Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats








The Global 


Edited iu 
Printed Sinuilta 
in Paris, London 



I long Koii». Stugapun'. 
'nit* Havin' and Marseille 


WEATHBt DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 14 




*« : No - 31,836 



INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


Mpn) dflODa. h rr 1 ivlim NprW— lO». 

taw.. SOS fc(y_^_IS00l». <>«" — 

Bofirwv 0A5DC* «0 ft a**** 

1H0««_ £* )t>in Obw A*** 

c2«to_ CSUO 5*S_“tnft **.«**»■*-»* 


Cjff*. 


_ Cl CUD 




Ami. 

UfaoMn. 


__500ft 

mm 


Sen* Anfco-i®*- 




.MOP. 


Ifto- 


, _ Sf®. nan*. 

IDaUS 5^^ — roosx,. 


Published With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 


** 


PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 29*30, 1985 


fflfM U— Acwfl.ULfr 

h** UOf **“* l0S6t T— q_-OSDDbi 

G-roMr— UDAM ‘**0 3SCn<> Twtay — T£«MO 

Giacrf Br*an. SO P Mwocco iSODh UAf. A£0&* 

) [>. Ncriwkmdi-27S fl US M |6*4_S0» 
. 115 Ink Npna 1X1 X. tugskwo — JOB- 


ESTABLISHED 1837 






Gain Seen 
In U.S. 
Economy 

ijl Indicators Up, 
S' But Deficit in 
v, -j Trade Widened 


■ By Jane Scabcny 

p " Washington Posl Service • 

‘ i *- - ‘ ’ 

■ vc-'.r 1 ^ WASHINGTON —The govem- 
• v-.T' V-ment’s main gat ige of future US 
' '■ ■» 'T^ etonoraic aenvity rose 0.7 percent 
last month, following two months 

- - ■- ■ ..of declines, suggesting that Federal 
‘ . ^7.*?:. Reserve B6ard action earlier this 

- : \4 ^ year may be succeeding in pulling 

• f*k‘ the economy out of its slump. 

‘ I 7 * r: -. Bui other figures released Friday 
•- showed that the U.S. deficit in mer- 
V ^jj- ' chandise trade widened again. 

. / * V. \ ^ Despite the improvement in the 
c.'-'i, 1 Index of Leading Economic Indi- 
'■ ' ators. Commerce Secretary Mal- 

• ■ : . ~'colm Baldrige cautioned that the 

' ‘'■^increase was not enough to make 
- the economy grow at the rate need- 
«I to keep the US budget defiat 
:r*c.> c T^^from growing. The Reajgan admin- 
^ ‘ v '-'istration has been anticipating that 
. .. ‘ the economy would expand enough 
_r vto keep a lid on the deficit. • 

- zj-.-Ti. - The Commerce Department re- 

• .'> vv . 1 -ported that (he index rose nearly 
- • ._0 .'1 across the board in May after a 

revised 0.6-percem dedine in April 
> • ■_ “ and a revised 0.1-percent drop in 

■ tj-.t,- ~ March. 

Although economists said Fri- 

.1 L « 1 »- * 



Vice President George Bosh at a Brussels news conference. 

Bush Says Soviet Deploys 
SS-20s Despite Its Freeze 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — Vke President 
George Bush said Friday that the 
Soviet Union was continuing to de- 
ploy SS-20 medium-range missiles 
despite a unilateral freeze pro- 
claimed in April by its leader, Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev. - 

He also said that the NATO al- 
ii- 


eastern and western parts of the 
Soviet Union. 

Mr. Bush repeated that be was 
confident that the Netherlands 
would cany out its decision to de- 
ploy U.S. cruise nuclear missiles, 
providing that, the Soviet Union 
had deployed more SS-2Qs by No- 
vember than it had in June of last 




• day that it looked like a rebound ' He praised Belgium for having 

• . “ 7. V wsn occurring, they cautioned that starte/to take its share of enri^ 

.. . " «!would be less than dramatic and ai terrorism. Some, feel that 

. . *;Sat growth would stiRbc farbdow 

- - z&JLFSS£as* » srsgto ?S £5 




•> 


■»* 


Reagan administ ration. 

The Commerce Department also 
reported Friday that theTIS. defi- 
cit in mcrchanmse trade widened in 
" May to $12.67 bflHan. the second 
highest ever, from $11.85 bdh'on in 
r.‘X t’ April. The May figure was the lai|- 
M8 ii.esi since a reewd ,$13J-biQi0D den- 
~cii last July. 

- The deficit for the first five 


riasg 


■»«w. — t. 



1 1 
-I > 


qil IJ 

i'*’*'-* •- 'll 

tel 






AV - X 


:vU nl- 




if; 


♦4 


I 1 





penodi 

/ - x Mr^ Baldrige estimated that the 
- - ‘."jsS deficit m merchandise trade 
= would be between $140 bffian and 
S 1 50 tnlHon riris year, Jar exceedip 
Vji:<;tbe record SI23~biQiafl deficit 

*7 The figures involve cmly trade m 
physical merchandise. 

The continuing deterioration in 
" the trade figures nas been called a 
■tar major factor in the economy's slug- 
gish pace in the past year. The Fed 
-• ■ ; has pursued an easier monetary po- 

bey in recent months in an effort to 
- 1 lower interest rates and revive 

growth. 

The increase in the Index of 
Leading Indicators “is welcome 
; ; news as the gains were widespread 
and offset the declines in March 
i. and Aprfl," Mr. Baldrige said. 
. “Over the past six months, the 

- leading index has risen an average 
. of 0.3 percent per month. As a 
' rough guide, we need sustained in- 

• -jeases of about half a percent per 
.jjloih to maintain economic 
growth at a 4-percent rate." 

So far this year, the economy 
grew at a 03-percent rate in the 
' first quarter and at a 3.1 -percent 
. pace in the second quarter. For the 

- administration to achieve its goal 
■ of 4-percent growth for the year. 

ihe economy would haw to grow at 
a 6-percent rate in the third and 
fourth quartered 

FOR ^ Few economists are predicting 
r such an increase in economic activ- 

it> and instead forecast growth of 
between 2.5 percent and 3 percent 
for the year. However, econranists 
said Friday that the Fed’s easier 
money policy and the decline in 
inttast rates were reflected in re- 
statistics pointing toward im- 
proved economic activity. 


agamst 

hostage crisis, he said. 

Mr. Bush said at a' news confer- 
ence after a two-hour meeting with 
NATO's Council of Ambassadors 
that new figures would show the 
number of SS-20s continuing to 
rise. 

“You wxB See they have gone 

S " he grid “My interpretation is 
1 they don’t fed inhibited in 
deploying their SS-30s. . . . There 
isn’t the restraint that perhaps has 
been advertised out oL the. Soviet 
Unioh." ; / 

NATO sources said that VS. in- 
telligence had determined that 
Moscow has completed .one extra 
missile base since Mr. Gorbachev’s 
April 7 announcement of a six- 
-month moratorium. • 

James Dobbins, a US. deputy 
assistant secretary of stale, said lat- 
er after a meeting ofNATO experts 
that the SS-20 force had grown 
from 414 to 423 and that more 
bases were bring built in both the 


missil es earlier this year. 

Mr. Bush said President Ronald 
Reagan was deeply committed to 
achieving arms reductions in nego- 
tiations with the Soviet Union. He 
later flew to Geneva for meetings 
with the U.S. and Soviet negotia- 
tors on nuclear and space weapons. 

Asked about a statement by Mr. 
Gorbachev on Wednesday that the 
Geneva talks might collapse if the 
United States persisted with its 
Strategic Defense Initiative re- 
search. he said, “I think the matter 
isso serious that threats are not the 
way to do basin ess." . 

He said that Washington was de- 


other NATO countries approached 
cooperation. 

Mr. Bush declined to discuss 
moves to free the Americans still 
being held hostage in Beirut by 
Shiite guerrillas after the hijacking 
of a TWA airliner two weeks ago. 

Bui he said the unanimous re- 
sponse of the allies was that the 
world had to do more to combat 
international terrorism 


Summit 

Accord 

Reported 

Reagan Would 
Meet Gorbachev 
In November 


By Gelatine Bohlen 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — The United States 
and the Soviet Union have reached 
a p reliminar y agreement on the 
time and place for a summit meet- 
ing between President Ronald Rea- 
gan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
diplomatic sources said Friday. 

The meeting would be held in 
Geneva In the second half of No- 
vember. the sources said. 

Settling the issue of time and 
place solved the main procedural 
problems for the meeting, which 
was first proposed by Mr. Reagan 
in a letter to Mr. Gorbachev last 
March when the Soviet leader took 
office. 

[In Washington, the State De- 
partment accused Mr. Gorbachev 
of “hypocrisy" on Thursday for a 
speech Wednesday in which he said 
that the United States was marking 
time at arms control talks in Gene- 
va.] 

Sources in Moscow said that a 
final decision on a Gorbachev-Rea- 
g*n summit meeting still depended 
on events of the next four months, 
in particular an progress at the Ge- 
neva talks. 

The U.S. Embassy refused com- 
ment on the report of a preliminary 
agreement on a meeting, as dia 
officials at the Soviet Foreign Min- 
istry. 

The likelihood of a summit meet- 
ing between (he leaders of the two 
superpower s became greater this 
roring after the accession of Mr. 
Gorbachev upon the death of Kon- 
stantin U. Chernenko. In a letter 
carried here by Vice President 
George Bosh, who attended Mr. 
Chernenko’s funeral, Mr. 
specifically invited Mr. Got 
to Washington. 

Mr. Gorbachev, answering Mr. 
Reagan’s letter, reportedly said he 


Since then, both sides have stuck 
to the line that an agreement to 
meet had been reached in principle 
but that definitive details were to 
be discussed further in diplomatic 
channels. 

A meeting in Vienna between 
Secretary of Slate George P. Shultz 
and Foreign Minister Andrei A. 
Gromyko last month reportedly 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


mwmn¥ 



tonn 


Three hostages were taken to die home of Nalrih Bern on Friday for an interview. They 
were, from left ADyn ComveU, Simon Grossmayer and the Reverend James McLoughHn. 

U.S, Plans New Security Measures 
At Airports, Including More Searches 


on 
t some 


By Herbert H. Denton week, amt even the 
1 Washington p ml Se nmusteis acknowledged 
MONTREAL- The US.gov- of the problems m getting nations 

iuw wx. 6"' IA m ■•nnhwl JJimM 

eminent, responding to the recent 


upsurge in hijacking and apparent 
amine sabotage, has announced 
new aviation security measures, in- 
cluding an expansion of the federal 
air marshal force, intensified 
searches of passengers and baggage 
and ehminaiion of the popular 
curbside check-in service for travel- 
ers flying overseas. 

Elizab eth H. Dole, the secretary 
of transportation, announced these 
and other security procedures 
Thursday at an emergency govern- 
ing counal session of the Interna- 
tional Civil Aviation Organization. 
Transportation ministers from 
and Britain also attended 


latest incidents. 

The French and Soviet delegates 
to the UN organization, which sets 
standards and recommends proce- 
dures for all aspats of civil avia- 
tion, endorsed ibrir counterparts’ 
calls for new measures. 

Commission staff said they' did 
not expect the 33-member council, 
whose president, is Lebanese, to be- 
gin drafting proposals until next 


•jU ,Kl 




■T. *- X ' 


CLASS® 


Tax Cut Helped Americans ’ Incomes Rise in 5 83 


By Spencer Rich 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The after-tax income 
of the average American household rose 
shatply in 1983 to S2QJ101. with a major assist 
from President Ronald Reagan's 1981 in- 
come tax cut, the US. Census Bureau has 
reported. 

A study released Thursday showed that, 
contrary to a popular impression, the elderly 
have a higher per-capita income than most 
other age groups. • 

It also showed that only 7.6 percent of 
households below the government-set pover- 
ty line in 1983 ($10,178 for a family of four) 
paid federal income tax, but about two-fifths 
of them paid Soria! Security or property 
taxes. Social Security prorides retirement 
benefits and disability payments. 

The repot is the fourth in a series of 
studies trying to determine how much cash 
income American households have left after 
deducting payments for four major taxes: 
federal income tax, state income tax, Social 
Security payroll taxes and property taxes. 

The study reported that in 1983 the na- 


tion’s 85 million households averaged 
$25,401 in gross income, paid an average of 
$5,400 in taxes (21 percent), and ended up 
with after-tax income of $20,001. A house- 
hold is defined as one or more persons. 

[Although no exact comparable statistics 
were available for other Western nations, the 
Paris-based Organization of Economic Coop- 
eration and Development said that figures for 
other major industrialized nations were far 
lower. 

[A official at the organization's headquar- 
ters said the average 1983 net income for a 
family of four, including family benefits, was 
$1 1, 105 in Japan, $10,793 in West Germany, 
$9,630 in Britain and $8, 1 09 in France. How- 
ever, the OECD total for the United States, 
using the same basis, was $14338.] 

Compared with 1982, income before taxes 
— in constant dollars after accounting for 
inflation — rose 13 percent. But after-tax 
income rose 14 percent, showing that tax 
changes had a dear effecL 

The bureau said that the major reason 
after-tax income rose more was the 1981 tax 
cut, which reduced federal income tax rates 


about 10 percent. Not all the savings were 
pocketed because state income taxes and So- 
cial Security taxes went up, but there was 
enough left to account for higher after-tax 
income per household. 

' An overall 21 percent was paid for the four 
types of taxes included in the study, com- 
pared with 22 percent in 1982 and 23 percent 
in 1981. 

The study showed that on a per-capita 
basis, which takes into account the number of 
people in different types of homes, house- 
holds headed by persons of age 65 or over had 
a per person income after taxes of $8,113. 
This is higher than any age group up to age 50 
tot slightly lower than age groups 50-54 
(S8.614),, 55-59 ($8,996) and 60-64 ($8361). 

According to the report, white households, 
with 520,751 after-tax income, were finan- 
cially far better off than the households of 
blacks ($13,673) or Hispanics ($16,076). 
Among family groupings, households con- 
sisting of women with children but no hus- 
band were at the bottom of the range: 
$11302, less than half (he figure for married 
couples. 


. ; * *■ •. tg > 
iv‘ * 


Pu> 


Budget Director Reportedly Called U.S. Tax Rise a Necessity 


V-" 


v. 








t*Uf 








Oct*" 
cna* iINff 


• ■ ^ 





By Peter T. Kilbom 

.Vw York Tones Service 

WASHINGTON— In a ! 
worded off-the-record speech, 
rid A. Stockman, director of the 
U.S. Office of Management and 
Budget, has sounded an alarm that 
U.S. budget deficits have become 
intractable and that sizable tax in- 
creases might he the only solution 
“consistent with fiscal sanity." 

He also said, that the Reagan 
Administration, the Republicans in 
- Senate and, io a greater extent, 

uw Democratic leadership of the 
House of Representatives' have not 
“come dean* with the figures that 
they have bom using to calculate 
. the deficit reductions in the two 
conflicting budget proposals before 
Congress. 

If the Securities and Exchange 
Commission-had jurisdiction over 
the executive and .legislative 
branches in kudi matters, Mr. 
Stockman said, in a June 5 speech 

that he thought would remain pri- 
vate. “many of us would he in jail.” 
w ’ , ^ 1 Jhe dispute over the budget for 
uk fiscal year 1986 has arisen be- 
cause of President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s refusal to raise taxes, the 
House's refusal to eliminate cost- 



David A. Stockman 


of-liring adjustments for Social Se- 
curity, beneficiaries and the Sen- 
ate's opposition to further 
reductions in military spending 

“When the books dose on this 
fiscal year next Oct, 1,“ Mr. Stock- 
man said, “we will haw ran up 
another 5200 billion in national 
debt.’* 

He added: “As a policy mailer, it 
is obvious enough that to close this 
threatening 5200-billion budiP 1 ' 


gap. we must either massively cut 
spending or raise taxes by large, 
unprecedented magnitudes: or, by 
the lights of some, enact a sweeping 
mixture of both." 

[Asked about Mr! Stockman’s re- 
marks, Mr. Reagan said Friday in 
Chicago Heights, Illinois, “He 
didn’t say it The story is fallacious, 
We have thesprech. We know what 
he said." The president added 
“This has been a definite and delib- 
erate misquote." Mr. Reagan also 
said that ne intended to keep Mr. 
Stockman on as his budget direc- 
tor. United Press International re- 
ported 

[Earlier. Larry Speakes, the 
White House spokesman, said the 
report was “totally off base. The 
reporter who wrote that ought to 
have bis mouth washed out with 
soap.” 

[Bill Kovach. The New York 
Tunes Washington bureau chief, 
said: “It’s unfortunate they didn't 
tec” Mr. Reagan “read the story 
and the speech. The fails 
very plainly and dearly for 

selves."] 

In three speeches this month — 
far more appearances than usual — 
Mr. Stockman has been striking the 


same theme, that the budget defi- 
cits continue to undermine the U.S. 
economy and that the government 
seems powerless to deal with them. 

But nis off-the-record dinner ad- 
dress on June 5 to the directors of 
the New York Stock Exchange, 
their wives and at least a half-dozen 
senators and congressmen, was far 
more forceful than the others. 

A copy of the speech, marked 
“not for release." was furnished to 
The New York Times. Several 
guests at the dinner have confirmed 
the remarks by Mr. Stockman. 

Only twice before has Mr. Stock- 
man spoken so harshly of the US. 
budget problems. 

Following the first occasion, 
when his remarks appeared in the 
December 1981 issue of the Atlan- 
tic Monthly, he offered to resign, 
but the president reprimanded him 
instead. The other occasion was in 
an interview in Fortune magazine 
in January 1984. 

In the first case. Mr. Stockman 
has said be did not expect his com- 
ments to appear until after he left 
office, and in the other he has said 
he understood the remarks were 
not to be attributed to him. .. 

Mr. Stockman and John J. Phe- 


lan Jr„ chairman of the New York 
Stock Exchange, apparently ex- 
pected the off-the-record restric- 
tion to prevent any disclosure of 
the speech delivered at the June 5 
dinner. 

“That's the reason be was so 
frank," said Mr. Phelan, who de- 
clined to discuss Mr. Stockman's 
remarks. 

At the dinner, Mr. Stockman 
said: “Let me suggest two stan- 
dards which apply equally to both 
sides in this monumental debate." 

“First.” be said, “there is a plau- 
sible case for both going-in posi- 
tions — no lax increases and no 
domestic spending cuts — but nei- 
ther can be responsibly held unless 
one is willing to spell out and be 
politically accountable for the con- 
sequences on the other side of the 
budget ledger: No spending cuts 
mean drastic tax increases, and vice 
versa" 

“Secondly," Mr. Stockman add- 
ed. “as the fiscal crisis has wors- 
ened and the political conflict in- 
tensified, we have increasingly 
resorted to squaring the circle with 
accounting gimmicks, half-truths 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 4) 


to act in concert involved delicate 
questions of national sensitivities. 

Mrs. Dole and her Canadian 
counterpart, Donald F. Mazan- 
kowsiri. detailed a series of similar 
steps that their countries were tak- 
ing to ensure that bombs were not 
planted in baggage. The moves fol- 
lowed the crash on Sunday of an 
Air- India jumbo ie: off the Irish 
coast in which 329 people died and 
an explosion at Tokyo airport in 
baggage unloaded from a CP Air 
flight in which two airport workers 
were killed. Sabotage is suspected 
in both cases. 

Mrs. Dole said her department 
was requiring an eightfold increase 


ee be designated as a security coor- 
dinator on each flight. Ibai crew 
member would be responsible for 
overseeing maintenance, baggage 
and other ground operations. She 
said it also would be necessary for 
service crews to be “far more care- 
fully scrutinized." 

Mrs. Dole said that on both se- 
lected domestic and international 
flights greater attention would be 


given to examining carry-on items 
even after they have been inspected 
by X-ray machines. She also said 
that luggage to go aboard planes 
would also have to be matched with 
passengers. 

She said curbside baggage ser- 
vice. in which passengers are aide 
to check-in suitcases at the road- 
way entrance to an airport, would 
be terminated for international 
flights. 

The administration is also order- 
ing a 24-hour bold on all cargo, 
freight and mail on passenger 
planes unless an X-ray or physical 
inspection is conduct wl or the car- 
go being transported involves per- 
ishable goods from known ship- 
pers. 

Many of the same precautions 
being instituted hastily by Can- 
after criticism over apparent 
security lapses following Sunday's 
incidents. The new measures have 
caused delays of from two to four 
hours for flights overseas. 

■ Bulk of Wreckage Located 
A British navy search ship locat- 
ed Friday the bulk of the wreckage 
of the Afr-India jet that crashed off 
Ireland, an Irish government 
spokesman said. The Associated 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL 3) 


EC Discusses Reform 
Before Iberian Entry 

The proposal envisions the de- 
velopment of common foreign and 
security policies, coordinated by a 

President Francois Mitterrand 
of France and Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of West Germany bad prom- 
ised earlier this year to’ make major 
initiatives for community reform, 
but had made no proposals until 
their coordinated move Thursday. 
Some EC diplomats said the pro- 
posal was an attempt to reassert 
French and West German leader- 
ship over the community. 

Two member states, Ireland and 
Greece, are known to have reserva- 
tions about closer political coordi- 
nation in the community. “Is Euro- 
pean union just countries having a 
common foreign policy?" asked an 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


By Steven J. Dry den 

Ituematimal Herald Tribune 

MILAN — European Commu- 
nity leaders considered proposals 
Friday to improve the community's 
methods of derision-making and 
coordinate their countries' posi- 
tions on foreign policy. 

Meeting on- the first day of a 
summit, the leaders examined a 
British initiative promoting greater 
use of majority voting and closer 
political cooperation, and a 
French-West German proposal 
that similarly endorsed moves to- 
ward common foreign and security 
policies. . 

The intention of Prime Minister 
Benino Craxi of Italy, who was 
chairing the meeting, was to get 
preliminary agreement from the 10 
member nations on an outline of 
community reform, officials said. 

A final agreement then would be 
sought at the EC summit meeting 
in Luxembourg in December. 

EC foreign ministers were to due 
to meet on Friday evening to at- 
tempt to draft a document outlin- 
ing the reforms. 

The institutional reforms are 
considered by EC officials to be 
essential for revitalizing the com- 
munity's economy and meeting 
technological challenges from the 
Llmted States and Japan. The offi- 
cials want a change from the pre- 
sent requirement for unanimity to 
majority voting before the admis- 
sion of Spain and Portugal into the 
community next year. 

The EC leaders also were urged 
by Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain to rerive exist- 
ing agreements against terrorism 
and examine new ways of combat- 
ting hijacking. 

A British spokesman said that in 
view of ihe recent upsurge in terror- 
ist incidents, it was necessary to 
find wav's to “put impetus behind" 
the more effective international 
agreements against hijackings and 
other acts of violence. 

The French-West German pro- 
posal, which took the form of a 
draft treaty of European Union, 
was unveiled only hours before the 
opening of the summit. It was iden- 
tical in many respects to one plank 
of an earlier British initiative for 
community reform. 



U.S. Also Asks 
For 7 Others 
Held in Beirut 

Crnnpiled by Our Staff From Dapatdta 

WASHINGTON — As the Bei- 
rut hijacking crisis entered its third 
week on Friday, there were indica- 
tions that preparations were bring 
made to move the 39 American 
hostages to Syria. 

The United States, however, now 
is demanding that seven Americans 
previously missing in Beirut also be 
freed as port of any arrangement 
for the release of ibe'hastages taken 
from a TWA airliner that was hi- 
jacked June 14. 

Three of the hostages met Friday 
with Nabih Bern, the Shiite militia 
chief, in Beirut. He is mediating on 
behalf of the hijackers who seized 
the Trans World .Airlines plane 
shortly after it took off from Ath- 
ens. 

The hijackers' principal demand 
has been that Israel free more than 
700 mainly Shiite detainees, who 
haw been held without charges for 
up to 19 months, and have been 
moved to a prison in Israel. 

The three hostages spoke later by 
telephone to the ABC television 
network and indicated a willing- 
ness to stay in captivity, voluntari- 
ly. as long as it would lake to end 
the crisis without violence. 

United Press International said 
that the British Broadcasting Corpi 
reported Friday that Syria had 
agreed to accept the hostages, pro- 
vided they were delivered under 
United Nations control. 

The Associated Press quoted an 
authoritative Lebanese govern- 


OnPageS 


• Israeli officials say they are 
doing what U.S. really wants. 

• Jesse Helms says Iran fi- 
nanced the TWA hijacking. 

mem source as saying that Syria 
had agreed in principle to take the 
hostages, and that they could leave 
48 hours after an agreement was 
reached on freeing the Lebanese 
prisoners being held in Israel 

The source did not mention 
whether an agreement to transfer 
the hostages to Syria would apply 
to the seven other Americans lad- 
napped in Lebanon over the last 15 
months. 

The demand for the freedom of 
the seven missing Americans was 
made late Thursday after the Rea- 
gan administration had asserted for 
days that the seven were in a differ- 
ent category than the hostages from 
TWA Flight 847. 

Some officials in Washington 
said that the insistence by both the 
White House and the State Depart- 
ment that **aH 46 Americans” be 
freed held out the potential of de- 
laying completion of a deal. This is 
because Mr. Beni has insisted that 
his Amal militia has had no control 
over those who might be bolding 
the seven .Americans, and that 
Amal had been unable to find out 
where they were 

President Ronald Reagan was in 
Chicago on Friday to speak on his 
recem tax proposaL At a luncheon 
with community leaders, he was 
asked whether it might be a mistake 
to link the fate of the 39 hostages 
with the seven others. 

“I don’t think anything that at- 
tempts to get people back wbo have 
been kidnapped bv thugs and mur- 
derers and barbarians is wrong to 
do." Mr. Reagan said. “We are go- 
ing to do everything we can to get 
all Americans back that are held in 
that way." 

Asked about demands that Israel 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


INSIDE 

■ Moscow rumors suggest that 
Grigori V. Romanov, once a 
contender for the party leader- 
ship. is in disfavor; Page Z 

■ Protestants, defying a ban on 
parades, clashed with police in 
northern Ireland. Page 2. 

■ A mushroom cloud rose over 
the New Mexico desert, tot the 
explosion was not a nuclear 
one. 


■ Ian Smith won re-election in 
Zimbabwe in a campaign that 
reflected while fears. Page 5. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Souren MelBdan reviews a 

major exhibition of Islamic art 
in Geneva. Page 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ New York's State Assembly 
approved legislation that would 
protect companies from un- 
friendly takeovers. Page 9. 

■ A Federal Reserve Board 
governor who has been aligned 
with Chairman Paul A. Vofcker 
will resign Sept. I. Page 9. 



Anne White's leotard 
suited her and the fans at 
Wimbledon, but it was 
ruled inappropriate ten- 
nis attire. Page IS. 


V - 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


.1 ^5w 

7?: -ci ; 


Moscow Suggest Romanov Is in Disfavor 



By Dusko Dodcr 

If 'tuhutgtan Post Serna 


press, and that was on ihe list of D * 12 involves a wedding party 
mourners after the death this some years ago for his daughter, for 
month of Marshal Kirill S. Moska- which Mr. Romanov allegedly bor- 


Muse- 

xberine 


xsrvcnrau □ muoui ui ivnuaiuu ivuiu j. mww — **“• w* 

MOSCOW — Reports circulal- .. rowed from the Hermitage Muse- 

FnlE^iSr 


Marching 
Protestants 
Clash With 
Ulster Police 


• - ••• -. v . 


Grigory V. Romanov, speaking in Finland m 1984, 


future is uncertain. 

Mr. Romanov, 62. has been 
viewed as a rival io Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev. the Soviet leader. In 
March, Mien Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko died, the two were the only 
Politburo members who were si- 
multaneously secretaries of the 
Communist Party's Central Com- 
mittee. 

This is a combination of posi- 
tions traditionally held by anyone 
who moves up to take over com- 
mand of the Communist Party. 

Speculation about Mr. Roma- 
nov’s long absence from public life, 
and about leadership shifts, has 
grown as the Central Committee, 
the party's policy-making body, 
prepares to meet Monday. The 
meeting will precede a session of 
the Supreme Soviet, or parliament 

Mr. Romanov, long part of the 
powerful Leningrad party organi- 
zation, was last seen in public May 
9 when he attended Red Square 
ceremonies on the 40th anniversary 
of the World War II victory over 
Nazi Gennany. 

Since then his name has ap- 
peared only once in the Soviet 


WORLD BRIEF S__ 

Salvador Case Reportedly Reopened. 

SAN SALVADOR (UPI) - New testimony! has 
reopening of the case against a former army officer in UW mure 
American land-reform advisers more than four vears aga Ri ___ ' 

Based on the testimony of an American couple and 3 CostaKtran. 
criminal court judge, according to a court source Thursday, reop™ _ 
murder case of David Peariman and Michael Hammer. Amencan jand 
reform advisers, and Rodolfo Viera, a Salvadoran peasant leader. Oft 


arriving here from Pitsunda, a tv Another minor was that Mr. Ro- Retam reform advisers, and Rodolfo Viera, a Salvadoran peasant leader. 

son on the Black Sea, reported see- raanov had violated party disci- BELFAST — Police have were shot to death Jan. 3, 1981, m a hold restaurant by National 

ing Mr. Romanov there on vaca- pkne by taking up residence with a r i aeh< ^ ^ Protestants who tried Guardsmen. , - 

tion earlier this month. young woman, a well-known Len- ___* ,h m , ia h » According to court documents. Gerald Smith Walker, a former mBit 


young woman, a well-known Len- 


According to the travelers. Mr. ingrad pop singer. 


— — v - - , - , . ut. luwn m louiuiciu ireuuu 

Romanov was welcomed to Pit- Yet another, and more recent, a mwrn mcni tun 

sun da, contiarv to protocol, by a rumor was that the couple had 

local party official rather than by caused an international incident by . More than u) police were 


>ugh a Roman Catho- According 
Northern Ireland in tary attache ; 


tary of the Georgian Republic's 
Communist Party and alternate 
member of the Politburo. 


aboard Mr. Romanov’s yacht. 

It seems significant, according to 
diplomatic analysts, that the Soviet 


isnea wire rroiesiants wno men vwar™™*- , _ framer mOi- « 

to march through a Roman Catho- According to court documents. Gerald Smith Walker, a former ^ * 
lic^SS in uiy ilJa the U-S. Emtasy m Panama his «fe P^« 

Gance of a government ban. Rican, Carlos Francisco Aguilar, have implicated an arxny ^ n r?“T' 

M ^ m named as ordering the killings- The three said that Captain Etodo 

Ernesto AlfonsoXila had io£ them that he “participaied in the ] krikng 
red, seven pereons woe arrested . . Americans and a Salvadoran in January 1981, according to 


»» uj — 7 ; : , ^.t-. mcfT? crnesiu /uiuusu uou luumauiutus p— 1 

Eduard A. Sbevamadze. first secre- straying into Finnish waters jured. seven pmons wCTearrested ^ ^ ^ Americans and a Salvadoran in January 


There have been indications that authorities have not gone out of 

Mr. Romanov's influence was wan- their way to rebut the speculation - r • 

ing and chat he was no longer a or to indicate that Mr. Ilomanov’s 

member of the inner circle. political standing remains unchal- lown 15 w P®*” t-aroouc. 

Since he vanished from public lenged. The g ov ernment earlier 

view, rumors have begun to rircu- Mr. Romanov was promoted to banned Protestant parades thre 
late that Mr. Romanov had sought full membership in the Politburo in Catholic areas. Irish nationally 
actively to block Mr. Gorbachev's 1976. He was Grst secretary of the 


and an unspecified number of re- “ 

porters w^Ta^auiced late TTiurs- ** court source. 

day as members and supporters of rr» _ a f Jj 

Protestant marching bands set out A 

on their annual parade through »EW DELHI 

Castiewdlan in County Down. The iritis hv a«ri-Ta 


■SKToS Top Alihan General Killed by Rebels 

irade through NEW DELHI (AP) — A top-ranking Afghan Army genial has been 

tty Down. The inned by anti-Comnnmist guerrillas, Kabul Radio tqjorted Friday tugot 
itboUc. The radio said that General Ahmeduddin, 45. was kzllexi in a “frontal 

earlier had clash with the bandits,” referring to the Moslem rebels fighting the 
irade through Soviet-installed Afghan government. No other name was aven tor me 
narionalis tsiD -general. The radio identified him as the “counterpart of thearmyemef 


the Catholic minority bitteriy re- of staff, but did not elaborate. He had been trained at a Soviet nauiarv - 


election as general secretary of the Leningrad Region party commit- sent the arches, which celebrate H , _ r m - n ; lnrw » r>dhL did not sav^ 

Communist Party after the death of teeTwrclding authority over half a loyalty to Britain. The Dari -language broadcast, mo^mredin N 

Mr. Chernenko. One version, minion S members and apoliti- Prototantsbdieve that the ban 

which could not be confirmed, was cal andecononric center ranking issued because of pressure highest-ranfang Afghan Army officer lolled rebels. It w^ioetra 
that Mr. Romanov hSlnomiiiaied second in the country, after Mo* ^0“ the republic of Ireland, which tone the radio has made a special announcement on the death of ft 


Viktor V. Grishin, mother Politbu- cow. _ . . 

ro member. He was transferred to Moscow 

Rumors of alleged indiscretions bv Yuri V. Andropov, the Soviet “SP" 1} 
by Mr. Romanov have beem re- leader who died in 1984, to became 


is holding talks with Britain on pos- generaL 


vived during the last few weeks. 


toefthcmoKsenshiveisM* 

* m-niwr of the n.rtv’f ovmanii under discussion is a posable role 
a member of the party’s secretariat. f OT Dublin in running themovince. 


Poland’s Meat Prices to Rise Monday 


Agreement Is Reported on Summit 


Dsable role WARSAW (Reuters) — Poland’s government announced Friday its 
te province, plans to increase meat prices on Monday despite widespread public 
are shared opposition, including calls for a strike. . 

it courts to The date of the increases was announced on the state-run television 
pariiamen- system’s evening news broadcast, along with an announcement that an 
increase in purchase prices paid to fanners would result in more food on 


Among the proposals are shared opposite 
security operations, joint courts to The da 
try guerrillas and joint pariiamen- system’s i 
tary sessions. increase i 


(Continued from Page 1) the United States look a “more of the Geneva negotiations on nu- 

did not movie the issue forward, reasonable stand." dear and space arms and by iris . . . 

according to Western diplo mats Mr. Gorbachev said the Soviet thinly veiled threat to suspend the “°n with Ireland. “Preparations for a strike m response 

The American industr ialis t Ar- Uttion would have to “reassess the talks,” the department said. 0° Thursday, about 500 police discussed and methods of swift commni 

mand Hammer cast doubt on a entire situation” if the Americans Since the arms talks resumed in officers in riot gear seal e d off all the strike action were to be prolonged.’ 

Reagan-Gorbachev meeting two continued a military buildup while March, the two sides have differed roads to Castiewdlan, a town of 


Clinic 

Bon Port 

Biotonus 

The leading medical center for revitalization 
in MomreiLx, Switzerland 
Provides: 

— a complete and personalized check-up. 

— an individualized treatment based on the ven latest 
medical regeneration techniques. - 

"Cel/ therapy. 1 Mine in it. \o more anxiety ewr 1 ' time / begirt _■ tepanitf! 1 
set out. certain of success, with no problems or depression." 

N. Narnia. Documcni Rtris-Ma'.eh. June S2. 
“The multiplicity of the therapeutic techniques offered fn- Biotonus Cltn.c Bor.- 
Port determined our choice for this center for our inquiry. " 

Dr. Cara SI. D. Special Same. Man* 19M 

For further information please send your visiting's card to. 
or contact: 

BIOTONUS HT, 24. Rue Pbnt-Pon 
| CH- 1820 MONTREUX. SWITZERLAND 
Tfel. (021) 63 51 01. Telex 453 133 


The Protestants have been wary the market. 

of such change* fearing that they Calls for a strike included a statement by activists of the ontiawec^-J** 
mnW I re*A evr-nmaHv m mmifim. SoHdarilv trade union in Warsaw’s biszest industrial plants. ' It said: * . 


ui Hit vJUi&Tft m,tuuauwiu uu iiu~ - _ u — » a ■ J _ ,, , , . . ' . , _ ■ ■ i _ 

dear and space arms and by his lead eventually to netmifica- Swidariiy trade union in Warsaw's biggest wdnsmai 


ri 1 


m 

irf- • 


thinly veiled thr eat to suspend the ^° n Ireland. 


Preparations for a strike m response to meal price rises have beed 


” the department said On Thursday, about 500 police discussed and methods of swift commnnicatkms have been agreed m case 


weeks ago. stating that the Soviet “marking time” at Geneva. sharply on how to approach 

leader had said that “to have a ■ Gorbachev Speech Decried three-part negotiations on Urn 

meeting, well something has to be c .. „ VT^T _ _ . strategic weapons and med 

accomplished at such a meeting." n « ViSr Gwenzman of anns and cm 

In recent weeks, however. West- Vl e jT w ^ . ^ imes reported from ygn^g ^ anns race in space, 
em diplomats in Moscow have ex- i *^ un § ,on: . ■ . . .. The United States has prop* 

pressed increasing confidence that tk T^f Reagan adnumstrauon said jggting garjy agreements in the 
a meeting between Mr. Reagan and !f w ¥- by nffemm* amw oitesnries an t 

Mr. Giirharh<»v W n„IH JSS ~ called a thinly veiled threat by Mr. 


sharply on how to approach the 1.500 people. A police 
three-part negotiations on limiting said the show of stren^ 
strategic weapons and medium- umded as a warning to 


range offensive arms and on pro* who have threatened to defy the 
venting an arms race in space. ban on marching. 

The United States has proposed The Protestants' attack on police 

seeking early agreements in the two officers, whom they normally re- 


Mr. Gorbachev would take placet 

Soviet officials and Moscow- dip- G orbacbev to suspend the Geneva 
lomats see developments at the ne- ta rf‘ - .. ch , r „^ 
loii.iin l uble jnOeneva as the key 


offensive arms categories and on S 31 ^ as their friends, was viewed in 
bolding talks on future uses of stra- Belfast as a sign of the commtmi- 


Mr Gorbachev* y s P ccch ^ w** quesuons about 

During a visit to the Ukraine, the Soviet sincerity in seeking an agree- 
Soviet leader suggested that the ^ the arms negpuauons. 


I Geneva talks might collapse unless 

7 Drug Smugglers Sentenced 

The Associated Fress 

EDINBURGH — Seven persons 
who tried to smuggle two-thirds of 
a ton (600 kilograms) of Nigerian 
! marijuana into Britain have been 
given prison sentences totaling 64 
vears and Ones totaling £ 120.000 
(S 156.000). 


The department added that, with 
the second round of the Geneva 
talks nearing a dose, the Soviet 
Union had yet to produce a new, 
concrete proposal on reducing nu- 
clear arms. 

Despite the sharp words, the 
State Department reaffirmed U.S. 
interest in arranging a meeting be- 
tween Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorba- 
chev. 

“We are astonished by Mr. Gor- 
bachev's distorted characterization 


tegic defensive arms. t/s growing frustration. Tbeysai 

The Soviet negotiators have said Meanwhile in London, police man of the 
that until the United States agrees maintained tight security Friday °f son 
to negotiate a ban on all space mound those arrested in ccmneo- Hajek has 
defense weapons, including re- tion with bombing attacks by the been allow 
search, they are not ready to nego- Irish Republican Army. _ 

tiale limits on offensive weapons. Many of tbe suspects were ar- I j p.HT] 
“The Soviet Union's apparent rested after authorities uncovered a __ 
threat to suspend the ongoing new plot last weekend to bomb a dozen „ LUXIJ 
negotiations casts doubt on its sen- Engl i sh resents during the height of ^' oin P ta P i 
ousness in the talks,” the State De- the holiday season next month. standards 
panmem said in its statement At London's top-security police After a. 

Noting that the second round of ^oa, Paddington Green, where g™*** 
the resumed talks is due to recess !wo suspects were being held, 


t jj““ Curbs Reported on Ex-Czech Aide 

jtestants VIENNA (Renters) — The former Czechoslovak foreign minister, Jin 
fy the Hajek, has been placed under strict around-the-clock surveillance to 
prevent him meeting foreigners, tnugei sources sa id Friday. _ ' 

r ice The sources said Mr. Hajek, foreign minister in the Prague Spring era 

re- under Alexander Dubcek, was bang followed dosdy by the secret police 
wed in to prevent him from meeting members of a French parliamentary 
tmrmi - delegation currently in Czechoslovakia. 

They said that the authorities feared that Mr. Hajek, a former spokes- 
poUcc man of the Charter 77 himnan r ight* movement, might try to put the cas£ 
Friday of his son Jan to the French delegation. Over the past three years, Jan 


of ms son Jan to the French delegation. Over the past three years, Jai 
Hajek has been barred from studying at Prague University and has so 
been allowed to accept invitations to study in Austria and Norway, j 

r 

Denmark Dissents on EC Car Exhaust 


e years, Jan 
and has not. 
'forway. )r 


July 16. the statement went on: marksmen squatted on surround- 
“ After almost two full rounds of m 8 rooftops, roads were blocked 
talk* , we have yet to see any con- “td passers-by were 

Crete new proposals for the reduc- searched, 
tion of offensive nuclear arms.” Armed police officers watched 


W\ 


iPlll 


The statement said that the Sovi- ovcr suspects in Glasgow, and 
et Union had also refused to engage unconfirmed reports said that they 
in a “constructive discussion” with would soon be transferred to Lon- 
the United States on the potential ^°. n IriaL Six others are 

contribution that “emerging defen- being held in L a nc as hir e in noith- 
sive technologies could make to the era England, 
establishment of a more stable sua- Bntam s director of public pros- 

tegic relationship, and to achieve- comons was considering whether 
mem of the agreed goal of eliminat- suspects should be formally 
ing nuclear weapons.” charged, a spokesman said. Police 

“Instead," it said, “the Soviet tii at under tbe Prevention of 
delegation h-i* sought unilaterally Terrorism Acf most would have to 
to impose preconditions, linking berdeasedif they were not charged 
discussion of nuclear arms reduc- bv tins weekend. 

lions to prior U.S. agreement to ! 

Soviet demands that we abandon 

research under the Strategic De- mi ni*Ar\A<ino 
fense Initiative” ljUrUUCclIlo 

The statement added that the . "*■ 

“hypocrisy of this position" was A Dn/jf 

evident because the Soviet Union ilUUUi J. aUl 
had the world’s only anti-ballistic *• 

missde system and anti-satellite /V— 

sysiem. Un Soccer 

It charged that tbe Soviet Union 
had been “undermining" the treaty The A*ocuued Pm* 

on defensive missOes and expend- cm a esm m n c 


LUXEMBOURG (Reuters) — Denmark prevented the European 
Community from reaching unanimous agreement Friday on. gmitcinn 
standards for antomobiles, arguing that the jsoptsals were too lenienL 

After a 2 1-hour session, tbe other nine member natioos agreed on levds 
for toxic exhaust gases, diplomats said. The com protni sc proposed by the 
ECs Executive Commission proposes a combined marimam level of 
right grams (28 ounces) of nitrogen oxide, the most dangerous pdhnapt, 
and hydrocarbons for cats with medium-size engines. 

Commission offi cials said that Denmark would be tinder strong 
pressure to compromise. Britain also agreed during to drop 
moves to block West Germany’s proposal to grant fiscal incentives to 
buyers of “dean" cars, diplomats said. In another concession, the 
commisaon promised Greece (hat it would emergency measures if 
pollution in Athens exceeded certain levds. - - v 

FortheRecord ? 

Hie crew of ft Turkish Airlines jet w a powad a passenger on Friday 
who said that he wanted to blow up the pfc™» Anatolia news agency 
reported. The Boeing 727, with 81 passengers aboard, landed safely in 
Istanbul (AP) 

Hungary’s paifiaraent re-elected President Pd Ipsonczi Friday lor a 
another five-year term, Budapest Rafioreponed (Reuters) 

A strong tremor shook northwestern Yugoabra near the town of Bovec 
on Friday. There were no reports of casualties or damage. (Rearers) 

As Hijack Crisis Drags On, 
Syria May Accept Hostages 

(Continued from Page I) terests of resolving the problem 
should release the Lebanese prison- nonviolentty, he and the other bos- 
ers, Mr. Reagan said, “I only know tages would accept weds more of 


r 

f 

’“'r i’’ 

; • • «*»• » • 

Vt^V 

E - a1’4(.w2 

•Vj5C 

i 

; - 

: 

! ^ 

^ /'-t 

. . .j.. «. -• 

r * 7 : j- • 

-V V;. : - 


Ml 

. m 


nau oeen unaerminmg me treary 7 ha Associated Press 

STRASBOURG. France - 

ing a higher level of effort for Sports ministers from 21 West Eu- 
many years on the same land of 7 *^ 7 .* 1 ^ , 77 ^ \Y ^ Tr 

nffirSTfuftf 5 tr , SaK yto 

wars project to devdop a space KTsocxSlS^ 
shield against nuclear missiles. 7 T, _ 

In his speech. Mr. Gorbachev 
^otedttaithcU.ii^SiacwB 

^ 3 “ W «33* m a riot May 29bcfore 


that none of us, any country, can captivity in tbe hawk of a foreign 
afford to pay off terrorists for the embassy. 

crimes they are co mmitting, be- “I think that they would vert 
cause that will only lead to more willingly almost become seff-fifiF 
_ posed hostages,” he said. “If Mr. 

The Lebanese government Eeni would release us on our own 
source, who spoke an conditi o n recognizance, you wtmld find the 
that he not be identified, tdd The majority of the people wafa* to do 
Associated Press that Syria had that” - 
agreed in principle to arrangements ABC also talked with Mr. Item 


agreed m principle toarrangemmte ABC also talked with Mr. Bern, 
to end the crisis worked out by who said: “I don’t have contrSfS 


- -wr. .. im ^ ^ j 

"To walk fhe streets of Paris — without deadline or curfew — 
stalking everything wonderful to eat. 

To get lost and rained on. To find the most The "Food Lovers Guide to Paris* by ihe 
romantic spot for breakfast and the trustiest Internationa! Herald Tribunes restaurant critic 
cheesemonger. To quarrel with butchers and Pafriaa Wells, includes lively critical commentary 
descend into the great bakers cellar as he anecdotes, history and local lore. A great gift 
pulls the days bread from the oven. To be idea. Paperback, over 300 pages with 140 
tempted and indulged by the cifeys most evocative photographs. $ 11.95, plus postage: 
brilliant chefs. Its the dream of every one of odd $ 1.50 in Europe and $ 4.00 outside Europe, 
us in love with food. And Patricia Wells has P“ “ “ — 

done it_ No series hedonist should go to w. 

Parts without it, and reading it at home is a I Please send me: 

Bite doser to actually being there." . ^ T ° ^ 


7Zr° ~r~ — culminated m a not May 29 before T wausaia: i aoni nave control lor 's 

,0 ^ SMS retorted SW? ™ ) 


The State Department retorted R , T iverr^o! nnrf of the UN secretary-general, Javier 

that his staiemeot was “striking” rfrS« fTSSiiS ***** 

because, during the two years of TSJS' Mr. Aime has been shutlfing 

negotiations on medium-range SSh^eam’s^uDoner^were anwng Beirut, Jerusalem and Dt 

nlnu^rl .A Cll/4l mirnlH nklT. UtoLdS? 'iJHEBEtoS* mascusinflrep^fewdajuL 


weapons, the United States had de- 
ployed no such miss iles, while the 
Soviet Union had added about 300 
SS-20 warheads to its arsenaL 


CHURCH SERVICES 


blamed for most of tbe violence. 

Under tbe convention, soccer 
clubs and stadium owners would 
have to segregate rival spectators at 
matches and impose stnci controls 
on ticket sales to prevent the inter- 
mingling of rival fans. 

The sale of alcohol a! stadiums 
would be restricted, and spectators 
would be forbidden to bring in any 


Mr. Been reiterated the hijack- 
ers’ condition of no release of 
A mericans until Israel released its 
prisoners. When aske d about die 






-l u other Americans in Beirut, he said: 

Mr. Bern met Fnday with three ‘This is not my problem? 

of the hostages — Allyn ConwdL, Th#. <»». nn 

S™on Grossmayer and the Rever- S'™' 

end James McLouzhim. a U5. Embassy 

Mr. ConweD later told ABC that 

tbe three had asked for the meeting terPwerKiIbmnnSS^^r.^E 
because of concern “about 


AMERICAN CATHBXIAL N PARTS, 23 Avs. objects — such as club s tandar ds 
C*ofg*.V 75008 Paris. The Very Rev. — that COUld be Used as weapons. 
Jones R. Leo. Dean. Metro: Georg»-V ar , _ , 

AimaMorcsau. Sunday: 9 djiv, 1 1 ojb. Joop van der Reijden, the Dutch 
Churdi school ond nursery 1 1 ajn. We* SpOTtS minis ter, who presided Over 
days: 12 noon. TeU 720.i7.92. the meeting, said that the con ven- 

OW B*TOT CMWOt 13 h. * 

VieuxrColombier, 75006 Peris. Metro Sf.- 11141 onl y Swl Welland abstained. 

