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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Park 

? )|ir. Printed SimulUmeouslv^ 

Viifi in Paris. London. Z|#irlu|r ; 
1 ^i-v flung Kong. Sy&^5k 
The Hague 

■ WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 18 

. No. 31,833 

•-,.U.S. Plans 
Xnti-Spy 
Dismissals 

Foreign Staff 
» In Soviet Bloc 
Posts to Be Cut 

By Joel Brinkley 

•. **' New York Times Sendee 

WASHINGTON — The State 
-- Department plans to reduce the 

* * -• number of foreign nationals work- 
' ing in American embassies in Sovi- 
et bloc countries became many of 
them are believed to be spies, gov- 

1 ■ eminent officials said. 

Meanwhile, Secretary of State 
v Georee P. Shultz told a senator 
Vi- Monday that he endorsed in princi- 
pie an advisory panel's recommen- 
dation that dozens of new embas- 
‘ties and consulates be btrilt around 
<■ **Je world to discourage terrorist 
attacks. 

S.V In a letter to Senator Richard G. 
: • Lugar, the Indiana- Republican 

. who is c hairman of the Senate Far- 
’ - eign Relations Committee. Mr. 
' ,r ' 5 c Shultz said the cost of construction 

- had been put at more than S3 bQr 
' lion over die next five to seven 

’ • 1 years. 

The reduction of foreign em- 
V ployees and the construction pro- 
. gram are among actions recom- 
mended in a report by an Advisory 
Panel on Ovoseas . Security that 
' Mr. Shultz set up in My 1984. The 
panel was headed by Admiral Bob- 
by R. Inman, former deputy direc- 
tor of central intelligence. 

An expurgated version of the re- 
port describing the bonding pro- 
- posal is to be public Tuesday, 

but a summary was made available 
Monday. 

A 50-page supplement detailing 
espionage problems in U.S. embas- 
sies in Soviet Woe countries will not 
_ be made public, but government 
. .. officials and members of Congress 
\ . described its contents an Monday. 

’’ According to Sena tea Patrick J. 

• _■ ‘ . Leahy, a Democrat of Vermont. 
: .itiT - : who as deputy chairman of the Sen- 

- . ate Select Committee on Intefli- 
gence has been briefed cm the prob- 

. ^ lent, the report said that so marry 
-u -.^ttsians, inducting’ known' intdli- 
j & Joe agents, are employed at the 
UlS. Embassy in Moscow that the 
. : 7 7 embassy “is a sieve." 

• - Alxmt half erf the nearly 400 peo- 

ple wodring in the embassy in Mos- 
cow are Soviet ritizens. The ratio of 
foreign nationals to US. citizens is 
siiniiar in other embassies in Soviet 
bloc capitals, just as it is in most 
other American embassies around 

‘ the world. 

But in Soviet bloc capitals, offi- 
cials said, local citizens can gener- 
ally work in Western embassies 
c.-d ; r only with the approval of their gov- 
s ' emments, which usually means se- 
f CS curity clearance and approval of 
- 1 re:;;?- die security agencies of the host 
\.LhS>' -■ countries. 

“Sure there are agents of the 

- KGB" a State Department official 
said Monday, referring to the Sovi- 

. ) »]* « internal security and intelligence 

'' agency, “Wit there are also many 

loyal employees who have worked 
.jjr us few years despite great hard- 
— Ships." 

The Soviet citizens are alloyed 
in such jobs as secretaries, photo- 
copiers, chauffeurs, repairmen and 
■ ?-Z groundskeepers. 

Members of Congress and State 
Department officials have long de- 
bated the wisdom of employing So- 
viet citizens. The State Department 
has defended the practice on the 
ground that Soviet ritizens have no 
access to American secrets. 

But, according to an intelligence 
official, the advisory panel found 
that Soviet ritizens are “so perva- 
rive throughout the embassy that 
by watching and reading available 
materials they can gather sensitive 
_,y. information. 

£55*' ''The State Department has insist- 
ed that there have been no msgor 
security breaches. . But early this 

(Confirmed on Page 2, CoL 5) 


INSIDE 

■ The US. budget stalled over , 

cuts in Social Security and mili - 1 
uiy spending. Page 3, 

■ The latest Soviet proposal ! 
was not expected to advance i 
arms control talks. Page 3. | 

■ A Christian Democrat ] 

emerges as Italy's new power j 
broker. Page 4. 

■ A Vatican statement about 
Judaism has been criticized by 
leading Jewish groups. Paged. : 

■ El SaJvador*s leftist rebels | 
have publicly targeted Chris- 
tian Democratic Party officials 
for potential attacks. Page 6- 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ US. orders for durable goods 

jumped 4. 3 percent in May. the 

largest month-to-month in- 
crease in six months.; Page 11. 

■ IBM said it would bqy an in- 

terest in MCI Communications 
Corp. in a 5400- million pack- 
age. PagelL 



INTERNATIONAL 



eribunc 


Published With The New York limes and The Washington Post 

► * PARIS, WEDNESDAY, ^JTINE 26, 1985 


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ESTABUSHED 1887 



One of the Shiite Mosdem hijackers who are still holdmg a T 
airport fired at reporters from the cockpit Tuesday to keep 


a TWA airliner at tire Beirut 
eep them from approaching. 


Japan to Cut Tariffs on 1,800 Items 
In Bid for New Round of Trade Talks 


The Associated Pna 

TOKYO — The Japanese gov- 
ernment announced Tuesday tariff 
reductions on more than 1,800 
products, most taking effect next 
year, and said it was willing to 
rfic/THa; abolisihing tariffs on all 
manufactured goods. - .. 

Faced with rising foreign criti- 
cism of Japan's huge trade surplus- 
es, -Prime ranuterVasuhirD Naka- 
sone announced in April an “action 
program" to open Japan's market 
to imports. 

Mr. Nakasone pledged to make 
tariff reductions by late June and to 
take other market-opening mea- 
sures in July. Japan had a trade 
surplus of S45 bfflkm last year, in- 


cluding a $36 J billion surplus with 
tire United States. 

The cuts announced Tuesday 
will mean reduced tariffs on prod- 
ucts ranging from jellyfish and dri- 
ed seaweed to gasoline and antibi- 
otics. 

The redactions may be suspend- 
ed if they cause considerable dam- 
age to. local industry, the govern- 
ment said. 

Asked what effect the reductions 
might have on Japan’s trade sur- 
plus with the United States, a U.S. 
government official in Tokyo, who 
asked not to be identified, said: 
“With a reduction or elimination of 
over 1,800 different tariff items, it's 



1 



With Weary Optimism 


Mhrio Soares 


S Soares Quits; 


- A ■ 

'Is 


Seen likely 

Return . 

LISBON — Prime Minister 
Mario Soares, aSodalist, formally 
submitted his resignation to Presi- 
dent Anldnio Ramalho Eanes on 
Tuesday. The dissolution of parlia- 
ment and early elections appeared 
inevitable. 

The crisis began June 13 when 
the Social Democrats withdrew 
from the governing coalition. Mr. 
Soares, with his party holding only 
101 of the 250 seats in pariiament, 
immedia tely announced his inten- 
tion to resign. _ . 

General Eanes. after consulting 
the country's highest advisory 
body, the Council of State, was 
expected to announce Wednesday 
whether he would dissolve parlia- 
ment and call early ejections. 

He met with the 16-member 
council twice last week in an effort 
to fmd a way to .avoid elections, 
which are not due until 1987. 

A council recommendation is 
sot binding on the president, but 
he is seen as having scant room for 
maneuver in the race erf the ada- 
mant view of the Social Democrats 
and of the opposition Communists 
'and Christian Democrats that early 
ejections are the only solution. 

Mr. Soares. 60, has supported 
General Eanes'sMew that early 
elections would disturb the coun- 
try’s economic and political stabil- 
ity just when it ispreparing to join 
the European Community . The 
present assembly is scheduled to 
debate ratification of the commu- 
nity entry mean on July 9 and 10. 
Entry into the EC is set for Jan. 1- 

Tfie Serial Democrats under 

their new leader. Anibal Cavaeo 
Silva, pulled out of the two-year 
coalition. They accused the Soaal- 
ists of delaying controversial labor 
and farm reforms to boost Mr. 
Soares's chances of: 'succeeding 
General Eanes as president. 


By Adam Gymer 

• International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — As the United 
Nations tents 40, ritizens of five 
major industrial nations regard it 
with a weary hopefulness sustained 
by a firm conviction that the world 
is better off with it than it would be 
without h. 

Women are generally more fa- 
vorable to the UN, according to a 
poll taken by The New York 
Times, CBS News and the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune to measure 
the organization’s standing on the 
anniversary of the signing of its 
charter in San Francisco on June 
26, 1945. This gender gap was 
found in Britain, Japan, the United 
States and West Germany, but not 
in France, where there was no sex 
difference. 

About half of those polled in the 
United States and Europe said that 
the United Nations was doing a 
good or very good job, while two- 
fifths of the Britons and Americans 
and a quarter of the French and 
Ger mans said it was doing a poor 
or very pom job. In Japan, howev- 
er, only one respondent in nine said 
h was doing a good or very good 
job, while naif said it was doing a 
poor or very poor job. 

But even in Japan, very few re- 
spondents thought the world would 
be better off without the United 
Nations. One percent said so in 
Japan while 56 percent said it was 
better off with iL The margin was 
closest in France, where 1 1 percent 
said the world would be better off 
without it and 45 percent said the 
world was better off with iL 


Reagan Considering Embargo 
On Lebanon, Airport Closure 


impossible to make a rapid, educat- 
ed analysis of its effects." 

Representatives of Japanese 
fanners criticized the measures, but 
business leaders welcomed the 
changes. 

The package includes reductions 
of 20 percent or more on import 
duties on boneless chicken, palm 
oQ, bananas and 33 other agricul- 
tural products that have caused 
concern among foreign countries. 
mainl y in Southeast Asia 

It al-v* includes an across-the- 
board 20-percent cut in tariffs on 
160 other agricultural products and 
1,600 manufactured and mining 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 3) 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, considering ways 
to increase pressure for the release 
of 40 Americans held captive in 
Lebanon, may attempt to dose Bei- 
rut International Airport or estab- 
lish a United States embargo 
against Lebanon, the White House 
announced Tuesday. 

After the president met Tuesday 
afternoon with his foreign policy 
advisers, the White spokesman. 
Larry Speakes, said that Mr. Rea- 
gan would first rely on diplomatic 
initiatives involving Lebanon’s 
neighbors. 

“The president will let diploma- 
cy run its full course before talcing 
further steps," Mr.- Speakes said, 
“but is prepared to take whatever 
action is necessary to bring an end 
to international terrorism” that is 
used as a means “for testing the 
United Stales and its allies." 

But the White House spokes- 
man, reading from a written state- 
ment, said teat “if diplomatic ef- 
forts do not bear fruit" in the next 
few days, the Reagan administra- 
tion will turn to a series of other 
options that were presented to Mr. 
Reagan on Tuesday morning. 
These would include dosing tee 
Beirut airport and undertaking ac- 
tion “affecting the flow’ of goods 
and services to Beirut and Leba- 
non." 

When a reporter asked bow the 
White House could cany out the 
embargo on goods and services, 
Mr. Speakes replied, “Some sort of 
a blockade." 

U.S. warships are on duty in in- 
ternational waters in the Mediter- 
ranean Sea off Lebanon, according 
to the Pentagon. On Monday. Na- 
bih Bern, the Lebanese Shiite lead- 
er who is negotiating with United 
States for the release of the hos- 
tages, demanded that U.S. naval 
vessels leave tee waters near Leba- 
non. 

Mr. Speakes said that the U.S. 


options “do not necessarily have to 
include military action, but we do 
not nils that oul" 

He said earlier in tee day teat the 
president had ruled out a “violent 
rescue" of the hostages. 

[Mr. Bern was quoted by CBS 

Racfica! Shiites may be holtfing 
some hostages in Baalbeck. US. 
officials think. Page 5. 

News on Tuesday as having said 
that he would propose a plan 
Wednesday that he believes could 
break the impasse in negotiations 
for tee release of the 40 Americans, 
Reuters reported from New York. 

[Mr. Bari also was quoted as 
having said that the Red Cross was 
visiting the hostages and teat he 


was reviewing statements from 
Washington that Mr. Reagan was 
studying ways to increase pressure 
on the captors of tee Americans. “1 
am eager to gel more details; I hope 
he isn’t being loo belligerent," he 
said, according to a statement is- 
sued by CBS.} 

Mr. Speakes said teat Mr. Rea- 
gan also was considering ways to 
bring pressure on “those countries 
that support terrorism." including 
Iran, Libya and Syria. 

The White House, he said, initi- 
ated consultations Monday with 
U.S. allies in Europe and the Mid- 
dle East on possible actions in Leb- 
anon. 

He said the White House had 
received “general indications of 
support" from Israel but had not 


yet received a letter from Prime 
Minister Shimon Peres. 

■ Message From Peres 

Israeli radio said that Mr. Peres 

had told Mr. Reagan that Israel 
would cooperate with tee United 
Slates in an effort to end tee hos- 
tage crisis. Reuters reported from 
Tel Aviv. 

The prime minister, in a message 
conveyed by tee Israeli Embassy in 
Washington, told Mr. Reagan that 
Israel supported the Reagan ad- 
ministration's opposition to terror- 
ism. the radio said. 

■ 2 Shines Sentenced 

A Spanish court sentenced two 
Lebanese Shiites, whose freedom 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


U.S. Agency Gives Reagan a Plan 
For Improved Air Travel Security 


Compiled bp Our Staff From Dtyatchei 

WASHINGTON — The US. 
Transportation Department, re- 
sponding to a surge of terrorism 
against ou mfYiMrial «iHiu «s in the 
last two weeks, has sent President 
Ronald Reagan a list of steps u> 
increase air travel security. Lany 
Speakes, the White House spokes- 
man, said Tuesday. 

Earlier, the transportation au- 
thorities in Canada, Japan and sev- 
eral West European countries re- 
potted that they already had taken 
measures to intensify security. The 
increased vigilance was causing 
long delays for passengers, in some 
cases up to two hours. 

It is expected that some of the 
U.S. proposals will result in com- 
parable boarding delays. 

The security steps followed the 
hijacking of TWA Flight 847 in 
Athens, which has left 40 Ameri- 
cans hostage in Lebanon: an air- 


port bombing at Frankfurt that 
killed three persons ; tee crash of an 
Air-India Boring 747 off Ireland 
with 329 people aboard, and a 
bomb in luggage removed from a 
CP Air flight in Tokyo teat killed 
two baggage handlers. 

Mr. Speakes outlined tee Trans- 
portation Department security 
proposals and said, “Z would think 
the president certainly would ap- 
prove them." 

The recommendations include: 

• Expanded use of federal air 
marshals to protect U.S. airliners 
on the most seriously threatened 
routes. 

• Belter training of airline crews, 
with special emphasis on high-risk 
routes. Mr. Speakes said that the 
options included assigning an “air- 
line security coordinator" on high- 
risk flights. 

• Stepped-up research and de- 
velopment of equipment to detect 
explosives and hamper hijacking. 


• Enforcement of carry-on bag- 
gage security, calling for opening 
and physical inspection of bags. 

• An improved system of assess- 
ing and monitoring all foreign air- 
ports serving U.S. carriers to ensure 
that they meet minimum standards 
set by international civil aviation 
organizations. 

Mr. Reagan had requested secu- 
rity recommendations after the hi- 
jacking of tee TWA plane on June 
14 after it took off from Athens. 
The precautions in other nations 
were ordered, for the most part, 
after the Air-India crate, in which a 
bomb is suspected. 

tn Canada, the measures took 
effect at Toronto and at Montreal, 
the departure point for the Air- 
India flight, Vancouver, where the 
CP Air plane rook off for Tokyo, 
and also at Halifax. 

The security measures stipulate 
mandatory search of every piece of 

(Continued on Page 2. CoL I) 


SjrjKcUr Jiork euncp ' CBS news 

Bfral^SShUSribiukc poll 

Opinion of the United Nations 


Police Link Japan Blast 
To 2d Air-India Flight 


Aside from gender, there were 
some important variations from 
country to country in the groups 
that thought well or badly of the 
UN. In Britain, West Germany and 
Japan, the left thought worse of tee 
organization than the right did. In 
tee United States tee opposite was 
true. 

For example, 51 percent of Con- 
servatives in Britain said it was do- 
ing a gpod or very Rood job. but 
only 39 percent of Laborites did. In 
Germany, 56 percent of Christian 
Democrats said it was doing a good 
or very good job, compared to 49 
percent of Social Democrats. In Ja- 
pan all partisans were negative, but 
those of the conservative Liberal 
Democrats were least so. 

In the United States. 54 percent 
of Democrats and 48 percent of 
Republicans said it was doing a 
good or very good job, and tee 
difference was even more striking 
when respondents were asked their 
political ideology. Sixty-one per- 
cent of self-styled liberals said it 
was doing a good or very good job. 
Only 46 percent of conservatives 
did. In France the pattern was 
mixed. 

In the United States those bom 
after the United Nations’ founding* 
were much more likdv to think wefl 
of it than those born earlier. At 
least 58 percent of those under 40 
said it was doing a good or very 
good job, but only 42 percait erf 
those 40 and over did so. But in the 
other four countries, age made little 
difference. 

The polling, whose results can- 
not be precisely compared with 


West Great United 

Germany Britain France Japan States 



1 J 

§11 

D 

• \ 

V 


Howls the UN doing In 
solving the problems it 
hashed to face? 






Very good job 

2% 7% 

2% 1% 

5% 

Good job 

46 

39 

45 

11 

46 

Poor job 

21 

28 

22 

43 

27 

Very poor job 

6 

9 

3 

5 

13 

Don't know 

26 

17 

28 

41 

10 

Does the Third World 
have too much 

Influence In the UN? 






Yes 

13 

31 

25 

12 

42 

No 

45 

48 

37 

17 

42 

Depends/Don't know 

42 

21 

38 

71 

16 

Would the world be 
better off without 
theUN? 






Yes 

5 

11 

11 

1 

13 

No 

58 

89 

45- 

58 

78 

Makes no difference 

16 

7 

21 

8 

- 

Don't know 

23 

13 

23 

35 

9 


Based on 950 interviews conducted in West Germany from May 17 
through 29, 888 tn Great Britain from May 8 through 13; 980 in 
Franca from May 15 through 22; 1,440 in Japan titan May 9 through 
13; and 1,509 in the Urated States from May 29 through June 2. 


previous studies of attitudes to- 
ward the UN because of variations 
in question order, was conducted in 
the United States by The New 
York Times and CBS News and in 
the other four countries by Gallup 
International for these news orga- 
nizations and the International 
Herald Tribune. 


The hopefnlness about the Unit- 
ed Nations extended even to those 
who thought it was now doing a 
poor job. In Japan, for example, 
only one tenth of those who said it 
was doing a very poor job said they 
thought the world would be better 
off without iL In the United States, 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — A bomb that explod- 
ed in luggage removed from a Ca- 
nadian jetliner may have been in- 
tended for an Air-India flight 
bound for Bombay, police sources 
said Tuesday. 

Canadian and Indian officials 
are investigating the possibility of a 
link between the explosions Sun- 
day at Tokyo’s international air- 
port at Narita and aboard an Air- 
India flight from Toronto to 
Bombay. 

All 329 people aboard the Air- 
India Boeing 747 jet, which crashed 
into the sea off Ireland, were killed. 
The Narita blast killed two bag- 
gage-handlers. 

The Japanese police sources told 
United Press International that the 
luggage may have been intended 
for Air-India Flight 301, which was 
scheduled to leave Tokyo for Bom- 
bay less than two hours after tee 
explosion. 

The police confirmed teat the 
explosion look place in an area 
where luggage normally was stored 
while in transit between airlines. 
The luggage had arrived less than 
an hour before aboard a CP Air 
Boeing 747 from Vancouver. 

Japanese news reports also said 
that six people had checked bag- 
gage onto the flight at Vancouver 
but did not board tee aircraft. 

The Canadian Press news agency 
reported Tuesday that a special in- 
telligence task force of tee Royal 
Canadian Mounted Police and tee 
Toronto police began looking for 
Lai Singh and Ammand Singh, who 
are suspects both in the airline ex- 


plosions and in a plot to assassinate 
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of 
India during his recent visit to the 
United States. 

At a news conference Monday 
night. Prime Minister Brian Mul- 
roney of Canada repealed official 
assertions that both explosions 
were the work of terrorists, but said 
that investigators had not yet un- 
covered “the firm evidence. ’ 

Militant Sikhs are fighting the* 
Indian government to gain inde- 
pendence for the northwestern In- 
dian state of Punjab. Two Sikh 
groups and one Kashmiri group 
have claimed responsibility for the 
Air-India .crash. 

Indian newspapers urged re- 
straint Tuesday wuQe investigators 
tty to determine what causal the 
crash. 

A fresh outbreak of anti-Sikh ri- 
oting. like teat which followed the 
assassination of Prime Minister In- 
dira Gandhi in October by Sikh 
members of her security staff, 
would undermine efforts by Prime 
Minister Rajiv Gandhi to effect a 
reconciliation with the 13-million- 
m ember Sikh community. 

In Cork, Ireland, on Tuesday, a 
U.S. official said that those investi- 
gating the Air-India crash were 
“not optimistic" of ever learning 
whether a bomb was involved. 

Jack Young of tee National 
T ransponation Safety Board said a 


flight recorder, which was lost in 
deep water. 

A total of 131 bodies have been 
recovered, but officials called off 
the air search on Monday night*. 
(UPI. AP. NYT) 


U.K. Arrests 15 After Discovering IRA Bomb Plot 


Reuters 

. LONDON — Police said Tues- 
day that they bad arrested IS sus- 
pected guerrillas of tee Irish Re- 
publican Army after uncovering a 
plot to bomb a dozen British sea- 
side resorts. 

The 15 suspects were arrested 
over tee part tour days in nation- 
wide police raids, authorities said. 
Police sources said one of teem was 
a prime suspect in tee attempt last 
October to kiQ Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher in a bomb ex- 
plosion at the Conservative Party’s 
annual conference at Brighton. 

“This has to be our biggest 
breakthrough against the IRA,** a 
pobce office- said. 

Scotland Yard's anti-terrorist 
squad announced Monday that it 
had uncovered a plot to bomb the 
12 resorts next month at the height 
of the summer tourist season. The 
squad defused Sunday a timebomb 
at tee Rubens, a 200-room bold 
near Buckingham Palace *h?i is 
popular with American tourists. 

Simon Crawshaw, the squad's 


chief, said there was a slight possi- 
bility that other bombs timed to 
explode in mid-July already had 
been planted in some of the 12 
resorts on tee IRA “hit list" seized 
during the police raids. 

Officers performed emergency 
searches at tee resorts with dogs 
trained to sniff for bomhs. 

fisted as targets were some of 
Britain’s most popular vacation 
towns, including Brighton, Blade- 
pool and Bournemouth. Others 
were Eastbourne, Torquay, Mar- 
gate, Ramsgate. Southend, Folke- 
stone. Dover and Southampton 
and Yarmouth. 

Police in Yarmouth on the east 
coast assigned 100 officers to 
search hotels, saying they had in- 
formation that a bomb already may 
have been bidden there. 

They also showed photographs 
of IRA suspects to hotel ualfmetn- 
bers in an effort to determine 
whether any of them may have 
stayed in Gres Yarmouth in recent 
weeks. 

Police said the bomb found at 


the Rubens in London, which had a 
delayed tinting mechanism and an 
anti-handling device, was similar to 
the one teat exploded in Brighton’s 
Grand Hold last October. 

Five persons were killed in the 
explosion, bat Mrs. Thatcher and 
other members of her cabinet es- 
caped death. Police suspected that 
the bomb had been planted at the 
hotel weeks before tee conference 
began. 

Police sources said Tuesday that 
one of the 15 now hi custody was 
believed to be the man who planted 
the bomb in Brighton. Police said 
the nan registered as Roy Walsh 
and stayed ur Room 629. where tee 
bomb was concealed behind a pan- 
el in the bathroom. 

The suspect had been under sur- 
vefflauce since be returned to Ire- 
land after the explosion, the 
sources said. They said he was ar- 
rested after he returned to Britain' 
last weekend. 

The sources said tee suspect was 
a dose associate of Gerard Tuite, 
an allegsd IRA member once called 


tee most dangerous man in Britain. 
Mr. Tuite is serving a prison sen- 
tence in Ireland following his con- 
viction on charges related to bomb- 
ings in Britain in 1978 and 1979. 

■ UK, UJS. to Revise Treaty 

In Washington, the United 
States and Britain signed a new 
extradition treaty on Tuesday that 
officials said would help counter 
international terrorism. 

The accord, whit* was signed at 
tee State Department, would close 
a loophole in existing treaties that 
has allowed members of tee Irish 
Republican Army to escape extra- 
dition by claiming political immu- 
nity. 

A spokesman for the British Em- 
bassy said tee treaty would cover 
all “terrorists who claim a political 
umbrella for what they are doing." 
and not IRA members alone. 

The treaty would cover hijack- 
ing, the taking erf hostages, murder 
and certain offenses involving ex- 
plosives and firearms. It must be 
ratified hy Parliament and the U.S. 
Congress' to take effect 





TALKING ABOUT TERRORISM — U.S. Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush, left, and Chancellor Helmut Koh! of 
West Germany -greeting each other Tuesday. Mr. KoM 
pledged cooperation on combating terrorism. Page 4. 


r r.-;f ■ - 


V* 







age 2 


INTERNATIONAX HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 , 1985 



U.S. Agency Gives Reagan a Plan on Air Security 


by metal detectors and of carry-on 
luggage by X-ray devices. 


(Continued from Page I) bv metal detectors and of carry-on Interior Ministry officials in lta- Montreal office said iha*"The tegb- 
' ^ lu&aae bv X-rav devices. ly stepped up security checks at Iv critical human factor wouldbe 

checked baggage and cargo going *jf|J-ush Airports Authority of- airports on Monday, including discussed as well as improved de- 

.mo the holds of alt plan® headrf tl nSre frequent police’ patrols anS tecuon eqtripmenL He added that 

forEurope.Asu and Aina, ac- Healhrm . international rigorous baggage inspections. recommendations for unproved 

cording to Jacqueline Richard of ^ ^ ^ , 0 in Tokyo, passengers were being training programs for security per- 

fiic public relations department of that seemed subjected to physical searches be- sonnd could result. 


Transport Canada. 

Mrs. Richard said that airline 
officials of other nations had been 
requested to “do the same thing for 
flights coming into Canada." 

She said that the new rules would 
remain in effect “as long as needed, 
and we think that may be quite a 
while." 

The new inspections of cargo- 
hold items are in addition to cus- 
tomary examination of passengers 


The airline safety experts also 


even slightly suspicious. fore boarding their planes. _ The airline safety experts also 

“Security at Heathrow is already Members of the security adyiso- n-^ramine another security 
very tight." the official said, “but ry committee of the International measure used at many airports, 
we are giving staff pep talks wiling Air Transport Association, which w foch involves passengers pomting 
them to be doubly vigilant in the represents 137 airlines, are to meet om their luggage on the tarmac 
wake of what has happened over Friday in Montreal to examine beside the plane before It is put 
the past few days." measures to combat terrorist at- aboard. 

In Bonn. Friedhelm Osu the tacks on civilian airplanes, IATA ... .. IATA 


aboard. 

John Brindley of the IATA office 


chief West German spokesman, spokesmen in Geneva and Momre- urewuAonTre 

saidthatacomprehen^reriewof aj I tdd 1 the International Herald 

~ of ^ ^ ssssiSfisi 

plane carrying his bomb. “It now 



plane carrying his bomb. “It now 

UN Still Regarded With Weary Hopefulness MTaSSS 

ance and frustration in those reac- fluence in it — was not supported Pilots in the United Stales have 
tions. Eileen LaDue, 56, a clerk for by a majority in any of the five long felt that curbside check-in of 
the state government in Albany, countries, although there was an luggage — at the spot where a trav- 
New York, said “They have not even split on the question in the der arrives by car or bus — 
lived ud la what we thought they United States, with 42 percent on makes it nosable for a terrorist to 


fCnnliniieri fmm Paae II MCC ana trustrauon in muse rcut- nucucc in u — wpyuiwu 

(Loa turned from rage I) LaDue, 56, a clerk for by a majority in any of the five 

three fourths of those who thought lhe slale government in Albany, countries, although there was an 
it was doing a poor job said the j^ew York, said “They have not even split on the question in the 
world was still belter off with it. ^ ve< j up w what we thought they United States, with 42 percent on 
One of them. Lois Taylor- Holsie wou id," she added. “Mostly we each side of the question, 
of Chevy Chase. Mary land, said m bend over backwards to be a good There was greater support for the 
a follow-up interview- said that ihe w e nee d l0 pull back, re- idcj ^ Britain and France, fonner 
UNwasdraiyapoorjob .but sou lrenc h. stop mierfenng m other colonial powers, than m West Gcr- 
have got to keep nations talking counLr jes. take care or our own many o/japan. Twenty-five per- 
and therefore the world * as better problems. I mean, it's not like any- ^ of ^ ^ench agreed, while 37 
Off With it. nne thanks us.” ]l 


Other follow-up interviews with For several American respon- ^ British agreed, while 4$ percent 
some of the .Americans who had dents it was hostage crises, past and dtew£™>d i Q Germany only 13 per- 
heen polled revealed a wide range present, that emphasized what they agreed, and in Japan only 12 

.■%! oh.Mif inn IlmtAri W*a_ L _ 1.— _C .L. T “ 


t on tne question in toe efcr arrives by taxi, car or bus — 
tates, with 42 percent on makes it posable for a terrorist to 
of the question. slip a bomb into the cargo hold 

vas greater support for the with the least possible risk, 
ritain 8 °^ France, fonner For that reason, the Air line 
lowers, than in west Ger- py 0 Ls Association has been urging 
Jyjan. Twenty-five pa-- f or years that curbside baggage 
e French agreed, while 37 check-in'be banned. 

pCTCent ?3ESf=iLK2Li w nyt. wt> 






of ignorance about the United Na- 
tions. from a belief that the United 
Slates pays half the organization’s 
budget (it pays a fourth) to the 
belief that the UN provides mili- 
tary aid to its members. 


saw as the weakness of the United 
Nations. Shirley Whitfield. 24, a 


percent. 

In the United States, France and 


Senep. South Carols waitress, ££££?*£ Tow* 

saidit was mostly not effective. famijy incomes were more likely 

h^nnirL^NTt W| l than those with more money to 

think the Third World had loo 


There were mixtures of annoy- oping countries have too much in- 


much influence in the United Na- 
lions. 

How Poll on UN Was Done 

ence between Conservatives and 

W m i r ay 9 ^«1^ulUsu q S 0 Naf“onS 
PARIS - These poUs by The through May 3. In Wes Germa- From supponers were rauch more 

New ^ ork Times. CBS News and ny. 950 people were interviewed lilelv lo w than „ social- 


New York Times. CBS News and ny. 950 people were interne 
the International Herald Tribune from May 17 through May 29. 
are based on face-to-face inter- The interviews were coadu 
views with adults in France. Brit- at approximately 100 random!) 


• ' ft P*2P“ iT™ likely to think so than were Social- 

)m May 17 through May 19. [su.I„ the United Stales there was 

The interview’s were conducted no significant difference between 
approximately 100 randomly se- Democrats and Republicans, but 


views with adults in France. Bni- at approximately 100 randomly se- Democrats and Republicans, but 
am. Japan and West Germany and leered locations in each country ex- 50 percent of self-styled conserva- 
telephone imemews with adults in cepi Japan, where there were 150 Uves and only 37 percent of liberals 
uieunited Mato. locations. The locations were cho- said developing countries had too 

The i ace-to-face interviews were sen to ensure that each region of muc h influence 
conducted by Gallup In ternauon- each country was represented in AmerirelnK and w «t n,rm,n, 


SSLrtt* «■ United Nahons d'da better job at 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


mis 01 sex. age urn nousenoiu kee ping WO rid peace, while in Brit- 
coraC- ain, France and Japan about as 

In the United States, 1,509 man y respondents picked one as 
adults were interviewed by tele- picked the other 
phone by The Times and CBS FinaUv a quesvion 
MewsJTje resuJtsfor ah countries m thc united States. 42 percent of 


Reagan Plan 
On Hostages 

(Contbroed from Page 1) 
had been demanded by the TWA 
hijackers, to 23 years in prison each 
for wounding a Libyan diplomat a 
year ago. The Associated ness re- 
ported from Madrid. 

The National Court convicted 
Mohammed Kahir Abas RahaL 22, 
and Mustafa Ali Khalil , 24, of ille- 
gal possession of firearms and as- 
sault with a deadly weapon against 
Mohammed Ahmed Idnss on Sept. 
12. 1984. 

Mr. Rahal and Mr. Khalil told 
the court on June 19 that they had 
not intended to kill Mr. Idriss but 
merely to damage his car in revenge 
for the alleged Libyan kidnapping 
of a Lebanese Shiite spiritual lead- 
er, Imam Moussa Sadr, on a trip to 
Tripoli from Rome. 

■ Pan Am Restores Fights 

Pan American World Airways 
said Tuesday that it would resume 
flights to Athens on Friday. Aeence 


Air-India officials on an Irish vessel examine wreckage. 

U.S. Plans Anti-Spy Dismissals 


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have been weighted to take account Americans said their country had 
of household and to adjust for ^Kuic influence in the UN.'while 
variations rathe sample relating to 33 rcent ^ it ^ abou[ ±e 


sex and age. 

In addition to sampling error, 
the practical difficulties of con- 
ducting any survey of public opin- 


many responciems picsw one as nights to Athens on Friday, Agence 
picked lie olher. France-Phse reported fJoreNei 

Finally, in a question asked only York, 
in the United States. 42 percent of The airline suspended its one 
Americans said their country had daily flight last week after Mr. Rea- 
100 little influence in the UN.'while gan appealed to airlines and travel- 
33 percent said it had about the ers to avoid the airport because of 
right amount and 1 3 percent said it what he tailed lax security that had 


had too much. 

Adam Clymer, who directs Hie 
New York Times polling operation. 


ion may introduce other sources of wrote this article for the Intemation- 
error into the poll. a/ Herald Tribune. 


aided the hijackers. 

A Pan Am executive said the 
decision was made became of an 
improvement in security at the air- 
port over the past week. 


(Continued from Page i) 
security breaches. But eariy' this 
year officials acknowledged that 
electronic bugging devices had 
been found in embassy typewriters. 

A Soviet employee had been in 
charge of assigning typewriters, 
and when the devices were discov- 
ered. one typewriter was being used 
by the secretary of the deputy chief 
of mission, the embassy's second 
ranking officer, an intelligence offi- 
cial said Monday. 

Officials who have read the advi- 
sory' report said that it described 
several other instances of security 
b reaches attributed 10 Soviet em- 
ployees. 

The State Depanmem has op- 
posed legislation that would limit 
the number of local employees in 
Soviet-bloc countries to the num- 
ber of Americans employed by the 
embassies of the host countries in 
Washington. The Soviet Embassy 
in Washington has fewer than, 10 
American employees. Senator Lea- 
hy said. 

The legislation has passed the 
Senate and will be discussed in a 
Senate- House conference. A Slate 
Department official said. “We 
don’t think we should be dictated 
to on this question.” 

But several officials said the ad- 
ministration had decided, partly in 
reaction to the advisory report to 
reduce the number of foreign em- 
ployees in Soviet-bloc countries. 


The espionage problem is also a 
reason behind the proposal to build 
new embassies and consulates. In 
Soviet-bloc countries, officials said, 
host governments can plant listen- 
ing devices in embassy walls. But 
the principal reason for the build- 
ing proposal is the threat of terror- 
ism in countries outride the Soviet 
bloc. 

The State Department's Adviso- 
ry Panel on Overseas Security said 
Monday that unless a substantial 
rebuilding program were underta- 
ken at once, ihe United States 
would “remain hostage to the like- 
lihood of American diplomatic es- 
tablishments being physically as- 
saulted by mobs or bombed or 
sabotaged by terrorists." 

“For many years the Depart- 
ment of State has attempted to dis- 
charge growing and changing [se- 
curity] responsibilities with austere 
resources.” the report said. “The 
interests of the United States can- 
not continue to be upheld by con- 
tinuing that approach." 

The pond recommended also 
that a new Slate Department secu- 
rity bureau be established to be 
headed by an assistant secretary of 
state for diplomatic security. 

It said the heart of this operation 
should be a diplomatic security ser- 
vice charged with incorporating 
“the best features and attributes of 
professional law enforcement" to 
protect U.S. embassies and consul- 
ates. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

—7 4^ 

Agca Alters Testimony on Bulgarian 

ROME ( AP) — Mehmct Ali Ages, in a major change of testimony, said 
Tuesday in court that a Bulgarian defendant did not drive him to St, 
$ Peter’s Square the dav he shot the pope four years ago. 

Statements bv Mr.’Agca led to the trial of three Bulgarians and four 
Turks am tw d along with him of complicity in the shooting of Pape John 
Paul II in 1981. . „ 

Originally Mr. Agca had said that Sergei I. Amosov was aimed aod 
waiting ra his car to drive Mr. .Ages ana two Turkish accomplices yj 
safety at the Bulgarian Embassy after the shooting. But on Tuesday.-M- 
Agca said that he and Oral Celik and Omer Ay drove themselves Vat- 
square. Mr. Cdik. who has disappeared, is charged also with shooting the 
pope. Mr. Ay. imprisoned In Turkey, has not been charged, hut Mr. Agca 
testified that he was in the square. 

UJL Arrests Suspected Soccer Rioters 

LIVERPOOL (AP) —Police said they arrested an unspecified number 
of people Tuesday in connection with the riot that caused 38 deaths last 
month at thc European Cup soccer final in Brussels. 

A spokesman for ihe Merseyside County police said the arrests wm 
made after local officers collaborated with Belgian police who visited 
Liverpool earlier this month. He refused to say bon' many people were in 
custody or what charges they may face. 

The May 29 riot at the Heysel stadium in Brussels began when 
supporters of England’s Liverpool club charged fans of Italy's tea** 
Juveatus of Turin, before the game. Many of the 38 persons who.\ EM | - 
were crushed when a wall between the two sections collapsed, or utre 
trampled to death in the ensuing panic. Police in Liverpool and Brussels 
studied hours of videotapes recorded in the stadium in on attempt to 
identify the riot leaders. 

Democrats Cancel Midterm Meeting 

WASHINGTON (AP) —The Democratic National Committee dead- ; 
ed Tuesday to cancel a party midterm convention in 1986. taking a step j 
back from one of the changes it made in the 1970s to open the party to the I 
opinions of the Tank and file. 

The chairman of the committee, Paul G. Kirk Jr„ pushed througrthe 
decision, saying that it would produce savings well in excess of $1 aaffica. 
“The party needs these funds more for midterm election victories fbanfor 
a midterm conference,” Mr. Kirk said at the opening session of the 
day summer meeting. ?: . 

The change was approved overwhehningly on a voice vote, bat tirae 
was opposition. “We’ve always been an open party." said Sue Rockncof 
Zumbrota, Minnesota. “Don t send a message that we are dosing down." 

South African Rebels Expand Panel 

LUSAKA, Zambia (AFP) — The African National Congress, which is 
waging an armed struggle a g ainst white minority rule in South Afiicarius 
opened its national executive committee to members of all races, it was 
announced Tuesday. 

The congress president. Oliver Tambo, announced the policy change at 
the organization’s Zambian headquarters after the conference, which was 
held at a secret location in southern Africa, ended. About 250 delegates 
attended the session. 

Mr. Tambo said that five Indian, while and mixed-race persons had 
been included for the first time in the group’s top body, the executive 
committee. Formerly open to blades only, it was expanded from 22 1 £- 
members, he said. ; 

For the Record 

A letter pmpqrtetfljr sent by the Peace Conquerors, a group that has 
claimed responsibility for a bombing June 20 at the Frankfurt airport hud 
another Saturday at the Brussels (Sice of Bayer AG. a pharmaceutical 
company, says it will strike again in the name of the environment audio 
protest “U.S. militarism." The letter was received by The Associated 
Press in Brussels. {AP} 

A series of explosions at a fireworks plant Tuesday at Hallett, Oklflho- ’ 
ma, kffled 21 persons, injuring five and leaving two missing. (AP) 
Yugoslavia’s League of Conmnmists elected Vidoje Zarkovic, 58, as its 
bead for a one-year term Tuesday, replacing Ali Sakrija as chief of- the 
23-member policy-making presidency of the party under the country's 
system of rotation of key party and state posts. (Recast 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


Page 3 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


U.S. Legislators Call Oft Talks on Budget C PiAGCl 



The Associated Pre^ of fruitless ne gnriafinrw between the Senate's call for a one-year ing plan that freezes the defense 

WASHINGTON — House and the two chambers. freeze on 1986 benefit increases for budget. 

Senate bucket negotiators broke Mr. Domenid called off further Social Security and other federal The reforms are designed to 
off efforts Tuesday to produce a sessions of the conference and said pension recipients. change Pentagon procurement and 

compromise 1986 federal budget, that Congress would have to pro- Representative William H. Gray end the recent senes of contracting 
claiming differences between the ceed this year without a formal 3d. Democrat of Pennsylvania and abuses such as S640 toilet seat cov- 

two chambers on defense spending budget. There remains a chance head of the House negotiators, ers and contractors' country club 


the Senate's call for a one-year ing plan that freezes the defense 
freeze on 1986 benefit increases for budgeL 


Social Security and other federal 


reforms are designed to 







pension recipients. change Pentagon procurement and 

Representative William H. Gray end toe recent senes of contracting 
3d. Democrat of Pennsylvania and abuses such as S640 toilet seat cov- 



two chambers on defense spending 
and Social Security benefits were 


and Social Security benefits were that the negotiations could resume agreed wun Mr. uomnuci mat tne memoersmps mat w 

too wide to be resolved. • after Congress returns from its House was not likely ever to agree the taxpayers. 

"I have concluded that from our Fourth of July recess. to scaling back the Social Security One scries of pro 

side there is no useful purpose to House leaders responded to the increases. Social Security provides forms, approved 41 1- 

continue this conference" in the breaking off of talks by claiming retirement benefits and disability vide criminal penal li 




peed with Mr. Domenici that the memberships that were billed to 
ouse was not likely ever to agree the taxpayers. 

> scaling back the Social Security One series of procurement re- 


continue this conference" in the breaking 


absence of a House agreement to 
limit next year’s Social Security 
benefit increases. Senator Pete V. 
Domenid, a Republican of New 


that their chamber would 
move individual spending 
had been held up. 


payments. 


One senes of procurement re- 
forms, approved 41 1-4, would pro- 
vide criminal penalties and heavy 
fines against contractors who bill 


In addition to protecting the So- the government for inappropriate 


cial Security increases; the bu< 


The budget is not legislation as the House passed last month 


Mexico and chairman of the such but rather a series of spending calls for freezing mfliuuy spending cheat. 
House-Senate bar gaining panel, ceiling s that ran g r eya onal commit- at 1985 levels. The Senate budget The 
announced at the start erf Tuesday’s tees must abide by in acting on would allow it to rise with inflation, proval 
negotia ting session. various pieces of leg slab on. _ Earlier^ Democratic leaders ing f< 

le announcement of the dead- ’ " 


items and order new accounting 
practices to catch contractors who 


Uh r.u- 


'-un- 


lock followed more than two weeks agreement, both sides agreed, was 

U.S. Says Soviet Proposal 
Won’t Move Arms Talks 


Qings that congressional commit- at 1985 ievds. The Senate budget The House later gave 416-0 ap- 
is must abide by in acting on would allow ino rise with inflation, proval to another amendment caii- 
rious pieces of legislation. Earlier, Democratic leaders ing for increased competition in 

The biggest stumbling block to claimed that President Ronald weapons purchases and an end to 
reement, both sides agreed, was Reagan would be largely to blame the “sole source” buying that de- 
if the budget negotiators hit a stale- false critics say has contributed to 


mate. “The president wants to bust the current scandals. 

" T-x Plan R™*ed 

6 bi£kthe^h|arti^ *ion plan that appear to be disad- 
gjns Oa I, the Senate proposal ^.lagepus w middle-income 
Sm.iehnr .he fEJ?£re fanuh “ both parents I 



FIRST FAMILIES — Preadent and Mrs- Reagan joined Jacquefine Kennedy Onasas 
and John F. Kennedy Jr. at a fund-raising event for the John F. Kennedy Memorial 
library at Senator Edward M. Kennedy’s home in McLean, Virginia, on Monday mghL 




$56 billion in the fiscal year that 
begins Oct I. the Senate proposal 


By Don Oberdorfer 

Washington Peat Service 


gets much of the savings from cuts 1 , ^ 

move.” He added that “we would in domestic programs while allow- York Tunes report- 


have no objections to making deqp- ing military spen ding to increase 


WASHINGTON — Soviet no- muuol cuts." Mr. Gorbachev with inflation. 


lb j, 


< I 't U [■ i 


|!*i H. 


A Free Market 
Emerging lor Water 

In a challenge to long-stand- 
ing practice, a free market is de- 
veloping for water in the Far 

West, wnere most water has been 

sold by federal and state agencies 
at fixed rales kept low by public 
subsidies, The New York limes 
reports that a California irriga- 
tion district has hired an engi- 
neering company to help it save 
millions of gallons a year now 
lost through evaporation, seep- 
age and runoff; the water thus 
saved will be sold to the highest 
bidder. 

San Diego is negotiating to 
buy water from a group of Den- 
ver entrepreneurs who seek to 
dam a tributary of the Colorado 
River. Such efforts are being 
pushed by both politicians and 
environmentalists. They com- 
plain that the present system en- 
courages waste by pricing water 
too cheaply. 


Short Takes 

President Ronald Reagan is 
sending pins and certificates to 
761.139 school ptmCs in the 1st 
through 12th grades who aver- 
aged B-plns or better during the 
past academic year. This is the 
second year of the Presidential 
Academic Fitness Awards. 

Thns far Arntrak, the national 
passenger railroad, has survived 


bodgst cats, and interest in high- 
speed pagyng pr railroads re- 
mains high. The federal govern- 
ment recently announced grants 
totaling $740,000 for planning 
high-speed rad systems to con- 
nect Ohio’s Ing a ties, for the St 
Louis- Kansas City corridor 
across Missouri; for a Philadel- 
phia- Harrisboi^Pittsbarg^ line 
fn P enns ylvania, and a Houstoa- 
D alias tmg in Texas. 

Thomas A- NassS, deputy as- 
sistant secretary of state for Near 
Eastern and Smith Asian affairs, 
is favored as the next UJS. am- 
| bassador to Morocco. Mr. Nas- 
szf, 43, a California lawyer, has 
: been nominated by President 
Reagan to succeed Joseph Ver- 
ner Reed Jr. Mr. Reed is expect- 
ed to be reassigned as a deputy 
delegate to the United Nations. 

Shorter Takes; Los Angeles 
magazine is the biggest monthly 
dty magazine ixr the United 
States, with a . circulation of 
166,000, according to the Media 
Industry Newsletter. The Wash- 
ingtonian Magazine is second 
with 140,000. . . . The army may 
replace the metal mess kit with 
disposable paper plates and plas- 
tic ntenafe in cove drab to cut 
down on dishwashing parapher- 
nalia in the field. ... There are 
no fewer than 25 dries and towns 
natiwl Washington in the Unit- 
ed Stales, according to the U.S. 
Postal Service. . . . . line spoken 
by the shiftless father in “Coyote 
Ugly," a new play by Lynn Se- 


fert now at Washington's Kenne- 
dy Center “The Grand Canyon 
is nothing. You're just paying for 
a name” ‘ 


Water, Water 
Everywhere, But . . • 

New Yorkers are still being 
asked to conserve water, but it's 
not easy. “Every day it rains,” 
said Jan SDver, watching water- 
conservation messages being 
filmed for television, “and every 
day you turn on the TV and the 
weather guy says. Tt did not rain 
cm the reservoirs.* Where are 
these reservoirs, may 1 ask. 
Death ValleyT 

la fact they are in upstate New 
York, where rain is still scarce 
and the water levd is stiQ drop- 
ping. But the conservation com- 
mercials, being fibned on loca- 
tion in Manhattan’s Central 
Park, required powerful stage 
lights to simulate sunshine. 
Shooting was interrupted by rain 
several tunes. 

Tony Randall, who is acting in 
the conservation commercials, 
said he is doing his bit to save 
water. “I do take shorter show- 
ers, and lately I’ve been drinking 
straight out of the bottle,” he 
said. Another actor, Vincent 
Gardenia, said he has a contin- 
gency plan to water his tomato 
plants m the suburbs with cheap 
wine. 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HlGBEE 


gotiatore in the Geneva talks have also added whal somed to be a 

formally proposed the 25-percent conditiofl,saymg.-AIltlnsisp«®- _ 

ait in strategic nuclear delivery ve- . “ L “ e „ arTns race aoe& DOt Dc £* n would freeze military spending at 

hides that Mikhail S. Gorbachev, m s P ace * 1985 levels, 

the Soviet leader, advanced public- The White House and State Do- 

iy two months ago. panmem immediately responded ■ Buying Reform Ordered 

Paul H. Nitze, special arms ad- to the speech by sayipg lhal no such The House approved Tuesday 
riser to the Reagan a dmin i stra tion. Soviet offer had been made in the changes in the way the Pentagon 
in revealing the Soviet offer on first round of Geneva negotiations, buys weapons and ordered more 
Monday, said neither this gesture Mr. Nitze said Monday that in the competition to try to drive down 


ed in Washington. 

Ronald A. Pearlman, assistant 
secretary of the Treasury for tax 


The budget approved by the policy, said Monday that President 
Democratic House, by contrast, Reagan's proposal to alter the tax 


would freeze military spending at 
1985 levels. 

■ Buying Reform Ordered i 
The House approved Tuesday I 


treatment of child-care expenses 
would probably be rewritten. 


Mond ay, said neither this gesture Mr. Nitze said Monday that in the 
nor anotha recent shift in the Sori- second round & talks, which began 
et bargaining position is enough to May 30 and is continuing the Sori- 


the costs of defense contracts. The j 


advance the discussio n in Geneva, et negotiators have said little more 
which be said “isn’t making a great than Mr. Gorbachev said in War- 
deal of progress.” saw. 

Reiterating Reagan admmistra- ^ proposcd 25-percent cut, 
tion policy on the need for further ^ NitreleST appears lo be a 
Soviet concessions, Mr. Nice sad reference to the 1981Smfe offer to 
itwdl^ke^newdeasicai by the <« a ceiling of 1.8&0 strategic nu- 
Iradeniup to lead to a break- dear ^ sometimes 


The proposed 25-percent cut, 
Mr. Nitze said, appears to be a 
reference to the 1983 Soviet offer to 


uing, the Sori- Associated Press reported from 
aid tittle more Washington. 


through in tbetalks. He expressed ^ened to as laiincbers, for offen- 
donbt that sodr a major shift wiB avc HrrTK refers to mis- 

come this year. riles and airplanes. A limit one- 

Mr. Nitre and other U.S. offi- fourth higher, of 2,400 launchers 
cals said the recent changes m the on eadfade. was agreed to in the 
Soviet negotia tin g posture in Gene- m^tified SALT-2 treaty, 
va were restatements of offers ini- _ . u , • 

tially made to the United States The propel can be a counto- 
duriig President Ronald Reagan's produeuve thmg. said Mr .Nitre, 
firetrenn. because it refers only to the launch- 

Mr. Nitre said the Russians seem era, not .to warheads or the size of , 
to be responding to public relations warbeB ds. i| 

requirements in Europe and Asia, The other r ecent change in the 
with no evidence that they were Soviet bargaining position, fore- 
ahering their basic demand for a shadowed in a May 29 Gorbachev 
ban on research and development speech, was to offer a freeze on 
of the UiL Strategic Defense Ini- Soviet medium-range missOe de- 


dative, aspace- based defense sys- 
tem, as a precondition for all agree- 
ments. 

