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>,1^1 r 7.“ The Global Newspaper 
' '"X fr,- Edited in Paris 

’ *u.,. , '•■*. ( Printed Simultaneously ■ n ._ i 
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in Paris, London, Zurich, . 
Hons Kong, Singapore, W\ 
The Hague and MarseilleVj 



WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PACE 16. 


No. 31,835 


By Ruth Marcus 
- ^ _ and Sharon LaFcanriere 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — The House 
of Representatives has overwhelm- 
. ingjy approved a measure that 
* \j - r “would give die Defense Dcpart- 
. , mem broad powers to require lie 

* detector tests far more than four 
million people — military person- 
nel and civilian employees whose 
duties involve access to classified 

i , j ' information. 

ii New employees would be com- 
:y s - . peDed to submit to polygraph ques- 
• boning as pan of clearance proce- 
dures. 

j { _ The measure was approved, 333- 

' •ifjw 71, Wednesday night as an amend- 
ment to the Defense Department 
;• authorization bflL It provided offi- 
. .. trials more authority to use fie de- 
- i ->■' lectors than they had requested. 

■ N -"-*85. ; {The House voted Thursday, by 
." r * 7l! voice vote, to reinstate the death 
■ penalty in peacetime for US. mili- 
I tary personnel found guilty of espi- 
onage, Reuters reported from 
-• “ Washington. 

[Because there was no recorded 
■ vote, the amendment was consid- 
.. ered vulnerable when House and 
Senate negotiates meet to recon- 
...i, V die differences in their versions of 
the militaiy spending bQL) 

The House move reflects rising 

* concern in Congress over the Do* 

. , fense Department's methods for 

, . detecting present or potential spies 

following the arrest of four men 
. ■ Jtcused of spying for years in the 
u.S. Navy on btihalf of the Soviet 
Union. 

1 The Senate included much more 
limited polygraph authorization in 
its version of the defense authoriza- 
tion bilL 


U.S. House Bars Tests 
Of AntirSateUUe Arms 


.Mrtsgsrtft 

*s*™«“* of convennoMl 

r&s 


Defense Department from testing 
anti-sateUite weapons against ob- 
jects in space as long as the Rus- 
sians do not conduct such tests. 

The Democratic- con trolled 


,ui WMWU..WU ^ of California, and Lawrence 

Coughlin, Republican of Pennsyb 

The House may accept the Sen- vania, would ban tests of weapons 
ale’s military budget if Social against an object in space as long as 
Security is Page 3. the Russians did not conduct ami- 

lar tests of anti-satellite weapons. 

House approved a similar ban last J 530 e ?£ CI 

year bv a sUghtiy larger margin, but MrRogan stored the nrihtarybilL 
cornpromS with^rsSe in House ako adqpted by voice 
agreeing lo allow the Pentagon as «>tean aromdmmt by R^resenta- 

many as three such tests this year. 'j5? OCI ?f- of 

None has ommed, and the Hita* Mard^td. pnwdnlg $20 mi l.™ 
action could halt them. for .study of ways to make OS. 

The air fora has said that the s»!^lc»™lnenhletoauadc. 
rust test against a tatget in space is TJe Sonet Urnoti aimounced in 
scheduled nest month. ! Supportere l»M thaul would stty teting an u- 
of the lesdng program seflt as a saidhtt weapons, andrthas satd tl 
-.ay or pnssrnisgthe Soviet Union «uldiaeioimdudestichabaniii 
■ negotiate more seriously ax aims 


control talks in Geneva. 

The Republican-control 
ate voted, 74-9, last month 
unlimited testing of the we 
long as President Ronald 


OojgyjL The Pentagon has tested various 

xut-cootroUed Sen- P®™ 5 01 its anti-salelBte system and 
last month to allow fligbt-usted it twice, but it has not 
g of the weapons as targeted it against an object, 
nt Ronald Reagan ■ House Bare U.S. Troops 
i was trying to nego- The House voted, 312-111, 
time an anti-sateffite treaty with the Thursday to bar the use of U.S. 
Russians. troops in Nicaragua unless there 

Bui House lawmakers argued wasa“dem , andpre»aitdanger r to 
Wednesday that pressing ahead Americans or U& installations. 


INTERNATIONAL 



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PARIS, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


U.S. House Backs 
Use of Lie Detectors 
In Military Spy Hunt 


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. • - 


The use of the lie detector has 
long been controversial in Wash- 
ington, and it has-ordinarily been 

mandatory only for the most sensi- 
tive positions. ■ 

According to a recently declassi- 
fied Defense Department report, 
obtained Wednesday by The 
Washington Post, polygraph tests 
over the last several years have 
prompted at least nine persons 
holding or applying for sensitive 
government jobs to admit that they 
had been recruited by hostile for- 
eign powers, or had agreed to spy 
for them. 

Three other applicants for highly 
sensitive intelligence jobs disclosed 
that friends or members of their 
families woe spies, according to 
the report. 

Most of the individuals, some of 
whom had received the highest 
clearances, were applicants or em- 
ployees of the National Security 
Agency, which conducts communi- 
cations intelligence. Or the Central 
Intelligence Agency. 

The House amendment would 
allow randomuse of lie detectors to 
check out employees during their 
employment. 

The Pentagon is -conducting a 
test program in which it has con- 
gressional approval to administer 
3.500 lie detector tests annually. 
The tests are limited to those in the 
“special access" category. 

The ClA and the National Secu- 
rity Agency have long had author- 
ity to require polygraph tests fra: 
applicants and employees. 

The passage of the Young 
amendment came after the defeat 
of a substitute offered by Repre- 

( Continued on Page 3^ CoL 3) 





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U.S. Intensifies 
Diplomacy, Bend 
Sees End Near in 
Hijacking Crisis 


Mured L’ Angel, first sec 
Beirut, left, moving past 


of tbe French Embassy in 
igs at the heavily guarded 


entrance of Nabih Beni's home. Mr. L’Angd and Mr. 
Bern, leader of the Amal mflitin, discussed the hijack crisis. 


with the tests would lead to a space The Associated Press reported, 
arms race, and they said a ten ban The measure, part of the Penta- 


would make it easier to negotiate a goo budget package, would block 
treaty with the Soviet Union. the use of U.S. combat troops in or 
Differences between the House against Nicaragua, where U.S.- 
and Senate actions must be re- backed rebels are dying to over- 
solved in a conference committee, throw the leftist Sandmist govern- 
Lawmakers said a compromise meat. The House approved a 
-%ilar to that allowing limited resolution, 377-45, saymg that tbe 
taring was likely to result. ban would not apply if Nicaragua 

In the vote, 31 Republicans and obtained fighter jets from tbe Sovi- 
198 Democrats approved the ban, ex Union, 
while 148 Republicans and 45 The Senate bill concerning Pen- 
Democrats opposed is, tagon spending, passed earlier this 

The baa was adopted as an mouth, does not deal with the issue 
amendment to the 'S2916-billiaa of banning the use of UJS. combat 
Pentagon bin that sets spending troops in Nicaragua. 


- c tiling was Hkdy to 


Senate Unit 
Rejects Key 
Reagan Aide 

By Howard Kurtz 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
Judiciary Committee, in a series of 
votes, rejected W illiam Bradford 
Reynolds^ nomination as associate 
attorney general Thursday in what 
several committee members called 
a g gnfll to the Reagan administra- 
tion to strengthen its enforcement 
of civil rights laws. 

Even after the committee reject- 
ed the nomination. 10-8, the fate of 
President Ronald Reagan’s leading 
spokesman on civil rights remained 
in doubL 

At one point it appeared that 
Strom Thurmond, a Republican of 
Sooth Carolina and the committee 
chairman, had succeeded when be 
ordered a roll-call vote while sever- 
al Democratic senators were out of 
the hearing room. 

However, tbe Republican-con- 
trolled panel still could not muster 
enough support to salvage the 
Reynolds nomination after four 
separate votes. The only way for 
the nomination to be revived nc<w is 
for a majority of the Senate to ap- 
prove a highly unusual discharge 
petition to force the issue to the 
Senate Door. 

Several senators suggested after 
tbe vote that Mr. Reynolds should 
consider resigning as head of the 
Justice Department’s QvO Rights 
Division, although he has vowed to 
remain in that post if he was reject- 
ed for the position of associate at- 
torney general, the department's 
No. 3 job. 

[In a written statement after the 
vole, Mr. Reagan said he was 
“deeply disappointed” and stressed 
that ra. Reynolds "retains my full 
faith and confidence," United 
Press International reported from 
Washington. 

["Let me emphasize," Mr. Rea- 
gan said, “that Mr. Reynolds's civil 
rights views reflect my own. The 
policies be pursued are the policies 
of this administration, and they re- 
main our polities as long as I am 
presidents] 

The finny of action began when 
the committee voted to meet the 
nomination, with two Republicans. 
Aden Specter of Pennsylvania and 
Charles McC Mathias Jr. of Mary- 
land, joining ail eight Democrats In 
opposition. Senator Howell Heflin, 
a Democrat of Alabama and the 
only member who had remained 
undecided, said he opposed Mr. 
Reynolds because of the nominee's 
repealed misstatements about his 
retard. 

Mr. Thurmond then asked the 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL 5) 


Lufthansa Says It Flans to Order 
At Least 15 Jetliners From Airbus 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Deutsche Lufthansa 
AG, West Germany’s national air- 
line, plans to place firm orders for 
15 A-320s, Airbus Industrie's 150- 
seat jetliner, and to take options on 
25 more, company officials said 
Thursday. 

Tbe agreement, expected to be 
signed Saturday, was estimated by 
a Lufthansa executive to be worth 
about 51.3 billion, representing tbe 
largest single order for the twin-, 
engine plane. The plane is not yet 
in production. 

It is a major marketing break- 
through for the Airbus consortium 
that includes French, British, West 
German and Spanish aerospace 
companies. 

Heinz Runhau. tbe chairman of 
Lufthansa, was quoted by Reuters 
in Hong Kong as saying that the 
airline will review final details of 
the contract before signing it Satur- 
day. 

“If all is okay, we wjH sign on 


'Saturday to place firm orders,” Mr. 
Runhau «»id - 

A spokeswoman for Airbus said, 
“We are still negotiating and we 
have no contract in hand, therefore 
we «h*n not comment now.” 

Tbe A-320s for Lufthansa would 
be delivered between 1989 and 
1990. Neither Mr. Runhau nor 
company executives provided de- 
tails of how the planes would be 
financed. . 

The orders would increase the 
number of firm rales of the A-320, 
the first narrow-body airliner pro- 
duced by Airbus, to 90 and the 
number of options to buy the plane 
to 123. 

The seven other airlines that 
have placed orders include: Arnett 
Airlines of Australia. Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways of the United 
States, British Caledonian Air- 
ways, Inex Adria of Yugoslavia. 
Cyprus Airways, Air France and 
Air Inter, the French domestic air- 
line. 

A spokesman for the Boeing 


Corp. in Seattle said that his com- 
pany had bees competing for the. 
Lufthansa order with its 128-seat 
737-300, which went into service 
last year. 

“We were there with detailed of- 
fers,” he said, adding that the order 
would not affect Boeing's plans for 
a 150-seat plane under develop- 
ment. That plane, winch will com- 
pete with the A-320, will not be 
marketed until 1991 

The later delivery date of the new 
Boeing plane was a factor in Lufth- 
ansa’s decision to pick the A-320, 
which wQl he ready for deliveries 
starting in 1988, West German in- 
dustry executives said. 

Lufthansa, Scandinavian Air- 
lines System, and Swissair are 
among a group of airlines working 
with Airbus to coordinate develop- 
ment of tbe TA-1 1, and the TA-9, a 
medium-range, twin-engine Air- 
bus, executives said. 

( Warren Getler in Frankfurt con- 
tributed to this report) 


Conpiledty Our Stuff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States has launched an intensive 
diplomatic effort to bring the hos- 
tage crisis in Beirut to an end. ac- 
cording to Reagan administration 
sources. 

They said that the adrainistra- 

Syria hints that it would like to 
{day a key role in helping settle 
the hostage crmis. Page 2. 

lion has seized on the offer by Na- 
bih Beni, leader of tbe Lebanese 
Shiite militia Aroal, to put the 39 
remaining American hostages un- 
der the custody of a West European 
embassy in Beinu or or the Syrian 
government. 

In Jerusalem, a television report 
said that Israel and the United 
States have agreed that Israel 
would not free its 735 Lebanese 
prisoners until the release of the 
American hostages. The report, 
carried by Israeli Television, could 
not be independently confirmed. 

Mr. Berri. meanwhile, said 
Thursday in Beirut that he believed 
that the hostage incident was near- 
ing an erld. He has negotiated on 
behalf of tbe hijackers throughout 
most of tbe crisis, which began 
when -a Trans World Airlines jet 
was hijacked on June 14. 

Senior U.S. officials, including 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, 
were said to be probing foreign 
governments, particularly France 
and Syria, about their willingness 
intake the hostages. 

The White House has shifted 
away from strong talk — including 
the threat of a blockade on Leba- 
non — by adopting a policy of 
offering no comment on any aspect 
of the hostage crisis, including the 
possibility of retaliation. 

"I have nothing to add to the 
hostage situation,” Larry Speak es, 
the White House spokesman, said 
Thursday, “I won’t answer any 
questions. I'm just not talking. I'm 
just not saying anything." 

Switzerland declared Thursday 
that it, too. was prepared to take 
tbe hostages as long as no condi- 
tions were attached to the transfer. 


In Bern, a government spokes- 
man said that the Swiss foreign 
minister, Pierre Aubert. laid out the 
Swiss position in u message Thurs- 
day to Mr. Bern. He issued the 
following English translation of a 
government statemen i : 

“Switzerland is ready to receive 
the hostages in its embassy in Bei- 
rut but without any conditions jnJ 
with the assurance to be able to 
transfer them freely to Switzerland 
or elsewhere and to liberate them." 

A Swiss Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Stefan Nellen. said 
that the decision basically repre- 
sented Switzerland's position since 
the hostage crisis began. He said 
that “the new element” Thursday 
was that Switzerland now has re- 
plied formally to Mr. Bern's state- 
ment Wednesday that the hostages 
could be transferred lo the embas- 
sies of Austria, France or Switzer- 
land or to Damascus. 

Mr. Berri talked to Western tele- 
vision reporters Thursday at his 
heavily fortified house in West Bei- 
rut. minutes after coming from a 
30-minuie meeting with Marcel 
L'AugeL the first secretary at the 
French Embassy . 

“I'm waiting for an answer." Mr. 
Bern said. "Until now I don't re- 
ceive any answer from U.S. govern- 
ment. But I think we're in the end, 
end of this thing.” 

Mr. L’Augel said after meeting 
with Mr. Berri that “moving the 
hostages to an embassy would be a 
long-term matter." He added: "It 
trill lake a lot of talks to get them 
there." 

Both France and Syria had in- 
formed the United States earlier 
that they were wary of having to 
hold the hostages for more than a 
day or two and therefore asked for 
guarantees from the United States 
that Israel would release the Leba- 
nese prisoners, who have been held 
irt Israel since April as Mr. Berri 
has demanded. 

Bui there were no visible signs 
that Israel was prepared to move 
from its refusal to link the fate of 
the Lebanese prisoners being held 
in the Adit prison with the Amen- 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


India, in Switch, Condemns Extremist Violence 






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ThiteDoMta 

Investigators in the luggage area at Tokyo’s Narita airport. 


By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Pari Service 

NEW DELHI — With terrorist 
forces now threatening it at home 
and overseas, India has turned full 
circle from its previously passive 
attitude toward acts of violence by 
extremist causes. 

In a move that surprised the U.S. 
Embassy, Prime Minister Rajiv 
Gandhi attacked the hijacking of a 
TWA jetliner by Shiite Moslems 
and called fra’ the immediate re- 
lease of the American hostages. 

“We were pleasantly surprised 
by iL You know they usually don't 
do that," said an embassy spokes- 
man Thursday. 

Last week’s statement followed a 
strong condemnation of interna- 
tional. terrorism in the final cotn- 
muniqufc issued by the prime minis- 
ter and President Ronald Reagan 
at the end of Mr. Gandhi's visit to 
Washington earlier this month. 

Both the communique and the 
Gandhi statement contrasted 
markedly with India’s past posi- 
tions on terrorist incidents around 
the world. 

A new consciousness has devel- 
oped here on the effects of terror- 
ism, an Indian diploma! acknowl- 
edged. 

International terrorism was 
brought forcefully to the Indian 
nation with a series of assassina- 



In Sri Lanka, f the Boys 9 Rule in Tamil Territory 




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Tht Aiaacmd Pren 

A Tam3 guerrilla near Parenthan, in northern Sri T Aw ^ a , 
demonstrating the use of a rifle and grenade launcher. 


Washington Pan Sendee 

JAFFNA, Sri Lanka — The 
young ™n cradled the grenade in 
his ' hand, his Gnger curled at the 
ready in the pin. Another young 
man casually pointed a worn pistol 
through the car window. 

In all, four anted Tamil separat- 
ist fighters who were ridine try in a 
car stopped lo check three Western 
journalists whom they , bad ob- 
served listening to a shortwave ra- 
dio on the road outside this town. 

Once the journalists had shown 
that the radio was a receiver, not a 
tra nsm i tt er, the young men la 
than go with smiles and hand- 
shakes, after returning the radio. 

The guerrillas’ action, in daylight 
in the middle of a road less than 
five utiles (eight kilometers) from a 
police checkpoint, demonstrated 
how tittle control the government 
has of titis largely Tamil area in 
northern Sri Lanka . 

“There is no government,” said 



Shunmugam V. Murnsesu, a 62- 
year-oki shop owner who was ab- 
ducted last month and hdd for 10 
days by one group of Tamil fight- 
era, then freed by tbe intercesacm 
of another band friendly to him. 

“After 7 at night The boys’ rale 
here,” he continued. “The control 
in the mgbL is ‘the boys.’” Thai is 
die way Tamils refer to the young 


guerrillas. In Colombo, by con- 
trast, officials call them terrorists. 

Jaffna, a city of one million peo- 
ple, has been virtually an off from 
the rest of the country for the last 
year by insurgency. Last week, a 
cease-fire was announced by the 
government. 

Under its terms, the troops are to 
remain in their fortresses, and they 
have stopped the irritating massive 
sweeps and checking of travelers at 
bamcades. 

The guerrillas now move through 
the northern peninsula at wilL But 
a recent two-day visit — one of the 
first nnsnpetyised visits by^ Western 
journalists in three months — 
showed a lessening of support 
among residents for the militants' 
gWn of an independent Tamil na- 
tion, to be called Eelam. 

The government announced 
Wednesday that it planned to meet 
with die mahi Tamil political party 
and giwrriHfl groups in Bhntjm to 
discuss the crisis. 


Many people want the cease-fire 
to hdd, hoping that accommoda- 
tion can be reached between the 
Hindu Tamil n and the Sinhalese 
Buddhist majority. 

The militants, moreover, ap- 
peared to have frittered away their 
support by lawlessness — abduc- 
tions such as that erf Mr. Murugesu 
and at least three other traders, 
thefts of vehicles and attacks on 
army units, attacks that provoked 


lions, including the Oct 31 slaying 
of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, 
mother of Mr. Gandhi by Sikh 
extremists and a reported Sikh plan 
to assassinate Mr. Gandhi in the 
United States. 

The government is now reacting 
also to the likelihood that an Air- 
In dia jumbo jet that crashed Sun- 
day in the North Atlantic was 
downed by a bomb planted by Sikh 
terrorists and a possible Sikh con- 
nection to a luggage bomb explo- 
sion at the Tokyo airport the same 
day. 

|A Tokyo newspaper, Yomiuri 
Shunbun, reported that finger- 
prints of Lai Singh, a Sikh fugitive 
sought by the U.S. Federal Bureau 
of Investigation in connection with 
the alleged plan to assassinate Mr. 
Gandhi, were found on pieces of a 
suitcase that was blown apart in the 
airport explosion. The Associated 
Press reported from Tokyo. 

[Another Japanese newspaper, 
Mamichi Shhnbun, reported that 
police had determined that the ex- 
plosive was a plastic bomb inside a 
large radio or cassette player.) 

[Police investigators were not 
available to comment on the press 
reports, but a spokesman for the 
airport police said he doubted chat 
they were true, Agence France- 
Presse reported. “It is almost iro- 

(Contumed on Page 2, CoL 7) 


INSIDE 

■ Josef Mengde’s letters to his 
son confirm that he was de- 


World War 


Page 2. 


■ Two UN agencies are squab- 
bling over emergency food aid 
to Africa. Page 5, 


The rule of the gun has replaced 
government authority. 

“We are glad the fighting has 
ceased," said the Right Revereno 
B. Deogupinnai, the Roman Cath- 
olic bishop of Jaffna and a support- 
er of Tamil equality. “Our people 
were getting unnecessarily lolled" 
.He said that actions by “me 
boys" had hurt Tamils. The insur- 
gents blew up railroad trades to 
stop trains bringing supplies (or the 

(CootiBtKdouP%e2,Ccd.7) 


■ U.S. Democrats have chosen 

a course of “conscious invisibil- 
ity” for the time being. A News 
Analysis. Page 3. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The EC critidzed Japan's de- 

cision to reduce tariffs, saying it 
was not enough. Page 11. 

■ The dollar was mixed in Eu- 
ropean trading. Page 11. 

WEEKEND 

B Mode schools are turning out 
more and better musicians fast' 
er than the job market can ab- 
sorb than. Page 7. 


Paper Says 
It Has Films 
Of Sakharov 

By Wtlli.in Drozdiak 

H'ashingti'ii Pm: OV-ncr 

BONN — The We>i German 
newspaper BUd sato Thursday it 
had acquired two recent film reels 
depicting .Andrei D. Sakharov, the 
dissident Soviet physicL-i. to be in 
frail health and undergoing treat- 
ment for serious heart and circula- 
tory problems. 

The films. 75 minutes in length, 
would be the first tangible evidence 
offered in nearly a year of Dr. Sak- 
harov’s plight iri Gorki, where he is 
being held in internal exile with his 
wife. Yelena G. Bonner. 

In one sequence, shown in black 
and white. Dr. Sakharov takes off 
his shirt and is given an examina- 
tion. including a cardiogram. His 
wife is present in the room. 

A neurologist later appears to 
check his reflexes, lapping his fore- 
head. cheeks and chut with a small 
hammer. 

In the other reel, in color. Dr. 
Sakharov's doctor presents a bleak 
report saying the physicist is “suf- 
fering from serious heart rhythm 
disturbances, narrowing of the ar- 
teries, atherosclerosis, and the on- 
set of Parkinson's disease," 

The doctor, identified as Natalya 
Yevdokimova, said that Dr. Sakha- 
rov was receiving all necessary care 
and medication. Bild quoted her as 
having said that she had been treat- 
ing him for four years and that his 
condition remained satisfactory. 

While the exact date of the film is 
uncertain. Dr. Sakharov is shown 
changing a calendar in his room 
with June 14 as the last visible day 
and reading U.S. newsmagazines 
dated May 27 and June 3. 

Bild obtained a film in August 
from what the newspaper called “a 
high-ranking, authorized Soviet in- 
formant who occasionally curries 
out Kremlin assignments' to bring 
news to the West." 

The source, then and now, is be- 
lieved to be Victor Louis, a Soviet 
journalist with close contacts in the 
Communist Party hierarchy who 
has served in the past as a conduit 
of officially sanctioned informa- 
tion sold or given to Western news 
organizations. 

Dr. Sakharov, 64, went on a hun- 
ger strike a year ago to press the 
government into allowing his wife 
to go to the West for medical treat- 
ment of a heart ailment. 

He was reportedly taken to a 
dime and force-fed. 


I 

t 










U.S. Army Detained, Freed Mengele, Letters Confirm 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Past Soviet 

BONN —Notes and letters that 
Josef Mengele sent to his son have 
confirmed that he was detained by 
the U.S. Amy after World War U 
but was released months later be- 
cause he could not be properly 
identified. 

Dr. Mengde, who was responsi- 
ble for the killing of 400,000 Jews at 
the Auschwitz concentration camp, 
avoided detection while he was de- 
tained because be had refused to 
tattoo his blood type in his armpit 
as all offices of the elite Nazi SS 
were required to do. 

Allied investigators seeking SS 
personnel looked for the tattoo as a 
telltale mark in identifying high- 
ranking Nazi soldiers who ought be 
put on trial for war crimes. 

When U.S. soldiers found no tat- 
too on Dr. Mengele and could not 
find any wrongdoing committed by 
a Fritz HoUmann. the alias that Dr. 
Meagele was using at the time, be 
was discharged from the intern- 
meut camp. 



have confirmed their authenticity. 

The article was the second in a 
series that Bunte plans to publish 
using the papers. The magazine 
says it will donate all profits to the 
Auschwitz survivors’ fund. 


On June 21, forensic scientists 
from Brazil, the United States and 
West Germany announced that 
they were convinced that the skele- 
ton of a man buried as Wolfgang 
Gerhard and exhumed June 6 near 
SSo Paulo was that of Dr. Mengele. 


These photographs of Wolfgang Gerhard" were taken in 
Brazil in the 1970s. The body of a man buried as Mr. 
Gerhard has been identified as that of Josef M e ngele . 


In a letter to his son that was 
quoted in Borne, Dr. Mengele 
wrote: “At the war’s end, my unit 
was in Czechoslovakia. On the 
night of the cease-fire, we pulled 
back to the west. In the vicinity of 
the nearest city, we were taken to a 
U.S. prisoner-of-war camp. We 
were transferred to many camps 
and then released in the American 


The account, which corroborat- 
ed earlier reports that Dr. Mengde 
had been in U.S. hands after the 
war, appeared Thursday in Bunte, 
a Munich weekly magazine that ac- 


quired from Dr. Mengde’s son, 
Rolf, voluminous notes, letters, 
and photographs illustrating the 
doctor’s life as a fugitive. Foot his- 
torians who examined the materials 


zone. 


Dr. Mengde's son remarked that 
his father was narcissis tic and 
would stand for hours in front of a 
mirror admiring himself in hand- 


tailored suits. Rolf Mengele said be 
believes that his father's inordinate 
vanity made him flout SS rules and 
refuse to imprint his blood group 
under his arm. 

After his release Dr. Mengde re- 
turned to his hometown of Gtinz- 
burg. in Bavaria. Fearing pursuit, 
however, he took refuge in a nearby 
forest. In September 1945 two U.S. 
military officers questioned fann- 
ers in the Gtinzbuig region about 
him. 

They also interrogated his fust 
wife, Irene, who said (hat she did 
not know where he was. 

The family reportedly delivered 
food supplies to Dr. Mengde at his 
forest hiding place before he moved 
to Rosenheim, also in Bavaria, 
where he worked as a stable groom. 

Dr. Mengde stayed in Rosen- 
heim until late 1948, when he made 
his way to Genoa to catch a ship to 
South America. He was detained 
by the Italian authorities, but they 

him mistakenly and let him pro- 
ceed to Argentina. 


Britain Acts 
To Control 
Fan Violence 
At Stadiums 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Portugal’s Parliament to Be Dissolved 

LISBON (Reuters) — PortugaTs president, Antdnio RamalhoEaaej,^ 
said Thursday thathe would dissolve his country's parliament and cafi tor 
new elections in July. " 

The derision followed a two-week crisis caused by a decp spUt m the 
country’s ruling coalition. Prime Minister MArio Soares submitted his 
resignation on Tuesday. 

A government spokesman said that the parliament would be dssetvtd _ 
after it had ratified Portugal’s treaty making it a member of the Europe^; /• 
Community. The treaty is due to be ratified July 10. ■ «r- 


Rwers 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment,' reacting to Last month’s 
Brussels soccer riot is which 38 
persons were killed, proposed legis- ^ n , ,« 

^nThmbv^edai«oaiNi' Jraiis, Bonn to Propose United Europe 



The measure would ban alcohol 
at soccer grounds and on trains and 
buses tayvng fan* to matches. Of- 
fenders would face fines and up to 
three months in prison. 

Home Secretary Leon Britton 
said that the bill, which must be 
approved by Parliament, signaled 
the government's determination 
“to do everything possible to re- 
move this stain from a great British 
game.” 

Prime Minister 
Thatcher has 


PARIS (Renters) — France and West Germany will put 
drafted treaty of European unity before the European Co a 
leaders in Milan, the government said Thursday, . .;J> - 

Prime Minister Bettino Craxi of Italy, chairman of the 10-aaticu EC- 
summit conference, which starts Friday, has been consulted on the draft ‘ 
and has indicated his approval, the French statement said. In Bettis 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl told the Bundestag, “Free Europe must ose the 
chance to unite, with a vision of building a United States of Europe, 
Proposals for European union have been widely discussed in the tat 


Syria Hints Assad Seeks 
To Aid in Hostage Crisis 




Jonathan C Randal 

i'nshirtgion Past Service 

DAMASCUS — Syria has been 
dropping cautious hints that Presi- 
dent Hafez ai -Assad is trying per- 
sonally to solve the American hos- 
tage crisis in Beirut. 

As diplomats here credited Syria 
with inspiring an offer by Nabih 
Beni the Amal militia leader nego- 
tiating on behalf of the hijackers, to 
transfer the hostages to a Western 
embassy in Beirut, or to Syria, a 
pattern of growing Syrian determi- 
nation has emerged 

Quoting Syrian sources, diplo- 
mats reported that Mr. Bern has 
been in Damascus incognito once, 
and perhaps twice, in the past few 
days to confer with Syrian officials 
and presumably to work out the 
offer be made Wednesday in Bri- 
ruL 

In Washington, UiL officials 
said they believed Mr. Bern had 
made secret trips to Damascus. 

The official Syrian press agency 
announced that President Assad 
would leave for a delayed official 
visit to Czechoslovakia “within the 
next few days." Diplomats and an- 
alysts reasoned mat Mr. Assad 
would not risk failure by leaving 
for Prague unless a solution has 
been found. 

Diplomats said that in their deal- 
ings with Syrian contacts, they 
sensed a new desire to end the crisis 
quickly. Apart from the hostage 
situation. Syria is virtually isolated 
in the Arab world because of its 
role in helping Amal forces attack 


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the Palestinian refugee camps in 
Beirut. 

Also considered significant were 
recurring rumors that Syria was de- 
termined to crack down on the pro- 
Iranian Hezballah, or Party or 
God, a fundamentalist Shiite Mos- 
lem group believed responsible for 
hijacking the TWA airliner June 14 
after it took off from Athens. 

Moving the hostages to a West- 
ern embassy, as Mr. Berri suggest- 
ed. would solve the problem of 
their safety, diplomats said. 

But it would not restore their 
freedom of movement, as President 
Ronald Reagan has insisted be 
done. 

That analysis prompted specula- 
tion among diplomats here that 
Mr. Assad, in fad. favored Mr. 
Beni’s alternative suggestion: mov- 
ing the hostages to Syria. 

Mr. Bern’s offer was conditioned 
on the hostages remaining either in 
a Western embassy or in Syria, 
pending release by Israel of the 
Shiite and other Lebanese prison- 
ers being held in a prison camp at 
Atilt. 


Diplomats doubled that the Syr- 
ian leader could honor that pan of 
the bargain without laying hims elf 
open to charges that Syria was con- 
niving in the hijacking it is known 
to have denounced. 

Yet such a transfer here would 
help save face for Mr. Bern by 
shifting responsibility to President 
Assad. Mr. Beni would not be seen 
as surrendering the hostages to the 
United States, but rather to his ally 
and protector in Damascus. 

Theoretically, Syria as a sover- 
eign state could order the trans- 
ferred hostages’ unconditional re- 
lease by invoking the higher 
interests erf the state. • 

Logically, Syria would want to 
keep the hostages on its territory 
the shortest possible time. 

If Syria released the hostages 
without simultaneous Israeli re- 
lease of the Lebanese prisoners, 
Mr. Beni would look foolish. But 
diplomats contend that Mr. Beni 
could not afford to dispute any- 
thing his Syrian ally chose to do. 

Also far from clear is what Israel 
would be willing to do to help Syria 
accomplish what the Reagan ad- 
ministration demands — uncondi- 
tional release of the Americans. Is- 



Tha Aandotad Pm 

Hashemi Rafsanjani at Iran reviews a Chinese honor guard in Beijing. 


Iranian Leader Is Visiting Beijing 


Rouen 

BEIJING — The speaker of Iran's parliament, 
Hasbemi Rafsanjani. arrived Thursday in Beijing 
on a visit that diplomats said probably would 
concern arms purchases from (Tima. 

Mr. Rafsanjani, acco mpanied by Foreign Minis- 
ter Ali-Akbar Vdayati, is the first Iranian leader to 
visit C hina since the Iranian revolution in 1979, the 
Chinese press agency said. 

“China would like to sell aims to Iran, which 
would like to boy, as it desperately needs than,” a 
Western diplomat said. “But any trade would have 
to be done through a thud country, probably 
North Korea.” 


Army Corps launched Operation Li ghtning Wrath 
on a front of 1,200 meters (about three-quarters of 
a mile) in the Majnoon Islands. He said the Iraqis 
counted 108 Iranian corpses and found weapons 
and equipment left behind by fleeing Iranian sol- 
diers. 

The artificial islands, near the lran-Iraq border, 
are essentially a network of roads built before the 
war started in September 1980 to exploit oil depos- 
its beneath the marshes. 

Iran seized much of the region in an offensive in 



Meanwhile, in reports monitored in Bahrain, 
h claimed successes in Gulf war 


Iraq and Iran both < 

fighting across the marshlands of southern 

Baghdad said its troops recaptured part of 
Majnoon islands from Iranians stationed there 
shoe an Iranian offensive 16 months ago. Tehran 
reported an attack in the marshlands Tuesday 
night in which it said it killed more than 100 Iraqi 
soldi era and seized new territory. 

Marshes cover much of the extensive southern 
war front, and the two operations may not have 
been in the same area. 

An Iraqi military spokesman said the Third 


positions had been retaken. 

Iran's national press agency, ERNA. monitored 
in London, said the Iranian operation Tuesday 
night succeeded in clearing parts of the marshlands 
of Iraqi troops. 

IRNA said the operation was aimed at prevent- 
ing the Iraqis from retaking positions and strategic 
waterways the Iranians had seized in an offensive 
that began June 14. 

Iran earlier said that during that operation its 
forces had occupied 100 square kilometers of Iraqi 
territory, including important waterways in toe 
marshlands 


rad has little apparent reason to 
aid the Damascus regime. 

Some diplomats say that the cen- 
tral problem is ensuring that both 
the Hezballah extremists and the 
Israelis guarantee unconditional 
release of their i 


U.S. Intensifies Diplomatic Efforts 


prisoners. 


f Continued from Page 1) 
can hostages without a specific re- 
quest from the United States. The 
Reagan administration has de- 
clined to make such a request. 

In Paris, the French government 
responded to Mr. Benrs formula- 
tion by saying that France “is al- 
ways available when it is a question 


Comecon Urged 
To Tighten Ties 

tot. 1 . rri 1 Til of protecting human lives and pre- placed a 
Within 1 rade Bloc anting suffering.” Minister 

... But French officials quickly add- ask if Isr 


WARSAW (Reuters) — Prime 
Minister Nikolai A. Tikhonov of 
the Soviet Union and General Wqj- 
ciech Jaruzelski of Poland, ai a 
three-day conference that ended 
Thursday, accused the West of in- 
terfering ic the affairs of Commu- 
nist countries and vowed to 
strengthen the Comecon trade 
bloc. 

Mr. Tikhonov attacked what he 


called “the imperialist policy of the 
id interfe 


arms race and interference in the 
internal affairs of other states.” 

General Jaruzelski said: “Impe- 
rialism wants to block the develop- 
ment of a vibration and industry 
under socialism by applying ele- 
ments of economic and technologi- 
cal warfare.” 

The 10 members of Comecon. 
the Soviet bloc trade and economic 
organization, adopted several ac- 
cords designed to bind their econo- 
mies more closely together. Mem- 
ber nations include the Soviet 
Union, its six East European allies. 
Cuba. Mongolia and Vietnam. 


fidals quickly add- 
ed that France would not play the 
role of mediator or negotiator, sug- 
gesting that the French were offer- 
ing their embassy in Beirut, or per- 
haps in Damascus, only as a 
temporary sheltering facility lor 
the hostages on their way to free- 
dom. 

The French said Thursday that 
the release of (he hostages must be 
unconditional. “We cannot act as 
substitute jaflors,” they said. 

Mr. Shultz was reported 
Wednesday to have telephoned the 
French foreign minister, Roland 
Dumas, with a request for French 
involvement, according to reports 


from Paris and from Ui>. adminis- 
tration sources. But Mr. Shultz re- 
portedly was unable to give the 
French diplomat the assurances he 
sought that Israel would agree to 
free the Arab prisoners quickly and 
thus enable the French to release 
the Americans. 

Mr. Dumas then reportedly 
telephone call to Prime 
Minister Shimon Peres of Israel to 
ask if Israel would set a timetable 
for the release of the Arab prison- 
ers in return for France's taking 
over custody of the Americans. Mr. 
Peres declined to give such a com- 
mitment, indicating instead that 
there still was no dear American 
request for such a step, according 
to a report that originated in Jeru- 
salem. 

Israel’s inner cabinet met for 
three hours after Mr. Dumas's call 
but made no decisions, Israel radio 
said. 

An Israeli official who demand- 
ed anonymity said Thursday that 
die Israeli government had been 
informed that “the French option 


Jarazel&ki to Vial Belgrade 

United Pros fniimatimal 


BELGRADE — General Wqj- 
rietib Jaruzelski, the Polish leader, 
will pay his first visit to Yugoslavia 
sometime next month, a Yugoslav 
spokesman said Thursday. 


N.Y. Airport Service Crew Spurns Lebanese Jet 


Water Shortage in Jamaica 

United Press International 

KINGSTON, Jamaica — A wa- 
ter shortage caused by a strike may 
lead the authorities to begin airlift- 
ing tourists off the island, officials 
said. 


New York Times Stmce 

NEW YORK — A union at 
Kennedy International Airport re- 
fused to service a Lebanese airliner 
oo Tuesday and the union's leader 
said later that he would ask union 
members to refuse again Saturday 
when the airline's next flight is ex- 
pected. 

“It was inconceivable 10 us that a 
Lebanese aircraft could come free- 


Locai 504 of the Transport Work- 
ers Union. “We are not going to sit 
around and be of convenience to 
the terrorists." 

On Tuesday, members of Local 
504, who work for the Allied Avia- 
tion Service Coip., refused to un- 
load baggage or clean [he Middle 
East Airlines jet after it landed. 
Management personnel at Allied 
handled the ‘ 


. « and cleaned 

ly into the United Slates during the in? aircraft, which was the airline's 
hijack situation,” said Mel Brack- Flight 711. 


fitt. president of the 5,000-member 



E*r. 191 1 

Just tell the taxi driver "sank roo doc noo’ 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Falkentuim So. 9, MUNICH 

• M/S A5TOR 


at sea 



A spokesman said that MBA had 
been scheduling one flight a week 
into the airport but had raised the 
number to two this week because of 
heavier summer traffic. “It was a 
move that had been planned for 
weeks.” be said. 

■ Anti-Terrorist Proposal 
Robert C. Byrd, the Senate Dem- 
ocratic leader, said Thursday that 


arrest of known terrorists. Renters 
reported from Washington. 

Mr. Byrd, a Democrat of West 
Virginia, said he suggested the pro- 
posal at a White House luncheon 
with President Ronald Reagan this 
week but had not received a re- 
sponse. 

The plan would impose sanc- 
tions on any country that did not 
sign the treaty or signed it and did 
not enforce its provisions, includ- 
ing arrests of known terrorists. 

The treaty would call for Ihe 
compilation of a list of known ter- 
rorists. If such terrorists lived in a 
country and were not arrested, the 
country would be asked to extra- 
dite diem to any country seeking 
them. 

Mr. Byrd also suggested that the 
United Stales should consider re- 
taliation against those now holding ■ 
dw American hostages in in Leba- 


he was introducing legislation for non after the 39 hostages were 
an international treaty to force the freed. 


British fans were 


Margaret 
that 


Mame for the riot 


■e primarily to 
before the Euro- 


aiucui vn — — - — 

Jacques Ddors, endorsed the idea of union at a news conference Wcaott- ^ 
day. He nl<n expressed the hope that the Milan meeting would lay down ,■ 
guidelines allowing the project to get under way. 


pean Cup final on May 29 between 
Liverpool and Juventus, the Italian 
team. Mast of the dead were 
crushed when a wall collapsed as 
Liverpool fans attacked Juventus 
of Turin supporters. 

“We are putting forward 
but fair measures which go to 
heart of the problem of drunken 
behavior and hooliganism at foot- 
ball grounds,” Mr. Britton said. 

Opposition politicians have en- 
dorsed action against unruly fans 
and the bill is expected to paw 
swiftly through Paruament aiufbe- 
come law before the new soccer 
season starts in mid- August 

Provisions in the bill include: 

• Fines of up to £100 (£130) for 
dr unkenness s tadiums 

• Fines of up to £400 and three 
mouths in prison for sale or posses- 
sion of alcohol at grounds or on 
buses and coaches traveling to 
matches. 

• Fines of np to £1,000 for oper- 
ators who permit alcohol on trains 
or buses tilting fans to games. 

The Police Federation, an orga- 
nization repre se nting the nation's 
policemen, said that the bOl did not 
go far enough and urged that all 
fans arrested for violent offenses be 
jailed. 

The federation complained that 
the bill allowed magistrates to 
mate e xemp tions to the liquor h*n 
for fans in hospitality suites, 
branding tins “one rule for the av- 
erage supporter and another for the 
executive boxes” 


Pope to Honor East European Saints 


VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope John Paul II will issue an encydicri oc 
Eastern Europe and the Roman Catholic Church next week to c oinci de : 
with the anniv ersary of the deaths of that region's two patron saintv 
Vatican officials said Thursday. . - -J 

The encyclical will be the fourth from the Polish-bom pontiff smeehe 

J 1 mo T. ..II „ Tulu 1 ineil tn f^rechtvaramleii 


was named pope in 1978. It will precede a July 7 visit to Czechoslovakia . 
~ ’ * — - - Casaroh, the Vatican secretary erf state, tomarit the,. 


by Cardinal Agostino „ 

1,100th anni versary of Brothers Methodius and CyriL 




Ugandan Describes Role in Kill i n g s 

LONDON (Reuters) — A man who said he was a former Ugauc^.- 
secret policeman said Thursday that he bad killed 350 people and , 
tortured man y others on orders of President Milton O bote's govern ments 

Emmanuel Knddu, 24, said at a news conference that he ripped opes , 
the stomachs of civilians, broke the heads and legs of prisoners with 
hammers and dripped molten plastic on them. 

His statements followed last week's Amnesty International repeal on 

(n.-tT nHn«ir in I Tmn/fo tvhrfh T iTri^rtll-hpwi (lffnfK PlVNin r 


human rights violations in U; 
ribed a 


described as the most 



document it had ever published. Mr;' ; 


uwiu^u^ ~ — . . • 

Obote said Monday in Kampala that Amnesty International represent*-^ 
fives were welcome to visit Uganda to discuss the group's allegations.: >■ 


Sirhan Denied Parole, May Appeal /. 

SOLEDAD, California (LAT) — California's parole board has tumefii . 
down Sirhan B. Sirhan’s latest bid for freedom, but the posubtihyafjq^ 
le gal rhaHwigg was raised when it was discovered that reporters had beflSrV 
listening to the panel's deliberations. V - V; ■' 

After deciding to deny parole for the slayer of Senator Robert -F.-^ 
Kennedy, the three-member board discussed moving Mr. Sirhan from 
Soiedad to another prison and, at one point, a member was overheard 
saying, “We'll send his ass down there for as long as possible.” . 

A microphone in an adjoining room full of reporters had been; 
inadvertently left on. When Mr. Strhan's attorney learned about’ the . 
board member's comment, be said: “Tm dumbfounded. I plan to imme^ 
diately see what legal steps might be taken to set aside the boanft ' • 
action.” Mr. Sirhan is serving a life sentence for the 1968 assassination.^ 


I!.- ' 

..n • 


M. 


j;- 


I - ■ 


Lidia Shifts 
Stance on 
Terrorism 


(Continued from Rage 1) 
possible to get a fingerprint from 
material like doth,” he said.] 

Previously, New Delhi rarely 
condemned hijackings, especially 
when done on behalf of Arab inter- 
ests. It allowed Murtaza Bhutto, 
the son of the executed former 
president of Pakistan, Zulfikar Ali 
Bhutto, and leader of a group that 
hijacked a Pakistan International 
Airlines plane in 1981, to pass free- 
ly through Bombay. 

When Iranian fundamentalists 
seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran 
in 1979, moreover, India sent a 
trade mission to help Iran over- 
xicuons imposed 


Khmer Rouge Reports Slaying 186 ^ 

BANGKOK (AP) — Cambodian guerrillas, making one of their, ' 
highest single claims of Vietnamese casualties, said Thursday that thef^: 
recently attacked three Vietnamese battalion bases in northwester^ ' 
Cambodia, Miring or wounding 186 Vietnamese soldiers. * 

Khmer Rouge Radio, monitored in Bangkok, said file guerrillas 0. 
Friday attacked bases that served as “defense fortresses" for Vrctnaxqeyti : 
regiments stationed at Sisophon in Battambnng province. The broadcast ‘ - 
did not give guerrilla casualties. . 

The claim was impossible to verify. Khmer Rouge claims are usoiiflte* 
regarded as exaggerated, although diplomats in Bangkok do not damn: 
the guerrillas have staged ambushes on Vietnamese installations a 
lines. 


suppj 


For the Record 



The premier of Alberta, Peter Lougbeed, has resigned as head of th&. 
provinces Progressive Conservative Party, a step likely to lead la IC=r 
departure as government leader as early as September. (i~ 

Coretta Scott King, die widow of the Reverend Martin Luther Kii 

vA LA.. T> : •n ■ ..aL v/ : . « mm 


and her children. Bernice, 22, and Martin Dither King 3d, 27, 
” " African 


economic: 


was definitely dead.” The official 
said that theproposal was rejected 
because of French objections but 
be declined to elaborate. 

The Israeli defense minister, 
Yitzhak Rabin, took (he floor of 
the Knesset, Israel’s parliament, to 
restate in emphatic terms bis coun- 
try’s intention to release the Arab 
prisoners, who were rounded up in 
southern Lebanon and brought to 
Israel in April. 

“Since then,” Mr. Rabin said 
Wednesday, “the army has from 
time to time released groups of peo- 
ple and it is our intention to contin- 
ue ibis policy in the future accord- 
ing to cabinet decisions.*' (WT, AP, 
UPI) 


by the United States and its West 
European allies. 

J.D. Sethi, a former member of 
the planning commission in New 
Delhi, pointed oat in an article in 
the Indian Express in December 
that India had condemned only a 
“handful” of the 774 incidents of 
international terrorism that took 
place in 1983. 

Among the acts erf terrorism in 
»ht$ region India remained si- 
lent on, Mr. Sethi said, was the 
assassination by North Korean 
agents of 17 persons, including four 
Sooth Korean cabinet ministers, in 
a bomb blast in the Burmese capi- 
tal erf Rangoon. 

Sikh extremists brought turmoil 
to the Punjab with assassinations 
of opponents of their aim of creat- 
ing a separate state in northern 
India. The murders included Sikh 
and Hindu mainstream political 
leaders and journalists. 

Although India has accused Pa- 
kistan of aiding the Sikh terrorists, 
it has been blamed by Sri Lanka for 

ofsouth India to^^^Mtacks on 

that island nati rtn. 

■ Air Canada Bomb Threat 

An Air Canada flight leaving Zu- 
rich for Canada via Paris was 
forced to return to the Zurich air- 
port Thursday after ibe airline's 
office in Paris was told that a hnmh 
was an board, an airline spokes- 
man told Reuters in Zurich. 


arrested Wednesday for protesting too near the South Atman ramnsre ‘ 
in Washington. Thfy were urging congressional passage of UJS. sanctfciaf * 
against apartheid. ***»*» - 

A bank worker and two poCcemen were killed by unidentified , 
in Guatemala City this week and a San Carlos National Uz 
student was kidnapped, according to a university official. 

The chief of the Vietna me se Communist Party, Le Doan, 

Moscow on Thursday for his first full talks with the Soviet 
Mikha i l S. Gorbachev, the Tass news agency said. (i 

Sweden, Norway and Denmark agreed Thursday to tenrrfnate' 
weekly flights of the Scandinavian Airlines System to Johannes! 
joint protest against South Africa's apartheid policies. 

Countess Isabella GngBdmi, 37, was kidnapped Wedn esday 
gunmen ou Lade her country house north of Rome, it was » 

Thursday. There were no dgjaik available regarding suspects or ] 
motives. > (j.. 

n»e Spanish parfiaroent passed a MB Thursday malting abortiaal 
some cases, including danger to the mother’s life and when a raw 
results from rape or incest 





• ■ rm: 


In Sri Lanka’s Tamil Area, 
'The Boys ’ Bute Countryside^ 



Airport police said the aircraft 
had been searched but that nothing 
had been found. The plane subse- 
quently flew to Paris. 

■ Signals Near Crash Site 
Faint intermittent signals have 
been detected near the crash site of 

the Air-lndia jet but it has not 
been determined whether they are 
coming from the plane's rnissfng 
flight recorders, investigators told 
The A ssociated Press in Cork, Ire- 
land. 


A spokesman at the British Roy- 
al Navy's command center at 
Northwoqd, northwest of London, 
said Britain’s HMS Challenger had 
intercepted the signals. 

If the flight recorders can be re- 
covered from the seabed, they 
could help determine whether the 
crash was caused by a bomb. 


(Continued from Page 1} 
military, the bishop said. “They 
didn’t care that it him the people,* 
he added. 

“We are between two fires, the 
armed forces on one side and the 
boys,” Bishop Deogupinnai contin- 
ued. “They were both armed. 
Things were happening over whirh 
we had no control" 

“The boys were mining the 
roads,” he said. “If a security offi- 
cer was killed or wounded, the 
army would retaliate — go into 
homes, take people out and kill 
them. They didn't get the boys. The 
people ^affected are the innocent 

^ow” the bishop added, “the 
mmiant groups have to change and 
be satisfied with some sort of an- 
tonomy, which the political parties 
were wanting but couldn't commit 
themselves to because they were 
afraid of the militants.” the bishop 

Perhaps the biggest change is 

that people are wilhng to talk open- 
ly about excesses by insurgents^ 
well as by the army. 

Mr. Murugcsu said at first that 

hebad no problems" with the sep- 
aransu. But then he described Sw 
he had been taken at gunpoint by 
ax members of the Eelam People's 
itevototionaiy Liberal Front, one 

of the five major separatist groups, 

on the ground that he had faSXd 

arraa^i the release of another trad- 
er who was abducted in a business 
dispute. 


While one of Mr. 
sons went on a hunger striEe ati’ 
Hindu temple, joined during ,fe 
day by shop employees, mendt 
went to another separatist Rand,- 
the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Ee»j 
lam, to arrange ms release. ■ ^ 

Mr. Murugesu said that two otfrv 
er traders have been seized ancehisv 
release. As a result, the shop own-' 
ers have established the Jaffna! 
Traders' Union to deal with abduc-v 
lions and robberies by “the boys.“ 
Mr. Murugesu is its president -1'C 
Asked if he had paid money tobc? 
released, he laughed and said he’ 
supported the militants but gaya 
them no money. 

■ “If they need a car, they - 
with a gun and ask for a car, 1 
said. 

— STUART AUEKBAfl®: 
■ Headmaster Is Shin v j 

A school headmaster whO'crgS"* 
nized wicket matches between-*^, 
cunty forces and schools was shot v 
to death in northern Sri Lutes 
Reuters repotted from CoiisD&vV 
quoting government officials. >V'- 
Chdliah Anandarajah, he&d ofv 
Sl John's College in Jaffna, suck 
attacked as he rode his scqoteri 
officials said they suspected * 
ratists m the kffimfr :&»?. 

Ihe guerriBashad warned 1 ; 
headmaster not to go ah 
pkh* for cricket match es «»■ 
^amty forces and stndenfe; 
natch was played but the' 
wa s postponed. 





"r>.V 













I3STERNATI0NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


Page 3- 


1,1 l!p ^ pSoiise Agrees to Accept 
Senate Military Budget 
If Pensions Are Raised 




**» Jn p r(1 




E«Mi.»r r, |fc| J. 


L -"i, United Press tniemaiUmal 

WASHINGTON —The speaker 
. f the House of Representatives, 
Vhomas P. O'Neill Jr., said Thurs- 
day that House budget conferees 
.. would accept the Senate's higher 

’ ^ t d military spending figure if Senate 
negotiators would stop insisting on' 
changes in Social Security retire- 
mem payments. 

j Military spending and cost-of- 

- living increases in pensions have 

- been the two stickiest issues of the 

. ■*' ' deadlocked conference, which 

, I. broke up earlier this week over So- 

- i : -T.Of-.cial Security pending. 

The House froze spending for 
the military while granting a cost- 
a, ^ of-liyuig raise for Social Security 
^'Acipients. The Senate did the op- 
posite, giving an inflation-related 
increase for the Pentagon, bat not 
Social Security. 

"We win accept their figures 
' with regard to defease if they will 
V 1; '*^7 v acce P t our position" chi the cost-of- 
■"* living adjustments, Mr. 0*NdB. a 
Democrat of Massachusetts, said 
-/ ‘‘Tw, of the Senate. 

■ Jf -II' - Healsosaidthaibisideatoin- 

r: -'-,S u ^creaseiheatnountofSocialSecuri- 
ty income subject to tax for people 
*• with high incomes had been 

1 I H’v-j ilu.i. If 1 . hroached earlier in the conference, 

H ■ Itlllf ||i tjiit *pd it was “glossed over quickly” 
' ■ ■ , arnd rejected. 

. ..■ r* J !ra 5 L But the chairman of the Senate 
- : : . 1 • sJ Budget Committee, Pete V. Doroe- 

“ : ' 1 nici. said following a Wednesday 

• •*- - * " - meeting with the Senate Rcpubh- 

' i ' - V y can leader, Robert J. Dole, that he 

■ ^ was studying iL 

. ’ • ' Mr. Dole, of Kansas, warned 

, . ’ • - : 2 ^incv that the House “is goingto have to 

i i. ..... ... come to grips with the Senate pack- 

age” — which would curb Soda! 
Security and other government 
pensions — if compromise is to be 


VT"' 
"yr.-i: 


h ’ftii-i! FaruL. \i. u u > hieved - 

4 T * JV Apnfj; The HouseSenate budget taDts 
• * broke apart Ttiesday when Mr. Do- 

: ' . - - menici, a Republican of New Mcxi- 

.” : f r -:^saidtlatitwas.tisdesstocon- 
isfue until House conferees give up 
their still support of next years 
Soda! Security cost-of-living raise, 
which the Republican -led Senate 
wants to scrap. 

Mr. O’Neill, while saying he 
would not agree to abandon the 
„ .. — ■>: raise next year, suggested that 

" wealthy people could pay tax on 85 

• - -i percent of their Social Security in- 

come. They now pay tax on 50 
percent of it 

i!f norNHhvinoljKi The House and Senate budgets 
nt I M would trim about S56bflbon from 

-• the $220 trillion deficit in ihe 1986 
fiscal year. The Senate's budget 

• ' • ■ is®, t?’«u denied raises is Social SBcari- 

i ^ other govesamoat pension 

■ and benefit programs while ahow- 

... - T4 ing the nnUtary budget to grow at 
n.r the rate of inflation. • 


The Democratic-con trolled 
House did the opposite. 

■ Tax Han Called Costly 

Earlier. Darn'd £ Rosenbaum of 
The New York Times reported from ( 
Washington: 

The Congressional Budget Of- 
fice has reported that President 
Ronald Reagan's tax revision plan 
would cost the government a signif- 
icant A. nv yim of revenue over the 
next 15 years. 

. The findings Wednesday of the 
budget office, a nonpartisan agen- 
cy ihm conducts economic and fis- 
cal anal yses for Congress, are sure 
to provide fuel for people who op- 
pose the administ ration lax plan. 
Bui those who have been following 
the tax debat e in Congress said it 
was much too eariy to predict the 
outcome. 

Mr. Reagan has insisted, and 
most legislators have agreed, that 
any new tax. system be "revenue 
neutral'' When the president sent 
his tax package to Congress last 

month, me ad minis tration submit- 
ted detailed estimatdshowing that 
the plan would generate approxi- 
mately the same amount of money 
over the next five years as the cur- 
rent tax system would. ' 

The budget office analysis is not 
the official congressional assess- 
ment of the effects of the tax plan. 
That is now being prepared by the 
Joint Congressional Committee on 
Taxation and' is expected to be 
published by the: middle of next 
month. Nonedutiess, the report re- 
leased Wednesday is sure to be 
widely studied in Congress because 
it is the first thorough assessment 
of the tax plan performed outside 
the administration. 

The budget office (fid not chal- 
lenge the administration estimates 
of revenues that could be expected 
over five years. But it projected the 
effects of the plan for 15 years, 
instead of just five. In dang so, it 
. found that receipts from corporate 
taxes, as a portion of the gross 
national product, would drop from 
1990 to 2000 as some provisions. . 
especially the depredation rules, 
wereja hased in and others were 

“The longer-run revenue poten- 
tial of the system as a share of GNP 
is likely to be much less than would 
be shown by a simple extrapolation 
of five-year revenue estimates to 
future years," the budget office de- 
clared. 

Representative Dim Rostenkow- 
ski. diainnan of the House Ways 
and Means Committee, said that 
the figures “cast doubt on the bal- 
ance of the president’s plan." Bui 
the Illinois Democrat added that 
furtherstody was needed before he 
could reach a final assessment. 



For U.S. Democrats, 'Bland Is Beautiful 9 ’ 


* *&**-.: ■■ ' 

The AuuuuuJ tai 

An FBI surveillance photo taken Sept 13, 1984, shows 
Richard Miller with Svedana Ogorodnikov in California. 


