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LS. Trade Deficit 
acreages Despite 

rood Foreign Sales 


By Smart Auerbach 

Washington fast Service 
VSHINGTON — The United 
} hada$10J-bfllioo trade def- 
i January, the Commer ce Dc- 
ient reported Thursday. 

* January deficit* the highest 
September's S II J- billion 
j, was S2J billion greater 
(Decanber > s, an increase of 

than 28 percenL 
iiarply hfe her unports ac- 
ted Tor the deterioration in 
uy, n Commerce Secretary 
bim Baldrige said, 
he neatly 10-percent rise in 
adc-weighted dollar last year, 
10-petmnjamp since De- 

ONPAGE1I 

e defer dosed higher in Eu- 
and New York cm Thursday, 
fail** remained wary of fnr- 
ceatral bant intervention. 

iy <fid famsfens go against ex- 
opimon for so long to boy 
p and ted up the exchange 
. An analysis by Cad Gewirtz. 



annual basis would surpass last 
year’s record S36.8 billion, reaching 
$44.4 teOion. 

The United Stares and Japan are 


et Planners 
To Forgo Deals 
With U.S. Firms 



jer, and continued growth in 
estic rfwnimd tXJUm Hft the 

: defiat to abbot $140 bflHon 
year,” Mr. Baldrige said. 

imports completely 
a new export high of 

! bimon. 

r. Baldrige, pointing to the 
* news in the January 
. said: "Despite the 
r, total foreign sales grew 
feat daring 1984, and I expea 
hilar increase this year.” 

[e said that, though there was 
ppmw ement in the United Sta- 
i " tnde position in the final 
ahs of 1984, it was te mp or ar y 
|use tf lower yeap-end par- 
ies that “reflected the third- 
|ter economic slowdown and 
hess inventory adjustments.” 

he country’s major trading 
hew, led by Japan, continued 

B increasing surpluses. The 
at in trade with Japan 
17 tefikta, which on an 


the January agreement by Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and Prime 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone to 
open the Japanese market to highly 
competitive U.S. imports in teile- 
communications, wood and paper 
products, sophisticated electronics, 
and pharmaceuticals and medical 
equipment 

Is addition, restraints on Japa- 
nese car exports to the United 
Stales end March 31, and it appears 
that the Reagan administration will 
not ask thai they be continued. 

The United States's deficits in 
trade with Western Europe, Tai- 
wan and members of the Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries also increased in January from 
December, while the deficit with 

Canada rieplinwri 

Imports, drawn in by the 
strength of the dollar, were $29.7 
billion in January, despite a 33- 
percent d«ftTtn<» in the value of pe- 
troleum imports. The January im- 
port totals were the highest «rinra» 
the S29.8 billion in September, and 
exceeded the December figure by 
$23 billion. 

Leading imports were telecom- 
munications equipment and parts, 
passenger cars, airplanes, iron and 
steel products, cocoa, coffee and 
sugar. 

Exports were $300 million higher 
in January than fn December and 
$13 billion hi gher than in January 
1984. 

Leading exports were electronic 
machinery, office machine and 
automatic data-processing equip- 
ment, cars, manufactured fertiliz- 
er and coaL There were decreases 
in overseas sales of aircraft, tobac- 
co and wheat. 


Three Democratic senators plant crosses dazing a mock 
funeral at a park acrossfrom the White House to dramatize 


8 t* tvUnn»d Pm» I m a m m mid 

the plight of farmers. From left are Paul Simon of Illinois, 
John Meteher of Montana and Gary Hart of Colorado. 


House, Senate Approve Farm Debt-Relief Measures 


By Helen Dewar 
and Margaret Shapiro 

Wash ingum Pest Service 

WASHINGTON —Both houses 
of the U.S. Compress, defying 
threats of a veto from the White 
House, have approved emergency 
credit relief Tor fanners in debt and 
facing bankruptcy. 

The measures, approved 
Wednesday in different form by 
the two houses, would provide ad- 
ditional funds for farm-loan guar- 
antees, ease terms for both direct 
government loans and federal guar- 
antees of commercial loans and 
force a speedup in processing the 
aid. 

The 318-103 vote in the Demo- 
cratic-con trolled House came as no 
surprise. 

However, successive votes of 54- 


45 and 50-48 in the Republican- 
controlled Senate amounted to ma- 
jor defeats for President Ronald 
Reagan and the Senate majority 
leader. Robot J. Dole, a Kansas 
Republican who had lobbied hard 
against the aid measures. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, had said earlier 
Wednesday that President Rea- 
gan's advisers had unanim o usl y 
recommended a veto of what Mr. 
Speakes called the “budget-bust- 
ing” legislation. 

However, the veto threat, cou- 
pled with the fact that the Senate 
votes fell short of the two-thirds 
required to override a veto, cast 
doubt over whether the measures 
would become law. 

Mr. Dole predicted they would 
not, and in a last-minute maneuver 


the Seriate leadership sent its bill to 
conference with the House in a 
form that could enable the farm 
provisions to be stricken. 

The House measure calls for S3 
billion in additional loan guaran- 
tees. The Senate approved $1.8 bil- 
lion. 

Both measures would also allow 
farmers to get half their price-sup- 
port loans, up to $50,000 per farm- 
er, in the spring, when seed and 
fertilizer are needed before plant- 
ing, instead of after the fall harvest, 
as current law provides. 

In addition, the Senate measure 
would provide $100 million to sub- 
sidize lower interest rates for com- 
mercial loans, which critics called a 
bank bailout. The House bill did 
not con tain a similar provision. 

[Mr. Speakes renewed the veto 


threat Thursday, saying; “The 
president has not changed his 
mind.’’ United Press International 
reported. 

[In the Senate, the relief for 
farmers was attached to an African 
famine aid bill that Mr. Speakes 
said might be vetoed even if 
stripped of its farm provisions be- 
cause the relief was not provided in 
the form requested by the adminis- 
tration. 

[The next action was to come 
Thursday as the House took up its 
second aebt relief measure of the 
wed: — $1 billion in loan guaran- 
tees for farmers with the heaviest 
debt loads.] 

Congressional approval of mea- 
sures followed an intense lobb * 
effort by Midwestern fanners 

(Contained on Page 3, GoL 5) 


Ortega Holds Up Anns Buying, Says 1 



By Larry Roncer 

New York Times Service 

MANAGUA — President Dan- 
id Ortega Saavedra has announced 
aa “indefinite moratorium" cm the 
acqnisrtian of new arms systems by 
his government aDd said that Nica- 
ragua would send home 100 Cuban 
mmtaiy advisers. 

Mr. Ortega said in a speech 
Wednesday that the measures were 
being taken to “encourage the re- 
duction of tensions" in Central 
America and in the hope that they 
would be “the first step” toward 
“the complete withdrawal of all 
foreign rafliiary advisers" from the 
region. 

To “open the road to peace," Mr. 
Onega said, Nicaragua has decided 
to suspend the acquisition of all 
new arms systems “as weD as those 
interception airplanes needed, to 
complete the country's current 
anti-aircraft system.” 

In addition, he said, 50 Cuban 
military advisers are to be sent 
home in May, with another 50 to 
follow at an unspecified time. 

He raid that, m return, Nicara- 
gua hoped that the United States 
would agree to return to talks be- 
tween the two countries at Manza- 
nillo, Mexico, that were suspended 
last month, and that the Reagan 
adminis tration would “withdraw 
its request to Congress” for funds 
far anti-San dinist guerrillas. 

[In Washington, the White 


House rejected Mr.Urtega's pro- 
posals, saying Thursday that they 
did little to meet U3. concerns, 
Reuters reported. “There is noth- 
ing in his so-called peace propos- 
als,” said the White House spokes- 
man, Larry Speakes. “He has 
launched what appears to be a fair- 
ly sophisticated jpeace offensive' to 
influence the UJS. Congress.” 

[Asked if the White House be- 
lieved that Mr. Onega had ad- 
vanced his proposals to defeat 
President Ronald Reagan's plan 


Sfors Predicts 
VrU.S. Clash on 
lUaTyEconomy 

Reuters 

RUSSELS -^Jacques Deters, 
ident of the European Com- 
ion, predicted Thursday that 
United Sates and the Europc- 
ommunity would dash unless 
hmgtm its moue- 

and economic policies. 

, his most outspoken remarks 
5 taking office Jan. 7, the for- 
Frcnch finance minister urged 
10-natian immun ity to coop- 
:in combatting what he called 
ejor offensive* from the Unit- 
tetes. 

there is gobglo be a dash, and 
cone, somewhere, is going to 
tout,". Mr. Deters said at a 
tiog of the consultative EC 
Bank arid Social Committee, 
sc roemberscome from indus- 
■ trade unions and the profes- 
1& 

1 ’ m : 

jaalhng President Ronald Rea- 
s comments last week that the 
j was successful economically 
nue it had pm its house in or- 
!and that other nations should 
ffcwise, Me. Deters said: “They 
. simply, *Our system works 
l' This a particularly unhdp- 
r His commeiis drew warm sp- 
are. 

4r. Ddors entitmA the United 
|cs for moving cm strict credit 
BS through fmanriat institutions 

’New’ Generation Jockeys for Power 

: US. wheaL “Can a cotmuy _ 
av mghke this really say it is By Clyde Haberaian 

mg the wild’s economy?” be J*" York 
L TOKYO — A band of ^yotmg 


for aiding the rebels, Mr. Speakes 
replied: “Absolutely.” He said the 
100 Cubans mentioned by Mr. Or- 
tega were “but a token number of 
the 2300 to 3300 Cuban miliiaiy 
and security personnel and the 
3300 to 4,000 Cuban civilians who 
are in Nicaragua.” 

[He added: “As to their intention 
to take a pause in receiving Soviet 
arms, we note that they Jiave al- 
ready indicated they would not be 
able to handle much more weapon- 
ry immediately because of the large 
amount they received in their 
buildup in the last several years."] 

Mr. Ortega announced his pro- 
posal late Tuesday, saying it was 
his hope that the plan could “con- 
tribute so that jointly we, the U.S. 
and Nicaragua, can find a peaceful 
solution to the problems that have 
been raised and can move away 
from a military solution.” 

He offered the plan in a two- 


hour meeting .here writ a delega- 
tion of visaing Ameriian- Roman 
Catholic prelates, led by Archbish- 
op John J. O’Connor of New York. 

Mr. Ortega also repealed his in- 
vitation of earlier this week for a 
bipartisan delegation from both 
houses of Congress to inspect mili- 
tary facilities in Nicaragua. Such a 
visit, he said, would disprove the 
“false arguments of the supposed 
militarization of Nicaragua." 

Nicaraguan officials said earlier 
Wednesday that they also have re- 
quested a “dialogue” between Mr. 
Onega and Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz to reduce tensions 
between the two nations. 

The Nicaraguan government al- 
ready has transmitted a proposal 
“through diplomatic channels" 
suggesting that Mr. Shultz and Mr. 
Onega meet later this week in 
Montevideo, the officials SAid. 
They said that there has been uo 
response from the United States. 

[Mr. Shultz said Thursday in Ec- 
uador that he was “perfectly witt- 
ing” to meet with Mr. Ortega to 
determine whether his proposals 
enhanced peace prospects, The 
Washington Post reported from 
Guayaquil, Ecuador. 

[He said he was aware of press 
reports that Mr. Ortega wanted to 
meet with him, but added that no 
official communication had been 
received. “If Mx. Ortega wants to 
have a meeting in Montevideo, and 



IRA Shelling 
Kills 9 Inside 
Police Post 
Near Border 


Daniel Ortega Saavedra 


we can arrange it, which we are 
perfectly willing to do," Mr. Shultz 
said, “then HI listen carefully to 
what he says."] 

Mr. Ortega was to leave Mana- 
gua on Thursday for the Uruguay- 
an capital, bearing the text of what 
he rays is a major peace proposal to 
reduce tensions with the United 
States and Nicaragua's neighbors. 

He is to fly to Montevideo far 
the inauguration of Uruguay's 
newly elected civilian president, Ju- 
lio Maria Sangumetti. Mr. Shultz 
also is to attend the ceremonies. 

Mr. Ortega said Tuesday night 
that after be arrived in Montevideo 
he planned to make public “some 
initiatives in favor of the Conta- 
dora peace process.” Those negoti- 
ations, sponsored by Mexico, Ven- 
ezuela, Colombia and Panama, 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


Japan’s Politics of Age 


INSIDE 


U.S. 

far Middle East peace 
. Page2. 

on the New 

- 5 S|SS^'"MS 

Jews, the fu- 



athletes 
to compete in 
Page 17. 

Bobrov 

- 

9 ftstjjfl amort’s ap- 
i ~' : ' * its fre- 



Turks” in Japan’s 
has begun the difficult task of 
wresting control from the aging 

men who have dominated the coun- 
try’s politics for much of the post- 
war era. . . 

Whether the younger poiiucunis 
can succeed is problematical 
But by presenting a challenge 
* — their elders in 



it after WcsJd War EL 
; the younger group is 
deuce over having to 
wait while tne older politicians de- 
cide when to step aside. 

Nowhere has the generational di- 
vision been more graphically dis- 
played than in (he Liberal Demo- 
cratic machine beaded by the 
former prime minis ter, Kakuei Ta- 
naka, raw is also 66. 

Mr. Tanaka, despite having been 
found guilty two years ago of T 


inevitability they have 
that once the incumbent pnme 
minister, Yasuhiro Nakasone, 
leaves office, probably next year, 
the old guard will start to lose con- 

— ' n 3 i sSS 

In the Japanese politieal ooniKa, 
young means 60 years okl That 
may not seem much amt 
than the current leaders, such as 
Mr. Nakasone, who is 66. 

Bui these slightly younger men 

^percewedbyJapJ^^JjjJg mt^in^ekl^pow^cspetiat 

esnaSMffiSJ-B wssffti'ss* 

&»!"¥*- SEE!?** leoodourf-fteeicb Li) . 

contemporaries, wn° s 


major factions. But in the last few 
weeks potentially serious cracks 
have developed in what many had 
thought to be an invincible ma- 
chine. 

A challenge was thrown down by 
one of Mr. Tanaka's followers. No- 
beau Takeshi ta, the 60-year-old fi- 
nance minister and a man eager to 
become the country's next prime 
minister. 

Mr. Takeshita’s problem is that 
his ambitions are effectively 
Mocked while Mr. Tanaka hangs 
on as the faction leader. And since 



Three of the contenders 
for tiie leadership of the 
Liberal Democrats, 
Japan's 
Pfrty: _ 
above; KfichK 
Miyazawa, top right; 
and Noborn Takeslrita. 



The Asso ci a te d Press 

NEWRY, Northern Ireland — 
At least eight police officers and 
another person were lolled and an- 
other police officer was feared dead 
after Irish Republican Army guer- 
rillas attacked a heavily fortified 
police base at Newry on Thursday, 
police reported. 

At least three of six mortar shells 
that exploded inside the base, near 
the border with the Irish Republic, 
hit a canteen packed with officers, 
a police spokesman said. 

Another round hit the base's ob- 
servation tower, he said. 

The spokesman said that at least 
six other officers were seriously 
wounded in the attack, and that 
three or four other persons sus- 
tained minor wounds. 

The outlawed Irish Republican 
Army claimed, in a statement tele- 
phoned to news organizations in 
Belfast, that its guerrillas had car- 
ried out the attack. 

“This was a major and well- 
planned operation, indicating our 
ability 10 strike where and when we 
decide,” the statement said. 

Police said die mortars were 
fired by remote control from the 
back of a truck parked several 
blocks from the police post, which 
is situated in the center of the main- 
ly Roman Catholic town and 
ringed by houses. 

Rescue teams dug through the 
nibble to find the dead and any 
survivors. But they worked in dark- 
ness because the authorities feared 
turning on floodlights in case IRA 
snipers opened fire. 

A senior police officer in Newry 
said: “The canteen was packed at 
the time. The people inside bad no 
chance.” 

Heavily armed troops and police 
sealed off Newry, but the attackers 
were believed to have sli 
across the border into the 
public before the mortars 
fired. 

Police declined to say how many 
officers were inside the base when 
the attack came. 

The reported death toll was be- 
lieved to be the worst single casual- 
ty count suffered by the police 
force, the predominantly Protes- 
tant Royal Ulster Constabulary, 
since sectarian and political blood- 
shed in Northern Ir eland began 
anew in August 1969. 

Thursdays attack came amid a 
new spiral of violence in the prov- 
ince and a string of setbacks for the 
overwhelmingly Roman Catholic 
clan d estin e or ganitfirinn 
Last week, the guerrillas killed 
an off-duty prison officer, a police 
officer and a Catholic who they 
said was a police informer. 

The rebels have mgfnmiv t heavy 
casualties in recent weds, with sev- 
en of their men lolled by troops and 
police. Three were gunned down in 
an army ambush in the border 
town of Strabane on Saturday. 


is preparing its economic plan for 
the rest of the decade anud dear 
signs that most contracts for major 
development projects will be 
awarded to West European and 
Japanese companies, to the virtual 
exclusion of 113. industry. 

While Moscow has long dealt 
with West Europeans and Japanese 
on major commercial contracts, 
with most U3. trade being in grain 
and other commodities. Kremlin 
planners in the past appeared to be 
at least open to discussing projects 
with Americans. 

Soviet sources now indicate that 
a decision has been made on both 
political and economic grounds not 
to include U.S. companies. U 
would be a major departure in So- 
viet planning and development. 

For the first time, they say, sever- 
al projects valued at SI billion or 
more will be done by foreign com- 
panies under “turnkey contracts,'' 
meaning the foreign company will 
be in charge from design to start- 
up- 

Co mm eroal talks suggest that 
ihe Kr emlin is turning toward 
Western Europe and Japan for 
partners in multibillion-doliar, 
long-term development projects. 
Trade officials say this trend has 
Idd to a debate in Moscow. 

While officials in the Foreign Af- 
fairs and Foreign Trade ministries 
are said to be arguing for U.S. eco- 
nomic participation for economic 
and political reasons, the prevailing 
view among officials in the Central 
Commiitee, the State Planning 
Commission and Foreign Trade 
Ministry is that commercial rela- 
tions with the United States should 
be limited to specific, short-term 
contracts. 

According to the prevailing view, 
there is no guarantee that politics 
will not once again be injected into 
East-West trade. The Soviet bloc 
partners should therefore develop 
economic plans to reduce their vul- 
nerability to any posable U3. boy- 
cott. 

On the one hand, Moscow has 
demanded that its East bloc part- 
ners provide greater investment in 
technology, capital and labor to 
assist in the extraction of energy 
resources from Siberia. This has led 
to a greater integration of the bloc 
economies and an increase in trade 

On the other hand, Moscow is 
reportedly seeking to deal with 
Western Europe and Japan. 

In the past, some U3. allies have 
been reluctant to impose sanctions 
against the Soviet bloc. Some also 
depend heavily on their exports to 
the East. 

For example, of West Germany’s 
total exports, 40 percent of mining 
equipment, 10 percent of valves, 20 
percent of shoe and leather equip- 
ment, 25 percent of metal cutting 
machinery and 10 percent of textile 
machinery is exported to the Soviet 
bloc. 

In the 1970s, there were expecta- 
tions in Moscow that U.S. compa- 
nies would be involved in major 
development projects. Only a few 
of the planned prcnects have mate- 
rialized, such as the Kama River 
truck factory, while several others 
collapsed after the Soviet interven- 
tion m Afghanistan. 

Apart from the Carter adminis- 
tration's trade restrictions over Af- 
ghanistan, the Russians were also 
hurt by President Ronald Reagan's 
hard-line economic policy during 
his first term, including his attempt 


to delay the construction of the 
Siberian gas pipeline. 

The Soviet Union has recovered 
from an economic slump that was 
pronounced in the early 1980s. Its 
overall foreign trade in 19S4 
showed a S9.9-billion surplus. Al- 
though part of this surplus involves 
Soviet exports to Third World 
countries and is not readily con- 
verted to cash, it nevertheless puts 
Moscow in a more comfortable fi- 
nancial situation. 

Major projects envisioned by 
Moscow are said 10 include, among 
others, the following plans: 

• A $1 -billion metallurgical 
complex at Volzhsk, on Uk Volga 
River, to produce; among oilier 
things. large-diameter pipes. The 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Craxi Urges 
U.S.toMake 
Space Defense 
Negotiable 

By EJ. Dionne Jr. 

New York Times Service 


ROME — Prime Minister Bet- 
tino Craxi says the United Stales 
should give the Soviet Union guar- 
antees on President Ronald Rea- 
gan's proposed missile-defense sys- 
tem so that arms negotiations next 
month in Geneva can move for- 
ward. 

“We must declare from the very 
beginning the negotiability of this 
matter,” Mr. Craxi said Monday in 
an interview. 

He said “guarantees must be giv- 
en” on the defense system to over- 
come “the preoccupations of tire 
Soviets.” He did not specify what 
guarantees he thought would satis- 
fy Moscow. 

“This dialogue, which has just 
reopened,” he added, “should not 
stop at its birth.” 

Mr. Craxi appeared to give less 
support to the U.S. view of the 
mrsale defense than have Britain or 
West Germany. Mr. Reagan has 
said he wants the United Mates to 
conduct research on a space-based 
defense against nuclear missiles re- 
gardless of the outcome of the arms 
talks, which begin March 12. 

But on Wednesday a top aide, 
responding to the use of die sensi- 
tive word “negotiability," empha- 
sized that Mr. Craxi was not ruling 
om the possibility he would take a 
position similar to that of Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher of 
Britain. She has favored the pro- 
ject 

In the interview, Mr. Craxi, who 
Monday will begin a visit to the 
United States, also sketched out a 
wide area of agreement with the 
United States on the missile de- 
fense and said Italy was approach- 
ing the issue “without prejudice." 

He echoed Mr. Reagan's objec- 
tions to using the popular name 
“star wars” to describe the space 
system. 

“There are defensive arms,” Mr. 
Craxi said. 

He said research into the system 
would have important economic 
and civil applications and empha- 
sized that whatever aims agree- 
ments were reached, it would be 
nearly impossible to stop research. 
“It is very difficult to put a brake 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Henry Cabot Lodge, 82 , 
Ex-Senator, Envoy, Dies 


were 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Henry Cabot 
Lodge; 82, wbo was a three- term 
senator, the U3. delicti* to the 
United Nations and twice ambas- 
sador to South Vietnam, died 
Wednesday in Beverly, Massachu- 
setts, after a long tthress. 

Public life and service were tradi- 
tions among his Boston Brahmin 
ancestors. A Mayflower descen- 
dant, his family included six U3. 
senators, a governor of Massachu- 
setts, a secretary of state and a 
secretary of the navy. 

The Massachusetts Republican 
was the grandson and namesake of 
the first Senator Henry Cabot 
Lodge, the isolationist leader wbo 
did much to keep the United States 
out of the League of Nations after 
World War I. 

During a long and varied career, 
the younger Mr. Lodge was also an 
unsuccessful Republican candidate 
for vice president in I960, the year 
Richard M. Nixon was defeated by 
John F. Kenned^- The ticket was 
defeated by a tiny margin, 1 13,057 
out of 68,832,778 in ure popular 
vote. 

He was ambassador to West 
Germany in 1968*69 and on occa- 
sional presidential envoy to the 
Vatican between 1970 ana 1977. 





Henry Cabot Lodge 


Mr. Lodge held the UN post for 
seven years and right months from 
1953 to 1960, longer than any other 
American representative. 

As ambassador in wartime Sai- 
gon in 1963-64 and again in 1965- 
67, Mr. Lodge was cm hand for the 
generals’ coup in 1963 that over- 
threw President Ngp Dinh Diem. 

During his second tour in Sai- 
gon, in 1966, Mr. Lodge was in- 
volved in a peace effort (hat proved 
fruitless at a time when, he later 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 













in 1 BXLUA i lUJXAt HKKiui THUS UJNK, FRIDAY, MAKUi Ayg5 


Mubarak Calls on U.S. to Aid 
New Middle East Peace Efforts 


By Christopher Diday 

Washington Post Seri or 

CAIRO — President Hosm Mu- 
barak says be is relatively encour- 
aged by a continuing flurry of high- 
level contacts between Egypt and 
Israel wnri called on the united 
States to lend its weight to new 
Middle East peace efforts. 

"The United States cannot con- 
tinue to sit with its hands folded," 
Mr. Mubarak said in an interview 
Wednesday, as both Israel and 
moderate Palestinians show in- 
creased flexibility. 

{Th* flf p gan ar tmfnistT arinn said 
Thursday that it welcomed state- 
ments of support for direct negotia- 
tions between Israel and a delega- 
tion of Jordanians and Palestinians 
on a peace settlement in the Middle 
East, Renters reported from Wash- 


lt the White House spokes- 
man, Larry Speakes, repeated the 
U 5. position that the tune was not 
right for the administraikm to 
launch a new peace initiative. “We 
arc ready to step in and be helpful 
when die time is appropriate," he 
said, adding: “It is up to them to 
get started, to set the tone."] 
Moments before the interviews, 
Mr. Mubarak had received an Is- 



Hosoi Mubarak 


raeh minister and shortly afterward 

ie third i 


he dispatched the third envoy he 
has sent to the Israeli prime minis- 
ter, Shimon Peres, in the past week. 

The developing dialogue is the 
most serious Israeh-E§yptian ex- 
change since the 1982 invasion of 
Lebanon, cast a paQ over the U.S.- 


dinrinated. He said he would wel- 
come a UJ3. decision to forgive 
outstanding loans to Egypt for mil- 
itary purchases, which total about 
$4 bOJion, 

• An Egyptian offer to build a 
Red Sea military base that would 
be financed by the United States 
and used by American forces in the 
event of a Middle East has 
been shelved because of Ui>. insis- 
tence that American companies be 
involved in constructing me base. 

• Mr. Mubarak took issue with 


sponsored peace treaty that links 
the two former enemies and caused 


rails by Secretary of State George 
officials 


Egypt to halt high-level contacts 
with IsraeL 

Mr. Mubarak said the exchange 
had helped convince him that Mr. 
Peres “wants to be much more flex- 
ible" in seeking peace than were his 
predecessors, Menachem Begin 
and Yitzhak Shamir. 

In the interview, the Egyptian 
president specified that the ex- 
changes with Mr. Feres primarily 
concern “bilateral relations," in- 
cluding deadlocked negotiations 
over the return of a four-acre (1.6- 
hectare) strip of land at Taba, a 
coastal resort on the Gulf of Aqa- 
ba, to Egyptian sovereignty. 

Mr. Mubarak made these other 
points: 

• The next step in the renewed 
search fox peace mould be to estab- 
lish a dialogue between the United 
States and a joint Jordanian-Pales- 
tinian delegation that Egypt is 
helping to form. Israel should join 
these talks at a later stage, he said. 

• High U.S. interest rates an pre- 
vious military purchases are dam- 
aging Egypt's economic recovery 
efforts and should be lowered or 


P. Shultz and other UJ5. official 
for preemptive or retaliatory 
strikes against terrorist groups by 
warning that “violence wiQ create 
more violence; more violence will 
create more terrorism." 

He declined to go into detail 
about the series of meetings he ini- 
tiated last week by sending a senior 
Egyptian parliamentarian to Bu- 
charest to meet with Mr. Peres. He 
also dispatched his political affairs 
adviser, Osama d-Baz, and a rank- 
ing Foreign Ministry official on 
separate trips to Israel this week. 

Israel’s energy minis ter, Mosbe 
ShahaL met with Mr. Mubarak on 
Wednesday morning. 

The Egyptian leader’s remarks 
made it clear, however, that he sees 
a fresh opportunity to improve re- 
lations with Israel created by the 
arrival of Mr. Peres of the Labor 
Party at the top of a coalition gov- 
ernment, the beginning of a com- 
plete Israeli withdrawal from Leba- 
non and movement by the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
toward a full acceptance of Israel. 

“I am explaining my point of 
view car trilateral relations, mainly , 
and also on the problems of the 
Middle East." Mr. Mubarak said of 


his overtures to Mr. Peres. “We are 
discussing the problem of Taba. I 
t hink Mr. Peres wants to be much 
more flexible." 

Mr. Mubarak expects to arrive in 
Washington on March 9 also bol- 
stered by a‘ March 6 meeting in 
Egypt with King Hussein of Jor- 
dan, whom Mr. Peres has offered to 
meet for direct talks on the status 
of the Israeh-occirpied West Bank. 

Mr. Mubarak masted that the 
first step in getting peace talks un- 
der way should be die opening of 
contacts between die United States 
and “moderate Palestinians" who 
may soon be named to a joint Jor- 
Harntm-Pglpctmian delegation. 

Since 1975, the United States has 
refused political contacts with the 
PLO unless it renounces terrorism 
and accepts Resolution 242 of the 
UN Security Council, which calls 
for recognition of Isxsd in return 
for evacuation of Arab land occu- 
pied in the 1967 war. 

Mr. Mubarak 
that the deadlock can be 
through a formula agreed upon 
Feb. 11 by Hussein and Mr. Arafat 
The FLO leader agreed to the for- 
mation of a joint delegation with 
Jordanians and accepted the prin- 
ciple of a “coinprehaisive peace” 
based on “Security Council resolu- 
tions.” 

Both US. qnd Israeli officials 
haw noted that the agreement does 
not specifically accept the key reso- 
lution, 242, by name, and that PLO 
officials have repudiated portions 
of the agreement with Hussein. 

Saying that the Palestinians 
named to the delegation would be 
“moderate people who can talk 
sense, who speak logic,” Mr. Mu- 
barak urged the United States and 
Israel not “to out Arafat is a diffi- 



UwAnodoMcinw 

(X)UNTERATTACK — Foreign Minister Andrei A. 
Gromyko, right, and Ambassador Yuri V. Dubinin, 
center, of the Soviet Union talking Thursday with 
Spain’s {Rime minister, Felipe Gonz&Ies, in Madrid- Mr. 
Gromyko argued against UA space missile defense 
plans. Earlier, the roving XJJS. presidential envoy, Ver- 
non A. Walters met for 45 minutes with Mr. GonzsSIez. 


Warsaw Sets 
Three-Step 
Increase in 
Food Prices 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Roam 

WARSAW — The Polish gov- 
ernment said Thursday « would 
raise food prices, first scheduled for 
March, in three stages before the 
end of June: But it did not indicate 

bow big the raises would be. 

The deputy prices minister, An- 
toni Gryniewicz, said that details 
would be made public this week 
and that the first round of increases 
would affect bread and sugar, the 
official news agency PAP reported. 

Commentaries in the official 
; made it dear the government 


price rises, although it agreed — in 
response to trade-union pressure — 
not to impose across-the-board in- 
creases in March. 

Zyrie Warszawy, the country’s 
biggest daily newspaper, sard: 
“Same people wrongly read it as a 
complete abandonment of price 
rises. There should be no illusions 
in this respect." 

After the government had said it 
would reconsider imposing the in- 
creases. the banned Solidarity 
trade umon canceled a call for a 15- 
minute general strike to protest the 


Ex-Libyan Envoy Is Shot in Vienna m’|* 

VIENNA (AP) — E aoddin Ali M. Ghadamsi, a tamer r ‘ 
ambassador to Austria who opposed Colonel Moamer taW 
Libyan leader, was shot and serious l y injur e d Thursday as he b 
home here, police reported. 

A spokesman for Interior Minister Karl Blccfca quoted witues 
saying that one of the assa ilant s fled on foot and another penor " 
away in a car. Hesaid it was bdieved that Mr. Ghadamsi wasiemo 
ambassador when he refused to follow a call to return heme two a 
years ago. 

There was x>o official word on the degree of Mr. GhadamsTs in 
The Interior Ministry spokesman said that three mem cartridge: 
found at the site of the attack, but that it was not clear how mam 
the former diplomat had been hit . 

Spain Frees 3 Iranians, Holds Fou 

MADRID (Reuters) — After a three-day trial a Spanish cot 
freed three Iranians accused of planning a hijacking and tiffing, 
bidding a fourth on charges of Regally possessing arms and expkx 
court official said Thursday. 

The three men were released Wednesday from a maximum-s 
prison near Madrid, the official said. He said the trial verdict wo * 
made known later. Court sources said this was normal Spanish p 
and meant the defendants were either cleared or had served the t - 
lent of their sentences while in custody. 

The four were dunged with planning to hijack a Saudi au6 
Madrid and to kill an opponent of the banian regime. The four! 
remained in jail pending sen t encing after having confessed to 
possession of aims, the sources said. 


^ (I .| < Itirtw 


rm 





»•'-**?* 




Craxi Urges U.S. to Make 
Space Plans Negotiable 


> put 

cult position" tty insisting on^spe- 


rific mention of Resolution 24i 

“Be realistic,” he said. “During 
the negotiations this could be 
solved Give them some confi- 
dence. They need confidence. They 
are afraid to lose everything.” 

■ 2 in Uknd Deride Plan 

Two senior Likud ministers in 
the Israeli government derided the 
Egyptian peace initiative Thursday 
and said it was potentially danger- 
ous. The New York Tunes reported 
from Tel Aviv. 

Vice Prime Minister and Foreign 
Minister Yitzhak Shamir said it 
was nothing but “a t ransparent de- 
vice” to maneuver the United 
States into recognizing the PLO, 
and Deputy Prime Minister David 
Levy called it “a trap” and a 
“fraud.” 

Their assessments contradicted 
the evaluations of two Labor Party 
officials who met Egyptian leaders 
in Cairo. 


of the 


e New’ Generation Seeks 
Political Power in Japan 


Tanaka Suffers 
A Mild Stroke; 
Recovery Seen 


(Continued from Page 1) 
on the human brain,’' Mr. Craxi 
said 

He said he hoped the arms nego- 
tiations would focus “on thing s 
that exist,” a reference to nuclear 
weapons, since it is impossible to 
negotiate “on things that do not 
exist" 

The aide to Mr. Craxi said the 
prime minister was not proposing 
that the United States give up space 
defense research in exchange for 
Soviet concessions. 

“He is simply saying that space 
research st 

tensive tulles at an 

negotiations,” the aide 

Mr. Craxi, the only Socialist to 
serve as Italian prime minister 
since World War u, took over his 
post in August 1983. He is one of 
Italy’s longest serving prime minis- 
ters since the war, a period when 
governments have had an average 
fife of eight to nine months. 

During the interview, the prime 
minister also made these points: 

• He said there should be an 
initiative to start negotiations in 
the Middle East. Since Israel VMJftld 
reject an international conference 
thattmduded the Soriet,Umoqthe 
sakC he favored direct talks among 
the parties. 

' •The plot to kill Pope John Paul 


II did not involve “religious fanati- 
cism” but bad a political motive 
aimed at “the Polish pope.” Mr. 
Craxi would not elaborate, bat his 
view was similar to that of I talian 
magistrates who said Bul garians 
took part in the plot because cf the 
dangier the pope posed far Comnnt- 
mst governments in Eastern Eu- 
rope. 

• The new wave of terrorism in 
Europe differs substantially from 
the terrorism in Italy in the rmd- 
1970s. The new ter r ori sm , he stud, 
is directed primarily at the North 

groups" who lack “a base of sup- 
port socially pnH culturally." 

• During his visit to the United 
States, he hoped to discuss “this 
explosion of the dollar, which has 
become somewhat irrational.” 

Mr. Craxi also ex p ressed admi- 
ration for Mr. Reagan’s achieve- 
ments in office. 

“What Reagan has achieved is 
the creation of a great number of 
jobs, and this should make not only 
Italy but the whole of Europe 
think,” he said. 

“Now the anti- Americans say 
they are badjobl with tettic value," 
Mr. Craxi said*. “Buck's alwtys 
better to have a badjob than no job 
at all, while we in Europe have too 
great an unemployment rate.” 


would have raised 
tire cost df bring by up to 42 per^ 
cent. The official nnirms, which re- 
placed Solidarity, rejected these 
raises as darning to tire standard 
of living of working people. 

Mr. Gryniewicz said the first 
stage of the price increases would 
include “products that aroused the 
fewest reservations during consul- 
tations.” These, he said, were flour 
and grain products. 

“Such a growth will be accompa- 
nied by the lifting of their ration- 
ing.” Ire said, “but the increase in 
the pike of flour must be followed 
by price rises for bread and other 
gram products.” 

He did not indicate when prices 
would be raised for more sensitive 
items, such as meat, which is ra- 
tioned more strictly. 

Food prices in Poland have not 
been raised since February 1984, 
although prices paid to farmers 
rose 10 percent in July and axe due 
to be reviewed by the end of June. 

The government daily, Rzcczpo- 
spolixa, warned that To freeze food 
prices would mean drastic cuts in 
farm production” that would “in- 
evitably lead to empty shelves, 
enormous waiting lines and short- 
ages of food products, even those in 
surplus today.” 


Lebanon Seeks UN Aid Against Lgr 

UNITED NATIONS, New York (UP!) — Lebanon appealed* 
day to the United Nations Security Council to call on IsraeL} 
immediately hs “military onslaught* in southern Lebanon audis 
ately withdraw its forces. 

Rachid Fakbouxy, the Lebanese representative, told the open* 
rion of a council meeting on the situation in southern Lebanon tha 
action" was needed to end attacks by the “Israeli mflitaiy madm 
towns and villages in bis country. 

In Beirut, a Lebanese government source said it had been wan 
UJS. Ambassador Reginald Bartholomew that the United States 
veto any council resolution condemning Israel for its “acts of i 
in southern Lebanon. '‘Bartholomew advised Lebanese Fc 
officials against taking a hard line at the UN Security < 
them that Washington could not ascribe to and will veto any rest 
condemning Israel," said a Lebanese official who declined to be 
lied. 


„ * mm 


*» «•*- 




. . —■* 




Britain Orders Wiretap Inquiry 

TlLOgDON (UH) — The British govmmrent^ atkred^ a n i 

pionage ^agents illegally wiretapped tnde^rataiists and anti-f- 
pro testers. 

Home Secretary Lcoa Britten said in the House of Commons t 
investigation would examine wiretaps made since 1979 and site 
that they were ordered illegally for political reasons. “I think it - 
that interception and survefflance should follow the proper prxx 
and proper criteria,” he said. 

Cathy Masriter, a former agent of the M35 cou n terespionage 
described the alleged wiretaps in a television documentary ft 
banned from broadcast last week because of fears that it coonwe 
Official Secrets Act. 


*a» * 
V «M 0 
a* *4 


_ _ 


yrJT. 

3 Ex-Police Agents Charged in Mes T 


itiiinb', itJ, t 

Vniiu-'rtrarinr 




emphasized that 
several hundred thousand people 
had taken part in several weeks of 
consultations on the price rises. A 
government communiqufc in Janu- 
ary had outimed-jhrce sets of in- 
creases and called far a month of 
“social consultations" in work 
places and the news media to 
choose the one least objectionable 
to the public. 


GUADALAJARA, Mexico (UPI) — Three former Mexican 
agents held in connection with the kidnapping of a U.S. narcotic - 
were booked on three unrelated charges Thursday and were to be r 
after posting bail. 

The four men were picked up Sunday for questioning in coo. - 
with the kidnapping of a U.S. Drug Enforcement Adnumstratiot 
Enrique Camarena Salazar, abducted near the UR. Consulate in ■ 
lajara Feb. 7 by suspected drug traffickers. 

A former federal security agent, Tomas Moriett; a former 
policeman, Enrique Gonzalez Aguilar; and Eduardo Ramirez 
former security chief for the national pawnshop in Mexico Cii 
each charged with illegal possession at a firearm, perjury and ct L 
ping authority. They each paid bail of $1,136 and were to be i“ 
within 24 hours. 


For the Record 


sax 


(Continued from Page 1) 
forced to take matters into his own 
bands. 

In effect, he rebelled. 

Early this month, he enlisted 40 
other relatively young, disgruntled 
members of Mr. Tanaka’s faction. 
Together, they formed a “study 
group,” the marngoal of which was 
to support Mr. Takeshita’s future 
candidacy for party president and, 
by extension, for prime minister. 

The group, known as Soseikai, 
could have been twice as large, but 
fi na nc e minister deliberately 


As feudal as the system may ap- 
pear, it is the way Japan chooses its 
leaders. One of the three soralled 
“new leaders” — Mr. Takeshha, 


Mr. Abe and Mir. Mmzawa — is 
Sr. Nakasone as 


the 


tojpt it small in a spirit of compro- 
mise. Even so, Mr. Tanaka, who is 
often referred to as “the old man" 
by supporters, grew furious. 

But when it became dear that he 
could not stop his impatient disci- 
ples, he announced that the new 
group had Us blessing. That state- 
ment seemed to avert a possible 
wide breach, at least for now. 

Many political analysis conclud- 
ed that the kingmaker had suffered 
a blow. However, the resourceful 
Mr. Tanaka is a man of proven 
recuperative powers, and Us politi- 
cal dominance appeared for from 
over. 

In the meantime, other relatively 
young pofitidaos who also hope to 
become prime minister have given 
Mr. Takeshi ta moral support. Most 
conspicuous among these is Shin- 
taro Abe, tbe 60-year-okl foreign 
minister. Like Mr. Takeshi la, he 
has been held back by a powerful 
faction leader — another former 


likely to follow Mr. 
prime minister. 

Some political analysts 
that the generational split 
the Tanaka faction has benefited 
Mr. Nakasone by neutralizing pos- 
sible rivals before the scheduled 

idem in November 198^^^™” 
But others say that any kind of 
divisioa must worry Urn. IBs own 
faction is small, and without Mr. 
Tanaka’s full support, Us grip on 
power would be tenuous. 

There had been speculation that 
the prime minister would call par- 
liamentary elections this year in 
hope of strengthening his hand, but 
that prospect seems dimmer now. 

There had also been talk that Mr. 
Tanaka might try to change party 
rules to allow his contemporary, 
Mr. Nakasone, to stay on for an 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Kakuei Tanaka, who 
remains one of Japan’s most pow- 
erful political figures deroite a 1983 
conviction for accepting bribes, has 
suffered a mild stroke and. is hospi- 
talized. 

Doctors said that Mr. Tanaka, 
66, complained Wednesday of 
chest pain and numbness in Us 
right side. They said the stroke was 
odd and that Mr. Tanaka could 


Soviet Planners Favor 
Firms in Europe, Japan 


(Continued from Page I) 

ladders for this project are the 
West German company Manncs- 


• A multibfllion-dollar project 
for gas and oil extraction on the 
island of Sakhalin in the Far 


Ortega Says 
100 Cubans 
To Leave 




Newspapers speculated that die 
stroke could dimmish Mr. Tana- 
ka’s influence in the Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party and permit a realign- 
ment of party alliances that could 
threaten Prime Minister Yasuhiro 
Nakasone. 

Mr. Tanaka, who was prime 
minister from 1972 to 1974, re- 


extra year, until late 1987. The gen- 
' :Lib- 


erational divisions among the 
oral Democrats make it doubtful 
now that the party would endorse 
such a proposal 


Us financial dealings. He is appeal- 
ing tbe 1983 conviction. 

Nominally a political indepen- 
dent since his arrest, Mr. Tanaka 
still beads a faction of 122 mem- 
bers of tbe Diet, or parliament. 
That is the largest faction in the 
Liberal Democratic Party, a loose 
conservative coalition that has 
dominated Japanese politics for 30 
years. 


Itafimpianti and Finrider. 

• A chemical and plastic com- 
plex whose total cost will exceed 
$12 Ullion. This is a turnkey con- 
tract Moscow is negotiating with 
the British companies of John 
Brown, IQ and Davy McKee. 

• A chenrical -cqui pmcni plant 
whose construction cost is estimat- 
ed al SI billion. The talks involve 
the Italian company Montedison. 

•A $1 -billion project to build 
and equip a roctannrgiralpl a n i at 
Ord, west of Moscow. The 
Udders are the Austrian company 
Voechst Alpine and the Italian 
company Daniel). This is also a 
turnkey project 

• A multitufllion-doilar plastics 
plant involving an I talian compa- 
ny, SNIA Visoosa. 


project would require imports 
equipment exceeding S2 Uffioo. 
Several Japanese companies are 
said to have been approached an 


ILK. Miners Plan Strategy Review 


■ Ftikuda. 

Trapped in the same way is yet 
auc more would-be prime minister, 


KScU Miyazawa, who cannot ad- 
: while his fa 


vsnee while his factum remains in 
the hands of framer Prime Minister 
Zenko Suzuki Mr. Miyazawa is 65. 

“AD these younger men are ri- 
vals," a university political scientist 
sad. “But unless they ran displace 
the older ones, they are all stuck. 
For now, they have a common in- 
terest" 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The leaders of 
Britain’s miners called Thursday 
for a special conference Sunday to 
consider their next steps after the 
government appealed for more 
miners to abandon the nearly year- 
long strike. 

The 26-member executive com- 
mittee of the National Union of 
Mineworkers convened after the 
government's National Coal Board 
said Wednesday that the number of 


4 Cars Burned Near Gibraltar 


,0^0 






c t\p 


PERSONALITIES PUS 

MUTHUME 

IN THE WEEKEND SECTION 
Of FRIDAYS HT 


Reuters 

LA LINEA, Spain — Four cars 
were set ablaze in La Lfnea, on the 
frontier with Gibraltar late 
Wednesday, causing rfHmagg but 
no injuries, the police said Thurs- 
day. Four cars were set on fire here 
Feb. 5 when border restrictions 
were lifted between Spain and Gi- 
braltar, restoring normal traffic for 
tbe first time in 16 years. 


the union’s members back at work 
surpassed 50 percent 

The union leadership announced 
that delegates would be summoned 
from all mines to Sunday’s confer- 
ence in London. No agenda was 
published, Nit the Press Associa- 
tion. Britan’s domestic news agen- 
cy, said it was thought that the 
conference would discoss the possi- 
bility of an organized return to 
work without a settlement. 

The strike started March 12 . over 
management plans to dose 20 
money-losing mines with the loss of 
20,000 through attrition of the in- 
dustry’s 186,000 miningjobs. 

Negotiations have repeat- 
edly. and the m anagem e nt of the 
state-owned industry has refused to 

hold further raTIfs unless the union 
agrees in advance to the closure of 
money-losing mines. 

The union's president, Arthur 
ScargQl said after the seven-hour 
meeting in the northern English 
city of Sheffield: “We've had a Tong 
ana in-depth analysis of the current 


taken 


situation and we’ve also 
stock of the numbers of . 
both out on strike and those 
have returned to work.” 

Die coal brand reported that 
1,018 miners abandoned the strike 
and returned to work Thursday. 

