

COLLECTION ETE 85 

a partir du 21 juin 


67. FAUBOURG SAINT -HONOR E - 75005 TARIS - TEL. : 26^.67.7? 


note what they insist are parallels. 

“Obviously, they are similar in 
the sense that Amaican citizens 
are being held by forces not firmly 
in political control" said Zbigniew 
Bnmnski. Mr. Carter's national 
security advisor. “The hostages in 
Iran were bong held by a terrorist 
group at a time when the govern- 
ment was falling apart and the 
Ayatollah [Ruhollah] Khomeini 
was backing ii from the sidelines." 

“In Beirut," be said, “they are 
held by some component of Amal 
but again without our real knowl- 
edge. That is a real parallel." 

In addition, although Mr. Rea- 
gan for the most part has tried to 
operate in a manner of “business as 
usual," 


Reuters 

TOKYO — The killing of a sus- 
pected swindler in Japan as televi- 
sion men stood by with cameras, 
rolling has caused an outcry over 
media ethics. 

Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 
sone denounced in parliament the 
murder of Kazuo Nagano, 32. bead 
of a gold deposit company, by two 
men who broke into his Osaka 
home on Tuesday and stabbed him 
13 times with army bayonets. 

Television crews, who had wait- 
ed outside Mr. Nagano's a part- 
mail for days to get a statement 
from him, filmed the {tillers burst- 
ing in and showed them emerging, 
their bayonets dripping blood, 
shouting, “We are the criminals." 

The scenes were shown on lelevi- 


(Coutinued from Page 1) 
said it was a “foregone conclusion" 
that the requirement for allied ap- 
proval would be dropped by the 
conference. 

The Senate has already approved 
the administration's full request for 
$163.5 million for chemical weap- 
ons. 

Mr. Porter added that foes of 
chemical weapons could still halt 
the program by blocking the actual 
appropriation of funds when that 
issue comes to the floor later this 
year. 

Since Mr. Reagan took office, he 
has been trying to win financing for 
chemical weapons. In three previ- 
ous tries, the Senate approved the 
proposal, but the House voted it 
down, and the plan was dropped in 
conferences of the two chambers. 


the program. The Associated Press 
reported. : " 

The House, on a voice vote, di- 
rected the Pentagon to provide 
more information about what ac- 
tion the Soviet Union might tyk* to 
overcome tfae Strategic Defuse 
Initiative, how much the entire sys- 
tem would cost, and whether die 
United States should provide fruits 
of its research to the Soviet Ur^ 
President Reagan, who An- 
nounced the program two yean 
ago. requested $3.7 billion for the 
1986 fiscal year, as opposed to $1.4 
billion in fiscal 1985. The Sejuue 
has approved only $2.95 biUioo. 
and the House is considering a 
of spending proposals from 
million to $29 biDzoo. "! 


Last year, renewed production of 
chemical weapons was defeated in 
the House by 68 votes. In explain- 
ing the reversal, Mr. Porter cited 
the vigorous White House lobbying 
effort. 


al Safety Commission, Torn Fur- 
uya, told a parliamentary commit- 
tee: “It was unpardonable.” 

“It is a matter of reproach,” the 
newspaper Sankd Shimbun said in 
editorial “that none of the report- 
ers who witnessed the murderers 
breaking into the flat tried to per- 
suade them not to commit the 
crime." 

The mass-circulation paper 
Mainidri Shimbun, which carried a 
picture of Mr. Nagano being 
stabbed, said: “As the murderers 
began to kick the door and pound it 
with a chair, reporters should have 
at least have acted to stop them." 

Mr. Nagano's company, Toyota 
Shqji, had been under investigation, 
after depositors, many of them „ 111 aaajuon ’ Mr . Porter said, the 
pensioners, complained they could * louse * as expressing its Mger and 


Gunmen Kill 
13 in Salvador 


“I’ve got President Reagan's lire 
tracks down my back," he said af- 
ter the vote. 


He noted that Mr. Reagan was 
particularly effective with the 30 
Republican freshmen who have 
never voted on the issue. All but 
two supported the president and 
accounted for the major share of 
the reversal Mr. Porta said. 

In addition, Mr. Porter said, the 


(Controlled from Page lj 
tional money from Congress. Pr>£ 
dent Reagan could provide fo- 
under the .Anns Export Control 
Act and the Foreign A distan ce 


Act, Mr. Speakes said, 
t C. M 


Robert C. McEarlane, assistant 
to the president for national securi- 
ty affairs, said the United Stales 
must “assist the Salvadoran gov- 
ernment and make sure we bring a 
halt to this kind of outrage.” 

He said be did not envision the 
use of U-Sw forces io El Salvador 


lucswuc wcicsnowaun leicvi- r-'*-***'**— w“*t™**““»* .. ? “ use or U.O. lOrCCS IQ Ci 331 vau 

sion, provoking telephone calls back neither gpld nor money bat stud “assistance is justified." 

from angry viewers wKo wanted to from the firm. **r- McFa 

know why the police were not on Two men arrested after the kill- i* ° r lt ! c kne added: “Well action to make 

guard, and why journalists, news- ing were formally handed ova to {n , h Pf°P le dear that there is a price to pay 

paper photographers and the tele- the public prosecutor on Thursday ^ mt. sorter among the terrorists for this kind of 

vision crews jostling for the best to be charged. thing and our own efforts to assist 

view did nothing to stop the killing. A police spokesman told a par- , ***}■ ** “ 

“It is extremely regrettable." Mr. liamentary committee that the men e ® sIaL, c on detailing 

Nakasone said, “that in a constitu- did not smear to he victim' of the nunareas . for the Pen- 


El Salvador specifically and their 
efforts in that direction." . *1 , 


- 

ge5i that the attention Mr. Reagan uonal state such an incident oc* company hot had that they had 
has devoted to the crisis has been curred openly and in broad day- said under questioning chat they 
almost identical to Mr. Carter's IighL" acted out of “moral indignation" at 

during the Iran crisis. The chairman of Japan's Nation- the firm’s actions. 

l.** .u. ii.. ■ 

11,1 fcUoUH &THE UK VtA SATELLITE j 


CARD OF THANKS 

CHANNEL “Europe’s Best View " 

PROGRAM. FRIDAY 21 si JUNE UK TIMES 

• 3 35 MOVIN' ON 18Q9 THE LUCY SHOW 

\i £ SHUSTER 10 30 MORK & MWoT 

1SOO SKY TftAX 1 19 20 STaRSKY & HUTCH 

15 J5 SKY TRAX 2 20 10 mE new CANWO CAMERA 

1 6 30 SKY TH AX 3 20-0 DETECTNE SCHOOL 

17 30 MR ED 21 10 TERRIFIED 

22 40 SKY TRAX 

FOR CHARTER 

LUXURIOUS THIRTY -METERS YACHT 

Dutch steel construction. 

One king size, one double, two twin cabins. 

Four bathrooms with tubs. 

Interior decoration mahogany and leather. 

Five crew. 

Please contact: 

CAMPER & NICHOLSONS 

London: TeL: (01) 82.61.641. Tek= NICLON 918.078 

Guu*® (93) 43.16.75. CHABYCT 470.734 

Mrs. Hooda Abdefrahmai 
her children and family were pro- 
foundly touched by the numerous 
expressions of sympathy and affec- 
tion they received after me death of: 

Mr. Mofagned Ahdrfrahnwm 
and as they are unable to reply to 
everyone individually, they would 
like to attend their warm thanks to 
all those who helped them bv their 
presence, kind letters and flowers. 

SKY CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING SELLS PRODUCTS FAST - 
FOR MORE INFORMATION. RATES. MARKETING t 

AUDIENCE DATA CONTACT SKY CHANNEL SALES 

SWAN HOUSE. IT-19 STRATFORD PLACE. LONDON WIN 9AF 

TEL: LONDON (01) 493 1166 TELEX: 268395. 





House Seeks SDI Studies 
The House, trying to decide to 
how much money for President 
Reagans space-based missile de- 
fmse to include in the autboriza- 


cont'mgem or U.S. advisers. He *as 
killed in May 2983, when he drpve 
to the university in San Salvador to 
pick up his girurieqd. * 
Leftist guerrillas are fighting a 
civil war against the U.S.-hacked 


ilnn nrA J . T- apni i. -u UK u.a-uaLKGU 

^ Thursda y swwnjmeot of President lost Ha- 
te uy to answer questions about poleon Duane. (AP, Uflf 





. , Est. 1911 

Just tell the ttoti driver "sank 
•5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 
•ftlkentum Str. 9, MUNICH 
•M/S ASTOR 


TOO 


ac sea 



S/KKV 




•ft 


b' 


l All ■ • 

-0w- - 

.Nielli ■ 
-tied ,i1 - -i • 

«,C P“»“ • 
pftjNex- • 

Ik’.-.i.: •- 

fciJite.’ '■ 

cjj’jK; • : 

wclnv-v:-'- 

dui uni-' ’• 

-if ihr rt.T- 

Bfi'.m-' ■ • 

Ill'll'. 17.:- • 

iksuv i' ' ' 
ids ih.’ :. •: 

The l.i ■- '• 

.c, • : 

auTiT i. 

Itin> 1 \iw 1 

atSiMT..* 
m i-A-hu' ■ ’ 
tesdhiWv! ' •' 

llimr. • ■■ 

15 *5 : 

email .. 
heju. r •: 
piWKd.jr 1 .- 

In .i:; p •; 
tfjfaim: -j,:- 
Suti.*,^ 
bans avja. 
ajnU,L n ir;-: 


jflrie Hiiilj; ,, 

ArtePalrnn. ?»;. „ 
In Washing, 


■WLi\ ... 
Atari* a,-’.;; . 


r. C; . • 

- - 

^afcev’T 

Nut*/.'.: ■ 

lalldlr: |k • 

iw • 








'°Ki.n 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


Page 3 


Uv 


^Tax Fight : Reagan vs. Cuomo 

Angry New York Governor Assails Plan, Bisks His Future 


By Robert Show n state and local operations — siiiu- 

Las Angda Tuna Seme* lar to the way Mr. Reagan’s 1 381 

WASHINGTON — Governor tax cut has curbed the federal gov- 


state and local operations — simi- sent a gamble both for the governor 
br to the way Mr. Reagan’s 1981 and his party. 


' ■ : ih,_ WASHINGTON — Governor 
4 ,. ; ' % Mario M. Cuomo of New York, 
■ ■ i emerging as the severest critic of 


tax cat has curbed the federal gov- [In an unusual display of bipani- 
ennnenL unity, the US. Conference of 

As evidence, be dt«i a recent Msyms u rgriGmgrcgio, mar- 

. unanimous voice vote Weanewlav 


■ J'V President Ronald Reagan’s tax press briefinTal which the White votc Wednesday 

' V. overhaul program, has asserted House comnumications director, proposal lo allow 

. *bat the plan's provision to elinri- Patrick J. Buchanan, acknowl- p°°& n usd deduction of state and 
"• % late deductions for state and local that “an anefflarv cons*. l0cal 12X65 and. to retain the tax- 


and local tax deduction would be i 


• • income taxes is ideologically in- quence” of disallowing the state nnnncipal bwtds, 

11 V spired and “would be atfisaster for andlocal tax deduction would be to re P onw |- 

ftri nuDions of beneficiaries of state prompt citizens of higb-tax states i* 0 make “P . revame !os& * 
, local wvices." ■ S^X^OTgsecoiKkatwlBt ^ 

1 * ' turi Mr. Cuomo’s attack on the pro- they're getting for the government Alaska, asked that wealthy rndivid- 

' M 1 ‘* Ol| \' vision, made in a speech Wednes- SeVrc p^Sfor.” ^aiuicorporaDOnsbe taxed ala 

, ' ’Ate day before the Nationafpress Cub X M ^ . higher rale than the maximum 35 

here, was the latest ramd in a fierce C f in ^ *?“ pcrcenl 11181 Mr - Reagan pro- 


san politics and public policy. 

At stake are Mr. Guomtfs re- 
election prospects inNew York 


mai me aamxmsuauuu uau amu, m _ p a evo 3_ t™ p.„ 

effect: “What we’re trying to do is ■ Reagan Assails Tax System 
to hurt high-tax stales Eke New Earlier, Bernard Weinraub of The 
York . . . to force them to ignore the New YoHcTimes reported from Indi- 


■ election p 

■ next year 



With $2.6 Billion Already Invested, 
U.S. Cancels Uranium Plant in Ohio 


PiageT 


By Thomas O’Toole 

Washington Peal Seme* 


more than the estimated cost of raw uranium, then shines laser light 
running the new centrifuge plant- at a precise frequency into a cham- 


PORTSMOUTH, Ohio — Eiaht “The gas diffusion plants were ber housing the vapor. .The laser 
years and $2,6 billion after break- developed with the idea that they gives atoms of the U-235 uranium 


. .. — * — . . Ana inev warn uiai uevausc i . 

‘ ^ P , ? ldenMl - Can ?^ sociologically they know it’s good Wednesda- 

in 198S. Btrt far more important-^ to have less govern- system 

j*. (■ will be the outcome of the debate ■ Na 1" 

**> liri>;|(L-,.| over tax reform, and the future - . cans. 

* ,S|> ( ^11 fart -!• * ^ urn taper- “fc * 


Mario M. Cuomo 


Department has decided not to centrifuge, said Mr. LongenKi 
complete it of the Energy Department. “Th 

As Energy Secretary John S. 

Herrington put it last week, “There 

comes a time lo make tough busi- r We tnOUgilt tu6 
ness derisions, and this is one of _ , 

those tunes.” market for enriched 

The announcement was made 

June 5, and pn the same day the n raninm was endless. 
Energy Department said it was 

S°SSf We were wron §- 0h ’ 

’wtaSS uOipimi™ were we wrong.’ 

began, economic and market con- —John R. Longeneck 

diteons were markcdW different. 0 Deportment of Energy offic 

The world demand for enriched 
uranium for electricity generation. 


developed with the idea that they gives atoms of the U-235 uranium 
were already obsolete 30 years ago isotope a negative charge, and then 
and would be eliminated by gas positively charged plates in the 
centrifuge.” said Mr. Longenecker chamber attract the U-235 atoms, 
of the Energy Department. “That leaving the rest behind. 


day that the current lax 

iad “become public enemy — you’re looking at him.” This 
for middle-income Amexi- drew thunderous applause in the 
rndiana Convention Center. 


. Though not yet proved, the das- 

rifted laser technology has made J 
e thought the dramatic strides. 

“We want the best technology 

irket for enriched is £ r f “ lurc ;" sa [ d 1 . Mr - 1 

Longenecker, and we fully believe 

an sum watt endless that is the laser technology." 

aniiun was enaiess. ^ Ieaves ^ ^ anin/uge 

~ - At, out in the cold, even though it may 

e were wrong- On, ^ ^ ^ ^ jest technology of its 

, kind in the world. The 3,000 centri- 

re We wrong. fuges that the Energy Department 

r_L_ „ / yuyflr/tiiprl'pr contracted for in Ponsroouth will 

were to house the centrifuges may 

inw a iriinH set, nobody be another matter. Even now, the 



could no longer guarantee deliver- announced we were going ahead 


became a wiinH set, nobody be another matter. Even now, the 
ever bothered to try to bring diffu- department is trying to. come up 
sion costs down until we actually with alternative uses for them. 


4ii jnfcfr oi Kaviixs usu. wm uc iiw- . ---’ v: o ~z _ n is tmv » we tore U down." lie The president pointedly crili- ws, even thcai^h another plant in with centrifuge. All of a sudden, 

1 fl fonned by stale and local govern- m I9KZ, urged toe smiting ot aov- ^ tQ M anHi^nra- of cized those who have said that his Portsmouth and facilities at Oak people began finding ways of cut- 

■ 1 1 mem. anment from the federal revel to -j—- than 5_000 nmnie at the an- nrooosal favors the rich because of Ridge and Paducah. Kentucky, tine costs on diffusion-’’ 


more than 5,000 people at the an- proposal favors the rich because of Ridge and Paducah. Kentucky, ting costs on diffusion-’' 

nual convention of the U.S. Jay- its 35-percent top tax rare. were operating around the clock at At least 80 percent of the cost of 


Underlying Mr. Cudmo’s aggres- HJ5L v. nual convention of the U.S. Jay- its 35-percent top tax rate. were operating around the clock at 

ve criticism of the president’s pro- . ^hai used to w tMjnOT’ mambas of junior chambers “Some say that, to make it even full capacity. 


oitvm&UVLMUUI Uifc WlV.HVte . UI J UIV . , . .11 * I ■ 1^0. nmiiuai 


tbeWhiteHouse. And’what used to 
be a call for stales to shoulder more 


and his 


to eliminate the abiH- Mr. Cuomo’s decision lo aggres- ing 


, u gang rnHiana Convention Center. could no longer guarantee deliver- announced we were going ahead One suggestion was to use the 

rf 005 * 1 *Tt is time we tore it down,” he The president pointedly crili- vs, even though another plant in with centrifuge. All of a sudden, buildings as a federal prison, since 

ot gov- tQ gg nn rfi^nra- of cized those who have said that his Portsmouth and facilities at Oak people began finding ways of cut- they were designed for maximum 

level ^ to xuotc <hnt] 5,000 people at the an- proposal favors the rich because of Ridge and Paducah. Kentucky, ting costs on diffusion.” security. That idea stayed olive 

fm? 31 tl mial convention of the UJS. Jay- its 35-percent top tax rate. were operating around the clock at At least 80 percent of the cost of only until someone wondered what 

lateral- av< m^ hm: nf j imiw i- y r pTvr c “Some say that, to make it even full capacity. enriching ontnium by gaseous dif- would happen if the prisoners 

m of commerce. fairer, we must raise the top lax In addition to helping meet this fusion goes for electricity, which broke out and captured the neigh- 

[used to The president also said that bis rate higher than 35 percent so the demand, the new plant was sup- the department predicted in 1979 boring gaseous diffusion plant, 

proposed tax revision, winch would rich pay more," Mr. Reagan said, posed to produce uranium that would increase in price at leasL 3 where aU the nation's weapons- 

lor eliminate many deductions in ex- “But that argument misses the cen- could be priced so low that the percent every year until the turn of grade uranium will be produced. 

chany* for lower tax rates, was be- tral pant of what we’re doing. We United States would do mina te the the century. Instead, electric rates 

| aggres- ing threatened by “the special in- are not lowering the top tax rate to market. Revenues to the Treasury peaked in 1982 and have since de- - -*■ ■ — - ■ 

LStrarion teresrs and thrir lobbyists.” 35 percent so the rich wll do better, were expected to grow from about dined steadily. / _ 

J t. — -- - nr iti i *. in-*/ . _ r * i_ - ffl A KiArairc fhn c 


fairer, we must raise the top lax 


The president also said that his rate higher than 35 percent so the demand, the new plant was sup- the department predii 


11 capacity. enriching uranium by gaseous dif- 

In addition to helping meet this fusion goes for electricity, which 
maud, the new plant was sup- the department predicted in 1979 


Gant'i watch 
In IB carat gold. 

maiar -resistant, 

with mtro-tlai 
quartz mowatnont. 

Instant imw-zona change. 

r PiogeL> 3 

‘ZMonie-CaAo SSL 
3, avenue des Beaux- Arts 
MONTE-CARLO / 


' y to deduct state and local taxes, sivtdy confront the administration teresrs and their lobbyists." 35 percent so the rich wall do better, were expected to grow from about dined steadily. 

. , . I 'Mr. Cuomo said, the Reagan ad- on tax reform, at a time when most “They’re already swarming like We are lowering the lop rate to 35 SI billion in 1976 to between $4 Managers ffl the diffnaon plants 

»Ur JUi.inls. \ ^ ministration is motivated not only other Democrats have been more ants into every nook and cranny in percent so that every working billion and $5 billion by 1985. found other ways to cut costs. They’ 

u W MfiL by the need for revenue but also by restrained on the issue, is conad- Craigress,"hesaid.“BtniheArQer- American wall have a better chance But none of the forecasts panned had run the plants continuously at 
■ ^ the goal of financially restricting ered by some Democrats to rep re- ican people have their lobbyist, too to get rich." out. top speed, figuring that they would 

. ... • — : — Worldwide demand today for Jose effiaem^ if they stowed down. 

, enriched uranium to generate dec- But^ engtnttis eventually discov- 

; % Space- Arms Critics See Laser Test Failure as Omen predicted. And at this time oi 

. . ' JT ■ um is not being enriched for u 


Always the superb choice 


ity is rally one-sixth of what was ***. that they could vary power 
dieted And at time orani- levels without sacrificing efficien- 


‘Shootfng’the 
Shuttle 


By William J. Broad 

!’„■ New York Hum Service 

--./..f* 4 . CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida 
’ . .. -I- Critics of President Ronald Rea- ' 

gap’s proposed space defensive 
- r , , , shie ld agamst enemy missiles have 

ilT* I ilFlii'* tin cited the faQore Wednesday of a 

1 rr^^ser test involving the space shut- 
• .■ s “Ike Discovety as evidence of big^r 
• T ; f problems to come. 

^ ' They said that a mistakecauang 
: ..r ' the faunre — a simple Human error 
- ■. capable of upteetSag a complex 

... :»Tl: technological effort — was the type 
. ,7. that could be the ultimate ondrang 
of the proposed anti-missile shield 
Because of an error in mstruc- 
. /;tions, the spaceship was turned 180 
degrees izt the wrong direction dur- 
ing the tesL 

, |? f ... ... } The laser beam strode the craft, 

• it bat on the opposite side from the 

; -tv,-. . ■ . - mirror intended to bounce the 

-■beam bade to a U.S. Air Force 
- - . i ^jpuntaintop station an lhe Hawai- A U-S. test of a laser in spa 

- island oi_ Mam. 'Die test was involve aiming a kw-pi 

t • .i. rescheduled for .Saturday. Hawafi to a mirror in a win 

' ... ‘ ' Ul timat e success of the laser test 

is viewed by Pentagon officials as after they had been fired, before 
crucial to deter minin g whether ^ fog Pleased ihdr warheads 
; -t. ■ •: -‘heavy, powerful lasers on the and decoys. 

• ground am be used to fire at enemy Critics of the Pentagon's Strate- 

... ^ missiles in space. ^ . gte Defense ImtiativeTbiown pop- 

■" ” In one proposal, relay mirrors nlariy as “star wars,” said that the 

orbiting high above the United failure of the ample test showed 

— ’States would bounce the laser how difficult it might be to develop 

. beams around the globe so they a defensive shield. 





maty is rally one-snob of what was 131 
predicted. And at this time orani- 161 
urn is not being enriched for use in cy. 
weapons. 


At the Mme time, plant manag- 


“These people are seizing on ri- A European consortium of pro era began buying electric power at 

mime rliinoc in Irv in mtirrw* . uuirwu wuaut uuiu ui £nu- . i-_„ ,1.,. .I,, ,k a 


GeneralJames A^AbrahamsOT, di- Sites. At therame time the older cfaaiging-At the gaserais diffusion 
rector of jhePratagon s Strategic pi^ which ^ appeared to be plant in Portsmouth, for instancy 
Defense Initiative Organization. Lrt-vmerfohsolSaSbeBan ^ oegotiated a contract with 

Becto c to buy off- 

^^^ dh ^ eXpg ^ tS percentfowerthanbrfrae.Sgh P £ B*JS 


^ percent lower than before, through peax oewer at h^f the price they 

are conducted roombination of operating^nd for declncit y 

“If your car doesnt start m the budgeting dtanges. from the TV A 

morning, does thai mean *star wars’ Even as gaseous diffusion costs 

isn’t gqmg to work? There’s no log- Si c 3 ™® dow d a new enrichment 

ic to iLWe had a small procedural technology more promising than 

eiTor. AD you have to to do is wait S5LJ! 1 £S£ I iSSS3S " Khn the centrtfuge was being develqxxi 
for the reJ of the mission and well 81 CaliforSa’s Lawrence Liver- 

haw. a successful experiment. Tm 

Tile key part of the experiment The process heat lovqwriza 


Tha New York Tim 

A UJS. test of a laser in space, rescheduled for Saturday, 
will invoke aiming * low-powered beam from a. base m 
Hawafi to a mirror in a window of the shuttle Discovery, 


had been, fired before meat like this, what are they | 
released their warheads to do in combat?” asked John 


sure." L — , — - r j is aevetopsuK aucicar weapons. 

TTie key part of the experiment nKprocgsusasheallovaporia 

was to take place on the ground, oh, were we wrong." 

pSS^Z l r2 US. Biding Curbs 

^ th e di aonmg effeeui of tha ^ tta dasa«!imwct™faal PoWBT Of UlUOnS 

Earth s turbulent atmosph ere. ^ loymenL n, e fcjon will J 

But when cantroOets radioed a eliminate 450 jobs in Ponsmouth i j * 

senes of numbers to direct the 500 in Ctek Ridge. WASHINGTON — In a dea- 

aiuomatic piloi to align the Disaiv- ' By oexl F ebruary. a total of sion wiLh^-re»^impUcations 
ery property, some of the numbers , also be lost at Gar- organized labor, ime U.S. Court 

were in units of feet rather than j_ Sa ndusky Ohio. 400 °* ^ or *he District of Co- 

nautical miles. This confused the Cora, in ,Um ^lfej td | 0d ^ 

«ni«n uuwjwi J* . orp nerrmtlMi to mnvp rmmmtinnc 


SST£E -ssw'ssrsssa us. Ruling cud* 

iSattSBSSaiS PowerofUmons 

1 s tartuloit auoosphcre. P™, L ^ ^ on ^ J 


. , ^ . , , ... icu unp. ui 

nautical nnteL This confused the ^ Aero 

shuttle’s flight control system, Akron ^ 530 al 


KSmEiS which.p^^r^-mthe qS thd^tr^ to SlKTSSS 

^ ^ prohibits such uanv 


tagoo’s Strate- ingumbased Federation of Amen- <jPP°sw rarecoon, win. ay make centrifuges for the Ports- 

t* known pop- can Scientists. “You can’t resched- tilcstars - mouth plant expire. 

” said that the ole Worid War DDL Are they going In contrast with problems “The marti-j for uranium has 

le test showed to ask the Russians to come bade aboard the shuttle, the laser on the gone to pieces,” said US. Repro 

t be to develop on Saturday?” ground worked perfectly m the pro Jo hn F. Sdbcriing. a 

• A Pentagon official strongly dis- dawn darkness, sending its beam **03. distrirt includes 

. simple experi- agreed with the critics. flashing up to the Discovay. • GoodYear’s Akron plant. “But 


“If they can’t do a simple expert- agreed with the critics. 


a Viim-fll could strike enemy missiles shcaily “If they can’t do a single experi- agreed with the critics. flashing up to the Discovery 

r \npro't ,N : — — 

Marjorie Phillips, Senate Unit Faifc to Approve Reagan Aide 

Arts Patron, Dies Compiled by Ow Staff From Daputcha Mr. Reynolds's testimony before Senator Biden said he di 


In Washington 

Washington Pad Service 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatcher 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
Judiciary Committee voted, 17-0, 
Thursday to postpone action on the 
nominatxou of william Bradford 


apologized four limes. 


tion to the floor unless it voted on a 


■- WASHINGTON — Marjorie Reynolds as associate attorney gen- 
.%Qtips, 90, a painter and patron .of era! 


(he arts who 


ion on the Mr. Reynolds said he had had no favorable or negative reoommenda- 
Bradford intent to deceive but acknowledged tion. 

S ^ Lairy Speakes, Ac While House 


the Phillips 


the arts who foundea the pmutps The move came after it became 

Collection here with her late bus- ^ votes were lacking to bean of Utah and a strong si 
band, Duncan, more than 60 yeare send the nomination of the assis- of Mr. Reynolds, moved 
ago, died Wednesday of pulmonary ^ attorney general fordvil rights ^ 10 re P ort *** nominauo] 
failure at her home. w Senate toor with a favorable without a recommen 


that his recollection “may have r- n Portsmouth plant, the cost ot run- from a union plant m Wisconsin to 

“Ofi plants *Sc the cue st Oat , nonunion pLt ic Mdferey. Iffi- 
Senator Onin G. Hatch, Reraib- spokesman, sad the prratdent had Ridge, which enrich uranium urns, without the permission of 
lican of Utah and a strona support- °° P* 3115 10 withdraw the nomina- through diffusion, a sort of endless United Anstomobale Workers, with 


failure at her home. to the Senate Boor with a favorable 

The Phillips Collection was the recommendation! Some dvil rights 
first museum of modem art in the groups have opposed the runmna- 
United States when it opened in the tion of Mr. Repolds to the No. 3 
fall of 1921. Over the years it came position in tin: Justice Department. 


day to report the nomination to the -The Republicans, who control 


through diffusion, a sort of endless United Anstomobale W 01 
filtration process, was 30 percent which it had a contract 


he years 
: of then 


t ,>iniu f11 


to be known as rate of the treasures 
of Washington's art community. 

Mrs. Phillips was associate direc- 


iauiuvuui un.iMJJuu/i/MraiuuwtJM « . » t 

If the Senate rehi5atocoarimi pone the vote for a week, 
him, it would be a political defeat 
for President Ronald Reagan, sym- 


Senate without a recommendation, the committee, 10-8, lost their vote 
But the ranking Democrat on the margin when Senator Aden Spec- 
commiuee. Senator Jose^i R. Bi- ter. Republican of Pennsylvania, 
den Jr. of Delaware, countered said he would not vote for a favor- 
with the successful motion to post- able recommendation of Mr. Reyn- 
pone the vote for a week. olds. (AP, NYT] 


1 , . ,, .in'll t tor of themuseum from 1925 until b°kzmg section of hu avfl n&i s 
I rUiu 111 her husband died in 1966 and then pobaes. The presidenl ^^phoned a 
- 1 ■ director from 1966 until 1972, She number of senators on the commit- 
? ‘J ,'n Ml'> counseled and oicouraged young ^ ^ wedc urgmg them to sup- 
I .1 1 1* artists and was 'herself an accom- pwt the nommation. 

i. -i- « «ctw t painter. - At a hearing Tuesday, several 

■ 1V ‘ \ senators said they were troubled by 

V Other deaths : inaccuracies ana coatradictioiis in 



^'r'V^fished painter. 

- ii Other deaths : 

■ . Xuan Tbuy, 73, North Viemam*5 1 
foreign minister from 1963 to 1965 | 
and the leader of Hanofs ddega- 
. tion in the first year of the Paris' 
peace talks, Tuesday of respiratory 1 
- and heart failure. 

Russell & Berkey, 91, a retired 
four-star admir al and one-time j 
commander of U 5. Navy forces in I 
the Far East, Monday in Portland, ] 
Oregon. 1 


MARINER SG 


NEWU$ACCOUNT 
where your dollar 
makes more cents. 




YOURBESTWJY 

Single diamonds at whoesaie pnoes 
bv oriering direct fiom Antwerp, 
the workfs. most important cut- 
diamond market. Give diamonds 
10 the ones you love, buy for 
investment, for Jour enjoyment. 
Write airmail far free price fftf 
nr call uk 

Joachim Gokfenstein 
diamantexport 
BsUfalfaked 1SZ8 

. Pdi|uuatnu62,BaiBAiitmn, 
f . ftdejm** - (S23) 234.0731. 
tj Tden 71779 Bji b< 

at the Diamond Club Bldg. 


HCdlWWBMStd MHMOMI 0*«Ol 



Tb« ofhrt 

1985. . 

BwIwukm. 


teatweiAMfittl 

kMMSM S»th.J«lp 

O JYSKE 
. BANK 

2ptNo.7QH32, 


Prtw» CBrnu Dmumen. 

Vfesteb«03«l« 9,Ml501 Copenhrfien V. 

Phooe + 45 1SXS2ZZ ' 

H*w«ssndmB further Momiadoa 
ebeotUSAcxouM. - 

Fhttnmrw . . 

Rmdy name " L _ . 

Aktos ' ' 


Please wrtwmnwln; 

□Engbdt _ ODauisdi .• 

□I amabadyaJialH BtriccustcMatr 


Concord Mariner. For her. 18 karat gold, black chromium 
. stainless steel, diamonds. Quartz. Water-resistant. 

An art carried to perfection in Swiss watches. 


CHAUMET 

PARIS 1 2 place VendOme-* LONDON (78 N*w Bond Street ■ 
BRUSSELS 82 avenue Louise • GENEVA 2 rue du Rhone • 
NEW YORK 48-Eest 57th Street 


CARAMEL 

HOTEL 


If you come to Athens (Greece) 
and you like a Hofei 

100% fireproof and 100% earthquake proof 

all 420 rooms and 72 suites with facilities, such as 

Mini Bar, color T.V., 

free indoor-outdoor swimming pool, 

free dry cleaning of your ties, 

the best food in Athens, 

24-hour Room Service and 
also a beautiful Mosque on the 
roof garden, then come to 

CARAVEL HOTEL 

the only Hotel in Athens 
with these privileges 
for its clients. 


If you like enjoying your life 

there is also CARAVEL No. 2 

on the island of ZANTE in the Ionian Sea, 

for the most exciting vacation. 

Reservations: Tel.: 0695/ 25261 -2-3 

Head Office: CARAVEL HOTH. - Athens - Greece 
P.O. Box: 18106 GR 
Tel.: (01) 7290721 (60 fines) 

Telex: 214401 CH GR 



Beverly Wilshire Hotel 

Wildlife Boulevard a! Rodeo Drive, Beveriv Hills. Calif. 90212 
(213)275-4282 TMex 698-220 

‘Jhd JgM to tfH otd&ofdHFMxU m ‘B;rr fesOS-m^iw. m 

London (01) 583-3050 London {Oil 409-0S 14 

Frankfurt (069) 29 04 71 Frankfurt (069) 28 75 14 

Hong Kong (5) 22 11 42 Hong Kong (31 68 23 3 5 


New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — In a deci- 
sion with far-reaching implications 


are permitted to move operations 
from a union to a nonunion plant 


In contrast “The market for uranium has f °^ ie decision, reached unani- 
ahoar ^ ** to pieces,” said US. Repro moody Tuesday by a tbree^udge 

semative J^n_ F. Saberiin^ a pandLaffetLia/aS® 


Democrat whose distna mauaes ruling by the National Labor Rda- 
Goodyearis Akron plant. “But dons Board, effectively revokes 
what bothers me ts that you d think muon veto of such moves. The 


the Department of Energy would United Automobile Workere, the 
•f_ ^nvmvito P/i^nYTfi A i/?/) dose out their kast-effioeat .plants union involved in the case, said it 

lls to Approve MxBCIQCul ydlCM> first and keep going with then most had not decided yet whether to ap- 

A A O efficient planu which I always im- peal to the Supreme Court. 

Mr. Reynolds’s testimony before Senator Biden said he did not d««ood was the gas centrifuge The decision jgrcw out of a case 
the committee, and the nominee want the panel to send the nomina- P™* bmIt 81 rorismoum. m which the union had challenged 1 


plant being bidt at Portsmouth." yj which the union had challenged 
The department insists that this the right of the Milwaukee Spring 
is no longer the case. When con- Division of the Illinois Coil Co. to 
sanction began in 1977 on the transfer its assembly operations 
Portsmouth plant, the cost of run- from a onion plant in Wisconsin to 
ning plants like the one at Oak a nonunion plant in McHenry, Uli- 





s-j. ■■ nrrrtrfrrs » ■spj ryr. tettb 


.vmeMmmum 

QMStot • 




nm 




9 


i wm. 




I#*!*'**** 






rk— ■ *. . //*{. 


pp^j • y 





- v .*• 

jfsSflfft'** 



Please send me information material on the 23rd Overseas Import Fair 


Company 


AMK Benin AusateUunoa-Moasa-Kon 
MMaadaiun 22. P-1000 Bstfln 22, 16b 


*a-GmbH 

i: (030) 3038-l.lblex: 1 62 908 arnKb d 


P»3.tnnM ir.txam 








Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
PARIS & SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
SWITZERLAND 


VERSA] LIE AREA, 31 KMS PAHS, _ 

superb estate, 3 ho, 8-nXXti house + MONIRHJX - SWITZERLAND 

Anoomome* + eutbiftdings, ten*. towy cOcxtarett IS) • 180 gy m. iffl , 
swinutinn oool inter attina pnce. cwatable to torajien in tmioepa 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Bade Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 
BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 


AUTOS TAX TStiSR 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAK 

taxfrkawibeourL^^SS^^ 


artwci iasM£ 

Esrarts to Roi. Tefc 01 041 60 54. axiom* bedrooms & baths, My 


Es»rb to Roi.*T«»b 

CANWS. Croedte 
OBB apart m e nt . ! 
ISO sqjn. p rwtfe 
^ Swing, chmg 
bedrooms, 2 fadhr 
winter garden, fa 


ipooout bedroo m & baths, My 
oqirpped lafthen, spectocufcr view i 
ovarUm I Ata. Mortgages ovaifobfe \ 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
USA RESIDENTIAL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

USA RESIDENTIAL 


REAL ESTATE 
TIMESHARING 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT 

TO RHST/SHARE EDUCATIONAL 

PARIS AREA FUKNISHED~ POSmONS AVAILABLE 
JULY-AUG. 7TK Heart of St Gmm 


GREAT BRITAIN 


YVBJNBk 25 ktw Pb« (WMJ. 7 km 

Gotf St. Nom. BoMshbig oiKi proper- 
ty «i vifejge. 195 tom an one level, 
on IS00 sqjtl wofl kept freed en- 
dow! landf Price; nJOOJJQO- Tefc 
387 83 38 or 056 44 81 


TiJSkU 8 Be* - At Disposal a 

i!-Smj 707 Frwriehorae fix rammer hofidow if 
11 283 TO deadan it ft£n before July IS. 198& 
WeslL 7 km Deed from owner/dewtaper. 


B.6. promotion sjl 


1820 I 

TeL- 31/63 


four Stravinsky 4 
Monfreax, Swize 
3 57 27 - Tb 453U 


Swfcorlcnd__ 

r 453161 8GHL 


ST. GERMAN m LATE 180 tqjn. 
house, with garden, 4 bedrooms, 3 
baths. Hdf «ray between RB & tart , 
Lye m. m®5b0. Tel pi 973 7t 58 
office / [§) *51 43 75 offer 8J0 pm 1 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 


1STH. Unique opportunity, on 
piex house, pnvde cuvtyai 
wigs. 2 beckooms, 2 berths. 3 
completely redeegned, never 

rajaum tSbiwo. 


„ , GenevaA mountons. Mon- 

m, I treux. VSarv Verbkr, Let Dmbforets, 
in. [ Chateau cfOex racr Gstoad, toytin. 


PLACE HtANZ US77.( 10THJ. Duplex 
ttutfio. 42 sq.ni " monsard* .corefifty 

restored A ready to be Syed in. Mar- — GlQBE'PLAN SJL 
dole. Low charges. 5ih floor. No da- Aw Mat Kmx 7A 

voter, $42flTO& Tel 326 1323. CH-IOte LaS^^^W 
8TH FAUBOURG ST. HONORE. 5- Tel P!) Z? 33 1Z Tbc 251 ffi MBJS 
room Hear, character, liredaca. dot* b ldw lwd Smee 1 970 i 


SANDS FT, LONG ISLAND, NY 

PRESTIGIOUS 
CLASSIC COLONIAL 

Snorted on 15 beautifully 
kncbcaped kibs with heat- 
ed pod & cabana, tennis 
court A 3 stone pahoL This 
mogra&enf rasanx offers 
o dramatic reetpeon room 
with 18 ft. ceSnQL The ete- 

ganr a nt artoroing or so hoi 
huge Bring room, dating 
room & Sherry. Master suite 
with hie & her bathroom (An 
4 addriond large bed 
rooms, Completely furnished 
- ready to move in. 


FORT LEE, NJ 


Luxwious cfaQraiaum epartment in 



BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 


ttSWXBHnt' 


EDUCATIONAL 

posmoivs available 


. nBHjST ■ Em 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 


dm Ptes, 7 ream, SOfo-m. F55QO/ 
month net. Tel 260 86 90. 


endased terraces with specftxwkx 
*wwt of NIC skySne. AJrtfimo (ufcfexi, 
Kohler erwironmentd center, fireplace, 
2 bedrooms, 2K bad*. Priced at 
SSTSjoaa 


CANNES 


Par ^formation on dm & Other luxury 
properties in the New York rnetropoS- 
hn area, colour Spetid Properties 
Consultant at 20J-53-2552 


FRANCE - COTE D'AZUR i 
WOMMARJL VlllA 

fat 1977, 8 doude bedroom*. 7 both- 



ST. GERMAN DB PIS Comfartd* 
riuda charoasr, bath, tatchen 
WJDO. Short/lcm terra. 7D4 87 93. 


muther-fongw EngRih foadtaa MfBi 
haw EK passport or wfid worring 
papers, mrinn contnxt 6 atpras 

Srfor Uraet. ad Pwt747 12 DO. _ 



BJCOPORT TAX FRBGM5 ' 
Cafi for free cotatag ■, • 
Box 13011, Bostrdom «port hkilq, 
T* 0UW±M77. Hx* 250n9OWh 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SWFSDE Inc. 576 fifth Avenue, 

KttaarirSfei 


room, very bra tying, sep a r ate (fin- 
ing, big hoated ptmnmg pool Sepa- , 
rate ^o rtman t hr oareMer. 


Prices from SFT21000 l 
L ibard interest. 


ExceSent pubfic & private 

Khoofa, country 

dubs & yocM dubs nearby. 
Sands Pcint is hist 35 mn 
ham NYC 


SCHLOTT 


. REAUORS 

Special Properties Division 


For ran h P fflJOO - season. 

(rfmosen. 

Further btformemon nmu- 
IMMOBUHS DE VUAKS SA 
P-O. Bex 62, CH-18B4 VUm 
toe 456 2.13 GE5S SrihelwL 


room to, character, Br e pl a OM. dm* 

We recaption, 3 bedrooms, 2 bafto. 2 
meads' rooms. Owner. TeL 265 26 31. 


Offered ot Sll SUOO l 
I GOUNnrrREAuY! MC. 



MONTMARTRE her 
fa, awdobfe Md Ji 
HSOOr month net. Tel 


1 bedroom 
-MU Sept. 
$02 35 eves 


S» YOUNG AMBUCAN MAN. au ! 
par. south Francs, m exchange for ] 
ooowrtotioa Tel 272 67 09 Pms. 


OTPSB* SA, OrauBw de Wawe 


SHORT TBtM in Latin Charter, i 
Msooen^TelCTSSa | 

5 MMS. ETOBE. BO tqja flat. J«4y / 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS WANTED 



5. ETOBE. BO sqjn. t». My / 
R5J00/morth.g2D3U. 

IB HAUB. Big Sucbo, sunny. 


tCARlBHAUB-Br 

F4J00/manth. Te! 26 


GHGNY STATION, CBHIBL Aroom 
apartment. 2 bathrooms. 906 45 


TOWN A COUNTRY REAUY INC 
AffScrt of Solheby Ptxice BerneJ 


17m ETORL targe studio 40 sqm, id j 


m 


GB4EVA COUNTY 
(FRBMCK FREE ZONE 


551 Port W u da h gtan Btvd. 
Port WastanOtoa NY 11050 


NEWYOBK CTIY 

m west 3 booms 


187H. EXCEPTIONAL VIEW. 30 sqm 

no Hoar studo with 35 sq^TV. terrace 

* porlonq. F365.000. Tefc 281 0701. 
MONTPARNASSE now 5L German 


des Pres, 2/3 rooms, bakwiy. sunny, 
rodonert750,W0. 296 61 97 evetwig. 

TROCAD6RO. 7 th heawn. 250 sqjo. 
duplex + 70 sam. terrace, 3 bed- 
rooms. Tel 548 43 94. 


16TH AUTEUH. 35 sqjn. stufio, 6th 
floor, elevator. 355 6304 -7431>05. 


6TH Despeto 
luxe aportm 


2-roara de- 
I. 544 4179 


H ■ - m j-. - - ■■■ . NEW YORK. Od 

f©iR LAKE GBlEVA) 7tr* East EsUm Offering 

Splendor in Hie Sky 

HELVE SUNBHJ SjC TNs unique 14 ream home defies do- 
PO Box 40 scripfconl Roodad with sunlight on c4 

157 Rie dHennonc e rides it offers spectoaAx dty views. A 

0+1245 Cotto ny Be flcnve 40 ft gofcnr wUoo roe s you rto o se+ 

GHdEVA - SWTtZHUAND Ira ofOld Wbrid gmW combned 
leb M 52 35 95 wim a modem toffihe feafing. Ow - 1 

Telex; *29 603 FMS CH riled roans throughout for entartomiiig | 

pha cd Ihe c n emtiw ond comfort for 

fmuiy brig, 5 master bedraoms & 

LAKE GENEVA/ LUGANO 


20x30 TERRACE 

Orerlootong Musewn of Natural Hsto- 
rr and cn of Centred Pari an hi(^i floor. 
Trw is o chararing penthoine in a tap. 



14IH. ShwSq, hah damfina cosy, sm- 
ny. JdyAggust. Tel 588 M30 l 
I 6TH Lmng, bedroom, F5J00, short- 
/b»g term Tel 525 


PARIS AREA UNFURNI5HID 



Cars of 

COP&MAGEN 

TAX FREE 


BOATS ft 

RECREATIONAL^ 

vehicles. ::g.z 


• Wemotxjndl Sales 

• Worldwide DeSvery 

• Eunopeat Pnee Indaa 
. TeLim 45 1 37 78 00 

• Telex 19932 DR 


BENCH IdVBU. (toftaffwieBrA^ 
ft. houesbecn for salt 
212-79? £019 USA weekdays^ 7”- 


FOR SALE& WAN13a>, 

IBM 196 C TYPEVntriS' VM? " 


55 Vodroftvei DX-1900 
CPH V -DENMARK 


French keyboanJ, cknostnew. 
Tet5684420a(fiCBhoin/7ll 
home after 8 pm. 


This is o doming penthouse in a tap. 
W I Krrioe bMng. Asking 

S345JD0 Plecna contact 

Wttar. Wilson 212-832-5451 
Residence: 212-496-1029 
Douglas Simon Gibbons & tas 


0+1245 Coltoogs-Baflenve 
SatfVA - SWnZHUAND 


G8NEVA 
•el J 
Telex: 4 


Q 52 35 95 
7-603 FMS CH 



PORTUGAL 


tv UtWVIU met btdwn & generous doff qurtwv 
In these exomtiand regions, including ABin sparling condtion. This one of a 
Montreux, Vllors, Goaad-Vciey 5 kind home must be seenl Shown arrty 
maty other famous mountain retorts, by. 

we have a vary big choice of m uu wfi- Janies G. GoicbMh 212-3557480 
cent APARTMDfl? / VILAS /Otfl- Residence: 212-249-9426 
LETS. Very recsanohly artoed hit -4 »q 

rtw b«Ti from Unlonfk Rplrk 1 U 

about USS40.00QL Mortgages at 6M% ne,en ® neiQS Lid 
nearest Pleam riot or [ran 


PORTUGAL- Buldra for sale Lisbon “ "T?. 1 SnSi 
area, 3300 sq. m. 5. 1H Iwctares of St 
lend, I HocTaox 2377. Hardd Tri- ^ 

buna. 92521 NeuAy CecSex, Trance 


ce & Goldsmith 212-355-7480 
Residence: 712-249-9426 


1011588 7581. 

5WB5 COTTAGE. Brand new house ta 
lei u nfenfohed with carpets, axtara 
catd ol upp i u m j es. 3 bedrooms. Tf> 
bc al io uun, hxge double reception 
room, bteban,gcirqge gQrdeft. I year 
+ , E350/vvBe£fDlj5w756I. 

LONDON. Far the best fancied flats 
and houses. Consul the S a p oahtS: 
FHBol Kay and Lewis. Tel South of 
Pal 352 jilt North of Pal 722 
51 35. Telex 27846 RESDEG. 




BMt A BUTCHOfF. A kxge selection 
of proparties in Si. John's Wood 
fagerXs Pork, Swiss Cbtrage, Hrxnp- 
ifeod & emnrora. 6 morvts +. Tel 
01-586 7561. Hx 883168 ACO G 


HOARY POTTER and jxxtner s for 
good quoftiy funxshed flats & houses 
to rent in ce n tr al London ixeas. Spe- 
aofc* in letting, aonenment & sees. 
01-493 2020. Tbc ALDM7994 


SEVERAL LUXURIOUS HATS. 200 
and 350 sqm. My furnished large 


HSHKXDS.A. 


terraces overtaoUng tea 
readenac decorated with pmk marble 
m the mddto of o beautiful tropical 
gmden. 2 pooh [I with sea water], 
access to the sea, 4 tennis courts, 
indoor and outdoor restai/anfs, ba, 
supermarket, ladion shops. ragh5 
dub, foundry hnudresser, portorar. 
Price for Hie 200 sqjtl flats: 


Tour Grise 6, 0+1007 Lausam 
d 21/25 36 IT. Tlx 24298 SBO 


a pcrfmw i te . 

Zunodi Jfamous spa far rheunctam]. I Charles latdien; Botonum efawet skyft 
Bari: loan maUtie. Write; Postfach I Studio & office hideaway} luxurious 
406. 4102 B taningan 1. Swfaertond. I master suita with ircrble spa. Sansahon- 
Tel 061/44 50 90. I a) riews from terrace. Bam w*h 2do% 


SWnZHUAND 
FORBCTBIS CAN BUY 
neats on the Lr^e Lucerne ond Ot 


Bedford, NY Westtherter Co. 

42 ACR£ ESTATE 

Luxury 6 bedroom Colonial only 2 yts. 
aid. nestted on arne acreage in coun- 
try estate area laid abut* nature con- 
servancy. SutMiririon possanhy. 
Graceful residence fearures superb S. 


YORK COUNTY. A very attractive 
country estate in the rofcng hfih of 
Penns^Svania. I2H acre wim a com- GERMANY 

pletrijr restored 2 story fomtamse. 

Large restored red tom with box uuninn 

sMrafor horses & white bexvd fences -Tryri rTt xTT- 

plui a forge metal stortui *hed that GOETTBIATT 

PtaraWg Si P? 0 ? 8 ?' I BaM acimbe saparotod 


Muraa+aiT 

"GOETHfflATZ" 


LONDON GEORGIAN TBKACE flar 
for ewtartive, m Noricnd Square. 
Kensington WU. Modem, fafy for- 
reriwd, 1 bedroom. £150 per wesli 1 
year oorTyony let. Tel (01)997 17 65. 



b^ishexpsts —* 

foe lqnguqB?.^Tax-fr«g Lrerian WT . 01-493 2«9 . hSettar 


PORSCHE, BMW, 4 ROUS ROYCE 
LH/KH 6m New & PrfrOwntd. 8 , 
veers experience in bnporiTExport. i 
Doamwntohon, jtvppng etc USA our i 
specially. Take advantage of our 
expenena. 


MX A XX Century wsb d'cst 1 
Juno - 27th July, Mondays- F ftW 
10onv5om, Saturday lfiiain-ttai^f. 


SERVICES 


HUGHS MOTOR COMPANY 
B ow— <v England 
(Ol Ha 744643” 

It* 41254 HUGHS G. 


***** 

YOUNG BLEOANT LAOY fA 

ZURICH 830 lSMRt 


F1JOOJXIO. 350 son ftoh negotable. 

F<y detak. cal: Mrs FeariHe. Gub 

Mix^iHdd Sur (Adefe) Tenenffe. Tel DBECTLY ON LAKE GHCYA. 
(34-221 78 1000. mils, horn airaort ri beautiful i 


REGENTS RAJDC. Luxurioudy for- 
nahed apartment, 3 bedrooms, IH 
bath, large recop&n room, madam 
kitchen with cA machines. 1 year +, 
ESOO/ww*. (01)5867561. 


SWITZERLAND 

VILLARS 


LMlSA 

OmQAL ROUS ROYCE 
DEALS FOR BELGIUM 

TAX FRS CARS 
ROUS ROYCE BENTLEY 
RANGE and LANDROVER 

r. de MIDDBBOURG 7+82 
1170 Brands 
TEL: 2-673 33 92 
TlX: 20377 


** PARIS 553 62 62V* 


FOR A REAL VJ.P. YOONG 
Daringuahed. Bogont, fl h iWnyuuL 


VtP YOUNG LADY GURU 


w j i J * rev - - • < t 

awctxoa, CRffoaic CBn.nim - 
tar days, avminm & traw- *. 


MAKE MOUSY hi SUNNY A1MBHA 
buying about 60,000 sq.m. tfiriride 
aw 10.000 sqjm. tots. Wotw. On 
nxxn road. H5 bns airport to Gfy, 
neat university, beachas. Ideal yea 
round gerefoman ftxm in g retrod. 


reins, ham carport it beautiful tagh 

dam reridcnco, luxury fl^s, with per- 

mits for sole to ratmidiA Jutf 2 1 
toft. Phone Swihartond 021/715282 1 
office or 021/719370 eve. 11x458131. . 


Grounds in exceBenl eoni- 


A worn) CLASS PROPSTTY 
Color Brochure Avcriabfe 

HOUUHAN/ LAWRENCE 


\tam 5r Bax ^ D&XKwi PA hwtw mditadwe, green, attar hmer JOM4 BIRCH has 20 yean experience 

aafo&Bianft.* 

IIK]AH fftHFOBNiA HQ3GOUT 2 * ® ® JTL " ^ P Jn * dean. BWi & Co. 01-499-8802. 

RAMOURT AM MAIH bmiuhWry 

on ynor -rouna natffucan itnson. Moa- f l. iu la/ri nj-f n ntttrm nos, Afflenan mcranL UaKwca' 

em 4 bedroaci, 3V5 bath luxury tome ^Tl SOauT wdf+TdLvWD *»ps 4 or £175 /week - stems 2 Tel 
on deadend county momtained rood. Ho0rt -. 1 50 -^ J ! L ?°P I T-l l [ flo0f TC ” ObZSi 2204 or 01-486 W5RJK] 

fotrih amWl nshiUm. ri. ImrMXXCVery fw rort by gwrier. — — - — — 


Only 75 nans Irani Geneva Airport 
do - tennis - golf ond sun 


MAGNIFICENT CHALET 
FOR RENT 

whh wonderful view aver Ate Alps 



10 YEARS 

Wo Deliver Can to Ifee World 


YOUNG aEGANT UOT 
PA. PARIS 525 tt 01 


AUTO RENTALS 


TRANSCO 


ft PARK 527 01 93 * 


TURKEY 


914-232-5007 212-8240260 


era 4 bedroom, 3W bath luxury home 
on deadend county mamtoined rood 
ParttaBy completed cwlteikSra ov- 
dude second residence, garage, bora 
indoor term court, stop S great- 
tore*. $375,000 Dunham, 1823 


sleeps 4 or £1 75/week - stags 2. Tel 
084421 2204 or 01-486 341?|UK] 


private park of 1 5,000 sqjn 
vary knwious: 12 bedrocxns 
3 reception rooms, 6 baths 


sqjn. lireMmoKty for rent by owner. I — — I 
DM23 / sam. Pergomon Press GmbH, FOR FUHKRSHB) IHTMG5 IN S.W. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


53/ sqjn. Write: Mrs De Diego. Gran 
via 55'Mcxtod II Tel: 2471947 Tbc 


vw JJ'MoOTd 

22675 NSUEE 


MALAGA, COSTA OB. SOL Studio, 
felly equipped, both, kitchenette, pri- 
vate terrace, 35 wun_ 24-tour porter- 
age, secuMy. teieidiqna operator, 
prestige bulking on man promenade, 
next to beadtes. USS14O0Q. Write: 


Mrs De Diego. Gran via 55/Mortad 
13 Tel 2^1947 TLc 22675 NBUR E. 



I LUXURY CONDOMINIUM 
IN TOP FLIGHT HMUSE 
AT PARK AVE & 79TH 


* 4,5J LUXURY EXECUTIVE APARTMENTS. 
— ■ Kmghlibridge/Chelsea. Over 100 


London. Surrey & Berkshire. Contact , 
MAYS. Oxstott (037 284) 3811 UK. 
Tehee 89551 1Z 


1 morrtfc USS20J300 + charges 
special rate for a tanger periods 


MAGNmcmr ESTATE south ol San 
Fronoitoo,CA. Buib in the grand Bro- 
pepn manner; irepemaUy presarved; 
11 acres park, settrita. Previews for 


M BB41DORM, TVEANY*! 

One or foe finest X best known restau- 
rants m Span. Sole agent knmobiaria 
Ponorana Write Em Lai Pcftnas 8, 
C/Gombo. 3/8eredann. 3+65882552. 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


SW1T2XRLAND 


NYC AREA 


Bright, immocufofe ibedraom, 315 bath 
ap u I n tent in beautih^y cnju i i eed, Fu8- 
service buMng. 1,950 sqJl, with east 
md wot exposures. Dear byDongho. 
AvaSoble with or without turtoftnos , 
[odiaoenl studio also ovoiofaie). PriS 
[ u nhrnelied) newly reduced to Sl.l md- 1 
Son. Exdame Ssibm Contact: 

EdUi ScJtan 

The Hakteod Property Company 
1065 Modson Aw NY. NY 10028 


fuRjr serviend stadfes, 1 & 2 bedroom 
acortmer ib . Al modem corvenienng. 
Minimum day 22 days Prices from 
£145 par week. Plane contact Lor- 
raine Young, NGH Apartments, Nefl 


GREB4E A CO. Exoeleni Selection of 
Houses & Hats far rented m North, 
Northwest A Central London. Tefc 01- 
625 8611. 


Far Infown tdhm ; 
hBDebSwe de VX^s SJL. 
P.O. Box 62. 0+1884 VOars 
Tefc 25/3S 35 31 
Tafoxu 456 213 GE5E 



Keeping a conskxtt stack of more than YCIUNG LADY IWUNGUAI W*’ 
300 bread new con, . “ “ 


making 5000 hempy drents every yeor. 
Send for free mdtk xta ra attta a 
Transco SA, 95 Noordelaan, 


PARIS: 520 9 7 9S\ 


2030 AiUworo. Balorian 
iTd 323/S42 «40* OTTRANS 8 


DtSTTNGUISHHJ TOUNG1ADY M 

- - 1- 


★ ★ZURICH 558720 **; 

Sephahcated V±P. LodyfA 


AUTO SHIPPING 


^ ro WHMSp UY ‘ A ^ Ul Soph-fated VIP. It 

AND GET-BE5M1EAC? BEST-DEAL ratrtT ir iFT r atitfTTirjt Ti 
Owdi arraond. Then oafl us anytime. *^2? 

ASK FOR PHE ‘“’T tMnetonojL Why 


Gwynn House, Stoane Awl London 
SWl TdrOTw 1105. Tbc 295817 G. 


HAMP5HBE. MAGMHCB6T Vfctori- 
an Hver Ml. Sleeps ID, every luxuy. 
Health hydro. Aiwst $4,000/ weal. 
Please phones 01-36 696 L , 


HOW TO IMKIRr A EUROPEAN 
CAR BiITO IHE ILSJL 
This document explains fe% what one 


wafer* wittout^imto^nS BRONXVljtt NV - quint wlage one 
studio abo ovaJabH. PriS *1 "ft % jn»,NYC famous 
*0 newly reduced to 51.1 nd- idiodK-llGraaous homes & a«p 
live fisinn. Contact: apartments. Write for brodwna. Deed 


SUMMER M ENGLAND. Far Juiy/Au- fT. m & lft floor, awraximo 

gust. Soufe Kensington, UrefoiL koni- torrftm. Tel SAL Ud, London |0U eocb for rent Con be 

rv IMwn rriL .h .— a lUo 935 7469 naJer dntYVtnwrXl 


: Hcskteod Property Connom 
i Modson Aw NY. NY 10028 
21 2-734-00 W861 -6995 


Bed Estate. 120 Kraft Ave^BremoaBe, 
N Y 10708 - (914) 237-CT&. We ora 
relocation spoo 


nr Ztodraom apaimenr, taxhen, 
drawing/ dining room, roof gcxden. 
Close to nxxn fcne tube, ided for , 


“NHJHAUS EM AM RH HWALL 1 * CAR B4TOTM 

Swtotold This rri ww f iil —ylnin i 

"««. do to.brtog o cor jnio Ihe Ql 

iSiEssawate 

eodb for me. Con be smxxoted into DOT & ffA conversion 


ASK FOR PETE 

kL5S. - Motor Cars 

121. Heeew^atr. 2275 ED Voorbu 
Tefc The Netherktods 31.07^7561 
Telex 20010 PM5 [MSS) 


lady companion. Why doatTrew. 
dune 277-01-69 for your days,W 
rings & weelmndil An ategaar Um- 
guw guide, even for your mfaear-; 

SWTTZEDANDl Young 


b mdudeS'ttew & I WE ORB SPECIAL HFAVORS" 


compa n ion for your days, (mhb 
and we eke nds. Free for travel Tefc 
061/43 82 34. 


LONDON NT 6 3-bedroom house with I ready to move 


rden. £100/week ovafcbie Au^nt risortfy, rfai 


®77 (day)) 


85/ 86. Tel 01-249 7036 eves. 

LOPBON NW3 SPAOOUS HAT 
with garden July & August £170 per 
wpckllel p) M 75rST 


Friday B ojh. - 6 pm. BMW m Europe & airpcxtog V tTfa 

■ l — 5to*n To recerim this monud. send 

CALVIN UVD. fOE Kenovated USJIBJO (add US$1 JQforposfogriKa 


owner, no axtv 
1316 Monday - 


op- tom clearance & shippmg procedures 
' " as vnl as legal ports. Because of the 


Oetods by phona. Conversion in US. wraNATIONAL BEAJJTKA Ifa), 
& shippmg procefees UPATO. USA & W08UJWE£tS 


212-7657793 / 7657794 


luxurious condonmum oportmait in LONG ISLAND ESTATE Mroom,kral 

SUNNY SOUThBM SWilZBOJUMD E^^^tartapriiSii'ifc^^ff^t Qcbsk 20's fa^Mtb^monor home or«vennas9-i: 
LAKE LUGANO enclosed terraces with spfaxufcr ^ nreepmg waterviews over Lang 2813 or Sax 41 

WtoCMW AW views of NYC skySne. AWfattSm Wand SoSd Si 14 acres. Bi* for leaf Acre. London W 

Kolter erefanraentd a»(Xw, Fxaciaca, "JflUSfanSytxidtetteoarotedtoiRtl 
bocwtitul oark P7£00 sqjru) wxth swim- 2 bedroom, 214 baths, ftiradat winner. Supub puUc rooms, took- SUMMIT, NEW 
mmgpocJ. pnwte manra fa pnverie S575m &*d Rxary, etegreif master sufe P NYCaxmnuta. E 

befaltfteiaGry. Apartments rosqj^ rooms. 2 breinj, 4 doutte bedrooro, mm & Fnmdi sc 

up w Ira sank + nurara 24 • 47 Par i n fon i xit i a n on dhes & other luxury bote en wife, servaes" teng, separate chore: LO(S SC 
*4 *2: *;y* SF4OJ0Q - SFl^lZiM) pr o pe rti e s m the New York etekwo Z gfawree. H i d ed pool. tenmsTfoond 441 Spring fi eld 

gardens. 1 tour N»C fa arc 


SSfeSSSiaS NEW MERCEDES ■CTJSMSSftS 

eewsTSSra n,sa ^^^ -fiuH5H63gs 

US$1 850 [odd USJ1J0 for p^toge) tea ROM STOCK LONDON, BEGANT muBfauand 


PJ. Schmidt, Pbstfadi 313r 
7000 Stuttgart 1. West Germany 


bond, cenverXMn m USA 


LONDON, BEGANT muBfaoased 
French lady campanioiL weHnneM 
S vendkfe. Tel 821 0364 (OIL <. 


umdon, Nr. CJnse, mornings 7 - 1 1 am 

orevenmas9. 12 cm 581 8275 or 581 
2813 or Bax 411&4. LH.T„ 63 Long . 
Acre, London WCrf9JH.UK- 


nquippnd. 

IhroudiFr 

dturefOl] 


fe moid service (Mon. 
otor TV. Phone for bro- 
1342 or write Piesiden- 


£250/week.01-5Bl 5828 or 581 4544. 
HOLLAND 


I lid Estates (Mmfdri Ltd, 1 Uravfaiy . 
St. London WOE 6JE 

LONDON NEAR BUCKMGHAM Pol 


Tfc- p-^h„ T " ■ •** prop^es m re rraw rare merapob- 

^pwRfaenatavtfaointeSfai tan amt aft our Spedd ftapeSa 
*** Lo *® “(*«"** Corautenf 201 -s5^S. 


nxm & French spoken. Wile for bro- 
chure: LOIS SCHNOJa JtEALTOR, 
44l Spnngfiaid Ave, Summit, NJ 
07901. Tel 201-277-1398. 


from 5? sqjn. to 130 sqjtl, overiookxig 
the fake and the mounicans. Pihzk 
SF 210.450 - SF 485/5a Free for sde to 
foreigners. Mortgagee at low Swift 


SCHLOTT 


I hour NYC fa orparts. 

$3JXX)JX» 

Littcxi H Phelps Inc. 


ace. Superbly funihad and appoint- 
ed 2-bedroom flat for short term or 
haSdoy rentoL$S0Q/week inducting ■ 


DUTCH HOUSMG CENTRE B.V. 

Deluxe rentals. Vateriusstr. 174, 
Amjtardcrn. 020621234 or 623222. 


VBWBL Swiss Chalet for summer 
rent. $500 werik deeps four to six. 

Sss^^ rto,w,, ^ Ca ‘ 


FRANKHJRT/MARf-W. Gere 
b e nnonn GrtoR Tift 069- 
PidHjp al over Europe "ro/r 


deeps four to dx. »v*-ttoaeoverturapeTo/raelxm. 
ighito twelve. Cal TRANSCAR 17 ov de Friedkmd, 75008 

i Paris. Tel 22564 44. 1*0*839533. 

p. Antwerp! 2339905. Comas 39 43 44 


RULE INC 

TAUNUSSTR. 52, 6000FRANXRJRT 

W Gena, tel B^-232351, tlx 411S9 


FRANKFURT. You ng lady coftpa n faB. 
Enoksn. FroadL CftniuiiyiDiiM. mML ■ 
to travel 069/44 77 75. 


frumputulion to & from repo rt it 
requxed. Mmd servka avafable. Tel 


9 Oyster Bay Road, 
oaist VoBey NY 1156a 
Tefc [516) £7*4600. 


EMERALD - HOME LTD. 


Special Properties Division 


_ requxed. Mmd sorvks avatable. T«L 

NYC APARTM04T. Sturmfa 2 bed- Mr. Kiught on 0935 74753 or 0935 
room condo opposite Lincoln Center. 86212a 

BlipinyE SUF1B MAYFAM.Lra>- 


PEIHl BRUM MAKBAARDU 
fort Housing Servfre Rentals 
Amsterdam. Tot 020-768022. 


WAIBRONT PEMTHOUSE on fbsh- 
sonable Grave Me Manx. Outtand- 


AUTO CONVERSION 


OCSANWIDE LONDON safMSnCATH) Gertnorf 4 . ' 

^ MOTORS GmbH 

3 mSjSiZfiffSSt wS. GU,D& “ ^ 

favery. Full serekn faort/raport. 

& 5>A stepino for touri* FRB4CH RIVSRA. taterarater -Travel 
daatar- Ocfavntfe W« G ntH, g sinponion [93} 61 78 63 . . . 


>47 59 SB TOURIST GUIDE. Pbr%~. 
reports. Young, etegexq, anofadS 
dwrmina 7 an / 12 pm. Ml travt 


Amsterdam. Tefc 020-768022. 
ITALY 


or 212-227-1579. 


43-Story CONDO MAUL HAWAII OGEANFftONT 1 


Via G. CaHori 3, CH-8900 Lugano 
Tel: 0+91-542913 - 
Tbc 73612 HOMECH 


New York City 


402 E. 64 St 


Dag Kcranarskjold Tower 

240 EAST 47th ST. 

1 Blade To Unfa Nations 
, „ -SPECTACULAR. 

1, 2, 3, & 4 Bedroom Apartm ents 


1 bath condo completely & 
’ feranhed, pool & Vto 
BflOCL Write Dunn, F XX 
ofaxir.CA 94939. 


ry ferrashed upu maxes, navdy deoo- 
ntad fifty sorvKHl seoetorid/ielex 
foriShes. C4S0/^b per week. 3 
monte to 2 wore. Moumcutzon Mmt- 
ogemeni Ltd London 01 491 2626 


ogemant Ltd. 
iX* 299185. 



wim unporaBeW mews. StySsHy fur- 
mshed complete mdudng Knens, dori- 
es. Unnyie services include elegant 
gnirmet renarae. temxs, pool, 
molds dona splmcfid private se- 
cured peninsula. Aimud re nt $4 500 
month Cal owner (305} 858-73/2 tJ. 
tar 4 PM Miami line. 


EMISSION 

BIGINraMG 


MODnCAIKM OF WW MOO& 

CARS M GOOD BNHN6 __ . 

CONDI DON. MOST: < 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


A unique 12-ihxy infl desire 
CONDOMMUM RESIDENCE 
in Ihe heat of 
Manhattan's East Side 


DO YOU WISH - 
TO BUY AN APARTMENT 
OR A HOUSE? 

1 TO REUSE IN SWITZERLAND? 
1 TO INVEST IN SWTTZESLAhDi 


NO TWO OF OUR 30 ONE LEVEL 
DUPLEX, THPlEX OR QUADRUPIEX 
UMTS ARE ALIKE 


New Fufl Service BuUng With 
Swimming Pool, Health Otto and 
ffousekesitigServioRS Avatabie 
RENIAL APARTMEN7S 
ARE ALSO AVAILABLE 
For Wo Oft 212-759-8844 
Sort, 5un 11-4; Mon to Fri 9-5 


MANHATTAN LUXURY CO-OP. 24 
few doorman buUna Large mod- 
ern 316 rooms. 5169,000 negotiable. 
400 E. 77 Si. NY, NYlOOTVTof 516- 
2398426. 


MILANO. 220 sq. m. apartment, exnd 
leni location. To be ter empty or pally 
finfehed. Oft Mian evening 02- 
796688, or NT 21238M137. 


1. 2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartmerts 

from $297,000 


NYC 79IH 5T. OFF 5TH AVE. 


CONTACT US: 25 YEARS OF GOTO 
ENCT IN BUILDING AND SELLING 
FINE SWISS REAL ESTATE 


Fxcephonal 9 mom CO-OP for sole by 

owner. Ptatiga feB service buMrg. 4 USA 

COMMERCIAL 

ssij tSr-f e ,S?SSSr r, £3: - * industrial 

•»&»> <°o>e + 

fat. 2 servants' bedraoms with bath. **0^00. Rfaents & ram 
Lorre rooms, high cefings. antral or 8108^01 Tefc Pms 260 W0 imtil ANSGOMBE 8 MNGIAND with a+ 
ootaitiomno. SU ndfire. Bax 904 fkre in 9 lotos Wood & Kensington 

Southampton, NY 11961 "jiMfa^WeB&hamUM offer the fa service m remind 

Angeles 900% USA; 213-931 9533 letting. Tel. 722 7101 MIL UK. 


SODtM SA. 

P O. Box 61 
1884 VBrex. Swtaorkfa, 
Tlx: 456213 GBE CH 


Exdmive Sdes Agere 

J.I. SOPHS & CO. r INC. 

Far info, eafl 7 days a vreek 

212 -371-1555 

I The complete oLfering terms ree in an 
afferang plan atettli 



treat necx water. Fabulous man 
house, poof house, pool, dock, exclu- 
sive wooded estate area 4 bedrooms, 
4 berths. Marta, season or year. 


212-6888131. 

PRESTIGIOUS 


Service 


USA 

COMMERCIAL 
* INDUSTRIAL 


75008 Pari. 

Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


decorated apa rtm e n t for rert or ex- 
change. Al cxnenriies mdurfiM teand 
piano. Mead avoiabie. Rent SloOO a 
month, but prefer exchange in Poris m 


MERCEDES 

H000 

BMW 

$4,000 

PORSOE 

Kooo 

JAGUAR 

$4y500 

FHIRAIU 308 

$5,500 

TESTA ROSSA 

$6*000 


ffitm 


TAX FREE CARS: MBKHttS, Rofc HONG KONG |K4] 723. U 37 
toyoe, A u£, Volvo, Pdqche, BMW. Charming - elegant WU 
We keep a large stock of brand new m*- itew V^Ttea ub.wi,< 
fa goad am. We do the 

D.O.T. fa ERA. cxi our awn pne- tWMg'treopere} aanpomon. 


Rob KONG KONG 


723.U 37 


vy,i. rea tr./s. txi our own pne- 
mises. We abo hfte eexe of the nxp- 
png fa bonding in UiA. Contod w 
re these rexmaers: teL Belgium 

0R>/715Q71.teLU5A301/63SSll. 
Ibt BeUum 82209 EUROAU B, dx 


TOKYO LADY COMPAMOK JWL 
Personal Asjistrel 034565539 . 


TOKYO COMPANION 586 4674: 
Tel now for the be*. ■' 


USA. 4995689 via US. NVEoroAu- LONDON EDUCAIB) IADY Cotv 
K of » n 9 OT AstrickOT paniow/Cutda. Tel 961 0154.- 


TOKYO 64S 2741. T( 


INTRACAR GmbH 


« I ■ jw nng * 
■ifaiiftdJit etc ~ 


AGM IN PARIS 
562-7899 


A PAD OF YOUR OWN R4 Beverley 
Ms, double bedroom, tilting roam, 
kitchen, both, tetajhone & grew 
space. RenfUHflJWO per cdfaS 
raDath,<x USS2^par week. Tefc USA 
010 1 818 763 WfllDfae hfamre. 


NEW/USS TAX FREE CARS 
BMW, Mercedes, Porsche, Audi, 


YOUNG CARRUEAN LADY PA P 

I London. 01-724 1859 Airpors/iraref 


, , - , YOUNG SOFWSnCAIBDlADY ford 

J-wJTh n V ^ London VIP Soison. 01-630 C7R- 

S^TiSS.’rf^gflS^S LONDON-YOUNG IRISH LADY PA. 

01-245 9002 days, everingi&InMl 


from spomre. I Southampton, NY 11968 


fine in 9 Johns Wood & Kmngton 
offer die best service m retidentid 
letting. Tefc 732 7101 (01). UK. 


RATSKXKBVT 
SHORT- LONG TBM 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES [ ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS ft GUIDES j ESCORTS ft GUIDES 


HATS FOR SA1E 
OmCB FOE KB4T/SALE 


spare. KemiKsi^oo par catondar 

010 1 818 763 D97^D^htrfv^ USA (714) 898-2182 

MAMIATTAN. Beautiful luxury East- HX 704356 FWARJ COM Iffl 
■Me re n eft . 1 bedroo m, terrace, : 

DOT/BPA CONVBSIONS 


:WS3 i"wgS 01-745 9002 days, evBrengs&kfa 
, be 8584458 auto TOKYO 475 54 80 Young tfay Com- 


MANHATTAN 747. offCPW. 2 dou - 1 


bontSug, injur- 


TAX FRH AUTO SALES 
Order your European - US - fa UK 
mrt oroob fl aL 

Cor rental, unEmfa ndaggo. 
tooting new cor 1 to 6 monte. 
_Telex 20057Z. Tel: 651 434L 


HONG KONG 5-7954823 1 


PARIS YOUNG LADY, taunt guide. 
Tefc Paris BQ7 B4 95. w ^ rr 


INTERNATIONAL 


ESCORT 

senna 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office m New Yorl 
330 W 56th St . N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 


ZURICH 


GENEVA - BEST 


ESCORT SERVICE 

10 KENSINGTON CHURCH ST. WB 
TIL 9379136 Ot 937 91 $3 


CAROLRC ESCORT SBIVKE 
Tel 01/252 61 74 


ZURICH 



«* *" T/SM£ btefcS^: kfa & S ^ ^ 2jfaTWtedTsfa?3fa 

ESCORTS ft GUIDES S-SS 8 **nou. 

DUSSBDORF Cologne Bamwfatm 74 CHAMPS-RYSSS 8ttl tMPoffiu. hre, Ho *° nd W 705592421 

dra» ere or t tarvtce. D2H/2217S4- StefeJ 2 or Sreom Tretmere ~ Alrlv>c TAX FRS CARS 

ESCORT SHtVKE. 022 / 86 U 95 00087 «VKE- ■ .TxTJS®* Jfty I^Uforebay-UK PU3S1 0929 AUTOS TAX FREE ___ 

' ^■"3 - " EMPLOYMENT 


WEST INDIAN LADY GxuswTft 

London 351 9847. 


LONDON LADY COMPAM OK o l 
oacanon*. Kero telWll 821 02B3 
PAHS YOUNG SOPMSTtCATH) VB> 
lady.WfaualPA.256059& ~ 


StoeEa, 2 or 3-rooro uportinanf 
• Ow month or more. 

IE CLA1HDGE 359 67 97. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


COLOGNE / DLESSHDORF/ BONN j CUT YOUB HOTTL 


i Escort Service 0221-524757 


reartmenr near the 


BUL ay a Fktatel 
5 Gffef Tower. Lux- 


BRUS5HS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

Ihcart Service. Tefc 02/7317641. 


yry studtas to Sraom apartment s , 

from one week upwcxdi. FLATOTH, a rBSSB a B — —■ — : — ; 

14 n* du ThHfnL 75015 Plxts. Tefc OYHSEAS POSmONS. Hundreds of 
575 62 20. Tbn 205211 F. I top pcxyrng pcsTotj avcddM. Tax 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


SanMmtbnTi Escort 1 Guide Service 
Tab 01/57 75 96 


★ LONDON ★ 


AMSTKDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SBNKE. 021+954344 


LONDON BATSWAISt ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 01 229 0776. 


ROUS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 


TAX FREE CARS 
P.CT. 

J models, hrred new 
hftflet, W. 2018 Antwaro. Bakxre 


FRANKFURT YOUNG UUJY 


rOUNG LADY cocapoa- 
Gwfc. 069/62 


Send USS5 for cototag 


FRANKFURT 069/233380- Young 
tady, VIP. - PA. - Gomprem •' 


BRUSSELS. CHANTAL ESCORT Sw- MHUIIV 

I vice: Tefc 02/520 23 65. NHJliiT 

Ww WaCOME Escort servte ^ RB0 °- 


MAJOR CREDIT CARDS AND 
checks Accmai 


EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


NEW YORK 


n» u wred -winni ng tatvfea hoe 
feaen I t taraJ at the tap A meat 
a xd ot i aa Extort Serviee by 
USA A Intel notionol newt medta 
fo ebad fo o nadfo red TV. 


MALE ESCORT SERVICE 
212-243-6320 (MC/V1SA) 


** MADR© GIPSY ** 

SaVKL Tab 233-03.19 


tap poymg posfiom awftable. Tax , 
free incomts. Attractive benefits. Op- 
porturetws far c4l octupanonj. Free 
dekfts. Orenen Employirert Ser- \ 
woes. Dept. HT, P.O. Bax 460, Town . 
of Mount Boyd, Owfanc. (jo node 
H3P3C7. 


MRS BflJNGUAL ASSISTANT to 
redness executive*. 500 58 1? 


- RJL Spur Utnautine 

■ JA tonaraw “Lmtited Etfition” 

- RJt S 3w Spire 
-RJLSfimrSpir 

- Bentley Turbo 


* BUY YOJR TAX FREE CAR. 
Marcedas, PoraJw, BMW, Ferrari. 
Dfcwd km Mutta 


Direct from Europe 
fat from SBECrtON 


I MAIMS) TASTE BGORT SHtVKE. T9TH. COMFORTABLE FIAT FOt re- FULL TIME 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 


LONDON 

GAY/ EVENING ESCORT AGENCY 

TR: 724 2972 


JASMINE 


GacVA - FHENE ESCORT SHWKE 
Teh 36 29 32 


TEL 411 72 57 VISA 

BRUSSELS MICHBIE ESCORT fa 
guda service. Tefc 733 07 98 


reether: <que«. wel %taed ptaoe. 
Sept, through Juw 86. Al modem 
aswoaancej, 2 hmshod rooms netx 


/c ueto kar for onol East He 
Estate in Long Hand, New 
Please aft Pen 260 w4 


BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHERS 


Dbed from 

SUCTION Impa 


HONG KCMG/X-3/721 70 54 
txeaifrves tapcomponkei. 


ri*! PAIK, YOUNG FRB4CHBMJCMS) 
West tody companion, gewfe. 574 71 41. 


AMSTERDAM ESCORT S8NKL 
TEL- 020-366655 


OOMMA, AMSTBtDAM ESCORT 

Guide Service. Tel «32ffi 762BQ 


A-AMEMCAN 

ESCORT SBLVICE 
EVERYWHERE YOU ME OR GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Call free from US: I -800- 237^872 
Coil free from Ronda 1-800-782-OG92. 
Loweil E a st ern wokomes you badJ 


ZURICH-GENEVA 


LAUSANNE - MONTSBIX tote Guide Servkx. Tel $001 762&Q 

^T^i^r d? " a, ° 8 , 2™isssgsg"*»»-' 

Tel 0211-6799861 JgJgJSiSS 


Latin Quarter (2D mins. peak, irons- B4GUSH SPEAKING 
purH.F5JD0/mfa. Tefc 506 32 16 tS770806£Ecw 


port), F5JD0/ north. Tefc 50fi 32 16. 

GOLF ST CLOUD. Near Amanoan aid 
German Schoak. Futiy equpptd 3/4 
room Bert, on 1st floor of a chanting 
house in priv iXe retidense. fork, go-, 
rage. FSBOOrmonth net. Tefc (1] 741 1 


ARISTOCATS 

London Extort Sendee 
128 Wigmore S., tondon W.l. 


«NGSrS ESCORT SERVICE. 
TH; 01/363 Ol 64-022/3441 86 


DUSSBXKHff - COLOGNE - BONN 
+ area Pam's Escort & travel sar- 
«B, Al credr cards. 021 1-395D66 


LONDON. French esoort vs 
Hom-lOpm. Tefc pl) 589 490a 


AS rngor Cr«fa danh Accepted 
Tel 437 47 41 / 4742^ 


* G0IEVA-HRST * 


DAH.Y ESCORT S8LVTCT 
Tali 023/32 34 IS 
+ WE9CEND 6 TRAVEL 


MILANO + LUGANO ESCORT re- . - 

wee, fate and travel senfa Tefc HUNM ' MAND ESCORT Ser- 
Akfon 02/685035 via. Tel 069/63 41 59. 