SulpiaL Sunday warship in English 9=4S m TfiafcliH' Fyutpospo IZrird 
tun., Rev. A. Sommervflle. Tdj V37Ji7S37. m 1 naiCOCT ILXpreSSeS WTiei 


whruuuu. mi. urosHuayer, 3 /.has Catholic nrtest* ajt 

^ one hrng and has been taking *». £ EftSS &££ 
About the U is. French and 

Swiss positions that release of the ^ 

hostages must be unconditional, Thomas B rnfaw faffi ^ 

Mr. Cmiwdl said he agreedTbS- 

that such a condition ou^u also be unrversitv. ^Sriculture at the 

Ttntvwnl An mu muntn* tn - - T 1 ‘ ■ J- 


PARS SUBURBS 

EMMANUB. BAPTIST CHURCH, ReiriMAot- 
nsobon. EngTah speaking, dB dwwwino- 


Prime Minister 
Thatcher of Britain e: 
grief to Italy over the 


Margaret 
pressed her 
Brussels di- 


rions. BiUe study: 9*5. wordiip: 1 0-45. 56 j saster again Friday, and British of- 


"Jt is impossibte to read it and not want to 
be in Paris. Now" 

- Lois Dwan, The Los Angeles Time 

"m.one of the best guides in English. And, 
mon Dieu, rt was done by an American. 
There will be consternation in high places.” 

- Frank Prial, The New Tbrk Times 


International Herald Tribune Book Division. 

181. avenue ChoHej-de-GouJJe. 92521 Neuifly Cede*. France. 

Please send me: 

copies of FOOD LOVBTS GUIDE TO PARIS/ 

at $ 11.95 each, plus postage: 

odd S 1.50 each in Europe, $ 4 each outs*de Europe. 

Please check method of payment: 

n Enclosed « my payment. (Paymen* con be mode in a. iy 
convertible European currency at curreni exchange rales) 

□ nS r,£ 


Signature 

tf*. rvrsi hr rrml 

Name 


Rua Boro-Roiwn. Tel.: 749.15.29. fic jals Said that the ! 

mem would compensate the 

Ml Sunday R ' Utm ^ 

BU. hr. (a/f age*) 9*5 cjr. Worship 11+6 POrt“ from Milan, 
p-m. Tel. 255151/253115. A British snot«a 


impTOed on any country “bolding 

This was a reference to IsratTs them in Bra 
detennon oftbe Lcbmirae prison- abonts is in 
ras, which the United Stales and failed to sfao 
the international Couumttes of the cember 1984 
Red Cross have denounced as Ole- as mueim?Ti 


ficials said that the British govern- gal nnder in MMtar. 


Mr. ConweD said that in the in- 


Six of them are bdieved to be in 
me hands of militants wiro ip-rwy i 
them in Beirut, and their where- 
abouts is unknown. Mr. KUborn 
failed to show up for work in De- 
cember 1984 and is officially listed 
as missing. No group has riamwa 

rcsponsibmty f or him. (NYT r AP, 
• upn 


A British spokesman said that 
the government was discussing 


EC Leaders Discuss Ref 


onn 


2 r!£ 33 S h “ £ 5 “oo« ^ 1 

: ■ Ban on Games Upheld , A ,^ y committee ^mointed by S^l? f 5 arners to trade ^ 199 Gl. 


29-6-85 


STOCKHOLM 

IMMANUa CHURCH mar dry center. 
Arienrfy Christian MbwMp. Sunday IliOO. 
Tel.: (08) 316051. 151225. 


To place an udoerttaement 
in this section 
please contact: 

Me Elizabeth HERWOOD 
181 Are. d^dr-CeoUe, 
92521 PteuiOy Cedes. Fnwee. 
TeL: 747.Z2.65. 


■ Ban on Games Upheld ^atady committee appointed by 

The Engfish High Own upheld a conferen2^ti| r 5^i^2^ ^ 
ban imposed by the English soccra consider revising t£? TiSf rf raly 
es on their top dubs play- Rome, the 1967 do^nraJfSmJ T 
nropean compeuuon next ing the community kJ, 

Reuters reported Friday The EC stetra/towEww 


authorities on their top clubs play- 
ing in European competition next 
season. Reuters reported Friday 
from London. 


The goal of drminaring. trade, 
is broadly supported by 


season. Raiters reported Friday The EC states, however an- m su Pporied by 

from London. videdovertbe 1 ^^^’^^ ^o?^^’ an ^ bec “ 

A High Court judge said it would to caff such coherence. British Ddo? Jacques 

be wrong to frustrate the Football officials who opporethe confer- tte , cxcaiti )fe 

Assodatioa in its attempt to re- enoe and treaty amendmmtTh-^ yJtoUiisaem. A-Spoko* 

,urZl_^7 CQameilts have “an for Mr. 


Assodatioa in its attempt to re- era* and treaty amendmmf7i»u_ lTrjv^\V w 4E luSaoa . A spoktt* 
store the reputation of English said that the summits are the T^oes sa^ he had 

dubs following the Brussels wo- er plare to discuss comammSTE 

lence. forms... ' ■ASSKSSfif^^ ** 











""'tin „ ^ 

• ■ 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


Page 3 


a] 


■::«a 


' : ■ .?** 


‘-1^ 
. :.C;I 


^ A? 


• : *v‘ 


- % J , i! 


\| ( 


•*? ! 


Ht 




Vn. 


AMERICAN TOPICS 



TAKEOFF ABORTED — An American Airtines DC- 
10 bound for Dallas skidded off the runway Thursday at 
Munoz Marin Inte rnational Airport in San Joan, Pner- 


IkaAoocWhai 

to Rica, causing minor injuries to several passengers. 
Officials were investigating tbe cause of the mishap that 
occurred jnst after tbe plane's tires Mew out on takeoff. 


i; 


* Viz 

*i .. 


tf ilf j | 


w *‘<'hAi{ 


-4 i*. ^ 


-:S- 




«*n 


' ( ar[.4 


Son Befr’s Glory Days 
Give Way to Northeast 

Tbe New England and Middle 
Atlantic states as far sooth as 
Maryland are enjoying the big- 
gest long- term boom in the Unit- 
ed States, The New York Times 
reports. 

Historically, the region’s revi- 
talization is rooted in the entire 
country's shift away from smoke- 
stack to higb-tedmoiogy and ser- 
vice industries. In the Northeast, 
tbe decline of mamifwiining be- 
gan earlier, and now is more near- 
ly complete, than in other parts of 
the country. 

What was left by the end of (he 
1970s was a region with thou- 
sands of skilled bat tmemotoyed 
workers and industrial real estate 
ciying for new tenants, hut a 
wealth of leading universities and 
well-established transportation 
systems. 

In 1975 the tmempbymau rate 
in Massachusetts was 11-2 per- 
cent, the highest in the country. 
Now it is 19 percent, tire lowest. 
Other states in the region rite 
qmilar statistics. 

“The glory days of the Sun Bdt 


are over,” said William S- Wood- 
side, chairman of tire American 
Can Company in -Greenwich, 
Qmnecticnt. “It uxk a longtime 
for tire Northeast to get its ad 
together, but it has dote it nowin 
a magnificent way 


Short Takes 

Michael JL Dover, who was 
President Ronald Reagan’s depu- 
ty chief of staff until going into 
public relations easier tins year, 
says of Ins former . employer 
“He’ll say, in don't get what I 
want, donl count me ouL m fig- 
ure oat another way.’ The thing 
that most people have underesti- 
mated about mm is his competi- 
tiveness.” 

Many a US. tom has an in- 
door nfle range hut Marietta, 
Georgia, most have one of the 
first indoor submachine-gun 
ranges, soundproofed and armor- 
plsied. It costs S13 to rent a 
Thompson submachine gun or an 
Israeli Uzi that can fire up to 
1,000 rounds a minute. The catch 


is tbe price of ammunition: a box 
of 50 rounds, or enough to keep 
an Uzi gang at full blast for three 
seconds, costs S10.75. 


Shorter Tabes: The Reverend 
Jesse L. Jackson is edging up to 
another run for president, tire 
magazine U.S. News & World 
Report says. After months of re- 
fusing to discuss the topic, tire 
Democratic dvfl rights leader has 
told aides that be u a “potential 
candidate’' for 1988. . . . CHendoo 
Wminger, 41, was sentenced in 
Bloomington, Indiana, to “*■* 
years in prison las kH 
boyfriend by repeated! 
ping a 14-pound (633-kilogram) 
bowfing ball aphis head while he 
slept in front or the TV set . . :A 
poll of riders of Washington’s 
Metro subway system by the 
American Journal of Public 
Health showed that three-quar- 
ters of adults prefer to ride facing 
forward while two-thirds of the 
children would rather face back- 
ward. Neither the Journal nor the 
Metro have said what, if any- 
thing, will be done with this infor- 
mation. 


Chemical Bazbecne 
Gomes Home to Roost 


Stan and Brenda Evans, having 
read news reports that some bar- 
becue grills cm sale in Houston 
were made of chemical waste 
drums, were careful to make in- 
quiries when they went shopping 
for a grilL They were assured that 
the one they were purchasing was 
made from a dean new barrel 

Imagine Mr. Evans's surprise 
when he fired up his brand-new 
cooker to barbecue chicken and 
the words “Dow Chemical Co.” 
emerged from beneath tbe new 
block paint, followed by the en- 
tire Label warning of tire danger of 
poison. 

“That’s when I derided I didn’t 
want to eat the chicken,” Mr. 
Evans said. After a few phone 
calls, Dow bought the gnll for 
$40, slightly more than the 
Evanses had paid for it The re- 
tailer quickly offend to pay for 
the chicken and the restaurant 
meal that replaced it 


ARTHUR HIGH EE 


Israel Feels It’s Doing What U,S. Wants 


By Edward Walsh 
Washington Pal Service 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli 
government has been led to believe 
that the Reagan administration 
does not want Israel to release the 
more th™ 700 Arab prisoners it 
bolds — who are central to the 
current TWA hijacking drama — 
until Washington is assured of the 
safety of the airliner hostages, ac- 
cording to well-informed sources 
here. 

Despite increasingly blunt pub- 
lic statements by Reagan adminis- 
tration officials that Israel should 
immediately release the prisoners, 
as demanded by the hijackers, offi- 
cials in Jerusalem expressed confi- 
dence that Israel's position in the 
hijacking case reflected UJS. de- 
sires. 

They strongly suggested that the 
Israeli stance was being coordinat- 
ed closely with Washington. 

“The Americans do not want to 
see any linkage between the hos- 
and tbe prisoners,” a senior 


Blast by U.S. Military 
Simulates Atomic Bomb 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

. New York Times Service 

■ ALAMAGORDO, New Mexico 

The largest conventional explo- 
:;j, r JJ . .. i: .,J Jan ever set off by the United 

l! ' States huried a gigantic mushroom 

* < . ■ , . .... cloud above the desert Thursday, 

... rattling windows dozens of miles 
, . ... away. 

• Nothing like it had been seen in 
. ... the United States since atmosphex- 

< v ■ ic nuclear tests were banned in 

1963. 

• ’. The explosion, which was creat- 
ed by a mixture of ammonium ni- 

irate and tod ral, was a mffitmy test 

to simulate a nudear bomb. The 
••ft /I blast effects were equivalent to 

f i f * ‘ f 1“ those of an ergbf-kOoton nudear 

f r ‘ * 1 . weapon, officials of the Defense 

I t . Nudear Agency said. By compari- 
V /#/ llOStw- soa, the bomb that destroyed ffiro^ 


ilfi »* ’/»’ 
a if-% 


i 


shiraa on Aug. 6, 1945, had a yield 
of 13 kflotom. 

Eight-kfloton unclear explosives 
■are standard tactical weapons in 
modern armed farces, the officials 
said, and thus Thursday’s test was a 
.fair gauge of tbe battlefield use of a 
unclear weapon. 

Under the atmospheric test ban, 
all U.S. nuclear tests have been 
carried out underground at a test 
ate in Nevada. 

Underground tests are of limited 
utility in gauging tire actual effects 
■of nudear weapons on housing and 
military facilities, so simulated 
tests are carried out from time to 
time using chemical explosives. 

Thursday’s explosion, code- 
named “Minor Scare,” was the first 
true simulation of a nuclear blast, 
however. 

The charge consisted of 4,880 
tons of high explosive packed in a 
fiberglass hemisphere 88 feet (27 
meters) in diameter that was stand- 
. on tire ground, officials said. 
' Tbe largest previous test, conduct- 
ed two years ago, involved the deto- 
nation of only 660 terns of explo- 
sive. 

A principal purpose of the test, 
which officials said cost about 537 
■ million, was to gauge the effect of a 
'nearby nuclear explosion on vari- 
o us designs for hardened mobile 
missile launchers, which would be 
used to deploy the proposed Mid- 
german mis sile. 

- Other targets of thetest included 
military and civilian shelters, weap- 
ons systems, aircraft, fortifications 


and houses. Among the experimenr 
tal targets at or near ground zero 
were some provided by Canada, 
West, Germany,. France; Norway, 
Sweden and (neat Britain. 

Minor Scale was detonated not 
far from Trinity Site — • the spot 
where the wodifs first unclear de- 
vice was detonated on July 16, 
1945. In some respects Thursday's 
explooan resembled the Trinity ex- 
plosion, and the thunder of the 
shock boomed far several minutes 
as it echoed between tire mountain 

^^rither cameras nor binoculars 
were permitted in tire area of the 
lest The milhary distributed three 
photographs but declined to make 
available one showing the mush- 
room plume, saying that it con- 
tained sensitive information. 

Officials said the test would take 
a month or more to evaluate and 
that many of the results would re- 
main secret The several hundred 
foreign dignitaries, scientists, mili- 
tary officers and .journalists assem- 
bled for the occasion coold sec little 
of tire Mast site five miles (right 
kilometers) away except the huge 
hemisphere of explosives and the 
blast itself. 

But the windows in buildings 10 
miles away were shattered, and 
spectators were knocked back by 
the shock wave. 

Major General Niles J. Fulwykr, 
commander of the White Sands 
MissOe Range, said tire main differ- 
ence between Minor' Scale and a 
nudear blast % that a nudear 
smoke plume rises faster than this 
one. And, of course, amidear fire- 
ball is far hotter, and that creates 
all kinds of colors in the fireball 
anddoud.” 

*Tm not sure whether tire Rus- 
sians have ever set off anything 
comparable,” General Fulwyler 
said. “This may be the most power- 
ful [nonnuclear] blast anyone’s ever 
carried out,” 



[President Ronald Reagan, in 
Chicago lo speak on his tax propos- 
al, refused to comment Friday on a 
Washington Post article quoting a 
White House official as having said 
that the administration expected 
Israel to free the Lebanese prison- 
ers without waiting lo be asked. 

[His national security affairs ad- 
viser, Robot G McFaiiane, said 
that there was “no fundamental 
change” in tbe hostage situation. 
“There are a lot of actions eping on 
behind (he scenes,” he said. “They 
haven’t congealed yet.”] 

If the Israeli understanding of 
U.S. intentions is correct, it would 
appear that the Reagan administra- 
tion had linked the American hos- 
tages and the Arab prisoners by 
dealing Israel to sit ti ght until tire 
hostages’ safety was guaranteed. 

This might en me through their 
transfer to tire custody of a West- 
ern embassy in Beirut, or to ~ 
Israeli television reported 
day night that such an understand- 
ing had been readied between, tire 
two governments. 

This was denied by some offi- 
cials, but others suggested it was 
more accurate than contradictory 
reports that the United States 
wanted Israel to continue to release 
theprisoDOT in groups. 

The Israeli comments followed 
tire blunt remarks Thursday by a 



Dm Amoved Ran 


Lebanese held by Israel strolling and sitting in a tent at a makeshift prison north of Haifa. 


White House official, as reported 
by The Washington Post, who said 
that the United States expected Is- 
rael to go ahead and free the Leba- 
nese without having to be asked. 

There were no claims here Fri- 
day of a firm agreement between 
the United Slates and Israel. Offi- 
cials spoke in terms of “under- 
standings,** and suggested that the 
degree of contact and coordination 
in tire TWA case has been greater 
than might be evidem. 

From Israeli comments, it ap- 
peared that the key issue now, as 
seen by the Israelis and possibly by 
the United Stales, was whether Na- 
bih Beni, tire leader of the Shiite 
militia Am.il — who is ne gotiating 
on behalf of the hijackers — can 
guarantee the safety of the hos- 
tages. 

“The problem is not Israel,” said 
an official dose to Prime Minister 
Shimo n Peres. “The problem is if 
Nabih Beni can deliver. The Amer- 
ican position is that it should lead. 


and Israel's is a willingness to help. 
There is no Israeli position as 
such." 

It did not appear that a possible 
major role for Syria in resolving tire 
crisis, as reported from Beirut on 
Friday, posed a major problem for 
Israel. 

The Israelis have not objected to 
third parties bring involved in a 
settlement, but have insisted that 
they will deal directly only with (he 
United States. 

The Israeli government has 
pledged to be as helpful as posable 
in the case, but has insisted that it 
■will consider releasing tbe mostly 
Shiite prisoners it holds at the Atht 
prison only in response to a direct 
request from the senior levd of the 
Reagan administration. 

Israeli officials have made dear 
that such a request need not be 
made in a public forum. 

In the meantime, statements to 
the news media — including a 
strong hint earlier this week by 


Vice President George Bush, who 
said the prisoners at Adit were be- 
ing held by Israel in violation of 
international (aw — will not affect 
the Israeli posture, the sources said. 

The visible level of U-S.-lsraeli 
contacts is likely to rise next week 
with the arrival in Washington of 
David Kimche, director general of 
the Israeli Foreign Ministry. 

The Reagan administration has 
vowed not to give in to tire hijack- 
ers’ demands or to pressure Israel 
to free the Lebanese. At the same 
time, the drumbeat of indirect pub- 
lic suggestions and blunt comments 
by anonymous U.S. officials dearly 
increased pressure on Israel. 

Israeli officials said signs of ero- 
sion in support for Israel in US. 
public opinion were “worrisome" 
and “unjustified,” but suggested 
this would be overcome. 

“There has been no permanent 
damage” to Israel's standing in the 
United States, a senior official de- 
clared. 


Helms Says Iran Planned and Financed Hijacking 


r “ ,S ' 




AIDS Death Rate 
fOcer SO% hi US. 


1 "he- Assoaafcd Press 

ATLANTA — A total of 
1 1,271 cases of AIDS, acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome; 
has been reported m the United 
States, and more than half of 
those infected . have died, ac- 
cording to figures released by 
tbe national Centers for Dis- 
ease Control 

The fatality rate this week 
passed the 50-percent mark for 
\ i the first time, with 5,641 deaths 
' Sported since 1978, tire centers 
1 said Thursday. 

No cute has been found for 
'AIDS, and no one has been 
found to have recovered from 
it 


Costa Ricaii Leader 
Rejects Nicaraguan 
Request for DMZ 

The Associated Press 

SAN JOSE Costa Rica — Presi- 
dent Luis Alberto Mriige has re- 
jected a Nicaraguan call to set up a 
demilitarized zone along the two 
nations’ tense border. 

“Costa Rica,” Mr. Monge said 
Thursday, “is a neutral territory, in 
practice always because that has 
been its tradition, and formally 
since Nov. 17, 1983, when it issued 
a proclamation of neutrality in 
conflicts of other notions.” 

Tbe country has not had an army 
since 1948. Security is handled by 
rivfl and rural guards. 

Daniel Ortega Saavedra, presi- 
dent of Nicaragua's leftist govern- 
ment, sent a. letter to Mr. Monge 
renewing his suggestion that a de- 
militarized zone b e established. 

. In recent weeks there have been 
claims of shooting modems across 
tbe border. - . . . . 

' Meanwhile, in Moscow the act- 
ing head of state, VatiHV, Kuznet- 
sov, met Thursday with a Nicara- 
guan delegation, and reiterated 
support for the Sandmists. 


Elizabeth H. Dole 


U.S. Plans 
New Airport 
Regulations 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Press reported from Cork, Ireland. 

The spokesman, who declined to 
be identified, said the wreckage 
was located by HMS Challenger, a 
seabed survey vessel, in waters 120 
miles (193 IriJomeurre) southwest of 
Ireland. 

He said that he did not know 
whether the wreckage might con- 
tain the “black box" flight record- 
ers, vital to detemtmmg whether 
the Boeing 747 was blown up by a 
bomb before it crashed. 

An Indian newspaper reported 
Friday that examinations at toped 
conversations between air control- 
lers and the Air-India flight re- 
vealed “a thud, a muffled bang and 
a fhint shriek” minutes before the 
plane disappeared from radar 
scopes. 

The Times of India, tn a dispatch 
from Cork, said experts believe tbe 
identifiable sounds ‘indicate that 
tbe pilot was trying to convey the 
distress signal moments after the 
emergency arose.” 

Meanwhile, passengers on a Pan 
Am flight from London to New 
York made an unscheduled landing 
Thursday night at Ireland’s Shan- 
non airport after the airline re- 
ceived a bomb threat The passen- 
gers resumed their journey to New 
York on Friday after a seven-hour 
delay, but without their heavy lug- 


By Hedrick Smith 

fifow York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Senator Jes- 
se Helms has asserted that Iran set 
in motion the seizure of the Trans 
World Airlines plane an June 14 
and trained at least one member of 
the original hijacking team. 

In » s tatement inserted Thursday 

in the Congressional Record, the 
North Carolina Republican said 
that All Atwa, a Lebanese Shiite 
Moslem, was flown to Iran on May 
5 and reportedly sport three weeks 
in i 

Tehran- 

On the day of the hijacking at the 
Athens airport, Mr. Atwa was a 
standby passenger and was unable 
to board the airimer. He was arrest- 
ed by the Greek authorities after 
his two colleagues had hijacked the 
plane, but later was flown to Al- 
giers to join the hijackers in ex- 
change for some of the passengers 
aboard the TWA plane. 

Mr. Helms said that, according 
to information gathered by his 
staff, rate Iranian camp where Mr. 
Aiwa was trained had Boeing 727 
and 747 airliners parked on a run- 
way to familiarize (he hijacker- 
tramees with cabin layout and con- 
trols. Mr. Helms described the 
other camp as “a special training 
center for suicide squads.” 

According to the senator, Mr. 
Atwa was aboard an Ir ani an C-130 
Hercules plane that took officials 
of Iran's Revolutionaiy Guards to 
Damascus on June 8 or 9. 

“By June 10, it is believed that 
the Iranian officials were in Baal- 
beck working on the actual logistics 


•X*> 

4^- 


RM*r* 


AH Atwa 


op- 
eration,” Mr. Helms said. Four 
days later the hijacking occurred. 

Mr. Helms said that the princi- 
pal reason for recruiting Mr. Atwa 
for the hijacking was that his broth- 
er, Abdullah, was killed during an 
Israeli military operation near Si- 
don in son urern Lebanon in 
March. 

Reagan administration officials 
have said that there are close con- 


nections between Iran and the Shi- 
ite extremists who are believed to 
have had a role in the hijacking. 
But officials said they could not 
confirm or deny that Iran actually 
had ordered the hijacking or that 
Mr. Atwa had been trained in Iran. 

“The elements involved in this 
hijacking have Iranian* connec- 
tions,” one official said. “But we 
don’t have specific evidence that 
Iran said, Go ahead on this.’ ” 

Mr. Helms, a ranking member of 
the Foreign Relations Committee, 
said his information was based on 
his staff's monitoring of develop- 
ments in Iran. Lebanon and Syria 
in recent months, especially in the 
last right weeks. Aides said they 
had maintained contacts with Ira- 
nian, Lebanese and other Moslem 
sources in the United States and 
overseas. 

Based on this information, Mr. 
Helms described what be said was 
tbe “infrastructure of terrorism” 
established by Iran's ruler. Ayatol- 
lah Ruhollah Kh omeini, through- 
out the Middle East 

He said that if the reports reach- 
ing his staff were accurate, tbe Ira- 
nian government had designated 
June 14 as the “Day of Jerusalem,” 
to be marked especially by Shiite 
■ Moslems. 

Mr. Helms asserted that more 
than $30 million had been trans- 
ferred from Iran to Lebanese Su- 
ites in the weeks just before the 
TWA hijacking. 

He said that the Iranian Martyrs 
Foundation was the channel for the 
funds. The agency's chairman. 
Mahdi Karrubi, visited Lebanon 
twice, in early and in late May, Mr. 


Helms said, for meetings with pro- 
Iranian Lebanese defies in Beirut 
and Baalbeck. in eastern Lebanon. 

The senator said that Iran’s par- 
liament had appropriated the 
equivalent of S65 million for the 
Martyrs Foundation and that Mr. 
Karrubi had transferred “at least 
half of the money to the local radi- 
cals. leaving the other half with the 
I ranian ambassador in Damascus.” 

An Iranian radio broadcast, re- 
porting on a visit by Mr. Kanubito 
Lebanon, described the Martyrs 
Foundation as an agency that pro- 
rides welfare and employment for 
the families of those who have died 
in the Suite cause. U.S. officials 
say they beheve that the families of 
Lebanese terrorists get funds from 
the foundation. 


DIAMONDS 



YOUR BEST BUY 

Single diamonds at wholesale prices 
by ordering direct from Antwerp; 
the world's mon imports iu t cut- 
diamond market. Give ’diamonds 
to the ones you love, buy Tor 
investment, for Jour enjoyment. 
IT rite airmail for free price list 
nr call us: 

Joachim Go Ide nstein 
dzamantexpoTt 
aiablhhad 1928 

P.Ukuiwtnal62, B-2018 AntweipJ 
Belgium -TeL: (323)334*07.51. 
TeteH 71779 nib. 
at the Diamond Club Bldg. 



Tax Rise May Be Necessity, Stockman Says 


(Continued from Page 1) 

and downright dishonesty in our 
budget numbers, debate and advo- 
cacy." 

Mr. Stockman said that until the 
White House and the Republican 
leadership of the Senate settled 
upon a budget proposal that would 
reduce the fiscal 1986 deficit by £56 
billion, “oar side had not come 
dean on holding die line on taxes.” 

He added that in the matter of 
“honesty in accounting, we have 
not come entirely dean." He said 
the Senate budget “rests on some 
pretty optimistic assumptions 
about the path of our economy 
over the next three years — namely 
4 percent average growth over the 
next 14 quarters, inflation where it 
is and a steady descent of interest 


rates to 55 percent on Treasury 
bills by 1988 ” 

If the administration and the 
Senate used the consensus figures 
of the 50 economists who 
their forecasts to Blue Chip In 
tors, a newsletter, the growth figure 
would be L9 percent, Mr. Stock- 
man said, and inflation and interest 
rales would be higher. 

He was harsher on the House’s 
budget proposal Like the Senate's, 
it shows $56 billion in deficit reduc- 
tion in fiscal 1986, but it shows 
email pt reductions than the Sen- 
ate's in subsequent years and con- 
tains still mere questionable calcu- 
lations than the Senate's. 

And in maintaining nearly oil 
domestic programs that the Rea g an 
administration would eliminate or 
reduce, Mr. Stockman said, the 
House would cut only 510 billion 


from a domestic budget of $600 
billion. 

■ House, Senate Deadlocked 
House and Senate negotiators 
talked Thursday about tbe 1986 
budget, but left for a 10-day recess 
without breaking the deadlock over 
the cost-of-living increase in Social 
Security benefits that had stymied 
talks on Tuesday. They are sched- 
uled to talk again after the recess. 
The New York Times reported 
from Washington. 


_ O’Shea, the airport opera- 
tions manager, said a relief {done 
was flown to Shannon from Lon- 
don to allow them to continue their 
trip to New York. 


Swedes, Danes Propose 
Car Bridge, Bail Tunnel 

Reuters 

STOCKHOLM —Swedish and 

Danish rrffirfrls recommended Fri- 
day that a motor-vehicle bridge be 
buflt between Mahno and Copen- 
hagen across the OrcsmuL 
Also, a rail tunnd linking Hefc- 
ingborg and Elsinore, further 
north, was proposed The total cost 
would be $640 nnffion- 


SC/ 

■l A N N E L 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE CDMMNJE5 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 

“Europe's Best View' 


PROGRAM. SATURDAY 29th JUNE UK TIMES 


7200 STANLEY CUP ICE HOCKEY 
7305 ALL STAR WRESTLING 
UOO INT. MOTOR SPORTS 
ISOO SKY TRAX \ 

1545 SKY TRAX 2 
1&30 SKY TRAX 3 
7730 THRLLSEERERS 


1800 CHOPPER SCKJAO 
1830 STARSKY HUTCH 
7940 ALL STAR WRESTLING 
2035 CITY WITHOUT MEN 
2135 SKY TRAX 


SKY CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING SBULS PRODUCTS FAST - 
FOR MORE INFORMATION, RATES, MARKETING a 
AUDIENCE DATA CONTACT SKY CHANNEL SALES, 
SWAN HOUSE. 17-19 STRATFORD PLACE. LONDON WIN 9AF 
TBj LONDON (01) 493 1166 TELEX: 268395. 




FINE 

HAVANA 

CIGARS 

DAVUXHT 
MONTOCUSnO 
H.UPMANN 
ROMEO YJUUETA 
BOLIVAR 
PUNCH 

and nay oAer tund- 


Sned fa Mr HAVANA 
ROOM ai the ideal 

temper ft lore and In 
tuitocitficcl 

ARo ndfac uc apa 
am, hankfag 

and a fade OOP a t 


IkIMU&a 

iS SL Jam^ Surd. 
Laden &W.I. 
THephanc 
01-4303079. 



Qunrtz uxuch in 18 c r. gold set with diamonds. 
Awifoble trith various dials and bracelets. 


B V LG A R I 

10 VIA DEI CONDOTTl ■ ROMA 
HOTEL PIERRE NEW YORK 
30, RUE DU RHONE 1204 GENEVE 
AVENUE DES BEAUX-ARTS MONTE CARLO 
HOTEL PLAZA-ATHENEE PARIS 













irrjrasg- 



Page 4 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc. 


PaWWKd Whli TT*e Iwi 7W» #nd The WfcOimgtoa Pwl 


Spy Detectors Unlimited 


! The House of Representatives has ap- 
proved, 333-71, a measure that many of the 
333 and most of the 71 knew could not achieve 
its goal The measure was a broad grant of 
authority to the Pentagon to administer lie 
detector tests. The goal is to detect spies before 
they can do the bind of damage allied to have 
been done in the Walker case. But Congress 
must think harder about the means. 

It is accepted that lie detector tests have 
some role in keeping secrets. The Central In- 
telligence Agency and National Security 
Agency routinely administer them to their em- 
ployees. and to an extent dial cannot be 
Imown the tests, or die threat of tests, may 
have prevented some spying. Polygraph test- 
ing, its proponents admit, is less than 100 
percent reliable. Lie detectors detect not Iks 
but stress. Skillful liars, presumably including 
some spies, can fool the machines. The results 
of the tests are not admissible in court 
■ So the weapon the House proposes to rely 
on is faulty, moreover, its aim is imprecise. 
What is needed is not authority for fallible new 


methods to test four million Pentagon and 
defense-contractor employees, but a focus on 
the far smaller number with access to impor- 
tant secrets. Powerful institutional incentives 
exist to classify far too much material as secret 
and to clear far too many people to see it Ibis 
makes protection of real secrets more difficult. 

One suggestion is to use a method applied 
by the Office of Management and Budget in 
domestic government: put hard limits on the 
number of employees to be granted security 
clearances and on the amount of material to be 
classified. This would cause a lot of grousing 
and might lead to some wrong decisions. Bat 
under the present system a man such as John 
Walker Jr„ with access to genuine secrets, 
evidently escaped ail scrutiny from the time he 
first was granted his clearance until he finally 
was implicated by family members. Authoriz- 
ing the already overworked Pentagon security 
apparatus to give lie detector tests to four 
million people blurs any focus on the much 
smaller number of potential spies. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Cattle Show Begins 


A Cornered Europe Shows a WiU to Survive 


p ARIS — After a decade of dol- 


drums, members of the Europe- 
an Community are worried enough 
about their future to seek new mo- 
mentum. Already, though, high ex- 
pectations for this weekend’s sum- 
mit meeting in Milan have sagged. 

Thane is not much chance yet of 
rewriting the Treaty of Rome into a 
much tighter charter fora real Euro- 
pean Union, as has been discussed 
for so long. More modest moves are 
likely to try to overcome the many 
remaining barriers to internal trade 
and to restrain the egotism of states. 

Still, there has been a change in 
the wind. For the first time in years, 
the issue among the leaders is not 


By Flora Lewis 


the EC. 


about extracting money from each 
other but about how to d 


develop the 
great potential that Europe has but 
cannot pull hself together to use. 

And for the first time, they will be 
a round dozen. Portugal and Spain 
do not become members until Jan. 
1, but they win attend as observers. 
The Community is reaching its full 
proportions, 320 million people, 
more than the United States or the 
Soviet Union. The prospect is reviv- 
ing almost-forgotten hopes of creat- 
ing a vital new world power. 


No one denies that the impetus is 
fear. It is the fear of proud nations, 
once masters of global empires, that 
they will be left behind to stagnate 
and founder in a fast-moving world. 
The danger of irreversible decline 
such as others have faced in history 
is seen looming ahead. 

For the Europeans, the spur is 
not the dankmg, armor-plated So- 
viet Union. It is the innovative 
United States, hard-selling Japan, 
the busily productive countries that 
have moved from underdeveloped 
to highly competitive in a genera- 
tion. The fear is of missing the third 
Industrial Revolution- 

President Reagan’s Strategic De- 
fense Initiative focused minds in a 
way he never intended and no one 
foresaw. It seems to foreshadow a 
vast new technological spurt to 
overturn economies. 

European interest in it is not 
about snooting down missiles, but 
about penetrating markets, saving 
jobs, keeping scientists. Whether 
they admi t u or not, the French 
hope their Eureka project will mobir 
lire Europeans for their own indus- 


trial purposes. Four big companies 

from four countries have just agreed 

to join in h. 

There is a long way for them to 


go, and they are coating to realize 
mat 


that imprecisely bccausethey 
sd to complete 


have failed to complete their Com- 
mon Market An American high- 
technology expert points out that 
European companies make 10 dif- 
ferent types of tdeoomnumications 
switches and spend'a quarter of 
their programmers' time on it, when 

only two or three switches and less 
than half the time in a combined 
effort would mean profitability. 

These facts of modem life inev- 
itably collide with national politics, 
- stfn chugging along at the old pace. 
Tbe political tendency has been to 
look inward, to bold on to the bird 
in the hand and let (hose in the bush 


go their own way. 

A dear sign of the apposing tugs 
has come with the formation of toe 


has come with the formation 
“Action Committee for Europe.*’ It 
is a deliberate repetition of the com- 
mittee established by the late Jean 
Monnet, who used it as a weapon to 
lobby, chivy and shove tbe Euro- 


peans into creating 

The nostalgia is redolent. Some 
of the people arc the same. The 
secretary is Max Kohnstamm, the 
venerable Dutchman who was a 
loyal Monnet aide. The formula is 
the same: leaders of labor, business 
and politics who are ready to use 
their influence behind scenes to 
move governments. They met m 
Bonn earlier this month and issued 
an appeal to the Milan summit con- 
ference "to give back to the Com- 
munity Strength and confidence 
in its future.'' 

This is inmoruuu. It creates a 
constituency for hard decisions. It is 
■lot revealing t hat businessmen and 
labor officials are much more 
strongly represented on the com- 
mittee than politicians. 

These are the first signs that Eu- 
rope is producing, the wiU to pick 
itself up as it did after the 
war. The difficulties also show 1 how 
hard it is for nations, even friendly 
ones, to cooperate for joint benefit- 
But they can when it is painfully 
clear that there is no other way. Tbe 
future depends on seeing clearly be- 
fore there is too much pain. 

The New York Times. 


Ignoring 1 
Economic! 


Warnings 


Bv Jeff Faux 


WASHINGTON - The ftp. 


notate debate absorbing'- 
Washington is dangerously nano*,' 
While (he president, the Grom*' 
and the media arc preoccupied 

budget-cutting And tax trade-off^ 
few are giving serious attention rothc 
economic warning signals flashing 
"trouble ahead." : • : 

The chances of a recession occurs 
ring in the near future have risen 


or. 


Inaneicdoivnlum, 
Americauould face a 
Catch-22 situation. 


Has the 1 988 presidential campaign already 
begun? Sad to say, there is evidence it has. The 
first votes are to be cast at the Republican 
county conventions in Michigan in January 
1988. Already potential candidates are scour- 
ing Michigan for support But the deadline is 
even earlier than it seems, for the 10,000 pre- 
cinct delegates entitled to vote at the state's 83 
county conventions are to be elected in the 
August 1 986 primary. To get your name on the 
ballot as a candidate for precinct delegate, you 
have to file signatures with the clerk in June 
1986 —less than a year from now. 

This deadline transformed last weekend’s 
Republican Midwest leadership conference in 
Grand Rapids. Michigan, into the first cattle 
show of the 1988 campaign. Trooping into the 
Am way Plaza, just across the river from the 
Gerald R. Fond Museum, were Vice President 
George Bush and Representative Jack Kemp, 
Senator Robert Dole and Former Governor 
Pierre du Pont of Delaware. We will spare you 
speculation about which candidate got the 
support of the Shiawassee County chairman 
and bow many judgeship hopefuls attended a 


reception for another candidate. Long before 
we can even guess the challenges that wiO face 
the next president, the campaign has begon. 

Must we add that this is preposterously 
early? We are sympathetic to any state that is 
ready to challenge Iowa’s and New Hamp- 
shire's claims to be the first to vote for presi- 
dent, and Michigan certainly is larger and 
arguably more typical of the nation than the 
other two. We suppose a focus on Michigan 
will force candidates to take blood oaths to 
help the auto industry, but then Iowa requires 
them to swear never to order a grain embargo. 

The greater defect here is giving the vote to 
people elected two years before a party’s na- 
tional convention. This is one of those absurd 


Terror, Live at 5: Are the Media Part of the Problem? 


A Want, a Need, to Know 


tics that the Democrats were wise enough to 
get rid of and the Republicans should not 
revive. If Michigan Republicans want to out- 
flank ihedr copartisans in Iowa and New 
Hampshire, fine. Just let them begin their 
process in the same calendar year as the elec- 
tion, not two years before. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Sabbath Decision 


N EWSPAPERS face a difficult task in dealing 
with events such as the hijacking of TWA 
Flight 847. The terrorists' goals include publicity 
for their causes and demands, but by their actions 
they are also malting news, and people grab eagerly 
for derails. Newspapers have had calls from read- 
ers who cannot wait for the next day’s paper, other 
people keep their radios on all night- 
The enormity of the deed has commandeered 
tbe public's attention; how could the media turn 
off the cameras, put away the microphones and tefl 
reporters to step aside and wait patiently until the 
final act Is over? The question answers itself. 

We want to continue reading about what is 
happening, what is being done to bring the hos- 
tages’ release. We want most of all to read that they 
are safe and ready to resume useful lives. Then we 
will want lo know what is being done to the 
perpmraiors, what is bring done to prevent a 
repetition. But a blackout now, while it would turn 
off the klieg lights shining on the terrorists, would 
also deprive us of information about the welfare of 
the hostages, and this we need to know. 

— Sam Zagpria, Washington Past ombudsman. 


QKH-HKEPT PQR 
lUfiKUSWlBSI 


In striking down a Connecticut law that let 
any employee take off from work on his cho- 
sen Sabbath, the Supreme Court has drawn a 
useful line between yielding to the demands of 
religious interests and accommodating them. 
The derision gives hope that rulings like the 
approval of a city-sponsored Nativity display 
were momentary lapses from the role of strict 
government neutrality on religious matters. 

Connecticut's unusual law guaranteed every 
employee tbe right to designate a personal 
Sabbath. That forced employers to give them 
the day off, regardless of tbe effect on the 
business or on co-workers who did not invoke 
religious duty. The law was an innocent out- 
growth of the Legislature's derision a decade 
ago to abolish Sunday dosing laws. Under- 
standably worried that devout Christians 
would be forced to work Sundays against their 
will, and solicitous also of those who observe a 
different Sabbath, the Legislature let every 
employee make an individual choice of a guar- 
anteed day of nest. But that forced some citi- 
zens to bold to others' religious demands. 

Tbe 8- to- 1 decision to this effect is encour- 


aging because the court recently showed signs 
of looking for more ways to ‘'accommodate" 
religion. Connecticut and the Justice Depart- 
ment argued that the state law was just such an 
accommodation, but the court correctly saw it 
as a religious command. As Chief Justice War- 
ren Burger wrote, "Government must guard 
against activity that impinges on religious free- 
dom, and must take pains not to compel peo- 
ple to act in the name of any religion." 

A truer model of accommodation lies in the 
federal civil rights law. which calls on employ- 
ers "to reasonably accommodate" employee 
Sabbath preferences if that can be done "with- 
out undue hardship on the conduct of the 
employer’s business.” 

Americans do not always live up to their 
constitutional tradition of religious tolerance. 
They sometimes show insufficient regard for 
the religious sensibilities of others. But rigid 
laws Like Connecticut’s will not foster under- 
standing, and they send the wrong message, of 
government partisanship. Neutrality best- 
keeps faith with the Constitution. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Distant, Useless Knowledge 



sharply. For the last year, the unept. - V 
ployment rate (now 7,3 percent) 
been virtually motionless, and in Sep- - 
icmber the current recovery will be 33- - 
months old the average duration 
of all recoveries since the end of *■. 
World War II. Already a slowdown ’ 
in the first halT of 1985 has led i noSt 
economic forecasters to reduce euj. 
mates of future growth. 

No matter bow the budget -cutting 
and tax-reform debates arc resolved, 
neither will be of much help in deal- 
ing with a stalled economy. Indeed, 
in the short run both factors could 
hurt. Cutting a deficit draws money 
out of circulation; doing it when eco- #■- 
nonne growth is slowing down could/ . . 
be a recipe for recession. The uncer- 
tainty caused by a long debate over 
tax-code revisions, coupled with the 
certainty that any significant reform 
will depress some sectors (such as 
homing), will also tend to damped 
short-term economic growth. 

If a downturn does begin soon, the 
United States will be caught in a 
Catch-22 situation. Since Wodd War 
(I, Americans have been able to 
spend their way out of recessions — 
including the last one — by increas- 
ing the deficit and lowering interest 
rates. But the high and persistent def- 
icits of recent years have frightened 
the public, tbe press and most politi- 
cians into makin g deficit reduction - 
the No. 1 economic policy goal. A of, 
the Federal Reserve Board masts cm 
reducing the deficit before h will fur- 
ther lower interest rates. 

Slower growth, which also slows 
tax revenues, is already creating a 


M ARSHALL McLUHAN observed that 
primitive peoples may be better equipped 
for the communications revolution than highly 
intellectual peoples. CS. Lewis, who somehow was 
both highly intellectual and stubbornly primitive, 
refused to read newspapers. He was convinced that 
they unnaturally ana banefuliy engage our sympa- 
thies on behalf of remote people we can do nothing 
to help. We were given the power of compassion in 
order to help our neighbors, he contended, and 
only frustrated our better selves by getting worked 
up over the fates of strangers beyond our power to 
assist Lewis had a point Why should so many of 
us be hanging on tbe TV for the latest interim 
report on a few dozen people we can't do anything 
for? Who benefits from this monstrous maufistri- 
bution of attention except the criminals? 

— Syndicated columnist Joseph Sobrrn. 


not, and should not be, the i 
of the First Amendment to the Constitution. 

The Reagan administration has promoted a 
good deal of grumbling over TV coverage of the 
hostage crisis. But its "Mephistophelean bargain” 
with the tube (in Godfrey Hodgson’s term) has 
been the meet eager in our history. An administra- 
tion with so much frith in going, via television, 
over the heads of government ana media middle- 
men to "the people” can hardly complain when the 
it usually s 


monster 


ly strokes develops a bite. 

— Syndicated columnist Edwin M. Yoder Jr. 


But there is do imperative is terrorism that dictates 
the kind and amount of television coverage it gets. 

What would more responsible coverage look 
like? It would require a sense of perspective. It 
would be less extensive and repetitive and would 
give less air time to tire terrorists themselves. It 
would also avoid interviews with so-called experts 
who second-guess the government and with family 
members who sometimes blurt out information 
that endangers their captive relatives. 

— Stephen Klaidman, a senior research fellow a 


For Greater Self-Restraint 


the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georget* 
~ YorkTu. 


University, writing in The New York ' 


own 

ones 


DO the networks cover terrorism the 


Two Edges to the Sword 


Other Opinion 


Slender Hopes for Milan 


The outlook for (the European Community 
summit meeting inj Milan is worse than it 
looked after the Brussels summit in March. 
Optimism over reform has waned and a whole 
string of other topics will cut into a 10-cor- 
nercd discussion of only a few hours. The need 
for progress has grown visibly since Brussels. 
From next year when the Iberians join, there 
will be 12 viewpoints to reconcile; and there is 
growing pressure from America on a number 
of fronts such as the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive and tbe threat of a food-dumping war. The 
add test of the will to European unification 
remains majority voting. It entails the partial 
surrender of that national sovereignty which, 
in capitals like London, seems to gain in im- 
portance as its reality in the world of the 
superpowers shrivels before our eyes. In Mi- 
lan, then, blessed are they who expect nothing 


for they shall not be disappointed. Hope, how- 
ever, is free as usual. 


— The Guardian (London). 


Desperation in El Salvador 


The terroristic machine-gun attack by guer- 
rillas that left 13 people dead — six of them 
Americans — at an outdoor San Salvador cafe 
is a savage act of desperation, more evidence 
that the leftist rebels are impatient with the 
lack of progress in their campaign to take over 
the country. Spraying gunfire into a crowd is 
not likely to win hearts or minds; it does 
inspire fear. Whether the terror was aimed at 
the American victims we cannot say. What is 
dear is that the world must not grow used to 
this terror. The terror must end. but never 
on the terrorists' terms. 


H OW FAR should media self-disriptine go? 

Should tbe press play censor at the source, 
and if so when? Should television blot out Nablh 
Beni's news conferences, or conceal the anguish of 
the hostages’ families? Certainly Vietnam and Wa- 
tergate discredited the assumption that govern- 
ment knows what it is doing and would do it well if 
only the press kept its big nose out of it. 

True, television is about as capable of self- 
discipline in its chase after good footage as a dog is 
in chasing a rabbit. True also, television changes 
the terms of political action and discussion. It has 
helped arm puny mini-states and terrorist rings 
with the capacity to disrupt the composure and 
injure the pride of great powers. But this nuisance 
capacity can be turned into a fundamental threat 
only by inflated talk, panic and oveneaction. 

Ithid de Sola Pool of the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology has observed that every new 
communications technology has aroused the cen- 
sorial instinct. But deference to tbe censors’ fears is 


w way they do? Largely for commercial reasons. 
Their coverage is driven by ratings, not news 
judgment. Television executives understand that 
the public responds to the underlying tensions of 
hostage situations, but the situations themselves 
are fairiy static after the first few days. According- 
ly, there are few dramatic developments to tape 
and put on tbe air. So the networks try to expand 
tbe news to fill the excessive time allotted. 

The need to fill air time has several unfortunate 
effects. It tends to exaggerate tbe importance of an 
event And it may encourage dwelling on historical 
analogies that may be mainly false, such as the 
comparison being drawn between the current situ- 
ation and the Iranian hostage crisis. 

Excessive and distorted coverage can frustrate 
policy-makers and limit their options. There was 
no good reason to allow Nabih Bern to appear 
regularly on network television, communicating 
his demands himself to die American public. The 
U.S. ambassador to Lebanon, Reginald Bartholo- 
mew, has had a particularly close relationship to 
Mr. Bern and could have negotiated with him in 
private — probably to much better effect. 

Some may argue that the real problem is the 
nature of terrorism, not the nature of television. 