Mr. Gorbachev announced April 


ployments in Asia in the context of 
an overall arms control agreement. 
The Russians had expressed will- 
ingness to n e gotia te such a freeze in 


26 is Warsaw, “We have already earlier negotiations but in this 
suggested that both sides reduce year’s Geneva talks reportedly in- 
strategic offensive arms by one- sisted on no restraints on such Asia 


The votes came as the House 
considered a 1986 Pentagon spend- 


U 1 

Tin i ( i 

[m c ( 

im r ( i 


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Amateur tournament weeks 

July 20 to August II 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


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Christian Democrat Emerges as Italy’s Kingmaker 


By Henry Tanner 

International HcroM Tribune 


|y unanimous election on a single not dosely identified with any one two years, Mr. Cossiga has already of the government this mrom pr or 


ballot on Monday of Francesco of the many carrenti, or dans, that been above party politics. 


ROME — Ciriaco Dc Mita, the Cossiga as Italy’s new head of state, have been operating within the Even more important to than, he 

... ... n .r oil n, neti«n r^n«iii~i i ■ iiflr f/w tka kau *1 C. u 


secretary of the Christian Demo* Editorialists of all political Christian Democratic Party for the has not been 


cratic Party, has emerged as Italy's shades, in rare agreement, have last four years and have been re- government 


foremost power broker. 


The 56-year-old lawyer from the sibledioice — a man of great in teg- 
small town of Avellino. southeast rity who win remain above party 


hailed Mr. Cossiga as the best pos- sponsible for its many destructive lino Craxi, a Socialist, with whom 


internecine battles. the Communist Party has long Mr.CrarihasthcChrisrianDemo- 

Mr. De Mita bad vowed to fight beta engaged in open political war- crats* backing to continue in office 
the power of the correnti back in fare. and is almost certain to become the 


This was taken to m ean that Mr. 
Ctaxi Is certain to stay in power for 
some time to come. 

It was also taken to mean that 


of Naples, has received personal politics as president. 

credit for having initiated, domi- The election is described as 

nated and concluded the successful “new national consensus" and 


■ , H . HH. Wb 1TUU J UIUUUI >>U. UW 

new national consensus and a By getting'lhe leaders of the cor* siga thus was regarded as a cau 


negotiations that led to the virtual- sign of the basic soundness of the w acogpi ^ choice, he has nous but deliberate 


Mr. De Mila’s choke of Mr. Cos- longest- servifl| prime minister in 
q thus was regarded as a cau- tfr* history of the I tali a n. Republic. 


w*. *- - — — ~ r* r*'- renn to accept us cnoice, ne nas nous but deliberate opening to- He will have been is 

Italian political system which has WQQ within the party ward the Communists and an two years this August 


often been criticized for being slow ^ a powerful tradi- attempt to mitigate their isolation. wbo’was murdered by the Red I 

w donaI pre- Scvai ^ editorialists underlined ?***■ urban guerrida group, i 

and always dominated by narrow OTt deputy prune minister, Ar- dus asoect of the ^ previous Imgest-semng pn 

parochial interests. naldo Forlani, and former prime lion inTbesday’s minister, having been in office ; 

“Our politicians are capable of ministers, Giulio Andreotb and *u JulT T.w». v*. two y® 315 aD< ^ about three moo 

making good decisions effectively Ammtore Fanfani, all of whom had Some expressed me hope that by conseartivdy. 

ii «_ : . -J _• j v:.: _r .«■ managing m lndude the rnmimi- w_ r ■ . 


The home L 

of Burberrys Paris, r 
since 1909 

(Near the Madeleine) 


Som e expressed the hope that by 


who was murdered by the Red Bri- 
gades urban guerrilla group, was 
the previous longest-serving prime 
minister, having been in office for 
two years and about three moutte 


imiMiifi WVU wwwiww VIWU I ruiuuiwiy i u.muiu, uu wi nuvuiuou ■ - ■ i j • - * - 

after allra prominent editor said, presidential ambitions of their w the Cmubu- 

»TU_, rusts m the national consensus on 


“They may have been turning a own. 


page Monday/ 


Mr. De 


Mr. De Mita knew, moreover, 
who took over his that in picking Mr. Cbssiga, be was 


managing ro inauue uw v-ammu- Cmd b*s been the dominant 

rnsts m ^ muon^conseosus on gg^ m ltalism politics since be 
tlw presidential electron, Mr. De cam* to newer. Hal Unortas and 


me presioenuai ejection, w. ue came to power. Ha supporters and 
Mha may have lard the ground- critics agree that he hasmade it his 



WVWM Wf«i UM MM4I UA ptWOLUg VVJJIfeUy UW V»CU . rn <■ T ■ , UglW UMII) |A*« I M I J II UW 

post in 1982, has now become the able to propose lo tbe Communists w . , * .°? uc 3150 0,1 ** policy to make fuBer ose of the 

un contested leader of his party for the only Christian Democrat whom et ? womiC UBoe s on wtnc& prime minister's power than any of 

the first time. they would endorse without great f? e |° vcr ?™ cn * ^ cl 4 , his predecessors in dealing with the 

Mr. Cossiga was bis personal difficulty, perhaps even from the rzny nave been, at log- opposition, 

choice. first bafioL gedicads for more than wo years. At tunes his coalition oartnere. 


choice. 

To a large extent this was be- 


firet ballOL gcrncaas ior more man two years. 

It was an important consider- Mr. De Mita and Mr. Craxi both 


cause Mr. Cossiga, a former prime a lion for the Communists that, as predicted in theirpasietection com- 


At times his coalition partners, 
including Mr. De Mila, have com- 
plained that he was high-handed in 



Classical 

Burberrvs 


minister and interior minister, is president of the Senate for the last mems that there will be a reshuffle his dealings even with them. 

Mr. De Mita, when he took over 

as party secretary in 1982, an- 
J~tm m _ • j nr nounced in many interviews that 

er on Umstums ana Jews jyr«EbS^»“aa 

in 'Tel /y from Catholic youth organizations 

i by Some Jewish Groups 

•*- His success in engineering single- 

Semitism and called for “object! v- the faithful the remains of ami- handedly Mr. Cossiga's election is 
ity, justice, tolerance.” Sanitism” and to expand “knmri- seen as having brought him much 

“There is evident, in particular, a edge of ihe wholly unique ‘bond’ nearer to this goal than he ever was. 


The full range 
of traditional 
Burberrys Mens. 
Ladies & 

Children clothing. 


By E.J. Dionne Jr. 

Nov York Tuna Service 


ROME The Vatican has is- painful ignorance of the history which joins us as a chur ch to Jews 
sued a document on relations be- and traditions erf Judaism,” the and Judaism.” 


Rauf Dentash, the Turkish Cypriot leader, celebrating the 
parliamentary election victory of the party he foiwW.' 


Vatican Paper on Christians and Jews 
Stirs Criticism by Some Jewish Groups 


Center-Right Leadership 
Likely in Turkish Cyprus 


seen as having brought him much NICOSIA — A two-party cen- 


lurberrys* 


tween Christians and Jews that im- statement said, “of which only neg- Her 
mediately drew sharp criticism aijve aspects and often caricature rector 


nearer to this goal than he ever was. tar-right coalition government is 
Journalists predicted Tuesday expected to be formed in northern 
that he will use his new-found pow- Cyprus following the first pariia- 


id Judaism. that he will use his new-found pow- Cyprus following the first pariia- formed, was a t 

Henry Sregman, theraecutivedi- er not only within his party but also mentary elections in the breakaway ty and safety” 
ctor of the American Jewish Con- ^ deafi™, with Mr. Craxi. “There state. Mr. Denktas 


eminent would take notice of the 
strong showing by the two leftist 
parties but added that the victore^ 
by National Unity Party, which hi, 
formed, was a mandate “for securi- 


8. bd Maleshcrbes 
Parb: & - 266.13-01 


fnewn several leading Jewish organi- ^ 

ofmanyChr&s.” aT^temenl “SniTTaS 


of many Christians." Ihe statement “will serve to ad- 

The Vatican statement, issued by But the International Jewish vance the dialogue between the i*. between them." nnfanalvsi 
the Commission for Religious Re- Committee on Interreligious Con- Catholic Church and the Jewish cn ;^ ^ 

latious with the Jews on Monday, saltations, which includes leading community ” But other aspects of 

emphasized the “Jewish roots of Jewish organizations, said the doc- it, he went on. were “problematic.” 

Christianity," condemned anti- ument reflected a “regressive spir- The statement by the Interna- 0 _ .. . _ 

it" and “little recognition of how tional Jewish Committee on Inter- 5 East OlOCiNauOIlg lest 

Jews concave of themselves.” religious Consultations represented -r mm** w ■ . 

— ■ ~ yV The group also said that the Vat- the views of five organizations: The NCW Military N|Uipmeilt 


ite. Mr. Denktash, elected 

Political analysts said that Rauf ^ Jane 9 as an indeper 


remained above party politics and 
did not actively back his party in 
the election campaign. 

Cyprus has been divided into an 


iu, to form a governmenL U is 


hkefy to be an alliance between his Turkish north and Greek 

party and New Dawn, a center- sOQth ^nce 1974. when Turkish 


-right party representing settlers 
from Turkey. 


troops invaded the island foDowing 
a short-lived coop backed by the 


ican statement included only a World Jewish Congress, the Ameri- • Roam the National Unity Party had won 

“vague, passing and almost gratu- can Jewish Committee, the Anti- BUDAPEST — New military 37 percent of the vote on Sunday 
nous reference to the Nazi crimes Defamation League of B’nai B’nth, technology is being tested during giving it 24 of the legislative assent- 




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against the Jews and dealt made- the Israel Inlficfailh Committee exerdsesnow under way ir 
quately with the rehgious signtfi- and the Synagogue Council of n, involving 25,000 Soviet, 
cance of the state of lsraeL America. J — t ^ 


It said that while the Vatican official said Tuesday, 
of the World Jewish Congress, is- statement contained “much of val- The state scene tar 
sued astatemeatsaymg that Jewish ue,” some of “the formulations rep- General Lajos Moro 
communities in 70 countries resent a retreat from earherCatiib- BudapestRadio in 
^wouldsak clarification .from the Uc statements.” “newmethods of nnk 


g giving it 24 of the legislative assem- 
i- Ely’s 50 seats. New Dawn won four 


local bishops and local bishops 
conferences* on “the interprets- 


SCCi prm, whichh e unjattraliy deda^S 

fidal said Tuesday. at the results, saying that he had m ^ 5cn “ en . m 983 ‘ . . . . ^ 

The state secretary of defease, expected more than two parties s* 3 *® » recognized only by 

eneral Lajos Morocz, said in a would be needed to form the coali- Turkey and has been, coodonned 

id apes l Radio interview that don. fry ^ United Natrons, 

lew methods of military technol- Two other parties, both leftist. In another vote last month, 


Mr. Denktash said Sunday’s vote 
was the final step in forming a 
parliamentary democracy f ra the 
Turkish Republic of Northern C& 
pres, which he unflatexally dedarejy 
independent in 1983. 

The state is recognized only by 


Budapest Radio interview that tion. 

“new methods of militaiy technol- Two other parties, both leftist. 


lion of the meaning" of the Vatican “f 01 


... docurneni’Tir^tmenf of the mean- Treaty Organization. The exercise won 10 seats. land’s partition and described Smt- 

to^i^SStra S^e ^ofdie st^Sd^Holo- is to continue into early July. Mr. Denktash said the new gov- day’s vote as illegal 

leaching of Catholics about Jews caust and treatment of “hie histori- 

and Judaism, took on particular caI . expressions of Christian |-| j A1 1A1 T T\ • 

^oiflsracTtbe Vatican slaJcment -OUSti, ASKed AjK>Ut lSradl DetameeS, 

Vatican Council s declaration on said Christians are “invited to un- ^ __ „ __ _ _ - _ I1 

““vS ^'ocumn.t, “Nostra Calls for Release of Illegal Prisoner^; 

Aelate,” or “In Our Time.” was teuce of the state of Israel and its ™ . 


HOTEL BOROBUDUR 
INTER- CONTTNENTAL 


land’s partitimi and descrit 
day’s vote as filial. 


cu <u guiucuuo ua uic — ^ j Z^T, .7 — . 

of Catholics about Jews caust and treatment of “ihehiston- 
dsm, took on particular caI . expressions of Christian 



importance because this year is the anti-Semitism." 

20th anniversary of (lie Second On Israel, the Vatican statement 


Vatican Council’s declaration on said Christians are “invited to un- 


the Jewish 


people. 
ITs doc 


demand this religious attachment” 


Vatican ITs document, “Nostra to the state. It added: “The cris- 
Aetate,” or “In Our Time,” was teuce of the state of Israel and its 


widely hailed as marking a major political options should be envis- 
improvement in Catholic- Jewish aged not in a perspective which is 
relations. The statement specifical- itself religious but in their reference 
ly declared that the Jewish people to the common principles of inter- 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 


He said that the administration against 
had earlier “expressed our concern we of 


nracy a century ago, t 
he democratic world 


BONN — In the Reagan admin- about prisoners being held in Isra- need toad in concert if we are to 


should not oe heta responsible tor 
the death of Jesus. 

Throughout the year, Jewish 
leaders have been meeting with 
church officials to discuss the 


istration’s strongest declaration eL 


national law.” that Israel should free 735 Leba- “We are not in the position erf 

The co mmi ttee's statement said detainees. Vice President linkage; we are not in the position 
that in this passage, “modern Israel George Bush said Tuesday that of knuckling under to the demands 
is arm tied of any posable religious thi n k that people being held of hijackers,” Mr. Bush said, 

significance for Christians” and against international law should be While stressing that the United 


. _ » f .* • r » VT 1 — IV* 1- 1 11 I,1»M* I I. | mui V - - — ^ 

meamn 8 of the Vatican IT docu- “nothing is said about Israel's released, 

meat and what steps Catholics and right to exist or the justice of her At a news conference on the sec- 
Jews should take lo promote dia- " 


eliminate this modern scourge,” 
“We are not in the position erf Mr. Bush said at lunch hosted Ity 
ikage; we are not in the position Cha n cellor Helmut KohL 
knndding rader to the demands Earlier, in an bourkmg meeting ' 
hg ackers, Mr. Bush said. the woe president secured a firm . 
While stressing that the United promise from Mr. Kohl that Westi 
Stales was “not going to participate Germany would intensify its coqp- 
in linkage,” Mr. Bush said, “We eration witii the United States m 


Mr. Bush said. 


logue. Jewish groups have been 
hoping that the church would issue 


Vatten statement’s only ome £ 


* faal people being held battling global terrorism. 

Mf. BuSh Was asked if the United aorrinct inlM-nnlinnnl laar«hmil/l lv n ■ • • • ■ 


X D — ■ | « Vj t tfMUW TVU1U ITWWUIV ua, UIV 

statements going beyond “Nostra roeohoo of the Holocaust was a 0 f aj] Shiite prisoners 

Aetate” in opposing anti-Semi tism. sentence saying, 'Catechests ti.- 


prompt 
era still 


agdnst i niemalional law should be During his luncheon speech. Ml 

released. Bush thanked the chanceflar for his 

President Ronald Reagan, at a vigorous support and praised West 


remaining in Israel The Israelis 


THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL® 


The church, it said, had the obh- should on the other hand hdp_in frc©d31of the detainees on Mon- P^ss conferencelast week, said it Germany’s refusal to succumb to 


gation both “to uproot from among understanding the meaning for 


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was the U.S. belief that Israel had past demands by hijackers and oth- 
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tey^J93 < >-\945,»Dditscoas B - ^ kt y demand of the Shiite gun- {* ^ Gowva conveniioo. Israd a Bonn spokesman. Jfiraen Sud- 
auences. ac a : has denied that the Shines are he- & 


quences. 

The Jewish 
meat said “th 


ions’ state- 


men hold&g40 Americanshostagc h^ demed that the Shiites are be- hoS.^d tfil^rity ■ 

in Beinit flowing the hijacking of “S hcId ^legally. sevoi leading indusuialaanocra- 


a strong a TWA jet. 


Mr. Bush used his 24-hour stop ties would 


industrial democra- 
cuss anti-terror tao- • 


statement on the Hdocaust is par- Mr. Bush declared that UA pol- in Bonn to exhort all Western states tics at a meeting in Bonn . 
ocularly disturbing” and called the icy would “certainly welcome" the to join in fighting a terrorist dial- month. He said the conference 


reference in the document “vague, early release “of people that are tenge to their societies. 

rtOi 'cm n imH 'ilm/Wf Ifrafnif Aiir ** iH«*imlki kncfAAa " M T..^* 1 


passing and almost gratuitous- Qtegally bdd hostage. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JIHNE 26, I9BS 


Page 5 





Radicals Holding Some of Hostages in 




^ Part 


‘ ' "rfe/, f 


>!* 

'. V P* 




‘.V 

■\- 


fe ■ By David B. On away 
and George C Wilson 

Washington Pent Senior 

WASHINGTON — U.S. inlelli- 
geoce officials believe that a group 
of hostages from TWA Flight 847 
is being held in a Shiite miliiaiy 
barracks in the eastern Lebanese 
town of Baalbeck, an area under 
Syrian control, government sources 
have disclosed. 

p If this is true, the officials say. it 
would further diminish prospects 
for the prompt, release of the 40 
Americans from the airliner that 
was hijacked on June 14. 

The base in Baalbeck is a head- 
quarters of the tbosi radical Shiite 
elements, who seem least falcely to 
agree to an unconditional release of 
the hostages. 

The Baalbeck barracks has long 


Police Take 
y -Control of 
Beirut Camps 

Reuters 

BEIRUT — Lebanese police 
were sent Tuesday to take control 
of three Palestinian refugee camps 
in Beirut after five weeks of bloody 
fighting between camp residents 
and Shiite Moslem forces, security 
sources said. 

Paramilitary units of the police 
moved into the Sabra and Chatila 
. Jamps and prepared to take up 
1 positions in another camp. Borge 
Barajrn, the sources said. 

The police force totals 70 to 100 
men. about 50 of them assigned to 

- Sabra and Chatila, they added. 

' At least 635 people were killed. 

2,500 wounded and hundreds made 
: homeless during the assault by Shi- 

- ite Amal militia and Shiite army 
troops seeking to stop a revival di 
Palestinian power in Lebanon. The 

■ Shiites sought to prevent Israeli re- 
: prisals in Lebanon over renewed 
Palestinian attacks. 

The Shales, demanding that the 
Palestinians be disarmed, captured 
Sabra and most of Chatila, but 


been at the top of a list erf potential 
targets for U.S; military retaliation 
against the militant Shiites — a fact 
known to the Shiites, since the bar- 
racks has been attacked previously 
by Israeli and French bombers. So 
the presence of these Americans 
could make military retaliation un- 
attractive to the US. 

There were conflicting reports 
Monday about the identities of the 
Americans — at least six of them, 
officials said — who are believed to 
be held in Baalbeck. One possibili- 
ty is that four U.S. military men 
who 1 were aboard Flight 847 are 
among those being kept away from 
the main group of hostages, the 
'officials sard. 

There are signs that the radical 
Shiite elements of HezbaUah. the 
Party of God, who have a bead- 


quarters at Baalbeck. are position- 
ing themselves to dictate the final 
terms of the hostages' release. 

Theoretically, at least, Syria 
could influence these radicals, be- 
cause it controls the territory where 
they operate, but President Hafez 
al-Assad of Syria has said In the 
past that he is unable to sway them. 

The more moderate Shiite leader 
Nabih Bern, who has been negoti- 
ating for the hijackers, said Sunday 
that he had no direct influence over 
those holding the separate group of 
hostages- 

Even a radical Shiite leader has 
acknowledged that the situation 
becomes more complex with the 
passage of time. 

Sheikh Mohammed Hussein 
Fadiailah. the influential Beirut 
Shiite religious leader, warned last 



-Spiled to penetrate Borge Barajni, 
fhe biggest and best defended 


biggest and best defeat 
camp. 

The police deployment is part of 
a peace accord, sponsored by Syria 
and signed by the pro-Syrian Pales- 
tine National Salvation Front, 
Amal and Lebanese leftist parties a 
week ago. 

Two Syrian intelligence officers 
are helping an all-party security 
committee set up to cany out die 
Damascus agreement State-owned 
Beirut radio said that the commit- 
tee had decided to draw up lists of 
heavy weapons to be withdrawn 

f *f!V * from’ the camps. 

| vjloweyer, it quoted a Salvation 


li Israeli Urtainft! 


Children] 

inn camp of 

From representative, Abu Ali 
Mehdi. as saying that the Palestin- 
ians had no big guns and had al- 
lowed the reference to them in the 
Damascus accord as a goodwill 
gesture. 

“We will enter the camps, and if 
there are any heavy weapons we 
will remove them," Mr. Mebdi 
said. 

The committee would also list 
prisoners held fay both sides to pre- 
pare for their immediate release, 
the radio said. 

A security committee represent- 
ing the army and rival militias was 
to discuss how to re-open long-- 


Esutn 


-dosed roads linking Christian east 
Beirut with the mainly Moslem 
western part of the city, radio sta- 
tions reported. 

Beirut newspapers said the Amal 
leader. Nabih Beni and the Druze 
leader. Walid Jumbhit, would trav- 
el to Damascus Tuesday to discuss 
the aftermath of the Shiite- Pales- 
tinian battle and ways to improve 
security in Beirut. 

But a source at Mr. Bern’s home 
denied that the Shiite leader would 
leave Beirut. Mr. Bern is negotiat- 
ing on behalf of the hijackers, who 
seized a TWA jet and are holding 
40 American hostages. ■ 


ilpnh^iv 
t>.S<*<r*)in Mown* 

I^MWW 

" . • • -r. T. 




aggribuntig 

it Leaders Vow to Punh 
ah Ecunmmc Recovery 


fc-ttMT 





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accordingly. O I would l.ke to hoi e fhe paper sent lb nty vacates <n addt MS- 
(Hoao«ckaeitistn>ct»«l. - 

■ m mm mm mm mm mm mm ms mm h hi ihi c-a ■ 


Solidarity Leaders 
link Strike Date 


To Price Increases 

United Press International 

WARSAW — Three leaders of 
Solidarity called on Poles on Tues- 
day to go ahead with a 15-minute 
national weak stoppage to protest 
higher meat prices on the day the 
increases go into effect, whenever 
that turns out to be. 

“The date oT the increases is stiD 
unknown,” said a statement signed 
by Bogdan Borusewicz, Zbigniew’ 
Bujak and Marek Muszynskiy, who 
form the coordmating committee 
of the underground union. 

The government earlier planned 
to introduce the increases on July 1, 
but facing the strike call an- 
nounced by Solidarity two months 
ago, it has not since referred to a 
definite date. 

The statement by the three labor 
leaders coincided with an an- 
nouncement by the government 
dial “meat prices wiB go up by 10 
percent and sausage prices will not 
go up by more than 15 percent.” 


Trudeau Arrives in Moscow 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — Pierre Elliott Tru- 
deau, a former prime minister of 
Canada, arrived here Tuesday far a 
monthlong visit at the invitation of 
the Institute of U J. and Canada 
Studies, the press agency Tass re- 
ported. He wiH meet with Soviet 
officials and travel around the 
coumrv. Canadian sources said. 


week dial prolonging the situation 
could diminish the prospects for u 
negotiated solution “because tire 
parties keeping the hostages are di- 
versified." and local Lebanese 
events have a tendency to ‘ become 
regional and then international.'' 

The United States and interme- 
diaries have been through a frus- 
trating series of uniuec;ssiu! at- 
tempts to negotiate -a deal with the 
radical HezbaUah element* to re- 
lease seven Americans kidnapped 
in Beirut over the last 15 months. 

During those talks, carried out 
by Arab third parties on behalf of 
the U.S. government, the radicals 
refused to accept a proposal for the 
prior release of the Americans, 
based on a Kuwaiti commitment io 
free 17 convicted Shiite terrorists at 
an unspecified date. 


The radicals insisted that all the 
prisoners in Kuwait be released 
first or at the same time, according 
to one Arab source. 

If lie radical Shiite captors of 
the separately held group of TWA 
passengers adopt u similarly hard 
line now. then even the release of a 
good number of the 735 Lebanese 
prisoners still being held by Israel 
may not be enough to persuade 
them to accept an 'Israeli commit- 
ment to complete release of their 
captives after the Americans are 
free. 

This leaves open the possibility 
that over a period or weeks the 
Israelis could continue the process 
— begun Monday — of releasing 
Lebanese prisoners in batches of a 
fev. dozen until all have been freed. 

But such a continued Israeli re- 


lea.ve could begin to i :■■■ 
unilateral concision ;■:> :r.-t Li - 
ars — the one tfiiua 
Israeli officials *u> the; - ■'•til 
consider. 

U.S. and Uracli leader- '.-..i-.- 
sisted mat there t- ro vc.tr 
between ihe release of the In-. 
Lebanese prisoner* m hr.u- 1 
the fate of ice Arrerit iri 
(ages. Buz evenica;!’ : l i: l :- 1 
Stale* and Urae! m:y. ita-c 
ride how far the* .ire v»iilrjz ' ! 
unilaterally to v'.UtsJ; :n; <iii: 

principal, demand- 



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Claims for Indian Plane 
May Be the Costliest Ever 


Net v York Times Sr rvue 

NEW YORK — Tne crash of the 
Air- India jetliner off the Irish coast 
could result in the largest property S32.9 million, 
insurance claim in aviation history, 
insurance experts said. 

Insurance on the Boeing 747 air- 
craft and equipment amounted to 
million, said Terry Ti- 


treal Convention, an international 
treaty. At S 100.000 for each of the 
329 people aboard, that would total 

p-*-* t> 


about $1 00 
tron, former chairman of the 
Lloyd's of London Aviation Un- 
derwriters Association, on Mon- 
day. In addition, liability' claims by 
dependents and estates of the 329 
passengers and crew members arc 
expected to increase that amount 
substantially. 

A major part of the insurance on 
the plane was underwritten or rein- 
sured through Lloyd's, the world's 
biggest insurance market, accord- 
ing to insurance executives. The 
primary insurer was said to be the 
government-owned General Insur- 
ance Coro, of India. 

Peter O’Grady, president of the 
Aviation Office, said. "The lead 
company or syndicate will handle 
aQ the cl aims negotiations.” refer- 
ring to Uoyd’s. “and the rest of the 
market will follow." 

Mr. Titron told Reuters in Lon- 
don on Monday that the large size 
of expected claims was due to infla- 
tion and to the fact that the inci- 
dent involved a total loss. 

John Brennan, president of U.S. 
Aviation Underwriters in New 
York, said that the SI 00- mil lion 
figure was derived by adding the 
595-million insurance on the plane 
itself and the $5-miUion coverage 
on a spare engine that was carried 
on board. 

.As for liability coverage, he said, 
many passenger claims against the 
airline would be limited to a maxi- 
mum of $100,090, under the Mon- 


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Sunday 


Sex in Space? 
NASA Taking 
Precautions 

Unit id Press lnienuatonal 

NEW YORK — Scientists 
are planning for the possibility 
of sex in space for astronauts 
assigned to the first continuous- 
ly occupied U.S. orbital station. 

“If we lock people up for 90- 
dav periods, we must plan for 
the possibility of intimate be- 
havior, " Yvonne Clearwater, 
the leader of the Habitability 
Research Group of the Nation- 
al Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration. wrote in the cur- 
rent issue of “Psychology 
Today" magazine. 

NASA's plans call for su to 
eight men and women to be 
housed in an orbital space sta- 
tion for three-month stints. The 
station is expected to be 
launched in 1992. 

Ms. Clearwater also wrote 
that in planning for on under- 
ground military command cen- 
ter with the possibility of a two- 
year period of being “locked 
down." she was told to assume 
sexual relations would not oc- 
cur. 

“ ‘After all, we are sending 
‘professionals' down there."’ 
she said she was told by military 
officials. 





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After 30 years 

? IN EUROPE WE KNOW 
OUR BUSINESS. 





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AMSTERDAM 

ATHENS 

BRUSSELS 

CYPRUS 

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GENE\A 

ISTANBUL 

LONDON 

MILAN 

MliNICH 

PARIS 

ROME 

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’.v 1 ii-.k'i- T; :F. NX’OKLD IS AT HOME " 


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Page 6 


I INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


U.S. Navy Tightening Security After Spy Scandal 

Rv (\lvmm T •il'r-inmri* vi-i'iinn ilrilk inr ii'iimo ihnu* fidtinii n.iu f.lirililiK tthfTf i'.ir tK.. ... m:.i i urn 


By Sharon LilVanicrc 
and Rurli Marcus 

ll.liiiiily.'iii: r>n. A'ji;, . 

Washington — Na%> b.i>o 

and shipyards acro>-» (he 0 oiled 
Stale*, a* well a> .ships and subma- 
rines at «ra. are implementing a 
wide array of measures designed to 
lighten necurity following the ar- 


increa>e ^county drills lor testing ihu&e visiting navy faciliiit 
turn well yard employees guard elawified information is Mi 
confidential inf. -rotation. accord- .- As ftC con , inue l0 investigate 
ing to Dave Hillard a shop steward , he \Valker espionage case." Mr. 
with the Metal 1 rados t ouncil. . Lehman said, "it is essential that 
The drills involve decoys who ( he navy take a strong lead in itn- 
attcmpl to emer rcsirietcd areas plementing far stronger and more 
without the proper clearance or stringent seeuritv measures ” 
w ho ask employees for information 

that ihev jre not authorized to rc- Charged with espionage 


those visiting navy facilities where for the Metal Trades Council in 
clarified information is stored. Norfolk 


lor the Metal Trades Council in Michael Walker. 22. was one of 
N’orfolC those aboard the USS Nimitz with 

Instead. Mr. Belcher said, lock- access to the ship's “hum ba»" of 
smiths are instructing the individ- classified material to be destroyed 






r£t> of four naw men on charse> ,hal « he > not authorized to rc- Charged with espionage in oon- 
of funnel, ni defJnsc secreis to The aeeoydmg io Mr. Hillard and ncction with the cae are: John A. 
Soviet Union other officials with the metal trade* Walker Jr., a retired ehief warrant 

* The steps, pan or a nawujde uni ™- tthi ‘- h ^presems 9.1XW em- jji«r: his brother. Arthur James 
effon ordered hv ,he secretary of at the \ard. Walker, a retired lieutenant com- 

the naw. John F. Lehman Jr., in- "The naw is testing itself." said niander. Jerry Allred Whitworth, a 
elude changing safe combinations. Mr. Hillard, adding: “They Ye tty- re[l ™ commumcalions specialist. 


effon ordered hv ihe secretary of P 1 *'**- a« the vard. Walker, a retired lieutenant com- 

the naw. John F. Lehman Jr., in- "The naw is testing itself." said niander. Jerry Allred Whitwonn. a 
elude changing safe combinations. Mr. Hillard, adding: “Thevre try- re[l ™ commumcalions specialist, 
limiting access to area* in which «ng to find out where their weak Jid Seaman Michael Lance walk- 
classified material is stored to those points ..re so they can reinforce er. John Walkers son. 

mih a "ikVii lii know " and uara- them." a. .h- „»....i k...- ,u.. 


with a “need to know.” and warn- 
ing employees to beware of spies 
among their friends and families. 

\t 'ihe naval shipyard in Nor- 
folk. Virginia, the navy's biggesi 


lem - At ihe Norfolk naval base, the 

III a message to all navy com- largest in the United Slates, lock- 
mun tiers earlier this month. Mr. smiths no longer arc given the com- 


Lehnun ordered, jmong other bination* of safe* in which confi- 

,i_ . : j’ . . • , . . , . 


the immediate imposi 


•* L, cc mwujuivo. ix. iiiiiiix.Liikiix. mipuxr 

repair yard, plans are under way to lion of random security checks on 


Jenlia! documents are stored, said 

Robert Belcher, acting chairman 


uals responsible for opening and 
closing the safes how to change and 
set combinations. 

“Just the individual who will be 
opening and closing the safe will 
have the combination." said Mr. 
Belcher. “They’re try ing to get the 
barn closed up before another 
horse jumps out." 

Norfolk, a prime Largei for Sovi- 
et spy -recruiting efforts, is home to 
one-sixth of the navy's sailors and 
one-fifth of its ships. Three of those 
accused in the Walker case served 
there. 

In his message. Mr. Lehman or- 
dered navy personnel to make cer- 
tain that "all classified material 
awaiting destruction is protected at 
all limes until actual destruction 
occurs" and that two people are 
assigned to supervise the process. 


In addition. Mr. Lehman said, 
commanders should re-emphasize 
to all hands the requirements “for 
reporting information bearing on 
loyally, reliability, judgment and 
trustworthiness. (Tompfiance with 
these procedures might have de- 
nied Soviet access to classified in- 
formation," 

Following the Walkers’ arrests. 
Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger ordered an immediate 
10-percent reduction in the 4.3 mil- 
lion military and civilian personnel 
cleared to see secret information. 

The navy also announced that it 
would spend millions of dollars to 
replace equipment for coding mes- i 
sages because of what the Russians 
may have learned about how the 
codes wort 


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In Hong Kong 

we are in the Central Business District. 
And yet just minutes from Kowloon. 
You should be, too. 

HOTEL FUR AMA 
INTER* CONTINENTAL 


|E i^ac; 
i :§5=s=p= 


Salvadoran Rebels Targe 
Ruling Party for Attacks 




THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CO NTINENTAL” 5 ' 

•X INTER- CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

One Connaught Road. 5/253111, Telex: 73081 
For reservations calk Tokyo: 2150777. 

Singapore: 22024/6, Osaka: 2b406bb. or call vour nearest 
lntenContinent.il sales office. * . 


By Dan Williams 

Lits 4nt:e/ci Tiuki Service 

SAN SALVADOR — In an ap- 
parent escalation of their plans to 
bring warfare to the nation's cities. 
EJ Salvador’s leftist guerrillas have 
placed officials of the ruling Chris- 
tian Democratic Panv on a list of 
combat targets. 

It is the first time that top Chris- 
tian Democrats have been singled 
out publicly by the guerrillas, al- 
though they have kidnapped Chris- 
tian Democratic mayors in several 
small towns and routinely have re- 
ferred to the government as the 
enemy. Rightist politicians and 
military officers have long been tar- 
gets of assassination. 

The threat came in a communi- 
que Monday that listed other po- 
tential victims: U.S. military advis- 
ers. Salvadoran military officers, 
air force pilots, rightist Nicaraguan 
rebels who live in El Salvador and 
the rich. 

The rebel leaders said that they 
were not threatening the life of 
President Jose Napoleon Duarte. 
But Uiey stated that as commander 
in chief of the army. Mr. Duarte, as 
well as other top commanders, 
“must assume responsibility for 
their role in this war." 

The warnings came in a commu- 


Beijing Aide to Visit Pakistan 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China’s defense 
minister. Zhang Aiping. is to visit 
Islamabad. Pakistan, on Thursday, 
the official news agency Xinhua 
reported Tuesday. He iso is to 
visit Romania and Portugal. 


nique broadcast on Radio Vencere- 
mos. the guerrillas’ clandestine sta- 
. tion. in the name of the five 
> military leaders of the Fan bund o 
Marti National Liberation Front. 

; the rebels’ umbrella group. 

“We are resolved to carry the 
f war to wherever necessary.* the 
communique said, “with the re- 
sources necessary in order to end 
the peace of military commanders, 
Yankee advisers, "the oligarchy, 
murderous pilots. Nicaraguan 
counterrevolutionaries and Chris- 
tian Democratic functionaries." 

The communique offered a de- 
tailed justification for the shooting 
of four U.S. Marines at a sidewalk 
cafe in San Salvador last week. 
Nine bystanders also were killed. 

The statement called the killings 
of the Marines, w’ho were guards at 
the U.S. Embassy, a “just action in 
legitimate defense of our people 
and our sovereignty." The rebels 
added that “we are not disposed to 
continue tolerating and permitting 
our principal enemy to make war 1 
on us without receiving a re- 
sponse.” i 

Although the rebels have 
stepped up assassinations in recent ! 
months, nearly all the cases in- l 
volyed rightist politicians, police. s 
military or other seeuritv force per- i 
sonnel. v 

In February. leftist gunmen shot c 
at a Christian Democrat election 
official but missed him and killed C 
his bodyguard. 1 

Earlier this year, when guerrillas f< 
in the eastern pan of B Salvador g 
began to kidnap mayors, one 
Christian Democratic mayor was a< 
shot to death. •>, 


Thn Anocutod Pim . 

General Wojctech Jaruzetski. right, greeting Prime Minister Nikolai A. Tikhonov; C . 

Tikhonov Says West Plots Against Comecon 

A.'ub>n r. t_ . i /*. .w . c 


WARSAW — Prime Minister Nikolai A. Tik- 
honov or the Soviet Union asserted Tuesday that 
the West was seeking to undermine the economies 
of the Communist countries. 

Arriving here for economic talks. Mr. Tikhonov 
urged that the 1975 Helsinki accords on European 
security and cooperation be the basis for expanded 
East-West cooperation. 

“Imperialism has been intensifying activities 
aimed against the socialist states, seeking to weak- 
en economically socialism and the unitv of our 
community." Mr. Tikhonov asserted. 

He was speaking at a conference of prime minis- 


ters from the members of Comecon. the Soviet- 
bloc trade and economic organization. 

Polish commentators have suggested that the 
meeting here might deal with a recent Comecon 
move for formal relations w iih the European Com- 
munity. 

The’ Polish Army newspaper Zolniere Wohtosd 
.said: “Recently established working contacts with 
the Community permit hopes for a normalization' 
of relations between Eastern and Western Eo- 
rope." 

The Comecon members are the Soviet Union, its. 
six East European allies. Cuba. Mongolia and : 
Vietnam. 


pric^ 


i * ’U* 
.i c' " 1 


Walter Kotschnig, U.S. Envoy, Dies 


Aw Vort 7»iiui Senior 

_ NEW YORK — Walter Maria 
Kotschnig. 84. a foreign service of- 
ficer who was present at the forma- 
tion of the United Nations and who 
went on to represent the United 
States at world conferences for 
more than a quarter century, has 
died of Alzheimer's disease. 

A native of Ausma, Mr. Kotsch- 
nig joined the State Department in 
1944 and became an expen on in- 
ternational organizations. He re- 
tired in 1971 as a deputy assistant 
secretary of state, a rank he at- 
tained in I%5. but he continued to 
work for two more years as a spe- 
cial UN consultant on drug abuse. 

He took pan in the Dumbarton 
Oaks Conference in Washington in 
1944 and the San Francisco Con- 
ference in 1945. which prepared the 
ground for the United Nations. 

From the Truman to the Nixon 
administrations, Mr. Kotschnig 
acted as a delegate, adviser, secre- 


tary or head of several U.S. delcga- 
, tions to world gathering* ranging 
from the General Assembly to 
UNESCO to ihe UN Conference 
on Slavery. 

Hector Boiardi. Promoted 
Italian Food in U.S. 

P.ARM.A, Ohio t UP!) — Hector 
Boiardi. 87. who as Chef Bovardcc 
founded one of the first packaged 
Italian food businesses in the Unit- 
ed States, died here Friday. 

Bom in Piacenza. Italy, Mr. 
Boiardi wa«. an apprentice chef be- 
fore coming to America in 1917. He 
worked m restaurants and hotels in 
New York and elsewhere. He 
moved to Cleveland and opened a 
restaurant in 1928 that became so 
popular that customers kepi asking 
for portions to take home. This led 
him to create an Italian food prod- 
ucts factory. 

Mr. Boiardi said he phoneticized 
his name on the packages because 
even his own salesmen could not 


pronounce it. "Everyone is proud 
of his own family name but sacti-. 
ftce> were necessary for progress.^ 
he said. 

■ Other deaths: - 

Walter Stauffer \1cUhenny, 74’ 
patriarch of a Louisiana dynastjj 
that has pul Tabasco sauce on the* 
world's tables for more than a ceJU 
liny, Saturday in Lafayette, LouisJf 
ana. 

Jan Tuanlrr. 58. chief economise 
at the UN secretariat of the Gener-* 
al Agreement on Tariffs and Trader 
in Geneva on Saturday. .• 

Robson Manuka, 51. a Zimba- 
bwe politician and a leading figunr- 
in the war that brought indepenv 
dence to the former British colonji. ^ 
of Southern Rhodesia, on Monday" 
after a stroke. 

Keith Castle. 5S. Britain's longest, 
surviving heart-transplant patient^ ' 
Monday in London. He recehred - 
the heart of a 2 1-vcar-old in August' 
1979. 6 cj ; 


ir.i*’- 
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finpiro 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUN E 26, 1985 

ARTS / LEISURE 


Page 7 


Words Are Supreme on Dylan 9 , 

. f - unl..J. DlnmlA " TVuMlfU VR 


By Jon Pardos 

New York Timet Service 

\T EW YORK — Bob Dylan's 
/N “Empire Burlesque" album. 
' lakes a Hue first impresaocu Its 
iusic. the blues- rock-gospd amat- 
am that Dylan has been potishmg 
tough the. 1980s, has drive ana 
ffinitiaa. Its lyrics, meanwhile, re- 
eal ihm Dylan Tim left behind Ins 

■ - t 


layering process for “Slow Drain 
Coming" in 1979; by how he can 

create the illusion of spont ane ity 
while taking advantage of the clear- 
er sound oT multftrack recording. 

“Tight Connection toMyHean" 
and ^Tnist Yourself” (which 
oreacbes, “Don’t put year hope in 
an ungodly man / Or be 8 dave to 

whatwmebody else Relieves") 
jWalonaHke Staples Singers aqs- 




hase — winch resulted m some of ' 
is worst verse ■ — and is willing to 
/rite about people again instead of 
bstractkms. 

During his born-again p has e, 
)ylan learned to use the recording 
tudio. He was the last major song- 
TUer of the 1960s to accept mod- 
m methods. While just about cv- 
ryone dse in rock was assembling 
. ongs trade by trade, dea nin g up 
■■ , acb layer as it was added, Dylan 
' -’oade albums live in the studio, 
(■stakes and aH He adopted the 


Cut Kid" has such a .vigorous 
blues-rock, backup that its work- 
manlike lyrics gam conviction, in 
most songs, £o?pd-ayie ^mak 
backup smgasjoin Dylan, bolster- 
ing bis voice and adding warmth. 

Dylan’s music has hem as influ- 
ential as his words, perhaps more 
so; rockers from the Velvet Under- 
ground to David . Bowie to Toon 
Petty look lessons from Dylans 
“Highway-. 61 Revisited and 


“Blonde on Blonde." Twe nty ye ars 
later, Dylan is borrowing from his 
students, using members of Petty’s 

band and the Rolling Stones to give 
“ Emp ire Burlesque” a professional 
gloss. “When the Night .Comes 
Falling From the Sky” mighty al- 
most be a mixture of Dylan’s “All 
Along the Watchtower’ and the 
Stones’ "Too Much Blood." Yet 
the words, not the music, are what 
make “Empire Burlesque" the best 
Dylan album since “Desire." 

When be doesn't write straight’ 
forward narratives, which is most 
of the rime, Dylan’s best lines work 
like Roman candles — striking is 
th emselv es, illuminating in unex- 
pected ways, a little blinding. That 
has often been banality alongside 
the brilliance, but images such as I 
knew he’d lost control / When he 
built a fire on Main Street and shot 
ft full of holes” carried bis songs 
through their lapses. 


f Empire Burlesque 9 

Perhaps no one could keep on . strung with lovers; pearls and all I 


Perhaps no one could keep on . 
being as inspired as Dylan was in 
the 1960s, but the ratio of triteness 
to incandescence rose bit by bit 
These days. Dylan seems unable to 
tell the difference between a song 
compounded almost entirely of cli- 
che nnages. such as the new “Some- 

thing’sBuming, Baby" or “Emo- ■ 
tionally Yours." and one that 
rarefy stumbles, "Tight Connection 
u> My Heart." As those titles sug- 
gest however, Dylan has returned 
to writing love songs. 

His insistent voice signals listen- 
ers to pay attention to the words; 
that’s why so many singers imitate 
iL Bui for long stretches of the last 
he has seemed long on de- 
livery and short on substance. That 
fi ling isn’t entirely absent from 
“Empire Burlesque/’ The lyrics of 
the closing song, “Daric Eyes," are 
a~ virtual Dylan parody: “I bye m 
ano ther world where life and death 

are memorized / Where the earth is 


see are dark eves.” 

Elsewhere, however, Dylan's gift 
for characterization in a single line, 
for offhand aphorisms and Tor 
open-ended images, has resurfaced. 
Amid its galloping percussion and 
wading guitar, “when the Night 
Comes Falling From the Sky" 
tosses off lines like “From the fire- 
place where my letters to you are 
burning" or “It was on the north- 
ern border of Texas where I crossed 
the line." "Tight Connection to My 
Heart" sums itself up with a terse 
“Never could learn to hold you, 
love / And call you mine." . 

After its first impression. “Em- 
pire Burlesque" turns out to have 
songs that are good, bad and indif- 
ferent. But it’s encouraging. The 
arrogance that has fueled some of 
Dylan's greatest songs and greatest 
gaffes falls away, and be sounds 
more human »han be has in many 
years. 



Glass Arrives in London 
With ENO’s f Akhnaten’ 


By Henry Pleasants 

L ONDON — With the English 
d National Opera premiere of 
his three-act opera “Akhnaten,” 
Philip Glass has finally arrived in 
London. He has, as an opera com- 
ooser at least, been a long time 


Dylan: Bade to people. 


Priestley’s 'Lost Empires’: Uneasy Backstage Romance Goes Onstage 

J ..... ... ........ Hin. iimitim are al the corners of dl .he bool's noo-bsclslaE* 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribtate 

A MID mnch else in a long and 
. rV prolific career, J.B. Priestley 
vrote two great backstage sag as 
hat stand l»re booked ds at either 
- ndtrf his working life.' 


isiiis sg&sgg iSliil =ssas 


ct to find a quartet or recent 
iuates from Kind’s College, 
[bridge, doing in dinner jackets 


uu m m> wuiuug Mib. buu uM«> cymcai . — - — - . — — 

The one that made his name, or other side ofthe 
k any rate his fortune, was the story of greed and “JJ; 
mm fmnmirinnt ” vohkii Minted suicide and violent sexual 


)l any rate his fortune, was the story ot green ana .. .** • shaky, but Pryde has realized that, j- * . , Tnhnnv Mer cer in scoring mj 

T929 “Good Companions,” which Sf 3 its ^SSrand sodal echoes, fashion. jlgS Companiotis" a decadl 1*2*35 

TBEBWmH STAGE 

-.Bis ss SSsSK's&s TU a aaga aw sfsfesrtrrs ESa&SS 

SEgsgS SSHg gffiSSSS £333*38 

^ 5SB3H: SStess 

«us an altogether more uneasy Now we na ve an," and there ts flfll work to do ^STtoives. and are therefore 

’ toward the end, if Pnestlq/s desire the "Figaro" 

fiAOWSRlIRY , ■ - 1 to link the backstage : wand of the fromanaltogether different 

LIUUINlMMJUni ■ ■ — — 111 i I I I uruiiKBKJnNG I v.»Ue to the outer reahtv of cmema Ir ““ , Ko . t v_. 


jC a ilKUC law (uni -- — - — .. 

has realized that, Priestley’s usual soap-operatic 


tas been twice filmed, once turned 


an^nri^up^ost^ridof^ — 

music hafi m deep and utter an- ^ ^ow the plot of "The 

thenticity. Marriage of Figaro." Bui even asr 

Richards wans a tafe sJ^ngthey have never seen the 

and glamorous for the <#berwom- R^ nmarrhais stage satire from 
an." and there is still work to do ... . .whim: and arc therefore 


HI5NAFBI5 

MUVKB. 

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an," Mid there is suU work rodo whidj ■„ Aetive ^ Md arc therefore 
toward the end, if Priestley's desire va _. the "Figaro” 

ro link tte backstage worid of *e vSgethcr different 

halls to the outer reahty of anema u Seems that they 

screens and trenches is not to he ^^ing to want the whole turgid 
thrown away m a f<w offhand aff| J^ d<wtoa t«o-hour I six- 
asides. But most of the rest is hoe. bedroom farce with a lot 

the dissolving ghost of Ganga Dun but no jokes, 

for whom even Sarajevo is just an- of songs out no jo 

other trick of stage management, The program, presumably by 
Madame Fifi and her performing ^ of period justification, rambles 
poodles C*Nice act but you have to ^for pages about the world of the 

travel an awful lot of sawdust") 1 %^ but in fact this “Figaro" 


L=br= 


ft: 





ffava an awitu mi / lyous, DUL 1U idti uuj 

and the girl who has had more niighi as well be set in 1890 or 1 930 
experience of playing with fire than for all the difference it would make 
Vesta the Human Torch. on stage. A likable cast of six, led 

O by Terence Hillyer and Prue 

for botfi simuluneously. 


poser at least, been a long time & 

ee ^ A^hna Sn" is the third work in tl 
a trilogy "about men who have 
-hgngffi the world through the a 
force of a powerful and idiosyn- t 
era tic vision." The first was “Ein- 1 
stein on the Beach” Th e a 

second was "Satyagrana” (1980k 1 
about GandhL Both were intro- J 
duced m Europe and later present- j 
ed in Glass’s native United States. 1 
“Akhnaten.” first produced just . 
over a year ago in Stuttgart and J 
subsequently in Houston and New 
York, is drawn from the life and > 
reign of a pharaoh (1379-1362 ■ 
B. C) who renounced the Egyptian 1 
deities in favor of monotheistic 1 
sun-worship and was overthrown 
by the old guard and priesthood. 1 
Glass’s tardy arrival in London 
is probably accountable to the fact 
that, while he has been for some 
years the most talked about and 
commercially successful composer 
ainrf the explosion of Stockhausen 
and Boulez upon the contemporary 
musical scene, he is by no means 
the d»rti n g of the contemporary 
music critical establishment. 

His studied renunciation of the 
' complexities of serialism and cen- 
turies-old traditions of composi- 
tional procedure, and his return to 
1 the basics of tonal, or more promi- 
nently, modal, melody and harmo- 

[ ny, and especially to the potentially 
hypnotic device or repetition, re- 
mind the critics of Carl Orff and 
r the enormous popular success of 
[ his “Carolina Burana,” which most 
* of them loathed. 

The a bse nce or dramatic devel- 
s opment in “Akhnatan," and the 

I insistent repetition, leave a great 
. deal to the producer. Working 

within designer David Roger’s spa- 
^ rious sandbox Egypt, David Free- 
: man has devised an effective, if 
3 often over-busy, sequence of ritual 
■" procession, ceremony and occa- 

II sional violence ingeniously attuned 
to the incaniatory character of 

iy Glass’s score. , , , , 

s A further problem is the lack of 
ie chara cterization, or the unpalal- 
>" able aspects of such characterize- 
10 don as exists. Paul Daniel, the ex- 
ce cellent conductor, describes 
•d Akhnaten as “grotesquely de- 
ie formed by the hermaphroditic 
to characteristics of TrOhHch’s syn- 
ry drome* (swollen cranium, fleshy 
breasts and hips, recessed genita- 


lia), proudly* displayed in all his 
portraits." 

That most of the opera is sung in 

ancient Egyptian, undent Akkadi- 
an and Hebrew is less problemati- 
cal. Meat of what we bear in En- 
glish at the ENO might as well be in 

any other language for all we get of 

the words. 

In sum, "Akhnaten" is notable, 
as are Glass’s other operas, not for 
their successes operas — if. indeed, 
they can properly be called operas 
at all — but for the implications 
they suggest for the directions to be 
taken in musical composition. Bet- 
ter theater can be achieved 

from the same structural p retpis c s . 