VENMA CD — ESCORT SERVICE 
Vienno 92 05 612 


ALLY^AUGUST-SffT. [posaUy Ocfl 
comfrxtuble sunny a portnrerf, 75 
W. ported concSbcxv 3 room s , 

in uerwna. rtJUtw per rnonm 

charges mefodai 422 8772/428 1640 


.Tefc 069/63 41 59. 


B4GU5H SPEAXJNG Hitmgiri wanted. 
Tat //uEQ/ffgOr prmhvobty vi ol m in 
person id tondaron. PASKjmSDE 3 
rue du Haidar, fans 9. Metro Opera. 
CHARMING IEMA1E MOOB5 need- 

ass%aaa?isifc 

GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


Monte-Corto 
Prmdp^y of Monaco 
Tat pa 50 64 84 

TtitBtiffWS MC 

OffiocW Dtrcd factory Dectier 
Esctafal iti i ed tinco 1925 


Ptoco Your CfassHied Ad Quickly and Easfly 

In tfo 

WTCRNATTONAL HStALD TRIBUNE 


HOUAWfrJB ESCORT SBIVIC£ 030- FRAIWURT “TOP TBT Escort Ser- 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 


SHADOWS 


2227B5, 030-944530, 02997-3685. 

LONDON BCORT AGO* 

Tel 935 5339. 


vice. 069/59-40-52. 


MONTUGNON (Parte). iferaahedvR- 
to 5 bedraara, 4 both, indoor pod. 


AGENCY. VSNNA- NUMBER 1 Eraort Service. 
Tel 45 31 25. 


la 5 bedroo m , 4 Ext 
Ffifa executive fcvi 
S2M0/mcaith.Tel31 


IN NEW YORK 
TEL 212-737 3291. 


MADRID ESCORT SERVICE 

CREOfT CARDS. TO.- 2S09603 


ROME CLUB EUROPE BCORT 

* G ^. S T nctT#t 04/589 SB9 
1146 (hora 4 pm to 10 pm] 


LONDON ESCORT SHtVKE Tefc 937 AMSTB^M FOWL BOSES Etcret SHORT IHM STAY. Advantages of a 


VBLNA CLEOPATRA Escort Service. DUSSaDORF/ COLOGNE/ BONN 


Tefc 52 73 88 or 47 7035. 


Dcnano Escort Setvire 0211/ 38 31 41 


GBHEVA BCORT 

SERVICE. Tel: 46 11 58 


hotel without i mum ra a encra. feel at 
home in tea sttxfiot cm bedroom 
laid mere in Paris. SOKHiM, B0 nn 
da rgniverete. Para 7ife 544 39 40 


VENNAJTOBE ESCORT SatVKE. FRANKFURT + 5U8ROUNDR4G5 Ey i T TpSai pxgcy V4 ~ ^L d^Z 
I Tefc « 7B 55 I cort Service. 069/364656 Visa & DC ' r W B p n? s T- raoms,_do»>- 


LA VENTURA 


(MADRID IMPACT esoan fa fafe MW>« IWATE ESCORT + 


Guide Service. Tefc 91 23 14 


be d rao m s , feta. 


LONDON 

BaGRAVlA 

Escort Service. 

T«i: 736 5877. 


NEW YORK BCORT SERVICE 
212-481-1666 


geneva * beauty* I , WSi^"^l^-4BW“ fcb 


tar, for 6 people. Tel: 520 84 17. 


ESCORT SERVICE. 022/29 51 30 LONDON ZARA ESCORT Sente. AMSTERDAM -BLUET Esaxt Sfare 


Hfarow/GfaidL Tefc 834 7945. 


326420 or 340110. 


REGENCY 


HV0E PARK EM30RT SERVICE 
LONDON/ ICA1HLOW/GATWICK 
Tel: 01 890 0373 


PARS 6TH. (Luxambourg Garden^. 
Begant 90 sqjn. quiet, dare, flow- 
ereo terrace on garden. FT3ID0/ 
month. June- Sea, refc 329 32 14 


•BSIjP Sarfaa. t "S™ “ [ jT in ^lg HANTS. Otortn- 



NEW 

ASTON MARTIN 

Wmatiute Defivery 


By Ft ware. Cnfl your food IHT representative with your text Yoc-- 
HTtformed rf the fa nmwdfoteiy. and anu prepayment s 
rexte your od wfl appear within 48 far*. 

£22? “W-aOPftiwpf day + feed tee*. There** - 

^ T **? ** Sw fa 36 in the following fate ' 
«renum spore a 2 tinra. No obbrevireion* ampted. 

“ nef '’ b '‘ xanL 


NEW JAGUAR 


HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMBUCA 


- Sovereign 43 L 

- XJS 3^5 L 


For dratified Oftiy}: 

747-464X1 


EUROPE 


LONDON 

Foriman Escort Agency 


NY/WORUDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 
212-438-4027 or 733-1464 , 


CHARia« GENEVA Guide Service 1 
Tefc 283-397 


■tS* fas*, bright. 2Vr roams, excep- 


SE CRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


GHELSEA 80QRT SBLVICE. 

51 Beoudi omp Ptaoe, London SWJ 
Trf. 01 584 6513/2^49 (4-12 pm) 


DOMfiMA'S ESCQRT-GUDE service. AMSTBUJAM DOESBCA'S BCORT JULY^UJOl XBi NEAR MARAH MJN&VE SMS. for AMERICAN 

■n- u— . Hatoto. 07 D 401823 * n«na7*'jrj — j iIZ-tiT I txunBRTB rcuc ^ pack. 


07 CUtera Street, 
London WT 

Tel: 446 3724 or 486 1158 
AR major credit Cradt accepted 


MAYFAIR CLUB 
CUBE SBWKX C»n 5 m 
ROTTERDAM (Oil 0-25-4155 

THE HAGUE (0) 7060 7V 96 


MADRID SELECTIONS ESCORT Sa- AMSTHDDAM SYLVIA BCORT Set- 
vice Tol. 401 1507. Credt Conh. vice ffl 20.255191 “ r?”"” 

V1BLNA-BCDBTJLGOLCY MUNICH -BLOWY 4 TANIA feat FRANKFURT - PETRA Eraort & Travel “5^2? 

^^T^»5239 ' Sennce. Tefc 311 79 00 at 31 1 29 36 Serve. TeL 069 / 68 24 05 SmOtS. to 1290* - ^ 

I VIENNA LflP ESCORT SBVKE. Tel FRANKFURT/ MUFICH Mrta F«mrt . 6 ^ 

- .:«'tm?.-35nat ~— 

srnnssAB tssusaBr 1 «*■ 


VIBMA-ESCORTnAGENCY. 
Tel 37 52 39 


Smvtce. Tefc 311 79 00 ot 311 29 36 


dupfcx, 2 badraams, kxge ten 
otam taichteL fell bath. Takti 

eft jnchnted. Tel: 33890 01 “25«S*« 

UES (tie*]. Nice 100 sam. 


BUMS in PARIS: 

Duteh cx Gctman 
edge c# French re- 
artfxxxl BSifoud 

^ 138 Avenue 
. Prfae. Tefc 


USED 

ROUS ROYCE 

- Sh*r Spur 

- BerdeyTurix) 

ASTON MARTIN 

- Lagonda 

OTHER MARQUES 


■ foraftw limtad EffiHon- 
bnenfri Lunoutme 


ZURICH MADRID INT'L FRANKFURT AREA. BABBITS h- (MINCH SUPREME E5CT3RT Serve. 1 LONDON TRLH2E ESCORT 5«rvfoj. 


ALEXIS BCORT SERVICE 
TEL 01-47 55 82 / 69 55 04 


ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL: 2454548 CREDIT CUDS 


mefc fa mate Ungual Escort end 

SESra™?** Pba * 

6k-o2 S 05- 


Tdt 089. 4486038 


Tefc 01-373 8649. 


PENTHOUSE AVE MONTAIGNE,, 
new Cfanf* Qysees, 130 sqm. + ! 


near utanpe CyvKS, IW sqjn. + 
large terrace, high doss. 723 43 28. 


[ZOE WB T farntt Agency. Tel Uaodon l LON DON GPBE BCORT Service. I TROCACStO. 


Tel: 320 7151. 


nOCASSU. Luxury ? room + 
apartment Jfty-Aua Tefc 647 52 82. 


Deaf rates 

international 

SKEHAMAL POSITIONS 

TUBDAYS 

in &e IHT QaetiHed Sectksn. 


BWT1SH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHERS 

„ . MontesCaffo 


AtaUra Jura: 2636-15. 
AWte 361-8397/360-2421. 
■nntate 343-1899. 
Cepenteo g e M. (01) 329440. 
^n»«»rtsBWl72-47«. 

farerente. 29-58-94. 
fauns 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
fafare PI) 8364802. 
MrelrbL 4S5-2B91/45M306. 
Mim: (02) 7331445. 
Norway: P3) 845545. 
Ifanes 679-3437. 
S*«fai«OT 7569229, 

Tri Avhr: 03455 5S9, 
WfanraQsetoaFrflnWuri. 


Boenoc Aanre 41 40 31 
(Dept. 312) 

CraracoK 33 14 54 
GooymtrifcS] 4505 
Umra 417852 
Itaseena: 6905 II 
San Jock 22-1055 . 
Srettago: 61 555 
Sao Pouter 852 1393 


MIDDLE EAST 


Briwafa 246303. 
Jordan; 25214. 
Kuwait 5614485, 
Iriwnons 341 457/8/9. 
Oaten 416535. 

Saudi Arabia: 

Jfarit 667- 1500. 
U.AJL; Dubai 224161. 


FAR EAST 


UNHED STATES 


NraarYerfc: (212) 752-3890. 
W«! Corah {415) 362-8339. 


Brefarie 3900657, 
Hong Kang; $.213671. 
Mrariai 8170749. 
Seaafc 735 87 73. 
Sfogaponer 222-2725, 
Torwam 752 44 25/9. 
Takyat 504-1925. 


AUSTRALIA 
Mrifaeume : 690 8233. 




j€ r s & (\ 


WW i 

"lx.*:#'* 




\ K0 s 




1 


k -.n. ■■■ 

IV 

,««' "‘■ , - 
ns-nr *\ 
t-ii'*"-- . 
if?* “ 

|Ih’ 1 '' 

l« r 1 ' 

ih/ 1 ,:, ‘- 
iV v "'* 

tr - ' 

IT- 

|hj 

JJ.* ' 

— hji 
fe-bn-t '• 
ten^ ’■ ‘ 
Jo*"-- 

jlii'UI’l- 1 ' 

Mr 

ft nil!' 

jin!. 1 "-* - 
i/id >tj ; • 

■JiT* • • 

..II- 

fc'lu ' -• 
u.ith v ; 
imr r ‘ rt ; • 

ntiUTteti! 1 
mtu:! -" ’ 

Ml 

iiimi ■: =•■ 

Iflity ' 
tuici i ’ ! : - 
tilth ill' 


EanesfiM 


Again on f 

r 


LlSRi'V 

Rjnuih. I .■/ - . 
i4 PiYIllis' • : ■ 

Kih .• . 
uiw rljj- •. 
tirl' iV.L." 

LW.T7.- 
Ithf-T- (• C •• ’ 
CiHIBd.--' % . 

lU-tPi . 
bfSi'.l . -, 
KjJft! K "■ 

S'ja-' 

Tb fs.-. 
nilfcYu! >:.•;• - 
dtwhiKr’.' . 
rinlo6.iL-- ; • 

'Veil.--,- .. 

Mr. S.M-. . 
Wiair. „s ; . ... 
WtW 
. CcncfjJ f-i-"-. 

•0 - 
pTjc- r; -. , 

- 

Bill it- -' 

faMW.-.'- . _ 

«foi y 
Nhfcfct ■ 

'Air. tv- 


■^io. I 

'•Si., 7j/ ( 


»0\r- „ 

n,, L 

«ite( s ; 

kin* v- ; 

- 

■ 

'fc-lr 

V' 

• 


,, ^-*.4 

‘‘It- I r:, '>u 


1 » 

i , 1 ; ; r 

"n\ 

t 


Sc 'it 


■' ‘ J 







fU CAR 

<** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


Page 5 


Si 


save 


'SS^orwe^am Diplomat, 
^ A Key Spy lor Moscow, 
Sentenced to 20 Years 



■ ^ OSLO — Anie Treholt, a former 

.. '/ u-.i^t.'Jonvegian diplomat and junior 
minister in the govenunatt. was 
• sentenced Thursday to 20 ytars in 

prison as a spy for the Soviet 
Union. 

K|.- ( Mr. Treholt, 42, walked into the —— — — : — 

courtroom smiling and waving tO gnva mmml- nffl Norwegian Dc- 
former colleagues. But he bowed ferae CoHesp, where be was a stu- 
. y^Sir^tiis head as Judge Astrid Rynning deni from 1982 to 1983. 

. *. ^ £ pronounced the sentence. . There, Mt Trcfcoli beard kc- 

K.'^T^O Western diplomats said that the tuxes by sanca- nriliiary officials 
severity of toe sen lence reflected giving details car virtually all of 
. ’ *he damage Mr. Treholihad caused Norway’s mOitanr plans. He also 
■ V**; reducing nine years- of . spying, from was privy to mfannation on de- 
- •- OO 1974 to 1983, for the KGB, the f eases of - tl» Western alli an ce’s 
' Soviet intdhgcnre sennen. 

During that rimy- he I hyd 


North Atlan tic Treaty Oiganiza- 
tion on the Iran-Iraq war, on Af- 


os 


ddk 


troop movements m the 
East 

Diplomats said that Mr. Tie- 
bolt’s most, important espionage 
activity would have come from the 


LX PU TS 

‘ rA- A fcr J, . , 

■“ r^SK-g.. 




Mar 


? AX Nit CARS 

Us cctce b?Nr,xY 

*5* «wrf LANDS: OVER 


■u - e: 

1 4.* ; 


TEARS 


transco 


ARt?' . 

‘ ^high-level information on West- 
. Jff era military deplo ymen t and plans. 

The eight formal charges in- a 
5.000-word indictment contained 
more than 40 specific accusations, 
ranging from passing NATO stra- 
^-Liegic nuclear policy secrets to dis- 
««, t closing contingency plans for troop 
’^NcatGiu’ movements and other deployments 
ZURICH 83 Q?™ rimes of East-West tension. 

Mr. Trehcit had access to the 

. . p. B " secrets dnringhis career as a junior 
[ ARJ55sj«goveram<mt minister, a dipkanat at 
. .^Wthe United Nations, a student at 
Norwegian Defense College 
as head of the press section at 
-- .--.- c T® u ®it®e Foreign 
‘ Prosecutors said during the trial 

ma safe' that his polhical sympathies — he 
.was a member of the Labor Party 
. — had not been the driving force 
PA PADir behind ins espionage. They con- 
- r Aiu 5 515 1 tended that greed was the motive. 

‘ — - Judge Rynning ordered the con- 
* PARIS til ft flscarion of 552,000 in a Swiss bank 
*owij ladt account and J80,000 in another ao- 

IT* count. 


Dad Mr. Trefaoh said during the trial, 

SfflU which began in February, that he 
‘^^i^^was introduced in 1967 to a Soviet 


iV « • * CTJ. * 

»* li.1-. A 

ft 


X . 1.1 


diplomat at an Oslo cocktail party 
developed 


1 Zurich Bir aiu * ^ fo* contacts 
., * 7 j from that day. 


au. 

!..* T 1 

M’li Mu««r Cars 


; AftV.Tii 


Z772SSS- k He denied all the 


as l*M ift- 4. 


, saying 

had actively fostered contacts 
■Vwiih Soviet officials in a bid to 
■ improve East-West relations and 
:tiJjc^T' never had intended todamageNor- 
. - r wegian or allied security. 

. *' Mr. Treholt was cleared of one 

viwr a^greount, spying for Iraq while at the 
• " ■ • i sx' United Nations, bnl.be was con- 

mW MERCEDES the 

>TW* 1M : ■ . . . -~y, - - 

j.vca 

SnSrV 

IWC 

• * v '■* ' -4- *c •? 'arc 


southern flank. 

At secret meetings' in Vienna, 
Helsinki, Oslo arid New York, Mr. 
. Trcholt was Said to have given So- 
viet agents ihfonhafion from coded 
messages on talks between Norwe- 
gian and U.S. pQtifyal and militar y 

officials. 

Her was arrested in January 1984, 
as he prepared to board a plane to 
Vienna for what he said during the 
trial was to have been a final meet- 
ing wi A a Soviet intelligence gener- 
al, Gennadi Titov. • 

Mr. Trehdt had ihcproper cre- 
dentials and spoosors, m toe small 
and oozy worid of Norway’s poli- 
tics, that woold have enabled him 
to move swiftly to a senior cabinet 
post, accordhffito colleagues. 

His father, Tcnstein Treholt, was 
a member of ther Norwegian parlia- 
ment for 20 years, serving as agri- 
culture rmni.tt w for four years in a 
LaborPaxty government. 

Mr. Trehdt, whobocn in 1942, 
fallowed in hk father’s footsteps, 
studying political sdence. econom- 
ics and history at the University of 
Osto ‘ "" 

bor n« 
where he' 

~ He joined the Foreign Mmistiy 
is 1973, rising quickly to become 
personal secretary to Jens Evoisen, 
his friend and mentor, who was 
ndaisterof trade snd shipping and 
now is a judge at the International 
Court of Justice in Tbe Hague. 

The young diplamaf moved with 
Mr. Evensen as junior minister to a 
ministry established by the Labor 
government erf 1974 to deal with 



^■■Vv'r. =: 


. . > • ■■■■ . • -. I..' \l> 

/v -v..-. 


■■■■ ■ ■ . ■; '■ 


fef - • 


. -.S' 


• •’ if '■j' Vs, 


j - . 

/ > V..* ; 

V* ''Js-.t.. ■ •/{.•"/!. S 

• . ' 
v..' • y ; 

; 




'• * 2 vy:*. ■ '• '! ■ •:! 

■■'t.V v • ‘V-‘ 


■'L tt.-vi':,/ 

J. y'***s. 4 

X" 

y * • 


AS 

i . ‘ s 



A Brazilian pathology expert, Eh-. Jos4 Bonato Prospero, 
displayed on Thursday a fragment of bone from the skele- 
ton that poGce believe may be that of Dr. Josef Mengele. 


Frankfurt Police Search 
For Suspect in Bombing 



the Law of the Sea, concentrating 
Iks with 


on territorial and firiring talks' 
the Soviet Union involving the Ba- 
rentsSea. 


isAuF.r 


.VUV&': kw 


Eanes Consults Council 
SAgainon Call for Vote 


Rouen * .ought be found would be just as 

:-rrr LISBON — President Antonio harmful for the nation as the main- 
taining of the current government,? 
the Social Democratic Party, which 


. v i ; -- Ram ^ 0 Eancg sought the advice 
•* 4 \.--*w»r*of Portugd’s highest amsoitative 


3#n «;p>: 


« i -i*- v •* * 


-r ,,i; 


at.: *%' 


__ -body on' Thursday, fw die second 
- 5 i • *.vw uptime this week, on whether to call 
.pearly elections. 

>; £ • Government and pditical party 
. leaders form part of the 16-monber 
‘ -* ^Cotincflof State; whfchuw to dis- 
■ . . .jl-THScuss possible scrfntions to the cd- 
> • Elapse of the coalition government 
\«o c.-^'^ headed by Prime Minister M&rio 
- IL-Soares. - 

.>» The meeting is a required consti- 
/^tutional step Wore a decision on 
*• >’ - M %_■ dissolving parliament for early gen- 
• .i«^~eral elections. But thecoundrsad- 
_ j, vice is not binding. 

Mr. Soares's Soci 


.s*t' 


Mr. Soares’s Socialist Party, the 
;Jj~ country's biggest political party, re- 
-^■^^sponded Wednesday to a call by 
General Eanes to avoid dissolution 




igy contacting the three other main 


-c- - 


parties and proposng talks on the 

. .. <■ — ->f a new government- 


formation of 
But the move appeared not to 


withdrew a week agp from the co- 
alition, said Wednesday. 

The Commnnist Party, Portu- 
gal's third hugest party, said that 
the Socialist proposal for talks was 
inopportune. 

Mr. Soares, who has said he in- 
tends to resign, shares the view held 
by the president that eariy elections 
could disrupt the country’s eco- 
nomic and pditical stability as it 
prepares to jam . the European 
Community on Jan. 1. 

The Socialists accused the Social 
Democrats of “throwing the nation 
towards a frenetic round of elec- 
tions." Presidential - and local mu- 
nicipal elections are due at the end 
of the year. General elections are 
not due until 1987. 

PortugaTs treaty of accession to 
the European Community, signed 


The Associated Pros 

FRANKFURT — West Ger- 
man police said Thursday that they 
were searching for a young man 
who was seen running from the 
passenger terminal at Frankfurt In- 
ternational Airport shortly before a 
bomb exploded Wednesday, killing 
three persons and injuring 42. 

A police spokesman, Franz 
Wmkler, said that the man had 
jumped into a car and sped away. 
He added that no one had claimed 
responsibility for the explosion and 
that there stiD was no information 
about a possible motive. 

Investigators tentatively identi- 
fied the two children who had been 
killed as Australians, a 5-year-old 
boy and his 3-year-old sister. A 
man killed in the attack is thought 
to have been Portuguese, Mr. 
Winkler added. 

He said that the police believed 
that the mother of the children was 
one of those seriously injured. 

The explosion occurred'. in a 
crowded departure lounge 

A spokesman for the Hesse state 
police, Klaus Knut, said the bomb 
wa$ probably made up of several 
kilograms of explosives contained 
in a suitcase left near a wnstepaper 
basket. He said that investigators 
bad discounted reports that the 
bomb was placed in the basket it- 
self. 

Mr. Knut said the explosive had 
been of a type produced for both 
military and commercial use, but 
he declined to elaborate. 

He said the bomb bad gone off 
near a Lufthansa German Airlines 
information booth. The counters of 
several other airlines are nearby, 
however. 

The mass-circulation daily news- 
paper BQd reported that an anony- 
mous caller had told its Cologne 
office that more bombings would 

follow. 


The caller, “probably a young 
woman," was quoted by the news- 
paper as having said; “Attention, 
attention. Attack on the Frankfurt 
airport It will continue.” 

The Frankfort police said that 
they could not comment on the 
Bild report 

They said that among the injured 
were at least one American, a 
Greek, five Iranians, a Yugoslav, a 
Moroccan, five Pakistanis, 10 Ger- 
mans and several Australians. 

The nationalities of the remain- 
ing injured had not bom confirmed 
yet, and the authorities refused to 
release the names of any of the 
victims until their identities could 
be positively established, a spokes- 
man said. 


■ Calls Are Discounted 

A spokesman for the state prose- 
cutors office said that the r rank- 
fort. police had discounted six 
claims of responsibility for the ex- 
plosion, Reuters reported. 

- The spokesman, Reinhard Ro- 
chus, said at a news conference that 
two telephone calls from people 
claiming association with the Red 
Army Faction, a leftist urban guer- 
rilla group, were “completely un- 
typical” for the group. 

There have been four other 
claims, also discounted, but the po- 
lice did not give farther informa- 
tion. In addition, there have been 
10 bomb threats since the explo- 
sion, Mr. Rocfaus said. 

A special commission of almost 
100 officials has been set up to 
investigate the bombing. 

Asked about future improve- 
ments in security at the airport, Mr. 
Rochas said: “1 don’t see how it 
could' be improved.” Local govern- 
ment officials consider the airport 
secure, with more than 300 - ,5 -- 
officers on permanent duty 


* \ convince other parties, which in- last week, is scheduled to be rati- 
a , - sisted that eariy elections were the fied by parliament eariy in July and 

only solution. ** ‘ " = " a ** ‘ 

i “Anv onun 


.s’* 


'Any government solution that 


it may be allowed to continue its 
work until then. 


•a-*? 


r. *fi 


.4gra Testifies He Sent Letter 
To Envoy to f Blackmail 5 U.S. 


•»»O r J 






i- 


,3. *- 


' ' 


re*** 


%- 


l,^M 


The Associated Prtps- 
ROME — Mehmet AliAgcates- 
. . -*ified Thursday that he sent a teller 
■ the UA Embassy in Rome sug- 
‘ \. gesting be had some connection 
with American officials because he 
wanted to blackmail the U.S. gov- 
ernment into supporting him. 

Mr. Agca, a Turk who is serving 
a Ae ** u i life sentence for the attempted 
„ — „ rjii* assassination erf Pope John Rani H, 

h&Al" . also said be had hoped to obtain 


letter he tad sent to the U.S. £m- 


The tetter, written Aug. 5, 1983, 


and addressed to the u!f! mSSlsjy 
attache contained such cryptic re- 
maiks as; “Yon told me to talk so I 
and, “To avoid all 


am 


obstacles fam writing you in Turk- 
ish this- time.” ... 



’ 1 

• 




. 

■ if 

■t— * * *■* 


set* - 



*** ► 

r-rf- - 



ri s 










** ■ 


' 



' 



‘ " d? 

- : 


*Er-- 



Jt r * 


^ ■ . 

*+***• 


-*■ * ■ 

A’* Jt 

. , t" 1 ’ 

tfi 


U.S. citizenship and a possible ex- 
tradition. 

He spoke at the trial, of three 


looting 


Jud: 


_ Mr. Agca to 

explain why he wrote the letter, 
which he said implied Mr. Agca 
had previously communicated in 
secret with the Americans. 

“To give an impression Ameri- 
cans were involved,” Mr. Agca first 
said, speaking in I talian . He then 
said he wrote the letter so that ‘‘the 
embassy would support me rtsand- 
ing the mass meduL" 

On further -questioning, he add- 
lichi, after ed: “You could consider it as aro - 
ife bladbnaO for some 
trial was adjourned u» 
day. 


pie I 
Thei 


Mon- 



ExceptionaHy 
the Interrmtional 
Real Estate rubric 
will appear on 


Saturday , Juwia 22 


2 FORI 


Take advantage of our speaa! rates for new subscribers and 
we'll give you cm exfra month of Tribs /haewfth a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: neerfy 50% off the newsstand 
price in most European countries! 

^aSubsaipHon Manner, Hfralb^^Enbunfn 

1 181, avenue Chariesde<3caifle, 92521 Net^Cedex,?^^ | 


| Please enter my 


subscription for: 

| □12fncrths 
( + ) month foe) 

I □ 6 months 
■ (+ 2 vreefefra^ 

O 3 morrtht 

| I wootfori 

I D My chock 
kenebsad 


I Please charge my. 
□Access 

I □American 
Express 


| □ Diners Oub 


□ Eurcccrd 

□ Mestortorri 



! 

1 Qwrtry CiTTmcy 




iHffl 

Autrio 


KB 

WEE 

■DO 

Bebum 

afr. 


4JEV6 

■ E^3 


■d3! 

■B21 


HVllH 

Mud 

K3 

MBA iiJ 

7ffl 

■Eg 

fiznB 

a 

MME3 

6*4 


Csrmuinr 

■EC9 


361 


GtecdBrildn 

. . * 

Kl 

55 

30! 

Greece 

Dr. 

m&j3 

■E3 


fc I X- . e 1. 

I'fXraXMD 

a 

550 

m 

166 

Mead 

■E3 

■HP: 

« 

34 

Wl - 

lie 



■tdLsa 

(membenm 

!AJ 


WWJ~? 


Nonniay 

■G3 

I ■R3 

76b 


Fortuod 

Ere. 

■KE3 


■Essa 

?p=e 

Ptor. 





wmm 




r ,r ^ ~wm 

Sft. 

432 

^MkSA 



Bert aFAiiinGQradq.lctinAmerie(v Gutf SlotssAan 

i\ 4G I 238 [ 130 


G»d expiry detfe. 


■SpAre. 


GnJacaoutfi 
number 


Name. 


n l 


I 



VAC^nONNStHUCnONS 

| IwSbefravefcgfixxn 


I 


Mengele Investigator Says Proof Mounts 


By Ralph Biuntcncha] 

New Pont Times Service 

SAO PAULO, Brazil — The 
Brazilian official in charge of the 
Josef Mengele investigation has 
said that “all experts are coming to 
the same conclusion” and that he 
hoped to have an announcement by 
the end erf this week. 


Romeu Tuma, the federal police 
chief in Sao Paulo, stopped short erf 
saying Wednesday that experts 
were convinced that bones un- 
earthed in a suburban cemetery on 
June 6 were those of the fugitive 
Nazi concentration camp doctor. 
Bat he left little doabt that the 
forensic tests backed up testimony 
of witnesses who said that Dr. 
Mengele drowned at a nearby 
beach in 1979 and was buried un- 
da another name in a cemetery at 
Embu. 


Evidence of an old hip fracture 
also has b«n found, but whether 
this corresponds to injuries that 
Nazi SS records suggest Dr. Men- 
gele sustained in a motor vehicle 
accident at Auschwitz has not been 
established. 

Mr. Tuma and other authorities 
have said that anv X-rays of Dr. 
Mengele in West Germ anv or Bra- 
zil would speed up the identifica- 
tion, but none have surfaced so far. 

Last week, two American hand- 
writing experts said that writings 
attributed to Dr. Mengele in Brazil 
matched his known script in the 
1930s. 


in South America, to the Federal 
Criminal Office in Wiesbaden. 
West Germany, on Friday for con- 
sideration by Manfred Hecker, a 
handwriting expea But the Bunie 
editor said that, before the maga- 
zine could obtain a written certifi- 
cate of their authenticity. Mr. Klein 
intervened. Reached by telephone, 
the prosecutor said be would not 
commenL 

As a result of the surprise move 
by the prosecutor, according to 


sources at Bunte. editors at the 
magazines headquarters removed 
on Tuesday about 30 pounds (1? 
kilogromsl of supposedly original 
Mengele material* supplied by Dr. 
Mengele's son. Rolf. 

Mr. Sokowski said that Bunie 
had openly supplied sample note- 
books believed to have been writ- 
ten bv Dr. Mengele in I**WJ. i96?. 
1974 and 1977 to Mr. Hecker. in- 
sisting ri had no wish to circurmcm 
the law. 


A test of the age of the skeleton 
— Dr. Mengele would have been 
almost 68 years old when he died — 
“seems to be positive," Mr. Tuma 
said. “What’s missing are three or 
four more tests.” 

Examination of the bones is said 
to have determined that the man 
buried at Embu had a diasthema, 
an unusoaQy wide space between 
his two upper front teeth. Such a 
gap was one of Dr. Mengele's dis- 
tinctive features at the time he se- 
lected victims for gassing and med- 
ical experiments at the Auschwitz 
death ram p in P olan d in 1943 and 
1944. 


■ ’Mengele' Notebooks Seized 

James M. Markham of The New 
York Tima reported from Munich: 

A magazine editor said Wednes- 
day that four notebooks said to 
have been written by Dr. Mengele 
bad been impounded by the Frank- 
fun prosecutor's office. 

The editor said that his maga- 
zine. Bunie. had submined the 
notebooks to authorities for hand- 
writing tests. 

Norbert Sakowski, a deputy edi- 
tor in chief at Bunie, said that 
Hans-Eberhard Klein, a Frankfurt 


Defense Ministry in Bonn Repudiates 
District Judges Ruling on U.S. Missiles 


Xiiticrs 

BONN — The Wesi German 
Defense Ministry said Thursday 
that a ruling by a Frankfurt judge 
against U.S. Pershing-2 nuclear 
missiles would have no effect on 
the deployment of the weapons. 

Commenting on the ruling by 
District Court Judge Christoph 

Jahr on Wednesday that accep- 
tance of the missiles was unconsti- 


tutional. a ministry spokesman said 
had no authority to 


proseemor in charge of WesL Ger- 
rch for uie Nazi fugitive. 


many’s search for 
ordered the notebooks impounded 
Tuesday. 

Mr. Sakowski said that Bunie 
submitted the samples, believed to 
have been written by Dr. Mengele 


that the court 
change or influence government 
decisions. He said that a district 
court, the lowest tier of the judicial 
system, could rule only on minor 
local matters. 

The judge acquitted six anti-nu- 
clear demonstrators on Wednesday 


who had been arrested outside a 
U.S. base, and issued a ruling that 
the Pershing-2 deployments 
breached u clause in West Germa- 
ny's constitution forbidding a war 
of aggression to start on iuT soil. 

Karl Miltner. the deputy floor 
leader of Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl's Christian Democratic Par- 
ty. said in a party news release that 

it was difficult "to believe that a 
West German court had called the 
missiles a “legally impermissible 
threat to peace" and had accused 
the U.S. or increasing the danger of 
war. 

He said that the Frankfurt ver- 
dict contradicted a ruling by the 
West German Constitutional 
Court on Dec. IS. which upheld the 
validity of the missile deployment. 


REAL ESTATE 1 N THE SOUTH OF FRANCE 
FRENCH RIVIERA AND MONACO 



International Agency ' 
for oil 

Real Estate Transactions 


M"“ Jose CURAU 

A member of the Chambre invnob&dre do Monaco 
(Association of Real Estate Agents in Monaco] 
and of the FSdSration Intemathnate da Professions tmmobfiira 
l International Federation of Red Estate Professionals) 
(FJA.B.CL) 


PURCHASE, SALE, RENTAL 
MANAGEMENT, INVESTMENT 

• APARTMENTS 

• VILLAS 

• BUILDINGS 

• BUSINESSES 


Place de la Cremaiflene 

Passage de I'Andenne-Poterie - MC 98000 Monte Carlo 
Tel.; {93} 50.66.84 - Telex; 469477 MC 

English spoken . Man spricht Deutsch 
Si porta itaKano Sc boblo espanol 




* i 

III"" IE 


PRINCIPALITY 
OF MONACO 

FOR SALE 


2 BEAUTIFUL 
PENTHOUSES 


Please contact: 

JOHN TAYLOR & SON 
20 Bd des Moulins, 
MONTE-CARLO 

TeL- <931 5030.70 
Telex: 469180 MC 


CdTE D’AZUR 


20 minutes from Cannes 


Splendid domain - 3 ha. 
Swimming-pool, 10 rooms 
+ caretaker's house. 
Justified price. 


Eliott bnmobilier 

(93) 43.12.87 


D’AZUR VENCE: 


Lovely villa 

New condition, dining-room,! 
bar, living-room, library, 5‘ 
bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, out- ] 
buildings, large terrace, 450! 
sqan. living space, garage. 

F.Frs. 2,800,000 

’CLP., 40 iw Buffo, 06000 Nk»j 
{93) 87 31 Bl. 


MONACO 


OWNER 
sells apartment 

in now building. 2 bedrooms, 2 
bathrooms, Gving-room, terrace 
overlooking the port and the Pal- 
ace , completely equipped kitchen, 
total 100 sq-m., ceflor, parking. 

Fir. 2,700,000. 


TeL (93) SO 26 34 or Box DU!, 
International Herald Tribune, 
92521 NeuiBy Ce de* France. 



On the lulls of Cannes-Edeiu. 


-in a fabulous 12 hectare park, 
appartments-vilas with large tor- 
races overlooking the metfeterra- 
nean. This is another way to live 
in Cannes, more relaxing, more 
agreeable and man elegant 
One, two, three and tour room 
appartments as weH as villas, two 
swimming-pools, tennis courts, 
high dass feriffies. 

“Demeures de Gumes-Eden". 



Pta&e cut out coupon to receive our documentation 
Name Address. 


Town. 


ZpCbde. 


Country. 


.TeL. 


Sales Infor ma t i o n and Office : "Demeures de Qumes-Eden' , ctemin dcs gakuk 
■06220 Cafe- Juan. VaHauris. Fiance, T& 93^180.08 > Consmxbwi 

Program STCI 34. Bd Vctor-Huftx 06000 Hoc. Td 93-8TJ6.44 


For buying 


CONSULT : 


AGED} 


lj.de Beer, ' , '“^ ncesse Chorlo«e 

sow SSS—-'""^ 



UNIQUE! ' 

In HISTORIC XVIth CENTURY CASTLE 
OVERLOOKING THE BAY OF NICE, 

TWO GARDEN- APARTMENTS 
FULLY RENOVATED ARE STILL FOR SALE. 

Swimming-pool, private gardens, luxurious fittings, a quiet 
place on foe French Riviera, 20 minutes from Nice interna- 
tional airport and 10 minutes from Nice conveniences. 

For further information contact OWNER; 

(93) 96.27.28 / 


CAP MARTIN - NEAR MONACO 
LUXURIOUS VILLA 


in a superb 13,000sq.m. parte Numerous receptions, 8 bed- 
rooms, 8 baths. 4 fcfoukxis terraces, lift, warden’s lodge. Soar garage. 
Panoramic sea view from tidy to Cap Antibes. — $1,000,000. 
Apply: AZUR AGBrfCE 

H Avenue Powl Boome r , 

06190 ROQUaRUNE-CAP-MARTlH FRANCE. 
twi . ( 93 } 35.62.03 (Exempt weekend.). = — 


Prinelpality 
of Monaco 


Sale or rent 
ON THE PORT OF MONACO 


Urge nxmnmal premises ■ 600 n\ ja 
Possibility of dividing; into 2 parts 
Would suit a financial instiluie. 


John Taylor & Son 
20 Blvd. des Moulins 
Monie-Cario 
TeL: (93) 50.30.70 
Telex: 469180 MC 


SOUTH OF FRANCE 


In itto Mb behnd Cams with fin* «mo of 
dis mounhsra and ths ssa hicai aiticenvs 
PKxmtkoI country hows m pmam osbm at 
80 Im cM ne* (onih 74 hour yvoriJ). Aannno 
demon nctudea 4 bethoonq. 3/3 berivoons, 
2 krQB iscepnon nxm, hJy equppBd kach- 
mn. tnToca. oordni Ond mad wnnee Out- 
tfondmg amtnMi 2 pools. Mim cram 
end cnvoM ehcrtoau ter ent e r t aru rig and 
ntuamm* Wtm 

fVKB UJJ. $350.0001 


Hampton & Sons 


■ SlMt I 


Tel : 01-eta S2M (in wWtn wtdi 
Howokew P ayk i , Haej Kaw| w r e l en h ene 
(93) 752451 


My address 
in Nice ? 


Do/twine de Ctairefontaine 
Bd. Imperatrice Eugenie 


/ am arrive, and I neeaeJ (atm as well 
as the amenitim nf a nmti-eemer ntwby 
Rather private. I aymred to live in a 
human-vizrtl rendenve surnninJed hy a 
private part to enjoy the charm and 
freshness of loa ns, flrnern and trees . . 
Sporting, I needed a residence with u wtm- 
minyt paid, rinse ro the benches 
Romantic . I needed a comfortable, inn 
apartment tn which to share my happiness. 

A dreamer, f wanted the sea for horizon .. 
The of Clairefonlaire irtinrrrf me. 

I have discovered tin- srert liir. I found myself. 
Do like me... 



UemellMi i*l m It* prratoet 
Bd- liMWtatffep-Feettde 
NH.-E - Rad; d Ihe In 



5 nL£i OFFICE 

timmabiliin*. 


......... MjrccfcalFnch 

IWKNI Nice FRANCE -Tel.(*»3t KS.Ul 711 


Been* 

WtSI/d 


lama 

eJi \1 

(heel* MUvnceupMiHUUOH. CHE 













Page 6 


FRIDAY. JUNE 21, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL 


tribune. 


^fah The Vw ^ ork Times and TV T«*hiii^on Po«l 


Reagan and the Hostages 


President Reagan stales and the Israelis 
state that there can be no negotiating with 
terrorists, otherwise these will be encouraged 
to sally forth and terrorize again. With the 
second pan of this statement all agree. When 
terrorists reclaim captured comrades, hum ble 
a government or draw attention or political 
ad vantage to their cause, they have won some- 
thing of value and their success is bound to 
encourage them or others to have another go. 
What this formulation omits, however, is that 
there are only a finite number of ways to fight 
back, once hostages have been taken. 

There is force: Kir. Reagan wmc l0 mie ii 
oul Bringing nonviolent pressures to bear over 
lime to induce the terrorists to recalculate the 
odds is the route he appears closer to endors- 
ing. despite its similarity to T imm y Carter's 
course in Iran. Otherwise there is the painful 
course of negotiations. It offers the prospect erf 
quick relief and spared lives this Hmf , but 
provides incentives for further terrorism. 

The Israelis’ pattern is the roost relevant. It 
is to refuse to negotiate; to negotiate if neces- 
sary; to swear they will never ne gotiate ?ga»n 
and, meanwhile, to tear themselves apart over 
whether it was wise to have negotiated. A 
country that cares Tor h uman life and has a 
government responsive to public feeling can- 
not expea to have it another way. Deterrence 


. There has been a strong temptation all week 
to throw President Reagan's bluster straight 
back at him. and it boiled over at his news 
conference on Tuesday. As a candidate he had 
suggested repeatedly that Timmy Carter han- 
dled the Iranian hostage crisis like a wimp, and 
after his election he warned terrorists world- 
wide that real men don't eaL quiche. “We hear 
it said that we live in an era of limit to our 
powers,” he said in welcoming the Iran hosr- 
tages home. “Well, let it also be understood, 
there are limits to our patience.” 

ft is not hand to understand reporters' desire 
to puncture the bluster, to seek retrospective 
justice for Mr. Carter. Aren't you frustrated? 
the reporters asked. Haven't you now learned 
something about the limits of power? Aren't 
you now compelled to be patient, too? 

Enough. Such questions are understandable 
but they are also digressions. Whether or not 
Mr. Reagan confesses to having once been 
simplistic, that does not lessen the complexity 
of the torment that he and the country now 
face. The question honed by the hijacking and 
cowardly murder is not whether the presidem 
is behaving consistently but whether he is 
behaving wisely, and so far the answer is yes. 

With Lebanon as with Iran, there are people 
who think that the way to demonstrate 
strength is with strength, by which they mean 
violence. The same frustrated chauvinism that 
prompted proposals in 1979 to bomb Tehran 
into a parking lot now lead to talk of leveling 
Lebanese villages. That is not the president's 
view. On the contrary. Precisely because of his 


— that is, community with prospective victims 

— has its just claims, but the full burden of it 
cannot easily be put on current victims. Com- 
munity with them has its claims, too. Equating 
negotiating with “caving” is no help. It de- 
pends on the circumstances and the terms. 

The International Committee of the Red 
Cross appears, siilL to be in a position to 
facilitate the indirect negotiation that has lain 
there ready to be pursued from the start. The 
Shiite terrorists can release the hostages, and 
the Israelis, bowing to no one. can release the 
Shiite prisoners whom they hold on their soil 
and had already determined to release any- 
way; the hijacking interrupted the onset of the 
release. It will be tough on the Israeli public, 
which has reason to worry about terrorism, 
and on the Israeli government, whose opposi- 
tion is already exploiting the issue, and it will 
win Israel respect from decent people. 

A range of more effective policies, from 
physical security to diplomatic pre-emption, 
has lo be put into place to ensure the safety' of 
Americans. Where these policies faiL a range 
of other ways, not excluding retribution, must 
be found to demonstrate that there are costs to 
terrorizing Americans or allowing others to. 
Giving Greece fresh reason to improve its lax 
security should be only a start 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


past hawkish simplicities, it is decidedly ap- 
pealing when he now declares his primary' goal 
to be the safe return of the hostages, and w'hen 
be rejects any lashing back in the other direc- 
tion as “a terrorist act in itself.” 

There are few formulas for fighting these 
modern shadow wars. The only sensible one is 
to tight them one at a time, looking for differ- 
ences. for diplomatic handholds. In 1979 the 
shah was in a New York hospital: in 1985 
some 700 Shiites are in tents in Israel. Central 
facts always differ. Mr. Reagan knows iL 

Indeed, he is trying too hard to hide behind 
the distinctions. He says the crime in Iran was 
committed by an identifiable government but 
in Lebanon the criminals are unidentified indi- 
viduals. Really? Is it harder to deal with Nabih 
Bern, the Lebanese minister of justice, than it 
was with Mehdi Rnyargan who for a few- 
feeble weeks was called prime minister of Iran? 

Nevertheless, the president and his col- 
leagues are so far pursuing the right goal, and 
with the true strength of subtlety and patience. 
They are tempering the natural instinct for 
vengeance with humane honor. Better to 
pound walls in private presidential frustration 
than to bomb villages in blind anger. 

President Carter “has skirted the twin dan- 
gers of inaction and overreacuoa," we wrote at 
the start of the Iranian hostage crisis. “He 
deserves admiration and support.” Let all w ho 
are concerned about honorable consistency 
now leave off twisting President Reagan's tall 
and give him the same. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Opinion 


Seized Pawns in a Brutal Game 

The biggest blunder of [Mr. Reagan's] presi- 
dency was his abortive peacekeeping effort in 
Lebanon, especially the shelling of Shiite vil- 
lages when US. marines were under attack. 
The shelling generated some of the anti-Amer- 
icanism that led to the present crisis, and 
might well have taught Mr. Reagan the limita- 
tions of armed forces in dealing with suicidal 
terrorists. There may be a time when retalia- 
tion can and should 'be inflicted with precision 
against lawless organizations. IT so. the world 
can have greater confidence in Mr. Reagan's 
prudence for having watched him at this hour. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 

It is incredible that Lebanon's justice minis - 
ter should act as spokesman for the Shiites 
[while they hold] innocent airline passengers. 

— Afienposten (Oslo). 

Moderate or gangster? Whal do you have to 
do to become the strongman of Lebanon? 
Nabih Beni thinks he has found a triple re- 
sponse: Defy America, make Israel bend and 
show Syria that he is the master. 

— Sud-Ouest (Bordeaux). 

In Beirut the last pretenses have been 
dropped. Beirut airport has been hijacked, too, 
and the same could be said for all of Lebanon. 

— Information (Copenhagen). 

To capitulate, as other countries have done, 
inevitably encourages new acts of terrorism. If 
the demand of [the hijackers) is met, then next 
week other American air travelers could be 
seized, and a still higher price demanded for 
their release. Blackmail is not a one-time thing. 
Pay it once, and it is certain that blackmailers 
will be back, again and again and again. 

The fate of the hostages remains a matter of 


urgent concern. But for now it is best seen as a 
problem, noi a crisis, and it is a problem most 
wisely addressed by patience, by continued 
quiet efforts to win freedom for the hostages, 
by restraining justifiable outrage. Above all. it 
is a problem to be faced while keeping Ameri- 
can principles and interests always in sight 
— Vie Los Angeles Times. 

Neither Israel nor the United Slates could 
have mounted a successful raid, even with 
bombing cover, to rescue the hostages. 

— The Sydney Morning Herald. 

Impotent frustration cannot last indefinite- 
ly in a country like the United Stales. At some 
point the impulse that prevails over every 
other consideration will be to strike blindly. 

— La RepubNica (Rome). 

Mr. Reagan learned during the martyrdom 
of Jimmy Carter that the president who makes 
it an issue of principle not to negotiate with 
terrorists entrenched in their own territory will 
see the days mount the yellow ribbons flutter 
in the breeze and his own viscera extracted. 
Ronald Reagan can shrug off a few weeks of 
embarrassment at a climbdown; a continuous 
siege with the risk of death to the passengers 
[would] rot Mm half a grain a day. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 

Hype is probably the most common error in 
the treatment of terrorist actions by the media. 
Hostages are taken precisely in order to cap- 
ture public opinion in ways that coerce govern- 
ments. But to be successful what is merely an 
episode has to be escalated to crisis propor- 
tions. In sum, little is gained and much is lost 
when journalists deal with terrorism as if they 
were doing business as usuaL There is an 
overwhelming case for self-discipline. 

— Syndicated columnist Joseph Kraft. 


FROM OUR JUNE 21 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910; Bryan Sees an Age of Peace 
LONDON — W illiam Jennings Bryan ad- 
dressed a meeting in Edinburgh [on June 20] 
under the auspices of the Edinburgh Peace and 
Arbitration Society. Mr. Bryan said be was 
glad his country was sufficiently prominent in 
the peace movement to make it proper for him 
to take part in the meeting. They read, he 
proceeded, that there was danger erf war be- 
tween the United States and Japan. There was 
no danger erf war between these countries, he 
said. Nor did he ever expect to see war between 
two Christian nations again. The political de- 
velopment of the world made for peace, he 
said, and it would be sad if moral development 
did not keep pace with political development 


1955: A Change for Pacific Airmail 
WASHINGTON — Difficulties between Chi- 
na and Japan, with the outbreak of war as a 
strong possibility, have upset the plans of the 
United States Post Office Department for 
trans-Pacific airmail sendee. Pan -.American 
Airways, which handles the greatest part of air 
Lravel over the Pacific, and also has a line in 
CMna itself, is understood to have opened 
negotiations with the British and Portuguese 
authorities to obtain the use of Hongkong or 
Macao as an Oriental terminus instead of the 
present one. Canton. Impending hostilities 
have centered far north of Canton but the city 
is likely to become the heart or Chinese resis- 
tance should the situation become more grave. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1058-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubtaker 

pun ip m FOIS1E Exmdnc Editor RENE BONDY Deputy Publisher 

wilTCRWELLS Editor ALAIN LECOUR Atsoave Publisher 

ROBERT IlMcCABE gS %£ SKSS 0,^7^. 

—national Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charies-de-GaulIe. 92200 NguUy-wr-Sane. 

FranctTdL- 1 1) W-IMS/Wex: 612718 (Herald;. Cables Herald Pirn- ISSN: 0294-805- 
Dirrcieur de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 


- \ 


■n ' ~Z. 

s " IT*.— - -~-- 














f 


Uf! site 


jg;' 

W , ;r, -.h <£=? 














rJ m A 


When the Skies Are Unsafe, Quick Thinking Helps 


A SPEN. Colorado — President 
Reagan, who found it so easy 


By Anthony Lewis 


to attack Jimmy Caner. now knows 
something about the frustrations or 
power in a hostage crisis. But in the 
course of adjusting to reality be may 
have missed the chance to" free the 
passengers of TWA flight 847 at the 
lowest possible price. 

That is the view of a man espe- 
cially qualified to understand the 
hostage problem: Gary Sick, a for- 
mer Navy captain. National Securi- 
ty Council specialist on Iran under 
Presidents Ford and Carter and au- 
thor of the much praised new book 
“All Fall Down: America's Tragic 
Encounter With Iran.” 

The chance seen by Mr. Sick was 
to meet the terms asked bv Nabih 
Berri, the Shiite leader who took 
responsibility’ for the hostages when 
they were removed from the plane 
in Beirut. Israel would release the 
700 Shiites it detained in southern 
Lebanon and stiU holds, and Mr. 
Beni would deliver the hostages. 

It would have been a painful bar- 
gain. but less painful than some in 
hostage situations. Washington had 
already said that ihe 700 were held 
illegally, and Israel was moving to- 
ward their release. Mosl Americans 
would have regarded it as one more 
terrorist swap and would not have 
held it against Mr. Reagan. 

But that solution was probably 
available only briefly. Mr. Sick be- 
lieves — for a day or two. The 
reason is Mr. Bern's position in the 
turmoil of Lebanon today. 

Nabih Bern is a moderate by in- 
stinct. and not anti-American. His 
children and former wife live in 
Dearborn. Michigan. He has spent 
much time in America and still has 
a resident alien's green card. 

A leader like Mr. Berri must wor- 
ry about trailing behind the fervor 
of his people. That may be why he 
moved into the hostage situation: to 
show that he was the leader. He 
could not afford to stand aside. 

The risk for any such figure is 
that, unless he gels results quickly, 
the radicals will lake over from Mm 
and escalate demands. The model 
for that disaster was President 
Abolhassan Bani-Sadr of Iran, who 
wanted lo settle ihe hostage crisis 
but was overtaken by the mullahs. 

On that analysis, it was essential 


for the Reagan administration to 
act quickly on Mr. Bern's terms: to 
get the 700 prisoners released. In- 
stead it played Alphoase and Gas- 
ton with Israel, hoping that the In- 
ternational Committee of the Red 
Cross or someone would arrange 
the release without open American 
involvement. And time passed, per- 
haps too much time. 

Every day of stalemate turns 
emotions up' another notch among 
Lebanese Sniitcs. Would they now 
be satisfied with the release of the 
700. or will radicals insist on other 
demands? Many can be imagined: 
abandonment by Israel of its “secu- 
rity zone” in southern Lebanon, an 
end to Israeli support of the South 
Lebanese Army-, release of Shiite 
terrorists held in Kuwait 

Moreover, the Shiite radicals are 
not likely to find much incentive for 
an early settlement in Mr. Reagan's 


press conference comments. He vir- 
tually forswore use of force while 
the hostages are held, implying- that 
retribution might follow later. 

“Time is working against us,” 
Mr. Sick said when I spoke with 
him. Not only is Mr. Berri likely to 
be under pressure to escalate de- 
mands. Public opinion in Israel, al- 
ready sensitive over last month's 
release of Palestinian prisoners in 
an exchange, may harden. Ameri- 
can emotions may rise. 

One can see why Mr. Reagan 
failed to act quickly. The realism 
demanded by responsibility was at 
war in him with a posture against 
terrorism. Both were on display in 
his press conference Tuesday night 
He bad lo hear the frustration, he 
said, lest action kill innocent peo- 
ple. But he also said that “America 
wiD never make concessions to ter- 
rorists.” an utterly unrealistic posi- 


tion in a nasty world. Every govern- 
ment negotiates when its citizens’ 
lives are at stake. 

In the crucial first days of this 
affair, when Mr. Reagan was cran- 
ing to grips with it, a strange and 
deplorable role was played by Hen- 
ry Kissinger. He went on television 
to urge that there be “no negotia- 
tions and no concessions.” Asked 

what then should be done, in: said 
he was not up to date on inte ffiggn ee 
but the president's men could surely 
think erf “something.” His irrespon- 
sibility was breathtaking. When he 
was in office, at a moment of high 
sensitivity he would have insisted 
on the greatest discretion and free- 
dom from outside pressure. 

Hi ere are human bongs involved 
here, and a president cannot forget 
them. Thai is why an implicit ar- 
rangement with Nabih Beni is 
probably the least bad choice Mr. 
Reagan has —or had. 

The New York Times. . 


n UN Friends 
? Can Easily 
:» Be Counted 

3 By Robert J. Hasten Jr. 

W ashington — Now that 

Vernon A- Walters has tak/" 
his seat as'the chief U.S- delegate a 
the United Nations- he will need to 
cast a wan eye over Ms shoulder 
Manv of America s so-called fnends 

there' still get away with ra “ r “£- 
. The second annual State Depart 

k mem study of UN acting pattern; 
— ' required under lecislauon. is distress 

ing, particularly if one cn« to cor- 
reSteU.S. assistance to other coun- 
-t tries with their support of U.b. 
jn positions in the General Assembly. 

i First the good nevvs. 

ft It is no surprise that Grenada has 

• gravitated Mward the United States 
Since the American military action, 
there in 19S3. That year, under A 
previous regime. Grenada supported 
the United States in the Assembly m 
less (ban one vote in five. In 195a. m 
nt- jo votes selected bv the State Depart- 

ns* tnent as most important to U.S. inter- 

ests, Grenada was not with the Umt- 
tois ed States once. But in 1984 it sided 
with the United States 60 percent of 
tnd the time . On key votes n refrained 


Hijackings, and Worse, May Continue 


W ASHINGTON — The U.S. 

government is relatively pow- 
erless to take effective action, be- 
yond negotiating, without jeopar- 
dizing the lives and safety of the 
American passengers who remain 
hostages somewhere in BeiruL 
How did the United Stales find 
itself in this position, and whal can 
be done about these acts that put at 
risk the most valuable assets of any 
country — its citizens? 

There is tittle new in these acts of 
terrorism presumably performed by 
zealots willing to give their lives for 
a cause. Martyrdom has deep his- 
torical roots that include causes re- 
garded by our culture as good, as 
well as evil. What is different today 
is that large, powerful industrial 
states are increasingly vulnerable to 
these types of acts as society offers 
more and more points of potential 
leverage to would-be terrorists. Like 
it or not. we will never be able to 
protect all of our assets and poten- 
tial vulnerabilities — whether they 
be airlines, merchant ships or com- 
patriots traveling abroad — with 
satisfactory levels of safety. 
Further. Americans' political 


By Har lan K. Ullman 

rights, indeed the Constitution it- 
self. are levers that terrorists use 
against them. The media (even this 
article) provide a forum for terror- 
ists and their propaganda. Media 
coverage is the terrorist's coin of the 
realm, and its scope partly defines 
the success or failure of the terror- 
ists' goals. Beyond that, through 
media coverage of their acts, terror- 
ists can exert leverage against coun- 
tries and leaders, possibly to the 
extent of causing them to fall. What 
the “Desert One” raid to rescue 
U.S. hostages in Iran failed, so did 
President Jimmy Carter's chances 
for re-election. That is leverage. 

We must realize that events like 
the hijacking of flight 847 will con- 


tinue and probably expand into 
other areas that may be more fright- 
ening and truly more threatening. 

What should be done? 

• in conditions like the present 
ones, the elected government must 
be permitted to get on with the 
difficult business at hand with limit- 
ed or muted help from critics. At 


some stage that condition need not 
apply, bet not in the early stages. 

• There must be serious public 
understanding of the need for co- 
vert operations, pre-emptive strikes 
and retaliation against those who 
threaten our system and oar citizens 
through acts of terror. These steps 
grate against America's national 
character and its system of individ- 
ual freedoms, yet without some car 
pabilhy, indwHing an expanded in- 
telligence network to allow these 
options a chance of success, we will 
be virtually helpless in future acts 
of international terrorism. 

• Finally, we must understand 
that terrorist acts wD continue. 
They are an unwanted and entirely 
wasteful ride effect of a free, pros- 
perous and potentially vulnerable 
society. This is no solace to hos- 
tages, present and future, or to their 
families. But patience must be a 
virtue. There are few other choices. 

The writer, a national security ex- 
pert. is a senior fellow at Georgetown’s 
Cotter for Strategic and International 
Studies. He contributed this comment 
to the Los Angdes Tunes. 


Gandhi and Reagan: An Understanding Is Progress 


. YtZisty. jcxwuu-vuw p— ■ — — 

O 1985. tnienunuml Herald Tribune. AH rights reserved. 


W ASHINGTON — What with 
one thing or another, the 
world’s most papulous democracy 
has only occasionally cut much or a 
figure in the American consciousness 
or in U.S. policy preoccupations. In- 
dia is no threat and no nan of .Ameri- 
ca's cultural heritage, it is South {as 
in North-South). It is poor and non- 
aligned. Any right-thinking cold war- 
rior knows that the proper focus has 
to be East-West in the real world, and 
that right-thinking nations, wherever 
they are. must choose sides. 

For those reasons and more, the 
U.S.-India relationship has ranged 
more often than not from distant to 
hostile in the nearly 40 years since 
India's independence. In his mem- 
oirs, Henry Kissinger described the 
encounters in 1971 between Richard 
Nixon and Indira Gandhi as "the two 
most unfortunate meetings Nixon 
had with any foreign leader.” 

When Mrs. Gandhi died at the 
hands of Sikh assassins last year, her 
untested 40-year-old son Rajiv suc- 
ceeded as prime minister. Only a few 
optimists thought much good would 
result for U-S.-lndian relations. 

So how do you explain last week's 
extravaganza: the young prime min- 
ister’s acclaimed address to a con- 
gressional joint session: the star-stud- 
ded state dinner: President Reagan 
proclaiming this "the year of India”: 
the gushing accounts of how well ihe 
two leaders “hit it ofF in their talks? 

To begin with, you wait for the 
oohs and aahs to subside. S'ou then 
proceed carefully, bearing in mind 
the trendy and transitory influence of 
modern communications on .Ameri- 
can interests and concerns. 

Even before the engaging young 
Mr. Gandhi burst upon this town. 
India had been looming increasingly 
large as entertainment (“Gandhi.” 
"A Passage lo India." “The Jewel in 
the Crown") and as tragedy: the 
mothers violent death, the Bhopal 
catastrophe. The ‘Festival of India" 
road show of Indian culture will be 
feeding the vogue. India is “in." 

That is a good thing. India is too 
big and too important to U.S. securi- 
ty to be as little known or cared about 
as it has been by most .Americans. 

The bad thing would be to proceed 
from heightened awareness of India 
to heightened expectations — to en- 
gage. that is. in the popular fancy that 
somehow this newly discovered India 
can be “weaned away” from the Sovi- 
et Union. To insist on applying the 
Easi-West test to a developing '"rela- 
tionship with the gotemmem of Mr. 
Gandhi would be to invite failure. 

With his cool, collected charm and 
self-confidence. Mr. Gandhi made 


By Philip Geyelin 


that point clear enough while he was 
in Washington. India's long frontiers 
with the Soviet Union, China and 
Pakistan will determine his policy as 
it did his mother's and her father's. 
Non alignment and noninterference 
in the internal affairs of sovereign 
stales will be his creed 

But if a sensible awareness of the 
limits imposed on India by geogra-- 
phy is taken into account, it can be 
said that last week's public and pri- 
vate exchanges between U.S. and In- 
dian leaders did much to define some 
opportunities for easing strains. 

Mr. Gandhi chose the congressio- 
nal setting to express more active 
interest than be has in the past in 
ending the brutal Soviet occupation 
of Afghanistan and hastening the res- 
toration of independence and "non- 
alignment” in that tormented land. 
American diplomats applauded this 
“shift.” What difference iL will actu- 
ally make hinges on Mr. Gandhi's 


The Turkish View Differs 

Regarding “A Second Chance for 
Pap an dr con and Some Allies ” (June 
I5i by Andriana Icrodiaconou: 

Traditional Greek policy vis-a-vis 
Turkey is well known: to involve the 
United States and the Europeans on 
her side in her disputes with Turkey 
and in. to obtain their support for her 
unjust claims. The theme or a Turkish 
threat is used as a smokescreen. The 
allies are invited to make Turkey pay 
the price for improvement of their 
relations with Greece. 

The Republic of Cyprus was creat- 
ed in I960 with the equal partnership 
of the two communities. .As in a mar- 
riage. the political will of only one 
side could not have brought it abouL 
The Cyprus problem did aot start 
with the legitimate intervention of 
Turkey in 1974 but well before, when 
Greek Cypriots butchered 206 Turk- 
ish Cypriots, including women and 
children, on the night of Dec. 21. 
l g 63. and evicted Turkish Cypriots 
from the government. Thereafter the 
Greek Cypriots continued a cam- 
paign to try to break Turkish Cypriot 
reliance against Enosis. Any solu- 
tion has to take all this into account. 

Nor has Turkey sought “a larger 
slice of the operational control pic in 
the Aegean." General Bernard Rog- 
ers. the NATO commander, made 
strenuous efforts in 1979 and 1980 to 
work out a modus vivendi between 


willingness to work toward some way 
to ease the darkly distrustful state of 
India’s relations with Pakistan. 

Mr. Gandhi may talk of an effort 
to resolve the Afghan conflict, but his 
rule on nonintervention specifically 
extends to the role of Pakistan as a 
conduit for “covert” U.S. a id to the 
.Afghan rebels — a role that puts 
Pakistan at considerable risk with the 
Soviet Union. Hence the rationale for 
U.S. military aid to Pakistan. 

Mr. Gandhi professes to see nei- 
ther the risk nor the rationale. That is, 
be is for settling the Afghanistan war 
but not for continuing the pressure 
on the Soviet Union that might pro- 
vide some incentive for settlement. 

Or so it sounds now. The question 
is whether the relationship struck up 
with the Reagan administration will 
clear the way tor something construc- 
tive later oh. Prime Minister Gandhi 
conveyed an interest in acquiring 
U.S. military technology, ana may 


get some. He did not push for U-S. 
arms. That is just as well, given the 
likely congressional and/or adminis- 
tration reaction while he remains de- 
pendent for 70 potent of his weap- 
onry on the Soviet Union. But ms 
interest in military high tech reflects a 
longer-term Indian goaL By becom- 
ing increasingly its own arms suppli- 
er, India lightens its dependence on 
whatever outride sources. 

You gel the idea: The governments 
of two vastly different nations, mak- 
ing whal appear to be honest efforts 
to work their way around their differ- 
ences. Mr. Gandhi let it be known 
that he got what he wanted. 

He had arrived convinced that the 
nuts and bolts of aid and trade and 
even policy issues are of no relevance 
“without basic understanding.” He 
left saying that tins was achieved, 
which is a lot more thaacould be said 
far the meeting that his mother had 
with another American president in 
another time, 14 years ago. 

Washington Pori Writers Group. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Turkey and Greece on the question of 
operational control in the Aegean. 
After three visits to both countries he 
finaUy obtained the agreement of the 
parties on a text known as the “Rog- 
ers plan.” It is this agreement which 
enabled Greece to return to NATO 
— but Andreas Papacdreou rejected 
it as soon as be came to power be- 
cause he wanted to have operational 
control of the whole Ae gean 

The Greek approach to other Ae- 
gean problems is the same: an expan- 
sionist mentality that sees the Aegean 
as a “Greek lake.” If Greece today 
changed this approach and accepted 
the fact that there are high seas and 
international airspace in the Aegean, 
it would not be an exaggeration to 
say that all these problems could be 
settled in a matter of days. Being one 
of the two coastal states' in the Aege- 
an. Turkey has. like Greece, political, 
security and economic interests in 
this sea. What Turkey seeks in the 
Aegean is just a fair share. 

AYHAN KAMEL. 

Ambassador of Turkey. 

The Hague. 

A letter from the Greek Cypriot 
ambassador to France (May 2) dis- 
torted the facts about Cyprus. Media 
coverage of the Jan. 17 summit meet- 
ing in New York between Spyros Ky- 
prianou and Rauf Denktash contra- 
dicts the statement that the Greek 
Cypriot government acted with good- 


will whereas the Turkish side raised 
obstacles. The Greek Cypriot House 
of Representatives criticized Mr. Ky- 
prianou for not cooperating with the 
United Nations secretary-general. 

The Turks’ 1963 rejection of the 
constitution's revision is not evidence 
of a Turkish “separatist philosophy.” 
Archbishop Makarios’s purpose in 
amending the constitution was to es- 
tablish his absolute authority over 
Cyprus and pave the way toward En- 
osis, something which was dearly un- 
acceptable for the Turks. The then 
valid Cyprus constitution was based 
on international agreements. The Zu- 
rich" and London agreements estab- 
lishing the Republic of Cyprus in 
1960 had been the result of hard 
bargai n i n g, exhausting disniwiqn s 
and give-and-take arrangements. The 
ambassador should know that such 
agreements are not to be signed one 
day and amended the next 
The Turks did not withdraw from 
the government but were ejected. 
Government security forces ran- 

Lctters intended fa r publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor” and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Utters should be brief and 
are subject to editing We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


from voting against iL while choosing 
to abstain orbe absent on six of the 
10 most important issues. 

In 1984. Israel stood with the Unit- 
ed States nearly 90 percent of the 
time. As for the NATO allies, Bntai? 
and West Germany were at Ameft- 
ca's ride at least 80 percent of the 
time; and Belgium. Luxembourg, the 
Netherlands. Italy. France and Cana- 
da voted with the United Slates on 
more than 70 percent of aQ issues. 
From 1983 to 1984, France increased 
its support from 67.6 to 72.1 percent. 

In 1983, El Salvador, a recipient of 
U.S. assistance, supported Washing- 
ton on 70 percent of the key votes. In 
1984, while overall it opposed the 
United States 70 percent of the lime, 
it did not oppose the United States 
on any major issue. 

Now for the bad news. 

Voting patterns in 1984 were 
alarming in a number of respects. 


The Arab bloc sided with the Unito* 
States in just one vote in 10 — sub- 
stantially less than in 1983. 

African nations opposed the Unit- 
ed Stales in almost 80 percent of the 
votes. In fact, support from the bloc 
dropped by one-third last year. 

Arian am Priafre nations support- 
ed the US. ride on less than 15 per- 
cent of the issues — again, a substan- 
tial drop from 1983. 

Several NATO allies are not 
around much when America needs 
them. Of 153 issues on which the 
Assembly voted last year. Greece ab- 
stained. was absent or apposed the 
United States almost 75 percent of 
the time. On two key Middle East 
issues, the best Greece cozki do way 
to refrain from voting. - ' « 

Turkey was not much better. It 
backed the United Slates just 35 per- 
cent of die time, down from 40 per- 
cent in 1983. It refused to offer sop- 
pori on a key vote concerning Israd's 
credentials and on a critical vote con- 
cerning foreign aid for El Salvador. 

Canada's 1984 voting is somewhat 
perplexing. Even though Canadians 
elected a more conservative govern- 
ment, Canada dropped from thud to 
eighth among Western nations in its 
support of the United States. 

Mexico opposed the United States 
more than #) percent of the time. On 
key issues of Middle Eastern policy 
and human rights in El Salvador, it 
opposed Washington. Among West- 
ern Henrisphere nations, only Cuba 
and Nicaragua provided less help. 

The Indian government opposed 
Washington in the General Assembly 
in 93 5 percent of all votes last war. 

Egypt, the second hugest US. aid 
recipient, opposed America 87.5 pe^-r 
cent of the time, although it did ghfc 
support on key votes: 

The foreign pcEcy of the United 
States ought to be directed at making 
improvements in this situation. 
Again this year. Congress should 
keep this widespread lade of support 
at the United Nations in mind when 
it reviews requests for foreign assis- 
tance. Americans are entitled to ex- 
pect more from those who call them- 
selves fnends and who are quick to 
line op for US. tax dollars. 

The writer, a Republican senator 
from Wisconsin, is chairman of the 
Appropriation Committee's Subcom- 
mittee on Foreign Operations, which 
oversees foreign aid. He contributed 
this commenrto The New York Tam* 


sacked the Turkish vice preride&t’s 
office and killed any Turk daring to 
come ran into the open. .Turks would 
have risked their lives going to their 
offices in the dries' Grade sectors. 

Without the Turkish mHiiaiy inter- 
vention of 1974, Cyprus would have 
been annexed to Greece. The ambas- 
sador would not now be representing 
an independent Cyprus is Paris. 

ALAEDDIN GULEN. 

Salzburg. Austria. 

True Roles in Ethiopia 

In response to the report “ Ethiopia’s* 
Orphans: The New Crisis " (June J); 

Youngsters in Ethiopia are being 
indoctrinated to believe that Western 
donors have done, nothing to help 
ihem and that the millions of dollars 
in food relief pouring into their coun- 
try comes from the Soviet Union and 
East Germany. If Western govern- 
ments and rdief agencies cutoff sup- 
Dbes, we would see bow.weU Colonel 
Mengistn’s Soviet and East German 
patrons provide for his people. . . 

I would not "advocate siichn mmir 


I would not "advocate sudTa cutoff. 
Bui we must reccgnize that 'part of 
the reason the starvation has been soi - 
severe and so prolonged is that Etbky 
put. is ruled by a cruel, oppressive 
regime that cares little about its fam- 
ished people and is determined only 
to maintain itself in power. - - . 

MARK KRAMER- 
Oxford, F-n glanrt ' 




>1 w 

V y; 

% 


?} i 


a 






-V 

F. >V< "• - 


m 


■W s 

\‘. y r . 4 

<0 y 


> i 

‘Ifii*.: ■ ! 
■ „$££■?*$; • 















'Tt 1 V EVTER.W10WL | 

IteralOc^^^nbune 

IWin > hiJ»MiTVV.1aATW>>wl1WT>,M n Om.PW* 


SWEDEN 


A SPECIAL REPORT 


i, . ~A’> , 

it. * 

'-■S'** 

* " < : \S 

' ih : .. 

I::.-'; >£ 

... .“V'nft 


.. >' Mn£ 

::T*$ 

i "“’ii 

;s;^ 

■ • ’VVat^ 

I ■'■'I... - ^ 

- 'Jfi» icj 

' • Sll 

r.'-tiS 

. .;' *‘ 1 '1 fnaac 

1 V..2dr 
.; •-iTi’tttu 

■ j~-'. n 

!W. 


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


Page 



For Palme, Summer Means 
One Long, Hot Campaign 


Glassware and Furniture: 

Design for Export Triumph 

Some designs from the Far 
North: The bluebell vase, 
far left, designed by Lisa 
Bauer; at left, NELO chair 
from Koistinge; above, a 
Lindan 2 table. Details, 

Page 10. 


■ h: lit 


Economic Upturn on Tax, Spending Cuts 


'■ - A , By Juris Kaza ■ 

k STOCKHOLM —By most indi- 

7 ^ i\ cators, the Swedish economy has 
;■? ,,;i f ,j>erfonned rather wefl since 1982, 
" c c f-'>?hen Prime Minister Olof Palme’s 
-" r — Social Democrats reamed power 

• after six years (rf conservative gov- 
' -K eminent. 

Swedish indrutriol production. 
' lit corporate profits and experts have 

• .all risen sharply, reaching record 
' levels for some sectors dnnng 1984 

and promising, in many cases, to 
stay nigh during 1985. Sweden's 
: unemplo yment has hovered around 
■ cr. 3 percent’ 

•. According to the 1985 economic 
- zfi survey of Sweden by the Paris- 
based Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development, 
- “overall growth, could decelerate to 
25 percent in 2985 and 1.5 
it in 1986.” Economists at 


Skandinaviska R«hl <la Banken 
( SE - Bmta t the ootsuacc- 
dal bank in the Nordic region, are 
more pessimistic. 

They predict 1985 growth of un- 
der 1 potent and a decrease by 1 
percent in gross domestic product 
in 1986. The downturn may already 
be starring oh the order inflow side: 
Export orders to Swedish industry 
as a whole were down 6 percent in 
the first quarter from the fourth 
quarter of 1984. SE-Banken econo- 
mists forecast that exports, general- 
ly, will rise 2 percent in volume 
during 1985, compared to a 6.1- 
peroentrisein 1984. In 2986, Swe- 
den’s exports will stagnate, they 
predict The trade surplus will de- 
cline from nearly 24 billicai kronor 
($227 billion) in 1984 to 16 billion 
kronor in 1985 and 14 billion kro- 
nor in 1986. - 


The key economic policy ques- 

tember 19^f^^^sts say.^nH 
be controlling inflation Specifical- 
ly, it is rising labor costs that can 
undermine the internatinnai com- 
petitiveness of Swedish goods and 
services and set off, once a gain, a 
whole spiral of advene economic 
developments. 

“In f.prnfnny»r prices, we are far 
behind oar competitors, most of 
whom have made big p rogres s in 
the right against inflatio n," said 
Bruno Johansson, manag er of the 
economic research department at 
SE-Banken. “Wage cost is an im- 
of [the problem], as 
tax system/ 1 


well as 

The current Social Democratic 
administration started! off in 1982 
with what marry observers called a 
"shock devaluation” of the krona 


by 16 percent on October 8. This is 
credited for much of the export-led 
upturn in Swedish industry. 

The policies of Sweden’s finance 
minister, KjeB-Olof Feldt, have 
also bear helped by external fac- 
tors, such as the unexpected 
strength of the dollar. Domestical- 
ly, tbe OECD survey points to the 
speed and flexibility of Swedish in- 
dustry in taking advantage of new 
international market opportunities. 

"Our main criti cism of the gov- 
ernment is that they have failed to 
use the opportunity created by the 
devaluation and the upturn in the 
international economy to do some- 
thing of lasting value regarding the 
main imbalances in the economy," 
said Lars Tobisson, deputy party 
leader and chief economic spokes- 
man of the Moderate Party of Swe- 
den. the conservative party that is 


Sweden’s angle largest opposition 
faction. 

On his record in fighting infla- 
tion. the finance minister has left 
himself open to attack, at least if 
the government’s official inflation 
targets foe 1984 and 1985 are accu- 
rate. For 1984. the government set 
an target of 4 percent; actual infla- 
tion was double that, despite a tem- 
porary price freeze imposed in 
March. For 1985. Mr. Fddt set an 
ambitions inflation target of 3 per- 
cent at year’s end. That appears to 
have been shattered, in no small 
measure tty the governments May 
13 austerity package, winch wffl 
add at least 1 percentage point to 
consumer prices through sharply 
higher interest rates. 

"The inflationar y goal has been 
(Co n tin ue d on Next Page) 


By Axel Krause 

STOCKHOLM — General elec- 
tion i^pipaig nt in Sweden usually 
do not begin until late summer and 
often they axe low-key. But for sev- 
eral weeks, the ruling Social E>emo- 
crais and the conservative opposi- 
tion parties have been battling over 
the issue that is expected to domi- 
nate the voting on Sept. 15: wheth- 
er or not to reform the welfare state 
economy. 

Most political and diplomatic 
observers and polls predict that it 
will be one of tbe dosest elections 
in Sweden since the end of World 
WarIL 

tics wasrtffected in asenesof con- 
troversial spot commercials cur- 
rently being projected in movie 
theaters throughout the country. 
One shows a distraught youngster 
in his school cafeteria unable to 
pay for his hutch; another, filmed 
in the emergency room of a Swed- 
ish hospital, shows an embarrassed 
mother searching her pocketbook 
for rash, while her bleeding sou 
waits for treatment and a doctor 
glowers impatiently. For decades, 
medical care and school lunches 
have been provided free of charge. 

The message being conveyed by 
the sponsoring Soria! Democrats is 
that the conservative parties, if re- 
turned to power, would transform 
Sweden into “an egotistical society, 
for economic reasons” Some party 
officials and even Aftonbladd, a 
leading pro-government daily 
newspaper; have criticized the films 
as embarrassing and vulgar. Many 
yioung viewers m Stockholm react- 
ed with brighter. A conservative 
leader termed it "scare tactics.” 

Meanwhile; in the center of 
Stykhnlm and other major rides 
last week, young volunteers from 
conservative parties proposed 
bumper stickers to passing motor- 
ists bearing an equally strong mes- 
sage — the need to immediately 
dismantle union-controlled wage- 
earner funds established by the 
leftist government in 1983. The 
funds were aimed at purchasing 
important interests in Sweden’s 


leading companies, banks and in- 
surance companies, and have been 
vehemently opposed by the Swed- 
ish business community. 

Prime Minister Olof Palme, dur- 
ing an interview in his office last 
week, predicted that “it will be a 
straight left- versus- right cam- 
paign.” Appearing relaxed and 
confident, he said that "we will 
show that Sweden is on the right 
path; that we can manage the econ- 
omy without sacrificing full em- 
ployment or the welfare slate and 
that we represent the interests of all 
Swedes.” The conservatives. Mr. 
Palme added, represent "Thatcher- 
ism” and about 20 percent to 25 


patent of Sweden’s population of 
8.3 million. 

Surprisingly, however. Mr. 
Palme did not predict a sweeping 
leftist victory nor that the Social 
Democrats would gain seats in the 
legislature. He said he "would like 
more” than the 166 seats his party 
won three years ago after six years 
of conservative rule. That repre- 
sented 45.6 percent of the total 
vote. The Communist Party, with 
5.6 percent of the vote, obtained 20 
seats and joined the ruling coali- 
tion. 

“We will govern with the Com- 
munists [again] if necessary.” Mr. 

(Continued on Next Page) 


Palme, in an Interview, Terms 
SDI * Very Dangerous ’ for Peace 


STOCKHOLM — Olof 
Palme, Sweden's prune minis- 
ter, finds President Ronald 
Reagan’s Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative "illusory. 

During a one-hour interview 
in his office last Tuesday, the 
58-year-old leader, who has ad- 
vocated disarmament causes 
for three decades, said he could 
understand Mr. Reagan's 
"search for security ” But be 
said the administration’s pro- 
gram, sometimes known as 
"Star Wars.” was "very danger- 
ous” for world peace." He said 
that conservative party leaders 
in Sweden agreed with him. 

Yet. Mr. Pahne did not indi- 
cate much interest in Eureka, a 
French-led project aimed at 
pooling West European re- 
sources in high technology and 
countering toe Strategic De- 
fense Initiative's potential Tor 
drawing European resources to 
the United Stales. "I have not 
looked at Eureka yet. but we 
can understand its applications 
for peaceful purposes,” he said. 

Commenting on other sub- 



Okrf Palme 

jecis, Mr. Palme slated the fol- 
lowing: 

• Violations of Swedish air 
and water space by the Soviet 
Union during the past several 
years have been “the toughest 
since the end of World War II." 
But recent measures aimed at 
increasing Sweden's anti-sub- 
marine defenses will be effec- 
tive. "We have not had any new 
incidents in a long lime, and the 
(Continued on Next Page) 




What Lies Ahead for the Welfare State? 


By Gunnar Heckscher 

UPPSALA --On Sept. 15 there wjjl be elec- 
tions m Sweden, both to the Riksdag, tbe pariia- 
menl, and to local and provincial councils- The 
outcome is most uncertain. 

Until recently opinion polls in dic at ed a win 
for the non-Sooalist parties, so that Prime Min- 
ister Olof Palme would have to resign; one <d 
the latest polls has given hup a narrow majority. 
But they all agree on (me print: more than 8 
percent of the voters are as yet undecided. This 
reflects the dfliynma of contemporary Swedish 
society. 

The welfare state in the accepted sense was 
established under Social Democratic rule, espe- 
cially in the decade just before and the two 
decades just after Wcnid War II. It came to be 
ge nerally accepted that the state had collective 
■responsibilities is (he social field. Poverty, as 
previously defined, was made to disappear. The 
average standard of Irving rose steeply and be- 
came one of the highest in the worid. Prosperity 

was more and more evenly distributed. 

This was made possible by high productivity 
and rapidly growing exports. Economically, the 
sky seemed to be tbe limit. The lot ot less 
favored dements in society could be improved 
without demands for any real sacrifices from the 


Gunnar Heckscher, a professor of political sci- 
ence. was formerly a number of parliament and 
ambassador to India and the United Nations. He 
is the author of “ Asian Pmmpby” and "The 
Welfare State and Beyond, Success and Problems 
in Scandinavia."' 


more fortunate. Resources being virtually un- 
limited, it was relatively simple to accomplish 
equitable distribution. 

But there is a proved) that says that it is seen 
to that trees do not grow np into heaven. Things 
are not nearly so simple today. With exports 
corresponding to about 35 percent of the gross 
national product, tbe Swedish economy de- 
pends on international developments far more 
than on national policies. 