By David S. Broder 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Worried 
that any misstep would cost them 
heavy political damage, leaders of 
the Democratic Party have -chosen 
a course of conscious invisibility 
for the time bring, while searching 

^VEVSANALYaS 

for clues to the path back to power. 

Under their new chairman. Patti 
G. Kirk Jr., the state chairmen and 
members erf the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee went through 
three days of meetings this week 
and never raised their voices. ' 

“This body is morally, spiritually 
arid intellectually dead,” said Rich- 
ard M. Roster, a veteran member 
of the conmtiilee, said Wednesday. 
“It's just lying here like a piece of 
hamburger on the griddle." 

That is an overstatement, but the 
most striking aspect of the session 
was the deliberate effort by almost 
everyone to obey Mr. Kirk’s com- 
mand to lower the decibel level on 
such perennial points Of dispute as 
party rules, policy statements and 
the status of rival constituency cau- 
cus groups. 

Fra 1985 Democrats, who are 
opening their sessions with prayers 
and patriotic songs, (be motto 
seems to be “Bland Is Beautiful" 

After watching Mr. Kirk push 
through a move to abolish the 
scheduled 1986 midterm conven- 
tion over objections of some liberal 
activists, John C White, who was 
party chairman during a troubled 
period from 1978 to 1981, said, “If 
I had tried io do that, we would 
have had armed guards in here." 

Mr. While, a Texas moderate al- 
lied to former President Jimmy 
Carter, said that Mr. Kirk, a former 


House Votes to Let Pentagon Senate Unit 
Use lie Detectors on 4 Million Rejects Key 

Reagan Aide 


ix ...ittf- » 'V' 


r-r v "> " 







(Continued from Page I) 
sanative Jack Bracks, Democrat of 
Texas. It would have continued die 
test program for another year. The 
Senate version of the authorization 
bill favored that approach. 

“There is no scientific basis for 
relying on the polygraph as a valid 
indicator of veracity," Mr. Brooks 
said, warning that innocent persons 
might be denied jobs, while spies 
possibly would slg) through unde- 
tected. 

’‘Hysteria to do something 
should not overwhelm our sound 
judgment,” he said. 

The Pentagon has stepped up use 
of polygraphs for various purposes, 
such as uncovering sources of raws 
leaks and conducting criminal in- 
vestigations. It haslieen pushing 
for several years unise lie detector 
tests to screen applicants or people 
bolding security clearances. 

The Defense Department relies 


1972 Utter ActRenewed 

The Assodmed Pros 

LONDON — Britain’s Parlia- 
ment approved on Thursday an or- 
der extending for six months the 
am that gives London the power to 
directly govern Northern Ireland. 
The act, which first went into effect 
in March 1972, is renewed periodi- 
cally by Parliament. 


almost entirely on background 
cfayts and examination of police 
and other records for routine clear- 
ances pennitting access to low-level 
information classified as confiden- 
tial or secret 

Because of staff shortages, the 
Pentagon’s Defense Investigative 
Service has fallen , at least 14 years 
behind in its assignment of rc- 
ch eelring employees who bold top- 
secret and special-access clear- 
ances. 

■ Soviet Couple Pleads Guilty 
- In Los Angeles, Nikolay and 
Svetlana Ogorodnikov, Soviet im- 
migrants accused of spying, 
reached a bargain with the govern- 
ment and pleaded guilty Wednes- 
day to avoid possible life sentences. 
The Los Angeles Times reported. 

Under the agreement, Mrs. 
Ogorodnikov is to be sentenced to 
18 years. The semenring will crane 
later. 

Her husband, in an unusual re- 
quest asked to be sentenced imme- 
diately, and be got eight years un- 
der the terms of the agreement 

A former agent erf the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, Richard 
W. Miller, accused in the Ogorod- 
nikov case, is to be tried later. The 
Ogprodnikovs were accused of con- 
spiring last year with Mr. Miller 
while he was a counterespionage 
agent. 


Kul.- f 









L«*y» w W i. 

UlDV-lhHl, 

ou*ra, 

Mat black treated ma! 
WTdso'd placed. 

Tax-fim for axpcMt 


i " 

t -r-«* 


PARIS : 76, plnce Vonrfdme ■ 7, bd de >’vi Madefoinc 
70, fg Saint-Honore Palais dat Congros, Porte Maillot 
CANNES. 19, Ln Cfoisorte 


Elias Sarkis Is Dead at 61; 
Former Lebanese President 


United press I Mentation cd 

PARIS — Elias Sarkis, 61. the 
former president of Lebanon, died 
Thursday at his Paris home after a 
long illness, an official at the Leba- 
nese Embassy said. 

Mr. Sarkis, a Maronite Chris- 
tian. was trained as a lawyer. He 
was appointed a judge at the Gov- 
ernment Audit Office in 1953. In 
1962, President Fuad Chehab 
named him director general of the 
president’s office. 

In 1976, at the height oS Leba- 
non’s civil war, he was elected with 
Syrian backing to a six-year presi- 
dential term. The election took 
place in dramatic circumstances, 
with the parliament convening un- 
der heavy shelling and deputies as- 
sociated with leftist and Palestinian 
groups boycotting the voting 

Fighting was so heavy in Beirut 
that Mr. Sarkis had to be sworn in 
outside the capita], in the eastern 
dty of Shtaura, and for the first two 
months of his term he could not get 
to the presidential palace. 

In 1967 he. was appointed gover- 
nor of the Banque du Liban, Leba- 
non's central bonk, where he reor- 
ganized the country's banking 
system after a major bank failure, 
the collapse of the Intra Bank. 

He first ran for the presidency, 
which is traditionally occupied by a 
Maronite Christian, in 1970 but 
lost by rate vote to Suleiman Fran- 
jieh. . 

Mr. Sarkis earned the respect oT 
many Lebanese during his difficult 
term, although critics accused him 
of indedsrveoess. 

He enjoyed good relations with 
the United States throughout his 
term and organized the deploy- 
ment of a multinational peacekeep- 
ing force of U5.. British. French 



- (Continued from Page 1) 
panel to forward the nomination to 
the Senate with no recommenda- 
tion, which would have allowed the 
full Senate to decide the matter. 
That tactic failed on a 9-9 vote. 

Then, in a surprise maneuver, the 
committee voted 8-3 without the 
presence of several Democrats to 
send the n omina tion to the Senate 
floor with an “unfavorable" recom- 
mendation. 

Minutes later, the Democrats re- 
turned, were permitted to cast their 
ballots by Mr. Thurmond and de- 
feated the measure for an “unfa- 
vorable” recommendation toy an- 
other 9-9 tie vote. 

Senator Patrick J. Leahy, a Dem- 
ocrat of* Vermont, said after the 
votes, “I think a person who’s ex- 
hibited a lack of credibility should 
not be" head of the Crvil Rights 
Division, a reference to allegations 
■that Mr. Reynolds had repeatedly 
misled the committee in sworn tes- 
timony. 

Mr. Leahy said that Mr. Reyn- 
olds would add to his problems if 
he ignored the committee's criti- 
cism and intensified his approach 
to civil rights enforcement, which 
has angered dvi] rights groups. Mr. 
Reynolds has opposed so-called af- 
firmative-action programs, under 
which minorities have been given 
preference in some areas of em- 
ployment to reverse the effects of 
years erf discrimination. 

Mr. Specter said he hoped the 
bearings “will prove to have enor- 
mous beaeficia] impact on the ad- 
ministration of toe civil rights 
laws." - 

“What happened today," Mr. 
Specter said, “was a dear indica- 
tion of the intensity of feeling in the 
country on this issue." 

But Senator Alan K. Simpson of 
Wyoming, reflecting the view of 
several Republicans, said that Mr. 
Reynolds had fallen victim to “this 
ritual of getting pecked to death by 
ducks." 

Referring to repeated questions 
about discrepancies in Mr. Reyn- 
olds's testimony, Mr. Simpson said 
that no witness could possibly re- 
call the details of hundreds of cases 
“while some bug-eyed zealots are 
going though the transcript." 

Ralph G. Neas, director of the 
Leadership Conference on Civil 
Rights, called the vote “a big vic- 
tory for civil rights and for fair- 
ness.” 


•.'.V.v-V'- 


V. .•> 

Elias Sarkis 

and Italian troops in Beirut follow- 
ing the Israeli invasion of Lebanon 
tn 1981 

■ Other deaths: 

Fefix Greene, 76. who was one of 
the first Western reporters to visit 
North Vietnam whim he traveled 
there for the San Francisco Chroni- 
cle in the 1960s, or cancer June IS 
in San Francisco. 

WnCam J. Driver, 67, former 
bead of die Veterans Administra- 
tion and the Social Security Ad- 
ministration, Tuesday of kidney 
failure in Washington. . 


FifakJffiMap 


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aide to Senator Edward M. Kenne- 
dy of Massachusetts, “could do 
what 1 couldn’t because he’s goL the 
credentials" with party liberals. 

Since Mr. Kirk’s hard-fought 
ejection in January, he has moved 
methodically to alter the party’s 
image as the willing agent of its 
activist constituencies. 

In addition to fritting the “ mini , 
conventions," he has: 

• Stripped a' variety of demo- 
graphic and ideological groups of 
then- status as officially designated 
Democratic Party caucuses. 

• Denied tire black caucus’s au- 
thority to designate its own choice 
as party vice diainnan. 

• Denounced organized labor’s 
tactic of endorsing a presidential 
candidate before the primary elec- 
tions begin. 

• Defied pressure from women's 
groups for half the seats on a new 
party policy council, thus breach- 
ing -the “equal division" rule for 
which they had battled. 

Mr. Kirk has sent significant sg- 
nals to the South and the West, 
where disaffection from the nation- 
al presidential ticket of Waller F. 
Mondale and Qernldme A. Ferraro 
was sharpest in 1984, that their 
bdp is needed. 

He has named white men from 
Southern and Western states to 
bead two important party commis- 
sions: Donald L. Power, of South 
Carolina, to re-examine nominat- 
ing rules, and Scott M. Matheson, a 
former Utah governor, to devise a 
policy statement for the midterm 

campaign. 

Both panels are under orders 
from Mr. Kirk to -work fast and 
keep controversy to a mintmiim. 

Brian Lunde, Mr. Kirk's execu- 
tive director, said that the commit- 
tee would invest $500,000 in a se- 



Psad G. Kirk Jn, Democratic National Committee chairman. 


ties of in-depth interviews and a 
massive, 6,000-person voter poll, 
seeking themes that Democrats can 
use to regain support. 

Mr. Lunde said that the study 
would be run by Phillip Kotler, a 
marketing expen at Northwestern 
University, because “we're not 
even making the assumption that 
we know what questions to ask 
anymore." 

About 2,000 Evacuated 
During California Blaze 

Los Angeles Times Service 

COACHELLA, California — 
Toxic smoke drove about 2,000 
people from homes and fields here 
and from the nearby towns of Ther- 
mal and Mecca after fire enveloped 
a warehouse packed with 25 tons of 
chemical pesticides and fertilizers. 

More than 130 people were treat- 
ed Wednesday for nausea, eye irri- 
tation and respiratory ailments. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 



• - ‘ r/i t 

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INTERNATIONAL yiF.ll AT .n TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


Page 5 






save 

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n, . . 

Vs., 2 ^ i-'" 

'*> « lu-V - ** * M ° 

■ - v " 


Smith Seen 
Gaining as 
Zimbabwe’s 
Whites Vote 

By Glenn Frankfcl 

i Washington Post Service 

' BULAWAYO, Zimbabwe — 
The s mall white minority of Zim- 
babwe went to the polls Thursday 
amid signs that Ian Smith, the con- 
servative former pome minister, 
was gninfng sutJDOil -from whites 




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:a* tin ;«? 

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■TV. •»•»•• ' 


. w J support i 
**•- ^ troubled by black majt 

Mr. Smith, who has said this wfll 
be his last campaign, has made a 
strong emotional appeal to the 
anxieties and anger of the 32^00 
OiJNfG Rb,, ‘ registered white voters, many of 
Pi >.*** whom resent the Marxist rhetoric 
5>. and variable economic policies of 
~ — Prime Ministet Robert Mugabe’s 
AMsttan. ‘ government. 

^ w* Mr. Smith, 66, was’ the leader 
during 14 years of white minority 
‘ r "”^ rule when the country was known 
as Rhodesia. 

In recent days, he has drawn 
Large enthusiastic crowds in 
ihis southern aty, where he is seek- 
, mg re-election to Parliament, and 
- PARIS jj. in the capital of Harare. . 
CVl46u ^i^ Mr Smith has spoken whb grow- 
' • — ing invective against Mr. Mugabe, 
••Zl»iru who led a black guerrilla struggle 
55{j| against his rale, and against his 
_ T * r 5as-.,i <! moderate white exponents, whom 
''T""'--'* he accuses erf disloyalty for break- 
. . » 5 flg ranks with him in 1982. 

Ifrs main opposition,. the Inde- 
pendent Zimbabwe Group, has 
drawn lackluster crowds, it was 
heckled by a largely pro-Smith an- 
'*• :;'■*$ log dience here Tuesday night 
y_ -J-v* ■ Under a 1979 agreement that 
helped pave the way to black rale, 
*r??* whites havesok conlrolaver20 of 
nvttcjTT^L Zimbabwe’s 100 parHamentaiy 
seats, even th ough they comprise 
less than 2 percent of the popula- 
tion. nm agreement expires in 
-....t 1987, when 70 parimnentary voles 

iMiaSr* will be sufficient to alter or aboBsh 
' the whites-oulyrolL 

"■ ” “ ■ In the dectKmThmsday, whites 

were choosing among the two main 
litkal groups a handful of 
.-dependents. The elections for (he 
remaining 8Q sats/mD take place 

served 37 


..... , who — 

years in Parliament, won all 20 
while seals in the 1980 pre-inde- 
pendence poll hot defections and 
interim by-elections have reduced 
the strength of Ms conservative Al- 

liauce ofZnnbabwe Party to seven 

seats. 

"-MR : A* ^ caiMgn began. Mr- 
- -*•: •< e Smith emphasized a desire to 
-wwTEcrex unite" the white community and to 
• . u » - work with Mr. Mugabe. But in re- 

• •*.**i’. v* \- cent days he has mode pointed at- 
*. . •* 7JZL and his descriptions of the 

• »** ^utc-rulcd past have been more 

... • . •' • . 

' '* Smith received his greatest 



Quarrel Ov< 


Wmm'M 


t/. • . J.-.- 

.x v.Or&t*., 


s:\f 

AP 


Tan Smith 



rrai 

• — >; 


applause 
s '_-;i2. of about 400 


meeting 

Monday night 


" • ' — %JA •» “ 

»*t u r when he said he would not aptw- 


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ter he wbuld not accept black mar 

rarity rale “in a thousand yearn." 

“In Pariimnentyoa mil see white 
members apologizing to their new 
T»1f »rJr masters for the white colonial 
regime,” Mr. Smith told the crowd, 
“it makes me sick to my stomach." 

He contended that Mr. Mu- 
gabe’s “Ccammnust” regime had 
Sowed schools, health care, law 
and older and the economy to dete- 
riorate and was “doing damag e to 
our country” by advocating a one- 
party stale. 

He. said countries such as the 
United States“are rick and tired of 
.having insult and abuse hurled at 
tUn one.day, and the next the 
begging bowl putin front of them” 
by Mr. Mnctid’s nooaligned goy- 
exnment- Zimbabwe’s biggest aid 
donors are the United States and 
Britain. 

More than half of the white pop- 
ulation has left Zimbabwe since 
independence, leaving about 
100,000, Mr. Smith called the 
“brain drain” of ritiDed white 
“this oountxy’S' biggest problem.” 
The crowd, which was a l white and 
generally over age 40, was hushed 
and respectful 

Tuesday night’s audience of 
about 100 at the rally jeered Mr. 
Smith’s opponent, Paddy Shidds, a 
veteran member . of ■ Pariiamenl 
who said that the former prime 
minister was “a man with a prob- 
lem for every solution” who led a 
party of “moaners and groanera” 
and practiced poBdes of “eternal 
confrontation." 

The crowd also bedded William 
Irvine, leader of the Independents 
and once a member of Mir. Smith’s 
cabinet, who called his former lead- 
er “a spent force” who was “totally 
destructive.” 

Mr. Irvine accused Mr. Smith of 

lyin g and wwOTprB^witmgtiielnde- 

pendents’ ocritkms on several is- 
sues, including the ouejuirty state, 
which Mr. Irvine said they also 
opposed. 


By Iain Guest 

International Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Bureaucratic in- 
fighting is jeopardizing a new Uml- 
ed Nations organization estab- 
lished to deal with emergency 
famine relief, according to diplo- 
mats and UN officials. 

They fear that (he squabble 
could ffamapp the credibility of the 
United Nations and threaten its 
rdkf efforts. 

Edouard Saouma, the director 

general of the UN’s Food and Agri- 
culture Organization, has strongly 
protested a derision by the newly 
established UN Office for Emer- 
gency Operations in Africa to pur- 
chase seed, for Chad, which is suf- 
fering freon a fanrnia. 

The protest was contained in a 
cable sent June 5 to the office’s 
director, Bradford Morse, com- 
plaining that the purchase of the 
seed encroached on the older agen- 
cy's responsibilities. 

Diplomats here portrayed Mr. 
Saouma’s cable as the first indica- 
tion of serious rivalry within the 
UN system since the African office 
was established Dec. 17 to coordi- 
nate UN aid to 20 stricken nations. 

They also described it as symp- 
tomatic of the resistance that Mr. 
Morse is encountering from UN 



attempting to carve out a separate 
identity for the new or ganiza ti o n 
within the UN system. . 

Mr. Saouma’s protest stemmed 
from a decision by the Dutch gov- 
ernment to allocate 250,000 guil- 
ders (about S7I.000) to the FAO 
for the purchase of 125 5 tons of 
rice seed, for Chad. About 22 mil- 
lion people are affected by a 
drought m the country, but only 1.2 
mini fin are said to be receiving as- 
sistance. 

Following a request from Mr. 
Morse, the funds were diverted to 



ILO Proposal Puts Onus 
On Mnltmational Firms 

Reutm multinat ional companies responri- 

- GENEVA — -The International bie far their subsidiaries and for 
Labor Organization ended Thurs- ensuring that international safety 
"day a three-week annual assembly standards are observed. 

■devoted Largely to preventing in- Employers from 26 countries, in - } 
dustrial accidents such as the gas ceding the United States and West 
leak last year that killed oeore than European nations, said that the rcs- 
2,000 people in Bhopal India. ohition placed too much e mphasis 
■ But a resolution passe d by the on the responsibility of multina- 
juscmbly that listed measures to tkmals. 
improve safety in plants using dan- The employers said that interna- 
<^kxis substances and processes tkraal standards should apply with- 
provoked a split between employer ^ (jjsdnction to aH^campaiues, 
delegates and other representatives wither or not they were multina- 
of the 150-nation UN agency. rinml. 


i UK irfw-jMw. — ■ agency. _ 
The resolution proposed making 


in” « 


Swiss Pmstitute 
WinsAppeal 
For Disability 

The Amdated Pros 

LAUSANNE, Switzerland 
— The Swiss Supreme Court 
- .. . has ruled that a prostitute tem- 

' . | [Wrarily disabled by an auto- 

if Mobile acrident can riaimdam- 




•V;-? 

% -c& 


..re”' 


ages for loss of earnings. 

The prostit u te, whose name 
was not given, had been unable 
to work for two years following 
the accident Before that she 
said, she earned 12,000 Swiss 
francs ($4,705) a month. 

The driver's insurance com- 
pany, arguing that the prosti- 
tute’s work was immoral bad 
refused to pay compensation. 
Lower courts had ruled in favor 
■ of the company. 

The Supreme Court, in a rul- 
ing published 'Wednesday, said 
ihni. while the woman’s work 
was immoral it was not illegal 
She most be compensated for 
any prayed loss of earning, the 

said. 


tional 

Francis Blanchard, the ILO’s or- 
ganization’s director-general, de- 
scribed the resohmem as the re- 
sponse to a plea by Prime Ministcx 
pajiv Gandhi of India; In an ad- 
dress to the conference last week, 
(he prime minister urged that mul- 
tinationals be subject to a well-do- 
fined code erf conduct . 

Mr. Gandhi cited the Bhopal di- 
saster, which occurred at a pesti- 
cide plaat owned by a subsidiary of 
the American-owned Union Car- 
bide Carp. 

In another move to safeguard 
workers* health, delegates dis- 
cussed new draft standards to pro- 
tect employees exposed to risk 
through contact with asbestos, 
which can cause crippling and 
snmetwnes fatal long diseases 

The conference was notably free 
erf political polemics, although So- 
viet bloc countries repealed asser- 
tions that the ILO’s structure and 
procedures were out of date and 
a gninti coamumist und de- 
veloping countries. . 

A draft resolution sqbmitied by 
Moscow and its allies, calling for 
an overhaul of rite ILO’s watchdog 
system for checking allied labor 
abases and other breaches of con- 
ventions, failed to win sufficient 
badring to be considered for the 
second successive year. 


Edouard Saouma 


the Office for Emagency Opera- 
tions, whose officials have since 
purchased the seeds. 

Mr. protested in Ms ca- 

ble fh »t this should have been done 
by bis agency, which is the special-, 
feed UN body that handles agricul- 
ture. The fact that the FAO was 
bypassed, he continued, indicate 
that the new office is as s u m ing an 
“operational” role. 

“This was not my understanding 
of whai OEOA was sunoosed to be 


or do," the cable said, “and I trust 
that this is not in fact what is in- 
tended for the future." 

One UN official in Geneva said 


that the impression of interagency 
squabbling would be “extremely 
damaging” to the UN’s credibility' 
aia tune when 17.7 million people 
are estimated to be still at risk from 
famine in f-hari, Ethiopia, Mall 
Mozambique, Niger and Sudan. 

The distribution of relief sup- 
plies has been hampered in Sudan 
and Ethiopia by heavy rains, fl 
shortage of trades, and other logis- 
tical bottlenecks. 

At the same time, diplomats and 
UN officials in Geneva also said 
that the disagreement over Chad 
Shistrated the larger problems fac- 
ing, the UN emergency operation. 

These, they said, lie in de finin g 
its mandate dearly, establishing a 
separate identity at a time of no 
growth in the UN budget and per- 
suading donors to continue provid- 
ing emergency assistance. 

UN officials agreed that the de- 
livery of seed lo Chad was dearly a 
form of emergency aid and thus 
within the scope of Mr. Morse's 
operation. At foe same time; they 
said, it also fits the FAO's long- 
term aim of trying to increase food 
production in Africa. 

Officials also said that they had 
detected a tendency for Mr. 
Morse’s office to dramatize the Af- 
rican emergency, whereas FAO of- 
ficials are presenting it as a prob- 
lem of development and pan of the 
perennial cycle of famine and 
drought that has affected much of 
the continent for several years. 

. They noted that the emergency 
office stQl considered 18 African 
countries" to be affected by the cri- 
sis. According to the FAO, howev- 
er, Tanzania, Zambia, Burundi and 
Rwanda all have had sufficiently 
good harvests to be considered out 
of danger. This leaves 14 nations 
still affected, according to the 
FAO. 


Mr. Morse also is reported to be 
f*ran;» reastance from Western aid 
donors wbo have insisted on stabil- 
ity in the UN budget. Earlier tins 
year he appealed for 5100 million 
to cover the costs of his office. So 
far only New Zealand has offered 
funds. 

On March 11 Mr. Morse s office 
sponsored a meeting in Geneva at 
which donors pledged S566 million 
for the African emergency — 51.2 
billi on short of the office’s target- 

Mr. Morse approached Western 
donors with a proposal to hold a 
follow-up meeting m Paris on May 
22, but he reportedly was told that 
this would be unnecessary. 

The donors also turned down a 
proposal to bold a ministerial facet- 
ing in Geneva on June n.JJtplo- 
patg $aid that an “informal meet- 
ing between Mr. Morse and 
Western governments was sched- 
uled for mid-July in Geneva. 


Agca Refuses to Appear 
At Conspiracy Trial 

The Associat'd Pros 

ROME — Ali Agca refused to 
testify Thursday at the trial of sev- 
en men be has accused of plotting 
to kill Pope John Paul 11. 

The 27-year-old Turk, who pre- 
viously was convicted of shooting 
the pope, did not show up. as is his 
right, and wrote the court from his 
prison cell that he wanted to “think 
about” whether to continue testify- 
ing. 

The indictments brought against 
three Bulgarians and four Turks for 
complicity in the shooting May 13, 
1981, were largely based on Mr. 
Agca's statements to investigators. 
Although he is the state’s principal 
witness, be is also a defendant 


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Page 6 


FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


I 


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INTERNATIONAL 

P*Wiafaed M Hw Nn» York Tmo sad TTic Yahu^ion Post 


(tribune. 


Credibility, Too, Is Taxed 


Tbe KeagaQ administration, when it sent its 
tax reform plan to Congress last month, called 
the measure revenue-neutral: It would raise as 
muchby canceling tax preferences as it would 
lose by lowering rates. Now we are told that 
the Treasury has suddenly found that the plan 
would lose from $9 b illion to SIS b illio n a vear. 
in 1983 dollars, if it took full effect 

The administration also nurtured the im- 
pression that typical f amili es would gain from 
its plan, and that the losers would mostly be 
schemers. It said that the burden on most 
individual taxpayers would fall while the bur- 
den on businesses would rise; that amo ng 
individuals, winners would vastly outnumber 
losers (three-fifths would win. one-fifth break 
even, one-fifth lose); and that Lbe winners 
would be found in all income classes. The 
president called his plan pro-family. The Trea- 
sury later presented data showing that middle- 
income families, in particular, would gain. 

Yet now it turns out these statistics apply 
only to those middle-income families with one 
earner, and most such families have two. The 
two-earner families would lose, the Treasury 
confesses. It is said that (he administration 
may rewrite parts of the plan to correct this. 

It is hard to believe the administration did 


not understand the bask fiscal and distribu- 
tional contours of its plan — how much would 
be raised, who would pay — before submitting 
it to Congress. We believe that it has been 
improvising, and there are other examples. 

The figures it has published make the busi- 
ness tax increase look larger than it would be. 
and the tax cut for those in the very highest 
income brackets smaller. The business figures 
do not make full allowance for the transition 
rules that Congress almost always includes in 
major tax bills to blend new provisions into the 
economy: because they defer effective dates, 
these rules cost revenue. The business figures, 
moreover, also run only through 1990. A major 
tax-reducing provision for business, allowing 
depreciation write-offs to rise with inflation, 
would not take appreciable effect for several 
years after that. The result? No one knows 
whal business taxes eventually would be. 

The administration is entitled to sell its tax 
plan as hard as it can. But it is losing credibil- 
ity by the way it is doing so. In a way it is also 
diminishing the debate. The tax plan reaches 
to every comer of the economy; i t is not a used 
car. Congress needs to be told honestly where 
it does not work, as well as where it does. 

— THE WASH IN CTOS POST. 


Closing Money Laundries 


U.S. banks and law enforcement agencies 
are finally moving against money-laundering 
— the disguising of illegally earned cash. Until 
recently, too many bank tellers did not even 
twitch when brought bags of limp $20 bills and 
asked for large cashiers checks. Banks are 
supposed lo report suspicious cash but mosL 
are just starting to comply. Federal agents, 
spurred by Congress and the president’s Com- 
mission on Organized Crime, are at last coor- 
dinating with banks and taking action. 

Now the Justice Department proposes to 
make money-laundering a crime. It is a neces- 
sary step. Bank reports can help to expose drug 
and gambling operations. But the law does not 
clearly reach the underlying rice of accepting 
and legitimizing cash from such activities. 

The Reagan administration's bill aims not 
just at h anks but at any channel used to 
convert hot currency'. It seeks to punish mob 
financiers and to stimulate financial institu- 
tions to help catch them. The bill aims in all 
the right directions. Now Congress must de- 
ride whether it sweeps too broadly. 

One apparent excess is the bill's attempt to 


catch third and fourth parties in its net. The 
bill would mate it a crime not only to wash 
illicit money but also knowingly to use it in 
any transaction. That could implicate anyone 
who takes a mobster's money. It could punish 
someone who knowingly deals with a launder- 
er — or who acts “with reckless disregard*' of 
some money's illicit source. Would that punish 
a car dealer or real estate broker Tor a careless 
transaction? If so. the bill goes too far. 

Quite properly, the bill would encourage 
bank employees' to report any suspicion of 
laundering by protecting them from suit if 
their suspicions are false. It would also permit 
taking bank records to the authorities without 
an official request or court order. Left unclear 
is what becomes of such records if they never 
lead to prosecution. Could intelligence agen- 
cies share and store them without restrictions? 
Again, Congress had better spdl things out. 

The proposed law looks like a creative step 
to pursue hoodlums through their legitimate 
and illicit bankers. It deserves careful study 
both for its strengths and potential dangers. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Plutonium — Ho Hum 


Whenever plutonium is bought sold and 
shipped from one country to another, that is 
grounds for concern. Switzerland had earlier 
sent some spent fuel from a nuclear reactor to 
France for reprocessing and now wishes to 
bring the separated plutonium bade for use in 
its own nuclear program. Because the fuel 
originally came from the United States, the 
Swiss need U.S. approval to more it The point 
is not that the Swiss are proposing anything 
unusual, but precisely the opposite — these 
shipments are becoming common, and Ameri- 
can approval seems routine. It ought not be. 

Plutonium is highly toxic, and, of course, 
nuclear weapons can be made with iL There is 
quite a lot of it around, mostly in the hands of 
the five countries that maintain nuclear armor- 
ies. But at least their weapons are under mili- 
tary control. The movement of plutonium into 
the civilian economy as a fuel raises other 
kinds of anxiety. The more widely the stuff is 
dispersed among civilian power stations and 
laboratories, moving along the highways and 
rails, the greater become the chances of loss, 
theft, mishandling and misuse. In the absence 
of any compelling reason to expand the trade 
in plutonium, there is a pretty strong argument 
for keeping it out of circulation. 

Switzerland has no nuclear weapons, nor 
any intention of developing them. Its interest 
in plutonium is solely in its potential for gener- 


ating electricity. But it is not really the power 
supply that is in question here. The early 
promise of the breeder reactor has faded, and 
only the breeder requires plutonium fueL Ex- 
perience shows the breeder reactor to be enor- 
mously costly and utterly uneconomical. 

Why do governments spend large amounts 
of money to pursue research on the breeder, as 
Switzerland will do with this plutonium? Per- 
haps because it is a way of asserting a country’s 
command of nuclear’ technology in general 
Switzerland is 3 major producer of nuclear 
equipment and, unfortunately, it has not al- 
ways been careful about its customers. Within 
the past decade the Swiss have sold equipment 
to Pakistan that may be useful to that country 
in its attempts to build weapons. 

A standard nuclear power reactor, using 
uranium as fuel, does not have large implica- 
tions for the proliferation of nuclear weapons. 
The fuel will not make bombs. But when a 
reactor uses plutonium, the wall between nu- 
clear power and nuclear weapons becomes 
frail and porous. That is why, in a world that 
has plenty of uranium, it is unwise for govern- 
ments to mess around with plutonium fuels. It 
would be equally unwise of the United States 
to get into the habit of approving these inter- 
national transfers of plutonium with nothing 
more than a nod and a shrug, 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 

Hie UN’s Unseen Successes 


The United Nations celebrated [this week] 
the 40tb anniversary of the signing of its Char- 
ter in San Francisco. It is a good time to 
wonder about the role the UN has played. It 
was founded with less naive optimism than the 
League of Nations, but does it not share the 
same illusion? And is it not stricken with 
the same inability to prevent conflicts? 

But it would be unjust to consider only the 


organization's failures. Successes are harder to 
enumerate: How can we count the wars that, 
thanks to the LIN, did not break out? Security 
Council meetings, however virulent, have the 
effect of a safety valve. The blue-helmeted 
soldiers of UN interim forces have often sepa- 
rated warring factions. And a new style of 
diplomacy has developed. The 19th century 
was that of nationalities. The 20th will be that 
of international organizations. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


FROM OUR JUNE 28 PAGES, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 

1935: CxMiceraOv^ Japanese Imports 
PARIS — Americans are not as efficient as 
they were twenty-five years ago, according to 
Eliot Wadsworth, former Assistant Secretary 
of the Treasury and President of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, who addressed the 
American Club in Paris [on June 27]. “There is 
one problem,” Mr. Wadsworth said, “that has 
been preoccupying us very much in America: 
the competition with Japan. We are receiving 
more and more imports from Japan at very 
cheap prices. There is a great deal of talk about 
the possibilities to which that competition 
might lead. Meanwhile, our plants are a little 
bit out of date. We don't want to work very 
hard; we don't wanl to be disciplined, and in 
general we are not as efficient as we were 
twenty-five years ago. The international trade 
situation is verv much like war." 


1910: Two New Stare in the U .S. Flag 
NEW YORK — With the admission of Arizo- 
na and New Mexico into the Union there are 
no territories left except Alaska and Hawaii 
The two new States are spacious in area but the 
population of both is sparse. They will have a 
combined papulation of less than 400,000 — 
somewhat less than that of Buffalo and one- 
twelfth the population of our own city. Under 
the Constitution each of these States will have 
two U.S. Senators — as many as the Empire 
State, with its population of 9,000,000. This 
disproportionate preponderance in potential 
legislation affecting the whole country has 
been one of the strongest arguments against 
admitting these territories. Paucity of popula- 
tion, however, is a defect that time will cure, 
and meanwhile it is gratifying to know that we 
shall have two more stars in the flag. 


international herald tribune 

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Negotiating With Terrorists Can Make Sense 


N EW YORK — On Jan. 23. 

1968. the North Koreans 
seized the Pueblo, a U.S. electronic 
intelligence ship, killing one crew- 
man and capturing 82 others. The 
prisoners were cruelly treated and 
subjected to trial as criminals. The 
Johnson administration worked 
hard behind the scenes for their 
release. It took 1 1 months. 

During those II months, life 
went on much as usual in the Unit- 
ed States. “Every day that passed 
during those II months,’’ Lyndon 
Johnson later wrote, “the plight of 
those men obsessed and haunted 
me." But be did not permit their 
plight to obsess his government. He 
instructed his administration to 
play down the incident. There was 
no "Day One . . . Day 30 . . . Day 
300" on television. He did not ex- 


By Arthur Schlesiuger Jr 

ploit the prisoners for domestic 


government's capacity to think and 

act. The government itself will be- 


pioit me prisoners cor domestic po- 
litical advantage. Nor did he allow 
ibe government to become itself a 
North Korean prisoner. 

Eleven years later, when the Ira- 
nians seized 61 Americans, Jimmy 
Carter, tike Lyndon Johnson, felt 
personally involved. “The safety 
and well-being of the American 
hostages became a constant concern 
for me. no matter what other duties 
I was performing as president,” he 
wrote. But. unlik e Mr. Johnson, he 
permitted the hostages to become 
the constant concern of his whole 
administration. He played up the 
crisis, and TV cooperated. AU this 
greatly satisfied the Iranians. He 
used the hostages in his campaign 
for renomination. He allowed their 


plight to dominate his last year as 
president and, in effect, made the 
government itself hostage to Iran. 

The Ir anian episode gave the me- 
dia the habit of playing up hostage 
crises. This was not a problem for 
Mr. Johnson in 1968. After Iran, it 
is an inescapable problem. However 
much some may deplore the avidity 
of the media, and however mum 
media attention gratifies terrorists, 
the First Amendment Forbids the 
government to do anything about it. 

As the media glare intensifies and 
the crisis protracts, the plight of the 
TWA hostages will increasingly ob- 
sess and haunt the Reagan adminis- 
tration. Its ability to address other 
issues will wither. The terrorists will 
have cast a malign spdl over the 


Nations Have Added to the Anarchy 


By Henry Steele Commager 


A MHERST, Massachusetts — Nothing can justify 
the terrorism practiced by the Shiites, the Irani- 
ans, the Pales tinians and other desperate groups who 
wage war on innocent victims. But then what can 
justify terrorism as introduced and practiced by most 
of the great powers whenever it served their ends over 
the past century or so? 

For whal is terrorism but resort to deadly violence 
against random and inno cent victims, and shattering 
the fabric of society with dynamite and fire! 

What is most sobering is that all the Old World 
nations practiced interim tient. terrorism throughout 
the 19th century: the British in India, the Belgians in 
the Congo, the Russians and Poles against their own 
Jews, the Turks against Armenians. 

Americans, too, must confess their own history of 
terrorism against those they feared or hated or regard- 
ed as “lesser breeds." Thus, the extermination of the 
Pequot In dians as early as 1637; the Sand Creek 
massacre of 300 Cheyenne women and children in 1864 
— and this after the tribe had surrendered; the atroc- 
ities against Filipinos struggling for independence at 
the beginning of this century; the 1969 massacre of 430 
Vietnamese women, children and old men at My Lai. 

The formal rationalization — we might almost say 
legitimization — of terrorism came with World War u 
when all the major participants abandoned “precision" 
bombing, directed against the military, for saturation 
bombing directed against civilians. It was a policy that 
eventually took the lives of milli ons of women and 


children in London, Coventry, Hamburg, Berlin, Dres- 
den, Warsaw, Moscow, Tokyo and scores of other 
“open cities." The climax of all this was the Holocaust 
in Germany and. in 1 945, the fateful use of the atomic 
bomb at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

By the Vietnam War, terrorism was so taken for 
granted that it almost ceased to excite comment. The 
Vietnamese practiced it in the traditional form of 
jungle warfare. Americans practiced it more systemati- 
cally by pouring seven milli on tons of bombs on 
Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos (with none of which 


i great powers 
terrorism for granted, they should not be surprised 
when desperate fanatics, unable to wage traditional or 
“legitimate" warfare, emulate their boners. 

What Justice Louis D. Brandos said a half century 
agp is now more relevant to the global than to the 
domestic scene: “In a government of laws the existence 
of the government willbe imperiled if it fails to observe 
the law scrupulously. Our government is the potent, 
the omnipotent teacher. For good or 31 it teaches the 
whole people by its example. If government becomes a 
lawbreaker it breeds contempt for law: It invites every 
man to become a law unto hims elf. It invites anarchy. 

What confronts us now is international anarchy. 

The writer, a historian, is professor emeritus ai Amherst 
College. He contributed this to The Hew York Tones. 


come a Shnte __ 

The media glare denies Mr. Rea- 
gan the capacity for behind-the- 
scenes maneuver. The best means in 
his power to save bis administration 
from obsession and paralysis is to 
get the hostages out quickly. If tins 
can be done without visible conces- 
sions, so much the better. If it re- 
quires a public request to Israel to 
release the Shiite prisoners, do it 
ihai way. Bat get the hostages ouL 
We all know the argument 
against this proposal: Negotiation 
now will invite further terrorism. In 
fact, negotiation now docs not ex- 
clude retaliation later. Nor does it 
exclude the abundance of possible 
measures to increase airport securi- 
ty and the safety of air traveL Nor 
does it exdude the mobilization of 
world opinion through the United 
Nations, with a focus on proposals 
for an anti-terrorism cov enan t. 

The anti-negotiation argument 
deserves a more thoughtful exami- 
nation. The argument is that terror- 
ism will continue until terrorists are 
shown that the costs outweigh the 
benefits. This theory of the terror- 
ists as a pack of cost-benefit ana- 
lysts is obviously defective. They 
are not rational men weighing gains 
against losses. They are religious 
fanatics for whom death in a meat 
cause is its own reward. Uke l 9th- 
centnry njhflisls. they believe in the 
philosophy of the deed — the deed 
as an end in itsdf, regardless of 
consequences. Refusal to negotiate 
will not stop terrorism. 

Whal refusal to negotiate is more 
likely to do is to discourage future 
terrorists from bothering to take 
win murder on the 

It is a fallacy to suppose the 

rites to be meticulous bookkeep- 
ers. We must not project rationalist 
Western concepts on alien cultures. 

If this is so, fet us at mice liberate 
both the hostages and the govern- 
ment of the United States. 


The writer, a historian, is professor 
of the humanities at the City Univer- 
sity of New York. He contributed (his 
comment to The New York Times. 


America’s 

Outdated 

Constitution 

By Arthur S. Miller 

W ASHINGTON —The time has 
come for Americans to take a 
hard look at their Constitution. Is it 
up to present and future needs? The 
answer, clearly, is a resounding no. 

Almost 200 years after its drafting, 
serious shortcomings are evident in 
the world's oldest fundamental law. 
Most obvious is how presidents are 
elected. Last year’s electoral cam- 
paign was both an exercise in system- 
atic boredom and a latter-day Roman 
circus. It titillated instead of sti- 
mulating informed discussion. Other 
countries do it better. 

Another shortcoming is the separa- 
tion of powers — which are not sepa- 
rated The Constitution established a 
system of separate institutions shar- 
ing powers — an invitation for battle 
rather than a way to govern efficient- 
ly. No president is able to govern as 
does, for example, Britain's prime 
minister. He must negotiate treaties 
with Congress and interest groups. 
Coherent policy is impossible. 

Another flaw is the soda] patholo- 
gy of factionalism. Special interests 
dominate narrow segments of public 
policy. The overall public or national 
interest is lost in a welter of groups 
pursuing their separate goals. 

Thus Americans have a govern- 
mental system that, as Lard Macau- 
lay said is “all saD and no anchor." 

Factionalism is far from cured 
Yale University's Robert Dahl be- 
lieves that “representatives in mod- 
ern democratic countries find it ex- 
tremely difficult and at limes 
impossible to assert suffident control 
over wayward subsystems to bring 
them under control.'* This means that 
the people “have losL final control 




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over the agenda of public affairs." 

Then there is the defect of federal- 
ism, as it has evolved The United 
States is split politically into SO 
states, but economically it is one huge 
common markeL That makes no con- 
stitutional sense. 

Add the sodal pathology' of na- 
tionalism, which is factionalism writ 
large to encompass the entire world 
The Constitution is largely an instru- 
ment to resolve domestic affairs. 
Those who drafted it did not foresee a 
technologically shrinking planet and 
several terrible vulnerabilities, none 
of which has been adequately con- 
fronted: nuclear war. population 
growth, the gap between rich and 
poor, persistent unemployment, rac- 
ism, sexism, religious prejudice and 
the extinction of spedes. 

The U.S. Constitution, in sum. is 
not up to the needs of the day. 
Changes should be made soon, and 
by design rather than, as in the past, 
by drifL .Ml this suggests the need 
for a new constitutional convention. 


Some fear another convention, be- 
lieving it would be divisive. They 
think the BiB of Rights might be 
abolished and Supreme Court deci- 
sions on such matters as school pray- 
er and abortion reversed . 

That is a counsel of despair. There 
will be constitutional change, and it is 
better to plan it than merely to react 
to what Alexander Hamilton called 
“accident and force." If France could 
write a new constitution, as it did in 
1958, why not the United States!? 

The United States has survived 
and prospered not because of the 
Constitution but in spite of iL As 
Princeton University's Rufus Miles 
said “The extraordinary affluence of 
the United States has been produced 
by a set of fortuitous, nooreplicable. 
and noosustainable factors/ 

The world is far different now from 
that of 1787 when the Constitution 
was written — so different that a new 
structure of government should get 
serious attention. Thought should oe 
given to such matters as these: 


• Finding another way of electing 
the president 

• Moving toward a version of the 
parliamentary system. 

• Splitting the presidency. Ameri- 
ca is the only major nation that has 
the same person as chief of state and 
head of government (This was erne 
reason why it was so hard lo impeach 
Richard Nixon; one senator called 
Im peachmen t “akin to regicide.") 

• Creating 10 to 12 regions oat of 
the present 50 states. 

0 Malting Congress a unicameral 
body of not more than 100 members. 

• “Constitutionalizing" the riant 
corporations, which now, as pri- 
vate" governments, rale as much as 
or more than public government 

All this would be no panacea, but it 
would help. It is time to get on with iL 

The writer, professor emeritus of con- 
stitutional law at George Washington 
University, is preparing a book on consti- 
tutional charge. He contributed this to 
the International Hendd Tribune. 


■The Work; 
My Friends. 
Is Peace’ 


w 


Nakasone as Free-Trader: Just an Act? 


By Hobart Rowen 


T OKYO — Perhaps no one is in a better position 
to assess the tension between the United Stales 
and Japan than Ambassador Mike Mansfield who last 
month completed his eighth year in the post 
Many Japanese I have met here prefer to believe that 
the present difficulties are just another sparring round 
between U.S. and Japanese trade interests. 

Officials such as Makoto Kuroda, director of the 
Ministry of International Trade and Industry’s inter- 
national trade policy bureau, do not take the situation 
lightly, but despair that much can be done about >L 
“The situation is in a sense unreasonably emotional 
and we’re worried about it" Mr. Kuroda said But he 
saw no way lo calm “these mountingfrustrations." 

Mr. Mansfield agreed saying, “This is the most 
serious and difficult period in our relationship" — a 
relationship he called the world's most important 
' Reagan administration officials say Prime Minister 
Yasuhiro Nakasone is doing the best tie can to open the 
Japanese market buL is being frustrated by the bureau- 
cracy. But others close to the process insist that Mr. 
Nakasone “is as good an actor" as Ronald Reagan, 
posing for the Americans as a believer in open markets, 
but failing to demand support from his Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party faction in the DieL 
As one observer noted Mr. Nakasone “can’t afford 
to alienate his rural supporters in the LDP." 

ft seems clear that the highly touted “action pro- 
gram" Mr. Nakasone promised Mr. Reagan will have 
Dmiied results against the huge U.S. iradedeficiL 
Mr. Mansfield does not welcome congressional at- 
tempts to punish Japan. He believes Congress has 
“become mesmerized by that S36-billion trade deficit 
of last year." More attention should be paid he said to 
the global nature of the problem: The 1984 U.S. deficit 
with the world 5123 billion, was almost twice 1983's. 

The latest proposed “cure” for the situation, a 20- 
percent U.S. import surcharge, would be useless. As 
Kazuo Nukazawa, director of the international-affairs 


department of Japan's largest business federation, 
pom ts out a further depredation of the yen against the 
dollar would soon wipe out the effect of the surcharge. 

Mr. Mansfield accepts the view among economists 
here and in the United Stales that as much as two- 
thirds of the problem can be attributed lo the overval- 
ued dollar. And that is the consequence of too loose a 
U.S. fiscal policy and too tight a Japanese fiscal policy. 

Like his friend Kiichi Miyazawa of the ruling Libera] 
Democratic Party here, Mr. Mansfield would like 
to see Japan expand its spending on domestic projects. 

Mr. Miyazawa believes that for all of Japan’s eco- 
nomic might Japanese families lack true prosperity. 
The foremost deficiency is in housing: Japanese brisue 
at Sir Roy Denman's denigrating description of their 
"rabbit hutches," but admit it accurately describes 
many Japanese dwellings. Perhaps less than one-third 
of the homes in Tokyo nave a direct sewer connection. 
Roads are in bad repair. Public park space in Tokyo is 
a pitiful one-twentieth per capita of what is available in, 
Washington. And investing more money at home, Mr. 
Miyazawa believes, would stimulate economic growth, 
attract imports and reduce capital outflows, thus 
strengthening the yen. 

But despite an inflation rate of only about I percent 
the government resists any new fiscal stimulus, citing 
the already large budget defidt 

.Alan Wolff, former deputy trade representative, has 
noted that the United States is on an overconsumption 
binge while Japan underconsumes. “This," he said, “is 
why there is no fundamental solution to U-S. -Japanese 
relations lo be found in any specific list of tariff or 
nontariff barriers to be removed by Japan." 

All this is not to say that Japan — which has been 
opening its market to some extent — should not 
abandon protectionist devices. 

But as one journalist said. “Most Japanese have a 
hard time admitting that we do any thing wrong." 

The Washington Past 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Owen, Not Brooke 


In his opinion column, “Most 
Wars Seem a Good Idea at the Tone” 
(June 14), Wflfiam PfafT attributes 
the lines, “at every jolt . . . comes 
gargling from the froth-corrupted 
lungs, obscene as cancer ..." to Ru- 
pert Brooke. He is wrong on two 
points. The lines are from “Dulcc cl 
Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen,who 
died in the last weeks of fi ghting , in 
World War L And the quote is incor- 
rect It should have read: 

“If in some smothering dreams, 
you too could pace/ Behind the wag- 
on that we flung him in,/ And watdi 
the white eyes writhing in his face,/ 
His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of 
sut/ If you could hear, at every jolt 
the blood/ Come garoHno from the 
froth-corrupted Jungs/ Bitter as the 
cud/ Of vile, incurable sores on inno- 
cent tongues — / My friend, you 

would not tell with such high zest/ To 

children ardent for some desperate 
glory,/ The old lie: Duke et decorum 
estl Pro patria mori." 

Mr. Waff's sentiments are wen 
placed, but be should be a bit more 
attentive to his documentation. 

John m. McMahon. 

Karlsruhe, West Germany. 

Close, but No Sitar 

Regrading “ Gandhi and Reagan: 

The author writes: “India's kmg. 
**“ Union, a* 
na and Pakistan win determine his 
[Rajiv Gandhi s] policy." let me ’ 


point mu that India shares qo^oq- 
tier with the Soviet Union. < 
RAMACHANDRAN NAUL 
Zurich. 

FntUdyAnti-Racist? 

Regarding "Anti-Racism Concert 
Draws 100,000 in Paris ” (June 17): 

I attended part of the concert 
against racism at the Place de la Con- 
corde. The atmosphere was remnris- 
cent of the Woodstock festival and 
the late 1960s; The public came, had 
a good time and returned home. Can 
tteep-seated prqudices be eradicated 
through conceals and songs? 

The f utility of the event, the naive 
araanption that people subjected lo 
different types of disoimmatian and 
intolerance will unite across political 
and national tines in order- torfs* 
ail forms of racism, was hjghfidrted 

out Anti-Zionism.” 

MICHEL FINGERHUT. 

.Paris. 

Rhetoric 

My thanks to Abraham Bmmbcre 
for his succinct analysis: L to* ai 
fed up with overblown far afCom- 
““DKm. I do not have’.THuMs 
about Communist reghha,'* baf/do 
the reality of thetoal aScta- 
tora the United States has installed 
“^“Wwtedin Latin America — 
an somekow justified fay this fa 

RACHEL POOLEY, 
La Rochefle, France, 


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By Janies Reston 

ASHINGTON — It is one of 
, , the many ironies of our time 
thm the nations of the world are c* 
involved in another span of interna- 
tional terrorism on the 40th anniver- 
sary of the signing of the peace char- 
ter of the United Nations. . 

And yet it is not surprising, for 
many of the nations that committed 
themselves to abide by its principles 
and code of conduct — including not 
only the Soviet Union but also the 
Uni Led Stales — have not done so. 
and are now faced with the conse- 
quences of their failure. 

Nobody who was present at the 
creation of the United Nations m San 
Francisco 40 years ago thought the 
organization could solve conflicts be- 
tween major nations that could v_ j 
any resolution against anything they 
did no matter how outrageous. But 
there was at least a hope then that 
these “principal powers" might coop- 
erate to avoid or control events that 
iin y nifp ^ the common security of 
their peoples. Sometimes they did. 

The United States and the Soviet 
Union agreed to stop nuclear test 
explosions in the atmosphere, cm the 
reasonable theory that whatever else 
they thought they could control, they 
could not control the winds, which 
paid no attention to borders and 
might carry nuclear fallout to friejfcd 
as well as fee. ' 

They also signed an agreement 
which they have honored, not to ex- 
port the means of producing nuclear 
weapons to other nations, and prom- 
ised to negotiate a nuclear arms limi- 
tation agreement, which after almost 
a generation they have not honored. 

What they did not imagine at San 
Francisco was how they could con- 
trol what the Russians encourage — 
regional wars of “national liberation” 
— or what they would do about the 
tactics of political or rdigjkus fac- 
tions within states that blow em- 
bassies and airifngrg and threaten the 
security of international commerce. 

Not only modern airliners tail also 
modern cities are vulnerable. Foivx- 
ample, a few determined and kne-wl- 
edgeable saboteurs, crawling through 
the electric bowels of New York, 
could easily paralyze part of the city. 

This may be melodramatic, but we 
have to be careful about this present 
madness. Terrorists have demon- 
stinted that they can get aH the 
bombs they want It is probably be- 
yond their finances to gpt atomic 
weapons, but even if they got atomic 
wastes and du mp e d tlwm into har- 
bors, they couM pm dries at risk. 

What is to be done? The thought 
here is that President Reagan and 
Mikhail Gorbachev, the Sonet lead- 
er, might take rime out to cooperate 
on the conttol of this tenor ana aaru- 
chy, which both of them denornO: If 
Mr. Gorbachev used his influence in 
Syria, and Mr. Reagan appealed to 
Iaad, this immediate crisis could 
probably be settled by the Fourth of 
July — not a bad day for freedom. 

But to do so they would probably 
have to remember their treaty com- 
mitments under the Charter of the 
United Nations, which in die orafo- 
sion and contention of die last 40 
years they have forgotten. 

Actually, (Ik principles and rales 
of conduct for the natures as defined 
in the UN Charter were as dear and 
simple as the American Declaration 
of independence. The Charter just 
said it was a bad idea to use military 
farce to settle political differences, 
and maybe it would be better for 
everyone concerned to stick to the 
rules of the United Nations rather 
than blaming it for their troubles. 

On April 11, 1945, the night before 
he (tied. President Roosevelt drafted 
a speech he hoped to deliver in 
UN Conference in San Francisco? He 
never made il, but the draft at that 
speech has been preserved. 

u Tbc work, my friends,” he wrote 
in his own hand, ts peace. More than 
an end at this war — an end to the 
beginning of aD ware. 

“The only limit to our realization 
of tomorrow will be our doubts of 
today. Let ts move forward with a 
strong and active laith.” 

He died the next morning, secure 
in his faith. Bui the doubts remain. 

The New York Times. 


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FRIDAY, JUIVE 28, 1985 


3faaUOK®rtiranf. 

WEEKEND 


Page 7 


&. _ 


Updating the Salzburg Marionettes With a New Art 


by Alan Levy 


i . 




S 


ALZBURG — Far the first act of 
Offenbach’s “The Tales of Hoff- 
mann,” when Himffm»twT con ju res up 
his recollection of the doll Otympia, 
.she materializes like a genie in a wisp of 
smoke. In the second act, the Venetian dano- 
ers swirl thr ough the mlnmnc of Giulietta’s 
palace. In the third act, the sinister Dr. 
Miracle exits by opening and closing a door, 

jwtrc-enten by walking through the door — 
and, a little later, when Mirade is sitting in a 


■ •'•■SS' :■ 

But 
. . TDOSt 


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' 

““lit t* 

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there is a miraculous switch of identities. 

afaaps the greatest, nrirade is that 
dm performers are a 18 inches to 
t .three feet (46 to 92 centimeters) taD and 
■^J.-made of wood, while some are just laser- 
1 beam projections. For the Salzburg Mario- . 
nette Thaler’s first production at “Half' 
man a," Gunther Schneidcr-Siemssen, 
resident stage designer for the Vienna State 
Opera and the Salzburg Festival, has created 
four holograms for the mnn'mim s stage. ■ 
Holography is not just a new science, but a 

new art D ennis Gabor, a Hungarian-born 
y Briton, won the 1971 Nobel Prize in physics 
Jot discovering the theory of holography in 
.jr.~ „ $11948. At that time, Gabor used mercury- 
’ ’ va P° r lamps, since. the first laser wasn’t boot 

■ ' I960- Today’s holography utilizes inter- 

: -•.£* -j secting laser beams to create a layered “pic- 
jr.’i;. -lure” on a photographic plats. After the 
.jCT/- plate has been developed and shot through 
. . rp -once again by lasers, it will present the three- 
: - diraensioDal image that Sdancider-Stenissen 

^ has sought for nearly a decade, with the help 
erf the Mesamchmrtt wades in Bavaria, toe 
3 ' Holographic Museum in Pnlhezm sear Co- 
C 3 logne, the Light Fantastic team in England, 

- T ‘"'and the Masjachussetts Institute of Tedintrf- 
r.i.y-.ogy. ‘The Tales Of Hoffmann," which 
.'-/T:' -opened without the use of holograms os 
, 3 ‘May 24, wifi premiere with them cm Jnty 28 
~'for the Salzburg Festival. 

"if ■ No matter now well the holographic 
...;P vf Hoffmann” fares, Offenbach win son play 
'! 3 "second fiddle to Mozart in the latter’s native 
city. Four Mozart operas are among the 
’ . "eight in the Salzburg Marionettes’ 1985 rep- 
V" ! ertory. “Mozart," says Gretl Aicher, the the- 
1 -Water’s third-generation director, “is the 



-■ music — i _ 

: Using master ■ 

: r ‘ as their voices, these tiny performers are 
'■ '• adored by many opera lovera who have tired 
~ ■‘■■•of the vagaries of opera with live singers. 
~ ' :: ‘ Which is why, from caster to October and 
■ then again at Christmas time and daring 
Mozart’s birthday week (Ian. 27-Feb. 1, 
- '1986), up to 340 patrons at a time pay 200 to- 
350 schillings (about $930 to 516.25) to sit in 
• “red plush splendor beneath a stnoco ceiling 
' '^^Studded with gilded cherubs and be tnms- 
'- -^>rted to. a world of magic, music and Qhx- 


Schneider-Siemssen 's Act 3 holographic design for “ The Tales of Hoffmann.”’ 


stats as Don Giovanni departs to hell dr 
Tamtnn and Pamina pass through the caves 
erf fire and water armed only with faith and a 
flute. 

As with holography, these are spectacular 
effects, yet often there is more awe, and 
applause, for the small gestures: Leporello 
unfolding, accordion fashion, Don Giovan- 
ni’s list of conquests, or the mini-barber of 
Seville giving Bartoio a shave. Each mario- 
nette comes m two sizes: one for foreground 
scenes, one for background appearances. As 
the critic .Harold C Schonberg once ob- 
served is The New York Times: “It’s the 
damnedest thin g. You forget that mario- 
nettes are on stage: Papageno sweeping lust- 
fully after Papagena and colliding with one 
of the priests is a touch of legitimate humor 
that the opera house cannot give us. Mario- 
nette tenors are more handsome than real- 
life tenors; the girls are prettier than most 
operatic sopranos. The Mage Flute’ realty 
performs magic.” 