On Wednesday, the union’s gen- 
eral secretary, Peter Heathfidd, in- 
sisted that 59 percent — 109,777 — 
of the country’s 186,000 miners 
were still on strike. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher; speaking in the House of 

Commons, urged the remaining 
strikers “to take matters into t y» r 
own hands and return to rebuild 
The industry which their leadership 
has shattered,” 


Belgian Rail Guide in BralDe 

The Associated Pros 
BRUSSELS — A complete 
schedule for Belgian tr ains his 
been pubhshed in Braille in Flem- 


• A gas and oil development 
project in Kazakhstan whose total 
cost exceeds SI button. Officials 
said engineering for tbe Kjuach&- 
wnA project exceeded $100 mil- 
lion. Mannesmanm the French 
company Technip and an unnamed 
Canadian companies are reported 
to be seeking this project. The same 
companies are fighting for em- 
mets fra a similar project at Ten- 
giz- 

• A new gas pipeline, the so- 
called Ymahorgska, to run to the 
border of Czechoslovakia. The 
multibillion-doUar project will 
mainly involve Soviet and East Eu- 
ropean companies. But Kke the 55- 
berian pipeline, it will also involve 
huge imports of large^iiameter 
pipes aim compressor stations from 
western Europe and heavy con- 
struction machinery from Japan. 

• A still nebulous project to de- 
vdop the Continental Shelf on the 
Barents Sea. The cost is estimated 
by Soviet officials to be greater 
than any of those mentioned earli- 
er. Soviet officials said Finnish and 
Swedish companies are bombard- 
ing Moscow with proposals. 

Tbe five-year plan that is being 
drafted for 1986-90 also involves a 
series of projects whose cost runs 
unde r $1 billion. Nevertheless, offi- 
cials say, they involve substantial 
amounts of money. 

Among these projects are plans 
calling fra the construction of sev- 
eral wood treatment plants and pa- 
per mills along the Baikal- Amur 
railway, the modernization and re- 
construction of automobile plants 
at Goriri, Moscow, Togliatti and 
Zaporozhe, and a large number of 
food processing facilities. 


(Continued bun Page 1) 

working as the Coatadora group, 
brake down earlier this month be- 
cause of a diplomatic dispute be- 
tween Nicaragua and Costa Rica 
over the right to political asylum. 

■ Pessimism on Rebels 

Bill Keller of Vie New Font 
Tones reported Wednesday from 
Washington : 

The departing commander of 
UJ5. military forces in Central 
America said Wednesday that Nic- 
araguan rebels were incapable of 


Fire raged Thursday in Manila through two blocks of a i 
district, leaving at least 2,000 families homeless, Manila] 
were no immediate reports of imuries. : - 

Ninety-one dUMren fathered by LLS- servicemen during the V"- 
War left Vietnam on Thursday on their Gist step to new home 
United States. Die children, accompanied by 146 Vietnamese re: 
arrived in Bangkok on a regularly scheduled Air France flight tr. 
Chi Mmh City. 

Hmidreds^ people were evacuated Wednesday from their ham .. 
Mozambique’s capital Maputo, to avoid poisoning Ire tccric fumes 
fire at a pesticide warehouse, officials said. The fire, in the fit . 
Matola, 1 2 miles (20 kilometers} west of Maputo, began eariy Wed 
and was brought under control Thursday morning. (ft : 

Governor Edwaa W. Edwards, 57, of Latinum was indicted * 
others Thursday cm charges of racketeering, wire fraud and mail i.- 
a hospital development schema He has admitted he accepted S2 . 
as a partner in a development company he later exempted from a >, 
hospita construction. _ ' 

Duck fog on hig hways into Paris caused chain collisions Th 
morning involving more than 300 vehicles. At least one person wat. ' 
and 10 were seriously injured, police said. 

on 



'*Nt ' '4 


51V2 


two-day blockade of a Norwegian freighter loaded with __ ^ 
chemicals at the port of Saint Nazaixe, on France's west coast T,' 
Flora sailed Thursday afternoon for South Africa with a 4,500-tm.' 
of tetraethyl and tetnonethyl lead, port officials said. (ft 


meat in ‘She foreseeable 
even if they got more UJL aid. 

General Paul F. Gorman made 
his remark in a parting assessment 
before turning over his command 
Saturday to General John R- Gal- 
vin. 

He told the Senate Aimed Ser- 
vices Committee that while most of 
Nicaragua’s neighbors have pri- 
vately told Mm they would favor a 
change in the Sandnust govern- 
ment, the rebel faces were too 
small and ill-trained to nmompKah 
such as objective. 

“I would argue that you buOd 
your policy on what’s posable," he 
said later. *T don’t think overthrow 
w feasible in the near future.” 

General Gorman’s remarks 
came six days after President Ron- 
ald Reagun said that the goal of 
U.S. policy was to “remove" the 
“present structure" of the Nicara- 
guan government. 

The general said Wednesday that 
support of the rebels should be re- 
sumed, along with diplomatic mea- 
sures, to keep up economic and 
Ttical pressure and “bring the 
to a reckoning." 


Accord on Spam’s Enti 

• ,4k 



Still Eludes EG Ministe r 'Minn Hrir 1 


Reuters • 


BRUSSELS — European Com- 


munity foreign ministers aban- 
ilks Thursday 


domed talks Thursday on condi- 
tions for Spanish entry and asked 
officials to study the matter further 
before another meeting in two 
weeks, diplomats said. 

The ministers shrived the issue 
after bogging down in disagree- 
ment over granting Spain's huge 
fishing fleet access to EC waters. 
This issue has been a key element in 
the negotiations, the diplomats 
said. Both Spain and Portugal are 
scheduled to enter the community 
cm Jan. 1. 

In Paris, President Francois Mit- 
terrand of France and Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of West Germany an- 
nounced they had resolved their 
differences on how to handle tbe 
ECs budget deficit this year. 

They linked enlarg ing the EC 


with increasing the budget and the 
sent to Britain of a rebate 


ish and French, tire two official 


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Saudi Arabia Gets Snowfall 


Reuters 

MANAMA, Bahrain — Snow 
has fallen in Saudi Arabia for the 
first time in several years, tire offi- 
cial Saudi Press Agsncy reported 
Thureday. Nearly two fees, (more 
than 50 centimeters) of snow fdl 
Wednesday in the area east of the 
Gulf erf Aqaba and dose to the 
Jordanian bonier, the agency 


■ Pofl on Nicaragua 

Americans oppose by almost 4- 
to-J any U.S. involvement in at- 
tempts to overthrow the govern- 
ment of Nicaragua, a Washington 
Post- ABC News poll has indicated. 
Tbe Post reported Wednesday. 

The percentage of opposition is 
as high or higher than ever in the 
past, despite recent efforts by Mr. 
Reagan to marshal support for 
pressure against the Sannmists. 

In tire survey, conducted Friday 
through Tuesday, 70 percent of 
those interviewed said they op- 
posed US. involvenrent in efforts 
to topple tire Nicaraguan govern- 
ment, 18 percent said they favored 
it, and 12 percent expna se d no 
opinion. 


payment 

agreed to last June. 

Under the formula they worked 
out. West Germany agreed that 
British compensation should be 
paid from 1986 revenues, Mr. Mit- 
terrand said. France would make 
part of its EC budget payments 
three months early, provided the 
budget deficit was not excessive, 
and providing that Spain and Por- 
tugal joined on schedule. 

The dispute over fishing also has 
held up a settlement of the commu- 
nity's budget difficulties. 

■^We appear to have fallen al the 
first hurdle,” a diplomat said in 
Brussels after a compromise pro- 
posal was rejected by the five most 
interested countries: Britain, Ire- 
land. France, Denmark and West 


Germany. Tbe compromise bad 
been offered by the EC’s president. 


Prime Minister BettmoO ' 
Italy, as a way of brcakt . 
deadlock over fishing. ThrW *.l 
has thwarted two mccesshft ***?? 
in p o f the foreign minis ters 
Diplomats said the five oo ■ 
particularly objected to 
some restrictions on Spanish . 
to northern community waK “ 
ter a transition period of se, 
eight years. They want to Iff / 
Spaniards out for up to IS } 
Another major obstacle ' 
larging the EC is a Greek ve 
Athens said would be lifted . - 

the EC agrees to an ambitiot 
of aid for tire community's : 
Mediterranean regions. ^ ; 

The European Commissio 
ideal, Jacques Ddors of 1 
announced that tbe cost of 1' 
ea-year Integrated Mediurr . 
Programs of aid would iota 
billion European Currency <• . 
(about SS bmion). 

Tbe commission said las ; , ~ 
that this proposal, prim - " 
meant to help Greece, wo 
financed by 81.4 billion in 
aid, 51.75 billion in knv-i 
loans and an unspecified a .. 
of cosh from existing aid pro 
Greece is concerned that t' . - 
will be less than tire $4.8 - 
over six years promised last j ' - 
the previous cn mmiaripg , ; , *. 
other EC members are exp© ; 
oppose Mr. Ddors’ program . 
generous at a time when th 
m unity needs to tighten its \ , 
Senior community officia. < 
diplomats have been meetin] " 
lately and with their Spann V 
leagues almost continuous!} v, 
fruitless discussions last we 
tween the foreign ministers. . • . 
discussions were to explore v 
breaking the stalemated talk .; ^ 



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° B «ig 

,K si,„ >M*etz 'Checked,’ Shot 
“ SKSsSiSh Yorth a Second Hme, 




IOTEENATIONAL HERALD TRDBUISE, FRIDAY, MARCL 1, 1 


Page 3 


•C ,n Mi s , 

Kan „ N! 

“ Mr r 7.«j; 


^ Jolice Report Claims 


.» i.y, By Marcia Chambers 

. ' l,rt l|ij*A- fta*7crkThaetSenm 

K . s . v 0e Vl r * 3 EW YORK — After {hooting 

‘ t r.-V, ^ Ki ;li.ii ,1 ^ <vf ywmg. on a Manhattan 


"««7> 


' a «»an. s 






; (il , i Three of the fair were lying 

‘ • *itr , n 4 r the floor off the train. 

fegm ?jfe saw. the fourth “half sitting 
• ^ lying on a bench,” tfie report 

■ . _ , 1 , and “stated that he ‘saw no 

l \ IjJ i bd on the snfaecL”' He then 
x L “You donft look so bad. 


Marcia Qiflfflb crs down and in a b«w The other 
r *w Tcrk Times Service three have recowretL 

YORK — After dtootmg According to hospital reports, 
mg men on a Manhattan each was shot once. Bat police and 
train in December, Bern- prosecutes said Mr. Goetz Bred 
^^vC^aJH-GoazsaWiooneoIthan, fivediots, oik of which missed. Mr. 
. : % don’t look so bad, here’s an- Foote quoted Ml Goetz as saying 

El i ®»" ^ ! * ot ** again, ac- foal initial news repots ofhis fir- 
. ■ mhMn to a poEce report. ingemiy four shots “were wrong he 

' tc ^*U report, made, public fired fivcdKte.” 

! a L J- i fcitasday, is a snmmtryof state- Mr. Goetz declined in the inter- 
the police say Mr .- Goetz view to recount specifically what 
f- irwa* try ttea in Ctmcord, New had happened to hfo on the train 
ire, when he surrendered that day. Bui be did say that the 
31- four “played a dangerous game” 

led that after Mr. Goetz and that die inrideot begsa within 
d a shot al each of the seconds after he had boarded the 
he “checked” their oondi- wain a block from his hnr pp. 
ree of the four were lying The police report said that about 
ioor off foe train. 20 otter passages were atone end 

w the fourth “half sitting of the car and that Mr Goetz was 

f ofl a be nc h," the report virtually alone with the four youths 
“stated that he ‘saw no at the other aid The report said 
n the subject.’ " He then, one of the faro, lata- idanffiad fm 


to them in Concord, New 
shire, when he surrendered 



Rural Banks in U.S. Misery 

Lm AitgtHes Tuna Service - ■ — 

ire falling and more are in danger Farmers at Iowa Rally Assail Reagan 

rf coHanse. hist as a farce numfier ** C7 


Lea Angetes Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — A growing 
number of American rural banks 
are failing and more are in danger 
of cdbpsejust as a large number 
of farmas find themselves mired in 
debt and desperately in need of 
refinancing to stay in business. 

The farmers need batik, loans and 
the banks need repayments from 
farmers, and trouble for one spells 
trouble for the other. 

About 420000 of Amaica's 14 
minion farmers arc considered “fi- 
nancially stressed,” with debts 
amounting to al least 40 percent of 


% and “stated that he ‘saw no at the other «»d The report said 
bd on the subject.’” He then one of the fanr. later idauffiad *e 


v , ' *'* afiaihl “You dotft look so bad, Troy Canty, 19, of the Bronx, went 
■ *• ' I | _ . another.’ Then he shot at the up to and asked how he 


fc another.’ Then he shot at the up to fcm and asked him how he 
WVj, t r *!* t o Un ,.i^^ i& fe»,"accordii® to the repot was doing. 

“Mr. Goetz stated that he . . 

^ LdJunc'fbote, the Cm officer to inter- thought this was funny, but also "f*™* 8 ™ 
:t <'c repri-so,, WMr. Goetz, and details for the . stated that at this time he <5d not Wedmesd 

r *■' iu.it!. •„ , n told jf .time the events ctf Dec. 21 fed that was a threat,” the report 

'• 1 i| K . .. :' t,ui henj i 4 ,h an mtervtewat his apartment, said. seriously,” d 

lr - Tlelj is^rdnesday, Mr. Goetz said that “A short time after the train left that is why 1 

t S i, -r •'*. Foote’s statement was “esseor the 14th Stxcet station, the two tire incident, 

f accurate,” but he would not males sitting across from him, at Wednesdt 


Five tiiral banks have failed tins 
year following 2d last year, 22 of 
them in the last ax months. With 
failures accelerating, 275 rural 
banks have been placed on the 
“problem loan” fist of dm Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corp. 

The bills that passed the House 
and the Senate on Wednesday 
would bail out fanners principally 
by baffing out banks. 

Cost estimates range from $100 
milfioa to $9 MEon, depending an 
how many fanners would receive 
help. 

/Mooted fam Fffdffld and Mate nffiriah qw»s. 

Bernhard H. Goetz, center, being escorted by guards doc how many debt-burdened 
Wednesday a pre c e d n ral reurt hrarm g ia M anhat t a n farmers could, oradiould.be kept in 


New York Timer Some 

AMES, Iowa — Worried and 
angry fanners from across the 
Middle West and from as far as 
Tennessee gathered here to send 
a message to policy-makers is 
Washington. 

They packed to overflowing 
the 15,000 seals of the HU ton 
Coliseum on Wednesday, and 
filled it withjetn and boos auhe 
mention of President Ronald 
Reagan and hi$ budget director. 
David A Stockman. 

Farmers Hire Merle OTool of 
Anbum, Iowa, Tom Parker of 
Galesburg. Kansas, and Jody 
Beck of Mwuevideo, Minnesota, 
said in a different ways thai rural 
America was in trouble, with 

farms like theirs loaded with 

debts they could not pay ami 
their crops bringing in less than 
their costs of production. 

They heard the words echoed 
back to than from speaker after 
speaker in a four-hoar session 
called the “National Crisis Ac- 
tion Rally” on the campus of 
Iowa State University. 


The fanners and vber sup- 
porters cheered attacks on offi- 
cials of the Reagan administra- 
tion and demands for programs 
to ease debts and improve then- 
prices. ' 

. Some of the most ardent ap- 
plause was reserved for a soft- 
spoken Catholic bishop of Des 
Manes, Maurice Dingman, who 
gave an emotional warning of a 
threat he saw to farm life 

“I come before you today; to 
tell yon that, if we do nothing, 
the bells win have idled for the 
American dream,” Bishop Ding- 
man said. “It is a sad fact that 
our business and government 
leaders, for years, have been pur- 
suing a policy towards agn cul- 
ture which has bad the ruthless 
effect of eliminating farmers 
[ran the land.” 

“We have forgotten our roots 
as a people in the land, roots as a 
people of faith and roots that 
stretch to the dream or our an- 
cestors.” he concluded. “And 
now we are in grave danger of 
losing the land.” 


■ H la<j Jy accurate,” but Ik would not 

I _ J tot n.jwbQEate as details of the case. He 

in -w ie instead about -what he saw as 


tg a firearm.” 

. Goetz said: 


Mr. Goetz, ‘Give me $5/ At this «*¥*» ramwswnose oetn is so 
time, Mr. Goetz stated he pulled 1*W exoreifing 70 percent of there 


the door where he came in, got up “Once you have been beaten up! col the revolver that he had in his as »® ls > *bat neither commercial House and 
onA mTfcwf mot rsi Me Irfr ” Tk«« u «- - L. n ™r_u j n banks nor t aiveium mtal apenries wnuld altm 


' , T ^wiu-w &e instead about be saw as and walked over to 2ns left” Then, youH never la it happen again.” 

in-j .,i ij' ' 'p 1 ^' ^KuuyppVneed for citizens to arm. than- foe repost said, the youth identified The report continued: M Mr. 

•i .li ^urin (v><5 gainst criminals and ovedy as Mr. Canty asked for $5. Goetz stated he staid vp and in 

“ ?"•« ft iU imjrictive gzm-ticensing laws. Mr. Goetz said Wednesday that doing so he noted that me of the 

■ why Manhattan grand jury indict- “I never said to anyone that they men out his hand in his nociet in a 


waistband belt.” 

GT. Daman, a second New 
Hampshire officer who interviewed 


Virei 


Mr. Goetz said Wednesday that doing so he noted that one of die Mr Mr t pJdKhw 

“I never said to anyone that they men put his hand in ht< pocket in a that foe four had shown no “out- 
asked for $5.” He woald not elabo- move that mrfinated he was cany- ward signs of being armed or a 


banks nor governmental 
are willing to hdp them an 
It is the renaming 260.C 


passed by both foe 
Senate on Wednesday 


willing to help them any longer, tain immediate advances on federal aie-passedbOlw 
i is the remaining 260,000 farm- crop loans. billion in additk 


farm- crop loans. 


billion in additional guarantees. 


statements Mr. 


peraan .sbot by Mr. 


**■ 

s.su« u S® -fourth peraan shot by Mr. 

I1r , H ^rfC«^accorfing to pofice reports, 
I ^ KiDand Cabey, 1 £ofthe Bronx, 

v M- paralyzed from the waist 


possession, ha rate. ing a weapon, 

s him with il- According to the report, Mr. “Mr. Goetz wait cm to state that 
Ihe grand jury Goetz tdd Mr. Foote that he did fois in itself was not a threat, be did 
s report as weal not take foe request as a threat. not fed threatened by this move. 


not take foe request as a threat. not fed threatened by this move. 

Mr. Goetz, according to foe re* Mr. Goetz stated thm he knew 
port, told Mr. Focxte that he had what he was going to do and he 


riawgpr to Vrcrry other than «nt>. of 
went on to state that the indrvidnals w p p wrrmg to be 
ts not a foreat.be did holding something under ^ his jack- 
tened by tins move. eL He went on to say that be fdt 


House, Senate Back Farm Measures 


(Continued front Page 1) 


been assaulted twice before and already had in ms m 
that, doling one assault, his knee fixe, that he was goi: 
had beenhgared. Be said that “two he did in fact shoot 
other times he bad been threatened “He said he sdoI 


mind foe spirit of Mr. Goetz said Wednesday: “I 
oing to fire when wish this never hap pened muff I 


ibiic othaals, including virtually the White House in a mock funeral 
e entire Sooth Dakota legislature, for farms that foey «?a«d go bank- 
i behalf of foe legislation, ». nq>t day. 

In Ames, Iowa, thousands of in vain, Sw»? t nr Dole angrily rc- 


“He said he spoke to the mm hanky an the street 


woe just an ixmocoons gnu-toting farmers rallied to protest foe Rea- r 

n>Mi. ..a w iMn Avm maTIku - 


anm 
,c h".-.M.in is 


..•u'o ,-. f f«rs [ham 


- Charged in 

' ! — ihr.v 


gjaenry Cabot Lodge, 82 , Dies; 
j Senator, Ambassador 


(CaatiBKdfraa Fnge 1) 


Bseahower then named Mr. 


' * • ,,„;,n r : l L ;;Tc DA boning of Noth \fiet- Lodge to foe UN post 

- lt t ,, ", ®mi was being “coodncted on a Taking tq> the polenncal cadgds 

mTHtary basis without against Russia, Mr. Lodge de- 
ion;! FKard for its political and noimcedwhal he called its “whde- 
i : in^&ations.” He went sale brutality” in 1956 in crushing 

. .. .. .y.'i * ^^“H^totiave as ddsate to the Viet- foeHungarim uprising. At another 
•< » * 1 * 1 '™*m'peace talks m Paris in 1969. time he sad: “Where foe people of 



gan a d m i n istration’s farm polices, ing foe emergency farm aid when 

— Senate leaders are trying to find a 

way to reduce federal deficits. 

“If foe membership doesn’t care 
abom deficits, Tm not sure foe 
leadership does,” Senator Dole 
said. “We’re demonstrating we 
don’t have the will to face up to the 
deficit.” 

Despite Mr. Dole's comments. 


the Senate voted, 55-43, against a processing loons, provide for re- 


proposal by Senator Pint Gramm, 
Republican of Texas, to prevent 
implementation of the farm legisla- 


timehe sad: “Whei 
Eastern Europe are 


At another 
e people of 
cemecLfhe 


tion if it would add to federal dtfi- meat prog ram s. 


duced interest rates to victims of 
multiple weather disasters and ease 
foe terms for existing debt-adjust- 


. . Laity in his political career Mr. Eastern Enrqpe are concerned, the 

1 an isolationist, and he United States seeks to fill their 

' t j ^ u “ r “‘ l ^rnMnedaneumflaftaPeariHai- slomadts with food. The Soviets 
i Ikf in N^KHesawconfominEnropednr- seek to fill their s t omachs with 

1 '''-".T |^niin:«3VivU'Wwlt ant nnw. tam lead.” 


... Hally 111 till. LAJBlUbAA .Jii m 1T1 ^ - mm w. * ■■ ■ ■■■■ - maw w m wju w , iub 

.. 1 an BoJationist, and he United States seeks to fill their 

. ^inidned one utefl after PeariHar- stomadis with food. The Soviets 


, “gWorid. War H and. came to say lead.” 

... i a** .ir:J hoc ttpt "foe idea! of a provincial n»- Probably his most dramatic UN 

» has pvm way to foe reaEza- itentt* occurred in I960, after an 
m foal we- have becom e the American. U-2 reconnaissance 





dls. Administration officials have 

House members also inHiparwri said the biB could cost $1.6 billion 
that heavy lobbying by politically to $9 biDioo over the next two 
powerful groups would nkdy con- years, depending on how many 
tinne to pay off, despite pressures farmers paid back federally guar- 
to reduce deficits by containing anteed loans. 


ats. 

House members also inriirgf«d 
that heavy lobbying by politically 


But the Congressional Budget 
Office estimated the cost at $455 


r'.»A'rfa 


xkTs'Beatest power,” and that plane was foot down over foe Sovi- 
Varid War fl first taught us the etUmon. 



spending. . But the Congressional Bud 

“In government, the squeaky Office estimated the cost at $4 
wheel gets the grease,” said House mQfion over the next five years. 
Speaker Thomas P. O’Neill Jr„ 

Democrat of Massachusetts. jgSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSZ 

The House measure was ap- i fe.' ■" “ 


e it was asah ardent inianalional- 


In rqpty to Soviet charges that 
foe Ihuted States had committed 


Pc lr.nKrfhg r «|^ e 


armrftofoe teeth, has rqjeatedly 
,/1he fact that tite talk may be its relatkms with ofo- 

mg or turgid « mnugmn g er sovereign states.” 
aid not cause us to forget foe i T* 5 ^ * t , ,i i~n 

He defended what he called one 


I.. . .riwnyi m ioTorgst the 

-line » ' w» y timi it is preferable to war.” 
l.u tire, m z£fter stints as a rep e al er *nH 
writer for ThStewYofo 
. ... peda Tribune and as a Mass&- 

it i .hemjiu uj.% miysats state fcga a tor, Kfa. Lodge 
mi. fraud smlcjs first dected to the Senate, m 
:iiv,; !w atrp^6. g e defeated James M. Cur- 
i : . : .-uMipioi iKuMfoeti wffl governor. 


Richard M. Nixon nod Henry Cabot 
when they were nommated as rite ] 


Lange Says U.S, 
Acts like Tyrant 

ifican National Convention in 1960 Over Ship Bail 
and vice presidential candidates. The Associated Puss 


elected to the Senate, m 
defeated Tames M. Cur- 
foenwffl governor. 


and caused a furor when he pro- 
duced in foe Security Comal a 
wooden plaque with the Great Seal 
of the United States. The plaque 
contained a microphone hidden by 


Union in tins case has taken full 
advantage.” 


During the war, be rose to the foan-fife 
rank of Kentenant ooSoneL He words, c 


moat ememsaes. The Associated Press 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
r. He was gifted with David Lange of New Zealand im- 
tfe by toms of do- plied Thursday that the United 


As a senator, he was especially earned six battle stars and several qneoce, wit and bruising bhmtness. Slates was attempting to remove 
cud of his role in passage of foe decorations. After Geoige Cabot Lodge's him from office and said Washing- 

>dge-Brown Act Tins legislation He was originally narrmd Henry ifawfli in 1909. his widow took the 100 was using methods akin to to- 


ge-Brown Act This kgfottion He was 


the Rnssi ans and for yem^ fotce it fad to the fonnation of foe Hoover Cabot Lodge Jr. 


young Henry Cabot I ^dge her tafitarianism in its quarrel over a 


. •,! » kOlli#®' 

•f.lsl.HH-pttZ] 


Wpa ierdectKa in had been ^>Qaiicd to foeU^am- OnnnrissicHi,whifostui£ed&ec^)- the Jr. m 1956- He was born at two younger foildren to Paris for ban on port calls by nuclear ships, 
in nerve fn armv bassador m Moscow, it bMl rcutyed eranons of foe executive branch of Nahant a resort northeast of Bra- vem in Inmi Fmndi. vhidi m . 




^ tjiigned to serve ia the army 
war, and . was again 
BOed m 1946. He ran again in 
S2bot, after pending much ef- 


bassadorm Moscow, it had rdmred 
ccmversations held in the U.S. Em- 
bassy to Soviet recorders outside. 


Tina ,'fi Hnflg2but, after gie ad in g mnefa ef- In another widely died ri 
, n | f j wife rat toward eosming Eoenhowti’s he said: “ M anbe t ship c£ the 


nposte, 

icUhit- 


eratioas (d the executive brazteh of Nahanl, a resort northeast of Bos- two years to learn French, wind 
tha government from 1947 to 1949, ton, the son of Georae Cabot Mr. Lodge wrote years latir, “ha 
and winch, be liked to say, led to Lodge, a poet, and Mathilda Fre- stood me in good stead all my hfe.' 
savings of more than $3 billion. He finghnysen Davis Lodge. The young Cabot, as he came t 

also enjoyed saying that, during Nature seemed to cast linn to be known, graduated from Middle 


i to kam French, utich, ^ Uniwd States has ii 
sanctions au iudligeuce an 




* ?**? ”■ - T memgooasieaa jminynie. ^ setivitics became Mr. Lange’s 

♦ The young Cabot. y hecaiM to Lfoor goveounent has refarfto 

l*** xu>d«x-P 0 «rrf or nude- 


^ or^ction as presidenL was hhns df ed Nations gives every jnembff the Worid War D, he was foe first sena- smceed Us ancesuxs. He stood sex School in Concord, Massachu- a^nrm^shmstnntf-NraiTMismri 

■- j- ■ tAnHilwafnrJ nf KSmcnlf mu! Iftr enw the rtvil Wnr tn Imvp tllft nH)riv ffrt 1 talimul me ,*4tr in Ilffll wul nim Imul* Fmni ** ““ fW^HiaDO 


defeated by Keanedy for right to make a fool of himself, and 


Senate seat. 


foax is a right of which the Soviet 


Ur since the Civil War to leave the nearly 6 fed 3 indies taH&sd was setts, in 3920 and cum laude from 
Senate to enter the army. handsome in a somewhat larger- Harvard in 1924. ^ 


ain'g Mellon Heir Funded Westmoreland libel Suit 


WJV « • - 

..»*■: 'ft**;- 


The A ssoci a ted Tress 


ifaikimgtcH Paa Service foat his Capital Ijgal Foundation L^al Foundation is one of a net- 

WASHQNGTON — Most of foe woald be able to continue fighting cf busness-spooscKed pubBc C 
money for retired General William on behalf of people he considered interest law firms that look root in I 
C. Westmoreland’s libel suit “naderdogs,” ranging from Ver- Ate 1970s. a 

a gmud ntS Inc name from Rich- moat knitters who want to woik at The Scaile Ioundatkms and h 
ard Meflon Scaife, rate of the rich- home despite Departmenlaf Labor Ststifo-coailrofled fa mily trusts con- a 
est men in the United Stares and a ndes to lemon growers in Cafifor- tr flw aed about S3 rxnlnon to these s 


Mr. Lange said that “the type off 

pressure which large powers can 
V 1 C« •« exert over the small ones is seen by 

JjGl ijHll the peoplein a small democracy as 

being somewhat akm to foe very 

a*, ni totolttorianismwearestqjposedto 

Mr- pecame_ president ca jfeujin- anmo" 


Estkof bnsnes&^osisocedpuhfic Cmntal Legal Foundation in May 

terest law fonts foal todk root in 1980. He was a combative attorney He said the New 

e 1970s. and sdf-described libertarian who exmnent viewed U. 

The Scaile Ioundatkms and had estabiHfoed a law firm with pmsoing once more 
aiWuHrnlltd family H ums enn- a ffl nwi in Marblehead, Massacfrn- having the shuatitai 
3aaed abont $3 re'B* 00 to rhe« smA SawB Arabia, and was land changed to the 
tms between 1973 and 1980, foe making mere than 5400,000 a year government is decte 


tribraed abont $3 


He said the New Zealand gov- 
ernment viewed Ui policy “as 
pmsmng once more the strategy of 
having the situation in New Zea- 
land changed to the point where a 
government is dected ihat will wel- 
come nuclear weapons to New Zea- 
land.” 


,, sdftrety cu 

.. ...jihsi P^Ste; 

ifev^Stthkstfe 

... i.ii Uf ^ t. 


said John^errigan. foe 
n-i>' r WnAets Union anfora 

. . :!k- > 1 rl vjfwsetwi director, .who announced 

*ada»t off .5,753 i pudani c s , 
.... : f 1 lamfoers, ffigjrt dispmdt- 

. :!ir s *nd food-savice waduxs. 
i i.-.m ftto Am spokeswoman said 

■ : ■ •; v - ir ‘ wDuldopcrate I5J3«hls 

; ,v *t rirooztemfoeX&iir 

■ ' iUrd lIu ?y Stales 00 Ttadas: one from 
V*5f three from Miami, 

■* .. .i .uJ from New Yadr and three 




■ --” 15 « 


Am pfflpts, who 


j its overseas Scaife, a greax-grandson of foe 

founder of the hfeflou oil and 
lo be a long banking e m pire, was foe “r cal 
jerrigan^ foe hinder” d tire Westmor land case, 
hrion anfox Mr. Burt said Mr. Scaife put up, 
» amtounced mcae than $2 miTtinn of foe ^mox- 
t mechanics, jiuatdy S3 m3Hon that it cost 
^ddispmdt- BurftOmitalLqjal Foundation to 
w kw it. pursue the lawsmL This week, 
woman sad Scaife interests mproved another 
ate 15 flights “hnge grant” to bdp reduce foe 
in foe Unit- <fcfidt, Mr. Burt said. 

L one from “Hepaovaedmjxethan70pex- 

n cent of tile case," Mr. Burt said of 

k and Three ^ pj(QM| miTH onaire. “I have 
LAausuaUy aiotofreroctforfoegittr." 
n tteUmted Netthcr Mc. Scaife, who rarely 
speaks to foe press, xkt fai$ admin- 
3 at anports j S tiath«a^ltiifoariLamr ) coaU 
s> Sg n Fran- ^ ^eachal for c omment But so- 
fi. Ke ro g m W j n ^roMr.Burt,Mr. Lartysent 






» jKESCSSKSH 'SSSaESEtt- 


word this week foal a ddraon al 
lands “in six figures” lad been 1 


hare isaatised; to bwror foe 
etfras^^itf other muons have 
red foerfiembera to stay off 


other omoBs have the case was sealed last week in i 
raembeistostay off m agreement between General 
; . , . . Wes tmor danAand CBS t h at m a n y ; 

beta c ont a c t in g ris conservatives regarded as a surren- 
tosedt available space ^ ^ Generri Westmorriand. i 
wu fonty pas se oa ecs y nmf. specolxtod tiiat perhaps he ! 
f .fte stife, a spokes- hadronootofmcHiey.&tMrBnrt 
said moon’ was “never an issue, ] 
adayrRm Am^ offered not really. 

r 2Bpocent irrarease Me. Bert demed rqwrts that Mn ; 
fosy kfi, Kerrigan said. Scaife or aw .other donor had 1 
Rut Am offered me- forced Mr. Rfestmardand to drop ; 
2O0bodnsandS9OOto the case. J 

ms. be sad. - - -He riso expressed confidence; 


y/M 



seriously " lira report added, “and who asked f at the $5 asking him ^® nn «*pots agree that ersin the “financially stressed" cat- The bill passed by the House also 

time after the train left that is why he was, at ihe time of what do you want The manasked foereis litrie hope lor about egc^rwbo are foe targets of most of would provide $3 billion in US. 
treet station, foe two foe modem, eurvine a firearm." Mr. Gaet* ‘Giw me *5/ At fins Io0,000 fanners whose debt is so the emergency relief proposals. loan guarantees to protect banks 


the emergency relief proposals. loan guarantees to protect banks 
The buls passed by both the against defaulted farm loans, on 
House and Senate on Wednesday top of the current S650- million 
would allow needy fanners to ob- loan guarantee program. The Sen- 
tain immediate advances on federal aie -passed bQl would provide $1 .85 


The gathering was designed to 
exert pressure on lawmakers in 
Washington now debating mea- 
sures to relieve a credit squeeze 
on fanners that resulted from 
debts, largely undertaken in a 
period of expansion in foe 1970s, 
that have grown rapidly as a re- 
sult of rising interest rate s and 
falling prices in the 1980s. The 
House and Senate both passed 
separate measures Wednesday. 

The rally brought together as 
sponsors a variety of farm orga- 
nizations that generally diverge 
on farm policy, including foe 
National Fanners Organization, 
ihe National Farmers Union, foe 
National Grange, foe American 
Agricultural Movement, which 
attempted 10 organize a national 
farmers strike in 1 978, and Prair- 
icGre, an activist group in Iowa, 

The speakers contended that 
immediate action from Washing- 
ton was necessary if farmers 
were 10 get ihe credit they need 
to buy supplies for spring plant- 
ing. 


The home 
of Burberrys Paris, 
since 1909 

(Near the Madeleine! 


On Wednesday, farm state law- proved as a separate bill; the Sen- 
makers planted white crosses near ate provisions were attached to the 


bill proyiding 5175 million in disas- 
ter and refugee relief for starving 
Africans, which was finally ap- 


proved. 62-35. 

The House approved a similar 
African relief bill earlier this week. 

In addition to authorizing spring 
advances on fall price-support 
loans, the House Nil would expand 
foe federal loan-guarantee pro- 
gram, allowing the government to 
guarantee an additional S3 billion 
in loans to fanners who would be 
unable to get credit otherwise. 

lt -would speed up foe time for 


tButhems 
1 r.sinKejr 
I /him 
f I.730FF 


The full range of 
traditional Burberrys Mens, 
Ladies & Children clothing. 

Burberrys 

8, bd Malesherbes 
i Phris 8’ - 266.13.01 


PiageT 


Gant's match 

in 18 cant sold. 

wstar-robtanT, 

wid) nan-flat 

ouam momnaaL > 

Instant Uma-zona change. { 



Marl 


1U 4 


vv •* 


amen a 


Marffloro, 


^SljiQBbortns and $900 to 








Page 4 


FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1985 



Jtcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Sribunc 


Published Whh Tbr Nr*. \orV Tinr* and TV Yanhington Pm 


Mideast: A War Too Late 


Jordan, backed by Egypt and Saudi Arabia, 
c laims to have won the Palestine Liberation 
Organization’s consent for negotiations — 
presumably with Israel but maybe only the 
United Slates. The tortured lan g ua g e of King 
Hussein's agreement with Yasser Arafat bears 
only a faint resemblance to the terms of Camp 
David and the Reagan plan for the Middle 
East and is far from a realistic basis for negoti- 
ation. But if pro- American Arab leaders say it 
is a step forward, that is reason enough for the 
United States and Israel to embrace it as that 

The accord mentions negotiation but not 
Israel. It promises "peace” for a "total with- 
drawal” from the West Bank. Gaza and East 
Jerusalem, but not even recognition of the rest 
of Israel. It envisions the PLO sitting with 
Jordanians in a joint delegation but contem- 
plates a confederation of tbe "states of Jordan 
and Palestine," with “Palestine” leTt free to 
exercise seLf-detennmarion. 

These terms only prove that the diplomacy 
of the most moderate .Arab regimes continues 
to be at least one war loo late. After the 1967 
war, they offered to settle for terms they could 
have had in 1948. Since the war of 1973, they 
have yearned for the terms available in 1967. 
And though in the Lebanon war Israel has 
surely lost its taste for occupying hostile Arab 
terrain, tbe PLO lost a great deal more: its last 
base of operations against Israel. The Israelis 
did not chase the PLO out of bases in the north 
only to grant it sovereign bases in the east. 

Still, the latest exertions deserve some re- 
spect. for they represent a grudging recogni- 


tion by pro-American Arabs that the aid and 
protection of the United States must be paid 
for with their progressive acceptance of Israel. 

President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt needs 
this sense of movement because be wants more 
economic aid from a Congress that resents his 
chilly observance of the Camp David peace. 
He has kept his ambassador out of Israel since 
the invasion of Lebanon and even before then 
held travel and trade to a minim um. Now that 
Israel is withdrawing from Lebanon, he feels 
hard-pressed to improve relations. Having the 
PLO appear interested in coexistence can 
blunt the charge of radical Arabs that Egypt is 
still betraying the Palestinians. 

Jordan and Saudi Arabia can similarly ben- 
efit from Mr. Arafat's apparent blessing. King 
Hussein and Mr. Arafat are rivals in seeking to 
speak for the Palestinians of the West Bank 
and Gaza, It is good that tbe king is gaining in 
that competition, but be is far from ready to 
arrange, over Syria's opposition, an Israeli- 
Jordanian condominium in the West Bank. 

Such a condominium now seems to be the 
only plausible formula for the future. Israel 
may not be ready for it either. But Israel 
should, in time, want to shed the burden of 
subjugating tbe huge Arab populations of the 
West Bank and Gaza. Until their status is 
resolved, they threaten Israel's domestic order. 
And until Israel finds a way to gram them the 
autonomy it promised at Camp David, they 
cannot produce the natural leaders needed to 
supplant the vexatious PLO once and Tor alL 
— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Commerce Counterattacks 


Fed up with years of needling from the 
Pentagon, Secretary of Commerce Malcolm 
Baldrige has now struck back — and rather 
effectively. As an example of turf warfare in 
Washington, the affair is turning into a classic. 
It revolves around the leakage of technology to 
the Soviet Union — and the question of who is 
more vigilantly anti-Soviet than whom. 

The Erst territorial aggression was commit- 
ted by the Defense Department when it 
charged the Commerce Department with care- 
lessness in issuing export licenses for technical 
equipment that the Russians could put to 
military use. The suggestion was that Com- 
merce tends to get carried away with its enthu- 
siasm for export promotion. The obvious solu- 
tion, Defease thought, was to ask for some of 
Commerce's authority over export licensing. 

Then the Pentagon's allies and admirers 
began to be heard from — notably the com- 
missioner of customs, William von Raab. Af- 
ter each new round from Defense. Mr. von 
Raab warmly joined the refrain, like the sec- 
mid tenor in an operatic sextet, on the general 
theme of the awful things that he was power- 
less to stop under present law, and so on. 

Tbe Commerce Department is run by peo- 
ple who think of themselves as reliably to the 
right in their politics, and their first reaction 
was pure astonishment. Because of this inter- 
nal quarrel Congress deadlocked on the re- 
newal of tbe Export Administration Act. 
which, to the embarrassment of the White 


House, expired last year. In January, the De- 
fense Department won an important victory 
when President Reagan finally stepped in and 
gave it the authority to review, with Commerce 
officials, the export applications. 

Mr. Baldrige counterattacked last week, ac- 
cusing the Defense Department of allowing 
military and technical secrets to fall into Soviet 
hands through routine declassification of doc- 
uments. While the Pentagon has an adequate 
staff to duplicate Commerce's work on the 
export licenses, be said, it does not seem to 
have anyone overseeing the papers that are 
automatically being opened to the public. 

More recently, the Commerce Department 
turned its attention to Mr. von Raab, charging 
that the U.S. Customs allowed a series of 
shipments of helicopters to continue for more 
than a year while knowing that (hey were being 
diverted illegally to North Korea. The ship- 
ments ended, according to Commerce, only 
when it heard about them and intervened. 

No doubt there is a serious issue here. Amer- 
ican technology is crucially useful to the Soviet 
Union and its friends, and they work assidu- 
ously to obtain it For the administration, it is 
a matter of balancing security requirements 
against the necessities of an open society with 
an immense flow of international trade: But all 
that is almost too Tamiliar to be worth discuss- 
ing. The territorial struggles within the admin- 
istration are infinitely more entertaining. 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Balanced Budget Fantasy 


• Whereas President Reagan has generat- 
ed more federal deficit spending than all his 
predecessors combined; 

• Whereas the aforementioned has again 
asked Congress for a constitutional amend- 
ment "mandating the federal government 
spend no more than it takes in"; 

• Whereas even Mr. Reagan knows that 
what he says about balancing the budget is 
inconsistent with what he does about it: 

• Now therefore be it resolved that the fed- 
eral government’s deficits can be wiped out 
with the stroke of a pen. 

This is only a fantasy, yet it has now gained 
the endorsement of the National Governors 
Association. More important, it has been en- 
dorsed by 32 state legislatures. The stales seek 
a constitutional convention on it, though Con- 
gress could write an amendment. 

A convention requires approval of only two 
more states. Tbe proponents, defeated this 
week in Montana, have their eyes on the legis- 
latures of Connecticut, Michigan and Wash- 
ington. Michigan’s Senate has voted approval 
and the proposal’s chances in the House, 
where the Republicans have gained strength, 
are rated a toss-up. Connecticut's Legislature 
seems ripest. U is back in Republican hands 
again, and backers of the measure have signed 
op a majority of members in both houses. 

A constitutional convention would be haz- 


ardous. It is by no means certain that one 
could be confined to the budget issue. But 
whether the amendment came from a conven- 
tion or Congress, it would be bad law. The 
U.S. Constitution now properly avoids rigid 
guidelines on any phase of national life so 
inherently subject to fluctuation. 

Writing the balanced budget into the Con- 
stitution would also be reckless economics. 
Mammoth deficits are clearly a problem, but 
there is ample evidence — there have been 
only six balanced budgets in the last 50 years 
— that deficits per se do not doom the repub- 
lic. .And no legal language has yet been drawn 
that would guarantee effectiveness but allow 
flexibility. Finally, the idea is simply unreal 
Mr. Reagan's new Budget Message projects an 
S82-bQlion deficit in 1990; the Congressional 
Budget Office thinks it will be mice that. 

A maze of possible challenges to a constitu- 
tional convention leaves the final outcome in 
doubti but there is no reason to be sanguine. 
Approval by just one more state might make 
Congress nervous enough to go ahead with 
an amendment of its own. 

Desirable as budget control may be. the 
answer is not to add some wishful paragraphs 
to the Constitution. That document already 
puts the responsibility where it belongs: on 
the president and Congress. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR MARCH 1 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Avalanche Buries Idaho Town 
NEW YORK — The mining village of Mate, 
Idaho, was practically swept out of existence 
(on Feb. 27] by an avalanche; and it is feared 
that between 150 and 200 miners have per- 
ished. Details at present are meager, owing to. 
the fact that a raging blizzard has rendered it 
impossible for rescue parties to any 
headway. According to stories obtained from 
survivors, the town was overwhelmed while the 
inhabitants were asleep, and thousands of tons 
of snow and ice swept down the mountainside 
with such little warning that all the more 
exposed houses were obliterated before those 
inside could escape. Several freight cars which 
were Standing on a siding on the outskirts Of 
the village were buried in the masses of snow, 
and of the fifty men known to have been 
sleeping in them not one escaped. 


1935: .Another Depression in 1939? 
NEW YORK — “Inflation .Ahead — What to 
Do About It” is tbe title of a full -page newspa- 
per advertisement which appeared [on Feb. 28] 
from a pamphlet by William Kiplioger and 
Frederick Shdton giving advice to investors. 
Tbe authors supply a weekly private news 
letter to subscribers. The pamphlet says: “In- 
flation is coming because of a long accumula- 
tion of causes, circumstances, conditions and 
incidents. The gold clause decision merely re- 
moves one of the previous doubts concerning 
the steady inarch toward inflation. Congress is 
even more inflationary” It predicts there will 
be tittle currency inflation, but a big-scale 
credit inflation starting in 1935 and increasing 
in 1936. "There may be danger ahead in 1939 
or 1940.” the pamphlet concludes, “a reaction 
from the inflation and another depression.” 


U.S. and New Zealand: 
Friends, Not as Before 

By William S afire 

H ONOLULU — Russ Cohnnbo, which ship contains what big bong- 
ihe crooner who captured era When New Zealand dosed its 
American hearts before there were ports to tbe United States and told 
any Grammy Awards, made popular UJS. ships to sail away, Americans 
a 1930s song that expressed the poi- took offense, 
gnant change of a relationship: Prime Minister David rj»nge, re- 

“Frieuds. Lowers No More.” porting on a meeting with a U.S. 