Inspiring Needed Outrage 


national product for 1985 now pre- 
dicted by tem forecasters will add 
about $20 billion extra to the govern- 
ment’s debt. To prevent tbe economy 
from tumbling into recession, interest 
rates will have to be lowmed in the 
face of still higher deficits, or deficits 
will have to be deliberately increased 
further in order to put growing num- 
bers of tbe jobless back to work. ; 

Tbe difficulty is compounded ip. 
mushrooming trade problems. Sir^ , 
last summer, industrial production 
has been stagnant while imports havp 
siphoned off the market lor goods. 
Despite the fall in interest rates, the , 
dollar remains strong. And hopes 
that the United States could arrest -• 



his foot like Rmnpdstihskin, crying out his iaes- 
sage of “no deals, no negotiations, no coverage” 
and retaliation when its over. And like Rumpd- 
stfltskin, he finally stamped so hard he put his foot 
through tbe floor. 

It happened the other night during an . 
ance with the talk-show tost Ted KoppeL’ The 
former secretary of state was, once again, l 
tbe news media for giving a platform to terrorists 
and hijackers, particularly in a news conference 
given by the Lebanese minister Nabih Beni that 
disintegrated into rngby-fidd chaos. 

"If the Nazis had invited networks to Auschwitz 
to watch people marching off to gas chambers, 
would it be appropriate news coverage to cover 
that?” he asked, opening up the floor beneath him. 

Had they -had tbe chance, responded Mr. Kop- 
pd, tbe networks "abselmdy" should have shown 
Auschwitz. "Can you imagine what the outrage of 
the world would have been if it had seen live 
television pictures of what was going on there?” 

— Syndicated columnist Mary McGrory. 


lions equipment have proved naive;’ 

Reaganomics has no answer forthp 
trade deficit. Neither do the Demo- 
crats, who last year abandoned some 
promising industrial-policy propoa- > 
ais to help capital and labor become 
more competitive. " 

Finally, the banking systematic 
totters. Debtor countries and.thar 
creditors averted disaster this year 
primarily by raising exports to the 
United States. But the trade balances 
of scone of tbe largest — Argentina 
Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela and others 
— are shrinking a gain- An 
downturn in America could wipoou A 


Gandhi and the Sikhs: After the Crash, a Narrow Road 


most vulnerable debtor nations 
the world financial structure nrtb 
chaos. It could also wipe oat atiritd 
of American savings and loan associ- 
ations, which are technically bank- 
rupt or very dose to bankruptcy. ^ 
The deficit, the erosion of the UJSl 
trade balance, and the fragility of die 
ba nking system are all fundamoufil 
problems of economic manw 


— The Seattle Post-Intelligencer. 


FROM OUR JUNE 29 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


N EW YORK — There is increas- 
ing agreement that a bomb de- 
stroyed Air-India’s Flight 182 off the 
Irish coast, but we may never know 
whether the Boeing 747 was blown up 
by Sikh militants, as some of them 
reportedly have claimed. Yet, in the 


By Pranay Gupte 


1910: A Platform for U.S. Democrats 
LONDON — Thomas F. Ryan. New York 
financier, arrived here [on June 28}. To a 
Herald correspondent. Mr. Ryan said: "Busi- 
ness in the United States is good and if the 
politicians will let it alone the country will take 
care of itself. The Republican Party is breaking 
up. Were it not for Mr. {Theodore) Roosevelt's 
popularity with the masses the Democrats 
could elect a President in 1912. What would 
the issues be of the Democrais? First, stop 
malting business subservient to political ambi- 
tion: adjust the tariff in the interest of and for 
the benefit of all the .American people instead 
of for a comparatively small number, rigid 
economy in the expenditures of the Govern- 
ment: upbuilding of the navy till it is superior 
to those of any two nations put together.” 


1935: U.S. Envoy fe Jeered in Dublin 
DUBLIN — The journey of Alvin Mansfield 
Owsley, new American Minister w the Irish 
Free State, from the .American Legation to 
Dublin Castle {on June 27] to present his 
credentials to President Eamon de Valera, was 
marred by a demonstration by scores of Com- 
munists. As Mr. Owsley's car, escorted by 
cavalry, approached the entrance to ihe castle 
at Cork Hill here, a group of Reds tried to rush 
it in order lo shower the American envoy with 
leaflets demanding the release of Tom Moo- 
ney. the veteran labor leader imprisoned in 
California. While Mr. Owsley, former Minister 
to Romania, proceeded through the streets, 
other Communists passed among the crowds 
and distributed leaflets headed: "No welcome 
to Mr. Owsley! Release Tom Mooney!” 


minds of many Indians, the 329 men, 
children on the Ton 


women and children on the Toronto- 
Bombay flight were victims of a 
stepped-up global effort aimed at de- 
stabilizing their democracy. I fear 
that the prospect of a reasonably ear- 
ly resolution of India's most presang 
problem — the Punjab, where Sikh 
separatists haw bets agitating to es- 
tablish a theocratic state called Kha- 
listan — may have also disappeared 
with Flight 182, 


La a perfect world, Sikhs would be 
thebe 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


Katharine graham, william s. paley, arthur ochs Sulzberger 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
Walter wells 

SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEW1RTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Puhtohx 

Execane Editor RENE BONDY Dcpun Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Asgoaoh: Publisher 

Dtpm RICHARD H. MORGAN PMsfZ 

riyon Editor STEPHAN W, CONAWAY Dmaor H Optmumi 
Aupcurt EJuor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS DireaarN^Sm 

I ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertising. Sates 

iniaruuciu! Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charies-dt-GaiiHe. 92200 NeuiDv-sur-Srint 
France TeL: (1)747-1:65. Tdfii; 612718 (Heraldl. Cables Herald Paris. ISSN/Q?M<S:. 

Dmeaeur de kt puHianum: Waiter S’. Timer. 

2 A' 3 t **?%**? Nang Kong TeL 5.285*18. 7W« 6ll?0. 

oST® TeL Tdex 262009. 

wn Mgr- " German W. LaeabadL Fncdnda e. 15, tQQOFnaikfiinJM. TL ffl6W26755 71t 

” AKn P ta ”- RttTmfr Sceoni-ciaB postage paid at Long Island Cm. NY. IllQi 
C 1985 . Imammai Herald Tribune. AH rights reserved ‘ 



given the benefit erf the doubt There 
is no hard evidence of their responsi- 
bility. And tbe plane carried Indians 
of many ethnic backgrounds. But In- 
dia's majority Hindus already are in- 
flamed by attacks by Sikh terrorists 
against ptople in New Delhi and in 
tbe Punjab: they see the Sikh separat- 
ist problem as threatening the very 
fabric of nationhood. They were re- 
markably restrained after the recent 
incident largely because of pre-emp- 
tive measures taken by the Indian 
government — a marked contrast to 
the bloodbath against innocent Sikhs 
in northern India after the assassina- 
tion last October of Prime Minister 
Indira Gandhi by Sikh bodyguards. 

But now Mrs. Gandhi's son and 
successor, Rajiv Gandhi, will be un- 
der fresh pressure to adopt a hard line 
toward the Punjab and the Sflchg , 
During his recent visit to the United 
Stares, he impressed many as a man 
who seemed determined to bring 
about a negotiated, democratic settle- 
ment to the problem and to other 
regional disputes. For example. Mr. 
Gandhi had assured President Junius 


R. Jayawardene of neighboring Sri 
Lanka that India would not encour- 
age separatists who wanted an inde- 
pendent Tamil stale in the northern 
part of that small island nation. The 
Sri I.ar\kans had long suspected that 
Tamil separatists received sanctuary 
and succor in India. I think Mr, Gan- 
dhi recognized the implications of Sri 
Lanka’s irredentist movement for his 
own country — for the Punjab, for 
Kashmir, for Assam. 

Bui the airline disaster has pulled 
Prime Minister Gandhi's Punjab 
problem back into the international 
limelight. It raises the question of 
whether his strategy of tackling the 
Punjab issue through negotiation and 
good will is irrelevant in the face of 
stepped-up terrorism. And the epi- 
sode suggests a fresh challenge to tbe 
government's capacity to provide se- 


curity to its own people. India has 
long prided itself on us liberal de- 
mocracy; it is almost alone among 
me big nations of tire Third Wodd in 
not bernga “security state.” Will that 
change? Will Mr. Gandhi be forced 
to demand a curtailing of liberties in 
the name of national security? 

During his visit to the United 
Stales, be was reported to be coming 
around to the view that, contrary to 
his earlier assertion and to the belief 
of some of his advisers, America was 
not colluding with Pakistan-based 
Sikh separatists. But he nevertheless 
ex press ed concern over the Khaliflan 
movement’s being largely financed 
by wealthy Sikh expatriates and their 
American supporters. And he knows 
that some KnaHs tani leaders find 
sympathetic ears in Congress. 

Pnme Minister Gandhi’s cbaBaig e 


lies in resisting renewed calls among 
some inflnential Hindu politicians 
for a tougher stand against the Sikhs 
Hie must stay on the course he had 
decided on — negotiations with Sikhs 
over genuine economic and political 
grievances in the Puqab. He will be 
tempted to conclude that peaceful 
solutions arc now out of the question. 
His mother met the threat of Sikh, 
separatism by closing off most ave- 
nues of political compromise and by 
centralizing derision-making. Bat 
Mr. Gandhi must issue a fresh appeal 
to tbe “Indian” in Sikhs and non- 
Sikhs alike and convert this tragedy 
into an opportunity to fashion a new 
1 sense of Indianness. 


to which neither traditional 
nor conservatives have satisfectoty 
answers. Nor is the public being pre* ' 
pared for dramatic; perhaps Draconi- 


an, measures that may be necessary 
when the next crisis hits- 



na 


Laissez-faire rhetoric notwitfir 
standing, bank bail outs show. 
Washington will expand its 
intervention when major institute 

are threatened. Yet policy-makers 

neither developing alternative strate- 
gies nor addressing the constitution- 
al, social and political issues that fm"*' **- 
ther interventions would raise. * 
While Mr. Reagan and tbe Demti- « 
mats squabble over taxes and daft- 
cits, few leaders seem concerned wifli 
the larger issue of new growth. ;, >: 


Hll-' . 

-v r > V:i 

K tb i 


U* 

..*»!' 


by 

t> ' : . 


The writer. 


corre- 

Nm York Times, is 
author of the forthcoming book “Ven- 
geance: India After the Assassination 
of Indira Gandhi." 


The writer is president of the Etxy - 
nomic Polity Institute, a research or- 
ganization, and co-author (with- Gar _ 
AJperovitz) of “Rebuilding America!?.. 
He amtrtbuted this comment Ifr The 
New York Tones. - 


IK- ' 

fi ? . 
J|V " 


\r- . 

.I*”'--' 

v. ‘ 


«*.<*• 


;trf ' 


V 

w'i: 





uh:.- • 
•he '• - ' 

it. 1 ■? 


jr.:\v 
■i - 


S'-'--’ ' 


\.’u: ■ 

■ 

hv.r." 
jf-ir -■ 


•ACT-. • 

I;-- 


Iv--- " 

JIU.I- 

tiu: 

more. 

oi.*:;:' 

lb- 

:: 

Mi: 


ra : .• 


urz-. 



■■ • ‘ i; . V: i: Is: 

- r; -J? 








UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 




Anti-Terror Tactics 


In response to the opinion column 
-Time for a Convention Against Ter- 
rorism ” (June 25) by Flora Lewis ; 

If “any country that refuses to ago 
and apply the rules [of an interna- 
tional convention against terrorism] 
would brand itself a supporter of ter- 
rorism for all the worm to see,” what 
can we infer about the United States 
from its failure to sign the interna- 
tional convention on genocide? 

Terrorism does not take place in a 
social, political or economic vacuum. 
State terrorism begets injustice and 
injustice breeds terrorism. Until the 
two superpowers cease sponsoring 
criminals in the name of ideology 
(read: geopolitics and economics), no 


piece of paper, signed or unsigned, is 
going to make tbe world safe. 

JEFFREY L. SELBIN. 

Paris. 


to 


'Greece Reasserts Plan 
Bases” (June 24): 

Prime Minister Andreas Papan- 
dieou has triumphantly announced 
to the Greek parliament that he wO] 


Western attitude and would save the 
United States from further bumilia- 
tion. it might also have a beneficial 
effect oa other countries from whom 
the United States leases bases. 

Edward wells. 

Marbdla. Spain. 


SSsjawa! 
MsssatSS 

S. GROCHOLSKL " 
Londrat^ 


Questions for Hammer ?nlprawl ^ /4 


close all American bases in his coun- 
try at the end of ibor lease in 1988. In 
view of this and of Greece's return to 
Beirut of an associate of thehiBacfaws 
of tbe TWA airliner, I suggest that 
the American government should an- 
nounce now that as soon as practica- 
ble it will dose these bases. 

Such swift action might cause the 
Greek -government to mortify its anti- 


Regarding "A Reag/m-Goriradtev 2&]yP\5? P***- but vdjdriififc ’ 


Initiatite” (June 17): 

AtiowmetoaskArmand Hammer 
about tire “events” which, accenting 
to him.ha.ve turned. President Reagan 

“into Ji cooperative spirit” What 
were they? Harsha warfare in Af- 
ghanistan? Hardening of oppression 
in Central and Eastern Europe? 
Deadlock in Geneva? Mr. Hammer 



“ntes °ftiie “electric shod: rfmatift" 
rauon throughout the woridT 

undcr ^ walls Of the Kremlin? \.g 
FWEDJUCH SEYTHAL>- 
NewYoA. ' 













iVv 


S 


,W — " — — ^ — — — 

K('o, JSmith Wins Re-election 
\Y art]i V Zimbabwe Campaign 
.. »> j^Reflecling White Fears | 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUTVDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


Page 5 


80 Killed 


In Storms, Odd Couple in Asia: Sihanouk and Kim II Sung 


“the first step in the right djxectufiL 
of brmgi&ga Silk bit*f sanity $ 


Washington Post Servicr “the first Step mt& 

BULAWAYO, Zimbabwe : — (rf brmgb^a nine 
• - lan Smith, the former prime minis- the scene. ■ 

• ter. has been re-dected io ihe Zim- But twooflfoSn 
:. : babwe Parliament in an election white opponents — 

. .. that rrftettd 


roblnn? 



.s& 

'5 >' 

> 


' . UtQL II.; RA#*WXI UVW ■ — — _ . • 1J- 

' . r country’s small and uneasy winte bwe Group, ay U 
■'popuhaion. one of two.^toe m 

s Thursday's election was beM for 
.. the 20 seats designated for whites. dect ^-pf tw °^ 
. ' v The country’s L9 nrilKon black vot- oat from Mr. tot 
~ ’ ers are to gp to the poBs Monday ye®? *§<> 
r^j 'and Tuesday to choose the 80 other wrthmffie white pa 
“ ltr 5 t l le^slators in andection that Prime Ration. 

-Yi ,, Minister Robert Mugabe's party is Mr. Smhh von a 
■'•it considered almost certain to wm. in the 1980. vote p 
■ Mr. Smith captained on white dence, bni drfectu 
^presentment of the black-mmority elections have .era 
. ""x government toregainhis seal by an delegation tq-seven 
. - overwhelming margin. His censor- He started this ca 
‘ V ;*vative party gained 15 of the 20 ^in g ins desire t( 
V-.1. seats for whites while his principal conmsmity i 

opponents won four. An mdepen- gedier with Mr. Mi 
- ..^dent opposed to Mr. Smith’s hard- black leaders: But h 

■; ^linepofidesalsowcoaseaL attacks grm* more 

The fonner .prime . minis ter scriptions of : Rhc 
' ' i.‘. waged a confrontational campaign mfed past more ev 

‘ - :? t ' against the socialist-oriented gov- largec < 

-'m 'eminent of Mr. Mogabe. It con- ^ ] 

_ - misled sharply with the more con- ., s , 

- ^ciliatory approach of the moderate allowed schoo 

whites. . the economy and la 

**£ Mr. Smith won 71 peromtof the Jgeriorato^ousl 

- *f 'vote in a parliamentary district m . danaae to oar' 
■ Bulawayo. Zimbabwe s second- ^Zg JWpari 

- ^ largest dty. He hafled his victory as 


I’sptojcipal 
Karnlrviift 
lent 25mb fc 
5 AnSersol 


wereie- 
&waBt- 
-q three 


led past more e 
bwds largec. 

He conreiided 
ibe’s “comnumi 
id allowed. schc 


dr. Slu- 


ing damage to onr c 
v ocating a one-parti 
Mr. Smith, who 1< 

then known as Shod _ 
t’-n* -t ir -• i» .,_ years rfwirito'inniow rnmaefi- 

c Black Nationalists anceofmtematkm^w^ean 

'^motionriajgjealtofpaMksof 

gin South Africa 

Urge hmcrrection “■* 

The Assodaxed Press In recent days hfi Sch, who 

; *< JOHANNESBURG — After has said this wfll Wpas jtcam- 
. - ■ months erf demanstcating against paign, drew large anp.ezusastic 
: - white domination in Sooth. Africa, crowds in Bulawayo and iiararc. 
- the mam black narionalistgncrrillfl He lashed out^gmnwdrlngabc 
group has called for full-scale and against his whifecprienis, 
.armed insurrection. whom be accused of-gtskityfor 

■ •'•‘z “Earn your place in the free leaking ranks with HmJ981 
South Africa that is coming by or- Under a complex| 1 97agree- 

^-janizing to turn yoor guns a ga i n st that helped payp tbvay to 
your masters,” the African Nation- hlack-mriooty rofe, 20 ofanba- 
_ : . - W Congress appealed to Hack po- bwe’s 1$ seals stthet te for 
■ -.^icemen and soldiers Thursday whites, despite the fa^ttheonsli- 
■' v -’: from its office in Lusaka, Zambia, mte less than 2pcrcenlof tx^m- 
“The end of apartheid is near, it ta^rm He agreement eies ’in- 
. went on. **1116 flac k gian t is rising ^ 937 ^ and at that time 7tadi&- 
- to his feet, tall and strong.” mentary votes will be SUfint to 
• The statement, tl» strongest ever abdish or alter the arrangmL 

? -issued bytheorgamzationffllowed Smith said Thnisdnight 

- - attacks on power, water and other ^ ^ ^ Mngakould 

.'vital installatio ns, .as well as ^ petsuaoed not to abn the 

' : months of demonstrations and n- hope ttey wisten 

■:: ois against white rale. to us," he said. Tf they t any 

- The African National Congress jjadHaence they will, if thvant 
. ^ said the statOMnt wasKSued <m tokcroOT brains, our skf 

Sda^tStona ^ 5 wedt* at an MtwetihmihaHUte^AerrfaH 


with fare, 
an. order to 
Indm^do- 
antrmad- 
«t 

fecotmtry, 
02 , 3002 14 

yrn&defi- 
awnadean 
ea^ics of 
wiriyoters. 
d rait Mr. 



In recent days 
has grid this ami 
paign, drew large 


whom be accused of 
breaking ranks with 3 
Under a complex 




rSofr, who 
pris jtcam- 
n enaiastic 
mdiiarare. 
{Mrlugabe 
^op nents, 

«W^gree- 
iWtlw^ to 
20 ofixnba- 


wfaite rofl. *1 hope they vnsten 
to ns,” he said, u thw t any 
i ii>i 4 iigjRncg they will, if tbnmt 
to keep our beams, our do" 
More than half the wfaherala- 
don has left Zimbabwe sreode- 
peaderice^kaving about 100 . ■ 


Floodingm 

Philippines 

United Pros Inltmmoaal 

MANILA — Monsoon rains 
spawned by tropical storms have 
brought the worst flooding in 13 
years to the Philippines, kuhng 80 
people over the past week. 

Seasonal rains also continued 
Friday to batter western Japan, 
leaving 12 persons dead and 1,778 
homeless, police repeated. 

Among the JO victims wert a 
woman and her five children who 
were crashed Thursday when land- 
slides buried three hffl'odft houses 
in Olongapo, outside toe UJ. Su- 
bic Bay Naval Base 60 miles (97 
kilometers) north erf Manila.' 

Authorities estimated that 60 
percent of Manila was under water. 

Officials asked navy (fivers to 
rescue residents marooned on roof- 
tops, and hundreds of residents 
were evacuated to higher ground.. 
More than a foot of water sur- 
rounded the H3ton and Manila ho- 
tels in ceatraT Manila. 

President Ferdinand E. Marcos 
blamed the flooding in Manila od 
garbage that dogged drams. He 
said that fie would post guards at 
sewage and flood control systems 
to prevent people from dnpwmg 
away trash. 

■ In the suburban town of Caihta, 
authorities said that poisonous 
cnairwn bait been flrwhwf out by the 
flooding and were threatening resi- 
dents. 

The National Hood Control 
Center said residents of toe central 
plain of the island of Luzon, a rice- 
growing area just north of the capi- 
tal, were urged to evacnate because 
the Pampanga and Agno rivers 
were dose to overflowing. 

The weather bureau’s chief f ore- 
eaitter, AnwifaPinwia cmi that the 
flooding was the worst since the 
July and August 1972, when 500 
people were killed in Manila and 
central Luzon. 

A typhoon veered away from the 
Philippines on Thursday and head- 
ed Friday toward southern Japan, 
but toe winds brought heavy rams. 

Torrential rains feQ. in wide areas 

in western Japan for the eighth day 
Friday, triggering 1,150 mudslides 
and msnrptmg rail and road trans- 
portation, police said. 

Ozal leaves on Visit to Qrina 

The Associated Pros 

ISTANBUL — Prime Minister 
Torgut Oral left Friday far a five- 
day visit to China, the first by a 
Turkish prime minister. He is to 
make stopovers in Qatar, Pakistan 
and Thailand before r ea ch ing Qu- 
naop Sunday. j 


By John F. Bums 

New York Xima Service 

PYONGYANG, North Korea 
, — As Prince Norodom Shanouk 
1 tells h, his friend came to him one 
day and said, “You’ve lost a coun- 
; try, toe least we can do is to build 
you a house.” 

The friend was Kim II Song, 
rare of the most forbidding figures 
m toe Communist world, and the 
, house be built for the prince od a 
wooded hillside outride the North 
Korean capital was fit far a king. 

The prince, king of Cambodia 
as a teen-ager, and later prime, 
minister and .c on sti tu t i onal head 
of stale, tells visitors that the 40- 
room mansion in »h»* austere 
workers’ state is the grandest resi- 
dence he has ever bad. 

“I call /t my palace;” fie says, 
breaking into the nervous laugh- 
ter that punctuates I^neh of nis 
conversation. 

On the face of it, the politics of 
this region has prodneed few od- 
der couples than the. prince, 63, 
and Mr. Kim, 72, his benefactor. 
-Prince Sihanouk. is a gentle- 
mannered aristocrat with a pas- 
sion for French aviKTatinm fie is 
a Buddhist who says of the 
Khmer Rouge, murderers of five 
of his children and 14 grandchil- 
dren, *T have to pardon,” 

, After IS years under house ar- 
rest in QanwinHw or in male, ei- 
ther here or in Bexjina, he remains 
an aesthete, immaculate in Paris- 
tailored ran stripes, partial to cav- 
iar »nri Champagne. 

In addition to the mansion Mr. 
Kim has provided 100 Koreans to 
staff it, aind a fleet of hncniy cars 
are at the prince’s e*n There are . 
also hefty nard-cnne&cy expenses 
to be met for toe prince's frequent 
ovoseas travels and even for his 
do toes. “It was not France which 
gave me this suit,” the prince says. • 
“It was President Kim. " 

Then there are the lesser favors, 
tbe imported wines and foods, the 
sports near the artificial 


with Pyongyang-based dj p 1 nm«fs l 
the dances for the diplomatic 
corps at which the prince, man- 
ning the stereo, favors American 

pop mrm'r*- 

Mr. Kim, wham tbe prince re- 
fers to as “more than a friend, 
more than a brother,” is a man 
wbq has rardy been called that 
outside toe Communist world. 

A peasant’s son who took pow- 
er when tbe Soviet Army arrived 
here in 1945, Mr. Kim, through 
his Korean Workers’ Parly, has 
imposed a chilling regimentation 
on his country’s 18 milli on peo- 
ple. He has Mistered it with a 
personality cult that many believe 
even Stalin could not rival 

The “glorions and beloved 
leader,” one of Mr. Kim's many 







ef 

ife 




1 raor. .t: 

k.- j .'VT t Jif/rt'i 



" •>/ 





n* htew Yort Ton 


Prince Sihanouk with his pet dog, Mifei, at his mansion outside Pyongyang. 

Prince Sihanouk recalls how President Sukarno placed him and the 
North Korean leader in adjoining suites in his palace and told them: 
*Yon are both nice men. I want yon to be friends. 9 


titles, has been for 40 years a 
bitter enemy of mnrh that Prince’ 
Shanouk admires, mrindmg the 
United Stales. 

The two men first met in 1965 
at a gathering in Bamhmp Indo- 
nesia, to cnmmwnnra tft ffc 10 th 
anniversary of tbe movement pro- 
fessing nonalignment Prince S- 
hanouk recalls bow President Su- 
karno, the host placed the two 
leaders, in ad joining suites in his 
palace and told them: “You are 
both nice men. 1 want yon to be 
friends.” 

In 1970, Prince Sihanouk was 
deposed as ruler of Cambodia by 
pro-American generals who re- 
sented his neutralism during the 
Vietnam War. He later took up 
residence in Beijing. 


Mr. Kim proposed that be 
make an additional home for him- 
self in Pyongyang. In 1974, the 
North Korean leader built tbe 
mansion in the Jang Su Won hills 
north of the capital, a few miles 
beyond Mr. Kim’s own headquar- 
ters. Since then, toe prince »nH hie 
wife, Princess Monique, have 
lived in the mansion for a few 
months each year, except from 
1976 to 1979 when toe Khmer 
Rouge placed them under house 
arrest in Phnom Penh. 

The differences between the ex- 
fled prince and his host are re- 
flected in the architecture. When 
Mr. Kim asked what kind of place 
he would like, toe prince specified 
something restful, beside water. 


What resulted was a two-story 
budding in Korean style, with 
fluted tile roofs, overlooking the 
lake. There are pheasants and 
cuckoos and lengthy woodland 
walks for the prince and his Mal- 
tese poodle, Mflri. 

The “assembly hall” where Mr. 
Kim is to be found much of the 
time, off toe beech-lined avenue 
that leads back into the city, is a 
massive granite and marble struc- 
ture that looks more like an air- 
port leimmal It is ringed by 
troops, and diplomats say there 
are signs that Mr. Kim rardy 
sleeps there, shifting from place 

to place on short notice. 

With all their differences, the 


two men share a taste for a lavish- 
ness. 

In tbe chandelier-lighted din- 
ing room, the prince says, chuck- 
ling: “Not much here that’s prole- 
tarian, is there? More like toe 
lifestyle of a millionaire!" 

The prince is treated as a head 
of state. Since 1982, he has been 
nominal bead of a goverament-in- 
exfle, this time contesting the 
Vietnamese occupation that sup- 
planted the Khmer Rouge rule in 
Phnom Penh. 

Tbe Khmer Rouge, with Chi- 
na’s backing, is the strongest de- 
ment in the alliance. This places 
tbe prince in harness with men 
who locked him up in his own 
palace, slaughtered part of his 
family and, he believes, lulled 
“about two million" Cambodi- 
ans. 

It is an association that dis- 
turbs many old friends of toe 
prince, and one that is not easy 
for Mr. Kim to accept, either. 
Habitually careful to balance his 
ties with Moscow and Beijing, toe 
North Korean leader has been . 
squarely on Bdjing’s side on the 
Cambodian issue. Lately , he has 
shown signs of edging away from 
the Khmer Rouge, but according 
to the prince, Mr. Kim has never 
tried to influence him politically. 

Why, then, does the Korean 
leader make such extravagant ef- 
forts on the prince’s behalf? 

Diplomats here say they believe 
that Mr. Kim may nave been in- 
fluenced by a desire to increase 
his prestige in the non- Commu- 
nist world, but the prince says this 
underestimates his host's generos- 
ity. Similarly, he denies that toe 
reason he has been spending more 
time lately in Pyongyang than 
Beijing, where he has another 
mansion, is because he resents the 
inflexible Chinese commitment to 
tbe Khmer Rouge. 

The real reason, he says, is that 
the environment in Pyongyan g is 
quieter, more conducive to writ- 
ing his memoirs and to guarding 
his health. But an outsider walk- 
ing through tbe eery midday quiet 
of the mansion wonders privately 
how happy he can be in this re- 
mote place, linked to the more 
sophisticated world he cherishes 
by the shortwave broadcasts of 
toe BBC and the Voice of Ameri- 
ca. 

As though sensing his visitor’s 
thoughts, the prince says: “To un- 
derstand Shanouk, you have to 
know that I am an Asian man. I 
am a yellow man, not a white 
man. So I am guided by sentimen- 
tal feelings, by feelings of grati- 
tude, and it is those that are most 
important to me. I will always be 
grateful to my hosts here, and in 
China, for giving mt everything 
when everything was lost” 


mti i hu 


Ad)R 


A WORLD OF NE/ PERSPECTIVES. 


fit HU 




Accor ; leader in the field 
of hotels, restaurants and services. 
Present across the five continents : 
Sofitel, Novotel, Mercure, Ibis ; Ticket 
Restaurant, G&nSrale de Restauration, 
Cl R, Courte-PaHle, Churrasco, 
Seafood Broiler, Free Time, Pizza del 
Arte, TArche, Cafe Route; Novotour, 
Jet Evasion, Afiicatours, Devimco, 
Scapa. 64 countries, 500 hotels, 320 
private restaurants, over 1300 institu- 
tional restaurants. And 1, 7 million 
meal vouchers distributed every day. 

Accor, an expanding 'world. 
1984: a turnover of 9,9 billion francs 
showing an increase of 21,3 % in 
relation to 1983 and a consolidated net 
profit of 142 million francs representing 
20, 6 % progression per share. 

1985: an estimated growth of turnover 
of 18 % and an estimated net profit of 
20 % per share. 

Accor, a world of openings. 
1985: Accor will open more than 
three new hotels or restaurants per week, 
boundaries unlimited. 

1985 : it's also Year I of the Accor Aca- 
demy, a real university campus within 
the Group, a secured development of 
a 45.000 strong human capital. 

Accor, a world of new perspectives. 

^ 4 .ccojl 


HOTELS, CATERING 
AND SERVICES COMPANY 




Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 



Remarkable Genera E xhib it Brings Islamic Art to Europeans 


latenuaumal Herald Tribune 

G ENEVA — It is a paradox 
that after centuries of inter- 
course between the Islamic world 
and Europe, so tittle should be 
known in the latter about the art of 


SOUREN MEUKIAN 


the former. Its miniatures, calligra- 
phy and objets d'art are rarely dis- 


played, and the highly diverse cul- 
tures conventionally lumped 
together under the banner of Islam 


together under the banner of Islam 
are barely understood. 

The exhibition “Treasures of Is- 
lam" at the Musfe Rath on the 
Place Naive in Geneva, through 
Oct. 27, underlines both these 
points. 


The display of 367 works erf art 
and 200 consists entirely of 
items in private hands (those la- 
beled “National Museum, Kuwait” 
are in fact on loan to the museum 
from the collection of Sheikh Nas- 
ser Sabah ai-Ahmed al-Sabah). 
This is a remarkable initiative, for 
which credit goes to two Geneva 
collectors, the Swiss lawyer Jean- 
Pan) Croisier and the Iranian busi- 
nessman Hasbem KhosrovanL As a 
result, the show is compact, yet it 
includes masterpieces some of 
which have never been exhibited 
before. 


Remnants of the greatest manu- 
script produced in 16th-century 
Iran can be seen for the first tune in 
Europe. Commissioned by Shah 


Tahmasp in the late 1320s, the 
manuscript was executed in the 
royal atelier at Tabriz, then the 
capital of the kingdom. The manor 
script, given as a state presort to 
the sultan of Turkey, Suleyman 
Kan uni or Suleiman the Magnifi- 
cent, was intact until about two 
decades ago. It was then acquired 
from the Rothschild collection by 
Arthur A. Houghton Jr, then presi- 
dent of the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art in New York. He took the 
manuscript apart, gave 79 leaves to 
die museum and sold the rest 
Fourteen pages bought by three 
private collectors give an idea of 
the splendor of this mutilated 
manuscript of the Shah Name, or 
Book of Kings, the lOth-centmy 
Persian epic by the poet FerdowsL 


AUCTION SALES 


HIGHLY IMPORTANT 
SWEDISH 
STUDIO GLASS. 

Ariel, graal and engraved glass. 


Auction 4th August 
in Orrefors, Sweden. 


Catalogue available. 


AUKTIONI 


AB STOCKHOLMS AUKTIONSVERK 
Oldest in Hie world. Established 1674. 

JAKOBSGATAN 10, PO BOX 162 56, S-103 25 STOCKHOLM. SWEDEN 
V PHONE 08-14 24 40. > 


mars seated “in the heart of the 
mountain" looking down on the 
aide erf his standing subjects. Styl- 
ized clouds trail over the dry, paint- 
ed a uniform gold to symbolize the 
light of divine glory that suffuses 
the world. Rocks and trees burst 
out beyond th e rectangular frame. 
Cartouches of the text are inserted 
within the image. The proportions 
were worked out in relationship to 
the other side of the double page 
and to the general layout erf the 
manuscript creating a balance that 
has now been destroyed. 

The cardboard mounts that 
frame the page, as they do all the 
other miniatures, reduce the width 
of the gold-specked margins. It is 
not necessary to be a specialist to 
-be disturbed by this distortion — 
or dazzled, despite everything, by 
'the calligraphic outlines and by the 

dancing rhy thm of the figures. 

While no other manuscript in the 
Geneva show, and very few else- 
where, can match this, the exhibi- 
tion does include one other book of 
considerable importance, last seen 
in the 1931 Exhibition of Persian 
Art in London. It contains part of a 
“Universal History” written by the 
Vizier Rashid ad Din and copied 
and illuminated a t Tabriz in die 
early 14th century. The horizontal 
miniatur es rflmhinp the monumen- 
tal figures inherited from a tradi- 
tion that goes bade to pro- Islamic 
fresco painting, with the first at- 
tempts at introducing landscape el- 
ements under Far-Eastern influ- 
ence. Unfortunately, the 
miniatures with human figures 
show traces of touching up. This 
makes the folds of some of the long 


coats look, clumsy and gives some 
faces a comiostnp appearance. 

The paintings inching thp garlirsi 

datable landscape in any, bode 
from the Mamie world, inspired by 
Chinese Song painting. Despite the 
streaks of stiver paint cradely add- 
ed to the trunks and to the hillocks 
of the foreground, the landscape 
remains one of the highlights of 
miniature painting in the Middle 
East. It belonged to the Royal Asi- 
atic Society of London until July 
1980, when it was bought at Soth- 
eby's by a Geneva collector. 

This is also the first time that a 
few marvelous minia tures from 

Turkey and Islamic India have 
been exhibited. One is a beautiful 
figure of an angel, done in Istanbul 
in the manner erf the Iranian paint- 
ers from Tabriz who worked in the 
Ottoman royal atdier. At a Chris- 
tie's sale in April 1979, its Iranian 
appearance induced the English 
cataloger to call it Persian. 

What is perhaps the greatest por- 
trait done by an Islamic artist in 
India is also here. A court character* 
is writing a letter with four lines of 
script addressed to some member 
of the royal household, in which he 
identifies hinwrff as Shah Abul 
Ma’ali Kashghari. The signature 
“Master Dust, portraitist," appears 
at the bottom, telling us it was 

painted by the famous calligrapher 
who aim signed one of the minia- 
tures in the Book of Kings. 

Another mayor work is a minia- 
ture by the Ir anian artist from Shi- 
raz, Abd os-Samad, who moved to 
India in about the same period. A 
Persian inscription of rare autobio- 
graphical content, not mentioned 
in the catalog, gives it extraordi- 
nary historic importance: “At the 


thoroughly bletded the Iranian 
heritage and the impact of Western 
European art. The strong shading 
of the -rocks suggesting volume and 
depth, the pwnfiar darning per- 

spective of constructions in the dis- 
tance, betray the influence of 16th- 
centuiy European engravings. But 
the subject matter is purely East- 
ern, as is the handling of the fig- 
ures. This miniature, sold at Soth- 
eby’s in October 1977, had been 
lost sight of until now. 

More revelations arc to be found 
among the objets d’art. The eastern 
Iranian ootierv from Nevshabnr in 


white, ranks among the great cre- 


ations of eady Mami e art, and four 
bowls and platters that illustiBte 
the art at its highest had been un- 
recorded. 

Two bronze caskets with figura- 
tive ymey miaid with silver are 
top-quality examples of late 12th- 
century metalwork from Khorasan. 
So is a drni king vessel of striking 
beauty. It is asaibed in the catalog 
to Jazira, now in northwestern Iraq 
and southeastern Turkey; but die 
style of tire calligraphy, the word- 
ing of the inscription, the handling 
of two silver inlai d figures of gal- 
loping horsemen, and tire prove- 
nance of tire object — from the 
Kabul market in Afghanistan, 
which includes half tire historical 
province of Khorasan — leave no 
doubt that it comes from there. The 
caskets, equally typical of Khora- 
san in every aspect of style and 
technique, are attributed to “Pun- 
jab or Hindustan,” which is unlike- 
ly; we know nothing about metal- 
weak in India at that time. A ewer 
with cylindrical body on three legs, 
typical of eighth-century Iran, is 
riiaracterfaed as “Egypt ... 9th, 
10th century." A oronze door 
knocker, acquired in southern Iran 
with a Persian signature that the 
cataloger could not fully read, is 
not from “Iraq, Iran or Eastern 
Anatolia" bnt obviously from 
southern Iran. 


working and my side bad reached 

an extreme of weakness, tins was 
sent as a keepsake ... to my el- 
dest son." 

A group of 16th- and 17th-centu- 
ry miniatures Cram Islamic India 
follows, making the Geneva show 
one of the most interesting exhibi- 
tions of Mogul painting m years. 
Again, these have only been seen, 
bnefly, at auction, except those 
from the collection of Prince Sa- 
druddin Aga Khan, which have 
bem exhibited at Asia House in 
New York. Few people, even 
among art historians, have set eyes 
on the elephant procession that il- 
lustrates the art of Mogul painting 
in its first blossoming, when it had 


Mami e east looms as large in vt s*j 
and literature as that of China in 
tire Far East, a situation reflected r| 
in the art market. Since the G eneva £ 
ex h ib ition consists of works from £ 
private collections, it was bound to C; 
reflect the state of tire market. Ibis 
has an unfortunate consequence . rl 
T urke y is inadequately represented ? 
— 00 uninfo rmed visitor would it- 
aim* the glory of its 14tb-centmy ~ 
woodworks or its 16th-century pot- ^ 
toy after seeing this show — axis %: 
the Arab world Another regrctla- 
bk result is the extreme contrast l- 
between the splendor of some q 
pieces and tire mediocrity of others, j 
Given the d isp r opor tionate share *j 
erf Iran, there was no need for two £ 
figurative bowls from Neyshabur -p 
rhat are as Ugly as they are poady y, 
preserved. In addition, one or two ■ ; 
works call forth serious reserve- f 
tion s concerning their dating and ife 

authenticity. 

This does not prevent the Muste y 
Raid exhibition from being a sen- 
sariou for its abundance of new ^ 
material and for some of its master- 'o 
pieces. It is a great exhibition, one % 
of the few major shows of intern*- £ 
ti mial significance to be staged in 
Geneva rinne World War EL 


— 

ril of work signed “Master Dust, portraitist* 


Eastwood Excel I in f Mystical’ Western 


By Vincent Canby 

New Font Times Service 


N EW YORK — As the Book of Revelaj 
it. “Behold a Dale horse: and his name tl 


IN it, “Behold a pale horse: and his name t] 
him was Death." j 

“Pale Rider" is the title of Clint Eastw ocj 
taming, mystical new western, and the nan 
who szts on tire pale horse is, simply, the Straj 
called Preacher when be chooses to wear} 


ns puts 
t sat on 


Janet Maslin of The New York Times rat “St , 
Elmo’s Fire": . ^ 

Its characters are old etxouga to enjoy the first 
flushes of prosperity, but still sufficiently youthful to' 
keep their self-absorption intact. Soon enough, they 
will have to give up their late-night carousing u-i 
favorite bar and move on to more responsible lives, la- 
the film’s terms, which are distinctly mnited, this wifi’ 
mean finding a more sedate hangout and going theft 
for brunch. “Sl Elmo’s Fire" has seven attention^ 


MOVIE MARQUEE 


setting stars. As director. Joel Schumacher’s hardest 

- < ■ .- - _ .1 I IUI .1 


collar. No matter what his costume, he’s siilDeath. 

The hard-working, ever-hopeful gold pro; mors in 
Carbon Valley, high in the spectacular iwiooth 
Mountains of Idaho, are running low cm su lies and 
patience. They’ve not yet made a tag strike, gang of 
thugs in the pay (rf an unscrupulous robbt laroa is 
regularly turacang them in an effort to pe lade the 
prospectors to give up their claims. [ 

After one such raid, in which her dog is lied, 14- 
year-old Megan Wheeler, after burying i animal, 
asks God for deliverance. “If You don’t hel is,” says 
Megan, “we're all going to die. Please, jm me mir- 
acle:" As die pronounces “Amen,” the can a cuts to 
the figure of alone horseman astride a fine, lehorse, 
riding easily but with inexorable purpose u ard Car- 
bon Valley. He is, of course, the Stranger, ayed by 
Eastwood, who also directed. This veteran wie icon 
handles both jobs with intelligence and fai ty. 

“Pale Rida" recalls the curious meiAysics of 
Eastwood's “High Plains Drifter" (1973ivhich he 
also directed and in which he played anothAharacter 
called the Stranger, an implacable gmwlinB r eventu- 
ally revealed to be the ghost of a higlSrincipkd 
sheriff wreaking revenge on the Mammy warsnip- 
ping townspeople who had lynched him. 1 
Resurrection also is the key to “Pale Rift.” How- 
ever, just who this fellow was in his preview incarna- 
tion is left so vague, you have a right to susact that he 
might have been Efim. j| 

It doesn't take particular inventiveness 3 an actor- 
director to cast himself as God Ego cony with the 
territory. The difficulty is in bringing it dL which is 
where Eastwood's special talents come iiLjftale Rider 
is a Western played absolutely straight, fit it’s also 


Many other mistakes have 
slipped into the catalog. They are 
perhaps the inevitable consequence 
of the haste with which the exhibi- 
tion was put together. The correc- 
tions for which they emphasize 
even more the imbalance from 
which the exhibition suffers: While 
miiwi “Treasures of Islam,” it in- 
dudes a large proportion of Iranian 
works. The share of Iran in the 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


U.S.A. 


U.S.A. 



PREPARE FOR: 



PACIFIC SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY 

9301 WllSHIRE BOULEVARD 
LOS ANGELES, CA 90210 U.S.A. 


OVMHQNSOOX 

ATHENS, GREECE 

NEW BOARDING HOUSE 


EARN YOUR DEGREE THRU OUR 


OVERSEAS DIRECTED 
STUDY PROGRAM 


itself to 


lied, 14- 

animal, 
is," says 
me nur- 
a cuts to 
lehorse, 
ardCar- 
laycd by 
3vie icon 

lyacs (rf 

/Inch he 
haracter 
eventu- 


job is apportioning than equal time. What the story- 
gets in tne way of this, it is simply jettisoned. Rob 
Lowe's pretty-boy ne'er-do-well is more or less thfc 
central figure. The most unusual actor is Emilio Estes- 
vez, whose pugnarioosness is so crazily intense it lends 
itself to comedy. Judd Nelson's serf-importance occa- 
sionally gives way to some welcome humor. Andrew 
McCarthy does very well as an aspiring writer who's 
the easygoing iconoclast of the group. The women V* 
roles, less developed, are those of a garish extrovefr 
(Demi Moore), a trim young professional (AH?' 
Sheedy) and a nice-girl social worker (Mart 

W inning faam). 

□ V 


L" How- 
lincaraa- 
ct that he 


Vincent Canby on “Henry IV”: 

Marco BeUocchio’s screen adaptation of Pirandel- 
lo's play is an unexpectedly interesting work. It alSCk 
offers the rare opportunity (rf seeing Marcello Mas- 
troianni in a comparatively classical role — that of 
Pirandello's obssessed hero, a man of the modem 
world who far 20 years has lived under the delusion 
that he is the 11th-century German king and Holy 
Roman Emperor Henry Hr. Beflocduo has, to a cer- 
tain extent, “opened up” the play but, except for a 
crucial alteration of the ending, remains faithful to the 
original. - - 

□ 


anactor- 
with the 
. which is 
’ale Rider 
it it’s also 


Janet Maslin on “Songwriter”: 

Willie Nelson and Kns Kristoffersou declare war 


Campion is an international co-ed ucational school with 900 
pupils aged 3-18, offering preparation for universities world- 
wide, but particularly those in Britain and the US. 

The school admits pupils of any race, colour, ethnic origin 
or nationality and is situated in one of the safest and 
educationally most interesting dues in the world. 

The new boarding house is in a green suburb conveniently 
dose to the school buddings. The resident house-mistress, 
her family and staff, together provide a home atmosphere in 
food and amenities, ranging from central heating to spacious 
common-rooms with colour TV and video. All boarders are 
accommodated in single or double study-bedrooms with 
private bath-rooms. 


INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY. NO ClASS ATTEND- 
ANCE REQUIRED. ONE-ON-ONE STUDENT/FACULTY. EN- 
ROLL NOW FOR NEXT SEMESTER. COMPLETION IN ONE 
ACADEMIC YEAR PERMITTED. 


very funny in a dryly sophisticated wa_\AThere are 
laughs in it and all bat one or two if . them are 


laughs in it, and all bat one or two i 
intentional, including a final, shameless 
George Stevens’s “Shane.” 

□ 


them are 
tote from 


EDUCATIONAL 

CENTER 


For Information regar dng 
programs authorized under 
Federatlaw to enrotl 
nonimmigrant alien students 
m the U S.A please caH: 


• Business Administration • Bachelors 

• Economics • Masters 

• Engineering • Doctoral Programs 

• Education • Many other fields 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND TUITON GRANTS- FINANCIAL AID 
Send a brief resume detailing your background and your 
goals. IMPROVE YOUR PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. 


CAPSULE reviews of other movies 
leased in the United States: 


on the music business and very nearly win. This 
chaotic comedy also further establishes the maverick 
directorial touch of Alan Rudolph, who directed 
“Choose Me.” Here tie has a snappier, much messier, 
less languid style, recalling his “Roadie” in its choppi- 
ness, its knowing view erf show business and its humor, 
which tends to be exuberantly rude. Ndson once again 
commands the screen with effortlessly stellar author- 
ity as a country music superstar who has lost all 
patience with and control over the business side of his 
career. “Songwriter” has a free-spirited vitality that 
goes a long way toward overcoming its sloppiness. 


Two Exploratory Exhibits in Paris 


*P.5. U. is Authorized by The California Department of Education 
* P.S.U. is a Member of N.A.S.A.C.U., Washington. D.C 


By Michael Gibson 

International Herald Tribune 


For further information please write to the He a d m aster 


AS. EGGLESTON, OJUL, MA. (Oxon) 
P.O. Bax 65909 
GR 154 10 Fsyddcm Greece 
Telephone: 913 3883 


212-977-8200 

OrWrftEOeptHT 
Stanley H. Kaplan 
Educational Center Ltd. 
131 West S6 Street 
New York. N Y 10019 
Pet manem Centers in More 


P I ARIS — Jean-Fran^ds de Lar 
Dfaouse, a French naval officer 


Than 120 Major US Chios 
Puerto Rico ft Toronto Canada 



UNIVERSITY DEGREE 


BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 

For Work, Academic, Life Experience. 


A pfaoasc, a French naval officer 
who had escorted Rochambeau's 
regiment to North' America riming 
the war of independence, was en- 
trusted by Louis XVI with a voyage 
of discovery around the world. U 
departed from Brest two centuries 
ago, in 1785. 


