Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


The Global Newspaper 

Edited in Paris- 
Printed SimuiLweousIv 
in Puis. London, Zurich. 
Hong Kong. Singapore. 

Tte Ha gue and Marseille 

WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON Rage t g 

No. 31,832 


INTERNATIONAL 




ribunc 


Published With The New York Hines and Hie Washington Post 

* ZURICH, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


Mpno .AflOD"- 

^ 3 >S Mr 

BJ^i—DASDfc ipnUm. g _d50*«* 

— *5^, lt * " y Q a*i of .JBP. 

Cu -o Al CS1-25 S30S» ctduo -»nj ®- 

Crprai _CHW* bteva ti02 _K0Pfc» 

Db«m*-OTD* ibKl __.lJJr.C 3 $ Sm¥jmi „?CCSJv 
*gg- -J fu fc««**>*S-*S-* *-WB«*-“**£ 

S*»J 740 fM USEe. CSS Or 

ES^J*** S^” T iooJ 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


• T • 


-y -1 


Of U.S. Warsfe: 
Release of Hos 


By Christopher Dicker' 

It ushingtcm Past Service 

BEIRUT — Nabih Bern. who is 
negotiating Tor the hijackers hold- 
ing 40 Americans seized in the 
i’ TWA hijacking, said Monday that 
the withdrawal of U.S. warships 
from positions near the Lebanese 
coast was a new condition for the 
hostages' freedom. 

In interviews with local repon- 

As terrorists become more inno- 
vative, aviation experts ponder 
new. better defenses. Page 3. 

ers, the Lebanese Shiite Moslem 
leader said the demand was being 
made in defense of Lebanon and 
not in the name of the hijackers. He 
; said he was making it in the name 
of his own AmaJ militiamen, who 
have acted as middlemen in the 
crisis. 

The central demand to be met 
before the American hostages can 
be freed is the release of 766 Leba- 
nese detainees held in Israel's Atlii 
prison. 

Israel released 31 of the prison- 
ers Monday. The release, the first 
since the TWA aircraft was hi- 
jacked June 14. was approved Fri- 
day by Defense Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin. 

Mr. Berri dismissed the freeing 
of the 3 1 as snowing “no goodwill" 
on the pan of Israel. 

The Shiite leader rejected L'.S. 
,* and Israeli contentions that Wash- 
ington did not have the right to 
pressure Israel to release the de- 
tainees at A [lit. 

Mr. Bern, who is justice minister 
and state minister for south Leba- 
non in the Lebanese coalition gov- 
ernment. noted a 1982 pledge by an 
American special envoy. Philip C. 
Habib, committing the United 
States “to safeguard" detainees held 
by Israel and implement interna- 
tional agreements related to them." 

Israel, in moving Lebanese de- 
tained during its occupation of 
southern Lebanon to a prison in 
Israeli territory', violated the Gene- 
va conventions. Mr. Bern said. 
\Thus, the United States should call 
on Israel to release the detainees 
“whether because of a plane inci- 
dent or without it." he said. 

The implied threat of American 
warships reportedly passing dose 
to Lebanon, he said, “makes us add 


another condition for returning the 
plane’s passengers, this rime from 
the AmaJ movement, namely, that 
the .American fleet sail away from 
our coast." 

[Because of the hostage siiua 
lion. President Ronald Reagan 
canceled plans Monday logo to his 
California ranch this week for a 
nine-dav holiday. Reuters reported 
from Washington. 

[The White House spokesman. 
Larry Speak es. said that “the presi- 
dent thinks it would be best for him 
to remain here in the White House 
as long as those people are bein 
held over."] 

Later in the day another top Shi 
ile official said there bad been no 
movement toward the release of the 
40 American hostages, despite the 
release by Israel of the 3 1 prisoners. 

Akef Haidar, head of the Ama] 
movement's politburo. ruled out a 
gesture by the hijackers. 

Mr. Haidar said at a press con- 
ference that after 1 1 years of war. 
the hijackers “have a lot of time." 

“These people are very patient." 
he said. “We are very patient" 

Mr. Haidar rejected any possibil- 
ity of reaching an agreement with 
Israel, secret or not that was not 
guaranteed by Washington. The 
burden of making the deal, he in- 
sisted. lies exclusively with the Rea- 
gan ad minis tration. 

The 31 freed Lebanese arrived 
early in the afternoon at the south- 
ern city of Tyre in a school bus to 
an enthusiastic reception by their 
families. 

■ Pilot Reportedly 01 

Hijackers aboard the TWA jet at 
the Beirut airport summoned a 
doctor Monday to examine the pi- 
lot Captain John L. Testrake, who 
they said was suffering from stom- 
ach pains. United Press Interna- 
tional reported. 

Dr. .Alfred Zebeuni visited the 
plane twice but under orders from 
the hijackers, refused to talk about 
the pilot's condition. 

Grenade Attack in Manila 

L'mteJ Pros Ir.tenunonol 

MANILA — A grenade explod- 
ed Monday night outside a crowd- 
ed cafe in the centra! Philippine 
city of Bacolod. killing at least one 
peison and wounding 18 others, 
hospital officials reported. 



Ttoi AuobaMd fttsi 

The mother and mother-in-law of S-S. Binder, the co-pilot 
of the Air India jet, wept after learning that he was aboard. 


Irish soldiers carry a victim of the crash from a helicopter in 
Cork. At least 130 bodies had been recovered by Monday. 


Cossiga Is Elected Italy’s New President 


huemjiionjl HeraU Tribune 

ROME — Francesco Cossiga. 
56. a Christian Democrat and pres- 
ident of the Italian Senate, was 
elected president of Italy on Mon- 
day with the combined backing of 
ail five government parties and the 
opposition Communists. 

The former prime minister and 
interior minister received 752 out 
of 977 votes cast in a secret ballot 
by members of both houses of Par- 
Lament and representatives of Ita- 
ly's regions. 

’ The lopsided vote made him the 
first president to be elected on the 
first ballot since Enrico de Nicola, 
who became the Italian republic's 
first head of state in 1946. 

The only numerically significant 
dissent was expressed in the form 
of 141 blank votes. They were as- 
sumed to have come from the neo- 
fascist National Italian Movement, 
which is ostracized bv ali the other 
political parties, and from the small 
Radical Party, which is not repre- 
sented in the government. 

Mr. Cossiga's virtually unani- 
mous election was engineered by 


Ciriaco di Mila, the secretary of the 
Christian Democratic Party. 

Mr. di Mila first obtained the 
agreement of the other four parties 
in Lhe government coalition of 
Prime Minister Bettino Craxi that 
it was the turn of the Christian 
Democrats to succeed outgoing 
President Sandro Pertini. 88. a So- 
cialist. 

Mr. di Mita's second task was to 
negotiate with the leaders within 
his own party, several of whom had 
presidential ambitions. 

After a consensus on the choice 
of Mr. Cossiga had been reached 
by the Christian Democrats. Mr. di 
Mita obtained a pledge from the 
Communists that they would vote 
for him even on the first ballot 
instead putting up their own candi- 
date. 

Mr. Cossig3 was the only serious 
candidate even before the voting 
started. 

By contrast past presidential 
elections after 1946 have taken be- 
tween four and 23 ballots. One 
election lasted 16 days. 

Prime Minister Craxi called the 



Francesco Cossiga 

v«e a sign of political stability in 
Italy. Mrs. Nilde Jotti. the Commu- 
nist president of the lower house 
supervised the election and read 
out the results, announcing each 
vote as an envelope was opened. 


There was tumultuous applause 
when Mr. Cossiga reached the re- 
quired two-thirds majority of 674. 
Mrs. Jotti then congratulated Mr. 
Cossiga and embraced him. He will 
take office on July 8. 

Sixteen votes were cast for Ar- 
maldo ForianL the deputy prime 
minister, 12 for President Pertini 
and between two and eight each for 
10 others, none of whom had de- 
clared their candidacy. 

Mr. Cossiga, a professor of law, 
was prime minister in 1979 and 
1980. 

He was interior minister in early 
1978 when former Prime Minister 
Aldo More was abducted and 
killed by the Red Brigades urban 
guerrilla group. Mr. Moro had been 
his friend and mentor. 

Mr. Cossiga resigned a day after 
Mr. Mora’s body was found, not 
far from the Christian Democratic 
Party headquarters in central 
Rome. 

He said then, “Fran this mo- 
ment you must consider me politi- 
cally dead.” 


Canada Probing 
'Terrorist’ Links 
Involving Sikhs 
In 2 Jet Blasts 


CompMby Our Staff Front Dispatches 

OTTAWA — The crash of an 
Air- India Boeing 747 jetliner and 
the explosion in luggage taken off a 
Canadian airliner at Tokyo's inter- 
national airport are believed to be 
“terrorist incidents,” and investiga- 
tors are looking at possible links 
between them, a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said Monday. 

Claims of responsibility for the 
Air- India crash, which is believed 
to have killed all 329 persons 
aboard, were made Sunday night to 
news organizations in the united 
States and Canada in the name of 
the Kashmir Liberation Army, the 
All-India Sikh Students Federation 
and the Sikh 10th Regiment. 

The three groups are suspected 
in previous incidents of political 
assassinatio n, random murder, hi- 
jackings, arson and sabo tag e. 

Salman Haidar, a spokesman for 
India’s Foreign Ministry, said 
Monday in New Delhi that “it is 
still to early to include or exclude 
any possibility” India’s minister of 
state for civil aviation said Sunday 
there was “a distinct possibility” 
that the plane bad been destroyed 
by a bomb. 

The Canadian spokesman, Sean 
Brady, told The Associated Press 
that the Toyko bombing involving 
luggage taken off a CP Air jet from 
Vancouver was “clearly terrorist. 

“There is no question about 
that,” he said. 

CP flux is also known as Canadi- 
an Pacific. 

Mr. Brady said a statement by 
militant groups Harming responsi- 
bility for the crash of the Air-India 

flight, plus Other information, hag 

brought the government “to the 
conclusion that it was a terrorist 
incident as wdL” 

“As a result we are not discount- 
ing possible licks between the 
two," Mr. Brady said. 

Mr. Brady said police were in- 
vestigating the travel of an “indi- 
vidual who may have been booked 
for tbe flight to Tokyo but not 
taken it, slopped off in Vancouver 


and not t atcen it- but had his bag- 
gage move on.” he said. 

Two Japanese ba g gage hand las 
were kffled in the explosion in the 
airport at Narita, near Tokyo. Ear- 
ly reports bad erroneously said the 
flight, like the Air-India flight, had 
originated in Toronto. 

Qmariian officials said Sunday 
night they were focusing their in- 
vestigations on tbe possibility that 
radical members of the Sikh reli- 
gion living in Canada may have 
been involved in the two incidents. 

They said the All-India Sikh Stu- 
dent Federation, one of the groups 
claiming responsibility for the 
crash, has a significant number of 
supporters in Canada, especially in 
tbe Vancouver area. 

In Canada, tension rose in the 
Indian communities in Toronto 
and in other cities, estimated to 
total more than 200.000, 3fter the 
Indian government’s raid in June 
on the Golden Temple in Amritsar, 
the holiest site of toe Sikh religion. 

A hig h- ranking Indian diplomat 
was roughed up in July by Sikh 
militants in W innip eg, and there 
have been other instances of radical 
groups storming consular offices 
and threatening moderate mem- 
bers of the Indian communities. 

India's diplomatic mission in 
Canada reported to the govern- 
ment about a month ago that it had 
received threats against its envoys 
and national airline's flights that 
were thought to be framSflchs. 

The request triggered a number 
of special precautions, including 
the posting Of Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police at check- in 
counters and embarkation area for 
Air-India. 

Air-India also used X-ray ma- 
chines to inspect checked baggage, 
bur the machine in Toronto broke 
down Saturday night, and flight 
personnel resorted to hand search- 
es. officials said 

On Sonday, Canadian officials 
ordered special security measures 
and additional inspection equip- 
ment for all flights from intema- 

(Cootiii&ed oo Page 2, Cot 5) \ 



A doctor boarded the airliner in Beirut oo Monday to treat tbe pilot, John L. Testrake. 

China Relaxing One- Child Policy ■ 


'■ BELTING — China has started 
relaxing its rigid one-child family 
p lannin g policy, particularly in the 
countryside where opposition has 
been strongest- 

Shea Guoxiang, spokesman for 
China's State Family Planning 
Commission, was quoted by Mon- 
day’s Beijing Review as saying the 
policy had served its purpose in 
limiting population growth. 



Comoro Fnrb 

Tan credo Neves, who 
died before taking office 
as president of Brazil, 
left heavy legacy for his 
replacement. Page <5. 


He described the one-child po- 
licy as an interim measure not ap- 
plicable lo some rural families in 
“special difficulties," who could 
have two children, or members of 
ethnic minorities who could have 
three. 

Mr. Shen said provincial officials 
had been charged with meeting 
China's goal of holding its 1.03 
billion population to 12 billion by 
the year 2000. They could weigh 
local economic, religious and cul- 


EVSBPE 

■ Frugal H arterites in Canada 
are not immune to hard times 
on the nation’s farms. Page 3. 

■ Tbe wife of Wladyslav Go- 
mulka described the ‘neU’ of po- 


litical disgrace. 


Page 5. 


■ Chancellor Kohl of West Ger- 

many has been coming under 
increasing criticism from his 
political allies. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Adam Opel AG of West Ger- 
many had a $225.6-millR)D loss 
in 1984 and blamed last year’s 
strike by metalworkers. Page 7. 

■ The dollar was stable in quiet 

European trading ahead of U.S. 
economic reports due later this 
week. Page H- 


tural factors when deciding on the 
approach to family planning. 

He said couples in the southeast- 
ern province of Guangdong may 
now have a second child if their 
firstborn was a girl. 

Tbe one-child policy, reinforced 
by material incentives and penal- 
ties, has received support in urban 
areas but there has been opposition 
in the countryside. 

Farmers prefer sons because af- 
ter marriage they remain with their 
own families, while daughters 
leave. After years of training, a 
girl's adult labor will belong to her 
husband’s family. 

The Chinese press has highlight- 
ed a rise in female infanticide in 
rural areas that has coincided with 
the re-establishment of family rath- 
er than communal fanning. Rural 
parents have killed girls to gain 
another chance that their one per- 
mitted child will be a boy. 

Mr. Shen said China's popula- 
tion growth rate was still declining, 
with 18.62 births per thousand in 
1983 dropping to 17.5 last year. 

In Jiangsu, one of the most 
densely populated areas of China, 
women had an average of 1-44 chil- 
dren in 1983, compared with 4.61 
in 1970 when the family planning 
program began. 

But with the population aged 
over 60 expected to grow from 8 
percent to 20 percent in the begin- 
ning of the 21st century. China is 
worried about the ability of the 
younger generation to support its 
elders. 


Food Distribution in Sudan Falters 
Over ILS. Plan’s Reliance on Railway 

By Jonathan C Randal Kosti on the Nile west to Nyaia in during Ramadan, the Moslem 


mouth of daytime fasting and 


U.S. officials said that they were 
baffled over the railways refusal to 


By Jonathan C Randal Kosti on the Nile west to Nyaia in during Ramadan, the Moslem 

u adiiitgton Pan Struct Darfur. month of daytime fasting and 

truADTnilM An After successful initial deliveries nighttime feasting, which has just 

.Sudan - An - m December and January. Sudan «2ded 

rfSiSSSS Railways abruptly cosed honorinj UJS . offi^ais said that they were 
S rrSr K its contract despite the doubting of baffled over the raU way's refisai (o 

officials afraid of a sharp rise in the f ° r ^ ^ deIi 'T r ^despite !»«*«- 

mimbcrs of Sudanese threatened ... . . treaties by the country s leader, 

by starvation. k ended OS. General Abdul Rahman Swaredda- 

. JESr&i'zste ss/jsisassr-s 

8niU h director of aninlcmaikmal StiS tommhrCT^FrKidmt Chafer 

relief orgamzauon said, warning of but inrot1ssihle in 0 ,- wesIem Ninoem in ApnL 


normal freight rates for tbe grain dcspite public ^ 

ship ments. treaties by the country's leader. 

In retrospect, that ended U.S. General Abdul Rahman Swaredda- 
hopes of stockpdmg sorghum in ^ Genera, Swareddahab heads 
regional centers before the July and y.. transitional military council 


a new tragedy. 

Conceived 18 months ago with 
foresight and imagination and 
skillfully guided through the Wash- 
ington bureaucracy, the U.S. pro- 
ject to deliver huge shipments of 


all but impossible in lie weslera mOttamt „d incompeiau 

provinces, an area the size of . 7 

France. m a n a g e me nt, tbe decrepit condi- 

ButU.S. Agency for Intonation- filing stock and roadbeds, 

Develimment officials continued widespread corruption _and a htgb- 


niwuuy guiucu uirw.au uic nozu- ^ Developinem officials continued 

rngton bureaucracy, the U.S. pro- t0 hope that Sudan Railways would erpnonty for traffic destined for 
ject to deliver huge shipments of functioning normally and l urban 

sorghum to Northern and Southern delayed uiraing ro road transport lag® are of ated by rdief offi- 
Darfur, Sudan s westernmost prov- 25 a major alternative cutis familiar with tbe difficulties. 

^ “ r S S- ■«■». „ Meanwhile, thousands of hungry Summing up his frustration, An- 


Dariur, Sudan’s westernmost prov- 
inces. lies in ruins. 

Together with a similar opera- 
tion in Northern and Southern 
Kordofan provinces, just to the 
east, where trucks are delivering 
sorghum again after a six-week in- 
terruption. the U.S. relief program 
already has cost more than S4G0 
million, including 5100 million for 
transportation in Sudan. 


as a major alternative. ***“ “ W,UJ 

Meanwhile, thousands of hungry Su mming up lus frustration, An- 

villagers have abandoned homes drew Timpson, director in Sudan of 
and fields to the encroaching de- Save tbe Children, which AID 
sen, defeating lhe program's goal hired to distribute the grain to Dar- 
of keeping them on the land to ^ villages, said: 
proven t further ecological damage “We've got the food in the coun- 

and potentially dangerous migra- try, first at Port Sudan on the Red 
tions to urban cec ters. Sea, then trucked to Kosti. We have 






* -M 

,•»*£> ! -> 

■ ' 

ijfcp 


SSL including S 100 million for 10 urban ^ Sra, then trucked to Kwti. We have 

transportation in Sudan. “We didn’t think it was possible the Tud to move it, and the relief 

Al the heart of the Darfur Future for Sudan Railways lo fail entire- workers were on the ground m Dar- 
Jief what jSSv obKrtSscrtiS “ AID official said. “We fur before the food arnved. For the 

as overeehance on St^anRailwa^ thought they could manage at 30- first Umew e felt we could prevent 
An inefficient, sovemmem-ov^rd percent efficiency." a 


An inefficient, government-owned 
corporation, long impervious to 
outside pressure, the railroad was 
10 have transported I _50Q tons 
1 11.700 metric tons) of sorghum 
daily along the final 590-mile (954- 
kilometen route from the citv of 


ursi time we left we could prevent LONDON -British police have 


Sudan Railways has managed to of ^ ® Place dotting about the IRA bomb attack 

operate other services such as pas- „ . , ' . , . Wme Minister Margaret 

sensor and general freight trains, . . A“ d ,?*!«' ** months, you d Tbatdier last OcL 12 and a bomb 
especially for enormous shipments thmk we d 5°° e no wotk at alL You found Sunday at a London hotel 
of sugar for pastries and candy ®° oul t0 Darfur ^ y° u ’ d Dear 
sought by the urban population (Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) A 


sought by the urban population 


»©ma Protests U.S. Pressure on East Bloc Trade 


By Warren Getler 

fmenunoarf HeruiJ Tribune 
BONN — U.S. pressure on West 
Germany to prevent technology 
leakage to the Soviet Union is be- 
coming so intrusive. West German 
officials say. that Lhe Reagan ad- 


Loreoz Scfaomerus. a senior ofO- It adds, however, that “the Kohl tarily relevant technology to the 
rial in the Economics Ministry’s government, like previous govern- East bloc, it said, “West Germany 
division on foreign trade policy, ments, sees expanding trade be- is the leading target of nipg-q tedi- 
said the report by the U.S. Central tween West Germany and tbe Sovi- no logy transfer amrmo COCOM 
Intelligence Agency was riddled et Union as essential to its aHies.” 

with “falsehoods about German economy and its balance of foreign Recent West German police re- 
law. about German administration trade. West Germany win, there- ports have said that Soviet indostri- 
procedures and about German in- fore, continue lo interpret CO- al espionage is imeasiag in West 
tentioos." COM regulations narrowiv in its Germany. 


Police defused a bomb at tbe Rubens HoteL 

7 Arrested in Britain 
Over IRA Brighton Blast 

Hid Monday that Eve persons had 
LONDON — British police have been arrested Saturday war Gias- 
arrested seven persons for ques- gow and were being brid under the 
tinning about the IRA bomb attack Prevention of Terrorism Act. The 
against Prime Minister Margaret other two were arrested in London, 
Thatcher last OcL 12 and a bomb the spokesman Ra i d . 

nrBS£pir onhotti 

detectives planned to question the 
A spokesman for Scotland Yard five held m Scotland about tbe 

2 bomb attadc at the Grand Hotel in 

Brighton, where Mrs. Thatcher and 
__ ' her cabinet were attending the art- 

Bloc Trade ~ Coo “ ^ 

The Irish Republican Army, 
tarily relevant technology to the Jr“r 10 60(1 British role in 
East bloc, it said, “West Germany -22c 1 claimed respon- 


ar Buckingham Palace: 

A spokesman for Scotland Yard 


German officials - ^ best interests." Beyond tbe report itself, some 

1 ° A h- 10 , and a U.S. official in Bonn — ecb- Mr. Scbomeius rejected as “ri- West German and UJL officials 


cuss decision-making. Page 4. ^ ^ , ieW5 


Mr. aetjomerus rejected as “ri- wnnan ana ujs. officials 

dicuious” tbe implication that who asked not to be named, said 


the leading target of Qlegal tech- sl&Jlr y, 1 , “*1 attack. Five people 
•logy transfer among COCOM 2?® ™“d when a 100-pound (45- 
ies." Vagram) bomb exploded. Mrs. 

Recent West Goman police re- t p at ents and her senior cabinet 
irts have said that Soviet indostri- hurt, 

espionage is increasing in West e P ve ^F ersons arrested in 
snnany. *0003110 will also be. questioned 

Beyond tbe report itself, some a toa-pomid boom defused 

est German and U.S. officials 31 London’s Rubens Hold, 

to asked not to be named, said t?® 11 .MB yards (90 meters) 


ministration's campaign risks be- 
coming court lerprooucti vc. 

West German irritation over ex- 
port controls was fueled recently 
when West German officials ob- 
tained a v ear-o Id classified CIA re- 
port that strongly suggested that 
Bonn was unreliable on the issue 
because of its strong Unde relations 
with Eastern Europe. 


VJ ■ IV w uav uupiiUMUUU UU4 b — * » 1 1 -M1MJ p ^ 

The report, called “Transfer of 801111 mi & hl put its economic inter- that wbat they termed heavy-hand- 110111 "Qckatgham Palace. 
Stra regie Technology to the Soviet 01 h** 01 * its commitment to CO- ^ Uf - dralings on the issue of the p °l«* said that the b 
Union from West Germany ” «v« COM- The organization series to transfer of technology could start planted bv the IRa am* 


organization series to 


that West Germany, “as a’ serious monitor exports to the East bloc. 

participant in" the West’s Coordi- He said that “West Germany’s . lilx h , — — - — r 

filling Commit lee for Expons to trade with lhe East Woe has always m 106 Oroad arca of trade po- samn«to tfiscoarage vacaiiooen 

Communist Areas (COCOM), been, and probably will continue to r . Eran coning to Britain. ... 

"supports the concrot of limiting be. about 5 p er c ent" of its trade. 1 TS n ^f? r ®® n ' . J-tmdon's Standard newwjaper 

the flow of military technology to While the CIA report stopped ^ arrest of one of the sns- 

Sovjet Union and the East short of accusing West Germany of 11121 our resooices win be dissipai- in Scotiand kd to the discov- 

being the most serious leak of mili- (Continued on Paw A i a t** f* *9 bomb at the Rubens 


tion between 


tology could start planted 
og future coopers- discover 
nn and Was&ina- °f no 1 


d that the bomb ni'afr 
tbe IRA and that the 


,- an IRA bomb campaig n 


(Contiraied on Page 4, CoL 6) 













Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


a*cnaars • mastbts • doctorate 

For Work, Ac irf wit Ui Lif rimw. 


Sand detailed resume 
far free evaluation. 



Shuttle Lands; Mission Called Success 


The Associated Press 
EDWARDS AIR FORCE 
BASE, California — Discovery’s 
international crew guided the space 
shuttle Monday to a perfect dawn 
landing on a desert runway to con- 
clude a flight hailed as me of the 
most successful of the 18 shuttle 


missions. 

As the shuttle rolled to a stop, it 
dug a tro ug h in thesand six inches 
(IS centimeters) deep, indicating a 
possible repetition of the brake 
problem Lhat has rerouted the land- 
Log site of the shuttles from Florida 
to this desert base. 

Because brakes locked up on a 
Discovery during an April landing 
on the concrete runway at Florida's 
Kennedy Space Center, all shuttles 
are being returned to the softer, 


open lake bed of Edwards until the 
brakes have been redesigned. That 
means the next four or five flights 
will end at Edwards. 

Five Americans, a French test 
pOot and a Saudi Arabian prince 
touched down at 6: 12 A-ML, after a 
weeklong journey. During their 
trip, they launched a record four 
satellites and their ship served as a 
laser target in an experiment that 
was part of UJS. research for a 
space-based missile defense. 

"This was one of the most suc- 
cessful missions of the shuttle pro- 
gram,'’ said Jesse W. Moore, the 
shuttle project director. “All of our 
objectives on this Right were 
achieved. The crew successfully 
launched three communications 


m visiting m 

New York City? 


Gramercy 
Park Hotel 


Distinguished 500 room 
hotel with excellent 
Restaurant, Cocktail Lounge, 
Room Service and Piano Bar. 
Overlooking Gramercy Park 
with newly decorated, 
comfortable rooms. 
Singles $85-95 
Doubles $90-100 
Suites $115-175 
Group rates and attractive 
monthly rates available. 
Call Gen. Mgr. Tom O'Brien 
(212)475-4320 
Telex 668-755 
Cable GRAMPARK 
21st St. and Lexington Ave. 
New York. NY. USA 10010 


A Slayer of Maleohn X Freed 

United Press International 
NEW YORK — One of three 
men convicted in the 1965 murder 
of Malcolm X, the black leader, 
was freed Monday after having 
served a little more than his mini- 
mum 20-year sentence. Muham- 
mad Abdul Aziz, 46, who insisted 
he was innocent, was one of three 
members of the Nation of Islam 
convicted of the shooting. 


satellites, and the Spartan satellite 
should give astronomers a lot of 
scientific information.” 

Among the goals of the Spartan 
was to scan the core of the MUky 
Way for evidence of black boles, 
stars theorized to be so dense that 
light cannot escape their gravita- 
tional pulL 

On Sunday, the astronauts held a 
televised news conference, answer- 
ing questions from the control cen- 
ter in Houston. It was dominated 
by questions directed by foreign 
journalists at Prince Sultan al-Saud 
of Saudi Arabia and and Colonel 
Patrick Ban dry of France. The 
Americans, John M. Fabian, Ste- 
ven R. Nagd and the U.S. Navy 
commander, John 0. Creighton, 
did not speak at all, and Shanno n 

tl I V I 



"I.; ”4 


K 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Agca Asserts He Can Raise the Dead 

rT% U.kmM A), Aor-I CliH MOfldjV lU CCHlld IS 


ROME (Reuters) — Mehmet Aii Agca said Monday he wuld raise 
people from the dead as be testified in the trial °f, fou T TlStSS 
|Ete Bulgarians accused of complicity with him in the attempted 

flS ^3l bringtaSuj^e aperson who is scientifically dead, provided 
the Vatican acknowledges I am Jesus Christ," Mr. Agca told the court 
ch-M a nhnwwranh taken in Sl Peter’s Sauarc after he snot ami 


•d to be running 
Kremlin.” 


Wm 




The prosecution alleges that Bulgarian agents empioyea wr. 

Turkish associates to assassinate the pope on May 13, W»i. Mr. A^ca 
said a Turkish gunman. Oner Ay. now imprisoned in Turkey, was wi th 
him as well as another defendant. Oral Celik. who is being tried xa his 


absence. 


W. Lucid only briefly. 
The astronauts had 


been told by 


£ Q — T — 

questions about the flight, but a 
reporter brought up the subject of 
40 Americans still being held bos- 



Jamaica Disrupted by General Strike 

KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) — A general strike, called by major unions 
protesting layoffs and the high cost of living, spread Monday across this 
Caribbean island and union leaders said the protest would last at least 


•SUSOf 


tage by Shiite Moslem radicals. 

“If I knew the answer to that, I 
think I'd probably stay in space 
and solve more problems,” mice 
Sultan replied. “Looking at it from 
here, the troubles all over the world 
and not just the Middle East look 
very strange as you see the bound- 
aries and border lines disappear- 
ing.” 

“Lots of people who are involved 
in causing the problems ought to 
come up here and take a look/ - said 
the prince, who is a nephew of Kmc 

Fafad. 


exceptional 

SALE 


Police examine debris left by a suitcase bomb that explod- 
ed Sunday at Tokyo's international airport at Narita. 


Jet Blasts Called Terrorism 


Caribbean island and union leaders said the protest would last at least 
three days. 

A walkout by water commission workers cut off water in the northern 
coast resort city of Montego Bay, and leaders of other utilities indicated 
they were joining the job action. Commercial flights were delayed 
because of a job action by some air traffic controllers. Prison guards, 
postal workers, bank employees and workers at a variety of private 
companies joined the strike. 

Police said the protests had been peaceful and that soldiers and police 
were keeping streets dear of debris and burning tires that were bang 


exclusive creations 


SWEATERS 

BAZAAR 


Spanish Fisherman Is S lam 


83 Rue du Fg. Saint-Honor* 
(angle Avenue Matignon ) 

Tel 266.65,08 - 10 am. - 7 p.m. 


BILBAO. Spain — A Spanish 
fisherman was shot dead Monday 
in the borthem port of Lequdtioin 
what appeared to be an attack by 
Basque separatist gunmen, the po- 
lice said 


(Continued from Page 1) 
tional airports in Canada to Asia. 
Europe and Africa originating in 

C-anaHn 

The search for victims and for 
clues to the cause of the Air-India 
crash continued Monday. 

The Irish authorities, revising an 
earlier count, said 130 bodies had 
been found in the sea and air search 
Sunday and Monday. 

Helicopters ran a grisly airlift 
from the crash site to a temporary 
morgue in an airport building in 
the southern Irish city of Cork. 

In San Sebastian. Spain, a 
spokesman far a maritime radio 
said Monday the captain of a Pana- 


manian ship had reported seeing 
the Air-India jet explode in the air, 
turn over twice ami plunge into die 
Atlantic Ocean. 

Jesus Ferrciro of the station 
Onda Fesquera said that Esteban 
Fraile, speaking from his container 
ship to his company in London, 
described seeing the jet fly above 
him and then watching “what he 
said was the rear part of the plane” 
explode. 

He said that the conversation 
was not recorded, and that the op- 
erator who monitored it did not 
know the captain’s nationality nor 
the name of ois ship. 

(AP, WP, UPI, NYT) 


piled up as roadblocks. The strike was called by six major unions to 
protest layoffs and the high cost of living, according to E. Lloyd Taylor, 

Local Government 


protest layoffs and the high cost of living, accor 
general secretary of the Jamaica Association 
Officers. 


Tamil Attack Reported in Sri Lanka 


COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (Reuters) — Tamil separatist guerrillas at- 
tacked a hospital Monday and fought a gunbanle with troops, breaking a 
weeklong truce in Sri Lanka, official sources said. 

One guerrilla was killed in the clash in northwest Mannar district The 
shooting occurred when the guerrillas in a jeep charged into the hospital 
and opened fire on 15 soldiers escorting a colleague for treatment The 
guerrillas fled, leaving behind the jeep and two rifles, the sources said. No 
casualties were reported among the soldiers. 

It was the first reported clash between guerrilbs, fighting for a separate 
state for minority Tamils, and security forces since the government said 
last Tuesday that five major rebel groups had agreed to stop hostihtks.- 


This is the start 


of something 


very big. 



You’ve got a big future ahead of you with Hewlett-Packard’s new 
HP 150 II personal computer. Because the HP 150 II makes it easy to be 
more productive in your office. In many ways. 

• It’s your own powerful yet simple-to-use personal computer. With 
built-in Personal Applications Manager so you don’t need to remember 
system commands. Ergonomic design for the office, with 


system commands, ergonomic design tor the orhee, with a new, easy- 
viewing 12-inch screen. And a wide choice of user interfaces, such as 
optional touchscreen and mouse. Plus hundreds of the most popular 


touch of a key, it links you to the power of minicomputers and main- 
frames. So you have access to your departments data bases and financial 
reports. 

• Your HP 150 II can be your link to Hewlett-Packard’s Personal 
Productivity Center; the advanced office automation system- So you can 
communicate instantly with other users. Exchange information. And 
tap a wide range of computing resources. 

The HP 150 II. With it comes the forward thinking you expect from 
Hewlett-Packard. 


and professional-quality plotters. 

• The HP 150 II is your own highly flexible terminal, too. At the 


Michael Zandwyken, Hewlett-Packard B.Y, 
P.O. Box 529, NL-1180 AM Amstelveen. 
And then there’ll be no stopping you. 


The Hewlett-Packard 150 II Personal Computer. m 


Louisiana Legislator Switches to GOP 


WASHINGTON (UPI) — John W. Scott, a Louisiana state represen- 
tative and a member of the Democratic National Committee, became the 
latest prominent Democrat to join the Republican Party, it was an- 
nounced Monday. 

The Republican National Committee distributed copies of a letter 
from Mr. Scott to Paul Kirk Jr_, chairman of the Democratic National 
Committee, on the opening day of the 386-member committee's summer 
meetings in Washington. In the letter, Mr. Scott announced his decision 
to switch parties. 

Frank f. Fahrenkopf, Republican national chairman, expressed delight 
with Mr. Scon's decision and invited him to speak to the Republican 
National Committee, which is meeting Thursday through Saturday in 
Atlanta. 


U.S. Aide Walks Out of Moscow Talks 


MOSCOW (Reuters) — A senior U.S. Embassy official walked out of a 
Moscow meeting commemorating tire founding of the United Nations on 
Monday, accusing Soviet Foreign Ministry officials of having deliberate- 
ly insulted Washington. 

The embassy counselor, Mark Parris, left the meeting because of 
references by Soviet officials to the United States that he considered 
“gratuitously offensive,” an embassy spokesman, Jerry Venter, said. He 
declined to say exactly which remarks caused offense, but other diplo- 
mats present said a. senior Soviet Foreign Ministry official, Vladimir 
Petrovsky, and a Soviet expert on American affairs, Geoigy Arbatov, bad, 
made fierce attacks on UJ5. foreign policy, j 

The meeting had been been arranged for ambassadors, but most 
Western states sent lesser-ranking diplomats. Only the American repre- 
sentative walked out 


4 Killed, 20 Injured in Indian Riots 


NEW DELHI (Renters) — Fighting on Monday between Hindus and f 
Moslems in Ahmedahad left four persons dead and 20 injured, despite 
efforts by Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 10 restore order in Gujarat stated ’ . ;1 

Three persons were stabbed to death in the violence over job and ‘ri 
college quotas for underprivileged groups, according to the news agency ' 
Press Trust of India. A fourth died when a bomb he was malting exploded 
in his home. Nearly 200 people have died since the fighting began. - . : ~ 
The government jobs policy which led to the violence has been' 
suspended, but leaders of protests have ngected recent government prace . .. . 
plans. The latest violence erupted as Mr. Gandhi sent five senior officials ■ , 
to Ahmedabad to try to halt the fighting * 


For the Record 


The European Football Union said Monday in Bern Lhat it had recwved - 
formal appeals from Liverpool and Juventus against penalties imposed ~:;-l 
last week on the English and Italian clubs. (Reuters) 

The Yugoslav government cornered its regret Monday io the Austrian^ 
chargts d'affaires m Belgrade over the fatal snooting of a Czechoslovakian^T?] 
trying to flee into Austria, a Yugoslav Foreign Ministry spokesman .7 - , 
said- (Reuters) - .. 

J. David Dommeffi, a San Diego financier, was sentenced Monday to 20 
years in prison for a raultimflhon-dallar investment swindle. Mr. Domin- ; ^TY 
eUi, who was convicted of four counts of fraud and tax evasion, must alsd ' 
pay restitution to an estimated 1,000 investors and pay more than S2"'\ 
million in back taxes. (API;; 

Afghanistan and Pakistan ended Monday a fourth round Of talks aimed ; 
at finding a political solution to the Afghan conflict, a UN spokeswoman: 
said. There was no word on the outcome of the talks (Reuters) ! - 7 


U.S. Plan in Sudan Falters 


(Continued from Page 1) 

we’d only started. And the r ains are 
coming.” 

According to Emil Steinkrauss 
of CARE, a U-S. organization un- 
der AID contract to distribute sor- 
ghum in Kordofan. lack of fuel has 
halved deliveries of grain rations 
for 1-3 million famine victims in the 
north of the province. CARE 
stands for Cooperative American 
Relief Everywhere. 

Critics of the U.S. operation fo- 
cus on the lack of management 
control and especially the absence 
of a backup delivery system by 
truck. 

Had an extensive trucking net- 
work existed for the Darfur opera- 
tion from the be ginning, critics ar- 
gue, some supplies would have 
reached the drought victims in ad- 
dition to the trickle of daily rail 
deliveries, which declined from 224 


tons in the month before March 26 
to 176 tons for the 75 days there-- 
after. Y? 

US. officials remain adamant 7 ■ 
that Sudan Railways not only can. * 
deliver the contracted amounts oT. 
grain, but, in fact, that it remains 
the only means of transporting the; • ■ 
sorghum in meaningful quantities. . ' 

In the meantime, as more grain 
ships dock in Port Sudan, the sor- ;■ .. 
ghum is being fu rinded into waifr' 
houses, and U.S. officials worry ' 


that the stockpiles there may soon 
“get out of hand.” >' 


Chris Eldridge, the Save the 
Children director in Nyala, said 

Wflilino firvr lha n. " — 


. . — — ' , aaw 

waning for ihe grain trains to arrive 
had made him “numb with frusira-' 


— uuuiv vtriUJ 1 11C3 WO” 

non and the thought of impending — 
disaster.” . • 

Mr. Timpson, his superior m - ^ 
h^artoum, predicted an “explo- >'•- 
sion" of d eaths next moaih. '^l 


f -r ! ’ 1 

i,i b* 




ltl'i'" 




HtiStW 


t: 


HEWLETT 

PACKARD 


2T*. 



A* Wi *- 

M " 


THE BEST of all possible worlds 

bolder grand hotel 

ZURICH 



Rao^de GgTKfre, Or. KurhaiMfroMe 65, CH-B032 Zurich 
TWephon* 01/251 62 31. T*fex.- 53449 grand <h 





‘ ‘ J'- 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


u ’;^In Farm Crisis, Frugality Is Not Enough 

Fundamentalist Colony in Ckmtida Auctions Land in an Attempt to Survive 


S £' VV'. ''fJzjjft*: - ^ 


^ i'll T ;■ 

i i 


i » 

*| M 


By Christopher S. Wren 

.Vew York Tima Serna 

SASKATOON, Saskatchewan 
. — When the Hutteriie colony at 

Star City auctioned off 3349 acres 
• or fertile black soO recently, it was 
taken as proof of hard tunes for 
Canada's fanners. 

The colonists of the Hutterian 
Brethren Church, a fundamentalist 
Protestant sect whose roots reach 
\ ]., . back 350 years into central Europe, 

" ' * . have earned a reputation Tor aus- 

‘‘ »il| Ju terity, prudence and hard work. 

‘ “ But their aversion to profligacy, 
. ' which made than among the most 

- productive fanners in North Amer- 
ica, did not prevent the Hutteriies 
at Star City from losing two- thirds 

. of their land. 

“We had no choice; the banks 
" wanted thezr money,” said Sam 
"■ Tschetter as he milked cows before 
supper at the Star Gty colony,- a 
-luster of tidy white bungalows, 

. bams and aluminum silos dwarfed 

- by the expanse of prairie in eastern 
Saskatchewan. 

The plight of the Hutteriies at 
Star City is characteristic of what 
other Canadian farmers face, ac- 
r*, ,1 ; , cording to Wayne Easter, the prea- 

s ill V! L, dent of the National Fanners 
^ Union. 


“The fact is that most farmers 
are living frugally and are selling 
off their life’s work.” he said. 

Mr. Easter cited a federal study 
last autumn reporting that one out 
of six Canadian farmeis was in seri- 
ous financial distress. In a move to 
shore up its fanners, the Saskatche- 
wan government has halted fore- 
closures on farmland during 1985. 

The German-speaking Hutter- 
iies are descended from Moravian 
Anab aptists who were driven east- 
ward to eventual settlement in Rus- 
sia. In 1874, 440 pioneers moved 
from Rusaa to South Dakota. Dur- 
ing World War L many moved to 

Canaria. 

Today, more than 18,000 Hutter- 
ites inhab it 224 colonies in the 
provinces of Manitoba, Saskatche- 
wan and Alberta. Nearly 8,000 live 
in the United Stales, according to 
John Ryan, who toadies geography 
at the University of Winnipeg and 
is an expert on the Hutteriie econo- 
my. 

Mr. Ryan 1ms documented the 
efficiency of Hutterite farmers 
most thoroughly . in neighboring 
Manitoba, where be found that 
they formed 6.1 percent of the rural 
population, owned only 1.6 percent 
of the land, yet produced a quarter 


Estwyl. 


L. 

nSnnipao 


NORTH DAKOTA I 


of the province’s eggs, bogs and 
turkeys, among other commodities. 

Consequently, he called the debt 
load of the Star City colony omi- 
nous. “When the Hutteriies get 
into difficulty,” he said, “it is a 
pretty good indicator of what shape 
the prairie economy is in.” 

The Star City colony was formed 
seven years ago out of a larger cdo- 
ny at Estuary in southern Saskatch- 
ewan. Hutterite colonies usually di- 
vide up assets and split into two 
when the population exceeds 100 
members. 

Peter Tschetter, a patriarch, led 
his four stms and a cousin with 
their families northeast to a new 


homestead. With the help of Tvm lr 
loans, they bought more than 5,000 
acres (2,000 hectares}. 

But by this April, the Star Gty 
colony had to sell off two- thirds of 
its land, leaving it with 1,760 acres. 
The auction price of about S3 80 an 
acre was hardly more than half 
what the property was worth four 
years earner. 

String in the sparsely furnished 
living room of his spotless bunga- 
low, John Tschetter, the leader of 
the colony, attributed the financial 
problems less to falling commodity 
prices and rising fuel and seed costs 
than to crippling loan repayments. 

“Mostly it’s high interest,” he 
said. “We’ve paid as high as 23% 
percent, and if you make a return 
of 5 or 10 percent, how can you 
afford to pay 23% percent? And the 
banks have no mercy on you.” 

It is difficult to see how the 53 
Huttmtes at Star Gty could cut 
back much further on expenses. 
They raise almost all their food, 
from meat to potatoes and vegeta- 
bles. The men wear fl ann el snixls, 
rough Housers and wide-brimmed 
black hats, and the women sew 
their own bonnets and ankle-length 





i -k r nh-j? ! 

• V .& • ! 

* jt i v. f 

b 





invoWnmtin Terror in Air: Security Experts Combat New Perils 


m l 


i?*:r s 


1, u 


Beirut Bombing 

•: Washington Past Service 

\ WASHINGTON — In a letter 

- published in The Washington Frist, 

■ : a spokesman for the Central lntdti- 

^ l U'fif* In j gence Agency said the agency was 
J not involved in a Beirut car bomb- 
. -ing lhal killed 80 people on Maich 

- 8 and criticized a Post article on the 
incident. 

The Post’s May 12 article said 
. that President Ronald Reagan dj- 

• reeled the CIA late last year to 

- train and support units for strikes 

- • against suspected terrorists before 

they could attack U.S. targets. 

- C The story said that in March, 
.1 members of one of those units, 
' “acting without GA authorization, 
‘ went out on a runaway tmssiao and 

hired others in Lebanon" to plant a 
\ M , f car bomb outride the residence of 
-ii'vDV 1^ Sheikh Mohammed Hussein Fad- 
lallah, leader of Hezballah, (Party 
' of God), a militant Suite faction. 

• The letter from the CIA, signed 
-by George V. Lauder and pub- 
lished Sunday, said the stray “gave 

• the American public and the rest of 
the world the totally false i m pre s - 

’ - si cm that the UJS. government was 
'•involved in terrorist activity. ... 
-This mislendmg theme has been 
racked up by a number erf other 
fcfhmalists as fact” 


By Douglas B. Beaver 

Washington Pea Service 

WASHINGTON — Although 
the rash of hijackings and bomb- 
ings in valving commercial airliners 
and anprats in recent days may 
prove to be no more than coino- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

dentally related, the incidents have 
ted airhne and airport security offi- 
cials around the world to ask if ihcy 
are doing enough to assure safety. 

On Sunday, U.S. safety and air- 
line officials met at the Federal 
Aviation Administration here to 
rfi<aniRs th« prob lem. - 

Rodney Wallis, security director 
of the International Air Transport 
Association, representing 138 air- 
lines, called an emergency meeting 
in Montreal of the group’s security 
advisory committee to discuss the 
crash erf the Air India Boring 747 
into the Atlantic on Sunday. 

On Monday. EATA : said it ap- 
peared that a bomb had been in- 
volved in the Air India crash and it 

pledged efforts to tighten security. 

U.S. experts are concerned that 
the terrorist type of hijacking or 
bombing presents a greater risk 
than what people in the airline in- 
dustry call the “homesick Cuban.” 

For one tiring, many security 


still assume that no air- 
linear hijacker is suicidal. But expe- 
rience m recent years with suicide 
car bombers seems to invalidate 
that assumption. 

For another thing, after a hijack- 
ing occurs, a terrorist with a power-, 
ful organization behind him is 
more difficult to deal with than an 
individual or a small group. With 
an indivklafll or small group acting 
alone, “Yon can wear them down 
and eventually get everybody off 
safety," said a specialist 

Considering the tens of thou- 
sands of domestic amt internation- 
al flights each day, the odds of 
being hijacked or blown up are in- 
finitesimal Every day, UJS. airlines 
cany about a million people on 
15,000 flights, including about 500 
international flights. 

Nonetheless, events such as the 
Air India disaster and other vio- 
lence in recent days — the hijack- 
ing of the TWA airliner after it 
took off from Athens, the bombing 
at the Frankfurt airport, an explod- 
ing suitcase at the Tokyo interna- 
tional airport — make many people 
uneasy, regardless of statistics. 

After President Ronald Reagan 
said the United Slats regarded se- 
curity at the Athens rirport as inad- 
equate, 30,000 Americans canceled 
trips to Greece, according to a sur- 


vey by Knight- Rid der newspapers. 

On Monday, IATA criticized the 
Athens airport security. 

The United Stales has developed 
simple and sophisticated responses 
to the threat Some of these are 
cleariy visible, such as the metal 
detectors for passengers and hand 
luggage. 

Some are unseen, such as (he 
“hijacker profile” that has been de- 


N. Y. Hotels Busy 
Despite Strike 

Nett York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The strike that 
began June 1 against 53 hotels in 
New York Gty apparently has not 
had a significant impact on occu- 
pancy rates or convention business, 
according to industry officials. 

In addition to having supervisors 
fill in for the 16400 strikers, who 
are members of the Hotel and Mo- 
tel Trades Union, the hotels have 
hired 5,500 temporary workers, 
bringing the overall replacement 
work force to about 12,000. 

“Occupancy in the holds has not 
fallen off substantially,” said Al- 
bert A Formicola, president of the 
Hotel Association ’of New York. 


veloped to help airline employees 
anticipate trouble. 

Several secret techniques for 
screening passengers, baggage and 
cargo have been developed. 

After the hijacking of Trans 
World Airlines Flight 847, FAA 
officials urged airports and airlines 


experience has shown that hijack- 
ings beget hijackings. 

“We’re looking at a very unsta- 
ble world at the moment,” Steve 
Last, principal rice president of the 
International Federation of /Ur 
Line Pilots Associations .said in 
London, according to a report by 
United Press International. 

As in all endeavors, there is no 
such thing as total security, and 
reputations do not mean a thing. 
TWA has been known within the 
industry for years as having one of 
the best security programs. Canada 
and West Germany are regarded as 
countries where passengers can de- 
pend on the airports and the 
screening procedures. 

On the other hand, countries in 
southern Europe, particularly Italy 
and Greece, have bad a reputation 
for reiaxetf security. All countries 
have access to the equipment and 
the knowledge to thwart hijackers 
or bombs, largely through infonna- 


Page3 


Republicans Lure Teens 
To Join Now, Vote Later 


ThaNAwYorfcTm 


77kt Associated Press 

NEW YORK — They stuff en- 
velopes, sharpen pencils and make 
phone calls. They display an un- 
usual new enthusiasm for tradition- 
al politics and for their country. 
They are Teen Age Republicans, 
and they are so active that the 
Democrats have realized they must 
find new ways of reaching teen- 
agers. 

“The Republican Party is reding 
them in like fish," said William 
Bdk, president of the Young Dem- 
ocrats, an organization for party 
members under 36. “The Demo- 
crats have sat back and let them do 
it” 

For the past five years, Teen Age 
Republicans, a political organiza- 
tion for 13- to 19-year-olds, has 
maintained a membership of 
100.000, successfully recruiting 
new members as quickly as older 
ones move on to become College 


Chakiren of Huttoites at Star Gty colony in Saskatchewan. 

Everything is coQedivdy owned low other cokmies that are making 
except' for clothing and some windows, heaters, brushes or toys 
household gpods. on the side. He sounded philosoph- 

To afford the cost of fanning, icai about the recent setback. 

John Tschetter said, the Star Gty “I think you just accept it as a 
colony is looking fra a way to fof- way of life,” he said. 


ones move on to become College 
Republicans or Young Republi- 
cans. Most of tbe TARs, as they 
call themselves, are loo young to 
vote, but their contributions to the 
party are significant nonetheless. 

“Young people provide a great 
work force," said Turn Wine- 
brener, chosen as one of two “Out- 
standing TARs in the Nation” for 
1984-85. “They can do a great deal 
of work that older members would 
scoff at." 

In exchange for the labor, the 
Republican Party offers teen-agers 
educational material on free enter- 
prise, constitutional government 
and patriotism, arranges for them 
to meet experts from government 
and industry, and organizes sum- 
mertime workshops on leadership. 
Most importantly, perhaps, teen- 
agers say the party makes them feel 
welcome. 

“We’re getting involved so we 
can put our two cents in,” said Ira 
Brody, 17, a high school junior who 
is vice chairman of the New York 
State TAR dub. 

Last fall, Mr. Brody advocated 
President Ronald Reagan’s re-elec- 
tion in a debate at Stuyvesant High 
School in New York Gty. Mr. 
Brody wooed the crowd and ra- 


tion exchanged through the IATA 
and the International Civil Avia- 
tion Organization. 

Last year, there were five hijack- 
ings and seven unsuccessful at- 
tempts on UJJ. airliners, and 21 
hij acking s of foreign carriers. Since 
1950 there have been 80 explosions 
aboard passenger aircraft 22 of 
them VS. airliners. 

Although it has not been estab- 
lished that a bomb caused the Air 
India crash, which is presumed to 
have killed all 329 aboard, that is 
the most logical explanation for the 
scattering of debris and bodies over 
a wide area of the ocean. 

Only one other Boeing 747 has 
ever disintegrated in flight. That 
was an Ir anian Air Force transport 
that crashed near Madrid in May 
1976, killing all 17 aboard. Official- 
ly, it was said that lightning caused 
the crash. But that conclusion is 
disputed, and many experts list the 
efr iffi g as unknown. 

Soviet Restricts Foreign Vism 

United Press International 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
is restricting entry visas to relatives 
of resident foreigners during the 
Inter national Youth Festival bc- 


cruited some new members to the 
local TAR club. 

Early images of the presidency 
often influence a young person's 
sense of which party can do a good 
job, said M. Kent Jennings, a pro- 
fessor of political science at the 
University of California at Santa 
Barbara and at the University of 
Michigan. 

“If somebody is 20 right now.” 
he said, “they were only 12 when 
Carter became president. The im- 
age they got was not a very success- 
ful president, and they figured out 
he was a Democrat. Reagan came 
to tbe White House, and he has an 
image as a good president. Then 
they figured out he was Republi- 
can.” 

The lack of any nationally orga- 
nized Democratic group for teen- 
agers may also have steered some 
to join the Republicans, and the 
Democrats are working to change 
that. Mr. Be Ik and others con- 
cerned about recruiting young peo- 
ple recently urged Paul ft. Kirk Jr„ 
chairman of tne Democratic Na- 
tional Committee, to take action in 
order to compete. Mr. Belk hopes 
to explore different ways to reach 
teen-agers at a meeting of the Dem- 
ocratic National Committee this 
week. 

Both parlies have a large stake in 
how these young people will vote. 
It' is uncertain, however, where 
their allegiances will be 10 years 
from now, said Gary' Orrcn. an as- 
sociate professor or public policy at 
the John F. Kennedy School of 
Government at Harvard Universi- 
ty. 

“One thing about young people 
is they do things in fads,” Mr. Or- 
ren said. “Young people who don’t 
have a real strong partisanship to 
begin with tend to go with the na- 
tional trend. They lack very strong 
political moorings. Later, they 
might gain some.” 

“On tbe other hand, the evidence 
is that that earliest political in- 
volvement is not just a throw- 
away,” Mr. Orren said “Your first 
date, your first love — you don’t 
just throw it away." 


Among the riches of Beverly Hills, 
a little gem of a hotel. 


The Beverly Pavilion Is one of two 
small, fashionable Beverly Hills hotels 
that are run in the European style, 
under the direct supervision of the 
proprietor himself. And we offer our £ 
guests the ultimate Beverly Hills 
experience: free limo service to y 
glorio us Rod eo Drive. 




Inte rnational 
ginning in Ju 


h Festival be- 
lomats and So- 
fonday. 


03 Beverly. Pavilion 

a Max Barti Hotel 

9360 WHsMceNviL, Beverly HUfe,CA902l 2. lelec No. 691 366. 


1 • 'M i\ - 

*. . _ f- i ■ . » 


hiiianKi? 


ti*'- 




icM 


• . • _ A .% * 



How times have changed 
at Wimbledon. 

Wimbledon. Organised to raise funds lor a new lawn roller 
in 1 877. Mildly international by 190Z The dream of the worlds 
most gifted tennis players lor something over seven decades. 

Wimbledon fortnight. Today 14,000 people daily witness 
breathtaking tennis on Wimbledon's Centre Court. Millions 
more across the world watch on telexnsion. 

The original courts for "the new game of lawn tennis” were 
shaped like an hourglass. 

The hourglass went, but timing is still everything for Wimble- 
don champions. And it is Roiex of Geneva who measure the 
score, time and duration of marches. •?- 

-Th is is why we I ike to say that, tod ay, everyone W 

at Wimbledon uses a Roiex. ROLEX 


IXVn-Jl'srr OYSTKk PKKPICTVAL l UKONU.'lfcThK i DIAMETER )l»l IN STAINLESS STtU. ANII HATKH'ST UYKTEK 
PERPCTCAL CHRONOMETER IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH WHITE COLD BEZEL BOTH WITH JL'BII.EE BRACK I -ET 


... ^ 









1 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


EC Urged to Improve Decision-Making 


By Steven J. Dryden 

IniemdUi'twI Hernhl Tribune 

BRUSSELS — European Com- 
muniiy leaden, who will meet in 
Milan this weekend. ore being 
urged to take steps to improve their 
methods of decision-making. The 
meeting will be Lhe first in several 
years noi dominated by the prob- 
lems of the budget or or admiitlng 
new members. 

"They have a clear Held to get 
down to the basics." commented a 
community official. 

But as the preparations for the 
meeting have unfolded, disagree- 
ments among the 10 have made it 
unlikely that the leaders will ap- 
prove far-reaching decisions on in- 
stitutional questions. 

Instead, some members have 
suggested that the meeting endorse 
changes such as a move from una- 
nimity to majority voting, which 
could then be ratified at the De- 
cember meeting in Luxembourg. 

The EC leaders will also be asked 


Brazil Plane Crash Kills 13 

The irscu-iared Press 

RIO DE JANEIRO — A twin- 
engine airplane crashed Sunday 
while making an emergency land- 
ing in the northern Amazon 'state of 
Mato Grosso, killing all 13 persons 
on board, airport officials said. The 
dead were all Brazilians. 


to back an ambitious program in 
high technology research and a 
timetable for removing, by 1992, all 
physical technical and tax barriers 
holding up the movement of goods 
and services within the community. 

Earlier this month. Lord Cock- 
field, the co mmissi oner for the in- 
ternal market, said that the elimi- 
nation of trade barriers could 
-fundamentally alter the face of 
Europe" by creating a true com- 
mon market that would unleash the 
community's economic potential. 

The Executive Commission's 
while paper on eliminating trade 
barriers proposes more than 300 
steps, some of which are expected 
to be resisted. Because of this, aides 
to Lord Cockfidd said it was un- 
certain whether the document as a 
whole would be endorsed or in- 
stead agreed to in principle. 

The technology program, which 
envisions an EC commitment of 
several billion dollars annually, is 
designed to enable the community 
to catch up with the United States 
and Japan in the development of 
computers, lasers, semiconductors, 
telecommunications and other ad- 
vanced products. 

The technology proposal is part- 
ly seen as a response to the UJS. 
research campaign to build a space 
shield against nuclear missiles, 
which is expected to provide stimu- 
lus to a broad spectrum of technol- 
ogy- 


The European technology pro- 
posal is being pressed as a way to 
combat high unemployment and 
also to avert a “brain dram." 

Commission officials played 
down suggestions that their pro- 
posal conflicted with the French 
plan for European technological 
cooperation, known as Eureka, 
which will also be presented in Mi- 
lan and has the backing of West 
Germany. 

“There is no contradiction." said 
Karl -Heinz Narjes, EC commis- 
sioner for industry. 

The EC leaders have planned to 
devote a substantial portion of the 
meeting to institutional changes 
recommended last year by a study 
committee. 

The committee, urging the cre- 
ation of “true political entity," said 
a special conference of the mem- 
bers should be convened to revive 
the Treaty of Rome, the 1957 docu- 
ment founding the community. 

The conference would consider 
such recommendations as giving 
the Executive Commission and Eu- 
ropean Parliament more power, 
and changing the present require- 
ment for unanimity in decision- 
making to majority voting in most 
cases. 

The task of reaching unanimity 
among the 10 member states has 
slowed the process or change in the 
community to a crawl. The entry of 
Spain and Portugal next January 


makes a move to majority voting all 
the more urgent, said community 
officials. 

“With enlargement to 12 mem- 
bers. 1 can't imagine things wring 
on the way they are," saida West 
German diplomat “In a few years 
there will be a crisis." 

Italy, Belgium and the Nether- 
lands have supported a special con- 
ference on reform, but it has been 
opposed by Britain or viewed with 
skepticism by other countries. 

Britain has recently proposed a 
package of reform measures and 
initiatives to strengthen political 
cooperation. The package, to be 
considered in Milan, includes a 
pledge to make more use of major- 
ity voting and the setting up of a 
secretariat to coordinate political 
consultation. 

The more ardent supporters of 
reform argue that more “solemn 
pledges" by community leaders 

will serve little purpose. They point 

to the previous commitment try the 
leaders to reach “final conclusions” 
in Milan on institutional questions. 

The British proposals were ad- 
vanced amid wnai one community 
official termed the “vacuum" left 
by the inaction of West Ger man y 
and France. Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl and President Francois Mit- 
terrand hinted earlier this year that 
they would undertake a major ini- 
tiative for community reform, but 
then “discovered how difficult that 



Bonn Protests U.S. Trade Pressure 


(Continued from Page 1) 

ed in crying to enforce a controlled 
items list that, as a result of certain 
voices in the Pentagon, keeps get- 
ting bigger and bigger." 

“We're especially concerned." he 
added, “that we will lose German 
industry's cooperation in export 
controls the image grows that the 
U.S. is using COCOM controls as 
an embargo instrument for high 


He added, however. "We do not 
feel we've been heavy-handed or 
insensitive to European concerns 
but some issues cut io the bone," 
such as those involving the security 
of UiL forces. 

West German officials died sev- 
eral recent cases in which they said 
UJS. inquiries have been unfound- 
ed: 

• A U.S, complaint to Foreign 
Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher 


technology overall and not for the about a West German-made lathe 

- j I f _ i . * « t 


Lord Cocfcfield 

would be to achieve," said another 
community official. 

West Germany's credentials as a 
supporter of reform were tarnished 
by its use of a veto last month to 
block a cut in grain prices that had 
been agreed to by a majority of the 
members. 

A West German spokesman said 
that Mr. Kohl planned to tell other 
leaders in Milan that his country’s 
use of the veto was a one-time ne- 
cessity and that West Germany was 
ready to back a system of majority 
voting. 


was rescinded when the tool, far 
from being capable of making so- 
phisticated ban bearings for Soviet 
military aircraft, was found by 
West German officials to have 
none of the capability attributed to 
it in the US. protest. 

• A U.S. protest about the sale 
of helicopters by a West German 
firm to North Korea backfired 
when the U.S. officials were told 
that the German government bad 


no jurisdiction over the sale be- 
cause the helicopters were not on 
the COCOM list and were never on 
West German soil. 

• Last winter. Washington tried 
to block the sale Io Syria of bullet- 
proof vests made by a West Get. 
man firm, which used UJS. -sup- 
plied parts, but Bonn balked at 
blocking the sale because Syria was 
not on the COCOM list of high 
security risk countries and because 
the company had already recover- ■ 
re-export licenses from Washing, 
ton. The problem was resolved 
when the Pentagon decided to pur- 
chase the vests. 

West German sources said an 
investigation to determine whether 
it would be possible to run a securi- 
ty check cm aU West Gentian scan- 

lists who work with .American- 
made, super-high-speed computers 
encountered stiff resistance from 
Bonn officials. 


intended purpose. 

An American official here, who 
requested anonymity, said the U.S. 
government in the past year has 
made numerous inquiries — some- 
times protesting at high levels in 
the West German government — 
about what he described as “rela- 
tively unimportant or innocuous” 
products. 

The inquiries, most of which ap- 
parently originated in the Pentagon 

office of Richard N. Perlc, on aasis- 

tarn secretary of defense, have 

uJbSS ic^cooper- Migratory Songbirds May DectineinXJJS. 

are." the official said. ‘‘You can G * ° J 

only scream wolf so many times 
before they stop listening." 

Steve Bryen, deputy assistant 
secretary' of defense under Mr. 

Perie, said in Washington in a tele- 
phone interview that the CIA docu- 
ment “is not an official report, nev- 
er was sanctioned at the top 
government level and doesn't re- 
flect our view." 


Atat York Times Sennit 

SILVER BAY. New York — Ex- 
perts of the National Audubon So- 
ciety are predicting a decline in the 
number of migratory songbirds in 
the United Slates because of the 
destruction of their winter habitat, 
(he tropical rain forests of Latin 
America. 

At a convention of the societv 


here last week. Dr. George PoweQ, 
a research biologist, said trees m 
those regions were bring cut to 
clear pasture for cattle, leaving kss 
room for birds like warblers ami 
vireos to nest. Marshall Howe, a 
biologist with the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, stressed a de- 
crease in 1>.S. forests where the 
birds breed in the summer. 


P 1 


i\ J 
. . 


MANNESMANN 





hiv 


Machinery, Plant 
and Systems 


Mannesmann Demag, your partner 
with experience in ail matters of 
mechanical engineering and plant 
construction. With a broad financial 
base, world-wide sales network 
and a future-oriented research and 
development programme for new 
products. 



9«l 




Mannesmann Demag AG 

Postfach 10 01 41, D-4100 Duisburg 1 
Fed. Rep. of Germany 



Metallurgical Plant 

Integrated plant, blastfurnaces, steel mills, 
continuous casters, electrometallurgical 
plant. 



Pipe Making 

Plant and machinery for the production 
of seamless and welded tubes and pipes. 
Hydraulic presses. 





Process Compressors 


displacement machines for air and 
technical gases. 


• m 
-■m 




"flPSII 

HUM 

-ail 

Industrial Drives 

Electric drives, 
control systems. 




Cranes and 
Lifting Appliances 

Serial lifting equipment crane components, 
cranes, electric suspension track systems. 



Construction Equipment 

Hydraulic excavators up to 21 m 3 bucket 
capacity, mobile cranes up to 1,600 1 
road finishers up to 12.5 m paving width.' 


Nlining Equipment 

Shaft winding equipment tunnelling 
machines, shaft drills, raise cutter heads, 
com pressed air motors. 




Systems Engineering 


Warehouse engineering, warehousing - 
systems, handling and distribution systems, 
integrated materials handling systems. 



Pneumatic Systems 

Compressors* pneumatic tools, : 
equipment and components for the 
building trade arid industry in general 



Plastics Machinery 

Machinery and complete systems 
for injection moulding. 



Bulk Handling 

container handling systems. ' 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


Page 5 


K, 


' Hv/;, 


Now Kohl’s Allies Are Assailing Policies 


By Henry Tanner 

International Herald Tribune 

BONN — As the Bundestag ap- 
proaches its summer- recess and po- 
litical life in (he capital is about to 
be suspended until late August, 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl is facing 
sharper personal-political attacks 
than at any time since be took of- 
fice in 1981 

The attacks are increasingly 
coming not from the opposition 
but from members of his coalition 
partners, from his cabinet ministers 
and from conservative publications 
that have supported him in the 
past 

The cover of Wirtschafts Wochc, 
a weekly aiming at leaders in busi- 
ness and banking, last week 
showed the chancellor’s portrait 
hanging lopsidedly from a crooked 
nail under the headline “Chancel- 
lor Kohl: Bonn’s position askew.” 

“Having failed to provide solu- 
tions for so many problems, the 
chancellor himself is the problem 
now," the weekly said “Despite 
(heir protestations of fidelity many 
in the chancellor's own party now 
doubt he will be able to overcome 
his love of authority," it reported, 
adding that he needed “quick suc- 
cesses to stabilize his position in the 
party." 

The article enhanced the impres- 
sion, created in a multitude erf pub- 
lic statements or leaked remarks by 
members of the coalition, that Mr. 
Kohl has become a “chancellor on 
probation” and that it can no long- 
er be assumed that he will lead the 
coalition when the campaign for 


the 1987 national elections begins. 

Mr. Kohl became chancellor in 
1982 when the Free Democratic 
Party broke away from its govern- 
ing maiirinn with the Social Demo- 
crats and joined the Christian 
Democrats. Mr. Kohl confirmed 
his hold on power with a landslide 
victory in general elections in 
March 1983. 

Franz Josef Stranss, (he state 
premier of Bavaria, is the central 


Mr. Strauss, though powerful in 
his stale, is too controversial ever to 
brc o n y national chancellor. But he 
is a forceful person who would be 
able to i mp ose -a consistent policy 
concept on a government simply by 
being part of it, and be has been 
openly disgusted with the fact that 
Mr. Kohl has failed to consult him 
on crucial occasions. 

There is no commanding figure 
in the governing coalition ready to 
step into Mr. Kohl’s job now. 

Mr. Kohl has been singled out 
for blame by several leading pro- 


The conservative Frankfurter 
Aligemeine Zeatung remarked that 
the optimism and “good humor" 
far which the chancellor is famous 
were not enough- It warned that if 
the government continued in its 
confused ways it could face a catas- 
trophe in the 1987 election. 

Die Welt, another conservative 
daily that had been a Kohl stal- 
wart, has tamed into a frequent 
critic. It has hinted, among other 


things, that be may have lost his 
famous touch with the common 
man. 

Even the mass-circulation Bild 
of the far-right Springer group has 
attacked the chancellor after years 
of being his champion. 

The start of the flood of criticism 
from Mr. KohTs own political al- 
lies is easy to pinpoint, it started on 
the evening of May 12, when the 
first results in the state election erf 
North Rhine-Westphalia showed 
that the Christian Democrats had 
suffered an electoral collapse. 

The Christian Democratic vote 
dropped by abont 8 percentage 
points to 36.6 percent of the vote 
from 45 percent in (he previous 
state election. The opposition So- 
cial Democrats soared to an abso- 
lute majority erf more than 52 per- 
cent. 

Until then it bad been assumed 
by politicians in all parties, includ- 
ing such opposition leaders as Wil- 
ly Brandt, mat the government co- 
alition would easily win the 
national election in 1987 and per- 
haps in 1991 

Leading Soda! Democrats still 
concede that it is unlikely that they 
will come back to power in 1987, 
buL (hey hare hoped to become the 
largest single party, bypassing the 
Christian Democrats. 

The sudden suspicion, after the 
North Rhine-Westphalia election, 
that the defeat of the Christian 
Democrats might be possible sent 
shock waves through the ranks of 
the coalition — ana especially in 


Bavaria, where Mr, Strauss is fac- 
ing a state election next year. 

Mr. Kohl’s first public reaction 
to the election defeat was that the 
government’s policy, especially in 
the economic field, was basically 
sound and that all that was needed 
was more time to bring down un- 
employment. 

The notion took hold quickly, 
however, that the defeat was the 
cumulative result of Mr. KohTs 
personal mistakes as head of the 
central government. At present, 
only 31 percent of West Germans 
regard him as a good chancellor, 
according to a poll in Wirtschafts 
Wochc. 

After more than two years in 
power, the' government has not 
beau able to reduce the unemploy- 
ment level of more than [WO million 
members of the work force, con- 
trary to Mr. Kohl’s promises. This 
is Ins heaviest single political bur- 
den. 

But farmers, on whom Mr. 
Strauss relies in Bavaria, retired 
people and other recipients of state 
support also are up in arms against 
government austerity and tax poli- 
cies that they say favor the rich and 
punish the poor. 

The small Free Democratic Par- 
ty. which is essentia] to the coali- 
tion, is pressing the government to 
move even further toward a Rea- 
gan-type policy that Mr. Kohl, 
whose Christian Democrats are ba- 
sically a populist party, cannot af- 
ford 

On foreign policy, Mr. Kohl is 
accused of inconsistency. He has 


Gonudka’s Wife Describes f HeU 9 of Polish Disgrace 


Reuters 

WARSAW — How does it feel, 
as the supreme leader of an East 
European state, to be toppled from 
power and cast into the political 
wilderness, not once but twice? 

Only one man has known: Win- 
dy slaw Gomulka. the late Polish 
leader who was removed by Stalin- 
ists in 1948, returned to office in a 
blaze oF glory in 1956, overthrown 
in 1970 amid riots and again con- 
signed to oblivion. 

Luxembourg Gas Plant 
Is Damaged in Bombing 

The Atsodated Press 

LUXEMBOURG — An explo- 
sion. believed to hare been caused 
by a bomb, damaged a natural gas 
plant Monday in the southern pan 
of the city of Luxembourg. No in- 
juries were reported 

“We believe it was a bomb attack 
and as in previous cases no respon- 
sibility has not been claimed,” a 
police official said 


In a rare interview published this 
month, Mr. Gomtilka’s widow and 
fellow Communist. Zofia, gave an 
insight into how die and her hus- 
band coped with what she called 
the “heir of political disgrace, in- 
cluding three years in prison in the 
1950s. 

The interview in the journal 
Sprawy i Ludzie reflected the full 
rehabilitation of Mr. Gomulka, 
who died in 1982 at 77. In yet 
another turn of the ideological 
wheel, he is now officially praised 
as an outstanding Co mmunis t ac- 
tivist. 

Mrs. Gomulka recalled that Go- 
mulka's first troubles began in 1 947 
when he disagreed with Stalin over 
the creation of Cominfonn, a coun- 
cil designed to impose Moscow’s 
control over the new ruling Com- 
munist parties of Eastern Europe. 

“You know what it meant to say 
no to Stalin." Zofia said 

She described how in June 1948 
Mr. Gomulka addressed the Polish 
Politburo, which Jiad a Stalinist 
majority, and defended his hereti- 


cal concept of a "national road to 
socialism. 

"That was a ’crime,’ ” she said 
explaining that he “just wanted to 
apeak his mind Afterward we lived 
Hie lepers. Not a angle soul visited 
us. We were not recognised in the 
streets. We were soon pul in prison. 
It washed” 

Mr. Gomulka was imprisoned 
from 1951 to 1954 for his “rightist- 
nationahst deviations.” 

Tnfia said Stalin summoned Mr. 
Gomulka to Moscow shortly after 
his removal in September 1948 and 
in the daunting presence of his col- 
leagues, Vyacheslav M. Molotov 
and Lavrenti P. Beria, told her hus- 
band: “Give it all up, comrade, and 
go back to work.” 

Zofia said her husband left and 
later “wrote to Stalin, once again 
explaining his refusal to return to 
the politick scene " 

“Would any of the others hare 
dared say no V she said referring 
to Mr. Gomulka’s fellow Palish 
Communists. 

In October 1956, he was swept 



Helmut KoM 

allowed himself to be drawn into 
such controversies as the visit to the 
Bitburg military cemetery with Mr. 
Reagan. He hastily endorsed Mr. 
Reagan's Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive for a space-based missile de- 
fense, and then had to distance 
himself from it. 

But although his imag e as a 
statesman may hare suffered the 
chancellor is still sees as a formida- 
ble party politician. 

As the leader of the party from 
1973 until 1982, when he became 
chancellor, be shaped the Christian 
Democrats into a winning party. 
Except for the fan that his smile 
has become a little forced, he seems 
unruffled and unrepentant. He 
blames others, including the press, 
for his difficulties. 


hopes that he would introduce full 
democracy in Poland after the 
bleak repression of the Stalinist 
era. 

The interviewer asked Zofia if 
she thought he had done enough at 
that time to eliminate his enemies 
from the party. “I was the first to 
admire him for even talking to 
some of them,” she answered “But 
he told me: ‘Am 1 to break up the 
party?”’ 

With characteristically fierce 
loyalty, Zofia rejected the widely 
hdd view that Mr. Gomulka bore 
the primary responsibility for Ms 
downfall in 1970, which followed 
the killing of workers on the Baltic 
coast in nots caused by meat price 
rises. 

She made it dear that she be- 
lieved a conspiracy to remove him 
had long been planned by Edward 
Gierek, his successor who was him- 
self overthrown in a national pro- 
test in 1980. 

Zofia admitted that socialist eco- 
nomics as practiced by her hus- 



un/iws 

Wladysbw Gomulka 

band had left something to be de- 
-sired 

“We made an error from the 
start by assuming that everybody 
deserves everything, that every- 
body must get an apartment, free 1 
education and free medical care, 
while unemployment does not ex- 
ist." she said. 


Consortium Proposed to Coordinate 
European Work on Eureka, SDI 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — A member of the West 
German Bundestag called Monday 
for the establishment of a West 
European governmental consor- 
tium to coordinate, and possibly 
control, the emerging participation 
of European induknes in the U.S. 
Strategic Defense Initiative and in 
Eureka, the French-led project to 
develop European cooperation in 
higjb technology. 

Markus Berger, a Christian 
Democratic member of the Bun- 
destag’s defense commiiiee, made 
the proposal at a conference on the 


gan administration's research into 
the development of a space-based 
defense a gains t nuclear missiles. 

Mr. Berger said a consortium 
could help bridge differences in ap- 
proach to SDI by Bonn and Pans. 
He said it could be comprised of 
■government and possibly industry 

representatives. 

The suggestion is a new one, Mr. 
Berger said. He said it had been 
discussed with other members of 
the de fense committee and was ex- 
pected to be supported by the gov- 
ernment in Boon. 

Jacques Ramriri, a Gaullist dep- 
uty in the French National Assem- 
bly and chai rman of the confer- 
ence, said he supported the 
proposal, adding he hoped the So- 
cialist government would also give 
its backing. 

President Francois Mitterrand 
“said no to the idea of participating 
in SDI at the Bonn summit last 
month,” Mr. Baumd said, “but we 
believe the French position could 
become more flexible, because the 
United States is going ahead with 
SDL and Europe cannot afford to 
stay out" 

Several executives of slate- 
owned French companies explor- 
ing participation in Doth SDI and 
Eureka, who declined - to be identi- 
fied, described Mr. Berger's pro- 
posal as feasible. 

The consortium's main goal 
would be coordinating trans-Atlan- 
tic cooperation in high technology. 
Mr. Berger said, and it should “ju- 


diciously” examine European par- 
ticipation in SDI. 

He emphasized that he was not 
suggesting the establishment of a 
new agency. 

“I am talking about a political, 
European framework, so that we 
can find and develop common po- 
sitions with regard to participation 
in SDI and Eureka and show we are 
not split.” be said. 

The consortium could, for exam- 
ple, stop the United States from 
purchasing European know-how 
and technology for SDI “at a low 
price” and then denying Europe 
access to these once they were de- 
veloped. Mr. Berger said. 

Eureka was announced in April 
by Roland Dumas, the French min- 
ister for external relations. It drew 
the full support Friday of the gov- 
ernment of Chancellor Helmut 
KohL 

Eureka itself could evolve into 
the consortium, Mr. Berger said. 

“Why could not Eureka become 
the partner of SDI?” be said. 
“Would it not be a suitable bridge 
across the Atlantic, which could 
also block the exodus of our best 
scientists and technicians to the 
American research program?” 

Mr. Berger, reflecting widely 
prevailing views in both French 
and West German industry and 
politics, said that he considered it 
“senseless" to regard Eureka as 
purely a civilian project. He said 
that various Eureka projects being 
examined probably would have 
military applications, including 
those related to satellite reconnais- 
sance. 

A senior French government of- 
ficial said he was skeptical of Mr. 
Berger’s proposal. 

“He appears to reflect a logic 
which is not ours, because in Eure- 
ka we are neither trying to keep 
potential partners out of SDI, nor 
are we pressing for cooperation 
with SDL” the official said. “His 
logic appears to be directed at rec- 
onciling the problems of those that 
want to be in both." 

Leading European military con- 
tractors said that they were con- 
tinuing to examine possible partici- 
pation in either SDL Eureka, or 


Tlie Daily Source for ' 
International Investors. 



both, including companies and 
governments in the European 
Community, and in Scandinavia. 
Switzerland and Austria. 

“It is quite dear that there is a lot 
of overlap between the two pro- 
grams.” said an ambassador from 
one European country, adding that 
“we were approached by the 
French on Eureka and are still try- 
ing to assess what role we might 
play.” 

The list of projects for Eureka 
covers nine areas, European offi- 
cials said: high-power computers, 
micro-elec ironies, fully-integrated 
production lines, robotics, artificial 
intelligence, lasers, new materials, 
opio-electronics and new technol- 
ogies for application under extreme 
conditions of temperature. 

The SDI organization, according 
to Aviation week magazine, has 
identified “significant capabilities” 
among allied countries in the fol- 
lowing sectors: electro-optics, 
pointing and tracking systems, la- 
sers. electromagnetic gun technol- 
ogy, sensors, data processing and 
next-generation computer technol- 
ogy. 

The first contract under the Eu- 
reka program was signed Friday 
between Matra. a stale-controlled 
French military contractor, and 
Norsk Data, a Norwegian electron- 
ics company, to develop a new line 
of high-speed compact computers. 

Company officials continued 
Monday that Matra was among 
those French companies "interest- 
ed” in posable SDI contracts, and 
might pursue than as weD as new 
Eureka projects. 

Siemens, the West German com- 
puter company, France’s state- 
owned Bull and Britain's ICL are 
examining a project to develop a 
large-scale computer under Eure- 
ka, which may be announced later 
this week to coincide with the EC 
summit meeting that begins Friday 
in Milan, French industry sources 
said. 


HOTEL DU RHONE GENEVA 

A prestigious dwelling 
on the Riuer Rhone 
Next to business and 
shopping center. 

Quai Turreltim 
1201 Geneva 
Phone (022) 319831 
Tx 22213 hrho 

A member of HR I 
The Leading Hotels 
of the World. 


annt»sm.t!'ii Demaa* ... 

rri 






Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


Palestinian Gamp Filled With Rubble, Memories of the Dead 




By John Kifner 

Nr*' York Times Service 


there were tales like that or the 

1 serin family. 


the Palestine Liberation Organiza- “Our bests, whai can I say," an 


lion, and to consolidate, by proxy, and- Arafat Palestinian official who 


BEIRUT —The Palestinian ref- 
ugee settlement of Borge Barajnl 
was quiet Sunday as a Syrian-bro- 
kered peace plan took hold after a 
month of fighting in which Shiite 
Moslem militiamen tried to crush 
any armed Palestinian presence in 
Beirut. 


A thin shaft of sun from the shell their own hold on Lebanon.' ' toes the official line in public said 

hole threw just enough light to “The real reason for all this is u b ^ 7 ^ me 

show the dark stain where the that Syria does not want the Pales- for the Palestinians. They will let us 
blood of Maha l-amr, 16. was tlnlans to have any independence.” do nothing, 
spread over the wall of what had said a young man speaking English On a more direct level, Syrian- 


sources say the necessity of face- Further, l 
saving was in large pan the reason effect of giyi 
behind the cease-fire agreement ft- to the Syria 
sally hammer ed out six days ago in factions kno 


Further, the agreement has the \ 


Palestinian 


Damascus by the Syrian vice presi* National Salvation From, w hile 
dent, Abdel Halim Khaddam, who Amal had wanted no political role 


been her home. From somewhere who as 
in the dnderblock house a color through 
photograph was produced, show- ^ | 


On a more direct level, Syrian- has struggled with Lebanese affairs for Palestinians in Lebanon. 


guide journalists backed factions in the Druze-con- f° r near ^ a decade. 


United Nations relief trades with 


i destruction. 


trolled hills above Beirut, including 


The bitterness extends to the Abu Musa’s forces and the 


Borge Barajni had held out even 
more stubbornly than the neigh- 
boring Sabra and Chatila settle- 
ments on the southern edge of the 
city. 


ing a pretty gill with dark eyebrows ^-Arafat Palestinian factions, 
in a white dress holding a younger n(W making their headquarters in 


sister on herlap. Damascus, who have become in- 

Miss Lazziz had beoi baking the ^ maqngi y disillusioned with the 
fiat, round bread that is a staple of Jjq|j gf jjjg Syrian regime of 
life here with her sisters when the p^jdent Hafez al-Assad. 
mortar round hit. Five days later, . 


anti-Arafat Palestinian factions, Pro 01 fw toe Liberation of Pales- 
now making their headquarters in tine-General Command, headedby 
Damascus, who have become in- Ahmed Gebrii, a former Syrian 


R phind Uk complex language of food and water entered the chatila 
the 13-point statement was, in ef- settlement Sunday. At midday, a 


feci, a defeat for the Shiite Amal group of Lebanese policemen were 


forces led by Nabih Bern. 


seen in the center of the battered 


As a handful of foreign journal- £££ srid. « oF C ta SSE 

daughter’s tands was found atop a dut.lZfy ar^caduiau.Dght- 


aanglv disillusioned with the Anny captain who usually follows 
bt hold of the Syrian regime of toe Damascus line, shelled and 
estient Hafez al-Assad. rocketed the Shiite forces and their 

SrSfutaSfuSS 


The Shiites had wanted to dis- “ talking with a group of young 
arm all Palestinians to prevent the c a - S iL il clothes carrying 



f... ■ 


resurgence of any Palestinian state weapons; they were discussing 
within a state in West Beirut, as w ^’- re toe policemen would be al- 
had existed before the 1982 inva- ^wed 10 80 under the tenns of the 



first time since the conflict broke 
out May 19. the- shantytown was a 
jumble' of smashed houses and 
chunks of rubble with automobiles 
and walls riddled with bullet holes. 

it looked almost as badly 
wrecked as it had toward the end of 
August 1982, after weeks of bomb- 
ing during (he Israeli invasion. 
Hundreds of people died, this lime 
at the hands of fellow-, Arabs — no 
exact figure will ever be known — 
md throuehoui the settlements 


m liftSl passports and withheld travel Mestinian in Damascus. 

permissjcnfbr a number of promi- “H-y thought .hey would deuu U 


heap of mattresses piled against a 
wall for protection. 

“This was the hardest," the 


had existed before the 1982 inva- 
sions. peace plan. 

The reasons were twofold: First Amal m ilitia m en and^ soldiers 
the -9hiit« are now in the political ^ ro ™ the Lebanese Army’s mostly 
.iscendencY and wish to enntmt Shiite Sixth Brigade who had 


* Jl) 5 
ih i * * ’ 


ascendency and wish to control 


West Beirut; second, they fear that iou ^ lt alongside them still guarded 
the reappearance of Palestinian enlrances to the settlements. 


even the PhalangisLs. 


There wasbittemess not only to- cent Palestinians. 


ward the Shiites in the set dements, Even Sayed Musa, leader of the 

but. perhaps even more so, toward rump Fatah or ganizati a 
Syria, which is widely seen as hav- Mr. Arafat, was turned 1 


out in 24 hours or so.” 

He added: “Above all 


of the He added: “Above all, they 
>osing didn't realize the extent to which 
at the the factions would come together 


ing set up and backed the siege of airport this month when he tried to when they were threatened as Pal- 

the settlement in order to break the go to Libya, according to Palestin- cstimans.” . 

influence of Yasser Arafat, head of ian sources. As Lhe fiehiinE draaaed on for a 


guerrillas will bring swift reirfbu- Inside Borge Barajni, 35 
lion from Israel ana thaL, as bap- were buried in a mass grave 
pened before 1982, they will bear a statue of a Palestinian gi 
mast of the suffering. erected in headier times a5 

The key face-saving clause in the years ago. A black moumii 
agreement calls for the fighters in nafled to a stick was tied 


erected in headier times about six 
clause in the years ago. A black mourning flag 
e fighters in nailed to a stick was tied to the 


the settlements to give up their statues upraised fist Around the 


btsMtion Is Likely in Turkish Cyprus 


But the catch is that there are no pie in a imm grave, the places 
heavy weapons — artillery pieces, marked with cinder blocks, some of 


NICOSIA — The breakaway 
Turkish Cypriot state's center-right 
National Unity Parly was leading 
Monday in returns from parlia- 
mentary elections but was denied 
an overall majority. 

With most votes counted, the 
party had 37 percent of the vote, 
giving it 24 of the 50 seats in the 
legislative assembly. Parly officials 


said that the rest of the count also won seats. The Turkish Re- 
woutd not affect the seat distribu- publican Party won 21 percent of 


lion and that a coalition was likely 
Political analysts forecast an all! 


publican party won zi percent of 
the vote and 12 seats, ana the Com- 
munal Liberation Party drew 16 


, , r / . . , . heavy weapons. comer, there were another 24 peo- 

As the Sighting dr agge d on for a But the catch is that there are no pie in a im«i grave, the places 
month, u became increasingly em- heavy weapons — artillery pieces, marked with cinder blocks, some of 
barrasong to Syria. It not only mortars, rocket launchers or tanks which had little pots of flowers on 
strained Syria s ties with its Pales- — in the settlements. them. 

■ T itS ““T Thus, by indirection, the Pales- Scrawled in Arabic on a lump of 
pr allies m the region, Iran and linians in the settlements will be concrete was the slogan: “We wiD 
Libya, who were openly critical of able to keep their assault rifles and not give up our guns to those who 
the attack on the settlenKnts. Md other light personal weapons. This we taught how to use them," a 
left it isolated m the Arab world, leaves the situation where it was reference to the Palestinian role in 
Palestinian and Lebanese before the siege began. first training the Shiite militias. 


Libya, who were openly critical of 
the attack on the settlements, and 
left it isolated in the Arab world. 


first training the Shiite mflitias. 


The AuoaoMl Pitn 

Mourners gathered on Monday at a mosque in Chatila 
where 40 to 50 Palestinians were buried in a mass grave. 


ance between the National Unity percent, giving it 10 seats. 