That has become the theme song of diplomat in Los Angeles, said: “They 





Building a framework for peace in the Middle East, 


That has become the theme song of diplomat in Los Angeles, said: “They 
New Zealand and the United States, [American officials] are going to stop, 
in one of those tiule episodes in bilateral defense exposing with New. 
the relations between nations that Ze aland , cut off some intelligence, 
illustrates tbe nature of alliances mostly of the raw military type, and 
around the weald. there would be in that respect an end 

The facts of the affair are not in to oar defense relationship." He was 
dispute. New Zealand, a pastoral unimpressed by this UJL response, 
land, has an a verson to au things saying: “That’s heavy, we can cut it.” 
nuclear. Recently it told the United Why the fuss? Are Americans over- 
states that it would refuse to enter- reacting to the nuclear fears of a 
tain U.S. Navy ships in its waters democratic nation that shares their 
unless assured thai dve warships con- language and f Ought valiantly cm the 
rained ao nnrUmr weapons. U.S. tide in World War H. and that 

UJS. policy, eminently sensible, is now produces nice people and deli- 
not to teQ anyone — friend or foe — dons Is 


Nicaragua: Reagan’s Pressure Was IBrTimed 


W ASHINGTON — Achieving 
peace through the application 
of pressure requires a sure sense of 
tuning. For at the moment of maxi- 
mum leverage, a deal has to be cut 
and the chips cashed in. 

Nicaragua has recently come from 
and center again because tbe Reagan 
administration missed the moment to 
strike a bargain. Now it seeks to 
spread the blame for failure to the 
Congress and the Democrats. 

The time of maximum leverage, as 
high U.S. officials acknowledge, was 
before the American presidential 
election. President Reagan was a 
nearly certain winner: the Sandinist 
regime was highly uncertain as to 
what actions he might take with his 
mandate renewed. Uncertainty bred 
caution, and caution induced moves 
to soften differences. 

To take the steam out of charges 
that they were following a Marxist- 
Lcninist takeover script, the Sandin- 
ists called their own national elec- 
tions for Nov. 4 — two days before 
the vote for the American president 
They endorsed the democratic princi- 
ples put forward by the Contadora 
countries; they even accepted a Con- 
tadora draft proposal for neutralizing 
Nicaragua against any foreign influ- 
ence. They also entered into formal 
bilateral talks with an American dip- 
lomatic delegation. 

The bilateral talks, held in Manza- 
nilla. Mexico, moved smoothly 
through right sessions, including one 
last November. At the December ses- 
sion, the Sandinists turned lough. 

The reason for that switch presents 
no mystery. The American people 
spoke, and what they said robbed 
Ronald Reagan of a credible military 
threat. In the course of the presiden- 
tial campaign, the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency, and its director. Wil- 
liam Casey, became increasingly 
controversial because of unautho- 
rized activities in Nicaragua. 

In the election, Mr. Reagan lost the 
House again and bandy hdd on in the 
Senate: New leaders of the Senate 
Intelligence Committee made it plain 
they would not favor continued sup- 
port for the "coven” anti-Sandinist 
effort. The United States sustained a 
propaganda Loss when it pulled out of 
a World Court case involving CIA- 
sponsored mining of Nicaraguan har- 
bors. More public relations damage 
was done when the United Stales 
suspended the Manzoniiia talks. 

The loss of leverage came home 
with a vengeance when the Congress 
went into regular session. It immedi- 


ately became clear there was no ma- 
jority for continued support of aid to 
the "contra” mercenaries. A sugges- 
tion that aid be made overt scared the 
daylights out of Honduras and Costa 
Rica — two countries friendly to the 
United States but exposed to Nicara- 
guan military pressure. In El Salva- 
dor. a right-wing resurgence suddenly 
turned political conditions sour for 
President Napoletin Duarte, the 
moderate leader the United States 
has been trying to sustain. 

In these conditions, the adminis- 
tration suddenly began to blare out 
its case on Nicaragua. President Rea- 
gan strongly implied he wanted the 
Sandinist government overthrown, 
and Ukenedthe contras to such “free- 
dom fighters" as Lafayette. Secretary 
of State George Shultz spoke of Nica- 
ragua slipping behind "the endless 
darkness of Communist tyranny.” 


By Joseph Kraft 

vas no ma- The wild, braying nature of those 


backera — the Soviet Union or Cuba 
— seems to have much stomach for 
new confrontation with the United 
States in Central America. 

But if it is relatively harmless to 


comments suggests their true pur- States in Central America, 
pose. The hope is to panic the Con- But if it is relatively harmless to 
gress into a continuation of support make threats without following 
for the mercenaries working against through in Central America, that j$ 
Nicaragua. Failing that, the broad- not tine everywhere. If the United 
sides win leave those who do not rally States talks tough in the Middle East 
round exposed to charges of being and then does nothing, friends in 
“soft on communism." Europe and the Gulf take sole and 

Odds are the tactic will not work, act accordingly. If Washington talks 
For tbe administration shows no dis- up democracy for the Philippines and 
position to put Americans into the South Korea, then smiles benevoknt- 
struggle, even with something as lira- iy on other authoritarian Talers, such 
ited as an air strike. With American regimes will get the message, 
lives not directly at stake, the Con- Most important, there is the Soviet 
gress is apt to stand behind apropos-- Union. If the Reqgan adnmistration 
al to keep U.S. involvement low. misses the moment for negotiation 


Not at all America's reaction to 
New Zealand’s selectivity in mutual 
defense sends a signal to every U.S. 
ally in the world: u yon are uncom- 
fortable with the requirements of de- 
fense, Americans win not quarrel 
with you — but you will have to 
defend yourself. Actions that make 
an alliance less useful to both parties 
must have consequences. 

If the United States had not taken . 
this unequivocal stand, the first ma-' . 


make threats without following jw in mutual defense would 

through in Central America, that » lave, been m Japan, where public 

not true everywhere. If the United 

States talks tough in the Middle East America’s reaction 

and then does nothing, friends in 

Europe and the Gulf take sole and sends CL Signal lO every 

act accordingly. If Washington talks _ _ _ . _ .jf 

up democracy for the Philippines and t/A Olfy HI the WOrtO. 


No very bad consequences are like- with Moscow, if it ov 
ly to follow congressional inaction, vantage; if it refuses to 


ys its ad- 
yes for an 


The Sandinists are under a lot of answer, the Russians can lower tirdr 
economic pressure. They will have a bayonets in die Arctic night and 


hard time escalating conflict by 
Lhemselves. Neither of their mqor 


make life miserable for all 
Las Angela Times Syndicate. 


A Refreshing End to U.S. Hypocrisy 


By Ronald Steel 

W ASHINGTON — At last. Pres- 
ident Reagan has made it offi- 
cial As he told the nation last week, 
he wants the government of Nicara- 
gua to “say uncle” and surrender to 
the U.S. -supported guerrillas trying 
to overthrow iL 

This is a refreshing admission. It 
removes a veil of hypocrisy that was 
getting to be a joke. No longer need 
the administration say it is merely 
trying to “influence” the Sandinists 
to become more democratic. ‘No 
longer need it trv to funnel weapons 
la the “contras” under cover or the 
Central Intelligence Agency. 

Tbe president has been stymied for 
months because of congressional re- 
fusal to conduct a semi-secret war 
through the CIA. He is now appeal- 
ing to the public directly to support 
what he calls "freedom- fighters." 

His policy —based on the assump- 
tion that the United States has a right 
to overthrow an unfriendly govern- 
ment in the hemisphere — is a hai- 


pmsr c« 

Pis TRW 3 

CLKrfc? L 



o u 


<*% 


opinion is understandably repelled 
by atomic weaponry. U5. warships, 
which visit New Zealand only once 1 
every couple of mouths, visit Japan 
frequently; that nation’s wise pdicy 
is to turn a blind eye to the weaponry, 
preferring not to know what ts 
aboard. Japanese reporters have de- 
scended on New Zealand; had U-S. 
officials given an inch, Japan’s gov- 
ernment would have been forced to 
demand a yard. 

Thai would have triggered a reac- 
tion in Europe, where some members $ 
of the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation are unhappy with the deploy- 
ment of nodear missiles on theft soa. 

A US. concession to public opinion 
in New Zealand and Japan would 
surety have resulted in similar de- 
mands by skittish European coun- 
tries, and would have increased the 
pressure of the neutralist Greens par- 
ty on the West German government 

That is why the American attitude 
toward the New Zealand go-it-alone 
decision is so important. If ah ally 
chooses its own means of defense, 
and ceases to contribute to the mutu- 
al defense, it is no aflv. Its people wzH 


tbe doctrine enunciated by the late 
Leonid L Brezhnev, who vowed “fra- 
ternal assistance" to prevent East Eu- 
ropeans from rejecting the brotherly 
embrace of Soviet “socialism." 

“The strong do what they will the 


lowed one. It dates back to the age of weak suffer what they must," as the 
Manifest Destiny, when Secretary of Athenians told the hapless Melons 


% \\ vOv ~ 1 meraai rnaaons need sorter no pun- 

■ ■ j&hment, but that nation, if attacked; 

no^l^CT^h as a guarantee of US. 

'./ V\\\VN The episode raises some questions 

— *- — * in AnrencaH minds as wdL What has 

the United States been defending , 7 ^ 
cy from tbe president, one might at Zealand from, anyway? What is 
Iren hope for a M r** America getting in return for its nn-^ . 

tbe facts. Yet he seems HSssftdly na- gear umbrella protecting Japan? , 
aware that Congress has actually "by are & third of a nmuon Amcri- 
passed legislation protaTuting covert can “ Europe, 40 

U.S. aid to the Nicaraguan contras. S’ 8 ® 5 a ™ r M 

“I rhmlr that some of the proposals . Zeajanos willingness to cut j j . 


State Richard Otaey proudly de- 
clared. in 1395: “Today the United 
States is practically sovereign on this 
continent, and its fiat is Law upon the 
subjects to which it confines its inter- 
position.” It is also consistent with 


NATO Needs to Improve 
Its Public Relations Effort 

By Peter Corterier 

The an ter, a former West German minister of stale for foreign affairs, 
is a Bundestag member and president of the Atlantic Treaty Assmatton. 



B russels — nato’s rela- 
tionship with the public is not 
satisfactory. Opinion sunevs show 
that the credibility of the alliance's 
strategy is doubted by large sec- 
tions of the public. 

The 1983 debate on missile de- 
ployment showed that, quite apart 
from the anti-nuclear demonstra- 
tors. majorities in all deploying 
countries except Italy felt ’that 
deployment increased* the threat 
to the population. 

NATO's capacity w resist effec- 
tively under threat is doubted by 
sizable minorities. Its ability to re- 
pel an attack is doubled by 39 
percent of the British population 
and 40 percent of Belgians. 

Increases in defense spending 
are unpopular. The only European 
member country in which people 
who support a rise in military ap- 
propriation outnumber those* who 
oppose it is Norway, which has a 
common border with the Soviet 
Union. This is □ serious situation 
because budgets are voted by par- 
liaments that have to represent the 
suue of public opinion. The trans- 
Aiiactic debate on burden- sharing 
is therefore likelv to continue. 

One cause of this situation is 
failure of NATO’s information 
structure lo move with the times. 
As in the 19?0s and '60s, when 
there was a national consensus on 
NATO in most member countries. 
NATO's main correspondents ia 
member countries are voluntary 
organizations called the Atlantic 
Committees, federated in the Par- 
is-based Atlantic Treat”.- .Associa- 
tion. .As president of the ATA. 1 
would be Lhf Last to underestimate 
the role of voluntary bodies, but it 
L dear that they have limitations. 

In distributing information, they 
natural iv cater mainly to their 


members, who are already con- 
vinced of the need for the alliance, 
at tbe expense of the more crucial 
sections of the public who are uol 
F urthermore, their activity varies a 
great deal from country to country. 

NATO’s parliamentary wing, 
the North Atlantic Assembly, re- 
cently passed a recommendation to 
the NATO Council and to member 
governments that suggests a series 
of measures to change the NATO 
information structure by giving it 
a more dynamic form. 

There are many aspects to this 
recommendation, but the gist is 
that NATO should establish infor- 
mation offices in member coun- 
tries manned in such a way as to 
represent the main political ten- 
dencies and social groups in the 
countries. Liaison officers would 
be able to adapt NATO informa- 
tion to the requirements of each of 
these groups, by presenting it from 
different angles". The NATO strate- 
gy and policy could be adapted to 
the diverse heeds of each group, 
using terminology that would be 
readily understandable to each. 

Obviously, nothing con be done 
in the realm of defense against the 
stated desires of an elected govern- 
ment. For different rejsons. some 
member governments would object 
to the establishment of NATO in- 
formation offices. France, with its 
independent strategy, or Spain, 
which is still in a transitional peri- 
od as regards NATO, are exam- 
ples. The important thing is that 
these governments should not pre- 
vent others who fed differently 
from obtaining the benefits of a 
reformed system. The position or 
cb«sc governments at the NATO 
Courted should be based on soli- 
uxrity. both financial and political 

International Herald Tribune r " 


before annihilating than in the 4th 
century B.C But there is also a differ- 
ent tradition in American policy. 

It rests on tolerance aiul a belief 
that America should not try to im- 
pose its notions of the good life on 
other peoples by force. It rests also on 
the practical conviction that unless a 
country threatens the United States 
with serious harm, Americans should 
not gratuitously seek to barm iL It 
rests cm what the United States 
learned where it tried to set up gov- 
ernments it liked and then had to 
withdraw in embarrassment. And it 
rests, finally, on the Charter of the 
Organization of American States, 
signed at Bogota in 1948, in which the 
United States solemnly agreed that 
“no state or group of states has the 
right to intervene, directly or indi- 
rectly. for any reason whatever, in the 
internal or external affairs of any 
other state.” 

Thai is fairly explicit. Yet Presi- 
dent Reagan pretends it does not 
exist. He wants the United States to 
force the Sandinists to bring the guer- 
rillas into their ranks. It might be well 
if they did, and thereby forged a 
government of national reconcilia- 
tion to end the fighting. That is not. 
however, the policy Mr. Reagan fa- 
vors in El Salvador. There he views 
any “power-sharing" with the guerril- 
las as tantamount to surrender. 

If one should sot expect causiszen- 


passed legislation prohibiting covert 
U-S. aid to the Nicaraguan contras. 
*T rhmlr that some of the proposals 
that have been made ia Congress 
have lacked a complete understand- 
ing of what we're trying to do," he 
replied when asked specifically about 
the Boland Amendment 

President Reagan seems to have 
made the overthrow of the Sandinists 
the great moral crusade of his second 
administ ration. He justifies this on 
the grounds that they are “totalitar- 
ian, brutal and crud.” 

So they may well he. But that is not 
the point. The world is Coll of such 
regimes, some of them supported by 
the United States. How about dona 
for totalitarian, Chile fox brutal. 
South Africa for cruel? 

The real question is: Do the San- 
dinists threaten the United States? 
President Reagan has not even begun 
to nrakfr a tremble case that they do. 
To deefare that they are nasty and 
on fri endly is not good enough. That 
is no better than the argument the 
Soviet Union uses to justify putting 
the screws on its helpless neighbors. 

The power to quash another gov- 
ernment merely because Americans 
dislike it does not give the United 
States the moral right to do so. Amer-. 
icons can afford tohoM themselves to 
higher standards than Moscow. 

The writer, a fellow at the Woodrow 
Wilson International Center for Schol- 
ars at the Smithsonian Institution, con 
tributed this comment to The Hew 
York Times. - 


it,” in both slang senses, reminds 
Americans of the need to re-examine 
periodically regional commitments 
everywhere. For too long Americans 
have viewed that alliances as good in 
themselves — as if the purpose of on 

alliance is to have an alliance. Too 

often, U.S. allies have taken, this con- 
tinued commitment to their security 
for granted and have shied from mak- 
ing comparable sacrifices to the cran- 
man defense. At the start of a new 
presidential term, with a new Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee in 
place, the time is right to take a new 
and critical look at age-encrusted 
guarantees to others in die light erf 
America’s national interest today. 

The message to New Zealanders, 
and to every -aDy that thinks an 
American commitment is . a one-way 
street, or subject to unilateral revi- 
sion to appease local neutralists, 
should be dear. We can stiff r emain 
breads, even if military allies no 
more. Friends, as Russ Colombo 
sang, but not as before. 

The New York Tones. 

Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed "Letters to the 
Editor" end most contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and fall ad- 
dress. Letters shotdd be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Help the ‘“Contras’ there ore also Miskito Indians, who 

r have bom terrorized by the present 

Regarding “Why US. Aid to Rebels regime. A large part of the estimated 
in Nicaragua Must Stop" (Feb. 14) by 15,000 contras (the Somoza National 
Carlos Tunnerman Bemheim: Guard had 5,000 members) arc rfcwri 

Ambassador Bernhehn msAm* n*f- hirioned San d hris ts. 
erence to the opposition campaign of Does it not seem strange that for- 
Arraro Jose Cruz, the | »rff <jf press mer A mb assa d or CrazshooldptihBc- 
censorship and other points that' ly state, in Warigngtoa on Jan.-3, that 


United Skates. And not long ago we 
found Interior Minister TomSs Boige 
Martinez continuing his visits and 
consultations with Libya’s leader, 
MoamerQadhafi, m Tripoli. 

I urge continued open support to 
those forces that would restore the 


would lead readers to bdeewe that the 
Nicaraguan election was representa- 
tive of democracy at work. Nothing 
could be less true. 

Ask Pedro Joaquin Chamorro Jr. 
about his former newspaper. La 
Prensa. He recently pointed out dial 
“80 percent" ofhis artides were cen- 
sored. He, like Mr. Cruz, was in the 
forefront of opposition to tbe late 
General Somoza. The leaders of the 
revolution thought so much of Mr. 
Cruz they made trim ambassador to 
the U«>sd States. He leagued is 
1 9^ ]/Ha disgust with the future of his 
to b ring democracy to 
'tfcpeopie of Nicaragua. 

77k ‘'contras"' are not “remnants 
l * 1e National Guard of Sontoza." 
True, there are some Somozistas, but 


^ . . MAURICE SONNENBERG. 

The Sanoiztist Front has been using New York., 

last year’s questionable elections as a ' 
disguise to divert hrtrniatioaalaaen- HAI tflm. Toanht 
tkra from its real totalitarian armsT? 

Cfr that ‘^negotiations with the San- Regarding the report "Sihanouk 

dinists are to have any real effect. Holds Champame Party at Combo- 
there gfiflnM be no unuateral with- dud* (Feb. Iff by WUBttm Bnadgpc, ■ 
drawal of the U.S. aid to the armed Not until Frrnce SLinnair <h«k 
opposition"? hcrWestenirtalored suits and lives tn 

Tbe partem is all too famDIar. The foxholes, sifferisg tbe pain and hard - 
Russians and tbe Cabans look foe aii ships that only a wat-watry soldier 


Regarding the report " Sihanouk ; 
Holds Gummtmte Pony at Combo - 
dud* (Fib iff By WUEam Brmtigac, 

Not until^ Prince Shanoafc sheds 
las Westem-tagored suits and lives tn 


and rash in, add tins 
I million given the Si 


can understand, mD then: be any 


New ties are established with Iran 


bad; to their border. - ' 

A leader for a cause cannot damn 


and Libya. The Iranian prime minis - ' tbe positron nntff he suffers with Ms 
ter came roNiraiagua recently to pay poofsfe^ ant£a .toast cannot.be made 
Ins respects; he offered aid to save 'tmoiyBaofy te be«w 
Nicaragua from the usual Hairy cl . . .... BtD- BiEUK^ ■ 

fictional maladies caused by the - ; ‘Sfegapoie.* 







K * 


INTERNATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1985 

rageo 

I..-* 

' ' ' 




* [: By Clifford D. May • 

" lit, h . . New York Times Service 

rr '' Wijj plains _. AMBOVER,. Eduoaa — The 
h»n\ ( „ , L -'eta 7 ^tmec«ucw this northern Ethwpi- 


ws in Ethiopia: Bleak Future 

Shrinks, and Most Are Old, Youngor Infirm 


l ' S ’•hi, 


The Jews who are suD in Elhio- 

is fpass hots and drcsseii in ragt 
Africa’s draught has not struck 
is a tme-raora suae their partly wooded, moomamous 
s ai] , ^iSding with wooden shutters ova region as hard as it has hii further 
windows and a metal Star east From a strictly economic per- 
; David monnted on the roof. spective, their conation is not as 


P"ir 1 '," V ^>Mc r tv . _ 

'lii*!,,, ’ 11 ■* itirp,, 1 'diTbe rabbi, Amha Nigata, is an desperate as that of many imDimw 
1 Wi u ‘. hfedl* bearded man with hollow of other Ethiopians. 

S!., (0 'i'" 1 ‘'fficiai^jjedts and sad, earnest eyes. On Nevertheless. this fa a critical 
£ rday he wore a brown cape, a moment for Ethiopian Jews. Those 
‘ >i[[ JJJsJIte tuiban and tattered sandals iwe are mostly dd, young or 

ili... . 01 die rj he carried a fly. whisk fash- infirm. There appeal to be many 

' 

,;:i, iiip ri v, MH , k tel Jiifm^To his left was a dairy table 
v n mi- nT y) this ftiolaving a raenorah and Hebrew 

,i ‘.u ij- k . u ' s - vA-the wall above 
'iriim;,' l «e nutk^o letters from the chief rabbis of 


Ethiopia enthusiastically welcome 
outsiders, especially other Jews, 
whom they seem to look upon as 


Gary 

New York, who visited die region 

5JSS asstsc 

it lit as. . "ortoiL.^iwTsand vears in northwestern 


tom, shalom," fa the invari- 
able greeting, accompanied by 
modi pumping of hands, smiting 
and curious staring at people wbo 
to them, weD, just don’t look Jew- 
ish. 

They are careful about what they 
say in from of the ever-present gov- 
ernment officials and armed mQi- 
lia, a caution not particular to this 
more women than men among Ethiopian community. Even so, bc- 

fore long, many reveal that their 
it won t be viable community dream is to go to load. It fa a desire 
for verv long." said Representative that does not necessarily tt*m from 
Ackerman, a Democrat of any bitterness toward Ethiopia or 


t 

mm yeas in northwestern 

fi.«, h I ln .£* nice not far from the source of 

N.,1 ", BhreNik:, are indeed of Jewish 

Nr W ?^i a , 'tticnci, wJ “d 


tU-fon^ ' ^ni^liere are now 300 fanuly heads 
,ill\ in ,k . d> ? Sena] h re in Ambover who are of Beta 
’•>11.114. »„K l ? If Rabbi Ahma said using a 
(enn- \„ ^ ^wihLin meaning House of Israel to 

unh \ . U K TK ? IU aiQscribe the Ethiopian Jews, 
defend V0 T 5“ >w used to be many more.” 

•m .liluiuv ’ -^taoJOffiaali say there are^probahly 
must h.i\,. “^ul logout 7,000 Jcws ttiH in Ethiopia, 

If (he i *st of then in 40 or so scattered 

iIik uncum, ^, lt! tefages Hke Ambover, which lies 20 
i-’r er.flfcL fries (32 kflometos) south of the 

\\.w e h_,._ n ‘"“tvaifey <rf Goodar in Gondar region, 

___ ,n J =pan. ijthe northwest. — 

. ~ fa estimated that as of nrid- 

^Merica'gftto^bniaiy, there were 3JXX) EAio- 
, _ Jews in the Sudan, and that 

sends a $igftd uflO rootc have died mere. More 
/ • o „ ; 10,000 are said to have emi- 

1 °*n‘ in fftifeiud to Israel in iieoent months, 

nmg several thousand wbo ean- 

> -.Uvmu- ueajyy,^ 

i,,uh vimi New Zeai ; 

«ft4uemly. that n aUt S3 
* •«' turn a blind eve ic^ ’ 

■referring nm t 0 
bo.ird Japanese 
-cmkti on New Zea h2 
Nicuun given an iniU^ 1 - Ream 

ZTl W ' ,ul ^ ha ' e ^MOSCOW — Preadeat Kon- 
n , J mtinU. Chernenko made his sec- 

n «oulJ hjveing^pobiicq^carance in five days 
: “' Lu T- Inursday. But he appeared 4, 
be North AiUniKTrife md bnafldess m pictures.. pp^-n^v , 
lion are unhappv aiicown on the main evening televi- f „ n ^ tU 

vns of nuclear ^ broaifcasL tout Mi. Chernenko was frail ratb- 


Rabbi Nigaia was asked about 
those who left He glanced furtively 
at a government official who was 
standing next to him, then spread 
his hands, palms up, inaaesuire erf 
helpless puzzlement "locy have 
gone toward the west," he said. 

Toward the west fa Sndan, where 
refugee camps recently served as 
way-stations for thonsands of Ethi- 
opian Jews who were then flown to 
Israel — a land that, for the Jewish 
refugees, hovers somewhere be- 
tween a people’s dimly remem- 
bered past and a hazily imagined 
future. 

Publicity about the airlift, code- 
named Operation Moses by the Is- 
raelis, lea to its canoe&atkm in ear- 
ly January. The Belgian ai rline ihar 
bad been ferrying the Ethiopians 
from Sudan far several months 
halted its flights. The wait proved 
fatal for many. 

The Jews who stayed behind in 


even toward the Marxist govern- 
ment that came to power here 11 
years ago. 

_ The Ethiopian Ministry of For- 
eign Affairs has riwnnnnryri the Is- 
raeli airlift as an “abduction," de- 
nied that tire people who were 
flown out were Jewish and de- 
manded their “immediate repatria- 
tion” to Ethiopia. 

The Ethiopian Jews refer to 
themselves as Beta Israel but are 
sometimes called Falashas. That 
word, which means stranger in Am^ 
baric, fa considered derogatory by 
the Ethiopian Jews. 

History has not dearly estab- 
lished what brought these people to 
the Horn of Africa. Once a thriving 
culture with longs, queens and a 
population that may have been 
more than a million, ihay began tO 
lose their power and freedom in the 
13th century. Their land was con- 
fiscated. Some were forced to con- 
vert; others were enslaved or killed. 
By the 18th century no mare than 
230,000 Ethiopian Jews were lcfL 

In 1930, when Haile Selassie be- 



Vietnam Lost Credibility 
In Cambodia Offensive, 
U.S. Official Contends 


TW New Y«t T«n 

David Saperstem, center, a representative of the Union of American Hebrew Congrega- 
tions, reading from Hebrew books with Ethiopian Jews in the Ethiopian village of Wafiaga. 


came emperor, only about 50.000 
Ethiopian Jews survived. During 
his reign, despite dose relations 
with Israel — winch until the mid- 
1970s did not officially recognize 
the Ethiopian Jews as Jews — their 
plight grew worse. 

By the time of Haile Selassie's 
overthrow in September 1974, the 
Jews in Ethiopia numbered a mere 
25,000. The revolution and the new 
government of Lieutenant Colonel 
Mengistu Haile Mariam eased 
some of their problems but created 
others. Although they were given 
acreage to work — all Ethiopian 
land now belongs to the govern- 


ment — the teaching of Hebrew 
was banned. 

The previous governor of Gon- 
dar was widdy regarded as antago- 
nistic toward them and there were 
complaints of brutality and even 
torture during his admmfatratioo. 
Since Wegaydiu Sahalu became 
governor a year and a half ago, 
however, such overt persecution is 
reportedly far less finmnvm. 

■ Mengistu Seeks More Aid 

Ethiopia continues to suffer a 
critical shortage of food. Colonel 
Meng&u sard Wednesday in an 
interview televised in Canada and 


reported by United Press Interna- 
tional. 

Colonel Mengistu told the Cana- 
dian Broadcasting Corp. in Addis 
Ababa that while extensive interna- 
tional aid to Ethiopia undoubtedly 
has saved lives, it has not been 
enough. 

“Overall, the international assis- 
tance has only been enough to give 
the people tittle crumbs of food,” 
be said. 

Colonel Mengistu also said that 
the airlift of Ethiopian Jews to Isra- 
el was “illegal and indirect slavery 
of people.” 




Chernenko Reported 


: of v f 

f f Cii-'yl ' 


** • * 


members of the ruling Politburo in 
which they praised his charariw 
and activities. 

Western diplomats said that the 
television film and Thursday’s re- 
pented ceremony were cvulence 


tonccvMitn iowMl Quemeuko, 73, supported 

Nov Zc.ll.ind Jill! b-mcflf yifh htclrfl liatiri on a chair 

h.iw resulted oddc.as.lre was presented with his 

j:hV- h\ skilti^h Em»wfw!titth « a par Hanwntar y 

* - v .uni uiuilJ hjiea^aflerregionu elections Sunday. 
v.-.MiK o' the neutrilafcHe, uttered a few breathless 
■ •n ilio West Cremun ejrds of thnr\te to local party offi- 
1 li.ii \- w h\ die Ameails from his Moscow coustituec- 
•i.nti ilie New ZahW bot was undbie to. let go of his 
iT.ii >n !% impnrtimpport to receive* bouquet of red 
it- own maibowos. His persanataide, Victor 
.i.i-.s.i-N i.'u.ntnhuKrabytkov, came forward to take 
ii i- lu* alh.lcpan. - ••• 

mi I S i n-.-n d-.hip aMri. Qcfucukq, looking pale 
r« i.i! u-ijiN’n 1 - m-cd mfiid unsteady; made * oue-minote 
tui-.u.l'iii ih.ii iuiha.rtesifakm appearance Sunday in 
;.-ny«i h i' ,i pmaalndi he wassem casting his ballot 
it.-.r\ .jid the riectiom. Thai was his first 

Hu- i.nx> Mw/pcaranbempublicfljiceDec.27. 

'Vmtil? Suil^bwW'or o^ScSions and was 
x /iTjtjnd fr.ini. snwsWidy adcnowledged bythean- 
v.'kd* ^•ttir.giniBiiS™*' to be unwdL Western 


er than dose to death and were 
designed to present him as still in 
c omman d. 

After Mir. Chernenko failed to 
attend a scheduled nyyring with 
Prime Minister Andreas rapan- 
dreou of Greece on Feb. 12, reports 
spread in Moscow that he had suf- 
fered a heart attack or a stroke. 

Some Western officials say that 
Mr. Chernenko’s emphysema may 
have been complicated by a rela- 
tively mild winter attack of pneu- 
monia: rather than a major illness. 

■ Message to Americans 

A call for peace from 14 disabled 
American veterans has prompted a 
personal response from Mr. Cher- 
nenko, who said he shares their 
desire “to stop the madness of the 
arms race;” United Press Interna- 
tional repotted Wednesday from 



Mandela Associate 
Freed by Pretoria 
And Flies to Israel 


By Jim Mann 

Los Angela Tuna Service 

BEIJING — Vietnam has suf- 
fered a “substantial propaganda 
defeat" because of its recent mili- 
tary offensive against Cambodian 
guerrillas near the Cambodia-Thai- 
land border, a high-ranking U.S. 
diplomat has said here. 

Paul D. Wolfowiiz, assistant sec- 
retary of stave for East Arias af- 
fairs, said Wednesday that al- 
though the drive by Vietnamese 
forces has deprived the resistance 
groups of thetr territorial foothold 
inside Cambodia, the action has 
been a propaganda defeat for Viet- 
nam because it undercut Hanoi's 
claim that its troops are in Cambo- 
dia only to prevent the Khmer 
Rouge from regaining power. 

The Khmer Rouge, a Commu- 
nist faction that governed Cambo- 
dia under Pol Pot From 1973 until 
1979. was driven from Phnom Penh 
shortly after Vietnamese forces in- 
vaded in late 1978 and set up a 
puppet regime 

Blamed for widespread atrocities 
during its time in power, the 
Khmer Rouge is one of three 
groups in the present coalition of 
Cambodian resistance forces. A 
second faction fa headed by Prince 
Norodom Sihanouk and the third fa 
the Khmer People's National Lib- 
eration Front. 

Mr. Wolfowitz said that Viet- 
nam's military action near the Thai 
border has demonstrated that its 
purpose was not merely to counter 
the Khmer Rouge but also to pre- 
vent the development of the other 
two factions, which he termed the 
“noo-Communist resistance” 

Mr. Wolfowitz said that the 
United 'States was not providing 
wea pons of any kind to the resis- 
tance groups. Furthermore, he said, 
“We do not provide any assistance 
of any kind to the Khmer Rouge, 
wbose atrocities we abhor.” 

He said that to cany out the 
recent offensive, Vietnam was re- 
quired to bring two additional 
army divisions into Cambodia. 
After six years in Cambodia, 


Wahinpon Pen Service 

JOHANNESBURG — South 
Africa’s longest serving white polit- 
ical prisoner, Dennis Goldberg, 
was released Thursday after serv- 
ing 21 years of a life sentence for they are still facing enormous prob- 
jouting with African nationalists in fams there,” be said, 
plotting the overthrow of the coon- The assistant secretary held two 

try’s system of white minority rule, days nf nwninp with Chinese pofi- 
Mr. Goldberg, 31, was released 
on condition that be leave the 
country. He later flew to Israel 
where he was to join a daughter. 

Hillary, who lives on a kibbutz. 


comakers, including Foreign Min- 
ister Wu Xueqian. 

On Jan. 29, Mr. Wu held out the 
possibility that China might take 
militaiy action against Vietnam, as 
U did in 1979. Mr. Wolfowitz. was 
asked what the UJ5. attitude would 
be if China did so, and he replied 
that the United States would take 
no position. 

“That’s a matter between China 
and Vietnam,” he said 

Mr. Wolfowiiz said that he 
sought to explain the U.S. position 
in the dispute with New Zealand 
over port calls by Navy warships. 
New Zealand has refused to let 
US. ships stop at its ports unless il 
can be assured the ships do not 
carry nuclear weapons. 

“H fa not oor policy to punish 
New Z ealan d," Mr. Wolfowitz 
said. 

■ Hanoi Reports Chinese Raids 

Vietnam said Wednesday that 
China rejected a proposal for a 
cease-fire during the lunar New 
Year and insteaa attacked five bor- 
der provinces with anilkry and 
ground forces. The Associated 
Press reported from Bangkok. 

The Vietnam News Agency, 
monitored in Bangkok, reported 
that at least 24 people were kille d 
and 44 wounded in attacks by Chi- 
na between Jan. 16 and Feb.' 26. 

China, in turn, has accused Viet- 
nam of artillery and ground attacks 
during the proposed truce. 


Internist Chief Named 
Soviet Envoy to Japan 

UmcdPras hammonal 

MOSCOW — Pyotr A. Abrosi- 
mov. head of the Soviet state travel 
bureau Intourist and a member of 
the Communist Party Central 
Committee, has been appointed as 
the Soviet ambassador to Japan, 
Fravda reported Thursday. 

Mr. Abrasimov. 73, fa' a career 
diplomat who served as ambassa- 
dor to Poland and East Germany 
before taking over the Internist 
post several years ago. He replaces 
Vladimir Pavlov, who will be trans- 
ferred to an unspecified post. 
Pravda said. 


Konstantin U. Chernenko is drown greeting election officials of Moscow’s Kuibyshev 
district Tass said the photograph was taken Thursday, when the Soviet leader was 
presented with Ins credentials as a parliamentary deputy following Sunday’s elections. 


ir u hi It. Hi pr.>fME*dkal experts diagnose Mr. ™““, d°\i » 

tuv'p- -Mir.-niii uifcoa, a resniraiozy complaint. Victor Isakov, an official at the 

•• jiu-i ihutt.ir” During hfafflness, Soviet news Soviet Embassy in Washington, dc- 
i-ii /c il.m.1% uillincgamzations kept Mr. Chemen- livered Mr. Chernenko’s 
h.*ih 'I jia' jmP profit to the fore, poWfafainga 
- K i he nrtd if [page of statements in Us name 

Mi icch'iu! ^ reporting speeches by other 
1 u }|.-| * I'M I** 1 “ T — • . • 

lhcirjHua V — — 

- J' if ^ K. WQH UPWTOE 

r i.. h.ntf 3D ^pMnBXAlNIIlKNT 

l s jlhi-s Iuh-uMF". . 

^iininiink'nl t»'“% 


in person Wednesday, saying 
had been tdd to do so as a gesture 
of respect for veterans wbo fought 


with SovieUroops in World War IL 
Hie 14 men, who live at the 
Michigan Veterans* Facility, wrote 
to Mr. Chernenko and Resident 
Ronald Reagan in January, calling 
for negotiations to end the threat erf 
nuclear war. Mr. Reagan has not 
replied. 


“The descendants of the soldiers 
who met and embraced at the Elbe 
River can no longer be enemies,” 
the veterans told Mr. Chernenko. 

Mr. Chernenko said the two 
world powers should unite as they 
did in World War II to “remove the 
war danger hovering over the peo- 


ple and to stop the madness of the 
arms race." 

He said: “I completely share 
your view and I will say even more 
— this happens to be our debt to 
those who struggled hand-in-hand 
against the forces of evil and tyran- 
ny." 


Mr. Goldbog, a one-time Com- 
munist, is the Inst member of the 
imprisoned l eadership of the un- 
derground African National Con- 
gress to break ranks and accept a 
conditional offer of release made 
by President Pieter W. Botha earli- 
er this month. 

The leader of the organization. 
Nelson Mandela, 66, spurned the 
offer two weeks ago. 

Sources dose to the African Na- 
tional Congress said Thursday that 
Mr. Goldberg’s acceptance of the 
offer would cause consternation in 
the black underground. 






Beverly Wilshine Hotel 

IN THE HEART OF LOS ANGELES 
Wi Is hire Boulevard at Rodeo Drive 
Beverly Hills. Calif. 90212 
(213)275-4282 Telex 698-220 


ybtffgsdiafHDleisafihtWbrldQ 

London (01) 583-3050 
Frankfurt (069) 29 04 71 
Hon* Kong (5)2211 42 



London (01) 409-0814 
FrankfUrt (069) 28 75 24 
Hong Kong (3) 68 23 35 


rducJfvi. 


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PARIS Fi?fiNCE 


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North Korea Submarine Said to Sink 

raise the sub. “But we don’t see any 

1 W. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — North Ko- 
rea lost a submarine and its entire 
crew last week, the United States 
believes, but U.S. intelligence offi- 
cials have refused to discuss their 
analysis, a Pentagon official said 
Thursday. 

The official who insisted on an- 
onymity, said the submarine appar- 
ently sank Feb. 20 off the North 
Korean coast with all hands 
aboard. 

He confirmed that there was evi- 
dence of Soviet and North Korean 
ships having tried to locate and 


for survivors now,” he said, 
official said that North Ko- 
rea did not have nuclear- powered 
submarines, “and the diesel subs 
don’rhave enough air to stay down 
tins long.” 

The source refused to say what 
type of submarine was involved or 
bow many sailors woe thought to 
have been aboard. 

Michael L Burch, UK assistant 
secretary of defense for public af- 
fairs, declined to take questions on 
the incident Thursday, saying: “I 
can’t touch that one now. 


SC/ 

|H A N N E L 


BROADCASTING TO CARE CDMMMES 
IN EUROPE ft THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


PROGRAM. FRIDAY Itt MARCH 

UK TIMES T3J6 THE B L AND OF NEVAWUZ 
USB FRED BASSETT 
14230 NBVANBiAL WORLD 
11QO SKYTRAX1 
li45 SXYTRAX2 

woo skytraxs 

17 J0 MR H> 

1&0J THE LUCY SHOW 
18J0 . UORK4MWUY 
1SL20 STAB3XY & HUTCH 
20.10 THE NSW CANOIOCAICRA 

2QJS WAYNE A SHUSTER 

21 JS THE DEADLY ERNEST HORROR SHOW 
2235 SKYTRAX 

[ CONiaCT SKY CHANNEL SATCUJTE TELEVISION RjC FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
TELEPHONE LONDON (01) 636 4077 TEl£X 266943 



; ■r.r.inmd' 


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far and away 
tb? best nude revue 
in the universe " 


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WITH 

THE DORIS5 GIRLS 
* 


mm 


■ R HI INFORMATION 

™SE CAU MONTE-CARLO 

(93) S0.6S.00 


WORLDWIDE ENTERTAINMENT 


y.O. - GAUMDNT CHAMPS ELYSEES, CAUMONT LES HALLES, SAINT GERMAIN STUDIO, UGC DANTON, 
14 JUILLET BEAUGRENELLE, MONTPARNASSE BIEN VENUE. 


7 


ACADEMY AWARD 

NOMINATIONS 

including 

BEST PICTURE 
BEST DIRECTOR 

Robert Benton 

BEST ACTRESS 
Sally Field 




SALLY FIELD. 


PLACES IN THE HEART 


Tricar Pictures Preserts^ -SALLY FELD-TLACES N THE HEART - UNESSf CROUSE -ED HARRIS • AMY MADIGAN 
JOHN MALKWICH^ -CANNY GLOVER^ -Ecfiled by CAROL UTTLETOH ACE- Director trf Photography NESTOAlMENDIWaASC 
EsecuiivE Producer MICHAEL HAUSMAN ■ Pitxfcjced by ARLENE DGNCWU4 

Written and Directed ty ROBERT BENTUN „ 


*nUnRRDCME 


DiTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 



OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 

Your own vacation land on the fabulous Lake of the Oz&xks tn Central 
Wssourt. Right In the heartland of America. Away from cities, noise. 
poQufion and the rat-race of the workaday world 
Forbes Inc. publishers of Forbes Magazine, through Its subsidiary. 
Sangre de Cristo Ranches Inc. Is offering the opportunity of a lifetime for 
you to acquire one or more acres of our choice Missouri lakeland. 

There's no better time than right now to find out if Fotbes Lake of the 
Ozarks is the place for jreu. A! our homesiies. mdodlng lake fronrand lake 
view, will be a minimum star of one acre— rangmg to over three acres. 
Cash prices start at $6,000. One or more acres of this incredibly beautiful 
lakdand can be youn for die modest payment of $60 per month, with 
easy credit terms available. 

For complete Information, inducting pictures, maps and full details 
on our Bberal money-back and exchange privileges, please write to: 
Forbes Europe Inc, Dept H. P.O. Box 86. London SW1 1 3UT England 
Obtain the Property Report reqinreo by Federal law ana reW U before 
pgning enjVuig No Federal agercy has indoeo me meras o> value, if any. 

naHouM “ 


Ol this property. 


ana Housng Opporiimry. 



a Mumncenr mm n cmrouiE sesidqibe 

RS>tACEM0<rr COST $5,000,000 

SAOOHCEPHCE *1^00000 


■■ jwwiiiowunir nmnb wiaj wumun ano uarir s*r in mm 
ohaacm of custom lan«auHnfcSrt*cf»d stone, woods and Blass new 

beenhormo otousty MenQgO to ochleve □ lecitnyBlawclousneis. npht 

and prhmey. thirty nwrc, eleven troths, three car mtom, aym, tow 

pqoH. steam room, nurih servants auorrers ond oafooetn to poN 

cowot^moonjinart lemfor entertairUna, conPuctlna pudnass or 

wwhm l ty. Privat e sate. Weekdays (212) M4-TO* 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 
COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 
EV BRITAIN 

wffl appear on April 25 


For 


i contact: 


international Herald Tribtme, 
63 Long Am, London WC2E9JH. 
TeU 01-8364802, Telex: 262009 
or yonr nearest BIT Tepresentadsx. 


Global Vision 

As the largest full service 
real estate firm In Texas 
and the southwestern U.S., 
we provide expertise in 
property acquisitions and 
management. 


Please note specific interest 
in request to 


HENRY S. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS* 

David Donosky> CEO 
Corporate Headquarters: 
2001 Bryan Tower 
Danas. Texas 75201 
214/740-9171 latex 732459 

The DrMng Force In leas Hen Estate. 
PBnnam In Service wtt! GnjfrP & EBa 


ON THE BEACH 

SOUTYffltN CALIFORNIA 

This lOJOOO aq. ft. Mtfimown VBa V 

InoStfln Sonlo Monioo on wte ond 

irmt boouflU baach in SomtMnn CaSfer- 

nia. Datimd by ranawnad rxdiMact, PoJ 
WB&ams, Ms full taairily homa has high, 
baomad caBnar In Gving room, dlnma 
room, oooon room. Tha kago morior ba» i 
room wito has firepiaa ana hk and hen 
n ote bmhroop*. Hw» o dctecnol bed- 
room* will iul baitmom, ImMr/pImiw 
oom ond ptojadion booh, icdudado ffi co 
tuba end wwfahop on third floor wVi 1 
mopriSc ort ISO* pranerme vi#w of tfw 
oooon, l*o *arvr»4i rooms wkfr frjfl bah 
Swimming pod. Enjoy fho privacy of I 
booth fiviig aid #» conmnienco of bdha 
210 minutes driving tiaw to Los Angola^ 
bos An g s t o s Arpmt, or Bovoriy HWl 
tlASQUDML 

For mom information and 
a pictorial btodutre, plane contact 
WHom i. Xaly Jr. (Zt3) 826-452) 
11942 Son Vkanto Blvd. 
UoAngohs,CA 90049. 


siuiTiininiiitHiiuiiHHnuiiniiftiuiniiic 

= DREAM VACATION = 

| it the feet ot = 

I^Lefl Bans de Pravence ,, = 

S i die bean of dw efranmag village ofS 
borrieDe rot an exclusive renovated = 
siMi century ofa-aiUL Bern bvine. rv-= 
Sceptkm mo dirnng. entirely funiabds 
S fc i lHim . 4 bedrooms with bub, pha 


Dowered somh oriented, i 
S*d ranees. 3-c*r gsage. (Byi 
swiinmg pool sod vnn» couna vc 
Iren. rMance. Housekeeper. 