YOU WANT 
TO SPEAK GERMAN? 
...SPEAK TO US FIRST 



Goethe-lnsthut 


Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 


Lapfcnouse crossed the Atlantic, 
sailed past Tlerra del Fueeo and 


Mora than 3 minion students in 33 yean 
1 46 institutes in 6A countries 


e. 9- CORDOBA, TeL 25727 
TEHRAN, Tel. 627336 
RABAT, TeL 27145 


NATURAL HEALING 

Home study with D iploma 
free Brochure EH 3 
via ewTOoa from 

hockkun academy 

D7B58 WeVRUne 


PACIFIC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 


600 N. Sepulveda Blvd~ 
Los Angeles, California 
90049, Dept. 23. U.S.A. 


1 5 i n stitutes in the Federal Republic of G ermany 


For detailed i nformatio n ; 
GOETHE-MSTTTUT 
Ze n t ndve rweH un g 
lonbadipiatx 3 
D-8000 Mundten 2 
Tel. (01 89-5999-200 
Telex: 522940 


J// 


■WOK 


Deutsch lemen - 
in der Schweiz 


sailed past Tlerra del Fuego and 
made halts in Chile end at Easter 
Island, where he and his team of 
scientists watched in bemusement 
as the islanders crowded around 
them, filching their hats or their 
handkerchiefs and scattering like 
naughty children. As the stay was 
to be short, Lapfcrouse did not fed 
he had time to improve their man- 
ners. 


! north to Hawaii, where 
his log, “Although the 
the first to have set foot 
id in some time, I did 
ould take possession of 
ame of the king. The 
Europeans are, m tins 
utterly ridiculous. Phi- 
rust moan upon seeing' 
p of men, for the sole 
hey dispose of cannons 
sts, should count for 
CO of their ftilow men; 
it any respect for their 
1 rights, they should 
mer as an object of.cooqoest a 
(that its inhabitants have wa- 
x' with their sweat and which, 
b many centuries, has been the 
b of [him ancestors.” 


from Alaska (where 21 member* of 
the crew woe drowned in Lituya 
Bay) to California before crossing 
Ac Pacific to the Gulf of TonK. 
and sailing up to Kamchatka, 
where in September 1787 the team 
sent reports to France. In Decem- 
ber, 12 members of the crew were 
killed by the inhabitants of an is- 
land where they had stopped to gci 
water. In January the expedition 
readied Australia. After more re- 
ports were sent to France, the expe- 
dition sailed and disappeared. 

It was only in 1826that a Brititii 
captain sailing through the islands 
of Santa Cruz in the South Pacific 
discovered a silver sword pommel 
such as a French naval officer 


pferouse's missinn continued 
iward, then descended the 
an coast of North America 


that Lapfarouse’s expedition 

had been shipwrecked on the island 




SCHILLER 

INTERNATIONAL 

UNIVERSITY 


/vv 


THE E.E.C. SCHOOL ANTWERP AND BRUSSELS 

The indeDondent miefnattonoJ school that responds to the community's 
needs, and cares about each child's need* Our Bnttsh end American staff 
has impressed parents and educators with our children's work in the: 
□ Kindergarten (from age 2 □ Primary School □ American Secon- 

dary School □ British G.C.E. curriculum through A-leve< 

Our highly efficient use of hinds keeps your tuition lees et a reasonable 
level' from BF 65 000 to BF 1*0.000 per annum. 


m the e.e.c. school 



In two or ihree three-month periods, the .German lor Foreign Natio- 
nals* course ol the 'Hochalpines Tochter-lnstitut Fetan' will teach enough 
German to deal with everyday situations U is an excellent way lor students 
who do not speak German and wtsh to enter the departments ol out school to 
acquire the necessary language basics 

Optional final examination the internationally recognized German 
exam ol ihe <Vblk-shochschuh/erhand> IVHS Cemficaie) 

For additional information, please contact 
Hoehalpines Tdchter-lnstitut Fetan. Exti 16, CH-7551 Ftan. 
Switzerland. Telephone 084/9 02 22 


DOONESBURY 


Noui,sprr 
sum, PEAR. 

BOY, WVE 

HAP A urn- 

CJJCTBM. 

' / 


LPCEf.T 

AS6URB 

YOUM 

FINS. 

I 


um, IMMSTSOASHAMB? 
0FH0U9U8BWiarmeB9i. 

! WEAJ&HEFB. IW&UNDER 
Ve/H&W&fMPRES&aN 
THAT MM BEACH HAMONB? 


_m Hoehalpines 
\ *.Tochter-^ 


stayed behind rather than risk a 
crossing on such an uncertain ves- 
sel. The raft disappeared. The two 
men survived on vanikoro for 30 
years, during winch time no Euro- 
pean ship approached the irfnmL 
, The Mus6e de la Marine has as- 
sembled almost 300 items (iwhijfci 
rag the silver sword pomme^ 
winch resemble so many exhifauC 
presented for a court inquiry. 

"La g&tereuse a tranque expidh* 
Hon Lap irouse," Musee de la 
fine. Place du Trocadero, through* 
Sept- 23. - % 

n 


t i‘ r * s 


■ •K'" , , 

pl3 # 


\1>- V 


Of v/' 




hi, 


™ AmenHalai S3 - 2000 Antwerp/Be<fltum 
Jacob Jordaeivatraat 75-79 - 2018 Antwerp/ Belgium 
Bur H ovale 302 - 1030 Brussefe/Beigum 
For information and re gistra tion call 
Mr. J Weils. Headmaster at 03/237^7.1 B 
L 03,218 81. 82-03/238.10.82 A 

Registration daily all summer. 


E -HOTEL- 


UNITID KINGDOM 


m\ 


International 

Herald Tribune's 


ft FINISHING-SCHOOL 

TIhrx^i study of Fnndi, German, Eo- 


ranci 


WANT TO SPEAK FRENCH? 


You con, through the 'TOTAL APPROACH” to French, 
o unique 4 wee k program on the Riviera 

COMPUTE AIL-DAY IMMERSION. ONLY N HtDiOt: EWy 830.17:00 
VMt» 7 mtat, hi unafl grovpi, Ao£o*hjiiI Ckaui. language Lab. P r ud i cu Sonora. 
tfeeuraMtUwdt. C wunro n. lodging in privet* gun fount I n efiwtod. 

For oaunh6lmai nan boomer I roadnonad it 

f*mO * tmnwni u n arena Marts Aagutf S. 2 rad d ywr. 

Yrare wt > ■■ ■-* A - p ri m e , It Utm MU« ti Am* to «Mk 

MSimJT DE FRANOUS - F.29. 

n 23 A VO. Can. Udert, 06230 VMm&e/Mer. TeL: (93) 01-88 


NEXT SPECIAL 
EDUCATION 
DIRECTORY 


(A&OK Fanpse. CorrtrSastitufc Caro 
hodp»Certft<ate). Onuiurniil hranrt n*. 
Arty Cmoal ajuuHiuu. stop vine. Done* 
tic nricnce . Suciun axil uniOp enti is 
csnHaatdndie. for concern it the Daadro 
ing d imaai and dndopnsd at (draafi. 
dence Vocaonal podne Farrflm t refer 




SPECIAL COURSES 
FOR FUTURE 

TOURISM AND HOTEL CAREER 
Sdiofeeic nvnl aanoer 
lapgage oan in Jtdy. 


CanyB— norg.e u rydftfUdarii 
ikvnhcfegawyirowtbubpty.DrerlOO 
•eMtiaMuduiaaa6aii...eainpwar 
prewnene pti*. ndritx, rime, oft* 
■ea t —Mwa, leheOa. tone d j i u > mL 
Unte.eB.aae. OtecaopnalBaBd 


LhfBDBCSBDTOCANCBJW 
PMERfMNSmGffr I 
umr YOU TO MET MB HERB 
BnmwmAr*OQ,/w 
ueLLGOttREcraouno 
X THBAKPOtr. AILOSHT* 


wmi 
sfmpjusr 
WAT? Meenou 
/ mmon 
. / ums. 


For information 
plet ueco ntactjoar nearest 
IHT representative. 


Sumy Ode, 
kone Ganiar 
propr. uiIA 

013812 Meritta 
Wfeforwi 
Tel, 36/22 17 18. 
Telee;92 31 73 


enn0HBihe UK^bfA (tie EaeMdafaur 
W rptn e n catfioeb.adwbec(«raree il a nmi 
my wetiamnal nri. Ofeadro w} .V»te 
er*pli u ii u feife wl aae fl^feG i*6a. 


saaPEiKaaECB' 


A Danish explorer was' moviteL 
alon§ the western coast of GredL, 
land m 1934, in what was suppose 
to be an uninhabited region wfamj 
to his great surprise, he came up#£ 
an Eskimo couple. The weathef ms 1 
warm — all of 4 degrees centigre^C 
(39 degrees Fahrenheit), au3 
couple wore only loincloths. W? 
year two French anthro polopsWK 
Paul-Emile Victor and Robert Grip 
sain, went to study the ways of toe* 
people of the region, Amasalfia 
and to collect artifacts. Some 
these are being presented in an &£ 
tractive little show organiM^ 
around 50 or so gouaches devOtT" 
to life in Greenland between 1*#l 


9VHm9-.f>«fneirlnueCaiilii14^e«. 
' Wt (0480)5(03 (MM 


and 1950 by the Danish artist GL. 
Johansen (1897-1977). g 
“Greenland," Musee de PSamm 
Place du Trocadero, through & 09 - ■* 



<f\ ■ 


L 






Jl 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


Page 7 



ARTS /LEISURE 


Robert le Diable’ 


By; David Stevens 

Jmmnkmat R znJd Tribane 
, ARIS— The for the Paris 

OpdraV- revival of Giacomo. 
•$ “Robert le Diable" 

to.be set right at the start, 

th the ocebfistralprdijdc accom- 


pfaydfi" and “GSdle” —was outra-; 
geousiy travestied inApdrt Pro^ 
fcovsky’s chora^aphy.yb^reas ini 
1831 Rrf>m was sednW by ih* 
balletic graces of Manej agjioru^ 


A\,. 


to be set right at the start, todays Robert was -cog 
th the aRAestral pzriode accom- drag bacchanal , that a 
byaanstri^that^as part m any way to: The j 
1 WUJ...MCI a Ertmdiose succes- • ongi^ 

onrf cre^ in/a mode, Cecil B. Musically 

ThSteSaiv • «* mcs , over 5"*Lt 

VM Tvhnt Triltowed once the cur- Frew* puogww 

, way tJrtthe outrageous par-. 
tKat t iik beginning suggested, tiays the woa^OTJ^ 
ith oo6 8usfo exception, this, non as an optt^»m|u 
and preposterous Romantic are echoes of eanyfc 
vagaraawas presented as manto opera aad B 
^^„ld te 6to«acd,and 
atallv it was riven mil measure w ^ cstral 
subsLnfially^mplete (five wrdmg, and some ^ 

The problem with a revival of iag B £i™ 

tobertkSabW after almost a amfinns theffdgm 
of ohlivioh is that it is beer as a greaj lassj 
j less to the opera's than as a peat create 

trmsic inteiert thantoitsagnifi- The most stitid m 

- . " ^BJfeoce as a seminal weak in the cast was S ahipri R* 

"^^sistcHy of French grand opera and tram, the devil who i 
1 be Romantic movement Mnerally. tries to capture the » 

/Ylf- IP lie story'was' regarded as sifly Robert. Neither iris li 

' Ff Mubca it was first staged in 1.831, rate bass nor las amii 

^vnd what carried theaay wasMey- meaner is precisdy < 

. v rbeer’s ymiae and a lavish and then this devil is not oj 

Vi ijjmospheric staging — neither of acta - oat erf Goethe etj 
vhich could have the same effect prano June Anderson] 
■; r ^ vJk an andtmee today. Isabelle; stopped the sj 

BackedbyabagprodnctMHibud- Monday’s opening nij 
• : vjiet, PeuSka Ionesco, the director bravura smging'ot twi 

;-."^5d designer, and his oostame de- ianate scenes. Michfl 
' : - ^Signer, FTorica Mabireann, created sangwitoconviirfionai 
' : “ "zApi kind of fantasy Middle Ages that tone as Alice, the fosU 
•' : ‘c:\i7niited with campiness without to- triumphs, in the final ti 
t -J ^^ally g^ E over the edge. The Ro- tram m the struggle 1 
\ ._ ~ nan hf- ^ y*ii c gestures are there, souL 
• : C?dth affection if not always with • Alain Vanzo as Robi 
.1.. Conviction. For instance, when the do-historical Duke of 
demonic Bertram gets bis comeup- was a shrewd -piece 
...- .““.aiice. he goes back to hell through Vanzo cats no great fig 
" trap anridasafisfying burst of fire and the character erf R 
*.• . ^nd brimstone. It is the stage effect posterouriy indecisive, 
^-hat counts, not what it represents, he sometimes lapsed ii 


#raiedbya ; 
f not id ale* 
writ of thee 

He cfeble": 
[archetypal; 



* -n. is lory of French grand opei 

' Mystical' ip VS^SESSR 

« F? Ptfyhen it was first staged m 


xe, andthertt 
Jerman Ro| 

Shim Can li? 
oe ingenious 
jDfulwocsi. 
aditi/kfe« 
JeAct3basj 
felt<rfrou3 

Dalir/iath^ 


Lohis sen 
tad aegj- 
bagetfc- 
mcic, ¥m 
ptljad^- 
rr.rheso- 



Jime Anderson in 'Robert le DiaWe.” 


w vice ;ai 
it tthiier 
(led Aal- 

:Ipfflge 

lapsing 


Indian Tiving Arts’ a Delight 


irnmg.- By John Russell 

ijMJiTipr Nov York Tima Service 

isfwbo W/-ASHIKGTON — “Aditi: 
feorBer- W The living Aits of India” at 
Iberfs the National Museum of Natural 
History came to this visitor as a 
tlpseu- delightful surprise. 


man beings come and gp as they 


_ boxed in or put i 

itory camt* to thig victfnr as a They are very Tunny, too, 1 with 
ightful surprise. boasierous and unfeigned hi^ispir- 

■ Aditi” is at once an exhibition its that visitors dearly find couta- 


f trng of high-grade Indian painting and gious. Doubtless it helps that many 
fvtnop OTilptrm* and a fivin g cvnra tirm of of them perform great feats of skill 
utpre- Indian village life. Orchestras and agihty and that the craftsmen 
t,ongh strike up. Dancers dance. Child ao- ^ vcr y good at what they do. 
dama- robats irmn themselves inside out. In d ia ns have an inborn distinction 


' Alas, tte celebrated Act 3 ballet tory ranting, ^ Vanzo remmasenor Puppets act out their stories. is heightened when they arc 

. w^UdmiamtllicfflillldoiH with a ran, nannal M .of Janfas, orvras, toko, iot- ^ wna^ito is rootedm 
' - l a — a forenmner of Romantic French voeal style— a riyleoba- makers gp about their busmess-Al- {he Indian past and has been 


i ft !J 
i|w- 

i-.-Jtf, •- 


;P:Wiet and specifically crf “La Syi- 


)tamp to Honor Writer 
3f f Gone With WindP 


bty tr acea ble to Ado^ihe Ittzit, mostfiffrsizeinock horses canter to brought down to us intacL 
tteoririnal Robert— and nil of and fro, and a licensed saboteur, pr Bot their activity has to be con- 


a smooth, unforced lyricism bring chaos wherever there is order. 

The musical tfirechon wa- the AH this has been concerted, ffirect- 

* . M r . ■ . - li r_i 


direct- We must never know what to ex- 
Indian pect next There most be noisy 


The Asxxuaed Press doctor Thomas rtliton, woo ms 

ATLANTA — Margaret Mitch- orchestral and chorat forcoith 
' "" -V : H whose novel “Gone With the brio and conviction. 

- -'^ind^impuWiahed 50 years ago , — ' - n 

; -Text year, will he the subject ofa Further performances Ju29, 
- ■" -J. S. postage stamp to marie the /ufy i A o, 11, 13, Jo ana An 


hands of the young AnKric^m- ed and designed by a young hufian P 661 ncxf - There most be noisy 
doctor Thomas Futon, who his designer, Rajeev Serin. ' places, but there must be qtriet 

• 1 . '* p _ Umm f*. « ** A nlorK tArt ATI tltifi potlc «trtf raiKr 


How far what we see in “Aditi” places, too. All this calls not only 

ftu pliratec what ram hf. men rn any for Stage- managanCtll (rf a high 0T- 

giveh Indian village is a matter far der but for ddicale insights into 
discussion. The important thing is human nature. Sethi exeds in both 
that S ethi has a rare gift not only these respects, and “Aditi” gives 


1 - : -fi The hbCs CttlLUmiji that Sethi has a rare gift notrndy these respects, and “Aditi” gives 

■■ ^ ^mMcentiring on m So le for presentation bnt the han- wstins a WDnderfultinie. (The lev- 

•• '-~c.:^£c Service said the Diable" and Meyerbeer's™ effing of the living human bongs d of rales at the gift : shop would 
•. .. . ■ -Ijj nn* nt wwn 1QR(! French operas ft at the i na who make the show such a delight, alone be proof of that.) 

MhsSo.daihfrmlM. is no regimentation, no “AdiU canbe^Unongh July 


-dditiems to the Great American through Sept 20, dally from 1M. 
.-tamp series. : to5.PJf* 


schedule, no set program. The hn- 28, and is dosed Wednesdays. 


•fl’o. 


ge-i 






g-%— 

sr-jczsS3.es 




Openmg lor Talks 
b Seen In Moscow 

issass b«u 
2£'¥S.* , st 


omit Leaders Voir to Pnsh |*; 
an Eeonomie Recovery F* 


rlU«ie@K. 


U£.Smp7 

ai’BhxdT 



^afeg 








e~i grr M S gi< s*casi.ti; -s a,g*r.‘ j 

asfe^^aiSissMIs 


— WwiBraliEsderaDonli* 55S£HS j 
Es US. Bamo/i 




2FW1 

Take advantage of our spf rates for new subscribers and 
we’ll give you an extra moifTribs free with a one-year 
subscription. Total sayings: "ly 50% off the newsstand price 
in most European couritnes 


i * v . 


m 


h*.~ - 


4 




S p i wH— h*qr ** w 

fmA iu rtw H 

Curnneyl lyor . 

ASA <020 2-170 

aft, v/ai 

1 DXi. 1J30 LP« 

f M. lxio 222 

j Eft 1300 64* 

“ DM. « ast- 

” l im » 

Or. ISiOO a»46* 

ft ao »e 

~1 lh. m g 

~ ike 2/6030 HWMP 

Lft. 9J0» <H76 

MJCr. 1 JOB 765 

- Esc. laaoo 7AS0 

__ Pte 21333 rt/500 

— SKr. l/OO 795 


JMofBurep^htathAfefcniwFrendi 

AfikaUSA.ft w «l> W yr^W8cMeEo» 

1 *1 3a| wl 


GrnrttHbn 

Gtmat 


Ta Subscriptkoger, Irtemoliond HerddTrawie,^ 181, avenue ChcrtesdfrGcajfl^ 
92521 Neuffly 1 Franca Tdi 747 C7 29. Tetet 612832. 

Pleose enter my subscriphon for: 

a! O12roofdhi □ 6 months □ 3 months 

(+1 month free} {+2vwefafiw^ t+lwwfcftwj 

□ AAy check is enclosed 

- ; 4 a Pieasa chcmgemy: □ Access □ American Express □ Diners Oub 

■ I □ Ewacanl □ Afa Baneard □ Vsa 

, Card expiry dale Signature — 1 

13 Gydoeooatf 

MMRD rvnber i — i — i — i — i — i — i — I — i — i — | — r — \ — I — I — i — i 


Tel J i Telex 

M vacmonvisns 

IvtibeVttrtitlQfr— ~ t °~ — ^ ^ ' 

qq nrhw uf^mii rLoliun during myotaeinaond extend thettalE of exyxiJftjtiocBoriAighr. 
DtvwuidaitohP^ sent to my voKdion address. pieasoeficJoBBinstfiJdioreJ. 


29A-85 


A Sampling of London’s 250 Exhibitions 


By Max Wykcs-Joycc 

L ondon — a sampling of 
• some of the 250 exhibitions 
currently in London: 

At the Odette Gilbert Gallery is 
the first one-man show of Alfred 
White] ey, 57, who until two years 
ago was an an teacher in a schooL 
His work is of a genre beloved by 
the English: literary p anning , ele- 
gantly portraying a complex dream 
world, without the fripperies (rf 
Surrealism, where “Pandora’s Box” 
is a case full of tropical butterflies 
and where in “The Painted Ceil- 
ing” a mother watches over her 
sloping child while two men con- 
struct a golden calf. This is a re- 
markable debut by a visionary art- 
ist 

“Alfred Whitdey Odette Gilbert 
Galley, 5 Cork Street, Wl, through 

□ 

*JPL Hue Art is showing more 
than 50 Bonnards, including the 
three-quartere-length ofl “A Baby” 
(c. 1894); the “Seeping Model” (c. 


1650). Until recently in the Chais- 
worth collection of the Duke of 
Devonshire, this is a working draw- 


virgm and child at the root or the 
cross were cut from another sketch 
and pasted to this one, the drawing 
closest to the finished work. 

“ Old Master Drawings," Kate de 
Rothschild at Alan Jacobs Gallery, 8 
Duke Street, St. James’s, SW1, 
through July 5. 


At the Rabi Gallery, which usu- 
ally specializes in Middle Eastern 
antiquities, the walls have been giv- 
en over to the Italian painter Rio 
cardo Benvenuti. His chief theme is 
that of mysterious and beautiful 
young women, a theme that preoc- 
cupied his Renaissance compatri- 
ots. 

“ Riccardo Bemenutz, ” Rabi Gal- 
lay, 94 Mount Street, Wl, through 


(c. 1894); the “Seeping Model” (c. 
1905); still fifes of “A Wicker Bas- 
ket of Fruit on a Table Cloth" 
(1895) and “A Planer of Fruit” (a 
1930); landscape waiercokxs such 
as “ArcadHHT (1930), “Trouvffle" 
(a 1935) and “Le Camiet” (c. 
1938); and a wealth of drawings 
made from 1900 to 1940. 

“Paintings, Gouaches. Watenol- 
ws and Drawings by Piare Barnard 
(1867-1947), “JPL Fine Art. 24 Da- 
vies Street, Wl, through Jufy -& 

□ 

At the Alan Jacobs Gallezy, Kate 
de Rothschild is mounting her an- 
nual exhibition of about 40 rnrior 
Old Master drawings, Hirinrfmg 
work by Salvator Rosa, Francesco 
Piranesi, Giambattista Tiepolo, 
Luca Giordano, Hubert Robert, 
Frasgois Boucher and Rembrandt. 
One notable item is a pen, ink and 
chalk drawing, “The worship of 
the Cross,” by Pietro Testa (1611- 


At the Mercury Gallery is the 
second one- woman show of the 
Scottish painter Carol Ann Suther- 
land, whose colorful and qiriritirii 
images much attracted my atten- 
tion at her debut in 1983. Her 
world consists of eccentric inven- 
tions — the young ship, the spotty 
horse, the changing sea, the sitting 
kite — portrayed with the utmost 
conviction, so that, despite one's 
initial doubts, one cooks totally to 
accept and believe in them. 

“Carol Am Sutherland," Mercu- 
ry Gallery, 26 Cork Street, Wl, 
through Jtify 6 

□ 

The Christopher Hull Gallery is 
showing recent works by John 
Graxton, some of which were seen 
earlier in the year in Crete, where 
the artist now lives for most (rf the 
year, and at the British Council’s 
gallery in Athens. Bom in 1922, 


Craxton studied in Paris, for some 
tune shared a studio with Lucian 
Freud and has worked chiefly in 
Crete since 1977. His large oils, in 
tempera on canvas, are executed 
with impeccable drawing, composi- 
tion and color. The essence of good 
Mediterranean living is summa- 
rized in a kitchen still life. “Me- 
zedes.” 

“ Paintings and Drawings 1980-85 
for John Craxian, " Christopher Hull 
Gallery. 17 Motcomb Street, SW1, 
through Jufy 6 

a 

At the Hayward Gallery, the 
Arts Council invited the historian 
and dealer Nigel Greenwood to se- 
lect this year's “Hayward Annual," 
which attempts to display major 
developments in contemporary 
British art. Instead of the usual 
catalog, the council has allowed 
Greenwood lo produce an essay 
explaining his choices, accompa- 
nied by two folders of color repro- 
ductions. Too many of his choices 
are dreary oldsters like Francis Ba- 
con, the knockabout comics Gil- 
bert & George, and Henry Moore, 
bm among the young he has lighted 
upon winners in the sculptor Ni- 
cola Hicks (b. i960), the draftsman 
Julian Grater (b. 1959) and the coi- 
1 agist Anthony Zych (b. 1958). 

“A Journey through Contempo- 
rary Art with Nigel Greenwood 1- The 
Hayward Annual 1985," Hayward 
Gallery. South Bank. SEl, through 


with a foreword by George MeDy, . 
the portraits carry his imagery a 
stage farther than those illustrated 
in the book, and promise, especial- 
ly in the sculpture, exciting new 
developments. 

“Still Alive — Pictures of His 
Friends from Life: Portraits by Phil- 
ip Core." L'Escargoi, 48 Greek 
Street, Wll, through Jufy 12. 


Ros Newman's sixth one-woman 
show of sculpture, at the Alwin 
Gallery, {IDs the space with danc- 
ing, aerial, running and leaping fig- 
ures made in steel burnished and 
patina ted so that the room seems 
filled with glittering movement. 

“ Ros Newman: Rhythms in 
Space, "A twin Gallery. 9/10 Grafton 
Street. Wl. through July II. 


L'Escargoi is a Soho restaurant 
in an impressive 18th-century 
building, the paneling of which has 
been restored to its original ele- 
gance. Here the American painter 
Philip Core, now living and work- 
ing in London, shows a worthy se- 
quence of 29 portraits and one 
wooden portrait bust. Mounted to 
coincide with the publication of a 
book of his “Paintings 1975-85,” 


Hozliti Gooden & Fox’s annual 
exhibition of 19th-century French 
drawings ranges in time from a self- 
portrait by Louis- Leopold BoQly 
(1761-1845) to “La Dame en Bleu” 
by Marie Laurencin (1885-1956). 
The 40 drawings include a page of 
studies by Tneodore Gfcricault 
(,1791-1824), a waiercolor illustrat- 
ing a. La Fontaine fable by Honor£ 
Daumier (1808-1879); the “Pont 
du Carrousel” by Henri-Joseph 
Harpignies (1819-1916); a theatri- 
cal evocation, “Le Protecteur dans 
les Coulisses” (“Sugar Daddy in 
the Wings”), by Jean-Louis Forain 
(1852-1931); and a splendid chalk 
drawing of “Two Cats” by Thto- 
phile Alexandre Stemlen (1859- 
1923). 

“ Nineteenth Century French 
Drawings," Hazlitt. Gooden & Fox, 
38 Bury Street, Sl James's, SW1, 
through Jufy 12. 

Max Wykes Joyce writes regular- 
ly in the IHT on London art exhibi- 


INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 


PAHS 


= WALUFINDW = 

OALLERIES 

2, Avenue Matignon, Paris 8th - 225.70.74 
Hotel George- V, 31, Avenue George-V, Paris 8th - 723.54.00 

EXHIBITION 

ANDRE VIGNOLES 

From Florence to Lake Trasimeno 


The Modems 
Nicola STMBARI 
Zvontmir MXHANOVIC 
Bernard GANTNER 

Hie Earopeans 
Yolande ARDISSONE 
PhOippe AUGE 
Andre BOURRIE 
Jean-Hare CASSIGNEUL 
J.-C. CHAURAY 
Louis FABDEN 
Claude GAVEAU 
Fred JESSUP 
Jean REUSE 
Constantin KLUGE 
LEPHO 


MICHEL-HENRY 
Gaston SEBIRE 
Andre VIGNOLES 

He PotatiBUs 
Pierre BOUDET 
Yvonne CANU 
Camille LESNE 
Laden NEUfflJELMAN 
Jean VOLLET 

The Past Impressionists 
Suzanne E1SENDEECK 
Francois GALL 
Andre HAMBOURG 
Fernand UEBBO 
Marie NESSI VALTAT 


Portraits by AJejo vedal-quadras 

FRENCH IMPRESSIONISTS 
POST-IMPRESSIONISTS AND MODERN MASTERS 
Moxl-FtL, 10 auiL-1 pjm. - 2:30 pjn.-7 pro. 

New York Paris Chicago Palm Beadi ' Beveriy MI 


GALERIE FELIX VERCEL 

9, avenue Matignon - Paris 8" 
tel.: 256.25.19 


ESKENAZI 

Oriental Art 25th Anniversary Exhibition 
12 June -12 July 1985 
Ancient Chinese Bronzes 
Gilt Bronzes 
inlaid Bronzes 
Silver 
Jades 

Ceramics Fuiiy >:' i ;;~,-.raied cc^a/ccve Bj&iiab's 

Foxglove House 166 Piccadilly London W1V9DE 

! ocpos : 'e 0 : c Bora Sireeri Tmeohcne: 0 • -493 5464 


[*74 


June 12- july 12 


GALERIE SCHMIT 

396, rueSaint-Honorf, 75001 PARIS 260.36.36 

DE COROT A PICASSO 


exposition : jusqu'au 20 juiUet 

GALERIE MERMOZ 

| PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

... 6, Rue JeatvMermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.82.44 - 

MUSEE RODIN 

77, rue de Varenne, Park (7") - Metro Vansnno 

Rodin/ five Contemporary photographers 
in warns. Daria uuf, ia ubd, Braun tbitub, Hprittzsn. 

DcJy (except Tuudoy) 10 aja - 1130 am. and 2 pjn. - &45 pjn. 

FROM MAY, 3 to SOTEMBBt. 30 


MARLBOROUGH F»€ ART 
(LONDON) LTD. 

6 Albemarts Sl., Wl. 01429 5161 


July 31, 1985 

Moa-Fri. 105,30. Sols. 10-1 2J0. 


raaiuiaai 




A Retrospective Exhibition of 
Painting! and Drawings by 

ALBERT MARQUET 

19 Jane through July 

147 New Band Sl, London, WL 
Mool-FiL, 10-530; Sun 10-12J0. 


First European Exhibition of Decorative Work by 

FRANK LLYOD WRIGHT 

Drawings. Furniture. Class, etc. 

26 June - 30 August 


FISCHER 
FINE ART 
LIMITED: 
LONDON 


30 King Street 

St. James’s 

London SW1 

01-839 3942 

Monday — Friday 10-5.30 


ZABRISKIE 

BRIGGS, KERN, 
POIVRET 

724 Fifth Ave, New York 

WILLIAM KLEIN 

37 me Quincampoix. Paris 


AGNEW GALLERY 

43 Old Bond 5t, Wl. 
01-6296176 

VENETIAN PICTURES 
OF THE 1 8th CENTURY 

lh*U19Jufy 

Mocvfri 9 JOJL30; Thun unB 630 


f reasons v 

to visit J 
LE LOUVRE J 
DES 1 
ANTIQUATRES 

250 ART DEALERS OPEN 
FROM TUESDAY 
THRU SUNDAY 
11 a.m.to7 p.m. 

2, PLACE DU PALAIS-ROYAL 
76001 PAHIS-TEL. (1)29727 00 
. PreMrtt CxMMHon 
- AUTOUR DU PARFUM - 

DUXVPAUXWSlSaE 


= MU$£e RODIN = 

77, rue de Varenne (7°} 
Mfitro Varenna 

KIRILI 

Sculptures exhibited 
in the museum gardens 
Daily, except Thu es day, 
from 10 a.m. to 5.45 p.m. 
SSSSJune 2A-S«ptwnber I«5s=s 

GALERIE LOUISE LBRIS 

47, rue de Monceau, 75008. 
TeL: 563 28 85/37 14 

HENRI 

LAURENS 

60 works -191 5-1 954 
June 12 - July 20 
m Deity axcapt Sunday end Mandaym 


June - September 1985 

MAX ERNST 

LANDSCAPES 
GALERIE BEYELER 

Baumleingasse 9, Basel 
Tel: 061/23 54 12 

Opening hours: Tues., Fri. 9-12, 14-18 & Sat. 9-13. 


PARIS 


-ROBERT FOUR TAPESTRIES 
MONET, K1£E WCASSO, FOLON, 
LfiGBL UJRCAT, CARZCXL. 
AUBUSSON 
hand-woven TAPESTRIES 

Original prestigious hand-knoHed 

SAVONNERIE CARPETS 

28 Rue Bonaparte, Paris 6th 
TeL 329 3060_ 

CENTRE INTERNATIONAL 
D’ABT CONTEMPORAIN 
SUMMBI AST IN PARIS 

June 16 - 24 
June 27 - July 6 
July 10- 19 

37, rue Tone - 75013 PAHS 
TeL- 607.17.37 


LAHUNE 


ARROYO 

FASSIANOS 

FOLON 

14, Rue da I'Abbaye, Paris. 
P*tac* St-Garmam-des-Pras). 


'ART EXHIBITIONS’ 
"ANTIQUES* 
"AUCTION SAUES” 
appear on Saturday 












Pa«e 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


fridays 


Oven High Low Close Orts 
ID0U9 IJ34.12 1341.17 1326.16 I335A6 f 125 

T rents 66433 010.18 656J2 66409 + 16S 

UHI 16434 16*33 16111 liifli Urwh. 

Como 550 JU 56434 54660 551.37 + '-00 


Cemoosita 
industrials 
T ronsp. 

uniiim 

Finance 


High low Oom Ora* 
111.11 11068 111.11 +039 
12S.95 12238 12565 +038 
1D9j07 10039 10089 +068 
6026 5983 t&M +029 
12000 11981 12088 +055 


N1SE 


dosing 



AMEX Most Actives 


asgT 

inuMt*** 

BV** 

Transo- 


£ ini com **• *#* 

+086 2*03153985 

Sgus&sp 


3US »W 
tvS talk 
uai 2 % 
1613 «* 
UN in 
M86 m 
1431 l»* 
IV IM 

m hh 
I" 


NYSE Diaries 




Cine Pmr. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 
Util I Nos 
industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unowned 
Tefal issues 
New Mans 
Now Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


951 »77 

620 590 

436 438 

2007 2005 

is in 

8 17 


60870550 

27.915800 



Buy Sola 

•Urtl 

June 77 

181775 419530 

1.946 

June 26 

196378 412481 

928 

June 25 

206.17B 417,118 

2107 

Juno 24 - 

194408 4SMS9 

1791 

June 21 

197615 417400 

1.102 

-induced in mosaics figures 



IMlKOU 

18&3404W 

Pm A bil mil 

10U3CHU 

PrenconsoOdatnlclose 

wxam 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


AMEX Sates 


Tab (ms include the nationwide prices 
up to Mm doslnp on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


InO us tri aU 

Tnetse. 

UtlUftM 

F U iance 

Composite 


High Law dose OTH 
21152 21187 21152 +OM 
17147 17157 172J4 +W 
S786 8787 8786 +IU2 
2122 3330 +UI 
mJ5 1918* 19U5 +52 


ketone 


AMEX Stock Index 





Dow Average Reaches New High 


Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — The stock market advanced 
further into record territory Friday with the 
Dow Jones industrial average closing at an all- 
Lime high of 1,335.46. Trading was moderate 
through much of the day but quickened at the 
end or the session. 

The Dow finished with a modest gain of 3.25. 

Advances outpaced declines 910-683 among 
the 2.000 issues traded. 

Volume decreased to 10524 milli on shares 
from 106.73 million Thursday. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department reported the U.S. index of leading 
economic indicators rose 0.7 percent in May 
and Lhat the U.S. trade deficit widened to 
S 12.67 billion. 

The 0.7-percent rise in the index of leading 
economic indicators was weaker than econo- 
mists had expected. Combined with a largcr- 
than-amicipated drop in M-T money supply 
reported by the Federal Reserve after the mar- 
ket closed Thursday and the growing trade 
deficit, the data presented an argument for 
further interest rate declines, analysis said. 


ings reports arrive beginning in the second week 
of July." 

One test for the market will be how investors 
react to those reports, which are “going to make 
some very poor reading," she said. Weaker 
earnings already are partly reflected in stock 
prices, she said. But even though many compa- 
nies have warned investors that earnings are 
expected to be weak, "you often get a second 
wave of selling when the earnings are actually 
announced." 

American Medical International was the 
most active issue on the New York Slock Ex- 
change, up % to 26. 

American Hospital Supply followed, up 1% 
to 41. Baxter Travenol said it would sweeten its 
$3.6-billion bid for American Hospital Supply. 
Baxter Travenol was up 14 to 15H. 

AT&T was third, up % to 24K. AT&T won a 
contract valued at close to SI billion to supply 
minicomputers to the National Security Agen- 
cy- . . 

Federal National Mortgage Association, sen- 
sitive to interest rate movements, added ft to 




329 17* 
404 14* 
72S 38* 
4 18* 
4 28* 
125 13* 
905 37* 
46* 
48* 
33* 





femur ur 
36Tim im 


149(24* O* 
S4}S* 43 ■ 


7174 U, 1 
IDtlfin J 


744 [4* 

17 14* J** 
ooH J7W S7- 
2028 61* *!.- 
74 DU Q* 

1 27 27~ 

106 4* 4* 

3145 19* «K 

73 a* a.-. 

49 it m 
381 14* u* 
2254 17* JM 

2 IU5« 
40 19* 7916 

7671 28* 3816 


10614* 

3, SI£S 


26(0* 10* 
wpj si 


Quot-Orw 
11 *— * 
24* +1* 
65*+ * 
29* + * 

55* -1* 
74 -* 
13 — * 
25* + 'A 
8 *— * 
24* + * 
14* + * 
57* +1 
61* + * 
33*— * 

27 
4* 

48*— * 

28 - * 
«a* + * 

14* + * 
36* + * 
5416— 1* 
79* 

28* + * 
69*— * 
1BW + W 
II* +1* 
26* + * 
9*— <M 
13* + * 
2D* + * 
33*— * 
27* + 16 
35 

30*— * 




27* 27* 
08* 108* 
08* 108* 
48". 47* 
33+ 32* 
14* 14* 
16* 16'% 
9* 9* 
31 30* 

30* 30* 
16* 16* 
18* 18 
23'+ 23* 
25* 25* 
71+ 73* 
62 63 

29 28* 

36* 35* 
34 33* 

25* 25V* 


3W 

4* 1* 

1* VS 
3. 6* EsAir 

SB* 6* EAir p 
27* 9* EAir p 

28* 21* EOSJG 
93* 12* EostU 
52 41* 

40+ 40 
30* 20* 

32* 20 
37* 31* 

18* 13* 

34* 19* 

24* 19* 

29* 25* 

29* 24* 

19* 9* 

12 * a* 

28* 1734 
I TVs 11+ 

12* 4* 

78+ 59 


257 

34* 

33* 

34* 

123 

‘JAW 

28* 

28* 

ft 

17* 

16* 

17* 

75* 

73* 

75* 

2V 

3* 

JW 

64 

6 

A* 

6* 


SI 4V 

40* 

40* 

40V) 

51 

2b* 

25* 

7flk 

244 

24* 

24* 

24* 

53 

4* 

J* 

4* 

348 

6J* 

62* 

62* 

18/ 

2y* 

29* 

29* 

192 

ID 

9* 

10 

104 

18* 

18* 

in* 

163 

11* 

ID* 

10* 

142 

12* 

11* 

12 

28b 

48* 

4/* 

47* 

4V 

1/* 

17* 

17* 

18b 

43* 

42 

42* 

bio 

3V* 

38 

38* 

56 

311k 

J6* 

37* 

619 

12* 

T2* 

12* 

3J9 

74* 

73* 

«* 

3856 

62* 

61* 

61* 

31/9 

81* 

HO 

Bl 

177 

6* 

6* 

6* 

96 

&A 

6* 

6* 

1647 

16* 

16* 

16* 

IB 

9* 

9* 

9* 

881 

16* 

15* 

15* 

2250 

*4 

61* 

63* 

3322 

76* 

71* 

72* 


u i9 <a 
U 13 U1 




54 
37* 
39* If* 
SO 34* 
UVS 9* 

6* n 

29* 20 
43* 

24* 

33* 

» 

28* 


It 

1J» 14 
130 2J 
34 1.1 
JK> 25 
2J3 ill 
I2JW ion 
144 3JB 
130 1.9 
338 18 
1.00 1 A 
JS0 7S 


35 12* 

1723 78* 

88 39 
687 7* 

904 6* 

“3 ^ 

33 6* 

2§ *2* 7* 

15* 15* 
48* 47* 

sasa 

9* 9* 
20 
25* 


34* 20 
34* 23* 
28* 14 
13* ID* 
45* 26* 
65 46* 

18* 13 
10* 5* 
47* 28 
46* 37* 
27* 21* 
26* 15* 
27* 21* 


1.12 33 18 
56 1J 10 
- .12 S 12 
1.4401 19 
152 36 6 
an 119 

1,8 1,J 2| 
1J0 28 16 
1560 <A 9 
150 AD T7 
M 32 U 
150 58 14 



34 + * 

32* + * 
25* + * 
11 *— * 
42*— M 
63 + * 
18* 

10* 

46*—* 

42* 

24*—* 
24*- * 
24 


££%* 
14* 9* 

TS 27 * 




14* 6* E 
20* II* E 
32* 24* E 
13 99* E 

22* IS* E 

5 * ’*1 
32* 224. E 


m 





5* ■» 14 S SIS '** 19 * +i 

38* MCA M i3.3] »0? 60* 59* 59* + * 

24* 76* MCam 1.40 U. * >55 21* 21* 21*— * 

ES M MCar* aso w- 5 38* 38* 38* 

14* 7* MDC 32 9 400 12 11* 11* + * 

37* 26 MDU 256 TO ? 7l 37 36* 3**— * 






“ 18* PHH 140 3.1 13 131 32* 32 32* 

?? ESP 160 18 9 663 42* 41* 41* 

29* 15 P5A 60 2.1 63 7129 28*9* 

?1£ JJK* £ SA A*' I* U 15 21* “* 21W 

J1V. Pocas 15* 11.1 6 13* 13* W* 

20+ 13* PoeQE 144 u 7 2941 19* W* W* 


37* 26 MDU 


36* 3**— * 


(Continued on Page 10) 


WL 





























































































m 

UK . 


f" — * 


Statistics Index 


AMEX prfcea P.IO Eornbia raoaris p.n 

AMEX nWWtowP.W PIM« «* «*W p -« 

MVSEMXB P-8 GpUraortets P . * 

myse Nato/tan P- 10 *nt«mJ row p - * 

CansHan stocks PM MoriuH sumnwrv P- 8 

CurrwBW n*s P.* JJrtfara =31 

fc ComnWfllto M» OTC Mp* P-W 

' Dividends P.ll Ottwf markets P.14 


IIcralb^^tEribimc. 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 8. 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


*'* 


Page 9 


•+k 

.Z5= 

-If 

I 

' 4- 

.. #. 



ECONOMIC SCENE 

U.S. Nearing the Brink 
Of Foreign-Trade Disaster 

By LEONARD SILK 

New York Times Service 

N ew YORK — What can be doueal , 

United States trade deficit, which n --- 

SI 23 billion Iasi year and is risingstill gbertosyMi? 
Under mounting pressure from* he nwusmes, 
ranging from autos and sled to textiles, electro cs and lumber 
that have seen their markets and jobs shrink, G tgresshas been 
ur ging the administration to adopt a more jgressive trade 

^The administration has been crying to 1 hold te tine .against 
protectionist pressures. On the whole, the adi msration has 
given rdativdy little ground thns far, but the m w n Congress 
appears to be swinging toward 


i 


Many in G igress 
believe: tin si . 
mmungov i»r 
U.S. action 


■■ -s 




4r 


- t 


.» i> -• 

c > 


■ : \ 


protectionism. 

This week, a leading con- 
gressional trade expert. Rep- 
resentative Don Bonker of 
Washington, emerged from a 
meeting of congressmen with 
White House officials to dis- 
cuss legislation to protect the 
lumber industry arid declared: 

"The president- doesn't care about trade."' 

This was obviously an overstatement. 1* 
her, like many congressmen, is critical of tbea 
its failure to develop a more hard-hitting 


Mr. Bon- 
liiaiion for 

r _ ^ pqqy.They 

believe that time is running out for admmiitratioaaxon. Some 
expect f'wfTws to pass an outright protectkmistimiat. would 
impose a surtax on all imports. jL . : . 

The trade policy issue is often seen as a batfl^be-een free- 
traders and protectionists. But, in the view of a grbw^nnmber 
of economists, this is a simplistic way to see the isswScme are 
now tuninrig the point that the trade issue breaks dfl«rn to a long 
list of problems, which vary from industry to industrjap affect 
the economy as a whole and not just individual njouics. 

Nevertheless, ah problems cannot be swept into® In agri- 
culture, for example, the United Stares is cburoeting w s^me of 
its major allies, such as Canada, Europe and Latin Ajka, to 
sell to a drying number of other countries led;bye Soviet 
Union. Pressures on farm prices have been intenand are 
putting the survival erf many American farms in j«Jpjy- 
New suppliers and new technologies could drasscalncrease 
output, raising the Hanger of an agricultural trade wgjpedfic 
negotiations with the Europeans over their common acultural 
policy are seen as growing more urgent 

i 

A NOTHER major issue is in the area of high techngy and 
f\ intellectual property. Should a pioneering coon like the 
-L*JL United States not have a better way of -pitting its 
achievements in technology and its new knowledge? Icannot, 
will this not kill off technological progress before it res into 
existence? New efforts are likely to be forthcoming in tbahn of 

■ . a* i - - * — onVaonD 


V 


\ I 


Competition is intensifying among old-lme mmistnioima 
the woridHow important isit for the United Statcsto i cm to 
its basic industries in manufacturing, mining and agnure? Is 
that a serious national security issue? . 

The traditional response of free-trade theory is maoation 
should produce only those goods or services m wine has a 
comparative advantage. If the United States has its aduge m 
services, it should be prepared, according to this doctrto see 
other industries go. But what if the proce ss erf seg oat 
industries is facilitated by foreign policies of targeting malar 
industries and subsidizing those to establish its own unant 
position in the worid market? Does that not call for retion — 
or a t least an agreement from foreign competitors to e such 

practices? • , .. 

Even those who believe that a liberal and open Jraohcy 
best serves the interests of the nation — and of World 
economy as a whole — are starting to consider wtr the 
United States should adopt a more aggressive pdiewand 
nations which do not play by free or fair trade rulesnn is 
often singled out as the worst offender by many Amen, and 
(Gxtfmaed <m Page B, CoL 7) 



DJA. 

FJP. 

ILL. 

GUr. 

BJF. 

! Y«B 

1HW* 

34785* 

B.I77* 

— 

un m 

1 13X22 y 

20.1775 

44025 

3.14* 

17462 

— — 

: 2471 • 


32825* 

IS«SX 

8BJ2S * 

4747 • 

i ua* 

1970 

none 

ZSU5 

MWH 

7Wt 

325*25 

QUO 

2BM4 

— 

54135 

sun 

: 7824 

liras 

923 

17380 

340 

4UB 

MJS 

1006 


<70* 

27057 

1S.U4- 

3742* 

81.53 

2477 

1272* 

7122 

<040* 

— 

0745* 

27.485 * 

1.1313 * 

7045 * 

<73*7* 

17STT7 * 

1W9 

6JS41 

urns 

2534B 

<53455 

ISL1T3 

US5U 

9J009S 

17*440 

NJQ. 

<1*417 

20522 


CrawRates e28 

i r 

Amsterdam 1444S UP 

BrussaWa) 41J475 JWJ 

Frankfurt W*0 U® 

London (b) U1 

Milan l J4M0 UOSi 

Mow Yorfc(c) — 
part, U17 11*4 

Tokyo WM# 9V0 

Zorich m xm 

1 ECU 07M» M477 

I SOU ojiMSI DJJ 041 mi*i . — — — — - 

defines ta London anti Zurich, ttxtnas in other European centers. Hew York ri PM. 

m Ainowtfs need* to buy one pound icJ Anwxtfs mwm 
aoHar Cl Units of 100 (xl UnUsofMOOM Unrtf of IUB0NA: nor mxXod; KA-SlaUa. 
(m} TO BOX MM PtmOO: tUMM> 

Oikter DmOmt VbIbm 

Cwrreocv Mr U3J 
Anwo.aattR4 MO 

Austral- s UBM 

Aurtr.KUB. V\A& 

(Mta.no. It. 41-30 
BrazHcraz. &MMUD0 
f -H H . u fi w i s 1,341 
DaaimknM 1EV145 

E**aLo«md 0JS19 


U-SJ 

Ftn. markka 4330 
OfMkdmc 134-10 
Hans KoasS 7J43 
inOaorapM 1 MJ 
iBda-ruphUi 1.UU0 
irttn t 0.WM 

MIMl. U31J0 
Kakkitt tfnsr 03832 


Cutthky pm- VSS 
Matav.rtag. zx*15 
MKNH 31100 
Noov. krone Ml 
ptdLMta n JO 

Pertoscudo 173J0 
SamU rival 34513 
Staa-S 23338 
S. Afr. rand UJ04 


Currw USA 
S. Hor >7538 
SMO.I7A20 
twed. 87775 
Tulwo 4001 
Tbal UZ7JM 
TarkUEOSB 
UAE 04725 
vmiua 


iMnflnr. 13*45 Irish t 

Soorcov: Boom* du Benelux (Brussels); Boko Cornnerctale 
• ST* Ports fParW; Bank of Tokyo fTafcwJ; IMF (SDR); BA1I Ulnar, nam). 
Other aWa Man /teuton ondAP. 