T HE company that makes this magic 
started at the local spa in 1913, when 
Anton Aidier, a sculptor and teacher 
who put on private puppet shows for his 
academic &iends, went public with a perfor- 
mance of Mozart’s pastoral opera, “Bastien 
and Bastiezme,” written when the prodigy 
was 11. Subscribing to the dictum of Ger- 
man poet Heinrich von Kletot (1777-1812), 
who wrote, “Grace appears at.its purest in 



Papageno and Papagena in " The Magic Flute. 1 


that human figure which has either an unlim- 
ited awareness or none at all. that is, in a 
jointed doll or in a god,” Aicher turned to 
puppets as the match for Mozart's purity 
and perception. 

That fust night. Aicher 1 s son Hermann, 
th<»n h, manip ulated the magician Colas. 
With piano accompaniment and live singers, 
“Bastien” so thrilled the crowd that it was 
repeated thrice weekly well into the summer. 
That autumn, the Aichers rented a baroque 
had downtown and refurbished it into a 
proper puppet theater. It was home for the 
Salzburg Marionettes for 49 years, until its 
walls were pronounced unsafe. 

The late pianist Wilhelm Backhaus even- 
tually persuaded Salzburg’s conservatory, 
the Mozarteum, to give the marionettes a 
former gambling casino that had come into 
its custody. The municipal, provincial, and 
federal governments contributed toward 
renovating the hall while the Aicher puppe- 
teers themselves built the stage and all its 
supporting technology. 

Hermann Aicher gradually took over from 
his fatha, revitalizing the marionettes — 
who had suffered a decline into Punch-and- 
Judy bouts after World War I — by thrust- 
ing them back into the world of opera. He 
initiated tours in Austria and Europe, then a 
total of 16 American tours. They made the 
marionettes world-famous, but none of this 
was really lucrative while a typical perfor- 


mance required two-dozen live musicians, 
singers, and speakers under the stage. 

After a few disastrous attempts to use 
gramophones instead of singers, Aicher bid- 
ed his tune until tape recordings came along 
shortly after World War II. For the 1951-52 
U. S. winter tour, he engaged a tape techni- 
cian, but was not satisfied with the tone 
quality until the following summer, when a 
radio recording of the Salzburg Festival's 
“Magic Flute” convinced him his company 
could dispense with live musical talent. 

Every puppeteer (there are 14) is assigned 
specific roles, often two or three in one 
opera, as well as a second job: administrator, 
carver, stagehand, etc. For their ballet pro- 
duction, “Nutcracker,” each human worked 
intensively with the choreographer on mas- 
tering just one role. “Ballet is another an.” 
admits Gretl Aidier, who succeeded her fa- 
ther, Hermann, when he died in 1977. 

M ALE puppeteers play only male 
roles, while some of the women can 
do both males and females. Is this 
sexism? Gretl Aicher thinks ool “Men bring 
too much power to the female roles. Male 
marionettes do require more energy, but a 
woman who has that strength tends to have 
more curiosity and con, psychologically. 
think within a male character. After ail 
women have influenced the thinking of men 
for centuries.” To prove her point, that night 
she was Don Giovanni and the next she was 
Count Almaviva and also manipulated Fi- 
garo when he wasn’t on stage with the 
Count. 

Schnader-Siemssen was not a name to be 
reckoned with in 1951 —just a young stage 
designer from Germany doing his first set 
for the Salzburg Landes theater. When the 
marionettes' designer for “The Magic Flute” 
left unexpectedly, he stepped in to do the 
sets a fortnight before the premiere. There 
was such rapport between man and mario- 
nettes that he has been their exclusive de- 
signer ever since — for 28 productions in 34 
years. He rebuilt the stage to put the puppe- 
teers, who used to stand behind the scenery, 
up on an overhead bridge, thus affording the 
settings more depth. He put in a revolving 
stage — and now holography. 

And he sees his holographic “Hoffmann” 
as a stepping stone to “actors one day peo- 
pling seemingly solid rooms and settings that 
are entirely composed of light on stage. The 
progression of this concept from the mario- 
nette theater to the full-sized stage is not a 
physical problem, just a financial one. Can 
you imagine what we could do with the 
phantom ship in The Flying Dutchman’ or 
in ‘Macbeth,’ Banquo's ghost?” 

Salzburger Marionetienthemer, Schwarz - 
strasse 24, A -5024 Salzburg, (el (06621 
72406. ■ 

Alan Levy is a Vienna-based author and 
journalist. 


Sending Out Top-Caliber Musicians 
Into a World of Underemployment 


by Bernard Holland 


- . --Wk "T* EW YORK — Every generation 
'* 1^. I *“* ils handful of grad perfarm- 
I era They appear in equal man- 

- -L N bas regardless of intellectual di- 
-..mate. economic health or the systems of 

• - . ■ education which reared them. 

But at the level just bdow neatness, there 
• has beat big growth since World War DL 
■ . “ Music schools have been ranting out more 
.and better top-caliber musicians — ones 

- •. who can play loader, faster and more accu- 
■ Vtyaiety. who read music with impressive flu- 

-Jncy and move easily from style to style. 
The wrenching question for music edoca- 

- tors — which will have to be dealt with 

- - derisively in the next generation — is what 

promising students arc going to do once they 
. i.' • finish school Concert ana opera life has 
. expanded — especially in the chamber music 
field — but the increased opportunities are 

* nowhere near to matching toe flood of job 
seekers. 

' Only a few conservatory graduates will 
have solo careers; Colbert Artists, the New 
‘ York firm, says it receives three to five re- 
quests for management every week, but took 
on only four new artists Last year. The mar- 
ket for orchestra positions is more competi- 
„ cive than ever; the Oricagn Symphony, 
which has had 11 openings the last year — an 
unusually high number — reports that there 
"Hiere 240 candidates for one second violin 
position and 159 for a viola chair. 

Says Joseph Pofisi, the president of the 
. Juilliard School “A disproportionate nnm- 
' ber of graduates with expectations of a pro- 
fessional career in muse are going out into a 
field which is already fully employed." 

The other problem before the music world 
. — more difficult to grasp yet crucially in 
-. need of solution — is what the struggle for 

- professional success is doing to the art of 
, ; music itself. Whatever makes young players 

, function better seems also to be threatening 
. the spirit of their playing. 

' _ ' Competing for jobs in the musk: business 
. has raised performance levtds significantly, 
but the not-quite-great will continue to find 
' . > that talent and dexterity are not enough — 
> 1 with ambition, stamina and public relations 
'•'-skills in inordinate doses playing just as 

- -^valuable a role. 

■<T Thereto a. fietwrividiy for management, 
“ ■ patronage and publicity and it has in the 

■ .. 'eyes of many had an meet an the mnsio- 

• -making itsdf. The thick Ain that brings 
aspiring virtuosos to prommence is often at 

•'odds with the sensitivity of their subject 
* .matter. 

Among music schools, money pressures 
from every side are forcing a crisis of con- 
. science. Schools need students to survive, 
„ but some institutions are being accused of 
Turing students with hopes for careers and 
’• jobs that do not exist 

Polisi thinks that many of the schools 
’ i\^acking in top faculty, top students and pror- 

- • -«mity to performing centers are going to have 
^ *to stop raising false expectations about their 

■ ability to- produce sucxxssM. musicians in 
.■ . ■* today’s market. There is an argument that 
' ‘ 1 schools shnuM teach and not worry about 

jobs. An Fngfch major may have many Op- 




i-H* 


tions in the future, but music training is so 
specific. We have to take a look al this 
-problem." 

John de Lande. director of the Curtis 
Institute, says that one must accept the fact 
that in every profession, more people are 
going to be trained to reach the top than the 
top can accommodate. “No matter what the 
economic climate, good people are going to 
get jobs. Training is going to have to be 
balanced between solo, chamber music and 
osehestraL Violinists should come to Curtis 
with hopes of being another Heifetz, but 
they shookl have the other training too." 

Robert Freeman, director of the Eastman 
School of Music, thinks that music schools 
are going to have to stop producing special- 
ists — people whose skills are boned to a 
r instrument performing in a partio- 


Competing has raised 
peri pnnance levels, but 
the not-quite-great will 
still find that talent and 
dexterity are not 
enough — with ambi- 
tion, stamina and pub- 
lic relations playing just 
as valuable a role. 


nlqr situation — and start creating more 
broadly trained musicians. 

“In baseball you teach kids skills at an 
early a g^ but you also teach them about the 
game itself the rules and the strategies. 
Children i«hti to play the piano or the bas- 
soon, but they don’t know anything about 
music. It’s interesting that they grow np and 
go to baseball games, but they aren’t inter- 
ested in concerts.” 

Teaching, says Freeman, should farm the 
core of the multiple skills a musician of the 
future will ideally have. Itis the teaching that 
creates the a ^ii-riryx that in turn create the 
opp o r tu nities for players to make a living. 
“Fbr all of Leonard Bernstein’s sldfls — as a 
conductor, composer, pianist — he is at his 
best as a teacher,” says Freeman. 

Job opportunities should continue to grow 
bat probably will not keep up with the musi- 
cian explosion. In the case of wind and brass 
players, with usually only two to three jobs 
per section, the war is fierce. The Pittsburgh 
Symphony advertised fra: a tuba player not 
long and attracted 108 applicants from 
ah over the world. 

L LTHOUGH educational standards for 
the elite and especially talented have 
—become higher, many teachers see a 
general diminishing b: musical basics among 
average students. 

Economic pressures again are being laige- 
tyblamaLTve talked to many colle^ics of 
mine across the country,” says Charles 


Kaufman, president of the Marines College' 
of Music in New York, “and I find a general 
agreement that the level of preparation has 
sapped We are getting young people less 
ready to deal with the rudiments of music — 
key signatures, the ability to sight ring and 
take musical dictation. The leva of perfor- 
mance ability doesn’t seem to be down, but 
people are having more trouble with prob- 
lems of the ear ” 

“When cuts are made in school programs 
across the country,” he continues, “music is 
usually the first to go. Early training in the 
schools is bring disemboweled." 



T HE firid of string playing long a 
wasteland in this country, is, on the 
other hand, in ascendancy. Shirley 
Givens, who leaches young violinists in the 
preparatory division of Juilliard, is im- 
pressed by the enormous number of new 
talents among the very young. Despite the 
proficiency, however, Givens is deeply trou- 
bled by a pervasive lack of imagination in 
the music-making. 

“Thee is intensity, but it’s the wrong 
kind," she says. “Music to very competitive 
now, and everyone feels the way to get that 
edge is to be able to play faster and louder. I 
go to concerts by young players and come 
away thinking, ‘Doesn’t anyone love to play 
the viofin any more? 1 They just seem to beat 
h to death." 

Joseph Rezits of Indiana University 
thinks the Chinese have found the answer. 
“In Ghina, the opportunities are built into 
the system. Young music students are 
screened to choose those suited lor the pro- 
fessional trade. After a four-year training 
period, they are assured of a position as a 
professional. Then the most talented are seat 
on to the conservatory. A pianist settles in a 
community, where he also teaches, plays for 
ballet groups, gymnastic dasses." 

In a world of underemployment, there to 
also the irony of performers threatened by 
too tnn«h success. Orchestra miL«ariaiw J once 
hired fra- pan of a year only, will continue to 
win year-round employment; and through 
thgrr union, they are establishing a firm 
ground from which to resist the potential 
tyranny of conductors and managers. 

a early, more people are going to make a 
living at music only if more people want 
what they have to offer. “It is the business of 
young musicians to create new audiences," 
says Potisi. Ideally, the Chinese model would 
be followed — sending a chosen few to the 
educational elite and preparing the others 
for more practical careers. In a regulated 
society, this kind of wheat-rfrom-chaff pro- 
cess is easier than in a free market — where 
competing fra tuition dollars is a matter of 
survival 

So long as students, abetted by their 
teachers, aim their talent and training al star 
careers and a life in New York, the top levri 
trf the murical wodd wiQ be choked to burst- 
ing, while the lower-tying, less glamorous but 
crucially important areas will tie tmderdevel- 
oped. Schools are going to have to sort out 
what they can and cannot do and start pre- 
paring students fra realistic — though not 

nt-rt-ggar-TTy mig* defy ing — . lives [q music. ■ 
& J9&5 The New York TUwea 


A Midwife to Others’ Talents 


The following is excerpted from an article in The New York Times 
Magazine. - - 

by Michiko Kakutam 

s i 

N EW YORK — Paring back and forth in his cluttered 
office, Joseph Papp lights up a Havana cigar and starts 
reciting some of the Duke’s lines in “Measure fra Mea- 
sure.” Papp is directing a new production of the play — 
which this weekend (June 29-30) kicks off the New York Shake- 
speare Festival's 30th summer season — and hto set and costume 
meeting has soon turned into a one-man exercise in acting. 


Steal 



subject, as he expounds upon hto concept of the play, sandwiching 
hto opinions between puns, lengthy asides on the quality erf sunlight 
in Brooklyn, sexual imagery in “Henry IV," and maybe a few bars 
from "Hallelujah, Tm a Bum" or “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” 

At 64, Papp has the quick, fast movements of someone trained as a 
dancer or basketball player, and one might easily mistake him for an 
actor — so swiftly docs he slip in and out of inqpersonanons, moods 
and poses. U s teni n g to Papp talk is like listening to a Renaissance 
scholar on Benzedrine. 

“Measure" to the 41st production Lhat Papp has staged himself, 
but he to not recognized, mainly, as a director. It to as a producer, a 
midwife to others' talents, that Papp has made his reputation, and his 
influence on the theater consequently remains a highly personal 
affair. 

If the last three decades have diminished neither Popp's energy nor 
his passion for -the theater, they have witnessed remarkable changes: 
The festival has evolved from a provisional acting workshop, boused 
in the basement of a Lower East Side church, into America’s largest 
theatrical arts institution; and as its founder, architect and presiding 
spirit Papp is one of the most influential men in U. S. theater today. 

While he has been assailed for bring too avant-garde, on the one 
hand, too commercial on the other, the festival has developed an 
eclectic agenda over the years — an agenda that has included such 
works as “A Chorus Line." ^Sticks and Bones,” “Hair," 
ammonship Season,” “Short Eyes,” “Marie and Bruce,” 
“Dead End Kids,” “The Pirates of Penzance” and “Plenty." Under 
Papp’s leadership, the festival has revivified classics ana brought 
Shakespeare to toe public; helped bring radical new works into the 
mainstream; given black, Hispanic and Asian - A men ran authors a 
valuable showcase; and provided a model for not-for-profit theaters 
around the country. 

The theater is where Papp lives. He and his fourth wife, Gail 
Memfidd — who to director of play development at the festival — 
have an apartment in die East Village three blocks from the Public 
Theater, the home base of the festival but, with its pressed-wood 
bookshelves and a dining-room table that doubles as a desk, the 
place has a modest, improvised fed. Hto office at the PubliCr cm the 
other hand, possesses all the amenities of home: a fancy stereo 
system, complete with a compact-disc player, framed pictures of 
family and colleagues, souvenirs from trips abroad, as well as a wail 
covered flora to ceiling with awards (including 23 Tonys, 91 Obies, 
and three Pulitzer Prizes). 

“I was talking to these students at Gty College the other day” 
Papp recalls, “and they asked, why did I start all this, and I said I just 
wanted a home.” 


! HE theater, by its very nature, tends to encourage paternal 
relationships — between actor and director, writer and pro- 
ducer — and as head of the Shakespeare Festival Papp to in a 



Joseph Papp. 

of Age in SoHo.” “I'd gone into it feeling ray career was over — but I 
would only have to talk to him for five minutes tofeel an incredible 
input of energy. He was there 24 hours a day — he became a 
colleague, rather than a boss or producer.” 

In a business of intermittent employment, short runs and uncer- 


tain futures, the sense of an ongoing relationship that Papp offers 
' : extremely alluring — especially to writers and actors who are 
just starting out. “It's like a combination of high school summer 


can be < 


theater got his 


looked upon 
girlfriend pri 


pregnant and needed S150 for an abortion. 


Papp was the one he tumid to for help; and when Miguel Pinero, the 
author of “Short Eyes,” was arrested. Papp was the one who went 
down to the police station and bailed him out. “There was a time,” 
recalls one writer, “when anyone was in trouble, Joe would be the 
first person they’d calL” 

When Papp derides he Hkes a particular writer, be not only agrees 
to do his first play, but promises to do his subsequent work as well — 
he makes it clear that he's embracing the writer as an individual not 
merely buying his work. As a result, a rela tion ship frequently 
that is much more intense than any ordinary business or 


camp and famfly." says the composer and playwright Elizabeth 
Swados, the author of “Runaways.’* “Thai’s why so many people fall 
head over beds in love with the place. The problem to that, at some 
point, you also have to grow up and find your own family. My 
personal experience was feeling confused: I wondered what was 
mine, before 1 became so involved in hto incredible charisma. 1 think 
’ at rate time or another has said I have to gel out of 


here, but nearly 85 percent of the people crane back. Joe can be very 
possessive, ana his possessiveness has caused innumerable crackups 
in relationships.” 

Papp, himself, speaks of understanding the problems King Lear 
has with authority and filial affection — “He just wants Cordelia to 
say the right thing,” he says, “and the little batch gives him all tins 
intellectual buH.” But if he expects undivided “caring, loyalty and 
friendship” from tee artists he takes under his wing, Papp says he 
also has problems qictarnrng intimacy with them. 

The playwright David Rabe, who says be benefited from Papp’s 
“real creative insights" on his first play, “The Basic Tr aining of 
Plavio Hummel” observes that with each successive play of his, Papp 
seemed to have “less and less time.” “The Public hnn begun its huge 
rise to prominence," Rabe recalls, “and decisions got nm)g quicker 
and quicker. Ultimately, Joe was overextended — he was doing 
Broadway, Lincoln Center, Shakespeare in the Park and plays at the 
Public. It was too much, and if you’re one of the many events and 
you get shortchanged, ill will develops. In tec beginning, Joe offers a 
kind of haven; and then when you feel you're not getting it, you feel 
betrayed." 


deydops 

artistic affiance. “It was a kind of 
Innaurato, recalling hto experience 


iritual thing,’’ says Albert 
” ' with Papp cm “Coming 



»g' 


you 


theater and have strong 

Continued on page 9 






by Richard Bernstein 


P ARIS — It was horn-handled knives 
that introduced me to the great 
French world of used objects. I 
jraated a set of 12, old ones, prefera- 
bly with heavy-gauge stainless steel blades 
engraved with the name of some long-gone 
iptaiiraat, to go with my silver-plated forks 
and [spoons, which were bought at auction in 
Paris- You don't find ancient ham-handled 
knives m department stores, of course, so the 
search for them took me to the world of 
itinerant fairs and Ilea markets that are a 
kind of national passio n among the French. 

. I went to suburban villages Iflrr Soisy- 
sous-Montmorency north of Paris, I visited 
the rows of antique shops in Bartuzon to the 

south; 1 stopped at the signs for mriquitfa 

and. brocflnie (a term covering any thing that 
is used and not of insurable value) along the 
highways radiating outward from Paris. And 
eventually, what has happened to countless 
others happened to me. I was drawn ineluc- 
tabfy, OEe a pilgrim to Lourdes, to that great 
djOrnam. that Roman Empire of old objects 
and used goods, the mammoth flea market at 
Saint-Ouen, on the northern edge of Paris, 
which is celebrating its 100th year of exis- 
tence tins summer. 

For the record, let it be said that my horn- 
handled knives — ■ and a very nice set they 
are.-- came to light at the Sunday maHcwf at 
Samois-sur- Seine, a picturesque v illage 65 
kilometers (about 40 miles) south of Paris. 
They were lying on a folding table, 12 of 
them for S60, with the words awe 4mx lions 

engraved on the blades. 1 spotted them amid 

a jumble of silver spoons, cordial glacis 
wine decanters, brass candlesticks, gold- 
threaded perfume vials and old postcards 
showing sepia scenes of the Seme-et-Mame 
department. There was an old German bel- 
lows- type camera, an ancient razor and 
shaving bowl, a few empty filigree picture 
frames, sane antique copper coins and 
World War I m ed a ls, an old dentist’s minor 
and other instruments from the stone age of 
tooth repair. Nearby were other objects, the 
most attractive to my eye being various 19th- 
century provincial oak andchenywood ta- 
bles and chests priced to sdL 
You get the idea. There was more to look 
at than old table knives. The flea markets are 
mesmerizing places in the fashion of old 
. m a gazin es and time capsules. They are also, 
not incidentally, a different and fascinating 
variety of tourism, a way of poking axound 
an aspect or eveiyday life, at alternating 
museums and galleries with some elbowing 
of local crowds. Samois-sur-Seine and vil- 
lages like it whet the appetite, which can then 

■best be satisfied just a M*tro ride from the 
center of Paris, at the March* aux Puces at 
.Saint-Ouen. There are nearly 3,000 separate 


stands in seven distinct markets, each with 
its own character. Together, they mnln» op 
what the French mamurin is the largest flea 
marketin the world. 

Even after several months of Innking and 
hoping, neither I nor any of my co-conspira- 
tors in the flea market game has uncovered a 
neglected Delacroix in some dusty comer of 
a Saint-Ouen stall, even though part of the 
market’s celebrity derives from nfirrmfirm etf 
stones of just such fortune-making discover- 
ies. In d eed, while yon can find nice pictures 
them, many of them, in say perhaps jaun- 
diced view, belong to the winf category as 
those bought in the Paris flea by 

Renoir and Manet, who soaped off the rwfo i 
so they could use the canvas underneath. 

The fact is that, despite the grandma’s 
attic atmosphere of the flea nytriwt, jt him; 
become big business. Two years ago a na- 
tioaalized bank bought two erf the maim 
mark ets at Saint-Ouen and leases out the 
stands to individual dealas at about $300 a 
month — not a small sum for a pin***- that 
only opai Saturday, Sunday and Monday. 
In short, the merchants at Saint-Onen are 
specialists. They know what they have. Still, 
prices at Sain t-Ouen are said to be 15 to 20 
percent lower than in the slums in town. 

It must also be said that Samt-Ouen is not 
a beautiful duty-free place. It is a grimy 


Century-Old Flea Market, and Others Like It 


if B* 


-r" . . m vast temton 

partiailany in the area known as 1 
MafiLweatpiles of hluejeans. tin models of 
-the Hind tower encased in rhinestone 
frames, rack after rack of imitation leather 

tabks laden with porodain buddhas 

tram Hong Kong, great piles of old records 
and paperback books and other objects for 
*e sake of which one does not travel to 
Pans, 

Still, there is considerable authenticity to 
the flea market’s generally flea-bitten ap- 
pearance. Certainly it rose from the most 
modest of cucumstances, when in 1885 the 
"SI** 05 and junkmen of Paris were ex- 
pelled beyond the city gales to the mat 

glassy plain of Saint-Ouen near the Porte de 
UwnfncourL There they sold old clothes 
and household goods, some unknown lin- 
guistic genius eventually coming the wonts 
Mnche mx puces, or flea market, as a meta- 
phor for die whole thing 

The exiled junkmen also did a weekend 
business selling to the numerous Parisians 


awing me numerous Parisians 
who passed through the Saint-Ouen plain on 
thox way to play in the fields and woods- 
In those days, and until the 

Und- 1 93fljL dntlM nmv Imiuul « J 



__ - — wuguuua auuj 

as oil ami soap when merchants brought 
them made the dty limits. Buying these 
nems at Samt-Ouen was the early equivalent 
of the airport duty-free shop. 



tfiti. 



rJij' 1 


: 


* - 




W" . ,i .‘I - 

* < r ■ 




fur: 


•>» 


Browsing in the market at Saint-Ouen . 



FTER a century the flea market has, in 
1 “any aspects, gone considerably up- 
scale. Certsmlv it h» omsm C. 


come 


——v 1 * l ) w ii atuni 

\Scb1&. Certainly it has grown and be- 
dwersa, It covers some 75 acres 


die indmdnal markets, a place for gflded 
K^emjy furniture and fine lewdiy, emai-t 
antiqim mood furniture; old silver, bronze- 
framed minors, Limoges porcelain and oth- 
“^^^^OTjgmal’OmerdiaEitsofthe 
Mandie Biron started the enterprise m 1925 
as a kmd of partnership, and it stffl goes 
strong. 


and you will see it The cheaper staff, the 
stand after stand of used clothes and house- 

ham lounae m the outdoor cafes that inter- 


Also along Rne des Roaere one fo lds 

varied mark<^ the hbyrinthme 
M*"=h£ Venunson, with its 300 stalls, the 



TTm NmrYbrfc Ian 


the sellers’ stands. Three-card monte 
«« active at their cardboard box 
trade on the sidewalks. Music blares from 
■“seen loudspeakers. This is the place to 

am» for framed pictures of Ehis Presley or 

Arc de Triomphe T-shirts. J 

A bit beyond, down Rne Marcean, are 
stands of African tribal art. ok! masks and 
woodcamngs. Beyond, Rue des Rosters 
tracts to the atha*. more specialized and, for 
the person seeking real antiques, the most 
mterotmg markets. The March* Biron — 
220 high-quality stands of many exquisite 
objects stretching in two parallel alleys — is 
generally considered the most expensive erf 



V. . : - > — "M i hufc jmca-yaues. 

March£ S^Pette, founded 

bought a sprawling garage in Saint-Onen 
™ carved it up mto rented flea market 
stalls before retiring to Australia. Here is a 
vast and complex worid of old thin** of 
“tbccwmk bird cages and rosewood Chi- 
nese stools, <rf old leather and marble statu- 
ary and minions of other objects from 
around the worid fashioned by the of 
mm m decades and even centimes past 
Again, it is big business. The French nmwg- 
^pers, writing about the 100th anniversary 
the flea market, say that 150,000 people 
gS* e** other there every Sainrdaymd 
Sunday. Some 10,000 people earn thmliving 
m Samt-Ouen’s stalls. The total yearly bua- 


ness at the market, most of whose stalls are 
open from 10 AJ1 to 6 PJ vL, is said to be 
about $120 million, about half of it wwimp 
from foreigners. 

Incidentally, English-speaking visitors 
will get akmg all right in Saint-Onen. Plenty 
of the merchants speak English, and there is 
even a sprinkling of English dealers who 
have set tip shop m Fans. 

, t his were not already a s nffiH«ntK f 

bro ad rivci to drain all of the rivnli-f^ nf ns rd 
products put on the maricet around Paris, 
tiiere are several other flea markets on other 
edges of the city. They were formed there in 
years past when such cotarfufly mnrat 
plaas as the Old Linen Market and the Iron 
Market were poshed out of the dty center. 
There is one at the Porte de Vanves on the 
ronthem edge of the dty, the March* tTA- 
hgrcin the 12th Arrondissement, and anoth- 
er m the southern suburb of Kremlin-Bi- 
cetie. 


■ ** ■. 

of semi-industrial sprawl that gird Parf? 
Stand after of elmhing , L— 

household scpplies, even a few 
genume antiques. 

It’s a crowded place at most times; ' 

..... I r" 



-*Sl 
in ih- 
LuJl 

. .. - 

- 

5E^^:r ■ 

antique-", . 
Ur.d<- { • -v - 
guivi'ui*-.; .. .. 
aieeJ w '■-'*■ 
or three . . i. 

WcU. h“ • ' 

with XI , 


July 25: Clans Peter Flor conductor 
(Hindel, Haydn). 
•Bosendorfer-Saal (tel: 65.66511 

D C/TT i T n w t — — *Z 


Many Puisans swear by the flea market 
m Montrenil, at the eastern edge of the dty. 
It is more casual, mare disorganized, cheap^ 
er, but also mare laden with junk thanthc 
flea maricet at Saint-Ooea. It stretches the 
len gth of s everal football fields just outside 
the Ffcrinhfricme in another of those regions 


a rocuca imrxpj.s at aaint-t juen. m 

— best action at Montrenil is only for the 
very hardy, but finding that action wiSpra 
vide one erf those Parisian experiences that 
take yon far from the centers of tourism. .> •" 
Satu rday at 4 AM. is when the antine 
merchants and brocanteurs of Paris shop for 
their used goods at Montrenil, buying from 
the backs of trucks by the ghmmer orOa&' 
lights. You can go these if you get up early at 
if you go to bed very late. Perhaps afar aft. 
evening at a late-night spot you will 
overcome by an impulse not to sle 
roam about in semxxi of something i 


pj^uh’ " " 

j . 

Bui ; .- 

nuu»r : , ' : " 3 , 

dirrctu'* - -' i-f 
inns . 

from Hp*-’ _ 

jlOu 10 : - 


pH" 


i Jr* "• 


>s >- 


you* too, 

forever, such as a nice set of 
horn-handled knives. 


e I 9&5 Th* Nc*> York Tima 


JULY CALENDAR 


-m»cmioncr-aaai tiei: w.oej) ii. ir j- ■ ■ i»i i v ■ # rusi July .12: Navarro Pncnte-Ierinta mitiim Teatm nii« c^-i. 

VIENNA, Arkadenhof (td: 57 25 RECITALS — Julv 2- Pamda t,,k, <. Wma □ . n _ (flarntneo). on ni Scala (tK' 

52). 1 ' Reach piaw (Bach. Hen ? a,1 T AI1 Stars, chestra, Sr Yehudi Menuhin con- jnJv 7- Joe WilTiiws -n, * n . — _ T •Unesoo (td: 32&2189). Stict M ^ 

$E&3tsf?7& 

tor (Beethoven). July 15: Johanna Picker cefla Mar- July 21: Royal PhOharmonic Or- Dfrty D^Brass Band. ? ^Cb 

POETRY READING — I,.tv a- ,1 * 13: ^ PasqmAfe 


rT . - . . — ■- J^y 15: Johanna Picker cdlo; Mar- Grappelli trio, Paris' R*S ml JuIy 21 : Phflharmonic Or- 

Wfllter con ^™^“‘' fa Pi dc a r -piano CBadi, Debussy). Lounge Lizards, Big Ba nd Mar c * Kstra ’ James Judd conductor. Sir ■'**§» «j«=au, xeu Hinson. Herve.” ' POEArv RPAnfwr ^ » u jury^.o, «, 

Walter Klein, piano (Mozart. Berh- IgylS: Ma^anta Anselmi piano chbuT Yehudi Mdmhin vio&r (Beetho- July 10: Monbasa, Jimmy Owens JulysW O- *T)iscipkSofAnsd’ ■“ Juiy (D°n=et^. 

r«). (Schumann. BrahmsY mv — 1^._. venl Quin let, SalsamaniiL - - . ?7 uw r* 0 f “°°aid RkIul • vKomu* * ™ 

. .. .. julv 11: Stevie RnvVfmffh on TnL. c a on: or, n ^ VdOni 


(Schumann, Brahms). 


Petr Vronsky conductor 
Dvnrdk). 


^ : Mr a SEHffiEW July gfflSSSySS®. -v. TTCATER . 

,r “ MSSSTAifi: 26 ^ ^ A S Drtroit 411 


WEEKEND 


, ujaa “““ 1 8 W-ISM Dream and ReaH- 
Quartet, Shankar-Garharefc group, ty: Tbe greatest names of the Vien- 

^ nesc fin -de- slide." 


July 11: Stevie Ray V; 
Detrc' 

I Stats. 


Md 


■NOLAND 


HOLIDAY & TRAVEL 


FOR THE GOOD TIMES FW 

Self-catering holWavs Hive von the rhsnr** m «Hnv nrHoh, 1 1 


- fle ttin to enjoy Britain 
Go ILK. has a ***-- ' 


Sia 


Self-catering holidays , 

“toady and kdepeiwu^.. w nas a ma. _ 
®^f f -hS“j df ' cate I5S tobilay homes taEmteiMJ. Scotland and 
■ Jgf otter oor •‘Cameo" self-catering pacSgenohday wMch 
ta G?ri K p ^. 3C 5 ogu ^ claa<m days carkre Olfl^ ’penm 

Go UJK, HoOtagtaa. Glewstime, Ross-on-Wye, RerefordsK - UK. 

-■ — Td: W9M8SS - Telex: 3S34I Go UK G.. 


[ 


SHOPPING 


OUR MASTER ARTISANS 
HAVENT LOST THEIR TOUCH SINCE 
THE 18th CENTURY 


BIRMINGHAM, Town Hall (t d : 
236.38.89). 

CONCERTS — CSty of Birmr 
ham Symphony Orchestra — Ju, 
3: Simon Rattle conductor (Haydn, 
Mahler). 

, July 4: Andrew Litton conductor 
(Persian, Gershwin). 

, Jnly 5: Andrew Litton conductor 
(Verdi, Tchaikovsky). 

July 7: Barry Wordsworth conduc- 
tor (Strauss, Offenbach). 

July 10: Sunon Halsey conductor 


(Rosrini, Pucdm). 

Edwards conductor 


■ Gria). 

i Handford con- 


|na worid which is losing te sense of real values, Ifs reassuring 

* ? er 5 b a P 130 ® ,n heart of Paris which keeiK 

up tractions handed down from an age when workmanship 
as an Art in its own rieht. 


was an Art In its own right. 

VRADIS you will thus find 


At the EDmONS PAf 

, J 1 J«u mil Uiua ill lu 

extremely rare pieces such as fine LE TALLEC 
gold-gilded pedestal tables. Fabulous lamps 
with hand -pa in red silk lampshades, SEVRES 
andHERENO pieces and bisque, SAXE and 
CAPO Dl MONTE porcelain collections, 


Juty 12: Manrice 
doctor (Tchaikovsky). 

July 13: Christopher Seaman con- 
ductor (E lgar , A radd). 
CHICHESTER, Theater Festival 
(td: 78.13.12). 

July 3-6, 12, 13, 16, 17, 20: “Antho- 
ny and Cleopatra" (Shakespeare). 



-faiy 5-Aug. 30*1 “David Hockney,” anmamn, 23520) 

retrospective. «WMAHT BALLET — July 11, 14 20 2 fc 

>July 31: “Powers of Photog- rayrftitm Wom« e .• 1 “ Gisd le" (Adolphe Adtunk 1 

a^gnon. FMUV ,™r S"- wagnw ^ 

8624.43). - 


(Id: 20221). “ 13. n, 

1: OPERA — July 25: Taimtalso" JSTS rv-s* 

y Julv 27- “T ’Hr H.i X 


(Wagner). 


t/umnagej. - — . . .. . 

July 26-29: OtSkDuboc Company ™^ NKFURT - Opera (tek2562- AM«mn»na M T 7T 
“Die Heme <f Antenne”.^^ 5»). AMSTERDAM, Concertgebo^ 

July 23-27: Karine Strata Com- 3: Ufiddar < Verdi )- ~ r . : 2-‘ 

pany “Incandescence.’^ 4; “Hoffmanns Erz5hlungca” CONCERTS — July 2: Arastix- 

LYON, Fbnrvifre Roman .Theater „ dmn PMhamionic Orchestia, Mh- 

(tek 841JSI.il). 7 V Rosenk avalicr" (R Tang conductor, Pierre-Alam 

TArrT , — July (5: Keith Wp*t StmiSfl). Vrl« nH»# /ia TS _ 


porcelain or Bohe- 
mian crystal 
chandeliers, a large 
choice of gifts 
such as boxes, 
cases, ashtrays, 
vases, bowls, 
silverware, and 
hundreds of other 
pieces "like they 
used tq make". 



ARTS DE LA DECORATION’S unique pieces can be found xtz 

-J Editions Paradis 

29?yue de Paradis -75010 Paris -TfeL : 523.0534 


July 8-11, 13, 15, 18, 19, 24-27: 
“The PhflanthropisT (Hampton). 
July 29-31: Scari^Smpa- 

neT (Orczy). 

LONDON, Barbican Centre (td: 
628.87.95). 1 

CONCERTS — July 2: London 
V Orchestra, Neville Mar- 
riuer conductor, John Browning pi- 
ano (Verdi, Rachmaninoff). 

Juty 4: Gty of London Shifonia 
Michael Bremner conductor, Patri- 
cia Adkins Qriti mezzo-stxnano 
(Britten, Shostakovkh). 

Jnly 8: London Symphony Orches- 
tra, Gennadi Rozhdestvensky con- 

Hllrtnr /V^ 4 r CliiimiiL.p i?_ 


MONTREUX FESTIVAL 
This Swiss lakeside dty will 
hold its annual jazz and folk 
festival from July 4 to July 20. 

Among tbe many artists and 
groups scheduled are: 

July 5: Working Week and 
Nina Hagen. 

July 7: Kid Creole and the Co- 
conuts. 

July 8: Dallas Jazz Orchestra 
and Randy Weston Big Band. 

July 9: Leonard Cohen. 


July II: Mann Dibango, Hor- 
ace Silver Quintet. 

July 14: Miles Davis. 

July 15: Johnny Otis, Stevie 
Ray Vaughan. 

July 17: Bob James, Lee Riten- 
cwr. 

July 18: Joao Gilberto, Tom Jo- 
bim. 

July J9: Modem Jazz Quartet, 
Woody Shaw, Kenny Drew. 
July 20: Dirty Dozen Brass 
Band. 


JutyHfc Keith Jarrett and Gary For further information tel: 
reacodL 63.71.45. 


Vwodat piano (Mozart, listt, 

x-ciKws. Muiiivn, iianonai i neater Stravmdcy). - 

July 16: Kid Creole and the Coco- (|d j21851X Jtrfy 5: Cbnocrtgebouw Orchestra, 

nuts. OPERA— July 6, 9, 13,17: “Lnlu" An^l Dorftn condnctor, (Betthti- 

Jnly 17: Fats Domino. (Bog). ¥['?)■ • 

July 19: Ray Qtades. *ly 1, 20, 24: “Arabdla" (R. J3 . 1 6: Amsterdam Phflhannonfc 

Movtpvt jxm u , StranssX Orchertia, Arpad Joo condo " 

jss^***^ 

^^and 6: Ivoiy Coast Natkad ' 6: 

July 10-13; Merce Cunningham ^ rl8and21: “ L a T raviata”(Ve r- “Descartes and Ibe NetSidi^ 

^^i:“LcNozzedi Figaro" (Mo- 

July 10: Benny Waters, Fats Domi- July 25: “Macbeth" (VerdiL ' r ^ ^™ 5slra » EEaRtz- 

July 26 and 29: “Nonna” (Bellini) ,^artet with 

**11: Dizzy GN^ Woody ^ 28 and 30: “GinstJ?® 

J^rU: "orking W«i. iw STOTTGAKT, Nafiood !!«, )^g Bud, o»r ftttnta 
^ 1 ?l Faddis - Wl£T — Stuttgart Ballet - rS aL^ 0 C fe ries * 1 * I,, >ny °**> 

£V 4: ^ ^ b.e 

July 15; Miles Davis. July 10 and 11: “Schwanenesee” ROTTERDAM r 

(Cranio, TdnrikovskvL Bo 


. signed 

. COUK 

■ AIM 

] is ho* '•*’ " *' 

thcAvmjv;:: ■ - 1 - / 

nrv Kfii 4 -‘ 
eipft't> : 

^ipsenikt a'- 1 : 

1 from nupv •- 1 ‘ 

stiu J r ' x ‘ Ji * ■ 

24-hiHii -“"n?- .- 
firm< <0 
JohuauiJ < - J 
exoniU'c N‘ A ' ' 
peaxi'ed 'il-l- - * - - 

loma. oftfi-jV. • • 

* TJwjt..-*-' ' 

for euiapi* • s ' 

Europe*;:!*.^ - 

ervation"'..:.-... "■ 

dcri to pfi».r • : ■ 

where in :L* 

\elcv .\fif.lc ■ - 

semrerenu: j- ■ 
^?CHir ci>jr;r .j:.' . • : 
*i*3twvoii:;\;V • 
reservjikU'. ft .. v:..'i g- ■ • .» 
and feurn • , 
parkaigl.>:.tt.\-v-. j - 
lion, the tBi'j! .■ t-.v -.- :■ 

on the fr.c: wj: v: 
your dmtei 

ingthecjr'j ." I 
'chide au.r"c: :: ; 

readuig iau> 
tailed rcoi’ij ;r , 

. Hertz ir:r,x!"..v .... 
directions y. [.•% \ 1 

port in Mj% . 

The idea y , "" : ‘ 

.verbal dira^.,-.* 

*°rs with jmjih : . . " ' - 
(English. Frsr^.i. 

.ton) to etuM; i|* 

?»« for ± e ^ . : 

at A»l S . 

“ropeUsifj;! “ ' ’ ' : 

Youcjnj-.iU 

-Ontain, Danark.^ v . 

^jand, liaj\ l*i- \-. v' '■ 

*'dVy,;p :v‘ 

“to addeu to j*,.. - 

!0hjV: : : . '■! 



SfcfdS®*— • 


-1 ? r °" 



doctor, Oscar Shumsky violin. . . . . 8005 0*°*- 

(Sbostakovich, Brahms). ^ 10, 11, 22, 23: “Henry V” July 13- Johnny Otic "ih™ 

July 13: Royri Philhajinomc Or- ^ Otis Show, Jungle PAKB^Comc Georges Pompidou 

July S. 9. 15, 16: “RMuud m- AdTirinh ZZ Jj jjft 


■■ 


Orchestra. 'iri-7771 iin 

**** ^ 4: £S M0Ses ’ UeRilffl0ur bMBfnoNS — To Ant 19- 

July lf-20, 24, 25: “Hamler ? " Je ^Kare Bertrand,"^|al er - 

(Shakapeare). — — mo, TJavid Tremfctt." 

"**« .Muste d'Art Modenie (t e l: 


'3,6,IZ14: 

8, 10, 20: “Wilhdm Te 
nrX 


723.61^7). 


S; ***»! :o* 

— July 20 and r22: 

^“1 Tortelfier cello (BachL • " ' 

ATDMJNS.F estiva 1 (leL 322.1459). and 29; Afoerto Lj^ varfin 

TAZZ— July 1 and 2: MiW ^ ac “)> 


friends, a* 


r:>.- 


>»h.i v, • 





• .«. l-r_< 71. — »H/Jk.vav wuu 

. Ly^L^rpieetdeMiwqne^: fMusie des Arts DteSS’ (td: Jidy Orchestra. Ctoaa Baflet.^ Dfl » dd | srf 

Julv 22 and It- RF/TTai c t . . . ‘ : 




SfiWMacbeth-TV^ ^.8T^ US ^ (td: ZgSjf ^ 12: V^ An Orchestra Sfc 

BALLET — Ju ^ 15 16,^24^Ta °^ A ~ Jul y 19: “Atiane k Nax- EXHOTTION — To Julv It Tu1y 22 a°d 23; Herbie HaacodL 

*** ■* sssfssss^s^ 


“F™ “ To Juiy ,3: EX-’+Ttnr'ssr 

fig*—-*-- ^on-tcs^.-h, m gajjsvsa, 

GteunovX ffiSbT-J..!.,, «Mu^dn Petit P^ai, ( td: 





bother mT' 


r f „ ' “ ’ — ' ~ wji- 

tenng (Atitton, Glazunov), “La rnwrcoT , , , »mu»ce t 

ST*' 'toeyev, Min- SSSKSfflSE^ 


kui). r-* •••* »u*jvT, Mm- taiE^emblemd Choir of the Roy- ExmBmON - To Sent to- ' — — Ark< 

iccT 31 Chapel PbiUppe Heneweghe “Gustave Dort." ***■ 73 ' GESOk, International Ballet FesI P"” 

S- “^^ozart). tOQ - 

* nnr) TK. 1 Bfakey . 


July 27 and 30: “Varii Capricci” Z 9 I ^ el v 
(Ashton, Walton), “EnigmaVaria- (Mozart), 

rions" (A^^^pr). •Ajx Dance Festival (tel 


•TatfiGaDay (td: 821,13.13), 26.23.38). ««« lucjaaMessengen. 

July 2: Carolyn Carlson, “Blue 24, 25 and 28: Stm Ra Arkes- 
Ladv” r’Parisrwi AnKnA tn 


™®mON — To August 18: J°|y 2: Carolyn Carlsi 
Pmntmgs by Francis Bacon: 1944 Lady” (Carlson, AubiyL 

to Present" July 3: Beau Geste Company «ThMtrc Artistio-Atli*vam 

( S5 n ?- 355^7.10) -July 4-13^ 

T°ly 5. C hri sti ne Gerard-Arcor vaL 


roma salita san sebastianello 16 /b 


POM, Jazz Festival (let 41.15.65). 
—July 6: Benny Greene Trio, Fats 
Domino, Jan Faddis Quintet 






* Like It 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


Page 9 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 



betting Behind the Wheel 
With Computer Printouts 




-■V&rV- 

" ' 

TV - 


?:» 


' *' ■ 


i «J »*" 


S cvdry seasoned business traveler 
knows, one of the most dTnrtfng 

mana g eme n t tads is picking- up a 

> rental car at a strange airport and 
nndbgyonr v^downiowii to tbehotel or a 
oc^ibcKing city, especially at night. 

~ First you have to find the car in theTot, 
Qgure out by trial and e r ror bow toes fights 
work, andcrack the code of the airport maze 

Jto get col Faced with a forest Of sagos at the ; 

^rankfmt Autobalmkreiiz, yoa bavfc two 

seconds to scan the scrabbled directions bn 
the back -of nn. envelope damped' to tire 
.Wheel with your right -fomd You flick the 
huficator to go right and tom on the wind- 
Shield wipers and washer by nrisratofe With : 
Jcars comma at you from all sides no decision . 
•Ms the oolydetistaa andyoa head irrevocably 

Si the direction of Cologne instead of Dann- 

feadt Tom bade' Bat how? As duly say. 

^Yon can't get there from here.” 

7 Or prafcaps you've |nst landed j^Beath- 

tnaoess inXoodoo wouldfike to 

take off to explore a few stately hoboes or 
antique shops or tour the Scottish High-' 
lands. Of coarse, there are plenty of grades, 
bat yon really need something more persaa- 
alized to make the most of your precious two 
or three days. 

\ Well, Hate and Avis have now come up 
with novel sohrtions: compaterized driving 
directions. They won't bop you find the 
agizmo for the fights or the cunningly con- 
cealed reverse gear an the new Renault or 
help you drive on the wrong side of the road. 
Bid they are the nod best thing to ah anto- 
... lr matic piuot or a navigator bu vnmr «rL» The 

■ ^ v daemons are m the ri*m 

’ _ ■ • . L"'!^ u caSh • dots tailored to yoor own itinerary. 

from Hertz; tell yon, simply and condsdy, 
•" J. . l ‘ J ^Teies how to get from one point to another. Avis 
•* te=s j? lap* provides more discursive motor tours de- 
signed with the leisure traveler in mmd. Both 
pome with the rental of the car. 

V A MTi wital finnw face 

is how to dfffereatiate their products from 


turns, although only about 250 are pro- 
grammed so as to leave capacity for future 
demand. They include hotels, restaurants, 
department stores, government buddings, 
convention, cultural and sports centers, and 
mqghboring tides. At sooto airports, sud as 

Frankfurt -and Stuttgart, driving directions 
to major corporations are listed. And Bote 1 


i o(U. S. executives arriving recently in 
lonasksd far an it in er a ry »»hng in the 
Grosveoor House Hot el, Stonehenge, Win- 
fafTwir p] and the (Sty of Tfath- 
. Last April, Hertz in Britain introduced a 

sett-service touch-screen program to replace 

the eafljr installations on which employees 
have to key the destination code into the 


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J lea p. 


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‘cast, 
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furs 

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yon . go and everyone 
dean, rcfiahte.cars and good hack- 
service asamatter of course— everything 
m maps, umbrellas, ice-scrapers, baby 
seats and roof racks to insurance options and* 
24-hour emergency .service. Some smaller 
firms go to the discount route, bat “this is a 
downward spiral” according to one Avis 
executive. So what can be done to build a 
perceived “added value” for the rental cus- 
tomer, especially the traveling executive? 

* The answer, it seems, is in mgitcch. Avis, 
few example, claims to have been the first in 
Europe with an “an-fineT computerized res- 
ervations system. This enables the counter 
dak to process rentals an “real time” any- 
where in the world, instead of sending a 
telex. Another development has been, sdf- 
semce rental and retimLSinqAy by inserting 
.gmr charge card into a computer terminal 
^gsfarc your flight leaves, you can check your 
reservation, choose^ the actual caryoa want 
and get a printout showing where it is in < the 
parking loL When you arrive at your destina- 
tion, & rental agreement is muting for you 
"on the front seat All you need to do is show 
your driving license on the way ont Return- 
ing the car is just as easy. You pouch in the 
vehicle Dumber, mileage and fad gauge 
reading into the terminal and receive a de- 
tailed record of the transaction. 


Car rental firms 
turn to high tech 
for new services 


com p u ter. All you do is choose the lang u age 
and destination you want from a wmn an 
the screen and the directions are printed oat 
in a few seconds. They shew mileage be- 
tween each torn, estimated driving time, how 
to get out of the airport and, just as impor- 
tant, how to get bade in again. 

The Hertz directions should certainly get 
. yen there, but they are not a definitive imofs 
guide as they lack any reassuring coOoqmal 
reference to strategic landmarks along the 
rente. ("Yon tell usnow to get an the round- 
abouts biit not how to gel off," one viator 
complained.) Apparently, it is hard to do this 
with a standard text for all languages. 

In contrast, the Avis routes are luxuriant 
with anecdotal detail Bat then they are 
much more than simple driving directions. 
They are c us tom ize d tour guides containing 
e v er y t hi ng you need and more — from where 
to stay and where to eat to {daces of caltma^ 
sports and historical interest Typically, each 
itinerary runs from 25 to 50 dosdy printed 
and reads like a transcript of a pleag- 
. local chatting at your tebow. 
are updated every three months and 
ty traffic ccmctitkms, roadworks,, 
parking places and seasonal events at the 
time of your visit 

Called “Personally Yours,” the Avis toms 
were launched last September, initially for 
American visitors renting a par in Britain. 
You can choose two subjects from 15 catego- 
ries: Stately Homes, British Gardens, An- 
cient Britain, Christian Heritag e Welsh Cas- 
tles, Getter's Britain, Craftsman’s Britain, 
British Architecture, Industrial Archeology, 
Spas, Then and Now, and Maritime Britain. 
A potpourri, The Best of Britain, has proved 
the most popular, chosen by a third of the 
more 5,000 American car renters who 
have asked for itineraries. 

I ti n er ari es can be programmed for toms 
of 3 to 14 days on the baas of 50 to 75 miles 
driving, a day, . If you resayc ^uAvis car 14 
days before yon leave on the tup,' it will be 
mailed to you at home. Or you can oaBecbit 
at a counter at Heathrow or Gatwkk ajr- 
ports or at Marble Areh in central London. 


mrvmuN 


. > c- -■ 


_ directions at Los Angdcs International Air- 
.port in May 1984 in time for the Olympics. 
o's'fF.'t** ' r The idea was to avoid the confusion of 
verbal directions by providing foreign visi- 
. \ .-I ’tors with a printout in one of five languages 

— ^(English, French, German, Italian and Span- 
‘ish) to enable than to find their hotels and 
_ 'sites for the games. The system was soon 
installed at 30 U. S. airports and arrived in 
-v.i - 'Europe last fell 

•„v- ‘ You can get driving directions at 32 air- 
orts in 10 European countries (Belgi u m, 
□tain, Denmark, Fran ce, West Germany, 
Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and 
Switzerland) and Danish and Dutch have 
been added to the fist of l a n g u ages. Each 
'terminal is able to up to 400 destina- 


Yours” itineraries for Ireland (13 1 
inrindhig Myths, Legends and F< 
Fishmg and Antiques), the island of 
and the Costa dd Sol and A ndalusia regions 
in southern Spain (eight categories, includ- 
ing Caves, Spanish Beac he s and Wjger 
Sports), and me Rhine, Black Forest and 
Bavaria in southern Germany (nine catxgp- 
rics, indnding Amusement Prnks, Museums, 
and Music, C^iera and Theater). So far, there 
is total of 45 itineraries covering about 6,000 
miles of routes. 

‘ Unfortunately, “Personally Yours” is 
available only tt you reserve an Avis carfram 
certain countries. For example, the British 
can get it in Spain, Germany and Ireland but 
not m Britain. So if you hanker for a tour of 
Welsh cashes, put on your American accent 
and call Avis at Heathrow, where they keep a 
“back-up stock” of itineraries, or aric Hertz 
tonmaspedal program for too. 

There's no better free value to be had 
anywhere. *• ■ 


TRAVEL 


In Search of Italy’s Cucina Genuina 


by R. W. Apple Jr. 


T EE gratifying renaissance in Italian 
cocking continues apace, especial- 
ly in the north and especially in the 
countryside. It has even acquired a 
kind of manifesto, drawn up by Franco Co- 
lombani, the self-effacing but fiercely com- 
mitted proprietor of II Sole, south of Milan. 

In ms bam, Cotombani brews the best 
vinegar I have ever tasted, aging it for nine 
years in a succession of birds made of 
different woods — juniper, myrtle, cherry, 
oak and chestnut, tie has also started an 
attocfation of Eke-minded restaurateurs, 
who have agreed to follow several precepts, 
ihe most important of which are “to limit the 
nwnhw of Atghf-g on the menu” and “not to 
invent just for the sake of it, not to play 
games, and not to slavishly follow fashions. 
They are at the forefront of what many 
Italians are now calling the cucina gemdna. 

I repented last fell on a group of Italian 
restaurants where new trends were stirring, 
and during a couple of recent trips to the 
peninsula we scouted around for other, com- 
parable places. Here is the result — a second 
fist of establishments wine yon will find, if 
the gods axe stuffing, a respect for regional 
tradition, a passion for ultra-fresh ingredi- 
ents, an interest in lighter sauces and smaller 
portions and a blessed disdain for clumsy 
plagiarism of the nouvdte cuisine in. France. 

The approxim ate price in doflars is given 
for dinner for two persons. 

CaPeo 

In this brightly lighted, almost Spartan 
room, perched high above the resort towns 
of Fortofino audRapaHo, Franco Solan is 
Conducting an undeservedly unheralded cro- 

sade forme foods and wines of Liguria. It 
has not been easy; due mixture of fine crystal 
and stainless-steel cutlery shows that he has 
been able to invest only a very little bit of 
money at any one time. 

But there is nothing about the cooking to 
suggest poverty. Warned that Ca Pea serves 
only those who have reserved, even if that 
means that tables go begging, we called sev- 
eral days in advance, asking Solan to serve 
us whatever struck his fancy — a request that 
produced such a cascade of dishes that we 
op»ild only mhMc at the last three or four. 
IBs first offering was a typically Genoese 
capomagro, a kind of vegetable tart topped 
with skewers of shrimps, prawns, lobster and 
the like. There was also a f Cathay timbale of 
f&va beans and potatoes with a subtle tuna 
sauce, a roulade of sweetbreads and, of 
course, the great regional specialty, trenetie 
ed pesto — noodles with a basil sauce. As 
always in Liguria, it came with a potato amid 
the noodles as a reminder, so Solan ex- 
plained, of the peasant origins of the dish. 

On (he sideboard when we arrived was a 
basket crammed with theiewds of the .arty 
Italian tall, porrird mnshm rmts t same tit 
than as big as a soup plate. We ate them in 
half a dozen ways: shaved over a terrine also 
of porcini^ stuffed into little pasta 
envelopes; deep-fried; in a dear soup, mid so 
an. All tins was served by the owner himsett, 
a body, hawk-nosed man of serious mien. 
The dishes combined earthy flavors and ddi- 
catc textures, which is not uncommon, mid 
the utterly unknown wines that came with 
them were light, fruity and cheap. When we 
left, Solan pressed upon us a couple of 
bottles of extra-virgin alive oil (as the Ital- 
ians inexplicably call it) that his father had 
made. 

Stroda Panoramka, Lari, near RapaBo, 
let 3130.90. Closed Mondays, Tuesdays at 
lunch and Nov. 5 to 30. Credit cards: Visa. 
About S50, including Wine. 


DTrigabolo 


A tendency to underestimate the time 
needed to get from here to there almost cost 
ns the chance to eat at this restaurant. It was 
2.-05 PM. when we pulled into the square 
where it is set, a square out of a de Chirico 
painting, in a nondescript town in the rich 
farm country between Bologna and Raven- 
na. Lunch had ended and we had no reservar 
tioc, but I put on my best basset-bound face 
and Giadnto Rossetti, one of the two own- 
era, took pity on ns. fries Corelli, the chef, 
was hastily summoned from a nearby cafe. 

Yon would have ri ym ght that they had 
been expecting us for a month. 

Rossetti showed us to an immaculately 
laid table. Among the dishes we tasted were 


Papp 


Continued from page 7 



“AD the people he was intimate with are gone now” says 
Debuskcy, a press agent who has been with the festival sh 
berimting. “Irs fike has erne of those specks of palm tree that 


M ede 
since its 


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****** 






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. . beginning. “I: _ ^ 

..very taR Att the lower leaves fall off, so only the leaves at the top arc 
left That tree trunk, when it grew, had to be alone — anyone that 
, might rfwThaw-- it had to be cut off. Joe can’t stand there and be 
Ragged downby anything; — in d n dm gpeople. Ev er y t hni gha s to be 
'Sbswded so you can move on." 

Clearly Papp has little time, these days, to have casual ffinnera with 
friends, chat on the 
matters have a way < 
family’s annual Passover seder 

But while Papp enjoys being in front of an audience— he once 
-tbooght of becoming a stand-up comedian — he say* he coold never 
‘“be a professional actor because “you most be too concerned with 
your own psyche.” He does not fike to worry abent Inmsdf, he says, 
-and he has orchestrated his fife so that he is rarely ever akme. 