The sew situation has not bees foreseen. In 


ft could be argued that it 
does not make too much 
difference which party is in 
power. Anybody in charge 
after 1985 will have to do 
many unpopular i h in gft . . • 

1969 the Social Democratic Party adopted a 
report presented by Alva Mydral, who was a 
minister without portfolio in the cabinet, with 
the message that their "frill employment and 
social security” were no longer enough. “A po- 
licy of equality is what the 1970s demand of our 
movement,” doe said. Tbe perfect egalitarian 
society should be realized, mid economic re- 
sources were not even to be discussed. 

. Since then both the economic situation and 
the attitude of the people have changed. While 


the establishment and the welfare stale un- 
doubtedly corresponded to the wishes of the 
great majority and disputes had related to the 
means of realizing it rather than to the objective 
itself, perfect egalitarianism was a different 
matter altogether. 

Equality of opportunities was acceptable to 
everybody, but what about equality oi results? 
Tbe new approach lent itself to jealousy be- 
tween major social groups, all of whom laid 
Harm to toe right of bang more equal than 
others. Who mould be favored: blue-collar 
workers or white-collar workers, farmers, public 
employees or those working in industry? 

In 1951, the Swedish Federation of Labor, 
which, organizes aD blue-collar workers, had 
adopted the principle of "solidarity in wage 
policies.” Wages of its members should be pro- 
gressively equalized. But now, in 1985, the presi- 
dent of tbe Meal Workers’ Union, in many 
respects the most important of its constituent 
bodies, has come out with a statement arguing 
that there should be an end to equalization 
between members. Instead, the aim should be to 
reduce the wage differential in relation to sala- 
ried white-collar employees. And trusted Social 
Democrats in the administration do their best to 
raise the salaries of higher civil servants to a 
level comparable to those of senior executives in 
private industry even though this increases tbe 
salary differential within the public sector. 

It now appears doubtful whether there will be 
any increases in prosperity to distribute. Distri- 
bution policies can then no longer be made to 

(Confirmed on Page 10) 



>1 1 - 


4 


By Errol G. Rampersad 

TORSLANDA — Volvo and 
Saab are now diversified industrial 
groups — tbe former is even into 
food — but for car buffs they repre- 
sent a special sensation cm the open 
road, one that combines engineer- 
ing solidity, high-level finish and 
Speed- 

One American automobile writer 
said after, driving the new Volvo 
740 turbo that it was perhaps a bit 
staid-looking "but it gives you a 
smug look while nailing the accder- 
ator to the flow and leaving sports 
cars eating the dust” He meant the 
feeling a “family man” can have 
whenmownga3 l 100ix»»nd(L407- 
kilogram) car from zero to 60 miles 
(97 kilometers) per hour in 8.4 sec- 
onds. 

The United States is Volvo’s big- 
gest market — bigger than Sweden 
— and if present trends continue, 
Saab will be setting twice the vol- 
ume of its cars m the United Sales 
that it does at home^ 

Of the 386,000 Volvo cars deliv- 
ered last year around the world, 
some 97,900 were for American 
buyers. Saab so!dJ2,768 cars in toe 
United States in 1984 om of a total 
production of 10Zj&] aud it ex- 
pects its U.S. market to expand to 


40,000 this year. The Saab has a 
particular appeal for the affluent 
young American. 

Volvo started retting cars in Cali- 
fornia in 1955 and has never looked 
hack. Last year was the eigblh year 
in a row that it added to sales. This 
first quarto was weaker in Western 
Europe but continued strong in the 
United States, which, along with 
Canada, now accounts for dose to 
halT of all soup sales, Including 
cars, trucks/buses and marine and 
industrial engines. - 

Thehigher-perfonnance Saab 
9000.tnibo 16, with a top speed of 
138 mil es per hour and an accelera- 
tion, of zao to 63 miles per hour in 
8 J seconds, has recently got itself 
an American rating aaa Targe car" 
by the Environmental Protection 



Vohro’s 760, above Saab’s 900 experimental, car, below. 


ii 



te Saab, like the Volvo, is 
now fast; foreign and family, toe 
dwacari^'toat /apparently ap- 
peal to its American buyers. 

Much -of the mystique surround- 
ing these Swedish cars is based on 
engineering. Both Volvo and Saab 
pour a lot Of hioney into research 
and development. According to 
Volvo’s latest technological chum, 
“The new electronic traction warn- 
ing. system means jhat as soon as 
the drive wheds.ibiaie faster than 


the front wheels, a control unit re- 
duces tbe fud supply gradually un- 
til tiQ wheels rotate at toe same 
speed." 

The system substantially re- 
duces toe risk that a car win lose 
traction while moving under power 
on toy surfaces,” said Ingpmar Or- 
tendahl, a Volvo vice presi- 
dent-This is a key factor consider- 
ing toe harsh Nordic winters.” 

Saab, for its pan. showed a pro- 
totype fra a twophis-two-seater 


if- 

Sat* 

sports coupfi at toe recent los An- 
geles auto exhibition. This Saab 
900 turbo EV-1 has futuristic styl- 
ing with a glass top, a turbocharged 
engine capable or pushing the ex- 
perimental car to around 168 miles 
per hour, lightweight seats, and 
"energy-absorbing” front and rear 
sections of. extremely lightweight 
materials. It also has automatic in- 
terior ventilation powered by solar 
cells, entirely new headlamps, glass 
(Continued on Next Page) 


Not surprisingly we 
offer you better service 
to and from Scandinavia 
than any other airline. 

It’s our own backyard. 


EuroClass - the complete Business Class within 
Europe at no additional cost. 

iC You fly the most punctual airline within Europe. 

\f High quality meals. 

^ All drinks, wine and other refreshments are free 
including champagne. 

In EuroClass. vou select your seat in a separate cabin. 
More legroom. 

^ Comfortable contured chairs. 

^ Five abreast seating gives you more cibowroom. 

• / A 30 kilo free baggage allowance leaves lots of leeway 
^ for whatever you ve got to carry. 

|/ You’re welcome to our Business Service Lounges 
throughout Scandinavia and at other locations 
in Europe. 


-hours-a-day, 

+45-1147555. 


. / You can make your SAS reservation 24- 
» year round by phoning Copenhagen at: 

✓ Only SAS offers hovercraft service between Malmo 
and Copenhagen International Airport 


S4S 

The Businessmans Au-ine 






Page 8 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON SWEDEN 



Summer Means a Long, Hot Campaign 


(Continued From Previous Page) 

Palme said, but tbe the priority 
going into the election, be said, is 
“keeping what we have” in tbe 
Riksdag, tbe parliament, which re- 
convenes SepL 30. 

Bothering to the Social Demo- 
crats is the fact that recent polls 
show that the conservative parties 
could win the election, largely be- 
cause of growing support among 
Swedish youth and white-collar 
workers for Ulf Adelsobn, the 44- 
year-old head of the Moderate Par- 
ty. He not only has vigorously 
called for reducing Sweden’s tax 
levels, the highest among industri- 
alized countries, but has openly 
challenged the powerful role of the 
state in Swedish society. 

“Our message is that tbe future 
ties in greater freedom, which 
mans such thin gs as privatization 
of certain government services and 
creating greater competition in our 
economy.” Mr. Addsohn. former 
mayor of Stockholm, said in an 
interview in his office at the parlia- 
ment. where he has served for the 
past three years. 

Mr. Adelsohn said that many of 
his views are similar to those of 
Jacques Chirac, the Neo-Gaullist 
leader and former prime minister 
of France, who is calling for wide- 
spread deregulation or the French 
economy. “Our message seems to 
be getting across here, judging from 
the enthusiastic reactions, the 
Swedish political leader said. 

A senior U.S. diplomatic official 
described what is happening in 
Sweden as “American-sryle polar- 
ization“ of politics, raainlv because 
of Mr. Adelsohn's aggressive style. 
“He has captured peole’s imagina- 
tion by showing the Swedish model 
is not' a sacred cow, and for Swe- 
den, that is surprising." the official 
said. 

The most recent nationwide poll, 
published June 13. showed the 
Moderates winning 27.6 percent of 
the vote, representing a leading po- 
sition among several other conser- 
vative parties. They were shown 
obtaining a combined total of be- 
tween 43.5 and 50.1 percent of the 
vote. That compared with a total of 
between 47.8 and 49.4 percent go- 
ing to the Social Democrats and the 
Communist Parly, which have 
ruled Sweden with a comfortable 
majority in the 349-seat legislature 
since reluming to power in 1982. 
The leftist ana conservative parties 
showed roughly equal strength in 
Stockholm. 

However, the poll by the central 
statistics bureau also shewed a re- 
cord number of undecided voters. 
These included an estimated 
100.000 going to the polls for the 
first time, most of whom are be- 
tween IS and 21 years of age. In 
previous years, only about 2 to 3 


percent of the electorate were un- 
decided, but this year at least 6 to 8 
percent of some 6.1 million eligible 
voters have not yet made up their 
minds , according to party strate- 
gists. 

Sag Malm, chairman of the 
Swedish Trade Unions Confedera- 
tion, which has close ties to the 
Social Democrats, said that the un- 
certainties were greatest among 
young, white-collar workers, in- 
cluding government employees, 
who are aturaewd by the Moder- 
ates’ message, particularly with re- 
gard to cutting taxes. Mr. Malm 
said be feared the Communists also 
may be “losing ground" and that 
tbe ramp ai g n, as it gets under way, 
will be “dirty.’’ 

Mr. Malm predicted renewed, 
personal attacks against Mr. Palme 
and bis minis ters, some of whom 
have been severely criticized by op- 
position leaders in parliament. 
“These affairs are being deliberate- 
ly blown up by the bourgeois press 
and are diverting interest away 
from the real issue, which is wheth- 
er we keep our system or move 
toward a new European-style, lib- 
eralism-monetarism,” Mr. Malm 
said. 

An “affair” frequently cited was 
the vote of no-confidence against 
Foreign Minister Lennart Bod- 
str&m, which was defeated by the 
leftist majority in February. The 
charges by opposition leaders 
clearly implied that the govern- 
ment was unable to cope with the 
dangers of Soviet violations of 
Swedish waters and air space and 
had damaged Sweden’s traditional 
neutrality. 

Defense Minister Anders Thun- 
borg has said he plans to resign 
after the elections but denied this 
was linked to “the BodstrQm af- 
fair.” Although conservative lead- 
ers plan to cite the two cases and to 
attack Mr. Palme's leadership dur- 
ing the campaign, foreign policy, 
notably Sweden's neutrality, is not 
expected to be an issue. 

“Mr. Palme is controversial, but 
we do not disagree with the Social 
Democrats on foreign poHcy” said 
Ingemar Eliasson, deputy chair- 
man of the liberal Party and labor 
minister in the previous, conserva- 
tive government of ThorbjOm Fall- 
din, who has remained leader of the 
Center Party. 

The Liberal Party, with 21 seats 
in parliament and which draws 
most of its support from teachers, 
civil servants and small business- 
men, will campaign on the theme of 
“social responsibility without so- 
cialism," hopeful of gaining an ad- 
di tonal dozen seats. Mr. Eliasson 
said. The Liberals could prove cru- 
cial in a new conservative coalition, 
and, like the Moderates, they are 
counting on the appeal to youth of 



Ulf Addsohn 




their leader, Bengt Wester berg, 
who is 42. 

But the Liberals and some Cen- 
ter Party officials are uncomfort- 
able with the Moderate’s hardline 
approach to reforming the econo- 
my, privatizing government ser- 
vices and urging substantial cuts in 
Sweden's high income-tax rates. 
“We must not forget tbe weakest 
elements in our society, which 
might occur by concentrating on 
tbe strong, beautiful people," Mr. 
Elliasson said. 

Although the main conservative 
leadens — Mr. Adelsohn, Mr. Wes- 
ter berg and Mr. FSIldin — get 
along personally, the question 
raised by political and diplomatic 
analysts is whether they could gov- 
ern effectively in a new coalition 
government. The conservative gov- 
ernment that ended 44 years of 
Social Democratic rule in 1976 was 
led by Mr. Fall din. But the loose 
coalition was deeply split over such 
issues as nuclear power and eco- 
nomic reforms. 

“They are still in disarray,” said 
Mr. Palme, adding that tins would 
help his campaign efforts, but he 
quickly added; “You never know 
bow things will work out, and polls, 
after all are polls.” 

Some of Sweden's most influen- 
tial business and union leaders, 
looking beyoud the campaign rhet- 
oric, are worried about Sweden's 
future, regardless of which parties 
wind up controlling parliament 

“Big budget deficits are the ma- 
jor problem here, and we are pay- 
ing for it as a society, including 
through falling competitiveness in 
world markets,” said Hans 


Werthen, chairman of Electrolux, 
Sweden's large appliance maker. 
Although he does not believe that 
Mr. Palme is under any 
pressure to devalue the krona, he 
thinks the new government win 
probably be forced to “squeeze 
harder” through more restrictive 
policies, in order to finanoe grow- 
ing government outlays and con- 
trol rising inflation. 

Jan Fknyin, vice chairman of 
Svenska Handelsbankeu, is con- 
vinced that if government spending 
is not substantially reduced, tbe 
only alternative will be raising tax- 
es. 

“The best period here may be 
over, and it will be a ni ghtmari sh 
situation for whatever party or 
ips win the election,” said Mr. 
who does not hide the fa a 
that he is a Liberal Asked about 
“Thatcherism" or a possible “Rea- 
gan revolution” in Sweden, Mr. Ek- 
man said: “You just cannot imple- 
ment those kind of policies lure. 
But that is my opinion. . .we have 
never seen so many people unde- 
cided about this election/’ 

Even more disturbing, said Mr. 
Malm, is the prospect that Sweden 
may emerge from the election polit- 
ically weakened, governed by a 
shaky coalition. 

“Do not look for dramatic 
changes here after the election,” he 
said. “But we may possibly emerge 
with a weak government, with nei- 
ther side gaming a stable majority." 

How can the Social Democrats 
win? “A lot will depend on our 
enthusiasm," Mr. Maim said, 
whose union has some 2 million 
members. 



Europe! 

Here are the 
results of the Telecom 
Contest if there had 
been one. 


A Timely 
Consensus 
OnSeeurUy 
Policy 

By Michael Metcalfe 

STOCKHOLM — A report on 
Swedish security policy submit- 
ted to the Riksdag, the Swedish 
partiament, by a parliamentary 
defense committee last month 
noted that the repent had been 
unanimously adopted by all po- 
litical parties represented in the 
committee. 

“This serves to demonstrate 
the important fact that there is 
broad consensus in Sweden on 
the basic features of our security 
poBcy," said the committee chair- 
man, Gimnar Nilsson, a Social 
Democrat and former leader of 
the labor union federation. 

The report, reflecting allparty 
□mty in security policy, is timely. 
Based cm the premise erf “nonad- 
herence to alliances in peacetime 
aiming at neutrality in war ■" 
Swedish security poucy rests, or 
falls, on the cornerstone of pre- 
serving, and being seen to pre- 
serve, a high level of militaiypre- 



Troops in Gotland debark from a Hercules transport plane during manetros. : • 5 


Sandwiched as it is between 
opposing forces of tbe North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization and 
the Warsaw Fact, Sweden, to- 
gether with neutral Finland, acts 
as a military buffer to preserve 
the strategic status quo in the 
Nordic region. 

Swedish territory is of immense 
strategic importance, since it oc- 
cupies an exposed position be- 
tween the Anmc and the Baltic 
Sea outlets, znfliiaiy attaches of 
Western embassies u Stockholm 
said. 

“IT its level of military pre- 
paredness and its degree of 
watchfulness are ever thrown into 
doubt, the threat arises of the 
delicate balance between East 

eoing (he threshcM^of tension in 
the region,” (me diplomat said. 

The presence of a stranded So- 
viet submarine in Swedish territo- 
rial waters in October 1981 and 
repeated incursions of Warsaw 
Pact submarines have raised 
questions about the level of 
Swedish security credibility, as 
well as gone to the heart of its 
policy of neutrality. 

The diplomatic row that fol- 
lowed between Stockholm and 
Moscow highlighted and threw 
into jeopardy Sweden's position 
as a confidence bridge-baDder 
between East and West 



1985-1986 budget, the defense 
minister, Anders Tbunborg, 
plan* to spend more than 25 bil- 
lion kronor (52.84 billion) in the 

year up to June 1986 in the area 
of “total defense.". 

The main aim of total def ens e, 
according to the government, “is 
to be so well prepared for war 
that it serves to maintain peace" 
Possessing no nuclear deterrent 
anH relying on conventional 
forces to ward off aggressors, 
Sweden's total security concept is 
crucial to its straiegy. 

Despite rationalization mea- 
sures and cost-saving, Sweden 
has manag ed to keep its military 
spending at about 3 5 percent of 
gross national product each year, 
roughly comparable to West Ger- 
many, France and Norway. 

• While tbe level of miHtaiy 
spending remains broadly un- 
changed, the degree of emphasis 


and the scheduled replacement of. 
a large number of these ly a note; X- 
mnlmole combat aircraft code- 
named JAS-39, white mi time. n*. 
mains far off in the late 1990$. 


TheJAS, 
than 35 billion 


project, tying up tsxor 
^Jion kronor at constant - 
1981 prices, takes a large slice of:, 
the military budget, although the , 
effort and the magnitude ef the- 
funds at stake are deemed vilal to 
Sweden's future air-defense capa-l 
bflity. . - 

Sweden cannot ensure the con- 
tinued viability and competitive*', 
ness of its armaments industry,!^ > 
running the risk of neglecting r& T 
lations with the United States 
particularly in the areas of no- 
tary hardware and high tcchnok 
neutrality policy 




ogy. But its , . 

obliges it also not to ignore tie 
interests of the Soviet Union, an 
observer said. > . 

The difficulty was evident in ' 
1983, when customs officials at 
the southern Swedish port of 
Helsingborg discovered that UJ&- 
. -manufactured computers woe 
being shipped Illegally via Sooth 
Africa and Sweden to tbe Soviet 
Union. The US. has banned ex- 
ports of sensitive electronics aad 
other equipment to tbe Soviet Jp 
Union. .Jyfr 

The issue of producing arma- 
ments for export in a neutral 
country resurfaced earlier. this 
month, when the head of the 
Swedish Employers’ Federation, 
Claes- Ulrik Wtnberg, resigned 
pending the outcome of a police 
investigation into reports of sales 
of explosives to Iran by the amrn - 
ments and explosives company 
Bofors during me time he was the 
firm’s managing director. 

The latest incident comes at a 
time when the incumbent Social 
Democratic gove rnm ent is fight- 
ing hard to ensure the credibility 
of its security policy among the 
electorate. 


The SwnUi Dafma Mnisry 

Troops on winter ma- 
neuvers in northern 
Sweden. 

The tangible evidence of a So- 
viet submarine thought to have 
been carrying nuclear weapons in 
Swedish waters, together with less 
tangible but no less disturbing 
proof of further foreign subma- 
rine intrusions in the Stockholm 
archipelago a year later, brought 
home to Swedes how exposed and 
isolated they could be. 

The submarine episodes came 
just as recession and budget defi- 
dts were restricting Swedish mili- 
tary spending and encouraging 
calls for cuts in ntifitaiy forces. 

Swedish mili tary expenditure 
remains large: According to the 


lifted slightly in favor of 
improving Sweden s antisubma- 
rine warfare capability and its 
early-warning tystems. Defense 
Ministry officials said. 

The case of the Soviet Whisky* 
-class submarine’s presence near 
Kariskrona naval base, one of the 
country's most sensitive military 
installations, revealed loopholes 
in the early-warning system. 

During the period 1982 to 
1987, about 12 billion kronor has 
been earmarked to bolster anti- 
submarine warfare. New types of 
torpedoes and depth charges for 
use specifically in die Baltic have 
been developed, and plans to add 
four new minesweepers and four 
helicopters specially equipped 
with high-frequency sonar to 
hunt far mine-submarines and 
other submoged objects have 
been speeded up.. 

The air force has problems of 
its own. Its squadrons of Viggen 
and Draken fighters are agmg 


i 


Economic Upturn Hinges on Tax, Spending Cute 


In ifie Household "telephone Charges 
Division Sweden won with SEK 105 a 
month, second came Holland, closely fol- 
lowed by Denmark. 

In the Business Division the order was 
reversed: Denmark, Holland, Sweden. 

How come Sweden has the lowest charges 

YEAR .AFTER YEAR WHEN EVERYTHING ELSE IS 
GOING UP? 

We haven't raised the price of ordinary 
phone calls since June 19S3 and we’ve 
promised the Swedish public not to raise 
it in 1985 either. 

But low charges mean more people 
ringing and talking for longer. No country 
has more phones per capita. No country' 
has a better mobile telephone service - 
an automatic system covering all of Scan- 
dinavia. 

No country has developed a better 
AXE system... 

Thats enough dragging from you, you 

HAVEN'T GOT A BUZBY BntD LIKE ENGLAND AT 
ANY RATE. 

No, we hardly have any telegraph poles 
for funny little birds to perch on. Eighty 


percent of all our cables are buried. 

Tklking about that - have you heard 
that we've just started installing a digital 
network that will be serving all of Swe- 
den by 1987? 

Digitalen 87 is what we call it 

What was wrong with the good old tele- 
phone LINES? 

They can't handle all the data traffic They 
get overloaded We have more modems 
connected than any other country, so we 
need an electronic speedway to take big 
volumes of fast traffic 

Bit you dont send itemised accounts, 

I HEAR? 

No, it would cost nearly as much as Digi- 
talen and all subscribers would have to 
pay. 

It’s low charges that make people 
happy. 


UTeleverket 


Swedish 'telecom 


(Continued From Previous Page) 

totally put upside down," said 
Cheong Han Kim, the Korean- 
-born senior economist of the go- 
vernment-sponsored, independent 
National Institute of Economic Re- 
search. Before the austerity mea- 
sures, the institute forecast the av- 
erage inflation rate during 1985 
would be 6.8 percent, based an a 
labor cost increase of 7 percent, in 
contrast to the government's hope 
for a 5-percent rise. 

A ma jor problem, according to 
many economists, is a wage-forma- 
tion system that dooms Swedish 
labor costs to tiring at least 10 


percent every year regardless of 
what else happens in the domestic 
or international economic scene. 

“There is a general risk that wage 
drift [wage hies in excess of labor 
contract levels] will be rather high- 
er than what has been included in 
the government's calculations,” ac- 
cording to Mr. Kim. 

“The most icbent indicators of 
export prices suggest that export- 
ing finns arc iraraslng prices more 
than our forecast implies." Mr. 
Kim added. “It is a consequence of 
the firms' not being able to increase 
prices in Sweden because of the 


SeUingthe US. on Fast, 
Foreign and Family Cars 


(Continued Dram Previous Page) 

fiber reinforced doors conforming 
to the strictest American ride-coUt- 
sion regulations and invisible de- 
mister wires. 

In addition to research-and-de- 
vdopment outlays, Volvo has long 
had a management-worker rela- 
tionship aimed at giving the work- 
ers a large voice in the running of 
plants. The results have been better 
quality, shorter hours and hi gher 
profits. At Volvo, production tech- 
nology goes hand in hand with 
what the company calls quality of 
working life. There is a strong re- 
semblance here to Japanese partici- 
patory work structures, except that 
m Sweden the consensus involves 
government, management and la- 
bor unions. 

Professor Rebel Cole, an indus- 
mal psychologist at the University 
of Michigan, comparing tbe Volvo- 
style participatory work infrastruc- 
ture wilh employee relations in De- 
troit, said; “Sweden differed in that 
Swedish management moved early 
to involve tbe unions and gained 
their full support in the earty stages 
for instituting self-steering wane 
oups. But in the United States, 
ere was failure to develop union 
support and today the attitude ot 
organized labor ranges from deep 
hostility to limited acceptance.” 

Volvo’s three model series — the 
760/740 sedans, the 2 00 smaller 
series and the 300 made in tbe 
Netherlands — had their begm- 
“ : TS$ in the “Jakob," which was 
ae on the island of Hismgen, 
outside of GOteborg, in 1927, by. 
two former SKF employees, Assar 
Gahridson and Giistaf Larson. 
The first Volvo was fairly Ameri- 
can in style, although it was pri- 
marily designed for Scandinavian, 
conditions. The PV 444, with its 
integral steel body, was the fiat 
mass-production unit, in 1944. 
knd production is still on the 


rise. At tire beginning of this year, a 
feasibility study -was undertaken 
for a new passenger-car plant at 
Uddevalla. This is in addition io 
the main Volvo plant at Torslanda, 
with its 96 robots and production 
groups with full responsibility for 
operations, and Kalmar, in Swe- 
dffli; Hefmosid, in the Netherlands; 
Ghent, in Belgium, and assembly 
plants in PaimHa, Thailand, Ma- 
laysia and Australia. 

Tbe Uddevalla plant would be at 
the center of the largest expansion 
of car operations in the past 10 
years, with production of 40,000 
units a year m a single shift 

Saab, which started with the very 
modest production rate of 1,000 
cam in. 1950, is now at 102,000, and 
last October, the board derided to 
increase annual output to 150,000 
by 1988. A production increase of 
about 10 percent annually is sched- 
uled for the next few years. 

The Saab 900 has established it- 
self in the market segment for “ex- 
clusive” cars with a high standard 
erf equipment and performance. 
Saab said the new 9000 expands the 
range upward. The eagmes have 
been developed from two-stroke to 
four-stroke with single or twin car- 
buretors, then to fud-injection en- 
gines and now turbocharged units. 
Tbe third- generation turbocharged 
engine with 16 valves has now been 
introduced. Exports account for 70 
percent of production. 

Vo! vos mid Saabs arc not cheap, 
but there is competition at this lev- 
el As Pehr GyUenhammar, head of 
Volvo, pointed oat “We increased 
our shares last year in the greater 
part of our marketing areas. The 
competition for Volvo is substan- 
tial, and commands respect West 
German and American manufac- 
turers are offering updated product 
programs of good quality and die 
Japanese producers are applying 
mercaring resources with an eye to 
our segment of the market" 


price freeze. That could be an unr 
happy indication if sustained.” 

Non-Socialist economists tend 
to blame Sweden’s well-organized 
labor unions and their policies of 
“wage solidarity" for regularly 
pricing tbe nation’s exports out of 
inte rn a ti onal markets Bat Rolf 
Andersson, an economist with the 
Landsotgarusationen, the Swedish 
trade union confederation known 
as LO and representing some 2 nril- 
Iionwurkers, said that productivity 
has, so far, kept pace with wage 
hikes. 

“For the greater part, higher 
wage increases have been compen- 
sated by higher productivity in- 
creases, Mr. Andersson said. But 
be added that “this can’t last indef- 
initely.” 

Sweden’s labor negotiations 
have, traditionally, been highly 
centralized. LO and the Swedish 
employers’ federation, known as 
SAF, would reach agreement on 
how much Swedish industrial 
wages, generally, would increase, 
with various industry sectors and, 
unions then deriding the specific 
'pportionment of the wage hn«-_ 



gap between low and high wage 
grades, as weD as ensuring equal 
pay for equal work in all industries. 

Centralized wage talk* broke 
down in 1984, when the employers’ 
federation and some unions want- 
ed contracts to be signed on an 
indnstry-by-indnstiy basis. The re- 


sult was that the government’s 6- 
percent wage guidelines werewide- 
ly ignored and labor costs rose by 
about 9 percent. In 1985, a .son-. 
Mance of the old “order” was . re; 
stored with the 5-percent 
agreement between the unions 
the federation early in the year. 

But the appearance of labor mar- • 
ket harmony was quickly shattered 
by a nearly three-week-tong white* 
-roDm, pubUc-anptoyecs strike in 
May. The strike got international 
attention try cutting off all air con- 
nections with Sweden and stopping 
most international trade due' to 
walkouts by airport personnel . and 
customs inspectors. - 

“Tbe problems for Sweden, is • j 
that we have organizations on tie 
labor market that are very strong, 
and especially, the public-scctoris- 
bor organizations do not have the 
same feeling for tbe importance of 
Posing down wage increases as 
there is in the private sector," said 
Lfflemor Tbaiin, an economist and 
vice president of Svenska Handels- 
banken. 

“After the election, irrespective 
of who wins, (here will be a rtdoo- 
tion of interest rates ami tighter 
fiscsu policy, and this is a recom- 
mendation thai many eodndnit&&..' 
make,” according to Ofle Djerf/aiK 
economist at PK-Banken, ttesa^ 
to-owned commercial bank- 1 -"!'- /L 

Mr. Fddt said that he has^epet- 
government spending und&acop?'/ 
trol without cutting into the bread - 
and liberal range of social batefte j 
available in Sweden. • vrC. 


Palme, in an Interview , Terms 
SDI *Very Dangerous 9 for Peace 


““ervatives here trust us" on 
toe handling of foreign policy, 
which includes relations with 
Moscow. 

• Commenting on a predic- 
tion made to an American re- 
porter in 1981 that “Reagartism 
wall not function" in the United 
States and in other Western 
economies, Mr. Palme said, 

Foe reason Mr. Rea 
ma nag e d until now is t 
or a super-Keynesian 
that is based on a large federal 
there may an end to 
Meanwhile, ^Thatcher- 
Bffl ts not working out well in 

JJJSS ■ a * aoOE ° 0r [Hel- 
mut] Kohl is in trouble" in W«t - — , — 

G^fany, because of rising un- c P a P m 

employment there. ' oration and DevriMMumt in it* 


a year after the Socialists took 
power in 1981, and the higMf 
restrictive monetary and fool 
policies of Prime Minister Mar: ' 
garet Thatcher of Britain, 
‘yure is the third way, and we, 
also have kept unenqilqyniait 
oown to undo- 3 percent” v • 

•What if he is re-etocted? 
“We have come about halfway, 
[ance 1982] and in the next’ 
“roe years, if we win, we will 
try dong more for the under- 
pnvdeged in Sweden and en- 
couraging environmental 
causes." Does he plan new aiifrv 
tcrity measures? “Not necessar- 

H? 1 JteS? 5 dkagrae with 

the OECD estimatesTThe Or- 


_ v? 

Qplqyznem the 
• He said he 


had achieved 

success in economic policy 
*■*. tafang power in 1982 by 

Fiance, which were abandoned 


majuwua# uw" 

erauon and Development, in ns 
June 3 report on the Swedish 
“onoay, warned that Sweden 
faced weaker economic growth 
this year and in 1986. “Our pro- 
jections are better than that," 
Mr. Palme said. 

—AXEL KRAUSE 



v 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


Page 9 




1 • -■TM* ,r y . i 

‘ >li,r 




* r: • ! Ulr3‘5- 

r- 1 ; 

" ■ l ' c lit]:' - 

••l* A ■ 


, '"Si! 

' 1 


. ’/ * -sfc 

• • '.am* 
'*ur2r, , 

' «*x- 

• r ^ 




* * • ! 


x-i- % z 




Fax. Spnulinrfi 


THE MOTORINGJOURNAL “WHAT CAR?” HAS CHOSEN THE BEST DIRECTORS CAR FOR 1985 

(nc 


•T» 


^ Cr °Bs72, 




sass£Z* m *S& 




ssspsgsggggs 

IMSIfe 




i& — ..._ J # 


•^asparS^'y 0 — m . xf-4? • 9? re^ ?' a 

»^gr tST 





Be one of the few 

to have Saab’s stunner 


“Because of its unique combination of phenomenal 
performance, driver appeal and sheer practicality it 
thoroughly deserves its first place status.” 

That’s what the people at the British magazine What 

n . -1 ■ -« •_ .11 1 • ■ . r J, T '1 til n 1_ 


900 TUrbo 16S as the “Best Directors Car”; for 1905. (In 
America, this dazzling car is referred to as the Saab 900 
TUrbo 16 SPG, Special Performance Group.) 

This really didn’t come as a great surprise to us at Saab. 
We already knew that the 900 Thrbo 16S was a terrific 
car, but if s nice that some other people flunk so also. 

What Card’s recognition isjust another indication 
that the winning Saab product concept has made our 
turbo cars into frontrunners for people in the lead who 
intend to remain there. 

i 

The Third Generation TUrbo 
One thing’s certain, the Saab 900 TUrbo 16S is not a car 
forthe typical driven 

It’s for people who have a little bit of Charles Lind- 
bergh or the Red Baron in their blood. That’s because the , 
900 TUrbo 16S has a little bit of Saab’s aircraft in it 
Aerodynamics. Precision engineering. 1 

Man-machine interaction. All-weather dependability. 

Under the hood of tins turbo lies a powSer plant that is 
an advanced stage of the evolution of the internal 
combustion engine. 


While other manufacturers are /X . . 

busy producing their initial turbos, 
we have developed our third 
generation turbo engine. 

nology has a turbo- 

charger with inter- i8 fci ^ i 

cooler, double overhead 1 a £f /fT 

camshafts and an advanced EL jf 

microprocessor-controlled Qjfi If 

fuel injection system that gives ysA Ja igy L 

flie 16-valve engine explosive 
power in virtually any RPM. 

And Saab’s patented Automatic 
Performance Control system |g^||SSgni 

(APC) is included to guarantee v^=®?|8J| 1 

that you get the power you \ 

demand from the fuel you choose. \ w 

But engine efficiency is only 
one part of the story With the third generation turbo 
engine, the main part of the story is performance. 

The 900 TUrbo 16S offers breathtaking performance. 
The engine delivers 175 bhp along with 273 Nm torque, 
and the car likes to show it off. It Joes the 0-100 kilo- 
meter sprint in only 8.7 seconds. And with its sleek 
aerodynamic design, its top speed exceeds 200 km/h. 


Performance with flair 
The 900 TUrbo 16S not only performs outstanding^’, it 
also feels great. Its design advances the state of the art in 
man-machine interaction. It features special aerodyna- 
mic fairings, front and rear stabilizer bars, specially- 
tuned shock absorbers, high-speed V-rated radial tires, 
leather seats, electric sun roof and fog lights. 

And with its sleek design, the 900 TUrbo l6Sisas 
stunning to look at as it is to drive. 

Ifyou are working abroad or shall be soon, you are 
entitled to buy this dazzlingcar at an advantageous price 
through our International and Diplomat Sales program. 

Supplies are limited so don’t delay Take off to your 
nearest Saab dealer and test 
drive the “Director’s Car of the 
year”- the Saab 900 TUrbo 
16S. 

For additional information 
write to Saab-Scania AB, 

Saab Car Division, 

Advertising Department, 

S-611 81 Nykoping, Sweden. 



One reason Saab aren't like other cars is that Saab isn't like other car manufacturers. 

Saab cars are just one part of Saab-Scan ia’s line of specia lized products. The Saab-Scania group also produces 
commercial and military aircraft, buses, trucks , satellites and industrial equipment 





■ ^ * - ^ '> A* ' 1 - ■ '*T 


' * • > > * 


S' ’ 










Page 10 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON SWEDEN 


Glass Leaves the Cottage for the Industrial Plant 




• . * 


A vase in the Poem series by Ul- 
rica Hydro an-ValHen. left. 
Above, a bowl and vase in the 
Cascade line by Bengt Edenfalk. 


KOSTA — “Glass has its own will," said Anna Ehraer. 
one or the designers a [ Kosta Boda. Sweden’s large* glass 
producer. The observation applies with equal force to Swed- 
ish design overall. 

Whether in glass, silver, ceramics, textiles, furniture or 
industrial design, Sweden has fashioned a special place for 
itself in contemporary international design. 

Whereas Swedish design intematioaally is judged as bong 
synonymous with Scandinavian design, it has developed its 
own line of direction. 

As Ake Huldt, organizer of a current exhibition of Swed- 
ish glass at the Swedish Cultural Center in Paris, said 
recently: “The variations of Scandinavian design have come 
to be regarded in the world as dialects of the Mnw language." 
tThe exhibition, entitled “Un An du Feu." is at the Centre 
Culture! Suedois. 1 1 me Payenne, to July 14.) 

But just as each of the countries making up the Nordic 
region possesses its own language quite distinct from that of 
us neighbors, so design in each is distinguished by its own 
speech patients and terms of reference. 

Denmark is eager to keep furniture and silver as national 
design motives; Finland leads in textiles and jewelry; Nor- 
way derives its strength from industrial design and wood 
products, and Sweden loves its glass. 

J think Swedish glass has a special place in the hearts of 
Swedes as a national treasure," said Mr. Huldt. who has 
collected some 150 pieces from 24 artists for the Paris 
exhibition. 

At Kosta, a small tranquil town skirted by woods in the 
heartland of Sweden's Sm&land province, in the southeast 
corner of the country, it is easy to see why. The factory 
outside the (own houses a glittering treasure trove of glass 
dating to 1742, when Kosta was founded as a glawnalrin p 
community. 

Since then, its fine crystal, its skillf ul engravers and 
polishers have carved out a unique name in the field of 
decorative glass, matched perhaps only by Orrefors, another 
leading Swedish glass manufacturer. 

But companies, like glass, fuse. In the mid-1960s, Kosta 
merged with Afors. which, with designer Be nil Vallien, had 
as its specialty everyday table glass. It later joined with Boda, 
which had focused on experimentation under designer Erik 
Hoglund. Orrefors ceased being a family business in 1971, 
becoming pan of a larger conglomerate. 

These ownership relations have their interest, since they 
also affect production and design," said Kaga Walden, 
author and translator, now chief of information at the 
Swedish Cultural Center in Paris. “The glass produced by 
Kosta Boda now is a pan of stocks covering objects for the 
whole table, in glass and porcelain." 

The emphasis has now switched from a cottage in dus try to 
a large- scale industrial operation focused on increasing 
exports, Miss Walden said. 


Most Swedish glass is produced in a small area in Smd- form." according to Helena Dahlback Luiteman and Leu- 
land, where fewer than 20 glass companies are active, cm- nan Lindkvist. authors of a book on contemporary Swedish 
ploying some 2300 workers. The largest is Kosta Boda. design. 

f-H * » — f- - n* I i AA ■ k.tn -V-T /loeinn ' 


praying some workers, idc largest is Kosta Boda. design. 

followed by Orrefors. the others employ between 20 and 200 They also emphasize the role of industrial design. "In 
persons each. earlier decades, silversmiths, potters and other trained 


persons each. earlier decades, silversmiths, potters and other trained 

At the Paris exhibition, one can view some of the best craftsmen, as well as engineers and other technologists, were 
exnmoles of omiemnorarv Snmtich atacc <t»«on fmm nr net? ImyiIvaI in industrial desicn and often concerned with 


ai me ran* exnraiuon, one can view some of the best era! tsmen. as wen as engineers ana outer icvuuuiuguu. we 
examples of am temporary Swedish glass design from Kosta involved in industrial design and often concerned wi 
Boda, Orrefors and the independent smaller companies, complex technical products." the authors argue. “Now? 
Included are works from Kosta's Mr. Vallien. Ulrika Hyd- davs. things are becoming more and more specialized." - 
man-Vallien and Anna Ehrner, and Orrefors'sOUeAlbenus. One example of this trend in Sweden is design for the 


man-Vallien and Anna Ehraer, and Orrefors’s OLe AJbenus. One example of this trend in Sweden is design for the 
Gunnar Cyren and Eva Englund, Mr. Vallien, originally a disabled. Here, the team of Maria Benkizon and Sven- Eric 
ceramist and sculptor, is one of the * Juhlin lead the field, pioneering » 


founders of the “new" Swedish glass. 
Mixing techniques .and colors, often in 
the same glass, his forms are sand- 
-blasted expressions of organic growth 
molded by spontaneity and stnetness 
of design. 


Stating his view of the designer's 
task at Kosta Boda. Mr. Vallien said: 


task at Kosta Boda. Mr. Vallien said: 
“Free experimentation is often called. 


by the managers, ’playing around.' but 
that is decidedly the wrong expression. 

Freedom to experiment with forms 
and materials is absolutely necessary 
and extremely serious. It is our form of 
research." 

At Orrefors, Mr. Alberius is con- . 
turning to evolve the glassmaker’s pure 
classic lines of the 1920s. fashioning 
his bowls and vases in crystal, with cut, 
etched or colored displays. 

“You have to bund up a natural 
relationship with glass; it's a material 
with its own characteristics and prop- 
erties," says Eva Englund, who works 
with free glass sculptures. 

For Mr. Huldt. form and function Coloinbine by / 
are fused in Swedish glass design to 
produce a translucent harmony between the designer’s vi- of 
sion and the craftsman’s technique. But Mr. Huldt is careful sy: 
to note that "glass design in Sweden does not predominate ca] 
but rather is a single important facet in the overall picture." 



Juhlin lead the field, pioneering re- 
search and development of utensils 
and equipment for people with im- 
paired muscular strength and mobil- 
ity. 

'The Stockholm-bused team de- 
signed. for example, a kitchen lmife 
with an extra high blade, good bal- 
ance and new grip for hands afflicted 
by rheumatoid arthritis or shniiy 
muscular disabilities. 

Other utensils, which have since 
become household items in Swed^ 
homes, nursing-care units and hospi- 
tals. include stout-handled cutlery, a 


tong with a pistol-grip handle and 
supporting arm to uft objects with 


supporting arm to uft objects with 
minimum effort and maximum sup- 
port. and protective glass and oven- 
ware. 

“The designer, working in indus- 
try or on a consultant basis, has a 
clearer profile dun previously," said 
Dag widrnan, chief curator of the 
applied arts department at the Na- 
tional Museum of Fine Arts is 
f Anna Ehrner. Stockholm. "In collaboration with 
other experts, be gives form to 
of the environment, sdeh as, for example, a complete h 
system, or he attempts to solve the problems of the 


Coloinbine by Anna Ehrner. 


— e— *•** wk utaou pibiuic. • ue link between form and function is omnipresent in. 

Design in Sweden runs in two directions. First, there is the Swedish design, whether in the field of furniture, textiles, 
interest in utility goods, to give good shape and form to ceramics or silverware. 

A*vliN«iMi f J Zrnm JT .1 ■ .» 


ordinary household items; secondly, there is the movement 
to fneeiy express artistic values in materials such as glass, 
silver and wood, which has become known as "industrial 


“After a period of strict technical and social preoccupa- stackable stool of ch 

“ St - 

mies lapsing into mere styling, to the concept of design as 


Furniture designers Borge Lindau and Bo Lindekrantz,. 
for example, like to combine materials and functions in 
novel ways: here, a conference table that can be turned intqa 
dining table and then into a Ping-Pong table; there, a 
stackable stool of chromium-plated or enamel ed tabular 


— MICHAEL METCALFE 


A Land Where the Wilderness Is Family-Friendly 




LOFTAHAMMAR — Moun- 
tains lakes and forests form the 
quintessential Sweden, and foreign 
tourists with a love of the outdoors 
have long followed in the footsteps 
of the first prominent tourist to 
Sweden. Charles Rabot. a French- 
man. who conquered Sweden’s 


highest peak. Kebnekaise. back in 
ISS3. 


Today, the peak is climbed every 
year by thousands, while thousands 
more, particularly visitors from 
Denmark. West Germany. Finland 
and the Netherlands, roam over 


what is one of Europe's lost re- 
maining wildernesses. 

The Swedes realized early that 
many other Rabots lived in the 
crowded, even then polluted cities 
farther south. They founded their 
National Tourist Association just 
two years after the Frenchman's 
climb. They built a system of trails, 
overnight cabins and mountain sta- 
tions and also set up youth hostels, 
which alone account for 850,000 
overnight stays a year. There are a 
number of young visitors from the 
United States, although nowhere 
near the total from West Germany. 


Sweden’s wholesome style of liv- 
ing has long fascinated its Europe- 
an neighbors. Today, the tourist 
association is selling Sweden's non- 
mountaineering attractions, start- 
ing with the capital city Stockholm 
— rightfully described in the bro- 
chures as “the city that floats on 
water” — and including the weft- 
era coastline around Goteborg, the 
large Baltic island of Gotland, with 
its old Hanseatic city of Visby. and 
the 3,000 lakes and the many folk 
traditions of VSrmland. 

The capital's main attraction is 
its proximity to water. A vintage 


steamship from the quav opposite 
the Royal Palace lakes aquarter of 
an hour to reach the outskirts of the 
Stockholm archipelago, a unique 
labyrinth of 24.000 islands and is- 
lets stretching 55 miles (89 kilome- 
ters) out into the Baltic. 

A more distant kind of "ailing is 
offered by the Viking and Silja 
lines, which make daily trips to 
Helsinki and other Finnish ports. 
An unusual opportunity for sailing 
to the Soviet Union from Western 


Europe can be had through the 
ScanSov line, which has rwnihr 


ScanSov line, which has regular 
voyages to Leningrad. ScanSov, 




'V . . • ■ ' 'V tW.; 



e which takes care of arrangin g visas 
I and accommodations, also offers a 
i combined eight-day trip to Lenin- 
i grad and Moscow, with the journey 

- to the Soviet capital by train, “soft" 

- class, from Leningrad. The pac kage 
also includes guided tours and eve- 

; ning entertainment, 
t The water in the middle of the 
) capita] is dean enough for swim- 
. ming, and it is not unusual to see 
. salmon fishermen on the city 
i bridges. Boats also sail to the fresh- j. _ 

■ water archipelago of Lake Malar- 

■ en, with its uninhabited islands 
covered with woods and midlife. A ■' 

_ regular service sails to Drottningh- 
olm Palace, the permanent home of 
tbe royal family and Sweden’s 
minj-vereion of Versailles. Next 
door is the Drottningholm Court . 

Theater, the oldest in the world, ' -,k 

with summer performances of op- 

era and ballet. •,$3 

^Spannmde , " said Ulla HuzeD, a ’’ * / * - 

ywiting radiology technician from .. 

Linkoping, describing the “exrite- - J >* s **» 

ment" of Drottningholm. "I have 
been to Versailles — and it is pret- 
ty." she said. “But the water 
around Drottningholm gives it a 
special beauty. Nature in harmony, 
that is what we strive for in Swe- 
den. It is all so spanrumde. " 

A group of small islands near 
Stockholm called Fjirdabolmarna 
is being opened to the public. 

Not far from the center of Stock- 
holm. near U dingo, are the Carl 
Miles gardens, famed for its sculp- 
tures. "This is one of the most 
beautiful spots in aD of Stockholm, 
where one can come to relax and 
enjoy the calm, away from the bus- 
tle of the capital" said Magnus 
Tobiasson, a recent high-school 
graduate from HSsselby. as he 

helped a friend assemble her cycle, „ 

They planned to spend pan of their w ' n * 

summer "exploring the wonders” from the Kobnirden zoo and safari 

«l^^*S*? A 5 lpeC, ? y P 3 * oulside NorrkOping, with its 

galleries of Gam! a Stan, the old dolphins, elks, bears and “wilder- 

l °TW . . ness hotel” there are sommarland, 

J?-* « ca f /tram packages summer-lands, in several parts of 
ihfc tT^f 11 C3 f Cr lo J gst aro , and the country where children can en- 

nrfcB^n?s.S lint 7 ^ ne ^ ^ j° y P° n y -ridin $- canoeing, cycling 
pnee air and rail connections to and water-dhufing. * 




^ r\ 




Vacationers ex 
ploringtheKai 
turn River, 
above. Left, 
dawn in tbe 
north and a 


chalet in winter 


snow, right 



■mw-f : 4 <i 

"A 4 ’ 'V : / 




- PPiltSlifl# M >' :> 

rh* *' % ‘ ’ 

* ‘t-: Z r i >’£ V:’ ‘ I / /A -i'- • .A 

SM-'’ : 








WVM 


S«wfch NaoonJ Towat Office 


Wfah r-k»ond Townf Ofik* 


encourage viatore to leave their 
cars at home if they want 


me votvo k^roup 


Sizable family discounts can be 
had in the cities. Lisebere in GOte- 

c 1 •_ 1. z. 


r . 7 Uicuua, XJUCUCIX m VJULC- 

bweden is one of the few coun- borg is Sweden’s largest amuse- 
rnes to make a consaous effort to ment pari, with free entry for the 

DlKlUft WtV VAnnn nintnm «»L — * 1 1 - 


Volvo is an industrial grpup manufacturing produds of superior 
quality and providing outstanding Service. 


r. -7 uivin, (»!», wiuj iicc aiuy iui me 

please very young visitant, with youngest and cheap rates for older 
prices that make it easier for whole children. 


families to go out together. Aside The past winter tourist season in 


Sweden broke records, and the 
camping aspect of winter sports has 
been expanded for the benefit of 
summer visitors. 

Camping now represents a major 
portion of the rise in summer tour- 
ism. Some 63 new camping grounds 
are spread over the country, and 
the Swedish Camping Book for 
1985 lists more than 700 sites, two- 
thirds of which are rated two or 
three stars. 

Most camps charge from 35 to 55 
kronor {about $4 to $6) per night 
for the entire family, including car 


and caravan or tent There is 00 
per-person charge, and this is prob- 
ably the cheapest rate in Europe, 
given the high standards. In addi- 
tion l? the regular sites, some 180 
comping grounds offer facilities for 


“V U lJfl l/lUJ. 

Camping grounds have often de- 
veloped into full-scale holiday re- 
sorts where tourists can hire boats 
and bikes, canoes and windsurfing 

lwanlr J 


Boards. More and more ground** 
are open year-round, with summfe-. 
tennis and winter fishing and si/ 
lifts. * 

— ERROL G. RAMPERSAD 


Volvo's growth and development have been mainly within the 
transport equipment industry. Today Volvo produces cars, trucks, 
buses, construction equipment, marine, industrial and aircraft 
engines and more. The activities within the Group have been broa- 
dened to encompass energy and food. 

In the energy business, Volvo is active in oil trading as well as 
prospecting and recovery of oil and gas through associated com- 
panies. ■=- 


What Lies Ahead fi 


A third line of business is represented by the food processing 
and softdrihks dUdnS ^ P ° tat ° e and ve S etabIe Products, meat 


S hly intemaHonal with 85% of sales outside Sweden, the 
/o Group has activities all over the world. 

The Group employs 6S,500 people and is owned by 160,000 
rights ^ ° Iders, none of whom holds more than 6% of the votings 

cm?L U S^ as an annua l turnover of around almost 90 billion 
?no K 10 f 1 »Hon USD) and its return on total capital of more than 
--O/o. makes Volvo one of the most profitable companies operat- 
ing tn the automotive industry. 

VOLVO 


(Continued From Page 7) 
favor all and sundry. By the same token they can 
no longer remain universally popular. 

Other problems also rise to the surface. The 
welfare state is. by definition, interventionist, 
and perfect egalitarianism calls for even more 
intervention. Swedes have been criticized by 
foreign observers for being excessively docile in 
face of such tendencies. But there may be a limit 
even to their patience. Freedom, as opposed to 
regimentation, has again become a popular 
watchword. This troubles the Social Democrats, 
who reply with the argument that no real free- 
dom is posable without security and equality. 

Taxes — especially direct taxes — are higher 
in Sweden than in other countries. Thar impact 
is fdt not only by "the rich" but also very much 
bv such “ordinary people" as skilled workers 


strike that included air-control personnel at all 
major purports and customs officers at the fron- 
tiers. The disturbance of the national economy 
was substantial and quite disproportionate to 

ffl* ICCIIM rat nni>f !■ I 1 1 » P - - V . 


lL . : — “WFiv^Aimuiuuc (O 

the issues at auestioo. Foreign trade was almost 
stopped for three weeks. 

Swedish exports have benefited from three 
major devaluations of the currency as well as 
from the rate of exchange of the U.S. dollar. Tbe 
Ut«t devaluation, at the advent of the Social 
Democratic government in 1982 was of 16 
percent. It was. however, not followed up by 
vigorous austerity measures, and the effect is 
now wearing off. There are even those who say 
that another devaluation may prove necessary, 
although the size of the latest one was justified 
by assurances that nothing of the sort would 
ever take place again. 

. welfare state as originally envisaged 

f “iiething that few Swedes are willing to 
forgo. Reaganomics or Thatcherism are not 
popular outside small groups of intellectuals. 
And many voters are probably afraid of what a 
bourgeois victory on SepL 15 would mean in 
that respect. 

In fact, it could be argued that it does not 
make too much difference which party Is in 
power: Anybody in charge after 1985 will have 
todo many unpopular things, and maybe Social 
Democrats could be good at pursuing "bour- 
geois policies. 

But the approach would not be the same. 


“‘“““j propie as smiled workers 
and clerical employees. Swedes are still ready to 
work rather hand, but quite a number of them 



. ■ — - -I—*- h uuuiutci 01 mem 

would apparently prefer to keep a greater part 
of their earnings for use according to their 
personal preferences. 

If was assumed that unemployment should 
never again become a problem. Indeed, it is still 
veiy m uch lower in Sweden than in other OECD 
counmes. But even in the present period, when 
industry is on the whole doing quite well, it 

above U* traditional 
leveL And labor relations are by no means as 
paceful as they used to be. Recently, white- 
collar workers m the public services staged a 


Austerity, to a labor government, usually means 
higher taxes; perhaps indirect taxes in the fint 
place, but to some extent direct taxes as wefl. 
Then- opponents would make spirited attempts 
to reduce public expenditure even to the point 
of affecting some soda! benefits, and they 
wouW probably try to seO out some publidy 
owned enterprises. They are also pledod to 
abousn the wage-earner funds immediately. If 
this happens, it might well be finaL It is doubtful 
whether Social Democrats, if they cam? badw^ 
into power later, would ever try to resuscitate 
this highly unpopular plan 

'JOS** - lhere “ considerable risk 
that Sweden will lose its traditional pariiamea- 
tary stability — and for a considerable time, 
there may again be frequent changes of govem- 
ujent, with the result that no policies can be 
planned for a longer period than until the next 
election. 

Th e answer would seem to be a reversal to the 

pobha of compromise rather than oonfronta- 
t u Jn ' 50 there seem to be no prospects of 
that. When Social Democrats talk of geuinE 
away from “bloc poCtics” they have in 3 
nothing beyond support from or coalitions with* 
one of the smaller non-Sodaiist parties. Thee.” 
on tiieoiher hand, are afraid that much accon> 

indication that he could think of an all-nartv 
consensus policy. 3 


*•-' ‘ 9 V 


sv A/’ -V 


•i-rV'.!? ;r 











Jhi- . 









cv^iV- 


W&'y _ ,-y_ 


LfV . * 


ft*- - .y£ •.••-a?--"*' 

l*T~ • .. : 

- - ■*: -'.7^ -z • •T' ■ 











tp.u. . **■... a: ■ 

tt'.- • ■' 

j.. 




^ t- , _ 

r_ • * -i3r jr ~ 


•' ■.& n 

■sf /jzgm 


r /■' - , 

;■ A 




- 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


Page 11 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON SWEDEN 




■'sJ 






^Manufacturing Sector Provides Core of Industrial Recovery 




i-wsa 




. . Tii 5 


STOCKHOLM — Swedish in- 
dustry. which has slowed several 
times over the past decade, is h cat- 


alyzing air and rail services and the Soda] Democratic government net investments and net 
hampering foreign trade, appeals of Prime Minister Olof Pahne when Mr. Sohlman said This i 

m r . ’ TSIj 1 f -■ I • ■■ i. r* _ IMJ I I... _ 


'.fr , ' . mg up again, although not without 

•••, *" fnMinn 


to have, been sailed before major national elections are held in Sep- a 1984 export surplus more than year. 


s," cent in 1985. slowing from a 6.8- 
in percent annual expansion rate last 


' : v- r fe’ ’ 

• _ iv 

• "-V ' 



:i„' concents. 

, u *h "i . “In terras of long-term industrial 
, LTLivj,* prospects, we are new on a much 
• .'h SCUQCler footing than on earlier oo- 
" •-■'V.ifcc, casions," said MI chad Sohlman, 
deputy undersecretary of state at 
the Finance Ministry. 

The official's viewpoint is shared 


some friction. tor could occur, economists said. 

Industrial performance, when However, the conflict highlight- 
measured against its chief interna- ed the friction under the surface of 
lionai competitors, is making Sweden's smoothly functioning in- 
strong headway. Production, prof- dns trial machine, rec allin g a major 
liability and investment are in- strike in May 1980, when a 10-day 
creasing labor unrest pared half a percent- 

. The manufacturing sector has age point off that year’s gross na- 
become (he core of the recovery, tional product _ 
generating sufficient momentum to “I think it*s fair to say that lucky 

transform ailing sectors, such as for us, the latest strike was too 


damage u> the manufacturing sec- tember. After dismal showings in double the previous year’s level. The fixed-investment plans of 


tor could occur, economists said, opinion polls earlier this year. Mr. swinging the current-account bal- the companies in the survey also 

i, ..clm n.i ». ■ 1 _ _n ™ : j: .. 


However, the conflict highlight- Palme's administration appears to ance of payments into a small sur 
ed the friction under the surface of be recovering following the strike's plus after years of deficit. 
Sweden's smoothly functioning in- settlement. Official statistics show that tb< 


reflect expansion, indicating an in- 
crease in value terms of 45 percent 


i dement- Official statistics show that the this year, ixirrespondin* to a vcl- 

dus trial machine, recalling a major Industry, despite the dispute and industrial sectors carving out the ume growth of one-third, although 
strike in May 1980, when a 10-day cost increases, continues to benefit best performance in export value these initial forecasts may 


labor unrest pared half a percent- from the world economic recovery, were trucks, cars, pulp, 'steel and 
age point off that year's gross no- coupled with fundamental rhangp* iron ore, while exports of ship ton- 
ti<m«l product in its structure accomplished over nage were more than halved 

“I think ir*5 fair to say that, lucky thepasl four years. Overall industrial production 

for us, the latest strike was too The government's industrial has jumped a cumulative 20 per- 


were trucks, cars, pulp, steel and downgraded slightly. 

iron ore, while exports of ship ton- i n 1984, volume investments 

nage were more than halved were up 16 percent on the previous 


Overall industrial production year's levels. Investments in plant 


shipyards) and in the pulp, paper 
and printing sectors. 

Profitability levels also pointed 
to the buoyancy of Swedish indus- 
try last year. As the Paris-based 
Organization for Economic Coop- 
eration and Development noted in 
a report on Sweden published earli- 
er this month: “In this respect, 
both 1983 and 1984 saw dramatic 
improvements, bringing profitabil- 
ity in most brandies close to or 
above the levels of the ‘golden 
year,’ 1974." 




transform ailing sectors, such as for us, the latest stoke was too The government s industrial has jumped a cumulative 20 per- and buildings rose by 40 percent, 
sted and shipbuilding, into gnmg short-lived to hit manufac turing in- strategy, Mr. Sohlman said, has cent from the trough of! 982, when while those in machine tools in- 


Ship building, while remaining a 
oblem area, has been stream! in- 


dustry's strength,” said Lars Math- been orthodox. By attempting to output was lower than eight years creased 10 percent. 


lein, another senior Fin ance Minis- pot straight industrial and econora- earlier and when Sweden’s share of industrial sectors reporting gen- 


try official. 


ic fundamentals, it has put the era- world exports rad of fixed business ^ ■ mvestmcDl of man 


problem area, has been streamlin- 
ing its operations, closing down un- 
profitable shipyards. 


" ' ■'■■’w-W -’^hy industry. “Investments in Swed- 
• F*MS- isfa ““tostry continue to increase 


But officials rad industrial econ- phasis on improved profitability investment exhibited marked de- 
omists are acutely aware that rising and a sufficient degree of demand dines. 

wage costs could blunt industry's "The strategy has bees built The turnaround has been broad- 
competitive edge, honed by two around our goal of raising employ- -based and shows signs of being 
double-digit devaluations in 1981 mem levels rad cutting inflation," maintained this year, although at 
and I9S2. Tr : industry federation he said, adding that the govern- slower growth rates. In the first 


M Slat investment UKTCSDCS IM HAMC -Ka _ ", 

mvestment exhibited marked de- ^ ^ ^ year deluded 2Jj* _£“! 


part, the go 
it focused n 


most of its ef- 


competinve 


dines. ™ 1351 forts arid resources on the task of 

The turnaround has been broad- Stile ‘and^othSTrad^ r “ l ™turing troubled sectors 

-based and shows signs of being JLSISnrt d “W” 1 , rneawes ; 




such as subsidies, soft loans and 




■ r! v; hi; 


and, combined with a comparative- 


forecasts that honriy wa 
could rise by between 7. 


Utilization of industrial capacity capital injections. The task of indi- 


ment has shifted from a defensive quarter of this year, general indus- ®lso improved steadily throughout recily promoting new sectors and 


and 8 support of ailing sectors of industry trial production rose by 7 percent 1984. re aching 87.2 percent in the growing industries through finan 
uch as toward more expenditure on im- in volume terms from comparable *°“ r th quarto - , 3.8 percentage dal incentives and channeling pii 


-.-w l: "ly favorable competitive position, percent this year,- twice as much as toward more expenditure on im- in volume terms from comparable 'ounn quarter, j.e percentage 
• the underlying prodnetion trend m competitor coantries. proving infrastructure and the 1984 levels, with output in the rap- ^mistugher thra m tlmcomparar 

for major parts Of Swedish industry “Oni* «Snr»W Tin* eel dbw fmm hreerimo oTYvmit fnr Hiph-wehniv irflv emanHin* enaneMine srcijir quarter, and With all m- 


" »«% 
..,V^ 

. -'IJCto- 


is positive,” the Federation of success,” Mr. Sohlman said, adding 

£■ J!.L J - - • - . .V., — - J Vt. Jnn, 4 a 


“One should not get dizzy from breeding ground for high-techno- idly expanding engineering sector 5 je 1 r®4 quarter, and with all m- 
ccess,” Mr. Sohhnan said, adding logy areas. growing 14 percent, statistics show, austnal _sectors excepi mining and 


Swedish Industries said in a recent 
report. 


A two-week labor dispute in recovery gong. 


that much remained to be done to 
curb inflation and keep industrial 


logy areas. 

It is undeniable that the accelera- 
tion in industrial performance has 


growing 14 percent, statistics show. 
The industry federation, in its 


the textile and clothing industries Mill have 


vate savings into fresh investments 
is relatively new. 

Whether the present government 


latest survey of the plans and as- re fi lslenn & increases 


her the present government 
■e the chance oi furthering 




this industrial policy depends on 


1 *:;n, 


May involving more than 100,000 The performance of Swedish in- m wim m . «a. u u. h... mh >«i t „ nnn stainless sreei 

Iv public-sector emplc^ees, while par- dnstry is crucial to the chances of was geared to raising the levels of al production will grow by 4J per- industry, engineering (excluding — MJLHAfcL METCALrt 

n ,!j' 4 jjj 

Debate on Labor: What Happened to the Swedish Model 9 ? 


rdriven. "During the sessments of 250 leading Swedish Particularly high utilization per- the electorate's judgment in Sep- 


982-84, substantial growth companies, estimates that industri- callages were seen in the chemical 


n ’•'■'IbL ' ‘ 


tember. 

— MICHAEL METCALFE 


Sandvik Steel produces and markets special steel in the 
form of tube, strip and wire, predominantly in hiph -alloy 
and stainless sreei. 



SALT&JOBADEN — This tiny 
spa on the chain of islands string- 
ing together the Stockholm archi- 
pelago, sedate and tranquil as it is, 
hardly seems the setting for fiery 
debate between labor unions and 


A (ahor denronstratiofl in Sweden. 


But h was here in 1938 that 
Swedish unions and management 
forged an agreement out of which 
grew what became known as the 
"Swedish model," the key to har- 
monious industrial relations over 
more than four decades. 

The ghosts of union leaders and 
industrialists of the 1930s are hard 
to find in tins tourist root of the 
mid-1980s; so is the mood, which, 
nearly 47 years later, appeals to 
have been laid to rest 

What happened? According to 
economists, the model centered on 
centralized wage bargaining in pe- 
riods of economic growth, which 
ensured an unbroken record of la- 
bor-management peace based on 
consensus and no government in- 
tervention. 

With the slip into recession at the 
be ginnin g of this decade, the de- 
cline in corporate profitability rad 
the threat of scarcer jobs combined 
to erode the pillars of the model, 
which collapsed under the weight 
of a series of strikes, the breakdown 


in consensus and the decentraliza- 
tion of wage bargaining. 

When Sweden strikes — which it 
does rarely — it strikes in a big 
way. The latest example was a 17- 
day dispute in May involving more 
than lCb.000 public-sector employ- 
ees, which halted air and rail trans- 
port and disrupted foreign trade. 
Thinly veiled government interven- 
tion and a tough credit-tightening 
package led to a settlement before 
the dispute began to bite deeply 
into industry’s exports, according 
to economists. 

This was not the case in May 
1980, when a conflict involving 
more than half the 4 S -milli nn 
working population in 10 days of 
strikes, lockouts and work- to- rule 
actions sapped Sweden’s economic 
resources by shaving half a percent-, 
age point off that year’s gross no- 
tional product 

But this was not the final blow to 
the modeL At the be ginnin g of 
1982, the centralized system of 
wage negotiations collapsed, when 
members of the Landsorganisa- 
tionen, the trade union confedera- 
tion known as LO and representing 
2 million workers, threw out a wage 
proposal by the employers’ federa- 
tion, known as SAF. The employ- 
ers, after faffing to agree among 


themselves on a joint negotiating 
ktand. wanted existing wage agree- 
ments to be extended for 12 
months. 

"The 1982 breakdown marked 
the beginning of the end of a 
30-year tradition of central wage 
discussions between employers and 
unions, who have yet to agree on a 
fresh approach to joint industrial 
labor relations." said an indepen- 
dent industrial analyst in Stock- 
holm. 

In March 1983, the metalwork- 
ers' union agreed on a pay deal with 
the engineering employers' associa- 
tion, marking the first time in 28 
years that an agreement al union 
level had been concluded outside 
the centralized negotiations be- 
tween the LO and Die employers' 
federation. 

Since then, attempts have been 
made to find common ground but a 
return to the "Swedish model" is 
far off. 

The LO advocates the traditional 
pattern of coordinated central wa- 
ge-setting, which its leaders say em- 
braces the concept of "wage soli- 
darity" and under whose banner 
Die margin of pay discrepancies has 
narrowed to 30 percent of its 1960 
level 

The employers grouped in the 


SAF federation favor a more de- 
centralized approach, arguing for a 
framework settlement that leaves 
room for maneuver in individual 
sectors and which they say would 
better reflect different levels of cor- 
porate profitability and productivi- 
ty. 

Burying their considerable dif- 
ferences under government pres- 
sure. Die union-employer factions 
stitched together an agreement for 
a temporary framework for this 
year’s wage "rounds. 

Last February, Die two sides 
came together to make a joint rec- 
ommendation that nationwide 
wage increases be restricted to 5 
percent this year. The result of this 
approach, economists said, was 
that pay negotiations al the sector 
level turned into protracted wran- 
gling over small prim. The Social 
Democratic government fears this 
will lead to companies making local 
pay deals in excess of its pay-ceil- 
ing guidelines, thereby putting its 
anti-inflation policy into jeopardy. 

Whereas Die government has set 
a taiga of reducing inflation to an 
annual 3 percent by Die year's end. 
recent industry forecasts suggest 
that hourly wage costs could rise by 
as much as from 7.5 to 8 percent 
this year, torpedoing the govern- 


ment's strategy in an election year. 

“The fear of a wage free-for-all 
hitting the government's prices and 
incomes policy fast looks like be- 
coming a painful reality this year." 
an economist said. 

The implicit haigain between la- 
bor and industry on which the 
"Swedish model" was rounded also 
had os one of its featu res the goal of 
full employment, an aim that has 
come to dominate postwar Swedish 
economic policies. 

During the years of recession in 
Die industrial countries covered by 
the Paris-based Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment. Sweden has gone against 
the common grain of trying to re- 
store economic balance at the cost 
of jobs. 

In a survey published early Iosl 
year containing economic policy 
projections for this decade, the gov- 
ernment set as its dual goals the 
restoration of full employment and 
the return to a balance in external 
trade. 

"Hie main message therein was 
that these aims are achievable pro- 
vided a number erf conditions are 
fulfilled,’' Die OECD noted in a 
report on Sweden published earlier 
this month. 

h cautioned, however , that these 


conditions — price stability, bud- 
getary and external balance and 
adequate business profitabiliu — 
could prove difficult to reconcile ir. 
the short term given the compro- 
mises and “trade-offs" with the 
sectorial interests involved. 

Full employment in the govern- 
ment's survey is defined as the 
minimum levd of unemplovmer.i. 
which is equivalent to 2 percent oi 
the nation's workforce. On paper, 
at (east, (he government got close to 
that target last year, when the job- 
less total dipped below 3 percent ir. 
November, for the first time in four 
years, to an average 3.2 percent for 
the whole of 1984. 

The demand for labor started to 
accelerate in the second half of 
1984. and for the first time since 
1980 an increase in industrial em- 
ployment. of around 10.000. wa> 
discerned, the official added. 

Yet, Swedish industrv is experi- 
encing growing difficulties in ob- 
taining skilled labor, particularly 
technicians in high-technology. 

The government, aware of this 


shortage and the problems it could 
create bv impeding growth in new 


create by impeding growth in new 
sectors, has launched a scries of 
retraining and job-creation pro- 
grams. 

—MICHAEL METCALFE 




li 1 


& 




- C-UW-- ' ' 


u 





^ -*• 


u ’ 


w. -• • 


• W- 


i j 

- >.v 


> 


' ■ .? 


x- 


& 


- > 


yv 


' : 




■ / 


*■* : 










■/ 






> 




. iy- * j 

< ... : 


< - Z* ' 


a; ; ,j: w>;\. 


* * * 
5? 





/'■' 


f 


-- 

> x -r ' - < w * . - 

: . ‘ -■ ; ' V /' • 




•'ir: <Jfnr ' 

/ \ - r - ■- •: ' . 




/ 


/ - 


/ - - . 'a 


9- • . 

y-* ^ 

X' ^ •* -/ 


/ 


s 


+'■ . 


Shanska is Scandinavia's fargest civil engineering and 
building contractor, with extensive international 
operations. 

We are a full-service corporation offering 
a complete range of resources for construction projects 
of aB types and sizes— from preliminary designing to 
completion of functioning installations. 

In our international activities we specialize in 
large, technically advanced projects— on a design- 
construct or turnkey basis. 

We pride ourselves on completing projects fast 
and on schedule. 

Within Skanska we run a property management 
business to develop and administer our extensive 
holdings of office, business and residential properties. 
Skanska is Sweden’s largest private owner of real 
estate. 

Our financial management operations endeavour 
to fortify Skanska's established financial strength, 
which includes large holdings in Swedish industry- 
safeguarding our high liquidity— a great asset to our 
international construction activities— is a fundamental 
Skanska policy. 


Skanska. Consolidated Balance Sheet, 
December 31, 1984. 

In mfflionsol Swedish Kronor (SEKM). Exchange 
rate * SEK 1 ,000 = USD 712 (May. -85). 


Assets 

Current assets: 

Bank balances 
Receivables 

Investment and development 
properties 


11.880 


Fixed assets: 

Other receivables 
Shares and participations 
Machinery and equipment 
Fixed -asset properties 


498 

3,041 

812 

760 


Total SEK 16.991 M 


Liabilities and shareholders' equity 
Current liabilities: 

Uncompleted contracts 
invoiced sales from 
beginning of contracts 16,061 
Accumulated expenses 
from beginning of 
: contracts -1Z3B6 


Long-tom liabilities: 
UrDaxed reserves 
Capita) stock 

Reserves 

Net profit for. the year 


ConsoBdated Invoiced sales in 1984- 
SEK 14,765 M 


✓C ■ y 7 . . •/' 


Skanska International Divisions, Sweden: 

Stockholm, +46 8 753 80 00. Telex 1 1 524 skanska s. 
Melmo, +46 40 14 40 00. Telex 32247 skanska s. 
Gothenburg, 4-46 31 85 40 00. Telex 20642 skanska s. 


^5KAN5KA 


The Civil Engineering and Building Contractor. 


r’3^. c ^ ^ • 







Pa ae 12 

A SPECIAL REPORT ON SWEDEN 


Lower Lending Ceiling Cuts Banking Profitability 


STOCKHOLM — For Swedish 
banking. 1985 started ±s a medio- 
cre year that turned much worse on 
May 13. when the central bank, 
Svenges Riksbank. as pan of an 
austerity package, sharply boosted 
interest rates and lowered the ceil- 
ing on new lending for the year. 

With bank earnings already 
weakening, the rate hikes, aimed at 
sharply reducing private consump- 
tion and reversing private capital 
outflows, could mean that Swedish 
bank profitability will plummet 
rather than amply decline in 1985. 
However, the interest-rate hikes 
were described as temporary and 
may not last through the rest of the 
year. 

On tbe bright side, the Riksdag. 
Sweden’s parliament, passed a law 
on June i that will allow foreign 
banks to open subsidiaries in Swe- 
den after July I. It was a move 


supported and welcomed by Swed- 
ish banks in the name of free com- 
petition and also to prevent foreign 
discrimination of Swedish banks 
because Sweden was the last indus- 
trialized country to ban foreign 
banks. 

As a practical matter, foreign 
banks have to apply for licenses by 
October I. and they will not be 
opening for business until early 
1986. “The May 13 package means, 
on a yearly basis, a reduction of 
profits for Swedish banks by 2 bil- 
lion kronor [$227_2 mittioai. which 
is considerable when one considers 
that for the whole of 1984, profits 
for commercial banks totaled some 
5.9 billion kronor,” said Sven 
Baukman, information secretary of 
the Swedish Bankers' Association. 

At Skandioaviska Eoskilda Ban- 
ken. dropped 12 percent to 643 
million kronor in the first four 


months, and the bank said it ex- 
pected tbe higher interest rates 
since May 13 to cost it from 50 
milli on to 60 million kronor a 
month. That could mean an earn- 
ings drop of as much as 720 million 
kronor, from 1.841 billion kronor, 
in 1984. 

Post och-Kreditbanken. PKban- 
ken, the state-owned commercial 
bank,' said its group pretax profits 
were up 5 percent, to 436 million 
kronor, in the first four months. 
The bank declined to make an 
earoiags forecast for the whole year 
and warned that if interest rates 
stayed high, it would lose some 300 
million kronor of earnings during 
the rest of 1985. 

Uplandsbanken, a regional 
bank, said its earnings had declined 
17 percent in the period from Janu- 
ary to April. It predicted earnings 
would improve in 1985 from 1984 


despite the in leres t-rate hike, bul a 
large part of 1985 profits would 
have io be put in reserves against a 
drop in the value of tha bank's 
bond portfolio. Bond prices fell 
sharply after the May 13 rate hikes. 

Mr. Baakman. of the bankers' 
association, said that the unexpect- 
ed reduction of the ceiling on new 
lending to 2 percent above 1984 
levels from 4 percent "means, prac- 
tically. a lending freeze, and that’s 
why we called this an ‘idiot stop.' " 
He said that the only bright spot in 
the May 13 package was the aboli- 
tion of interest-race controls, in the 
form of "recommendations" by the 
centra] bank as to how much cus- 
tomer lending rates could exceed 
the discount and penalty rate lev- 
els. 

However. Swedish banks beat a 
hasty retreat from interest levels as 
high as 3 J percentage points above 


Booming Stock Exchange Takes a Breather 


STOCKHOLM — The fair-weather days of 
the Stockholm stock market, when the exchange 
sailed into record prices and turnover, have 
turned cloudy. 

The pace of trading, frequently frenetic dur- 
ing the past four years, has relented and in its 
place has come a mote sober attitude reflected 
in a degree of caution toward market trading 
and performance. 

“The level of activity is relatively low at the 
moment and what seemed a good opening to ihe 
year has turned into a veiy nervous situation," 
said the new president of' the stock exchange. 
Bengi Redin. who took office late last year. 

Since I9S0. when the boom got under way. a 
deluge of foreign and domestic investor demand 
had burst upon this .sedate exchange, housed in 
a 16th-century building in (he heart of Stock- 
holm's old quarter. 

The surge in trading took Stockholm to eighth 
place in rite ranking of tbe world's leading 
exchanges, boosting its equity turnover from an 
annual 1.5 billion Swedish kronor (S 1 69 million) 
at the end of the 1970s to more than 7Q billion 
kronor bv the end of 1984. 

The general exchange index has soared a 
cumulative 271 percent Tor the five years up to 
the end of (his March, an expansion unparal- 
leled by any of the world's stock markets and 
surpassing ihe record growth seen by its Nordic 
counterparts in Oslo. Copenhagen and Helsinki. 

There are now 245 companies listed on the 
exchange with a total market capitalization of 
22 1. 1 billion kronor. Their profits were boosted 
by a 16-percem devaluation of the kronor in 
October 1982. which sharpened export competi- 
tiveness and made shares cheaper for foreign 
investors. 

According to share analysts, the sharp in- 
crease in interest from abroad has been one of 
the main features of the Stockholm success 
story, coupled with a string of tax incentives in 


the late 1970s. which encouraged the small do- 
mestic saver to enter the market. 

While the Social Democratic government has 
removed or altered some of the incentives, mak- 
ing the market less attractive to the Swedish 
investor, the foreign presence has remained and 
even strengthened. 

"The presence of foreign investor interest has 
been the only stabilizing factor keeping the 
market ticking over in the post couple of 
months," said Anders Klimorpn. head of inter- 
national trading at tbe Swedish stockbrokers, 
Richard Hagglofs Fondkommission. 

Tbe level of net share purchases in the first 
four months of 19S5 was around 2.4 billion 
kronor, with the bulk of buying coming in 
January and February, a steep rise compared 
with the 1.1 billion kronor over the same period 
last year. Mr. Klintorph estimated. 

Private and large institutional investors, pre- 
dominantly from the United States. Britain, 
West Germany and Switzerland, had shown a 
strong presence throughout the past five years, 
but these institutions in May and June were 
beginning to hold off. 

The reasons for this change in attitude are 
ascribed by share analysts and stock exchange 
officials to political and economic develop- 
ments. rather than to any disenchantment with 
Swedish companies' profitability or the ex- 
change s performance. 

The May strike and lockouts of more than 
100.000 public-sector employees dealt a blow to 
economic prospects for this year, the analysts 
said. Also, the credit-tightening measures intro- 
duced by the authorities to reverse outflows of 
capital at the height of the strike took domestic 
interest rates to peak levels and placed addition- 
al burdens on capital formation. 

With less than three months to go before 
national elections, which could see the conserva- 
tives returned to power, investors are preferring 


to sit on the sidelines and see what happens. The 
conservatives, if they win. appear to be planning 
substantial benefits to shareholders, which 
would have the net effect of improving the 
investment climate, Mr. Redin said. 

"The market will be quiet in the next three 
months as investors Teel the effects of the credit 
squeeze and await the election outcome," he 
said. 

The credit measures included substituting the 
old tax rebate plan on savings in unit trusts with 
a new program less favorable to the small inves- 
tor. an increase in net wealth taxation over 12 
months, now expired; a deregulation of stock- 
brokerage Tees last July: a new turnover tax of I 
percent, divided between broker and client and 
a new law penalizing inside trading 

The latter is the latest in government moves to 
ensure a larger degree of regulation in a market 
that has been largely self-regulatory over the 
years and that has witnessed a number of poten- 
tially harmful and embarrassing incidents in- 
volving the disclosure of misleading prospectus 
information and conflicts of interest. 

While prospects for the next three months 
remain dim, foreign investors looking for bar- 
gains in the designated "free" shares, which 
constitute 20 percent of the market, have a 
choice of some 35 companies, which are blue 
chip. 

"For the patient investor, this summer repre- 
sents a good opportunity to start purchasing 
Ericsson shares," Mr. KJj morph said. He said 
the telecommunications and electronics group 
was improving profitability through completion 
of a product and marketing restructuring pro- 
gram. 

He added that the longer term should favor 
pharmaceutical companies again, including As- 
tra, Sweden’s biggest pharmaceutical group, 
and Pharmacia, which is forecasting a 20-per- 
cent rise in profits this year. 

— MICHAEL METCALFE 


the penalty rate when the Finance 
Ministry dad the central bank ex- 
pressed 'dismay at this initial result 
of their action. Despite bowing to 
government pressure. Swedish 
banking is regarded as much less 
subject to regulation than it was 
several years ago. 

A domestic money market has 
appeared, in large pan fueled by 
high corporate liquidity that is 
locked inside Sweden by foreign- 
exchange controls. Requirements 
that banks bold large blocks of gov- 
ernment and housing finance 
bonds have also been eased, and 
the government has. for nearly 3 
years, used open- market opera- 
tions with its own treasury discount 
bonds to steer short-term domestic 
interest rates. 

Lookrng forward to the opening 
or foreign banks. Mr. Baakman 
said that “now. they will have to 
suffer the same conditions as Swed- 
ish banks." He said that of 28 for- 
eign banks represented in Sweden, 
from 15 to 20 would probably ap- 
ply for licenses. He said it was not 
dear how the government, through 
the Bank Inspection Board, would 
select from among applicants. 

“They retain the nght to deny a 
license.'but bow to make selections 
in practice is a problem." Mr. 
Baakman said. "1 already know 
that four French banks will be ap- 
plying. How- do you say no to 2 and 
yes to two?" 

Bo Hammerich. who heads Citi- 
bank's representative office in 
Stockholm, said the large. U.S.- 
based bank would apply to open a 
Swedish subsidiary. By the end of 
1986. he said. Citibank would be 
operating as a bank with a staff or 
just under 50. about double the 
current staff of the representative 
office. 

"Our initial effort will be to ex- 
pand existing relationships with 
Swedish export industries," Mr. 
Hammerich said. "We will also do 
foreign exchange as early as possi- 
ble.” Other activities.' he said, 
would include using Citibank's 
electronic banking and informa- 
tion network "when we see how- 
important it is to the Swedish cus- 
tomer community ” 

The Citibank executive indicated 
that the bank wanted to develop its 
international specialties and 
strengths, becoming "a major mar- 
ket-maker" in some banking prod- 
uct areas in Sweden. But Mr. Ham- 
merich stressed that Citibank's and 
other foreign banking operations 
would probably lose money during 
the first year or years of presence in 
Sweden. 

"The key is to make a cautious. 


Stockholm's city hall. The capital was built on 14 islands separated by wide bays. 


broad cl 


and narrow waterways. 


professional start," he said. “The 
most important thing is for us to 
learn during the first year, for ex- 
ample, with the pricing structure, it 
would be foolish for Citibank or 
any other foreign banks to go in 
and try to change the normal infra- 
structure, such as by cutting 
prices." 