Glass may achieve >L He is work- 
ing with Doris Lessing on an opera 
based on her “The Making of the 
Representative of Planet 8.” It 
seems safe to assume that we, as 
Glass’s great-uncle Al Jolson used 
to say, “ain’t heard nothin' yet!" 

Further performances of “ Akhna - 
,«i n ’7 and M. 


ten” June 27 and 28. 

□ 

Neither the singers nor the sing- 
ing counts for much in “Akhna- 
len," but they count for everything 
in the Royal" Opera’s new produc- 
tion by Jean-Louis Martinoty of 
Richard Strauss’s “Ariadne auf 
Naxos," borrowed from Paris's Op- 
era-Comique. 

The inventive production is an- 
noyingly gimmicky, but the singing 
by Jessye Norman in the title role, 
Kathleen Battle as Zerbinetta (a 
hgiatpH but auspidous Covent Gar- 
den debut) and Ann Murray as the 
composer, splendidly supported by 
the Royal Opera’s new principal 
conductor, Jeffrey Tate, provides a 
glorious and thoroughly enjoyable 
example of what is most disastrous- 
ly missing in “Akhnaten." 

Further performances of “Ariad- 
ne” June 28, July 2, 4 and 5. 

Henry Pleasants is the author of 
several books on music and singers. 

— WlulfT 

in Madrid 
Etmember... 


JewfakWoila of Art-Uhtchw 

Main distributer: 

piaget-bauue&meboer-rolex 
Gran Via, 1. TeL 232 100 7. 
— m 28013 MADRID iSB 


Some of those magnificent men in their flying machines were Thais. 



In 1912, a mere eight years after 
American aviation pioneers carried 
out the first powered flight in their 
Tieavier than air’ machines, three 
Thai army officers travelled abroad 
to a French flying school. They 
learned not only how to fly aircraft 
but also how to build them. In quick 
succession the Kingdom bought 
airplanes, established an airport and 
trained new pilots. 

Starting as a mail carrier, the airline 
quickly grew and soon a passenger 
service was available. Then in a major 
reorganisation just 25 years ago, Thai 
International came into being. 

Thai’s pioneering spirit, its attitude 
towards service and the importance 
it places on the training and skill of 
its pilots, has led to the airline’s 
development as one of the world's 
major carriers. 

Today, Thai’s route network has 
grown to include over 40 cities in 30 
countries across four continents. 

And servicing these destinations is an 
ever-expanding fleet of magnificent 
747Bs and wide-bodied A300s. 

So, fly smooth as silk on Thai The 
airline that’s still enchanted with the 
wonders of flight 





Herald 


Pnbliabrd TOfaTbr New Yo* Time* and The Wufcingtan P«« 


Sribunf. 


Farcical, but Not Funny 


The trade war now wanning up between 
Americans who grow oranges and Europe- 
ans who extrude spaghetti would be comic if 
it were not symptomatic of a deep disease. 
The European Community gives special 
preference to Mediterranean growers at the 
cost of California, so now America daps a 
special duly on pasta from Europe. As usual, 
there is a lot to be said for both sides. 

Europe's aim of helping its poorer mem- 
bers on the Mediterranean rim is not exactly 
ignoble. It is hard to have much sympathy 
with California when relative living stan- 
dards and job openings are compared. And 
this sort of discrimination has respectable 
antecedents in the accepted rules of trade. 
America has long participated in the Gener- 
alized System of Preferences, which favors a 
wide range of goods from the developing 
world over the products of the rich. 

On the other hand, it has been found in 
GATT — the ul timat e arbiter of good and 
bad in world trade practice — that America 
has been unfair ly injured by the citrus fruit 
preference. Unfortunately. Europe has 
shown scant willingness to negotiate or 
make compensation. So the Europeans who 
produce good pasta, and the Americans who 
like to eat it. find themselves innocent hos- 
tages in a war to which they ate not a party. 

Oranges. lemons and pasta, in themselves, 
pose minor problems that any set of govern- 
ments could solve if the banc good will 
existed. It is inconceivable that Washington 
would have embarked on the perilous path 
of reprisals if all that was at stake was part of 


California’s foreign market And there are 
other ways than rigging the fruit market for 
Europe to help the Mediterranean. 

But the Reagan administration today is 
faced by a gale of demands for protection 
across a wide range of industries (textiles 
and steel are in the fore) and 70 percent of 
Americans believe that imports are killin g 
jobs. So Washington was in a weak position 
to repel pressure by the alius growers. The 
European Community, in turn, faces a de- 
termined American attack on the agricultur- 
al policy that was basic to its inauguration. 
And both sides face fierce competition from 
Japan and ihe industrializing counting In 
these circumstances it is hardly surprising 
that reactions to individual events should be 
out of all proportion to their importance. 

Unfortunately, as Virgil pointed out, the 
descent into heU is deceptively easy. We are 
not all that many steps away from the infer- 
nal conditions of the 1930s, when trade 
barriers and competitive devaluations bred 
depression, intense xenophobia and war. 

The descent cannot be stopped simply by 
the decisions of the trade experts who ad- 
minister the import barriers and export sub- 
sidies. because they can only react — often 
unwisely — to economic conditions. We 
need policy changes that fundamentally re- 
move the economic 31s underlying trade 
warfare — overvaluation of the dollar and 
undervaluation of ihe yen, weak domestic 
demand outside the United States, visible 
and invisible barriers to trade with Japan. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Cleaning the Defense Mess 


For America's defense contractors, the best 
deodorant is competition. For lack of it, they 
have slid en masse into a stench of fraud and 
deceit. .An army of accountants and auditors 
and a festoon of regulations have merely of- 
fered the excuse to add excessive overhead 
charges without securing simple honesty, 
much less efficiency or quality. 

Read the latest charge-sheet from the De- 
fense Department’s inspector-general. Nine of 
the 10 largest Pentagon contractors, and 45 of 
the largest 100, are under c riminal investiga- 
tion, McDonnell Douglas and Rockwell are 
bring investigated for alleged misstatements of 
cost: Genera] Dynamics for subcontractor 
kickbacks, product substitution, security 
lapses, defective pricing, cost duplication and 
false claims; Lockheed for wrong labor 
charges: Boeing for misstating labor and mate- 
riel costs; General Electric for false claims, 
defective pricing and product substitution; 
United Technologies for subcontractor kick- 
backs, bribery and defective pricing; Rayth- 
eon for labor misch urging and product substi- 
tution; Liuon for bribery and kickbacks, false 
claims and bid-rigging; Ford for defective 
pricing and falsifying records; Texas Instru- 
ments for product substitution: and Northrop 
for false progress payments. 

Much of the trouble implies a more basic 
malady — bad management Without the goad 
of competition, contractors have fallen short 
of even their own standards of efficiency. The 
dumber of hours a contractor estimates a job 
should require, divided by the hours actually 
taken, is a telling index of efficiency. In com- 


petitive industries it is dose to 95 percent. But 
according to data obtained by the air force and 
reported in The National Journal, General 
Dynamics is only 58 percent efficient in build- 
ing the F- 16 fighter; Rockwell builds the B-1B 
bomber at 34 percent efficiency, and Hughes 
Aircraft makes the Maverick missile at an 
app alling 21 percent. Efficiency is far higher 
where procurement is competitive; Raytheon 
builds the Sidewinder missile, a contract it 
shores with Ford Aerospace, at 78 percent 

Congress is keen to improve military pro- 
curement In the House, 133 members nave 
now joined the military reform caucus. It has 
the ideal instrument Lo an amendment framed 
by Representatives Denny Smith of Oregon 
and Mel Levine of California. They would 
require the secretary of defense to state in 
advance for ah new weapons how be will 
provide for competitive procurement They 
would require at least two sources for every 
weapon, unless that can be shown to cause 
exceptional cost or delay. 

Even if the permitted maximum of SO per- 
cent of the weapons budget is waivered 
through this loophole, that would raise the 
competitively let contracts from 6 percent to 
50. Competition would make contractors re- 
form themselves with a minimum of regula- 
tion. If in addition the Pentagon could learn 
not to overdesign weapons, and Congress not 
to let parochial interests determine votes on 
national security, there would be fewer S659 
ashtrays and many more weapons of high 
quality and affordable price. 

- THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


An Attack on India Itself ’ 

June 23 will go down as a black day in 
India's history. It was a deliberate attack not 
just on Air-India but on India itself, by un- 
known enemies of India. We do not wish to 
speculate on the identity of these enemies. We 
cannot afford to rush to conclusions. The 
stakes are too high. We have to be cautious. 
It is our duty. 

— The Times of India (Bombay). 

The country must not allow anger to domi- 
nate its response. Nor should any individuals 
or groups seek private revenge. 

— The Indian Express (Bombay). 

India has still not expiated the blood lust of 
List November [when thousands of people 
were killed in anti -Sikh riots after the assassi- 
nation of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi], It is 
incumbent on the authorities to preserve fu- 
ture stability by ensuring that there is no 
recurrence of such savagery. Nothing is to be 
gained — and much lost — by visiting the 
crimes of a guilty few on the innocent many. 

— The Statesman (Calcutta). 


Fora Cease-Fire on Trade 

Probably the worst thing that could happen 
to the world's trading system would be an 
outbreak of protectionism in America and the 
Common Market directed against Japan. That 
possibility may have to be faced shortly. From 
America come alarmingly clear signals that, 
without specific and substantial moves by the 
Japanese, the Reagan administration will find 
it impossible to hold the tide of protectionist 
legislation building up in Congress. The word 
‘'retaliation” is being freely uttered on both 
sides of the Atlantic. 

There is no doubt a strong dement of saber- 
rauling here, but the evidence of tempers at 
their breaking-point is unmistakable. [Yasu- 
hiro] Nakasone. the Japanese prime minister, 
will visit Europe in the middle of next month. 
[He] may surprise us by producing proposals 
.that are both effective and tangible, and it 
would be rash to act before then. Retaliation 
against Japanese exports would have profound 
consequences for world trade, something not 
(o be taken lightly. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 


FROM OUR JUNE 26 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Spain Rebukes die Vatican 
MADRID — The strained state of relations 
between the Vatican and the Spanish Cabinet 
was brought about by the Royal decrees re- 
cently issued. These allowed dissenting sects to 
place on the outside of their places of worship 
certain religious emblems indicating their 
character. Up to now the Catholic Church, 
being the recognized State religion, has alone 
enjoyed this privilege. As news of these decrees 
reached Rome, the Cardinal Secretary of State 
entered a decided protest against them. This 
protest Senor Jose Canalqos. the Premier, re- 
fused to entertain. He declared the issuing of 
the decrees was an act of domestic government 
and that to admit the right of protest on the 
pan of the Vatican would be equivalent to 
conceding to the Pope the right to interfere in 
the internal affairs of the country. 


1935: A Humanizing Trend in Russia 
PARIS — Coincident with the throwing off of 
regimentation in the United States, the 
U.S.S.R. is undergoing the inevitable reaction 
against too great social rigidity. As Washing- 
ton relaxes its grasp upon the lives of private 
citizens, so is Moscow admitting that the to- 
varischi [comrades] are human beings entitled 
to some other thoughts, emotions and plea- 
sures besides those fed to them by a propagan- 
dizing state. Old Bolsheviks may mutter in 
their beards at ihe turn oT events, but the all- 
powerful state has collapsed before the de- 
mands of Soviet women for cosmetics, Paris 
fashions and fabric winch do not cany in their 
warp and woof the representations of tractors 
and Red Army soldiers. The jazz band, once 
taboo, is blaring within earshot of the tomb of 
Lenin and people are dancing the fox trot. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chatman I958-I9S2 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISE 
WALTER WELLS 

Samuel abt 
ROBERTS. McC^BE 
carl gewirtz 


Deputy Publisher 
Atwcuut Publisher 
Associate Publisher 
Director, 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubtaher 
Etatdivr Eduor REK£ BONDY 

Elinor AlAIN LECOUR 

Depm Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Dcpufi Eduor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DE SMA ISONS Director ojf Gradation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dmcwr of Adteraang Sates 
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■S 1985, International Herald Tribune. AH rights reserved 



Europe’s Environmental Paralysis 


W ASHINGTON — Last Janu- 
ary I left the polarized, uncer- 
tain world of American environmen- 
talism to study what I thought might 
be the more calm and effective clean- 
up programs of Europe. 

I. returned to the United States 
persuaded that European environ- 
mental problems are not just more 
serious than America's, but also less 
likely to be solved. 

At least in West Germany, where I 
spent most of my time, public con- 
cern has readied American levels and 
is still climbing. But turning this emo- 
tion into effective remedies turns out 
to be even more difficult there than in 
the United States, for three reasons: 

• Few measures disturb the status 
quo more than effective environmen- 
tal reforms, and European societies 
have become rigid. 

• Most environmental problems 
have no respect for national borders, 
and there are too many borders in 
Europe for easy control Hie frag- 
mentation of political power between 
countries gives the most recalcitrant 

ihe veto power over change. 

• By U.S. standards, European 
countries do little scholarly analysis 
of environmental problems, and they 
give less weight to those analyses that 
a re done. That makes it easier for 
politicians to avoid problems. 

As West Germany’s Greens party 
suggests, anyone who tries to insert 
basic change into apolitical system as 
wedded to the status quo as Europe's 
is almost forced to challenge it on a 
broad front, both polemically and 
intellectually. And basic change will 
be required for Europe to achieve 
anything like American levels of en- 
vironmental protection. 

The new environmental conscious- 
ness in West Germany is linked to 
problems that makes America’s look 
small by comparison. Germany’s 
population density is more than sev- 
en times that of the continental Unit- 
ed States. More than 10 percent of 
the land is covered by cities or roads. 
There are only 120 areas of 36 square 
miles (93 square ldlometeis) or more 
that are not divided by a road. 

No wolves or bears remain in Ger- 
many; nature protection often means 


By William F, Pedersen Jr. 

This is the J?rsr of two articles. 


protecting the frogs and butterflies. 

There are only two national parks, 
and they are relatively small 

The concentrations of people and 
industry show up in pollution levels. 
Only a few short river stretches high 
in the Alps are not polluted. Though 
sulfur emissions in West Germany 
are only half the U.S. level on a per 


Not only are die 
problems serious 9 but 


European government 
seem designed to 
thwart solutions. 


person basis, they are four times 
more per acre. The country is so 
crowded that stale environmental 
agencies have separate departments 
to regulate “vibranon” — the shaking 
of houses by industrial activity. 

Knee Roman times, Germany has 
been famous for its forests. Despite 


the crowding, the Germans have re- 
tained a greater percentage of forest- 
ed land — 29 percent — than any 
other member Of the European Com- 
munity. Nearly every acre of German 
woods is cultivated and watched over 
by professional foresters. 

So “Waldsterben,’’ or “dying for- 
ests,” is a term the Germans have 
discovered painfully in recent years. 

Samples from all the woods in 
West Germany show that in 1983, 34 
percent of the forest area had been 
damaged, and in 1984, half bad been. 
No one can yet scientifically explain 
this trend Bui the accepted judgment 
among scientists and the public is 
that air pollution is the culprit 

Waldsterben has made air pollu- 
tion's effect on Human health an un- 
easy subject. “First the forest dies, 
and then people,” gxs a papular slo- 
gan. A co mm on children's disease 
known as “pseudo-croup," unknown 
in the United States, is generally 
blamed on air pollution. 

And the Germans have more than 
air pollution to worry about. Two- 
thirds of the notion's drinking water 
comes from wells drilled into under- 
ground aquifers. The purity of that 
water is in danger. 

When rain falls on the ground, it 
can be contaminated by {lowing over 
built-up areas before it percolates 






l*< 


'A^OeSll 
_ vferinFtbs 

apaSoF 
weT- 



into the ground. In many parts of 
'Europe, form overfertilization has led 
io high nitrate concentrations in 
groundwater. West Germany suffers 
from pollution of groundwater 
ng;iwf by abandoned hazardous- 
waste rites. This is magnified both by 
the dense population and the results 
of war riamnae in some cases muni- 
tions, including nerve gas, were bur- 
ied and forgotten after the war. 

One knowledgeable official says 
Goman groundwater in some re- 
gions may need to be left alone for a 
half century until it purifies itself. 

Germans also speak of “soil pollu- 
tion” — an idea completely undis- 
cussed in the United States. Soil pol- 
lution stands to some extent for 
groundwater pollution or damage to 
plants. But it also expresses a fear 
that the ecological cycles in the soil 
by which dead matter is broken down 
and regenerated may be affected. 

Environmental protection is al- 
ready one of the two biggest long- 
running news stories in Germany 
(unemployment is the other). West 
Germany two years ago also became 
the first country to elect representa- 
tives of an “ecological" party — the 
Greens — to its national legislature. 

Yet demands for effective anti-pol- 
lution action will confront two prob- 
lems. Soch programs are tremendous- 
ly difficult to make work, as has been 
learned in America; and the struc- 
tures of European government seem 
designed to thwart than. 

Environmental protection is a field 


that runs on immensely technical grid 
detailed information. West Germany 
and other European countries cur- 
rently lack both this information and 
the legal and bureaucratic means of 
collecting it. For example, tbeGfer- 
federal government has no pow- 
er to collect emissions data (firefly 
from chemical companies. It has' to 
ask state governments to provide tL 

And such information lSorihyl-" 
ful if it can become th e fMndSant' 
for wrenching political decisions — 
idling citizens, for example, tfaauhe 
way io protect water in ah aquifer is 

not to fertilize the land over it, or that 

the only way to protect lakes miKte- 
region is to reduce pollution hun- 
dreds of mites away in another. 

The American system has its 'own 
weaknesses when addressing such 
matters. But European political sys- 
tems are not even as open to poetical 
decisions based on careful study bf 
the facts. They embody a bias agawi 
change that shows itself in a tendency 
to support established interests, ? 
ticuiany if they have some tie toftfe 
government, as is often the ode. 
Imagine that General Motors wfe a 
state-owned auto company, tikeRe- 
nault America might not nave auto- 
emission controls. • ' 


'I 


The writer, a lawyer for tkrIIS. 
Environmental Protection Agency,'iis. 
tiedEia*pcaspartoftmECexdi<BtK 
program. He contributed this to The 
Washington Post. The opinions ex- 
pressed are not necessarily thcEPA’s, 


In Drawing a Line Against Terrorism, Beware Nasty Surprises 


W ASHINGTON — The Reagan adminis- 
tration has been pointing with pride to 
progress in El Salvador more democracy, less 
violence, a shrinking insurgency. Lieutenant 
Commander Albert A. Schaufelberger 3d, the 
first American serviceman to die in S Salvador, 
would have read the same evidence with alarm. 

The commander, who was killed in 1983, 
would have been shocked by the brutal slaying 
last week of four U S. marines and nine civil- 
ians in a sdewalk caffe in San Salvador. But be 
would not have been surprised. He would have 
seen it as a logical, tactical turn to urban war- 
fare against Americans in a guerrilla war when 
U-S. support is turning the tide against the 
insurgency in the countryside. 

We know this not as a voice from the grave 
but from an extraordinary interview with The 
New York Times, a few days before Command- 
er Schaufelberger was murdered on the streets 
of San Salvador. “They haven't targeted Ameri- 
cans because things are going so well,” he told 
Lydia Chavez. But “if President Reagan is 
successful” in bolstering the government with 
U.S. aid, the rebels “are going to get nasty." 

Trained in counterinsurgency. Commander 
Schaufelberger had no illusions about the na- 


By Philip Geyelin 


tore of the struggle — or erf the enemy. He knew 
the difference between nastiness for a particu- 
lar purpose and “senseless terrorism” — the 
White House way of connecting last week’s 
killings in San Salvador with the bombing of 
the airport in Frankfurt and the Beirut hostage- 
taking from the hijacked TWA jet It all added 
np to “further evidence" that “the war which 
terrorists are waging is not only directed against 
the United States [but] against all civilized 
society,” the White House said. 

The trouble with talking about “terrorist” 
problems in such epic, indiscriminate terms is 
that it leads to talk about solutions in the same 
amp fistic way. Consider last week's presiden- 
tial statement: “This cannot continue," it said, 
without defining “this." “We must act,” the 
statement went on, adding: “Our limits have 
been reached.” Asked what that meant, Larry 
Speak es, the White House spokesman, said: “It 
means that we are now drawing the fine." 

What that line-drawing apparently means for 


now is more military help for the Salvadoran 
, Vice President George 


government Meantime, 

Bush will take advantage of his trip to Europe 


this week to rally same son of concerted inter- 
national counterterrorist program. Afterward, 
be wifi set up a U.S. government-wide task 
force to help the presidaat decide what to do. 

You would think that the Reagan adminis- 
tration had not been witness for four and a half 
years to a steady increase in terrorism, to the 
war in Lebanon, to an alarming spate of terror- 
ist attacks against NATO installations (more 
than 80 in the last year). You might even 
suspect that the administration is wracked by 
internal differences — and you would be right, 
if the public record means anything. 

Secretary of State George Shultz tells us, 
“Experience has taught us over the years that 
one of the best deterrents to terrorism is the 
certainty that swift and sure measures will be 
taken against those who engage in it" Experi- 
ence has taught us no such thing: Terrorism 
is on the rise; there is no record of “swift 
and sure” retaliation and therefore no evidence 
that retaliation deters. 

Mr. Shultz wants us to be willing to use 
military force and to “understand there is a 
potential for loss of life of some of our fighting 


men and ... of some innocent people:- 
president recently said that the killing of fltno- 
ceat people would itself be a terrorist act Apd. 
Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger has srid 
publicly that “simply unloading a large bomb- 
ing attack on some group you think may tost 


done it [is] not going, io prevent it in the mure." 
In a comprehensive qocuj 


locumen tary by the CBS " 
television network, serious students of ,/fae . 
problem opened up a new set of impHcat&os ' 
for the United States if retaliation or pre-eap-, 
live strikes against terrorists become a part of 
policy. William Webster, director of thereaer : 
al Bureau of Investigation, said that any reart 
sals that wound up "lolling women oral ijjfl- 
dren" could provoke “suicide- type” attach in' 
the United States. Robert Kuppermancflte' 
Georgetown Center for Strategic and Ir' “ 
tional Studies said the “infrastructure" l 
rorist attacks is already in place in 
Perhaps Mr. Bush's task force will examine 
some of the seemingly endless new surprises 
that might be in store now that the linns of' 
U.S. patience have been reached. If the admin- 
istration is “drawing the fine." the least it could 
do is tell ns what it thinks is on the other tide. - 
Washiogton Past Writers Group. 


Kennedy: A New line , 
The Same Old Politics 


By David S. Broder 


W ASHINGTON — The tim- 
ing was accidental. But 
when Senator Edward M. Kennc- 


on Monday at a glittering fund- 
raiser for the John F. Kennedy 
Library, more than one message 
was bang sent. 

Top state leaders of the Demo- 
cratic Party, in town for the meet- 
ing of the Democratic National 
Committee, were reminded that 
Mr. Kennedy wants very much to 
be part of the dunce of Mr. Rea- 
gans successor. 

It is not the first time Mr. Ken- 
nedy has dropped such hints. Last 
March he told the Boston Globe 
that “Td like to be president some 
day," and that he no longer felt 
inhibited by the family concerns 
that he said sidelined him in 1984. 

In March, he began what was 
seen as an effort to reposition him- 
self and the Democratic Party, 
with a speech at Hofstra Universi- 
ty in Hempstead, New York. He 
warned that Democrats would 
continue to lose national elections 
if they remained “content with 
fighting a rearguard action to save 
ibepohdes of the past" 

The man who challenged Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter from the left in 
an unsuccessful 1980 bid fra the 
Democratic presidential nomina- 
tion was reported, as The Washing- 
ton Post said, to be “moving his 
party and Ins political image to- 
ward die center.” 

There is nothing subtle about the 
effort Last winter, be was photo- 
graphed in a smiling handshake 
with the Reverend Jerry Falwell, 
the Moral Majority leader, when 
both appeared at a convention of 
religious broadcasters. 

Last week, when I went to his 
office for an interview, I was 
shown a framed enlargement of a 
letter of praise he received last year 
for his concern about the men and 
women of the armed services. It 
was signed by Barry Gold water. 

But for all the image-making, 
there is no evidence of a radical 
change in Ted Kennedy. His heart 
and bis head are where they always 
have been — at the left of the 
American political spectrum. 

When the nonpartisan National 
Journal published its ratings of 
members of Congress early this 
month, Mr. Kennedy was ranked 
the most liberal of all senators on 


combined economic, social and 
foreign-policy roll-call votes in 
the last Congress. 

He is off to a good start in his 
title defense. In his Hofstra speech, 
Mr. Kennedy said Democrats most 
show “the courage to discard" out- 
dated programs. When the Senate 
was debating the budget in May, 
he voted to discard only two. On 24 
other floor amendments, be voted 
to maintain or increase spending. 

At Hofstra, Mr. Kennedy said, 
“We cannot and should not de- 
pend on higher tax revenues to roll 
in and redeem evoy costly pro- 
gram." But the rejected Democrat- 
ic budget resolution he helped 
shape would have raised taxes 551 
billion (mainly on corporations, he 
points out) to maintain, higher lev- 
els of domestic spending. 

He also warned Democrats 
against the “special interest” label 
that was SO damaging to Walter F. 
Mondale in 1984. 

Bui when the defease spending 
bill was up in the Senate early this 
month, it was Mr. Kennedy who 
offered an amendment to restore 
wage requirements fra mOitaiy 
construction projects — a perenni- 
al issue of special interest to the 
AFL-QO budding-trades unions. 

The point is not that Mr. Kenne- 
dy is hypocritical but that, fra all 
the rhetoric, his heart is where it 
always has been. Listen to him for 
an hour and it is evident what stirs 
Him: racism in South Africa and 
what he sees as the retreat on dvO 
rights at home, famine abroad and 
hunger in America, unilateral U J. 
military intervention in Central 
America, the need for nudear arms 
control, health cart for afl. 

My strong sense is that Mr. Ken- 
nedy is not moving — that if be is 
ever to be president, the coon try 
will have to come to him. 

That scans unlikely today. Bui 
Mr. Kennedy is only 33, the same 
age Ronald Reagan was in 1964 
when Ik made his famous televised 
plea for the lost cause of Barry 
Goldwater’s election. By 1980, the 
country's politics had shifted 
enough to put Mr. Reagan in the 
mainstream, and he benefited. 

It may be that Mr. Kennedy’s 
guest of honor Monday was ready 
his role model I find that possibili- 
ty more plausible, and attractive, 
than the new-image alternative. 

The Washington Post 


A 'Legal’ U.S. Invasion of Nicaragua? 


L ONDON — Rhetoric or not? We 
/ probably won’t know until the 
day jt happens whether Ronald Rea- 
gan is senoas about invading Nicara- 
gua. But the talk is alarming, not just 
because it exaggerates Nicaragua’s 
strategic importance but because it 
appears oblivious to the basic under- 
standings of international law. 

But what is international law? And 
must it be obeyed? No less a figure 
than Dean Acheson stated at the time 
of the U.S. quarantine of Cuba in 
1962: *1 most conclude that the pro- 
priety of the Cuban quarantine is not 
a legal issue. The power, position and 
prestige of the United Stales has been 
challenged by another state; and the 
law simply does not deal with such 
questions of ultimate power — power 
that comes dose to the sources of 

sovereignty The survival of 

states is not a matter erf law.” 

But what about the Charter of the 
United Nations, which abjures aimed 
attack rat another state unless it is in 
self-defense? It is not so simple, say 
the critics. They argue that uueroa- 
tional constitutions, like national 
ones, are not self-interpreting. No- 
tions such as “armed attack,^ “self- 
defense” and “intervention” are no 
more self-explanatory than “cruel 
and wniiAMi punishment,” “inter- 
state commerce* or “due process.” 

To interpret international law re- 
quires sophisticated judgment. Nev- 
ertheless, certain dungs stand out 
that are difficult for the president of a 
major democracy to put aside. 

Evoy nation recog niz es and ob- 
serves srane elements of international 
law, ranging from the Law of the Sea 
to diplomatic immunity. All nations 
fee} the pressure to find legal justifi- 
cations for their behavior. 

As Richard Gardner, professor of 
Jaw and international organization at 
Columbia University, writes in the 


By Jonathan Power 


journal Freedom at Issue: “The UN 
charter cannot be treated as pieces of 
India rubber to be stretched one way 
and then another in the fight of the 
short-tens political necessities of 
each situation. There has to be some 
continuity in our day-to-day inter- 
pretation. If we ‘bend’ the principles 
to fit one case, we must be willing to 
live with the new configuration-” 


In the eyes of 
international hnc, Air. 
Reagan does not have 
much to stand on. 


By wbat measure then could a UJ5. 
invasion of Nicaragua be justified? 
Would it be self-defense? Clearly 
there is no direct threat of Nicaragua 
invading the United States. Interna- 
tional jaw before the UN Charter 
recognized the right of anticipatory 
self-defense, when the “necessity of 
that self-defense is instant, over- 
whelming or leaving no choic e of 
means and no moment of delibera- 
tion.” But even this bold interpreta- 
tion badly fits the Nicaraguan 
A more telling justification of the 
use of self-defense would be fra the 
United Stales to dahn that it was 
defending El Salvador from the 
threat posed by Nicaragua’s gun-run- 
ning to rebel groups opposed to the 
established government. John Stuart 
Mill provided a useful fine of reason- 
ing in an essay in 1 848: The doctrine 
of nonintervention, to be a legitimate 
principle of morality, must be accept- 
ed by all governments. The despots 
must consent to be bound by "a as 


LETTERS TO TBE EDITOR 


A Cyprus Solution 


Regarding “ A Second Chance for 
Papmdreou and Some Allies ” (June 
15) by Andriana Icrodiacpnou: 

The author seems to have forgotten 
the ordeal of the Turkish Cypriots 
before July 1974, and why Ttirkey 
was forced to resort to military ac- 
tion. The Turkish Cypriot republic 
and the democratic election of Rauf 
Denktash are facts. A workable solu- 
tion fra Cyprus can come only after 
the Greeks accept the irreversible re- 
alities that are of their own creation. 

Disputes between Turkey and 
Greece over con tinental-sfadf rights, 
territorial waters, airspace and the 
militarization of L emnos in violation 
of the Lausanne Treaty can only be 


dealt with effectively when Andreas 
Papandreou finally chooses to talk to 
Turkey. Recent history has taught 
thar both rides are capable of solving 
their disputes more quickly when 
there is no outside interference. 

HUSEYIN AVNL 
Izmir, Turkey. 


well as the free states. Unless they do . 
the profession of it by free countries 1 
comes but to this miserable issne:' 1 
that the wrong ride may help the. 
wrong but the right must not hop jibe 
right Intervention to enforce nanior. 
tervention is always rightful, always, 
moral, if not always prudent” : “ 
Perhaps, then, there is a. cue for 
Mr. Reagan. Yet even hereis acatt^t , 
Would a UJS. invasion be “prude^ j 
when the Nicaraguan supply ofjj* ^ 
to the rebels in El Salvador has^gDF.i 
icantiy slowed down in the bstfew j 
years and when these arms play sock t: 
a small role in the rebels' armory?; ? i 
Another well-recognized interim- \ 
tional principle is military assistance 1 1 
upon request Could Mr. Reagaujtise . j 
this? On this question the UN ChOr- 
ter is silent, though traditK^al.l^w j 
has long recognized the right of ihyt 1 ] 
tation by a beleaguered nation. ; nut [ 
the West has made a practice of ghr-; 1 
ing aid only to an internationally rec- ] 
agnized government unless ft^faas i 
been overthrown by an outside imfa- J 
son . In^conbast, the Soviet Uiktn j 

to support “wars of libantimi.”^^ i 
Reagan would be stealing FSdd ^ifcJ 
tro’s clothes if he went in at th«£ • — 
tation of the “contras." . 7 

Could Mr. Reagan rest his casCOfl 
Article 52 of the UN Charter,- wftiHi 
permits regional organizations 1 * 0 
deal with “such matters relating; to - 
the maintenance of intemation&l 
peace and security as are appropriate 
for regional action"? Not easily. 
cle 52 carries the proviso uiakito.. 
“enforcement action^ shall be tajaeo j ' 
without the vote of the Security 
CoundL Needless to say, the Security r 
Council would not authorize a^ion ■ 
against Nicaragua. ...; 

. Finally, could "it be “tnmmnkar-.;. 
tan” or “democratic" interveoricp? 
Some scholars argue that internatkffl- 
law permits countries to use fori* ■ 
in the territory of another to" tad. 
human-rights abuses or to enaanr3*C.^ 
democracy. Jeane Kirkpatrick, 

former U.S. ambassador to th&UfflM 


l 


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Bubut; ’ 
fffltloV" 
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ili’n" 'i •' 

itu-nt • 
life it; 
plait:- 1>‘ "• 
menun!. 
scinn. •••■ 
luJf-Jtitf. " 
nun> t.u*. '■ 
misfit 

cfcan' , i , s 1 • 


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* ■: vi, ' . 

‘nni -uCit i ■ 


Menifclc in 


His Life on 


B> Kjlj.jj !<;. 


For a Free Nicaragua 


The United Stales Is justified in 
wanting a non-Communist govern- 
ment in Nicaragua. With Cute and 
Nicaragua as Soviet bases. It would 

take only one small island to effect a 

triangular stranglehold over U.S 
shipping in the Caribbean. 

PAMELA M. DAVID. 
Cleveland Heights. Ohio. 


justify U.S. support of rte contote 
Yu with so many nondemocrades^ , 
the world, an honest application#' , 
this principle would lead to anarfefiy- 
So international law suggests tfi®-' 
the only real case Mr. Reagan vsbukk ' 
have for going into Nicaragua .wqnW 
be to cut off Nicaragua's supply of; j 
weapons to El Salvador. But A 
United States has conspicuriE&y 
rased to prove the accusation of ofc 
as large-scale trafficking. ' 

. The truth is, in the eyes of intef 
tional law, Mr. Reagan does notT 
much to stand on. whether this. ... 
give him pause remains to jjeseei’v^ 
International Herald Tribune. v ^ 
AU ritfus reserved. ‘ 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


Page 9 




INSIGHTS 


Bonn’s President Seeking to Lift Guilt for Nazis From the Young 


ash > 


ii r 


A •> 

• • 

► I . . 


■ S * . 


By James M. Markham 

New York Times Soviet 

Y May 8, 1943, the day Nazi Germany 
capitulated, Richard Freiherr von Wei 2 - 
5adter» a 25-year-old Wdmnacbt cap- 
tain, had made it tack to his grandmother’s 
in southwestern Germany. The war had 

years jeari^er, on the Second day of IffiSer's 
.invasion of Poland, he had been 300 yards away 
when his older brother Heinrich was killed by a 
bullet that pierced his throat as he clambered 
over a railroad embankment. Richard kept 
mournful watch over his brother's body that 
nighL 

. Later wounded three rimes himself, he sur- 
vived the rigors of the campaign in the Soviet 
Union and rose to the position of adjutant in the 
9th Potsdam Infantry Regiment, a legendary 
unit steeped in the aloof, mozuuchial spirit of 
the Prussian aristocracy. So many of its officers 
were implicated in the botched July 20, 1944, 
>1 on Hitler's fife that the regiment was 
disbanded. 

, Yet, for Mr. von WdzsOcker, World War n 

, did not really end on May 8. His father had been 
the Third Reach’s top career diplomat for most 
- o.. of the war and was soon to be tried at Nurem- 
.,"V r >. berg as a war criminal- A law student, Richard 
. ~ would join his father’s defense team and con- 
’f-: % front the. full honors of Hitler's 12-year Reich. 

: On May 8, 1985, Richard von Wetzsfcker, 

- **■; ?•'; president of West Germany, climbed a podium 

- m Bonn’s hushed parliament and, in a speech 
,.,.7^ that distilled a hfe’s experience, spoke out 
. against forgetting. He declared (hat younger 
..'.V generations of Germans “cannot profess a guilt 

rJ their own for crimes they did not commit,” 

. v^-f-.fTyfo discerning person can expect them to 
wear a penitential robe simply because they are 
-C7"' : Germans,'* be continued. “But their forefathers 
:. f have left them a grave legacy. AD of us, whether 

the^art^We are al^a^ted by the conse- 
.. quenccs and Babbs for it- The young and old 
' generations most and can help each other to 
'.V- understand why it is vital to keep alive the 

- memories.” 

.V! Coming after a painful West Goman debate 
over President Ronald Reagan’s visit to the 
Bitborg mffitary cemetery — a debate in which 
tendencies to rewrite and prettify the past some- 
times ran stronger than impulses to recollection 
and contrition — President WazsScker’s Bun- 
destag speech had a cathartic impact. 

Jffis office was inundated with aunoving let- 
ups and telegrams; the Israeli ambassador to 
Bonn pronounced the discourse “a moment of 
glory” in West Gennan-Isradi ties; a govern- 
ment agency printed 250,000 copies to distrib- 
ute in schools, and a Hamburg company made 
plans to bring out a record of the speech. Mo- 
mentarily, the president had cleared the air of a 
seamy, sdf-pitying revisionism, banishing a 
half-articulated wish among some older Ger- 
mans that Mr. Reagan's gesture at Bitborg 
might be a final act of - absolution, a ritual 
cleansing of Germany’s past. 

F OR many Germans, the resonant speech 
also confirmed the 65-year-old presi- 
dent’s growing importance as a guardian 
of the nation's moral conscience, a role that 
-ife-k German leaders have seemingly forfeited, 
/•-iflough a Christian Democrat, Mr. von Weiz- 



e Wliat is asked of young 
people today is this: Do not 
let yourselves be forced into 
enmity and hatred of other 
people. Let us honor 
freedom. Let us work for 
peace. 9 


& 


Thft AixxxHad i Yea 

Richard von WeizsScker accepting election as president in 1984. 


prigi 


V. 


slicker has shaped a following that cuts across 
party fines; he seems to have touched a need for 
oratory and rectitude that has been missing 
since Helmut Schmidt, a Social Democrat, with- 
drew from politics. 

There are other prominent German politi- 
cians who have cried to reconcile their nation's 
Nazi past and democratic present, but none can 
riaim the kind of national influence and visibili- 
ty that Mr. von Weizsficker enjoys by virtue of 
high office. 

One such figure is Manfred Rommel, 56, the 
popular mayor of Stuttgart, whose father. Field 
Marshal Erwin Rommel, was forced to commit 
sukade because of his opposition to Hitler. For- 
mer Chancellor Willy Brandt, 71 , a Nobel Peace 
Prize laureate who went into exile during the 
Third Reich, can also speak with moral author- 
ity- 

hi aspiring to make the largely ceremonial 
West German presidency a center of intellectual 
and, thus, political power, Mr. von Weizsficker 
has consciously jutted himself against Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl, 55, a clumsy communicator 
bat a politician with tenacious survival instincts. 
It is a largely symbolic confrontation, because 
the president has neither the political leverage 
nor the ambition, to challenge Mr. Kohl's posi- 
tion as chancellor. Despite Mr. KohFs cheery 
attempts to portray himself as the country’s first 
postwar chancellor, the Christian Democratic 
leader is not unburdened by the Nazi past . 

The two men’s approaches to the Third 
Reich, and to the present, are opposing models 


for other Germans: the chancellor's is rooted in 
a bluff, brightly optimistic view of life, the 
president’s in a mare somber appraisal of hu- 
man frailty — something he witnessed in his 
father and in himself during the war. 

Yet in his Bundestag speech, the president 
was able to transcend the Nazi nightmare and 
offer a message of hope to the uneasy generation 
of young West Germans who will soon inherit 
leadership of the most powerful nation in West- 
ern Europe. 

“We in the older generation owe to young 
people not the fulfillmen t of dreams but hones- 
ty,” he said. “Hiller's constant approach was to 
stir up prejudices, enmity and hatred. What is 
asked of young people today is this: Do not let 
yourself be forced into enmity and hatred of 
other people. Let us honor freedom. Let tu work 
for peace. Let ns respect the rule of law. Let us 
be true to our own conception of justice. On this 
8th of May, let us face up as well as we can to the 
truth.” 

In this 40th anniversary year, the theme of 
Germans as victims — victims of ruthless Allied 
bobbing raids over their dries, refugees from 
the pdlaging and raping Red Army — has been 
rmmingsttxmg on German television shows and 

in the utterances of politicians. As the anti- 
Bitborg protests quickened, senior members of 
Mr. Kohls center-right Christian Democratic 
Party managed to turn their sense of victimiza- 
tion into a weapon of outrage. In a letter to 53 
U.S. senators who had urged, the canceling erf 
the Bitbmg appearance. Alfred Diegger, the 


Christian Democrats' floor leader, termed the 
proposal an insult to German soldiers who 
fought an the Russian front 

On April 29, in a joint open letter to the 
chancellor, two of ficials from the Bitburg area 
went further “The dead who lie at the military 
cemetery must not after a cruel selection among 
the living over 40 years ago. be now made 
victims of a selection among the fallen, most erf 
them youths." 

In pitting himself against such revisionist uses 
of history, Richard von Weizsficker has been 
forced to confront the moral ambiguities that 
cloud his own family’s past. Some of his friends 
believe that hewas detennined to become presi- 
dent of West Germany, and remains determined 
to become a great president in order to rehabili- 
tate his famil y nam e. 

From 1938 to 1943, his father, Ernst Freiherr 
von Wrizsficker, was chief slate secretary in die 
Foreign Ministry under the vainglorious Jo- 
achim von Ribbentrop. The rider von Wriz- 
sficker at first adjusted easily to the collapse erf 
the chaotic Weimar Republic and to the Third 
Reich’s sterner methods. A conservative patriot, 
he embraced the idea of the expansion of the 
German Reich into the Sudetemand. Yet well 
into the Polish crisis of 1939, he believed that 
Hitler was prone to compromise and needed to 
be isolated from the warmongering Heinrich 
Himmler and Ribbentrop. 

Richard von Wrizsficker has never written at 
length, or spoken publicly, about his father or 


bis own role in the war. but on May 17 he settled 
hlrmglf into an armchair in Villa Hammer- 
schmidi. the presidential mansi on by the Rhine, 
and in a candid two-hour interview, reminisced. 

The president's manner is dispassionate and 
ironic — a warm chuckle punctuates his s lory- 
telling — and throughout, he seemed less inter- 
ested in justifying man in explaining what he 
called his father's “failure.” 

It was. he said, a failure to understand Hiller 
when he came to power in 1933, a failure of 
believing that diplomats could sway the dictator 
from his warlike course, a failure to understand 
the impact of popular (minion on foreign policy 
and, finally, a failure erf character. “My father 
was very honest but not very strong, not very 
outspoken,” said the son. 

T HE president explicitly repudiated the 
view, encouraged by his father’s memoirs 
and some German historians, that the 
lomat W3S at heart a member of the ami- 
tier resistance. But he said he was “deeply 
persuaded” that his father, who was imprisoned 
by the Nuremberg tribunal, was not a war 
c riminal, and be recalled Churchill's comment 
that the Americans tad made “a deadly error” 
in trying him. 

“My father always took the position,” he said, 
“that after such a dreadful war, with such tilings 
as happened, it was not surprising there should 
have been an indictment. But he tad his duty in 
the face of this indictment to make his view- 
point dear and stand up for his name and the 
family name.” The rider von Weizsficker was 
granted amnesty after 18 months. He died in 
1951. 

Mr, von WeizsScker's dosest friend in the 9th 
Potsdam Infantry Regiment was Axel von dem 
Bussche-Sirritbobt, who became involved in a 
plot to blow up Hitler, and himself, with a 
specially equipped vest. The scheme, worked 
out with Omni Claus Schenk von Siauffenberg, 
failed when the vest was destroyed in an air raid 
and the officer was wounded in combaL 

In 1942, the impetuous Bussche-Strrithotsl 
investigated the murder of 1.000 Jews bv SS 
troops at the Dub no airfield in the Soviet Union 
— an event of decisive importance for the young 
von Weizsficker. He said that he had already 
been indoctrinated by bis father to regard Hitler 
as “a misfortune,” but that the Crj&laJ Night 
and his friend's revelations about the SS “com- 
pleted the picture of a misfortune into one of a 
crime." 

Mr. von Wrizsficker is disinclined to lionize 
his role in the war and passes harsh judgment on 
himself. “From young people like us,” he said, 
“one should have expected that we would have 
gotten better information because of the things 
we had seen with our own eyes." He sounded 
this theme in his Bundestag speech, saying that 
most Germans had been in a position to know 
about the persecution of the Jews. But just as his 
father could not bring himself to leave Hitler's 
service, so, too, the son could not resolve what 
he calls the “tension" between competing im- 
peratives. 

“There was always the tension that one was a 
soldier, got orders from above, bnt also passed 
orders down further ” he said. “But on the other 
hand, one had rcsponribflity for the troops un- 
der one’s command and couldn't simply say, ‘In 
our sector we are now dropping out’ ” 


In a conversation while he was mayor of West 
Berlin, be depicted a principal concern as “the 
failure of my generation to bring younger peo- 
ple into politics," 

“The young people do not admire the moral 
substance of the older generation,” he said. 
“Our economic achievement went along with a 
very materialistic and very selfish view of all 
problems. We have defined freedom as a sum of 
claims and rights, and not that oT duties and 
responsibilities.” 


B 


JTBURG bared (he profound cleavage 
that separates West Germany's postwar 
youth from their riders. Passion, self- 
pity. self-justification and the occasional flash 
of high moral argument — all this came from 
Germans old enough to have been in the war. 

The young looked on as faintly concerned 
spectators, wondering when the past would real- 
ly become the past, so they could live in a 
normal country, they did not crave the absolu- 
tion that their parents and grandparents did. 
and, if numerous conversations are any guide, 
did not believe that the Third Reich's crimes 
could be simply washed away by the gesture of 
an American president they do not exactly ad- 
mire. 

“The reaction in the many letters I get” said 
the president, “is that younger people didn't 
particularly want Reagan to come to Bitburg. 
but didn’t' particularly like this kind of obses- 
sion and debates and arguments pro and con.” 
He said that most young Germans had not 
adopted the views of Elie Wiesd. the Auschwitz 
survivor who spoke out fervently against Bit- 
burg in the United States. He said that they were 
simply “shocked over this strange world in 
which suddenly, for weeks, nothing existed but 
litis” 

If Mr. von Weizsacker succeeds in leaving a 
political legacy to Germany, it may be in recon- 
ciling emerging generations to paradox. It is a 
paradox — one that younger Germans have 
trouble embracing — (fiat the most tolerant and 
successful democracy in German history was 
built by men and women who emerged from the 
moral ruins of Nazism. Few were free of some 
kind of complicity with the past, and many were 
spiritually lamed, but these burdens did not 
condemn the democracy they erected 

The president does not boast about this tran- 
sition, and in his Bundestag speech he phrased it 
with characteristic restraint: “There was no 
‘zero hour,' but we had the opportunity to make 
a fresh start. We have used this opportunity as 
well as we could.” 

His truest legacy, though, may ultimately be 
in confronting Germans unflin chingly with 
their past, so that they can go move surefootedly 
into the future. Almost doggedly, Mr. Kohl likes 
lossy, “We Gomans have learned the lessons of 
the past.” Behind this oft-repeated cliche lies an 
impatience, an eagerness to get out of the past, 
even to buy it 

Mr. von WeizsScker's life has taught him to 
be more wary. “When one looks into history 40 
or 50 years later," he said, “it is better as a young 
peraan to judge someone for having behaved 
wrongly if one has also experienced such a 
situation. The tendency to believe that people 
then were evil but today they are good is very 
widespread. And this tendency, naturally, is not 
good" 

This ankle has been excerpted from The New 
York Times Magazine. 


Mengele in Brazil: Acquaintances Call 
His Life on the Run Reclusive, Ordinary 


• Iltll i >{ % f ( By Ralph Blnmentiial 




New York Timer Service 

S AO PAULO, Brazil — The man identi- 
fied by associates and scientists here as 
Josef Mengele, the long-sought fugitive 
Nazi war criminal led a reclusive tile for nearly 
two decades in and around Brazil's largest city, 
according to neighbors, friends and a house- 
maid who says she loved him. 

They portray the man as an authoritarian 
figure, but also someone who was cultivated and 
rometimes charming. They say he spent his days 
’#ecluded farms and simple cottages, tended 
sick animals, disparaged blade people and kept 
a diary but never publicly discussed hist on 1 or 
politics, and liked to watch “Disneyland on 
television. 

The accounts, given in media interviews and 
in depositions to die Brazilian police, help ex- 
plain how the man — now identified by forensic 
experts as the Auschwitz death-camp doctor — 
managed to escape his pursuers for so long only 
to drown, as his fcsmer.proieciors here say. in a 
swimming acci d ent in 1979. 

In fact, the story erf a robust but lonely exile 
that now is emerging here bears almost no 
resemblance to the often lurid accounts over the 
years of a surgery-altered Dr. Mengde, sur- 
rounded by armed guards, torturing Indians or 
serving as the personal physician of President 
Alfredo Stroessner of Paraguay. 

to the accounts given so far, the 
identified as Dr. Mengele arrived in Brazil 
from Paraguay in 1961 and was taken in hand 
by a former Austrian Nazi corporal, Wolfgang 
Gerhard, who had been living in Brazil since 
1952. He died in 1975 in Graz, Austria. 

In 1961, Mr. Gerhard introduced his friend as 
Peter Hocfabicfalet, a Swiss, to Geza and Gitta 
St amm er. Hungarians who had spent World 
War H in Budapest and sealed in Brazil in 1948. 
Mr. Stammer was a surveyor who took property 
in payment for some of his work and the Stam- 
mers agreed to let “Peter” manage a small farm 
or theirs in the Austrian and German colony erf 
Nova Europa in Araraquaxa, about 200 miles 
(320 kilometers) northwest of Sao Paulo, where 
the Stammers tad moved in 1959. 

In 1962, the Stammers moved to another farm 
at Serra Natra, about 100 mites from Sfio Paulo, 
and “Peter followed. It was there, Mrs. Stam- 
per said, that she happened to see a newspaper 
p9MHQgraph of Dr. Mengele of Auschwitz and 
questioned tar visitor about the resemblance. 
At first he denied the connection, die told the 

K hce, but that evening acknowledged he was 
Mengde. He ended up living under the 
family's protection Tor the next dozen years. 

M RS. Stammer, 65, said that Mr. Ger- 
hard threatened the family if they gave 
away the secret. She also said the Aus- 
trian tad tola them: “You used to be nobodies, 
unknown. Now a great thing has happened in 
vour lives.” She said the man they knew as Dr. 
Mengele never threatened the family himself, 
hut instead had chided Mr. Gerhard for doing 

r Mrs. Stammer did not appear troubled at 
having had the death-camp doctor os a house- 
guest She recalled playing the piano for him 
and cooking Hungarian dishes tanked. Sta said 


he repeatedly promised to leave but always 
stayed on. 

“The people in Hungary didn’t know what 
happened until later” she said when questioned 
about Nazi atrocities. But she also said she had 
trouble believing that Dr. Mengele could have 
been as cruel as he has been portrayed. Sta said 
she did not feel guilty about having sheltered 
him because the family tad been “manipulated” 
into helping him. 

Mrs. Stammer said her family was Roman 
Catholic. She said she heard Dr. Mengde say 
that the Jews were working against Germany 
and were a foreign group that the Germans 
wanted out of the country. Sta also said he once 
mentioned having contracted typhus at Ausch- 
witz but that otherwise he avoided any discus- 
sion about the war. 

Other witnesses in Serra Negra told the police 
that the Stammer farm bad an eight-foot (about 
25 -meter) observation tower on the roof and 
thar the visitor used to go up there with binocu- 

An authoritarian figure, 
cultivated and sometimes 
charming, he spent his days at 
secluded farms. 

tars to scan the countryside. The period ooin- 
ddes with die time Dr. Mengele was being 
intensively hunted by the Israelis, who missed 
capturing him at the same time they seized the 
Nazi official Adolf Ekhmann in Buenos Aires 
in 1960. 