Even in the midst of crowds, however, a put of him remains 
' detached — separate and apart. It is a feefing of isoJaticn that Papp 
traces back to ms childhood, when he had the sense of firing in a 
* “secret wodd,” cat off from those he loved. “Tm rather outgoing, but 
■ I don’t fed that way,” he says softly. “I fed very much by myself. 
When I was a kid, I always fdtlondy, though I shouldn’t have been. 
I had brothers and sisters and friends, but I guess it was mostly my 
^mother who gave me that feefina. 

“There are lots of time now when I fed londy for no reason. I get 
plenty of attention from Gail, and people are very supportive around 


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a fish terrine — bits of sole, bass, scallop and 
river crayfish, flavored with basil and en- 
cased in a crust, which was slightly too 
heavy-, the local pasta, gargpnelE, with a 
glistening and superb sauce of hum, cr eam , 
butter and garlic; a car amdiTed mariaTli nn nf 
veal with a preposterous-sounding bat excel- 
lent sauce of gorgonzda cheese and pista- 
chios; and latte Brule, dense and rich, the 
best custard I’ve ever tasted, and a soft 
orange ice cream with orange sauce and 
candied ped, the best orange dessert I’ve had 
since my Aunt Anna’s nonpareil cookies. 

Asked for something local to drink, Ros- 
setti produced a fine chardonnay and an 
even Setter cabernet, both made by a relative 
newcomer to the trade. Dr. Enrico VaUania. 
(If I understood correctly, he used to be the 
coroner in Bologna.) To finish, there was a 
grappa from the house collection of more 
than 200; but if I had left the choice to him, 
Rossetti would probably have riven me a 
sing]e-malt Scotch whisky, of wiudi he is an 
improbably situated connoisseur. 

- Piazza Garibaldi, Argenta, near Bologna, 
tek 85,4131. Closed Monday evenings, Tues- 
days. Credit cards: American Express, Visa. 
About $45. 

Bosdbetd 

Tricesxmo is tucked into Friuli, the ex- 
treme northeastern corner of Italy, not a 
region you’re likely to visit unless you are 
traveling from Venae to Vienna or Sahfrun*, 
It is wdl worth a trip, with the seventh- 
century relics of Crvidale del Friuli and the 
gentle bills nearby, carpeted with vines that 
produce superb white wanes, both dry and 
sweet You can sample them (the aromatic, 
pate gold tocai from Sdriopetto is espaiaBy 
worthy) at Boschetti, a crossroads mnn-Ver- 
srifies of a restaurant, done up in the best 
bourgeois taste but completely free of bour- 
geois pomposity. 

The cooking is marked try admirable fi- 
nesse. Whether the dish is a reinterpretation 
of an old regional specialty, such asfogudi e 
orzo (white beans and rice-shaped pasta, 
drizzled with green ofive oil), or a near cre- 
ation, such as petto di cappone (breast of 
capon, sliced razor-thin and simply sauced), 
it is likely to be well thought out and careful- 
ly balanced. We particularly Heed the little 
gnocdtiwiih smoked ricotta. 


Giorgio Trentm, the proprietor, has in- 
stilled m iris staff the kind of devotion that 
leads to twice-polishcd cutlery; to good-hu- 
mored patience with a German family with 
two restless children; to a “present” of a 
little of the shellfish. called sea truffles 
— “just a taste, in case you've never tried 
them,” to a suggestion of a wine more mod- 
estly priced ^and better, sir, really.” than 
the one you've ordered. And afi of this white 
a huge and demanding wedding reception is 
taking place in a private room. 

Piazza Mazzim ID, Tricesimo, near Trieste; 
tel: 85JZ30. Closed Mondays and Aug 5 to 
20. Credb cards: American Express, Diners 
and Visa. About $50. with wine. 

Locanda ddTAmoroga 

If you were to dream up an Italian country 
restaurant, it would lock like this: an avenue 
of cypresses leading to a duster of low budd- 
ings around a courtyard, their walls covered 
with flowering vines; i ns ide , old tile floors, 
brick vaults, rough-hewn tables, yellow ta- 
blecloths, open fees, wrought-iron sconces. 
It has been there for a very long time; in the 
Museo Gvico in Siena there hangs a fresco 
showing the place as it was in 1300. 

I first came across it several years ago, 
when a group of us converged on the place 
for an Easter gate We ate all (he regional 
specialties, from poppa al pomodoro (a thick 
tomato and bread soup) through bistecca alia 
brace (the very dose-grained local Val di 
Chians steak, grilled over an open fire). It 
was delicious, especially when washed down 
with copious quantities of the excellent, vir- 
ile young Chianti produced on the property. 

The approach has since become altogether 
' more ambitious. The old standbys are still 
. there, joined now by such things as lamb 
roasted with tarragon instead of the usual 
rosemary; fish from Lake Trasuneno, in- 
cluding grilled ed, smoked coregone (a beast 
without an English name, so far as I know) 
and perch with pasta. On our most recent 
visit, there was also a smarting apple ruffle- 
feuDle. The cellar now affords a wider 
choice, indnding the a 1980 Mcmte Yertinc 
Chianti, which showed just how complex 
and satisfying that supposedly common 
wine can be. Happily, the inn remains low- 
key, despite its new sophistication. 

1.5 miles south of Sinahmgfl, ask locally for 
directions ; teL 67.94.97. Closed Mondays, 
Tuesdays ax hatch and Jan. 20 to Feb. 28. 
Credit cards: American Express, Diners, Visa. 
About $40, with wine. 

ns ole 

In my view, this modest place -in a trim 
little village between Cremona and Piacenza 
.serves the best coraby cooking in Italy; it is 
enough to brag back memories of 
ltardh, the extraradinary general-store- 
cum-restauranl near Busseto that dosed a 
couple of years ago. 

A gpld sun signboard is the only due to 
Franco and S3 vans Colomb&nf s charmin g 
establishment TniaiV» art two rooms witfi 
wooden anting* terrazzo floors, white- 
washed walls and long tables. The Cdom- 


banis are collectors of old recipes, but they 
are not above serving something simple, like 
the salami and ham (both merely perfect) or 
the salad of (ficedpeppers, beets, carrots and 
capon, dressed with lemon and olive oil 

Every tingle (fish captivated us — moc- 
cheroni alia verdura (fat pasta tubes cooked 
with squash, tomatoes, green peppers, zuc- 
chini, eggplant, onions and green beans); 
shin of veal with porcini and mashed pota- 
toes made with the drippings from the roast- 
ing pan; two of the cheapest bits of beef, 
muzzle and tail, transformed by slow cook- 
ing and served with a puree of polenta; a tart 
’ 'igiano cheese and a sweet goigonzcda in 
Jc condition; a sliced pound cake wife 
ltiess crema £ mascarpone and a rose 
petal tart wife a macaroon crust. 

We drank two unpretentious wines and 
one blockbuster — a 1976 Sassicaia, full of 
spice and balance — and loved all three. As 
fee ideal ending to an ideal meal, we ad- 
journed to a shady loggia overlooking an (rid 
courtyard, gazed at fee grapevines and fee 
birds* nests and the beds of salvia and uxqpo- 
tiens, tiotenuri to the church bells, drank our 
coffee, sipped grappa from di Faedis and 
envied the bronze statue of a boy fishing, 
because be got to stay there all the time and 
we had to leave. 

Via Trabattoni 22, Make, near Cremona; 
tel: 581.42. Closed Sunday evenings, Mon- 
days, January and August. No credit cards. 
About $50, with wine. 


lit 1848, fee Bersagtieri, the flamboyant 
Piemontese riflemen in plumed hats, fought 
the Austrians beside the River Mincro. The 
Ferrari family had already been running a 
restaurant on the spot for 18 years, and they 
ran it stffl: Roberto in the dining room and 
bis brother Massimo in fee kitchen. 

The cooking is rooted in the traditions of 
nearby Mantua, where Mantegna’s mqjestic 
frescoes in the Camera degli Span survive as 
evidence of the magnificence of the Gonzaga 
court. But everything has been made lighter, 
fresher, zestier — cod with temon ped, une* 
tuous risotto wife snails, frog-legs soup, 
grilled eel fresh from the Minrio, and lean, 
moist dude or pigeon breast with honey axe 
among the delights an the Bersagliere*s 
menu. In homage to anotherpair of brothers 
who todk over an old family business and 
put it on the gastronomic map, the Ferraris 
pften prepare sahnon wife solid sauce in the 
style erf Troisgros. 

Exceptionally among the establishments I 
have fisted here, this one is slighty formal, 
with a fair sprinkling of basmesmen among 
its patrons, even though Goito, with 9,149 
inhabitants, is not exactly a center of world 
commerce. Men might be a bit more com- 
fortable in a necktie, but this is Italy, after 
all, and no one looked askance at my polo 
shirt or my wife’s sun dress on an unseason- 
ably warm day in May. 

Via Statale 258, Goito, near Verona; let 
600.07. Closed Mondays and Aug. 5 to 27. 
Credit cards: American Express Diners, Visa. 
About $55. ■ 

e 1985 The New York Tim 


Marlboro 


the office. But ! don’t know if that’s what you’re looking for, really. 
It’s not discoverable —it's an inner place that you’ve already made 
and it doesn’t matter if you’re busy or surrounded by people, because 
■you missed something when you were growing up, mid there’s no way 
to replace that Some people tty desperately to fill it m> — drugs, 
drinking , sex. I think wooc is relatively healthy — at feast you’re 
productive,” 

T HE festival, certainly, has thrived on Papp’s restless need to 
keep moving, his tingjo-imnded devotion to its future. life is 
time, lie beheves, and there is never enough of it He hasn’t 
taken a real vacation, he estimates, in two decades; hasn't visited hb 
cramfry house in a year: complains he rardy geis a full night’s deep. 

In the meantime , there are more benefits, more projects, more 
performances at what Papp calls “culture baron things — where 
you’re expected to pot in an ap pe ara nce.” On a recent Sunday, for 
instance, Papp’s sch ed ule calls for a speech at Lincoln Center — the 
event is a tribute to the children of the Holocaust — followed 
h m n etE ate lybyabeoefefgrtheWHKa m stio w nThenta:atSttidio54 t 
followed by another party. Ten nmrales after leaving Lincoln Center, 
Papp is standing on tire gfiacMtrewn Box of the disco. 

The a n tfien c e is quiet, preoccupied — there’s “no connection.” 
says Papp, between “than and what’s going on rat stage”; and he 
s ta r ts his routine by. telling them whai he fhwilrc “Tms 
seems a Ettte quiet for Studio 54,” he says, startling the sleepy 
patrons. “Itseems fike a funeral fra someone dead and forgotten. Irs 
not your fault — maybe ifs the acoustics or the dinner. Anyway, Fll 
just gedL on with fee songs — same golden okfies.” He then begins his 
first number. “You’ve got to accentuate the positive;” he tings in a 
load voice, swinging the nrikebadc and forth, working the anfeence. 
“Ehmynate the negative. Latch on to fee affirmative. Don’t mess 
wife Mister Inbetween ...” ■ 

o 19&5 The New York Times 



1 







Page 10 


IiVTERJVATlONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 



Obwi Hhrt Low Lost ClW. 

Indus 1333J4 IttlJl 1321J0 133371 + &£ 

Trm 4SB76 666.90 4*150 MID* +■ L5t 

UHI 163.93 1 6562 16101 164X5 + 1.03 

camp 5477$ $53.17 S44J6 55U7 + 4j>l 


NYSE Index 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


-BOnds ' 
UllllNe* 
industrials 


17 Month 
High um 5m* 



1 1 NYSE Diaries 1 1 


Cine 

hw. 


976 

787 

Declined 

SK 

730 


439 



20 j» 

1996 

Now Highs 

99 

97 

New Law* 


22 

'volume up 

Volume down 

SSS 



i uifc low CPu Cffao 
Composite 110.75 DOTS 110.73 +059 

IncHcMi'Ml 125-58 125.16 12157 +066 

Trai9. IQB74 107-55 1CS-2T +Mk 

UfJUthn 59,77 59 JB 59X7 + 075 

Finance 119,53 I1MI 119.53 +072 




Buy Sales •sh’rt 

June 3t I9677B 413*1 920 

June 25 _____ 206.178 <47,118 1107 

June 34 191808 456,95? 1771 

June 21 197 J IS 419«N 1,102 

June 20 - IS1335 292470 1454 

"inducted in the Kies Inures 


Thursdays 

]\YSF 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Qoang 


VoLbHPjH : 

Prev.4PM.voU-.— ■ 
Prev cntwlHlfited close 

UHJJOMO 

H.IWM 

112451420 



Composite 

JnduHrtaf* 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Transo. 


WOok 

Close Ch'oe ago 
HUI + LJ4 2P77 
30174 +1.96 29180 
375.71 +1B 373.14 
349.91 + 420 330.93 
399J2 + 3-50 275-77 

26023 +101 S 


Vol. HUB LOW 

1W7S 4%, 4|k 

SIM 1 * 1 S 

tnrwt || 17tt 

2187 3V-I M» 

3647 Ns »'-• 

30122 Stt » 

JM. K* a 

SS K *> 

1746 114a IJV. 
1438 II I* 
UlO 3DH SOW 
1174 4> 

l«4 171+ Ufa 
1073 1346 I2*» 

1043 30% 


Sl*h 
»■ tt 
ft ^ 
& tfc 
IT ti 

— t -J 

«r 

13* • + H 
a*-. + * 


Standard & Poor's index 


AMEX Sales 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the CfosiM on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


induuriaif 
Transit. 
UMiUtes 
PI nance 
ConwnfMi 


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in.M 169.24 I71B1 + 155 


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4pjw. vahime 
pm.4PJA.vqtume 
prev. cons. voHime 



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Dow Average Reaches Record 


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;* -20b 1SH. Alain at 2.19 la? 4 20b 20b 20b + b 

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206 111b 111 111%— b 

5 102% 102b 102b 
19 17b 17b 17b— b 


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12b 5b AllisOl 17* 5% 5 516 + b 

34b 24 AltsCol 25 34b 34b 34b 

. 28% 20 ALLTL 184 66 9 419 27b 27b 27V + 4t 

39'« 29b Alcoa UB 35 17 1544 3<b 33% 34b + b 

22% 14b Amax JO 13 903 15b 14b IS 

40 32b Amax of 100 98 4 33b 33b 33b— V_ 

34 22 b Am Hex 1.10 If 20 1812 28% 27b 28 + Vi 

140b 98* AHespf 150 2.9 3 121 119% 121 +3 

~3 ?b iv, Ain Aar 553 lb is* lit 

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9 24% 34 24 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Slock Exchange broke into new high territory in 
active trading on Thursday, with tne Dow Jones 
industrial average closing at a record 1J312I. 

The Dow, as much as 10 points higher late in 
the session, finished with a gain of 8.40. 

Advances led declines. 937-572, among the 
1,977 issues traded Volume picked up, totaling 
106,730,000 shares, compared with 94,130,000 
Wednesday, 

Analysts said lower rates in the U.S. bond 
market and signs that further progress may be 
made on the budget deficit in Washington sent 
the stack market higher. 

“The stock market is encouraged by the bond 
market’s failure to capitulate to good economic 
news.” said Hugh Johnson of First Albany. An 
axiom of Lhe bond market is that a strengthen- 
ing economy, with its potential for stimulating 
inflation, is bad for bonds. 

Mr. Johnson said that a lot of the expected 
bad news on second-quarter corporate earnings 
is already reflected in prices ana that the stock 
market is beginning to shift its focus to the third 
quarter, when many people think corporate 
profits will show improvement. 

Late in the day’s trading, the Treasury De- 
partment said the United States ran up its 
biggest monthly deficit ever — S40.45 billion — 
during May, a month when interest rates were 
falling. 

The red ink exceeded the previous record. 
May 1984’s S33.75 billion, and brought die 
accumulated total for the eight months of the 
government’s 1985 fiscal year to SI 56 J billion. 

Pan American World Airways was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, adding Vs to 6 ft. 

Other airlines also gained, with AMR Corp. 


new high territory in M-l Falls $1.5 Billion 

,with the Dow Jones « . . 

it a record 1J312I. ^ AssxnatU Pras 

points higher late in YORK — The basic US. money sup- 

gain of M0. Ply figure, M- f , fell 5 1 J billion in mid-June, the 

>37-572. among the Federal Reserve Board reported Thursday. 

; picked up. totaling 1116 FecI M-l fell to a seasonally adjusted 
red with 94 130 000 average of $589.3 billion in ihe week ended June 
17 from $590.8 billion the previous week. M-l 
s in the U.S. bond deludes cash in circulation, deposits in cheek- 
ier progress may be in S accounts and non-bank travelers checks, 
in Washington sent . ^ or ^test 13 weeks, M- 1 averaged S579.7 
billion, a 9 J- percent seasonally adjusted annu- i 
imaged by the bond ^ raie of 8 ““ fr °m to* previous 1 3 weeks. ! 

e to good economic — j 

of First Albany. An 

s a strengthen- jumping ift lo 47ft and Pan Am and Eastern 
dial for stimulating increasing fractionally. TWA added ft to 19ft. 

Santa Fe Southern Pacific was second-most 
lot of the expected active, advancing 1ft to 33 '/ 4 . 

- corporate earnings Baxter Travenol was third, falling ft to 15ft. 

> aim that the stock A block of 1.2 million crossed at 15. After the 
its focus to the third market closed, the company said it would 
le ihinfc corporate sweeten its $3.7 billion bid for American Hospi- 
EDL fcl Supply. 

„ toe Treasury De- American Hospital gained 1 to "38ft in active 
States ran up its trading. 

—$40.45 billion — Recovering from developments in the long- 
interest rates were distance telephone service market, AT&T add- 
ed ft to 23ft and GTE CoTp. V< to 40ft. 
le previous record, IBM increased ft to 124. 

. aud brought toe Other technologies also improved, with Cray 
ight months of the Research jumping 2ft to 85ft, Motorola up ft to 
ir to S156J billion. 34ft and Digital Equipment up 1ft to 95ft. 
ways was the most CBS continued lo slide, losing 2 to 1 15. 

Iding ft to 6 ft. In food stocks, Borden Inc. was higher. Gen- 

. with AMR Corp. eral Mills advanced 1ft to 61ft. 


394a 40W AmCdn 2.90 A? 12 191 59M 5816 584. — la 


’ - 2FW 2IH ACaflOl 280 11 J 4 24T» 24% 24*. — ¥ 

. i 51% 37 ACrnipt 100 58 14 52 51 52 +1 

, • ar» 164* ACooBd 2M laj OT 20* 20H* MVi 

! :. 3DW 25% ACooCv 2J1e BJ 2V 2W2 2836 29Vi 

■ U tVi ACenrC 213 7 M |h M 

J - 5611 47% ACvart 1.90 38 12 1061 504B 4«% 50% + rt 

. 27V, 1B% ADT .92 Xi 26 527 25% 24'* 25Vj +1% 

■ 24it 16% AElPw 2260 98 9 1974 27% 27% 23 VS— I* 

' W* 25 Am Exp 129 SJ 17 7717 48W 47W 48% + 41 

• 5* E* AFaml 6 AS 2.1 IS 347 22 D 8 224a 22W + *k 

I - KVi l»H AGnCP 180 19 10 1348 34%. 344* 3414 + % 

, 151a 6 % AGnl wt 41 14% I3?a 14% + % 

55% sija AGnlp<A624elU 57 544a 5414 54W + 44 

■ r MV, 584* AGnl pfB 587a 6J 587 93% 91 93Va +244 

. J <5 AGn lot 3JZ5 4J I 7444 7444 7444 +1% 

; » ?!!* «“ AGnpfD 264 38 120 694* 68% 69 + Vi 

■ !07a 7Vi AHolst 86 10% 10% 10% + Vn 

! « 66% 4*4. A Home 290 4J 13 2865 63W63%63M + 48 

• . 39W 26% AHoap 1.12 29 1312926 399S 3778 38% +1 

. *i 6414 Amrlctl 660 78 9 374 9446 94 94% + % 

, _,»7% 52 AlnGrp M J34 2M7 854i84%85%+4J 
-.144 1129: AIGppt 585 4.1 151 143% 143 143Hf +2V9 

■ . 28% IBiV AMI 72 28 12 W 26% 2444 2646 + 46 

{ SVa Vh AmMxrt 916 3% 3 3M + W 

t- 29 16% APrssdJ .121 i 929 20 19% 20 + 4* 

.13% 5 ASILFfc? 6 13 74% 74* 74* 


'■ 10T* TVj AHolU 
« 66% 4*4. A Home 290 AS 13 2 
l 3»W 26% AHoap 1.12 29 1212 
■J *444 Amrtcfl 660 78 9 
87% 52 AlnGrp M J 34 2 


13 Month 
HI* UW stock 


35. OOM 

raa* HtahLon auot.artR 


* M M AmWxrt 
t 29 16% APrasds .121 


. 13% 5 ASLFIa 6 

' IBVa 13% ASLPI pf 219 I5J 
" 16 104a AShip 80 68 10 

354a 24% AmSIcl 160 54 10 


| 354a 24% AtnSId 160 54 IS 391 30 

. T 67% 3044 ARlStal- 84 1-0 12 427 67 

j J 78 46% ASIr plA *J» SJ 9 77 

} ,57% 51 A5tr pfB 680 11.9 It 57 

5 244a 16% AT8T 170 51 17 16473 23! 

, 4146 30% AT&T pf 384 9.1 1115 39! 

) 42 31% AT&T of 374 97 57 « 

L r~ 27% 15% AWotr* 180 47 * 71 24 

a% 19% AmHotl 2^40 11.1 9 91 21 ! 

71% 5S«A ATrPr 564 7.9 44 7V 

I 17 4% ATrSc 20 ti 1 

I .36 Jdia Aowron 160 <4 8 S3 34 1 
.SO. . OVAmoDs 70 A 23 121 « 


929 20 19% 20 +4% 

J I 746 746 74| 

7 14% 14 14% + % 

511 13% 13% 1346 + 46 
391 30 2946 29% + % 

427 <7 66% 66% + % 

9 77 76V, 76% + Vi 

It 57 56% 57 + % 

473 23% 23 23% + % 

115 39% 39% 39% + % 
57 404* 40% 4046- % 


160 58 11 371 
188 38 17 1424 
15 25 

1 80a 66 7 286 


27% 27% 
62% 61% 

27U 27% 
224« 22% 
3U. 3% 
23% 23% 
4046 40% 
35% 35% 
20 % 2 B% 
29% 29 
49% 49 
364* 36% 
32% 32 
17% 17% 
IM 18% 
17% 17% 
26 25% 

61% 60% 
6 % 6 % 
50% 50% 
12% 114. 
5846 58 
19% 18% 
1% 1% 
4% 4 


27% 

6144— % 
«% 

271.— % 
2214 

3% + V* 
23% — % 
40% — % 
35% 

20% 

29% 

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36% 

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17% 

1 B%- h. 
17% +% 

1- 

5044 

12% + % 
5 *% + % 
19V. + % 
146- % 
4 — >4 


21% Com lot lJO 36 12 3«6 35% 35 
21% CPsvc 78 8 26 953 34% 33= 


21% CPsvc 78 8 26 953 34% 

25 Compor 60 26 9 34 2S% 

11 Compsc I 307 17% 

11% cptvsn 50 735 14% 

23 ConAsa 87 23 17 550 374. 

13% ConnE 160 06 9 B 18% 

19% CrrnNG 240 86 9 7 28% 

10% Conroe 60 11 6 239 13 


U 12 3M 35% 35 35% + % 
8 26 953 34% 33% 33% + % 
16 9 24 25% 25% 25% 

■ 307 17V. 17 17% — % 


50 735 14% |3% 14 
17 550 374. 37 37% + 44 


0 184. 18% 18% 
7 28% 28% 28% 
239 13 12% 13 




24% ConsEd 260 *8 8 1017 36% 36% 36% + % 


* u 

6% Amtesc 
50V. Amoco 3700 XI 
26% AMP .72 23 
11% Amoco 70 15 


92 21% 71% 
44 71% 70% 
20 15V. 15 

O 2S2 34% 
121 48% 48 
127 2446 24% 


12% Amraps _ 

34% 20 % Amsifl 160 4.1 9 14 34% 

43% 25% Am Sled 160 4.1 13 97 40 

4 % 1 % Anocmp 467 3 

24% 16V* Aidoes 19 112 21% 

30*. 19’. Anchor 168 57 482 27 

42% 26% AltCJoy lm 16 34 612 39 

W. 9% AtldrGr 30 1J IS 36 114* 

24% 17 Anodic 80 27 13 147 24% 

32>. MV. Anheuss 12 305 32 

67% 47% Anhou pf 3-60 56 9 6646 

13% Anlxfr 78 1.9 16 127 15 

1*4. 8 % Anthem JH 7 15 178 U 

15'. 10 ’b Antftnv 640 JJ V 32 13% 

13 «U Apache 78 2J 10 100 10% 

•HI 1 % ApChPwt 199 116 

i«’» 15% AodiPuiUlO 11.1 207 19% 

3<% 27% ApPw pf A1B 127 IS 14 

31% 26 ApPj. pt 380 127 1 31 

3V% 18 ApIDto 1.761 A9 19 74 36 


5 "fi ”7% 
1700 XI 9 2797 64% 
72 27 20 1576 33% 
70 27 16 745 12 


70 27 16 745 12 11% 12 +% 

18 26 19% IBM 18% — % 

atiiS ss*«jp- ,% 

19 112 21% 21%- % 

14 34 6R » 

1J IS 36 114* 11% 114* 

27 13 147 24% 23% 24%— % 
. 12 305 32 31% 31%— % 

56 9 6646 6646 66% + % 

1.9 16 1 27 15 1444 14%—% 

7 15 178 U 17 13 +T 
37 9 32 13% 13% 13% + % 


15 15% + tt 

s*r-% 

11% 12 + % 
18 % 18 % — Va 


21 % — % 
26% + % 


is'- ln- a Anthnv 640 JJ 9 32 13% 13% 13% + % 

* Apache 78 2J 10 100 10% 10% 10% + % 

2% % ApdiPwt 199 116 1% 1%— % 

13% A* , S ,p “ n ^33 !H »7 19 % ism »%- % 

34% 27'. ApPw pf 4.18 127 IS 34 33% 34 + % 

31% 26 ApP» ot 0JJ0 1JJ l 31 31 31 - % 

39% 18 ApIDto 1.761 4.9 19 74 36 35% 35% + W 

15, .5^ Ana^AJO 137 13% 13% 13% + % 

AfCJ'Dn «b J 17 9523 2*% 23% 24% +1% 

30% 23% ArIPpt 378 117 11 30% 30 30% + % 

Igj, TV ArIPpf 1070 106 1240,100% Iffll 100% +1 

23% 14 ArkBil «0 1.9 g 84 21% 21% 21% 

24> 16 Arklp UB 57 IB 1400 184. 10% 18%—% 


•• •« ArlnRt 

IM* <*• Arm co 
24% IS 1 s Armc t>< 110 10,1 
24-« 1*'* ArmsRD 68 29 


959 8% 8% 8% + % 

35 m. 30% Tfif> + % 
7| 164* 16% 16% — % 


39' j :3‘. Armwin I Jo 36 647 181 38% 38% 38% 

34 * 19 AroCp 170 4.1 7 4 29 2041 39 

25% 17% AnmE 70 16 10 115 14% 13% 14% + % 

jjjj'i 16 Ariro 72 J 135 61 28 26% 77 —I 

22 % 14% Arvins 30 19 I 400 30% 20 % 20% 

T?-« 1 TH Awrce 
334* ?a— AthlOil 160 47 

O'l 31*: AshtOpl 3.96 97 


V£3h l 

4% CCX 
8% CCXi 
27 CIGN 
23% ClGc 
50% CIGl 
2% O.C 
23% CNA 
■% CNAI 
16% CNW 
35% CPC1 
14% 

19% 

18% 

24 
7% 

22% 

8 % 

113* 

3246 
13% 

11% 

15% 

3 

9V* 

59% 

94* 

14% 

150% 

15% 

180% 

ID 
28% 

15% 

19% 

19% CarP pf 
35% Car Tee 
7% 

17% 

18% 

20 % 


160a 67 11 
M0 U 20 


U» 3,1 

68 27 9 
: 475 96 
75b 17 
.12 .9 

60 
.161 
27D 

270 13 12 
68 
l M 

M 21 
77 13 ’D 
1077# 97 
68 

172 37 9 
60 17 11 
M U I 
267 1BJ 
2.10 56 9 
77 A 12 
9 

172 47 10 
32 17 15 
170 68 9 


35 ConEpf 465 1IL0 67100 

38% ConE p| 5.00 106 13 

21% CniFrts l.ia 36 11 232 

31 CnaNG 272 57 9 162 

4% Caa’iPw IB 1<m 

13 CnP DfA 4.16 119 90 

13% CnP ptS 450 145 50 

23% CnPpfO 765 147 100 

254. CnP DIE 772 146 300 

25 CnP pfG 776 148 3«tt 

11% CnP prV 460 157 148 

9% CnPprU 3-68 15-1 48 

10% CnP PrT 370 148 50 

11% CnPprR Jin 15.4 35 

10% CnP prP 3.98 115 37 

10W CnP prN 385 156 7 

7% CnPprMISO 147 4 

7 CnPprL 373 145 32 

11 CnPprS 4JO 155 24 

7% CnP PrK 263 147 5 

23% cm ICo 260 6.1 21 1986 

4% Contlll 77 


4% Contlll 
% Cantll rt 

% cmHdn 

4% Crrl Info 8 . . _ .. 

IBM ContTel I« 78 9 1859 23% 22% 23 + % 

24% a Data .72 28 1076 26 2SW 25% + % 

25% Canard 1,10 37 13 63 34H 34% 34% 

I vtCookU 12 14* 14* 14* 

27 Coopt 152 4J 16 860 35% 34*. 35% + % 

30 Cooplof 270 7J lit 37%. 37% 37% + 4* 

12% CoorTr 60 26 6 610 15% 15% 15% + % 

15 Coopvis 60 16 17 690 25% 24% 25% + % 

10% Coourfd 64 37 a 114* 10% 114* + 4* 

17% Cardura JM 37 17 91x25% 24% 254* + 4* 

10% Car* In 56 4.9 11 47 114. ir* li%— w 

304* ComGs 170 27 10 2460 44% 434* 44% +1% 


67100V 46% 45% 46% + % 
13x 48% 48 48 — % 

11 232 32% TF* 32% 

9 162 43% 43% 434* + % 

II M n 1 8%— u 

90z3ffl 30 30 

5ta 31 31 31 - % 

XS § s 

48 24 23% mi + 4B . 

50 25% 24% 25% +1% | 
35 26 25W 26 +4* 

37 254. 25'6 254. I 
7 25W 25 25 - % 

4 18 174* 17% — V* 1 

32 16 15% 15%—% 

24 26 254* 26 + 4* 

5 17% 17% 17V* 

21 1906 42% 42 <2% + 4* 

77 7% 7% TV. — V* 

1% l% + % 

258 ft 4. % 

H 196 II 1046 104.— % 


WE WERE RIGHT... 

THE “EXPERTS” WERE WRONG 


In extolling their virtues, gargantuan Wall Street firms, dwell upon the size of 
their research departments, promoting the fiction that having dozens of analysts, . 
insures stardom. This is pure sophistry. , . 

On the "Street," there is no correlation between the number of oracles and 
their ability to outperform the Dows. Oiir research department is 
orthodoxy, but large in concept and perception. "A superior man. a bniiiam 
portfolio manager muses; “not e committee, is needed to set the policy and 
assuming he has access to good information, one man can set the buy list 
if a Churchill can preside over a nation -at war- cannot “one" man pick, stocks? 
Similarly, nofirstrate investor wants to filter his ideas through a committee. When- 
Michelangelo, he notes, "falls of his scaffold, never presume that his colleagues 
can continue his work." To compare analysts to Michelangelo, is sacrilegious. 

We labor in a less noble milieu. As contrarian we subscribe to the law <rf 
contrary reason, rebuking prevailing opinion, seeking rewards by emulating the. 
“Power Elite." Since late 1981, approximately 90% of equities recommended by 
CGR subsequently advanced; while 92% of suggested “short sales" eventually 
buckled, among them APPLE. COLECO, COMMODORE and TANDY. 

When we “hit" the Quartet; APPLE was $ 56, COLECO $ 50, COMMODORE 
$ 56, and TANDY S 54. Today’s quotes? APPLE S 15. COLECO S 16. 
COMMODORE $ 9, TANDY S 32. Having prophecized (white the DOWS were, 
drooping under 795} that the “DJI'S WILL TOUCH 1,000 BEFORE HITTING 750:" 
CGR updated its vision a year ago, divining that the sacred Average would soar 
above 2000 with corollary upswings in secondary and "emerging equities."- 
Ignore the bleatings of bears. 

Send, or telephone, for your complimentary copy of our forthcoming report, a 
report that highlights a "special situation" that may spiral to fame... 


nAPTTAL CMC. Capital Venture Consultants - • r . 

Amsterdam B.V. l 

GAINS KafverstraatTI2 j 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands | 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Telex: 18536 



Name: 



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4 -'n« 


Statistics Index 

‘ AMEX jvtaM P.M - Ewntogs raped* P.li 
, h AMEX Mah*/im*pni Fsng rue nMa P.I3 
• WfBEPrtcM P.10 &»M markets PJ1 
. . Hvse msuamc P.J2 intana run p.» 

* Conodton Mocki P.14 Mortal switancrv P.W 
. AQnwcmhi P.11 Option* P .15 

COinnwdMM P-15 OTC Sack . P.J 2 
P .15 QHWf wcrtwtf P.16 

;• FRIDAY, JOT 28, 1985 


HoalOESribunc. 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


UjS. Stocks 
Report, Page 10. 
P««* 11 


TECHNOLOGY 


Major Advances in Energy: 
How to Bnm Coal— -Qeanly 




- .. v 

• ■> , 


By STUART DIAMOND 

New York Tima Senfce 

N EW YORK — The technology of homing txal is 
undergoing what energy experts say is the largest 
advance in mote than a century. Hundreds of compa- 
nies are researching and applying methodsto bum the 
traditionally dirty fuel as cleanly as ou. They include large boiler 
maifgw utilities anrT gngini^rmg companies as Well as small 
industries. 

Some of the impetus stems from stricter environmental laws to 
combat add rain and toxic waste. Abo, Congress late last year 
approved a 5750-nriHion dean-coal fund — a major new program 
in a ahrmlfing energy budget. ' - 


ICH 


’*** *5s3£ 


f The Electric iNwer Research r* -i 
. institute, the utility research WMU 18 tnc UDIKQ 

. arm, plans S582 nriffion for Statoa’ moat abundant 
dean-coal projects. Finally, it 1BOOT aonnoani 

is believed that other conven- conventional 
* ■ tionalfods — oil, gas, midear 
. and hydropower — face un- energy SOIlFOe. 

certain futures. . _ 

■" “The nation stands at a 

" ■ threshold of fundamental change in its technological base for 
; coal-fired generation,” said Knit E. Yeager, the research insti- 
tute’s coal vice president. 

Coal is the United States* most abundant conventional energy 
Vja source, with reserves far 500 years at curretxt use. Demand has 
B risen rapidly amid recent oil abodes. Coal how provides 56 
■ 7 percent of domestic electricity, up from 46 percent in 1973, and 
: 1_ 23 percent of all energy, up from 17 percent in 1973.. 

But traditional ebaiburning emits sulfur and nitrogen oxides, 
both components of add rain. Soot and fly ash cause further 
pollution. 

Recent efforts to dean the banting of coal have been costly or 
. ; imperfect Electrostatic precipitators trap flue-gas particles on 
metal {dates like dust to a doth, but many, particles escape. 
Scrubbers can remove sulfur from smokestack gases by injecting 
limestone and water, but each year one scrubber generates 
- enough pastelike waste from a an^e large plant to cover a square 
j” mile one foot deep. Italso can add 40 percailtoa plant’s cost and 
use up to 8 percent of the power output. 

T HE MAJOR new technology for sulfur removal is a fluid- 
ized bed which extracts the sulfur during combustion 
instead of in the stack. Conventionally, finely ground coal 
Jfc is shot into a furnace and bums in midair. Butin the new method, 
,7 ooal bums in a limestone bed agitated by air from below. Sulfur 
combmesvwth the Dmcstime without water, resulting m less waste 
- and furnace slagging. Low-quality fuel such as lignite, peat, 
garbage, wood, waste and cow manure can be used, without 
~ violating dean-air laws. 

After a decade of research into the process, commercialization 
1 is starting, and it is estimated that 200 existing plants can use it 
In Burnsville, Minnesota, a S50-nriflian, 125-megawatt unit is to 
open at a Northern States Power unit next year, with Foster 
Wheeler boilers. In Nuda, Colorado, a S35-mflEoa, 100-me^a- 
watt unit is to open, in 1987 at Colorado Ute Electric, with 
Pyropower Corp- boilers. And near Paducah, Kentuck y , a $220- 
- million, 160-megawatt unit at a Tennessee Valley Authority plant 
is to open in 1989, with Combustion Engineering bailers. 

At least 20 American and 32 foreign companies are competing 
for the market, as are engineering concerns such as Stone & 
^ Webster, Wormster, Bums A Roe, and Pbpe, Evans A Robbias. 
. x Several dozen industries have also built or planned units. 

Another technology for cleaner boring is known as combined- 
cycle coal gasification. Coal, steam and oxygen combine under 

dcfdouble wS^ley^f?tinS«togSrate ctectricityfand 
then are burned in a boiler, turning water to steam to generate 
more electricity in another turbine. The sulfur combines with 
hydrogen and can be removed for salt One plant, Texaco's 5284- 
mfflion, 100-megawatt Cool Water unit in Daggett, California, 
opened last year. Shell and CErLummus Crest arebnikfing one in 

(Contimed oo Page 13, CoL 1) 


Currency Rates 


OnMNldea Jum27 

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ports MD5 12575 MOl 4J77* 3J» I5.MB- 1441 3743* 

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1 SDH HOMI 0770* 365SB HQ. VMJl SM <UKt 25578 MUM 

CkBkv* in London and Zurich. RxkKB ft) athmr eunxwan centtrs. N*w York rat*s trf / PM. 
fa) C4ma»rciaSrninc{MAnm>rsnt»dedttibuvaiweODnd(c)AaioanlMnndadtoboyof* 
dollar (') UaffsoflttUxI Vnttsot 1JXJ0 (v> UaBs of IBM «4J_- not quoted: fLA^ natavaiimo. 
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AMtraLf 15024 srsskdrac. USJ1 MULM* 30UO SpouPMe* 17540 

Antfr.scML 2144 HwKwl 7705 U*5 ' Sand. krona M32 

(«.*.#. 4175 MftmrwM 1279 rtfijM TTM TatmmS Ml 

Brazil cm. &mflO MknpM 171*70 ftrLtscsds 11470 TObIMB 37J9S 

ComSont ua Iitti 0710* aMOrtvol USB TUtfcMiHra 53350 

DwKUkrtJM 107725 fnwflsMb 170770 BW.* 2*4 IHIMm 3473 

EBVPI.PMMI 0351* KmBHAur 0J0» S.A0r.raMd 17473 V^w-baOv. 1370 

cMw«m; LOU trisftc 

Scums: Baamadu Booster (BrutstrtsJ; Banco Commando* NoBoao (MBooJ,- Bonmm N* 
Hobo* da Porta (Porit); Bonk a i Tokyo (Tokyo): (MF (SDR): BAH fanor, rtya L dtrtioml. 
Omar data front Roafart ood AP. 


U.S. - EC 
f Pasta War’ 
Heats Up 

Europe Raises 
DutyonCXtrus 

Reuun 

LUXEMBOURG — The Euro- 
pean Community on Thursday an- 
nounced higher tariffs cm nuts and 
lemons imported from the United 
States in retaliation for Washing- 
ton's restrictions tm imports of pas- 
ta from the 10-nation bloc. 

Community import duty on U.S. 
lemons was more than doubled, to 
2) percent, from 8 peaxat Import 
duty on walnuts shipped in from 
the United States was more than 
trebled, to 30 percent, also up from 
8 percent. 

The higher tariffs, due to take 
effect in the next few days, were 
formally approved at a meeting of 
community environment ministers 
here Thursday as part of a speedy 
response to the U.S. move an- 
nounced on June 20, EC officials 
said. 

Sales of U.S. nuts and lemons to 
the community were worth S333 
million last year, they added. 

The comater-offenave in the so- 
called trans-Atlantic “pasta war” 
was touched off by U.S. objections 
to special arrangements favoring 
imports into the community of cit- 
rus fruit from neighboring Medi- 
terranean countries^ 

The community says citrus 
agreements for Israel, Tunisia and 
Morocco are pm of its develop- 
mental aid for the Mediterranean 
area. 

The increased community im- 
port tariffs on U.S. lemons and 
walnuts are designed to make up 
for Washington’s action an EC ex- 
ports of pasta to the United States, 
worth an estimated S28 mffl ion a 
year. 

The United States and the coat- 
mnmty have been at odds over the 
rilrus issue for almost IQ years. 

The Reagan administration jus- 
tified its move last week by saying 
the community had refused to ac- 
cept a ruling from the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Track 
tlul EC tariffs cm oranges and lem- 
ons be cot no later than October 
1985. 

In Brussels, meanwhile, Vice 
President George Bnsh called 
Thursday for increased efforts to 
stave off protectionism and prevent 
an all-out trade war. 

He warned the EC president, 
Jacques Ddors, aT the fragile mood 
of tbc American people in response 
to a sharp increase in imparts and 
stressed the importance of pressing 
ahead with a new round of global 
trade ta l ks , 

“The loss of overseas markets 
has aggravated that mood,” a se- 
nior UJS. diplomat told reporters. 

The United Stales bhunes the 
community's export subsidy sys- 
tem for hurting American fanners, 
while Europeans say the high UJS. 
dollar has given European products 
the edge- 



BP Benefits From In-House Bank 

Asea, Volvo, GEC Use Own Units in Capital Markets 

By Colin Chapman 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Directors of 
British Petroleum PLC are sin- 
gle-minded to a degree when it 
cranes to explaining why the big 
oil company decided to set up its 
own in-housc bank. 

“Our aims are to maximize 
value for our shareholders, to use 
our financial strengths in as effi- 
ckaui and effective a manner as 
possible, and to get the maxi- 
mum value for our liquid cash 
holdings," Robert Horton, BP’S 

managing director, Finnnrt* , said. 

“Ills entirely to do with mak- 
ing money," he added. That is 
what we are in business for. We 
are not in business to compete join, Browne, 
with the banks: Our basic cran- 

SSiin^ ihe Bp,s w prompted by a keis. and General Electric C 

finauda I revolution ini jfe Sw the British ^electrical groi 
r ,-Tin 1 , Ti of London, where traditional forming GEC Finance. 

SS 1 " bMriers between banks, stock- Another major Europe 
make them woricas best "^a^- brokers and other financial Insti- company followed suit this we 

Mr. Horton, who senthw unions are being broken down, asEAaR, the Swedish decui 
with the idea that BP should and by the experience of large and electronics group, esu 
break with tradition and act as U.S. corporations like. General lished a fully-owned subadis 
its own banker, said that the Motors Corp. and Chrysler ASEA Kapualforvaltmng / 
move cu is out mtermedxanes ana Corp. in entering financial mar- which will act as an independ 
should save BP "tens of mdhons ^ hrc&er in the Swedish nwa 

of dollars a year. Since British Petroleum Fi- markets. 

And even before the first com- nance International (BPFI) was ASEA. which has liquid ass 
plete year of the scheme, BP ex- established at the beginning of of about $780 million, said 
ecu lives are happy with the new the year, other European compa- would be applying to the Sw 
bank. rues have moved in a similar di- ish Rank Inspection Board fc 

-It’s early days yet, but the rectiou, with Volvo AB, the money-market dealer’s lice 
bank is going much better than Swedish automaker, establishing for the new company, which i 

we anticipated," Mr. Horton a financial-services subsidiary, 

AB Forms, to enter capital mar- — 



Baxter Sweetens 
Bid for American 
Hospital Supply 



Robert Horton. 


kets, and General Electric Gx 
the British electrical group, 
forming GEC Finance. 

Another major European 
company followed suit this week. 
ASEA AB, the Swedish decuical 
and electronics group, estab- 
lished a fully-owned subsidiary, 
ASEA KapitaUbrvaltmng AB, 
which will act as an independent 
broker in the Swedish money 
markets. 

ASEA, which has liquid assets 
of about $780 miUion, said it 
would be applying to the Swed- 
ish Bank Inspaxkm Board fra: a 
money-market dealer’s License 
for the new company, which will 

(Continned on Page 151, CoL Si 


Stevens to Sell Most Apparel Plants 


Compiled tp (hr Staff Fhm Dispatches 

GREENVILLE, South Carolina 
— J.P. Stevens & Co. announced 
Thursday that it would try to sdl 
about a fourth of the company’s 
holdings, a move that would take it 
almost totally out of the apparef- 
making business. 

The holdings for sale include 18 
apparel plants in four states em- 
ploying 7,500 workers. Hie compa-. 
ny, the second largest US. textile 
maker, said the move was designed 
to “reduce its exposure" to cheap 
imports. 

Whitney Stevens, the chairman, 
said the sale “would represent a 
very considerable reduction in the 
size of the company." 

After the announcement, Ste- 
vens stock rose S2J0, to S22B75 on 
the-NewYorit Slock Exchange, and 
was among the day’s biggest gain- 
era. 

Wall Street analysts viewed the 
derision favorably, noting that the 
company can increase its profit- 
ability by focusing on its more sue- 1 
cessfui housewear and industrial- 
fabrics operations. 

"The competition from overseas 
fabrics producers, as well as slow | 
retail sides in this country, has i 
made the apparel fabrics part of 
Stevens's business highly unsuc- 
cessful," said Edward Johnson of 
Johnson Redbook Services. 


China’s Falling Reserves 
Are Put at $12 BiUion 


Interest Rales 


DMtar D Mart Franc Staffed Pranc. - ECU SDR 
atoatn 7llr79t> JMX> SfrAfr 13*6-1214 MMD* W-Afe 7*6 

maa»* .7*b-7*> 5fh«H 5tW5to 12 Mr-12 H. 1016-1034 714 

month* 7*6-716 5 Uk 5*4 5vw5t6 12W-T216 TO6-T«V6 *16416 714 

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Sourvm; Morgan Guaranty (t*Bar. DAS. SF. Pound, FFJs Uoydt Bank (ECU); Radars 
(SDR). Ratata gatlc a m toMorbank danulhi ata ndUkm minimum tarmndvaOrdt. 


■ BEUING — Western bankess in 
Bering forecast Thursday that Chi- 
na’s foreign-exchange reserves 
have fallen to $11 or $12 ixllion 
and warned that the shortage, 
Mamed for a sharp fall in imparts 
and delayed foreign contracts, will 
last at least until next year. 

Reserves were last quoted offi- 
cially at $14.42 bOKon, excluding 
grid, at the end of last year. The 
figure for the end cf the first quar- 
ter is long overdne, the bankers 
said. 

“Tins time a year ago, we had 
been oven the figure for end- 
MarchT one banker said. *Tt has 
not been published this year be- 
cause the authorities consider it too 
low." 

Last September, foreign-ex- 
change reserves stood at a record 
$16.67 Mliion. 

An analyst concerned with trade 
between Japan and Puna put the 
resCTves at $13.03 bOKon at the end 
of February. But bankers stressed 
the shortage is more acute and cited 


trains and telecommunications 
equipment in the first quarter. 

In addition, they said, China had 
increased its investment in Hong 
Kong during the quarter. 

According to one Japanese 
banker, the reserves problem began 
last antumn, when hanlringi units in 
the provinces used foreign ex- 
change for purchasing consumer 
imports, which do not generate for- 
eign currency. 

Thai was stopped in March 
when new chids were appointed to 
the Bank of China and the People's 
Bank of (Tuna. 

The Japanese banker said his 
country would be hardest hit by 
China's cat in import’s and cited 
consumer-goods manufacturers in 
particular. 

But another banker maintained 
that the import cuts also are politi- 


cally motivated. 
“There is also ; 


KeyMwM'r 


twmliiiM 

J cmiHfran 

’ «D64M**W» 


OraraMHRato 


Claw Mw. 

7Kt 7 Vi 

I 7 5714 

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H6W6 S64H 
744 74* 

US 479 

774 7.17 

775 72* 
7-29 ue 


476 477 

551 555 

550 355 

570 £70 

US £75 


1016 - 10*6 
TO6 W4 
103714 103/14 
1M Utt 
io3/i4 warn 


WoHwDfiyBlte 

JaneZr 


“There is also apolitical dement 
in China's spending," this banker 
said. “China wants to build up 
Western Europe by giving it more 
business and reduce the level of 
imports from Japan. You don't sell 
to China: It derides to buy.” 


7*6 -7H 
716-716 
716-716 
716-616 
46-16 


VA Ww ayMtekat F—4» 

JnneS7 

MtrrU LncM ftmtr Ants 
a* day ii vi ai yWd; 744 

Ttteratt wmw Rot* Dwtax: MA 

Source: Merritt Lmcti AP 


U.K. Trade Surplus 'Widened 
To $934 Million During May 


Gold 


MkMUUk 1316 1216 

... MW iM f 12* C&b 

IT o b»*Hi HOrtwt 15*714 196 


S 5 
iitu A6 

asm * jtm 


Sauretrt stadar* Caanaandnmk. Oitad 
U otmn lM. UwragaMt BankcTMan. 


JaneS7 

AM. PJA. one 

HhmKmw 31475 33430 +030 

t in t — boon 31425 ' — +171 

Porto nisMw.nsji ii«5 -u> 

ZWrtCh 314.15 3U70 —TSS 

r radon - 31425. -'SISfl —US 

awwVBHt.- . ■— 314W +0M 

Luxembourg, Part* **/ London o HUM flx> 
tosw Hang Kang ood Zmiai opening and 
efeotw Pfhoatt. How. Wwt Canaan earrmd 
■ ceatnxzAtfpr&af kt UASanroonoa. 
Scarce: Rooter* 


LONDON — Britain's cunent- 
accomt smplus widened to £724 
million ($9>4-imllkin) in May, its 
best showing snee February, 1984, 
-as monthly trade figures swung 
hade mm surp lus , the government 
announced Thursday. 

Department of Trade and Indiis- 
try statistics showed that merchan- 
dise trade turned around to show a 
surplus of £224 minio n in May 
from a deficit of £277 million in 

April. 

The current-account smplus 
compares with April's upward re- 
vised £7-7- 3 -minion surplus. 

The improved perform an ce was 

attributed to a big drop in imports. 


In Mnr, imports Fell by £616 mil- 
lion, to £6-56 brUicm, while exports 


dropped by £115 million, to £6.78 
bfflujn. 

The surplus on the current ac- 
count, which measures trade in 
goods and services as well as inter- 
est, dividends and certain transfers, 
included an estimated £500-nrilhon 
in e a min g t from nonmerriiandise 
items, such as shipping, hanking , 
tourism and government transac- 
tions. 

In the first five months of this 
year, the balance of trade has 
shown a. total surplus of £1.07 bH- 
tibn. 

- Government officials called the 
May figures for trade very good. 
The statistics represented a turn- 
around from the worst ever viable 
trade deficit of about £1 billion in 
. March. 

(AP, Reuters) 


If the proposed divestiture is suc- 
cessful the company said, it will 
concentrate on towds, sheets, bed- 
room accessories, carpets, industri- 
al fabrics, auto products and elastic 
products. 

Mr. Stevens said he would know 
within six months if there was in- 
terest in buying the plants: There 
already have been some “some un- 
solicited expressions of interest,” 
he said. 

Stevens has corporate headquar- 
ters in New York, but its manufac- 
turing headquarters is is Green- 
ville. 

The company is selling four divi- 
sions: Delta Fabrics, which has six 
plants in South Carolina; Woolen 
and Wasted Fabrics, with five 


plants in Georgia; United Elastic 
Fabrics, with two plants in Virgin- 
ia; and Stevcokmt Fabrics, with 
five plants in North Carolina. Each 
division will be sold as a unit. 

The four divisions will contrib- 
ute an estimated $487 milli on to 
Stevens’s total estimated sates of 
$2.1 tuition in 1985, a company 
spokesman said. As a whole, the 
four businesses are “breaking 
even,” Mr. Stevens said. 

“If they are not sold, we will 
continue to operate than,” he said. 
“They will not be dosed.” 

Stevens mil not sdl its Fine 
Goods divisan. which makes shirts 
for men and women, its only other 
apparel-making division. 

(AP, Reuters) 


Conned by Our Staff Front Dupateha 

DEERFIELD, minors — Baxter 
Travenol Laboratories loo. derid- 
ing to pursue a hostile bid for 
American Hospital Supply Corp., 
said Thursday that it bad sweet- 
ened its offer bv guaranteeing 
American's shareholders $50 a 
share, either in cash or Baxter secu- 
rities. 

The announcement was Baxter’s 
latest attempt to prevent American 
Hospital's previously approved 
merger with Hospital Corp. of 
America. 

American Hospital’s directors 
cm Tuesday unanimously rejected 
an earlier offer from Baxter, saying 
the long-range benefits to share- 
holders would be greater if the 
company merged with HCA under 
an agreement reached March 31. 

American Hospital, based in Ev- 
anston, Illinois, had no immediate 
comment 

Baxter dosed off 25 cents at 
$15,375 in trading Thursday. 
American Hospital was up $1 to 
$38,875, and HCA was up 37.5 
cents to $48,625. American Hospi- 
tal and Baxter Travenol were 
among the New York Stock Ex- 
change's most active: 

The new offer was basically the 
same as its original, offering $50 a 
share for outstanding common 
shares, half in cash and half in 
stock, far a total of about $3.7 
ration. But Baxter amended the 
offer to include shares of preferred 
stock, and guaranteed the vahie of 
the preferred at $50 each. 

After American HospitaTs re- 
buff, Baxter Travenol announced 
Wednesday that it had set up a 
£L5-WDk>n credit tine with a group 
of 21 banks. Baxter said the syndi- 
cation, led by First National Bank 
of Chicago and Morgan Guaranty 
Trust Co. of New York, was heavi- 
ly oversubscribed. 

Concern about the amount of 
credit that Baxter Travenol would 
have to line up was died as a factor 
in American HospitaTs rejection. 

The new offer was made in a 
tetter sent Thursday from Vernon 
R. Loucks Jr, Baxters president 
and chief executive officer, to Kail 
D. Bays, chairman and chief execu- 
tive officer of American Hospital 


“Our objective is to offer your 
board of directors a dear choice 
between $50 and the $35 vahie of 
Ute HCA transaction,” the letter 
sakL 

Mr. Loucks also said the $50 
value was guaranteed even if Amer- 
ican Hospital and HCA completed 
the exchange of new shares of stock 
under a provision of their merger 
agreement, designed to eliminate a 
third-party offer. 

His letter said there would be 
“no downward adjustment of the 
consideration offered to your cur- 
rent stockholders if you affect the 
share exchange with HCA.” 

But Baxter said Thursday that it 
would not consider its offer as hav- 
ing been rejected until American 
Hospital's stockholders have voted 
on HCA offer at a July 12 meeting. 

It said it would extend its offer 
beyond July 15 if American Hospi- 
tal is "required in good faith” to 
postpone the stockholder meeting. 

(AP, Reuters) 


Dollar Is Mixed 
InN.Y. Trading 

The Associated /Vow 

NEW YORK — Both the 
dollar and gold were mixed in 
extremely hght, tcchically ori- 
ented trading Thursday. 1 

Dealers ' said there were no 
major factors to influence the 
dollar. One Fr ankf urt / frqlw 
said the market was waiting for 
die release Friday of the uil 
index of leading economic indi- 
catora, which was expected to 
show an increase of up to 1.2 
peroent over ApriL 

In New York, the pound 
eased to $1.2955 from $1.2975 
late Wednesday. Other late 
New York dollar rates and 
comparable Tuesday rates in- 
cluded: 3.051 Dentache marks, 
up from 3.046; 2^565 Swiss 
francs, from 2.5415; 9.295 
French francs, from 9.28; 1,947 
Italian tire, down slightly from 
1,949, and 249X15 Japanese yen, 
up from 248.65. 



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Trade Development Bank 


An American Express company 











Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


Umffsdays 


Q Month 
HWiUtw Stock 


YM. P6 


NVSE 


Closing 


34ft 261b Oh Ed of AM 122 

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58% 41 OtlEOPf 72* JIB 

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32% 25% OhEd Pi 3-06# S5 

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311a 21 Onea »r J 

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60 AT* OhEdPf 804 J2.9 

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17to liv, OhMntr JQ 12 u 


511 

MHHWnLOW 

4007 36’*. M 1 - 
Jpl 3S% 3SV> 
MtfXSdft 55% 
SOI 43 67 

200 32U 
41 28* W 


CM* 

Qua. Orta 


12 Month 
KtehLaw stock 


Sts. 

to won low 


36 3m 30*1 
4 14V. 16 
2502 68 67 

1IB 87 87 

211 121" 12*6 
3 33 33 

i2n to Kt anwr 
(SHOW lOWl 

but io% nod 

15701 75W 75 
mniB a7=i 
1204 24W 34 
61 31« 31 
640 6M 4 Vs 

>7 i2% >ra 

84 D'.l 32ft 
56 277* 2m 
116 10% <0% 
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854 11% Mtt 
1 !»■ 81* 
41 314a 304* 
5706 21V: 19% 
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236 35% 35% 
1048 46% 44% 
713 14 13% 


32% 25% ChlPpfH JJ-7 
71 H iffto OhPpfG 2-g 11.1 


Tables include Hie nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


?2 Month 
MohLOw Stock 


Sfc. Cla» 

Wv. VM. PE 1005 Htfi uw> Ouor. OTpa 


(Continued from Page 10) 


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1 ,t+.? 

’ft 

25% + « 

JP-._ In 

n* 

17% 

18% — % 
243* — Va 
8 

19 — w 
26% - l. 


18"* — v* 

4‘t: 

l»i— 

3% - S 
41* + 
IP- - % 

11 a * l. 

If; 

IS': — % 
IP. 