Interest Rates 


Em m en reney Pcpwtts 


s 


imoom 

2 months 

3 man Iks 
* months 


twU 

Franc 

Sterfiao 

Franc* 
Franc .. 

COR 

5ta-» 

12 'tv- 12 IV 

IMfc-lOft 

f tv* 

SVW14 

124M2* 

10H-Wh 

9Vw 

5 VV 

12 *»128V 

mb-ioft 

nw 

5U-5ta 

12 IW-12 h 

1H6-11 

n» 

STA-S* 

ra-UMi 

10 TV-11 Tw 

?fv 


Donor D-Mark 

74k-7%i Sfc-Sn. 

7 Ik- 7 V. 5M%i 

7^7911 SKrSfc 

MW 5Vlh5ta 

. 94h*V* SkeSVi 

saarems: Monun Guaranty Uoilar. OH SF. PauntL FF)i Uavds Bonk t earn 
onallcnbie to Merbank tfuaslt* of SI miinon minimum (oroauN 


Key Mwwy ■ft**’ rs 


Close Pm. 
7W 71ft 
7U. 1 

Hit W* 
IlV-IVj !W4V, 
Ceei Pos er M-I7t non 7-45 7 jW 

Ha«amTiW«lor»mMs 477 U» 

4-OMaHI TTMfMT MBS 4*t 73* 


imm Bates 
Dkwoant Roto 
Federal Fom» 
Prime RaM 
Broker Loan Mm 


Afllut DoBUur B«i 


Smooths 
imoiM 
* mounts 
1 year 


7*4-714 

77W-7-H. 

7M-7» 

l-M 

M-IM 


CDft 3Mt days 
cnMtms 


735 

735 


733 

733 


CrventiaMI 

OatUMk 


frmootk t u loiBwdi 


nnow oiua Mk 
Call Moan 

One-month Inter bank 
MnanAMertxak 
s- month m t ei - b oak 

Brmta 

Booh bom Rett 

CaMMeatr 
«vaev Tthonry Ml 
tmen» IMtrMMi 


Tljk JQ*°» 


** fl u i tatertwak 


AM 4M 
5J0 5J0 

155 ISO 
5J0 378 

575 S73 


1«k KHk 
UK. 1814 
103/14 18 3/1* 
KM 10<4 
181/14 win* 


12V, 12VJ 

12M ira 
u a 

129/14 129/U 


S s 

4S/U 4S/U 
4J/U tsm 


Sources: Hooters. Cornnontoak. Credit 
Lvotmaa. Uo MB Bonk. Bank of Tatra. 


Sourer: Reuters. 


VA Money Market* 

- • •• ' Ju n 

MMTBI Lynch Rhoov Moots 
NdgvntnM vWd: 7 

Telerate lataresi Rule Index: 4 
Source: Morritt Lynch. AF 



HaO KM* ■ 31453 
Lwemhoara 3)450 - 
port* nu hno) sun 
31450 
3 U* 

iVWt — 


zsrtah 


•: pj*.' 

JttjO) 

3WU7I 
217X5 ■ 
31771 ' 
31A70 1 


LiHremBoura Port and London 
frets.' Hof» Kona and Zurich a 
ckjstna arices; New Vont Com 
contract. AH price* in US. toaro 
Source: Reuters, 


Mexico 
Devalues 
Peso 33% 

Official Rate 
Is Set Afloat 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MEXICO CITY — The Mexican 
government effectively devalued 
the peso Friday by 33 percent by 
raising its official exchange rate to 
compete with private exchange 
houses that give American tourists 
more than 300 pesos for their dol- 
lars. 

Analysis said the government, 
which did not want to announce a 
peso devaluation before its July 7 
elections, was quietly acknowledg- 
ing the black market in pesos ana 
letting its stale banks enter the free 
maiket instead of trading the Mexi- 
can currency at an official ex- 
change rate. 

“It’s a clever way to resain con- 
trol of the pxriinng B market with- 
out having to announce a devalua- 
tion," one analyst said. 

Private traders had been baying 
dollars at up to 310 pesos, and 
selling them for some 325 pesos. 
Until Friday, banks, which are b! 1 
government-owned, were required 
to operate at the standard rate, 
which this week was at roughly 245 
pesos to the dollar. 

Bank officials, after a meeting 
Thursday, decided to open trading 
Friday at the uncontrolled rate of- 
fered by the private exchange 
houses, which is scone 33 percent 
higher than the figure the banks 
were forced to follow. 

The move was seen as an attempt 
to stop customers from taking un- 
due advantage of the lower, con- 
trolled bank rates. American tour- 
ists typically sold their currency at 
the free rate, while Mexicans 
drained dollars out of the state-run 
banks at the controlled rate: 

The decision included the abol- 
ishment of exchange houses inside 
the Mexico Gty International Air- 
port where, previously, anyone 
with a plane Ucket could buy dol- 
lars at well below the uncontrolled 
private rate, according to one re- 
port 

Analysts said the devaluation 
was forced in part by Mexico's ef- 
forts to make payments on its for- 
eign debt, now at $97.5 billion, and 
fay the reduction last week of heavy 
oil prices for export, which wiD cost 
Mexico $520 million a year. 

The peso has undergone two ma- 
jor devaluations in the past three 
years and currently is devalued dai- 
ly at a rate of 21 centavos. There 
are 100 centavos to a peso. 

In Laredo, Texas, International 
Bank of Commerce was buying pe- 
sos Thursday at 320 to the dollar, 
while Texas. Commerce Bank in 
McAllen, bad an exchange rate of 
317 to one. 

Joe Carrizales Jr. of the Valuta 
exchange house in H Paso, Texas, 
which was buying ai 313 to the 
dollar Thursday, said there had 
been a large demand for American 
dollars. 

“For the last month, when all the 
rates went crazy, we’ve had more 
people wanting doflais," he said. 
“The rate gets moved by the de- 
mand of dollars.” (AP, UPT) 


Shearson Lehman Seeks New Image 



Tho New York Times 

Peter A. Cohen, right, 
chief executive of Shear- 
son Inhuman, and Peter J. 
Solomon, vice chairman. 



Shearson's Investment 
Ba n ki ng Fortunes 

Quarterly operating revenues In 
inrtlons of dollars 


Merged Firm 
Struggles to Gain 
Upscale Identify 

By James Stemgold 

New York Times Stmce 

NEW YORK — When Shear- 
son Lehman Brothers Inc. moves 
later this year into its newly con- 
structed lower Manhattan head- 
quarters, two stalwart traditions 
of the old Lehman Brothers 
Kuhn Loeb culture will go with 
it: the efeganl partners' dining 
room and the stiver boxes with 
the unlimited free cigars that 
Ijdiman partners have enjoyed 
for years. 

Other than those aristocratic 
symbols, however, not mud} sur- 
vives of the old Lehman Broth- 
ers, the one-time investment 
banking powerhouse acquired by 
American Express Co. lor $380 
million a little more than a year 
ago and joined with its Shearson 
unit. 

“Frankly, there is no T-riunun 
anymore,” said Jeffrey B. Lane, 
Shearson L ehman 's vice chair- 
man and chief operating officer. 
“The pieces are so blended in at 
this point that you cannot sepa- 
rate them out. The focus is dif- 
ferent, and out pitch has 
changed." 



But if the aura that had sur- 
rounded one of Wall Street's old- 
est investment banking firms is 
now faded, Shearson executives 
maintain that they have gained 
much of what they had sought: 
an investment banking operation 
that would confer prestige — 
and hicrative fees — cm what had 
primarily been a retati brokerage 
house, and significantly bolster 
Shearson’s existing securities un- 
derwriting and trading efforts. 

Indeed. Lehman’s old trading 
and money-management opera- 
tions, most of which remain rela- 
tively autonomous, have thrived 
in the recent bull markets, mak- 
ing the acquisition price of $380 
milli cm seem cheap. Shearson 
has also jumped into the first 
ranks of underwriters. 

Although Lehman was only 
the latest in a string of 18 acqui- 
sitions that have beat the build- 
ing blocks for today’s firm, Peter 


A. Cohen, Shearson's chief exec- 
utive, did not hesitate to call it 
“our best deaL" For the first time 
in years, he said, he is not on the 
prowl for more acquisitions. 
“We have aG the resources in 
place now to do what we want." 

Even the announcement that 
Sanford L Weill, the man who 
built Shearson and then became 
president erf American Express, 
will be leaving, was not expected 
to blow Shearson off course. Mr. 
WetiTs assignments bad takwi 
him away firom Shearson and left 
Mr. Cohen in command. 

But Shearson Lehman's future 
remains cloudy. Some of its key 
investment bankers have left, 
and more are expected to lea vein 
two more years when the con- 
tracts they signed not to join 
competitive firms expire. A 
weakening of the investment 
banking operations could be crit- 
ical Shearson would like to use 
its abilities there as a fulcrum to 
till its emphasis away from its 
low-margin retail distribution 
and brokering businesses toward 
higher-margin operations in 
which it would act as a principal 

‘The challenge is not to re- 
create Iehman Brothers, but to 
create something entirely new" 
said Peter J. Solomon, formerly 
at Lehman and now rice chair- 
man and co-director of the in- 
vestment bank. “We have not 

(Continued mi Page 11, CoL 5) 


Japan Reports 
Another Large 
Trade Surplus 


Anti-Turner Bill Gains in New York 


United Press imemananai 

ALBANY. New York — The 
State Assembly has voted 146-2 in 
favor of a bffl that would make it 
more difficult for Ted Turner to 
cany out his plan to acquire CBS 
for $4.5 tnllion worth of stock, 
bonds and notes. 

The l egis l a tion, which changes 
state laws governing corporate 
takeovers, has a good chance of 
pasting the Senate, lawmakers said. 

The bill which was passed late 
Thursday, would require a majority 
of the board of directors of a corpo- 
ration based in New York state to 
approve any attempt to acquire a 



non, the acquitition 
be approved by the holders of two- 
thirds of the outstanding shares if 
the board opposes the takeover. 

No approval is needed by the 
(Erectors or the shareholders if the 
offer is made in cash, the bill says. 


The bill would also restrict so- 
called two- tier offers, in which cor- 
porate raiders offer to pay more 
than the market value for shares of 
stock to get control of a company, 
then pay a lower price' for the re- 
maining shares. The bin would re- 
quire anyone offering a high price 
in an attempt to obtain control of a 
company to offer the same price for 
all remaining shares. 

The legislation was praised as a 
way to protect New York-based 
companies from hostile takeover 
bids that threaten the stability of 
companies as well as the state’s 
overall business climate. 

“I think this is really a terrific 
and important piece of legislation," 
said Assemblyman Richard Gott- 
fried, Democrat of Manhattan. 
“Any legislation that win keep our 
companies from being picked at 
and torn apart and taken away 
from us should be supported." 

The legislation would affect the 


proposed takeover of CBS, a New 
York corporation, because Mr. 
Turner’s complicated bid for the 
network involves little cash. 

The sponsor of the biD, Assem- 
blyman Oliver KoppejL a Bronx 
Democrat, said the legislation was 
proposed before Mr. Tomer’s bid 
and was not aimed at stopping any 
specific takebver. He said, howev- 
er, the bill would apply to takeover 
bids already in progress but not yet 
completed, including Mr. Turner’s. 

George Vandeman, an attorney 
for the Turner Broadcasting Sys- 
tem, circulated a memo among law- 
makers criticizing the legislation. 

“Provisions of the biB make vir- 
tually impossible unsolicited, non- 
cash offers,” Mr. Vandeman said. 
“This legislation is unfair to the 
extent that It singles out one com- 
pany — Turner Broadcasting — 
and a business deal that is already 
well under way." 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Another large 
monthly trade surplus was an- 
nounced by Japan on Friday as 
officials put the finishing touches 
on a package of measures to try to 
contain growth. 

The Finance Ministry said that 
Japan sold the rest of the world 
$4.28 billion more in goods than it 
bought in May, a huge jump from 
the $2. 99-billion trade surplus in 
May last year. 

Exports in the month rose to 
$14 .23 billion from $14.09 billion a 
year earlier, but lower oil prices 
helped push imports down to S9.95 
billion from 511.10 billion. 

The latest figure brought Japan's 
trade surplus for the first five 
months of the year to 517.29 bil- 
lion. almost 20 percent higher than 
in the same period in I9&4. 

Japan's export successes and a 
perception that its market is not 
completely open to imports has 
triggered widespread complaints 
from the United States, Europe 
and its Asian neighbors. 

Many countries are preparing 
measures to curtail the flow of Jap- 
anese goods and preserve jobs in 
industries at home that cannot 
compete with Japanese products. 

To counter such moves, Japan is 
assembling an “Action Program" 
designed to increase imports to 
bring trade more into balance: 
Government officials said details 
would be announced by the end of 
July. 

On Thursday. Prime Minister 
Yasuhiro Nakasone promised to 
take action to simplify customs 
-procedures for goods entering Ja- 
pan. He has already pledged to cut 
or end tariffs on 1,800 items and 
said he hoped to announce mea- 
sures to strengthen the yen, making 
Japan's goods more expensive 
abroad. 

Japan's current-account bal- 
ance-of-payments surplus, which 
takes non-merchandise earnings 
such as services into account, also 
expanded in May, from $1.99 bil- 
lion in May 1984 to $3.58 billion. 
■ Trade Talks End in Tokyo 

Japan and the Association of 
Southeast Asian Nations ended 
two days of trade talks in Tokyo 
Friday with a call for “renewed and 
determined efforts” to strengthen a 
free-trade system. United Press In- 
ternational reported. 

The appeal was contained in a 
joint statement, summing np dis- 
enstions between economic mmis- 
tera of the two Asian partners. It 
was the first conference of econom- 


West Germany 
Reports Rise in 
Trade Surplus 

Reuters 

WIESBADEN. West Germa- 
ny — West Germany, its ex- 
ports benefiting from the recent 
weakness of the Deutsche mark 
against the dollar, reported Fri- 
day that its current account and 
unde surpluses in May were re- 
cords for the month. 

There was more good news 
for the economy with the an- 
nouncement that inflation fell 
in June to 2.3 percent, the low- 
est in Lhe industrialized world, 
from 2.5 percent in May. 

The surplus in the current ac- 
count. measuring cash transfers 
and trade in sen-ices and goods, 
rose to 5.9 billion DM ($1.93 
billion) from 3.5 billion a year 
earlier. The April surplus was 
revised upward to 3.9 billion 
DM from the original estimate 
of 3.7 billion DM. 

The latest current-account 
figures are not adjusted for sea- 
sonal factors. 

In May, the surplus in mer- 
chandise trade widened to a re- 
cord 7J billion DM from 4.8 
billion in May last year. 


ic ministers held by Japan and 
ASEAN in nearly six years. 

ASEAN includes Indonesia. Ma- 
laysia. Singapore. Thailand, the 
Philippines and Brunei 

Japanese officials said the six- 
nation regional group pledged to 
support the opening of a new round 
of trade talks in return for Japan’s 
commitments to further open its 
market to imports from the 
ASEAN countries. 

■ Recorder Exports Drop 

Exports of video tape recorders 
by Japan fell to 1.89 million units 
in May from 113 million in April 
but were up from 1.71 million a 
year earlier, Reuters reported Fri- 
day. 

The VTR exports included 1J6 
million to the United States, up 
from 887,803 a year earlier. 

Other statistics released Friday 
showed that Japan's unemploy- 
ment in May feu to 1J3 million 
from 1.57 million in April and from 
1.60 million a year earlier. 


New York Traders Ptish Dollar Down 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — A relatively weak economic showing in the leading 
U.S. indicators sent the dollar down Friday against major currencies. 

“Expectations about a rebounding U.S economy now seem prema- 
ture, and the dollar was hit all round,'' a London dealer said. 

The index of leading indicators, designed to predict economic 
activity in the months ahead, rose 0.7 percent in May. a much smaller 
rise than the market expected. 

The pound benefited most from the dollar’s weakness. The curren- 
cy rose to $13090 in New York from $13955. Other late New York 
prices, with comparable Thursday rates, included: 3.0355 West Ger- 
man Deutsche marks, down from 3.0510; 225400 Swiss francs, down 
from 23565; 93300 French francs, down from 93950; 1,928 Italian 
lire, down from 1347; and 248.35 Japanese yen, down from 249.05. 


Gramley 
To Leave 
Fed Board 


Dealers See Little Impact on Yen From Free Japanese Markets 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — Lyle E. 
Gramley, an infl uential member of 
the Federal Reserve Board, said 
Friday he would resign effective 
Sept. 1 to become chief economist 
for the Mortgage Bankers Associa- 
tion of Anma, a private trade 
organization. 

His departure, along with that of 
Charles J. Partee, whose term ex- 
pires in January, gives President 
Ronald Reagan the opportunity to 
have a majority of his appointees 
on the seven-member boara of gov- 
ernors. 

The president’s two previous ap- 
pointees, vice chairman Preston 
Martin and Martha Seger, have 
tended to favor somewhat looser 
monetary polities than their col- 
leagues. 

The Fed's chairman, Paul A. 
Volcker, noted Mr. Gramley’s 1< 
tenure ai the Fed, first as a 
member and five years as a gover- 
nor, saying he served with “distinc- 
tion and dedication.” 

Mr. Gramley is considered a 
strong ally of Mr. Vdcker on the 
board. His 14-year term was to 
have run .until 1994. 

He served as an economist and 
staff chief at the Fed, before being 
appointed to the board in 1980 by 
President Timmy Carter. He had 
been a member of Mr. Carter’s 
Council of Economic Advisers. 

Fed board members are paid 
$73,600 a year. Mr. Vcdcker, as 
chairman, is paid $75,100 a year. 
Mr. Gramleys salary in the posi- 
tion he is taking was not disclosed, 
but ii is believed i 
higher. 


By Hisanobu Ohsc 

Reusers 

TOKYO — Foreign-exchange 
dealers in Tokyo say they do not 
expect further liberalization of Ja- 
pan's financial markets to affect 
the value of the yen, despite thtir 
forecasts last year that the currency 
would weaken as the markets were 
freed. 

Hie dealers said that political 
pressures from abroad and the de- 
cline in U3. interest rates have 
helped change their views. 

“Even if Japan lifts aO the re- 
strictions, a stop yen fall is unlike- 
ly," said Shigeru Nakayama, vice 
president at Bankers Trust Co„ 
adding that the flow of capital out- 


side Japan has “already poked." 

Japan's long-term capital ac- 
count deficit more than doubled, to 
$54.55 bflhoD in the fiscal year that 
ended March 31, from $20.80 bil- 
lion in fiscal 1983. 

The dollar advanced to a 1985 
high of 263.65 yen in February 
from 235 yen in June 1984, but is 
now trading at around 249 yen. 

The flow of yen out of Japan 
through foreign bond and other in- 
vestments has shown signs of slow- 
ing because of the recent drop in 
U3. interest rates, the drop of the 
dollar below 250 yen and height- 
ened foreign exchange risk.*, deal- 
ers said. 

However, Western trading part- 


ners repeatedly have demanded 
that Japan strengthen the yen to 
cut its huge trade surplus. And it 
seems likdy European Community 
leaders win discuss the yen during 
their current meeting in Milan. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain, who said last 
week that Japan should stop keep- 
ing the yen at an artificially low 
level said that she would raise the 
issue at the meeting. 

David G Midland, assistant U3. 
treasury secretary for international 
affairs, said Tuesday in Tokyo that 
the United States wants faster ac- 
tion by Japan to deregulate interest 
rates to increase the attractiveness 
of holding yen-denominated assets. 


Mr. Mulford said that this would 
slow Japanese capital outflows and 
help strengthen (he yen to a level 
more accurately reflecting Japan’s 
economic strength. 

However, Masaio Ka warn ura, 
chief dealer at (he Bank of Tokyo 
Ltd., said that further liberalization 
in current market conditions would 
temporarily depress the yen. 

Mr. Nakayama of Bankers Trust 
said it was Hkdy that speculators 
would take advantage of further 
liberalization to buy the dollar and 
capital outflows aiso would sup- 
port the dollar. But he said that 
such buying would be short-lived 
and that the Japanese currency 
would not again weaken to 260 yen. 


He said that the Japanese gov- 
ernment has a difficult task in ey- 
ing to liberalize its financial mar- 
kets while strengthening the yen. 

The Finance Ministry has reject- 
ed requests from Japanese trust 
banks to allow them to invest in 
foreign bonds from their loan trust 
accounts. 

Foreign-exchange dealers and 
trust-bank officials said that the 
ministry' apparently is worried 
about creating another channel for 
capital outflows, which would 
weaken the yen. 

Last week, Japan allowed nine 
foreign banks to enter the domestic 
trust bank sector. 


The Merger Game Becomes Long-Term Strategy 


1 to be substantially 


By Daniel F. Cuff 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — - Last year, the 
lag players were oD companies, 
with tbor multibfllkkn-doDar deals. 
This year, the focus in the game of 
mergers and acquisitions has scat- 
tered, jumping to broadcasting, 
health care, consumer brands, 
banks, the airlines and to two new- 
ly acquisitive giants: General Mo- 
tors Corp. and International Busi- 
ness Machines Corp. 

In fact, few business sectors have 
escaped the fast-paced buying and 
selling in the first six months of 
1985. Beyond the blockbusters, 
hundreds cf companies sporting 
more m oderate price m gs have 
been bought ana sold; by one 
count there were 793 transactions 
completed in the first quarter 
alone. 

Deregulation is spurring consoli- 
dation in such industries as broad- 
casting. banking and the airlines. 
An easier antitrust climate has also 
eased the way for corporate giants, 


such as General Motors and IBM, 
to oiler the playing Geld. Such 
combinations would have been 
practically unthinkable 10 or 15 
years ago. 

Creative ways of financing merg- 
ers have also sprung up. But what 
most impresses some experts is that 
many companies have accepted 
mergers ana takeovers as part of 
long-range strategy. 

“Certainly 15 years ago, acquisi- 
tions were made as a separate 
thrust," said Albert T. Olenzak, 
corporate planner at Sun Co. 
“There were some that acquired 
and some that didn't Today acqui- 
sitions and divestitures are consid- 
ered a normal part of carrying out 
corporate strategy.” 

This is happening despite the 
failure of many of ihe publicized 
mergers. The track is tittered with 
companies that have taken on new 
businesses that turned out to be 
losers, often because the acquiring 
company did not understand the 
operations they purchased. And ac- 


say it is getting 
more difficult to find com panies to 
buy without paying prohibitive 
premiums. 

Current corporate catchwords 
are “restructuring" and “maximiz- 
ing shareholder value.” Ii turns out 
that the best defense against corpo- 
rate raiders is to beat them at their 
own game erf trying to drive up a 
stock price. 

“The basic thing is when you 
strip away the Icahnsand the Pick- 
enses, all the mega-mergers, the 
vast majority of the mainstream 
things are very strategically driv- 
en,” said Martin Stkara, editor of 
Mergers and Acquisitions maga- 
zine. 

The blockbusters are still very 
mud) in evidence this year, though 
they are not as big as Chevron's 
5133-biffion purchase of Gulf last 
year or Texaco’s SIO.l-biDioa ac- 
quisition of Getty. But the numbers 
did reach records outside the od 
patch: 

• Hospital Corp- of America 


proposed a merger with American 
Hospital Simply Corp" in which 
A merican Hospitals shareholders 
would get about S2J> billion for 
their stock. Later, in a competing 
bid, Baxter Travenol Laboratories 
lno, offered $3.6 billion for Amer- 
ican HospitaL 

• Ted Turner, the Atlanta 
broadcasting entrepreneur, is seek- 
ing a S5.4-bQlion takeover of CBS 
IncL, to be financed with high-inter- 
est securities, called “junk bonds." 

• GM outbid other companies 
for Hughes Aircraft Co., for 55 
biffioa m cash and stock, in a 
strong move into high technology. 

• Allied Corp. has agreed to ac- 
quire Signal Cos. for 55 bflhon, a 
combination that would result in a 
huge industrial complex of high 
technology and aerospace. 

• RJ. Reynolds Industries is of- 
fering to pay $4 3 bfflion for Na- 
bisco Brands Inc. to create the larg- 
est consumer-products company m 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


On the French Riviera 

THE ONLY FRENCH 
CASINO WITH A Fl'I.I. 
COM PI -EM ENT OF 
FEMALE DEALERS 



Loews 
La Napoule 

five m inure drive 
ham downtown Cannes, 
on die beadi 


FOR INFORMATION: 
PLEASE CALL 

(93) 49.90.00 


V 




Page 10 





















































































Jrt, 'Jji £> 


INTERNATIONAL 


TrsTLvrr 


TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


Page 11 


U& Furfures 


UMn High Law Ofi** Qn 


Food 


Gnindig Plans Layoffs, Joint Venture With UTC 









$40 5473 








Eat. Sales 
prev.Day 

SILVER C 



Eat. Soto • . rv_Salas 3 
Prev.Day Open t»64*2 upi 
■m •Tiutmnrn 

5S 4 

sor 

44! 

ray at-doflar: tray az. 
1.50 MU? 4 26550 

26758 26430 264JD +30 



4 


Currency Options 



FURTH, West Germany — 
Gnindig AG plans job cots in Italy, 
Spain and Portugal as part of re- 
structuring program aimed at re- 
turning tbe group to profiiabfliiy. 

the manurin g board chairman, 

■Herrnanus Kotng, said Friday. 

During a briefing for Bavarian 
stale officials. Mr. ftouig said that 
the re struct uri ng included forma- 
tion of a joint venture company to 
produce car components with 
United Technologies Automotive 
Inc., a subsidiary of United Tech- 
nologies Corp. 

He confirmed earlier estimates 
that the company, winch is con- 
trolled by NV Philips, reduced its 
world group net loss to 185 million 
Deutsche marks (S60.45 minion) in 
the 1984-85 financial year from 286 
million DM a year earlier. Revenue 
rose rose 2 percent to 2.83 btEHon 

DM, chairman 

Mr. Kooig said that Gnindig, 


which manufactures radios, televi- 
sions and electronic equipment, 
will cut 1.000 jobs at its Portuguese 
television factory and an unspeci- 
fied number of others jobs in Italy 
and Spain. 

In January. Grundig said that it 
would cut us international work 
force by 29 percent, or about 7.000 
jobs. A company spokesman said 
Friday that that number had been 
reduced because of a plan for vol- 1 
notary layoffs and early retire- j 
mats reached with West German 
unions that represent 2JXX) em- 
ployees. 

At least half of those workers 
Hkdy wfll take advantage of the 
plan, he said. However, the spokes- 
man could not say how many jobs 
would be lost worldwide. 

Mr. Konig said that the restruc- 
turing efforts were beginning to 
show some success because revenue 
in the first months of the current 
fiscal year, which ends March. 31, 


T hat will lake more time. " 


character of their juiciness hac a]- 


•.-i-m'.Tf-l-r 


jlLADEL PHIA E XCHANGE 



SP COMP. INDEX ICME) 
points and cants 

T9&M moo sep 1909 mss mao mar -oo 

199.1 D 17570 Dec 197 JO 197 JS T964B 1*445 -35 

20235 190. HI Mar 2BCU0 200J0 200.40 1*9.73 —JD 

20230 J00J0 Jun 20240 20240 2D240 20275 —A 0 

EP. Sato C59S Prev.Sato S1J00 
Prev.Day Open InL 52781 off IU 

VALUB-UMECKCBT} 

21940 17100 Jun 20040 20070 199.95 20035 —.15 

217 JO 185J5 Sep 2D4JB 20475 28155 ZHDQ -^55 

211i» 20000 D«e 2DBJ0 20140 20740 207 JO —S5 

Est Sates Prav.SalM- <4409 •, 

Pruv.DayOOMlnL 7,W up in 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
pabits and GMlS 

11340 *135 Sw 1T2J0 11180 11235 112J0 

1155G 10121 Dec 11450 1U60 11420 11440 

1172) 1094D Mar 11430 11430 11430 11430 
114.10 11450 Jan 11130 

EstSaws 4294 Prev. Sales 1043* 

Prsv.oavOpen Int. 4011 up4B) 


rf Amairan Erqpress, said a. Wiegers, a former Lehman part- 
that mddmg Lehman into Shear- ^ w ^gf t ^ 1983 Md 

Read & Co. “Lehman 
pressed optmnsm. “Sure, we’ve Brothen of old may have been 

small in influence. That’s the heart 
bottom is behind us. This company of whalh was, a very high-powered 
has a maior part to play m the deal maker” 

“If. mors , ctoribolk® buri- 

ly of the old Lehman firm, have h^-e" J 

But Shearson Lehman’s officers 
s P ealc excitaS y now about using 1 
rf WMhSE investment bank’s special skills 
thefo mth quartg of 1984, before ^ just to _ transactions, 

mah “ 1 “ but u>paiti4Sm them. 

^ tS^S'tahmar, Umth **If you csd go into deals as a 
At 134yeOT old, Lehman Broth- prindpal rather than just a broker. 

SlESl *** rctuni “ 50 math better,” Mr. 

Cohen said. ‘That is where we sre 

s& sasssz rswttssfs 

fare threatened to tear it ^MTt broadeuinE, Shearson’s retail busi- 

MISSSldSSEi 

a wide range of securities — have |.iu.i: JL |i i i nanK™ pJrL i_aj 

^ a stnm^^SS intent, 
tkmal financial madras. 

They have also retamed some of aeareoo Lehman does not envi- 

aonitsdfasafmandalsupermar- 
bet in the mold of Merrill Lynch or 




Previous 
*1M8f 
1J54j6D 
11SJ4 
227 JO 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody's 9142Df 

Reuters 1,7500 

DJ. Futures 11 & 4 Q 

Com. Re se arch Bureau. 22460 

Moody's : base TOO : Dec 31, 1931. 
p- preliminary; f- final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 14 1931. 
Dow Janes : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


CMcaeo Board of Trade 
Chtcnno Mercantile Exchange 
International Monetary Market 
Of Chicago Meramnie Exdianoe 
Haw York Caca o , Sugar, Coffee Exchange 
JJevr York Cotton Exdnwe 
ComnxxfltY Exctxewe. Mem York 
New York Morcanffle Exchange 
Kansas CJtv Board of Trod* 

New York Futures Exchange 



nty combining the attributes erf a nKrc h anl ^ c™™ with 

JSSSJ LS* m5avmeal “ d kingpinssodiasS^SIUws 
praerreo siccz. and G oldman, Sachs, acoording to 

The adaptation has been more Mr. Cohen, 
difficult on the corporate finance “Nobody has done it, but I don’t 

side, m clu ding mergers and aoqui- think that means it cannot be 
sitions. Tbe uncertainty over where done,” said Robert F. Shapiro, 
the comhmetf company is headmg president of Wenheim&Ca and a 
has led to an exit of some senior Lehman partner until 1973. “It’s a 
Lehman partners — and clients, matter of the commitment* of the 
The loss of its independent tradi- people at tbe top. If they’re set on 
tion also eroded its reputation for it, and they have the capability, it 
deal-making panache. can happen.” 

For example, American Broad- But the trickiest issue Shearson 
casting Cot, an old customer, Lehman faces in building such a 
turned to First Boston Corp. for merchant bank is fostering an 
advice m its acquisition by Capital open, entrepreneurial environment 
Cities. Chase M a nhatta n Bank, amid its buy bureaucracy. So far 
ltd, Uniroyal, Storer Comm nnica- though the emphasis been on 
tions and Allied Carp, are among tighter controls, 
other defect or s. “There has bees a change in phi- 

Mr. Solomon said the investment losophy there,” Mr. Lane said. ^We 
bank was harmed by the chaos in centrafize trading risk. We organize 
Lehman’s last months, when part- it more than they had before. In 
hot made fewer csjb an dnti. spite of the fact that our total posi- 
^fc took our eye off the ball, he non is larger than theirs was — 
stdd. w “But we’re working harder about S26bfllion a day— our risk 


Still, tbe investment hank has 


posture is somewhat smaller." 
Some Lehman partners who left 



CoimmfitM I Commwiities 




had its s u ccesses. Shearson Leh- the company point to this unaccus- 
man Brothers, far instance, was an tamed control as the reason they 


Cash Prices 




Jr Mr B ' ■ >' 



WM. 1 * ' 1 " ** ^ C ^ 

Fma erano g«r metric tan 

Aon 1310 1315 1323 —3 

Ocf 132D 1310 1310 UU +1 

D*C 1330 1330 1325 1334 UncfL 

Mar 1370 1355 1350 1366 — 1 

MOV 1370 1310 1300 1319 Uncft. 

Aug . N.T. M.T. 1350 1370 +3 

E*t NbWIA of SO torn. Prov. actual 
sons: 4097 rats. Opon intemt: 19350 
COCOA 

FradiftmNrWti 

±tY H-T. N-T. 1350 2350 Unch. 

^ I8S ii 

ZZ, VS 1® 3SS “5 t? s 

JIV >LT. N.T. 2310 — +15 

S» N.T. K.T. 2315 — +15 

Ext. WjLi .H2.hti.0j io tona. Prav. actual 
goto: 45la(s.Opgn InlarMt: 754 
COM* 

rrm c k knm w 100 kg 

JtV 9LT. NT. 2300 2375 —SO 

S*P 2340 2325 2336 2350 —IS 

NOV 2400 2409 2376 2398 — 11 

Jan NT. N.T. 2422 2460 Upch. 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2430 2460 Uadi. 

May N-T. NT. 2425 2455 —ID 

JIV N.T. N.T. 2425 2460 —15 

.ENyoU 31 loti of 5 tana Pnv. actual scMs: 
34 lots. Oaan Mmrt: 433 
5eure»: Bourmttu CommwraL 


C wN BuadUMt Frt Ago 

Cofte«4 SontcsUb 140 146 

1 PrintdflUl 64^038 V^vd_ 469 474 

steal uuitta (PlttJ.tan £130 453J6 

ln3n2RJrv.PWla.tDn 21334 21304 

Stoat scroa No low Pitt. 7V71 UO-191 

LBOdSpOJ.Hl 1»-21 39-22 

Cooper elect. B) 4M> <4* 

Tin (Straits), ft 41374 4370 

B"C,E.SLUB«H«.lb 94+47 BJ4-JS 

F»allocflurn.oi - - *M* 153 

Silver N.Y. QZ 414 US 

Sourct: AP. 


Dnidends 


adviser to Nabisco Brands in its left, and say it will sap creativity. 
S4.9-billion acquisition by RJ. Mr. Cohen bristles at this. 
Reynolds Industries. Gnawing at one of the unlit cigars 

The deal involved the classic fra- he favors since giving up cigarettes, 
mu in of the traditional investment he said: “I have no patience for 
bank-client relationship. Andrew people who say that It’s wishful 
G.C Sap 2d, a Lehman partner thinking on the part of our compel- 
who stayed with the combined itore.” 

firm, sits on Nabisco’s board. Mr. And Mr. Solomon stated, “We 
Sage had been on the board of have introduced more accountabil- 
Standard Brands before its union ity. responsibility and management 
with Nabisco in 1981, for which systems throughout” He added: 
Lehman was an adviser. And he “If an IBM can do it, it ram be done 
will Jain tbe Reynolds board. in this indnstry. Bigness does not 


people who say that It’s wishful 
thinking on the part of our compet- 


whb Nabisco m 1981, for which systems throughout” He added: 
Lehman was an adviser. And he “If an IBM can do it, it can be done 
wffljoin tbe Reynolds board. in this indnstry. Bigness does not 
Toe improving reputation in the have to extin guish that creative 
capital-markets area, contrasted verve.” 


1986, was up slightly from the the 
year-ago period. 

That increase, he said, primarily 
reflected higher exports and higher 
sales volume in specialist electron- 
ics. little growth is expected in 
consumer electronics, be said. 

Mr. Konig also said that Gnin- 


digwfll lake a 25.1-pcrceni stake in 
tbe new car-components venture, 
named UTG-United Technologies ■ 
Grundig GmbH, and the United 
Technologies unit the other 74.99 
percent. The new company will 
start production later this year with 
100 employees. 


Shearson Lehman Seeks 
To Fine-Tune Its Image 

(Continued from Page 9) with its slipping image in corporate 
, finance, has altered the way rivals 

oor chMMaya rally. ^ b Wt itomi The 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations supplied by Funds Listed 
28 June 1985 




ALMAL MANAGEMENT 

(w> AJ-Mal Trust. SA 

BANK JULIU5 BAER & CO. 130. 


■UPOl led by the Ftsnd* listed wtttittM 
oswf aa bsiM pricu. Tlw MtoHtns 
ui otaWo us meted tor tbe IHT: 

(r) -regularly; tn-l r r w t c rty. 

— +tw> uovtte uto F«ocmc SF 13136 

$15400 — +(«rl Lloyds InTl SmaHar C04. SM47 


— IOI BoertsorW 

— <dl Conbar. 

—Id I Eouiboer America 
—Id ) Eauibaer Eurooe- 
—Id ) Eaulboer Pacific- 

—Id > Crater 

— (d ) Stock bar 


SF *42.15 —Id J Class A 

SF 1247JB -li» CteB-UA — 
s 110700 — iw i Class C ■ Jason. 
SF 126100 
SF 1210M 
SF 10BSOO 
SF 1476.00 



Treasur) 


ljondon Metals 


DM Futures 
Options 

W scraw Mar*- 22U08 marts, ctexstr 




i O; j 



Company Per Amt 

- INCREASED 
Gaa u u ntH h Ensrav Q 43 

REDUCED 

Raputdlc Auto. O 34 

STOCK 

Soper VtrtuStaras . 100 % 

USUAL. 

Alex 4 Baldwin Q 35 

Amoco+'lmSuroto Q _S7 Va 

Bay Banks Q -SB 

Boston Edliaa Q 41 

CtemLown Con> B 39 Vb 

Cbomolon Prodods Q .10 

Colgate , Q 32 

Collin* g. Alltrocn o .76 

Curtice- Bums Q 33 

Dale Electronics Q 34 

Fed Dept stares Q43U 

Hotel invest Tr a 45 

jmb Realty Tr o 47 

Moore Ftad Group a JO 

MuWtenfc Ftad Q .7* 

MunaetSparlGds Q 35 

Peerless Tube a .10 

Pftaer O 37 

Ptoneor standard Q 33 

Plttway Corp a 4S 

Sara Lee Q J6 

Sy» Eng ineer a Mto Q 32 Vi 

TwJsnat Corp Q 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


9-5 B-15 
7^1 7*10 
S-l 7-14 
0-1 7-10 
T- 1 S 7-1 

7- 14 7-4 

8- 1S 7-25 
M M 

7-30 7-15 
7-14 7-9 

7-26 Ml 

4- 1 7-15 

7-31 7-14 
7-1* 74 

MB 7-9 
7-26 M2 

9- 13 B3D 
MO 4-1 

5- l 7-W 

10- 1 M3 

16-1 9-3 

7-25 7-15 

4-1 Ml 


Earnings 

Snenoe end arsfffs. to mHOA ore in 

local currencies unless nffierwisr 
foot extra. 





[vrrrj 


mmm 


Om* European organization with headquarters in Switzerland 
offers a career opportunity to a 

VICE PRESIDENT 
SALES & MARKETING 

reporting to the President/ Europe 

Yon will be leading a highly qualified team of engineers servicing major accounts in 
industries in Europe, Africa, Middle East. 

REQUIREMENTS: 

— University engineering graduate 
— Successful negotiator on senior management level 
— Experience with major industries 
— Team work and willingness to travel 
— Age 35-45. 

We are the recognized world leader in the field of metallurgical specialities in both products and marketing 
innovations, with more than 50 years successful experience. Our customer base covers all industry sectors in all 
parts of the world. 

Please reply h confidence, giving business experience, personal data and salary reqtiiretnents to: 

REF. 102, OFISA, P.O. BOX 3453, 1002 LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND. 

























































































































vrmfc* 






** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKPAY-5UNDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


Page 13 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


t - y 

i 


Ekiserdi Plans 
To Reduce Assets 

iVev- Yvrk Tunes Serri K v 

NEW YORK — Enserch 
Corp„ affccied by falling oil 
and gas prices, has announced 
thai i! will wrile down its assets 
by about $225 million before 
taxes in the second quarter. 

The company said Thursday 
that the write-down, to about 
S400 million, would be partly 
offset by an $ 85 -million, after- 
tax gain from die public sale of 
about IS percent oi Enserch Ex- 
ploration Partners Ltd-, a limi t- 
ed partnership formed in April- 
Some analysts believed the 
write-down would result in a 
second-quarter loss for the Dal- 
las-based company. 

Enserch earned S14.8 mil- 
lion. or 16 cents a share, in the 
second quarter of 1984. The 
company declined to comment 
on this year's second quarter. 


Nestle, UnUeyer Plan 
Merger of Some Units 


Hewers • 

VEVEY, Switzerland — The 
Nestlfc and Unilevergroup vplan to 
merge' their fresh dairyproduci ac- 
tivities in France andpeigium be- 
ginning in 1986*. Ne^6 SA said; 
FridayT Nestld would fl? the major- 
ity partner. f 

A spokesman for declined 
to give (Sails erf the 

agreement. | 

The merger wpuldfrmprise Nes^ 
Ik’s Cfaambourcy fcjw diary in 
France and Thule#* s umts in 
France ar *ri BdgunJ Nestlfi said,: 
Nestle has nofresw^ny product 
company in Belgfcn but sells 
Cbambourcy piddu® diere,, 

Chambourwhadp^tuedf 1.18 

billion French' fray *S126 m3- 
lion) last year, wle Unuevo’fc 
Fraud) .units, ~La Kwh* aux F6cs 




Mergers Becomelxmf 


and Rousset. had revenue of 1.12 
billion francs. 

Unilever’s Belgian subsidiary, 
Jacky. bad revenue of 2.65 billion 
Belgian francs ($43 million). 

Chambourcy employs 1,700 peo- 
ple, and Unilever's French units 
1.650. Jacky employs about 700 
people. 

The agreement is subject to gov- 
ernment approval 

The merger was prompted by 
pressures on profit margins, a Unil- 
ever spokesman in London said. 

Recent cost-cutting measures 
were not enough to secure long- 
term profitability and “a structural 
solution was therefore necessary," 
he said. 

Nestle emerges as the majority 
partner because it is more strongly 
based in the relevant refrigerated 
foods such as yogurt. 



■ i; {Continued from Page 9) 

' S' the United States. Animal sales 
' * would be $19 bOBon. 

V • Capital Cities Cotnmunica- 
tions Inc. is snapping up the much 
' larger ABC for 53.5 Mbon- 
: 4;. • Rupert Murdoch, the pubbsh- 

. ; • er, is seeking a group of indepen- 
:• dent tdeviaon stations from Me- 
-^tromedia Inc. for $2 biU km . 

. . GM and IBM, which have sd- 
1- dom mmte major acqui s i tion s, be- 

• gan last year to do so as they pm- 
•n sued then- bnsmess stretches. GM 

— •bought Electronic Data Systems 
t 1, for $2.6 MEon, and IBM pur- 

■!! rhawt ihat 77 percent of Rom, a 

£ telecommunications manufacturer, 

» that it did not already own, for $U 

- :• billion. 

: : This year, GM is seeking 

' : • Hughes, and IBM is allying itself 

• !* with MCI Commozdcations Carp. 
— in an agreement to buy up to 30 

percent of the stock « the long- 
distance telephone company. 
“Truly we are not just tap in g 
■;^jhboui merger for merger’s sake, 

; - :^aid Alfred Rappoport, a meters 
'. , expert at Northwestern University. 

‘These are parts of strategies for 
1 transfer off technology and produo- 
- tiviiy. The motivation is quite 
: clear.” 

Mr. Olenzak, the Sun Co. plan- 
"■ ner, said of GM*s move: “They are 
designing a carparation for the 
. year 200®." 

In the broadcasting industry, 
’ ■' more mergers are expected, be- 
. cause the Federal Commnnications 


Commission has 
owner to holdup 
12 AM and 12 ’ 
from 7 in each « 
Themoststn 
mergers, however, 
do with that change, j 
was able to bid for 
because the net* 

under valued the i 

And Mr. Tomer was] 
hk publicized nm 
of the aw 
bonds that allow . 
rimaholdas without' 


athingto 

*altifies 

in -ptot 
* 

pace 
's assets. 
tO tpKlcft 

be- 
of junk 
■CBS 
any 


In hwwVing j n-ginnya tntinm 
are expected.to get ffcerwilh 
mere frequency now ®the Su- 
preme G»m has bac^ h com- 
binations. Wachovia. jp. of 
North C ar o lina and EfoUlanta 
Carp, announced aptWd com- 
bination, as (fid First Un. Carp, 
of North Candma.ndtlflntic 
Banomporation of Flopo . 

ihe anhnes were potato the 
merger fray by Can C^fci’sb id 
for Trans World Anfu>which 
smoked out a higher^ hid 
of $930 ndnkm from Is Air 
Carp. Now other mqotaies are 
said to be stn^ying one aier for 
merger possibilities, andy are 
also manning defepseqainst 
takeover as the indnsttyuofir 
dates. ■' r. 

In health care, Hoqstaip. cf 
America’s plan to me with 
American Hospital woolcih in 
a vast enterprise combi the 


largest private hospital company 
and the largest hospital supplier. 
But Baxter Travendf suddenly de- 
cided that it. too, wants American 
Hospital and although its first bid 
was rejected, it has now sweetened 
its offer. Baxter TYavenol said it 
was offering $50 a share, or $3.6 
bflfion, for American Hospital's 
72.6 mQfian shares outstanding. 
HCA’s offer is valued at $35 a 
share, or $2d> billion, to holders of 
American Hospital stock. 

At RCA Corn* there was elation 
recently over the agreement to sell 
the Hertz car-rental business, 
which had been put on the block 
several years ago when it no longer 
seemed to fit with RCA’s business- 
es. UAL Ino, the owner of United 
Aidines, saw Hertz as a fit, howev- 
er, and agreed to buy it last week 
far $587 J mini on 

Gulf & Western Industries and 
Wickes Cos. found a different kind 
of fit. As the big conglomerate pur- 
sued its divestment strategy, it was 
eager to sell its consumer and in- 
dustrial groups. Wickes was willing 
to boy them for SI teffian. 

"What is gong an in the UJL 
today are several trends causing a 
restructuring of all American bus- 
ness,” Mr. Olenzak of S&n said. 
“One is a political-economic trend 
toward deregulation and lower tar- 
iffs. Another is a trend toward a 
free market, with competition in 
almost everything. Companies are 
now far sale, just the same as prod- 
ucts and services.” 


AT&T Wins 

Computer 

Contract 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Ameri- 
can Telephone & Telegraph 
Co M which entered the crowded 
computer field only last year, 
has won a major contract from 
the National Security Agency 
that ultimately could be worth 
as much as $946 milli on. 

Under the contract, con- 
firmed Friday by the Defense 
Department, the giant commu- 
nications organization would 
provide as many as 250 of its 
new 3B line of super minicom- 
puters to the NSA, the largest 
and most secret of the nation's 
intelligence agencies. 

Neither AT&T nor the secu- 
rity agency would disclose how 
the new computers would be 
used- An agency spokesman, 
Mike Levin, would say only 
that the machines wore for a 
“new purpose" and would in- 
volve “many units, spread oul 
over a number of places^ 

The agency recently was as- 
signed responsibility for com- 
puter security within the gov- 
ernment. 

AT&T said it would get die 
foil $946 million only if the 
agency exercises all the options 
in the contract, which extends 
through 1988. In winning the 
job, AT&T beat out a host of 
major computer makers, in- 
cluding International Business 
Machines Corp., Gould Inc. 
and Digital Equipment Corp. 

‘This is a Very large procure- 
ment which we worked very 
hard on for more than a year," 
said Warren Corgan, the vice 
president in charge of AT&T's 
Federal Systems Divirion. 