For details arise or phone ok 

S MPL306Ri» Vswieridnd« 
B - 1050 Bnmoets. 


tniKE 


S 









rage b 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 

1278*5 

13X132 1271*2 1284*1 + 

S3 

Tram 


616.96 

624J4 

43098 — 

urn 

147*3 

149*0 

147.16 

VOLTS + 

0*7 

Coma 

521*3 

526*1 

518.17 

523*7 + 

0*8 


23% 1Mb AAR R U It 8 21% >1 21 — * 

23% 9% AGS 11 133 ISM 15 15—16 

IB Vi 11 AMCA 8 life 11% 111b— lb 

77* 13tb AMF *0 ID 38 381 1Mb 1Mb 1Mb + H 
<1 24% AMR 10 »11 411b 40% 41% +1 

20% 18% AMR JR lit MU 29 20% 301b 3B1b 

» mAMRnl 2*710* * 29 

23 1? AN R erf 112 1U I 21' 

1Mb 81b APL 3 MW 

69% 444b ASA 280 O 508 *7 

27 14 AVX *2 U 75 322 24' 

49 3Mb AMLob 1J0 IS 14 2008 48 

251b 16% AccoWdS 44 14 T9 IB 24 

231b 1Z% AanaC 40 12 84 18 

1M 8% AaTWE J2b 12 12 4 V 


171b 15 AIM Ex 11 1012.7 
20 Ilth AdmMI -33 14 

79% B% AflvSvs 811 48 

411b 259b AMO 

121b 4?b ArtvBSt .12 1.1 

14% Mb AOrfHM 


121b 41b ArtvBSt .12 1.1 188 101b 10% 1Mb— 1b 

14% Bib AOTfMsc 13 127 131b 13% 131b 

42H 271b AotnLf 244 U 40 1576 411b 41 41«b + lb 

5Mb S2% AotLpf 587olU 39 55% S3% 55%— lb 

321b 151b Ahmns 180 43 16 1809 28 27% 28 + % 

41b 2% Alleen 30 135 M 3 3 

51 38 AJrPrt 180 2 4 11 224 49% 999b 494b— 14 

241b 13 Af ittFrt JO ZS 13 205 3414 2324 24 

2 % AIMoas 25 » IK IK W 

32 26% AiaP PtA 3*3 12* 11 311b 3Mb 31 +14 

TVl 6 AMP (Mf 87 128 23 7% 7% 7ta + *6 

73% 61% AMP Of 9JM 124 lDz 70% 70% 70%— % 

102 8514 AMPpt 11-00 114 1002 95% 94% 94% 

13% 10% Atooscs 93 7,1 1 28 12% 12% 12% + % 

19% 9% AUkAIr .14 J 9 847 1914 18% 19% + % 

10% ABx-tDl 88 15 19 28 15 15 15 

22% A IbtOTS 48 22 13 879 30% 39% 30% + 14 

23% Atom 130 O II MO fl 27% 27% 

279b AtorSM 1 80 34 12 109 3S% 35% 35% + % 

17 AMxAU 14» 07 1740 H 24% 27 + % 

2Mb A lore dr 24 50 23% 23% 23% 


19% 9% AltbAIr .14 J 9 
14% 10% Alhrtas 88 28 19 
31% 22% A totals 48 28 13 
351b 23% Atom 180 <3 11 
36 279b AkoStd 180 34 12 

29 17 A7MAU 1*0 07 

28% 201b Atexdr 24 

89% 43% AIMC0 2*61 2.7 8 
26% 23 AfsCPBt 246 114 
28% 1814 AMIfd 140 5.7 
22% 1514 ATglnPf 2.19 114 
94% 81 AMI PfCllJS 120 
30% 24% AllgPw 270 90 8 
23% 15% AltalG 40b XI 13 
39% 2814 AlFdCuS 110 U I 
62% 53% AkJCc pf 6.74 188 
107 99 AMCppnUO 118 

107% 100% AI0C Pf 1209*121 
23% 10% AJktPd 


54% 38 AUdStr 212 09 92572 54% 54V. 54% + ta 

14% 5% AltoOi 114 714 7 714 + % 

37 24 aiuCpI 2 29 29 29 

27 20 ALLTL 104 7.1 8 70 26 25% 25%— % 

43 30% Alcoa 180 02 12 1990 37 36 37 + M 

27% 15% AmCDC 80 1.1 554 18% 17% 18% 

43% 32% Amax Sf 300 85 3 35% 3514 3614 +1 

34% 22% AmHH 1.10 29 14 2354 29% 28 25% — lb 

2% 114 AmAar TO 1% 1% 1% 

19% 15% ABabr II 24 19% WVb 19% 

47% S2% ABrcmd 150 5 3 9 BOB 4«6 67% 68% + % 

27% 24% ABrdpf 275 181 5 27% 27% 27% — 14 

67% S3 ABrdpf 2*7 X9 8 48 47% 674b— % 

7714 51% ABdcst 1*0 14 10 1596 66% 46% 66% + % 

25% 19% ABMM 06 3* 12 5 25 25 25 

2414 18% ABUSPr 04 25 U 220 25% » 25% +1 

55% 40% Am Can 290 58 11 374 51% SI 5114— % 


24% 2114 ACCMPf 200 119 4 23% 23% 23% 

X 36 A Can pf 308 47 15 45% 45 45 — 14 

19% TMb ACapBd 288 11* 42 19 18% 19 +14 

33% 25% AChpCv 696*219 27 30 29% 36 + % 

11% 6% A CenlC 13 13 9% 9% 9% 

56% 43% ACyon 1.90 X6 12 1333 52% 52% 52% + % 

29% 18% ADT 92 S 28 300 25%24%25%+M 
21% 15% AQPw 2860100 8 1964 20* 2D% 20* + ta 

43% 25 Am Exp 188 00154753 42% 42% 42% + 14 

30 14 AFamll 44bU 13 94 29% 20% 2B%— % 

3Mb 19% AGnCp 100 83 9 4219 30 29% 30 + % 

12 5% AGnl wt 401 12 11% 11%+% 

57 51% AGfll pfA 480*11* 200 55 55 55 

83% 58% Add pfB 590e 72 341 81 80% 81 + % 

62 40% AGnpfD 2*4 4* 447 60% 59 iff’* + % 

32 25% AHOTtt TOO 85 12 6 31% 31 21 

13% 7% AHotat 11 Mb 9% 9% 

58% 46% AHotrw 290 49 12 2399 58% 57% 58% +1% 

38 2614 AHom 1.12 U 10 2018 33% 33% 21% + % 

B3% 62% Amrtcti 600 70 8 1W 82% 01% Bl%— % 

73 50% AlnOrp M * 16 913 72% 71% 72% +1 

130 112% AIGppf 905 <7 75 125% 125 125%+% 

20% 18% AMU 82 80 14 729 23% 23% 21% + % 

6 314 Amlbtof 97 1169 3% 3% 3% + % 

5114 27% ANIRsb 282 4* 9 9435 5Mb 491* 49%— % 

43% 22% APrssId 94t 10 5 1279 42% 41% 41%— 1 


581* ATrUn SOS* 89 
26% Amoron 1*0 50 8 
17 AmasOs 80 * 19 

60 Amos of 532 5* 
21% AimM *0 20 15 
18% AmtOC 

10% Amfssc 5 

26% AMPs 92 22 U 
14% Amoco JO U 21 


13% 9 ASLFM 8 19 11% 11% 11%— 14 

18% 15 ASU=1pf2.1« 125 2 17% 17% 17% 

16 10 AShlp 00 55 16 124 14% 14% 14%+ % 

39% 22% AmStd 1*0 O 13 827 34 33% 34 + 14 

55 14 26% AraSfor *4 19 11 587 5414 32% 5414 +1% 
64 46% AStrotA 438 81 12 84 64 84 

56 51 AStrpfB 800 127 18 53% 53% 51% 

22% 14% AT&T IJ0 5* 1713029 211* 20% 21%+% 

37% 30% AT&T pf 1*4 100 173 38% 36 36%— % 

38 31% AT&Tpf 374 102 24 37 16% 36%— % 

44% 27% AWOfr •-■l 4* 7 126 45V4 444b 45 +% 

55% 35 AWOlpf 1*3 25 270e 57% 56% 57% +1% 

12 ID AWatpf 1-25 109 10b 11% 11% 11%— Vk 

12% 10 AWoSpf 195 10* 100X12 12 12 + % 

27% 20% AmHoH 248 9.1 11 109 2714 36% 2714 + 16 

68 53% ATrPr 535* BO 2 66% 68% 66%— % 

11% 4% ATrSC 69 HR4 10% 10% + 14 


38% 26% AMPs 72 22 U 155 

24 14% Amoco JO U 21 204 

21% 12% Aimws 8 5 

28% 19 AniMli 1*0 SJ B 23 

39 25% Ambled 1*0 U 13 177 

5% 1% Anaanp 542 

30% 1Mb AnataOS 19 47 

30% 1914 Anchor 1*8 6.1 1671 

30% 24% AnCknr 1-32 15 19 56 

12% 9% AndrGr JO 17 16 M 

23% 161* AnaeflC 56 27 12 173 


.. 28% 28% 28%+ 14 
338 26% 36 28% + 14 

157 11% fl% 11%— 1* 

5 

- 5 r 3K B£-% 

3814 37% 38% + % 
27% 27% 27% + % 


47 27% 27% 27%+ % 

1671 24% 24 24% + % 

38% 24% AnCknr 1-32 15 19 56 37% 36% 37% + % 

13% 9% AndrGr JO 17 16 M 12% 11% !1%— % 

23% 16% AnQSHc 56 27 12 173 20% 30% 20% + % 

78% 53% Anhvus 208 2* 10 1377 77% 77 77% — % 

57% 44 AldMU pf 3*0 84 250 56% 56% 56% + % 

23% 13% Anlxtr JB 15 22 579 18% 18% 1B%— % 

16% 8% AnflMfn O* J 13 28 15% 14% 15 

1514 10% Anttmy Mb 34 7 9 13% 13% 13%— % 

14% 9% APach* -28 35 11 329 11% II 11% + % 

3 % ApchPwt 92 1% 1% 1% 

19% 15% Apcfd* un200*11.1 158 18 17% 18, 

68 55% ApPwpf 8.12 13* 357K 65% 65% 49% 

59 50 ApPwpf 7*0 Ull nr 57 57 57 - % 

S ib 27% ApPwpf 4.18 U2 5 3T% 31% 31% 

% 21 ApPwpf 300 111 1 29 » » ^ 

39% 17% ApfDta 1.121 30 22 67 37% 36% 34%— % 

2114 8 APPWW EM* 85268 61 1|* 13% ljg* 

21% 15% Arch On .Mb 7 U 1357 19% 19% 79% + % 

22% M% ArfxPS 2*0 >23 6 710 21% 21 21%— % 

19% 23 ArtPpf 358 12J 15 38 27% 28 

17 79 ArtPpf 1070 llO Hffi 97.. 97. 97 +1.. 


1 % 1 % 1 % 
8 17% 18 

rsrr 

T% 31% 31% 

7% 36% 36% 
3% 13% 13% 


c- 

5*-% 

T9H+ % 


19% 23 ArtP pf 358 120 
17 79 ArtPpf 1070 HO 


21% 13% ArkBst 


299 22% 21% 21% — % 


24% 16 Artda 108 3.1 17 1040 21% 21 71%—% 

% % ArlnRf 160 % % +fc 


% % ArlnRf 

21% 9 Armen 
30% 18 Armcpf 2J0 100 
23% 15% ArmsRs *8 21 
38 22% ArmWIn 1J0 13 

35 mi ArmWpf 375 ML7 
34% 18% AroCP UD 17 
13% ArowE JO 1J 
njb 16 Aitra J2 1.1 
23% 14 Arvtns 
34% 17% Asarce 
3% 2Mb AshlOfl 1*0 U 
42% 33% AWlIOcf 450 107 
3WJ 31% AlhtO pf 356 103 
61% 45Vb AsdDG 260 45 
» » AMO Pf 475 i? 

35? ,B % AIM an* 1*0 7* 
«5% IWb AfCvEI 2*8 101 


160 % % +Hi 

1121 10% 10% 10% — % 
4 21 31% 21 

8 81 22% 22% 22% + % 

10 1889 37% 36% 36% + % 

4Br 35 35 25 +1 

8 61 33% 32% 32% — % 

8 377 16% 16 16% + % 

12 20% 19% 19%— % 

9 250 2Z% 22% 2214— % 

10*21 23 22% 22% 

169 28% 28% S% 

49 41% 41% 41% — % 

6V 38% 38% 3f%+ % 

9 980 50% 57% 5X%+ % 

49 99% 92% 90% +>% 

18 16 21% 21% 21% — % 
8 80 24% 24% 24%—% 


52% 40% An Rich 300 6* 21 2977 47% 46% 47% + % 

125 97 AHRcpf 200 53 2 112% 1 1 7% 112% 

10 11% AHasCP 38 14 13% 14 — % 

34% 18% Aupal J2 1J 20 97 27% 27% 27% 

4*%29%SSK>. ^3 1* » 743 «b « «-% 

25% 19% AVEMC * U 11 14 2614 39% 2614 + % 

J?% 23 Avery *0 1* 15 217* 37% 36% 36%- % 

15% 10 AvfaH n I 4 U ,4 * 2fi? — 

41 27 Avne! *0 M 15 805 34% OTb— % 

2»b 191* Avan 200 VO 10 M05 22% 2ZVb OTb- % 

3**b IB A yd In 10 30 34% 21% 24%— % 


NYSE Index 


High um om Ch'pe 
Comeoade 1 04.93 104J1 10473 +U7 

Industrials 171.16 120*5 131.16 +0*3 

Tronsu. 101.18 10009 101.11 —009 

UtilHMs 5136 5336 SX36 —003 

Finance 10877 108*3 HOLM +008 


■sdayS 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 




Advanosd 
Dad hied 
unchawed 
Total Issue* 
Now Hus 
now Laws 
volume up 
votume down 


% SI 

979 SJ 

ZED 255 

*? ”5 


Camposn* 

Industrials 

Ftnanca 


CM arw AW 

284.17 +006 a*n 
38*77 +0*1 W.M 
B&62.— 039 332.18 
32278 +082 mil 
261*6 +8*5 2*ftW 
MbM-IEn 25E1I 
2*5.10 +0122 367.12 


•T.r. 


Bay ' Satos "SUTt 

Feb. 37 185*07 447J79 1363 

Fab. 36 197.156 486*74 1477 

Feb. 35 ______ 199*76 492395 1340 

Feb. 22 175 . 9 B 6 434305 1712 

Feb. 31 18M13 489.9*9 29*57 

‘included In the soles figures 


VOi-Of 4 PA1 108320000 

Prev.4PJW.voL 187*98088 

Prev awundated dos« 138411020 

Tables hnclixfe the nationwide price* 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect kite trades else where. 


Standard & Poor^ index 


I n dust ria ls 

Transa. 

Utilities 

Finance 

CemaobiM 


HMfl LOW CMM C1TM 
202*7 201*7 202*8 +031 
16039 15907 199*6 — &59 
7835 7779 78M — 8.J5 
20.99 2085 02-98 +004 
181 J1 18833 181.18 +5*7 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages I 


AMEX Most Actives _ 

VM. HU Low List CM 

7XB 8% 814 8% — % 

IB 5147 26% 26% 26% — % 

d> 3098 214 2% 9b 

2816 3% 3% 3% —4b 

dl 2637 5% 4% 44b — % 

*tf T895 16% T5% W% + % 

6a i« *% 9% 9% 

no 1472 «Hb <3 43 «* 

*0 1281 17% 17% 17% — % 

A 064 8% 7% 8 — * 

EC 1164 40% 39% 39% — % 

el M04 Mb 24% 14% + % 


AMEX Stock Index I 

Man low aaM CNto 
217*4 22*00 227*0 +0J5 


U I 21% 21% Zita— % 
3 M KW 10% 10%— % 

43 508 47ta 46% 46% 

13 T5 322 24% 33% 24 + % 

23 14 2MB 48 47% 47% + % 

13 19 IB 24 23% 23% — % 

23 84 18% 18 18% + % 

U H 4 9% 9% 9%— % 

27 64 16% 16% 16% 

I* 8 23 19% 19% 19% 

*9 19 17 11% 11% 114b— % 

14 T43S 33% 22% 33ta + % 
1.1 188 10% 10% 104b— % 


20% 

I0U 

35% 

18% 

23% 

15 

24% 

18% 

796 

% 

a 

28% 

23% 

11% 

15% 


41% 

JOta 

44 

36% 

M 

20% 

5% 

3% 

62 

39ta 

47% 

29 

53% 

43 

41 

26V* 

26% 

U% 

71% 

M% 

52% 

40 

17% 

llUi 

32% 

22% 

46 

37% 

24% 

19% 

39 

X 

12*6 

7% 

33% 

19 

24% 

18 

49% 

32% 

33% 

19% 

13% 

B% 

28% 

17% 

18% 

1196 

25% 

17% 

30 

19% 

38% 

20% 

35% 2446 

65 


47% 

30% 

12 

4% 

M% 

996 

18% 

17% 

30% 

19% 

30 

19% 

0496 

<4 

28% 

SJ 

27ta 


37ta 

37% 

5D1U 

29% 

ss 

89% 

73 

37% 

36% 

Sta 

33 

33 

20% 

17 

& 

Jta 

*% 


17V. 


28% 


58 ta 

37% 

28% 

18% 

36% 

19% 

2(46 

1W 

2646 

17ta 

JOta 

2ft 

40 

14% 

an 


66% 

44% 

32% 

57 


29*6 

TOta 

«% 

2446 

Igfil 

0% 

4Vi 

36% 

3$ 

75 

63 

w% 

+ 

12% 

10% 

25% 

1496 

31% 

25% 

55% 

o% 

496 

Jta 

X 

71% 






EH 


*0 

TJ 


142 

33% 

32* 

.92 




17% 

17 

*6 


M 


24% 

W 



325 

2% 

a* 

128 

27 



67% 

47% 

30 

1* 


1359 

14* 

14 



11 

21 

10% 

BRk 

330 

8* 

7 


40% 

40 

4*0 

105 



43 

43 

1-10 

37 



29% 

29% 





4% 

4% 

120 

2* 

13 

49 

61% 

61 


3* 

5 

497 

43% 

43 

5.13B1D* 


1 

49% 

49% 


51 

6 

137 


79% 


4* 

8 

190 


24% 

1*2 

7.9 

11 

2904 


19 

5/190122 


46 


42% 




X 


15% 


73 

11 

19 


20% 



7 





10* 




73% 


10* 







18 

16 






515 

U 


M 



24 




2* 

V 

215 




24 

IS 

84 





12 

IK 

12% 









2* 

69 

4548 

U% 



i 9 

21 

57 

23 









2* 

71 

17 



\30 

5* 

9 

2335 

30% 





3 




26 

15 

458 

47 





163 

6 





1 

10% 



27 

1 

9 

14% 



M 

10 

407 

M 



2* 


1 

29% 



77 



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NYSE Finishes With Small Gain 

United Press Inienuuumat 

NEW YORK — A kut-minuie spun helped M-l Rose $1.7 JSuuOn 
the New York Slock Exchange finish witn a . 

small gain Thursday as investors responded The Assodmod Prm 

cautiously to turmoil in international currency NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 
trading. the UK. money supply climbed 51.7 billion in 

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 2.98. mid-February, the Federal Reserve Board re- 
to 1,284.01. The Dow lost 2.76 over the entire ported Thursday. 

month ot February but still showed a gain of M-l totaled a seasonally adjusted average of 
72-44 for the first two months of 1985. S569.3 billion in the week ended Feb. 18. up 

Advances lopped declines 808-719 among the from a revised S567.6 billion the previous week, 
2,008 issues traded. the Fed said. The previous weeks figure origi- 

Big Board volume totaled 100.7 mfllion nally was reported as S567.4 billion, 
shares, down from 107.7 million traded M-l represents funds readily available for 
Wednesday. spending, and hence is considered by many 

Marvin Rate of Sanford C. Bernstein Co. said credit analysis to be an important economic 
in lieht of the turbulence in currency and bond and interest-rate determinant. 


74 7746 77% 77% — % 

3 24% 24% 24% 

177 27% 36% 27% + % 

77 19% 19% 19% + % 

2 94 M 94 

974 38% 3946 X + % 

44 19% 19% 1916— % 

730 3M 38% 38%+ % 

» 62 61% 61% — % 

10 107 W6%U7 +1 

175 lin%l«2Vi 102% 

39 22% 32% 22%+ <* 


United Press l m emotional 

NEW YORK — A last-minuie spun helped 
the New York Slock Exchange finish with a 
small gain Thursday as investors responded 
cautiously to turmoil in international currency 
trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 2.98. 
to 1,284.01. The Dow lost 2.76 over the entire 
month of February but still showed a gain of 
72.44 for the first two months of 1985. 

Advances topped declines 808-719 among the 
2,008 issues traded. 

Big Board volume totaled 100.7 mfllion 
shares, down from 107.7 million traded 
Wednesday. 

Marvin Rate of Sanford C. Bernstein Co. said 
in light of the turbulence in currency and bond 
markets this week, the slock market was ''sur- 
prisingly strong." He said the path of least 
resistance for stocks was still upward and a 
sizable advance could cake place within a week 
or so. 

He said the important point about the dollar 
was not that it was still nigh relative to other 
currencies but that it had retreated from its 
highest levels. 

Crandall Hays of Robert W. Baird & Co„ 
Milwaukee, said if the dollar declined further 
but not too far or too fast it would send stocks 
significantly higher. 

- -For the moment, Mr. Hays said, the stock 
market is playing a “wait and see game" with an 
eye on the dollar and on Intent rates. He said 
after a period of backing and [filing, the ad- 
vance that started early in January may be able 
to resume. 

Ford was the most active issue, up Vi to 44%. 
General Motors was up 1 14 to 79!£ and Chrysler 


was up to 33ft. The auto companies could 
benefit from a lower dollar. 

Safeway Stores was second on Che active list, 
up lft to 33 on volume of nearly 2 million 


Texas Oil & Gas was third, off ft to 19ft. 

Sperry Corp. shed lft to 51ft on heavy vol- 
ume. Toe stock had gained 6 over the previous 
two ses sms . 

Tootsie Roll Industries jumped 2ft to 33ft. 
The candy-maker reported fourth-quarter net 
income of 83 cents a share, up from 40 cents in 
the like period a year earlier. 

Hilton Hotels Corp. tumbled 2ft. to 59ft. A 
New Jersey commission denied Hilton a license 
to operate a casino in Atlantic City. After the 
ruling, the compnay said it would appeal. 

In the weaker oil group, Exxon shed ft to 
47ft, Royal Dutch ft to 53W, Chevron ft to 34ft 
and and Mobil ft to 30. 



9% — % 
64%+ U 
79%— % 
21 

1246 + 4* 
12%+ Vh 
18%+ % 

15%+ % 
23% +7 
16 

2846+ % 
21 + % 
11%— 46 
6 

34%— 46 
37—4* 
34%+ % 
37 

16% — % 
22 + % 
2146 

19%+ 46 
SS%+ 46 
27% — V, 
32 — % 
8 % — % 
5%— % 
3446—1% 
4 

18%— % 
27%+ % 
3214+ » 
30% + % 
68+46 
2316— % 
7646— % 
16*6+ % 
12 — % 
78% + 46 

47% ~ 16 
29% + % 
71% 

4846+ % 
746— % 
2946— % 
31 +% 

2016 

25% — 4k 
36%+ % 
18% 

32% +1% 
2546—% 
36% — % 
31% 

1246— % 
35%— % 
29 —1 
3B%- % 
24 — % 
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546— % 
39+16 
18% + % 
54% +146 
44% 4446+ % 
in 11 W+ % 
67% <746+ % 
14% 14%—% 
946 9%+ % 
25% 25% — % 
9% 946 + % 
194k 1946 — 46 
2C46 26%—% 
2346 2)46— 46 
29 29%— % 

34 34% —1% 

53 S3 -3 


FACT: 800% GAIN 


The market is crammed with timid souls, with investors who refuse to challenge 
the ersatz gods of prevailing opinion. In the summer of 1982, C.G.FL rebuked the 
‘consensus’ predicting, while the DO W was hovering around 800, that the "DJI WILL 
TOUCH 1,000, BEFORE HrTTTNG 750’. 

After we released our projection, BARRON'S financial weekly commented “The 
market seems to be sayi ng if s seen the future and it doesn 't work". Th e rest is history; 
the Bull rampaged to record highs. Joseph Granville, who had in November 1982, 
envisioned the DOW Collapsing under 650, was among the pariahs of pessimism 
who eventually hid behind a barrier of semantics to justify their myopia. Despite the 
cascading bull market present day fears about the market proliferate. We may be 
unorthodox in debunking the pessimist but unorthodoxy has biblical support *What 
is man’ asked the Psalmist and replied ... ‘A little Lower than angels, crowned with 
glory and honor". 

Six weeks ago, our researchers mused ... The West has not wilted. Evangelists of 
despair win be converted, as the market is being primed for a gargantuan 
dimensioned./jpaide breakout one that will propel secondary and conceptual 
shares’. And now? 

The DOW will carapult over 1500 enroute to 2500, forthe American market is being 
catalyzed by factors as pervasive and powerful as economic forces, Europe’s 
darkening negation, the suffocation of hope in the ’old world". The “revolution of 
riding expectations’ has not uprooted centuries of European prejudices, of self- 
defeating chauvinism. Once again the ‘new world’ shines, the loud irrational 
discords of the Woodstock era have silenced. Ourforth coming report discusses the 
renascence of North America, focusing upon equities that could dramatically 
ourperform the DOW, as did a recently recommended, natural resource, “special 
situation’ that spiralled 800% in a brief time-span. 

For your complimentary copy, please write to, or telephone: 


B CAPITAL 
_ GAINS 


FAS. Fmancial Planning Services bv 1 
Katverstraatt12, j 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Nethertands 
Phone: ( 020 ) -27 51 81 j 

Tefex 18536 , 


Name: 

Address; 


I JT 1 ^ _ _™ r Ll 


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SO 3 15 225 10% 10*6 1D%— 46 
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S I* 12 53 3146 31% 3146+ % 

8* 7 93 M 13% 1!%— % 

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•to; 2jt 2: ^ a 

?.:,■•« !?! »• t S «- 

'•»n*i J>n '£k i- 
lj tn 5i* yj) V 


X, 1985 


'Tit cvrawgioNAL-y 

iterala^^erUmne 

weekend 


Page 7 


f the Bar 


— by Draal Hetmhao 

"T EW YORK —Great composers 
t|i.j^L-l and their music "inevitably be- 
^V4 ^1 come icons, so easily worshiped 
■■.•t,i..- J- ^ thatit can take a leap of imagma - 
l - c, ^ ,0 ch a .&ijn to see past the image and glimpse the 
(h '^irality, the miracle of the musical achieve- 
'^'Oi'njent itself. Handel and Bach, those twin 
the Baroque, sum up the problem. A 


' cr.fnn, p**"," muu up me proDKSD. A 

• i* K 1 ^ better works have become hardly 

.( S - "i N , '^^■hjore than venerated relics, so continually 
, , ’ t'-ifMh- r^r'and so reverently kissed for three centuries 
‘ "’'on,- £**•*■* ***? bcen ru bbed smooth. The 

0 ." , ‘ ^.outline of the woric is there for ns, but its 

.... . : ,I,| ic ^enjneanmg or meanings tend to fade. 


!,! ’•' Until something Happens to shake ns ont 

^Nn^bf music-business routine and complacency, 
'•• -I ^ iit.-Q r such as the tricentennial celebration of their 

;,,::,| 'A! | 0I .^gtsbirths this year, the same faxnffiar pieces get 
■-= ^jperforraed endlessly, so that we hear “Messi- 
Co, K^ah, r ' say, in the same spirit as we look at 
“ :i " f 'uin ^roductiore of the “Mona Lisa." That is to 


_;. nrn icf«uuuv.uuiQui me muoauu. xnaiisio 
' " •■»« •!.. for.- J^jfciay, we hardly experience it at all If it were . 
w, -i i 0 T(1 Eurjjot for this birthday celebration, would we 
sv. :n ever have bad Handel’s “Rinaldo” and “Al- 

: ‘ ! ' l,rVM v .yj e-ana" at New York’s two leading opera 

•jc::r 1 c : ,-p i . i Chooses? And would we ever have been ex- 

!•'! lb li itr 4 a U/\J„ j. w 



/ z'f* 


_ . . • ,^>rl 

> .- j,, *2*+.S*5 ***- 


, s.wuow*; nuu wuiuu wc cvei Uttvc occn CX- „ , ... , , , , 

^ loosed us to such rarities as “Orlando,” Roubiliac s statue of Handel 
“ffijngj^Ariodante," “Sonde” "anH “Aioct^/fm " 


rti0ij - "^-AnoaHnie, aanae ana “Alessandro,” 
\to mention only tins season’s Handel opera 
> uho,,u schedule at Carnegie Hall? Famous though 

they are, we still know only the surface of the 

. oceans named Bach and Handel 

in.n Ptjnninn r " "t Worse J®** **» identities of these two an- 
il n? ^ Swvicejjnents may tend to ran together in the mind. 
'Stordam TK .. '^ ler e 11 * weren’t they bom less than a 
0) - 27 c T I '*elhe^nicaith apart (Handel on Feb. 23 and Bach 
5 01 pn Marcn 21) m German towns separated by 


about 80 mfles as the jet fEes (Halle and 
Eisenach)? Weren’t they both enormously 
prolific and fastidious craftsmen? Weren't 
they both virtuosic organists? Didn't they 
'both compose stacks of religious music? 
Didn’t they both go blind in old age and 
"' didn’t the same English surgeon treat thiwi 
fc „ J»th? And, most confnsingly, didn’t they 
— -Jjoth wear wigs? 

V : All true. But rarely can two composers 
from essentially the s ame cultural roots have 
— — developed in snch different directions. Han- 

■ — _deL in the tradition of so many musicians 

before him and since, left home early and 
‘ * >«■ traveled to Italy where he soaked himself in 

■ w a, , t i44 the vocal tradition of the warm south. Tn bit 

- <■ ^ Italian years he congxjsed more than 100 

'£ *•; >| » EHecamatas, two. operas, two oratorios, and 
^ >• u s u^gsome Latin p»lms and motets. By the time 
:i ‘ % W he settled in London in 1713, Handel was a 
' j* vriuisoi*isticaled, weB-travded young genius of 

, ^328 with a passion for the theato^Fortunaie- 

.1 jv « 3 St^ly, London at die time was in the grip of an 
^ ' 5 i- ft Italian opera craze, so he found himself righ t 

*>' T.i'al home. He .became an F-n gliahman jn all 

• •■j . >5 >: S S but speech — his German accent never left 
, Jhim— and deqnte some ups and downs in 

’ f ji ; ‘J; ^ fcpqjulanty became England’s most honored 
■' ib ^PTO>oser and^Eoreefl- At his own request, 

... , v n £3* w®* boded In Westminster Abbey, where 


•/ ;» ip; »,;• 


the mourners — I nearly said audience — 
numbered 3.000. 

A burly, bluff man. Handel was also a 
well-rounded cosmopolitan of unusual taste 
and perception who was rich enough and 
smart enough at one point to buy a large 
Rembrandt. He gained a reputation for irri- 
tability and fits of sudden anger, which 
sounds credible when you remember the 
story of his throwing his wig at a particularly 
stupid musician. On another occasion he is 
supposed to have picked up a female singer 
and held her out a window, threatening to 
drop her unless she agreed to sing something 
' properly. It is such tales as these that musi- 
cologists take delight in undermining — per- 
haps both have been consigned to Handel 
apocrypha by now — but it cannot be doubt- 
ed that Handel must have been a pretty 
formidable fellow, a kind of musical Sflrnnrf 
Johnson or Mr. T. 

S INGERS will ten you that Handel's 
music is easier to handle than Bach’s. 
Rather like Liszt’s florid piano mndr, 
Handel’s vocal pieces are written with the 
instrument firmly in mind, rarely making the 
musician sound clumsy or pressured, no 
matter how elaborate and decorative the 
writing. He achieves a special kind of un- 
forced majesty in his arias, both in the operas 
and the oratorios, that resists analysis Lis- 
ten, for instance, to John McCormack ring- 
ing “Where’er you walk” or Kathleen Ferrier 
in “Ombra mai fu” or Beniamino Gigli In 
“Care sdve." What strikes you about such 
seemingly simple arias is that they temptyou 
to -think you could ring them as well as 
anyone. You, after all have an inner nobility 



that may not always show itself in the voice 
but comes out thrmingly at times, especially 
when you are alone. 

In this respect, as in so many others, Bach 
and Handel are decidedly different compos- 
ers. Although Bach knew how to write for 
the voice and spent most of his life doing it 
supremely well, he tended to ignore the little 
thmgs that make a ring w love a composer, 
little things such as letting the singer breathe 
once in a while: Bach thought instramentally 
even when writing for the voice, so it is 
characteristic of his vocal fine that h often 
might be handled as effectively and with 
greater ease by a violin. Tbe solo voice in 
many of Bach's cantatas, for instance, would 
transcribe wi th perfect effectiveness for oboe 
or cello or piano. But it is hard to thinir of 
Handel's “O sleep! Why dost thou leave me" 
or “Lasda ch’io pianga” without hearing a 
particular vocal timbre. In Bach’s ntatny 
and passions, we tend to hear Bach first and 
last; in Handel’s vocal music we first hear 
Ameling or Baker or Schipa or Peerce. 

Handel though a man of the opera house, 
also was religious enough to write a string of 
splendid oratorios and other sacred pieces. It 
must be assumed that he was a sincere be- 
liever. However, he Was en«tnan*rl by this 
world early and seems to have worn his 
religious beliefs lightly. He apparently 
cleaved to no rigid dogma Bach was a strict- 
er sort of believer, as befit a native of Lu- 
ther's hometown. He was caught up in the 
mysticism of the Pietistic movement in his 
younger years and — though scholars now 
argue about this — probably remained rea- 
sonably devout to. the end. However, like 
most musicians of his day and since, he haH 
to be an opportunist. When he was employed 
by churches, as in Arnstadt, M flhjfiausen 
and Leipzig, he composed mostly devotional 
music; when he was in the hire of the Duke 
Wilhelm of Weimar or Prince Leopold of 
Cftthen, he cheerfully turned to w^iTar mu- 
sic. A Lutheran by birth and persuasion, he 
composed the greatest Roman Catholic maw; 
known to man. In London, be probably 
would have written Italian operas and En- 
glish oratorios, but that.is merely wild con- 
jecture since he never set foot in any foreign 
land. 

Bach traveled in a small radius from his 
birthplace. He went to Hamburg a couple of 
times, probably to hear the organist Georg 
Bdhm. He went to Lfibeck to hear Buxtehu- 
de and. it is coigectured, to apply for the 
organist's job there. (According to one story, 
Bach, then just 20, was put off by the stipula- 
tion that Buxtehude's successor would have 


• ry.‘.> 

v " -fV • '».> " • ■ <“^VAv/ 


■/.... %Jfc db0»Ak i 4^ « A-‘ ■ 


Creating Imagi 

P ARIS — “Where photography is at monuments, 
its strongest, where it can do more fished, partly, 
than film or television, is examining general of Hi 

the nlace we live in and tmrrnff m the Prosner Men 


P ARIS — “Where photography is at 
its strongest, where it can do more 
than film or television, is examining 
the place we live in and giving us the 
means to re-unagine it,” says Frames Hers, 
the 41 -year-old Belgian photographer who 
has worked in France since 1968. 

Having worked successfully as a photo 
reporter. Hers now believes that the days of 
reportage are oven that photography must 
create rather than record and mat creation 


don for the otganisfs job, and was rgected. 
Three years before his death he even ma<fr 
the trip from Leipzig to the Prussian court at 
Potsdam, about 85 miles by crow flight, at 
the invitation of Frederick the Great, himself 
a flutist and dilettante composer. The ki n g, 

Continued on page 9 


implies taking a point of view. 

It is an attitude that has been and will be 
discussed for years of late nights. It is also an 

Mary Blume 


K 

Dresden Opera, Past and Present 


by David Stevens 

RESDEN — Now that Gottfried 
| Semper’s neo-Renaissance opera 
f bouse has been magnificently re- 
stored, where it was and almost as 


ini 2*> ~‘i 
■ IM 4*4 


J« tt-r J 

w in. r- 

1 1 ; % by David Stevens 

. 1 in. i:. — : — — — — 

: ;i a fT^VRESDEN — Now that Gottfried 
? 3 “ a; I ■ Semper’s neo-Renaissance opera 
• M ^ * I -M house has been magnificently re- 
;; » stored, where it was and almost as 

^ “ S'i £it was, h remains to be seen whether the 
j”! » resident Dresden State Opera can be equally 

restored to some semblance of its forma: 

— — — ^gloiy. Nostalgia in tins department is per- 
^ stops doomed to disaroointmenL The world 
y \ pilws changed in the 40 years that Semper’s 
u o. gnpera lumse stood as. a bombed-out shell, 
i; j, in j aod the operatic wadd along with it. 

w IK o. . So®* reasons for both optimism and pes- 
" ,j{ Jisimism became ^jparent in the first few days 
i> ni; Rafter the gala reqxaiw of the house with a 

• i* »v production of Weber's “Die Freia- 
■i - ch&tz.” For one thing the acoustics in the 

^ ^.restored house are qteidid, and the opening 
: f '‘T, s ^chords of the “Frejichto” overture were an 
. { . a .^immediate reassurance that the opera's or- 
i -v* - jdiestra, the Staatskmdlg remained me of 

* world's pre-emment orchestras. The 
■r! i i V chorus, too, on this and other occasions, 

“ (I a-i i*; contributed to this feeling. . 

; There is also the boose itself. A fine exam- 


4 f V Z 1 wm i iOTni i HU XUiU It m mu 

^ * ; : i ft !< relatively modem part of an ensemble of 

* .» 1: =“ ft j , tanMings that earned Dresden its celdnity 

, ... \i as the “Florence on the Elbe.” In Germany 

l -• ft?; and Austria, the destruction of opera houses 

: ’• was generafly greeted in post-Worid War II 
... .. "» ^ years as an opportunity to put op startlingly 

. K.a modem replacements. But not in the conser- 

-I t bl yative south. ‘Wennaiw^ened its Staatsoper 
; *■; in 1955 and Munich its National Theater in 

” JlS > S' !?63 in their familiar forms, and Dresden 
;• 1 C V. done the same. 

;; ; * i' % £ Sa as in. Vienna and Munich, it see ms 

* ‘ ^ '■*' ^ certain that the Semper house will be an 

“ .. ^ S+; attraction in itself. That East Goman au- 


thorities are aware of this was suggested by 
the opening — only one week brfore the 
opera house — of a modem and luxurious 
hold on the right bank of the Elbe, across 
from the opera. One of the selling points in 
the hotel's brochures is that a stay there can 
include a ni ght at the (menu Its importance 
as a magnet for hard Western currency may 
make it tough for the ordinary Dresdner to 
get a ticket, but in that respect the Dresdner 
will probably be no worse off than, say, the 
ordinary Parisian. 

(By the way, (he name of the new hotel is 
the Bellevue, itself a venerable name. An 
earlier hotel of that name was where Richard 
Strauss — nine of whose 16 operas had their 
world premieres in Dresden between 1901 
and 1938 — stayed there when in town and 
spent much of Ms mare time playing his 
favorite card game, skaL) 

But the traveler more in search of music' 
than architecture is likely to be less happy. 

Dresden has a long operatic history, ranging 
from the Baroque to the Romantic era — 
when Weber and Wagner were the music 
directors and composing operas — to tire 
20th centnry. 

The Dresden opera's last glorious era was 
between the two world wars, when Fritz 
Busch and Karl Bdhm were the music direc- 
tors and the roster of singers whose artistic 
home was here was legendary. The soprano 
Elisabeth Rethberg, the mezzo soprano Er- 
nestine Scbumann-Heink and the baritone 
Paul SchOffler are three who reached New 
York’s Metropolitan at different times. And 
the phonograph record not only helped to « 
spread the renown of individual singers but \ 
the company as a whole — as in the historic r\ 
1930s recording of Act 3 of Wagner’s “Die * 
Meistersinger, still obtainable on long-play 
transfers, conducted by Bdhm and with a 
cast that included Margarete Teschemacher 
and Torsten Ralf. 

But the structure of the operatic world has 


changed in the last 40 years. It is an age of 
homogenization, in which conductors, stage 
directors and singers jet their wares from one 
theater to another in the West In East Ger- 
many, as in other countries of Eastern Eu- 
rope, there has been aland of talent drain to 
the West, although a number of leading 
artists still based in the East are allowed to 
travel freely and perform in the West 
Thus, the tenor Peter Schreier and the 
bass-baritone Theo Adam — Drcsdnerc 
both, and both graduates of the city's fam- 
ous boys’ choir, the Kreuzchor — still live 
and work here, although they are mainly 
known for their appearances at the Salzburg 
and Bayreuth festivals and at leading opera 
houses in the WesL Otherwise; as the Brat 
performances in the reopened opera house 
suggested, the vocal level is respectable pro- 
vincial rarely more. i 

One wonders why Dresden had to borrow 
a not very impressive soprano from the Ko- 
mische Oper in Berlin to sing Agathe in the 
opening performance. And why, where 
Busch and BOhm once ruled, did the compa- 
ny require the services of a guest conductor 
from Leipzig for the same “Fretschfltz” and 
another from the Komische Oper for a later 
world premiere. Those who saw the second- 
night new production of Strauss’ “Der Ro- 
senkavalier — a work that historically “be- 
longs” to Dresden — almost unanimously 
found it tacky in every respecL Musical 
affairs at the State Opera seem to be in a 
state of transition at best 


attitude that fits in with one of the French 
government’s most imaginative and unsung 
projects, a photographic survey of France 
under an agency concerned largely with re- 
gional development DATAR, or the Dele- 
gation k I’Am&nagement du Territoire et k 
1' Ac tion Rfgionaie, known in English as the 
French Industrial Development Board. 

“Since DATAR organizes our territory 
and tries to take charge of the ways it 
changes, it must know that territory and 
understand the changes that are occurring," 
says Bernard Latarjet who heads the Mis- 
sion Photograhique, as it is called, with Ears 
as artistic and technical adviser. 

Latarjet and Hers agree that the dizzying 
changes France has undergone since 1945 
have slowed down sufficiently so that one 
can step back and study the remit: France of 
the early 1980s and its future needs. 

“DATAR’s concerns aren’t usually artis- 
tic,” Hers says. “In the past a factory owner 
who was thinking of moving to a region 
would inquire first about highway access and 
airports. Now they are concerned about the 
quality of life. There was a need for a mission 
that could show the country from a cultural 
as well as an ecological or technical view- 
point.” A photo survey was the answer. 

The three-year mission has just ended its 
first phase, in which 13 photographers, some 
famous, some unknown, three not French, 
spent several months of preparation and six 
months in the field photographing their cho- 
sen subjects, which range from supermarkets 
to the coast of northwest France. The mis- 
sion will cover all sorts of French life but not 
every inch of France. 

As far as Hers knows, no country is under- 
taking a project of such scale, but there are 
historical precedents. On their own, such 
famous photographers as France’s Eugfcne 
Atget (1857-192^ and August Sander of 
Germany (1876-1964) tried to make photo- 
graphic inventories of their times, and in 
1851 the French government established the 
Mission Heliograph! que, which attempted to 
make a photographic record of France’s 


monuments. The photographs were not pub- 
fished. partly, it is said, because the inspector 
gpneral of Historical Monuments, the writer 
Prosper Merimte, thought architecture was 
best expressed in drawings. 

Another important antecedent was the 
U. S. Farm Security Administration project 
of 1935-42. in which such photographers as 
Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans recorded 
Depression America (170.000 of their nega- 
tives are in the Library of Congress). 

“One thing that becomes dear from the 
Mission Hdiographique and the FSA pic- 
tures is that a photograph becomes a better 
document the more artistic it is," Hers says. 
Artistic does not mean arty: The occasional 
photographer who uses his subject to serve 
his own interest in form or color fails in his 
aim to show a pared of French life. 

“We are responsible for leaving to future 
generations the symbolic images from which 
our descendants will create our legend,” says 
Robert Doisneau, 72. the distinguished doy- 
en of the mission's photographers, most of 
whom are in their 30s and 40s. “Pictures of 
the French cancan were responsible for our 
view of the Belle Epoque." 

Doisneau’s subject for the mission is the 
architecture of French suburbs. He shows 
the bleak vanity of contemporary French 
building, the disconcerting contrasts and, 
even worse, the lack of contrast when the 
architecture shows nothing but a vapid, self- 
satisfied monotony. 

T HE other famous photographer, Ray- 
mond Depardon, chose farm life m 
the southern pan of France where his 
family comes from — Douce France in the 
age of technology. There are linoleum table- 
cloths and scrubbed floors that seem eternal 
bnt probably will soon become residences 
secondaires, and electric pylons in wheat- 
fields. 

One, with a clean desk^backed iby bulging 
dossiers, testifies to the abiding French fixa- 
tion with paperwork. Another picture shows 
a gleaming empty office with a photograph 
of a raging surf on the wall — the dream of 
paid vacations, of escape and of unfettered 
nature that make daily routine bearable. 

With a few exceptions, there are no people 
in die photographs to distract the eye. The 
decision was hard and has been criticized, 
butit works. “The person in the picture is the 
photographer,” Francois Hers says. 

The mission’s photographers were chosen i 
in part because of their ability to woric on an i 
arduous long-term project. The result. Hers 
hopes, will make the French aware of how < 
they live. ] 

“People don’t look at their environment, i 
We asked peasants to describe their land- i 
scape and they described that of their par- 1 



ents because to them it was more solid and 
real. If you ask people in a Paris suburb what 
they see on their way to work, they are 
incapable of saying. They don't notice a 
thing.” 

The photographer’s job is. literally, eye- 
opening. “The painter-photographers' of the 
Mission H61iographique. Walker Evans and 
many others have taught us that an image of 
territory cannot simply be recorded," says 
Bernard LatargeL “It must be created." ■ 


j) 

4- 

; I r. 


.tvj S f 


5^!- 

I u ** S* 1 ' 

■: ' :i jr, S< 

• 

Sc 

• • .v L»( 

, •• •'( 

!■ f Sg>. 

*; • •:? r* K 


y. ,i 'i r**? 

[; • T? The first ofGottfried Semper’s Dresden opera houses (1841). 



A SIGN of the times everywhere is the 
rise of the stage director, and Dres- 
den is no exception. Joachim Herz, 
since 1982 Dresden's chief stage director, is 
the leading artistic personal! ty m the compa- 
ny. He was preceded by Harry Kupfer. 
whose brinianlproductions made Dresden a 
place on the German operatic map during 
the 1970s — so much so, indeed, that he was 
rewarded with one of East Germany's theat- 
rical showcases, Berlin’s Komische Oper, 
made famous by the late Walter Felsenstein. 

The mos t encouraging aspect of the spe- 
cial reopening performances was that two of 
the first four featured music by leading East 
German composers. A ballet entitled “Burn- 
ing Peace” featured agreeable choreography 
in a classical-modem mode by Harold 
Wan dike and set to two existing, and inter- 
esting, SCOreS by Udo Z hnmi rm am^ the 
State Opera’s resident composer. An opera 
cumbersomdy titled “Die Weise von uebe 
and Tod des Comets Christoph Rilke” was 
distinguished by the music of Siegfried 
Matthus — resident composer of the Ko- 
mische O^er and the country’s most success- 
ful operatic composer — who drew fascinat- 
ing combinations of sotmd from a small 
instrumental ensemble and a large chnmc 
Unforhmatdy, like the ballet, it was lum- 
bered with a heavy “peace” message; not to 
mention an incomprehensible staging by 
Ruth Berghaus. 