Dr. Mengde stayed with the Stammers until 
1974 when he moved into a small yellow stucco 
house also owned by the Stammers on the 
Strado do Ahrarenga in an outlying area of Sfio 
Paulo near the suburb of Santa Amaro. 

Mrs. Stammer said Dr. Mengde tad told her 
ta attended his father's funeral in 1959 in the 
family's hometown of Gunzburg, West Germa- 
.ny. She said that in all the years “Peter” stayed 
with the family, he never left the house for more 
than a day or two at a time and never took any 
extensive trips, an account that conflicts with 
widespread reported sightings of Dr. Mengde in 
Paraguay and elsewhere in the 1960s and 1970s. 

Sta also said that he received no visits from 
strangers bnt that Hans Sedlmeier. an official (rf 
the Mengele family company, came for two days 
in the early 1960s and for three days in the eariy 
1970s to bring Dr. Mengde altogether about 
$7,000 in U.S. currency. 

Mrs. Stammer said that Dr. Mengele had 
several ailments, including a chronic swelling of 
his entire left tat, rheumatism in his hands and 


migraine headaches. 

' The mm identified as the Nazi doctor also 
was briefly hospitalized for a stroke in 1976, 
according to accounts given to the police in 
BraziL 

ABOUT 1 970, the police say, Wolfgang Gcr- 
/\ hard introduced Dr. Mengde as ‘Peter 
XjL Gerhard,” an Austrian widower with a 
questionable political past, to Wolfram and I> 
sdoue Bossert, Austrians who had moved to 
Brazil in 1952. Soon, the Bosserts said, they 
became “Peter’s” dosest friends, sharing his 
secret. - 


Often, the Bosserts said, “Peter” would visit 
them in their house at 7 Missouri Street in Sfio 
Paulo for evenings of music and conversation. 
The friendship continued after “Peter” moved 
to the Stammers' ydlow stucco house on Alvar- 
enga Street, where he lived until the drowning. 

The house, winch the Stammers sold to the 
Bosserts after the drowning, is dank today, with 
paint peeling from the discolored green gray 
walls and with dirty faded curtains covering the 
latticed windows. 

Across the street, a retired metalworker, 
Jaime Martins dos Santos, said ta knew his 
German neighbor only as “Mr. Pedro" and that 
they had spent much tune together. He said that 
“Mr. Pedro” had a Mauser pistol that ta would 
keep by day in a locked box in his bedroom and 
at night by the bed. 

He described “Mr. Pedro” as sometimes 
moody and a man who would make remarks 
disparaging about black people. But Mr. dos 
Santos said that the man never made any refer- 
ence to Jews. 

He and others said that “Mr. JPedro” was 
cl eariy partial to a former housemaid. Elsa Gu- 
ptan de OKvera. Mis. de Olivers, a thin-faced 
34-year-old woman with bleached hair, con- 
firmed in an interview that the man she also 
knew as “Mr. Pedro” in 1977 and 1978 had told 
her he loved tar and wanted her to live with hun. 

During the interview, sta wore a white wool- 
en shawl sta said ta tad given tar on Nov. 4, 

1 978. Sta said they never tad an intimate physi- 
cal relationship. She acknowledged with a shy 
laugh that sta had loved him too bnt had insist- 
ed on getting married, which, she said, ta had 
declined to do. She said she had asked him often 
whether he was married and that be swore to her 
he was not but that ta could not tell her why he 
could not marry tar. 

A former gardener at the bouse cm Alvarenga 
Street, Luis Rodrigues, said that “Mr. Pedro" 
used to be lonely and often invited him to sit 
with him in the house late into the evening. He 
said (hat “Mr. Pedro” long resisted buying a 
television set but finally acceded and soon be- 
came addicted to watching “Disneyland” and a 
soap opera called “Slave Isanra.” about a slave 
girt. 

“Mr. Pedro" seemed particularly distraught 
in his last days, several who saw him then agree. 

Three days before the drowning, Mr. Rodri- 
gues said, “Mr. Pedro" was nearly hit by a bus 
rat the steep hill in front of his bouse. He may 
have started to sway and faint as the bus ap- 
proached. the gardener recalled, and the mis 
slammed on its brakes, grazing “Mr. Pedro's” 
arm. Another time, Mrs. Mehlich recalled, he 
□early FeB in the well behind the house. 

The Bosserts had arranged an outing at near- 
by Bertioga Beach for the weekend of Feb. 7, 

1979, in ita Brazilian summer, but “Mr. Pedro" 
agonized over whether to go. Mrs. Mehlich 
recalled. She said sta told him the. outing would 
relax him and recalled that be relied, “Pm 
going to the beach because my life is ending.” 

He took the public bus and met the Bosserts 
there. At the beach, the Bosserts told the police, 
their friend appeared to have a stroke in the 
water and drowned despite the efforts of Mr. 
Bossert to save him. 

Witnesses have told the police ; that they saw a 
man fitting Dr. Mengele’s description lying un- 
conscious on the bench with the Bosserts bend- 
ing over him. 



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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


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t» 


Stocks Qose Slightly Higher 


5k. Close 

DP. Yld- P€ unsHlahtjowQuat.< 


United Pros fmenmnoraJ 

NEW YORK — The stock market lost early 
strength to close just slightly higher Tuesday 
following collapse of the House-Senate budget 
conference. 

Break-up of the conference along partisan 
lines regarding military and soda! spending 
hurt the market because it heightens uncer- 
tainty on the economic outlook, analysts said. 

Stock prices gained through early afternoon, 
temporarily surpassing the June 6 record clos- 
ing high for the Dow Jones industrial average of 
1,32728. Analysts said investors were heart- 
ened by the market's firm hold on Friday’s 
sharp advance, by the breadth of (he gains, and 
from some signs the economy is rebounding. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department reported an unexpectedly strong 
4. 1 -percent surge in May durable goods orders. 
The chief economist for Salomon Bros., Henry 
Kaufman, commented in Philadelphia that the 
economy is coming out of ‘’hibernation.” 

The Dow Jones finished the day up 2.47 at 
1,323.03. 


grips with the budget deficit and if that hap- 
pens, it raises the question of how much more 
red ink we gill have over the next few years,” he 
said. 

Nevertheless, analysts said the market has 
performed well, bolding on Monday and Tues- 
day nearly all of the 24.75-point gain achieved 


39*6 18V 
29% 17V 
21*0 20 
2*6 Kk 
16*6 9*6 
20 15*0 


EfHSBo 86 18 
ElHofCh 180 A2 
EdsExn Me 3d 


Friday. 

“We are seeing an expansion of leadership” 
said Ricky Harrington of Interstate Securities 
in Charlotte. North Carolina. “The coming 
back to life of the technology stocks has created 
a very dynamic situation.” 

Just before trading began, clerks for the De- 
pository Trust Co_ a national clearing house for 
securities, went on strike but thefirmsaidit was 
handling transactions with other workers and 
there was no immediate impact at the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

Southern California Edison was the most 
active easing VS to 2754. 

IBM added \% to 122. The company said it 
would acquire a substantial interest m MO 
Communications Carp, in exchange for all of 

a stock deaf valued at $400 ntiltioiL^MO^d- 
vanced IVi to 9Vi in over-the-counter trading, 

American Express edged up M to 48%. The 
financial and travel services company an- 
nounced the resignation of Sanford L Weill as 
president in a move that had been expected. In a 
related announcement, American Express said 
it plans to transfer its troubled Fireman’s Fund 
Life Insurance Co. life insurance business di- 
rectly to American Express and develop a pub- 
lic market for the remaining property-casualty 
activities. 


Advances topped declines 9S9 to 61S among 
le 2,021 issues traded cm the New York Stock 


the 2,021 issues traded cm the New York Stock 
Exchange. 

Volume on the New York Slock Exchange 
increased to 115.66 million shares from 96.04 
million on Monday. 

“The key is that the market does not like 
uncertainty ” said Alan Ackerman of Heizfeld 
& Stem. “Weak economic growth combined 
with uncertainty on the budget resolution af- 
fects individual and institutional investors' abil- 
ity to decide on long-term positions. 

“The market fears Congress will not come to 


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'Vreetingp, Earthlings! Name all the Grow Group products 
and win a free trip to Mars** 


12 Month 
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2V IV IV IV + W 
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12 Month 
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Dlv. Yld. PE MBsHMi Law Qwot Chun 


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U% 

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43V 

I +14 

&, 

S2% 



For our 1984 Annual Report, write: 

Grow Chemical Europe N. V, Oudestraat 8 
B-2630 Aartselaar, Belgium. Dept. G 


28% + % 
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Grow Group 

Awlgrip, Treewax, Devoe, three of our weH-known brand ■ names 


12 Month 
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Statistics Index 

■*'. >2 

« v . AMEX pruts P.17 Earnings reports P.IZ 
.. AMEX h&aftn»P.n FBop rate notes — 

HVSE prices P.10 GoU markets P.U ' 

NYSE kwotoi P.12 (Morast rata P.n ' 

Canadian stocks P.18 Mortal summary PJO 

■ \ Currency tons P.U options p.u 

hQaam odHMf PM OTC stack pjj 

. J' l yt»klnnai P.16 Qtfaar mortots P .n 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


jtcralhrf^fcribimg. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10. 

Page li 


in :n FA 1 1*7; FT 


MANAGER 


i Firms Count Cost of Failing 
] To Study Expatriate Stress 





v- 




By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

/mentauanal Herald Tribane 

P ARIS — Selecting executives who adjust well to a foreign 
environment can be difficult. The most technically com- 
petent executive may not always be the best pereon. The 
wrong choice is expensive for the company and traumatic 
for the individual Depending on the length of the assignment, 
the location, the adaptability of the executive and the family, the 
expatriate attrition rate among companies can be high. 

An expatriate assignment is considered a failure when the 
expatriate family is sent home before the end of the assignment 
because of an inability to cope in a foreign country. 

Because companies do not like to talk about iaflnre among 

their expatriate personnel, it is ■— . — 

r difficult to get accurate fig- . n 

ures. According to UA expa- All execptweS 
triate- training companies. 

Saudi Arabia ranks high on sent overseas 

the Mure-rate list, with a 60- experience a 
to 100-percent failure rate, de- J ■ 

pending on the project. culture shock. 

General Dynamics Services -- 

Co., the subsidiary of the U.S. 

aerospace company that services F-l 6s. believes that an 8-percent, 
attrition rate in Egypt is a success. 

But you do not have to go to exotic locations to find adjust- 
ment problems. Texas Instruments and Digital Equipment Corp. 
admitted problems with employees based in the south of France, 
where wives have difficulty fitting in. 

| Rosalie Tung, professor of management at the Wharton Busi- 

ness School, University of Feansylvaaia, has just published the 
final results of a comparative study of expatriate failure rates 
among U.&, European and Japanese companies, , the first work of 
its land. 


Afl executives 
salt overseas 
experience a 
culture shock. 


>w 


-J-vJ- lowest expatriate failure rate and U.S. companies, the 
highest 

Depending on the company, she found, 5 to 30 percent of U.S. 
executives sent overseas went home before finishing their assign- 
ment In half of the U.S. companies, 10 to 15 percent of expatri- 
ates did not complete their assignment In 10 percent of these 
companies, 30 percent of expatriates were sent home before the 
end of their assignment. 

By contrast, las than 10 percent of European executives and 
. less than 5 percent of Japanese executives went home before 
y finishing their assignment, the study found. Die sample of West 
* European companies included British, Italian, Gennan and Swiss 
' companies. But no French companies participated in the survey. 

Psychiatrists, psychologists and companies who specialize in 
training expatriates believe most corporations do not do enough 
to select die best people to send abroad, and are offering 
companies a variety of new ways to make a better selection. 

According to experts, aD executives seat overseas experience 
some degree of culture shock. Culture-shock symptoms range 
from home-sickness, a need for too much sleep, compulsive 
eating and drinking , marital stress, hostility towards host nation- 
als and dying fits. In extreme cases, failure to cope with culture 
shock can result in psychiatric illness. 

“It is only just bemg recognised that expatriate stress is a 
separate problem,” says Peter Mambw, administrator of the 
Charter rimir. in London. “In terms of psychiatric xDness, it isn't 
different from every day psychiatric illness, but die fact of being 
jjan ‘expat* makes you much more susceptible to psychiatric- 
Ifillness^ _ 

The Charter Clinic, a psychiatric and addictive clinic, treats 12 
expatriates a year, representing 10 percent of the dime's patients. 
It does not provide a "program for failed expatriates,” Mr. 
Marnow stresses. 

New research on expatriate stress is currently being done in 
Britain. Dr. Ricky CapLan, a psychiatrist at St George’s Hospital 
Medical School in London, is conducting a threo-year study of 
expatriate couples to determine how well they cope with stress 

(Continued on Page 14, CoL 4) 


Currency Rates 


CrwMlbles 



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Dollar CMMBTft Franc Startns From: ECU SDR 

IlTMMft no-7* 51*JH 5*Y&b TOW-lttH, 7* 

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(SDR). Ratos orwACoMe to interbank donca/t* at St million mMmum (or oavtvaterw. 


Key Wwwy Rates J***2S 


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June 25 

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tin.- Hong Kong and Zurkfi ppenfna and 
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contox*. A it ericas In U5.Sp*r ounce. 
Source: Haulers. 


OosMos In London and Zurich, fbdnas to ottor European canters. Now Yortnjtosat 4 PM. 
to) crinmerciairranc W Amounts needod to buy one pound (c) Amou nt s needed to t>uY one 
dollar n UnIHotIBO lx} Units at UUOM Units of laaxW.OJ not quoted.- BJU not aeoOablo. 
to! To ouy one pound: SUS.UM 

OtherBoIlarValiies 

Currency Pt* U3J Corrohcy nor U8LS Curronw per U SS Camocr Ptr UAS 

nrowLoostral 0J0 Fln.norMkn US Motor, rtn*. 2874 5. Kar. won S7615 

Austral, l 1^178 omtlrsb 13170 Mox-Mso 399M S e a m . u B SOto 17135 

AHtr.ttML 2L55 H000 KomS 7357 Horw. krone SJU5 SwmLkraaa U66 

neto.Hn.tr. 6105 UtotoarupM 118! PW.PW 17 JO Taiwan t 3932 

Brazil cm. UMLOO mda. niptoh 1,117 JO Port.cscuOo 17100 tMMB 27JBS 

CamdtooS 1J64 IrttoS 19783 SooOirtred 165BS TaUdiBUni 527J5 

DanMiRnno 1US IwwanshetL 1,179X0 Stoo.1 2339 UAC«i7wbi 3673 

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( StortM: 1 JSB5 IrHt) C 

Sources: Banque do Benelux (Brussels}: Banco C oam erdole Hattons tMHan}; Banaue No- 
donate do Ports /Ports}; Bonk of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAH /Osar, rtyok dun am). 
Other data tram Reuters ana AP. 


IBM Buys 
16% Stake 
InMQ 

It Trades Shares 
In Satellite Firm 


Complied by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corp. 
agreed Tuesday to merge Satellite 
Business Systems with MCI Com- 
nnmicaiioas .Corp. in a debt-free, 

MM -mininn unrt f ronayrtin n rtmf 

makes IBM the largest single hold- 
er of MCI stock. 

As.a preliminary step, IBM said 
it also wiB pay an unspecified T>rice 
to Aetna Life & Casualty Co. for its 
interest in SBS. The two companies 
have operated SBS in partnebhip. 

IBM has agreed to take over full 
responsibility for the SBS business,' 
including its outstanding debt, and 
to make future in m^nnent* in 

MCL IBM estimates SBS’s debt at 
S400 Frill in n 

Based in Mclean, Virginia, SBS 
uses satellites to offer corporate 
customers low-cost, long-distance 
telephone service. MCI uses micro- 
waves to offer longdistance ser- 
vice, generally to residential users 
and small businesses. 

Under the accord, IBM will re- 
ceive 45 nriUkm shares, or about 16 
percent, of MCI common stock 
and warrants for an additional sev- 
en miilinn shar e* of MCI COmmOQ 
stock at $15 a share. IBM has 
agreed to bold the shares for a 
minimum of three years. 

IBM also said it would not in- 
crease its total interest in MG 
common stock beyond 30 percent 
without MCTs approval 

MCI slock, traded over-the- 
counter, rose SI-375 per share 
Tuesday to dose at $9,375 per 
share. Based on that closing pnee, 
MCI is paying an initial $421.9 
jn ini on for SBS, not inducting the 
warrants. 

IBM shares finished Tuesday at 
$122,125 each cat the New York 
Stock Exchange, uo $1.25. 

John F. Akers, IBM's president 
and chief executive, said that the 
package reflects the computer gi- 
ant's ‘‘confirming interest in the 
trf fwnnrnnimfati/ws industry." 

The agreement is subject to ap- 
proval by (he Federal Communica- 
tions Ccmmissian, other regulatory 
a gencies and the boards of direc- 
tor of all three companies. 

Analysts said that the plan 
would step up competition in the 
telecommunications industry, par- 
ticularly far the giant Amer ican 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

“In no way is this positive for 
AT&T," said John Bam of Shear- 
son- Lehman Bros7 American Ex- 
press. He said that the only benefit 
for AT&T might be to make it 
easier to get restrictions on its com- 
munications badness rcmovrd- 

AT&T stock retreated 6Z5 cans 
per share alter the announcement, 
to close at S23-50 on the NYSE. 

The plan “makes it very dear 
IBM wants to become a transmis- 
sion company,” Mr. Bain said, add- 
ing that AT&T mil face a stronger 
competitor, “not a substantial 
threaL” 

Glenn Pafnmi of Dean, Witter 
Reynolds said that “this is a mod- 
erate positive for MG and I don’t 
think it’s a significant negative for 
AT&T” 

(UPI, Reuters). 


Bonn Panel 
In Turnabout 
On Tax Issue 

By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Bonn’s Coun- 
cil of Economic Advisers has said 
that it now supports accelerating a 
planned 19.4-billion Deutsche 
mark (S631-bfllion) tax cm into 
one step rather than in two stages 
as mandated by the government. 

The influential, independent ad- 
visory group of econonnsts normal- 
ly issues a report in November. But 
it presented an unusual 18-page 
special report this week urging a 
one- step taxcut to spur growth and 
generate jobs. 

The council had previously stat- 
ed its support for tire tax art in two 
stages — II billion DM in 1986 
and 9 billion in 1988 — as promot- 
ed by Finance Minister Gerhard 
Sloltenbeig and recently approved 
by both houses of the Bundestag. 

West Germany's five leading 
economic-research institutes have 
also called for a one-stage cut 

The council's report was sched- 
uled for release next week, but was 
made available Monday as Mr. 
Stol ten berg detailed proposed 
changes in the government's 1986 
budget. 

The Finance Minister said that 
federal spending would be held to a 
2.4-pcrcent increase in tire 1986 
budget, allowing the government to 
maintain a 25-buIion DM deficit in 
1.986, as is foreseen for this year. 

However, the couatiTs report 
said that Bonn could levy indirect 
taxes on mL alcohol ana cigarette 
consumption to condensate for an 
estimated 6-billion DM expanson 
of the deficit over the next two 
years that would be caused, it said, 
by accelerating the timing of the 
tax cul 


US. Textile Industry Dresses Up 
To Counter Foreign Competition 


By William JEL Schmidt 

Hew York Tima Serna 
■ EASLEY, South Carolina — 
From the road, the red brick mill 
looks like scores of other textile 
plan ts scattered across the low 
rolling hills of South Carolina’s 
Piedmont area. But inside the 
walls of Alice Manufacturing 
Co ’s El^ean mill, one of five 
fabric factories the small family- 
owned manufacturer operates 
haem rural Pickens' County, the 
rinmgftt sue dramatic. 

In roams where workers once 
moved through a fog of cotton 
dost, powerful vacuum hoses 
now gfide along rails suspended 
from the lowering, keeping the 
air deared of fiat The old cutck- 
ety-dack shuttle looms have 
been replaced by sleek high- 
speed weaving machines. And 
throughout the plant, television 
screens hooked to a central com- 
puter flicker a continuous stream 
of data measuring the perfor- 
mance and efficiency of cadi 
piece of equipment on the floor. 

“There have been more 
ritaitg gfi in (he textile industry 
daring the last five years than in 
the previons 100," says Ellison S. 
McKissick Jr„ who not only pre- 
sides over Alice, a company his 
father «nH grandfather founded 
in 1923, but also is the president 
of the American Textile Manu- 
facturers Institute, the industry’s 
national trade organization. 

As Mr. McKissick is quick to 
acknowledge, these are turbulent 
times for America's oldest manu- 
facturing industry. Buffeted by a 
65 percent increase since 1982 in 
the volume of i mp ort s of appar- 
el, fabric and other textile prod- 
ucts, manufacturers are scram- 
bling to reposition themselves, 
investing billkau in new equip- 
ment and marketing strategies u 
an effort to regain a competitive 
ed ge, 

The industry’s problems go 
bade more >h*n a decade: Over 
that time, its largest segment — 
the domestic apparel manufac- 



U.S. Orders for 
Durable Goods 
Up 4.1% in May 


The AstoaoinJ Pros 

WASHINGTON — Orders for 
durable goods, led by a huge in- 
crease in military orders, jumped 
4.1 percent in May, the biggest in- 
crease in six months, the XiS. Com- 
merce Department said Tuesday. 

The department said that orders 
for manufactured durable goods 
totaled $103.8 billion last month, 
compared with $99.7 billion in 
April The montb-lo-momh gain 
was the biggest increase since an 
83-advance in November. 

In April, orders for durable 
goods rose only 0.2 percent after 
declining 2. 9 percent in March and 
2^ percent in February. 

Demand for manufactured prod- 
ucts has been particularly weak in 
recent months as foreign competi- 
tors have taken sales from U.S. 


Thai 

Modem yarn-spinning machinery at a plant 
Alice Manufacturing Co, in Easley, Sooth 


Thn Nr» York Times 


owned by 
Carolina. 


carers, who fashion the mills' 
output of print-doth. denim and 
other fabrics into dresses, jackets 
and jeans — has increasingly 
been overtaken by imports, 
mostly sewn goods made out of 
iibric woven and finished in the 
1 Far East. Industry figures esti- 
mate that, as erf last year, imparts 
accounted for 43 percent of the 
clothing sold in this country. 

But more recently, imports 
have begun to penetrate the mar- 
ket for even basic textile materi- 
als, such as raw yam and unfin- 
ished fabric, and household 
goods like draperies, sheets and 
towels, which areitans that until 
1983 were virtually free of for- 
eign wwmrfil ifm 

In 1984, S4JS7 billion in yam, 
fabrics and dry goods were im- 


paled, compared with $3.46 bil- 
lion the year before. The 41-per- 
cent rise was the biggest ever. 
Last year, for the first time in 
history, the volume of these tex- 
tiles entering the country from 
overseas milk exceeded the vol- 
ume of imported finished appar- 
el 

The flood of new imports, 
which has surged on the strength 
of the dollar, has raised ques- 
tions about the future of yam 
and doth manufacturers. Only a 
decade ago they employed more 
than a miffioa people in 36 
states, with nearly half of those 
jobs here in North and South 
Carolina. Today, employment is 
down to 7024)00, its lowest level 
since records were kept in the 
(Condoned on Page 14, CoL 4) 


Baxter Bid For AHSC Is Rejected 

Crxtftiedby Ow Swff From Dispatcha create the largest health-care com- operate independently Mole being 
FVANSTON Illinois The di- pany in the United States. owned by a Nash viHe-based hoW- 


Compded by Ow Staff Fran Dispatches 

. EVANSTON, DBnois — The di- 
rectors of American Hoaxtal Sup- 
ply Corp. rejected an offer of $3.7 
bflHon to merge with Baxter Tra- 
venol Laboratories Ino, the com- 
pany said Tuesday. 

American Hospital said Baxter 
TravenoTs proposal was rejected 
unanimously by the directors and 
that it would pursue a previous 
agreement to merge with Hospital 
Corp. of America, which is based in 
Nashville. Tennessee. . 

Baxter TravenoJ had offered to 
swap 3D1 shares of its common 
stock per share for one half of 
American Hospital's common 
stock and to pay $50 cash for each 
of the remaining American shares. 

With 72.6 million American 
shares outstanding, the pact would 
have been worth about $3.7 bfllion. 

Hospital Corp. is a leading for- 
profit hospital chain, and Ameri- 
can Hospital is the nation’s biggest 
producer of hospital supplies. 

American Hospital agreed 
March 31 to mage with Hospital 
Corp. in a combination that would 


create the largest health-care com- 
pany in the United States. 

Karl D. Bays, rhairman and 
chief executive officer of American 
Hospital, said the merged firm 
would be known as Kuron Corp. 

“We are comnriRed to forming 
the premia health care company, 
one able to participate in all sectors 
of the U.S. health-care market and 
in selected international health- 
care markets/* Mr. Bays said. 

.Stockholders are to vote on the 

proposed merger July 3. 

In a letter to Mr. Bays last week, 
Vernon R. Loucks, president of 
Baxter Travend, said his firm 
would not pursue its proposal with- 
out the support of American Hos- 
pital’s directors. 

American Hospital said its board 
was concerned about (he debt Bax- 
ter Travenol would incur in the 
proposed transaction, which was 
estimated at more than twice its net 
worth. 

Hie agreement between Ameri- 
can Hospital and Hospital Cotp. 
calls for an exchange, of stock and 
provides for the two companies to 


mg company. 

American Hospital Simply stock 
dosed down S2J7% at 5fo.75, after 
the announcement Baxter Tra- 
venol was at $16, unchanged, and 
Hospital Corp. ended at $48. down 
SI. (AP. Reuters). 

■ Capital Cities, ABC Agree 

Shareholders of both American 
Broadcasting Cos. and Capital Cit- 
ies Communications In& voted 
overwhelmingly Tuesday in favor 
of S33- bflHon merger of the two 
broadcasters. The Associated Press 
reported from New York. 

. The merger, which requires ap- 
proval from tbe Federal Cormnnni- 
cations Commission, is expected to 
be completed early in 1986. It 
would create a company called 
Capital G ties- ABC Inc. 

In a related development, ABC 
said its board has authorized the 
spending of up to $300 minion for 
buying its common stock through 
the open market. United Press In- 
ternational reported. 


This battering has been blamed 
Tor a dramatic slowdown in overall 
economic growth during the first 
three' months of tbe year, when ihe 
gross national product advanced at 
a minuscule annual rate of 03 per- 
cent. GNP measures the total value 
of a nation's goods and services, 
including income from foreign in- 
vestments. 

But analysis said that Tuesday’s 
report provided encouragement 
that the U.S. manufacturing sector 
— and the Whole economy — may 
improve soon. 

“I think we are out of the dol- 
drums,” said Michael Evans, head 
of Evans Economics, a Washington 
consulting firm. “People are begin- 
ning to realize that the economy is 
back on track. The decline in inter- 
est rates is prompting businesses to 
go ahead with prefects they had put 
on tbe shelf." 

The government estimated last 
week that growth in the GNP bad 
rebounded to 3.1 percent for the 
an i e nt quarter, easing fears that 
ihe economy was headed into a 
recession. 

Allen Sinai, chief economist for 
Shearson- Lehman Bros./ American 
Express, called the big increase in 
durable goods orders a “positive 
sign.” 

“It supports the view that the 
economy is emerging from the 
growth recession with Tittle chance 
of a relapse,” he said. But he cau- 
tioned that one month's data is not 
enoug h to manatee scenario. 
“It is too early to tell whether inter- 
est rates have fallen enough to sus- 
tain revived growth of ova 3 per- 
cent” 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baldrige said (hat strength in the 
construction and service industries 
was hdpmg to “keep the economy 
moving ahead" despite setbacks in 
manufacturing. 

He said that recent declines in 
interest rales should bolster the 
manufacturing sector, especially if 
rates go Iowa in coining mouths. 

The big May increase in orders 
for durable goods, items expected 
to last three or more years, was led 
by a 503-percent increase in de- 
mand for anKtaiy hardware. 

Orders for military equipment, 
which tend to be volatile, had fallen 
2.6 percent in April after a 325- 
percent March increase. 

Without the big gain in militaiy 
orders, new ordos overall would 


have risen by a smaller 1.1 percent 
in May. 

Orders in the key category of 
non- military capital goods were up 
a slight 0.9 percent following a 6.6- 
percent decline in April. This cate- 
gory is watched closely for signals 
of industry plans to expand or 
modernize production facilities. 

By industry category, orders for 
transportation equipment were up 
126 percent with an increase in 
demand by tbe military accounting 
for almost all of the increase. 

Orders for machinery were up 
4.1 percent, portly offsetting a 9.8- 
percent drop in ApriL 

Orders for primary metals such 
as steel feu 7.1 percent in May 
following an 115-percent gain in 
April. 

Shipments of durable goods in 
May increased a slight 05 percent 
following an even smaller 0.1 -per- 
cent gain in April. Shipments of 
durable goods so far this year were 
described by the government as 
“very sluggish,” averaging $1022 
billion since January. 

In another report the National 
Association of Realtors said Tues- 
day that U.S. sales of existing sin- 
gle-family homes dropped a slight 1 
percent in May, to a seasonally 
adjusted annual total of 3.01 mil- 
lion units. 

Despite the slight decline, ana- 
lysts said that they expected home 
resales would remain strong in 
coming months because of declin- 
ing mortgage interest rates. 


Profit-Taking 
Weakens Dollar 
InN.Y. Trading 

United Fras International 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
retreated in New York Tuesday 
when an initial rise following 
the report on U.S. orders for 
durable goods gave way to prof- 
it-taking. Gold remained on a 
slow upward path. 

Dealers said the dollar rose 
initially following the govern- 
ment's report that durable 
goods orders rose 4. 1 percent in 
May. but fell back when the 
market reassessed the figure. 

“Most of the increase was in 
defense orders, and even the 
non-defense portion is highly 
volatile and subject to revi- 
sion,” a bank dealer said. “Peo- 
ple took their profits and 
brought the dollar back down.” 

In New York, the pound 
eased to $13880 from $13885 
on Monday. 

Other late New York prices 
and comparable Monday rates 
included: 3.0580 West Goman 
Deutsche marks, down from 
3.0670; 25600 Swiss francs, un- 
changed; 93200 French francs, 
down from 93450; 1,95150 
Italian lire, down from 1.953.00 
and 248.75 Japanese yen, up 
slightly from 248.65. 

Republic National Bank in 
New York dosed cash gold at 
$31635 an ounce, up from $316 
Monday. 


How Argentina Devised Its Bold Plan lor Economic Recovery 


By Lydia Chavc2 

New York Times Serric e 

BUENOS AIRES — In Ihe 
months following Argentina’s sur- 
prise appointment of Juan Soor- 
romlle as economics minister in 
February, hopes faded that be 
could somehow rescue tbe coun- 
try's troubled economy. 

The country's hyperinflation 
soared to more than 1,000 percent. 
President Radi Alfonan talked 
’about the need for Argentina, the 
third-largest debtor among devel- 
oping countries after Broil and 
Mexico, to live stringently, as if tbe 
country were at war. But be offered 
.no specific plan for tackling tbe 
economic problems. 

Political tensions grew and la- 
bor, business and the opposition 
Peromsts began to agree that Mr. 
Alfonsin’s tenure was in serious 
trouble. 

Meanwhile; Mr. Sourrouflle was 
working quietly on a radical and 
far-reaching plan that Mr. Alfonsin 
was anxious to put m place. Tbe 
day he moved into his new office; 
replacing Bernardo Grinspun, he 
began to assemble a small imm of 
American-educated economists 
who were known to be creative 
thinkers and relatively immune 
from the push and pull of politics. 

The program they devised was 
markedly different from previous 
attempts over more than three de- 
cades to reverse Argentina's eco- 
nomic coarse. 

Indeed, Mr. Alfonan, when be 
presented the anti-inflationary pro- 
gram to his own country on June 
14, including a new currency, wage- 
and-price controls and slashes in 
interest rates, called on Argentines 
to support “a profound change” in 

their country's econo mi c system. 

According to interviews with 
government officials who asked not 
to be identified, it was a program 
that resulted from extensive study 
of other byperisfiationaiy econo- 
mies, past and present, and the 


Philippines Talks 
Reportedly Stall 

Reuters 

MANILA — One major Eu- 
ropean bank has declined to 
sign a SlO-biffion rescue pack- 
age put tqgetha by & committee 
representing the Philippines’ 
483 creditor banks, central 
bank sources said Tuesday. 

The sources said tbe rescue 
package; which is regarded as 
tbe key to the country’s eco- 
nomic revival program, could 
not be delivered without all 483 
banks joining. The sources de- 
clined to name tbe bank, but 
said it is disputing its share of 
the bailout plan, which they de- 
scribed as significant. 

A majority of tbe Philippines’ 
creditors signed a financial 
agreement in New York on 
May 20. The nation owes its 
creditors $25 billion. - 

conclusion that if a course of action 
were to succeed, it had to be bold. 

Mr. Sonnouiile, 44, the forma 
planning secretary, headed the 
team personally. His second in 
command was Mario Brodersohn. 
chief negotiator with the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund and a Har- 
vard University graduate. Two of- 
ficials in the Economics Ministry 
mended out tbe team: Jose Luis 
Machines, with a doctorate from 
the University of Minnesota, and 
Adolfo Canitrot. a PhD. from 
Stanford University. 

Their goal was to reverse more 
than 30 years of spiraling inflation 
and to give the nation’s currency 
enough credibility to halt the black 
market’s feverish speculation. 

Mr. Sourrouflle, who received 
undergraduate and graduate de- 
grees in economics from the Uni- 


versity of Buenos Aires and wrote a 
book on Argentina’s economic his- 
tory during a year as a visiting 
scholar at Harvard in the 1960s, 
was already wdl versed in wbat had 
failed to work. 

Since the 1950s, different gov- 
ernments had borrowed piecemeal 
from every school erf economics in 
their efforts to return the country 
to tbe prosperity it enjoyed in the 
1930s. Bat price controls, wage 
freezes and opening and closing the 
economy to foreign investment had 
all been doomed by economic or 
political problems. 

The team also looked at Bolivia 
and Israel, two other nations that 
suffer from high inflation. They 
studied the Gennan experience of 
the 1920s, as wdL 

They saw, one of the planners 
said, that half-measures always 
failed. A wage-and-price freeze, 
tried in Israel in the early 1980s, 
backfired the day controls were 
lifted. Price controls attempted in 
Argentina in the first year Mr. Al- 
fonsin was in office, in 1983, floun- 
dered and antagonized the business 
community. A simple system of 
wage controls to bring the govern- 
ment’s budget into line would be 
unacceptable to the powerful 
unions. 

To put an immediate break on 
inflation, thn settled cm wage-and- 
price controls. While both labor 
and business would suffer, they 
would suffer together, one planner 
said. StiH outstanding, there was 
the issue of how to stabilize the 
peso and give h value after the 
controls were lifted. 

ij= CHARTER =n 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHAIUNGE" 

121 Ft. 12 persons zo anywhere. 

We arc the bett in Greek Islands. 

Mediterranean Crakes Ltd. 

3 Stw£oaSt_ Athens. 

TeL: 3236454. 7U_- 222288. i 


The idea for a new currency 
came from Germany, which had 
successfully tried a similar ap- 
proach in the 1920s when the mark 
had become a \shidess piece of 
papa, according to sources. Mr. 
Alfonsin chose to name it ihe aus- 
tral. a word meaning southern but 
evoking for Argentines a sense of 
discovery and pioneering. 

To give the austral backing, the 
government would attempt some- 
thing not previously tried in Argen- 
tina. Mr. Alfonsin would pubfidy 
promise not to print currency that 
was not backed by revenues. 

As planning progressed in 
March, a handful of Peromst econ- 
omists and businessmen were 
polled for their views and some 
were asked to study aspects of tbe 
plan. The final paacagje, however, 
was guarded from everyone except 
Mr. Alfonsin. The president, anx- 
ious to get going, urged his eco- 
nomic team oa in April, when be 
agreed to their proposals, accord- 
ing to the planners. 

Before it could be began, howev- 
er, the government needed to put in 
place revenue-raising tariffs so that 


when it halted its currency presses 
it would still have funds to pay the 
nation’s bills. Furthermore, Mr. 
Brodersohn bad to renegotiate an 
agreement with the International 



a standby loan, and ihe $43 billion 
in fresh funds from the country's 
creditor banks. 

In ApriL Mr. Alfonsin slowly be- 
gan to prepare his countrymen for 
Lhe idea of sacrifices. Earlier 
speeches promising growth woe 
shelved. Instead, the president be- 
gan talking about the need for an 
“economy of war.” 


SIjtapman 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTREND 11 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

y«Med the kflomng 


IN 1980; -4-1659 
IN 1981: +1379 
IN 1982: +32% 
IN 1983:— 24% 
IN 1984: -34% 

JUNE 20. 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $87,096.25 


Now Jfefk 10005 212-269-10*1 
TfetexBMI 667173 UWL 












•Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


Tuesday s 

mse 

dosing 

Tobias include itm nationwide prices 
opto n» cutting on WoH Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


'ttMMth SB. 

■ MMuSw Mode Dlv.YM.Pe lOfcHMl U* 

(Continued from Page 10) 
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244k im Muntrd 04 U 13 4 

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21k 2b + to 
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2Vi 2ft— ft 
21ft 21ft + ft 
16ft 16ft 
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15% 15* + * 
31ft 31ft + b 
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74ft 77b + b 
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29ft 30J8- ft 

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27ft 27ft 4- ft 
19ft 19ft— ft 
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30ft 30ft + ft 
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18ft 15 
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33ft 74ft 
IB 12ft 
69ft 48ft 
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45b 30 
30ft 13ft 
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26b Ofi Ed pt 40* 122 2001 

Mb OtiEdpf 454 122 10OZ 

41 OtlBdDt 724 1X7 *052 

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45 OhEd pf 820 13J 500* 

2SW OhEdPf X06C 95 1100 

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54b OhP pf 8X4 I IA 450* 

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107ft + ft 
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32b— ft 
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67b 4-lb 
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RtooelT 1A0 fcX 11B 
Rif* Aid a 1.9 IS 2019 

RvrOkn 11 394 

ROSJSIW 1,12 14 7 18 

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Rootn* 30$ 

Roenc Z20 93 7 795 

RotJlTl 204 40 10 25 

Rockwi 1.12 XI W 2237 

Rklnfot 135 IX 1 

RohmH Z2D 14 10 444 

Rohrin 10 383 

RoMCm 08 15 35 397 

RoUnEl X7« J 39 82 

RofHna 04 45 16 505 

Roman 57 

Roper 54 40 U 0 

Rorer 1.17 33 17 1358 

Rowan .17 IO 44 571 

RoWD 1074 50 2910 

Ray lilt 9 17 417 

Robnnd 54 L7 18 144 

RustBr 14 208 

R LO Too J6 4.1 9 S3 

RvanH un 35 15 95 

Rvder, m 22 to 731 

Rylond 54 25 16 54 

Rvmar 5 W 

RvmerpU.17 9.1 710 


Hew Issue 


AM ot these bonds hawing boon sold, this announcement appears as a matter o< record only 


June 25. 1085 



Soctete Luxembourgeoise de Centrales Nudeaires 

SocWt6 Anonyme, Luxembourg 

DM 150,000,000 

TU % Bearer Bonds of 1985/1995 

secured by assignment of the rights under a LEASE CONTRACT 
not terminable during the life of these Bonds with 


50ft 35V 
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31ft 19V 
20 15 

71ft 16 
18b 119 
10 5* 

2ft IV 
34ft 21*1 
34ft 229 
35b 24V 
22* 14V 
lib 9 
18b 371 

34b 2391 
54 51 

28ft 17V 
9ft 8k 
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51 31 

2 ffb lift 
31b 20ft 
43b 28 
54b 50ft 
34b 27 
22to 15b 
12b 9ft 
9to 4ft 
13b 9b 
2B 17ft 
47b 33 
49b 34b 
13ft 7b 
32ft 22b 
40b 48b 
41b 24ft 
14ft lift 
43b 20to 

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14ft 12ft 

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5to 3b 
44*6 3® 
Zlb 12b 
2Bft 20 
32ft 2Tb 
45b 40b 
39* 29ft 
106b 97 
31* 19ft 
19ft lift 
38b 25b 
14* lift 
25b II 
3Sb 28b 
30b 17b 
39* 24 
8b 4b 
14* 17 
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2X0 45 13 48 44V 

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JO 25 15 16 31 

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73 510 521* 


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104 3J 12 1264 43ft 

303*65 2 S2ft 

100 45 14 8 31ft 

150 75 8 42 21ft 

IJB 70J 9 11* 

103 7b 
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2.16 75 9 3S7 27ft 

lot 17 13 448 45ft 

la 12 9 5032 38to 

.12 IX 18 854 IZto 

76 20 14 93 31ft 

IS 391 40* 
1.24 XO 10 1147 41ft 

52 17 10 41 14b 

14 2 41* 

02 IX 10 214 41b 




Rheinisch-Westfalisches Etektrizitatsweric AG 

Essen, Federal Repubfic of Germany 
- Stock Index No. 475935 - 


Dresdner Bank 

WrtiengoseJHchaft 


Issue Price: 99 Mi % 


CSFB-Effectenbank AG 


Deutsche Bank 

AkVangeoellsctiatt 


Banque Paribas Ca^tal Markets 


Goldman Sachs Internationa] Corp. 


Kredietbank International Group 


ABD SftOirttift# Corporation 
Abu Ohsbl Investmant Company 
Atgwnena Bank Nedartand N.V. 

AHIMal Group 

Amro Intumatkmal Limited 
Arab Banking Corporation - - 
Daus A Co. GmbH 
Badan-Wurttambergfache B»k 
Aktlftopemoltocheft 
Banca Commercfale ItaUana 

Banca del Gottardo 
Banca* Maxkmile dot Lavoro 
BankAmariea Capital Markets Group 
Bank Ifir Genwtnwfrtacfaaft 
AktlengMftHschaft 
Bank Lay International lldL 
Bank of Tokyo Internati o nal Limited 
Bankers True! International Limited 
Banque Bruxanas Lambert &A. 

Banque Franc al ee du Co mm erce Exrtrietir 
Banque Generate do Luxembourg SJL 
Banque I nd oauaz 

Banque Internationale A Luxembourg SJL 
Benque Natkxwie de Paris 
Banque Worms 

Barclays Mer ch ant Bank Limited 
Baring Brothers A Co, Umttad 
Beyarieehe Hypothefcen- und 
Wechael-Bank AMtengeaenachalt 
Bayerfscbe Landesbank Gtrozontrale 
Bayerische VarrintbMifc 
AJctfengaaeOachatt 
Joh. Baranbafg, Goealer & Co. 

Bergen Bank 

Berliner Bank Akttangesefechaft 
Sertktor Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 
Catese da* 04pdts et Consignations 
Chase Manhattan Capita) Markets Group 
Chase Manhattan Limited 
Chemical Bank International Group 
CIBC Limited 

Cttfcorp Capital Markets Group 

Commerzbank Aktta*gase 8 sehaft 
County Bank Limited 
Credit Commercial de France 


Credit Industrie! et Commercial de Paris 

Credit Lyonnais 

CrMHduNord 

Credttanstalt-Bankveraln 

DaHchl Kangyo International Limited 

Dahwa Europe Umited 

Den Danske Provhwbank A/S 

Den norske Cradltbank 

Deutsche Glrazentrale 

- Deutsche Kommunalbank - 
DSL Bank Deutsche Stedhmqa- und 

Landesrentenbank 

DG Bank Deutsche Genoesenechaftsbank 
Ensidlda Securities 

Skandlfwvtska EnskOda Limited 
Buropean Arab Bank 
European Banking Company Umited 
Generate Bank - 

Genoesenschaftfictie Zentralbank AG 
Vienna 

Glrozeotrato und Bank 
der oterr ete htochen Sparicassen 
AkUengaseHschart 
Grunenus & Co. 

Hambros Bank Limited ■' 

Haaattche Landesbank - Glro ze nt rato - 
HUl Samuel A Co. Umited 
Industriebank von Japan (Deutschland) 
AkbengeaeAeehaft 
Istituto Bancario San Paolo dl Torino 
Kamatn»08al{ft*pBnhid 

Kkfater, Peabody International LlmHod 
Ktabmort, Benson Limited 
Kredtetbank N.V. 

Kuwait Poralgn Tradkig Contracting & 
knestmentCo. (SJUL) 

Kuwait International Investment Oo. sJLk. 
Kuwait Inveetmant Company (SJLK.) 
Landasbank Rhdnland-Ptalz 

- Glroa o nt ra le - 
Lazard Pr*rea et Cte. 

Uoytte Bank International Limited 
LTCB International Limited 
Mamiescturera Hanover Undtecf 
Merck, Fincfc« Co. 


Morgan Grenfell & Co. 

Limned 


MerriB Lynch Capltsl Markets 
B. Metztor eeeL Sohn A Co. 

Mitsubtehi Faience International Limited 
Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited 
Morgan Guaranty Ltd 
Morgan Stanley In t er nationa l 
The MUdro Securities Cot, (Europe) Ltd. 
Wppon Crerfit intamatkxia] (HX) Ltd. 
Nomura International Limited 
Norddeutsche Landesbank ta roza nt ia ie 
OaterreldMadia L3ndearhank 
AktfengeseBsdwft 
Sal. Oppanhetm Jr. A Cl a. 

Orion Royal Bank Limitod 
PK Christiania Bank (UK) Limited 
PosttoanUd 

Privatbankan Aktteeetekab 
Rabobank Nederland 
neus ch o l A Co. 

H. M. Rothachfld A Sons United 
J. Henry Schroder Wagg A Go. Lbntted 
Sdiwebserieche Hypotheken- 
und Hen delabenk 
Smith Barney, Harris Upham a Co. 

Incorporated 
SocMMGtednrie 
Sumitomo Rnance international 
Svenaka Hand elsb anken ftoup 
Swiss Bank Corporation In te rnational 
Umttad 

Swiss VPtksbank 
Trinkaus A Bwkhardt 
Union Bank of SvritaMland (Seeurttlea) 
Umttad 

Vertiand Sdnrabsrfschar KantomBrankan 
Venrim- und Weatfaank Ak M an g aaw Uschat t 
M. M. Worbuig-Brinckmann, Wirtz A Co. 
a G. Warburg 4 Co. Ltd. 
WastdautscbeGanosdan a c ha ft a * 
Zentralbank olG. 

W eatdeutache Landesbank g waumnh 

Wss U Ma nb an k Aktlanga sellach B H 

Dean Witter Capital Markets 
Inte rna tio na l 

YamaicN IntanwUonsI (Europe) Lbntted 


32b 24b 
18 12b 

14* 8b 
70b 98* 
67* 38b 
41* 29* 
15* 12* 
43b 27 
19* 12ft 
SOU 22ft 
40* 27ft 
23* 18 
25ft 20 

2K Sto 

35 23 

sar 

44 29 

38ft 31* 

3?“ a* 
37b 23 
16* Uto 
Bb 6b 
27b 14ft 
20 11* 
17b W* 
82* 55b 
29 19ft 
26to 18b 
17* 11b 
27* 15* 
59 33ft 

38 3»to 

43* 31* 
44* 41* 
24* 17* 
23ft 14b 
20* II 
SO* 39* 
21* 7* 

16ft lift 
31 !9to 

11 8ft 

3* 2* 

20b 14b 
11* 9* 
34to 2* 
Zlb 15b 
34 34b 

12 Bb 
4S* 33 

39 34 
53* 34* 
21ft 15* 
12ft 2 
79b 34* 
21* 18* 
Ub 14b 
7ft 3* 

4ffto 23b 

52* 43* 
W9 Wft 
49b 34* 
11* 7 
38b 24 
Oft 23to 
ITU 14 
21b 17* 
35ft 28ft 
15ft 11* 
65 39* 

38b 29b 


SOU 34* 
33* 24* 
tZ* 7* 
19b 11b 
25ft 17 Vj 
ttb 62* 
177b 131* 
>to 2* 
77* 53* 
19* 12b 

S * 15 
49ft 
35ft 23U 

15* 12* 
48b 51* 
5b 2* 
302*221 
7* 13b 

48ft 24ft 
3Vb 25b 
45ft 32ft 
35U 20 
17* 9* 
30* 20* 

S b 3Tb 
U 31b 

2* 

34* 75 
147ft 86ft 
3ft 1 
34* 15* 
39 28* 

30ft 21 
4* 2 


1.46 11J 21 12* 

2.18 1X1 26* 16b 

Z10 1X2 33x 16 

4 U 7 2201 22b 
67 4ft 

JO 1J 12 573 42 

17 38 14ft 

40 13 IS 96 34b 

1X0 48 8 154 25* 

1X0 1.9 14 487 53* 

136 66 10 5315 38ft 

VJQo 9A SS W 

1J4 45 7 443 29ft 

S 17ft 

M IX 19 341 38* 

J2 5J 32 290 13b 

JO 25 8 88 24* 

237c 45 1101 36b 

JO 10 4 303 27b 

J2 23 14 287 39* 
6 340 ito 
xa 62 13 15 Wb 

1J0 84 I 270 Wb 
1X0 14 14 1820 41* 
4.12 AJ 4 61 
JO VI 9 14SB 34to 
3J0 1U 48 31* 
JB 14 19 272 13ft 
32 36 230 Vto 

2J0 XI 11 4441 68* 
1X8 U 18 25 C6to 

1.16 3X 13 319 38* 
2X0 117 15 411 15b 
145 M 7 609 36ft 
-14e IX 13 1714 Kb 
UO 45 13 16 26ft 

120 62 S3 39 
740 104 38 23V. 