•fc-i. 


u:, 

!6 -r % 
33 - v* 
3»* 

1?. + 18 
l r » — '* 
■12% +K, 
M, + 1* 


T5W, 16 + Vb 

361ft 37 — Vi 
21b Jib + % 
9% 9%— (ft 
9 9 —1% 

8% 8% + lb 

5% 5% 

20% 21 +% 
Sift 8% 

10 % 10 % — % 
23% 34% + V, 
28% 28% + Ur 
61ft 61* + Vb 
5% 5% — H 
18% 18% — (b 
11% 11% * % 
4% 4%— Hi 
ITU 18 
3% 3 % 
39% 39% + (ft 
14ft 17 
5% 5% — 14 
15% 27 +1% 

12% 13% + % 
2% 3 

nib 23V. -ft 
17% 11% 
lft lft + ft 
10% 11 
1 llu + % 
lft HA 
6ft 7ft 
49ft 49% — ft 
7 7 

31ft Jlft— ft 

9ft 7ft 
0% a% — ft 


17Mcntti _ 
HW»LBW Mock 


Pie. YkL P6 WCSMjfiLixr 


CMS* 

gpot-Cn'M 


itManlli _ 
WcaLnw Stock. 


<i« Ckat _ 

enc Him tan Quit cirw 


(2 Month 

Mon low 5W 


15ft— 1, 
28 +i* 
309b 

14 + Vb 

381:— ft 

48ft + ft 
19ft 

22 + ’b 

70 

66 —lft 
2ft , 

131* + ’* 
6% 

15ft 

16% + It 
25 - Vb 
BV. + ft 


11 lPi 


«!*« 20ft 
15ft 12ft 
43'b 27 
19ft 17% 

B'A IB 
79ft 22 

49ft »ft 

35 22 

10 Sft 

77ft IBP- 
22% 14% 
26% 17 
44 29 

38% 21", 
26ft 21'* 
31 23 

37V* 23 
16ft lift 

S', tft 
77V? 14% 
20 11% 
17ft 10ft 
Kft 55ft 

29 19% 
2»v, law 

17V* lift 
27ft 15ft 
» 33% 

30 30ft 
43ft 31ft 
64ft 41>b 
24ft 179* 
23% It'., 
3Mb 11 
50ft 39ft 
71ft 7ft 
16% 11% 

31 \9Vs 
15ft 21% 

11 8% 
3ft 7ft 

ao>* i4W 
Tift 9ft 
34'* 74 
21'& 15W 
34 26ft 

12 8ft 

39 24 

53V* 34ft 
71% ISVk 
17ft 2 
79ft 34ft 
21% 18ft 
19 14ft 

7% 3ft 
49ft 239ft 
39 TSVb 
14 4% 

52ft 43ft 
49ft 34ft 
lift 7 
38 Vi 26 
47% 37ft 
21V, 17ft 
35% 28% 
15% lift 
65 39ft 
38% 29ft 


lft- ft 
47ft * ft 
108ft— 3 
+ '* 
37ft + ft 
7ft- ft 
Jft 

l*ft + ii 

lift + '* 
44V, — ft 
7ft— lb 
18 + ft 


lft— ft 
42 W— ft 
ll%— ft 
50 + ft 


17% 

13ft 

10V, + ft 

SH 

9ft + ft 
ft— Vo 
38ft— ft 
Bft + lb 
lft + ft 
Oft 

44ft— ft 
77ft 

31ft— ft 
28 
23% 

25ft 

11% — U 
41ft 

24% 

zib + ft 
13% + V* 
31ft 

48% + lb 
34 + V* 

33ft +1 
21ft + lb 
27 + V. 

4ft— lb 
31ft— ft 
27=* — ft 
17% + ft 
24 — lb 
38ft— W 
34% + W 
4SW + l, 
55% + W 
24ft 

27ft +11* 
10ft + ft 
2 

lift — (4 
37W +lft 
8W 

579b + % 
13 — % 
52% + ft 
21 — ft 

18% 

27ft + ft 
Z7ft + % 
24W— ft 
17% + ft 
12% — ft 


A Wil 36 13M 1T« 

JOe 13 15 10 J4W 24*4 

22 JJ 337 »'<« 8ft 

tm 40 11 2049 49ft 6?’. 

1438 U II 34 47% £7 

1.16 3J3 U W71 38ft 38<m 

200 1X4 14 104 U 14ft 

US 5.1 7 141 367? 36 ft 

.166 10 13 9004 'Jr'.: ltr* 

Ije 44 13 15 26W 26 

120 80 35 3V 38% 

2JD IDS 20 23 33% 

2J8 ftJ !I 23ft 3ft 

100 21 11 UB 43% 41% 

UO u 10 547 34 33ft 

Z139JU 43 5 Aft 


X16 73 91031S 37% 
7.92 V 7 S33 3ft 


. V 7 833 31a 
UO 40 B 3 3% 

2L72 40 *0 450 40 

X82 91 7 38V, 

1A3 90 4 341: 

1X2 57 419 30T* 

2J 12 423 34% 
19 215 W% 

5 235 7 


_ tt 1223 
30 403 
UA 70 8 261 

600 73 9 1» 
S3 20 II 4 
US 7J te 243 


57 4X304 54 

200 

1.92 3A 10 3494 
10 (J 1 7 

104 <J II 447 
lit U 17 IZU 
JO 3J 19 1405 
06 2J 12 81 

X2 X7 10 13 

280 SS 8 1027 
II 95 
St 18 9 46 

.96 3X II 250 
108 3J TO 8 
1.2EOI13 40 

.12 40 7 

76 X9 10 4 

74 40 9 744 

UO 30 13 2553 
19 53 h 3963 
141 U It 34 
100 90 970? 

JO 2X 10 305 

1.10 2J 10 357 

ij 4 aj is iso 


Wb— ft 
34W — W 
lft- % . 
49% — ft 
6T4- % 
3&'i + V, 1 
14ft— 'b 
34ft + l b 

16ft + ft 1 
26',.- . .1 
39 + W 

2ffft + *» 

a% + '* | 

*2% +1 I 

3 V* + *4 
6% 

ir., + ft 
22 — ft 
26'* + lb 
3?ft + Vt 
38ft - '* 
aft 

3 »- 'A 
36'9 + 

uv: 

6*1 

Jaft + w 
14 — ft 
17% + ft 
Wi + h 
26 W + ft 
251, 

17 %-% 
18% — 1: 
53*. — 'A 
37% + % 
39% - ft 
63". + 'A 
2291 + % 
23% + is 
lift 

47b — W 
?Fb + ft 
73% + ft 
29ft- ft 
32 — W 
10% 

3 

19% — •* 
II + 'i 
31% + 7k 
23% 

27ft— ft 
lift— ft 
27% + V, 
toft — a 

n 

2% + Vb 
77% + ft 
19% — % 
18 % + % 
5%— 'ft 
3S%— % 
35% 

11 + W 

«%- ft 
45ft + % 

7 

38ft + % 
45T« + % 
18ft + (A 


saw soft 

27V. 19% 
jo aow 
37% 13 
31% 30% 
43% 7Mb 
4ft 4 
8% SH 
19% ltft 
25ft 11W 
14% 8% 

41% 30’, 
I Sib 9% 
19 16 

41 30 

17% 11% 


4.16 70 
XS7el3J 
2.50 9 3 
40 13 23 
100 lj 8 
04 10 17 
9J T 
20 13 15 
-SO X? 
.10b S 38 
1.10 BJ 
100 7J 10 
.44 14 12 
00 <U 10 
JO 20 10 
JO 17 8 


61 SI% STL. 

122 26ft *4 

11 PI* J7 1 * 

87 3? 31 

12 27’* tr r . 

UK to J « toft 
7 5 '- 
V 4 l # 

J3? 11% IHV 

Sv Sl'a 51' » 
28 13'*. 13 

123 41 40% 

39 13' a 13 
11 17 17 

168 39% J9W 
26 15 14* 


SJH + H 
24% + '+ 
271* — % 
3t:* + % 

27’b + '+ 

toft — 

61. + •• 
ir, 

Sl'a - '» 
73W 

41 + W 

13 

17 

3*j + '. 
IS + 


JO'i 19 
4 2‘* 

toft 24% 
13% 9ft 
2Sft 17% 
8% 3% 

tin b% 

51% 28 
W. 54 
91% 69 
n ffs 
6P* SI 
6« 51% 

MU lift 
45ft 281- 
78U al 


vawrpf 

voie»in 

vaitom 

veren 

vac ton 

Vara 

weaco 

VeiW 

tfrntSe 

Vtocam 

uoEPpf 
VaEPPI 
vaE PU 
V'oEP of 
VoEPol 

Vithevs 

vanwo 

l/uknM 


cry, tv PC_ 
144 150 


5H. 

utat+w u*» 
i? rii. 3S> 


Obi* 

qwftOfta 


M « 14 
JO 34 37 
A II U 
16(1 

1X0003.4 
.« .« 2- 
7.77 107 
1 75 W.7 
772 110 
7 70 10.9 
7*5 113 u 


:jo is i? 


J? t3,W 
« i'- 
40 ::■* 
74 If 
340 ?«% 
74 ll’« 
Jfl 10% 

?T 3 
?l H»» 
19S 4Sft 

jok n 

100! 91 

1W, 70 
100: ti'- 
24U: 69 
9 20 - : 
72 «;-• 
» rt% 


** - 

}«• f ft 
lift * • 

tou-w 

91 

73 

MW 
M -I 

47ft- ft 


32ft UAL !0Oe 1.9 8 
25 UALPf 140 7j 
7% UCCEL W 

lift UGI 204 8.7 10 
19V, UCHPt 2J5 10.9 
I'b UNCRn 

10 URS JO is 15 
17H USFG 220 *0 J9 
22% U5G, 1 JB AD 7 
13 UnlPrtf JO U 11 
75 UmNV 5X4e 52 10 
31% UCama U4 4J 11 
37% UnCarb 3J0 7J 10 
4% UnkmC 

12 UnElec U2 90 7 
75ft Ua&lof 400 11.1 
29 UnEJpf A50 11.9 
24ft UnElpfMfJM 113 
4b'a UE1 PfL 800 1U 
1BW UnElPf 2.98 1X« 
13ib UnElPf XU 109 
19ft UnElPf 172 10J 
to UnElPf 7J4 11 J 
50 UEIPfH 8J» 11J 
34W UnPac UO M IS 
87 UnPCPf 7X5 60 
11% Unlml .18 3 13 

$0 unrvlpf 800 140 
Jft Ural (Or 

10W UnBma 11 

9% UBrapf 

S ft uCbiiv .14 J 68 
ft UnEnro 2JB 9X 19 


2850 53% 52% 
637 JH- 32ft 
1067 15 U 
735 23% 73': 
120 : TT. 3 Sft 
89 9% 9U 
138 1 1»s 10*S 
1434 V J4ft 
1184 43 41ft 
43 13% 13W 
182 1W*10»% 
851 34ft 34 
6144 46% 


5018 IP: 
390iB 
40: 37% 


VXan 

144 77% 
1 199* 
21 26% 
I90x At 
1540Z 73 

an « 

111 107V> 


1 iT 

14 I5<4 
40 43W 

592 271b 
710 18% 
21 29% 
30(h 17% 

15 7973 

5? 21% 

12 47'* 

36 «V 

37 13% 

14 3% 

3509 35% 
517 7% 
141 34% 
634 38 
1395 27% 

9 57% 
8 130 

171 29 
1771 37% 
2049 81 

10 716 
5693 41% 

322 34% 
3433 23% 

2 28% 
39 19% 
271 28ft 

38 7916 
X 2a 
*4 24% 

352 2DW 
2954 29% 
U43*M8ft 
138 34% 
31 10% 
610 25ft 
4 27% 
<0 77W 
29 Ml, 
472 19% 
IRS 24% 
3 22Vj 

13 34 

3 34ft 


9 Ullhim 200 10J 
19% uiliu Pf X97 1X9 
11% UUhiPr 2X0 1X6 


2TVb Uiliu pf 400 lift 
10 UUlu pf 1.90 13J 
15 Unitlnd M2 7 9 
35*i Unillm 02 J 34 
36ft U-lerBk 106 15 la 
7% UtdMM 11 


7V. UPkMn 
33 UKUrG .12 X 
5% USHofK 
291, USLaOV JO X2 
23 USShoe 06 7J 


27 USStcal 100 3J 19 
49% USSIJPf AJlelZX 



^b + H 
9% 

70 + % 

25% + ft 
74*,— l, 
2ft 

74 +1 

]7U 
30 

77li + % 
34ft— ■* 
14% + % 
58% +1 
316 

256ft— 1% 
17% + % 
3K8 + Vb 
33% + ft 
42ft + 13 

^+1% 
10%—% 
231b— ft 
3718 + V* 
31% + ft 
32 — % 
33ft + ft 
27ft— ft 
97 + ft 

15ft— ft 
38% + ft 
3% — ft 
54V, +1V* 
58 
9ft 
27% 

Z7VS + % 
Bft + ft 
14% + tb 
16ft + lb 
21V. 

1416 + ft 
98%—% 
71b + ft 
57% — % 
18 + ft 

52% — 16 
47ft + ft 
7% 

10% + ft 
30ft + ft 
1716 + (6 
21 +1 
20 +16 
77% 

26% + H 
WA + V, 
1B%— W 
17% + ft 
41W +1% 
49 + % 
47 + ft 

14ft 

3 + ft 
9 + ft 

MW + to 
19V6 + V8 
14% 14% 

29% 29!, + ft 

sifrIS 

18% 19V. + 16 
47ft to — % 
SI SI —ft 
2tto 21%-% 

25* 25* 

11% ll%— to 


57to U SWe*t 5.72 7.1 
4% UnSlck 

31 V. UhTech 1J0 3> 
29% UTdlpf 255 4.9 
17% uniTel 1.93 &2 
21% UhS7 3pf us® 53 
14ft UWR| US ts 
21 unitrde 20 2 

14% unlvor JA 42 
7ft UnvDew XOe J 


19% univFd ... ._ ._ 

ISto On Leaf 100 4J 7 
28 Unocal UO 4.1 7 

4S UPiohn 10 li I! 
23ft USLIPE 104 29 ID 
8ft U0foFd 1040 9.9 
30ft UloPL 2X7 90 14 


XOe J 18 
1.12 4J 12 


21% UlPLpf 200 10X 
21ft UlPLpf 290 IOJ 
18ft UlPLpf 2X4 IOJ 
15% UtPLaf 304 lOj 
15ft UlIIICo TX2b 5.4 
18 UHICdPf 244 109 


18% UlMCa pf 241 109 
29ft UtiICa Pf 4.12 120 


53ft — 

32'S — ’•* 
15 +1% 

33'-— ft 

S'V 

b - . — ' a 
lift * % 
36’:- ‘S 
42 - to 

lift , 
105 + % 

36',— ft 
4511 91% 
+ ft 
19' * . 

3a — a 

371. 

CT? + J» 
71 + % 

77’i + ft 
i9i» — 

2tft + ft 
at + % 
48 —3 
47ft + ft 
107'i + to 
701, 

SI - ft 
3% — '» 
14!, 

15*. 

43W + % 
31 + "* 

18V, — ft 
201b + V: 

29ft + ft 

ii-. 

42*1 

toft — ft 
13% + 'b 

3§ft + to 
TH + lb 
36*. + % , 
jr* + ft 
77** — ft , 
53% — % i 
im + % 
M>— ft 
37% + ft 
BOH— % 
7'i 

41H + 'b 
34ft + H 
23to — ft 
28% 

19H— ft 
28 +1 
1916 + ft 
25H— ft 
26ft + H 
20% 

STto— lb 

ioaw +u* 

34ft + ft 
10'., 

2Sft + to 
271* + I* 
27V, — (6 
tin 

19% + to 
24% + lb 
22H— Vb 
24 + '6 

341, — to 


Wft Mto WICOR IJO 70 8 \\ *JJ* jj- - * 3JJ- 

^ ft ESi? ^ il J« » 'ft ^ 

3 % 3 ?'-: SSSSR JI 3 » 

116 si WIMrlPf 1* ,0 T~e 171: 2IV 

30’. i7ft VWJlerhS M U l* to ;ji, nifi 

Oft 15% WkHR9Bl^ , « J? 26%— % 

JB'b 25% WalCSv 0 I; J jji, 371* HI. * u 

w. a woium IJO ,xb a JZ3. J «% « 1 2 
9% TV j WnrtJPf U& I®-? „ S' jiZ ML 

M 15 ” ?S jlft 38ft Jlto + f i 


r ,S?5SS5g? .3 H ' J & f-ft 

P 55 SSSs. 38° u II 3 S SKI Sift +H 

^ISS£i«g.! .ilEEBil 

19ft 12 Wendy » Jl U J8 «?a 17% «• » IJJ-'Tft 

s% &s;g& « a » i jg « ; t U 

v, ssssss; 1 * £ ft! ^ s’* p; 

j?> £ saw 200 94 i ‘g -■ % |g- jC 

MH StoWAlrpf X14 9J 33 13 l;to 13%-^ 

B% ?*-WCNA >=£ j’- « 


51 38 WCNApfTJS 19J '3 

176'V 92 wpoci >8 , J nib iir, H 

UV. 5V. wunlon 373 ”, i U H il* .... 

58 U't WnUnpf i B Bft W , 

41% 76 WnUpfC ,■ Mj; “w ~ to 

,K SlKSSI 

Mto 38to wlwE IJO IS M 1634 Mft J4ft + vj 

*1% !-S ? ! .1 %S 


41% S'i WMtvc 10 3( « 58 lift 38% »%tft 
» ¥«erh IJO *J N M*? 2f% JQ »%+% 


*4% 34% Wevrpf 200 A7 
51% *3%Wevrpr 400 90 
241* 6% vlWhPlI 

40 14<« vlWPlfpfB 

jb ioi, viwnPii pf 


■ 33 411, 41% 41»b + n 
15 49-» »V> 49% 

15 ’ft 7ft 7*, 

1082 a 21 21 

izm li 1* 16 


Si: 37% ffi'lM 41 10 B 47ft 4%, Cft-H 

S& SSsSSSSSmr&S 2 gSsfi-18 

37% 17% Whilefil 13 MS 32 CT* 

25V, 14>, wnlimk M 2J n 12< 23ft Jft ^ + ft 

17% 6% WleWdl 45 « 9ft 9% Mj 

lift a WKH/rin 12 BS 12*4 12 12>| 

31ft 72% William 1.40 40 7 1263 29 »H 2».— , 

5V- 2 WUmEI 307 S’- 5 1 * 51. + ' 

Mb 6>. WlimrO .10 IJ li 6 6% 6% »%+>. 

34% 271, WidDtx I JB 42 13 54 35% 3Sto 35ft— ft 

30ft 7% JO U ID 3463 lift 10%. Hft ♦ 


13% Sib winner 


7% 3% WlnrprJ 

38% 27% WUcEP 2J8 6J 
90 49 WbFPf 090 l«fl 


77% $9', WISE Pf 7.75 1X1 
2t> 23ft WlsGPf 2JS 1AI 
36ft 25% W*cPL 2Jt 13 « 


39 87 6% A'i 6U— ft 

4 eft 6V, «b 

9 34 38 37% 37% 

U»:K 09 89 -1 

10: 7t<? 74V, 7«b— ft 
1 3-* 25% 3%-% 
e 11 IV. U + to 


37ft aw w!£ps 2J4 A9 « 47 3?'* 37 CTb + li 

401, 77% WlfCO 1 J8 *X 9 393 36 35ft CT, 

LS'i 9ft WolwrW 24 22 3 4X>7 10'* 10% 1B%— % 

%4X> (ML lUn^fOl 17 10 9>» ?!■!* t* 


U'i v^2 woivrw -*A z^t * ■ Xtif n 

M% 18% Wood PS 00 17 16 7S 21% 21% 2>% — ji 

c7ft a?% Wolwfh 200 4J 10 898 4 7 46ft 46ft +% 

44% 47’i WdfltPf 2JD JJ J M 66 64 + ft 

tob 2% W rid AT ’7 31, 3% * 1- 


17 3*b 3ft 3H + ft 


39 71% VFGorp 1.12 30 ID 174 37Tb 37% 37% + ft 
12% 5% Valero 883 12% 11% 11% — H 


AJJm 74fe wrldAT •> * d*i ati t v« 

Oft a WrK.lv I JOB 14 13 UO 7T: i^b ». +1% 

5H 2'a Wlirrtxr 5 J 1 * 3to JW + ft 

IB 10% Wvlrth J2 20 13 101 lift 11% lift + W 

33% ISft Wynns 60 XI 7 22 16% 16 16% +.% 


Earning 


Revenue ana oro fits. In millions, are M local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated 


S?n 33% Xerox 100 5.7 22 3740 S3 « k SJto + *i 

54', *5% xero. p| SJ5 IOJ 3^ I 4 . S’ 55? ■ 

79 1* XTRA A 2* 1 13 74'- 24 26% 


Australis 

Arnold 

is! MaM 1988 

Revenue 84504 


Scott & Fetzer 


Profits 7909 

Par Share OJBI 


Britain 

Ferranti 


TndQear. 

1985 

1«4 

Revenue __ 

1953 

199A 

Oaer Net — 

14.16 

14.16 

Ouer Share— 

208 

209 

in Hall 

1985 

1984 

Revenue—. 

372J 

JS9J 

doer Net 

21 J5 

asst. 

Oner Share— 

115 

304 


30% 24 ZatoCa U2 4J 9 15 MH 278k M%- ft 

21V, 9% Zmxrto 04 8J 30 767 ICPs 10 18 C 

56% 25 Zavres M .4 IB 619 56ft 551: SfcH + » 

30 18lb ZdnllhE 8 3«3 30ft 20's 70%—% 

21ft 15% 22F0S X IJ IS 42 18% 181b 18% 


35 v* 22 Zurnln U2 19 12 


42 lilt 181b 18% 

10 34 33% 33% + % 


Year 1984 

Revenue — 567.9 

Pretax Net— 460 
per Share 00717 


IflW nets include oa fra eftfl.l 
1983 nUHian m auarter anO of S2J 
45U million In halt tram tUsam- 
„ 70S tbwad operations. 

(LDoOfi 


I INI^SE 1 


1 iMS 

z 



Trusthouse Forte 
1 Sl Halt 1985 1984 

Revenue— HI .9 473X 

pretax Net— »J 3AJ 
per Snare — D0358 00319 


Super Valu Stores 


NEW HIGHS 99 


Revenue ilTo. 109SJ. 

Net tnc 29J3 48.48 

Per Stare 000 1J1 


India 

Tata iron A Steel 
Year 1984 1983 


IttU net Includes 9amotS3i3 
cnUtlan. 


Revenue 11031 8390. 

Profit — 847J mi 

Per Stare — 1I7J7 2139 


West Germany 


Bosch (Robert) 


Mltsukoshl 

Year 1984 1983 

Revenue 457,700. 55 aj*. 

Profits (QUOAD 5.730. 

PerStare__ — 3X2 

a: loss. 


Year 1984 1983 

Revenue 1SJOO. l<uoD. 

Profits — 4440 2420 


Fried. Krupp 


n% n%— to 

3214 3T4— to 
3816 391 m + % 

L v?x\ 

46 4416 


ValtNSialM 
Parker Pim 

IM door. 1985 19M 

Revenue TJoJ 3010 

Net Inc. 2J8 1U8 

Per Share, — 814 005 

iff* net includes gain of 
SMOHOftomsoie of Interest. 


Year 1984 1988 

Revenue— las®. 17X70. 

Profits- l07Jla)301J 

a: toss. 


AZP Group 
Anaellca 
BaitGE ptfi 
Sever fy inf 
CIGNA 410pt 
Chin Bell 
Corned 9 
DeUnChs 
DukoP pfM 
FstWlSc 
GrtAmPM 
HarkmdUh s 
in Power 
mterst Pw 
Lear Sleefer 
Uahel Inc 
NCJlBCp 
NIMAlOpf 
Pflxer 

RufaOermold 
TECO 
Toledo Ed 
TARIty 
UMUluinpt 

WoitcstTrv 


AlrProd 

ArchOnM 

Banfcatva 

Bordens 

CarbPIrs 

CievElec 

CrovRsch 

Disney W 

EostnAfr pf 

Capita 

Gralier 

Hem Iso Cop 

ImpCpAm 

KCf’L 380pf 

LILCopfJ 

Mallei wf 

Nat Homes 

OccWP4pt 

Portec 

SFeSouPac 

TNP Enf 

TolEdJTTpf 

Transwfo 

Wat Mart of A 

Wrlptey 


AmCan Jof 
AtIRh 375ul 
BaubxhLbs 
Boston Ed 

Oianesc 
Clorox Co 
DavcoCorp 
Dive "OS 
Fbt Boston 
Gen Mills 
GlfSU 88Dpt 
HorixBtap 
inter Reo 
KansPL 232 p 
L aPwLt Pf 
Minn PwLI 
NofMedEn 
OhPwMpfF 
PuSSNWMx 
SwstBoli 
Tanibrand 
TolEd 428Pf 
USGs 
WarwrCam 
Xerox Co 


Am Family a 

AutoOoto 

Bon Is Co 

CIGNA Cn 

ChasMnh740 

ConAaras 

DcHoAJn 


DowChem 

FstVoBks 


GofdWMFn 
Harcourt 
Hough rMH 
lniMuii(fd.|^ 


KawBanAj* 
MCA Incvte- 


MCAInCH 
Man! Pew 
NYSBaOPf 
Pan Am 
RorarGP 
Stevens JP 
Textron 




Un. 
wasteMgt 


NEW LOWS W 


Philip Hatzmami 


Yeor 1184 1983 

Revenue 2.970. 12® 

Profits.. 4108 48J3 


Allfoomm 
EQK Rfvn 
GHRespfA 
Ptrilnv 
WStCaNAPt 


AllRfchfld Baker imf 
vlEvonPpfB FrMcMEP n 
KolsrAI 44Pf LTV 52Spf 
TexasOGos Tldewtrpt 


Copwfd , 
GtoBAUrpf 
NwMSttW 1 
TtnCdaPfpen 


Sales In Net 

109s HMi Low 3PJ4.C8VC 
5 19% 19V, 19V, 

18 X5 2659% 99 59% +1 

12 23 3573ft 73 73V, + ft 

M 25 1542% 41% 41% 

S 2J 3714 13% 74 +16 

Al 449% 49 49 

65114% 14% 14%—% 

S 4.9 9 lOto 10 ittto 

112 XI 0ft 8% 8% + Jb 

2217% 11% 11% 

0 SJ 33 30ft 29% 29%— % 
129 2 1% 2 +% 

8 IJ 549 281, 2BW 28% 

93 9ft 8% Bft— to 

0 4J 5312V; 11% 17ft + V. 
4421to »ft 21 li 
1424 9% 9ft 9ft + Mi 

Ir .1 25 ' 9ft 9ft 9ft + % 

a \2 138733% 33% 33% + H 
252 S'i 7% 8% + to 


Net 

jam SPALOfta 

Jft 3ft + Vi 

2% 3to + to 
22(6 22ft 
11 11 +ft 

4% 7 


Sales la 
180s 
XT) 

UO 3J 
39 43 
A JO 2.1 


90 2% 2% 2% 
ISIlOto 9ft 10% + % 
123527ft 27 27ft + ft 
42 5ft 5% 5ft 6 % 
08 J 1710to 9ft 10 — li 

5 6ft 6ft 6% 

210 9% Sft »ft + W 
.12 20 79 6% 6 4% 

224 4% 4ft 4% 

IQ 7% 7% 7%— % 

605 7VS 7% 7to 
12 4to 4% 4ft 
197 15ft 14ft 15% + % 
263 4% 6 4 — 16 

11 JV; 3ft 3% 

33 3V, 3% 3ft + to 
75 9 8ft 9 + % 

21 12ft 17% 12ft + lb 
119 lft 1% lr» 
118211ft 11% 11% 

21 7% 7 7 + ft 

100 32 18077% 26ft 27U. + ft 

1J8 7J 7720ft Xto IM* + li 
30QO1X9 14323ft 23to 5to 

UOo BJ 14218ft ISto IBft— % 
UflalOJ 350 16 >« 15ft 16ft , 
300 130 M23U 23 73 — ft 

6 7% TV. 7% + to 

US 30 241 47ft 49 to 49V. — ft 

-BB ?-» TO 4 4 A — Vb 

152 4J 28 32 31ft III, + to 

113 3ft 3% 3ft + % 
05e 1.1 24 4ft 4ft *V? 


11 11 + ft 

6% 7 

4ft 5% + ft 
2316 23ft 
10ft 10ft + ft 
3416 3416- % 
«to 4to 
4 to 4% + to 
11% 11% 

1416 14ft + 16 
13V, U% + % 
5Vi 5to 
27ft 28>6 +116 
34% 33% + ft 
211b 22 — 'A 
14ft 16ft 
15ft 15ft + % 
25 2S% + % 

12ft 17ft 

n% ti%— to 

27(6 28 +1 

T7 17 
18ft 18ft — Vb 


'«+* 


22% CT* 

39 39VB— ft 

IOft lffto— ft 
16% 16ft 
ioi6 law 
4% 4% 

22% 22ft 


1617% 12 13 —to 

83 116 1% lft— ft | 


11 5% 5 5% + % 

8 7V, TV. 7ft i 

284 3V. 3 3% + ft 

9 8ft 8% 8% 

1711 11„ 11 „ , 

348 ft ft ft— ft I 
126 2ft 1% 2 + ft 
100 8ft 8ft Mb— to | 
131Zto 12% 13% 1 

35633 32% 33 + % , 

1 1416 14to 14to 

« % n w 1 

15817% ITto lift + to 

24015(6 ISto 15V. + to 

mow. low. low. 

24 996 9% 9% 

52 19ft 18% 19 — ft 

518ft 17ft 17% — ft 

1 5 5 5 — % 

273 74. 7U 7V. — to I 

177 ISto 1714 18 — to 

8815% 75ft ISto + to I 


UO 40 
1.1* 31 

1 -3 K 

100 73 

20 1 5 

UO 4J 


2813 1ZI4 13 + <6 

105 18 17% 17% + % 

10 5% 514 5% 

7S11W. 1VA 11 — to 

23Sto 35to 35to + U 
341 Bto Bto Bto 
154 to Tb to + ft 


154 to <ft to + ft 
19 8U 8ft 8ft — to 
143 7% 7ft 7% 


3% 3to — li 


30 616 6 16 6(6 + to 

306911% lOto 11 
23 61 m 5% b — to 
8814ft 1314 1416— to 
170ft 20ft Sift-1 
28718% ITto 18(6 + 16 

3511% lOto lift +% 

to 7ft 7% 7% . 

25 to ft to + ft 

10817ft 16% 16%— % 
1 Uto Uto Mto— ft 
19S I0W. 9% lOto 
34 5% 5ft 5% — ft 
2818% 17% ISto— li 
17 9ft 9K. Jto — to 
2026% ^ 24% + to 

13212(6 lift 12V. + % 
4011 10% 10% 

5 BW SH 8% 
86117ft 17% 17% — ft 
14 5% 4ft 4% 
21727ft 27% 27ft + ft 
422V. 22V. 22V. 

, 7% 7% + % 

54033% 37H J2V, + ft 
3021,102% 102% +1% 
14)14 15% 15Xb 

49 9W Bto 9ft + % 


am 3pjM.arge 

(4(6 + 'A 
35% + % 
2016 
9% + ft 
14 + to 

*9% + % 
34% 

5516+14 
S — % 
Z7Vi + % 
46 —IV. 
*8% + to 
38% — % 
12% 

14to— % 
17% — ft 
19 — % 
13 + % 

24 — to 

19% + % 

24 Vi +lft 
lift 

8% 

8% — to 
28 + to 
27% + to 
M. +216 

21% ~ 

16 — to 
32 +2 

3to + to 
3316 , 

30 — % 
41% 

13 + to 

22% + % 
28 to— % 
32 — ft 
37 + % 

1H + ft 
23% 

18% 

34V, +1*. 
8to 
3716 

25 

9%— (6 
23% + (6 
15to 
12% 

39% 

40%—% 
19% + % 
34'4 
5to 

51 —1 

5% + Ml 
13to— % 

flb- K. 
19 
Mto 

40%— to 
15% + % 

14 

3%— H 
17(6 

17% + 16 

31 

17% + % 
22(6 

1% + % 
9% + to 
.4% — to 
15% + to 
36 +1 

10% + 56 
ii% — to 
27 —to 
6% 4- ft 
1S% + ft 
4% l li 


' S"H* ip Nef | 

nos HMi Lew JPJACft fte 
77 6to 5ft 5H— % ■ 
26 5% 5H 5H 
772U to 1*% Uto + % 

8 8% 8% 8V, + Vi 
I 27 122 22 22 

29 5% 5% 5% 

< 28 4 14 16 16 — % 

8015 1446 15 

25914% 14to 14ft 

1 13 ISto 15% 15ft 

M J 45 12 11% lift + % 


Sales in Nef -. 

HO* HIM Law JPJLOYg* 


2 13% 13% 13V. 

64 18% 18ft 18% + to 
133 19% 19'i 19ft + ft 
87 7ft 7H 7% — ft 


44 M 34^ %-%, 


6 22 to 2Jto 2216 — to 
<*072 to 21% Tito- to 
139 7ft 7ft 7%— to 
1 3'6 3*6 3to + ft 
52510 9% 18 , 


4% 4% 

21ft 21H + ft 
II 11 
5 5 - ft 

12% 13 +16 

5’4 5\6 
13% Mto + % 
18% 19 
4 4ft 
2% 3% 

% % 

,2ft + % 
16% + % 
6 

9% 

<52% — ft 

*9 

31 + ft 

45(4 + to 


525 10 9% 18 . 

■Ole J 39 3ft 3% 3% J 

06C .9 315 6% 4(6 6% + ft 
2468 9H 9% 9% + % 

160 80 945ft 4SV6 4516 

24 9% 9to 9% — to 
HOT B'b 71b 8 + ft 
311 4% 4to 4% + to 
635% 34% 14% + to 


JBRMJ .16 1.1 

JLG 

JPlnd 

Jacknaf 

JackLM 

Ja^a, SO 10 
JeftrGo 

JeflBNi 1JA X4 


JeNNLS J4 XI 
JefSmrl JOo 11 


59 13'm 
104 216 
299 3 
17918% 
250 10% 

1 8% 
107 4 

60 25% 
11037% 
15018% 

1824 

3010to 

2209 30% 
114 4 
16527 
74 29% 
78215ft 
3012% 
2520 

58 8% 
10632 

72 21 '4 
3827V. 

59 6lb 

S 4ft 
23% 
523(6 
14S 4V: 
1524(6 
Tflllto 
11246 
3005 4 
23) 25V. 
3 5ft 

447 IQ Vi 


9 + % 

2116- to 
8% + % 
13ft 
I* l - to 
2ft 3 

18 to 1816 — ft 
ISto 18% + to 
Bft Bft 
3ft Jft- ft 
24ta 2516 + ft 
37V. 37% 

19% 20% 4- % 
3% 3% — (6 
*6 0+1 
29 79ft + ft 
14% 15% + to , 
13ft 12ft— ft 
20 20 +% 
8% + ft 
33 +1 

21 to 
26ft 

6 — ft 
4ft 
23U> 

23 to— to 
4% + ft 
24(6 — to i 
1H6 


Mto 14% + I* 
5% 5% 

17 T7%— ft 

7ft 7%— to 
36ft 36ft 
2816 2816 
17% 18 

*8% -!8% + to 

SES-ft 


5% S%— ft 

6% 6%- < 
6% 4% 

Bft *ft + % 
17% 17V, — ft 
18% 18% — % 


2516 + % 
5%— ft 
10 
7to 


KLAe 

KVPIir 

Kaman 

Kamnsl 

kodpo 

Karctvr 

Kasler 

Kavrlon 

Kavpro 

Keane 

vIKetvJ 

KMWS A 

Kemp 

Kenoao 

KvCriLJ 

Kevex 

Kevlin 

KewnSs 

KevTrn 

KeyjFn 

KlmtM 

KlmDrk 

Kincaid 

Kinders 

KnoVV Id 

KlobVd 

Krov 

Kruaer 

Kuldui 

Kuatei 


18% 1«AA — %■ 
4% 6%— (6 

29V. 29% + % 
2% 2%— to 
4% 4% 

14 lift + 'If 
15% 15% 

8% 8% —.ft 
2% 7% +ft 

17% 17% + ft 
% % 


411, 41»-f 
58% 59V. ± 


3% 3ft- ,S~ 
SH 39%—ft 


39H 39%— % 
6% . 4%— ft 
5Vk 5% +-to 
13 Uto + ft 
7% 7ft— Wi 
73 34 + % 

301, 30% + % 
4 4 —ft 

8ft Bft + % 
19% 2016 + % 
37 32 — % 

*% *%— to 


‘0 


¥'■ i 

St'.- ‘ 

Ste: . 


! 


8—ftw Ai w u auuuy 


IV: ■ 

BE*:-: 
ftt r. 
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ml • 
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it- 

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DBuq. . 

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teunw,- '■ 
l *Wcrr'.. 
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i 


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15% 15% + H 
6% 6% — % 




4 4V> 4ft 
1310 9% 


97228% 271m 
75 1% lft 
39611% 11% 
W37% 37U 
697 5% SH 

10 X 

21 S*i SH 
36 4 3% 

31 2(6 2’A 
33 4% 4ft 
146 *0Vi 39ft 
19121b lift 
10 7ft TV. 
17-43% 43ft 
8733% 33(6 
30 Ato 5% 
■2 3 7% 

182 4% 1% 

34141, 13% 

a 1% 1% 
72*5% 3S 
« 2% ?% 
1719ft I9ft 
'91 12ft 12ft 


425% 2S 
73 7ft 7% 
13 7ft 7to 

S AW, 6 
12V6 11, 
54 ?5 h 
1134% 24% 


25(6 

7%— ft 
7to- 16 
6 — ft 




S ISft Mft 

J* J** 

138 38 

1.76 17 Bit 64V. 67% 
34 20 712% 17% 

JOe 3J 710% 10ft 
89131 20 

209 SH 5% 
5613% 12% 
673114 31% 
UO 10 5053ft 51% 

At 10 2236% 36 

3021 21 

00 30 4116% 15% 

Me 10 337 716 7% 
1 6% 6% 


24H— to 
MU— ft 
3% — tb 
38 +1 
Mft +lft 

12% + n 
18% 

31 -I- ft 

5% + ft 
13ft 
31V. 

52ft + ft 
36 — V 


24 5ft S Sib + ft 
6 13 12>b 13 + to 

7342 40V? 40ft— Tb. 

ueidto 9>h 9%— % 

28 9ft 9to 9ft + ft 
44 6% OH *%— % 
82 3H 2ft 3ft — ft 
45347% 46% 47ft + ft 
71 15 Iflli IS + to 
525 22% 22%— 1% 

21* 12 13 + ft 

2616% 16li 16". — % 
1? 1H )% IH— ft 
2 3ft 3ft 3ft + to 
156 7ft 7W 7% 

695 3 2ft 3 + Vi 
17 5to 5V. SV. — to 
40917% 16’’, 17% 

65 8% Bft 8% + ft 
514 14 14 — to 

60S 15 15 + ft 

4072221, Zlto 22ft +1% 
1 1SV. ISto 15%— tt 
338V> *8to 38’6 
5217% 17 to ITto— ft 
913 13 13 + ft 

1319", 19to 19ft 4- to 
1088 17% T3 13ft + % 
26314% Mto 14 to 


4ft 

10 + (6 
28ft +1% 
1% 

lift + ft 
37% + tb 


LCSs 

LDBrnfc 

UN 

L51L18 
LSI LOS 
LTX 

La Pete* 


*15 lOto 9ft 
534 7% 7? 
1 1 571, 27 
5 4% 4lb 
5005 4% 

20 6% a;,* 

439 !»6 10ft 
102 4 3% 

256 ISto 17V, 

6’b 6% 
127 lft lft 
2 SI* Sto 
34I0to 10k> 
32 .f% 7ft 
«»3 11% 
■20 7ft 7% 
591330% 30 

tOSlAto 1^4 


7917% 17 ITto 
1 12 % 12 % 12 % 


WO 6ft 6% 
, a i2% lift 

1.12 30 9229ft 78 


21 

15% — to 
7to 

6ft + Mi 

Wb— to 
12% + to 
29% +1 


79 flW 8 8% + to 

99 7% 7ft 
12916% 15% 16 + % 
37 3% 3% 3% 

602 6% 6ft 6ft - ft 
IM ?to 5ft 9W. + ft 
46 4ft 4ft 4ft- ft 
3817% 13% 12% + ft 
431 20% 20% +lto 

!H2 lift lift- ft 
2 6% 6% hUt + to 
237924 23% 34 +rto 

<800 1«5 195 +1 


33 Bto 8% 
<13% 13 
W13% 13ft 
4t aft 4% 
34815% 15% 
19310% ipn 


% + ft 
SH— H 
4 

3 to 

*ft +to 
39% + ft 
lift— % 
7to— to 

33>A 

5% + % 

4V. + to 

13% 

35%-’^ 
+ ft 

*to — to 
6% + to 
!$% + to 
,3%- to 
17ft- to 
34to + v. 
6 ft — to 
lft + ft 
5% 

tllto— ft 
7ft 

lift— ft 
7% 

3§ft + % 

7%— to 

157k- % 
SVs 

]» + % 
10% + ft 


LoZBv IJO 12 1644% 

LacldSt 2So IJ “li 

1-odFm ,13 q j -— w - 
Lalelw .16 ,e 


JJWf-m .12a J 40718% 

I La kilo* .16 ,9 797 yfy, 

I J * 'A 14% 11 

LomRs *54 99, 

tamaT 00 54 7 Mft 

, Lancoat JS AS 1315to 

lfc2P» B «« lj nsjoto 

LdLnSL 33 SJ A2 lift 
: HSgE - 40 ii 2iKi9% 

LdmkS 249 IMA 

LaneCo .n u usS 
XS. 12 106 7% 

Lmwns 312lti 


La*»f>s J8 10 15Ba% 


Lilly a , JB 20 19 lift 

LMBrt M ,j! 

tw« u 
trs^s - ,4 u f « 

u«?Art d lift* 

UWArt JO 2J 205VJ 

UwdnH J .S’L. 

w 2918 7ft 

iSST 

‘-WHb 83622% 


7% 7%— to 

6(6 616 — to 
13% 14% + % 
1BH 18% + % 
13to 14% + % 
13% MW-tV 
15ft 15ft + ft 
44 44to+% 

18 18 ' 

IWb 18% + to 
17% 17% — % 
ioi* Wb + % 
9% 9% _ 

14% 14% + » 1 
14% 15ft +< 

??*?!% f 
iSfc U% +1- 

2£TCb 21% +;.fi 
28 ft 2 lft— ft 
514 5ft +fi 

m ft+’B 

34ft 34ft ^ 
23% a» +"5 
W% Hft + tt 
46, 46 +" 

r mi 


j 

I wnmit . . 

i fet.- 


( DtH..i ‘v 




^S S "-' ••• 

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rzsrr' « -u nri 
8361 

(Continued oo 


4% 4*8— % 

4%* 4% • 

54 55, — K 

22% nft+j* : 

25V* 25ft— L 
44% 46 +**■■■ 

16ft 17 +.W 
7ft 7W , 

se fr + 2 

21 ft »ft ♦ j 






14 ) :x 










■fc* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


Page 13 


BUSMSSROUNDW 


Bogch Reports Increase 
Of 84% in 1984 Profit 


By Warren Gcder 

Intcmatioaed Herald Tribune 

STUTTGART — Robert Bosch 
jmbH, West Germany’s second- 
' PJgesi electronics group alter Se- 
..nens AG. said Thursday that 1984 
world group net profit rose 84 per- 

- -xni from a year earlier, to 446 
• . Hfllion Deutsche wiarlre ($145 mfl- 

JOn), from 34a millio n DM. 

But Marcus Bierich, Bosch's 
, diairman, said the profit was dis- 

- Honed by an eattraorainaiy gain Of 
■ i 50 million DM. The extraordinary 

• item was a result of Bosch’s not 

. ttaviog to deal with a legal matter in 

• .the United Sates that never tran- 
. : ; spired, Mr. Breach said. He did not 

- .provide details. 

. Mr. Bierich, who a-conrepl his 

• position last July, said he expected 
d985 set income to be as strong as 
‘Iasi year’s, without tbehdp of sndi 

; .a large extraordinary gain. 
r Revenue was up 14 percent, to 
.18.4 billion DM, from 16.1 billion 
. - DM in 1983. Mr. Bierich said reve- 
nue was expected to rise to 20 W- 
1km DM this year. 

Bosch, whose sales of electrical 
;* parts for automobiles account for 
: nearly GO percent of total revenue, 
jsaid sales grew 16 percent is the 


first five months of this year, to 8.7 
billion DM. U.S. sales; accounting 
few 10 percent of the total, were 
.particularly brisk. 

The 1984 performance was one 
of Bosch’s best since the 1970s in 
twr.YB of profit as a percentage of 
sales, Mr.Bkricb sm The 2S- 
percent p rofit margin — the ratio 
of net earnings to sales' — was last 
reached in 19/7 be said. 

But Bosch oodrinnes to have 
problems in the home electronics 
division, winch suffers from weak 


market, he said 

Mr. Bierich said last summer’s 
seven- week strike by. metal workers 
continues to handicap Tkach. The 
strike disrupted Bosch’s prodne- 
dan of auto parts far several weeks. 

Bosch will raise its capital to 800 
million DM, using. 120 nrilfion DM 
of 1984*5 « roring , the first such 
increase ance l97v. In additi o n to a 
dighi increase in the. dividend to 
family sharehoklers and the Bosch 
foundation, which controls 90 per- 
cent of total equities; Bosch win 
plough back the remaining earn- 
ings for major investment ~ J 
in the next year. 


Amro Offers 
To Buy EBC 
From Partners 

Roam 

AMSTERDAM — Amster- 
dam-Rotierdam Bank NV said 
Thursday that it planned to 
take over, the London-based 
European Banking Co., in 
which it is a partner. 

Financial details of the agree- 
ment, which is subject to offi- 
cial approval, were not immedi- 
at dy available. 

EBC, which specializes in 
Eurocapiial market business, 
was founded 12 years ago as a 
joint venture of Deutsche Bank 
AG, Creditanstah-Baakverain, 
Midland Bank PLC, Sod£t6 
Gfaferale, Sotifcti Gfin&ale de 
Basque; Banca Commenaale 
Italians and Amro. 

An Amro spokesman said 
that EBC has shareholders’ 
equity of 90 million guilders 
($26 nriDion) and total assets of 
3 billion guilders. He said the 
size of the agreement corre- 
sponded to book value. 

In May, British banking 
sources had estimated EBCs 
value at £25 minion, or about 
$31 mi llion at the tiny*. 


BASF Planning to Buy 
Akzo’s U.S. Fiber Unit 


Reuien 

LUDWIGSHAFEN, West Ger- 
many — BASF AG, West Germa- 
ny’s biggest chemical company, 
said that it has signed a letter of 
intent with Akzo NV, the Dutch 
chemical concern, to take over its 
UJS. fiber-producing unit, Ameri- 
can Enka. 

A spokesman for BASF said 
Thursday- that the company’s su- 
pervisory board must sanction the 
move and that it was meeting to 
study the proposal. 

A takeover of Enka would be Lhe 
third UJS. acquisition by BASF this 
year. In May, it bought I x uuon t 
Ccurp-, an automotive paint-making 
concern, from United Technologies 
Carp. for 51 bSfion. 

Eariier, BASF acquired for 5135 
mini on three subsidiaries of Cdan- 
ese Carp. This provided the Ger- 
man c onc ern with a foothoJd as a 
maior 


and carton fibers to the U.S. avia- 
tion aood aerospue industries. 

The management board chair- 
man, Hans Albers, (old dm animal 
meeting that BASF was particular- 
ly interested in the nylon-produc- 
ing activities of Enka, which has 
total annual sales of nearly 5500 

miUion 



COMPANY NOTES 


GoldmPtmfic Insured Funds 


: New York Times Service 

\ NEW YORK — Hongkong & 

• "Shanghai Banking Crept, one of 
,‘lhe biggest banks in Asia, has 

/agreed to acquire $117 million of 
' . insured deposits of Golden Pacific 

• '■ National Bank, a New York bank 
— -that was closed last Friday by fed- 

'-era! authorities. • 

• i If approved by the courts, Gold- 
"• - en Paaftc’s headquarters in Chtna- 

~~ -town and three branches would re- 
~~^Dpen as branches of Hongkong & 
Shanghai. Officials of the Federal 
■deposit Insurance Corp., which 
. •. took over Golden Pacific after it 
was declared insolvent, said they 
hoped the branches would reopen 
~ by Friday. 

•i inv At a news conference Wednes- 
day, Alan Whitney,, the FDICs 
chief spokesman, sboA prospects 
were undear for the uninsured de- 
positors and other creditors to 
whom the bank owes $49 mfliwn. 

' Of that amount, $17 minion is 

Apple Sheds 
Sales Staff in 
Streamlining 

• By William C Rcmpel 

Las Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — As part of a 
major reorganization, Apple Com- 
puter Inc. is to eliminate its 60- 
member U.S. direct-sales force that 
•has marketed Macintosh comput- 
ers to major corporate customers, 
Apple's president, John Scufley, 
said. 

Mr. Sculky said that the sales 
force will be phased out by July 1 
and that the company willrdy on 
retail dealers is its efforts to com- 
pete with International Business 
Machines Carp, for huge business 
customers. 

Earlier this mopth, Apple an- 
nounced the elimination of 1,200 
Jobs and the consolidation of its 
management that mdudeda 
reduced role for Steven Jobs, chair- 
man and cofounder. 

“We have put our individual 
egos aside, and we are mitring 
teamwork in its place,” Mr. Scplley 
told computer-industry executives 
and analysts at a San Francisco 
conference on Wednesday. 

He said that Apple will continue 
to streamline its work, force and 
reduce expenses. In addition to 
transferring sales operations to in- 
dependent dealers, Apple will build 
more atli»nt*g with other software 
and peripberal-equ^nrKnt compa- 
nies and change its advertising 
campaign far the Macintosh com- 
puter, Mr. Sculley said. 


* 

Big Advances 
In Clean Coal 

(Condoned from Page 11) 



Deer Park, Texas, and Potomac 
Electric Power of Washington is 

planning OIK. 

To minimize nitrogen oxides' 
formation, utilities are adding new- 
ly developed burners that lengthen 
the eomoustidn zone and lower the 

temperature and oxygen concen- 

tration. 

New flue-gas cleanup methods 
include capturing sulfur with mag- 

that can be re-used 

the sulfur is separated for sale. 

ddphia Electric and Essen 
Chemical of Cfifton, New Jersey, 
are using that mmhod. Other utili- 
ties are injecting a substance simi- 
lar to baking soda to capture the 
sulfur. Indiana Power & Light, Ro- 
search-Cottrril and others are test- 
ing electron beams to break up sul- 
fur dioxide and nitrogen oxides 
and combine them with ammonia 
to produce fertilizer for sale. 

More utititfcs also are using 
vacu- 


New methods to dean coal be- 
fore bunting mejude an emulsion 
that separates coal from impurities. 
General Electric is amernnenting 

with m i cr o w a ves, and TRW is us- 

ing mohen sodium hydrorirfe to 
remove imparities. 


owed to holders of what have been 
described as bogus certificates of 
deposit Many purchasers said they 
thought they were purchasing in- 
sured CDs, but barking officials 
said they were not put on the 
bank’s books as deposos^ 

Mr. Whitney said the FD1C was 
still Uying to determine whether, 
the funds were insured; The issue 
seems to be whether the FD1C is 
obliged to cover funds that repre- 
sentatives of an insuredbank indi- 
cated were deposits even if the 
funds were not booked as such. 

Among others who. ■•may lose 
money are depositors -whose ac- 
counts ex c ffttte l the maximum in- 
surance of $100,000. 

Foreigners who deposited mco- 
ey in Golden Padfic’s intonational 
banking facility, which is based in 
New York but which under federal 
law is eqnivaleni to .a foreign 
branch, will not be immediately re- 
imbursed, if at aQ. 


Asahi Glass Co. has formed two 
UK units to produce automobile 
glass for Japanese manufacturers 
based there. A.P. Technoglass 
Corp M a glass fabricator, and Bdle- 
tech Corp., which will operate an 
assembly factory, have been capi- 
talized at S100,(»0 and 510,000. 

Cooper laboratories Inc. has set- 
tled a charge by the Securities and 
Exchange Commission that it 
failed to promptly disclose sales of 
Frigitrorucs Inc. common stock. 
Cooper, without admitting the 
charge, agreed to set aside 5Z2 mil- 
lion to satisfy any legal daims by 
investors. 

Nissan Motor Co. will sell car 
kits and provide training and tech- 
nology to Iran to help h start as- 
sembling four-wheel-drive vehicles 
in mid- 1986. Iran plans to produce 
30,000 cars a year by 1989. The 
value of the sale was not disclosed. 

■ Orient Leasing Co- of Japan has 
offered to buy seven subsidiaries erf 
Taiwan’s Camay group, indndmg 
three credit-leasing companies and 


a motor company, which industry 
sources estimated to be valued at 
more than 5100 million. 

SbeareoB Lehman Brothers 
Knhn Lodi Asia Inc., a subsii 
of American Express Co., int 
to apply soon for a branch license 
for securities business in Japan. 

Sperry Corp. wifi purchase Texas 
Instruments Inc.’s Explorer Sys- 
tems for an estimated 542 million 
over three years. Explorer, an arti- 
fidal-mtelhgente product, will be 
used in Sperry's Knowledge line. 

Tavda Pty. LfaL, the takeover ve- 
hicle owned by Jack Qua (Austra- 
lia) Ltd. and the Liberman family, 
w£D raise its offer for Allen’s Con- 
fectionery Ltd. to 4.65 Australian 
dollars ($3.10) a share from 4.60 
dollars. 

Trafalgar House Oil & Gas Inc, 
a subsidiary of the British diversi- 
fied group Trafalgar House PLC 
has bought about 9 millio n bands 
of proved dl reserves in Texas from 
Usenco Inc. The purchase is valued 
at $26.5 nuIEon. 


The purchase would be mnrfa 
through BASF’s U.S. subsidiary, 
Badische Corp., according to the 
spokesman. He said that BASF has 
sufficient liquidity to f inanc e the 
purchase since strong results in the 
first half meant the company’s liq- 
uid reserves have risen from toe 
end 1984 level of 2.7 billion Deut- 
sche marks (5900 million). 

Mr. Albers also referred to 
strong first-half results at the annu- 
al meeting. He forecast that earn- 
ings for the fuD year could be high- 
er than year-earlier results. 

“Figures for the first half year- 
give us reason to heme that we will 
achieve a somewhat better result in 
1985 than 1984,” Mr. Albers said. 

He said foreign markets are 
mainly responsible for the im- 
provement. 

Mr. Albers said sales rose in Lat- 
in America and in southeast Asia 
during the fast half 

Group sales in the first six 
months are estimated to be 10 per- 
cent higher than the year-earlier 
level of 223 biffion DM, Mr. Al- 
bers said. Parent company sa lesBie 
expected to rise nearly 5 percent, to 
about 10 j 4 bQhoa DM, be added. 


Frameca Signs 
Caracas Contract 

Reuters 

PARIS — The French consor- 
tium Fram&ca A Ge. has won a 
contract from Venezuela of about 
$240 million to construct 8 kilome- 
ters (5 miles) of lines fa the Cara- 
cas subway system, the consortium 
leader, Spie Baiignolles, an- 
nounced Thursday. 

The consortium, which also in- 
cludes Soo&i Gdnfirafe d’En tic- 

prise, Soti£t£ Auxiliairc d’Entrc- 
prise and Montcocol SA, already 
has a contract for electromechani- 
cal equipment for the subway. 

Venezuelan companies wall be 
involved in construction work, 
which will start immediately. 

AEG Tries fw *87 Dividend 

Reuters 

BERLIN — AEG-T defunk en 
AG intends to make a dividend 
payment in 1988 on 1987 earnings, 
its first since a 5-Deutsche mark 
dividend on 1973 earnings, Heinz 
Duerr, chairman, said Thursday. 


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Source ; CrrtW Sulsse-Flrst Boston UtL 
London 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


NEW ISSUE 



27th June. 1985 


International Finance Corporation 

has raised 

U.S.$50,000,000 due 1995 

through a private placement 

arranged by 

Nomura International Limited 


Citibank,; N. A. and 


Interest Rate Swap 

arranged by 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company 



We have the pleasure to announce the 

formation of an 

INTERNATIONAL 
INSTITUTIONAL INVESTORS’ 
DEPARTMENT 

managed by 

FRA2VCOIS-XAVIER WEISS 

newly appointed 
effective July 1st, 1985 

;gSajxJtIrim£ ©ebrSta* 'JJrtyuuroit * 

— Private Bankers since 1748 — 

BethmannstrasBe 7-9, 6000 Frankfurt am Main, 
Telephone: 69/2177-370, Telex: 4 13674 



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London W14 SNZ. ToL 01-603-7121. Tbc 297305 REGAL G. 


Men 


Lei your SUS Dollar buy more in Canada 

170 Apartment Complex 

■ Very well maintained complex 

• Price: S3.31 0.000. CDN or $2,412,000. US 

• Excellent low, long term financing until 2007 

• True 12% return on Inves tm ent 

Office Building 

12,000 sq. ft. modem office building, 5 year lease with a triple 
A tenant 11% return Price: $850,000.00 CDN or $474,000 US. 

For further information and brochures please contact: 

WINZaU REAL ESTATE LIMITED VVMZEN CORPORATION: 
Attn. MarkaUng Manager A LmtBng Dmnfopmant 

67 Yonge Street Suite 700 Sties, Property Uanagemont 

Toronto. Ontario. Canada MSE 1 JS end Uerketlnp 

Tat (413) 963-0(771 • Telex 00584301 Organization. 