Party and the New Dawn Party, a 
center-right parly representing set- 
tlers from Turkey. New Dawn won 
four seats with 9 percent of the 
vote, just past the 8-percent mini- 
mum for representation. 

Two other parties, both leftist. 


Rauf Denktash, leader of the 
Turkish Cypriots, has said he con- 
siders the vole the final step in 
establishing parliamentary democ- 
racy in the Tur kish Republic of 
Northern Cyprus. 

He unilaterally declared the 
north independent in 1 983, but it is 
recognized only by Turkey, and its 
creation has been condemned by 
the United Nations. 


In Brazil, Fill-In President Finds Neves Legacy Heavy Burden 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 


herited. The broad alliance formed Samey has announced he will serve far, the initiative has been received exposed a rift: the industry and 


Ne*- York runes Service by Mr. Neves to sustain the new the four-year term of Mr. Neves, without great enthusiasm. commerce numsier. ixooeno uus- 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Two government seems close to disinte- The 55-year-old president has One reason ma y be the ambi- mao, publicly bemoaned the con- 

months after the death of Brazil's gration. Mr. Neves was .the arcfaj- been unable, however, to shake off lions of politicians who are looking ctiiatory approach of the labor 

immensely popular president-elect, tecl °f political transition, but it his image as a transitional figure, a to succeed Mr. Samey but do not minister. Aimir Pazzianolto. 

Tancredo Neves, his name is barely seems he left no blueprint. stop-gap solution in a moment of want to wait until 1989. Two in At the moment, attention is To- 

mentioned in public. But, as his Aware of complaints about drift, particular stand oul The leftist cu*od on whether a power siruggle 


RIO DE JANEIRO — Two government seems dose to disinte- 


without great enthusiasm. 

One reason may be the axn bi- 


commerce minister. Roberto Gus- 
mao, publicly bemoaned the con- 


mentioned in public. But, as his 
successor comes under mounting 


Mr. Samey appealed last week to And for many politicians, who governor of Rio de Janeiro state. 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE 4 THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


Elected presi dent as an indepen- criticism for lack of strong leader- Brazilians to abandon their pessi- 03111101 forget that he defected from Leonel Brizola, continues to call 
dent on June 9, Mr. Denktash has ship, Mr. Neves’s absence is being tnism. “I entered the government in toe ranks of the pro-military party for presidential elections next year. 


remained above party politics and felt increasingly. " a dramatic situationT placed there Dn b 3 ago, lie is still viewed as 

did not actively back the Natiorud The heightened expectations by destiny, but already today I toe representative of the conserva- 
Unity Party, which he formed, in that were awakened by Mr. Neves have much greater confidence," he tive interests that had ruled the 
the campaign for Sunday's dec- during his long months of cam- said. “We’re not going to cany out country since 1964. 
tion. In another vote last month the paigning. and then abruptly be- miracles, but we will conquer our As a result, the Brazilian Demo- 
Turkish Cypriots approved a new queathed to his vice preskUmtial problems." cratic Movement Party, which 

constitution. running mate, Jose Samey, are pan .. , .. served as the main opposition to 

Greek Cypriot see the election of the problem. After 21 years of ,‘J S , ^toevemenu tfie military regime and owed its 

as further consolidating Cyprus’s military rule. Brazilians are eager - c “ 1DClud J , TffJr “J 1- loyalty to Mr. Neves, continues to 


"Europe's Best View' 


did not actively back the National 
Unity Party, which he formed, in 

-v_ . r p.— j ’ _i 


a dramatic situation, placed there °“b' a ago, he is still viewed as 


PROGRAM TUESDAY 25(h JUNE 


13 35 MOVIN ON 
Id 30 WAYNE & SHUSTER 
IS 00 SKYTRAX I 
IS 45 SKY TRAX : 

1C 30 SKY TRAX 3 
I7 30 MR ED 


18 00 THE LUCY SHOW 

18 30 CHARUE S ANGELS 

19 20 SKYWAYS 
2015 ROVING REPORT 

20.40 US COLLEGE BASKETBALL 

21.40 SKYTRAX 


particular stand oul The leftist cused on whether a power siruggle 
rveraor of Rio de Janeiro state, over economic policy will be won 
xmd Brizola, continues to call by the finance minister, Francisco 
r presidential elections next year. DomeUes, who favors big spending 
Aurdiano Chaves, who served as cuts to control inflation, or by the 


by destiny, but already today I toe representative of the conserva- vice president in the last military planning minister, Joao Sayad, 
have much greater confidence," he interests that had ruled the government before joining Mr. Ne- who argues that Brazil should not 

mnnlrv rirw IQKA um mill •»!«, minM nwklv In ihi* sfe- 


ves, has said he will resign as mines 


As a result, the Brazilian Demo- and energy minister next year to 
cratic Movement Party, which run in the November 1986 legisla- 


tion to tive elections. 

wed its The first test of political 


“surrender’’ meekly to the de- 
mands for control of spending by 
the International Monetary Fund. 

Mr. Samey has announced that 
he will define policy, yet the public 


“ •— t — • a -■jr*—" uuuuu; iwv, mh m. iii. u ij oiw vdgu - -nnrrtmi rjt ii^j T atTm *u ‘ u j“y w i«i. iium, wuuuuu w strength, however, will coroe this squabble continues. 

partition, and the government has for change and ready to voice their r[‘~' . 3 tana reaistnpu- bdiave much like an opposition November in elections for the may- As a resulL not only has a new 


described it as illegal. 

Cyprus has been divided into a 


impatience. 


uon program, increased spending nartv 

.XlS ItlOiTf^ra nnil n liflinn nf »Ln * _ ■ * 


ipaui-A^. , ..... - oral ties of 23 state capitals, indud- standby credit from the IMF been 

Mr. Samey has not inherited Mr. a , 01 ^ Its partner in the Democratic Al- ing Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, delayed, but Brazil has been unable 

r I-.* • ban on numerous left- eamns no it- i: .t »- n mRl .... . ..... . *.l r 


SKY CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING SELLS PRODUCTS FAST - 
FOR MORE INFORMATION, RATES. MARKETING ft 
AUDIENCE DATA CONTACT SKY CHANNEL SALES. 
SWAN HOUSE. 17-19 STRATFORD PLACE, LONDON WIN 9AF 
TEL- LONDON (01) 493 1166 TELEX: 268395. 


military junta then ruling Greece, patby; so far it has not won him amended to dismantle the 686- going its own way. 


An estimated 1 7,000 Turkish acceptance as the successor to the member Electoral College and re- In response. Mr. Samey has an- further weakening of his base. 


turns, Mr. Samey can anticipate a payment between 1985 and 1991. 

i- _ i » i ■ i r ' J ^ 1__ 


i remain in the north, 
-sponsored talks aimed at 


presidency. 


Mr. Samey’s problems run d ee p- dential elections. 


store the principle of direct presi- nounced plans to form a new “ as- 


serting up a federation between the er than that He has been unable to 
Greek and Turkish Cypriots col- define an economic policy because 


nouncea pians to form a new na- ine president s hesitancy in as- 
tional pact," calling together econ- sertmg his authority over the cabi- 


rther weakening of his base. In addition, industrialists, who 

The president's hesitancy in as- are uncertain whether the economy 
rting Ms authority over the cabi- faces recession or expansion in the 


lapsed in January. 


Thedateof the next election win onrists, businessmen, politicians, net is perhaps the greatest cause of next two years, have hurt Mr. Sar- 
be fixed by a constituent assembly and labor leaders in the hope of malaise. Soon after Mr. Neves's ney’s cause by holding back on new 

ftVt aVaaIaJ mm MB* SIMA — 1_. A JT_. ..L..II ^ T _ £% . 1 _ f_ A M « rn -» . 

investment. 


of infighting in the cabinet he in- to be elected next year, but Mr. rebuilding the Neves consensus. So death, on April 21, a wave of strikes 










ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


* * %m 

V. 







ragjgggp’ 1 

■I*, f® 











m&r 1 





"When a man is tired of London he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford Dr. Samuel Johnson, 20th September. 1777 


It is not only Wimbledon that provides an Ace of a Service 


W imbledon is simply the greatest tennis 
championship of alL It; is more than just 
a tradition, and its worldwide reputation 
has little to do with the excellent facilities it offers 
to players and spectators alike. To everyone they 
are The Championships. They provide an 
atmosphere and sense of occasion that is as 
different to the tempo and flashpoints of Flushing 
Meadow in New York, the venue of the US Open 
Championships, as that event is different from the 
cauldron that is the Stade Roland Garros in Paris. 


Between 1877, when the 
first tournament was held, 
and 1977 when the centenary 
celebrations took place, 
Wimbledon grew to proport- 
ions undreamed of by the or- 
iginal committee of the All 
England Lawn Te nnis & 
Croquet Club. Its history is 
the story of lawn tennis. 

Via Television it has 
captured the imagination of 
millions. But long before we 
all became addicts of the box, 
Wimbledon was a sell out and 
tickets changed hands at ten 
times their face value. 

Tennis fascinates because ir 
is more than a mere athletic 
pursuit. It requires touch and 
artistry, as well as ability and 
stamina. It is also one of a few 
international sports where the 
ladies and gentlemen, as they 
are still known at Wim- 
bledon, can play not only al- 
ongside each other, but 
together. 

Billie Jean King, once said: 
“I don’t like to lose anywhere, 
but especially at Wimbledon. 


When I walk onto the Centre 
Court I try to shut everything 
else out of my mind except a 
determination to come off a 
winner. It is not easy, because 
the occasion is always 
electric.” 

That has been the 
background of every Wim- 
bledon champion beginning 
with the first holder of the 
men’s singles title, Spencer 
Gore. 

It was seven years before 
the male dominance of 
Wimbledon was broken and 
women competed in what had 
been, until 1884, a masculine 
stronghold. The first ladies’ 
champion was Maud Watson 
to be followed a few years 
later by the first of that 
delightful band of precocious 
youngsters who captured our 
hearts as well as our titles ... 
and also proved invincible. 
She was Lotte Dod who won 
Wimbledon at her first 
attempt when she was still 
only 15. 

This year, when John 


Tax Free 


couple of 
blocks away from 
a small pail 
of Sweden. 

Based m Mayfair W. 1. 

Volvo Export have a direct 
computer link to Sweden and are able 
to sell you a fabulous Volvo at 
Tax-Free fectary prices! 

We even include FREE shipment to the 
States plus the customs hassle dealt with 
and a factory warranty that is truly 
international Call and check out 
our pnces, we could save you 
1000’s of dollars! 

VOLVO EXPORT 



Ifomoucfwistttia^aaJity 

Vnirm Con cessionair es Ltd,, 

28 Albermarle Si, London, W1X 3FA Tat 01-493 4954. 


Jewellery 



VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 

— WORLD FAMOUS JEWELLERS — 


o 


153 New Bond Street 
London Wl 
Tel: 01-491 1405 
Tlx: 266265 VLC G 


Exclusive Jewellery 
Gift Items 
and 
Watches 


Car Rental 


RENT A BETTER CAR 
FOR LESS IN THE UK 


1 1 




BMW - ROVER • PORSCHE us I «o sabJbe? 0 ** 
FERRARJ-LAMBORGHIN! 





McEnroe walks onto the 
centre court at two o’clock on 
Monday June 24 to begin the 
defence of the title he won last 
year, the men and women will 
be playing for record prize 
money and the seats will cost 
more than ever before. 

But if you fail to obtain a 
seat for one of the two show 
courts do not despair. Some 
of the best matches, and 
biggest upsets, take place on 
the outside courts where the 
seats are not reserved. 

After two weeks of fierce 
competition the finals take 
place on the second Saturday 
and Sunday and the winners 
receive their trophies. 

And if the sight of those 
most coveted of tennis 
trophies sets you think ing 
about acquiring some new 
prize piece of silver for your 
own home, there is no city 
more likely to offer what you 
are seeking than London. It 
remains the antiques capital 
of the world. 

Almost every district has a 
shop where a bargain might 
lie hidden and unrecognised 
... bur don’t rely upon it. 
Mostly the finest pieces are in 
the best shops. One of these is 
Marks Antiques, at 49 Corzon 
-Street, in London’s Mayfair, 
where they are quite likely to 
have a trophy to rank with 
those that are presented by 
members of the royal family 
on Wimbledon’s Centre 
Court. Certainly their select- 
ion of canteens of cutlery and 
silver tea and coffee services is 
among the finest in the 
capital. 

In Gray’s Antique Market, 
58 Davies Street Wl , you can 
find one of the most exquisite 
displays of Chinese porcelain 
there is in London. Solveig 
and Anita Gray’s shop is like 
an Aladdin's Cave - magical. 
Kangri plates, rare Celadon 
vases. Export Ware tureens, 
mark and period Qianloug 

For the good times 

MoQnUcatf MtecUon of UBO 

aWMitorMtcofladno Hoidoy 

Property m England. Scotland and 

Watat M selected lot ovwsea 
Moa 

«o OK. OtaHtoM. 

BoMnWy*. HmkidMt. 

HO TtfeMWMOU 

Uuk Mn3SMl OOOKO. 


by Moss Murray 


bowls line the shelves, all 
centuries old yet in mint 
condition. 

Nothing pleases SoJveig, or 
her daughter Anita, more 
than to talk about Chinese 
porcelain and their many 
adventures searching for rare 
and interesting objects all 
over the world. To Solveig 
and Anita every item of stock 
is a cherished possession. 

For 46 weeks every year the 
same sedateness is noticeable 
at Harvey Nichols, the fash- 
ionable departmental store in 
Knightsbridge where sophist- 
ication blends with exclusive 
designing. 

However, twice a year, for 
three weeks, it becomes like a 
battlefield with customers 
making near frenzied attacks 
on a particular rug or specific 
designer suit. The occasion is 
known as The Sale, and bar- 
gain hunters are already 
sharpening their swords for 
the battle about to begin. 

The sale commences on 
Thursday June 27 - except for 
account customers who are 
allowed to buy a day earlier. 

Six floors are devoted to 
clothes for men, women and 
children along with borne fur- 
nishings, linen, china and car- 
pets. Particularly popular 
with visitors from overseas are 
the designer clothes, many 
marked down to half their 
usual price. But be warned, 
you have to be brave and 
courageous when you shop at 
Harvey Nichols during their 
three week sale. 

If you are one if the lucky 
twenty thousand to have a 
reserved seat for the final 
Sunday at Wimbledon, or 
even if you plan to watch the 
matches on televirion, there is 
no better way to start the day 
before the play commences, 
than eating the best brunch in 
town at the Elephant on the 
River dub and restaurant on 
the Embankment dose to 
VauxhaJJ Bridge. The buffet 
table here can hold its own 
with the finest smorgasbord 


Summer Sale 


For the finest 
designer collections 
in London, 
goto 

Harvey Nichols. 



displays in Scandinavia. 

Come back to the same area 
the next day for lunch or 
dinner and allow your tennis 
memories to surface at 
Pomegranates, 94 Grosvenor 
Road (01 828 6560), where 
you will find fare from five 
continents, presented with 
flair by die gourmet and 
peripatetic owner, Patrick 
Gwynn-Jones. No matter 
where your home is, you are 
likely to find a dish that has 
its origins somewhere nearby 
on the menu. 

The dishes may sometimes 
be exotic, but the atmosphere 
is highly civilized with warm 
dark brown walls, tiffany 
lamps to provide in tima te 
lighting, gilt mirrors and leafy 
plants that help to relax the 
diners. 

Another restaurant that 
conjures up pictures, from the 
cuisine capital of Europe, is 
Monsieur Thompson, 29 
Kensington Park Road. Not 
only is the owner a native of 
Paris, but his three chefs are 
from there, too ... and you 
will be welcomed by a 
delightful Parisienne young 
lady. 

The owner and his staff 
obviously believe food is to be 
enjoyed and not regarded as 
some kind of medicine to be 
eaten because it is good for 
you. At Monsieur Thompson 
they are not ashamed to 
encourage diners to indulge in 
what can best be described as 
a little sensuous gratification. 
Thgy^vould not disown their 
Bouillabaisse in Marseilles, 
but if fish soup is not your 
favourite dish, start your meal 
with one of the chef s specials 
such as home duck foie gras 
with slices of brioche. 

It is almost like staying in 
France when you visit the 
new Champagne Exchange at 
1 7c Curzon Street. Here you 
can drink many of the great 
champagnes including a Tail- 


Dining; 

Out 



cl % 
Elephant 

on the 

River 

DINNER & DANCE 

Op*« Tuesday to StmJay 
induuxe. Closed Monday. 

129 G ros ven or Road, London S.W.l. 
TaL: 834 >6 21. 


. tinger Comtes de. Champagne 
1976, a 1975 Bollinger or a 
Piper Heidrieck champagne 
rare, 1976. If available there 
may also be a Louis Roederer 
Cristal Rose. 

The Champagne Exchange, 
as well as serving excellent 
champagne by the glass, half 
bottle, bottle or magnum is 
also a good restaurant, whose 
decor is an elegant, cool grey. 
You can sit at the bar or at a 
secluded table where the 
choice includes blinis, a large 
assortment of smoked fish, 
baby lobsters or a very Eng- 
lish steak and kidney pudd- 
ing. The restaurant is open 
daily from noon until 1 a.m. 
and there is a Sunday brunch 
from noon. 

A lunch at the Champagne 
Exchange will almost certain- 
ly put you in the mood to in- 
dulge yourself - or your wife - 
at one of the exclusive shops 
that abound in London's 
West End. Bond Street, 
where there is a congregation 
of some of the finest jewellers, 
is a magnet that attracts every 
visitor. None has a higher 
reputation for excellence than 
Van Cleef & Arpels, and few a 
longer tradition than Holmes 
at 29 Old Bond Street. Or 
walk across the street and 
enter the exclusive walkway 
that is the Burlington Arcade, 
where Holmes have a second 
salon, and the shop names are 
all hand lettered by artists, 
and two beadles in fancy bow- 
ler hats patrol the area to en- 
sure peace and quiet. 

Stop at No 41 where there 
is that fascinating aroma that 
assures customers that what- 
ever they purchase will be in 
finest, handcrafted leather. 
Here at D L Lord, ladies can 
buy the Launder handbags 


Furnished 
Rentals 


NEED A LONDON BASE? j 

Businessmen: short or long 
term leases available on ! 

EXCLUSIVE CENTRAL 
LONDON RESIDENCES 

Hampton & Sons 

6 Arlington Street, St. James's, 

London SWIA 1RB 

Tel: 01-493 8222 Telex: 25341 


Shopping 


RENDELL & SON 
SHIRT & TIE MAKERS 

64a Cannon Street, 
London E.C.4. 

Tel: 01-236 1019 
Associated with 
D. L. Lord. 
Burlington Arcade. 
London W.l. 


Oriental Ceramics 


v'* 

j" ,$ Solveig & Anita Gray 


FINE ORIENTAL CERAMICS 

Our stock is Interesting, different, 
constantly changing and -we 
hope - utterly desirable. 

We are located right in the centre 
of town, 3 minutes from Claridges 
& Bond Street. 


. GRAYS 

58 DAVIES STREET LONDON Wl 
Tel: 01-727 1655 01-408 1638 
Telex: 268312 DRAGON 



Champagne Restaurant 



CHAMPAGNE 

EXCHANGE 

RESTAURANT AND PIANO BAR 

An agrmhlr oasis for a glass uT Champagnr. lunrto. I hr afrer-wnrk 
rrfreshri. And somr glilit-rine unobirusivr) jjzz pijiai m 

pnft-idr ihr rig hi amhimrr. Rt-siannini snacks In-bur- and a Cut iln- 
theatre. .StvKsh supprrs all rlr up »■ lam. Ci-irhni} jazz 
■Sunday runing jnti irn loid brum li. 

And >v« wm* uiuderiini mIuh- In iin. 


SELF AND CHAUFFEUR DRIVE I Summer Sale suru June 22 Harvey Nkhols. Knigh rs h rid ge. London SWl. j || I7r. ( tnr/j>n Sirrri. huwbin Wl\ 7FE. 'Irlrplimr: Hl-44'l 44‘« 1 


favoured by members of the 
royal family including the 
Queen, the Queen Mother 
and Princess Diana. 

Near the Piccadilly end of 
the arcade ’ is Lord's other 
shop where they specialise in 
the finest cashmeres for men 
and women. 

Down every street in 
historic London there is 
something to fascinate not 
only the visitor, but those 
who have found themselves 
trapped by the capital's old 
world charm and a pace of 
living, that is as different to 
New York’s as Wimbledon is 
a world away from the 
sponsored commercialism of 
lawn tennis everywhere else. 

For those who decide to 
make their home here, either 
permanently or temporarily, 
finding a residence, town flat 
or pied-a-terre can be time 
consuming and frustrating. 

Sheela Leggatt, who runs 
Facing South from 5 Fleur 
Gates, Princes Way, Wim- 
bledon, SW19, has been a 


Home 

Finders 


FACING SOUTH 

The Specialists for Home- 
Finding in Central and 
South West London. Work- 
ing for buyers only, we can 
save you time and effort. 
FACING SOUTH 
S, Fleur Gates. Princes War. 
Wimbledon SW!9 
Tel: 01-789 9549 


fairy godmother to scores of 
Americans and other nation- 
als wanting to live in London. 
She rakes over the logistics of 
house hunting, not only in the 
fashionable areas of London 
such as Chelsea and Belgrav- 
ia, but also in the Home 
Counties such as Virginia 
Water and St. Georges Hill, 
Weybridge. She also advises 
on all those localities with 
good schools, excellent public 
transport, leisure facilities 
and churches. Her’s is an ace 
of a service not only during 
the Wimbledon fortnight, but 
throughout the year. 


FINE 

HAVANA 

CIGARS 

IIIWI 4 HI 
Ml Ml t Ms'll i 
II I I'MAVN 
W*MIO% U IJl'l % 

ntnw 
« v it 

jihJ man .din r luuJ 


Hnnil m <air II « VM 

HI It Ml il lilt ||f|«f 
it mpi uitiri jnJ m 
IkumulNnil ftinuMmir. 

ji aUit,- A • ■£■> 
ims < units. ImnnJur, 
JIM] J * sir unfit III 
tniit. juivifa. 

Ihc bowdi* Shops 
MM JoksSMtn 
limltiS* I 
Trk|4>mr 
hi aw vpi 


Antique Silver 


The finest 
in London 


Antique Silver’ 

I MGL 1 V\M1 \AI 1 1 SAMI tram ION 
Kl U'RNCHnR 

JDarks JJnfigues Idd 

3 Umomtal Ccnpony: The Cunan Sired tjihvnrorcCb C 


Dining- Out 






DeSghtfJ restauant tucked away 
47 St. James's. Nouvste aJsne pks 
other favoufles. Private member- 
ship ckt> dwnstciis. 

6. Ormond Yard SW1. ofl Duka of 
York St. Closed Saturday lunch and 
Sundays. Jet-. 030 2642. 


KEN iO*s MEMORIES 
OF CHINA 

Probably the most prestigious 
Chinese restaurant r< Europe 
Highly thought at by over 150 
Chinese and Far-Eastern delega- 
tions who eftne here. The only 
restaurant featured by 'Mew York 
Times', ■Gorxmet' and "People's 
Dotty' of Befng Cusine features afi 
4 attmay regens of China Res 
esserttial o7-60BxivSt. Befcyavia 
SWl Tel- 01-730 7734. 


94 Gfosvenoi Road. W u s tmlmtur. 
Cosmcpcktan load from Fa and 
Mdcfle East. Europe and the 
Americas. Pec by Mchein. Gault 
Ronay and N.Y. Times. Mon 
- Sat reservations. Tefc 328 656a 


Green’s 

CHAMPAGNE BAR 

Champagna oysters and cold 
seafood ri heat of St. James's - 
new we hewe a new section serv- 
ing traditional hot Engfch dishes. 

36 DiJie St. Tefc 030 4566 


For the serious gourmet... 

IMONSIEURThOMpSONS 

Restaurant Francais 707QQC!! 

29 Kensington Park RoadWII T /LT *7«7 O# 


Exclusive Nightclub 



> MC-H - CLJE- V.AY-AR 


me .iicncst :n!crr.at:o; 

Menpershp dctcils cre cvcilabie r.-cm Rejection 
MunborshipSccrf/Icry. d: Upper Brock Street 
lor dor. V/'Y "Fr 

o 1 . *.c fc'». Leris, Lorsdc" '.ViT 2.D. leiec’r.o-.e; 01 

















Ilcralb 


international 



tribune 


Published With Vk INcw Ymk Time* uni TV Wahhpga Pw* 


Priority for the Budget 


President Reagan has been devoting great 
enthusiasm and energy to his tax reform bilL 
Meanwhile, the budget, abandoned at the 
Capitol like an orphan in a basket, is making 
slow progress. The president has devoted 
much of his time this mouth to the tax bill and 
recruiting public support for it. His contribu- 
tions to the budget have consisted mainly or 
sending down word that this or that change 
would be unacceptable. A conference commit- 
tee has now spent two weeks working diligent- 
ly to reconcile the House and Senate versions 
of the budget resolution, but so far does not 
have much to show for its labors. It is always 
difficult to move a budget along in the absence 
of active participation by the president. This 
president's attention is elsewhere. 

Viewed from the White House, the budget is 
an irritation and an embarrassment. The Rea- 
gan budget strategy of 1981 has not worked as 
advertised. Far from b alancing the budget, the 
administration is still collecting less than 54 in 
revenues for every SS that it spends, and the 
difference is currently $215 billion a year. Mr. 
Reagan has walked away from the whole sub- 
ject and prefers to talk about tax reform, which 
draws warm applause. He tends to dwell on 
those features of his bill that cut people's taxes. 

That brings you back to the budget The 
congressional budget committees are strug- 
gling to reduce the deficit, amid hints and 


signals that the tax reform bill will increase it. 
The reform bill was not supposed to do that, 
but things seem to be slipping a little. The bill 
was intended to raise as much money as the 
present tax law does. But in recent days there 
has been a dribble of warnings from the Trea- 
sury itself that, when fully effective, the reform 
bill would raise 3 or 4 percent less than present 

law. In terms of this year it would amount to 
re n i-thino over $12 bflHtm, a substantial set- 
back to the job that the two budget committees 
are trying to accomplish. 

Tax reform is a more congenial topic, but 
the budget is more urgently important Tax 
reform, if carried out slriQfully, ought improve 
the performance of the economy beginning 
around the end of this decade: The budget 
deficit directly affects the way the economy 
operates now. Tor it keeps interest rates higher 
than they would otherwise be, it keeps the 
dollar high and it leaves American industry 
less competitive than it needs to be. Delay on 
the budget is dangerous. But the budget is 
boggedaowu in the conference committee in a 
long quarrel over nrilitaiy spending and cost- 
of-living increases in Social Security. 

Tax reform and the budget are competitors 
for political attention. Mr. Reagan is support- 
ing the tax bill with all of bis very considerable 
skill but it is the budget that needs priority. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Shoes Unfit to Compete 


The US. International Trade Commission, 
yielding to pressure, recommends quotas that 
would reduce imports of shoes sharply and 
drive up their price. President Reagan must 
decide whether American consumers should 
finance this remedy, saving American jobs at 
an annual cost of S 50.000 each. Shoes offer a 
model study in what is wrong with protection- 
ism. and why it is so bard to stop. 

Manufacturing inexpensive shoes requires 
simple machinery and abundant Low-cost La- 
bor. So Brazil South Korea, Taiwan and other 
low-wage countries produce most of the shoes 
sold in the United States. Their competition 
has forced American manufacturers to re- 
trench, dosing two-thirds of their plants in the 
last I S years. Many of the remaining plants are 
profitable only because they produce high- 
quality shoes, whose style is more important 
than price and whose main competition comes 
from high-cost factories in Europe. 

Competition ought to determine the indus- 
try's future, allowing smarter, more flexible 
domestic producers to find their niche in a 
market dominated by low-cost Third World 
producers. Indeed, the growth of the American 
economy depends on a gradual shift from low- 
wage. labor-intensive to high-wage, high-pro- 
ductivity industries that can sustain rising 
living standards. What is good for most Amer- 
icans. of course, is not necessarily good for 
those who own or work in shoe factories. 

Of the remaining American producers, the 
most marginal could not possibly survive open 
world competition. Even the most productive 
would benefit from protection. From the Car- 


ter administration they got temporary quotas 
on imports from Taiwan and South Korea, 
briefly halting the industry's decline. To the 
shoemakers' dismay, Presidait Reagan chose 
to interpret “temporary” to mean just that. 
Quotas were allowed to lapse in 1981. 

Last year the International Trade Commis- 
sion. an independent federal agency, denied 
the shoemakers' petition for import relief, cit- 
ing the High profitability of the more modern 
shoe companies. So the industry went bade to 
work the new-fashioned way: lobbying Con- 
gress. That changed the commission's mind. 
and for an obvious reason. The manufacturers 
speak with a single voice and can point to job 
losses in 48 states. Thus their influence in 
politics far exceeds their importance to the 
economy. The Senate Finance Committee in- 
sisted that the ITC reconsider. 

This time around the commissioners voted 4 
to 1 for a plan that would limit imports to 60 
percent of the market, saving an estimated 
26,000 jobs. By the reckoning of the one dis- 
senting commissioner, that would cost con- 
sumers SI .28 trillion a year — three times the 
wages of those 26,000 workers. 

To resist. Mr. Reagan may need more than 
arguments. He is devoted to free trade, yet has 
yielded expensive import relief to the clothing, 
sted and motorcycle industries. A nation ben- 
efiting from open trade needs to offer some- 
thing^ better than protectionism to workers and 
communities caught in the tides of industrial 
change. But that is a policy problem that 
Washington has never taken seriously. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


In Pursuit of Safety in the Air Merely a Great Military Power 


The Air India Boeing that exploded in flight 
Sunday southwest of Ireland should never 
have received permission to take off from 
Montreal some aviation security experts say. 

Liberal societies, unless they transform 
themselves into their opposite, will probably 
never manage to eliminate terrorism altogeth- 
er, but at least they should be alert to the threat 
and determined to combat ii Terrorism in the 
slues, which ignores national borders, is one of 
the hardest kinds to defeat. Security checks on 
passengers and freight need to be lightened at 
most of the world's airports. Added expense 
and more inconvenience for travelers will 
doubtless result, but that is the price of in- 
creased security in the air. The airlines and 
governments involved will have to explain the 
need to the public. Travelers will have to 
realize that security can sometimes require 
long delays. But what good is leaving on time 
if it means never arriving? 

The challenge, which addresses democratic 
countries especially, is not new, but it will 
become more and more compelling — even if 
the true cause of the destruction or the Air 
India airliner is never clearly established. The 
hypothesis of terrorism, already argued by 
most experts, is strengthened by the [explo- 
sion] on Sunday at Tokyo International .Air- 
port. It remains to be siren whether [the Air 
India tragedy] was an isolated instance or the 
start of a large-scale operation. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


The Soviet Union is no longer an attractive 
political modeL And the economy that was to 
surpass aD others by virtue of socialist plan- 
ning languishes and falls further behind. It is 
not in the running in the technological race. It 
is no longer second in the world, even in terms 
of gross output, having been left well behind 
by Japan. In a few years China will probably 
make the Soviet Union the world’s fourth 
largest economy — or fifth, if the European 
Community is counted as an entity. 

We have become habituated to speaking of 
the two superpowers astride the globe, but the 
Soviet Union is a great power in only one 
dimension — military strength. This alone 
makes it widely respected and feared. It is only 
because of weaponry that Soviet leaders stand 
up mightily on the wodd stage: 

Thus, to ask Mikhail Gorbachev and his 
fellows to renounce their military buildup 
would mean asking them to renounce their 
status and self-respect. There is no conceivable 
concession that would make it worthwhile for 
them to give up the one thing that makes them 
great Without heaps of super weapons, they 
would have to surrender their dream of great- 
ness and resign themselves to relative insignifi- 
cance in the world. For the Kremlin, military 
strength is not a burden that has to be borne 
but the central value of their state. 

— Robert Wesson, a senior research fellow at 
the Hoover Institution or Stanford University, 
writing in The Baltimore Evening Sun. 


FROM OUR JUNE 25 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Centennial Salute to Argentina 
NEW YORK — The South American centen- 
nial evokes cordial expressions or interest The 
New Orleans Picayune says: “Argentina, that 
most progressive 'and prosperous of Latin 
American republics, is celebrating the 100th 
anniversary of its independence from Spain by 
holding a great world's exposition. Those peo- 
ple in litis country who are disposed to sneer at 
the Latin Americans and believe them incapa- 
ble of such progress and enlightenment as we 
are used to would do well to study the history' 
and present status of Argentina. Argentina has 
actually rivaled our own phenomenal pro- 
prss.’’The Los Angela Times adds: “Within 
the next 20 years there will be two more world 
Powers among the nations. Brazil and Argenti- 
na, neighbors and very dear friends of ours.” 


1935: U.S. Fashion Comes to Moscow 
MOSCOW — For the first time since the 
revolution, women’s clothes designed west of 
the Soviet frontier were shown here [cm June 
24]. They were American, created by Elizabeth 
Hawes, Vassar graduate and fashion expert, 
who is here to study the Soviet dress industry. 
A showing was arranged by the so-called art 
group of the Commissariat of Education in 
line with a new policy of catering to Russian 
women’s innate desire for attractive clothes in 
accepting fashion ideas from the West Earlier 
efforts of Soviet designers to create “proletar- 
ian" modes failed. The Soviet type of beauty 
being somewhat larger hipped and bosomed 
than the American. Miss Hawes encountered 
difficulty in securing mannequins sufficiently 
slender to don Lbe frocks she had brought 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Chairma n 1 058-1 9S2 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PuUaher 

Executor Editor RENt BONDY Depm PttbBsktr 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Auacvue Publisher 

Deputy Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Depot* Editor STEPHAN w. CONAWAY Director at Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Dottier of Ctraihuon 


ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dottier if Adtenabig M- 
International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Chartes-de-Ganlle, 92200 Neuilly-sur-Sdne. 

France. Td.: (1)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Para. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Direaeur de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Nennessv RtL, Hong Kang Tel. 5-285618. Telex 61170. 

Marianne Or. U.K.: Robin MacKidtan. 63 Lang Acre. London Wd TeL 856-4802. Tekx 26X09. 

Gtn Mgr. ft: Germm: W. Latabcdi Friedndatr. IS. tiOOOFnakfutlM. 71 (0691726753. 7h 416721. 

S-A. au capital de 1. 200.000 F. RCS A amerre B 732021126. Commission Pantaur No. 61337. 

L'.S. subscription: 5322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island City. N. Y. IHOI. 

© 1985. Imemaiuaal Herald Tribune. AO rights reserved. 


6M*I 


Time for a Convention Against Terrorism 


P ARIS — Terrorism is contagious. Now 
there is the lost Air India plane and the 
explosion at Tokyo airport to add to oik week’s 
headlin es about hostages in Beirut and the blast 
at Frankfurt Apart from the obvious need to 
insis t on observing security precautions, there is 
a need to fight this international epidemic. 

President Reagan said he will name a task 
force to make recommendations. What America 
decides to do, he said wisdy, “must not be done 
in pointless anger” — although his press spokes- 
man underlined the sobering effect by saying 
that be "could not rule out military action" in 
retaliation once the American hostages are safe. 

Military reprisal — proportionate or, as some 
are even arguing, deliberately disproportionate 
— cannot stop this plague. It would only escalate 
disorder and distress, which is precisely the pur- 
pose of terrorism. It must be understood that the 
demands made by those who flout civilized roles 
are secondary to them. Their prime goal is to give 
importance to their cause by sowing fear. 

So the response must be a strong international 
consensus to treat them as common criminals 
and make sure they are punished as such. 

This has seldom been possible because it is 
individual nations that must apply law and, indi- 
vidually, they have been reluctant to do it Some 
states refused because, in fact if not in words, 
they support some terrorists and expect to bene- 
fit from the crime. Most seek to avoid responsi- 
bility because they are more afraid of the terror- 
ists than of law-abiding opinion and hope that if 
they look the other way, so will the c riminals. 

The timg may be at nanH to change attitudes. 
It happened before when a great preponderance 
of wond opinion was ready for it. International 


By Flora Lewis 

conventions on abolition of slavery and mi treat- 
ment of prisoners of war are examples. They have 
induced nations to shift from looking over one 
shoulder in fear of outlaws to looking over the 
other shoulder in fear of being 
The desire for international legitimacy is a 
powerful motive, even for dictators and despots. 
There should now be an inter national convention 
a g a in st terrorism. Any country that refuses to 

The European Community 
could take the initiative. 

sign and apply the roles would brand itself a 
supports of terrorism for aS the world to see. 
and for it to draw conclusions about air trans- 
port, tourism, trade, credit and other benefits of 
membership in the international community. 

At a minimum, the convention should oblige 
signatories either to prosecute anyone involved- 
with a terrorist act or to extradite those charged 
to a country that wants to prosecute. Refusal to 
arrest and prosecute or ooradiie would signify 
complicity, and would not be excused as fright- 
ened impotence as is now the usual case. 

Interpol or some such agency should be 
charged with drawing up a centralized list of 
everyone identified with terrorism. It would be 
a duty of signatories to provide all the informa- 
tion they acquire, and a duty to arrest any person 
on the fist if he or she turned up on a member 
state’s territory at any time. Overall the conven- 


tion's requirements should be firm but not exces- 
sively inclusive; and as non-political as possible. 
It is more important to achieve very broad agree- 
ment, among all states that wish to be considered 

pan of civilized society, than to write stringent 
rules that will not be applied and will leave 
governments in their current lonely dilemma. _ 
Because terrorism must be deprived of its 
political ambitions the United Nations is not an 

B riate sponsor. With its habit of flond 
: and sordid logrolling, the United Na- 
tions would tun the effort into a futile free-for- 
all of recrimination. It tried once to take up the 
issue and bogged down hopelessly in arguing 
how to define terrorism. The crimes are dear — 

falnng hntlagpg and p lanting bombs in a COntCXt 

that involves more than one nation. 

Nor should America take the lead too viably. 
That would ride turning the question into being 
pro- or anti-American, or even for or against a 
particular UJS. policy, when the question to put 
quite directly is being pro- or anti-terrorism. 

The European Community could wdl take the 
initiative, all the more because it would start with 
the authority of a dozen states. It means some- 
thing that Greece felt the need to offer an expla- 
nation of its behavior to its EC partners after 
TWA 847 was hijacked from Athens. There is 
more pressure available here, and if the appeal is 
properly handled. Communist and most Third 
World states coukl be expected to join. 

These are cynical times. The temptation is to 
lose p atience w ith attemp ts to establish a bit of 
law in the world. But without striving for law 
there is nothing left but force, which cannot 
assure safety from fanatics. 

The New York Times. 


The Case 


Waste at the Pentagon: An Issue for the Democrats 


W ASHINGTON — The Penta- 
gon's procurement scandals 
mean tha t an hour has come round 
for the defense Democrats. Not only 
can they play a vital role in determin- 
ing national security priorities, they 
are also in a position to change the 
character of their party. They can 
move it away from the eddies of mi- 
nority infighting and back to the 
mainstream of presidential politics. 

The term "defense Democrat" is 
preferable to the better known term 
“Jackson Democrat." The namr of 
the late senator from Washington. 
Henry Jackson, has been hoisted as a 
banner by Democrats deserting to 
the Republican Party. It has also 
been brandished against arms con- 
trol. But the defense Democrats fig- 
ure to stay in their party, as Senator 
Jackson aid. And unlike him, they 
regard arms control as a positive ele- 
ment of national security. 

The clout of the defense Demo- 
crats on substantive issues is certain. 
Pentagon procurement scandals have 
stripped influence from Secretaiy of 
Defense Caspar Weinberger and his 
entourage. Even within the Republi- 
can Party, the Pentagon is losing bud- 
get battles almost every day. When it 
comes to procurement poncy, many 
Republicans sound as if they are try- 
ing to cover up the scandals. So Dem- 
ocratic support is necessary to bold 
the line on crucial projects. 

On the Senate side, Sam Nunn of 
Georgia virtually dictated the terms 
of the 1986 defense budget On the 
House side. Chairman Les Aspin and 
some fellow members of the Armed 
Services Committee have been hold- 
ing the fort against the liberals who 
dominate the Democratic majority. 

They recently supplied the formula 
whereby Congress backed limited 
U.S. aid to the “contras” fighting the 
Sandinist regime in Nicaragua. 

They kept alive limited funding for 
the MX missile as a bargaining chip 
in arms control negotiations. They 
raised by $150 million funding tor 
another missile, the Midgetman. 

Mr. Aspin sees a danger in quick 
fixes for weapons procurement He 
notes that much of what went wrong 
in the past resulted from inefficient 

Congress. He cites three celebrated 
cases: the $400 hammer sold to the 
navy for the F-18 fighter, the $600 
pair of pliers sold to the air force for 
the B-52 and the $1,000 cover for a 
three-legged stool sold to the air force 
for the AWACS radar defense plane. 
All were spare parts. 

After Congress mandated compet- 
itive bidding on basic systems, those 
costs came down, but prices for spare 
pans soared. To demand competitive 
bidding for spare parts would make a 
new problem in getting warrants 
from the original suppliers, who 
would not undertake to fix the equip- 
ment of their competitors. 

To be sure, the defense Democrats 
are wary of being co-opted for what 
could turn into a whitewash of exist- 
ing policies. Thus Mr. Aspin refused 
to join the blue-ribbon commission 


By Joseph Kraft 


der former Deputy Defense Secretaiy 
David Packard. Mr. Aspin also has 
doubts about the circus of a prosecu- 
torial approach like that of the com- 
mittee on defense production headed 
by Harry Truman during World War 
D. “We can do a lot of harm if we get 
it wrong," be says as he leans toward 
a more cautions investigation. 

The true test of the defense Demo- 
crats, however, does not come in the 
area of defense procurement and 
budget. It comes in the context of the 


Democratic Party. Over the years, 
various minority groups have estab- 
lished veto postions within the party. 
Women insist on naming a vice presi- 
dent; blacks on a commitment to civil 
rights; labor on the minimum wage 
and a protectionist stance; Hlspanics 
on protection against immigration 
laws; Jews on support of Israel. 

The result is a party lacking appal 
to significant segments of the voting 
public — white Southerners, inde- 
pendent-minded Westerners, young 


professionals who are not pro-union. 
The Democrats are a party of minor- 
ities condemned to be a minority. 

Success for the defense Democrats 
mwns making themselves into a veto 
group within their own party. If they 
have to be consulted in the choice of 
and the development of 
programs, they can insist on standing 
with the majority of the country for a 
strong defense as weD as bong with 
the majority who want arms control. 
They can-put the Democrats back in 
the running for the presidency. 

Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 





America’s Military Outlay Can Be Cut 


W ASHINGTON — A group of 
senior Pentagon officials told 
the Republican Congressional Con- 
ference recently that not one dollar 
less could be spent on defense with- 
out harming national security. But 
billions can be cut from the Penta- 
gon’s budget without endangering 
America’s security or that of its allies. 

Many in Congress agree that the 
solution to the dilemma of the deficit 
is a general budget freeze that applies 
equally to all spending categories. 
The Pentagon, unlike other govern- 
ment agencies that have been stream- 
lined in recent years, is grossly ineffi- 
cient and could play a significant role 
in reducing the debt. It has created 
obvious targets Tor those committed 
to reduced spending — the $600 ash- 
tray, the $7,000 coffee pot and other 
such horror stories. We must solve 
problems in the procurement process. 

But ending an the waste there will 
save only a few billion dollars — 
scarcely a dent in the defidL 
If we are truly dedicated to reduc- 
ing the defense budget in a sensible 
fashion, we must look beyond spare- 
pans scandals. For example, the DI- 
VAD anti-aircraft weapon has yet to 
prove its effectiveness in shooting 


established by President Reagan an- down planes; it certainly does not 


By John McCain 

The writer, a Rnubtican from 
Arizona, is a member of the House 
Foreign Affairs Committee. 

merit a price tag of $6.8 million 
apiece. Cutting the entire program 
could save $4 billion. 

Similarly, foregoing the purchase 
of Bradley armored fighting vehicles 
requested by the army could save 
mare than $4 billion. 

These are just two examples of in- 
efficient weapons systems that could 
be cut without endangering mpinnal 
security. But members of Congress 
(and their constituents) wfll also have 
to take their licks if we are truly 
serious about defense cuts. Congress 
can no longer squander money on 
sacred cows of the defense budget 
Defense needs are a function of 
foreign polity. So we must agree on 
overall foreign polity goals and com- 
mitments. We can no longer be the 
world’s policeman, nor can we with- 
draw to Fortress America. Between 
these two extremes we need the bi- 
partisan consensus that has been sad- 
ly absent since the Vietnam War. 

This does not mean falling into tine 
behind successive presidents. It 


A Service Economy at Whose Service? 


L OS ANGELES — America, 
* economists and cabers say, has 
become a “service economy.” But I 
wonder: Where is the service? 

I read, along with everyone else, 
that in the last four years the Unit- 
ed States has lost Vh million jobs in 
the manufacturing sector, which in- 
cludes steel chemicals, clothing, 
automobiles — all of those weary- 
ing, hot, repetitive jobs that were 
once the working-class backbone of 
the nation. Instead there are more 
than three million new service sec- 
tor jobs in banking, finance, insur- 
ance; publishing, communications, 
auto repair and medicine. 

But if there are now so many 
more people available in the auto 
repair field, why does it cost me $58 
per hour to get my car fixed? 
Shouldn't the influx of new workers 
allow the price of labor to fall? 
Even more puzzling, why can’t the 
auto repairmen ever fix anything 
the first time? If the auto repair 
field is overran with applicants, 
why can’t even one of them fix ray 
car's thermostat after five tries? 

If workers are flooding into the 
restaurant business, why do I have 
to wait so long for a waitress when I 
go out for pizza? If men and women 


By Benjamin Stein 

are streaming into (he food sector, 
why can’t they find someone who 
knows how to make a pizza with 
sausage as well done as the crust? 

The financial services seam is 
booming, with increases of almost 
100.000 workers per year for the 
last several years. In that case, why 
does Merrill Lynch lose my individ- 
ual retirement account for months 
cm end? Why does everyone the 
firm hires seem determined to 
punch the wrong buttons, making 
my modest provision for retirement 
simply disappear from their re- 
cords, only to reappear when I 
threaten to call in the Feds? 

Why are there giani lines at most 
banks— and no tellers to be found? 
What are all those people in the 
financial services sector doing if 
they axe not servicing customers 
at banks ami brokerage houses? 
Aren’t 100,000 new workers per 
year enough to send out my state- 
ments each month, instead of keep- 
ing them for a year in a drawer 
marked “comnKTcial loans"? 

A friend underwent a minor pro- 
cedure recently at a hospital in Bev- 


erly Hills where the room cost 
$1,200 a day. “For hours at a 
stretch," he said, “there were no 
nurses in the hafl, at the station, 
anywhere — unless you leaned on 
the call button aQ afternoon.” 

Try to get an appointment with a 
dentist —even for a teeth naming 
— less than a month in advance. 
Try to get an eye examination les 
than two months in advance. 

In Santa Cruz, a small university 
town in central California where I 
rent a home in the summer, you 
must pay SI I per hour to have a 
student vacuum your floors. 

Up and down Ventura Boulevard 
in Los Angeles, along K Street in 
Washington, on every comer in 
north Dallas, new high-rise office 
buildings blade the sky. Who is in 
them? “Service workers.” But what 
services are they doing? Who in 
America can say that he or she is 
getting more service than 20 yean 
ego? is phone service better? Taxi 
service? Airline service? Car repair 
service? Bank service? What are all 
those new service workers doing? 

Mr. Stan’s next navel is “ Her 
Only Sin." He contributed this com- 
ment to Hie New York Times. 


means reaching broad agreement on 
vital interests and the level of com- 
mitment needed to maintain f |i™ 

Few would deny that strategic re- 
alities require an American presence 
in Europe, but more than 60 percent 
of the U.S. defense budget is commit- 
ted to the defense of allies. Given the 
parsimonious attitude of NATO and 
Asian allies, bow large an American 
presence abroad is warranted? What 
are America's interests in the Gulf 
region, as opposed to those of allies? 
What level of U.S. forces is needed to 
defend U.S. interests there? 

Once the outlines of a broadly sup- 
ported, long: term foreign policy are 
established, we can begin to match 
force and spending levels to those 
commitments. Such levels must then 
be funded with consistency. 

The fcast-or-famine character of 
defense spending since the early 
1960s is partly responsible for todays 
inflated budget: the sad state of 
America’s defenses five years ago 
provoked what some would charac- 
terize as the Pentagon’s greed. 

A general who is offered more 
ta nk s than he can now use will proba- 
bly accept, knowing that down the 
road be will race a drastically reduced 
budget. A Pentagon confident of con- 
sistent, adequate spending will not 
plead for excessive Dud gets as a buff- 
er against future shortages; consis- 
tent levels would also improve will- 
ingness to accept inferior weapons. 

We stand on the threshold of a 
long-needed redefinition of defense 
needs. Presidents come and go, but 
America’s pledge to Europe has en- 
dured because the co mmi tment was 
the result of bipartisan accord. Only 
by forging a bipartisan consensus can 
we resolve the current debate and 
provide the best possible defense at 
the least possible cost to the taxpayer. 

Las Angeles Times. 



LETTERS 
Hijacking and Worse 

Is it not to be expected that in his 
capacity as justice minister Nairih 
Bern will bring to justice the cold- 
blooded murderer of that oouraseons 
but helpless US. marine? 

A. SPERLING. 

Cheltenham, Englan d. 

J^sSL n°£%r dW °™- 

Harlan K. UUman's column points 
op the need for an expanded rateUi- 
gen ce net work to help avert inrideais 
of terrorism, but he fails to mention 
the staggering Middle East policy of 
the Reagan administration. No mtd- 
tigHK* network was needed to fore- 
see this hijacking. 

ROGER GUY. 

Paris. 


With Iran 

By Robin Wright 

This is the second of wo amdes. 

A NN ARBOR. Michigan— Shiite y 
extremism has become too big ' - 
to stop by cleaning out a framing 
camp or two, especially with the 
growth in the past 1 8 months of a 
large politicized body of Shiites who 
agree with the zealots* motives ami 
goals, if not with their tactics. 

As Israels tragic experience in 
Lebanon showed, the policy of “an 
eye for an eye" only escalates the 
cycle of violence into a long-tens 
confrontation. Shiite militants are 
prepared to die in acts that they do 

Rule based on Islam 
is certain to survive 4 
Ayatollah Khomeini. 

not view 3S terrorism but as noble 
deeds against perceived aggressors. 

The dimensi ons of the problem are 
reflected in attempts to pinpoint the 
groups or individuals responsible. 

U.S. officials last year charged that 
the Party of God was responsible for 
the second embassy bombing. This 
elicited a bitter snicker from a U.S. 
diplomat in Lebanon. “That doesn't 
teti us anything,” he said. “Every Su- 
ite in Lebanon is now Hezbamh.” ' 

This was only a slight exaggeration. 

Another argument against use of 
force is that it would endanger Amer- 
ican allies, especially the moderate 
Moslems who already have problems 
with fundamentalists at home, in part 
because of their ties to the United 
States. The fundamentalist crusade is 
unlikely to bring down other Moslem 
governments, but it can force them, 
through continuing intimidation and 
terror, to accept extremist tenets. 

A second policy option is econom- 
ic sanctions. But they are unlikely to 
work because of Iran's oil. 

Iran's revolution has proved defi- 
antly durable, surviving the drain of 
earlier sanctions, the challenge from / 
opposition groups on both right and. * 
left, the trauma of almost five years 
of war and the isolation and hostility 
incurred because of its policies. The 
reality is that many Iranians, already 
bring with meat and gasoline ration- 
ing, appear to be prepared to end ore 
further hardships to protect their Is- 
lamic form of government 
American vulnerability, on the 
other hand, has never been grater. 

More than 55,000 American diplo- 
mats awH federal civilian employees 
now live abroad in 10,000 different ' 
facilities — not including thousands 
of American military nermnnd at 
bases around the world The State 
Department unofficially estimate*-,'- 
that more than 1.7 million Americaiy r . 
drilians live overseas. Merely light-- 
cuing security, discouraging the use 
of certain international airports or 
spending millions to improve diplo- 
matic installations is not going to 
prevent further attacks. 

To end the Shiites' war against 
America, the Reagan administration 
has no alternative but to defuse the 
tension with Iran. As unpopular or 
uncomfortable as it may be. especial- 
ly after two major hostage traumas 
and the rapidly increasing toD of 
American lives, the United Stales 
must begin looking at the possibility 
of rapprochement with Iran. 

Just a year ago I would never have 
believed that 1 would write these 
words, after watching rescuers dig 
through rubble at two American em- 
bassy buD dings and the marines' 
compound in Beirut looking for ray 
friends, who were often roeweredm 
bits and pieces. But a certain degree 
of realism is needed to avoid the loss. - 
of more lives, without America seem-T .... 
ingto cave in or concede. 

lbe Iranian revolution is not ami- 
rage, and the elimination of retain 
radical mullahs or activists will not 
make it or the crusade disappear. 

Most Middle East experts now ajgee 
that, despite Iran’s many ongoing 
problems, Khomeinism — or role 
based rat Islam — is certain to survive 
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khnmrfm 
The United States now needs to 
demonstrate the maturity and confi- 
dence of a superpower. Indeed, the 
outcome of this confrontation with 
Moslem extremists may depend more 
on political initiative by foe United 
States than on the success of Iranian 
propaganda and the training of sui- 
cide commandos at Iranian Bases. 

Rapprochement will not be quiet'- - 
or easy. It will not reach fruition 
during the Reagan administration. 

And it will probably not happen dur- 
ing the lifetime of Ayatollah Khnmo- 
aL But that does not mean that 
America should not position itself by 
laying the groundwork that might 
help save American lives. 

And there are some hopeful signs. 

Iran is moving to end its isolation- 
This year economic ties with Europe 
have almost returned to pre-revom- 
tionary levels. Japan and West Ger- 
many are new among Iran’s main 
trading partners. Contacts b ehind the 
scenes have begun with Western 
stales as wdl as Islamic rivals, jndnd* 
mg the Saudi foreign minister, who 
visited Tehran last month. 

The major pragmatic consider^; 
ation for Iran and the Shiite extrem-.' - ' 

ists is that lhe war with the United 
States is unwinnable, even though 
(hey can wreak havoc and destabilize 
governments along the way. 

The United States could rday qm- 
et messag e s through intermediaries 
that h recognizes that the Islamic 
Republic of Iran has a wide base of 
Ktpport, and that the United States- 
has no intention of repeating the 
CIA-sponsored operation that re- 
stored power to the shah in the 1950s 
— which would be folly anyway- 
such messages would go a long wav?* 4. (, 
toward easing the tension. ^ 

The writer, a former Bans conespo*-; . 

^ f<* The Sunday Times in London, h 
the author cf_ "Sacred Rage; TheCnb 
safe afMihiant Ishtm. "ShccontTfttded 
this camera to The Washington PosL 


y { \' % 

(•%, 

JlM 1 


^ ». 


! v: 

i r- 


j — 

,v • 

j-,s. 


Allh^r' 
To hilt’ f •“ 
LuiuUi i 


iiaivl-esi 


R«'e-v . : 

^iMVrcr 

pNfcuiL ' 

hacmi,-. ' 

> C-;-- 

■ kiLi 

£>xv : :. . 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


Page 9 




^ i Gilberto Gils Zeal 
x -For Brazilian Pop 




a'., 

m 



Bu ( .id 


By Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

P f ARIS — GQberto Gil has been 
criticized in his native country 
for polluting Brazilian music with 
rock, to which he responds with a 
hearty “I don't care." 

Gil, who will be 43 on Saturday, 
is one of the most popular, influen- 
tial and hard-working Brazilian 
artists, lie exports his native cul- 
ture with a missionary zeal, bat he 
is tired of what he calls “the univer- 
sity mentality of socioeconomic 
purists. There are a lot of small 
I , . i talents pretendinglo be the guard- 
ians of culture. They say. Took 
bow intelKgeot we are.’ ” 

. v Jn the past five years, Brazil has 
become more open to what Gil 
calls “worldish treads,” and he was 
-one of the motivating faces. He 
- describes the new Brazilian pop 
.music as “the local equivalent of 
the Liverpool generation. They are 
■ playing fresh music, a California 
■- type thing — it’s humorous, criti- 
- cal. open, naive. It’s got a happy 
- '- beat. Brazilian mireir been get- 
ting tired, the same old thing over 
and over. So now we’ve got these 
teen-agers going back to the beat 
,. agatn. They say, ‘Come on, man, 

• .'let’s just have a good time.’ " 

Gdberto Passos Gil Moreira be- 
' Jgan fooling around with drums at' 
: ..the age of 3 in his native town of 
Salvador, tried the trumpet in Ms 
- ..early teens, then the accordion, and 
. by 18 was playing guitar and trying 
. to sing Eke Jo5o Gilberlo. While at 
: _ university he wrote and recorded 


‘a degree in business administration 
he worked for Gessy-Lever in S&o 
Paulo. In the 1960s, when artists 
like Ellis Regina began to record 
his songs, he moved to Rio to work 
full time at writing and performing 


11 Theater Groups 
To Take Part in 
London Festival 

The Associated Pros < 

L ONDON — The third London 
/ International Festival of The- 
ater. known as LIFT, will bring in 
11 theatrical companies from 20 
countries July IS through Aug. 4, 
the festival office has announced. 

The biennial festival will include 
the Peking Opera presenting Wu 
Zuguang’s 1962 work "The Three 
Beatings of Tao San Chun,” a com- 
x piece about patriarchal Chinese 
^odety, a Spanish troupe perform 1 
mg “Ale," described as “a cosmic 
farce,” and an outdoor spectacle 
called “The Devils"; and the actor 
and mime Alberto Vidal at the 
London Zoo for three days in “Ur- 
ban Man.” 

South Africa’s Bahama tsi The- 
ater Company will present “Dirty 


Work” and “Gangsters.” The Unit- 
ed States will be represented by 
Winston Tong’s musical salute to 
Duke Ellington and Trad Wil- 
liams's “Journey," a compilation of 
.Afro- Caribbean poetry, oance and 
mime. 

Other partidpaiits indude Ita- 
ly’s La Gaia Sdenza, the Mla- 
dinsfco Theater of fiabijana, Yugo- 
slavia. the South Korean dancer 
Ko Oku Jin, the Pelican Players of 
Toronto and Poland’s Teatr Nowy 
contributing a laige-cast drama 
about the destruction of the old 
order, “The End of Europe. 


Italy Fest to Stage 
Play by John Paul 

United Press Imcnuuiona! 

R OME— An impuMished play 
about suffering, written by 
Pope John Paul II when he was a 
20-year-old student and actor in 
Nazi-occupied Poland, will be 
staged next month in the medieval 
Tuscan town of San Mmiato, orga- 
nizers have announced. 

The Polish director Krzysztof 

7 .AI.IM ir Muhina iKp ntau “Inti” 


in I talian for a July 25 outdoor 
performance, said officials of the 
institute of Popular Drama, which 
sponsors an annual theater festival. 

The 1940 play, inspired by the 
Old Testament story of Job, will be 
accompanied with an original mu- 
sical score and win be broadcast 
live by Italian television, the Spon- 
sors mid. 


ARTS / LEISURE 


The potential social and political 
power of popular music is impor- 
tant to him: “It’s a poor, bloody, 
dirty world but if Brazil is going to 
play a role in it we better be con- 
scious of what that role is going to 
be. We’re a Mg nation, let’s gel 
prepared. Let’s join the rest of the 
world. You know, ‘We are the 
world, we are the children.' Exactly 
that. 

“Brazil is just as ugly as tire rest 
of the world. We live in big over- 
crowded, noisy, polluted cities like 
everywhere else. But we have light, 
too, and ! say let’s follow the limit 
The kids are out there in the middle 
of the streets and I figure Td better 
go and find them there. When I say 
kids I mean my kids, I have six. 
La’s say tyes 1 to what's here." 

Twenty years ago, Antonio Car- 
los Jobim was criticized for saying 
“yes" to jazz. The memory is bitter 
for hhn; Jobim recently talked 
about it to Cash Boot Magazine: 
“Critics w anted ‘authentic’ samba. 
They said bossa nova is American, 
which isn’t true. I got bad press for 
r unning after the American dol- 
lar." Jobim points out that Brazil- 
ian music cones from the same 
African roots as jazz: “A musician 
friend of mine used to say that the 
only people who have rhythm are 

- B rarriiang, Americans and Cubans 

The rest is aQ waltzes and mazur- 
kas.” 

Gil “Recently, intellectuals 
started complaining about the in- 
fluence of that foraga music,’ reg- 
gae: . . . But reggae is so rooty, so 
African, Brazil is so dose to it 
rhythmically — that Third World 
feeling. There is a folk music in 
northeastern Brazil called Xote — 
it descends from Scottish folk mu- 
se — it bounces along like reggae, 
dook cfaak dook chak. They’re ob- 
viously related. So they couldn’t get 
away with that xenophobic non- 
sense: It was going too far. It was 
too ally.” 

He has a frequent, boisterous 
laugh but the intensity that sur- 
faces from time to time is anything 
but jovial: “You know a lot of the 
crituasm cones from whites tatting 

about mnwrinna. Thwfr is this 

myth that we have an egalitarian 
society free of racism in Brazil. But 
of course there’s racism. It’s hid- 
den, disguised, but a black person 
could hardly become president of a 
major corporation. And a minister? 
Never. Personally, I fed it less now. 
I'm a ‘star.’ I bought my ‘equality*, 
with hard work and talent.” 

One of his songs, “The Cleanest 
Hand,” is abouL racism. He ex- 
plains it “Thfc whites say we’re 
dirty, that if we don’t dirty up a 
room coming in we’ll dirty it gqmg 
out, but our role in Western society 
has actually been cleaning white 
dirt Whites pollute the oceans and 
the air — industry and technology 
is all white. We blacks have had 
nothing to do with that, except to 
dean it up. You make the dirt, we 
dean it So our hands are the clean- 
est hands." 

In the middle of each concert, as 
if to sty, “See. I can do this too," 
GO sings various styles of Brazilian 
music in its “pure” form, accompa- 
nying himself on guitar. Recently 
he switched from an acoustic to an 
dec trie instrument, explaining: 
“Now they make electric guitars 
that can sound just like an acoustic. 
So I pity electric. It’s only a psy- 
chological difference, and I’m not 
interested in psychology. I*m inter- 
ested in music — Fm interested in 
life.” 

Gilberlo Gil: Valencia, Spain, 
June 28; Senile, June 29; Baden- 
Baden, West Germany, July 4; Co- 
penhagen, Jufy 6; Vienna, July 7; \ 
London, Jufy 9; Lisbon, July II; 
Oporto, Jufy 12; Antibes, F ranee, 
Jufy 16. 

DOONBSBURY 

GJNSUBAI MU, DEAR. I 
HOPEYOUlL UttlDNTMAtE 
MCZm&W- TOOMUCHOFTHS 
! BYESRKME- UmBNOPENT.. 
i \ \ 





Brazilian pop missionary GQberto GO. 

Howard’s 'Cocoon’ Fine 
Except for Spielbergism 


By Paul Atcanasio 

Washington Peat Service 

T HERE are two “Cocoons.” 

One was directed by Ron How- 
ard, and it has all thewarmth of his 
comic touch, his respect for his 
character, his way of plugging into 
the humanity of a situation. The 
other, a bloated special-effects ex- 


travaganza, seems to have been di- 
rected by a particularly slavish 
camp follower of Steven Spielberg. 

Walter (Brian Denneby) and 
Kitty (Tahnee Welch) rent an es- 
tate next to a retirement communi- 
ty; they seem to be vacationing 
cousins, but they’re actually dis- 
guised aliens, fanner residents of 
Atlantis who have come to recover 
the ground crew they left behind 
They hire a boat skippered by Jack 
Bonner (Steve Guttenberg) and set 
about recovering cocoons on die 
ocean Boot, ovoid, rocklike con- 
tainers for their long-lost brethren. 

The cocoons are kept in the es- 
tate's pod; when three drams from 
the retirement home (Wilford 
Brimiey, Home Cronyn and Don 
Amecbe) ctmIc in for an afternoon 
swinvihe pool rejuvenates them. 
They collect their girlfriends and 
spouses (Maureen Stapleton, Jessi- 
ca Tandy and Gwen Verdon) and 
find there’s life in the old guys yet 

Finally, the aliens reveal the 
glowing, fetal beings beneath tbdr 
latex guise and the movie starts to 
disintegrate. As long as it sticks 
with the oldsters, “Cocoon” has a 
rare kind of charm. There’s a comic 
poignance in these lives, as they 
debate the relative merits of Ex- 
Lax and prunes or deal with loss of 
memory. 

There are few treats equal to 
watching Ameche, splendid in a 
white suit, crooning “Some En- 
chanted Evening,” or Brimiey 
sneaking op on his wife in the 


sneaking Dp an his wife in the 
drawer and saying, “Want a piece 
of candy, little girl?" 

Even these segments, though, 
have their problems. The way the 
movie emphasizes the revival of 
sexual potency nearly to the excln- 
sion of everything else starts to 
grate; certainly, other aspects of 
rejuvenation would be just as im- 
portant — the ability to pity sports 
again, or to read. And the screen- 
writer. Tom Benedek. has slighted 
the women characters; it’sa shame 


umm/sK&RECBmmr,iN 
W9. mpp/mcommyumM 

ORPBIANCBBAMNGNEGRC&FROH 

^ PROPERTY. 

/B I \ 


to waste talents like Stapleton and 
Tandy, but they’re not given any- 


thing to do. 
There woi 


There would be more room for 
the women if Benedek and Howard 
weren’t so busy working in extrane- 
ous aspects for the youth market. 
The romance between Welch and 
Guttenberg, for example, is just a 
third wheel 

What’s left is a mishmash of ref- 
erences to every Spielberg movie 
from “Jaws" to “E. T.," mdnHing a 
drawn-out finale that apes “Close 
Encounters.” Howard’s great 
strength as a director is that he’s 
able to tap into emotions that are 
real and familiar even when his 
character s are. thrown i nfrt fenfatf ie 
situations. What makes the best 
scenes of “Cocoon” so vivid, like a 
tearjerfcer in which Brimiey, fishing 
with his grandson, says goodbye in 
one long take, are their sense of 
lived-in me: 


C APSULE reviews of other 
movies recently released in the 
United States: 

Vincent Canby of The New York 
Times writes of “DAJLYJL.": 
“The best that can be said is that 
it’s inoffensive. The movie is a sci-fi 
fable about a little-boy robot 
named Daryl (an acronym for Data 
Analyzing Robot Youth Lifrfonn), 
conceived in a test tube and human 
in every way except for Ms brilliant, 
inhnman computer-brain. When 
Daiyi, well played by Barret Oliver, 
1 1 , escapes from his laboratory and 
learns to fed love and friendship, 
the U. & Army sends oat a two- 
word message: “Terminate it,” 
meaning him. 

The direction, by Australian- 
born Simon Winoer, who received 
good reviews for “Phar Lap," is as 
ordinary as the screenplay by Da- 
vid Ambrose, Allan Scott and Jef- 
frey EUis.” 

□ 

Janet Martin of The New York 
Tunes writes of TJfeforce”: “Tribe 
Hooper’s directorial work an *Pol- 
tergnst* may indeed have been 
heavily influenced by Steven Spiel- 
berg, who wrote and co-produced 
that film- TJfeforce’ snows off 
Hooper’s way with a winding mass 
of protoplasm, just as *Friltergd5t’ 
did, but its style is shrill and frag- 
mented enough to turn ‘Lifeforcc’ 
juft* hysterical vampire pom." 


mm THIS THffTS 
IN 19797 NIGHT. 


French Organization Helps Retailers 
Get a Share of the American Dream 


liuemonanal Herald Tribune 

P I ARIS — To many European 
mailers, the American dream is 
now. The strength of the dollar and 
Americans’ increased interest in 
European goods make the dream 
even more attractive. This has 
prompted new. cooperative ven- 
tures by Europeans in an effort to 
break into the American market 
It seemed recently that the whole 
world of fashion was in New York. 
Hanae Mori flew in from Tokyo, 

Hebe Dorsey 

Zandra Rhodes arrived from Lon- 
don and Sybil Connolly from Dub- 
lin. Henri Chaumet, the Place Ven- 
dritne jeweler, was in his newly 
opened pearl-gray store on 57th 
Street Madame Gris was being 
honored by Bloomingdalrfs. 

Kail Lagerfeld introduced his 
first American ready-to-wear line. 
Chanel's model. Inis de la Fres- 
sange, was working on ads for 
Cooi, Chanel's new perfume. Azze- 
dine Alala was in town with the 
decorator Andree Putman. 

Besides working with licensees, 
more and more American design- 
ers, discouraged by the anonymity 
of American department stores, are 
opening boutiques to establish 
their image. Many look with envy 
at such European successes as Ben- 
etton, which has 200 U. S. shops, 
and Laura Ashley, with 55 U. S. 
shops and growing rapidly. 

Burberry is another case in 
potDL Besides its New York opera- 
tion. launched 10 years ago, the 
British rainwear maker has opened 
shops in Washington, Boston, Chi- 
cago, Francisco and Philadel- 
phia. IKEA the Swedish furniture 
retailer, is about to open its first 
U. S. store in what is planned to be 
a nationwide chain. 

Many European retailers have 
succeeded in America, but quite a 
Tew have failed. The number of 
boutiques opened and closed on 
Madison Avenue within months is 
a cruel reminder that New York is a 
tough citadel To many Europeans, 
the American dream is still a mi- 
rage. 

This prompted the Sodete des 
Centres Commerciaux to open a 
U.S. branch in an attempt to 
bridge the gap between European 
retailers and American promoters. 
The organization is a Paris- based 
development company that for 22 
years has participated in the devel- 
opment, leasing and management 
of shopping centers throughout Eu- 
rope. Today it manages properties 
vwt^-aboot $100 million in rental 
ib&me. Since creating the Party II 
complex outride Paris in 1969, the 
organization's chairman, Jean- 
Louis Solal, has added 17 Europe- 
an shopping centers, including La 
Part-Dieu in Lyon, which he called 
the largest in Europe; it opened in 
1975, covering about 1 2 million 
square feet (110,000 square me- 
ters). 

From Ms grand offices on the 
Place Vend&ne, Solal said he first 
sensed that there was a new market 
for Europeans in the United States 
in 1981, “when the wind really 
started turning.” 

“We felt a desire from French 
retail as to get out of France," he 
said. “Simultaneously, we fdt a de- 
mand on the part of Americans for 
European goods." 

Sola! attributes this to the new 
new U. S. prosperity and the devel- 
opment of Americans' taste. 
“Americans travel a great deal 
more — they are more open to 
foreign merchandise. The strength 
of the dollar helps Americans to 
buy more imports and make Euro- 
peans more competitive.” 

Solal created an American de- 
partment in his company in 1982 — 
headed by Ms sister, Michelle So- 


H4 YEARS 
AF1ER.W& 
CMLUIAR ? 


7 Wf 
SEEMS? 
REAP, Y. 

\ 



Michelle Solal-Karr 

lal-Karr, a lawyer — to assist 
French retailers on the U. S. mar- 
ket. Quickly dubbed “Mrs. French 
Connection," Solal- Karr look 35 
French retailers chi a 12-day mara- 
thon, visiting 25 shopping centers 
in eight cities. Sola! became a con- 
sultant and leasing agent for a 
shopping mall in New York, one in 
Dallas and another in Washington, 
all with a strong European accent. 

The $ 100-million New York pro- 
ject developed by Madison Equi- 
ties on 57th Street between Pork 
and Madison, has set aside $10 
million to develop a “Place des An- 
tiquaries,” strongly geared to Euro- 
pean dealers. Shortly after plans 
for it were announced in New York 
and Paris last month. Sola! had 
more than 40 applications. 

Quadrangle, in Dallas, is another 
SlOO-rmffiQn project its 666.000- 
square-foot surface a combination 
of European food haO — inspired 
by the Place de la Madeleine in 
Paris and the food hall in the Ka- 
DeWe department store in West 
Berlin — plus a selection of shops, 
restaurants, galleries and bou- 
tiques. Its developer, Kenneth H. 
Hughes, who comes to Europe ev- 
ery other month, is an old hand at 


bringing European flair to Dallas, 
having introduced Ungaro, Yves. 
Saint Laurent, Louis Vuitlon. 
Gianni Versace. Guy Laroche and 
the Wildenstein art galleries to 
Texas shoppers. 

Solal. who teamed his trade in 
the United Slates and has been a 
member of tbe International Coun- 
cil of Shopping Centers for 22 
years, said half of every dollar 
spent by private consumers in Ihe 
united States is spent in shopping 
centers, including purchases of du- 
rable goods and automobiles. 
There were 7.600 shopping centers 
in tbe United States in 1964; in 
1984 there were 25.508. 

With that many shopping cen- 
ters in tbe United Slates, be said, 
“the only difference between one 
and another is in the architecture. 
But for the consumer, the most 
important thing is still the mer- 
chandise. Europeans will bring 
their own sense of style, sophisti- 
cated presentation and a different 
product" 

Solal. insisting that “we’re pro- 
moters , not brokers,” said: “we’ve 
been dealing with American devel- 
opers for years and we’ve estab- 
lished a distinct degree of confi- 
dence. We also bridge a cultural 
gap. We explain America to the 
French. We tell them bow to ap- 
proach America, when to negotiate 
and when to stop negotiating. We 
tell them of Americans' obsession 
with productivity, of which the 
French are not fully aware. In 
France, once a retailer is in a cen- 
ter. he's in for life. Not in America. 
After a lease is over, if the promoter 
doesn't like a client’s bottom line, 
he throws him out” 

Some European retailers have 
been with Solal’s organization for 
years. Bernard Beylerian. who 
started from a small family busi- 
ness in Versailles, first opened in 
tbe Parly 11 complex, then followed 
Solal to the United States, where be 
is now at the Dallas and Houston 
Gallerias and Boston's Copley 


shopping center. 
“Ultimately, wi 


“Ultimately, we have a moral re- 
sponsibility toward people who 
have followed us for years,” Solal 
said. “We want them io succeed.” 





.VIN7 


CERRUTI 1881 

LIGNE POUR FEMME 

PARIS 


Sales 


15 PI. de la MADELEINE 
39 av. VlCTOR-HUGO 




MONSIEUR 




100 , Champs-Ely sties 

Paris 8* 

44, rue Francois \" 

Paris 8' 

237, rue Saint-Honor6 
Paris l" 

BRING WITH YOU 
THE LAST FRENCH LOOK 
FROM THE BEST PLACE 
IN PARIS 

TOt : 339.86.04 J 


AUTHORS WANTED 
BY N.Y. PUBLISHER 

Lcadng ubsefy book pubtiher Mb maw- 
vcnpft of oS types, Sown, non-Raion, poetry, 
Rivendle. schotorty andretaota works, etc New 
nrthon wetewnad Send tor free booklet H-3 
Vemoge Pie*, 516 W. 34th Si., New YoA, N.Y. 
10001 USA 



The Director & English speaking staff of 

Mappin & Webb 

1 INTERNATIONAL 

warmly invite you to their salon to view 
their prestigious collection of fine jewelry and watches. 

We are the # 1 of the rue de la Paix .75002 PARIS .Tel.: 261.50.13 

# - T CD 

Featuring: EOLEX Mapping Webb PlAGEi Baume & Mercier 


UNCORD corum GBGL 


VACHERON 
‘ CONSTANTIN 


Highest Export Discount. 

Our Cannes showroom is at 32-33 La Croisette. 

By Appointment 10 Her Majesty The Queen. 

PARIS . CANNES . LONDON . D0SSELDORF . TOKYO . NEW-YORK 





: -'-A ' "'v r 

r r- - . 'Jr* — v>f. -.■r > 




A THIRD FLIGHT: EVERY TUESDAY. 


p DIRECT FLIGHTS ZURICH-SEOUL 
I EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SUNDAY. 
| DIRECT FLIGHT FRANKFDRT-SEOUL 
S EVERY SATDR DAY. Il'.'iV 1 ") 


Korean Air inaugurates its 
3rd Paris- Seoul direct flight Now 
you can leave for Seoul Tuesday, 


Thursday or Saturday with Korean 
Air. It’s now even easier to fly from 
the heart of Europe to the heart of 
Asia - and under the best possible 
conditions. You will enjoy the ame- 
nities and conveniences offered on 
Korean Air’s Prestige Class. There 
you will find all the services of a luxury 
business class, but you’ll also disco- 
ver a warm welcome, great charm 


and refinement Because in Korea, 
it’s a tradition. 



K®REANA 1 R 




Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD. TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


DowQl 

AHosc 

ATAT 

HttsoCp 

BomtTr 

cnierp 

UnToch 

IBM 

NoSIPw 

RCA 

AmSxD 

NotncB 

SFeSoP 

Motorio 

AMF 


VOL 


18S74 


9WI 


HKMl LOW Ldst 

Chs- 

34(6 

39ft 

34* 

— ft 

39% 

37 

39’h 

+2U 

24% 

4* 

Mft 

47% 

24% 

49 

+1% 

69 

47% 

66ft 

46ft 

69 

47% 

+1 

<1 

39ft 

40to 

— ft 

121ft 

lis 1 * 

ia% 

+lft 

50% 

SOU* 

son 

— ft 

<9% 

46% 

4878 

+1% 

48% 

44% 

48U 

+ % 

82% 

81% 

B2to 

+ ft 

31ft 

30ft 

Slto 

+ % 
+1U 

a 

31ft 

Hft 

IBM 

IBto 

15% 

— ft 


Dow Jones Averages 


open Mali Law Last Cha. 

I Indus 131AC8 132AJ2 130700 132006 — 3J2 
Trans 64501 64B.P9 63901 M60*- ?■£ 
Dill 16548 166.14 16U3 I6S01 — 

I Cams M24b 5*655 SJX79 5*01— 10* 


NYSE Index 


Previous Today 

HM Low CtoM 3PJH. 
10*45 1OB08 10905 10*49 

121.15 12247 121.15 12290 

MA0J 1063* 1060 WS07 

4053 S9M 4053 tSS* 


Comuaslfe 
Industrials 
TransA. 
Utilities 
FI* ~ 


11071 11747 


11022 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 
U Mill In 
industrials 


Prev. Today 

cum Now 

9001 7)91 

7742 7741 

9241 9243 


NYSE Diaries 


aoM pto*. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchansed 
Total Issues 
New Kioto 
New Lows 


72* 

s 

2013 

*e 

15 


1BU 

551 

449 

203* 

1M 

V 


Juno 21 

June 20 

Jimel* — — 

June ll ■— 

Juno 17 . _ _ 

•included in the sales fiflrftt 


»oy Sates ■suit 
197415 419*0 1.10 

431*2 109 

405460 SOB 


Mondavi 



VoL at 3 pal 75,140*0 

prey.apALYot. nmm 

Pivt GBBMlhiakd dose 15U3UM 


Tobies indiide me nationwide prices 
up lo me dating on Wall Street and 
da not refled lata trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unc han ge d 
TOM Issues 
New Kioto 
New lows 


272 

2S3 

2*8 

7*2 

21 

13 


3 


NASDAQ index 


Gommlfe 

induotrioU 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

T reran. 


Wart Year 
Close swan Am 

M7T 22J5 

2*660 2*4* 2*50 

37003 — 37091 

3410 — 33171 

277.11 - »646 

21661 — 2810 

2SU3 - 2*0-96 


2 * 1.11 

77l»4 

25742 

249.10 

20940 

196M 

206.78 


1 Standard & Poor's Index 1 

P remia * Today 
HW LOW aon SPAN, 
industrials Z2.H 205*0 SDK* 20137 

Transa. 16747 1630 1470 16644 

UtIHftel H45 BAW 045 BM 

Finance 23-13 2279 2U3 22* 

Composite 19*46 19643 U»4I MU9 


AMEX Sales 


3 PJA volume 

Prev.3PjM.vrtmw 

Prow. cons, wuume 


4420*0 

4420*0 

6430*0 


AMEX Most Actives 


VbL 


tutu Low Lost Che. 


WpngB 

BAT in 

TeKAIr 

Dots Pd 

W*4Kn 

WDWfl 

CnSWn 

cmacn 

Amdahl 

TIC .. 

OomeP 
pDEpIK 
GrtUtC 
Foe* ML 
POEofR 


£§ “ 
203* 13% 
1115 13% 
1757 lift 
1440 .5% 
12S4 "% 
1003 m 
933 3 

121 »tt 
m 3*n 
784 30?k 
764 3316 


14'- 

4ft 

IS 

iflft 

13 

11%. 

17 

4ft 

ms 

959 

ll, 

Wi 

»ft 

2 **, 

22VU 


IT'S -rll, 
ilk tL 
lift 4- H 
llth * kh 
13% ♦ n 
12V. * lh 

194 ♦!■* 

SV, ♦ ft 
ll*h + *s 
4to 
2 

19*4 4 % 

39U 

30*6 +m 

I2Vj 




\\Y 


AMEX Stock index 


previous Today 

Mob LOW CiUM 3PJ6. 

2260 324.16 22S4-* 2260 


lIMPnrti 

H#Lm Sna 


Die YU. PE 


SIX 

lift WWl LOU 


Close 

OuttCtrg* 


08 1* 14 86 18ft 74*8 I8V1 + lh 

12 413 14 12* 14 

40 2.7 56 9131 1B98 IBV. 18ft — W 

10 5339 4SVj 44« 4» , 

2.10 94 6 22V: 22*6 22* - ft 

167 114 * 23% 23% 23% — V, 

14 8% BVh Bto — ft 

2* 44 IBS 50th 4**h 9 

0 14 11 26* 13ft 13 13ft + ft 

17? Ill 9 1*00 27ft 26*4 77 + to 

. 143 24 17 1514 50 5696 57}. + ft 

2Fk 18 ACCOWd a SO 23 17 412x22*6 22to 229* + Vi 

24*4 171 AcmeC .40 14 - 

J2h 11 11 11 I 18 

1.92(114 75 17th 17V, 17V* + >4 

0 14 7 29 16=h 166. 16**— ft 

J3t 44 IB 46 11*8 Ills lit* — It 

11 6617 26-4 24U 25th +IW 
.is u it is m mt-ia 

12 422 13*8 12*6 13 + Vi 

ZJM 50 34 1097 4A-S <S?5 46 — ft 

5J9O10J ' ' ' ' 

10 15 14 


23% T« AAR 

lev, «t ads 

21 Vs 13%. AMF 
48 v, 24'A AMR 

S - * 19*8 AMR of 

25% 72"h AN Rot 
Uft 7U A PL 
61 Ve 444 ASA 
77 17V* AVX 

77 16 AZP 

57% 364 AOTLeb 


i Trading Is Moderate on NYSE 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Share prices were lower in 
moderate trading late Monday on the New 
York Stock Exchange, but still holding on to 
most of Friday's strong advance. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was off 


10th 74 AcnvrE 
17V, 15 AdaEx 
3) IKS AdmJVU 

19% 948 AdvSrs 
41 Vh 72 ll AMD 
13*4 *'o Advest 

14*8 9 AerUex 

47 7T~ ACtnLf 

574 5x4 AofLof 
274 IT 7 * Alimns 
3*8 n* Aileron 
54 04 AlrPrd 10 12 12 

244 13 AlrDFrl M ID 11 
I 1 AIMOO % 

334 Jn 5 - AIdPr1A3.93 111 
8'» 6% AlePfluf 0 10.9 
0 61'* AlDPpf »JMI llxl 

71 5* AlaPpf 230 1IJ 

16V* ll'h AlDSSCs UH Afi 9 
25% 9% AlskAJr .16 J 9 

184 13'* Albrtas 0 32 X 
SU 241 ■ Alhhns .74 14 13 
31% 21% Alcan 
374 774 AlcaSId _ 

0 17 AlexAlx 10 U 

264 Alsxdr 2! 

891, 72% AiloCo 2JMt 16 25 
26% 23% AlaCont 286 108 
23% 19% Alolnl 160 5J> 
204 15'8 Aloln at 2.19 10.7 
93 81% Alol PICII15 113 

344 2*4 AiioPw 
304 ls=. Aiienc 
*6% 23% AlfOCo 10 A3 
6* 53'* AICCD Of 6J* ltu 

113% 99 A IOC paT 290 108 

^4 15’. AiWPU 
59V, XO-. AllaStr 112 
174 Vo AlllsCh 
34 , 24 AllsCpt 
28'e ?! ALLTL 184 
3*4 29% Alcoa 10 
72% 144 Amax 0 
CO 321* Amo* Pf 3JW 
34 ArnHca 1.10 

140% <9 : * AHespf ISO 
2% 1% AmAor 

SI’* IS' a A3ahr 
73 54% ABrantS 3-90 

19% 74% A Bra of 175 
115 561 h ASdCSt 160 

27 1*1 a A3klM M 

371, 304 ABusPr 64 
59% 401* AmCan 1*0 
25% 71'* ACanpf SJO 11.1 
SI 37 AContri 380 5.9 
23 r i 16% ACapBd 10 107 
33-5 25V* ACcoCv 15 lo OJ 

11 *'.* ACentC 299 

56'* 434 ACvan 1.90 1* 12 

274 16% ACT .«2 18 24 

34'.* 16% AElPw 126a *6 


124 is% is i54— % 5,50 10 j j [8.88 shortly before 3 P.M. 


216 554 MV, 55% 

353 344 334 4 

7 3 34 24— 4 

428 54 534 54 

34 204 19% 194—4 
23* |*6 1*8 14 

5 04 0U. 33V* + 4 
53 9 8 B + 4 

240r 79 79 79 

520z 0% 0 784 

21 154 15% 15% — th 

600 0% 23T, 23 — 4 

21 171* 174 174 

__ „ .. 108 31% 311* 31V— I* 

10 48 12 3346 254 24*s 2SV8 + 4 

180 26 12 191 35% 344 H% 4- 4 

734 30 294 0 + 4 

50 234 23% 0% 

125 51 Vh 804 B04— 4 
1 264 264 264 

160 23% 724 234 + 4 

7 204 20’h M4 

9 *8 974 *74 + Vh 

370 88 10 1465 34 334 334 4- to 

80b U 14 118 184 184 154 + Va 

9 3449 414 414 414 + % 
64 644 644 644 

8 111% 111 111 * to 

16 14 18 174 174— to 

2267 564 56 5*4 + 4 

150 54 S% 5%— 4 
16 344 344 34% — V, 
9 *5 27% 264 2618— 4 

38 17 1010 3J4 33% 33% + 4 

18 537 144 144 144— % 

90 10 34 33% 04— % 

4.1 If 1827 27V 27 0—4 


Declines led advances by a 3-io-2 ratio 
among the i, 969 issues traded. 

Five-hour volume amounted to about 
77345,000 shares, compared with 83,690.000 in 
the same period Friday. 

“The market is just pulling back a little bit 
from Friday’s big run." said Bany Berlin of 
Shearson Lehman Brothers. He noted that a 

A I though prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. close in Netc York, for time reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 P.M. 


38 9 


68 


30 

9 

5.9 9 
9J 

18 17 
32 14 
JA 14 
A* 12 


third of the gain in the Dow Jones industrial 
average on Friday was due to the large advance 
in the price of shares of General Foods. 

“The weaker price of that stock today is 
impacting the averages," Mr. Berlin said. 

“Bul by and large the market is behaving 
itself," he added, citing a good demand for 
stocks of companies that are likely takeover 
candidates. 

Profit-taking after stocks moved broadly 
higher Friday was also responsible for the lower 
levels, analysts said. But they noted that the 
market, up to late Monday, had given up less 
a»i 2*4 »% 794 T 4 [ than half the gains it made at the end of last 

396 113 112% 113 + 4 j week. 

“The market is consolidating,” said John 
Burnett of DU Securities. “It's giving up gains 


118 119 118 —1 

126 1% 14 1% 

85 04 20% 20% 


21 264 364 264— % 
36 244 24 34% 

196 5B’8 594 58% 

7 254 35 254 1- 4 

58 51 51 51+4 

60 20% 204 204— 4 
a 39 284 284 

16 84 8% 84 

996 49% 48% 49 +4 

351 24 0% 24 + % 

1733 23*8 23V* 234— 4 


grudgingly and generally giving a line account 
of itself. There’s strong buying power just un- 
derneath this market.” 