250 19 J 25b 

248 BJ 11 67 Taft 

1X0 14 11 90 42to 

120 35 10 2840*23% 
113131 J 40 7 6ft 

116 8X 839706 27b 
1.92 87 7 4019 22b 
1J0 45 8 349 24* 
2J2 7J> 10 864 40 
182 95 452 38ft 

260 99 3 26U 

172 19 38 29* 

1X8 27 12 *8 37 
.12 9 19 367 13ft 

58 29 3 220 7 
.13 5 17 1038 26ft 

29 1251 1 3b 
154 75 8 -365 17* 
UBJ 75 9 892 82 
52 25 11 37 26b 

IJ8 75 10 1381 24* 
m 4.1 319 8 12ft 

314 18 

1-92 3J 10 8559 SJft 
IX U 1 85 32ft 

1J4 *3 II 538 39ft 
136 29 16 1569 62to 
JO 17 18 1131 21* 

54 15 12 309 22to 

32 27 10 86 lift 

180 45 a 947 47b 
11 132x71ft 

52 18 9 97 13* 

M 12 12 277 30* 

1500119 47 II 

.12 4X 40 3* 
56 18 10 6 19* 

514 7J 9 47 10* 

150 19 13 2102 31W. 
150 45 11 1156 19* 
IX 15 U 109 27* 
1X0 BJ 40z lib 

IX If 8 13x41* 

40 U 1 288 24* 

1.10 25 10 383 47to 
1J4 U 15 144 21b 
393 3* 

JO 5 825 77ft 

AOm 11 190 19ft 

JO 63 31 370 17* 

33 Sto 
1 58 U 14 1W 40to 

X U 10 4 36b 

154 11 

150 4J II 438 49b 

55 12 4 101* 

JO 4.1 12 649 45to 


1* 

9* 

*4*— to 
Z7b+ * 
54 + to 

32*— to 
28 —to 
TOO 4- b 
23ft + to 
25* 

11*— to 
41* + * 
22 + to 

13* — to 

Sto"+ * 

72 + to 

32* + to 
lift * to 
» 

4b 

31* + b 
2BU— to 
16* + b 
24 + to 

38to— M 
36* + * 1 
131 +3 

64b + to , 
55ft— to i 
24* 

28 

ioft— to 

u*+ * 
35*— to 
8 * +* 
58*— to 
t3ft— U 
58 + * 

21* + * 
nb— to 
2* 

27* + to 
23ft— to 
17* +* 
12* + * 


44b 

lift 

31 + * 

15ft + * 
17* 

14ft 

9b + to 
1* 

33b + ft 
33b— to 
26ft— * 
22 + to 

lift 

4to + to 
31 + * 

51ft— * . 
27* 

9ft 

111* 

35* + U , 
24b- * I 
31to 

43 + * 

52ft 

31b— to 
21*— to 
lift + b 
7*— to 
12* + ft 
27* 

45U 

37* 

lt* + ft 
31*+ to 
40* +lb 
4Tto 

13ft— to 
41* 

40b— 1 
12* + to 
16 + to 
15*— b 


14*- to 
26ft + b 
35ft 

53ft- to 
38b— ft 
104 + b 

29b 

17ft + to 
38ft + * 
13to + to 
24b— ft 
34* + to 
27 +* 

39ft + * 
4b 


ing at a rate of 10 

r. Howard said, a 

s, a 590,000 home 
In two years the 


19 — * 
4ib— b 
61 

34* + to 

as— 

sh*iS 

$}:a 

35* + to 

¥h 


12 Month 
HWiUtof Mock 


su. om 

EMV. YU. PE MOoHtofiLoiwQuol.QrtB 


109 27* 
40z lib 
T3x 41H 
288 24* 


51 480 7b 

J8 IJ 12 455 37ft 

J8 1.1 13 919 45b 

.90 59 14 25* 15b 

J8 5J 10 118 19 

JO 45 5 34ft 

20 127 14* 

nun bm Mb 

36 IX 15 188 35to 


25ft— to 
28ft 

42 -12* 

33* + * 
4ft — to 
Z7to— b 

1=1 
38ft + b 
gft + to 

34*—* 
13* + ft 
4* 

24b + ft 
13* + b 
17U 

BTto + ft 
24to — ft 
25ft — to 
12ft 

17* +1* | 
52*— * 
32 + ft 

»U + b 
lib + b 
2lft + to 
»* + to 
11* + b 
46ft + to 
21 + to 

13*— b 
»ft 

11 + to 

3 

19ft— to 

io* + to 
n + * 

19b +i 
27ft + 44 
iib + to 
»l + to 
14b 

i7b +Ito 
J1 — to 
2ft + ft 
rib + * 
I9b 

1 7b— to 
5b 

n 

16b— to 
i oft — to 
19* + * 
Uto +1 
Uto— lb 
7 

I7W + * 
Uft— ft 
Uto 

18ft— to 
14ft + ft 
14* 

B* + to 
14ft 


1X0 15 13 534 S3 51ft 52b 

W u 31 57ft 56b 57* + * 

MO 38 40 47 47 47 + to 

95 55 9* 9b 9b— to 

4.15 15L0 1 27ft 27ft 27ft 

24 12 28 27b 27*— to 

148 38 15 850 34b 35 35* + * 
XbU I sa M 15ft 15* + * 
.m 23 % atx Kb »4* is* + * 
M 29 14 137 21b 21 21 

50 4J 208 14ft 14 14* 

93tm. 99 4X102 100* IQQto +1* 


26X 15* 14* 15* + * 
137 21b 21 II 
208 14ft 14 14* 

4*02 lOObtQOb+lto 
615 7 4* 4*— * 


615 7 4* 4*— * 

1X0 13 17 1534 59* 58 58ft— ft 

15 mi 17 16 17 + * 

144 Z4 15 714 52ft 93ft S* +lb 

IJOn 18 15 177 47* 44ft 47* + ft 

106 7ft 7* 7ft + b 

1X0 94 18 11 W% 10* 

143 44 7 04 30* 29* 30 +ft 

J8 Z8 8 259 17b 17 17 

ZS2 134 5 822 19b 19 19b 

342 148 16 27* 38b Mb — b 

3J5 134 67 27ft 27 27*+* 

3J7133 3 36 36 26 + to 

448 115 II 31* 31* 31* + * 

ZJ6 12J 35 lBft 18ft 18b— * 

241 UJ S 17* 17* 17* 

20 J 7 211 40ft 39* 39*—* 

ASb IX 14 16 48 47ft 47*— to 

1J0 240 587 44b 45* 44b + ft 

1 0MO.1 272 109* 109* 10¥to +lb 

JO 27 9 100 15b IMfc 14*— to 
573 2ft 2ft 2* 

55 9 8* 8*— b 

30 1186 « 39* 3»* + * 

42 I J 666 22b 22 22W + * 

77 1807 19ft 19b 19b— to 

Z2S 15.1 94 15 14* 14*— to 

Z2S 74 400 29b 29* 29b + to 

1J4 54 14 391 32to 31ft 31ft— * 

242 104 33 21b 21 21 — b 

1X0 78 15 2 12ft 12ft 12ft 

I.* 55 8 12 19b 19* 19to— * 

ZI6b 44 18 352 49b 40* 48*— * 

107 63 4 58b 50 SB — ft 

244 UX 300 21b 21to 21* 

5 to «* 8* 8*— to 

164 9.1 20c »S* 95* 95* + to 

Z50 VOX 425*25 25— to 

11 T7 12 lift lift— b 

IJD S3 9 318 33b 32b 32b— to I 

JB 14 12 1440 38ft 3B 38ft 

10 20* 20* 20* + to 
150 IM 4 17b 17b 17b 

UM 44 10 1143 46b 43ft 46b + * 

4.16 7J 32 57b 56* 57* + b 

U2»T3J S3 26b 24 26b + b 

U0 94 1 27b 27b 27b— to 

JO 14 23 IM 32ft 31* 31ft + b 

1X0 27 8 938 27 26ft 24* + to 

J4 M 17 915 47 44b 44* + b 

JB 3J 14 10 6b 6 6 

50 3.7 37 13ft 13* 13* + b 

.11* J 38 50 31 20b 20* + b 

1.10 8J 35 13 12ft 12* 

1X0 7J 10 1094 40* 40* 40* 

44 U 12 34 13b 13 13 

JO 43 10 35 17 17 17 

JO ZI 10 267 39* 38b 39 + b 

JO 17 7 151 IS . 14* 14ft — * 


J4 M 17 
30 U 14 
50 3.7 
.11* J 38 
1.10 84 


26m 3 215 38* 38 38* + * 

236 7.1 9 11* 33b 33b 33*— to 

15 154 10 9ft 10 + W 

1.25 62 10 35 19ft 19b 19ft + b 

1X0 4X W 103 25b 24b 2Sft + b 

3X0 4A 11 1040 76b 75* 73b— 1 

4J0 17 1 145 188 145 —lb l 

9 2b 3b 2b + to 
1.12 1 S U 340 74 77ft 73ft +)b 

,Ue J 13 47 1*6 17 17* 1 

1X0 SX 3 20 20 20 — to 

120 4J 14 4fl 75b 75b 75* + to I 

16 5589 35b 34b Mb + * 

13 5 Mb 14* 14* + b 

M0 1J 8 2700 58b 56ft 57A +1b 

6 30 3b 3* 3b + * 

10 389 258ft 255b 257* + * 

SUM 1081 II 17 17b + b 

11 1314 40b 39* 39ft— to 

J4 13 8 414 34 33ft 33ft 

Z92 7X 12 1913 42b 41ft 41* + ft 

11 1844 23ft 22b 23 + ft 

JO U 345 10b 10 KM + b 

Z14 9J 14 23 22* 22*— b 

3X0 79 34 3267 » 37ft 37* + * 

M2 45 0 39 31b 31b 31b 

156 40 6 3515 33 32 32ft + b 

220 63 9 538 33* 32 32* + * 

JOb Z9 13 17 Z7b 27to 27ft + * 

2X0 Z0 18 2353x99 97 to 98ft + b 

402 2 b 2 * zw + to 

.18 1.1 10 3362 16ft 14b loft + b 

JO 12 20 35 32b 32b 32b 

252 BJ 7 1176 3D* 30* 30*- Ik 

121 3* 3* 3* 


58* 32b UAL IXOe M 9 5538 54b 52* 53b + * 

36ft 23 UAL Of 240 7J 2035 33b 32* 33ft + b 

15* 7to UCCEL 17 86 13* Uto Uto— to 

34* 14b UGI UM U II 78 23b 23b 23* 

25b I9ft UGI of 275 TO* lOOz 25b 25'A 25V. + ft 

UM Bto UNCRM 1735 9ft 9ft 9b 

14 10 URS JO 33 14 43 10* ia% 10ft 

38ft 17* USFG 220 S3 40 522 37ft 37ft 37b 

40* 22ft USGl MB 4.1 7 581 41* 40 41 +1* 

IT* 13 UnIFnrf JO 15 II £D 13* 13b 13b — to 

40ft 45 UMIwt 212a 33 9 1 50 58 58 

102ft 75 UntNV 5J6e 52 10 152 102 101 10146 + to 

41b 31* UCamp 144 « II 509 37 36b 34ft + ft 

57ft 32ft UoCOrtr 340 7J ID 4022 44 43* 43* + b 

7b 4* UnianC 14 5b 5* 5ft + ft 

19b 12 UnElBC M2 9.1 6 1848 19 TOW 19 + * 


IXOe M 9 5538 54to 52* 53b + * 
240 7J 2035 33b 32* 32ft + b 
17 86 V3* Uto Uto— to 

UM U II 78 23b 23ft 23* 
235109 100x2Sto2S*25b + to 

1735 9* 9ft 9b 

JO 17 14 43 10* m% 10% 

220 59 40 522 37ft 37ft 37b 

MB 4.1 7 581 41* 40 41 +116 

JO 15 II 50 13* 13b 13b — b 

21 to 33 9 1 58 58 58 



Dtv. VM. PE U»MMfiLowOwJ.O»lie I More inU.S. Are Said 

To Be Falling Behind 

"! I PI 1=5 In Mortgage Payments 

B i By Peter T. Kilbom 

A 5 9to 946 9b + to WfW fpt TUHtS S*f*tC£ 

3 SS Sb-i^ WASHINGTON - A banting group has 

io 331 HfkT* Wb-H reported that in the face of a rdaavdy sound ; 
fr» K ^ ^ 3 m + ft economy, a record number of U.S. families have 1 
J i" S » » been faUbgbdund in their monthly mortgage , 

lS 2S iib ^ \y* + to payments. Far fewer, but soil a near-record I 

u u ton ¥* 1b ' number, are losing thdr homes to foreclosure. 

* ™ sfl 'S T* »‘+b The Mortage Bankers Association said 

j 30 4M «* 4i 6»> +i* Monday dial payments on 6,19 percent of all 

u 1? aria sib 4?S 49b- * home mortgages had Men 30 days or mare into 

j, ^ it* it% “ arrears dumg the first three months of this 

-* « wi y*®- It was the highest figure in the 22 years 

•9 i7 441 to Bb a* ihai the assodarion has been monitoring mon- 

32 n m * 9^ + b JMB :p jWncnll 

% + b The association, which represents banks and 
i* sayings instimtions, said that in the first quarter 

u3- * this year, lenders had begun foreclosure pro* 
» + 3? needmgs an 02A percent of all home loans, a 
®*Z ^ reiatevay small figure but unusually high by 
+ historical standards. It said that 0.79 percentof 
2 gh all mortga^s outstanding were bang fons 
41* + ^ dosed att& end of the quarter, 
fft 1 S Earlier, the Federal Home Mortgage Assoda- 

J» tkw, a private, govemment-creaied investment 
w + g organization, disclosed that 1.17 percent of the 
^S + to loans it had bought art in foredosorc, the high- 
Ift est figure since the mid-1970s. 

+ & And the Department of Housing and Urban 
w* + £ Development said that 30,000 of the loans that 

* it guaranteed through the Federal Home Ad* 
ui ta* ministration were foreclosed in 1984, the last 
sm + to period for winch it has figures. The foreclosures 
v* ex c eed e d the 1983 figure by 5,000. 
i|b- to Experts died various factors, including an 
ub + * unflraknnicnt rate, at 12. percent, that is un- 
^ + usually nigh for a growing economy; slight 
gw— » declines in family incomes after the dfects of 
50 + * inflation are removed; and especially hard 
a!*- * times in certain sectors of the economy, such as 
Hrtl + V3 family farms. 

£ “Looking at the state data, the number of 
i2* + * foreclosures is particularly high in Che farm bdt 

"s 1 — Iowa, minors. North Dakota, Kansas — and 

46b in the timber belt — Oregon,’* said Warren 
1”* + ^ Lasko, executive vice president of the Mortgage 
is* + * Bankers Association. 
ito A still-bigger cause, however, may be that 

i*** dedines in the rate of increase of home prices, 
to less than 4 pescent annually nationwide, and 
actual price declines in some parts of the cotm- 
11* try. 

31* + * “What you're really seeing is another of the 
many examples of stress the system goes 
™ through in me transition from a high-inflation 

35* + u economy to a low-inflation economy” said 
sib * Timothy Howard, chief eccmomisi at the Feder- 
+ H National Mortgage Association, known as 
£ Fannie Mae. 

ii* + * When home prices were rising at a rate of 10 
ito + b percent a year in the 1970s, Mr. Howard said, a 
family could bay, for example, a 590,000 home 
h* ^ with a mortgage of $80,000. In two years the 
am + to home might have been worth $1 10,000, so the 
4?b * owner’s equity was S30JXKJ. That gave the own- 

* er a strong incentive to keep op monthly pay- 
'8 S*+ 1 m meats, even in the face of finandal difficulty. | 
is* IS Today, in extreme cases, the value of a 
21 * + ft 590,000 home mi^it have fallen in two years to 
4 wS + m $75,000. The owno- then has no equity and, 

except for the down payment, has little to lose 
&to % by forgoing payments. State laws allow an own- 
S?— * er to remaoi in the house without making any 
aft** payments, sometimes far a year or more, so the 
g££* owner is able to live there free of mortgage or 
+ * rental payments until the bank finally daims 
m + * the house. 

3?b + * u He can say the heck with it and not make a 

payment,” Mr. Howard said. There’s nothing 
i* — * the bank can do.” 


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13 Month 
HWlLOW MOCh 


5(4. 

Oft. YW. PE lOthh 


UEJMH 8X0 1IJ J* 

UnPoc 1J0 3J 12 1«J 
unPcof 7X5 63 J* 
Unlrovl -18 J 12 ]■ 
Unrvi p( 8X0 14X 
UnlfOr ,, 

UnBrnd >2 113 

UBrd pf II 

UChITV .14 J 47 IBSl 

UnEnrB 2M M 19 U01 

III Hum ZOO 107 3 140 

UlltUPf 3.97 1U 14 

UUkipr 2 J0 121 tooj 

Ulllupf 4.00 117 7 

until Pf 1.90 13.1 34 

umnnn JO Z7 » 63 

UnXInn 32 J 34 7 

UJerfMt 1X4 35 JO 22 

UtCUWM 11 131 

UPKMfl 1 W 

U-MlrO .12 J 8 3080 

USHom a® 

uSL«n JO Z3 » 42 

USStHW J4 2J 14 329 

USSIerl 1X0 3J 19 to05 
U55flpf 6Jlrl2J 3 

U5SM prOJS 99 HI 
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the previous 52 weeks «Hus the current wee* but not the latest 
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percent or more has been paid, ms roars WeMow raw and 
dividend are Show fOr the now stock only- Unless otherwise 
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me latest dsdavatlen. 
a —dividend also ekhnatsl. 
b— annual rate of dividend Plus stock dteUsnu 
c — itaufdaftno dividend. 
cKL— called. _ . 
d — new yearly law. 

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a— dividend Tn Canadian funds, sutHeO tol 5ft non- residence 

l —dividend declared attar splt+ap or stack dividend. 

I— dividend paid ItiFsjrear, omitted, deferred, or no ocHan 
taken at lateaf dividend meeHno. 
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%. BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


Page 13 


vRacal Electronics Posts 
10% Increase in Profit 



RR\\i 


Reuters 

LONDON — Racai Electronics 
PLC said Tuesday that its pretax 
profit rose 10 p ercent in the year 
ended March 31. to £1 32 3 1 mi Own 
(S165.4 mOEmO. from £119.25 mil- 
lion a year earlier. 

Sales in the period rose 36 per- 
cent. to £1.11 b01k>n. from £815.65 
million. Racai said. 

On a per-share basis, profit rose 
to 15 35 pence from 14.81 pence a 
year earlier. 

Racai said the profit figures in- 
cluded a post-acquis lion contribu- 
tion of Chubb & Son PLC 

The pretax profit of Chubb for 
the full year ended March 31 
amounted to £163 mfflkm, Racai 
said. 


;'l Hohsmann Profit 
" f Off 14 % in Year 

^ Reuters 

FRANKFURT —PWHpp Hdz- 
mann AG, the West German con- 
iyl struction concern, said Tuesday 
that net profit in 1984 fell 14 per- 
cent from a year earlier, to 42.1 
million Deutsche marks (S13.6 nril- 
lionX from 48.7 nnfljon DM. 

Sales declined 8.5 percent, to 
2.97 billion DM, from 324 billion 
f DM in 1983. 

Despite an increase of more than 
1; 100 percent in U.S. orders during 

: • J the first five months of this year, 
the company’s overall group profits 
for 1 985 coold decline, the manage- 
v ’ ment board rhafrmanj Hermann 
Becker, said. The strong U.S. per- 
formance win not offset continued 
weak performance at home and in 
foreign markets, he said. 


But to bring the accounting poli- 
cies of Chnbb into line with those 
of Racai, it was necessary to make a 
provision of £131 million, leaving 
. a pretax profit of £15 nnHion for 
Chubb. 

Extraordinary expenditure of 
Chubb amounted to £7.6 minion 
net of tax, the sugority of which 
was in respect of discontinued busi- 
nesses and related to the pre- acqui- 
sition period, Racai said. 

Racai acquired Chubb last Octo- 
ber. Analysts saw in the £ 180- mil- 
lion purchase a chance for Racai to 
improve its flagging profit perfor- 
mance last year. 

The British electronics concern 
blamed the poor performance a 
year ago on problems at its Califor- 
nia-based Racal-Varfic unit, a mak- 
er of low-speed modems which are 
used to hdp transmit data between 
computers. 

Like some other electronics con- 
cerns, the umt overestimated the 
market for perronri computers. ' 

In addition, the. Racai unit ran 
into problems with a chip for a 
modem designed so fit into a com- 
puter, analysts said. 

But Racai is more optimistic 
about the current year. The compa- 
ny said pretax profits for the first 
half of the current year are expect- 
ed to be less than in. the year-earlier 
period because of the planned in- 
crease in costs associated with the 
expansion of reflate? radio, higher 
interest charges and the slow start 
to orders by U.S. companies. 

However, for the full year Racai 
forecast record profits but said that 
growth will depend on the strength 
of the U.S. economy. 

The company is aiming for sales 
approaching £L5 billion this year. 


Schraders to Sell 
Some U.S. Units 
To Tokyo Bank 

Agence France- Presse 

LONDON — Schroders 
PLC, the London commenaal- 
bank holding company, said 
Tuesday it would sell control of 
its Norm American interests in 
banking, leasing and trusts to 
the Industrial Bilk of Japan for 
5107.6 million. 

Under terms of the agree- 
ment. the Japanese firm would 
buy a 51-percent interest in 
three affiliates of Schroders 
Inc, the British bank’s New 
York branch, for S73.1 million! 
In !8 months, rts participation 
would increase to 75.1 percent 
for an additional $343 million. 

The affiliates are J. Henry 
Schroder Bank & Trust Gx, 1 
Henry Schroder Banking Carp, 
and J. Henry Schroder & Co. of 

Canada 

Schroders Inc. will retain 
control of its non-banking U.S. 
af filiates, which specialize in in- 
vestment, venture capital, port- 
folio mBnftgempnt, mergers and 
acquisitions. A spokesman said 
the arrangement would enable 
Schroders Inc. to concentrate 
on non-banking operations ir 
the United. States. 


ADVERTISEMENT — 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
25 June 1985 

Th* mtaucf value quotations shown below or* eg ppned by FundsRsted will* ttw 
exception of some fends wime quotes ore based oa tssos Prices- The Mkwtoa 
mgrjtnol symbols indicate frequency of quotottom sopqHq d Or tbe IHT: 
(d)~tkillr;M-wee*ir; fW-M-nwittlr/ (r) - rwtarty; 0 )-inrspulorl». 

AL MALMANAGEMENT MW) Uovd* Mil POCfflCL--. SF 134® 

(w) Al-Mol Tnwa.XA S Util — t-(w) Lkwtb InfL SmoMr Cos.. $T£S 

BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. Lid. NIMARBEN 

—Id) Boerbond SF M245 — (dlCtanA SMM 

—Id ) CorOjar SF«37joa -(wicloaoB-yx. : |».u 

— id J Eootoow America. — J 11 4100 — Iw tCJossC- Jam — : S7R36 


— (d ) Eaulbow Europe . SF )26SJ» 

—Id I Emrtbaof PoctfiC_ SF 120AM 

—id ) Grobor SF 1077.00 

— (d 1 StockOar SP MMM 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 

-Id I Aslan Growth Fund s«U5 

— (*» l Dhiertxnd — — SF BLAG 

-Iw) FIF — America $17.83 

— fw) FI F — Europe SUM 

-Iw) FIF — Pacific SltM 

— (dl IndOGliezMMmiendsA — *9079 

— la) indasuezluumbonasB S 154.42 

—Id 1 Indosuec USD (MMFl B S 

BRITANNj AJ*OB 271, St Heiior. Jersey 

— Iw) Brit-DoBor income SOJW* 

— <w) BritS Mono&CUrr l»JS* 

—Id > Brit. inllS Monou mrtt SI-MO 

— Id I Brtt. IntU MonouJ’orTf — . 1 1.151 

— Iw) Brit Am. Inc. &Fd Ltd SIAM 

— (w) BritGold Fund SOB45 

— Iw) BrlLMcBrnLCurrency ( MOV 

— Id ) Brit. Japan Dir Pert Fd *0243 

— <w) Brit Jersey Gilt Ftmd £0222 

—id ) Brit. World Lets. Fund, — ~ S 1.110 

—Id I Brit world Teem*. Fund $0712 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— Iwl CopHul Inri Fund— . $ 37.01 
— |w) CaotHU IWIn SA SIAI0 

CREDIT SUISSE {ISSUE PRICES) 

—Id ) Actions Suhseo SF 7*930 

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— Id) Bond Voter DM 11006 

—Id) Bond Valor US-OOLLAR *11954 

—Id) Band Valor Yen Ten 1U2UQ 

—Id) Convert Valor 9w(- SF 110.10 

— Id! Convert voter US-OOLLAR. $122.13 

— idIConasec — 

-Id I CS Funds— Bonds SF 77J5 

— Id I CS Fonds-hrtl SF11L25 

— Id) CS Money Market Fund—. *1049^0 
— (d I CS Money Marker Fund DMiMQAo 

-id I Enwale-valar SFUMJ 

— idlUswc 5ESI59 

—Id 1 Euraoo— Volar. SF J3A73 

-id) Poefflc— volar 5F14M0 

IC 


NIMARBEN 

—Id ) Oaa A 

— Iw I Class B- UA : 

— Iw ) Class C • Jasxsi : 

OBLIFLEX LIMITED 

— M Multicurrency 

— Iw) Dollar Medium Tsrm_ 

3 w) Dollar Loop Term 

— (w) Deutsche Mark 

— tw) Dutch Florin , , .. 

— ( w) Swiss Franc — J. - 

ORANGE NASSAU GROUP _ 
PB 85573. Tne Hraue (OB) 44M70 

—Id) Bauer BMesaMMH- 

PARISBAS-GROqP 

—Id I Coriesa Inlsmalloool — — 

— iw] 0BL1-OM . 


— Iw) OBLIGESTION 

— I«) OBU-OOLLAR— — . 
— Iw) DBU-Y6M-. ■_ 

— Iw) OBLVGULDEN 

—(dl PARC I L.-FUMO 

—Id l PAR IN TER FUND. 
—Id ) PAR US Treasury B< 


S 87.45 

DM 1 JQQJS 
_ SF 93_» 
+ 1 1,IK39 

YWLS9400 
, FL1QS2J4 

SK74 

$ 112.12 

S1NUM 


-HdlRBC 

-flw)RBC 



5KANDIFOND INTL FUND (46B234270) 

—Mix.: Bid SUV offer K57* 

— Iwiacc.: nut tunww 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Dqyanshlrq SQ-London-QKr77-e04Q 
—lb ) SHB Band Fund.. ■ .$2231 

— Iw) shb Inti Growth Fund $227$ 




112X49 
IBS 
S11J7 
10281 

~ ' - S122S 

I w) worldwide Securities S/S 3i'>_ M4.13 
(**) Worldwide Soectal S/5 ZW _ $U15J9 
DIT INVESTMENT FFM • 

— ild ) Concentre— — DM MJ1 

— Hd ) Inn Ront e n f ond dmplm 

Dunn » Karefft * Lloyd Georae, BrewB 
— |ml DLH Commodity Fool- J3£.l9 “ 
— (m) Currency & Gold Pool — " 
— uni WInciL Life Pul. Poo*— J592J1 ••• 
— (ml Trora world Fuf. Pool. JS29.M — ' 

FSC MGMT. LTD. I NV. ADVISERS 
I. Laurence Pountv HllL EC*. S1-4214M0 

— |w) FAC Aikmtlc 

— Iw) F4C Euroeran — $11^ 

— Iw) F8C Oriental. $2549 

Fidelity POB <70. Hamilton Bermuda 
— Iml American ValuH Common- INJ7 
—im) Amer values CunvPrel — $I0).9* 

— Id ) Fldolllv Amer.Aisais- 

—Id I Fidelity Australia Fund- S UB 

—Id ) FJdeWV DJsawerv Fund $«.« 

-id ) Fidelity Dir.Syas.Tr_- 

— f d ) FkJolltv Far East Fund $ WM 

-Id) Fidelity inn. FwW- 

— Id) FUellly Orient Fund- 

—Id > Fidelity Frantfer • Fimd * lisa 

—Id ) Fidelity Pacific Fund— __ *111.95 
-Id) Fidelity Sect Growth FO. — $Ug 
-Id I Fidelity World Fund S3M9 

FORBES PO BW7 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 01 -83M6U 
— Iw) Donor Income. — ... — — - *;J* 

— Iw) Faroes HW* Inc GIB Fd MR 

—Iw) GoW incomo J 7J5 

— Iw) Gold Appreciation *L31 

— Im) Strategic Trocbnq, — — * U7 

OEFINOP FUNDS. 

— Iw) East Investment Fund * p*A* 

— |w) Scottish WorM-Fund 5 ilf” 

-Iw) State SL American- -■ » ls *- 52 

Capii.TrustJ.M,LoftAocnUll49M23Q 



UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 
— id) AmcaOS. St* ■ . SFflJJ 

—Id > Bond- Invest— SF 49JB 

— Id) Fonsa Swfes Sn. SF Vrt-DO 

— jd) Jooan-InvesJ 5F 93ASO 

—id ) Sofii South Atr.Sh. sfaujs 

—Id) Sima {stock Arfee) SF 20QJX) 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

—Id J Uni rente — ; — OMCB 

— Id j Uldfonds DMK.70 

—id) Unlrak— DM77.9S 

— (d)UNIZINS DM112J0 

Other Funds 





O.T. MANAGEMENT IUK) LltL 
— (wi Berry Pac. Fd. Ltd.—— 

— id I G.T. APWlcd Science --- 

-Id < G.T. Altai H.K. GwffkFd 

— (W) D.T. Asia Fuad- — — 

—Id * G.T. Australia Fund— — 
—Id ) G.T. Europe Fund — . . .. . ■ — 
—Ini G.T. Euro. Small Cox Fund — 

—id I G.T. Dollar Fund. — 

—id I G.T. Bona Fund—— 
— id I G.T. Giotai Toctmiov Fd — 
— Id I G.T. HDnyKu Pathtwder — 

—Id ) G.T. investment Fund 

—to 1 G.T. Japan Smalt CoJ-uod — 

—Id ) G.T. TecnnoMV Fund 

—id I G T. Soutn China Fun d .. — 



Renault Sells Slake, Has 
Talks With GM on Plant 


Members 
Of Lloyd’s 
Plan Talks 

By Colin Chapman 

International flerakt Tribune 

LONDON — Members of 
Lloyd’s of London, facing losses of 
about £130 ntiDion ($1663 motion) 
after a fraud involving nearly £40 
million three years ago, are to meet 
Friday to discuss withholding 
funds they have been ordered to 
pay by the exchange. 

Richard Beckett Underwriting 
Agencies, a maftber of Lloyd’s, an- 
nounced in May that it would cease 
trading by the end of this year due 
to losses incurred by the syndicates 
it manages at Lloyd's after the 
fraud was discovered 

Owned by the British insurance 
brokers, Kfinct Holdings, Richard 
Beckett was focmeriy PCW Under- 
writing Agencies, also a Minet sub- 
sidiary. Three years ago PCW exec- 
utives were alleged to have been 
involved in the misappropriation of 
the £40 Tnilfinn 

Minet said the resulting losses 
are the reroonsflxfity erf its mem- 
bers, not tne Minet group. Under 
Lloyd’s rales, each member of a 
syndicate, including those who 
have merely invested but take no 
active part in its business, have un- 
hnriied liability for the syndicate's 
losses. 

Some of the members face bank- 
ruptcy beca us e of the council's or- 
der to pay by July 31 . At their talks 
on Friday, they also wiQ be study- 
ing a variety of legal moves against 
Rlqhard Beck ett . 

Throughout the investigation 
into the fraud, the cooncfl of 
Lloyd's has insisted that members 
of syndicates involved should meet 
their underwriting losses. But the 
members argue that tbe losses are 
directly the result of the PCW 
fraud. 

The memb ers also chatlwige tbe 
, validity of an agreement they 
signed with Minet last year which 
provided compensation for losses 
; due to fraud in exchange for their 
I promise not to take further legal 
action. 

Officials at Lloyd’s repeated 
Tuesday that the members — 
known as Names, because most are 
not professional insurers but nota- 
ble individuals who join Lloyd’s as 
a profitable and prestigious hobby 
—would have to honor the dahns. 

7he only bright spot for the syn- 
dicates is a study by the accounting 
firm Price Waterhouse: According 
to the members’ action committee, 
the study “contains information 
which was not made available to 
Names at the time of the 1 984 offer 
(on compensation with Minet) but 
which would have been material to 
any decision to accept that offer.” 

Tbe committee says it does not 
think the Lloyd’s Names should 
take immediate legal action, bat 
should withhold the funds owed. 

Japan to Cut 
1,800 Tariffs 

(Continued from Page 1) 

goods, to take effect early next 
year. 

Tariffs on 34 other manufac- 
tured items are to be um&teraDy 
abolished and 30 items with tariffs 
of less than 2 percent wil! be ex- 
empted from 1987 duties. 

Tariffs cm five categories erf wine 
and other liquor also are to be cut 

20 percent. 

Tbe affected items do not in- 
dude agricultural staples, such as 
rice and other grains; products 
with quotas, such as beef and or- 
anges; goods supported by govern- 
ment subsidies, such as sugar, and 
crude oil and coaL 

Tbe aim of tbe cuts is to contrib- 
ute to the early start of a new round 
of multila teral uadc talks and ^to 
the mtwnienanre and strengthening 
of the free-trade system," a govern- 
ment statement said. 

The government said it was 
ready to abolishing tarif fs 

altogether on all manufactured 
goods “along with other advanced 
industrialized nations.” 


The Asaodaied Pres 

DETROIT — Renault, the fi- 
nancially troubled French carmak- 
er, said Tuesday that it plans to sell 
its interest in an automotive elec- 
tronics company and is discussing 
with General Motors Corp. a posa- 
ble joint venture at its Mexican 
engine plant 

Renault said it was selling its 51- 
percent interest in Renix Qectroni- 
que SA of France to U3.-based 
Allied Corp., which owns the other 
49 percent and is a major auto- 
industry supplier. The price was 
not disclosed. 

Renix makes electronic igni- 
tions, fuel-injection systems, elec- 
tronic automatic transmissions and 
engine sensors. Set up as a joint 
venture, it will become pan of the 
Aided unit, Bendix Electronics and 
Engine Controls. 

' Separately, Renault said it was 
holding ta lks with GM about its 
engine plant in Gomez Palario, 
Mexico. Renault is understood to 
be seeking either an investment by 
GM to ‘spread the amortization 
burden of the plant’s cost or an 
accord in which GM would buy 
rei gfn« fiom the plant. 

Renault’s plans had called for 
production ot 450 car engines drily 

COMP ANY NOTES 

Ashton Mining Ltd. said that it 
had sold its 38-percent stake in tbe 
Argyle diamond mine plant to Na- 
tional Australia Bank Ltd. as part 
of a levnraged-kase package worth 
100 million Australian dollars 
(S66.1 mfflionV 

Akzo NV, the Dutch chemical 
and fiber group, said it was discuss- 
ing the sale of its American Enka 
Co. unit to an unnamed U.S. com- 
pany. American Enka employs 
4300 producing synthetic textiles 
in North and South Carolina. 

BPC International Ltd. has been 
chosen by India to help build a 
petrochemical complex worth 6.45 
billion rupees ($519 tmOion) at 
Haldia port in west Bengal Reu- 
ters reported, quoting industrial 
sources. BPC is a subsidiary of Per- 
gamon Holding Corp. of tne Unit- 
ed States and Xinde AG of West 
Germany. 

Briertey Investments Ltd. has 
■been told by New Zealand's Offi- 
cial Commerce Commission that it 
may acquire as much as 100 per- 
cent of Dominion Breweries Ltd. It 
now owns 40 percent. 

Deutsche Lufthansa AG and 
CAAC, China’s national carrier, 


by the end of this year, with 80 
percent exported to Kenosha. Wis- 
consin. where American Motors 
Corp. makes Renault-designed Al- 
liance and Encore subcompact 
cars. However, sales of the cars 
have fallen sharply. 

Renault owns" 46 percent of 
AMC and 40 percent of Mack 
Trucks Inc. of Allentown, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

A GM spokesman, Ronald 
Tbeis. confirmed that the Mexican 
talks had been held but said they 
wen; “in a preliminary stage." 
Without elaborating, be said a 
“business arrangement" between 
Reoault, AMC and GM was posa- 
ble. 

The future of tbe $400-roillion 
plant will be a key dement in the 
financial recovery of the French 



The S.F.E. Group 


announces that 


International Energy Bank Limited 


has been renamed 


fmanrial reco 
carmaker, whs 
1984. 


t$l J billion in I 


The Jeep complex in Toledo, 
Ohio, is AMCs most profitable 
unit and employees there have said 
recently that Renault might use it ] 
to raise cash. However. AMCs 1 
president. Jose Dedeurwaerder, has 1 
said repeatedly that Jeep is not for I 
sale. 


said they will launch second weekly 
sendees between Frankfurt and 


Beijing next month. 

Holiday Cora of * 


Holiday Gup. of Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, said it has agreed to sell as 
many as 28 holds to VMS Realty 
Inc. of Chicago for more than $400 
million. Holiday said that its sub- 
sidiary, Holiday Inns, would cour 
Untie to operate tbe hotels under 
long-term management contracts, 


Corp. has sold its 70-percem inter- 
est in Mansion House Securities 
Ltd. to the company’s chief execu- 
tive, Evans Lowe, the two compa- 
nies said. Tbe price was not dis- 
closed. 

Japan Line Ltd. said it would 
withdraw from joint-liner service 
with four Japanese operators on 
tbe Japan-New York route and be- 
gin qrnflar service with Evergreen 
Marine Corp. of Taiwan by mid- 
1986. 

National Semiconductor Corjx. 
Malaysia, said it will dose its semi- 
conductor plant in Seremban over 
the next four to six months. An 
official said the closure was part of 
a modernization and consolidation 
program. 


S.F.E. Bank Limited 

1 1 Austin Friars. London EC2N 2HE 
Telephone: (01 ) 588 1 234. Telex: 881 1 51 1 SFELON G 


Main Banking Entities of the S.F.E. Group 

B.S.F.E. - Banque de la Soctete Financi6re Europeenne 
Paris. France 

S.F.E. Bank Limited 
London, England 

S.F.E. Banking Corporation Limited 
Nassau, Bahamas 


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Bank of America NT & SA - Banque Bruxelles Lambert SA 
Banque Nationale de Paris - Barclays Bank PLC - Dresdner Bank AG 
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Seoul Singapore. Hong Kong Representative Offices in, Houston. San Franasco. Aflanta. Toronto. SOo Fa uio. Mexico Car. Cara c as. Buenos Aires. Bahrain. Jakarta. 
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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSSS 8th 

Srucfio, 2 or 3-roam apartment. 
One north or irnra. 

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AG0KE DE L’ETOILE 

■ REAL STATE AGENT 

764 03 1 7 


FOCH SUMPTUOUS 

Rraphon, 4 tadnjomj, 3 bafa, ihart 
Term poufctn. &nboiy, 563 60 38. 



(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTO CONVERSION I UEGAL SERVICES 


AU PAIR FOR MANHATTAN oupto 
with 1 yen old. 2nd due February. 
tied situation. Minimum I year. Noc- 
moker. Phan tend photo. Ware to- 
Bax 2436. Hwtt Tribune. 92521 
NauBy Cede*. France 


DOMESTIC 
POSmONS WANTED 



SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

-PA/Mtoifeeter & Towttm Gwde 


TkeStressCost 
Of a Transfer 




Weill to Leave American Express 


(Continued from Page II) un .J' W " A _ 

, NEW YORK — American Ex- 
owscas. Dr Caplan hopes to de- prass Q,. said Tuesday that San- 
vdop a preseteaion test to evaluate ford L WetD had resigned as presi- 


Guaraniy. succeeding Philippe 
Coppe. 

Mastercard International Inc. 
has named Serge J. Robert aecu- 



SHOOI TERM STAY. Advantages of a 
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home in mas dudbi, one bedroom 
and more in Porn. 50RHJM: BO rue 
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6 room +■ garden. Id; 325 0929 



TW MHKH3B SPMAiBTS 
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Tax free - LHD - EugX>ftrt deWry ■ 
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380 SEC- Bfadt, S*«r 
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LOW COST FLIGHTS 



YOUNG EEGANT LADY 
PA PARIS 525 81 01 



10 YEARS 

We Mhw Care to the Wortd 

TRANSCO 

Knping 0 con*w Uodt of mare than 
300 brand new cars. 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, for immedHto detaery 

FROM STOCK 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE 

STELLA 

SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUtSB 

To the Greek Wand*. Tixfaey, 
Egypt & krod. 

SaiEng Every Monday from Piraeus 
aid 

THE YACHT4JKE 
STELLA 
OCEANIS 

3 AND 4 DAY CRlflSB 


vdop a prasdecticm test id evaluate ford L WdH had resigned as presi- has named Sage J. Robert oecu- 

PARIS 56ft 0537 1 s abaity to oope with dent, effective Aug. LHe will be live vice-president international. 

_ stress overseas and prevent potea- succeeded by LouuV.Gerstner Jr.. He will operate from ton* bases — 

ba L~ astcrs - , chairman of the company's ex ecu- Paris, New' York and Hong Kong. 

************** One extreme example of an exec- due committee. Mr. Robert previously had senior 

PARIS: 520 97 95 wbye^nabiht>^ cxjpewiihcultur- No reason was given for the res- management responsibility for 
DtsratGutsto young urn pa ^ ignation. American Express said Caisse Nationalc de Credit Agn- 

— - qmdanng the snbsdiayhe had set & Mr. WrfIL 52, woSd pursue cole's international affairs. He also 

vru □j/' octamt i *nv Ki - - sears *2° a . ’ mcc “ an * his own interests and be a consul- has been vice-chairman of London 

YOWG ELEGANT LADY engineering company sent one ^ ;o ^ chainnan, Janies D. & Continental Bankers Ltd. in 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 of ,ts ^ «J»We managers to Robinson 3<L London and assistant general man- 

open a subsidiary in Nigeria. A Mr. Weill has been with Ameri- ager in Paris for the Banque de 

vtP young lady guide ^ mMgpfflBl at the „ for four ^ France. 

Educate^ aradM and Mtagud company's U.S. headquarters start- earned more than 51 million last Nonreefcn-Caribbean Lines A/S 
for dan. awraigs & frawt ed IO Sense Something was gang vear , 

PADS 530 m 84 vmn* ^ . has named Erland M. Raastad 

r 6, ... . . . The financial-services giant said chief executive of the company. 

AurramAu ionic* k jjj5“£" d 1 hs separately that it planned to re- which operates a fleet of cruise 

AMSTERDAM 182197 had become border-line alro- structure the capitalization of its shins from Miami as wdl as the 

TRgTHjug^MPWjpN holies. Like many expatriate cou- large, troubled subsidiary. Fire- Une fleet acquired 

Ch ^ g ~ 55,5?, W S e ^ agamst tw0 . t yp? s man's Fund Insurance Co- taking Mr. Raastad is president 

°f stress: setting up an operation m direct control of the life insurance of Hdicooter Services A/S. of 
* PARIS 527 01 93 * a difficult environment and the business and creating a public mar- OsIoTand^fonneriv was head of 
young LADY irhmgual virja spouse i tdaamx to go to Nigma ket for the remaining property and Chrvslerin Noiway and Austria. 
m the first place which put strains casualty activities. _ . _ . , 


VIP YOUNG LADY GUM 
FriucOrri. u H ig cftre and bftnoud 
for d an, awn ings & trawl 
PADS 530 02 84 


AMSTERDAM 182197 

TRUSTR& LACY COMPANION 
Charming, educated, trawl 


* PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY lllflJNGUAl VIF-PA 


Pearson Taking Over 
As President al TWA 

The .liMiuttv' fnn 

NEW YORK — Richard D. 
Pearson, who last year became 
Trans World Airline's first chief 
operating officer, will move up , 
to president and chief executive 
of the company later this year 
after 3 planned merger with i 
Texas Air Corp. 

Mr. Pearson will succeed 
C.E Meyer Jr., who will be- 
come president and chief execu- 
tive of Hilton International Get. 

a subsidiary of Transworld 

Corp. Mr. Meyer takes over the 
Hilton spot being vacated by 
the retirement next January of 
Curt R. Strand. 


★★ZURICH 558720 ★★ 
SaphatiaMd VIP. Lady PA 


casualty activities. 


jsssssas;^ 

Toledo E£sod Co. hM named h. Gotzen. to Zurich to> 


bond, mnvawon in USA J #uw t uni uwu» 

RUTE INC. & 

TAUNUSSTR. 52, 8000 FSAMCHJRT ^ & ^ ^ Rr * us 

W Gerov, ta (0)49-232351, tfx 411559 PlecM <^pty to you- Trovd Agwtf or: 


sunufe 

2. Kor. Service », Altars 10562 
Telex: 215621, Phone 3228883. 


how to import a European MOTORS GmbH 
CAR WTO THE UJLA. _ T™* 7 . , 

The documtof explore fuOy »4*rt one Sno« 19 72. expene nc ed ot frottafor 
mua do to brow o cor >r»o the U5. Mercedes P«sJ*. BMW. tnmectiato 
saWy and legcft. H indudes new 8 taWy. M seivro. nipat/emt. 

saars-*SA 8 nfsus 

itrang dollar, you can save up to 
USSIanOQ when buying a Mercedes, or 
BMW di Europe & importing it to the 
Statu. To receive tin manual, send 
USJIR50 todd USS! JO far pretwe) te 
Pi. Schmidt. Pastfadn 3131 
7000 Stuttgret I, West Germany 



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Muridi let 395 613 
Geneva N, 327 110 
Zurich let 391 36 55 


Cruise in Begance 

to the GREEK ISLANDS 
EGYPT, ISRAEL 8 TURKEY 

CHOKE Of 7-4-34-1 DAY 

□MSB oat of Athene (Kroem) 



on the marriage. It said that it antiripatwi that T T ^° Efison V 0 ’, „ Tokyo, H. Gotzen. to Zunch m 

This is the first of two articles on Fireman's Fund eventually would . w i“ an ?' a rcQrea u . become a general manager of its 

expatriate stress. Next week's col- be set up as an independent oomna- X ice ' adnu f a1 ' . sei ^, 1 . vl f^ p J^r subsidiary. Amro Bank & Finanz 

umn will look at how companies try ny with its own board of dSS AG ' van W ^ esbo ^ ,c ^ 

to reduce their expatriate attrition and management after the public ^ Toledo Edisons nuc^r nove j f rom Hong Kong to take 
& , puutH. —n—an, a smior vice-oresi- u. -r-.t 


market is created. 


Japanese Firms Reduce Ton smann Named 
investment in Chips To Morgan Post 

Return O 


program, was a senior vice-presi- 
dent for nuclear operations at Cin- 
cinnati Gas & Electric Co. until last 
year. He replaces Richard P. 


over the Tokyo branch. 

Bank of New Z ea l an d Ltd. has 
hired Robert J. Hinen as executive 


Crouse, who is to become senior vice-president responsible for US. 


Ream 

TOKYO — Japan’s investment 
in semiconductor plants and relat- 
ed equipment is expected to fall 21 
percent, to 606 billion yen (S2.44 
billion}, in the year ending March 


By Colin Chapman 

International Hernia Tribune 


ants and relax- international Herald Tribune of tour company, British Cale- 
ected to fall 21 Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. of donian Travel Holdings (BCTH), 
ion yen ($2.44 New York has appointed H. Hen- after rising to sell off its retail 
ending March amg Tonstnann vice-president in outlets. Barry Male, former manag- 

iriflA «La AAMMAntofil A>««t - *• r m m (Y.iU 


vice-presidenL operations. 

Caledonian Aviation Group PLC 
has restructured the management 
of its tour company, British Cale- 
donian Travel Holdings (BCTH), 


operations. Mr. Hirten has worked 
at Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. for 
34 years, most recently as vice- 
president in charge of Morgan's 
interests in Australia and NewZea- . 
land. ' m 


v _ ismann vice-president m outlets. Barry Male, former manag- Inqierial Gro 

31, from 763 bulioa yen in 1983. charge of the commercial and tug director "of Blue Slcy Holidays, pointed John A, 
the Ministry of In ternaiional Trade banking dtvirion of the Brussels- becomes deputy chief executive of ing director of 
and Industry said Tuesday. based clearing system for interna- BCTH, and John Standley, former- Ltd. Mr, Bloxcid 

The ministry blamed a fall in tionaHy traded securities. He sue- ty sales director of Jetsave. be- 
demand for the lower investment, ceeds Christian M. Jacobs, who comes sales and marketing direc- 
revealed in an annual government becomes general manager of the tor. Chris Smart continues as chief 
survey. Belgian banking offices of Morgan executive. 


Imperial Group PLC has ap- 
pointed John A. Bloxcidge manag- - 
ing director of Imperial Tobacco 
Ltd. Mr. Bloxcidge is president and 
managing director of Wilkinson 
Sword Group Ltd. and corporate 
vice president of its parent compa- 
ny. Allegheny International Inc. 



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U.S. Textile Industry Battles Foreign Competition 



AUTO CONVERSION 


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HOMO KONG (IU3}723 12 37. 


WINES & SPIRITS 




(Continued from Page 11) imports and a domestic market that 

1940s, and last year hard-pressed “ growing at 1.4 percent a year, 
manufacturers were forced to shut L The Commerce Department says 
down 60 plants. thai manufacturers last year spent 

In their scramble for safer ar«»rdS 1 .? bUbpn on new eqitip- 
ground. the textile manufacturers from robots that 

have mounted an insistent cam- automtic^yl<^d and unload pd- 
paign to persuade President Ron- ,ets ^ and cotton to high- 
tSfeaganaShStigress to tighten speed machines that use jets of wa- 

controls on imports and protect ^ w 

their sales, which totaled S55 bfl- weave dotiL^f^ure is expectal 

lion last year. But at the same time, f 0 . 1 ^ 52 “Jf® “ 
manufacturers have embarked on a mdu?tfY gambles that higher pro- 
variety of strategies on their own, tiuctrvit y will cm costs enough to 
Tanging from pumping Mlions into 


a much greater emphasis on spe- 
cialty products and marketing, in 
order to seek out the high-margin 


rate of 2 percent a year, and im- 
ports growing at 30 percent, the 
difference has got to come out of 


niches that foreign competitors jobs here at home." said C Hunter 


cannot yet reach. 

For example, a Burlington In- 
dustries mill in Ervrin, North Caro- 
lina, five years ago turned out just 
six varieties of denim, most of them 
the standard, heavyweight stuff 
from which blugeans are mad* 
Now' the plant uses its looms to 
produce and finish 21 separate va- 
rieties, ranging from high-fashion 
stretch denim to various shades of a 


G allnun. senior vice president for,: 
manufacturing at the M. Lowen£~ 
stem Corp., which has spent mcrev 
than $110 million in the last five 
years on plant modernization. 

In that time, the company has 
consolidated operations by dosing 
three plants and selling two others. 

In turn, the company has reduced 
its payroll to 9.000 workers from 
14,000. “It comes down to a ques- 


longwerdue plantS)dearizarion “ whco y°“ transfer a liquid as- brushed, veioor-like fabric, market- tion of sumvai,”said Mr. GaUman. 
programs to new markerina pro- ^^‘^“toironandstoLyou ed under such catchy trade names “But I think that, overall, we have 

grams to increase revenues from fra taking a real gamble, particu- as Hug Bunny, Crossplay lce Blue made some real improvements in 

high-margin fashion products that £iiyn an industry where the pub- Cimkle and Easy Gomg btripe. productivity.** 

hmvim rarmnr wi mrh bc market puts you at a discount,” While a weaker dollar and According to statistn 


imports cannot yet reach. 


said Mr. Metoer. On the other 


While a weaker dollar and According to statistics from the 
tighter enforcement of trade quotas Textile Manufacturers Institute, . 


^hav^a^leoflcyo- ^ 4 * ^ 
aged buyouts. At least six since - w r. 

1982 h>Mi toroed private, . radnfing Many manufacturers, induding 
Cannon Mffls and Dan River Inc. ^ Abce, a®S 

Stffl others have moved to lake ad- Here in SSfr. M^SrSS 
vant^^toww^move^by ^ded installing 280 

sending thar ovm fabric to the Ca- ncw Swiss-made weaving machines 
ribbean to have it sewn into appar- ,u a . u- 


their own de- 


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textiles and apparel through April 
were off 4.4 percent from last year's 


record pace, for e 
mestic shipments c 
riod still dropped ! 
That means the 


increase of more than 4 percent, ^r 
Stiff, the textile industry was 


for example, but do- slow to modernize. Even now, bare- 


new Swiss-made weavi 
that he said cost him 


•meats over the same pc- 
opped 8 5 percent 
ans the industiy is con- 


ly 30 percent of the more than 
200,000 looms in use in domestic 
nulls today are of toe more modem. 


el and then reimported, nariy duW 5E, u Sd tTbuild aS^ 
free, under Provision 807 of the w f K j e factnrv in 1955 “Tfw 
United States Tariff Schedule. Im- uyt 


ving machines tinning to go through a transition, shuttle-less variety, 
m three times which. Mr. Meltzer said, will see Mr. McKisdck t 


POS 

moNS 

i AVAILABLE 





FP 

R -t — 








port shipments of this sort in- ^ 


don’t automate, you don’t survive,’ 


times which. Mr. Meltzer said, will see 
uip a •‘the marginal plants, toe weaker 
I you plants, go by toe boards.” 