Swedish banks have prepared for 
the arrival of foreign banks by ex- 
panding thdr own international ac- 
tivities — both to Follow customers 
abroad and to meet the inevitable 
arrival of foreign b ankin g competi- 
tion in Sweden. 

SE-Banken. the largest b anking 
group in the Nordic area, is meet- 
ing the foreign challenge by form- 
ing a regional alliance. Scandina- 
vian Banking Partners, together 
with Union Bank of Finland and 
Norway’s Bergen Bank. 

"The object of this is to establish 
one single network of 810 branch 
offices," Jacob Palms tierna. chief 
executive and managing director of 
SEB International. SE-Bonken's 
international division, said. “As a 
network, we've gone a long way. 
We’ve integrated our EDP [elec- 
tronic data processing] systems, so 
that, for example, a Swedish com- 
pany’s subsidiary can move its 
funds the same day from Norway 
to Sweden. Our business customers 
con treat thdr accounts in any one 
bank in the group as one account." 

On June 10. SE-Banken pur- 
chased 7.5 percent of Bergen Bank 
and 3.75 percent of Union Bank of 
Finland. Hie stakes wiD later be 
increased to 10 percent in Bergen 
and 7 percent in Union. The origi- 
nal Scandinavian bonking partners 
agreement, signed lost year, also 
calls for the Finnish and Norwe- 
gian banks to take a stake in SE- 


-Bankcn. but that still is not per- 
mitted under Swedish law. 

“The ownership relationship is 
only to underline that we are in this 
for the long run." Mr. Palmstiema 
said. "We think that this idea is an 
aggressive way of meeting the com- 
petition in the Nordic area. For us, 
the Nordic area is everything. This 
is our home market, and we have to 
defend our turf.’’ 

With foreign banks opening 
soon, Mr. Palmstiema said he ex- 
pects to feel competition "in pay- 
ments. guarantees and foreign ex- 
change. where thev will no doubt 
be competitive." He said that "we 
are also much more competitive 
today than we were five years 
ago. .if they come here with the 
object of making easy money, they 
will be disappointed." 


Svenska Handelsbanken, one gp 
Sweden's “big three" commerdSa 
hunks, has also prepared for inter-'- 
national competition by strength-, 
erting its foreign operations in Lon- 
don and elsewhere. • ' - * ■ 

But. according to vice president • 
LillemorThalin, ‘‘our philosophy is • 
not for going into partnerships. 

While Handelsbanken was. 
aware of Scandinavian banking 
partners, "we don’t have anything 
in mind in that kind of coopcra- * 
tion." she said. "Our bank doesn't . 
think it is possible to earn that, 
much more through ownership o£> 
other banks,” she added. 43c. 

Although there are no limits on 
the number of branches foreign.'' 
banks may open in Sweden, it s 
unlikely that many wlQ try iojsx-~- 
— JURIS KAZA 


t. : ‘ 


CONTRIBUTORS 


GUNNAR HECKSCHER, a political scientist, was formerly a 
member of the Swedish parliament and ambassador to India and die 
United Nations. He is the author of "The Welfare Stale and Beyond, 
Success and Problems in Scandinavia" as well as “Asian Powierplay. 


JURIS KAZA, a financial journalist based in Sweden, contributes 
frequently to the International Herald Tribune. 

AXEL KRAUSE is the International Herald Tribune's stag 
economic correspondent. ••-■■7 

MICHAEL METCALFE, a Paris-based financial and economic 
journalist, formerly reported for Reuters in Stockholm. 

ERROL G. RAMPERSAD is on the editorial staff of the 
International Herald Tribune's special reports department. 


I--- 






ADVERTISEMENT 


ADVERTISEMENT 


Free Annual Reports from Swedish Companies 

The latest annual reports from the distinguished companies listed in this section are available to 
you at no extra charge. Simply circle the appropriate number on the coupon at the bottom of 
this page before July 15 and the report(s) will be mailed to you by the companies involved. 


ft 


i* i 


SAAB-SCANIA 


Saab-Scania develops, manufactures and markets advanced 
transportation equipment and systems. Products include 
passenger cars, heavy trucks, buses, commercial 

and military aircraft and satel- 
lites. We also manufacture 
industrial process products and 
heating equipment etc 
1984 was an eventful year. 
The consolidated sales rose by 
25% to SEK 25,956 m. The 
Group was able to increase its 
profit to SEK 2,555 m before 
appropriations and taxes, cor- 
responding to 9.8% of total 
sales. Pre-tax return on total 
assets, rose to 1 6.4%. The Group 
has 43,000 employees. 



The S-E-Bank Group 
Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken 

Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken, Stockholm, and its domestic 
and international subsidiaries. The S-E-Bank Group, showed 
consolidated deposits of SEK 146,980 million <US$ 

16,347M) and consolidated 
assets of SEK 182,097 million 
{US$ 20,255M). It is the largest 
‘ y hanking group in the Nordic 

^ H countries. 

* The Bank operates 349 

eii branches throughout Sweden 

and has six domestic sub- 
sidiaries. The international 
network presently comprises 14 
representative offices, five sub- 
sidiaries, including an invest- 
ment banking company, and 
one associated bank, all of 
them operating in financial 
centres around the world. 





AST IE A 


The Astra Group is the largest manufacturer of pharmaceuti- 
cals in the Nordic region, with about 6,300 employees and 
sales of SEK 3.9 billion in 1984. Sales outside Sweden 

accounted for 82 percent of this 
figure. Astra products were also 
sold through licensees for 
approximately SEK 2.8 bn. The 
Company's operations com- 
prise research and develop- 
ment, manufacturing and mar- 
keting in the pharmaceutical 
field. Earnings after standard 
deductions were SEK 801 mil- 
lion, up 27% from the preced- 
ing year. The increase is due 
primarily to the strong profita- 
bility of Astra's major sub- 
sidiaries. 



Si 


A 


p-ttO.T,-; 

Fnnrrr. . 

j^W'. 

Nitt. 

I. 

k&trL-.-. 

Ssuj;,’:: 

... 

j^der^ , 

TW 

* ’ 


' I 
I 


Mail this coupon orsend telex to: 

Matthew Greene/ Annual Reports 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre 
London WC2, England 
Telex: 262009 

Please send me the Annual Reports of the 
companies circled, at no cost or obligation. 


ALL 


Name 


Address _ 


City 


Code. 



Electrolu 


ERICSSON 



fi‘.hv<ax 

Aimiu! Sirpirt 
MM 



1984 showed substantial improvement in earnings and pro- 
fitability. Earnings improved by 40% to SEK 2,460 
millions and the return on equity after tax at the standard 

rate increased from 16.4% to 
20.8%. In December 49% of the 
Italian company Zanussi's 
shares were acquired, with the 
intent of widening profit mar- 
gins and of further strengthen- 
ing Electrolux's position in the 
European white goods market 
The goal of the group for the 
coming years is to create the 
right conditions for sustained 
expansion leading to sustained 
profitability and steadily 
increasing dividends. 



ERK5SON £ 


A long worldwide practice in building systems and networks 
for telecommunications is the basis of Ericsson activities. But 
today Ericsson is not only one of the world's lead- 
ing suppliers of telephone 
exchanges for public networks. 
Ericsson is also an information 
systems company. The future 
lies in integration of telecom- 
munications, data processing 
and office automation. 

The total number of employ- 
ees in the Ericsson Group is 
75,000. Ericsson products are 
manufactured in 32 countries 
and the group has activities in 
100 countries. Total sales were 
approximately SEK 30 billion in 
1984. 











INTERNATIONAL 




June 21, 1985 


WEEKEND 


Page 13 


An Operatic Dinosaur Gets a New Lease on life 


* »H|. l£l ,h tf . h "3?§ 

^"•'>- l u l ' ,rJlvi1 >*> n^TS, 


••••’■ : , ;• --v-S* 

hi 

■■ f 

■■■■» .. . '***££ 

••• 

••• 


I by David Stevens 

— r : 

P ARIS — A contemporary critic 
thought the libretto was “awfully 
stupid," the composer’s music has 
been almost completely out of fash- 
ion far a century, and the work itself has not 
beeriseen here since 1 893, but despite all this 
— dr perhaps because otf it - — Monday’s 
revival of Giacomo Meyerbeer's “Robert le 
Diakie” by die Paris Opera is one of the 
mostly hotly anticipated dales in die operat- 
ic cilendar of recent seasons. 

\jei the worldwide interest in this event is 
'.‘fteto mote than mere antiquari anism. Mey- 
«oper, bom Jakob Licbmann Beer to a 
wealthy Jewish family in Beriin in 1791, is 
considered the founder (or at least the cle- 
vmest exploiter) of what is nocmaUy under- 
swod as grand apim, and “Robert le Dia- 
bfe.” winch created a furor at its Paris 
premiere in 1831, was the composer's first 
effort in this ifaft- Furthermore, uie celebrat- 
ed ballet in Act 3 is considered by many 


dance historians to be the starting point of 
Romantic ballet. Paris was the capital of the 
operatic world at the tune and French grand 
opera became the dominant style for de- 
cades; not even Wagner and Verdi escaped 

its influence. 

At a time when the resuscitation of forgot- 
ten works and research in performing styles 
have become specialties, the Romantic era 
has not been much favored. True, there was a 
mild Meyerbeer comeback in the 1 960s. “Les 
Huguenots” (1836) had a star-s tudded reviv- 
al at Milan’s La Scale and a respectable 
provincial one in Rouen; “Le Pr ophite” 
(1849) was exhumed in Zurich and later at 
New York’s Metropolitan, and “L’Afri- 
caine” (1865) was produced in Munich. But 
“Robert le Diable" seems to have h«ri poly a 
severely cut concert performance in Flor- 
ence in 1968, in Italian, and a recording of it 
is the only one that can be found today. 

Paris, where it all began, did not jom in. 
Georges Auric, who directed the Optra, in 
the 1960s, when asked once about the possi- 
bility of a Meyerbeer revival, visibly shod- 


mg* 

I'.r v 


\nwn mn> 


IK. , r 


K • 


’** *•’!**• 

“‘.'■■--aJBsw*- 

Smarts*. 

i* at*#' 


' ' here ; eg 

i 

: • -f ig- 

' l'-" uX 



One of Degas's paintings with the ballet scene. 


lfaoria ml Abut Mowum 


dered at the thought and muttered, “You 
can’t do that anymore.” But he was a com- 
poser of a school that was still reacting 
against all that 19th-cemury flamboyance, 
whereas the present director, Massimo Bo- 
gjanclano. has made the revival of key works 

in the history of the Optra a cornerstone of 

his programming. 

Meyerbeer, with a solid German mnsical 
education under his belt, moved to Italy in 
1816, Italianizing his name and acquiring, 
chameleon-like, a talent for producing op- 
eras in the current Ro ssi nian style. Ten years 
later he moved to Paris, embarked on a 
methodical study of French opera and en- 
tered into a contract to compose an opira 
camique in three acts entitled “Robert le 
Diable:” The principal librettist was Eagfenc 
Scribe, master artisan of the “wen-made” 
play, proprietor of a veritable opera-libretto 
factory, and perhaps the most influential 
figure on the Parisian operatic scene in the 
nnd- I9th century. 

M EANWHILE, the ground was be- 
ing laid for the appearance of grand 
mem. The ingredients included the 
traditional French taste for theatrical specta- 
cle and the shift from opera as court enter- 
tainment to an appeal to a bourgeois public, 
some of its early manifestations were the 
ephemeral patriotic spectacles of the Revo- 
lutionary and Napoleonic periods, “rescue” 
operas such as Cherubini’s “Les Deux Jour- 
ntes" and Beethoven's “Fidelia” and pre- 
liminary steps toward 19th-century grand 
opera in such large-scale works as Spontini's 
“Fernand Cmter* and “La Vestale.” 

The growing Romantic spirit called for 
emotionally charged plots, historical or 
pseudo-historical situations blending into 
legend, the invocation of nature and the 
supernatural (sometimes mingled with gen- 
teel eroticism), striking contrasts and theat- 
rical effects, colorful orchestration, the dra- 
matic use of choral masses, and growing 
demands on the vocal prowess of singers. 

A list of early French grand opera has to 
include “Moke,” Rossini’s 1827 adaptation 
of one of his earlier Italian operas; “La 
Muette de Portia” by Daniel-Francois Au- 
ber (book by the ubiquitous Scribe), which 
racked up 100 performances in less than year 
after its premiere in 1 828, antfhelped ignite a 
revolution when performed in Brussels in 
1830; and Rossini’s “Guillaume Tdi," which 
had a triumphal success in 1829. 

Meyerbeer knew a trend when he saw one, 
and somewhere in here the “Robert le Dia- 
ble” project changed from a three-act opira 
antique to a five-act grand apim. After its 
enormous success, Auber returned to a pro- 



EkhAoihftji!'- Jr i Opf» 7 


Contemporary lithograph showing the ballet scene of the original production. 


lific career in opera comique (almost always 
In collaboration with Scnbe), while Rossini 
went into a well earned retirement from the 
operatic grind. 

The complex and silly libretto, inspired by 
a medieval tale, has Robert, the Faust-like 
duke of Normandy, arriving in Sicily to seek 
the hand of Princess Isabelle. He is accom- 
panied by Bertram, a demon who is ihe 
rather of Robert by a human mother and 
who keeps trying to win his offspring for the 
powers of evil. In the end Robert is saved 
from this fate by his foster sister, Alice, and 
he weds Isabelle. The most celebrated scene, 
however, is the ballet in the third act in 
which Bertram summons from their tomb: 
the spirits of nuns who betrayed their vows, 
seeking to enlist them in seducing Robert. 


The success of “Robert” was due, besides 
Meyerbeer's music, to a singular combina- 
tion erf factors and characters. There was the 
Opera's director. Dr. Louis Viron. a shrewd 
judge of his bourgeois audience and its tastes 
and the person most responsible for creating 
the five-act grand spectacle as a theatrical 
form. Under him, as production director, 
was Charles- Edmond Duponchel, an archi- 
tect and decorator of high-society shindigs, 
who had a corresponding taste for superp re- 
ductions and a penchant for romantic his- 
torical re-creation. Duponchel sent the de- 
signer, Pierre Cicftri. to study the 
architecture of monastic ruins, and the set he 
designed for the nun's ballet is variously said 
to be based on Saint-Trophime, near Arles, 


or the cloister ai Momfon I'Amaurv. near 
Paris. 

The Opera cast “Robert le Diable" from 
strength, as it did all of Mcycrbecr'v operas, 
but the roost distinctive singer in the cast was 
the tenor Adolphe Nourrit in die title role. 
Nourrit. by all accounts, was a stvlish and 
elegant singer who excelled in the iise of his 
head voice and what the French call wix- 
ntixie. but he was far more than that. A 
cultivated and intelligent man. he frequently 
wrote the words for parts of his roles and 
took an active role in staging of works he was 
in — some sources credit him with the stage 
direction erf the premiere of “Robert le Dia- 

Continued on page 15 


1 n ies The Founding Mothers of Dance Murano Makes a Comeback 


■ >: r*i rtCJl'- 
i' |V-S 3nd 
v SAt?ce r 

‘ •. < ' 0 <3 
:or 

• *?■*, T u <= 

«:<>*• 

. ,-LieioP- 
- i 'OF' 


by Anna Kisselgoff 

N EW YORK — “I aim to speak 
the language erf humanity, not the 
dialect of a folk-” The founding 
mothers of modem dance in 
America' were prone to making such pro- 
nouncements and this statement, typically, 
came from the mother of them all, Isadora. 
Duncan. Just as typically and in the same 
interview with The San Francisco Examiner 
in 1917, Isadora felt compelled to declare 
where her “center of inspiration” lay. As Ihe 
reporter indicated, she placed her hand'on 
her breast and then on her brow. ' For Isa- 
dora, the source of movement was in the 
solar plexus. Later, in the 1930s, the phrase 
“fall and recovery" would be identified with 
the movement principles of Doris Hum- 
phrey just as “contraction and release" 
would be identified with Martha Graham.. 

premise about movement became a ba- 
sis for a dance technique in each case and, by 
extension, became a metaphor for an aes- 
thetic —for what each dancer wished to say 
through her dancing. The general principle 
was, as Humphrey wrote in 1927, “that of 
moving from the inside out — it’s the domi- 
nant expression of our generation, if not of 
the age, and ballet is as out of style as bustles 
and leg o’ mutton sleeves.” 

We don’t hear talk like this nowadays and 
it is hard perhaps for us today to recapture 
the assertiveness of the modern-dance pio- 
neers and their immediate disciples, many of 
whom are still active. Two ideas need to be 
considered. One is these dancers’ belief that 
an individual’s own body could be the source 
for an entire hew form of artistic expression. 
Tb e second is that this individualism would 
ratidentified with all humanity. 

Tn short, there was a pervasive id e ali sm - 
about early modern dance that hardly seems 
evident today. It is true that this viewpoint 
might look naive in some respects. But it was 
not put forward by naive artists. Duncan, 
who died in 1927, could gush. But she was 
well read, well educated in art and music and 
at the center of creative currents is all the 
arts. Humphrey, who died in 1958, was — 
like Graham — trained at the school of 
Isadora’s counterparts, Ruth Sl Denis and 
Ted Shawn, and was a pioneer in her analytic 
approach to classical music. 

To the first modern dancers, the new ways 
of Hariring were universal in expression be- 
cause, in pan, they had reaffirmed anatomi- 
cal truths about the body. The difference 
between perfect balance and yielding to 
gravity created drama obvious to anyone, as 
Humphrey knew. The contraction and re- 
Jfease m the Graham technique was an ampli- 
fication of the mechanism of breathing — 
that is, common to alL 
“Contraction and release” could be incor- 
porated into a new dance idiom that was 
percussive and sharp. “Fall and recovery” 
could create a shift of weight that would 
affect not only isolated dancers but the way 
an ensemble looked — the entire stage pic- 
ture. The body-centered ballet vocabulary 
no longer needed to be the norm in theatrical 
dancing. 

Theidioms erf the modern dancers did not 
consist only of movements based on such 
principles. But what these dancers seemed to 
& saving was that the norm in dancing was 
actually found in physical laws applicable to 
everyone, while ballet sought an artificial (if 
highly efficient) use of the body. The indi- 
vidual was everyman — - that is, humamty. 
And humanity’s lot was dance's concern. 







& 


BJK 


W 



yz 


Pen drawings of Isadora Duncan by Jean-Paul Lafitte (c. 1909). 


The days are over whm a debate over how 
the body moves is the prime issue. Nor is 
Isadora's Whitmanesque “I See America 
Dancing" manifesto finding its echo in cur- 
rent aesthetic concerns. Tnere are social- 
protest dances and dances critical of society. 
But the hanoony-afier-confUci that Hum- 
phrey might promulgate in her works finds 
no equivalent today. There are no images of 
Utopia, of ideal societies. Isadora’s visions 
of healthy children skipping hand in hand 
toward happiness or of allegorical figures are 
replaced for the most part by sardonic or 
ironic pieces. These are heavily systematized 
or cerebral in their concepts. 


| ACH age begets its own creative spirit 
H and obviously an America that has 
-1 J lost its innocence cannot be the same 
as it was in the first half of the century. Yet it 
is worth recalling that the early modem 
dancers also lived in turbulent times. Isa- 
dora’s personification of the “Marseillaise” 
was a call to French patriotism, a response to 
World War L and her most dramatic dances 
were infused with her enthusiasm for the 
Russian Revolution. Internal upheaval was 
certainly the stimulus for Humphrey, 
flmHes Wtidman and Graham when they 
left Denishawn to express what they felt in 
what proved to be more contemporary 
terms. It is pertinent to recall that they did 
their major work in the midst of the Depres- 
sion and the New Deal 
The print is that no matter how dearly 
(hey saw the disasters of the times, they 
identified with the values of a sodety around 
them that promised resolution. Graham van- 
quished bigotry, Puritanism and conformity 
in ha- pieces; Humphrey put strife and con- 
flict through a prism in which good won out 
over evil Interestingly, even m an age of 
Works Progress Adminstration murals, 
modern dance’s early exponents often 
tamed to a strain of lyricism — not the 
machine-dances one could have expected 
Lyricism is out of fashion nowadays, and 
perhaps that is why it was startling to see 
how much it dominated an especially inter- 
esting recent concert hoe that included 
works by various modem-dance pioneers. 
The guiding lights were Lori BdHove, who 
has done very well as a Duncan exponent, 
and Evelyn Shepard, to whom Pauline 


Koner has entrusted the performance of her 
solos.. The program included Humphrey’s 
“Day cm Earth’' and several Duncan pieces 
that have been revived in recent years. There 
was also “Les Funerailles” to music by Liszt, 
a solo Isadora danced at a memorial service 
fra the French actress Rfgane. Bdflove and 
her teacher, Julia Levien, reconstructed it 
freely from various sources. At best it 
seemed an exercise “in the style of” Isadora. 

Koner’s 1953 “Cassandra,” Anna Boko- 
low’s Rachmanin off premiere.“Two Pre- 
lodes,” and Eleanor Xing’s 1970 “Enthou- 
sjasroos” to Barttik were the most recent 
works on the program. The latter was vi- 
brantly H uncurl by Betilove — a Hellenized 
bacchante, skipping mtinhibitedly with a 
tambourine and then turning into a snake 
charmer, with the “snake” around ha neck. 

King was a charter member of the Hum- 
phrey-Wddman company from 1928 to 1935 
and her memoirs, “Transformations” 
(Dance Horizons), offer a revealing pmture 
of an art form in the midst of seif-defmition. 
King, who left New York in the mid- 1940s 
for Seattle, was not considered one of mod- 
em-dance’s giants, but the early solos on this 
program reflect the form and aesthetic she 
absorbed from them. She writes that her 
“Song of Earth”(1933) to an arrangement of 
an English sheep-shearing song by Eugene 
Goosens, borrowed its opening stance — 
legs mart, torso bent over — from Breugh- 
el’s “Reapers.” Belli ove’s heavy plunging 
gestures and her sinking to floor signaled a 
peasant's affinity Tor the earth — and mod- 
em dance’s love affair with Qoorwoik. When 
she rose into a profile with one arm curved, 
she did so impressively within one phrase. 

“Mother erf Tears”(1933) is King’s other 
best-known solo. Here again, Behloye began 
bent, rooted to a spot The music is by 
Herman Reutter, a German composer killed 
in World War L and the impression is of a 
Dflrer woodcut. The movements are sharp 
and the virgin wears in one simple gesture 
with capped hands before sinking into a 
twisted form. Despite (he derogatory charge 
of “5df-oxpressiozi” often hurled at modem 

saw them as dances of life an^death. Cer- 
tainly, they eschew literalism and they are 
surprisingly abstract ■ 

O f 0S5 The Hew Yorbffinus 


by Kate Singleton 

V ENICE — If you think of modem 
Murano blown glass as meaning 
those tawdry ashtrays, doorstops, 
paperweights, gondolas, animals 
and assorted gewgaws that lure tourists into 
the shops of Venice, you are mistaken. Re- 
cent developments in Murano are showing 
that the kitschy image of its age-old craft 
amounts to little more fhan an embarrassing 
interlude in an otherwise glorious tradition. 

The glories of the blown glass of the past 
can be admired in the Museo Yetrario, the 
glass museum in Murano. a 30-minute vapo- 
retto ride from San Marco. It was refur- 
bished with perfect simplicity a few years 
ago: well selected objects from a 500-year 
span, displayed to their best advantage in the 
bright Venetian daylight. Now a new and 
separate section of the museum, dedicated 
entirely to 20th-century Murano glass, has 
just bran opened nearby. It holds a perma- 
nent collection of modem blown glass and 
an exhibition of coniemporaryprodticts that 
will be changed twice a year. The museum is 
the most striking sign of the renaissance 
taking place in the world of Murano glass. 
Both the new museum and the rebirth of the 
craft are the outcome of far-sighted collabo- 
ration between local authorities and a hand- 
ful of Murano glass firms led by two erner- 
I prising brothers, Giovanni and Carlo 
Moretti of the Carlo Moretti company. 

“The situation here ten years ago was 
dismal,” recalls Giovanni Moretti. whose 
family has been in the glass business for 
generations. “Quality output was rare, and 
the shoddy stuff lha had kept a number of 
firms going was being ed|ed out of the 
market by manufacturers in Taiwan.” Large 
factories had to shut down, unemployment 
became a problem, and the master glass- 
blowers reaching retirement age found there 
were no youngsters prepared to learn a craft 
that didn't seem to offer much future. 

The Morettis felt that the only way out 
was to pool ideas and initiate some collective 
action. Along with 11 other firms, in 1975 
they founded the Consortium for the Promo- 
tion of Venetian Artistic Glass. “We had to 
overcome considerable resistance,” recalls 




Hi, 

SSI. 

§m 

ties 

IlfSIii 

s'':;'. 







f V • I 

'A 


- -:rv':vv.;, 

* ^ " • T- ■ 



. . : 7 

■ • a- •• 
»•< A \V « 

ps'W 

Uu? 


‘La Fenice” carafe. 



r,'. . >•*': . 

14 J ■ ft. ‘it- > 



Moretti “ Cartoccio ” glass. 

Giovanni. “Relations between the various 
firms weren't good and people tended to 
have a self-defeating, insular outlook. It all 
took a lot of persuasion." 

There are 53 glass companies in the con- 
sortium today, and their coordinated efforts 
have reversed the downward trend of the 
1960s and early '70s. Their VM — Vetro 
Murano — mark has come to be recognized 
as a guarantee of authenticity, quality and 
traditional production techniques. Employ- 
ment is once more stable (around 2,00(3 em- 
ployees), and in 19S4 sales of Murano glass 
injected $50 million into the local ecomomy. 
That 55 percent of this was in exports shows 
that the consortium's promotional efforts 
abroad are bearing fruit. In collaboration 
with the Venice Clumber of Commerce and 
the Italian Institute of Foreign Trade, they 
arranged shows of contemporary Murano 
glass in London and Dussddorf m 1984. A 
show is scheduled for Paris in October this 
year, and Bloomingdale’s in New York wifi 
have a large glass section in its Italian design 
week in September. 

For the Murano /inns, the U. S. market is 
particularly promising. In the first half of 
1984, sales there showed an increase of 95 
percent over the previous semester. Ameri- 
cans seem to be moving away from the 
showy, ornate lamps and vases they once 
went for and choosing glass that embodies 
first-class design instead. This is exactly 
what the Moretti brothers hoped would hap- 
pen. Their firm produces up-market designer 
glass ([Carlo designs all their output) using 
traditional craft methods and a few carefully 
guarded inventions that allow them to in- 
crease production while maintaining quality. 

Other flourishing companies such as Sal- 
viati, Venini, Barovier & Toso, Mazzega or 


VeArt may work with a number of different 
designers, including outsiders, but they all 
aim at individual objects of superb crafts- 
manship and the best Italian design. The 
ideal customer is discriminating and reason- 
ably wealthy, “rather as he roust have been 
in the past,” says Carlo Moretti. 

The new section of the museum was really 
set up to gjve luster and a sort of imprimatur 
to modern Italian glass design. The building 
was bought, restructured and fitted out by a 
group of 10 Murano firms who lease it at a 
nominal rent to the Venice Municipality 
Arts Board. An advisory committee was 
formed to select the works shown in the 
temporary display. All Murano glass compa- 
nies, consortium members or otherwise, were 
invited to submit up to 10 objects. 

The 50 pieces on show on the ground floor 
of the museum are the outcome of the selec- 
tion. Most of the works were designed dur- 
ing the last three years and are varied in 
form, function and decorative techniques. 
The idea is that when you succumb to temp- 
tation and buy that extraordinary black vase 
that is slit at the rim and folded back to 
reveal the different colored glass on the inner 
side (from the “Gli Spacchi” series designed 
by Toni 2Luccheri for Barovier & Tosoh or 
those strangely surreal flasks with their dis- 
concertingly suggestive stoppers in pale 
fume blown glass (called “Zefiro” designed 
by Luciano Gaspa for Salviati). or the “Car- 
toccio” wine glasses designed bv Carlo Mor- 
etti (your guests may not know which side to 
drink from, but it is beautiful tableware!, 
you have the added pleasure of knowing that 
your new possessions are museum pieces. 

To make sure that new generations will 
keep production and standards up. next au- 
tumn a glass school on Murano will take in 
its first 40 pupils for a two-year period of 
professional training. Retired roaster blow- 
ers will teach the secrets of their craft; paint- 
ers, draftsmen and engravers will impart 
their knowledge of glass decoration; art his- 
tory lessons will widen the otherwise local 
horizons (most students «ill come from the 
Venice area). Jobs with Murano firms are 
assured for at least 80 percent of those w p ho 
get their diploma. 

(The Museo Vetrario at S Fondamenta 
Giustinian and its new section at Ic/d Fon- 
damenta Martin are open from 10 AM. to 4 
P.M, Sunday 9 to 12:30, closed Wednes- 
day.) ■ 

Ktue Singleton, a journalist based in Milan, 
generally writes about art and design. 


gm 


fcwwegjc*. ■ 


Midi's 


‘Gli Spacchi ” vase. 






•' v ■ - .' ii yj! r> 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1983 


TRAVEL 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 




VIENNA, Konzenhaus(teL 73. 1 2. 11). 
CONCERTS— June 23: Vienna Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Gianandrca Gavaz- 
zeni conductor. Katia Riccarelli sopra- 
no [Verdi). 

June 24: Bach Collegium. Hermann 
Furthmoser conductor (Handel). 
•Muakverein (tel: $5.6 1.90). 
CONCERT— June 23: TonkOnsdcr- 
orcbestra, Heinz Wall berg conductor 
(Schubert, Bruckner). 

June2S: Vienna Symphony Orchestra. 
Leopold Hager conductor. Sydia Bor- 
owska soprano (Handel). 
*Staat50per(Lel: 53240). 

OPERA —June 22: Ttirandot™ [Puc- 
cini). 


sky), “A Month in the Country' - ( Ash- 
toil. Chopinl . , 

OPERA — June 22, 25, 28: “Ariadne 
auf Naxos" (R. Strauss). 


•Tate Gallery (tel: 821 . 1 3- 13). 
EXHIBITION — To August 18: 
** Painting! by Francis Bacon: 1944 to 
Present 

•Victoria and Albert Museum ltd: 


589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To October 22: 
“Textiles Tran the WeHcome CoRec- 
lion: ancient and modern textiles from 
the Near East and Peru-™ 

To September 15: “Louis Vuitton: A 
Journey through Time." 

•Wiemore Hall (tel: 935.21.41). 
CONCERT— June 26: Nadi Ensem- 
ble. Lionel Friend conductor (Mozan. 

IL^?fTALS— June 23: Norman Ruiz 
guitar (Duarte. Villa-Lobos). 

June 28: Johannes Leertouwer violin. 

Julian Reynolds piano (Debussy. We- 
bern). 

June 30: Vincent Lindsey -Cl art guitar 
(Brined. Lindsey-Clartl. 


ENGLAND 


LONDON. Barbican Centre (lei: 
62&8?.95).ToJune3Q; "American Im- 
ages™ Photography 1945-1980." 

June 23: London Symphony Orches- 
tra. John Georgia dis conductor, Stc- 


EXH1BITION —To July 7: "Cather- 
ine Willis." 

•Galerie Scfaraii (td; 260.36J6). 
EXHIBITION— To July 20: “De Co- 
rot & Picasso.™ 

•H6tel Meridien (id: 758-1Z30). 
JAZZ— June 22 and 23: Buddy Tate. 
•Musee d’Art Moderne (tel: 
723.61.27). 

EXHIBITION— To Sept 8: "Robert 

and Sonia Delaunay.” 

•Muafae de la Vule de Paris (td: 
723.61.27). - 

EXHIBITION —“Marc Riboud." 
•Mu$£e de Montmartre (tel: 


•Tb6£ire des Champs* Elystes (tel: 


muter piano (Chopin, Ravel). , 

June 25: Dang Thai Son piano 


•Theatre 

245.28.12). 


arie-Sluari 


GBMANY 


606.6 Ml). _ - 

EXHIBITION — Through June: 
“Montmartre, its origins, its famous 

residents." 


•Musee des Arts DdcoratiXs (id: 


26032.14). 

EXHIBITIONS — To July 13: “Jean 
Amada" 

•MusAedu Petit Pahris(td: 265. 1 2.73). 
EXHIBITIONS — To June 30: 
“James Tissot: 1836-1902." 

To SepL 29: “Gustave Dora." 

•Musie Rodin (td: 705.0134). 
EXHIBITION —To Sept. 15: “Alain 
KiriDL" 




phen Hough piano (Elgar. Ravel). 
June 27: Rafael Frfihbeck de Burgos 


conductor. Pierre Amoyal violin (Bee- 
thoven. Dvorak). 


June 22: Roval Shakespeare Compa- 
ny. "Henry V". 


nv. "Henry . 

•National Portrait Gallery (tel: 
930.15.52). 

EXHIBITION— To OcL 13: "Charlie 
Chaplin 1889-1977." 

•Roval Academy of Arts (tel: 
734.9032). 

EXHIBITIONS — To July 14: "Ed- 
ward Lear. 1812-1888.™ 

To Aug. 25: “217th Summer Exhibi- 
tion." 


•Royal Opera (td: 240. 10.66L 
BALLET — June 24 and 26: “La Baya- 


dere" (Petipa. Nureyev. Minkus), 
“Consort Lessons" (Bentley. Stravin- 


N1CE, Acropolis (td: 92J0.05). 
EXHIBITION —To June 25: “Bale 
des Arts." 

PARIS, American Center (tel: 
335221 .50). 

EXHIBITfON — To June 25: “Mar- 
line Abatlea. Olivier deBouchony, Da- 
vid Rvan, AnneSau5sois." 
•CarriSilvia Monfon (tel: 531.28.34). 
DANCE— Through June: “50 Yean 
of Tap Dance." 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
277.I2J3L 

EXHIBITION —To Aug. 19: “Jean- 
Kerre Bertrand." "Palermo," “David 
TretnJeiL" 

•Galerie Charles Sablon (tel: 
548.10.48). 


•Palais des Congres (tel: 266220.75). 
BALLET — To June 30: Ballet Anto- 
nio Gades (“Carmen," “Suite Fla- 
mcnca"). 


•Paris Art Center (td: 322.39.47). 
•XHIBmON — To July 6: "Leon 


EXHIBITION — To’ July 6 
Geschia." 


•Salle Ptevd (tel: 563.07.96). 
CONCERT — June25: Ensemble Or- 
chestral de Paris, Jean-Pi erre Wallez 
conductor, Mstislav Rostropovitch 
cello. Galina Vishnevskaya soprano 
(Haydn). 

•Th65tre de la VHk:(td: 887.54.42). 
DANCE — June 22: Compagnie 
Francois Verret 

RECITALS — June 25-29: Rrysrian 
Zimertnaa piano, Kyung-Wha Chung 
violin. 


garo” (Mozart). 
June 26 and 29: 


Iune26 and 29: “Don Carlo” (Verdi). 


WEEKEND 


HOTELS 



m ra 

GOTE DAZUD 


**** LUXURY HOTELS 


GRAN HCHH. SARR1A 
BARCELONA 
314 rooms 
Busnwss ferities 
Fort das 


ANTIBES - 06604 


HOTEL DU CAP-EDEN ROC 

M (93] «JWI -Ttet <70763 


PKNQPAUTY OF MONACO 
MONTE CARLO 


BEAUUEU5/M9! - 06310 

If MBIROKU 
U(9310inOQI-Un47l23(M 
IA RCSBtVE DE 8EAUUBJ 
W. {93)01 JODI -Ufa 470301 


CANNES - 06400 

GRAND HOVEL- La Ctabafta 
Td. (93) 3MS.46 -Tik* <70717 

HOVEL MAJESIIC - la Gabon* 
M. |93) 66.91 J» -T«la 47Q7V 

HOTEL MARTINEZ - la Grohorta 

T* (93)66.91.91 - Tain <70708 

MONIHJBURY lm#ir 

Td. (93J 66.91 SO - Tain <70009 


hoth.de nuns 

Tat (93) 5080.30 - I4ax 469925 

nsUIDTAGE 

Td. (93J5067J1 -T4k«902 

HOIH MBU8EAU • a». RhMaOm 
Tat (93) 30.9001 - Mn <79413 
MONTE-CARLO BBfcOi HOTEL 
TaL (93) 7HJ1.40-UB <79413 


Aada. Sam*. 50. 08029 Barcelona 
Id. S3) 239 11 09 
Idee 51C03 y 51638 GHSB E 

Cite GKANHOTB. 



NICE-06000 
HOTEL NEGRESCO 

Td. (93) S8J9.il -TdmA 


HOTEL CHAMARHN 

MAEMUD 
378 rooms. 

Business ferities, 
first dass. 


EZBSURMER • 06360 
CAP ESTH. HOTEL 
W. (93)01-51X44- Tala 470305 


ST.-JEANCANORAT. 06230 
lAVOOEPIX 
TA (93) 01 .13.13 -Woe 470317 

SAJNT-PAUL-DE-VENCE - 06570 

UMASD’ARTIGNr 
U (93) 318454 -Uh 470601 


ESaridn Chamartin. 28016 Madrid 
Tet«lj733 7l 11 -7339011 
Idee 49201 HCHME 
CfteBsfTURSA - 


SAINT-TROPEZ - 83990 
If BYBtOS - U» CHodafa 
W. (94) 97-0004 -T*» <70235 


JUANLESPINS- 06160 

HOTEL BH1ES4BVE5 

TtL (93) 61 J0U9 -lah* 470964 


VENCE - 06140 

DOMAIIC ST^MARTM 

Td. (93) 56/am -W« 47002 


SHOPPING 


your 

own 

initials 





BOTTEGAVENETD 


roma salita san sebastianello 16/b 


OUR MASTER ARTISANS 
HAVENT LOST THOR TOUCH SINCE 
THE 18th CENTURY 


RESTAURANTS 


m nsm« wish, 

PtSflJWS 

SUBBUIMM 


I n a world which Is losing its sense of real values. It’s reassuring 
to know rhar there is a place In the heart of Paris which keeps 
up traditions handed diown from an age whenworismanship 
was an Arr in its own right 
At the EDITIONS TARADIS you will thus find 
extremely rare pieces such as fine LE TALLEC oom^hmEoi 
gold-gilded pedesral tables, fabulous lamps 
with hand-painted silk lampshades. SEVRES 
and HEREND pieces and bisque. SAXE and 
CAPO Dl MONTE porcelain collections, 
porcelain or Bohe- 


r\mSR/W l 


TOUSSE 

Doily TRAITEUR until midnight 

a?. *, wepc»”P«ttS-l7*.T> 7T7 3<7V.CB. 


mian crystal 
chandeliers- a large 
choke of gifts 
such as boxes, 
cases, ashtrays. 

vases, bowls, 

silverware, and 
hundreds of other 
pieces like they 
used to. make". 


HOLIDAYS 



CHAUFFEUR 

DRIVEN TOURS 

3, 7. 10 and 14 day chauffeur driven 
guided torn in afl remora of Britain. 
Lineup vohkfof for parties of 2 or 1 
Spadaus 8 Mater station wagon for 
larger parties. 


Cameo Toon, HoStagtan, 
Gt ow t o n e . Rea-On- Wye. 

.TeL: (0989) 66066. Telex 35341.. 


ARTS DE LA DECORATION’S unique pieces can be found ah 

Editions Paradis 

29, rue de Paradis -75010 Paris - T6L : 523.0534 


WEEKEND 


| SIGHT SEEING BOATS i 


BATEAUX-MOUCHES® ^ 


PARIS RIVER BOATS 


nbJ 225.96.10 
eught bank 35930.30 



appears every 
Friday 

For iofonnation 
call Dominique Bouvet 
in Paris 
on 747.12.65 
or your local IHT 
representative 




DUBLIN, Abbey Theatre 
(teL74.45.Q5). 

THEATER — To July 13: “Sfve” (J.B. | 
Keane). 

•Olympia Theater (tel: 77.81 AT). 
THEATER — Through June: “Good - 1 
bye to die HiB" (Dunne). 

•Oriel Gallery (td: 7634.16). 
EXHIBITION — Through June: 
“Irish Landscape Exhibitions." 
•National Concert Hall (tel: 
71.15.33). 

RECITAL— June 14: Peter Kerr ten- 
or (Schubert). 

•Peacock Theatre | tel; 74.45.05). 
THEATER— To July 6: “In the Shad- 
ow of the Glen," “Tne Tinkers Wed- 
ding" (J.M. Synge). 


•Project Arts Cenirefld: 7 13327) 

, EXHIBITION — Through June: 
! “Paintings by Denis Looergan." 

1 «Tavlor Gallery (tel: 77,60.89). 
EXHIBITION — Through June: 
“Sculptures by James McKenna-™ 


ITALY 


FLORENCE. Tcatro Conroaak (tel: 
277.9236). 


CONCERTS — June 22: Mapio Mu- 
sicale Fioremino Orchestra. God Al- 
brecht conductor (Pfitzner, Strauss). 
June 25: Munich Philharmonic, Lorin 
Maazd conductor (Brahms. Weber). 
ROME. Alinari Gallery (tel: 
6793933). 

EXHIBITION— To June30: “Rome: 
Her Monutnen ls,Streets. and People.™ 
VENICE. MuseoConcr(td: 25625). 
EXHIBITION— ToJuly28:“LeV CT - 
mePossQnlL™ 

•Palazzo Fortunv (td: 70.09.95). 
EXHIBITIONS — To July 14: “Ro- 
boL" 

To July 28: “Horet, Phougraphy. 
1931-1984." 


— ADMIRAL HOTEL = 

MANILA 

2138 Roxas Blvd. Manila Phils. 
P.O. Box 77 55 MIA 31 20 PhS^ptaes 
Telex: 74240488 AOHatel PM. 
Cable: Admitel Manila 
Telephone: 57. 20 81 To 94 


JAPAN 


TOKYO. Azabu Museum of An (tel: 
582.14.10).. 

EXHIBITION— To June 30: “Ukiyo- 
E Paintings." 

eBunkal&m HaU (tel: 8283 1. 1 1). 
CONCERT — June24: Japan Philhar- 
monic Symphony Orchestra, Jiri Be- 
lohlaved conductor, Patrick Gallois 
flute (Janacek, Shostakovich). 


•Hibiya Kokaido (td: 3235255). 
CONCERT— June 28: Tokyo Sym- 


phony Orchestra. Shunji Araiani con- 
ductor, Yuko Yamaoka, Nobuyosfai 
Kaio piano (Beethoven. Mahler). 
•Japan Folk Craft Museum (td: 


467.4537V 

EXHIBITION — To June 23: “Crafts 
of North-Eastern Districts." 

•Knn-i Hoken HaU (td: 470.0437). 
JAZZ — June 25: Horace Silver Quin- 


•Kokuritsu Noh-gakudo (tel: 
423.1331). 

EXHIBITION — To Aug. 18: “Noh 
Masks." 

•NHK Hallltd: 465. 1 l.l 1). 
CONCERT — Jane 22: NHK Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Hans Drewanz con- 
ductor, Mikhail Rady piano (Ban ok. 
Tchaikovsky). 

•Tobacco and Sail Museum (id: 
47630.41). 

To July 14: “Uldyo-E Woodblock 
Prints. 

•Tokyo National Museum (tel: 
822.I1.1IV 

EXHIBITION —To June 30: “Selec- 
tion of Japanese Art from the Mary 
and Jackson Burke Collection." 


•Zeit Photo Salon (td: 246.13.70V 
I EXHIBITON — to SepL 16: **Tsu-| 
kuba City.™ 


PORTUGAL 


ERJCEERA, Junta de Turismo (td 
63122). 

EXHIBITIONS — June 24-30 
“Lurdes Carrasco.™ 

LISBON, Sl Luis Theater (tel 
365359). 

BALLET — June 27-30: “Vivaldi" 
(Navarro. Vivaldi), “Sylvia" (Lifar. 
DdibesV “As Troianas (Rorix, Cap- 
deville, Salome), “Suite en Blanc" (Li- 
far, Laio). 


UNITBISTAm 


San Francisco’s 


723J6J7). 

RECITALS — June 24: Vlado Pcrie- 


By Robert Undsey 




THEATER— Through June: “Savage 
Love" (Sam Shepherd). 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA — June 22: “La Bobeme™ 
(Puccini). 

June 23. 26, 29: “Cost fan tutte” (Mo- 
zart). 

June 24: "Die Zanberflote" (Mozart), i 
June 25: “Salome™ (Wagaer), 1 

June 27: “Flddio" (Beethoven). 
Junc2S: “Simon Boccancgra" (Verdi). 
•Philhannonie(tel: 2548&0V 
CONCERTS — Berlin PhiDurmooic 
Orchestra— June 23 and 24: Riccardo 
Mini conductor (Rossini. Schumann). 
June 27: Riccardo Mini conductor. 
Emil Gilds piano (Beethoven. Schu- 
bert). 

June 23: Berlin Symphony Orchestra. 
Daniel Nazareth conductor. Denes 
Zsigmonky violin (Mendelssohn. 
Schumann). 

COLOGNE. Oper der Stadt (td: 
213551). 

OPERA — June 23: "Cost fan tune™ 
(MozartV 

MUNICH, National Theater (tel: 
22.13.16). 

OPERA— June 23: “LeNozze di Fi- 


NEW YORK. Guggenheim Museum 
(tel: 360.35.00). 

EXHIBITIONS— To July 7: “Giuiio 
PaolinL™ 

•Metropolitan Museum of An (id: 
535.77.10). 

EXHIBITIONS— To SepL 1: “Man 
and the Horse.™ 

To SepL 5: “Revivals and Explora- 
tions in European decorative arts” 
•Museum of Modern Art 
<id:708.94.00V 

EXHIBITON — To Oct. I: “Run 
Schwitters.” 

SAN FRANSISCO, Museum of Mod- 
em Art (td: 863.88JMV 
EXHIBITONS— To Aug. 25: “art + 
architecture + landscape.” 

ToOct 6: “Paul KlceTSdections from 
the Djerassi Criection.™ 


S AN FRANCISCO —The roses arc in 
bloom in Golden Gaic Park. Rich- 
ard Warner has been casting his 
speQ at the Opera House. The Gold- 
en Gale Bridge, as usual is getting a fresh 
coat of ihe red-orange paint that seems to 
blend so beautifully with the colors of sun- 
set Herb Caen, the popular columnist for 




The San Francisco Chronicle, is still eying 
to convince oeoole not to say “Frisco.” And 


•Suat$theater(tel: 201.67.67). 
MUSICAL — June 22, 26, 27: "My | 
Fair Lady” (Leaner. Loewe). 


j to convince people not to say “Frisco.” And 
! on Fisherman’s Wharf, the few fishermen 
I who are still there arc asking again: Where 
I have the crabs gone? 

Perhaps no other U. S. city of its size — it 
I has fewer than 720.000 residents — offers so 
rich a tableau of sights, sounds, cultural 
attractions, ethnic diverary and culinary 
l nnrimarlf< a$ Ran FrandSCO. 

It has fashionable lately among local 
people to complain that the cable cars, which 
resumed (hear legendary' climb halfway to 
the stars a year ago after being silenced for 
almost two years for a systemwide overhaul 
are noisier." But San Franciscans seem to 
have few other complaints as they await the 
annual summer influx of tourists to the place 
they refer to simply as The City. 

Situated at the tip of a peninsula ringed on 
two sides by its beautiful bay and on a third 
by tbe Pacific Ocean. San Francisco is com- 
pact and relatively easy to tour. A visit of 
two or three days allows enough time to see 
most of the city’s highlights, such as China- 
town. Fisherman’s Wharf, Nob Hill and 
Russian Hill Golden Gate Park, the Union 
Square shopping district. North Beach and 
the Montgomery Street financial district, 
and leaves enough time to ride a cable car, 
explore some of the city’s 24 miles of water- 
front or visit a museum. 

Fisherman’s Wharf, according to opinion 
surveys, continues to be the city’s most pop- 
ular destination with visitors, even though 
many oldtimers say sadly that over the last 
decade it has taken on the gaudy atmosphere 
of a carnival especially in summer. 

The Red and White Fleet (415-546-2810) 
operates 45-minuie tours of the bay every 30 
minutes or so from the wharf, with the first 
boat leaving at 10:45 AJvl. The fare is $7.95; 
for juniors 12 through 18, SS.9S; children 5 
to 1 1. $5.95; under 5. free. 

In conjunction with the National Park 
Service, the Red and White Fleet takes visi- 
tors to Alcatraz Island, site of (he former 
maximum security prison that is now a tour- 
ist attraction. Boats leave hourly from Pier 
41 near Fisherman’s Wharf between 8:45 
A_M. and 2:45 P.M. Warm clothing and 
comfortable w alkin g shoes arc recommend- 
ed. The fare is $4; children 5 to 1 1, $250. 

San Francisco is a city for shoppers. A few 
blocks from Fisherman’s Wharf is Ghirar- 
delii Square and The Cannery, both former 
industrial buildings that have been redevel- 
oped into clusters of shops, boutiques and 
restaurants. Nearby is Cost Plus Imports, a 
sprawling sue -story complex of imports from 
around the world. 

The Union Square neighborhood is a 
world-class shopping district with not only 
dozens of small shops, some 60 at the Ihrce- 
story Galleria complex at 50 Post Street, and 
Gump’s, an elegant gift store at 25frPost, but 
large ones operated by Neiman-Maicus, 
Saks Fifth Avenue and Many’s. 





V * - 


\‘\- 








San Francisco from the Golden Gate. 


bpnond Dnntfdw^ 


es and streetcars require an exact fare of 60 
cents: rates vary on BART, depending on 
tbe distance traveled. For information about 
the Municipal Railroad routes, call 415-673- 
6864; for BART the information line is 415- 
788-2278. 

The San Francisco Convention and Via- 
tors Bureau (415-974-6900), which operates 
a Visitor Information Center at 900 Market 
Street, is a good source of information about 
the city. A telephone information tine (415- 
391-2000) informs visitors each week of in- 
teresting current events. Ask for one of its 
publications, “The San Francisco Book,” a 
convenient compendium of information for 
visitors. Among the best of the guidebooks is 
the “San Francisco Access” book ($9.95) 
published by Access Press of Los Angeles. 

American Family Inn/Bed & Breakfast 
(415-931-3083) offers an unusual way to 
spend tbe night in San Francisco — -on a 
sailing yacht or power boat berthed on the 
bay. The rate for two for a night is $100 to 
$120. Tbe company also makes bookings for 
bed and breakfast establishments in the city 
and its environs, with rates ranging from $50 
to $90 nightly. 


mence of having breakfast or lunch -at tjjff ■ 
Palm Court, its elegant Victorian dinS^ 
room illuminated by sunlight cascading ' 
through a giant skylight. Two can enjoy a \ 
beautifully prepared Dungeness crab or bay • 
shrimp salad, for about $22, excluding wine, s 
Rates $105 to $135. . \ 

The Canterbury (750 Sutter Street; 415- 
474-6464) has a relaxing English atmosphere ’• 
and is reasonably priced at $68 to $98 for a ; 
double. Nearby, even more moderately^ 
priced at $52 to $65, is the King George r. 
Hotel (334 Mason Street; 415-781-5050), i 
where tea is served daily and studentmusi- \ 


dans often perform at mealtime. 


T HE Hayes Street Grill 324 Hayes I 
Street (415-863-5545), is an unprcten* ■ 
nous-looking place near IhePerfc^ 
ing • Arts Center that offers wonderfully 
grilled tuna, salmon and other, fresh fish 
chicken, salads and other specialties diiudged 
seasonally and listed on a huge blackboard. 
Dinner for two, including a sdection from a 
fairly good list of California wines, runs 
about $55. Try to avoid the. pre-theater g 


T HE Airporter bus leaves every 15' 
minutes from San Francisco Interna- 
tional Airport for the dty’s downtown 
terminal a L Taylor and Ellis Streets. The fare 
is $6. A taxi ride from the airport costs about 
S2Z including tip. 

1/ you plan any side trips from the rity, 
you’ll probably want to rent a car. If you do, 
abide by the city’s strict parking laws: Po- 
licemen are aggressive about ordering ille- 
gally parked cars towed away; and when you 
park on a hill turn the wheels into the curb 
tightly to keep the car from running away. 

If no out-of-town trips are on your agen- 
da, a car is unnecessary. The citys hills can 
make walking difficult, but San Francisco is 
well served by taxis and it offers one of the 
nation’s easiest- to-use public transportation 
systems: the transit network includes not 
only cable cars, but also buses and trolleys 
operated by the San Francisco Municipal 
Railway and high speed trains of the Bay 


The Compton Place (340 Stockton Street; 
4I5-7S 1-5555) is one of the dty’s newest and 
best-run holds, with a friendliness and at- 
tention to detail reminiscent of a small de- 
luxe European hotel but with the kind of 
efficiency found at America’s best-run hotel 
chains. Its dining room, specializing in sea- 
food and other examples of California cui- 
sine, is one of the best in the city. Dinner for 
two is about $85. Double rooms are $150 to 
$ 210 . • 

Other recently opened hotels include the 
French-owned Meridien (SO Third Street; 
415-974-6400), where Walter F. Mondale 
stayed during the Democratic convention 
(rates $140 to $205, a $99 a night weekend 
special with a rental car is sometimes avail- 
able). and the Ramada Renaissance (55 Cyr- 
il Magnifl Street; 415-392-8000). Rates $120 
to $165. 

The Four Seasons (495 Geary Boulevard; 
415-775-4700) is a first-rate hotel two Mocks 
from Union Square that was thoroughly re- 
modeled a few years ago. Tbe price of a 
double room is $150 to $220. 

The Stanford Court (905 California' 
Street; 415-989-3500) is at the Center of 
things on Nob Hill and its Caf6 Potpourri is 
one of the most pleasant places in town for 
breakfast (about $25 for two). A double is 
$165 to $210. 

Visitors still crowd into the elevators of 


hours, when it is often very busy. 

While the Hayes Street Grill may^ repre- jj 
sent the best of contenmorary Cafifopiia \ 
cuisine, Tadich, 240 California Street (415- 
391-2373), and Sam’s Grill 374 Bush Street 9 
(415-42100549), both in the financial dis- § 
trio, typify Ihe best of San Francisco's tradi- § 
tional seafood houses. Specialties at both* 
include local rex sole and petrale sole, sand l 
dabs and Dungeness crab. Because of .al 
shortage in local waters, much of ibe 
these days comes from Washington £ 
Alaska. Purists prefer cracked crab, which | 
means it comes odd. usually with maypn- \ 
naise, and with its hard shell cracked soyou | 
can extract its flaky white meat witlKwt| 
much trouble. Lund for two at Tadich' or 3 
Sam’s runs about $40. 9 


With a carafe of respectable house winc 
from California, two can enjoy pasta or a 
seafood dinner for less than $40 at the Wash- 


ington Square Bar & Grill 1707 Powell 
Street (414-982-8123). a lively place in North 
Beach popular with politicians, writers and 
visiting actors. If they are available, try the 
scallops from Maine or fried strips of eala- 


the nearby Mark Hopkins Hotel at Califor- 
nia and Mason (415-392-3434) to ride to the 


Area Rapid Transit District (BART). 
A cable car trip costs $1, and a 


A cable car trip costs $1, and a ticket 
should be purchased before boarding from 
self-service machines near major stops. Bus- 


nia and Mason (415-392-3434) to ride to the 
glass-walled cocktail lounge known as the 
Top of the Mark, with its view of tbe city and 
the bay. Rates are $160 to $210. 

The Sheraton-Palace (639 Market Street; 
415-392-8600), which opened in 1909, is al- 
most worth staying in simply for the conve- 


man. 

Donaiello.501 Post Street (415-441-7182). 
in the Pacific Plaza hotel is one of the city’s 
finest Italian restaurants, serving risotto, 
feathery pastas, seafood and a wide range of 
other dishes from northern Italy with ele- 
gance. Dinner for two, including wine, about 


For an introduction at, moderate - cost ' 
spicy Hunan-style cooking, ioin tbe 
people usually waiting outside (the wait (s 


usually not very long) the Hunan restaurant 1 
at 853 Kearny Street (415-397-8718). TTris is 
a hole in tbe wall but the food is excellent 
and it is fun to sit at the counter and watch 
the cooks in front of you laboring over their 
woks, turning out batch after batch of pep- 
pery shrimp, chicken and smoked meat, on- 
ion tarts (a specialty) and other items. Dress 
informally and expect to spend less than $20 
for two, including a can or two erf cold beer. 










emm 




Valkyries seems to have replaced “I Left 
My Heart in San Francisco” as the city’s 
favorite piece of music. 


raw*— 




r x * i 

fOw. > y NO 

v# f“ ■ 

x- < 32* i 5 

•f.r /g j .* 

£ it \ 
y* § i 

I 


tv*** 


The San Francisco Opera’s ambitious pre- 
sentation of Wagner's “Ring” cycle enA - 
Wednesday, but the opera has scheduh&ir 
diverse program of concerts, motion pictures 
and other events devoted to the composer 
through June 30. For information about pro- 
grams and tickets call 415-864-3330. 


H \ 


Under its new m u si c director, Hubert 
oiomstedt, the San Francisco Symphony 
(415-552^8000) is presenting a mop till ong 
tribute to Beethoven in. Davies Symphony 
Hall. 


fO& 


Mat 1 ' 1 "" 

uW“' 






Jflll* . -• 

^ . . . 
- » 

£:£■" • 

TV • . 


. .. -i 

■! 1'- 


tvULC ' - . . 
IBUB*-'- 

v.’u--':' 
eeti'J- 
tri‘d r ' . 

• £ jf.’i- ■ 

r.. 

J»T. “ ■' 

A*'-" \ 
'■■■■■. 
oil! N- v 

j lUsr - 
imfhl : - 

IK-:” 

uaif* 
tf.'pl-: ; 


\i« •*■■'■ 

l-nii."- ' - 

'' 

rin;i - 
\xi b • • ' 

♦jnfu;-' : 

mi,' » ' 
MW f- 1 .’ • 

lui: i‘->: •• 

Imp* c*- • * 

Rji ■v'-" ■ 
ubuji 1 :.; ■> 

jlich! - - ■ ’• 
rtjviw- - '*• 

S/C lC.Mii i* ■■ 

tro! 


dobxl >v: % • 

pwviJ: pi- : 

Um' 1 Sc; 

v,iur toL k ,, > l • : 
be on era!;.' •• 
'Hpuri., 

-iipV- r - ; 

| nnx->c.sc:>4.' 

j 0r.e :n.- = 

j et> llub ■ >. ■; 

1 oilkT r_i;..-.. ■ 

1 ffhieh. 

; erage.M l™ .■* 

[ al . 
i oeaunc:} : . 

perjt'iijl lij-, 

I parture • 

l if VtMir bz: 

, >cii Jte ri.-.v,- 

i u/jiIuk..- . 

Wl Ti:,-:; . 
dfl-SKrj. . 
m fin • 
chased .' 

ossnn,.- v . 

bo**;. 

B AlbSu a • 

n ; . . 


»enoil:i„- - 


^ JT..1 ..... 


Chefs B 


Js/i,,;: 


mi/ 


CALIFORNIA 


Beneath tbe southern anchorage of the 
Golden Gate Bridge, the mitwim at Fort 
Point, afortress built during the Civil War to 
guard the entrance to the bay, has an inter- 
esting exhibit of photos tracing the role of 
black soldiers in the army. Admission is free. 
10 A.M. to 5 P.M. daily. M 


Thr Now York Daa 


® IOS5 The Mew York Tima 


***».,.; 

^ , 
T^T' . 

Kfcv • • 

S ki: ‘ : 
«Ur ; : 1 • • 




DOONESBURY 


(DNSWSLfi, I’M NOT AT ALL 

HAVING M A10S QmjSf 
DROPOFFAGOPf 
l OF A1Y PROPOSAL NflS&f 

1 OW. IH0P5 \jffS 

P YDUPONT/tm 7. I Ml 


imLYROfC£.H& 
A PERFECT OEM, 
TWAREALFm. 

pzuseoToufiim 
posmoNfm&HR 
&SE£ JACKSON. 


TESeejPCKr 

soNfonim. 

YOUR ABE 

tarrsrm 

omsoAK 

&m,LAcef? 


ASA THAHW>mmHT 
MATFBZ NOTGST HERE, DEAR. 
OF FACT. PALM BEAM HASA 
HEts.£tm Tmuwmrs 
po you ask a ume.,mL, 

G0N3&A? 


MYPMxrAam MULDYDU 
*%*%££££%? S7EP0UT0F 

SI W££L Twgp*' 

n&szsiR? 

IT'tiKa l I 


S:- : 

V 




iKlu^ 














. 

V,' •• 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


Page 15 


an v 


a S 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 

Matching Policy to Needs 
Is Travel Insurance Goal 


by Roger ColEs 


1 




*■ * ; —jts^A 

Z ’■V-'. • yL ,*-* •" ’ v 


£nu&4' 








■i-i 


ilU- 


NSURANCE people love to tell cau- 
tionary tales. There’s one about a Brit- 
ish pilot on vacation in Florida whose 
wife and three children were drowned 
when their rented car was hit by another 
automobile and plunged into a mnal. The 
otter driver was found at fault and the pilot 
pressed for damages. However, it transpired 
that he was unemployed and not worth string 
personally. Moreover, he. carried only the 
minimum $20,000 third-party, insurance re- 
quired by the state. Half of this sum went for 
legal expenses and there was barely enough 
money to shm the bodies home. 

Most prudent Americans are protected 
with uninsured motorist (UM) insurance, 
which is generally unnecessary in Europe,' 
where most countries have dither unlimited 
(bird-party coverage or much higher com- 
pulsory levels than m the United States. The 
problem is that UM is so far notavailable to 
overseas visitors. 

The lesson of this tragic tale is that if you ’ 
rent a car in the United States or Canada, 
you should consider talcing out a 
. insurance policy for both third-party 1 
1 ity and personal accident. Most major car 
rental firms proride automatic third-party 
coverage of $300,000, wdl above the mini- 
mum in any state, but woefully inadequate if 
you are involved in a serious accident in the 


. v 




I 


.travel policies exdude automobile driving 
l ; i: . £ 5i ; - .. ‘Stfrom personal liability coverage and person- 
' al accident benefits rarely exceed $25- 
50,000. A policy that provides a partial solu- 
tion is TopSnre, marketed in Britain and 
designed specifically for North American 
car rental. A premium of £54.50 (about $70) 
win buy £2 million of thud-party coverage 
and $300,000 personal accident coverage for 
a 14-day rental period. It's expensive, but it 
might help to alleviate a catastrophe. 

The first thing to consider when buying 
travel insurance is protection against calas- 
~ . trophe. This will depend on where you're 

going and what you plan to do. For example, 
you will need more medical coverage in the 
United Slates, say $500,000, than in Europe; , 
where $50,000 should be ample. If you are 
going to a remote part of Africa, make sure 
’-?> ’ .you have emergency medical repatriation 
~-Z:- Coverage. If you are just driving from France 
into Germany, vehicle breakdown may be 
-.l your mam concern. On the other hand, trip 
cancellation insurance may loom large if you 
have just booked an expensive world cruise, 
u In any event, spread your insurance sensibly. 
But before you start shopping for travel 
insurance, be aware of what coverage you 
already have, duplication is unnecessary and 
i expensive. Most of us already have sufficient 
... life insurance: Executives are usually cov- 
ered 24 hours a day by their company’s 
global policy. Home ownership plans often 
proride protection for personal liability and 
loss of baggage and valuables. If you (marge 
your tickets to a major credit card, you may 
be covered automatically for death or injury 
an public transport, personal liability, loss of 
l^aggage and money, flight delay and some- 
times even medical expenses. 

; . One of the most attractive of the credit 
.7 card free insurance plans is the British Din- 
ers Club (benefits vary considerably in the 
other national Diners Onb franchises), 
which offers 24-hour personal accident cov- 
erage of £75,000, the same amount for medi- 
cal expenses (including emergency dental 
treatment and air ambulance), £500,000 for 
personal liability, £75 if your scheduled de- 
parture is delayed for more than four hours, 
if your baggage is mislaid for six hours, if 

you are bumped off a flight, miss a flight due 
to failure of public transport or miss a con- 
necting flight because of the late arrival of an 
aircraft. There is also free baggage insurance 
_ •; of £1,500 and a shopping policy, which cov- 
ers for loss or damage of any article pur- 
chased with the card for up do 30 days. 

Visa International is less lavish with free 
insurance. According to a Visa spokesman in 
London, the best deal is offered by Z-Bank 
in Austria. AD you need to qualify is to have 
made any purchase with a Visa card in the 
reviews month. You are covered for medi- 

expenses of 30,000 sc hillings , personal 

accident 200,000 schillings, personal liability 


free insurance ($100,000 for common carrier 
accident, $100 for flight delay, bumping and 
missed connections and up to $200 for bag- 
gage delay) but cardholders can buy the 
Amex Centurion comprehensive travel po- 
licy (marketed in Britain and certain otter 
countries under different names). It is an 
annual polity you can buy in any of three 
units. Fust is medical, which provides 
£75,000 of hospital care, no limit on emer- 
gency repatriation through Europe Assis- 
tance, family care both on the trip and at 
home (including medical treatment of chfl-. 
dren at home) and the cost of dose relative 
to visit you. All this for a premium of £35. 
The second unit covers personal liability up 
to £500,000, baggage £1,000, and cancella- 
tion and curtailment of a trip up to £2,000 
for an additional premium of £15. The third 
part is a comprehensive vehicle assistance 
plan, which costs £25. 

The Interna t ional Airline Passenger* As- 
sociation has a new policy for its members 


Protection from 
catastrophe is 
the mai n idea 


outside the United States. The annual premi- 
um of $168 provides for $300,000 medical 
expenses (including emergency repatria- 
tion), $120,000 personal accident, $600,000 
personal liability, $1,500 for baggage loss 
and $1^200 for cancellation. It also covers 
winter sports up to 21 days a year. 

Both these polities are fairly typical of the 
best comprehensive travel insurance avail- 
able outside the United States (where prenri- 
ums tend to be higher and benefits lower 
than elsewhere. Britain is probably the most 
compet i tive travel insurance market). Extra- 
Sure (from the TopSnre people) offers a 
comprehensive policy for £120 a year, with 
medical expenses up to £100,000. It indudes 
three months of continuing medical care 
back home as well as the cost of a colleague 
flying out to replace an executive who falls 
sick. A similar policy is SuperiSure, marketed 
by Hong Kong-based Jardine Matteson. 

An annual poficy is probably the best buy 
for the frequent traveler, but make sure there 
are no restrictions on the number of trips 
and that the limit on the duration of any one 
trip is not less than 90 days. Also check that 
any d aim you make is not deducted from the 
total annual benefits. 

But if you are only making one or two 
trips a year, it is worth considering the per- 
trip hoKday/busmcss policies. They are 
more expensive (typically, the annual equiv- 
alent of 30 days is twice that of an annual 
licy) but per- trip benefits can be much 
r. For example, SupciSure Plus from 
Jardine Matteson and American Express 
Travel Protection policies both have medical 
coverage up to £1 millio n and cancellation 
insurance of £3,000 and £3,500 respectively. 
You also can have worldwide coverage or 
choose only European coverage, which is less 
than half the oosL 

Before you buy, look carefully at the ex- 
riuaooSw what does the fine print say about 
pre-eristing medical conditions, age and 
pregnancy? Are family members covered 
and how? What abut hazardous activities, 




insurance for ski breakage. 

American Express offers relatively meager 


you 

separate policy for your video equipment? 
Does medical coverage include a reliable 
emergency assistance service? Are medical 
expenses guaranteed up front or amply re- 
imbursed when you return? Are yon fully 
insured from the time you leave home, or 
only when you arrive overseas? 

Be especially careful with limitations and 
restrictions on cancellation and curtaflmenL 
Some polities allow business reasons. Others 
limit bona fide reasons to death or illness of 
a dose relative at home or in your travel 

pa tf 5 in doubt, get the insurer to take you 
through “What if?” scenarios rather than the 
abstractions of policy jargon. 

Travel insurance is certainly worthwhile, 
provided you shop around and match the 
policy to your needs. But bear in mind that 
nobody ever buys insurance, someone al- 
ways sells it to than. ■ 


TRAVEL 


Tracing the Footsteps of the Crusaders 


by Nitza Rosovsky 


T HE Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem, 
the name by which the Crusaders’ 
rule over the Holy Land is com- 
monly known, lasted from 1099, 
when the Crusaders “rescued Jerusalem 
from the yoke of the infidd," as one contem- 
porary account put it, to 1291, when the dry 
of Acre was retaken fay the Moslems. At its 
zenith, the kingdom stretched from Beirut to 
Eliath, from the Mediterranean to the Jor- 
dan and beyond. 

Even though the kingdom was in a con- 
stant state of siege, a building boom of a 
magnitude rarely equaled in the land oc- 
curred riming the period of Crusader rule. 
Despite man-made and natural disasters the 
Israeli landscape is still dotted with 12th- 
and 13ch-centuiy remains, and a visitor can 
soon learn to recognize the idiom of a Cru- 
sader architecture in the Holy Land. 

There woe three types of construction: 

loos aha civilian. Forts and 
«nri monasteries, mns, mar- 
kets and hospitals were built by (he Crusad- 
ers to defend their holdings and to serve the 
needs of pilgrims. The style was basically 
Romanesque with some early Gothic de- 
ments; a few local motifs were introduced by 
native craftsmen. 

In Jerusalem, the city that had beckoned 
from afar. Crusaders’ footprints abound. 
Capture of the city came after a five-week 
siege: On Friday, July 15, 1099, Godfrey of 
Bouillon and his men finally scaled the wall 
and won the battle for Christendom. A terri- 
ble massacre en«i«ri. The Jews, who had 
fought alongside the Moslems, woe locked 
up in a synagogue and set on fire. 

Later that day, Godfrey, Tailored and the 
other leaders of the First Crusade made their 
way barefoot to the Church of the Holy 
Sepulcher. At the church they found evi- 
dence of the damage inflirmH earlier in the 
century by the Egyptian Calip h el-Haldm. 
Soon, refurbishing of the church began; it 
was completed and celebrated in 1149, 50 
years to the day after the Crusaders' victory. 

Unlike the interior, the facade has 
changed little since the 1 2th century. The 
double portal (the right one has been 
blocked since the days of Saladin, tbe Mos- 
lem ruler) and the two corresponding win- 
dows on the second floor are accented by 
three archivolts supported bv engaged col- 
umns. The ra pilalt with a fouige motif and 
the rosette-frieze were common to local ar- 
chitecture since the Byzantine period. The 
-voussoirs — (he evenly shaped stones in the 
arches — may have also beam influenced by 
Easton masons. The carved lintels of the 
portal, depicting scenes from the life of Je- 
sus, have been removed to Jerusalem’s 
Rockefeller Museum for preservation. On 
the terraced roof, near the Ninth Station of 
the Cross, are the remains of the Crusader 
refectory and cloisters. The remains now 
surround a duster of mud huts — the Ethio- 
pian holding in the Holy Sepulcher — where 
old monks reside. 

Southeast of the Holy Sepulcher are the 
Three Covered Bazaars, built to produce 
income far the Order of the Templars and 
the Church of Sl Anne. Light enters the 
bazaars through apertures ax the top of the 
grain vaults; the shops, still in use. are small 
and dark. The central bazaar, Suq el-Attarm, 
was known as RuedeMakpusinat (tbe Street 
of Bad Cooking) for the quality of the roust- 
ed meals sold to pilgrims there. Not all foods 
were poor, however. Oranges, peaches and 
bananas were available, along with a variety 
of breads, and local wines kept tinned in 
snows from Lebanon. 

At the southern end of Suq d-Altarin 
begins the recently excavated Cardo, an ele- 
gant arcaded street from the Byzantine era. 
Slops ox either side of the street, added 
some 600 years later by the Crusaders, have 
recently been renovated to accommodate 
modern goods. Below street level, one can 
see remains of fortifications from the sixth 
and first centuries B.C 


E AST of the Cardo, on Misgav Ladach 
Road, is the partially restored Church 
of SL Mary of tbe Teutonic Knights. 
The church was established in 1128 to care 
for German pilgrims who might have felt 
unwelcome in the French-dominated Cru- 
sader Jerusalem. The church , which hari a 
hospital and a bodice attached toil, was the 
modest birthplace of the Teutonic Order, 
which lata became so powerful that it con- 



The view from Belvoir. 

quered the state of Prussia and gave rise to 
its militaristic spiriL 

The most beautiful Crusader church in 
Jerusalem is Sl Anne, the traditional dwell- 
ing of Mary' s parents. It was turned into a 
madrasa, a religious school, by Saladin after 
his victory over the Crusaders in 1 187. as is 
testified to by an inscription above the por- 
tal Some seven centuries later, after the 
Crimean War, the Turks presented this 
building to the French government, which 
committed it to the care of the White Fa- 
thers, a religious order. 

Romanesque in style, built of white stone, 
it is pure and austere. The facade is elegant 
in its simplicity. A plain, triple-pointed arch 
marks the main portal; above it is a delicate- 
ly carved molding. Only the top window is 
adorned, flanked by_pillars and capitals. Six 
cruciform piers divide the interior into a 
nave and two aisles. The central apse creates 
a cfcevet, an unusual rounded projection in 
the exterior of the eastern wall. light filters 
into the sparsely furnished building through 
a few clerestory windows. The acoustics are 
superb; to hear mass sung here — divine. 
(Mass is sung every morning at 6:30) 

Some time after the conquest of Jerusa- 
lem, the Templars — the order charged with 
protecting pilgrims in the Holy Land — 
implanted themselves on the Temple Mount 
and refurbished the Mosque of Aksa. The 
Crusaders renamed it Templum Solomonis 
for Solomon’s Temple, which had stood on 
the Mount souk 2,000 yens before. The 
zigzag centra) arch in the entry porch is 
Crusader as is the small octagonal edifice 
northwest of the Dome of the Rode. 

That building was turned into Templum 
Domini, and the octagonal structure saved 
as its baptistery. Known today as the Dome 
of tbe Ascension, the former baptistery is a 
fine example of Crusader architecture. 

If one Leaves the Temple Mount through 
Bab d-Silsdeh (Gale of the Chain in Arabic) 
one can see the twisted marble columns on 
either side of the gate, which probably come 
from a Crusader structure, as does the “recy- 
cled” rose window in the water fountain 
across from (he gate. 

Before leaving Jerusalem one should visit 
the Citadel, an amalgamation of walls, 
towers and other fortifications. In the Cru- 
sader period, as the city changed hands more 
than once, the Citadel' often served as the 
defenders’ last stronghold. At its southwest- 
ern comer one can see the glads and the 
outer wall of the fosse — the dry moat 

In the autumn of 1099, having fulfiDed 
their vow to redeem Jerusalem, most of the 
Crusaders returned home. Those who stayed 
behind were known as the Franks --Chris- 
tians of European, mostly French, origin. 
Noblemen, merchants artisans, even peas- 
ants — most of the Franks settled in urban 
centers such as Jerusalem, Acre, Tiberias 


and Bethlehem. The country's indigenous 
Christians detested the haughty Franks, who 
had replaced their clergy and liturgy in the 
churches. The Moslems who survived the 
First Crusade were mostly farmers who were 
allowed to continue to till the land and 
produce foodstuffs for the urban Franks. 
The Jewish population was almost complete- 
ly eradicated by the Crusaders. 

One of the main tasks of the 150,000 
Franks (about a third of the total popula- 
tion) was to keep the highways safe for 
pilgrims. Since the pilgrims were in constant 
danger of Saracen attacks, the Franks built a 
strong network of forts and castles along the 
borders and on major routes and crossroads. 

B ELVOIR, a few miles south of the Sea 
of G&litee, is a fine example of a 
castram. as a small Crusader fort was 
known. Known in Hebrew as Kochav 
Hayarden (Star of the Jordan), it commands 
a sweeping view of Mounts Hennon and 
Tabor, the Golan, the Sea of Galilee and the 
Yarmuk and Jordan valleys. One could ob- 
serve any movement on the nearby road, one 
of the ancient trade routes from Egypt to 
Damascus, which crosses tbe Jordan near 
Beit She' an. Belvoir was built in the middle 
of the 12th century and served the Knights of 
St John, also known as the Order of the 
Hospitalers. 

Belvoir, which was meant to withstand 
prolonged sieges, is a double fort. Tbe outer 
portion is a rectangle: 330 by 440 feel long. 
Square towers stand at the four corners and 
at regular intervals. Entry is over a culvert 
and through a low, fortified gate. Inside is a 
courtyard with arcaded corridors that used 
to house stables and storage areas. The inner 
fort is built around an open court where one 
can still see tbe Hospitalers' dining quarters, 
kitchen, ovens and steps that led to a chapel 
and bedrooms.The bedrooms are now gone, 
as is the upper part of tbe keep. 

Belvoir served the Hospitalers wdl until 
tbe time of Saladin, to whom it surrendered 
in 1189, after an 18-month siege. In the 
1220s, tbe fort was partially destroyed by 
Saladin's nephew, el-Malek el Mu'azzam. 

Before leaving, the visitor might look 
again at the view and listen to the whispering 
breezes that gave Belvoir its Arabic name — 
Kaukab el-Hawa (Star of the Winds). 

Keeping the sea lanes open was of vital 
importance to the Franks, who depended on 
arms, supplies and men from Europe. Acre, 
on the coast just north of Haifa, with its 
natural harbor, was second only to Jerusa- 
lem in its importance to the Latin Kingdom. 
Tbe city, which is at least 4,000 years old, 
was famous since Phoenician times for its 
glass and for the dye extracted from tbe 
purple murex, a local snail. 

King Baldwin 1 captured the city in 1104. 




Like other Mediterranean coastal cities. 
Acre was conquered with the help of Italian 
merchant fleets. For ihdr .-issisiance. com- 
mercial and other privileges were granted to 
the merchants; Venetians. Genoese. Pisans 
and Amalfians occupied large sections of 
Acre. The Orders of the Templars and the 
Hospitalers dominated the rest of the city, 
which, noted a contemporary visitor, “is so 
populous as to surpass all the rest." A 
Moslem traveler described it as the “focus of 
ships and caravans, and the meeting place of 
Moslem and Christian merchants ... Its 
streets are choked by the press of men so that 
it is hard to put foot to ground.” The traveler 
also commented on the preponderance of 
crosses and “pigs" — his term for Christians. 

Like most of the country. Acre was con- 
quered by Saladin in 1 187. but the balance of 
power stuffed with Lhe arrival of Richard the 
Lion Hearted and the Third Crusade. In 
1191 Acre relumed to Christian hands and 
became for a century, thecapital of the Latin 
Kingdom, replacing the fallen Jerusalem. 

The grand quarters of the Hospitalers in 
Acre were built mainly after 1 191. A century 
later, when the Moslems demolished the dtv. 
they found the complex too solid to destroy 
and covered it with rubble. It took the Israe- 
lis 12 years to remove more than 30,000 
cubic feet of debris from the subterranean 
halls that housed the Master of the Hospital- 
os and his administration. 

The entrance to this subterranean Crusad- 
er city is opposite the Mosque of eklazzar. 
After reaching the courtyard through a large 
Turkish gate, one can see, on the right, sever- 
al huge rooms covering an area of 500 square 
yards; the barrel vaults are 25 feet high. This 
area, known today as the knights’ halls, may 
have served as barracks. 

Acre, the last Christian stronghold in the 
Holy Land, came under siege on April 5, 
1291. “The enthusiasm of the Moslems was 
so great,” wrote one historian, “that the 
number of Volunteers exceeded the regular 
forces.” The walls and towers were bom- 
barded by siege machines; the moats began 
to be filled. King Henry II of Cyprus arrived 
with his fleet, but it was too late. On May 18 
the Saracens “in numbers past counting” 
broke through the walls. The Franks who 
tried to flee were captured and killed. The 
last tower, held by the Templars, was being 
undermined when its defenders agreed to 
surrender. So many Saracens then entered 
tbe tower that it collapsed under their 
weighL crushing hundreds of Christians and 
Moslems. The conquerors destroyed the 
city’s markets, towers and walls, and Acre 
was in r uins for centuries. Thus ended 200 
years of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem. ■ 

Nitza Rosovsky is the author of “ Jerusalem 
Walks (Holt. Rinehart & Winston). This orti- 
cle was written for Tlte New York Times. 


Chefs Burned Up Over No-Shows 


by Florence Fabricant 





OR some tourists, a visit to France 
without dining at a fipe restaurant 
would be as unthinkable as passing 

up the cathedral at Chartres or the 

Eiffel Tower. Yet the number of people who 
reserve a table and fail to show op is increas- 
ing. according to some of France s top chefs, 
some of whom are asking For deposits when 
they accept reservations. 

The culprits are mainly tourists, Amaican 
tourists in particular. But the no-show prob- 
lem is worse in Paris because some Parisians 
have started "miring multiple dinner reserva- 
tions and honoring only one. 

“We try to do our best, but some people 
play games with us so that now we are taking 
steps to try to correct the situation,” said 
Alain Chapel, whose restaurant in Mionnay, 
- near Lyon, is ODe of those with the top three- 
star ranking in tbe Michdin guide. 

Chapel has joined Paul Bocuse and Rare 
Troisgros, who also own three-star restau- 
4 rams in the Lyon area, in masting that 
reservations made from the United States be 
accompanied by $50 deposits. 

“We discovered, after examining our res- 
ervation books, that a number of reserva- 
' tions had been made by the same people at 
_all three restaurants for the same date and 
riffle, 1 ’ Bocuse explained. “Obviously, they 
were waiting until the last minute to decide 
whoe they wanted to eat or which place was 
the most convenient for their itinerary. 

. problem was that they neglected to cancel at 
the otter two places. 

In essence, travelers are now doing to 
French restaurants what they have long done 
in overseas air travel — making multiple 

fell that asking for deposits would 
discourage tte practice. “I’ll return the de- 
posit,” he said. *1 dc not want to create any 
-Sl will and I would like the people to come 


and eat in my restaurant in the future. We’re 
just trying to be serious about this.” 

Chapel said he would return tbe deposit if 
the reservation was canceled al least several 
bonis in advance. “But if they give you an 
hour's notice, there’s not much you can do,” 
he stud. “We are out in the country, and 
arranging things with a waiting fist is not so 
easy. He estimated that every party of two 
that did not show up cost him about $150. 