American Hospital Supply was near the top 
of the active list and higher. Hospital Coro, of 
America was also active and up. Baxter Tra- 
venol Laboratories, after offering to buy Ameri- 
can Hospital Supply Corp., was little rhang^t 

Northern States Power and Middle South 
Utilities were lower. 

TRW lost ground after a Gol dman Sachs 
analyst removed the stock from his buy list 

AT&T (ex-dividend) was off 'A to 23ft. Unit- 
ed Technologies eased after announcing that 
due to worldwide weakness in the computer and 
semiconductor markets, earnings from opera- 
tions for the second quarter ended June 30 are 
expected to be substantially lower than in the 
year-ago quarter. 

IBM was ahead after announcing two new 
computer programs. Digital Equipment was ad- 
vancing. 

Cray Research was up after introducing a 
new model of its solid-stale storage device and 
lowering the prices of two other storage prod- 
ucts. 

Burroughs was higher. Texas Instruments 
was easier. 

RCA added to Friday’s gain on the view that 
following its sale of Hertz Corp. The company 
is a takeover targeL 

General Foods receded after racking up the 
session’s biggest gain Friday amid speculation 
that Philip Morris would buy it. Philip Moms 
was off ma rginall y. 

Hershey and Campbell Soup were lower. 


WMo«fi 

Mon Lo« Stock 


Din. V14 PE 


519. 

1366 Hirt Low 


Clan 

Quota's* 


394 174 Ensardl 160 6J 17 253 254 254 254— 4 
564 514 Erwetlpf 6.150110 UOQZ&5 SS SS + to 
214 20 EtoExo +0*29 1 Ota 20V* 204 204 + 4 

2% 1*8 Etom 24 1056 2% 24 24 + 4 

164 94 Emara 16 114 134 114 + % 

30 154 EntxEn UOolV 5D 1*4 17% 18 —4 

21% 16 EJlMxIn 10 6.9 II 262 194 184 18% + 4 
32% 17% Etorixi 1.T4 12 17 79 

64 2% Etolmk 1721 

1% 4 Eaumkrt 1632 

20% 114 Eqmfc Of 23t 11 J 

494 2|4 EqtROS 1J2 28 

.12 
JO 
M 


IZMaath 
H*sfi Low Stott 


pt». m pe 


SB. 

lift Mgil Uw 


SScirw 


1 A U U 


304 XPt, »% + % 
34 3% 3%— 4 
*8 4 4—4 


M 

SB 

'M 

1J0 


2 A 13 
13 9 
24 13 
27 15 


UMontti 
High Low, Slack 


Sis. 

Dtv. Vld-PE Ufa HkXi Law 


erase 
Quotaroa 


47% 25 Am Exp 108 27 17 9816 494 464 48% + 4 


2.90 

1.12 

640 

M 

J3 


.13 4 


22% *% AFaml » .48 23 14 

35 * I«'b AOnCo 100 2.9 ID 
15% i 1 , AGnlwl 

55% 51% AGfll a<A6J4*ll^ 
964 55% A Gal p«B547a 63 
71% 40% AGfl PTO 244 19 
Ml T* A Hoist 
66’* 46% A Ha me 
394 26% AHaso 
96V* 64% Am rich 
87% S3 AinGrp 
2BV* 1SV* AMI 
5V8 2% Am Mot 
0 164 A°rosa S 

13-4 5 A5LFfa 6 

ia% 12% ASLFI pt 2.19 154 

16 10% A Ship 00 67 7 

35% 24’ 8 AmSfd 140 S3 10 

6-j Z£. AmStor 44 14 12 

754 44' J AStr otA A38 5L7 

57- . 51 AStr D?B 600 120 

24% 16'# AT&T 10 

41% 33V a AT AT pt 164 9.1 

42 r.V ! AT1T of 3.14 90 

27% ISVhAWofrs 1.0 60 B 
12^* 10 AWaSpt US 10.1 

29% 19’* Am Hat I 240 110 9 

71% 55’* ATrPr 544 80 

17 *% ATrSc 

87 60’ 4 ATrUh 544 63 

SO 23% AmesOs SO A 24 
30 12 13 


1306 54 
37 


JO 


140 

140 


148 

1J2 

30 

40 


10 
4.1 9 

X9 U 

1* 

5.7 

33 32 
14 IS 
23 14 


2*1: 22‘s Ametefc 
27% IB' ■ Arrrtoc 
16 6 'j Amtow 

69 50'* Amoco 

381* 26’ * AMP 
24 11% Amoco 

0.* 12% Am reps 
36% 0% ARlSm 
431*! 25% AmsteP 
4% 1% Anacmp 
24V* 1*% An loo 9 
30% 19% Anchor 
42% 0'h AnCtar 
12 l » 9% AndrGr 
S4V- 17 Anscllc 
0v* 20% Anheuss 
66‘* 47% Anneu at 340 
1*L 13V: Anlxlr 08 

16% S'* Anthem .04 a 13 

15% I O'* Anthnv .4*14 0 
13 9’4 Apache 08 23 10 

2% ApchP wt 

19% 1518 ApchP urttlO 110 
72 55Vi ApPwpf 9.12 113 
66% SO ApPwpf 740 114 
34% 27V. Appw p| 4.18 120 

? 1U 24 ApPwol 180 113 

r-i 19 APtDtO 106t SJ 10 

S B AppIMo 

23% 15% Aren On 

mi 23V* ArlP pi 

23% 14 ArkBst 

24% 1* Ark la 

% % ArinRt 

12% T1« * ArmtWa 

15% 6% Armco 

24% 15Mr Anne Pf 2.10 104 

24% 16% AnrrsRb 4 11 1 

39V* 73% ArntWln 1JO 34646 

0 79V: Armvv pf 3 75 10.7 

3e’h 19 AraCP 109 4.1 7 

25% 12% AronE 00 13 * 

33% 16 Artra 02 .7169 

23% 14% Arvim 30 19 B 

27% 17% Asorcn 

33% 70% A 3*11011 140 43 

44% 33% AjfllO pf 430 104 

43'.* 3t’v AlhlOPt 196 *J 

69 4* AKJDG 240 10 11 

1101* 79 AsdDot 4.75 

24% 13% AMilan* 140 

2*% 20% AtCvEI 238 

64 V. 40% All Rich 440 

39 32>T AlIRcpf 3.75 

153 97 AlIRcpf 249 

151* 10% Atras C p 

321* 18% Appal 40 

40'k 34to AuloOl J9 

5 6% Avalon n 

»H 2418 Avery 40 

15% 10 A*Wli n 

41 27 Avne! 39 

25% l"i Avon 103 

33% id 1 « Avoin 


S04 21U: 20% 219: +1 
927 34W 33% 34%- to 

46 14 13% 14 + to 

33 54*8 54% 54% 

9 91 90% 90%—|% 

366 48% 67% 68% — % 

57 lOVn 10 10 

44 13 1754 63 42V, 63 + to 

2.9 1323803 39’* 37 39to +2to 
70 9 2943X 9498 93V* 94 — % 

3 24 489 85 849* 841*— V* 

18 12 5368 26 25% 2598 + % 

B26 3 2% 7%— Vh 

90S 19Vh 19% 19 
27 7V» 716 7to + to 

42 T4to 13% Uto + to 

V 12 11% ll*fc + to 

310 31 339* 30% — % 

914 67 66 66%— lVh 

703 77% ?s% 77 +1 

23 57 56% 56% 

50 1822025x24% 23% 24% 

1001x40% 37% 40 
666X41 40V* *5%— to 

136 24to 24 24 — to 

2Wfc 12% 17% 12% + % 
56 22 21% 2116— U 

Bx7Wi 701* 70 Vj 
51 16 15V. )5to— to 

4x 869* 85% 869* + V* 

S 489-1 48 489* + % 

34% 23% 24% +| 
311 77*8 27V. 27to- % 
44 7to 6% 6% 

. 3C<9 611* 60V* 61 + to 

23 19 2882 31% 30% 31% +1 
16 15 59 K 11% 11V— V. 

9 19 19% 19 + to 

18 34% 34to 34to + to 
56 41 40% 40% — % 

520 2% 2% 2% + to 
629 2tta 20% 219* + % 

w W* wviw „ 

6 379* 379* !7fc— to 
6 11% 11% 11% 

354 349* 23% 24to + % 
13 4248 32to 31% 32 
54 441 67 66to 67 +9] 

1.9 16 193 15 14% 14% 

644 11 109* 11 +to 

15 12% 12% 13% + to 
i85x iDto io into 
U Ito ito %— % 
772 19to 19 19to + to 
ML 70% 70% 70% — to 
B20Z A4to A4 64 
4 34% 34% 34% 

9 31 30% 31 — to 

914 33% 33 33V* + to 

156 13to 12% 13 
028 23 229* 22% + % 

as am. 30% + % 
18 71% 71% 21% 

" 18% 1IU 109* 

% % 

2 11% 11% 11% 

915 89* 9% Pt- to 
9 309* 20V* 28%— to 
50 1 16% Uto Uto— to 
134 39% 3898 38% + to 
61 Ox 36 Uto 35 
20k 29to 28% 29to + % 
207 IJto 12% 13% + 9* 
26 29% 399* 29% — lh 
77 70% 20to 20% — to 
187 23to 22% 73%— % 
342 3398 32% 32% — to 
331 43% 43% 43% + % 
9 42% 421* 42% — 98 
99 48to 67% 699* — % 
3 HW 100% 108% —Ito 
42 33 21% 22 + % 

92 29 78% 39 + Vh 

ai7 58% 579* 5818 + % 
toss a a a 
12 139 137V* 138% +2% 

1 14 10% lOto 10% — t* 
129 22to 31% 22to 
744 50% 48% 5018 +1 
35 4% 4% 4% + Vh 

788 31% 39to 30% — % 
30 14% 14% Uto + to 
1.7 16 3662 9 27% 29% +tto 

*0 10 1641 20% at* 20% — to 
11 8J 18U II Uto +1% 


29 21% ftrttPt 10Oe 6 S 7 

25% 22% 0rm DP 
5% 1% Brock 

34 V. 15% Brcftwv 132 56 33 

40% a BJtvUG 112 73 9 

25% If to BkUGpf 247 mi 

J7to 29 BkliGBf 305 110 

»% 13 B«n5n 00 10 9 

29% 22% BnwnGP 106 4.7 19 

SOU. 29% BrwnF 100 12 17 

40% 279* Braswk 100 17 9 

40% 27% BrshWI -53 I J 14 

19% 13% Bundy 00 44 9 

20 15V* BunkrH 2.M 114 

21 to 14% Bonnet 11 

_ 6 23 aurrind 104 AS td 

Uto a BrtNth 140 20 9 

7to 6 to BrINapt 05 u 
23to 19 8rtN of 112 94 
51% 44% BrIN Pf SJ6el05 
19% 11 Bimxtv 44 30 12 
66to 48% Bunrph 160 44 11 
20% 12V* Butlrln 02 16 98 
7% 1% Butte* 

15 3% Buies Pf 1051 


280 27V* 27% 279* + % 
27 23 22% 23 + to 

112 3to 3 3 —to 

14* 3A 23% 23% — to 
39 40% 40to 40% + to 
4 24% ato 24 to— « 
29 a 15% 35% 

79 21% 20% 21 — 16 

217 29% 29 29 — % 

914 49% 48% 49% — % 
1332 36% 35% 36% + % 
338 XV. 30 30to + Hi 
23 U 10 18 + to 

13k 18% 18% 11% 

33 16% 16% 16% — % 
334 251* 24% 2598 — to 
2023 62 60% 61% — « 

11 6% 6% 6% 

1 22to 229* 22% 

451 50% 50% 50% + to 
703 11% 11% 11% + % 
3227 SBV* 56% 58V* +11* 
157 19% 19% 19% + to 
418 2 1% 1%— to 

13 4% 4*4 4% + % 


1400 4.1 
UW 20 
100 10 

200 46 
20S 86 
410 7.9 

104 114 


17 


47 12 


207# 94 
1.16 45 
100 XI 

.92 34 


48 2.1 


00 

30 21 

07 14 10 
48 
102 


.14b 0 15 
308 11.9 
.40 10 8 
109 50 U 11M 
39 


100 

102 

02 


27 9 
43 10 
10 14 
f 


7J 10 
8.9 10 
49 27 


20 12 
B 


18% 10 BMC 
351* 2IU Balm co 
IV* 15 Bkilrtl 
24% 10% BO! dor 
2to to .iBoidU 


.121 64 10% 10% 10% — to 

00 U 13 222 at* 30% 30% + to 

.9? SS It 409 17 lb% 16% 

J6 10 13 33 U’k 19% 19th + <m 

BA 1% !'* Ito— 9k 


S% 6 + U 

20 13 22 M'- 55 55 — to 

10 2258 17% 161. 16% + V* 

12 8 IS'. KWh lOto — lh 

* 701 46% 46 Ve 46% — to 

250* % 45V* 45% + to 

214 331* 33 331* + to 

88 3% 3'. 3% 

18 58% 5B!u 58% 

856 54'i 531* 5318—1 

134 52 51% 52 + % 

35 2 451* 44% 45% + to 

3SU 31 30% 31 + to 


70 

90 

30 11 


9 2 vIDIdUpt 

55% 29% Banco 105 

23V. II s MU. Ml 00 

13% 7% BollvPk 

46% 31% BtFIGE 340 
44-.* 37'. Ball PtB 400 
341 b 21'. DncOna 1.13 
5% 3'. BcjnTc* 

67 43% PanCaa 103 20 12 

541-r 79 B9B» 243 40 6 

S'- 43 BkQps P, 4010 9 4 
46% I* - BVNY 204 40 7 

31% IT"* B<m*Va 1.17 10 

r% 14% Dnhtm 1 02 80 10 2350 18% «V* IBV*— to 
<7 40 OkAmat 5.13*120 470 41% 41% 41% 

76% 66 BkAfn pi S0?e!24 101 66% 65% 65% —Ito 

Uto 11% BkAmpf283 91 15% 15% 15% — to 

37% 23'h BkARto 2-43 A1 12 54 »% 20% 2«%— 9* 

;s% 3S BankTr 7.7C 3.9 713219 69 689* 69 

r 19% BkTrpf 250 *0 64 26% 76% 26%—% 

is tv* Banner 04 J U 12 12 llto 12 
54 14 Bare 44 10 IS 1015 34’h 54 54% +1 

74i* is BarnGp 00 14 10 2» Hto 73 22to— % 

41% 73 Darnels 104 00 411 Mto 37 37’,— 1 lh 

r»l 17 Bar, tor 63 3.2 13 138 18% U 18% lh 

3% BA3IX .170 10 12 48 17% 12 T2 — to 

25 U 1 594 311* 31*. 31’* + to 
07 23 67 644V 16 ISto 16 + to 

0? .9 43 49 23% 2318 23% + 9s 

5 W - - - 


•7% 

37% 19 * BairsTh 
iS'i 11% QaxtTr 
TV: r’% Ba*Fln 

34%. 22'-h Do*5h5 

36% 74% Bear lap 100 20 12 
33 74-a BrotCo 103 5.9 a 

Ml 46.*: Declol A3B 59 
:5”t 12 PoCiU* 44 30 52 
54* 10% BednD I0D 20 15 
0% 4 Bckcr 
IS 6% Beter of 100 7«J 
17% !:■* BtWH « U I 
35% 27% BelHwl 06 
15 r eciHt.pt 6? 

9T.= 67% Sri I Atl 607 
M 73 BCE e 
27u 19% Belilnd 
47% 27" . BellSeu 
57 41'.- BeloAH 

23 21% Bern!* 

45’s 7* BontCp 

»% Mto Bend Pt 03 18.9 
72'* 17 Benelpf 200 H.4 
If 8 17% Bencotn 
6‘* 3 B . BcnplB 

8 3to Borkor 
IS W* Bast Pd 
21% Uto BethStl 
49.. JTto BethSfpfSJKI 120 
24-. U% SainSlof 2JD 120 
37 73% Beeeriv 

?4% 197, BI0TT3* 

30 U'8 Plpcttn 

261 17'. Blacks 
D't II - 8ICHHP 
43 14‘. Stclrjp 

SS% 53".* BICtHP L4J 
4T 28 - Boe’np* 103 
45 33--* BallcC l.W 

6! 46 BorteQ at 500 

rr* 15% eciiBcr .13 

40 23 BoraenslJT 

24Tl ’6> MTBWa .«! 

8% 4% Bcrmnj 
43 26 BosE3 324 

33 63 BosEpI 80S 180 

111. 9 BOSEpr 1.17 186 
13% 10% SOSEnr 106 180 
2f*> Uto Bovmtr W 
31% 251* SrlaSl 100 L 
611* 4i*t BrlMM !-H 3-1 
Oto *Sto BnfM of S0O 10 
4-* 3’. BriiLnd 


208 

02 

203 

a 

1.00 

200 


■ B71 76 

04 10 33 

JC 20 


34% 54% 34% + 

14 3Sto 35% 35% 

49T 31 30% 30v* — v* 

320 57V. 56 to 56% + % 

65» 13% 13% 13% 

176 54% 531* 53to— % 
236 4’. 4% h! a — to 
29 7% 7 7 — % 

7 ISto \3 13 

234 34 33% 33%— % 

1 339* 331* 331*— 1 
1093. flto 90% VO% 

61 »to 33 J2% 

a 19% 19% 19% + to 

3861x41% 40% 411b— 9* 
48 55% 55% 55% — to 
11 Jfto 391* 29% + to 


03 


t.92 

St 


124 IS 


1.5 
28 

75 9 

10 13 
60 9 

1.4 27 

14 tl .. _ 

+7 I) U51 43 42% 4278— % I 

2 39V* 3«l* 39to + l* 

360x 27 73 22 

42 Uto 1818 Uto 

61 4% 4% 4% 

66 6 % 6 % 

921 13% 13% 13 — H 

1118 16% Uto 16% — Vh 

34 40to 40% + l* [ 

83 20to 20% »9* 

a I4S5« 3S*1 35V. 35% + %■ 

3 J 18 151 N 73% 24 + to I 

35 36 21 205# 21 

30 11 963 U% 19% 191* 

50 * 13 31-8 329* 32-8 + to | 

5*100 50 21% 2H* 311* — 

40 15 89 56% 55% 56% + % | 

10 IS 2190 43V: <3% 4jto 

4.1 70 1510 46'k 46% 46% + to 

80 4 SflVi 58 56% + to 

.4 JJ 762 25 :«* 24ft + Ik 

Sf 39% JSto 39lb + % 
688 7ST9 32% 3298— % 
22 7> 79* r.*— % 

IS9 43 43% 43 + to 

3201 83 81% 82 + to 

is M ii n 

7 13% 13% 13% — to 
JOS 23 22% 23%— % 

.. 310 a 77% 27%—% 
17 1X3 61% 60% 6t% + to 
5 129 l» 129 +1* 

IS 55 4% 4% 4% 


319* 22% CBI in 
122 M% CBS 
B2to 52V* CBS Pi 
Bto 4'4 CCX 
S8to 21 CIGNA 
37% 23% CIGpf 
S2to 50% CIGpf 
56% 23to CNAFn 
llto 0% CNAI 
»to 16% CNW 
45% 35% CPC lilt 220 
Z3to 14% CP NM 100 

in* cmiAiu _ 

18% CSX 
40to U CTS 
129* 7% C3 Inc 
33% 22% Cabot 
U% Bto Conor 
25 11% Cal Fad ... _ 

S31* 37% CalFdPf 405 94 
30V* 139* CallM 05b 10 
17 11% Comml .12 0 

259* 15V. CRLkB A0 
7% 3 CmpR a .161 

Uto 9V8 CpRdIo 250 

79 59% Cams? ISO 30 12 

151* 9% CdPoes 08 

72’- 14to CaoPfi D 

2281* ISO to Copals 
77% 15% CapHrtS 
Uto 10 Carlnpo 
40to 2Sto canine 102 3.1 10 
26V. 157s CaroFt AO 1.7 11 
19% Uto Corpttr 200 80 8 
2S» 19% Carp pt 207 10.9 
48 35% CorTec ZI0 5.7 9 

111* 798 Carrol 07 8 II 

48% 349* CarsPlr * ' 

30% 18% CartH*» 

40% 20V* CarlWI „ 

I Bto 9% CascNG 100 60 
1698 918 CostICX 
29 15% CstlCPt 108k 

40 to 38% CotrpT JO 10 
27% 16 Coco 06 3.1 12 
Tl5to 62% Celonse 400 30 ll 
44to 34 ceianpf 4jo io* 

IS 79* Cengyn 03e 0 23 
44% 34 CMM 208 50 10 
26% 17 Contain 11 

26% 179* CmSOW 202 70 8 
29V* 17% CenHud 204 90 7 
20% 14% Cnl IPS 104 8.1 10 
zru lBVi CnLaEI 208 70 7 
37 29% CLdEIPfAla 110 

12% 8% CeMPw 100 110 7 

20% 13'8 CVtPS 1.90 90 6 
121* 2% Centre* 

11% TV. CMtvTV 

239* Uto COflvIlt 
Ml* 15% Crt-tned 
24% lev* CeoaAjr 
»% U% Oimnln ... 

27% 19 Chrnipt 100 *0 
S4to 43to Own I pt 4410 80 
10 8 ChomSP 00 40 13 

4% 1 vlChrtC 

418 ItovICtirlPf 
Al 35% entna 300 60 6 
71 601* Dion pf 700 100 

*F* 36% Chase of 505 11.1 
56 to 48 Chase pf 609elZl 
sm 51 Onse pf 120Oe230 
21% ISto Chelsea 02 30 9 
34to 24% Che mad IJ2 5.1 14 
431* 23% CltniNY 208 60 A 
43 24 OlNYpf 107 40 

551. 46 CtINY Pf 404e 14 
Ml* 31 to Owsak 104 30 9 

38% 31to ChCSPn 300 62 

37% 2»to Chevm 200 60 . 

200 127 CMMtw #1 

Hto 53 Vj enurn pf 
26% 16% ChIPnT 0Oe 0 8 
11% 7to ChVFull 03i 40306 
54 27 Chrfscr 081 .9 

m* io'a aicRpf 100 

LT* 9% Chroma 
54 42 Chrm al 

33V; 24% Chnrjlr 100 
75 34-8 Chubb s 200 

63V. 50% Chubb pt 405 
70'- 12% Church t 04 
17 30 Cl I co re 303 

49% 35% cine el I 
18% 9% ClnGE 
3418 24 ClnGpf 
SB 39 ClnGpf 

74 SO OnG Pi 
77 1878 ClnMIl 

37 23% ClrclK 

31 IS ClrCtv 
TBto Uto Circus 

9 271* Cl Hem _ 

96 751* Cites pfA90Se 9.9 

102 97to CilCFPf09JMe 9.1 
«'-8 33% Cltylnv 70Jc 

«% Mb ClabJr 
29% 6V* ClalrS I 

32 23% Clark E 

16 718 ClavHm 

33 to 17 Clvai 

73’-. 14% ClevEI 

42% 46to OvElPl 700 120 
16% IB Clavpk M 50 
17% 15% Clvpkpf 203 130 
19 14% Clvpkpf 104 115 

38% 221* CJarox 106 17 12 
25 Uto CluDM n “ 

34% 24 CluotfP 
21 to I2to Coochm 
36% 15% Caastls 
*0 2 *V» Cstlpt 

771. S61* CoCdCI 
19% 9% Co loco 

14 2Sto celemn 


238 33 22% 22% 

1719 120V* 1199* 119% —1% 
10 83% 83% 83% +19* 

69 5% 5% SH 

1468 58 56% 5618—1% 

147 32 31% 32 

375 52 U. 51% 51%—% 
1H 569* 55% 569*— % 
33*11 10% 10%— 9* 

123 191* 19% 19% + % 
420x 46% 44% 46% +1% 
41 23% 22% 33 — % 
2M«Z1% 21% 71%— % 
1847 259* 2598 25% + 98 

88 31% J1V* 31% + % 

115 8% 7% 8% + % 

397 27 26% 26% + 




00 70 8 
200 110 9 
00 20 13 
00 10 19 
00 1.7 


16 2608 15% 14% 15 + % 

8 1164 22% 2298 22%— % 

10 51 SI% SOV*— V* 
19 16% 16% 16*8— to 
21 13 13 13 

273 21% 21to 71% 

8 fiS 38 ft 

425 78 77% 7799—1% 

ISVh 15% 1516 
21% 20V* 71% 

73 225 223 22316 -09* 
450 23 22% 22%—% 

3, llto 11 11 

10 33% 33to 3316 
161 23% 23 23% — to 

1964 29% 29% 79% + to 
10 24% 24% 24% 

481 37 36% 36%— % 

17 8% Bto 8*6 

a 46 45to 45to—l 
3d »W 28to 28% + % 
103 40to 39% 39% 

47 ISto 17% 17% — % 
653 18% 10% 10% + W 
49 23% »to 23to 
1910 33% 3J% 33% — to 

14 24to 2* 2416 + to 

372 114% 111% 11416 +2% 

4 42% 42% 42%— % 
Al 898 8% 8% 

17S 44% 4418 44% + to 
47 25% 33 2516— 16 

828 36 25% 25%— to 

177 30 29% a% + % 

521 30V. a 3m— % 
IK 36% 36% 26% — to 

12 36% 36% 36%— % 
403 12% 13% 12% + % 

79 20'4 30 20W— % 

SS 3 2% 3 + to 

275 11% 10% 11% + % 
12 20% 20% 20% 

234 27% 27% 27% 

534 23 33 22% + % 

1910 30 22% 22% 

13 25% 3«% S — % 
44 S3 52% 57%— % 

191 916 9 9 — 18 

90 396 298 218— % 

34 2V1 2% 2% + % 

6984 59% 59 59%— % 

3 71% 71% 71% +1 
5* 47% 47to 47% 

19 54 53% 53%— % 

36 52*8 52to 52% 

15 Slto 20% 2016 + to 

120 30 29% 30 + V* 

1518 40W 36% 40% + V* 
43 4016 39% 40to + % 
332 57% 52*8 52*8 
*3 3316 33% 33% 

9 1708 32% 32 32% + to 

7016 36% 36to 36% 

17 130% IX 130 —Ito 

1 64% 64V* 64% + V* 

24 269* 2578 26 U + % 

16 8% Bto Bto 

103 53to 51% 51% — % 

1 II 11 11 

51 IDto 1018 10th— % 
42 50 499* SO — 16 

20 3 3131 BA. 33 JSto + % 
30 17 239 73% 7318 73% —Ito 
70 4Sx 60% 59% 60% + to 
2J 15 I ISO 17% 17% 17% 

80 10 363 77 26*. 26% + lb 

12 49% 49 49% + % 

1949 U I7to 17% — 98 
750= 14 34 34 +1% 

late 57to 5716 5716 
2B6te 73% 73 73% + to 

99 19% 19% 19% + % 
684 15W 34% 35% + to 
334 235* 23% 23% — to 
111 I7V8 Uto 76%— % 

7 12244k 47% 44 to 47% +1 

9 94to 94% 94% 

I 9936 99% 99% + to 

B 35% 35V* 35% — to 

6 94 81b 7% 7% — % 

2*« 28 27% 27% — % 

2*4 J9to 289* J*to— % 
96 I2to llto 1216 + % 
73 20 19% 20 + % 

575 22% 22'i 22% + % 
I5Q; 61% 61% «1%— % 
33 11% 11% 1116 

11 17 16** I6%— % 

18 16 16 <6 

568 17% 36% 37to + to 

80 24V: 24 to 24% 

251 33 !8 23% 3336— to 
148 13% ISto 13% + % 
931 37% 31% 3136— % 

6 S2% 52% 52% — 1% 
43 U TA73 69% 68% 6916— % 

. _ , U49 16% 16 16% + % 

100 30 10 a 31% 31% 3116— 16 


9.1 


169 


3.12 60 _ 
ZI6 122 7 
4JJ0 110 
704 110 
902 130 
-72 30 23 
04 21 U 
08 0 12 
IS 

206 40 


03 

-10 

1.10 


90 A 
0 45 
30 21 
13 


1.00 50 
2-52 110 


-10a 0 71 
100 30 14 
00 2.V 14 
00 U II 
1-63 IS 
2.96 


nAtoith 

HU Low Stock 


95 

_MWHt*Low 


Qoat Chile 


IV 13% CanriE 100 80 
30 19% CrwiNC 200 B0 

15% Iff* Conroe 00 11 
37% 34% ConsEd 200 60 
49% 3898 ConEpf 500 100 


36 21% CnsFrts 1.10 30 11 

47% 31 CraNG 202 53 9 
7% 4V8 ConjPvr 
31 13 CnPpfA 4.16 119 

33% 13V6 CnPptB LS0 130 
53% 25 CnPpfG 706 145 
78% 11% CnPprV 440 150 
24% 9% CnPprU 300 15J 
25% 1016 CnPprT 308 150 
54 25% CnPpfH 708 M0 

77 1196 CnPprR <00 150 

26% 10% CnP prf> 3.98 150 
26% 10V6 CnPprN 305 150 
18% 716 CnP prM 2-SO M0 
16% 7 CnPpfL 203 740 
a 11 CnPprS 402 155 
17% 7% CnP DTK 203 145 

47% 23% CnttCp 200 
iow 4% Com 111 
416 % Cantu rt 

12 cmin pf 
% CfliHdn 


9 21 Uto 17% Uto— % 

9 IS a 2898 2S%— % 

6 9 Uto 13 13 —% 

• 1015 37% 3716 37%— to 

13 49% 4716 4916 


40 16 


49 

4% _ 

12 4% Cntinfe 

a «% 18% ContTot 1J0 

38% 2«% Croofn 02 

3418 25% Conwd 1.10 

3to 1 vlCookU 
3S% 77 Coopt 153 

38 30 Coop! pf 2.90 .. 

20% 12% GoprTr 00 25 7 

V 13 Coopvb 00 10 17 

17U. 11% Copwfd 04 30 

ay* 1916 Cpertdpf 208 110 

27% 17% Corduro 54 30 16 72 

1516 10% Camln 56 45 II 26 

43% 30% ComGs 108 10 18 2355 

« . 35 CorBI k 100 23 

77% 44% CoxOn 

10 4 to Crnfei 

3898 73 Cram 

BJ% 41 CrayRa 

19% 16 CrckNpf 2.U 115 

n% 49% CrckN pf 109a 25 
Uto 18% OttoK 100 55 II 
68 36% CntnCfc 15 

4411 27% CrwZei 100 20 IS 

5018 43% CrZel pf 403 90 

4516 50% CrZel pfCiJO 70 

30 20% cwbro 00 29 9 

33% 17% Cultnets 

B8V1 58to QifiiEn 200 

10% 8% Currlnc 1.100100 30 

38% 3016 Curtw 100 30 14 5 

S2to 27% Cvctope 1.10 22 10 a 


144 32% 31% 32 
113 44 43% 43%— % 

18 2773 7% 7V6 7% + % 
31 Or 30 a a 
*40x33% 32% 32% + V* 
73fc 53% 52% 53% +1 
207 28to 27% a — to 
77 23% 22% 2316 
14 34% 24% 34% + % 
1600x53 51% 52V*— 1% 

3 25% 25% 25% 

20 25% 25% 25V* 

16 25% 36% 24%—% 
10 18 17% 1798— % 

5 15% 15% 15% + % 

21 369* 25% 36 

5 17 16% 16% — 16 

<0 n 5269 42% 41% 42 —1 
107 7% 798 7% + to 

159 1% 1% 1%— to 

12 48 48 41 — to 

830 % to % + E 


8 86 11 10% 11 
70 9 355 23% 23% 23%— to 
27 19S >6% a 25% + % 

U 13 11a 34% 34% 34% + to 
1% Ito 1% 

35% 34to 3446— to 
. 37% 36% 3716— to 

la 16 15% 1548— to 

976 34% 23% 24% + % 

f 12% liih uto— to 

21% 2198 Zlto + to 

24% 3416 24% 

11% llto Uto + to 

4016 43 +1% 


54 5 33 


. +14- 

394 4416 43% 43% — % 
174x74% 74% 74% — to 
5 89* 8% 8%— to 
10rt 46 10 119 34% 34% 34% + % 

10 1610 83% BOW 83 +1% 

BOB 1916 19 1* 

153 50% 58% 5CTto + to 

11 2!to 21% 21% + to 

45 6516 64% 6596 + (8 

325 3B % 38% 3816— to 

a 48 47% a 

2 a 58 51 + 16 

5 5B% 27% 27to 

32 1351 25% 3418 25% +1 
30 3 1054 60% » 59% + % 

" Uto TffW 10% 

KL, 35 35 

$0% 49% 5016 + % 


11 


23% 15 Dallas 06 30 
15% 9to DomanC 00 19 
30% 21 to DanaCP 108 50 
8% 5% Dcnctir 
15 8% Daniel .Ito 19 

36% 23% DarlKri 
76 31 DafnCfl 

23 1118 Datpnt 

12to 8V8 tJtaDn M 20 10 

203*. 12W Davco 04 10 IT 
4516 29% DaytHd 04 10 14 
20% 11% DavtPL 200 105 8 
64 4Sto DPLpf 708 110 

89 73 DPLpf 1100 120 

40% 23% DeonFd 06 10 19 
3398 24% Deere US M B 
26% 17% DtrimP 19] 70 10 
19% 27 DeltaAT JO 10 8 
7% 416 Oertona 
39% 20% CHxOia .92 20 IV 
■ 17% DenMIS 100 40 13 
3718 26% Desoto 100 40 11 
17% 12% oet Ed 108 93 8 
» 68% DelEpf 5-50 50 

» » D^Ent *02 1V» 

67% 40 DetEpf 708 110 
4SV* 44 MtEpf 70S 110 
64% 46 ME Pt 706 111 
25J8 1998 DE pfF 20S 110 
2B% 20% DEm-R 304 110 
27% 19% oepfQ 113 119 
27% 19% DEPfP 112 120 
25% 70 DE PtB 175 110 
29% 71 W DEpfO 300 120 
29% 20% DEpfM 302 120 
33% 2*96 DE wL 400 130 
14% 24% DEatK 4.13 129 
114% %% DEpfJ 1500 118 
20% 13 I 6 DetC pr 208 110 

24 17% Dexter 00 30 11 

15% 9% DVGtor 0* 4.1 

2W* 21% DIGdPBt 20S “ 


9 34 17% 17% 17% 

70 10% Wto 10>*— % 
7 1091 » 2516 25% — % 

19 135 7% 7% 7% + to 

140 1016 10 10W— to 

12 3328 36% 3518 35% — % 


2708 37 34% 37 +1% 

2*4 11% llto 11% — % 
52 9 8% 9 + to 

194 20to 2098 25% — to 
5*5 43 42% 42% 

503 19% 1* 1918 

1901 63% 63% 63% — % 
I 94% 94% 94% +5% 
SI 38% 38% 38% + to 
774* 29% 2916 2998 
460 26% 25% 2616 
1096 47 46% 46%—% 

17 » J 5 —to 

388 79% 38% 39% + to 
SO 26% 2616 26% — 16 
812 35% 25 ISto + to 
5178 T7to 17% 1716 — to 
7 *71* 971* 97% 
350x78 78 78 +2 

l <60Bx 47% 47% 67% +2% 
93901 65% 63 64% +2% 

lOQz 61 41 61 

1 25 25 23 

30 27% 2716 27% — % 

30 24to 2616 2616— to 
11 26% 25V* 2S%— to 

6 25to 25 25 — 18 

56 28 27% Z7% 

47 2818 27% a 
17 31% 30% JU%— % 

31 32% 31% 31% — % 

2 11316 11316 11316 
14 M 19% 19(8— to 
3A 20% 20% 20% 

57 15% 15% 15% + 18 
1 " ' 


16% 9% E oulle n 
14% 918 Erhmnt 
23% 12% Eos Ban 

ie% Esaexc 4K> J.1 
is% Estrtne 03 40 
109* Ethyls -56 20 
616 1% vfEvonP 
Pto 2% vlEyonpf 
12% 3% vIEvnpfB 

41% 30% ExCela 103 40 
1716 13% ExcPtsr lJ4el1.1 
$4% a Exxon 300 80 




■ 

34 

487 

T9V, 

4SU 

19 

<3* 

19% 

45 +1% 

11 

392 

UU 

15% 

1418— ft 

15 

7 

129* 

129* 

1298— ft 

14 

19 

ZTto 

21% 

22U + ft 

13 

63 

25% 

25 

ZS% + % 

10 

45 

16% 

14% 

169* — ft 

13 

549 

23% 

a 

23V*— (8 

10 

157 

26 

1 

234 

2(8 

2% 

3% 

37% 

2 

2V. 

3% 

34* 

2 

2% 

3% 

37ft + % 

• 

43 

5512 

14% 

S3Vh 

14% 

Sift 

14% 

SZ%— ft 


11 416 FH I ltd .150 U 3 713 lOto 99k 99b— 16 

68 46% FMC 200 30 40 28 45% 45% 45*8— 16 

84 5B% FMCpf 203 20 1 81% 81% 81% + to 

36% 17% FPL Go 106 70 9 2025 25% 25% 25%— to 

13% 9% FobCtr 2 UN U 10% 19% 10% 

14% 9% Focal 7 16 12% 12% 12%— to 

20% 13% Falrtfaa a 10 3*8 Uto 13% 13W— to 

37to 33% FoircPt 300 102 70 35% 35 35% + to 

16% 10 Folrtd .18 10 9 31 13% 13% 13% 

25% 131b Fomois a 0 a B81 26 25% 25% + % 

1«* 13% Fnnslel M 18 U 3 15k. 15% 15% 

30to 23 FrtWJF 4 4 29% V 29 

3&VS. 1C% Foroh a U 8 106 17% 19% 19V* 

U 8% FdyDto 01 21 17 BIx 9% 9% 9% + to 

4% 4% Fooer* JJ2e 0 I 149 5% 5% 5% 

40 29% FodlGo 104 40 B a 39W 39% 39% + % 

45% 3116 FedExp 32 7484 43to 42% 42to— to 

a 39V) FdMPO la 40 IT 77 36% 36% 3616— to 

21 10% FMNM .16 J 1723 19% m. 19% 

77 16% FrfPBS 00 30 7 92x19 18% 1E%— % 
» 25% FPtpPl 201 80 190 27% 2716 27% — W 

23 16 FedRK 104 60 13 132 21% 21% 21% 

19% 13% FdSgM 00 40 15 32 17% 17% 17% — % 

65to 45% FedDSt 2J4 40 9 332 63% 63 63% 

35 2216 Ferro 100 40 13 114 28V* 35V. 2816— to 

36% 25% Fide*, 100 U 12 Ito 26% 26% 26% 

17% 4 FblCpA 051 12S 7% TV. 7to— to 

3% FlnCPPf JO 120 3x 5 498 4to— to 

1418 FlnCPPf 661C9D0 37X33 32V* 238— % 


48% 30% Hemrr 
IBV* 5V. Hesetan 
13% 9 Hottapf 
44% 0i% Heart Pk 
30 2118 Homl 

Zlto 1316 HI Shear 
1398 IVi HIVatt 
Wt 10% Minted 
73% e% KWton 

37% 27V* HltocM 

Bto 35% KotWov 100 14 14 
83% 51% HettVO LOO 10 17 
»to 12 HamtD 79 

26% 11% HmFSO 8 

9% 7 HltteG pf l.W 12.1 
27% 25% Hmstke a J 57 
IS VA HrafFn 00 20 5 
60% 43% Hondo at J ID 
66% 46% HenweU la 32 11 
32 19V8 HrxnBn 1.12 30 10 

7% 3to Hortzon 
48% 36% HOVCP 00 
30% 22% Hotel In 200 
40% 23% HetMhM a 
19% tm HeoFtto 00 
3fto 2498 Heueim 105 
21% 61 Holntpf 60S 
298 1M Houlnd 204 

to am Hbung 
m* a houor 
23% 14% Homes 
m 20% Hubbrt 
9* Huffy 
17% 12% HuohTI 
23% 17% HuptlSp 
34% 21% Human 
a 19% HuntMf 
4198 23% HuftEF 
31% 18% Hydra, 


480 40% 47% 40V*— 9* 
10 7 6% 7 + to 

IB 19 Uto 12 
14 6033 35 3348 3448 + % 

20 14 70 25% 24% 25 + % 

234 21 209* 21 

25 llto 11% 11% 

37 23% 22% 22% — % 
_ _ ._ 90 66W 65to 66to+1 

03a LI 10 1359 29V* 29 3*% +' 

736 S14 S2V* 54% +1% 
14 72 71V* 72 

466 14% U 14% — to 
124 25% 25% 25% — % 
3t 9to 8% *»8 + V8 

903 3*% 34% 24W — % 
64 15% 1448 15% + to 
504 554k 559k 55V* +T4k 
2140 6Bto 99% 60% + to 

5 31% 3VH 3148—48 
418 4 4 

10 14 10574 49 47% 49 +1% 

92 n 65 28% 2818 2098 + % 

30 U 37 3998 3948 3»to + % 

15 TO 182 U 13% 13% — % 

40 9 1474x37% 27% 3748— to 
70 127x 78% 71% 78% + to 

90 7 3447 28 27% 28 + % 

U -18 69% 6948 6*48— % 

1.990190 48 1098 9% 10 —to 

00 23 21 5 17V* 17% 17% — W 

208 80 12 58 26% 26V. 26% + to 

00 30 9 a in wt into— to 

08 -27 669 13 12to 13 — to 

a 10 II 4 20% 20% 20% 

a 20 16 2009 33% 334* 33% 

S IJ 16 91 27to 36to ZTto + % 

20 14 807 3446 33V* 34% + *k 

2a 60 M 117 fito 31 31*8— to 


2.12 


t 


5% 

47 

6 


2V* FnSBor 
23* 16% Flreafn 
ZTto 124k FtAtl 6 
48% 7ito FtBkSr 
37% 26% PBkFta 
79 37to FBO»t 
27 18% FsfCWc 


45 5% 548 54k 

00 XB 10 348 Zlto 239* 20%— % 

M 20 10 811 26% 26to 2648—% 

100 40 9 680 40 39% 39%— to 

105 30 13 22 I7to 37V. 37to 

100a 16 12 250 77% 77% 77% — to 

. 102 50 26 2S9 22% 2248 22%— to 

83% 70 FCMPfB 803*110 *1 75 75 75 -Bto 

Uto 11% FIB Tex 100 106 9 260 12to 1218 12U + % 

54 35 FlESTPPf 506*170 457 35% 35 35V8— to 

49 JAW F I BT*Pf 508*17 J 122 34 32% 33fto— 39* 

2418 70% FFedAj 00* U 8 118 23% 23% 23%— % 

60 3Sto FFB 108 40 8 73 59% 504* 58%—% 

54% 3014 FlntstC 2-50 <0 9 223 54% $4% 54%—% 

33% 21 FlcttSlPf 207 70 29 EW 33 1398— % 

11% 7V, FtAMs* M 20 8 IHh S% 614 Bto— to 
24to 14 FMaffl n 16 91 23% Z2to 23% +1% 

7% 4% FsfPo T766 7 6% 6% 

30to 20 to FsdPaPf 262 80 214 29% 2W8 29% + lb 

31% 24to FtUnBJ 106 68 IS 36 2998 28% 2B%— to 

36% 15 FtVaflk M 13 11 393x26% 36 36% + to 

ink 17to FIWIsc 100 4j 9 ” — — 

SJV* 79 FUctt) 100 11403 

Uto Bto FtahFd 05e S 
39% 20to PltFnGs L32 13 10 

»t UV8 FtartEn 04 21 9 

3944 25% Flemno la 27 14 

33V. 2346 FlexlV 00 25 13 

Uto into Flexlef 101 120 

31 14% FIOhtSfA 22 

31 to 1446 Floor Pt IS 

45% 2944 FloEC .Ito 0 13 

2Rk 1846 FloPrp 216 70 10 

— a 20 14 


18% 11% FloStf 
646 346 FtwGen 

21 12 Flawr* 02 22 19 

28% 14% Fluor AO 33 

WA 47Vh FastoC 220 40 11 

Slto a FordM 200 SJ 3 

Uto lOto Ftoeor 106 100 

74% 53% FtHoartf 104 22 17 

15% io Poanvn 04 xe n 

llto 6% FoxStP a 60 12 
Uto 25 Foxbro MM Al 87 

27 24 Fox/ilyr 17 

22% 21% FMEFn 55*25 

11 7% PMOG 2010240 


I# 3014 30% 30% — W 
43 32*i 31 to 32to +1% 
1271 11% 11 11 +1% 

182 41 399* 40U. + 48 

1908 21% 71% 2116 + % 
156 3746 37to 374*— % 
5»c 82% 32% 32% — to 
Six Uto 13 13to + % 
133 2744 27% 27% + % 
65 S% 25% 2S% + to 
U 4246 42% 4244 
392 28% » 28% + % 

61 14 13% 14 + % 

80 4% 4% 446 — 9k 
248 1914 ISto 19U +1 
13B3X 17% 17% 1746 + to 
U 5444 5*% 5446—% 
4530 44% 44% 44% — 16 
42 13% 13 13% + % 

IE 7316 72% 73 + % 

372 13V, 13% 13% — % 
19 Uto 10% U%— % 
11 254* 25V. 25% — to 
478 26 25% 25% + % 

92x21% 21to 21% + 46 
266x 9% 9% 946 + U 


35% 22% 1C tad 104 4.1 13 
1946 154b ICMn 2U 10 
1216 646 ICN 111 

» 22% ICN pf 200 90 

lHto 14% I NAIn 102 100 
Z744 23 IPTlmn 070 18 
20to 1646 IRTPr la 18 
3644 20% ITT CP 181 30 
6346 40 ITTpfK 400 68 
61% 44% ITT DIO Sa M 
2146 1246 III Int T0B 03 
23% 16% IdchoPk 
I9V8 11 Ideaia 
36% 1748 IllPowr 204 9J 
19% 13% IIRowpf 204 100 
19% 14% (IPmepf H3 110 
1966 15 IIRowpf 201 IBB 
21% 1548 KPowpf 205 11.1 
38% 27to llPaarpf 4.12 100 
35 25to llPaarpf 308 110 
52 ~ 5946 llPaarpf 108* 28 
40 3*% llPaarpf 407 11.1 

3616 21to ITW 02 20 13 
40 to 2746 ImpChm 209# 50 ■ 
llto S48 imrtCp 8 

Uto Bto INCO a 10 
a 49 maiMpf 73* 110 

1948 14 IndIMpt 2.15 110 

19% 141% IndIMpt 205 110 

30% 23to IncOMpf 303 120 

284* 17% IrvUGf 6 188 70 7 

11% 59* Imxco 071 
2646 1316 Infmtc 32 

SIR* 35% InparR 160 50 16 

37V* 23 IneRDf 205 70 

13% 11 InarTac 04 40 21 

254* 1?% InWStt 50 12 

4816 38to InldSIpf 403 100 

2146 M% Iredko 100b 50 11 
84* 3% IrapRs 

24% 11% IntoRxc 10 

28 19 IntaRpf 303 12.1 

3546 25to IntaRpf 425 120 


12 

2 TOOl 00 
388 40 12 
M 59 5 
240 52 7 


741 35% 34% 35% + V, 

242 UW ISto l*to + to 

700 11% 104* 1198— to 

12 29*6 29 29to— % 

12* 1746 17*6 1746 + % 

52* 254* 25% 25% + % 

7 4 W6 19*6 1146 

10 2949 31 304* 30% 

11 59to 584* 5846— % 
5 59% 59% 59% + % 
998 14% 1346 13*1— to 
9 524 22% 22% 22% + % 

66 11% 1148 llto— 46 
7 2190 27 26*6 36% + % 

3802 1916 1916 1916— to 

2000X Uto 19% 194k + to 

2SOi JEW 20 20% + 46 

5DQZ 2116 2116 Zlto + % 
100x37% 3748 37%— % 
2290Z35 339* 3«to— to 

1 53 53 53 +1 

2001 40H 40to 40% +14* 
495 31% 3546 31% + % 
478 31% a alb + to 
1194 Uto 1046 104* + % 
558 1216 12% 17% — % 
P0X65W 65% 65% 

8 18% 18% 18% — to 
U 1948 1946 1946— % 
1 2916 2916 29 1* + % 
72 2546 2Sto 2516 + to 
202 5% 5to 5% + to 

447 264k 264* 2646 
389 4848 48% 4548— to 
7 3116 3346 33to— % 
3 11% 11% 11%— % 
249 22*8 2216 22 to— to 
■ 46 46 46 

144 18% 18% 1846— % 
136 5 4% 5 +% 

309 Zlto ZIYb 21% — % 
19 25% 25 25 — % 

5 33» 33to 3316 + to 
113 12% 11% 12 +98 


12 Month 
wwn Low Slock 


Hv. YHL PE 


SH. 

HOiHlgil LOW 


Ctm 

Oowarnt 


W : ; 


\ 


36% 16% MCtn 140 
39to 34 MCor pf sa 
14% 746 MDC ^ J2 

3746 26 MOU 2-5* 
42 34 MEI -X> 

17% 9V. MOMCr M 
Uto 9% MGMGr Pt44 


60 6 

27 9 
4.9 9 
10 14 
20 43 
35 


15% 10 ' MGMUo 00* 1.4 

4% 2% MGMUWt 

2216 15 MB Lf O .781 — 

35to 14 Moan, 8 05 10 20 
Sto 38% MOCV 1.16 


*71 

6 

127 

*0 

2M 

ISA 

3 
643 
150 

4 


u% ii?* m*— % 


Z3X 19% 1(46 19% + to 
6646— V, 


32 30 9 


174 67% 66% 

329 Uto Uto 10*8— to 

4 S7% 5046 5846— 46 

292 10% 946 10% + % 

, 4 1848 1844 1846— % 

400 80 1211222 1Z1V8 11(16 120% +1% 
a 10 11 15? 25% 2444 ISto + to 

1.12 30 14 154 » 29% 29% — % 

796 I 746 71* — % 

hi i a a 

4 6946 49% 4946 + to 




79V. 


3446 2196 Frtotm 
2946 » FflMltf ■ 


22% 13% FrptMe 40 30 13 2089 18% 18% 1646— % 

B-SS-SSSfc# 

167 3U6 5% “to + % 

" 1 


a% gw Front pt 200 


Fuqua ' A0 


11 17 

73 * 

1J 9 


17% GAP 
2546 GATX 
IgkGCA 


a* 

ia 


la 


la 

200 

200 


40 

J 6 


40 IB 
19 14 


JO* 10 
ijobao 54 
10J*»J 
100 24 ■ 
-40 1.1 1] 
At 10 

13 

ia u 9 


0 12 378 33% 33% 33% — % 
0 13 23 Wt 8 28% + to 

9 1023 Iflto 17% 18 + % 

13 11 ia 75% 7516 7516— to 
70 3% 3% 3% + to 

2 •Hfissa** 

11 88 2 » 

U 24% 2416 M% + to 
25 416 4 4to— % 

1157 Alto 60% *<7to 
217 28% 27% 3 +to 
252 UW 9% 19% + to 
57 19% If 19% + % 
11 1046 1048— % 

12% 12% 12% + % 
49% 48% 494* — to 
17% 1646 14% + % 
62x41 40% 41 

83 Wto 37V* ZTto— 46 
2 3646 364* 364*— to 
233 12to 1146 12 — % 
697 75 73% 7444 + % 


- GEICO 
7% 316 GEO 
12% Sto GF Cp 
44% 3646 GTE 
39% 31% GTE Pf 
2646 Mto GTE pf __ 

24% 19% GTE Of 205 10.1 
9 3% GcIHou 

*3 38% Goman 1-48 24 21 

%% IMa Goplnc SO 10 23 
32% 9% Geortrt 

21 13% Golco 

1216 9% Com 1IC 
12% 10 Gem 1 1 | 

51% 31% GnCorp 
1746 144fc GAInv 

4616 31V. GnBcsh 
38% 22% GOruns 
37% 21% GCnpfi 
71 10% On Data 

Sd 50% GnDyn . . .. 

65to «to Gen El 2a 3J 12 4317 60% 60 68U— % 

•SJ “ S"«» M» »1 12 905P Slto 7BV. B8to-3to 

7% FVIGGfhn JOa 93 643x 6% 6% 4%— to 

3846 26% GGtflPf 1JB 70 3 27 77 77 —1 

.f* SJ S "M"% _ 13 U 6% tm 6 %— % 

* 946 G Hails a 1.9 1 222 15% 15to !S%— % 

14% .8% GnHoos 34 23 6 Uto Uto Uto 


Tito 74k IftfRFn 
19% 16 Itcpse 

uw 55 Iolanta 

13% 9% imrbt 
sto 41 Inrrlk 
14% 8% Intmed 
24% Ml IntAlu 
into 1024* IBM 
29 15to IrtCtrt 
304* 33% IntFlav 
llto Sto Inttfarv 
7% 2% Int Hr art 
52 23% intHpfC 

42 20% MtHptA 

3446 17% intHPfD 

4346 32% IntWUfl 200 60 11 3651 .... 

32% 23 IntMult 176 50 12 2»x32% 32 334* +1 

574* 46 IntPUPT 14 47 0 — ~ 

17% 9% I id Res 25 

54% 3246 MNrth 200 55 9 

434* 2846 IldPbGP'UB 20 U 

lfto 10% int Bohr 

21% 15% inWPwr 10 U t 

21% 17% inParpf UB 1U 

ZI46 14% lOWOEl ia 9J 18 

33 22% lowtlG 174 55 8 

23 17 lOMlilpf 201 180 

37% 25 loaraRs 308 BJ 9 

st % :s& ^ s iS 

40% 23% irwBnk 106 50 9 


» MBCVPf +25 10.1 

18 11% MddRH 

42- 24 MoeiCf la 20 9 

29% 1% MBtASt 1B0BC 

23V8 12% Monhln 00b 2.1 

31% 14% MorthNI J2 XB 

30 12 MonrC ■ -16 0 27 

42to 22% MfrHon 300 10 5 

54% 41 AUTHPf 650*1X7 

Slto 40 MfrHpf 507*1X3 

946 5% vIMonvl 9 

3SV» 21 MASCO 100 19 9 

5 3 Marntx 

2to % Marcde 
35% 19% MarMfd 100 Al 5 
5198 404* MarM Pf 504*100 
39% 16% Morton » 08 0 43 

12% ■% MarfcC 02 3J 
15% 134* Mark pf ia 70 
95% 64% Mamet S» 0 17 
7246 40 MrsItM 240 30 20 
59 31% MartM 104 20 

40 21 MarM w! 

14 8% MaryK .12 10 U 

354* 22% Masco 06 10 17 

15% B MOS3MT 00 10 17 

30 15% MOM 100 90 13 

3% 1% MasevF 

29% a% MoaCp aa 100 

12% 9% Maine 102 100 

66 Slto Ttotsue Mr 3 U 

Uto 7to Mattel 8 

17V. 44* Mate, WT 

154* 9% Moxam „ 4 

5848 36% MOV'D 5 108 30 11 

55% 36% Mavra 200a AT II 

31% 25% Me Or at 2a 10 

2648 20% McDrpf 200 U0 

31 2348 McDerl ia 70 47 2109 

lit* Sto McDrl art 5363 

10% 6% McDtd 30 

6946 4446 McDnle SO 


37% 37% 37% - _ 

37V, 37 17V,— to 

17 llto 17 +% 
12** 12V. 12%— % 
14(8 141* 14% — (6 
346 Sto =%_% 
. Uto 1618 MI6 

205x 3416 MU 34% — to 

2J 12 1656 5046 50% 5046 + % 


67DC43U 42 42 —1 

ZT 1146 11% 1118 
156 4198 41 4146— 16 

478 2H 2to I 1 *.— % 

a 14% uto uto— % 
59 169k 1546 Uto- to 
775 29 37 3%+lto 

2616 39% 38% 79 — % 
514 51H 51 51—16 

I 47*6 47*6 4Tto— (I 
204 414 4 4H— to 

57* B 34% to 
37 41* 496 416 — to 

49 to S 48 
114 35% 3SU. 3546 + 16 
1778 50% 50% 50% + 16 
1455 16 34to M +46 
27 918 946 946- 16 

01 1596 l5to 15V.— to 
216 93% 93 93 

921 72% 70% 7216 +19* 
310 55% 55 55*4— to 

11 3? 3718 37U—TV. 

12% 12% 12V, 

35% 34% 3448 — 46 
14U 14% 14% + % 
>91* 19% 19% 

S% 198 3 —to 
toto 28% 2M6 + 4* 
12% 12 1218+16 
55% SSVk 55% — % 
ISto ISto 15% — to 
1146 U% ll%— to 
ISto IS 15 
235 5518 55% 55% +16 
167 51% 501* 51% + % 
818 25% 25% 2516— to 
1092 26% 26 36 —14 

24 23% 34 

5to 5% 516— to 

8% 916- to 


691 
331 
11 
S« 
l D0> 
31 
39 
149 
3006 
41 
49 


c 


U 20 24 BT8 

__ 10 15 1654 67H 66% 66%—% 

04% 54 McDnD 104 20 9 24? 75to JWk— 46 

52 3796 McGrH 144 18 17 7« W% «% «to- to 

3996 19% Mdnfo 31 Z7U Slto M!6— to 

a 34% Me Kina 208 Al 13 2064 47% 47 47 — % 

15% 946 McLeon 9 327 9T6 «6 9(6 + % 

6% 2% Melon wt „ 

294* 20 Mcrreil ia 30 7 
CP6 31 Mead 100 14 9 

24% 13% Mesnix 04 1.1 13 
3348 24% Medtrn a 20 13 
5416 3366 Mellon U8 5J> 9 
2816 33V) Me Don pf 200 100 
48% 3516 Metvtll 104 XI 14 
20 11 


rT 


iJt 

300 

ia 


109e S3 
•74*109 


* a ¥ st, s 
.. ft.fl 

S!iSS*t!532 

2196 21(6 + 96 


UfS 



1796 + 

a + to 


70 SO MercSf 
115% 78% Merck 
80 42% Merdth 

36H 22 MerLvn 
3% 2 MemOf 
22 IZ’A MnoPt 
35 2B96 MooR 

796 5% Me** 

496 ZU M e at * k 
32 22 MtEPfC 3.90 120 

99% 4496 NttEpfG 70S 130 
64% 47% MIEpfJ 002 130 
6448 45% MtE Pfl 012 100 
Sto 2% MexFd 01a 00 
IB 1348 MchER 
796 4% Mlcklbv 
55% 3396 Ml Ocon 
15% 18 MktSUt 
32% 15% Mid Rat 
31% 2Z46 MWE 
15% 11% MlltnR 
16 7396 MMM 

38% 25% MJnPL 
1516 696 Mtonlrt* 

8 4 Mitel 

3496 2398 MoMI 
3% % UIMOUH 

9V. 5*8 ModCpf 
3298 169* Mohaec A0 10 13 
IS 396 MahkDt 
19% 1496 Monreh JO SA 72 
SI 40to Mattoan 2a 13 11 
»% 1646 MOnPw 2a 70 11 
9996 14to MonSt 
10% 696 MONY 
19% I2to Moore a 

3648 1898 MoorM ... . 

94 38% Moraaa 200 40 

84% 75% Moron pf 740a 9,1 

43% 2698 MorKnd la 30 10 

25% 1816 MonoS 00 17 U 

Z) 1296 NUoRty 1J60 09 11 

35% 2396 Morton* 04 Lf I 

44% 39% Motcrta 04 1.9 11 

2696 1896 Munfrd a 13 12 

1496 7% Munjae 

31% 23% moi-pO ia 36 II 

2396 14% MurrrO 40 17 10 

1496 11 MutOm 104 lOI 

llto 1% MyerLn 


25 3 218 3 + Vh 

14 ®to 28% 289* + % 
1180 42% 41% 41ft— % 
3*4 22% 21 22% +1 

747 3TB, Jlto 3196 + 16 
194 54% S3** 5396— 16 

a 28 28 28 

740 46to 46*6 46% — 9* 
_ .. 7 66% 66 6dto— to 

2J 17 1225 US’* 11496 114% — to 
10 17 a 74 73*6 73*6—1% 

20 S 3361 «% 33 3096—16 

VVA :% 218 2% 

3 1338 1396 13% Uto— 16 

Ax 33% » 33% + 9*. 

8 12 HV M 6to 

2 2*6 2*8 2to— to 

WOr 32 3116 33 +1 

S500:9to BP* 5896 +1(6 
15001 63% 63U 43% +1% 

203 60% 60% Mto— Ito 

153 24, 2% 24b 

140 as 10 Z M% 14% l«to + to 

a i.i a a s% 5% sw— % 

206 50 a 372 4Sto 45 45% — to 

108 127 5 7844 14% 1396 14 — 96 
la 60 352 15% 15% ISto— to - 

XM 09 11 35 3196 31% 31lh— to 

04 14 IS II 12% 12% 1216—16 

3JD 40 12 2584 77 75% 74% + 98 

Z76 70 9 136 38 279* 379*— % 

44 7to 728 7ft — % 

101 69* 698 618—% 

2J0 70 10 4?W 30*6 30% *£- % 

9 2f 69* 496 4to 

712 32% 3196 22 —to 

448 296 296 2%— to 

22 15 14% 1428—26 

1135 47% 44% 4126 

354 ZTto 279* ZTto 

41 19% 1918 19% + to 

120x996 9% V%— % 
S3 1996 1V% 199* + % 

411 26 2596 2594 + 96 

44J3 51 SOL 5B%— «*X 

8 93% 13% 83% f 

2* 41 40% 40% + to* 

51 11% 21% 21% + %' 

173 1916 19% 1918 + 16 

388 33 3298 JTto— to 

9270 33 31% Zlto +1% 

12X23% 22V. 72 + lh 

■ 13% 13 13 

202 27% 26to 371* + % 

48 18% 17% 1M 
38 14% 14 14% 

34 7*6 29* Sto 


10te90 
J8 90 10 
02 X7 13 
104 aj u 
■ 


W' 


H-f • 


191 

283 

911 

265 


34% 30 JWTs 
34% 2396 J River 
2B% 14 jammy, 

139* 1096 JcexiF 
4596 24toJOffPII 
74 5496 JarCpt 

65 44ft JarCpt 

64 45% JerCaf ^ 

io* vo jercpf isa 1*7 
1896 13 JorCpf X1S 1IJ 
10% 5% jprner 
47% a jeftnJn 
4t% 37% johnQi 
27% 21(8 Jordan ia Al 17 
24% 159* Jostani a 30 74 
27% 219* JOVMtO MO 54 14 


1.12 U 
56 10 
.12 S 

9 JA 1X5 
OJ2 US 
7M 120 


42 2198 3198 3196 + % 
847 3194 31% 3198 + 18 
200 3448 239* 24% + 96 
9J0 1198 11 11—96 

107 43 42% 4296 — 96 

IBx 75 75 75 

400( 43% 42% 62% —1% 
50x 62% 42% 42% — ft 
17Ort0* 104 104 
a Uto 18% 18% 

. a M 10% 10% 10% 

100 2S 14 2459 47% 46V. 4716 + 96 
1060 45 9 227 4198 41 41 — to 

II 2496 3496 249* 

42 24% 24to 34(8 + to 
« 3f Zlto 24 — M 


21% llto NAFCO 
36% 20 NBDS 
229* 1294 NBI 
H% 17% NCH 
439* 24 NCNB 
3096 20% NCR 
Uto 9% NLInd 
3496 27 NUI 
1% % NVF 

23% HWA 


ia A2 18 
l-« 40 
_ 12 
02 IS 13 
102 XI 11 
a ao 9 
SO ZD 
U2 U > 


S3 19% 19% 19(6 + % 
ia 36 3596 3596—to 

153 18% 1796 ISto + to 


.90 


279* 144* Gnlrat 05 10 

609* 4796 GnMIlto 2J4 30 34 

BS 4396 GMot LOOr 40 I 

48H 11% CMEl JkSl .1 

429* 3*9* GMctPf 303 03 

58% 4448 GMdt pt 580 U 

9 3% GNC .14 20 17 

14% Sto GPU 7 

859* 46% GenRa 106 10 52 

Uto S GflRefr 7 

5399 40% GflSIonl ia 42 11 
1296 10% GTFlpf ia 190 

4 Gensen 17 

28% 13(6 GnRod .10 ‘ 

IS Gensto la 


70 . _ 

7118 15% OKxnS 106 104 9 1466 1498 1496 14(8 

38% 34% DkxSftPl 400 N0 47 38 37% 3798— to 

5? 37 DHUd a 10 U 10 305 40% 39% « — to 

11 5058 91% 88% 91% +298 

L3 M 1570 92% 8996 91% +196 
» 38 25% 25% 25% 

3 99 59* 5% 596— to 

383 7% 7% 7% 

90 9 15B4 33% 33 33% — (6 

V I 54 17% U 17% — ft 

XO 16 1116 57(8 579* 579*— (6 

30 14 35 32% 31(8 Jlto 

22 13 7* 379* 3648 36*6— to 

SJ 1340684 3t% 3*9* 349*— ft 

10 24 IE 48% 479* 48 — 96 

X« . II 12% 12(6 1316 + 16 

a 30 16 734 21% 31% 21% — to 
Iffl 14 21% 20% 2096— to 

00 10 B 257 5*9* 58% 58(6- to 
100 50 12 1443 579* 37% 57% — % 

' 90 36 39% a a —I 

90 27 <9% 49 a— % 

* 3451 35% 35% 35to— % 


100 


ia 

0i 

50 


12596 77% Digital 
90% 45% Dtsnev 
26% 15 Dei* 

*% 3% Dtvrsln 

12 696 Dtmtg 

37% 2299 DpfnRs 
21% 14 Donald 
Alto 36 Donley 

34 23% Donev 

42% 32% Dover 
35% 259* DowCii 
51% 36% DcrrOn 
I3to It Drava 
21% 15% Dr*sr 
31% Uto DrvxB 
59% 25% Drevfus 
Alto 43% duPont . - 
40 31 duPntpt X58 

50 39 duPntpf 450 

3Sto 23% DukeP X4B 20 
SS 64 Dukeof 800 102 
80% 609* Duke pt 8a 100 
71% 57 Dutapf 7a 104 
27 319* Duke Pt 249 100 

35 a Du kepi 305 110 

949* 64% Duk ptM 804 103 
90% 57% Dunard 200 20 
11 llto DuoLt 10b 1X5 
18% 1441 Dim PtA X10 110 
16% llto DuCPf 107 1X0 
16% 12% Due pi TOO 12J 
18 12% DuA Pf 207 110 

1798 Uto DuaprK XU 120 
19% 14% Dim or 201 122 
42% 43% DUO Pf 730 120 
16% 8% D-rcofH 60 50 

26% 17% DmAm SO S 


lUz 85 84% SS +1% 

I40z 799* 7996 7996 
3U8T 75% 73% 75% + % 
43 26% 24 26% 

16 34% 34% 34% 
04820* 859* 84% 95% +296 
882 789* 77% 7B% + % 

as 16% 16% 16% 

20C1 ib% ia% is% 

520* ISto 1548 1596— to 
10Z 16Va 161k 1416 
7SMz 18 17% 18 +9* 

89 174* 17% 1798—98 
an* 19 If 19 
450* 6098 60% 6016—98 
19 19% 10% lOto 
24 22% 22% 22H- to 


27*6 JO'l CoiOPal 108b 4.9 25 1468 269* 26% 2696 — 98 


54 11 
U 9 
20 13 
3 


19 11 
4.1 10 
13 


10 It 


23to 14% Col Aik ■ 04 10 

Sto llto ColFdss -tl 7 17 
29% M% C01 Pen la $j 9 
93' 1 39to Coillnd 2a 40 10 
a 26% CalGos XI B 1X1 
45v* CalGapf 5J9ell0 
108% 96% Cso eta 1505 10 
9n. CSQpf nlA25 140 
49% 37‘t Comorn ill 40 
371* 259* CmoEn 104 
P 1 * 8 Centals a 
20 1S>8 ComMlI 04 

3396 Bto Comdre 

31-8 cmthE aa 

31to SH CwE Df 102 40 
I8H 1J CwE Pf 1.90 11J 
IBto Uto CwE rt 200 110 
76% 54 CwE Pi 80S 1U 
24% 18% CWE Pi 137 mi 
26>* 3% CwE erf 207 llj 
76% 54% CwE pi 100 110 
45%. 44 CwE Df 704 110 
299fe 1798 CamES 202 90 
35% 21% Comat 100 
Mto 21% CPsw SB 
35 X. 2Sto Com DOT AO 
17* ll Cornu Sc 
449. 11% CPtYln 
34 73 ConAsS 07 


669 729. 21to 2198— to 

447 »98 23% 24% + to 

719 27% 73 77 — % 

145 43U 634* ATto + % 

416 318. Jlto 3198— 9* 

8 469S 46% 46% 

«rW7 107 107 —1 

280*189 107 109 +JU. 

605 47v« 444. 47% + to 
231 33% 324. 221* — % 
770 13% 12 % 13 — % 
73 Uto 1514 UU + % 
929 9% 8% vto + % 
7814x31’,, J0% 31 -to 
1x31% 31% 3198 

55* 17% 1646 16%— % 

15x18% IBto 1SU 
1A70OV 74 7216 7791 — Va 

J7«a% 23% 239* 
303»25to 25% 25% 
T278Cy 7316 71 73 k fl% 

35UV63 61% 41% —Ito 

25 2?to a a — 9k 
IK Kto 3446 35% + to 
847 34% 3346 33%— 46 

9 a a 25 — Vi 

„ 1W » 16% I6to— 16 

59 2072 1496 13% 14% + 46 

Z4 16 149 35% 35% 359- 


30 12 
0 26 
IA 8 


09 10 21 
106 IA 
JO UH 
104 +4 8 
09 22 


41% 2448 EGG 
17% 16% EQK A 
32% 22% ESest 
Zlto 2D EooleP 
20(6 T2 Easco 
9% 3% EaefAJr 

4% 1% EALadO 

19k % EALortA 

20% 4% ESAlrpf 1.18k 
23% 4% EAtrpfB 109ft 
27% 9% EAlrafC 
2898 21 to EaefGF 100 50 79 
Sto 12% EasdUtt 206 9.1 8 

51 419* EsKOdf 220 Al ' 
40to 40 Eaten 10 U i 
SW8 20% EchHn a 30 12 
32% 37 Eekerd 
J7% 31% EdtoBr 
18% Uto EDO 
Uto 19% Edward 
29V. 25(8 EPOPf 
2916 24% EPGPr 
1914 9% ElTaro 

13% 8% Elcor 

5% 2% ElOCAl 
28% 17% ElctMJ 
17% llto Elgin 
12% 4% Ebdns 
78’a 59 EmrsEI 200 


a 

a 


141 39% 3898 799* 

62 14% 14% 14% 

698 32 31% 31% 

42 2Z(8 22% 22%— to 

9 19% 19(8 19(6 + to 

1911 *96 Bto 916— to 

91 3% 3% 396— V8 

92 1% 19a 1% 

41 20% 20% 25H 

109 23 22% 22% 

34 24% 44to 26*4— % 

173 Z27i 22% 23% 

- _ n 23(6 22% 229a— Vh 

13 3820 434* 4314 <39*— % 
' 388 509* 49% 49%—% 

299 25% 25% 29% 

788 75% S% 29%— to 

48 34% 3*to 34% — to 

W ISto 15 15% + to 

328 91% 3118 31% + to 

11 2 Hh anil 28% — to 

a 28% SPA 28% + to 

<S3 18 17% 18 + V6 

16 9to 916 916 + to 
14 4M 4% 4% + % 
166 26% 2418 74V. 

23 Uto 14 U%— 16 

_ 248 Sto 4(8 4(8— % 

17 13 1174 49% 49% 49% — to 


104 30 14 
108 44 14 
SB VO » 
a 25 IS 

175 130 

JDe .1 U 
06 3 J 


J 29 
5J 15 


14% 4(6 Cm Rea -tot 7.9 U 383 12% 11% 119b— to. 

20% 1196 ErnryA a 30 12 1989 16% 16% 16% 

37% »% Ernnort 100b 4J U IS 3916 1918 2716 

2Zto 1516 EmpOs IS* Al 8 

07 1X0 


3% Etmot 
to EnEXC 
OT6 229* EflMCp 
39% IBto EntsBu 


20 V 
10 14 


.27 21% 21% 21%— 98 
Uta 4% 4% 4% 

33 to % 

AS 24 25% 25%— to 

449 39% Sto 39% — to 


23% 14% Gstpf la 70 3 

34 2416 GenuPt 1.10 35 15 291 

27to 18 GoPoc a 35 24 1055 
N GoPwpf 106e 60 <0 

3K6 22% GaPwpf 304 7X1 39 

31% 25% GaPwpf 306 1X0 35 

2Jto 17-4 GaPwpf 2L54 110 34 

2316 17 GaPwpf 2J2 1IJ 14 

2416 >116 GaPwpf 175 110 12 


16% 16 16 — % 

741 40*8 5916 60% + % 

4891 7M8 72% Sto— to 
1347 37% 34% 37% + to 
11 Oto 43 4316— 16 

1 57 57 57 

145 5(8 Sto Sto— to 

1112 13% 139* 13% 

*M 83% 81% 83% +1 
.92 12% IZto 1246— to 
247 43% 43% 41 + to 

lOCz 17% 12% 17% + ft 
401 5 4(4 4% 

0 27 1509 14% 14% 16%— % 
Z19 ZJto 22% 23 — to 


W 7%KDI SO 25 10 43 8 7% 7%— 18 

109* 9% KLM» 076 XJ ■ BK 17% 14% 17V8 

41% St* KM! pf 400 100 2 41% 41% 41% + (8 

41% 2914 Kmart 1 00 30 18 2327 37 Jfto 34% + to 

45to S KN Eno 108 4.1 16 - 

14% 12% KdlorAi .151 


SV6 14(6 KoteCe sa 1.1 
If 15% K0K pf 107 70 
Uto 7% Konab AO SS 
Uto 14% KCtyPL X06 1O0 
22% 25 KCPLpiaa 110 
a !5to KCFLpf 203 1U 
54(8 36% KCSOU ia 10 
jfto into Kcsopf la 70 

19% 12% KtMGE 206 1XS 
3*% 29% KonPLf 2J4 70 


67% 53 GaPwpf 7J0 110 
67% 52 GaPwpf 702 HI 
36% 20% Gera Pd IS 30 1J 
23% 12% GerbS 6 .12 " 

12% Bto GiontG 
12% Sto GtbrFn 
27 1696 GHfHJII 

6316 44 GHlettx 
14% 11% GtasC 
U 446 GtalFd 
71* 1% GtoteM 

23* 4 GlobMpf 1051 

13% 8% Gld H ub 
I toGUNwt 


23% 239* 3M 
34 33% 33%—% 

23 22% 2298— to 

m 27% 279*— (6 
28% a 18 2*6 + to 
30% 30% 3016— V. 
2396 22% 22U>—% 
a 22 22 — to 
2516 a 25 


la 


30 

23 S 
101 90 
805 110 
104 XI 16 
100 30 7 


200x 47 67 67 

Mix 64 64 64 —1 

. .. 402 35% 3«* 0S — % 
0 12 1425 17% 17 1716 + to 

23 18% 10% 10% — % 
5 1429 11% Uto llto + to 
-52 24 20 42 22 21% 219*— to 

200 44 11 1137 68 59 599*+% 

57 1216 1216 Uto 

4 323 13to 12% Uto + V6 

.921 1747 2 1% 2 

204 6V. 616 416 — % 

VI 1206 12to 11% 12% + V6 
34 2% 298 2% — to 


244 


a id 
10 


11 GUWF SO 4 I 384 32 319* 32 — to 

S 24% Gdrtch 106 4J 15 467 321* 31% Sto + ft 

II 816 Gdreti pf J7 100 108z 9to 996 9% 

30V. 33 Geodvr 100 54 B 2415 2M 29% 29% — % 

llto 139* GerdrU 02 30 IS 21 164* 16% W%— to 

32to 19 Gould 44 20 44 1379 2398 21% 23% — to 

♦4% 38% Grace 2a 9.1 10 UC* 39% 39% 39%— to 

34% 24% Grows U 151 S3 3216 3298— to 

209* Sto GtAFst A0 20 10 342 19V. 18% 19V, — to 

llto 14% GtAtPe a 741 1646 16(8 14% 

54*6 27% GtUdn UB XO U S3 <7% 49% 4m— to 

- - - — * USel 13 7 U 15» 15% 15ft + % 

102 Al 9 112 27to 36% 37Vh— % 


23V. 18% KaPLpf 202 

5 17V6 KaPLpf X23 100 

45 15% Katrln 

115 4116 Katy pf 

20 10(6 KoufBr 

llto 1216 KaufPf 
M 49 KaufPf 

SV6 . % Kenal 

2916 mi KWJttr 
14% 9% Korro 04 40 

2398 26V6 KMTMc 1.18 34 29 

30% J7to KeyBk IS 44 9 

15% 12 Key Int a AO 30 
S% 26% KWd* 100 14 9 

Sty. 4216 Kiddepf 104 30 

59% 399. K/mba 202 40 IT 

391* 23% KnphlRd 06 X0 17 

29 17(6 Kaper 200 XI 57 

OT* 74*8 Koimor 32 ll 14 

22% 17 (Copers a 44 27 

IM K% KoPM-PflOa 9J 

IS m, Korean 

jzvh Kroger 200 40 12 
22% 716 Kuhons U 

avi 3i to Kypcer 03e 10 16 

Sto ljto icysor a 40 6 


14 Ug) 36% Mto + to 
B23 TM 1J% ISto— to 

S 1746 17% 17% — to 
1 17V. 1716 1716 
84° 8V8 7% 7(4— % 

32* 2296 229* 22% + Vh 
200x 32% 32% 32% 

4 19% 19% 19th — H 
709 53 51 52% +1 

2100z 13 12% 12% — to 

3384 17% 17% 17% — to 
m am 3*96 am + to 
12 2318 22(6 22%—% 
6 22% 22% 22% + to 
IM 17% 1714 1716— to 
2X45 45 45 — 1V8 

71 1516 14% 15 + to 
1 1696 14% 16%— to 
1 79% 79U 79% + to 
886 571* 56% 57% —116 
37 36% 34% 36% — % 
165 % % (C 

717 20% 20% 2Cto— to 
451 2916 28% 2916 + 18 

15 U1* 10% 1816— % 
584 291* 28% 29 — % 

•9*29% 29 29% + % 

« 1J% 1M6 + to 

22* 35% IS 35% + %' 
3 £5 B 55 + % 

197 589* 579* 55% + to 
630 37% 36% 37% + % 
87 28% 28U Sto + to 
85 15% 15 15 —to 

251 TTto 1716 17% — V* 
3 102 10118 M2 +1(6. 

in u uw 14*8 + % 

267 44% 44% 44% — V* 
C 19% 19% 1996— 16 
,54 72 31(6 319* + % 

IM 1816 17% 17% 


31 
llto 
29 
14% 
30% 
18 
n 

32 
15 
19 
!2to 


SS 

500 

52 


10 44 
85 


+1 12 


21ft IS GNIm 
«1* 31 GtNNk 
29% 17 GfWFM 
19% 11HGMP 
30% 18% Grevti 
616 7% G roller 

1318 9 GrowOa 

12% 4% Grub El 
339* 34 Grama 100 30 
27 Mto Gram el LN Mi 
Bto 414 Grants! .16 11 
27% 20 GUtHrd 44 U 

<2 2$n — 


GTfWM 30 
535 


_ 57 GHWpf 505 90 

2216 llto CoffRs 20 14 

Bto 16V* GulfRpt 1J0 60 
16 10 GltSJUt 104 104 7 

a 30% GffSU pf 440 111 
a 32% GtfSUpf 452 120 
50% a GUSUPt 448*1X6 
31% 24 GH5U pr IBS 113 
25 77 GtfSJ or 4A0 120 

■S ssv. GtfSUPI 850 114 
1R6 12% OAera 
19% 14 Gallon 


27V* 27% 27% 

19to 19V8 Wto— to 
29% 2916 27to— to 
5% 5% 5%— to 

llto 11% llto 

11 in* iiw— to 

339* 21% 3218 + % 
26% 26V* 2*to 
32 5V6 5V6 516— to 
_ f 15 ZH6 2TV1 33V. 

20 12 rm 36% 38% 38% — to 



1 62% 62% 42% — 1 
94 15 l«to Uto— % 

2 21 21 21 — to 

4506 15(6 15% 1094 + to 

10% Uto Mto 3616 — to 

200x 37 37 37 +9 

M UW 51ft 5I» +1 

34 Slto 31 Slto + to 

13 34% 3416 34%— Hi | 
... 4550ZBS 85 63 +1 

JD* 40 30 2B97 ISto 18% 18% 

JO XJ 11 47 Uto 14% 14% + to 


H 


29% 19% HallFB 
36to 26to Hoi ten 
1% (6 Haiiwd 

11% 5% Htewdpf 56 Al 
37% 25% HomPi 1J6 17 11 
15% 11% HanJS 1^701X1 
21 l«to HonJI 
30 14% Hart s 

20% 15% HandH 
Zlto 14% Hama 
64 27% HvBrJ 


154a U 
54 2.1 16 
06 30 19 
A0 11 a 
ia 10 17 


35% 19% Hrnlnd a 0* 10 22 
17to 7% Hamfth 21 

2SU 25 Horn PtB 340 T35 
23% 2*18 HamPFC 


ia 14 U5> 2816 27(6 >718—16 

IJ» 40 11 3303 29% Mto 29 

- - - 14 2BSx 1(b Ito Ito 
4JX 9% 9% 9% 

9 « 36% 3596 3448 + % 

S3 14% 14ft U%— to [ 

» 2R8 20% 2TO6 

294 27% 24% 26(8—1 

12 18% 18% TBS* — to) 

ia* in* ibv* 18% 

43 42to 61% 6216 

3X * , ~ hi 

402 9% 9V* ... 

BkJSto 25 3Sto + % 
400x25to 25% 2Sto+ Vk| 
a 27% 27% 2796— to 
7J4 27to 26% 37 —% 
a 14% 14% lfto 
»to 2*96 2? 

34% 344% 3416— % 
1718 169* 17 — 16 
23% JJto 2398 — 9*| 
110 10 9to 10 


9 22(8 LM MO 207e 90 11 

17% 12% LLE Rv 119*140 
416 Ito LLCCp 
12 8 LLCPf 

1318 7(6 LTV 

» 41 LTV Of 

S96 15% LTV pf 306 180 

69 4218 LTV Pf 505 120 

veto V5*I LTV Of US 11.1 
T7 . 10% LOuMf 21 

2948 TAto LacJGs 100 70 7 
509* 6to Lofarae 00 25 
255* S Lofrppf 204 100 
14% 9V8 Lomuri 04 20 11 

4% 1(6 Lom5ee 143 

U% Uto LnwtlOf 04 40 IS 
2Sto V3V* LeorPt 31 U 11 
Bto 2D% LeorPpf 207 111 

S 3916 Leorfo 200 30 10 
_ 14 LeaRfU* A0 20 13 

34% 259* LxwyTr 10 U 11 

429* 22% L**Ent 02 20 20 

I6to 9 LraMas 
21% 14% LwPlat 
4to 2% LehVal 
15-to 13% Letiarn 108*11.1 
15% 9% Leaner SO 10 18 

26% Uto LIUCNtS 4 

379* a LevlS I 105 A3 19 

SW* 4316 LOF 1-32 20 I 

225 S2E LOFf* 40S 44 

Hto »to LttevCp J2 14 If 

90% S3 Lilly 308 12 12 

55% 18% Limited 02 0 30 

259* .9% Limtd art 

46% Mto LincNd 104 40 II 

239* 1818 UncPI 204a 90 

88 *1% Litton 100, 22 

86% 81% Lftonwn 

53to 36 LOCfchd 

«to 27 Lodi to 


. . 1.9 19 

S3 43% Notncfk 248 13 U 

28% 21V* Nteco 100 A0 12 

29% 219* Nashua 7 

18% 10% Ntcnvs 06 20 15 
34 22% NatDbt 200 60 34 

19% 16% NDUtpr 105 9.7 
20 11% NatEdu 15 

38% 18% NatFGe XM 7.1 7 

34 19% NFOet 200 90 

45% 27% NatGvp 2a 40 4 
fto 2% NiHom 

3398 23% Nit 
45 52% Nil pf 

17% NMtdE 
6% N Mines 
229* NtPTMt IM 
9% NtSend 33 

229k NtSvcm ia 13 11 
11% NStond a 20 11 
10 Neraon 04* as 7 
23% NovPw 176 80 10 
11% NevPpf 100 100 
Uto NevPpf 105 100 
8% NevSvL JO 40 9 
«% 31% NEnoEl 300 80 7 
29 22ft NJRBC 200 70 10 
27ft 16% NY5EG 204 90 7 
74 55% NYSpf 188 110 

199* 13V* NYSpf 112 100 
Jlto 241* NYSpfDITS 120 
T9 1318 Newell a 30 10 
5m 32to Hewtxal 908al7J 27 

18 11% Newtrii 100a 64 4 

996 716 NwhIRs 2004010 B 

IM* 31 Newmt ia 20 39 
3% 19* Nwpark 

2W8 13ft NtoMP 201 100 7 
30% 31 NlaMpf 140 110 
719* 23V* NlaMPt 160 110 
34 24V* NlaMpf ISO US 

37V* 26 NlaMaf AID 10.9 
Wt 75 NiMpf 1060 100 
67 <m NfOMpf 7.72 HI 
18% IS Nkto5h ' - 
lgk 1048 Ntadet 
339* 24% NICOR 

11 12ft NoWAf 

69% 48V* NarfMa 800 
31 5% Norik] 

45 30 Norstr 300 SJ 10 

19 12 Nortek 08 0 4 

569* 439* NACOte 1.10 21 7 

45to X NAPItJ! IDO 28 S 
»% 134. N gurO use 90 to 
17% 11 NantUf 108 90 6 
15% 109* Wind PS 1.56 IXO “ 
509* 36 NoStPw 302 70 
37 a NSPwpf 300 113 
39% M NSPwpf 408 100 
_ 319* NSPwpf 4.10 1Q2 

4DV8 S2to NSPof 4.16 111 

51 NSPwpf ABO 100 
56% NSPwpf 704 M0 



10Sel20 
.12 10 16 
3JH 9.1 
,.12b 0 44 
50 9 


9 20% 20 Va 
215 43K. 42% 

3144 29% 28% 

1042 10% 10 
3 34 34 

581 H to - 

570 47% 44ft 47to— to 

9776 82V. llto B2Vh + % 

552 2448 24 24 — % 

2S4 24% 26% 26% — 18 
522x |J% 13% IH* + to 
544 32ft 3218 229*— to 
» 1918 1918 19» 

582 Uto 15% 1418 + % 

12* 29% 29% 29% + 16 

2x23'.* 23V* 7Wi— to 
320 43% 44% 45 +18 

113 4% 418 4% + to 

132 269* 26 2614 

„ „ 44 5Bft 5B% 54% 

10 15 1352 30to 29% 30to + % 

5 7% 7% 7%— to 

38 26% 2598 2618 + % 
7290 12(8 11% 1298 + % 
306 30 2998 X + to 

12 14 UW 1396- ft 

13 11 1V% 11 

94 32 3198 32 + to 

400x 13 14% lfto 

1 IBto 18% 18ft— to 
24 lift 11% 11% 

84 43% 43% 43(8 + to 
j Sto 27% 27(8— % 

409 ZTto 26(8 27% — to 
380z 74% 74% 749* +1* 

11 19% 19to !»% + l* 

12 30(4 30% 30% 

129 15% 1518 15% + to 

40 56% 56to 54V* + % 

2 14(8 14% 14% 

.34 B% B% Bft 

161 4298 42V* 42% + to 

54 1% 148 Hk 

82U a 19% a 
260X 29% 29% 29to + % 
lOte 31 31 31 

200x33% 33 » 

2»37% 37% 37ft +Ift 
l»dfll 101 W1 +1 

100x64 64 64 -0 

97 15% ISto 15% + to 
199 17% 11% llto— ft 
3734 33% 3Zft 33% + to 
305 1518 15 15% + to 

t4S 6Bft 6798 SI%— 98 
75 99* 918 9% + % 

268 46% 44% 45% +1% 
1186X15% 15 159* + % 

10 52 51% 32 + I* 

300 36% 35(6 36% + to 
35 16% 16% 1648—" 
472B 1718 16to 
5600 12% Uto ._ 

911110 509* 50% 58ft— to: 
1550V 36 a 35 
I20OV 39 29 39 + % 

I3MOy40to 409* 40% +118 
100V41 40 41 +9% 

7209 65% 65 65 —(to 


€ 


‘T.-L '■ • 

r>: c. 
Hu;:. 

hv:: •: 


l um 


fro** iLaj»»e 

**»*'f:- 
o-jvn : . 
rn-,» L - 
L-iOp 1 ; 

Win 

■We 1 :n.; 
fen 
rant 
Irxt 

1 sa- 
mob 

CtL-Jt - . 