Arnexco to Shut Japan Banking Unit 


Reuters 

TOKYO — American Express 
International Banking Corp. has 
told the Japanese finance Ministry 
that it will return its Japanese 
banking license and suspend bank- 
ing operations by next January, a 
bank spokesman said Friday. 

The move follows a decision by 
its parent company, American Ex- 
press Co„ to concentrate on securi- 
ties rather than banking in Japan. 
Shearson Lehman Brothers Kuhn 
Loch Asia Inc., which is owned by 
the holding company, said Thurs- 
day that it intended to apply soon 
for a securities branch license. 

Shearson Lehman has an office 
in Tokyo but its activities there are 
limited. A securities license would 
enable the company to engage in 
such operations as bond and stock 
broking and bond underwriting, a 


American Express International 
set up its Tokyo^ branch in 1 954 and 
had assets of 78.9 billion yen ($317 


million) at the end of March, the 
spokesman said. It is rated as a 
middle-level bank in assets among 
tiie 76 foreign banks in Japan, but 
its return ou assets puts it among 
the top 10, he said. 

Banking sources said foreign 
banks account for only about 3 
percent of banking in Japan. 

A senior banker at a large U.S. 
bank said liberalization of the fi- 
nancial market in Japan has barely 
touched the money market, which 
restricts foreign bank operations. 

Some bankers said American Ex- 
press's decision is typical of the 
shift by foreign banks into securi- 

Ilalian Coit*umer Prices Rise 

Reuters 

ROME — Italian consumer 
prices rose 0.5 percent in June after 
rising 0.6 percent in May, the na- 
tional statistics institute said Fri- 
day. The year-to-year increase for 
June was 8.7 percent. 


ties. Their interest is restricted 
mainly to underwriting and dealing 
in government and other public 
bonds. 

Some banks have tried to deal in 
a wider variety of bonds by encour- 
aging their securities subsidiaries to 
set up offices in Tokyo. The Bank 
of Japan tends to turn a blind eye 
to bond transactions by these of- 
fices. 

Citicorp, which has long been 
engaged in banking through the 
Tokyo branch of Citibank NV. has 
made inroads into securities 
through its interest in Vickers da 
Costa Ltd., sources said. 

Citicorp's access to securities 
through Vickers is allowed because 
its slake in the company is below 
the 75-percem limit set by the for- 
eign securities bouse law. they said. 

Japan and West Germany last 
week held talks about the possible 
entry of West German banks into 
the securities market. 


Cor Firms Make 
Cuts in Argentina 

l 'luted Pnss Irttenuinouul 

BUENOS AIRES — Argen- 
tina's two largest auio compa- 
nies. Ford and Renault, have 
announced they were temporar- 
ily suspending or curtailing pro- 
duction because of labor unrest 
and plummeting sales. 

A Ford spokesman said the 
company. Argentina's largest 
auto concern, had indefinitely 
suspended production line op- 
erations at its main plant near 
Buenos Aires after a one-day 
occupation of the factor/ by 
employees protesting the dis- 
missal of 33 workers. 

In Cordoba, a spokesman for 
Renault said production at its 
Santa Isabel plant would be 
suspended every Monday for 
five weeks, beginning July 1. 
"The market is going down ev- 
ery day.” he said. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Chrysler Finance Arm 
ToBnyEJF. Hutton Unit 

The Associated Press 
DETROIT — Chiysler Finan- 
cial Corp., Chrysler Corp.’s finance 
arm, will buy me common stock of 
E.F. Hutton Credit Corp. for $125 
milli on, it was anno unced Friday. 

The Hutton unit is involved in 
commercial lending and leasing. 

In mid-May, Chrysler an- 
nounced ajoint venture between 
Chrysler F inanc ial and General 
Electric Credit Corp. 


Alcoa of Australia Ltd. and the 
Victoria state government have in- 
creased their stakes in the 1.15- 
bfllion -dollar ($766 minion) Port- 
land aluminum smelter project by 
15 percent Rob Jolly, state treasur- 
er, said Alcoa now holds 60 percent 
and the government 40 percent. 

Amada Ok of Japan has signed 
an agreement to buv about 40 per- 
cent of Prima Industrie SpA of 
Moncalieri, Italy, for 1.10 billion 
yen ($442 milli on), including 200 
million yen as payment for research 
and development that Prima con- 
ducted for Amada. 

Britofl PLC has awarded £20 
million ($25.8 million) in contracts 
for the commissioning phase of the 
Clyde Held in the North Sea. 
where oil production is to begin in 
March 1987. ADC International 
LtdvBICC PLQ SGB Group PLC 
and Salamis Marine & Industrial 
Ltd. won the contracts. 

Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. 
of Japan has signed an agreement 
with China National Automotive 
Industry Import & Export Corp. to 
make 250cc motorcycles under li- 
cense in China. 

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. 
of Japan said it has signed a tech- 
nological cooperation agreement 
with Spain's largest industrial 
group, the state-owned National 
Industrial Institute. The pact calls 
for cooperation in shipbuilding, 
ship repairs, engine manufacture 
and offshore construction. 

OM Court Saving & Loan Asso- 
ciation's withdrawals have been 
frozen for at least 20 days by a 


Baltimore judge who also has 
barred the thrift from accepting 
any new deposits. Judge Martin 
Greenfeld allowed Old Court to 
pay off all balances of less than 
$100, about 4.500 accounts. 

Pfltebmy Co. of Minneapolis has 
purchased about 24 mini on shares 
tendered under its offer for Diver- 
sifoods Inc. at SI 1 JO a share. Pills- 
bury said an additional 4J million 
shares have been tendered. Diversi- 
foods has about 33.6 milli on shares 
outstanding. 

United Airlines plans to increase 
flights to Japan from Los Angeles, 
San Francisco and New York on 
the routes it has purchased from 
Pan American World Airways for 
$750 million as soon as transfer of 
the those operations is completed. 

Rothmans Holdings Ltd. of Aus- 
tralia said it is entitled to 61.6 per- 
cent of the 13.93 milli on issued 
shares in Allen’s Confectionery 
Ltd. after Life Savers Ltd. accepted 
a Rothmans offer for its 162-per- 
cent stake. 

Semens AG of Munich said it is 
planning a geothermal-energy pro- 
ject with Deutsche Schacfatbau und 
Tiefbohr GmbH and Deutsche 
Tiefbohr AG. Financing and loca- 
tion have not been settled. 

Yardney Corp. of Los Angeles 
said its shareholders have adopted 
an agreement to merge with a sub- 
sidiary of Whittaker Corp. under 
which Yardney stockholders will 
receive $550 per share. Yardney 
manufactures high-energy-density 
batteries and water-filtration sys- 
tems. 


White House Under Pressure 
To Confront Trade Problems 


(Continued from Page V) 
the large United States bilateral 
trade deficit with Japan is offered 
as evidence of this. 

This week, in an effort to ward 
off such attacks, Japan announced 
that it was making a sweeping uni- 
lateral reduction on duties on 1,790 
items to open its market wider to 
foreign products. 

But the UJ3. trade difficulties, in 
the view of many economists, stem 
not just from the deeds of others 
but from the failings of the United 
Slates itself and its industries and 
labor. Low productivity growth 
and inadequate rates of investment 
are blamed as the underlying 
causes of declining United States 
competitiveness in many fields. 

Whatever the problems of indi- 
vidual industries, two major mac- 
roeconomic problems are disturb- 
ing the trade position of U.S. 
industry: the overvalued dollar and 
the more rapid rate of U.S. expan- 
sion compared to most other coun- 
tries. The former puts UJ5. prod- 
ucts at a serious price disadvantage 
and the latter sucks imports into 
this country more rapidly. 

Both of these problems are prov- 
ing tough nuts to crack. The dollar 
has held up, partly because the 
United Slates budget deficit re- 
mains high and this country has 
become a heavy capital importer 
from other countries. Further, the 
United States economy has slowed 


down from the rapid rate of ad- 
vance in 1983 and the first half of 
1984. but the trade problem has not 
yet eased. 

An ancient proverb holds that 
the fox knows many things, but the 
hedgehog knows one big thing. The 
one big thing that has dominated 
United States trade policy since the 
war — the concept of free trade — 
appears to te giving way to the 
belief that the United States now 
must do many things if it is to 
rescue itself from a foreign trade 
disaster. A more aggressive and di- 
verse United States trade policy is 
in the making 


National Australia Bank 
Raises Loan Rate 0.5% 

Reuters 

MELBOURNE — National 
Australia Bank Ltd. said Friday 
that it will raise its benchmark 
lending rate to 18.25 percent from 
17.75 percent on July 1. It also said 
it will lift its base lending rate, the 
other component of its split prime 
rate for large corporate knits, to 
17.25 percent from 16.75 percent 

The new benchmark rale is the 
highest set in Australia since trad- 
ing banks began using the term for 
large corporate lending rates early 
this decade. The previous record 
was 17.75 percent. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS WANTED 


lihon in private home. T«l franc* ( 
738471 


FRENCH COUPIE awb gyfe" 
prrvata cook/govemaL Tel Fran 
1941 73 84 71. 


— AUTOMOBILES 


MBCEDgfr — i BBDPE 

FBJHWUZE CM ITOMEET 
SAFETY 5TANDASDS 

D.O.T. * LPJL 

S YEARS EXFBBBNCE 
j. FRANK MC 


1008 Lagunas, Swteertad 


MERCEDES 350 SLC 1981 IHD.pMn 


Sect, 

1C w 


Td London BU 435 3230. 

_J3PEL ASCONA 1300GI 1984 
^31JX» km. tn mcefart.ewrftan 


F39.000 oNy > 

+ sroefi. Ira&er Ml 
93 Pin. 


fCXMJj 1 — 

' TfA.7451 


1981 BMW 3.1&. 1MMAOAA1 
blodk 5 ip«ci. 55fl00 bn. 

AM PM cosulfe. Worn 
F4Q.0Q0-Pori» 36134 07. 


miuiuBrau in 

Con be npeded in Ml 
For info- trt Sweden. ■ 


RESTOaroDAlMUSVi 

i aatefeiBftg 




AUTO RENTALS 




AUTORENTAtS 

OMHCRBfTA CAR. Prretjgeoon 
vdh phene: fab Spirt, Mwasdet, - 
Joguor, BMW, beonfineL tmgB enrv _ 
46 r Pierre Ounov 75006 PariL Tee - 
730304a Telex 630797 FOWLOC 

CHAUFFEUR » 

SERVICES !.) 

MBCB3B OOUFt You amTOj 

fSEE a 

edlunt. Porit &2O0392-3{xn/8pm. 

AUTO SHIPPING J 

HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 

CAR WTO THE U5-A. 

Thn doewnort (Ofimnt hfiv vftal on 
muit do fa bring n m nip the U5. 
w&Jy end lagaiy- k tncfadea.iew 8 _ 
reed fcwopeen auto prices, bujiogfipfc 
DOT & H*A cnrtvmjon udrfrenm, an- . 

r , 

jm^ieabuyi^a ^ ckIm, S 
BMW m Europe & enporting rt ta ft* j 
State*. To rnecric !te nxjxtoi, tend 

us, K , a®sa. p s!sr"“ . 

7000 SMtgan 1, Wert Germany R 

1 

CAR SHRYINO A SHVICB " 

As tpeaafaed Gorman ear fotwmfar ] 
we era your bert canracfcari farfaro- 

Free tatawnte utaboodMe. •] 

DffiTRKHRV. KOS5^HG. * 

ropil - 73Q5J51, Tbt 9230963 

Woridwfcte Car OMuq « 

TRANSSWPGrafcA 
Bgaju^Str- 58/<Q 

2800 Bremen 1 ■ 

Tefc 8M21/14264 Tfa 246584 Tim D 

Bei dnaMuhren 91 

Trt: |0)4a^^l&lfo < 2?4944 Tram D 

1 dwuOr/FPA + band in USA 
Member of AJCA. Washington 

MATWA5HMVK 

SMppita ta/lram UAA. 

n MATMA: Antwerp (3} M4 36 68 

- speritd CeodMrase at the Urerfag 
Antwerp SwM EwraleL 

0 WOSUJWBJE Cm 
k- eft ATK..NV. AMmne 

wera, Bekpum. 03/231 1653 Ts31535 

. 


Place Your Ctesified Ad CMddy and Earily 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Fbanu Gd your local WT representative with your text You 
wtH be informed oP the cost unu mdfotnty. and once prepayment a 
made your ad ertf appear witter* 48 hours. 

Cosu The basic rtfe is V £0 per Igopy ** T ^. B ? 

25let»er«.sia«ondipos*sinthefi r tfFt* 0, * , 36 ,1, *“* Da<,v ™'8* nos ' 

Mirvnun spam is 2 Bras No obfcrwWom 

Credit Conte Amenam Express, &ner * Oufa. EuxKord. Master 

Card. Access and Vea, 


HEAD OFFICE 

(For dewfied only): 
747-464)0. 

EUROPE 

Amsterdam 263615. 
Attune: 361-8397/360-2421. 
Brueeeb: 343-1899. 

: pi) 329440. 

; (DO) 72-67-55. 
r 29-58-94. 

Uibont 47-27.93/6625-44. 
Undo* (OU 8364802. 
Madrid: 455-2691/4563306. 
Milan: (02) 7531445 
Narmr 9^845545. 
Roam 47*3437 
Sweden: p8j 7569229. 

Tel A vim QB4S5 559. 
View** Certoct Frankfort. 

7 

UNITED STATES 

New York (212! 753-3890. 
West Coast: (4151 362-8339. 


LATIN A M E R ICA 

■vanei Aires: 41 4031 
(Dept 313 

33 14 54 


Guayaaofc 51 4505 
tem 417 852 
foaes 69 0511 
San Jeaer 22-1055 

Smdfoeo: 6961 555 

Saa ftjvtoj 852 1893 
MIPPLEEAST 

BdhMdn: 246301 
Kuwait: 5614485.' 

Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar 41&53S. 

Saudi Arabia! 

Jeddda 667-15DO 
IIAEj Dubai 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Bceufcofc 39O06S. . 

Hoop Konw H13671. 
Monlm 81707 49. 

SeooL 7358771 
- Snp n por a: 2Z2-2725. 
Tidwan: 752 44 25/9. 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 
Mebouma: 690 8233. 
Sydney: 929 56 39. 957 4350 
Perth: 328 96 33 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


IT) SHIPPING | AUTOS TAX FREE 


A> CONVERSION 


EMISSION 

KHNSUNG 


N GOOD RUNMNQ 
inmON. MOST: 


Kooo 

$4,000 

KOOO 

K500 

$5,500 

KOOO 


m KOOGMZED 
UORY 

CL BROKKAflE AND 
K AVAILABLE 

W14) 898-2182 

nx FBtAH COM UD 


LAVt BMW, MERCEDES, 
PQHAGUAS converted to 
meety & nCBBon H ueJmh 
far jfw UL5. Our uraric it My 

dec& guu indeed n be op- 
proon 5 years & older, ony 
sates era raqated. PteaM 
ml far apooutaent K1B 

AuwiaSr p.o. box 

7MP0 STUTTGART 70. Teb 
ton or 721 013.6* 7259966 


DO1C0NVER5I0N5 

to USrffeifl, born fci fl, emir , 
i Dutoanbve comp-- 

to USA B wo tad 

5anpcll7, 2586 HC The 
Hague Phone (0) 78-559245. 


nCffSWBBKM5 to US. 
-aMcsnee aua r oa tei d. VIA 
Sdd AeW, B«*nior., 
MO fc 301-592-3200, Tfo 
4995S. 


A TAX FREE 


ISCO 

THIS SPECIALISTS 
Sw&» Germany & England 

Tax fh^agoean May - 

y the opens. 

WSTCrt- Buck, Gray, Blue 
e Blade Hver 
L- Hod, Hue 

0M SOURCE 

■ndon Ud 
6540, Londo n Wl. 

. 39 7779 
122 TEAS G. 


500 StUE/BUOC metal, 
271 le. Price. DM95JW0. 


gJrfofonb. BMW 635 
09 ad arete blue natal, 
201 1r DM55000, 
. 635 C 1 81 deawnd Mod 
metal, « buRda black. 

mid, * bmoto brown. 
Price: til Procw-DiSo. 
ajfaieuMledrm. me 

Sft&CtVTl Turbo fasfah 
red.le, 3 rieMDMT15jqp, 
: 9UCo.™riraeteTlee*ri- 
erfakx&OQO, 9285 oulo- 

■aacts 

. ZTK 2B58404Z AUG E 


10 YEARS 

We DeBeer Cars to Nw Worfd 

TRANSCO 

Beeping a oonshal stock of more 8*» : 

300 brad new ow», 
l, wJ? n il I ® a, ^»PPy ctets every year 
Send far Free nwfacolarcardoa. 
Troraeo SA 95 Noonfclaan, 

2030 Art wp . Beknim 
Tel 333/sSasS^bl ^TOTEANS Bl 


LMiSA 

OFFIOAL ROLLS BOYCE 
DEALEB FOR BRjCUM 

TAX FRE CARS 
ROILS R0YCE BENTLEY 
RANGE and LANDROVBt 

rue MDD380URG 7482 
1170 Bresaels 
TH: 2-873 33 92 
TLX. 20377 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE far ematlule daKery 

FROM STOCK 

**&£ xs&jrssr* 

RUTE INC 

TAUNUSSTE. 52, MOORANGUKT 
W Gernu. W (016^232351, Ac 411559 


NEW BMW'S 

WHERE ELSE BUT MMKH 
745 Executive Artie Bee 
735 B e rae wd y/ Bejae leafter 
635 BejGtanceMea-ButB u ndy 
S3S Red-Arfc Bfoo-Whle 
323 Cdbriefat/318 GdmoM 

We Dinradee prices under German fat 
let (riM- 465041 er 42 
Tbc 522*51 - 10 (Lm. - 10 pjn. 


FROM STOCK 

Mercedes 500 SL/5&/SEQ new 
and many often at 
CadRfac, Ferrari. Jcncr. Range Rover, 
Und Rover, Pondia, Mercedes and 
after leadng nedes. 

Same day rugsbrUtan pnaijk. 

ICZKOVITS 

□eridenstrase 36. 0+8027 Zorich 
Tel: 01/20? 76 10. Tetec 815915. 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

Snes 1972. experienced car trader far 
Mercedes, Ffaraira, BMW. bnmednle 
deCvety. _Fu8 seraae import/ export, 
US. DOT & EPA, shipping far tourer 
wd draler. Oaraa Mnora GmbH. 
Teraeegendr. I BL * Duendcfarf. W. 
GermoraTn 211-«34646u fa 858>37A 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTI DELIVERY 

We beep a loraejtod at 
road cor brands 
Tet 02/648 55 13 
Tete 65658 
42 ne Lera, 

1050 r 


• BUY YOUR TAX RES CAR * 
Mercedes, F a nd he, BMW, Ferrari. 
Direct faeai eearee 
Direct from 


SELECTION taport-fxport GaifaH, 
Max^andnStrTTs. 280B Syto, West 
Germany. {q424240458l r 9, Ik 24109 


HOWTO GET A BR AND N EW 
GOMAN CAK M SHORTEST TIME. 
Consort our office m Mundt 
Prior lifadur Tax Fran Ck 
T k 5214751 Td 898576021 
W4 lel new MBtCHJES. BMW, 
Pondie, Perron end drier maka. 


RG TEAM 

Ofien to free com at low prices. Ai 
mefan & types* new& ittd. rBtfdw 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


USEDIlWtf CARS. Best choice. Sales; 

5 shipping vwridwide, Mercedes,! 
BMW, Jaguar, ftsahe. Peoraat, etc. 
Cheapest m the world. Sendfc far Est 

6 podogeto fradc Janswra, P.O. Box 


HAOPORT TAX .FRS CARS 
Cal far free cahdog.- 
Bax 1201 1, Bate rdcm Airport. HolandL 
Tet 010423077. The 2507T1 ffCAR NL 


New/ used. hrraecBat e detvery. Fo AVI 
Tnt Gwawry P) 6234-4092, Ifae 464986 


BMW WL43BC9, USS9m0,MB-80 1 

380 StUS$14ma MB76, 450 sa. 
USS&HKL All hdy loodod, uxahnt 
cOtaSon. Ohd GMBH, Muenchcn. 
■Ttfe m 8971 58 60. Tie 321B230 M 


TRANSMUNn RBOUM. 21 GesteL 
sebaon, 8-2241 ZnerriL Antwrap. Tet 
03-384.1054 Tlx 323B Train. A hi 
node Mercedes, BMW, ASP, 

LOTUS, VOLVO, SAAB, Alfa Romeo. 
Al models in stock. D og nuuo t-Oxxv 
det « Ge, Man Carla Tet (93} 
304851 Tefcnc 479TT5MC FAXAL 


MBCSB - PORSOC - FUBtARI 
CDcnpeWive aka + customized ser- 
vicc. Tet [352} 78651. Telex 2996 
DPmi ■ | »* wn botirp)- 


HEW PBXXOT. i and Sow to** 

ontcBL zxjnfwooan i o, Awucn- 

broefc.HalaidP130445492.tx 47062 


. PORSCHE, FBKAU, 
BMW, Boh Rqyce. DSN Cars Triex 
Madrid 46340 WG4 


TAX Free an, dl nxAes & models. 
ATX, NV.Anfcemx 22, 2000 Antwerp, 
Begum, Vel 037231 16 53 Tx 31 S» 
ear ad in Monday's 


EXCAIOU 


efttaon. 


BOATS & 
RECREATICHMAL 
VEHICLES 


OWNER S8J5 privately, cause depar- 
ture, beautiM motor yoeht, 70 h. brfr 
in 1981, perfed condition. So borgam 
far nmneatile condusion. Tet France 
(93| 25 61 87. Mr Cbensn. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


■U5UB2S VISAS Aimnigralion. Ally. 
&J. Levine, 1611 Ccmnedicot Ave, 
NW, Wasn, D.C 20009 U5A. Tet 
pazj 2324617, fa> 350004 (lew. 
node], h Alhens 7/37/6 OOjnf 323- 
0251, Venn 7/137/lfiCRUl 765- 
921; Borne 7/177/20 P9I HmSL 


DGMNCAN DIVORCES. Bok 20802, 
Santa Dcrnfaflo, Donamcan fapebSc 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


LOW COST TOURS 

USSR t5 7P, Y ugoslavia SBS 
Greece SSsCOSvt $1780 
2 mat padmgei Iram Paris 266 54 67 
Baa prias far fSgfas abroad 


5TU0O4T A YOUTH FARES: Paris - 
London one way from F225/USJ25. 
bSce-london one >ray from 
F69Q/US$75- For booti n a contact 
USIT Voyages id 6 me da Vcxarard. 
750 06 Pare. Ftoiice. Tet 329 85 00 
Luxwnbmxg) and 10 rue de 
Noe 060CO.T^f931 873496 


-tsnaausirft 1 : 


RESTAURANTS 

NIGHTCLUBS 


SWITZERLAND 


AU VBUX CAVEAU - FULLY: Superb 
Swiss style gourmet dfain^ bar, tjonc- 
ing. banquets end private parties. 
Summer terroott. Let the fandy Morel 
serve you at the beautiful An Vieux 
Caveau, II nm de la Gore. 1009 
PuOy/Lausanne. 021 728 2749 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


FOR SALE 2 wtews made by GUCCI 

of finest block oEaatar. High price. 
Paris 553 56 27, (f fan A 1 pnA 
WATStBEDSL 220 VOLT WATBES. 

Tet Brussels 649 57 12 or 5112330 


PRECIOUS STONES 


HAMONB/SAPPHRE/RLIBY triple 
eternity ring mode far Queen 9zn- 
beft’s S8«er Jubilee. E3250L Tel UX 
1042873) 57Q3. 


ARTS 


THE MAN WHO FOOLED 
TW ART WORLD FOR 
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 

ELMYR DE HORY 

THE MASTER FOR^B 
OF TW 20ft CENTURY 

Own a matmrficent Manet, Renoir, 
Van Gogh, ModigEeni. 

EngKsh coBedar has far sde these 
unque signed oil pranJeigs by the late 

&nw de Hory. 

Tet London (01) 4 85 4828. 


IHGVRE GAUERY - 30 Bruton St.. 
London Wl- 01-493 2107. toportant 
XK & XX Century works of art. 20th 
June - 27th Ji/y. Mondays - Fridays 
lOont-Spm, Saturday 10am- 1230pm 


COLLECTORS 


HUNGARIAN UMVBtSUY student 
coBedar of pennants, bamen, flagp 
of qxrrts teams, coutUnes. locdhies, 
wants to exchangs & share. Inquiriat: 
Horanyi. Andros, KufcuSo U. 12. H- 
1026, Budapest, Huiqory. 


LLADRO dseoNinoed bmtedadrSdon 
Nix 1317 Dudes at the Pond for sate. 
Tet [3)975 71 65 France. 


EDUCATION 


LEARN HtBKH in ft* momma in the 
of terixxei enoy-aedoor Bfe Dmis. 
horseback nAig, wind surfing, Mung) 
end the Medtermean efimare of the 
Haute IN u sance or just empty rekec in 
scenic beosftr of a tandsoope that has 
entente! mrch writers & artsL In- 
tensive French lessons led by protw- 
nond ratnidorsand occommodohon 
in a historic mowtain viloge. Flat let 
Homy 325 29 52 Park Or write Nof- 
dw Debroee, 90 owe du AAaine. 
75014 Paris. Tefc 321 92 77 


PENPALS 


GStS AND BUYS oB cont in ents wml 
pen pah. Detah faee Hermes Veriag, 
Bar 110660/N., D-1000 Berfin Tfi 

West Germaiy. 


WE FOB YOU DEAL PEN PAIS. 
Write to: Honey Rase Servers, Toa 
Rayoh Centrd, r.O. Box IIPTs^jo- 
pate 9131. 


SERVICES 


*************** 
** 553 62 62 ** 

FOR A REAL VXP. YOUNG LADY 
Distinguished. Efegmil, MsAinguaL 


YOUNG BEGANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 


SERVICES 

YOUNG LADY 

PA/Intefpreter & Tourism Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 

************** 

PARIS: 520 97 95 

DSTMGUBICD YOUNG LADY PA 

VP YOUNG LADY GUDE 
Educated, ertrarive and trifingud 
far days, evenings & travel. 
PARK 530 02 84 

* PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY TRILINGUAL VIP-PA 

PARS VIP SOFHBT1CATH) YOUNG 
lody coraponioa Why don’t you 
phone 277-01-69 lor your days, eve- 
nings & weekend? An elegant bfin- 
guc2 guide, even for your shopping 

VIP ASSISTANCE 722 51 77 
bfaigual lady far days 8 dinners. 

LONDON SOPHSTtCATH) German/ 
French lady camparvorv Mubifngud 
& ertaldnfag. Teb01-3B1 6352 

SOOETE DULNE PARS 260 87 43 
Men & women guides, security & rent- 
mq car servicei, 8 am - 12 pm. 

MTBNATX3NAI BEAUTTHIt People 
UNLIT). ISA & WOODWDE. Tet 
212-765-7793 / 765-7794 

RANKRIRT. Young lady comprnon. 
Enatsh, French, Gwman spoken Free 
to traveL 069/44 77 75. 

YOUNG LADY COMPANION Lon- 
dan/Heoihrcw. Tet 386 7671. 

HONG KONG. Charming western 
lady for companion. Tefc 3-682483. 

HONG KONG 5-7954823 European 
young lody companwn. 


SERVICES 


PARIS NOTE 1HK PHONE AT ONOE 

7 57 6248. Trustful VJJ>. lady, trawl 
mnipoihOft _ 


74 7 59 58 TOURIST GUIDE. Peris, 
airports. Young, elegant, ottraorvp, 
charming. 7 era / 12 pm. tail trawl 


M ENGLISH, IN SPANISH, in French, I 
yew way in Ffark 


ATTEN5. Lady annrion and person- 
al ossstant. Tel: BM6194. 


PARIS YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. 
VIP PA 8 bfaiguol interpreter. 


5WGAPORE ENTTGUTOS-GASn- 
gryore 734 96 28. 


HONG KONG IW1267 VP bdy 
(Onentd/Ewopeonl cotnpotioa 


MANILA, FHUPPWES V.IP. Lady 
guides, tel: Bl 60161 t 872175 


TOKYO COMPANION 586 4674: 

Tel. now far the best. 


LONDON EDUCATH) LADY Com- 
ponfon,' Guide. Td: 961 0154. 


TOKYO 645 2741. Touring & shop- 
pmg guides. jnterpteter\ etc. 


LONDON-YOUNG BOSH LADY PA. 
01-245 9002 days, evenings & trawl 
TOKYO 475 54 80 Young Lody Com- 
panion. 


LONDON LADY 
oocauons. Please 


COMPANION, oB 
tel PH B21 0283 


PARIS BtLMGUAL ASSISTANT to 
business executives. 500 58 17 


HONG KONG (K-3J723 12 37. 
Quinmg young lady ooroporaon. 


FRANKRST YOUNG LADY cornporv- 
xxi & Travel Guide. 069/62 84 ST 


FRANKFURT 069/233380. Youra 
lody. VJ.P. - PA - cgnpmai 


PAHS LADY DflERPRElDL Travel 
anraav Pore 633 68 09. 


PARIS NTT. PERSONAL/ BUSftCSS 
Asraront. Tefc 8287932. 


PARIS YOUNG SOPHKTKATB2 Vtp 

lorty, trEnnuol PA. 256 05 95. 


TOKYO 456-5539. Lady Comparxon. 

pmond assistant. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


Uffi MAGNIHCB^T 
STELLA 
SOLARIS 
7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek UandL Turkey, 
Egypt & brad. 

Saing Every Monday from Proem 

THE YACHT-UKE 
STHLA 
OCEANS 

3 AND 4 DAY CRUSES 

To the Greek Wands & Turtrey. SaSng 
every Monday S Friday from Piraeus 

PWase apply tojgwxTraral Agent on 

Z fax. Sorrias St, Aft ro 1056 2 
Telex: 215621, Phone 322888 3. 

Paris tefc 265 80 36 
Mooch tefc 395 613 
Geneva tefc 327 110 
Zuri* tefc 391 36 55 


Cruise in Elegance 

to the GREEK ISLANDS 
EGYPT, ISRAB. & TURKEY 

CHOICE OF 7-4-3-2rl DAY 
CBUtSB out of Athens (Pfaaeae) 
ABOARD 

THE MO DERN LUXURY SHffS 
JUPfTBLJA. 

ATLAS, OOANUi 
W. RENAISSANCE. __ 

OtPHBJS. M&7Uh«, 

mam cruises 


.2660324 

■443032 



HELLAS YAOUMG. Yacht Chortert. 
Acodemiat 28, Athens 10671, Greece. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

soma 

USA A WORLDWIDE 

Heed office in New York 
330 W. 56th SL, MY.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CAPS AND 

CHECKS AGCHTHS 
Private Me m be r s tep s A v i e taU e 


Th*» etad x 


been fe a t u red aMha top 8 most 
exdoBhre Enori Sravfae by 
U5A A Inteniatiencd news mesfia 
fie and TV. 


service bos 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SBVKZ. 
EVBttWHBE YOU ARE OR GOl_ 

1-813-921-7946 

Cal free from LLS: 1-800237-0892 
GJ hma frtwn Honda: l-g»®24B9Z 
lowed Eastern w etan m es you badU 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 
IN NEW YORK 
TEL: 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 
KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SERVICE 
10 KENSINGTON CHURCH ST, W8 
TILW9136 OR 93791^3 
AR major «<* «de nceepted. 


LONDON MAYFAB ESCORT Ser- 
■.Teh 01-661 2800 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Enat Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Fortmcm Escort Agency 

67 CMbera Slreri, 
leaden Wl 

Tefc 486 3724 er 486 11SB 
AD major mfi cord* a n eep ted 




★ LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
01-229 2300 er 01-229 4794 


LONDON 

DAY/ EVENING ESCORT AGENCY 

TEL: 724 2972 


AR1STOCATS 

London beat Service 
138 Wanore SL London W.l. 
AB motor Crerfcf Cords Acce p ted 
let 437 47 41 / <WT 
13 noon . midnight 


LA VENTURA 

NBitf YORK ESCORT SERVICE 
212-888-1666 


MADRID INTL 

SCOUT SERVICE 
THj 2456548. OUST CARDS 


MWWjHYrajCOME Escort Semen. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


ZURICH 

Sa eranl ha'i Ereert A Grade Sendee 
Tefc 01/57 75 96 


JASMINE 

AMSTBB>AM ESCORT SERVICE. 
TEL: 020-366655 


** GENEVA-FIRST ** 

DAS.Y ESCORT SERVICE 
Tefc 022/32 34 18 
+ W5XH4D + TRAVR 


ZURICH 

Cnrefi n e Ewart Service 
Tefc 01/2S2 61 74 


ZURICH 

ALEXIS ESCORT sama 
TEL 01-47 55 82 / 69 55 04 


ZURJCH-GENEVA 

GINGER'S ESCORT SfitVlCE. 
TBi 01/363 08 64-022/ 34 41 86 


PRESTIGE 

London Escort Service 
Tefc 988 3163 / 08833 3163 


ROME CLUB EUROPE ESCORT . 
& Guide Serv^n-Tefc 06/589 2604- 589 1 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pm) 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


CHELSEA ESCORT SBVKE 
51 Beaucham p Place. London SW3. 
Tel: 01 584 6513/2749 (4-12 pm) 


** MADRID GIPSY *- 

SERVICE Tel; 233.03.19 


G0«VA - BEST 

ESCORT SaWTCE 022 / 86 15 95 


FRAMGUET. + SURROUNDINGS 
Caroline's Escprt_+ Travel Serwce. 

& German 

Pleate ad West Germany. 

7435763 


AMSTERDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SERVICE 020-954344 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


«W YORK: ttNEPt Etcari Setvkx. 
Tefc 212-581-1948. 


OOMMA’S ESCORT-GLADE service. 
The hoflue - Hotand. 07P601B23 


MADRBJ SEUEClK3t(5 ESCORT Ser- 
rioeTri: 4011507. Credt Conk. 


VBMA YOUNG E5CORT SBVKE 

Contact: 83 33 71 


CLAIRE Es- 

14-7684535. 


COLOGNE / DUE5SSDORF/ BONN 
Engfeh bcortSmwce 0221524757 


VraftlA CD — ESCORT SBVKZ:' 
Vienna 92 05 613 


DU5SaDORF/ COLOGNE/ BOM4 
Domino Erari Service 0211/ 3831 41 


FRANKFURT + SUBSOUNDINGS Es- 
cort Service. 069/364656 Veg & DC 


BRUSSELS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

boon Service. Tel: 02^12641. 


• AMSTBIDAM SHE * 

ESCORT £ GLADES. 020-227837 


NEW YORK Renee & GabrieSe Etaori 
Service. 212-2234)870. 


FRANKFURT AREA. KABHIFS fe- 
male and mote b&igud Etcort nd 
Travel Serviae. Please tetephenm W 
6963 88 05. 


LONDON BAY5WATER ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 01 229 0776. 


MADRID TASTE SCORT SBVICE 
TEL 611 72 57 VBA 


FRANKFURT “TOP TEN" Escort Ser- 
«ce. 069/5940-52. 


MUNICH -HLONOY ATANJA Escort 

Service Tel: 3H 79 00 or 31 1 79 36 


AMSTERDAM FOUR ROSES Escort 
Service f0) 30-964376 


MARIA SOWBiB BCORT Service 
London 403 4000/402 4008/402 0282 


DUS5HDORF > COLOGNE - ZURICH 

ExrJutivA Escort + Travel Service. 
Tet 0211-6799863 


GBCVA ESCORT 

SBVKE Tefc 46 11 58 


GENEVA * BEAUTY* 

ESCORT SBVKE 022/29 51 30 


HYDE PARK ESCORT SBVICE 
LONDON/ tEA THROW/ CATWKX 
Tefc 01 890 0373 


LONDON MAXME BiCORT Sennre 
Heattvaw.'Gcflwick, Credit cards ac- 
cepied, Tet 937 4428 -I- 9350570 


AMSTERDAM, I 

Hague Barter dam. 

Service. Anetg dam (0031 2 


LONDON TOJDUE ESCORT Serwce. 
Tot 01 373 8849. 


VBNA W ESCORT SBVICE. Tet 
IWerwol 65 41 M 


VB4NA CLEOPATRA Escort Service. 
Tet 52 73 88 or 47 70 3S. 


MADBD IMPACT escort and guide 
service. MuSihnouoi. 261 4142 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Servn. 
Heathrmr/Gatuadi Tet 834 7945. 


BRU55EL5. CHANT AL BCORT Ser- 
vn». Tet 03/520 23 65. 


FRANKFURT/ MUMCH Mole Etcort 
Service. 069.-386441 & Q89/35182M. 


GENEVA AMA BCORT SBVICE 
tfcfcitnflud. Tet 34 39 55. 


V1B4NA - SCANDIA ESCORT Ser- 
war. Tel: 65 30 552 


AJOTBDAM JEAMBET Etcort Service 
Tet 1020} 326430 a 34011ft 


MUNICH - PRIVATE ESCORT + 
Guide Service. Tet 91 2314 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Service. 
Tet 0711 / 262 II 50. 


FSAhKHJZt jaWHBTS Escort S 
Tiovd Sennca. Tri: 069/55-72-10 


N.Eu- 


AWSTaOAM SOOTIY facort 
Service. Tel- 0ptL843735i 


F*ANKFI*T SONIA ESCORT Ser- 
vn. Tet 069-68 34 42 










Page 14 


ACROSS 

1 Flag woman of 
1777 

5 Cheekbone 
l® Garret 
15 Kind of raiuor- 
lesi 

19 Utter or vigil 
IdUower 
2® Wazhazhe 

21 Bluster 

22 Japanese 
beverage 

23 Stan of a 
quotation 

2® Emulate 
Mount St. 
Helens 

27 Freshen, with 
"up" 

28 Guide; teacher 

29 Irony entree 

31 . .our flag 

was still " 

33 Quotation: 
Part II 

39 Baltic port 

40 Dismantle 

41 Marie 

Saint 

42 Norman Lear 
forte 

43 Quotation; 
Partlll 

45 Forepole 

48 Provoke 

49 Typewriter 
part 


DOWN 

1 Cheer 

2- if by 

land. and. . 

3 Blame bearers 

4 Division 

5 Cistercian, e.g. 

6 Solicit 

7 Leaf monkey 

8 Guinea pigs’ 
kin 

9 Packaged 
again 

10 Light silvery 
gray 

11"... if by 

sea" 

12 Aggie 

13 Net fiber 

14 Seraphim and 
cherubim, e.g. 


ACROSS 

50 Dir. from 
Springfield to 
Boston 

51 Loop loopers 

53 Kind of shark 

54 Strength of a 
chemical 
solution 

55 Quotation; 
Part IV 

60 It is so 

61 Countess's 
spouse 

62 Suffix with 
expert 

63 Certain 
fashionable 
creations 

64 Quotation: 

PartV 

68 Integrity; 
valor 

69 Sport 

70 Two Va. 
signers: 
7/4/76 

71 Romaine 
lettuce 

74 Quotation: 
Part VI 

78 Core 

80 A lot 

81 Indian weight 

82 C a nog ram 

83 Social 

reformer 
Margaret 


DOWN 

15 State 

16 Erratic 

17 Harry’s 
successor 

18 Droplet on a 
petal 

24 Homophone 
for air 

25 Have dinner 

30 Blacksburg 
sch. 

31 Like Friday 

32 Flower child 

33 Kin of qls. 

34 Manumit 

35 Egg: Comb, 
form 

36 Diamond 

window 


ACROSS 

84 Famed cargo 
of Boston 

85 Reno's 

chance 

88 Quotation: 

Part VII 

89 Resume 

93 Pitcher 

McGraw 

94 Texan's grassy 

plain 

96 Ruminate 

97 Quotation: 
part VIII 

100 Kind of lace 

101 Red, white or 
blue 

102 " Ideas," 

1951 song 

103 Famed 
wedding site 

104 Swift, spirited 
steed 

106 End of the 
quotation 

113 Decoy. 

114 les- Bains. 

French spa 

115 Murrow's 

“ Now" 

116 Fast-rood 
order 

117 Villainous look 

118 Patron saint of 
France 

119 Inspirit 

120 Descartes 
word 


DOWN 

37 Atoll 
component 

38 Rectify 

40 Riv. boat 

44 Suffix with 

cash 

46 Badges of 
office 

47 Telephone 
pioneer: 1857- 
1927 

52 Unkempt 
abodes 

53 Master 

55 Table type 

56 Revolutionary 
patriot- 
inventor 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATLTO>AY-SUNPAY» JU NE 29-30, 1985 

Paine Declaration: 1776 by carouneg.itizgerau> peanuts — 


n 12 is i 4 


fl 

7 

6 

9 






*6“ 




M0 111 112 113 114 


IIS MB 117 118 


I W0ULP HAVE SAJP 
SOMETHING, BUT I WAS 
AFRAiP I'D REGRET IT— 


.cm re N3T!FYart¥A»6.. S*EWEP^VtAUtfttS 

. LIFE ISJUU OF pocS HM7HMEKEQCT5 - ffiSRETTB? TWff I - 

R£ 6 RET 5 ,CHARUEBR 0 a'N] — — 1 IcOkflft Mu & mbni i 


SflOUAffiAlWj 



It 





BLOND IE 


171 172 173 


Ife: 

'JM 


7-*rts One < 
„ Nce^iNfse 
iXtUS 




roorccc 
tuba . 


sD 








11061 1107 Il06 1108 I 


BEETLE BAILEY 

WHY 171 PI EVER r rC^. 
ASK THIS 

TO PLAY jFtiXK 

WITH ME? 


OH, TOO BA 
YOU HIT ITC 
SOUNDS/ B 

another At- 
take a f& 


\ SIR. 
itof 
r Hit 
>PONT 
ilTY 


OH, YE AH--. 

THAT'S WHY , 

X ASKEC7 A 

HIM 9f 


© Near York Tones, edited by Eugene MaUaka. 


DOWN 

57 Norwegian 
kings 

58 Colonial 
historian: 1823- 
93 

,59 Bale 
61 Kefauver 

64 Oft-furrowed 
feature 

65 Common Mki. 

66 Some spices 

67 Teachers' org. 
68". . .deep- 

drenched in 


DOWN 

71 Arithmeti- 
cian’s gadget 

72 Threatener’s 
phrase 

73 Stick ball 
locale 

74 City or river 
near Moscow 

75 Absquatulates 

76 Lyric Muse 

77 Offer a defence 

78 Shack 

79 Reject 

83 To's partner 

86 Fall flower, for 
short 


DOWN 

87 Type of horn 

88"... to the 

Republic. . 

90 One conduct- 
ing an 

investigation 

91 Conger 

92 Like Broad- 
way at night 

95 Rose of Sharon 

98 Trail held 

99 Initials for a 
royal person- 
age 

100 Considerably 


DOWN 

103 Cell: Comb, 
form 

104 "... liberty 
and justice for 

105 Sorrow 

107 Stannum 

108 Botany is one 

109 Printers' 
measures 

119 Illuminated 

111 Heckler's mis- 
sile 

112“Diga Diga 

.” 1928 

song 


wSep I 



ANDY CAPP 

Dill 3, NM L-Vinca SkiJCH 



THAT BACK GARDEN 
IS A DISGRACE - IPS 
> LIKE A JUNGLE 
( O UT THER E. DP T 
V BETTER HAVE 
T A GOAT IT... Y 


■YPET, SOL/VE 
GOT T HEM -< 
SBER BOOTS 
ON T HE V 
iRCNGFEET) 


yjuWE telung 
MS~ THEV J 
r SHOULD BE < 


==77 IwyOUKSf, 


ONE EARTH, FOUR OR FIVE 
WORLDS: 

Reflections on Contemporary History 

By Octavio Paz. Translated by Helen R. Lane. 
224 pp. $14.95. 

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1250 Sixth Avenue, 
San Diego. Calif. 92101 

Reviewed by Art Seidenbaum 

T HE Latino poet is supposed to have — is 
almost required to have — a place in politics, a 
role in diplomacy, a stake in the hurly-burly of 
temporal events. No contemporary Latino poet has 
lived the political part more knowingly or indepen- 
dently than Octavio Paz, the Mexican-born septua- 
genarian who fuses the study of language, history, 
government and an in a world view free of super- 
power prejudices or theocratic certainties. 

Here are essays of the immediate, some of them 
written for Spanish- language newspapers, some of 
them new. all of them celebrating human freedom as 
p^osedaomanufactured ideology. “Ideology,” Paz 
writes,, “converts ideas into masks: They hide the 
person who wears them, and at the same time they 
keep him from seeing reality.” 

He offers aid, but little comfort, to the United 
States. He offers explanation, but no support, for 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


BOOKS 



Marxist- Leninist re gimes .- “Not a few European 
and Latin American intellectuals attempt to equate 
the policy of the United States with that of the 
Soviet Union, as though they were twin monsters. 
Hypocrisy, naivete or cynicism? It seems to me that 
wfaai is monstrous is the comparison itself. The 
errors, the failures and the sins of the United Slates 
are enormous, and I am not trying to absolve that 
nation.” Paz goes on to criticize the United States, 
Western democracies and Japan for incoherent poli- 
cies, for blindness to the social problems in less 
developed nations and for being the accomplices of 
brutal dictatorships. 

“All this having been said, however,” he contin- 
ues, “it must be added that the capitalist democra- 
cies have preserved fundamental freedoms within 
their own borders. On the other hand.. ideological 
war abroad and totalitarian despotism at home are 
the two constituent features of the Soviet regime 
and its vassal countries.” 

The trouble with the United States, he suggests, is 
a two-faced approach to the world — one inside 
expression for its citizens, another outside appear- 
ance in dealing with other nations. The United 
Stales is, internally, a democracy, and its people 
enjoy the freedoms attached to a changing society. 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 


□□□□BED □□□□□ □□□□□□ 

□□orcjcjGa aaaaaa aoaaata 
□□annua □□□□□□□□□□□□□ 
am ano □□□□ □□□□ □□□ 
□□□□□□□a □□□□ □□□□ 
□□□□a □□□□ mania □□□□□ 
□□an □□□□ □□□□ □□□□ 
□□nuunm □□□□ □□□□□□□ 
□□□□□□a □□□□□□□□□ □□□ 
□□□ □□aaanaaa □□□□ 
□□□□a □□□□□□□□□ □□□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□□□□□□ ana 
[!□□ □□□□□□□□□ □□□□□□□ 
□□anana □□□□ □□□□□non 
3UQG □□□□ □□□□ □□□□ 
□uliuu hhqq naan □□□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□ QDDSaaGD 
□aa □□□□ naan □□□ □□□ 
aaaaaEnnnaaaa □□□□□□□ 
□□□nnc □□□□□□ nanmnno 
□□□□□□ □□□an □□□□□□□ 


But the U. S. approach to foreign affairs is too often 
the posture of empire, with all the oppressions and 
power plays associated with empire. Paz sees the 
contadora group of nations — Panama, Colombia. 
Venezuela and Mexico — as the best brokers for 
peace in Central America. 

The trouble with Mexico, be suggests, is proximi- 
ty to the United States, sometimes aping and some- 
times loathing the big neighbor with the fancier 
house and larger yard. “The passion of our intellec- 
tuals for U. S. civilization ranges from love to bitter 
rancor, from adoration to horror," Paz writes. While 
Mexico embraced U.S. notions of freedom and 
modernity. Mexico arrived at that embrace from a 
wholly different history: “Between puritanism, de- 
mocracy and capitalism there was not opposition 
but affinity; the past and future oT the United States 
are reflected without contradiction in these three 
words. Between republican ideology and the Catho- 
lic world of the Mexican viceroyalty, a mosaic of 
pre-Columbian survivals and Baroque forms, there 
was a sharp break: Mexico denied us past” 

Paz discusses Protestantism as a positive force for 

i * j i:_: ui .l a 


WIZARD of ID 

r Wfc HE, * P&&FAt\0H 


WILL WP UP 
1HBPWIN R9WS, 

OJPflaV ISM i 
. EFP^r! A 


REX MORGAN 


HOW DID . 
YOUR EXAM <50 WITH DR. 
MORGAN, DARLING -Z ARE YOU 
CALLING FROM HIS OFFICE? 


universal allegiance. He compares the relative in- 
flexibility of Catholicism with the almost absolute 
inflexibility of Marxism as a kind of kinship be- 
tween sworn enemies. The certainty and the pseudo- 
science of Marxism, he writes, has a logical appeal 
for revolutionaries who grew up in a Catholic cul- 
ture. 