“Soviet-Caiman Friendship” was another 
message delivered at every street comer, but 
the best sample of it — and the music higb- 
light of the reopening ceremonies — was 
Peter Sehreier’s performance of Schubert’s 
-Jfie Vmterreise” song cycle with no less 
than Sviatoslav Richter as his pianist ■ 









l^’* 1 


From the top, photographs by Raymond Depardon, Christian Milovanoff and Robert Doisn^L 


b DMAS 




I 






■'narp n 

~ Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1985 


TRAVEL 


Renaissance in Augsburg 


by Alan Levy 


A uc 

A 


UGSBURG, West Germany — 
Home of the Holbeins and Bert 
Brecht, Mozart’s father and the 
• Fugger family, this Renaissance 
city is enjoying a long-overdue renaissance 
as it celebrates its 2,000th birthday this year. 

When they founded it in IS B.C„ the 
Roman generals Drusus and Tiberius named 
it tor their stepfather. Emperor Augustus: 
"Augusta Vmdeliconim,” meaning "a city of 
Augustus within the territory of the Vm deli- 
dans," a Celtic tribe. Two millennia later, its 
German name still means "citadel of Augus- 
tus" and its emblem atop the newly restored 
City Hall remains a pine cone, the Roman 
symbol of prosperity and fertility. 

Augsburg’s golden days came in the ISth 
and 16th centuries, thanks to the Fugger 
(pronounced Foog-uh) dynasty of weavers 
that, through trade with Venice, evolved into 
merchant bankers who held the fortunes of 
the Habsburg Empire in their hands. Fi- 
nancing wars, buying die election of Charles 
V as emperor, launchin g their own fleets. 
minin g silver and copper, coining their own 
money and lending it at interest (normally 
forbidden except for Jews), they and another 
Augsburg family, the Welsers (who, for a 
while in the 16th century, owned Venezuela), 
were forerunners of modem capitalism. 

Fortunately for the future, the Fuggers 
were also cultural and social philanthropists 
-whose good works still glitter in today's 
Augsburg. Entered through its imposing 
Roles Tor, or Red Gate (1544), the mecca of 
Germany's “Romantic Road” possesses an 
astonishingly large cultural treasure for a 
textile center of 250,000 only 62 kilometers 
(39 miles) northwest of Munich, 

The world's oldest social settlement, the 
Fuggerei, is still administered by the Fugger 
family, without government subsidy, on 
much the same terms as when it was founded 
in 1519 as a walled community for the poor 
just outside the city walls. The 1985 annual 
rent per home of 1-72 Deutsche marks (50 
cents) matches the original 16th-century rent 
of one Rbeimsche gulden. The 250 people 
who live there now have to be Augsburgers 
over 55, married when they move in, and 
Catholics of good repute without children 
still living with than. Though ever to the 
right ofReaganomics, the Fuggers accept 
social-welfare status as proof of poverty. The 
religious restriction relates to another stipu- 
lation in each lease: AH tenants are expected 
to attend Mass daily in the community's 
church and say one Our Father, one Hail 
Mary, and one Credo for the Fuggers. 

The Fuggerei’s simple old church, tike half 
of Augsburg, was destroyed by Allied bombs 
in World War H, but it has been elegantly 
restored with a paneled ceiling and house 
altar from Fugger palaces as mil as a main 
altar from SL Ulrich's Catholic Church. 
Tourists wandering the Fuggerei’s six streets 
often find cheerful grandmothers ready to 
invite them in, but a typical two-family 


bouse built in 1 520 at Mittleregasse 1 3 serves 
as a museum. 

Of all places to follow in the Fugger foot- 
steps. St. Anna's Lutheran Church might 
seem least likely. But St. Anna was a Carmel- 
ite monastery in 1518. when an Augusunian 
monk nam ed Martin Luther was given shel- 
ter there after walking most of the way from 
Wittenberg to debate with Cardinal Cretan, 
the pope's emissary. Cajetan stayed with the 
Fuggers. When negotiations reached an im- 
passe. Luther — not trusting his imperial 
letter of safe conduct — left tows by night 
through a small door in the city wall that the 
mayor's son, a sympathizer, opened for him. 

Within seven years, Luther's ideas had 
prevailed at SL Anna’s and Holy Commu- 
nion was first administered in Augsburg "in 
the Wittenberg way” in the church's Gothic 
east end, now adorned by Lucas Cranach 
portraits of Luther and his protector Johann 
Friedrich of Saxony, flanking an altar fea- 
turing another Cranach painting, “Christ 
Blessing the Children,” on its base. 

M EANWHILE, the Fuggers had 
built an addition to the church and 
even had Albrecht Durer design the 
two middle reliefs of their burial chapel at 
the west end. That chapel is considered the 
first decisive achievement of the Renais- 
sance in Germany. The most famous Fugger, 
Jacob the Rich, died in Augsburg's Refor- 
mation Year of 1525 and, since his family 
owned (and still owns) that end of the 
church, he was buried there, as were two 
brothers and two nephews. To this day. this 
Protestant church is closed to the public 
twice a year when Mass is celebrated at the 
west end for the Fugger family only. _ 
A heady mix of Gothic, Renaissance and 
Baroque, with reversible benches and a 
crooked nave, St Anna is just the mosL 
eclectic and eccentric of several spectacular 
Augsburg churches. It is a forerunner of the 
religious and aesthetic harmony that pre- 
vailed here after the strife, executions and 
military occupation between Luther’s 1530 
Augsburg Confession, the official statement 
of Lutheran churches, and the 1555 Peace of 
Augsburg, in which the Holy Roman Empire 
allowed the city to exist as a town of mixed 
religion. 

Today Augsburg is three-quarters Catho- 
lic. Two onion-domed St Ulrich's churches 
— the smaller Protestant, the larger Catholic 
— side by side dominate the south end of 
Maximilianstrasse, a Renaissance street with 
stately palaces, patrician houses, airy bay 
windows and splendid fountains. 

Much of Maximilianstrasse stin belongs 
to the Fuggers and you can enter the inner 
coutryards of the Fugger palace at number 
36. The most delicately decorated of the four 
Italianate courts is the Damenhof. where the 
Fugger women played badminton while 
tharmen jousted in the Turaierhof. Nowa- 
days, commedia delP arte is performed in the 
summer on a stage at the center of the 
Damenhofs Tuscan marble mosaic floor. 


Opposite the back exit on Zeugplatz is a 
fortress-windowed, hand-carved armory 
that was the fust grand achievement of Elias 
Holl ( 1573-1646). Augsburg’s great Renais- 
sance architect. A recent plot to replace it 
with a department store was foiled by a 
restoration campaign and it is now an adult- 
education community center. 

Back on Maximilianstrasse, the Schaezler 
Palace at number 46 is a Rococo edifice built 
by another banking family in the late 1760s 
and donated to the city as a museum in 1958. 
One strolls through the Deutsche Barockga- 
lerie and then a green marzipan extravagan- 
za of a banquet hall — where Marie Antoi- 
nette Han <-t»d on her bridal trip to Paris in 
1770 and where Mozan is now played by 
candlelight in summer — to reach the ad- 
joining Staatsgalerie and DOrer’s penetrat- 
ing portrait of Jacob Fugger the Rich in his 
Venetian gold skullcap. 

The Staatsgalerie is a former convent sec- 
ularized in 1807 and its highlights are its 
Holbeins. Though his home was destroyed in 
1944 bombings. Hans Holbein the Elder, 
who died in 1542, lives on in a series of 
notable altar paintings in the gallery’s sec- 
ond room. His three-paneled altar showing 
14 views of the life of Sl Paul is of particular 
interest because it depicts the Holbein fam- 
ily attending Paul's baptism. Partly because 
of their father’s tax troubles with Augsburg 
authorities, Holbein's two sons left town 
young and the younger Hans's fame was 
made in Basel and London. Although Augs- 
burg owns none of the younger Hans Hol- 
bein’s works, on the S c ha e zler Palace’s top 
floor is an international collection chat in- 
cludes major works by Hals, Veronese and 
Tiepolo, as well as works by Rembrandt, 
Rubens, Van Dyck and Jordaens. 

Four more works by Hoibdn the Elder 
belong to the cathedral, the Mariendom, 
parts of which date back to the 10th century. 
For the town’s 2,000th birthday, the interior 
has been restored, rather too brightly in red- 
and-wfaite Tudor Lego and, even though half 
its Holbeins will be out for restoration this 
year, it is a treasure trove housing a series of 
five stained-glass windows of prophets 
which have survived since 1 132; a huge fres- 
co of Sl Christopher, looking as vital as a 
contemporary movie poster and, beneath the 
Romanesque* west chancel (for some reason, 
the church was not built facing east but a 
towering Gothic east chancel was added over 
two centuries), crypts containing a medieval 
onyx window ana a 12ih-or-13tb-cenmry 
sculpture of the Madonna and Child, the 
lovdiest in a town of many. 

Outside the cathedral, one can stand for 
minutes or hours deciphering the Old Testa- 
ment scenes and symbols carved on an early 
11th-century bronze door, as well as the 
populous New Testament scenes in sand- 
stone carved above and around Mary’s Por- 
tal a 14th-century entranceway. Some of the 
sculptures are now chemically coated against 
pollution and discreedy netted against pi- 
geons. A wall of Roman exhibits separates 



The Perloch Tower (left) and Rathaus , both by Elias HolL 


the church from the former palatial resi- 
dence of the bishops of Augsburg, now gov- 
ernment offices. 

T HERE are more Mozarts in the Augs- 
burg phone book than there are in 
Wolfgang Amadeus’s native Salzburg, 
for his father, the violinist Leopold, was 
bora here in 1719 at Frauentorstrasse 30, an 
attractive reddish-brown house that is now a 
museum of the family. (Qosed Tuesdays, 
unlik e virtually all other Augsburg muse- 
ums, which are closed Mondays. Like every 
museum in town, it charges no admission-) 
Among its quirky odds and ends are the 
Mozarts' water barrel and stove, an imagina- 
tively modern Catholic pilgrim’s cross from 
the tom of this century, and one of the 
earliest hammer pianos (1785) from Johann 
Andreas Stein, an Augsburg organ builder 
and friend of WA Mozart and Beethoven. 
Built without pedals (the pianist pushes knee 
levers), it is still in working order, but only 
one local pianist, Gertrude Kottermaier, is 
licensed to play it By arrangement with the 
Augsburg Tourist Information Center, she 
will give an hourlong evening “House Con- 
cert at the Mozarts” with a historian named 
Martha NatQer-Schad reading (in English, 
French or German) the composer’s love let- 
ters to a young Augsburg cousin- This event 


costs 400 Deutsche marks for up to 40 per- 
sons. 

Bertolt Brecht went long unappreciated 
but now has two local addresses to his name. 
The Augsburg Bert Brecht Society, founded 
in 1983 by a Lutheran pastor, Hoist Jesse, 
holds readings and concerts in the house 
where Brecht was bran, at Auf dem Rain 7, 
behind City Hail. Two rooms are reserved 
for students doing research on the play- 
wright But the house in which he wrote his 
early dr amas and poems, on the corner of 
Bleachstrasse and what is now Bert-Brecht- 
Strasse, is occupied and not visitable. 

The giant MAN factory, for which Rudolf 
Diesel (1858-1913) invented his engine, and 
a Messerschnritt plant made Augsburg a 
prune target for Allied bombing throughout 
the war and, on the night of Feb. 21-22, 1944, 
EHas Holl’s two great “Skyscrapers of the 
German Renaissance,” the early- 17th-centu- 
ry Perlach Tower and Rathaus, or Gty Hall, 
next door, were mortally wounded. The Per- 
lach’s golden weather vane and the tower’s 
copper lid melted into one lump. Nothing 
was left of City Hall except its facade and 
rubble. 

Patched together in the cheapest modem 
way, the Gty Hall was reopened right after 
the war, and the Pedach’s carillon of 35 
bronze be&s resumed its noonday serenade. 
In 1947, there was a move to restore Gty 


Hall’s Goldener the golden ceremonial 

hall with its picture-book cedar ceiling and 
m a gnific ent portals. Kit the people voted it 
down in a referendum because they wanted 
the money spent on housing, food, and jobs. 
With prosperity, however, public funding 
and private initiative in the 1970s raised 18 
million marks to restore the Golden Cham- 
ber and other parts of Gty Hall and the 
Periach Tower. 

Whoa the restoration was unveiled in arc- 
tic weather', some 30,000 Augsburgers lined 
up outside Gty Hall to be admitted, a few 
hundred at a time, to see the Golden Cham* 
ber. That Saturday, at the Opera Ball, 2,000 
of the city's burners danced all night afd 
the Augsburg Philharmonic became a dance 
band for the evening. Augsburg’s 2,000th- 
birthday present to itself was a yearlong civic 
celebration that will continue with Folk festi- 
vals, special exhibitions, a city-wide regional 
garden show (April 19 to OcL 6), “Aida” „ 
with elephants and a first-rale cast this sum- i. 
mer at the Rotes Tor open-air theater, his- 
torical re-enactments and recreations of 
Augsburg in the time of EHas Holland open 
house at Gty Hall daily through the end of 
the year. : 

For information, guided tours and the like 
contact Augsburg Tourist Information Center, 
Bahnhofstrasse 7, D-8900 Augsburg West 
Gernumy. teb (0821) 36024. ■ 


MARCH CALENDAR 


?■ 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA, Konzerthaus(td:72.12.1 1). 
CONCERTS — March 3: Vienna 
Chamber Orchestra. Herbert Prikopa 
conductor. Gabride Sima soprano 

March 4: Vienna Youth Choir. Gta- 
tber Theurine conductor (Handeiy 
March 14: Vienna Symphoniker. Mar- 
tin Sieghart conductor, Dimitnu 
Sgouros piano (Beethoven. Strauss). 
March 20: ORFSymphonyOrchestra, 
GCnther Schuller conductor (Gruber, 
Schuller). 

March 24: Arnold SchOnberg Choir, 
Nikolaus Harnoncourt conductor 
(Bach). 

March 2B: Vienna Symphoniker. 
Horst Stein conductor Elisabeth 
Leonskaja piano (Cherubini, Debus- 
sy). 

RECITALS — March 10: Malcolm 
Frager piano (Brahms. Haydn). 


March 13: Haydn Trio (HayduTchai- 
kovsky). 

March 22: Martin Haselbdck organ 
(Bach, Liszt). 

March 25: Yo Yo Ma violin(Bacb). 
March 27: Ernst Kovacic violin 
(Bach). 

•Muskvenanftd: 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS— March2aud 3: Vien- 
na PhOharmomker. Larin Maazel con- 
ductor (Mozart Stravinsky). 

March 6: Vienna Ptalharmoniker. 
Christoph von Dohnanyi (Stravinsky, 
Tchaikovsky). 

March 1 1 and 12: BBC Welsh Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Roger Noiringion 
conductor (Handd. Haydn). 

March 20 and 21: Vienna Syraphoo- 
iker, Juri Ahronowitsch conductor 
(Franck. Profokiev). 

•Vdksoper(td: 53240). 

OPERA — March 5: “Orpheus in the 
Underworld” (Offenbach). 

March 13: “The Barber of Seville" 
(Rossini). 

OPERETTA— March4, 15.2125,31: 
“The Land of Smiles" (LehArV 


WEEKEND 


HOTELS 




The Grand Hotel In the mountains 

The hotel surrounded by snow-covered 
forests. Skischool. Chairlift and skilifts to 
the sunny slopes. Downhill runs lo the 
doorstep. Cross country skiing. 

Curling- and skating rinks. 

Elegant indoor swimming-pool. 

Sauna and massage. Solarium. Bars. 
Dancing. Restaurant (ran cats «Le Miroio. 

SUVRETTA HOUSE ST. MORITZ 

- Phone 082 -2 11 21 Telex 74 491 R. F. Muller. Mgr. s' 


tfiUbV 



intheTrib. 


Gel Bie big picture on 
world business trends in 

Leonard 

Silks 

Economic 

Scene 


HOTELS 



GRAN HOTEL SARRIA 
BARCELONA 
3)4 rooms 
Bua n ca faSfe 
fetches 

A»da. Sarni, 50. 0B029 Barcelona 
Tel. 05 239 11 09 
Tekx 51033 V 51638 GHSB E 
Cable GKANHQTEL 



hotel chamarttn 

MADRID 
378 rooms. 

Business fc»cSti&- 
fetdass. 

EsBdfln Chamartin. 28016 Madrid 
**.191)733 7! I’-™* 111 
Tetec 49201 HCHM E 
Cable- ENTUBSA 


| HOUDAVS 1 


ROME 


RESIDOmAL AREA 

Lovely o uu rtme n a by day. try week 
by month. Dfc*3 phone, omonomow 

hooting, ber, rwftjuront. gorog*. 
24 hour s e nd ee 

RESIDB4CE 

, CORTINA D'AMPEZZO 
L (39-6) 3387012 - 3387015. -J 


March 8: “The Beggar Student” ( Mil- 
lOcker). 

BELGIUM 


ANTWERP. Elisabethzaal (tel: 237. 
22.47). 

CONCERT — March 19: Flandere 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Thomas 
Sauderling conductor. Malcolm 
Frager piano (Mendelssohn. Schu- 
mann). 

•Royal Flemish Opera (tel: 
233.66.85). 

OPERA — March 2. 8. 10: “The 
Rake’s Progress” (Stravinsky). 
OPERETTA — March 16. 17, 20. 22, 
24: “Grifin Maritza” (Kalman). 
BRUSSELS. Opera National (id: 
217JJ2.1J). 

OPERA— March 10 and 15: “LaCle- 
menzadi Tito (Mozart). 

•Palaisdes Beaux Amt td : 5 1 1 29.95). 
CONCERTS — Belgian National Or- 
chestra — March 8: Georges Octors 
conductor. Miriam Fried violin 
(Tchaikovsky). 

March 24: Mario Venzago conductor. 
Walter Boeydens darinene (Debussy. 
Weber). 

March 28: John Currie conductor 


ALS — March 7: Vladimir 
Ashkenazy piano (Rachmaninov). 
March?: BngitieFassbander soprano. 
Irwin Gage piano. 

GHENT. Royal Opera (tel: 25-24.25). 
OPERA — March 15. 17. 23: “The 
Rake’s Progress" (Stravinsky). 
OPERETTA — March l. 3. 6. 9. 10: 
“Grafin Maritza” (Kalman). 

LIEGE. Theatre Royal (tel : 23.59. 1 0 j. 
OPERA — March 1.3. 14. 16: “Turao- 
dol" ( Puccini). 


DENMARK 


COPENHAGEN. Nikolaj Gallery 
(tel: 15.16.26i. 

RECITAL — March 10: Harry Spar- 
nay clarinet. Rosalia Sevan piano. 
•Radio House Concert Hall lid: 
35.06.471. 

CONCERTS — Radio Symphony Or- 
chestra — March 7 and 8: Richard 
Hick ox conductor (Handel). 

March 14: James Galway conductor 
( HandeL Schubert). 

March 28 and 29: Frank Shipway con- 
ductor (Mendelssohn. Tcbaikovskv). 
March 3 1 : Radio Light Orchestra. Ta- 
deusz Wojciechowski (Debussy. We- 
ber). 

•Rosenborg Castle (id: 15J2-86). 
EXHIBITION— To March! J; “Am- 
ber at Rosenborg.” 

•Tivoli Hall (td: 14. 17.65 >. 

BALLET — March 2 and 6: “Pe- 
trushka" i Fokine. Stravinsky). 
OPERA — March 4: "Wozzeck" 
(Berg). 

March 6: “Tosca" ( Puccini). 


ENGLAND 


LONDON. Barbican Centre Mel: 
628.87.95 j. 

Barbican Art Gallerv — To April 8: 
“Munch and the Workers.' '“T radi tier, 
and Renewal: Contemporary .Art in 
tbeGerman Democratic Republic." 
March 12- April 14: ‘'Mahler. Vienna. '' 
Barbican Hall — London Swaphony 
Orchestra — March 2: Richard 
Hickox conductor. Jorge Bole: piano 
(Beethoven. Rossini). 

March 4: Paul Capoloaao conductor. 
Ozan Marsh piano < Bee uwjcn. Liszt >. 
March 7: Yoel Leri conductor. Chris- 
tian Zacharias piano (Profokiev. 

Rachmaninov). 

March 10: Sir Charles Groves conduc- 
tor) Bcethm nil. 

March 28: Claudio Abbado conduc- 


tor. Bruno Camni/Aotoaio Balista pi- 
ano (Berio. Mahler). 

March 8: London Concert Orchestra, 
David Coleman conductor (Tchaikov- 
sky. Weber). 

March 13: Pnglidi Chamber Orches- 
tra. Josi-Lurs Garcia conductor (Vi- 
valdt). 

March 17: London Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. Maurice Handford conduc- 
tor, William Stephenson piano (Han- 
dcL Rachmaninov). 

March 25: BBC Symphony Orchestra. 
Yevgeny Svetlanov conductor. Ernst 
Kovack violin (Sibelius, Tchaikov- 
sky). 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 
speare Company — March 2, 4, 5. 15, 
16. 18. 19: “Twelfth Nighf (Shake- 
speare). 

March6.7,2i 23: “Comedy of Errors 
(Shakespeare). 

March 8. 9. 11-14, 20, 21: “Mother 
Courage" (Brecht). 

•British Museum (id: 636.15 -55). 
EXHIBITION —To March 10: “The 
Golden Age of Anglo-Saxon Art: 966- 
1066." 

•Hayward Gallery (td: 928.57.08k 
EXHIBITIONS— To April 21: “Re- 
noir.” “John Walker Paintings from 
the Alba and Oceania Series.” 
•Londoo Coliseum (id: 836.01.1 Ik 
OPERA — March L 8. 13. 16. 21. 28: 
“Count Ory” (Rossini). 

March 6. 9. 12. 14. 22. 26, 29: “Xercs” 
(Handel). 

March 7 : “Rigoletto” (Verdi). 

March 15. 20. 23. 27. 30: “Fiddk>” 
(Beethoven). 

•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734 90.52). 

EXHi BiriON —To March 31 : “Cha- 
gall” 

•Royal Opera (id: 240.10.66). 
BALLET— March 2.6. 25,28: “Ballet 
Imperial'' (Balanchine. Petipa). “Dif- 
ferent Drummer" (MacMillan. We- 
bern/ Shoenbeig). “Facade” (Ashton. 
Walton). 

OPERA — March4.7. 13, 15. 18.21:“! 
Capuleti e i Montecchi” (Bellini). 
March 5. 8. 11, 16: “Samson" (Han- 
dd). 

•Tate Gallery fid: 82U3.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To March 3|: 
“William James Muller." “John Walk- 
er Prints 1976-1984“ 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (id: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS— To April 14: “Mi- 
chael * Anaric' Rookcr (1743-1801) 
and John Variey 1 1 778- 1 842).” 

To June 9: “The People and Places of 
Constantinople: watercolours by 
Amadeo. Count Preriosu 1816-1882). 

FINLAND 

HELSINKI. Finlandia Hall (Lei: 
40241). 

CONCERT — March 6: Radio Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Erich Bergri con- 
ductor* Bruckner). 

March 7: Helsinki Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. Esa-Pekka Salonen conductor 
t Berio). 

March 13: Radio Symphony Orches- 
tra. Leif Segersiam conductor. Bruno 
Canine/ Antonio Bali is u piano (Bou- 
lez). 

March 15: Leningrad Philharmonic 
Orchestra. Jwgcni M ravins Id conduc- 
tor (Mozart. Tchaikovsky ). 

March 25: Vienna Philharmoniker. 
Lorin Moazei conductor ( Beethoven. 
Haydn i. 

FRANCE 

LYON. Matson de la Danse (tel: 
829.43.44). 

DANCE — M arch 2: Comp jgnjc Ec- 
chymose. Patrick Roger choreogra- 
pher. 

March 14-17: Lindsay Kemp Compa- 
ny t“ Midsummer Night's Dream"). 
NICE. Galcric d'Art Contcmporain 
r tel 6137. II). 


EXHIBITION — March 6-24: “Chris- 
tian Vialard.” 

•Galerie des Ponchettes (tel: 


“Girard Titus Car- 


623124). 

EXHIBITION — 

mcl." 

PARIS, Centre Georges Pompidou 
(id: 277.I2J3). 

CONCERT— March 20: Groupe Vo- 
cal de France, Michd Tranchant con- 
ductor (Bousch, Mcfanoj. 
EXHIBITION —To April 8: “Klaus 
Rinke.” 

• Fondauon des Etais-Unis (tel: 
58935.77). 

RECITAL — Shannon Scott clarin- 
eue, Alexander Wimastm piano, Ga- 
briel yn Watson soprano (Brahms. 
Schumann). 

• Mus6e d'Art Moderne (tel: 
723.6 U7). 

EXHIBITION— ToMarch31 : "Gus- 
tav Mahler.” 

•Muste de la Publialfc (td: 246. 
13.09). 

EXHIBITION — To April 15: 
“French Film Posters." 

• Musee du Grand Palais (tel: 
26154.10). 

EXHIBITIONS — To April 15: 
“EdouanJ Plgnoo." 

To April 22: "Impressionism and the 
French Countryside.” 

•Musee du Louvre (id: 260-39.26). 
EXHIBITIONS— To April 15: “Ho- 
bem at the Louvre." 

To May 6: “French Engravers from the 
XVW Century.” 

•Music Rodin (td: 705.0134). 
EXHIBITIONS— ToMarch 18: “Ro- 
din Drawings." 

To April 15: “Robert Jacobsen." 
•Opera (td: 74237.50). 

OPERA— March 7 and 9: “Wonedt” 


olle de NethQy (id: 7220435). 
LECTURE — March 8: Jacques Cous- 
teau, “The Amazon.” 

•Salle Gaveau (tel: 5633030). 
CONCERT— March!: Ensemble Or- 
chestrale de Paris. Jacques Houtmann 
conductor. Joseph Suk violin (Beetho- 
ven. Mozart). 

RECITALS — March 6: Eric Hdd- 
sieck piano (Bach, Beethoven). 

March 8: ELiane Ricbepin piano (Cho- 
pin. Schumann). 

March 14: David Nonhington piano 
(Beethoven. Liszt). 

•Salle Pleyel (563.07.96). 

CONCERT — Man* 27: Orchestic 
National de France. Roberto Abbado 
conductor, Yo Yo Mb cello (Brahms, 
Dvorak). 

•Thiiirede Paris (id: 280.0930). 
BALLET — March 19-23: Le Jeane 
Ballet de France. 

•Thcdtrc des Champs Bysies (td: 
723.47.77). 

CONCERT — March 20: Orchestra 
National de France. Jeffrey Tate con- 
dii cior ( Mozart). 

RECITAL— March 8: Vladimir Ash- 
kenazy piano f Rachmaninov). 

•Thfedtre Musical de Paris (tel: 
261.19.83). 

CONCERTS — March 3: Nice Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra. Berislav Klobu- 
dar conductor. Michael Rudy piano 
i Prokofiev. Roussel). 

March 8: Vienna Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. Lorin Maazel conductor 
i Haydn. Strauss). 

March II: Lyon National Orchestra. 
Maurice Arena conductor. Margarita 
Castro-Al berry soprano (Verdi). 
OPERA— March 2. 3.5. 6.7, 9. 10. 12. 
14. 16; “LaTraviata" (Verdi). 

March 25-April 9: “Ariodante" (Han- 
del). 

GERMANY 

BERLIN. Deutsche Oper (tel: 

341.44.49). 

OPERA — March 2: “Cannon" (Bi- 
zet). 

March 5: “Lulu" (Berg). 


March 24. 27, 30: “Siegfried” (Wag- 
ner). 

COLOGNE, Oper der Siadt (tek 
2135.81). 

OPERA — Marti 3: “Idoroeneo, Redi 
Creta” (Mozart). 

March 8. 11. 13. 19: “The Thievish 
Magpie" (Rossini J. 

March 9, 10. 24: “Die ZauberflOte” 
(Mozart). 

March 17 and 22: “Lohengrin" (Wag- 
ner). 

March20, 23, 27.29: “Madame Butter- 
fly" (Pocdni). 

March 28 and 31: “Le Nazze di Fi- 
garo” (Mozart). 

FRANKFURT, Alte Oper Frankfurt 
(td: 134.04.00). 

CONCERTS — March 10 and 11: 
Frankfurt Opera and Museum Or- 
chestra, Yuri Ahrooovuch conductor, 
Brigiue Engera piano (Tchaikovsky). 
RECITALS — Man* 5: Heinrich 
Scitiff cello (Bach). 

March 10: Gerhard Mantd cello. Zo- 
oms Ruzx±ova harps ich ord (Bach. 

Timmerman ) 

March 13: IvoPogordich piano (Cho- 
pin, Prokofiev). 

March 24: Yehudi Mennhin violin 
(Bach). 

•Cafe Theater (td: 77.74.66). 
THEATER — Through March: “The 
Mousetrap” (Christie). 

•Oper Frankfurt (id: 2562335). 
OPERA — March 2: “The Flying 
Dutchman” (Wagner). 

March 3: “Don Giovanni" (Mozart). 
March 10: “Eugene Onegin" (Tchai- 
kovsky). 

March 14: “La Bohtanc” (Picdni). 
March 17: “Aida” (Verdi). 
HAMBURG, Staatsoper (tel: 
35.1535). 

BALLET — March 2: “St Matthew 
Passkm” (Neumder, Bach). 

OPERA — Marti 3 and 7: “Der Ro- 
senkavalieT (R. Strauss). 

March 5 and 10: “La Bonfeme” (Pucci- 
ni). 

March 7, 13. 20: “Arabella” (R. 
Strauss). 

March 8: “Der TroubadoT (Verdi). 
March 22: “Madame Butterfly” (rue- 
dm). 

March 23 and 27: “Ariadne auf Nax- 
os" (R- Strauss). 

March 25: “Cod fan tutte" Mozart). 
March 28: “Der FreuchOtz* (Weber). 
MUSICAL — March 9, 12, 29: “My 
Fair Lady” (Loner, Loewe). 
MUNICH, National Theater (td: 
22.J3.16). 

OPERETTA —Feb. 17 and 19: “Die 
Ftedermaus” (J. Strauss). 

ITALY 


BOLOGNA. Galleria d'Arte Mo- 
derns CieL 503839). 
EXHIBITIONS— To March 18: “Le 
Corbusier: Journey to the Far East. 
1911." 

•T catro Comunale (let: 222939). 
RECITALS — March4: AugustinDu- 
may violin. Michel Dalbcrto (nano 
(Schumann. R. Strauss). 

March 18: Giorgio Zagnooi naif, 
Alddo Benniti viola. Giovanni Adamo 
violin. Franca Bruni cello (Mozart). 
GENOA. Team? Margheriu (tel: 
58.93.29). 

OPERA — March 3. 5. 8. 10: “Le 
Nazze di Figaro" (Mozart). 

March 29 and 31 : “Aida” (Verdi). 
MILAN, PUdigiione tf Arte Goniem- 
poranca(td: 784638). 
EXHIBITIONS — March 14-AprB 
28 : “Afra and Tobia Scarpa: architects 
and designers," The Imaginary and 
the Real: Paolo De Poli, Candidt Fior, 
Toni Zuccheri.” 

•Tcatro alia Scala (tel: 80.70.42). 
BALLET— March 2. 3.7, 10: “Swan 


ROME, Accademia Nazionale di San- 
ta CetiEaftd: 679.03.89). ..... ■ 

CONCERTS — Oniestre ddT Aocar 
dw«i» Nazionale de Santa Cfnlin — 
March 3-5: Rieriuim Urban conduc- 
tor, Nikita Magaldf piano (Chopin, 
Dvorak). 

March 10-12: BnrooAprea conductor, 
MassunOiano Damenni (Iws, 
Magler). 

March 17-19: Gianandrea G avaz zem 
conductor .Alessandro Del-oca piano. 
Wieslaw Ochman tenor (Bartok, 
Liszt). 

March 24-26: EngenJochum conduc- 
tor, Gerhard Hetzd violin (Beetho- 
ven). 

March 31: Georges Pr ft tr e conductor 
(Bediaz). 

JAPAN 

TOKYO, AsaM Hall (td: S45.83.4ft). 
RECITAL — March 9: Cristina Orfiz 

niwin ( T ka, Sr h n m m iTi) . 

•Bario HaH(td: 818.4131). 

JAZZ — March6: Faskmatein Jazz. 
•Budokan (td: 402.72.81). 

ROCK — March IS: BozScaggs. 
•Banka Kaikan Hafl (td: 82831.1 1). 
CONCERTS — March 7: Gevand- 
hau5 Quartet (Beethoven, Mozart).' . 
March 8: Telemann Chamber Orches- 
tra, Takebaru Nobuhara ct ndnrtor . 
Kdko Urushibara violin, Takoshi Ki- 
tayama recorder (Vivaldi). 

March 14: Yomiari Nippon Sympho- 
ny Orchestra, Karl Mtmdnngpr con-' 
doctor. Amete Nicold flute (Bach). 
RECITALS — March 2: Jean-Pieue - 
WaDez violin, Mariko Hone piano 
(Beethoven, Schuben). 

March 4: Amde Nkolet Ontc (Bach, 
Scarlatti). 

•Fmlwara Opera (td: 3713334). 
OPERA — Mardt 9-11: “Carmen” 
(Bizet). 

•Goto Museum (td: 703.0631) 
EXHIBITION —To March 31: “Ka- 
tana Cdletion." 

•Japan Folkcraft Museum (tel: 
467.45,27). 

EXHIBITION — To March 24: “Ainu 
Craft.” 

• Kanagawa Kenmin Hall (tel: 

45330^). 

OPERETTA —March 23: “Die Flts 
dermaus” (Strauss). 

March 24: “The Merry Widow” (Le- 
har). 

•Kan-i Hoken Hafl (td: 4803 1.1 1). 
CONCERT — March 3: Tokyo Met- 


ier, Pliane Rodrigues piano (Haytjn, 
Mtwt) .. Vf.i 

Mart* 23: Ra^ pffirawinc Or- 
chestra. Richard Dufaflo condnCtor 
(Ives, Revodtas). 

March 30: Sdifiabag Ensemble(lCn- 

danhh.Stg>hanX 

RECITALS —March 3: Ndson Fre- 
ire piano (Chopin, Debussy). 

Man* 6; Angela Schouten/Jeok Ek- 
kd piano (Brahms, Mozart). 

March 10: Ons n o ph er Oaf a Sager pi- : 
ano (Bach). 

March 11: Imogen Cooper piapo 


Bertimi 

•Nerima Banka Center (tel: 

993.33.11) . 

RECITAL — March 3: Teiko Maeba- 
shi violin, Kyoko Edo piano. Keni- 

•fflowa Womea's^IMventty (te^i 

403.80.11) . 

CONCERTS — March 5, 7, 18: PfriL 
harmoma Orchestra of London, SL 
mon Rattle- conductor (Beriioz, De- 
bussy). 

•Yamatane Museum (td: 669. 40361 
EXHIBITION— To March 24: “Be- 
quest,” Japanese paintings and crafts. 


March 22: Charles van Tassd bari- 
tone, Marten van Nicukctfccn piano 
(Schumann). 

March 29: George Pieteisoa cUrinel, 
Ranald Bnmtigam piano (Prokofiev! 
•Print Galknrftd: 22.42.651 
EXHIBITION —To March 8: “Mi- 
cbiaki Sakamoto.” 

•Rijksuntseum Vincent Van Gogh 
(td: 76.48BI). 

EXHIBrnON —To April 15: “Dutch 
Identity.” 


EDINBURGH, National Gallery (id: 
556.89Jji T 

EXHIBITION — To April 28: "The 

Face of Nature: Landscape drawings 

from the permanent collection." 
•Usher Hall (td: 228.1 135). 
CONCERTS — Scottish National Or- 
chestra — March 8; Sir Alexander 
Gibsonamdnctor, Salvatore Accaido 
violin (Dvorad, Profokiev). 

March 15: Fhfiip Ledger conductor, 
Anne Dawson soprano (Handd). ' 

Marx* 22: Neeme Jam' conductor, EU- 
sabeth Soderstrom soprano (Korea- 
kov. Tchaikovsky). 

March 29: Neemeiarvi conductor, Al- 
fred Breodd piano (Beethoven. S. 
Strauss). 


. rasf Id: 251.692b! 
OPERA — March 3, 6, 8, 10, 14, 17: 
“The Escape from the Seraglio" (Mo- 
an). 

March 5. 12^26: “FuJeOo" (Beetho- 
ven). 

•TonhaDefteL 221^2.83! " “ 

CONCERTS — March 3: Collegium 
MnstcomZuridi, PanISacher conduc- 
tor (Barih. Mozart). 

Marc* 6: ToohaUe Orchestra, JefEcey 
Tate condactoc. Frank Peter Zfamhra - 
manh violin (Busoni. Mozart). 


( Brahms , grl /n lu-rty 

March 28: Empnre bass Quiniet 
( Pmufe) , Rac hmanin o v) . 

RECITALS —March II: Em Wto 
Paik piano (Bach, Bosom). .• 

March 17: Werner Bfiitsdn/ Georges 
Martmpxano (Mozart, Sdmben). - 


OMIiD STATES 


NEW YORK, Gog ge nh dm Mpsetyn 


OPERA— March 15. 17.20,22,24,26. 
29. 3 1 : “Die ZauberflOte” (Mozart). 


AMSTERDAM. Concer te ebouwftd: 

71B3.45L 

CONCERTS — March 2: Coocertge- 
bo uw orkest, Bernard Haitinfccondac- 
tor (Brahms, Mozart). 

March 5: Amsterdam PhUhaimanie 
Orchestra, Anton Kernes conductor, 
Jean- Yves Thibuidet mano (Chopin. 
Tchaikovskyj. 

March 12: Amsterdam PhUhanoonic 
Orchestra. Emmanud Krivine oon- 
ductcr, Deszo Ranlti piano (Mozart 
Schubert). . . . 

Man* 16: Netbahmds Chamber Or- 
chestra, Antom Ros-Mafba condoc- 


EXHIBmoi 

Morton. 


-ToMarch 24: “Rfee 


. .** V 


-T* 


•'K-- 

[■ iC 








J ■? 


1944." 

ToApril2t: “FrankcnthaleronPapdn 
A Retraspeethie, 1950-84.” I 

•Metropolitan Museum at Art (td: 
535.77: ft!' T 

EXHIBITION —To April 14: Tlie 
Age of Caravaggio.” ' - 1 

ToS«?>Ll:"MmandtheHcase." J 
•Museum - of Modern: ^Art. ' 
[id:708.94j00). . l * 

I—ToMarcb 11: 


To May “Fle»m Matisse." ' 

To Jane4i“Hemi Rousseau.” 



1 .. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1985 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


TRAVEL 


W York-Nice Nonstop: g ome Ferr y Rides Can Be Voyages 


.sign of a Boom Time? 


by Roger Codis 


P AN AM is keeping faith with its 
pioneering tradition by being the 
fast airline to inaugurate a nonstop 
scheduled service between the south 
of France and North America. Starring on 
■ April 29 there win be one flight a day in each 
• direction between Nice and New York. 

The flying time to New York wffl be 8 
■ hours 35 minutes and one hour less the other 
way. This should save up to six. horns on the 
round trip, which now means changing 
planes in Paris. 

The first Boeing 747 of flight PA-82 will 
leave John F. Kennedy Airport in New York 
at 5:25 P.M. on April 28 and arrive at Nice- 
Cdte d'Azur Airport at 7 the next morning. 
The plane will continue to Rome, arriving 
there at 9. The return flight (PA-83) will 
leave Rome at 10:50 A.M. and Nice at 1:05 


A.M- Unfortunately, it was longer on per- 
orations than facts' “What is your forecast 
for passengers and freight to New York?" 
“This is confidential.” “Will local passengers 
in Nice be allowed to board the Rome leg?" 
"Probably, but we’re stiH awaiting confirma- 
tion from the French authorities-" “What 
will the fanes be from Nice to New York?" 
“We will follow the 1ATA tariffs for the 
same route.” 

Yet, according to Pan Am's sales agent in 
Nice, its business-class and economy fares 


there at 9. The return flight (PA-83) 
leave Rome at 10:50 A.M. and Nice at 


. P.M., reaching New York at 3:40 and San 

■ Francisco, its final destination, at 8: 15 P.M. 

This is welcome news for the Nice-Cdte 
d’Azur Airport, which although slightly be- 

■ hind Marseille in total number of passengers 
(about 42 million each last year), is the 

■ second most important hub in France (after 
; the two Paris airports, Charles de Gaulle and 

Orly) for international destinations. 

Pan Am officials in London said that they 
did not expect that a strike by transport 
workers that began on Thursday would affect 
plans for the beginning of the New York- 
Nice sendee next month. 

According to preliminary figures, the re- 
s * gion had iS million visitors in 1984, includ- 
ing a record number from the United States 

■ ■ (30 percent more than the previous year), a 

result of the strong dollar. (One tourism 
official talks jocularly about devising a new 

• system for currency futures based on fluctu- 
ations in the number of U. S. tourists.) 

. Armand Arel Pan Am’s Paris-based man- 
aging director for France, Iberia and Swit- 

- ’ Zetland, says, “My experience has been that 
'• whenever a one-stop or connecting service is 

'replaced by a nonstop service, you can ex- 

- pect a 35-percent increase in local business. 
‘/The added convenience means that more 

■ people wiD come and wQl stay longer." 

This prediction has met with amused 
-k skepticism in Nice, especially by the local 
1 press. And it is hard to imagine how the 

- arrival of a maximum of 138,700 passengers 

■ a year (assumin g that Pan Ams 380-seat 
" 747s are packed to capacity each day) can 
-.galvanize the local business scene to this 
-degree. 

■' But Arel may not be too Far off the mark if 
■•the experience of Atlanta is anything to go 
‘‘by. Since 1981. the opening of direct air 
routes by Sabena, KLM and Lufthansa has 

■ reportedly coincided with a significant in- 

- crease in passenger traffic and overseas in- 
vestment. According to a recent survey, a 

-majority of foreign -owned companies in 

• Georgia cited the availability of noostop 
trans-Atlantic services to and from Atlanta 
as a prime reason for choosing to set up 
business in the state. It may well be true that 
prosperity follows the airplane, as it did the 
■railroads in the 19th century. 

, Industry has been quietly growing along- 
. side tourism on the Core d'Azur. In the last 
. 10 years, 15 U- S. corporations, including 
blue-chip names like Dow, Texas Insim- 

- men is, Searle and IBM, have set up in and 
around the local silicon valley at Valbcmne- 

‘ Sophia- An tipolis, a superbly landscaped sci- 
ence park 15 minutes by car from the airport 
The congress industry, mainly centered in 
(/annes, Nice and Monaco, is booming, 
there are excellent facilities for conferences 
■‘‘at most of die major hotels. Nice is holding 
inauguration ceremonies in early May for its 
huge new cultural and congress complex, 
Acropolis, which has an auditorium for 


AcropoKs, w 
•2,500 people. 


Nice airport officials reckon that business 
tr affic is growing at a faster rate (8 to 9 
•reent a year) than total traffic and re pre- 
sents 25 percent of arrivals and departures. 

■ • As if to prove that it’s not all play and no 
work on the Cflle d’Azur, a press conference 
was held at the relatively brisk hour of 9 


are higher than those quoted by Air France. 
Round-trip fares to New York in business 
class are 14.335 francs (Pan Am) versus 
[1,900 (Air France) and in economy are 
9,165 francs (Pan Am) versus 8.840 (Air 
France). 

The Pan Am 747s have 25 first-class, 52 
business-class and 303 economy seats on its 
refurbished planes. “The front of the plane is 
about 22 percent of the seats and a third of 
the revenue. If we do our job right, the back 
of the bus trill pay the expense of the air- 
plane." Arel says. 

The question is. will the business traveler 
be prepared to pay a premium or 12 percent 
in business class for the convenience of a 
nonstop flight? Not to mention being able to 
get a much cheaper /are by flying via Lon- 
don or perhaps Amsterdam. 

Air France says it will start nonstop flights 
between New York and Nice from June 8 


Pan Am to start 
Cote d’Azur 
flights in April 


until the end of September on an experimen- 
tal basis. Initially, there will be one flight 
every 15 days, increasing later to one Right a 
week. The service will be operated by Air 
Charter, an Air France subsidiary, and wiD 
be all-economy class with 479 seats. 

Pan Am last flew New York-Nice in 1975, 
a 707 service with stopovers in Lisbon and 
Barcelona. The flights were abandoned for 
economic reasons when Pan Am replaced its 
fleet of 707s with the larger 747s. 

According to Andre- Daniel Carrt, direc- 
tor of Nice airport, the 747 killed off several 
long-distance routes and reduced frequency 
cm others. “The 747 caused a revolution." 
Arel says. He points out that it forced air- 
lines into their present “hub and spokeT 
strategy, by which smaller capacity planes 
like the Boeing 727 and later the wide-bod- 
ied Airbus and Boeing 767. feed major air- 
port hubs from smaller centers. With the 
exp ansio n of its international and domestic 
routes. Nice is now a major European hub. 

Nice is also one of the most attractive 
airports in Europe. You come in over the sea 
to land, touching down on the edge of the 
runway to palm trees and a fragrant breeze. 
It is still on a human scale, which means you 
can often walk to a plane from the two small 
departure lounges. 

But this will change. Carr* says that work 
began this month on a new airport terminal, 
800 meters (about half a mile) from the 
present one. This will be opened in April 
1987 and will be used exclusively for Paris 
flights, which account for half the traffic of 
the airport, two million passengers a year. 

On Friday evenings crowd-watching can 
be good value when the flights from Paris 
arrive. After all this is the Cote d’Azur. There 
are groupies and weekend wives, dowagers 
waving vintage arms, a gaggle of executives 
on their way to lubricate a conference in 
Monte Carlo, machos in Pierre Cardin dun- 
garees and ambiguous ladies with impatient 
poodles. 

The first flight to Paris is at 6:45 A.M. On 
Monday mornings it is filled with sun- 
tanned executives who seem not quite to 
have decided whether they are on business or 
pleasure. 