«• 

73'.-. • .' 
r5 'F.‘h, . 


den t re 

1648— to^- 


so ij a 

AS 20 10 


86% 62(6 N&Pw pt UD VQ0 
69% 51% NSPwpf 700 103 
4216 21V* NorTel SO 
4% 2% Ntbpotp 
53 29% Nortrps la 20 lj 1021 

46% 41 Nv^P pf 502el20 J 
6818 40(8 Nwtlnd 268 A2 19 
23% 19% NwtP of 2a U3 
17% 8% NwStW 

wv an* Norton 200 50 is 
29% 21% Norma 100 60 ia 
gL, 4B% Nwetpf 6070110 

SJ 5* ate .9 n 

^*2 ssk a u » 

60% NYNBX 460 70 B 


34010 9 77% 76% 76to + to 
— - 83% +2% 


as a* 25% 3VA— ft 
Ml ISto U% IBM + % 

3 Ift 1% 1%— to 
32 9% 9% 99* — ft 

2236 7% 7% 79* — % 

7 419* 41% 419* + a* 

368 17% M 16% + % 

39 43 42% 43 

*5 lift lift 1118— ft 
516 74% 73% M + ft 
115 239* 23% 23% + % 

94 7% 716 718— to 

5 23% 23% 23% — % 

43 9V. 9 9% — % 

M6 3% 314 3% 

226 llto 11 1198 + V* 

132x14 13% 14 +*h 

57 2J(* 2218 2M8 + 48 

209 54% S4U. 34ft + to 

5 17% 17% 17% 

39 Jlto 30(8 31 — % 

40 41M 41% 419b + % 

77 Uto 16 16 —to 

125 22 Zlto 22 + to 

173 VU 3% Ito + ft 
2B5 14% Uto Uto— % 

771 12% 1218 129*— to, — , . 

14 20% 20% 50% » IH Oteiind 

245 35 34% 349*— to 2* Z3V> OoklteP 102 40 11 * 3)9* eii* 31% 

20 46% 44 Mto-% Mg* aa X4 11 B63 5% Sto 33to + to 


B9 


3aarovB6to 83% 

5450V 67% <7% 47% +1» 
1121 35% *5% 35% + to 
3% 3% 3% 

Sl% 51% Sl%— to 
^ 45 45 45 —to 

2 s a% si% — % 

20 23 23 23 — to 

6 9 9 9 —to 

s g Sto r -'.a 

& SJ5SS8 + S 

506x 8718 86% BTto 


A9B Ito 1% 1% 


1 74 


» 74 + ft H 9% OcdPwt 

10 3048 30% 30% + to 2414 Zlto OodP pf 200 1X6 
*08 66 « B5V. + 2 2L , 17ft OcclPpt X19 100 
49% 4996 " ll 


A 10 
3 A 13 
XT 12 


2J 10 
30 12 

109 4 A 12 
UB 15 11 
100 100 11 
IJt ltu 

Xm IB ■ 
A0 1 3 13 
02 17 II 
37 


s 

110 


33% l*to HrpRw 

35 22% Harris 

U% 10% HarGrn 

29ft 19 Ham 

39% 24H Harhnx 

17% 13% HattSc 

HU 15% Haw El 

V3to 8 HorasA 
34% 23ft HaZtoM 
13ft 9*8 HazLQfi 
n 13% HllhAo 

21ft 21 HNCrPn 

234k 10% HftUSA 

15% 9% Hecks a 20 
ISto 13% HectcM JO 10234 

Sto UH HeJknn AM 14 13 

3018 1598 Htino A0 IA 15 

Sto 34ft Helnx 160 10 U 1471 

S 12% HOlneC 24 S 

24% IB HelmP St 23 22 IS 1*9* lfto lfto— ft 
4* 3% HomCo . IS 4% tfl* 448 + to 

W* lift Hemlnc 105ol40 10 Uto 12K Iflb + to 

Bto Sto Heraib umj n w »k in 34ft— .. 

TB% Wto Homes 041 24 999 1!% 18 lift + % 

3Jto 19ft HeritCPfia 40 5 S 3218 9 +118 

19% 14% Herman 14 Bo mt if lfto 


78 24% 9% 23(8- % 

vex in. nth 12 — to 

43 22% 22% 22% 

P a 229k 2298— U 

44 20% a Zflto— to 
X 14R4 14 Uto 

395 14% 16to 14%— to 
715 20% a 2514— ft 
234 21% 3Sto Sto— % 
53*. 53 5318 — % 

18 17% 17% — to 


519* Loewes la 
35 22% Log icon 00 

3448 22% Lorn Fin 1.16 
JMh 1696 LBRlMts 266 
3% 2 LomMWt 
77 179k LnSter IM 73 

51ft 44 LoneS pf 507 H4 
9ft 3% ULCo 
a BftLILpfX 
22 9 ULpfW 

21% 9ft LILPtV 
34*8 llto LILpfV 
71 8% ULofT 

14% * ULpfP 
1W8 7 ULpfD 
29% IB LoaoDS 
35 22% Larte 

14% TUN LoGani 

X Sto La Land ]0o 3J 
25% 17 LPPpc — L” 
33ft 28% LaPLpf 400 143 
25% 14% LaPLpf XIA 120 
Btt 2 2% LOuwGe IM AS B 
50 36 LOwst 200 40 7 

31ft 1416 Lowes 36 10 IS 
2Sft 19% mart T.I6 50 12 
32ft 24 LubylJ 04 10 20 
22% U LuekvS 1.16 A3 12 
14 lOto Lufee» At 16 10 


907 50 

36 25% 25 2518 + % 

! 5 £ *5^—1% 

23 S 22(6 23 
■96 8318 829* 83ft— % 
341 SJto 62(6 BJ — % 
65* 10 9 31K 5094 M 50% + to 
a XJ va 908 39% 3tft 29ft 


7B9* OcdPpf 200 100 
,57 «* OcdPte tS 1X0 

1>3 105(8 OcteP pfl 500 I4J 

TOOK. 101% Ocdpf uaa 1x7 

'Su. ^ ,XA 

329* X DO ECO la 40 IS 

100 &0 14 


31% HtoOoden 


XI 12 KJ1 4M* 47% 489* +J 
• “ 204x 32% 31 1* 32% + % 
»< 3«8 M J«8 + ftl 
91 2M 37% a — to 

172 3% 3ft 3% — to 

254 24% 24(8 24% + to 

M 51 50% 509* 

1027 B% Bto 0% 

M 209* 20% 20ft— to 

2 25 + 2 

39 20% 20ft 20ft — % 

79 25 349* 25 + 2 

2 19% 1994 I9*k— to 

I Uto 16 14 

4 TBto lift Uto— ft 

721 29% 20% »% + 2 
W 35 MV, 34% + H 
UTU 12 12 

sg n an* 31% + ft 

2X 21 to 2148 7148— to 

00 32* 32% 329* £ 

0 24(6 24U 2€4h 
454x31ft 30% 30% —ift 
13 4418 44% 4<ft 

388S 1 

5 13ft 13% 13ft — % 


02 25 IS 
A0 10 19 
64b V 10 

0Sb 17 41 


i5S "6 OhtaEd 108 T20 w 

36 V* 26ft ObEdpf 406 125 

SBft 41 OhEdpt 704 127 
43 OhEdpf 706 1X7 
66 45 OflEdpf 600 IJT 

31% 25ft OtiEdpf Uto M 
» 1S18 OtiEdpf 150 120 

21% 21 OhEdpr 192 ]]j 
mu! ~55 ^ 100 110 

2* 51 2£S tf P' V ' 12 1“ 

» 76 ME pf 1X48 123 

09* 77 OtiEpt 1076 125 

is 2 s as? 14 

70 53 OhPpfD 7.74 110 

25% 19ft OkloGE 2a 70 ll 

** WH oitn 100 io a 

^ n* SISS* JO 40 6 

031 50 13 
36 XV 

38 

50 

90 


23% 19% 

U% 79* 

19ft 

12% Bto Orion P 
9% 6ft Orion pf jo 
31% 24 Orion pf 


M 


33ft 15% MACOM 
59% 38% MCA 


04 10 17 41B gft M% 17 — 

08 10 a 192B SPA 55ft SB* +2ft[ 


SSJSSgSMif ^ ^ 


124 354* JJ 

(Gontumed oo Page 12) 


ISO 13% 13V* 1J% 

2 2% 23% 22ft + ft 
13 5% 2DU— % 

I 22 22 22 — % _ 

79 ,SJ%.56% SAM + (8 A 
5» IM M 1069* 108% + ft f 
9 107% 107 107 * 

»zT 72ft 112ft 112ft + ft - 
231 21 20% a gft 

*5 28% fflto 2ffft + to 
42B5 15% ISto 15% 

41ta 34% 3S% 36ft +1% 

390x 57 57 57 —I 

280x 58 SB S8 
’£* «ft 44ft 64ft +Wl 
2350 toft 32H 32% +Ift 
US *H 38% 28% — % 

30 31ft 30% n(8 + 4b 
to 16 15% 16 — to 

190r 70 m 7o 
JteKft BSVj #5% 

10* B* 06 84 + H 

* ]fft 12% 179* -ft 
302 68 68 48 

3fel09ft 109% 109ft . 

M 1» 110 +1 
*7% 67ft— % 

I83S 25ft 25% 25%— ft 
»y Bto g% 1m + 18 
3!4 3] 30% 30% + » 

213 4% 4% «*— H 

39 m* 12 12 -»>■ 

iw^g£§S“ 1 *{" 

a »»p— 

lift 10% lift + JJi 

iksshUS+s^ 


ID 

44 

1231 

4*3 

344 





-■ .— 517 



















. Statistics Index 

- AMEX prises P.M Etonkios marts P.l t 

AMEX MBhsAoMP.U FHng rat* notes P.M 

1 HYSE nrtees P.18 Gold mortals P.l! 

NYSE Ngm/NM P.M Interest rote* p.ll 

ConodiQfi stocks P.1B Mortal sonwiory P.1D 

'■ Currency rote* P.tl Options p.12 

ConMnooHto P.12 OTC stock P.M 

“yiomas P.M Othor mortals P.ll 


TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


itcral fr^jpgribiinc. 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 



FUTURES AND OPTIONS 

'Triple Witching Hour’ Has 
Seasoned Traders Confused 


Hie GNP figures 

helped to canse 

the disarray, one 
expert said. 


* By HJ. MAIDENBERG 

Sew York Times Sentce 

N EW YORK — Several days before last Friday’s “triple 
witching hour," many professional stock traders again 
braced for a wild fmaf 60 minutes in the life of three 
key market Forces: index futures and stock- and index- 
options. A wild 60 minutes it was. The market, as measured by 
the Dow Jones industrial average, soared to dose up 24.75 points, 
. at 1 *324.48. 

Not only do the professionals expect the final trading hour of 
the third Friday of each month to be e tdtrn g, but they know 
which way the market will jump during the last hour and begot 
positioning their portfolios accordingly beforehand. 

In fact, as early as last Wednesday arbitragers and other 

- professionals began unwind- — — 

mg spreads involving bewil- ™ 

dering comb inatio ns of atnrtc inc wlu ngures 

and of June stock options as tn n map 

well as index futures and op- to CffllSe 

dons that also expired last Fd- the disarray, one 

“As they unwound their expert said, 
spreads on Wednesday and T 
Thursday, they commenced 

- placing Friday ‘market-at-dose’ buy orders for stocks in the 
Standard & Poor's- 100 options and the S&P-500 futures,” said 
Jack A. Barbanel director of futures trading at Grnntal & Co. 
and an authority on index-futures and options markets. 

Meanwhile, he said, the professionals began to sdl June SAP- 
500 futures short and buy various June index puts, which is the 
same as selling the market short Mhifcet-ai-cloae orders are 
orders to buy or sell shares, options or futures at prices prevailing 
in the final few minutes of trading. 

T HE behavior of the June SAP-100 options between 
Wednesday and Thursday made it dearly evident what 
was afoot: The volume of the expiring puts climbed to 
149,826, from 103,383, while the premiums, or prices of the “at- 
the-money" 180 June puts dropped to slightly less than $50 an 
option, from about $80. 

At-the-mcmey puts and calls are dosest to the value of the 
underlying basket of stocks upon which a particular index is 
based. These strike prices are set in increments of $5. When the 
current value of an option moves doser to the next higher or 
lower strike price, it is an indication of where the market is going 
. Options give the buyer the right, without any obligation, to sdl 
' (put) or buy (call) the underlying goods cn* other store of value at a 
fixed strike price during a specified period of rime. 

That the pros were also heavy buyers of the expiring June SAP- 
500 futures on Friday was also evident, Mr. Barband noted. 
While the June futures dosed up 175 points on the day, the next 
“delivery month,” September, rose only 10 paints. 

Because the SAP index consists largely of blue-chip stocks, any 
large purchases or sales of snch issues can easily move these 
indexes. The same applies to the Dow industrial average of 30 
blue chips. Last Fnday, for example, when General Foods 
jumped 10% on a rumor of a takeover by Philip Morris, it added 
9.46 to the Dow average. The reason is that the way the Dow 
average is calculated, each point move in General Foods repre- 
sents 88 cents in the average. 

This is why the performance of professional portfolio manag- 
ers is measured against the broader-based SAP indexes, which do 
, pot give so much weight to individual blue. chips. 

^ Another expert on the relationship between the index options 
and futures and the stock market is Arthur M. Rose, rice 
president and Atlantic region op tions-trading' director at E.F. 
Hutton A Co. As he prepared Ins staff for Friday's triple witching 
hour, he said: 

“On the third Friday of eight months of the year, we have a 
JConthmeri on Page 13, CoL 1) 


Currency Rates 


Ctm« Bales 




1 

t 

DJUL 

F-F- 

ILL 

cwr. 

BJ=. 

LF. 

Tan 


Amsterdam 

MM 

cm 

nzw» 

30** 

0-17*1 * 


ssw- 

not* 

ararr 

* 

Brunei* (a) 


7»42S 

2D.W7S 

MI15 

3-1575* 

I7JJB 

— 

24.10 

2431 • 


Frankfort 

un 

US 

— 

31*15* 

UUSx 

■J15- 

«a- 

ms- 

nwi 

•. . S. 

London (b) 

UBS 

_ 

iwn 

turn 

ZSBUS 

usn 

TMI 

UN 

3WJ45 


Milan 

1MOSO 

152040 

tiuo 

3BJS 

. 

54530 

SUB 

7<US 

12V 


New Vorfc(c) 

. 

UM7* 

1 MS 

ftus 

U55JB 


am 

US 

tax 

1 

Parte 

MOS 

HOSTS 

wr 

— 

*7UX 

2205 

ISMS' 

IMS 

ms • 

Tokyo 

JOB 

J17J7 

KJB 

MS 

US* 

Ties 

«049* 

MJ1 

— 


Zurich 

UBS 

un 

BJ1* 

VMS’ 

0.011- 

TltOS* 

4.UB* 

— — 

13314* 


1 ECU 

DJ1U 

ASM4 

12* 

tarn 

laur 

2SM 

*5201 

1J7S7 

1IUM 

' -••• • 

1 SDH 

MW) 

0J7SJ4 

lMB 

93US 

MSB 

x«sa 

SOSO 

1885 

247 JOS 


aastngM fa London and Zurich fbttost M ether European centers, new Tor* rates ats PM. 
la) Commercial traaclb) Amounts needed to buy one pound (cJAammtt needed to buv one 
d HUort-t UMttonwM UrritMofimiV) Units of 10X00 NXU notauated: HXu not avaffabln 
(*) To ber one p oun d: fUSiJtn 


f Olbor Bollw Vali 


cwtmc* m r US. s Cmrtnat per USS Currency pop UJS Currency Mr US* 

Aroao. oudral OlBB Fta-mottfl 4J3 MBMr.rtM. 24713 S. Her. won BJ&X 

Antral. I 1.511 Oraefcdrac. 137.10 MM. MM 30U» 17SJB 

Audr.KML 71 JO Ham Kangs 1JM6 MormEreM U315 SwteLkrom 22*2 

Beta. RB.fr. 42JX3 Mtanw 1142 PULgaga 1140 TataMS 3M6 

Brazil enn. 5*3040 todo-raptaO 1,117.00 Partawt* nuo TMbdtt 27J8S 

Canadian S IJ 66 IrteAC MOO* SaaMrtWi 245? THrkUfiUra SOM 

Danteb krone TU3 taraalftflok.Ui1.7Q Hao.5 130 IMKdhtwn 3473 

ESYPi.paMBd 0J5W Kmnmttw &30a s.AJr.n*tf USI2 van.bg». 1U0 

cstentna: iJilirltbc 

Sources: Banaue Ou Bonek at (Brussels): Banco Cammerctate ttaUana (AMani; Otomlcai 
Bane (New York): Bows Nationals Ob Paris (Paris): Sen* of Tokyo fTatovj; IMF (SDR); 
BAH (Ulnar. rtytd. cSrftemJ. Other data from neuters andAP. 


Interest Rates 


E m 'Rf MTw y Pepori tt 


MarDM 

manta TVfc-F* 5IWW SVB-SVSr T3H-12W Tfliw-Wte » »W*N 7% 

*4nmrilH 7 4V-7W. SVj-5ta 5tv5N T2W121W 10V4-1M TV, 

IrnenlM 7«e7% SVt-S»k 5 W5te T2tW-12ta KM-IOfe Wi-Wk 7M 

6 monte* - Mta 5Vi-5% S*w5». 12W-12U W*rT0«ta 9V..Fta 7M. 

1 rear lUh SH-SV. SW-5* U-l2Mi 10W-im in 

Sources: Morgen Guaranty (doner. OM. SF. Pound. FFi: Uuvds Bank (ECU); Pouters 
tSOP /. antes aaoRaabte to Mertxmkdaiastts at SI mWon minimum (ormnrterUenr). 


Franc ECU SDR 
TOTW-Wta 9IW9B. 7 tv 

lOta-lM 9VWS* TV, 

WMOtt W.+* TV. 

18 BrTO tV 9Vi-7ta 7 tV 

10 tV-11 V% 9Mr9 IV 81V 




untted Start* 
PteC Bunf Rote 
Federal Fond* 
Prim Role 
Broker Una Rati 


7tS TKi 

7% 7571* 

ih m 

8 B 


Can Paaer 9*^79 den 740 US 

Mwn T imm y Ms 7jB7 741 

MHAie Treemn BBU 7J» •' 7JB 

CDtJ»srdan 745 7.10 

CDTIMldm 7-» 7J0 


ywtlOrmw 

LembardRata 

preratgMBMe 


MervenUoa Rat* 

CnRMoaar 
O M ine ma InU rt ae fc 
unonta teWBonfc 
mwffi In t artwwh 


545 555 
555 559 
5Jft 570 
57S 575 


19** Utt 
19V. HJfll 
183716 W3/M 
MU TOVi 
nim M3/u 


AhSbb BbHit Bepiri ta 

June 24 

Imantti 7 V. -7 tv 

TtnonBa 7tv-7tv 

Smentts 7 tv -7 tv 

6 months 7 tv -81* 

1 year M-IB 

Source: Reuters. 


VANMKyMarketFBHb 

June 24 

MntrlU Lyacb Ready Assets 
tSdw mww i MeMi 771 

Tale rate Interest WsM Mdt; KA. 

Source: Merrm LynAAP 


Gold 


Bittern 

Bank Bare Rate 

im 

UU 


AJM. 

PAL 

June 22 

area 

Call Maaev 

N-day Traanav MU 

12* Ute 

11 15/14 11 un* 

Kona Knag 
imanm 

CM 

aid 


3-monHi imrrtnMf 

1214 

m 

Parte C1Z5KBQ) 

21334 

31430 

+ 130 

Jiunw 

DVcoont note 

i 

s 

Zirtt 

London 

Now York 

HA. 

314.10 

sum 

SUM 

slug 

+ .135 
+ 130 
+ UB 

CaO Moore 

M 

4Vi 

Luxembourg. Paris anti Lorttaa arffetai 1U- 

to-day Interbank 

45/14 

45 n* 

mosj Hone Kona and Zurich apenlaa and 


dosing prices: Hew York Game* current 

jmv; Reuters. Coe u oentonk. Cn UP contract. All prices In US. Suer ounce. 

Lrvmdn Lloyds BanKBaM id Tatm. Source: Routers. 

Markets Closed 

Financial markets were closed in Hong Kong Monday because of a 
typhoon, while markets in Luxembouig were dosed for a holiday. 


IBM link 
Is Offered 
By AT&T 

Networking Ties 
Deemed Crucial 

Ream 

LINCROFT, New Jersey — 
Americas Telephone & Telegraph 
Co. announced Monday the intro- 
duction of more than 70 commum- 
cations products that will allow dif- 
ferent sizes of its computers to 
connect to Urge IBM mainfraxne- 
compnter systems. 

AT&T officials said at a news 
conference that its 3-B family of 

minicomputers, annrnrnffwl a year 
ago, are now compatible with In- 
ternational Business Machines 
Coip.’s systems network architec- 
ture, or SfNA. 

Industry analysts consider SNA 
compatibility crucial for AT&T if it 
is to sdl minim mpniw g in the 
mainframe-computer market, 
which IBM dominates with a 70- 
percent market share. 

AT&T's group of new hardware 
and software products wiD allow its 
customers to co nnec t personal 
computers, work stations and mini- 
computers with the large main- 
frame computers that form the core 
of most data-processing opera- 
tions. 

AT&T also announced two new 
3-B computers. The 3-B 2/400, a 
super mic ro computer, will support 
up to 25 users, and (he 3-B 15. also 
a super minicomputer, wiD support 
60 users, the company said. 

AT&T has also reduced the price 
of its 3B 2/300 modd by more than 
20 percent 

“The fact that AT&T w31 intro- 
duce an interface to the IBM world 
shows that they recognize that IBM 
is the major factor in the computer 
industry,” Fritz Ringling, a consul- 
tant with Gartner Group Inc. “This 
recognition is an absolute necessity 
if ATAT is to succeed in the indns- 
try.” 

AT&T bad a rocky entry into the 
computer market last year. The 
company’s drive to challenge IBM 
an its own territory largely failed. 

In March this year, company of- 
ficials conceded that only then was 
the company overcoming the inter- 
nal chaos caused by the splitting up 

of AT&T »nd misdirected market- 
ing strategies. 

The first indication of a tough 
time ahead in the computer field 
for AT&T came last summer when 
the company introduced its first 
personal computer, the IBM-com- 
patible PC 6300. Industry analysts 
said it was constructed to take ad- 
vantage of the huge software base 
available for IBM machines, but 
offered little to distinguish it from 
IBM’s machines. 

AT&T officials conceded after 
the machine was that fol- 

lowing in IBM's wake was the com- 
pany's only way to get into the 
computer market quickly. 

ynternntimiHl Business Machines 
Corp. said Monday it introduced 
two new programs that enable a 
large IBM computer to serve as a 
Videotex host, and an IBM person- 
al computer to create Videotex col- 
or graphics for the host system. 
Reuters reported from New York 


The Workaholic Guiding Pru-Bache 

Seeking Success During 19-Hoor Days 


By Leslie Wayne 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Once the 
wunderkind of Wall Street, 
George L Ball, now 46, is find- 
ing the going much tougher in 
middle age. He still is a work 
— logging 50,000 air 
TnflgF a month and keeping a 
workaholic’s schedule from 
dawn to dusk and beyond. 

But, success has proved elu- 
sive. The firm he beads, Pruden- 
tial- Bache Securities Inc., has 
rolled op multi- million dollar 
losses that have staggered Wall 
Street And, Mr. Ball himself 
continues to be dogged by the 
check-kiting scandal that took 
place at EJ. Hutton & Co. dur- 
ing his five-year tenure as presi- 
dent there. 

Last week, the specter of Hut- 
ton loomed once again when a 
House subcommittee released 
documents that pointed a finger 
at Hutton's top management, in- 
cluding Mr. BaD. Hutton and 
Mr. Ball have quickly responded 
that a mix-up of dales on some 
key papers revolted in an errone- 
ous fniffyetion that top Hutton 
executives knew about the ille gal 
scheme. And, much to his dis- 
may, the issue con tinues to haunt 
Mr. BaD: *Tve been done an in- 
justice,” be laments. 

Mr. Ball contends that he 
knew Tiftthing of the fraud — a 
scheme of aggressive over-draft- 
ing that cost the banks used by 
Hutton ndDions of dollars in in- 
terest Nor was he in a position 
to know, he said. 

“1 was not responsible for cash 
management, nor w er e the peo- 
ple reporting to me,” he said. “1 
was told about it initially by Bob 
Fomon in February, 1982 and 
was told that a group of attor- 
neys had identified the problem 



Ths Now To* Tmi 

George L. Ball, Pru-Bache's chief executive. 


and eynaari the wrongdoings to 
cease.” Robert Fomon is chair- 
man of Hutton, which pleaded 
guilty to 2,000 counts of mail and 
wire fraud, is paying a S2 million 
Eng and has set aside S8 milli on 
to repay the banks involved. 

lire Hutton saga, however 
dramatic, is not Mr. Ball’s most 
pressing concern. Dearer is Pru- 
dentiaJ-Bache Securities Inc., 
which in 1984 posted (he biggest 
one-year loss in Wall Streelnis- 
tory. 

Mr. BaD was lured from Hut- 
ton in July, 1982 with the man- 
date to torn around Wall Street's 
perennial laggard. But that has 
proved to be no easy feat for him 
or for Prudential Insurance 
Corp. of America, which has in- 
vested about $458 million in the 
firm. There has been no quick-fix 
for Pru-Bache and Mr. BaD has 
met with one disappointment af- 
ter another. 

“George Ball has been given a 
free hand and the losses have 
been fairly phenomenal,” said 


Brenda Davis, an analyst with 
Mabon. Nugent. “One would 
think they could have done much 
better than they hav&” 

Added James P. Hanbury. an 
analyst with Wertheim & Co.: 
“Ban has this terrific reputation 
and maybe people expected mir- 
acles. I don't think this has been 
a s tellar acquisition for Pruden- 
tial.” 

Last year was particularly dis- 
tressing. Pru-Bache reported a 
net loss of $113 million — big 
even by the standards of an in- 
dustry accustomed to dealing in 
big numbers. Better markets 
have since lifted Pru-Bache’s 
1985 first-quarter earnings into 
the seven-figure range. 

Still, Prudential has not seen a 
positive return on its investment. 
It paid $379 milli on for the com- 
pany in June, 1981 and has 
pumped in 579 million since. In 
return. Pru-Bache has reported 
losses since the acquisition of 
$130 nrillioiL Many say that 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 1) 


Japan Sees Lower Exports to China 

Reuters ■ — 

Tofcyo A Uows Foreign Trust Banking 


Ream 

TOKYO — Japan’s exports of 
manufactured goods to China wiD 
fall this year because of a decline in 
China’s foreign-currency reserves, 
Japanese industry sources said 
Monday. 

Japanese exports to China rose 
to 57.22 biDion in 1984 from $4.90 
billion a year earlier, bringing Ja- 
pan a $1264riDion trade surplus 
compared with a 5180-fllion deficit 
a year earlier, finanre ministry fig- 
ures show. 

Japanese car and electrical- 
goods companies have already re- 
ported that Chinese orders are low- 
er this year than last, especially for 
large contracts. 

The value of vehicle exports to 
China rose to S471 million in 1984 
from 5121 million a year earlier. 
Television exports last year 
dimbed to 5364 minion from only 
S69 million a year earlier. 

However, steel, machine-tool 
and other raw-material industries 
are still optimistic about exports in 
1985. 

Beijing bought 7J01 million tons 
of sted and steel products from 
Japan in 1984, op from 6 .51 milli on 
tons a year earher. China recently 
agreed with Japanese exporters to 
buy 3.69 million tons m the first 


United Press International 

lions by all nine fareign bankMhatapplied to domist banking in 
Japan. 4 

The finance minis ter, Noboru Takeshi ta, said at news meeting on 
Saturday that the banks were all highly qualified and that the ministry 
was unable to eliminate any applications. 

> "Earlier, the ministry had said it would authorize a maximum of 
eight'' foreign banks to conduct trust banking business. Tb is was 
because only eight Japanese banks are engaged is trust banking. 

Tbe ministry's decision clears the way for six U.S. banks to set up 
trust units. They are Gticorp, Bankers Trust Co, Morgan Guaranty 
Trust Col. Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co, Chase Manhattan Bank 
and Chemical Bank. 

Applications by Union Bank of Switzerland and Credit Suisse were 
also granted, as was a request by Barclays Bank PLC of Britain. 


half of 198S, and .similar exports 
are seen for the second half. 

Japanese steel exports to China 
rose to 5167 biDion in 1984 from 
$232 billion a year earlier. 

Machine-tod industry sources 
said China will have to buy ma- 
chine tools to produce more of its 
own finished goods for export. 

Japan exported machinery to 
China worth 52.96 billion in 1984, 
up from 51.38 billion a year earlier. 

Despite the predicted faD in ex- 
ports, Japanese industry leaders re- 


main optimistic about exports to 
China in the longer term. A new 
Chinese five-year plan will start 
next year. China has often curbed 
imports in the last year of an eco- 
nomic plan before arranging large 
orders at the start of a new one, the 
industry sources said. 

China's central government re- 
strictions on foreign-currency 
spending by regional governments, 
delays on contract signing and an 
April to June suspension of import 
licenses have all nun imports from 
Japan, the sources said- 


Hidden Liabilities Worry U.S. Bank Regulators 


By Robert A. Bennett 

Now York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The 15 largest 
U.S. banks have accumulated al- 
most a trillion dollars in liabilities 
— obligations stub as bank-issued 
guarantees, and commitments to 

make loans pur chase foreign 

exchange — that do not show up on 
their balance sheets. 

The fact that banks have made 
such comnritments comes as nc 
surprise; they earn sizable fees for 
doing so. But bow big those obliga- 
tions are — and the fact that at 
many banks they exceed assets — 
has rally recently come to light. 

Tbe scale of these obligations is 
worrying federal bank regulators, 
as wdl as some bankers, because it 
nwiM i ndicate tbat hanln are carry- 
ing greater risks than had previous- 
ly been thought. At the end of 1 984, 
die 15 biggest banks, whose assets 
totaled SS5225 bflban, reported 
5929.63 bGfion in contingent liabil- 
ities. 

“The raw numbers are a link 
scary” said Irvine H. Sprague, a 
director of the Federal Deposit In- 
surance Corp. 

The concept of contingent liabil- 
ities may seem confuting at first 
glance. Although a bank loan is 
counted as an asset on a bank’s 
balance sheet, a promise to make a 
loan is a liability, or obligation. 
Allhough these contingent liabil- 
ities do not represent actual money 
lent by tbe banks, they do represent 
potential risks. 

For example, a bank, for a fee, 
may proride a standby letter erf 
credit that guarantees that a dry 
will pay off a bond when it ma- 
tures. If the city pays off the bond, 

the lank simply keeps its fee. But if 


tbe city defaults, tbe bank most pay 
the bondholders, suffering a loss. 

The banks may have to make 
good rat only a small portion, if 
any, of these off-balance-sheet 
commitments. On the other hand, 
they could also be called upon at a 
moment’s notice to put up substan- 
tial amounts of money. 

It is highly unlikely that aD of < 
these commitments would be called j 
upon at any one time, bnz the 
banks cannot control whether — or 
when — their promises to provide I 
funds wiD be called upon. 

In the mid-1970s, far example, a 
number of the largest banks found 
themselves obliged to make good 
an cammrtmaats to lend to real- 
estate investment trusts when the 
trusts lost the ability to raise money 
elsewhere. And many of these loans 
could not be repaid by the ailing 
trusts, canting luge loses at some 
banks, such as Bankers Trust Co. 

About 18 months ago, federal 


sheets. Nonetheless, the discovery 
of the existence of almost a trillion 
dollars of contingent liabilities was 
enough to alarm regulators. Earlier 
this year, tbe Office of the Comp- 
trbfler of the Currency, which regu- 


lates federally chartered banks, and 
the FDIC framed an interagency 
group to study the issue. 

The regulators have already hint- 
ed that they would like to require 
(Coutumed oo Page 17, CoL 1) 



reports from banks regarding these 
off-balance-sheet items. They 
feared that, as they began to press 
for banks to increase their capital 
in proportion to their loans, the 
banks might try to shift same direct 
loans into categories that did not 
show up on their balance sheets, 
circumventing the demands for in- 
creased capital 

If a bank makes an outright loan. | 
its total assets rise, and it must I 
increase hs capital by a proportion- 
ate amount. But if the issu es a 

guarantee instead of a loan, its as- . 
sets do not rise and no capital in- 
crease is necessary. 

There is no hard evidence that ; 
the banks have been shifting actual 
loans into arrangements that do i 
not show up on their balance 


FINANCIAL TIMES: 26 JLIN 
NUMERO SPECIAL FRANCE 


GBOUPE REDOUTE 


In its letter to tbe shareholders. Mr. Joseph POLLET. Chairman of I he Board, 
gives the results of fiscal rear ended February 28. 1985. 

LA REDOUTE S-A- {the Croup's holding; company) has achieved a cui ieui 
result of 69 million F.Fr. and a net profit of & roilltoa F.Fr_ taking into account 
an additional 20 miflion F.Fr. provision for depreciation of ihc ROMBALDf 
flevuritin. 

REDOUTE CATALOGUE (sales through catalogue and stores). Turnover 
before taxes 6.957 million F Jr. ( + 7%). Net profii 89 million F.Fr. ( — 2.4%). 
SNER w hich ju st opened (successfully) two new stores (Vfelizy and La Defense) 
and MOVTTEX fuve shown stgnificnu Increases both in their turnover and (heir 
resulu. 

CROUPE PREMAMAN (419 stores under trade signs: PREMAMAN, PRE- 
NATAL. BALLOON. TILL. JULIE AMBRE) earning out its policy of 
remod el ing and o pen ing s in 1985. 

Turnover before uro: .87 million F.Fr. (+52%). Net profit 20 million F.Fr. 
(+14.4%). 

GHOUPE S.IA.D. purchased in February of last year (21 1 stores in Austria. 
~ltaly. Germanv and Spain under trade signs: PRENATAL and RAGA2ZERIA). 
Turnover before taxes: 161 billion lire. Net profit 2 billion Lire. 

VESTRO (Catalogue sates in flair). 

Turnover before Uses; 14) billion Lire ( +7.3%}. Net loss: (XZ billion Lire. 
EDITIONS ROMBALDI (books, informative index cards and lithographs). 
Turnover before tues: 238 miflion F.Fr. ( — 2R5%). Net low: 18 million FJ'r. 
FINAHEF (Financial company of the Group). 

Co Hectic ns: 313 million F.Fr. (+ 16%). Net profit 26 million F.Fr. (+29%). 
CROUPE REDOUTE 

The consolidated turnover before taxes was 9.571 million F.Fr, Le. an increase 
of 21.3% (+9% for comparable period of the previous exercise). 

The current result before taxes is 259 million F.Fr. (+ 12%) and the net profit is 
f 18 miilioo F.Fr. 1+7%). 

Cash Dm* after corrmion for effect of employees profii sharing is 226 mil. 
lion F.Fr. (+ 18.4%). 

The Board of Directors will propose, at the next General Meeting July 25. to par 
a net dividend or F.Fr. 44 per shore (vs. F.Fr. 43). Taking inis account the 
F.Fr. 20 advance paid on June 10, the balance (i.e. F.Fr. 2$ shall be paid on 
November 29. 

Tbie fiscal rear b Flatting under excellent conditions; for all tbe Group Companies 
since, at the end of tbe first quarter, the consolidated turnover w 2.743 mil- 
lion F.Fr. (+ 18.1% for comparable period of the previous exercise). 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10. 

Page 11 


Opel Gtes Strike 
In Swing to Loss 
Of $225 Million 


By Warren Gctler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Adam Opd 
AG, the West German subsidiary 
of General Motors Coro., reported 
Monday a loss of 695 million Deut- 
sche marks (S225.6 million) in 
1984. compared with a profit of 299 
milUon DM a year earlier. 

The automaker blamed the result 
on last summer’s strike by metal- 
workers. 

Sales Iasi year dropped 12.4 per- 
cent, to 12.88 billion DM, from 
14.7 billion DM. 

Ferdinand Beickler, Opd’s man - 
aging board chairman, said the sev- 
en-week national strike in May and 
Jane cost Opel 300 million Deut- 
sche marks and continues to be a 
burden on profits. 

Mr. Beickler said tbe 1984 result 
had been further depressed by an 
allocation of 156 miflion DM into 
reserves as part of an early retire- 
ment program agreed on earlier by 
company and union officials. 

Describing last year's result as 
Opel’s worst postwar performance, 
Mr. Beickler did not rule out an- 
other loss for 1985. Opel’s last loss, 
in 1981. totaled 593 milli on DM. 

Opel last year controlled 16J 
percent of the West German mar- 
ket. second to Volkswagen-Audi, 
Opel officials said. Its share of the 
European market in the fust five 
months of this year was 11.9 per- 
cent, or third place behind Ford 
and Fiat respectively. 

Ford-Weite AG. the West Ger- 
man subsidiary of Ford Motor Co., 
also announced last week that it 
bad a loss of 298.1 million DM in 
1984 after three years of profits. 

In addition to falling snort of its 
production target by 120,000 units 
last year, Opd also was hurt by the 
delayed startup of its new Kadett 
and Ascona models caused try the 
metalworkers* strike, Mr. Beickler 
said. 

Although Opd was operating 
profitably in the first five months 
of the ament year, bolstered by 
Kadett sales, he said the company 
might have problems in the second 
half , when vacations and other fac- 
tors generally combine to depress 
earnings. 

Mr. Beickler expressed disap- 
pointment that Qpel, suffering 
from stiff price competition among 
Europe’s six leading volume manu- 
facturers, did not make up more 
ground lost in the strike last year. 

Moreover, be said the debate 
about auto-emission regulations in 
Europe has had a “paralyzing ef- 
fect” on potential buyers. 

Mr. Beickler said Opd has in- 
vested 400 million DM of a total 1 
billion DM earmarked fra catalyt- 
ic-converter development at the 
company’s West German head- 
quarters in Rflsseisheim, near 
Frankfurt. But, he added, “the eco- 
nomic sense of this investment has 
turned out to be questionable these 
last few months — particularly in 
view of the European solutions that 
are now in the offing.” 

The European C umin uni ty's ex- 
ecutive commission put forward 
proposals earlier this month that 
would make catalytic converters 


superfluous for medium-sized cars 
with engine capacity between 1.4 
and 2 fliers. 

Although EC ministers meeting 
on Thursday may reject tbe propos- 
als, West German car industry 
leaders — especially Ford and Opd 
who do not export to the United 
Slates or Japan where converters 
are required for all cars — are con- 
cerned that much of their invest- 
ment in tbe technology may be 
wasted. 

Mr. Beickler said that only 1.4 
percent of total sales this year have 
been Tor cars equipped with con- 
veners. The German consumer “is 
not willing to go along” with the 
emission-control regulations pro- 
posed by Bonn until a European- 
wide agreement is reached, he said. 

Tbe Opel chief also died in- 
creased competition from Japanese 
producers as another constraint on 
profits of major auto producers in 
Europe. 


Dollar Is Mixed 
In Europe Trade 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — The dollar was 
mixed in quiet European trad- 
ing Monday as traders awaited 
reports on U.S. durable goods 
orders fra May, due on Tues- 
day, and the index of leading 
economic indicators later this 
week. 

Dealers said they wanted 
confirmation of the strong U.S. 
growth indicated by last week's 
estimate in W ashing ton that 
gross national product during 
tbe second quarter of this year 
was growing at a 3.1-percent 
rate. GNP measures the total 
value of goods and services in- 
cluding income from foreign in- 
vestments. 

In London, the British pound 
closed at SI 3875, down from 
51.288 on Friday. In Frankfurt, 
the dollar ended at 3.073 Deut- 
sche marks, down from 3.0844. 
In Zurich, the dollar ended at 
2J675 Swiss francs, up from 
2J655, and in Paris, at 9.3685 
French francs, down from 
9.405. 


REPUBLIC 

EXTERNAL U.S. $ BONDS 

AID 

BONOS NOMINAT1V05 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

Enquiries to: 

CH-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Rue de la Paix. 
Telex: 25869. 

TeLi 021/20 1741. 


IX) REAL 

The Annual General Meeting of 
Shareholders was held on 12th June 1985 under 
the Chairmanship of Mr. Charles ZVIAK, Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer. 

The accounts for the 1984 financial year were 
approved at the meeting. They show: 

• Consolidated Sales 

of 15804 million Francs; 

■ An operating profit of 1 657 million Francs; 
and 

• A consolidated net profit (excluding capital 
surpluses) of 729 million Francs. 

Net profit per share came to 154.32 Francs. 
Mr. ZVIAK confirmed that the Group would 
continue to base its expansion strategy on: 

1) Innovation; L'OREAL has made the world's 
largest budgetary commitment in the field of 
cosmetics research: 398 million Francs in 1984, 
equivalent to more titan 3% of cosmetics sales; 

2) Internationalization! sales by the L'OREAL 
Group outside France in 1984 reached 60% of 
consolidated sales. Furthermore, the share of the 
cosmetics sector alone in soles outside France now 
exceeds 66%. • 

On a proposal by the Board, the distribution of a 
net dividend of 28.1 5 Francs per share was passed 
at the General Meeting and will be paid as from 
28th June 1985. At that meeting, Mr. Roger 
GINOCCHIO was appointed a Director and it 
was decided to appoint a second Alternate 
Auditor: the Soci£t6 Pierre FEU1LLET S.A., 
represented by Mr. Olivier TH1BAULT. 

The Annual Report of L'OREAL for the financial 
year 1984 is available upon written request to: 

L'OREAL 

Mr. Francois Archambault 
Financial Information Officer 

41, rue Martre 92117 Cfichy - France 





fcPage 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


Monday?* 

NISE 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the doslno on Wall Street 
cnid da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


S 1! Month 

! High Low Stock 


Div. YIA PE 


5b. 

uasHWiuw 


Ss 


orae 


(Contained from Page 10 ) 


48ft 31*u Owen I It 150 
15ft 10ft Oxford 84 


19 10 

12 13 


873 40 44 

19 1W 134k 13*— V4 


J4 18* PHH ljn 

{ 27 PPG 1J0 

1 29ft IS PSA 40 22 60 

1 21* IT* PSA Oof 1.V0 9JB 

| 14* 11* PocAS 134 103 

. 20* 13b PoeGE 1JB4 98 7 

, 45ft 30* POCLTO X32 73 12 

2 29 21 H PcLutn 1J0 47 15 

1 10 5ft PucRn OST 3 27 
I 19* 13* POCRspf 2.00 113 

J I Tn 12 PocSd 30 23 12 

1 77* S4 PocTeie 172 73 I 

■ 30* 21* Pnclfcp 132 73 B 

2 33* 27* Podf Bf 127 

J 431 % 25 Polnm 30 1-7 49 

■ 34'.% 2Ato POSMN Pf US IS 

I 39 27 PolmBc la 14 IS 
J 341% 20b PonABk JO 22 ID 

■ 7 4 PanAm 

3* 1* PanAwi 


11 13 S3 33 32* 32ft— V% 

U 10 1671 42* 41* * 

71 27* 27* 27ft— ft 
17 21* 21 21 — * 

56 14* 14* 14* — * 
2767 I9W 19* 19* — to 
300 45* 44* 44*— N 
1M 2Sto 35 2Sto + to 
89 Bft Sto 0ft + to 

99 M* IB 18* + to 

61 15ft ISto Uft + to 

766 77* 74* 77* + * 

1269 mn so + to 

166 32* 31S% 33to 
722 347b 33* 34*— to 
M 30to 29* 30 — to 
30 34 33* 5*— to 

3 J2to 32* 32*— 1% 
2S2I 6V% 6* 6W 

126 3* M 


21 13* Pandcfcn 20 IJ 30 252 16b 15* 
41to 31 PanhEC 2J0 65 10 611 35* 35* 
7U 3to PootPr 32 2312 7 


JO 


43 

20 
9 

.16 U 
1.12 3J ID 
J2t 2* 56 


1 iv* is* Pawcff 
I 18V% vv% Pnrflvn 
'21* 111% Port E 8 
10 5to ParkDrt 
.391% 25b PorkH 
'• 19* 13* PorhPn 
. r.% lto PotPtri 
•'I7to llto PavNP 
, It* I3to PavCift 
10* 6* PnMv 
f 1* Penoo 
SB* 43* PenCen 
-55* 44* PertlWv U6 4J 
27* 21 PaPL 234 98 
40* 301% PoPLlif 480 11A 
40 30 PdPLpf 4 JO 11J 

* 78b ST* PaPLpf B40 HJ 

- 29* 23* PaPL dPf3A2 1Z0 
•771120 PaPLdprXW IM 
l 73* 56to PaPL or 880 111 

381% 22* PflPL.lfpr3.25 11 J 
-33* 25ft PaPL OprO.75 12J 
1 96U 81* PaPL prtMM 11 J 
70* 54* PaPL or BOO 11.* 
72Vi 58* PaPL or BJ0 11.9 
40U 311% Pen wit 230 6.1 

- 2S* 20 Penwpl 160 65 
54* 30* Penned 230 4 A 
18* 9V: PcapEn 1 30 6.9 
4SV% 26 Pee Bav A0 

39* PepsiCo 1.78 
3tH% 17* Perk El J6 


43 IS 
.9 16 
2J 22 

11 

9 
t 


189 18* 181% 1 
1358 ID* 9ft 1 

98 uto 12 i; 

323 5* 5* 

719 32 31* - 

438 17* 17* 17* + to 

21 2b 2to 2* 

243 15 14* U 

334 IB* 18* IBto— to 
508 V* «* 9W — * 

Ids * to to 

290 51* 51 51*— to 

951 50ft 50 50* + * 

640 26* 261% 36* + to 
lOOx 38* 3SV% 381% — »% 
4201 39 38to 38ft— 1% 
200E 74to 73 741%— to 

14 28* 281% 28ft— to 

22 25* 25* 25to— to 

40Z69U 49* 69* —1ft 

10 27* 27ft 27* 

19 XU X 30 

23QZ77 97 97 +lft 

50x 67* 67* 67* 

1902 73 72 73 +1 

300 36V% 3SV% 35*— * 

2 23* 23* 23* + to 

423 50* SDl% 50b— * 

153 17* 17b 17ft— to 

.9 IV 68 44* 43* 44b— * 

10 25 282S SVft 5B* 59ft— to 

22 13 1294 25* 24b 2Sb + * 


n Month 

HMiLflw Stuck 


Ohr. VI4PE 


5b. 

1005 Hum LOW 


Ckno 
outtLOice 


14 KM PSEGpr IA0 
39 38ft PSBGpf 418 115 
1 Uto 102 to PSEGpf>384 11 J 
Cft 46ft PSEGpf 65B 11.1 
221% 16* PSEG pf 282 11.1 
72 55 PSEG Pf 7J0 110 

68ft 51 PSEGflf 7A0 10.9 

l3 .16 U 19 

15ft 9* PuflPtP 1J4 118 » 

21* 10ft pnWtHrn .12 J 24 

33* 22* PurOfflf 138 5.1 40 

10to Sft PWO * 


8 13* 13b 13b— to 
3382 37b 37b 37*— to 
46*113* 113* 113*— * 
30z 6lft 41ft 41ft +1 
JS 22 21* 21* + 1% 

IJQz 71 71 71 — 1 

Mfett 48 M + ft 
36 3 3 3 

52 13 12* 13 

3 6* Aft 6* + ft 

399 15ft 15* IS*— ft 
83 16* 16b 16* 

317 25ft 3** IS — * 
207 71% 7* 7* + ft 


12 


ID 7* Prmlon 1.21(147 391* B* 8ft Bb — b 

221% 14 Pen-Dr 28 IA 15 114 21 20* 20* + ft 

44 31 Petrie 180 3J 16 356 42ft 41* <2b + ft 

2E* 24* PetRs 172(142 52 26ft 25* 26ft + U 

17 14 PelRSPf 1J7 97 IB 16* 16* 16* + ft 

S-% 4 Prrlrrv .95e2SJ 53* 3* 3* 3* 

50'% TTn Pltxer IAS 10 16 2563 49* 48* 49* + * 

22b 12* PnefaO 454 17* 17 17 — * 

51 34 PhdperSJO I0J 9 46 45ft 45*— ft 

43ft 70* Ptllbrs 54 U M 3763 41ft 40* 41b—* 

16* 9 PhlfaEI 270 MJ 6 7526 15* 15 IS*— * 

36V: 25 PnllE pf 480 1X6 lflOz 35 35 35 +1 

37ft 2S*% PMIE pf 488 12J 12100c 371% 35* 371% 


67b 50* PtlllEpf BJS 139 

lift 9ft PtlllEpf IA1 13A 

ID* Sft PhilE pf IJ3 116 

60 43 PnllE pf 755 1X9 

10b 6* PhilE Pf 178 117 

TO V7 PhllPt 17.12 148 

115 B7 PI1IIE Pf 1575 13J 

74 51 PhilE Pf 9 JO 117 

60ft 44 PtlllE Pf 7 JO 114 

60 43ft PliUE pf 775 117 

Z)to 15* PnllSub 1.33 10 13 

»5i% 67* PhflMr 480 
25 10* Phliain AH 

60* 26 Phllln pf 180 
56b 33* phi I Pel 100 
18* lift PnliPwl 
23* 22* PhJPtpf 
29ft !6b PhllVH 
34* 23111 PledAs 
34 23* PleNG 

22’% 14* Pftrl 
56* 34ft Pltsbry 
34 21* Pioneer 

26* lift pkonrEl 
44ft 27 ' j PlfnvB 
12* 9* Plttstn 
15b 8* PkmRs 

13ft 7 P km Ira 
13* Sft Playboy 


AO 

79 

132 

1-56 

174 


29* 19ft Pftse y^ 


22* 15ft Papal . 

32b 24 to Potortd 

21ft 10* Pondn 

21ft 15 PopTaf 

19* 14* Portoc 

21ft 13ft PODGE 

24* 17ft PorGpf ... 

35* 2Bft PoDS pi 4AO 111 

34* 2Bb 


ParGPf 432 13.1 


38* X* Potttch 1 J6 46 12 


280- 


7* 63 63 63 —1 

381 10* 10* 10ft + to 
463 10* 91% 9* — * 

230Dz57to 56ft 56ft— 1 
226 10b 9* ftk— * 

320x122 122 122 —1 
100x113 113 113 —2 

23Qz 70ft 69ft 69ft— lft 
34Qx 99 SB 58 — 1* 
2W& 57 56ft 56ft— 1 
62 22b 23 22 

47 11 17T3 B5* B4* 84*— 1 
U If 541 22* 21ft 22Vi + * 

18 4 53 52b 53 +1 

2735 37* 37* 37ft 
946 11* llto 11* 

61 23 22* 23 + to 

21 24ft 241% 24ft 
117 33* 32* 32*— to 

14 33to 33 33 — to 

11 20ft 20* 20*— ft 

383 55* 55* 55*- to 
271 24* 14ft 14ft— ft 
142 14* 14* 14* + * 
ms 44* 44b 44ft— to 
121 lift lift llto— to 
178 13* 13* 13* 

11 B* Sft B* + to 
3J 10 7* 10 

6 21 20ft 21 

. . ._ 24 17* 17to 17* + Ml 

3.1 192 2694 32* 31* 32* +1 

A 25 210 llto W* 11* + to 

15 19ft 19* 19*— ft 
67 IB* 17* ISto + * 

332 21 to 20* 21 + to 

10 23* 23ft 23ft— to 
32 33* 30 33ft + to 
57 33* 321% 


68 8 


1A II 
S 9 
78 10 
13 

28 13 
_ 5.1 S 

,T7r 12 
120 V 13 


20 1J 14 
,16b 1.9 13 

7* 45 13 
80 IS 32 
1JW 
.40 

JO 41 
A0 22 68 
l.TO 98 7 
240 11.1 


33 

_ .„ ._ 27 $4to 33* 3Tb— ft 

33* 20V% PotmEI 2L16 64 10 >026 33 33ft 32*— to 

46 36 Pot El pf 4J0 10.1 700z4Sft 44ft 44ft— 1 

2Sft 18* Premls 76 18 15 51 mh 19* 28ft +1 

“ " ‘ 52 8 67 3H% 3Bft 381% 

-14 3771 IBto 17* IBto + to 
J 27 454 30b 291% 30* + * 
4J 13 4405 56ft SS* 55*— ft 
U 21 in 16 15* 15*— to 

BA U 
9.9 


39 75* Prlmrt 

20b 12ft PrlmeC 
32* 13* PrlmMI 89 
59b 50* PractG 240 
161% 7* PrdRMl 82 

47b 32* Prater 1.40 
24b 16* PSvCM 288 
21ft 16b PSCnlpf 2.10 . 
8* A* PSInO WOO 122 
Bb 6 PSlnpf 184 138 
Bb 6ft PSlnpf 188 138 
47ft 37 PSlnpf 7.15 152 
63ft 50 PSlnpf 9A4 152 
57 44ft PSIn Pf 852 149 
SSft 431% PSIn pf 888 157 
5* 3ft PSvNH 
14* ib PSNHpf 
13ft 7ft PNHptB 
19ft 10ft PNHpfC 
17> BHPMHpfO 
17* 9 PNH PIE 

15b 7* PNHpfF 
16b 7* PNH pfG 
» lift PSvNM 288 IDA 
32ft 21 PSvEG 284 89 



217 38 

526 » 

23 21b 20* 

8 846 Bto 7* 

4201 8ft 8 
3120* 8 7* 

B70z 47 46b 47 + to 

340X62W 62b 62b— ft 

3 1 ?%: i Tik 

15ft Ub 15b +1to 
14* 131% 14* +1b 


5 

ill 


20ft 19* 20ft -MM 
~ 18 + to 


18 17* ._ 

17* 17 17* + * 

15* 15 15b + ft 

16 15ft 16 — ft 
942 27* 27ft 27* + to 
2429 32b 31ft 31*—* 


1 O 1 

52 

22ft 

low 

34ft 

25ft 

29ft QuokOs 
15 OuokSCl 
Aft Quonw 
23 ouestor 
14 Ok Roll 

1J< 28 14 1165 
J» 3J 23 171 
20 57 

180 51 10 33 

2Aa 1.7 17 190 

57ft 

aw 

7ft 

31ft 

37ft 

50ft 51 to— ft 
71ft 21ft + to 
7ft 7ft 

31ft 35ft— ft 
21 V% 22V!i +1U 

R R 1 



841 8 6 

9to 

9 

9 


29ft RCA 

18i 

ii u tom 

49ft 

461% 

489% +11% 



3JC 

9.1 20K38ft 

33 

3Bto + to 



4JX 

16 7 111 

i07ft in -ton 

34ft 26ft RCA pf 

ZD 

68 811 

35ft 

34 

354% +1K 



385 108 ID 

34ft 



9to 

Bft RLC 

81 

27 n a 

7to 

7ft 

7ft 




*56 

Sft 

3ft 




J6 

38 10 32x10ft 

IBM 

lBft + ft 

lift 

7 Radtce 


9 1*1 

lift 

11U 

lift + to 











06 TtM 

Aft 

Aft 

69% + to 

Sift 


84 

*7 10 27 

Ttl 

17ft 

IB + to 

7ft 



153 

m 

3A 

3 - to 



84 

3 30 161 

61 

60 

61 




7 

lift 



50V% 

35 Ravtlm 

180 

12 17 2097 

50ft 

49ft 

to 


7ft RaadBt 

80 

*6 57 

Bft 

Bft 



16ft RdBOtPtZ12 119 19 

IBto 

1/ft 

179%— ft 

16ft 

ii RJtRef 

1J2B 98 10 6 

13ft 

Uto 

13ft— to 




M 255 

fft 

9ft 

9ft— to 

12ft 


JO 

3J 17 90 

Bto 



91% 



21 8 

9to 

9to 

9to— to 




130 

ft 



43to 

23 RetePC 

80 

Z1 10 12 

38to 

a 

aw + 1% 

8ft 

3ft RepAlr 


10 8!S0 

Bto 


■ + %% 




48 

lft 

ift 

ift— to 

17ft 


JO 

XI 10 113 

9ft 


9ft 

49ft 

31ft RcpNY 

184 

37 8 30 

441% 

44 

441*— u 


21 RNYPfCX12 1TJ 176 





oim aM<uf 

184 

58 7 59 

32ft 

321% 

32ft— to 

99ft 

B6ft RflPBk ocffjla 73 320 100 

99 

99%% +lto 

24 

Uft RanCflt 

J2 

18 402 

23ft 

23to 

23%%— to 

32ft 

22to Revco 

80 

XI 13 2003 

26 


259% + 1% 

I4to 

9?% vlRever 


266 

12to 


12 — to 



184 

*J 13 37OT 




24ft 

1 7ft Rrtttm 

JO 

32 15 7 

» 

3141 

3 Ift 



84 

11 9 1404 

14 

13ft 

14 + to 

321% 



4421 

31ft 

311% 

31ft + to 

4lft 

261% RcvMfl 

180 

38 6 424 

33 

32ft 

32ft + to 

B7 


AJ 3 

72 

71ft 

71ft— 2to 

35 

25ft RdlVCk 

180 

*5 10 467 

32ft 

321% 

32ft— ft 

29 

17ft PteovIT 

180 

04 39 

21ft 

31to 

am 

331% 

19ft RHeAM 

JO 

1.9 15 717 

261* 

25ft 

26 — ft 

7ft 

Sft RvrOk n 


11 225 

4ft 

4to 

4V% + to 

36ft 

27ft Rotate* 


36 7 24 

31to 


3Ito + to 

44 V% 

28 ft RobtVl 

180 

58 17 ZU 

29 

av% 

28)%— ft 

3*ft 

12 Robins 


» 

t#ft 

16ft 

164*— to 

24ft 

13ft RocftG 

720 

u 7 it; 

24ft 

239% 

23ft— to 

39ft 

271% RochTI 

284 

68 10 188 

38ft 

a 

38to— to 

39ft 

27 Rockwl 

1.12 

XI 10 1219 

36ft 

36 

Uto — to 

137 

>9 RfclntPf 

1J5 

1.1 1 

28 ia in —iv. 

Tito 

IBto RohmH 

280 

XI 10 136 

6*ft 

M 

M —1 

55to 

33ft Rotwin 


ID ISO 

56 

54ft 

56 +lto 

2Sft 

31% RomCm 

80 

18 35 41 

25to 

249% 

34ft 

29ft 

Bft Round s 

-07r 

J 29 653 

27 

2ft 

36 —1 

12ft 

Aft Rollins 

86 

48 16 194 

10ft 

IBto 

iflVi— to 

4to 

2 Ramon 


3 

2 

2 

2 

19 

2ft Reaer 

84 

*4 14 56 

14ft 

4to 

14%% 

36 

!4 Rarer 

1.13 

12 17 2006 

36ft 

144% 

351% + ft 

13 

7ft Rovmn 

.12 

IJ 42 925 

Bto 

7ft 

■ — to 

60ft 

lift RoylD 

387e 54 2284 

S7K 

56ft 

57 + ft 


9 Rovlnts 


18 6T 

14V> 

4 Ml 

I4to — to 


ISto Rubrmd 


IJ 18 39 

49ft 


19ft + to 

26 

4ft RUSSBT 


14 552 

21ft 

Oft 

21 

19ft 

Sft RuiToO 

36 

*1 9 31s ISft 

Bto 

8ft + ft 

28ft 

Bft RyonH 

180 

38 75 125 

70 

7ft 


»to 19ft Ryders 

80 

22 10 370 

77V. 

7 

27ft + ft 

an* 

2ft Rytand 

86 

28 14 134 

»ft 

239% 

23ft— )% 

17ft 

8ft Rymrr 


5 91 

17to 

Aft 

I7to + to 


lft Rvmer pfl.17 

98 B2 

13V% 

12 

12to + to 

1 s » 


50* 35ft SCM 280 U 13 

12ft B*5Llnd 22 18 10 

31* 19ft SPSTflC 80 24 IS 

20 15 SflMne 84 8 30 

21* 16 SabnRv 248(112 
18b 11* start B* 80 1J 16 

>0 5* SfudSC 

34* 11* SofKMa 40 
34* 22* Sofewr 140 
35ft 24ft Sona J2 „ 

22* 16ft SUoLP 1J2 7.9 

lift 9 5 Paul 120 107 

Mb 3* visatant 
34ft 23* SallloM 
28* 17* SDfoGS 
9* 6* SJuanB 
11b 81% SJuanR 

51 31 Sanor 

25* IB* SAfllfRt 
llto 20* SFaSoP 
431% 28 
34b 27 


26 
12 23 


J IS 
81 f 
92 11 
21 

14 16 
78 12 


J6 
184 

- 180 
SaraLee IA4 
Sgtwd 1 AO 4A 15 


18ft 14ft Saul RE 2D 13 40 
22b 15ft Sou El P 140 74 8 
23 Ml 16 EavE A 124 5.9 
12ft 9* SavE pf 128 118 
9ft 4* Savin 
Uto 9b Savin pf 1J0 128 
28 179% SCANA 2.16 78 V 

47b 33 SchrPIo 148 37 13 
4»b 34ft Sdllmb >20 32 9 
13* 7b SclAtl 
32* 22ft Scaalnd 
60ft 48b ScotFef 
41 26* SOflftP 

16* 11* SCDHvs 
43b 20ft ScovtU 
45 21* SmCnf ._ 

12* 9* SeoCipf 1A6 11J 
16* 17* SeaC pfB 2.10 127 


.12 18 18 
76 24 14 
10 

124 38 10 
J2 37 11 
14 

42 18 10 


16* 1ZM SeaC pfC 210 125 

Lnd 48 


27ft 15ft Sea 
5ft 3ft seaCa 
44* 30 Saaorai 80 

s&ir , !s& ao 

32* 21b sealPw 180 
Mft 40b SaarteG 180 
39M 29* Sears 176 

38b 2SV% ShellT 
Mb 17b ShefGfo 
399% 24 Shrartn 
8b 4ft 5hoet%ni 


316 46* 45* 44b + ft 

6 12 II* 11*— b 

IS 30* 30M 30*— W 

502 151% 15* 15b- ft 
143 17* 17b 17* -» ft 
651 16* 16ft 16* 

21 9* 9* 9*- ft 

132 32* 32b 32b — b 

48 >1 10B4 33* 32* 33* + ft 
20 11 442 26* 26* 26ft— to 

13 22ft 21* 21*— ft 
63 lift lib llto 
24 4to 4* 4ft 

626 32 30* 30*— 1 

310 27* 27ft 27* + ft 
120x 9* 91% 9* + to 
5 lift lift lift— ft 
163 35* 35 35* + ft 

20 24* 24* 24* 

38 1] 9569 31ft 30ft 31b -V * 
14 12 943 42* 42 42* + * 

4 31* 31ft 31ft — b 
i is* 15b 15b 
91x21* 21ft 21* 

4x 22* 22* 22* + ft 
3x11* 11* IT*— ft 
67 7* 7* 7ft 

7 12ft 12ft 12ft— to 
387 Z7b 27* 27* + to 
B2A 45b 45b 45b— * 

3999 38ft 37* 37* 

S3 lift lift lift + * 
235 31ft llto 31*— to 
352 59 58* 59 + to 

488 41to 40b 41ft + * 
41 14 13* 14 —ft 

TO 41* 41* 41* 

444 41* 38* 41ft +1* 

14 12* 12* 12* + ft 

22 16* 16ft 16ft 
90 16* 16* 16* 

1035 21* 21 21 — * 

88- 4* 4ft 4ft— ft 
791 41* 40* 41ft + to 
9 17 16* — - 


U 7 


15 12 
17 
1J 15 
48 
15 
43 
4J 


402 36 




8 149 25to S 25b— U. 

10 6 SS S* S S SS + % 


IS 


1352 29ft 

1.1 IB 1336 38b 
5J 32 IBIx 13ft 

si & 

97 6* 6ft 


AC 
J2 

40 2A 
23/e 64 
80 M 6 
52 2A 13 
6 



12 SlmM 40 48 U 

13* SlerPoc 140 BA 9 

24* Slonol 180 3A 14 

48* Stall pf 412 68 

25* Singer 8 LI f 

26ft Stnorpf 3J0 118 
12to Skyline At 34 II 
- 8ft Smlihin J2 34 

TBft sm Sinks 280 41 11 1992 61b 68 68b— to 

67* 38to Smuckr 188 17 17 13 65ft 64ft 66b +1 


s& 

IS* 


209 12* 12ft 12ft 
165 19to 18* 19*— ft 
525 41* 41* 41*— ft 
4 61 40ft 61 
414 36 35to 36 + ft 

12 31* 31* 31* 

IQS 13ft 13 Uto— to 
281 9 8* 9 


12 Month 
Hwh Lew Slock 


Dfa. rm pe 


Six. 

iDOs Hbn low 


Qom 
tfrat-Oi-Bp 


29* loapOn 
12* Snyder 


41* 

15* 

43ft 27 

19ft 12* SanyCP 

30* 22* 5oo Ufl 
40ft 27* SouraC UO U 
23 18 SrcCppf 2A0 IDA 

25* 90 5CrE pf 280 98 
29* 22 Sajerln TAB 84 11 
49ft 38ft SouJwn 180 2J 10 
35 22 SocfBk 180 34 10 

10 5* SoetPS 2131318 40 

27* IBM SColC 8 116 75 
27 14* SflUttiCa 1.92 87 

26* 17 SoinGaa 180 68 8 
44 29 SNETT 272 68 W 

38* 31ft SflNEPl 382 108 
26b 21* SoRy pf 380 TOO 
31 33 SeUflCe 172 55 

37ft 23 SflUttnd 180 
16* lib So Ror .12 
8ft 6to saumrK 70 
27ft 14* SwAIrl .13 

20 11* SwtFor 

17b 10* SvrtGai 
83ft 38ft SwBefl 
19* SwEnr 


174 

680 

JS 

188 

83 


27 12 
S 19 
25 S 
J 17 
29 
77 8 
7A 9 
28.11 
77 10 
41319 


152 ... 
182 49 
184 47 
176 
80 
J6 
72 
280 


26ft IBto SwtPS 
T7* lift Snrtm 
27* 15ft SpectP 
5V 33* Sperry 

38 30ft Spdim 

Oft 31* Bernard 
64* 41* Saulbb 
24* 17* Staley 
33* left StBPnf 
20* 11 5tMofT 
50* 39* swoon 
76ft 73* SOOn Pf US 
ST* 7ft SIPcwCs 
16* 11* StandCK J3 
31 19ft StanWK 56 
35ft 23* Storraff 
11 8* 5t«M9e 

3* 2* Sfaeoe 

11* 9* StrlBep 76 

34b 24 ateDDfl 170 
21 to ISto Stevnj 170 
36 26ft Stwwrn 14S 
» Bft SfkVCpf 180 
45* 33 ShmeW 140 

39 24 5fonrC 40 _ . 

53ft 36* Slflpsno 1.10 2A 10 
21* 15ft StorEa 184 17 15 
IZ* 2 vISterT 

79ft 36* Storm- AQ j 
21* 18ft SfrtWn A0o 2.1 
18b 14ft StrWRl 80 46 31 
7* 3* SUflvSfi 

« 23ft SunBks 170 23 14 
39 25ft SunGh AS 17 10 
14 6* SunEI 

57* 43* SunCo 270 47 11 
109 90* SunCpf 2S 27 

49ft 34* Sundetr ' 

11* 7 Swum 
3814 26 SuprVI 48 
47* 23ft SupMkf M 
17b 14 Swank 50 
21ft 171% Sybron 188 
35* 20* Svbrn Pf 3A0 
IS* 11* SvmsCP 
65 39* Svtvtcx 152 

38b 29ft Sysco 76 


1.16 38 13 155 38* 38b 3Bto— ft 
ZOO 138 15 190 15* 15b 15* 

185 U 7 911 35ft 34* 35ft +1 

.160 18 13 5B64 16 15* 16 + * 

UD 46 13 35 26* 26b Uto 

54 39 38* 38* 

30 23ft 23* 20 + 1% 

6 25* 25ft 25* + b 

58 28* 28* 28* 

57 39* 39ft 39* + b 

195 34ft 33* 33*—* 
33 6* 6* 4ft -f ft 
9 7919 27* 27to 27*— ft 
7 5814 23* 21*- 22 + ft 

60 26* 26ft 26* 

247 40to 39* 39*—* 
3 38to 38b 38b — ft 

2 24ft 26* 26* + ft 

32 29* 29* 29*— * 

7B6 37to 36* 37 — ft 
384 13* 13* 13*— to 
171 7 6* 6* + * 

271 26ft 25* 26ft + ft 
44 13ft 13 Oft— ft 
404 17ft 17ft 17* + * 
1413 Bl* 80* BTM + * 
109 24* 26 36* + * 

513 26ft 25* 25*— ft 
B4 W* 12* 12* 

404 16* 16* 16* + * 

34 10 5638 53* 52* 53* + ft 

9 96 33 31 to 3114- * 

10 649 3Eto 38* 3Sto— ft 

25 16 1042 61b 60* 6114 + * 

17 II 913 31* 3114 31* 

15 TZ 234 22* ZZ* 32b — * 

27 ID 183 12 II* II* 

40 8 944 46* 44b 46*—* 

57 40y 73* 72* 73* 

11 44 » 20* 21 —ft 

37 9 27 13* Uft 13* 

U 12 3129 20* 29* 3014— ft 

UB U It 8 33ft 32ft 32ft + b 
170(018 13 11 10* 10* 

.13 48 41 3 3 3 

77 9 81 Mb K)«% 10ft— ft 

35 13 3336 31 30* 30*— * 

48 11 329 IB* IBM lift— * 

131 26ft 2614 26ft - 
Mxll 11 n — to 
23 41ft 41* 41*— ft 
349 26ft 96 36* 

601 47ft 45* 4614— ft 
1M 31ft 30* 21ft 
387 3ft 214 2b— ft 

187 76ft 78* 76* + ft 
159 19* 1914 19*— ft 

74 17b 16b 17b + ft 
41 3ft 5* 5* + ft 

277 40b 399% 40 
12 26ft 36b 36ft + W 
in HA 9* ID* + * 
229 49to 48ft 4S*— * 

1 180* 100* 180ft +Tft 

180 48 12 1101 44 45* 45ft—* 

487 7ft 7 7ft 
223 36ft 36* 36b— ft 
234 45ft 44b 45* + ft 
10 15* 15* 15*— ft 

75 19ft 18* 19 —ft 
2 34M 34* 34*— * 

53 15* 14* 14ft + ft 
916 64 63ft 63*— * 
342 35 34* 34*— to 


67 16 
9.1 

19 | 
27 9 


15 13 

1.1 14 

SJ 16 
57 11 
77 

20 
U 15 
17 15 


40 37* 37* 37* +lft 
164 33ft 33b 33* 

46 16 9* 9ft— ft 

09 19* 19* 19* + ft 
155% 24ft 24ft 34* + ft 


SOto 36ft TDK 

33ft 24* TECO 

12* 7* TGIF 

19ft II* TNP 

25* 17* TRE 

SI* 62* TRW 300 35 11 1101 76 7SM 76b— 2b 
Bb 2* TacSoat 56 2ft 2* ZS%— to 

77ft 52ft Taft Brel 1.12 1J 14 313 74 72ft 73*— 1* 

19ft 12* Talley ,10e 4 13 38 17ft 17* 17ft— to 

21ft 15 Talley pf 170 50 4 2BW 20* 20 to— b 

77 49* Tambrd 370 47 14 V40 749% 74b 74*— to 

16 3021 34b 37* 34V% + * 

13 7 13* 13ft 13ft— to 

18 B 2151 56ft 54b 56* 4- to 

6 29 Sft 3* 3b— to 

IB 141 259 256* 757b— * 
15 23 411 17 16b 17 + to 

11 T3M 39* 38b 39* +1* 
1.9 8 461 34* 33* Uto— lb 
78 12 KM8 41* 41* 41*—* 
5 183 102* 1DZ* + to 


Tte 7 
276 70 9 
15 

ITS 64 9 

1-00 4.1 14 


35b 23b Tandy 

15ft 12ft Tndvcft 
68b 51* Tektrmc 180 
5b 2* Telcam 
302* 221 TeWyn 
34 13* Tel rate J2 

48b 24* Telex 
39* 25* Tempi n 44 
45b 32ft Tcnnco 252 
104ft BSft Tencpr lljOO 107 
83* 86 Tttlcpr 740 B5 
35b 20 TenJvn 
17ft 9* Tesaro AO 40 
30* Sift Tejorpf 2.16 9A 
40b 31* Texaco 380 M 
30* 31ft TxABc 1J2 47 
46ft 31* TexCm 1J6 48 
39 26* Tex EH 120 6.9 

57 52 TxETpf 679B1U 

34ft 25 Tex lnd Jflb is 
147* 06b Texlnt 200 28 
3ft I Texlnt 
34ft 15* TexOQs .18 1.1 
39 28* TjcPac A0 17 

30* 21 Texlltll 2J2 83 
4ft 2 Texfl In 
52* 26* Textron 180 IS 
57* 29* Textrpf 288 34 
10ft 5* Thoek 
27* 23b Thnck pf 4.15 ULO 
27 146% Therm E 

43b 28b ThniBt 3 176 35 
18* 12* Thom In 48b 4J 


1 83 83 


10 

501 

70 

10 

22ft 

ioto 

23 

21to 

10 

73 

22U + to 

io —u 

23 

a 

1573 

379% 

37ft 

37 V»— to 

a 

9 

Tito 

31to 

J1U 

6 

9 

W 

230 

33to 

32ft 

Bto 

32V. 

3ito 

55to 

32ft— ft 
32 — to 
Bto + ft 

13 

99 

27*1 

26 

27V% + ft 

10 

zin 

617 

99S% 

2Vi 

93 

2 to 

98ft — 19% 
39% 

10 

4703 

169% 

759% 

16to + to 

20 

5 

azv* 

3Zto 

32V. + ft 

7 

■a 

304* 

4 

20%% 

Sft 

soto— to 

39% 

13 

812 

8 

52to 

57 

51ft 

56to- 

521% + to 
57 + ft 

96 

a 

2 

99% 

274* 

99% 

27ft 

9ft 

27ft 

2S 

S9S 

279% 

Uto 

27ft +11% 

14 

ia 

35 

34ft 

Uft + to 

V 

24 

Uft 

ISto 

Uto— ft 


Earnings 

Reverwe and profits. In mlftlom. arm In tocal atmnclm 
unless otherwise Micated. 


United Stales 


Year 


Bloanf 

IStQwar. 7983 

Revenue — 3668 

Net Inc. 4.9S 

Per Stare— 0A1 

2nd oaar. 

Corning Glass Mflcs *£*£!£ 

2nd Qoar. ms 1986 


1985 1984 

l.m LSHL 

Net inc. 4A0 345 

Per 5 Harm — 053 011 
1906 1M4 year net IncHKhts ex- 
2044 rnsordlnorY credit of S716JXJB. 

BJl Falter (HJL) 

ms -1904 . 

1157 Tf73‘ 

. 147 rut 

4m j Oner Stare- 
334 ixl Half 
087 Revenue — . 

Goer Me! — 

1W oner Stare— 

B2R5 

6 sm Hefnz (KJJ 

1 - s< 4rtQuar. 19B5 190* 

I9BS net Includes mins of 3Z2 SST 1 *" - ~ ''Pi 

million vs HJ million In H** I nc. — — 4&K 6289 

aworier and SU million is Per Shore— bot 0-Vl 
SAS million in half from tax Year 19B5 1181 

lou asmHontonds. miner Revenue— — 4846. 3554 

share results adjusted fdr 2- NetliML - 2655B 237 S3 

for- 1 stock split Per Share — 386 340 


lit Half 
Revenue — 

Net Inc 

Per Share 


ms 

817.9 

737 

773 


038 

19BS 

2343 

Uf 

057 


BA3 

1984 

222.1 

6.10 

044 


Farm House Foods 
4th Goar. 1985 19B* 

Revenue 1354 3628 

Net Lass X63 0A4 


inn Mult Hoods 


IxmkJoii Metals 


Cion 

DU Ask 

ALUMINUM 
5 ter Una per metric tan 
SPOl 78350 784G0 

B0SJ0 ’ 


June 24 

Prey loot 
Bid As 


794JO 

81580 


79550 

BISJO 


COPPER CATHODES (HUD Grade) 

Sterfina per metric bo 
tool 1.16880 1.10980 1.11380 1.1 1580 

forward 1.12280 1.12250 1.I26J0 1,12780 

COPPER CATHODE5 (Standard) 

Sterling per medic ton 
wot 189080 189280 189100 1.10080 

forward I.I0B80 1.11080 1.11380 1.1)680 

LEAD 

Sfertteo per metric tan 
spot 36880 308JO 

forward 39480 304J9 


30880 

30580 


NICKEL 

Sterling per medic fan 
spot oiano 472080 4J5Q80 07080 

forward 477580 4 78080 431080 472000 

SILVER 

Pjo°e per tnrr ounce 

^ 47»J0 47780 

•a'Wd 491.00 491 JO 


47380 

48980 


47780 
49180 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric tan 
U>ot v.79080 980086 948080 949080 

forward 950000 9J0580 9JWU0 9J10J)0 

ZINC 

ireriina per metric Ion 
sref 571.00 57280 56980 57080 

tarward 5*9 JC 57H80 568J0 569 JO 

Saar cn AP. 


j Imwin Bilb 


June 21 


3 menu-. 
6-maniti 
One <rc 


’84 

77) 

»J1 


782 

7.19 

7JS 


776 

7JB 

791 


Prev 

Viefd 

7.15 

7A9 

781 


Lv'.y Salomon Brothers 


.V-ta' irffrrnui 
CBOT 

BOND 

FUTURES 

i & 1 — ~~i 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

AJso Funim jnd 
Futures Optioiw on 
COME X -GOLD & SILVER 
IMAI-CI'RRJENCIES 

La* I'pfti mu — » KaVfft 


ns 


* HOLXPTl'RS 
IH1 toll 
lAFR>hi<rt 


■ lv..v» . ;■< irjfrt 

I'wwrfj'a c .’fu c ufiMAff per 

tmihutltir ttwitd' Rw.'Sj 
iwi.v.:,fj j.t n-uihl :um. 


f till ' fli'itfiwr/yi^Bi tails 

212 - 221 - 713 S 

BDPUBLIC CtEARBiG 
COBFOBATION 

4M Fbk MINT BUM 

Bepshib bdmd Knit el Itew Ink 

» *| • llillnm I’lfimriml ILmL 


CommwSties 


Jane 24 

High low Bid Art CD-gt 


SUGAR 

French franca per metric loo 

Ai»0 

I.1M 

1.160 

1,174 

oct 

1J0S 

1.171 

1,194 

Dec 

1JI0 

1.105 

1J06 

Mor 

1-255 

1J30 

1-240 

MOV 

1J95 

1J9S 

USD 

Aua 

U60 

,W60 

1J42 


1.177 

1.195 

7715 

1J42 

1795 

US5 


+ M 
+ 21 
+ 18 
+ 16 
+ 25 
+ 21 


Ear. voL: 1400 lots of 50 fans. Prev. actual 
sales: 1J1S lots. Open Interest: 18J19 
COCOA 

F ranch francs per 108 Kb 
JW »LT N.T. 2800 2.100 —25 

Seo M12 1,995 1594 1.996 —31 

Dec 1580 1.965 1,960 1.965 —32 

Mot 1595 1.985 1.9BD 1,995 - 23 

May N.T. N.T. 1,990 — —IS 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1,995 — —IS 

Sen N.T. N.T. zsaa — —IS 

Eat. voL: bi tai* of 10 tans. Prev. actual 
sales: IX Ms. Open Interest: 679 
COFFEE 

French Cranes per IN kg 
Jlv N.T. N.T. 2780 2765 — 53 

Sea 2A10 2785 2782 Z3W —40 

Nov 2A24 2A24 2A10 2A2S — 48 

JWI N.T. N.T. 2A2S 2A6S —50 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2A2S 2A65 —50 

(May N.T. N.T. 2A26 2A56 — 54 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2A26 2A56 —54 

Ed. vol: 43 Ms of 5 lam. Prev. actual sales: 
55 lots. Caen interest: 420 
Source: Bourse <to Commerce. 


i 


S&PIOO 
Index Options 


. 4 s|sm 

Gomniocfities 


June 24 


SINGAPORE GOLD FITTURES 
USJ per nance 


Dee. 


High 

31670 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


Lew 

315.90 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


Volume: 111 lots aflOO OZ. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Matavslan cents ner kilo 
Close 
Bid A sk 

Jly »oj» tojd 

Aug 1SSJ0 196.50 

SOP 19680 19780 

Oct 19980 201J8 

Nov an JO 203-50 

Dec 203-50 2Q5L5D 

Volume: 14 lota. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore coots pot KHo 
Ctaso 


Settle 

31680 

31880 

hnm 

32280 


Settle 

318.10 

320.10 

322.10 
New 


RSS 1 Jly _ 
R35 1 AuO_ 
RSS 2 JtV — 
RSS 3 Jlv— 

RSS 4 JtV 

RSS 5 JtV 


DM 

TteJQ 

174J0 

17080 

16880 

16480 

15980 


Ask 
179 JO 
17550 
17180 
16980 
16680 
16180 


Prev loos 
Bid Art 
30080 20280 

19675 19650 

19780 19880 

30180 
201-50 20150 

20350 20550 


PrevtaH 
Bid Art 

mun 18180 

176J0 17780 

17280 17380 

17080 17180 

16480 14B80 

16180 16380 


Hrfle CaU-Lod 

Price jbs 8* Am Sip 

IN - Jib - - 

U6 Iff* UVi — 
IN IU% I7H UL Mb 

1H Jft B «ft 101% 

NO 1ft 4 5V. 7 

105 III* Ito 7b 41% 

1*0 — ft 1H. 767 

193 - 1/16 7/16 11% 


June 21 

PotiLod 

Jn Jd Aee S» 

- - i/14 - 

mi i/n j/u sm 

1/11 15111 lft 11716 
1711 1 5716 I ft Tto 
J 3/144 Cm 4L 
71V Ik 7ft - 


ToM CBB "NOT* 3BUB7 
Total 008 non M.7U217 
Total Wt iet — 6 179461 
TGMM«aU.«I.M 
taCtx: 

Hta isles Lovmn 
Source: caae. 


Cloia IU.%6 + 345 


DM Futures 
Options 

ft Gertnwtftort- (3833 marks. «if» otr mart 


June 24 


Prtee Sep 

Dec 

Mor 

See 

Dec 

Mor 

11 

203 

UB 


n.TB 

043 

047 

r 

1-34 

1.91 

230 

0J9 

099 

1.17 

u 

003 

183 

187 

JJM 

1JS 


M 

089 

184 

183 

lit 

1.95 

_ 

35 

5J7 

032 

187 

X43 

iai 

283 

36 

0.13 

048 

— 

XU 

343 

320 


Esflmotsd total HL1S03 
Pols :Frl.voL 14C6 BUM IA 16418 
Source: CME. 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RE$B*VE ASSET FUND 

PBCK AT 10A3S- 
A, Ui. DOLLAR CASH S102S* 

B: MUWCUBENCYCAaf SlOte 
Cz DOLLAR BOMM $1136* 

D, MULTICURRENCY BONDS $10.97* 
Ei STWUNG ASSET Elftfil* 

F0R8CN& COLONIAL 
M6NAGE M&4T (J SSEY) LIMITED 
14 MJLCASTER SIRffrjrmBUSSEY/lL 
TH.- 0S3C7351 TREX 4192063 

fOKOTHBl FA CFUNDS,Se 
OdJBtNAJtONAlFUmSUST 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MaMnkn rtonHts per 25 tons 

_Close Previous 

BW Aik aw Art 

JIV 1^ 1.190 7.720 1700 

AUB 1890 1,140 1890 7.748 

Sep— _ — 1870 1.1M 1870 1.1X 

Oct 1840 I860 1840 1880 

NOV 1JJ20 1860 1820 I860 

Dec 1830 I860 1JOT 1860 

Jan 1810 1850 1810 S8S8 

MOT 1810 1850 1JJ10 1850 

lay, 1800 1840 1800 1840 

Volume: 0 lots of X tons. 

Source: Reuters. 





June 24 

Per , 

Amt 

Pay 

RK 

USUAL 

a 

29 

8-5 

7-2 

a 

22 

8-3 

8-5 

Q 

.M 

B-l 

7-15 

a 

J5 

7-10 

6-20 

Q 

.10 

9-18 

823 

i a 

a 

B-l 

7-5 

9 O 

.15 

7-13 

6-28 


CTSCorp 

Foroh 

kAamrfacturlng 
Huffy Corp 
Lincoln 

Telecom mcfni 
Penobscot Shoe 
Union Enlerwriios 


A- Annuel: MMonffaly; O-Ctaarterlv; S4em+ 


Source: uPt. 