Oner of the bast 

BELGIAN SPORTS CLUBS 

FOR SALE 

(due to owner’s OMiecAfa). 
Cosh Sow obtdnad for 1984: 17%. 
Qub it com plete wHh indoor and 
outdoor tennis, squash, unmet, so- 
larium, gym, aerobics, restaurant, 
bar. important increase in annual 
turnover. The present management 
and team eon remain if you wish. 
Contact Box D 112. 
Intomafienei Herald Tribanag. 
lfil Aim. C h a rles d o G a ufl e, 
NewSty Codex, 92521 France. 


CMDffL, Cliff. KEMffRWT 

SfMcSaailaf vtaM marioaking wh ift w u tar 
mn flk»nng nioea & n ^y tsiiig «Ada S 
wi rinl train (■ ilmn, pat caw ti Wd 
Sou* Oral hon, 4J3DD sail. baatiUy cb- 
sigmd fay no«M lOBrnePond DMhtal tnlargp, 
priHcto MMg wdk ppaHy goto, rant Cypraa, 
radwoodt & pirn. 

11.71 ffl.9W . 

Contad Alrai or Bariroro GSbert. 
Inspiring coaod wmb of sperMag ho & meito- 
■c m o u na iw from tat —tto to i Itora & gmn 
nuwry wWi hti tab & Brapk en brick daw 
taraea. [n grid K g 5ar Tuufa4“ oraa, 
Ufli<m8|'i5fnrrH>Jrwolobow«MOvi»ilhfotk 

ganira MtafA 4 firaplaewi Inirii uh of Sa & 

nertta) fdbric, Inafaw & wood vats, 
ptjxoo. 

Contact Hoinord Sttton. 

M Meat* bally Cft, Dm* 74X9, 
OroaLCA 93921 (4Qf} 42S4na 



MALLORCA’S NEW 
SUPER PORT 



t In to ba. of Unq, S 
I.XMI 


Mae. 15 i 

i raped. X44 fanrifa 8 to 3# Mbn. 7 to m la 40 
[ Mm nodi. Mhabd lV/nsirn/*oto/pho«t 
l Pie l ori mJ pen w icQ m n 
! hX morinp KMB Im. rado, rip, k omlft. 
ngoi. W Man, a 4 eutioar <aMr had- 
stamh. UdBtgnmd oor pert laden. Cunplf. 
naritoy imrt & him fodtae aadksL bank 
mg i t rainy , etirang eMpairl Gdt & 
tamp many. Coaoerad area compute IS «nib 
en 13,171 s^jn. ia M. Ptu 21 lp« gaMi 
g abate & 7B mupiitaa bray anb - ei it trad 
W along nan part 7op uateill 4H «aM 
ttaty now bdora w priat rial Codod dntiy < 


PUBtTO FONT A KXTAIS, SJL 
Diractor Cornmertid 
C/Morino 101, Portcfc Nous 
1 Mtikxcq, Span or Tb. 63686 CAUU E. 


CaHfomia 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


Eight hundred ninety 
acres prime CaUfomb real 
estate for sale. Locrted 
north of Los Angeles and 
in dose proximity to the 
Pacific ocean. 

Suitable for investmerts, 
agriculture or devefopmenL 

Price $20 mflDon US. 

Please contact 
Bax GP-105 

380 Lexington Are, nsiir 
New Vbric. NY 10017 


ST. BARTS 

ST. BAKTHE1EMY 
FRENCH WEST INDIES 

ChanniM French oo&mry ookwlal 
booae with imectBicalar new of the 
GmUkcaa Sea. 

Nothing ia between you and the ata 
eacept yowr bad and a saaS catmuy 
road. 4 bedroom have h ra mrd arise- 
dial etaBng, die umc« ia an ootdoor 
(fimneroran, rise ktodeu baa fine nora 
and then >■ a deck rononudad fry 
flowers. 

An ideal pxndne. 

Please taU USAs 0*I1 2&844S 
or (914) 23&#XB freedy by 


SWITZERLAND 

Montreux-Geneva Lake 
APARTHORL BOWVAIfD 

For sate luxurious apartments, 
from 1 to 5 rooms, overlooking the 
prettiest part of Geneva Lake. 
Price*] S.Fr. 123,000 ind. equip- 
ment and furniture. 

60% mortgage available at 
6tt% interest. 

Please contact the Builders 

REGIE DE LA RIVIERA SJL 

32 mm* du Carina 
1820 Mantravx-Swibarfcaid 
TaLs 021/635251 

Tatac 25873 erf di 


SANTA BARBARA 

California 

A special classic de s ig ned residence 
an four acres. Private grounds in- 
dnde two icfkctiaa pods, swimming 
pool, mam residence with many ar- 
chitectural wm'lt. tte p ng tower, 
nniiyv yeparglf Baptismal ayt piwt 

house. European Davor on Amenca’s 

Riviera. Brochure. 

sUSMioa 

Contact. Etbcrta Bern or Jcy Simpson 
Alexmder VaUo Reaf Era* 

1181 Corot 


93106 (80S) 969tiB9S. 


CALIFORNIA 


da 


Oceaa View Estate 


497 acre male widi 24JOOO aqJL ; 
reradenoa juR xanp le tad . 9 bedroom 
■nau all writ ocean view & private ! 

bathe, easy conceivable luxury in- 

cluding 9 whirlpool mb. 14 fixe- 
pbnea. indoor Bwinunine pooL Be&- 
port at hem door- Lime ham. 
Garage* & tarnua ootut included. 40 
adn. cnartvi drive from Sen Francis- 

co. Airport 10 min. away. On f fa tij 
funuBfasd. Immed i at e occupancy. - 
* UL250jOOa Bnetane^K 

HABB3CAN, VIEDeNMULLEB Go. 

344 Koannr Some 
|X Saw F iwriiw , CA 94108 

AftftftMta (415) 4344600 <MW4M44 


^FLORIDA U4UL- 

B*y A Geld Fnmt 

Property sale by owner 
Historic early Florida 6 acre — On 
Snwd* Bay. Florida. Deeded beach m> 
6 Zamry 1 acre cstalea or 1 
rhaneeatate. Huge oak & 
— trees. Deck oo aee wall 

RARE PROPERTY 

PmribiEtytri bktnrie tax Adher. 
D5.SS00K/ae. 

Com i nm cUl ft nsddcBrial m on at * 
-borareflaUe. ***** 

Cttfl or gr&e CMwar. 

*1 Cooottnt Atc. 

Sanmn, Florida 33577, UJSJL 
818/S66-916L 
818/349-8829 after 6 ju*. 






















fiomwel ind Bowvauev CMtO PfB MladwIOac. 
MatrlRlh RktiTnk of v SprtamEng SPannr Cat 
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Over-flie-Gmnier 

NASDAQ National Market Prices 



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18* Hfth Low SPJACk’ea 

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(Continued from Page 12) 


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STOCK USB USB 

OeVoe-HoUnrin 

fnienurtoiu] bi- 55i 6 % 

Gry -flock 

International nv 2^4 3^4 

Quotes as of: June 27. 1985 

Investors seckini: above average 
capita} pains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
ruHeandiheweekit. 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will bv sent lice and withnm 
obligation 

First Commerce Securities hv 

Herrnpiacht 48* 

1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)31 20 26 On 01 
Tele* 1 . 14507 firconl 


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1.12 19 2739 Wft BV 4- V 

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150 72 1BQUV l«V 16V 

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13 — to 
29 4- Vi 

57V 4- V 
50 

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40 IV IV 1ft— ft 

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FIDELITY FAR EAST FUND 

Sih'mIi* <rtmcSli»M:nipnt a Capital Variable (S1CAV) 
Luxrmlxujrji. 37. Kue Nf»ln*-Daint: 

R.C. LuxrmiHiurji B 10926 

mvmEIVU NOTICE 

\ »if t "Sfu li |m vKaiv will U- jiaitf im nr after Jnl> 12. 

I'flfi In khaiehnliler. i.f nnd tan June 27. |WS iqim 4 Minraln- 

• if nM||M.I| ||n tl. 

H» nitlnr id ifm Ibunl uf Iftm-tup. 


I'ji iit» Aerut. 

hniilrtlliflk S \ IjIXPltlUiUinniHI 1 
VI. Htutisjnl Rusal 
i-iakrlnlNMIR: 


MONTGOMERY FINANCIAL FUND LTD. 

NOTICE TO ALL SHAJfcEHOLDERS OF 
BEARER SHARES IN SUBJECT FUND 

The direrttua nl MonteORiL'n Hiuih U] Fund Ud,. have declared a final 
dividend of L.S. SO. 1 19606-1 net fenw fipire l he same) per preferred 
?hare and L-S. SL1235 net (jjrws fipure I hi’ 5ame) per i-Lch a common 
-'hare parable to holders of muni as of Ihwmbcr 31. 19BV Bearer 
wtunAwhleis pbntdd tMivrr enupnn No. 3 to Baiwpie CVrnoalr. du iaitrni- 
imuqtS-V.. Id Rue Aldrin^m. lartembourp as- from June 27, IQSSlopelher 
»iih ajiprofirutr pannnil iimlruelioiK.- 

Ihlnl June f-L IKK By order of ike board 

Cavman Corporate Serrice* Ud, 
Secretary 


Fidelity 

.International. 


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24 26 26 

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17 

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17 


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26ft 24J/. — ft 
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19 |9 - V 

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522ft aft 2216— ft 
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139 5 4ft -5 + ft 

1096 7ft 6V 7ft + ft 
13512 llto 12 + V 

117 liV 14V* 14V + ft 
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1*4 5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 

241 „ + 
21916 13V 73V 

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«24 2JV 2Jto 
2D10 10 10 —ft 

4 7V4 tto 6V— to 
1084 3'6 Zto 3ft + 9» 
104 10 9ft 10 
3347ft 47ft 47ft 
24917* I7ft 17* + V 
* 8 TV 8 + to 

15916Vj ISV 14 +16 

29813ft 12V 12ft + V 
653416 21 24ft + V 
S221V 21ft 21V + to 
1 fflto 20 !6 20ft + to 
1423V 23V 23ft 
734ft 2416 3416— ft 
241 5ft 5* 5ft 
90624ft 25V 26V +1 
733 17* ?7to 17* + ft 
.127 27 27 +y* 


Satan Hat 

108* WO Law JP-M-OCpe 


180s High Law IPALOUa 


3Com 
Ttm*E * 
TroaFlb 
Tlprary 

Tofa_ 

TnledTr 1J0 

TaNSvi 

TrokAw 

TmLas 

Tenant 

TrwkBc 

Triodsy 

TriMlc 

TribCm 

Trflopv 

Trton .10 

TrusJo XQ 

TBkGn IjQO 

TuekOr 

Tyson* M 8 


286 9'6 

a» 
26 * 
10923V 
45 77*3 

477 
1013ft 
315ft 
113 2* 
X 6* 
437 7* 
55 SV 
33 3ft 
6387 1ft 
U 24 TV 
15 6127 

28 22934 ft 
< SV 
X 87921ft 


133 IT* 17ft 17* + ft 
137 27 27 +ft 

1453 6* 4ft 6* + V 

*4wnviiv» lift— ft 
68617ft 17V 17ft + ft 
49826 23V 23V-TA 

5xfi6 4M « + ft 

6 12V 12to 12V +1 

7 2ft 2* 2ft 

13 MV 14ft 14ft 
40 Tto 7 7 

17 Sto 5V SV— ft 
22916 aft 2914 
169014ft 14 14ft + V 
834 Bto 34 +ft 
\ 17 7ft 7to 7ft + V 
2313V, 12V J»i + V 
324 23ft 23ft— to 
9066 67ft Sift 
HA A 4V— * 
» S 4* 5 + * 

9 7V 716 7*— ft 
1113* 13* 13*— * 

5Z3to 23to ZJto— V 
40 6V 6* 6V 
3517V, 16ft 16V + V 
26 9ft 9to 9 to 
51115ft 15 15V 

164 33U 37 ft a + ft 
1C 33 33V 33 

10624 S 34 +1 

M 4* «V Oft + ft 
4454ft 1S3V 15i +1 

157 62V 62 42to + V 
116 9ft 9V BV— to 
50 19V 19 19V 

i§27to n* A — to 

Tit >Sf 'tt 

43 6V 6 6ft 
111 5ft Sto 5to— ft 
7 S 5 S 
9 14 14 M —I 

1644V 43V 44V + ft 
3922V 72 22V +1 

2 9 8ft 9 + ft 

3 9* 9V 9V 

10 3V Jto Jto + ft 
2 10ft Wft 10ft + ft 

234 ft to to 
29,3V 3W 316— ft 
62211V 10* I0W — ft 
35311 10* IDft— ft 

a ito 4 4 — ft 

9011ft llto llto — to 
747 3* 3W 3to— ft 
7 14 ISft H + to 
4724* 24 34ft + ft 
95 ito 4* 4V 
442 96} 9ft 9ft + ft 


TBC 

TCACfi 

TSClnc 

TSI 

TSRS 

TMVtvs 

Tandem 

Tandan 

Tchnals 

Tehincs 

Talco 

TkmA 

TelPluk 

Tekrtr 

Teletrd 

TriealcJ 

TcMd 

To tabs 

Tef rans 

Temca 

TcnoiE 

TndrL* 

Tennani 

TwaCp 

TermDt 

Tesdofn 

Taxon 

Textne 

TherPr 

Thrmda 

ThrdNt 

TCBVbs 

Thor Hi 

Thartec 

TheuTr 


210ft Uft 
.12 5 10*9 74 W 23to 

4712V in 
M & 59 W Qto 

39 10W 9V 
164 5to 5ft 
2742 18 to 17* 

4391 5 ito 
I9I0V I0W 
ms TO 6ft 6ft 

fZMto M 
I 1641 31 XU 
485 9 BV 
1314V 14W 
J2 21 54916V 15 
1010SK 25* 
3747 Tto 7 
49316ft 15to 
107516V ISV 
68 7* 7»* 
329 2W 2ft 
61 4(6 4 

.92 4X 1«71'6 I0V 
8 3 n, 

24 5 4ft 
1? 2, IV 

25 V * 
JSe IX 22917ft lav 

4310ft 9ft 
1 37 MV lito 
IX 27 31 47V 47ft 

47630ft 19* 
4trA U 
786 8H 7* 
74614 13* 


10ft— ft 
24V +1* 
12(6 
18 +\ 
9ft 

5ft— ft 
lift + V 
5 *■ to 
lOto + V 
6ft 

14ft — ft 

«-* 
Mw + ft 
15V. — V 
25*- V 
5V- to 
15V— ft 
14ft + V 


21 — to 
ito— ft 

kit 

17ft + to 

Wft + to 
lift + V 
47V,— to 
I9V + ft 
1216 + to 
flft + V 
14 + to 


7V 7ft 
81b TVS. + * 

1H6 lift „ 
ft ft 

23ft 23V + * 
41V 43 
25ft 27 +2* 
13ft 13* 

ISft ISV, 

2* 3* 

6* 6* + ft 
7ft 716 
S* Sto + * 
3V 3ft 
1 Ito +ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 
26* 26ft— to 
35* X — V 
S* SV— ft 
20ft 21ft + V 


2Jft + ft 
11 — ft 
aft— ft 
7ft + v 

v* 

r 

42to +1W 
lift + V 
25ft 

24ft + to 
77ft +1 
10* + ft 
19ft + V 
24V 

9ft— Vi 
3* + V 
17V + ft 
ii — to 
26 — to 
X 

19 

13ft + ft 
4ft + ft 
,7V + ft 
17ft— ft 

nw» + ft 

w + to 
13to + to 
3* 

X + V 
1*+ ft 
3 + ft 

5ft 

3916 + ft 
in* + to 

5— ft 

4V»— to 
19ft 

12—16 
35 + ft 

20 — ft 
22V + ft 

7ft— * 
-47* + Vk 
20V— ft 
IQk + ft 

Jft 

II 

4* 

21 - ft 

4ft 

s 

X 


9ft 9ft— ft 
,7V f + ft 
12V 12V— to 
6ft 616 + ft 
Jft Oft — to 
8ft 9* +1* 
14* 14* + ft 
31 31 +1 

1916 19V— 16 
« 42 — 3 

40 40 + ft 

n 2 s — to 

15 ft 15 * + to 

* + w 

22V 22V 
13* 14V + ft 
9* 9* 

6ft. 7 + ft 

L M 

12% 17V + ft 

8ft 8ft ~ 
3U 3ft 

*V 31 +lft 

\ v* 

2&2S-V 

73 73 

ju ito— ft 
6ft 6ft 
10ft 10V 


vturn 



3712V. 

11V 

nvk- 

Vlnriek 



1211ft 

18 

w 

VaBodi 

at 

21 

2S 7*\s 

7ft 

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VUToch 



25 ft 

. * 

V— 

Vndmri 



71511V. 

11 

lift + 

VotTCp 



19 4V 

4to 

« ■ 

Volllnl 



103415V. 

14ft 

IS 

Volvo 

X8r 

ia 

254 27ft 

27* 27ft 

Vbrioe 

M 

.9 

3031 9Vi 

8* 

*■ • 

vytwsf 



47 6ft 

6ft 

4ft 


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23 j*. 

14ft + * ‘ 

» ..I - 

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lift JET.. . 

30to +T 
Sft— ... 

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a-*: ■ 

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ill- 

- 

— 


nnukOEtPrj... 

Offta* Ikir 
gMikln 9*s* •-* 

us . 

iiaiftrtiwiHu.-cv*". n. 
BPounfl •> 


lCk»«la«Cc*k J. m 


tUNwcdOcrjvri^ii .» 
Dwcrk 

Vi 




,1 .'• J c 


toirwe 

surer: xp 




4« “ *5*18* 


Wopoc* 


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Xlcor 

238 4 


- ..." ; 


1146 14W 

13V 

14 -ft- 

■ — ' — 





i YtawFI IjOO 2x 
YorKFd jJOfi 27 


1T038W w astto+^r-. ' V:l 

ai6W 15V l«4r+L -Wl 




Zohnial 
ZenUs» 
JenNH X8 

Zleslar xia 
ZlonUt 134 
ZJlel 
Ctvad 

Zandvn 4)01 

Zycod 

Zymos 


„ && 

27 T40 1B16 17ft Uto +#V- 

4.1 &1TV MV 11V- - - 
35 28635V 34V » +.* . 

M 2v j* ^£5- . ■; 

_ «7 kVj ito *8,.- . . J- 

J 29 10W 10 KV-. :'i • 

«14 13V 14 - •• 

49 Tto 2* ,29b +J» 1 ” 


Soviet faviteg NATO Viewers 

The tssoewied Prest 

MOSCOW — Observers from 
five NATO member countries have 
been invited to view maneuvers in- 
volving about 25.000 Soviet troops 
in ihe Caucasus Moun tains next 
month, the Tass news agency said 
Thursday. Greece. Italy. Spain, 
Turkey and Portugal were among 
those invited to send observers 
from- *Y 15 to July 21. 


Reuien " j; 

BRUSSELS — Belgium's' 
safe price index Ceil Q&ptsea£}' 
in May, after a O.l-percmi fait}- - 
April, according to the EcoaofflK. 
Affairs Ministry. The index «P^ 
at 275.4 in May, 0. 1-percent ata* ' 
m levd b May 1984. the mimst® 
said Thursday. . " 


zntue anpur^, 
Rrutm ‘ ! ■ 

. KUALA LUMPUR — . 

sia s trade surplus narrowed j£r-' 
55 1 3 million rmggit (SZ21.S: w > 
uonl in February from 740.1 nflf ^ " 
lion ringgit in January. comparS-' ' 
«nth 254. f million risggjnt in 
njary 1984. the gavcnuxoz-iB&'-‘ 
Thursday. . . 














































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


Page 15 


II& Futures 




Jn Season 
1 Lew 


JunrST 

Owi High Law Clair Chs. 


Groins 


'*t ic»n 

+> minimum, dollars per bustel 
3.12% jut - 120% *20% 

» 3.15 S«P 3-233* 326% 

. 3 3.1# Dee 33814 urn 

. 1 127% MOT 138 3J0V. 

II* May 117% 31* 

» l*S Jul 191% 182% 

■ ales Prev. Seles 7*53 

. ono mom. Jtaot o»3» 

.«1ICBT) 

■ {0 minimum. dollars i 

U9 Jul 172% 

i ZS» SflP 154% 

UK Dec 151% 

2S9% Mar l«KA 

• « 2*3% Mav 1*4 2*5 

- 1*3% Jul 2*3% 1*4% 

147 Sep 2*1 14* 

..ate* Prev. Soles 2UM 

' OOV Open lnLlD4073 UP 231 

j®A*OfCBT> 


S 338% — JIIV 

133% — vORA 
13% 339% 

327% 138% 
iu% 116% — jn 
380% 341% —41 


231 232% —41% 

2 56 2-54% —48% 

2*0% 241% 

2*0 2*0% — 40% 

2*3 263% —41% 

2*3% 2*3 —41% 

147% 247% —41% 


hi minlmum-dollars per bushel 

356% Jvi 5J4 W7 3*3% 3*4% —43% 
1 353% Aup 5*5 5*6 5*2 3*2 % -44 

. ’ i«u- - — >.*» ' ju icn * —irot 

358% 5*0% —44% 

SJWt —.04 

541% —43% 

3.90 . —43 

1W SM —43 




■ f V 
*- 


3*6% Sep 5*0 541 

5*9% Nov 5*3% 5*4% 
5.58% Jon 5-73 37* 

5*9 Mar 542 384% 

5.77 May 390 392 

382 Jul 5M% 391% 

^opw.Hras 1 !^ 

EAMMEALICST) 
dollar* per ton 
117*0 Jul 11940 119-50 
120*6 Ana 12140 12250 
Sep 12450 12320 
Oct 12750 12840 
Dec «iei 13340 
Jan 13550 13SJ0 
tutor 14140 14140 
May 7*500 1*500 
Jul 1*849 14840 
Prev. Safes 15524 



lotas 


M750 


11580 11580 —150 

K 

mjo mjo —140 
13870 13450 —1*0 
13950 13750 — 58 

1*440 )i*S> —JO 
14580 1*550 —180 


‘1 *■’ 


'...DavOpenint 49877 off *71 

72 3270 Jul 30.15 30£ 

■' 95 2250 AW 2945 2945 

10 2250 SeO 2755 2820 

37 22.70 Od 2741 27JO 

22.90 Dec 26.10 • 26*0 

22*0 Jen 25*5 2*45 

W 34*9 Mor 2550 23*5 

45 2440 May 2310 2310 

•1 25 2L9S Jul 2*80 2*80 

« 15 2440 AW 

». Soles Prev. Sales 10800 

V -Day Open InL 60817 off 1.160 

^S(CBT) 

bu minimum- dollars per bushel 

% 1-4* Ur Jtll 1*6% 1*5% 7*5% —00% 

1*1% Sep 1*2 1*2% 1*2 1*2% +40% 

1*5 Dec 1*5% 1*6% 1*5% 1*5% +40% 

1*0% Mar 1*8% 1*5% 1*8% 1*8% +40% 

153 May 150% +40% 

. ales Prev. Sain 790 

, .’- Day Open InL 2511 off 4* 


30.15 3032 — 45 

2555 2944 —46 

27 S3 2840 +42 

2741 Z7.® +45 

26.10 2*3 +45 

2365 2382 +.12 

23*5 25*5 — vl9 

2310 2SJD +48 
2480 3*71 +.10 

24*8 +42 


Livestock 


‘ -.^‘SSLrfe 

s 2£ 83 1 U& IS?0 

; | £2 S £2 

* 17 fflrt APT 6270 6285 

• 1 25 6355 Jim 8350 6350 

- • - Jiaies 18405 Prav. Sates 17*44 

. Dav Open Ini. 4X362 UP 1,324 
" \ DER CATTLE (CME) 

• 6440 6315 

• r,ffi 64*0 Sot VOS 6*50 

• *.32 6*25 Oel 688S 6*92 

'TO 6325 Nay 6570 4382 

' - *0 66*0 Jan 67JB 6775 

■ 55 66.10 MV 6840 6840 

65 6840 APT 6740 6780 

- , Scries 1801 Prev. Sales 1526 

• ■ -~Aoy Open InL 5980 UP M0 

• VMfeS—fc _ M 

•3 

< IS 4*25 Ocr 4*60 4*80 

. .B 46.10 DtC *6*0 %*5 

; S3 2? fS S3 

--d fir 2 S- 3 £ 

1 ‘70 4800 Aug 

- Sales 6873 PreiSal** 7454 

- ‘. Day Open lid. 25.130 off » 

7~K BELLIES (CMS 

- • ff~‘ETJS »» 

15 6020 Aw 6L25 6105 

ffl S5 Fit, ISO M 

n 6*00 Altar 70.10 70.10 

vmimkbwJ 

solas 11872 Prev. Solas 11872 
Day Open In* 11824 up 192 


57.17 5782 
cm 77 5847 

6ttl5 *950 
40.95 61*0 

*.7 74 aa 
6100 6135 


6*30 6*85 
6*28 6482 
6*30 6482 
6330 6315 
6750 67J5 
6780 6785 
6780 6505 


4980 *MS 
jjUJO *530 
*385 44*5 
4*05 45*5 

jm nc jito 
4310 4530 
47*0 4785 
*780 fSS 
*785 


5950 4058 
60.10 61.10 
6880 6950 

6980 69 JO 
69 JO MJ0 
6985 7L00 
6955 


— 87 
—.11 
—.13 
-.15 


+s 


— .15 
+.15 


+85 


—.90 

—IDS 


Season Season 
High low 


Open Htsh Law Close Chp. 


Food 


COP FEE C IHYCSCE7 
19*0 1»S Dec j*3S0 14600 


14985 


' jrt 14130 U225 

Sep 14*2 14480 


iSS ms 1*325 14350 
m» May 14*85 J**g 
l T,ea Jd 143*5 14*30 

147 JO 177 7 C 

eS . Idas |g“h J« 

Pre». Day Onen ipl: 10346 ofllta 
MJGARWORLD 11 (8VCSCC1 

2* 234 

§3 28? 

IS BS 58 52 

?rS is May 339 185 

6*9 J79 Jui 482 434 

*oJ 4X5 Del *24 *32 

ESI. Sales 9325 Prev. Sales 10310 
PSvVDSopSSinL 05*76 oft 2344 

COCOA (WYCSC81 
10 metric tone-lper ton 
2400 1963 Jul 


1*130 14183 
14381 14*13 

ttf 185 

14450 14*65 
14X45 MJ0 
14338 


2*4 

233 

2.90 

330 

356 

178 

197 

*24 


167 

2*6 

194 

120 

159 

380 

IPS 

*29 


+85 

+1JB 

+189 

+.78 

+X2 

+129 

+25 


—32 

+85 

+.07 

+83 

+86 

+85 

ts 


24 IS 
2337 
2190 
7130 
2110 

H 0230 H 
EsL Sato 


1963 Sep 
1*45 Dec 
1*55 Mar 
WM MOV 
I960 J«l — . 

SOBS S«P 2035 2035 

Prev. Sales 1611 


2010 »]D 1981 1983 
2CDS 2006 1993 1997 


. 1«1 19*9 1977 

1990 1993 -1982 1983 

3000 2D00 2000 1995 

2025 2025 2000 2020 

_ jbjs 


Prev. DOV Open InL 21*70 up 14 

ORAMOEJUKE1HVCE1 
15800 R>»- cents per jb; 


18*05 
18280 
18180 1 
70080 i 
17Z50 1 

16250 1 

U75D 14220 Jul 

T #p a> 179 JS S«P 

NOV 

EsL Sales 350 Prev. Sales 775 

Prrnllw Open InL £887 up 46 


Jul 14180 1*155 
SOP 13850 13880 
Nov 13*00 13680 
Jan 13480 134*5 
JUtar 
Mav 


14080 140*5 
137.10 1 37*0 
13530 135*0 
13480 13*00 
13*10 
13*10 
13*10 
134.10 
13*10 


—.10 
— AS 
—15 


Metals 


82.70 

8125 

8*20 

MM 

7480 

74*0 

7Q50 

7020 

7020 

67JM 


^CuiroicyOptioits ~| 

'Aim mm m—m mmm — mr 1 


ADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

i Brtttsb PotMlvcnits per eon. 

md kb 2380 r 

110 V X 

115 r r 

“ ii H £ 

135 280 350 

j- ’# Canadian DoOars-ceBts per eML 
lr 71 2*0 131 

tI Mi un 

7* r r 

• west Berman MurRMBi per wit 

*fc 2 

32 t*6 r 25 

33 <338 1*0 183 

34 0*6 183 

35 025 0J1 

-'MO Japanese Yae-BBRs of acaa* 

* * jo re 

39 LSI r 

40 089 1*0 

41 0*8 089 

*2 024 083 

*3 MO r 

r Swiss Froncs-onts par mdt. 

UK 36 3*0 r 

37 2*4 r 

30 181 r 

39 127 152 

40 0J9 1*5 

41 l.U 389 

d eal! ¥0L WLMS 


J-% 37 


Puts— Lost 
a Dac Mar 


r r r 

r s r 

r 22o r 

a no r 

r 7*0 
585 US r 

r r r 


US r 

r 174 
0J8 S 

US 1JS 

084 118. 

026 r 

053 r 
059 r 
r r 
U»_ r 
rwtt. 

Ho r 
125 r 
r r 
r r 
r r 
r r 


130 


196 

1J4 


■ OHmrw M«PHlU.Wit 

•-tapfST Pet open let 93234 

Jn traded. »— No option offerwL o— OhL 
1 ^premium foorchaie price). 

rex: AP. 


COPPER tCOMEJO 
*Sffi 5 “-'«SSr r Jg i 5840 5845 

ss ^ %% 

5850 Dec 6855 6050 

59*0 Jot 60.90 6059 

5980 Mar 61*0 61 JB 
61.10 MOV 615S 62*0 
6120 Jul 62*5 5250 

4830. -Sep 6*10 6*10 
6480 Dec 6335 6375 
6520 JO" 

Cst. Sales i£bS Prmi.Scdas 52*1 
prev. Oov Oeen hd-8£576 OP 231 
ALUMINUM (C0MEX) 

4350 4335 

AW 

7*30 4435 Sep *480 .*4*5 

70*0 . 4S2S Dec 4580 4580 

' 7*50 SU5 JOT 

73*0 46J5 Mar 4650 *650 

sss ss 

.** ^ ^ 

Jan 

Mar 

esLSqles 400- Pm. Sales 647 
p££DavOf>Mlt«. 2236 up 7 

SILVER OCOMBO* 

sssr-s ^ssrvsk 

TlSx OT8' ' Sea 6238 6298 

12300 5908 Dec 6358 6395 

12158 59S0 Jan 

11938 6078 Mar 6*85 6528 

TMX0 6218 May 6595 6608 

M£0 6358 JsK 6715 6705 

9408 6418 Sgt 058 6758 

7998 6678 .’Dec *938 6915 

7708 7058 Mar 7085 7148 

EsL Safes 2UU0 Pm. Sates 27878 
PmDWOpmlai 7*840 up 206 

PLATINUM (WYME1 
50 troy at.- dollars par troy oz. 

4«3l 3000 26450 26*50 

. . Sap 

39180 2SQ80 Oct 27080 27080 

mx 26000 JOT 27*50 27580 

&50 27558 A Or 27950 27950 

30280 23786 Jul 

EsL Sales 2*48 Prev. Soles 1809 
Prev. Day Open InL 11*36 eff 52 
PALLADIUM OTTME) 

isirtt'ff 9,^ 

SB -SS SS 9750 £2 

11480 9*00 Jtm _ 

Sat Sates 453 Prirv. Sales 82 

Prev. Day Open lot £548 oH 110 

GOLDtCOMETO 

100 trey atr dollar* per frov et 

31158 JUl 317.10 317 JO 

29180 Aw 31080 320.10 
29780 S3 -32170 323J0 
30150 Dec 325JB 3Z770 
30680 Fab 32950 33150 
31*70 Apr 
r woi Jon 

33180 Aw 34*10 34*10 
33580 Oct 
34280 Dec 

36280 Apr 

EsL Soles 28800 Prev. Sales 20.199 
prev. Day Open MM2&545 ap34 


—50 


-JO 


5750 5755 
58*5 5850 
5590 5980 
60.10 68.15 

6050 6050 

6) JO 61.15 
6185 61*5 

6225 62.15 
4380 6275 
6375 63*5 
6370 
6*20 


43.15 4320 
4355 
4350 4350 
4*90 4*55 
4580 
«n yxnn 
4670 
47*0 
48.10 
49.15 
4950 
5020 


6095 61X6 
617J 

6188 6228 
6305 63*2 
6388 
6472 6472 

wn AAA7 

6672 6658 

6758 67*1 
6932 6912 
6975 
7085 708* 


26320 264*0 —1.10 
8180 
26650 26820 
2722Q 27320 
27720 27BJ8 
28420 


—1.10 
— 1.10 
— L10 
—1.10 


mace 

9J0 


*9680 

*3570 


39570 

39X00 


9625 97*0 
9650 97*5 
9720 97*5 
9770 


31780 31650 
31670 31980 
rXIM 32270 
32*00 32670 
32850 33050 

ISM 
33950 
36*10 36450 
34950 
354*0 
36520 


-JO 


+.90 

+170 

+178 

+120 

+170 

+120 

+120 

+1.10 

+180 

+.90 

+50 




US T. BILLS IIMM) . 

SI ridnian- ptsal 160 dcL 
9X30 8654 Sep 9376 9281 


9291 
9254 
9273 8721 

9LM 
9170 
91J9 
EM Sates 


8X77 Dec 9225 92*8 

Atar 9281 92.12 

Jot 91 J* 9174 
MOO Sap 91*5 9154 
M85 Dae 
8958 Mor , 

Prev. Sales 6.W 


w WHPSKDI 

(8 PCt-Sl 008004*1 £32Adsal 100 
79-12 57-W SOP 765 

78-13 SM Dec 75- IQ 


Prev. Day Open Bt 3X030 up 73 
IS TR. TREASURY ICED 
*100800 pr to- ptsUSndsot 100 pci 
88-31 75-18- SOP t+31 85-15 

87-13 75-13 Dec SMB 86-13 

fid 7S44 -Mar 

BS-7 74-30 ‘.Jen 

80-31 80-19 Dec 

Est. Soles Prev. Sates U383 

Prev. Day Open InL 57565 up l*8S 

1» TREASURY BONDS CCBTJ 

. ___ 7S-I0 75-19 

57-3 Mar 764 7+20 

56-29 Jun 73-12 73-23 

36-29 Sop 72-17 73-26 

5+2 J OK 7+3! 71-37 

56-27 Mor 70-29 71-7 

63-12 Jun 

3-T . Sep 69-12 69-20 
18 63-34 Dee 

-16 68* Mar 

Est. Sate* Prev. Satosl 51503 

Prev. Day Open lnt2U*15 off 5561 

ONMAfCBTI 

S10(U)0Opr|tvi4a£32lMBa1 100 pet 

77-10 57-17 Jot 73-11 73-12 

7+24 9-13 SOP 74-30 7S-76 

75-29 59-4 Dec 74-5 74-19 

75-10 58-20- Mor 73-18 71-28 

74-1 65 Sap 

Est. Sates JPrav.Sales 342 

Prev. Oov Open InL 3835 otf 65 


9X74 

9255 

9101 

9174 

91*5 


SS 


75-28 

74-29 

7XJ1 

7X4 

72-9 

7+38 

70-36 

69-12 


9285 

92*4 

9210 

9L79 

9153 

9X29 

9187 


85-13 

■6-11 

03-11 

82-14 

00-28 


7+14 

75- 14 

76- 17 

££ 

7+37 

71-7 

70-16 

49-25 

A9-10 

60-25 


+.15 

+.14 

+.14 

4fl 


til 

+31 

+31 



Open High low time o*g. 


Swum Seaton 
Hion Low 
CERT. DEPOSIT IIMM) 

*1 million- oft of lOOpcJ 

9289 8SJ0 Jun 9259 9259 

92J* 8580 Sco 92.13 9225 

9284 8654 Dec 9IJ2 91 J2 

91 JS 8656 Mar 

9IAJ B6*3 Jun 

9108 8786 SM 

90.10 8854 Dec +0-33 9053 

EsL Sates Pm. Sates _ 207 

Prev. Day Open I nl. 3547 UP 72 

EURODOLLARS IIMM) 

81 milllan-Ptsal lOOpet. 

92*5 8*53 Sep 9L86 9154 

91.9* 8*80 Dec 91J7 91*5 

9155 86.10 Mar 9054 9102 

91.15 86-73 JOT 9058 90*4 

9044 87JW Sep 9024 9030 

9053 87 JS Dec B953 9000 

9024 87*4 Mar 89*4 B9*5 

Eat. Sales Prev.SaJeS 38,171 

Prev. DavOoeninl.il +228 up 2*85 

BRITISH POUND [I MM} 

Spot pound- 1 Paint eaualsSUOOl 
1*450 10200 5CP 1 J32S 1J840 

10870 10200 Dec 15790 10750 

T 0800 10680 Mar L264S 18645 

10500 1.1905 Jot 

Esl. Sales Prev. Soles 11021 

Prev. Day Onen inf. 36J66 UPX342 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 
ipw^r-lomr^eaua'i 500001 
.7585 J025 See J306 7309 

7566 .7006 Dec .7280 7 SO 

ISO* *981 Altar .7258 .729 

7350 J070 JOT 

Est. Sales Prev.Salee _ 491 

prev. Day Open int. 8071 oft 33 

BERMAN MARK IIAIM) 

Suer mark- 1 point equals 50X081 

J54S J930 Sep J291 J2J5 

J610 0971 Dec 8314 831* 

_3Jli JtMB ■ Mcu- 

8325 8335 Jun 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 23*17 

pm.DavOpen InL *7094 up 1513 

JAPANESE 

‘STlST 'Jam"**? %ShP004O36 004025 004036 
004350 xnw Dec 004052 004052 004048 004 0 45 
004160 084035 Mar __ 004070 

EsL Sates Prev. Sates +198 

Prev. Day Open ltd. 25844 eft 270 

SWISS PRANC fJMM} 

50 S£° nC - 8944 8919 8« 

*360 3531 Dec 8972 8972 899 8963 

*025 8815 MOT 8009 

EsL Soles Prey. Sates 

Prev. Day Open InL 377 - oft 24*1 5 


9259 9259 
92.13 9222 
91.72 91.7S 
9132 
90.96 
90*5 
9033 9036 


91*3 91.92 
9135 91*3 
90.9! 9100 

90*4 90*4 

9022 9033 
69.93 9004 

09*4 8977 


1J76S 18815 
18680 17710 
18610 18630 


7302 7303 

7280 rw 
729 7299 

.7240 


8277 3208 

8102 3310 

8334 
8367 


+09 

+.13 

+.14 

+.14 

+.14 

+.14 

+. 1 * 


+.14 

+.14 

+.14 

+.14 

+.14 

+.14 

+.14 


—25 

—3D 

—35 


—14 

—16 

—16 


Industrials 



LUMBER (CMS) _ 

130X0QOT.il- spar i0QObd.lt. 

ZxSo 12930 Jul 14270 14190 14150 14250 

19750 13550 Sep W+30 147-5Q 1*550 14*30 

18630 13700 NOV 14930 15X70 14X60 14980 

18700 144*6 JOT 156*0 156*0 15*90 156.10 

195XQ 150X0 Mor 16300 163X0 141.10 16150 

176*0 1000 May 16700 16700 16700 165*0 

18100 17100 Jul 17150 17150 17150 17400 

Evt. Sates 1*27 Prev. Sales 2599 
prev. Day Own Int. 9*24 us 00 


COTTON 2 (NYCSJ 
sai}00rttt.- cents per lb. . 

T90S 6080 61*5 6105 

7750 6002 Od 6102 47-92 

7100 60*2 Dac. 6)05 6LPJ 

7675 61*0 Mar 62*0 S27B 

7000 61*6 May 6205 6205 

7005 m rK jij 43fn 6105 

6550 9908 Oct 

5985 58.00 Dec 5050 5850 

EsL Soles 1500 Prev.Sales 1077 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 15*20 aH«l 

HEATING QIL(NYME) 

42000 sal- cents per dal 
7580 M+s Jul 69.10 6935 

7550 6635 Aw 6X75 6X95 

7L« 6+90 Sec 69.10 69^ 

77.10 67*5 Od 6950 7030 

7*55 6450 Nov 7050 71.15 

7835 69.15 Dec 7130 7100 

7*90 6900 Jan 7205 7285 

7X90 7100 Feb 

7X00 7200 Mar 

7400 7400 Aar 

ESf.SaEes Prev. Sates £ 349 

Prev. Day Open tot. 20.968 up 1087 


CRUDE OILCNYA4E) 

I^OTL-dto^PerOTL 

»50 2*S Sw 2*3 2639 2659 

2K50 2*S Od 2605 2625 2600 2621 

»5Q S* 0 Nov 2557 2fL99 2SJS 25.93 

2?^ £63 HJ3 »S6 X70 

2950 2438 Jan 2S.40 25*5 2582 25*5 

39*6 vy Feb 25 75 2587 25.10 2587 

SS 2*13 Mar 25.1* 25 !6 25.16 25U 

EsL Sales Prev. Sales 11821 
Prev. Day Open ml. S£933 affl.101 


+*0 

+90 

+00 

+50 

+50 


5X50 


6X70 6905 

6880 6X55 

6X00 -M.I6 
69 JO 69.92 
70.15 7083 

7130 71*0 

71.90 7180 

US 

7080 


—01 

—02 

+86 

+84 

+*3 

+30 

+30 

+30 

+JQ 

+J0 


+.15 

+80 

+81 

+.M 

+.15 

+.12 

+.10 

+.15 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

potofsondcNds _ 

195*0 16000 Sep 191*5 19485 192*5 19195 +.95 

199.10 17580 Dec 19*55 19780 19685 19700 +100 

90285 190.10 Mar 19955 20085 199*5 208-15 +85 

20100 20000 JOT 20200 20200 20200 20115 +.75 

Es* Soles 51094 Prev. Sates S1J33 
Prev. Day Open InL PJI1 up 19 

VALUE LINE CKCBT7 

points and cents 

219*0 17300 JOT 19950 20055 199.15 20X50 +1*0 

21330 TSSJ5 Sep 20X30 204*0 202*5 20*55 +1.70 

31 000 30180 Dec 30700 30883 20650 30X25 +1*0 

Est. sates Prev. Sates 1106 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 6011 ott273 

NYSE COMP. INDEX fNYFEJ 

paints an) cen Is 

11160 9185 SCP 11225 11Z75 11100 1 250 +-50 

11550 10180 Dec 11*10 114*0 11170 ]1**0 +^ 

11780 1D9JD MOT 11639 116*0 11620 11630 +JD 

11X00 11650 Jun 11X10 lla-HJ HXIO n*3D +50 

Ea. Sates I05M Prev. Sales 8833 
Prev. Day Open int £331 oH58 


Commodity indexes 


Moody’s. 
Reuters. 

DJ. Futures. 


Close Previous 

719 JO f 923M f 

1 .754.60 1.760 JO 

11X36 11X29 

Com. Research Bureau- 227 JW 227*0 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 

D - preliminary ; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18,1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 


CBT: 

CME: 


MYCSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

kcst: 

NYFE: 


Otieoao Board of Trade 
CMcooo Mercanllle Exchange, 
Intematiarwl Monetary Mortet 
Ot cwcoso Merconilte Exchange 
New York Cocoa, Sugar. Coffee Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchonoe 
Commodity Exchonca. Naw York 
New Yotv MercOTttte Exchange 
Kansas a tv Board ot Trade 
New Yarn Futures Exchange 


Cofflmiiities 


JtmeST 

NO-KOeS GOLD FUTURES 

Phprtaus 

Htgn Lew Bid Asfc BM Ask 
l_ NT. ALT. 51 500 317JJ0 J15JX? J7709 
__ ALT. ALT. 31508 31700 31X08 3T70O 
a _ N.r. ALT. 3T70O 31900 31700 31900 

1 _ 32200 32200 mflO 32300 3Z10D 32 

C _ N.T. ALT. 32500 32700 3354* 33 
8 _ 33000 33000 32900 33100 32900 33UM 
I _ ALT. ALT. 33200 33500 33400 33600 
rotume: 24 lots of U0 aL 
WSAPORE BOLD FUTURES 
Ls per ounce 


NM Law Settle StNte 
g 31850 31X50 31X50 21 

’- fc B a?: . : 
SSSm&w'ii- M 

I ALA LUMPUR RUBBER 

■torsion cents Mr MM 


Ask BM Ask 

. 300*0 mm 202*0 20300 

■a 19600 19700 19X50 19400 

19650 19700 19500 19650 

« -- »9J» 20100 1H50 20058 

W ~ —I 3150 2BX5D 20100 M0O 

« 20350 20X50 28300 20500 

■tofume: 14 lots. 

MOAPDRE RUBBER 
nweoreceMsiwUe __ 

Bid Aik Bid Ask 

5 1 jiy-_ ittjo mss iiojw m0O 

d I AW— 17700 }77J0 17X50 17600 

* 2 JIV 17108 17500 17800 13100 

£ 3 Jly 16908 17800 MX00 16900 

>S4 Jly— 14800 16700 16*00 14*00 

IS 5 JIV — MU0 16300 15900 16100 

IALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
■lovaiM rtnootts pur 30 tuns 


Ask BM 
1.150 L200 1.158 

Lire 1,150 Lire 
tore 1.130 i 0 re 

T0SO 1010 1097 

1030 1070 1030 

C 10» 1070 1030 

10» 1060 1030 

- <ff 1026 1060 1020 

Hi . .1010 . . 1050 1010 

/Mume: 0 tots et 35 tons. 

IwBf: Saute* 




li^wy 


June 2? 


r 


Offer 

Bid 

VMd 

Prev 

TIM 


HMItl 

686 

684 

70S 

702 


waHi 

706 

701 

7*2 

7J8 


» rear 

7J9 

rst 

707 

7.96 


ere: Setomoa B r others 




■*4t 


rpan VehkJe Exports Fall 

< Retan 

1 TGKYO — Japanese vehide ex- 
ms fell 112 percent in May, u> 

- 1,822 freon 655,284 in April but 

- st up 10.7 petceui from a year 

■ rlier, the automobile manolac- 

rers assocaiion said Thursday. 


London 

Cnmmodhies 


od 


oo 


Jaw 27 

High LOW Bid Aik SET'am 

SUGAR 

Storting ear metric toa 
Ago 0X60 8700 0X00 8900 0*40 8600 
90*0 9988 9080 90*0 «X4Q 88*0 
9X60 94*0 94*0 95*0 93*0 9X80 
10600 1 0*80 105-06 H&20 103*0 10*00 
N.T. ALT. 10900 109*0 108*0 HB*0 

114*0 115*0 11580 II L40 11X80 11*60 

11900 119*0 11920 12000 117*0 119*0 
Volume: 1093 ton of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Starting Per metric tan 
Jly MSB V2S V37 IJ39 1024 1J2S 

Sep 1017 1*98 -1007 1009 1005 L707 

Dec 1*S4 1*73 1*76 L638 LOT 1*79 

Mar 1*91 1081 1*84 1*86 1*86 1*87 

Mav 10® U95 1*99 1081 1*98 1*99 

Jly 1014 1010 1J13 1014 1015 1014 

Sep 1020 1020 1018 1030 1020 1028 

volume: 3*58 lots aflO tans. . . 

COFFER 

Storkng Par metric toe 
J hr 1.953 102* 1042 1015. 1925 702* 

Nn aw 20W 2041 20fi 2016 2011 

iSr 

May X100 2080 2092 2J»5 2075 2086 

Jty 2.185 2-1 BS 20H XH0 209S 2*00 

volume: X2SS tats of 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

US. dettors par matrlc toe 


Jty 


71503 

21X75 

Sep 21*25 

Od 21405 

Nov 21805 

Dec M.T. 

Jan N.T. 

M ALT. 

N.T. 



21*58 21405: 


21200 2127521173 UfS) 

21300 21X85 71200 21205 

21*75 21X73 71*00 

N.T. 21600 320*0 21600 22100 

Votome: Wtatspf.lW tons. 

Xeurata: Reotersorxt London Petroleum Ex- 
chono * (oasom. 


J ijondon Steals 


BM Ask 


Jmc27 


I’ ve* toe s 
BM Ask 


ALUMINUM 
SMrHM ear melHctoa. _ 
spot _ 7M50 76JJD 2*00 77500 

forward 19100. 29200 7*700 797 JO 
COPPER CATHODES ((Ugh Grade) 

Sterling ncr metric toa 
foot 108500 1A60O 109600 109700 

forward i09uo LOivre l.i tua Lii*oa 
COPPE R C ATHOD ES UtandenO 

SpO* naW "* r 107OJM°Um0O 108X00 10BS0O 
fSvarrf 108500 108700 1*01100 l.IMOO 

Storting per metric taa„ 

ZZa rtf « « » JfiS 

NICKEL . . 

Sd 1 ” P ”‘ 4.X3SM 4J3BJB *34000 404500 
forward *1 1509 4J3O0O * 38 808 *80500 
SILVER 

^pwtrayww. ^ M 
forward 49000 *9100 49858 49100 
TM OWnN r g. _ . 

StoilUa per metric ton 

soot XO80O 900800 vure HUSO 

forward 901800 f*RUe 9*500 903000 

Xtor S ne per metric ton' 

m 61x00 inn AU0O cixm 

forward 5SX00 58900 59100 59200 

Save**: op- 


CoimSlities 


June 27 

Cl aw 

Klgb Law BM Ask cargo 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric fun 
Aw 1025 1000 1015 1025 +25 

Od 1030 IJDO 1010 1015 +]2 

Dec 10*5 1040 1025 1035 +1* 

Mor 10*1 1JS5 10O 1065 +13 

Moy L3M 1J00 L3C0 1010 +13 

Aw !*T. N.T. 1350 U66 +7 

EsL voL: 3000 tats ot 50 tans. Prev. actual 
sales: 3043 lots. Open interest; 19*59 
COCOA 

French Rones par M0 kg 
Jly N.T. N.T. 1050 2050 Unde 

Sep 2020 2005 Z0C2 2008 —2 

Dec L980 1,970 L966 1075 —9 

Mor 2000 2000 1.986 (.996 —7 

May N.T. N.T. 1090 — —5 

Jly N.T. ' N.T. 1095 — Uneh. 

sap ALT. N.T. ,2000 — Unch. 

EsL vat.: 42 lota ot 70 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 26 tots. Open interest: 770 
COFFEE 

French fraecs per 106 kg 
Jty N.T. H.T. 2070 1305 Unch. 

Sep 2040 2027 2050 2060 + 14 

Nov 2098 2079 2099 2*10 +17 

JOT N.T. N.T. 2*20 X460 +5 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2*25 2*65 + 10 

May ALT. N.T. 2*38 2*79 Unch 

Jly N.T. ALT. 2*35 2*75 —5 

EsLvaL: 30 tots of 5 ten* Prev. actual sales: 
34 lots. Deen Merest: 403 

Source: Bourse <tu Commerce. 


. S&P 10 P 
Index Options 


June 27 


Prtm Jty tote « 

S 1 * 5 5% - uu 

W* 11» O 13 
OD * _n w W 
1*5 7S/U» 5 *14 

m % i% Pt m 
tlS M t/M 1 5/147 


JR M« SCP OU 

in* in* - — 

in* % im vi* 

1/16 9. f/U % 
7/16 I 1J/U%1 
11k 2ta 3 Ji 

a ft i h, 

R 1H4 - - 


nu3« 

1MU(adtocaiaL£7« 

INrtPW lutor ya 

TaMWI CPCPtaLStklM 

mSwm Low«U8 OHinui+u* 

Source: CME 


[ 


DM Futures 
Options 


June 2? 
Puta-Sefflc 


Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

sea 

aec 

Mar 

ZW 

259 


071 

as 

90! 

US 

1.90 

222 

1*7 

#08 

LI6 

0J2 

140 

105 

092 

L32 

— 

X45 

1* 

145 

u* 

107 

■ — 

033 

087 

1.18 

UD 

157 

IS 

XU 

0*9 


ID 

327 

319 


31 

32 
31 
34 
IS 
3* 

EstkncPed total voL 2380 . 

Cels: Wed. reL 2029 gpaaioL 2*2 
puts : Wed. veL U59 bpm ML 15421 
Source: CME. 


J Cash Brices 


Jum27 


C u ium udW y end Unit 
Coffee 4. Santos, to. 


Prfntdafil *4/30 38 "a, Vd _ 

Steel blltets iPItt.). ton 

Iron 2 Fdrv. Phita. tan , — 
Steel scrap No 1 Iwv Pttt — 

Lead Spot. ID 

Cccoer elect, to , — — 

Tin (5troHs|,lb. 


Zinc E.SLL Basis, lb 

Paltodium. ez 

Stiver N.Y.az 

Source: AP. 



Year 

Wed 

Age 

7*9 

J*6 

8*0 

■74 

47300 

45308 

21300 

21309 

7B-71 

100-181 

19-21 

38-32 

*7-79 

66% 

60911 

63699 

8*4-47 

0-SV03 

99-164 

151 

6.M 

839 


^ Dhidencb 


Company 


BtmkeedCarp 
Viacom inti 


June 27 

Par Amt Pov Ree 
INCREASED 

Q .17 7-23 7-lS 
Q .12 8-17 7-26 


INITIAL 

MkMgonNoH - -W 7-15 7-1 

STOCK 

Crazy Eddie - 10096 7-31 7-12 

STOCK SPLITS 
Ag ency Rent-A-Car — l-tor-2 

SSSS'&SKl^SS-34or.2 


0 4 0% 7-21 7+ 

O -15 7-31 7-9 

Q 03 7-30 MS 

Q *6 9-3 8-1 

Q 06 M 7-tO 

S .12 9-16 8-16 

§ 00 7-24 7-1 B 
.12% 7-25 - 

O -77 8-2 

0 05 8-1 

Q 04 10-1 

O .10 9-U 

.02% 7-25 7-15 
O .10 7-22 7-8 

O *1 % 8-1 7-18 

01*3% 8-1 7-5 

O-QwtarTr; S-SemV 


ji Soot 

Cunt. Bk Canada 
Curt Ice-Seres 
Federal Co 
General Mills 
Harper Group 
Harper A Row Pub. 
Hunt Mmnttadurtog 
l owo Resources 
Ocean O r WL X Exa . 
Pay less Cestiwove 
Peertess Tube 
Svs. Engin ee r tag 
Vara Inc 

Washington G Ltont 
RRMBliug X Lfc Erie 
A-ABuaal: M-Muettily; 


7-12 
. 7-9 
7-15 
9-2 


Source: 1/7*1. 


Gold Options (price* in S/olX 



Mjo. 

row. 




1450470 
ROJJJO , 



39 

IUS-I97S 1 

1 

i 

SO 

575- 775 

13751525 

20753225 

34) 

32S 475| 

moan A 

165X1800 

333 

IO- 275 , 

725-875 

120X1*50 

333 

oa 150 

503.603 

H32SI175 

-3L 



! 775.9^ 


Gel* 31600 3&SD 

Tatons WUte Wdd SjL 


1211 Geneva LSwfemtaod 
T«L 31 62 51 - Tries 2*385 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 


Cuckney Named Westland Chairman 


By Colin Chapman 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Westland PLC. 
the British helicopter manufacturer 
that recently commissioned an in- 
dependent investigation into its fi- 
nances. has appointed Sir John 
Cuckney as chairman. 

He replaces Sir Basil Blackwell 
who took early retirement Wednes- 
day. No reason was given for his 
surprise decision. Sir John’s ap- 
pointment coincides with the Bank 
of England's mitiative to uy to re- 
store confidence in Westland, 
which supplies helicopters to Brit- 
ain's military. The effort does not 
involve cash support. 

The price of Westland shares 
soared Thursday after the an- 
nouncement but fell hack to end at 
78 pence (96 cents) on the London 
stoat exchange. Share prices had 
fallen to 52 pence Wednesday from 
I (5 pence on June 19, the day be- 
fore Bristow Rotorcraft PLC with- 
drew an £89-nuHion takeover offer. 

Sir John also is chairman of John 
Brown PLC, the engineering group, 
and Thomas Cook & Sons Ltd. 

RCA International Ltd. (Bermu- 


da) has appointed Robert F. Young 
president of its operations in Asia 

with additional responsibilities for 
evaluating new business. Mr. 
Young, who replaces John H. Rich 
Jr., who is rearing, has spent the 
past 20 years in the U.S. .Army, 
most recently as the key represen- 
tative of the UJS. Military Technol- 
ogy Cooperation Delegation to the 
Peoples' Republic of China. Prior 
to that, be was a military attache in 
U.S. embassies in Taipei and Beij- 
ing. 

Alexander Hamden Group Ltd- a 
London-based insurance broker, 
has established its first operational 
division in Canada, responsible for 
North American operations. Mi- 
chael R. McDermott has been ap- 
pointed to head it. 

Morgan Grenfell & Co- the Lon- 
don merchant bank, has appointed 
Charles Fraser chairman of its op- 
eration in Scotland. Mr. Fraser, an 
Edinburgh solicitor, succeeds Lord 
Taylor. 

Prudential- Bache Securities Inc. 
and Prudential Insurance Co. of 
America have formed a new sub- 
sidiary, Prudential Global Funding 


lnc„ to furre non in the interest- 
swap business, acting as principal 

in swap transactions winch begin at 
$10 million. The new corporation 
has hired J. Dickson Brown, for- 
merly with Citibank's New York 
currency and interest-rate swap de- 
partment, as president 

The Royal Bank of Ca n ada has 
appointed J.E. Denis Lepage man- 
aging director of the Royal Bank of 
Canada (Belgium) SA. He previ- 
ously was senior manager, lending, 
for the bank’s Europe, Middle East 
and African headquarters in Lon- 
don. 

Svenska International Ltd-, the 
London-based international mer- 
chant banking arm of Svenska 
Handelsbanken Group, has ap- 
pointed two new executive direc- 
tors. Hans- Eric Von der Groeben, 
formerly senior vice president and 
bead of the Nordic American 
Banking Corp. in New York, be- 
comes executive director for mar- 
keting. The other executive director 
is Michael Turner, promoted from 
within the company. 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. of 
New York has named Garence H. 