Paris restaurants are also taking action. 
For example, La Tour d’ Argent, the land- 
mark restaurant in Paris with a view of Notre 
Dame Cathedral asks for deposits of $25 a 
person. Otter Paris restaurateurs have set up 
confirmation systems to protect themselves 
from no-shows, which in some instances are 
reported to be as high as 50 percent At his 
two-star restaurant Michel Rostang requires 
that dinner reservations be reconfirmed by 2 
PJVL that day. Al Janrin, a small restaurant 
not far from Place du Trocadfero that was 
recently elevated to three stars, lunch reser- 
vations must be confirmed by 11 AM. and 
dinner reservations by 6 PM or the table is 

^t^snot only better-known establishments 
that have to cope with tte crush of advance 
reservations and the plethora of no-shows. 
Paul Bajade, who owns Les Chfines Votes, , a 
restaurant in Provence with 18 tables, send 
there had been occasions when 40 percent of 
the reservations, most of them made by tour- 
ists, were not honored. 

. Antoine Magnin, tbe 85-year-dd owner- 
chef of L'Ami Louis, the ca fc ulatedly run- 
down bistro famous for its foie gras and 
hearty, earthy cooking since 1928, holds an 
inch-thick sheaf of letters from Americans 
requesting dinner reservations, often months 
. in advance. “There is no way I can deal with 
tins,” he complained. *T have no telex or 
secretary so that I can reply to all these. It’s 
impossible.” Magnin generally ignores tbe 
letters and will not accept reservations made 
more than a week in advance. For regular 
customers and friends there is always a table. 


Bocuse prefers reservations made via tel- 
ex. “With it you usually have a business with 
an address to go back to, and in my experi- 
ence, the people who use it are more seri- 
ous ” he said. “I fed much less secure with a' 
letter or a telephone call” 

In Paris, lhe deluge of reservations for top 
restaurants annoys many city dwellers; on 
paper, at least, their favorite establishments 
are often filled. “Now I have to call ax least a 
week ahead for a table,” remarked Franpris 
Trfeves, an executive whose office is near 
TaiDevent, where he likes to dine. 

Some Parisians, however, are contributing 
to the problem by playing the no-show game. 
From his Micfadm two-star restauranL Guy 
Savoy said tte practice involved making a 
dinner date with friends and inviting item to 
tte house for a drink. The host, who has 
made several reservations, then asks where 
everyone wants to eat, mentioning tte three 
or four reserved places. “They decide where 
they want to go and forget to caned tte 
others,” Savoy said 

1 ATELY, many Parisian restaurants, in- 
cluding Alain Senderens* new Lucas- 
J Carton cm Place de la Madeleine. are 
demanding that everyone who reserves a 
table provide a home or office telephone 
number. Tourists must provide the name of 
tte hotel where they are staying. Lucas- 
Carton expects patrons to confirm reserva- 
tions tte day before; tte restaurant will not 
make the confirmation call to the customer. 

For Americans who have made or are 
planning to make dining reservations in 
France, it is advisable to reconfirm the day 
before, if possible; and if posable, caned a 
reservation at least a few hours in advance. If 
you don’t speak French, a hotel conrierge 
can help. Those who prefer to dine early 
should keep in mind that few of tte better 
restaurants, especially in Paris, serve before 
7 or 7:30 PM ■ 

C 1985 The New York Timer 


’Robert le Diable’ 


Continued from page IS 


ble.” He also devised the scenarios of several 
ballets. 

The choreography of tte nuns’ ballet is 
generally attributed to Filippo Tagfionl and 
his daughter Marie danced the role of H£16- 
na, tte principal nun. She stepped out of the 
part after a few performances, however, 
greatly upsetting Meyerbeer, who consid- 
ered her participation crucial. During the 
rehearsals for the opera, Nourril handed 
Filippo Taglioni the scenario for the ballet 
that became “La Sylpiride.” which Taglioni 
choreographed and presented the following 
season with Marie in tbe title role. It is 
considered the first full-fledged Romantic 
ballet, so it is reasonable to regard the nuns’ 
ballet scene in “Robot le Diable” as a direct 
ancestor of the genre. 

(NouniL incidentally, came to a tragic 
end when be leaped to his death in Naples in 
1839. IBs downfall began when a rival tenor. 


Gilbert Duprez, moved in on his repertory, 
asto nishing audiences by singing his nigh Cs 
in chest voice The sound tins made remind- 
ed Rossini of “the squawk of a capon having 
his throat cut,” but it secured Duprcz’s fame 
anyway, and Nourril left the Opira and the 
repertory he had aeated within a year, never 
to return.) 

There is some interesting pictorial docu- 
mentation of tte original production of 
“Robert le Diable.” In the 1860s and *70s. 
the artist Edgar Degas did a series of four 
paintings — in effect group portraits of 
friends usin| the Optra as the setting. The 
background is unmistake&bly the set for the 
nuns’ ballet, and by comparing it with con- 
temporary lithographs of the original pro- 
duction it can be seen that the Optra was still 
using tte original scenery or a copy thereof. 

“Robert le Diable” remained in the reper- 
tory at the Optra's theater in Rue Le Pele- 


Hi y>? 






i * 


Vi . ..- ,4 

A Degas study of nuns for his paintings 


04- 


tier, and moved to the company's prese 
home, the Palais Gamier, when it opened 
1875. It had its 758th and final perform an 
there on Aug. 28, 1893. By then, changes 
public taste ted left Meyerbeer behind , ; 
though the grandest of his grand operas 
“Les Huguenots" — hung on in Paris un 
1936. In a way, the ornate splendor of t 
Palais Gamier is a kind of architectu 
equivalent of a Meyerbeer opera, but by L 
time it was opened the composer’s wor 
were on the way out. 

Meyerbeers best music, with its stzikxi 
orchestra] effects and shrewdly calculab 
finales, was much admired by Berlioz, b 
not by Schumann, who compared him to 
circus performer. Although Meyerbeer w, 
generous in helping the young Wagner, tl 
latter later repaid his benefactor with instil 
(“a Jewish banker who composes music’ 
Nonetheless, Meyerbeer lives today main 
through his influence on early Wagner (“R 
enzi” and “Tannhauser”) and Verdi who 

“Don Carlos," wriuen for the Paris Op^ra j 

1867 is very likely the greatest of Franc 
grand operas, even if it is heard only i 
Italian these days. 

The young American conductor Thorn 
Fulton, who had a success with “Don Ca 
los” at the Orange festival last summer, is : 
musical charge for this revival, with Petrii 
Ionesco the stage director. The cast on Moi 
day is headed by tbe French tenor Alai 
Vanzo in the title role, Samuel Ramey ; 
Botrain, June Anderson as Alice and M 
chile Lagrange as Isabelle. 

Fot this revival the Paris Optra seems 
be playing tte game to the Ml Its pro 
that the sets have r 
quired 10,000 cubic meters of wood, 35t 
square ^meim of painting fabric and 
. while tte 


terns of sculpted latex, 
tames and 600 * 


the 600 * 

. hats required 1,000 meter 

sarin. Besides tte soloists, there will be 
chonsK, 76 extras and 40 dancers in 
corps de baDeL It should be fun. 



fi 




Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


(Mm hm low La» aw. 

Indus 1JW-71 1305+4 1287.75 1299JJ + 225 
Trans 638J3 611+7 630+2 436.94 — 234 
Util 1 64+4 16523 163+7 16455 

Como 53X14 5»+l 531-79 SUB + MO 



NYSE Index 


Hfeft LOW dOSO OTj* 
Comooslta 10S+6 100.10 10&46 + QJ1 

industrials 12157 mot 12251 +003 

TrSnSfL 10X96 10X36 10X76 —049 

Utilities 59.90 59 Jt 5950 4-0+8 

Finance 11740 1 17 Jit 1)748 — 016 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Bar Sole* -ShTi 

June 19 209,511 428.963 2,117 

June 10 _ 200229 43UI92 1J78 

June 17 ■ 210743 400300 808 

June 14 1BM14 38X239 1,890 

June 13 207+93 46X084 1.969 

■included In ttie safes figures 


Thursdays 

N1SE 

Qo^ng 


VoLdHP U J7J0&8M 

Prw.4PAl.woL 1WBJ7WNH 

Pn» ansotUited close 13M2M3D 


Tobies include me nationwide prices 
uptottwdoslneonwail Street ond 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


iiri 


Adueneed 
Declined 
unoianaed 
Total issues 
New NMb 
N ew LOWS 
volume w 
voXinw ookuyi 


Canweslle 

industrials 

Finance 

.Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Transp. 


.Week 
i enw Aeo 
r — X78 38X93 
> — 1.04 2M+S 
l— 070 WW* 
1 +0.11 B8X 
r —047 2L|B 

1—024 38037 
1-049 34CB4 


Standard & Poor's Index 


MW low cjom arse 

tivhntrlaK 2K+n 20481 30X73 +OI1 

nSSx K 16241 16351 -048 

Utilities 67.22 84+7 87+7 +0.11 

FIno>ce S28B 2X74 2X06 +003 

cSSS m 18X75. 185.97 18X73 + 0.10 


AMEX Sales 


4 PM. volume 
prev. 4 PM. votume 
Prwv. cons, volume 



17 Month 
High Low Stuck 


Sis. Ouse 

«». Ylc. PE 108s Hi* Lew fluaLOTw 


Prices Mixed in Slow Trading 


23b 16 AAR 48 24 14 203 1BU 18 I8« + V. 

I8tt m* AGS 12 9 141% 13b in. + vs 

16b 93, AMCA B t0% 10% 10b + V. 

21to 13% AMF +0 27 56 2399 181% 1M IBb 

51W 59 AMFpf 4.91 el (LD 1 49 49 40 —2% 

4SI-* 34b AMR 10 1436 44% 44to *445— V8 

22 TM ISbAMRpf Z18 9+ 14 22b 22to 22to 

25~8 22'% ANRpf 247 112 4 23% 23*. 23% + to 

33 IV AN Ref 9.13 TO* 1 19to IPVa 19V,— 1% 

14to 74* APL 10 8V* 84* BV» + 18 

61b 444* ASA ZOO XI 384 SO 404 49b— lb 
97 I ri AVX 23 34 10 1605 13 1946 194* 

267s 16 AZP 272 109 S 923 27 264* Wt 

57b 36% AULab 140 Z5 16 3773 57 554 5644— to 

2Sto in AccoWdl 40 12 17 37 2946 221% 2246— Vh 

244* if -3 AcmeC 40 U 26 1546 15to 1516 
10V, fn AcmeE 42b 40 10 3 8 8 8 

17VJ \S AdaEa l.WnllJ 63 17V* 17 17V* 

20 IP* AamMl 22 20 7 82 1646 151% 1616 + f* 


10V, 7b AcmeE -32b 40 
!7Vj \S AdaEc I.»2all2 
2S 1 PM AamMl 22 20 


19'.-, 846 AdvSvs 431 47 18 55 1146 lit* 1148+18 


411% 221% AMO 
1244 6-k Aavesf 
1446 9 Aerfleo 


10 2433 23*6 276, 234% + 4% 
114 Bto 8b 818— to 
12 32 124* 121% 124* + 16 


47 27 1, AefnLl 264 58 33 2B62 461% 4546 45?* 

5746 5246 Art L of SJJeltLS S3 5S% 55 5548 + 1* 

374, ir% Aim ns 140 34 14 285 36 SSto 35*6— 48 


146 Tn Alleen 


948 218 218 


3846 AlrPrd 1-20 2J 12 377 53*6 52*8 5346 + 4* 


2446 13 AlrtoFrt 40 U 11 
2 1 AIMoas 

33*6 26k. AlaP PfA 302 1X0 
8 6V* AlDPOPf JS7 107 

794* 61 W AlePpf 900 llO 

1031- 851* AloPpt 11O0 107 

851% 631% AJaPpI 9+4 11 2 

74 57 AlaPpf 1.16 11J 

71 56 AJaPot 028 11+ 

I6V6 111* Akinses 104 6+ V 

25'* 9V. AbkAJr .16 J 10 
184* IB’S Albrtoi J8 Z3 19 

33’- 231* Albtsra J6 X* 13 

31'* 2314 Alcan 1X0 4.9 12 

3716 27*6 AlcoStd 1.70 3+ 12 

32 17 AlBaAlx IOO 22 


+0 30 11 43 20'A 19% 20 — to 

57 14s 1*8 148— V% 

302 1X0 6 32*6 321% 32*6 + 48 

07 107 104 Bt» 74* 818+48 

900 110 51202 82 83 82 +3 

11X0 107 3150rW3t8 10246 10946 +14% 

9+4 llO 2*Qz 84 84 84 + 46 

8.16 11-3 lOOz 72 72 72 —1 

ua no 4saE hi to 70 

104 60 9 93 15to 151% 151* 

.16 J 10 166 241* 231% 231%— *6 

08 2J 19 3 1646 1696 1646 

06 1+ 13 668 311% 311% 311*— V* 
100 +9 12 1141 24*6 24 ■* 241% + 1% 

100 X* 12 74 3S46 344* 3SU + to 

IOO 3J 340 3016 294. 30 


The Assoewt&t Prm 

NEW YORK — Stock prices on the New 
York Stock Exchange were mixed in sluggish 
Lrading Thursday as investors tried to sort out 
several economic and technical developments. 

Auto, telephone and drag issues generally 
moved ahead, but oil and airline stocks weak- 
ened. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials rose 
2.35 to 1-299.73 after a late buying flurry. 

Declines slightly outpaced advances among 
all NYSE-listed issues. Volume slowed to 87.50 
million shares, from 10827 milli on in the previ- 
ous session. 

The Commerce Department estimated that 
the economy, as measured by the gross national 
product, was expanding at an annual rate of 3.1 
percent in the current quarter, up from a revised 
OJ percent rate in the first quarter. The first- 
quarter gain originally was reported as 0.7 per- 
cent. 

The latest figure, which also is subject to 


further revision when the quarter is over, was at 
the high end of economists' expectations. Credit 
analysts speculated that the Federal Reserve 
would find the economy strong enough that it 
need not drive interest rates still lower. 

In addition, the Fed reported after the dose 
that the basic U.S. money supply surged 54.8 
billion in the week ended June 10. Analysts said 
the rapid money growth was a further reason 
that the Fed was unlikely to ease credit condi- 
tions soon. 

Inflation, meanwhile, appeared to stay in 
check last month. The Labor Department said 
consumer prices edged up only 02 percent in 
May after climbing 0.4 percent in April 

Technical factors also weighed on Wall 
Street. On Friday, several stock-index futures 
and options contracts will expire, and on previ- 
ous expiration dates prices have fluctuated 
wildly near the final bell as traders dosed out 
their positions in the contracts and in the stocks 
underlying those contracts. 


23 16 FedRIt 1+4 62 13 77 211% Zlb 21V) 

1998 1318 PdSoni SO 44 15 29 TTb 17 1 * 17% + % 

65*6 44*6 FMOSt 254 4.1 » 707 62%. 6196 69 + !* 

32 32V, FoflTD 1 20 AS 13 32 29 2846 Bto — V* 

3696 Mto FWctI 1+0 18 12 SO 26b 26*4 26V. - U 

141* 4 FlnCpA .051 998 g% 794 £8— £ 

5VS 3V4 FtaCpof +0 I1J I SW _5>6 _SVl + i% 


32 32Vt Form ISO +2 

3696 Ml* FHcd 1J» 3J 

141* 4 FDCAA .051 
51% 31% FEnCpof M II J 

444% 14’* FblCpPf X6WM 
A 21% FnSBar 

2296 1618 Flmtn JSO IS 

271* 12*8 PI All i +8 Z6 

40*% 211* FIBkSy 140 +0 9 

mi 254* FBkFla 135 3.4 13 

79 361% FOBS) 1.20 IS 12 

27 18*8 FjtCMc 122 52 


M I1J I M Bl + 8 

L6!el9+ 95 34*8 341% 34(%- It 

23S 5*% 54* S'* . 

nun 312 2116 204% 304%— 1% 

48 26 10 38226k* 281% 24*» + 9« 

S 4Q 'i> 303 40'.% 4S 

3+ 13 69 371* 37V, 37V, 

30 IJ 12 M 71 77*6 7716 — V 


18*8 FflCWe 1S2 5J 96 1121 »W 23 

541% 441% FChlOPf5J3elXl 18 47V, 47V* 47V*— 9 

8394 7D FCW PfB HjOpIU 13 771% 7Th 77VJ— V 

W% 1194 FTSTM ISO 10L6 9 153 «■* 12 12V* + fc. 

54 36 FtBTx Pf 5S6C1X6 6 36 254% 35?6— Vs 

21 8*6 Ftcirv 8 26 806 894 84.— 1% 

2319* «n% FF66A2 306 12 8 212 24 OT, 239% + V% 

«0 3596 FFB 2S8 U I 30 50’s 591* 59W— I* 

541% 30V, Ftntate X58 4* 9 437 506 53*6 541% + 96 

33 21 Flnftfpf2J7 7.1 36 331% 3Z9* 33V% + 4% 

11*6 ru FfMtss J4 U I 170 8*689* an— V% 

2414 16 FtNufnn 14 25 22 211% 219*— 1% 

79% 41% FsfPa 428 61% 69* 69* 

3014 20V* FWopI 2+3 LB SB 297% 2996 29«6 + V* 

319% 241* FHJnRI 1S6 X9 IS 201 29% 28U 2818—198 

261% IS FtVaBk +8 3+ 11 164 2£H 36>% 26V. 

307% I7»* FtWISC TJO O 9 35 301% 30V* 3fH4 — 94 

551% 4598 FWbe Of X2S US 31b 55 541% 541% — 1 

531% 29 Flsdlb 1+0 337386 77 309% 301% 3(K% + 1% 

1196 8W. Ffs/lFd .« 56 J 3391*9 914 + 1* 

3914 2014 FltFnG 5 122 3+ 9 256 3898 381% 3898 + 98 

28** 141% Fleet En +4 XI 9 312 21 W. 21 21'% 

3996 2518 FMmng 1J» U 14 106 3896 3814 3H6 

3314 23% FtaxlV JS IS 13 176 3294 22% 331%— (4 

13% 101* Ftexlpf 1+1 1X2 24 1396 IT* 13U + % 

28 141% FlBMSIa 23 37 27V 27% 279* + 1* 


35 30% 3054 30W. — 94 
31b £5 541% 541% — 1 

77 309% 301% 30% + 1% 
32 914 9 9V. + 1* 


31% 14*4 FlOOlPI 
4S*8 299* FktEC J6d + 13 110 4296 42% 43*8 + % 

2B9* 10% FloPro Z16 7 J 10 934 28% 279* 2818 

18*8 11*8 FtaStl +0 10 15 23 13% 13*8 13V6 


24 13% I3V. 13b + Ik 
37 279* 27% 27** + 14 
24 26 251% 2596 + 86 


26% 7098 AJesdr 21 49 23% 23% 231%— V8 

89% 73b Alla Co X06t XS 25 13 81 007% 81 

28% 189* Alafnt 1+0 XI 321 2318 2296 23 —1 

98 81% Alai DfC 11-25 IIS 360 97*4 969* 971% + 9* 

34*6 74*8 AllflPw 270 XO 10 1593 34b 33** 339*— *6 

2tF8 15b AllenG +0b 12 14 72 1918 18*6 19 

46*j 20V, AIHCb 1JW 4J 8 3256 41% 419% 419* + U, 

66 53 ■% AWCppI 674 105 1 07 6496 64% 6414— U 

11 JU 99 AlaCppflXOO 10+ 2 110% 11098 110%— Vk 

23% 151* AII0P0 16 12 18 I7V 17*6 

591% 40b AlldSfr Z12 3+ 8 1915 56% 55% 55% — *8 

12% 5% AllbCh 00 51% 5*8 51% + 18 

34'6 24 AlUCpf 1 3498 34% 34% — % 

SB 7 * 20 ALLTL 1+4 6+ 9 93 271% 2 T* 27b — % 

37 37% ALLTpf 2+6 5.7 I 36% 3618 3618 - 98 

39'. 299* Alcoa 120 07 16 884 12*6 32 33% + % 

72b 15b A max 20 1J 1008 15b 149* 14% — 1% 

34 22b AmHas 1.10 4+ 19 1135 279* 26% 271* + % 

2*. 11* AmAgr 547 19* 1% 19* 

21V) lSVbABakr 9 87 31% 209* 209* — to 

70 5396 A Brand 190 5.9 9 1627 66% 651% 66 —1% 
249* ABrdpf 7JS 95 3 29 29 29 

70% 55 ABrdpf Z67 4B 18 67b 67 67 —2 

115 561% ABdCSt 1+0 1+ 17 823 112% 111% 112% + % I 


696 3b FlwGen 
21 12 Ftowi 

20% 141% Fluor 


18 4% 4% 4% — % 

+2 2+ 17 114 17% T7H T796 

+0 23 2781 179% 161% 1796 + 94 

130 4+ 12 22 54** MU. 549* 


5BV% 47b FOOteC 230 4+ 12 22 54*h 541* 549* 

5196 34% FcrdM 2+0 5+ 3 3357 44% 44K> 449* + b 


13'* 101* FfDeor 1J6 10+ 17 13% I3V8 13% 

749% 52% FIHawb 1+4 Z3 17 101 72% 72b 72V%— 18 

15to 10 FcjfWfi +4 313 13 3S3 131* 13 Ub + % 

lib 6% FaxStP +8 X512 79 101% 10b 101% + % 

33% 25 Faxbro 1JM XI 87 120 25% 25% 25b 

TO 24 F nxm yr 16 35 3F8 25*6 25% 

22% 21% FMEPn 113 22 Z1*« 219* 

1196 TTt FMOG 2+1C25J 464 W% 9b 998 + % 

22% 13V8 FrptMc +0 32 n 1220 1898 18b 18% + % 

34% 21'* Frlgtrn +0 X2 1 6 55 2718 Mb 27% 

» 17% FrueMt +02+ 5 340 23 22b22%+% 

Sto 25 Frutif pf ZOO 7.1 19 28% 28 2818 

36% 22% Fuqua +0 1+ 9 208 329* 3298 32%—% 


26% 19V% ABklM +6 3J 14 
27% 20'* ABusPr +4 23 14 


34 2696 25b Mb + % 
S3 24b 24% 24%— % 


55*8 40Vs AmCan Z90 5+ 11 934 50b 57b 58 — % 


Address; 


75 9- 21% AUn.nl 7+0 112 4 25V. 25 25 

51 37 ACon pf 3J» 6J) 17 50 49to 50 — to 

114 103 ACanpf 13J5 1Z1 U 113% 113b 113to 

TOV* 16b ACapBd 230 10+ 96 20b 20% 20b + % 

2f » 25V% ACapCu jLSle 8+ 12 29% 29b 29b — b 

11 6% A CoflfC 309 2 Bto 8*8 8%— % 

5617 43% ACvan 1.90 19 13 1547 48b 48% 48% — % 

27% 18b ADT .92 4+ 23 371 23b 22% 23 + % 

24V* 1a% AElPw 2260 95 9 1290 24% 21b U%— % 

47% 25 Am Exn US IB 16 5192 46)8 46 46% 

Mb 9b AFamls +0 2+ 13 627 20b 209* 20*6— to 

35Vi 19% AGnCn 10a 13 10 688 34b 33% 34% — b 

JS9* 6b AGnlwf - 117 13% 13b 13% 

Mb 519* AGnl B<AA24o11-5 3 Mb 54% 54% + % 

71% 40b AGn PfD 3+4 3+ 76 68% 67% 67b— to 

34% 259% AHerlt IJ0 XS 10 6 33% 33*6 33%— to 

10% 7V? AHotSl _ 107 10 9% 10 + b 


11 6to ACon 1C 
56% 439« ACvan 
271*: 18b ADT 


JS9* 6% AGnlwf ■ 117 13% 13b 13% 

Mb 51% AGnl Pl A Alkali .5 3 54% 54% 54% + % 

71% 40b AGn PfD 2+4 3+ 76 68% 67to 67b — to 

34% 259% AHerlt UO 15 10 6 33% 33*6 33% — to 

10% 7V? AHotSl 107 ID 9% 10 + b 

66% 46% AHome 290 4+ 13 1264 6318 6296 S3 to— to 

38 26% A Horn 1.12 33 11 3067 34% 34% 34b— V6 

9F8 64b Am rich 6+0 7.1 9 1713 93to 92to 93 + to 

87b 52 AlnGrP +4 +24 321B4bKM6B4%+b 

144 l!2to AIGppf 5+5 XI 2 142V8 14218 142W + to 

79% lr* AMI 72 Z9 12 2221 25b 24% 24% 


Sto 2-% Am Mot 590 3 2% 3 + to 

29 16to APreads ,12f + 426 19% lBto 18to— b 

13% 5 ASLFIa 6 174 7% 6% 7 — U 

JfS ASL.Flpf2.19 1SS 20 14% 14to 14V8 + to 
16 ijb AShip m 7+ 9 96 iito lib iib— u 

35b 23to Am Sid 1+0 53 10 529 30 29b M +18 

65to 27'* AmSIor +4 IjO 12 477 46 65b 66 +b 

«to ASJTPJA 4 JO 57 268 76to 7Sb 76to +1 

57% 51 ASh-pfB &£0 11.9 16 57 57 57 

2«» 15% ATAT WO 50 1819114 54% 239* 24 + % 

41% 30V; AT&T pf 3+4 8+ rt9 41b 41 41b 


42 3lto AT&T pf 374 8.9 223 42 41b 4l%_ % 

27b lS-% AWotr a UM XI 8 431 24% 24to 24to— b 

28to 19to AmHoff 2+0 11+ 9 141 22% 21b 21b— v% 

71% 55% ATrPr 5+4 BJ 8 70b TOto 70to- 2 

17 4b ATrSc 24 15% 15% 15b— V8 

86b 60b ATrUn 5+4 6+ 8 86 85b 8S%— to 

36 Mto Ameron 1+0 47 H 12 34b 34% 52— to 

n 27> AmnD % JO + 23 319 49 47b 48 + to 

»V8 22to Amofek JB 15 12 417 23% 22b 23b — to 

27b IBV8 Amtoc 373 27% 27 27b— to 

16 6to Amfcsc 4 588 7b 6b 6b— b 



THE DOWS AT 2,000 ...THE 
VIRTUES OF LINDA EVANS... 


When the DJI’s were hovering around 790, white the "Street" was mesmerized by 
Granville, Kaufman, and other purveyors of doom. CGR predicted... "The DJI’s will hft 
1,000; before touching 750." As a post-script, we added... “The Prime Rate in the 
United States, will drop below 13% by the time Congressional elections eventuate; 
American and British markets will thrust upwards in record volume.* Our optimism 
was considered heretical, an optimism time has vindicated. Peddlers of pessimism 
share a common equalizer, all sniff the dark side of human nature. To mention 
fiscal pundits In thesame context asOrwell, may be sacrilegious. StiU, their impact isa 
reality. Perhaps they're addicted to lyrics -from Gilbert and Sullivan's, "Princess 
Ida" 

—.“Man is coarse, and man is plain- Man is more or less insane- Man'sa ribald, Man's 

a rake- Man is Nature's sole mistake-" We rebuke those who await an apocalypse. 

Eternity, infinity, immortality, potentiality, omniscience; to say nothing of zero and 
the square root of minus one, or the virtues of Linda Evans, have no counterparts in 
animals; the individual is not a "mistake." In caressing the future. In pursuing the 
"Impossible Dream," mankind insures that his progeny win rise above the malaise of 
past nightmares. The "revolution of rising expectations,” will propel the DOWS 
over 2,000, despite the moans of sages who inhale the Dusk, not Dawa Our 
forthcoming report reviews CGR'S "track record” since late 1981, a performance in 
which approximately 90% of equities recommended, subsequently advanced, with 
92% of suggested "short sales”, eventually buckling, in addition, CGR highlights a 
"special situation" that could escalate, emulating a recently recommended, 
"emerging equity" that spiralled 800% in a brief time-span. For your complimentary 
copy, please write to, or telephone: 


C.V.C. Capital venture Consultants 
Amsterdam B.V. 

Kalverstraat112 

1012 PK AmstercUun, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Telex: 18536 


69 50% Amoco 3J0b 5+ 

3818 36b AMP .72 2+ 
24 119* Am PCS M 25 

20b 12b Amrws 
Uto 20% ARlSlfl 1+0 XI 


417 3% 22b 23b— 18 
373 27% 27 27b— to 

588 J96 6b 6b— to 


3J0b 5+ 8 1942 59b 58b 59% — to 

.72 2+ 18 3011 30 29 29to— % 

JO ZJ 15 171 12 119* 11% 

9 B0 19 189* 18b 

4.1 9 TO 34to 33b 34% + b 
4JD 13 146 40% 40b 40V8— to 

1456 2b 2to 2to— % 

17 515 19% 19b 19to + to 

S7 1576 36% 25b 259*— to 

3+ 32 48 37b 37to 37b— to 

1+ 15 IB llto 11% 11b + to 

2+ 13 71 23b 22b 23to + to 

12 6457 31b 31 319% + 9* 

55 165 6SVi 65V% 65% + % 

1.9 16 317 ISW 14b 15 + to 

+ 13 53 10b 10b 3Bb- % 

a .! *** + to 

33 ID 94 10b 10% 10% — % 
24 1% lto 1% 

1.1 357 199% 19 19 — to , 

2+ 10 34 33b 339* 

23 10 31 31 31 


43to 25b Aimted 1+0 4+ 13 146 40% 

4% lb Anocmp 1456 2b 

Mb t*% Antes % 17 515 19% 

309. Wi Anchor 1+8 S3 1576 36% 

42b 2S9. AnClay 02 3+ 32 48 37b 

12% 9b AndrGr JO 1+ 15 IB llto 

!4to 17 Anpeflc +0 2+ 13 71 23b 

3lto 20% Andrus s 12 6457 31b 

65 479* Armmj pf 2+0 55 165 65Vi 

19% I3to Airixlr JB 1.9 16 317 ISW 

16% Bto Anthem JM + 13 53 into 

15% 10b Anlttny +46 3+ B 4 12b 

13 9>4 Apache J8 17 10 9« lOto 

.2* to ApctlPwt 24 1% 

19b 15b AnrtiPunXID 11.1 357 19*% 

34 37'-, AaPwpf 4.18 12+ W 34 

31 » AaPwpf UO 113 10 31 


39to 17% ApIDIO IJtt S3 IB 416 34 


300 13% 13b 13 


23b 15to ArchDn ,T4b + 15 2788 22% 22b 32% 

Wto ArIPpf Ijj 11.9 9 3016 29b 30b +■ % 

23% 14 ArkBst +0 1+ 8 44 32 21b 22 


24% 16 Ark fa 1JM SJ 
% % ArlnRI 

15% 6% Armco 
24% isto Armcpf Z10 I0J 
Mb 16v% ArmsRU +8 Z9 


1JM SJ 18 104* 18% 18b llto— to 
147 b ni 4 b 

401 Sb 8b 8to 

Z10 105 7 20b 20 20 

+8 2.9 7 256 16% 16’* 16to— % 


m, 23% Arm Win I JO 3+ 638 2371 JOto 37% 38% 

25% 12b ArawE JO 1+ 9 54* iav% 12<% 13b 

»6 Artro X 3 140 48 2994 29 to 29% — b 

23b IJbArrlns « IB I M 21b 21 21b — % 

SJ* II? Asor £° 1,8 »b 22b 22% 

33% 20% AshlOII 1+0 4+ 444 33b 23 33% 4- to 

44% J3*6 Aid lO pf 4 JO 10.3 2 44 44 44 + % 

4?b 31 to AshiOpf 3.9# 9J 38 43to 41to 43 +1 

69 49 AW DC 180 19 II 76 66b 66% 66b 

7 108 108 IDS +■ to 
14 21b 21b 211% 


110 78 AKlDpf 4.75 4+ 

24% 18b Alhlpnr 1+0 7+ It 


27% 20*6 AlCvEI 2J8 X9 10 113 29% 79 2fl% 

M% 40b AM Rich 4J» 7+ 27 2658 57b S7b S7V« — % 
.3* 12to AIIRc pi 175 9+ 40(fc 39 38to 39 + to 


153 97 AM Pc pf 2+0 11 

ISto 10-"% aiiosCp 
5 ' 18% Ausal +0 1.9 18 

» 32b A moot +8 1+ 20 

S 4% Avaionn 8 

15b AVCMC +0 XI 14 

»b I«'% Avert AO 1.9 13 

'.5b 10 Avlalin 7 

41 27 Avnel JO 1+ IS 

Mb 17-» Avan 100 9.9 10 

Mb leb Avdin 10 


UJ U 400: 39 3813 39 4- to 

2+0 XI 10 136(7 136b 136b —lit 
250 10b lOto 10b— % 
+0 1.9 18 179 21% 21'.% 21b— b 

+8 1+ 20 172 48to 48 481%— b 

8 36 4b 4b 4% 

+0 XI 14 3 2Bb 28b 28b 

AO 1.9 13 483 33% 31% 32 —1 

_ , 7 54 13b 13b IJb— % 

JO 1+ IS 447 27b 271b 27V, — to 
ZOO 9.9 10 1472 19% 20b 4- to 


lto 1394 Dallas +6 17 
FI* 9% DamonC JO 1+ 
lb 21b DanaCp ljfl 49 
to 5b Donahr 
1 Bto Daniel ,18b 1+ 
to 23b DartKrs 
31 DataGn 
llto Datpnt 

% Bto DlaDse J4 Z8 
% 12to Darco 34 ij 
% 29% DaytHd J4 1+ 
b Ub DnyIPL ZOO 10.1 
45% DPLpf 7+8 1X2 
to 45 DPLpf 7 JO 1X2 
b 21b DeanFd 56 IS 
to 24b Deere 1+0 34 
to 17b DairnP 1.92 7J 
% 27 DeHaAr J» 13 
to 4% Dedona 
to 19b Dl«Ol» 92 2+ 
to 17% DeitMfs 1J0 4+ 
to 26% Dr So fa 1+0 4+ 
% 12b DelEd 1+8 9+ 
to 4* DefEpf 7J6 119 
to 19b DE pfF Z7S 1X9 
to 2DV% DEPTH 3J4 11+ 

to SI **t9 >W 

% 19to DE pfP 112 119 
f 20 DEpfB 235 1X9 

5 2lto DE pfO 1+0 1ZI 
16 20% DEpfM 142 1X2 

• 24% DEprL 4+0 1X7 

6 24V6 DEPfK 4.12 1Z8 

7 96 DEpfJ 15+8 13+ 
h 13% DelEor 128 11J 
t 17% D«tar +0 18 
6 9b DtGtor m 43 
6 21% DIGIopf Z25 7+ 

% 1»6 DlamS 196 10+ 

6 34b DtaShpf 4+0 10+ 

, 37 Dlebfds 1+0 15 
t 77% Digital 

: 45% Disney 1J0 1J I 

■ 15 DEIs 

’• 3b Dlvrsln 

• 6b Dameg .12 

■ 22*to DamRs 292 8J 
i 16 Donald +6 39 

i 36% Donley 1.16 20 1 
23% Dorsey 19D is l 
i 32% Dover +2 23 1 

■ 2594 DowOl 1+0 SJ 1 
i 36% Dowjn JB 1+ J 
I ii Drava JO 19 

I 15% Drear +o 1+ 1 
i 149* areas zoo tj 
i 25V% Orryfuj m Ijb i 
i 43% duPont UO U 1 
i 31 duPntpflSD 8+ 
i 39 duPntpf 4JB 9+ 
i 23b DufceP X48 7+ 

64 Dukepf 890 10+ 
«F6 Dukepf 090 109 
57 Dukepf 7+0 I0J 
2196 Dukepf 2+9 1X2 
28 Dukepf 3+5 114 
789* DukpfN 8+4 99 
S5% DvnBrd 290 29 2 
lib DuoU 2+6 125 I 
14b Duci pfA 110 11+ 
12% Duqpf 2+0 1X1 
I2Vt Duqpf 2+7 114 
13 DuqpfO XIO 1X9 
12b Duq prK XIO 123 
14b Duq pr 131 11+ 
43b Duqpf 740 11+ 
8b DveoPt +0 5+ 1 
17V; DvnAm 40 9 II 


9 9 51 17b 17b 17b 

9 105 11 109* 109*- 

9 a 507 26b Mto 26% - 

18 98 7b 7% 7b 

+ 53 10% 10 10% 

12 2811 35b 34% 35to 

10 2000 3496 33b 34b - 

1332 11b llto 119*- 
8 9 113 Sb Bb 816 - 

2 11 297 2016 19b 20b - 

fl 15 3870 42b 41b <2% - 

1 8 1603 19b 19b 19b- 

2 lOOt 6116 6116 61b- 

2 Ite 63 63 63-1 

S 19 48 38b 28% 3BU- 

4 29 385 29% 28b 29% H 

3 10 150 2£b 26 . 2£b H 
7 8 S83 47b 46b 4796- 

6 5V. 5% 5b H 

( 18 318 39b 38b 38b- 

• 14 220 27b 26b 2716 H 

1 11 355 35b 35 35 - 

5 B 1778 T7to 17% 17b 4 

l 1001 61% 61b 61% 4 

J 31 25% 25 25% 

10 27b 27% 27b 
75 Mb 26% 26% — 
' 68 26b Mb Mb- 

I 117 38% 20 28 - 

' 12 31b 31b 3Tb 

15 32b 32b 32b- 

7 113% 113% 113% 

l 17 20b 19b mm 4. 

11 113 21 333b 21 + 

56 15% 15b 15% 

I 3 28b 28b 28% — 

9 1873 16b 16b 16b + 

! .187 37b 37% 37b + 

10 1K8 40b 38b 39b — 

11 11071 88b 85% 87 — 
S9 750 B9b 88b 89% + 

7 » 26b M M 

3 68 5b 59* 5% 

1914 7% 7 7b — 

9 1596 32b 32b 32b 

8 69 17b 17 17 — 

16 822 59to 5B% 58b- 
1J « 31b 31% 31% - 
13 279 36b 36 369* + 

13 4264 34% 33b 34% + 
24 80 48% 47b 48% 4- 

60 T2b 12b 12b 4- 

16 600 21% 21b 21% + 

14 21 20% 21 

M 306 5Bb 55b 57b « 

12 2200 56b Sib 56b - 

3 40 40 40 +1 

„ 36 50 49b 49b + 

9 885 35*6 35 35% 

38te 82b 83b 83b— I 

50x 79b 79b J9b — 
lOOz 74b 74b 74b — 
2 2696 26% 26b 4- 
57 34b 34% 34% — 
93to 93% — 
72 982 77b 7596 76 — 
8 job Mb iib iib — 
1301b: 1+16 T7b 18b 4- I 

znz lib l+b 16b + 

181Hz 18 17 18 

4te 16% 16% 16% + 
I20B 17b T7b 17W— i 
28nt 19b 19 19b 4-11 

JOr 61 61 61 —II 

.! n 10b Mb 10b 4- I 

II 4 37b 22b 22b— I 


46b 2B ITTpfN X25 £1 I 43b 43b 43b 

« «b ITT pfl 450 7+ 7 MV 2 60b mr 3 — 1 

219* 12b IU IM 1 JO S3 644 13b 1396 13% 4- b 

23b 16b IdahoPs 9 1119 23b 22% 22 — b 

19% llto IdcolB 72 lib 11b 11b— b 

26% 17*6 III Poor 2+4 9J 7 2072 26b 26b 269* 


KTI-wJtJ 


19b 13b UPowpf 2+4 105 
19b 14b IIPOfTPf 213 11.1 
21 15b MPowpf 2JS 11.1 

38b 27% JlPowpf 4.12 10+ 
34b 25% MPowpf 3-78 11. 1 
5146 51% MPowpf lJOe XI 
53b 48b MPowpf S35 103 
40 28b MPowpf 4+7 11+ 

37% 2Sb MPowpf 4+0 11+ 
36% 21% ITW 32 12 13 
40% 279* fmpCdm 2+9e 55 8 
11% 5b ImpICp 8 

Mb Bb INCO JO 1+ 

62 45 IndIMpf 7+8 11+ 

68 49 IndlMof 7J6 11+ 

19b 14 JadlMpf XU.11J 


m. Mb IndIMpf X25 11+ 
»V6 Bto IndIMpf 363 1X6 
25b 30b IndIMpf X75 11+ 
28b 17b IndlGS* 1+8 7J 7 
12b 5b Inavco +71 
26% 13% Infmlc 32 

«• Mb l"8WR 240 SJ 16 
37b 28 IngRpf 235 7+ 

"WTee +4 44 21 
im InMSfl +0 33 
48% 38b InldSI Pf 475 MU 
21% 14b Irwlkn 1+Ofa 53 11 
_9 3b InspRs 
Mb Ub IldBRac 10 

28 19 InlgRpf 3+3 12+ 

35b 25% JnfgRpf 425 12+ 


200Z 19b 19b 19b 
100Z 19b 19b 19b 
290Z2IW 21b 21b + % 
lOOz 38 38 38 + b 

5D0Z 349* 34 34 

105 51 ERi 50%— 9 
20 Ob 53b 53b + b 
20z 39 39 39 

897 37b 36b 36b— to 
79 32% 32 32% — b 

389 38b 3816 38b— to 
724 10b 10b IMS— to 
1376 12b 12% H%— to 
5Uz 599* 59% 59% 
lOOt 65b 65b 65b— to 
35 19 18% 18% 

47 19% 19% 199* + % 
13 29 28b 28b— % 


13% Th UdRFn 
1«6 16 itepse 


12 29 28b 28b— % 

7 25 Mb 25% 25% — Vi 

442 5b 5b 5% 

S JSS 3SS%i2 

21 li^WZSZ-* 

11 70 189* IBb 18%— b 

139 5to 5 5b + to 

10 687 21% 209* 21 -b 

22 25b 25% 25%—% 
241 33 32% 33 

11 92 11b Ub Ub 

65 199* 19b 19% + b 


>n # aw f to 
33 32% 33 




Hm 

iCJitl 



p4+ 






I ntofM u# 44 12 323 6db 66b 66% + b 

KJS » jrrtTfs* +0 5.9 5 376 10% Mb lOto— b 

^ 81 nilik 2+0 SJ 7 21 50b 50 S3 — 96 

14b 8b Inlmed 260 9% 9b 9% + b 

24b 14% InfAlu +2 3+ 9 25 18% 18b 18b 

'MtoW IBM 4« 3+ 11139M11W 11796 llSfc- % 
® JSS. 2*Sll M P 22 25b 25b 25b— b 

112 M w .^2X29% 29% 29b + % 

’IS 55 SSI? 1 ' 1506 8 7b 7b 

7b 2b IntHrwt 314 5 4b 5 — b 

S3 23b InfH BfC 27 51b 50 50 -lb 

« 5 JOto »% 29% — 1% 

34% 17% inlHpfD 4 34 24 34 — b 

ST* !"l! |Un . Z60 6j 11 was ub 4i 41b +1 

39 30% IntMnpf 4tt3 11.1 5 37 36 36 —2 

™ H “ H 55 32b 32b 32b 

57% 46 UTtPOPT 2+0 4+ 33 84049b48b49b + b 
125 . 28 210 13b >2b 12b 

58b 32% WN1H J+ SJ ■ 951 43b 43% 43b + % 

?W6 86% InlNI pfH&SD 10 J 35 98 98 98 + b 


951 43b 43% 43b + % 
35 98 9B 90 + b 


43% 289* InfpbGp 1+8 2+ 14 097 41% 40% 41 


* JO 26 
+8 J 
, 1+0 3J 
f 2+0 10A 
.16 3+ 
+8 2 + 
+0 2+ 
2+ 

1+4 10+ 
Pf <52 129 
Pf 5+8 125 
PT 3+5 1X3 
pr 4+0 12+ 
+3B 65 
+0 3+ 


nIBo kr 23 17% 17b 17b— % 

325 IS f»“Pw 1.90 8+ 9 97 21b 21 21b + b 

21% 14b lowEl 1+0 9.1 10 160 20b 20b 20b 

31b 20% IPwllG 234 8+ fl 6B 32b 31b 31b 

23 17 IOWIU Pf X3T 1X5 200tr 22 Z2 22 

MS M8 13 9 85 37b 36b 37 

37b Mb PCtoDO 3+4 53 9 148 37W 37 3716 

Wb W* IpcdCp J4 X7 13 38 12b 12b 12b 

2!* I « 5.1 7 30 38*6 3896 389+ 

53 42% IrvBkpf 5.11*1X1 M 50b 50b 50b 


200tz 22 2 32—1 

05 37b 36b 37 +b 

148 37b 37 3716 

38 12b 12b 12b + 16 

50 36b 38b 38b 

M 50b 50b 50b + b 


u 

11 

1 + 

3f 

6+ 

6 

92 


23 

9 

65 

9 

IJ 

14 

X6 

42 

1+ 


1+ 

19 

23 

12 



10 BMC .III 
70 Bol.ncs JO 1.7 

15 Bkrlnll .92 X5 
18b BaWor 26 1+ 

b vIBaldU 
? vIDIdUPf 
29% BoIICp IJB 32 
lib BollvMr JO IJ 
~b DallvPk 
31b BallOE 3+0 7J 
X”, Ball PfD 450 9+ 
Sib BncOne 1.10 X3 
OH DncCfr n 54 
3b BanTes 
43b Bandog 120 Z+ 
79 B6BOS 2+0 4j 
43 BkBokPf 491e 9J 
Mb BiNY 20i 45 

16 BnhVas 1.1S 34 
1%"S BnhAm 1J2 XI 
40 BkAmnf 5130122 
66 BkAm Pi 027*1X3 
11b BkAmpfZ+5 
23*6 BkARtv 2+0 7+ 
» BankTr 2m X* 
19b BkTrpf 2J0 94 

?*: Bower JDe J 
19 Bard +4 1.4 
18 BnmCp +0 3+ 
23 Bomel s 1+4 32 

17 BoryWr +0 3.4 
8% BA5IK .12B 10 

IBb Doused .78 ZS 
11% BavtTr J7 XI 
ITS* BovFln 20 * 


43 Ub 

12 US 30b 

14 676 I6!6 

13 49 19% 

129 1b 

I 5% 

11 70 55b 

1974 I6b 

12 48 10 

« 527 46b 
40t 46 

11 284 33b 


181k 16b— b 


10% tab— % 

30% 30% * v. 
i*b i#to + % 
!«. W%— to 
lto ib 
5% 5%— to 
ssb ssb + b 
141% |6b 
9b 10 + % 


r?to BovSIG 2A0 7+ 
S»% Bearmo 1+0 ZB 
■ f » BeaiCa 1+0 5.« 
• S Decor +4 34 
30% BectnO 120 32 
4 Baker 

6% Deter pf i.m 217 
IT 1 - BeidnH .40 11 
77’ • BelHwi 46 14 
32 B*IH„pf 47 1.9 

67»» Bell All 640 7.4 
SSb BCCg XS8 
19b BrtHna 22 1+ 
"to BellSau 2+3 6+ 
4l‘l BClOAH +0 IJ 
Sib Bealls 1 00 3+ 
S4 BenfCo 2.00 4+ 
3S Benclnf 4J0 1L7 
17% Benealn 
BenalB +7| 

3 m B«r*ev 
icn% BeUPd 24 IJ 
1«b BetfiSli +0 SJ 
37b BethSI PfSOO 1X4 
IBb DrtnSlotXso 1X3 
S3's Beverly 23 9 

I9"% BloThr +0 34 
13b BlocHn 
13b BlDCtD M 33 
Sib BlCfcHP 1.92 5 9 
MU Blair Jn ii 24 I 
38'S BtcfcHR 2+0 42 
77b Boemas i+B IS 
32<7 BMseC 1.90 Cl 
46 BM6eC PfSOO 8+ 
15% BauBer .10 + 

SO, BordentUS 4+ 
16>% B org Wo n Cl 
8% Datums 
25*% BasEO 321 74 
63 BasC pf 688 1X7 
9 BotEnr 1 T7 10.9 
10>7 Ba»C pr 146 1X5 
Mb BCiwrtr .72 XI 
DU05I 140 4 7 

«to emiM i+a xi 


148 Jb 

0 12 JJ 59-% 

5 6 464 53% 
5 95 Jib 

5 7 153 46 

1 J 1 * 3'** 

I 10 2933 19 
S 1 37 42% 
3 II 671% 
136 16 

I 13 7 36% 

» 7 1607 70 

> 2 36% 

1 16 8 12 

I 13 464 32 

> 10 25 22b 

223 38*% 

I 12 2S3 IBb 
>12 M 12 
f 18 1734 31b 
1 6910795 16% 

> 43 53 23b 

; 30 7? J4b 

I 12 4 351% 

■ 6 2307 31 

I 51 209 13% 

r IS 441 53to 
391 4b 
33 7b 
■ 3 1316 

i IS 891 3Sb 
3 34% 

9 5907 41% 
142 32b 
13 17 W* 

9 5677 41b 
27 99 55b 

11 1 S9b 

II 853 431% 
40* 381% 
48 18% 
82 41% 

H tt <1 

34 314 13b 
1366 l*b 

10 40H 
658 30b 

20 431 35% 

II 111 24 

35 63 21% 

II IIS8 19% 

» 6 32% 

108 lit 31% : 
13 37 56% , 

IS 3632 44b , 
If 447 lib • 
9B 59to , 
29 134 24 

10 JB8 38b ; 

10 1B» 23 
13 M 71% 

8 U 4J1 , 
200: 83 I 
20 11 

„ „ » 131* I 
8 2404 23b : 

11 IM 2T* ; 
17 3IS9 60b 1 


45 1 > 46 + 1% 

■ 33b 33 — u% 
1 9b 9b 

1 3b 3b 
k Wto 591% — 1% 

• 57 b 53% +1 
% sib 51b 

45 451%— b 

■ Mb 31% 4- % 
11% lib 

• 41 42 + !% 

1 *7 67b 

15% 15% — b 

. 3BX, 38% + % 
69 691% — % 

1 ItAl 26% — b 
111% 12 

31 to 31b— b 
1 32b 22% — b 
1 38b 38% — to 
, 17U 171*1 — I* 

llto iit% 

> 30 r 6 31b— V* 

1 16b 14b 
1 33 l % 23b 
1 14b 34Vi + to 
1 35b 351% 

30to 30b— U 
13b 13b— b 
52% S3to + % 
4b 416— ■* 
71% 7b— to 

13 13 

341% 34 to— % 
341% 34V, — to 
91b 91b +■ to 

32 32b 

20 20 — % 
401% 41 + I* 

55 55 

2«k 29*6 *. to 
42b 42*%— to 
38b 38b— lto 
18% IBb - >* 
4b 4%— >* 
4% 6b + to 
>3 13b + U 

14b 16b + to 
40b 40b 

20 20b 
3Bl.ii 35% 

23% 24 4- ’* 

21 TIM— to 
19% I9H 
Kb 32b + V* 
Jtto 2lb- is 
Mb 36b — % 
4)1% 44 — to 
45% 46 — H 
Mb 58b —I 
23b 24 

37b 17b— to 
77V, 22b + to 
7b 7b- Mi 
<Tb Cb— b 
U 83 *1 

low 10 % — to 

in* + b 

Kb 33 + to 

a saw 

ub 
























































Statistics lodes 



AMEX price PJB Eernbm noons 
|. ' AMEX Mahs/tomP20 Ftta* ml • notes P.19 ~ 
NV3E oris»s . PM GoU markets P. 17 
NYSE Moha/toM PJ3 ln)«T«$t ttm PJI 
Cjnpdtan stocks PJ2 Mortal sa»iwv P.16 
WKY roles P.17 (teflon P 31 

CtSmoanio* pzi (JTC stock PJO 
WyWenas • othor markets P Xt 


«cral65SEribunc. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Slocks 
Report Page 16 


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


** 


Page 1‘ 


capacity. 


■ \ •- 

r ' t ?J '-' , hcrtji tt 
,,J « 18536 




•’ M 


• r«- 


: : TV 

. > 
. 3 


TECHNOLOGY 

Cellular Phones Display 
'Early Signs of Inadequacy 

By ANDREW POLLACK 

blew York Ti/na Service 

N EW YORK — Celhilar mobile telephone service, 
which is just getting started in most U.S. cities, is 
already showing signs of inadequacy. The technology 
was supposed to allow for a vast increase in the nmhber 
of people who could own car telephones. But already, with only 
an estimated 150,000 such phones in use, the ceOular-tdephone 
providers say they arc in dpugpr of naming short of capacity, and 
are asking the Federal Communications Commission to provide 
additional radio frequencies for mobile-phone service. 

Capacity is already dose to being reached in Chicago, West 
. Angeles and parts of Orange County, California, according 
officials of companies tfr** ' 

provide service in those areas. r n i 

The Celhilar Tdecormmrmcar Cell Splitting Has 
tions Industry Association, a ^ 
trade group, says that limits Slg ll U K amiy 

will be readied m all 10 of the 
largest cities within five years. 

These statements have been 
greeted with astonishment in 
some circles, because shortage 

of capacity was the very thing the cellular technology was 
supposed to prevent 

“It doesn't seem to be living up to its promise in terms of 
spectrum efficiency," Mimi Weyforth Dawson, an FCC commis- 
sioner, said. “No one conceived" the industry would want new 
^frequencies so soon, she added. 

Before cellular-telephone lechnology arrived, mobfle-phone 
service was extremely restricted. Generally, a single antenna 
served an entire city and there were, at most, 44 channels 
available, and erf ten less. On New York telephone’s system, for 
instance, only 12 mobile telephones could be in use at once. 

Cellular-radio technology, as it is also called, was supposed to 
change all that. In this technology, the city is divided into smaller 
cells, each with its own amenm saving ozrfy that cdl As a driver 
passes from one cdl to another, sophisticated computers insure 
that the call is hanH<»d off from one antenna to the next. 

H ENCE, the same frequencies could be used by different 
drivers in different parts of the city. Moreover, as the 
number of customers increased, capacity could be in- 
creased merely by splitting cells into smaller cells, so that the 
frequencies could be shared by even more people. 1 
■ But this turned out not to be the case. Cdl splitting so far has 
--%ot been that important in increasing mobile-phone capacity. 
What has been important is that the FCC when it authorized 
cell ular-t elephone service, inc re as ed the number of channels 
av ailab le in each dty to 666. In other words, even if a city is not 
divided into any cells at aB, the new system can handle at least 15 
times as many simultaneous calls as the old system. . 

There are other “real World" problems, as welL For one thing, 
cellular-telephone use is highly concentrated in certain neighbor- 
hoods, such as downtown areas, so that having cells outside those 
areas does not hdp much. 

And the industry o fficials say there is a practical problem in 
continually shrinking the cells below a radius of two miles (3.2 
kilometers} or so. In Chicago and West Los Angeles, the cells are 
already that small 

As the cells get smaTiw and closer together, coordination 
among different cells becomes more complex and interference 
more troublesome. 

Moreover, the antenna must be situated near the middle of the 
cdl for optimal performance. Bnt as cells get smaller, the range of 
antenna sites gets smaller and it gets more difficult to find a roof 
or spot of ground. 

“You start to encounter local resistance to the proliferation of 
antennae," said Reed Royalty, vice president of external affairs 
for Pactd Mobile Cos. “Sometimes we find that we just can’t 
locale a cell site in its optimal spot” 

In Chicago, Ameritedi had to buy. and then demolish, a 
building to dear a space for an antenna. In Tucson, Arizona, 
local residents objected to a tower spoffing their view. In Bedford. 
(Continued on Page 21, CoL 5) • 


f Ckmrency Rates 


Cram Rates 


hots 20 



S 

8 

DM. 

FJP. 

KJL 

e». 

BJ=. 

SlF. 

Yen 

AiMtantan 

3824 

3441 

raw- 

36175 ■ 

41764 • 

— 

333* 

U4J1* 

0828 y 

BranotstB) 

41225 

7M4S 

76.1475 

66115 

11575* 

T788 

. 

XU4 

2434* 

Frankfort 

38365 

354 

— 


Uttx 

16445.* 

4557* 

11M»* 

1228* 

LMdon CW 

127* 

. 

28278 

115713 

350365 

40 

73235 

tan 

31740 

- r Ml tan 

184180 

251980 

OM6 

2DM1 


54648 

31655 

76434 

7846 

NewYorMO 

— 

•7834 a 

3872 . 

M7 

15S7JB 

147 

41*5 

3573 

248.1* 

Porta 

MU 

am 

385M 

— - 

4776 X 

Z7M 

TiW* 

34505 

33455* 

Tokyo 

3080 

32126 

ns 

2675 

. 1321* 

7U9 

404J4* 

*70 

■ 

• dtaicft 

\Iecu 

35745 

uu 

nm 

2780- 

41311 • 

74. IS* 

4.1542* 

— 

UI5i* 

*7365 

uns 

32453 

68404 

1-43487 

un 

45230 

18743 

1BJ83 

1 SDH 

umaz 

47714 

saw 

HA 

HA 

um 

412824 

Z53* 

2000 


CtosMus to London and Zurtot, fficAm *i enter European etofan; Nmu vur* rotas at 4 P/A. 
(ai Communal frmc W Amounts no&kdtobuyane pound lei Amounts needed to bur ont 
donor {•) Units of too M Units of lOXHr) (/o/fc of KU00*U2:iin/ quoted.- HA.:nottnanal*9. 
(*} To bur aoe pound: 8USJ2765 

Other PaBar Vriwea 

CwrtBCY rar US* cwrMcr nr lUt Comae* per UM Cimacrwin -s 

Arm. austral OBO Rn. markka 62775 Mato r.rfas. Z454 S.Kar.wim 874*8 

AustraLS 1.5184 OMkOK. UUD MRPtB 29100 . 5aaa.MM«o 1715D 

AiMtr.seia. 2132 Hoag Knag $ . 7.757 Horn. krona 52975 to o H-k n mo 8X3 

MM. to.*- 6158 imflmiratoo 1242 Mltm 1&464 TatemS 3U1 

and on 525000 tadarwfati MT7JQ0 Port needs T7UD TWMI 27275 

CamtatanS 12677 trtttS 0963 SoaOIrtyol 32515 TarktakUra SZ725 

Oaabkkroat KL99 knaRtok. iwpo Stag.* ■ Z229 UAEttVaa 16725 

Egypt. pound 0351* KownOI «wr OJ025 IMTjmd 1208 Wn.M ». 035 

estartag : 12555 Irish c 

Sources: Bannue du Bundux (Brussels); Banco Ce mnmnU a TtaUano (Milan); Banaue Mo- 
NanaM da Park /Parts}; Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAH (maer,rtyot dtrhemX 
Other data from Bouton and AP. 


I 


Interest Rates 




Em oianuMy Be| 8 «to 


1 month 7«r7«* 
amontos 7ft-7ft 
amounts 7i*7ft 

6 months 

1 rear 8 


MWrk 

S*r6ft 
Slwdfe 
5 VS*- 
SVudU, 
540-516 


Franc 

5M 


; Jane 20 

Frndl • - 

Frnnc ECU SDR 
WM2ft HMM091. IMh 7 At 
SHrS*. Q**ntk Wft-Htt VHr** 7 Vj 

SMA 1210.1216 lMhttfe 9Mlk 7Vi 

S1H6 Vnt-12 Non*.. »V»«. 7H 

5VS«h lWMm WVIIVO * V9 N 70W 


Sources; Maryan Guaranty (dollar, DM. SF. pound FFH-Uards Book (ECUJ; Rautars 
(SDR). Ram afioHcatHato tntartxmk Otnaslts ot St ndMon m k haon t (or aautvaknt). 


RryMawy 



UntorLaarReie 
cam Pwwr»MJ» days 

wnofltt Treowry anfc 

aMrtb TreamrY B «* 
C mmfdan 

^CDIiMJUon 


LMHwtf 

OMntoMBBh 

OMMoattUtalMto 

MfwHaok 


MMrwd oa Ml 
CallMDBar 
OoMBantt M e r tg * 
hriertonk 
6m«afa(aMftaafc 

BfVBM 

Book BOM HUM 


Jaw20 


7ft ..7ft 
75/« 7ft 
VW fft 

8 * 
7.M 7 JO 

624 672 

7.18 . 6M 
685 688 

MS &» 


UR U» 
SM 565 

s a sm 

ST 8 530 
UO 575 


WO KM 
10306 TO 3/14 
103/16 103/16 
19ft H3m 
H3/16 MW* 


4 


- 12ft 12ft 

T» !» 

ntovnasmvBM 

jHMatn l ulertiH* tlVH 12ft 


OtacaaalRaia 

cafl Manor 
tMnrJaftrM* 


6l/U 61/1* 
ISM 65/16 


Saunas: Rnkn. Cm*entar*.Crcd* 

Lmak.LMtBcnk.BaMonhkya. 


AaimBoOwBepadU 

Jane 19 


inmni 


ly*ar 

Saorca: 


Jft-TJfc 
7ft -no 
-7ft- 7ft 
7ft -7ft 

■70,-t 


VAHMeyHarketFkate 

Jane SO 

M«rrtH tmt fiooto Assets 
Jttoj utfoiuMyWto. 320 

Taftraf# Mtoml Raft latex: HA 

Sauna: Mktm Lynch. AF 


f Gold 


’ June 20 

.- A-**. PJA 

HoaalCaw 32275 . rmn — 1M 

1-BxaatoMra 322JS. . — UD 

PaVnUkh) 3937. < m* —223 

West . 32235* . 31325 —760 

Laatoa . . BUR . mm -7 JO 

n *» r «* ■■■ . — . --- raj * ~ijo 

w»«6«n«f» Parti antf Lsqdbn efftdol n*- 
kas: HanO Roaa andlwieh epootoo and 
tSasMa aritau Nar-nit Cmwx current 
contract. Alt arias In VA Star Bunco. 
Source: Rautars. 


Rebound 
Is Seen in 


Gen 


iany 


Building Slump 
Stitt a Concern 

By Warren Geder 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The West 
German economy, after a 1 -percent 
drop is fiisi-qaaiter gross national 
product, is again growing with the 
aid of strong exports and capital 
goods production, the Bundesbank 
said Thursday in its June report. 

The report cautioned, however, 
that economic growth remains 
handicapped by serious problems 
in the construction industry. 

Severe winter weather com- 
pounded the construction indus- 
try's troubles and contributed to a 
40-percent drop in orders for new 
homes in the lina four months from 
a year earlier, the report said. De- 
mand for homes has stabilized at a 
low level, but there are no immedi- 
ate signs of a turnaround, it added. 

The Bundesbank emphasized 
that extraordinary influences — 
the severe weather, the problems of 
the home-construction industry 

anri fypra»rnj over amtfw emigri fwi 

controls — contributed to the dra- 
matic slowing of the economy at 
the year's outset 

“Without the weather-induced 
fallout of production, real gross na- 
tional product [in the first Quarter] 
would not have been lower than the 
previous quarter ” the Bundesbank 
said. 

As was previously reported, sea- 
sonally adjusted GNP, winch mea- 
sures the value of a nation's goods 
and services, fefi 1 percent in the 
first quarter from the last > 
of 1984. 

The Bundesbank said a mar ginal 
half-percent rise in private con- 
sumption in tiie first quarter from 
the previous quarter was attribut- 
able to consumer uncertainty about 
new csnisaoD-control regulations 
in Europe and related tax-incentive 
programs. It said that as of April, 
when the timetable for the new reg- 
ulations was clarified, domestic or- 
ders for can had picked op. 

Some economists noted, howev- 
er, that die main reason for weak 
private d/manri was not the emis- 
sion-control controversy but high 

(Continued on Page 21, CoL 5) 


Hew Delaware Molds Takeover Law 

State’s Supreme Court R uling s Have National Impact 


By David A. Vise 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — In the 
midst of the Frenetic merger ac- 
tivity that is reshaping corporate 
America, the Supreme Court of 
one small suae is rewriting the 
rules that govern conflicts be- 
tween management and stock- 
holders in takeover battles. 

Because many of the nation's 
largest public companies are in- 
corporated in Delaware because 
of its favorable tax laws, the Del- 
aware Supreme Court is in the 
unique position of rendering 
opinions that have a powerful 
national impact. 

■Since the beginning of the 
year, while Congress has held 
hm yi rpH c of hoOTS of hearing* to 
try to decide whether new federal 
rules regulating mergers are 
needed, the Delaware Supreme 
Court has been involved in some 
controversial cases that are alter- 
ing the existing rules in Delaware 
and affecting court derisions in 
other states. 

Last month, the Delaware Su- 
preme Court administered the 
first major defeat in a takeover 
battle to T. Boone Pickens, the 
chairman of Mesa Petroleum Co. 

In Unocal Corp. vs. Mesa Pe- 
troleum Qx, the court ruled that 
Unocal could discriminate 



T. Boone Pickens 

against Mr. Pickens, a major 
stockholder who had made a 
572-a-share hostile takeover bid, 
by excluding him from the com- 
pany’s offer to buy back a por- 
tion of its own stock from share- 
holders. 

The impact of that controver- 
sial decision has been to give 
numagwnMn greater power in 
fighting hoaik takeover bids 
and to discourage raiders from 
launching two-tier takeover bids. 
This tactic involves an offer of 
cash for 51 percent of a compa- 


ny’s shares and high-yielding se- 
curities known as junk bonds for 
the rest. 

The court said that since Mr. 
Pickens's two- tier bid for Unocal 
was coercive and inadequate, 
and heraiise his past activities 
“justify a reasonable inference” 
tha t his principal objective was 
“greenmail,’’ ihe company had 
the right to exdude him from its 
offer to buy back its own stock. 
Once the’ decision was an- 
nounced, Mr. Pickens dropped - 
his bid to acquire the company. 

Greenmail is the term used to 
describe the profit made when a 
stockholder, who has hundred a 
hostile takeover bid, agrees to 
drop the bid if the target compa- 
ny will buy back his shares at a 
premium price. 

Daniel L. Goelzer. general 
counsel of the Securities mid Ex- 
change Commission, said the 
SEC staff plans to recommend a 
challenge to the Delaware ruling 
in the Unocal case. Mr. Goelzer 
said the SEC staff believes that 
federal law requires all share- 
holders to be treated equally in a 
tender offer such as the om Uno- 
cal made to all of its shareholders 
but Mr. Pickens. 

Only four days after the Uno- 
(Contfnoed on Page 19, CoL 3' 


Dollar Surges 
On Economic 
Report in U.S. 


The Assvciuied Press 

NEW YORK — The 


dollar 


drove higher Thursday after the 
government reported that the U.S. 
economy has picked up steam, a 
development that analysts said di- 
minishes chances for further de- 
clines in interest rates. 

The Commerce Department re- 
port. released midway through the 
European trading day and at the 
start of business in the United 
States, said that the gross national 
product was growing at an annual 
rate of 3.1 percent in the current 
quarter. 

The GNP is the value of all of the 
country’s goods and services, and 
the slightly larger-ihan -expected 
rise indicated to many currency an- 
alysis that hopes for 'lower interest 
rates have faded. 

David Arbesman, first vice presi- 
dent at Prudential-Bache Securi- 
ties, said that some traders who had 
been betting cm lower growth fig- 
ures “were caught short . .and had 
to run for cover" bidding up the 
price of the dollar as they went. 

“This may be the beginning of a 


Mrl Shorn Gain 

Of $4.8 Billion 

The AssonairJ Press 

NEW YORK — M-l. ihe 
United States' narrowest mea- 
sure or money supply, shot up 
S4.S billion in the week ended 
June 10. the Federal Reserve 
Board said Thursday. 

The Fed said M-'l rose to a 
seasonally -adjusted $590.(1 bil- 
lion from a revised S5S5.S bil- 
lion the previous week. The pre- 
vious week's figure oririnallv 
was reported as S5S5.6 billion! 

M-l comprises cash in circu- 
lation. deposits in checking ac- 
counts at financial institution* 
and nonbank traveler's checks. 


U.S. Banks May Press Argentina Over Interest 


quarter 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — US. bankets 
are expected to press Argentina for 
more' interest payments amid ru- 
mors that some of the recent $483- 
miBion brid ging loan may be used 
to cushion the impact of recent 
austerity measures instead of re- 
ducing interest arrears. 

• Argentina announced last week a 
new economic program which in- 
cludes price and wage freezes and a 
new currency linked to the U5. 
dollar. On the strength of the pro- 
gram, the International Monetary 
Fund agreed to reinstate a standby 
loan agreement with Argentina, 
clearing the- way for a resumption 
of private-bank lending. 

The subsequent bridging loan 
was agreed to by the United States 
and several other countries after 
the IMF derision. 

Although Argentina recently 
paid $250 milli on in back interest 


from its own reserves, it is still 
about $1 bflbon overdue on interest 
payments on its commercial-bank 
debt of roughly 525 bOlion, U.S. 
bankers said Wednesday. Argenti- 
na's total foreign drill stands at 
about $48.6 bShoo. 

■ Reforms Are Supported 
EoHia \ William D. Momalbano 
of ihe Los Angeles Tunes reported 
from Buenos Aires : 

The lines were long and the con- 
fusion was almost total, but Argpn- narily good, really surprising. Even . 

tina’s KanW reopened nevertheless people affected by the price freeze to the dollar On Wednesday, 
Wednesday amid wide popular are supporting iL" austral was valued at 51-25. 

support for sweeping economic re- ^ SC£med t0 ^ re _ 

fleeted at the banks, which were 
dealing for the first time in the new 
currency. The unit of currency is 
now the austral, replacing the 
much-devalued Argentine peso. 


Newspapers published the re- 
sults of a poll that showed 80-per- 
cent support for the reforms, which 
include a freeze on wages and 
prices and a promise by the govern- 
ment to pay its own way without 
resorting to the printing of addi- 
tional money. 

Alfredo Canitnx, the Economics 
Ministry official who was one of 
the authors of the plan, observed: 
“The response has been extraordi- 


or- 


forms. 

A three-day bank botida; 
dered by the government of 
dent Rail Alfonsin to allow imple- 
mentation of his across-the-board 
attack on inflation ended with 
higher prices on the stock market 
and the new currency bolding its 
own against the dollar. 


“I believe it’s going to work," 
Felix Cuadra, a music-store owner, 
said as he waited in one of the lines. 


“I don’t see any other way; J have 
to believe it will work." 

Last Thursday, the last banking 
day before the reforms were an- 
nounced, there were runs on some 
banks, and the peso declined 20 
percent against the dollar on the 
free market. The reform offers real 
interest on savings deposits of 4 
percent a month as an incentive to 
keep money on depoat 

When the banks closed last 
week, the peso stood at about 800 
one 
One 

thousand pesos are equal to one 
austral. 

The reform is much more severe 
than the austerity traditionally 
counseled by the IMF, which Mr. 
Alfonsin long resisted. How long 
the emergency measures will be 
kept in place is not clear, but gov- 
ernment spokesmen suggest it will 
be a relatively short time. 


major rally," Mr. Arbesman said. 

He said that the strong economic 
growth figures, coupled with the 
continued tow level of inflation evi- 
dent in a separate government re- 
port which said consumer prices 
rose 02 percent in May. hare quiet- 
ed talk of (he chances for a cut in 
the Federal Reserve’s 75 percent 
discount rate, its interest charge or. 
loans to financial institutions. 

James T. McGroarty. vice presi- 
dent at the securities dealer Dis- 
count Corp„ said the GNP growth 
figures “postponed any kind of dis- 
count rate reduction for another 
week or so." 

Late Thursday, the dollar ex- 
tended its gains after the Fed re- 
ported that ns basic measure of the 
money supply shot up by a larger- 
tbao-expected $4.8 billion in the 
week ended June 10. 

In London, the British pound fell 
almost 3 cents Thursday, to 
S1.2780 from $15055 Wednesday. 
The pound fell in New York to 
$12765 from $1.2940 Wednesday. 

Other late dollar rates in New 
York compared with late levels 
Wednesday, included: 3.072 Deut- 
sche marks, up from 3j041; 9370 
French francs, up from 9280, and 
2.5730 Swiss francs, up from 
25485. 


General Dynamics Offers 
To Cut Price of Fighters 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapatdtes 

WASHINGTON — General 
Dynamics Corp. said Thursday 
that it lias offered to seD the US. 
Air Force a stripped-down version 
of its F-16C fighter for a cheaper, 
guaranteed cost of $9.7 million 
each. 

The Air Force now pays $18 mil- - 
lion to $20 million for each F- 16C 
General Dynamics said the new 
offer would save the government 
$1.3 billion. 

Last month, Northrop Corp. 
submitted a proposal to the Air 
Face offering 3% F-20 Tigershark 
jet fighters at a fixed price of $15 
million 

Herbert F. Rogers, a vice presi- 
dent and general manager of Gen- 
eral Dynamics’ division in Fort 
Worth, Texas, acknowledged that 
the offer was prompted in part by 
Nonhrqp's unsolicited bid- 

competition is a wonderful 
thing," Mr. Rogers said. “Obvious- 
ly, I'm working as a contractor to 
protect my business." 

Northrop has spent hundreds of 
millions of dollars on the F-20, but 
has been unable to sell it to theU.S. 
military or to foreign governments. 

With its offer, it hoped to gain a 
share of the current Air Force mar- 
ket for 720 front-line fighters over 
the next four years: It proposed 
that ihe purchases be divided even- 
ly between F-16*s and F-20’s. 


Mr. Rogers said that the new 
version of the F-I6C would not 


have equipment like radar and 
weapons 


lor such things as all- 
weather ground attacks. He said 
the company bad proposed Lhatlhe 
Air Force acquire 504 multi-role F- 
16s and 216 of the specially config- 
ured aircraft. 

ZJ Thornton, a spokesman for 
General Dynamics, said that the 
cheaper F-l 6s would hare the same 
advanced cockpit and would fly 
more than twice the speed of 
sound, as do the more expensive 
models. 

The proposal would provide for 
delivery of the specially configured 
aircraft over a four-year period be- 
ginning in October, 1987. Mr. 
Thornton said that it was submit- 
ted Wednesday to Verne Orr n sec- 
retary of the air force. 

“Recent budget pressures and 
apparent government willingness 
to consider alternative fighter con- 
figurations have provided General 
Dynamics with the incentive to of- 
fer alternative configuration and 
program options to the force struc- 
ture currently planned." General 
Dynamics said. _ 

Following the" General Dynam- 
ics offer. Northrop stock fell more 
than two points on the New York 
Stock Exchange. At midday’, shares 
were trading at S50J75. off $2,125, 
analysts said. (AP, Reuters). 


Britain Intends to Tighten 
Supervision of Its Banks 


Return 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment announced Thursday 
plans for new legislation to tighten 
supervision of banks following a 
1984 bank failure that unnerved 
London’s financial community. 

The Bank of England said that if 
it had not stepped in to take over 
Johnson Matthey PLC when it col- 
lapsed last October, there could 
have been a banking crisis in Brit- 
ain with international repercus- 
sions. 

JMB, a relatively sinaH bank bet- 
ter known for its bullion-trading 
business, posted losses of £245 mil- 
lion (5311 million) before authori- 
ties realized there wss anything 

ami« 

The Chancellor ot the Exche- 
quer, Nigel Lawson, outlined the 
new leg&ation in reporting to Par- 
Uament ot an inquiry into the JMB 
collapse. 

Mr. Lawson said serious short- 
mminffi in the management of 
JMB led to its fmhne. He said JMB 
committed itself to lending too 
much money and was “guilty of 
serious mjsreportmg" to 


of England, the supervisory author- 
ity. 

But he added that the Bank of 
England, as the nation’s central 
Tr-mlf , “cannot escape crit fci«m for 
failing to respond more quickly to 
the dinger signals." 

Mr. Lawson said the Bank erf 
England had decided that, in fu- 
ture, exposure of a leader to a bor- 
rower or to closely related borrow- 
ers should not exceed 25 percent of 
the lender’s capital base, except in 
extraordinary circumstances. 

He said Britain’s existing two- 
tiered system of supervision would 
be abolished. 

Under this system licensed do- 
posit takers, which offer a narrow 
range of financial services, have 
been subject to stricter supervision 
than recognized merchant or com- 
mercial banks such as JMB. 

Mr. Lawson said he was confi- 
dent the changes would “greatly 
strengthen the system and make a 
repetition of the JMB affair much 
less likely to occur." 

The legislation is planned as 
soon as possible after publication 
of a poEcy paper lata 1 this year. 



What makes TDB exceptional? 

Our service in Switzerland, for example. 


As the 6th largest commercial 
■tjLbaok in Switzerland, TDB can 
give you a complete range of 
sophisticated banking services. We 
also give you the personal atten- 
tion that can be so important to 
your business. 

At TDB we serve our custom- 
ers exceptionally well — and we 
do that in a number of ways. Tb 
begin with, we concentrate on the 
things we do best, such as trade 
financing, foreign exchange, pri- 
vate banking and precious metals. 

Moreover, now that we are 
part of American Express Interna- 
tional Banking Corporation, 
we are even better placed to serve 
your individual banking needs. 


Through this global link, we pro- 
vide access to the broad choice of 
investment opportunities and asset 
management services offered by 
the American Express family of 
companies. In addition, for certain 
clients, we also provide such 
unique “extras" as Gold Card® 
privileges and the exclusive 
Premier Sendees, 6 ** for round-the- 
clock personal and travel assistance. 

While we move with the times, 
our basic policies do not change 
At the heart of our business is the 
maintenance of a strong and 
diversified deposit base. Our port- 
folio of assets is also well-diversi- 
fied, and it is a point of principle 
with us to keep a conservative 


ratio of capital to deposits and a 
high degree of liquidity - sensible 
strategies in these uncertain times. 

If you would like more infor- 
mation about any of our services, 
stop in on your next trip to Switz- 
erland. Or telephone: in Geneva, 
022/37 21 U, in Chiasso, 09 1/44 19 9L 


TDB offices in Geneva, London, Paris, 
Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monte Carlo, 
Nassau, Zurich, Buenos Aires. Srn 
Paulo. 


TDB, the 6th largest commercial bank 
in Switzerland, is a member of the 
American Express Company which 
has assets of(J5$ 64.5 billion and 
shareholders' equity of US$4.8 billion. 