Bankers T rust, Di gital in Tie 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Bankers Trust 
Co. and Digital Equipment Corp. 
of the Uni tai Slates said Monday 
they will jointly market ibe bank’s 
Remos integrated decision-support 
trading system to major financial 
institutions. Bankers Trust will 
provide software support and Digi- 
tal bill provide the hardware and 
operating parts of the system. 


j Cash Prices 


1 2 Month 
HUt-Bw Stock 


aw. m pe 


105 Utah Lew 


a orae 


2s 15* i«va du i- ft 
209 zi* X* 31 + to 

263x 14b M 14to + to 

m 7 6* 1 + to 

B41 59* 58ft 59 — to 

3 104b 104b 104b +3 

321 Mb 76 Tito 
443 Sift 50* 51 + * 

272 46* 4| 46*— ft 

372 7* 7 7* + * 

72 Uto 10ft U* + * 
55 29* 29b 29b— to 
124 17b 76* 17 — to 
1927 19b n Tf* + * 
42 Z7ft 27 27 — to 

4B 27* 27* 57b— to 
2 25ft 29* 25* + to 
38 31* 31 3»M * * 

IT W* 1C* W* + to 

4 Uft 17* 17ft +ft 
382 40* 3BH 40 -4* 

B 48 47* flft + M 

291 45* 45b 45*— * 
Sid 709* 109* W** +1* 
,61x15* 14* 15 
341 Zft 2* 7* + * 

It 9 9 4 — to 

X 3150 39ft 38* 29*— to 

. __ 1213 22ft 71* 22 —to 

X* 8* TWA 7B 1714 19ft T9* 79* + M 

15M 71ft TWA nf 225 158 214 15 18ft IS 

30ft 17* TWApfSZZ 77 774 29* 27to 2» + * 

32ft 2C* Tmom Uf U 14 1» 3*4 K 3Sto— to 

21* 16ft T ranine 222 XL4 33x21b 21 21b + to 

17ft 10ft TARftv 180 78 15 H IK 12* 12ft + to 

21ft 19* TrnCda nl.12 57 B 

57b 39ft Traraeo 2.1M 44 10 
66* 46* Tmseet 387 68 
25b 19* rronfix £36 118 
U* 7ft Tramcn . 5 

25b 20 TrGPpf 2J0 IOLO 
lift 6* TnrfOh 11 

36b 39* Tranwy 180 SJ 9 
39 23* TntWlfl 48 

21ft 9* TwtdwtA 


29* 13b TfimMea 40 28 B 

22* 74b Thrifty 40 2.9 W 

24ft 13ft Tidwtr SO 64 

to* 5* Tlgerln „ 

Uft 33ft Time 780 13 17 

106b 60* Ttffll PfB I J7 TJ _ 

23b 12ft Thnphi 75 

Sft 34b TlmoM U* 27 15 

58* 46* Thnfcen 1800 3.9 14 

9b 4ft Titan 

10* 7ft Titan pf 180 98 

X* 26ft TD05M UB 4J 7 

21b 14ft Tokftflis 48 28 9 

19* 13ft TOIEfU 253 112 5 
27* 34ft TaiEdPf 172 138 
X* 22 TotEdafUS 718 
26ft X TofEd pf 147 I3J 
31* 25* TalEd pf 4L28 117 
IB* U ToLEdof 136 1U 
18b 13ft TalEd of 231 127 
45ft 136% Tonkas 20 J 7 
53ft 21* TOafRM 486 18 W 
57* 20* Trchmk 180 13 13 
108 97* Trcn of iiBveifLl 

IT* 10 TeraCe 40 27 10 
3 1 TOSCO 

19b Bto Towle 
40ft 25to TOVRUS 
Mb 17* Truer 5 J2 1J 


34* 24 Twklpf 280 6.1 

4S4fe 23* Travlor 284 4J 10 

58b fOto Travel 4.16 78 

Z7b 17ft Tricon 3J2eUJ 
X 20b TrtCnpf 2-50 9-2 

32 13 Trtalnd 40 1J 23 

31b 20ft TrtaPC 180 37 8 


309C 196% 19* 19* 

922 49* 47* 49*— ft 
25 59* SOft SB* 

438 21* 21b 21ft—* 

16* 9 8* » + * 

305 25b 35* 25ft + to 
17 12 lift 12 + to 
76 30* 32b 32* + * 
78 12 1282 ISb JTto 38* +1to 
47 20ft 20 20ft +7 


*86% 24* Tribune 84 

6* 4 Trieste 4Be 88 7 

B* 56% Trial 29 U M 

37* 12ft Trlnfy JO u 

25* Tib TrlfEno .10b 8 38 

14* B* TrltE of 1.10 B4 
41* 306% TuesEP 380 7J U 
15* Oft Tultex 44 34 12 

19 14 TwtnDs 80 47 10 

41 30 TveoLb jm 2.1 IS 

17ft lift Tyler • 40 27 B 


12 3316 33 33 — ft 

B66 45ft 45* 45*— to 

82 56ft 56b 56ft + to 

157 28* 25ft 26 

5 27b 27b 27b 

735 31ft 30* 31* + ft 

277 36* 24ft 36ft— * 


18 17 1557 46ft 46ft 46ft— ft 
3 5* 5* Sft 
9 6 6 6 

50 13* 13* 13*—* 

51 20* 20% 20ft— lb 

16 13* Uft 12ft 

100 41 40* 41 

41 13* 13 13 — ft 

1 17 17 17 

144 3B* X* 3M%— ft 

637 14* 14* 14* 


U 


]J0o 18 
240 74 

17 

284 88 10 
27S 107 


SO* 33* UAL 
36* 25 UAL of 
75* 7* UCCEL 
24* 16* UGI 
25* 19* UGI pf 
llto Bto UNCRes 
14 10 URS 40 17 14 

30ft 17* USFG 270 58 40 

40* 22* USGs 1J6 42 7 

T9* 13 UnlFrat 20 IJ II 

60ft 45 Unihrr 2.12e 37 9 
102ft 75 UnINV 5760 52 10 
41b 31* UComp 144 4J 11 
57b 32ft UnCorh 340 
7* 4ft Uni onC 
19b 13 UnElac 172 97 
31* 21 UnElpf 3J0 11 J 

37 25* UnElpf 480 107 

39 29 UnElpf 450 128 

»b 27* UnEl pf 456 114 

32* 24* UnEl PIM480 I2J 

Z7* 18* UnElpf X9B 118 

19ft 13* UnElpf ZU 1 07 

69b SO UEfpfH 880 118 


B 1743 S* 52* 32ft— ft 

471 32* 32b 32*— * 

366 13* 13ft 13ft 
102 23ft 23b 23* + Ml 

3001 25* 24ft 25* — ft 

166 fft 9ft 9b— * 

40 11* 10ft lOW— ft 

355 37ft 36% 37b— * 
537 39* 39* 398% 

95 Oft 13 13ft + ft 
1 50 58 58 — T 

68 101ft 101ft 101*— 1 
322 36ft 36* 36*— ft 
78 10 2925 43ft 43b 43M— * 
74 5* 5* Sft 

3138 lBft IB* l** + ft 

1IU38* 30* 30*— 1 
2WZ 37* 36* 37* + ft 
140x38 37* 27* 

2Qx 40 40 40 +Tft 

55 32b 31ft 37* 

221 27b 27 27 — * 

28 19ft 79ft 19* + to 
Hta 69ft 69 49+1 


SOW 34b UnPoc 180 38 12 1462 47ft 47* 47ft— to 

114*82 UnPcpf 7J3 68 73 106* 106ft 106* + * 

20ft lift UMrovf .18 J 13 537 20ft am 20ft— to 

ID SO Unrylpf 880 13L7 3630Z 5BU 57ft 5Bto + ft 


5ft lb LfnltDr 
17ft 10* UnBmd 
16ft Oft UBrd pf 
45b 23b UCDfTV 


12 


30 3ft 3b. 3b— to 
181 17* lift 17* + ft 

31 15ft 15b 15ft + to 
372 43 42ft 42ft + to 


17 Month 

WQhLow Start 


Pte. YkLPE 


SK. 

H701 HWO LOW 


ClOW 

MLOiW 


32* 23* Unem 241 97 19 

79 9 UlUom ZOO 184 4 

39* 19ft UlllUPf 197 1X9 
18* lift UirU pt 270 1Z8 
29* 23* UlUtfpf 4J00 1X7 
14* 10 UIDuDf 1.90 138 
m 15 Unftfnd 80 V t 

a 35ft Untrlnn 72 J 36 

45b 26b UJofBk U6 16 10 

14* 9ft UfdMM 11 

2* 2to UPVMn 1 

X* 22 UsoIrG .13 J 

Sft 5to uSHom 


310 27* 26ft 27 
267 19 ^ Uft lift- * 

« “* SS 15S + % 

900X17* IT* 1Z?*TS 

6 29b * 29b + W 

9 14b Uto 14 + to 

103 22b 32* 33* 

12 42* 42* 42* 

74 45ft 44ft «4ft— to 
29 Uto 13* 13* 

14 2* 2V% 2* „ 

I 1844 34ft 34* 3^*- b 
561 7* 7b 7*— to 


12 Month 

HtahLQw Start 


Dw YU PE. 


SB 

1 DO man Law 


dOM 

M5» 


«% 39* USLpoa 80 U 8 362 35 3jto 34*- * 

40M 23 USStae JU Z4 14 200x 36* 3Sft 36 — ft 

29ft 22 USSnof 180 37 19 3176 27* 26ft OTt 

Mto 4»ft USSflpf &81iU2 15 53 * 

135ft USft USSflprlZTS 108 3S3 IX IX* 127ft + M 

X 22ft USSnpf 135 73 96 38* »* X* + * 

39ft 32ft USIPb L71 4J 13 729 37 36 V +1 

81* 57b USWOSf 572 7.7 9 903 Bib *0* 17 — * 

IS 14 7M 7 7to + * 

35 171393 47 39* 4flto— ft 

77 627 36ft X 35ft— to 

XI 9 4318 23ft 23* 23* 

AS 13 S 19* WJi 19* -«* 
J 76 IX 23ft 22* 231% +1„ 
0 7 

70e 7 IB 
1.12 XI 12 
180 O 7 
170 48 7 
256 ZB X 
186 27 10 
in uu 


13 6* ustekn 

45 Uft UnTocti UO 
39to 29ft UTcfIPf Z5S 
X 17ft l/m Tel 1.92 
21 14* UWRl 

33ft 21 unttrde 
30* 16ft Unfvsr 
2TA 7* UnvCtev 
X 19ft UnMFd 
2JH ISM UnLPof 
53 X Unocal 
113ft 45 VMrtm 

43 23 * usure 

32ft 30ft UBLFef 


UB 

20 

80 


TO* B* UeftaFd IJMo 98 
X 30* UtaPL, 2J2 X9 14 
27M 2VW UIPLPf 280 105 
X* 21* UtPLPf zn 108 
20 Uft UIPLPf 284 107 
24* IS* UIIIICo 172b SA B 
XU IB UlllCopf 284 117 
24* lBft UIIICOPr281 11.1 

35 291A umCopfX12 11.9 


X IB* IB* IBM— * 
44 Uto X Uto + » 
274 27* 27* 37*— * 
37 20* XH 20* + * 
3292 SOU 39ft 30*— ft 
6 a TOTblH* 106*— lb 
607 36ft 34* 36ft — M 
1 33 32 32 

47 10* 10b 10* + M 
461 X 35ft X + to 
42 27M Xft 26ft— * 
X 27* X 27W— M 
10 W* 19ft 19* + * 
S4 24* 24* 24ft 
7 23 21* 21ft 

5 ZM 23* 23*— ft 
■ 3S 34ft 34ft 


X 21* VF Corp 1.12 SlD IS 
12* 5* voter* 

23* 14 Voter pf 144 148 
4* 2M Valeyln 
28b 19 Von Dm 82 43 4 
4 2b varce 

13 5ft Vorcppf 

46* 26ft Market 20 

13ft 9* Vara M 

25ft I7ft VMM JO 11 13 

8* 3* VeadO 155 

II* Bft VeetSa 170O18L4 
48ft 23 Viacom 42 8 22 

87b 67ftVaEIPf 880 108 
91* 69 VaEPpf 975 107 
67M 51 VaEPpf 7 78 108 
XM lift Vlahavi 13 


370 37ft 36ft 37 —1 

082 12 11* lift — * 

14 23ft 23* X*- M 
2SB 2M 2M 2b— * 

47 21* 21* 21ft — * 
I H N N 

I 9b 9b 9b + b 

8 14 lira SBft 27ft 2Sft + ft 
3J 15 93 11* lift 11* + * 

377 19 IB* 19 + ft 
IX 7ft 7* 7ft + to 

13 11* 11* 11* 

M9 51ft 47ft 50 +1« 

2Mz 81* 81* Bl* + * 

190*91 91 * 

190* Ub Ub Ub + * 
56 20b 19ft 20ft + b 


W 


29ft XM WICOR 278 77 1 
3B* 22ft Wadivs 1-00 28 II 
23* 16* Wncknt M 37 
10ft 4b Wolnac 
56* 37b WOlMrt 23 J X 
30b !7to waterns M 18 19 
23* 15* WkHRSgUO 
38* 25* WotCSV JS 17 17 
39b 22 WaltJm 18 17 I 
9ft 7* WaftJPf 180 118 
26* 17ft WarnCD 8 U 11 
30ft 17 wracm 


IX 29ft 29* 29ft— to 
380 33ft 35* 35* 

36 18ft IB* IB* 

228 Bb 7ft 8M + to 
1202 54* 54 54* 

764 28* X Mb — b 

64 21ft X* 21ft— M 

242 37* 36* 36* + to 

133 3Bb » 38*— * 

100X9* 9* 9* — b 

X 24M 24M 24b 
1470 30ft 30* 30* 


43* 28ft WtxnrL 1.48 14 15 2243 43* 42ft 43 —to 


22 15 wasnGe 186 78 

28W 15* WatiNOt 1J7B 47 
»b 16b WshWI Z48 10J a 
99* 31* Wam 82 1 J » 

2SW » WQfkJn 36 U 11 
Uft Bft WdvGOS 20 22 9 

X 19* WovSPf 180 78 

23* I2to WebbD 20c 18 15 

40 29ft WfrisMk 70 17 15 
63b 30* WollsF 140 48 I 
49* 40 IMF Of <87el&3 

31b 23* VWIFM 280 104 12 

Uto 12 Wendy I 71 17 18 1848 17ft 17* 17*— ft 

27b Ub WsstCO 84 18 14 26 24* 24* »* + * 

41* 31* WMPTP 270 SJ 14 415 40ft 39ft 40*— ft 

7 2* WlnAirL 81 1X4 4* 6b 6* 

2* ft WTAlrwt 200 2 1ft 2 


91 72 31ft 21ft + to 
52 33* X X — b 
193 33ft 23* 23* 

1377 99ft 57ft 59* +1* 
422 2flto 25* 25ft— M 
44 9* Oft Sft— to 

23 20b 20b 20b 

17# 21 20* 21 + to 

27S 40ft 39* 40ft + ft 
45* 59* 59* 59* + * 
10 41* 47ft 47ft— to 
79 27to 26ft 2? 


§3 KSKS itt Si 

51* 43to WCNA pf 775 17.9 
S3 to 5ft VlUnlon 
Bft 2to wnu pts 
Uft 4* wnu PIE 

18* S* WUT1 PfA 
SS W 30M WSfeE 
41ft 33* WBByC 2-5 
3« 33ft wvygrt) 1J0 


51* 

Uto 

40 

X 


34ft Weyrpf 280 


.... WOyror 4J0 
6* vlWhPII 
14* vfWPII Pf® 

„ 10* vnrmPitof 

491% 37ft Wfilripl UO 

32* 24* WIIHC IJO 
Oft 36* White RfOatl 
STM 17* WhWlI 
35* 14* Wtattok 80 
I2M 6* Wtcbhlt 
14ft | wtlfnin 
31ft 22ft Wlinam 180 
5* 2 WlhnEI 
81% 6* W1WVO .10 
36ft ZTtoWinObt 180 
30* 7ft Wkmbg 70 
13* 5* Winner 
7ft 3ft WinttrJ 
30* 37* WIscEP 288 45 
BB* 69 WNE Pf M0 KU 
77ft S*V» WISE Pi 775 107 
26 23* WIiG ef 275 IM 

36M 25ft WHCPL 284 77 
37* 27b WlscPS 2J4 68 
40* 27* WlfCO 188 47 
TSU 9* WofvrW 
Zlft IrtfeWDOdPt 
47* 32ft Wolwth 
4ft 2* wrtdAr 
69ft 53 wriohr 
5* 2ft wuntir 
IB 10* WyteLh 
23* 16* Wynns 


40 30* 20 J®— J4 

XI 21* 21* 2W*— M 

1414 4ft 4* 4*— * 
|4a 41* 40* 40*— 1* 
990 12* If* 13* + * 
44 6ft •* 6ft— * 
X II* tlto lib- * 

17 13* 13 ISto- U 

38 II 3508 Uft Xto 31* + ft 

3^ 8 236 37 36* 37 + * 

4j 19 i3» x x* ran— to 
67 


97 


42 IB 

58 

7J » 
28 11 
48 

12 
4.9 7 

1J IS 
AT 13 

ZO 9 

41 


9 
9 
9 

27 3 
37 It 
AS IB 


74 

80 

280 


180a 28 13 

39 1111 
80 15 7 


40 43 4)1% 42 + to 

]| 49* 49* 49ft + * 

M 8 7* 79% — * 

ISttStM 21 21 

SOX 14* is* Mb + ft 

391 41 47* 47ft— M 

171 X 27V% 27ft— U 
5 42ft 42* 42ft + b 
317 31ft 31* 31* + * 
Bl 23* 23 23 

14 9ft 9* MB— ft 
» 12* 13* 12*— M 
478 » 28* 2M9-* 

222 5* 4ft 5ft + * 

20 6* 6* Bft 

150 Uto 25* 3f — M 
1)47 HTto 9ft DM + * 
40 Oft 6* 6*— to 

5 6* 4* 6V% + ft 

1310 38* 37* 37ft— U 
rain M 81 
IOOOzM* 75* 75* 

5 25* 25* 25* + * 
93 Ub 35* Ub + M 
169 37 36* 34ft 

73 3SV. 34* XM + * 
476 I0!S 10* 10ft + * 
176 21ft 31ft 2tto 

474 469% Uto 46* 

14 3* 3* 3* + It 

44 TOM 69ft XM + Ik 

55 3 3 3 

142 llto ID* 11* + ft 
36 IT* 16* 17 —ft 



r 


soft 33b Xereoc 
29 19 XTRA 


U0 58 21 4563 
84 28 10 33 


51* SOto 51* +1 
34ft 24* 34ft— to 


SOM 24 ZataCp 132 A7 9 X 28ft X* 3lto— ft 

21* 9ft ZM M U 19 1»2 IP 9* 9* — H 

56 2S Zayrai JB 8 IB 189 

SB 18* M»ms 7 

21ft Uft Zeros Ji 18 15 


55 54* 54ft— M 

m 19ft 19M 19*— * 
229 ISM 17* IBto + M 



NEW NIGH5 N 


AZP Group 

Am Express 
Auto Data 
CBS of 

CenHudGas 
CafSO IS2SO 
DeluxOi* 
FamDIrS* S 
GltSU 452pf 
m Power 
INPwSMPf 
Marwrcreo 
NSPw4l0pf 
OflPwI4PtF 
PouroM 
PSNH 275of 
PSNH 386pfE 
RCASllcvaf 
RorerGP 
SoaCnlLId pf 
Southland 
TofEd 236pf 
UnEI456P> 
WMsMkM 


AmpcoPItf 
CBI lnd 
La mow & 
Timken Co 


AbbiLabs 
AmStor pfA 
BardCR 

CPC inn 
ChaeMnh760 
Comsat 
DatE 745pf 


AfnBrd373of 
Am foe Inc 
B«nof490pf 
Coeaarswid 
Cbm B#U 
Cortfu Pow 
DunevW 


FlavtFnGrpi GTE 24Mpf 
GlfSU (tan Pf HoiiMwCm s 


IHPvi442pf 
intMuhifd 
NVSBBOof 
N5Pw4l6pf 
Orange Rk 
PSvCol 84pt 
PSNH XlPfB 
PSNH 325pfF 

RflPBk adlpi 

SFeSouPoc 
SvcaCPS 
StnwesfGos 
Trchmk odl p TARIfV 
UnEl BpfH UnJOrtv Bk 

WtiNetmii wrtotey 

NEW LOWS 15 


lUPvr41Qpf 
mwrsf Pw 
NV9B48PI 
OcdP itaf 
PaPL llpr 
P3ind4U«f 
PSNH 425PfC 
RCA 
Rovlon 
Scoff Paper 
SouroeCaopf 
TNP Enl 


Arrow Elec 
Comeuor 
Ptrilnv 
WstCaNApf 


FfBTx adf Of 
SfOCtaPfA 
Zorn fa Cp 


Amor Can 
Anfwwpf 
BrWMy pf 
CaroPwLl 
ColllaFdoe 
DovfPL pfj 
OukePofM 
Gomll In 
HoiPiCp 

war 

NOrSHrBcO 

Oh Ed Odl Df 

PoPLBrapr 

Pub5vcNM 

PSNH37SPID 

RCAcvtel 

Rohr lnd 

SeoCnfLWpl 

Southern Co 

ThermoEl 

UnElAaf 

Viacom 

Xerox Co 


BankAmodlp 
PCM Prop n 
stawWora 


f. 


faler I- N J 

iinir iiM !i 


| LLS.fiitures 


Season Season 
'Mgfi Low 


June 24 


Open MFoh Low dose Cta- 


Grains 


WHEAT (CRT) 

SJMhu minimum, doi tara pgrbuihcf 


370 

376* 

383* 

3-74* 

A02 

372* 


ZT2M 

3.15 

118 

377b 

116 

Z9S 


Jul 375* 376 334 3L24M —IBM 

Sag 377 377M 375to 37SM — Alft 

Dec 371* 3J2to 370M 231 —TIM 

Mar 3J0M 231 379ft 230* —80* 

IIS* 119 —01 

3JBft 383* —00b 


Mav 222 372 

Jul 382ft 3JM 
Prav. Sales A176 


Prev. Day Open Int 40311 off 132 
CORN (CUT) 

5800 bu minimum- dollars par bushel 
331 Z72 Jul 373ft Z74 272* 273ft —80b 

221* 2J5ft Sep 2.58 Z59M 2J7b 259 +80* 

295 250b Dec 2J2* 255 Z52b 2J4* +81b 

110 259* Mar 283 284 281* 283ft +81to 

221b 282* May 285* 287ft 285* 287ft +81* 

286 282b Jul 285ft 287ft 283ft 287* +81* 

286* Z47 Sop 249ft 251ft 249ft 2J1* +JHW 

Est. Sates Prav. Soles 293m 

Prev. Day Opel lnL102843 off L5VB 

SOYBEANS (CBT1 
SM bu minimum* dollars par bushel 
779 556* Jul 538 57# • 588* 575* +J71ft 

7J6 SJ2* Aug 587 SJIto 586 5.71b +8lft 

ATI 586* Sep 580* 585* 5 39 384ft +82b 

681 589* NOV 583* 589 582* 5 88* +82* 

679 558ft Jan 573b STB* 572* 578b +82M 

782 589 Mar 582* 588* 581* 588* +JB* 

779 177 MOV 570 596* 570 576* +J72* 

ATI 582 Jul 597* 682 597* 682 +81* 

cut. Sates Prev. Sales 2*815 

Prev. Dent Open Int. 62837 off 5120 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open High Law Close Cta. 


Food 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CAT] 

100 tons- dollars per ton 

19A5D 11780 Jul 12Z50 12300 12270 12280 

Aug 12510 12590 12480 12580 
Sep 12780 12540 127 JO 12840 
Oct 130JD 13080 12970 13(L70 
DOC 13520 13600 13470 UB70 
Jan 137 JO 13BJ0 1X80 13880 
Mar 14380 14330 142.50 14150 
MOV 14780 14780 14780 14780 


18080 

179J0 

inuo 

IMjOO 

16100 

204J0 

162JB 

116780 ■ 
Est.Sales 


12060 

moo 

126J0 

131J0 

134LS0 

139.10 

14380 

147.90 


Jul 

Prov.SateS 9.169 


15U0 


—30 


+30 

+80 

+70 

+30 

+80 

+JE 


prav. Day Open Int 51881 up 311 


SOYBEAN OIL tCBTJ 
sCino fbsr doi lari pot wo lbs. 


June 24 


CammpdftT and Unit 
Coffee 4 Samoa. B>, 


Prtnrefofh 64 /j: a *. vd _ 

Steel Mltets ( Pitt j, ton 

Irani Fdry. Pfillo. tei 


Moo 

188 


1 scrap Nc 
I Spat. lb. 


Ago 

186 

176 

45380 

21380 

10B-1DI 


Cooper elect, lb 

Tin | Straits), Ib 

Zinc. E. SI. L. Bails, lb . 
PaHadhinvoz - 

Silver N.Y.04 

Source: AP. 


47380 
21380 
70-71 
19-21 
47-70 
*8593 675V 

084-87 0J2J3 
99-104 in 
AMS 8815 


London 

Gmunodities 


June 24 

Prey loas 
Bid Art 


Close 

High Low BM Art 

SUGAR 

sterling per metric tea 

8780 0580 §680 §640 6540 8560 
BBAO 8640 8780 8740 8640 BAN) 
937D 9270 9280 92NJ 9140 92JB 
1S4B9 10180 10240 ID2J0 10280 I02X 
10770 107.80 10780 10730 10670 10780 
11380 11140 11280 11380 11140 111J0 
11780 11780 11680 11788 11680 11689 


Oct 


Am 

oct 

Volume: 1 J24 lots of X tons. 

COCOA 

r metric hm 

1741 1730 1733 1735 1750 1753 
1710 1492 1896 1497 7778 1720 
1478 1468 1474 1475 1487 1488 
14SS 1484 1491 1493 7701 1702 
1706 1700 1706 1707 1716 1717 
1717 1711 1716 1719 1728 1739 
1725 1725 1724 1732 1730 1750 
Volume: 2801 lots of ID tons. 

COFFEE 

5ferflng par metric too 


Jly 


Jhr 


2800 1.962 I860 1864 28DB 2809 
2JW8 zan 2804 2805 2854 £955 
2895 2850 2852 2854 1102 J.1W 
2.133 28B2 2JB5 2890 2,133 2,135 
2.133 Z109 2893 2897 1131 2.135 
XI 30 XI 15 XI 10 XI 25 X136 XM0 
2.130 ZI25 1120 Z123 Z1» 2.145 


& 


Mar 

May 

JIT 

Volume: 5.1U latsef 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

U8. donors per metric tan 
Jlv 21625 214JD 716-50 71675 21780 21785 
Aug Z1SJ0 21375 21373 21480 21475 21150 
Seo 2MJB 21380 21175 21 ICO 21275 21380 
OCf 21380 21475 21500 21575 2144C8 214JB 
«9v 21 5 JO 21SJ0 Z14JD 21980 215.50 71 UO 

Dec N.T. N.T. 21775 22180 217JB 320X0 
Jan N.T. N.T. 2 1670 22180 217JB 22200 
Feb N.T. N.T. 21580 324X0 21780 23X00 

Mar N.T. N.T. 21580 22480 Z1S80 22380 

Volume: 969 lots of 100 Ions. 

Sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Bx- 
taasaii). 


Taiwan Export Orders Up 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Foreign oniers re- 
ceived by Taiwanese manufactur- 
er. and exporters totalled 52.78 bil- 
lion in May, op from 52.63 billion 
in April but down from S187 bil- 
lion m May 1984. the government 
said Monday. 


WHAT WOULD UFE BE LIKE 
WITHOUT IT? 

WEEKEND 

EACH FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


3X72 

2X70 

Jul 

7955 

29.95 

2980 

2932 

+36 

31JS 

2X50 

few 

2880 

29-00 

y-W 

7032 

+32 


2X50 

Sop 

27 JO 

2000 

2785 

7739 

+.« 

3037 

22J0 

Oct 

2*85 

27.15 

26J5 


+35 

»J5 

2290 


2*00 

2630 

25*5 


+89 

2987 

2380 

Jan 

2SJ0 

25*5 

2SJ0 

2573 

+J» 

2880 

24.40 


2585 

2585 

2530 


2785 

2*20 

May 

25.15 

2530 

25.10 

2520 

+83 

2525 

23-75 

2195 

2*30 

Jul 

Aw 

2485 

2485 

24JB 

2 635 
2487 

+JB 

+84 

Eat Sales _ 

Prav. Sale* 1]JB7 




Prav. Day Open Hit. 0839 up 116 
OATS (CBT) 

5880 bu minimum- dal lara pot bushel 
IMS 147ft Jul iji 1J1 

179 143* Sep 143ft 145 

182* 147 Doc 146* 148 

147ft U3 Mar 

141 1J3 May 

Est.SalM Prav. Sates 4B4 

Prey. Day apon Int. 3860 oH2 


1JD 1 JO* —80* 
143ft 144M +80M 
146* Lg* +80* 

TJTft 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMEJ 


40000 lbs.- cental per ib. 
6787 59.10 Aug 

5X45 

3885 

57*0 

57*0 — U0 

65*0 

60.10 

Oct 

6035 

6035 

59 S3 

59-52 -UO 


61J0 

Dec 

61 JS 

6180 

6085 

6130 —97 

6785 

6XW 

Feb 

6X30 

6X50 

6782 

6X00 —1.12 

67 J7 

6X50 

Apr 

6380 

6380 

6285 

6330 —85 

6635 

4435 



6*10 

6X75 

6X65 —85 

EN. Sates 17346 Prav.Satea 1X138 




Prev. Dew Open InL 4A120 oH 1815 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 


4MWIteL- cents per lb. 


■70 

7Z32 

7120 

7940 

71155 

■tbasH 

Est.Sales 


6447 


tss 

Oct 
Nov 

Jan 

Mar 6880 
Apr MM AS pi 
,1727 Prev. Sales 1435 


6475 

4575 


6A10 

6980 


* sss 

65JB 

me 

MJ0 

6873 


U85 

6540 


6075 


6077 
6780 
#7 JO 


6580 —1J0 
6*95 -142 
6497 —175 
6680 —172 
6785 -180 
*870 —1.10 
6070 — 180 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 1834 ofI53 

HOGS (CME) 
saooo ilia.- cents pi 
5577 4785 

5*37 4787 

E8 4580 

5085 4620 Dec 4740 4780 

5047 4675 Feb 4040 4U5 

47.35 4*50 Apr 4582 4345 

4985 4AM Jun <7 JO 47 JO 

4985 4775 Jul 4050 4050 

Est- Sains 8726 Prev. Soto 0407 
Prev. Day Onen Int. 2*429 up 223 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

30800 ante per Ib. 

82.47 61.12 Jul 6443 *445 

8045 4020 Alia 6380 6380 

7670 63.15 Feb 72JB 7X30 

7548 6480 Mar 78J7 71.10 

7540 70. W May 7195 7195 

7680 6970 Juf 71.95 7195 

73.15 67 JO Aug 7180 7180 

Est.Sales woi Prev. Sates 4890 
Pnw. Day Open int. 10849 off 448 



ins) 

7X95 

7077 

7195 

7195 

7180 


6445 -ZOO 
6380 — 2J70 
7095 -080 
7087 — 1.SS 
7195 — Z00 
7195 —ZOO 
TUBS 


Currency Options 


. Pots— Last 
Jun Sop Di 


June 21 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

* 3. strike 

tea Price CaBs— Lost 

Jen Sep Dm 

1X509 British PouDds-cents per Urtt- 
BP-WUid 105 s 2380 22JD s 

12841 115 S r r s 

IH4B 120 s 9J0 985 s 

12fl40 125 s 625 r s 

I2S4B IX f r 140 S 

12&68 135 s 120 17® S 

5*000 Conod Ian Dollamcsfits per null. 

CDoiir n S r r s 

7122 74 s r r s 

fZHBWetf Goman Martuvcenff per anil. 

DMort » s r r s 

3243 X l r r s 

SS a s 2.13 r s 

3X63 33 S 143 r S 

3243 33 S 093 1JD S 

3243 34 s CJ3 r s 

3243 X 9 034 173 s 

1 338** P ranch FnmcviBttn of o cent per do It. 

FFnme IDS S 180 r s 

ID78S 110 s IX r 8 

USOfitt JapgntM Yeo-UBtM of a cent per unit. 

->T9" 77 i 135 r 1 

40J2 X s r r s 

48 8 187 145 s 

4113 41 s UO r S 

. 42 s OlX r c 

Swiss Fmo-ianta per anU. 
aPirt* » » *20 r i 

* s r r s 

32-S 3Z s r r ■ 

3940 X 5 1.77 141 £ 

M 39 I 142 UO * 

39-55 4B 3 095 r s 

TWO 41 | 180 r « 

TWofcaU voLZBB 

Total PM voLU07 Put anti laf i njai 

n-fiat trotted. s-No option oftarw. o-Old. 

Lost la Premium (purchase price). 

Source- JP. 


ua 

240 

380 


142 

087 

0.17 

037 

048 

r 

1.76 

2JJ 


0.12 

043 


*30 


0JB 


t 

r 

02 * 
t 

r 

s r r 

s r r 
Call open lot IH721 


082 

0.42 

049 

1.13 


COFFEE C (NY CSCE) 

37JTOi&Sj- cents par lb- 
14940 12180 Jul 141.10 UI.10 139J5 13988 —722 

15020 12780 Sep 143.11 143J6 14280 14281 —1.15 

15040 12925 Dec 14*85 144M 14X38 14328 —149 

149 JS 128J0 MOT 14*25 14*50 14130 14X50 —18a 

1«J0 13180 MOV 14290 14300 14245 14X00 — 1J0 

K-liffl 135.50 Jul 14X50 14X50 14235 14240 —23 

147J0 13X75 SCP 14X28 — U 

Est.Sales X2D0 Prev. Sale* XS29 
Prav. Day Open Int UJ02 off 448 
SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYCSCV) 
iKitiiSte cents per lb. 

9.95 243 J«t Z75 XB2 

9J5 24* Sep 144 XS6 

985 X74 OCf ZB8 292 

7JS 380 Jan 182 3.15 

9J3 X34 Mar 192 194 

7.15 398 Mav 170 3L75 

649 17* Jul 187 392 

496 405 Oct *1B *22 

EH. Sate* 7438 Prev. Sale* 1X551 
Prev. DavOPen lot. 81791 up 158 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tans-Sper tan 

Juno lf?3 Jul 1990 2005 

2415 1965 Sep 1979 19BS 

2337 1945 Dec 1965 1970 

irn 1955 MOT 1977 1904 

2m mo May 

2110 I960 JoJ 

2)30 1045 Sep 

Est.Sales 2839 Prra.Safw 480 
Prev. Day Onen Int. 21899 up 284 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15800 lbs.- cents per Bs 

18445 13170 jul MBJS UI8B U030 14085 —AS 

18X00 13*80 Sep 13670 13780 13UB 13630 —185 

18180 132JO Nov 13490 13*90 13180 13240 —US 

18080 13X00 Jan 13480 13*30 13100 13280 —1.15 

177 JO 11X00 Mar 13358 1 3350 13388 13110 —185 

16X50 13645 May 13110 — !X« 

157 JO 14X20 Jul 13110 — 18S 

MOJO 179 JS Sep 13110 —sits 

Nov 13*75 13*75 73350 13110 — 18S 
Est.Sales 350 Prev.Safcs 547 
Prev. Day Open mt. M99 off 115 


X75 

in 

IBS 

143 

147 

3J0 

346 

*M 


1980 

190 

mi 

no 


2J7 

179 

286 

3.15 

153 

171 

390 

*20 


19B2 

i960 

1953 

1948 

19S7 

2004 

2021 


+86 

+81 

+84 

+86 

+84 

— 81 
+84 


—12 
— W 
— 13 
— X 
—3 
—2 


Metals 


COPPER (COMETH 
25800 lbs.- cent* per lb. 


6555 

8835 

6000 

5780 

Jun 

Jul 

60,15 

6080 

6085 

60 JO 
6035 

— -15 

5980 

5X10 

5980 
57 JO 

Aua 

Sen 

6180 

6125 

4085 

6080 

6135 

0435 

5BJD 

Doc 

6ZI0 

6280 

6X00 

6X30 

— -21 

8430 

0080 

5980 

5980 

Jan 

BAar 

6X00 

6X10 

6285 

4240 

63.15 

--IS 

7480 

61.10 

May 

6X50 

6335 

6X50 

6X60 

— .K 

7*40 

6130 

Jul 

6X95 

63*S 

6385 

6485 

-vIC 

71190 

6X30 

Sep 

6435 

6*35 

6435 

6*55 

—.ia 

7U0 

7030 

6780 

6*00 

65J0 

6585 

Doc 

Jan 

BAar 

65*5 

6195 

65*5 

6530 

65-40 

4585 

— -10 
—.10 
—.10 


Est.Sales 7800 Prav. Sates 9842 
Prev. Day Open Int. B5930 up 554 
ALUMINUM (COMODO 
40800 Ibs^ amts per lb. 


4985 

5980 

4635 

4430 

jun 

Juf 

43*0 

4*20 

4175 

4480 -.15 

4*05 —30 

7*30 

4480 

Aua 

SOP 

4455 

4*85 

4*40 


7080 

4580 

Dec 

4540 

4580 

45*0 

T" 

7650 

?2J« 

6675 

6X45 

51 J5 
47*0 
5X95 
5*50 

JOfl 

Mar 

Mav 

Juf 

4785 

4785 

4785 

|E| 

5X10 

EBt. Sales 

5180 SAP 

Dec 

Jan 

Mor 

264 


HI 

Prav. Dav Open lift. Z1 69 aft 19 





SILVER (COMETH 
5800 Irav g*r ends per tray ol 


MU 

14618 


39«8 


11038 

12308 

12158 

11910 

10408 

9458 

W08 

7998 

7898 

7700 


Jan 

f/tar 

MOV 

JUf 


6398 


6758 
61 U 
<788 
4198 
6318 


6458 6328 6458 


6708 

6703 


6658 

6758 


7068 


6734 

6MJ 

618.1 

<10*7 

6358 

639J 

6478 

6568 

6J6J 

6769 

69X7 

6915 

709J 


Jun 6158 6758 

Jill *128 6115 

Aug 6118 6108 

5738 S«P 6205 

5900 Dec 631 J 

5938 
6878 
6218 
6358 
6418 

6678 DOC 

707 J Jan 

7058 MOT 7068 7060 

gat Sates 18800 Prev. Sales 19 JOB 
Prav. Day Open int. 71484 off 6*4 
PLATINUM (NYME3 
S> tray tar dot lara per troy ox. 

38780 25180 Jun 267.18 

449J0 24180 Jul 26690 26980 36188 26880 

39380 25080 Oct 27120 27350 26980 27X20 

373JO 2MJ0 Jon V*M Z77J0 27SJ0 Z7720 

IVf 28180 2B2J0 28080 2BX30 

30X00 29780 Jul 28B2D 

Ert. Stiles 1873 Prev. Sates 1813 
Prav. Day Open Int. 11812 off 244 
PALLADIUM (NYME1 

loo tray u- dollars pern 

1WJ0 9^80 Jun 97 JO 98J0 97J0 9625 

96-00 9680 Jul 9035 

741-2 23 Sep 97 JO 9140 9780 9825 

HI-50 9380 Dec 9725 9125 9725 9640 

7773 9*50 Mpr 97 JS 90JD 9725 9B40 

17480 B468 Jun 9045 

EsXSelsa 1B2 Prev. Sates 420 
Prev. Day Open Int. A4d0 up 42 
GOLD (COMEX1 


510801 

I33SJD 

2590 

49380 

489 JO 
148550 
49680 
43570 


39570 
39X00 
37280 I 


2B780 
313JB 
29180 
29780 
3B1JB 
msja 
31*70 
•no qi 
33180 
33580 
34X00 
36280 


Est. Sates 1X500 Prev. Sate* 2*607 
Prev. Day Open lrrt.1268U up 1.104 


Jun 31X50 31680 31X50 31540 

Jul - 37*20 

Aua 31680 37190 31549 317.90 
Oct 32D8Q 32X40 31940 32140 
Dec SMOa 3X650 32X30 32S40 
Feb 32050 32* JO 32050 32988 
APT m*fl0 33480 3)440 33* IQ 
Jun 337.10 337.10 337.10 33890 
ftp 34340 

2? 74690 

Dec 35190 

APT _ 36440 


+18 

+18 

+1.1 

+18 

+14 

+18 

+X0 

+Z2 

+2-4 

+Z5 

403 

+11 

+13 


+80 

+20 

+20 

+40 

+40 

+40 


+185 

+785 

+1JB 

+185 

+185 


+140 

+1J0 

+120 

+140 

+140 

+120 

+140 

+1J0 

+1-80 

+1.90 

+2JM 

+430 


Financial 


64-24 

0342 

80-35 

ST-29 


175 T. BILLS (IMM) 

» mnitan- pts. of 100 net. 

9U0 SAM SAP 9244 9X70 9Z59 

9X91 8577 Dec 9X26 9223 9225 

9124 M40 Mor 91 JB 91J9S 9IJ3 

»xm 0781 Jun 9146 9UA 9146 

JJrt BB80 Sep 9145 9148 9141 

91JD 8985 Dec 9129 9129 9UB 

*1JB 69 JB Mar 

ErtSrtes 0107 Prev. Sates 11894 
Prav. Day Open Int. 33J96 off 308 

jsa%afas5S7 MMI 
sr 3 gs a 

gw 75-14 MOT 0220 S3 

2M Jwi EM »s 

80-28 80-19 DOC 

EstSaJes Prev. Seles MJ28 

Prev. Day Open Int. 50816 off 469 
TREASURT BONDS (CBT) 

(B PCf-S7:800-pt* 4 35ivJl of 100 act) 

7*13 57-70 ' 

78-13 574 

77-29 57-2 

764 56-29 

7M1 56-29 

74-34 SA-25 

74-75 56-27 

74- 26 43-12 

7X27 AM 

7X73 62-24 

69-1* 6B4 

EiL Sates Prev. Sate* 1 9 1891 

Prav. Day Open Int21 ASS5 up2449 
GNMA (CBT) 

SlWXnnrtn-pfs&SMeefWpct 

77-10 57-17 Jun 

g-H Sep 74-19 IS 7+18 

»££ gl 2« M 744 73-28 

75- 10 5MD . Mor 

*5 Ste 72-23 72.23 72-21 

Est Sales Prev. Sates 219 

Prav. Day Onn Mil *|si atfey 


9X68 
9281 
915E 
91 JO 
9147 
91 JS 
*185 


84-27 

B3-2S 

#2-25 

81-29 

80-11 


Sep 

75-21 

75-29 

7S-12 

Dec 

7+22 

74-a 

7+12 

Mar 

73-23 

73-39 

73-15 

Jun 

73-22 

73 

724? 

See 

71-29 

724 

7149 

0*6 

Mar 

71-5 

71-12 

71 

Jun 

70 

a 


Sea 

Dec 

Mar 

69-11 

69-13 



7M1 

7M6 

71-3T 

714 

70-14 

69-34 

69-4 

68-18 

6B-I 


73- 1 

74- 25 

74-2 

73-1# 

73-21 


—84 

—84 

—84 


— Bl 
—21 
-21 
— T7 


—75 

—15 

-15 

-IS 

—15 

-T5 

—IS 

—IS 

—15 


—10 


Seeaan Season 
High Law 

CeRT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 
SI million- Ptsaf 100 act 


Open High Lew Oom Chg. 


9289 

8SJ0 


9230 

9230 

«X50 

9X50 

—85 1 • 

9X74 

*600 


9X00 

V234 

*189 

9283 

-J» 

9X31 

91 JS 
9180 
9188 
■0*9 

6534 
8636 
8683 
87 J6 
8834 

Dec 

Mor 

Jun 

Sip 

Dec 

9131 

9151 

9151 

9157 

91.16 

9083 

9035 

9029 

-81 

^85 S 

-85 
— 85 

-85 .» 

EH. Sale* 

301 

Prev. Sale* 

477 



1. 


Prav. Day Open Hit 3448 off If 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

Si mlllton-ptsof lOOpct. 


9285 

8453 


9 IJI 

91 J4 

9180 

91.71 

—84 

■iiv 

0*80 

Dec 

via 

9135 

91.12 

9135 

—84 


86.10 


90-7# 

9084 

90.72 

9054 

-85 


8*73 

Jun 

9051 

9052 

9039 

9051 

—35 


#780 


9030 

9034 

90.11 

9023 

—36 


87a 

DM 

8986 

89*9 

8954 

89.97 

—35 

9034 8784 Mor 8951 89J2 

Est. Sates 35J01 Prav. Sale* 50825 
Prav. Dav Open imi 11.102 uo2J04 

8980 

■9J2 

—OS 


BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

Sper pound- 1 point equals 5080 01 
1.4450 18200 SOP L272Q 1 

1J870 18200 Dec 1J640 1.26 

1J2SW 18600 Mar IJ575 1 

1-2305 1.1905 Jun 

Eat. Sales 7,154 Prev. Sale* 8834 
Prav. Day Open Int 31333 off 22* 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM1 
Soerdlr- 1 natal equals 500001 
35SS -7025 Sep J291 -7302 J2B3 

J566 JD06 Dec -7277 3771 3271 

JSS * 4981 Mar 

J3S0 jvk Jun 

Eat Sates 730 Prav. Sates 501 

Prav. Day Open int 78ST up 70 
FRENCH FRANC (IMMU 
Sper franc- 1 point eauahH080«n 
.10940 -09650 See 

.10710 89670 Dec 

Eat Sales Prav. sates 
Prav. Dav Doen Int. 397 

GERMAN MARX (IMM) 

SpcrtwarV- 1 point equals 508001 
■3545 -2930 Sep -3249 J205 8263 

J610 2m Dec 8290 .3*2 8289 

8415 3&ea Mar 8314 8326 83M 

JJ35 Jun 

Est.Sales 11108 Prav. Sate* 1*637 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 47838 off 607 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

5 per ven- 1 palnf eauali 10800001 

0041 3D 8C3870 Sep 804032 lr: <040 804030 804034 
004350 803905 Dec 806050 804050 804050 80400 
004169 804003 Mar 804070 

Est. Safes 1006 Prav. Sates X62S 
Prev. Day Open Int. 26,942 up323 
SWISS FRANCIUM*) 

Sper franc- ) oofid enunts 500001 
*030 J480 Sep J90B 8930 -3904 J923 

^53as -3S3T Dec 8940 8959 8934 J9S2 

.4025 8B3S MOT JM) 

Est.Sales 11876 Prav. Sales 11851 
Prav. Day Open Ini. 25833 up 201 


.T-: 


2399 

3771 

J252 

-7234 


.10100 

.10*15 


8270 

830) 

8326 

8351 


■HO 

+11 

+12 

+15 


t- 


fv '■ 


Wi.- 


\W. 

yy 


At\\ 


-0 

-a 


—12 
— n 
— u 


+a 

-to 

+a 


Industrials 


Jul 


LU6*BER(CME) 

130800 bd.it.-S ear 1800 bd. ft. 
230SI 12980 - - 

197 JO 13150 

10A10 13780 

10780 14*60 

195JM 15080 

17640 15380 

18380 17380 


14780 147 JO 14580 14780 
. 14000 149 A0 14680 74060 

Nov 151.10 157 JH 14980 15180 

Jem 15780 IS760 15680 15780 

Mar 16380 16380 16X00 76150 

MOV 169.70 169-90 169.10 16980 

Jul 17580 175J0 17580 175J0 


+J0 

+40 


Jut 

6080 

6180 

6080 

61J4 

+152 

Oct 

6180 

6185 

6055 



oee 

61-20 

61*0 

61*5 

4180 


MOT 

6Z16 

62*2 

6381 

6256 

+J4 

Mery 

6250 

6355 

6X40 

62*5 

+J1 


6X45 

tuo 

6280 

44.95 

+57 


5985 

59.15 

5980 



Dec 58.72 5BJ0 

Prev. Sates *286 

5B.12 

5085 

+J2 


Elt. Sates 1875 Prav.Satea 2438 
Prev. Day Open Int 9J81 off 31 
COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

91800 Ibsr cents per Ib. 

7985 6080 

77 JO 6082 

7380 6041 

7635 6140 

7000 6186 

7085 6X05 

65J0 5980 

9925 5880 

Est.Sales 
Prav. Day Open I 
HEATING OIL (NY MO 
42800 ua I- cents oer aal 
7580 65-35 Jul 6980 7080 

66J0 Sm 69 JO 69.90 

%-}£ SJ 15 7080 7085 

4|J0 Nov 7080 7180 

7*85 19.15 Dec 7180 71JU 

TWO JS" 7X10 72% 

TWO 72J3 Feb 7180 7180 

7380 7280 Mar 

7480 7*00 APT 

Eat. Sates Prev. Sates 0J62 

P«v. Day Open Int 20,126 affTBO 
CRUDE OILfNYMH)^ 


6980 
60.15 
6880 
69 JO 
7080 
7180 
71 JO 
7180 


—87 


6983 
6082 
6&71 
6* JO 
7040 
71.10 
71 JO 
7185 — JO 

7185 —.10 

»85 -1.10 


—JO 

-JQ 


i800bw^doi lara pert 


29 J7 
29 JO 
29JDI 
29 JO 
29 JO 
29 JO 
29.46 
2985 
2985 
2786 
26-70 
2780 


2*25 

2480 

2485 

2*40 

2330 

2*39 

248S 

3*13 

2L90 

2*92 

2*70 

2175 


SS 

oct 

NOV 

Dec 

Jan 


2681 

2A16 

25J5 

2M4 

25.12 

2485 

2*60 


2783 

2642 

2680 

2582 

2530 

2*99 

2480 


Mar 
Apt 

May 2480 2*80 
Jun 
Sea 

Jul 

^■Sates Prav.Satea 1*183 
Prav. Day Open tin. 60837 effxsm 


2677 

2A16 

2SJ5 

2554 

2511 

2*85 

2*68 


3489 
2689 
2591 
2547 
2530 
2580 
24S0 
2486 
2481 
2*20 2480 

2488 
2*80 
2*48 


+83 

+ 8 * 

■KM . 

+.19 , 

+» JT^ . 

+8lA. . 
+81 
-MB . 

-KM 

+81 


Stock Indfatan 


ft MBteT- j;,., 
doiib! : . .. 
tocivn*?. --1. ■ 
°P | i"n* - 7 ■ 

when tit— I.*." ’ 

“w. Sul' • • 
jUs',.".' • 

a 0iHQl v : ’. ’ - 
r Fw ^ir/‘'" 

• ' ■' 
'K-Ttci:-'-' 

-jnaine!. 


lre 'Tratit 


199.10 

20% aw 


(Indue* complied shortly before market cfara) 
SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
ertnii and cents 

“Mg SJP 1*180 19X10 1*085 I91JS 

W g m S» 19*90 

MM0 OTJK 

prev. Day Open inf. 01829 op*169 
VALUE LINE (KC8T7 
points and cents 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 7,175 up ra* 

Hlrt ,S1S I s liiig liiS Vi& 
WM0 Mar Hill i’Jjs HIS 

F ,, , ■ Jun 11780 11780 116J0 11780 

fcst. 5otei _ Prev. Sates i*9i* 

Prev. Day Ophi int 8.150 off M4Q 


+98 

+180 


+W 


+-H 

+U 

4735 


mini I u »n . 




Commodity Indexes 


P'N i. . 

up- ' • 

4,,: ' 

u* i, •‘•i 


Moody's. 

Reuters- 

Dj. Futures. 


Close 
9)7.10 f 
1.76130 
N.A. 
NA 


Com. Research Bureau - 
Woody's : base 100 ; D-c. 31 io%V 
D- preliminary; ♦ - fuSff* ‘ ,93, ‘ 
gewlers : bose loo ; seo. 78. 1931 
Dow Jones : bose 700 -Dec 3?rW 


PravMB 
92088 f 
IJdWO 
Ilf. 10 , 
229.10* 



Market Guido 


CHT: 

CME: 

IMM: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME! 

KCBT; 

NYFE! 


SSSMJE5™ 

tJS?* 

»w» York Futures Exchwoe 


3F 

:lry i i«i'^ 




Her,, 

, 

ii • 1 ■ 



**. a ■* i j - • 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


Page 13 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Olivetti Says 
Group Sales 
Are Up 33% 

Roam 

IV REA. Ita]y — The chairman 
of Olivetti SpA said Monday that 
consolidated sales for the elecuon- 
ics group rose 33 percent m the first 
five months of 1985, fueled largely 
> by increased overseas orders. 

Carlo de BenedeUi told Olivetti’s 

* annual meeting that oli^ were 
■ 1.971.9 billion lire (about SI bfl- 
' lion) through May 31 compared 
' with 1 ,4823 billion for the live pe- 
riod in 1984. He said the results 
were the best ever achieved by the 

. office automation group. 

' . Net group profit in 1984 was 356 

billion lire on group consolidated 
sales of 4.5 trillion lire, 22.5 percent 
>. up on the previous year’s sales. 

Sales for the parent company 
sales rose 51.3 percent, to 1,1983, 
, billion lire, from 7922 trillion over 
the same period, he said. 

Overseas sales by the parent 
company rose 1263 percent, to 
639.8 billion lire, from 2823 billion 
while sales in Italy grew less rapid- 
. ly. rising to 558.7 bfllion lire from 
; 509.7 bmion. 

Mr. de Benoedetti told the annu- 

• ai meeting that he believed Olivetti 
; could become the world's sccond- 
' largest computer company after In- 
, temational Business Machines and 

(hat that goal was within reach. 


D’Arcy MacManus Sets 
Merger With Benton 


n 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — D’Arcy Mac- 
Manus Masius Worldwide and 
Benton & Bowles Inc. announced 
agreement Monday on a merger of 
their advertising agencies that they 
say would be the largest ever in tire 
business. 

The new company will be called 
D’Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles 
Inc. and will employ 6,000 people 
in 50 cities and 25 countries. 

D’Arcy MacManus ranked 12Ux 
among American ad agencies in 
1984 with worldwide billings of 
$1.34 billion, while Benton & 
Bowles ranked 14th with billings of 
$ 1.13 billion. If the agencies were 
combined and their billing; were 
added together, it would have 
ranked as tire frfth-laigest U-S. 
agency in 1984.. 

Tire accord is the second major 
advertising consolidation an- 
nounced in the past two weeks. 

Earlier this month, Lorimar Inc., 
an entertainment and communica- 
tions conglomerate in California, 
said it had tentatively agreed to buy 
a New York-based advertising 
agency, Bozdl & Jacobs Inc 

Lonmar said h planned to merge 
Bozdl with Kenyan & Ecfchardt, an 
advertising agency it acquired in 
1983, and would call the new con- 
cern Bozefi, Jacobs, Kenyon & 
EckhardL Its estimated ballings 


Baxter Is Seen Dropping 
American Bid If Fought 


By John Cmdele 

Nn- York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Baxter Tra- 
venol Laboratories will drop its 
. $3.7-biUion offer for American 
Hospital Supply Corp. if that com- 
. . pany’s board of directors opposes 
Ure plan, a source close to tire trans- 
action has said. 

Baxter, however, remains inter- 
1 ested in pursuing the merger. Ac- 
cording to the source, Baxter also 
said it would be willixg to divest 
itself of any of its businesses neces- 
■ sary to wm government antitrust 
approval 

American Hospital Sipply, with 
headquarters in Evanston, 
is the largest U.S. distributor of 
hospital products. Its intravenous- 
solution business, the source said 
on Sunday, is regarded by Baxter as 
most likdy to cause concern among 
Washington antitrust overseers. 

The offer, disclosed Friday by 
American Hospital Supply, came 
just three months after h had 
agreed to combine with Hospital 
^Coip. of America, based in Nash- 
fvilk, Tennessee, in a $6.6-triUiao 
stock swap. 

American Hospital Supply’s 
board was scheduled to meet on 
Monday to discuss the new offer. 
Officials of the company could not 
be reached over the weekend for 
comment. 

Baxter has said its proposal 
would be worth 43 percent more to 
American Hospital .shareholders 
than the merger with Hospital 
Corp. A Hospital Corp. spokesman 
. said his company would not issue 
any statement about the Baxter 
move For a few days. 

American Hospital Supply said 
Friday that its chairman, Karl 
Bays, had received the buyout pro- 
. posal in a letter from Vernon R. 
Loucks Jr„ Baxter Travenol's presi- 
dent and chief executive officer, at 


Baxter headquarters in Deerfield, 
Illinois. 

In the letter; Baxter offered to 
pay $50 a share in cash for half of 
American Hospital Supply’s 74 
million shares and 3.01 Baxter 
shares for of the remaining 37 
milKnn shar ed The total is estimat- 
ed at $3.7 trillion on a fully dilated 
basis, which takes into account all 
outstanding convertible securities. 

The letter also stated Baxter's 
intention to proceed only on a 
friendly baas, the source said. 

“We are not interested in pro- 
ceeding with the offer if yoor board 
of directors is opposed to it,” the 
source quoted Mr. Loucks as writ- 
ing. 

Mr. Loucks added that “we are 
wifling to agree to such divestitures 
or other actions” that would help 
win government antitrust clear- 
ance. 

Baxter appears reluctant to dis- 
cuss its offer because (hat might 
trigger a stock swap between Amer- 
ican Hospital Supply and Hospital 
Corp. Such a swap, intended to be 
triggerbd .if a third party entered 
the situation with a new proposal, 
was part of the merger agreement 
reached in ApriL 

Under tire stock-swap plan, 39 
million newly issued American 
Hospital Supply shares would be 
given to Hospital Corp. American 
Hospital in torn would ret 29.5 
million shares of tire new Hospital 
Corp. stock. 

Mr. Loucks reportedly said in his 
letter to American Hospital that he 
would be willing to confer with 
officials of Hospital Corp. about 
the possibility of its withdrawing 
from the previously announced 
merger. 

If the stock swap goes through, 
the source said, Baxter win adjust 
its offer for American Hospital 
Supply, which could mean 55 a 
share less to American Hospital’s 
shareholders. 


Futures Traders Confused 


(Continued from Page 11) 
ouble witching hour, when just 
lie corresponding stock and index 
p lions expire. But it gets really 
cary on the third Fridays of June, 
fepiember, December and March, 
/hen the index of futures also ex- 
ire and we have a triple witching 
our. Still, not all witching hours 
re alike or produce the same 
mount of fireworks.” 

For example, he said that the 

Line-Sepiember-December-March 
ycle normally produces a relative- 
/ quiet final hour in the three mor- 
els. Tire reason is that there are 
datively few volatile issues in tins 
ycle of options and futures. Why, 
ien, was last Friday's final hour so 
xploave? 

“First off.” he said, “early on 
hursday, we had tire ’flash’ sec- 
nd-quarier gross national product 
gures and they were unexpectedly 


bullish. Then after the close on 

rcconfsLxt interest This meant 
that any upward move could spark, 
a record amount erf buying to cover 
shares that had been sold short. 
Then on Friday there were tire 
General Foods-raffip Morris ru- 
-roors and, of course, the loud and 
rJn»ar Ignats from tire index-op- 
tions and futures markets that the 
balance of market sentiment was 
decidedly on tire boy ride." 

As for the August-November- 
Februaiy-May stock and index op- 
tions cycle, Mr. Rose said these 
included name of the index-moving 
blue chips, bht this factor is some- 
what offset by tire absence of expir- 
ing futures. The same mollifying 
factor is involved in the Julv-Octo- 
ber-January- April cycle, which in- 
cludes the largest number of blue 
chips, he added. 


United Technologies Foresees 
Lower 2d-Quarter Earnings 


Compiled fy Our Staff Frvm Dispatches 

HARTFORD. Connecticut — 
United Technologies Inc. said 
Monday that it expects earnings 
from operations in the second 
►quarter to be “substantially lower” 
than tire same period last year be- 
cause of an anticipated operating 
los at its Mostek semiconductor 
unit. 

Danish Prices, Deficit 
Both Increased in May 

Reuters 

COPENHAGEN — Danish 
consumer prices rose 0.7 percent in 
May after a rise of 0.4 percent in 
lApril and a LI percent nse in May 
{1984. the national statistics office 
said Monday. 

The office also said the counter 
recorded a provisional trade deficit 
of 1.6 Billion kroner (5140 million) 
in May. 


The decline is expected primarily 
because of declining economic con- 
ditions in the worldwide semicon- 
ductor and computer markets, the 
company said in a statement 

United Technologies said that 
although it continues to anticipate 
growth in earnings freon its other 
operations for the full year, the 
results at the company’s Mostek 
subsidiary will cause its overall 
1 985 operating earnings to be lower 
than those in 1984. 

UT said its Mostek unit will in- 
cur a “significant" operating loss 
for the second quarter, including 
about 575 miQion to restructure its 
inventories, because of a fl a gg ing 
demand for its memory chips. 

The company said it is reassess- 
ing its investment in the semicon- 
ductor business. 

In 1984. United Technologies 
earned 5645 million, or 54.90 a 
share, an revenue of $16.49 bil- 
lion. (AP, Reuters). 


would exceed $1 billion, placing it 
15th worldwide. 

a The recent interest in acquisi- 
tions or mergers is linked to efforts 
by some second-tier agencies to be- 
come big enough to attract adver- 
tising from major multinational 
firms, said Claries Crane, who fol- 
lows the industry for Oppenhehser 
&Col Inc. 

There was no estimated value 
placed upon the merger between 
Beaton & Bowles and D’Arcy Mac- 
Manus, which are privately held. 

The announcement said the 
merger has been unanimously ap- 
proved by the boards of directors 
of both companies and wfll be com- 

al by shareholde^lS* 8 ?? the 
companies mil have equal equity 
and participation in management. 

John S. Bowen, chairman and 
chief executive of Benton & 
Bowles, will be worldwide chair- 
man and chief executive of the new 
company while Hal Bay, chairman 
and chief executive of D’Arcy Mac- 
Manus, will be worldwide presi- 
dent and chief operating officer. 

The two companies now serve 
some of tire leading advertisers in 
the United Stales, including An- 
heuser-Busch, Beatrice Foods, 
General Foods, General Motors, 
Man, Pmsbtny and Procter & 
Gamble. 


Acorn Discloses 
Deterioration 
In Its Finances 

Reuters 

LONDON — Acorn Com- 
puter Group PLC, tire British 
maker of personal computers, 
said Monday it was seeking out- 
ride finanrijt? support as its sit- 
uation had deter iorated sharply 
since Olivetti SpA of Italy 
stepped in with a rescue pack- 
age earlier this year. 

The announcement followed 
the temporary suspension by 
Acorn of trading in its shares on 
the London Stock Exchange. 

Aloog with other personal- 
computer makers, including 
Britain’s Sinclair Research ana 
International Business Ma- 
chines Corp. of the United 
Sates, Acorn is suffering from 
a slump in demand. 

The company said that since 
Olivetti’s purchase in February 
of 49 percent of its shares and 
an attempt to raise a further £ 1 2 
million (515 million), its sales 
bad shown a substantial decline 
from -levels predicted earlier 
this year. 

The computer firm, which 
had a loss of £11 mfition in the 
six months to the end of De- 
cember, 1984, said talks were 
under way with its bankers, 
Barclays Bank PLC 


Kieschnick to Retire as Arco Chief 


Compiled {>» Oar Staff From Dispatches 

LOS ANGELES — Only two 
months after beginning a brad fi- 
nancial restructuring plan, Atlantic 
Richfield Co. has announced that 
W illiam F. Kieschnick, its 62-year- 
old president and chief executive, 
wOI retire tins faiL 

Lod wrick M. Cook, 57, chief of 
Arco's products division, was cho- 
sen Sunday as Mr. Kiesrii nick’s 
successor. Mr. Kieschnick will re- 
tain his seat on the board after die 
retirement, effective Oct. IS. 

Some oil industry analysis ex- 
pressed surprise that Mr. Cook 
would advance to the company s 
top job from divisions that are be- 
ing cut back in the restructuring. 


and that Mr. Kksehrick would not 
see Arco through its major move, 
mmfe in response to the 
fortunes of the ad industry and to 
the threat of corporate takeovers. 

To e x tr em e ly surprised that 
Kieschnick would step aside at (his 
point,” said Mark Gilman, an ana- 
lyst with EF. Hutton & Co. 

“It seems almost certain that 
there must be some kind of internal 
dissension, especially since the 
changes were adopted in the height 
of the frenzy going on at tire com- 
pany on the other ride of the free- 
way” be added, referring to Uno- 
cal Corp.'s recent takeover battle 
T. Boone Pickens, a Texas 


“I don’t d»T|k you read any- 


thing into it other than what you 
see on the surface — that Kiesch- 
nick apparently wanted to resign," 
said Todd Bergman, an analyst 
with Goldman, Sachs Sc. Co. 

Mr. Cook has been a director of 
Arco since 1980 and since last May, 
chief operating officer of the prod- 
ucts division, the unit responsible 
for Arco's refining and marketing 
operations. An engineer, he coordi- 
nated construction of the trans- 
Alaska pipeline. 

Mr. Kieschnick, who spent Ins 
entire 35-year career at Arco, earns 
$825,000 in salary and incentive 
payments, according to the compa- 
ny^ most recent proxy statement. 

(LAT. NYT) 


COMPANY NOTES 


Affied Investors Corp. said its 
shareholders overw helmingl y de- 
feated a proposed payment of a 
special bonus of 101.9 million 
Hong Kong dollars ($13.12 mil- 
lion) or 5 Hong Kong dollars per 
share. 

BardaysAmerican Corn, a sub- 
sidiary of Barclays Bank PLC, said 
the Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corp. has approved its application 
to set up a national bank in Wil- 
mington. Delaware. 

Digital Equipment Corp. and 
Sony Corp. stud they signed a tech- 
nical cooperation agreement to ex- 


change videotex products and doc- 
umentation. 

lfoctman Kodak Co. said it will 
begin selling an easy-to-use disk 
camera with built-in telephoto lens 
in September. 

International Thomson Orgam- 
zrfoo Inc. said it acquired Autex 
Systems, a provider of electronic 
information services to the finan- 
cial community, from Xerox Corp. 
for an undisclosed amount 

Uttoa Industries Inc said the 
U-S, Navy has awarded its Ingalls 
shipbuilding division a $129.5-mil- 
Bon contract to buy equipment and 
services for three Ticonderoga 


CG-47 class guided-missile emb- 
ers. 

The New York Times Co. said it 
had agreed to acquire The Santa 
Barbara News- Press, a California 
evening daily and Sunday morning, 
newspaper. Terms were not dis- 
closed. 

RnhrfcoUe AG said it expects a 
decline in sales in 1985. Sales rose 
last year because of special factors, 
inchiding a recovering European 
steel industry and the British coal 
miners’ strike, Heinz Horn, the 
management board Aairman said. 

Toshiba Corp. plans to increase 
its production of color television 


Yamaha Posts 
SwingtoProfit 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Yamaha Motor 
Co. of Japan reported on Mon- 
day that net profit in the year 
ended April 30 rose to 7 bmion 
yen ($2822 trillion), compared 
with a loss of 35.04 billion yen a 
year earlier. Sales in the period 
rose 15 percent, to 389.05 bil- 
lion yen, from 33731 trillion 
yen. 

Yamaha said the sharp recov- 
ery was based on higher motor- 
cycle sales at home and abroad 
and reduced interest burdens 
following improved motorcycle 
inventories. 

The company forecast an un- 
changed net of 7 billion for the 
current year on sales of 430 tril- 
lion yen. But the dividend pay- 
ment is still undecided. On a 
per-share basis, last year's net 
. was 4143 yen, compared with 
217.31 yen a year earlier. 


sets in the United Slates to 750,000 
in the fiscal year ending March 31, 
1986, from 500,000 last year and to 
increase its British output to 
260,000 units from 200,000. a com- 
pany spokesman said. 

Transco Energy Co. of Houston 
said it has decided to discontinue 
negotiations with the MA Hanna 
Co. of Cleveland and WJL Grace 
& Co. of New York for purchase of 
their Faramont Coal Co. 


INTERNATIONAL 



LET THE TRIB BE YOUR GUIDE. 





LHX GUIDE TO 
BUSINESS TRAVEL & 

ENTERTAINMENT: 

EUROPE. 

Theres never been 
a guide quite like if. 

Trib business readers dl 
across Europe shared 
their most treasured 
travel secrets with 
journalist Peter Graham. 

The result: a book for 
business travelers with 
contributions from business travelers. 

Turn an ordinary business trip into a pleasant, more 
efficient journey. Guide covers Amsterdam, Brussels, 
Copenhagen, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt, Geneva, London, 
Lyon, Milan, Munich, Paris, Stockholm, Zurich. Over 
200 fact-filled pages, this hardcover edition is a great gift 
idea for colleagues, business contacts, or yourself. 

Seven subdivisions for each dty indude: 1 . Basic dty 
overview with vital information.- 2 Hotels, with emphasis 
on business services, 3. Restaurants, for on- and off-duty 
pleasure. 4. After-hours suggestions. 5. Diversions, from 
grand opera to jogging. 6. Shopping. 7. Weekending 
ideas. 

Rave reviews from fhe travel industry experts; 

"Where to stay, dine and revel in Europe ... a handy 
companion " 

Travel and Leisure, American Express. 
"„a good deal of information in compact easily 
assimilated form." 

Signature, Diners Club International. 
"Peter Graham and IhfT have produced a small 
masterpiece." Executive Travel 



FOOD LOVER’S 
GUIDE TO PARIS. 

As restaurant critic 
for the Trib, Patricia Wells 
has explored the 
treasures of food 
shopping and eating in 
Paris, from the bistros, 
cafes, cheese shops and 
outdoor markets, to the 
classic feasts. 

The gastronomic 
delights of Paris are 
varied, historic, abundant - and too delidous to be left 
to chance. Food Lovers uncovers the many delights to 
be found all over this extraordinary dty, and takes an 
up-to-date look at some of Paris* internationally known 
restaurants. 

Wells indudes critical commentary, anecdotes, 
history, local lore - as well as basic facts like business 
hours and nearest metro station. To recreate, the taste 
of France at home, 50 recipes are induded, gleaned 
from the notebooks of Parisian chefs. 

Paperback, over 300 pages featuring a French/ 
English food glossary and 140 evocative photographs. 

"Bound for France? Don’t go wHhout Fblrida Wells’s 
Food Lovers Gride to Par#* 

Houston Chronicle 

"Wells spills fhe beans here... No serious hedonist 
should go to Paris without it." 

Gael Greene, New 1 fork Magazine 
"An illustrated tour through... one of fhe great food 
cities of the world." 

Philadelphia Daily News 


International Herald Tribune, Book Division, 
181, avenue Charies-de-Gaulle, 

92521 Neuilly Cedex, Franca 

Please check method of payment 


AB 10 


N°. 


Enclosed is my payment. (Payment can be made in any 
convertible European currency at current exchange rates). 

Please charge to my -- Hi Co! 

wBff Sil l ^ — A 

□ Wm □ mbnmSnu 

_ Exp. date 


credit card. 




Nama 


Please send me: 

copies of I.H.T. GUIDE TO BUSINESS 
TRAVEL & ENTERTAINMENT: EUROPE 
at US$16 each, plus postage: 

add $1.50 each in Europe, $4 each ouiside Europa 

copies of FOOD LOVER’S GUIDE TO PARIS 
at US $ 11.95 each, plus postage: 

add $1.50 each in Europe, $4 each outside Europa 


Addressu 


Signature 

(necessary for card purchases) 


CHy/Cod©/Country_ 


25 - 6-85 










Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


Over-tfie-Counier 

NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


Soles in Net 

loot Htsti Low 3PJH.Ch-ee 


309 6 5* K» 

130717 IW iw 

■33 12 2 10 10 10 — % 

11 34 23 23 

10321 am si 
574 T2W. 11% 13V. +1 
448 m 14*6 15b + 61 
11410 Mi. 9=41 + 111 

1 41* 41* 41* + % 

102219s 71 21V* 

20 13 321x7 m 6% 

38 41* J% 4’A— 16 

u t* tu m 

■20 -S IB623b 33 2H* + % 


Sales In Net Aufmtx 

IMS KlfA Law 3PJVLQiae AjjtagP 




I927>* 

Xb 

26 Vft — 

% 



137 5 

4A 

4b 


i 


10 8 

7% 

7% 


no 

2.9 

1X27% 

27 

27V, — 

% 

33 

ZS 

63 11V* 

lib 

11% + 

4ft 


Auntek 

Avatar 


41* + 16 AmLoek .07e J 
211* AJWnoni 
6% AMS 
4'* — 16 AMdSv .18 3 

94* AMIUI 

2348 + 46 ANIHW 1.18 4,9 
151* + Ml an; I ns 14B 33 
% APtivG 

191* + 16 AQuastl 


33 1«* l«% 151* + 16 AN (Ins IDS 33 
272 b %. % APtiyG 

6191* 191* 191* + (6 AQuash 

1282 2% 246 246 + 1* ASecCo IJD 18 
31 746 7 746 + 46 AfflSfts 

388 Bb BVs 646— 6. ASolor 

STt TE 3 £-* SSSSbi . 

54 416 416 446 Amrttrs 1.60 44 

1751016 10 1016 Amrwst 

31 546 S'* 546 + 16 Airmen 


SB IT 792 3SV. 3416 3SV| — 16 
AO 73 STB 1346 1316 1346 + 46 
1.12 S3 212116 2116 2116 

1701746 1444 1846—16 
®D U 2 546 546 516 
JHe J 91046 1044 1046 + 46 
X 74» 746 74fe 

1017 17 17 

.18 3 5171* 17 in* + 16 

307 Vm b Vi 

1,18 4,9 2 2346 2346 2346 + 44 

108 33 Z7B3246 33 221* + 46 

3 It * 

IJD U 9«6te X 26V> 

310 T3 121* 121*- «* 

218 21* 216 246 

17* % 44 96 + v, 

t 21 76* 7 7 

IjH 44 786381* 38 3846 + 1* 

XX X X - 16 
X 746 7V* 746 + 16 


Sales In Net 

loot HMi Lew JPM-Ch’vt 
84 12<* 1216 121* + 46 
122 1046 1046 1096— 16 
3144% 23b 2416 
135151* 1516 1516 — 16 
207 24 W 2316 24 + 1* 

42 4 4 4 + 1* 

1X16 IK 1546- 16 
I 14 846 81* 846 

205 416 4 4<* — 16 

71 B46 8W 816 — 4h 
189 7 84, 846— M 

I 24 846 846 044 

93 61* 6 8 —1* 

271 4b 4 446 + 16 

492 41* 4 6 — 1* 

383201* 1916 201* + 46 
XI 1844 181* 101*- 1* 
721846 18b 181* 

X 44 394 446 44* 446 


220 4 A 11650 49 491* + 46 

,10a IjJ 24 746 716 7<6 — <6 

35 246 246 246— Ht 
6 8 B 8 
205 7 8% 846 

iJOOo 27 3036b XI* XI* 

87 91* 9 9 

■10e A 1d3 2546 2546 2546 

224 43 6511* 511* 5U* 

TBa 17 12316 2316 23(6 

.90 47 33 19 1848 19 — 16 I 

134 18 SJQ34M. 331* 34 ■ 

IX 746 7b 7V*— 16 OCHS 

AO BJ 295x996 9% 946 + 1* CCOR 

1TO 43 629V* 2746 X — Ml cPRHb 

M 14 5 28Vr 2746 SB +2 CBTB ft 


Sales la Net 

lets HMb Leer 3 PM. COO* 

■ «* 446— iS, 

XU. 3816—46 
71 2116— <6 

71* 71*— la 
6 6—16 
846 846 
4ta 4V6 + I* 
1744 174, 

221* 23 +|6 
844 8b 
Wm 191ft— |4 
1344 1344 + 44 
X X — |* 
m i8i* 

.3516 3546— 46 
348 4 
4 4 

9b 916 + 16 

’fiS’ta + S 

?r?a-b 

746 746— V* 
1846 1846 
1748 111*— 46 
271* 271* 

7 7—16 

19 19-44 

X48 2844 


58 444 41* 444 + 16 AmsfcB 1A0 19 222261* 2Sb 2556—4, 


262 2V* 746 246 
1 A0 54 4 18 IB 18 —I 

A0 48 338 17 1846 1846—46 

t 5X18 3314 33% + 16 
1 516 516 516 

42 516 5 5 

■10c J X1 1246 1746 121* + I* 
22214b 14*6 1416— Hi 
73 6*4 6 6% + % 

■23e 14 1818 15*6 15*6—46 

t 1015 141* 14V* + U 

JOB l.l 9928*6 28*6 28*6 

LA 41 7734 XI* 34 + b 

1 16*4 1814 1814 — I* 

« 5V6 516 516 + 16 

3)0 5 ISO 2 9 

JHo 3 7522b 221* 2248 + I* I 

40 21 213 18b 18*6 18*6 


Ameadi .40 Z8 
Amflta .ID 15 
An look: 

Analvl 

Anaren 

AndrGr 

Andavr 

Andrew 

Andros 

Anlmeds 

Aeeco 

.12 14 


2316 151* 15V* 

A 5=4 5*41 5b 

8101146 lib 1116 
59 10 948 948 

78111* 1146 1146 
5 1214 12b 1214 
43 7 648 7 

25920*4 194* 20 — 1* 

12 5V* 5V6 5W + 1* 

,7 £ 

X 916 896 816 
5700191* T7b 191* +146 
78181746 1596 1746 +114 
223234* 22b 2344 + 46 
96 14 1344 14 

4 4 4 4 — 1* 

478231* 2214 231* + 44 


1J» 104 13310V. 

5312 


48V* 46V* — 46 CML 
2714 2714 CPI 

19 25 +61* CPT 

944 ID — 14 CSP 
1196 1196 CVBF 


CBTBs 40 14 


307 1814 15=5+ 1614 + 14 I Cab! TV 


3A 3 

433% 

31% 

31% + % All IdS 

ir 

X 9% 

9% 

9% 


208522% 

21% 

21% — ’* Arabs 


131 6 

4Vr 

4 Vft 



21b 

21% + % ArcflJ' 

e 

I® 5b 

5% 

Sb + b 


45 5% 

5% 

Sb + b Anns 


30719% 

19 

19% + b 



3 


Mb ZA 

335 Jib 




1010% 

10% 

10% — Vft Aiawl 

2.12b 4J 

1 49% 

49% 



13 6 

5b 

6 Artel 


16 8% 

7% 

S'* 


20 3*4 

3% 

3%— b Adrian 


TOT 9 

8% 

8b— b 


20 8 744 8 + V4 

I-SW lOVft 9b ID** + 44 

1410 10 10 

-40 73 1911614 1544 1814 +1 

1302 II V< HP6 IT'A 

t 123181* 10 101* 

22 B'm 6% 8b + 1ft 

■50 ZB X 13b 13 13V6 — 16 

71196 1144 1144 

191 71* 71* 714 


30 73 4 31V* 311* 311*— 1 

.13 Ml IX 12 1196 1196— 14 

17 91* 946 99a 

9 416 316 416 

45 6b 846 896— Hi 
M 73 45171* 17 17V» + b 

I 9513V* 1314 13V* 

252 7.9 148 X 38b 3144 + 1ft 

MH\S 4S& 25b 73 + I* 

.90 2J 43340 39*6 40 + 14 


95 8b B Bb Coche 

17 I * 1 + K CA?t 

294M46 34 2414 + J* CbrVsc M M 

1! 2. L ITS CnHbne 

74 91* 8b 914 + b CfllAlUP 

MMT 7 A 92 14b 1344 14 + b cSSte 

50o 21 1 37b 37b 37b + 1* CoisuTn 

_ 238 814 716 814 + (ft Ealwtr % 160 53 

332 43 1858b SBV* 581*— M ColtanP 

.12 IT X 8*6 81* 856 + Vj rST .16 13 

_ 137 8b 81ft 8Vft CnnSnC 

.106 1.1 32 » TO 914-46 cananl Jir S 

9 91* 914 914 — b CotFSL JD IB 

132 19b Hi, 1BH-46 caeCrtj 

28 121* 121* 1214—1* caraots Mr 3 

37 2.1 2915b 15 15 - b CarSnk 

JO 4.1 71121* 12 12b cSS s »T 

*»*,"»*" CoreerC JW 23 X 34 

1J2 AO 81633% 32b 33b + 44 after! t min 
517V, I7V6 1716 + 16 a»m * 

“«£ 'St ’£? b ST*?* 1-X S3 11331 

4 41ft 4*4 4b — b CwriOOT IBIS 

814 13b 14 + I* CwBco 2ASh4J MN8 

48 51* 5b 5b- b Cn&iS +4 

151 71* TA 71ft + b CFdBks S 11 

11017 181* 18b CJa-Bc \X A9 

?i 2b s sets §3k 13 

20e23 IS 946 9^ 9^- 14 C^A .15 , « 


SB 27 37XH4 33 331ft— 4* 

» ™ JW 7Vft— b 
77 5=* 5 5 — b 

M 1J 15221ft XKt 22Vft + b 
81 mb 10* 10b + I* 
27»t7b 171ft 17b 
151 8Vft 846 896 

am m m + n* 

t 912b 111ft 12b + b 

ID 4 3b 3b 

lint M h 

M U 4352016 1796 20*~ * 


The Perpetual Calendar 



gg£ 

ai^o ips* a+* 

Conwfri 280 57 5481ft 45 48 

CoOonP 355 216 246 2b 

ColOV .16 U 8912V. 13b 121ft + 16 

Cananl Mr 3 §11*246 Mb 2?*"+ * 

COPFSL 7. 14 gig 1ft 11*+ » 

CardDb JHr j 29I7V* 17 17b + b 

Carank 741 1046 lOVft 1046 + 46 

CanSs MO 7b 8 

CarerC JW 13 X 3b 31* 3Vft- 1ft 

c artert . t mins im im+u 

gs ifisrsass** 

Centoar 75315 14v* IS + b 

CenBcg 2JK6 4J BHN6 451* 45b + 1* 

OnBihS 1J2 44 7935 341ft 3446— Vk 

OFdBks 44 11 1152716 28b 2716 
CJerBc IX 43 X24b 24b Mb— 96 
CftwLI .18 17 IX 141ft XI* 141* 
™?Bn 7«il9 831 XI* 28)*— 21ft 

Central 30 73 35404; 40M, 4096 

Certvrl 275 19ft 1b 176 + fc 

Centvn 73 Mb U 14—16 

CerbrA .12 14 12x7b 7b 7b— H 

Cenmtfc 10 3b 216 216 — b 

Cetus 171 10b 18b 10b — U 

CtwdTh 20 b 46 b 

.10 14 22 5b 516 5b + b 

ChncCp 9 8 8 8 

Oworaf 94 lift lb iBk 

OMPEn 48 4b 4b 4b+ b 

Ojarntt 7 9b 9 9b + « 

OwrCh X 7b 7 7b + b 


5dMS HI Met 

nos KWi low ipjtaw* 

.12 2jQ 100 816 5b 6 + b 

19 4b 41* 41*— 1ft 

70S 7b 7b— b 

1076 t 71*— I* 

24 4b 416 4% 

T4Xlft 14 141ft + b 

76 8b 61* 8Vft 

70 3b 3W 3b— b 

1 8 8 8 — b 

82 X* 3b 3Vi + b ni 

as t w i n ^ 

111125. 12b T2H D1 

97 lift lb lift Dli 

24919b 11b lib— b Dt 
132 6b AM. 6b + 'A Dt 

1JM U XXVft 26b 26b— b Dt 

149 77 192M 29 20b — I* Dt 

370012* 15223b 231* 23b Dt 

UOa U W9WK 17b WA— Vft 

148011.1 11115b 15 151* — b 

100 IA2 18723b 229* 22b + b 

9 7V6 7 7V6 + 5ft 

148 37 9950b 49b 49b— b 

78 L9 43 4Vft 4 4V6 + 1* 

152 47 21 311ft 31 31b + b 

287 3b 3M 3b 

75e 1.1 18 41ft 4H 41ft 

140 43 T9® JtVa 2Btft— b 
2Mb 4J ra<1Vft 40b 41b + 1* 

214b 14b Mb + b 

7615b 151ft 15b + 1ft 

2 3b 5b 2*6 + b 

278 b 16 T» 

JM 4 174799ft 111* T9b 

IflB 41* 4 4 — W 

J8e 4.1 28b 8b Bb + b 

399 5b 5b 5b 

2414b Mb 141* — j* 

254 2b M Zb + S 

288 51* 5b 59ft + 1* 

40 2.1 2388 18b I8b IBb + b I 

5119b 181ft Wb— b ■ — 
125 7b 8b 7 

799 lb 81* Bb 

278 24 354 51% m 5Tb + H 

1738 2b 2 2A + ift : 

154 3b 3U 3b — Me ■ 

SB 2.1 12*3b 25b 23b + Vft 

70 SH Stk 5%— Vft 

40 23 3A2DV* * 301ft 

6 96 b b 

M 1.1 1512b 131* 13b — Me 

J8 34 1 T9 18b 181ft 18b + b 

27 9b 9b 9b— Vft 

385527b 24% 27b +21* 
78214b 14b 14b 
33 11 28325% 25b 25b 

2212U 12 13 — b 

74 53 7818b Mb 18b 

■58 ZS 21334k 2»* 221ft- Vft 

JM U 4 61ft 8b 61* 

622 211* 22 +96 

JOB 73 a 9b 9b 91* 

8 2b 2b 2b 

51312 lib llVft— VS 


OirmSs TO 17 18819b 19b 19b— Vft 

Cnarvj? 1015b 15b 15b 

amthM 70a 37 1921 20V* 21 

Owttm 48 27 100171* 17b 171*— M 
CWcPrt 43919b 10b 19b + b 

CMTctl tllOM 9b 10b + b 

OlLwn X 1J 1193»Vft Mb Ml* + b 
Owmex 37 6b 6 61ft + Vft 

awake 8518 17 17b + v* 

ChrvE .12e 1.1 811b lib 11b 

OilCIll 1438 lib 10+ 11 +M 

Ol Poes 34329b 39Vft 29b + b 

OllllS 70 26b 28b Mb 

Oiltand 170 43 1223b 22% 23b + 1ft 

Owmer 131 X 29% X — b 

Oironr Si lb a a — u 

au-Dwt M 21 10617b 17b 17b + 1ft 

Cftyrn s .ISO 14 233 7b 7 7U 

annPft 134 27 3348 471* 47V6— 1ft 

amtuc 7i r 4018 171* mi — b 

Qntas .120 J 3X1* XU Xb + b 

Clrtier 172416b 15b 16b + 9ft 

Clprlco t 5 71* 1 7 + Vft 

Clrcon 6 5b 5b 5b — U 

CbSau IX 37 1X40% 39% 40 — b 

CtzSGa J8 34 167922b 21b 22b + U 

CIzFM UM 37 20434% 32% 34% +2 
CtzUIA t 49 Mb 38% 38%— U 

CIzUtB 176 58 XX XVft 35 + Vft 


ChMiFft IX 27 
anMJc 7ir 


CIzUtB 176 57 


15b 159ft + U 
3SVft 381ft— 9a 
m 3V6 
lib lib 
Bb 8b 
s% «rv. 

17b 17b + b 
9 9 + b 

»b iip* — 9 a 

22 23% +lb 

2BVr 2BVa— M 
6 6b — b 
14b 14b 
103 IDS 
5b 5b 
18 18b + b 

10b 11b + b 
4b 4b— b 
2% 2%— Vft 
i7% iTb— b 
3b 3b 
m 5b 
» 39 — b 

15 18b +1b 

5b 5b— b 
25b 25b + 14 
10b lOVft + b 

3 a + b 

23b 23b 
17b 17b— b 
lb lb 
Iffb 10b— b 
6 6 
1 1b 


Mcsia ml 

lots turn Low IPAftOTM 

lb— h 
6 %— H 
49b— 14 
7 + M 
7b— K 
12b— U 
27b + VS 

3 + W 
22b— U 
1 M + U 

71ft + U 

4b— b 

znft + % 

34 — b 

4 

Mb 

13b— w 
13b 

5b— b 
25V* + % 
35b — Vft 
17b + » 
15b 

35 — Vft 
12» + b 
lib— b 
28b + Vft 
17 

1* -b 
iAb 

73 — b 
239* 

38b 

18b— b 
18b— Vft 
794 + b 

5 + b 
22b + U 


1112b 12b 12b 
5 ib ib lb 
X 5 5 3 +b 

.13 IT « 7b ' 7 7 — Vft 

51 3 2b 3 + b 
21 8b B Ib + U 
3611b 11 II + 1* 
117 J* S, b 
1077 SC 2 7 — 5ft 

90 8 7% 8 + b 

UM 35 13531b mb 31% 

SfB 9 X 9b 9b Vb + b 
3411% 11U 11b 
146 9T 25B15Vft X I51ft 

410b 10b 10W— b 
1 9b 9b 9b— b 
JO U 20 19% W 19% + b 
3XO IT 1618b 17% 17%— Vft 
11 5b 4% 5b + b 
8% 8b 6b + 18 
30520U 19b 20 + b 

7115b IS 15b— b 
104 T2b 12% 13b + b 
13T7V* 17b 17b— Vft 
2511 10b i ITb — b 

240 7T 335% 35b 35% 

112 9b 8% 9b— Vft 
16 8% Ob Bb 
300 7b 7 7 

99 3b 1 3b + b 
18 6 5% 5b— b 

384 9% 91* 9% + U 

24 4% 4b 4b 
11215b 14b 15 + b 

UXb 4.9 40 27 21 22 +1 

in 18 T7b 17% — b 
3911 W% 11 

iSTt *4 7 %r* 

30 13 Ml» 16 16 + b 

10 15b 14% 15 — b 
33 9b 9b »b 
102 5b 5b 5b— U 
36 18% 17b 18% + b 
49® Xb Xb 
8412b 121* 12b + b 
1 9b fb 9b 
IN M N 
100116% 15% 16b + b 
47 5b 4b 5 

3M» 30 UM 27b 27b— b 
IX 34 10 23 23 23 + b 

33 D 94 7 8% 6b- b 

3 22b 22b 22b +lb 
458 24 7332b 3ZH 32b + b 

201 in m 

11 3b » 3b— b 
215 15b 14b 15b + b 
24 2% 2b 2b— 18 
1® 9 Ib 8% + b 


ions In Met 

1086 HU LOW JP-M-OlVt 


Xta HU Lew iPJACtibe 


1 


58 13 I0M 25 25 +11* 

1 Ib Ib fb— b pnpaSL 
7N 8 Tb 8 Framnl 

.u it 2 Sb 5b 5b— Mi craiPd 

js-e t 

1134b Xb S4b-J6 ^ 
t 107315% 14b 14b— b I 
t 101 3b >U 31*— U I 
1.X 7S M0282 61b «b-b CMSvs 

34 73 UT2U 12 12 GTS 

40e 3 l 8 12 Wb Mb 10b Oamaa 

*“"• =£ ”2 * a gSSm 

73 5 4b 4b— It nf,uw»H 
6113 TXft 13 + U. Goman 

9031 30% 31 + b cSSfa 

3 42% 51% 52% cSSa 

48 IT 12936 TO* W* CtfMfcn 

3121 20b 20b CnBbvd 

S is ^ 

■ M,,J i! db SS SS=!S gffi 

L12 40 7323 W 8 + U Geneic 


FrnkCp 13X U 
FrnkEJ X 18 

FrnkRs 


L12 40 72 M 77% 23 + » oenex 

UM S WW W* MW + b feSnd 058 

J9 4P 4B0U lb* 2«4 +1 GaFBk 


J72 25 1® 

ITS 3T 24925 
2JB0 5.1 14 B 

IX 44 90 XT' 

144 30 18371 

IJZ 29 1445F 


1« 9b 9% 9b 
20113b 13 13b— 

1 ® » ® 

249 25 U% 34% 
1455 55 H +1 

■027% 27 27 

1837b 37b 37b 


GcrMdi 03 .9 

GonflF JO* If 
OMNI 33 23 
CMMGl 34 IT 
GtooTr 

OHbrtA L70 80 
Godfrvs 52 20 


IJB 29 1445% 45b 45b — ■* GWCOCT 43* 40 

10427b 27 27b GeldEs 34 IT 

IX 35 738% 38% S8%— b GdTnco 

112512% 12% 1296— b GOtOOS 

5541796 >7% 17b Gott 

48* 4 21013 12% 13 +1 GouUP T6 45 

31Mb X W* +1 Qrnco 44 14 

102t 94 819b T9 19 Crodea 

40D IT 111 72 XTVi ■n Grantre 

80 11% II II — U Oraptil 

B0 9 8% 9 — % GrnMM 

16 9b 9 9V.— 1* GrphSc 

30 23 1627b 27b 27b GravCo 

1 17% 17% 17% GtArnC 31 34 

.40 14 1229 » . » + b SSpIi -40r 84 


!JX 9T 1 13 13 p. — b 

jT 35 114% 14% 14% -b 

43® X M.-b «*. 