5 BelgianBanks 
Link Computers 

The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — Five Belgian 
banks said Thursday that they 
would link computers, enabling 
holders of their cash cards to 
collect money from any auto- 
matic idler regardless of which 
bank issued the card. 

The banks are Genemle de 
Banque. Credit Communal, 
Krcdietbank. Banque Bruxelles 
Lambert and Caisse Generate 
d’Epargne et de Retraile. 

The agreement benefits hold- 
ers of 2 million Mr. Cash and 
Bancontact cards. The five 
banks said ii would take a year 
to enable the machines handle 
both card systems. 


King 111 to head its Antwerp office. 
He previously was a vice president 
in Lhe Brussels branch. 

A5EA AB has appointed Seen 
Jakobsson managing director of its 
appliance group, ASEA Cylinda 
AB, based in Vara, Sweden. He 
previously was production manag- 
er of another ASEA subsidiary', 
ASEA Control. 


BP Counts the Benefits From Its In-House Bank 


(Continued from Page 11) 

be beaded by its treasurer, Jan 
Roxendal 

The Swedish company’s chief ex- 
ecutive, Percy Bamevik, described 
the move as a further step in the 
company’s “efforts to see treasury 
management as a profit center of 
its own.” 

“As a result of the group’s sub- 
stantial liquid assets ana major for- 
eign-exchange business,” Mr. Bar- 
nevik said, “our net financial 
income represents an increasingly 
important part of our total earn- 
ings.” 

He added: “An independent 
company will make it easier to fol- 
low up the earpingi and risk level 
of our treasury management. At 
the same rim e it will provide great- 
er opportunities for us in the Swed- 
ish money market 

At BPFL there are four main 
operating divisions — a treasury 
division handling cash manage- 
ment and foreign-exchange dol- 
ing. a corporate-finance division, a 
co mm er c i al-banking division, and 
a division dealing with long-term 
planning and controL Each oper- 
ates as a profit center in its own 
right, ana its customers are BP 
companies across the world. 

The chief executive of BPFL 
John Browne, a former engineer 
who brought the Fortes Field w the 
North Sea on stream, said that cli- 
ents are charged at commercial 
rates except where BP policy 


obliges departments or subsidiaries 
to do business through him. 

Outside Britain, associates can 
go to other banks. “We act as just 
one place they can come to buy and 
seQ from.” Mr. Browne said. “If 
they do not come and see us, we 
know there is something wrong, 
and then we have to change our 
policies accordingly.” 

The size of & operation puts 
BPFI directly into the category of a 
medium-sized bank, bringing it 
into the top 100 such institutions in 
the world. 

The degree to which other bank- 
ing institutions have lost business 
as a result of BFs move can be 
gauged by the size of treasury oper- 
ations: About £60 billion ($75 bil- 
lion) will be handled by BPFTs 
foreign-exchange division this year. 
In addition, the bank wiD also man- 
age about £15 billion of BFs sur- 
plus cash. 

BPFI has had to go to the bank- 
ing community Tot some Of its 70 
senior staff, although the mqority 
have worked on the financial side 
of BP before. 

“One effect of this is that we find 
we can fund our normal invest- 
ments internally, without going to 
the capital markets,” said Mr. 
Browne of BPFI. He noted that 
BPFI has also acted for BP in two 
recent acquisitions. 

BP is sensitive to suggestions 
that its move was ill-timed, coincid- 
ing as it did with the near collapse 




TOTAL GROUP 

Cornpognie Fron^oise des Petroles in 1 984 

Annual Shareholders 7 Meeting 
of June 21, 1985 

Tbe OnfioBry Geoeal ShareboUea' Meeting dtJP. hdd os Juoe 2L 1985 
with Mr. Francois- Xavier OfiTOll. ProwfcnL m the ciair. approvedthticmmulbr 
1984. AU the rraotajoos were idopted. Tbk was ioltownd bj bo Extraordinary General 
Shrebotda v' Me eting, during which the change in the corporate identity at die 
company to TOTAL Connapne ftanQaiae des Rooks w» form a ll y tppnmd. 

Ia his address, tnePnsidra. wtthnm wishing to prejadge the resdhs lor die 
jeer a a whole. Mated chit Fust HaH results tor 1985 rdketed on encoanfpiig rate of 
advance”. He strewed however that the Ntnaiiaa in the refining and mmirtmgsectta 
gave canae For awtem. cspcriaDy in France, and dm the intornarinnal oil mantel, after 
a period d vtalnlitv in the carte put d die year, was now trending downwards. 

Mr. ORTtJLf pointed out that thuds to the recovenr began in 1983 and 
consolidated in 19&V, toe investment throat would be imna&d in the "upstream” 
■erteos ol eiplonaioo and field devetopmcnL It is to be vure in die prodnerinn <rf oil and 
oe dot the greater nut of the Company 1 * profits is achieved. He went on to tsnphnsae 
Lbe all- important zwe, in the unstable market we know today, played by i nieinatinn a l 
trading at regards the Company's supplies od «nkta- 

Ute Prmdem also paid trnrnte to the work d bis predecessor. Mr. Reoe 
CRANIER de LILUAC President of ihe Company (ram 1971 to 1984. who "during# 
period d tax ing change showed himtetf die equal of die launder. Ernest MERGER, 
and d the tram re sponsible for rebuilding the Company again after lhe wax; namely 
Victor de METZ". 

DghUgbte oT 1984 

• Cin t wu fan: eocnucfflng respite have been obtained in France (ViDepadne, 
Mefimj. the British North Sex Indonesia, the United States as wed as in Australia aad 
Angola- Rewrite in the Paris Basin, where die VHJepenhre Geld has nor am* 
nnorfMwi. Sf pmimlari v Mpiifiranf In lhe 1 kited State*, the GpHIMBT has derided to 
carry oul its own eapforaboo jgngram m conjuncture with ana, if necessary, in 
aasocntioo with ifc su aa i fi a i y TDPfNA). 

• Dev elo p ment and Production: Deveknxnem and production erqpenifitures 
have increased very shandy, mainly becanse d toe scape d the wodt earned oat in dr 
UK on the bigr-scale Aiwyn Nana project, m die Netherlands and to Indonrsui. 

E Refining — 0 MarheVlnp; MoaenUHthm Of the refining tool has CORBBtcd in 
equipping certain unite with uuu m aton facilities and in storing down those unite no 
longer able u meet the demands of the market The ad^&rion and nansf omarion id 
lbe /Hwrilmiinn network have been stepped up. 

• UrwsisBi and Coat Ponaendy soft mamnm prices have led the Comp any to 

ita position without seeking to exten d h. The same bolds good for Us coal 
assets and for the name reasons. 

• Ronda end Dividend: CFP (Punal Co t a p tm y) OR earrings in 2 984 amounted lo 
l^BbaitoBttaDCS comp a red with 524 miffion lanes to 1963 and earthy dirtribtaed 
to 553 zmllka Traacs (compared with 437 nuOioB fames). The total rim per stare 
came toZUrsna (dividend pins tax credit). Ehr? td dirideod paymeot JnDe28L 1965. 

The genets] meeting ratified the appointment as direclon id lbe Cwnpanr of 
Mr. Ftnocois-XsTier ORTOLl with enact irnro October 26. 1984aud Mr. Edouard de 
ROYERt with effort From April 3. 1985. 


Some RgmrvM on die Group 

1983 

1984- 

nrnnurmn 

Oil (aaUtoa tom].— - 

43 

45 

Berolte 

5l7 

6 

(coMolidned in ol francs) 

1393 

158.7 

% In France - - 

55 

56 

• Abroad — — . 

84^ 

102.7 

Cash flow 

8.1 

8.7 

Esnuflgs ... ... — - ....... - 

0.42 

1.3 

Met investments 

6-8 

7 


The brochure 
1984 ” is available to Enetah 
75781 Pans Cedes 16. Fram 


ie Fren^aise des Pfnoles and die TOTAL group to 
French from Se :»i c e Dgwurei. 5 Rue Mind-Ange, 


Compognfo fttmy ni e des Wtro l w 
hot dumgad its itam s to 
TOTAL Compognte Fran^cme des M f io l es 

TOTAL I'a’w..:, Frjoqatse des Ptaales bs become lbe new corporate 
identity of C MOpqaae Fancier des FErndes. This dudatoo was tokos , following a 
recommendation of the Board a! Krecmre. hv an E maon fi nary General Meeting of 
SbarrboWen held ou June 21 subseqneni to the Ordinal)' General Merting. 

TOTAL has. for the hat thirty re am. been lhe trademark d the Croop in 
France and sbfoad. ll ii linn i mi uni nfiihgii Hrei ita iwul In ilriii^imr rta mijiiiili id 
the Group’s aHiluiem. imuwrthr of Ac sector — exploration, prafartiem. refining ot 
umltejug— to whidt they briong. Lastly, ii is the name by which the Creep j» known 

The Group’s parent c ompan y fail h could bm stand aside [ram ibis 
development and therefore derided to add TOTAL to its name: in onler to adapt to die 
Teafirics of economic Ur and » refafortE the image of a muted, rosily mptoUe and 
robeutec Group. 


Prtroles). 


The -share will be listed under die name TOTAL (C w n p n gnie Fraa^ise des 


of the industrial company bank. 
Johnson Mauhey Bankers, which 
hnd io be rescued by the Bonk of 
England. 

It is also cautious about making 
a decision to go outride BP for new 
business. 

“We have to build up a cadre of 
people who really do know what 
they are doing." said Mr. Horton. 
“It is a matter of proceeding slowly. 
We do not rule out selling our ser- 
vices outride: It would be foolish to 


do that. But we are a long way from 
that point at the moment" 

In lbe last few months. Mr. Hor- 
ton and Mr. Browne have been ex- 
plaining their plans to traditional 
bankers. What has been their reac- 
tion? 

“I think lbe most efficient ones 
welcome it." said Mr. Horton, "be- 
cause the number of transactions 
we are generating has certainly in- 
creased. I think perhaps the less 
efficient smile between gritted 
leeth." 


- ADVERTISEMENT - 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
27 June 1985 

The net auetvfllwmotoHOMskMra below are HMUotftv Ihe Foods lured wilhl the 
exception of tome Hindi whore motes on based on treat prices, mo fcOowtog 
marginal symbols iwUcoie freuoencv or quotations wjpufled tor IM IHT: 

(d>- dotty; (w)- weekly; IM-hLmonflilY; (r) -regularly; ID- Irregularly. 


At MAL MANAGEMENT 
(w) Aj-Mal Trod. SA - 


— f fwl Uovtte inn Pacific — 5F I3*» 
815800 — Mw> Uovdslnn Smaller Coa. 814*7 


BANK JULIUS BAER XCa Ltd. NIMARBEN 

—t0 ) Boor-bond SF 942.15 —Id I Ctes A. 

—Id ) CodOTr ___________ SF 124700 — (w ) Class B - U0. . 


—Id J Eauiboor America. 


s 11736700 — <w> Clare C-Jegan. 


.89107 
J 99.11 
-87X36 


~}h i i£$£E SF SS 0®UFLEX LIMITED 

—Id I Eaulbaer Podflc T^^ffSSSSr 


— Id 1 Grobar- 

— 4d I Stortcdar 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
— W > Aslan Growth Fv 
—|wl Dhwrbond — — . 

— twl F IF— America _. 


— Iwl FIF — Europe. 
—twi FIF— PocHJc- 


|e li^Tnc —i«“) Dollar Mutflum Twrm. 
SF 166608 __ lw) Dollar Lung Term. 

—Iwl JananuM Ywi 

. 81X61 — iwlPoimd Starling 

SF 8*70 — iwl Deutsche Mar* 

. 8 1X33 — (w) Duldh Florin — __ 

. 811.91 — tw) Swiss Franc- 


.81X66 


.sum 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PBBS57XT1W Hague 10701 46908 
— Id ) Bcver tte teng ln gen I ) 


.1 1X56 

-DM 1X31 
— FL 1007 
_SF 9.94 


—id i indosma MulHbonds A 89200 

3s!isssssass&& , « 

V“£ riS88t!SiSj!2S 

5S;l’S S^ r!?«rs5' rtfn — «iparoil-fumd_ 

-w Sf^*i25S?nSfr2I^Ba wm -« 1 PARINTER FUNI 

— Id i Bril. World Lria. FOTd_ 

— (d 1 BrlL World TcehiLFOTd 


83X10 

S0X1B 



CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— (w) Cmritai inn Fund 

— tw| Caoiial I to Bo SA — 


CREDIT SUISSE I1SSUE PRICES) 

-rid ) Actions Suteses 
— <d) Band Valor 5wl 


81.121 ROYAL B. OF CANADA.POB 2tt£UERNSEY 

8X710 **wl R8C COTOdtan Fuad Ltd 811*0 

-+-I vr> RBC Far EoN&Padflc Fd_ 8)0*3 

CVT17 -Hwl RBC I nr I Capital Fd. 821*1 

! 1*37 -Mwl RBC inn Income Fd 81100- 

* -+{d 1 RBC MOT-Currencv Fd._— _ 82147 

-Hwl RBC North Amw. Frt 8909 


—Id) Band Valor D-mark i™ • Bid 

-id) Bond Valor US-DOLLAR — 8119*5 -»*»»*«.. B» 

—to) Bond valor Van ■ — Yw 1OB270O SVENSKA INTERN ATIONALLTD. 
— (d) Convert Valor Swt— — __ SF 116JD 17 Duvaredilre 3a*-oKton4l-377-8Q40 


8F1k 2 SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (464-23S230) 
IMB 11X16 — Iwl Inc: Bid; 8502 Offer 15*0 


J8504 Offer_ 


SSL63 


— Id) Convert Valor US-DOLLAR. 8 17110 — (b ) SUB Band FimL 

—Id 1 Canoaac — SF 01700 — ( W ) SHB Inti Growth Fund 

—Id ) CS Ponds — Bonds SF 77 JO 


J 2203 


120*7 


-Id i CS Foreto-rinrt SF 11600 SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICESl 

—Id I CS Money MortreT Fi*id_. 8 107X00 J nM Itaji 

-rid ICS Money Mortal Fund DM 104100 — <d DritortBOTdS o tac tion DM1U» 
-rid ) Enorgle— Valor. — SF 16205 — « I Oojtar Band Seteerton— . * 13127 


-rid I U reec- 

—Id ) Euroto— Valor- 


-rid ) Podflc— Valor. 


SF 97200 —fa > Florin Bond Setoclton— FL 1006 
SF 156.75 — fa > Inlgrvolor SF 8X50 

5F 16550 —“1 > JW'O" Porttallp — SFM175 

jrittuu _ {d j Bond selection c 1MJ3 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC — id 1 Swire Foreign Bond SeL. SF 10702 
winrtwster House . 77 Lon don Wall —Id > Swisavafor New Series. SF 3JL50 

LONDON EC2 101 9209797) —Id ) Universal Bond Select — SF 0425 

Iwl Finsbury Grci*> Ud * T2145 — (d ) Universal Fund SF 12204 

“ ' *2053 — (d } Yen Band Selection Y 10,12600 

1 1107 


t«n) Wbieheiler DhrerwIedM. 
(ml Winchester Financial Lttt- 
(W) winchester Hold tore 


(w) Worldwide Securittre 1 5/S 3%- . tt*TJ ! tSS.'SSLwT 

(wl Worldwide Special S/S 2%_ 8 1*15.99 —Id I Fon» Swire SL 


D1T INVESTMENT FFM 

— HP 1 Coruxntro 


— +<dl Inti R o ntentand- 


FF 10203 UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

S «0S -rid)AnicnU0.Sfl. SF 410S 

— *— "* 5F 4X75 

SF 15100 
SF 93*50 
SF 490*0 
SF 20000 


—Id 1 Japan- Invest- 


„ _ , , — (d ! SafH South Air. Sh. 

DM 2X JI —(d 1 sima (stock price J , 

DMW3 UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

Dunn & HaigW 6 Llovd George. Brwrts —idlUnlrentg DM 4500 

— Im) D&H Commodity Pool- 8OT.I9 ■- -rid ) Unltand* DMKJ0 

-imi Currency 4 Gold Pool — Slg*6~’ -rid I Unlrok, DM71U5 

— tml Winch. Ute Put. Pool— 55y?01 — Id 1 UNIZINS DM 11205 

—I ml Trans World Fu». Pool. 

LLSurmrePa^wVtKx’otemMM ^CTLDo™M li+vwg+rmwirg. Fund. 8210* 

*!!2*!E= ills ! am 1 * 1 !::' = : Vi5 

-{:}^gj5srz=== Iks wiarisSHSE is& 

FIDELITY POB 67X HomHTon Bermuda _ (b > Arkme 81*7X53 

— Im) Amerlcon Value* Common- 89*57 ( W | Trust cor Inn FX JAEIF1 — SIX'S 

— (m) Amtr values CumJYef — 810104 [w> BNP Intortoond Fund , — 811201 

—id I FkteJffy Amer, Assets 87003 (wl Bopdailn-lsauePr., — SF UV0S 


SSgLSJ “* —Id 1 UNIZINS 

•® M “* Other Funds 


—Id 1 Fidelity Australia Find 58*4 (m) Corada Gtd-Mortoage. 

-rid I FldelirY DocEwery Fund- — 810^ (d I Cupllal Preserv. Fd. Int 
-rid) Fidelity Dir. Svgs.Tr S 124*5 |w) CHodel Fund 


-rid 1 Fldolltr For East Fund 82001 (d I CJ.R. Australia Fund 

—Id 1 Fidelity Inti. Fund- 86113 (d 1 CJ.R. Japan Fund 

— Id > Fidelity Orient Fund ‘ 

— to 1 Fidel tty Frontier Fin 
—I d ) Fldetlfy PdcHIc _ 


8 905 
811*0 
8102 
5X40 
81X38 


826*0 (m) Cleveland Offshore Fd. 8111257 

*.12^2 '«l Columoia Securities— _ 


8 13309 (O! COMET E. 


— Id IF IdemvSpcL Growth Fd. — - 5U68 (w) Convert. Fd. inn A 

— Id) Fidelity World Fond 13202 (w) Convert. F± Inn B 

Iwl DXS£. 

Id I _ 


FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN 

London Agent Ol-nMEU 

— |wl Dollar Income ■ — — 

— (w) Forbes High Inc. Gilt 
— lw) Gala inenme. 


FL 11X6B 
, 877X37 
-. 8957 
- 82757 

885.14 

D. Witter WW Wide Iwt Tsl 81X76 


— |nr> Gold Aooreclolhw- 
— Im) Strategic Trodb ‘ 


s n n lb 1 Drakkar Invest. Fund N.V— 81.110*8 

Id) Dreyfus America Fund 8 1001 

£47? (d ) Drevtus Fund inn. 8305* 

S40D W Bwt»i lirtorcentlnent- 83533 


,n? (wi The EitaMbfimenf Trim s 1.16 

* '- 7 (d) Europe OWtaoitans : 

|w> First Eoole Fund - 8 1407507 

8334*4 ID) Fhly Slurs Ltd. S0VSJB 

c 71427 twJ Fixed income Trans _S 1X16 


GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— (w) East Investment Fund 

— (wi Scotttsti World Fund - - *_ - 

— lw) Stole 5t. American 816632 (w» Forael» Issue Pr SF 212-40 

Captl.TroSLl*d.L0ftA9etd01ri014BO (wl gorextund- - ■■■■ . _ *759 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. }”» cSSSSj * 1 Brt * 0n 

GuOTT,sey - Id > Oovernirv Sec. Fund* 592*4 

ml FuturGA MSA -— 8 10724 ,a ) Frankt-Tnist Intentns — DM4299 

iwIGA M Arbit rage inc 8121M [wj HaurenKim Hldgs. N.V SiiBJO 

wGAMertrol tk 813656 <W J Hesl to Funds 8106.0 

fwl GAM Barton toe VIJb? Iwl Horizon Fund §1.17508 

{* SAM E rmlto Be (ml IBEX Holding Ltd — - SF 1 HID 

Iwl CAM Franc-yol-— — — — SF 102.19 lD ) ila Inti Gold Bund 1 1X04 

fa) 


14 1 GAM Internollonol Inc. 


I w) GAM North America Inc. 

(wl GAM N. Amertai Unit Trust. 

(wi GAM Poclflc Inc 

(mi GAMrtol Cora 


ILA inti Gold 
Intertuna SA 


81*72 

S3B2M 


fwl Infernrorket Fund . — 

(d } Iniermlntog Mut. Fd. CLV- 5530-75 
(r) Inn Securittre Fund 81000 

(w) GAMSieriTXjnti Urtti Triad- {?) iS AwSStouri. ...^*57*6 

= m ja'^ssssMaw* 4 — 

(ml GAM Tvehe SA. Class A 5117.79 '«) FuOT 

s9*s KitiSSSttESb 

-0.1G.I.AnMta4Srien«^— 8J*fa MKgSS 


d I G.T. Aston UK. GwttLFd 

w| G.T. Aslo Fund 

d ] G.T. Australia Fimd 

d ) G.T. Europe Fund 


S10J1- 

— lw) G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund — 511.77 
8 1508 
S1XS2 
812*2 
82*73 


81203 twi I . 
sSS Id) Leleom Fund. 


821*5 (w) Leverage Caw Hold 


d 1 G.T. Dollar Fund- 
'd > G.T. Bond Fund. 


d ) G.T. Global TedvUoy Fd 

[d 1 G.T. Honshu PathDnder 

4 ) G.T. investment Fimd - — 81X19 


d 1 UquIOOW. 

wl Luxtund 

ml MoamHund N.V._ 
d ) MedWamen SeL I 
b 1 Met core. 

Wl NAAT. 



dJ NikJco Growth Pockaae Fa 8X42*09 

[d I G.T. Jawan Small CoJHmd 837*7 J" 1 . Ntojon Fi*to--_ — 52952* 


d 1 G.T. Technotogv Fund 82*53 

d) G.T. South Cntoa Fund — SM24 

HILLSAMUELINVEST.MGMT.INTl.5JL 

Jersey, PXl Bc»6i Tel QS34 74079 
Berne. PJ3. Bo* 2*22, Tet 4131 224051 

—to ) Creechow (Fur Eaatl SF1X06 

— (d) CSF (Balanced) SF 26.17 

— (d 1 IntnL Band Fond - 89.95 

-rid 1 im. Currency U5.. 8 26.12 

—Id l ITF Fd (Tectmotoav) - * 1302 

— (d ) O'Seas Fd (N. AMERICA! 82901 

EBC TRUST CO. (JERSEY) LTD 

1-3 Seale St*St. Heller ; 053+ 34331 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

Rttdllnc.: BM - 89*2 offer. 

lldtCag.: Bid 810*2 Otter. 


-89.929 

.810040 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
— Id > Short Term ’A’ (Aceuml — 8 1*001 

— Id 1 Slwrt Term 'A' (Distr) 510211 

-rid > Short Term -B 1 (Accum) — 8 1.149D 

— (4 ) Short Term V (Dlstrl 8 00768 

—Iwl Long Term 822*7 

JARDI NE FLEMING. POB 79 GPO Ha Kg 

—rib I J.F Hong KOTO Trust. 8302 

—lb 1 J.F Japan Trust Y 4527 

—lb I J.F Japan Technology — Y 1X359 

— lb 1 JJ= Podflc Sec5.lAcd 55*7 

—tb ) J.F Australia S3*8 

LLOYDS BANK I MTL POB 43X Geneva 11 

—Hwl Lloyds Int'i Dollar silxw 

—Hwl Llovds Inti Europe— SF 11X70 

— Hwl Ltovdm Int'i Growth SF 185J0 

—Hwl Lloyds inD Income 5F 32*00 

—Hwl Ltovds Inn N. America- 8 10X75 


ml NOSTEC Portfolio 8 *960*7 

wl Novotec Investment Fund 891.18 

w) MAM.F 815700 

ml N5P F.l.T 8 1*7.10 

d > Podflc Horizon Invt. Fd 8 1035.73 

wl PANCURRI Inc. 516*0 

Parton $w. R Esi Genova SF 109700 

Permal Value N.V„ 8 1069 J4 

Pleiades 81023*2 

PSCO Fund N.V. 813272 

PSCO InlL N.V 8105*6 

Putnam inn Fund 86258 

Prl — Tech. — — 885203 


_ *4010.18 

LF 273100 

LF1J - 


Reserve Insured Oegatits- 81OB907 
Samurai Portfolio— SF 107*0 


^ SCI/T«Jt.SA Luxembourg 89.74 

w) Seven Arrow s Fund N.V 8736*5 

■ state Sr. Bank Equity HdOSNV 8901 
Strategy Investment Fund— 52(1*1 
Syntax UtoVCtet Aj ’ . 8X97 


Techno Growiti Fu 

Tokyo Poc. Hold. (Sea). 
Tokyo Poc. Hold. N.V. _ 
TransBaclfte Fund— _ 
Turquoise Fund. 


SF 82*7 
. 8 92*7 
812672 
87X38 

8103*1 

TweedvArewne n.v£lassA 82,127.98 
T wee d y, Browne n.v£les&B 8 L58J0B 

WasMB gjjW"* SJM 

dl UNI Band Fund X1JBXM 

b ) u N I Capital Fund 8111955 

w) Vanderalit Aseets — *1103 

S ILI3 


DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Belgium Francs: FL — Dutch Florin: LF — 
Luxembourg Francs : SF — Swire Francs; a — asked: + — Otter Prleestb — bid 
change PA/ 51 0 to 51 per unit; NA- Not Available; N.C— NolCommuntased.a-. 
New; S — suspended: 5/5 — Stack Split; ■ — Ej< -D ividend; •• — 

Grres Performance injtex May; • — Redempt-Prtat- Ex-Coupgn; Formerly 


As • 
•>: • 

X > 




1 


*•> 

































• - -4 '" -L.__ - r ~t -■ j ^ 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


PEANUTS 


ifiWMWTRiC 
HELP 54 


man 


THE DOCTOR 
I5@ 



HOW D0E5 7 SHE HA5 THE 
SHE DO / BEST KIND OF 
BUSINESS I APVEKTIS/Ng 
wrTHQirr Vthere is..., 
AW6fnaN6 


ALL RI6HT, WHERE 
ISSVERVBOPV? 
LET'5 SET OVER 
HERE RI6HT MOW/ 




BLONDLE 



BOOKS 


MARTINA 




7WS MODEL. „ 
> IS Tl4g “TOP l 
r-4 OP TJ-E LINE I 


h 1 rrs sot ^ 
Everything 


do vou 
uvce rr ? 


mmmm 


ACROSS 
1 Architectural 
adornment 
7 A, B.C.eLc. 

13 Bailey, Belli ei 
al. 

15 Glaringly 
obtrusive 

16 Like a 
microscopic 
animal 

17 Trellis 

18 Indian reign 

19 Make 
serviceable 

21 “ Didn't 

Say Yes’* 

22 Shape up a 
script 

24 Express a 
belief 

25 Push-button 
predecessor 

26 Aegean island 

28 Turf 

29 Wee 

30 Public 
defender, in a 
way 

32 Most intimate 

34 Head-table 
location 

36 Unit of rain 

37 Compare 
critically 

40 Budget 

considerations 


43 Prey of the 
hounds 

44 Stool ie 
46 furtive 

glimpses 

48 Genus or swans 

49 Escalates 

51 Alpine Rhine 
feeder 

52 Slower, in 
mus. 

53 Disencumbers 

55 Disencumber 

56 Insulting 
58 Ominously 

indistinct 

60 Hiker's flask 

61 Put in order 

62 Co-Nobel isl in 
medicine: 1954 

63 Anchors 


1 Signal fires 

2 Riyadh fasting 
period 

3 Ml. 

Suribachi’s 

locale 

4 Spud feature 

5 Indian ox 

6 A daughter of 
Nereus 

7 Ice 

8 Evaluate 
9N.Y.S.E.abbr. 

10 Oxeyes 

11 Put under a 
spell 


12 Hard and 
tough 

14 Sassy ones 

15 Bedazzled 
20 Celebrity 
23 Tot 

25 Kind of fishing 
27 Marine 
barkers 
29 Flock 
31 Spanish 
estuary 
33 Bowlike line 

35 “1 have to 

be Thine. . 
Melville 

37 Pros pero’s 
slave 

38 Resonant 

39 Adroitness 

41 Activity in a 
car chase 

42 Small-game 
trap 

43 Roman poet- 
satirist 

45 Electrical 
genius Nikola 
47 Marsh plants 

49 Splits 

50 “Delivery” 
bird 

53 One using a 
cutting tool 

54 Grievous 

57Sault ; 

Marie 

59 “All poets are 
Burton 



REP3K3G5ZATORS ^ 
ACE AAV HUSEV^ND'S 

deraptment 




BEETLE BAILEY 


I'LL have the 
CLUB SAhJPWICH j 



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O i\e k York Tones, edited by Eugene ifaleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


WIZARD of ID 


m. 



By Martina Navratilova with George Vec- 
sey r 287pp. $16.95. 

Alfred A Knopf. 201 East 50th Street New 
York, N, Y. 10022 . 

Reviewed by Samuel Abe 

T HE Englishman with the porcine grin was 
waiting to ambush Martina Navratilova at 
the press conference during the French Open 
tennis tournament early this month. When she 
arrived from a straight-set victory in the semifi- 
nals and asked if there were any questions, he 
put one to her about her companion: “Haven’t 
vou been troubled and distracted by the fact 
that Mrs. Nelson has lost both sons in her 
child-custody case? Hasn’t this domestic crisis 
tafcgn your mind off tennis?" 

Unwisely. Navratilova replied that yes. she 
had been brooding about this latest develop- 
ment in her love lire and that yes. it had ruined 
her tennis concentration so badly that she had 
lost all of 21 games and no sets as she advanced 
to the finals. “I hope you realize that I am 
speaking sarcastically." she added, too late to 
avoid a “confession'’ in one of London's grimi- 
er newspapers. Then she turned to the rest of 
the room and asked if anybody wanted to talk 
about tennis. 

She had a record victory streak of 74 match- 
es in 1984. finished the year ranked No. 1 
internationally, has won ll Grand Slam tour- 
naments (Wimbledon and the French, U. S. 
and Australian Opens 1 and this week will be 
marching toward her sixth championship at 
Wimbledon. However, as Navratilova recog- 
nizes in her autobiography. “Martina,” people 
may want to talk tennis with her but so much 
else can stand in the way — sex, money and 
politics, for starters. 

Sex first- In this breezy book, she is lumpy to 
talk about what she calls her “bisexual” Ve of 
affairs and friendships. She speaks in detail 
about her seduction by a male at age 17 in her 
native Czechoslovakia and her later discovery 
that her “attractions — social, emotional, pro- 
fessional, intellectual, sexual — were toward 
women.” She names the female names that 
have already filled the gossip sheets and hints 
that now and again that is a male friend too. 
“Fd still like to have a baby before Fm too 
old,” she says. Tm not sure how marriage fits 
into the picture, but Td definitely want to 
choose the right father. He would have to be 
bright and sensitive and a good athlete — and 
good-looking, of course:” l 
Money nexL During her 10-year career as a 
professional in the United Stales, she has 
earned more than S9. million, including 
$2,173,556 last year. Some of it she has spent 
on homes, some on cars. She notes that she 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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owned at one and the xamc rime i .Ttrjvj- 
Supra, a Pontiac J, a 733 BM\l . a shier Miy 

cedes.aEorsche«8.a iSbSRifls-Rwce&li* 

Cloud ami a white 1976 Rolls-RpyctGornk'htf 
convertible valued al S 100,000 new. As for 
homes, she has owned spreads m .V&girmi 
Beach and Charlottes' ilk. Vugmia, a hidr- 
awav in Tramp Tower ut Manhattan rad a 
average middle-class house in Danas" dial 
her grandmother, just wer from the 
old country: “About 3i00 square faeL q ~ * 
knocked her out Carpeting. furniM-« 
TVs. the remote control Jot the TV. 

couldn't comprehend it all.” 

Most of the monev now goes into 


tioo. “Once I stop plating tennis tor* Jiving. 
FH be able to devote a lot iaa£ tunc 
to . . . other causes — working toawd end- 
ing world hunger, helping preserve nittae arid 

- wildlife, and cleaning up (lie environment that 

we have polluted so successfully. Iwittilova 
also notes that she used to sleep wig* a gun 
under the pillow and still keeps one waned the 
house. '<£”■ 

Politics finally. She defected ut MTfttt.tbu 
age of 18 because, she says, she was 

with the Communist system in Czech 

and ”1 honestly believe 1 was born tobeAil, 
can. ... I always felt t could be thriQSC 
Martina, from the first time I came to- the 
States. . . . This country was waiting for me. 

- It would give me the friends and the spsxand 

the freedom and die courts and the safisfeas 
and the weigh! machines and the right fbodib 
let me become a teams champion. * - - 

And so. at last, lo tennis. She is a great tennis 
player, at age 28 in position to become the 
greatest ever on the women’s cirtfUL Accord- 
ing to her bode, she worked bard to get there. 

On arrival in the United States she was a 
graduate tomboy, rather mousy and t&n, *sho 
quiettv ballooned when she discovered 
food. She just as quickly began tosns tran* 
matches and righted herself only Mtejgy- 
grudgmgLy gave up hamburgers and lutxgSmh 
a proper diet Is the early years she waxheatni 
consistently by Chris Evert UowL.hw.nrit^ 
Navratilova lost io her in the rrenc&Open 
final, she had won 17 of their last 19 
Improvement came with tong hours trf hnfow 
her muscles and mastering new sl»k-'Hrif. 
accounts of her training and ner descnpfcpHS of 
how various coaches nave added to ur game 
are some of (he best bits of 14 Martha.” 
status report on where women's tennis is today/ 
and why, is also interesting. Much of the rest — 
the romances, the sexual politics — KAjroritv 
house chatter. The book was written with 
George Vecsey. a room coJummstiSf Thc 
New York Times, who does a fme job sealing 
the seams of her bubbly narrative u^i^kv 
obviously likes his subject. 

Navratilova likes hersdf. os Ac 
the U. S. Open in 1981: “I liked 
there in front of 18,000 people in iqy“ 
new orange and gold outfits, with a tfilch 
blusher on my riieeks. I felt good aboaf 
better than I ever had. I was getting to 1 
new me — makeup, blond hair, and.frillvL 
clothes.” 


Samuel Abt is on the staff of the Itfemifbmi 
Herald Tribune. 


Museum Gets Nrison-Hamihow Relic ' 

The Assodand Press ^ •’ 

LONDON — A wreath of flowers madc^ 
E mm a Hamilton, mistress of the British^ * i — 1 
hero Horatio Nelson, from her hair an 
son’s has been left to die National MtflRM 
Museum here by Aeiwyn Howard- Wilfisto, a 
drama coach at the Royal Academy cf lDra^ 
made Art who died in March. f" . 


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(Arawwars tomorrow) 

Jumttes- EXERT FETCH WALNUT HERALD 
Answer What a rainy tfay Is for a cabdrtvw— 
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TltanwonCSP 

530 

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Aueft index : ha. 
Previous : 219.98 
CAC index-. m» 
Previous : 22X48 




F.T.3 0 index : 93X90 
Pi Wl u w : 93650 
F.TAE.1M Index 1 1236.10 
Prerioos : 123650 


MDa 


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Previous : 21646 


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Welle 587 580 

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China LW 
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HK 5INng Bank 
HK Teteanene 
HK YMimatei 

HK Whorl 

Kufdi wiunuuu 
Hvsan 
Inrt Clhr 
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Jans iw Sec 

Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
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Hondo Istcmken 

Pharmocla 

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Previous : 86X28 


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W* ra n sa l Index : 7457 
PrevlodS : M74 


Kong Seng lodes : 158L70 
(Novtaes : 7565.19 


-i-4— 


AO ZiS : 

AM2 4 

BHP *3 4 

Boral 3 J 4 3 

BauooinvMle 1.92 

Castiemalne 6J4 6 

Cotes 1 

Cmalco 1.95 1 

CRA iflU 

ZBO 7 

Dunlap 2J0 2 

Elders Ivl Z 9 S 3 

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1 OW Coal Trust li? 1. 

S®1(os 5A6 £. 

Thomas Notion 1.9s I. 

Western Mining 17B 1 

WMtpoc Bonking A01 

Woodswe 188 1. 

AH Ordinaries Index : 8*180 
Previous : I6MS 





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nng^sin it 









Svoifl. ^ 'Mow 




I NDdtel/D_l. Index : 12841 AS 
Zta preview : 1291X29 
I New Index : 1 H 4 A 3 
*A2 | Previous : iB2U» 

sJ 

iS 




^■*-XaT-. u 5- 


270384 . ‘ YMWI. - ' ■ : i 


Montreal ‘ &neZt+. m ^ 






















































lit m 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


cm MM 


July 4* 


Wuiww 

Trials 


'July 2 


Paris 


O FougSres 
Vftr6 


® Raima > 
July 5 
July 21 


J W.GERMANY 

vr/ 

Strasbourg 
Sa rrebo u rg 

July 6-3^1 


Evert Beats Piatek 
As Wimbledon Is 
Beset Again by Rain 






July 6 ' 
Eplnal d 


■June 30 


’Orleans 


FRANCE 


PontarlierJ 


July 7 


SWITZ. 


By Andrew Warshaw 

The Associated Press 

WIMBLEDON. England — 
Chris Even Lloyd began her chal- 
lenge for a fourth Wimbledon an- 
gles crown Thursday with an over- 


games later and was gone from the 
tournament. 

Play began on tbe showcourts 
two hours early as tbe All England 
Gub attempted to make up for the 
backlog of matches caused by the 


Umog«s 
s July 19^ 


4 Triafs ‘ Morzlno-Avorl^^^ 

JL Autrans f ^ — 

°jO Safnt-Etlenne Meudre iT'duly 10 
** July 14 \ 

, XJfl Grenoble 

Aurillactr^ Ju, y 13 Vitaly 

a July 11 De-Lana 

tint- A July 15 > 


powering 6 - 1 , 6-0 victory over wet weather the first three days of 
fellow American Mary Lou Piatek. the tournament. 

Although the first-round match ‘ 01X1 »ter only 35 mmutes of 
was delayed until the fourth day of P**y. the ram returned and play 
the championships because of tbe was suspended briefly an all 17 


rain and Even's slight neck injury, courts. 

she showed no sign of discomfort in Mandlikova, the runner-up w 
taking only 40 minutes to beat Ha- l981,hadbufltacommandinglead 
tek oq Centre Court. by the time her match was held up. 

Evert, 30, the Australian and She took tbe opening set in just 18 
Fr ench champion who is on the minutes and led by 3-0, 30-40 in the 
third leg of her bid to win the second set. 

Grand Slam, quickly established When the match resumed, Bu- 



■mm- 

S: 


Lanins^ 
Col D'AubJsque 

SPAIN 


ft Luz-Salnt- / JU *V ' 

July 17^0* 

\ Sj Toulouse 

3*&P"*July16 (? 


control »nri dropped only four darova won the first point, break- 

• . - r _ r : w.... jin, . 


Luz-Ardlden 


points in four gai™* ing Mandlikova’ s serve. But she did 

She dropped serve in tbe fifth not win another game, 
game, but quickly rallied, winning Connors, who turned in a 
the next two games and the seL straight set victory over Stefan Si- 
In the second set the co-top seed, monsson of Sweden on Thursday, 
with defending champ ion Martina thought the rain had become part V^<<! 
Navratilova, was even more con- of tbe game at Wimbledon. 'f&v. 

vincing, dropping only seven “It takes more than just playing * 5,7 
points in the enure set as me mixed good tennis to win tins tourna- ** r 
up her shots and made few errors, men t,” he said. “You have to learn 
Carling Bassett of Canada, the to cope with the waiting arcrund.” 

No. 13 sttd, began her first-round He should know, because he bad to 
match with a flourish against Bra- wait three days to play his firsl- 
zfl's Mercedes Paz, warning the round match. 


' the Nuw YoA Tunas 

e route set for the 72d Tour de France bicyde race, which begins today in Vannes in 
stern France. It niD costume clockwise around die country, ending July 21 in Paris. 




0P 


mm 


m m 




Lore Than One HiU Lay Ahead 

S. RkferShapiro’s Biggest Hurdle: Getting to France 


By Samud Abt miles) before ending in Paris at 

International Herald Tribute July 21. 

ORIENT, France — Until “I plmtmng on making the 
iday, Doug Shapiro feared he race aD year,” Shapiro saw! “When 
Id be spending Ms Toor de I was told I wasn’t on the team, I 


opening set, 6-0. But Paz. who was 

celebrating her 19th birthday, won 
A -g | tbe second set, 3-6, before Bassett ^ 

ZM n£% l/F/F regrouped and won the third, 6-3. I liTlDC J ^ 

A/ j XjLi MANAMA/ Left-hander Tom Gullikson of JL YY JLLX© 

•S the United States upset 12th-secd- 

• n cd Miloslav Mcdr of Czedioskjva- n . » . T . 

[mg tor ranee ba, 4-6, 6-3,64. 6-7 cs-7l 6 - 3 , as But lies Losing 

° the third mot’s seed went out of the 0 

Yet he was hired by Kwantmn, tournament The match took just Until 9th IniWlQ 
i d then left off the Toot de under three hours. c? 

nnce team, precisely because he Earlier, after a one-hour rain de- Compiled by Our staff From Dtipma 

a strong climber by, ftrna Mandlikova, the No. 3 MINNEAPOLIS — I 


Jimmy Oonnors, the men's No. 3 seed, found his moment in the sun at Wimbledon a little 
too glaring during fust-round, 6-1, 6-3, 6-4 defeat of Stefan Simonsson of Sweden. - 


Twins’ Sehrom 1-Hits Royals 

ButHe 9 s Losing 


tee in Colorado. 

£had a lot of stress then, 1 * he 


“I was planning on making the France te«m 1 precisely because he Earner, after a one-hour ram de- 
race all year,” Shapiro said, “when is a strong climber. by, Hana Ma n dlik ova, the No. 3 

I was told I wasn’t on the team, I **w e signed Shapiro because we 7 ' on * n ’ 5 seed » 5 We P) 
began getting ready to ride in Cdo- heard he was oneof the best climb- “f 1 ? the second round with a 6-0, 6 - 
rado to prepare for the Cocas Oas- ere available," said Jan Raas, 32, i ; wctoryovnr fellow Czechoslova- 
kia ” Hft snn that race, last vear and t M « , m «n.a»r On, mnwl •<- a Man Iva Bndarova. 


j nr>naft*T sic." He wot that race last year and the team manager. Raas retired as a . 

was second the year befoti. rider this Boris Becker, 17 the West Ger- 
n “t started rid^gin tbe Coots is bade pro£ after a crasfcinthe man who is cooadered the most 

1978,” he said, “and rode h while I Mflaisan Remo spring dassic last dange^ non-seed m the draw, 
was at the University of Florida at year. Five rimes ancSm the Tour to Cratre Court and com- 

Gainesville. I went there because ^France Mrnsdf, Raas excelled pjetoi unfimshed match against 
VraSlvBoSri^TlM they had a cyding program and the on theflat, usually quitting the race Hank Pfister of the LMited Stoles. 

weather was just ^t for train- aitbefiSsbhtof amoaStain. He . 
ranee is the showcase we A biology major, he gradual- has moStbe Kwantmn team mg, 2 sets to 1 when daftness halt- 


ing the oMgalo 
nation ana is 
rse of Friday’s f 
e-week race. “N< 
mess. I haw the 
ft Fm a really g 
r de France is tl 
icpefra." 


tray medical ex- 
in spec ling the 


rde France is theSowcase we ^ J 1151 p«fe« for train- at the first sight of axnotmtam. He 

m g. A biology major, he gradual- has modded the Kwantmn t^ain 
. „ . , . ed in 1982 and moved to Boulder, ainnp those 

? Cdorado whe^ and his wife, ^ie reason we left SMmiro off 
■ aannon, hyc rtxn .they arenot at was we need a team for Sst two 

rftorS^arasapR^Sl Wore we get to *e Alps, 

■j- _ r^, Shapiro came to Europe last and he s primarily a dimber, Raas 

SKi ^ summer “in hopes of making a pro- said. “I don’t realty know bow weB 


ing, 2 sets to 1 , when darkness halt- 
ed the match Wednesday at 2-2 in 
the fourth set He needed only 25 
minings to finish the job, breaking 
Pfisters serve for a 4-3 lead and 


Wore we get to the ^p, 

Siapuo came to Europe last and he’s primarily a dunber,” Raas ’ A £ lh a 


sd in the Netherlands, 
mday, Shapiro got the bad 


•ssnessas jsszjz ST AeMlcilMjia 

s; ftAjssissirdiss 

-Toed K™»s aiadim tel ^ !if ra ,^i S S d ,”'HS W 

Wtelher be does or not, Shapiro w SufSw 

^ ft .1 CKh, to Na 6 *oi from 

n .j i «Mr mi nf «K* omorMir ^ nnriniK ibn Australia, had even more trouble 

.u^^yourrMvoujyoo CShlSd Ndori <t the Uoittd 


Vhat he was noc-one of theJO traded Kwantum*s attention but Maybe heU surprise us. 
re Kwantmn had sdected fra did not get an offer until he had whether hr Jrv* arm 

Tour de Ranee, the world’s returned to the United Slates. ood show- 

Uesday afternoon !!!£ _ phone Thank^rvmg Day . plained. “Tm more anxious than 

-gagam. One of bis teams stars. His first year ont of the amateur nervous. When voa’rc nt 


raes HanegrM^had crashed ranks has been rocky, be admitted make mistakes. Anxiety leads to- 
nday m an exhflnhon race and Shapiro did well in some spring ward positive riding.” 

^ them “I got really sick, a Th^^stm^^^caraed most nf 


broken his left hand. Could 
piro be packed and ready to fly 
next day to Brittany? 

Tie question made Shapiro doesn’t help me. If there’s anybody ^ j g ^ 'J^Ondere rach, 
Je as he sat mbs hotel m Lon- with an infecttoo, I get mfected. ^presenting 18 countries. 

after a team 5 pm over the flat TmhopingiidoesQ t happen here. . . . 

ds along the southern coast erf Eveitfhe stays healthy, Shapiro 
ttany, host to the start of the 72d said, “my expectations are not that 
or de France. After three days high for the tour. Ihe team hasn’t 
e, the race win set trff dodewise really prepared me for tte mourt- 

rad the country, covering abort tains, fin going to try to do it on Sih 

00 kilometers (atom 2,500 farmer." " wheat 


Llr5Li®? Thai distinction escaped most of 

prcjbm that starts vnth my anus- a*. 30 or 40 other firstrSne riders 
ra.Bdgnimiscoldmd wet and that in the Tour de France, which com- 


Stotes before winning, 2-6, 6-2, 7-5, 
6-7, 6-3. 

Manuda Maleeva, the women’s 
No. 4 seed from Bulgaria, defeated 
Micfaeala Washington of the Unit- 
ed States, 611, 6-1. 

Guflflcson’s grass court 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dbpadus 

MINNEAPOLIS — Ken 
Sehrom pitched a one-hitter 
Wednesday night for the Minneso- 
ta Twins; but be was losing the 
game until pinch-hitter Roy Smal- 
ley singled in two nuts in the ninth 
inning to beat the Kansas City 
Royals, 2-1. 

Losing pitcher Charlie Leibrandt 
had retired 13 straight batters be- || 
fore giving up a leadoff single in the ^ 
ninth to Kirby Puckett. Rot Wash- 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 3 

£>1 

ingtoo, after fooling off two bunt $ 
attempts, bunted Puckett to sec- 
ond. 

Kent Hrbek walked on four 
pitches and, after a wild pitch put 
the runners at second and third, 
Leibrandt intentionally walked 
Tom Bnmansky. 

Dan Qidsenberry came in to re- 
lieve, but gave up the two- run sin- 
gle to Smalley. 

Although Sehrom struck ont 
four and yielded only a single to 
Willie Wflson in the third inning, 
he walked five and trailed after 8 % 
innings because he had control * ( 
problems with his fastball — both T1 
to tbe plate and to a base. 



■ ■■■r-’toa-.f v 

■ 

-tip 






Tom Herr headed into second base, and tbe Phiffies’ Desrel 
Thomas, with a two-nm double for the losing Cardinals. 


Cubs’ Streak 
Ends as It Grew 
— On Failure 

Complied by Our Staff From Dapacka 

CHICAGO — It figured that the 
Chicago Cubs’ failure to execute a 
simple, fundamental play would 
save them Wednesday from the ig- 
nominy of a dub record-setting de- 
feat 

Keith Moreland failed on a bum 
with two runners on base, then 
took a strike to fall behind by 0-2 to 
the New York Mels’ ace reliever, 
Roger McDowell, in the sixth in- 
ning. Chicago was trailing, 3-1. 

So far, it was all too f amiliar for 
die Cubs, who had seen rally after 
rally falter during a dub record- 
tying 13-game losmg streak dating 
to June 12 But Moreland hit the 
next pitch out of the ballpark for a 
three-run homer and Chicago was 
on its way to a 7-3 victonr. 

“It was a sinker that didn’t rink,” 
explained McDowell, who also 
rave up a two-iun home run to 
Kyne Sandberg the next inning. 

Winning At last, said the Cubs’ 
manager, Jim Frey, “pretty much" 
took the weight of the world off Ms 
shoulders. “You've got 50 guys ev- 
ery day asking you how you fed, 
and I felt like ...” 

“It’s a lot better feefing,” said 
Moreland, who was with the Cobs 


■ .« _ 10 vrv, vri- 

„ representing 18 cccntncs. Guffikson’s grass court game 

ro Most of the other beginners gave him the edge against Medr. 
al spoke mainly of realizing their ^ huest i^nk star to emerge 
!*[ dreams as they prepare for tbe long Czechoslovakia. Medr, 20, 

grind ahead. A typical example was has beaten Jimmy C onn ors and 
m Alois Wontere, 22, a Belgian with Sweden’s MatsWandrr this year 
ibe Tonisstemer team who sat with an j tournaments ai Hamburg 


w HI “ u n w>, ■ tAAit I 1 | • 

c ^ ^ save its victory in bmgh, Marvefl Wynne drove in £ eS toTnSrii' 

Smith walked with one ouL Sehrom Toronto. Reliever Bob Gihson shnt three runs and Bffl Almon and Ja- icanL ^ 

attempted to pick him off first but out the Blue Jays the last four in- son^ Thompson each drove in two to « f 


&ross Swims to 3d W orld Record 

The Associated Pma 

JlEMSCHEID. West Gennany — Olympic champion Michael 
3ross of Frankfurt set a world record of 3 minutes 47.80 seconds 
rbursday in tbe 400-meter freestyle race of the national swimmi ng 
'hanrpioaships. 

The previous mart, 3:48J2 was set by Vladimir Salnikov of the 
Joviet Union on Feb. 19, 1983, in Moscow. Gross, 21, also holds the 
vorid records in the 200 -meter freestyle and 200 -meter butterfly. 


rr-r-vnr- 


big eyes Thursday morning as and Rotterdam, successes that have 
teammates talked about previous helped nudohim No. 10 in the 
toms, like Shapiro, Wauten was * 0 ^ 

an amateur rider at this time last h c had several chances to beat 
y®*- Gnffikson, but Jet a 3-1 lead slip in 

I m nervous and scared and ex- the third set and thereafter liad to 
ited,” Wooters said. “AH the others fight for every point. 


threw wildly and Smith raced all ning^ 
tbe way to third, from where be Marinas 5, R 
scored on Schrom's wild pitch to tie, pinch-hitter 
George Brett. bases-loaded wa 

The pick-off attempt, Sehrom rang forced homi 
said “slid like a ent fasthafl. It was Texas. The Mari 
probably the best-moving ball I straight, 
threw all night. Tigers 3, Red 


mugs. help beat Montreal and end a four- 

Mnrinas 5, Rarsos 4: In Seat- game losing streak, 
tie, pinch-hitter Barry fionnefl's PTnBes 6 , Cm&uds 4; Ozzie V 11 - 

bases-loaded walk in the 10 th in- gfl hit a two-nm homer in the sixth 


team. 

“1 was angry at mysdf fra not 
getting the bunt down,” be said It 
was Mordanxfs mispky of a fly 
bafl in the first inning Tuesday that 


™ UU. IWUJ ur- KU uu a iviriuu uuuw m uk >uui 1 t 1 ,L_ I" J ,L. Vvr. 

zting forced hrane the run that beat as tbe Phillies extend their winning !“ “* 

Texas. The Mariners have won six streak to five games by beating Sl 3m Shaight Joss, 
straight Louis in Philadelphia. His fifth home run this year, a 


Tigers 3, Red Sox 0: Detroit’s Braves 3, Astros 1: Pinch-hiuer shot to left field, gave him 40 RBI 


“If we would have lost the game, Randy O’Neal and WiTfo Hcnran- Albert Hall tripled to score Glenn and six game-winning hits, 
it wouldn’t have been anybody’s dez pitched a seven-hitter in Bos- Hubbard from first base in the 1 1th When Lee Smith retired t] 


have told me what to expect and After narrowly pulling out the 
there’s so much ahead” fourth-set tie breaker. Medr trailed 

He flattered his hand at the mag- by 1-5 in the final set. He staved off 
nitride of it afl. defeat in the next game with two 


fault but my own. ton and Kirk Gibson drove 

Schrom’s one-hitter was the low- runs with a home run and a 
esl hit game ever at tbe Metro- Yankees 4, Orioles 3: 


ovation from the Metrodome out in the ninth, foDowm 
crowd of 20,060. rots by Baltimore second 


The tour is so big and Fm just a fine cross-court backhand passes 


t - f m_ 4-^, _ : . • H VJ MUWiUUlU OMVilU iAkMUW A ttUUIMT ouu UUSVI. VJOIV&Y W dUl 

drfeat m the not game with two For his part Smalley employed Lenn Sakata, won tbe game in New hit a three-run homer to send Los 


tittle boy . 1 


but could not repeal the feat two 


dez pitched a seven-hitter in Bos- Hubbard from first base in tbe lllh When Lee Smith retired the final 

ton and Kirk Gibson drove in two inning and Atlanta won in He ws- batter for the Mets, the Cabs raced 

nms with a home run and a single, ton. onto Wrigley Reid and the crowd 

Yankees 4, Orioles 3: Bobby Pa&es 10, Dodgem 4 : In San of 35,876 gave them a five-minute 
left the mound to a long Meacham’s two-nm single with one Diego, LaMarr Hoyt posted Ms standing ovation. 

From the Metrodome out in the ninth, following two er- oghlh straight victory and Tim Ray Fontenot, who was the 

rots by Baltimore second baseman Flannery and Steve Garvey each Cubs last starter to win a game 
Lean Sakata, won tbe game inNew hit a three-run homer to send Los before the losing streak began, got 
York. The Yankees ha\r won all six Angeles to defeat. the victory but needed reneT hdp 


and Steve 


and Tim 
rvey each 


Tennis 


Wimbledon Results 


t>cn»m »iw ll. Britain. HUH; ftotttrt S>- 
B»«vOj^iteta«ir»yMor»wvU4^<*A«- 
Oj Dante vrsaar.Sount AMcaiM. Damir Ker- 
OtlC W out Germany. 7-4. M. 4-7. *4; Matt 
NUtdKn.U^.aaLTMerrYatoaiptQQ.Franca. 
4-3. 44, 42; Oras Halmt, Ui. det Henrik 
SMtdrtrom, Sweden. 43. 44.47,4c 42; To- 


Baseball 

Wednesday's M^or League line Scores 


StanMoo, Now Z«iian(C44 47. 74 7-4! Brad 

Drawen,AaatraUa.<M. Scott McCain, U-S. 7- 

4 ML 44. 

WOMB ITS SlttQUBS 
fWBW 


MEN'S UmOLJSS 


c My Connors (31, UA. M. Stefcn SL- Stmdrtwm. Js w rt t n , 43. *4. 47,44.42; To- . _ 

EB^t. Sweden. 4'b 4X44; Pat Cam (A), mas SmW (ISUQerJxaJovaWa.tW'. Russell TMtWton. W-Si gton. ^5 . L : ^-gcnnlagr■ S-6. 
ttraHa.d«f. Todd Nelson (CS-M 4% 7-&4 SlmawB, New Zeatond^4t 5-7. 7-i 7-4; Brad 
r2; joaKhn Mystrom r7). Sweden, del. Jo- Drewen,A««tio»a.det Scott McCain, Ui-^ 
t Gaodall, BntoJn. 41 4& 3+ «; Svd 1 ML 

xs-iSfaTsssis-ss: ““srrr 1 isS 

once, det. Brad Gttbert. US- 41 14, 71; Fim mmrnt <WI« 

lolT«ttsCHT(H|.Uj5.de|.GUwlOc lema» Orh Evert Uovd (loinWJ,UJ,def. Morv 
4y.47.7-d 17-3}. 7-4 (7-3). MC Jav LaotOus. Lou Piatek. US. 4L 40; Mcnueto Maleeva 
j. del. Jimmy Arkn,UJL, 4444^4 4-7, M Ut.Butoart^del BartMmWaMR8tan.ua. 

41.47 (471.43; DovMPafeU.S.dM. Nlcfc 40. 4J ; Rodto White. 1ES.0W. Sandy Coffins, Mima 
itueoa Brtiohv 4144. 44; Pawl Aimocono. US. 48.42; Catherine Tamfer, Prance^ det. Torev 
S-aet. Dan QoHW Ui, 47. 7-X 4L \-A* <F>: Marianne Groat. Canada 4142; Eva PMft, 

Lome cilckstefav Israel, def. jaee LoPSt West Germany, del. Shown PoBtUi^a 43; . 

moo. Spain. 7-4 (7-51. 43. 4L Hana MaadHkM (31. CzettMliwaUa. dot 

<m FWAiUUM.PowlSlinfl.OMwb- (vaBudarova,CiectMMtovakla40L4l; Mar- om 
KM. 43.47 {471.41.74 nuiirtaiWUUsan. Cefla Meeker. Holknd. det Kate Gamperl. 