Hade Development Bank 


The Trade Develo \ 
> ai 96-98, rue du 


r; Bank building m Geneva, 

An American Express company 






8 


Thursday s 

m se 

Closing: 

Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 


12 Moult) 

r HWi UwStedi 


( Continued from Page 16) 



1AM in 

11 Sft 314k 
ID IBM 33 

sa 131% 
3 511% 

1 isnvi 

2 234m 
1 20U 

3 2246 
17 544% 
121084% 
1 107 
10Z112 

IS 1470 204% 
1] 254 27* 

4 1030 154fe 
1310x34 

4001 361% 
2001 354ft 
mm 58V, 
100Wr <Ml% 
53 » 

34 3146 

35 151k 
33001 M 

14 76 134% 

2tNK45 
23 214% 
100*100 
16402 744ft 
14901 70 
IT 420 25H 
10WZ 84ft 
» 503 32 
136 44% 

5 223 121% 

10 SO 32 
10 58 274% 

13 41 101% 

49 36 

38 294 111* 
20 14ft 
62 2946 
9 45 214ft 

12 56 304ft 

10 364 151% 

9 144S 3SU 
10 405 464% 

13 20 134% 


14% — ft 
314% + 4% 

33 +41 
134%— W. 
9144 +4 

1024% WV% 
2344— H 
2016 
2316 
564% 

100ft 

107 

113 +2 

204% + 41 
274%- V% 
154% + H 

34 +2 

36ft +2ft 
354ft— 116 
58 +1 

61 —1 
29 +44 

3116 +4% 
15ft + 4% 
£846— ft 
13ft— 16 
68 

214% + ft 
109 

764ft +144 
70 +1 

251% 

54ft + ft 
30ft— 14% 
64% 

1216— Mi 
3T4%— 4% 
Z7ft 
WH 

25ft— ft 
lift— 16 
Bft— 4% 
29ft— ft 
2146—16 
3046 + ft 
151% + 16 
354% +1% 
46ft— ft 
1344 


34 left 
42ft 27 
29ft IS 
21ft 1316 
1444 lift 
20'4 13ft 
W4 30*% 
29 211% 

10 54ft 
194% 13ft 
17ft 12 
77ft 54 
13 9ft 
304% 2146 
334% 27ft 
431% 25 
341% 26ft 
39 27 

34ft 20ft 


PHH 13X1 10 
PPG 1.40 18 
PSA AO 22 
PSA apt 1.90 8.9 
POCAS 1-54 MU 
POOGE 1*4 9A 
PocUo 332 7J 
P claim 120 *J 
PocR ta 45 r A 
PacRapf ZOO 114 
PocSd 40 16 
PocTeto *72 75 
PacTln 40 15 
PocItCB 132 74 
Pad) of 447 124 
PalnWb 40 12 
PalnW p43L25 74 
PaimBc 120 34 
PonABk 20 2.1 


33 32ft 
42ft 4146 
28 27ft 
2116 204% 
1446 14ft 
19ft 19ft 
44ft 434% 
25ft 25 
046 8ft 
171% 17ft 
15ft 15 
76ft 7616 
114% 114% 
30H 291% 
324% 321% 
3446 34ft 
30 2946 

34ft 3416 
334% 33ft 


321%— Mi 
4216+16 
271%— ft 
2166 + 16 
1446 + 1% 

44* + ft 
T746 

15ft + ft 
7646 + 4% 
114%— ft 
3M + 4% 
324% + ft 
34ft— 4% 
29ft- 4% 
34ft 
33ft -1 


HlatlUm MO 


Dft.WPE lOftHWilBW _0»A 


Dh(. YU. PE KBs Hlflll LOW QllBtOi’O 


7 27 264% 264% 364% + ft 

, is asa h 13M. u +ft 

I 35 284 321% 316% 316%— 41 

14 140 15ft 151% 154% 

17 31 301% 2946 2946-4* 

6 401 434% 4316 434%— 4% 

1 15 4ft 4 4 — ft 

I 65 363 26ft 35V* MV* + ft 

1 59 59 59 + J* 

! 15 1596 294% 29 2W« - ft 

7 76% 7ft 7ft— ft 

1 11 31 254% 25ft Sgs 

13 3310 lift lift 114% 

! II 175 296% 29ft 29ft — 4% 

11 17 1 346 13ft 1346 + 4% 

7 9 lift UV% «ft ^ 

10 195 32 3Tft 316*— ft 

3 lift 151% lift 

« 18 lift 116% lift + » 

7 1S8 434% 43 4JV* — ft 

10 3 2B 2746 28 + ft 

7 MS 271% 271% 274* + 16 

501 32 32 32 —1 

lOQz 74 74 74 

10 2616 26ft 26ft „ 

4 19ft 19 19 — ft 

31 31*% 31 31—1% 

9 26 I5V% 15ft 151% — ft 

27 21 56ft 56 SA + 4% 

4 3 1646 1646 16*% 

8 72 8ft Oft 8ft — ft 

38 200 42Tj 421% 42ft— 1 

139 1ft 1ft 1*% 

7 2162 20 191% 20 

ms 31 31 31 — lb 

lOOz 33 33 33 

23Qz 35ft 35ft 3566— 16 
560x 42 42 42 — 41 

400k 53 53 53 — ft 

11 2746 274% 271% + U 

15 151% 15ft 15ft 

14 64 1246 13ft 124%— ft 

T 77 331% 324% 32*%- ft 

43 1454 151% MJk 15 — ft 

9 425 4746 674% 674* + 6% 

334 104% 946 146- 46 

9 65 45 44 44 — ft 

14 40 ■« 45 

5 Vtt 154% 15ft 15ft — ft 

7 23 52ft 5146 5146 — ft 

5 203 36ft 354% 3S4%— 4% 

10 5 16ft 164% 16ft + 1% 

4 570 17ft 17 171% 

9 3536 12ft 1JV% 12ft + ft 

9 S3 4946 491% 494%— ft 
lOOx 37 37 37 + 46 

700x1034% 103 103 —1ft 

20x 68 68 68 —1 

1677 354% 34ft 34ft— 4% 
64 34% 3ft 31% 

13 6865 52 49ft 51 — Tft 

19 2*6 52 51 51ft — ft 

42 511% 514% 511%— 4% 
14 91% 9 9 —ft 

12 81 36 154% 3346— ft 

16 322 27 244% 27 +1% 

255 534% 531% 534% + ft 

13 469 294* 29ft 2946— ft 

10 «83 3Sft 344* 35 — ft 

41 34% 3ft 3ft— ft 

5 3933 80 Pft 5746 + ft 


2746 Mft PaPV 236 9* 9 
4046 30ft PbPLPf 440 11 3 
3946 30 PoFLpf 4J0 11* 
78% 5746 PoPLpf 8*0 US 
BA 2JV. PaPLdpdA2 II* 
T& 20 PnPLMiMO 1U 
724* 56ft PoPLpr 540 II S 
28ft 224% PoPL dB«125 1? 
3046 25ft POPLdPiaZS 1U 

SS 51ft PagLOTUM "■* 

704% 54ft PoPL or 5*0 J M 
72W 58ft PnPLpr BJO 12.1 
40ft 31ft Porn«tt 220 6.1 12 
SBft " J ' 

254% 20 P«iwi»t _ 


947 . Mft Mft Mft + ft 
310x 40 39 » —1ft 

160x3946 3846 3546 — 
200* 7496 74ft 7446 +144 
284% 28ft + ft 
25ft 3Sft + ft 
70ft 70ft +1«. 
95 27ft 27% Z746 — ft 
H 304% X 30ft + ft 
96 99ft 96 +3tt 

67 a a 

50* 79 72 72 +ft 

58 3646 36 V% 36ft— ft 
5 54 54 54 + ft 

2 23ft 23ft 23ft + ft 


544% 3046 Pan mol 22) A4 23 » 

ink ou. PA imPn 1 7fl 7,1 7 VI 17 1M 1/ 

45* 25ft pSpflw M 3 19 116 45ft 44ft 44ft 

10 74% Prmftn 1 JiaUB „ *]f JS J!? JS + * 

44* 28 pSrfT l5 2A IA § I* S + M 

,2-s 

22ft 121% PtiatpD 379 1716 174% 17ft 

51 34 Photo DC SjOO ID.* W 

43ft 2046 PhferS *4 IJ 26 4192 «.« 

9 PhllaEI 220 1441 6 2529 16 

22 PMlEPf 3*0 128 ~ 

Ptalli pr 4A8 12* 134801 36ft 341% 36ft + ft 

40 PlillEof 700 113 
67ft 50ft PhliePf *75 13L2 
lift 9ft PnllEaf 141 13* 

101* 6ft PflllE Pf L33 111 
6Q 43 PtlKEof 7*5113 

TOft 64% PtlllE Pf 121 111 
126 97 PiiU Pf 17.12 1U 

79 55 PDHEpf 9S2 111 

74 51 PTUlEEp! 9 JO I3J 


17 46ft 45ft 46 — ft 
4192 41ft «re% 41ft + ft 
2529 16 15ft 1546 
350V 38 2916 2994 

Wr33 33 33 + 4% 

134801 36ft 341% 36ft + ft 
1040v 53ft 52ft 
ASOr 66ft 65 66% +2 

244k 101% Mft 109k 
277x 10ft 9ft 10ft— ft 
294095106 58 59 +1 

173* 10 94% 916 

20M24 124 124 +24% 

450* 724% 724% 724% +14% 


... _. .--+14% 

„ 290V TOft 70 70ft— 1ft 

40ft 44 PMlEPf 7*8 112 J400V 59 Mft » +1 

68 43ft PtlllE Pf 775 132 1080y S8ft 57 Aft + ft 

23ft 15ft Phil Sub 122 6* 13 53 22ft 2146 JlJfc 

95ft 651% PtillMr 4*0 4A 11 3411 88 844% £to— 1 

104% PWtolrt M 22 11 133 2146 214% 214* 

56ft 334% PhllPat 3*0 8* 8 37ft 37ft 37ft 

1546 lift PhlIPwl 11I/ - ,,Sfc 

234% 2946 Phi PI Pf 


1* 3.1 6 
IAS 4A 10 
1*0 03 
JO 1* 15 
11 

1.12 3* 7 
I JO SJ 17 


230 9.1 7 

2J4 62 10 
1.12 11 10 
2*5 11 10 
10 

JO 1A 34 
*76 2 30 
46 42 16 

Rpnson 

R u par M 44 16 

Rorar l.tt 3-1 17 
Rowan .12 1A 40 
RovID 3*7+55 
Rovint* 15 

Rutarmd *4 L7 17 
Rusa&r 13 

Ru* Top 3* 4.1 9 
RvCmH 1*0 3A 15 

RvdDTl * U I 

Rvfand M V 17 
Rrmw S 

Rvmarpfl.17 9* 


504% 35ft SCM 2*0 6A 13 73 *5ft 45ft 45ft 

12ft 84* SL Ind 22 1.9 10 15 12 111% 111% 

3146 19ft SPSTec *D 3A 15 77 31ft 304% 30ft 

20ft 15 SaMna JM J 30 167 15ft 1514 1544 

214% 16 5obnRy 2AtalSJ 152 174% 17 17ft 
1016 114% SMBs 20 1* 15 162 164% lift 16ft 
0 54% StodSc 26 26 946 9ft 9ft 

29% 116 sums art 42 14% 14% 14% 

3446 71ft Sat Kins A0 12 23 2 9 


38ft 16ft PhllVH ._ .. 

344% 2JV% PledAs 28 3 9 

34 23ft PIpNG 232 62 10 

221% 144% Pltrl 13 


1189 114% lift 114% 

1372 234% 229% ZH% + 4% 

AO U 11 127 2446 24ft 244% + 14 

28 5 9 594 33V* 32 32ft— 4% 

11 33ft 33ft 33ft + ft 

18 EM 20ft 20ft 


0 54* SfceSSc 26 26 946 9ft 91% 

29% 1ft StndS art 42 14% 14% 14% 

.446 71ft Sot Kins A0 1* 23 29 33ft 3246 329% 

344* 21ft sotewv 140 45 W 2120 32ft 32V. 321* 

35ft 24ft Sma 52 10 11 121 2)9% 26ft 26ft 

229% 16ft StJOLP 122 73 1 12 21ft 214% 2146 + 4% 

114% 9 SPaul 120 1DJ 33 lift lift 114% + ft 


544% 34ft Plbbrv 1J6 2* 13 494 55ft 55ft Kft— ft 


114% 9 SPaul 120 105 33 lift lift 114% + ft 

10ft 3ft visalant 57 446 44% 4ft— 46 

34ft 22ft Sal I KM .16 J 15 153 31K 30ft 3046 + 4% 

54 51 SdllMpf 199c 73 150 52ft S2ft 52ft 

201% 174% SDKGs 224 5.1 9 766 274% 27ft 27ft 

946 646 SJuonB A9e 92 11 3036 946 94% 94% 

31 Sonpr J6 U It 236- 35ft 35ft 354% 

SAnllRI 1.94 7* 13 42 25 244% 24ft + ft 

SFcSaP 1*0 14 12 5774 30 29-6 291% — ft 

Sara Lea 141 U 11 960 4196 40<A 4016 + ft 

SfltWrt 1A0 4A 15 4 314% 31ft 31ft 

15ft 14ft SauIRE 20 12 42 10 16ft Mft Mft 

22ft 15ft SavElP 1A0 72 5 126 22ft KH 22ft + ft 

9ft 446 Savin 45 Tft 7ft Tft + ft 

1346 9ft Savin pt 1*0 12* 2 12ft lift 12ft 

28 179% SCANA 2.16 72 9 228 27ft 27ft 274% 

47ft 33 SdirPIo 1A0 3L7 13 395 45ft 45 45ft + 4% 

49ft 34ft scfcimb 120 U 9 MS* 36ft 36 36ft 

134* 7ft SdAII .12 1.1 17 411 lift IT lift 


34 2T46 Plonaar 1*4 5* 5 

2646 17ft PtonrEl .17r 12 


584 244% 24ft 244%— ft 
21 M 14 14 


461% 27ft PHnyB 130 U 13 251 444% 44ft 444% + ft 

88 55ft PHnBPt 112 2A ’ “ “ “ 

1516 m Pl'tSto JO 1* 14 606 lift 129% 1 346 + ft 

13ft 7 Ptatrfm .16b 1* 12 21 01% Oft itt— ft 

131% 8ft Plavbav I 26 91% 9ft 91% 

304% 19ft Plesey *4% A6 10 

aji sfiiiftijfti 

21ft 109% Pondn A0 A 24 1948 lift 10ft 11.. 


21ft 15 PapTpl 
191% 141% Parted 


1 19ft 19ft 19ft 


A0 22 66 SS* 17ft 174% 17ft + ft l 13ft 7JA SdAII 


4 314% 31ft 31ft— ft 

10 1616 MU 1416 — Ml 

126 221% 21ft 221% + 4% 

45 Tft 746 7ft + ft 

2 12ft 12ft 12ft 

228 27ft 2716 27ft— ft 


80ft 7246 Parfrpf 3LS8 73 MB* 7816 7516 78U 

219% 13ft PortGE 1*0 9* 7 506 21ft 2W% 21_. 

Mft 17ft Porcpf 260 109 13 23ft 23ft W6 

354% Zlft PurGpf 4A0 111 » OT% MV1 

34ft 2816 PorGPf 4J2 13* 31 33ft 33 

3Bft 2516 Poflfcfl 1J6 46 13 Z7 3414 34 34 . — U 

33 20 PofmEI 2.14 65 10 

46 36 PofElPf 4J0 10* 

40ft 31 PatElPf 4*4 10.1 1100* 4046 40 40 

25ft 159% Pram Is J6 1* 74 VO IPft 19ft 19ft + 16 

39 25 Prtmric 2*0 SJ I 166 35ft 38ft 38ft 

20V6 lift PrtmaC 13 2398 Mft 16» 1M + 16 

3216 134% PrlmMs *9 3 27 279 30ft »ft 30 — ft 

991% soft ProdG 2M U 11 1TO 54ft S4U 54ft + ft 1 

Mft 714 PrdRjti J2 Zl 21 71 15ft 154% TSft + ft 

4716 3Zl% P rotor 1AD 3* 11 11 36ft 36W 16ft 


32ft 22ft Scon Ind M 24 14 107 31ft 31ft 31ft + 4% 


592 33ft 32ft 33ft + ft 
300* 451% 45 45 

1100x4046 40 


60ft 48U. ScctFei 

41 ZSft ScotfP U4 11 

lev* YtftScotm 52 35 

4316 201% Scxnrlll 

45 214% SeaCnt A2 1.1 

1246 9ft SaaCi Pf 1A6 11J 
Mft IZft ScaCpfBZIO 125 


10 19 59 589% 589% 

IJ4 11 10 1121 40ft 4SH* *6 

52 IS 10 It 1346 lift 13ft 

14 11 41ft 419% 419% 

A2 1.1 « 107 371% 37U 37ft 

1A6 11J 6 12ft 121% 121% 

2.T0 125 21 16ft Mft 164% 


164% 12ft SeaC PfC 2.10 122 97 loft 101% 10ft + ft 

27ft 149% SeaLnd * U 7 3339 2116 1996 21% +1% 

SVi 31% SttaCo 44 44% 4ft «% + ft 

444* 30 Ssagrm *0 2* 13 2727 40ft 40ft 40ft 
21ft 12ft Scowl 17 33 17 16ft TAk 

78%. 20 SoalAIr A0 1A 14 ID 259* 2SV% 251%— 46 

324% 2116 SoalPw 1*0 4* 8 69 251% 24ft 25ft 

65ft 40U Sconce um 1-9 15 1646 539% 52 V. 521% 

39ft 79ft Sean 171 44 9 4456 38 371% 35 

1041% 97 Saanpf 9JB2r 9J 95 103*6 103ft taw* 

314% 19ft SecPacs 1*4 4A 7 1662 29ft 281% 29ft + ft 

36ft 2516 SvcCPl A0 1.1 15 -32 36ft 35ft 34ft + ft 

17ft 114% ShaMoa J2 5A 32 47 1316 131% 1316 + ft 

TSft II Shawln A0 25 8 32 23W 73ft 234% + ft 

38ft TSft SheKT ZJ7e 6J 930 3S\% 35ft 35ft— ft 

30ft ITU SholGlo *0 10 6 257 274% 261% 2646- ft 


734% 169% PSvCoJ 250 BA 10 664 24 2346 23ft 

21 lift PSColPl 210 iSffl 1 21 21 21 

89% 69% PSInd lJD® 12J 8 2198 B 746 B + ft 

25 20 PSlnpf 3J0 14* 100x25 M 25 


8ft 6 PSlnpf 1*4 13A 
0 6V% PSlnpf 1*8 125 

47V7 37 PSlnpf 7.15 152 
43ft SO PSlnpf 9A4 150 
609% 471% PSln pf 8*6 15J 
51% 3ft PSvNH 
114% 6ft PSNHpf 
12ft 71% PNH pfB 
ll im PNHpfC 
89% PH H pro 
1646 9 PNH pfE 
746 PNHpfF 
15ft 79% PNH pfG 


1000X 79h 746 746 

4378x 8 79% 8 

490x47 47 47 

550x 63 621% 63 + 1% 

100x581% SSft 58ft— lft 
2 1779 54% 51% 59% + ft 

3130* 129% 111% 129% +19% 
53 134% 124% 134% + 9% 
71 m% 18ft 199b +m 
32 171% Mft 17 +14% 

130 179% 164% 15ft + 4% 

14 149% M 149% + 9b 

50 Mft 154% 16 +9% 


25VS 11 Shawln 
38ft TSft Shear 
30U ITU ShalGla 
391% 24 Shrwln 
8U 4ft Shoatwn 
17 12 Stwwbf 


.72 5A 32 47 1316 13ft 1316 + 1% 

A0 25 8 32 231% 23U 234% + ft 

L37e 6J 930 ISft 351% 35ft— ft 
*0 10 6 257 274% 261% 2646 

.92 2A 13 254 38ft 38ft 384% + ft 

7 372 tft 6V» Ml 
40 4J 13 12 129% 124* 12ft 

kAO BJ 9 25S 194% 19 194% + ft 


19ft PSvNM 288 10* 9 1140 27ft 274% 2746 


311% 21 PSvEG 2*4 9* 

M 10ft PSEGprlAO 10A 

404% 279% PSEGpf OB 112 
474% 33ft PSEGpf US 116 
204* 15 P&eG pf 217 10* 
62ft 46ft PSEGpf 6*0 11.1 
22ft 169% PSEGpf 243 11J 
71 S3 PSEGpf 7 JO 11* 
71 55 PSEGpf 7*0 11* 

«ft 51 PSEGpf 7A0 11* 
8£U 659% PSEGpf 9A2 11* 
41% 24% Publlck 

9ft Pueblo .16 1J 

6 PRCam 


9M 314% 319% 31ft — ft 
5 13ft 1314 1346 — ft 
1650* 39ft 38 38ft +tft 
630* 46 43 43ft— 21% 

$9 19ft 1946 194% + ft 
MOr 62ft 61 61 + ft 

9 71ft 21U 21ft + 9k 
1001 79 70 m 

2Xtz 71 71 71 

100*68 67ft 67ft— 1 
110OZ 871% 871% B7Mi +lft 
15 3 29h 29% 

73 12ft 12U 12ft + 9% 


91% Pueblo .16 1J 9 73 1 

6 PRCam 5 10 .. 

154% 946 PuoatP UilM 9 £01 Mft 159% I 

96 10ft PuHaHtn .12 J 24 397 17 16 1 

22U Purotat 1J8 5* 40 326 

10U 5ft Pyre 7 78 


J1U 29ft QuataOs 13M 25 M 651 49ft 49 49U— Mi 

1029% 90ft QuaOpf 9J6 9A 21470*1014% 1014% 1014% +1U 
2296 15 QuaicSO *0 3* 36 59 209% 201% 2096— U 

UU 696 Qucnex 20 52 79% 7ft Tft— U 

3496 23 Questor 1A0 5L1 10 225 319% 31U 31ft 

3SU 14 QkReit J4a U 16 51 28ft 30ft 20ft— 9% 


17 12 Shawbf A0 4J 13 12 129% 124* lift 

19ft 13ft SterPoc 9A0 83 9 255 194% 19 199% + U 

42 Mft Sterol 1*0 24 It 1053 4196 41ft 4146 + 9% 

62 4846 Stool pf A12 A* 6 61 £0ft M)ft + ft 

38U 25U Sinpef A0 1.1 9 173 3546 35U 359% + ft 

3216 26U Stour Pf 3J0 11* £ lift 31ft 319% 

IB 1ZU Skyline A8 3A 19 285 13ft 13ft 13ft 

179% 8ft Smith In J2 JJ :rn 9 54% BU 

70ft 50ft SmkB 2*0 4.1 11 1607 6796 66ft 67ft +IU 

674% 35U SmucKr 1*8 U 16 24 £39% 61ft 6196—1 

419% 29ft SnapOn l.ia .1 13 255 39 38ft 38ft 

15ft 12ft Snyder 2*0 13* 15 132 15ft 15U 15ft 

43ft 37 Sana! 1*5 5A 7 682 34ft 34ft 34ft 

19ft 1246'5onyCl> ,16e 1.1 12 6678 154% 15ft 15ft 

3016 2246 SaoLln 1*0 45 13 9 269% 269% 269% + ft 

40ft 2>« SaurcC HS 82 18 29 18ft 39 

23 20 SCrE pf 250 U 1 2SU 25ft 25ft + ft 

29ft 22 SoJerln 2.48 SA 11 12 294% 29 29 

49ft 3M% Soudwn 1*0 2A 10 1651 39ft 38ft 39 

35 22 SoetHK 1*0 17 10 60S 31ft 32ft 32ft— 1U 

TO 5ft SoctPS 2.13131* 40 S4 691 69% 69% 

2796 MU scales 2*4 7* 9 1886 279% 27ft Z7lk + ft 

219% 14ft SouthCo 1*2 8* 7 2276 214% 21ft 214% 

2646 17 Salnossusa M I 43 26U 26 26 

44 29 5 NET I 2J2 6A 10 2130 429% 40 41 

3896 31ft SoNE pf 3*2 9* 316 3096 389% 38ft 

M 21ft SoRVpf 2A0 93 4 MU 26 26U + 9% 

31 23 Saunca 1J2 53 171 2996 29U 29U— U 

3496 23 Soutlnd 1*0 18 12 921 3646 3616 36 U— U 

169% UU SaRpy .12 .9 19 358 Mft 13 13ft— 9% 


8ft 6U Soumrk *0 2-9 


6U RBInd *41 A 
25U RCA 1*4 Z3 
29 RCA pf 350 9* 
71 RCA pi 4*0 33 
349% RCA pf 2.12 45 
299% RCA pf 3*5 9* 
616 RLC *0 23 
3 UPC 

12U RTE -56 3* 
7 Rod Ice 

2546 RatsPur 1*0 22 
5ft Ramad 

16ft Ranee 34 43 
2ft RanurO 
47ft Rayctn A6 J 
9ft Rnvmk 
35 Rnytim I A0 3* 
74% RoadBf AO 4A 
164% RdBafpfZ12 11* 


23 9ft 
93 2017 45ft 
100*38 
9 102ft 
391 33 
4 3696 
10 37 79% 

im 3ft 
IB 119 Mft 
9 87 lift 

14 413 45ft 
83 618 64% 

10 1 18 
943 3 

» 70 599% 

943 lift 
17 3413 499% 
962 89% 
38 18 


4<ft 4SU 
38 38 +1 

102ft 102ft 
329% 3246— lft 
3696 369k— U 
7U 7U— U 
39% 3ft + ft 
18ft 184% + U 
lift 1116— U 
441% 449k— 9% 
6ft 6ft 
18 18 
2ft 3 —ft 
59 994%— ft 

119% 199% 

4916 49ft + 9% 

l^k 18* + U 


27ft 14V 5wAlr1 .13 J 17 B97 
201% 119* SwtFor 29 112 13U 13ft I 

17U 104% SattGaS 1*4 7* 5 127 17 1646 M 

KZft 56ft SwBell 6*0 75 B 3SW BOW. 79ft K»ft + 

29 1996 Sw&ir J2 2* 11 120 26U 26 26 — U 

2596 17ft SufPS 1*5 7* 10 813 Mft 25ft Mft + 4% 

174% lift Spartan S2 4.1316 28 T2» 121% 134% 

279% 154* SpectP 257 151% 151% 15ft 

3396 SPerrv 9.92 Z7 90 2573 52U 599% 52U + ft 

30ft Sprlna* 1J3 45 * 1 3116 31 U 

439% 319% SotmrD 1-84 43 10 339 39ft 3B96 


13ft 13 13ft— 9% 

696 6ft 


641% 41U Squibb 1-76 2.9 16 
246, in 1 . «b.uw an ay la 


17V Staley JO 37 18 1582 

2396 Mft SIBPnf J6 2A 12 98 

II SIMotr *2 2J 10 31 

399% StdOOh 2*0 At ■ 1488 

U 7ft StPocC S 11 62 211% 204a 2 

1446 1946 Strode* *2 3* 9 536 1346 

19ft StanWk .96 32 12 132 304% 

231% Sfomeff 1*0 34 10 IS 319% 

. 896 StoMSe IJDolB* 32 11 

3ft 2ft Steeuo .12 as ft 3ft 3 

29U 1416 StanM J6 39 10 8 19ft 199% 1 

lift Fto StrIBcjj Ji 7* 9 41 1046 101% 1 

3416 24 Start Dp 1*0 3* 13 2309 31 309% 3 

2TU 15U StavnJ 1*0 6A II 179 18ft 181% 1 


30 £01% £0U 60ft + U 

"“USS^S, 

114% 1196— ft 
4546 4546—1 
62 21ft MU 20ft— ft 
136 1346 13ft 13ft— ft 
33 304% 29ft SOU + 9% 
IS 319% 31ft 31ft 
32 11 1046 11 + ft 

93 3ft 3 3ft— to 
8 19ft 199% 19ft 
41 1046 101% 10ft— ft 



3SU 2896 
1516 119% 


SOU 34ft TDK Me 3 
334% Mft TECO IM 7.1 
129% 7ft TGIF 
19 Tift TNP 
2546 TTft TRE 
811% 584% TRW W M 
177M138 TRWpf 440 24 
8U 29% TocBoof 


Me J Ml 3596 3Sft 35ft— ft 
IM 7.1 9 3237 3Jft 33«. Wb ^ 
U 37 I0U 10ft 10ft— ft 
1*5 45 9 70 1916 19 19ft + ft 

1*0 4.1 16 44 Wa Mft »«%— £ 

MO 3* 11 843 78ft 77ft .774% + 96 
4A0 24 2 I66U 166'% I46U +14t 

58 29% S 


842 334% M 33ft— ft 

875 3U% 30ft 31ft + 96 

66 JSft 35U 554% 

3646 2646— V 

77V. 98ft— U 


34% 1 Texim 42S 24% 2U 2U— ft 

244a 159% TrxOGs .18 1.1 10 3168 16ft 16 1«% + U 

J9 7846 TxPoc A0 1* 2D 2 32ft 32U 32ft 

30U 21 TBtUfH Z52 SA 7 1208 30ft 3m% .. 

5 2 Texflln 74 4ft 3ft 3ft— ft 

52ft 26ft Textron 1*0 3* 13 270 52 51ft 53 

S7W 2846 Textrpf 2*8 3J . T2 Mft HU 5646 + ft 

109% 5ft Tnock « 29 99% 9ft 9ft— ft 

27 M4i TTiermE 23 125 26ft 25U 26 

43U 28ft TTimBtS 1*4 3*14 122 35 344* 344% + U 

18ft 129% Tbomln Mb 45 9 7 15W 15U 15U 

254% 13U TtanMed A0 2 3 3 411SU15 15 — U 

22ft 14U Tbrlftv A0 25 14 174 31ft 20ft 309k— U 

24ft 1346 Tldwtr .90 6.1 174 14ft I4U 149k + ft 

10ft 54% Ttoerln 639 7 68% 6ft— ft 

7ft 7ftTtorlwl 5 tft 69% 6ft— ft 


60ft 3396 Tuna 1*0 l* 17 1356 57ft 5646 57ft + ft 


iDftu 60ft rtmi PfB 1*7 I* I 
23U 121% Tbppfac 15 149 

53ft 34U ThtwM 1*6 2A IS 599 

58V% 47 Timken l*0a 3* 15 M 

9U 49% TUpn 169 

39ft 269% TodSho 1*2 4J 7 487 

2IU 1446 Tokhms AS 29 9 300 

\9ft 139% Toiems 2.52 129 S 1337 

27*% 244% TotEdpf 172 13L5 77 

2SU 22 TolEd pf 175 13* M0 

2646 a ToiedPf 3A7 13J 70 

31ft 25Vb TolEd Pf 4*8 T3A 17 

98Va 94 TSEd*l U4 Ilk 13 

I8U 134% TolEd pf 2*1 1Z8 12 

4546 134% Tonkas *0 J 7 3Z1 

5346 204% TootRol A8b 1* 14 13 


I 101U HHUIOIU— 146 
149 Mft 16U 16U — ft 
599 52 51 514%— Vi 

M 47ft 47 47 — 96 

149 74% Tft 74% + U 

487 29ft 29 29ft +9% 

300 l«i Mft l*ft + U 
1337 Mft 19U 19ft + U 
77 27ft 27 27ft + ft 
140 209% 27ft 27V. 
a 26 25V. 25U— ft 

17 31ft 31ft 3Tft + ft 
13 18ft 18ft IBft 
13 1796 17 17U + U 

3Z1 419% 41U 4146 + 4% 
13 46ft 45ft 46ft— ft 


ASb 1* 14 13 469% 45ft 46ft— ft 

1*0 22 13 1017 45ft 44 45 — ft 
“■ 14U ISft + ft 


5346 204* TootRol 

524% 20ft Trctanh 1*0 22 13 1017 

lift 10 ToroCo A0. 3A 10 lit l^a w-w -r n 

3ft 1 Toko 484 2ft 396 2ft + ft 

19V. BU Towle S 9ft 9 9ft + 9% 

40ft 25U TayRUs 29 IT36 38ft MU 38ft— ft 

28 U 17U Truer* *2 12 1347 24ft 24 24 

-XP* 71% TWA 77 5154 19ft 19ft 19ft— ft 

15U lift TWA Pf 2*5 152 152 14ft 14ft 14ft + ft 

30ft 17ft TWA PfB 2*5 73 3183 29ft 29 V. 29V, — ft 

20ft TrortHTT 1A4 5.1 14 1041 32ft 31ft 32ft + 95 

211% 1696 Tran Inc 2J2 10J 33 21ft 21ft 21ft 

12ft 1096 TARttv UU 7.9 15 12 12ft I2ft 124% + V* 

21ft 19ft TmCda n 1.12 5A8 3 SOU a M — U 

5716 38ft Tnmusp ZMb 4A 10 516 49ft 49ft 49ft 


66ft 43U Tmscpf 3*7 6A 

ZSft 19ft Tran Ex 2J6 10* 

13ft tft Tnntscn 
M 77 TrGPPf 864 9.1 

25U JO TrGPpI 2J0 HLO 

13ft 6M TrraOti 
36U 29V» Tronw 1*0 SJ 


23 58ft 57ft 5896 +1 
425 22ft 23ft 22ft + ft 
12 9 81% 8ft— ft 

30* 95ft 95V6 95U + ft 
4 25 25 25 —ft 

65 Tift 119% 1T9%— ft 
158 Mft 31U 31ft + ft 


25ft Trmrfd M U 13 553 37 3696 3696 — 9% 


2196 9ft TwWwfA S 1996 19ft 19ft— U 

34ft 34 TwM Pf 2*0 6* 9 33ft 33 33ft + 94 

1796 15ft TwIdPf 1*0 11-fl 3 17%. 17U 17U 

459% 25V3 Trawler 2*4 AS 18 6299 45ft 45ft 45U + ft 

5816 50ft Travpf AM 7* M 569* 56 5696 + ft 

27U 1996 TrtCan Z52eUA 86 M 25ft 25ft— ft 
32 13 Trlalnd Ji? 1A 21 33 29ft 28ft 29U + 4% 

3116 2096 TriaPe 1*0 3J B 2*3 27ft 26ft 27ft + ft 

48ft 249% Tribune *4 1A 17 1745 46ft 46 46ft — 1% 

tft 4 Trtaitr ASe 8* 7 3* 5ft 5U 59%— U 

Bft 5ft Trice *0 33 15 10 tft 6 6ft + ft 

37«% 1296 Trlntv JO JA H 1396 »U 1396 


10 tft 6 61% + ft 

H 1396 I3U 1396 


25ft ltU TritEra .10b J 37 156 3W. 20ft 30ft— ft 
Mft 89% TrltE pf 1.10 BJ 3 129% 129% 12ft— ft 

419% 30 TucsEP 3*0 73 10 193 41ft 409% 4l — ft 

15ft 9U Tultex ' A4 3A 12 140 13ft 13 13ft + 9% 

» T4 TwtoOs *0 A7 10 6 17 T7 17 

30 TYCoLb JO Zl 10 140 3Sft 30ft 38ft + U 

179* ]|96 Tyler J AO 23 7 41 1494 14U 149%— U 


32ft UAL 1-ODt 1* 8 
25 UALpf 2A0 73 
7ft UCCEL 16 

16ft UGI 2*4 33 M 
19ft UGI of 275 11.1 
Oft UNCRes 

10 URS A0 3A 14 
17ft U3FG 2*0 6* 40 
22ft USG f 1 At A3 7 
13 UnlFnl 20 1J 11 
75 UnlNV S2fa S3 10 
31ft UCamP 1A4 A5 11 
33ft UnCarb 3AQ 73 10 
+1% UntonC 

12 UDElec 1J2 9A 6 
25ft UnElpf A00 10* 
Mft UnEI pfM4*0 1Z3 
18ft UnElpf 298 10J 
19ft UnElpf 2J2 10* 

46 UnElpf 744 11* 

SO UEIpfH 800 11A 
3496 unPac 1*0 38 11 
e UnPcpf 7*5 65 
10U Unlrayt .18 * 13 

SO Unrylpf 8*0 117 
3U Unitor 

unBmd II 

9ft UBrdpf 

22ft UCWTV .14 * 65 

2Z9% UnEnrs 2A8 9* a 
9 U Ilium 200 WJJ 3 
19ft Ullh.pl 3.77 13* 


1734 53ft 51ft 53ft— 9k 
306 33 324% 3296— ft 

433 12ft 129% 1296 + ft 
108 23ft 2h% 23ft + 9% 
390K 24U 24ft 2496— U 
32 99% 9U 9U— ft 

a n ii ii 

548 369% 36ft 3696— ft 
534 39ft 39U 39ft + U 
2*1 1JU U 13ft + Mi 
144 99ft 99U 9996— T 
217 37 36ft 36ft— U 
2534 43U 429% 43 
42 59* 59% 59% — ft 

468 18ft 1SU 1SU 
1400z 37 Mft 37 +1 

57 32ft 32M 32ft + Ml 
123 271% 27U 279% + ft 
1 269k 269% 269% 
200x66ft 669% 66ft 
llQx 69U 49U 69U 
1867 47 46ft 46ft 
45 105ft 105ft 105ft— 9k 
672 20ft 209% 20ft + ft 
720x 59 55 58ft 

19 39% 3U 3U 

361 1696 169% 1 6ft— ft 
4 Mft 15 15—9% 

« 41ft 41ft 41ft— ft 
187 27ft 27V% 27ft— ft 
365 189% 189% 1894 
31 29ft 28ft 2896 + ft 


779% S2ft ToRBrd 1.12 1 J 14 SB 73 72U 73 — ft 

199% 12ft Taltoy .We A 13 70 17ft 17V. jm — ft 

219% IS Taltoy Pf 1*0 ll 4 19ft 19ft 19ft— W 

77 4996 Tambnf 120 A3 14 S6MUM7S 

3S9i 3V Taucty 16 1649 33U 329* 33 + U 

159% 129% TlWVtft )3 6 M 14 W 

dS’u 51ft Tektnu 1*0 I* 8 18SS59%55U5M + ft 


s f 




r; ^ 


[l [C! 


- Yii 


• 'h 


i 

Tt+trUi 


2V% TeKnm 6 C w 

3029% ZT2U TPkfvn 10 146 2574% 25Z»% 2527% — 3U 

24 13ft T«Mm 37 19 73 4» t£fc 16U l« + U 

4BU 22ft Telex 10 446 371% 37U OTk + ft 

39W BW Tamm M I* B 156 15ft 34U 05V% + ft 

451-3 329* Tonnes 2*2 7.1 12 2535 41ft 409} J} 

hmu> bs renepr iijo iu niwuTOftiMu— 9* 

83®. 66 Tone 9 7* I o B H- . “ 9 

3SU a Tprtvn 10 2M 2ift aim 51U— ft 

18ft 99* TP90TO AO AO 83 10U 10 10 

3196 209% Tpserpf ZM 9A >*2. 5? 2. + 

4S% 31ft Texaco 100 103S206« 37ft37U379% + ft 
389* 31ft TxABc 133 40 * 85 3196 Mft 31ft— « 

46ft 319% TexCm » 4J 4 W aft g 33ft— ft 

39 26ft TCxEsf 2*06* 8 S75 3U%30&311k + 46 

57 52 TxETpf t29ellA 66 35ft SPA 559% 

349% 23 Tex Ind Mb XO 13 164 27ft 

147ft MU Tex I rut 200 20 10 1958 1009* 


39 21ft VFCCTp 
lift 5ft Voter* 
23ft M valor of 
4ft 2U Vatoyln 
281 m 19 VanDm 

4» 2U Vara 
46ft 26ft Vartan 
1396 9ft Vara 
2$ft 17ft vaaca 
Oft 39% Vencto 
lift 89* VasISe 
409k Mft Viacom 
72U 54- VaEPpf 
18ft 67ft VaEPpf 
87U 67ft VOEI Pf 

91ft 69 VaEPpf 
47U 50ft VaEPpf 
23U 111* VbMVI 
4Sft M vomad 
7BU 61 VutcnM 


*6 * 13 

AO 3* 15 
A0 Z2 12 
153 

1J0O10J 
A2 3 SI 
7J2 WL7 

■ta u* 

SAO TOA 
935 103 
7J9 HU 13 
12 

2*0 3A 12 


291 36ft 35ft 
853 12ft 12ft 
33 239% »U 
4A 2ft 29% 
13 21ft 31ft 
5 Tft 794 
1015 27ft 27U 
18 HU lift 
149 1IU 1796 
38 8 7ft 
15 lift 119% 
411 47U 465% 
20* 72 72 

1 78 78 

1O0X 81 81 

J0Z 91 91 

’ST&k&S 

11 44ft 3 
8 77 77 


349% + ft 
Oft + ft 

2JU— U 

2ft 

71ft 

796- ft 
27ft— ft 
lift— ft 
18 + U 
Tft— ft 
lift 

46ft— ft 
72 

7* — U l 
•1 +J 
91 

67 +96 

209%— ft 
44ft + ft 
77 


SOCIETE GENERALE 
ALSACIENNE DE 
BANQUE S 20.000.000 . 
FLOATING RATE 
NOTES DUE 1989 

We inform the bondholders that in 
accordance with the terms. and 
conditions of the notes. SOQETE 
GENERALE ALSACIENNE DE 
BANQUE has deaed to redeem aU ' 
of its outstanding' notes on - 
July IS, 1985 at 100*. 

Interest do the said notes will ' 
cease 10 accrue on July 18. 1985.*- 

The notes will be reuhbursed, ' : ;~ 
coupons n° 13 and followings ~ 
attached according to the terms and-,; 
conditions of die notes. 

•* .*■. 

THE PRINCIPAL 
PAYING AGENT T 
SOCIETE GENERALE . 
ALSACIENNE DE BANQUE 
15, Avenue Emile Reuter - 
LUXEMBOURG 





VfICOR 2*0 T* a 
Wodivs 1*0 23 11 
Wocktif A0 12 
Wolnoc 

WolMrt 33 3 72 

Watema A4 ia w 
kVkHRaglAO 
WalCSv AS IJ M 
VValtjm 1A0 16 8 
WOKJ pf 1*0 117 
WdUpf IAS IT 
Wamco *8 17 13 
WmCm 

WtarnrL IA8 3A 15 
IMtfiGa 1*6 7 3 9 
VfttlNat 1*8 4A 7 
WWWI Z48 I0A' 5 
Waste 32 1* 19 
WMkJn M 1 A 11 
wavGa* JO 13 « 
MtoarU 

Wean pf Jlk 
WcbbD JOn 1* 14 
WetsMk * U IS 
WtltoF ZAO 4* 8 
WalFM 2^3 10.5 n 
Wandy 8 2 UU 
MIMCO A4 1* 14 
WPanP pNJD 10.1 
WstPtP 130 16 14 
WBtdTs 1*4 32 

wnMrL 78 

WtAIrwt 
WAh-pf 2*0 '9* 
WAlrpf Z14 10* 
WCNA 

WCNA pf 7JS 115 
WU toon 
WnUnpf 
wnU pt5 
wnupfE 
WUTlpfA 

WstaE > 1J0 17 10 
w«stvc U2 17 f 
wavarh 1*0 as 19 
weyrpf 7*0 03 
Wevrpr 4*0 9* 
vlWtiPII 
vlWPItPfB 
vlWhPItpf 
Whirl pi 2*0 42 10 
WhttC 1*0 14 
WWtefU 12 

Whlttak A0 Z6 11 
Wtebfdt A4 

WUfrdn IS 

William 140 U 7 
WllmEI 

WNahrO .10 I* M 
WlfiDIx IA8 A9 13 
VSfbinbo *0 I* 9 
wmnor 42 

WlntorJ 

WWcKP 148 16 I 
WUCPL Z64 TA 9 
WtoePS Z56 7* 9 





29ft + ft 
359% + ft 
181b + ft 
79% 

539% + ft 
71 + ft 

22 
35U 

38ft + ft 
9ft + 9% 
51ft 

23ft— ft 
30 —9% 
4316 + ft 
219k— ft 
23ft— ft 
23ft— U 
56ft— ft 
25 
9 

5ft 

10ft— 9% 
209k— 9% 
39ft— 9% 
59ft + ft 
9696 + 16 
179%— U 
34ft— U 
44ft 

39ft + ft 
13U 

616 — ft 
lft— ft 
2016 + 16 
lift— ft 
494— 9% 
44 — U 
11V— ft 
33 —1 
bft 

119% + U 
139%— U 
329k— 9% 
359% + ft 
2096 + ft 
4196 
50 

7ft- ft 
21 + ft 
15ft— ft 
48ft + ft 
3796 + 16 
30ft— ft 
23 

M + ft 
12 + ft 

259% + ft 
4ft— ft 
696 

34ft + ft 
10ft- ft 


IS Manta 
Irish Low Stack 


Hv. VM.PE »a» HH* Low OuW.Cr%» 


SO*' 3 


40ft 7716 
15U 9ft 
23% 1(9% 
47ft 32 
6696 66ft 
Aft 29% 
69ft SOU 
59% 2ft 
18 109% 

239% 16ft 


Wlteo IAS 4* 9 
WolvrW 31 U 1 
WoodPT *9 16 16 
Wotarth ZOO <3 W 
WotaiPt Z20 14 
WrMAr 

Wrtaly l*0a 2* 17 
wuritxr 

WVtoUb- *2 19 12 
Wynns A0 3* 7 


W 35 349% 3496 + 9% 

163 10ft Wft 109%+ ft 
683 22 219% 22 +1% 

210 46*% 45* 46 — ft 

4 6594 6516 65U— 9% 
7 3ft 3ft 3ft 

55 689% 67 IBW +lrft 
U 3 3 3 , + U 

323 lift 11 11 ■' 

12 17U 17 17 + ft 


50ft 33U Xerox 3*0 6* 71 
5*ft 45ft Xaroxpf 9A5 10.1 
29 19 XTRA A4 Z6 10 


3*0 6* 71 3761 50ft 49ft 5BU. .+ V 
SA5 XL1 13 54 SP>% S4 — to. 

SI 24ft 34ft 2496 


SOU M ZatoCP U2 A6 ♦ 7 29 » ■» '’ 

21ft 10U Zapata «1 » 847 lou «% I8U— ft 

56 25 ZOvrws At 3 18 177 541b 54ft 54ft— ft 

3D 18ft ZanntlE 8 7W 30W 199% im— .4* 

21ft .15 Zeros 32 U IS » lift 17ft 17ft + ft 


NYSE Highs-ljov9S 


NSW HIGHS 120 



The Global 
Newspaper. 


AMFpf 

AyiUnCp 

Esftsrfee 

Goortilnd 

IllPwodf pf 

ModtonRsc 

Oneida 

SunihMn 


Amaxlnc 

BritTetz 

vlEvanPpfB 

BtobMar 

KVOOBTU 

WeDemuni 

Rowan 

Ttoarlntwi 


ArmstRub 

CtnMltcni 

FaircMd 

GtobMarpf 

LLCCarP 

McOrmtntwt 

SouttMfwn 

Zapata CP 


AHaaCp ' 
Cumin era ' 

FtDTxodlPt 

Mnlltoe 
LTVCppfA 
McLmnwt 
SlawWarn . 


AMEV tlighs^jms 



Brawn Far B 
DtamndBath 
Hally Corp 
UbryFMPhli 
PGE aupfs 
Rums!! 
SCEBHpf 
WIRET 


ActanCpnt 

MIcbGenl 

NkimacOfl 


CharMAdAs 

Flrafcorpn 

ICHCpwI 

ManPwpfA 

PGE 237pfR 

SOto780p< 

StartSoff 


CannaUv 

GaathRsPf 

lrfrdyG.0 

NawartEI 

PGE2pfO 

SaroPrWn 

TachOpi 


NEW LOWS 11 

CampCon ConOil Got . 

MfchiEna MaarMWdn 

T Bar WOrthwiOh 


tMVaf 

GrabtBr 

Jetronlc Ind 

PGE254pfT 

PGE22SPR. 

SCElttaf 

TalEd4Ztof 


Kxty Jewel n" 

NuctoarDta- 


. V’*'' 
|l> 'i-/ 

A" 1 - 

is -1 ' 

! ‘J* - ’.. - 

1 

1 w’*” 


I Jlit 

j 111. 1 ! - -' ' 

i .■fcaj;-’" 
j liMfl i : -- 

I ftv.v 

■ j : ‘ uil 

l JA'.: • • 



Over-the-Counter 


Jane 20 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Amnnl 

Amm 

Amtsior 

Am%6B 

Amui 

Amood i 
Anodity 

An ionic 
Anal » I 
Arsren 
Anaid 
Annewr 


Sales In Pint 

loot Utah Law SPAAChtoe 


6 6 

9%. 996— U; 
23 M +1 1 
sin. 

10ft 1096 
1JU lift— ft 
9U 9ft + ft 
71 11 

6ft 6ft — ft 
6ft 61% — ft 
4U 4U— ft 
916 9U 
TTft 33 + ft 

8ft Oft 
ft K 
WU l*ft 
31% 3*%— U 
6*. 7 + ft 

199* 1996— IU 
lft 8ft + 9% 
u 

4ft + 1% 
10 — V% 

SH 

4ft— 4% 

31% + ft 
18 —lft 
17ft 

33 - ft 
I39« — 9% 
151% — 9k 

61* + 9% 
159- + U 
149k + U 
36U— U 

34 + U 

16U— U 
4T% 

61 +1 
23i%— 9% 
18ft — to 
32*%— ft , 
21ft 

5to + U 
3 

6 — 1 * 
3ft + U . 
794—1* 


10U + U 

159- — 16 

11 + H 
10ft 

au + ft 
22U + u 
13 +1% 

1196 

7*6 + \b 
27 — U 

1596— U 
+ ft 
37U + ft 

12 — Vi 

36 — Ito 

ir% + 1% 

311% +|U 
17ft 

5ft + ft 
1 + U 

17 + ft 

17U 


SS** 33 +1 

SU 32U — ft 
4U *>% 

*» Vj 

26 26U + U 

13ft 13ft 
2ft 2ft— ft 
9. ft + ft 

3Sft 36ft— 9% 
28ft 20'-. — U 
7ft Tft 
6 6 

2ato Sato— u 
38 38 

1596 159— — U 
4ft 5ft 
1IU HU 
10 ID 
IIU lift + 1* 
Wft IT's + 

7 79* + 1% 

1996 20 


Solum Hal 

180a HIM LOW 3 PAL Cbm 
6U 6ft — ft 
lift 116% — to 
9ft 94% — ft 
29 6ft 39% 39% — U 

310 99k 9*6— U 

72 6ft 6ft 6ft— ft 

A4 3* 0 17 1696 17 + U 

» 31 1396 13U 13ft 

234 9U IU au— u 

2*2 U £031 nu Mft 

AOb 1.4 725ft 25ft 25ft— U 

30 13 2694QU. 3916 37V. — 9k 

2 12 12 11 + ft 

HHk 1094— U 
7ft 7U + U 
Mft 34ft 
I5U 1SU — ft 
23U 23V. — U 
4 4 + ft 

159k 16 + ft 

694 6ft 6ft— ft 

4U 4ft 4V6 
9U 596 194— ft 

7U 7 7 

Hm 894 896— U 

61% 6 6 — ft 

4ft 4ft 4ft + U 
616 6ft 616 
9ft 1914 19ft 
lft lift lift 
6ft M la 
49k 4ft 4ft 


Soles la Mol 

100a HIM Low SPALCWM 
76 7ft 7ft 7ft 

1017 1611 17 + U 

I 1622196 30ft 31ft— U 
4 3 3 52716 2716 2716 + U 

960 7U 7 7 

60 * 519ft 19 19—16 

3 43 7506 269k 2696 


Avocro 

AvtitGr 

Avntok 

A volar 

AvtalGP 

Ait CM JO 4A 



BBDO 
8GS 
BlWCb 
BPISV 
BRCom 
BalrdC 
BakrPn : 
BalteK s 

BaltBco 

aanePs 

Banenhl 

BcpHw 

Oanctnt 

03JIBH 

BLDats l 
DKNEs • 
8K50US 
Bnl.ni i 
B hiowa ■ 
BkMAm i 

Bankvt 

Bantal 

BaranO 

Barlckp 

Barrls 

Barton 

Ba*Ain 

BsafF 

BayPac 

BavQka 5 

Etavly 

BIFusa* 

Beiiw 

Brief'd 

Bennan 

Bmm %rt 

Bwl-lov 
BerhGs I 

Berk Ha 

OulCa 

Eats Lb l 

Bibo* 

BtoB 

BloBeor 

Biukm 

Bindlvi 

BioRn 

Btooen 

Blontei 

Binore 

Bletofl 

airainc 

Blrtehr 

BIStlGr 

BJcklnn 

BllaaAT 

Boatan : 

BobEvn 

BallTc 

BaoWB 

BoanEI 

Boomm 

BaomFn 


49 49U 

0U 89*— ft 

7 7 — ft 

34% 2ft 
TU 794 
6ft 69% — ft 
36M 36ft 
>9% 89% + ft 
2SU 259* + 9% 
3394 229k 
1* 19 — ft 
3394 3294 
79% 7ft— 9% 
094 8ft + ft 
379k 2194— U 
46 4696 + U 

7796 28 

1396 14 —9% 

48U 4816 + U 
10ft lOto + ft 
1194 lift— ft 
1596 1596 

V. 1 

Mft M9%+ ft 

3 3 

13ft 13ft + U 
37U 37U— *6 
71% 796 + ft 

599% 599%— ft 
69% 6ft 
6ft 6ft— ft 
9ft *94— U 
9ft Oft 
IPft 19ft 
l3to 13ft + ft 
Mft 15 + ft 

22 Z2 —lft 

32U 32ft + U 
23U 23ft— ft 
16ft Mft — to 

*SS 'S-ft 

1316 14 
SU Sft— ft 
7to Tft 
16ft laft — ft 
29% 3%% + ft 
6U 6U — ft 
896 9 + ft 

4 4ft 

4U 496— U 


38ft 39 
21 21 

Tft 79k + U 

*u au — u 

aft 6ft 

4to 4ft- ft 
17ft 17ft 
22ft 23 + ft 
18U 19*+ — ft 
13 13 — U 

33 JJft + ft 
1JU MU 
W<* 36ft 

394 394 — U 

3ft 4 + to 

91% 10 — ft 
14ft 1496 — ft 

1*. lft 
13ft 13ft— ft 

11% lft— ft 
2SU 2S» + to 
17 IT 


5331k 

22 796 
539 Sft 

i 29831 
61% 

13810ft 
31 1 7ft 

407 6U 
531 594 
25 2ft 
67 4 
1702209% 

820ft 
1 296 

4 29% 
1 181% 
438 

530 10U 
56 49% 
10 459k 

90 3 

1 12U 
483194% 
380 2196 

i aft 
2179k 
157101% 
IIS 1ft 
B717U 
5339W* 

1 L 

as sft 
128 Ito 
36313ft 
37261% 
8 9 
9O3094 
17514ft 
14516 
5534U 
466 27 
1524*6 
1213ft 
9215 
125ft 

JJTC 

83 2ft 

424 lift 

5 ft 

if sft 
IS 6ft 
280 2. 

62 496 
138 9*6 

27 69k 
3031*1% 
16 15 
220ft 
15719 
2310 
1320ft 
21 aft 
13 6 
81716 
3811ft 
24 25ft 
IM8I1 

244 2996 
22259% 
153 22U 
*331 
11* BU 
7179% 
436 Tft 
11848 
871716 
46K91SU 
71 Tft 
34 Sft 

23 4096 

236 23ft 

61331% 
40 1546 
403*to 
631 

4149 12V. 

42M 
435 
S3Z39* 
15 18ft 
2D 2D 
23625 
SOM 
1 6 
31 7 
MISft 
S 7H 
lUIHi 
11401% 
5713ft 

91 2>% 
waiBu 

63 4ft 
8512%. 
■0824ft 
21 4to 
141716 

17317 
2318 
400 33ft 


33U 33U + ft 
7*x 79% 

5 SU— ft 

19ft 20ft— ft 
10U 19 +16 

10U 10ft 
17ft 17U 

61% 64% — ft 

IU 59% + 9% 
296 7*. 

39% 4 + 1% 

20 M — ft 
20ft 20ft 
216 29k 

29% Z9%— ft 

1Mb lift 

37ft 38 

*tft *299 — -fj* 
1ZU 12ft 
1*4% 1«U — ft 
219% 219%— *6 
bft « h 
1796 1716 + U 
Wft 101% 

11k lft 
169% 1716 +1 
lOWa— 4% 
0 

Sft— 4% 
lft lft— 4% 
134% 1346 + 4% 
259* 26ft— ft 
11% * + to 

30ft 309% + 4% 
14 141% + 4% 

4516 4596 + 46 
339% 34V6 + 96 
26ft Mft— ft 
24 24 — 1% 

13ft 13ft — 4% 
1496 14ft — ft 
2BVa Mft— 4ft 

% ^ 

14 14V* + ft 
7to Tft + to 
2ft 2ft + ft 

109% TOft— U 
ft ft 
Sft Sft— u 

6 4—4% 
lft 11% + ft 
41% 4ft 

IU BU —1 
4U 6U 
1*1% 1*4% 

15 11 + U 

209% 20ft 

189% |* 

*v* *n 
28 28 
« a — u 
5U SU — ft 
Mft 1596— to 
lift 119% + U 
24ft 25ft + ft 
104% lOto + ft 
2*1% 2*4% — ft 
269% 261% + ft 
31 31ft 
304% 301% 

B fl — to 
17ft 174% 

69% 7 + ft 

47to 47ft— U 
17 ITU - ft 
Mft lift — u 
641 7 — 9% 
Sto 5U— U 
401% 40ft 
234% 23 V. 

BU 3514 — u 
I8W IBft 
30ft 39to + ft 
35 35 

lift lift + ft | 
26 26 
371% 38 
23 23 — ft 

1796 17ft— ft I 
lift Wft— ft I 
244% 25 , 

13ft 14 + to 
6 6 

6ft 7 I 

1SU ISft— V% 
Ito Ito 
laft lift + to 
40ft 40ft— u 
13ft 134% — u 
2to 3U— 1% 
1796 17ft— ft 
31% 44% 

124% 124% — 4b 
ZJth 24ft 4 %% 

4 4—4% 

17ft 17ft— ft 
It 16ft 
17ft II 
339% 33ft 


COllAMJI 

Camera 

Comarc 

Corneal i 

Com coo 

Cantata 

QmtalaJ 

Camera 

CntaAlr 

Com Be 

Com B of 

Com Bah 

ComClr 

Cm ecu 

CmBCal 

CmclBn 

CmdFtf 

CmlSbr 

CwlltiF 

CmwSv 

CamAm 

Comlnd 

CamSva 

ComShr 

CmpCda 

Compoq 

CrrwoT 

CmpCr 

CmpraL 

CmpSva 

Campus 

CCTC 

CmoAs 

CafAut 

CmoOt 

CptEnr 

CmpfH 

CrriDldn 

CmpLR 

CmpfM 

CmoHtrt 

CmcF’d » 

CmpRs 

CmTSk 1 

Cmautn 

CincH 

Cmsrvo 

Camahr 

Coimffc 

Comte h 

Concpv 

ConcpN 

Conlfra 

ConnWI 

CnCap 

CnCapi 

CCapR 

CCooS 

CaiFttr 

CnPaPS 

CansPa 

CnTom 

CarratIB 

Consul 
CansFn 
iCanwts 
CntIBCP 
aiFSL 
CIIHIf S 
CtIHItC 
Canrsn 
Cantina 
Cl Lost 
C onvgl 
Conirp 
CoorBlo 

Coarutr 

Coorv B 

Copy Ini 

Cor com 

Carols 

CorkSi 

Corvin 

Cosmo 

Cowers 

CourOJS 

Couapr 

Covnat 

CrkBrl 

CroaTr 

Cromer 

CrazEd 

Cronus 

CrosTr 

CnAuta 

CwnlUi 

Crump 

CulinFr 

Cultural 

Cula 

Cream 

CvptSv 

Cyprus 


Salas ia Mai 

100s HIM Loir 3PJH.Cb*e 
961 171% 17V. 17V* 

.74 ZA 8621 3096 20ft — 46 

84 9 lft 9 +4% 

2512 lift lift 
1*0 23 1835 35 35 +lft 

111144% 144% 14ft 
*2 .1 2316 15ft 16 + ft 

.12 A 11230 3M6 29ft 

7 34% 3ft 39% 

.16 IA 23111ft 119% lift 
289 Tft 196 1ft 
Z10 SJ 8440 39ft 40 + 1% 

2 4 4 4 

JOr 3* 10 1746 Mft Mft + th 

519ft Wft 1*4% 

2*8 34 IISTVi S7U 57U — 46 
Z13 2A 40 774% 76ft 76ft— ft 
1*4 26 47740ft 40ft 40ft + ft 

J6 Zfi 201396 lift 1394 

3*0 <1 169 4* 41 

213154% Mft 151% — Vi 
JDa 45 22 10ft 10 10U — ft 

1.13a 128 54 Bft 8ft 896 

11512 12 12 +U 

13 2 1ft Ito 
-38 IJ 472281% 289% Mft— ft 
47 fto 816 Bft 
AO 5* 5311 1016 11 

5120ft 3046 30ft 

4275 SVh B B —ft 

Air .1 48 Wk * * —1 

AO IJ 322311% 31 3IU + V* 
1 5 5 5 — 9* 

35 SU Sto 8ft — U 
31 3 2ft 3 + ft 
685 *U 9 *U + ft 
41324 25U 25U — U 


685 VU * *to + ft 
41SM 2546 2516 — U 
63 54% 4ft 4ft — ft 
*8 A 3 *ft 9U *ft— V. 

22 Sto 5U 51k— U 
20 Sft SU 89*— ft 
60 81% 8ft Sft — to 
.12 Zl 34 Sft 596 5ft 

*53 4ft 3ft 41% + ft 
13* 8VX 8 84% — ft 

567 7 6U 7 
11 44% 4V% 44% 

13 14to 14 14 — U . 

227 4ft 6U £U — 16 
S3 3Vl 31% 3ft + 1% 
46 Sft 31% 3ft + 4% , 
10 BU 896 896 

S’* ww* 

237 151% ISft 15ft 
48 M. 4ft 4ft— to 
1*0 38 I7Mft Mft 26ft 1 

1.48 7 A 46 20ft 30 20 ] 

3JJ0O12.9 203 3396 2J'k 23to | 

140a 63 991* 184% 1BU + to 

IABoIIJ 17715ft 1416 15 — U 
3*0 133 29123 22to 22ft — to 
5 7 7 7 

IA8 29 91 50ft 4*96 SOU + ft 

4M 1.* 56 44% 4 4ft — 4% 

.-«« 1-7 1 35 35 35 

132 4.9 14031ft 31 31 ~ U , 

_ 623 39% 3ft 3ft— 1% 

ASe 1.1 3* 41% 4ft 4ft — ft 

1A0 4* 62* 2* 29 

2*4b £1 354046 30ft 40U +146 I 

10 Mft 14ft 14ft + 16 I 
97151% Mft 15ft— ft I 

S % % ”tr * 1 

.00 A 520 20 20 

32 4ft 4 4 — to 

2828 Sft 4ft 5 — ft 

38 Mto 144% Mto I 
608 2U 2 24% — 4% 

137 5ft Sft 516— 4% 
■40 22 74189* 1BU 151% + 4% 

39 19 Wft 19 + ft 

168 7ft 61k 7 

248 Bft Bft *U 
209 17 341 56ft 5646 56ft — 4% 
106 2ft 2 2 

4*9 39% 31% 3ft 
JO 13 1023U 234* 234k— ft 

22 Sft Sft Sft 
A0 23 226 20 to Wft 201% + 1% 

302 ft ft to 

.14 I* 59134* 13 13ft + ft 
it 19 2916 ISft M +1% 

1 *9% 0H 91% + to 

232026ft 2416 2SVi— ft 

15141% 141% l«ft + ft 

JU 3.1 39925ft 2SV* 25ft — U 

*S 4ft 4 4ft + ft 
49112ft 12ft Wft— ft 
44 IA 2433 32ft 32ft— 1% 

.94 5* 14715ft ltU 189%— to 

J6 Z5 7 22U 221* 22ft— ft 

a 13 0 7 6ft 6ft — ft 

24 21U 21 to 211% — ft 

JOe SJ * fto 0to *u 
llllWft IZft I3U 


! OattCD 
Cttastti 
Datum 
Dauattn 
DcvtWs 
Dawson 
DebSh 
DocbD 
Occam 
DahBxA 
Datctwn 
Del TNG 
Dal talc 
Derious 
Danelcr 
DentMd 
□apGfv 
Deagnb 
DatacEl 
Datum 
Deway 
DtaaPr 
OtaCrva 
Dlasane 
Dlbrol a 
Dfceon 
Diemen 
Dtawo 

DhrtCm 

DlnnrBI 

DM no* 

□Ionic 

Dial Log 

Dvfood 

DIVlH 

DiJUlTI 

DocuOl 

DlrGnl 

DomB 

DglLom 

DOVIDB 

□rant* 

Oraahr a 

DrcaBs 

Dmclr 

DrorGr 

OudcAl 

OunkOs 

DiMSva 

Durnti 

Durtims 

Durtron 

DurFll 

Dvoom 

DvnRa 

Dvnscn 

DynfchC 


Sates ta Mel 

M0» HIM Law 3 PAL Or ge 

.13 .1 103 183 103 

26 51% 5U 5ft 

572 1816 1746 17ft— 16 
153114% Iff* 101% — to 
444 3ft 31% 3U + ft 

4 296 29k »— ft 

47171% 17 1716— to 

t£ 396 3* 316 + to 

27 59% 51* 51%— to 

1J6 1* 239ft 39ft 39ft + U 

M A 1714ft 1316 14to + ft 

41 596 Sft 5ft 
JOe * 092496 344% 2416 + to 

2931016 101* 109%— ft 
22 39% 2* ito— 9% 

J2 3* 21024ft 249% 241% 

33 I J 104 Wft I0U 15ft + to 

1*4 9A 12311ft 10ft 18ft— to 

5 6 6 6 

17 14% 4ft lft 

366 11% lft lft— ft 
3B7 74% 7 74% 

220 4A 56499k 49U 47U + 9k 

2 6ft SU 6ft 

3 4ft 69% 41% 

53 71% 7U 7ft 

1 3ft 34% 3ft 
21246 1216 I2U 
A0 U 3 27ft 274% 27ft 

Z7D 216 2ft <H%— to 

*0 X5 17223 22ft 2216— U 

43610ft 10 10ft + 46 
181 696 61% 6*6 + to 

10 4H 4* 4ft— ft 
6521ft 71 U 27 Vi + ft 

A0 4.1 2919 to ft 

535364% 36 36 

20 4ft 4 4 

25 4U 4U 4U 

34 3* 115111% 111% 11*% 

167 Mto 14 MU 
413U 1316 13(6— 16 
34 59* 5U 5U 
JO A 311241% 2*9% Mft + ft 

1J0 14 1403516 3516 3516— to 

A0 2A 1151% 154% 15ft— V. 

*8 35 1702576 25 25ft— 4% 

JM IA 26IZU I7U 12(6 

8811* lift lift 

763254% 2416 254% + 16 

46 18(4 1716 17ft— to 

161916 19ft 19ft 

32 2* 68161% Mft Mto— to 

■24 1* 4723ft 23ft 23ft— to I 

423ft 231% 234%— ft i 

41996 Wft 19ft 

IJ8 3J 33816 38(6 38U 

M SJ 810ft 10ft 10ft— l% 

.18 IJ 398 77 16ft 161% + to 
I 10(6 I0U 1016—16 
3 64% 64% tfft 

44 4* 416 416 — 46 

58324 224% 22ft— 1 


IU Ito— to 
54% 5ft + to 
74% 74% 

2ft 210 
74% 8 


sale* ia Net 

1088 HIM Low JPALChU* 

A9a 2A 750321% 231% 321% 

902 101 102 +1 

2 316 3ft 316- 16 
12215 144% 141% + t% 

28 3 2ft 216—4% 
5 Mto 144% Mto + to 
350 81% 7ft BU— 1% 


344% + U 1 
Bft— 16 
716— M 
154% — U 
6 — to i 

^- + S 

24ft— 1% 
1446— to 
. 316 

am— to 
12to + to 
lOto 
2116—1 
5 

131% + to 
30ft + Hi , 
36 — 46 1 


1.12 A1 
321 

I JO £5 
*0 5.1 
A JS Zl 


Safa* ta Nat 

106* HIM LAW IPALOltae 
FullHB ja Z2 146 Mto Wft 148% + to 

Funfma ASr 1.7 10 4ft 416 Aft + 4% 


134% 134%— ft 

4 4U 
124% 1211% 

44 44 

9ft lOto + to 
816 016 + to 
7 7—1% 

216 Zft 
4616 474% + to 
M 14 — U 
214% 22Jft 
11 life 
It 16U + to 
Tft 19% + to 
3ft *%— to 
4ft 7 — 1% 
216 21% 

Sft 51%— 1% 

5 * . 
164% m% +i 
M% BW + 4% 


Satoata N« 

Has HIM Low SPALCbU* 
6071016 9to lQU + ft 
58 7U 7to 7Vi— U 


915ft 15U 
8248ft 3*va 
17 JU 34% 
I310U 9ft 
181 11U 119% 
101 81% 81% 
4 tfU 6U 
5451 laft MU 
164 9 81% 

271323ft 211% 
18289% 284% 
378 69% 4 
31141% 131% 


ISft 

30(6— to 
34% — \% 

in% + 4% 
an + 4% 
6ft + u 
1M%— ft 
Bft +1% 
2116— 16 
281%- to 

4$to~* 


Sto 
136144* 
1738b SA 10304% 
*■“1816 
111% 
71% 
ft 
ISft 
15ft 


'2 

7ft lft— to 
124% 121% — ft 
3416 319% + to 
916 916 
114% lift + 1b 
IS 75V*— to 
109% im% + 4% 

10 1M6 

1896 1896 
17V. 171% 

51% Sto 
41% 496 + 4% 

64% 61% 

T716 10 +lft 
Mto Mto + 1% 
124% 124% — to 
144k 17ft + to 

llto in% 

10ft lift — ft 
w% 354% 

*4 nr* 

81% Bft— 4% 
r 7to — 4% 
21 % 3 

64% 4(6 — 1% 
0U 04% — 1% 
41% 611— to 
ISft HVi + to 
304% 201% — 1% 
171% 1716—1 
10ft — 

nt m-n 

15 15 

15U 1SU— U 
04% 9ft 
Sft Sft + to 
16ft lift 
*to 9to— to 
2446 26U 
lift lift— 4% 
9 9 — U 

U 154% +11% 
4ft 4ft 
27ft 28 
22ft 23U + to 
7 7—4% 


M 

316 — to 
74k— ft 
6ft + to 
6ft 

13 + to 
271%— ft 
14<% + ft 
344% + U 
19U + 46 

04% 

13ft 

29 — U 
3416 

544% + U 
7 au + u 
26 

3SVX— 1% 
464% + til I 
2646 

38ft— 1% 1 
12ft— to I 
15U +1 
18 + 14 

20 +»6 
2316 + ft 
194% + V% 
214% + to 
1IH%— 9* 
15ft + 4% 
Bft— 4% 

944 + to 

37 

279% +1% 
261% — 96 
28ft— Vb 
29Va 
18U 

30ft + 4% 
1SU— 46 

291% +1VJ 
33M + to 
304* — ft 
411% + ft 
129%— to 
2196- to 

2896— ft 
359%— ft 
23V, _ ft 
1846 — ft 
W +I» 
44 + to 

jto— i% 

sus 

10 +4% 

22ft 

141%— 16 
124* + 4% 
41ft— ft 
4196- 16 

J4U + ft 
284% + 4% 
Sft 

llto— ft 
54% 

134% + ft 
34% 

2ft- 4% 

38 —1 
10 —4% 
Mft 

404%- n 
14—4% 

14 


134% 134% 

144% Mto 

S U 204% 

V. »U— ft 
1716 17ft— ft 
124% 12ft— 44 

”%“* + * 
13ft 13ft 
12ft 13 

.1616 16ft — ft 
124% 1346 

b a 

7ft Tft— U 
14to 141% 

3 34% 

64* 64% + to 
01% 89%— 4% 
Ato 41% + 46 
m* 1216— 4* 
2016 21 U 
lift lift 
6U 646 — to 
21ft 224* + 4% 
188 118 
54% 54% — ft 
SVV 54% — 4k 
121% 121%— M 
9 9ft 
54% 54% — to 
Mft 1416 + U | 

MU 1416 + 1% 1 

1446 144%— to , 

154* 154* i 

lft 11*— 4% 
lift lift i 


khoiit 

HBO ' JO 1* 
HCW .10 10 
HEITx 
HMD Am 
HodlCo J4 * 

■ * - I -- 

i KiUfjr 

Hod co 
Hcdaon 

HoieSvn 

Hal Ifo* *4e A 
Halml 

Ham Dll .10 A 

Hoimta 

HanvCo 

Hanvln JA IJ 
HarpG J4 1-2 
1A0 £1 
1AO 3A 


4to 4to 
1096 194% + 4% 
5 5—4% 

1396 14 — U 
12Vk 1296 + to 
2*4% 26 +1 

10ft 19 

4 * — ft 

2U 244 

ft ft 

5 5 

g* 29% — V* 
15ft 16—4* 

6 6 

0to 9to — ft 
42ft 43ft + 4% 
ZSU 28 V. — 1 
31ft— to 
46ft + U 
20 — U 
Sto + to 
1596 

204%- to 
Bft + ft 
uto + 4% 
24% + ft 

2ft — to 
10 + ft 

» -to 
84% — 1% 
4 — 4* 
3346— to 
374% 


100 2to 
786 4 

ASe 1.1 93 41% 

7 016 

.16 3 *5-2^ 

303101% 

2JD 6.1 4336U 

66 54% 

*0 Zl 66264% 

51 24% 

.40 VS 
26 Ato 
57 416 
82 21* 

10 4U 
1*2 4J0 3143046 

*8a A 5 lift 
37 4ft 

1AB U 4644 

- ,73B * 

2A6 73 24 Mft 

J5a 4* 3 4U 

123 3 

JO U *13ft 
16 2 
2323ft 
22I8U 
5 7to 
412ft 
122 9ft 
636 Tft 
56201% 
t 16 41% 

687 3*% 

54 64% 

361 01* 

34 3% 
22617 

4055 23ft 
1330 596 
12 11% 

3 6to 
1710U 
. 10 71k 

.16 1* 271 lift 
IJ3M5J 16 aft 
1047728 
02 71% 
17615ft 
23 846 
12138% 

5 4V* 
45312ft 
627101* 

I 213ft 

I 36518ft 

IB 194* 

222 7 to 

J6 £1 IQS 7 
51 1 
10221% 21 U 
232 71% aft 

35 3U 34* 

_ 12 946 94k 

-Ole J 162 3to >ft 

*6e 1* 114 64% 69* 

222 7ft 74* 
ZAO 73 144596 454% 

M 99* 9U 
180 71% 71% 
20 416 44k 


23k+ U 
4 + 1% 

4to— 4% 
fto— 1% 
Mto- to 
11% + 4% 
KM 

3446 + ft 
54%. -j 

64* + lb 

5u=tt 

4to + to 
30U — 4% 
lift +.U 
4ft— to 
43to— 1% 
32ft 

344% + fb 


1316+4% 
114—4% 
2316 + U 
17ft — to 

129% +U 

S=8 

28 —to 
4 

3th 

Ato + u 
9 + U 

31% 

168%— to 
22 ft— to 
5ft 

Ito— v% 

64% 

jou — VT 

iSSrfr 

6ft— ft 
Mto— ft 
Jto- 

15ft— to 
81% 

139* • 

4'1 + to 
12ft + Ik 
m— 4% 
13ft - 
i8i%— a 
10ft 

7 —to 
7 
1 

21U — 146 
-7ft + ft 
JU 

946 + ft 

ILft 

78% + ft 
4U 


JBRate .M IJ 

jp?na 

Jockpet 

JodcLfa 

Jadnn JO 1* 

JamWfr 

JeffrGa 

iaRBih IM 3* 
JefSmr! AOa Zl 
JafMorl 

Jerioo .12 A 
JhmnE 

3oneVs .iteaj 
Jonic&i f 

Jonal A t 

Jajptai 

June a 

Junttrt M ii 


121% 13ft- 
58* 5ft- 
17 17 

7VS 7*6 ■ 
3su ogi ■ 
27ft 2714- 
17 . 171ft ■ 
171% 17ft- 
40V% aft 
1816 19U- 
6U 6U- 

20U S8U- 

5ft Sft 
4i% 4*% • 
64% 696 

tft au 

Bft 9 1 
14 164%- 

10ft 101%- 






















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


Page 19 


l 'Sft business roundup 


Ill I. , l n 



Sony Planning 
New Plant in 
Eastern France 

Reiners 

TOKYO — Sony Carp, of 
Japan said Thursday that its 
French subsidiary, Sony France 
SA, win build a factory in Al- 
sace, eastern France; to produce 
compact didr players and elec- 
tronic components for video re- 
corders from the end of 1986. 

The company said the fac- 
tory, in Ribeauville, near Col- 
mar. will play a central role in 
Sony's audio and video produc- 
tion in Europe. 

Sony already has two lac- 
tones in southwest France 
which produce audio and video 
cassettes. 

The plant, winch will have 
d about 250 employees, will pro- 
duce 10,000 players and elec- 
tronic components for 5,000 
units a month for sale in Eu- 
rope. Sony said. 


National Semi Has $6. 5-Million Loss 


SANTA CLARA, California — 
National Semiconductor Corp., 
blaming the -weakened semicon- 
ductor market, said Thursday that 
it had a loss of S6J million in the 
fourth quarter ending May 31, 
compared with a profit of S16.6 
milli on for the like period in. 1984. 

Sales slipped 8.9 percent, to 
$428 j 5 mi llion from. $470.8 million 
in the last quarter of 1984. The 
fourth-quarter loss came to 7 cents 
per share compared with a per- 
share profit of 19 cents in the peri- 
od ending May 31. 1984. 

For the year. National Semicon- 
ductor’s net profit fcD 38.8 percent, 
to $34.4 million, or 38 cents per 
share, from $562 million, or 66 
cents per share, in 1984. Sales were 
up 83 perce n t, to $1.79 billion, 
from $1.65 billion last year. 

“Although we have made sub- 
stantia] efforts to rnititnoe the ef- 
fects of the ament slump in semi- 
conductors, we have not realized 
substantial improvement in our fi- 
nancial picture.” said Charles E. 


COMP ANY NOTES 


IDdHj 


?•: Abu Dhabi National (XI Co. said 

its 60-percem owned subsidiary, 
.4" Abu Dhabi Marine Operating Co_ 
^ has discovered oD and gas in eom- 
£ r, mercial quantities at two ofTshore 
v.£ Jsells, BU Haar-1 and Bdbasem-2. 
It gave no further details. 

^ Amoco Corp. will sell its 13-per- 
dj cent equity in Madras Refineries 
Ltd. and 243-percent share of Ma- 
dras Fertilizers Ltd. to the Indian 
government for the equivalent of 
1 50 million rupees ($12338 million), 
sources said. Amoco had no imme- 
diate comment on the report 

Cbesebrougb-PomFs Inc. of 
Greenwich, Connecticut said it has 
reached an agreement in principle 
with the managers of its Health- tex 
children's apparel divirion to sell 
them Health-lex jn a leveraged 
buyout No price was given. 

r Jf. Hewlett-Packard Co. said it has 
agreed to assemble its series 68 
minicomputers and instrumenta- 
tion for sale in China. The 10-year 
joint venture, China Hewlett-Pack- 


1 i 



Jane SO 


Dollar 


VMI \ llds -1 




I f 


{stmr/Mat. 

Allied IIWIVS 
AiiWd irfchw 
Allied Irish 17 
Allied irMi Pern 
#rat>0teQiro91/W 
-fttmfkFlnif/M 
Pagans asW 
BcaCaraniWH 
BaiHaz Lavarofl 
BCD Dl Ronta 17/91 
BcoDl Raman _ 
Ben Sarto Srirttofl 
Bangkok Bk IBM I « 
Boo Corp W 
B* Greece n/M 
Bk Greece n/n 
Bk ire toad 89 

B* I retond W 

Bk Montreal » 

Bk Montreal 06 
Bk Montreal 91 
Bk New York tt _ 

Bk Nova Scotia U/n 
Bk Novo Scotia M 
Bh Tokyo 93 
Bk Tokvo 8V 
Bk Tokyo 87 
Bk Tokyo FebSR/91 
Bk Tokyo DecUMI 
Bonkomedcn 0/5 W 
Bankers Trust* 
Banfcen Trust 94 
B« Cartful M 
BoB Fin 87/91 
BW*S 
BU Int » 

BWIntW 
BaindosuezH 
Ba indamcW 
Bur *9 
Bice 87 
BfccOcIBB 
Bit* Jan 18 
Bio 99 
Tno 95 
BnalS/M 

Bnp 84/96 

Boo 99 
Bno89 
3aoBB/91 

\S® 95 

Bo Paribas Pero 
Ba worms »/W 
BoretaVSO/S95 
Barclays O/S 91 
Bordays O/S Paro 
Borders Q/SD4 
BMalwnPero _ 
Belgium DeOf/M 
BeWumOO 
BCtanjm 09/BS 

Bergen Bk 99 

Bergen BV8W91 
BetohimN/M 
Beta turn Qct99/B4 
CcceM 
Ccc«l» 

Cnca90flS 
Oil 90 

con 

ClbC9S* 

CB>c96 IWtoYl 
CMC 94 „ 

CieWretS+4-M 
Central ini 97/18 
Chase Mon 0/5 93 
ChoKMonCorpOV 

am* Mon Cant Oo 
CMniieoi94 
Chemical 96 (WMvl 

CtrtdwnloBkft 

avWfania Bfc*< , 
VkarpAueMlWklvt 
5ton>Soo96 
onarvOcm 
Citicorp 94 
Ciikorp Pen* 

Cdkoro PMpW 
C o mme nt * Febg 
Common!* Nw« 
Comm Urt Mtrtnal 91 
Comp Fin CJ.C 97 
Council Ol Eurooe 9) 
Cri 14/98 

edit®. 

Cd Fe096 

CcJ97 

Cecm*87/W 
CeameM 
Cr Du Nord 8trtJ 
Cr Fonder 88® 

Cr For Ewart « 

Cr Lyonnais 91/9* 

Cr Lvannajsg 
CrL yonooUg® 

U LyonnnhJ9M4 

Cr Lyonnais 91/95 

CrLWwnattW 

Cr Lwrmota Jon93/» 

GrLywmali 

Cr Lyonnat* Jun9Z/9S 
Cr NatknattB 
Cr Notional 90/91 
Cr NBBonrtM 

gasss 

Cr iwiwnoW 

OoHcM KonovoU 
- .Oil Ndt Got « 

NorsheNairtB 

y en NQrt ke Petfg. 

DwmorJJcinM/w 
Denmark Od BMW 
Dcnrnort 99/04 
Denmark Pore 

DieEnteOefitKW 

OresdnerBkW 

OrKdnerFktB 

OrwdnernnW 

EideradaNucB9 

Eittrt 

EdtWW 

Ed>97 

EttHB 

EnelOo 

EBB 93 

EalW 
Eec 18/90 

E|rM 

Ester lor I id 91/94 
Per review 
FerroylefS/W 

Finland 98 

Finnish P0BW 98/95 
FlnJBortwM 
Jjtrri Bk Syy 9* 
StirOCWcagoW 
Srlrst OijCOPnH 
’First cm cooo« 

F/r*l City Tr*«9S 
Fir* intw 9* 

Fortfl 
(hill 11894.5* 
Genftioiicegjg 
GwflnancefS/W 

G«b« 

DrB Fora 

Grt«* 


Coupon Nmd BU AM 
79k 18-12 9M810UB 
9fk 17-18 1084810180 
95b OUT mSB10B.1S 
Nk 3D-11 9555 9A2S 
m uwKaarmv 
' 77-flfl muoMua 


91b 87-11 9957 9943 
B 


06-13 99 JU HUM 
38-10 1084710057 


75b 09-17 99A7 91J7 
7JB7S- 99 JB 99 Ji 

S I) 99 JD 9921 
1I9BA5 98JH 
1 99 AJ W-SJ 


81b 

k 


-- -- mp wviMf 

11-11 WAS BUM 
DM19 9940 99.3 
18-W9BM99A1 
1MB 9BjQ 9B72 
3M8 108.W10825 
JWI7 99J0 10025 
nunPLa 
»-07 wnemn 
3M8 M0J4MQAI 
1587 ful 9998 
JMD -teoBinttss 

99. J6-18 10USHffl4O 
88 2M7 1082718832 
Bob 2M7 108JJB108.1B 
wi asoiieunuuD 
N B-ntoouiiao 

fto J8U4 99JS99M 
75b 11-89 9958 99JI 
9V| 254b HU5H045 
Mb EM81BUB10B.il 
IBIb 3M9 9837 9947 
8 lb 1T-n UB5S10IU5 
M 11-10 1084718857 
75b 17-18 99^9993 
9V. 1547 M0JB81BZn 
Mb 7M9 lOOTJIDLq 
7* - ltUBUH.1I 

«b awioumaui 


Mi 

r 

75b 

W 

95k 


Mi 


918 38-10 1005210042 
9* 22-87 100-1710827 
1Mb 049 1085210882 
MMMU110H 

gSft 

towaoB 


... 1 lBUllOMl 

89b 31-87 10881190.1 

818 13-12 10041 

75b 0S-12 9958.. — 
Ikb 13-11 10042111052 

iov i6C9 hlzhbiu 

958 22-87 mUHlOOlB 
75b 17-18 9941 9971 
75k 11-89108531" 
9VV OMBifloran 
31-07 1809*1 

iobob 


9tb 


916 #1-11 W044WOS4 
10* 0M9 1084510055 
9A CW 1082118031 
Mb 13-12 WODVmM 
M 20-86 99 J4 9944 
71b ZM8 99J0 994B 

sib aMBmumou 

9 W07 1001210037 

fib #9-07 1000510015 
95b 11-101084310053 
f*i W* 1805110051 
N 1508 99JHW8D8 
B 09-12 1003)10060 
9*i 24-HUaaHOSI 
7325 BMW 99 JO 9J88 
Sb 3M9WJ5W* 
Tfc 3M8«45«JB 
9tb 10-07 1902518025 
8M 29-119958 18881 
0.91250-11 W* 9955 
85b 31-97 1005010060 
7kb 8509 995*995! 
B*b 09-00 99489930 
Mk 27-OS 1083719047 
75b 2WH9063 9070 
Mb 13-Si 1001310862 
10ft 96-69 MSJS70025 
7ft 1MB M4I 9801 
T5b TM9 996* 99J* 
85b 3M7 9995100* 
Bh 12419 1011*101.18 
85b 1507 9958 mm 
Mb 31-0799* MOB 

9h 2HH 99.91 W« 
8ft 2W1 100291*39 
1Mb 1M9 1002010055 

85b 

Hi 12-12 1805110071 
75b 8689 100.1010820 
9ft 27-8* manoow 
9ft DM9WL55U8* 
S% li! 80 99-92 10032 
95b 11-18 1DUMBU0 


I 

9 


biM 

29-11 100*191* 
26* W8M1082J 

■ssijarss? 
r 

95? 1^99* WO* 




MP IUIULIW.I5 

owpwoamji 

wSwunSu 

■ 2M7T952 9V92 
9VV 21-10 wuninR 

KjjS 

toss 

^9952 99.12 
OVW 1085110841 
17-13 99.97 10007 


Hj 

IHI 


n 

9ft 

7ft 1389 


76406- 
10 ' 
H 
n 

95b 


lisfe 
assssss 

n»H I 

7ft 0609 99 J1 9951 

•iisi!™! 

s?»Ii 

ift 39-n tauBtooie 


7ft 

% 

105b 


Utver/M at. 