■31 Mb Wb lBVf + U ^ 

HIM M% n% - % 

48 1.9 *21*5% SV6 25% 

X 14 2 11% 11% tl%-% 

118 d% 4b *% 

33 12 8514b 14% 14*9— % 


i! 313b 1316 13b + % 
147 4% 4b 4% 

211% 12% IS% ♦ % 

5 1943% 43 43%— % 

8 101ft 10 10b 4- W 

1.1 H W * 9 — W 

ID 7 4% 8%- b 

7 2% 2b 3% 

125 47 44% 48% — % 

95 MI4b 14% 14% 

4 533 23 73 « 

411b II 11% + % 

45 1218b 18% 16b 

70 lb lb lb + % 

IQ 3b 3% 3b- M 

389 7b 7 7b 
487 2% 2b 3b + to 
M 14% 4% 4% — U 

311 17b 1M0 I? — b 
.9 73 lb Bb Bb 

15 613b nb i3b 

5® 514% M% 14% 

IT 31720% Xb 20% 

1UV 151* 15V. 

6J) OXlft Mb. Ml* 

73 8215% 17®* 18 +b 

4JB 1413 12% 13 + b 

87813% 13% 13b— b 
4313 13 13 - Vft 

45 4517b <6% 17 

34 8713% 12% 13 — V, 

32 ■% 8 8W 
6 7*6 796 7b— b 

19215% 14b 15b -V- to 
13 3b 3b 3% 

893 4b 61* *%— W 

12 1% 8b Bb + U 
14 1520% 301ft 20b + b 

18 a 4b 4i> 4b + u. 


729% WS 2W4 + » I GfLkFd .108 5 11712% 12b 12b— b 


t 71 lSVa 15% 15b GtSeFd 

IX 34 3830 Mb 391*- Ift GlWOst. 50* 80 
142 3n 296 3 GrnanT 

'JH 54 111Mb m GrvrAd 140 15 

IX U 1730% X 30 — % GwtflFd 

148 38 X43% 41b 41% + % Gleet, 

58b 45 3342b 12b 12b + V. 

IX 55 2521% 21b 21% + % Guar NT 

56 15 JO 32 32 - b GoordP A* 25 

7 7b 7b 7b GuetfS 

140 3.9 MM 35% X GuHtrd 

+ £ GHApk) 30 2.9 

OtW KM 23b 23b M% + b GlfBUc 
50b 12 1 18% 18% 18% + % GHNuc 

A0 23 4217% 17% 17%— % S.H J05o A 

IX 45 1244b 44 44b + Vft _ 

108 Bb 8% Bb I 

36 25 m38b 33 33 — % l 

X 32 8325 34 Vft 25 + b HBO 

800 9b 9b 9b— b HCC 

1.10 45 71 22% 32b 23b + b HCW .10 15 

2912b 12 12b + % HEITk 

IX 45 31541b 40b 48b— % HMOAm 

1.12 23 29641% 41b 41% HocftCO 34 15 

T2 35 619 17 19 Hatar 

IX 20 14M% 34b 34b— W 

1280 4J 122H% 27% M% + % 

X 34 8 5% 5b 5b HsItSvn 

IX 42 252 52 52 +1 Halifax 54* 5 

TX IT 4312 lib lib— b Hoi ml 

275 5b 51* Sb Hamfl 

0 3 3 3 — Vft Honvln M 13 

49 3b 2b . 3b + % hotpG 

X 1.1 1I5W 18b 19 + b H rtf Nt 

15 94% 14b 14% HrffSts IX 15 

X 20 17341 40% 41 + U Harvlns 

X 63 7118 17 17b— b Haltiws 

89 14% 14 14 — % ftaveer Xe 24 

34 IT 2X14% U 14% + % Havrtv J2 15 

4% 4b + Ift HnftB .141 
X J 15318% 18b 18% + % HlmCS S 

57 A 39 17% 17 17 H min 

36 11 24S31U 28% Wl- % HttUdvr. 


3511% lib 11% + % 
73 6% 8% 6% — % 

3*424 22% 24 +!% 

090 190 190 +2 

10 6b 5% 5% 

4012b 12b 12b 
» 9% 9 9 

5 Sb 5% 5b 
116 16 16—1* 
16 15% 14% 14% — % 
714b 14b 14b 
12 Tit 7 7 — M 

88015% 15b 15b 
8 1% 1% 1U— % 

1412 11% 17 


30 15 IDVfcBHe » 30% 

56e J ®11 10b It + M 

.10 15 355 Sb 476 Sb 

31613b 12b 13b— 1 

2X12% 12b 12% 

34 15 224 24 24 —2 

JO 19 18% 18% — W 


.10 5 X 16 

36 1J 4843! 
34 IT I®® 


JO 19 18% 18% — W 

4 4b 4b 4b + b 

. 80 2% 2% 2% + V6 

8 5% 5b 5b I HsMvn IS b b Vft— % 

252 52_ S2_ +1. Halifax 54e J X 5% 5 5 

452 2S» 2% 2%— b 

.10 5 73 16 1S% 15b— 46 

12 0 3 3 — b I Honvln 36 13 4843% 43 43% + % 

34 IT I®® X'- 28% + Ift 

IX 52 196*1 30b 31 — % 

94» If* J HrffSts LX 15 4744 48 48 

2 41 40% 41 + % Horvln 1 29820% 19 20% 

23® ” Hottiws i7 m ob 8b-% 

Him M ]f4 — b I Hauser Xe 28 3216% 15% 15% —1 

X 25 9721% 20b 20b— % 

.141 22 8 8 8 

a 16% 16 Vft 18% + U I HlmCS* 8213% 13% 13b- b 

21™ 1L/ 1L. . Himin 34 2b 21* 2% _ 

?25lT }? HMNdvn 1244 3 2S6 3 + 

Si™ T7b 17% + % HchDA* .16 5 142819% 18% 19% + W 


HrtfNt IX SO 
HrffSts IX 35 


17522b 22 22 — b HchnU 

63 1% lb lb— Vft 

08b a mm m 9* + v* 

M 21 145 4% 4b 4% + % 


18% 18% — % 


(Continued on Page 15 ) 


Hoating-Rate Notes 


Co— a Wat Bid A— 


40 24 29711% lib 11b 


Dollar 


CtvNCp 58b 34 1758% S% X — % 

atvBee IX 20 54371* Xb 36b— b 

CtarlcJ x 3T 50231* 22b 23b + b 

CJatlcC 10 7 7 7 + b 

CJeurCfl 8 18 17b 17b + b 

aevtfit 250 HL3 3220 19b 19b— b 

atMme 131726b 25% X% + b 

CoartF 414 14 14 

CoaStR 33 6b 8 6% + % 

Cstllnt Xe 23 33 8% 4% 6% 

C3«av 10318 15% 15% — % 

CotwLb 20517b 18% 17% + b 

CocoBtf 58a 14 ®«% 40b 40% + b 

Coeur 3413b mt im 

coaenle 981 2b 2b 2b— b 

Cohmt s 93 18% 17% 18% + U 

CofafjR 216 4b 4 4 — b 

CotasKn 2212% 12*6 12% 

CalFdl 28225b 24% 25b +7 

Collins 73 4b 4 4b— b 

ColABn M73 1017b 17b 17b 

CBcaeA 50*18 11018% 16 18b— (A 

CotnGa* IX BT 7317% 17% 17b- U 


CalLtAc IX 35 
CcIrTle 

CotoNt T4 35 

CaluFd 

ColSav 

ColuMII IX 28 
Comar J 

Co marc JO .1 
Camcsf s .12 A 
Comaxi 


89T7b UW BklUlMtottX 

wantw ska 16 Bk Ham ScoNa 94 

^1 S Bk Tokyo 93 

iE5 iSti-SjasS - 

mu% 14b— 1 % ULTpScySgrtn/Tl 
MM 19b lSS W BkTekvoDeeaartr 
uiw « BodKmricaotSM 

w. Mk ftb + 16 BoUrtTruNM 
3b + b OmbnlniifU 


baotr/Nlat. 
AlfkdlrWi95 
ATOM) kWl92 
AlHsd Irtah87 
Alltel Irtdi Pcro 
An* Bka Caro 91798 
Atlantic Fin H/N 
AglopitlaiS 
Bee Comm IHH 
Bca Har Lawn 91 
Bee DtRonsi B/91 
BcoDI Roma 92 
Bco Santo Selrtio 91 
BomrinkBktBbllH 
Boa Cora 97 
BkCraaoeflTW 
BkCnwce 93797 
Bfc I retold 19 
BKIiHand92 
BkMontmXtO 
BkMmtraafW 
BkMonfnolfl 
X Now York 98 
Bk Nova Sofia tt/tt 
Bk Horn Scotia 94 
Bk Tokyo 9J 
Bk Tokyo 81 
Bfc Tokyo 87 


Comarc Z10 S3 
CmdAIr 

ComBsti 2X 35 
CamClr Z12 2T 
Cm coll ix 25 
OnBCal 36 13 
CmcIBn 2X 4.1 
CmdFd 

CamlNt IX 35 
CmlShr 30a 30 

S wtthB 154 4T 
vytttiF 1.1X135 
CmwSv 
ComAm 

Comlnd X U 
ComSvB 

ComSUr X S3 
CmoCd s 


X .1 MM 15b 15b 
.12 A 24630 29% 30 

IX 3b 8% 3b + b 
.16 ,5 «» lib 12b + % 

V10 S3 fi04tlb 39b 48b + Ik 

OB 35 4 57Vft J7% 57b- % 

L12 2T 7W5 72 73 —2 

04 25 ®<l% 41b 41% + W 

5 Zi 73 14 13% 13% 

X 41 549 49 49 + Vft 

389 15 14% IS + b 

X 35 IX X 23 +Tb 
JOoM 7430b 18 10 — b 

X 47 1*2% 22% 22% + b 

.1X135 77X8% B% 8% — b 

91 lib 11% lib + b 
213 lb 1% l%— b 


Baiters Trust 00 
■ad— Trust 94 
BH Capital M 
Ban Fh 0791 
BW95 
bn naff 
mint 93 
Be IndosmlS 
Bo lndosuez99 
Bueb 
BkoBT 
BknVf 
BkxOctH 
B tea Jon M 
Bice 99 

BelndouH97 
BnpVS 
Bra 97 


* “ lPStJ KEH 


ComSTir X S3 11 lib 10% lib + % 
CmoCd s 13321 20% 21 + b 

Comcoa 1747 9 IR6 Bb + % 

CmooT 5lr .1 18 9% 9b 9b— % 

CmpCr 43 13 3X31% 31% 31% + % 
CmpraL 142 5% 5 5 — % 

CmpSvs 78 B% 8% 8%— % 

Cojrmua 1M Zb 2% 2b 

CCTC 208 9% 9 9b 

pnpTVa 14226% 25% 26% + b 

Co'Aut „ 112 5% 5 5% + % 

CmpOt 03 3 5 9% 9% 9% 

CBlEnt 180 4% 5b 6<* + % 

CmptH 71 8% B% 8% + b 

Cmpldn 14 8% 8% 8% + b 


BWH79S 
Bra 99 
3np89 
BOP 88791 
BraJulM 
Bra 85 

BqPortba Pera 
BaWoraaR/W 
Borckm Bk Pera 
Bwckm07S9S 
Berdan O/S 90 

Barclays O/S Pera 

Barclays O/S 04 

HoROnm P«ra 

BeWuaiDeeW/m 

BeletaenX 

Betokmi 00/05 

BcraMBkH 

BwOHlBkH/VI 

BeWum 94/04 

BaWumOd99/M 

Cram 

Ca»0S 

Cnca 90/95 

cm 90 

CntH 

CBK 95/85 


i 0 ©■£= (B it©©® d3@® DiMemafeimgifl unw ' 


Hiar 1 

EMftJop 

ST 1 OioaemanO/S93 

9% 17 -10 namauD a«,ManCan:i® 

Chase Man COra Oo 
OwmlcalM 
Cteailcd 96 (WUv) 
Cbrisflanbun 
OrtetanlaBkM 
□HaraAHWWklv) 
OUcorpSraM 
enkoraOcH* 
CBtoarpW 
emcorp Para 
ancoraPlra® 
CamerkD97 


Cuiua Urtj Moteieaf 91 

Comp Fin CJX. 97 

Council Of Eonmod 

Cd 16/98 

CcfWM 

CcfFrMS 

caw 

crameW/92 
CrameU 
Cr Du Nord 89/92 
Cr Fonckr 88/93 
O' Far Eanrt 92 
Cr Lymnais«17« 
CrLnanalsD 
Or Umub 90/97 
CrLyamablfTW 
CrLyaraata 91795 
CrLyanoabW 
Cr Lyonnais Jan927K 
Cr Lyonnais 00 
Cr Lyaands Jan92/M 

Cr National IS 
Cr National 90/94 

OrNattraain 

Credltamkrit94 

CradltmwmtW 

CrltaDoaoR 

DoDchi KotmyaM 

Dan OH Nat era 99 

Dn Norsk* Nuv90 

DnNankeDtcH 

Danmark JaaX/90 

Danmark Oct 88790 

Denmark 99AM 

DBnmxkPn 

DNErste On 92794 

DrrafcwBkn 

DrakwrBal? 

DraracrFbV2 

Bdorada Nuc99 

ER99 

EdtWWS 

Edt 97 

Eiwn 

End On 

Eab93 

Earn 
Era am 
Ea» 

Exterior M9IAH 
FanawktH 
Fwroyfe 92/99 
Finland 90 
Flnatm Pracr 90795 
First Bcslra 94 
First BkSysIM 
HnlOUcBOOW 
First Oilamo92 
First Oilcraa 94 
First atv Traa 95 



First Mir 95 
F6rd 91 
Fall lot *4/9* 
CenfliHaKa 09/92 
Grnitkmnoi 92/94 

cm si 

Gzb92 
Gab Para 
GrbN 
Giro 91 

Gfytesten, 92/VS 
Grindlovstt 
Grtadftmtf 
GfWesNnilf/M 

HSU Samnal 98 
MU Samuel Pira 
Htm—91/K 
Hydra Qaefaec 02 
Hydro QartMcW 
Hydro QwtocK 
Id 91 

I ariond 95/97/10 
Indaaula 81793 
ux a 

Intend N/99 

Ireland 97 

Irtlaad94 

Italy 99 

IMv 89/94 

Italy 05 

CltokW 

jp Morgan 97 

K»FM 

KraMay92 

KumlrnOy95 

Ktebnmrt Ban 91 

KtetnaartBanW 

KtetawortBa Para 

Koran Day Bk 1649 

Korea EwhBkBSm 

Lincoln S+C 99 

UoyasBkParp 

Uovxn 

Uoyds92 

UoyttM 

LIXJatR 

Ltd] is 

UcbJunV 

Ltcbtt 

Ltd] 92 

MatarsteM/W 
MetoystoK/15 
Motovrin Apr» 792 
Moknriia DkI 9N2 
Malaysia n/VJ 
Man Han 94 
MflnHanwnvUyl 

Mar MM M 
Mar MMX 
Mar MM 94 
MdtenUfd 
MtelemtnPara 
MMtaodlntfS 
MUbeif MV 
Midland lot 92 
Midland IM 91 
MMUt let 99 
■MfewlFInW 
ManGranteBM 
MM Bk Den mm 
MM Bk Dan 92 
Nat Bk Detroit 98 
Not Canon BkV/94 
Nat West ParpSraA 
NafW8stPara5erB 
Nat Wed Fta91 
Nat Hast FkiB 
Not West 90 
Netateatfa 
Not Waal Fin 92 
Not West Fta Pare 
NaateOyM 
NawZeofcxMD 
Nr Stall Dev 92 
MpoanCrlD 
ffl—no-v 
Nippon CrM 
Nonflclritfl 


OkBU 
Ota 9. 

01695/99 
Patrol Cora Nr 88 
Petrol Cora Nz 91 
Plrefll 91/94 
PfcBmftenawPI 
QuaftaiU (Boll 98 
Rente 91 
Rap Bk Dallas 97 
RvlUCanodaX 
ESs 83/94 
SaQoma 91 /V3 
Sanaa lot FInM 
Sammlnt Fta 94/M 
Sanaa Hit Fin 91 
Scandt Fin Apr93 
Sand Fta Oedtj 
Scotland IM 91 
Sac Pad /lc 97 
StammwtCaraW 
Snctn 
Saatagm 
SHIM 89 
54* kit 91 
Sac Gan 90/95 
SecGanMortk 
BacGenNovM 
Sac Gan 97 
Snchfl 
Spate 92/97 
Spate 05 
Spain 88/93 
Spain 99 

StradChanAugm 
Stood Oort 94 
Stead Chart 91 
Stand Ovrf MarfO 
skxid Chart MtemafcB 

Staid Qiarl Pera 
State Bk India 87 
Sumitomo tm 92794 
StekJonM 

5«lnWB 
Saeflen 92/Si 
5aadraW79f 
Saeden9J/aj 
SaedanPars 
Taira 92/*4 
Tek nain92/94 
Tokd Aala 94/99 
Tartara 92 
Toro Tut 92799 
Ub Norway 99 
I/M O/S Bk 89 
WMHFaraoW 
WnadynW 
bond Bk Para 
World Bfc 94 
Vakctnma«l/M > 
TtasMnfl 


Cowan Next Bid AOd 

8% xii nxunu 
t% 29-n unssniua 
m lMO 1IU.IAMDX 
96. 23-17 IDOJIUJd 
8% 04-12 ISftl'HltnS 
Mb 23X99M THUS 
an. i9-n iHuemui 
9 18-11 wuthoji 

in. 7789 I034BND5S 
Bh 20-08 9887 99 J7 
8583 WJ3 9955 
9% M07UUt5inU 
8 05-12 MU8II02I 

5% 2M»JBa83 
Ib 29-87 10033X133 
9*. 19-81 99.97 MOflT 
9% I5-I9V7SNU8 
7% 23-12 99® 9931 
18h J4479 10UD1S0J92 
716 21-08 9950 99J0 
9V6 074S 99.13 9962 
PH. 3887 99.9* MU9 
86. - 99JB IRUO 
m 03-12 KD.I0MO2S 
SU 19-12 9971 mS 
10* 04V M0T51BLS 
WV 1889 1005510055 
9b 07-11 MSJBlXja 
1DW nv 1004410854 
8% 20-11 1HU3H0J1 
18 ®X 100X1X78 
7% JM99942 9172 
WK 3DX 100*51X75 
Sb 29-11 1X05HB.U 

19-03 

9Vft 064)71X1710127 
8% 20-11 TXH1X29 
10% 11-09 1X25 
83411 V® 99 J. 

9% 07-11 KX. 1510125 
J* 29-11 99JB tetLM 
9% 12-ffl 1W.J 
7% 05-13 WJ9 9964 
8% HHD 99® 99® 

7% W-tO 99® 99X 
8U 79-11 9947 9952 
H4 XII WU0TX2S 
9% 89871X141X19 
■b 26-11 IK32W42 
IBVi IM? IULS210942 
8b 12-12 1D0JIIX44 
*% I+8B 1X561X18 
1 16-12 10U11DILU 

9% 21-08 9850 9950 
9V6 2886 99® HXU5 
Vft 13X99® 9975 

w* iiv rausuus 

74401+09 99X99® 

77 380I9US98JS 
9b 82- MI UJ6J3OTX2 
Vlft 1587 1OU0KXU5 


Non Dollar 


Mtaar/MaL 
AmBkgW 
BkMantraat94 
Bk Tokyo ttm 
Bnlntawain 
Oftcora 89/91 
Qxi Gold Fin 95 
Cawne98 
CrFonctarOO 
O-Nononol 91795 
Dmraark 93798 
in 94 

Batatam94 
Lloyds Euro W 
Mini W 
H*»05 
Snct 90791 

SSSSBSST 


CaepanNna BM Attd 
U4I tXaiDQJB 
J3% 27X 1X150035 

' » m loumoui 

12% Z1X 1X091X19 
Ub UX 99® 9940 
£V 0589 9155 98J5 
IT* 23VTXI9TX29 
»« 1X15N02S 

nb 22x nuonasD 
12b 1587 9MB WM 
JIS WTO MOOTMQS 
17% 2306 99® NU8 
J*ft B3X 9940 1 £®j» 
12% Q2X 99.15 99® 
12b 7487 1HU7T0657 

» uxtuonx 

13% 274N 99® 181® 


Saurae : Crr<m Suisam-Flrst Boston CM. 


US$ 20,000,000 8V 4 % Notes 1977 due 1985 

Notice is hereby given to the holders of the 8y4% Notes 1977 due 1985 of Gist-Brocades 
International N.V. that, in accordance with the terms of the Trust Agreement dated July 15, 
1977, Notes belonging to Redemption Group nr.1, representing US$ 4,000,000 principal 
amount, will be redeemed. 

The Notes selected for redemption will be repaid at their principal amount on and after July 
15, 1985 at the offices of the Paying Agents listed below, upon surrender of the Notes: 

PRINCIPAL PAYING AGENT 
Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank N.V. 

595 Herengracht 
Amsterdam 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 



Bank Mees & Hope NV 
548 Herengracht 
Amsterdam 

Banque Nationale de Paris 
20 Boulevard des Italiens 
Paris 75009 


PAYING AGENTS 

Banque Generate du Luxembourg S.A. 
14 Rue Aldringen 
Luxembourg 

Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft 
12, Taunusanlage 
6000 Frankfurt/Main 


Asian Development Bank 

Dfls 200,000,000 

7% per cent. Bonds 1985 due 1991/2000 

.Annual coupons July I. 


Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. 


European American Bank & Trust Company 
10 Hanover Square 
New York 
NY 10015 

Generate Bank 
3 Montagne du Parc 
B-1000 Brussels 


Amsterdam-RoLierdam Bank N.V. 


European Banking Company Limited 
10, Devon Shire Square 
London EC2M 4HS 


Union Bank of Switserland 
45 Bahnhofsfrasse 
CH-8021 Zurich 


Not all the Notes belonging to the Redemption Groups nr. 3, 5, 4 and 2, called for 
redemption on July 15, 1981 respectively 1982, 1983 and 1984 have been presented for 
payment. 


Amsterdam, June 14, 1985. 


Trustee for the Noteholders: 
Nederlandsche Trust-Maatschappij b.v. 
326-328 N.Z. Voorburgwa! 

1012 RW Amsterdam 


Bank Mees & Hope NV 
Rabobank Nederland 
Nederlandsche Middenstandsbank nv 
Pierson, Heldring & Pierson N.V. 

Bank of Tokyo International Limited 
Credit Suisse First Boston Limited 
Daiwa Europe Limited 

Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft 
Kredietbank International Group 

Kuwait Investment Company (S.A.K.) 

Nomura Internationa! Limited 
Orion Royal Bank Limited 

International Limited 

Union Bank or Switzerland (Securities) Limited 

May, 1985 


/S v?‘ 




1**1 




t 1 i 





Page 15 


SahK in 

ISO* Hieh Low 3PMOW 


xa 3M> 

400 ?u 

15109 I3Vb 
1JD0 Z7 40 37-^1 


31] 

7U * Mi 
13V* + '* 
3*- — ■- 
IS'-. ~ *» 
X* 

33«» ♦ *e 
16*4 4- <4 
3'-. — . 
1 1 »*5 — V] 
3444 4- 15 
2lt + 5* 
41* 

«'» 4 1 10 
134.— U 
34. * I* 


New Publication 
On Economics 
Targets Laymen 

IntiTTutriivui HiraU Tribune 

PARIS — A new semi-annu- 
al publication aimed at making 
complex economic issues un- 
derstandable to the general 
public is planned for release 
this rail. 

The first edition of the maga- 
zine. Economic Policy, is sched- 
uled for October. It will be edit- 
ed by two economists. Georges 
de Menil.and Richard Pones. 

The publication is jointly 
sponsored by the Center for 
Economic Policy’ Research in 
London and the Maison des 
Sciences de I'Homme and Ecole 
des Hautes Etudes en Sciences 
Social es in Palis. 

Private corporate contribu- 
tions have assured financing for 
the fust two years and Cam- 
bridge University Press has en- 
tered into a five-year contract 
to market the publication. 

Twenty economists from 
eight European countries, the 
United States and Israel will 
meet twice a year as a pre-edit- 
ing review board, suggesting re* 
.visions or providing comments 
which also may be published. 


HeralbSiteSnbiiiw 

Mll " w 




* Opening tor Talks 

: It* Seen in M«wcow 
iWw — w M M S-Ww 

\ BrJwrfl. TCii-«»C— 4— J 


amit Leaders Vow to Pnsh -i.' 
an Economic Recovery [■ 


K&5 k «7 t- 
b Tfcwf 






This is the land of testo 
we like best. 


~ea VMtemlxadincaDwiht £s5 a5iS 
Ss US. Beew m 't Power jS;£!Vb; 




2F0R1 

Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 
we’ll give you an extra month of Tribs foe with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: pearly 50% off the newsstand price 
in most European countries! 


Sped bmdbdorv tea. 

, ode hi ■**»“* ** 

gto»»o4d(V«W l **jdi3>.i»5j , 

~ Currency I \ytPL 6 me*. 3 mm. i 

f A^K _ Z)?Q - 

m Rfr 9.030 _4g6 __Zg6 

ork DKi. 1.930 W 

5 FM 1.410 740 414 

~ IJOQ (M 3SP 

DM *a 361 Mi 

; £ !fii » 31 

Gw a Dr. 1S400 f M. 

NW tariantfa R SO 2§ 146 

“5 £K H5 g 34 

L*e 274X00 )49.(H0 82000 

_WEQ 2£§. 

«. NXj_ 1.420 Jt fi m 

ad be 13000 7/450 _4gj0 

Pul 21300 1IJPH- &30Q 

K SiT 1.470 ns 51 


To: Subscription Manager, International Herald T ribune, 1 81 , avenue Chcrles-de-GauBe, 
92521 NeuillyCedex, Franas.Telj747Q729.Tele>t:612832. 

Please enter my subscription for: 

B O 12mcrtbs □ 6martfhs □ 3 months 

[+ 1 month free) (+2weeiafree) (+1 week free} 

□ My check is enclosed 

r~j^ar~\ Please charge my: □ Access □ Amenaon Express O OneraOub 
[i □ Euroeard □ Mastercard O Visa 

Codwpirydcte Sgnatue 

- Gxdaorourt 

wmmml — : — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — \ — i — i — i — i — i — i 


Sweden LS 

Swmfcnd 5F«.| 432 

fenot Europe. North Afnenfarw Ftendi 
/»Aisft,USA. French 

I i\ 322 i 


765 m 

7AS0 4JQ90 

11.500 &3C0 

m 54 

233 17? 


VACATON WSIWXTIONS 

1 w3 be trowing from - 


OlMi ^^^ ^hnweiheps^iatftoinyviax^oddre^lPlKWwefaMingniUiond. 


25-6-85 


Whenyou make a greatbeei; you dorit have to make a great fuss. 














































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, Jl"NE 25- 1985 


x 


\l onda>s 

AMEX 

Closing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to ttie dosiiKf an Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

fin Tkr Associated Press 


17 month 
High Low Slock 


Olv YIJ PE 


SIS. 

100* Hteh to* 


Om 
Quot.Oi'w 


Ift ADI n 

ALLS* 
12 AMCn 
7W am inrl 
59% ATT FO 
6^3 fttmiU 
W» Action 
IW Acton 
1': Admits 


IB ~ AdRvsl 

.14 

5 

20 

14 

3B*6 

7B*6 

28*6 + 1% 

low 


2B 

U 

II 

30 

17*6 

17 

17 — to 

17% 




A3 

38 

5 

4W 

5 

12W 

TBto AftlPb » 

A0 

IJ 

21 

13 

49 



I5to 





105 

ito 

i 

6’% 

2616 




14 





W 

9to AiCalri 



178 

12*6 

12*6 


5w 




7* 

W 

1*6 



i 




9 

iA 

feto 



'X 

6W Aibaw 



35 

59 

7Vj 




7U 

33H 

2m 

5% 

U<- 

»% 

lfl% 

O’ 1 * 

3% 

30'i 

21% 

AH 

51% 

VU 

10'j 

17’* 

4‘* 

101 

9'1 

B% 

K 

r* 

30 

28'% 

rs 1 * 

14'4 

n 

44-b 

40 

9 


12 % 

• 

19=0 
t 1 . 

■to 
Ji- 
lt 

lift II- ■ ARovIn 
3 ASdE 


SO 

.12 


SJPt 5.9 
21 12 


53 4% 44o 4% 

70 r 21W 211* + Vi 

55 TOW 19 ft 191*— VS 

2t7 4 3* 4 — % 

102 86 BSVa Bi 

IS 10‘4 10 TOW + % 

IB 11*4 11*4 11*1— ft 

-o 2** Z% 7W + to 

2 7 2 2 + % 







13*6 

12*6 

13 ^ V ¥> 








Vh 4 ^ 

79*6 Alcoa pi 

175 

11.0 


350 z 34 










Uto 

9 't Amdanl 


T J 

15 

1254 

11*6 

Uto 



.08 

1.1 


IB 

7*6 

7 

7 




7 

IV* 12'6 









44 






3 CS 

42*6 

38 M 





12 

HM* 

ft 

5*6 

5? 6 — *4 




11 lOOOOz 

5 *t 






11 

309 

9 







77 

ito 






3 J 

3 t 

15 *s 


l«i ♦ * 







246 

2 1 *. + ** 

3 AmOII 



IB 

62 

S'* 

3 *« 

n> 





111 

w 



12 ' . APrce 9 

J 4 M 

15 

It 

B 

14*6 




14 13% I3<« 

MO 3'<- ‘ 



Ito AlTIDOl 

.06 

17 

B 

48 

2 to 

2*6 

Jto + to 





12 

13 

S *6 




AndJcb 




33 

3 







79 

7 

Q 

7 "% 

776 — ft 


vlAnol v 




55 

1*6 

1*9 

1 * 9 — to 


3 ' 0 ArooPt 




24 

399 








B 

6*9 







IS 

SI 

9 to 

•V 6 






13 


2 IK 6 

20 W 

20 ft 


tto Awnro 

.15 

XI 


70 A 

7 1 * 

7 ft 

7 * 6 — *6 

12 to 

B'-V A sire* 



11 

2 i 

11*6 




3 r i 

in, 

r» 

«-» 


t Ail role 
7 W Aitrotnl 
AIISCM 
2 i: Atlas wi 
2 Audlotr 
13*0 A vend I 


1 W IV. 114 — ft 
15 J* 12 VJ 12 VJ + ft 

Zto 2=4 2*4 

M ! 3 % + ft 

14*4 1<% Ub 


4'0 

23 '- 

3ft 

It’- 


ll. BAT In 
I2'« BOMs 
Ito BRT 
BSNwl 


2272 

128 

10 


Ah. 4V, 4S + ft 
20*0 20'- 20V] + ft 

3ft 3 3 

II 1010 1DW 


13'6 


.40 

19 

10 

177 

I0W 

Oil 

10*9 + *6 

17ft 

7*6 Baker 




S3 

Uto 

14 

14ft +1ft 


7*1 BaldwS 

J2a 14 


1 

9*4 

9W 

9*6— ft 


2to BalvMw 




53 

3*9 

3ft 

3*6 + *6 

7>. 





1 

7 

7 

7 

Vto 

BnhBId 

M 

46 

IS 

4 

BW 

Aft 

S*6 + W 


3'« Barca 




2 


3to 

3'A— *6 

4*» 

7*7 BamEn 



22 

91 

3ft 

3 M 

3ft + ft 

10ft 

r . Barirwl 

20 

2J 


1 

7ft 

TVd 

7ft— ft 


4 BarvRG 




66 

6*6 

6 

6 


JO' . Baruch 

J4I 

2.7 

» 

17 


17*6 

12ft 

9V. 

Jto Beard 




10 

aw 

tfft 

8*6 + ft 


ft Beirrnw 



7 

3f 


to 

to + ft 

29*. 

19" k BeroBr 

32 

1.1 

14 


29%, 

29*4 

29*4 + ft 

S*9 

3 to BeltiCp 

.421115 



3*6 

316 

326 + ft 


21*9 BIcCP 

.72 

2.7 

1 

21 


TAW 

24to + ft 

12'* 

9to BM)V 

A0 

11 

25 

105 

13 

12V. 

13 + to 


25% 14 BloR B 


25>. 

14ft BloR A 



26 

30 

25to 

24*4 

JAto 

12"> Blemo 1 

J0 

2A 

9 

7A 


24ft 

2'i 

>4 Black E 




195 

1*6 

1ft 

19V. 

I2ft BlaunlA 

AS 

H 




15*9 


12ft BlounlB 

AD 

26 




15ft 

45 to 

22ft Solar P 

D5 

.1 

31 

6V 

40ft 

39W 


IB'- 11 BowVal JO 
10V; 9*0 BawlAi .44 4J 10 

4*. 2*1 Bowmr IB 

19 13*0 Bonne A U It 

264. 1*'- Brscno 1J0 

17*- 11'- Brauns TO 

IS 24*0 BmFA IDO X9 10 

Wo 25": BmFB UJO U 11 

41* 31, BrnFpf M 105 

5 2*0 Bucfclm 

5*. 3*0 BucUipf JO 105 

34*0 23'. Buell JO 2.1 4 

IJto 9 Bush n 8 


1 25 25 25 

25% + *4 

34*. + ft 

lit 
15*0 

ISVO + V4 

40 + ft 

17 II 11 11 

10 10% 10% 1014 

50 4*0 414 4b— ft 

110 16 15*0 16 

32 21 20*0 20% — VO 

29 17*o 17*0 17*0 

23 35VO 34A. 35 

403 37*0 37*0 3710 + VO 

2 3% 3% 3*0— VO 

14 3*0 3*0 3*0— Vo 

21* 4*0 4*4 4*4 

1 28 28 28 

7 10b TOW TOW — *0 


12 Monin 
Hip Law Slack 


Sis. Com 

YM PE 1B8c Hurt LOW QuM C*8» 


.10 


5 17 
17 


1*0 

2W 

31 

J4% 

910 

4*0 


.17 


13ft 7ft CureA 

11*0 5b CareEn 

4Bft 36 CcroP Pf SD0 114 
6*0 Jft COSOWfl 561155 9 

Z2ft 15*0 CaSflA JOB 4.7 10 

7*4 3*4 Cortina 

w Central 30 

1*0 CenHtf 
20*0 CenM Pf 350 115 
9*4 Cents* iJOa'H . 
5b Cetec 50 35 | 
... 2b aunpH 13 

1714 1T0 ChmaP 3* 48 46 

2710 13ft ChtMA 5 M 5 21 

21% 14*4 OllRv 1500 14 10 

I) 8 CWDvtJ 

29 12*OOillhiS 
32*0 Uto Citadel 
28*6 16 VO CIIFst 
26*, 17*0 CTyGoS 
42W saw Ctarml 
12*0 6b OortC 
45 21b Owns* 

Z7V0 10W ClOOOV 3 
6*0 3ft CtsnlTr 
6*4 Crilu 
2VO ColFWls 
S Comfed 
6*4 Compo 
6b CompD 
4*0 Cmpcn 
. 5*0 CmoFCt 

20b 14*0 Cndvn 
12b 4% Coned f 

6% CoratY 
12 ConrCP 
5*o Cons 

1% Coro wt 

6*6 ConsOG 


5b v I Cant A 
7b vICntAPt 
13 CcnlMfl 
*0 Coradian 
2W CooCr n 
VO CosCrwl 

5*4 CntCrd -13r 15 19 
1*0 Caurtld -06e M 
24 Cross T-32 35 16 
9W CmCP 
7*0 CrCPB 


10b 
7b 
21 W 
1110 
12*0 
19ft 
10b 


A 28 
10 

150b 15 9 
150 4J 10 
153# 55 
58a 25 11 
150# 28 9 
.16 S II 

50 25 I 


JO 


13 

24 

9V: 


16 
26 15 
8 
9 
10 


17 


35 
IB 

14b 

23*0 16 CwCPpM-93 95 


10 CrutcR 
I0W 1*0 CrvstO 
73b 1 3b Cubic 
2B 21*0 Curtice 
3% ft CustEn 


15 12 

14 10 


26 12*0 12b 

6 10*0 I0W 

30* 44b 44b 

24 4*0 4b 

29 I7W lift 

i 3* n 
II iw i 

5 Ift 1ft 
JOtaJOft Sift 

25 13b 12b 

24 6b 6b 

196 2*0 2*0 

9 1514 14W 

27 17*0 27W 

i ieb itb 

4 8*4 Sb 

112 2910 29*0 

6 SOW 30% 
21x28*0 28b 

201 27 27 

9 39 3>b 

13 10W 10 

i 36 35b 

17* int 
49s 4b 
Bft 6*0 
... 8b 7ft 

26 19b 19b 
72 Vto 9ft 

8*6 8*6 
5% 4% 
7W 7*6 
15W 15*6 
. 9 9 

a taw raw 

11 22b 22 
489 8W BW 
101 4*0 4ft 

72 6b 646 
1757 lBto 17 
291 12ft I2W 
37 15*6 15*6 
72 21b 21ft 
SO *6 *6 

61 
29 

13S M 9b 

1 I Hi 1T» 

25 34W 34*6 

57 I3W 12*6 
20 11W 11W 
II 21b 21b 
83 % W 

66T 2b 2 
62 21b 209a 
13 27b 26W 
11 I I 


19 

7 

31 

173 


2 

1440 

15 

7 

43 




12b ♦ b 
I0W— W 
44b —lb 
4b 
17 

?S + W 

IW 

low 

12»I— *6 

6b — M 
2V4— W 
14*6- W 
27*6- H 
18b 
Bb 

29W + * 
30W + W 
28*6 + 

27 
38W — 

ID — 
35b — 
17*6 + 

4*6 — 

BW + 

Sb + 

19b + 

9*6 + 

BS6 — 

5*6 * 

7*6 + 
15*6 — 

9 

12 W + 

22 — 

8*0 + 

4*4 + 

6*6 — 
1BW +1% 
12W + ’ 
15*6 + 
21*4 
*6 — 

34*0 — 
12*6 — 
11W 
21b 
W — 

2W — 
21b 
27b * b 
1 - W 


W Month 
High Low Slod. 


Dh. Yla. PE 


SK. Ctssfc: 

ICOsHrtflLao Coot OTw 


9Vt 

S'. CAM Cp 



17 

46 

8*4 

8ft 

4*9 

l'B CMXCD 




13 

2 

2 

19*9 

13*6 CR5 

54 

1J 

15 

13 

row 

IBft 

1VU 

9ft CaesNJ 



19 

30 

i2to 

12W 

■to 

4ft CostvA 



4 

11 

5 

4ft 

14*9 

10 Col RE 

151 

95 

II 

98 

13*4 

13ft 

26 to 

lift Caimol 

JO 

Z4 

31 


24ft 

24ft 

ift 

3to Colton n 




33 

5*6 

5ft 

1*9 

ft Cal In wt 




A 

to 

to 

10ft 

7W Calproo 

501 

9j 

5 

16 

■'6 

8*6 

lBto 

9'6 Cameo 

53 

10 

11 

106 

16ft 

16*6 

3to 

Ito Campnl 




10 

2*9 

2*6 

22ft 

Uto CMorco 

JO 



4 

14*9 

14ft 

23*. 

lift CdnOcc 

J4 



17 

20*6 

20*6 

3SV. 

2 Sto ewine 



9 

27 

28ft 

28to 

13 

.to Cardin 



Hi 

II 

9ft 

9to 

4>l 

1*9 Carflll 




5 

iw 

Ito 

13*4 

7ft CareB 



17 

16 

12ft 

12*6 


8*4 + b 
2 — W 


5W— W 

*0 + W 
8w + b 
16*0— W 
2*6 + W 


9b— 16 
1*1 


I p~" "HI 



■13T 

65 

5 

217 

2 

Ift 

2 



52 

15 

9 

3 

2616 

26ft 

24ft + ft 






9 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 



100 145 


110 

lito 

13*6 

13% + ft 



250 

I7J 


69 

13ft 

13ft 

13ft + ft 





2 

II 

3*9 

3% 

3*4— ft 



X75 17J 


1 

21V9 

21W 

21ft 



.16 

IJ 

B 

2057 


10ft 

lift + ft 






67 

3ft 

3*4 

3ft— ft 

8*6 





16 

4 

3ft 

3ft- ft 



1JB 

1X9 

9 

16 

15*6 

15*6 

15*6 + to 






101 

2*4 

2*6 

2*4 



531 

46 

11 

7 

4*4 

4to 

4% 



.921115 

11 

5 

Bft 

Bft 

8ft— ft 

16 




20 

15 

12ft 

12*6 

12*6— ft 





30 

47 

7ft 

7 

7 





27 

6 

ito 

ito 

ito 

24 


50 

5 

23 

205 

24 

23 

74 4- ft 






36 

Ito 

iw 

1ft 






22 

to 

*6 

to 



50 

J 

IB 

476x 70*6 

A9to 

TBto— ft 





7 

16 

3*6 

3ft 

3*6 + ft 

9ft 

A DlrAct P 



11 

55 

7*6 

7 

7 —to 



,10a ID 

10 

4 

10 V* 

'X 

10ft + ft 






935 

2 

7 

ft 

*4 DmeP wt 



80 









183 

13*6 

13to 

13*4— ft 

23 




5 

194 

33 

22*6 

72*4— to 

I3W 

9 DrlvH s 



72 

1 

13 

12 

12 










. 1 





52 

to 

to 

*4 

36ft 

23*4 Duptox 

52 

16 

12 

1 

35ft 

35ft 

35ft + ft 

17ft 

13 DurTrt 


16 

55 


15*6 

15% — to 

16W 

Vto DvnJcf 

57e 1.9 

11 

182 

14ft 

14ft 

14*4— *9 

23*6 

lew Dvneer 

JO 

3J 

9 

6 

22*6 

22ft 

22*6 

r~ 




E 




3 

9*6 

ift EAC 

JO 

SJ 


18 

B 

■ 

B 

16*6 

12to EECO 

52 

25 

37 

7 

13*6 

13ft 

13% 

7*6 

3*9 ERC 



16 

35 

5ft 

5*6 

Sto 

ift 

2ft ESI 




5 

Sto 

BW 

5ft— ft 

3ft 

2*6 EoolO 



13 

25 

2to 

7*4 

7*4 — ft 

40 

31ft Estop 

X<MelX5 

4 

15 

37W 

37*6 

37*6— ft 

12to 

ift Echos c 

.12 



307 

11% 

lift 

11% 

3 





40 

ito 

ito 

1*6— ft 

23ft 


1J0 

65 

12 

1 

22ft 

27ft 

22ft — ft 

5*6 

2to ElecSd 




8 

4to 

ift 

4ft— ft 

BV. 

5ft Elslnar 



so 

il 

ito 

ift 

ift— ft 

13ft 


53e 

5 


1 

12ft 

17ft 

12*6 — *6 

17ft 

10% ESDn 

JOe XI 

9 

62x 13 

12% 

12% 

46. 

2ft Ensirpf 

J3e 9J 


2 

3*6 

.1*6 

3*6 + to 

12*6 

Sto Era ins 



11 

in 

12*4 

12ft 

12*6 

32ft 

18*6 ESP#* 

JO 

2D 

7 

11 

20 

19% 

20 - to 

5ft 





24 

Tto 

2ft 


34to 

22ft ElzLav 



39 

5 

30ft 

30*6 

30*6 — to 

«6 

7 Excel 

JOb sj 

8 

7 

7*6 

714 

7*9 

r Ji 

nw 

Sto Float a 




77 

Sto 

ift 

Sto + ft 

14 

11 FWvmB 

JO 

XB 

12 

30x13*4 

13*6 

13% + to 

TAto 

20ft F stern n 



9 

21 

26 

2A 

24 

lift 

lift FlschP 

JB1 

55 

9 

1) 

1716 

1716 

12ft— ft 

18 

ift FllcGE 



4 

44 

Rto 

R% 

Sto + ft 

27to 

23*6 FHGE p» 4J0 155 


23 

76% 

7A*4 

24to 

lito 

8ft Flan£n 




4 

V 

8ft 

9 

43ft 

25ft FlaRck 

.70 

IJ 

8 

11 

41 

40ft 

41 + *4 

30*9 

22*6 Fluke 

1581 

55 

10 

42 

2Sto 

25 

2SU 4- ft 

13ft 

Ato Foodrm 



5 

77 

17*6 

12 

12*6 + to 

Pto 

4ft FHUIIG 



20 

190 

8ft 

8*6 

8ft 

112 

70to FordCn d4D0e 



4001 99 

97*4 

99 +1 

22*6 

15 ForstCA 

.15 

J 

R7 

5 

31*6 

2ito 

21*6 

38 

lito Forest L 



42 

784 

.10ft 

79to 

30ft +lft 

2 

to Fatomt 




212 

ito 

1*6 

Ito 

7*6 

4*4 FrdHIV 




1 

5ft 

5ft 

Sto 

26 

14 FrvaEI 



17 

39 

20ft 

70ft 

20ft + to 


5 FrtnEn 




85 

10% 

low 

10% + ft 

25ft 

13*6 Frisch j 

52 

.9 

21 

19 

25>4| 

74ft 

25to + to 

15ft 

9 FrntHd 




35 

14% 

14*6 

14*4 

12V. 

Sto Furvits 



23 

284 

11*6 

lito 

Uto 

■ G “I 1 

6to 

2*6 GNCEn 




40 

3ft 

2to 

2ft + *6 

ift 

4ft GRI 




11 

4to 

ift 

4to + *6 

4to 

2ft GTI 



24 

7 

2*6 

2*6 

2to 

14*9 

9*9 GolcwC 



9 

97 

14 

13*4 

14 + to 

3 

2 GalxyO 



S3 

X 

2ft 

2 

2*6 + ft 

33 

24*k Garan 

150 

4 J 

10 

1 

27*6 

77ft 

27ft 

18ft 

7*6 GatLir 






7 

9*4 

Oft 

9ft 



9*4 

GelmS 



70 

15 

I2to 

11% 

Uto- to 

3 







IS 

3ft 

3*6 

3*6— % 

9W 

17% 

12ft 

GOefns 

J38 

XT 

9 

36V 

17% 

16% 

17% + to 

16W 


Sto 


.70 

4J 

14 




4ft 



1? 


.10 

A 

13 

24 

1516 

I5ft 

Uto + ft 

15to 

7ft 

7*6 





22 

4ft 

4% 

4% 

17*6 




50 

1.9 

12 

16 

10% 

10*4 

18% 

2to 

13*4 

Tto 

Gratae 



5 

44 

12*9 

12W 

12ft + to 

18% 


Ito 





47 

3% 

3* 

3*4 + to 

15% 




U 


2* 

12 

11*4 

12 + to 

31 to 

21*4 

lito 

GKmFS 

50 

25 


270 

19*6 

19*6 

19*4- ft 

13ft 

17% 

B 

GOTYlO 




01 

9ft 

Oto 

9ft * ft 

22ft 

34ft 

18% 

GIOMH 

X» 

U 

t 

S4 



31ft 

Tift 


23to 


ion 

XO 

14 

117 

34% 

22 

33ft *2to 

30to 

5*6 

2*4 

GtatiNR 




15 

X 

3% 

» . 

BW 

Ito 

*4 

GW Fid 






%— ft 

22ft 


AW 


52 

xo 


2 

TOto 

1046 

row + % 

i?to 

24*6 

16ft 


JO 

22 

II 

9 

11% 

lift 

1B%— % 

29% 

12 

8% 




B 

5 

Bto 

8*4 

Ito 

17*4 

15*8 

10ft 

GrTesh 



16 

45 

12*4 

nw 

12K + *4 

26to 

40*6 

27 

GrlLKC 

J4 

1.1 

16 

78B 

39ft 

38% 

39*6 

11 

35ft 

814 




IT 

315 

33 

32% 

33 + *6 

7ft 

12% 

A6 

Greiner 



14 

12 

12 

13 

12 + % 

3% 

13*4 

m% 

GrdCtt 

50t 

43 

111 

IS 

1IW6 


10*4 

3*6 

15ft 

into 

GlfCdo 

.52 



m 

13% 

17ft 

13ft -+ ft 

B6to 

36*4 

22W 

Glfrtr 

JO 

12 

13 

23 

33ft 

33W 

33W 

18*4 


1 H 1 

10*6 

ito HAL 

-10e 1.1 

71 


8*6 

Bto 

Bto + ft 

14*6 

11 HMG 

M 

M 



10% 

1016 

18% — % 

H 

Vto HUBC 

JOa 15 

11 

24 

17% 

16% 

17*6. + *6 

IBft 


.931115 

8 


Bto 

8% 

8ft + ft 

29% 






29% 

WW 

29ft — ft 

30ft 

16% Hanfrds 

JI 

25 

13 


79% 

29to 

20%— ft 

7 ft 






Ito 

ito 

Ito 

38ft 

16*4 Hashr s 

.15 

J 

12 

A59 

35ft 

34ft 

35 + *6 








38% + to 

46*6 

2ftto Hasting 

JOa 15 

6 


33 

3ito 

32 + % 

24 

15% HlthCr# 

2JM* 95 

9 

42 

23ft 

22% 

23 — ft 

9% 

5% Himch 



72 

367 

low 

9% 

10ft + % 

19ft 

8% HlftlEx 



20 

92 

9 

8% 

8%— ft 

15% 

10% HrilhM 

J4 

55 

8 


12% 

12 

12ft + ft 

17ft 

aw Helnlck 

.10 

J 

18 

53 

16 

15% 

15% + ft 





92 




2*6 

14*6 

3% Hritait 




140 

ito 


S. 

2to 

to HelmR 




8 

to 

% 

to— ft 

7*6 




30 


4*6 

4% 

4% 

5 

2% HtnOrl 



25 

3 

2to 

2*6 

2to 

15*6 

Vto H Miron 



20 


Uto 

13% 

Uto + to 

5*6 

Tto Hofman 




8 

2% 

Tto 

Zto— % 

14% 

ift HaltvCo 

54 

IJ 

11 

12 

13% 

13ft 

13ft— ft 

35*6 

26*4 Horml 

1J8 

35 

11 

6 

33 

32% 

33 + ft 

17 

899 HmHar 

511 

&0 

17 

304 

VH 

8% 


6*6 

2*4 HmHwT 

571120 


14 

Tto 

Zto 

Zto- ft 

19*4 

12*9 HollPtv 

IJ0 

VJ 

13 


19% 

I9to 

19V, — to 

6ft 

1*6 HOtlPwl 





ift 

6% 

AW— ft 

7% 

3W HouOT 




3*6 

3to 

3*6 

18% 

Sto HAvflE 



10 

61 

14% 

lito 

14*6— % 

43*4 

30ft HubelA 

152 

17 

12 


41ft 

41ft 

41ft— ft 

43ft 

29% HuD#IS 

152 

X8 

12 

54 

41*6 

40ft 

40ft— to 

57*4 

39ft Hubbl pf 2D& 

XB 


1X54*6 

54% 

54% + to 

21*6 

17U HudGn 

JO 

25 

14 

1 

1816 

18% 

18ft 

10 

6% Husky O 

56 

SJ 


193 

7ft 

7 

716 + to 

1 1 ■ 

III 

29*6 ICH 

55 

5 

10 

428 

97*4 

M 

97*6 + *6 

49 

45% ICH wl 




A 

49 

48*6 

49 + *6 

78ft 

4 ICO 


425 

58 

4% 

4ft 

4*6 + ft 

4*6 

3% IPM 

D5r 15 


A 

2% 

2% 

2% 

15*4 

646 IRTCor 



32 

69 

•36 

14 


2to 

Ito IhipGp 

.He 45 


7 

2% 

2*4 

Ito Imalnd 




17 

i% 

1*6 

1% 

4QW 

25ft imoOHo 

1J0 



75 

35ft 

35% 

35ft 

lift 

ift Inn gilt 



13 

207 

12 

11 

12 + *6 

19*6 

11 Instrns 

50 

IJ 

78 

33 

19% 

19ft 

19*6 + ft 

2*4 

IW InrtSy 



7 

244 

1% 

1*9 

l%— ft 

3*6 

2% irsSyri 

5511X5 


IB 

2ft 

2% 

2*6 + ft 

11*6 

ito IntCfYD 

JO 



77 

lift 

Uto 

11*6 

16 

Uto imrnk 

.12 

J 


20 

14*6 

Uto 

uto — ft 

4% 

1ft 

2*4 InJOknl 
to intBkwt 




108 

X 

3 

% 

3% 

%- ft 

I7to 

i% rrrtHvd 




104 

7*e . 

7% 

7% + ft 

lift 

8*6 HP 

90e 9J 

64 

2V 

9% 

9% 

9*6— % 

Ato 

3ft Int Par 



97 

15 

3% 

3% 

3ft— ft 

10*4 

i iruThrn 



29 

96 

6*6 

ito 

6% 

10% 

i InTUrpf 




23 

6% 

ito 

ito 

ift 

1 infDto 




10 

| 

1 

1 







32% 



41 

1BW IroaBrd 



19 

17 

38 

37*6 

37*6 + *6 

4ft 

2*4 IWN 

JM 

25 

30 

34 

3*6 

3ft 

3to 

■ J 1 

17*4 

12*6 Jocfvn 

5011 17 

9 

| 

13% 

13ft 

13ft + ft 


5ft Jacobs 




12 

ift 

6% 

ift + to 

5ft 

Tto jeTAm 



6 

131 

3 

7% 

3 

2 

ft ietAwt 




10 

% 

W 

*6 

9*6 

4% Jeiron 

511 

73 

17 

m 

0*6 

0ft 

9*6 + ft 

6*2 

2*6 JohnPd 




7 

3% 

3% 

3% 

11*6 

7V4 JaftnAm 

JO 

35 

13 



8% 


tito 

4*c Johnlnd 



3 

24 

Tto 

7 

7% + to 

7to 

3ft JmsJk n 



4 

11 

3% 

3ft 

3*6 + to 

■ K 

3% 

1% KapakC 



5 

432 

3to 

3*6 

3ft + to 

I6to 

10 KavCa 

.20 

15 

17 

1 

13ft 

13ft 

13ft. 

12*6 

10ft KayJn 

.106 

.9 


13 

10% 

10% 

10*6— to 

16*6 

9% KearNn 

JO 

12 

14 

18 

12% 

17% 

1716 

20*9 

I4to Kenwln 

-BOc 

4D 

9 

3 

19*9 

19*9 

19% + to 

23*6 

10ft Ketaim 

581 

27 


49 

22*9 

21ft 

21ft— % 

9ft 

5*4 KerCo 

JOB 15 


16 

9ft 

9 

9*6 

17% 

8 KevPh 

50 

21 


529 

9% 

9*6 

9*6 

4*6 





114 

ift 

4*6 


ift 

1% Kllem 



35 

A 

4to 

ift 

4U 

Sto 

3*6 Klnorfc 




14 

4*6 

4% 

4*6 

5*6 

2*6 Kirby 




71 

3ft 

3 

3 - ft 

5*4 

3% Kll Mfg 



15 

8 

4*6 

4*6 

4% ■+ ft 

3% 

2 Kleerv 

D2r 

J 


20 

7% 

TV] 

2ft- 

15*6 

9*6 Kimod 



IS 

17 

13*6 

13to 

13*6 — to 

15ft 

lOto Knoll 



16 

74 

13% 

13ft 

13% + ft 

30ft 

21 KOMi-C 

252 

XI 

95 

52 

28*6 

28% 

28*6— ft 

i z: l i i 

1*6 

1% LSB 




41 

1% 

1*6 

IW 

3*9 

2*6 La Bans 




71 

2*6 

2*6 

2*6 

7% 

2*4 LaFnt 




i 

4 

4 


62 

23% LakeS a 

■lSe 



44 

53ft 

S3 

S3 —1 

15U 

lito LfldBnn 

54 

18 

9 

30 

Uto 

Uto 


1/ft 

11 LOmki 

57 

2J 

1A 

4 

16U 

Uto 

lito + ft 

14*6 

9ft Laser 



47 

56 

11% 

11% 

11*6— to 

13 

8*4 Lauren 



21 

6 

9*6 

Vto 

Vto— to 


2lft LeorPP 

(JO 1X6 


7 

73to 

73*6 


«6 

2ft LaePh 



12 

147 

ito 

5*6 

5% 

31*6 

13 Lelilah s 

.101 



15 

29% 

79 


Aft 

3*4 LetsurT 




6 

5*6 

5% 

5% 

23% 

7ft LMFPtl 

JO 

1 3 

10 

53 

23% 

22*6 

23% + ft 


1*4 LHeRxf 




13 

2ft 

7ft 


3Y= 

Ito Lodge 




3 

1% 

Ito 

1%- 

39*6 

24ft Lorlmr 



19 

130 

36% 

3Aft 

lift— to 

lift 

Bto Lumex 

JOS 

5 

30 

33 

16 

lift 

15*4 — to' 

lift 

ift LundvE 



17 

39 

17% 

17% 

12*6— *4. 

1A 

9ft Luiio 



10 

71 

10% 

10ft 

10% 

14*6 

10 Lvdat 




21 

13*6 

13*6 


39% 

15% LvnCSv 

50 

15 

10 

706 

22% 

2116 

22ft- •' 

d 



M 




1 


14W 13 MCOHd 


6 22 13W 13 13 -2 


17 Month 
Hirti Low Stock 


Dm YM. PE 


5b Cox 

!XjtPQtlLfl» Sunt 0104 


1H 


MCORs 

MSAn Mm 7 A At. 
MSI Dt 11 

MSR 

HocOnt 14 

MacSOl .16 1.1 34 
Macrod 

Me PS 58! 25 2 

Metals JOe 


10 


i Mrkivs 
Mormot 2J5 105 

Mnnm 


MortPr 
Motes 
i MatRsh 

i Mcnscn 
Matrix s 


7 
15 
U 
S 12 
7 

22 


33 


12W MovEno 250 1X1 IS 
11b AAOYtlo 500 17 10 
B MeCOS 240)2X3 
4b Me Dow 25 
1*6 MeAoeA ,10e A3 
ith McRae B 
52 Madia 1.16 15 16 
t2to Madia 50 15 la 
26 W MEMCO 1.16 X7 11 


93 1*6 

3 9b 

in 7 
U 3W 
431 law 
129 tew 
25 lb 
8 14*6 
i row 
3 16W 
37 low 

1 21 *4 

16 16 
6 271* 
10 6b 
96 13*4 
260 16W 
114 24*6 
20 75b 
45 21W 
149 8*6 

5 4*6 

1 2W 
1 2 
a a 

36 17 
2x31 


9W 

5% Merest 

571 

4.1 

U 

28 

9% 

20ft 

BW MetPre 

.15 

5247 

74 

m. 

20% 

Uto Metal 



7 

3 

nw 

Bft 

4ft McnGn 



17 

2ES 

5 

12 

Bft MMAm 

M 

XI 

13 

2 

10% 

27 

14ft Mldlnd 

JO 

15 

8 

1 

26to 

SO 

38% niunPrf 

5JJ0 104 


100Z 

48ft 

9ft 

7ft MtfrtlW 

MM 

13 

1 

fl 

20% 

12*6 AMctUE 

54 

IJ 

27 

323 

1316 

10% 

8% MonAAa 

JO 

54 

7 

1 

10W 

17ft 

10% moobB 

50 

1A 

16 

S 

Uto 

17ft 

10% MoagA 

58 

IJ 

16 

79 

15ft 

17ft 

15% MMedn 




56 

16 

4W 

3*6 MMRtwt 



I 

3ft 

19% 

12% MlBGm 
74 Mourn 

156 

8J 

7 

104 

18% 

1% 




20 

1*6 

6% 

2% Minted 



14 

7 

4% 

21 

13ft MavStr 

.151 


8 

1 

14% 

9% 

ito MovleL 



u 

IW 

9% 

3% MuSeAr 




303 

TB 

Zto 

% Muse wi 




39 

13*6 

7% Mverin 

38 

25 

10 

8 

nw 


IW Hi 
9b 9b + w 
6T6 7 + b 
JW 3V6 — W 
13b 13*0 — b 
1410 1416— b 
IW 1V6 
14b 14b — W 
I0W ICW + W 
Ida 16W + W 
9W 10 

711* 2116 * W 
U 16 — V. 
2m 27W 
6b 6b 
13 13*6 + *0 

16W 16*0— W 
24W 24b 
15 15b 

71 2IW + 16 
8W 8*6 
4W 416 
2W 2W 
2 2 

53 b K +116 
17 17 — b 

31 31 

SW 9 — 16 
19*6 19*6— W 
)VW 11 W— W 
4*6 5 + b 

MW 10W 
26b 26b 
4tf 48 — IW 
8 8 

13 13b— V6 

10b 10b 
18b ISb + V6 
ISb 15W + b 
15b 1514— W 
3W JW- V6 
18*0 1BW— W 
HO Ht 
4W 440 
14*6 1490 

8b aw— w 

9b 9W + ?6 
W W— W 
11W 11*6 + W 


1 — H 1 

17 

lift 

NRMn 

55# 45 



IS 

1S% + W 

9 

5ft 

Name* 



1A 

9 

Bto 

8% 

846— ft 

14*6 

11% 

NIGsO 

JOb 3D 

in 

10 

Uto 

Uft 

13% 


1216 







14 

Uft — % 


*6 

NetoLB 






% 

to 

23*6 

11% 

NMxAr 

591 

35 

14 

11 

27ft 

21% 

22*6 + ft 

16% 

lift 

NPInlW 

1J2 

AJ 

15 



15% 

15% + to 

20% 

13 

NProe 

150# AJ 

10 



19ft 

19ft 

49to 

29 

NYTlRM 

JO 





44*6 

47ft— to 


4to 

MewbE 

■25c 4.9 






17% 

12 

NwpEI 

150 

85 

10 

AS 

1716 

16% 

17 — ft 

7 






143 


Aft 

ito — ft 

I3to 


Nichols 



9 

20 


1Z16 

IZto — % 

3% 

Zto 

Notev 



17 

29 


2% 

Zto + ft 

13% 

10 

NdTORs 



7 



lift 

lift + *6 

17% 

]3to 

NaCdOg 




5 

14*6 

lift 

14*6 + ft 

37 

29*6 

NIPS of 

45S 115 



3Sto 

35*6— *6 

5*6 

2ft 

NuHrzn 



9 

28 

3% 

3 

3V6 + to 

11% 

1**6 

NudDt 






A*6 

«6— % 

171b 

Bft 

Numac 




4 

8% 

8% 

8ft 

I 





0 




1 

34to 

lift OEA 



12 

2 

1916 

19% 

19% 

27% 

14% Oakwri 

JBb 


13 

37 


15% 

19 + to 

12 

4 

OdrtAn 



X 

30 

ift 

Sto 

d — to 

18*6 

11 


54 

IJ 


1 

13% 

13% 

13% 

22ft 

10*6 Ofaienx 

34 

1.1 

20 

203 

22*6 

32ft 

22*6 + to 

7ft 

3ft OOUcp 






4% 

4*6 

7ft 

3*6 Oaentin 

JBe 

J 

A5 



ift 

6ft— ft 

B 

5U OrtoJH A 

.15 

17 IBS 

18 

5% 

5% 

S% 

7% 

5% OrtoiHB 

50 

14183 

10 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft— ft 

2*6 






11 

1% 

1% 

146 + to 

2516 

15*6 05ulvn i 

J2 

IJ 

IS 

3 

23% 

33to 

23% — ft 

12*6 

ift Oxf raK 

J2t 73 

10 

55 

1016 

10ft 

10% + ft 

11 

7% OzarkH 

50 

XI 

9 

192 

9ft 

9*6 

9ft + ft 

1 P 1 


1. Month 

thaft Law SfXk 


Div. Yld. PE 


Sh. 

lOBsHMLm 


Close 
OoOt.Drt* 


24*4 18*6 
8*4 6W 
1*6 VS 
13W 9*6 
1114 6M 
6 316 

3214 17W 

39 sm 

2111 1414 
34W 27 
9W 2b 


pro«H 

Preml 


ProttL .92 45 9 
“ Rfl 5M 
. Ha 
PresRA .93 7.1 5 
PruRB 72 U 4 
Pmld IS 

PmCTl 152 65 14 
PSCfllBf 453 115 
PorpfC 254 T0L9 
PW PIE 457 1X1 
PurttoG 


77 31 ' 21 21 

2 7W 7V> 7W 

211 S W *- 

I M 13 Il- 
ia ii to lito nw + 
10 4W 4 4J6 

38 22 31*6 3TW — 

2Sr 38 38 30 

5 3Tb 21 2146 + 

41 33*4 33W 33W — 
13 3H 3W 3*6- 


tz 



Q 




“ 1 1 

ms 

10W Quabga 

Ji 


13 

29% 

38% 39%.+ « [ 

1 R 11 

9*6 

S RA1 

5St 55 13 

IS 

6*6 

6W 

ito 

5*6 

34* RMS El 



3 

3*6 

a% 

3to + % 

7% 

1% RTC 



5 

7 

1% 

116— ft 

lflto 

15ft Raaan 

.17 

J 44 

5 

ISM 

lflto 

15*6 . 

* 

13 Rarisba 

32 

45 40 

35 

lito 

16 

16 - % 

3*4 

*6 Ratlin 



48 

•l 

w 

1 

14% 


A2 

35 7 

14 

17 

lito 

Uto— % 

Bto 

6 RtlneT 


t 

11 

Bft 

8ft 

Bft + % 

19*6 

17% RliSoun 



3 

lBto 

IBto 

18to + to 

ift 

IW Aedtaw 



73 

5*6 

3ft 

3*6 + % 

50to 

27% ReiriA 



143 

4446 

43* 

44ft + % 

8% 

5*6 RertAte 


17 

16 

Sto 

Sto 

aw 

4% 

3b tax Nor 

.100 ZJ 13 

8 

4ft 

4% 

4ft 

14 

9% RlhtytP 

50 

15 19 

19x10ft 

ro% 

IBft + % 

9ft 

3£ ROlTpfv 



7 

4 

2H6 

4 + ft 

3to 

<■* RfoGOr 



75 

46 

fc 

46 

32% 

li Hcfcwv 

-56 

IJ 15 

34 

32% 

33ft 

32ft— % 

30% 

20ft Rooers 

.12 

J 13 

1 

25ft 

25% 

25% 


Ito RoanPn 



45 

2ft 


2ft + % 

Aft 

3*6 RoyPlm 



158 


595 

Aft + to 

34 

24 Rudlck 

56023 9 

4 

74% 

34 

34 -ft 

33ft 

22*4 Rudckpf 

56 

2J 

10 

23% 

73% 

23ft 

7% 

4 RBW 


8 

35 

7 

7 

7 

17ft 

Uto Russell 

50 

IJ 12 

57 

17% 

16% 

lift— % 

2f*6 

12% Rvkaff 

50 

25 13 

47 

23 

22*6 

33 

■ s —31 


.lOr 15 7 


... 105 
50 105 


8b 4b 5PM 

BW 7 5FN PtA 

SVi 246 SMD 

■ IW 6*4 sob* 

18b S Salem 

2b *6 scoria 

BW 6W SDflOPf 

9 6W 5 Due Pf . . ... 

87W 67b 5 DM Pi 954 115 
74 ’A 52*4 SDsapt 750 10.7 
M 17V4 SOaapt U7 10A 
39*4 31 W SDgopt AA5 1X2 
3516 ISW SDoapt 168 1X6 
45Vi 34b SanJW 190 47 10 
31 23W Sanaa to 50 35 7 

5W 3to Sanmrfc 4311X1 10 

4*6 4b SaundA 50 X6 7 

10W 9W Sound pf 150 115 
14b 11*4 seaman 
5b 3b Seoctrn 
22b 16b senate 

I4V4 TOW Schwab 
7b 3*4 SdMat 

35 12b 50 Las 

40b 34b Scop# 

17 11 ScurRn 

I 63 34 SbdCn 

I 2W iw Seaport 
J 15b WW SecCap . _ _ 

496 2*6 SalsPro 72 

W SelaDtt 

3*0 Setaa 3 

Zb SemtOi 
9*6 Srvtaco 


.10 


25 12 
<1 17 
M 

8 

56 15 M 
50 3 5 

-16e 15 8 


15 10V6 PGEptA 150 1X6 

13b 9b PGEptB 157 115 
12b 8b PGEpfD 155 103 
1ZW 0*6 PGEpfE 15S 1X4 
lib 8b PGEpfG 150 105 
35 29 PGEpfF 454 IZ6 

3316 26b PGEpfZ 446 125 
39b Z1W PGEpfY 350 105 
24b 17*6 PGEpfW 257 115 
2 15b PGEofV 232 1X9 

2416 17 PGEpfT 254 104 
24b 17b POEofS 162 105 
II 7b PGEpfH 1.12 1X4 
22b 15*6 PGEpfR 257 105 
19W 13b PGEDtP ZDS 1X7 
2D* 13* PGEpfO 250 105 
19*6 13b PGEpfM 156 1X6 
SOW 14b PGEpfL 25S 11D 
19V, 13* PGEPtK 204 1X3 
21*4 15*4 PGEpU 233 115 
IDb 7 to PGEpfl 109 HO 
24b 14W POTm 154 U 7 
41b 31 PocLtPt 456 1X6 
41 V» 30 PoeLt pi 4.40 no 
Mb 35W Pocffpf 500 1X0 
IW *6 Pope fl 
39*6 SOW PallCp M 1 A 19 

Bb Sb Pantast 37 

2<W 15b PartcCh 40a 25 9 

Ub 7b PatTch 32 

13 7b PEC 1 st JB2t 9.1 

lib 8b PeerTu .40b X8 18 

45W 35W Pen EM 150a XI 10 

23b 15b PenTr 150 55 11 

2b b PE CP 5543X8 

25b 17b PenRE s 150 75 10 

14*6 Sb Penril 50 25 8 

lb b Pentrnv 
29b 23 PcrlnlC OO X9 

14b n Pertnii 17 

12b 9b Perlnl pf 1.10 95 
2W PetLw 

6W Petto pt 105 245 
7W PetLopf 258 255 
lb PhlILD 56el25 3 

3b PlcoPd 

2b Pier 1 wt 3 

3b PlenrSv 3 

5b 4b PltWVa 56 1(U 10 

16b 11 PltOM *11 

12b 6b Plzznla JB 1JB 
20W 1316 PlCrO o JO 

16b 11 PIvGms 13 

3b 2W PtyRA 
32 21b PneuSc 1O0 45 

7b 3W Pod#Ew 7 

13b 7b Ports vs 27 

17*6 12*4 PasttPr 50# 15 12 

28b 13*4 PowrTa .16 4 

7b 5b PrnJrO s 


12 14W 14W 14*6— W 
22 12b lib 11b + b 
M 12Vt lib 12W + *6 

53 12b 12 12 

a 11b Ub TM6 — b 
27 34b 34b 3416— b 
M 32b 32b 32b- W 
109 29b Z9b 29b + W 
19 24 23b 23b— b 

30 21b 21b 21b— b 
49 24 23b 24 +14 

30 24b 24 2496 + W 

2 10b 10b 10b 
764 22b 22 b 22b 

54 m. 18b I9W— b 

49 19*1 19 19 — b 

148 19 18b 18b — b 

9 ZIBb 20b ZOb 
821 19W 19*4 19b + b 
6 20b 20b 20b— W 
16 10 9b 9b— *4 
34 21b 20U 21b + b 
400Z 41 41 41 + b 

268x40 40 40 —lb 

25* 50*4 5014 5DI4 

to b *6 b 

525 34b 34 3M6 

33 6b * 6*4—14 

3 22H 23*6 22b + to 
2V 9b 9b 9b + b 

45Qz 9b 9 9 —to 


3b 

BW 

4b 

isto 

1IW 

11 

MW 

2b 

19 
15 
13 
I5W 
7b 

15W 

6*4 

20 


7^6 servo 


S e rvatr 


h Sfioron 

9b Shopwl 
12b SterHS n 
18 SlerSpn 
ID Sterol 
5to SltCO 
B SlkesA 
3W Sllvrort 
10b SfflthA 
0b 5b Solltron 
16b 1 3b SorgPr n 


58 25 20 
28 

J6t 85 16 
I JOe 85 6 

.16b J 

51 

57t X4 29 
JO « ? 
50 XS 21 
50 15 15 


JO 35 


5 

row 

lib 

zb 

8 

6 

9*4 


55 


10ft 

10% — 

ft 

1 

38to 

38% 

38% 


15 

8 

"a 


a, r+ 


779 


J4*6 

2A- 

*6 

79 

■r 

9 

9ft — 

*6 

3 

■fi 

1% 

1% + 

ft 

34 

77*4 

77ft 

77ft — 

% 

305 

17ft 

17% 

12% — 

% 

33 

17ft 

12 

12 - 

ft 

366 

7% 

2% 

2% 


1 

ito 

6*6 

Ato 


H 

9ft 

9 

9 — 

ft 

11 

7ft 

2% 

7% — 

ft 

54 

3to 

3% 

3ft — 

ft 


4% 

ift 

446 


59 

3ft 

3% 

3ft — 

ft 

7 

5% 

5*6 

5% 


38 

11% 

104k 

11% 


7 

8*6 

8 

8% + 

to 

4 

17W 

17% 

1716 — 

w 

331 

14% 

lflft 

16 


4 

2W 

7ft 

2ft 


3 

2IV> 

7lto 

2t% — 

ft 

I5B 

3*6 

3% 

3% + 

*6 

40 

BB 

8% 

t 


3 


13 

13 — 

to 

30 

rfl 

75% 

25Vi — 

% 

B 

ELI 

6ft 

ift 



lb b SaTnx 
10*4 7H SC Ed pf 152 1X1 

H>W 7b SCEd pf ID* 95 

11 8 SCEd pf IDS 10J 

12 Bb SCEdpf U9 1X1 

51b 33b SCEdpf 450 85 

14b 10b SCEdpf 1-45 1DD 

22b 17 SCEd pf 350 IX* 

23 16b SCEdPf 231 !4 

73*4 53*6 SCEd at 7J1 1X4 

85b 61 SCEdpf 070 1X9 

65 SCEdpf 85* 1X7 
5b Sprfcmn 
6 Sort Of IDO 1X6 
4to SpedOP 

6b Stwicer D6I 20 

6b 5pndtnn 63 

1 Somft wt 

4to stHovn DUX 

23b 13b StdPrd JO XI 6 

llto TV. Stonwd 300 

20b lib StarrtH 10 

lib 6b States 

14b Stapan J8 X4 13 

IW SfariEI 39 

8b StrlEid 0 

5b SlertSft .18# 15 33 

lb smitw 


14b 

10 

7*4 

14b 

1IW 

3 


21 

3% 

23 
lib 

3 

14b 11b SumtE pflJO 1X6 

11 Ab SunCtv 18 

lib A SunSLn 
17b 11b SunJr J8 2J 12 

31*4 17b SuprFd .44b 15 13 

» b Super# 

ISto »*6 Sualnd 50a 15 12 

17b 11b suarSr 56 25 11 

Ab 4*4 Sunuefi 6 

2b lb SwMEn 12 

28 19b SwtfTIn 150 S3 22 

8 4b SvnoJov 

14b 6b svsfEne .10 15 9 


4 7b 7*4 7*4— to 

I! II* 1 BW + to 

5 3 3 3 

3 6b 6b 6b + W 

30 Sb 5b Sb 

20 lb IW IW— *A 

2 Bb 846 Bb 

T 9 9 9 + to 

BOOZ8» B2b B2b 
lOQz 73 73 73 

VI 23to 21 23b + W 

31 38 37b 38 

32 2SW 25b 2Sb 

5 61b 6116 61b 
13 3Cb 24b 24b + to 
28 4*6 4W 4*4 

3 :S6 ft S« 

13 10b tow 10W— to 

132 13b 13to 13W + *4 
52 4 3W 3b— ** 

33K21b 21*6 21b + to 
at iib lib iib 
118 7*4 6b 7 + to 

SO 16 ISto ISb + to 
5 25b 35b 35b 
12 15 IS 15 — to 

5 57 56b 56b— b 

4 IW 166 IW 

X 13b 13W 13*6 — *4 
9 2b 2b 2b 

4 lb lb lb 

22 4b 4b 4b— to 
12 3 Zb 3 — b 

2 10b 10b 18b + to 

2 10 10 W 

12 10*4 rob row— to 

12 11^6 lib 11^— to 

7 19 19 19 

339 14b 14b 14b + *6 
54 lib II lito + b 
B low 10W 10W — w 
31 5b 5b 5b + to 
31 15 14W 15 + to 

3 3to 3W 3b 

23 19 18b 19 +b 

5 6b 6b 6b— to 

M 6 “S ’‘b 

3 10b 10 10b + b 

12 lflb 10b 10b 

19 10b 10b 10b 

a iib iib iib + to 

50! 51 51 51 + to 

196 14b -14*4 14W + b 
40 2296 21b 21b— b 
190 22b 22 22W + b 

3 73 73 73 +lb 

11 81 80 80 

1 84 84 84 —1 

1 5b 5b 5b— b 
2x 7*6 7*4 7*6 + b 

3 566 5*6 596 

13 7W 7 7 — b 

12 7 6b 6b 

20 114 1*4 1*4 + b 

2* 5b Sb 5b 

65 19to 19b 10to + to 
96 9b BW 9 + *6 

20 17W 17 17W 

3 Bb Bb Bb 

12 19b 19W 1996 

6 2*6 2W 7to + b 
11 16b 16*6 16b— W 

1U II 10 10b + *4 

10 2*4 2*6 2*6— *4 

10* 13*4 13 13*4 + *4 

5 7W 7W 7W— *4 

14 6*4 6 6*4 + b 

13 17b 17*6 17*6 

44 30b 29W 29b— h 

373 1*6 1*4 1*4 + b 

21 15b 15 IS — *6 

30 16*6 16 1614— *6 

68 J*4 B4 5*6 

9 ito lb ib 
21 20b 20b 20b + *6 

45 414 4 4*4 — to 

B2 7W 7b 7*6 + *4 


\¥~~Z T 1 

11% 

4% T Bar 

5» 

16 

18 

48 

6% 

Sto 

5% + to M 

13% 

7ft TEC 

.16 

IJ 

20 

15 

11% 

11% 

lib— b p 

15% 

ift TIE 




1003 

4% 

44k 

4*6 y 

14% 

A% Til 



34 

5 

9*6 

9% 

9*6 

18*6 

13 TobPrd 

JIB 

LI 

12 

53 

18% 

1846 

38% + ft 

10% 

Ato TandBr 




14 

7*6 

7 

7% + % 

5% 

2*6 Team 




17 

3*4 

346 

3*6. 

4% 

1% TcflAm 




9 

2ft 

7% 

2*tr 

22% 

13% TdiSym 



13 

iH 

15% 

11% 

154k— % 

Alto 

33% TechOp 



14 

l 

Uft 

Uft 

Uft— *6 

7*6 

Zto TecfiTp 



U 

2 

3M 

3% 

3%— % 

30*6 

7% Techtrl 

50 

28 

9 

71 

15% 

15% 

15b- ft 

2% 

1ft Technd 




48 

1% 

1% 

1%— % 


13 Month 
High Uni Stock 


Dm Yld. RE 


sa 

KBlHWi LOW 


CUB* 

HnOt.ChW 


\ 




JOe J31? 


,44 14 U 
J40 3J 14 
23 

12 


214b B3W TthmR 
9*6 2 Titocon 
Jib 21 '4 TriHe* 

11*6 8*A TMQ» 

Mb 6b Triad 
A* 214 TritlPh 
ito 3*6 Tenner 
10b 4to Tensor 
3ib 8to ToxCde uo 
15 6*6 TexAlr 4 

10b 4b TexAE J91 8D U 
23*4 16b TexAE nfS57 1X9 
12b 2b Txactm 46 

3b 2 TlWrEJl 
6b 3b TnrD a .to u » 
5*6 3 TMwril 
34 34b TriEd pf 4JS 1X9 

4b Tonef J9t 76 103 
7b Toll PI a J4 
22 TgffPtpf XB8 11 J 
. . 8*6 TmaLjt jsr A 13 
19*6 lib Tro»Tec 
■18*4 13b Trooron 

nw 4b TrieCp 
45b 6to Tridex 
4 3b TlOUtttx 
21b 31b TurnBn 
3TU 3TU TUmrC 
3*6 lb TYb-mrtl 


9*6 

13b 

26*4 

13b 


64 X6 
M 2J 
69f 6J 


46 

IDO 4D 10 


M50OUb 

51 3*6 

3 8b 
330 lib 
43 7*4 
157 4U 

46 4to 
S 7b 

3 aw 

3133 ISb 
>03 5 

i7 aw 

s rt 

4 2*6 
a 4*? 
39 W 

3Jrt 

47 51% 

204 lib 

T 34 to 
3 13b 
16 17b 
3 ISW 
38 MW 
64 616 

67 3b 

303 a 

12 30to 

47 3 


199b 200 -Ib 
3*6 3t»— ■■% 
27*6 37*6— 'V- 
10-6 II + - 

7 f ’ 3 
416 4W— W 
4*6 4b 
7b 7b + to 
23'4 33*6 + rt 
IS 15*6 + W 
4b 4b— to 

38 — w 

7to- *, 

3*6 

4*6— to 
_ . 2b 
3T1 33 — to 

S 5V» + to 
II*# lib + *6 
24 H 34b 

13b i3b + w 

17b 17to 
ISW ISto 
II lito— to 
Sb 5b— to— 
IW 316- (tV 
31b 32 + *4 

30 JM ♦ b 
lb 2 + W 


a 

2b 

216 

4b 

I’l 


4to 

4b 

MW 

b 

15b 

11*4 

21 

23 

316 

3 

M« 

zzw 

896 

a 

14to 

ww 

23*6 

15b 


lb UNA 
2 USftllKJ 
BW Ultmte 
W Untcorp 
lib UniCBpf 
Bb unhrtr n 
14b UAtrPo 
16W UnCosF S 50 
1*6 UPoodA M 
Ito UFoodB 
IBM UlM#d 
Ub USAGvd 
5to UnltetV 
14b Uniril n 
BW UnvCm 
5b UnHrRs 
15*6 UnluRu 
9W UnvPor 


a 

a 

35 U 
.91# 9.1 
54* X7 11 
17 II 
57 

16 

MtlX9 rs 

JOe 20 

14 

19 

JOe 49 12 


1 lb 

5 2b 
184 II 
921 b 

67 IS 
90 10 

8 30 

6 18*6 
29 1b 
16 lb 

435 15b 
10 lBto 

68 6b 
1 19b 

23 Ub 
31 6W 
10 16b 
96 14W 


Ito ib 
2W 2to -16 
10W 10b- b 
to to 
14b 14b— b 
9b M 

30 30 + 'A 

low nw 

ib ib— *6 
ib ib 
14b 15*4 + b 
18to 18b 
AW ito + to 
19b i9« — to 
lito lib— to 
ib ib— to 
16*6 16W- to 
13*6 146. + w 


10ft 

9*6 VST n 

50# 19 


lA2x 10% 

)0ft 

Hfa 4- % 

27% 

17*6 ValWi 

J4 

IJ 

14 

101 

25 

Tito 


7ft 

2% Vorti 




7 

ito 

6% 

ito > 

73*6 

15% VlAmC 

JOb 25 

B 

2 

17to 

17% 

17% 

6% 

3*6 VfRrtl 




2 

3% 

3% 

346— % 

1V6 

46 Vorra 




32 

to 

% 

% 

14% 

9ft Vomit . 

50 

11 

to 

74 

9*6 

9% 

9ft- ft 

6*6 

Ztt Vertnie 



23 

ift 

4ft 

4% 

5ft 

2*6 vmtae 




5 

3% 

3'm 

3% — to 

64% 

53% valnlf 




7 

64 

64 

64 + % 

9*6 

6% viauaiG 

50 

16 

10 

4 

Bto 

Bto 

*%— ft 

12ft 

B Variex 

56 

35 

n 

14 

lift 

lift 

11*6 


w 


8W 6W WTC 
1614 10W Woleo 
11b 15 WtansB 
32to 14b WonnC 
3to 9k WraCwt 
Ub abWshHi 


16 

9 

.9 13 
.7 13 


49 6b 6b 6b— to 
35 lito lito IMA 
3845k 17*6 lito 17*6 +1*6 
IM lib lij% 14b + ^k 


il W 
11 10V6 10 
45 130 119 


1BW + to 
W -Ito 





65 

17 

28 

77*6 

27 

27ft- ft 







3 





lift 



15 

A 

3 

IQto 

lOto 

IWL + ft 







731 



3ft— ft 

■ 




8* 17 









12 



1% + ft > 

■3** te C 

i 

17% 

im WMtcn 

D 2 rt 

.1 

14 

2039 

13% 

13 





18 


IS 

5 


■ % , 



JM 


2 



7%- ft 


M 

4*6 Wridtrn 


II 

6 

10% 

10ft 

10% 







34 

Vft 


2ft + ft 

1 . , • 

39% 


J2 

25 

S 

43 

24 Vi 

25ft 

34ft +1 

1 ' " 






18 



1 — ft 

1 4 

40*6 

31% WTcxrI 

4J0 UJ 


Wl 40ft 


40ft- ft 









/■W 



1346 


50 


12 

21 

10% 

low 

10*6 + to 



5% WDWM 
7b WtHIMin 



1815 

12% 

Uto 

13ft + ft 

■ 

30% 



19 

54 

30% 

19% 

19*6— % 


30*6 

1416 W1RET 

1J4 

75 

14 


20ft 

70 

20ft + % 


40*4 



17 




39 +1*6 


30% 

10*6 WhEnf l 



22 

13 

77% 

77ft 

27% 


5*6 

2% Wichita 






3% 

246 

• 


I3V6 1016 Wiener n 
Ub 7*6 WIIIOcG 
23b I9b wintin 
44 36 wnaPpt 

4*4 Zb WotfHB 
10b 8 VWrtrai 

15W 11 WkWeOr 
5)6 3b WWdeE 
34 lib worita 
21b 12 Wrattir 


11 


3to WrgtHe 


JO 14 9 84 I Ito 11*1 Uto + W 

5 256 Uto LIU. 11b + to 

Z24 1X0 32x 2276 22'* 22 *6— to 

am 105 401 « 43 O — to 

.10# 10 24 4 3b 3W 3W 

41 U II 7 9b 91% 9W— to 

53 14 ■ 16 15W 15to 151% + to 

181 66 3b 3b 3*6 

,2S| 69 TSV? IB 18W + *6 

m 32 20*^ 20b 30*6 + Vi 

JSe 30 34 OW 9*6 9*6- to 


Ub 

5b 


Sb YtBlkCO 
4 Yardnv 


D6 


14 

15 14 


8*% 7b 7b— *6 
Sb 5b Sb 


JL 


Wto 5b Zimer .10 1J 


It ft ft ft 


AMEX 


AmExprwt 

Chiltons 

CanSloran 

infUahtSvc 

PGE 240pfK 

WorkWear 


NEW NIGttS 21 

BlaV Sup Brown For A 

CltvGas Fie CrinFdswls 

Dtxlco ForertLab 

UDtYFedPhll Olsten s 

TaeProd TexasAlrCo 


NEW LOWS 13 

CampCon Canon Goa 

NudoorDta PtaiMnr Sv 

Svnallov Tex Am Ena 


Brown Far B 

Cannstly 

KaatthChm 

PGE262pfS 

TumerBrdn 


hmg PrapJv 

PltOMrin 

TrtdexCp 


KXJR GUIDE TO DB'fiNGWHi 

PATMOAWHLS 

INHBOay^WEBCB'lDSKTION 

OFTHEIHT 


f- 


:i" • 


1 • 

t~- : ■ 

<.<.:• 
•?:. ... 
•ir. : 

A... 