The magnificence of these essays is fearlessness, 
intelligence, literary grace and a willingness to make 
the opposite seem apposite and the paradoxical 
appear predictable. Paz knows bis neighbors’ histor- 
ies. and he knows the global stories in Asia, Africa 
and Europe. The weakness here, if lack of a political 
formula is in fact a weakness, is the absence of Paz 
— translate peace — proposals to cure what aQs 

InimnniHr "I Hd nnot^e Crtlrthnin l/Vh/Hintr 10 lenffiiSOA 


nf. 


YK/ WHY 
DID YOU 
. WANT ME 
L TO CALL 
% YOU, 

X BRADY* 




GARFIELD 


f LET ME GET 
VOO OUT OF 
THE WINDOW, 
^ GARFIELD j 


ourselves and from denying the humanity of the 
adversary.” The trouble with that solution is the 
presumption that both sides of a struggle want to 
talk. Look at Geneva, right now. Listen lor dialogue 
and hear vilification instead. 

Art Seidenbaum is on the staff of the Los Angeles 
Times. 


Jg* PaV35>fe-29 | 



1 THOUGI 
FOR ,ViF 
GOTO C 


\Ybrid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse June 28 

Closing prices in local cuftaidct otherwise. ijuJicatcdL 


He GOES OUT (JKE A UON AH’ COWES IN LIKE A IM 10.* 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

NIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 



c 

F 

C 

F 


Atgorve 

27 

■1 

20 

68 

1r 

Bangkok 

31 

88 

26 

77 

r 

Amttentoni 

17 

63 

II 

52 

O 

Billing 

30 

86 

22 

72 

Ir 

At bens 

78 

B2 

18 

64 

tr 

Hoag Kong 

31 

a 

27 

81 

sh 

Barcelona 

23 

73 

15 

59 

0 

Manila 

28 

82 

24 

75 

r 

Belgrade 

t9 

64 

13 

55 

e 

New Demi 

37 

99 

24 

75 

d 

Berlin 

17 

63 

12 

64 

cl 

Semi 

30 

86 

23 

73 

0 

Brussels 

15 

59 

II 

52 

0 

Shanghai 

27 

81 

23 

73 

0 

Biwharcmt 

37 

81 

13 

55 

Ir 

Singapore 

30 

86 

27 

11 

tr 

Budapest 

20 

48 

11 

52 

O 

Taipei 

3D 

84 

26 

79 

O 

Canmhogea 

17 

63 

9 

48 

a 

Tokyo 

24 

75 

18 

44 

sh 

Costa Det Sol 
Dublin 

28 

16 

82 

61 

19 

10 

66 

50 

tr 

0 

AFRICA 






Edinburgh 

15 

59 

10 

50 

Ir 

Alflien 

28 

82 

17 

43 

tr 

Florence 

27 

Bt 

15 

SV 

Cl 

Coins 

34 

93 

20 

48 

fr 

Frank tun 

17 

63 

ID 

50 

D 

Cape Town 





no 

Geneva 

20 

65 

8 

44 

Ir 

Casablanca 

25 

77 

17 

43 

tr 

Helsinki 

IS 

59 

ID 

so 

0 

Harare 

20 

68 

ID 

50 

cJ 

Istanbul 

30 

54 

17 

43 

tr 

Lagos 

27 

81 

24 

75 

0 

Los Pal mo* 

25 

77 

20 

M 

tr 

Nairobi 

24 

75 

13 

95 

0 

Lisbon 

27 

51 

16 

61 

tr 

Tunis 

30 

86 

21 

70 

tr 

London 

15 

59 

10 

50 

0 




Madrid 

30 

56 

15 

59 

ir 

LATIN AMERICA 



Milan 

Mm cow 

Man left 

Nice 

Oik* 

23 

!1 

17 

74 

19 

17 

73 

70 

63 

75 

M 

15 

n 

5 

17 

12 

59 

55 

46 

63 

54 

cl 

0 

0 

Ir 

d 

BwnuAMs 

Caracas 

Lima 

Mexico aty 

24 

28 

22 

24 

75 

82 

72 

75 

IS 

21 

14 

11 

59 

70 

57 

52 

0 

r 

0 

DC 

Ports 

63 

12 

54 

0 

Rlade Janeiro 

24 

75 

15 

59 

O 

Prague 

Reyklovik 

>5 

13 

5V 

55 

7 

6 

45 

43 

0 

0 

NORTH AMERICA 



Rome 

78 

87 

18 

64 

tr 

Aocharago 

19 

66 

1 

46 

tr 

Stockholm 

17 

63 

13 

55 

a 

Atlanta 

30 

86 

20 

68 

PC 

Strasbourg 

21 

70 

12 

54 

cl 

Boston 

IS 

W 

12 

54 

r 

Venice 

23 

73 

16 

b! 

Ir 

Chicago 

27 

81 

19 

66 

PC 

Vienna 

19 

66 

13 

55 

a 

Denver 

29 

li 

9 

48 

fr 

Warsaw 

17 

43 

11 

52 

cl 

Detroit 

35 

77 

12 

54 

PC 

Zorich 

15 

44 

11 

52 

Cl 

Hoaomiu 

30 

64 

30 

48 

PC 

MIDDLE EAST 




Houston 

Los Angeles 

32 

29 

96 

84 

20 

18 

68 

44 

a 

to 

Ankara 

27 

BT 

B 

46 

Ir 

Miami 

32 

90 

23 

73 

si 

Bekral 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

Mlnnaaoolli 

21 

78 

14 

57 

d 

Damascus 

28 

B3 

IB 

64 

Ir 

Montreal 

23 

73 

10 

50 

cl 

Jerusalem 

29 

82 

14 

57 

Ir 

Nassau 

38 

86 

21 

70 

PC 

Tel Aviv 

30 

B4 

a 

48 

Ir 

New York 

19 

44 

13 

55 

r 

OCEANIA 






5an Frgntitscv 
Seattle 

20 

20 

48 

68 

12 

9 

54 

48 

PC 

DC 

Auckland 

14 

57 

8 

46 

Cl 

Toronto 

23 

73 

11 

S3 

tr 

Sydney 

15 

64 

0 

44 

a 

Washington 

25 

77 

14 

57 

PC 



(i ciQud,. tr-ioie: n-noit; nn not wviioUoi o-ovorcast; 

oc- parti* cloud*; r-ram; sh-shawers; swsnow: U-itormv. 


SATURDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Slightly CiKMCY FRANKFURT- 

Madrid. Cloud*. Toma 38— 17 tte — ui. NEW YORK: Rotn. Tmu jo— V i 
- S7I PARIS: CUMOV. Tbitw Ml - 13 1«3 - s7). ROME: Wr TwTm.J0 - IS 
, r’,y, TE K 7 19 nPRJCMi fSi?: 1 Temc£ 

— I. 1 r 3J— S3* BANOKOK; TlHirwIerslorim. Temo. 31 — 27 m ail HO HQ 

S CT- *L“ 19 *<* — Ml SINGAPORE: Fair. 

»rmo M— 2a i»i — 7»i TOKYO: Dqln. TtiYip u_u 441. 


AEC-TelelunKen 
Allianz Vers 
Altana 
BASF 
Bayer 

||yVMl«Smk 

BHF-ftsnJt 

BMW 

CorimentMnk 

Coni Gumml 

DBimler-Befii 

Dwuua 

Oeuische Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
gres^Bonk 

Hareener 

Hochtief 


1«LS0 143 

1S03 I5T7 
341 340 

2!U)2teJ1l 
33S70 33SSO 
33S 340 

371 34V 

22S W 
337 334 

438 434 

zizsomso 

ISSJO TS4J0 
.851 831 

347 364 

IS7 157 
. $64 587 JO 
159 JO 344 
17050 140 

331 332 

MQ S4Q 


Bk East Asia 
Cheuna Kano 
anna UoM 
Green Island 
Hang Seng Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Ha lots 
HK Land 
HK Stoia Bank 
HK Teteenane 
HK Yaumafel 
HK Wh arf 
Hutch HTKnroaa 
Hvsan 
inn atv 

Jar dine 

Jaralne Sec 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
Now World 
Orient Overseas 
SHK Props 
Steivx 

Swire PadtlcA 
Tat Cheung 
wah Kweng 
wrwelock A 
Wing On Co 
wimor 
Wane im 

Hang Seng lades : 
Previous : 151UB 


24J0 3430 
*630 16j)0 
1SJW 1170 
reo 7J0 
47 4735 
110 2.15 

1U0 1030 
.140 ButO 
1130 1U0 
35JD 3535 
170 5-80 

»3S 7 AS 

w m 

335 3J-B 
Wj U5 
as. Iff 2530 

0-60 0M 
0A4 MS 

11.10 11 
11. V0 1150 

am us 

31 38 

7.15 7 JO 
2-1 7S 2.175 

’tfs 

2340 24 

140 141 

1.15 1,15 

730 7 JO 

2.10 110 
$45 440 
l.VJ 1.95 


AECI 

Anglo American 

Anglo Am Gold 

Barlows 

Blyvoor 

Buttets 

De Beers 

Drlefontela 

E kinds 

GFSA 

Harmony 


BOO 805 
2VI0 
Ipoo 17350 
117S 1175 
1325 1315 
7175 7300 
IKS HOI 
4TO5 4900 
1775 1775 
3350 3350 
2725 2700 



Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 

Haw Par 

Inchcope 

Mol Bonklno 

OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

ShanorMa 
SimeDarfa/ 
S'ooar Land 
S'para Press 
S Steamship 
St Trading 
United Oversao 
UOB 


2-54 2J5 

540 4 

534 S3S 
US Z16 
235 Ut 
540 540 

_ * 845' 
243 197 

H/3. — 

N.Q. 235 
145 147 

249 Z72 
6J05 e 
143 MW 
N.Q. 444 

1JB 144 
4 348 


482 
574 
147 
304 
131 
444 443 

374 349 

454 654 

343 344 

273 273 

124 
442 
144 


AC1 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bcrol 

Bougainville 

Casfiemalne 

Colee 
Coma lea 
CRA 
CSR 
Dunlap 
EWert lx] 

■Cl Australia 
MoaeUan 
MJM 
Myer 

Nat Ant Bonk 
NewsCorp 
N Broken HUI 
Poseidon 
Qld Coal Trust 
Santos 

Thomoo Nollon 
Western Mining 
Westpcc Banking 


y» Ordinaries Index : HUD 
PrevkMH : MAO 




2.58 245 
445 448 
634 640 

333 334 

130 1.72 

634 6J4 

342 348 

1.90 135 
530 5.74 

244 248 
125 2J0 
2SB 258 
145 148 

223 225 
246 237 

23S 240 

A15 419 
64S 440 
220 222 
330 KO. 
143 . 149 
542 544 

T.9A 145 
.273 17B 
444 441 
144 14B 


22* 

*n» zin 























I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


Page 15 




i i 




SPORTS 


* 


i ^ Hinault Wins Tour Prologue 

Bretons Oieer Favorite Son as France’s Big Race Begins 

**— c -* A1 ~- Tbe next best time. 8:51.59; was 


. i i 
■ ». r . * 




By Samuel Abe 

'N. [nl emotional Herald Tribune 

PLUMELEC. France.— Sixty 
thousand Bretons tamed out Fri- 
0’> to cheer Bernard Hinault, the 
. Y._ ■region's favorite son each summer. 

V‘ He did not disappoint them 
s " Setting off next to last in the 
I80«rnan prologue to the 72d Tour 
■\. de France bicycle road race, Hin- 
i auli overtook much of the Geld 
_ \ | that, in IK-mmute intervals, had 


turned in nearly half an hour earlier 
by Eric Vanderacrdea of the Pana- 
sonic team. “I can do that too," 
Hinault remembered thinking as he 
started off in pursuit of his fifth 
victory in the Tour de France. 

Third m the prologue to the 
4,000-kilometer tour was Stephen 
Roche of the Redoute team, with 
Phil Anderson of Panasonic fourth 
and Greg LeMond of Hinault's La 


T WAT y, 


J left one-py-onc before him. He won Vie Claire team finishing fifth. AH 
easily. were timed in more chan nine min- 

.TSl" “We’ve started in the right dime- utes. 

tion." he said. - “The public gave me a lot of 

A mighty cheer went op, sirens joy," Hinault said of the throngs of 
blared and the blade and white flag .spectators along the coarse. “This 
of Brittany flew as Hinault crossed support really wows their interest 
the finish tine. His time for the 6 . 8 - in bicycling, 
kilometer (just over 4-nrik) race Hinault, 30, was being modest, 
•was 8 minutes 47.4 seconds. Since he arrived two days ago, bicy- 


\ : 

\ ^ 

/V i ; | 

( - * I 




SPORTS BRIEFS 

V dominated the Geld in the l 

( Aouita, Cram Speed to Victory in Oslo 


ding the 100 kilometers from his 
home in the north of Brittany to its 
southern coast, be has been del- 
uged with affection. Cheered every- 
where and pursued by autograph 
seekers, the sometimes prickly star 
has been patient and gracious. 

Brittany is strong bicycling 
country but does not often enter- 
tain the world's most famous race 
because its flat terrain does not 
allow for varied competition- Bre- 
tons are fond of complaining (hat 
the Tour de France should add a 

g hrase in parentheses, except for 
ritiany, but this year the mori- 
bund area won the right to be host. 

The result is three days of racing 
through a host of cities and towns 
before the riders begin rolling east- 
ward on a long clockwise circuit 
that ends July 21 in Paris. Hinault 
is the strong favorite to be wearing 
the overall leader's yellow jersey, 
then and equal the record of five 
tour victories held by Eddy Merckx 
and Jacques AnquetiL Merckx 
dominated the Geld in the 1970s 



For Hu, Wimbledon’s little Hungs Mean a lot 


By Peter Aifano 

New York Tima Service 


WIMBLEDON, England — She played 

on Cup 


turn to China. She was homesick and did not 
speak En glish. 

“My English wasn’t very good.” Hu said. 
“1 watched Three's Company' and The 


Chinese defector Hn Na 


Hu is ranked 150th in the Women's Tennis 
Association rankings but has made the big- 
gest tournament in the world the site of her 
her first match of the 1982 Federation Cup professional breakthrough. She qualified for 
tournament on a July evening in Santa Clara. Wimbledon by winning three difficult 
California, and was not seen again in public matches fast week and Thursday became the 
for eight months. Hu Na bid in the homes of first. Chinese-born player to win a match in 
sympathetic Chinese families on the West the main draw, defeating Annabel Croft of 
Coast during that time, hoping one day to be Britain, 6-3. 7-5. in a first-round match. Fri- 
granted asylum in the United States. Her day. she beat Lea Plcbova of Czechoslova- 
secoDd wish was to pursue a professional kia, another qualifier. 7-5, 6-4. 
tennis career. Although Croft, ranked 40th. is not be well 

Hu's defection caused an international in- known herself, she was tbe favorite of the 
cident and ber whereabouts had all tbe in- crowd on Court 2. which usually draws tbe 
triguc of a spy noveL The Chinese govern- second-biggest crowd. “1 was nervous." Hu 
mem suspended several cultural exchanges said. “There were so many people who came 
with the United States, which eventually out to see us." 

granted Hu asylum on April 4, 1983, in Hu is 22 years old but her game is just 
Washington. She played her first profession- developing. Tbe Jack of top quality competi- ^efecL 

al match two months later. tion in China is one reason, and the custom- Her potential as a player remains in ques- 

But Hu was not to become another Mar- ary slow progress made by serve-and-volley jj on sh e tutored by such notable 

tina Navratilova, who defected to the United players is another. coaches as Vic Braden, Harry Hopman and 

States from Czechoslovakia when she al- T think she’s improved a lot." Croft said. Nick BoUenieri but has advanced as far as 
ready was one of the highly ranked players in Tve been told by other players (hat she the quarterfinals only three times in 23 tour- 
the world. Hu was a champion in China but cracks under pressure." oameuts, and those were on the satellite tour, 

only a qualifier on the world pro tour. Any pressure Hu may face on the tennis She has earned $7,000. 

“It was very hard because the players were court, however, would not begin to compare At this point, however, Hu appreciates 
so good,” she said. “I got discouraged be- to whai she encountered when she defected, some things that most players take for grant- 
cause every time my game went up, I'd get She received letters that were reportedly ed. It was a thrill for her, she said, to be able 
injuries." written by her parents, pleading for her re- to play a match without braiding her hair. 


Love Boat.' Jack Tripper was my first teach- 
er." 

Jack Tripper is the character ployed by 
John Ritter in the television show Three's 
Company." Hu has since had other instruc- 
tors. She is attending the U.S. International 
College in San Diego, where she lives in a 
Chinese community with several families, 
spending a few months with each. She speaks 
English well enough to face interviews with- 
out the aid of an interpreter. 

She said she never questioned her decision 
to leave China. She also said she preferred 
not to talk about her reasons for deciding to 



■ OSLO (AP) — Olympic champion Said Aouita of Morocco ran tbe 
world's second fastest 5,000-meier race and world champion Steve Cram 
of Great Britain recorded the third fastest 1,500 meters on Bislett 
^ Stadium’s new super-fast synthetic track Thursday night. 

' Aowraregjsttm^ l 3:0452 and Cram turned in a 3 :3134 m outclassing 
their opposition in the international Oslo Games track and field meet 
.Despite running in thunder and rain, Aouita bettered his previous 
personal best of 13:04.78; the world record of 1 3:00.42 was set by David 
Moorcroft of Great Britain on July 7, 1982, in Bislett Stadium. 

Cram defeated Steve Scott of the United States and a dozen other top 
s rUQners by winning in only 037 seconds off fellow Briton Steve Ovetrs 

0 k y&t' world record set in 1983. Bruce Bickford of the United Stales was nnmer- 
up behind Aouita. 

Sutton, Sander Lead in U.S. Golf 

MEMPHIS, Tennessee (UPI) — Hal Sutton, winner of more than $1 

tour, and Bifl Sander, who 


to beat 

since he first started in the Tour de 
France in 1978. He won that year 
and in 1979, 1981 and 1982. Ten- 

dimtis in his left knee forced him to BoSSettlS (jOSet* 
withdraw while he was leading the j 

1980 lonr md the same aitoa.! Other Seed* Gain 


McEnroe Struggles; Navratilova, Evert Win Easily 


kept him out of the 1983 race. 

After an deration, he returned 
last year to nni&h second to Lau- 
rent Fignon, who himself was kept 

iflutiniHs in^ris left A d^i^ Men- 
doru 

Fignon, 24. was a spectator Fri- 
day afternoon in Plumelec, a vil- 
lage comprised of a handful of 
stores, a church and a circuit or 
weO-kept roads that is often used 


By Andrew Warshaw 

The .Associated Press 

WIMBLEDON. England — 
John McEnroe and Martina Nav- 
ratilova won their second-round 
matches in straight sets Friday and 
stayed on course to retain their 
men's and women's singles titles at 
the Wimbledon tennis champion- 
ships. 

Chris Even Uoyd, the co-top 


is last on this year's money list, each shot a 7-tmder-par 65 Thursday to for bigde races, including last ^ ^ Navratilova in the worn- 

share the first-round lead in the Memphis vear s French national chamnion- — . *—» .v_ 

David Ogrin was one stroke bacEJahn Mahaffey and George Burns 
two behind 

V-V- Sutton got three of his seven birdies in a four-hole span after a 90- 
minute electrical strain delay. Sander, who had not broken par previously 


«£ugbt Sutton with a 

Grand Prix Fined, Date Set 

PARIS (AP) — The executive committee of the International Auto 
Sport Federation levied a fine ofS 10,000 Thursday against the organizers 
' of the Belgian Grand Prix and rescheduled the race for SepL 15. The race 
was postponed June 2 because of poor track conditions at the Spa- 
Francorchamps circuit. 

In New York, it was announced that plans to hold a Grand Prix race in 


year's French national 
ship. As he said beforehand, 
ault knows the course welL 

Mostly he knows the people and 
their feeling for him. Spoiling a 
broad, confident grin, be mounted 
the victors podium and was pre- 
sented with an armful of flowers, 
then both cheeks twice by a beauty 
queen and next the yellow jersey, 
that had just anived in the embrace 
of a parachutist. How they did 
cheer when Hinault launched the 
flowers into tbe crowd. 

Hinault continued to be the best 
of sports as he was deluged with 


en’s singles, also reached the third 
round and kept alive her hopes of 
winning the Grand Slam — consec- 
utive victories at the world's four 
major tournaments. 

McEnroe overcame a cautious 
start before beating Nigeria’s top 
player, Nduka Odizor, 7-6 (7-1). 6 - 
I, 7-6 (7-1). Navratilova overpow- 
ered Anne Minter of Australia, 64, 
6-1, and Even took just under an 
hour to spoil the 21 st birthday of 
fellow American Susan Mascarin, 
6-3. 6-0. 

Carting Bassett of Canada, the 


aQueens parkin September have been canceled because the rite* could *&*&*»* of the tour’s comma-- SSffj, °i 


not be prepared in time. 

;For the Record 

- Alan Wiggins, the San Diego Padres' suspended second baseman, was 
. officially traded to tbe Baltimore Orioles for minor ^ league relief pitcher 
T^Roy Lee Jackson, and a player to be named Jala. Wiggins has -been 
.' Aygned to the Class AAA team in Rochester, New York, but is expected 
tq join the Orioles next week. (AP) 

' ‘George Stetabrama, owner of the New York Yankees, has been 
- — denied an owner's license to race horses at the new Canterbury Downs 
race track in Minnesota because he made illegal political contributions to 
former president Richard Nixon. (ALP) 

.Trials for the seven men indicted by a federal grand jury of drag 
activity involving major league basebauplayers probably will not start 
uqtil fall, attorneys said in Pittsburgh. The trials had bus expected to 
begin in July- (AP) 



On The Road Again became the world’s leading money-winning pacer 
after winning the second kg of the World Cup at the Meadowlands in 
>East Rutherford, New Jersey. The 562,000 won . put his earnings at 
5 S2JJ52056; Gam Fella retired in 1983 with $2,041,367. (AP) 


Quotable 


* 


*1 lifted my left foot and I thought. *God, it feds pretty good for 

right foo 


: surgery. No cast or anything.' Then I noticed 


foot was all 


■bandaged up and l ydled, ’Hey, you guys did the wrong foot." 
University of Wisconsin football player Robb Johnston. 


dal ballyhoo: a plush lion symbol- 
izing a banking sponsor, a small 
flag celebrating a builder of vaca- 
tion homes and, finally, a can of 
Coca-Cola. He took a quick sip of 
the soft drink before thrusting it to 
an official. 

Coca-Cola, this year, has re- 
placed Perrier as the official drink 
of the Tour de France, ending rath- 
er controversially 52 years of spon- 
sorship by the French mineral wa- 
ter producer. To some the change 
has been regarded as a sign of the 
race's internationalization, but to 
others it is yet another example of 
American cultural inqjerialism. 
Wicked souls insist the change 
interest in 
States since, 
_ Coca-Cola 
wfli sponsor a weekly series of U.S. 
television programs about the race. 
Officials of Colombia Broadcast- 
ing System, which is filming the 
programs, deny this. 

In any case the Tour de France 
has changed. No rider henceforth 
triO finish a long, hot race by pour- 
ing a can of soda pop over lus head 
or swollen feet, as many used to do 
with Perrier. 


(14-12), 6-3. 

Men’s seeds joining McEnroe in 
the third round included Timmy 
Connors, Johan Kriek and Tim 
Mayotte of the United States, Yan- 
nick Noah of France and Stefan 
Edbergand Anders Jariyd of Swe- 
den. 

McEnroe played well below par 
at tbe start of his match, making a 
number of unforced errors. He 
needed to call on all bis experience 
to pull out the opening set after 
trading, 3-5. 

After winning that tie breaker he 
never again was behind but still 
had to work hard For victory, need- 
ing the tie breaker in the third set to 
finish off Odizor. 

Twice. McEnroe shouted at ihe 
crowd to keep quiet and twice que- 
ried line calls. But otherwise, he 
kept his notorious temper in check, 

“I felt like I just got by, just 
enough to win," he said. “There’s 



John McEnroe, left, toughed it out; Carling Bassett was unable to choke off a defeat 


“My opponent today was a base- 
liner, which for an Australian is 
unusual," Navratilova said. “It’s 
strange to play an Aussie who stays 
back, so I prefer to play her on 
grass than on anything else." 

When tbe action resumed, Minl- 
er gained a consolation game be- 
fore the defending women’s cham- 
pion served out the match for a 
comprehensive 43-minnte victory. 

Mascarin played some fine ten- 
nis in the opeaing.set against Evert, 
the Australian and French champ i- 


easier time against Paul Annaoone 
of the United Slates, who reached lander of Sweden Tuesday 
the quarterfinals as an unseeded In a battle of two big savers, 
player last year. Nystrom won, 7-5, Zivqjinovic was beaten bv Heinz 
7-5, 6-3, setting up an intriguing Guentbnrdt of Swtzeriani 64, 4- 
third-round .match against Boris 6, 4-6, 6-3, 64. Each set was dedd- 


White Suits Crowd, 
But Not Tradition 

The Associated Press 

WIMBLEDON. England — 
Anne White stubbornly defended 
her outfit. Her first-round oppo- 
nent in tbe Wimbledon champion- 
ships. Pam Shriver, said it was “the 
most bizarre, stupid-looking thing I 
have ever seen on a tennis court/* 
The Wimbledon press corps 
adored it. Shocked Wimbledon au- 
thorities banned iL 
But one thing was certain: 
White’s skin-tight leotard was the 
biggest talking point around (be 
staid All England Gub on Friday. 

White. 23, appeared on court 
Thursday wearing the white nylon 
outfit, complete with leg warmers 
and headband. The crowd that 
packed around No. 2 court cheered 
and whistled, and the photogra- 
phers snapped away busily. 

But whim the match was halted 
due to darkness, tournament offi- 
cials told White not to appear again 
in the tight-fitting body suit when 
she returned to the court Friday. 

For the completion of ber match. 
White wore a conventional white 
top and matching skirt 
“I did not want to canscprob- 
lemsor make people here spill their 
strawberries and cream," she joked 
after her 6-3, 6-7. 6-3 defeat 
She said wore the body suit be- 
cause of tbe chilly weather. And, 
because of its sheemess, “I had on 
actually at least two body suits. So I 
had a lot of stuff on." 

Wimbledon rules state that play- 
wbo upset fourth-seeded Mats Wi- ere must dress in predominantly 
• • ~ * white tennis dothing and that it 

must be “appropriate" 

Ted Tinling. designer of wom- 


Becker. 

Becker, 17. the West German 
who is considered the most danger- 
ous non-seed in the men’s singles, 
dispatched Matt Anger of the Unit- 
ed States, 6-0. 6-1. 6-3. 

John Uoyd kept British hopes 
alive with an exciting, 6-3. 64, 4-6. 


ed by a single service break 
Zina Garrison, No. 8 . defeated 
Terry Phelps, 6-3, 6-1. in the second 
round. On Court 1, sixth-seeded 
Claudia Kohde-Kilsch oF West 
Germany straggled to lake the first 
set against Betsy Nagdsen. then 
stepped up a gear and beat the 


en s tennis outfits and now tbe 
tournament's player liaison, said 
Thursday: “She is quite within her 
rights. And she has a lovely figure 
to go with iL" 

Nearly 70 years ago, Tinling not- 
ed, France’s Suzanne Lenglen 
caused a sensation with ankle- 
length dresses that clung to her 
body. In 1949 Gussie Moran creat- 


not a lot you can do when you fed on who has just regained her world 3 ^ 7.5 upsel ^ tfg jq” American, 7-5, 6-1, to reach the ed a stir when her short slrirt re- 


like thaL 

Navratilova, who has 
only seven games in two mai 
led by 64, 5-0 when rain interrupt 
ed her match for an hour. 


SCOREBOARD 


******* 


Tennis 


Baseball 


Wimbledon Results 

MMS SINGLES 
First RMUM 

Terrv Moor. U3, M. Jofcoto Hlowk. Swtt- 
ajriond. W.M. M <fr4).7-6 (7-6). 7-Si Vine* 
vot Pattm. IU.M. Peter Eitar. W*st Ger- 
manv. ML fr-7, *4 4-4. 


S*ce*d R*tmd 

John McEnnw (1). U-S~IS*L Nduka Odbar. 
tftgerla. M CWL *-I. W f Ml: Jimmy Oon- 
nart 13). Ui. ML Kallv Evamden. Now Zm- 
land. 6-3. 6-2. Mv* Jooklm Nystrom [7), Sw- 
0e*v deL Pad Aopocwm, U.S* 7-4, 7-5. 13; 
Kcvm Curran (It, Ui. def. MBct DePalnw. 
U.?c*5.S-7.A-4.M: Johan Kriek (V). U-5-Qe*. 
■’ VpiInjcraW.Aurlrnlla.3-i.7-4 (jUl.7-S.6- 
n Jbim Uoyd. Britain. deL Eliot Tdtschar 
iU>. UL 63. 4-4.44. 3-4. M; Staton Edttara 
<14) , Swrton.ctol.Tlin Wlfcfcoo. UA. 6-1,7-S, > 
6, 6-7 (0-7>. 6-7; TJm MOVott* (Ml. 05. Oat. 
NO" Float. 04L. 6-4. M. 6-4. 

Andreas Maurer JAfestGormanv.atf. Hans- 
Jocra Schwa tar. Was* Garmcnv, u 7-5, 7-S; 
Boris emfcer. w«at Germany. <tof. Matt An- 
aer, U^, 646-1.63, PautMcNamw.Austra- 
ila. d*(. dobeaa SaacL Arasnltna. 4-3. 74. 7-6; 
ffemrsn tertofrav India ML (Jaref Bourn*. 
UA. «-*. 7-S. 6* Holm GuOTthartt, Switur- 


tana.dat. Slobodan zivollnovlc. YuwHlnvl a. 6- 
4, «-«. 4-6. 6-3. 6-4; David Mustard. Now Zea- 
land, d*f. Marc Rut, U&. 7-6. tr*. 2* 6-6; ' 
Henri Laconic. France. deL Wally Masur, 
Australia 4-4. 4-4, 7-6. 4-3; Ban Tasterman, 
UXtW. LaNSWrca U-S_A-4.6-7.4U4.6-L 7-5: 
Robert Sanaa IL&. deL Mika Bauer, U5- 63, 
6-4, 6-4; Shioma GUcksloin, IsraaL del. Fran- 
cisco Garuatos. Paraauaw, 61 K H M; 
David Pata U5_ del. Steve Denton. U5_ 7-4. 4- 
4.6-4; Yannick Noah (HI. Franc*. dot. Eddto 
Edvmrds. South Africa 4-4, 6-4. 7-4. 4-2; Dante 
Vfssar. South Africa M. Jon Gunnaresoa 
Soadoa 6-7. 6-4. 6A, 7-6. 


Thursday’s Major League line Scores 


Cycling 


Tour de France 

Top flntetwrfo lh« Tour de Franca cycto 
race praiowM *4 P tometoc. Praoc* <45 km 
■Mttvldoal time Hot): 
l. Bernard Htoamv Fnmca««nbwMc. 47 JU 


2. Eric vandottordea Behriom. at 4X5 sac- 


WOMBWS SINGLES 
Ftra Reaad 

Pam Snrhw t 5 >. US. Oct. Anne WHITE. US. 
60. 6-7 (7-?). 6-3; Katnv Jordon Ot), U J- dot. 
Joy Tacon. Britain. 60. 6 - 2 ; Etsuko Inoua 
Japan, del. ElboMn EkMom. 5 w o dtoi.60.6- 
lj LUlan Oreodwr.l«>ttz>n<*iiLdat. Marcello 
Skuheraka, Cwdioslovakla 6-1. 6-7; Anna 
Smitn. ui, tut. Vicki Netan, UJI_ 6-0. 62; 
Ctaudio KohA-Kfttch <61. West Gerntony. 
deL Botsv NoeelMn. U5-7-5.61; Bonn to Go- 
dmwk m. U£_def. Htoattwr LudtoH. UJ- 61. 
61; EllzaOHti Wnhr. Australia dot. Masako 
YanaaL Japan, 6-3. 6-1 

Patti Fetidlck. MeUs&a Brown, Ui_ 

a-4, 6t; Jenny Byrne. Austro) to. oat. Sophie 
AirUach. Franca 62, 63; Yvonne Varmaak. 
south Africa dot. Mima Jausovec. Yugosla- 
via 63. 64; Dianne Batostral, Austral la dot. 
ft teg* Otos. BraxiL 6-0. 62. isabelto O*mon- 
geot. Franca a*L Bartaaro Jardaa U 5- 61.6 
4; Katftv Cammlnas. US. d*L Koto Brasher. 
Brtfptn, 6-4 6^; EUsa Sura In. US. net. Patri- 
cia Mooroda Broxll. 7-4 (7-SI. 62; Jo Duria 
Britain, 0*1. Kkm Shooter. US. 64 67; 
Adriana Vlllaoran. ArauHta dot. Jenny 

Kllteh. U 5L 67 lS-n.64.Mj Barbara Gerkon. 
US. d*f. Corlnne Von ter. 64 62. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
MUaaaUC IN N 2 NO -3 7 1 

Toronto IN MS ita — 7 10 l 

Hlmiero. Cocanpwer (SI and Huppert. 
Moore [ 41 ; Key. Acker (41 and Martinez- w— 
K*v, 62. 1 6 S. Sv— AcVer W|. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
San Frnadsee no 220 200-4 12 1 

Onctenatl 2 W 22 * «*— 7 D I 

Galt, Garretts IS). Mdavb 14 ), Minton ft) 
andSrentv; Pastore, Robinson 15 ). Hume ( 61 . 
Franco ( 8 ). Power 19 ) end Knlcetv, w— Rob- 
hnoa 24 L L — GetL 45 .Sv — Power ( 13 I.HR 6 — 
CtndnnalL KrenanckJ ( 21 . San Frandsca 
Leonard 18 ). 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American Laoeoe 

MILWAUKEE— Stoned John Wilder. ottch- 
er, and assigned film to t-Meno o( tee PIcnMr 
Lbqpur. 

MINNESOTA— tUgnad Jett Bomcarner, 
Pilcher, and astopned Mm to EUiabeibtm ot 
Ihe Appalachian League. 

Kattoaofl * qKiRitr 

PITTSBURGH— Traded Steve SMrtoy, 
PIT cner. to Detroll tor Sia Mange, pticner. 

SAN DIEGO— Assigned Rev Lee Jackson, 
pitcher, to Las Vegas of ihe Pacific Coos 
L(O0ut. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Announced ihe retire- 
ment of Duane Kulper. Inhelder, and waived 
him far Hte purpose of glvlnalilin Ms unamtS- 
tlenal release. Reactivated Brad Wellman. 
HifWder. from tee 71-dav disabled Hsl 


SLLanll 1M 181 108—4 8 8 

PWbodetphta 008 818 1U-d 4 2 

KeasWre, Campbell 17), LoMI (8) and 
Ntoto; Rawier. Rucker (7). Andersen (8) and 
Vlroil. W— Kepshh-*, 5-5. L—Rawtov. 5-6. Sv— 
Lahti (4). HRs — St. Louis. Smith (3). Philadel- 
phia Haves Ml. Vlratl (18 1. 

LOS Anodes 108 300 m~4 B 0 

Sob Olega 812 811 OOx— 5 IB 1 

Vdenmela, Nledenfuer ITT nod Sdasda 
Yeager (B1 ; WOlnaLeHerts (4). Stoddard <?t. 
Thurmond IB). Gossoge (9) and Kennedy. W— 
LeHerts.62. l — V aiornwela, 7-8. Sv — Gossoge 
(171. HRs — los Anodes. Ltmdreovx (4). Son 
Dtega Me Remolds (81. 

New York 010 808 180—2 5 

CMcopo )H B» Me—* 9 2 

Darling, Sisk (7) end Carter; Sutcliffe mj 
Loke.w— Sutdlfte.7-6.L- OorUng.62.HRs— 
New York. Foster 118), Hurdle (2). Chicago, 
Sandberg (V), Hatcher (1), Durham (7). 
Montreal 888 220 888—4 8 8 

Pittsburgh 880 900 200-2 12 1 

Palmer. Burke (71, Reardon (91 and Fitz- 
gerald; McWilliams. Guante (5). Winn (8). 
Candelaria (9) and Pena W— Palmer. 6-6 1 — 
Mewmiams. «* sv — Reardon 122). hr— 
Montreal. Raines <4j. 

Atlanta 0)2 880 Ml — i 10 1 

Houston 0M 011 080—1 4 B 

Smith. Dedman (61 Sutler (81 and Benedict; 
Rvan. Dawtar 18) and Bat lev. W— Smite. 4-4. 
L— Ryan. B-S. Sv— Sutter (141. HR— Atlanta. 
W as hingt o n IB). 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DMUaa 


No. 1 ranking. But tbe second set 
was a different story with Evert, 
always a huge favorite with the 
Wimbledon crowd, dropping only 
10 points and winning on her third 
match point. 

Connors beat KeUy Evernden, a 
qualifier from New Zealand, 6-3, 6 - 
2 . 6-1; Kriek, seeded No. 9, rallied 
to beat Australia's John Fitzgerald, 
3-6, 7-6, 7-5, 6-1, and the 16th- 
seeded Mayotte, who has a fine 
singles record at Wimbledon, won 
by 6-4. 6-4, 6-4 against Ken Flach 
of the United Slates. 

Edberg, the No. 14 seed, had a 
marathon battle before eliminating 
Tim Wilkison of the United States, 
6-1. 7-5. 3-6. 6-7, 9-7. 

Nystrom, seeded No. 7. had a far 


Eliot Teltscher of the United 
States. 

Lloyd appeared on the verge of 
losing the match when he let slip a 
two-set lead and trailed, 3-5, in the 
final set But he hung on grimly to 
win tbe next four games and send 
tbe Centre Court crowd into 
cheers. 

“I'm pleased with tbe way I 
played, especially considering J 
watched John's match and 1 was so 
emotional,'' his wife said after- 


second round. 

Gabriela Sabatini of Argentina, 
the No. 15 seed, advanced to the 
third round with a 6-3, 6-4 victory 
over Camille Benjamin of tbe Unit- 
ed Slates. 

On an overcast day, play again 
began two hours early on tbe snow- 
courts to make up for the backlog 
of matches caused by bad weather 
earlier in the week. But rain again 
held tip play for half an hour in the 
afternoon and the day's matches 
were halted in the evening by a 


ward. “I hope John doesn t have second storm that swept through 
any more efiffhangers before my (h e ana. 


matches.' 

It was the end of the road, how- 
ever. for Slobodan Zivqjinovic. 21. 
the 6 -foot -6 (1.98-meter) Yugoslav 


In a suspended match. No. 2 
Ivan Lendl was tied at one set each 
with Mike Leach of the United 
States. 


vealed lace-trimmed panties. 

Said Shriver, who was not 
amused: “All of a sudden I was 
about to serve and heard everyone 
stan booting and hollering. Then I 
turned round and saw tins thing. 

“I told Anne afterwards that she 
could have warned me beforehand. 
It would have been fun, wouldn’t it, 

right in the middle of tf^coun?"** 
Shriver accused White of delib- 
erately seeking publicity. 

“Ji worked, but she lost, it’s 
over," said Shriver, the tourna- 
ment's No. 5 seed. “She is one of 
my friends, sure, one of my weirder 
ones.” 

— Andrew Warshaw 


' Expos 9 Burke, Reardon 
Terminate Pirates’ Rally 


Compiled h Ovr Stuff From Dispatches 

PITTSBURGH — You have to 
hand it to Jeff Reardon, and the 
Montreal Expos usually do near 
the end of a game. 

“It makes it easy for me, know- 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


won two in a row after 13 straight 
losses. Rookie Billy Hatcher tiki 
three hits and two RBI. his first 


H raaxp II easy ior me. atom- major-league homer breaking a 1-1 
mg Jeffs in the buUpta" the Ex- li S L ° ra6r DraiUnB 
pos long reliever. Tun Burke; said 


■^onO* bartne loader 
srsreahen 


Rocj io. Ireland, at UBO 
4. Phil Andenaa, Australia, at 19X3 
S Groo umeod. UA. M 21.44 
4 Steve Bauer, fe nvin go 30 

7. Alan Peter. MtotraUa. at 34 

8. Pella Rub Cabaftny. soatn. at 2S 

9. Kim Andenoa. Denmark, at 25 
« Pascal PWmmw France, at V 
11 . Pascal Stave,. France, at V 
•ft Thierry Marf*. FrtMte*. at 29 

ft Oomintave Galana. France, 01 38 
ia jean.Luc vaaatoibraucke. Belgium. 01 30 
ft Demons valu Franca, at 30 
14. Joan ZnaktnaBt. Wotiand. at Si 
17. Robert Minor, Britain, at 3T 
n. Frederic Brag, Prance, at 32 
». Lwhi Merrei* CotomHa. al 32 
30. NISI RuHhnaim SerflxeftteKL at 34 
*1. Oiriwooter Lovainn*. France, al 33 
32. Alain VMMtea, France, al is 
''“jJtwc Garnet, France, at 34 
ATOolA Sonant, Front*, ot 37 
2S. Rtoote «nwte France, at 37 
34. Scan Yotes. Britain, at » 

27. Dawto CriaetoMn. Betoimn, el 3» 
at. Mare Madtet, franco, ot 39 
». Ptorra Le BtaaoL France. « 39 
» Paul Hgglwaooren, BttoteM, ot 39 


Martina NowraHiova (latnt-i). del. Anne 
Winter, Autfratia. 64. 4-f; Curt* Llovtf llolnr- 
1), UA, deL Susan Mascarin. UA. 64 60; 
Gabriela Sabatini (15). Argentina del. Co- 
ming Beniamin, 6464; Hu Na China, 
del. Lea Pichova. Czechoslovakia 74 64; 
Cotftr Tonvior, Franca deL Melissa Gurney. 
U&.6X64.- Zina Garrison |t>. Ui-deLTeny 
Phete. US. 6461; Wendy white. UA. ML 
Aim Henrtcksson. US- 64. 34, 64; Alvcla 
Moulton, U4.del.SailT Reaves. Brttaln.62,6 
4 ; Molly van Nonrand, UJ. def. Peanus 
Louie, UA. 64 4ft 

Pascals PoaxSs, Franca deL Srlvtb Hnv 
Ika Wen Germany, 7-4. 67, 63: Morttlla 
Metker. Holland, def. Andrea Hotikarau 
Crtchostavakta.61 67,63; Rena Uv*. South 
Africa det Carting Bassett (13). 0* 7-4. M; 
Robin while, VJ, det. Era Piaff. west Gar- 
many. 4-4 62! Httono Suksva 171. CiecnasJo- 
vakia del, Virginia RiizlcL Romania 6L 64; 
Belikto Bunge, West Gemcny.def. Anno Ma- 
rla CecCNnL iiaiv. 64 62; 5teH< Grot nil. 

Wesl Gennanv.dd. Andrea TtohMvorLHun- 
BOfV. 40.7ft 


FOOTBALL 


W 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

Motional Football League 

Toronto 

44 

27 

JOB 

— 

CHICAGO— Stoned Stove Buxton, offensive 

Del roll 

40 

28 

S 88 

2V» 

tackle. 

New York 

36 

32 

sa 

ita 

HOUSTON— Stoned Gregg Blngnam. Ilne- 

Boston 

37 

33 

S3 9 

4Va 

boefcef. and Mike HoMon. wide receiver. 

Bar II more 

35 

33 

J15 

7V» 

SAN FRANCISCO— signed woily Kersten. 

Milwaukee 

31 

34 

.463 

11 

offensive tackle; Mike Weils, itoh; end, and 
Dimitri Tsarafski. defensive ena. Waived 

Cleveland 

32 47 

west DMiloa 

J19 

21 

Joey Lumakln. linebacker, and Doug 

CdH torn la 

40 

30 

J71 

— 

McCann, safety. 

Oakland 

W 

33 

sat 

2 

umm States Football League 

Chicago 

35 

37 

sn 

3Vi 

NEW JERSEY — Placed Dana Woodward. 

Kansas a tv 

35 

34 

-507 

4VS 

auarteniacJL and Ganf Nkrtea linebacker , oa 

Seattle 

34 

36 

.486 

6 

waivers. 

Minnesota 

30. 

38 

<441 

9 

OAKLAND— Signed Oils Brawn; UdcaH re- 

Texas 

37 

44 

-380 

1316 

turn eaeciatlcf. 

HOCKEY 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

East Division 


wattoaa i Mackey uagae 


K 

L 

Pet 

GB 

MONTREAL— Signed Kleil Datum, rigtii 

Montreal 

42 

30 

-583 

— 

wlno. to O fwo-vear contend. 

SI. Louis 

40 

29 

-588 

W 

COLLEGE 

New York 

38 

31 

J51 

2» 


4 

101b 

17 


COLUMBUW-Named Kevin McGill men's a '* coo ° . J* ® 

track coach. Ptiltodehdila 30 39 JOS 

DELAWARE STATE — Mooted Mentall P,n * 0urBh ® 45 M 

Emery basketaou cooch. OMgkm 

IONA Nam ed Richard D'Amico pnd John 50,1 Ph »” 43 * "Sf "" 

Castellano asstskanf feoteati coochvs. Cincinnati J7 X J34 5 

LOYOLA MARYMODNT— Announced ttigt «-R* AWeta 
farmer 1-A.LakersCoocn Paul We^heodtvlll Houston 35 34 A93 8 

replace JlraLynomm men's basketball cog- Atlanta 32 38 A57 Wa 

eh. -San FnanctoOB 24 45 344 17 


after Thursday night’s 4-2 viaoiy 
over the Pittsburgh Pirates. “I 
don’t have to wony about getting 
into trouble because he's there. My 
job is to get it to the ninth inning so 
he can come in and terminate." 

As usually has been the case all 
season, Burke provided strong re- 
lief in the late innings and Reardon 
nailed down the victory in the ninth 
for his major league-leading 22 nd 
save. Nicknamed “The Termina- 
tor.'’ Reardon has blown only one 
lead in 31 appearances this season. 

The Pirates' Joe’ Orsulak. who 
wenL 4-for-4, tripled and scored on 
Johnny Rays single before Jason 
Thompson hit a run-scoring double 
ofr the right field wall in the sev- 
enth, making the score 4-2. Burke 
came on to strike out George Hen- 
drick and pitched H 6 innings be- 
fore Reardon pitched the ninth. 

The Expos had scored twice in 
the fourth and in the fifth Tim 
Raines hit a two-run home run. 

Cubs 4, Mels 2 : In Chicago. Ride 
Sutcliffe pitched a five-hitter to 
help beat New York as the Cubs 


Cardinals A Ptuffies 3: Willie 
McGee had three hits and scored 
bis team's first three runs as Sl 
L ouis ended host Philadelphia’s 
five-game winning streak. 

Reds 7, Giants 6 : In Cincinnati, 
Wayne Krenchicki drove in three 
runs with a homer, double and sin- 
gle as the Reds swept the three- 
games series with San Francisco. 

Jeff Leonard became the Giants’ 
first player to hit for tbe cycle since 
Dave Kingman in 1972. but they 
lost their seventh straighL 

Padres 5. Dodgers 4: Kevin 
McReynolds drove in three runs 
with a homer and a two-run single 
in San Diego and Jerry Royster’s 
two-out single in the sixth scored 
the run that beat Los Angeles. 

Braves 4, Astros 1: Atlanta’s 
Zanc Smith. Jeff Dedmon and 
Bruce Sutter held the Astros to six 
hits in Houston. 

Blue Jays 7, Brewers 3: In the 
American League. Jesse Barfield 
drove in two runs, walked twice 
and stole two bases in helping beet 
Milwaukee in Toronto. (AP.UPIi 



Eadi wert two papeed c^ndar washes assaTtted poished and fcssfiHlty haft 
aie baHk} the Bbncpan wwishopi WaEHBwaam. tsfflel gold-swl TB k goH). 

BENOIT 

DEGORStJ 

64 RUE DU RHONE 120* GENEVE TEL 28 Id 30 
CHESERY PLATZ GSTAAD T£l 030-41165 




I 








ft 


KC-- 


Page 16 


CAi 

bt 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, JUNE 29-30, 1985 


ART BUCHWAT.n 

Teen-Age House Sitters 


WASHINGTON — Tbe hcsi 
■ T tun f for parents of teen-agers 
is wben taw can get away and take 
3 vacation bv themselves. The 
worst time is when they call home 
to find out if everything is going ah 
right. 