Giro 91 

GtWKtentWW 

Grbdan92 

MDSemueiH 
HU Samuel Pen» 
HtemnaWB 

! sSssw 

MB# 

Ireland 96/99 
Ire4and97 
Iretond 94 
It04v99 
Italy 09/94 
Italy 05 
C /(aft 07 
Jp Morgan 97 
KapFeufZ 
KopMdV92 
Kendra Oy 95 
KUrmort Ben91 
KWnwart Ben* 
Klekwnrl Ben Pent 
Korea Dev Bk 84/09 
Kara EectiBk 85/01 
Uacein S+L99 
Lloyds Bk Pent 
Llayds 93 
Lloyds 92 

LtoYdsOt 
Ltd>Ju«9 
UcbB 
Lf0UJ*d89 
Lit* 64 
Lid) 92 

Molaysia 94/09 
MatontatD/U 

Meuvsa ueai/n 
MrriovtlaM/93 
Man Han 94 

«6an Han 94 IWMvl 


i Me* Bid Askd 


95b 2744 10884UHM 
75b 0689 9780 97* 
TO*. 3889 1086510875 
M OMouxuama 
10ft 2381 9M0 (980 
Wb 27-0119* 10030 
n 9-11 M50 9450 
9ft 2618 9943 99.93 
9ft 2287 1088510035 
Oft 01-U9USU0* 
* 

a KK&SS- 

» 1689 18052100*2 

nib 3088 1B838H848 . 
9ft 1047 UkLlOlMUD 
1 0ft 0489 1504410054 

(ft mi mtnoaiB 

Uft 2M9WU510B45 
Bfe 2D4B HD6B1087O 
8ft 81-88 MB3Q10Q31 
8ft 12-11 'tgSJSlOl JS 
Nft 2589 1005810068 
Ift ZM8 18ai5UU35 
Mft Z789 1084110858 
2211 9950 9*60 
8ft B-O 99* 100* 
9ft B9-H louomn 
-- 1212 9950 WtU* 

, 020 99* 99* 

9ft 31-MWOJSmW 
Ift 84-0 10DJ810LM 
Ift 12111002818050 
91k 2243 99* 

85k U-11 HO* 


Bft 

8 


Mb 


Jsaro 

17-n ftarem 



SR. 

user 

Net West 90 
Not west M 
Mof MS/ Fit 92 
Nat Wed Rn Pern 
NKftDVM ■ 

New Zealand 07 
Hz Steel Dev 92 
NlaaeaCrW 
Nippon Cr 85 
Nippon. Or 84 
Nordic lid 91 
OHO 84. 

OtbU 
OU)9Sm 
Petrol Carp NiU 
Petrol Corp Hz 91 


M 

9 

9ft 

1 


7ft - 


9ft 



gMp97 

Sw 

Sec Gen 90/95 
Sec Gen f7 

If 

SSfaft- 

EE: 



Tatve 92/14 
TakUBtn 92/94 
TaM Ada 84/58 
7Srdomn__ 
TOVO TP 92/W 
lib Norway 99 
UtdQ/SBKD 
Wefts For* 97 
*kn»Gtyo91 
WorwBkPerp ... 

WeridBKM 

YefclMum 91/44- 


150*10020 
— 100531*63 

75k H-QI9JI99* 
8‘ 1210*9.18 9928 

Ift OWO 10048108* 
Oft 8M2 108*10115 
wyS-oo lOBJjmja 

8 3888 9950 MB* 

7ft 2288 9885 99* 
9ft BM7 100.1510825 
1 12» 101*100.17 

7» >209 99* 10003 
B 3H8 HHUHlOtTO 

M-U 9949 9959 
29® 108051*15 
1004410854 
89-U 1085010890 
9ft 39-10 181.UHTJI 

WJb 06091003510045 

W* 0689 1805410064 

9 11-07 99* 10810 
10ft 11-89 WL 1510125 
M 19-12 1881010825 

fft 99.95 10B.M 

«9* m* 
09419925 9925 
0900 19* 9926 
... 1287 1083710847 
9ft 1210 1883010830 
91b 2WMWXOO 
fft 12181085010810 
9 22» W42WU2 

9ft U-11 10UVHUD 
H -*2788 1005110841 
fft 09101886810070 
9ft. - 1002210032 

fft tMB MOJSTMUn 
91b 2204 99.90 10045 
Mb 1607 100*10811 
9 0-11 9925 10025 

Pft 28-11 WOJ910L49 
5ft- mi 1436(10833 
fft 11-111802018048 

9Sb 2387 U2L0BU810 

Mb 04-12 1803510843 
Wft 274B 99JM 108* 
Mb 19-12 1003710052 

9 12-11 1005410861 
UK. 27-09 1085410864 
Mb 2B-0B 9#J7 9937 

□5**9* 9946 
Mb 16/37 noAuaau 
I 05-n W0JBT08* 
9ft 268* (BLOO „ 

S SSlSSffi 

fft 15-10 9975 10050 
796 - 9933 9943 

101b 2609 HOMWIJIO 
71b 21489950 9J40 
Ilk 97-08 79.12 9963 

in SMPmanian 

m mnKiS 

Oft 19-1299* 10825 
Hft 8609 H025101* 

UK »09 1005210842 
Oft 20-11 raaisnaifi 

10 27* 1006510875 
7ft 2M99V9 9M9 
Eft 30* 1D8BTT0891 
■ft - 2211 10817*127 

fft 1908 HUB _ 
Ift *07 10820111030 
Oft 2211 1083(1*41 

18ft 11*10025 

SHI 9933 9941 
91b 07-11 10025100* 
Ik 2211 9950 BBJB 
9ft 13*1083710837 

Jft 05-1! 99* 9952 

Ift U079U9 99J4 
7ft H-W 9926 «36 
0ft 9-11 99* 9963 
8ft »iimuowo* 

. Mb 09-07 1081410819 
Bft 39-11 1004310853 

lift 

M 1H2 1005010860 

ml ummsnxzi 

0 16-12 H838U048 

fft 71-08 9850 9950 

9ft 2M4 99J5 1005 

kb u« ¥m wm 

Wft U09 H040U820 

744531609 9964 9994 

77 38089845 9815 
9ft 0210 1085010860 
9ft 1507 1085510045 


Non Dollar 


CnumNBt BU Askd 
■ m. u* 

13ft 27*! 

13ft 714*-! 


Kseer/MaL 
Anz BU97 
BklWftadM: 

Bk Tokyo 88 * 

atksrp89/91_ . 

Can Gold FU 15 
Cwme« . . 

11194 

BcWumM 
Uevk»Eunt96 ■ • 
MblllB 
RUSH 

Snd 90/93 ■ ' 

Slnnd OiartSft ftp* 
YorMdreintfl/94 


Souraf; Cred It Sutss*- Pint Boston Ltd , 



Sporck. president of National 
Semiconductor. 

The ccHzipany said that it in* 
creased its investment in research 
and development by 29 percent, to 
$204.6 million, from $158-5 million 
in the previous year. 

In fiscal 1985. the company in- 

Occideiilal Agrees to Sell 
25% of Libya Holdings 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Occidental 
Petroleum Corp. said Thursday 
that it has agreed to sdl 25 percon 
of its lucrative oil properties in Lib- 
ya to the Austrian state oil compa- 
ny, OMV AG, for an undisclosed 
price. 

The biggest share of OcridentaTs 
worldwide od operations is in Lib- 
ya, which accounts for proved re- 
serves of 312 million barrels ot o2. 
or about 31 percent of the 1.01- 
billion barrel total. The sale to 
OMV is expected to be completed 
by the end of June. 


vested more than $370 million in 
capital expenditures, up from the 
$278.1 million in the year earlier. 

Most of the capital expenditure 
was for plants and fabrication fa- 
cilities in the United Slates and 


ties for Southeast Aria. 

Two weeks ajgo, National Semi- 
conductor said it planned to lay off 
1 J00 workers in the United States 
and Europe and would cancel plans 
tor a new plant* in Oregon. 

National’s problems are similar 
to those of other U.S. semiconduc- 
tor manufacturers, caught in a 
slump brought on by slow comput- 
er saws, a major influx of Japanese 
chips and drastic price-cutting by 
Japanese manufacturers. 

Many UJS. chip makers are scal- 
ing bade or abandoning planned 
expansions. And the U3. Special 
Trade Representatives office said 
this week that it would investigate 
complaints that Japan bad 
“dumped” semiconductors on the 
U.S. market 


AT&T \ Quotron 
Join on Service 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
said Thursday that it reached 
an agreement’ in principle with 
Quotron Systems Inc. to devel- 
op and sell a computer-based 
financial- information system. 

The first customer for the 
system will be American Ex- 
press Co.’s Shcarson- Lehman 
Bros. unit. Shearson will use the 
system in its New York office, 
then extend it to all brandies. 

AT&T said there is no equity 
investment by either company. 
The agreement provides for the 
joint marketing of the products 
and services of both companies. 
AT&T said it will negotiate 
contracts for development, 
marketing and operations of 
the system, which is built 
around Quotron ’s Unix- based 
Q-I0Q0 super minicomputer, 
and AT&Ts Unix -PC and Slar- 
lan network. 


Ford-Werke Posts $99-MiIlion Loss 


Reuters 

COLOGNE — Ford Motor 
Co.'s West German subsidiary. 
Ford-Werke AG. reported Thurs- 
day a loss of 298.1 million Deut- 
sche marks (599.3 million) for 
1984. compared with a net profit of 
150.6 DM a year earlier. 

The managin g board chairman, 

Daniel Goeudevert said at a news 
conference that sales last year fell 
4.2 percent, to 12.79 billion DM. 
from 13.35 billion DM in 1983. 

But Mr. Goeudevert said an up- 
ward trend could begin in 1986. In 
the first five months of 1985. sales 
rose 5 percent from the sear-earlier 
level, although production was 5 
percent below the level in the corre- 
sponding period of I9S4. 

Measures to cut costs will not 
show results in the short term but 
will help a return to profit in the 
medium term, he said. 

Last year’s loss was the compa- 
ny's firsi since 1980. It was due 
largely to external factors such as 
high unemployment in Europe, 
high Japanese exports, stiff compe- 


tition which led to discounting by 
dealers, and lower profit margins. 

The fall in sales occurred in' both 
Ford-Werice’s domestic. and for- 
eign markets. Exports to the com- 
pany's largest market. Britain, fell 
25 percept as a result of a 2-percent 
contraction of the car market there. 
Mr. Goeudeven said. 

He noted that the West German 
market is still suffering from reluc- 
tance by consumers to buy new 
cars until new European exhaust- 
emission standards are fixed. 

Despite the Tall in sales, the com- 
pany’s share of the domestic mar- 
ket in 1984 totaled 1 2.5 percent, up 
from 12 percent a year earlier. 

First Boston Splits Stock 

Rouen 

NEW YORK — First Btnion 
Corp. on Thursday declared a two- 
for-one stock split, effective July 3. 
fi also declared a cash dividend of 
50 cents a share, an increxse from 
30 cents a share. 


During the year. Ford-Werke 
produced 792.000 autos, compared 
with 833.000 in the previous year. 


STOCK 

l-SS 

l.SS 

DrVor-Hnlbptn 
Inlmuliuiul bt 

5&i 


Gh^ln'k 
Inlrnulmnal rn 

2*6 

3U 

1 Quukit as ot: Jum- 2ft. 1085 


ln\ esiorv seeking above aver age 
capital gams in global »iock 
markets can simplv vtrnc u> a 
note and t he wrcklv 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will he sent tree and «% ithiuil 
obligation. 


b* 


First Commerce Securit 
Herengracht AS 5 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone. (OH 120 2fa0<>0 1 
Telex: 14S07 firco nl 


ard Co- mil be equally owned by 
the city of Beijing and the U.S.- 
based computer company. 

P£driney Ugjne Kuhhnann SA, 
France’s state-owned metal, chemi- 
cal and mining company, said it is 
raising 800 nS&an francs ($8733 
millio n ) through an issue of 435 
million investment certificates. 

Ramson GoUfidds Consolidated 
Ltd, said ii will spend about 60 
million Australian dollars ($40 mil- 
lion) to construct a synthetic rutile 
plant at Narojpiln in western Aus- 
tralia with a capacity of 112300 
metric ions a year. - 

Yasoda Fire A Marine Insurance 
Ox of Japan, Skandn Insurance 
Group of Sweden and Continental 
Insurance .Group of the United 
States have formed a joint venture, 
Panfinandal Insurance Co., in 
London, Yasoda said. The new 
company w31 cover political risks 
in international, business such as 
|W. caused by war, nationaliza- 
tion, confiscation and foreign ex- 
change regulations. 


Delaware Court Ruling Affects Takeover Moves 


(Continued from Page 17) 
cal made to all of its shareholders 
but Mr. Pickens. 

Only four days after the Unocal 
ruling, the Delaware Supreme 
Court in another takeover case 
heard oral arguments by IrvingS. 
Shapiro, former chairman of Uu 
Pont Co., against an anti-takeover 
method known as the “poison pflT 
used bv Household International. 

The' case was brought to the 
court by a shareholder who op- 
posed the plan. The nse of this 
device was put into place by 
Household directors without stock- 
holder approval at a time when no 
one was trying to acquire the com- 

IT makes a hostile take- 
over bio so expensive that it be- 
comes impractical, Mr. Shapiro 
said in his argument before the 
Delaware Supreme Court. 

The Delaware Chancery Court 
ruled in favor of Household, saying 
the, company's directors had the 
power to implement the plan. 

By making it almost impossible 
for a bidder to make an offer for 
Household without the blessing of 


the directors, the device forces ad- 
versaries to deal exclusively with 
directors, Mr. Shapiro said. He said 
this usurps the right of sharehold- 
ers to vote on unfriendly takeover 
bids. 

Several legal experts said last 
week that the right of shareholders, 
not directors, to decide issues of 
corporate control is well estab- 
lished and remains one of the only 
ways in which corporate manage- 
ment is held accountable. 

Mr. Shapiro said the “poison 
p3T would preclude a hostile bid 
by increasing the cost of acquiring 
Household from $2 billion in a 
friendly deal to about $8 billion in 
an unfriendly situation, 

‘This case goes to the system of 
corporate governance,’’ Mr. Sha- 
piro argued before the Delaware 
Supreme Court last month. 

“In our society we expect corpo- 
rations to be held accountable. The 
stockholder has been assigned the 
function of performing that job, 
and so far the system has worked 
pretty well,** he said. 

In an unprecedented move, the 
SEC has urged the omul to isvali- 


ViHage Voice Is Sold for $55 Million 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Rupert Mur- 
doch, the Australian publishing 
magnate, on Thursday sold the 
weekly Village Voice to the indus- 
trialist Leonard Stern for more 
than $55 million, a spokesman for 
both parties announced. 

Mr. Stern, chairman and chief 


executive of Hartz Mountain In- 
dustries, had signed the contract to 
purchase the Voice, long a leading 
counterculture newspaper, the 
spokesman said. 

Mr. Murdoch purchased the 
Voice in 1976, along with New 
York and New West magazines, for 
$16 million. He sold New West for 
$3 million. 


NOTIFICATION TO ALL PERSONS WHO 
RECEIVED COMMON STOCK OR 
DEBENTURES OF SAXON INDUSTRIES. INC. 
IN EXCHANGE FOR COMMON STOCK OR 
DEBENTURES OF STANDARD PACKAGING 
CORPORATION BY REASON OF THE 1970 
MERGER OF STANDARD WITH SAXON AND 
WHO SOLD SUCH SAXON SECURITIES AT A 
LOSS OR WHO CONTINUED TO OWN SAID 
SAXON SECU RITIES ON APRIL 15. 1982 AND 
HAVE SUFFERED DAMAGES THEREBY, AND 
TO ALL PERSONS WHO PURCHASED 
DEBENTURES OF SAXON INDUSTRIES. INC. 
AFTER APRIL 15, 1982 

An action is pending in the United States Dis- 
trict Court lor the Southern District of New York. 
83 Civ. 3780 tS.D.N Y.) (MJL) Ithe "Lewis 
Action”), on behalf of all persons who received se- 
curities of Saxon Industries. Inc. < "Saxon") in ex- 
change for securities or Standard Packaging Cor- 

f (oration ("Standard”). The parties to this 
itigation have entered into a Stipulation of Settle- 
ment. dated March 21. 1985. ana the Court in the 
Lewis Action haa scheduled a hearing on August 1 , 
1985 (the "Hearing"!, to determine, among other 
things, whether the proposed settlement should be 
approved as fair, reasonable and adequate, plain- 
tiff” a application for attorneys' fees and expenses 
and any assertions of interest by any persons who 
i after ‘ " 


purchased Saxon debentures after April 15, 1982 
("post-petition debenture purchasers'’), as assign- 
claims of any member ot 


ees or transferees of the 
the Class. 

A form of notice describing the Lewis Action, the 
settlement and the matters to be considered at the 
Hearing (the "Notice”), together with a proof o( 
claim form (the "Proof of Cla/m”), has been mailed 
to all persons whose names appear on the stock 
transfer records and debenture lists of Saxon as 
having received Saxon common stock or deben- 
tures in the 1970 merger of Saxon and Standard or 
as purchasers of Saxon debentures after April 15, 
1982, at the addresses specified therein. If you are 
or were a beneficial owner of Saxon common stock. 
Saxon S'* Subordinated Debentures due 1990 and/ 
or Saxon 6V«'* Convertible Subordinated Deben- 
tures due 1990 so received and wish to participate 
in the Hearing, or object to the proposed settle- 
ment, or submit claims for participation in a fund 
created in connection with the proposed settle- 
ment, but have not received the Notice and the 
Proof of Claim in the mail, you should first obtain 
copies of the Notice and the Proof of Claim by writ- 
ing to: 

Lewis v. Lurie Litis 
P.O. Box I 
• Wall Street Station 

New York, New York 10005 
or telephoning 718-236-2337. Alternatively, if you 
are a member of the Class but wish to be excluded 


i that you would not be bound by 
any judgment entered in the Lewie Action), you 
should submit a request for exclusion to: 

Clerk of the Court 
Uniled Stales District Court far Ibe 
Southern District of New York 
Foley Square 

New York, New York 10007 
nr. Lewis v. Lurie, 83 Qv. 3760 IMJL1 
postmarked on or before July 11, 1965, at the 
above address, stating your name, address, the 
number of Saxon common shares and/or deben- 
tures owned land, in the case of debentures, identi- 
fying the debenture issue), the dates of exchange ot 
_ such shares and debentures, the amount received 
‘ from any sale of such Saxon shares or debentures 
(net of commissions and transfer taxes) and your 
wish to be excluded from the Class. If you pur- 
chased Saxon debentures after April 15, 1982, and 
wish to assert an interest in connection with. the 
proposed settlement, as assignee or transferee of. 
the claims of any member or the Class, but have 
not received the Notice and the Proof of Claim in 
the mail, you should first obtain copies of the No- 
tice by writing to: 

Lewis v. Lurie Litigatio 
P.O. Boo 922 
Wall Street Station 
New York, New York 10005 
or telephoning 718-236-2337. 

Objections to tho proposed settlement or the as- 
sertion of an interest in connection therewith will 
not be considered unless filed with the Court and 
served on those counsel listed in the Notice on or 
before July 11. 1985. Failure U> comply with the in- 
structions contained in the Notice will preclude 
subsequent objections or assertions of interest. 
Failure of Class members to file the Proof of Claim 
on or before October 1, 1985, or such other date as 
the Court may fix, will preclude Class members 
from participating in the fund created in connec- 
tion with the proposed settlement. The Stipulation 
of Settlement, if approved by the Court, will deter- 
mine and resolve the claims of all members of the 
Claes to whom this notification is addressed (see 
above), except those requesting exclusion, whether 
they participate in the settlement or noL and will 
also determine and resolve all elaimn, if ony. of 
pout- petition debenture purchasers, as assignees or 
transferees of members of the Class. 


JOn 


date the “poison-pill" device on the as a businessman." Mr. Pickens 
ground that it is contrary to federal said. ‘There is no doubt that it puts 
polio/. The SEC said the method is management into the driver's seat 
such "a potent an li takeover device and puts them into a position 
that it eliminates share holder par- where it is difficult to try uptake 
ticipation by making hostile tender over one of these companies." 
offers impractical. He pointed out that once the 

While legal and investment decision was rendered he ended his 
banking experts speculate about takeover move and “the stockhold- 
what kind ol derision the Delaware ers came out the loser." 

Supreme Court will eventually ren- As a result of the derision and 
der in the Household case, they are his subsequent defeat in the take- 
engaged in a lively debate over the over battle. Mr, Picke n s says be is 
impact of the court's derision last not looking for potential acquis- 
month in the Unocal case. lion targets, for the first time in 

In the aftermath of the decision, several years, 
some experts say they think it has "We’ve lost a lot oT enthusiasm 
broad implications, while others ar- for trying to take over other com- 
gue that it is narrow in scope, ap- panics now because of that deci- 
plying only to future situations si on,” be said. “I cannot believe 
with facts similar to the Unocal how a Delaware court could allow a 
case. company's board of directors to 

As if to anticipate this uncer- treat shareholders differently. To 
tainty. the Delaware Supreme me it is insane." 

Court said in its ruling on Unocal The Unocal derision also has 
vs. Mesa that, “While we caution been closely reviewed by Carl 
boards of directors of Delaware Icahn and Irwin Jacobs, two other 
corporations that they do not have corporate raiders who disagree 
unbridled discretion to defeat any over its impact, 
perceived threat to corporate con- "I think the derision seriously 
trol by any draconian means avail- curtails takeover activity because 
able, we are satisfied that in the you really don't know where you 
context of this inadequate lender stand" said Mr. Icahn, a New 
offer UnocaTs action is not so irre- York financier and arbitrager. "1 
sponsible and unjustified." think it might be tested again. The 

In a telephone interview last consequences of the derisions are 
week, Mr. Pickens said the derision not good for the American econo- 
would hurt stockholders by dis- my because it means you entrench 
couraging hostile takeover bids management.” 
ik/M increase slock prices. Mr . Jacobs, a Minneapolis tnyes- 

“2t was the most unusual deci- lor, disagreed saying "the derision 
sion that I have seen in my 35 years is quite narrow in scope." 


All ihMO securities Ivmj been said. This anncuicemivii appears as a nvutor of iL-coid <*•>» 



Mas 138* 


ITOMAN & CO., LTD. 

Osaka, Japan 

50.000.000 Swiss Francs 
5 3 A7o Bonds 1985-93 

guaranteed by 

THE SUMITOMO BANK, LIMITED 

and 

THE BANK OF TOKYO, LTD. 


HANDELSBANK N.W. 

BANK VON ERNST &C!E AG 
BANQUE PRIV£E SA. 

LA ROCHE & CD 

SCHWBZERtSCHE HYPOTHEKEN- 

UND HANDELSBANK 

BANCA DELLA SVIZZERA ITAUANA 
BANQUE RARBAS (SUISSE) SLA. 
WWTSCHAFT5- UND PWVATBANK 


BANCA DEL GOTTARDO 

NOMURA (SWITZERLAND! LTD. 
SUMITOMO WTEHNATIONAL 
FINANCE AG 

BANK OF TOKYO (SCHWEIZ) AG 
OAIWA (SWITZERLAND) SA. 
MITSUBISHI RNANZ (SCHWBZJ AG 
YAMAICHI (SWITZERLAND) LTD. 


KREDETBANK (SUISSE) SA. 
J. HENRY SCHRODER BANK AG 


Aargsuncha Hypoiheton- 

imd Handabbanfc 
Banque Vaudofaa da Cridfc 
Bank in Gossau 
Bank in ManzBcan 
Bank vom Linthgebtat 
B aa e fc nd » c* »af i B dw Hypottn 


EKO Hypothekar- und Handatsbank 
Liusmer Landbank AG 
Banque Romania 
Bank EuropaiacItarGanosMnschaftBbanlcan 
Banque da TUraon EuropAenne 
an Suisse SA 

mbank Bank In Liechtenstein Aktienoasalsctaft 












INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


Thursday 


TCI I 


Tables include the nettonwhle prices 
dp to the closing on wan street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


4* 

4* 

4*— * 

a* 

B* 

8* 


6* 

fi% 4 V) 

20* 

20* 

20* 

9* 

9b 

9*— » 




0* 

a 

B*— U 

9* 

4* 

5*— M 

7VS 

6* 

7*4* 

15* 

15* 

15* 

0* 

ev. 

S* + * 

T7b 

12 

T2b 4 b 

77* 

&* 

22* 4 * 

«* 

0* 

S*— * 

4* 

4* 

4* 

6* 

* 

^vw 

t 

17* 

16* 

17 

12* 

72* 

12* 

IS* 

15b 

ISb 

21 C ^ ^ 

.1 

7* 

3 4 U 

* 

* 

* 4 * 

1C* 

9* 

9b— * 

1* 

1* 

1* 

8* 

K* 

5* 

35 

34* 

35 4 * 

46* 46* 

46* 


13b 

13b— * 

11* 

11* 

11* 

21* 

21* 

ZTb 4 b 

5* 

5* 

5V. 4 ^ 


* 




2b — * 

20* 

20* 

20*— b 


26* 

26*— M 


1 



38* 

15* 

42* 

22* 

46* 

28b 

2k 

15* 

9* 

3* 

19* 

It* 

15* 

10* 

17* 

8* 

4* 

2* 

14* 

3* 

2b 

* 

/* 

4b 

15* 

9b 

Mb 

2b 

13* 

6* 

35* 

35b 

17b 

a* 

6* 

Zb 

19b 

«* 

6b 

i* 

7* 

3* 

19* 

8b 


4* 


* 

14 



2* 

4 

* 

13* 

4 

b 

37b 


M 

9* 



Zb 



19b 


b 

6* 

4 

* 

3* 



14* 

__ 

vu 

10* 

+ 

M 

41* 

+ 

M 

41* 

4 

VI 

55* 

+ 

* 


+ 

b 

6* 

— 



24b 16V. i 

22 b MV, ( 

12 4 l 

20 * it* i 
22* 10* 
tv» n. i 

> 5V. I 

7* Sb I 
TV. 1 I 
25* 15V i 
12* 6* I 

11 7* i 


12 

jxb a n 
si 

* SB 


JZ IJ U 
431 74 f 
n ii i 


7 IP* 
54 «* 
*s «* 
5 1* 
69 21* 

5 S* 

11 5 * 

3 5* 

S 1* 
I 23* 
SO 

MO 9* 


2* 

13* 

2 * 

1* 

35 

10 * 

IS* 

1* 1* 
2 * m 
im ii* 


IMS 19* 4- M 
IBb IS*— * 
6* «*— * 
w w 

30* 21* + * 

& &4W 

s nsza 
ss sss=2 

p* ?* 


n* ii* 
>i* u* 


17* 

12 * Joctyn 

JOB 3 J 

9 

26 

13* 

13* 

13* 

7* 

5* Jocoia 



4 

A* 

6* 

4*. 

5* 

2b JfUm 


6 

10 

2* 

Z* 

a*— * 

2 

* JOtAWt 



24 

* 

* 

*— * 

8* 

4* Jetron 

Jit 72 

17 

IDS 

9* 

a* 

9* 4* 

A* 

2* John Pd 



49 

4 

3* 

3* 

It* 

7b JonnAm 

JO 34 

13 

41 

8* 

S* 

S*— * 

11* 

4b John rod 


3 

61 

7* 

7* 

7* 

7b 

3* JmpJkn 


4 

60 

3* 

3* 

3*— * 


m 


39* 

30 KnGSPf 

<50 1£5 


SQz 36 

36 

36 — * 

3* 

Ilk KcpcfcC 



5 

178 

3* 

3* 

3b + b 

16b 

10 KoyCP 

JO 

1 3 

17 

5 

13* 

13* 

13* 4* 

12* 

tl Koyjn 

.TOe 

3 


19 

11* 

10* 

10*—* 

16* 

9* KearNn 

JO 

13 

13 

52 

R 

11* 

12 

23* 

10* Kalcfim 

Jffl 

25 


11 

23 

27* 

22 4 b 

17* 

B KavPh 

JO 

£0 

16 

496 

9* 

V* 

9* 

11* 

5b KavCa 



B 

32 

5* 

5* 

5* 

4* 

2b Klddowf 




33 

4* 

4* 

4* 

Sb 

3* KJnork 




9 

4* 

4* 

4*— V» 

5* 

2* Kirby 




114 

3* 

3 

3 — * 

< 5* 

1* KltMM 



IS 

2 

4* 

4* 

4* 

3* 

2 KlserV 

m r 

J 


7B 

2* 

2* 

2* 4 * 

15* 

9* Knaao 



16 

44 

14 

13* 

13* 4 ta 

15* 

S* Knoll 



15 

20 

13* 

13* 

13* 

30* 

21 KagarC 

132 

7.9 

9B 

92 

29* 

29* 

29*— b 


>4 
4* 

7* Potto 

11* Petto 

1* 

2* 

2* 

3* 

4* 


22* 

16* Fabind 

JO 

£1 

7 

5 

19 

19 

19 — b 

11* 

3* PWala 




58 

5b 

5 

5b— M 

12* 

9* FtCann 

1-OQa LB 

8 

4 

11* 

im 

11*— * 

14 

II FWvmB 

B0 

5.9 

12 

91 

13* 

13* 

13*— * . 

23* 

20* Pstcrpn 



ff 

12 

Mb 

23* 

25b 4 * ' 

16* 

11* FtochP 

BBt 

53 

* 

17 

13 

13 

13 

18 

4* RtcGE 



4 

38 

B* 

Bb 

9* 4 * 

27* 

23* FTTGE pf 4J» 1JJ 


2 

to* 

to* 

26b — b 

lib 

B* FlanEfl 




15 

9* 

9* 

9* + * 

43* 

25* FloRck 

JO 

IB 

■ 

65 

39* 

39b 

39* 

30* 

22* Fluke 

U8t 56 

10 

64 

25* 

24* 

34*- * 

13* 

6b Faadrm 



5 

60 

II* 

11* 

11*— * 

9* 

4* FthlUG 



20 

113 

S* 

8* 

8* 

112 

70* FardCndJiU- 



max 99 

99 

99 

22* 

15 FaraiCA 

.15 

J 

57 

8 

21* 

31* 

Zt*— b 

22* 

IS FontCF 

B9 

J 

87 

2 

21* 

31* 

21*— b 

30 

lib FomtL 



39 

573 

20* 

37* 

28b 

2 

* Fotamt 




365 

1* 

1* 

1* 4 * 

7* 

4b FrdHIv 




12 

5* 

5* 

5*— * 

1 31 

14 FreaEl 



17 

31 

20* 

20* 

20* 4 * 

11* 

5 FrtesEn 




151 

lib 

10* 

10*— * 

25* 

13b Frbdii 

32 

9 31 

3 

24b 

Mb 

Mb— * 

15* 

9 FmtHd 




4* 

14* 

14* 

14* 

2«* 

ig* FuiVHn 



23 

23 

32* 

22* 

22*— b 


1* 

1* LSB 




13 

1* 

1* 

1* 

3*1 

2* La Bara 




17 

2* 

2* 

2* — * 

7* 

2* LdPrrf 



6 

71 

4 

3* 

4 

82 

23* Lakes o 

■iSe 



41 

54* 

53* 

53*— 1* 

17* 

II Ldmkt 

J2 

2B 

16 

138 

16* 

15* 

M — * 

14* 

9* Laser 



49 

62 

12* 

11* 

12b + * 

27* 

21* LearPP 

3JH T2 J 


100 

34* 

24* 

24* 4 * 

9* 

2* LaaPti 



10 

126 

4* 

4* 

4*— * 

31* 

6* 

13 Lohlohs 
3* LdfcurT 

.101 

J 

11 

6 

21 

10 

28* 

5* 

28* 

5* 

a sr* 

20* 

7* LbfFPh 

B0 

IB 

9 

190 

20* 

20* 

20* 4 * 

3* 

1* LMeRst 




71 

2b 

2* 

2b 4 * 

3b 

2* Lltfld 




16 

2* 

2* 

2* 

J* 

1* Lodge 




12 

3 

1* 

1*— * 

39* 

23* Lorlmr 



19 

1ST 

37 

36* 

36*— * 

16* 

8* Lumen 

BB 

J 

29 

34 

15b 

14* 

15b 4 * 

14* 

6Vi Lundy E 



17 

13 

11* 

11* 

12* 

16 

9* Lurkj 



9 

51 

10* 

10* 

io*— b 

14* 

10 Lvdol s 



4 

8 

13* 

13* 

13* 4 * 

39* 

14* LynCSy 
B* LyndiC 

JO 

IJ 

10 

308 

24* 

24 

94 — * 

10* 

JO 

£2 

15 

2 

9* 

9* 

9* 


4 % 
HU IP* + V* 
U* 19b 4 b 
18* 10* + * 
+ V» 
+ * 


20a 1 J 12 

S U11 


7V. 

5* 

7* 

n-n 

i* + * 
20* + * 
71% + VS 

a* + * 

ins 

5* 

* 
V. 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 


6ENEVE 




AvoHiUo M loodhtg tBMoBm wwtoNiOo 
Chopwd ft Cto SA. & nw do Voyrat - Gw^vs 022 8717 17 


12 Month 
High Cow Stock 


Dlv. ru PE WOkHtah Low Duel 


20* 14* 
40V 17 
30* KW 
5* Tm 
11* 7* 
23* 19* 
44 34 

10 * 8 
15* 11 
5V> 2* 
17* 17* 
34 17 

2144 12 

11 3 * 


WIHEt J-54 TA 16 
WstnSL Mb IJ 17 
WtlEM 8 22 

WIcMtu 

VfllkMG S 

iMnlin £34 P.7 

WUPbI 4J0 IQS 

Wdstrm .« 4J 10 
WkWeor A U I 
WmtoE 1*4 

wwnsMJt izo 

Worttm 3S 
wrolhr jo 
WrgtHo Mu 31 


1 9b 

2 M* 

117 3* 

23 15* 

323 U>’. 

291 2Db 
45 9* 


20 2054- to 

24* 56*-** 

*•’**-> 
23 23 .tf 

44 44 ^ 

914 .914 ■ 

14* 14*+-* 

a* a* ■ 

15 IS — * 
Utt 1714— 1* 
19* 20* +14 
9* 9*-b 


11* 5* vonkCo 


14 143 8* a 8b— H 


30* 10 Qu«b01 -36 


4 28* 28V. 21* — * 


24* IS* 
4* 3* 


24 

(C 9 

xyO S3 

1J0 O W 


n u i 

20 47 14 
.10 A 13 

20 II 12 

Iruo bj 

- JO £5 

’ 8 IB t 

lJDb 33 14 

44 U 10 


I 36 421 13 
40 22 11 

■ 

14 

M 1.1 14 
S 17 

14 

-50b 44 10 
-52 

JO IJ 14 


SUM 

1 414 414 

12 2 * 2 * 
94 14* 13* 
34 3* 2 

5 TP4 xrv. 

4 9* 9* 

50 12* 1214 
9 3* 3* 

555 1714 14* 

2 414 4* 

37 15* 14* 
19 4* 4 

13 ID* 10* 

45 12* mi 
55 3* 3* 
33 12 11* 

109 IP* 19* 
100 9* 9V. 

29 11* XIV. 
83 30* 29* 

14 3* 3b 

■ II 1914 1914 

19 4 3* 

122 * * 

I 19* 19 
27 18* 18b 

II (14 S* 
42 11* II 
53 39* 38* 

512 32* 31* 
102 12 * 11 * 
8 10 * 10 * 
313 13* 12* 
234 33* 33* 


2* + * 
4* 

2 * 

14 4* 

2 * 

27* + * 
9*~ * 
12* + * 
3* 

16*— * 
414 

15* + * 
4* + * 
10*— * 
12 * + * 
3* + * 
12 + * 
IP* + * 
914 — * 
11*4 <4 
30* + * 

19 * — * 

19 + * 

18* 4 V4 
B14— * 
11 

39 — * 
32* + * 
12 * + * 
TO* + * 
13* + 14 
33*— * 


4* 2 
34* tf* 
* M 
1534 11* 
lib 8* 
21 14* 

21 IS* 
3 1* 

3 114 

MU. 10* 
23* TO* 
Mb S* 
19* 14* 
14* a* 
10* 5* 
23* IS* 
15* 9* 


USR tnd 

uimt* 8 

umeurp __ 7 

Untcppf J5 5 A 
Unimr n 3le tf 
UAlrPd 5«lUll 
UnCoeFs JO 13 11 

URXKlA .10 SJ 

UFoaffl 

UMAod IS 

USACwt 

Unite IV .90147 22 
Unttlln Mb 2X 
UnvCm 14 

UnJvRs 19 

Unt»Ru JUa AS 12 

UnvPot 


4 2* 

m 10* 
7E0 * 

34 14 
37 10b 
3 19b 

1 IS* 

15 1* 

2 1 * 
163 M* 

a ibv 

14 6* 

1 19* 
<1 12 * 
47 7 

2 M* 
46 13* 


2 * 2 * 4 * 
10^> 10V 4 14 

13* 13*— * 
9* 10* 4 14 
19* 19*— * 
Iff* IE* 

1* I* 4 * 
I* 1* 

13* U 4* 
IS* IS*— M 
614 6* 

19* 19*4 14 
12 12 
6* 7 4 * 

16* >6* 

13 13* 


10* 10* 4 * 
ISM IBM— M 
24* 24V 
6* SV— * 
17* 17*— M 
3* 3*— * 
* * 

9* 9* 

4 4* 4 14 

6* «*— M 
3* 3* 4 U 
14* 14* 

44 M — * 
S* B* 


4* 6* 
’ 24* 24* 
; 16* 16U 
1 M* 15V 

X ^ 

TO* M* 
121 119 
27* 26* 
9* 9* 
11 10 * 
3* 3* 
1* 1* 
13 12* 

10b 10* 
25 24* 

1* 1 
0 * 0 
TO* 10* 
12 * 11 * 
2014 19* 


34*— * 
16* + * 
16 

16* 4 * 
* 

10 *— * 
120*— 1* 
27*— * 
9*— * 
10 *— * 
3* 4 * 
1 *— * 
13 4 * 
10 * 


10* 4 * 

ft 4 * 

19*— * 


n — now fcmw hr the post 52 weeks. The hWi-tow range bavin* 
with irw start of mufloft. 3 

nd— nekl day delivery. > 

P/E — prk**ornh*ga ratio. . * 

r— dlvidand declorad or paid In ercoeaing 12 months. pM 
stock dividend. f 

s— slock ssilL Dividend begins with dote albrilf. " 

sis— sates. 

1 — dividend paid instock In preceding 12 months, esMmoted 
cash valoe an M-dFvIdend or ex+ftetriburkm date, 
u — new yearly high, 
v— trading halted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being rwganbed wf 
dor the Bankruptcy Ad. or Mcurttla assumed bv such con*- 
ponies. 

wd — when distributed, 
wi— when Issued, 
ww — with warrants. 
k— ex-dlvidend or e*-rtplrtv 
jtdta — en-dlstrlbutkm. 

xw — without warrants. . 

v — ek-dtvtdend and sales In ML 
ykJ— yield. 

*— sole* In hHL 


Over-the-Counter 


June 20 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Sales in Hit 

IM* HIM Law 3 P.M. ctr oe 

(Continued from Puge 18) 


Khnbrk 
Kincaid 
Kinders BA 
KngWtd 
KlosVd 
Kretslr 
Kray .04 
Kruaer JS 
Kulcka .16 
K list El 


6 4* 4 4* 

1* m * 

J 114920 19* IMS- 

1233* 32* 32*- 
9 4b 4b 4b 
5 7* 7* 7W- 

1.1 565 5b 4* Sb 

23 198 15 14* I4U- 

13 651 14 1] 13*- 

29 6* ft* 6*. 


UK 14 
2JXJ 15 
.74 £1 
100 73 
PfS 140 107 
PTC 160 T£0 


1B0 

3L6 

1 

B4 

40 

2«: 

J00 7.1 

23 

1BU 

93 

43 

ZM 

44 

77 

3J0 

7.9 

26 

26 

68 

IS 

280 

O 

9' 

J0 

IJ 

27 

44 

38 

3049 



56 

65* IJ 

IT 



32 



2 



661 


lr*» 19b— * 

5* 5* 

15b IS* 

12* 13 
27* 27* + V. 
20b 21 — V. 
3* 4* + * 
15b 1514 — * 
4$b 45* 4 b 
46* 47 + b 

281* to* 4 * 
68* 68*— I* 
16* 16b + * 
II* II* + * 
VS 714 
35 V. 3514— * 
6b 6* 

3b 5b— * 
3 3* 4 * 

9b 10 

15* IF* 4 * 

3b ]b + * 


1091 8% 8* Bb — * 

250 6* 6* 6* 

2 9* 91* 914 

160 1b 1* 1* 

27 4* 91* TV. — U 
16219V. IS* 19* 

17 5* 5* 5b— * 
53 4 3* 4 

1 S* Bb Bb— b 

829 10b 10 10b 

322411b 10b 10b 4 V. 


7* *b 4 * 

59 59b + * 

9 9—1* 

3k* 26*— 1* 
15b 16—16 
91* 9b— 14 

lib 11b— u 
S* 5% + * 
23b Mb— * 
3* 3*— * 
6* 6b 
22 * 22 *— * 
16* 16b + b 
19U 19* 4 * 
15* 15*— * 
7 7* 4 * 

28 3* 

11* 11* 4 * 
Bb 8*— * 
5* 5* 4 * 
7 Vu 
5b 6 4 * 

4b 4*—* 

3* 3b— * 

21* 22 — * 


60 

18 

JOB 

M 

JO* 

79 

» 

38 

80 

76 

J2 

13 

80 

36 

JO 

18 

66 

38 

86 

J 


-ow 3PJWLC 

l 7* 

7* 

> 13 

12* 

> 11 

11* 

» 22* 

22* 

• 34* 

24* 

■ 21b 

21* 

If 

i?b- 

I 23 

23* 

i 34b 

Mb 

• 5 

5b 

p 27* 

23 

27* 

27* 

p 6* 

6* 

■ 44* 

44*- 

p 10* 

10* 

> 15* 

15% 

1 34 

24* 

■ 6* 

6b 

12 

12 . 

l 2* 

2* 

1 14* 

14* 

p 7 

7b 

1 5* 

6* 

1 28* 

28* 

p 11* 

12* 

p 32 

32* 

> 7* 

7b- 

12* 

12*- 

i 67* 

68b 

i 4* 

4b- 

! 5b 

5b- 

i 7b 

7b 

i 12b 

12* 

23* 

23* 

2* 

2b- 

6* 

6* 

i 9b 

9b 

14b 

14* 

33 

33 - 

32* 

33 - 

22* 

23 

«* 

4b 

143 1 

M3* 


TtneFJb 

Tlprarv 

Tofu 

TotlSYS 

TrafcAu 

TmLas 

Tmsnt 

TrladSy 

TrtMIe 

TrnjCm 

Trilogy 

Trtoo .10 

TnisJe ao 

TBkGa 1J0 

Tl>Ck Dr 

TwnCth 

Tv ion 

TVsons SB 


**s* Net 

103s HIM Law ]PJM.CVgo 

1111* 11* 11* 

782 * % * 
13224* 34* 24*— * 
21228V, 25* 28* +2 
813* T3 13* 4 * 
916 15* 15*— * 

312 2* 2* 2* 

52 6* 6* 6* + b 

6 5* 5b 5*—* 
38 3* 3$ 3* 4 * 

ST0 1 1* 1 

IJ 2 7* 7* 7b— * 
13 7027*“ 26* 27 — K 

27 694 37* 36* 36*—* 

30 5* 5* 5* 

3 b * * 

71 15* 15* 15* 4 * 
A 103919* I9U 19* 4 * 


Sates* 

1I0S HIM 


IN*.' 

3 PAL Otoe 


ID* 10* 

6* 6b 


T 

45 11 

10* 

10* 

34 22b 

22 

22b 

1 5b 

5b 

5b 

108212* 

II 

72* 

94010* 

9* 

9* 

5 5* 

5* 

5* 

715916 

15* 

!W 

5049 IV) 

4 

6* 

10 8 

n 

7* 

5 6b 

6b 

6b 

1 B* 

S* 

R* 

1 6* 

6* 

6* 

206 

05*105* 

8313* 

13b 

13b 

40031b 

30* 

30* 

616 9 

B* 

8* 

3915 

14b 


331 Mb 

14 


332 to* 

25* 

26* 

115 2* 

Z* 

7* 

271 ISb 

u* 

15 

16971b 

20* 

20* 

64 7* 

6* 

7 

5 2* 

2b 

2* 

110 4b 

3* 

3b 

4221b 

90* 

20* 

29 3 

2* 


175 6* 

6b 

4b 

20 2 

2 

2 

57 b 

* 

* 

3116* 

16* 

15* 

61610* 

9* 

ID* 

237 M 

13b 

13* 

7 9* 

9* 

9* 

18747* 

47 

47* 

IQ IB* 

17* 

17* 

.512* 

12* 

17* 

400 9* 

8* 

im- 

3431 U* 

14* 

Mb- 

251 7* 

ON 

7 

3 8* 

0* 





1563 8* 

Bb 

0*- 




251 3* 3b 3* 4 * 

334 7Vk 6* kb— b 

38612* 12 12b + * 

MS H 37V, 3716—4 

TorkFd M 38 315* IS 15* + b 


46 9* 
309 7* 
28911* 

103 5* 

60 9 
633 7b 

414V. 
1730* 
45919 
30 6b 
145 

11B&39* 
2226* 
4419b 
19 6b 
1623b 
2013 
10 9* 

STfc 

76 9 
463 4 
1016 * 
1340 Y» 

61 3 

17435* 
315 3 
427 M 
2611* 
174 IB* 
41 B* 
89 * 
5 S* 
12910b 
6315* 
10636 


9 9* 

7b 7b 

11 * 11 * 

5 5* 

9 * 

7* 7* 

14b 14b 
28* 30* 

n* is* 

6b 6b 
« 45 

Si 2* 

27* 28 
10* 19b 

6 4U 
22* 22b 
12* 13 
9* 9* 
6 * 6 * 

7 7* 

11* 11^ 

0 * 8 * 
3* 3b 
16b 16* 
b * 
2* 2*. 
25* 25b 
2b 3 
i* sb 

n* r** 

16* II 
S l _ 
* * 
,5V» 5V. 
10 10 * 
I5b 15* 


U.K. Industry Raises 
Capital-Spending Level 

R rulers 

LONDON ■— Brilish industry 
stepped up capital spending in the' 
first quarter of this year, the Trade- 
and Industry Department an- - 
oounced Thursday. ^ 

Capital spending rose an esti- 
mated 15% percent in the period 
from the year-eariier level as co®' 
parties rusbed to beat ibe April 1 
cut in capital-tax allowances. 







































































cofpee currcsgn 

37,509 Bit- cents per Ba. 

U9J0 m5» M MUD UUB 

. {£% TZ7M Sep MS* US3B 

_ inS m)£- Dm u**o ut7o 

Chft I MM5 S3 MOT U&QO U6A0 

UUD UUO MW M» ««» 

H m USJO - Jul 

U7 jzi iM3 i Sep 

EsLScies Pm.Ua ZW* 

mv. Dot Open int. OJM onas 

SUGAftWORLD J1 < RY CKB 
iiioooite^eKtfi wf^tb. 

•m iM Jet - Ufi £80 

VS £» ' Sep ■ ZJ8 IM 

9XS IB W W Ztl 

JJS 130 JOB 13J 130 

9J3 S Mcr U U1 

705 IK MOT X8D ua 

IM 194 Jul 4JQ 403 

4K A27 Ort 43 -LSV 

Ed. Soles MM0 Preu.Satoa 1»M 
Prov.Oay C*>m int *LM3 efll,2S4 

COCOA tHYCS CP . 
WmOWetBBo-SPtryw M ll1 „ 
24oo im -M ma aia 

2415 im SB 2M7 2025 

2337 7W5 DOC 1974 1M5 

ZHC 1955 Mar W«2 1»77 

IDQ TWO MOT 200S 2DB5 

21» TWO JUT 21QS 2035 

2330 ZM Sa«' 3045 2058 

esLSoIot ' Prev. Sale* 27*4 

Prev-DcvOeefi Utf. 2MM0 i®24 
ORANOE JUICS tNYCE) 
iM hr rente ere Ih 
1S4» najo Jui mud MU5 

18200 T34J0 SOT 13600 137.40 

15)60 TK50 HOT QSflO 1US 

IHkflO UUD Jon T342S IM3S 

TTisa nsoo mot mu* sauo 

1*250 \3*JS MOV 

15750 UVD Jul 

mss mJS SOT 

Ed Salas TDD Prev. Solas 754 

PW. Dot Open Urt. &994OTS5 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


_ BUSINESSPEOPLE 

Bundesbank ^ 


Page 21 


U145 MUS 
UUt Mtffl 
UUO 145J* 
UUO 14UD 
Ut7S 144.13 
14400 
1412S 


243 230 

240 271 

244 27V 

104 IDs 
3M 137 
ISO 259 
139 141 

405 410 


Ton ms 

1*97 3022 

1970 1991 

1982 2002 

an® am 
ism 2033 
304S 2&5 


13950 141 75 
13480 naas 
13270 13440 
mm mm 
132X0 13140 
13340 
13140 
1XU0 
13340 


5 ss n *rsr op*! mpfi 

ORT. DEPOSIT CIMM) 

SI mllllaiwplsalTCOPCl 
97JH 013V Jwn 9270 *270 

9274 OSJO SOT 923* 92* 

9224 BS34 Dec 9130 91.93 

9173 K54 Mar 

9140 8443 Jun 

91X8 87* SOT 

*299 *234 DOT _ 

Ed Said Prev. Sates 3*5 

Pipv.DotOpotIM. 3X45 oH 3 
EURODOLLARS UMM) 
StmllllatvpMonwpd 
9245 US SOT 92.18 9Z2* 

913* 8480 Dot *171 *172 

9155 8410 MOT *1.10 9139 

9L15 8*73 Jim 9077 90J94 

9U4 87* SOT 904* *055 

90X3 8731 Dec mi* *035 

9024 8744 Mar 0»X* 89.99 

Ed. Sales pipw. Seles 48J73 

Prev. Oar Open lirt.1C74*7 efftSS 
BRITISH POUND [IMMJ 
S per pound- i pane curate HL«01 

ns 8 a as a os 

13900 ■ 1X6*0 Mar UflO 13*30 

13365 1.190$ Jim 

Est.Sates prev. Sales 17X93 

Prev. DOT Open 101.35442 up MS 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMMJ 
3 mu' abr-1 point actuals 50X0*1 

.7585 7025 Sot 7M 7290 

J566 TOO* Dec 72S3 7358 

7504 xn Mar 

73SP TWO Jun 

Ed. Salas Ptw.Saies 772 

Prav-DarOesninL 7790 eH n 
PREHCH FRANC El MM} 

S per trnnc- 1 bow eauatt *0X9001 

.10940 X*4BQ sot 

.W7J0 X9570 Dec -1852S .KS25 

Est.Sate* Prev. Sate* X 

Prev. Oar Open tat 417 0194 

(MERMAN MAHKCIMM) 

3 par mark- Icalnleeuo Is 10X001 
35*5 JB* SOT -3XS .Mil 

7C10 -2971 Dec JXN 3221 

3415 . 3040 Mar 

EdSalM Pr*v.5ate* 29X1* 

Prev. Day Open M. 4MM off 59 


*244 9270 
9230 9233 
91X1 91X7 
*145 

91.10 


91.92 9202 
*147 91X5 

fig s-” 

*073 907H 
RU3 9040 
99,14 9030 
89X1 *9X4 


1X540 13*45 
1X440 13540 
1X420 1X455 
13390 


7271 7295 

7253 721* 
7345 


J2H J289 
3311 


r J. CATTLE (CMRJ 
-6*5 4BXOO Us-- cents per lb. 

»50 S7M Jun 5UD 5250 

■ 7 - 5747 4035 Atm 4045 4030 

r- 45X0 60.18 Ocf 61X5 41X5 

. U- aJ * 61-50 DOT 4220 4370 

, 6745 42.10 Feb <3X5 43X5 

, ‘ 6737 4050 Apr 44X0 44X0 

! 3 : *435 4530 Jun *5X0 45X0 

Z ■ Est. Sales 19X43 Prev. Sales 12X49 
. r,‘ Prew. Day Open lot 4745* off 309 
' • FEEDER CATTLE I CMS} 

A; 44X00 (bs.-ceatsper Hi. 
i 7370 *4X7 Auo 47X0 <7X5 

73X0 44X0 Sep 17.15 47.15 

••V 7232 4*75 Oct §7.10 <730 

■■■, - 7270 6575 NOT 47X0 <7X0 

79X0 6630 Jem 4935 6940 

^ 7035 64.10 Mar 4940 *940 

— -. TOM 49X5 Apr TOM 70.10 

! , Est Salas 1X53 Prev. Soles 13U 
Prev. Day Open Int *8SaffV 

HOOt (CME) 

'»aa® lbs.- cents per itt. 

V -040 4440 Jun 4970 5BJ0 

■**77 47X5 Jul 5130 5172 

5437 4777 Aim 5035 5030 

5175 45X0 Oct 47.15 4777 

50X5 4*30 Doc 4XJJ *95 

5047 4675 Feb 4975 49X5 

4775 4430 Apr 4437 4437 

49X5 46X0 Jim 48X0 «X0 

49X5 47.75 Jut 4880 OH 

Est Sales 8740 -Prer. Sato* 5745 
Prev. DOT Op*A lift 2U0S op» 
PORK BELLIES (CME! 

18X00 ItM^ cents per fb. „ 

8247 *1.12 Jill 6*40 4875 

80XS 6070 AUO <7X0 68.15 

7670 63.15 Feb 7470 74X5 

75X9 64X0 Mar 7472 7472 

7360 mm Mot 

76X0 6970 Jul 

Est Sal S3 8387 PrOT. Sales 4X05 
- v Prev. Day Open lift 11732 oft 81 


56X0 5*80 —IX* 

5937 5977 —130 

4035 4040 —1X2 
11X5 62X7 —173 
1270 4290 — LOO 
43X0 4478 —90 

*475 4470 —170 


UM 46X7 — ITS 
43X0 4S95 -470 
6570 4572 — US 
6665 6467 —171 
seen 483 0 — US 
49X0 49X0 —1X0 

4972 49X0 —IM 


4*35 4975 
4960 50.15 — X2 

*80 49X0 — UD 

45X7 46X5 —1X5 
4772 4775 —1X2 
4*77 40X0 —1X7 
4560 4577 —Jt 


4670 6&A5 —1X5 
6570 66.18 —137 

7290 7335 — LT2 
72X0 7338 —1.15 
7195 —175 
7372 —173 


Gurrency Options 


' Juae-20 

r- JLADEUPHIA EXCHANGE 
Opnm It Strike 

uadectvteB Price C a ll s— L ett Pate— Lad 

—■ Jon Sot DOT Jen Sap dot 

123M Brnteb Poeods-caete pot uHt 

b Pound ioo s sun r a r r 

12767 105 a r 2260 a r r 

13767 no a T7J8 i960 a r 160 

, ? 12767 115 * r r a . I 2X0 

127X7 120 s r r t 275 465 

12767 T2S I 575 r I 425 668 

127X7 13* a 155 535 I r 

12767 135 a 1X5 360 a UL10 

... SB*** Canadtoa Dollors-cMtaperantt. 

‘ CDoltr 71 a r r a „ r B58 

-" 7379 73 a r r a oxo 

4Z50B west C s isncm Marta-ceate POT gnft 
DMarfc 29 a . r r s 0.W 

«q 30 a r r s 071 _ 

3233 31 a 283. IX* a 061 070 

3253 32 a 174 1X0 a *2 

3233 33 B 0X1 160 S 174 

3233 34 a 036 1X3 5 T 

553 35 I IS DM * r 

&2saxoa Japanese Yee-lootM of a cad Mr im(L 
JYen * a 254 r a r 

4029 39 a Lg r a r 

4079 40 s 1X0 r a 0X3 

4079 41 a 030 096 a r 

4079 42 a 078 064 B r 

— ' 4079 43 S 0.T7 062 B r 

*2X» Swiss Francs-ceets par mJL . ‘ 

< s Franc 34 a r r a 0X6 

.... mm 3$ * r r a (LIS 

38X6 37 a 2* r a 06& 

38X6 a a r r a 0X1 176 

38X6 a S 176 1^ a 134 1X7 

. 3886 40 s 0X1 168 a 175 

hi 44 41 a 134 XII a r 

TeMicafi«aL43 « c^OTenkdiaTn 

Tatel P«t veL 4*15 _ Pd a p s e teLWJO 

r— Nol traded, a— No option offered, o— OkL 
Lost te premium (purchase pricel. 

Source: 4ft 


CMcopo Boon of Trade 
CMcago M erc antile Exchange 
International Monetary Marled 
Of QUcaao MeromtUe Exchonpe 
New York Cocoa. Sonar. Coffee Exchonu* 
New York Cotton Exctmnpe 
Commodity E x change. New York 
New York Me i un i t ils Exrftonpe 
Kanos CUy Board of Trad* 

New York Futures Extftanoe 


Goi^cUties 



Cash Prices 


ir 


Ijondon Mdals 


Dividends 


ComoditvaadUalt 
Coftee 4 Santos. m_ 
PrinWolh 64ABM 16, vd _ 

Steel Wllete (PUL), tan 

Iran* Fdry.PtlHa.ten 

Steel aerap No 1 hvy pm. - 

Lead Spot Ik— 

rtinn«M .»w* n» 

Tin (Straits), Ih 

Zin c E. SI L Bulls, lb 

Pmlotflunbaz -- - 

Silver N.Y.az 

Source; AP. 


June 30 
Year 
Thu Ago 
160 164 

BN VC 
473X0 4060 

213X8 213X8 

70-71 IM 
19-31 M 
<7U7t 47M 

4X02 0 (7895 

864-67 832 

•hi in 


i jt- 51 " i 


Commodities 


HMt Lw BM Ask ai\P» 

SUGAR 

French franc* per metric tea 
Aim 1,164 1.725 7,748 MS0 —47 

S” 117* I.U6 1,1 55 1.JS8 —» 

Dec 1.185 1.170 1.148 1.170 —53 

Mar 1740 17T0 1716 1720 —X 

MOT 17*3 17*0 1755 1765 _35 

Atm UK 1325, 1320 1X0 -48 

Est. vol.: 3700 hm of SO tons. Prev. actual 
iX3i lots. Open latered: 1S6U 

COCOA 

Franco francs per 100 >0 
Jlv 2X90 2X90 2X90 2180 +55 

itZo 1X55 2JJ4S 2X53 2X55 + 23 

Si 2X15 2X10 2X10 2X15 +20 

uv 2X2s vmumv> 2x29 +ziw 

May N.T. N.T. 2X30 — +20 

Tfr NT. N.T. 3X35 — +3* 

5«i N.T. K.T. 2X40 — +2C 

Bit voL: B lota oM W WkJ Prev. actual 
colei.' a lots. Open Interest: 729 

Franck francs per Itt kg 
jiy N.T. N.T. 27(0 2600 +( 

ub 2650 26U 2640 2649 +9 

££ 145 5 2655 267S ZOB +16 

**. N-T. 26W LOT +TO 

■-4?r N.T. N.T. 2600 2^0 +5 

Jay N.T. N.T. 2695 2 3M UnriL 

7^ N.T. N.T. 2305 — ‘ +10 

Ed vol,: Viola of 5 tons. Prev. octuof solos: 
a )0 is. Ooen Intered: 4«j 
Source: Source dU Common*. 


London 

Commodities 


. Hteh Low Bid Ask 
SUGAR 

Slemna per metric tea 

» PS£88£S£S 

SS- 1&S %% %% 53 

MW ]MX0 iraxo 1(0X0 104X0 


May 108X0 183X0 1(0X0 104J_ 
AUO 111X0-110X0 10*70 109X0 
OCt 11578 113X0 112a 11360 
Volume: 3X91 lot* of SO tons. 

COCOA 

Sterfiog per metric tea 


Previous 
BM Aik 


86X0 87X0 
B7X8 88X0 
9260 93X0 
10360 104X0 
1076* 109X0 
113X0 1TSXB 
117a 11960 


Oos* Pior low 

Bid Atk BM Aik 

ALUMINUM , 

ZS mmrm fjSFmm 794X0 7,430 
Inward 827a 828X0 8U3D 815X0 

COPPER C ATHOD E5 (High Grade) 

^ 1IOB **"' *171^80^125X8 1.U5X0 L1WX0 
forward 1.137a 1.138a 1.128a 1,12830 

COPPER C ATHOD ES ISkmdOTd) 

Stnrllpv per 1(S-00 ijj,, jjo 1,100a 

forworn lqsxo 1727a l.nza i.n*a 

LEAD 

stertera pot mdrlcton 
sod 306X0 307a 277a 29*a 

f^ord 2D6X0 207a 298a 299a 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric too . _ . . 

mi A TO Ml i-Wfiflfl 4,^XM 

tennara 4795a 4J00a 4730X0 473&W 


BM 48130 48230 485X0 487X0 

toward 49*50 49 7M mao scam 

TIN (Standard) 

^UOTPOTmddchm 

toward 9670a 9680a 963000 963*00 

ZINC 

^ m sSa° B s*4a s*m sam 

teraord ISxo ssaa 557a sssxo 

Source: Af. 



Vehicle Output in May 
Fell in West Germany 




DM figures 
Options 






Strike CNRdtH te , PlOTSetde 

%** uS 

S S S Tt* W 15 “ 

14 830 89S 174 177 - 

SS 077 167 099 251 275 — 

U *U 065 — IK 143 — 

Esti ma ted te MraL *387 
CpNb Pted. *et 3774 open fad. 23*B 
Pate: WmlvpL 1744 spot urn isjai 

Source' CME- 


R eaten 

FRANKFURT — Output of 
automobiles and comnKrdaJ vehi- 
cles in West Germany fell to 
369,100 in May from a downward- 
revised 388,975 in April the indus- 
try association said Thursday. 

The May Figure compares with 
313.715 in May, 1984, but last 
year's figure reflected the effects of 
a seven-week metalworkers' strike. I 
The association also said that pro- ' 
d action trend s had not reflected ! 
the increase since April in domestic 
orders for automobiles and com- 
mercial vehicles. 


int o»«n«f _ , 

PrkaJNiJ* M » J* * toflSca 
TU __TT--VU1/I4- 
7B 10 UR M IK 1/U 1/U U « 

iis k M n n UN UM to _ 1* 

m a » 4k 4» 7/u r wan k 
3 in* ito f* it; * » » 

Ji ^ 5/1 a 1 lh n m nm nl 

S _ i/i4 sn* % - » 

iwsl C0* raNOIC HUB* 

TOM a* to*"' 22? 

TpMUM teteme 
TSlDl WH PtepW-NUT 1 

iuSu824 uwinw C1B0I811I+U4 
source: c aOE. 


r Ircasur> Bills 


mh»: SWwboh Bn&m 


U VWd YlBlfl 

*91 J.1S 435 

7J0 769 735 

7 M 7X1 73* 


Exceptionally 
the London page 
will appear on 

Tuesday * June 25 



Report Sees 
Rebound 

(Condoned from Page 17) 
unemployment and uncertainty 
about the' economy's future. 

Unemployment continues to be 
fueled by layoffs in the construc- 
tion industry, although new hiring 
in the electrical and chemical in- 
dustries has partly offset that, the 
Bundesbank noted. The jobless to- 
tal in the construction sector alone 
is thought to be wdl over 200,000. 

In May, unemployment was at 
2.19 million,, or an unadjusted 8.8 
percent of the work force — the 
highest rate for that month since 

1950. 

Domestic orders to manufactur- 
ers in the first four months out- 
paced Orders in the same period is 
1984 by 6 percent, measured by 
volume, and Foreign orders jumped 
1Z5 percent, the Bundesbank re- 
ported. Against the strong fourth 
quarter last year, domestic orders 
in January- April were up 3 percent 


cent Leading the buoyant capital 
goods sector were dam-processing 
and factory-automation systems. 

The Bundesbank said West Ger- 
man industry had unproved its 
market share abroad not only be- 
cause of the strong dollar but also 
because of price advantages owing 
to low domestic inflation. 

New Phones 
Inadequate 

(Continued from Page 17) 
Massachusetts, it took a year for a 


board after encountering local op- 
position. And in Manhattan, many 
buildings are simply too high. 

Indeed, what was pictured in 
theory as a nice honeycomb pattern 
of hexagonal cells is turning out to 
be more a haphazard jumble of 
amoeba-shaped cells. 

“All of these things look really 
great when you draw the circles on 
paper." said Martin Cooper, chair- 
man of Cellular Business Systems, 
a Chica go company that provides 
data-processing services to cellular- 
tdepnone «nnp»ni«. “But the real 
world is not like that-”- 

The FCC, which is not expected 
to rule on the matter fix’ several 
months, ins proposed increasing 
the spectrum allocated to cellular 
telephones by roughly 30 percent. 
But the proposal is opposed by 
those who want to use the spectrum 
for other uses, such as telephone 
service for airplanes and mobile 
communications using satellites. 

These opponents say that the cel- 
lular-telephone providers are ask- 
ing for more spectrum merely be- 
cause it is cheaper to add capacity 
that way than to continually split 
cells. It costs $500,000 to $800,000 
for each cell rite. 


Space Agency Appoints 3 Directors 

By Colin Chapman general manager responsible for eri H. Smith, appointee 
international HcmLiTnbwK agricultural products, nutrition operating officer. 


By Colin Chapman 

International Hernia Tribune 

LONDON — The European 
Space Agency has strengthened its 
top team by creating three new di- 
rectorships to oversee major pro- 
grams in space research and tele- 
communications technology for the 
next 15 years. 

N omina ted to director of the 
Earth observation and micro^ra- 
vify program is Philip Goldsmith. 
Giorgio Sal va tori becomes director 
of the tdecoimmuncations pro- 
gram. 

Dr. Frcdrik Engstrom is to head 
a directorate dedicated to the Co- 
lumbus spaceship program. 

Mob3 Corp. announced that Al- 
len E. Murray will take over as 
chief executive officer next year 
when Rawlrigh Warner, who has 
headed the UJS. company for 17 
years, retires. Mr. Warner's depar- 
ture follows that of William P. Ta* 
voul areas, who had been president 
since 1969. The two men had 
formed one of the longest-serving 


rate history. Mr. Murray, who 
joined Mobil as an accountant in 
1952. was appointed president in 
place of Mr. Tavoulareas in 1984. 

Coadaeatal Airlines Inc. of the 
United Slates has recruited Colin 
Hughes from Cathay Pacific Air- 
ways Ltd. to bead a restructured 
Aust ralian manag ement learn. Mr. 
Hughes becomes general manager. 
Australia, and Richard Hersel, for- 
merly regional director, Australia. 
takes over the new position of di- 
rector of marketing services. Aus- 
tralia. 

1CL Australia Pty. Ltd. has ap- 
pointed Chris Wilkinson managing 
director. Mr. Wilkinson was previ- 




group's vice president for market- 
ing for the Asia-Pacific region. 

Monsanto Europe SA has creat- 
ed three general manager positions. 
John T. Marvel, previously head of 
Monsanto's worldwide agricultur- 
al-products research in Sl Louis. 
Missouri, has moved to Brussels as 

general manager science and tech- 
nology, responsible for research 
and development strategy in Eu- 
rope and Africa. Gustaaf M. 
Francx becomes general manager, 
responsible for polymer products, 
industrial chemicals and engi- 
neered products, and Bernard P. 
Auxenfans has been promoted to 


[Gold Options (friKni/Rt 


. *9— 
137S-1S2S 

Kfc>» 

&7V1CU5 

1775-1925 

535- «S 

1125 UTS 

3t»«0 

9JS1125 

ITS- 12S 

700 8J0 

1JD255 

SCO *50 
_3ZL5£. 


GoU 3Z22S 32275 

Vatan White WeM&A. 

I.Q—i Au Moot IHanr 
1211 Gcnctc 1. S-teoM 
T«L 31 0251 - Trim 2S3BS 



lists of Saxon as a purchaser of Saxon common 
stock or debentures between March 31. 1976 and 
April 15. 1982 or as purchasers of Saxon deben- 
tures after April 15. 1952. «C the addresses speci- 
fied therein, tf you are or were a beneficial owner 
of Saxon common stock. Saxon 5-‘V4 r + Convertible 
Subordinated Debentures due 1987. Saxon 61 
Subordinated Debentures due 1990 and/or Saxon 
5>'4<3 Convertible Subordinated Debentures due 
1990 and purchased between March 31. 1976 and 
April 15. 1982. inclusive, and wish to participate 
in the Hearing or object to the proposed settle- 
ment. or submit claims for participation in a fund 
creeled in connection with the proposed settle- 
ment. but have not received the Notice and the 
Proof of Claim in the mail, vou should first obtain 
copies of the Notice and the Proof of Claim by writ- 
ing to: 

In Re Saxon Securities Litigation 
P.O. Box 922 
Wall Street Station 
New York. New York 10005 
or telephoning 718-236-2337. Alternatively. iT you 
are a member of the Class but wish to be excluded 
from the Class (such exclusion would prevent you 
from sharing in any settlement fund but would 
also mean that vou would not be bound by any 
judgment entered in the Consolidated Action!, you 
should submit a request for exclusion to: 

Clerk of the Court 
United States District Court for the 
Southern District or New York 
Foley Square 

New York. New York 10007 
AIL- In Re SSaxon Securities Litigation. 82 Civ. 3100 <MJL> 
postmarked on or before July 11. 1985. at the 
above address, stating your name, your address, 
the number or shares of Saxon common stock and/ 
or Saxon debentures purchased or sold by you. the 
amount paid for each such purchase and received 
from each such sale, and your wish to be excluded 
from the Class. IT you purchased Saxon debentures 
after April 15. 1962. and wish to assert an interest 
in connection with the proposed settlement, as as- 
signee or transferee of the claims of any member or 
the Class, but have noL received the Notice and the 
Proof of Claim in the mail, you should find obtain 
copies of the NoLice by writing to: 

In Re Saxon Securities Litigation 
P.O. Bux 922 
Wall Street Station 
New York. New York 10005 
or telephoning 716-236-2337. 

Objections La the proposed settlement or the as- 
sertion of an interest in connection therewith will 
nol be considered unless filed with the Court and 
muilod to thoHe counsel listed in the Notice on or 
before July II. 19K5. Failure In com ply with the in- 
structions contained in the Notice will preclude 
subsequent objections or assertions or interest. 
Failure of (.'lass members Ld file a Proof of Claim 
on or before October 1 . 1 9X5. nr such other date as 
the Court may fix. will preclude Class members 
from purtieipuling in the fund created in connec- 
tion with (he proposed settlement. The Stipulation 
4»f Settlement, if approved by the Court, will deter- 
m 


Class tn whom this notification is addressed low 
nbovel. except those who request exclusion, 
whether nr not they parliripule m the settlement, 
und will also determine and resolve alt claims, if 
nny. of post -petit inn debenture purchasers, ns as- 
signees nr liansfen-es of members of the Clme*. 


general manager responsible Tor 
agricultural products, nutrition 
chemicals and the seed subsidiary. 
Hybritech International. 

Security Pacific Corp. or Los An- 
geles has promoted George F. 
Moody to chief executive officer of 
its largest subsidiary, Security Pa- 
cific National Bank. Mr. Moody 
has been president of the bank and 
chief operating officer of both the 
hank and (he parent company. He 
will continue to manage die day-to- 
day operations of the entire organi- 
zation. but will be assisted bv Rob- 


ert H. Smith, appointed chief 
operating officer. 

libra Bank PLC, an affiliate or 
Chase Manhattan Bank, has ap- 
pointed Peter A. Belmont manag- 
ing director. Mr. Belmont, now 
general manager, lakes oicr from 
Thomas Gaffney, named president 
of Chase Manhattan Ltd. 

Nordic Bank PLC has named 
three new directors: Christopher 
Beatson-Hird. in charge of British 
banking: Magne Fosheim. in 
charge of oil: and Bruce Lambie. in 
charge of shipping. 


NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 

European Coal and Steel Community (E.C.S.C.) 

U.S. 823,000,000. — 8 Wk 
10 - Year Bonds of 1976 doe August 1986 


The Communion of the European Commuoihra informs herewith the 
beams of brads that a selection by lot for a principal amount of 
U.S. S2.439.000. — has taken plare in the praeeacc of a Notary Public on 
May 30. 196S. by Banqoe fntenulionale a Luxembourg. 

Number of bonds selected bv lot: 

7173-7213. 7217-727*; 7318-7326. 7333-7350. 7606. 8042- 
8056, 8398-8408, 8858-8860, 8899-8904. 10297-10299. 
12394-12399. 14283-14400, 14641-14700, 15701-16000, 
16011-16100, 16201-16680, 16809-17100, 17764-17765, 
17851-18776. 

Principal amount of bond* purchased: U-S. 8436,000.— 

Principal amount exiled for redemption: U-S- 52JJ75.000. — 

Principal amount nnamortised after Anrasl 2, 1985r 
U-S. 82^875,000. — 

The bonds selected by lot will be reimbursed on/or after August 2. 1965 
with coupon on August 2 1986 attached in accordance with the terras of 
payment mentioned on the bonds. 

Uuumbourg. June 22, 1985. 




Certe 

Cert* 





































Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 




IHHM— M 

■■■■ Biiiiiaal 




■ ACROSS 

1 Like a 
windless 
windsock 
5 Ideology 
' 8 Ice-cream 
• bolder 
. 12 Zones 

14“ by night. 

a stocking all 
the day!”: 

O. Goldsmith 
16 Heed 

'17 Arch or clan 
starter 

18 Member of a 
Hebrew tribe 
20 Typewriter 
test, with 37 
and 55 Across 

22 Scoots 

23 as a bird 

24 Fall guy's fate 
27 Can, in 

Cornwall 

29 Slander 
31 Pew in a 

certain corner 

30 Image 

27 See 20 Across 

46 Mens 

(sound mind) 
41 South Pacific 
people 

.42 Pedro's nap 

45 Arts' or 
teachers' org. 

46 Experiment 

47 U.S. editor 
Max 


51 Sponsor of a 
basketball 
toum. 

55 See 20 Across 

57 Helps 

61 Confused 

62 Giant toad 

63 Kinofpkwys. 

64 Simon 

65 Oscar's kin 

66 Panama 
palindrome 

67 He wrote 
"Two’s 
Company" 

DOWN 

1 "Peace" 
capital of S-A. 

2 Hilla native 

3 Bumped into 

4 Wim Wenders 
film: 1984 

5 Poetic feet 

6 Neck wanner 

7 Lord's place 

8 RomaiEie 
lettuce 

9 Kimono 
accessory 

10 Take-bom e 
pay 

11 Observe 

13 So, to Caesar 

15 Handled 
roughly 

19 Snick -or 

21 Chinese Great 
Wall province 
24 Tears 


O New York Tories, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


SKA l 



‘TWMS.MARGWEr.'l&U *Ttt*T£CAU£D'S 0 FT 5 (&P* ‘ 
MAKE A GREKT COOWE.* 


BYT# VsI THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


Unscramble mess tour Jumbles, 
one toner to each square, to term 
tour ontfawry words. 


NOONI 


GOYGS 


ALVASS 


SWEENT 



Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday's 


lArrswers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: IVORY BRIAR WHITEN SOCKET 

Answer The flrBman is just about the only civil 
servant you'd prefer to see mis way— 

NOT AT WORK 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 



a 

73 

16 

61 

fr 

Amsterdam 

14 

57 

12 

54 

r 


27 

Bl 

2D 

41 


■nrcrioou 

23 

» 

13 

55 

fr 

©aterode 

20 

66 

W 

50 

fr 

(terita 

1* 

66 

13 

55 


■nrtMts 

13 

55 

12 

54 

r 


a 

73 

ID 

50 


*«i- ; »e*t 

19 

66 

10 

so 

r 


IS 

•4 

11 

S3 


CraMDci sal 

36 

79 


73 


DubSa 

15 

S» 

V 

46 


Bdbs^urok 

13 

55 

10 

SO 

th 

Ptardncw 

a 

»3 

15 

59 

cl 

Frank run 

u 

57 

12 

54 

r 

TteMfVU 

14 

57 

11 

53 


WIVnkI 

21 

70 

10 

50 


IttOPbul 

— 

■- 

— 

— 



34 

75 

21 

70 


UlMl 

25 

77 

15 

99 


Leadoa 

1* 

« 

II 

12 


KtesSrW 

25 

77 

11 

52 

tr 

SAttesn 

20 

M 

14 

57 


■«SSK)OW 

17 

63 

9 



Murick 

13 

35 

11 

52 


Nice 

22 

73 

16 

61 


Oita 

71 

,U 

10 

so 

d 

Purl* 

19 

M 

i« 

so 


Prwsa 

13 

55 

10 

a 

f 

RnftlerEk 

11 

55 


46 


Rente 

24 

73 




StacRhalm 

21 

70 

11 

62 

Cl 

iTrnttfeaurg 

IS 

59 

12 

s^ 

0 

wen ice 

IS 

64 


61 


Vteiuifi 

IS 

59 

13 

55 

r 

www* 

at 

78 


41 

Cl 

Zurich 

IS 

39 

II 

52 

sh 


Seoul 
She ratal 


AFRICA 

Alston 

Cain 

Cob* Town 
CnaMmea 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

30 86 24 n O 

39 84 IV 66 St 

27 n 24 » O 

30 84 25 77 r 

42 100 33 Ol o 

30 H 22 72 fr 

27 II iv u el 

31 n 25 77 o 

30 66 24 75 fr 

23 73 18 64 a 


28 7V 10 *4 Cl 

32 90 21 TO fr 

18 81 V 48 ei 

24 7S If 88 Ir 

22 72 8 46 fr 

20 S3 34 75 r 

22 72 13 55 o 

27 It 20 88 Ir 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 

Beirut 

MHM1CB* 

jM-usalom 

Te)A*l* 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 

Ivanov 


icr HwMn 

LOsAimtos 

— - — - ra Attaint 

— no MMMflHtU 

— — — — no mm treat 

22 72 17 83 cl Nassau 

28 TO 31 JO tr Now York 


14 57 7 45 Ir Taranto 

15 » I 44 si Wash in gton 


LATIN AMERICA 

Bl— 01 Altos IS 59 IT (2 r 

Caracas 27 81 22 73 cl 

Urea 23 73 14 S7 (r 

Mexico CHv 23 73 14 57 cl 

Rlooo Janoiro 25 77 If 88 d 

NORTH AMERICA 

Anchorage 14 i7 I « r 

Atlanta St 02 IB M nc 

boston 24 75 15 5V PC 

ancon 25 77 9 4| fr 

Denver 31 91 12 54 (r 

Oatrott 23 73 V 4* fr 

Hanafahi 31 88 22 73 Ir 

Haurien 37 M 30 88 pc 

LOSAnootol 28 TO 11 84 fr 

Nttani 33 91 24 7S fr 

MfnnMPOlIl M It 10 59 k 

Montreal i< H 11 5S k 

Nassau 31 88 28 75 fr 

Now fork 28 79 17 83 PC 

San Fraaeisce 17 81 14 57 pc 

S8ome 23 73 n a PC 

Toronto 20 88 92 48 fr 


29 04 18 84 


el-cloud*; lo-looov. fr-folr; tv-noll : nan ot available; a-overcoir: 
pc-pomit etaudv.- r-roln, sh- showars; stv-sn ow; M.sTcrrnv. 

MHPA1TS FORECAST — CHANNEL: Choenv. FRANKFURT: Oaudv. Tamp, 
IB — I (M — 461. LONDON: snows Tamp. 18 — 8 181 — a). MADRID: Fair, 
Tamp. SB — 14 182 — 571 NBWYORK: Partly elauav. Tamp. 25— 18 <77— 8l|, 
PARK: Rom Tuna 19— n 188 — 52). ROMC: Fair. Tamp. 24 — 13 <75 — SSI. 
TEC AVIV: Fair. »-» ZURICH: Fair. Tamp. 11-8 

143 — 481 BANOKOK; Thundersiarm*. Tamo. 30 — 28 fie — »». MONO KONG: 

‘Si - clDUd v T#mp 79—23 r 0 — 731 . 

WOOL: Omri*. Temp. K - 20 186 — el). SINGAPORE; Thunderstorm*. Te-« 

n a_ it i •] -di. 




BOOKS 


aesthetic sod morn power, tar its humanizing 


BLONDIE 

THATS no WAV j 11 '* 

TO MOLD 


CAN I HAJE 
IanOTHER t 


WELL, f-OW J 
CAN I EVER 


in HiiHia nail 
aimiaiU 


25 Love, for 
Lorenzo 

28 Sword's 
superior 

28 Treatment 

from an R.N. 