.v 

FL" ■ 

mi- • 

ii'i': 

:J .. 

LICL < 


■ j**. 
oK ”j; 





la 



N 





Don’t cut the cord. 


H’s a shame when distance cuts you off from the folks you were 
once close to. But it doesn't have to. A simple phone call to the folks 
you miss in the Slates helps keep you close Surprisingly close, even 
though you're far apart 



AT&T 


INTERMARKET FUND 1 
Soci£ te Ano nyme 

Registered Office: Luxembourg, II, bid C.D. Charlotte 
JLC. Luxembourg B 8622 

Shareholder* are hereby convened to the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

or shareholders at HYPERMARKET FUND 1 SA. la be held at the hotel of 
Bonque Intemationaie 1 Luxembourg S.A., 2. boulevard Royal, Luxem- 
bourg. on July 12th, IQ8S at 10 o.m. with the following agendo: 

AGENDA 

1 — Hearing and accepting the report of the board of Directors and of the 
statutory auditor; 


2 — Approving the balance-sheet and profit and loss account as ol 

results: 


Approving 

March 31, 1985 and appropriating 
3 — Discharging the directors and the auditor for the period ended 
March 31. 1985; 

4 — Statutory appointment* 

5 — Miscellaneous. 

The shareholders are advised that no quorum is required for the statutory 
General Meeting and that decisions will be tahen at the majority of the 
shares present or represented at the meeting with the restriction that no 
shareholder neither bv himself nor by proxy can vole For a number of shares 
in excess of one fifth of the outrianiiing shares or two fifths of the shares 
present or represented si the meeting. 

In order to take part at the meeting of July 12. 1985 the owners of bearer 
shares will have to deposit their shares five clear days before the meeting at 
the registered office or the Fund. 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Gold. Options (prices to S/atA 


fV<n 1 

A»xv 1 

Nt». 1 


310 

1150-15X0 



330 

asorom 

1755-1875 ! 


330 

550 653 j 

11/51475 

1950-21 J00 

M3 

150 400 

9251075 

1550-1700 

350 

ITS 250 

650- 800 

12001X50 

M 

Q50 ISO 

4JO i00 

925-1075 

370 

— 

325- 4J5 

725 875 


Hiddei 

Worn 


Gdd 1U5Q .31480 

VafamWUte WeM SA 

1. Qu de Moot Btnie 
1211 Genera 1. Switzerland 
Tel 310251 - Telex 20305 


STOCK 

De-Voe- Holbein 
International bv 
Gty-Oodk 
International nv 


US* 

5% 


2% 


uss 

6%:' 


3W 


Quotes as of: June 24, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracbt -485 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0JJ120 266901 
Telex: 14507 firconl 




Arrangements have been made through the undersigned for the private placement of 
t Acre securities with cert tun nutitutional investors outside of the United States 
These securities have not been and are not being offered for sale to the 
public. This announcement appears only as a matter of record. 


1,100,000 Shares 



Gnpdmfwn 

Common Stock 


Kidder, Peabody International 

Limited 


Paine Webber. 

International 


kii 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


Page 17 


A Workaholic Guiding Pru-Bache 


(Continued from Page U) Mr. Bali hired from Hutton to be 
without the deep pockets and coo- his head of research. “Otherfinns 
siderable prestige of Pr udential, its can get into businesses fike msur- 
Pru-Bache subsidiary would not be ancc, bat we're boxed in because of 
in business today. wbai our parent does. 

“You can't sustain losses of $100 Arthur Goldberg, a partner at 

million as a financial company and Nenberger& Berman, who was one 
m aintain your customers* coufi- of Mr. Ball’s mentors at Hatton, 
dence,” said Joel Rixentkil, an an- added: “George is having to turn 
alysi with Jesup & LamoL around a battleship, and one that is 

Mr. Ball remains ever the opti* listing because it is t a king on so 
misL “Though the ima ge lags fact, much water." 
the fact is that the firm Is extremely Mr. Ball's response to these 

solid today and has pe rform ed problems was to spend, so ranch so 


competently even in the stormy m- 
viroameat of the 1983 and 1984 
markets," said Mr. Ball while seat- 
ed in a rocking chair in his 34th- 
Hoor comer office overlooking the 
South Street Seaport 
“As an institution, we can com- 
pete with anyone in our chosen 
markets. Our operating earnings 
are not the best, out we need not be 
apologetic. It win take another 
three years until Pru-Bache looms 
into fun glory.” 

Clearly, Mr. Ball’s task is formi- 
dable. He has spent Bullions — 


that compensation scales across 
Wall Street were poshed up and 
Pru-Bache’s earning? were pushed 
down. 

Since ranting to Pru-Bache, Mr. 
Ball has faired 1,100 new retail bro- 
kers, brin g in g Bache to a new high 
of about 5,000 brokers — about 
half the numb er employed at rival 
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Haner & 
Smith, but in the same range as 
Shaa rspft Lehman/ American Ex- 
press and Hutton. Yet this hiring 
came just as a weak stock market 
paused retail customers to .flee, 
leaving brokers begging for 'ac- 
counts. 

And he began to spend lavishly 
to buSd up Pro-Baches institution- 
al presence. Hie institutional sales 
staff has grown to 147 from 94 
since 1981 and Pro-Bache has more 


t, attics say — to improve 
’s retail network mid to 
repair its spotty institutional bro- 
kerage operation. But this comes as 
industry-wide changes have made 
profits even more difficult to come 
by. The con tinual unfolding of de- 
regulation and cut-throat comped- than doubled its investment bank- 
tion from discounters have ers,to215 from 97 three years aga 
squeezed both retail and ms titn- “George went off on the wrong 
tional brokers, threatening to un- track,” said Perrin Longman analyst 
demrine all but the strongest firms, with Upper Analytical Services. 

“George has got one mammoth “George was handing out loans 
struggle ahead of him," said James ud funds to attract Dig brokers, 
Balog, senior executive vice pres- just as the bad times peaked in the 
dent of Drexd Burnham Lambert summer of 1983.” 

Inc. “He’s right about what he’s Lawrence Eckenf elder, an ana- 
picked to do. But the question is lyst with Dean Witter, added: 
whether he win be swamped by the “Some might say that Pru-Bache 
forces of chang e in the industry went overboard with the upfront 
before he can build up the firm bonus they were offering brokers. 
-What he’s miking about may take Pru-Bache outspent rivals and 


V 


may 

decades to do, but he doesn’t have 
decades.” 

Moreover, the tie to Prudential is 
a double-edged sword. It helps fru- 
fiache by providing some very real 
security. But it also narrows Pru- 
Bache’s scope of operations and 
'limits its ability to divenify into 
''activities that could offset the cycli- 
cality of the brokerage business. 

Untike other Wall Street firms, 
"Pru-Bache cannot rely on such ac- 
tivities as money management, in- 
. durance and real estate to cany it 


* \ I |jJ»J through brokerage downturns, mates. 


skewed the compensation struc- 
ture.” 

Spending for employee compen- 
sation tripled in 1983, to $661 mil- 
lion, or about half that year’s reve- 
nues of $1.2 hinim. That climbed 
to $691 nnffion in 1984 against rev- 
enues of S1J billkHL 

In 1984, wages accounted for 
71.7 percent of Pru-Bache’s Operat- 
ing revenues of 5965.1 nnllioa, 
compared with 43 J parent at rival 
Hutton, where operating earnings 
totaled $1.9 HUion, Mr. Long esu- 


rince these businesses are already 
; domain of the parent. 

Adding to Mr. Ball’s difficulties 
is that he took over a company 
much weaker than its Wall Street 
rivals, a legacy of decades of under- 
investment in the firm. The effects 
of under-investment range from 
the big to the small: from outmod- 
ed computers to slow rotary-dial 
telephones in a business where on- 
pioyees spend big chunks of time 
on the phone. 

” The firm had many more prob- 


apending 1 
of competi 


has drawn 


This 

wrath of competitors, 
overdid h,” said Thomas P. L' 
Hutton’s vice chairman, “He felt be 
had to provide a better compensa- 
tion pgrirngr and he did. Other 

fi rms had tn match that Tt rnst him 

a lot of money and h impacted 
other films as wefl.” 

Nor has all that spending ppiti 
off yet. Pru-Bache has hatT more 
trouble than other Wall Street 


firms in generating profits from its 
“The firm bad many more pro t>- employees. Last year, for instanc e, 
'bms than George could have possi- each employee cost the firm. 
“ bly realized,” said Gieg Smith, who $88^23, but brought in operating 


: — -sHirMpn Bank Liabilities 
Worry U.S. Regulators 


(Contained from Page 11) 
vtnks and (heir holding companies 

0 include at least some contingent 
labilities when calculating their 
capital requirements, which could 

1 , ... •-* extremely costly to the banks. 

“ - In addition. Mr. Sprague said the 
’ -:r DIC might require them to pay 
ieposit-insurance premiums on 
lillions of dollars worth of some 
f- balance-sheet liabilities, partis 
ilarly standby letters of credit. 

Courts recently ruled that a 
Kink’s standby letters of credit 
vere equivalent to deposits, and if 

1 bank fails, the FDIC has the 
obligation to make good on the 
guarantees. 

Salomon Brothers has estimated 
"hat, if the government requires the 
r anks to maintain capital a g ains t 
.tandby letters of credit alone, the 
15 banks it follows could be forced 
o raise $2.7 billion to $53 biffion 
n new capital. Some estimates pul 
be figures far higher. 

Most banking experts concede 
bat keeping better labs ou the con- 
in gent liabilities is probably a user 
iti step. 

“This is a fast-growing segment 
)f the banking business that de- 
nan ds greater disclosure” said 
'James J. McDermott Jr„ senior vice 
{resident of Keefe, Bruyette & 
Woods, a securities firm that spe- 
cializes in bank stocks. 

Carl Rdchardl, chairman of the 
Wells Fargo Bank of San Franris- 
x), told a bank-accountant group 
ast month: “1 think it is in our best 
merest if we put our own house in 
irder.” He accused banks of being 
lypocritical because “when it 
xwnes to our own balance sheets 
#c sometimes overlook practices 
md procedures that we would find 
questionable in others." 

Bankers are divided, however, 
wer the extent to which they 
ihould be forced to raise capital in 
proportion to these contingent li- 
i bill ties. One problem is that con- 
Jngent liabilities cover a wide 
range of items, and the risk each 
roses differs. 

Most bankers 
etters of credit, wl 
■jet s. represent a 
aanks. Net 
umped to $76.4 

rf 1984, up 39 percent from their 
evel two years earlier, according to 
’igures compiled by Keefe, 
Bruyette. 

In contrast, most bankers argue 
ihai commitments to buy or sdl 
‘ordgn exchange are relatively risk- 
ree and are actually often hedging 
devices specifically designed to re- 
duce risk.' 

Bankers differ on other areas, 
such as commitments to make 
oans. Thomas E Jones, a senior 
rice president at Citibank/ called it 
ihsurd to consider loan commit- 


ments as risks. Although potential 
borrowers pay fees for such lines, 
they often are not used. And in 
many cases — depending cm the 
wording of the commitment — a 
bank does not have to make the 
loan if the potential borrower’s fi- 
nancial condition deteriorates. 

Mr. Jones compared the idea of 
setting capital requirements 
against loan commitments with 
“penalizing General Electric for 
having bade orders fra washing 
machines.” 

By contrast, Bankers Trust treats 
loan commitments as risks for its 
internal capital accounting, ac- 
cording to Theodore L. Kesselman. 


are gnaran- 
uine risk to the 
letters of credit 
at the end 


executive vice president. Based on 
its experiences over the last decade 
or so. Bankers Trust indudes one- 
eight fa of die amount of its loan 
commitments among its assets for 
capital-assigning purposes. 

Banks also efisagree over whether 
certain activities — including the 
esoteric but increasingly used ‘in- 
terest-rate swaps” — should be in- 
cluded in the reports to the regula- 
tors. Through the swaps, a bank 
enables its chests to switch from 
fixed-rate to adjustable-rate inter- 
est payments. In doing so, the 
bank, in effect, guarantees pay- 
ment of interest. 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. 
considers such activities to involve 
risk and reports that risk to the 
Federal Reserve. According to its 
annual report, its exposure cm 
$112 billion in interest-rate swaps 
at the end of 'last year was $269 

miffinn 

But Citibank, which is believed 
to have about 520 biffion in such 
swaps outstanding — it declines to 
disclose the amount — asserts that 
little, if any, ride is involved and 
therefore does not indude the 
swaps m its report to the regulators. 

And amid the discussion over the 
off-balance-sheet liabilities, tank- 
ers are still trying to take some 
items off the balance sheet In par- 
ticular, they are backing a move 
being studied by the American In- 
stitute of Certified Public Accoun- 
tants to remove bankers’ accep- 
tances from bank hflis mre sheets. 
Acceptances are bank guarantees 
on IOUs issued by private con- 
cerns. 

The accounting group’s Mniring 
committee will vote on the propos- 
als eady next week, said J. Thomas 
Macy, chairman.- At the end of 
1984, the 10 largest UJ5. banking 
companies had more than $32 bfl- 
tion of bankers’ .acceptance liabil- 
ities on their balance sheets. 

“Human nature being what it is, 
banks are trying to get as much as 
possible off (hdr.balance sheets," 
said a senior New York banker, 
who asked not to he identified. 


revenues of only $78,777 — leaving 
a pre-tax operating loss of about 
$10,000 per employee, according to 
Mr. Long. Pru-Bache has been 
alone on Wall Sum in haring a 
negative gap for every year since 
1980, and the gap widened consid- 
erably in 1984. 

But this is all within Mr. Ball's 
game plan. “Ball is intent on budd- 
ing Pru-Bache into one of the su- 
perpowers of the industry," said 
Miss Davis of Mahon. Nugent 

“Unlike most of our competi- 
tors, we believe that the retail busi- 
ness will be a very lucrative profit 
source over the next five years.” 
Mr. Ball said. “And our studies 
show that customers prefer a firm 
that is part of a larger financial- 
services entity. By the nature of our 
ownership, we mil not be diversi- 
fied like MerrilL We are a broker- 
dealer. pure and simple 

“On the institutional side, we see 
a proclivity to deal with ns and we 
think that that business — both 
fixed income and equity — will be 
significantly profitable;” he said. 
“We have the systems to handle the 
incremental hmtitnrinna] business 
at a vwy, vay low cost It would be 
an Achillean flaw not to be in the 
major institutional segments.” 

That is a tall order, although not 
far-fetched, green the enormous fi- 
nancial resources of Prudential 
“Pru-Bache has this big grand dad- 
dy and they may not have motih 
choice but to go forward on afl 
fronts because the businesses are 
connected,” said Werthrim’s Mr. 
Hanbury. “Pru-Bache is a retail 
house, but you cannot ignore that 
institutions do two- thirds of all 
trades. You have to go after iL 1 
don’t think Ball has a choice.” 

So far, Pro-Bacbehas alt 
to gaits rating as a research 
is suB lackluster; it fell from 13tb to 
16th place in the 1984 Institutional 
Investor AB-American rankings. It 
ranked nmth in underwritings in 


1984 and Mr. Ball admits his cor- 
porate finance department is still a 
weak spot. 

In the immediate future, Pru- 
Bache is targeting specific busi- 
nesses. Fra instance, it recently de- 
cided to get into interest-rate swaps 
and overseas expansion. The firm 
opened its first foreign office in 
1902 and now has 45 offices in 18 
countries 

And Mr. Ball faces same stiff 
organizational issues. Pru-Bache 
has long hired from outside rather 
than grown from wilhin and it has a 
history of being a firm divided into 
warring fief dams. 

“Hatton was a more unified cul- 
ture and the challenge for George is 
to get everyone within Pro-Bache 
on the same wavelength," said Ed- 
ward Yardeni, Pru-Bacbe’s chief 
economist. “There are no machetes 
out here; where people are trying to 
slash eadi other’s throats. But, we 
don't have the West Point drill 
team where everyone is marching 
in the game direction and at the 
same speed.” 

In fact, one of the most frustrat- 
ing aspects for Mr. Ball is the pace 
of change — far too slow for a man 
who gets by on five hours of sleeps 
night, who reads four to five nows 
a week and who plays squash each 
morning before woit Mr. Ball is so 
driven that he even bad a hospital 
bed rolled into his office to Keep 
working after he had raptured a 
disk in his back while playing 
squash. 

“Patience is a virtue and on that 
score; tm not terribly virtuous;” 
said Mr. BalL “I have to have pa- 
tience to understand that 
need to be done in an ordedy f 
km and to accelerate beyond a cer- 
tain rale is impossible and undesir- 
able: It’s a discipline I’ve had to 
enforce on myself.” 

Mr. Ball explains that Pru- 
Bache’s 1984 performance was not 
as bad as the numbers mrifc a tr and 
represents many onetime expenses 
traded to bring Pru-Bache op to 
speed. 


ADVERT 


wwiai 


VT 


Tta net asM veto* 


IOTERNAllONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
24 June 1985 

tmtertiewatalnwnrwtttriiBeitbyMraFoMinrtedwntiltw 


5F tuaa 


l todlcote fr wm cv nt nBDtattoa rappfled tar toe THT: 

UD-dgRv; (b) - ■ m on thl y; <r)-melarty; CD-I 

AL. MAL MANAGEMENT 
WA U WTWi 

BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. Ud. NIMARBEN 

— « ) Bcortend SFM2-6 — -M>Oo**A. 

— (d)Gonbar SF1ZBJBB -JwICteB-US. 


—(a ) Etwttoor Aourka. 

—(a I EwjRnkt Europe 

—Id ) Eautooor Pacific — 

— (a ) Grotxr — _ 

— (d)Stocfcbar 

BAKQUE INDOSUCZ ' 

— {fl) Asian Grwrtftr 

— Iw] DNwrband 

—In] n r Am erica. 

— Iw) FIF— Europe — 

— (w) FIF— Podffc. 


*114000 — <w] OmC-Jai 

SF OBUFLEX LIMITED 

SF 1077JOO 
SF1M7JB 


JW.11 


| Mutttcurrmey. 


□oUar Madtum Tarm. 
RH Dollar Lons T«rm_M 
6) Japmeso Yen—ifl 
wm Pound MwtbwJ 
<w> Dautscft* 6tar* J 
(wl Dotcfi Florin _J 
<w> Swta Froraimi 


— <d) rndMMKMufflbandsA 
— <d) MoaMzMofflbOMbB 
BRITAN M I AJ*OS 271, St HNtv.JmV 
-{wl BrttOoUor htesma SUM* 


. SKL35 
SF MAO 
. SI7J1 

. sms 
- ORANGE NASSAU OROUP 

'S 151 J 9 FB N57X The Hogoa tCT) ) 4fW« 

SVLa — {dl Bmr BefcMlnswH-F 

PARJSBAS— GROUP 


JM0J0 


.DM 1031 
— FL 1037 
SF EM 


SSfll 




Brtt* Mm&jCulT >w 

BrS. InttSMonooporlf SUM 

M l.iltr Hm i nn TViitl rl 10 — «•> 


tur 


— Id I Cortwo MianotiMoi 


— |d | Brtt. Infix MmowPorlf 


OBUOIlH 

OBUGESTIO* 


. _j Brit Am. Inc aFB Li 
— {wl ant Gold Rnm 


-<«) OBLI-DOll 
— <w) OBU-YEH 


{art BrBJMonacLCorrwicr- 


— M I BrtL JaM Mr Port Fd . 

— (wiarlt-lonw Gift Fund 

— IOJ Brit World Lefv Fund 

— id l Brtt world Toctip. Fund. 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— (wl CopNdI Inn Fond 

{W)C 


S1J30 

iifS — twi OBUGUUJEN 
ySS — (d ) PARDtLrFUND 



CapUal ifoOaSA- 


— <d I PAR1NTER FUND 

Stm — Q ) PAR US Trwworr Bond— 
sajn ROYALS. OF CAN ADAPOHSILGUERNSEY 

-Hw) K8C CanacSan Fond Lh) SUM 

-«wj RBC For EnsJtPodflc Fd S1IU3 


™5SB|SSRSSSS; 


CREDIT 5UIUE (ISSUE PRICES) -Hdl RBCl 

— <0 ) Actions SutaOl SF3WJS -+twl RBC Norm Amor. I 

— tai Bond Vnlor us-DOLLAR — si»S4 ** «?! 

i Bond Valor ran Yan Tfle28JB 1*1 


— fdi Corvort Vnlor Swf SF 114.10 SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

—10) Cmvsrtvnlor USOOLLAR. ST22.n T7 nawimWm I nnrinr v^l J77Aa<a 


<b} 5H8 Band Fund- 


— Id » CS Fondo-mn. 


SFS2X00 

— <a»> SHB lim Grew* F«*td. 

5F 11625 


JH3M 


120L» 


—IdlCS Manor MarkN Fund — S 10*9 JO mUMNK< COW-USSUE P«ICK> 

— IdJCS Moray Mortal Fund DM 1 D«J» j SF57LZ 

— <di En w oN— valor SP K3J — <4 1 ^* ork _ Bol ? ^ s f^ la 1 

iip— . - - sFWim — <d ) Dolkir Bond Salaalon S 132*4 


—id ) E ur ope v oter- 
— lUlPaMc— VWor. 


SF 15125 -jd- 

SF USX — 


Florin Bond SoNdlon— 
Inttrv 
Jason 


— Id I SMrllno Bond SNnd 
I Swta ForW - 


— 


FL122LH 
SFB7JS 
SF B55J)0 
— 1BUI 

Ion Band Sal. SF 107.21 


D REXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 

WWioriw-Htnan . 77 Lond on VWI ^ _ 

LONOON EC2 (01 *2B»JJ71 — (d 1 Swtaavator Now Sdrf«_ SF: 

w) FUaburyGrtwi L W,- sizttf — id ) Unlwaml Band Salact — SF04J0 

im) mndwHw DIvonllMM S20J3 —{a J Utdvarwd Fund SFUBJB 

<™l Wto dwFw- F h wW LW »ttw —id J Yan Bind SaNcWon Y 10.UU0 

(w) wtnenam- Kokflna UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

1*4.13 — (d)Amco Ui.S»v SF 41 JO 


lw> WOrWwWa Secorltlea 5/S *0.13 

{Wl Worldwide SooPol S/S IVt. SU1X99 ^ 
DIT INVESTMENT FFM Ztd 

— Hmconartiv - — DMM.1t 


Bond-lnvost. 
FMUOSwteSlL. 


«... lb — — Sow Saudi A*: Sit. 
OMM57 —Id) suns (Pack mica). 


ISFIWO 
SF 147 JO 
SFM5JB 
SFWOJO 
SF 177 JO 


— Hd) mn R w dwdond— 

Dw»X Horom « UordGoorsB. Brarnd* UNION INVESTMENT FiwMurl 

— Iml D1H CbnwwdBv P ool. — (dlUnlranla DM4SJ0 

Pnal. tirtlU M i 


— On) Currency S Gold Pool — * 11244 1 
— 1ml wmt*. urn Pot Pool— S591S1 — 
— Irn) Trana World FaL PoaL. S 027.14 — 


—Id I 
— (d 
— {dl 


UfUrok. 


UNIZINS. 


Other Foods 


OM2SJG 
DM 77X0 
DM112J5 


FBCMGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 

LLourmco Poualr KUUECA B1-42W6S3 . . . — . . . . 

— ' Cir * rut tw) A ctB ao nd* tnvoatmanti Fund. SZL14 

— lw> FtC Eurooaoi S1US ‘ 


— Iw) FSCOrNnNd. 


S2&47 

FIDELITY POB 0BL Hamfllon Barmuda 
— (m) Anwrlam vcluoa Common— S7L57 
— Cinl AmerVntuaaCBBLPref — SlOUd 

— W I Fldallly Amor. *mm H S7BM 

—Id I FMNIlyAlltfrollo Fund SUI 

— Id I Fidelity DbcayarY Food S1D.1S 

—Id) M daByDN.Sodt.Tr. SISCC 

' FMeMv Far Eon Fona *1*77 

Fldcntv Inn. Fond *4L7V 

FldsUtY Orlanf Fund *2427 

■ FMMUv Frcrtler Fond *1043 

Fldallly Podflc Fund S732.U 

- - want) Fd HLS3 


lw> Acthiod inn. 
im) AIOM LW_M 


!T?J 

reii 


FMoffiy SocL Growtti 
FJdrtdK World 


S3277 


Aouita InfwnotlonoJ Fund— SUSP 

Aid!) Finance LF, SI7L77 

*147073 

Truricor Ian Fd. IAEIR SiaiS 

BNP InWrbond Fund ,*1Ujn 

Iw) Bandselax-lnua Pr SF137J5 

_«*Mortooo«Fd *925 

Id ) CapHai Prnssrv. Fd. Inti J1U9 

w) atod*1 Fund SUB 

(d ) CXR. Australia Fund IMO 

Id )Cj.R. japan Fund S 1040 


FORBES PO BH7 GRAND CAYMAN 

London Aoent 01-09-3013 

—iti) Dollar Incorna — S7JI 

3 W1 Fordo* HWi Inc. GUI Fd LUO 

wj Gold Incoim S7JS 

wl Gold Aporsdol Ian. *431 

ItcTnxHnp S1.17 


ml Clwulmul tHUhoro Fd. HT12J7 

fw) CdiwmMa 5ocurfttas FL IU71 

HICOMETt *79151 

w) Convert Fd. Ifm A Certs 5754 

Jwl Convert. Fd. Inn 8 Carls__ $2753 

IWID.OC. IEU 

(d)DL Witter WWWldalvtTjt — S1B52 


GEFINOR FUNDS. 


— {wl EoU IrrvcsfmmT Fund 
— Iw] ScuttfaB Wfcrld Fw ’ 
■p-jwj Stole St Amnrlcon 



Lmm mm Apantw-wnaa 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB lit. Si Paler Port. Guernsey, 04C-2SA5 

(ml FuturGAM SJk STO7J4 

IGAM ArbHraao Inc— S1ZUS 

IGAMorfcolnc S 13456 


li . 

IW1 

fwl 

(«) 

\r 

li 


gam Boston inc. 
QAM Ermrtooe- 


IwfHSiaFSS] 
ISlffl iwi Horten Fund 


GAM i m om o wonol Inc 

GAM North Amcrtco Inc. 

GAM N. America UnB Trust. 
GAM Podflc lac 


Im) GAMrlnl Coro. 

Cwl GAM StorL & taH UnttTrud. 

(m) GAM SYxtarm lac. 

(w> GAM Worldwide Inc 

(m) GAM Tycho SA do** A 

G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ud. 

— Iw) Barry PoC-fd. Ud. 

—id I G.T. Aanfled Sdeneo 

— Id ) G.T. Asmao HX. GwttLFd 

— Iwj G.T. ANo Fuad. 

— ld)G.T.Au*ln 
— Id ) G.T. Eon* 


SFK0.19 
. *11X29 
. *10X78 w 
10520 O IS, 
. S1D9J0 1“ 
. *10571 W 
134500 
S 10513 
SU7A9 
* 11729 


Im) IBEX Howmw I 


S 956 
SIAM 
SOM 
*352 
*21.14 
ST03& 

*1143 

*1503 


—Id i C.T. Band T ' 


xii k In).. 

— (d ) G.T. Globdi Tertndgy Pd S115Z «» ) MerBoOmum SaC Fd 

—(d ) G.T. Honshu Purtiftndor *2150 fbl Mjtei 

— <a ) (XT. rnvajfcnert Fund Stxns (*1 haat _ : _ 

— (d I G.T. Jooon Small CaFtmd *3757 W ) W hfca C rowy 

—id j G.T. Techndaov Fuad *2453 { w ',KJ52LE , * ,d 

— Id ) G.T. Soorh China Fuad sum fml NOSTEC 


PorHNIo *404047 

H^fU|U.NV f SC«teT. B m_S^ s’Sii 

d m ? WF ^- 

— Id) CrasAowlFor Essi SF 1045 w) 

— Id ) CSF (Botonod)- S F24.il rl 

—Id ) Inlnt Bond Fund *951 r 1 

—fa } tm. Qwrency U5. *24.10 q,i 

— Id ) ITF Fd (Techno ln g y ) *1304 w) 


—Id ) CSeos Fd (K. AMERICA] S2U3 (wl 

EBC TRUST Cat JERSEY! LTD. 
M5aolaSt5tHeaer.1S3*0*331 “ , 

TRADED CURRENCY FUNa Si' 

•Mllnt: BM W540flar »JO *5 

GdllCaNjBId SUL54 Offer__S10bH7 g 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

SIAOlO 

SLQM7 


—id » Short Term •* {Actum I — 

— fd I Short Tern »■ iDldil_ 

— <dl Short Term VHcm] — »LU41 

—id) Short Twm’B'fDhar) *04731 

— Iw) Long Term *2244 


id 

13 
\? 

JARDINE FLEMING. POB 70 GPOHaKo Iw! 

— lb 1 J.F Mono Kono True*. *2244 Iw) 

—lb ) jj Jason Trud VMS Iw) 

— to 1JJ Japan Teehnoloav Y 19 JM Iw, 

— <b > JJ Podflc Uc5.(Aca SSJ2 Id 

J^AOBtraBa SX75 1*5 

M 


i ) JJ- PocWc Sec5_(Acc) - 
Hblj/AMnBa — — 

LLOYDS BANK )yn.POB<3B.Genwa 11 In) TloiadyJw^ tUJCjSS. 

W) Uoyda tnrt Ponor_. Id 1 UN ICO Fund — DM IUO 


I uovd* in n Europe — 

J Uoydslnri Growth. . 

a) Liard* Inft I n co me , SFSUO («> tenocroitt Asset* 
»> Uovd* Inn k. A merica, smut m ! W arM Rjod&A 


SU34 

S340 


Drtddair InvesLFmd N.V- S1.11* 
Dreyn* America Fund— SMS 

Dmtut Fund inn *3054 

Dreytia l ul ei u oi d tnenl S3U4 

The EdtMitltMrt Truit S LH 

Europe OU lad Ion 

First EaaJeFwW. 

□tar Stan Ud.. 


4U» 



O auen w iLSoe. Fuid*Ji 
FrankFTnst inWrdm- 
Hmiawnonn HMa*. N.V. 


I LA Inti Geld Bond- 
laterlund SA. 


DM42JS 

S118J0 

*10643 

SL19743 

SF 112.10 
— 5940 
. SUM 
*30254 



Invea Aflcn» 


ttaHortuoe Inn Fundi 
Japan Selection Fundi 
■■ Jowaa Partflc Fund ^ 
(ml Jotter Pin*. imL LMfl 

Id) KletnworT Benson irtrl 

(w) KMnwort Bent-Japti 
(w) Korea Growth Truetl 
id ] Letam Fund — — | 
(w) Leverage Ccb» Mem 
Id ) UcaHboer^^HM 

(wl LurfimdJ 



Podflc Horten I nuf. Fd. 

PAN CURIO InCL^^H 


S 147.10 
1143*13 


Parian 9w. R Est Genova SF U77JN 

PertnoJ value N.V 1 144954 

1 100144 

FUnd N.V — IffiTl 

_ . . In tL W.V. *10*44 

Pufcman Uxn Bad ... (022 

Prt— Tertv. 


Quantum Fond N.V SXM7J3 

— • ts ga 

Insored Depaatt*- *100947 

Sevwi Arrow* Fund K.V s 73455 

State sl B ank Eauttv HdgtNV *944 

Strategy I iwunnent Fund— *2051 

Srnto LtsttacM A)’ *943 

Techno Growth Fund — — SF *154 

gSS^lSa^irzr.'tgS 
MK&zir,®} 

Tweedy 3rowae mwClawA tirass 
TweedyJtewtw t LvXtenS sl^sUt 
Jfc— ■— j 140010 

tc tK* te 1 UMt 8°** FunSm 

ta ) UNI CaotttJl Fund] 


*143044 
S 111955 
. 31144 
■ SIL10 


DM — Deutsche Marin BP — Mahon Franc*; FL — Dutch Ftarln; LF — 
Luxereheur* Franca; SF— Sate Francos a— aNcod; + — Offer Prtoavb — bid 
change P/VS10 to SI per unit; tin mil AaullidiU lir Hiiirnmiiiiiiili iiIimIih 

New; S — suspended; S/S — Stock 5ptit; * — EwOhrldertdJ - — Ex-RH; — — 
Grooo P o r l owna n ca Index Mar; •— Rede«P*-Prleo- Ex -Coupon; oe— Formerly 
worldwide Fund Ltd; 9 — Offer Price teeL 3* ortnm. charge; ++— dairy stock 
price as on Amsterdam Slack Eidum 


INTEJt rtATLO N A L C LASSIFIE D. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON HOME 

A tataBy rehnodwd Ahetfcoo m home 
«t pvhgKXd & pfctsc rtf MV London 
loaAy. Ready fa omedole oau» 
•ion. ClSShOti Tei UK (Dl) 203 5171 

Mr. Snow. 


EATON PLACE. KAUItfULY rafw- 
bidied edehor degated too ftoor 
I. Bt, 2 bedrooms, } bash* 


ssm 


B. 


NIAND •nvUDOOnr Awrdde pert- 
Saute, beaufefuOy funeriiodL QuWy 
situated anioyinQ p u r wa nic weua 
war tiunmi Oefaa Dutm dmert. 

Ul, video 

TetW37 


LONDON, far Am best fumnhed Re* 

md Housex. Carat* the SporwAmt 
PhBp*. Kay and Level. Teh South or 
KeTST Sin, North of Pbr* 722 
5135. Telex 27B46 KBDEG. 


ITALY 


BE OE BJUL Old c h armin B Tuscan 
house, 4 roan*, 45 beds, 2 bath- 
room, terrace, porch, brew arien 
15 iUy.15 AuaKHlm leh eariy 
momma 70S 2l OD Pdri*. 


PARIS AREA FURNSHED 


Embassy Service 

8 Am do Manatee 
7S00S Peek 
Tate 231496 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
562-7899 

hats fob umt 
SHOKT - LONG TBUt 

HATS FOK SA1£ 

OfHCCS FOA BNT/5A1E 


FACMG HOTH. 
CONCORDE LAFAYETTE 

Luxunota duple* dwins, both, phone . 
No agency tooL “ 


F6000 net by morth. 

. ... . vSr ■ — 

G o u won Si Cyr, hh 


Sheri term laae. Vint todayt 95 Bd 
■» 17dc 574 35 Q. 


AN ATTRACTIVE BREAK From hotek 
wdh Rteotef, for your ihorl (or long) 
rfoy i in P ar k. Fiiy a i yipjpcd d urioe 
to Sroom opartuwnti. ndudna Llch- 
m end how wnices if deweA ham 
day* or ana weak upuarck. Ittoi ... 
bon / cenhd boaba FIATOTH, 14 
.rue du ThMfra. 75DR Pant Tot : 

62 2ftTk.20Bl l F. 


AT HOME M PARS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR RENT OK SALE 

SfiTpiS*- 563 25 60 


sm ■ 
130 


raxEMBOURP Ganfcm. 
flat >iy/Aua. 25 sua. 
_ua dl day. Vary moaBm 
artkyie & modem fumhrt. 


la tenon. 3 

1 brih&l 

rdam' + WC Ti 534 2D 55. 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSSS 8fh 

State* 2 or 3room apartme rt. 
One month or more. 

IE OAIDGi 359 V 97. 


• r NEUIUlY 

townhotae, 2 renpton*, 4 bedroerm, 
2 bate, garden, F30IJ00. Short term. 
- 1*764031/ 


SHORT IBW STAY. Advcrtoge* of a 
ithout harMnitnas, Feel at 


adm ia An SOCBM 80 me 
dt rilniverate. Pori* 7tfo S44 39 40 


TO t£T H MONTPARNA SSE. Vary 
in uieu, completely modanKZBd, 
md 2-roorr Sal wA terrace, 6th 
floor. ROOQ/aior*. From July M lo 
October 3rd. TMP^SI) 60 fe 77. 


MARI OF PARK. NOTRE DAME. 2 
room, co uifo i L PIACE DTTAUE. du- 
pln for 5, hew. am, tenaca. Each fletf 
from Aug 17 - Sept K F3000/ 
Tot 70 52 25. 


HOUSE BOAT, in the enter at it**, n 
fro*# of EJFil Tower. 3 bedroorra, 2 
beef* 1 Rvtnp. An. & Sept. S40Q/ 
week. Dr. PA office 677 81 04 / 


of Parish 
2 


home 2B681 26 


BT OF LATH QUARTS. 4/5 
mam, 110 eqjR, term 2D sqiiL 
view Scrth, kaaniu*. peridng, owr~ 
Tek £33 71120-11 amtASml 


KUBUAMMABO H . Suprt Wv 
fonedwd u pertnert, 160 iqa, 4- 
bedx»rni 2 brtfo. 1 year, awdne 
now. TatTDB 37 43. 


IE MARAIS, in tfw host of Fete, 
taldly mnowded dmang 2 ropBB . 

/teS’^Fi ST 

7 POB wntL rAr&M. IM O f M lire 


17IH MAR BOH£ July/Aug. BeautH 
M 110 xun. flat. 5^ roans. 
n^SaVeurnffi. Tot 634 2B 41 Learn 
meaage on anawer bade 


(Contlnaed From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

16TH MtHTL large tecta 50 jqjb. 
readenhri, quiet. HAOO charge* in- 
duderi Tafc 527 49 387Wore n am. 
or (50| 43 76 93 avenma. 

FACING BE ST LOUIS. Wew aver 
Seine. 50 an 1 room. 1 tying, park- 
ing. July. FSCOL T it iU 3638. 

2/3 RBNSB ITOOMS. ham 
F500C/ month charges ieJuded. Tefc 
387 5303 

IUXCMBOUBG; large 2 room*. aAn, 
for a Toorthj F6000cfic»ges inducted 
Tab 546 63 SO 

IBKHOUSE AVE MONTAUW. 
■war Champa Bysees, 120 tqm + 
brge terrace, high dam. 723 43 28. 

ST GStMAIN DE5 PIES. Linurious 

13TH SOUTH PAHS. Jcly/Aug. 30 

nun. tecta, private garden 80 tqjn. 

FtSB/mcrtfi W dM28 43. 

SHORT TERM te Latm Quarter. 

No agenk. Tefc 329 38 81 

TROCADESO. Luxury 2 room + 
ttourtmert JulyAug. Tefc 647 5282. 

6IH. NEAR PLACE FUBTENBaa 2- 
bedroora mcrtnwnt. Tet 325 34 84. 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

AIMApMARCEAU. 2 ream mntoble 
soon. Rent f38B0/monrh. Tet 296 
6832. 

LOUVECBMB. Mae haum, double 

17TH MBR0 PORTE CUCHY near 
peek, nee 3 roam, dl comfort*, very 
fannv.F4.100. Tefc 739 92 54. 

FAST EXECUTIVE HOMBROWG- 
Paraft wburbs. Bens/toles 551 09 45 

SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 

V ILL A R S 

Orty 75 ows From Geneva Airport 
sfa - terns - go* and tun 

MAGNIFICENT CHALET 
FOR RENT 

wdh wonderful view over die Alp*. 
Priwite park of 15J300 sqm 
Vary kourioou 12 bedroonK. 

3 reoepten rooms. 6 bate. 
Speed rate for a longer period! 


r O long er | 

dTvfe 


^ SA 

P.O. Bn 62. CH-1RS4 VSar* 
Tel: 2V 35 35 31 
Telaoo 456 213 OESE 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


XGBiT. PHASE HBP ME RND 

i cnaeon e who con ocoomndrSa. in 
New-York. mother & 2 chTdron far 
cooing ichool year. Tefc{712) 714 
7U3.TOflte hour^l 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


MTLMAMETRiG MANAQ8L 

for tell BudneaAaodalion&Pubteher 
la plan aia imalemert aartimiauE WT 
deed moi. memo, (poop tales md co- 
op pro m otions. Mat be mpenancaci 
aeolrve, dete onentnd, achiover. 
Breed in Ptte and Imdm. Write Ml 
Trade Am, 37 Qua if Anjou, Pari*. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


.unique 

rkfyavizM&fomirKEviduawith at 
lead 5 years timal experienca. who 
has the ahiSty to mcnige a ratal 
agency ft operate a sucneaful laar 
oranzraion From Peris to the South 
Mraaem USA. We are one of tai 
oldesl ft largest indepandendy owned 
tail room comcoraet in Tool 
M uri be a detaied oriented depend- 


able prufossonai. dewing m appar- 
taxty for adwsicsnoM. Mud sped] 
Ehg&h as a stead imguqje. U 


Stas- 


. COMPANY, 

bourg, 

■Ut BMak 

mut be ablate 

Bok 2435, Hwtdd Tribune, 925Z1 

Neugy Cecte, FVoncB 


indteetad, 
GortnaL French helpFul, 
e to bweL IVa» write to. 


RRLTIME 

/caretaker far smdl East 
bate n Long tdari. New 
Fteaee cal Pans 2£0 wl 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AMBHCAN WOMAN 27, 

manager /interpretor/Mne pwtho- 
jer/pST for hotel in Mean Chiarti 
region, experience in C uKumkiu Tto- 
SanwnomdudTws,5eefathar ' 
poslion as kefan rap. for US. 

an^any, tedaiwnne tour* cn 

tor or opportady in wme tnwd nfoh 
ed wateWel Irarafled, fluent tofion, 
I French Cortacfc K. Stuffey. da 
Leaw 8arao S. Jacopo 78, 
>501 


AMHHCAN MALg 46, seeks norvtyp- 
mg deried poaban n Amsterdam, 
Borodona, Munich, ViMia or W. Ber. 
h. Experienced Dot not bifai 


Contact: Aialin E. State. Jr. Boa , 

Gndnrrfi. Ohio 45201\BA.Tet 606- 
2B3-1423 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


bujafo eota}. 

troniKL 
ble. 10 


75000 Purrs. 


secretary 

meftieroonB- 
Sib 

. . Rons orty. Write 

: : MA) tl, BuedlbAs, 


HBKH MRHAMCS ENGOOt. 
26. bifoguaL oOeum, uersatfle, 
leeksaPmiibcB^pasiiionoerefjra- 
sartaiive or tedwadm free to troxet 
Eric Sfoncfoau, 4 Sue P. Suad. 94120 
Fortenay s/Bois. Teh PI B 7S 1408. 


COTE D'AZUR, MGH L£VH. Hrim 
Engiah/ French a W UUiJ seels PA/PS 
pm S ai w» VIP. E xp e rie nced, free 
utanl Tefc OUST. 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AU PA* FOR MANHATTAN CMf* 

with 1 yarn old 2nd due February. 
Idtasl Bhiahon. Me t mum 1 year. Non- 
smoker. Please tend photo. Write to 
Bax 2436, Herald Tribune. 92S21 
Neufiy Cedes, Frcnce 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE - AU PARK, 
<htten * nanny, mum * helpers ft afl 
laun ch er of 1st dm* fom-m domestic 
help worldwide. CoS Soone Bureau, 


ALWAYS A VARAME LONDON only 

babymindert, 1e dtns drfy makfa ft 
dxniffeuri. Sloone Bureau, 730 B122 

/ 5142. licenced employment agency 


Y(XMG GffiL 23 YEARS OU), lote 

ing for o 1-year jab 05 ou-pair. Nrth- 
de Gratae, B rue des Chaudrav 
rwre, CHftbiG&iEVA. 


ALTimiOBILES 


MA5BAT1 TWT4-TURBO, uroenl 
sde needed gofoa home, many oner 
natas new. tec hee. Mforto, Daly 
2/4964522 or 807096. Gve us a a* 


WANTED MONTTVERDI 4 door sw 

don. The 62705 NYTet 2125827575. 


AUTO RENTALS 


AUSTKA A EAST BOK3K USJ15D0 

per day. Autohaua Fronzeteruedt- 
erah. 8. A-1D20 Vienna. Tefc 241694. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

nCCARSWffMG 

5TH3AUSTS 

PARS QIZS M 44 

CANNES/NICE 39 43 44 

PRANKFOZT {061 071 80 51 

BONN / COLOGhE ^2281 212921 

STUTTGART _ _ 

MUNICH Al9) 93 10 45 

BREMHHiWEN _ . „ 

h£W YORK (2f2) 65*5 7061 

HOUSTON 7l| 931 7605 

LOS ANGELB 213 568 9288 

MONTREAL 514 866 6681 

AGENTS WORLD 
. Leave 4 torn to braig il to you 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


MERCEDES 
soo sa 

500 SEC 
500 SE 

500 a 

500 SEC bhra block/ taafter black 
Plica DM105,000 
500 SEC mtaxte/lader reoy 


DMIOfoSOO 
500 SH. mlifnipd W» 
leaAar aaora. Price DM94,000 
500 SEL Uock/tarttar block 
Price DM98,000 

500 S& Mae block/ ledterlM 
500 SB Mm U^^teaSar black 
500 S bted^S^riaadno 


i DM1 

Al an ermerSrteFy avabUe 
EX Mteh / Wed Gemwiy 
Phone. SW141/36622 
Tfcc w§?} COS D. 


COOPS ST JAMES 

OFFICIAL AGENT 
OF BMW {08) UD 

Wh3e you ora m Europe, m am offer 
oonadmfole saving* an bnmd new 
BMW c m* to mo d ip ec S oodora. Fufl 
Factory wtrrorty. 

We can oho amply right or left tend 
ckivg la* free uMWs al tourist prices. 
We oho supply factory bult bulet- 
proof BMWi end the Alpkxi BMW 

range ke free. 

Cd London [01) 629 6699. 


10 YEARS 

We Defiver Cm to fte World 

TRANSCO 

Koaping a m m art stock of mor® than 
300 bn«l nw can, 

xna r<x free mwncooiABiBog. 
Transco SA, 95 Noord nb aty 
2TO0 Anhnmp, Betaun 
Tel 323/54? 62 40. Tb HSfo TRANS B 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


Beody to BUY-A-CAR 
in Europe^ 

and gel THE-BE5T-DEAL7 
Check aaund. Then cal us cmyrnne. 
Ask for PETE 

Mii. - Motor Cara 

S atoned 
k. 2275 _ 
erionds 3170375 
Telex 20010 PMS (MSS) 

WE OFFER SPECIAL "FAVORS” 
Detafe by phone. Gonwenion ei US. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

INTBtNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 

330 W. 56th SL, N.T.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS AND 
aCCXS ACQPTH) . 
Private Mimbardifar AvoftobU 

Tkia rwnrvd eknta aervtee bo* 
been footarad or (he top X mart 


★ LONDON ★ 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SBEVKZ 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 

* * 

LONDON 

Mr/EVENMG BOOB AGBKY 

THU 724 2972 
* * 

ARISTOCATS 

London bod Sank* 

128 Wigmore SL, Union W.l. 

Al major Credit Car* Accepted 

Tefc 437 47 41 / 4742 

12 noon - midnight 

todtodtog raafio and TV. 

* USA A TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SERVICE. 
EVBWWWE YOU ABE OR GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Cei free from Uii 1600-237-0092 
Cal free from Honda: 1-800-28Z0892. 
Loam! Eastern wefcamn* you bodd 

London Tops 

WATHROW/ LONDON 

bcort Service. Tefc 01-381 19SO 

LA VENTURA 

ICW YORK ESCORT SERVKZ 
212-888-1666 

CAPRICE 

ESCORT SBtVJCE 

IN WW YORK 

THU 212-737 3291. 

MAYFAIR CUB 

GUIDE 5BEVKE from 5am 
ROTTBSAM {Oil 0-254155 

THE HAGUE (6) 70-60 79 96 

LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

T«fc736M&7. 

MADRID INT’L 

ESCORT SBEVKE 

TH-- 2456548. CREDIT CARDS 

ZURICH 

CAROUW BCORT SBWKE. 

Tali OI/252 61 74 

LONDON 

fortran Escort Agency 

67 OfcHem Street, 

London Wl 

Tefc 4M 1724 or 416 1 15* 

ZURICH 

SauueHhn*t Escort ft Guide Sendee 
Tefc 01/57 75 96 

ZURICH-GENEVA' 

* GENEVArRRST * 

DART SCORT SERVICE 

Tefc 022/32 34 18 
+ WEBCEM) ft TRAVEL 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

LONDON 

KBOINGTON 

ESCORT SEKVtd 

10 KB4SMGTON CHURCH ST, W8 
TEL 937 9136 OR 937 9133 

AS major umJH ate em|M 

ANNABEL 

AM5IBRMM ESCORT SHTVKE 
TEL 020427799 

ZURICH 

AIEHS ESCORT SaVICE 

TEL 01-47 55 82 / 69 55 04 

JASMINE 

AMSIHDAM ESCORT SERVKX. 
TSU 020-366655 

ROME OUR EUROPE BCORT 

ft Guide Servio.TeL 05/589 2604- 5B9 
1146 [From 4 pm to 10 pm) 

GENEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tefc 46 11 58 

GENEVA * BEAUTY* 

BCORT SBtVICE. 022/29 51 30 

HYDE PARK ESCORT SSIVICE 
LOWON/tCATMCfW/GATWKK 
Tel: Of 890 0373 

CHH5EA BCORT 5EKVHX. 

51 Beauthanp Pface, London SW3. 
Tel. 01 584 6513/Z749 (4-12 pm) 

** MADRID GIPSY ** 

SBtVICE. Tafc 23X03.19 

* AMSTERDAM SHE * 

BCORT ft CUBES. 020-227837 

GMVA-BBT 

ESCORT SBMCE. 022 / 86 15 95 

FRAMOURT. + SURROUMWG5 

Carofei** Boart + Trowel Service. 
Engtah, French, Sand) ft German 
spoken. Fleam aft Wb» Germany. 

069/435763 

VB0UUE5C0RT-AGBCY. 

Tafc 37 52 39 


MBICfflES 

500 SH. biadc/terthar palanno 
USS335D0 

380 SL BgnalradTtecriher amne 

Can are avatoble anmedrteiy 
E*«.MY. 

Piece contact! 

CJ-RNANONG CORPORATION 
WEST GERMANY /MUNCH 
FHOPE; (018141/26632 

The 527697 COS D 

NEW MERCBJES 

PORSCHE, for iaetiertrte defcvery 

ROM STOCK 

Bart eervkev ihipnlng. towranee, 
bead, aamreneen tn USA 

RUTE INC. 

TAUMUSSTR. 52.6000 FRANKFURT 

W Germ, tel (0)^-232351. rk 411559 

OCEANWBX 
MOTORS GmbH 

Snot 1972, experienced cor Voder for 
Mercedes, Pcxsche, BMW. Immediote 
delivery. Fift service import/expart. 
U5. DOT & EPA, shmpteg for tounri 
and detev . OoMxVwide Motor* GmbH, 
Tenleegendr. S, 4 DuesuMorfW. 
Germany P) 211434646. tlx 85OT74. 

* BUY YOUR TAX RS CAR e 
Mercede*. Porsche, BMW, Ferrmi 
DM from mea 

DM from Europe 

Dfcort from SELECTION 
SHECTION Import-Export Gmfcffc 
MaeJIanck Sir. U 2BaJISyta, Wed 
Germany. |0)4242-60458^, Tx: 24109 

CARS MTBOIAnONAL 

CoS Ihe professionals far a firm quale. 
Fast detveries. B»A ft DOT. 

Dave (London) Dl 402 9697/2. 




LEGAL SERVICES 



LOW COST FLIGHTS 

SIUDBIT ft YOUTH FARES: tors- 
London one way from P225/USS25. 
PtcB-London one way from 
F690/USS75. For bookings corttad 
LST Voyages at 6 roe de Vaugirord, 

75006 itora, France. Tefc 329 85 00 
Metro: Luxembourg and 10 rue de 
Bettaue. Nee 060CS; Tet (93) 873496 

NEW YORK, 1 WAY FROM $199. 
Wed coast, rowd try 1 yam $585. 
Cdl Geneva 32 42 8ft 

NY ONE WAY $150. EverytfayMY.- 
West Coast $145. Paris 225 92 90. 

HOUDAYS & TRAVEL 



SHOPPING 

JEAN DELOR 

JEWESS MAMJFACTUR9 

ff YOU COME TO PAHS DOhtT MISS 
SONG OUB JEWEL COUECTION. 
OUAUTY ft FRB4CH TRADITION AT 
REASONABLE PHCE5 

1 RUE DU HAVRE 
PARIS 8TH 

FACMG ST. LAZABE STATION 
THj 294JIS^5. 

FOR SALE & WANTED 

SMAU HOUSBWD ITBRS. book*, 
portmgs, dshes, ale. Paris 2e(D 49M. 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

pew YORK Renee ft Gabriele Escort 
Service. 212-223087D. 

MARM SCHPBpR SCORT Service 
London 402 4000/402 4008/403 0282 

GBEVA - ISBtt BCORT SERVICE 
Tafc 36 29 32 


VDAIA STUDENT 

Escort Service- Tet 03 63 04. 

DIANA ESCORT 5SKVKZ London / 
Heathrow / Gatwidc. Eng DT-381- 
0608. 

DUSSSDOV - COLOGFC - ZUHCH 
Exduwve Escort + Travel Service. 
Tefc 0211-6799861 

MHANO + LUGANO BCORT ser- 
vice, guide and travel service. Tefc 
Man 02/685035 

DUSSHDORF - COLOGNE - BONN 
+ area. Pom's Escort ft travel ser- 
vice. Al cradt cards. 0211-395066 

AM5TEBDAJM, Brosefc, Antwerp, The 
Ifogue, Rotterdan. CoUrae Bcort 
SereS. Amsterdam IDCOiar- 261202 

U3NDON MAXME ESCORT 5entce 
Heatfewu/GatwidcCreds cmds ac- 
cepted. Tefc 937 4429 + 935 0570 

LONDON BCORT AGENCY. 

Tefc 935 5339. 

LONDON BCORT SSIVICE. Tefc 937 
6574. 

VENNA CIEOMTRA Esmri Servira. 
Teh 52 73 68 or 47 70 35. 

VDMA ETOOE BCORT 5BV1CE. 

Tot 56 78 55. 

MADHD IMPACT escort art guide 
rarviee. MufcftnguaL 261 4142 

VBMA - DESKS ESCORT Service. 
Tafc 5Q30355. 

IOFOON GAUB1A ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tefc 01-229 6S41. 

LONDON ZARA ESCORT Senxee. 
Heothrow/GotwidL Tefc 834 7945. 

LEW YORK; RBSPi Escort Seme& 
Tefc 212-581-1948. 

CHMUWj GBCVA Guide Service. 
Tafc 283-397 

DOMMA*S BCORT^UHE Servkm. 
The Hogue - Hoflond. 070601823 

LONDON MADO ESCORT Service. 
Tefc 01-930 3041. 

LONDON 04MAW^L£ Escort Ser- 
vice. Tefc 01-730 1840 

r-a i,x.->,>4a 



ARTS 


1BEVSE GAUKY - 30 Bnaan Su 
London Wl ■ 01-493 2107. hnportonl 
XK A XX Century work* of art. 2Qfa 
taw ■ 27lh July. Mondays • Fridoys 
lOonvSom. Satinday 10am - 1230pm 


SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/Merpreiei ft Tounsm Gwdo 

PARIS 562 0587 


PARIS: 520 97 95 

DSTMGU&HB YOUNG LADY PA 


** PARIS 553 62 62** 

FOR A REAL VJJ*. YOUNG LADY 
ttemngwtwd, Bogart, Muteingual. 


YOUNG BLEGANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 


VIP YOUNG LADY GUB3C 
Educated, attractive and rri&ngual 
Far dm, evenings 6 irawsL 
PADS 530 02 54 


* PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY TBUNGUAL VIP-PA 


MIERNATXJNAL IEAUTVUL Ptaple 
UNLTD. USA ft WOKLDWIDtl5 
212765-2793 ■ 765-7794 


SOOETE DIANE PAHS 260 B7 43 
Men ft women gudes, leatey ft rent- 
mg ar lerwees, 8cm - 12 cm 


LONDON, ELEGANT mute-educated 
Frond) lady companion, well travaDed 
ftvenatite TetPl 0364 OIL 


747 S9 58 TOURIST CUBE. Pam. 

cxrport* Young, 

dmnning. 7 all i 


carport* Young, elegant, attractive. 
" i / 12pm. Inti troveL 


KANKHBn. Young lady axapamon 
Engfeh, French. German snofan. Flee 
to travel. 069/44 77 75. 


PARS NOTE IMS B40NE AT ONCE 
757 62 48. Trustful VJJ*. lady. Travel 


LOfDON SOPtRSTKATBD Goman/ 

French lody companion. Mrtdngual 

ft entertoueng TSOI-381 6852. 


SINGAPORE Mn GUDES. CaB; Sw 
gapexn 73* 96 28. 


FBB4CH RMBIA. Irterareter Travel 
7B63 


c a mpani u n |93f41 , 


PARS YOUNG LADY 341 31 71. 

VIP PA ft biknflud rterpreter. 


HONG KONG K-671267 VIP fody 

lOrawta/beopeai) companion. 


TOKYO 456-5539. Lody Companion. 

peraand oeSStaK 


TOKYO COMPAMON 586 4674c 

TeL now for Sw bed. 


IOMX3N BXJCATH) LADY Cam- 

ponian/ Guide. TeL 961 0154. 


TOKYO 645 2741. Touring & dup- 
ping guides. iieBtpratei*. efc. 


YOUNG CAR08IAN LADY PA in 

London. 01-724 1859 Airports/Trovel 

LOWON-YOUNG RUSH LADY PA. 

01-245 9002 days, evemnBt ft travel 


TOKYO 475 54 SO Young lady Cora- 
ponion. 


PARS YOUNG LADY, later guide. 
TeL Paris 807 B4 95. 


LOFDON 


LADY COMPAMON, afl 
, Please tel PH 821 0283 


PARIS YOUNG SOMSTICAIfD VP 
tady. ttSnqud PA. 256 05 9S. 


PAHS BBJNGUAL ASSISTANT 
buwvw execubves. 500 58 17 


HONG KONG. 
tody far compaaga. Teh 


western 


HONG KONG / K-3-721 12 37. 

EtatuBve's top awtoonion- 


PAHS, YOUNG FRENCH HJUCATK) 

lody compavcry made. 574 71 41. 


BEAUTIFUL MODEL* Sotid compan- 
ion, New York band. 21 2496-1 (& 


FSAFKFUKT YOIMG LADY oanuarw 
ion ft Travel Guide. 068/62 B4 3L 


FRANKFURT 069/233380L Young 
tody. VJJ. • PA - companon. 


PARIS LADY MTEBPREIER. Travel 
Pas 633 68 09. 


LONDON SOPWSTICATBD LADY 

cowponion. Tel 01-555 2117. 


PAHS MTl PERSONAL/ BUSINESS 

AssataK. Tefc B2W932. 


A1WIS. Lady conmmaan and peraon- 
al assata*. Tel: W66I9A 


. The Daily 
Source far 
International 
Investors. 



Tefc 370 7151. 


LONDON LUCY ESCORT ft Guide 
Service. Tefc 01-373 021T 


ZOE WEST Escort Agency. Tel London 
579 736. 

VBMA YOUNG ESCORT SERVKZ. 
Contort B3 33 71 

COUXNE/ DUB5BDORF/ BONN 
Engfcsh Escort Service 0221-524^7 

HOUAfRVJB BCORT SHMCE (ED- 
722785. 030-944530, 02997-3685. 

BRUSSELS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

Escort Service. Tefc 02/73) 7&4). 

FRANKFURT JBMfBrS Escort £ 
Travel Service. TeL 069/5572-10 

CHAHBC GBEVA Guide Stmce 
Tefc 283397 

VBMA CD — ESCORT SBNKXi 
Vienna 92 05 612 ' J" 

DUSSBDCSf/COIOGtE/BONN ' 
Donna Eraort Service 021 1/ 3831 41 

FRANKFUff + SUMOUNDMGS Es- 
cort Service. 069/364656 Vn ft DC 

MUNICH - PRIVATE ESCORT + 
Gurte Service. Tefc 91 23 14 

AMSTERDAM JEANET Escort Service 
Tefc fXa 326420 ar 340110. 

AMSIBDAMTWBITY-fOUR Escort 
Service 8820-329858. 

FRAMCFURT - PETRA Escort & Travel 
Senate TeL 069 768 24 OS 

FRAFRWJRI - AWE'S Escort Service. 
Tel: 069 / 28-81-03. 

LONDON BAYSWATEK ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Td. 01 229 0776. 

MUKH WBCOME Escort Service. 
TeL- 91 84 59 

MADRID TASTE ESCORT SaMCE 
THi 41 j 72 57 VISA 

MUSSaS MIOSIS ESCORT and 
gukte senate Tefc 733 07 98 

DOWHNA. AMSTERDAM ESCORT 
Gwde Serviab Tefc KDQ 762B42 

FRANWURT POLAND ESCORT Ser- 

vxte. Tefc 069/63 41 59. 

FRANKHJRT -TOP 1BT Escort Ser- 
vice. 069/5960-51 

LOMION. Frendi escort service 
Htvn-IOpnL Tefc IDfl 589 4900. 

MJMOI-BU3NDY A TAF4JA Escort 
Senate Tefc 311 79 00 or 31 1 79 36 

s SR^KS ,B00 " Sm *- 


BRU5SHS. CHANT AL ESCORT Ser- 
-m: Tefc 02/520 23 657^ 

fWKRRtr/ MUNICH Mala Eroyt 
Senna. 059/386441 ft OBVnstSnt. 

HAMURO BCORT 4- GUDE Ser- 

vwl Tefc 010/54 17 42. 


- TeL 9946682 





Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 



BOOKS 


X Return-mail 
acronym 
5 Again and 
again, in poesy 
8 Grabs 
clumsily 

12 Neither ahead 
nor behind 

13 In a line 

14 Veranda 

15 D.C. 
machinery 

16 Flimstone’s 
P« 

17 Silly trick 

18 Coin 
swallowers 

21 dicit(he 

says nothing) 

22 Ubiquitous 
men's org. 

23 Kin of Jacob's 
ladder 

24 Galas 

28 Pisces 
neighbor 

29 Viking inlet 

31 Stat. for 
Gooden 

32 Foundry form 

33 Topologist '5 
doughnut 

34 Piqued state 

35 Adverse 

36 Not as 
misleading 


37 Sri Lanka 
money 

38 Lose hope 

40 Maker's ID 

41 Slam 

42 Predict from 
signs 

43 All-round 
entertainment 

49 Contradict 

50 Recess 

51 Set in a course 

52 Of an organic 
compound 

53 Say it isn’t so 

54 Chinese 

55 Filipino’s coin 

56 Deceitful 

57 On 

DOWN 

1 Utah’s lily 

2 Bristol’s river 

3 Topographical 
features at 
Rome 

4 Gave rise to 

5 Protuberant 
window 

6 Affectionate 

7 Small: 
cramped 

8 Ling-Ling and 

Hsing-Hslng 

9 Hostile to 

10 Hold the phone 


11 Lets the dogs 
loose 

13 Blend 

14 Did a surgical 
chore 

19 Sigma’s 
antecedents 

28 Bedouin 
bigwigs 

23 Lowly one of 
*’1884” 

25 Tithe 

26 A gazelle 

27 Provide too 
much 

28 In the course of 

29 “...the or 

the heaven”: 
Zech.2:6 

30 Choler 

33 City on the 
Mosel 

34 Commuters’ 
realm 

38 Become fond 
of 

37 Oriental cereal 
staple 

39 Spurious 

48 Winning in 

. Vegas 

42 Great distress 

43 Course sand 

44 Deep red 

45 Sluggers’ nos. 

46 Carol 

47 Bring to ruin 

48 Defeat by kayo 


BEETLE BAILEY 

I SOT Mi RIFLE/ 

Bazooka ain/p macHi we 

GUN ALL PUT BACK 
TOGETHER, SARGE 


® New Font Times, edited by Eugene MideJm 

DENNIS THE MENACE 




JOURNEY TO THE FORBIDDEN 
CHINA 

By Steven W. Mosher, 180 pp n $17.95. 
The Free Press, 866 Third Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

T HIS affectionate but bleak portrait of life 
1 in rural China is the work of a scholar who 
has aroused no small amount of controversy. 
In 1980, after spending a year studying a Chi- 
nese village near Guangzhou, he made the 
motor trip into the hinterlands that is the 
sntgect of this book. The Chinese claimed — 
falsely, be says — that the trip was unautho- 
rized and demanded that Stanford University, 
where he was studying toward a PLD. m 
anthropology, deal with him “severely.” Stan- 
ford ocpsled him from the doctoral program, 
an “effective disbarment from the scholarly 
profession of my choice.” 

Stanford’s action did not silence Mosher. In 
his Erst book, “Broken Earth,” he wrote about 
the Chinese village in which he lived; now. in 
“Journey to the Forbidden China, " be de- 
scribes his “extensive motor trip into the heart- 
land of South China,” an area to aO intents and 
purposes not seen by Western tourists or jour- 
nalists since the Communist revolution. Riding 
in a van, accompanied only by his Chinese 
driver, Ming, he got a firsthand look at the lives 


of the peasants who arc the large majority of 
China's population. 

What he saw was a society 1 that r em ai n s t& 
the 1 7th century at best, the Stone Age at 
worst. “Peasants in China remain trapped 
within the time warp of their valleys. Like 
European villagers in the Middle Ages, they 
live and die within a few miles of their birth- 
place, cut off from knowledge of the outside 
world. Like serfs beholden to the lord of their 
manor, they are in thrall to the totalitarian 
state, whose officials nm every commune. And 
like slaves in ancient Greece, they arc an. ex- 
ploited underclass, their labor the bulwark of 
the national economy.” 

Beginning 3 1 Guangzhou and moving stewfip - 
ty into the mainland. Mosher’s journey — for 
which, be is at pains to inasL he bad full _ 
authorization and oD necessary papers — took 
him from what passes in China tor urbanity 
into a world that most Westerners would have 
difficulty comprehending, just as its res i d en ts 
would have trouble comprehending theirs. It is 
a world of stoop labor, primitive huts, denuded 
land, a near-total absence of modem conve- 
niences and an utter ignorance not merely of - 
the world outside but of life elsewhere in Chi- 
na. This primitive condition. Mosher believes. 

■ e— » 1 L-. iL« - - 


;*■ rtf in 11 ’ 1 '' 


* V 


i r‘ 


I..*’ 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


0 

□ 

D 

□ 

□ 

H 

B 

0 

□ 

a 

B 

E 

n 

a 

□ 

□ 

D 

□ 

□ 

□1 

H 

□ 

0 

01 

001 


bTa 


EVE 


□noun 


ElSlTlO 


E3E0C3 


SQUID □□ 
□□ran 00 
□□□□ nn 

0000 0D 
00 DQ00 
K3Q0E3Q 
000 000 
I □□□OH 1 
000 0DI 
D0000 Q000I 
0EU30 
□0E2QH 

□a 00 
□0 ar- 

00 0L-_ 


6/25/85 


in an “insidious and never-aiding effort of an 
entrenched bureaucratic dass to refine the tra- 
ditional classes — peasants, workers and offi- 
cials — into hereditary castes, and to assume 
total control over them.” 

Mosher is convinced that there are two Chi- 
nas, the gap between which is unbridgeable: 
the China of the cities, aplace of bureaucrats 
and workers, and rural China, the land of the 
peasants. “What widens class differences in 
China beyond all reason is that a baby’s future 
occupation is fixed at birth, inherited from its 
parents, so that workers beget only workers, 
peasants beget only peasants.” 

Still, Mosher’s hip was a pleasure most of 
the way, and he describes it in an en g agin g 
fashion. He writes amusingly about China's 
road system, about his efforts to befriend peo- 
ple he met along the wav, about some of the 
more startling food and drink he encountered. 
He writes with particular admiration and af- 
fection about Ming, who “came dose to being 
the perfect traveling companion." a “silenl but 
friendly presence.” 

Jonathan Yardley is on the staff of The Wash- 
ington Post. 


1* 
1:' ". 
jk*-" 

JA' ■ 

hi: 1- -- 


\Vit.-~ ■ 


f, 


In Del” 11 V 


REX MORGAN 

APART FROM THE N 
HEART IRREGULARITY, YOUR *LOOD 
PRESSURE IS SOMEWHAT ELEVATED 
—AMD YOU DO SEEM TO HAVE SOME 
NASAL CONGESTION t DO YOU HAVEJ 

I/V\ NOT “ 
SURE l I-I 
DO HAVE l 
SOME 4 
STUFFINESS 
OCCASIONALLY? 


CHESS 


fe PLAflN 1 W GAME WHERE His ALWWS HIS TURK." O XRFJEU) 

1 V i Mil? • • IIU, 




I THAT SCRAMBLE) WORD GAME 
|« by Henri Amok! and Bob Lee 


I LOVE LYING ON THE SILL 
WATCHING THE RAIN 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
oro letter to each square; to torm 
lour ordinary words. 


MALGE 


U_ 

JJ 


PRUPE 


_C 

□ 

□ 


DISNAL 


□Sm 






I LO VE L YING UNPER THE BED 
LISTENING TO THE RAIN 



By Robert Byrne 

T N West Germany, the favor- 
A ite form of chess is team 
competition. While there are a 
number of individual tourna- 
ments every year, these do not 
achieve the imp os in g list of 
participants that the Btmdes- 
liga does. Bundesliga rules per- 
mit foreigners to play for Ger- 
man teams. In the 3984 season, 
for example, British Grand- 
master John Nunn playin g far 
SK Hamburg, encountered 
Klaus Wodcenfuss. 

For the lesser native players, 
the chance to confront the fam- 
ous is a boon to improve then- 
play, provided they don't talcp. 
the losses too hard. 

Against Nunn’s Sttimtz sys- 
tem with 4 P-K5 pn place of 4 
B-N5), die roast active attempt 
to produce counterplay is 
7 . . . Q-N3, which puts pres- 
sure on White's key Q4 square. 

To obtain any ad vantage. 
White must day sharply with 8 
N-QR4, Q4Rch; 9 I<B3, PxP; 

10 P-QN4, as Nunn did. In re- 
con years, most games with 
tins variation have illustrated 
the ambit withlQ . . . NxNP!?; 

11 PxN, BxPch; 12 B-Q2, 
BxBch; 13 NxB, whereby Bl«* 
gets three pawns fen his piece 
but White has nevertheless held 
the upper hand. 

Wockenfnss chose 10. ..Q- 
B2 sandy because, after the 
predictable II NxP, he could 
try his new move, II... P- 
KN4?! 

But whai was this radical on- 
dennmmg of fixe utile cotter 



with 11 . . . P-KN4 supposed 
to accomplish, had Nunn cho- 
sen 12 P-N3 for stability? How- 
ever, he preferred to 
with 12 B-NS!?. the 
being that 12 . . . PxP; 

BxP, N/2xP; 14 04), 

Q-R5, N-N3; 16 BxB, 

Q-R6, B-Q2; 18 N-QB5 yields 
White a powerful bind. 

It is understandable that 
Wodcenfuss would attempt to 
avoid that, but his alternative 
was the clumsy 12 . . . N-N3; 
13 NxN, PxN. Now where 
would the black king be safe? 

While Wodcenfuss struggled 
to complete ids lagging devel- 
opment with 15 . . . B-Q2, 
Nunn bored in with 16 N-B51, 
inviting 16 . . . PxN; 17 P- 
K6!, B-Q3; 18 PxBcfa, which 
gives White a tremendous posi- 
tion. 

Also. 16 . . . NxKP; 17 
BxBch, KxB; 18 Q-R5!, P-B3; 
19 BxN, QxB; 20 Q-B7cfa, K- 
Ql; 21 QR-K1, QxP; 22 RxP is 
ovwwhdming. 

Accordingly, Wockenfuss 
tried 16 . . . Q-Ql; 17 N- 
Qfcfa, BxN; 18 PxB, Q-B3, but 
after 19 Q-Q2, he could not 
castle; 19 . . . 0-0-0 allows 20 
B-N5, while 1904) allows 20 B- 
KR6. 



PFT' 

«uist - : 
Tiiu-- •' 
nr**' 

VI i'*:* - 
ViriS- 
[US 

T«: - 
fern 

j 


defense was 
'odrenfnss correctly 
o play as actively as 
with 19 . . . R-KN1; 
20 QR-K1, R-R6. However, on 
Nunn's 21 &-KR6!?, the way to 
continue the struggle would 
have been 21 . . . <Q-R5, after 
which it would not have been 


MkMUmTE 
PimIUm after 21 QxP 

easy to put down Black’s cous- 
terplay. 

wockenfuss did not see 
through the trap and playwk 

21 . . . QxP?, which permitted^ 
22 BxN!, PxB (22... BxB 
would not have helped — 23 Q- 
KB2, R-N2; 24RxPch! « 
creaking); 23 Q-KB2. Now, 

23 . . . P-KB4 is useless against 
24 QxBP!, while 23... R-N2; 
24 R-BI; Q-K4; 25 KR-K1 
-would cost Black a rode. 

The defense with 23 . . . P- 
B3 was wrecked by 24 R-K3! 
Since it would have been sense- 
less for Black to go through 
- QxP; 25QxP,QxP*26 
Q-B7ch, K-Ql; 27 QxRch, K- 
B2; 28 RxR, QxR; 29 B-B4ch, 
K-N2; 30 Q.N8ch, K-R3; 31 
Q-RBch, Wockenfhs gave up. 

FUNCH DEFENSE 


BA-IBli-i i:' 1 v 




GITHEY 


nm 

Ll 


WHAT THAT TWICE- 
MARRIEX7 GWIKJE 
COUU7 HAVE BEEN. 

Now arrange the circled letters 10 
tom) me surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Wwk! Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse June 24 

doting prices in local amendes unlesi otherwise indicated. 


Clo« Pree 


I Mia Comal Im 

| Prwviom ; mm 


i:M69 


-5 


— A TTTl - t 1111 T 

(Answers lomonow} 

Yesterday’s I JumWes: YOUTH PIETY BECKON FAMOUS 
I Answer What to exercise when you <eel you’re 
putting on weight— CAUTION 

WEATHER 


EUROPE 


DobUn 

EdMtanA 


Fri ml tf u it 


■rtaabul 
Lea Pfltnxn 


ModrM 

MOmi 


Nkt 

CMto 


MVKMvfk 


StecUKdai 

smMwre 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
39 77 M U 
n a 9 t» 

» M n 72 

n 73 IS M 
39 73 14 57 
17 U 11 SS 
HMDS 
33 73 IS Sf 
15 SI 1J 55 a 

17 *3 14 57 Jh 

» 75 II u (r 

U *1 sum 
19 55 11 53 o 

23 73 M 51 d 

17 <9 13 54 
17 53 11 53 
37 B1 15 59 
3 77 17 O 
a 79 2E M 
» 75 II U 
15 S» 13 55 
39 H 16 tt 
25 77 13 55 

21 74 13 5S 

14 57 • 45 

24 75 15 59 

31 70 >4 57 

U 44 U 57 

U 44 9 45 

19 54 9 48 

35 77 IS 59 

37 51 12 54 

» 41 13 

22 73 14 

39 45 13 

SI) 


ASIA 


tr 

sti Beilina 
tr Ha aaKm 
a Monika 
H Hew Deflu 
r Mow 
sn SMoohol 


TMM 
Tokyo 

AFRICA 


hkjh low 

C F C P 

39 BA 25 77 W 

21 59 22 72 fr 

37 51 95 77 r 

11 H 24 75 a 

® 1C JO 14 Cl 
94 79 21 70 e 

90 56 25 77 o 

33 91 24 79 cl 

32 9C 27 51 r 

24 75 99 45 r 


Cairo 


d 

st 

fr 

el 

fr 

01 

fr 

fr 

d 

r 

fr 

d 

Hi 

o 

a 

»r 

fr 

sh 

Ir 


Nairobi 

Taels 


29 84 17 49 

94 93 Zl 70 

Town 17 43 19 54 
94 75 19 44 

14 41 15 50 
» 81 25 77 

15 44 13 55 
91 58 15 59 


I amj 

acf HohBne 

*eoo n 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A Dam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

BuohrmannT 
Catand nmb 

ssssr* 

H anaava ni 
KLM 
Noardon 
Not N odder 
Nodltovd 
OcoVanderC 
Pakhoed 
Philips 
Robeco 
Rodomco 
Rollnco 
Woront u 
awn Dutch 
Unilever 
vm (Mo moron 
store 

AHPXBSCeaendl 
Previoes : 2W40 


Clou Prev 
M°«dl 11X40 112 

Horton 105 186 

HJ»»d 25940 280 

IWKA 346 348 

Kall + SoU THA-J 2D 

Karatadl 73? so 23 

Kauflwf 241 JO 

Kloocfcner H4> 2 KLBD 27V 

Kloedmar Werfce 70 71 

Krupp Statu IM 10450 

Linda 53S 

»1 

169 JO 165 
[ 19050 ISfflAB 

| Mend; Ruecfc TWO 1950 

577 574 

440 622 

1440 14« 
3U 299JQ 
151 JO 14090 
U2 171 
302 301 JO 
50551050 
342 340 

300 SfK? 
11470 T15 

i 217JB211JD 

VdkswafMimerfc 32150 325 

I WOlla 580 500 

iBBarnttr 1 ™ 


M 


E 3 


LATIN AMERICA 

i Aim 


19 46 15 59 

20 02 21 70 

u™ 17 63 15 59 

Me*la> Otr 25 71 9 a 

Rtade Janeiro 25 77 19 66 

NORTH AMERICA 


29 54 8 48 fr 


SS 
57 
53 

23 72 11 53 
M 61 11 52 

MIDDLE EAST 
Ankara 
Odnrt 
Dgmotcn 
Jarasnieai 
TtlAvtv 

OCEANIA 

A net kin d M 52 10 50 r 

•ydaey 15 S9 7 45 Ir 

cfdaudy; to-foouv; fr-lalr; hJiall; 
sh i lww re sm-wiow; si -stormy. 


Atlanta 


Dwwfr 

Oafrott 

Hoaalirio 


27 81 14 57 
29 84 19 66 


14 

31 
28 
26 
31 

a 

30 

31 

LesAaodes is 

Miami » 

Mtaaaapan* 37 

Mnatraol 26 

Noam 30 

Haw York 27 

Son Francisco 17 

SMtffa 18 

Toronto 17 

WaflU eaian 30 

frawcasf; pc -Parity 



I ArtMd 
Bekaert 

GB-lnoo-HM 

1 S«- 

Gevoorf 

■ --- M — ■- - 

rKMJXtn 

Inloreom 
Krodlothank 
, Pofroflna 
SocGanarala 
I Sofliia 
Sofvay 

VS*"** 

Unary 

vmim Monfoene 

Cwtm Stock ladn 
Previous : XU3J3 


West Holding 


815 825 

2910 2890 
17400 17300 
1185 1185 
1340 1900 
7400 7600 
1060 1005 

££ SK 

2000 2750 
48S 400 

5D5D BOOT! 
1500 1490 
MKJ 4950 
1400 1570 
SIS 005 

470 670 

6050 sm 


ssssT;ga.““ : '“-“ 


Oalaofy 423 431 

Oo Boors* 540 544 

.Distillers 297 2M 

D r Infan t-gin S25V. CSW 

Fhan 341 343 

Fmstoad S25H S254fc 

SEC 170 lee 

GenAocldant 623 426 

GKN 222 220 

gS3 c «* 

§5^s ’ » 728 

GUS 
Hanson 
Hcwker 
ICI 

Imperial Group 

Juouar 

Land SecurUtes 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
Lonrha 
Lucas 

Mark* and to 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 

Nat west Bank 
Panda 
Ptiunenn 
f ’lowi v 
Prudential 
Racai Elect 
Randfanfaln 
Ra* 335 

Roedintl 594 

Reuters 311 314 

Royal Dutch c 4463/64 44 s/ti 

SaatcM 
{ S olnsb urv 
S^Tfaldfa*, 

*TC 

Sfd Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tata and Lvlt 
Tosco 
Tlwrn EMI 
TJ. Group 
Trapdoor Hse 

unramar 
Unllevcrr 
United Biscuits 
Victors 


Air Lhaikio 
AMhom AH. 
AvDossoull 
Htmeedr* 

BlC 

Bonproln 

B sSSd " 

QwTofour 
Chargeurs 
Club Med 
Daily 
Dump 
ElfAquttaino 
Eunwei 
Gen Earn 


Bauaolnvnie 

CasHotnalno 

Catos 

COmalco 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlap 

Qdcra Ixl 

ICI Australia 

Maoencm 

MIM 

Mnr 

NatAust Bank 
Nows Om 
N Broken HOI 
PoseWan 
qidCod Trust 
Santos 

Tlwmas Nation 

"OOoSWt 


253 251 

441 440 
422 6.U 
317 134 

205 204 

430 6.16 

Ml XT] 
107 1J97 

£88 504 

2JD JJ5 
226 226 
205 295 
105 150 

110 125 

205 202 

125 227 

415 414 
600 720 

135 228 
350 35D 
158 1JB 
552 SM 

103 IOO 
157 306 
4 306 

1J8 US 




128 


PmAam z 21UB 

CAC Index : NLA. 
Pnvloao : 22&4D 


: 322705 


F.T.X) In dex: 963J8 
Prnlan:KU) 
F.TjJ s.wg fades ; 1266J5 
Prartoas : 126201 


Min 


TUESDAY-S FORECAST -CHANNEL! Rough. FRANKFURT: Oaadv Tama 
U— 12 ( 6 ) -Ml. LONDON: Cfaudv. Tetna 13— 12 139— 3«L SutDR®: iSSS' 
Tmw. 30— 15 < 86 - 99), NEW YORK: Fair. Tomp. 25 — 13 (77 — 39) . PARIS" 
Rohr Temp.ll— 11 (64— 57). ROMS! CtoMfv. Tamp. 26—14 (79-571 TEL 
AVTV: rajr. Tjsn p 30 — 19 ( 8 6 — 66 ). ZURICH: daudv. Tamp. 17 — 12 (U— ML 

sns-. aai-MT 1 “-*■ 


AEG-Tllafunlwn 
I All tarn vote 
1 Allana 
BASF 
Barer 

Bov Hypo Bank 
Ba^VanHm&ank 

BMP- Bonk 
BMW 

; Commef ifc anfc 
Coni Gumml 
Da l mtar4tonx 
Doousso 

Deutadw Babcock 

DtuisehaBank 

Drosdnar Bank 

CHH 

Harpancr 

Hochtief 

Hoeeiwt 


144 14630 
1565 1563 
35950 35500 
2630 2243D 
224JO 22200 
M7 349 
376 381 

SS 

327 325 

454 456 

wooanj 

1CT 15650 
BS7 536 
309 JO 362 1 
M150 1631 


5)4* S14te 

213 316 

mw 557 

222 281 

U6 146 

3B9 384 

5*9 si2 Banco Camm 21990 wmQ 

31* 213 SfifiStL .“S’ 

328 TK Ctaohotafa 10270 10649 

210 213 Crea llal 2289 2325 

40 39 10700 1K« 

SI SIS Farm Bed In 136SD 137U 

28S 786 Flat 3520 3648 

192 191 Flnsider suw- - 

265 267 Oatwran 51300 50000 

530 SO PI WOO B724 

292 291 I falcon ibijII CKsn 43300 

175 176 !W*» . .. _ MSI 1489 

361 348 itafmoWNarl 907SD f 

313 210 *to dj ob W ‘ W 1 14973 1 1 

343 343 Montedison 1944 IRQ 

233 252 OWvoffl 4CHQ Jffi 

S 530 Plrwm 2491 2699 

V54 RAS 77500 76M0 

156 186 Wnaaosnto 874 667 

712 216 UP, 2385 3447 

S29 529 SME 1400 1430 

142 141 Sola 3150 3040 


AsaM Cham mw 

AuhlGKn B65 

B caih of T okyo B *0 

Brfdoestano 561 

Canon 1130 

Onto 1640 

Cltah 424 

□al Nippon Prlnl mo 

Dohwi Haute 674 

Dahra Securities 594 

Fanuc 7890 

Full Bank 1660 

Full PhcWD 1910 

Fujitsu 1010 

PHtOCM 735 

Hitachi Coble 613 

Honda 1390 

Japan Air Lines 7650 

Kailma 311 

Kansal Power 1800 

JjMJpoaltl Stool 151 

Klrfa Brewery 72 s 

Komatsu 473 

Kubota 350 

Kyocera mg 

Main Elec inds 1390 

Matsu Elec Works 773 

MjtavgiaM Bank KH0 

MltsubWU Oubb 519 

MlltobMHEJae 396 

Mitsubishi Heavy 327 

MltaMstll Core 665 

Mllsul oqd Co .®S 

MltollfcMtil 633 

Mitsumi ko. 

NEC 1010 

NGK Insulators 781 


aruOsThamiiid ladoat : 792A4 
Prevtons :7BU6 


Close Prev, 

NlktaSec ' 775 776 

Nippon Koaofcu 1120 MH 

Nippon Oil 945 951 

Nippon Steel 166 T68 

Nippon Yusen 304 306 

Warn 635 612 

Nomura Sec 1250 1240 

Wraw 1140 1130 

Manner IBM 1750 

Rtaoh 930 929 

Sharp in in 

SMmani 7io 7m 

SMnetsu Chemical 003 740 

Sony 4000 3700 

Sumitomo Bank 1910 1940 

Sumitomo Cham 267 268 

Sumitomo Marine 740 736 

Sumitomo Metal 152 135 

TnHef Cora 257 250 

Totebo Marino sm 570 

TOtododiem 854 532 

TDK 4550 4300 

TeiTllJ 470 473 

Tokyo EJec. Power 2000 2090 

Tokyo Marine 930 921 

Toppcn Printing sm sm 

Tonnr Ind 476 475 

TasMba 369 358 

Ibvaia 12m 1230 

VanaMUSac 790 790 

Mto/DiL index : im&9i 
Prwtoae : WJ476 
New Index : 18T7J1 
Prevloae: 1 11844 


Autophan 
Bank Lou 

Brown Boverl 

Etoctrawatt 
Georg Fischer 
ifaMerbank 
In tonNscp unt 

SESSf" 

LdniSsGvr 

MoevenpkA 

Nestkr 

OertUum-B 

Roche Baby 

Sander 

Schindler 

Suuer 

SBC 

Surveillance 


Swleovolksbank 
union Bonk 
Winterthur 
Zurich l pi 

SBC Index : <7138 


3030 3525 

BOG ena 

5650 55S) 
3830 3918 
1750 1748 
3120 3U5 
2740 2720 
2820 2800 
9° 890 

774 770 

2290 2270 
6150 6075 
2340 2343 
1830 U» 
4650 4650 
6310 6240 
ISM 1510 
9275 9150 
13*0 1388 
4550 4400 
395 384 

430 430 

3950 
1272 1260 
1068 I860 
1680 1690 
4030 4800 

am ms 
2110 2170 


r via AP 


1286 Abb Pro 
2SU)AgnlcoE 

&7gE2$ 

1350 Alta Nat 
nOAtopma SI 
n00 Andri WA f 
8369 Aracen 

I& 


lAf 


2 Bra tome 

K 

ISSS'S, 


910 

34510 

17DCCL A 
UHUacadFrv 
BTOOCampeauf 
KMOO c Nor West 
lancpackn 
BOtOCan Trust 
88045 Cl Bk Com 
2060 Cdn Not Roe 
I24004.cn re A I 
400 C Utfl B 
600 Cera 
3978 Cetcnese 
2S0 Cofan 17 Sp 
29»CentriTr 

5 3&S% 





ISSSSM 

4 Daman A 

JSS'STa 


Af 


quoted; NA: not 
avaUaUa; xd: ax-dfuktond. 