../".Hello, Alfred, this is Mummv. 
Well, we just arrived at the beach. 


Whv did 



Buchwald 


Where’s Grandma? 
she go home? 

She said she 
would stay for 
the week. . . 

What's that mu- 
sic in the back- 
ground? . . . 

How manv 
friends? . . .* 

You’re not sure" 

. . How many 
did you invite? 

. . . You only- 
asked JO but 40 showed 
up? . . . Alfred, we told you you 
couldn't have parties while we were 
gone. ... If it’s not a party what 
is it? ... A high school reunion? 
. . . But you don't graduate from 
high school until n«t year. . . . 
It's a reunion of the kids who have 
already graduated from the school? 
Where do you come off entertain- 
ing college freshmen? . . . 
They're not freshmen, they're rug- 
by players from Detroit? . . . 
That does it Put your sister Grace 
on. . . . How can she be out? She 
promised to stay home and guard 
the house while we were gone. 
. . . Alfred, you gave us >our sol- 
emn word you would not fight with 
your sister. . . . What was that 
crashing noise? . . . Where are 
you t alkin g from? ... It does 
make a difference. If you're speak- 
ing from the kitchen it means 
someone has just broken my china 
— and if you're speaking from the 
upstairs bedroom it means some- 
one just smashed my perfume bot- 
tles. I'm going to put your father 
on." 

□ 

“Hello, son. how goes it? I hear 
you’re throwing a little party? . . . 
It sounds like everyone is having a 
lot of fun. . . . Seems to me we 
had a deal in exchange for your 
using my car that when we went 
away you'd kinda keep people out 
of the house. Isn't that what we 
agreed on? ... I teD you whau 
son. Why don't you just ask every- 
one to leave the bouse quietly, arid 
if they don't want to go. tel! them 


y OIL 11 kick their butts in for 
them. . . . No. I must admit I 
have never asked a Detroit rugby- 
team to leave my bouse. At the 
same time, since you let them in. 
you're going to have to figure a way 
of getting them oul . . . Alfred, 
are those sirens? . . . Out of curi- 
osity. are they police sirens or fire 
sirens? . . . Police sirens. Well, at 
least that means the bouse isn’t 
burning down. Any idea. Alfred, 
why the police are at our house? 
. . . Youd prefer to put the ser- 
geant on. 

□ 

“Yes. sergeant, this is Sam Sav- 
age. 1 know"* something is wrong so 
we better gel to it right away. . . . 
1 see. There have been complaints 
from the neighbors about scream- 
ing. shouting of obscenities, break- 
ing windows, beer cans on the lawn 
and some nudity in the bushes. 

"Yes. there is a possibility that 
our son could be hosting such a 
party. If his head comes to a point 
and if he strikes you as a first-class 
idiot who can't say no when his 
parents go out of town, then that 
has to be our Alfred. . . . Ser- 
geant. how much damage do you 
es tima te has been done? . . . Yes. 
include the bottle of red wine that 
was spilled on the sofa. . . . Two 
or three thousand dollars? . . . 
Well it seems Mrs. Savage and I got 
off cheap. . . . What do 1 want 
you to do? I'm not in a position to 
say. Are you people into police bru- 
tality? I'U tell you what, sarge, any- 
way' you could clear out the house 
would be very much appreciated. 
I'U see that your men get a com- 
mendation medal for each kid they 
throw out in the street. Let me 
speak to my son again. 

“Alfred, the sergeant has offered 
to persuade Lhe Detroit rugby team 
to lejve the premises. Tel] them not 
to take it personally. I've asked him 
to bounce everyone whether they're 
involved in sports or not. It has 
nothing to do with your friends. It 
has to do with your mother's and 
my dream of spending a few more 
years in Lhe house, after we get 
home from vacation. 

“Look. son. after the sergeant 
boots everyone out. he could" take 
you down to the station house and 
book you for disorderly conduct. If 
he does, he may give you the right 
to make one telephone call If this 
happens, son. don't waste your 
quarter on us. because we're going 
to try to get some sleep." 



the Value of a Human Life 


By William R. Greer 

" Vtfw l'.wrf - rimes Sentce 

'fcj' EW YORK — When a con- 
rNstruciion crane fell on Bri- 
gitte Geniev last month as she 
walked along Manhattan's Third 
Avenue, pi nnin g her for six hours, 
die city leaped into action. Hun- 
dreds of police officers rerouted 
traffic throughout the Upper East 
Side. Two cranes were brought 
from other boroughs to lift the 
one that had fallen. Doctors from 
Bellevue Hospital set up a mobile 
hospital at the construction site. 
Emergency Service rescue work- 
ers risked their lives to save hers. 
Once she was freed, police halted 
traffic for 3C blocks to speed her 
trip to the emergency room. 

No city official questioned bow 
much the rescue effort cos L or 
whether saving Gemey's life was 
worth the price. “There's no point 
where you say that’s too expen- 
sive." said Lieutenant Thomas 
Fahey, speaking for the New 
York City Police Department. 

Yet putting a price log on hu- 
man life is common among life 
insurance companies. airUnes. 
courts, industries and agencies. 
The l 1 . S. government routinely 
calculates the value of a life, hav- 
ing been required to do so by law: 
Executive Order 12291. issued by 
President Ronald Reagan in Feb- 
ruary 1 9S 1 . Ordinary citizens 
make much the same determina- 
tion. albeit unconsciously, when 
they choose small cars over large 
ones, take jobs hundreds of feet 
below ground for higher pay. or 
buy inexpensive bouses in a flood 
plain. 

The fact that there are these 
prices put on human life, and the 
processes for m aking such valua- 
tions and the ways in which the 
results are used, raise questions 
about the society: Is this neces- 
sary? What are the ethical and 
moral considerations? Given the 
answers, where does human life 
stand in society's scheme of 
things? 

People have been calculating 
the worth of their lives and the 
lives of others for as long as ar- 
chaeologists. anthropologists and 
historians can document human 
existence. 

“It may be Lhought to be an 
aberration of our own institution- 
al values, but it's not at all unique 
in the course of humankind." said 
Kenneth Korev. an anihrooolo- 



gist at Dartmouth College in New 
Hampshire. “In tribal and band 
societies, for example, we find in- 
demnification for the loss of a life 
that involves property transfers. 
How else can those "groups set 
straight the fabric of the society 
when it is distressed by the disor- 
der of a murder?" 

The Aztecs created an elabo- 
rate system of compensation for 
injuries and deaths; so did the 
Code of Hammurabi of ancient 
Babylonia. In ancient and medi- 
eval law, a composition, or sum of 
money, was paid by a guilty party 
to satisfy the family of the person 
he injured or killed. In Old En- 
glish. “wergild," meaning "man's 
price," referred to the amount 
paid to the king, who had lost a 
subject: to the lord of the manor, 
who had lost a vassal; and to the 
family of the deceased. 

But there is a fundamental dif- 
ference. many social scientists 
say, between calculating Lhe value 
or a life to compensate for its loss, 
and determining whether it is 
worth saving, a practice growing 
more common. 

“We cannot argue that in our 
society human life has gained in 
value "or that we cherish life more 
than primitive people did," said 
Robert Zeiflin. an archaeologist 
at Brandeis University in Wal- 
tham, Massachusetts.'*! thick, 
looking back at our society thou- 


Dmd SuMr/Thr Nnv Yorfc Timu 

sands of years from now, people 
will regard some of the things we 
do with absolute horror, the fact 
that we knowingly allow people to 
die from environmental hazards, 
for example." 

Some philosophers say the val- 
ue of human life is infinite or 
incalculable. “Individual human 
beings are utterly irreplaceable," 
said Daniel Callahan, director of 
the Hastings Center, a nonprofit 
research and educational organi- 
zation devoted to ethical issues in 
medicine and biology. 

However, insurance agents, 
economists, legal experts, scien- 
tists and agency ad mini s t rators 
assign life values ranging from a 
few dollars to many millions of 
dollars, depending on the formu- 
las used. 

One way of figuring value is to 
break down the body into chemi- 
cal elements — 5 pounds of calci- 
um. lb pounds of phosphorus. 9 
ounces of potassium. 6 ounces of 
sulfur. 6 ounces of sodium, a little 
more than 1 ounce of magnesium 
and less than an ounce each of 
iron, copper and iodine. Harry 
Monsen. an anatomy professor at 
the University of Illinois Medical 
School in Chicago, said that, on 
that basis, a human life is worth 
S8.37, up $1.09 in six years be- 
cause of inflation. 

Another approach is to look at 


the going price of contract mur- 
der. Andreas Santiago Hernan- 
dez, 22, recently told the Los .An- 
geles Police Department that he 
was paid $5,000 to kill Lorraine 
Kd/er. the 67-year-old widow of 
a San Fernando Valley executive. 

The life-insurance industry de- 
termines what people would have 
earned had they lived. "What is 
the economic value of an individ- 
ual?" said Robert Waldron, direc- 
tor of the New York office of Lhe 
American Council of Life Insur- 
ance. “It’s their earning power 
over the course of their working 
life. It's unsentimental but it’s 
fairly straightforward." 

Lee S. •Kremdler. a lawyer who 
since 1952 has been representing 
the victims of airplane crashes 
and their families, says his formu- 
la is specified by law. But the law 
varies from state to state. In 
Georgia, for example, people are 
worth what they would have 
earned, while in New York they 
are worth whaL they would have 
contributed to their family. “A 
35-year-old man, killed in a crash, 
is unmarried but was making a 
great amount of money,” 
Kreindler said. “That's a small 
case in New York, but a huge case 
in Georgia." 

Kreindler said crash victims' 
families can expect to recover 
$300,000 to $500,000, with a few 
cases in the millions. Insurance 
experts say that in the case of the 
Air- India jetliner that went down 
Sunday, many passenger claims 
the airline would be limit- 
to a maximum of $100,000 
under the Montreal Convention, 
an international treaty, but that 
there was no limitation in claims 
against the aircraft’s manufactur- 
er. 

Then there are federal govern- 
ment formulas. Executive Order 
12291 requires that, unless Con- 
gress forbids it. “regulatory ac- 
tion shall not be undertaken un- 
less the potential benefits to 
society from the regulation out- 
weigh the potential costs to soci- 
ety." 

The Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration, when analyzing the costs 
and benefits of proposed regula- 
tions or revisions in regulations, 
figures that a human life is worth 
S650,083, according to John Le- 
den. a spokesman. 

The Environmental Protection 
Agency chooses a number be- 


tween $400,000 and 57 million — 
the choice, agency officials say. is 
arbitrary — with tbe average be- 
ing “around SI million or $2 mil- 
lion," according to John M. 
Campbell, tbe deputy assistant 
administrator for policy. The Oc- 
cupational Safety and Health Ad- 
ministration uses a scale of $2 
million to S5 million. 

Federal officials argue that 
these computations make eco- 
nomic sense: It helps them decide 
which regulations wiD protect the 


Dale Jr., a spokesman for the Of- 
fice of Management and Budget. 
"If it would cost an industry $800 
million of remedial action to save 
one life, then it would only take 
1.000 lives before they would use 
one-fifth of the GNP.” 

W. Kip Viscusi, an economist 
at Duke University in North Car- 
olina who directed the Council on 
Wage and Price Stability in the 
Carter administration, supports 
the government's use of the will- 
ingness to pay" approach: An 
economist looks at how much 
money employees must be paid to 
accept a certain level of ride in 
their jobs; tbe economist can then 
calculate the value employees 
place on their fives. If, for exam- 
ple, a certain job carries a fatality 
risk of one in every 10,000 work- 
ers in a year and workers are will- 
ing to race that risk for $300 in 
additional pay, then that group 
values one of its members’ lives at 
S300 time s 10,000 workers, or $3 

milli on 

Viscusi figures that the av 
blue-collar worker puts a !~ 
lion to ft S-milKon price ta$ on a 
life. Workers in high-risk indus- 
tries such as muting and ofl-rig 
drilling, where the death risk is 1 
in 1.000. value life at about 
$600,000. he said, and white-col- 
lar workers, who are much less 
willing to accept tbe risk of fatali- 
ties in their relatively safe jobs, 
{trice it at S7 million to $10 mit 
lion. 

The issue for Viscusi is not 
whether to perform such calcula- 
tions, but now the answers are 
used. "The alternative," he said, 
“is to pull values out of the air and 
not make Lhe public aware of 
what the trade-off is between 
money and risk on the job." He 
added: “We always have to get 
back to the fundamental trade-off 
between money and risk, because 
we don’t have enough money to 
elimm.itR ail the rides. '" 


PEOPLE 

Court Overturns Aicard / 

To Ex-Anckoncoman 

A federal anneals court u: Kan- 
sas City. m 

Friday a jury award of 5-’— “ 
CfeistinexSft. the former TJ- ^ 
cborwoman who corded jfo. 
iras demoted because ; ,e -. k’S® 
did not like her age or 
court also ruled in Favor o. Mctrc- 
media Inc. on Craft s aiieaauop of 
sex discrimination mid 
violations. Dennis Egan, one o. 
Craft’s lawyers, said he would i ue : a 
motion for a reh^nag the 
appeals court ana. fadtn a tnaL 
SSTgo to the US. Supreme 
Court. Craft, now 40. was removed 
as anchorwoman in August 1*51. 
She sued Metromedia, saying the 
news director told her that rescarcn 
indicated viewers found her joo 
old, too unattractive and not defer- 
ential enough to men." The news 
director denied having made atch a 
remark. In 19S3, a U.S. Dismct 
Court jury awarded Craft 
5500.000. Tbe amount was lowered 
in a second trial to S325.GOO. ly 

□ 

Vanessa Redgrave and her 21- 
vear-o!d daughter. Natasha Rich- 
ardson, will play the actress Arka- 
Hina and her daught". Ninajn a 
London production s- Chekhov s 
-The SeaguIL” The -av opening 
July 29 at the Quee::' T oeaier win 
mark the finri time • -dgrave has 
appeared on stage w ^ her eldest 
daughter bv tbe d -rcior Tony 
Richardson.' Natasha Richardson 
received good notices in a version 
of "The Seagull" that piayed at th^ 
Lyric Hammersmith in May. Reap* 
grave appears with her younger 

ridHare’s newf film “Wslherby.” 


Retired Air Force General 
fhnft Yeager, test pilot and World 
War II hero, says there’s no Dick to 
having the right stuff: Plugging his 
new book, “Yeager," he said, “The 
way I led about it is you're a lot 
luckier if you're in the right place at 

the right rime* 1 


President ihuftl AlfonsiH of Ar- 
ms named 
as' winner 
Asturias prize, one < 
est honors, for his efforts in return- 
ing Argentina to democracy. The 
prize is 2 million pesetas (about 
$ 1 1,400) and a sculpture by the late 
Joan Mh& 




m 

irv'l 






'1frX 


•i r 


“ } '«. 

i: 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 


NICE 85 
JVC 

Grade Parade 
Du Jazz 

JULY 10-20 

JABMNS DES ARENS DE OM1E 
Miles Dcvts. FaS Domna Dizzv GQes- 
pw. Joe Wiliams and the World Fam- 
ous Count Baste Orchestra, The Most 
Explosive Faroe in Ja=. with Tried 
Janes (DireorttL BJLKmg. Lee ftterour. 
Steps Ahead. The Air,o end Flora Bm*i 
Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trou- 
ble. Shorty Rogers end his West Coast 
Giants ara Swod Guest Bud Shards. 
Bab Jones, the Johnny Ohs Shaw. 
[Vty Dozen Brass Band trom New Ch- 
itons. The Newport Ja= Festive! AD- 
Stan. Jan Fadds Quntel. Woody Her- 
man AlLStors. Jackie Me Lean ' Rene Me 
Lean. Marion Me Pantend Jcsnei 
Moody. Harold Ashby. Jjmm* Owens. 
Art Hades. Panama Pranas and ha Sa- 
voy Sutsare. Lew Tabodun. Jo- Leon- 
hart. Kevin Eubanks. Bobby Rcvmqar- 
den. Tete MonJaSu All-Star s. Benny 
Waters. Working Week. .Wdvd Scr- 
daby Trio. Quintette S.O.S. The fca 
Express All-Stars. Beef Lagiene Ensem- 
ble. Andre Vleger Quartet. Georges 
Ananias Trio. Bsabeth Cautnoni 
Quartet. Oaude Tnserxfier Sextet. 
Stedwr Tubapcd. Conjuro Quenda. 
Tickets purchased before July 10th 
are only 

(15 Francs Par chicken under 12]. 
Mrri orden Grande Parade du Ja= 
Hotel Beach Regency. 

223 Promenade des Angtea. 
06200 Nice. 

Tet |93) 71 93 22 
in Pant 3 FNAC 
Exdusrve on the Cflte d’Azur 
Cap 3000. 5ainl lourent du Vcr 
from July 10th on, price of tickets 
•ell to n& 


MCE - NEW YORK. 

Wish to change An France reservation 
*— ** *” m Aug. 17 to Aua. 31. 
oaD P31 87 7Y 76. 


for 2 from , 
Please. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 

. Paris (dosly) 634 59 15. Rome 
103 3U 



Exdusive ; IDAKS - 
cloth^s;dnd;' : v>'.. 
accessQi ; ies.|GF^ 
mena riu 1 ,w ; om e 
a vail q 

DAKS stocklst.s-:^ 
aroundtbe worlds 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUBSCRIBE 
to lhe 

INTERNATIONAL 

HERALD 

TRIBUNE 

AND SAVE 

As a new subscriber to the 
Iwerrcnond Herald Tribune, 
you con sews up to half 
the newsstand pact dependirg 
on your country at residence. 

Far details 

on this speed introductory offer, 
write to- 

IHT Sub sc r i ptions Departmonf, 
JUT, Avonvo Chcrim-do-Gcx/fk. 
92200 NcuUyeuiwSww. Franco. 
Or tab Peris 747-07-29 

IN ASIA AND PACIFIC 

contact cor kxd distributor at: 

bitamatiand HoraU Triune 
1G05 Tai Sang Commercial Buflding 
24-34 Harness™ Rood 
HONGKONG 
Tel: HK 5-286724 


4?h of July Fecsf 

8 PM 

FREE COCKTAIL 
ALL THE SPARERJB5 
YOU CAN EAT 
UVE BAND 
For F80 

73 run St Doris, Paris Is! 


THE CScME DS LA CKEME 
EXFfSKNCT 

HBMLEY / WIMBLEDON 

THE ULTIMATE LUXURY 
IN BRITISH SPORTS EVENT5 
A COMPUTE SERVICE 

* Chauffeur-driven Rolls Royce to event 

* Superb wining & dining aB day 

* Beit seals in the house 

Henley Royal Rrastar Thursday July 
Jrh + Saturday My 6th. Wmbledon: 
Saftrricy July fith - Women's Rnd Day, 
Sunday Jut, 7th - Men's Finds Day 
Tel: UK (6491) 04104) (24 hours] 
Tete*: 0951182 GECOMS G. 


AMERICAN HOSPITAL OF PARS. 

Accredited Ui Haspral. 24-hour 

Emergency Service. Encfch spoken - 
Blue Uoc. &3 Bid. Victor Hugo, 92102 

NEUtLLV SUH SEINE (10 rmutes from 

EtaReL Phono W 53 00. 


SJVANANUA YOGA teacher's Iran- 

ing course & voga vacation in Span. 

Sept. 3 to 29. Theory & arxhOD.rao 
76) 77 49_, London 229 79 70. Mumch 
52 44 76, Vienna 56 34 S3, Geneva 30 
03 28. Madrid 402 7467. 


JOANNE'S PBSONAL SHOPPING. 

Women •’teen fashion service. Pun & 
wonderful dares. Pans 703 4667 


Crisis CouHtafag, Compulsive Eating, 

Masters & Johnson. Paris 348 9042 


HAVE A NICE DAYI BoUL Hava a 

nice day! BoLel 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - 
Write hevser. FOB 2, BI 


HAVE YOUR E. AflUCAN MESS 

made wrtrin 48 hours. Paris 744 19 S4 


WIMBIBSQN 2 SEATS for man'-. Knot. 

Teh 04867 5506 (not agency]. 


MERCEDES 190 E-1984 

17,000 km all possible options, including 
ABS, air-conditioned sun-roof, leather interi- 
or, wooden dash, alarm etc. Swiss registra- 
tion. 

Original purchase S.fr. 59,000. 
price selling due to overseas appointment at 
S.Fr. 45,000. 

Contact J.-P. LECLBF, 

Geneva 22/46.93.66 (office hours). 


TERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


PERSONALS 


CONGRATULATIONS TO Frsrvxce 

More aid 941 Peace, marned 2? June 

1285 m Newcastle. Entfcr d . 


MOVING 


VAN LINES INT'L 

OVER 1300 OFFICES 
WORLDWIDE 

USA Alfiod Van Lines Inf'l Carp 
(0101) 312-6S1-8T00 
Office Address: 25th AvS RocwebRd 
Broadview. Illinois 60153 USA 

Or cdl aur Agency offices- 

PARIS Dnbafdes International 
(01) 343 23 64 

FtANKFUST 

(009) 250066 

DUSSHDORF/RAHNGEN 

(02102) 45023 LMJ. 

MUNICH ims. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSELS: zwgter sjl. 

(02) 425 66 14 

Call far ABedi free estwnde 


WHO BSE FCR YOU3 
NEXT INTBNATIONAL move 


FOR A FREE ESTIMATE CAU 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHENS: 

BARCELONA: 

BONN: 

BREMEN: 

BRUS5B& 

CADE: 

FRANKFUET: 

GEM-VA: 

LONDON: 

MADRID: 

MANCHESTER; 

MUNICH: 

NAH£S: 

PAMS: 

ROME: 

VKNNA-- 

ZURJOE 


07T) 89.93 J24 

01) 961.12.12 
03)6523111 

141166062 
04211170591 

02) 720.95.63 
956) 


06190)2001 
022)43.8540 
01)961.41.41 
01 {671.24 SO 
" 7072016 
1415036 
7801622 
. 49000 
0615269342 
0222)955520 
63.20.00 


01)36 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 

Offices Worldwide 


LONDON 




578 66 11 


MBT OASS SEBVKE 
ASSU8E3 EVBTY MOVE 


DEMEXPORT 

PARIS • LYON • MARSH Uf 
ULL£ a MCE 

Im'l moving by speodut ham mojci 
ones m Frawi la all dtie* in the world. 
Toll free from France 16 (BS 24 10 83 
FSS ESTIMATES 


BEAUOART 

France t I nt er nat ional Moving 
Fu8y preftssional - Seasonably prrced 

PARIS (1) 867 42 46 


CQNT1NEX. Smd njoym. cars, boo- 

i. wortdwde. CoS Charfa- Pan* 
1881 (near Opera] 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ITALY 


TOWNHOUSE m the country. 40 min- 

ute from Same, kitchen, famify roam. 
2 bedrooms, 2 baths, den. 2 fire- 

places. central hearing, root terrace 
overlooking Tiber valley. Restored. 
Od worid chart wMi modem conwr- 
raences. L I90.0HMML Tel- 6548473 
8-10 am. 6541520 office hours 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA’S NEW 
SUPER PORT 

In the bay of Palma. 5 nuns. Palma, 15 
mins, orport, <64 berths 8 lo 38 meiery. 
2 far up fo e0 meters each, Indnndua 
TV -mam-' water -phone connections. 
Profesuond port managemert ca Full 
marine services: rower, reefer, slip, trav- 
eWrfr. repair. Fuel station, in & outdoor 
winner hardstands. U-ground .^r- pari. 
Lockers. Complemenlarv service & lei- 
sure focSties: mecicnL laifang. shop- 
png. entering, entertainmem Golf & 
tennis nearby. Commeiad area com- 
prises 85 unrts on 13.171 uqjn. in al. 
Phis 21 super ut m tme nt s ahjve & 78 in 
separate luxury condo ■ al in front ine 
cJorg man pters. Tap hvestinenrt 46% 
saicfl Huirv now before next price-nsel 
Comae: directly developer* 

PUERTO RJNTA PORTALS, S-A. 
Dpedcx Comeraal 
C Manna lOI.Portnb Nous 
McJWca. Span or lU 66686 CALIU E. 


N3UA (MALAGA) 

Luxury viBo, steeps 6. swimming pool, 
video and reoeation room, cemet or 
vBfoge, I kn from beaches Avalacte 
far month of July al 51250 or £10)0 
staring. 

Tel: Brian. Malaga 
Buwreic-. 520634 
Home: 520253 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


INVEST ON THE SAFE SIDE! 
Avodabte in lhe famous mountain resort 
DAVOS SWIIZBILAND 

1 and 2 Roam C o rwfan w nhimi 
Witt Hotel Service 

Quiet, near golf course 
iite« e s ftng rerong possibilrties 
CONSULTUJVHT INTERNAT. INC 
40 North Dm St.. 
EnglewaocL NJ 07631 
Brann: 201-569-2301 
SUBSIDIARY OF 
CO-IN CONSULT] NVHT AG 
Lagerelr. 47. 8021 Zurich 
Swiberknd 


SWITZERLAND 

Foreianers ran buv STUDIOS.- A?ART- 
MBUTS ‘ CHALETS, LAKE GOBVA - 
MONTIBBJX or in these world famous 
resorts: CRANS-MONTANA, IE5 
DIABIKETS, VBS1ER. VlUARS. 
JURA & region of GSTAAD. From 
SF1 T OjCXX) Mortgages 60% a fi'tfi 
interest. 

REV AC SA 
four Fssrtnmr at Europe 
52 MonffardkaU, CHI 202 GENEVA. 
Tot 022/341540. Tele.': 22030 


DIRECTLY ON LAKE GBCVA 30 

mm. from airport in becufihJ hgh 
cte readenca. luvury floti. with par- 
nits for srfet ro non-reudems. Just 2 
left. Phone Swifter land 021 -71 5232 
office or 021 4779370 eve. Tlx 458131. 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


SOUTH TEXAS. Four-ple*. 3i 15.000. 

Assume: loan at S59JXJ0. Some 


SWITZERLAND 


SUNNY SOUTHERN SWITZERLAND 

LAKE LUGANO 

Ldteside apamnenB in a lags 
beautiful cart (17.000 sg.m.| with swim- 
ming pool, private marina and Ipmiaie 
b«ttK lit quaSty. Apartments BO 
up to 190 sqjiL + terraces 24 - 47 
wm hue* S453JM0 - 5F1,1 23^00 
or: The Residetna Rivdago in the South 
area of the Lfee offers apartmaus 
from 57 sq.m. to 130 sq.m., ovedooktag 
the lake and the mountains. Prices 
SF21 0.450 - SF 485.450. Free for sate la 
foreigners Mortgages at four Swim 
interest rates. 

EM3A1D - HOME LTD. 

Via G. Cotton 3, CH-6900 Lugano 
Tel: 01-91-542913 
Tlx: 73612 HOME Of 


In the chenring mountain resort of 

LEYSIN: 

RESIDENCE LES FRENE5 

Oueriadang a sptendd Alpine panora- 
ma 30 mm. from Monti eu* ami Late 
Geneva by car 

- f<sa can own qurirry n wd B noB 
with indccr swimrnng pvd end 
filneu faolities in an md 
environment for tenure end sports 


Jsfa. gdf. etc]. 
- rinonana 1 


at K»v SF. r.3tfti 
up to 60* mortgages. 

Beiidtncm •: teycin 

SWTTZHILAND 

Td: [OH] 34 1 1 55 Th: 4*6 IM RLAI CH 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


AUSTRALIA 


WESTON AUSTRALIA LAND yi 
space, peace S beaut- tlwr Perth. 

retirmc docar selling he countar 

late or 180 ha. For cokyed brochure 
nnafCpJ 384 787ior w nle 2C2 Marine 
Ifaroda Gatmdoe WA 6i'l 1. 


GERMANY 


FOR SALE - BARGAIN 4 pomiHtet 
neo' Frorkfurt onnn Hilly rented 

Price per sq/n- DM1 fiCO. (Era hsr-, 

welc om e). Wo-monc- o*riwn Z cm 
- 4 pan. po07f 29735 iGer.mar.j4ar 
write to: DMc. Pnreenjrciht 47*. 
1016 W Antdirdom. HJbta 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lterefy apc-*menft with [magnificent 
view; of Lake Gerevc & meumwe. 
Monrre-jj. UiBars. Vsrfe-. Le; Diatter- 
en. Qvfex d>Ge> nex Gvead. l^y- 
sm Excellent Cpsertunititac 

rsr. .-orat^icn 
Price; free: 5F1 

Liberal riiertrjesje'. a* <r:e-s: 
P^RAN 3A 
row mreto spodet h f i 

Av Man ?;pc: 

OJ-I0C5 Lauvanne Swit-'e-lcrd 
Td (2); 2? 35 12 T.r- 25? I* MSJS 
Esr abl ched inee I VC 


7091 IJ5A. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


DENMARK 


COPENHAGEN NEAR 5EA & fores, 

5-roam flat far rent, garden, & ga- 
rage. $lJ00/mmHi. more if fur- 
naiad. 1/ 6 H738. 


FRE2VCH PROVINCES 


COTE D’AZUR. ST. PAUL BE VINCE, 
10 mire, from rifica Airport, on 12JJ00 
sgjn. h&ide. dxanwig restored farm- 
house, 4 bedrooms. Independent 


spa. Separate dixiowith 


guest house 
house hydro 


Avcfcbl* August through 
93 29 or 32 P3 64. 


away. 

March. Tel: (93] 33 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

CALVADOS. PAYS D'AUGE, IW 
hours Paris. 1 1 km Deauville, J inde- 
pendent houses m 6000 sqm of gar- 
den & meadows bordered by sireri 
river. Proa pal home: forge room, 
fireplace bkhefl. 2 double bed- 
rooms, bathroom, 2 WCs. Smrii 
house- stuefio. kitchen, washroom, 
WC Aug. F850Q. Cavadfos. Pais 27B 
1840 /3171156 or 116-31) 642624 


Ijj 

*1 ! 

if 


| GREAT BRITAIN | 



HOLLAND 

Renthouse Intematiofxil 
020-448751 (4 lines] 

Nederhaven 19-21. Amsterdam 

DUTCH HOUSING CBfTO B.V. 
Deluxe rentris. Vriemnslr. 174, 
Amstenfom. 020621234 or 623221 

rero BRLHN MAXRAARDU 

Infl Homing Servioe-Kanlri* 
AmrienWTefc 02G768022L 

ITALY 

When in tame: 

PALAZZO AL VHABSO 

Uxury apartment house with Furnished 
hah, rentable far 1 week aid more 

Phone: 6794325, 679345a 

Write Via del Vefafrro 16. 

00186 Roms. 

When in Florence 

KESIDBiCE PORTA AL PRATO 
Begartf apartment house with furnished 
flats, avaiafate far 1 week and more 

Phone: 055/3549S1 

Write: Via Ptrte Afle Mane 16 

50144 Florence 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


ITALY 


CHARMING 3 BEDROOM, 3 both 

fuly Fumshed house far rent in die 
heart of Venal. Private courtyard 

with ed-in garden. AvoJobte imnetd- 

otehr. CcJl D&A {2031 22601B9. 


ROR04CE very near Etruscan exhibi- 

tions, 3- bedroom apartment, July / 
Aug, 51 30/ weds- QS5 / 486TO1. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SH.ARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


CBBTB PAHS. Student rootm, a5 

comforts in cpartmenl. 233 71 5? 


MONTMARTRE Exceptional stwfo. 

July / Aug. / Sept- Teh 26293 7A 


IA11N QUARTS WAua. 2-bed- 
room flat. F3J3Xfo month. 329 7668. 


NO AGBIT. Duplex cp unnwJ , fur- 

rnshed. newly- daaraad. 257 04 14 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-H.YSEES 8fh 

Shxfc. 2 or 3room u p u rtme te . 
One month or more. 

IE OARDGE 359 67 97. 


OOEON 

ravishing stuefro, beams, F420Q. 
Tel: 635 91 17 


SHORT TERM STAY. Advantages of a 

hotel withotf moonveniencos, feel at 

home in lire Budas. one bwfruum 

and more in Paris. SOREUMt 80 rue 
de rUmveni*, Paris 7tfa 544 3940 


BEST OF IATW QUARTER. 4/5 
roams. 110 sqja, terrace 20 sqm, 
view south, Usurious, parking, owner. 
Tet 9-1 fom& 68 pun, flf <gl 21 12 


BASmiE. Mre spare, artist 

sqjn., comfort. Large terroa, beams, 

(replace, modines, F550rf/ month. 
JujyT August onty~ Tri: 338 1090. 


NSTH by awire, luxurious, long term, 

double Lvun bedroorri btatvao. bath, 
lag^a. fW> daw buidng. F6.100 + 
Charges. Tef. 747 44 72 


SHORT RB4TALR4 PARS. Siwfes & 2 

roams, quiet, central, recently daco- 

roted. Wbric or moiSv [3)916 32 19 


«BMTHOUSE AVE MONTAIGNE, 
mar Champa Bysees, 120 sqm. + 
large terrace, h^h dost 723 43 28. 


. .. „ com- 

forts, 15/7-1/9; 5851793 7 8061946. 
Gamefar, 17 r Dr Magnan, Pate 13 


& 


Sunny stuefio, dean, 
DO, quo large ~ 


34111 


flat to 
no foe. 


. nsmum. 
262 34 10. 




IMH ETOttE. 

tablet $1 jOOO/i 
A ua 3 - 


_ 6-room apartment to 

SI 000/ martfri, from July 20 to 
II. TeL 553 57 54. 


LOFT APARTMENT 100 iqjn. wnry. 

Cohn, long/ short term. Avalabh July 
15th. Tet 367 47 89. 


sumy 
metro. Pons 


T. Juiv-Aug. Comfort, 
F250Q/moreh Nere 
0047 /604 4852. 


WORT TOM in Lalm 

No ageria. Tet 329 38 83. 


Quarter. 


International Business Message Center 


AHENTTON EXECUTIVES 

Publish your business message 

in Hie httamabaneJ Harold Tri- 
bune. urban more titan a third 
at a nuffien reader s world- 
wide. mart of whom are in 
business and industry, wilt 

read it. Just fefan us (Paris 
6 ? 35 PS I before 70 am. ert- 
surtng that we cat telex you 
back, and yaw message wiD 

appear within 4S hours. The 

rate a UJS. $9.80 or lead 

equnndent per fine. You must 

mdude complete and verifi- 

able biting address 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


LAKE GfNEVA - MONT^ajX. For 
sole to Torcigncn 4 Bis, foi* 
directly from wride* »» '.alas cair.i»t 
sfon. Re<sd-( Jufr 19i?S crioiterit mdi. 
vtrtwil Snonarvo r-iafoCi;. -^omoc: J3 
IMMOBJU3! fA. -ye cs Ecurg 17 
1003 Lcusornu, S«itartc->i Tck ri>2li 
20 91 '37. Tb: 24453 3AII.CK 1 


BROKERS 

INVESTMENT ADVISORS 

few d«nts can invesr m one of Amen- 

«i s mast Mating ledwofooccl feeaV- 

jfeoughS'n c blfew dollo out industry. 

tmres dreody Plated & 

4? PsUL Hqh annual aarmas 
as-jrad tw man. Tin, .tan. Genor- 
out renunKifom and Bonus. Maieu- 
=1 crataiU Fr-->rti. C-rmen. 

. Contact. 

GLCSc PLAN s jj. 

4 . t.Vtevy'epK it 

Swiriwland 

nl-f2I;22 I - 71«_- 25 13f MBJ50* 


STILL 8UYLM3 SWATCH WATCHES. 

Pcjmpj cash any srwfo and auontity. 
Mr Bicnmaer. iundv. iel 01 361 I? 
•» lcte'»sfaC55 


5f4 TOM."ANY Lcctearerem. PO 

8 o' 453. Arrecfe ksnarote. Sprei. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T-SHIRT FOTOS 
NOW IN FUU. COLOR 

on aAcash busmes that crei eam you 
58000 - 51 0.000/manth.JUew aid ined 
3 from 


S9500 - S26JOO. 

Dept. JI2, Postfadi 170340, 
6000 Fna*fun/W. Germony. 

Tet 060-747BQ8 Tbu 412713 XEMA 


wsterre 

Kema. 


WE BUT MORTGAGES at cfeoount. 

Loam orw purpaw. Bax 63421, The 
Hoque. HodviO- 70654049. 


2ND PASSPORT 35 COUNTRIES. 

CMC. 76 KteouHnoui St. 106 76 
Athem. Greece. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


WTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMITED MC 
U SJi. A WOR1DWB3E 

A compteie pers on al & busnea service 
proveing a unique coBedion of 
idenied, veramte & muMingud 
'ndnnduab far cd SOod £ 
promotional ocxieuik. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 

330 w. Seth Si. NYC ICON 
Service Repraenhrfivei 
Needed worldwide. 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 

leperr - 12 coutfren tmdyjed. De- 
Ians: WWA. 45 Lvrdhunt Tenure, 
Suite 503. Central. Hong Rang. 


TAX SERVICES 


U-S. TAX PROfESStONAL often rei 

AMNESTY SPEC1A4 B2. B3. 84 return 

prepared for SHXt Get tort in the July 
Z3 crowd. CA France (35) 96 27 42 
u n m eJo ie ly far qppowtmana in Paris. 
Geneva, Milan. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


HAVE U J. DOLLARS TO adore 
far Swig Frtna, Lira. WiS abo bor- 
row lerae tans of SF. 5 or lGymn. 
Have Promosory notec. Tel Swifter- 

tend, Zurich 361 6500 or 056/491 362. 


EARN 30% - 35%. INVEST m ihort 

term anxMrodl paper notex. ABed 
LM., PO B ox 432, nrernanbiirg, Vfr- 
flina 22801. U5A 


DIAMONDS 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DIAMONDLAND 

The begad Aowroom in 

Antwerp, Diamond Gty 

Appelmandr 33A. Tet 323^3436(2 


Sidkun Diamonds, Jewelry 

Export prirex drect from factory. 
Centre Intermional Roger, Hornet 
Entrants, PO Bo* 266. Tute 1509. 
1210 Brusub. Tab 222 / 218 28 83. 
open — elrdoyl 9om6pra. Set. 2-4pm. 


16TH: TOW1WOUSE. 8 rooms, oB 

corafbrb. 3 bods, F24JXX5. 247 12 10 


SWITZERLAND 


SWmTOLAND - BKSAMNE 5 mw. 

St. Moritz vary cosy house 5 bed- 
raaaa, 4 bmhrocmi, foundry, atngg, 
marvelous view, nee antique tirnah- 
mg, Sb 1 mm. Rent 1 menm or more 
my period winter seasoa 
SOfiOOfmor A, Cdl Mflao 7/8 eve- 
ring Tet 02/8039736.- 


EMPLOYMENT 


BOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS 
LOOK UNDER 

“WTHNATIONAL POSITIONS” 
PACE 1J 


EMPLOYMENT 


general 

POSmOKS WANTED 


YOUNG LADY 24. GOOD mttr 

ance, bringucJ German 81 engfaft 
knovdedgeof French, degrea a indM- 
tnd insuianre btamess. sales + nnv] 
aganwt in echone vwetan't deupi 
a looking far cm mten " 

Area: wniy stales. 


F riedridgh. 1 




fa, 

Frankfort/ Man 


DYNAMI C AMMCAN LAPY wonts 

position Fans. SfcBod odstridrabt-j 
/aonanwHUlu •asset fa any offire. 

Pcoiiiaa wanted: aakton to exeaitiva 

/ company . PJL WrGpg to MMU 

Contort Carry, foil: 81 3^7-8266 USA 


YOUNG HWKH LADY tningud End 
bh/Genaon, ft press ex 

perience, seefabiterasting chaBanalnc 
paatian m same fiakt Bax 2*53. 
old Tifoune. 92521 NauSy Cedo.j 
France. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


NANNY/GOVBWES5 for imafi ctfd 

dog & cctr Ecboatm foaured Maw 
five ia. Jtfa housevrork. Wcahowtoo,} 
D.C USA. Frencfr speedring pref 
Send resume ft mams to 

Monceae, 35 Amhim Hocho, 

Paris, c/a Kirk by July 9th. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MTL MARXETMG MANAGBL 
far ktT Busews Auadcrim & PubSsber 
to plan and inolsmere mnrinuow inti 
tfireef ma3, meaayoup sates and co- 
op promotions. Mat n^expericmxd. 
creative, dotal oriented, adimr. 
Based in Pari* and tendon. Write Infl 
Trade Aon, 37 Qua <f Anjou, fforit 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


MNOVATTVE EXECUTIVE 45, PhD. 

Phem s try), experi enced ri oirogft 
malt & Hufonm in the Efo saences 
pine dwuiuA ogodeakds, 



an pama- 

nsntbrcanwftancy bass. Kbom write 
to Bar 2452, Herald Tribarn, 92571 
Neuily Cedex. Fnmre 


MTL CONSULTANT 37, Germon- 

/EngBdi/Frendi, vereade, dynamic, 
geoerafct.fBs manageroenf gaps any 

afians, me* kefir 
anywhere. 

. . Air. Iff. . 

Tefc 0041-1-817.1479. 


ADMM5TKATIVE AS SISTANT, 27 . 

masters m itn-piUc iriiuitliulai, 
background in -mil fatsioe ft trade, 
FrerA ft computer Bmnt, wel trav- 
eled, strong Third Worid experienre, 
mowB. Douglas Crider, 40 Sanford, 
Colorado Spring;, CO 80906 USA 
Teh 303-471 


mANGAL EXECUTIVE. 10 yecnae- 
periwice with American mulenreonris 

m Europe seeks carftaller/asatant 

c on n ol e r positnn in Paris -no 
Bax 2447? Herald Ti' 

NetJy Cedex, Fiance 


MTL MVESTMBIT EXPERT, 35, ari- 

Anguri, gjafad contacts, seeks top 
levri posmon. Write Bar iBlDO, 
Houston, 1X77268 USA 


GENERAL POSITIONS 

AVAILABLE 


RENAISSANCE MAN with iff stoop 

serin nen-sraoteng women far Greek 
fates KsSng this simmer . faqeWw ft 
posrtnw altitude about toe mare rrv 

partant ihcsn experience. Appredo 

Sian arts, history, dosed tnuac. fSVP. 


TRANSLATORS AU LANGUAGES 

Hmid Tribune. VZS&lhfoaJy Cmtex, 
France 


SWEDISH RESTAURANT seefo writ- 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


CAN SOMEBODY REMEM3BL whet 

was to plug mo die naht ptoatriais 
very enre^aed to woft fired, an «- 
nely coregesere ft eftrodive wow- 
■eh maflart sUk. Free to fraud. 
65fah.Frw i ch.Spdn«K nri*n.6peK 
nence pubic rotations, irur t utnc & 


AMTilCRN H4GUSH TEAOBL 3ft 

14 yean n Beopa-. ftmaf Garam 


bone French, axperiunca pubfc/javj 
rale schools and btcknky. Phreaf 
write to Bax 2168, LH.T, Fradridetr.- 
15, 6000 Frankfwt/AAen 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


GDUHE 

Man ft wda. Houseman, gorda 

housekeaper, cook, driver. To rant an 
smed watartrort estate an eastern 
share of MaiyfancL 80 nries from 
Wddv DC Separate home, meab, ear, 
*1000 per marth rius bom for long 
upKkrprrn, 2 wads paid voa» 
& fer* !»«, No cfaWran. Send 
We irionnution ndudng ric- 
hterview mLxmdan or Foil Bax 
MD 21601 USA 
Agents Attention. 


HOUSBOSm NJ AREA. Wrem, ma- 

lure woman respansfofa for an of 
hone ft faawy mdudmg cooking & 
serving. Must bn exceSert cook ft 
*etye 2-10 people. Care far can 13. 
ttiwn Greree, norwnso&sr. 2 days 
aft Private roam w&i bate ft Tv. 
5fcrt Sept l-fl«dblo. Write/ p hoto: 
Bast 691, & OWnon NJ 07Q79uSA. 


OOUFU WANTS) for edrie in Amri-' 
CD. 45 arias from Washington, DC 

LO. Bax B4. i *k^W > W t mi7 >> 


NY COUP!! i needs au prir «t Qn 
" “trin house. JAamum 1 
. Must speak some Erv 
r week. Position avcriaUo 
y. Scnd personal data, ex- 
pnoteaniih: Mrs. Bereri, 
yn NY 


BraoUytv 



AU R. tetriwdefa, FL 2ehBdren 

m. t' hocgewoHy som e En- 
Sfah. Top sriary.. Photo ft references 


41 PAM- light housekeeping & drid- 

mm. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


OOMPANK3N ■ Couple oemfo GngEs] 

speaking warm, sane Bght houi ; 
ntpsiQ & cnoKiDa. nepom wsq nw 

uaaUuDno(RvUr„ nmpaianC'r 
RA 33069 








0VM4 AUFAM far infari fainstvjV 

Britimare, Mayfond USA WB6V 
vide one way airfare roam. tKv . 
rius $60 per week. Reference re‘v. 
quired. Frin labavetz. 8121 Han- \ 
maadStL Suns PnrL J A 19117 USA ' 


Ml Mfltr SAM HUNCBCO ana, 2 
dridren, non nieAer. drivers Irense. 
Send picture &' resum to Matow 
Cowan, Pasta Stip. SMI Crifage 
Ave^ QoMaad. CA 9c618, USA ' 


AU RAM with fraosekeepng. 2 dridw 
- 6 ft 4, in echoof. 1 tear fa. NTC 
Anrira cod of Aug. Send photo ft 
resume to S. Fncr, 4 Lark Ux. Sprang 
Vafay,NTifl977. 


> 




AU PAUL 5 year akf g«L Yctur own 

roam in foqyi Virginia Bern* tome. 
References adnngea 6465 Cblege 
Frifc SqmWL-Vbtjma Baodv VA 
23464 LJ&L»MaM9Sa ■ 


AU PAH/HOUSacSOL Las than I 

hour from KY.C Orw 7 year rid giri. 
BJwxd Fterxrifo €T Hartley Ara, 
tmeroft. NX IK2B USA 


All PAB WANi a W WOB CC2 

I fez W 


m 


AU PASLUSA Sarere. Send photo. 

jenme, salary reqaremerts far Sept.- 
-I yere. Ms. S. Fader. 312 Betsy 
Brawn fct. Bye Brook. Nt 10573. 


,**»■ r: 


:• 


Mooers hop, _ 

Ml tove dridreq, . — 
Wt. dwe and have aj 
hwoar. Paris 6t>bn. 1 


>•-/# 
y . *• 

T A * 

AiVi* 


AU HUi far 6 north aUriri ft fiause- 
wwk- Non-sraober. S. Raisone, Bax 
6616, Bridgeport. CT 06606, 1 


AU MBftNYC 2 d&fcwt 5 8.8. Write 
ftmdude photo & teLto JuSe, 419 1 
57 St, NVVNY 10022. 


DOMESTIC 
POStnONS WANTED 


MATUK AMB0CAN FEMALE, 33. 

best references with 12yeorsriemarv 

aa aafe 

retywhere m Ensapa. Liraei for Jriy 5 
August ifapb fa Teresa Graff, 4» 

isr5iiir y ' MD;n “ ,iBA ' 


ALWAYS AVAOABtE - AU PASS, 
AikJra* snowy, nun s helpers ft J 
branches of 1st does Hve-tei donratic 
be(p worldwide. Cat Som fans 
tendon 730 8122/51004 howdU- 
CJMPAGY. Tte BgsSojaOAhiG: 






ABOVE AVBtAGE 

riwra average Baft, CriiAul_, 

OmskcApprirtmentsin UK-?f579 
tefac299241 INTR£X G. tel 
ttegramere Gsnsufamft) 



YOLMOnSHOI GSLspaaktEn^h, 

SEBRStsa'a 

ALWAY^AVAOABLE LONDON oriy 

1*1 doss do3y mrids 4 

retf issKSBfllg 






&?■,»»»■ NreJi 
ftnUfawsULTi 


29044/5 


PAGE 13 
POR MORE € ! 
CtASSIREDS ‘ 


~.-£; 


& 


Mini Wood and Pickett 

drire 1974, 1275 GT, immaeft- 

late condition (contours). 

Totally rebuilt. Over U.S. S7,000 meat on 
renovation, including new engme.^^Iier 
mtenor. Swiss registration. Afl^ttions: , : 
ScUing at U.S.$8,QOO - doe to 
Appointment. 


r ?¥ : £i 

■ 


l Ms 




Imprime var Offprint. 73 rue de I'Evannile. 75018 Paris 



Contact JJP.XECLEF - - . 

(28) 46.93^6. (offi« t