Mr. McKissick describes the in- 
dustry as being “at war” with for- 
eign producers, and he likens his 


small rural communities own office to a bunker 


i_. -v, i,„ ,__ r u* — «. of toe southeast, a region that ac- 

cr ^f cd ‘? 24 paeon last year. Some of toe larger companies, counts for nearly two-thirds of toe 


At issue are a variety of claims 
that domestic goods must compete 


“To tlunk that toe textile tndus- like Burlington Industries, have nation's textile employment, the in- unfairly with imports. Not rally are 
try will ever return to what it was been investing 85 percent of their dustiy*s recent troubles have had a toe imports made under waiting 
even a few years ago is out of toe cash flow into new machinery, a devastating impact Often toe miff conditions and wage rates that are 
question, raid Jay Meltzer, toe tactic that forced them to squeeze is toe only employer in town, and illegal in this country, but U.S. 

fP.Yti Ip annlver with fin Hman : : L_1 1: ... _r ., ^ , . T 


BONDING AVARABLE 

USA (714) 898-2182 

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FOR A REAL VJ.P. YOUNG 1ADY 
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London: 836.4802 
New Yoifc 7513890 
Frankfurt: 72.67.55 
Hong Kong: 5.420906 


coiporate dollars in an effort to just the company’s return on average to other jobs, 
hang in there.” equity has declined, rather than im- Modernize 

Not since the nriD owners first proved. . nated many jc 


lives, and lack the skills to transfer oping markets, offering subsidies 
to other jobs. and enforcing trade restraints that 

Mode rni za ti on itsdf has elimi- Mode American imports, 
nated many jobs. Since 1978, when The solution, Mr. McKissick 


moved their factories to toe south- As a result. Waff Sheet continues Burlington began its modemiza- says, is for Congress and 


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But what is not yet clear is whether and Burlington are all trading well than $480 million on its capital 20 top textile importing nations, 

the industry's enormous invest- below their book value. program since 1980 has, over the broaden restraints to rover addi- 

nipment and In addition to automating and same period, cut bade to 32,700 tional apparel and set up a new 

pay off. giv- modernizing their plants, Ameri- employees from 41,400. import-licensing system to 

essure from can manufacturers are also putting “With toe market growing at a strengthen enforcement. 


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<3 


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LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort 5orvieo. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


U l IXMX^OCTCKBER 24 - 251 , 1985 . 

f The axth annual International Herald Tribune/OS Daily Conference on 
“Oil and Money in the Eighties^ win take place on October^ and 25in London. 
The theme of Oils year's conference is “Surviving in a Competitive Environment’'. 

The program, deigned for all senior exscutivesin energy and relatedfields, will address the 
key Issues affecting the current energy situation and assess future trends and strategies. Key 
speakers will include: H.E. Dr. Professor Subroto, Minister of Mines and Energy, Indonesia ■ 

The Honorable Johns. Herrington, UmtedStatesEnergySecretary; ABenRMurray, 

President Mobil Corporation; Arve Johnsen, President Statoil and The HonoraWe John 
Moore M.P, Financial Secretary to the Treasury, United Kingdom. 

For fun details, please contact the International Herald Tribune Conference Office, 

181 Avenue Charie&de-Gaulle, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France 
Telephone; (33-1) 747-1385, Ext 4568. Telex: 613595. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


Page 15 


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[Gold Options (priev«inlTaz.L 


INTERNATIOIVAU 
BUSINESS OPPOKTUNiTIES 

1 !k l'f S TV If X I • C0 1 7X .• '.'.f ftiwtst 5Tf -V I • COKJAmfR IIWCS Mtfw T 

Container Investment |i 

AN OPPORTUNITY THAT OFFERS A HIGH INCOME PLAN £ 


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1 manage ana acexAe a tow class wo«*wde conror»e» leosorg 
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• A GUARANTEE OF RSURN OF CAPITAL UNDBFNNNS) BY 
5ECUIHnE5 HELD IN 1RUSI • HIGH FIXED INCOME UP TO 173. PER 
ANNUM ON INVESTMENTS OF 5 5320 (montaly ana w nxmffrty - 
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For Ikoe aerate at tea mwosment oooortuniiv ttfeohane 
Soidhampton (0703) 335322 at our lonocn CfiCB. 01-499 S5W 
[24 hour serve fr) or lend 08 couoan to 

Pbose sona me derems of vouf Container irwsftwvif Oeporturwy 

NAME 

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Tei No («Motk> 


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, « ll li v*|l. 1 l.AH 


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INTERNATIONAL 
BISIXESS 
OPPORTI .MTI ES 


Appear* +t*ry 

WEDNESDAY 


-KVB Kurc. 

1 he 24 cm rut Scotch. 


1. Qua* do MooeBfamc 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


Htr-dne-Counter 


Main * w 

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SaiHk . Net 

!M» HW LOW JPALCWe 


NASDAQ Ncrffoflcif Market Prices 


5nl« in iW 

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(Continued from Page 15) 


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SUOaRWORLO 11 (NYCSCE) ' 

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449 179 Jul 194 194 . JJ8 194 fM 

494 4A5 OC1 423 4L33 417 421 +A1 

Eat. Solas Ifcxn Prov. Softs 7804 
Pm. Dev Open Hit. 88,109 oN442 
COCOA (HYCSCEI 
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2400 1980 JUI 1980 199$ 1943 1H4 —14 

2415 1963 S« 1970 1994 1947 WW +11 

3337 1945 Dm 195B 1900 - 1958 1947 +« 

2190 1955 Mar 1931 • 1995 1970 1971 +10 

2110 I960 May . „ W +10 

2110 1940 JUI 20T0 3011 2010 WIT +13 

2330 2045 Sm 3023 2097 W23 3037 +4 

Ell. Sales 1790 Pryv. Sales 2804 
Pnsv. DavOMn lot. 31A55 UP 54 


Ot>en nun low Ctose City. 


Groins 


inn. Jill 123V 124-i 12T- 123"- — Al 

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Ei*. Sales Prow. Sales +890 

Prev.OavOaenlnt. 3&2S7 up 2a 


CORN (CBTI 

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649 SV 51* 5V + V 

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7«v! n 7-9® 584VJ Jul $7ii, 5JB) 

% SS 734 S S21S Aim 573’^ 586 

322fl¥i 28 28V V 471 5L46U} ScP 546* y 549 

3M19 MV WV + *A *48 Nov STO UK 

7 6*4 6 6 AT* 53BV Jan SAD SAT 1 / 

444 23V Bk 22V— V 7.42 SAj Mar 5W i92 

153914 1)14 H'4-ft T-2 Hi W ?32 

8 9V 9V «k- 34 <38 582 Jul UN 4JM 

Hi 7 7 E st. Sales Prey. Sales =.186 

II 7V Ml 714 + *% Prev. Day Open Ini. 61810 up 573 

17 12V 12 12 


287 Jul 173V 385 283V 173V 

235V Sep 23* 740*, 238’.', Z58 1 / — A0V 

15ff» Dec 154’-: 2S&+ 233 * 15F4 — Al 

159V, Mar 244 244’-= 3JB^ £43 — AOV 

ZHT- MOV 2AS 248V UP 247 — A0V 

242'* Jul 248 249- i 247 247 — BVn 

UO Sen 252-* 153 251 331 -JOV 

Prev. Salts 77815 


WHY PAY FIXED 
COMMISSIONS 
ifHINYDUDDn 
HAVE TO? 


511 10V II + V 

506 23V Vm Ti -6V 
1012V 12SA 12 V 
11 9 « * 

IX 101a 9V, 9V + V 

65 5V 5V 564 
4978 18k. 171* 171* + V 


140a 35 742V, 42 42P, 

180 U 40040k. 40 40V 

I AO 3J 3228V 28 28V— V 

30 JJ 330 19 18'A 18V + '4 

.14 2J 7M 1 6 

AO 1J 64623'4 23k 22V— V 
AO 3A 153914 U«S 13'*- V) 
8 964 *V 9V— V 
22 7 7 7 


S34VJ Jul $76V, &8D S7F- 537*4 +A1V 

53211, Aim 583’a 586 S.71'* 581V -V-AQu, 

SCP 544>; 54* 544*-: i 45V +AI 

1»'j Now $70 $72'- 5471; 5691, +.01 

538V Jan $80 SAt'/s 586V 5891-? +A1'A 

S49 Mar 590 $92 $B7 S-S9V, +JT 

SJ7 MOV $99 $99\s 5»5"s 597’-, +fll 

582 Jul 6AI 404 6JBT 4JJ2V +J»V 

P rev. Sales 72.186 


KYCE} . 

gj, 

Jul MUO WSJ# 140140 M1.95 +140 

Stop 13*40 14180 13632 1394$ +3» 

Nov mOO 13830 13400 13755 +3.75 

Jan 132AS 137 AO 13200 13575 +2.95 

Mv moo 136.10 133X0 135X0 +2X0 

May - 139.95 +2AS 

Jul 189-95 +285 

Sea 135X5 +2X5 

Nov 135X5 +185 

Est. Sates BOO Prev. Soles 441 

Prev. Dav Open int. $773 wn 14 


Metals 


10 6 - 
19 9 BVi 8V + V 

225 364 31* 3H + V* 

5 17V] 17V] 17U, + V 

IV V V— V4 

19 1 2*4 1 + 1* 


5344 4k 

*V> 

4k + k 


X9a 

A 

1530 25k 

25 

25 

5010k 


■w,— k 

VtdBn 

1X0 


1027k 


27k 

V21 

30 

21 - « 

VlefraS 



700 3k 

3k 







19 6k 

a 

<k 

007 

07 

07 +1 

VtadeFr 

82e 2 A 

443 9<6 

9 

l*S7 13k 

13k 

13k 




I19]2>+ 

Dk 

ilk 

143230k 

30H 

30k— k 




SI 19 

18k 

1B'6 

120* 9 

Bk 

Bk— k 


3A 


145 BV3 

8k 

8k 

1614k 

14k 

14k— k 

VIsTech 


692 k 

k 

to 



722.10 12220 —80 

12500 12510 — JB 

12740 128A0 —40 

13000 UMO —JO 
13530 135S0 — 48 

i38Ao 13BJU — aa 
U2.W, 142.10 —40 

U7X 147JB +J0 

15200 15150 


Now you can trade through Eastern 
Capital in securities, options, bonds and 
commodities. At extraordinarily low rates. 

On US Stock transactions we offer a. 
• 50% commission discount to retail rates 
prevailing in 1975 when fixed rates were 
abolished. 

Our commodity rates are discounted to 
extremely competitive levels. 

In addition we offer managed portfolios 
■ in commodities, stocks, and bonds for the 
private investor 

So call us on (01) 250 0798 or send the 
: coupon below. Or pay the consequences. 


JZ 2.1 IMIS V4J, is 

43®2BVl 27*1 28 

Ml 216 9Vj 264 4- V 
1855 161* MV 161* +119 
582151* 14M ISk. +1 
178 7k. 7 7k. + 1* 

(AO 2k. 216 2to 

25 416 4 4V4 + W 

X2 44 I102IV 20k 211* + M 
23 3 2V 3 + k 

I 114 5V, 5 5 — v* 

16 11» If* 194— 1* 

12 ft to, '!« 

JSe U 3717 1664 16k 

8 10 96* 914 — V4 

178 1464 MV4 1464 + 64 

188 28 3244764 476* 4764 

101 19 V] 19 19k. + 64 

55 1264 12 12 

- 253 814 794 814 — <4 

ISM 141* 1394 14 +1* 

766 8k 7k 8k + 64 

I 109 A64 6*4 664 + k 

1487 8 TV* 7*4 + k 

2 12 12 12 4- k 

32 S V, S 

3032464 23V] 23k— 64 
1.90 44 1543 41k 41k— k 

$90 $4 10349] 3* V, 34V* + Vfc 

45 281* 24k 25k. + k 
16413k 12k 13 
I 16 16 16+1* 


432111* Ml* M + k 
42515 149, 14V,— V* 

89 271* 26*4 27 + 64 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT| 
6BXP0lbv dollars PCf 100 lbs. 


7k 9V. — k 


88 4-4 49 2D Vi 

84 JJ UM 1416 
38 71* 
186 7.9 175229, 


3282 

2280 

Jut 

30X5 

3090 

29.95 

30JS 

+46 

3185 

2190 


9RK 

2985 

ZBJB 

2987 

+85 

31.10 

2140 


27.97 

auo 

Z78S 

208* 


3087 

22-90 

oa 

27.10 

7740 

27.10 

2785 

+8S 

2945 

22.90 

Dec 

2630 



2648 

+36 

29X7 

2340 


7+10 

2+10 

2585 

26X0 

+37 

2840 

2440 


2545 

2585 

2545 

2545 

+80 

2745 

2480 


2540 

2540 

2535 

2535 

+.15 

2585 

23.95 

Jul 

9CM 

25X5 

9c as 

25X5 

+80 

25-15 

2480 


2485 

24 8S 

2489 

2485 

+80 

Est Salts 


Prev. Sales 9851 





COPPER (COMSX) 

2$n»tb9-c«at>per lb, 

65-S5 60A0 Jon 

■SMS 57 AO Jul 5980 60.10 5U0 

ssjsa . 59 JO Aug 

82.10 57 JO $sp 40X5 61A0 MAO 

B4J5 SUI Dec 6185 62.10 6183 

B4J0 5940 Jon 

80JMT WM J Mar 6285 62X5 <285 

/4UJO 61.10 Mav 63.10 63.10 63.10 

74^0 A I JO -Oil 6150 COM &3LH9 

70X0 62J0 Sep 64J0 6*50 6*35 

7DJ0 MSI Dk 65X0 - 65.15 65X0 

7020 45.30 Jon 

6TJS! ■ 65A5 MOT 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales $628 

■ Prev. Dav OasnliB. 8$J97 a«423 


S w3R P S TST Own HlBh Law CW» Cbg 

88.99 8034 OOC 9018 9018 «0.»9 

Esi. Sam „ SO* PIW.MB -W 
FV6v.DayOP«MIM. $461 va'i 

EURODOLLARS IIMM) J$k 

r SSs Ktp usi m Sm 9I.» «r 9IJ4 *LT3 M 
91fc 84.80 0« *1X* "rf — 0» 

da in uar 90.75 9085 "$6* W — C7 

91 JS *4.71 JUH 90.39 9045 J02T — M 

90X4 8709 ScP "Ml Wl? S2 S3 — * 

5SS ««« BWI WAS £92 -05 

M84 J7.64 MOI 09*5 8M0 W-60 B9M -» 

en.Som 47 JO* Pryw. Sol« 33897 
PrOV.DayOP9ninl.il L477 uuJTS 
BRITISH POUNO (IM**J 

L0200 oec 1»80 »•»»> 1 ■' 55 ° “J' 

W L1W tt? TJJM IJSOO 18500 1 2185 ~ » 

£31. Soles $339 Pw. Sales /JSi 
prw.DqyOowiInl. JW«! msW 
CANADIAN DOLLAR ll MM) 

:3S ^ ■™ % % 

8350 8070 Jun , „ « 

E«. Sales TWPnrv^oiw 63 
Prev. Dav Open inL oaw ua2*0 

r^hS^rKwSMooooi 

-!SS S wS +n 

ESI. Sales Prev.Saiee 

prw.OowOoenMW. 397 
GERMAN MANIC HMM1 

spermarK-lPalnfeauolsMMpI 

A545 J9M Sep J360 JWf -J* 8 +4 

J6I0 J971 DCS 3306 3X0 J2»4 ^06 +5 

3419 7M0 Mur $331 4$ 

S S US 33*1 *s 

Elf. Sales I5XS3 l^reV-Satea llOTa 
preu.DawOPenMI. 46X25 oH4U 
JAPANESE YENIIRM*) 

Spec van- 1 poinf eouafsiOCtOWl 

M4150 A03870 ScP .00M3I A04037 A04U0 08X34. 

Soon SS Dec A040SU 0040S2 X0404 1 AMW4 +1 

OMlflO .00*035 MW mi 

Ell. Sales 4X40 Prev. Sales <XW 
1 pr«tt.OayOP«ninl. 26X*1 an> 


JkK 




SWISS FRANC UMMt 
Saerlronc-l point equals S OXW I 
-1830 J400 SeP J920 J925 J*» 3921 

' .4350 JS31 D« J9SS J 95i JWl ^5# 

lOK JBJS IM, 3977 

E^Sulrs UNO Prev. Sales 9X8S 
Prev. Dav Open i nr. 2$48S 0H14S 


20 +1* 25-25 23XS Jul 25XS 25J3 

14k + k 25.15 2430 Aug 2485 248! 

7Y* E St. Sales Frev. Sales 98SI 

22k + t* Prev. Day Open lnl. 62X32 up 293 
SSiw OATS (CBTI 

157* r n sAOObu mini mum- dollars per bushel 


23k— Ik 
5k 

14k T V] 

69*— k 
16V*— V* 
I3«* 

7k— k 
MU + k 
99* 

79* + k 
18V* 

139* — V* 

14V* + to 

13k 


180’* 

147k 

Jul 

149k 

140 

!.49k 

14916 — XOk 

1.79 

1431* 

Sep 

143 Hi 

1*4 

143 ■** 

143** — XOk 

lJ&k 

146k 

Dec 

147 

147k 

147 

147** 

147k 

140 

Mur 




140 

143 

143 

May 






ALUMI HUM (COMEX) 
*aooo lbs.- cents per ib 



49X5 

*685 

Jun 



5740 

4385 

-Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

■4+05 

4480 

7480 

4440 

4+75 

45X5 

7040 

4540 

Dec 

4583 

45.95 

7+50 

5L75 

Jan 



7340 

47.90 

Mot 

46X5 

46X5 

6685 

53.95 

Mar 



6345 

47X5 

Jul * 



52.10 

51X0 

See 





Dec 





Jan 





Mar 



Est. Sales 

550 Prev. Sates 

572 


industrials 



146.70 143X0 14190 -A4Q 
tee IOJO 149 JO I46J8 14660 -2A0 
Nm 15050 151.50 14930 14930 —130 
Jan 15*J0 158.00 15620 156 JO -1.00 
Z 162X0 |63i® 162.10 >6210 -L« 
Stay 16030 16830 16830 14730 -1X0 
Jul 174.00 174X0 174.00 174X0 -130 
■rev. Sales I J7e 
I. 9344 off 137 


Prev. Day Open mr. 3.191 up 22 


Est. Sales Prev. Sales 2*2 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 3X07 oft 53 


CATTLE (CMEJ 
«AO0 lbs.- cents per lb. 


5 6k ik 6k + V* 

2J2 2k 2k 2k— l* 

15 6 6 6 

419 7k 6** 71* + k 

597 5k 5k 5k + V* 

58 3V* 3V* 3V* + <* 




17* I 

<k 7k 

6747 

5750 




5 7k 

k* 7k + W 

65.90 

5943 

Oct 


2.9 

7 Ilk 11 

16 Ilk 

67X5 

60X5 

Dec 

80 

at 

5 9k I 

16 9k + k 

6745 

6142 

Feb 



102343k 11 

* 12k 

67X7 

6245 

Apr 

40 

24 

31frk Id 

k 16k 

6+85 

6X75 

Jun 


5935 59.92 59X7 59.12 


410 Ik r. Ik + 

.19 13 5 7k 7k 7k 

M IX 2026V3 26 v* 2oV, 

1X0 28 904 371* 36k 36k— V* i 

1.40 38 5438 36 V, 37VS— V* 

16 5^ 5k S*%— k I 

35 % ^ '**— 'to 1 

XB A 86820k 19k 20k + k 


-10c J 9734 
6714k 
XS 12 16827k 

281 4 
804 9 

1X5 4J 87238k 


6737 6265 Apr 6120 6145 62X5 63X5 —.15 

66X5 6175 Jim 6165 

EaL5atas 20.9*9 Prev. Sales 14,930 
Prev. Day Open Int. 463*4 up 42* 


36 5X I 11k 
746124* 
105171* 
2X0 JA 54553*2. 


295 8 

X7 IX 251 Ok 


33k +lk EuLSal/n, 20.9*9 Prev. Sales 14.930 
14k Prev. Day Open Int. 46344 up 42* 

^TjJ FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

+ 2 44X00 lbs.- cena per lb. 

S + 7? 7170 6487 Auo 6SX0 65JS 64X0 64X7 —.18 

■wTT.S 7100 64X0 Sep 65JM 6$35 64X0 64.90 — X5 

+,lft 7132 6485 Oct 64.95 65X0 6480 64.97 

Sit , 7380 6585 Nov 65.97 6AM 65JW 6582 — JM 

1 J? 66X0 Jan 68JJ5 6885 6BA5 68X5 +80 

iiJi + M35 ■ 66.10 Mar 6830 66X0 6&30 6030 +.10 

^ 70X5 68X0 Apr 6830 6030 4830 6138 +.10 

0 Est. Soles 1368 Prev. Sates 1.7X5 

“T Prev. Dav Open int. a825 off 11 

32 +| HOGS (CME) 


SILVER (COMEX) 

5X00 trey ox.- cents per trey oz. 
in, S9BX Jun 6I5X 

3*61.0 562X Jul 611A 619X 60BX 6133 

61BX- 618X AUO 6213 (S13 6213 4198 

11810 5710- ..Sen 6198 627X 616X A34X 

1230X 5900 Dec 633A 63VX 6293 6363 

12ISX 59SX Jan 641,1 

I193X 607X MOT 645X 6518 645X 6493 

104BA 621 X May 6560 458A 6560 6S&7 

9453 4350 Jul 6713 6713 67U 44U 

*7*0.0 641X Sep <71X 47IX 671X 6718 

799A .6473 Dec - 6943 

TWO 7073 Jan . WM 

770A 70SX Mar 7113 

Est. Sales 19X00 Prev. Sales 17X02 
Prev. Day Onen Int. 75809 up 225 


COTTON KNYCE I 

50X00 IBs.- cents per R*. _ „ .... ,. „ j. 

79X5 6080 Jul 61 JO 6135 41.10 61.10 — |r 

7730 60.02 Oct 6145 6130 61.15 6134 +JL 

73X0 tOM Dec 61X0 61X8 614S 6133 -3? 

7685 M Mr VIM 62X3 6230 OS -X 

710X0 a, |6 MOV 4J.0S 6110 62.66 42XB — X7 

Ss SS !?S V ALW 6110 67.79 62X5 ^.0 

6538 59X0 Oct gJJT- -XI 

5925 5EJ131 Dec ^ W4S • " 

Est Sales 140Q Pw Sates,, 19«0 - 

Prev- Day Ooen int 15J02 afi«3A 


I8t* — k I MLoaoibs.-cenUDerib. 


| lb: hastern l.'apiial.9 Leonard Streer, London, ECZA 4HP | 
1 send me a commission schedule and brochure. I 


xa 

34 

66 23k 

77U 

23k +n% 

2480234 

51? 


11 


34 

827*4 

26k 

26k— Vs 

178 

17 

234k 

34k 

34k + k 

JMi 

.9 

W 6k 

6 k 

6 k + k 



3270 12k 

12 k 

I2k + k 

M3 

9.1 

216k 

16k 

16k — v. 



102710 

9k 

•k + k 



9 10k 

10 k 

lou.— k 



17314k 

13k 

13k— k 



289 11k 

Ilk 

ilk — k 

t.02 

+1 

8825k 

25 

25 — k 

1X91 

48 

53726k 

25k 

26 •+ k 

240 

XI 

310 76k 

74k 

76k + k 



«im. 

10 k 

10 k— k 

Ji* 

8 

53fl 19k 

18k 

i9k + to 

M 

24 

219 25k 

74k 

24k— + 

.15r 

14 

6 9k 

«k 

9k — k 



259 3 

2 k 

2 k— k 


M *A 30713V* 
44 24 1 25 28V] 


JSe IX 102 Ok 
XO 33 3133V* 


64* 

Ak— V* 
13k— U 
28k— k 
12k — V* 
8k— k 
23 — t* 
9V, + 4k 


47X5 Jul 4940 5035 4947 5040 +88 

4637 Aug 47.70 *fl_55 4745 4832 +82 

44J7 OCf 44X5 45J5 4440 44X5 +.10 

*4,10 Dec 46X0 *780 4645 47X0 — X2 

4685 Feb *8-30 *$fffl *805 4845 +.15 

4630 Apr *5.15 45J75 4S.15 *S30 

469ft Jun 4745 47 AS 47J0 47X5 +35 . 

4785 Jul 4830 *835 4830 *8X0 +40 


PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 Irov or- dol Ion per troy oz. 

207X0 25 1JM Jun 26730 24730 26730 267X0 —.10 

44930 241X0 Jul 24630 24730 261X0 246X0 —180 

393X0 250X0 Oct 275X0 275X0 26600 270X0 —140 

37330 26000 Jan 274X0 27658 271X0 275X0 —140 

32930 27530 APT 27730 28130 27730 280.90 —140 

JM 297X0 Jul 286X0 —140 

Est. Sales 2X21 Prev. Sales 1407 
Prev. Day Open Inl. 11488 ofll«4 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 tray oz- dollars aw a* 

15930 94X0 Jun 982$ 9825 9825 9830 +.1$ 

14185 9330 SOP 98J0 .99X0 9730 9825 —.10 

14130 93X0 Dec 9805 "838 9005 98J0 —ilO 

12730 9430 Mar 99X0 99X0 9830 98JQ —.10 

114X8 94X0 JUn 9835 —.10 

t:U. Sales 231 Prev. Sales 171 

Prev. Dev Open int. 6658 off? 

GOLD (COMEX) 


HEATING OIL (NYME) - 

4 2 JWBa | .«n Sr jol WJ0 ^ 

Ss ff" 5i« S* 

7645 6690 SCO 68X0 48X5 48.05 68X9- — 62 

7»I0 47X5 OCI 6930 49-*0 4870 6&T3 l)| 

7635 NOV 7020 7080 *940 

7825 69.15 Dec 70.90 70 90 7025 78.10 —LOO 

76» 6VM jS 71 2D 7120 71X0 -1X0 

7330 71X0 F» ZMJ -ISO 

KUO 72X0 Mar 23 —108 

76X0 74X0 Apr »■» — 1X0 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 5X71 

Prev. Day Open Inl. 19X** atl 282 


Est. sales 7370 Prev. Soles 11309 
Prev. Day Open Int. 25X25 up5W 


100 irey az.- dol lars aw trey 
510X0 287X0 jun 31; 

31330 Jut 


* 1 PORK BELLIES (CME) 

27B8 3k 3U 3k + IV 38X00 ibsv cents par lb. 


530 317X8 31330 


CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

'W t - - «"ar TOT X97 7674 2673 ^4 

2930 2600 Sep 2627 2626 2612 24.13,-— 04 

2930 36*5 OCI 25X7 25.95 3572 252* —.17 

2930 2**0 Nov 2530 25X5 2542 2541 --f*. 

2?iS? 2 Xm Dec 25.25 SJ0 25 18 2S.II - ip 

2930 2638 Jot 25X0 25.D2 2690 26*9 

2946 262S Feb 2**0 1*-B° 2673 2675 '.-® 

2945 2613 Mar 2*36 3675 2436 26» . +6 

2945 2690 Apt 2640 2652 24.40 34 A ,+M 

E sl. Sales Prev. Sales 11.133 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 57,114 aft 6 12) 


“1 ’I ’ • 

5- J 


559 7k 7V« 7k + I* I 
2391 14 13 13k + « 


YlowFt 1.00 28 426371* 37 37*k + (t 

YorkFd xOD 18 «9 15k 15V* 15k + k 


61.12 Jul 4170 64J0 6232 6287 — 1A8 

50 JO Auo 63.00 64.15 62.1 S 4232 — TJB 

6113 Feo 71X0 72X0 7030 7182 +87 

64X0 Mar 71JM) 71X0 7130 7185 +88 

70.19 May 71.00 71.70 71X0 7240 +4$ 

6980 Jul 71X0 71X0 71X0 72.40 +.*5 

6730 Aug 71J5 +40 


EASTERN CAPITAL 


THE STOCK & COMMODITY 
DISCOUNT BROKER 


76 17k 17k 17k + k 
80b IX 22911k II llto+to 
1.08 48 9026k 26 26 - V* 

1X0 34 31% 27V* 29V*— V, 

130 7.9 21119V, 19 19 

.92 7.1 I 1J 13 13 

TO 4k 3M 41* + V* 
43 7k 7V* 7V* 

261 16k 16V* 16k— k 
1441 163 41 11 V* Ilk Ilk + Vi! 

2312k 12 12k + k 

1 7k 3k 3k 

1X0 33 40828'* 28k 28k + V* I 
95 3k JV* 3V* 


Est. Sales 13830 Prev. teles 28M 
Prev. Day Open Inl. 10887 up 140 


291X0 Aug 31740 32080 3UL30 

297X0 Oct 32040 323X0 81980 

30130 DOC 324X0 32730 323X0 

306X0 Feb 32880 33090 327 JD 

314.70 APT 33230 335X0 33250 

32030 Jim 33980 33980 33930 

331.09 AUO 

335X0 OCf 34630 34630 34630 

342X0 Dec 155X0 355X0 355X0 

362.00 Apr 


Stock indexes 


Est. Sates 16X00 Pryv. Sales 11405 
Prev. Dav pnen lnLH6317 up *73 


24 3k 3k » 

1293 23V* 22k 23k 
46 4X 38817V* 16k 17 + k 

1 2k 2k 2k 

Ate 41 11211k Ilk Ilk + V* 

1 84 34 56X*k 34U 34k— k 

16 2k 2 V* 2k 
32 4V, 4V* 4V* 

XOI A 95 10-+ 9k IOVb + k 
123614k 13k 14k + V] 
364 Tin 2k 2"k + •» 


COFFEE C (NY CSCE) 

37300 lbs.- cents Nr lb. 

14940 111.00 Jul 13980 140.75 139X0 14030 

15080 127X0 SCP 14130 1*320 14130 1*2X6 

15040 12985 Dec 1*1X5 14690 143X0 >**X0 

14985 12830 Mar V63S0 144JBS 1*2.90 146X0 

140X0 131X0 May 142X0 14X75 142X0 14388 


Financial 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMC) 

«y*i i*t< Qfiri cenN 

19540 16a(M Scp >92X0 19345 19(60 191.90 

1WJD 17580 Dec 19110 196.75 194 70 19690 

202J5 190.10 Mar 199X0 199X0 I99JU 19030 

3D1X0 200X0 Jun 201X0 201X0 201X0 20130 

ESI. sales 66X09 Prcv.SaM 43819 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. Bfjm 


Currency' Options 


US T. BILLS (I MM) 

si million- ptsof 100 pet. 

I «J0 06.94 Sep 9245 9230 9253 9244 —.04 

9191 (587 Dec 9289 92JS) 9114 9287 — 84 

9253 0640 MOT 9135 .91X5 91X3 91.99 — X5 

9283 87X1 Jun 9140 9147 9136 9143 — X7 

91X6 88X0 Sep • 9189 — xg 

98.70 89X5 Oee 9L17 — X0 

! 91J9 0930 MW 90.96 —XV 

EsL Sales 0.933 Prev. Sates 639S 
Prev. Dav Open inl. 3380S oft 511 . • 


VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
poftirs and cents 

21940 173.00. Jun 197X0 19940 197.90 19SJ0 

21230 18585 SOP 201X0 7fU «0 20140 30140 

213X0 30000 Dec TOo. 10 20730 30540 20540 

Est. Soles Prev. Sales 3.104 

Prev. Dav Open Inr. 6«40 o«33S 


10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 


INTELEVENT 85 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

Option A strike 

undertv hm Price CaUs— Last 





Sep 

Dec 

Mar 


8 Pound 

105 

22X0 



12+63 

110 


r 


12X63 

115 

1X30 

r 

r 

128X3 

125 

+15 

r 

0X0 

12SX3 

130 

345 

5X0 


120X3 

135 

2X0 

r 

r 


, — 88-21 

JaarZy 87-13 
86-2 
05-7 

PttfS— Lost 00-20 

Sen Dec Mar Esf.Soles 


SlBOXOOprkn- wsfcilwfcol 100 pc* 
88-71 75-10 Sep 84-18 I 


75-10 Sep 04-10 04-20 06-13 04-19 0 

75-13 Dec 03-15 03-23 JO-11 83-16 -9 

75-14 MW 83-16 —9 

7+30 Jun 01-19 —10 

00-19 Dec 00-1 —10 

Prev. Soles 7825 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 5 

points and cents jS. 

11340 9185 Sap 11145 112.65 III 25 11140 ‘1 

11530 10180 Dec 11330 11440 11385 11380 — St 

11720 10930 Mar 116.15 11615 1)535 11520 .-SI 

11740 11650 JU5 110X0 11000 I1BJU 117.10 4*1 

Est. Sales 15313 Prev. teles 9X71 
Prev. Dov Open int. 7.990 off 160 


Cannes, France, September 22-24 1 985 

presented by 

Intelev&jt Inc. 

cosponsored by 

Finley, Kumble, Wagner, Heine, Underberg, 
Manley & Casey, 

E.F. Hutton & Co. Inc., 

Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co., 

ItcrafoS^ribunc. 


56X00 Canadian DaDars+xntt per IIPR. 

CDellr 73 r r r 0JS r 

7329 74 034 r r 180 r 

62300 Wen German Markvceats per uniL 
DMark 30 t T r r 043 

3242 31 203 r r 032 046 

3242 32 184 1X0 237 045 1X3 

3242 33 0JIB 138 1X7 120 1S2 

3242 34 053 1X4 t r r 

3242 35 081 0J7 r r r 

62SQXM Japanese Yea-iWlK of a cent pgr nntL 
JYen 37 r 337 r r r 

40.19 39 r r r 082 r 

4Sl^9 m 0.98 r r 045 r 

40.10 41 AS* 0X2 r 120 r 

62300 Swiss Francs-cents per unIL 
S Fror»c 34 r r r r 080 

39X1 36 r r r 023 r 

39X1 37 r 3X8' r r r 

3M1 39 1.1S 1X4 r r r 

39-01 *o BXO 147 r r r 

39X1 41 183 r r r . r • r 

Total call +01.5893 Call open lot 10692 

Total pvt voL 1855 Pot open Int. 92860 

r— Nat rraaed. s— No option offered a— Ola. 

Last Is premium (purchase price). 

Sower: AP. 


Prev. Dov Open Im, 54440 up 1X24 

2AS US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
r {0Pd-SIOWWl-PtsS.32ndsotlOflpct) 

79-12 57-10 Sep 75+ 7S-25 75 •* 75-16 

, "7 75-13 57-0 Dec 74-8 74-25 743 7+16 

r 77-29 57-2 Mar 734 73-27 73-7 • 73-10 

. r 76-6 56-29 • Jun 72-12 72-M 73-10 72-22 

- 75-31 56-29 Sep 71-17 72-1 71-47 71-27 

, 7+24 56-25 DK 7M4 71-« 70-24 71-2 

r 7+15 5+27 Mar 70-10 

r 7+26 63-U Jun- 69-1J 69-20 69-15 69-20 

r , 72-27 S-4 SOP 6+30 69-7 60-29 69 

L 72-18 62-24 Dec - 68-U 

f 69-16 6+6 Mar 67-29 

‘ Est. Sales Prev. Saiesl 12X65 

i Prov. Day Open Int J19839 op 248* 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

fttooGV 1 ® — 920.90 f 

Reuters 1,759.90 

O J. Futures 118.7a 

Com. Research Bureau- NA 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p- preliminary; f - final 
Routers : bow TOO ; Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Prevteu* 
919.10 f ' 
1,76330 • 

m« 

22*50. 


f 


ii-..: • 



J > 

1 »+."•• • 


•i». . ■ 


V 1 VI . 

r« 

• 

l+r 

V . .■ « 


•? i - . .• 

T. 

• 

Hi 


)•• 

’ R •! • 

• 

H . V 

b»- 

IS . ■ - 



u 


* T 


1) . 


U'f 


liv, 

*. . 


X- 

**» 

1 : ... : 

r . 

!■-» 

‘ " 



Wfesi: 


CNMA (CBT) 

r SI00XQ0 prin-pts & 32nds Of 100 pcf 

r 77-10 57-17 Jua 72-27 — * 

r 7+24 $9-13 Sep 7+12 7+20 7+11 7+20 —5 

r 75-29 594 Dec 73-22 7+3 73-22 23-28 -6 

7+10 58-20 Mar 73-15 73-16 734 73-10 —6 

r 7+1 65 Sep. 73d 73-15 72-8 72-15 —6 

r EsI. Soles Prev. Sales 224 

r Prev. Day Open inl. 4X36 off 1 19 
£ CERT. DEPOSIT (I MM) 

_ SI ml 1 1 km- pis of 100 pet 

, 92X9 85J3 Jun 9245 9245 9245 9245 — XS 

; 9174 85JHI .Sep 91.94 92X0 91X6 92X3 

«2J4 8584 Dec 9145 9143 9145 9146 — XJ 


Market Guide 


8646 Mar 
B6A3 Jun 
87X6 Sep 


91.14 ~JJ2 
91X80 — X3 

9040 9040 9040 9040 — XS 


NYCSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYPE: 


Chicago Boom at Trade 
Chicago Mercantile Excnange 
Internal lonoi Monetary Market 
Of Chicago Mercantile Exchange - -.' 

New York Cocoa. Sugar. Coffee Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodify Exchange. New York :• r 

New York Mercantile Exchange !f 

Kansas ary Board of Trade f- 

New York Futures Exchange ' 


GomimSdities 


CiKiimocikies 


Cash Prices 


Dividends 


HONS-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U84 per ounce 

Close 

High Low Bfat Ask 
Jun— N.T. N.T. 315X0 317X0 
JtV _ N.T. N.T. 315X0 317X0 
Aug _ 318X0 318X0 317X0 319X0 
Oct — N.T. N.T. 321X0 323X0 


Dec- N.T. N.T. 325X0 327X0 
Feb - 330X0 moo 329X0 331X0 
API _ N.T. N.T. 333-00 335X0 
Volume: 25 lots of 100 az. 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U44 per eance 



Commodity and Unit 

i Coffee 4 Santas, lb 

Prlnfcfoth 6*/3& 38 Vj, yd _ 


hv*2S 

June 25 Commodify and Unit Too Aire 

Hiati low n^Aw caw » taTvd _ bm Its 

sucab Htrt LOW Bid Ask Oi'ge steel billets (Pitu.ton 473x0 4jaxo 

Simrt ffttiTC mv motfir tnn IfWl 2 Wry. Philo* Ion _ 271a 21100 

Freoca rrocs per metric ton Sfeef %cron No l r>w Pitr m? 1 lium 

as ws visa H£ via - 7 Jtn 

Od 1.195 1,181 1,182 1.185 —12 rflflixrrltrf lh - 67-7e m* 

f'51S 1-SS HS ’-as —10 Tin 1 Straits), lb «S 60 6^2 

Atar 1840 1830 182$ 1828 — 14 ZfrKi E. H. I_ Basts, lb 04+47 041-S 

Moy N-T. »LT. 1869 1875 — 15 PoltadUnn, az — 79-104 m 

VajMJfiL jaS»-=3 snverN.Y.« 0OT 


JunrSS . 

Per Ami Par R« 
USUAL 


1 ' 340 — 12 Sliver N.Y. az 

Esi- yrt.: 2.W3 tats of so ions. Prev. actual 

tales: 1x78 lots. Ooan Interest: 10455 r ^ 


473X0 453X0 Barry Wright 

213JN 213X0 Fit Connecticut 8k 

70-71 11+101 Hach Co 

1+21 22-32 Johnstown Amer 

67-70 66k Measure* Corn 

6X667 4J545 Rogers Com 

04+47 041-43 Sterchl Bros Stores 
99-104 153 Vorten Corn 


§ i s iS'S 

a M 7-30 7-10 


8 X7 VS 7-10 H. 

$ ss M 


IWt H «Mi TVr V* 14 IW. m* TW ■■ 


sn televent 85 is the fourth annual 
International Telecommunications 
Conference to be produced by 
International Televent Inc. 

This unique symposium focuses on the 
evolution, impact and future of competition in 
telecommunications services and equipment 
(Ministers of Communications, industry 
executives and senior government officials will 
join their distinguished international colleagues 
ro discuss telecommunications policy 
developments in the United States, Europe and 
Asia, and their global implications. An 
c ^standing group of speakers will indude: 

— Richard E. Butler, Secretary General, 


International Telecommunication Union. 

— Brycr Carsberg, Director General, Oftel, UK. 
— Richard R. Colino, Director General, Intelsat. 
—-Sir Donald Maitland, Chairman of the 
Independent Commission for Worldwide 
Telecommunications Development, ITU. 

— Sir Eric Sharp, Chdrman, Cable & 

Wireless, pic 

— Mimi Weyforth Dawson, Commissioner, 
Federal Communications Commission, U.S A 
Addresses and panel discussions are struc- 
tured to provide interaction between speakers 
and the audience, while the program of soda! 
events will allow ample opportunity for 
informal discussion 


High Law 

AUD 31130 31830 

Scp NT- N.T, 

OCI N.T. N.T. 

Dec N.T. N.T. 

Vatuma: 100 lots of 100 az. 


UTURES COCOA 

French franc* per 100 kg 

„ JI+ N-T- N8-. 2X00 2X50 —25 

P . T **- S™ 1010 2J»0 2X03 +10 

Low Seltft Same Dec 1.985 1,970 1475 1.976 +12 

318-5) 3I$» 376^ Mar 1.996 1.905 1.995 1X96 +8 

N.T. 320J0 318JX) Mav N.T. N.T. 2X00 +5 

N.T. 32230 330X0 Jtv N.T. N.T. 2JUS — is 

N.T. 32*30 321X0 9m N.T. NiT. axiQ - +S 


Ijondon 

Coiumoctities 


A- Annual; M-fMretMv; Q-Oaart*r1v;S-5«n+ 
AMtDaL 


June 25 
Prevtao* 


Ijondan 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 10101 

Mataman canfz per kilo COF 

Close PrevfatH Free 

Md ASk Bid Ask ik, 

Jtv 30235 203XD 300X0 202X0 ^ 

Aug 19i5D 19640 195J0 19640 

Sep 19540 19640 196X0 197X0 

OCt 199X0 201X0 199X0 M!J» 

NOV 20140 30340 20140 20130 ftgy 


Est- *gL:JMS lots 'of 10 tons- Pm. actuaf sugar M h>1) ^ BU *«* Wd Ask 
rtnimtataOpMlnfresI^ IISS5 per mrtrtc too 


Dec 201S) 20540 2034a 20540 

Volume: 9 tots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Staaiwwe cants per kilo 

Close PrevktM 

Bid «+ BM Ask 
RSSIJIV— 180X3 181X0 17040 17940 

RSS1AU0- 17$9J 17585 17*40 17540 

RSS2JIV-. 170X0 171.00 170.00 171X0 

HSS3Jly„ 168X0 169X0 1*8X0 149J» 

RSS 4 Jlv 16400 166X0 1MX8 16600 

RSSSJlv— 159X0 161X0 15«X0 161X0 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Mokmloa ringgits par 25 ton+ 

CHse Prev la si 


sales: 236 lots. Open Intami: 700 

francs pm Mi kg off 

jtv N.T. N.T: 2800 2840 —7 Dec 

S*P 2870 38*5 2J70 2873 —1* Mar 

Nov 2*01 2889 2896 2817 —12 MOT 

i! n N-I- NT. 2890 2860 — 10 AM 

Mnr N.T. N.T. 2 AM 2X75 +2 OCT 

May N.T. N.T. I** 2475 + 16 Vat 


J** NT. N.T. uon i*» +9l_I__. 

- wf : +■ tot* of 5 ions, Prev. actual soles: 


■J §640 85X0 B$40 0640 B6X0 8640 

- 5JS2 SI- 00 B ™ S7.00 OM 

eC 9X20 9280 IXIU tun 92X0 92XD 

uw lima 10240 1D340 wlm m3® iSjo 

lay N.T. N.T. 10740 1G840 107X0 IwS 

S 113X0 113X0 mao 11340 ilixo mm 
117X0 11740 11740 11840 116X0 7*U 
Volume: 1451 lot* olSO tataT 


43 toll, open Interest: 431 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


Starting per Metric tea 

cZ J-S 3*22! I- 733 1.735 


1^9 1800 1496 J497 

!»S IIS Vffi 14S iffl 3-625 


lirasurv Bilk 


mm jf ig s \ss, 

* • ®! a A \n iss 

VWurtie: 4462 lata oflO tons. 

COFFEE 

Stall 11*0 P*r metric tan 

Jt» I-WO 1-030 1.936 1.038 1X60 i.im 


Jiv 

bio. 

1,135 

Art 

1.185 

Bid 

1X30 

Aik 

1.190 

Aug 

1X90 

1.1*0 

1X90 

3,148 

Sen 

1X70 

1.040 

1.120 

1870 

1.120 

Oct 

1X00 

1X40 

1X00 

Nov 

JJC® 

1.0&B 

IXM 

1X60 

Oee 

liras 

1X60 

1X20 

1X60 

Jan 

1X10 

1X50 

1X10 

1X50 

Mar — 

1X10 

1X50 

1X10 

1X50 

May 

1X80 

1X40 

1X00 

1X40 


PfW 
Yield YleM 


Mar 
789 I May 


Volume ; 0 lots of 25 ton*. 

Source: Rm/tor-x 


For fufl delate, please send your 
business card to 

Int erna tio nal Tetev&rt Conference, 

International Herald Tribune, 

18) avenue Charles de Gaulle, 

92521 NeutllyCedex. France. Tel: (311) 
7A7 12 65. ex!.: 4568. Telex.- 613 595 F. 


S&PlOp 

Index O|»tions 


Turner Contacts 
CBS Shareholders 


PftaJly A«e S» Oct |J1r an Sen on 


165 

_ 


__ 


1.16 

!2 

15W 

i* 

IB* 

n 

1/16 

175 

n. 

w» 

174 

i?t 

to 

IN 

*to 

Sto 

~A 

p* 

U/16 

IN 

Ik 

2k 

4L 

S’* 

3 

190 

PI6 

1L 

r. 

Ita 

7 

Hi 

1716 

Ml 

l's 


II 


The Ajsociareti Prm 

ATLANTA — Turner Broad- 
casting System Inc. said Tuesday it 
had started its tender offer to take 
over CBS Inc. by mailing a pro- 
spectus to the network's sharehold- 
ers. 


Jty J'MO 1.930 1. 936 1.938 1460 1464 

is, 2 S * 5 iS?? -Jffl |jg 

Jan 2X95 7J2S6 ’USJ 4 j S 4|a 

Mar 2XM 7XS5 iSe 2XM urn 2x97 

May am 2xao 2x75 2X00 iire 

Jly 2,115 2.110 2,101 2.104 2,120 2.12s 

volume: $417 kdsot 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

US. donors per metric ton 
J!y SK* 21 21540 21545 21+50 21+75 
Am 213J0 2122S 213X0 213X5 71 
Sep 21325 212X0 212150 7 1*^ jjjjf 3|JS2 
Op ? S2-5 21325 2tlS 2lt«0 2lJ§ 

Not 21540 21540 21X25 21+25 2164ft ?ieivi 

Dee N.T. N.T. 210X0 21S a 231m 

Jan N.T. N.T. 21000 226X0 216^ §1X0 

Ftb N.T. N.T. 20+00 224X0 flSXO mm 

“* "“I*”* mm filSS t&m 

Vtthjme: 495 tats of 100 tons. 

1 t£££i£££F anaL * nden et- 


_Ctose Prevfaas - • 

ALUMINUM BW Art “ - 

Stalk* per nwirtt tan 

yx* 7M4P 7H9J0 78150 78600 . 

forward 80940 810X0 00340 006X0 . 

CQPPe!RCA T HODE5 (Hitt Grade) 

SterHng per metric ton „ .. 

soot vxwxo 1.100X0 1.100X0 l,wtl» 

forward M17X0 I.IJ7JD 1,12200 l.RUD 

ggW CATHODES (Standard) • — r 
Starting per metric tan 
wat 1X88X0 1X90X0 1X90X0 L892XO 

tarword 1.107X0 1,110X0 U0BX0 UlOXQ .. . 
LEAD 

Starting pot metric tan 

W* 35J7JW 30740 30% . 30+50 . 

forworn 30X00 30340 30650 .. 

NICKEL L ! 

Starting per metric tan 

foas +295X0 4800X0 4810X0 4J20JBI - 

tarwand *865X0 4870X0 4875X0 4880X0 . 

SILVER . . 

Pence pot Itot Benge 

J™- *7640 470X0 *7640 477X0 

forward 69140 493X0 491X0 49140 

JIN (Standard) 

Steriina per metric tan 

s* 9.790X0 9JMX6- 

forward 9420X0 9425.00 9400X0 94IBJr*5tJ 
ZINC A 

Startlno per metric tan '• bzren 

_ 565X0 507X0 571X0 572Bh3 1 

forward 579X0 680X0 36940 '57XJ® I 

SOUfCB: AP. , r ; I 




PI On; 
Phone: \ 


DM Rrtures 


W. GermaaMart.llSM MpUbcMb « 


lies 


p> * * 

71| 6"i - 


A spokesman for Turner Brwd- ft* s«. bT’iL 

c...., *_.L.._e 31 Z® 280 — - dm nr? f!n 


Total con whittle rnjs) 
ToW eaXopHt M.*8+Fi 
Total ou wfutne uun 
Total nil opw Inf. D5J73 
Indei: 

HMhlKN Low 16101 
Sourer: CBOE. 


Ckse 13LH + 0X 


casting System Inc^ ArthurSando, w u? i.« |S S 
said CBS’ 24.000 shareholders 5 13 IS 

“now have to decide whether they “ +§ Sr UB 2 

want to tender thor shares in ex- EwimowdiptaiwL Z* 125 1 

change for our offer." The deadline ceot; mq+wl ixmSbi 

for the decision is SepL 30. m-'uffl 


ft & rs 

J* 1X4 - 

is a s, 

»> a u 


ranCh «: L, ; 


'■ I**, h* lip 


Re 


k*"i j,.; t * ( 

Suhy 


Cornmodidescl 
Cdumn. ■■ 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


Page 1' 


Tuesdays 

AMEX 

Closing 


Tobies include (fee nationwide prices 
or to the dosing on well Street 
and do not reflect Into trades et s ewfrere. 
F*b 73ie Associated Press 


* Month 

too Low Stoe* 


3M ADI n 
■A AL Lob 
IS AMCn 
2M AM Inti 
S*% ATT Fd 
2% AcmePr 
5% AOMU 

7% Action 
Hi Acton 
in AOmRs 
IB AdRi»l 
IS Adobe 
4% Aerone 
toU Aflipos 

At A (r Euro 
SM AlrCal 

«* ArGolM 
I Atoneo 
BVI Aim bon 
6M AlbOW 
5% Aim 
9% Atehaln 
VS Alton 
28% Alcuo pf 

'*% AmSnfil 
6% Amedeo 
■Hi Am Bin 

■4 AmCap. 
13b AExDKrt 
SA A F rue A 
Sb AFrucB 
7b AHtttiM 

4 A 1 vail 

ISM AMUA 
I VS AMBM 
3 Amofl 
53% APoff 
% Am Pin u 
12% AProcs 

6b AmRItV 
11% AROVltl 
a A5dE 

Hi Ajnpol 
4% Anna) 

2% AndJcb 
9 Andrea 
SO. Angles 
A wlAnotv 
3% ArooPt 

Mi Arrtttm 

7% AniMfs 
7«h ArrawA 
6% Asmrg 
8V» Asfrax 

1 Astiote 
7% Astretpi 

ft ArtSCM 
2% AtUWI 

2 AuaUtr 
134* Avcndl 


73 

JO J IB 
.12 A IS 


31 12 It 
35 

3 

.14 3 19 

J2t 16 (I 
it 

to u s 


075 11.1 

41 

31 M U 
JO LI 
.IS L2 7 
M 

13 

11 

13 

J3 34 33 

IB 

3JB 54 21 
3tb13 16 
Me 44 

« U 7 
13 

73 SJ 16 

7S 


14 

15 

JO £4 11 
■IS 2.1 

12 


-OSo L7 
JO SS 12 


73 3% 
27 T7K 
13 S 

n so 
70 M 
155 9% 
370x12% 
134 7rtr 
a MU 
« 7% 

19 Mi 

n S ,3 % 

1002 23V, 

1B7 23% 
MBS 124b 
82 7% 

S6 12% 
13 7% 

418 43% 
3SOOi 4 
600z 5% 
» 9% 

W 6Va 

to isb 

431 3% 

1 » 
17 5910 

2 W 

2 14% 

31 7 

429x13% 
141 3% 

109 2% 

126 5% 

M 3th 
7 12% 
50 7% 

IS 1% 
36 4 
4 6% 

75 9% 

3 B% 

30 714 

7 im 
344 1% 

I 12V» 
775 A 
- 1 2% 
27 3% 

IS IS 


4% 444 — 1b 

21% 2l%— A 
19% 19% + % 

ESA B4 
2% 2% 

10 10 — % 
11% 11% 4- 4b 
24b- 24b— tb 

37M— «■ 

4% 4%— 1b 
494b 4944 + V 
4 4% 

9% 944 

114* 11A — A 
I 7% + % 
9414 94% 

7% 7tb + A 
644 4A— A 

U a ,3 *=* 

3346 334b— A 
324b 22%— 44 
11A-12A + % 
64b 7 

124b 12% + A 
7% 7%— 4b 
41 <1% + A 

5% SA 
544 SA 
» 9% + A 
6% 6% + A 

^ 'ssza 

34b 3A 
59 39% 

A Ob' 

14% 1444 
6A 4A— A 
13% 13% 

3% 3% + % 
2% 2% — A 
54b 5% + A 
3% 3% + A 
12% 124b— 4b 
74b 744— * 
14b 1% + A 
3* 3A 
Mb 64b 
9% 916 
5% «A + A 
7A 7V6 + A 
1IA 11% 4- M 
IM 144 
12% 12%— A 
46 A— tb 
24b 2A 
3 3 —A 

14% 14% — U 


: SB. 