246 _ 

386 281 . 

373 373 

1ST 15) 
171 177 

40S 403 

370 HA. 
84 86 

207 287 

184 186 

310 218 

AMoersvaoriden index :3£L» 

— : 342.10 


FOR THE LATEST WORD ON 
EUROBONDS 
READ CARL GEWIRTZ 
EACH MONDAY IN THE IHT 


welSlmx 

13900 EauHySvr 
SOFCAInH 
SISCFoIcnnC 
73150 Flcnbrdoo 
2500 Fed Ind A 
5300 Fed Plan 
aooPCUvFin 
UOOGandtaA 
SiaaZGeBeComp 
9290 Geocrude 
1100 Gibraltar 
3900 GOldcsrpf 
1800 Grandma 
7008 Gronduc 
980 GL FBrest 
zraGrevhnd 
2900 Hrd) no A I 
UOO Hawker 
34940 HaTesD 
32300 Hoes Inft 
30749 H Bay Co 
25935 Imosco 
565B Indal 
SM Inland Gas 
nano inti Thom 
30330 Inter Pipe 

1480 luce 

66 B 0 Jamack 
200 Kelsey H 
TUB Kery Add 
SMtlAhaff 
3l«ULnCMnris 
noOLCMCem 
3IOOU)aana 
760 LLLSC 
1130 LtMawCa 


JJW Low Close Cboo 

sE \%r* 
^ « v + * 

M 1 % \%i 

ttl<A 2 DW 21 — Ufa 

- sr % ’sr* 

^ ^ M «k +,fc 

rr,r,r- s 

ill O u 

S 8 S +1S 

S19 18V. ion 

WU 9 9V6+ 4k 

243 240 240 

524 Z Ftt 23% 

sa uto iss-^ 

SL I5 h 15 +* 

5251A 25 25 — lit 

522*. 22 to 2214 + to 
gOtt M16 MV.- V* 
S37to 27 37 — U 

Ig9k Kto 3Bfc- to 
ou JO 30 
SHHfc 101* 1014 + Ik 

KE& 35S?» Mw 

SI9to 19to im , + w 

l»+to 

5 Vtk BVt 8U4- to 
$ 6 rt 4to 61* — to 
56 to 5*. 6ki + to 
M » 1091+ 2 
Stok 6to t'A~ to 
S9Ui 9 9U + )6 
315 300 318 +15 

3 S J5S 

s % 

3& M JSrlS 

^4 2 Sto a%.+ to 
220 214 230 

tr iss rT,“ i 
* 2 * t rris 
& & .£=£ 

m. 2 hi 

523 V. 23 V. m. 
n3to 1M<| 1314+ to 
MWI Sh 29to+ to 
»k Wi- V. 
"2 SW 2J0—3 
58 7% 8 + to 

2 39 70 +1 

sSto 20 Ik WfrZ to 
24to u£+to 
1g 145 150 +5 
saoto 2 Dto 304k 
SIM} lOto w* 

nm zito 2 iik— m 

g“ g! 8*+» 

C S JSL* 

sa a a-» 

S42 41 la + 1 

g«S I 6 to 
128to 271* TTVi u 

SSi HS DtoTi 

5109k ISto lOto— to 
tfftoTto 
S19to l«to 19to— to 


amo mmomes 

200 MP3 H A 

ran Mice 

IMMdonHX 
7SB4 Maritime f 
13441 MortandE 
21813MolsCinAf 

AttSA. 

70700 NvoAHAI 
20224 NomaoW 
’WgNuWstwA 
3600 Oakwuod 
PBlSOslKmaAf 
HV0Q PacWAIrbi 
aooPamaur 
17400 PanCan p 

SESS 

fa. 

900 Ram Pat 
eOOReyrackf 
2716 Redoath 
2UU RdsienheA 
i^RaaeriA 

2525 Sceptre 
700 Scott* t 
11715 Sear* Can 
21568 Start 1 Can 

’«o|to£rBf 

“gSjarAeroi 

12SiSK?o A 

25 Sleep R 
IgBOSymiOTo 
2500 Tolcorp 
3^0 Tam 
inoTechCorA 
41709 Tech I B f 
73ttl Tex Can 
3400 Thom N A 
^Igl wOm Bk 
HJgTorstnr B I 

4BJS5S** 

•TOTrltanA 
MOOTTtaKAf 
50000 Turbo I 

"gssr- 

TMOUSIomo 

'1 gCtf 


Total Safas: 10732*96^^ 

Qose 
23BU8 


SM m* 2Mk+ to 
518to 1|» lito+to 
JIO 310 310 — W 

nm 14 to um— w 
SJVi 15 IS — to 

375 340 360 30 

5169k l M Wto+?k 
«7 17 17 — to 

SS 27to+to 

Uto I^! +% 

J* r « +4 

M4to 24to 2tto— Ito 

iSto'Sto 1 ^!* 

^■iT^+s. 

£ & 5T"' 

rato m* rat 

522 Tito 32 

^ - 
A fr . 

€ %.%**■ 
a r + i ; 

*=» gto 27to+H 
S5 .l»k 20 + to . 
3B gO 255 +5 
215 275 

» a M +. to - 
96 M M +.1 

no ijto 20 + to 
H55J JEf 139k 

Sf 5 * M 

SJ 3M4 31 +to 
ni 20H 209b— 1%. . 
*gH 23 23to • •• 

la StoiK 

06 U. Mto 36 

I- S» S£+to 

"*+£ v 

g Jto (fa— to S 
*15141 15to .1516 

33 ® A*’ > 


Die iw .- . : 
CttMuir- _ :’ 
ankl .mj! . •. 
"Woftf : :■ : • 

ko>' i Bicg - - 

food .. • 

wnfiror - . . 

W»cl Tv. «•.. - 

■ben he'i t r; 

Will* Hrr.;. . 
lawod,:.-."- 
***c Th: 1/;,*, 
jhihriiH” 

Hcndersk^ \ f ' < , ^ ^ 

tofc.,::,. . 

■ n , 'iaici. ■< _. 

^ emon ’» r 

MIL 

"1 ihouciy... - - . . 
wUyiikj,- V— - ' 

SjUMra:*!;,.. ; 
jDamatiti-...' . 

' 0Wc t derf 1 - J ■ v,-r ' 
r 0 - • 

'a.wjiir.- ■ 

lSS ( ««,..V. 






2L69U0 


UwwJ 





MHdl LMCtMON ‘ 
9U29H+H 

ii r * . 

ar*-;, 

r-* 

wo « 

Shares 


i 

?S£ 

5161* 

nm 

nm 

Ir 

*31 




hf 

'^e.%7 

'v,; , .. 


21 +JS. • 
48 » : 


-nut 


w 


ssfS^fr* - ' 

CSS?***'*-'** 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25. 1985 


Page 19 




Wimbledon — Perhaps the Most Predictable of the Major Tennis Championships 




* '~s 




i . 


By Pecer Alfano 

New York Tima Service 

WIMBLEDON. England —The 

UdbiLsof cr w trfY V grs y pr t-rwHing thf 

tournament, the slick grass coons 
and traditional tennis whites that 
are re miniscen t of annthw era and 
the inevitable player complaints 
about the intrusive gossip-oriented 
British tabloids, all add to Wimble- 
don’s mystique and some say 
charm, as wdl as make h perhaps 
the most predictable of the major 
champi onships 

John McEnroe is a bigger favor- 
ite to dominate hen: at the 

U.S. Open. And there is little rear- 
son to suspect that Chris Evert 
Uqyd and Martina Navratilova 
won't be meeting in the women's 
singles final 

The atmosphere surrounding the 
most prestigious event in temws 
and the court surface are reasons 
why form should prevafl. Every 
Wimbledon seems to produce a 
surprise or two, but not in the final, 
when the pressure usually has tak- 
en its toll of the younger upstarts. 
The grass favors the serve-and-vol- 
ley players but even they are more 
accustomed to h ar dcourts and in- 
door carpet where the bounce is 
higher and true. The ball tends to 
stay low and skid on grass or what 
is left of it in the final rounds at 
Wimbledon. 


Early in his career, Ivan Lendl, 
who is the Na 2-seeded player for 
<hic y ear ’s tournament, which be- 
gan Monday, bypassed Wimbledon 
one year, raying that he was allergic 
to grass. He meant that the grass 
ma de him frown, not sneeze. 

l-gnril has since developed into 
an excellent aD-contt player who 
has recently begun to get the better 
of McEnroe and is capable of win- 
ning here. But be has won rally one 
major championship, losing five 
finals , and that victory in the 
French Open in 1984 is remem- 
bered more as the grand slam event 
McEnroe lost after he won the fint 
two sets. 

McEnroe is top-seeded and still 
ranked Na 1 despite losing to 
Lendl in the final Tournament of 
Champions last month at Forest 

Hills and to Mats Wflander in the 
■<e mifi«ais at the French — both 
day court surfaces. McEnroe has 
reached the- final at Wimbledon 
five consecutive years and won 
three all-Engknd championships. 

ffis victories over Chris Lewis in 
1983 and Jimmy Connors last year 
were more routine than some of his 
first-round matches. Barring an 
eariy-rotmd upset or another series 
of disrupting confrontations in- 
volving Wimbledon protocol, 
McEnroe should win agam and in- 


RoinDisrupts Opening Day 

The Associated Press 

WIMBLEDON. England — John McEnroe opened his defense of 
the Wimbledon men’s angles title four and a half hours late Monday 
and then played for just 22 minutes before officials suspended the 
match — against Peter McNamara — because of the slippery court 

Piny on 14 of the other 15 courts was called off following steady 
rain that did not let up until late afternoon. 

With the score on the center court standing at 3-3, McEnroe 
approached the umpire and called for tour namen t referee, Alan Mills, 
after both players had slipped on the slick grass following several 
hours of rain. 

“You cannot move at all. the court is unplayable," the American 
left-hander protested. With McNamara in agreement. Mills told the 
crowd he was suspending play until Tuesday “in view of the slippery 
nature of the court and the possibility Of injury to the players. 

The crowd, who had waited patiently all afternoon for play to 
bran, booed and whistled the decision. 

Tournament officials, meanwhile; granted Chris Evert Lloyd’s 
request to play her first-round match against Mary Loo Piatek cm 
Wednesday instead of Tuesday because of a stiff neck. 


don because he was homesick and 
tired of being in Europe. He is not 
the type of individual, however, 
who plays with his bags packed. 

As the are influ- 

enced by the computer rankings 
and Grand Prix pomt totals, tins 
Swedish players such as Wilander. 
Anders Jarryd, and Joakiin Nys- 
trom, and the American Aaron 
Krickstem, are in the top 10. This 
can be misleading. When the sur- 
face is taken into consideration. 
Wilander, seeded Na 4, appears to 
be the only serious threat among 
the Swedes. He wan his second 
French Open championship this 
year, and although stronger on 
day, he also has won two Austra- 
lian Opens, which are played on 


vite more comparisons to Bjorn 
Borg’s five consecutive Wimbledon 
titles. 

All this success is despite McEn- 
roe’s distaste for Wimbledon's 
pomp and tircumstanca He once 
said he would not return here if he 
ever won but it was an idle threat 
“Why spite myself,” he said. 
“When fm finished, 1H sure be 
glad that 1 woo Wimbledon. But m 


be happy when 1 don’t have to 
come bark here anymore.” 

Connors is seeded third although 
he has not won a tournament this 
year, and at 32 he is on the down- 
side of his career. But given his 
experience and competitiveness, he 
remains a force. 

Connors created a fait of a stir 
after the French Open when he 
that he might skip Wimble- 


Xanana Beats Yankees 
In Debut With Tigers 


us 





i 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

DETROIT — Malting his first 
start in a Detroit uniform, Frank 
Tanana pitched seven shutout in- 
nings Sunday to lead the' Tigers to a' 
3-1 victory over the New York 
Yankees. Chet Lemon hit a two- 
run homer for the Tigers. 

“I’ve wanted to wear this uni- 
form ewer since I was a kid,” said 
— - Tanana, a native Detroiter who got 
9 J ^away when the Tigers passed him 

1 BASEBALL KOUNDUP 

over in favor of Tom Veryzer in the 
1971 draft “This was an exciting 
day for me. It’s good stuff!” 

Tanana. a 31 -year-old left- 
hander. was acquired in a trade 
Thursday with Texas for a minor- 
league pitcher. He scattered eagbt 
hits in improving his record for the 
season to J-7. 

“It was interesting,” Tanana said 
of his homecoming. “I was waiting 
to see what kind of emotional redkr 
coaster I'd be an, myself. I was glad 
that first pitch out of the 


L 


".t 


one-time star at Detroit 
Catholic Central High School also 
strode out two and walked one. 

“We swung at a lot of bad latch- 
es," moaned BiQy Martin, die Yan- 
kees’ manager. “But he pitched a 
good game. You can’t take that 
away from trim. He spotted his fast- 
ball wdL That’s what Frank does 
when he’s at his game;” 

Willie Hernandez waked the 
last two inning s to record his 15th 
save. The Yankees scored in the 
eighth off Hernandez when Rickey 
Henderson tripled and Km Griffey 

hit a sacrifice fly. 

Bob Shiriey yidded onfy five hits 
in 6Vi innings, but one of them was 
Lemon's third home run erf the sea- 


Oriofes 6, Brewers 3: Larry 
Sheets hit a three-run homer to 
highligh t a four-run eighth inning 
that carried the Chides to victory 
in Milwaukee. Nate Shell pitched 
three inning s of hitless rdkt, while 
striking oil two and walking one. 

Marinos 8, Royals 2: Bob Kear- 
ney and Spike Owen, the eighth 
and ninth utters in the Seattle or- 
der. wii fait bases-empty home 
runs to lead the Mariners in Kansas 
Qty. • 

11, White Sox 1: Home 
runs by Kxmpert Jones, Rob Wfl- 
fong and Mike Brown highlighted a 
17-hit wttiiek by the Angels, who 
dealt the White Sox their fourth 
straight defeat. Mike Wht gave up 
six hits, struck out eight ana 
walked three over seven innings 

A’s % Maw 3: Mike Heath 
drove in two runs with three hits 
and Carney Lansford added three 
hits, inrfiwfing his third boner in 
four gamea, to lead the A’s in Oak- 
land. 

Dodgers 6, Astros 2: In the Na- 
tional league, Pedro Guerrero hit 
his 12th home run of the month for 
the Dodgers to support the com- 
bined five-hitter of Ride Honeycutt 
and Tom Niedenfuer. Los Angeles 
is 10-2 against Houston this season. 

Cardinals 7, Cribs fc Ivan Deje- 
sus hit two doubles and drove in 
two runs to lead the Cardinals in St 
Louis. John Tudor pitched a two- 
hitter to send the Cubs to their 12th 



Keke Rosberg waving to spectators as he wins the Detroit Grand Prix. 

Rosberg Captures Detroit Grand Prix 



'JL. — » SOI. 



1 thought Shiriey pitched wdL I 
really did/* Martin said. “The ball 
that Lemon hit was a good pitch. 
He just readied out and fait it” 

V Dandl Evans tagged Shirley fa 
1 lead off single in the fifth and 
scored on Leman’s homer into die 
lower deck in right-center. Evans 
hit a one-out double in the seventh 
to chase Shiriey. Rich Bardi re- 
lieved and got Lemon on a ground- 
er before Tom Brookens tingled 
Evans home with an insurance run. 

Stare Jays 8. Red Sax 1: Ernie 
Whitt hit a grand slam home ran 
and Ranee MuHinQcs had a two-run 
homer for [be Blue Jays in Toronta 
They backed the co m bin e d six-hit 
pitching of Dave Stieb and Dennis 
Lamp. A brawl broke out in the 
fourth inning after Boston’s Brace 
Kison hit George Bell with a pilch. 

Rangers 3, Twins 1: Glen Cook 
cade his major-league debut at 
in? mound, and Pete O’Brien hit a 
452-foot home run to lead the 
Rangers in Minneapolis. Code, 25, 
strode out two ana waited none 
before yielding to Greg Haras. 


Expos 5, Mets 1: Vance Law 
draw in three raps for the Expos, 
inrJntimg two with a fifth-inning 
homer, to support the seven-hit 
pitching of Bryn Smith in New 

PfaiSes 3, Prates 2: Rick Seim’s 
bunt tingle and a throwing error by 
third baseman Jim Morrison al- 
lowed Juan Saroud to score the 
winning run in the bottom of the 
ninth at Philadelphia. 

Padres 7, Giants I: Kurt Bevac- 

r hit his second grand slam of 
season and the fourth of his 
career, helping the Ptadres complete 
a four-game sweep of die Giants in 
San Diego. 

Braves % Reds 1: Steve Bedro- 
sian. Ride Camp and Brace Sutter 
combined on a four-hitter, and 
Dale Murphy knocked in ibe go- 
ahead run with a third-inning sacri- 
fice fly to lift the Braves in Cwcin- 
nati. (AP, UPJ) 

■ Carton Disabled . 

Fa the first time m las 20-year 
major-league career, Steve Carlton 
has been placed on the disabled 
list. Officials of the Philadelphia 
Phillies said the star left-hander 
had a strain of die left rotator cuff. 
He was pm on the 21-day hsL 
Despite a sparkling 143 earned 
ran average in 77% innings, Carl- 
ton is 1-7 this season after 13 starts. 
He has allowed 68 hits, has waited 
42 and struck out 36. 


The Associated Pros 

DETROIT — Keke Rosberg of 
Finland made the sparks fly Sun- 
day, running off to a solid victory 
in the Detroit Grand Prix demite 
his Honda-powered Wiffiams bot- 
toming out on evny lap of the 156- 
mile (253-kilometcr) race. 

“The skid pads in the rear were 
hitting the ground very hard,” Ros- 
berg said. “The car hit hard on 
every lap, but there was really no 
problem because the skids pads are 
nm something that breaks. 

Stefan Johansson of Sweden, in a 
Ferrari, finished second. Michele 
Alboreto of Italy finished third in 
the other Ferrari, adding to his 
point lead in the world champion- 
ship standings. 

]>spitette hard ride, it was Ros- 
berg’s day from the beginning as he 
took the fourth Formula One vic- 
tory of his career and his third on a 
temporary street circuit. Rosberg 
averaged 81.702 miles an hoar, 
breaking the Detroit mark of 
81.679 set by Nelson Piquet of Bra- 
zil in a Brabham last year.. 

“I must have some sort of disad- 
vantage on other circuits,” joked 
the 1982 worid champion, referring 
to iris mastery of the street courses. 

He started fifth on the 25-car 
grid, got past Alboreto, and passed 
two other cars to grab second place 
behind the pole-winner, Ayrton. 
Senna of Brazil in a Lotus, on the 

first lap. 

Rosberg took the lead on the 
eighth lap when Senna pitted fa 
tires, and be stayed on top through- 
out the rest of the 63-lap event. 

“There were some comers break- 
ing up out there and it takes a very 
high level of concentration fa two 
hours on a circuit like this, but tie 
brakes were really my main prob- 
lems,” he said. “Everybody had 
problems with brakes today. 


Rosberg made a strategic pit 
stop with just 14 laps remaining, 
getting four fresh tires hut, more 
important, having his crew remove 
paper debris that had blown up 
from the track and covered his ra- 
diator. 

“The car was overheating and I 
could not turn up the boost under 
those circumstances,'’ Rosberg ex- 
plained, referring to his turbo- 
charger power. “I had 25 seconds 
on Stefan, so I felt it was very safe 
to pit 

“But if be starts pushing me, I 
can turn up more power. But I 
couldn't do that if the car is over- 



move the paper from my radiator 
and they decided to change the 
tires; toa I was surprised to get new 
tins. It takes five a six seconds 
extra, but you can get (he time back 
easily with new tires.” 

Johansson, who spun two laps 
from the end when a brake disc 
exploded, said he was catching up 
on Rosberg at a rate of about a 
second per lap before his brakes 
went aray. 

“I had to be very careful because 
I bad no brakes at times,” said 
Johansson. ’That would have 
made h very difficult to get past 
Keke." 

Johansson, who was less than 
two seconds behind after Rosberg’ s 
pit stop on lap 50, limped to the 
ffni«fi fing after his spin, a distant 
57.549 seconds behind. 

Senna lost the lead at .the start to 
Nigel Mansell an Fn gKshmun and 
Rosberg’s Williams teammate. Bui 
the 25-year-old Senna regained the 
top spot on the third turn of the 
first lap. Rosberg also jumped past 


***** 




Champion Skater 
Wins Cycling Tide 
hi Philadelphia 

The Associated Press 

PHILADELPHIA — Eric Hd- 
den, the former Olympic speed- 
skating champion, broke from a 
pack of five qwists in the stretch to 

Jake a narrow victory in the U.S. 
wo Cycling Championship here 
Sunday. 

Heiden, 26, finished the 156-nriIe 
(252-kilometer) race in 6 hours, 
26.39 minings, about five meters 
ahead of two members of Den- 
mark’s nmirwml team, Jesper Wane 
and Jens Veggerby, and two fellow 
Americans, Yom Brozaowski and 
Tom Schuler. 

Pro fessional road-race champi- 
onships were also hdd in many 
Western European countries cm. 
Sunday. In France, the winner was 
^jm-Qaude Ledercq, in Beteuxm, 
rijul Hagfaedoaren; in Italy, Clau- 
dio Cortj; in Spain, Jos4 Luis Na- 
varro; in the Netherlands, Jacques 
Hanegraaf; in West Germany, Rolf 
Gtriz, and in Switzerland, Cody 
Schmutz. 





Cydists pedaling aroand the Art Masemn circle in PtnbdeSphia. 


Mansell -into second on that first 
trip around the course. 

Mansell and Hip de AngeKs of 
Italy, Senna’s Lotus teammate, 
both took turns in second place 
after that before nnschednleri pit 
stops cost them valuable time. 
ManseS stopped far tires on lap 26, 
then hit a tire barrier and had to 
retire from the race. De Angdis 
pitied on lap 29 fa repairs to a 
front wing mount 

At that point Johansson inherit- 
ed second, 38574 seconds behind 
the flying Rosberg. 

It was the second consecutive 
runner-up finish for Johansson, 
who came in right behind Alboreto 
a week earlier in the Canadian 
Grand Prix. 

A sun-drenched crowd estimated 
at more than 100,000 was on hand 
fa the fourth annual Formula One 
event in Detroit 


Ballesteros 
Edges Longer 
In Irish Golf 

The Associated Press 

DUBLIN — Severiano Balles- 
teros of Spain sank a 40-foot putt 
to beat Bernhard Langer of west 
Germany on the second green of a 
sudden-death playoff Sunday and 
win the Irish Open Golf Champi- 
onship. 

The tournament developed into 
a battle between the two giants of 
European golf after 1 jngw had 
shot a 63 on the fourth round and 
tied with the Spaniard, who scored 
a final round 66 for a 6-under-par 
72-hole total 278. 

After they squared the first play- 
off hole, the 17th at the Rjoyal Dub- 
lin course, they both reached the 
18tb green fa putts of similar 
length. 

1 jmgrr, the defe nding champ ion 
and winner of the U.S Masters in 
April putted from slightly farther 
away and finished three reel from 
the pin. 

Ballesteros, the reigning British 
Open champion, then stepped up 
to send home his long-range shot 

Tt was the Spaniards first victory 
in Europe this year. He earned 
525,600. 

■ Levi Wins in Atlanta 

Wayne Levi sank a 12-foot birdie 
putt on the second hole of a sud- 
den-death playoff Snnday to beat 
rookie Steve Pate and win the 
5500,000 Atlanta Golf Classic, 
United Press International report- 
ed. 

It was die eighth victory of Levi’s 
8-year pro career, and marks the 
fourth stntighi year he has won at 
least one PGA Tour event 

A birdie mi the 71st hole lifted 
Levi into a tie with Pate. The two 
went to wi ddm - dearh after match- 
ing birdies cm the final regulation 
fade gave both 15-cnder-par 273 
and a one-stroke edge over Ray 
Floyd, who also dosed with a fcdrd- 



Becaiisfi it is played in Decem- 
ber. many of the formidable Amer- 
ican grass-court players such as 
McEnroe have not entered the Aus- 
tralian in recent years. Wilander’s 
victories have beoi watered down. 

Players to watch among the men 
are Tim Mayotte, who is hiving his 

length cm grass courts Australia 
and England. The former Stanford 
University star has done wefi here 
in the past. Scott Davis, another 
American; Kevin Curren, who is 
seeded eighth, and Pal Cash of 


r ?‘ ■■ .,<*■ *■ * -i 

* ■ *** 

Swan 

John McEnroe 

Australia also have to be reckoned 
with here. 

The British fans also have been 
taken with Boris Becker, a 17-year- 
old West German who has the 
game, if not the experience, to 
make a good showing at Wimble- 
don. Yannick Noah, who won the 
Italian Open and has progressed 
rapidly during Ins comeback, is a 
dangerous player as wdl MDosIav 



Ivan Lendl 


Mcdr of Czechoslovakia and Ste- 
fan Edberg of Sweden are highly 
regarded players who could emerge 
as tournament surprises. 

Among the women, there was 
some controversy last week when 
the tournament committee named 
Navratilova and Even the co-No. 1 
seeded players. The committee’s 
precedent-setting action was a re- 
sult, it said, of not bring able to 


choose between the two. Or 
baps, as Navratilova suggested, it 
was the reluctance of the commit- 
tee to offend either player. 

Even reclaimed the No. 1 rank- 
ing when she defeated Navratilova 
in the final or the French Open. 
Thus, a magnificent rivalry that 
had been dominated by Navrati- 
lova during die past three years, 
appears once again even. Both 
players are a level above die rest of 
the women, who had been encour- 
aged earlier in the year when Nav- 
ratilova seemed more vulnerable. 

Hana Mandhkova, who is seeded 
third, will not surprise anyone if 
she wins the championsMp or is 
beaten in the first round. She is as 
talented, if not more so. than any 
player, and is expected to be at a 
level with Evert and Navratilova. 
But her erratic play is a result of 
constant mood shifts and a tenden- 
cy to lose confidence. 

The woman to watch may be 
Zina Garrison. She is having her 
finest year and becoming a good 
all-court player. She covers ground 
as wdl as any player and her speed 
will serve ha well here. But there 
still is a big difference between 
making a good showing at Wimble- 
don and winning the champion- 
ship. There can be two No. 1 -seed- 
ed players but only one winner. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Auto Racing 


M^or League Leaders 


I torn to, U; Hernandez. DetrolL 15; J. Howell. 
Oakland, 14; Qulsonbofry. Kansas City. IX 


RXenason NY 
Cooper MS 
Bomb Bsn 
PJndlw Sea 
Whitaker Dot 
Brett Kan 
MDavfe Oak 
Bentaun Cal 
Mod tor MU 
Buckner Bsn 
Fernandes Tor 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

G AB R H Pet. 

B 87 55 73 053 

41 247 31 SI 3» 

66 241 33 54 322 

S7 270 40 B7 322 

61 247 53 79 J20 

40 214 34 48 J1I 

43 230 51 72 J13 

M 20 27 O 310 

62 242 45 75 J10 

67 265 32 82 J09 

48 233 28 72 J09 

Rm: RXenderson. New York. 55; Whi- 
taker, Detroit, si; Ripken, Baltimore. 52; 

M.Davt% Oakland. 51 ; Mori tor. Milwaukee's. 

RBI: Brunarakr. Minnesota. 47: Mattingly. 
New York, 47; E_Murray. Baltimore. 44; 
HGftaofk Detroit, 44; 5 am Had with 45. 

KBs: p.Brodlev. Seattle. 87; Boobl Boston. 
84; Puckett. Minnesota. S3; Buckner, Bolton, 
82; Cooper. Milwaukee. 81; Gordo, Toronto. 
SL 

nodilor: Buckner. Boston. If: MatNnulv. 
New York, If; Butter. Cleveland. 18; GaeltL 
Minnesota 18; Cooper, Milwaukee, 17; Want 
Texas. T7. 

Triples: Wilson. Kansas Cttv. 11; Puckett. 
Minnesota 8; Cooper. Milwaukee, 7; Butler, 
Ctovekmd, 5; P-Brmfiev. Seattle, X 
Home Rune: Kinsman. Oakland. 17; Brun- 
anskv. Minnesota 16; Rsk,Oilasa14; Pres- 
ley, Seattle. 15; Armas. Boston, 14; ICGIbson. 
Detroit, >4; MJDovIfc Oakland, M. 

Stolen Bases: RJtonderson.NewYork.30; 
Pettis. Can lamia. 29; Collins. Oakland, 22; 
Buttor, Cleveland, 21; Mus n by, Toronta 21. 
PITCHING 

Eton LutnfBsntoo Pct/ERA 16 dod- 
densl; TerrHL Detroit, W. 200,4.11 ; CocBrolL 
Oakland, M -727, 4.18; Gulch-y, New York. 0-X 
.727.200; Romanic*. COUtomia sa JTJ. XOZ: 
Kev. Toronto. 5-2, JU. 130. 

StrBceesto: Morris, Dalroll. f3; F .Bannis- 
ter. Chicago. 83; Boyd, Boston. 80; BMeven. 
Oevetond, 76; Stfafe Toronto, 75. 

Sows*: BJomes,aileoaa14; DAMoraCal- 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

G AB R H Pd. 
HtrrStL 45 214 44 84 JS2 

McGee 5tt_ 40 232 41 81 349 

Gwynn SD 47 277 41 88 JIB 

Cruz Htn M 207 23 U 309 

Parker an 44 257 33 7f 307 

Guerrero LA 45 234 » 70 J97 

C Reno Ids Htn 58 142 16 48 296 

Moreland C HI 65 228 27 47 JM 

Murphy AM 47 255 44 75 29t 

JjOarit StL 44 340 42 70 J92 

Rubs: Cotamoast Louis. 50; Raines. Mon- 
treal. 47; Herr. SI. Loirii.46; Murphy. Atlanta. 
46; Samuel. Philadelphia. 45. 

rbi: Hott.SL Louis. 54; dork. St. Louis. S3; 
Parker, Cincinnati, 51; Murphy. Atlanta 49; 
Wilson. PMkutoMtia 47. 

Htts; Gwynn. San Diego, SB; Herr, SL Louts, 
84; McGee. SL LouibSl: Garvey. San Dieoo, 
00; Parker. Cincinnati. 79. 

Booklet: wsUach. Montreal. 21; Porker. 
Cincinnati, 19; Herr, St. Loub.18; Gwynn. San 
Dieoo. 17: 4 ore tied with IS. 

Trtoias: McGee. 51. Louis. 8; Raines, Mon- 
treal. 7; Wilson, PMkMWpMaS; Samuel PI til- 
odelpMa 5; 4 are Hod with 4. 

Hama Rues: Murphy. Atlanta. 17; Guerre- 
ro. los Aneatae. 16; CtoluSL Louis. 14; Cey. 
Chicago. 12; Garvey. 5an Diego. 11; Porker, 
Cincinnati. 11. 

Molea Bums: Colemon. SL Louts, 47; Lopcs. 
adcaiie.27; McGee. SL Louis. 27; Redus, Cin- 
cinnati, 22; Rolnea Montreal. 21; Samuel, 
Philadelphia 21. 

PITCHING 

WoB-Lorf/WtaNng PcL/ERA (4 ded- 
stousl: Hawkins. Son Diooa 11-1, Mt. 221; 
HersMsor. Lot Angelas. 7-1. J75. 2.10; Andu- 
lar, SL Louis, 122, 357. 242; Darlbia New 
York, 6-1, J57.Z20; Cox. SI. Louis. 9-ZJIia.22a 

Strikeouts: Gooden. New Vtork, T2S; Rvna 
Houston. 102; Valenzuela Loa Angeles. 100; j, 
DeLeon, Plttsbumh. ft; Soto. Cincinnati, 8» . 

Saves; Reardon, Montreal, 28; Gonoga 
San Dlega 14; L Smith. CWcaeo. 15; D. Smith. 
Houston. 12; Sutler. Atlanta. 1L 


Detroit Grand Prix 

1. Keke RoBberu, Pin. wiiUams-Honda 
1:55:39X51. 

2. Stefan Johansson. Swd. Ferrari. 
1:54:37^00. 

1 Michele Alboreto, Italy. Ferrari. 
1:54:4X021. 

4. Stefan Belief. WGrmny, Tyrrell- Ford, 
1:56:04X17. 

S Elio de Aneetls. IL Lotus- R enault. 
1:57:04117. 

6. Nelson Piquet. Brz, Brabham- BMW. 
1:57:0X787. 

7. Thierry Boutsen. Bel, Anows-BMW. 

8. Marc Surer, Swtta BrabTtam- BMW. 
f. Eddie cneever, UJL Alto Romoa 

10. Andrea deCesoris. It. Ugler-RenoulL 

11. Gerhard Berger, Aim. Ar r ows- BMW. 

12 Jacaues Lotflte. Fra. Ugtor-Ranoult. 

12. Ayrton senna Bn, Lotus-Renoutt 

14. Martin Brand le. Brit Tyrrell-FanL 

15. Philippe A (Hot, RAM+tart. 

16. Nigel MmselL Brit. WllUamvHonda. 

17. Alain Prosi. Fra. McLuren-TAG. 

U. Rlccordo Fat rose. It. Alfa Romeo. 

If. Derek Warwick. Brit. Renault. 

2D. Patrick Tambov. Fra Renault. 


FORMULA ONE STANDINGS 
I. NHchoie Alboreto. Italy. 31 points 
2 Elio de Angel Is. Italy. 24 
1 Alain Prod, Franca 22 
4 Stefan Jo h ans son, Sweden. 13 

5. Keke Rosberg. Finland, 12 

6. Patrick Tambov, Franca ID 

7. Ayrton Senna Brazil, f 

a. Thierry Boutsen. Be hi him, 4 
9. Ntaei ManselL Britain, 5 
ID Stefan Bel tot. West Germany. 4 
11. tiled! Ran* Amoux. Franca 3 
and Niki Lauda Austria 3 
and Andrea de Cesar h. Italy, 3 
14. (tied) jacaues Lafflto. Franca 2 
and Derek Warwick, Britain. 2 
14. Nelson Piquet. Brazil. I 


.Swimming 


USFL Standings 


Blrmingtan w New Jersey 6 
Jacksonville 42 Denver 6 
San Antonio 21, Portland 13 
Baltimore 3D Tampa Bay 10 


Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
New York DOC «N €10—1 t ■ 

Detroit MO 08 IS*— 3 7 € 

Shirtav. Bonn (71 ond Espino; Tonona Her- 
nandez IB) amt PorrHlLW— Tanana 3-7. L— 
Shlrtov, >2 Sv— Hernandez (151. HR— De- 
troit, Lemon (3|. 

■M8S8S1B-1 4 2 
M3 tat 2ft»— I 7 1 
Ktaon, Hurst (4). Trultlto (71 and Gadman; 
.Stleto. Lamp If» and Whitt W-Stteta,7-£. L— 
Khoas-ZHR*-' Toronto, MutllnHcs (4). Whitt 
181. 

MBSUSn-8 9 • 

DOS 001 061—1 8 ■ 

Cook, Harris (71 and B rummer; Smithson. 
Eufemta (7) and Salas, w— Cook. 14L L— 
Smithson, 5-7. Sm H arris (41. HR— Texas, 
O’Brien (€}. 

•M 881 148-4 18 2 
182 8M 806—1 6 1 
DovhsSneU (7) ond Rayford, Dempsay 18); 
Haas. Fingers (7). HJoueru (9) and Moore. 
W— Snell, 2-1. L— Fingers. 8-3. HRs— Baltl- 
martaLyan (12). Sheets (9). Milwaukee. Mod- 
tor (7). 

664 611 601 — 6 12 1 
Cttv 686 016 661—3 4 1 

Moore, vande Bern (7) and Keomey; 
Black, Sedcwitfr Of. AUon** «). LaCOss 19) 
and Sundbera. W—Moara, 54. L— Block. M. 
HRS— Seattle, Kearney (4),Owon (2). Katas 
atv, Batoonl (13). 

oatomto 436 812 166—11 17 fl 

Chicago 006 106 108— I 6 2 

WUL Corbett {■) and Boone. Narran (61: 
Tanner, Fallen (2), James (8). Agosto (9) wd 
Hdl W-J mu L — Tomer, M. HRs— Cali- 
fornia, Jones (»1. WIHana <2>, Brown (3). 
Clave tawl 606 161 288-3 7 8 

Otadaod 860 134 IBx— 9 12 B 

i l eal o n Creel (5). Thompson (7) ana Wil- 
lard; codfrafi, Ontiveros (7) and Heath, w— 
CodlnlLH L-Heatan-4-D HRs-Oevolond. 
Carter (41. Oakland, Lansford (11). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Montreal 663 S2( bm-5 7 1 

New York 661 666 MB— t 7 3 

Smith ond Nicosia; Lynch, Leach (4), Ger- 
man (fi and Carter. W— Smith. 83. L — Lynch. 
M. HR— Montreal. Law (41. 

Pittsburgh 061 MO BW-2 I 1 

PklltoHtahln 616 016 661—3 3 1 

DeLeon, Guards C7). WUm (?) ant Pea a; 
KGraa, Rowley (Bj.Tekutve IB), Carman (9) 
nd VlrglL W— Carman. 2-1. L— Wlrm, 2-1 
MR»-PWiadeWito,Schmktt (7), Thomas 111. 
CUOMO 668 086 668-0 2 

SLLotts 026 621 2BS-7 12 8 

Ruthven, Sorensen (4). Brusstor (8) mid 
Lake: Tudor ana Hunt- W— Tudor. 4-7. L— 
Ruthvso, 3-4. 

Atlanta 661 168 BOO— 2 7 1 

CtadOnoH 666 866 616—1 4 2 

Bedrostab Camp (7), Sutter (8) and OtMn; 
PaatonuHusae C7). Franco Wl, Power IV) ond 
KnKMv. Vim Gorttor (7). W— Bedrostan, u. 
2-1. Sw— Sutter (11). 


M^or League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L PCL GB 

Taranto 42 24 .418 — 

Detroit 31 27 JH % 

Baltimore 35 38 .538 5» 

Boston 34 31 -537 5M> 

New York 33 32 53 to 

Milwaukee 30 14 MO 10 

Cleveland 21 45 Jll 20 

West Dtvuioa 

38 29 J67 - 

34 3t SI to 

35 32 £22 3 

33 33 500 4W 

31 36 M3 7 

29 34 .446 6 

27 41 397 11b 

NATIONAL LRAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. GB 

St. LouU 39 27 J91 — 

Montreal 40 29 .580 Vi 

New York 37 » .541 2 

CMcOpa 34 31 S22 4V>> 

PMIodetahta 28 38 At4 11 

Pittsburgh 22 S3 3» 14W 

west DMsloo 

3m Diego 41 27 AOS — 

LasAnsetes 33 » J38 4Vk 

Ctadnnatt 34 32 .515 6 

Houston se xs jor tVi 

Atlanta 29 36 A33 11M> 

San Francisco 76 42 J82 15 


066 060 861-1 9 0 

661 641 60s — 4 7 0 
Ham maker. Garretts (7) and Branty; Dm- 

vecky ond Badly. W— Oravockv. 7-4. L— 
Honima ke r.3-7. H Re— San FrandsaL Adams 
(2). San Dieoo. Bevacnua (2), Bochy (2). 

M»-4 5 ■ 

662 0X1 66K— 4 9 1 
Mathis. Solano (6). OlPino (77 and BoUey; 

Honaycutt. Nledutuar (7) and Sctosdo. W— 
Honeycutt. 54. L — Mottos. 3-2. Sv— Nleden- 
fuor (51. HR— Las Angeles, Guerrero (141. 


Football 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


• 

W 

L 

T 

Pet. 

PF 

PA 

y-BU intnghrn 

ta 

5 

0 

J22 

<34 

299 

x-New Jenny 

li 

7 

0 

All 

418 

377 

x -Memphis 

ii 

7 

D 

All 

428 

337 

x-Boltlmare 

10 

7 

1 

563 

368 

aw 

x-Tompa Bov 

10 

a 

0 

556 

404 

422 

Jackson vllle 

9 

9 

0 

500 

407 

482 

Ortondp 

5 

13 

0 

37B 

308 

484 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


y -Oakland 

12 

4 

1 

J35 

442 

336 

x-Denver 

11 

7 

0 

.611 

439 

431 

* -Houston 

10 

7 

0 

58* 

523 

357 

Arizona 

a 

10 

0 

AM 

374 

405 

Portland 

6 

12 

0 

SO 

275 

422 

San Antonio 

5 

13 

8 

an 

294 

434 

Las Angeles 

3 

15 

0 

.147 

244 

454 


Rose Its Saturday at Urn Speeds Antnm-Ly- 
era Swim Meet ef Ckamploes held at the MIs- 
sioa WHo i n let u u ttuan l Saarts Cample* (all 
dWaacas In meters): 

MEN 

4S6 Freestyle: 1. Gory Brinkman. 5an Jas*. 
ColH J:54J7.iDan Jorseraen. Mission Vie to. 
CallC 3:5BJK-iSondv Goss, Etohiako. Cano- 
do,4ri>ua 

216 Ba ckst rok e : l.Seon Murphy, Etobicoke, 
Canada.2:0L2L 2. Dan Veoteh, Mission Vlelo. 
CO1H.2.-05X7.1 RJcarda Pnxta. Dallas. Tex. 
2:07X7. 

ns Butterfly: I. Tom Panting. Unlv. at Cal- 
gary. Canada. 5124 (new meet record, old 
record, 5L36, by Pablo Manilas!. 2. Anthony 
Mom Industry Hills. CnlH.5549. X VlastlmB 
Corny. Manta Canada 54.17. 

«M iwHyfctaai Med l ey: l. Rob Woadhousa. 
Sydney. Australia 4:2574. X Peter Berndt, 
Mtaslan vie to, CaUL 4:2754. X Matttiew Ram 
kin. Pori Iona Ora. 4:3X74, 

eosiNcdtovRetov: l.MlssianVMo-'A'lPe. 
ter Berndt. Mario Fernandez. Bermy Nielsen 
and Dan Jorgensen), 3:5551 X Golden Boar 
Swim Teara 3:5*57. x MBolon Who -B,’ 
3dfA 


Soccer 


(y-dinchod conference champloAdtip) 
(x-dinched ptovotf berth) 


WORLD CVP QUALIFYING 
SOUTH AMERICAN GROUP ONE 
Venezuela X Colombia 2 
Peru 1, Argentina 0 

Points Stood togs: Argentina X' Peru 7; Co- 
lombia 4; Venezuela 1. 

Remaining (Matches: June 3X Colombia vs. 
Venezuela and Argentina vs. Peru 

SOUTH AMERICAN GROUP THREE 
Brazil 1, Paraguay 1 

Points standtags: Brazil 5; Paraguay 4; 

Bolivia 1. 

Remain) og Match: June to. Brad I vs. Boliv- 
ia 


Can torn la 

Hi hi km » 

Oakland 
Kansas atv 
Seattle 

Minnesota 


BlancpaiN 

•/..f •• • ■fi.v.j 


*«.iii . f ii, a , i, ■ r 4-4M 


f J IT, 

•4« S r V*iii 

Ass^.,f tail Aids '*4kMt 





■mm 


m 


■ 


Si 




. Aim 

■ • * l _Vr 


Josittv Hork)gex.MfttoaedAi^atdehVIBF dePto!to. 

35, boulevard des Capudnes, 75 002 Paris. T&. 26U66.74 et 2BI.75J5 











Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


TV-Camera Diplomacy Earl of Hare wood Bows O ut of Opera 


PEOPLE 

June Wedding Bouquet 



W ASHINGTON — At some 
point in time, no one knows 


m 


W point in time, no one knows 
exactly when, the coverage of a hos- 
tage crisis becomes as important as 
the event itself. Whether we like it 
or not. TV news is diplomacy and 
diplomacy is TV news. 

1 was therefore not surprised to 
find Farlev Glitchfield, news direc- 
tor at Sky Network Co„ in the SNC 
situation room 
looking at a 
bank of moni- 
tors. 

A voice came 
over the loud- 
speaker. “The 
UN ambassador 
from Israel re- 
fuses to discuss 
what his govern- 
ment intends to n . u 
do with the rest • Buc5waM 
of the Shiite prisoners his country 
is holding.” 

Glitchfield said. “Did you tell 
him his government's position is 
vital to Bob Haircomb's lead hos- 
tage story tonight?” 

“Yes, I did. and he said things 
were too delicate for him to go on 
the air with any statement.’' 

“Then dump him and go to one 
of the Carter While House people. 
How are our negotiations going 
with the terrorists in Beirut?' 

□ 


USIA Library and none of the oth- 
er networks would put you on the 
air? Who let you read your de- 
mands on camera? SNC (ud, that's 
who. 

“You owe us, NabaL The other 
networks are sucking around be- 
cause you have control of the hos- 
tages. But just see if they’ll give you 
the lime of day, much less prune 
time, once the crisis is 
over. ... No. NabaL we’re not 


By James Forrester 

■ Reuters 


I ONDON — It may not seem conventional 
t to publicize a retirement tribute to a 
cousin of Queen Elizabeth I as “Goodbye 
George," but few things about the Eari of 
Harewood have ever run entirely according 
to custom. 

Spending 13 years as full-time, salaried 
managin g director of the English National 
Opera was hardly to be expected of an earl 
whose grandfather was the Ring-Emperor 
George V and whose uncles were Edward 
VIII and George VI. 

Many other things about 62-year-old 
George Henry Hubert Lascelles, seventh Earl 
of Harewood, are unconventional or unex- 
pected in a member of Britain's royal family. . 

He was on the staff of the Royal Opera at 
Covent Garden and has been director of the 
Edinburgh International FestivaL He ap- 
peared on the popular television show “This 
Is Your life," in which unsuspecting victims 
are lured into a theater to have their lives 
exposed by family and friends. He was the 
first member of the royal family to divorce— 
an event that barred him from attending the 
funeral of the Duke of Windsor, who abdicat- 
ed as King Edward VIII to many divorcee 
Wallis Simpson. 

Harewooas capture by Germans during 
World War U was also out of the ordinary. 
Wounded at Monte Cassino with the Grcna- 


in teres led in a joint press confer- 
ence. What kind of a news opera- 



ence. What kind of a news opera- 
tion do you think we run? 

“You have two hairs to think it 
over. If you don't reply affirmative- 
ly we’re p ulling all our TV cameras 
and lights out of your headquar- 
ters.” 


The person sitting next to 
Glitchfield in the situation room 
said. “That’s the way to talk to him. 
I hope he knows terrorism doesn’t 
pay unless he deals with us." 

“You have to talk tough or 
they’ll walk all over you in a crisis 
situation. By the way. whoever 
dubbed Kamal a ‘moderate’? He’s 
car-bombed more than seven 
buildings in Beirut.” 

“We had to call him moderate to 
distinguish him from those who 


was thought important to be doing a job, even 
if one did not need to work for money, 
though when he started working at Co vent 
Garden in 1933. be received letters accusing 
him of depriving others of a job. 

He gives the impression that bis years as 
manqgmg director of the English National 
Opera gave him an opportunity to bring 
more, and different, operas to more people, 
and at the same time to follow through on 
ideas he was unable to pursue at Govern 
Garden. 

A fervent exponent of opera in English — 
Covent Garden has a policy of original-lan- 
guage productions — Harewood believes per- 
formances must immediately be comprehen- 
sible. 

“Every angle composer insisted on their 
operas being in the language of the audi- 
ence,” he said. Mozart wrote his popular 
operas in German and his Italian operas for 
the Viennese court, where Italian was com- 
monly used, Harewood noted. 

U is Harewootfs concept of “ensemble" 
qpera, with merit deriving not from interna- 
tional stare but from a company of resident 




The Australian actress Diane G- 
lenta, former wife of the actor Sean 
Connery, has married the Bntisn 
playwright Anthony Shaffer at her 
ranch in northern Queensland. 
. . . Millions watched on televi- 
sion Monday a* Seiko Mareuda, 23. 
one of Japan’s most popular sing- 
ers, married the actor M asakt 
Kanda. 34. in Tokyo. . . . \asmm 


completed at ihe expense of several 
snapped brushes and a bolf-caba 
canvas. Bailey said. 

□ 

Louise Ncveboo. S3, went to 
California to dedicate a 30-foot (9. 
meter). 33-ton sculpture called 
“Night Sail" at the Crocker Center 
in central Los Angeles. The wjjfc . 




m central r-«s ftngcK*. us wont 

Kanda, 34. to ‘Tokyo. . . . was described by Mayor Tom Brad- T 

AKAO^n. lev as “a sculpture inspired by the 
tress Rita Hayworth and Ab Khan, vj s ,i 0 f Los Angdcs and 


the sea that borders the city.” Ne* 

Radi Emhiri ens- 36. in a Greek Ur- . ... ~.j * 


“5 Lmomcos. i-uThev nelson «id she was impressed by . 

ihodox ceremony in Pans, i n cy , Angeles's “luxury of space,- 

ft. ““Ti JMr- New . 


The unconventional earL 


tionai stare out rrom a company or resident 
singers, that has given the En glish National 


dier Guards, be was rescued by Italian parti- 
sans only to be caught in a German sweep. 


wiped out all the Palestinians in a 
refugee camp last month. Our new 


sans only to be caught in a German sweeg 
clad only in boots, bandages and bereL 


“The competition is trying to 
sabotage us. ABC is telling Lhem 
they con get much better Nielsens if 
they give them an exclusive inter- 
view. CBS is dealing with another 
faction that claims ii controls all 
TV rights to the hostages, and NBC 
is refusing to let us use their satel- 
lite unless we share our tape with 
them. Nabal Kama!, the moderate 
terrorist leader, says when it comes 
to negotiating exclusives, he will 
deal only with you.” 

“Get him on Lhe phone. 

“Nabal. 1 haven't spoken to you 
since your people blew up our con- 
sulate in Tripoli two years ago. 
Didn’t we treat you right when you 
hijacked the 747 over Lhe Dead Sea 
last April? And remember five 
years ago when you took over the 


refugee camp last month. Our new 
guidelines are if they talk to us, 
then they're moderate terrorists. If 
they don’t, they're radical killers. If 
Nabal won't play, do you want us 
to put on the back-up terrorist 
leader tonight?” 

“Does he have anything to do 
with the hostage crisis?” 

“I doubt it, but nobody's going 
to know that” 

□ 


His release from Colditz Castle, where 


prominent prisoners and incorrigible escap- 
ers were held, also had a touch of the bizarre. 


ers were held, also had a touch of the bizarre. 
One of a small group taken from Colditz as 


one or a small group taken rrom Colditz as 
hostages in the closing days of the war. he was 
ordered by Hitler to be executed. The Gesta- 
po were due to carry out the command but 


by Hitli 
i doe to 


“Put him on standby.” Glitch- 
field said. “Who else have we got?" 

“A terrorist expert from George- 
town Univereity, an Oxford profes- 
sor who wrote a book about hijack- 
ing, a former CIA Mideast 


Harewood was spirited to safety in Switzer- 
land by an SS commander. 

Harewood' s only real venture into a con- 
ventional royal career came immediately af- 
ter the war. what he was aide-de-camp to the 
governor-general of Canada. 

The one recurring theme in his life has been 
music, in particular opera, the “Goodbye 


George” tribute was held at the Coliseum 
theater Sunday to mark his departure from 
the En glish National Opera. 

“I think I've always wanted to work on the 
adminis trative side of music for as long as 1 
can remember," he said in an interview. “I’ve 
always wanted to do exactly what I’ve been 
doing for the last 30-odd years.” 

Harewood dates his interest in music to his 
early childhood. One of his kingly uncles was 
known to have remarked; “Ils very odd about 
George and music. You know nis parents 
were quite normal — liked horses and dogs 
and the country” 

Harewood’s emergence as a notable ad- 
ministrator stems both from this early pas- 
sion and from the immediate postwar spirit, 
which be said meant everyone wanted to 
contribute to society. 

“We all wanted to do something, make 
something happen,” he said, adding that it 


Opera its present eminence. 

Harewood admits that this was what he 
bad hoped for in his early years at Covent 


Garden, but the Royal Opera turned instead 
to expensive reliance rat the pulling power of 


to expensive reliance cm the pulling power of 
famous stars. 

When he retires at the end of this month, 
Harewood wiD leave his successor. Peter Jo- 
nas, with an innovative tradition, a firing 
number of regular operagqers who rely on 
seeing something worthwhile at the Colise- 
um, and an adventurous repertoire for the 
new season — 21 operas, including eight new 
productions. 

Harewood said he would not take another 
fuD-time job, but be does not envisage a 
future occupied solely with strolls round 
Harewood House, his stately hone in Yak- 
shire. A recent announcement of his appoint- 
ment to head the British Board of Him Cen- 
sors, which approves and categorizes films 
for public showing in Britain, may be an 
indication of other activities connected with 
the performing arts. 


nicn mar ried in a civil cerentofly 
May 15 in New York. . . . Vic- 
toria Principal, a star of the “Dal- 
las” television series, has roamed a 
Beverly Hills plastic surgeon, Har- 
ry dassman, in Dallas. . . . Wal- 
ler LCrontitt 3d, a film editor and 
the son of rite former CBS News 
anchorman, married the actress 
Deborah Rush in New Vernon. 
New Jersey, as the actors Meryl 
Streep and Dorn DeLuise and the 
advice columnist Ann Landers 
looked on. . . . Madonna, of rock 
music and movie fame, has a new 
engagement — to marry her beau 
of many months, the actor Sean 
Penn, in August, (he gossip colum- 
nist Suzy reported Monday in the 
New York Daily News. 

□ 


f i, l’l*"’ 

ni#' 


&SL. 

■*-nr-n 


Bill Graham’s plan to build a 


15. 000- scat amphitheater near San 
Francisco Bay lor concerts by such 
performers as Frank Sinatra ud 
EBa Fitzgerald has won approval 
from the Mountain View Cay 
Council. The council agreed to.^ 
grant Graham a 50-year lease on 60 
acres l24 hectares) of city-owned 
land. Graham plans to start con* - 
sanction on the $ 1 8-million theater : 
by late summer and stage the first, 
shows in the spring of 1^7. _ 


F,^ 1 



A Swiss team in a Mooney 231 
rolone finished first in the 4.781- 


• . 

ll>; 1 

* ' 
ilK* ’■ 
rtf*-' 

Mr-''.' . 



A tribute to Wes Montgomery 
provided a sizzling ending to the 
Kool Jazz Festival on Sunday night 
at Caroegje Hafl in New York. 


airplay finished first in the 4.781- 
mile 1 7.700-kilo meter ) ir mis- A llan- ‘ 
tic air rally from the United Slates ‘ 
to France, organizers said Monday. 
The planes landed Sunday night at V 


With the guitarist George Benson airports in Le Bourget and Poo- £ 
out in front, a band including toise, north of Paris, after circling 


among its soloists the saxophonist the Eiffel Tower. __ The winning 
Pepper Adams ended the evening Swiss pilot was WiHie SdiwirL Ju- 


with “Goin' Out of My Head” and 
“West Coast Blues," composed by 


Be and Juefgea Puetter of Canada, 
flying a Ted Smith Aerostart, were 


Montgomery, who died at age 43 in second. A British team from Jersey, 
1 968. The encore. “Caravan,” got a headed by John O’Stdfiran in a 


roaring ovation. Montgomery's Cessna 210, was third. Prizes total- 
brother Baddy played three Wes ing 520,000 were to be awarded to 


operator — and Henry Kissinger." 
“We had Kissinger last night." 
“It doesn't matter. People like to 
see Kissinger on TV during a na- 
tional crisis. Hello? . . . Just a 


SchUemann Mansion Opened for Athens Cultural Festival 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dupatdia the city center. “It's a quite unique Schliemann at Troy in the 1870s. festival marking Athens’s re 


* Montgomery tunes on the piano pilots competing in proficiency and 

and one of his own that Wes had speed skills. The rally was staged to 
j T~f o f intended to record. mark the centennial of the Statue 

iral Festival □ 

Sotheby's plans to auction a States. Of 68 planes that set out 
festival marking Athens’s reign as slightly futuristic oil painting done from New Jersey nine days ago, 33 


A THENS — The house that building, luxuriously decorated They were loaned by two muse- “Cultural Capital of Europe” on by a 3-year-old orangutan named 
Heinrich Schliemann built a with motifs from Schiiem arm's umt in Wpa Rrrlrn fnr thp rrr**Trinp Friday nifiht. TVw <unrt win on muter the 


Fabritios Work Auctioned 

The Associated Press 

MONTE CARLO — The 17th- 
century painting “Mercure and Ar- 
gus" by Card Fabritius has been 
sold at a Sotheby’s auction for 
7.992 milli on francs (5850,000). 


tionai crisis. Hello? . . . Just a zV Heinrich Schliemann built a with motifs from Schliemann' s ums in West Berlin lor the opening Friday night- 

minute. It’s the White House, centuiy ago and named the Palace finds and stamped unmistakably exhibit, which is part of an interna- When the 140-tmIKon-drachma 

They’re asking if we have any new of Troy, after his most famous ar- with his personality," Professor Lional festival in Athens. Foreign (51-million) renovation is com- 


Friday night- Sid. The work will go under the 

When the 140-tmlHon-drachma hammer Saturday to help raise cash 


by a 3-year-old orangutan named took part in the final leg from Ab- 
Sid. The work will go under the erdeen. Scotland. 


information as to what’s 
“1 told them we’d ci 


Logon.” chaeological discovery in the 19th George Korres, an expert on th 
if there century, opened its doors over the German-born archaeologist, said. 


hammer Saturday to help raise casn 
for the World Wildlife Fund, said 


was anything to report. Why do weekend as a museum after being 
they keep bugging us when they neglected for years. 


know we have a hostage show to 
put on?" 


George Korres, an expert on the Minister Hans-Dietrich Geoscher plete, the mansion will become George Bailey, director of Solh- 
German-bora archaeologist, said, of West Germany opened the ex- Greece’s Numismatic Museum, eby’s office in Chester. England. 

On display are mere than 300 hibit after President Francois Mil- displaying, among other items, Bailey said the painting is a master- 
objects, including copies of gold terrand of France and Prime Min- S dmcmann' s collection of more work by Sid. star attraction at the 


A fire caused an estimated 51.5" 
million in damage to the home of 


A Greek government team is re- jewelry and silver d rinking vessels, ister Andreas Papandreou of than ],1Q0 ancient coins. 


Bailey said the painting is a master- Barbara Stanwyck in Beverly Hills, 
work by Sid. star attraction at tbe California. The actress was in the 


storing the three-story mansion in and original pottery unearthed by G r e ec e inaugurated the six-month 


Chester Zoo, and is a prime exam- house when the fire started on the 


(AP, NYT) pie of his “blue period." It was roof, but escaped without injury. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS I ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUBSCRIBE 
to the 

INTERNATIONAL 


I HAVE A MS DAY I BokoL Hove a 
nfoe day! Bakri 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


SUN. N.Y. 71MB - brad deWy. I 
Write Knot. POB Z B1000 Bruaeh. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
SWITZERLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 


Write Keyier. POB Z B1000 E 

PERSONALS 


HERALD 


TRIBUNE 

AND SAVE. 


JON GAGE 
use cul Blanche 
■ at soon a passible 


MOVING 

DEMEXPORT 


MRS • LYON • MARSBUE 
UU£« MCE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

GERMANY 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


1 rifl moving by spends from mdpr 
□ties in Fraxa to dl dies in the world 
Tol free from Francs 16 (05) 24 10 82 
fSSBTmATB 


MOVING 


FOR SAIE - BARGAM. toomnenti 
near Frcnkfurt twport htty iwded 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

SWITZERLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 


FKENCH RmaUL near Cannes, la 
rent 1-1 5 Juiy & 4-31 Augml, hmraa- 


near Frcmkfurt airport fuffjr rwded 
Puce per sgjn. DM1,200. praters 
welcome). Information between 2 om 


As a new subscriber to the 
Internabonal Herald Tribune, 
you con save up to half 
the newsstand once, depending 
on your cwmtry or residence. 


For detenb 

on iha special introductory offer, 
write to: 


IHT Subscriptions D«|inifinnL 
181, Avenu* Ch t y fei de G a ult s , 
92200 NeuSyteur-Sam* From. 
Or M: tail 747-07-N 


ALLIED 

VAN LINES WTL 
ova woo ones 

WCWBWJDC 

USA ABed Van Unas Inflate? 

S I01J 312-681-8100 
<i Am i l Roosevelt Ed 
Broadview, Unoie 60153 USA 


GONTVaX. Smol move, aw bog- 
gags, woridwvte. Cal OaW Pats 1 
2BM8 81 (near Opera). 


- 4 pm. $3)6074/29735 (Germany) ar 
smta to: DME, Pi in usiumcfd 479, 
1016 HP AmstardaiL Hofcnd. 


EXCSPnONAL 

ON THE PARK 

AVENUE RAPHAEL 


1016 HP Am st erdam Hofcnd. 
(SEAT BRITAIN 


2 veryhigh dm* opartnMs, 

I & 27D sqjiv, netting nppnnty. 


I 81H CHAMPS ELYBS. 63 sjjBumod- 
, ten buUng, iving room one bed- 
'tMffl. acupped kitchen, brth. now 
dcseh, R50 030. Wednesday 1 to 3 
pm. 62 rue de fttnrtuu or 563 70 18 


V 1 LLARS 

WINTER & SUMMER 


In Kie diant sn g mountain resort of 

IEYSIN: 

RESIDENCE LES FRENB 



vda panoramic view, n the middeaf 
afive trees, pool, 5 bedrooms. 3 battv; 
roam, berbecue. (33-93) 42 05 24.. :r 


MONTE CARLO. Jufy-Aug^Sepl. fif^ 
fiandhed, lit ftoor of vOq, Mal^- 
atiependenl. deeps 5. bretflhJatnfcf' 
view!F20n00/moMh. Tel: 193) 3S917T 


15TH EDGE OF SHNL 


REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 

core D'AZUR, MCE Real Esue 


Agency - buying an t p a ti mes ar a 
Salve a seritys protfcm wxh a I 
serious aanpanyi Promotion Moajrt. 
Aik for aw broawe: 19 Ave Auber 
or Hotel Meriden, 06000 hta. Tefr 
193 87 08 20 - 81 48 8(1 


L5E21 


rr| 

Grade 2 


KEj 

j—tyU 

It*.' *lk nll»M >s!m 

55CSE23CI 



it in.- a " l.'i:' "/'K i! m 

MONACO 


mrvioes, garage. 24-hour security 

BATON 704 55 55 

TREX BATON 630 8SS 


temr, sumptuous dauUe iving 4- 2 

bedroonn. Luxuriously deconjte d . 

720 27 17. 


PARADISE, 20 MINUTES Q^faofa’g 9 

rono, jisj. ma 30 mn. frarn Montreiu end Late I 


FROM LAKE GENEVA 


MARAIS. MAGNRKBiT 

beem TH: 568 38 16 or i 


■nvtaWforteuremdgwts 
ry, saeaoa resoanoai anm. mces u: 

-fKAsf.mto 

aoBE PUN SJL - Inii.in 

Av. Monfaaot 24, 

l^jSaS^SilKSMi «W341. 55Tte45l T2DRAICH 


Geneva by cor. 

- you an own quakty rndana» 


irferea. 

IWACSA 
Ymtr Fortner in fine* 

32 MontoriUme. CHI 202 GB4EVA. 
Tet 022/341^540. Telex; 22030 


view. F20 JOb/monih. Tek |93) 
GREAT BRITAIN 


iwtevning poof end 
fitness footees in tto ioed 
•nvronnwrt for leiiure oi d sports 


O ad our Agency office*; 

M ASIA AAO PACtRC PARIS Dedsardet MemaHamd 

OHtoct our loed distributor or: (01) 343 23 64 

Interna ti onal Herald Tribune FRANKFURT eJ UjQ Jf x 

1005 Tai 5ans Commerc id Buicfag (0691 250066 

24 ^wicSf to** DUSSQDORF/ RAT1NGB4 

Tel; HK 5-286726 (02102) 45023 LMi 

MBttCAN HOSPITAL OF PAHS, MUNICH LFAS. 

Accri-dned MS HosptaL 2*hwit (089) >42244 

LONDON i„ATSX 

NBJILLY SUB SBNE pO mmutes from ( 01 , 953 3636 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
FRENCH PROVINCES 


MONT* CARLO 
PKNCfAliTY OF MONACO 

Enpfland bergain 

Far sale in luxurious modern readme, 
fteasant 2 roams, loggia sea view. 

wx, ceilcr. 

parting. H^OO^Oa 


ST NOM LA BSETECHE 
SUPBS PROPBTY 

217 sq m. Iving space. 

"dvs4e indoor wnitien poof. Fiiridi 
c*ma erarase room, 1700 jam. oat 
VERY HIGH CLASS 
F2JJ00I10C 

COP. (3)854 92 00 


PORTUGAL 




BTORU. Owrmrg Engfish pub / m 
10 bedrtxxts, restaurant seres 50, 
popidar pub. Privota teen aiarf- 
mert & garden. Fumshed & 
eqw ffwri . 5 mputes waft from beoefr, 
“na tens. goff. Contact Apvtado 
151. V66 Esfari Codex. Ptetogal or 
phone 268 75 6Z 


URUGUAY 


ct tour SF. ra tes 
X mortgages. 


m 22 35 121 

riliiiMisil 




PIR4TA DB. ESI*. Mogrsfkw# beach 
resort. 40U00 sqjn. wooded, 200 m. 
from beach. By oumer. Cm be cfvid- 

ed. usmoda Tel tail 727 6902 


SUMMER M ENGLAND. For My/ta 
gutf. South Kensmcpon, London, teat- 
ry 2-bedroam upun meel , hftta y 
arawmg/'iMng rooniy roof uufuBix 
Obw to man fine tube. Ideal far 

kOTOD iw nanoran jcsbos 
G raham, 01-263 5077 (day) or 01-584 
6808 (evenings). 


CPlTgALU3NDOH American styW. 2 
bedroom flat £140 J01J 637 CPS. 


Tel: HK 5-286726 


CANNES RESUNT1AI, . High dost 
residence, spiendd apartmenb 210 
KJ.I7L, tvmg.70 nun fivingreception. 
3/bedroann, 3 baths. FuKy eguoped 
kitchen. 30 sepn. terrace. M ar v el ous 


ZZ-.m ****™gHB > IA 81 AVMJE FOCH 

MC 98001 Monaco nodem, exception^, mortte hrf. r» 
Teb (93) 50 66 84. Tlx 469477. atohon. cW ng 3 bec topoms. 3 mcrble 

rnKfiS: PARIS & SUBURBS 


AMHUCAN HOSPITAL OF PAHS, 

*oc^dned MS. HasploL 244wur 


sea view. Summing pool and gaden. 
FiBOOflOa POW8IUTY TO NEGO- 


F3300fl00. 

T1ATE a 47 \a Omsefte, 06400 I 
CANNeTTefr 1931 38.19.19 


SWITZERLAND 



REAL ESTATE 

1AIE GENEVA - MONTSBJX. For TO RENT/SHARE 

sde to faremrs, 4 Rats, kite view, n „„ ri , ' * 

from buddor, no sb« commrs- DENMARK 

tai. feody July 19fe Excellent ted- 

vxfrxi) finoruiip ovdiable. Contact: J8 COPOBUGBI NEAR SEA & Forest, 


SUNNY SOUT1BN SWTTZBBAND 

LAKE LUGANO 


•idud financing ovoilablo. Contoc 
WMOOia CA. me de Bovg 
1003 Lcrnannt Suivtzertand. TD) 
20 91 07. TbcZ4453 BAIL Ot 


Sraora flat for rent, givdsn, & 


woe. $1.1 00/ month, more if 
nsfred. Tek (45) 1/611738. 


Page 17 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIHEDS 


11 am(o7pmi 
E 538 66 65. 


NBJILLY SUR SENE (10 1 
EtcleL Phone 747 53 X. 


Call far AEeds free estimate 


TSAJiVuSi DORESSAY 


US INCOME TAX. Jufy 2>d -s Ihe 
morosonum deadline for 1982 & 1983 
US returns. U.S. tax spoaafisti mil 
essut you to presenm your SH1JQOO 
wempnon. Mr 5Bman. Ppm 5639123 


ANONYMOUS n 


W P.jr»s (dotyl 634 59 65. Rome 
O7o03 X 


WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 
FOUR WINDS INTI 


pool. 15 mins, from lice Afrport. 

BJ>. 114, 74120 MegevtL Tel: 
33^1X8211x3093^ 

FRANCE COTE D’ AZUR, for sde 
mognrfieent seas id e property on large 
ciauixfr betweeen Monoca 8. Comes. 
Mandatory write B3NE 06450 St. 
AVefin Vesube or let: 03^ 03 24 47. 


NVAUDES 400 eqja. 

Excectianci Vievr 

3 rue du Vieux Cdomkmr. tab 6 
11x161X807 DCXJVOCA 
. Tr* pj 5*8 43 W 


BATON 704 55 55 

THEX BATON 630.855 F 


Latendo o p erttra* in a ksje 
beexiriMfxxx P7)100s^j*.| with *mm- 
■eng P°c*< privde nan and private 
beach, lrt quafity. Ap art ment s Maun, 
up to 190 sqm. + terraces 24 ■ 47 
«»m- Wera SF452000 - SF1. 123/00 
on Hie ta id cran ftvdogp tithe South 
urea of the Late dffte* apartments 

w wb ond tha mouAim hiQMc 
SP210v»»- SF435ASD. Free for sde to 
fattegmrs. Mwtg r^m aMowStsfa 


International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIES 

An you footing far a 
WBL4AJ6, HGW.Y QUAUFS3 
MUUrnimjAL XB IN PARBP 


MULTILINGUAL 


JOANNFS PERSONAL SHOPPING. 
Wornerv men laihton service. Fun A 
wonderful Bwcv Fans 703 4667 


CALL US FOR YOUR NEXT MOVE PORT GBUHAUO, Souih of France. 4- 


PARB (31 O 
U3NDON (01) 


036 63 11 
I) 578 66 11 


room ta. 85 Jam. wed located, 
moanno 8 m. for motor boo. 
F900.aS>. Tel: (94)56 70 92. 


1PSAR PARC M CNCEAU. Pms 6. 
forae re c ep ti on, 2 beteooms, 2 batfa, 
futfy equyiped khrfren, 120 sqjn, + 
fate equfoped Studio 4- color. Justi- 
f*c tipi pnc*. Owner: tel. 723 88 99. 


AG9KE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AG84T 

764 03 17 


EMERALD - HOME LTD. 

M SWkSt88!r— 

Tbu 73612 HOME 04 


PLUS 

MRNATIONAL 

The new ifwrinte d temporary 
agency *i tans 
CSf S22 01 79. 


adrinstfrath* assstant, 10 years buu- 
ne» experience, frua4 French, En^oh, 
Greek, Arabic. Interested in responsi- 
ble. remunerative position in Athens. 

Call 7784Q50/671811Z 


MNDStAD 

BUNGUAL Acatcr ftiffy B fcguol 
Temportry ORicb 
M s 758 12 40 fWroml 


International Business Message Center 


WE ARE AN Wrt DfVISKM of an SECRET ARY requret port-time Paris 
Aroerian fashion firm loaded in Mu- past, 4 years experience, French 
mefr. Our international (tractor is s h orthand, fluent French, Chinese, 


looking for an Araenam/Endjdi pro- 
fenionol secretay with exaSenr ex- 
ecutive secretorid tJtfc. Knowledge 
of Ge nrxxi « deared. Please send 
caifiete resume, references and a 
recent photo toe L Gras ra, Su eAcfre 
Muencnener Strasse 54, 8022 Gruen- 
wted. West Garmony. i 


ATTBimON EXECUTIVES 

tarftefr wvr fwcmrw manage 
m tha h ten dtewf HoraU In- 
bono, where mor* Mora third 
or e mWSort rwaders warid- 
« rides mo t t of whom are ai 
buUrmtM and indutby. wS 
road A Just Mn us (Ash 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


DIAMONDS 


613S9SJ baton 10 am. 
nma mol ura can tofu \ 


LOOKING FOR A 
POTODAL PARTNER 
IN MIDDLE EAST 


BROKERS 

INVESTMENT ADVISORS 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 


mmg that wo tan tofu you 1 
hoc*, and your mossago wS 
mrpotr wrffrin 40 ham. Tha 
rata is (7.5. $9.80 or load 
o ui infa nt par firm. You must 
indudo amtfdota and uariK- 
able bSing oMra a «. 


A corporation m tob fai ied snoe 15 


vw,wrth oKa» Wed m Europe, Dwteeo* tad. High ermud otxrinm 
h ^2i ,Bpr(B8n ' «»rad far many. mawyearvGeuE 

5S52®.??* v, ^u^ | te_.’rrtraa^iC , Klr ,, n mn cowhUm and ffonwi. Mcteri- 


INVBTMBIT ADVISORS ^^^4* 

Your teenh can mvOM mane of Ameri- ai rf-ccsb business rfxB can earn you 
rawiexcttuvg ledwofogxrf breot- 58000- 51 OflCDnrwiK Newandited 
WC 31^i a ' S' 5 *"™ from 59500 - S2AJ00, 

30,000 tree* airaady ftafad 4 fena, D«v. JJ2. Postfach 170340, 

6000 rranfcfart/W. Germcury. 

TeL 069747808 Tb: 412713 KBAA 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPAMES 


DIAMONDS 


Mating . Telephone • Telex 
Ful wretnf lenricra 
We of Mn. Jersey, Guerrasy, 


North A frica and Mxjde&st^octing as olav a W*mB 5 teh.F r «xfr. German, 
mman an behofl at mmar Europwi. Contact: 


Girata, Pmamq, Liberia 
Luwrrfooura Arties. UK. 
.Reodynnae or sperial. 


Your best buy. 

&amaidi mi arty pries raw 
at Iwext who lesale pices 

tfrto from Antwerp 

carter of the d em ond world. 
Fvl guuiuVee. 

For free pnoe fist wrrte 


Vfotnmnrae. good Engfah. Free from 
An Write Box ZOT.TteroW Tnbune, 
92521 Neuify Cedex, Franoa 

OR - LA CREMEOE IA O0M£ tenno- 
rmy help people in Pont. 758 82 5T 


K|TM “THE KELLY 
services GIRL PEOPLE” 

Best known mane in temporary help 

Immediate assignments with 
Top International Companies in Paris 
Phone Fran^oise Watson 
256 44 88 

for your nearest Kelly Office 


jlLiA- 
Ir.J - ' 

W ." 

acr. • 

bjj 

IrtVI • l ‘‘ : 

Vr: --•• 
rli’ifi- * • 
fljtn • 

Put-' >•' 

Mr Sht.' • 
pjjioi - 

H R 1 ’ 

a v." ■- 
- An 
jvn '' 
jkm! ' ’ ; 
pui J ’ 
Mi-dJ.'- 
^ ''T-- ” 
tfpL’S'J.-- 
jtomS 1 *:" ‘ 
te mad.- 
rfflibi’ 1 1- ‘ ■’ 

dfM.ni'tfii 

Wu-t: ' 

LdiV- a :•••• . 
afcj*a-C.r. • 
lie Sc!.. : ■ • 

bn n.-r.- ■ 

•. ’ 
•' 

\!S l>\... . ' 

flcha»i 4 •• • 
■Uv-ii: •: • ' 
f’ett.'rL-;;- ; • 
iV« JF. S 
Imign-j.- ■ 

ormiif i- ,i>^ ; - 
hLvvjrii: 
wher \r.-. • 
fhcuvcli 
Bin li S . . 

Oi >1 Il. -v-.. . 

J) V-r; , V,-. 
onhunh • 

cnurvTb -• 
tsrii) 

fc «ar« ’ 

Maine* 

“Sure 'sr: j. 
KGB' ’ 

Mirii. ’• 
n aionj .;_ r ’ 
J S C K). ■ ... 


In I 


Slips 

Thc&n.. ... 


ot such h-S. 


Fiu 


^ defeat : 
PoualUwc • 

rtficiaLu- * : 

siw ih_. 


MIMRnfC S®3 far AMERICAN 
WU! ' ttKVt RRMS in PARS. 


Engfish, Before 
aeacta ries, t m 

tavoBL Wntfi 


Dutch or Gemxai I 
edge cf French re- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTLiNITIES 


USA and Japanese compames m ifiese 
mas fr» tun-tey praiees. owning 
some of the office locations Ihey pres- 


GLOBE HAN SJL 
Av Mavtam 24. 
CH-ID05 Lausanne. Swifcerl and 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADE EASY 

ftearewnen! Temporcxy 4 penmrart 


Ready made or ffiaial. 
Fro* explanatory bocUei 
Bool re ydr afeont 
tendon raprasentothm 


gagass 


able to bring more representoSans and 
■mroduauns m the Mddk East to ex 


JULY 1st ISSUE 
ON SALE JUNE 24th 


| OFFSHORE TAX SHELTER ~, 


atmg businesi. Write far free info to 
Attorney David Hb-son. 14795 Jeffrey 
eu »mg i r« oirrx ilex 


Aston Company Farrncfiors 
Dept Tl, B Vfoana St, Da*4as, 
fsto of Man. TeL 0624 2fi»l 
Telex 627691 SWA G 


Es&tofoted 1923 

PefiiacxetTaat 62, B-2018 Antwerp 
Bttawn ■ Teb (32 3) 234 07 51 

Tte 71/79 *j4 b. At tog Qfomond Out. 

Heart of Antwerp Diamond mdutiry 


rite ar phone: 138 Avenue 
i, 7511a Paris, Fierce. TeL 


executive secretary 


MAXIG NAN SERVICE WTH BM 
■inufirti opeongs 


OFFICE SERVICES 


mvulmeit of the odud assets owned. COMPAMES — — 

^fn«ol BaA ,A w , ^C^mfoto^xxTfocAem.Very 

r ib nenen “frdentKAiy. be assured of bes Mi a u 


CA 92714 USA. 

toiw. 


faff daub, financial aaets, leferana a . 
«t to: 


BUSINESS WEEK 


C 18-115262 PuUatas. 
04-121 IGenevo 1 


Free camuttofion: 
Roger Griffin LLB.. F.CA 


Am AN PSOOUCTS. ffyou want to 
onpartarrepreseteasri lawanpred- 
ua, ptease write or tetex ul You ran 
be assured of best pries rtidity old 
wvwe ct oi hmesi Orient United LTD. 
No 845, Wen Swi Rd. , Sedion 4, 


OFFSHORE SKVICB 


rod- UJC - «n rasdent o omp m ee s wrtfa 
_ norms <fe«ckxi, bearer dwres and 
aid ronfideitiolbar* occowits. FuB bad-up 
.TO *■ mpport serwtees. P m xeno & Libencn 
. i compames. fist rate confidentid 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 
IN ZURICH 


For Cnufoti mother tonax 
MUNOAL SEOffTAfiB | 
oppte 156 rue Montmartre. Paris 2 ar 
al 233 17 54 


Administrative assistant wanted lor Pans office of SONY MAniUFnr 
PRODUCTS OF EUROPE, Etoile area in Paris. MAGNETIC 

&iglish rrolher tongue, fluent French, excellent secretarial skills, Enowsh 
shorthand required. 1 ^ a 

Several years experience desirable. 

Please address your C.v. in English, photograph and salary requirement 
H l iSJ erenCe ’ 10 FRANCE SA - Direction desRefafo??^ 


?Sk-:r- 

i 

[ 






J^IIIK 


INTERNATIONAL 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPAMES 


Brodxrp ; Corporate Mcnoaamant Ud 
Wtotem Hovse, Vitfono Sfied, 
Douglas Us of Mm i. (062J| 23303/4 
fate. 627389 CuRMAN G 




i_5>. t tendon 
Tte&939!IG 


fiAlY WT E GR ATH) gj^^wxfr/Enqkifa good solory. TsL 

FranpxM6ft5fl6r79£lT. 

aOSE TO FINANCIAL C&flH 

tasxdhsd Office / Conferanra Roams MUCrtNATIONAL EXECUTIVE seeks 


FOR PARS STH 

TYPISTS ! 

rther tongue, tafadly bin- 1 
fr/Engfish. good solory. TeL 

e & bvt -RSv 79 Efr. 


■Vs 

^Ulns.: 


19, rue Madame de Sanzillon 
92110CUCHY 


‘■“wins,,. .T-' 1 ' ; 


Tri^go g / Tohx / Mod Sorvig g 
wW Procrang / Tranjlobcxi 


• Splitting Up*. It s The 
Opposite Of Merger 
Mania 

• Japan: Big Guns Aim At 
Small Retasters 

• Europe: No Computer 
Slump Here 

• The High-Stakes 
Wrangling Between Paris 
& Bonn 


bwporto an and wanogcnurt 1 ire UK 
bie of Mon, Turin, Angwfa, Oxm ne 
kfon ds, Lwrig, Gbiofar ond 
most other affrfrora oroof. 

• Confrdenbd ndvnca 

• Immndfote awafabJif y 

• N o miw a hxvicss 

■ Baarar dwes 

A ILfewi fir,, if, .hi U .j 

w boot ro^siiuuons 

• Accounting & oA nw st nA on 

• Med. Mopfwne 6 telu 

'“TSfeWSgft 8 '” 

SWV1CBUD 
Haad Offic* 


ARE YOU LOOKING far busnes op- 
portunlim in heath an ftefd in 5audi 
Arabia ? If yas, we have frown. 

Now speed martet survey repon a — — 

avaikifo for iimnndtote dravgry, Tfas ARAB MVBTOR fan ccutel to 


INVBT 2 Wracs in Belter Hnokh. I 
taer Cardoc fefi Pravenfion & 
Heart! Rec o ndlfowing Piofrom now. | 
Begcrt mangan. peocBfU Sam 


countryiido. highly qudffied 
Npenrson. Vort trrton Med 



btingud se cr etory - En^sh mother- 
tongue, er m l urt typing defc. EmSdi 
shartfaxxirmBedwrTE^ - wsxi lora- 
oon near CergytaitoM (95) r*dy 

with CV. & solory requranentt to: 

Sox 2445. Herdd Tribune. 92521 
Neudiy Cedex. Frmce 


i, • 

■a r,. 

ntlern... ^*'lijn 1 1 


mead report frvw you bestdiarez 
■" c ow fi i i dM i L medori earaxnent 
suRriy, hoiptak monogemeni (fontS- 


buy and rival si coDarendv stocks, 
prcxkcis, buxnas ventures, rgei at- 


(t>*a B792231 


tory. pubfc, privote, efcj, tten O 
and M, mated equipment monte- 


nano, etc. For furlha detail, dgow 
cortod Mr. K. Atori/AJll P.Q BOX 
£12 R>ya*. SAucfi Arafan. Telex 
204562 PANAB SJ. phone 478 9676k 


S5£«wl?w«fte3’c^ws£* HOW TO GO g Second Pasyort, ra- 
(352)481331 1t« 40143LU 

BUSINESS SERVICES 



CCJA. LTD 

Compana fanned UK- & vrarkfanefo 
irduing We of Mm Turin & fr^. 
Angwlg, Panama art Liberia. 


MTl 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMirromc 
U5JL t WORLDWIDE 


WMA. 45 Lvndxrt Tarrace, 

503 Cent>d. Hong Kong. 

tax services" 


NOW ON SALE 


COMIC BOOK PUBUSHB 

teefe drfntetaVagenri 
far * Engfish language coma. 


Far farriwrifannmnLptoaie canted 
usat: ■ 5 Upper Chunfr 5t, Dcugfot Ho | 


m at: - 5 Upper Church Sfa Douc 
of M ai, wo Grafr Brton, tefi [ 
l P624) 23733, fc* 637900 COM 


A complete pefHted 6 hnnnmT wrace 
pramteg a unique c M edfon of 
tofonted. 'tersarGe & muMrigud 
Bxfcmdudj far A social £ 


US. TAX PBQfgSlONAL offers an 
AMNBTf SPEOALK. 83, 84 tefarat 
gepmed farSlOO.Grtbfl in fhe July 
23 omd. Call Franco (3^ 96 27 42 
riiiMUuM* far appamnera r Paris, 
Geneva. Mian. 


ZURKK-ZURKH-ZURKH ^ 

BAHMf°F5TSASSE 52 

THE FINANCIAL CENTER 9257T 

•£ ZSi3&* ia * a ’ h * 

• Business decisions by dsdson rates 

• M aTogemerr ravioBS eon^ony far- Bax 2 
inatifra. tax pbmig. busies & NeJfo 
btxting created to neat your needs 

• Donate yaw eddrafr/affiot et tongoe 
Zurich's renowned busmes street 

WMlmtaCMdkteg 3yS 


SECRETARY/ PA waned by smofl u*T 
astocxdian Boris area in Paris. &v 
mother t ongue , fluent in Frerafr, 
rt w l e nt secratarn bjK . too kxi- 


cotiond bodwowri. dwiSfied oc- 
hvrtes. Send htexkv rt ten cepfiateon 
+ C.V. to Box 2438, Herala Trtoune, 


92521 Nraily Cafex, Fnro 

•H5 LAW RIM in Paris sedo t*v 


Nous prenons en main 
votre carrie re ! 


f 4 1 >vi' 

p ^ad, i K * 

r " Jv c ty,k, ad,,r ' lrf.L. i * -1.-V 


Cedex, Ftmce 


AT ALL INTERNATIONAL wiSouSSfiSSl'S^Ki^iie panama ubbha. corporations 


NEWSSTANDS. 


House Bk 

Thb Sho Tnx 


2A. HcrtAve. 
wfoon, Hpng Kong 


fivn US5400 awfobfo now. Tel 
P624) 20240. Telex: 628352 ISLAND 
GNiuiq 


212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th Sf, N.Y.C. 15019 
Serwra Repretentotivt* 
NeededWorfiWte. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


Bohnhofercsse 51 OL8Q22 ZincK 
Tel 01/21! 92 07. Tbe 813 062 


YHST, bAiguoL EnaWi motor 
tan*, wanted for uti de uu t m et H 
of larpe French law firat u» Ne«#y, 2. 
3 (Cos expenenn wvd procasniw, I 
WbJWSL 1201 ext 6&9. 


Secretaires bilin gues 
Operatrices traitement de texts 


“an i.*f t 


"•’■tl k, . 


«»u,«-vuus un poste tailie sur masura 



YOUR QRKE M PARS: THH. 
ANSWERING SKVKE, MCreksy, 
esroKk mob* Bw 24H/doy, 
TeL PAT: 6099594 


G0SMDX5 RRM seeks secretary, 
torihfrid Enjjfah & Fren ch, t rgSo- 
tens rtto Punch. P) MO 4BD Pttis. 

SECRET AS1E5 AVAILABLE 


Contactez Sort* Su266 03 P 59% Haussmann. 
ou Nonna au 758 12 40 1 nJSE® 
ou Dany au 322 14 87 h 


"I'SlNEss .. ' w '' ! 

b "-sL '" N " 1 


fond. Zuricfr 361 


RUVETUS e ZURICH * 252 76 2T. 
Phone / telex / moAxs. 


hW SECRETARY, fluent fe 
*afa short term fob far July. 
1 preferred. let 7K , 32 21 . 


OU Dany au 322 14 87 ^ Montimassa 

m ,' france 


^ m -j, »"•!« 

■ihl, % ^lb. 




.... ... printed £> v adz in ZurichJSyritzerlantt) 


» l ^i, ! 




. - *g| f r 

■■ziSmd 


r