There are worse kinds of identity crises. ■ 


by Paul Grimes 

N EW YORK — To many Ameri- 
cans, travel by ferryboat seems 
austere. They conjure visions- of 
crowded, squat vessels, jammed 
with commuters, such as the boats that ply 
the Upper New York Bay between Staten 
Island and Manhattan. The main purpose of 
traveling on such vessels is to get somewhere 
as efficiently as possible, not to enjoy the 
voyage. 

Ferries, however, can be many things. 
They pan involve Spartan trips of perhaps 
only a few minutes, taking you from one side 
of a narrow river to the other. But applying 
the term loosely, as many ferry lines do, they 
can also involve many hours or even several 
days of leisurely, comfortable, entertaining 
sailing aboard multideck liners, crossing 
such substantial bodies of water as the En- 
glish Channel between Britain and France, 
the Bay of Fundy between Nova Scotia and 
Maine, the Adriatic Sea between Italy and 
Greece or the Canton River estuary between 
Hong Kong and Macao. 

Vacation travel by ferry has come a long 
way in recent years. For example, S e a link . a 
British company with car ferries that ply the 
English Channel and Irish Sea, puts out a 
color brochure of nearly 50 pages, explaining 
exactly where and when they go, for how 
much, and what sort of facilities are avail- 
able. Between Dover, England, and Calais, 


France, a one-and-a-half-hour crossing, its 
ships have bars, food service, television view- 
ing areas and special rooms for mothers with 
babies. . . , 

F&O Ferries, a subsidiary of Bmams 
P&O Lines, which also plies the channel and 
has services to the Orkney and. Shetland 
also ha; mother-and-baby rooms 
and bars phis self-service restaurants, televi- 
sion areas, gamp rooms for children and 
reclining seats for overnight crossings- Both 

lines also offer cabins at extra fare, a popular 

facility on overnight trips, such as between 
Harwich, England, and nook of Holland, a 
port 10 miles southwest of The Hague. Most 
internatio nal crossings in Europe offer duty- 
free shopping, which attracts many passen- 
gers. 


always subject to change, but here are some 
rough examples of what to expect: 

On SmHtA until April 30, the seven-and- 
a- half-hour voyage from Harwich to Hook 
of HoDand will run about SI 9 an adult in 
second class and $23 in first cl a s s, based 
upon recent exchange rates between the dol- 
lar and the British pound. From May 1 
through Sept. 15 each fare will be about 
SI. 15 higher. Children under 14 pay half 
fare. 

These rates are for those traveling without 


lies of what to expect: 
t until April 30, the se 


cars. If you have a car, fares areabout$I9an 
adult plus $4 .SO extra for a first-class supple- 
ment, plus S20 to $47 for each vehicle, de- 
pending on when you go. Berths run from 
about $2.80 on day sailings and $6.15 over- 
night to $24 JO by day and $49 by night for 
an entire four-berth stateroom, inauding 
shower and toileL Children in cars often are 
ferried free. 

In high season, sleeping accommodations 
often must be reserved far in advance. This is 

Ferries can involve 
Spartan trips of only a 
few minutes, or they 
can involve many hours 
or even several days of 
leisurely sailing. 

not necessarily as formidable a chore as it 
may first seem, since marry major feny lines 
have representatives in major rides. Travel 
often have their brochures, or at least 
can find schedules and rates. You also can 
often find out about foreign ferry services by 
visiting or writing to the official tourist bu- 
reaus that many foreign governments main- 
tain. In fact, many forties are government- 


owned and operated, often through the state 
railway system. 

Reservations, made well in advance, are 
often necessary if you plan to take your tar 
aboard, such as on the popular Bay of run ay 
routes between Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, and 
Bar Harbor and Portland, Maine. (The 11- 
hour Yarmouth-Portland crossing, wlucn 
operates from May through October, has 
fares of $60 a car and $35 a passenger; 
children half price). 


P URCHASERS of Eurailpass. good 
for ixavel on the railroads of 16 coun- 
tries, will find that it is valid for many 
feny services, too, either at no additional 
cost or at substantially reduced rates. 
Among them are crossings within or between 
the S candinav ian countries; between Spain 
and Morocco (Tangier); between Rossiare, 
Ireland, and Le Havre and Cherbourg, 
France, and between Brindisi, Italy, and 
Patras. Greece. 

If you embark at Brindisi or Patras, how- 
ever, be carefuL Only the HeUenic-Mediter- 
r anean and Adriatica Lines honor the Eur- 
ailpass (though in midsummer they charge 
holders about $12. subject to change), but 
other companies often try to entice passen- 
gers by implying that they accept it, too. 
Once they have you on board, when it is too 
late for you to change your mind, they de- 
mand their normal fare. H 

© } 985 The New York Tima 


Twin Peaks 


Continued from page 7 


excited at the arrival of “old Bach," had him 
improvise on a royal theme and try out 
several newfangled SObermann pianos that 
the palace had acquired. Bach apparently 
did not record his reactions to the new in- 
strument, but that may have been because he 
was too busy to bother: He went home and 
wrote what must be considered the most 
impressive bread-and-butter note in history. 
The “Musical Offering," a gift to Frederick, 
was one of the few works printed in its 
entirety during Bach’s lifetime. 

C OMPARED to Handel, Bach led a 
placid life. Nevertheless, the Leipzig 
cantor, too. bad a reputation for 
prickliness. As a few documents show, he 
stood up to his church superiors with gump- 
tion when his musical standards were threat- 
ened. Early on, at least he showed be could 
be pugnacious when crossed. He once was 
surrounded and threatened by six fellow 
students, one of whose talent as a bassoonist 
he had maligned. (Bach had called him a 
“nannygoat," which is about as cruel a re- 
mark as you could make about a reed play- 
er.) After being hit in the face with a stick, 
young Bach settled the argument by drawing 
his sword. Unlike the bachelor Handel, Bach 
took wives, two of them, and as every writer 
must point out had 20 children. What is less 
often mentioned is that Bach's life was veiled 
in tragedy. In those days, of course, early 
death was common. StiH. what must it have 
been like for an artist of Bach's sensibilities 
to live in almost constant mourning? His 
first wife died, and by the time of his own 
death in 1750 only nine of his 20 children 
were alive. His second wife. Anna Magdale- 
na, died in poverty 10 years later, even 
though by that time several of the sons were 
already famous musicians on their own. 

Whereas Handel's reputation was on the 
rise when he died, Bach was already an 
anachronism, acknowledged as a fine organ- 
ist but condescended to as a composer. He 
'was thought of as a pedantic keeper of the 
contrapuntal flame in a time when people 
wasted music to break away from the dry 
old Baroque formalities. Handel faced with 
the disastrous collapse of the Italian opera 
vogue in London, had turned to the more 
accessible genre of the English-language ora- 
torio. Bach did not have that kind of tem- 
perament, though he could be surprisingly 
flexible at times. He could write in a simple, 
accessible style when he chose — any of the 
four orchestral suites, for instance, can be 


played on a pop concert program without ! 
conf using anyone — but as he grew older he 
wisfi grew increasingly insistent on summing 
up what he and his predecessors had known 
about music. His “Well-Tempered Clavier,” 
“Art of the Fugue" and “Musical Offering" 
must have seemed tike museum exhibits to 
most of his contemporaries. 

Lucidly for him, and for music listeners as 
well Bach's grandest choral works cannot be 
played to death. By their nature they are 
saved from the fate of “Messiah," a work 
whose very greatness has doomed it to be a 
musical “Mona lisa." The “St Matthew 
Passion" and the B- minor Mass simply de- 
mand too much of both audiences and per- 
formers ever to become everyday concert 
fare. Most of the cantatas are known only to 
devotees even now. The greater Bach still 
does not move in wide circles and probably 
never will H is music is famous, sometimes 
even f amiliar , but not quite popular. That 
kind of success might not have satisfied 
Handel whose whole career was geared to 
the theater and popular yyJarm, but it is one 
more way in which the icons from Halle and 
Eisenach can be told apart 

If you want to believe the difference 
makes Bach the greater composer of the two, 
go right ahead. Even some musicians will 
agree with you. Myself, I am firmly of two 
minds on the question. ■ 

© 1985 The New York Times 


QpjTip 

thevlorld 



The International Herald Tribune. Bringing the WcckFs Most Important 
Nctvs to the World's Most Important Audience: 


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THE NEW YORK. HERALD 


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RECORD-BREAKING FLIGHT 


Roar Welcome at Field 
As Lone American LAnds After 
Ocean Dash of 33hr. 30min 


p— — ■»» »■_- □ I CeoUdge’e MeaeageGree iMLimdbergh 






London Celebrates Handel’s Birthday 






Lindbergh TeU* of Hu Flight; 
‘Not Really Sleepy,' He Say*; 
Woe Within Ten Feet of Sea 


by Henry Pleasants 

I ONDON — Both the Royal Opera and 
the English National Opera are ob- 
serving the tercentenary of Han- 
mi del’s birth with new productions, 
the Royal Opera with a staged version of his 
. oratorio “Samson," and the ENO with his 
serio-comic opera “Xerxes," familiar to most 
Lay music lovers as the source of the famous 
"“Largo” (actually a “largbetto"). 

All productions of Handel’s stage works 
■face the problem of what to do about those 
long, often da capo, anas and the orchestral 
interludes between their various sections, 
which leave the soloists with nothing to do 
but await their next entrance. 

In the case of “Samson” the. problem is 
compounded by the fact that it was con- 
ceived as an oratorio, leaving it to the pro- 
ducer to provide setting and dramatic, even 
choreographic, continuity- If Elijah Mo- 
[■ shinsk y and his designer, Timothy O'Brien, 
‘ are less successful than Nicholas Hytner and 
JDavid Fielding with "Xerxes" in satisfying 
the requirements, it is partly because Hytner 
and Fielding have had the more grateful 
■ task. 

But there is another problem in staging 
'Handel. Too much attention to spectacle 
■and stage business can end in distracting the 
audience's reception of the music, and thus 


prove counterproductive. Again, in these 
productions, Hytner and Fielding have had 
the easier challenge, the opera having been 
conceived for the stage in the first place and, 
as a comedy, being less burdened than Han- 
del’s serious operas with overlong and too 
numerous arias. 

Granted that their task was the more 
grateful Hytner and Fielding have made a 
brilliant success of their undertaking Like 
Moshinsky and O’Brien, they have chosen 
an 18th-century (Handel iart) rather than a 
historically accurate setting, an enormous 
reproduction of Roubiliac's famous statue of 
Handel as Apollo suggesting the Vauxhall 
Gardens, for which it was done. Chorus and 
supernumeraries are ingeniously employed 
often choreographically, as audience and 
spectators. The ruins of Persepotis, seen in 
the distance, are a nice touch. Hytner and 
Fielding have sensed that Handel may have 
had his tongue in bis cheek in composing 
“Xerxes," and have staged it as a seno-up of 
opera- seria. It works, admirably and delight- 
fully. 

U PDATING works less well for “Sam- 
son," if only because it is a biblical 
tale and a serious subject, its serious- 
ness magnified by the central tragic figure 
(already shorn and blinded), eompeliingly 
cung and impersonated by Jon Vickers. A 
divisible white arch and a gigantic black 


pillar symbolize the Philistines and the Jews. 

The constant moving about of pillar, arch, 
platforms and other props is obtrusive, dis- 
tracting and superfluous, especially in the 
episode where Samson, alone on something 
that looks like a carnival float, is confronted 
by the giant Harapha. alone on a white 
pulpit. 

Musically, too. “Xerxes" comes off the 
better, due in large measure to Sir Charles 
Mackerras and Noel Davies’s new edition 
and Sir Charles's buoyant conducting of a 
most responsive chamber orchestra, but also 
to astonishingly fluent and often brilliant 
Handdian singing by Ann Murray, Jean 
Rigby. Valerie Maslerson, Lesley Garrett 
and the countertenor Christopher Booth- 
Jones. 

If “Samson 1 ' emerges, musically, a little 
too heavily, it is accountable partly to a 
Vickers's voice and style, better suited to the 
Samson of Saint-SaSos, one of his finest 
roles, and partly to a heavy-sounding instru- 
mentation under the guidance of Julius Ru- 
del. But there Is fine Handelian singing here, 
too. from Sarah Walker, Marie McLaughlin. 
Carol Vaness, Robert Lloyd. John Tomlin- 
son and Kim Begley. 


Heroic Airman, Nonchalant, 
Think t First of HU Mother 



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Further performances of “Samson" March 1 1 
5. & !! and 16; of "Xerxes" March d, 9. 12, | 

14, 22. 26 and April 2. all T3J Jg , .Sg& — 




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THE FRONT PAGE 1887-1980 

International Herald Tribune, Book Division, 

1ST, avenue Charles-de-Gaulle, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 
Ptease check method of payment: 

□ Enclosed is my payment. (Payment can be mode in any 
convertible European currency at currant exchange rotes). 

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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. MARCH 1, 1985 


Thursday^ 


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55V. + Vk 
631k 

16M— Ik 
Mto 
12 

42to— to 
llto— 30k 
36 +1 

41to+ 0k 
37to— to 
4su + to | 
544k + Vk 


64 
114 
TlJ 
114 
124 
141 
U7 
127 
38 17 
if 15 
126 6 

135 
1X7 
134 

141 

138 69 

142 36 

124 13 

34 18 27 

134 300z 

127 24Mz 

136 11 

T3J Tito 

7.1 7 337 

43 9 173 
30 306 

54 9 67 

40 10 327 
84 9 87 

44 14 376 
33272 TO 

21 515 
SJ7 

94 _ 

24 9 
24 14 
28 11 
64 9 
141 9 
XS 7 


1 23% Sto pSfpf *fl7 120 £ Si Wklto 381* gto MdfCC . MO 

sLSf.^!i““s£a:i sag saris 
™-S flS’SBt s sss'tsspia 

r=s ”™“kk£ ’st ajja=s s*.’aisssi“ 

jats sn I3to pSSSdfn X 18 W «} g; S£ + * 2L.5£KJ2?5i£ 

IBM ^Sfc * pSajpr C 130 w 16 iw ** 4% 6to+ to 2J5 llto some at w 

?S*+to jj* L StoS^SSS IS 

’gg+to .« 33” g ^ ’S'esss* s 

P** 

n 5V t i IW WWri 9m ji ol 9&U I* 5 w !H“ 1*^, 

5 Z7to UVi PovlNW jf H K .r S \Kh »k + 0k 25? 5. SwBOH i+J 

a to I7to in* PBVHP •“ }? 15 2*S ink 5%I% Eto gOfc* »jjnr ,■£ 

Zi* Wto Povcst. M 4 17 « W* 22 17 StotPS 1* 

CTk— to "S » KSSf * w to SJ5 »» is*™ ■» 

14to— to JS rrnSn 12 817 56to Ok 360k + Ik gw 

1506— Vk £S 2S KSJ 346 54 7 2565 *M 67V* 47V>»— TVk g Sjr “JT" 

2'*T a £ »* wtoKpST istw S*k SJ +,fc StoSkiSSS 

tSw 3$2 S55J-S* 15 s 22S?32S3!“ 


38 to 27 aoncrf 143 12 7 667 Mto 

1|Vk 1206 SonvCo .150 J 15 8Z1S 181* 

37VS 330k StoUfl 140 64 11 127 2*0* 

38V* 2706 Source 340 U 19 361* 

2106 U SrcCPPf 360 1U 5 301b 

38V* 32 SoJWrlfl 360 U Vf 36 38 

m 38ik swMwn ijo 24 n w 3to 

30to 27 3MtU U0 64 • 2N 3BVfc 

Wk 17% SCalC* 346 1.1 7 3151 m 

19 160* SauttsCo 1.93 108 6 4M9 tm 

M 3SV* SelnOC 380 78 7 131 M* 

371* 370k SNET1 243 74 « 131 370k 

lin 3i to some b* w mu s 3*to 

» 31 to SoUffCo 171 U U 1ST 380k 

36V* 23 SoaTtnd 140 XI 9 3680 33 

wo* 11U SoRoV .13 4 19 473b 15Vk 

90k 6Vk Samar* 40 317 4 *57 1 

to 1406 SwAirl .13 4 15 358 3606 

33» 13to XhTFbt _ 17 1*6 . 131* 

15 >90* SwfGas 146 U « 74 140k 

731* S3 taMI 540 76V I MM 74Vk 


ISVk 

106 —1 
211* + to 
361*— 0* 
706 

ISto— to 
310* + to 

in* + to 

24V* + to 
Tito— to 


POPt.Pt 4» 123 


279k Z3H PoPLOnra« 

241k 30 PoPLdMOKl 114 
660 k 56 V* PaPLPf 080 1M 
2806 220* P0PLdpi3L25 07 
290k 2SVk POPLCIM345 128 
103 941* PaPLPTlXOO 128 
65 561* PDPLpr 040 138 


40to 311* PnwD ZB 56 12 
50V* 40 vk Panwpf 4 A 


501* 40 Vk Ponwp f 250 +4 
250k 30 pmwpf 180 45 


15 27to 3*to 27J*+ to 
II 9*>k 36to MOk + Ik 
Ml 46*. 85 65V*— 0k 

to 35to 25V* 2Sto+ V* 
IS 2fto 29th 39Vh— 0k 
Mbiol 101 Ml —I 
oat 63V* 53V* 831* +1V* 
35 3*06 39k* 3fto— to 
I 57 57 57 

II toto 36to 340k— to 


34to 170k Statov 
32 16V* SIBPnt 

ZI 13 StMoJr 
MV* SDto StOInd 
50V* 370k SWOOti 
3C0k 90k 5IPOCCP 
17 111* SlOfXtoX 

300k 191* SfanWle 
3Sto 331k Stemrtt 
Mto 806 SWM3* 
27V* 1506 StmrfCh 


83 34 11 239 3506 

180 9.1 8 239 JOkv 

83 XS 4* H IS 

30 43 23 

X7 1113513 53V* 

U I 61 36 Vk 

*A ll 311 62** 

34 14 725 53to 

38 17 3400 Sllfc 

X6 12 327 ZI 


I 3SV* 

. Mto+ to 
35to— Ito 
1 3M 
> 3Wk+ 1* 

1 37*6— Vk 
1 44to+ Ik 
1 370k— to 

. 3M 
i 111*— U 
S*to+ to 
3718— tk 
1 3*18— Vk 
36lk— 0k 
: 39* + Ik 
141* ■k 0* 
7to— V* 

: MV— to 
131* 

M0k+ to 
76 — to 

25to+ V* 
304k— to 
1606— to 
33 + to 
no*— oto 

3618+ 0* 
611k— 06 
S2V*— to 


ACQUISITION 

opportuntt 


. %, .. S'an 

1 j.jt'fitth i 


23to+ to 
1Z»+ to 
35M + Ok 

36 +0* 
29»— to 

37 —to 
4to 

TBto— to 


30 18 PKH 88 34 12 538 30 2 9to 30 + to 

40 2406 PPG 180 84 9 756 3706 370k 3706 + to 

36V* VS PSA 80 2J 231 230k 230k 231k 

1906 13to PSA Oof 190 TOO 173 19to 79 79 

13to llto POCAS 146 123 14 T2» 12to 12V* 

179V not PacGE L72 9S 7 1365 170k 17M T70* + N 

420k 309k PacLtS 3428412 131 411*41 411k + to 

39 20to Pdjuan 140 48 14 *3 » » »+Vt 

101* 506 PocRei 4 Sr J 7 70* 71k 70 * + to 

1906 13V* POCRSPI240 126 8 151* 15% 151k 

17V* llto POCSCI 80 25 12 52 16 1506 1506— to 


3006 27» Pome 180 .17 

330* 340* PeiRs X72S146 

170* 14 PHRsW L57 HU 

430* 299* Pfizer 188 17 

279V 12to PtMlPO 


73to 539V PocTkte 580 78 8 1893 7Ht 71 


Floating Rate Notes 


Cowan K*xt BU Ad m 


^ hi . , tr' ii iz T £ n oviSiwcof 

180 »» W 2 “ 5 2L, t S 45H33to StonkW 

X72S146 “ 55 Su . i S 48 3506 SlnnoC 

157 «U » ^ Wto lg*+ to S3to Sta stocShn 

188 17 U13655 «to * 1 £ “to 15to StorEa 

1154 MTV in* Uto+ to 2 vJSforT 


pgSo 1154 Wto 181* M7V+ to 

Alb 31 Pt idfa tof IOJ 2 44 44_ +1 

4m a» pUBSTrS jS m m J JgJ 

1606 9 PhltoEl 220 144 6 1W_ 150k IBk V5*6— to 

2906 22 PhUE pt 380 138 ™= “ “ “ 

321* 24 PTUIE pi 440 134 2,, S 3I_> 

35 25 PhUE of 480 US ’SE 5£ “ Sw. - ’3, 

53V* 40 PhllEpf 740 1X7 IP Si* 52 5E? — * 

ion on ptiDEpt i8i na zr wu 10^. 

ion 61* PhllEpf L33 1X6 t5 W- 9to «* 

57 4] PM IE Of 745 U2 55j* Sffl- ®to— * 

10 60k PIUIEpf 12S 111 ** 

M& 97 PM* el 17XE 144 .SSHI , IS *11 

6> 51 PhllEpf 9JSB 142 10te 67 £ 67 

5506 44 PMIEPt 740 142 1*3 55 + V* 

20 T51A P1UI5ab 1J32 74 11 75 1R* !70k Uto + 0k 


59n aav. Sforar 
2Hk 30 StrtMtn 
230k 14Vk SWORJ 
•V* 31k Suav Sh 


12 10 37 Uto 

58 • 193S 611k 
6J 7 1977 45V* 

18 10 217 36 Vk 
34 10 1M 16M 
34 13 Zkl 30Vfc 

19 12 62 341k 

112 9 91k 

S3 3676 27V* 
34 41 306 

4J M 2 ISO* 
67 W 117 111* 
44 13 19S7 3706 
62 16 MI 1906 
U It SO 301* 
■J 3101 1106 
38 9 11 460* 

21 12 139 279k 

22 9 311 4504 
94 14 141 Uto 

539 31k 

80 J SO 99 
139 2IVk 

JO 47 23 - 166 17 
15 sto 


30«k— to 
1406— Ik I 
611* 

469V— Vk | 


159k— I* 

son + to 

36V*— to 


IMPORTED 

5r * s 


27V* + Ik I 
3to— to 


33to 2106 SMlBkS 120 18 11 157 31V* 


36 2CV6 SunCh 88 15 a 7 31 

MV* 7V* Sun El H 996 

STM 43V* SunCO 240 47 10 078 69 

122 7096 SunCM 229 22 2 101 

47V* 360* Sutttdr 1J0 19 13 259X 46Vk 


Uto 7V* sunMn _ _ - 

34V* 23V* Suprvi 88 XI 11 1538 33 

3»6 19* SupMkt 83 U IS 37 370fc 

170k 14 Swonk 70 58 10 5 Hto 

2396 16to Sytna 140 42 1Z 314 300* 

360k 3 *V* 5vhm Df 280 7.1 6 34 

150k 10 SvmCP 21 270 14 

S7tt 370* Svntu 1.92 38 14 3062 STto 

300k 35* Sysco 46 U 15 58 350* 


Feb. 28 


Dollar 


Cowan N«4 Bid AM 



Caauaa Next BU AM 
to 1M 
W 176 
to 07 

Oto ZK5 
3V6 IM 
Oft 3V5 

m m 

H6 364 
711/674 
706 27-5 
10to 3M 
M 

fto 104 

m im 

to 31-5 
7 257 

7h 204 
8V* 27-4 
109k 304 
A* 154 
Hk 304 
7* 114 
11 364 

H6 274 
Sto 27-7 
VVV 48 
to 134 
to 203 
11 

to 253 


Bankart Trial 76 
Ha Ante Et umk D/71 
BBL75 
BBLTf 

BaindasuazV 
Ba Indnuazff 
BUE07 
BFCEI7 
BFCEodtt 
BfCEkmM 
BPCE19 
BNP75 
BNP 87 
BNP cun 
BNPS6/M 
BNP 79 
BNP If 
BNP 08/71 
BNP 76 

Bq Paribas s«n> 

Bq Warms B7/74 
BardanOtecaK 
BardnnOsasTO 
BtvdavsOteasacrp 

fcrUoYiOsaasM 
Kina Beta parp 
KfelB Bata 77/04 
King Bata 00 
Bran Bank t! 

Beroon Bank Od 91/71 
Kino Bto 74/86 
Kina Bata 79/06 
Cccrffi 


9* 1X5 7782 1 
13 293 7980 1 

to 174 100841 
nn 1X4 9785 I 
flk 157 
12* 2M 
to 203 
to 27-7 
MOV 304 
to 22-7 V7J3 
12* 133 M0.1! 
TV* 64 
I to 253 
to 204 
to 04 
to 54 
KLMW 
10* 2M 
TVk 22-7 
to 113 
TV* 64 
to 307 
to 174 
MOk 1-5 
13* 63 
M IM 
M 113 
to 303 
to 31-5 
M 104 
716 77 
HOk 114 
71* IM 


CNCA 70/75 
CNT70 
CNT71 
Cite S3 

CtaciwuriM 

abcM 

QPtBfrtS+LU 

Chase Mamattan 73 
ChasaOf 
QwmioatBk74 
awrraf«6(WVJyJ76 
ChrWtaUa Bk 91 
Christiania 94 


atvcorv (wuvi oua.MM m U3 


Citicorp Soot 76 

CMOetMM 

OHcnrnM 

Cittavp-U rKtafad pent 
atom 97 
CaamenhaBkV 
Commerzbank KnrB 
CHnmUiU Montreal 91 
CCF84AS 
CCF 70/95 
CCFtatM 
CEPME 17/72 
CEPMEH 
CiWBOoNonl 87/92 
Credit Fonder B/73 
Credit For Ezp. 72 
Cr Lyon 93/76 


Cr Lyon 93/76 
Credh LyoaaakV 
Credit Lyaanab 10/97 
CretSl Lvama is 19/96 
Credit Lyannab 11/M 
Credit Lvamab dad» 
Credil Lvamab ianR/96 


EM 

if';,* 


■ hVYitt 





-Mi. 

lAiliiJR 


■ 1 


*i’ Y. ■ 

|T | ‘.v:]l 

TTtl 




Credit Lyot»ioSsliB)H/9S to 144 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Croat National ■ 
Credit Nationd 70/94 
Croat NaKond 00 
Cradikndolt 96 


Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
28 February 1985 


AL MALMANAGEMENT irnvn«M«»um -.-i — ,, 

IwlAl-Md Trust. XA * lIS^tar^f!?^SlOOO 

BANKJUUUS BAER&CO. LhL — Hwj Lloyds Infl Europa SF 1093W 

— <(ti Baarband SF 96110 —Hat) Lloyds InH Growths SF 114780 

— (dicanbea- SF 122X00 — Hwl Lloyds Inn Income SF318JU 

— Id) Equibaer Amartca S 1151110 — Hwl Llovds Inti Podde SF 14770 

— <d ] EquQMwr Europe SF 1U2J0 


— (d ) EquRMer Pad 
W ) Grabar 


— (d > Stocktoar, 


SF 118880 
SF 1137J0 
SF 1730X0* 


— 14 1 CSF Fund 

Id J.Croastww Fund- 


—Id) ITF Fund N-V_ 


BAMQUE INDOSUEZ 
— (d I Aston Growth Fu 


— twi Fl F - -America. 
— (wj FlF— Europe— 

— Id } tatoBNOftSStib 
—Id I Indasuaz Mulllb 



CredKOMtnit 71/97 

7% 

IM 

Creditanstalt H 

18k 

Z/-J 

Dot lehl KongyoW 

10% 

130 

DamkeOUeff 

91k 

7-3 

Dm NarafcenanfO 

716 

US 

DenMarsfudecM 

98. 

19-3 

Denmark [oflUTa 

71k 

9-7 

Denmark octtS/W 

1154 154 

DennurtCH 

954 

IM 

Denmark Mrp 

7% 

8-R 

Die Erst Deft 72/94 85k 28-1 1-7 

9761 

Dreamer Bank 73 

11% 

194 

Drainer BankB? 

751 

286 

Dreamer Bmk 92 

TO 

77-fl 

Eldorado Nuclear 67 

9% 

JOB 

EOF 99 

1060 278 

EDFfS 

95* 

IM 

ENEL SO 

WOO 3-7 

EAB93 

74k 

17+ 

EAB7B 

12tk 26-3 

EEC 88/70 

71k 

R-7 

Exterior Inti W 

Tlk 

2I-A 




Fkmhli EtanerTS 



Fim Barton lacTl/9* 

9% 

285 

First Bank Syrtems 76 

. Tlk 

13-4 

First CNcngg 77 

95k 

M 

Ftnt Chicago M 

94* 

3VJ 

FM Qty Texas 95 

M 

7M 

Fbrt lotarahfleH 

Wk 

63 

Frtl 74/94 

n 

15-7 


B3S 





trrJ 


LTCB85 KM U- 

LTCB lunO? M 11 

LTCBB6 to 17- 

LTCB92 to 31- 

Mahusia 94/07 to 10- 

Mdankiapf«/f2 12 74 

Maknrsks doc89/92 10 56 

•HtavsiaBPn 10* 2* 

MaaHaaO/SeasU 9* 31- 

MatHan IWMr) H HV* 11- 

M0rtneMh8aadS6 to 9-6 

Marine AVKScnd 09 7* S3 

Marine Midland 76 to 193 

MdknBkM 7* 31-5 

Mid land 73 9 29-7 

Midland 07 to 266 

Midland 72 to 74 

Midland 71 11 304 

Midland 79 1» 63 

Mitsui Fin 76 KHk +9 

Morgen GrenltffM 7. Tl-7 

Martaaaa Dsn 70/93 m* 11-3 

Monona Dea 72 to 196 

Nat Bk Detroit 94 nv. 203 

Nat Cam Ed) Arabia 76 to 314 

Natl Westnrin 91 to 103 

MattWaitmtatO to 274 

Natl WMtmln 94 Ito IM 

NaH WOstmln92 WE 254 

Ndt Wastmbi pare EBv 1X5 

Neste Oy 74 W. 274 

New Zealand 87 111k 74 

Now Zealand Stag! 92 Vh V* 

NbtaonCnvSBkn to IM 

Ntopcm CredB Bk» TV* 2B4 

Mnaaa Credtt Bk M to 164 

Nordtc IntRntl Htk 75 

OKB 86 UVk 205 

OLB74 10* 205 

OLB95/9* 119k 114 

OfMnreMlntagTI to 66 

Offshore Mining H to 2X7 

PtaHlfl/76 HV* 774 

Pkbankai 99/91 to 106 

QuaenslandH 10* 95 

Renfafl 1» 273 

Royal BkSariknd 05/76 to 164 

Sc6 tana 91/93 to 56 

Sanwu InLFInH 119*263 

Santa 76/2004 to 27-7 

Sanwa InLRnTl to 174 

Satndlnavian FlnaprfS 1196 154 

SOTjilnovton Fin dac93 to 214 

Scattond Int FtnT2 11* 253 

Sacurily Padflc77 7* 25-3 

ShawmutCapTJ to 75 

SNCFM 0* 304 

SEAT 90/93 to 244 

SlF-E. 89 to 34 

&FJ.71 to 174 

SadateGansreiatO/TS M* 69 

SodefeGownitafO 10V* 95 

5ad«taG«naraieMar76 12* 03 

Sodete Generate nw76 10U 75 

sodete General 77 109 

SNCB71 IM 2M 


91 Vk 40V* PWlMr 6J» 68 U 26C 5 » B«i 1MH+ 1* 


88 ZB U 115 331k Zto 239k 


561k 339* Phil Pat 280 69 916001 691* 671k 6? -HV* 


21V* 18V. PBflVH 80 1A 
361k 27V* PledAvt Jt J 
32% 2» PiaNG 2J2 73 
71 16 Ptarl 


80 1J 9 116 36*» 36 3to+ j* 

JS J f 1U 36 35% 35*6— Ik , 

5 72 I 55 304k 30V. 30Vk— 4k 


114k— Vk 
274%— Vh 
ITO 

3046 + Vk 

1146 

644*— Vk 
3916— Vi 
« — k 
IS* + Vh 
3 
99 

3H + Ik 
161k— Vk 
5V. 

31 Vo — Vk 

a 

Wk— Vk 
4B«k + * 
BOV* + V* 
4616 

0*fc+ Vk 
33 +lVk 
374* 

16*6— VA 
20*6 +1 
34+4* 
13V*— «k 
SWk— H 
KVk— 1* 






A RARE HND; 

WORTHY OF INVESTMENT: IN DEM/ 


,h ■ hrti 


71 U Ptarl 56 306 3IP6 307* 20J* + » 

66V* 33 Plbbnr LS6 X6 11 TVS 6A*654k6to+V* 
36 2146 Pioneer L» 39 7 192 325* 31V* 32 + Vk 

275* 17 PioarEf J71r J 67 7 JfVfc Z4lk 26V> f 1j* 

43V* 27Vk Pitnv® 1 3D 10 11 733 3W- W JP* + ?! 

>5 55 PWnBpt X12 27 « 79 79 79 — Vk 

15V* 956 PNtstn 1«* llta mk !«*— ?* 


1556 S4k Plan Its 30 18 U 
Ito 124* Ptanfm .16 1 J 56 
134* 74k Playtaay 3 

3SVk 191* Ptasev 85a XD ID 


L12 27 8 79 79 TV — Vk 

1556 IlVk llto IB*— 4* 
.20 18 U 65 Uto 134k 1ZX+ Vk 

.14 1J 14 25 155* 155k IW 

3 32 13 1146 ink 

85a XD ID 2 21V* 311k 21V*+ Vk 

80 12 37 73 185* 184* TO* 


334* TDK 29t 8 21 60 fto 

24 TECO 220 78 I 280 284k 

TVkTGIF 18 30 1144 

114k TNP 125 88 I 11 Uft 

17 TRE 120 O 17 S3 231k 

smb TRW 100 18 11 5102 7M6 

110 TRW or 4JD XI 3 1451* 

31* TacBoof 9 64* 

51V* Taftsrd 1.12 Lf 12 253 5946 

ID Talley JSe J 13 375 144* 

13VS TaitaYPt LOO 53 303 194* 

46% Tombrd X30 68 13 2DO HHk 

235* Tandy 13 2191 311k 

119k Tndycft 12 U 16 

51 Vk Taktnw IJD 1J 7 572 6fl* 

2Vk Takrara t 802 ilk 

147V* Tetdyn 10 Ut 2 H5t* 

13V* Talrata JO 18 29 141 30V* 

194k Tctax 14 35V 451k 

25V* Tarn pin 86 IJ • 43 34 

334* Tannea X92 78 10 5511 3to 

K7V* Tencpr run 117 2 78 

65 Tencpr 780 98 T2 77 

21 ’k Tardyn 15 254 ZTlfc 

94* Tesoro 80 X9 42 387 10V* 

204k Tasarpf Xli 15 1 Sto 

31V* Texaco X00 08 35 3630 3546 

324k TxABc 1-52 <2 9 53 3646 

35V. TexOn 156 16 MW <W 

3**k TxEstS IX 7.1 I id 31 

53 TxeTPf A3SalL4 1 55V* 

25 Texlnd 8MU1I 18 3046 

I0*V* Taxlnsl X00 IJ 9 MU 1111k 

Tex lot 549 21k 


60 4946 
360 28* 
30 1T44 
11 5896 
S3 231* 


3S1k 19V* Ptasev 85a 38 ID 2 21V* 3«k »!*+ V* 

2246 151k Proa Pd 80 12 37 72 IT.* 184* IM 

32 24Vk Potarid LOd 3J 32 1074 2*5* 36 3«* + V. 

2Z9k in* Poratre 87 J 7 1354 UM Ito Ito— to 

2246 15 PapTal JO 43 15 Wh 194k ITJk + Vk 

174k 135* Portae 80 13 66 7 M 1746 T7*»- V* 


06 73VA Purtrpf 550 72 U0z754*W*7S* + 46' 

IB 13 PortGE L82 508 4 1552 174k 171* T7V.— Vk 
98V* « PoGPt 1180 118 20z 79 99 +2 

219k 17V* ParG pf 280 128 9 ZTV. 214h 31H+ Vk I 

3346 281* FarGpl 480 1X3 18 334k U 33 — V* | 

331* 381* Porcpf 4J2 138 10 32H 3T* 31Vk—_V4 | 


351k 2SV6 PotHch 1 J6 42 U 3SJ 37V* 351k 37V* +146 


P0tWlPf12J7 11 J 6000x109 1071*100 +3 


I TVk P«lma 2-16 08 8 5889 25% 2SV* 254k + 5* 


37V* 31 PatElPf 4J4 11 J 500x 36 3» 36 + to 

25 1646 Premli 17 T04 255* 2«k 25 

36 244k Prtflir* 1MSS,! £to+l 

20V* 1146 PrimaC IS W51 1» WV 1*5* — to 

32 16 PrtmM .13 8 22 72 30 Ik 30V* 30V*— M 

Sto 454k PractG 280 48 12 1833 574k S64k Sflk— ■ Vk 

54 74* PrdRiil 32 U 2S 616 15 13V* 541* +15k 

475* 31 Prefer 180 12 10 15 444* 4846 44V*— Vk 


615k 494k PSInpf 984 MB 
SI 44V* PSln pf 052 188 
55 43 PSInpf 838 168 

57V* 46V* PSInpf 596 163 
12Vk 3V* PSvHH 
18V* 64k PNHpfB 
25V* BV* PNKpfC 
23 7 PNHpfD 

23 7 PNHpfE 

Ito 5V6 PNH pfF 
»46 74k PNHPfG 
254* 19V* PSwNM 288 11J 


T99fc 16V* PSvCof 182 10B 8 170 19W » MV* + Vh 
63 514* PSCtrf of 7.15 12.1 200x 59 57 57 —2 

Ito 16to PSCal pf 110 11 j 5 IS* vr- 181* 

94k 59k PSInd UO 1X3 7 530 74* 75* 7Vi— to 

Sto 6 PSInpf IJ54 14J 410r 71* 716 7V*— Vk 

8 61k PSIa pf 1 JO 148 lOOr 7V* TV* to + 4* 

47 365* PSInpf 7.15 168 4302 4416 43V* 431*— 46 

* 984 MB 50z 59 59 59 

882 168 100Z 52 52 52 + 1* 

838 Ml6 400z 51V* OTfc 504k— IV* 

056 163 4002 55 55 55 — to 

2 271 49k 446 ilk 

3 11 11 11 + Vh 

4 154k ISVfc 154*+ Ik 

54 U U 14 

45 14Vk 14Vk Mlk 

■m 12 114k U + 1* 

16 13Vk 124* 124k — to 

3J8 115 B 505 24to 34 2(16 


14716 Tetdyn 
Uto Talrata 
ito Tetax 
25V* Tam pin 


1146 

544k + Vk 
33 —4* 
719*— Vk . 
1454k +1*6 , 
41* 

9 —1 

164k 

194* + 4* 
70 — to 
3146+ to 
134k— Vk 
641k— to 
4 —to 
2Mto+lto 
30 

434k+ V* 
35M— U 
394*+ V* 
98 —1 
77 + 4ft 

27V* + Vk 

uto— to 


Hoffmann's Pate 
On Valium Expir 
Opening Up Meal 


>t ** * 






■tjVp- 


33to + 4* 

3*» 

43V* +1 
304k— to 
5SV*+ to ! 
3046+ Vk : 
into— ito : 
21k 


27V* 2M PSvEG 372 103 7 4969 2646 361* 264k 


nanrtomi mv 
om Of Soam 73 


C ^n fi nance S7 
Ganll none* If /12 

GanflncBCa 92/74 

GZB09 

GZB9I 

GZBpare 

GZB96 


Kingdom Of Spam 7 
Spain 97 
Stand Chart 40 
Stand Chart 94 
Stand Chart 91 
Stand ChortmarlB 
Stand Own pare 

Slate Bk Of India 17 


Uto 10V* PSEGpf 180 108 
36 38 PSEGpf 4JB 11 J 

455* 35to PSEG Pf S28 1L6 
US!* 97*6 PSEGpmao 12B 
184* 15 PSEGpf X17 12B 
58 464* PSEGpf 680 120 

204k M4k PSEGpf 283 UJ 
106to 76 PSEGPTUL25 11J 
63V* 514* PSEG Pf 7.52 128 
65 51 PSEG Pf 780 123 


BTV* 6556 PSEGPt 989 1X3 
45* 25* Publlclc 
in* 71k Puebla .16 13 
fto 64* PRCcm 
15 916 PuoetP 136 Ufl 


23 13 U 13 + to 
300z U5* 35V* 35V* + to 

TOOr 45V* 44 4SV* +Sto 

10 107 107 "7 +lto 
3 IBM T0> 18to 

2226s 58 56 « 564k 

44 201* Uto 20V* + 4k 

10x103 103 103 —3 
OOOQz 621k 62to 624k + to 
f50z 62 60 60 — 2 

400Z 7 Uto 7Bto 7BU— 4k 
39 24k 246 246 

99 12 12 12 

21 74* 716 71*+ to 

530 U4* Uto 131* 


SuRiNomTrtf 92/949*1 1-2 VI 99J6 


,53? Grtnojovs 

— (wl Brit* MatKHuCurr S837- 5KANDIFOND INTL FUND (464-23070) Grindlayi 

— (d jBrIL InKS MantAPorH, HL783 — (wllnc Bht MJOOttar S&BB Great Wei 

— Id J BrB: I nrtXManaoJtortl 1 1.199 — <w)ACc: Bid S430 Offor S5J* HMSamw 

s'flgg! ^^5^!!l T ^ R .'lf!l!9!J*LLTp. 


cam!! SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

; — Vi«£ 17DevaratilraSqXoretofMn-377-a040 

's — Cb I SHE Bond Fund Si 


Great Western Fbi 94 
HM Samuel 96 
HM Samuel Per p pn 


&GUt^Zr t W? 4wi ffi!, FundJ ^ 

■ Worid Lata. Fund- SIB23 SWISS BANK CORP. 

.WoridTachn. Fund S0J34 — <d I America 1/olor SF 63X35 

INTERNATIONAL IS 

»ni inH Pm. cuu — id » Dollar Bond Selection __ 112130^ 


hui Samuel Pare pore 
Hbpano Amartaono 95 
Hydra Quabac 94 
Hydra QuafaacKS 
lelmhMtria«91 


Sweden 71 
Sweden lOflH 
Swedan 0/94/79 
Sweden 73/03 
Swedaiporp 
Talyo Kobe 72/04 
Takaaln 72/94 
TakrtANa Lid 94/79 
TmntaOamhUacVZ 
TowTrert 91/79 
TVOT4/M 

Union Bk Norway 77 
Unttad 0/S*asBkS9 
Weih Fargo 97 
Wlffiamc+GfymTl 
Wnrtd Bank 94 
Yntabomo 91/ 74 
ZentrotaworkoaseTl 


2146 Uto Pultatbn .12 J 27 1(8 1746 T7to 17to+ to 
45V* 33to Porelat 138 47 13 411 28 274* 274*— to 
10V6 Sto Pyre 9 73 F* 91* 74* 


TaxOGl .58 .9 1318527 1716 184k 1916— Vk 

TxPoc 80 13 17 1 30to 30M. 30to— to 

TaxUNI 232 78 6 2354 27 26V* 2*V6— to 

Taxff lit 68 3V6 Sto 8V6 + to 

Textron U0 43 U 1542 42 4BV*414h + Vh 
Tatar pf 230 46 IS 45H -4516 4516— to 
Thack 5 7V* 7V6 7VS 

TharmE 23 99 23to 23 23 

ThtuBts 134 XI 16 101 39to 39 37V* +1 

Thom In 88b 33 10 18 18V* ISVk V8V* 

ThRUMad 80 33 8 356 18to17toUVk+to 
Thrifty 80 2J 13 149 211k 21 to 21 to— Vk 

TMwtr 30 49 789 18V* 171k 18 V* 

Ttaarln 3397 Sto Ito BV* + to 

Tlarl Pf 2852 BV* 816 BV* + to 

Time 130 XI 14 1643 48to 47 47V*— to 

Tbiwbt 19 475 

TlmoM 536 23 15 714 

Timken UOa U O 81 

TodShP 132 17 7 59 

Tokftm 32 28 11 33 


39V6 27to QuakOs 134 11 12 2857 37to 3BV6 37to + to 

98 90to OuaO Pt 986 103 300x 94 93 93 —2 

22 15 QuakSO J0 19 25 566 20V* 20V* 20to 

III* 6to Quoncx 37 56 946 9 TVk— to 

34V* 23 Quntar 180 48 9 377 33to 33V. 3356— to 

349k 14 Ok Rail 34a 1 J 19 1111 34 23V* z »— to 


Capital international 

— <W Capital tall Fund 

-Mj*1 Capital ItuOa s a 


- Florin Bond S e l ectan— FL116J5* 



(d ) Intarvator. 
(d i Japan Parti 


(d)5wtn Foreign Bond Sel SF10464* 


— td ) Swfxsvtdor New Ser„ 
— Id ) Unlv. Band SalecL— . 
—Id ) Universal Fund. 


SF 29X50 
SF 8575 
SFT27J2 


IBJK 
iBJnavn 
inland 96/77 
Ireland 77 
Ren.lretand74 
1HIB5 

EOT"* 9 

ItatVW/W 


Non Dollar 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

—(d) Am ca US. S/l SF4475 

— (d ) Band-Invert SF 67J5 

— <dl FanHSwissSh. SFU3J0 

— <d ) Japan-Inyest 5F1011J0 

— id) saflt south Afr.Sh. SF49U0 

— (d)Sfnw (stack price) SF 19550 


-LP. Manna 199795/16-2 
KOPW92 


KOPtebK 

KOPmav92 

KemlraOyBS 


Korea Dev Bk0 


UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

-id ) Unlrenta 0 

— (d } Unltoods. 


Am 97 

BkManlreatM 
Bk Tokyo 08/90 
nrladnmzn 
ancore»/9l 
CEPME fi 
CredB Fonder 79 
QnBlNaHoaol 91/W 
Denmeric 73/98 
LLL94 

Kingdom Rotatam 94 

UoydsT* 

MialtebiB 
5NCF 90/93 
YorUHre 91/94 



DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

— Md ) Concentre. 