Dlu. YW. P6 MBit 

38 13 

350 1*4 SIH. 

1489)27 16 

20 33 8 5 

<3 225 

.16' 4 21 1428 
.M A 21 7 

7 JOB 64 19 17 


.17 A 28 139 

10 55 

U» 13 9 48 

is: A0 2 
130 44 10 a 

1 J3» AS . 10 

36e 28 11 8 

UK M 9 14 

.14 .9 11 8 

13 

jo as s i 

77 

4 06 

.16 82 
112 
2 

850 

16 18 
AO 27 14 14 

7 10 

9 44 

10 7 
49 1781 

489 
3 33 

1927 

5 549 

Si 
7 M 
SO 

IS 18 

jar 2.1 19 I3S 

.15K 17 9 It 

132 16 17 82 

IJBn 21 » S 


CW onto 
HlatlLBW stock 


sb. ' Ctea 

Piy. Via. PE IBOlHIfltl Lb* Quot, ( 


.15K 17 9 It 

132 16 17 82 

IJBa 21 10 S 

15 TO 

2 a 

550 2% 

39 IJ 13 \K) 27% 

S3 34 10 4 2716 


1A 
1% 

304* -* % 
13% + % 
14% 

6% 

2% 

26% — % 
27 — % 
ISA + A 
Bb 
33 
29% 

30% 

30 414b 

50 +5% 

27 

39b + 4b 
10% 4 A 
34b— 1 I 
18% 4 % 

5 4 % 
8% 4 A 
BA— % ! 

19 — V 1 
9% 

ID 4 % 
B%— A 

6 + A 

7% 4 % 

HA— % 
BA— % 
13% 

2H6— A 
9 + 4b 

5b + Vi 
6% 4- b 
19b 4 4fc 
13% 4 A 
16% + % 
2146 
4b 

"bb + fc 

9%— H 
9- + % 
35 + % 

46%+ A 
114b— % 

21% 23* 4 % 
77% 27b 
1 1 


7% GMR» 

1% GtoRwt 
8b GttRstrf 1X0 
lHs&tanF? 50 

8 GMYlg 

184b G la It It 88 
2346 Glume ■ IJKb 
24* GlooNR 
IM Glaser ■** 
*. GW Fid 
ISA GorRpi .76 
194* GauUT 1 Mr 
8% Grand) 32 
1»A GmCIAU 60 
1 Geanlirt 
10% Gr7acft 
27 GrlLkC 4* 
8% Groom * 

4% Greiner 
an Gnich 50t> 
10% GllCdb 52 
22% Glt.tr At) 


29 T3 
120 J% 
13 Uli 
114 19% 
52 9% 
23 31% 
79 33% 
34 3b 

1 19% 
37 

13 18% 

2 26% 
t 10% 

77 ISA 
18 1% 
26 17% 
law 19": 
213 33% 
18 ISM 
77 10% 
530 13b 
41 33% 


13 + A 

3% + % 
12% + A 
19% — % 
9% + A 
31% — A 
33b — % 
3b— % 
»9% 4 A 

A + ft 
ism — % 

26% — b 
10 % 

Isa +ib 
1A— A 

12% 4 b 

ss+% 

12 

10% 4 A 
13 — % 
33% 4 b 


246 BAT In .138 12 6 

12b BDM» 26 

14* BRf 8 

IDb BSNnJ 

7b Bodgar .40 37 V0 

7% Baber - 24 

7 V: flaltbeS JBt 14 
2b BalrMwt 
7T Ban Pd 238*114 
646 Banstrg 

AA BnkBId A0 48 IS 
3% Barca 

2% Sam En 20 

7% Bemud JO 28 
4 BarvftG 
446 Beard 

1146 BddBIk 180 15J 
b Bettmv 2 

19% Bii-oBr 82 18 15 
3b BottlCp -421 Tib 
21 4b BKCn 8 17 6 
9b BlgV AO 38 25 
19% DinfcMf 180 45 11 
14 BldR B 25 

U% BlcRA 26 

ms BIB3H9S 80 28 9 
46 BWcfcE 

12% B loom A 85 2J 8 
12% BlDWItS 80 16 8 
22% Batorp 85 .1 32 

it Bowvat jo 
2V5 Bowmr 19 

12% Bourne 84 17 16 
19b Braaig 180 
111* Brauns 10 

24% BmFA 180 19 W 
25% BmFB 188 17 11 
3% BrttPp f 80 97 
24b BiKklm 
23b BuHl 
V Busftn 


1146 CDls 10 

n cmicp n 

1% CMXCp 

13% CDS 84 18 15 
9A C0MNJ It 

4% CaoteA 4 

10 COIRE 1JB VJ II 
18% Calm at 88 28 31 
3% Carton n 
% Coltnwt . 

7% CalnroP 801 94 5 
9% Cameo 32 18 11 
1% Campnl 
13b CMarcg JO 
18% CdnOcc 84 
25% CWlne 0 

4A Coeoltf 114 

1% Carol I 

7% CoreB 18 

7% Car*A .10 8 17 

5b CsrijEn 18 

36 CaroPptSflB 11J . 
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25% CasPd 220a 78 
344 Caatlnd 


5261 4% 4 

116 20% 28% 
17 3 2% 

38 11 IDA 
27 10% 10% 
43 ISA UK 

20 9U 9% 
6 3% 3% 

16 2S% 2S 

4 7 7 

2 8% 8% 
I 3b 3b 
55 3% 3b 

1 7A 7A 
3 M fl 
89 8% 8b 

1 11 % 11 % 
1 % % 
407 30% 30 

8 3% 3% 

21 26% 2648 
IT 13% 13 

1 22 22 
92 25% 25 
133 25% 2Sb 
6 25 24% 

iso in i% 

117 15% 15% 
11 15% 15% 
IBS 43b 40b 

2 11 11 

50 4% 4b 

129 16% 16 
161 21 2044 

41 1746 17% 
34 34% 34A 
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5 4A 4 . 
60 3% 34b 

9 28b 2SA 
t T0U 10b 


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374b— A 
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3 1 % 

27% » 
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1546 12% 
ISA 1246 
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30b IB 
24% 19% 
33% 10% 

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7 4A 
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16 1046 

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36 IM 
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76b 2546 
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16% 9b 
23% 15% 


16% 13% 
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23% 15A 
54b 2A 
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13% 104* 
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17% 10b 
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32% ISA 
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5 7% 

81 Ub 
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36 3% 

490 19 
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194 2b 
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114 2«J 

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214 % 


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2b 2b 
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12A 12% + A 
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6b 6% + 4b 
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2 IM + % 

13b 13b + A 
22b 22b— % 
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25% 25% + % 
46 b 
35b 35b + A 
154b 15% + A 
14A 14% + % 
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10% 6b 
14% 10% 
18 9b 
10b 7% 

29% 28 
30b 16% 

m % 

38% 16% 
42% 22% 
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35% 26b 
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6% 2b. 
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43% 29b 
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41 29b 29 29 — % 

10 >b lb Ib 

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93 40 38% 40 +1% 

30 23 b 33 23% + A 

175 IDA 10 101* 

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11 lnstmt 
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157 4b 

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436 MM 
167 3b 
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32% 32% + % 
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13% 3% 

36% 15% 

30b 9*6 
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22% 13b 
19b 8b 
29% 18 
17b 12A 
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11 B 

7% 4b 
3% 1% 

3% 1% 

86b 52 
18b 12% 

32 26% 

9b 5% 

38% Bb 
20% lib 
B% 4% 

12 8% 

86% *5b 
20% 17% 

10b BA 
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17% 10% 

17% 10% 

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6% 2% 

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23% 11% 
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M £4 8 

440 105 
JO L3 16 


29 Mb 
41 16% 
4 28b 
6 1646 
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362 *7% 
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lit 22% 


18 M 7 
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16b 17b + % 
Mb Mb + % 
Kb Mb— % 
21b 22% +1 
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2b 3b + b 
85 86b +lb 

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3% 3% + A 
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10b 10b— A 
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23% 23A— A 
10% 10% — % 


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5% 5b 
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37% 37% 
11% 11% 
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2Mb 22% 
4% 4% 
646 6% 
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2b 2A 
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6% 6% 
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746 5% J aeons 

5% 2A JetAm 4 

2 V5 JetAwt 

9A 4% Jelron JTI 73 18 

t% 2% John Pd 

11% 7b JaWiAm 30 33 13 

11% 4A Jahnlnd 3 

7A 2% JmojKn 4 


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30 3% 316 346 + A 

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10 944 

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9% 9%— A 
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12b 12%+ A 
10% 11% + A 
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11 FWymB 80 52 12 ' 
20% -Fjterpn .He S 9 
lift FtecftP Mt 53 9 

6% RtcGE 4 

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4A FtWIIG 20 

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11b ForestL 43 

96 Pateml 
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14 PreaEi IS 

7A Prledm 38b 34 12 
5 FriesEn 

13% Frisch s 32 3 21 

0 FmtHd i 

4% FrlAwt .171 11 
5A FurVtl s 23 


179 SA 4A 

14 HA >046 

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15 IA 8A 

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66 I2A 12 
58 8% 5% 

JOOrTQO 100 
1 21% 21% 
793 32% 31 
585 1ft 1% 
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104 2246 20ft 
36 8% I 
737 11% TOA 
12 25% 25% 

82 1446 14% 

T2 5%- SVi 
34 11A 11% 


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10%— b 
13% — '.* 
25b— b 
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26 — b 
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17% 8 
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4% 2b 
4% 3% 
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15% 9% 
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KtlGspt 4.50 125 
KoPokC 5 

KoVCp 30 18 17 
Kayj n .I0e 3 
KNrNn .40 33 14 
Kenwln 80a 48 9 
Ketchm SK 26 
Kev Co JOe 33 

KayPti JO . 28 16 
Key Co wl 
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Klltm 35 

Klnarfc 

Klrtoy 

KUMIO 15 

Klaerv J2r 8 
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326 3ft 
2S 13ft 
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23 T2b 
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799 10 
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350 Uft 


36 36 

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13% 13b + b 
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12% 12b — A 
20 20 + ft 

71ft 22 + A 

8% 9ft + ft 
9% 9% + A 
1 % 1 % 

7 7 

4ft 4b— b 
4% 4b 
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2A 3A + ft 
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274* 27b— b 


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135 104 

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135 103 
130 104 

28 12b 

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28% — % 

257 108 

221 74 

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232 104 

37 22A 

22% + % 

244 108 

IB 23A 

23% — % 

262 107 

26 24% 

24% 

10% 

22% 

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1.12 104 

1 10% 

10% 

237 105 

743 22A 

22% 

105 107 

100 19% 

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19% 

230 104 

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19ft + ft 

146 106 

18 18% 

5% 

18% 

235 107 

24 21 


21 + % 

2 04 105 

14 19% 


19%—% 

232 113 

10 20% 


20% + ft 

139 109 

10 10 

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43S 1131 

35b 39% 


39% — 1% 

440 109 

30b 40% 


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440 113 

lOOb 41% 

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16b 70% 


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17% 12% I 
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23 2% 2b 3b— b 
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34 10 2% 2% 2% 

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53 267 2% 2 2% 

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21 38 12 Jib 12 + A 

20 3% 3% 34* 

88 5.1 9 4*5 17b 17% 17b + A 
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16 4A 4 4A 

JO 18 13 92 lib II 11% + % 


1% 1% 
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7% 2ft 
62 23% 

15b lift 
17% II 
14% 9% 

2 7ft 21% i 
9% 2ft 
31% 13 
61* 3ft I 
23% 7% i 
3% 14* 
3% 2% I 
3% 1ft I 
39% 24% I 
16% 84* I 
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16 9% I 

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39% 15% 1 


14% 13 
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17% 

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38 9 74 

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1 




WestLBi in i 11 1 1 bi m ■ 11 ib n n ■ 1 

We recommend the following investment at current market prices: 

WestLB-Zeros 

Discounted Bearer Bonds in the amount of 

DM 250,000,000 

Series 600 due May 2 , 1995 at par 
Issue price on June 8, 1985: 51.85%; Yield: 6.85% 
Denominations: DM 5,000 and DM 20.000 

t 

Discounted Bearer Bonds in the amount of 

DM 250,000,000 

Series 601 due May 2. 2000 at par 
Issue price on June 8, 1985: 36.25%; Yield: 7.04% 
Denominations: DM 5,000 and DM 20.000 

The issues are to be listed on the Rheinisch-Westfalische Borse 
zu DQsseldorf (Dusseldorf Stock Exchange) 

Please contact WestLB Bond Trading Department: 
Phone: (211) 82631 22 or (2 11) 82637 41, Telex: 8581 882 

Dusseldorf. June 1985 

Westdeutsche Landesbank 

Friedrichstr. 56, 4000 Dusseldorf 1 


WfestLBfe International Network 

Branches: London. Tel. 63861 41 New York. Tel. 7549600 Tokyo. Tel. 2 160581 Hong Kong. Tel. 842 0288 
Subsidiaries: WestLB International SA. Luxembourg, Tel. 44741 43 
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Tokyo. Tel. 2 13 1811/12 Toronto. Tel, B69 10 85 Melbourne. Tel. 6 54 16 55 Osaka. Tel. 944-16 81 


Our mid-year outlook 

of the U.S. stockmarket 
is low on interest... 

Lower interest rates. Higher returns, for investors wise enough to 
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But high on reward. 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 


** 


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. ANP THEN THIS &KL 
1 5AIP TO ME/GOOPBYE, 
UNUS. i'LL SEE YOU 
SOME WHEN. 1,1 



“somewhenIthatIs An 

OLP COON1W EXPRESSION.. 
fTS VERY TOUCHING... 



REAlLY? I THOUGHT 
I WAS THE ONLY ONE 
WHO FELT THAT WAY. 




BOOKS 




ON WRITING AND POLITICS: 
1967-1983. 


by examining the hision' of Hdnrich Heine’s 
unfinishe d swcy “The Rabbi of 


BLONDIE 


ACROSS 


I “To and a 

bone..,": 
Kipling 
5 Best-selling 
drink 
9 Phase 

14 Island off Java 

15 Whilom 
Reagan Sec. of 
State 

16 idolize 

17 “Give a 

horse. . 

IS Bayou soup 
ingredient 

19 Balzac’s 
birthplace 

20 Iced, spiced 
wine drink 

22 Engine lever 

23 Author Hunter 

24 Fountain 
treats 

25 Gyro ida l 

28 Sack 

29 Torment 

31 Aptly named 
cheese 

35 Askew 

36 “Snake eye” 

37 Having wings 

38 Iranian of yore 

39 Baptism, 
matrimony, 
etc. 

41 Cause of ruin 

42 Lord Nelson's 
crewmen 

43 Plentiful 


47 Last royal 
governor of 
Mass. 

48 Ethically 
neutral 

49 Cooling drink 

53 Fail yard- 
worker 

54 Diminish 

55 Top Romanov 

56 Upright 

57 Glimpsed 

58 Envelope abbr 

59 Gets stuck in 

muck 

60 This, to Maria 

61 Whoppers 

DOWN 



By Giinter Grass. Translated by Ralph 
Manheim. Introduction by Salman Rush- 
die. 157pp. S 13.95 

Helen and Km Wolff fHarcourt Brace Jo- 
vanovich, 1250 Sixth Avenue, San Diego, 
Calif. 92101. 


Reviewed by 

Christopher Lchmann-Haupt 

I N THIS coDection of essays and speeches, 
Gita ter Grass, the German novelist, poet, 
graphic artist and political activist, seems to be 
divided into two parts like his country and to 
be waging a kind of add war within Himself. 

It is not simply that the book is divided into 
“On Writing’* and “On Politics." The division 
in Grass goes deeper than that Half of him is 
witty, intellect) 
an observer of I 
ences “with time ; 


iiiinnnii — ihwj ■ •>" - — — — -- ®®ehajBch. 

These essays are engaging and enlarge our 
understanding of European history . ^ 

It is boring to read Grass on technology, 
industrial waste, missile arms and the immi- 
nent arrival of the end of lime. What he has to 
say has been said so many limes before. Worse, 
it’s disturbing to find it boring because, if whaa 
Ire says is irue. as it wdl may be, then weonj^. 
to be awakened to the threats instead of ' 
numbed by their repetition. 

Fortunately, there is more of tire lnterestjog 
side of Grass m “On Writing and Politics B thaa 
there is of the boring side. 


1'iiiii"- 
W 1 


1° *■ . 


■V ' 


Christopher Lehmann ■ Hmqx is on ihtstoff of 
The New York Times . . 


BESTSELLERS 


contrary 

inscribed “a slow-moving animal in my es- 
cutcheon and said: Progress is a snail" The 
other half is shrill, ideological, polemical, an 
ovendniplifier of history who seems to contra- 
dict his insistence that “there is no such thing 
as a jumping snaO.” 

One part of Grass has written thoughtful 
essays cm Franz Kafka and Alfred Doblrn, the 
author of such nearly forgpttm books as “Wal- 
lenstein," “Mountains, Oceans and Giants" 
and “Berlin Aiex&nderplatz," whom Grass em- 
braces as his mentor. The other part sees the 
world as black and white, deman d* that writers 
be politically engaged, if only because of toe 
history of tire cold war. 

Many readers wifi insist that there is no 
ion between the two parts of Grass 
that seem to be set in opposition here. But I 
submit a subjective defense of my division of 
all Grass into two parts: One is interesting to 
read and the other is not It is, for example, 
highly absorbing to follow his elegant histori- 
cal analysis in “Erfurt 1970 and 1891," an 
address delivered in Baden-Baden in 1970 in 
which he tries to show how a 19th-century 
congress held by the Social Democratic Party 
ultimately led to the geographical division be- 
tween the two Germany?, it is gratifying to 
encounter Grass’s dismissal of toe television 
series “Holocaust" for failing to reveal any- 
thing about the roots of German anti-Semi- 
tism, and to watch him try to redress the fail ore 


TbeNewYoifcTtaes ' 

This Brt is Sotsod oo inium from wore tfud 2,000 hnnfci A ffl ai 

ftreeghom fee United Sate* Wetfa on la« «*■ not nrnm i jlK 

consecutive. _ 


(A- 

v 1 ’ 

\- 


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FICTION 


TV*» 

Wed 


um 


by John 


1 SKELETON CREW, by 

2 THE ODER HOUSE W 

3 JUBAL SAOtETT.iwL^'L : Ai^'^ 

4 THE HUNT TOR RED OCTOBER, by 




Tom Clancy 
JD THE 


HOLD 

Bradford 


DREAM, by Barbara Taylor 


IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sdaey 
Sheldon 


Herbert , 


Richard Btchnaa ■ 

USE: DUNE, by Frank 


5 HI 


9 INSIDE, OUTSIDE, by Herman Weak- & W 

10 THE CLASS, by Erich Sraal — 9 

11 A CREED FOR THE THIRD MILLHN- . 

IUM. bv CoQka McOiOooRh M 

12 FAMILY ALBUM, by DameDe Sled — 12 W 

13 QUEENIE. by Micfaad Korda 11 10 

14 THE LONELY SILVER RAIN, by John - 

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nur* 

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‘sires- - 






.irr ; . : ‘ 

it'--' 

•fills 


ihf.v 

\l 


15 FOOTFALL, by Larry Niven and Jeny 

Fcnsnelk — 1 


NONFICTION 


\ lACOCCA: An Autobiography. by Lee t»- 
cocca with WEffiam Novak — — 

2 A PASSION TOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Tom Poet* md Nancy Austin 

3 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES. 

r Comadl Ctwaa and Mdvyn Kinder — 


* Sr 


Md vyp I 

MOTHER’S KEEPER, by B- D. Hy- 


5 CONFESSIONS OF A HOOKER, by Bob 

6 U$TNO EACH OTSS,"^TLeoBia«fr 


4 34 

1 .T 

3 12 
4-6 
6 6 


lit 

7 MOUNTBATTEN. by ffefljp Zaegjn 

fH MOSCOW, by Ar- 


Sobaiou to Prevloas Puzzle 


S BREAKING WITH 

kady N. Shevchenko 

9 AUGHT IN THE ATTIC. t^ShetSaves- 

sieia 


3:43 

T, 4 


10 ONCE UPON A TIME, by Gloria Vander- 
bilt 


S I El 


E N 


V T 


EAR 



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a 

□ 


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a 

□ 

n 

□ 

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in 

a 

a 

a 

an 

a 

a 

□ 

□ 

ID 

3 

□□HD 


11 THE SOONG DYNASTY, by Sicrtms 

12 


HEART OF THE DRAGON, by 
Alasdair Clawre 


13 THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 
Richard Bach 


IE 


□EHB 


□ 

□ 

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m 

□CDE3 

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N G 


14 THE COURAGE TO CHANGE, by Den- 

15 YOUTLE JOKING. MSL 


fcl, 
15 
11 8 
12 10 

9 3 
14 42 

10 19 
13 14 


R C 


BE 


FEYNMANN." by Riduid P. Fcymnann 
ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANGOUS 

DR BERGER'S IMMUNE POWER .0 
DIET, by Smart M. Bobs- -*r 2 


fS NINTH NEW COLLE- 
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THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jeff 

^nwHi 


2 36 


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0/26/85 


NOTHING DOWN, by Robert G. Altai 
WEIGHT WATCHERS WICK START 
PROGRAM COOKBOOK, by Jean Ni- 
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3 12 
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SCOREBOAR 









BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


TRINP 



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A FTER hearing one heart 
.on the left and one spade 
cm the right. South coukfnot 
resist a one no- trump bid on 
toe diagramed deal He was 
lucky in the rireumstances to 
find two jacks in the dummy, 
but they did him no good. 

West decided to lead a spade 
in toe hope that East would 
gain fbe lead to play hearts 
through South’s presumed 
king, bast played the spade 
deuce, and South won with the 
jade He could have cashed his 


spade winners but not unnatu- 
rally led a diamond, trying for 
a trick in the suit 

West won and tried the club 
queen with a gratifying result. 
East overtook and shifted to 
toe heart eight West captured 
the jack with toe queen and led 
another club. When the smoke 
had cleared the defense had 
taken 10 consecutive tricks and 
collected 400 points. 

Few learn from their mis- 
takes, so South probably just 
thinks he was unlucky. He will 
on making his very vulnera- 
le one no-trump ovcrcalls. 


NORTH 

♦ 7S4 

3943 

0 1632 

* J 97 


WEST CD) 

483 

: A Q 10 7 2 
: A 10 9 4 
* Q 6 


EAST 

♦ 10 95 2 

9 85". 

« 87 S . 

• AK10 8 


TALKS WITHOUT 
©IV\H© ITSELF 
AWAY. 


Now oirange the circled letters to 
loirn the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer here: 1X11 X j 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumtfes GLEAM UPPER ISLAND EIGHTY 


I Answer What that twice-married swine could have 
been -A "PIG-AMIST 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 

N 

c 

F 

C 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 

Algarve 

» 

77 

19 

44 

ir 

Bangkok 

11 

88 

25 

77 

' ■ Amsterdam 

19 

66 

12 

54 

ir 

Belling 

M 

93 

X 

72 


a 

82 

21 

70 

fr 

Hoag Kaag 

19 

BJ 

25 

77 


zt 

75 

16 

61 

Ir 

Manila 

33 

91 

25 

77 


X 

7S 

17 

54 

Cl 

New Delta 

38 

100 

30 

84 


JO 


14 

S' 

0 

Seoul 

39 

S4 

21 

TO 

. ' annsrls 

IV 

66 

17 

54 

Cl 

Shanghai 

31 

88 

22 

n 



75 

12 

54 

0 

Singapore 

31 

88 

24 

79 


22 

71 

■ 4 

5? 

Cl 

Taipei 

15 

V5 

24 

79 

Copenhagen 

14 

41 

14 

57 

r 

Tokyo 

22 

72 

19 

46 

- Costa Del Sui 
■ ’ Dublin 

25 

17 

77 

47 

21 

50 

44 

c> 

th 

AFRICA 





. • EAtobureti 

(8 

M 

8 

to 

in 






Florence 











• Frankfurt 


41 


54 

o 



64 


54 

. Geneva 






Cafv&ftmca 

23 

73 

19 













Istanbul 





fr 






Let Poimas 











Lisbon 






T«M* 

H 

« 

18 



10 

61 

9 

46 

U1 


MMrkJ 

33 

91 

17 

43 

tr 

LATIN AMERICA 






57 

Ir 


— 


“ 



24 

75 

u 

57 

cl 

Buenoc Aim 

25 

77 

IS 

59 


IB 


10 

so 

ci 

Caracal 



20 



22 


15 


fr 

Uma 



IS 








Mexico City 

34 

75 

12 


Porto 

(8 

M 

n 

52 

o 

Rla Oe Janeiro 

U 

75 

19 

44 

Prague 

Reykjavik 

14 

44 

57 

D 

52 

48 

0 

NORTH AMERICA 



Wirld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse June 25 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Rente 

Stockholm 

Stnobeere 

vwn« 

Vienna 


Zurich 


a 77 13 SS 
» 71 13 55 
M te 13 55 

r r: ir *3 

3 72 14 57 
M U 15 SI 
l« 6* 11 53 


MIDDLE EAST 


N h II 54 Cl 


Beirut 
QwnatCui 
Jerusalem 
Trt Awi* 


— — — — na 


» b i: » 

a 82 IB U 


OCEANIA 


Auckla n d !J S5 B 46 Ir 

Svdoey n S3 t 4 cl 

ci-ctoudw: to 5 wav: tr lair: Rha-l, 
tn-snowri. M,-inow. sl-ilarmv 


Anchorage 

15 

59 

9 

48 

Allan to 

32 

90 

21 

70 

Bolton 

24 

75 

14 

57 

Chicago 

10 

84 

14 

57 

Denver 

28 

82 

17 

43 

Detroit 

77 

01 

11 

52 

Honolulu 

X 

Si 

15 

58 

Houston 

32 

90 

23 

73 

LasAnseias 

25 

77 

16 

61 

Miami 

31 

88 

23 

73 

Mloneopothi 

30 

86 

18 

44 

Montreal 

(9 

W 

(2 

54 

Nassau 

30 

84 

34 

75 

New York 

25 

17 

15 

SO 

Son Francisco 

25 

17 

14 

57 

Seattle 

21 

70 

9 

48 

Toronto 

28 

40 

9 

48 

washing loo 

28 

82 

15 

SR 


ir 

fr 

AC 





Closo 

Piti. 

ABN 

*57 

45440 

ACF Holding 

32X50 

224 

Aegon 

9740 

94.90 

AKZO 

10480 


Ahold 


l/l 1 

AMEV 

248 


A Dam Rubber 



Amro Bank 

77 JO 


BVG 

«a 

P’l'J 

Buefirmann T 

57 JO 

8840 

CataftdHiag 

Eisevier-NDU 

3580 

ItSJD 




13040 

18340 

Gist Brocades 

1&S40 

Urine ken 

146JD 

146 JO 

Hooaovens 

58 

58A0 


58AQ 


Hoard* n 

47 JO 

47 JD 




Necitavd 

l» 

15940 

Ore VanderG 

32250 

322 

PoklMM 

4040 

tOM 

Philips 

5240 

5240 

Roboco 

7440 


Rodamco 

141 


RoUnca 

697Q 

49 JO 

Rorenta 


44-20 

Roval Dulch 

194.90 


Unilever 

350 

354 

VanOmmeren 

29 JO 

2940 

VMF Stark 



VNU 

199 

19940 

( ANPjCBS Gem Index moo 1 

| Pravtmr* : 21040 



ll ll 







Cackertii 






EBES 

GB-inito-BM 

5?? 


GBL 

(90Q 


Gevoert 


. 

Hoboken 



inlercom 


Til 

Kredtotbank 

~<1 


Petrauna 

57SO 


Soc General* 

1815 

rr 

Safina 

7190 

I,. 

Satvav 

4370 


Traction Elec 


21 

UCB 



Unerg 


EE 

VleUig Montogne 



Carrent Sleek index : 2318.13 1 

Previeo* : TWM 



| Frjmkfurt || 


o^twercsst: oc-ocnw douflv; r-rain; 


WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Slight. FRANKFURT: Over cos*. 


Tcrnc. n — n »|J — «>. LONDON: Shewerv lerhp. li — to I61_— S#h 


MADRID: FA.r Temp. 33—18 fVI — Oil NEW YORK: Fair. Temp. U— 15 
175— lit. PARIS: Overtoil Terra. 17—13 1*1 — W). ROm£: Fair. Temp. 


74—1317" — Ui TELAVIV. For Temp 30— 17 (to— 431. ZURICH: Overcast. 
Terno. 1B~ 10 tM- SOI BANGKOK: Cloudy. Temp. 31 —25 (88 — 77). HOHO 
KONG: cieudv Temp 3S-TS (81 — 771 MANILA: Ufludv. Temp. 33 — 25 
(01 - TV) SEOUL; Fooov. Temp. 30— eel. SINGAPORE: Foggy. Temp. 
u — 3~ i«3 — si) TOKYO: Sho-crs. Temp. K— 10 (72 — 441. 


AEG-TetehinKen 

Allianz Vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Bayer 

Bov Hypa Bank 
Bav Verelnsbank 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Coni Gunwni 
Oalmter-fienr 
Oeeus» 

□euticM Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
DreWneT Bank 
GHH 
Harnener 
Hoctmef 




3S9JJ0 159 JB 
226.70 Z2t JO 


maamx 


33B ... 
176 374 
233 237 




454 


IWJO 201 JO 
154 JO 


IS? 
BH (57 
MOM JO 
163 14150 
M7J0 573 
220 231 JO 
14430 las 
334 337 

557 540 


Moedirt 


Horten 
Huwei 
IWKA 
Kaii + seiz 
Karstodl 
KMNhol 
Klocckner H-O 
Kloeckncr WOrke 
K map Stahl 
Una* 

LuHhtmso 

.MAN 

McBinesmann 
Mueoeh Rueck 
Nledon 
PKI 


Preuxog 

PWA 

Rwe 

Rhebimerati 

Sdierhrg 

SEL 

Siemens 

Tlnam 

Veho 

vaikswapenwerR 

yyelio 


224 225 

til JO M2A3 
U4J0 Iff 
2K 287JO 
320 34i 

33 28450 
231 232J0 
246 24150 

34 283 JO 
6430 7D 

105 104 

S34 05 

199 JO 201 
148J0 14950 
18470 I9O50 

iSS -S3 

1St» 151 3 ® 

im in 

300J0 302 

•502 505 

341 242 

57750 580 

M71I4J0 
21700 217321 
316 32450 
582 SM 


Comm e r z bank index : >43120 
Previous : 1427.10 


Hong Kong 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kong 
China Ughl 
Green Island 
Hana Sene Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Lend 
HK Shana Bank 
HK TeieniMne 
HK Yaumatel 


Hutch Whampoa 


inti City 


wbisor 
world Inti 


Mam Seng in<a : 1575.15 
PieHoo i : 1541.13 


Jnhimiigjihin-ji 




Anglo American 
AngtoAmGaW 

Barlows 

Blvvoor 

Buffets 

oe Beers 

GFSA 

Hormgnr 

Mi vela Steel 


_81S 815 

7900 310 

I74SB 17400 
1190 1185 
1325 1340 
700 7400 
IQSQ 106 
3400 337$ 
2T50 2900 
485 485 


KlOOf 

Ncdbank 
PrrsStevn 
Rusplat 
SA Brews 
SI Helena 
Sosoi 

Weft Holding 


CWIMl Slock Udex : (LA. 
Prevlom : 1134.1 


AACerp 

AMied-Lyans 

AfWlOAm Gold 

Ass Bril Foods 

Am Dairies 

Barclays 

Bass 

BJLT. 

Beertmm 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 

Bewoter Indus 
BP 

Bril Home St 
Brit Telecom 
Bril Aeraseace 
Sri toll 
BTR 
Burmoh 
Cafcle Wireless 
Cadbury Scttw 
Clio rter Coos 
Commercial U 

Coni Gala 

CourtoukJs 

Doloefy 

De Beers* 

DbfHiera 

Drieftmteln 

F Isons 

FreeStGed 

GEC 

Gen Acd deni 

GKN 

Gtano* 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GU5 

Henson 

Hawker 

ICI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securiues 
Legal General 
UoyOSBanfc 
Lanmo 
Lucas 

Maries and Sp 
IVKHal Boi 
Midland Bail, 
Not west Bank 
Pood 0 
Pllklngten 
Plessey 
Prudent kj I 
Racql El ect 
Randfonteln 
Rank 
Hoed Inti 
Reuters 
Roval Dutch c 
RTZ 
SoatctU 

Saineiwry 

Sears H swings 

Shell 

STC 

sidciwiwrea 


214 

144 


544 

313 

32S 

305 

40 

US 

280 

IM 


524 
»Q 
171 
3S5 
211 
333 
230 
515 
• 152 
184 
210 
534 
141 
418 
538 
297 



T#9* . 

MTO9. 


443 

445 

Tato and Lyte 

473 

478 


243 

348 


41( 

434 


240 

aw 


330 

342 

THF 

130 

133 

Ultramar 

208 

313 

Unilever c n 19/44 

11(6 

United Bhcuffs 

181 

185 

(Ticker* 

270 

274 

Wool worth 

a 

398 

(08 



S Prevtoa* : *4*Jo 



0 F.TJi.100 index 

I248J8 

5 Prevloas : 124A7S 
0 

0 



0 -»«■- li 

Banco Comm 


Centiraie 

,itSS 

3440 

] Cred itoi 


2289 

Ertaanla 

10999 


Fnrmltoita 

13SB 134501 

Ftat 

3800 

3820 I 

F Insider 


- 1 

Generali 

5D73B 513*01 



79*6 

Ifarrementf 




T4S0 

14S3 

Italmoblltort 

91000 

907® 

Mediobanca 

114400114975 1 




Olivetti 

6251 

4200 





MCS0 

7500 

Rinascente 

885 

874 


3419 

2385 

5ME 

1430 

7400 

Snte 

31*5 

3158 

Mapaa 

18390 18290 

Stef 

3385 

3275 

Mis Current index 

Previous : 1449 

'.14a 


1- -vwt. . ] 


SOUTH 
4AKQI 
? KJ« 

»K(J 

*543 2 

Botb sides were vulnerable. Tbe 

bfcUios'. 

West North East Sooth 

1 ? Pass l A 1 n.T, 

Pass Pass Pass 

West led the spade eight. 

m ’’F. 


>* s . i 


iT - 


S351A 525 y. 

335 341 

*255* 52549 

144 170 

220 Z72 

12W12 aS/44 


718 

235 

815 

185 

417 

ft 


187 

172 

244 

499 

594 

149 

303 

133 

450 

372 

442 

355 

283 

124 

442 

IM 


724 

254 

825 

1B9 

419 

734 

190 

m 

262 

709 

599 

149 

314 

135 

458 

374 

444 

343 

ft 

ft 



Air Lkukfc 
AtsttuunAH. 
AvDomouII 
Banco I ro 
BiC 

Bonaraki 
Bouyguea 
BSN-GO 
Gorrefour 
Chorpeuri 
Oub Med 
Dorry 
Dumex . 
EH-AauJfofne 
Europe 1 
Gen Eaws 
HOchslte 

Lafarge Cop 


5? 


719 


& ii 


LAS leer 

rOreal 

MOrtril 

Mono 

Merlin 

Mictielln 

Moot Hennenv 

AMuIlnes 

Ocdd ra W 

Pernod Rk: 

Perrier 

W ro te Use) 

Peugeot 

Print emp* 

Wadtete c m 

Redauta 
Roussel Utiof 
Sanofi 

SklsRassMnei 
Teiemecan 
Thomson CSF 


Agefl index : 228L43 
P r gv l ggt : 228.14 
CAC lodes .' 229JM 
P i P ri o n s : 22830 


Cota Storage 

DBS 

Froser Heave 

253 


5J5 

sJ 

how Par 

234 

2Jt 

tnchoosK 

Mai Banking 


2J7 

5J0 

OCBC 



OUB 

OUE 


X10 

2JH 

Shangri-la 

Z25 

NA 


1J8 

IJI 


Z72 

2J1 


605 


S Steamship 

UN 

UB 

St Trading 

*M 

4J1 

United Overseas 

1J0 

IJI 


406 

412 

Strutts Times Ind 


Prevteas : 79244 




AGA 

AHa Laval 


Astro 

Altai Copco 
B oflden 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 


119 115 

i® I® 

305 
395 397 

ioi im 
180 782 

245 246 


HandeHbanken 

JW 7 *jcanra 

5andvtk 


SKF 
SwedTstiAtatch 
Volvo 


375 375 

150 151 

172 174 

N-Q. 4M 

345 m 

J4 

204 207 

184 184 

211 210 




A Cl 
ANZ 
BHP. 


223 152 


BoaaolnvIlM 
Casttemotae 
Coles 
Co mo (co 
CRA 
CSR 
Dunloe 
_._0T8lMl 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 


Nat Aust Bank 
Now) Carp 
N Broken HUI 


GWCMlTnBt 

S onias 

Thomas Notion 


Western Mining 
Banking 


westpocl 

Woodsfdg 


4J2 L22 

127 327 
2A2 ZQ5 
623 4J0 

3J9J 321 
L9S 197 
553 5J8 
Z9C 2A2 
228 224 

258 255 

125 125 

220 218 
257 225 

222 235 
418 418 

470 490 

227 230 
325 350 

157 158 

5L54 152 
1.95 153 

320 XS7 
4 4 

1X1 1J8 


ABOramertos indtgt t Mil 
Prrytaoi : B728 




Aiuil 

AsatH Chem 
Asahl Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
artdgesiano 
Canon 

c-ikm 

Dal Hteaon Print 


SSSW 


DoIvm 
F anuc 
Putt Bank 


405 <VJ 
985 7010 
B 44 BU 

mo m 

548 5 a 

1IX 115Q 
1480 1440 
O) OA 

n« ir,c 

478 474 

918 094 

TWO 7890 
16*0 1440 


dose Prey. 


•Fuji Photo 
Fulltsu 
HHacM 
HUacMGObte 


Japan Air Linos 
Kaltma 
Kansat Power 
Kawasaki Steal 
Kirin Bre we r y 
Komatsu 
Kubato 
Kyocera 
Mehsi Elec tads 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Ml tsubhhl Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy • 
MltsubWlI Cora 
Mitsui and Go 
MltsukasM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NHcfco Sec 
Nippon Kooaku 
Nippon Oil 
kgapon Sleet 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 

asr 

Sharp 

Stomazu 

Shtnetsu ChemtaW 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
To tie I Carp 
Tataho Marine 
TakedpChom 
TDK 
Teftln 

Tokio Marine 
Tokyo Elec. Power 
Topaan Priorine 
Toroy Ind 
Toshiba 
TByota 
Yamal ail Sec 


1928 

999 

735 

410 

1470 

7840 

313 


151 
730 
<75 
340 
4}tt 
1390 S 
777 
1440 
534 
394 


470 

414 


1030 

749 


1130 

944 

144 

305 

415 

1250 

114B 

1830 

104 

«W 

731 

010 

4050 

1920 

244 

741 

157 

219 

S75 

848 

4790 

491 

921 

J 10 B 

070 


W0 
1010 
725 
4U 
1390 
7450 
311 
1880 
15) 
725 
475 
350 
3990 
1390 
775 
1440 
519 
394 
327 
445 
403 
433 
MjQ, 
in 10 
781 
775 
1120 
945 
144 
304 
635 
1250 
1140 
I860 
938 


1910 

ft 

IE 


054 

4710 

47B 

938 


343 

1240 

787 


WMcaUDJL index : 12837 J2 
Pre vie w : IZ76U3 

New index: 102258 
Previous : ISI73I 


Adta 

Alusubse 
Avfgphon 
Bank Leu 
Brawn I 


Elertfowatt 
HoWortonk 
mterdiseowrt 
Jacob Suchard 
Jeltnall 
LXDtoJs Ovr 
Maevonplck 
Nestle 
Oefflkon-B 
Roche Batrr 
Santa 
scMndlor 
Suizor 
SBC 

SurvamanCe 

Swissair 

Smss Reinsurance 
EvHMVgtksbanfc 
union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich Ins 



18 28 


393 395 

431 IX 
NjO. — 
12M 1272 
1875 ISiO 
USD UBS 
«M 4830 
5300 5030 
2108 2178 


SBC index :4MJt 
Prerfeus : 47220 


NA: not wetea.- HA: not 
wraitabie; ms-. estetoWsna. 


Jme2s\ 


21 75 AMI Prce 
MOOAOntaSE 
24323 All Energy 
210 Alta Not 
12009 Algoma 5> 
24485 Aracen 
195 Argus Cpr 
38525 Atcoll 
26009 BP Canada 
18597 Bank BC 
119438 Bonk N S 
49400 BarrlckO 
3038 Bonanza R 
I860 Brntome 
77455 Bramaloc 
400 Brenda m 


51207 BCPP 
■■ BC Re 


"WISIBCRes 
33 075 BC Phono 
XQDBranswV 
1450 Budd Can 
75235 CAE 
10SO4CCLA 
3912 Ota Frv 
2*200 Campoau f 
12324 C Mor West 
3S00C Packre 
4990 Can Trust 
300 CGE 

11700 Cl Bk Com 


^noa can Npt Res 


■tUCTlreAl" 
"4500 Caro 
9419 Cetanase 
782S Cefltrl Tr 
19400 Oneplexj 


T33790C DiStb A 

497700 NtaMM 


CDtstbBf 

23nDCTl- Bank 

goo Convontrs 

5DOConwastA 

tS22 Cosrka R 

303 Ccrean A 
WOSB Crownx 

27500 Czar Res 
«W90Doot1Dev 
2000 Daon A 
71500 DenJson A p 

ToS&SSn 81 

745*Dotaseo 

304 Damon A 

1828?®* 
48250V1SXA 
4^7 Eldhom X 
TOOEmeo 
34S) Equity Svr 
10 0 FCA UlM 

13090 C Falcon C 
58600 Ftenfardp# 
3290 Fed Ind A 
5W Fed Plan 
IMOFatVFlfi 
20OGendii A 
SMB Geoc Comp 
15332 Gaocrude 
2290 G ibrol tar 
6290 Gotdtnm I 
583SGL Forest 
WOGrevtwd 


S 6 V. 5 M 

3U iSS 

S4U. 6)4 


3839 H Gr otto A 
2000 Hrdlng A t 
4 SW Hawker 
!W* Hayes o 
11004 H*« tail 
15801 H Bay Co 
24 S 7 B tmasca 
3080 Indol 
2250 inland Gas 
35900 imi Thom 

AW inter Plee 
iwtpico 
tooeivocoB 
44 T 30 Jaimock 
1907 Kerr Adtf 
77 SBLobOtt 

3 ?2S hSEJS* 1 * 

1350 LOnf Com 
JTWLocana 
35 LL Lac 
fUSLaCMawCo 


3898 Lwpgnta 

3 BB 0 MDSHAI 


G nx& mstxkt t£aAP 

High uarctesocnge 
fi«9» rate T89b— ta 
516 1516 74 

SIPVk 181k 18% 

51516 1516 1516— Vk 
K1=ro 20%. OTfc-» 
51916 19 19 + 3b 

5]1 11 11 - 7 

Wt 9%. 93k 

S3316 33 33 

SM 5W 50fe+ Vk 
SI 3V. BVa 1361 
12 128 

395 390 395 +3 

465 440 445 +5 

S1W. 18V) 18W— 4k 
m. 8M 846 + 40 
JW 94* 94* + Ik 

244 240 240 

C4 2346 Z* + 16 
SWVk T1 12 + W 
S29 29 29 + 16 

5*Jk 16 l*Vk— 16 
SMJk 15,. 1516+ Vs 
1ft. lPN+\% 
ttS 3444 2446— 16 
S. 33 + 16 

OW 30 30ta+4k 

OTk 361k 37V>+ lb 
S70 70 70 

OMk gSi 36(9+ 46 
2B 28 28 

S1046 Iff* 1046+ <A 
SU1S I4W 1416 + Mi 
B 7*k ■ + Ik 

’SSS '8 ’8 

*616 5*6 6 — 1% 

546— 16 
109*+ Vk 
6V6 

9 9 

305 315 +10 

MW 13% 

20 

185 175 185 +5 
460 445 —5 

410 4ia +10 
— . im 119k 
5114k 114k llta+1% 
*44* 49s 67k 

J4J6 6Vk 6vS— Vk 
S416 4(6 6(6 

*26 254S 354* + Vk 

210 210 210 * 8 

S1S£ 18 18 — W 

at* 21 214k +1(6 

S43 43VS <1 + Vk 
W<6 646+ VI 

S17W 17» T7V%— (6 
*«% 646 64k 

*7S» 154h 18*k— 4k 

1W 1^+ Vl 
OTk THs 23W*— (6 
M3VS 231% ZTV4— Vk 

SS I £*+ (A 

SBVt 29V5 29W_*k 

** nt+ \6 

VS Z 70 272 — 2 

74 k 79 S 

M ^ 2nS+46 

Sflk S4H+V* 

.8* nTuT** 
SSS 8S ftr 1 * 

21 214 k 

M«* 2 M 201 %+ Vk 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1985 




SPORTS 


iV *'• 




•H '•■4s 


^Fine-Timing Prevention and Punishment 


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T-... • 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — An open letter to 
the Union of European Football 
Associations, winch is to hear ap- 
* peals by Liverpool and Juventns 
against punishments following the 
European Cn p final at whim 38 
■ ’.spectators were lol l ed. 

■$. Gentlemen: 

Your decisions, postponed from 
this weekend pntu early August, 
are on behalf of the 18 million who 
play and the hundreds of millions 
who get caught op in the passions 
of European soccer. May we ex- 
pect, thru, mote than cursory state- 
ments on actions that affect os all? 

Obviously you cannot be seen to 
.. take the atrocity lightly. Neither, 
surely, shook! UEFA or big broth- 
er FIFA or any sdf-dected sport- 
ing authority dump responsibility 
for a catastrophe that had been 
many years in the making onto 
^scapegoats who happened to be 
there at the tune. 

You have already made two 
~ quite distinct deliberations. Your 
emergency committee, meeting 
days after the May 29th tragedy in 
Brussels, imposed the logical indef- 
inite ban on EngB A dobs from 
European competitions for as long 
as their followers are deemed a 
threat to Gfe, limb and property. 

Most Englishmen accept that 

Your disciplinary committee last 
week apportioned specific blame, 
barring Liverpool for at least three 
seasons beyond the indefinite sen- 
' tence, ordering Juventns to make 
two home defenses of the European 
Cup behind closed- doors and plac- 
ing Belgium out of bounds for any 
European final for ID years. 

1 believe UEFA met in panic and 
got it right, then sat down and 
made a mess of the thing. The pre- 
ventative instinct is more valid 
than the punitive afterthought 

Do not misunderstand. My 
country has so persistently allowed 
her drunken hanks the freedom of 
total ban 
your action 


able destruction on the continent. 

The “opposition” has not been 
ah innocent but, let’s face it, the 

British are delc»alors wherever fff- 

ryboats wifi carry them — a lthou gh 
not further afield, where FIFA’s 
baa English dubs, playing 

outside the reach of the psycho- 
paths, is unwanantedFumshmest 
rather than prevention. again. 

The appeal before you concerns 


Rob Hughes 


is 


would he foolishly incomplete if 
the ban is not extended to En- 
gland's national team, whose fol- 
^ lowers spread even more predict- 


disdpHnary " committee hold re- 
sponsible for the uncivilized behav- 
ior tkm killed so tragically. Maybe 
your colleagues want to make ex- 
amples? Maybe they really believe 
depriving) the dubs win help find 
solutions that far decades have 
eluded police, politicians, justices 
of the peace, sociologists and psy- 
chiatrists? 

UEFA has bad such a policy for 
years — banishing cribs, enforcing 
games in empty stadiums, collect- 
mg masses of Swiss francs in fines. 
VWth what result? Tell us, if you 
will, what Liverpool failed to do for 
the match in Brussels that it had 
done through 21 years erf unbroken 
excdlencem your three European 
tournaments. 

Where does accountability end? 

Belgium seems almost relieved 
by your 10-year embargo. Its soccer 
union bridles at suggestions that 
Heysd StatEum was dilapidated,” 
by imputation too insecure a prison 
to hofd the English animals. 

Its police have accepted some 
measure of blame, a" 
colleagues speak of 
inadequate” security. 

Wouldn't h help if, just mice, 
you who administer the game and 
who sit in judgment were to bold 
up your hands and say: We chose 
the stadium and we were satisfied 
that security was sufficient so we 
also have a conscience about what 
wait wrong. 

If there are men among you who 
accept a morSd of responsibility, 
teQ us. Let os know that the shrug 
of the hooligans — who insist, in 
effect, “It’s notour fault, take your 


SCOREBOARD 


5 4 ■ 


* ^ 


Baseball 


Golf 


■- Monday’s Line Scores PGA Leaders 


Detroit 


BRUM, I 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

DM EDI Ml— 9 t » 
•at no sue-9 u i 
Terrell, Scharrar (7). Lowb £7). Bonmouw 
III and Parrish; Bard and Grdtnan. w— 
Bora M. L — TemHU B-L Hrs— D etroit, 
Trammell (71. Boston, Rios (»>. 

Mtkem AM MOM-4 7 I 

KM Yam MU ON u»— « f • 

„ O, Martinez. Aom ID, T.MarRnaBlU and 
. JMnpmv; Cawley. Fisher TV) end Haney, 
^£soi«m.W--Oi«*toy,ML>--a.Mor(lnebS- 
S.S* F isher 131. Hi ts Oan imors , Dwyer 2 
17). 

CNcaao WUgoMil • 

OaUand MMHM < * 

Barm, Safflmr (I), Netnon 17) and Fisk; 
Birtsoi. warren a), Krueaer (5) and Heath, 
w— Splllnar. M. *X Sy-Ne ban 

12). HR— CWcnaa Bata* («- 
Kansas CRr MO BM 510—12 TO 1 

Mt aa eieto on HI 001—0 > 1 

GiiMcBi,BeMwHhlMiQiitoHibarrY(S)and 
Sandbars; FBsms Lvaander CO, addon* IS). 
Whltehouse 17). WQrdte (91 and Salas. W- 
GuWctQ, y*. L — FI 1 * 00 . U. H Re— Kansas 
Cltv, Smith CD, McRae 2 (4). Sundtere (7), 
Motley (7). M in n esota . Bnmmskv (17), 
Hrhefc (9J. 