36 Store of yore 

31 " day's 

wages . . 
Carlyle 

32 Mammon 

33 Dipl, mission 

34 Wadlaba 

35 Arab word for 
hill 

38 Portuguese 
king: 1279-1325 

39 Alter 12. 
timewise 

40 Fast jet 

43 Memorable 
comic Jacques 

44 A nephew of 
Esau 

48 Poetic 
patchwork 

49 How everyone 
grows 

50 Dogie catcher 

52 Spain's 

del Sol 

53 U.S. writer 
James etal. 

54 Hindu month 

56 Complain 

57 Belfry 
occupant 

58 Kind of trip 

59 Games' 

partner 

60 Manta 



BEETLE BAXLEY 


and studies of 18th-centuiy literature. New she 
has undertaken an anatomy of gossip. As you 
would expect, it is a karoed work, drawing on 
a wide range of sources. It makes a aw™*™* 
excellent points, and shows considerable skill 
nnrl sensitivity in its handling of literary texts. 
It is also somewhat grotesque. 

The pain dug reproduced on the jacket, 
"L'Heure de l'Apintif,'’ shows a caf£ full of 
elegant women in picture hats, and you would 
be forgiven for supposing that it holds out 
delirious prospects. But Spades bangs that no- 
tion on the head right away by devoting her 
opening chanter to the “problematics” of gos- 


5 ARSE! THEY 
SAY A SEAR 
JSPROWUM 0 
AROUMP / 

HERE 1^ 


[ RELAY. V/ILP s 
I SEARS ALMOST § 
NEVER BOTHER ! 
s. PEOPLE ! 






sip. In due course, we leant that g 
intimacy of dyadic exchange," 


(hat its 


ANDY CAPP 

a ( E4t>VOU HBART HE^ 

TCICW/, PE if p p — S 

li a^CA?^. 


, OH, WSX/TWERE'Sj 
C NO pointt 
B pN ME HWfflNGl 

H THiSLorourH 


ARS-BUT^ 
"THEY WERE ’ 
HH*E FIRST , 




VIZARD- of ID 

w pi^p? 


/tYcij&n itSi 
waht& 




belongs to a modality of trust, since one of 
its functions is “verbalizing shared discovery.” 

The jargon of the seminar room falls thick 
and fast — “mewnynric,” “paradigmatic," 
“timinal status.” Not even Jane Austen is 
spared. “Gossip’s hermeneutic power gener- 
ates the internal dynamic of ‘Emma,* ” Spades 
observes with gay abandon. 

While technical toms have their rightful 
place in lin guistics or anthropology, it is hard 
to believe that this is the most appropriate way 
to address a general audience, least of afl on 
such a topic. The urbanity of an informal 
student of manners like Louis Kroncnberger 
would surely have provided a much better 
model. And what makes Spaeks's approach all 
the more incongruous is that she is so very 
much in favor of gossip. She praises it for its 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


0ohg(u naan anaa 
□Bnan aaan dqhs 
□edge aaaa □□□□ 
□□)□□□□ aaaQaaQa 

□HDG3 E3DI3E3 

□EmsaHaa ciaaaaa 
dec3e Kansan aann 
nna nanan aaa 
□dee maanua osas 

EDQDGlEi G3QQ3GIZ3QCJ 

□aoa aaaa 
EQQoaaaa oannaa 
nnao anna annaa 

EGHH DQOE3 00300 

GEQE naan aassa 


like that of Arden or Thessaly" and who cher- 
ish the opportunity ii gives them far innocuous 
“emotional speculation.” But there is another 
kind of gossip, (he kind that moralists and 
satirists nave denounced over the centuries — 
the gossip that belittles, betrays secrets, in- 
vades privacy, tears reputations to shreds. 

Spacks makes some show of standing back 
and holding the balance between opposing 
views of her subject. “Those undemanding 
gossip as fellowship typically deny its malicer 
she writes, '‘those stressing its destructiveness 
ignore its botufine” 

But in practice she herself comes dowt! 
heavily on the positive side, using loaded lan- 
guage about the “virulent condemnation’’ of 
gossip by those whose fears spring “from pre- 
rational depths.” She argues that gossip that 
seeks to damage others is probably rather rare 
— easy to imagine as an activity of the faceless 
figures who inhabit dark recesses of our minds, 
but infrequently evident in our living rooms.” 

Much of what die says in favor of gossip is 
persuasive, and some of the deminciatkras ol it 
are no doubt as overheated as she dauns. But 
she seems to me ludicrously optimistic, posi- 
tively PanglosaaQ, in the way she consistently 

Seamount of msSke titaTgoes into it - 
sides really be as blue as she seems to think, ' 
even at Yale? 

Gossip means many different things, from 
character assassination to innocent srnaB fait, 
and it would have been better, I dm*, if 
Spacks had dealt rather more with the raiddle . 
range of the spectrum — from the amiable 
(without being arcadian) to the mahdous (but 
only mildly so) — and paid rather less atten- 
tion to the extremes. I also wish she hatihad 
more to say about real gossip in the real world, 
and less about gossip in hteramre. 

The most valuable parts of the book are the 
detailed discussons of novels and other lita- 
aiy works. Spades brings an alert critical intel- 
ligence to oar on Horace Walpole's letters, 
“The School for Scandal,’' “Vanity Fair,’' “The 
Great Gatsby” and a score of widely diCferin^f 
writers from Boswell to Eudora Wdty. An 
interesting chapter on “soda! speculation" ex- 
amines the links in a number of novels between 
gossip and money. There are also some splen- 
did and wdl-choeen quotations — though it 
has to be said (hat they stand out all the more 
brightly against the prevailing academic prose. 

John Gross is on the staff of The New York 
Tones. 


REX MORGAN 



f NOW — IF YOU'LL Y IS— IS Niff DR. MORGAN ALMOST 1 
JUST LIE DOWN, SOME- I* ALWAYS DOES AN ERG . 


I'lL SET THE EKO ) THING t 

^■SktiAwK I 


ON NEW PATIENTS ( 


J -f ^ 




Ibbwjey 

mtelwS&J 

TUfUJE. 


GARFIELD 


ai vjk 


■0 iBSS Lmrtea Fejnxe SvreacJlamc 




By Alan Truscotr 

N ORIK'S opening on the 
diagramed deal was a 
weak no-trump, promising 13- 
15 high-card points. East bid 
an Astro two dubs, showing 
length in hearts and one of the 
minor suits. South jumped to 
three spades and eventually 
bid four spades. Between times 
West had bid three no-trump 
to locate his partner’s minor. 
East passed when three no- 
trump was doubled, but 
showed his diamonds when bis 
partner bid four dubs. 

West led the dub ace. on 
which South dropped the 
queen, and made an interest- 
ing shift to the diamond queen. 
East took his ace and thought 
it over. 

Why should his partner lead 
the diamond queen from a 
known long suit? It must show 
a strong desire for something, 
and East worked out Lhe an- 


BRIDGE 


swer. He returned the heart 
three. 

That was exactly what West 
wanted. He ruffed, taking note 
of his partner’s three-spot. 
This could not be a normal 
fourth-best for it was deaiiy 
East's lowest card from a long 
suit Therefore it was a suit 
preference signal for dubs. 

West, in his turn, interpreted 
his partner's play correctly and 
led a low dub. East ruffed and 
gave his partner another heart 
ruff. That was the end of the 
defense, since South could 
eventually throw his heart los- 
er on the diamond jack. 

■ Notice that South could 
have made the defense'morc 
difficult by refusing to cover 
the diamond queen with the 
king. East might, however, 
have worked out what was go- 
ing on and overtaken with the 
ace to achieve the same result. 

In the replay the same con- 
tract was played, but at the 


second trick West shifted to Z~- 
small diamond. This did i *£. . 
give a dear message to hri 
partner, and when East took 
his ace he failed to rind the 
vital shift to hearts. The con- 
tract succeeded, and the East- 
West team gained 12 interna- 
tional match points. 


NORTH(D) 

* K 10 
<7 A J72 
$ K J 2 
+ J 1098 

111 

IlillllJ O A 10 963 

I *4 


WEST 

♦ 633 

O Q 8 fi 4 

♦ AK7C53 


SOUTH 

♦ A Q J B 8 7 
OQ985 
*7 

♦ Q2 

Nora ad South wore vBbKntbta. 


The Wading: 
North East 

South 

West 

1 N.T. 

2* 

3* 

3 N.T. 

DHL 

Pass 

PUS 

4* 

DDL 

4 O 

4 to 

DDL 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

/ 

West led the club ace. 

Arv 


WiridStockMarbefs 

t uz Agence France-Presse June 20 

Ounag prices in local currencies unless othervue indicated 


ABN 

ACF Holding 
Arm 
AKZO 
Ahold 
AMEV 

A'Dom Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
0VG 

BiNhrmonn T 
Co land HKJO 
Elieum-.NDll 
Fokker 

Glsl Brocodeo 
HeineLan 
Hoooovem 
*LM 
MOOT den 
Hal H coder 
Neaiiova 
ace vondcr G 
Poknoed 
PtiUlns 
Raoaeo 

Rodomco 

Roflnco 
Rorenio 

Ravai Qu'cti 

unlievor 
won Ommercn 
VMF SlOrk 
VNU 

ANP.CBS Ganand Index : 208JUi 
Prevlwu : 318,11 I 


1 Pneweh 

Aroed 
Bekaerl 
CoeVerill 
Cobeaa 
EBES 

GB-inno-SM 

C 6 L 
Grvoert 

HdOaftea 
Intercom 
Kredietbank 
PeimliM 
Soc Generate 
Solina 
Sotimv 

l Trod Ion gin 
UCB 
unero 

vieiiie Monioone 

Current Stack lode, : 233251 

Previatn : 2333511 


FnuiJifiin 


1 I HoecMi 

_ Hoescn 
vra*. Horten 
Huart 
IWKA 
Kail + Salt 
Korsfttdl 
KouthcH 


223^0 225.70 
111 11OL20 
18450 183 

25 % 

794 2S7 

232 233 

249 JD 247 JO 


I Kloeckrmr H4J 28450 28950 

Kkwiiw Work* 88 JO 48 


Mtveid Steel 

KkJOl 

Ptattiank 
PresStavn 
Rusniai 
SA Brows 
Si Helena 
5O30i 

West Holding 


480 485 

BOH! 9125 
1485 1440 
5125 S325 
1540 1575 
80S 025 

3550 3725 
670 870 | 

5950 BIBO 


Sid Chartered 

<67 

<67 

Perrier 

559 

SSO 

Sun Alliance 

471 

466 

Petrol »i (He) 

24150 25050 

Tote and Lvla 

<80 

483 

Peugeot 

40, 

395 

Tesco 

250 

253 

Printempk 

3B4 

278 

Thorn EMI 


432 



315 

T.l. Group 

270 

2/4 

Redout* 

1464 

1450 

Trafalgar Hse 

353 

356 

Roussel 11 dal 

1550 

1485 




Sanafl 



Ullramor 

208 

710 




Untlew s 

llto 11 19/64 


2690 

2650 

United Biscuits 

TB7 

192 

Thomson CSF 

526 

522 

Vickers 

280 

286 


Woolwarth 

408 

496 

Agon index : 776J1 




preyiaM : 214.18 




Know Stahl 
Unde 
urfthama 
.MAN 

Manneunam 
Muencft Rueck 
Nlxdart 
RX 1 

Panda 

Pneussoa 

PVWA 

RWE 

Rneinmatan 
Setter ftto 

SEL 

Siemens 

Ttvrsson 

Veoa 


102.10 10150 
512 503 

200 2X7 

185 184 

187 JO 1B3J0 
1990 1990 
445 625 | 

S I H» 

I 1270 
303 279 

U7J0 148J0 . 

508 490 JO | 
348 352 I 

50350 565 I 

mjoivx* 

214 21250 


Composite Slock Index : 11342* 
Previous : NJL 


VoUuwMenwert 338 317 


CornmenbaiA Index : 1417J9 
Pravkms : MOSJO 


AA coni C14W SIS' 

Allietf-Lvoni 208 3 

Annlo Am Geld S88<* 5W 

Am Bril Foods 210 Z 

Ass Dairies 146 1! 

BorcHtvs 384 31 

Bass 542 S 

BAT. 318 X 

BwchQir. 333 I 

BICC 213 21 

BL 41 

Blue Circle 520 £ 

BOCGrauo 294 si 


AEG-Teiefunkan 
AiiKttu vers 

Allot™ 

BASF 

Dover 

Bo* Hvpq flank 
Bar vereinsbonk 
BBC 

BHF-Banit 

BMW 

Cammorstaenk 
Coni Gununi 
Datmier Be«u 
Deouua 

Deutsche Baocock 
Deutscne Bank 
Orcsdner Bonk 
GHH 
Harnener 

Moelttiel 


14080 1X50 
■SH 1475 
M8J0 148 
223J0 22330 
231 JO 23150 
3SUGMLS0 
M38W0 
243 23430 
325 10 326 

447 436J0 

205 23430 
15a 15X30 
835 B37 

370 156 

16XSQ 15070 
$4450 567-50 
228 23UO 
159 159 JO 
J38J0 337 

157 557 50 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kona 
China Light 
Green island 
Kano Sena Bank 
Hcnaersan 

China COS 

HKEIaetrLc 
UK Realty a 
HK Hotels 
HK Lend 
HK Snang Bank 
I HK Telephone 
HK Vouinatel 
HK Whorl 
Hutch whamaoo 
Hvsan 
inn City 
Jaraine 
J or dine Sec 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New World 
Orient Overseas 
SHK Proas 
Steiu« 

5 wire Pacific A 
To* Cheung 
wati Kwena 
WheatacH a 
W ing On Co 
Wimor 
World Intt 

Mona Sena index; 
previous : ISMJ8 


AECI 

Angkt “meckjon 

ausho Am Gala 

Barlows 
Biwear 
BtiHels 
De Beers 
Drtetantetn 
E Kinds 
GFSA 
Harman* 


7450 2170 
18.10 1 SA 0 
1540 15J0 
7.80 8 

4450 4425 
2JB5 2 

10J0 laio 
7.90 7.75 

IIJW 1040 
35 3425 
5.70 150 

770 755 

94 92 

3A5 180 

195 190 

7480 24 

057 058 
0S3 0J3) 

1130 11.10 

HjW iijd 

045 830 

38 3450 
70S 8J5 
2.15 2.15 

11.90 11 JO 
3A5 7*5 

2230 22 

1J4 IJ1 

140 140 
725 733 
3 1.99 

470 4JD 
147 1JD 


810 810 
.58SS .7935 
l»250 17400 
1190 1215 
1310 1330 
7475 7875 
1050 1080 
492S 5025 
1780 1785 
3300 3450 
2890 2750 


1 'a£ H a» 

188 ISO | 

38* 3C 

542 542 

318 318 

SS 338 

213 213 

*1 40 

520 523 

BOC Group 294 298 

Boots 193 197 

Bomitnr Indus 770 275 

BP 828 536 

Bril Home St 294 297 

Brit Telecom 178 179 

Bril Aerosoace 353 385 

Brllml 213 216 

BTR 353 355 

Burnt 061 2SS 261 

Cable Wlratast 535 535' 

CadburvSchw 154 156 

Charter Cons iu ist 

Commercial U 221 223 

Cons Gold 532 544 

, CourtdulOi <43 143 

Dalaelv 436 441 

Do Beersr 544 555 

Distillers 299 300 

dh Hon rein S2S^> sas 

Ptoans _ 348 348 

Free SI Ged J26W SZ7W 
GEC 172 174 

Gen Accident 633 638 

GKN 22) 229 

Glaxo ( 1251/641225/32 

Grand Mel 285 291 

GRE 736 798 

Guinness 2S4 2S6 

GUS *25 M0 

Hanson 190 191 

Hawker 425 437 

to 740 742 

imperial Grout* 190 191 

Jaguar 285 283 

Land Securities 272 275 


F.T. 38 Index : 974.M 

Previous ; MM 

F.TJLE.1M Index : 1274J0 
Previous : T2SU0 


Santa Comm 22400 23000 

Centra le 3485 3557 

CVodhotels 1W»9 10300 

Cred Hal 232S 2345 

Eridanla 10110 ID160 

Formltalla T3780 13850 : 

Flat, 3610 1850 1 

Fliulder 
Generali 
FFI 

HaieemenM 
lioVoas 
I tolincMblllori 

Mediobanca 
Montea bon 
Olivetti 
Pirelli 
RAS 

Rhtaicenta 
5IP 
SMS 
Snta 
5 tanda 
Met 

Mib Currant Index : 1458 
Previous : 1471 


CAC index : 324.10 
Previous : 223J8 

r Stockholm 


AGA 115 360 

A Ho LavaJ 184 184 

A*ea 321 325 

ASIro N.Q. 400 

Alias Copco 100 loi 

Botiden NJ3. m 

Electrolux 2*5 247 

Ericsson 281 283 

Esseite 375 380 

Hondofabcwiken 151 150 

Pharmacia 177 177 

Saab- Scan la 405 NjQ. 

Sandvlk tLa 375 

Skanflka 84 85 

5KF 207 208 

SwedtetiMDICh 188 >85 

Volvo 210 210 

AftaersvoerttfM index : 362.10 
Previous : KUO 


Land Securities 272 275 

Legal General 734 742 

Ltavds Bank 594 594 

Lonrha 167 168 

Lucas 328 328 

MerksondSp 135 13B 

Metal Box 45s 46$ 

Midland Bank 174 384 

Nat West Bank M2 867 

P and O 381 368 

Pllklnolon 290 293 1 

Ptaaev i» 1 J 8 

Prudential 892 m 

Ratal Elect 194 ISA 

Rondfontein site*, H04't, 


AlrUautde 
Atsthom AtL 
Av DOSSOUtl 
Banco! re 
BIC , 

Bono rain 
Bauvoues 
5SN-GD 
Car retour 

Chargaurt 
Club Med 
Dart* 

Dumez 

Ell-AoultoJrte 

Europe 1 

Gen Eaux 

HOdhiette 

LotowCap 

Leg rand 

Lesteur 

fOreal 

Martell 

Msira 

Merlin 

Micheiin 

Meet Hmrav 

MaulUKit 

OceantaM 

Pernod Rlc 


672 

MS 

307 

213 

1375 

1375 

646 

649 

537 

540 

’HS 

830 

"SS 

2525 


2160 

ypiH 

651 

h30 

514 

511 

1*60 

1*45 

638 


211-50 209.9 


251 250 

448 448 

6.18 A16 

335 325 

2.12 310 
6 5S3 

367 UB 
1.93 1.95 

9,92 M! 
390 0 

124 2.18 

253 195 

1-90 148 

125 130 

388 388 

122 Z 

4.15 4.18 
750 7.16 

234 335 

357 340 

140 159 

554 $56 

1.91 m 

183 

197 4 

1J6 . 1J4 


Dai wo Securities 

FOkWc . 

Full Bank • 

Full Photo 
Fulitau 
Hitachi - 
Hitachi Cable 
Hartda 

Japan Air Unas 
Kalima 
Konsal Power 
KawoMkJ Steel 
Kirin BKwtry 

Komatiwi 

Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Elec WOrkx 
MllubtoM Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
MltsuMtoil Heavy 
Mitsubishi Corp 

Mitsui end Co 
MUsukoahl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK insulators 
NHdeosec 
Nippon Koooku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steal 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 

Olvmpus 
Pione er - 
Ricoh 
Sharp 

ShJnefsu Chemical 
Son* 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 


1000 LoMaw Co 

Gntadum stocks via AP 

tSS ,S S+S »SSSSdE 

SS IS IS - w 15057 Molson At 
SS? IS i IS* 2900 Mntoan B 

SS SS- 14 MoooNobucpi 


43074 Horanda 

’S 'SJxu, 50334 Moreen , 
mt -hS JEStS 113994 NvaAllAf 
^ 40830 NowstD W 

JS* 112693 NuVM fid 4 


938 933 1 

BBS 894 


Bauoalnvllle 

Casttomalm 

Coles 

Camalco 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Elders Ixl 

ICI Australia 

Mt»H km 

MtM 

Mver 

Nat Auto Book 
News Cora 
N Broken Hill 
Fosridon 
Old Coal Trust 
Santos 

Thomas Nation 
Wesl»m Mining 
Westnoc Banking 
Woods I be 

All Or cfl uuiis* Index : 
I Previous : 851 j« 


Surmtomo Metal 
Talsel Cora 

Tateho Marine 

Takedo Chem 

TDK 
Tell In 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tokyo Marine 
TaOoan Printing 
Taray Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

YomaichlSee 

NMtol/PJ. Index; 13877^7 
previous : nmsf 

New Index : TS1S42 
Previous 1101811 


Zvkh 


S» 5to 54 

11314 131k I3M 

UV 132 134 —5 

118 18 M 

380 380 380 —5 

460 455 455 

S» Tina 18M— Vk 

S8H 81k Sib— to 

19 B9k 81k— to 

242 240 2411 

£24Vk 2314 331L— Ik ! 

*12*4 121k tZto— to . 

530to 29W 2Wfc— to I 

1161k 14V4 Uftfc— Ik 

si4n ink use— to i 

*1444 1414 1414— to 

S2SU 25b. 2516 


vmy 37b. wfc ill 

g2to 129k 12M ] 

SHto Sto Sto+ to 
30 30 30 

S1BV* UH4 line— to 
Sink Uto 18to + to 

SUto 13Pto Uto— to 
57to » 714— to 

ST2H 12H 129k— Ik 
*40 40 40 +lto 

«to Bto 89k- to 
M14 8to 4Vt— 14 
Sflfc 6to 6»b— V4 

sirok ioto urn 

*69k 6(4 £91 

» 9 9+14 

300 293 300 + 5 

S13to 1314 1314 


112693 VuWst CP A 

0600 Oa kwaod 
SSTSOstiowa Al 
6190POCW Alrta 
100 Pamuur 
3600 Pan Can P 
USD Pembina,. 
1500 PbonlxQll 
475 PbW Pobtl 
3000 Place GOo 
10300 Ptaosr 
1200 Provtoo 
TSeaQueliwao 
300 Rem Pet 
1362 ROyruAf 
3600 Redpoth 
uvuRdStenMA 


Won Lew Cteee Ops 

20 2D 
20to 2016 
T7*4 1794 
Wt 14VS 
ISto 1514 . 

DO 388 +3 
Mto 169k- to 
17V» mr- to 
271k 2714 
15to 1514— to 
1514 15U+M 
614 61fc— to 

T91k 19to— to 
Wto 38 — to 
796 794— to 

29 2914+ 14 

ISto 1314—14 
8 B — to 

32 3Zto — Ik 
ISto 16 
S9fc B9k+ to 
25to 25to 
31 131 — 3 

*24 Va 34 34 —to 

12214 2314 2214 
375 350 350 —30 

*6to 6to 6Wt / 

sSS JR 1 
into 21*. 2114 


2604 SdUtttm 

2071 soar Aeraf 
77060 Stein a 
200 SIMP R 
25000 Sydney o 
ygOTricora 
13700 Tara 
1800 Tock Cor A 
67530 TOCS 8 f 
swaTexGon 
AS5QS Thom H A 
67170 Tor Om Bk 
7435 Torstor B f 
4386 Trotters At 
630Trn»Mt 
»Bt> Trinity Rea 
172872 TmAtfO UA 
15002TrCan PL 


703 708 

251S 2541 
1778 1722 

105 1845 
2080 JUO 
1030 1040 

194$ 1945 
B8.9Q 1750 
70S 70S 

773 768 


Akal 

AwMCItem 
Asatn Glass 
, BankotTakva 

Bridgestone 
Canon 
Casio 
Cl lob 

Da) Nippon Print 
Daiwo House 


™ 390 
999 982 

867 875 
840 836 

547 541 

1080 1120 
1510 1090 
.453 446 

iToa ii 0 D 

677 078 


Rank 
Reed inti 
Reuters 


343 3M 
614 614 
338 339 


Ravel Dutch t 4317/32 43to 

RTZ 574 579 

Seaiehl 710 720 

Sainsbur* 317 316 

5eora Holding* 93to Mto 

Shell 688 m 

5TC 146 146 


7VE INTERNATIONAL 
MANAGBt 

A WE0<LY(5UOE BY SHSffiY BUCHANAN 
WS3NESDAYJNTHEIHT 


Adia 

AhKilsae 
Autophon 
Bank Leu 
Brawn Bowti 
Ciba Ceigv 
Credit Suisse 
ElecTrowott 
I Georg FtsOwr 
NoMertxxiR 
Irderdbcauni 
JueoD Svcnord 
Jeinwn 
LondliGvr 
MMvenaidc 
Nestle 
Oeri Hu>n-B 
Roche Baev 
Sandos 
Sctandier 
Sulzer 
SBC 

Surveillance 
Swissair 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss Volksbonk 
union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich Ine 

wc index :4itit 

PrevlaiK : 46608 

N.Q.: mu quoted; na; not 1 
avoUobie; xd: excUuidend. 


450 445 450 +VS 

51114 ms it 5~ ta . T ”” 'Trinity Re 
• ']*! 'IS 172872 TmAlto u 

J w 25 ? ? u. ISOKTrOmPL 

S £ JrS M3l”rrflonA “ “ 

is L Li 5 sm4 m 

liS^^TS «» 

sink I9to low + tk 

(ISto In lBvtto 5M Vestaren (llto 111 
s»to 5mS JOOWrichrad II 5V. isv 

S* 25000 Westtartp 6 4 

fh %s %tiS -wa- wb 

nass:" s sa ’s 

S* Mb— to Trial S«es: 10634296 snares 

Sri. ri 4a Cion 

K» +J TSK 380 index: unn 

52 SZ 62 , - 

CWi 20V3 MVi— - <4 I m. 

S3Tto 3194. 3111+ to < * 

SM16 24 24V. ■ 

W 816 9 +V. 

5209k 201k 20to+ 10 
*1011 MW URb 
CTto 215k 3194+ to 
52014 20 201b 

52614 36 26 -V. 

sisn ink isto+to 

3I6VV 16to 16to 

no . i*to so 

589* 8 to «to 

54116 419k 4196+ 9k 
SMto 141k UVs 
si4to Mto i4to 
541 41 41+1 

S14W 16W 16V>r 
126 2Sto 25%+ to 
*28 to 27to 28 - 9| 

„ *!3to 13 + to 

" , lediKtrtntehute.. 

SMto 60 60 —2 Industrials man: 


*56 55V. 56 +1 

OT94 27% 279k 
13114 19Tk 195k 
215 215 215 -15 

39 271k 37to— to 

96 93 93 

(1914 19to 191b— W 
Sim 13H 1»— M 
ST* 139k 14 

nj 30 V. soto- to 
(21 20*1 21 + to 

rate 22» 231k + J6 

mik it Ti*+ to 
SUM 1194 1194 . , 
365 360 365 +5 

(3614 26 26 — » 

*27Vi Z7V4 2714— to 


<25 <30+5 

123 2294 221k 

S26 25Vt 26 
50 49 49 —1 

ssto Sto ito _ 
(1194 1191 TIM-)? 
Sllto llto 119k- to 
Mi I 9 -tot 
77 77 77 „ ^ 

SS 490 -IV+ — W 
(iito llto llto , 
(15to ISto isi« + to 
6 4 6 

suto iito uik 

*Mto Mto Uto 

siBto iito Tom „ 

(69k 61k 61k- to 




3400 Rogers A 

(llto 

11 

11 —Ik 



tOO Roman 

SMS 

9K 

916 



1840 Scoot re 

SBto 

5to 

5to— to 



3100 SCDtts f 

*2716 

27VS 

27to— 16 




S 9to 

W» 

Wk 


M 

290(6 Shall Can 

*3516 

25* 

2Sto— to 



14204 Sfterrttf 

>71% 

6* 

Fto— to 



1300 Slater B f 

SWte 

12V. 

12 V. — to 

"*l . 



MoWreal Jme30\ 

. *299% 279s 2914— to 
1 1414 13to ISto- * 

1 isv. n 13 

S79J3 19Vk19to+9k 
*13* ,39k 13* 

*30 to 3014 Uto 

*11 into H + to 
into ms uik , . 
*14. 16 M — to t , 

onto 20 Vi 2016— 16 w 
«Pto 271%27to 
gfi 20tom+9k 
Cl 21 21 + to 

COto 201% 2014 — to 
Cl 20M 20to— 1 
.Wto 39to3*to-to 



















H»Ks 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1985 


Page 23 


... *; - 

' 4,* 


SPORTS 


Heated Battle of Chicago Pits Old Passions Against Modem 'Realities' 


.T-V 1 

■s . 


!’,'***< 
.•I j!.' *h. 


- >'.a 

• ... ■ if3 ^ 


By Ira Berkow 

New York Times . Service 

CHICAGO — A batik rages at Chicago over the 
baseball team cat the Noth Side, officially the Chicago 
National League BaH dub Inc., but better knows as the 
v * Cubs, or — io the incurably passionate — the Cubbies. 
Specifically, the batik concerns the ball paifc To put or 
not to put lights in Wrigley Field, that is the question. 

The battle has been raging for more than three years 
' now. and it is gening hotter. 

It is conceivable that if the Cubs, the defending Natiao- 
_ el League East dampioiis and currently in the thick of 
another division title race, are involved inpostseasen play 
they will play thdr games not in Wrigley Field, nwerai in 
Ccmiskey Park, home of the White Sox of the American 
. League. Dallas Green, the Cubs’ president ami general 
manager, has su gges ted the gam*; rould be played m <nmc 
’ distant NaiiooS League hippodrome, such as Riverfront 
Stadium in Cirw-irmari or Busch Stadium in Sl Louis. 

"We’ve got to come ont of the Stone Age, 71 said Green. 
“And if postseason play is taken out of the dty, Tve heard 
it estimated tfm* Qricngn would lose $100 nriSian in 
^ revenue" 

“It’s blackmail,” said Nancy Kasalr, president of Citi- 
zens United for Baseball in the Sunshine (C.U.B.S.). 

As some see it. the battle concerns the straggle to go 
from the primeval days to the Technological Age. Others 
see it as a struggle to retain the ample, esthetic virtues of 
the past It pits small homeowners and tenants against a 
. major corporation. It has involved the television networks 
ana Madison Avenue and the courts a nd the nwnnfa 
legislature and the Chicago CJty Council and possibly 
even the baseball standings. 

Wrigley Field is unique among the 16 major-league ball 


parks in that it is the only one without lights. Since lights 
lost shone upon a my or-league gftm* in old Crosley Field 
in Cincinnati, on May 24. 1935, every park then in 
existence and all that were subsequent^ buDt bad lights 
installed In all but the Cubs* part. 

The Wrigley family, which owned the team from 1921 
until 1981, had vowed never to pul in lights becauseil was 
felt they would wreak havoc in the streets and upset 
bedtime schedules in the tj»kr View residential neighbor- 
hood where Wrigley Field is located. Furthermore, the 
wiigleys believed that baseball was meant to be played in 
the day, and on grass. There also is no artificial grass in 
"Wrigley Fidd. 

On June 16, 1981, it was announced that the Wrigleys 
had sold the team to the Tribune Company, which owns 
The Chicago Tribune newspaper and the radio and televi- 
sion stations WGN. The Tv station is a superstation and 


has broadcast Cubs games since 1948. There is little 
question that one of the Tribune Company's main objec- 
tives was to keep the Cubs with WGN; and to keep thwn 
for reasonable rates. 

The Tribune Company has not evidenced any of the 
concerns for nighttime neighborhood tranquillity the 
Wrigleys did. When Cubs management met with the 
Citizens Council — C.U.B.S. is a committee within the 
group — Mrs. Kaszak said that Green told them. “If it’s a 
right you want, it’s a fight you’re going to get." 

The Citizens Council moved quickly and pressured the 
state legislature and the city coundl to enact trills prohibit- 
ing night baseball in Wrigley Field — and its concomitant 
□pise, crime and neighborhood disruption. 

The Tribune Company contended that this was unfair, 
and that it should have virtually unrestricted use of its 
private property. 


The company' also said that because -.f a 1983 contract 
that Bowie Kuhn, then commissioner of baseball signed 
with ABC, which will televise World Series games this 
year. ABC has the option of demanding that all games be 
played at night. ABC has said it will exercise this option. 
Advertising during prime time brings in more money than 
advertising during the day. And the more money televi- 
sion makes, the more each of the 26 baseball teams make, 
because they share in the television revenues. 

According to Chuck Adams, a spokesman for the new 
commisskmer, Peter Ueberroth: “Hie co mmissi oner has 


Tf it’s a fight you want, it’s a fight 
yon ’re going to get,’ the Cobs’ 
Dallas Green was quoted as saying. 


said tbal he is contract-bound,” and has made no attempt 
to influence ABC to change the agreement. 

The Tribune Company took its case to court. On May 
25, Cook County Circuit Court Judge Richard L. Curry 
handed down his opinion in favor of the citizens* group. 
“The scheme which has major league baseball Trashing a 
residential community and tinkering with the quality-of- 
life aspirations of countless households so that television 
royalties might more easily flow into the coffers of 15 
distant sports moguls,” he wrote, “is not ‘consonant with 
present-day concepts of right and justice.’ Indeed, it is 
repugnant to common decency.” 


The Tribune Company appealed to the Illinois Supreme 
Court. A decision is expected later this month. 

Green said he has learned a lot in the three years he has 
been in Chicago, and he understands the passions in- 
volved with many of the 55.000 residents of Laic View. 
Still, he would like lights in Wrigley Field on “a limited 
basis.” “Maybe IS to 20 regular-season games a year.” he 
said, “plus post-season games.” 

He said that if light toners are not installed, and 


might even leave Wrigley Field. Mayor Harold Washing- 
ton of Chicago has assigned a study of the possibility of 
building a domed stadium near the Loop. 

Mrs. Kaszak said that would not be acceptable to. the 
community. “The Cubs are pan of us there.” she said, 
“like the schools, the theaters, the stores. And I bet there 
are more Cub fans per square inch in Lake View than there 
are anywhere else in the world.” 

Many consider Wrigley Field, built in 1914, to be an 
esthetic treat. It is one of the few vintage parks left, along 
with Ccmiskey Park, which opened in 1910, and Fenway 
Park and Tiger Stadium in Detroit, both in 1912. It is a 
great contrast to the impersonal modern stadiums and 
indoor baseball edifices that have proliferated in recent 
vears. It is a park in a residential neighborhood, one of the 
Usl of its kind. The dark, heavy grandstands give way to 
the lush green of the grass, the brownish-red of the 
basepaths. pitcher's mound and baiting area, and the red 
brick outfield wall thickly covered with vines of biuer- 
sweet and ivy. 

The Cubs, too. are unusual They have one of the worst 


records in baseball history. They have not won a pennant 
since 1945. longer than any other team now in big-league 
baseball. But even in their leanest years, they were draw- 
ing a million funs a year. It w as due to lot ally, as well a> 
the simple pleasure of enjoying a ball game in **the 
friendly confines of Wrigley Field.” 

Last season, with Green's trades and deals coming to 
fruition, the Cubs started to win. People lined up around 
the park stoning at dawn to gel tickets. The Cubs won 
their division, and attendance for the regular season 
soared to a club-record 2.1 million. 

Although they lost lo San Diego in the piavoffs. this 
year the fove for the Cubs is even greater. There were a 
record 25.000 season tickets sold, and the Cubs appear on 
the way to drawing about 2.4 million. 

Last month. Ueberroth, who was bom and raided in 
Evanston. Illinois, the first suburb north of Chicago, 
attended a game at Wrigley Field. He said he had j grand 
time. Shortly afterward, he met with legislative leaders tr. 
Springfield, the state capital. 

(An amendment to Ihe state law barring the Cubs from 
playing night games at Wrigley Field won preliminary 
approval Wednesday in the Illinois General Assembly. 
The Associated Press reported from Springfield. The 
amendment would lift the ban only for playotf games.) 

"I think baseball ought to be played at Wrigley Field 
and for the long term.” Ueberroth’ said. “It i\ a great 
stadium and in some years hence it will be ivpical of the 
perfect type oT stadium that people will look' for." 

That raised a curious notion: Wngley Field, w hich <ome 
call an anachronism, is now. in the view of baseball’s 
commissioner, the “perfect ivpe of stadium" for the fu- 
ture. 


^ tfe 

’’I 

‘ ./ ' 

1 pi.- 

• V'iU", 
’ 7Sur 

*‘05 
’ : - • ' 



Gooden Fans Cubs; Hawkins Loses First of Season 





i i-. ' - - ' 

L '/ • ■■"•* l ‘ m . '• • 





. . - 

': r \, 


IMl.l 



Th* Auodotsd IVmi 

Angelo Spagnalo was treed for a time but “won” his tournament in a mere 257 shots. 

The Victor Was Not a Joy to Behold 

The Associated Pros walk around the water and putt down' a narrow 

PONTE VEDRA BEACH. Florida — Angelo carl path to the green. 

Spagnolo shot 257 bad strokes to win the dubious “There was a big hum in my head on 17. 1 kept 

title of America’s worst golfer Wednesday. And if hearing my son saying ‘Dad!’ and laughing," said 

the tournament was not golfing’s finest hour, there Spagnolo, who was awarded a crystal trophy and a 

was no question it was the sport’s longest tacky green-plaid sports jacket 

Scheduled for noon, tee time was set back to . W imtevwtmi? 

10:57 AAL to make sure the two twosomes had Spagn. oI 9- 1 Wf*?- * 

enough daylight to finish 18 holes. While an aver- ^ Oaunrng the distmcuoo of best of the worst was 

age game cm an average course lasts about four 4 . 2 ’q Tyter ' Texas> 

hours, these brave denizens of weekend golfing wI J£ Coasted a 179. Course j»r is 72. 
persevered for a few minutes more tiuufseS "*** fitter » be jhe bea of die worst than the 

worst of the worn, Ireland said. 

ma „ aojHr frnm Joel Mosser. 45, a stockbroker from Aurora, 

SHffl bSk Cdorada who finished at 120-over-par 192, led, or 

Fayette City, Pennsylvania, lost about 60 balls n^ged depending on one’s perspective, after the 

n,^ 10051 ° f * m -° a ** ^ trineSa 75. IrelamfSWd with an 

8> rted,/Ul,)0,e - . 89, Spagndo thin! with 99 and Pulford had 104. 

He appeared to be only second worst m Amen- ’The four contestants were selected from 627 
ca’s Worst Avid Golfer tournament, behind Jack nominations nationwide. Candidates had lo be 
Pulford, until he shot a 66 at No. 17. Pulford, 48, a jjjgjj of reasonable physical ability who play at 
restaurateur from Moline, Illinois, finished with a least 21 rounds of golf a year. 

208. Watching the seemingly endless slices and 

“1 just came unglued on 17,” said Spagnoio, who whiffs were a handful of spectators, mostly family 
hit 27 balls into the water before he was forced by members of the four men who were chosen to hdp 
officials at the Tournament Players Club course, encourage the bad golfers of America to keep a 

one of the most difficult in the United States, to stiff forearm and a firm constitution. 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK —The New York 
Mels’ Dwight Gooden struck out 
the game's last batter Wednesday 
night, having gotten the two previ- 
ous hitters to pop up with two men 
on base." to hand the Chicago Cubs 
their eighth straight loss, 1-0. But in 
Los Angeles, the San Diego Padres' 
pitcher, Andy Hawkins, bad his un- 
beaten streak stopped at 11. 

Gooden pitched a six-hitler as 
the Mets beat the Cubs for the third 
straight time. He struck our nine, 
raising his major league-leading to- 
tal to 125, and reduced his major 
league-leading ERA to 1.66. 

In the fourth, Ryne Sandberg 
and Leon Durham got back-to- 
back base hits, the Cubs' first Goo- 
den struck out Richie Hebner and 
got Thad Bosley to hit into one of 
the Cuhs’ three double plays. 

Keith Moreland and Ryne Sand- 
berg opened the ninth with singles. 
Then Gooden got Leon Durham 
and Richie Hebner on pop flies, 
and ended the game by striking out 
Bosley to the cheers of 51,778 Tans. 

“He’s probably the only pitcher 
in baseball with two men on and 
three guys coming up, all left- 
handers, and it’s still his ball 
game,” said. , manager Dave John- 
son. “It was his game to win or lose. 

“Besides, if Fd have taken him 
out in that situation, they’d have 
lynched me.” 

The Mets got Gooden the run he 
needed in the fourth. Keith Her- 
nandez led off with a walk, moved 
to third on Gary Carta's double 
and, with one out, scored when 
Howard Johnson’s slow grounder 
to shortstop Chris Sprier could not 
be turned into a double play. 

Hawkins lost his first game of 
the season when the Los Angeles 
Dodgers jumped cm him for three 
hits in the seventh. Although until 
then Hawkins had given up bul two 
hits and a run, he was lifted without 
retiring a batter in the seventh. 

Pedro Guerrero’s solo home run 
broke the 1-1 tie, the Dodgers 
sewed four runs and won, 5-1. 

“I just got beat untight,” Haw- 
kins said. “I’m not reafly that dis- 
appointed. I had a streak that I 



m 

H» Auooord Pita 

Cubs' center fielder Darrin Jackson had sign pointing the way, but ball fell for a doable off bat of Mets' Howard Johnson. 

Yankees May Be Giving Weaver Second Thoughts 


T^TTTT^ 




Baseball 


Wednesday’s Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAQUE Mlanrtota 

Toronto MB 111 KIM 9 0 Kvnm Or 

muwum m MM 189-4 » • Fttsan. Dm 

Ckncv. Lovolle 18). Caudill (9) end WMtT; Mnborrv (V) 


NUBoeWM Mil IN M0-7 8 1 HR* — PttK 

KWW CBr OH 80t llx—3 7 1 Brooks (5) 

FUjon. Davis (B) and Enoto; JocKson, Qul- Chicago 
■aniwrv (V) end Soodbero. w— juckson, 5-4i Mm York 


vuefcovich, C o om wwr [4). McClure (6},Fhv L— Rtaon. u Sv— Qirisenberry 03). HRs— 


DeLeon. Candoiar lo (Bland Rena; Hsskatti 
Burfca 191. Reoroan l»] and FHzoarahL W— 
Burke, j-a L— DeLeon. 2-9. Sv— Reorder 130). 
HRs— Pltttburati, Afanan («). Montreal. 
Brooks tst. 

Chicago NO RO MM— 8 4 0 

Mm York 9H IN 00*— 1 5 8 

Sanderson. Smith (8) and Loks; Gooden and 


oers (9) and Simmons. W— Clanev, W. L— MUmnata, Hrtaek W. Kansas City. McRae Carter, w— Gooden. IDG. L— Sanderson. 3-i 


Vuuaukh. 2-5, Sv— CaudRl (18). (8). 

caufontla WWHM 3 • OaWand 

V cuvefcmd 00$ oat aox— I 5 • Cklcrao 

Staton. Clement* U). cnbum 18) and Kruet* 


m on BH 809—7 18 1 
m 828 883 HI— 8 13 I 


Houston 110 1B3 801—7 14 0 

Atlanta m 1*0 811— J 13 O 

Nfekra, D I Pina (0) and As/iby: BodraUan. 


5 Slaton, Clemenls to. Cflbuni (8) and Knueer, Warren IS), Atherton (9). Lone- Camp <«). Garber (7). Sdiuter (9) and Bene- 
Boanaj Bivteven ondWlHanLW— 8Fvieven,0- lord (13) and TetHeftm; Bums. Sumner (6). dlct.W— Nh*ra,4-7.L— eetBmton. JA-HRs— 


a l— S taton. *A 

Boston 

Detroit 


IN 0*1 110-8 8 1 


James 1M» nod Fisk. W— James. 3-2 L— 
LnnefontO-1. H Rs-Oauand, Klnomon 7 (10). 


Bavd. Crnwlord 18) and Gedman: Terrell. 
Loaex (8) end Parrish, w— Terrell. 8-1 L— 
Bov<L B>5. Sv— Lopez IS). HRs— Detroit, VfliL 
loxer (91. GOMon (13). 

Hew York 2<T OH IMS— M M I 


121 111 81*— 9 13 1 aricaoo. FMc (74). Walker .110). 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

aednaotl OH 882 080-2 < 8 


Houston, Reynolds (3), Cruz 131. 
PMkxtelpMa 810 MM 806 — 1 4 • 

SLLOub 880 808 €88-0 5 0 

Koasman. Garmai (7) end virsQ; Andulor 
and Nieto, Hum (8). W — Koasman. 2-1. L— 


Soto, Hume (7) end Van Canter. Kjnlcetv 
ms LaPoint. Garretts (7). and Brenlv. «f- 


004 ON 01*— S 4 0 Andulor, 12-2. Sv-Carman 12). 


Battlmora 0» OH 000— 0 4 0 LaPoint, 3-4. I — Seta. b- 4. Sw— Gamuts (51. 

wnllson and Hussey ;D-Marttnez.Dhron (2), HR— San Prancleco, Brenlv 2 (7). 


5Mwarii7),Sn»ll<9)andDefnMev.W— WbH- Pltt Nuiph 
son. 2o. L — O Atari Inez, 54. Hite-New York. Mootreai 
Haszev 3 (3). WlnfMd (8). 

Seattle Ml BN MM— 4 18 1 

Texas 380 N2 10* — 5 7 1 I 

wills. Nunez (4) and Kearney, Scott (9); | 

Holes, welsh (3). Horns (71 and Brimmer. I 
W — Welsh, 1-1. L— WHS, M. Sv— Hams (J). 1 


/an Canter. Knlcetv San Dieee ON MM 108—1 3 1 

(7). and Brenlv. w— lo* Amw see on «o»— « s i 

•4. Sv— Garroih (51. Hawkins, utfferti (7) and Kennedy; Reuss. 
eniv 2 (7). Howell (81 and Scto&cia. W— Rune. 5-5. L— 

803 MM 888-3 7 8 Havrfcln* 31-1. HR— Las Anoetas. Guerrero 

mm no-* j • tu>. 


Football 


Major League Standhigs 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DfvMon 

W L pet. GB 

Toronto » Z5 /M - 

Dalroll 55 2fi J74 Vh 

Boston 2 3 A IK 

Baltimore 33 29 sa 5 

New York 32 29 J25 » 

Milwaukee 29 32 ATS 819 

Cleveland 2t 41 -339 17 

West Division 

Ctoeaaa 3* U 3£7 ~ 

CaiHornla 34 29 .540 lid 

Kansas CUV S3 30 SU 219 

Oakland 31 33 -493 4V, 

scam. a 34 AM a 

Minnesota 26 3S 42i 8V9 

7 -M» 24 '38 .«6 10 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East MAIN 

W L PCL GB 

Montreal 3® W ■j® “ 

New York * 27 JU 1W 

5t LPUH . SS-S-? 

PUtebur^ 

M nuga V 27 371 — 

^?on 33 30 534 3Vr 

SnSnnati X X JU e 

[LsAm-Hes * 38 Sto 4 

AWAto 27 35 9 

UranUS Co 24 38 AN 11 


Montreal 
New York 
SL Louts . 

Chicago 

pnimoelpt 110 

Pimtwrsl' 


USFL Leaders 

EASTERN conference 
Teem OftooM 
■ Yimte Bush Foss 
Tampo Bav 4U8 1975 4393 

Nm Jersey J358 3571 2187 

Memphb : suit 2625 3184 

BlrmlnatMnr . giSA 2349 3310 

BaWmore 5471 jl73 3298 

Jadunnvllle si 05 1830 3375 

092 1720 2572 

Team Detente 

Blrmlnuliuin . ug 7715 jgxi 


G. Anderson. TB 49 4S9 94 41 * 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Team Offmne 

Yards Rush Pass 
Houston 4484 1108 5574 

Denver 6192 1937 OSS 

Oakland 5997 3181 3814 

Arizona 5424 . 1937 3451 

puMtod 47X me Tta 

Los Angeles 4430 1946 2498 

San Antonio 4340 1674 2684 

ream ocfoaw 


in my life. It’s just been fun. I had a 
good time while it lasted, but FU 
admit it was awesome." (UP I, AP) 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

KANSAS CITY— Placed Pot Sheridan, out- 
Hetder, on the lSdav disabled list retroactive 
to June 17. Readied Dave Leoper, oul fielder, 
from O mafia of the American Assoctallon. 

BASKETBALL 

Matloool BaNUHbaH AssodatlM 

5AN ANTON iD-rTraded Cent Bantu, for- 
ward. to CNcaaa tor Steve Johnson, center, 
and a 7985 seamd-round draft choice. 

WASHINGTON— Tnxied Goto BallonLtor- 
ward. Id Goldea Slate tor a 19B5 seconiWound 
draft choice and a 1887 second-retina draft 
choice. 

FOOTBALL. 

National Football Leaaue 

KANSAS CITY— stoned Jonathan Haves. 
Haht end. to a series ol tour one-venr con- 
trade. 

PITTSBURGH— waived Ron Jomaoa de- 
fensive bock. 

SAN DIEGO— Stoned Curtis Adams, run- 
rdno bade, to a series at one-year conirads. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey Leawe 

PHILADELPHIA— Stoned Per-Ertk Ek- 
lund, center. 

COLLEGE 

KING'S POiNT—Nosned Tom deesonbas- 
keitxril coodi aid signed him to a three-year 

contract, 

MONMOUTH— Namod Ken Demptev as* 
tistant basketball coach. 

OREGON STATE— Name d Lynn Snyder 
athletic director. 

SENIOR BOWL — Named Erie A. Tillman 
executive director ond general menoaer. 

SANTA Clar a -N amed Terry Motley 
toattoll coodi and Dan Curry Interim (dWetle 
director. 

TENNESSEE-OHATTANOOGA— Named 
Lonnie J. Kitov assistant basketball coach. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BALTIMORE —The New Yoric 
Yankees are making Ear J Weaver 
wish he never left his vegetable gar- 
den. 

After a 2Vi year retirement. 
Weaver returned as manager of the 
Baltimore Orioles last Friday and 
guided his dub to three successive 
victories over the Milwaukee Brew- 
ers. 

Then the Yankees came to town 
and promptly took some luster off 
Weaver’s achievement by sweeping 
a three-game scries. 

The Yankees were not exactly 
cordial either. Wednesday night 
they won a second game' by the 
score of 10-0. 

“I’m glad we’re leaving, playing 
like we are,” said Weaver, whose 
dub hits the road for nine games. 
“People paystheir money and have 
to see those games." 

Ed Whitson pitched a six-hitter 
for his first shutout this season and 
Ron Hasscy hit rwo home runs for 
the Yankees. 

Hasscy hotnered leading off ihe 
second and third innings, marking 
the first time in the major leagues 
he had two in the same game. 

“1 didn’t know if the first one 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

was going to get out,” Hasscy said. 
“Bui I blew I hit the second one 
welL Heck, when you don’t hit 
many, you don’t ever know for 
sure.” 

Blue Jays 5. Brewers 1: In Mil- 
waukee, George Bell hit a two-run 
triple during a three-run third in- 
ning that but Milwaukee. 

The Brewers’ manager, George 
Bamberger, and Ben Oglivie were 
ejected in. the eighth for arguing 
with fust base umpire John Shu- 
lock. who called Oglivie's potential 
three-run homer into the right-field 
stands foul. 

Royals 3, Twins i Hal McRae’s 
basest-empty homer in the eiriuh 
bear Minnesota in Kansas City, 
Missouri. 

Tigers 9, Red Sox 3: In Detroit. 
Lou Whitaker and Kirk Gibson 
each hit a homer and drove in three 
runs to hdp defeat Boston a second 
straight time. Still, the Red Sox 
have won 17 of their last 21 games. 

Indians 2. Angels 0: Bert Blyle- 
ven pitched a three-hitter in Cleve- 
land and George Vukovich's two- 
out, two-run single in the sixth beat 


California. Blyleven got his AL- 
Ieading fourth shutout 

Rangers 5 Mariners 4: In Arling- 
ton, Texas, Wayne Tolleson’s sixth- 
inning sacrifice fly scored Larry 
Parrish with the go-ahead run 
against Seattle. 

White Sox 8, A’s 7: Rick Lang- 
ford’s wold pilch with one out in the 
bottom of the 12th inning enabled 
Ozzie Guillen to score all the way 
from second base and beat Oak- 
land in Chicago. 

Carlton Fisk had hit a two-run 
homer and Greg Walker a solo shot 
with two out in the bottom or the 
ninth to tie the score. Dave King- 
man hit two three-run homers for 
the A’s. 

Giants 5, Reds 2: In the National 
League, Bob Brenly hit two homers 
and drove in four runs to beat Cin- 
cinnati in San Francisco. 

“I hit two on the nail and missed 
six completely." said Brenly, who 
also struck out twice. 

Expos 4, Pirates 3: In Montreal, 
pinch-hitter Jim Wolhlord singled 
in Vance Law from third base in 
the bottom or the eighth to give 
Pittsburgh starter Jose DeLeon his 
ninth loss in 1 1 derisions. 

Jeff Reardon recorded his major 


league-leading 20th save with a 
scoreless ninth. 


V. Craig 

olds and Jose Cruz homered to hdp 
Joe Niekro to his 197th victory’ in 
the majors as Houston won in At- 
lanta. It was Reynolds’ third 
homer, all against the Braves. 

Phillies 1, Cards 0: In St. Louis, 
Jerry K oos man and Don Carman 
combined on a five-hitler and Pfiil- 
addphia’s Greg Gross drove in ihe 
game's only run to give JoaqUin 
Andujar his serond loss in 14 deci- 
sions. (UP l, API 

■ Drug Tests Set 

The first drug tests under a man- 
datory program for everyone con- 
nected with professional baseball, 
except major-league players, Will 
begin next month. The Associated 
Press reported from New York.’ 

Commissioner Peter Ueberroth, 
in a memo to major-league dubs 
Tuesday, said that minor-league 
players and umpires would become 
the first to be examined, followed 
by a group including major-league 
managers, coaches, trainers, um- 
pires and office personnel at both 
levels. 


BlmUnoti oa i 
MMlOftlt . 
JBoftimato 
(tow torts/ 
Twnw Sot 
JodcunvIlLe 
oodhdo 


Lewis. Memo 
Stood*, Efrm 
Fuctoa, Soft 
Keller. Mona 


<947 U51 
4950 1950 
5492 1845 
S4M 2143 
5484 2417 
4454 3172 


Arizona 

Oakland 

Sun Antonio 

Dttivtr 

PoiTtand 

Houston 

Las Angelos 


5123 2141 

5236 21*1 

5348 187* 

5377 2004 

5940 2241 

5941 1887 

5954 2034 

Qualttrfcadm 


Quartaftwekt . 




Att Cam 

Yds 

TD IB) 

-Alt Cam 

Yds 

TO int 

KBllY. Hou 

547 

3tf 

4423 

39 

19 

itt 9S 

1547 

IS 

5 

Moum.oofc 

433 

234 

3412 

29 

18 

«7 359 

324) 

33 

19 

DMOA.HDU 

1H 

9S 

1271 

8 

6 

472 284 

3300 

18 

14 

D-WlllkumAH 

470 

348 

3334 

18 

14 


241 ISO 1772 


son Olega 

Houston 

ClncfrawM 

LoS Anoeles 
A Han la 

Son Fronctxo 


Aft- Yds Avg Lg TD 
WtoUtofr NJ • , 413 2338 SJ 88 21 
Roller. Jock 12(3 «_5 23 ? 

G. Andorm TW : 266 1163 4A 48 16 
Brvartt. Bolt . 22( i(M 3 u k 11 
Rocotom 

Ke Yds A VO La m 
J. smith. 81m> 83- 1278 ISA 56 19 

Atoms. Jack . .77 . 9S4 124 51 4 
FHZkoo. BaH - 70 $U IZ1 V 3 


B. Johnson. Den 
R. Brawn. Adt 
A. Bentley, Oak 
Jordan. Port 


Johnson. Hou 
L Harris. Dm 
verdto, Jtou 
Lewis. Don 


Rasher* 

All Yds A vs 
203 1231 61 

224 1036 44 

177 970 55 
157 787 50 

R oeetvgr * 

No Yds Avg l 
95 raj tu- 
92 raw 135 
BO 987 125 
73 I)d9 «J> 


Tennis 

Pro Tour Leaders 

MEN 

ATp camwter Ranktoos 
1. John McEnroe, 16852 Dotote.2, Ivan Lomu, 
.10X2. x Jimmy Comm llui. 4 , Mate Mff> 
tondor. 11020. & Andres Oarrua, *957. 6. An. 
der*'JaiYVd,595LZ.PatCastiS255,8.joakim 
Nvtdrom.49.5l ?, Kevin Cvnw,4ftj& IO Jo- 
han Krlofc. '4535. 

WOMEN 

WTA Computer Rankings 
1 . Chris EvortUovd. 179J84S points. 2. Mar- 
tino Novnrtltova, T71T150. X Hana MandU- 
kova, B8JT691. 4 , mmela Maleeva. 747797. & 
Pams(irivor,5».T7l9.4,Ooudto Kohde-KIbcto 
S823SL 7. Hnttna Sukova, 56.9441. azjauCar- 

rtsaa. 545 SS 4 . 9 , Benue GadMOto 51 9W. 10 , 
Kathy Jordan. 502051. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

NCAA Wants to Begin Tests for Drugs 

NEW ORLEANS (WP) — The NCAA wants to begin testing athletes 
for performance-enhancing and street drugs at some championship 
events and bowl games by early next year, John Toner, chairman of the 
group's drug-testing committee, said Wednesday. 

The committee, meeting on the eve of a special convention on issues of 
institutional integrity, is putting into final form recommendations for the 
NCAA Council lo consider at its August meeting. After that, a council- 
sponsored proposal for drug testing would be placed on the agenda for a 
vote by the membership at the annual convention in January. 

Degrees Offered to Former Athletes 

NEW YORK (AP) — In the wake of the release last week of a survey 
showing that only 27 percent of the college basketball players in the 
United States had been graduated. 1 1 colleges have formed a national 
consortium to offer degrees to former athletes who left school without 
graduating. 

Northeastern’s Center for the Study of Spoil in Society will coordinate 
the program, which will readmit, without tuition, any rorraer students 
who entered school with athletic scholarships since 1975. The other I 
schools involved are SL John's, New Yoric University. Seton Hall, | 
W3Ham Paterson, Georgetown, Temple; Long Beach State, California, 
Denver and San Francisco. 

For the Record 

Tom Walt, 50, a former coach of the year with the Winnipeg Jets of the 
National Hockey League, was lured Wednesday as coach of the Vancou- 
ver Canucks. (AP) 

Roffie Massnnmo said he had turned down a lucrative offer to become 
coach of the New Jersey' Nets of the National Basketball Association, 
deciding to stay at ViUanova University \ AP) 

Quotable 

“Once people have lost their confidence in athletes competing honest- 
ly, spoils is in serious trouble. You don’t see many people gambling on 
professional wrestling.” John Davis, NCAA presides ! l 


BlancpaiN 








by hand, are leaving tia Btehcpan wwtahbps. Wier-resisa«j 




HOROLOGJ5TS 

16 New Bond Stes Utyfaii London wt 
01-4335816 







:*J*v 




OBSERVER 


Presidential Fussiness 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Dr. Harold J. 

Liverwonh, world’s foremost 
authority, has comforting news for 
fussy men. In his new book. “Fuss 
Without Fear," the doctor urges 
such men to "fuss to their hearts’ 
content” and ignore “so-called sci- 
entific studies" suggesting that 
fussiness shortens life expectancy, 
spoils picnics and reduces the 
amount of tune spent watching 
television. 

“Nonsense" is Liverworth's re- 
ply to such gloomy findings by the 
Fuss Research Institute Founda- 
tion. 

Ail of the institute’s data, he 
notes, come from experiments on 
laboratory mice. And fussiness in 
mice, he maintains, is so different 
from fussiness in men that data 
about a fussy mouse’s behavior at a 
laboratory picnic can tell us noth- 
ing useful about how a fussy man 
might behave. 

Liverworth's book deals only 
with fussy men: “As a friend of the 
fe minis t movement, I was reluctant 
to study fussy women without per- 
mission from Carla Calzone, 
founder of the Fussy Women’s Lib- 
eration Caucus and author of the 
best-selling ‘I Fuss When I Please.’ 
Ms. Calzone withheld that permis- 
sion. but assured me that if I left 
fussy women to her she would not 
attempt to beat me into print with a 
best seller on fussy men." 

□ 

Ms. Calzone’s kindness meant 
that Dr. Uverworth did not have to 
do a hasty, slapdash piece of re- 
search u> race a competitor for the 
best-seller-buying audience. As a 
result, we have a thorough, scholar- 
ly study as splendid as any of the 
124 books the doctor has produced 
in the last 13 years, including 
“Taming the Adolescent Male with 
Pams Suspenders." “Auto Trans- 
missions; Metaphor for Moderni- 
ty.” and “How High-Carbohydrate 
Fating Affects the Mood of Ex- 
pense-Account Auditors." 

> One always hesitates to quarrel 
with the doctor, and fortunately 
.“Fuss Without Fear” contains very 
little that needs to be challenged. 
However — and let us hope the 
doctor will take this in good spirit 
and not be provoked to write an- 
other book like "Hack Journalists: 
Causes of the Rot in America's 
Moral Fiber.” as he was when my 
review of “Auto Tr ansmissi ons* 


criticized him severely for not ex- 
amining what the loss of the auto- 
mobile running board had done to 
the United States. 

However, as I was saying, though 
generally sound this lime. Liver- 
worth is talking through his hat 
when he says President Reagan is 
“proof that a fussy man needn't 
alienate friends and family, but 
may indeed be loved by millions." 

□ 

By what standard does the doc- 
tor classify Reagan as “fussy"? 
Well, says the doctor, he is “ex- 
tremely fussy about presenting a 
dynamic but cheerful impression in 
the presence of cameras.” 

So what? The Fuss Foundation’s 
mice experiments showed that even 
mice — all mice, unfussy as well as 
fussy — became intensely fussy 
about creating a good impression 
when cameras appeared. 

Very well, Uverworth sneers at 
the Fuss Foundation’s mice stud- 
ies. so let’s discard the nevertheless 
valid comparison of mice and pres- 
ident and cite human cases. 

Specifically, the case of my 
friend Vanikker, widely known on 
both coasts, the Riviera and in Illi- 
nois as a man so unfussy that he 
will have two martinis before din- 
ner, then waste a great Bordeaux by 
pouring it across his anesthetized 
palate. 

An unfussy man, obviously. But 
draw a camera on him and, iol 
“Not 'til I comb my hair!" he cries. 

I once saw Vanikker panic when a 
snapshot fiend caught him wearing 
a short-sleeve shirt with button- 
down collar open at the throat, 
without necktie. 

“Wait," he shouted, "until i find 
out what the right kind of people 
do about die button-down collar 
when the necktie is off.” 

He absolutely refused to let the 
shutter click until he had called the 
Princeton Gub. longdistance, fora 
consultation. Opinion there was di- 
vided. The result? Vanikker 
changed into a different shirt. 

I cite the case only to prove that 
Uverworth errs in supposing that 
fussiness in the presence of cam- 
eras makes President Reagan a 
fussy man. All men are fussy when 
the camera aims their way, for what 
the camera produces can be kept as 
evidence, and who wants the evi- 
dence to tell the truth about us? 

Mtte York Tuna Service 


Anne Frank’s World 

Photo Exhibitions in New York, Amsterdam and Frankfurt 


Provide a Glimpse of Her life From 1929 to 194/5 


By Ari L Goldman 

He* York Tunes Soviet 

T HE smile of Anne Frank, perhaps as much as 
her famous diary, has become a symbol of tbe 
power of the human spirit over evil 
To picture the gifted girl who died 40 years ago 
at Lhe hands of the Nazis is to see a pretty, dark- 
haired child doing children’s things — sunning on 
the beach, jumping rope, playing with a pel raobil 
and. most strikingly and consistently, smiling. 

Last week, on the day that would have bear 
Anne Frank's 56th birthday, the Union 
Theological Seminary in New York began an 
exhibition of newly released photographs — 
imag es of her world. The opening of the New 
York exhibition coincided with openings of 
almost identical shows in churches in Amsterdam 
and in Frankfurt, where she was bom on June 12, 
1929. 

Her view of the world was summed up in a 
famous line from the diary: "In spite of 
everything, I still believe that people are really 
good at heart" 

The entry was written wily weeks before a 
German officer broke into the secret annex of a 
building, in Amsterdam where the four members 
of the Frank family and four other Jews had 
hidden for two years. All eight were sent to 
concentration camps; only Anne's father, Otto . 
Frank, survived. Alter having been rejected by 
numerous publishers, Frank had the diary printed 
in Dutch in 1947. 

The story has been told in movies, plays and in 
the more inan 30 lan g ua g es into which the diary 
of Anne Frank has been translated. 

The new exhibition of 800 photographs and 
documents, “ Anne Frank in the World: 1929 to 
194S,” puts the story in the context of the events 
of the aay. And it asks tbe question, “Had Anne 
Frank, a typical child, lived next door, could she 
have counted on us for help during tbe Nazi 
regime?” After three weeks, tbe New York 
exhibition will travel to other cities in the United 
States. 

In addition to dozens of photographs of the 
Frank family and their place of temporary 
sanctuary, whose entrance was concealed by a 
hinged bookcase in the back of a spice- factory, 
there are pictures of the conditions that led to die 
Holocaust. There are the soup kitchens in 
Germany during the Depression of 1929, the Nazi 
youth rallies, the hands raised in salute to Hitler 
and the word "Jude” scrawled on the shops of 
Jewish merchants. 

One series of pictures shows tbe huge Frankfurt 
synagogue afire on Nov. 9. 193S. and the Jewish ‘ 
shops with shattered windows after Kristallnacfal 
a few days later. 

There are photographs of the invasion of tbe 
Netherlands in May 1940, Jews wearing the 


required yellow star, efforts ar resistance and the 
eventual roundup and deportation of Jews to 
concentration camps. Finally, there are the 
chilling pictures of cattle cars packed with people, 
terror-stricken faces, death camps and mass 
graves. Three-quarters of the 140,000 Jews in the 
Netherlands perished. 

The photographs, mounted on 21 triangular 
upright structures, are the same ax the U. S„ 

Dutch and German shows. 

F.arh exhibition also has a sampling of original 
documents. Among those in New York are 
written exercises for a correspondence coarse in 
f .a tin rhaf Amu*, took, under the name of a friend, 
during her confinement. The envelope in which it 
came was addressed to EE Voskuyi. one of the 
Christian women who helped die family in hiding. 

There are p ly> pages of the original diar y 
written in Dutch, in which each entry begins with 
a salutation to an imaginary friend, “Ueve Kitty.” 

The material was pot together by the Anne 
Frank TW^ <»r in Amste rda m , which main rains a 
museum in tbe building in which the family found 
refuge. 

Several of the pictures in the exhibitions were 

§ ’ven to the Anne Frank Center by relatives of 
tto Frank after his death five years ago at the 
age of 9 1 in Switzerland. The international 
director of the center. Banco van der Wal, said the 
existence of the pictures was not generally known 
until recently. 

Soon after Frank’s death, the Dutch War 
Documentation Institute announced plans to 
publish portions of Anne’s diary that had been 
deleted by her father. The passages dealt with 
Anne’s awakening sexuality and disagreements 
with her mother, Edith, who died of starvation in 
Auschwitz. 

Van ’der WaL who has read the passages, said 
that the project to publish the complete, unedited 
version was still under way and that the book 
would not be ready for release for at least a year. 

The con fessio ns in the passages, he said, may 
have shocked the father at the time be read it after 
tbe war, but would not be considered surprising 
today. The passages, he added, would tend to 

reinforce the picture of a spirited young woman 
aware of life's hardships but still ready to smile. 

In the published chary, which has sold more 
than 1 3 milli on copies, Anne Frank wrote on Dec. 
24, 1943: 

“Believe me if you have been shut up for a year 
and a half, it can get too much for you some days. 
In spite of all justice and thankfuln ess, you can't 
crush your feelings. Cycling, rianrmg, whistling, 
looking out into the world, feeling young, to know 
that I'm free — that’s what I long for; suD I 
mustn't show it, because I sometimes think if aQ 
eight of us began to pity ourselves, or went about 
with discontented faces, where would it lead us?” 





On the beach with her older sister, Margot, in 1940. 



P^rn-3 


Holding skipping rope with a friend m 1935. 


Reach to Tdl Congress? 
About Cocaine Abuse. . 


..a ’W tt-3 n 1 1 vi t Be - 


a British jail for cocaine possession, 
will appear July 16 before tbeU. S. 
House Select Committee oa Nass 
codes Abuse. When the sctur'left. 
jail be promised he would g$ 08 
tour to preach the evils of drugjAj 
tbe request or Representative 
Gunks Rangel Democrat offoV. 
Yoric, Keach agreed to tdl ifce«tay 
of bis cocaine addiction, . 


An eariy oil painting fay the |9ttK 
century British landscape statist . 
J. M. W. Turner failed to reach its 
minimum selling price Thursday at' 
an auction in Folkestone,' EhgkmL : .' 
and was withdrawn from safc?ta< ■'/ 
dye Place, Hurley-on-Thames," 
owned by the family of the Scottish :. 
shipping magnate Sir DonaH Cw- 
rie. was withdrawn when ihe bidft; 
ding failed to surpass £185,00%'; 
(about $240,000). r 


Tbe gift of a ISOOyear-oW vss$' 
to Prince Qnrks of Britain fa& 
been defended by a Station politi- 
cal leader who is under fire fct • 
nuking the gift. Kino Nknbafc r - 
presidem erf tbe Sicilian regions) 
government, said Wednesday that 
the vase came from a private coUep 
ticm. Acting on behalf of the region, 
Nicolosi gave the vase to the prince/ 
last month when he visited Italy 
with bis wife, Diana. Before decid- 
ing on the gift, Nicolosi said, off*- . 
rials consulted authorities tridek^. - ; 
mine that there was what Nicoloa - 
termed ‘"an absence of coir- 
strain tx." Three Communist ment 
bers of. the Italian Senate have 
questioned the propriety of giving 
an art object of historical value to a 
foreign guest 


A civil court in Paris has convict- 
ed the writer Frafl^ots Weyergans 
and the DenoSl publishing house of 
invasion of privacy, fining -them 
10.000 francs (about 51,090) in a -. 
case involving a book about Mar- 
lene Dietrich. Weyergans wrote the 
preface to “Portraits 1926-J96Q>jv . 
Marlene Dietrich.” a collectim _ 
photographs illustrating the fo;' 
year-old German-bora actress’ » 
tea. Dieuich claimed the text con- 
tained allusions to her love life that 
constituted an invasion of privacy. 
The court prohibited the reproduc- 
tion of the offending lines in fit tore 
editions. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MOVING 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


french provinces 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


SUPERB 

BELGRAVIA INVESTMENT 

Newly ujrnfc ufle d and buft to o very 
faghrtondard behind an eta^jnf period 
hrude.a fine development of 7 luxury 
fkrti. 

Fidy fitted Jateham. nwUertrg to 
bathroom*. irepfSOS'to ertronee foye. 
pemnger ffi. 

S X 3 Bedrot — i 2 Uhneo m Dottle 
Reception s Room Fitted (Oschert 

I X 2 Bed roan#: 2 Bathroom* Double 
BeapSan Boone fitted Kildare 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MOROCCO 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


REAL'ESTATE 
FOR SALE 





SKOAL OPPORTUNITY 

roRS ^p a ^ occo DORESSAY 

Won retatev. work nee. 

bn iandy beach and pine tree wood. 

3 hours fight from London ar Nr# 

60 fan from Tangim, 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - Ewaet ddrtere. 
Write Keyset. TOBX BMX» Bnm*. 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN UNES INTL 

OVBt 1300 OFFICES 
WORLDWIDE 

USA ABed Voi Lines Inti Carp 
{0101} 312-681-8100 

Office Address J5lh Av & Roosevelt Rd 

Btoadnew, ttron 60153 USA 
O caB on Agency offices 

PARIS Pe i botdei International 
(01) 343 13 *4 

wankfurt 

(069) 250066 

DUSSBDORF/ RATINGS'! 

(02102) 45023 LMLS. 

MUNICH i.nls. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON JnEZZ 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSELS: Zfa*« s-a. 

(02\ 425 66 14 
GENEVA 

(0221 32 64 40 
CaB tc* Mads free mtencCe 


PRINCIPALITY OF 
MONACO 

Beautiful apartment with sea ww, eight 
in the certer of Monte Carlo fa anal 
modem buWng. near sea & Carina 
Ucrurixo tog. 2 be- 

fattfien, or conditioned CeBarSpafc- 


Four lafcefrant Estates • 45 minutes 
ftwn finenad dntna of Toronto 

• SI 500.000 (Cdn) 21t Acres. 4 
bvWngs, pool, tews court, 
sauna, wfsitpool. Boathouse with 
efcanc romp. Jeannette Sandman 
(41e) B45-4267. 

• SV0OQ00 (Cdn) 8 Acres, private 
property with development patent'd 
2pnnopal dwelngj. Indoor pool. 

• $7v5.D00|Gfai I 1 * Acres, grooous 
Enghh cnwifry styb Home, rerew 
uxrt. pool, separate staff 
Ouorter*. 

■ tl .500.000 (Cdn] Magnificent B yea 
old Georpan home on 3 acres with 
a stream. 6 bedroom s , separate 
staff quartan. 

Coll Ruth Arms Winter (416) 845-4247 
OR WRITE TO. 

toyrt LePoge Real Estate Services ltd. 

326 Laieshoro Road t 
Odcwfle. Ontario. Canada L6J 1J6 


mg- Price: F4^00 000. 
buknMtr JOtti TAYLOR 8 SON 
4 Bid. des Moulins 
MONTE CARLO 
Tet (93) 50 30 7DL The 469180. 


60 fan from Tangier, 

25 fan from Gibrator. 

Han belonged to lhe smne fortify far 1 5 
yearn. Wee P2M0JXia 
Write to 1 18-n5S>7ta*«as. 
0*311 Geneva 3. 




BELL 

GROUP M1HMUIONAI. 

AVE ffiNA 

OH High dots 470 s qja* gafcrv, su- 
perb rweplioa, very faye ckwno 
4 bedroom^ 4 banVooms, 3 
nods Tocvoa, qvdqu. 

NEAR PLACE COLOMBIE 

Kgh doss reception apartme n t, securi- 
ty. 3 reception, 9 bedrooms, 5 bath- 
rooms, 2 garages, mods" roams, wort 
needed- 

OTHS HIGH CLAS5 OfTBMGS 

IBEX 612906 
Ta 727 34 65. 


JASMIN 

fa priwste historic road. TOWT610USE. 

ART-DECO 

Scion. m exaj M , thing room, 9 bed- 
rooms, terrac es, mod’s roon\ 

LCJ , H/Par(s553 90 32 








r J.OI 

2tn3zacx!4i 




Internatioiial Business Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MOST COtflAMER LEASING 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES ? 

17% — 20% |YB1 Invest in one of America’s most 

FIXED INCOME 
PER ANNUM 


1 7TH ETOftE. large studio 40 sqjn. afl 
563 2D IT office hours. 574 if) 54. 




PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 




n 





CADGLM 

FXANKHJRT; 

G»EVA:H 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


On lhe Famotn 

MONT-AGEL GOLF 

COMBE 
donfaring lhe 

PRlNaPAUTY 
OF MONACO 

SUPBtBLY SITUATHJ VILLA 
Surrounded by lorqe prtvarc garden 
dojo n the ■’uub How 
ta further detab please contaa- 

AGED1 

36 fas Bid Prmcesse Ouriarte 
Monte Carlo, MC 98000 Monaco 
Tel 193) SO 66 OOJwl.155) 
Tcie* 479417 MCor 
SAfJ, Anibn - Tu na 




BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JOJOBA - LIQUID GOLD 

A SOUD C EXCITING RWE5T MBYT 

The mrade Joicba a 8 . produced from 
a ofant grown n the U.SjV wtndi Eves 
for Over 100 yews, has unique, out- 
stontfaig qudAes and can favort±iv re- 
place mnmd & anmal based lubri- 
cants. Other esfafcCshad ises. 
cosrru^a. phannoaniticds. feed. 
rtKFiunicfurmO. 

Esfatfap Plantafiane Afaeadv Pro- 
vide Return an f n v art nenl m Hnt 
Year. Bv End Of 6* Yew. Return 
Emid faMel Amount invested. 
Thereafter. (scteOKm show overage 
□muni income of Far complete 
dekrSs canted. AUOBA RESEARCH. 
Ban 2429, Herald Triune. 

92521 NeuBy Octet. Fierce 

■ INVESTOR 8 BROKER 
ENQUIRE WBJCOME 


INVESTMENT CONTROL 
- Have you invested ounde Europe & 
ma<e partwksly m ifte Ui 

- Da ycMhoiei ary potterre. v«h 
your mvamwiti? 

- Do you wrth to L qjricte d tea 
yogr mwestmanri 

• Are you considering ct present oi 
nvestment opportund y outgde 
Ewope, but would Me to drecV be. 
forehand its fegd 'hnaned cspeocJ 
Our corparrtan mrh in mein office in 
Geneva & brandies m London & taw 
YorE oHeri you itt effident services in 
eA lead X hnaripd fields. 

Our fees are tm ctly based on a t>me- 
spent bats, phis actual asstv 

cro ept n ndly & onfyon eeqtf teaueri 

of our (hems, uw can reeomtwrd von- 
ows aiyesmwnt opportuntes m the U S. 

Reuse mW to- INTBUiCAL 
nmCSSA, 9 Bae da la taMne 
CP. 8, 06-1211 Geneva 3. 


WE DON'T HAVE TO BECAUSE 
WE BEUEVE WE CAN OfFSt 


MORE! 


We are a major oo n tawer tersna com- 
pany (founded 1973) wrth an e*t»0eni 
record at return A service for our ct- 
ents. We at cumentfy m onqt y nq over 
17J00 contn n ers for over 2JuO efitnts. 

WE HAVE OVBl 




UNDGt MANAGEA1B4T 
AND AN ANNUAL. TURNQVS 
M EXCESS OF 

$15 MILLION 

IF you aw oot m denng an mveslmenr in 
contanen we suggest you come us 
before mc*tng your deavon. 

WE PAY OUR CUBG5 

ouARimr 

A GROSS OOUAR B4COME 

SHIRLSTAR 

I NTHB4A T10NAL SALES 
KHZaSGRACHT S34 
1017 BC AMSTERDAM 


USA 

BUSINESSES A REAL ESTATE 
6 soiw; ccnrar a di, wdarid & 
rese farf itj real ettafa-vJes A leases. 
Property management A busnesi dm 
•efapment. Write umh vour reqwe- 
menis & 6nanod specs to Ffayan fWty 
A Business Brokers. 14795 Jeffrey Rd, 
sllOJrmne. CA 92714 USA. 714*51- 
3030. 0k. 590194. 




COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T-SRRT FOTOS 
NOWIN BAL COLOR 
on efuenth bumn Ihct asn eon you 
58000 - S 1 0X00/ march. New orxj used 
MOems from V95CO . 5 26 .500. 

Ketno. Dept. J?2. Pastfacfi 170340. 

6000 Fronldurt/W. Germany. 

Tet 069-747808 Tbe 4J2713 KEMA 


COMIC BOOK PUBLISHER 

seeks cfatnKrtors/ogents 

R. 902 Supreme House BW& 

2A. H»t Art. Twn Sba Tsui 
Kowloon, Hang Kong 


HOW TO GB A 2nd PASSPORT. 
Report - 12 cauteries; mofyud. 
Detaasi WMA. 45 Lyndiwa TCE, 
Suite 502, Cenra, Hong Kong. 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


15TH JAVa 600 5QJA. 

Ground floor + 5 Roan 
tderrf far Sdud 

OfEKE SBtVKES 720 97 92 tan 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 



BUSINESS SERVICES 


OFFICE SERVICES 


PHONE DRIVE 

Trmre) & ComriuKOfton faOne: 
WHh a Comfertofcfc and Befiabie 
On»4t*ur Driven Semica. 

We ere a Ccrrftxry based at London 
Heodwwr. We provide 5-sJar chauffeur 
driven Iranspart ro Hotel or (tones. 
We offer Mridwkfe eanwmic M i u n 
wMe you travel: A te l o phon e for your 
use tn route. 

49 Queers Weft, Ashford, Middx. 


i mm 


T* 0636 204930/ 

44 836 204930 from abroad. 


r.'n =T^77 V.’.’.'t® I.- 






m „ajROBWWBSCBra 
99 KtemanadM, 1015 Of Anaterdan 
Tel: 312026 57 49 Telex 16183. 
Wbrid-VMde Shhi Ccww 









HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS I HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL ! HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


LUXURY 7-DAY 
Mediterranean 
CRUISES 

Med ite rra n ean 
Playgrounds 
ab oard the flag ship 
Ocean Princess 

• Weekly departures from Venice 
or ta* Saturday through 
Oct. 12 

• Ceding an Portofrno, Costa 
Smerdldo (or Bbaj/Noples. 

Tort*, Sc9y, Corfu, Dubrovrft. 

Greek Isles ft Daknatia 
abowd Hie yochf-fike 
Ocean Islander 

• Weefay departures from Vence 
or Athens (Proat) Saturtfan 
through Oa. 19. 

• Cling an Mykann. Crate, 
bfandt, Zadar. 

For mmdicee reserwcaimB oateart: 

OCEAN 
CRUISE UNES 

Vm*QKi San Marco 1497 
Tcfcfflj 709822 
tae= Gtode Travel 

37 Avo. Maredd tab . 

Tet (93) 8S6986 
Alhens: TrmAts 

97 Syngreu Aire. 

Tek {0lp21 4478 




ilT’V.'.’liVII.M'J'.l/ 


HEUAS YKHTMG. YaS» OortW. 
AoadenecB 2^ Aihmi 10671, Greece. 




-1 4' I" VA - 


» * • w, 79 room* vnth bdh. whw 

fa renowteed bi heart of Ports, d are 
Concorde / TuflerieL Cbbn A oontat. 
frwn F3S3. 3 rue Mont Thctoar. tab 
Itf. Tek 26032 80. 


Am E Ida, 1-2-3 room flats. 

Teh 5777202 


GREAT BRITAIN 


MONTI CARLO 

I TODAYS & TRAVEL 

"TsWiTsr ' 


Teh 01 703 4175.