— Hd I mn Rantenland_ 


DM2177 . 
DM8724 Iw 


—id ) Uni tonds 

— (d J Unirak 

Other Funds 


DM4U0 
DM 21 JO 
DM7780 


Soun* : Credtt Sutaao-Ffm Boston LAL 
London 


FS.C MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS ■ 

1. Laurence Pauntv Hllf. EC4 01-6234680 ” 

— (w) FSCAttontle ,1280 ** 

— (w) F&C European 8770 T 

— (w) FXC Oriental S2SJ7 “ 

Id 
Id 
Im 
Iw: 

!3: 

b 

|W 
Id! 

,h i 

id! 
iw; 
(w! 


FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Aeenf 01 -B37-XU 
— Iw) Gold income ,7J6* 

— iw) Gatd Apprectafton 5439 

— (wl Doltar Income 1882 

— (m> Strategic Trertlne 5 1B0 


GEP1NOR FUNDS. 

— fwt East Inv ert menf Fu 
— Iw) Scottish wend Fane 
— (w) State St. American - 


Caoti.GukLUd.LonJVoenUll-4914230 


su» q 

Id 

I347JI W, 
1 12056 id I 
, 147J7 iw! 



IVORY COAST 


18V* 6V6 
414* 2Bto 
3S 29 
31to 34V* 
35V* 29V* 
9V6 646 
4to 3 
18 1216 
11 <46 

39 25 

Oto Sto 
21 161* 
Vlh 446 
66 471* 

174k 81k 
4BV4 34V* 
5 Sto 74k 
23V* 164k 
25 30 

MV* 91* 
17V6 9 
Uto 8 
TOto 79k 
2to to 
37to 
4V* 

2 

22M 
45V* 

23 
36V* 

341* 
im 

33V* 

144k 


-56 13 Id 
9 


.46 IJ 11 f* f fit 

L04 28 12 1491 39to 39 394* + V* 

ZS) TDLO 30i 35 35 35 

Z52 7.1 49 30Vk 29V* 30 +4* 

385 1IL3 326 354* 355* 354* + 46 

JO 27 9 45 7to 7V* 74*— to 

60 45* 446 4V6+4* 

-56 13 10 14 I7to 17 17Vk 

9 549 11 109b 11 

UOO 28 M 1169 38to 3846 3846— V* 
36 987 7to 69* 7Vi + 46 

84 4.1 TO 34 30V* 30 2BU.+ 16 

1445 4Vk 45* 446— 46 

84 3 19 450 644* 62V* 6346—116 

6 12to 12% 12to— to 
188 38 T7 1560 47to 4646 46to— to 

80 4JJ 3* 238 Mto 10 10— to 

X12 9J 7 21to 21V* 2)to+ to 

134*151 23U 2346 21 22 +11* 

U3el0B 10 3 1316 1316 1356 + V* 

15 98 ISto Uto Uto— to 


112 9J 
'U4e15J 
TJSelOB 10 
U 


JO X9 21 208 Mto UR* »V*— Vh 


TodSho UB U 7 If 
Tokftm .72 28 11 33 

TalEdta 152 1X8 S 376 
ToiEdpf 172 148 41 

Tot Ed pf 175 14J 16 

ToiEdpf 387 142 7 

TolEdsf 4J8 548 7 

TolEdpt 136 14.1 U 
Tat Ed pf 121 14.1 8 

Tonka 80 J 25 24 

ToatRoi 88 18 12 154 
Trctans 1J0 2J 14 2*4 
TaraCo 80 25 10 109 
Tosco 139 

Towle 43 

Towle of 84 XI 5 
TayRUe 24 1481 

Trocar 44 10 16 413 
TWA 79 9967 

TWA pf 225 168 193 

TWApfB2J5 92 735 

Transm 186 58 11 1757 


Tranlnc 222 1U 
TARIty UDOe 82 
Tr uusc o 2.16 4B 
Trnscpf 187 63 
Tran EX 220 9J 
Traracn 

TrGPpf 884 9J 
TrGPPt 280 108 
Tmscm 


474*— V* 
194*+ to 
49V* +1V* 
SOto+4* i 
35V*— to 
3Hk 

llto + to 
2556 — V& 
2*46+ to 
24V* + 16 
2956 

16V*— to 
ISVk 

581* + *6 
33 Vk +24* 
43to— Ik 
16 — Ik 
IV* 


limted Prea International 

WASHINGTON — Hotfmaan-U Rc 
Ox's patent on the widely used tnoq 
Valium has expired, dealing the way foi 
pharmaceutical companies to seek feda 
proval to make the drug on a generic ha 
John Doorley, a spokesman at Hof!m* 
Roche's Nutley, New Jersey, headquarta 
the patent for the drug diazepam had e 
Wednesday after going into effect in ]9r 
said the Swiss-based company did not 
whether other companies plan to ma! 
drug. 

“We expect, of course, there will bean 
of them but we don't know how quick! 
will come on the market," Mr. Dooley . 

The Food and Drug Administrate: 
give its approval before anyone else c 
diazepam. An FDA spokesman, Edward 
said tne agency was prohibited from reye 
other companies are seeking approval 
Valium was developed by Dr. Leon 
back of Hoffraann-La Roche in Ntnk 
drug had distinct advantages over other 
cals used to treat anxiety and it became: 
commercial success. 

It was the No. 1 prescription drug 
1975. and although its use has droppe 
then, Hoffman-La Roche recorded $270 
in Valium sales in the United States la 
The total number of prescriptions for tf 
in 1984 was 25 million, including reQfc 
The drug has been criticized in recent 
being overused, and a 1975 study sug 
link between Valium when taken by £ 
women and newborns with cleft palatas 


<*; F-X • % 

w I'm ‘ 


-e-rf SSy ' ■* 

./ ■ to#. 

& wi 

- - • . W 

. I bUlf «*# 

. ' .• i 

" r ^ 




2956+ V* 
34 + Vh 

UH + 4* 

1356 

19V* + to 


U5. -Canadian study completed 
“little reason to believe" that cc 


i* -m 


In addition to bang used to tiqi 
Valium also is widely used to trea£$j 
meats, such as muscle spasm and da 
disorders,. 


TrGPPt 280 108 1 

TrnsOh 12 62 

Tranwv 180 SB 10 39 

TmwM 80 U 11 497 
Twld wtA 16 

TVldpt 280 68 6 

Twtapt 1.W ms 5B 


Travtar 224 48 10 942 


Tricon X53014J • 

TriSoln 6 

Trio Pc 180 32 9 6 

Tribune 84 iQ 56 1i> 

Trieo .16 28 17 i 

TrlrUy JO 38 2i 

TfltEDB ,10b 8 20 

TrMEPf 1.10 9J 1 
TucaEP im It f J 
TulUM J2 32 11 17 

TwtaDl 80 42 9 9 

rvcouj m xi 10 123 

rytar 25 23 9 152 


BB +1 
234* 

isto+ to 

hi* 

17Vk— to 
444k + Vk 

Mto— to 

!m 

)7Vk 

1346 + 46 

W4+ 4k 
□46— to 


wm 

*■:. J| 

Pm. 


12 Mom 
HtanUM stack 


IDOiHULM I 


3746 29to WttaMk 20 12 14 243 34V* 3556 

5446 301* WPHsF 280 45 B 40 531* S3 

2146 27H WeTFM 280 108 12 40 26Vk 2*5* 

22to 134k Wwtfva 28 13 18 2123 2246 21% 

2*4* 1*16 WOrtOl 81 XI 12 94 201* 30 


— ## 

'9.-R44*.- 


34 WPenPpRJO 


»4 201* 20 

me 4!to 41 


4M* 344* WstPtP 2J» 58 * .41 395* 39 


I1V6 fto WrtCtT* 104 
Sto 2to wnAirL 
Ito 56 WIAlrwt 
IS Ito WAtrpf X00 IT J 
585k. fto WAIT pf X14 113 
llto 4 WCNA 
Uto 47 WCNA pf 733 MS 
115 835* WFOCI 

305k Sto WUnkm 
9V* 3V6WnUPfS 
T3V* ffl WnUPfE 
20 WUTlpf 
55* WUTfpfA 


ns m* im 


112S Sto 5to , 
157 Ito 15* 

37 475k 17to ta 
179 19 WYl 

row*. 

6 50 4756 

21 U5toll5tol> 
371 9 8to 

71 4M 4 
49 7 «* . 

1 29V* 27to S 
■ 9Vt 9Vk 




MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS, 
CONSTRUCTION, POSTS AND 
. TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


NATIONAL OFFICE OF 
TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
IVORY COAST 


INTERNATIONAL INVITATION TO TENDER 
No 3290/84/0NT/DFB/M/031 


1 -OBJECTIVE 

The N ati o na l Office of Teleconmngri evtiono (OPfT) inriteo i ni mi« tiflp| 
lenders [or the mpply, ht ta a tl a t i o o and connection to (be teknhong network 
of an SPL local/ tianait exchange of 10,000 finAa, wtimAiMj. io 

he'^keT' ™ other optional m l a i ig w or ap ri p m ept as may 


2- FINANCE 

Finance tor the 


20 in 

I 

20 11 10 IM 
11 3048 
164 

JM 25 W 317 
184 38 I 36 
2-12 108 7 

3J2 122 25 

1i4 M 7 174 
22 18 22 TOO 
JO XI 11 170* 
72 

184 52 12 2125 
JO 38 11 ZI 
A4 XI 10 523 
380 4.1 B 2*78 
4.10 88 1 

259 

1J0 27 6 434 
450 iS 3 
188 SB 9 93 

TJS 8J 24 
JO 18 19 1401 

16 T20 

1.12 32 8 IZlK 

180 4-1 20 » 

J* 32 17 431 
X20 11J 5 70S 
284 72 9 SI 
180 28 11 1434 
200 2J 10 846 
10 47 

JOe L5 30 92 

JBP 3 26 S07 
86 40 10 137 

48 

84 32 10 M 
1J2 17 14 223 
08 8120 1550 

287a 58 5 34B5 
J4 IJ 17 90 

17 58 
71 44 I 39 

UO 42 14 86 

536 2! 18 3«l 
80 28 M 118 
5 32 


32to 194* WHIES 10Q 32 10 2776 31 305* 3 
41 315* Wortvc 122 38 8 293 3916 38to 3 


37to+ Vk 
6 

11* + to 
22to + to 
42to+ to 
20—16 
255* — Vk 
3256— Vk 
1956+ to 
25to— to 
131* + to 
35U + to 
19to— to 
1416 

BZto+lto 


woyerii 120 42 20 2480 301k 30V* 3 



11Dto + to 
375* + to 
81V* + to 
295k— to 
21 Vk— to 
3056— Ito 
*to— to 
33to+ to 
3756 + 56 
235* 

17to — to 
34 + to 
377k + to 
TOto— I 
Sto— to 
201*— 5* 
20V6 + U 
in*— to 
2to— to 
1656+ to 
30to— to 
9to— to 
SJto— Vk 
485k— to 
245*— to 
T7to 

34 + to 

55V* 

24to— to 
1356 


28 UAL JSe 18 7 2235 
245* UAL Of 280 72 130 

7*b UCCEL 20 167 

Mto UGI 204 9J 10 1821 
191* UGI pf 235 1X0 10O 

3 UNCRM 147 

M 10 URS 80b 29 59 » 

3256 175* USFGl 208 68395 2752 

45 USG 326 48 7 474 

13V* UnIFrrt 20 1.1 13 8 

45 Unlfvr 202e 40 8 1 

» Uni MV 420s 40 9 128 
30% UCompj 184 43 10 1086 
3» UnCarb 380 88 8 1797 
45k.UidanC 62 

12 UnEtaC 1 22 IOJ 6 1383 

21 UnElpt X50 1X6 20a 

TO* UnElpt 400 1X1 m 

2Dlk UnEIPf 4JU 1X5 10ft 

275* UnEI pf 456 132 10ft 

345* UnElpfM4O0 1X5 29 

48to UEIPfL X00 1X3 600] 

Uto UnEI pf 2JB 112 66 

43 UnEIPf 784 111 10ft 

49 UEIpfH 800 132 31ft 

3456 UnPac 1J0 32 12 2799 

82 UnPcpf 725 62 174 

956 UrHrayl .18 U 11 567 

535* Unrylpf 800 118 82ft 

356 UnllOr 66 2 

TOto unBraa m 216 

9to UBrd pf 10 

205* uairrv .14 8 68 22 

22to UnEnra 2.0 IS n 1095 

9 U litem 200 11J 3 364 

19 Ulltupf 197 M8 2 

11 Ulltupf 220 M2 6002 
20Vk UIHupf 400 148 4 


48+46 
3346 + to 
Uto+to 
21to—1 
23 
fto 

13to— Vk 
314k 

69to+ to 

175* 

50 —5 
BTto— 4fc 
34 V. — to 
3946+ to 
M 
181* 

2746— to 
SOW— to 
33V6 

34to+ to 


4456 3456 VYayrpf 2J0 6J 
515k 435* wavrpr 450 9.1 
33to 125* WTXHPW 
43 31V* WPttpfB 600 19J 

38 25 WhPH pf 500 190 

49V* 34V* WMrtPl 200 42 
365k 245k WMfC 150 43 
45V* 36to WW1C pfOOO 7 J 

22 m* wmtcM 

Mto 14to Wbittafc 80 28 
1714 64k WMMdt 19 
1446 ■ Willed n 


USB 52 446 41 405* 4. 

uo 9.i -a 4»to j. 

4S w Wto 1 
UO 19J 121 Or 35 301* 3 

UB 190 4B10E 27 25 2 

!O0 42 9 Ml £to £2 £ 

50 4J 165 30V* 375* 31 

U0 75 1 **5 

11 U 2Wk gto g 

80 28 10 244 23% 21% 23 

u » i» im ii 

«2 Mlk Mto M 




■- ***• 

• A ' . 4R» * 


315k 22to william 180 SO 6 18U 27% OT* 27 


10 Ulllupf 1.90 14.1 y 

Mlk Until nd 52b 28 13 273 

33V* Until nn 22 8 31 2 

251* UJerBh 156 42 9 29 

9V* UtdMM 0 104 

216 UPkMn 1 II 

23 UfBlrG .12 J 7 1276 

SVk USHom 
28% USL0O9 
23 USShaa 
22 ussteei 
49V4 USSftpf 
15V* USStlnr 
22% USStl pf 
Zlto USTab 
5554 U SWest 
295k UnTdia 


Finance for the project is aseund ioindv by die African Devdopment Wawt r 
(ADB) and the Ivorian Gov ernment. 


3 - TENDERING CONDITIONS 

The tender is open to nmnirfactnr+re and suppliers c 
systems in member countries of Hi* ADB and took wpi 
in these countries. The digital exchanges offered »"■* 
proven in service. 


lien Of digital w k ii y 
se equipment is produced 
I must nave been already 


4-- TENDER DOCUMENT COLLECTION 
The ten der d ocuments are available to be collected from: 
SERVICE DES MARCHES 
BUREAU DES APPELS iyOFFRES 
1I« ETACE PORTE 11-01 
POSTEL 2001 
ABIDJAN 


on payment of 200,000 PCFA by cheque or henfc order, signed by the 
manufactur er o r supplier, made payable to: 

"OFFICE NATIONAL DES TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


IONAL DES TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
DE COTE DTVOfRE" 


JARDtNE FLEMING. POB 70 GPO Ho KO 

—(b) J-F Jnnon Trusi- Y4B84 

— <b ) XF South East Asia ,3023 

— (b ) J.F Japan Tacftnoteuv Y 21709 

— 4b) JJPocHlcSPCitAccI ,528 

— <U ) J.F *422 


5 - RETURN OF TENDERS 

The lenders most be delivered rut later than 1730 oo ibe 3 June 1085 to: 
DIRECTTON DE L’OFFICE NATIONAL 
DES TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
SERVICE DES MARCHES 
BUREAU DES APPELS D'OFFRES 
11« ETAGE PORTE 11-04 
POSTEL 2001 


2J0 4J 13 342 48to 

20b U 10 7 TOto 

JO 25 13 41 27to 

« 2 29 68 T7to 

2J0al58 IM 18 
24 15 13 358 16V* 

72 225 6% 

nc iu 
*40 12 23 31 32V* 

180 4J 11T9673 33V* 
^ IJ 12 157 Zlto 

L72 84 7 37 20V* 

120 1IJ 9 im* 
123 55* 

.-J* ,■* 15 1503 27V* 
4-03* 78 2 53 

X1B 92 8 2314 23 
180.152 11 C M 
.56 13 18 744 43to 

1J4 XI 12 24 14 

120 38 11 3459 3Bto 

180 48 14 3 me 

20 12 44 9 17 

180 85 7 49 llto 

i!m itl5 3 

2.16 92 a K6 OT* 

188 42 12 1547 4056 

120 22 10 4038 42V* 

.12 J 24 TOO 134* 

J* 13 14 1583 JTVk 

10 1015 40’A 

1.12 X9 10 1373 38V* 

,53 38 11 91 15V* 

«UM » 41 


4M+ to 
W%+ to 
275* 

17to+ 56 
18 +to 
Mto + to 
65*— to 
156— 5k 
3ZV6+ to 
33 +1to 
375k 
205* 

1056 

5to 

27V4 + % 
53 + to 


60 

221*— to 
37 

60ta+lto 
49 + to 
WBV* +156 

sr* 

Mk+to 

12V* 

Mto— to 
2956— Vk 
17 — to 
27V* 

T5to 

27V* 

13V* + to 
zito + to 
37to + to 
37 

i4to+ to 
2M 

36*k+ to 


,<to 2 WUmEI SB 3* »* 3 

10 65* WBstaO .10 12 » 347 7% 41> 7 

X 2556 WlnDIx 18B 52 12 20, W* » 

20to 7V6 Wtanbu ,10a J 18 606 Tfto 1« 1» 

Uto 55* Wftmw 20 32 5* J 

856 3V* WlntarJ 3 jf 

Bto 2556 WilcEP X28 73 7 170 31% M M. 

7DH 57V* WIsEpt 7JS 112 MOl ««■ *« §: 

n 23% WHcPL 284 88 8 «* * 22 ST 

OT6 24to WlacPS 256 S3 7 B 31% 31V6 »' 

4M* Z7to Wit™ 188 3L7 7 « »* * 

TTto 9V* WotvrW 26 XX 15 361 W* Jgf JL 

m Mto WoodPt JO 38 17 70M 33% TO* » 

43to 29to Wotwtti 1J0 43 IB 3B8I 40% 48 «■ 

61 43* Wolwpf 220 Xf 5 S7 57 V; 


A m 


-Jm Wrn- 

W9M8- k.-ra*. 
n. 1 "toll 


3to ZVk WrtdAr 


61 45 Wrtety 

Sto Wuritzr 
ltto 1056 WytaU) 
Zlto 16V* Wynns 




1J00 XI 10 70 5*to SI * 

si 3% J% * 


% 




46K 3356 Xmt XU 68 

flto 4356 Xarax pf S8S 1X9 

29 19 XTRA 84 XS 


X00 68 18 ZB47 «% *g* } 
S8S 1X9 147 30 * 

84 15 9 172 Mto ISto 2h 


30 24 ZollCP 122 48 9 133 M* Sg* > y. 

24to HV* Zapata 34 38 IB *® If* c -it '.. • I > 

». 30 Zoyre 80b J 15 151 8*to L ‘ • *1 L 

3U6 Mto ZanHftE I 1470 22% 2«k JW - * » 


a «Lib i«n Aflnnnc ■ itru 

4156— to S* II Z«ro 80 IJ » H 265* Wk 
3K*+v* £to 201* Zara wl 1 21% ££ 3 

OTk + to 3W * 21% Zurnln 122 48 11 H8 30to 29* 2 - . 




9to 

42to+ % 
24 + to 
27to— V* 
m*— to 
17 

isto + to 
195* + to 
19)6— to 
7 

23V6 

4056 + 46 
42 + Vk ! 

1356+ to . 
32% +25* 
60 — to 1 

3Bto 

1356 + to 

41 


173* UnTTal 
12 UWR* 
22 Unffnle 
14V6 UrUvar 
18to UntvFd 
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30 Unoca) 
45 Urtoftn 
23to USUFE 
30to USLFpf 
25 USLFpf 
85* UrtfeFd 
305* UtaPL 
215* UfPLpf 
215* UTPLpf 
17% UtPt.pt 
155* UtPLpf 


32 + to 

132V6+ 56 J 

Sto + is I NYSI 

74%+ to 1 

41to— 56 li^Hi 
365 ft— 56 
2356— to 

ISJtTiS AMR Carp 


NYSE Highs-Lavra 


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MEW HIGHS 71 


aoto+ito 

ISto 

27% +1% 
215* — 51 
4AVk 

ISto— 5* 
3656—1 
315*— V* 
311*— 1 


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24 

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24% 14 valor pf 384 1*8 
Sto 216 vatayln 
2*5* M VanDri S3 XS 
<% 2V6 varco 


8 2f& 325* 32V* 325* 

4730 10% 1016 1056 + 5* 

13 205* 2056 Sto + to 

9 3 3 3 

7 184 26% 23% 26% +11* 
* 3 2% 3 + v* 


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CIGNA CP CTS Carp 

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135* 9V* vara 80 32 U 176 12V* 11% 12 

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6% 3% Vanda 12 4V* 4% 45* + Vk 

10% B5* VartSe UOdlU 7 HR* TOto Uto— to 

4056 2456 Viacom 82 12 10 2646 40V6 39% 4056 + to 


NIMARBEN 

— MICkmA 

— Iw) acres B-UX 

— <w ) Class C - Japan . 


Id) 

Id) 

5*129 J5,} 

*0187 jwj 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PBBS57& rae Hdrtie (0701 46900 
—Id ) Bever BaieeglngarH+ 


6 -ENQUIRIES 

All aiquiria during; ihe preparation of lenders must be made in writing or 
£ m” 10 SCTV ’ ce ** mArcbes" for administrative information and to 
™ Departmem de la production, project plateau UL panel 2001". 
concemn^; all other maltere. 


DIRECTOR NATIONAL OFFICE 
OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


DM — Dovtsche Mark; BF — Belgium Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs; SF — Swiss Francs; a — asked; 4 — Offer Pricesfb — bid 
eftange P/vsiOtaSI per unit; NJL — NatAvaliabta; N.C— NotCommunleotedre — 
*taw: S — suspended; S/S — Stack Spill; * — Ex-Dividend; ■■ — Ex-Rte; — — 
Gross Performance Index jan.; ■ — Reoempt- Price' Ex -Council ; Formerty 

W arJdwtde Fund Ltd; 0 — Offer Price tacL 3% preHm. charge; ++— daily Hack 
price as an Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


POSTS. 2001 

ABIDJAN 

01 B.P. 1838 

COTE D’IVOIRE 

TELEX: 23790 OR 23758 


>g IB 7 348 40% 795* 40%— to 
14* }S8 6 115* Uto 11% 

3-JS IM 5 15V* ISto TSV6 + Vk 

a-12 ’f! . 47 isto is 15% + V* 

88 IJ 7 453 25to 25 25 

^ 87 4V* 4% 4V* + Vk 

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B '■} M B2 265* 2*56 265* 

_ ^ . 9 51 291* M56 271* + 56 

2 18 TOSS sn* S7% 58 

lii. i-S 9 ;jns »» “'*■ 

8246 X7 3 10216 10256 18216 

601 2954 28V* 28% 

^ _ 243 MV* 14% 155* + % 

“S K l 8 SI Z 4 * 33fc 34V6 + to 
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Ji 8 583 25 24V62S+5* 

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H S 3 ^ 1 3356325*33 — 5* 
■22 55 285* 2Sto 20% + to 

2222 11 32532 311* 32 + 56 

„ J] TV. 7% + to 

,■*5 ,42 14 g 14to 14M 18% + to 

’K ,2 .I 33 15% IW 15to + to 

l« 11 13 1249 23 32 32to- 56 

?■? 21 5856 5856 S05* + to 

288 5.1 2 641* *45* 641* — 1% 

■.'18 i,2 11 *87 36 3556 36 + to 

« , J 30V* 30V* 305* 

» H S lfl * u 15% + Vk 

.■S “5 19* 12% 12V* 125* — Vk 

^SS MI? 1 *® 411 “ “to 61 to +1 

2i IJ 26 54% 53V* sm— to 


80 32 M 176 12V6 11% 12 
80 18 W 318 24% 24% 24% + % 


43 351* VaEPPf 5J0 118 

66 54 VaEP Pf 722 1X4 

75% 601* VaEPpt XM 123 
B35* 68V* VaEPPf 9A 128 
661* 52V* VaepU 722 1X5 
24% 14% VI Shay UBt 77 13 


4156 25% Vomad 


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170B 63V6 62% 62to + % 

lOz 72 72 12 

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1»Z 6256 62 62 — 56 

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36 395* 395* 37%— V* 
2 77% 775* 77% 


28 21 WICOR 220 88 

35% 20% 


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956 M6 
47% 31 
54% 28% 
ZT56 15% 
381* 2356 
37 22 

956 7V* 

SBto ITto 
26% 17 
37% 2756 
19% 1454 
28V* JS% 
20% 16 
5056 27V* 
2854 1956 
W* 4 
1156 9% 
23% 12% 


220 84 7 84 26% 2656 26% 

91 IS 10 820 31 3156 31%—% 

JO 73 12 113 20% 20% 20%+ 5k 

151 766 9H 9to 91*— Vk 

21 5 28 1692 45% 445* 455* +1 

J8 IJ 18 328 53% Sm Sto— to 
180 209 20% 2Dto 2D56 + to 

85 U M 44 35% «% 39% 

180 4,1 7 » 3454 3356 34to- 54 

U0 11.1 290Z 9 9 9 —56 

Jt 40 11 438 2216 22 22— to 

613 24% 24 34% 

188 42 13 1156 3756 36% 37%+ to 

MS 88 8 229 19 1S% Wk— 5k 

UN 42 14 271 27% 2756 2756 

288 1X7 8 142 19% 19V* 19to + V6 

JO 18 17 1561 50% 49% 505* + to 

26 12 12 349 2754 36% 27 — Vk 

73 HXk 9% 9%— to 
1 1156 1156 1156 + 5* 
2(ki 3 13 321 2154 21% 2151 + % 


3ues 

days 

intheTrib. / 




(Thursdays and 
Saturdays, tog} 

Start your day 
with a smile with 


'•> .T Ll 
' * ? 


* %»■ « 


Art, ,, 
Buchwatd 















i Index 


: prim P.M EnffltoK marts P,— 
:hMsAM«P.U nmo ratal*** P4B 
plat- P.4 (Md mortals P. II 
tMMM RW ' imnrt rotas P.n 
iso *»eto P.14 MertatSHMiiHiy P. t 
K? rtm : P.U OpHms ' PJ4 

xOHH pm arc stodc P.12 

P.w. Otoar nwrkfts P.M . 

[DAY, MARCH 1, 1985 


licralh^&feenbunc 


BUSINE S S / FIN ANCE 


** 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 6 

Page 11 


TECHNOLOGY 


rests Search for New Ways 
To Make User-Friendly Cars 


•0/0* < \ By JOHN HOEDSHA 

1 ^ Net* York Tima Service 

' [r^V^OIT — Economics, the relationship between peo- 

I ■ pie and machines, Is coming in for mertaa*! a tten tion 
■a!! r 'wj| M ffi^eaoxomobitemdiistiy. After all cars are the most 
g^Hl complicated mach ines that most people have to han- 

a^j j^ B[c.Amo models that are the easiest to manufacture and to drive 
likely to be the most efficient and the best seflos. 

Auto factories are being redesigned so workers can do their 
■\ easier and, the hope is, better. Assembly lines in newer 

•>ji ^0 dories rise, fill and twist,' allowing workers who wwt^n parts 
’ jdemeath' a vehicle to work standing up or even seated. The 
- — ‘ dow-gronnd pits that represented some of the most unpleasant 

bs in older auto factories do 

>t exist in modem plants. c „ , , . 

(Jilt] -n ^Researchers also are study- 50 dials with red 

K^uiiig are likely to 
confine to 


Price Pact 
Of OPEC 
Criticized 

UAE Aide Cites 
Differentials 


U.S. Group Studies West Bank Plan Dollar Qllllbs, 

BP^jgn Dealers Wai ? 

* Kassil iftif Jfeii Of Intervention 


toffuiQlij} \ ultStfSma^Me^Sdy- So (Ms with red 

lifting are likely to 
1 f a »m confined to 

OeWifto/iX wtat color <«iT»l»°oooApte- 

fJ iBfwtld m TTTTTrnirt^-'i TlKtT irrriPTU S 

■ - , r cfa as the speedometer for maximum readability? Ford Motor 
■VSHJNiiiu^ o.'s subsidiary in Britain, which recently took up the «*pvr w 
painu Ihl . ['‘^ported its findings this week at the Society of Automotive 
«i !»ai o\p:u-j Us! ' M&neers convention in Detroit. 

\ weuiu A .nip in ^ k'The test colors used were red, orange, yellow, green and bbre- 
i) tu m.iki; ilicdni U31 °^ eei1 * En^neers fitted oat a model of a car interior with an 
'it IXvrlo, „ . ‘r'^Sirtxtiment panel where lighting conld be altered by changing 
e\ Nutlet. v-u ) , filers in front of the panel lamps. 

item f,, r ,') K . « ^ fesTbe accelerator, ciutdi, brake, gear shift and steering wheel 
.liter c.w ' 1U!f fctre all operational in the simulator, and a sample of 80 people 
lie Sivivi-hov!- 1 * '“‘"“wove” thelaboraicaymodd while locking at a screen projection 
m . idler l i. n ,nm mp ^ a roadwa > r - driver was asked to state the speedometer 
pJmf ' ft* tding at the sound of a beep and to say whether the speed was 
cc\ixvi of ■ , thin the speed limit shown on the screen- 
in hu i w c liiwTi'i “teitiil 11 the performance test, red came out the best, with 68 percent 
inio nn -j) . i - 1 ® responses within 2 miles per hour (3.2 kilometers per hour) 
. } - lSV i . I ‘! rkri ’ ^Etthe actual reading. (Red lighting, not surprisingly, is cotnmon- 

L' .ippj.ii j J r for aircraft instruments.) But die difference in perfor- 

in, , vi ri> \ C i • Dn ' ft,nce between the test colors was slight, with orange ranking 
at 65-perceni accuracy; blue-green, 62-percent; green, 61- 
. j, ' . f ,r ' l ^bicjf tJ oent, and yellow, 60-perccnL 
mm u ^ j '* TC i however, was the color die test drivers liked least. When 

if 1 1 <h- "T** ^iy were asked to state their preferences, the winner was blue- 
• i I’liai.iiai-ij Rtdi* csen, flowed tty ydlow, green, orange and red. Younger 
' J V 0lMir ' 1 1 were the only group to favor red. 

-’'v rt HE researches noted that red lighting first was used by 

l ' 1 r r i“>cnpir| fliers and submariners for night coohbat during Worid War 
.i.ni a.. m u« to|_ . jj because red interferes least with the eyes’ adaptation to 
ii >ii n i.r- 1 Ki\ hr M-xtidaiessL But fairways at ni^it are lit by antomobOe headlights, 
lU y' ^ !ru ‘ *- ™»d v gyg adjustment is not a factor. The fact that red is associated 
, *’ 1 P'^nputh wanting signs seems to have been one reason the drivers 

iVL.l- Ukiik EiinrM it ■ 

uRij’l. i KvsuutwaiiigQ dials with red fighting are likely to remain confined to 
,nc::iv»;. ; ir,^ l^supiajie cockpits while automobile instrument panels keep the 
,*!»(•! :■ \ mis', when i& je-gFeeai cast mbst-of them now have, 
t asut with Af^^nothEi prcgect invblvmg ergonomics (a word derived from 

iin.wtMi. 'i-if - . .,'rnrlitt!^ Greek. w«k”ph3s “law** or “custom^ ms ccraducted by 
■e.y.T ihjiuefc deogn staff of General Motors Corp. The designers studied 

aih!>iv :>* 'vav; wjv^adnva accosts the seat in response to various distances and 
i J- ,* «i»W» i;<d »tglcs between tbesteexing wfaed and foot pedals. With space at 
mkV. ’ii!-.!; fi^;>rainium in new, smaller cars, the designers hoped to be able to 
i luce the leeway of fixsit-seat adjustment, thus providing more 

tor for reaf-seat passengers. 

Again, the testing was done with a mock-up of a car interior, 

•v., o-jJs one with.jm a^ustable wheel and pedals. The wheel and 

*i>l;ve 't Ii ’ :<i j.rials were set in 10 different positions, and 60 people of various 

H *V o ' ?r m '1 :« ?■' (GuBtianwl on Page 15, CuL 5) 

Su" ' H- Cnrrencv Rates 


*«•» V 

*r-.4. .. 

•t 3-M u 

,s-*. . ■ 
a * • »•» 

-V, 

^'1 M- 

A» • 




Currency Rates 


£ ’ tehi krtarbonk rates on Feb. 28 , excluding fees, 

t OWdd fixings for AnuferdOT, Brussels, Frankfurt, Man, Paris. New York rales at 
.'At 




' 

1 * m'. 

11 

i,i .«??* 


S C DM F.F. I Li. CUT. BJ=. SLF. Yn 

1761 4.111 11X15* 345*5* 0.1517 5432* I3WI«25l 

Oja 7250 20,118 45045 12373 ■ 17J54 2X42 2£05' 

13225 143 OJO* U07X 8540* 4575* H7J0* 1585 

-. U82 . X4T44 1UM2 2J51D0 40875 72755 2584 28115 

207X00 225575 42250 20122 55054 3055 73240 7510 

UD6 1354 1054 250200 17025 6750 25475 25MS 

15.1*2 1U» 15577 — - 4526* XX* 15.1W* 15534X5283' 

.2950 282JK 7455 25J0 1257 * 4051 38444* *U» 

25445 10874 85225 • 275*5* 0.134* 75425* 4545* 15*44' 

MO* - 05128 22244 48016 158453 25174 4475» 15*41 171154 

055*42) 05802 118748 9J6882 HA 18151 441004 2J141 34087 


B.F. SLF. Yn 
5832* 13283 "14S25y 

w« 2555* 

4875* 117-50* 1285 * 
72755 2084 281-15 

3085 73240 78*0 
4750 25475 25*55 


ABU DHABI — Producers of 
Qght crude dl still face difficulties 
selling their ofl despite last month's 
agreement on differentials by the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries, the United Arab 
Emirates" s oil minister, Mana Said 
ahOtaba, was quoted as saying 
Thursday in an interview. 

“What [OPEC] readied m Gene- 
va was not the ideal sototkm.lt was 
a major step and a courageous ac- 
tion to solve the dif feren tial issue, 
but H did not solve the problem 
entirety,” Mr. Otdba told the semi- 
official newspaper al-Jttihad. 

“We in the UAE are suffering 
from marketing problems, which 
were reduced after the recent agree- 
ment, but there is aritl some diffi- 
culty” he said. 

OPEC oil ministers agreed Jam 
28 in Geneva to reduce the price 
differential between extra light and 
heavy crudes to S2.40 a barrel 

Mr. Oteifaa said the OPEC mar- 
ket-monitoring committee, of 
which he is chairman, wiD meet in 
April to review market conditions, 
supply and demand, and prices. 

He said OPEC was ready to cot 
its reduced production ceding of 16 
million bands a day; if necessary, 
to defend prices. 

■ Oman Cuts Prices 

Oman’s col Tninkrw Said Bin 

Ahmed al-Shanfari, said Wednes- 
day rfe»> the cntfanar^ had reduced 
its oil prices by 55 cents, to 528 a 
band, down from S22L55 in 1984, 
United Press Latemarional report- 
ed from Muscat. 

Mr. Shanfari said Oman, which 
is not an OPEC member was. how- 
ever, pricing its crude in line with 
OPEC's decision to lower its baric 
crude by $1, to $28 a band. 

■ Egyptian Prices Unchanged 

Egypt, which cut the price of its 

top grade of oil in February, will 
leave export prices unchanged in 
March, The Associated Press re- 
ported Thursday from Cairo, quot- 
ing Hammad Ayoub, deputy chair- 
man and foreign trade director of 
the state-run Egyptian General Pe- 
troleum Corp. 

Egypt, which is not a member of 
-OPEC, followed OPEC pricing 
practices until this year, when it 
disassociated itself from the cartel 
after expressing dissatisfaction 
about bickering among the 13 
member nations. 

In February, Egypt reduced the 
price of its top-grade Gulf of Suez 
fight blend by 50 cents a barrel and 
, raised its Ras Gfaareb heavy crude 
by 15 cents. February prices woe 
$27 JO a barrel for Gulf of Suez and 
Bdayim North; $26.75 for Be- 
layim; $26.60 for Badras. and 1 
$25.75 for Ras Ghareb. < 


American Arabs and Jews 
May Promote Its Economy 

By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — On the West Bank of the 
Jordan River, a region brimming with antagonism 
and conflicting aspirations, a group of about 40 
American businessmen of Jewish and Arab de- 
scent has created an uproar with its plans to 
promote economic development. 

One reason the efforts nave created such a furor 
is the prominence erf some of the individuals in- 
volved: Najeeb E. Halaby. former president of Pan 
American World Airways and father erf Queen 
Noor of Jordan; Jay A. Pritzkor, c hairman of the 
Hyatt Corp.; Howard M. Squadron, former presi- 
dent of the American Jewish Congress and a part- 
ner in the New York law firm of Squadron, EQen- 
otT, Plesent ft Lch r ert Albert J. Thhmoush, 
chairman of Frank B. Hall ft Co.; William J. 
Baroody Jr., president of the American Enterprise 
Institute, and Lester Crown, executive vice presi- 
dent of General Dynamics Corp. 

The businessmen, whose leaders met last fall 
with Prime Minister Shimon Feres of Israel and 
U.S. Secretary of State George P. Shultz, say they 
want only to im p ro ve the hie of the Palestinians 
and thereby enhance the prospects of peace. 

But the unusual sight of cooperation between 
Arab- Americans and Jewish- Americans has pro- 
voked denunciations from several quarters. For- 
eign Minister Yitzhak Shamir of «iH in a 
statement that the group “does not serve the inter- 
ests of Israel” and should instead be helping Israel 
in a rime of fwmneial wr ing 

Some leftist Arab newspapers in the West Bank 
«nrf Jordan have alcn criticized the group, charg in g 
that it intends to establish a rival, more conserva- 
tive Palestinian leadership in the West Bank. 

“Basically what we want to do is make jobs for 


;golaju 

•hts. 


SYRIA 




wmi 


m mm 

■fj-y/ (Occupied Wg 

Y by Israel) 4 a 

T. 

Sonio MonHy-r'v. A 

Bethlehem;.'. • 

‘ /Hebron-'? 2* j 

1 X'SSAW <3 / 


Amman 


JORDAN 


Compiled in Our Sujf From Dupatihn 

NEW YORK — The dollar be- 
gan to rebound Thursday, rising 


The yen weakened in New York 
u> 259.S5 to the dollar, from 
259.15; the Italian lire was at 2,082. 


steadily on thin volume in uneven a weakening from 2,055. and the 
trading in Europe and New York. Swiss franc ended at 1867, com- 
Tradcrs were nnry of 3 repeat of its pared with 2.825, 


massive fall following large-scale 
central bank intervention toe day 
before. 

Gold prices sagged. 


In London, the pound weakened 
to SI. 082. down from $1,089 
Wednesday but still more expen- 
sive than Tuesday’s $1,067. The 


Th. N>~ Tort 

people and imp rove their living conditions, and do 
it with some of toe bridges that come from toe 
Arab- American and American Jewish consor- 
tium,” said Mr. Crown, who is rochair man of the 
.group with Mr. TahmousL 

The Business Group for Middle East Peace and 
Development, as it is called, began meeting in the 
spring of 1983. The gnfcp discussed toe idea with 
Israeli, Jordanian and Egyptian officials, accord- 
ing to Stephen P. Cohen, director of the Institute 
for Middle East Peace and Development at the 
Gty University of New York, who is working with 
toe group. The businessmen now are studying 
passible projects, he said. 

“They range everywhere from agriculture to 
sanitation,” Mr. Tahmonsh said. “We have not 
limi ted toe scope of toe shopping list” 

He declined to discuss particular projects being 
considered, but repots m toe Israeli and West 
Bank press have mentioned a hospital, a devdop- 

(COntinued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


The dollar’s gains Thursday were dollar strenghtened to 3.322$ DM 
relatively small since some caution in late London trading, from 
remained from the turmoil of toe 33150 Wednesday. 


past two days and because of the 
absence of toe U.S. Federal Re- 
serve Bank during il 


Other late dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with late rates Wednes- 
day, were: 2.8445 Swiss francs. 


“The Fed did not follow its stat- compared with 2.835; 10.182 
ed policy of smoothing out disor- French francs, compared with 
derly markets, which they should 10.175; 3.768 Dutch guilders, cam- 


do no matter what direction toe pared with 3.754, and 2,070 Italian 
dollar is going.” said Daniel Hd- lire, no change. 


land, vice president at Discount 


Corp. of New York 
“The purpose of tl 


“The purpose of toe market is to 
facilitate dealing and Wednesday 
the market was virtually closed,” 
Mr. Holland said. 

In New Yoik. toe British pound 
closed at S1.076. cheaper than 
$1.09 from Wednesday. The Deut- 
sche mark finished at 3.354 to toe 
dollar, a weakening from 3323 
Wednesday, and the French franc 
ended at IQ.24 to toe dollar, a 
weakening from Wednesday’s 
10.15. 


Why Investors Have Been Banking on the Dollar 


By Carl Gewlrtz managers, or treasurers managing themselves. Outbound investment toe sharp run-up in local currency 

/ tJLtianni t ^ temporary liquidity of their (long-term direct investment and prices and moving back into dollars 

inbvie companies — would, against toe portfolio purchases) last year was brfore toe loss on toe exchange rale 

r AKJS Pot aside this weeks advice of expert opinion, go on about halved from the $18 billion eats up too much of the local cur- 

TDtCChniCS On thft forWPll-Ct- r^Uinn /YUArmM m n * F rt- 1 nO*> _ _ ■ «L rtattmi amn* 


pyrotechnics on the foreign-ex- 
change market, which saw toe dol- 
lar tumble a sharp 5 percent within 
the space of a few hours, and focus 
instead on the 16-percent increase 


selling oversold domestic curren- of 1982 and repatriation is gather- rency gam 


On toe other side are toe non- 
Americans. who last year sold 


mg pace. The mast glaring example On toe other side are toe non- 

lVFWB A1VATVCTC of this is toe performance of UA Americans, who last year sold 

iir/WS ^iALI 313 banks. In toe third quarter last $123.3 billion more than they 

overvalued dollar ***2 cut too; international bought . in toe Unital States Bank- 


earty tms weea. 1 6 DereenP to theseccmd quarter. A substantial largely kept m dollars, bang sent 

Last autumn, toe dollar was Tbe fact of toe matter is that qq partof this cutback appears to have home and convened into local cur- 


Last autumn, the Hnifer was 
trading at 3 Deutsche marks — a 
level that European economists 
and mainstream U.S. economists 
were then saying vastly ovovabed 
the dollar. Deroite the one-sided 


ing a high of 3.47 DM this week. 

Reagan administration officials 
attribute this run-up to the invest- 
ment opportunities available to 
foreign investors — the strong 
business revival, which has in- 
creased profitability of U.S. com- 
panies, the relatively low rate of 
inflation, the high (nominal and 
real) level of U.S. interest rales, 
and, of course, the safe-haven that 
toe United States represmts for a. 
broad spectrum of foreign inves- 
tors. 

But is itcrwlible that investors — 
be they individuals managing their 
own portfolios or investment fund 


The fact of toe matter is that no P^of^wu»«iapp«rsiohave home and convened mto local cur- 
one has the answer. But there is a in mterbank lemfing. wintih rency only as nwded. 
growing suspicion that other fac- plates dollar scarcty for nofl-U-& Bankers say toemoney is kept in 

allQfwhkii add up to a ^ that use that market to fund doDarsmpanbecauseofthea- 
demand for dollars rather than a clotom Potions. tnua^y high mttraa rate avail- 

desire to dump foreign currencies At the same time, some special- 111 ^ Coded" States, but also 
- have beeTpushiM up the ex- ists believe thatTI. pOTtfSSto- bccause 
change rate. vestors are now sdtng fordgu term, negotiable mvtstment mstru- 

On one side are the Americans stock holdings, taking profits on (Continued on Page 15, CoL 5) 


then saying vastly overtrained 7..., ."r j y,“~ "r' f, “ their dollar positions, 
trflar. D^ite the one-sided demand for dolbrs rather than a 

I of toT^perr views, the da ™ “draqi feragn currencies Attoe rame dm^so^ 
has dmibedsteadiLy, reach- — W been pushing up toe ex- ists believe that U.S^porti 
. Trr*_rrTJ’ ‘ . change rate. vectors orr nnor cwlimr 


vestors are now 


On one side are toe Americans stock holdings, taking profits on 


“The market simply digested 
yesterday’s intervention.'' said Les- 
lie Puto erf Irving Trust Co. “To- 
day’s performance was not a vote 
of confidence in toe ability of cen- 
tral banks to manipulate the dol- 
lar." 

Currency dealers said toe dollar 
dipped when West Germany’s 
Bundesbank sold $70 nrOlion at the 
midday fixing and then another 
S100 million on the open market io 
the afternoon. 

But toe U.S. currency then rose 
laic in the day after traders realized 
toe action was not a repeat of 
Wednesday’s concerted interven- 
tion. in which European central 
banks sold at least $1.5 trillion to 
curb the dollar’s rise. 

“Sentiment is nervously strong 
for toe dollar,” said one dealer at a 
bank in Britain. 

Currency dealers said the dol- 
lar’s future would depend on what 
the central banks do in coming 
days. 

“If central banks don’t follow up 
their Wednesday action strongly, I 
see the dollar rising again.” a trader 
at a West Goman bank said. 

Wednesday’s sale of dollars by 
European central banks drove 
down toe surging currency by as 
much as 5 percent against the 
Deutsche marc. The dollar recov- 
ered slightly when it appeared that 
toe Fed had not joined toe inter- 
vention. 