L del. Marco OstDfcz.Voaaclavla.4-C 41!- UJ-4144,44; BeHMaBuapfc WMGermo- 

74 (741; Pool McNamee, Austrtffla. vt. ny.dM.un MOMU UJL.4143; Rene Uy*. T raV|l 
we MeWer. 141.4144 S4; Berts Becker. South AtrtavdetJo Loots. Br«nkv7-444.42; 
ki G onnany.deLHank Pftster.ui44.4a VimWa Wade. Britain, del. LoaAntoaopol is. . 

L44; Vitas GemtaMcU A. Peter Rem- US- 44, M Mfll 

s. UA- 42. 47, 44,34. 4-3; Romesh Krtav Oarung BnseeW P3I. Canada del, mengdes J 

n. India, del. BmeeOerUn, Mew Zealend.4 Poe^Ar8entma.4<t3LM 4 ; Solly R eeve i BrU- 
M 44 74,- Tam Ca/nfcem Oat Miraelav aNbdeOUnBEfeiy.BrHc*s 4147.44; Ho No. 

■drit2l.Cxodmieyakla,44 k 416-447.4 US-deLAanobel Craft BrUam,417-S; Terri 
Lloyd Baanee Ui, det. Guy Foroet, PhMM.US.deL Katerina SknmftwCiKte- Tcww* 

Je.34, 414-144; Kevin Quma (81.U&. Slovakia. 41 42; AiMrM Hailkova CketM- DMralt 
i wv SietanU. U5. 7-4 41 44; Man davakie, dot Pam CaROd US. 47. 41, 43; Boston 
iuer. OA. «fct Zamm Kuharmky. Hunoary. ua Pleiwva, Cmchosiavakla. def. Catarina New V 
». 42. 41 34, 41; Andreas Maurer, Wat KprUmn. Se iedeivH44.4a; Joann* RussMl. Baitim 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


kee. Oelivle Q). Simmons (3). Toronto, Bell 
tm. 

Batnmere 3ti M* ooe— 3 > 2 


BafwtIMw, Stadan (71 and HW; Sutton ent New York 


m Ml MS-4 8 0 


HR— OcddancL KJapman (U). 

Texas MB 282 ON 4—4 * 3 

SOMtte M2 M2 000 1-S 12 • 

Sebra, Horrts (4L Stewart 14} and SlougM ; 
Snyder. Lena (4), Vande Bare (9), Thomas 
(W and Kearney, w— Thomas. 3d. L— Stew 
art, 44. HRs— Texas. McDowell (31- Seattle. 


McGreaor, Aase (91. T Marti rrei (91 and ! »V«, _ 

Rayford; Rasmuesen. Banfl 12). Shirley <71, Cauforma, DOT Sutton pitched a 
Rlohetti (9) and Esotao. W— Rlahettl. S4. L— four-mtt£T ODQ Rob PlCGOlo had 


Chris Evert Uovd llotnMJ.UA. det. Morv * R * -Te *° 8 ' McI>w * D U, ‘ 

ML&lSrtifc«.BartmavSfete^IuS Sv-Hernandei (14L HR-De- 

*141; ROOM White, us-det Sandy twins. ^.nTTmT m sm no— s ■ 1 

U1 41 42; Catherine Tamfer.Praacw det. Toni* mgn«»4n 2 

Mortanpe GroaL Cwtada. 41 42 ; Eva Pfoft, vucbvktLfiiSM Ml ad Mas: Alnm- 

der. Lavede (8), Acker 18} and wnm. w- 
**■ G4>w>a44.L— Alexander, 74. HRs— MCwoo- 

** *•*•' W0 ^ ~ OetrtO 101 on 900—3 ( 8 

Ce«a Meeker. Hatland. det IWe Gamperl. M n , . 

PnenLHeraan dRi <81 a nd Ponish; Nipper. 
iSSSJ&SS Tra...k,tS)andGedm« U v«4-4TNeoL3.Ll^ 


ewort (sj ondSkxigtd; ttmatCUy 100 Mi 084-4 1 1 

ade Ben (9). Thames Mlaoesota 100 ON 002-2 « 8 

-Thomas, M. L— Sew Leibrandt Getmobenv (9 } and Sundberp; 

McDowell U). Seattle. Sehrom and Laudner. W— Sehrom, 7-i u_ 
Leibrandt, 44 

mridez (14L HR-De- Cle v eland 8M 2M Ml— 4 11 1 

CoBfonda 002 X OOP— It 14 8 

on 2M 014-5 t 1 RuMe. Bdriciev (4). Thompson (4). dark u> 


N taper. 44. Sv— Hermmdez (14L HR-De- Cleveland ON 2M Ml— 4 11 1 

tralL Guiean (IS. CaBfernla 002 X 00»— 10 U 0 

Mn-ae*»e m 3M 018-5 1 1 RuMe. Barktav (4). Thompson (4), Clark U) 

T om a t o 0Z1 081 004-4 w 2 and wtnardi McCatadii, Soncho* ce] and 

Vuckovlcft, GJbeon <4} and Maerr; AJwxatt- Boone. W— Sanches. 14L L— Barkley. 4-2. 

der. Lavede (8). Acker UU and Wnm. w— HRs -Cleveland. Thornton (3). California, 


mcras’ home ran in the eighth in- 

Soane. W— Sanches, ha L— Barkley. 42. 


the pewer of negative t h i nki n g . York. The Yankees have won all six Angeles to defeat. 

Walking to the plate to face Qat- games between tbe teams tins sea- Toe Dodgers’ Pedro Guerrero 
senberry he said be was “thinking son. equaled the record shared by HaD- 

abouthow tough heis-andhowTra New York’s Rickey Henderson, of-Famer Ralph Kiner (1947) and 
probably not gpmg to get a hit off the major learaes* leading bitter ai Philadelphia’s Mike Schmidt 

J59 after a Mor-3 night, stole four (1977) wito his 14th homer in June, 
Sehrom s performance, Smalley bases. It was the 10th time in his and tied Oakland’s Dave Kingman 
said, is the closest you’ll ever see career that he has stolen four bases for the major league le ad with Ins 
to a no-hitter m this bail pari: in a game; he has ban successful 18 th this season. (AF. UPI) 
against this good a hitting team.” 36 of 38 tries this season. 

Leibrandt allowed only three Angels 16, Imftma & Reggie ~ ’ 

hhs, struck cut seven and walked Jackson’s 11th grand slam homer 
two before yielding to Quisenberry. in tbe majors beat Cleveland in 
A’s 10, White Sox 0: In Oakland. Anaheim, California. Jackson had 
California, Dot Sutton pitched a struck out his first three at h*t« 
four-hitter and Rob Piccolo had Reds 6, Giants 4: In the National 
four RBI in the rout of Chicago, limp,*, Qndnna ti leadoff batter 
Sutton’s first shutout this season Gary Redos homered on the first 
ww his 57 th in the major leagues, pitch thrown to him and Eddie hfil- 
plaong him ninth on the ati-time ner drove in three runs with two 
fc t singles to bdp beat visiting San 

Brewers 5, Brae Jays 4: Ted Sim- Francisco, 
moos’ home ran in the eighth in- Pirates 11, Expos 2: In Pitls- 


Tbe Dodgers’ Pedro Guerrero from Smith the final two innings, 
equaled the record shared by Hall- The Cubs’ comeback overshad- 
ot-Famer Ralph Kiner (1947) and owed a 4-fra-4 day at the plate for 


New York's Gary Cants, who 
played right field to take a rest 
from catching. He homered in the 
third and tripled and scored in the 
sixth. (AP. UPI) 


BlancpaiN 


O-Naat. HamaPdaz (81 and Parrish; U Ipoer. 
Trullllo O) and G«lman. W-OWaaL 3-L L— 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Barf Otvtttoa 


, Saaffi Africa, 47. 47, 74. 41 43. 


Calttartna Sutra. Franco, 44 42; SwooMos- 


■; Dovla Mustard. Now Zooiand. dot Sfuort SevchankP,SawMUMan.dat.Sabrtna Gatos. 


■to. BritaM. 7^42.44 44; Francisco Gan- ToposIovRl 4V *A 49k SaaNto 

toa.Pareauay.dM.MBrkEdnwadHn.Aw- Malty Van Hosfnand. us. dot snoran Mhm«a 
4 >Ua.4X 42.7-4; Marc Flvr, US. (toLjertfmr Watstt-P«to.lLS,^43j AodraoTiintosvarL Taxes 
■* d44 Britain. 44. 4^, 4<J John FHsamUk Huoporv, ttoL Kotortoo Matoevo. Batec^ta. 3- 
adraUa. dot. Tony Ctammahni. 44. 7-5. 41: »,7-4.44jW«>drTmT*uiirMLAo«ra8a.drt. 

DcPolmw, US. <l*t Raul Vhw, Ecw Grafcfwo Rash, u*. 7*. 43; Katty MnaW 
r,43,4M-fc«; PpwlMdVqntoaJWrolla Oi). U5. ttoL Andraa BMxmt, WMt Garmo- Monfrca 
L Slave MMstor, US, 42, 4JL 7-41 Mika ny. 42. 7-5; Haim Butova OtodRotovekla. SL Lcvfe 
<o«A,UJ.d>LWsitakFlbafe,PafcRicL7d.4-4. ctoLCatrinJaaalLS«toitofw4a.4S;StofHGrat. Maw Ya 
>; Sammy Gtoamodva, us. dot &«■ Cox. Was»G«rmanv.itoLUsoSoah>-SJiort,US.47. aiknpo 
44.M.44; HMnz OucsmardL SwK- 44. 42; Sara Gamer, Britain, drf. BevcrieY PNMat 
rionAdaf. BrtoaT«aCMr, UA.44.7-S4>, 4 «PMSWilMIXW,H4t! Mallwa Gar- PHtsUir 
Koflv EvemdHL Maw Zealand, def. Jard4 iwv.LU. o*t 5oe Lea AuFratta. 7^,44; ERz- 
V NavraNL Cspdwlaraua 4G 44. M. cwti SmvOw Aintraila dot Andraa LotnL San Dial 


41; Edtfa Edwards, SaultiAJrKs. (ML Coila ChrUleana Jaltonkit. Stottaartont 44. 40. 



W L 

PtL 

GB 

Toronto 

43 27 

JU 

— 

Detroit 

40 X 

at 

2 

Boston 

37 33 

529 

6 

New York 

34 32 

529 

6 

Batthtwa 

35 33 

SIS 

7 

Milwaukee 

31 39 

JOB 

M 

Cleveland 

22 47 

west OhrisJoa 

J19 

20VS 

CaiHomta 

« 38 

-571 

— . 

Oakland 

37 33 

53 

3 

Chicago 

IS 32 

SB 

JK» 

Kansas City 

35 34 

30 

4Vl 

Seattle 

34 34 

JSB4 

6 

Minnesota 

» 3B 

«*41 

9 

Texas 

SO 44 

jao 

13V, 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Kat DtvUtaa 



W L 

PCt. 

GB 

Montreal 

41 X 

527 

— 

SL Lams 

X 29 

-574 

93 

New York 

X SO 

-55» 

1% 

Chicago 

is a 

SB 

4 

PWMetotria 

SO 38 

M\ 

9Va 

PHtohurgn 

23 44 

West OMstoH 

J43 

14 

Son Dtoaa 

42 a 

AM 

— 

OMtoaH 

36 32 

-529 

5 

Las Anaetos 

36 32 

sn 

5 

Houston 

35 15 

sat 

7 

Atlenta 

31 SB 

m 

icv, 

San FnsdKD 

26 44 

jn 

16 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Haw York too in ON-3 7 8 

cmcood aaa m nx— 7 11 ■ 

Fcroanctoz. McDowell 151, Sisk IB) and 
Reynolds; Fontenot. Smith (a> and L ake , to 
Fontenot 2-1 L — McDowoH. S-l $v— Smitti 
(15). HRs— Naw York, Carter (ill. Chicago, 
Moreland (51. Sandbar? IB). 

5a Fraactoee MB X 020—4 g « 

OociooaM 111 M0 26*— S II B 

Krakow, WHBerns (7) and Brody; Brown- 
taR, Power (■) and Knleely.W—Br awni no. 7-5. 
L— Krufesw, SL S v - Power (11). HRs— San 
Frondsca Braray (91. Brawn (5). OndnmtL 
Radus Ml, Parker (13). 

SLtoaU 081 830 MO— I 7 I 

P tmrvtowVn no ua eir — 4 n ■ 

Cax,Fareoi |7).LaMl [B1 and Ntoto; Daanv, 
Carman (71. Takwlve 19) and Virgil, Dtax (9). 
W— Dennv. SL L — Cnx. 9-3. Sv— Tefeutat (4). 
Hhs— P hnadetaMa. Maddee ui.Srtmitat [■). 
Vlroil (9L 

Mowirae i ob on 000— 2 r 1 

nttsbarata 34a m MM—' II H a 

(TCtaMor. SL Claire (2), Lucas (6). Batorn 
(81 and Nicosia. FfcgeraM a) ; Reusctwl and 
Pmo. W-AMdnl, 41. L — O'Connor. 41. 
AHaato tit 008 OH 02—2 f • 

Houston OH 6M OH 00-1 I D 

Perm, SMtkl* H), Coma (5). Dedirwn r9). 
Sutler (11) and Owen; Scott. SmHn (10), CaJ- 
bntei ni) ond Bailey. W— Oedmon, 4a L— 
Srellh. 43. S v- Su ite 1 (13). HR— Atlanta, 
Heritor (18). 

Los s n e e l e e » tea M0— 4 7 8 

SoaDtaea ISO T09 48o— M 13 0 

Hentaber, Howe (73. CasHJto m. Dim IB) 
and Sctascta; Hoyt and Krtmedv. w-Havi 
144 L— Henniser. 7-1 HRs— Los Anpelee. 
Guerrero Cli). Braek (in. son Dtoaa Flan- 
nery O), Garvey (121. 


""" a Wiggins Traded to Orioles 
y If Leagues, Union Approve 




-* ' ’ **xi : •*' *- 

r- 

• -*'•* 

. .. J- . .„ 

a,'*' * -- *- 

fe - *” 


The Associated Press don, which reportedly would give 

SAN DIEGO — Pending final the Padres two of Baltimore’s mi- . 
fproval from league and union nor league players. 
fieUk second baseman Alan Wiggins, 27, signed the contract 


fidals, second baseman Alan 


Wiggins has been traded to the Bal- with the Padres last (he winter and 
nmore Onoles, according to the was their starting second baseman 
San Diego Padres president, Bal- and leadoff hitter until his relapse 
laid Smun. into cocaine dependency. 

Smith said Wednesday that ihe ; 

Padres agreed to be liable through * Pirates Suspend Sara; 

J 9S7 far half at Wiggins’ four-year. The Pittsburgh Pirates indefi- 

S2^ milli on contract should be’ niiely suspended pitcher Rod Scur- 
have a relapse of the drug problems ry on Wednesday for failing to fd- 
thai led to bis ad m i tt a nc e in April low a drug aftercare program he 
to a rehabititation center. began last season fallowing treat- 

Smjth said Wiggins would also meat for cocaine dependency. Hie 
forfeit one-third 01 the remaining Associated Press reported. 

value of his contract shook! be sal- ~ ^ . . _ 

fer a rdapse. “We have no obtiga- ^ fafled to show ot f m Stm- 

don the W year of his contract day’s game lo PMaddphia. 


(1988),” Smith said. 


Scurry, 29, was one of tbe Na- 


The American and National tional League's top left-handed re- 
league offices, the Major League tieversin 1982, svim a 4-5 record, 14 
Players Association, and the com- saves and a 1.74 ERA. He slim 
missioner of baseball Peter Uebcr- badly in 1983, ending 4-5 wit 
noth, still must agree to the tnmsac- 5.56 ERA and seven saves. 


missioner of baseball Peter Uebcr- badly in 1983, ending 
roth. still must agree io the tnmsac- 5.56 ERA and seven sai 



0M93591Q 







Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUKE 28. 1985 


OBSERVER 


Three-Martird Patriotism 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — I once lived in 
Washington, and Hew York 
people would telephone and ask me 
to come up for lunch so they could 
present an exrinng business propo- 
sition. * Can’t we discuss it on the 
phone?” 1 would say. 

“Absolutely not they would 
say. 

So I would lake the shuttle, 
known on the East Coast as “the 
flying shim," and go to New York 
and meet the party with the excit- 
ing proposition in a restaurant with 
prices lit for a king. 

After two hours of feeding, the 
proposition would be presented. 
The presentation rarely took longer 
than five minutes It was always a 
terrible Idea, although 1 never had 
the cheek to say so. 

“It's a terrific idea, but it's just 
not for me,” I would say, and go to 
the airport, and so bade to Wash- 
ington. Eight hours had been spent 
doing what could have been done 
by telephone in six minutes. 

□ 

After awhile, I quit going to 
these New York lunches, which 
were now called “power lunches” 
presumably because of the power- 
ful credit cards that always con- 
cluded them. 1 had already quit 
g oin g to similar lunches in Wash- 
ington, because it was always hard 
to get out of them before teatime, 
after which you bad to allow time 
for the digestive system and liver to 
do their work on the food and the 
alcohol. 

It was obvious that you could 
either work or engage in power 
lunch, and after 1 chose wont, the 
power-lunching world wrote me off 
as an eccentric. 

Word got around that I had quit 
lunching because I didn't lunch 
well — ordered muscatel with the 
Dover sole, didn't know how much 
to tip the captain, and so on. These 
base lies were spread by power 
lunchers who naturally despised 
anybody who looked down on their 
activity. Just as naturally, I felt 
superior. Available at my desk 
throughout the three-hour lunch 
period, putting in a full day of 
honest toil, always clearheaded and 
alert enough to smell the Montra- 
cbet on the breath of colleagues, 
stumbling back to their desks at 
2:45 P. M for a long nap — such 
thongs can make you feel superior. 


2 am now ashamed of that atti- 
tude, for age has given me the wis- 
dom to see that without those hun- 
dreds .of thousands of lunchers 
tirelessly eating in the best restau- 
rants day after day, the United 
States would be in even worse 
shape than President Reagan and 
David Stockman say it is. 

Those New Yorkers who used to 
hire me up from Washington to say 
no to their tenible ideas — in my 
useful arrogance, I had seen them 
oily as idle wasters of time. 

What I should have seen, of 
course, was the service they did 
that country. Here were people 
whose ideas were almost always 
terrible. Is it in the public interest 
for such people to work an addi- 
tional three hours every day? The 
country is already being engulfed 
by millions of rotten ideas; imagine 
how much worse it would be if 
several bandied thousand power 
lunchers were no longer neutralized 
over food for half of every day. 

If all the people who rage so 
violently against the tax write-off 
for the three-martini lunch realized 
how important this deduction was 
to the nation's well-being, they 
would change their tune. 


The more hysterical might even 
start asking some interesting ques- 
tions, like, “Is the campaign against 
the three-martini lundi being mas- 
terminded by Moscow and foisted 
on an unsuspecting America by red 
dupes, bleeding hearts, knee-jerk 
liberals and worse?" 

Unfortunately, propaganda 
against the three- martini l unch has 
been so effective that it win proba- 
bly be impossible to save it Mil- 
lions of additional dreadful ideas 
win be generated daily. Coipora- 
tions and governments once run 
peaceably by secretaries for half of 
every week will now beat the mercy 
every afternoon of wide-awake, dy- 
namic executives, churning out tru- 
ly awful uew ideas. 

For the good of the United 
States, let's keep these people out 
of circulation for at least half of 
every day. Before it's too late, let 
each of us who has cursed the 
lunching classes reflect solemnly 
on the injustice of our anger and 
say from the heart, “The three-mar- 
tinilunch has been good to me.” 

New York Tima Service 


The Whistler: 2 Octaves From Low G 


By Michael Norman 

New York Tunes Service 

N EW ROCHELLE, New York — One 
fall day many years ago, a young man 
with music on his m in d was siting in a 
sevemth-grade reading class at Ardsley High 
School in New Rochdlc. He cannot now 
recall the exact circumstances that distracted 
him, but it must have been the kind of day or 
the kind of dass that sets die mind to wander. 

As the teacher droned on, the student start- 
ed to drift He was a young man with a 
heal thy curiosity, a tuba player who had been 
wondering for some time whether it was pos- 
sible to make music with just his hands. 

And so, on that now-historic day, he began 
to experiment. “I was preoccupied with try- 
ing to make this sound. I just naturally start- 
ed to interlock my fingers, cup my hands and 
blow into the knuckles on my thumb. All of a 
sadden I was making noise. The teacher 
yelled at ox to stop. Later on in that very 
same class, I made the sound again.” 

He had discovered the Hassell Hand Or- 
gan, which to the uninitiated may seem like 
just another way to whistle, bat to those in 
the know it is so much more. 

Peter Hassdl, now 35, has told this story 
many tunes. He is well-known in certain 
circles. His famous interlocking grip and rep- 
ertory of classical music have earned him an 
international whistling champ i fln«diip 
A celebrity of son&he whistles for report- 
ers and television cameras and radio talk- 
show hosts. But he is really stOl the boy 
whistling to himself, a free spirit with a col- 
lege degree in mathematics who preferred to 
drive a cab for a living, a musician with a fine 
ear blowing cross-eyed into his thumbs. 

There are those who might say that society 
does not have much use for a man like Has- 
sell, that even in the unpredictable market- 
place of music, where people can make a 
living by spinning records backwards, it just 
does not seem possible for a man to whistle 
for his supper. 

To say this, however, is to forget that 
whistlers have played vaudeville and Broad- 
way. And it is also to forget that in every 
school in every age. there are boring teachers, 
and children who whistle themselves free. 

Next autumn Hassdl is scheduled to audi- 
tion with the New England Vaudeville Re- 
view, a group of mimes, actors, jugglers and 
storytellers who travel the northeastern Unit- 
ed Slates entertaining in schools, churches 
and small auditoriums. 

If he is hired by the group, Hassell will be 
back in the classroom whistling a g^in **i 
want to pass this art on," be said. It would 
be a shame if some kid has the potential to be 
a great hand whistler and there is no one there 
to show him how.” 

He is looking for a protege, some bright, 
dedicated kid who. as be has done, will prac- 
tice four hours a day for that nice baroque 
sound and apply it to Bach’s cello prelude to 



Joyce Oopton/ha N law York Tm 

Peter Hassdl and the grip that brought him whistling fame. 


the Suite No. \ for Orchestra or Tchai- 
kovsky's Symphony No. 4 in F minor. 

Meanwhile Hassdl runs scales daring the 
day while be watches soap operas or financial 
news on cable television, and in the evening 
plays basketball at a local playground to keep 
in shape for what he hopes will be iris big 
break. 

When time permits, he will entertain a 
viator in the room he rents in New Rochelle, 
a warren of books and records and a shelf full 
of trophies wi arlrfr ig his distinguished career. 

He has won the World’s International 
Whistle-Off in Carson City, Nevada. This 
spring he won the National Grand Champi- 
onship at the National Whistlers Convention 
in Louisburg, North Carolina. 

He attributed his success to his left-handed 
variation of the interlocking finger grip. Ac- 
tually, he said, he was the first to use the 
interlocking grip — fingers laced together to 
form a resonant chamber — in national com- 
petition. 

The way Hassell sees it, he is playing an 
instrument, which happens to be himself. 
Instead of saying thathe is “in tone," he says 
be is good wrestle.” He talks about articu- 
lation the way a trumpet or asset player 
might. And he is always sure of his range — 
two octaves bom low G. 

Fully expecting to play one day with a 
chamber music society or a symphony or- 
chestra, Hassdl had dedicated himself to 
classical music. But in his first year of compe- 
tition at the National Whistlers Convention, 


he lost in the classical music division to a 
“pucker” whistler. Rather than go home emp- 
ty-handed, bo derided, without much prepa- 
ration, to enter the special sounds category. 
■ Handel and Rossini are one thing, but ms 
near-perfect imitation of a laser in an elec- 
tronic game is something else. When he does 
a police siren — either the two- tone Europe- 
an version or the classic wail of a southern 
sheriff — it is enough to make a visitor look 
ova: his shoulder for a squad car. 

He can whistle a mourning dove, his tele- 
phone number is Touch-Tone sounds, bis 


fee pot percolating in the arty morning 
cm a gas range. 

He is sure bis father, Donald R. Hassell, 
would have approved of his desire to spend 
the rest of his Iff e whistling. The father used 
to travel with the son to some of his early 
competitions, and when the boy was a leen- 
pfaenomeaoa whistling the scores to sym- 
lonies, the father thought he might one day 
cm Ted Macks’s Amateur Hoar or tlx 
Show. 

Donald Hassdl died in 1981, two weeks 
before the annual Whistle-Off in Carson 
City. The son (fid not make the uip that year. 

‘TMy father was proud of me,” Hassell said. 
Perhaps the father sensed that, in whistling, 
the son had achieved a certain timelessness, a 
kind of perpetual youth. 

“Yes,” Hassell said, “perhaps, in that 
sense, I am a kid at bean.” 


PEOPLE 


Flap at Royal BaBet 



Marguerite Porter, a senior prin- 
cipal f frncer with Britain's Royal- 
Ballet, has denied that bad reviews 
from the London critics forced her 
to give up dancing and seek a new 
career as an actress. Two hours 
before her test appearance with the 
company as Natalia Petrovna in 
Sir Frederick Ashton'S “A Month 
in the Country" the Royal Opera 
House, Covem Garden, took the 
fln qyiai course of issuing a state- 
ment cm her behalf. “Although it is 
never pleasant to read bad reviews 
of onus performance. Miss Porter 
always preferred to place her trust 
in the opinion of her director, rtpfc- 
ti tears (teachers at rehearsals], tel* 
low dancers and her public. Having 
danced all the roles sne had aspired 
to in the company's repertory and 
therefore feefing completely ful- 
filled as an artist, hex decision to 
leave was entirely personal." Por- 
ter, 36, joined the Royal Ballet 
School in 1964 and graduated to 
the company in 1966. She became a 
soloist m 1972 and a principal 
dancer in 1976. 

□ 

Italian critics are less than im- 
pressed this year by the Spokto 
Festival of Two Worlds, founded 
by the Italian-American composer 
Gun-Carlo Menotti. The festival 
opened Wednesday night in Spok- 
to, Italv, with a dismal greeting for 
PbconTs “La FaruauDa del west" 
(Gill of the Golden West), the Aus- 
tralian film director Bnice Beres- 
fonfs first venture into opera. Ital- 
ian critics roasted the production 
and attacked MenouTs two-week 
program as weak and banal They 
accused the 73-year-old composer 
of devoting Ins energies to the. 
American Spoleto Festival in 
Charleston, South Carolina, and to 
the projected 1986 Festival of 
Three Worlds in Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia, as well as to revering a castle 

for his retirement in Scotland. 


Shevchenko provided gftodriahlc 
intelligence information to tfc 
U.S. government. The OH. tad 
nothing to do with writing ft 
boOL^The editor of thebOdfc, A*: 
he} Green, said that Stac&ifo 

• j 1 P 1- 


Green added, however that hit gftjj 
connections in the inteffni;* 

community had “always eoaftfa ^ 
Shevchenko's rale," and he oi&d 
Epstein "s well-known conspiracy 

books challenging the co&chxstcii 
that Lee Haney Oswald acted 
alone in assassinating John F. £**. 
aedy. said that after two publishers 
rqected Shevchenko's memoirs « 
vague and uninteresting, the ddep. 
tor submitted a manuscript with 
“all the rfgmwns of a Spy thriller* 
jnHudmg “cinematic car 
QA case officers in safe houses" 
and “escapes from danger ” ■* 


□ 


r .. 

r> 

- Vanessa Wffiams the 1984 Mfr 
America who was forced to i 
because she had posed for 


athouse magazine, has made her 
New York stage debut in ah off- 
Broadway musical as one of three- 
female back-up players for the 
comic actor James Leoesae in 
“One-Man Band,” essentially * 
one-man show with Fmanff playc: 
mg multiple male and female ro!<a£- 



espedafly effective in the randcse- 
quences where one might expect s 
newcomer to be a bit awkward.” 


An article to be published in the 
New Republic magazine contends 
that the memoir “Breaking With 
Moscow” tor the Soviet defector 
Aikady N. Shevchenko, is mare 
imagination than recollection. In 
“The Spy Who Came In to Be 
Sold,” Edward Jay Epstein alleges 
that Shevchenko and the CIA in- 
vented the supcnnole image that 
propelled the book to best-sdler 
lists. Tbe CIA responded: “Arkady 


President Sandro Pertfoi of Iufly 
has received an honorary degree 
from Oxford University, praising 
him for bis tong career and his 
success in raisuut “confi de nce m 
the integrity of pofititiaos.” The 
honorary doctorate of ehfl law was 
presented by the university's chan- 
cellor, Lord Stocktim — bettef 
known as former Prime Minister 
Harold MacmBten. who B£ age 9) 
was one of the few people present 
older than Pterrmi. 88. PtertmffcdK- 
gree was “with diploma" — 4*^- 
tmetion held by only a few Other 
living people, including the kiag pf 
Norway and several members of 
Britain’s royal family.- Pertini was 
on what was probably his last fix- 
eign trip as president, since his sev- 
en-year term expires July 9., 




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sire;: 
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care D'AZUR NICE Real Estate 
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or Hotel Mericfan 06000 bice. Tefc 
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K3A MORE REAL ESTATE 
OPTOKWHmB SEE 
PAGE 13 


BELGIUM 


BRUSSOS. LUXURY PROPERTY. 
1904 Art Deea by V. Horta, TOO sqzn. 
mdutCng go-dan, entrance hal in 
marble witfi moMK flooring and ongi. 
ruAy decorated waSs. iMnter garden, 
* reeroeon room nen Wori parquet , 
8 bedroom*, central heating. 2 oa- 
rages. USDfiOH Proaa, 3*6 Ave 
Laurie, firuaeri. TeL 6*8 41 77 


CARIBBEAN 



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MocDougJ, 77, rae du 
Hr. 75M6 Pori. 5*4 04<M, 


MONTEGO RAY Jameca. Centraly 

foenwd coramerdii property, 16£00 

iq-Fr. at USSI I JO/sqftfe. 8. Smrtti, 
P.OA. 35. Mantega Bay, iamxo. 


CANADA 


TORONTO CANADA CONDO- Are- 
■we Road & Boor Street. Heat of 

oekme ifowmown area. 2ltf Boor m 
most deeroUe aiakty boUng in 
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usOTity. Poet fuly equipped emdse 
area, oarage, etc. 2 bedroom or den. 
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CANADA 


OafcvJB# - BaCngton, Ontario 

Four LaWrort S tal es - 45 manufes 
from finoKsai dMo of Toronto 

• SI .500.000 tCdn) ZA Acres, 4 
burking^ Pool, letwri court, 
sauna wtiripooL fSoednowse with 
dednc ramp. JenNltB Scndsnai 
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. 8 Acres, private 
dnelapment potential 
Brw. Indoor pool 
. ,, , . 1* Acres, gracious 

English country style home, terns 
court, pool, separate staff 

• s'umooo (Cdn) Magnificent B year 
eld Georgian home an 3 acres with 
a iteeom. 6 bedrooms, separate 
staff quarters. 

CaB Ruth Anne Winter (416) 8454267 
, OR WRITE ia 

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326 LcAediare Rood E 
Oofcvifle, Ontario, Canada LdJ 1J6 


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CAMIWBI HVBR, BC CANADA 

Entire 6 ho aksnd -with sports fishing 
bdSfioL Located across from world 

fomews Painter s Lodge. 5290400 Cdn. 

Write & Woe, Check Ready Lid, 1- 
1 100 boiMood s, Gmnbel Kver, 8.C 
V9W 5P7. Tefc 604.286MW. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


RBICH RMERA Sr. FW Ip Cafle. 
near Nee. (only mas PravencaL 8 
plf, Dfrhotrts 


mini, airport, 15 mini golf. 

H dams. 2 t- — 

17D00sq.fr. . .... 

gordera, residential. ! 

FZ1 mXoa Tefc Ranee 93.'! 
dear 7-30 pm. 


bsdien 


VB40E, core D’AZUR, Beautiful 83 
sqm.. 2 bedroom, Wig. American 
stpe kitcfien, terrace, celtir. poriana 
very pieman! Bauiel area. F7 50,000. 
Write Berms. 22 Bd. Jean Mermaz. 
72200 Newly. Tefc. (1\ 747 51 48. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 

Kara ■ Defightful house in Ihe . 
Mourns wrth a surface area of 
150 sq-m- with smcA courtyeed. Rnrad 
decarisfa ro . Very cWr active view, 
lounge, drwig-rooiTv equipped kildteq 
2 mam bedroom s , 2 bomroomt, W.C 
Prim $3,200,000 
Ref. 160 

JOHNHLySoR SJL 
55 la Croisette 
06400 Comes 

Tefc (93) 38 00 66. Were 470921 F 


COTE D'AZUR 

CANNES 

Close ip center, outstanding tkoam 
apartment in an aflraaive Wdarian 
house in per fed tcn d ilion. Large rooms 
faring South, afl modnrn comrorts. 
roge, targe cellar, 2 spare rooms, m* 
view an gorden & surrouncfaigs, red 
bargain. Nice R J50.000. Open to 
often. REF 1227. W. 

JOHN TAYLOR SJL 
55 La Gariefte 
06400 Cannes 

Tefc (93) 38 00 66 Tetoa 47092 IF 


core D'AZUR: ST. PAULDE vbke 
B etween Cannes & Ma. 3 semfcdB- 
tached vJhn for salt; tfoaut 110 spin, 
wrth Rraploce, eanoge, 1,500 st^m. land 
erxh, mdnridud, 10 mms. from sea, 
panoraeic view, ortrseisrmc asnsvuc- 
ftan, posab®tyJo bu3d a targe wUcl 
F rom FI ,231000 oath. Irfrymatiore 
AA Oritv. be tiffdiY , 73 Av Md GaSert 
Cannes, td (93) 39 70 48. 


core D'AZUR. For sale by owner. 3 
bedroom apartment, furnished or urv 
Furnished, rnovenn condition, north- 
sou rfl vi ew of lea & motmftens , pod. 

m reffi iwMiig raoron area me®. 
PfcMj. col Nee 193)81-97-01, )93) 86- 
3SB2, or cantod owneri: Auatonrion 
Proportes, 9<65 Wldvro Bvd. ! 
Beverfy HJte CA 90712 Talent I’ 
ASietNBVHL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


LANDER, EQUAL DISTANCE from 
Bordeaux & Bayonne, 30 fan from 
sea Renovated 300 year aid farm- 
house in 25 ha lend pfcrtod with 
odes. 4 bedroom^ 2 beds; dearie 
heating & huge fireplaces, rod, old 
bora frmiitand hritf oron. Ban 2407, 
Herald Tribune, 92521 NeufyCedex. 
(Voice 


DROME. NEAR GMGRAN north of 
ORANGE. TDOyew dd fannhowe in 
3 ha. land. Mtsvelous view, peaedd 
setting. Mdri house 350 sqm 5 bed- 
room, 2 baths. Fuel hedng, fcro e 
firoploai. Large nviraming pod. 3* 
boun from Pare by TGV. i hour from 
Medrernmean CoasL CoS RAMSAY 
Itofo 227 99 83 or 548 82 47. 


LORE CASTIB COUNTRY. Superb 
lflffi century fane iworated luxur- 
ywdy. Oak beans in tA rooms. 70 
sgnv kvmg room, 500 soa. Svmg 
space. Stems 3 horses. 5 can go- 
rage. (fond. bams. 25QQ igin. gra». 
tend 25 Ha Owner sates urgent; 
(95.0000 befoni departure far USA. 
Phone: 47-943705. 


COIR D’AZUR, hi snduded vea near 
sea and par*. 15 min. Cannes, a 
pfomed far 1988, fa first ecafogcd 
viloge in Europe. Interested penes 
wUhiqIo retaae tfmdd comacS Dr. 
5. I«w\ Tudwfckyifr. 77. 6000 
Frantfurt/M. 70. CoS 69-1 34«, 9WA- 
6 PM. after Awehends 69683180L 


CAW4B CAU FOBNff. hi a (tfodous 

garden with swenmuig poofs 8 teams 
court Splendd opanmofV. 2 bedh 
roams, 2 baths. Luxurious fittings. Pri- 
vate garden, Urepaiablo sea view. 
Lew running expense* F2350J®. 
SSL « Lo CrcrieOe, 06400 Canw. 
Td W) 38 19 19. 

M CANNEI CAliRMME A fantastic 
view on the Larins Ides, in a pnnquy 
mansion, a buaotiM 130 aim. Bat 
with terrace, 2 bedroom* F2.M0JXCL 

Oriyt Agence lateur, 20 rue Ldour 
Maubowg, 06400 Cannes. Tefc (93) 
9A4&53 


GRASSE. Beautfudy nwored 17ffi cen- 
tury Frovencd house. 3 bedaamsU 2 
receptions. F2.100D0Q. (9? 36 8567. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CAPMES CROtSETTE Fbrt Canto high 
dab aprrtnenf, duplex 251 sqm pri- 
vate garden* 150 sqm. Sea view, 
living, efirehg, playroom, 4 bedrooms, 
2 baths, 1 washroom, winter g ot d en 
6 parting. (1) 243 71 91. 


YOUR CONTACT M PROVBKE. 
Houses with character. Charming 
p ro ij ertie * Estates. Ernie GARON, 
£P. 51 13532 ST-REMf-O&NiO- 
VBMCTCede* Tefc TO WSIJX + 


NORMANDY, CALVADOS 
Uwdy 17\h century manor, confteh 
restored with cure. Tefc (31) 20 82 : 


1 20 KM SOUTH P, 
chunxler, large men 
tn' houses, 
ha. kmd. FliOOjXXL Tefc Paris 
56 / [38) 9533 



SANT TROPEL large choice of es- 
tates and apartments far sale. 519 a 
few renktis Wi for des cun 

Foraramer, RUe Fad Roussd, 
Saint Tropez. Td= 94 57 47 jg 


MEGEVE, fRBKH 
te x e n n eii te on 
dopes. MB 


ALPS, 


tra 

dapa. MJBH. Bf. Hi 74120 Me- 
gero. Tefc 33-5iAZl 0281 The 3093QZ 


WOE. JULY -AUG- Aparttrert m vfc. 


GERMANY 


fat SAlf - BARGAIN. 

new ffonkfut ajpcrl 
Price per sgjn. DM1. 


. .. . . 2 pm 

- 4 pm. (D)d^4/29735 (Gemxnyjor 
write to. DME, PrinwsngroAt 479, 
1016 HP Amstendten, HcBdnd. 

GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON, EAUNG. MOOBtN Twvrv 
Hcmm due to tube, shopping, sdioofa 
eta ei nceHaat doeorotrve order. Gas 
Mitral hea rin g, double stand win- 
dows. 4 bedrooms with vxft-ai clos- 
ets. 2K bathrooms, modem fitted 
kitchen, separde cteingroom, targe 
reception ram garage and many 
UQ2DM.TW pT) 998 0UQ. 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

MdUt your botinott iimhm 

m Hie Adentadfon^ HetNdfS- 

Auttefc wfc»imrvftMaA>d 
of a imKan readers wo tU- 
wid e moe* of w hem are in 
twfc u n and Industry. wM 
read it. Jud tetem us /Pads 
613695) before 70am, on- 
we c 


eurtajp 

b °*~tssr 


y** 

message wtt 


48 (Mara. Tbe 

US. $9 JO or had 
(if per fine u Yao most 
ktdvde c i v i gj ie te and varift- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JK)JOfiA - LIQUID GOLD 
A SOUD X EXanNG WVBTMB4T 

The nrode kfoba ail. produced from 
a plant grown in the UiA which lives 
for oiw 100 yean, has uraque, out 
sitnAtg quditief and ecu favorably re- 
place miMrd 6 «wnd ba»ed tabn- 
amts. Other estabtehed uses: 
caBiMa, phramo o Buttcds. food, 
ffvmuna^unng. 

bUeg Pfontoflo ni Already Pro- 
vide Return aa Inw e ehnent ei First 
Year. By End Of Mh Year, Retarm 
Equd MKd Amount Invaded. 
Thereafter, protections show average 
rawid medne of 33%. For 
detail contact: ALJQBA 

Bax 2429. Herald Tribune. 

92521 Neie^r Cedee. Franca 

INVESTOR I BROKBt 
ENQW1UB WELCOME 


CQMfC BOOK PUBLISfcffit 
soeta dHtifafOrs/oflents 
for « English tanguaoe cane. 
Wma OUUASASA..R. 902 Su^arw 
House Bdg. 2A. Had Aw. 

Tsm 5ha Tsui Koefobn, Haig Kong 


EXPORTBS - taipart.'geporf firm, 
tetatfoua fo r s ftmeniy. Anzono. ink- 
ing mariwMbta product Knes. Should 
yai dean safe representation aw- 
met D.W. Wick, Bax 1912. Cotontija 

Sn Lanka, Tetei 22307 EWB CE 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES ? 

YESl Invest in o ne of America’ s most 

obrSon ^hampk 

ed more nut trees in 19B4 than any 
affier developer in our Stale. 

Kgfa annual aaraingc ramrod for 

rorwy, noByyeera awtL vra g p BMt- 

S»C&5 r "B5a!*8lB 1 " , |NTOHl. 

Material avgJ able m Engfijh, Frencfo. 
Gemimi Bra 2358, Herdd Tribu™, 
92521 NeuJy Cectes. France 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T-SWRT FOTOS 
NOW IN HAL COLOR 
an cfl-cash busmea that oan earn you 
58000 - $10.0007 month. New raid used 
systems from 19500 - S2o.500. 

Kemo. Dept. 112, Porfadi 170340, 
6000 frtmUtat/W. Germraw. 

Tefc 069-7478* Tlx.- 412713 KEMA 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADE EASY 

BusmeEuned Temporary & permamrs 
re s w fa nce visas,- set up business m USA. 
trarsfor key personnel, expend your e*. 
isring business. Wnte for free info to 
Anarney Dowd hinon. 14795 Jeffrey 
Rd, ~208. Irvine. CA 92714 USA 
714651.8020; tfo 590194, 


SETTLING IN CANADA 
IMMIGRATION AND MVESfMfNT 
Contact DART4NVEST Ltd 
cenu lean Dare, President 

7981 McGil Cc^ge ■ Sute 458 
Manred H3A 2w? Canada 
Tel- (514} si tai . 

Tefec 5561023 ■ 


HEALTH FOOD 6 SPORT SECTOR 

mesary supplement [recaterea copy- 
nghfj.&dufivi^ for tttefcS USA tmd 
Ortier countries. Tel: Fronca 
3150025261 grttefcTWtUFMlwag.. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


PANAMA LBEBA. CORPORATIONS 
from US$400 twratah le n ow. Tel 
(062^1 W Telete 628352 ISLAND 
c TfriaUK). 


COMPUTBS for buriness and penoa- 
d dm. Adhorized deefcer for BfcA 
Appte, arimrs. Best price*. Co# Mr. 
l62rrance. Pbris 563 &»/ 3*8 3000 


STUL BUYING SWA3Q4 WATCHES. 
Payma cmh, my style and quantity. 
Mr. Winger, ZWv. Tefc. 01/36L 17 
77. Telex tfl6 055. 


sat 

Bra 


Uechtamtem. PO 
Arredfis Usga ra Se, Spain. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


BUTT 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPU 

UNUMIIBIMC 
U5JL X WORUWIDE 

A atmpltee penond & busimw service 

wen tea. vertcz&w & muH 
indhriduds for oA sac d 
fromcAond occasions. 

212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 
330 W. 56*i SL. N.Y^L 10019 
Service H 
Needed 


INVEST 2 WffiCS in Beta- Hearth. 
Enter Cradtac Bisk Fmertian & 
Hearth Becondtianng Froartsn rttw. 
Beganl mansian, peasetu Surrey 
crwitiyride, highly qualified meded 
supervtMA. Vfot Entan Mecficd Ow- 
ti-e. Biton nara Goddmina Surrey 
GU8 5AL 45 rein, tandoa. Rng 
{042) 8792233, 


HOWTO GB A SECOND PASSPORT 

K I2_raur«rief analyzed Detdls: 
«5 Lyndhwtt Tmn, Suite 
Hong KengT 


503 Central, I 


TAX SERVICES 


Ui TAX PROFESSIONAL often rat 
■AMhgTY SPECIAL. 82. S3, B4 reform 


preparnd for SJOfl. Set" tait in the Mr 
« emdi.Cal France p5) W 27 42 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


HAVE OS. DOLLARS TO eating* 
for Swiss Francs, lire. VAR also bra- 
row tame sum* of SF, 5 or 10 yean. 
Hraie fWimsorr nrtes. Td Swiber- 
tand, Zurich 361 6500 or 056/491 362. 


EA)N 30% - 35%. MVBT in diorr 
term ooounerriai paper notes. AEed 
Ud, PO B ra 422, VKsrisntaurg, Vir- 
gnia 22801, 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Fine demands in eery price range 
at lowest whoferiT prims 
direct from Antwerp 
center of the demand world. 
Fid guarantee. 

Far free price let wnte 


cBasronteepsuf 

EjJd*hecn928 
IWujautniot 62 , B-2018 Antwerp 
Bejaum - Teh P2 3 234 07 5T 
Tie 71779 syt b. Aj the Diamand Oub. 
Herat of Antwerp Dtamand industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


fNTBtNATfONAL BUSNESS Bureau 
SX Funtidted atbCK, bitingud per- 
sannd, legal addreiJ, meeting raoms, 
caanSfnNan af any rind of roestone* 
and orarwondenoe. Tel 34I-27D- 
9004 /05. Tb 44979 ITBB, Madrid, 

Spy 


euro business center 

99 Keaengradtt, 1015 CH Amterdan 
Tel: 31-2036 57 49 , Tekx 16183. 
Worh-Mde Arams GeMret 


YOUR BUSMBS ADDRESS m FRG-. 
Fnmfcfurt ma Mmanauage free- 
tanaer aroitaWe an fa pfiora & tain 
24 hn. Write/ phonfr Ubenetzunn- 
deraf VlMraK. Hohfafdee L SUD 
DanrstaPfiwna 06151/31 23 23 


PARIS ADDRESS. 

Smce 1957 liP- P«wd« ^ . . 
neetinorocsoL 5 n» a Artois, 
MMP47Q4L Ha 642504. 


YOUR OffW W PARK: Ta EX. 

ANSWB9NG SOMCE, seowary, 


Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de rEvangile, 75018 Paris. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


SUPERB 
BELGRAVIA NVESTMBJT 

Newly canUnictedwd buffi la a 
ligii Duelled beNn) an elegant 
facade; a fine development of / 

(tats. 

Flirty fitted Miens, mrabte Ding to 
branrarans, enpreseve entrance foyer, 
pt ra enger tft. 

5 X 3 Becfcaamss 2 Bathrooms: Double 
Receptions Room; Fitted KUchert 

.1X2 Bedrootnt 2 Brahroant Ctoubie 
E ec ephon Room; Fitted Kitchen; 

IXStufioFfat 

HtBKXDia.1 MILLION 

njraSS' 

SOLE AGB9TS 
DG GROOT COUIS 
VI 235 4166 

Telex: 295348 DG80OY G 


CANTBBUKY. KBIT. Unique prmr- 
ty, prafe of which dale back to 1200, 
in me center af this CraheAnl City. 
3,481 sqJt, reskfateid/offira accent, 
tnodoton in supwb candrtiani To let 


raid K acre garden, for 

E3SQJ000- Enquirte ta WQRSFOLDS, 
3 St Mragareti Street, CbMerbury. 
<B27A5G& 


LONDON HOME 

A twarty refurnished Lbeefroom house 
in prestirawi & jtleceant NW London 

loexfitv, KEady far jrarnariafS flffiffm. 

t^£165re0. Tel UK (01) 203 *&n 
Mr. Snow. 


B8GRAVIA, a rare Mews house, 6 
joe, 3 brate. doable reraptiaa 
Ooofcroom, drvng roam, 2 btOteTO, 


patia/comwvtioiy. garage, un- 
matched moots tacertion, recent luxu- 
ry renemdirat. Priwie sate, X year 
lease £475 JXM- Vlftxdd amder year 
twriaL Tefc 01-7X2238 


HEATHROW. HKTCHHC HOUSE 
overlooking vAage green, fatty mod- 
ernaBd cemrd heating, 4 receptions, 
3 double bedrooms, bathroom, shmv- 
er room, ganagp, attractive watted 

—venwriHerafaewrAii--^ 

£125/100. freehold. 


BATH/ BRISTOL - Lara Gwr Mansion. 
The test 2 a( 7 superbly bulb kaataaus 
apartments in berarifal grounds with 
panorank view. £90.000 -£125jSXL 
uBhr Edraes, Bitten, Avon. Tat 0272 
326654 


PRIVATE ISLAM) M Seotknfs hebn- 

dm for sate. Lodge. FoHrxi rudi 
shooting rata sftdang. Hcdf hour finom 
araras. US$100 per acre sated for 
gra* rotate 4U60. LKT, 63 Long 
Acre. London. WC2E9JH. 


400 YEARS OUI JULY 7lh 1985 
Grade 2 fisted detaKhedbladl/vrttite 
1 hoar from London, tagta 
tawvrademls 


tteafa 

15B5-I939, .. , 
GtakfibnlEll 


|0*H72i: 


KNM3HT5BR1DGE. Rani opportutiiy 
for nfttandng opratimnl on 3 Hows 
behind Harrads, 3 roatSion, 475 
bedrooms, 3 beflwaratn. 40ft ttaraat 
eta. Quite unique £385X00. Tete- 
phone (Oil 581 5360 BrglStfl 


LONDON HAMPS7EACL 1 dm 
tub^ supetfa ygcic w 4 float pa 
reodenoe tsrronyad art 2 quiiwfo 
witdbla hamermoanwAMedmeta. 
£4154100 freehold. Tefc 017WJ7®. 


GREECE 


PMAIO FAUttO, 10 Vm ftwn Afara, 
kwriaus apartment Freshed 83, for 
sate due ta fffcwss. 2 bedrooms, bath, 
facing East -Southw es t, enormous fiv- 
iitgvHth fineptace & sMnwuwm 
das off (round Mcvbta & parquet 
Boom, door TV, fitly fitted leaner 
with all appliraxxs, fully frandmd 

with CMofity furniture, fawn, aidery, 

edra TV, ekdriady ope ra ted aw- 


, sotar hot wow. individual can- 
: aAra, eras- 


ninft*, rotor hat water, n 

STfeTSF 

niefliHt ieMlirtinnlrtl i 
tmUJlIfl WTlCUB I IQi/. 


tamedtedv. TA 
jlealw 228/655 or Geneva 


Hr. r et ra yrae ta 316950. VMd'rort 
Embassy or foraifft mitflCn. 


HOUAND 


N«ICH ISSTAURANT for sate. A-ll 
Rhscafan AmBerdom i nsJudew tew 

|& property. yifOJOftl 


IRELAND 


STUD FARM - SOU1HBN IRELAND, 
75 modeni stoblei on 50 ant op- 
proidnsately. Unique Gera^an haute, 

HUAAir 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ITALY 


TOWnnOUSS'm fa courtry, 40 (ten. 
utes from Rome, kitchen, fcvnffyroonv 
2 bedroc nm , 2 bafts, den, 2 fire- 
(daces, central heatina maf tenaee 
raertaciang liber .vetby. Hestored. 
Old world ehrara with modern canve- 
nra«m. L 19UXXUXXL Tefc 6568473 
8 -K) am. 654TSM office houni 


ITALIAN RfVRXA, near Atassta. Easy 
access Mce, Genoa, Tram & Mffan. 
Beautiful country vaa. 4 beds, 2 re- 
oeptiaro etc, 1 +_ao«_Btaintas. 3 
mite beach. flOOJOO. Cteme ns, 87 
Kemtingtan Fade Rd, London Stll. 
Tefc 01735 5898. 


MONACO 


PRMQPAUTY OF 
MONACO 

Beauf^d apartiwat with sea view, ri^ht 
n the center of liter* Grata in ntcA 
modern bmUfog, near sea & casern. 
Luneiota fittings. ^Hol ^Jfrrir^ , g te 

lafehen, ar condriKmod. Cdtar&parfc- 
ing. Prico, F4JOOOOOL 
bwWfryt JOHN TAYLOR 8 SON 
» Bid. dn Mouira 
MONTE CARLO 
Tel. [93)0 30 70lTta4«9IBa 


MONTE CARLO 
PRMCffiAllTY OF MONACO 


. . bath, 11 .., _ . 
eqrapped krtchen. laggfa, targe osfar, 

f ■■ I urn* TBie 

1 iiHtoiif 

AGmCE MIBMBXA 
If.M 

MC 98001 Monaco 
Teb (981 90 M 84. lbs 449477. 


MONACO. CtWNBl S&1S apartment 
m new tafiding. 2 beteoat, 2 bath- 

rooms, fivtag room, terrace overtaafc- 
ing the part and the Fatace, coropleio- 
'y ntyjipped tatr 1 '— 

502634 or Era . 

92521 Neuffly Cedmc, tenae 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTE CAMO 
PtMORAUTY OF MONACO 


For sain in kocuriaw modem residence, 
ptasaart 2 rooms, faggro, sea vtaw, 

ssswSSF 5 * *■ 

Em to Wy 

AGENCE M1HMBXA 
IP. 84 

MC9800T Menace 
Teb (93) 90 M 84. tk 4*9477. 


MONIE CARLO 

Private mansion aera Monaco Prince 
Faiara panrawK wewhartsar. caring 
nauntaav wffh tenaee. 

Tel (9^ 30 46 54. 


PAWS & SUBURBS 


BELL 

GROUP WBWATWNAL 

AVE IBiA 

Old, high desi <7D 
perfa receptions, * 
room, A bedrooms, 
mods' roams, garage. 

NEAR PLACE COLOMBO 

Ffigh dees recaprion opertaent, securi- 
ty, 3 l eceptioro. 9 bertanan, 5 bath- 
room, 2 grappas, mods' rooms, wort 

OTFA HMH CLASS OFFERINGS 

THEX 612906 
TA 797 SAAB. 


ST. GERMAIN on LA YE (near) 
fiLYGEMTl 

SsSSffifflSlStaS 


“ b ti2j^jrS'iSL 

BaaitM ortAodmi B fori *. 
EXCLUSIVE MAXCEAlfc 720 Ol 44 


ECOIE MHJTAWE 

DUFUEX, AU COMFORTS 

ARTIST ATHJ01 

Tap floor, 4 bedrooms. 3 bafta. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE ~ 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


LE VBINET 7 MINS. RER 

.Beatefal m odem prapertY, h rf, 
living, fa® kffchen, bedoam, 
roam. Lfoper floor: 3 benfraann . 
ci comfonx. Frafc 1900 ssjm. Ve if 
day from 10 om to noon & 4 » 
pm, 86 Ave. Georges OeiW»y 


MARAIS 

DUPLEX 85 SOiA. 

chrammg Cving. baram teptara . 
roam, bath, cote street. B5WXXt ' 
Office 602 60 40. 6 wk 74] 35 A 


Nri 


NereAVHWEGEORGEV 

1990 buflefing. frvmg, dtiing, 

2 bedroom, 2barhs, 118 sqm. cdta 
6 th floor, smart terrace. 

D. ffiAU 294 20 00 


t^SSeS^: 


IS MUNS. Ht*£ 

Mtcfoemmean I 

fiorL 300 ttpn. 
salon, ipenonine, 
hath*. 2 WCs. firapfaos, day raw* 
loft, 4 cor grange. Securty systems 
2000 ecu*, treedtand. Board free fe 
2 foteign buywi. Tefc 671 76 26 cun. 


GENIBt PARK, fitly wrapped far, 
nished shKfia. 8th floor, tent bete . 
ny, u teo tratf view sun ti Say. Mori 
eni buffeting, ca amenties. Mtri 
fserishterre ir wes m iete. ABractive 
prior due Id departure. Co 8 affoe. 
hew* 508 45 42 Paris — 


A 


I'*?-’ 

Ml; ... 

ph; 

Ti;*.* 
ihrinc- 
nur. ■„ 
a>h r_r 
fu-rifr. 

i.-u.v - 
ifs’ltiliL 


NEAR FARC MONCEMS, <V 
2 bedraaras, 2 cd 

IfflKLBU+i- 




prica.OwnenteL7238899. 


MONTMARTRE B3BGNIIM.: 


sP°« y rtring on gardea 
soraiy bectaxnti, 2 brrihs, perfed ate 
Tat from Monday 606 01 41- 


PAGE4 
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hrtoB-tondrai one .way from 
RS90/USS75. For boakm 

U5ir Voyages 06 res de 
75006 RrtTftraoL Tefc 329 .. 
Metres Lraembourg) -®sd 10 rue de 
BdgtawhfaQgOal Tel: (93)873496 
STAND BY FROM HUBS one way 

New Y*k FI 200, 5125 Fridby Ju£ 
day- UA. 4 Frisco F17DCL $176 W 
day- Tour US agent, Para 522 20 20 . 


STAND BY FROM PAMS one way 
New Tori FI 200, SI 25 Friday, 
day- LA. & fiSteHTW, JWhZi 
day- Yarn US ogart, Pons 522 jfl a - 

NY ONE WAY $U 

West Corat $141 ! 


HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


each rate balfiroem fort American 

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TO ISRAEL rad when in Israel- we th« 
test daos travel services af TW*- 
Tronl rad TowlAbd House. -tWei?, 
in St^ Tel 3-2)0718. 262035. 


HB1AS YAQUWft Yacht Chcrtm 
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HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


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• y^ frgttoraj from Venice 


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OCEAN 
CRUISE UNES 

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w^l^i 445 % 


HOLIDAYS & 


CHARTER A YAOfT M G8BCE- ES- 
r*t from owner af ksijsij* 


American 


21 -2000. )KA offiee*: Rr __ 
bter, PA 19001 Tefc 215641 )i 


For nirae HOUDAYA TRAVB, 401 
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jratnc moanwniaKe « 9 . 

m southwest Pens arid. 
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