Ci eeel— d UOMIB-a 5 a 

caDhnNB om on io»-i « a 

BlytevonandWlHard; Slaton, dements 18). 

album (R) art Norton. W—UMevcn, 7-4. L— 

Staton. **. HR— devetand, Carter 15). 
Tern M MO MO— j 5 a 

Seattle lee OM Mix— 2 > ■ 

weisn, Rnmw (6), Stewart (U and 
Slouaht; win* Nraz 10) and Kearney, w— 
Wills. J-V. L-OWsM J. 5v— NunezCO). HR— 
Seattle. Bradley (ID. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Heostaa 1M M I0A-O IS 0 

Lac Anaatas M MR 001—4 5 1 

Nietao and Alter; Reus*. CastUlo U), 
Howe (B) and Sdascto. W— Ntafcra, 5-7. L— 
..Awas-s* HRs- Haaston. Oavls CTI, Base (7). 
Los Ansetes, Guerrero (17). 


UKHtartMtfcAProtatftoaal Gotten AnocF 
«Mea tear iMst toe Attaeto Classic which 
nett 

- earnings 


I. Curtis Strange 
X Loan* wwfldns 
X nay Flora 
4. Ccrivfci Pacta 
ft. coney Foyln 
4. Mam O’Meara 
7. Crate Staffler 
A BerniHHnd Looser 

V. Ftny Zeelter 
IB. Tara Watson 
It Rooer Mattbie 
U. Hale Irwin 

M. tarry Min 

W. Tam KUa 

IS Pome Stoiwul 


Major League Standings 


f A* 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



EM DtvUJaa 




W L 

PCt 

GB 

Toronto 

42 U 

JU! 

— 

Detraft 

aa a 

-576 

3 

Bottom 

37 21 

-544 

5 

BattHnora 

35 » 

J30 

1 

NH York 

34 32 

JUS 

7 

MJIwaukM 

90 34 

MS 

10 

Own lund 

22 45 

420 

TOM 


West Birman 



CaUtenria 

N 30 

JS9 

— - 

ewamo 

35 M 

J530 

1W 

Oakland 

35 33 

-sis 

3 

Kamos CBv 

34 31 

407 

31k 

Saattte 

32 34 

-471 

6 

MJnmtsota 

29 37 

439 

8 

Tokos 

• 27 42 

J91 

life 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Bast DhUM 



5 

W L 

fet. 

GB 

♦ LOUte 

3V 27 

491 

— 

Montrtal 

40 29 

-580 

16 

New York 

37 29 

J61 

2 

Chicago 

34 31 

SO 

4Mr 

pttlladalpnta 

20 a 

-434 

T1 

PHMburgb 

22 43 

431 

Ufe 


VWal BlrWon 



San Dteoa 

41 27 

JU 

— 

los Anoates 

35 11 

-590 

5 

Houston 

35 31 

jns 

A 

Cincinnati 

14 32 

415 

0 

Atlanta 

29 30 

-433 

llta 

San Francisco 

26 42 

482 

IS 


SCORIHO 

l.Don Pookv, 7040.2. Corey Povtn,7B54.X 
Lorry M)ra.71X5B4.CnilaStadter.7<X&1.SRoy 
Ftow4 TOM. A Loony Wadklns. 7042. 7. Keith 
Fenwe. 7046- 0, Tom Watson. 7BV2. 9, Mart 
O-Maara, TUB Kb Curth Strain, 71 JR. 

AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
i.Andy Beaa!77i 2. Greo Mormon. 27SJ.X 
Fred Ctondes aad Mac OWrady. 27SA. S Bin 
Gtassan, 27X7. A Sandy Lyle, mi 7, Grog 
Twtera. mx X Joey StoMar, mx », Jim 
Dent, 2/1* W. Tom Putter, 231 i 
DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
ICaWln Peotw JBVXQavfd Edwards. J03. 
s Larry Nelson, JV.4Hale i«*l 744. 5. Doug 
TeMllandM)k*aMdJi9.7,Tim Narrt*JSL 
A jack Renner. J51 9, Wayne Levi and Tom 
Kite. J4X 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
I. Jack Nlddaus, J30.Z Brno* Lletzke, Jit 
1 Al G e to e ra er. JU. 4. Corey Pm to. JO 7. S, 
Rooer MattMei. JBL k John Mobaffev, JVCL 7. 
Cotwin paete, JOT. L Dew TewetL Mac 
O'Grady and TraChuna Chen. A9S. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
I. Frank Conner, 2SS4. X Botev Ctampelt 
2L49. 2, cratg SimHer, 301ft. A Morris Ho- 
toMky.aaJft s. Chi CM Rodrtguez, 2&9a A Don 
Penman. 2ttt 7, Ray FtavtL 3LM. B, Dan 
.Puelev. 28JV7.9. Nit* Price and Mike Donald. 
WJM. 

PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
l, Craig Stodtor, J21 . 2. Tom Watson. Jl ft X 
TZe-Ctiung Chea, JUl. A Loony WadUns. J07. 
ft Lorry Nelson, Hal Sottoa and Philip Btack- 
mar, Jeftft. Lorry MtawAOLV, Three lied with 

am. 

EAGLES 

I, Corey Pavtn end Philip Btackmar, 1ft 3, 
Lorry Rinker and Joey Slndehr, 9. ft Crolo 
stadter, Curt* Stranaov Fred Couples, and 
Buddy Gardner, ft 9, Five Hod utth 7. 

' BIRDIES 

l Ha) Sutton, 2S7. 2. Prod Cowries. 256. 3. 
Crate Stadler. 254. 4. Joey Sbdelor, 241. ft 
Baddy Gardner.2M.ft Ray FteycL2ML7,Cumi 
Strange. 221. ft Tim Stamen, 23ft 9, Corev 
PovhV 23R. 1ft Scott 51WW.MV 2M. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 


BOSTON— Ptacod Steve QtMfera. oltchor, 
on iSdov dteeMed ibft effective June 23. Re- 
coiled Jim Dorter. pHetur. tract Pawtucket 
el the l idw uoUo ntd League. 

CLEVELAND -P u rote ie d the contract of 
Rov Smith. ptWnr, (ram Maine of me Inter- 
national League. OotrigMed KeHn CreeL 
pitcher, to Maine. 

MILWAUKE E— m r Uwu e tl the c ontra c t of 
Dave H u aaert. catcher, from El Paso el the 


Football 


NEW. YOR K - Pla c e d Butch Wvneoar. 
catctMT. on Me 15-doy dteohtod «s». Rearitod 
Juan Eaplaob catcher, from Cotumbus at the 
inlem u tten u l Loesoe. 


USFL Final Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

W L T Pet PF PA 
vBirtnlnaim D ) > J8 « » 

,-Mm Jersey U 3 1 ill <11 71 

x -Memphis 11 7 0 All 4H 227 

x-BottUrwe 18 7 1 J8) 3CB 2C0 

e-Tarapo Bay M B 0 JS* 404 422 

jadecariH* * 9 0 -SCO MB *02 

Oriando 5 13 0 JM 3CB 4U 


LOS ANGELES— Placed Bob Bailor, ta- 
Rekter. on the Iftday dtaatoed list. 

PHILADELPHIA — Recalled Rocky CML 
-pitcher, tram Portland of the Pod Be 


BTESTERN CONFERENCE 


y -Oak tana 
x -Denver 
■-Houston 
Arizona 
Portland 
San Antonia 
los Ange les 


13 4 

11 7 

» a 
a u 

* 12 
S 13 

a u 


J58 473 3» 
All 439 431 
JSt 544 3M 
AM 37* MS 
JXD STS 4B 
JM 294 434 
.147 2M 454 


FOOTBALL 

wa tt e* * FOettaB Leaeoe 
HOUSTON— Agreed tateras with Mike Ro- 
zhr, nmnina bate, oiva four-year contract 
INDIANAPOLIS— Mesteaed Ted Petersen 
etfaiulve tackle. Mamed John GaeUer. jack 
Graves and Brian Hueted scouts. 

KANSAS CITY— Sighed Vincent Thoaip- 
t*. deleashm end. la a series of three one- 
ytar oBO lf ocfie 

HEWEHOL M IO Signed Paul Lew*, run- 
ntao bock, to a eerlee * on i year c on tracts. 


. e • 

^ b. 

. '-V 


(y-d inched conferen ce champketshta) 
lx <11 netted piovatt berth) 

M eeday * Rend! 
Oakland 3L Houston 21 


ARIZONA — Fired Donald Poltard. defen- 
ri ve coordtaotor.ond Pat Stavnktt, defensive 


HOCKRY 


-s.t' 


■?.- . 


PLAYOFF SCHEDULE 
QUARTERFINALS 
June 29: Houston at Birmingham . 

1 June 3D: Denver at Memphis, Tdmpo Bay of 
Oakland 

July 1: SoHimi ra of New Jersey 
SEMIFINALS 

July ft 7 (PefarlnGfttdWsta be announced) 
CHAMPIONSHIP 
(At East Rutherford. New Jersey) 
Jury K: semMnof winasra 


BUFFALO— Homed Jhn Ptrcutelll trainer. 
DETROI T — Na m ed Horry' Neate coactt. 

- COLLEGE' 

MIAMI (OHM ) — Ham ad Wendy Sweney 
omen's ten** coach and Peter Undsav 

metre eMhmmlhg coach, . 

NORTHEASTERN. Anno u nced mat Ihe 
tmdractefCharMeCPMeBey l M*MM((aoocrL 
vrflt not he ram med. 

OHIO STAT E — N amed Lenny wuuntns 
nndnb hwk cbbA. 

PITTSBURG STATE— Named K*n Ash 
men's haetcettnu coach. 


blame elsewhere” — need not be 
traced from top to bottom. 

In England, I'm afraid, tbe buck 
also gets kicked around. Our gov- 
ernment, whose minister for sport 
continues in office despite years 
of denying the extent of problem, 
still is not ready to withdraw pass- 
ports even of convicted hooligans. 

Tree, the prime minister is now 
aware of tbe disgrace. For all of 
three months Margaret Thatcher 
has, like you, let it be known dubs 
most “put their houses in order,” 
That means banning alcohol ax 
grounds and on transport to 
grounds and it means identity 
cards, which may ultimately be car- 
ried by all wbo are not hooligans. It 


means that if smaller dribs cannot 
foot new Mis for safety and securi- 
ty, even if they’ve never had an 
incident in 100 yean, they can jolly 
wdl go to the wall 

Whit we do not see is govern- 
ment bearing responsibility far the 
society that produces violence, 
around soccer and beyond, or of- 
fering anything bade from its £220 
million (about $283 million) tax- 
ation of soccer. 

Nowhere, in tbe depressing af- 
termath of the Heysd honor, is 
there sufficient mention of post Live 
things. Many fraud the spectacle 
of a game too modi to take after 
the slaughter, yet we should ac- 
knowledge that you in UEFA did 
the sane thing , to prevent further 
bloodshed. 

It might be nice for UEFA pnb- 
bdy to thank the players and offi- 
cials for their courage in taking the 
field. Few wanted to play, and most 
appreciated the deathly thwat that 
still hung |Q the air. 

It has been thoroughly eye-open- 
ing to witness the acts of concilia- 


ians were first to call for the lifting 
of sanctions against the Fn gjfgh- 
thc Italian pubic has feted a Liver- 
pool barman who saved eight in- 
ventus supporters; Turin opened 
its arms to a contrite delegation, 
representing Liverpool and its soc- 
cer clubs. 

Even in Mgra™, where anti-Bri- 
tish feeling ran so high that an 
English schoolboy team was 
barred, there was last wedc a heart- 
warming gesture. A Kent police 
soccer team, forbidden to play in 
the Gendarmerie Nationale tour- 
nament at VUvDorde, actually won 
two trophies there. 

How come? Fim the organizers, 
acknowledging the men’s spirit in 
turning up to cheer the others, 
awarded them the sporting team 
prize. Then Eindhoven, the tour- 
nament champion, its tro- 


phy to the Knit manager. 

None of those acts mminishes in 


any way the loss of life or the need 
to prevent a repetition of Brussels. 
But they are a start in restoring 
relationships between the mas of 
well-intentioned soccer people. 

If UEFA wants to get aboard 
thm movement, by all m«nic pun- 
ish the proven guilty but show us 
justice and dividends as well 

And speaking of dividends, I ap- 
preciate that UEFA did not, tins 
time; extract blood money. Never- 
ihdcss, your coffers filled up nicely 

last week with fines totaling 


135,000 Swiss francs (against Bor- 
rid Vienna and 


lira from Italy, led by a media that 
blindly p 


can often be blindlyjpartisan. Ital- 


deaux, Juventns, Rapii 
Everton for the separate misdeeds 
of players but mainly of fans). 

UEFA has to meet its adminis- 
tration costs, but if those ill-gotten 
gniris represent anything of an em- 
barrassment to you, you may have 
heard of the funds to hdp the de- 
pendents of those trim died aiyour 
cup final last month. 



1984 Champs Gain 
In a Wet Wimbledon 


Dia Atsooattd Proa 

Heysd Stadium, Brussels, May 29, 1985 


■ The Associated Press 

WIMBLEDON, England —De- 
fending champions John McEnroe 
and Martina Navratilova cruised 
through their first-round matches 
Tuesday at the rain-plagued Wim- 
bledon tennis championships. 

After a SlA-hour rain delay, Nav- 
ratilova crushed fdlow American 
lisa Bonder, 6-0. 6-2, while McEn- 
roe also won comfortably against 
Peter McNamara of Australia in a 
match that had been suspended 
Monday because of rain. Resuming 
at 3-3, McEnroe quickly estab- 
lished control to win, 6-4, ’6-3, 64. 

Meanwhile, Argentine Gabrieia 
Sabatini rallied to beat Amanda 
Brown. 3-6, 6-3, 6-3. After a ner- 
vous start on her Wimbledon de- 
but, the No. 15 seed recovered her 
composure and had loo many shots 
for the Briton. Earlier this month, 
Sabatini. 13, became the youngest 
player ever to reach the semifinals 
of the French Open. 

The French is played on slow 
day, and Sabatini said she had to 
change her style slightly for Wim- 
bledon’s grass surface. “1 am hav- 
ing to learn to come to the net a 
little bit more,” she said. 

After eight breaks in nine games 
in the final set, Sabatini advanced 
to the second round on her fourth 
match point. 

Earlier, officials had announced 
that Tuesday’s last matches sched- 
uled for each of the 17 courts had 
been abandoned because of the 
persistent rain. That meant a sec- 
ond suspension of 17-year-old 
West German Boris Becker's first- 
rounder against American Hank 
Pfisterand of Kevin Curran's dash 
with Larry SlefankL 


The NavTatilova-Booder en- 
counter was. to that point, only the 
tournament’s second completed 
match. Amid Monday’s worst 
opening-day weather in 16 years, 
second-seeded Ivan Lendl of 
Czechoslovakia had edged Ameri- 
can Md Purcell, 64, 7-6, 7-6; as of 
Monday night the tournament was 
66 matches behind schedule. 

A loser to Sweden's Mats Wi- 
lander in the 1985 French Open 
final, Lendl needed four match 
points to move into the second 
round. He said he and Purcell had 
problems with their footing on the 
slippery court “Once 1 was polled 
wide, I had to go for a winner 
because there was no way I could 
come back.” Lendl said. 


“I don't think the players should 
be able to stop the game. I think the 
referee or umpire should determine 
when we can’t play. I think he 
made a mis lake by letting us play. 

“I cannot think about it on the 
court, but the chancre were verv 


high that so mething might happen. 

* ur io ask us to play and 


It was not fair I 
not fair for the match. [ knew it was 
dangerous, and so did the umpire 
who saw us sliding. Why did they 
stop the other match and not ours? 
I’m happy I have it over with and 
I'm not hurt.” 


After capturing the second-set 
tiebreaker 7-2, Lendl had a chance 
to close out the match in the ninth 
game of the third set But Purcell, a 
scrambler, saved three match 
points and held serve to knot the 
score at 5-5. 

The two players then fought to 6- 
6. sending the third set to a tie- 
breaker. 


Under Full Sail, U.S. Syndicate on Schedule for Cup Challenge 


By Angus Phillips 

Washington Pott Servtcc 

NEWPORT, Rhode Island — 
Everything is running just about on 
schedule for John Kotins and his 


and windy fatiian Ocean already 
under his bdt 


America's Cnp retrieval crew.' 

Kofios, you may recall, is the 
fair-haired Texan who took over 
the hdm of Crarageons during the 
1983 cnp trials and sailed the 10- 
year-old boat wdL 

Thai smug first effort at 12- 
meter sailing won Mm many adnrir- 
hs, including stalwarts of the New 
York Yacht dob, although in the 
end it picked Dennis Conner and 
liberty to defend tbe cup in the 
series against Australia H. 

Now Kofins, 34, is hack with a 
wdl-arganized -campaign to regain 
the cnp in Perth in 1987. This tune 
he has the full backing of NYYC 
and a foil season of saurns the wild 


And he has a plan. 

Kerims, whose America □ syndi- 
cate is testing and raring its two 
new 12-meter boats off Newport 
through July, said he sat down with 
syndicate organizes just before the 
start of the 1983 final series to map 
strategy for retaking the cup should 
it be lost, as it was. 

“What makes me happy,” he 
said, “is that we made op a sched- 
ule al that time and we're within a 
week of it now.” 

America H is one of. about 13 
challengers from six countries ex- 
pected to compete for the right to 
face Australia far yachtings most 
presrigians prize ip. February 1987. 

Four other US. campaigns are in 
the r unnin g, most notably that of 
Conner, whose Sail America syndi- 


cate will launch its first new boat 
latpr this summer. 

After more than a decade of sail- 
ing 12 meters, Conner is widely 
acknowledged as one of tbe best 
and probably the vm best Ameri- 
ca’s Cap skipper in the world. 

Kotins is the first to admit he’s 
still learning. To that end. he and 
his crew spent, all last muter (Aus- 
tralian summer) sailing their Gist 
new 12-meter in tbe roaring after- 
noon gales off Perth. 

No other syndicate, not even the 
Australians, managed to put a boat 
together in time to catch that first 
Australian season after the cnp 
changed hands, and Kohos believes 
the experience puts his organiza- 
tion ahead of the rest. 

“Its a whole new regatta,” he 
said. “The boats are going to be 
different, the weather is different. 


Bising Star: John Kolias, skipper for the New York 
Yacht Club syndicate, sailing America II off Newport. 



!?■ NbwVM Tra*/AK Mnox 


the crews are going to have to be 
different 

“We’re going through major 
shifts of keels, weight distribution, 
design. We’re learning every day, 
and it's not going to be easy to 
catch up with us.” 

To find rat what boat design 
would succeed off Perth, where the 
winds average 20 to 30 knots 
(about double what they are off 
Newport) and the seas are accord- 
ingly big, Kotins had Sparkman & 
Stephens design a boot that could 
be adapted to a number of hull, 
ballast, keel and rig configurations. 

“The Australians are trying to 
confuse everyone now by saying 
winged keels [tike the one on Aus- 
tralia II] won’t work” in the heavy 
conditions off Perth, said America 
U syndicate chairman Chuck 
Kitsch. “But we know what works 
and what doesn’t” 

Based on what was learned last 
winter, Sparkman & Stephens de- 
signed the second America II and 
launched it May 24. This month 
and next the two America ELs are 
sailing against each other off New- 
port, after which they wfll be 
shipped back to Perth fra another 
winter of testing. 

Next summer Sparkman & Ste- 
phens wifi design the third and fi- 
nal version. 

This is the plan exactly as envi- 
roned by Kotins and the America 
U organizers nearly 22 mouths ago. 
His $12 million -phis budget is 
about two- thirds of the way toward 
being met, according to America II 
fund-raisers. 

Whether tbe rigid America H 
schedule wiD create a winner is a 
question of same dispute. John 
Marshall, who is overseeing design 
and construction of Conner's new 
boat, believes Kotins might be 
wasting precious “motivation 
hours” by sutgecting his anew to 
such a heavy workload so long be- 
fore the fact. 

Marshall and Cramer, by con- 
trast, are concentrating on exten- 
sive scientific input to aeagn a fast 
boat now and a faster one next 
year, and banking on their crew’s 


long experience to assure good boat 
handling. 

Which is doing the right thing 
may be much clearer next winter, 
when all the top competing syndi- 
cates send boats to Perth. 

Meantime, said Kofius, “We 


have a pretty good jump. We start- 
ed our research six to 10 months 
ahead. But what we did so far won’t 
amount to anything unless we keep 
pressing. It's tike the Italian race 
driver said: 'You have to rip the 
rear-view minor off.’ " 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Swedish Trotter Sweeps 2-Race Series 


EAST RUTHERFORD. New Jersey (AP) — Meadow Road of Swe- 
den completed a sweep of tbe two-race Statue of liberty trotting series 
here Monday night by vanning the $185,000 ane-mfie finale in a track- 
record 1 minute, 54-2/5 seconds. 

Ihe previous mark of 1:55 was set in July 1983 by Diamond Exchange; 
the world record of 1:534/5 is shared by Fancy Crown and Cornstalk. 
Meadow Road won last week’s 1 56-mile first leg of tbe series in a worid- 
record 2^7-3/5. ‘ 

Again driven byTorbjom Janssen, Meadow Road, a 6-year-old son of 
Madison Avenue, finished^ lengths ahead of Sandy Bowl erf the United 
States, while Mon TomtiDon of France finished third in the 12-horse 
field, another 314 lengths farther bade. 


Berlioux to Help Paris Bid for Games 

PARIS (AP) — Monique Botioux, the farmer director of the Interna- 
tional Olympic Committee, is to become advisor to Paris Mayor Jacques 
s application for the 1992 Summer Games, his office 


Chirac for i 
announced . 

Tbe appointment had been widely anticipated since Berlioux, in 
conflict with IOC President Juan- Antonio Samaranch, resigned early this 
month. Frenchwoman Berlioux had bees (he senior IOC permanent 
official since 1971 after being its press chief since 1966. 


Neale Will Coach Red Wings of NHL 

DETROIT (AP) — Hany Neale, former coach and general manager of 


the Vancouver Canucks, on Monda^was named coach of the National 


Hockey League Detroit Red Wings. Neale, the 18th man in 60 seasons to 
coach the Redwings, replaces Nick Potimo, who on Friday assumed the 



during 

Vancouver posted a 21-32-7 record under him. 


Quotable 

Lonnie Smith, traded bySL Louis to Kansas City last month, says “the 
merican League stinks. The pitchers are afraid of a challenge. They ay 



to the top of the National League's Eastern Division. *Td love to be bade 
in the Nat 


Jational League” 


Royals 9 Home-Run Barrage Buries Twins 


Camp&edbs Ovr Siaff Fim Dispatches 

MINNEAPOLIS -—The Kansas City Royals 
don't have to utilize their speed or take advan- 
tage of the Metrodome’s springy artificial turf. 
They can hit the hall into the inviting and 
then simply trot around the bases. 

The Royals did just that on Monday night, 
matching a dub record by hitting five home 
runs and trouncing the Minnesota Twins, 12-6. 
Hal McRae drove m five runs with two homers 
and f fmntB Smith, J im Sandberg and Darryl 
Motley also connected in the Menodome, where 
the ball carries wdL 

“I think tbepadebas something to do^ with h,” 
said Kansas Qty Manager Dick Hawser. “IPs 
only 375 dram the power alleys. That’s notgood 
enough hi Royals Stadium,* which is 385 in 
each alley. “We have more power on the road 
just because of the dimensions." 

McRae and Smith hit two-nm home nms off 
Pete Hlscm in the first inning to give the Royals 
a. 4-0 lead. With Kansas City leading 6-5, 
McRae added a th r ee- run shot in the Royals’ 
five- ran seventh. Sandbag's two-nm homer 
gave the visitors an 11-5 lead, and Motley tied 
the franchise record with a bases-empty shot is 
the ei ghth. Tom Bnman&ky and Kent Hrbek 
homered for Minnesota. 

Marie Gubicza worked five innings-phis and 
allowed five runs bat earned his fourth consecu- 
tive victory with relief help from Joe Beckwith 
and Dan Qaisenbeny. 

- McRae is only two happy with two-homer 
nights because they may keep in the major 

leagues a whEk: longer. McRae’s dream is to stay 
in basebaHiang enough to play with his 17-year- 
old son Brim, drafted l?y the Royals in the first 
round thia month 

McRae, who wiH tnm 39 early in July, came 
into Monday’s game hitting J213. and the home 
nms were only his third and fourth of tbe 


season. He has played 39 games this season, all 
of item as the designated hitter, a role he once 
scorned. Now he sees it as a way to extend his 
career. “A man has to do what he has to do,” he 
said. *Td tike to continue playing. . . as long as 
it takes Brian to gel here.* 

Brians 2, Angels I: In Anaheim, Cafifomia, 
Joe Carter’s homer leading off the eighth broke 
a 1-1 tie and gave Bert Bfyleven his 2Q2d career 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


White Sox 7, A’s I: In Oakland, California, 
Harold Baines drove in three runs and Dan 
Spiflner pitched 556 innings of shutout relief to 
help Chicago end a four-game losing streak. 
Barnes started the scoring with a sacrifice fiy off 
Tim Birtsas in the first and finished it with a 
two-run homer off KD Krueger in the fifth. 

Yankees 5, Orioles 4: In New York, Don 
Baylor drove home the tying run with a sacrifice 
fly and WIQje Randolph singled through a 


triumph. Blylcven pitched a 10-strikeout four- 
hitter. 

The Angels, whose Western Division lead was 
sliced to IK games over Chicago, had tied the 
with a disputed nm in the seventh. Rod 
was on first when Juan Beniquez 
slashed a double into the right-fid d corner. 
When a fan touched the ball, first-base umpire 
Tim Welke signaled a ground-rule double, 
which would have held Carew at third. But the 
Angels argued that Carew would have scored 
anyway; third-base umpire Jim McKean agreed 
and let the nm count. 

Red Sox 9, Tigers 2s In Boston, Marty Bar- 
rett, Bill Buckner and Glenn Hoffinaa had two- 
nm hits and Jim Rice also drove in two runs 
with a triple and homer as the Red Sox powered 
post Detroit. Demos Boyd completed ms Amer- 
ican I 10th game despite aflowing 

six hi is and walking eighL 

Leading by 3-1, Boston broke the game open 
in the seventh. After Steve Lyras walked and 
Wade Boggs doubled, BiD Schema - relieved 
Walt Term! and walked Rice intentionally. But 
Buckner defivercd a two-nm single and Rich 
Gedman had an RBI single before Hoffman 
doubled home two more ;nms- Rice hit Ins 13th 
home, nm of the in the eighth. 


the Yankees past Baltimore. Joe Cowley pi 
eight innings and allowed six hits, two of th«m 
home nms by Jim Dwyer, who drove in all four 
Oriole runs. In winning aD four meetings this 
season. New York has outscored Baltimore by 
31-8. 


ToILesan- 
mtn the 


Mariners 2, Rangers 0: In Seattle, Frank Wills 
and Ed Nuhez combined on a five-hitter fra 
Seattle’s fourth straight victory. Wills gave up 
two walks and two hits in the Erst inning, but 
poor baserunning prevented Texas from scor- 
ing. First, Oddi be McDowell was thrown out 
to steal third. And with two out Gary 
' d, which appeared to score Wayne 
it Seattle catcher Bob Kearney went 
iger dugout to record the thud out 
by lagging Tolleson — wbo had migMd home 
{date. 

Astros 8, Dodgers 4: In the National League, 
in Los Angeles, Kevin Bass's three-run homer 
broke a fifthrinmng tie to spark Houston. Win- 
ner Joe Niekro pitched a five-hitter but walked 
six, hit three men and threw three wild pilches. 
Pedro Guerrero homered with two out in the 
ninth; his 13th home run in June set a Los 
Angeles Dodger record for most homas in one 
month. Ihe ait-tune franchise record is 15, set 
by Duke Snider in August 1953, when the 
was based in Brooklyn. [AP, Ufl) 



BENOIT 
DE GORSKI 


86. RUE DU RHOt 1204 G£N£VE TfL 281430 
CHESERY PLATZ GSTAAD T£l 0304T165 •' 










■ __ _ _ ...... , *■- -**- 




Page 20 


OBSERVER 


Oh, for a Welfare Queen 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Secretary 
Wanbeiger has reason to pine 
for the days of those “welfare 
bums” 

An ashtray, a coffeepot, a toilet 
seat ... 

Reciting that homey catalog of 
plain, old-fashioned American arti- 
facts might tempt a lot of people to 
lapse into fruity prose poetry of the 
sort popularized 40 years ago by 
Thomas Wolfe. 

“A stone, a leaf, an unfound 
door . . ." 

I doubt, though, that Secretary 
of Defense Weinberger would be 
one of the lemptees. To Weinber- 
ger, 1 suspect, an ashtray is not just 
an ashtray, a coffeepot not just a 
coffeepot a toilet seat not just a 
toilet seat. 

No. To Weinberger, I suspect, 
each is a monkey wrench tossed 
into the great war engine of Ameri- 
can peace. It cannot be pleasant for 
him to think in terms of monkey 
wrenches, dither, for though there 
is as yet no scandalous exposure of 
a spendthrift Pentagon paying 
S 1 0,000 apiece for monkey wrench- 
es, Weinberger, never sure now of 
what excess may be disclosed next, 
must be waiting for the next item in 
our poem to drop; 

An ashtray, a coffeepot, a toilet 
seat, a monkey wrench . . . 

□ 

But enough. Distracted by the 
poetic muse. 1 wander from the 
point of this discussion, which has 
to do with the grave mistake Presi- 
dent Reagan made when he de- 
throned the welfare queen. 

As long as the welfare queen was 
around to take the heat for the high 
cost of government, the Pentagon 
could pay as much as it liked for 
ashtrays, coffeepots and toilet 
seats. Nobody much cared as long 
as the detestable welfare queen ex- 
isted. 

Does everybody remember the 
welfare queen? She made regular 
appearances in Reagan's speeches 
in the old days, driving her Cadillac 
to pick up her welfare check, vaca- 
tioning in Acapulco, drinking 
champagne at Maxim's. Do I over- 
state slightly? Perhaps, but only to 
convey quickly to you the concept 
of welfare queenhood. 

The important point is that she 
served a vital political purpose. To 
people out of office — as Reagan 
was when be popularized her — she 


was more valuable than a torn full 
of county chairmen, for much of 
politics is a business of placing 
blame; 

When a lot of voters believe the 
gove rnment is spending their mon- 
ey improperly (that is, on other 
people), the blame for this squan- 
dering must be skillfully placed. 
Out of office, Reagan could blame 
welfare queens. Welfare queens 
crystallized public anger about big 
budgets into public hostility 
against government programs to 
help the unemployable classes. 


That was useful in getting Rea- 
gan elected but left him in a pickle 
afterward, because if be went ahead 
and cut the bejeebers out of gov- 
ernment programs for these people, 
who were the voters going to have 
left to blame for the immutable fact 
that government costs a lot of mon- 
ey? 

As president, neither Reagan nor 
the people who are said to do most 
of his thinking thought the problem 
through. Well, after all those years 
of knocking the old welfare queen, 
the president hadn't m»rh choice, 
and be did what his voters wanted 
him to do. 

As a result we don't bear much 
complaining anymore about “bums 
on welfare," though I now hear the 
same people who used to do the 
bums-on-welfare speech raring 
about threats to tirear Social Securi- 
ty, college loans, tax loopholes, etc. 

How could this be explained af- 
ter Reagan dealt so Firmly with the 
threadbare classes? For awhile it 
couldn't, and then — well, would 
you believe it? 

Those bums in the Pentagon 
have been getting a trillion dollars 
— - that’s trillion with a “t" — and 
what have they been doing with it? 
Throwing it away, paying insane 
prices for ashtrays, coffeepots, toi- 
let seats ... 

And suddenly Secretary Wein- 
berger sees everything endangered, 
Congress angry and punitive, the 
voters not so eager anymore to 
spend every last cent for the great 
war engines of peace. It takes so 
little to draw the public’s rage — an 
ashtray, a coffeepot, a toilet 
seat . . . 

If you love the Pentagon you 
must sigh nostalgically for the days 
of the welfare queen. 

New York Tunes Service 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JVJSE 26, 1985 

Pages From Life of Sir Richard Burton 

For Sole: A Remarkable Victorian Collection bv a Remarkable Victorian 


By Rebecca Brite 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — A reniailsably 
/ complete Victorian library, 
oiwoed by one of the most remark- 
able of Victorians, is on tte block. 
Price for the more than 2,000 
books, bound pamphlets, maps 
and documents in the working 
library of -Sir Richard Frauds 
Burton: SI million. 

Best known as an explorer, 
translator and Arabist, Burton 
was a prodigious linguist, is con- 
sidered one of the founders of 
modern ethnology, and wrote 
with equal facility and fecundity 
on an astounding range of other 
subjects, from botany and archae- 
ology to falconry and swords- 
manship. In 1855 he became die 
first European to visit Harar, one 
of the forbidden cities of Islam, 
and live to tell about iL Though 
be was not the first Westerner to 
make the pilgrimage to Mecca, his 
account of his adventure dis- 
guised as an .Indian physician is 
widely held to be the finest de- 
scription on record. 

He discovered Lake Tanganyi- 
ka, believing it the source of the 
Nile, and his bitter quarrel with 
his erstwhile partner in explora- 
tion, John Hanning Speke - — dis- 
coverer of the true source, Lake 
Victoria — brought him the kind 
of notoriety that mingled with 
fame throughout his life. His 
crowning actuevexnent, a 1 6- vol- 
ume translation of the Arabian 
Nights, caused nearly as much 
outrage as acrialm in some quar- 
tos because of its copious and 
scrupulously detailed footnotes 
on Eastern sexual practices. Bur- . 
ton’s interest in sexual behavior 
and erotica was not imus nal for a 
Victorian gentleman, but his 
scorn of hypocrisy about it was. 

The Burton library was housed 
for many years at Kensington Li- 
brary, where much of it was dam- 
aged in a flood. In 1955 it was sent 
to the Royal Anthropological In- 
stitute, which oversaw the restora- 
tion of the books and the compi- 
lation of a catalog. The institute, 
to raise money for a new head- 
quarters braiding, is now selling 
the library with the proviso that it 
be kept intact and available to ' 
scholars. - ] 

Its contents should be of panic- 1 



Burton and his wife are interred in stone tent. 


ular value to historians because of 
Burton's habit of margin-scrib- 
bling. In an act still capable of 
rendering ordinarily phlegmatic 
scholars purple with rage. Bur- 
ton’s wife burned 40 years' worth 
of diaries, journals and manu- 
scripts after his death; thus his 
extensive annotations on the 
pages and endpapers of his books 
are among the only dues remain- 
ing to the private workings of his 
extraordinary mind. 

Richard Burton was bom in 
Devon in 1821, the sou of a re- 
tired army officer. The family led 
a gypsy existence around Europe, 
where Richard early demonstrat- 
ed his talent for languages; he 
would eventually learn more th.-m 
20, with about an equal number 
of dialects. 

In 1842 — after being expelled 
from Oxford, which he had de- 
tested, for attending a forbidden 
horse race — Burton joined the 
Bombay Native Infantry and 
went to northwestern India. Here 
his linguistic ability, particularly 
his speed at learning lan guages , 


stood him in good stead as an 
intelligence officer — and got him 
in hot water, the pattern that was 
so often to plague him. His supe- 
rior, Sir Charles James Napier, 
sen t him, disguised as a Modem, 
to investigate homosexual broth- 
els. As a result of his report, a 
good many dens of iniquity were 
closed, but to some Victorian 
minds the very existence of the 
report was sufficient to blight his 
military career. 

The culmination of a longtime 
fascination with Arab tongues 
and lands was his pl grimag* to 
Mecca and the Prophet Moham- 
med's burial place; Medina, in 
1853. Following this voyage and 
the visit to Harar, both resulting 
in books that brought him popu- 
lar fame, Burton organized his 
first expedition to seek the source 
of the Nile. It ended disastrously, 
with an attack by Somali natives 
that left one explorer dead and 
Burton scarred for life by a JaveKn 
thrust through his jaw. Alter the 
Crimean War, in which he helped 
train Turkish irregular cavalry, 


came the discoveries of Lake Tan- 
ganyika and Lake Victoria and 
the long dispute with Speke. This 
ended with the latter’s Haath in 
1864 — officially by accident, 
while hunting. Burton, guilt- 
stricken. always believed his rival 
had kiTfcri himself. 

In the intervening period Bur- 
ton had visited the United Slates 
and written about Salt Lake Gty. 
married Isabel ArundeQ, daugh- 
ter of an old Catholic f amil y, 
whom he had courted for years; 
and saved as British consul in 
Fernando Po, a Spanish-held is- 
land off West Africa. He contin- 
ued in the Foreign Service for the 
rest of his life; in Brazil, which he 
disliked; in Damascus, back in his 
bdoved Middle East; and finally 
in Trieste, a son erf borderland 
between East and West He died 
in 1 890, after 1 8 years of service in 
Trieste and the production (here 
of an affMTing number and vari- 
ety of books and translations. Isa- 
bel Burton, burner of manuscripts 
and journals, carefully preserved 
his library and sent it bade to 
En g land from Trieste. 

It includes more than 100 
copies, some in several editions, 
of books by Burton, many of 
them heavQy annotated for future 
editions; more titan 200 works of 
grammar and linguistics; and al- 
most 1,000 works on countries 
and regions of Africa, Asia, the 
Americas, Europe, the Pacific (in- 
cluding Speke's books on the dis- 
covery of Lake Victoria, bearing 
in the margins frequent com- 
ments such as “rot" and “a lie”). 

Sotheby's is handling the sale, 
bat by private treaty; that is, not 
at auction. Roy Davids, bead of 
Sotheby's bodes and manuscripts 
department, said the Hhraiy had 
been offered to, among others, die 
British Library and the Explorers 
Gub in New York. No particular 
effort is being tnarf<* to keep the 
collection in Britain, though this 
probably would not much have 
bothered the man who once 
wrote, “England is the only coun- 
try where I never fed at home." 

It is something erf a mystery 
why Burton has never become 
better known. His studies, travels 
and works covered too much, per- 
haps. Davids, who compared him 


ham. Davids, who compared him 
to T. £ Lawrence and Sir Walter 



Nohonol ftjrtro* GAiy, London 

Burton by Lord Leighton. 

Raleigh, said of Burton, “Few 
people have the range of interests 
to comprehend this person." 

Isabel Burton, a devout Catho- 
lic, and her husband are interred 
at the churchyard erf Sl Mary 
Magdalen in the appropriately 
named Mortlake, an undistin- 
guished southwest London sub- 
urb whose only posable tourist 
attraction is undoubtedly the 
Burton tomb, a lifesize Arab tent 
carved in stone. The tomb. 18 feet 
(5.5 meters) high, was restored 
almost 10 years ago, but already 
shows many signs of neglect In 
the restoration, a panel of g)a« 
was let into the back roof, with a 
ladder leading to it Through it 
one can see a dusty collection of 
worse than mediocre religious 
paintings, a crucifix with the 
crossbar fallen off, a broken lamp 
or urn and other miscellany, and 
two coffins. 

Hers is simple, bis encrusted 
with the remains of ornate gild- 
ing. Hers bears no decoration. His 
is topped with a crucifix, no 
doubt at the wish of Isabel who 
had her rather less than devout 
husband “converted" to Catholi- 
cism on his deathbed some hours 
after he in fact had died. But it 
also bears a more appropriate or- 
nament possibly a relic of the 
original tomb trapping dropped 
carelessly on the coffin in the 
course of the 1976 renovation; a 
string of camel bells. 


1 PEOPLE 


Sobbenitsyn HL Liases 
Taking Qdzenship Oa St 

NfetaHa Solzhenitsyn. 4£iriJc<rf 
the Nobd Prize-winning author^ 
exandcr I. Sebbentoyn, tecta t * 
U. S. citizen Monday in Vena «a 
but said her husband »» $ ^ 
would have to take die oatfcanfcfc,: 
er day. The writer, who is sag, 
his wife filed applications forU.S. 
ritizenship in lute May whb^. 
U. S. Immigration and Naptrtik*- 
tion office in St. Albans. Verna' 
Their sons. Yennoby, ^ 
Stephan, automatically becnai£&. 
jxens once their parents ai*«Ka£ 
in. Solzhenitsyn won the Robe* 
Prize in 1970. Four years; Itierfe; 
was arrested by Soviet 
criticizing the government, «s£<a- 
pelled . J - 

O 

Seven hundred baseball notrirfea 
and other guests turned up # s- 
banquet marking the start of ttr 
second annual Roger Marts 'Cancer 
benefit eolf tournament in fW 








other former players, 
this head table, it’s like 
bubblegum cards come to 
said Boyd Christensen. (he-sBtter 
of ceremonies. - v 

Q 

The Norwegian stage and 
actress Liv UDmann, 46, will marry 
Donald L. Saunders, 50, a Basted 
real estate man. Sept 8 m Rome,. 

A liule-known British. jtf&r 
making bis professional film dckaft 
and a Japanese- American, actress 
have been cast in an American TV 
network movie about the former 
Be&de John Lennon and tea wife, 
the avant-garde artist YokoOftbc 
Mark Lindsay will play Legacy 
who was shot to death in NewYoa 
in December 1980. KraMjyari^ 
who starred for two seasons omk 
NBC network's series “St 
where," will play One. “Ima^ 

The Story of John and Yoko^wfc 
ten and directed by Sandor SKttt 
will be filmed this summer and 
scheduled to be broadcast on NBC' 
in November. . , - 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


TW CREME DC LA OSME 




INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


MOVING 


THE ITALIAN DESIGNS? 

ODICfNI'S 

EXCLUSIVE SUMMER COUEOION 

a now m London. Vnuting by aogaint- 
m« arfy. Tefc 01-407 OWE 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 

WHO BSE FOR YOUR 

«xt mtbmahonal move 

POX A BUI ESTIMATE CAU. 

AMSTERDAM; • (0(71)19.93.24 
ATHENS: 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


EXCEPTIONAL 

ON THE PARK 

AVENUE RAPHAEL 
2 vwytafi da s o pui fm a e i. 

230 A 2/0 iqra., dotting oppasfr, 

Servian, garages, 24-boue inanity 

BATON 704 55 55 

TH£X BATON 630 855 



AICCHOUCS ANONYMOUS in 
^£ntdaW&SP6S*om 



HAVE A MCE BAY! BaU. Have a 
noedoylBoM 




REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 



VlUA MOUUX. Dwatax + garden, 
tmg. 3 bndrowi^Tbcrthi, fiafcfod 

"fin price. Tat 527 15 99 menina. 


MBS NEAR CHAMPS BYSOS, 170 
sq.ni. potable for professional. very 
rare. 527 88 33. 


PAHS 1 6IH. Sj*uxSd on balcony. tlr- 
race A greenery, 2 receptions. 2 bed- 
room. 527 88 31 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lowly cqjortTnarts wth maleficent 
views erf LA* &3wva & oxxarnira. 
Montrm*. VObrs, fetter. Las Putter- 
ed, Oxrfeoj tfOex near Gdood, ley- 

“'"S’sasr*" 

Wees from 5H23JXXL 
Ubarof grtg^^sa^inarest- 

red estate epeda B rfi 

Av Man Bepac 24, 

Ot-1005 Lasane. SwitmHcnd 
Tefc (21) 22 35 12 Tit 251 85 MSJS 
tttafaUwd Since 1970 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


ITS YOUR DECISION 

h the famous fttng and summer 
resorts DAVOS ond Modufam net* 
ST. MORITZ at wd <8 on the world 
famous LAKE LUCBff* we offer boou- 
kfut apartOOTfc in typed Swss styled 
houses . Be rf loeniwns. Top querfty. 


far sofa to foreigners. Mortgages al _ 
Sums efeesT rates. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 

Dari*. Q4-M73 Weeian 
Tel: CH-5A-43I77S. 

Has 876062 HOME CH 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA 


mm tfher famaia maunfcsn resorts, 
we haw a very bp rfioice erf mogn£- 
mnt APARTMENT? / WUAS / OHA- 
IEiSi Very remanatty priced but afro 
ltd bent & most exduuve. Prieu from 
dnat USUOjna Mortgages at <B« 
■mererf- nease visit or phone; 

H. SEBOLD S A 

Tour Gnse A CW10Q7 Lauume. 

Tel 21/25 26 11. Tlx 24298 5BO CH 


DRBCIir ON LAKE GBCVA. 30 

Dent, from airport fa booudul high 
aam residence. luxury Hals, writ) per- 
mits for safe to navresdert*. Jusr 2 
toA. feme Sfatzariand 021/715282 
irffiee or (Q1 /71937D eve. Tbc 458131. 


PORTUGAL 


ESTOKL Charming EngSrfi pub / 

10 bedrooms, restau-ant serft 50, 

« garoerL rurrisnaj & 
5imA3 waft from hearty 

phone TfA 75 62. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 



AGENT IN PARIS 

562-7899 : 

RAispoumtr 
shout - long ram 

FLATS FCe SAJI. 
OFRCB FOB UBiT/SAUt 


AT HOW M PARS : '!• 

PAWSPROMO - 


HOLLAND 


Renlhouse International 
020-448751 (4 lines] 

hWahoven 19-21, Amsterdam 


APAKTMBirS FOR BMT 

lor 2 months minaDk' 
Properties for sde toft 

«&”*£** 563 25 60 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JOJOBA - LIQUID GOLD 

A SOUD « EXCITING NVESTMMT 

The (nirade lapba gl. produced from 
a plant grown m the U-lA «,hdi foes 
far over 100 yeas, has unique, out- 
itanefingquaiMiaidoanfbvarafrfyre- ' 
ptaoe irinerd & tranal based Uxi- 
amts. Other estcbfched uses: 
mmrta. phonnoceiifKnfc, food, 
mmrtactunng. 

Exbtfag Plarfatian Already Pro- 
vide Retain an Ii u ee t i n e uI m Rrst 
Tear. 8v End Of 6fo Yemy Returm 
Eqwrf tadml Amount Liveried. 
Iheroator, prmeceons show average 
annuel income of 33%. fxr an pine 
detail conroeh AUO0A REEMOfr 
Bo» 2429. Herald Trrfxre. 

72521 N*4y Cede*. Fnmoe 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


International Business Message Center 


BUSINESS SERVICES } BUSINESS SERVICES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 



INTERNATIONAL OH5HOSE 
CQMPANYtNQQKPQRATlQNS 
ROM £110 

Cumpefieiuive ^ tfrMwi i uiw n. 
Nome lernas. Fbwen of Atfonvy. 
B*Ostarod office*. Tetav, ta tephe im . 
mat bwMfaa 

Wand X e wM fcee 

BaSqcwne Hama. 
5un»ne»hi, 

We of Man. 


• Ucencse* for teleded maricet* or 
■nporf con 

• Minimum base capital USSISOiOOO 

• Turnover estentfe, worldwide 
USttMBen 

• 000,000 owns afready sold in 

Ewape 

• W orfa-nde fetRbutnn through: 

WT Concept & Ma n agement AG 

Head Office: Hei3anuz 57 
Vain: 

Tefc 075-28155. Tfo 719056 euro fl. 



MERCEDES 190 E-1984 

17,000 km ail possible options, including 
ABS, air-conditioned sun-TOof, leather interi- 
or, wooden dash, alarm etc Swiss registra- 
tion. 

Original purchase S.Fr. 59,000. 

Price selling due to overseas appointment at 

S.Fr. 45,000. 

Contact J.-P. LECLBy 
Geneva 22/46.93.66 (office hours). 



Omt IOO Ym 
WabEmM fiwMirf 
Stmbg tmd Bopufotion. 

wvnES 

ANT , SS^y t GoSw^b < WW 

MATSQAL5 ANYWfBC 
WOttDWIDE 


CAUFOtMA REAL STATE 

We provide the expertbe fa raeetnh. 
ptofamgpnd U na u cn on. Other cwtfl. 
gw Mnncet'can be provided fa rad 
*Ma law, monege m ert & kxm info r- 
madon. Send a bmf Rtau of your 
Were* and needs ro: 

US Red Estate 
S Development Semen Inc 
500 Oseshon house, 150 Segert St 
Londoo WlR 5FA 
Tefc 01 734 5354 


DIAMONDS 


m? a - cia tax -Fsiiroa Tet 

33-1-S97.87A9. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


WORLD-WIDE 
BUSME5S CBrfTKES 

- rus .s l s l . e il feewfee Office 
Cranpjeta m* Sentoiat, Telex 

MKTBIDAM Euro Bw» Center 
*11015 Oi Amsterdam 
TtiJmZ2763S. Telex 16183 
ATW« Eaartrw jSerwcs^ Athens 

IS! 2$- < 5, °- 

^ T^kx: 716343 
BOMAYs Ecfaeja Qonbwi. 213 
Ntnmm Port, Bombay 400 Q21 

toToftsw. 1 

4 Sue ds la Presst 

Tefc 217 83 60 

Tdese 25327 

DWAfe P.a B» 1515. ONATA 

AnfciB Centre Dubcv, UA£. 

Tefc 214565 Tetan 46911 
LONDON. 110 The Strand. 

London WC2R QAA, 

24973 

MAMfe C/Oense ^684, 

Td 270 36 * or 

SS& Tf,B675 * /8 ° 3,275 

tfppc 575 frkx&on Avenue 
X®** WUB22. Tefc OT2J 60S 
0700- Telex: 125864 / 237699 
MM* BOS. 15 Araue ViSr Hugo 

SS.'rAT'™ 

Tetet 613458 

TOft 1 

Telex, 812656/812981. 


PAGE 14 . 
FOR MORE 
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rtf' '~- 

IQfrU K-sT~Mi i'-*i 



GENEVA KMS WSS^ 


i i ^ 1 1 1 ' 




TT .:!,J 'F.:'.. Ml -<7— 


jgM^lTLT^ 


Ttor HoU'c 
3IL’*' tniliu 


<tt.’u»ti iVui 




r MfJ OEU5..TOCn iECOWAWY iSitt 

Sedfa ogenfs/ii(tr*uson to rafi «mi Tsvn Sho Tm 
ffoergfoB for fStrctian. dedned and I 
ravine uraArffaa. Aha. iraea seeesuw 
m coated yams, serous for axding 
rad bnnatag. Sind fri detaled quat 
tows on yaw letterhead to Bax 
208, HeraU Triune. 92521 Needy 
Cedex, Renee 


IN U A - fOR MUTINATKMAL5 
CPA RUM 

R U5. fra ftaranft oceeudfag. 
™oa & busnas seme** . red •}- 

225 W. 34 ST, New Yori. NY J012Z 
Tfo 226000 BIAS Ref. Gofoectfe 



Mini Wood and Pickett 

Left-hand drive 1974, 1275 GT, bamac* 
late condition (concours). 

, .. . 


is* or wan, jwwy, uuamejy 
Gibrdtor, Panama. Liberia 
Luxwiiourg. AsshSes, UK. 
Ready made or (peesd. 
Free ex p l u ntwy boaUn. 
Bora laffalutxjrs 

London re p res enta tive 

Aston Company Fcrmd fo itt 
Dept T1 8 1/Hsna a, Dougta 
Isle r/utrv Tefc 062^ 2^1 
Telex 627891 SPWA Q 



Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DIAMONDLAND 

The forged rfsowroo m n 

Antwerp, DSomotid Gty 

Afpebironsir 3>. 1^32372343612. 


k-'l Wv-® 


an opuons.- . . 

at O.S. *8,000 - due to overeea, 

Contact J.P. LECLEF 
CeaeTa < 22 > W.93.56. (office hoo»). 


Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de rEvmgtfe, 75018 Paris.