(UPI, Reuters, AP) 


Analysts See Growth 
Of Below 2% for France 


Dollar Values 

Etnlv. C “" w «« 

«r >. ' ‘2 Antrafim .UBS 0837 HUB 15172 M42J ttnovaraS Z26 

J ? 1 * Mrtrtoiiehnba 2X34 MB13 UratHAakU 7SM0 <W*5 LAMairuri 202B2 

I . 0 ■tfefcMfta.fRBc OSS 3551 KMNtH«MT U307S 8UBBI3 S.Konaawm 8*450 

• i', 1 -?5 Cantata 1 . 7JB4 03B72 Motor. riMMI 7SD5 050S4 Sooo. peseta 1B4M 

'»** MObH HJ3 0.1047 NarW-kroM 9SS B.WC 8 —d . lW i *51 

■f > " ■*•! Hnutanatti U* 0JH5 PUL mm 1B.17S 85254 TofwaaS 3952 

, : m Srwt droctoM U150 05054 ParLMCMki MB88 WBS7 TMbaM 285JS 

•, V HmoKbmI' 7 JO 02777 Saodlrtral 14001 02723 ILAXOlrtem 2879 

J 1 „• M» ‘Vtav;1.U45 IrtAc 

■■ '^MHnnctol franc (b) Amounts asMiadta buy on* pound (dAreaunMimtad 1o buv an dollar (*1 
V U» U) Urtfs of X 800 (VI Units Of 10000 
• , : ma auotM; KAj od cmOebta. 

' ■; r-nas: Banotm du Benelux (BrvssatsJs Banco Comaxtrcfale Uutlana (MUon); Omtrdea! 
(New Yertdt Banov National* a* Paris (Paris!: IMF (SDRJ: Banov* AroM at 
V ^-rnationaf* trinvaafUommant (dinar, rfyol, d/mamj. Ottwraata tram K*vt*n andAP. 


* Owwwmv ' ,r 

EMta. Q " TW (L55 
Obits SMMMrot 22* 
04*5 OAMcanrond 25282 
85812 S. Korean woo S4U0 


MO 8 —d . l W *41 

88351 Tdml 3*21 

05357 TMbaM 285K 

02723 UJLE. dkhom 14728 


Interest Rates 


■J ^nrocnrrency Deposits 


Feb, 28 


. ?*• DoOnr p Marti - . Franc . Starting Franc ECU . ■ SDR 
, <**“ Eta -9 ‘ SW.. SV» SVa -Sib 14 - UVi 10 %-W^Wb -10 *%-»¥. 

-• •«* SW.-4H.- 5W.-5M. iaoh-Ulk raw- TOM. 10 -1M H - 9 

" *<k -* 9 k 4 lh - 5 *b UA -14 11 - T 19 W I 0 K.. 10 tb.» -* 

! ■ 10 -int flt -M S«b-5H HH-inh 119U.11H 10 10 9V - 9 

‘ W4- tow. 4VL . «<U 54b - SW 120W- tzgkim-.nwi tOK.-1<nh 9«h . fW. 

**PPpBcatUr to Martoak OanasUs o!Sl mWlonmhiknum for amthnNantJ. 

" _-.7p e *»- Morton Guaranty (dollar, DM. SF, Pound. PF1: UorOS Bonk (ECU!: atfbcr* 

• 


nan Dollar Rates 


Feb. 28 


’ii’.'.'itaL 

Peuttrs. 


2 BlOC. 
*W -*9k 


Him. 

!*. *89b 


*.'V »unl Rof» 
tetd Pond* 
m Rota 

^ 1 ker Uxm Rota 

tan. Pwer, 30-17* doyi- 

Mil Tmtunr Hits 

•mti Treasury eiHs 

*308* ihm 
* *M9 days 


8 ‘ 8 
l» Mb 

■ tow* um 

357 855 

155 140 

150 175 

130 124 

150 145 


Britain 

Bor* Bate Rot* . 
Call Manay 
rt-dov TrtowfY Bill 
34non!h Intertnnk 

Jawn 

Dtscaunr ROM ' 

Cat! Money 
40-doy Infertonk 


14 . ■ 14 
14 UU 
U V. 1)*. 

13 It/32 VSt 


Gold Prices 


By Axel Krause 

. International ffentid Tribune 

PARIS — Representatives of 
West European and UJS. econont- 
io-forecastmg groups said Thurs- 
day that France's economy would 
grow mare slowly in 1985 than the 
2-percent expansion being presett- 
ed by the government and the Or- 
ganization for Economic Coopera- 
tion and Development. 

The analysts said that their pro- 
jections for this year ranged from 
13-percent to 1.7-perceot growth 
in gross national product, com- 
pared to last year’s 2-percent ex- 
pansion in GNP, a measure of the 
total value of goods and services. 
The analysts died an expected 
slowdown in consumer demand 
and in Bench export sales. 

Pierre Bfrtgovoy. finance nnnis- 
ter, on Tuesday had tdd a business 
conference organized by the Inte- 
national Herald Tribune that 
France would seek to expand eco- 
nomic growth this year, possibly 
beyond the projected 2 percent. He 
also predicted that West European 
growth would average around 3 
parent this year, slightly higher 
than the 12 percent m 1984. All 
these growth estimates are adjusted 

for inflation. 

In its December outlook report, 
the OECD predicted (hat the 
French economy would grow at 2 
percent annual raxes in 1985 and in 
toe first half of 1986. 

The analysts, add ressing a con- 
ference of economic journalists, 
disagreed with those assessm e nts. 
They said they expected growth of 
toe West European GNP to remain 
at last year's levels. Several added 


" that there was little room for more 
expansionary policies in France 
and West Germany without refuel- 
ing inflation. 

“Given our currently restrictive 
poheaes, we have not yet found a 
way to be more expansive,’’ said 
Joachim Volz, of the DIW forecast- 
ing institute in West Berlin. He 
projected a 1-5-perceat growth in 
GNP for France this year and 
about 15 percent for West Germa- 
ny, foil owing growth of 2.6 percent 
in 1984. 

Mr. Volz and several French an- 
alysts said that they also expected 
U.S. economic growth to be below 
toe 4-percent expansion projected 



“The dollar will remain strong 
and interest rates will stabilize, but 
U.S. growth will be weaker” than 
ad minis tration’s projection, said 
Emmanuel Devaud of the COE 
forecasting firm, winch is closely 
linked to toe Paris Chamber erf 
Commerce. He projected U.S. eco- 
nomic growth at around 3 J per- 
cent 

Mr. Devand and other analysts 
said that the Iowa estimate for the 
U.S. economy also would contrib- 
ute to relatively Iowa growth in 
Europe- 

Hove Passeron of ClSI-Whar- , 
ton, a U.S. firm, said that although 1 
he agreed with toe ^percent pro- 
jection for toe U.S. economy, 
France's growth would fall below 
the estimated 2-percent level 

“Europe as a whole will remain 
calm this year, and the French 
economy mil grow by around 1.7 
percent, according to our projec- 
tions,” Mr. Passeron said. 


For the man with exceptional goals, 
a new dimension in banking services. 



►month Interbank um 1MB ^zT. . . r _. o lll 

wm inurijj. „ ... Official Rxftm far Commv Pons ong Luon- 

tanih Interbank Mk l»rw«nWonac3o*ta 

■■"n mtorbonfe **, rurtdu Ham Yurt Conwc eurranl contrad. 

^Nauten.ConrnerMMLy. 

***■ Uartts Bank. Bank at Tokyo. Source: Rooters. 


farkets Qosed 

markrn were dosed Thursday in P akis ta n because of Elec- 


Troubles Deepen for Hunt Brothers 

The Associated Pm 

WASHINGTON — The Commodity Futures Trading Commis- 
sion accused Ndson Bunker Hunt, his brother William and several 
other inefivkhzals and companies Thursday of illegally manipnlatmg 
the silver market during laic 1979 and cany 1980. 

The complaint said the defendants acquired mart than 100 m3tio& 
ounces of silver bullion during a period of a little over ax months, 
driving toe price artificially high. 

When prices started to fall in early 1980, the complaint alleged, the 
defendants took a dumber of steps to hall the decline and, by March 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 5) . . 


TTThat makes Trade Develop- 
Wrnent Bank exceptional? To 
start with, there is our policy of 
concentrating on things we do 
unusually well. For example, 
trade ana. export financing, 
foreign exchange and banknotes, 
money market transactions and 
precious metals. 

Equally important, we are 
now even better placed to serve 
your needs, wherever you do 
business. Reason; We have 
recently joined American Express 
International Banking Corpora- 


tion, with its 89 offices in 39 
countries, to bring you a whole 
new dimension in banking ser- 
vices. 

While we move fast in serv- 
ing our clients, were distinctly 
traditionalist in our basic poli- 
cies. At the heart of our business 
is the maintenance of a strong 
and diversified deposit base. Our 
portfolio of assets is also well- 
diversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a con- 
servative ratio of capital to 
deposits and a high degree of 


liquidity-sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust 
with your business, get in touch 
with us soon. 

TDB bank j in Geneva, London, Paris, 
Luxembourg. Chiasso, Monte Carlo, 
Nassau, Zurich. 

TDB is a member of the American 
Express Company, which has assets of 
VS$ 62.8 billion and shareholders’ 
equity oj USS 44 billion . 



Hade Development Bank 


Shown at left, the head office 
of Trade Development Bank. Geneva. 


An American Express Company 










2 


HIM hi Ne> 

IBM HiSh LOW 3F-M.C6T* 


Over-the-Counter 

Feb. 28 

NASDAQ National Market Prices 



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NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

FIDELITY INTERNATIONAL 
FUNDN.V 

Registered Office: ScfaotlegaiwegOast. Salinja. Curacao. Netherlands Antilles 


Please take notice that the Annual General 
Assembly of Shareholders of Fidelii> 
International Fund N.V. lihe 

“Corporation ) will take place at CO p.m. at 

Schottegatweg Oosi . Salima . Curacao. 
Netherlands Antilles, on March -I. lw. 

The following matters are on the agenda for 
this Meeting: 

1. Report of the Management. 

2. Election of six Managing Directors- The 
Chairman of the Management proposes the 
re-election of the following six existing 

Edw^t^ohnwn 3d. William L. Byrne. 
Charles A. Fraser. Hisashi Kurokawa. John 
M.S. Patton. James E. Tonner. 

3. Approval of the Balance Sheet and Profit a °d 
Loss Statement for the fiscal year ended 
November 30, 19^ 

4. Proposal, recommended by Management, to 
' amend the Corporation's Articles of 

Incorporation as necessary or appropriate to 
enable the Corporation to continue to list ns 
shares on the Luxembourg Stock Exchange, 
by amending Article 5 to add a provision 
specifying the time within which investors 
must pay the subscription pnee for shares, 
and by amending Article 1 1 to add a provision 

stKditas «■!*“ — 


specifying the rime within which the 
Corporation must pay redemption proceeds 
to investors redeeming shares. 

S Proposal, recommended by Management, to 
' amendArtide 5 of the Corporation s Articles 
of Incorporation to add a provision 
authorizing the Corporation to issue 
fractional shares. 

6. Authorization of execution and delivery by 
representatives of Maduro & Curiel s Trust 
Company N.V. on behalf of the Corporation 
of appropriate Deeds of Amendment relating 
to items 4 and 5 above. 

7. Ratification of actions taken by the Managing 
Directors since the last Annual General 
Assembly of Shareholders, including 
payment on March 8. 1985 of an interim 
dividend in respect of the fiscal year ended 
November 30. 1984 in the amount of 5U.-VJ 
per share to shareholders of record on 
February 22, 1985. and authorization of the 
Managing Directors to declare an addiuonal 
dividend in respect of fiscal 1984 if necessary 
to enable the Fund to qualify for 


"distributor" status under United Kingdom 
tax law. 

8. Ratification of actions taken by the 
investment Manager since the last Annual 
General Assembly of Shareholders. 

9. Such other business as may properly come 
before the Meeting. 

Holders of registered shares may vote by 
pro xv bv mailing a form of proxy obtained 
from' the Corporation's Principal Office in 
Pembroke. Bermuda, from Fidelity 
International Management Limited in 
London, or from the Banks listed below, to 
the Corporation at the following address: 
Fidelity International Fund N.V. 
c/o Maduro & Ciiriel's 
Trust Company N.V.. 

P.O. Box»5. 

Curacao. Netherlands Antilles. 

Holders of bearer shares may vote by proxy 
by mailing a form of proxy and certificate of 
deposit for their shares obtained and filed in 
the manner described in the preceding 
sentence. Alternatively, holders of bearer 
shares wishing to exercise their rights 
personally at the Meeting may deposit their 
shares, or a certificate ofdeposii therefor, 
with the Corporation at Schottegatweg Oosi. 
Salinja. Curacao. Netherlands Antilles, 
against receipt therefor, which receipt will 
entitle said tearer shareholder to exercise 
such rights. 

All proxies land certificates of deposit issued 
to bearer shareholders) must be received by 
the Corporation not later than 1 .00 p.m. on 
March 21. 1985. in order to be used at the 


Gold OptiODS (prica taiS/n.). 


20 1373-1555 2201350 

300 8751025 16251775 240MS50 

JK> 43- ADO 1131300 1800-1950 

320 250 400 BOO 750 14001550 

330 100 225 550 700 10701225 

3« 350 500 800 950 


GvU 29950 -29000 

Vslears WttteWdd &A. 

1. Qai da Mam-Btanc 
1211 Geara I. S«to**tod 
Tel. 310251 - Tdn 2*305 


NOTICE TO HOLDERS OF 

IT0-Y0MD0 CO., LTD. 

6%% Convertible Debenture* 

Due Aiqm 91. 1993 

Convertible Debenture* 

Due ArrU * 1 . 199 ® 

PnrawU u Sedan 004U1 ih* Cmpoiri 
IndMtsns dazed u ef July 1. 1S78 Md Jotr L 

Debcoiara. Mbc* b bento H*eo M tollDwK 

l The Comzany has made* rraedaeribo- 

Stock todarehcUen 
of neord m * Febtowy 20 lM5in Japewel %e 
ralaaf I n*w (bare tor each 10 Uiarei held. 

O Accor***** <b» pneal u 

wbieb the Uanamuioned D*tM»rt* my be 
cenmud mzo o! Common Stock rf U» 

Com as fern been Kbaud eOrcove and March 
1. BBS. Japan Time, from Yan B3SJ0 per ihare rf 


99 10 
IX 10V 
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XXV 
314 18V 
2J 2441% 
J IX 17% 

ia x is% 

56 7014% 

45 a 15V. 
35 441 W% 
X 7V 
14 7A5gA 
34 X 7k 
25 728% 

J 15729% 
A5 AV 
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43 1823V 

3J 1521V 
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14 48 24% 

42 45010% 
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A% 
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. T 
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31 
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VMM 150 45 
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2 

vmtBk 4 

VbTtck 351 

Vodwi 


CUm 9wck to ftn 83S50 per duurof Commm 
Sum* far Conierublc Debran.'m Due 

Au*OK3L 1996 

ITO-T0MD0 CO, LTD. 

Br. The Bank d Tokyo 
TV-j* Company 
aiThaae 

Due* March 1. 1985 


BID ASK 
USS US8 

DeVue- Holbein 

International bv 5V4 6V4 

Gty-Qock 

International nv 2% 3V4 

Quotes as of: Feb. 28. 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 485 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3120 260901 
Telex; 14507 firco nl 


74 uv 11% 
79 3% 3M 
148 9% 8% 
47040V 40% 
30812% »% 
40 8 7V 
21417% 17 
4044V 44% 
SS 18 17V 

2S26V 24% 
„ 

4729 2BV 
24% 34% 
■% BV 
42% 42% 
7% 2% 
5% 5V 
20913% 13% 
M3 13V 13% 
IX 8% 8% 
» » » 
41 15 MV 
244 WA TV 
12 4% AV 
S2S27V X% 
44119% 11V 
X 


616 AV AV 4% + V 
29 10% WV WV 
3712 14V 14% 14V— % 


YtowFt U0 2J 150 3AW 34% 34V 
YorfcPd M 35 1WAWVWV+V 


March 21. 1985. in order to be used at the 
Meeting. , t „ 

By order of the Management 
Charles T.M. Coffis 
Secretary 

Fidelity International Management Limited 
25 Lovat Lane. 

London EC3R 8LL. England 

The Bank of Bermuda Limited 
Hamilton. Bermuda 

Bank Julius Bar & Co. 
Bahnhofsirassc 36. 

Zurich. Switzerland 

Kredietbank S.A. Luxembourgcoise 
45. Boulevard Royal. 
Luxembourg 




—**■«— a— 

World Index. , he obtained from Fidelitv International at: 

CODi« Of the latest quarterly and annual reports can ne oouu 

„ „ „ . , xt_ii 9 Bond Street. 

S._H.h 5 rJc«,,CI 


P.O. Box 670. Pembroke Hall. 
East Broadway. Pembroke. 
Hamilton." Berm uda 

Tel: (8W) WW 
Telex: 0280 53 18 


Tel: (0534] 
Telex: 4192260 


BANK IN LIECHTENS TEIN 
IS PLEASED TO 

ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF ITS 
LONDON SUBSIDIARY: 

LIECHTENSTEIN (U. K.) LIMITED 


LLvusl’J Deposit Ttifcti 

Malcolm H. Wetb dnJ Huns Oiristop/t Groscint/i, Mantigjng Dinectow 
Mich-icI J. Cdrpc'nti.T. Business Dercfopnieru unii Credits 
I Pewmshire S*puxre. London ECJM 4UJ. it'Itp/unu:: 01-377 0404. 
TcUja: 01-247 H71. Telex; SSII 714 billon 
Trading: Cohn King, Tr&.ur.irer, Telephone: 0 J -377 1661, Telex: S 953 302 bilfxl 

BANK IN LIECHTENSTEIN AG 

Honffisasw 12, FL-9490 Vlidu^ 


N1COR OVERSEAS FINANCE U V. 

[A Nutheriands Anfltai Corporcdion end 
who Oy -owned subs kfiary of NKOR he.] 

HHfc% Convwfibte S u bordkicded Debenfurt dn® May 1, 1995 
• and 

14% Sidsonfinated Debenlam due May 1, 1995 

AD debenture holders are hereby notified fat The Northern Trust Company hen. 
resigned effective upon fa dose of b«m3) an Deoamber 31, 1984 at TruUctr 
under fa Indenture doVd May 1.1980. at supplem en ted by fa Fird Sup p lemente d 
Menture doted Decen*w 2, 1982 pbe "InderturaT, pursuant la wfidi fa above 
debentures were issued. Irving Tnnt Conpcny hat been qppoMedrcmd acoepled 
such appointment, as suoDessar Trustee under fa Indatfum. 

ContinetUd Mmots Nationd Bark and trust Company of Chicago fCantmcrtaT) 
has been retained as Paying Agent and as agent for trtnfar, exchange; 
conversion or subeiihitian of debentures, and olio as an <37011 1 far authertkxriion 
and cn apart for service of process upon fa Company or NKX3R Inc (fa 
“Guarantor") in Chicago. UGnov Aoeonfingly debenture holdecs may corttauo to 
pwsertdeberturesfarhransfer.e ad bangvainimrBorwstfaihiliQnorpQiymertand' 
may eorrtinue to serve notices for demands upon fa Company end fa Guaraitor 
in respect of fa debwtfures at fa Offices of Co nfo e nta l and its afStfates which 
were heretofore designated for nidi purposes. 

A> demands and natioei which under fa indertue should be ddyered to fa 
Trustee may now be de fa ced to fa principal office of faring Tnrt Company, One 
Wbfl Street, New York, New York 10015 Attention: Corporate Trust Deportment 

SdnlarK. Headman 










































































■IIHISINESS ROUNDUP 


Bits re-. ' __ 

'Bid Reports 1984 Net Rose 52% 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1985 


Page 13 


ty said, with setting 
‘ overall, 


oal chemicals, industrial explo* des, (be 

LONDON — Imperial Gieiai- sves and paints. The largest im- prices lirtkcLmged overa 
Industries PLCs 1984 earnings provemenl, it said, came in The seasonal downturn 
) t«c 52 percent over 1983, the con- P^odiegacals and plastics, where rfv»mv«*ic *nd mini *»ti 
‘^S’WKported Tlnnsday- ? 1^83 loss of £7 nmEon was fol- 

^ '• lowed by a £138-nuHioo profit. 


Tbc company reported: a net of 
drillzon (about S659 nnQkm at. 

■ ’“'• ■prrent exchange rates), or 98-2. 
h - cnee a share, up from £397 mO- 
or 65 J pence a share, in 1983. 

[ said earnings last year improved 
• iS a all its sectors. «. 

it £ JjTbe dividend for 1984 was 30 deqnie detimmg output from the 
i^'.cuce, compared with 24 pence a Neman field in the North Sea, and 
^ftysnrcariicr. 


Fibers also returned to profit, 
IQ said. It said that the colors 
business was d is appo i nting but 
that polyurethanes performed weH 
The strong U.S. dollar contributed 
to ofl profits, which remained good' 


m agro- 
chemicals and paint, plus some 
price weakness in tbc commodity 
chemicals sector. limited fourth- 
quarter pretax profit, however, to 

£234 irnTIifln, op £fi millio n from 

the third quarter, IQ reported. 

The oil business contributed £26 
million to the fourth quarter, op 
from £24 million in the third, the 


S a \ __ 

’{rtjSiin 1984 for the 


£1 bit- 
time. at 


increasing petroleum icveime tax, 
the company said. 



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i^ArjB “ — — — ■ — ICI said fourth-quarter chenri- 

bfi&cn, up 67 percent from cals sales were up almnet 6 percent 
| fi J19 miltion in 1983, the company from the third quarter. The in- 
2 -ported. crease came almost equally from 

ji i'-' ICI said it bad solid gams is higher volume and the higher ster- 
^rrmacectkals. agriculture, gen- lmg value of sales in other cmren- 


J-S. profit doubled, with good 

progress con tinuing in pharmarwi - 

deals, agrochemicals and plastic* 
films, IQ reported. 

Completion of the $75Q-mffion 
purchase of rhg rfiwtflrak inf w efg 
of the U.S. company Beatrice Cos. 
is taking place in the first quarter of 
tins year and the transaction had 
no impact on 1984 results, IGsaid. 


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t^IdanucBank 
l^Turns a Profit 

k ^ United Press Tntenuaiomt 

? V- . KUALA. LUMPUR. Maky- 
il^-sia — Bank Islam Malaysia 
^ £ ‘turned a profit in its first 18 
a aC.Jxoouib5 of operation, according 
ii5 : to its accounts, published 

The bank a made SI-miEicni 
^384,000-ringgh) profit in the 
*jji - first six months of its second 
^ ‘ftnaweial year and recovered its 
j ® ^ i capital, according to Abdul Ha- 
3a. pm Tsniail, manggmg director. 
w : |£‘ The bank, with a paid up cap- 
{g giital of S50 nriffion and an autho- 
irizod capital of S250 million, 
s®*i< — — *•*“ - • 


*'V 


^operates strictly within the ten 
£ >nets laid down in the Koran. } 


Vittel Plans to Move Into U.S. Market 


By Heidi Evans 

Los Angdes Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Vittd, the 
131-year-old French company and 
an important presence on the Euro- 
pean miner a l-water market , ha s an- 
nounced plans to lap into tbc U.S. 
bottled-water business with a new 
acquisition, the historic Bartlett 
Springs in Northern California. 

Details of the acquisition were 
not disclosed. The Swiss conglom- 
erate Nestle SA, w hich has a 34- 
peroeot interest in Vittel, will par- 
ticipate in a joint venture to hwiwch 
the U.S. mineral water. 

The Bartlett Springs spa, in Lake. 
County, noth of California's Wine, 
Country, has had a succession of 
private owners since the mhM930s. 

'A public-relations spokesman 


for the company in Los Angeles 
saiH that vitid-Banleti Springs 
Mineral Water, a non -carbonated 
water, will tnalce its U.S. debut in 
about nwnths and will com- 
pete for a share of the market now 
enjoyed by snch imported waters as 
Perrier and Evian and by American 
products snch as Calistoga and Po- 
land Springs. 

“Initially, the water will be mar- 
keted in the Western United 
Slates,” said Jerry Digney, a 
spokesman for Vittd. He noted 
that there are 400 U.S. companies 
selling bottled water, as well as 35 
European imports. 

The company, with - £00 nriffion 
bottles sokf in 1984, claims to be 
the largest world’s premier bottler 
of nott-carbooated mineral water. 


U.S. Says Bank 
Was Told of 
Violations in 3 82 

Nevr York Tima Service 

BOSTON —A vice president 
of First National Bank of Bos- 
ton was told by federal bank 
regulators as early as 1982 that 
the bank was not m compliance 
with currency-reporting regula- 
tions and he promised to cor- 
rect the situation. Treasury offi- 
cials said 

The disclosure Wednesday 
contradicts the assertion by 
William L Brown, chairman of 
Bank of Boston Coip., the 
bank's parent, that the reason 

for the bank’s failure to comply 
with the currency-reporting re- 
quirements was that it was un- 
aware of them until 1984. 

Earlier this month. First Na- 
tional Bank of Boston pleaded 
guilty to failure to rniort $12 
billion in cash transfers with 
Swiss banks from 1980 to 1984 
and was fined $500,000, a re- 
cord amount. 

Officials in the Treasury De- 
partment and the Office of the 
Comptroller of the Currency 
said Wednesday that Daniel 
Dormer, the bank’s vice presi- 
dent for coin and currency, was 
told in August and again in Sep- 
tember of 1982 of the bank’s 
failure to file the necessary re- 
ports with Treasury authorities. 

Of ficials said that the bank 
sent a total of S2I0 million in 
rash back and forth to the Swiss 
banks in 1983 and 1984, with- 
out reporting these t ransac tions 
to the government. 


Voting Ends on Phillips Plan; Results on Monday 


By Robert J. Cole 

.Vw Vent Times Service 

NEW YORK— The Pfafllips Pe- 
troleum Co. said that h had closed 
the perils and would announce 
Monday how stockholders voted 
on its recapitalization plan. 

The company also seemed to 
leave the door open to possible new 
initiatives by top executives to deal 
with Car! C Icahn. the New’ York 
investor who is trying to take over 
Phillips. 

In what appeared to be a sign 
that it might be conceding defeat 
and at work on something new, 
W illiam C Douce, chairman, told 
stockholders Wednesday that the 
recapitalization was not “the only 
card in Phillips's hands.'* 

He spoke before about 500 
stockholders in a meeting in Bar- 


tlesville, Oklahoma, the company's would not want to leave the impres- 
head quarters. The "wiring was son that the recapitalization pro- 
then recessed for the third time gram has been the only card in 
since Feb. 22, when Phillips called Phillips's hands." 


stockholders together to vote on 
the rccapitalizatiQii. The recess was 
called initially to finish counting, 
then because* of court challeng es 
and on Wednesday to complete the 
tabulation. 

In Washington, Mr. Icahn fore- 
cast victory in Testimony before a 
congressional conmniiee, saying, 
M I think I won iL" 

Speaking about the plan in the 
past tense, Mr. Douce sad that 
stockholders were asked to vote on 
it because the board “fdt the recap- 
italization plan had merit, was 
sound and was for the benefit of 
our company.” 

He added, however. “But 1 


He said there “have been many 
considerations in arriving at this 
point and, regardless of the out- 
come of the vote on the recapital- 
ization, there wiD continue to be 
greatest consideration addressed 
and much effort required on the 
pan of the board.’' 

Speculation on possible new ini- 
tiatives at Phillips have centered 
for days on such things as a merger 
between the company and any of 
several other oil producers, a peace 
pan with Mr. Icahn providing for 
an improvement in the recapital- 
ization package or a management 
buy-out of the company. But none 
of the parties would comment and 


Phillips’s stock ended the day 
Wednesday at $47,875, down 50 
cents, suggesting that traders did 
not believe anything significant 
was yet under way. 

In Wilmington, Delaware, a 
chancery court judge, acting cm a 
request by Albert Fridman, a dis&t- 
dent New York stockholder, re- 
fused to grant a temporary order 
restraining votes cast after Feb. 22 
but left open the possibility. He 
asked for a voting breakdown since 
Feb. 21 Phillips agreed, should it 
win. not to consummate the recapi- 
talization for 10 days. 

Tire Corporation Trust Co. of 
New York is acting as independent 
inspectors of the voting procedure. 
Phillips said earlier that the UUS 
company would not be able to an- 
nounce a preliminary tally until 
Sunday or Monday. 


COMPANY NOTES 


British Telecommunications 
PLC said that it has with 
TRT Commun ic ations Inc. of Flor- 
ida to operate a npw telephone link 
between Britain and the United 
States. 

Combustion Engineering Inc. of 
Stamford, Connecticut said that 
two subsidiaries have signed agree- 
ments for joint ventures in China 
involving offshore oil drilling and 
petroleum and petrochemical pro- 
cessing. 

GJ. Coles and Cxu. a Mel- 
bourne-based chain-store group, 
said net earnings in tbc first half 
ending Jan. 27 rose &5 percent to 
64.68 million dollars (S4620 mil- 
lion) from 59.62 million dollars a 
year earlier. Coles said sales rose to 


3.12 billion dollars from 176 bil- 
lion dollars. 

Grumman Aerospace Corp. has 
won a S 109.1 -million U.S. Navy 
contract for development of F-14A 
aircraft avionics and radar and 
conversion of F-14A engines to the 
F-14D and F- 14A Iplus) configura- 
tions, the Department of Defense 
said. 

Hyundai Motor Co. of Seoul said 
it will begin selling its Stellar com- 
pact car model in Canada is: 
March. 

The New York Times Co. said it 
has readied agreement in principle 
to buy The Santa Rosa Press-Dem- 
ocrat, a morning daily newspaper 
in Sonoma County, California, 
with 73.000 weekday circulation. 


Financial terms were not disclosed. 

NEC Electronics Inc. of Moun- 
tain View. California, has filed a 
$10 million federal Lawsuit against 
Cal Circuit Abco Inc. alleging in- 
fringement on its exclusive license 
to sell NEC semiconductors in the 
United States. The lawsuit con- 
tends that Cal Abco has been im- 
porting NEC semiconductors from 
Japan, but the Van Nuys, Califor- 
nia company said that it was oper- 
ating within the law. 

RKO General Inc has signed a 
letter of intent to sdl its RKO Ra- 
dio Networks to a group headed by 
Dick Clark, an American entertain- 
er. Terms of the agreement were 
not announced. Tire RKO Net- 
works offer programs to a total of 


1.500 affiliated stations in the 
United States. 

Union Bank of Switzerland, the 
Swiss commercial bank, 
that its net income rose last 
15.2 percent to 583 million 
t francs ($190 million dollars). 
The UBS board said that it is rais- 
ing dividends by five francs to 115 
francs per bearer share and from 22 
to 23 francs per registered share. 

VauxhaD Motors LtdU General 
Motors Corp.’s British subsidiary, 
said that its net loss in 1984 swelled 
to £6.8 million ($7.4 million) from 
£1.1 million in 1983. The automak- 
er said the losses increased in part 
because of a strike by West Ger- 
man metal workers and a wort: 
stoppage at its Luton plant. 


IJ.S. Business Group Stirs Furor With West Bank Development Project 



»*i 

(CoaBmed from Page 11) 
SJiitnt bank and a cement factory as 
'2JL jsabtfities. Ml Tahmoush and 
ras i Crown said tfie group would 
lit ) everything it could to assist pro- 
* J as, mrfndmg arranging finano- 
s* g. Mr. Crown said he particulady 
* helping commercial enter- 


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•rfcises. 

S3 i The shyness in discussing possi- 
’*»Trl ; e prcgeclshasaionsedsomesits- 
^ ^ loans about the group’s aims, tat 

'5*reorgamzas .n the Israeli economy, is in deeptrou- 

University gradnatesSd few 

«■ ' “g, “jofaa in which they can apply their 
WVk osuress aereements. fit a receat. ^Trn- -n. t~.s-.J7 K.fr 


West Bank, the strip between Israel 
and Jordan that Israel has occupied 
since the 1967 Arab-Isradi war. 
Home to about 800,000 Palestin- 
ians and about 42^00 Israeli set- 
tlers, its future is tmemam Some 
Israelis want to annex it; others 
favor re t urnin g some or all of it to 
Arab sovereignty, perhaps in affili- 
ation with Jordan, and most Pales- 
tinians appear to want a Palestin- 
ian state: 

lire West Bank economy, like 


m*nnVirn»d in .wmi» Terai*H news ac- Zehdi Tjth ih Tend, the observer 
counts, is to give young Palestin- of the Palestine Liberation Organi- 
ianc more of a stake in the system, ration at the United Nations, said 
so they will be less inclined to turn 
to violence. 


Mr. Crown said that was a goal, 
and added that economic develop- 
ment in general might soothe pas- 
sions. “The important thing is 


be was not familiar enough with the 
group to comment. “I know tidbits 
from here and there,” Mr. Terri 
■ptid “Unless 1 know more 1 cannot 
comment." 

'Anything that moves in an envi- 


peace," he said “And a growing raiment of stagnation becomes a 

«--> ** target of attack.” Mr. Cohen said. 

“And we are moving. People as- 
sume that if something is moving, it 
must be moving against them.** 


^iterview, jibe first they .have gras 
* 2 ‘a the subject, they qxntrire first 
is v J inmates askzug that no article be 
Fatten. And they decEoed to be 
ii! notograpfaed at that sessi on . , 
lattUlhe reticence is cssenthd/flrey 
jj£=y, because of tte passttau ia the 


skills. The sprawling refugee 
ramps. Eke Dahaysha near Bethle- 
hem, seethe with a frustration that 
sometimes seems almost as eco- 
nomic as it is pcriiticaL 

Therefore, a goal of economic 
development in the West Bank, 


economy helps peace. 

Not everyone is so enthusiastic. 
Peter E. G oldman, executive direc- 
tor of Americans for a Safe Israel; 
said that the Arab- Americans in 
the group were trying to help the 
Arabs in the West Bank over the 
Israelis there, hoping to get the Is- 
raelis to leave ana arming eventnal- 
ty for tire destruction of Israel 

“We’re upset that leading Jewish 
businessmen are getting involved in 
this.’* he said. “We think they don't 
know what they’re doing." 


Hong Kong Price LufexFalh 

Reuters 

HONG KONG —The consum- 
er price index in Hong Kong fcD 0.1 
percent in January from December, 
but rose 3.3 percent from January 
1984, the Census and Statistics De- 
partment said Thursday. 


The organizers acknowledge that 
the odds are against ifa™ , and that 
they will have to move slowly to 
gain credibility from all sides. Mr. 
Tahmoush said it might be another 
year before the group decides on its 
first project — assuming that it 
derides its aims are feasible. 

But they say that as business- 
men, engrossed by the practical 
rather than the political, they may 
be able to avoid some of the diffi- 
culties that beset efforts to cooper- 
ate in the Middle East. For that 
reason, they take care to inform 
governments in the region, but to 
remain independent of them. 

The same goes for the UJS. State 
Department. W illiam Kirby, a 
Middle East ne gotiato r in the de- 
partment, said: “The group has no 
links with the State Depar tmen t, 
bat it has kept us informed of its 
plans in general terms. An organi- 


zation of this nature obviously has 
the potential for having a signifi- 
cant impact in the region and we 
wish it wdL" 

The group is more cautious in 
assessing its impact. Members say 
it is too early to tdl what may 
develop. “You could wax eloquent 
that there are Americans, of both 
Arab and Jewish persuasion, work- 
ing together." Mr. Tahmoush grid. 
“But so what? Unless we accom- 
plish something, it's an empty ef- 
fort." 



/T 


SILVER SPUR 
SILVER SPIRIT 

Paris delivery tax free 

F.F. 786000 & 682000 


ROLLS 


1 


FRANCO BRITANNIC 

25. rue P.-V. Couturier. 92300 Levailois 
Tel. : (01) 7 57.50.80 Telex 620420 

JAGUAR - ROVER - RANGE ROVER 


5 i> 3 ' 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
SPECIAL REPORTS 
1385 


One sure way of getting your message 
across to a third of a millio n decision-makers 
in govexnment, business and finance in 164 
countries around the worid is to advertise in 


Internatio nal Herald Tribune Special Re- 
ports. The following Reports are scheduled 
for 1985, with topics and dates, of course, 
subject to modification. 




| MH 


*•% « 


and 


MARCH 

Ivory Coast 
Bermuda Economy 
Japan Economy 
Japan F 
Nigeria 

APRIL 

ftahrsm Economy 
Office Automation 
Germany 
Kuwait Economy 
taking & 
in Italy 
Travel in France 
Commercial Real 
Estate in Britain 
Sweden 




MAY 

Arts & Antiques 
Banking & Finance 
in Britain 

United Arab Emirates 
Economy 
Fiance Economy 
Jordan 
Aviation 

TdecomnaTnications 

Turkey 

Portugal 

JUNE 

Banking & Finance 
in Luxembourg 
J3ectronfc Banking 
Egypt 
Spain 

Cayman Islan ds 
Economy 
West Africa 
Korea 

Travel in Asia 
Scotland 


SEPTEMBER 

German Fashion 
Commodities 
Auto Industry 
Japan 

Banking & Finance 
in Nordic Countries 
Banking & Finance 
in Arab Countries 
North Yemen 
Hong Kong 
Italy 

Small Computers 


Greece 

French Fashion 

an king <8 

in Asia 
Italian Fashion 
Banking & Finance 
in France 
American Fashion 
Energy 

Banking & Finance 
in Austria 


NOVEMBER 

Saudi Economy 
North American 
Real Estate 
Netherlands Economy 
Construction in 
Arab Countries 
Travel in West Africa 
Euromarkets 
Gulf Stales 
Latin American Trade 

DECEMBER 

London 

Caribbean/Cenlral 

American 

Development 



P * 





mo man am 

mSFBRTaPBRBfBK 


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890 

7300 

3.650 

2000 

U300 

750 

410 

1.120 

560 

308 

1JXU 

500 

280 

412 

206 

115 

82 

41 

23 

12.400 

6,200 

3.450 

104 

52 

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216,000 

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59.000 

7J00 

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1000 

450 

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1,160 

580 

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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1985 


VoL at 4 FJA. 
Pm. 4 PAL ¥1 


Tables include me naffcwrwlde prices 
up to me dosing oa Wall Street 




21Tb Dlitrcrs 30 a 

TA Mum 
A DirAdn 
5% DlxJcn ,17 b 2.1 

DemeP 

22% Damira I JO 
6ft Dwnn 
II* Driller 

2m Dvcmn 80 lA 

% Dunlap 

2 2Vj Duoiex M 24 

13 DwTn) JOa 2S 

9=A ormia 3J* 14 

)8*t> Dyneer 40 34 


474b 47% 
Sft 5% 
5ft BW 
8% Bta 
3ft 2% 
28% m 
w» m, 

354 314 

5TO 28% 
16% U 

ISVk VM. 

23% 71 


471*— 14 
5% 


271b 

ms— ib 

714 

W4+ % 

M 

WS+ lb 

l*% + V» 

UN + Vb 

22ft +1% 


43* 

2% 


22V* 

1% 

SVb 

Oft 

3* 

tb 

13Vb 

7ft 

*7V* 

7V* 

VH 

7V* 

*14 

2ft 

25% 

21 

6% 

4ft 

TVS 

«Vk 

4H 

3Vk 

4ft 

2V* 

11% 

7ft 

6V* 

4 

15V* 

nr* 

9Vb 

4ft 

«ib 

1ft 

8% 

av* 

55 

33% 

50ft 

33ft 

28V* 

19 

5% 

3ft 

30ft 

16% 


40a U 7 
242B 17 S 
It 
33 

M U M 

30* 13 13 
.10 4 13 

100 
30 


.130 14 17 
140 3-3 12 
.711 47 13 
471 40 
172 IL1 10 

““•“ll 
OKU I 
U* 34 12 
176 U 12 
A0 23 M 
.15 


TO 4140 

77 21 

a * 

56 UIS 
S UR 
10 9% 

43 isvsi 
13 3 

1» 714 

00 I 

34 4ft 
10 14% 

id u 
£ 

is 3% 

56 15 ft 

35 3 *b 

472 404 

5 Wl 
9 lift 

10 am 

39 4M 

4 UR 

78 7% 


4V* 40*— ft 
37*. 3034*- 4b 

Bb 9 

139b 14 Vj + 14 
14ft 1AM— % 
89b 894— lb 
ISb 15% 

\ « 
A «- % 
144b 14ft 
4 4 — Sb 

74b «Vb + 44 
320b 320b— Vb 

iov* m + u 

3V4 30b + Vb 

15V9 15V.— W 
3VS 3Vb— V4 
40b 404 

160b WS 
114b 110b * lb 
ms am— ob 
40% 4014— Vb 

laob ia% + vb 

70b 7» 


24% IMA l 
221b 141b i 
904 4 ' 

1114 40b i 
180b 9 i 


a 5 % i 

79b m i 
4 1 < 

am 3iib i 

urn «tb i 
11 70b i 


13 

Mb A 13 

M 

103 

a ua 
A0 20 a 

S U 17 
22 U 


33 311 13 
-421 A3 11 
30 2.1 9 


IF 

291 140b 

M 140b 

3 

3 6ft 

a m 

• 10b 

7 34 W 
107 tlb 
273 904 


21 21 —Ob 

S ?§£« 

T2 Wb+» 


STtt-a 

Aft 6% 

10b 1ft + tb 
Mt 340b— M 


Mmiw no 


10 40 b 

30 b 10 b 
2414 13 % 
2804 110 b 
DM MM 
35 2004 

21 14% 

JOfc 414 
30 b 14 b 
904 5 *b 
4 IK 


, PC bmhwilow ouct-Ort* 


1304— 0b 
7Vi — Vb 
30b— Vb 
15 + Vb 

37 + 0b 

37 +! 

190b 
9Vb 

37V* +1 

am— ob 

340b + ft 

77 Vb— ft 

3SU 

23 


17V, 

100* 

2Mb 
120b 
14Vb 
BH 
26 
9V* 

3804 
2904 
1204 
90b 
44 9 

S 2 2ft 
IBS 18*b 
77 Hi 
3 43V* 

2 «Vb M 
43 22V* 22ft 
57 7ft 7V* 
IBM lBVb 
19V, 190b 
13V. 130b 
Mb bM 
18V. IBM 


i I OH 125 

i ICO 

> IPM OSr 

i IRTCpn 

i 155 .72 

> Imolnd 

i imoona ijo 

i Inflow 
i InstSy 
I I wav 9 AO 
IWrew 771 ; 
Inrmk .12 

i InlBknt 
InlBkwt 
i InfHvd 
i IntPwr 
iWPrat 
IrrtDta 
i Ionics 
i IroaBrd 
Isaivn J» : 


140 KMftWIVSHMV* +2 
111 Mb £04 60b + Vb 

72 30b 314 3<4 + Vb 

203 12Vb lift llM * 0b 
4 Sb » Mblk 

a » » ns 

151 XSVl 33 331b * M 

77 10 «4 904 

» » 2 1 — Vb 

33 «% 7ft 9ft 

2 804 004 004 

43 iau> law nu— % 

479 30b 3V4 30b 

10 114 IV. IV. + Vb 

TT 9 9 9 

1 404 404 404 

7 Zft 20b 20b 

44 lib Ub IV* 

30 279k 270b 27% — % 

34 201b 27 27M— 1 

25 314 3ft 3Vb— Vb 


1704 lltb Jactvn 50b 15 9 

90b 5Vh Jacobs 

14 KM Jansen 7 

504 704 JelAm 4 

OVb 3*k JBtran J9t 45 14 
Mb 20k John Pd 

110b 7V4 JahnAm JO 27 17 

754 40b jmpJfcn d 


7 140b 1414 1414— 14 
17 40b 404 6ft 

2 150b 15V. 150b + V4 
71 1 8k 20b— Vb 

57 OVb S OVb 

If 5b M 5V*,— Vb 
233 llVSi 1114 1114— V4 
SO 5% 3*0 50b— U 


30b 
PA 

n%b 

7 V, 70 b 

04 04 

10 V* 

30*4 
3104 
1304 
loss 
14*4 
10b 


av* 

1 % 

Mft 

17 ft 

9 Vb 

3 % 

10 % 

3 ft 

X 

24 ft 20 ft 

74 

13 % 

9 % 

3 % 

8 % 

3 ft 

15 % 

lift 

11 % 

av* 


4 

11 % 

7 Vb 

10 ft 

5 % 

10 

5 % 


JV 4 
3 V, 

414 
2 VS 
IMS Mb 
30k H4 
33 240 * 

18 Vi 10 
10 ft 7 
130m 904 

51 « 2 ft 
T 7 VS 12 VS 
41 b 29 k 
I 7 H im 
Oft 20 b 
141 b 111 * 
7 V 4 
10 b 
SV, 
19 VS 


q 


36V. 28V, 
Mb l«b 
1414 10 
160 b 9 % 
50 b 3 
199 b 1414 
18 10ft 
1714 B 
15 5 

40 b 214 
40 b 3 

30 b 7 ft 
15 89 k 

15 M 8 % 
271 * 21 


KnCspt 450 1X3 

r— Mr 

KovCp 70 15 20 

KmNn 8 U l 

Wntm __ 10 

Kanwtfi JObU 0 
KW Am 58t IB 38 

KcyPtl 30 15 IB 

KevCa 10 

KkMewf 
Kirby 

KlBBffV s R2r A 
Know IS 

K/Xtfl Id 

KwbtC 232 B3I54 


10 V 3314 
39 3 

37 130 k 
22 13 V* 
10 4 

34 20 * 
20 1504 

257 11 
9 70 k 

ISO 45b 

170 30 b 
IB 3 Vb 
28 12 V* 

135 140 b 

171 240 k 


3304 3304 — Vb 
204 3 

13 V* 13 V 4 + Vb 
139 * 13 V*— Vh 
4 4 

20 20ft + ft 
15*4 150 b + M 
1004 109 k 
7 7 Vb + Vb 
4 *b 41 b + 14 
35 * JVb + lb 
35 * 3 M+ Vb 
12 V* 120 b 
1414 140 b— % 
2414 2414 — Vb 


3 lib ' 
4 Vb 2 VS 
704 Z 04 
410 b 230 b 
140 b 110 b I 
mb n i 
17 p* : 
6 VS 414 I 
90 b 2 % 
5404 2554 | 
Mb 304 
90 k 5 
404 TVS 1 
304 104 I 
380 b 21 I 
140 b 80 b I 
1314 6 V* I 
14 100 * i 

1404 m ! 
3504 170 k 1 
W tb 804 l 


-15c 

J54 37 9 
.14a 9 

51 

17 

7 


20 

M S 19 
IB 

41114 1 
4 

.10 J 23 
JO 11 9 


4 IV* 

4 314 

5 5 VS 
65 27 V* 

5 t« 5 & 
13 17 bh 
51 13 
28 414 

78 71 * 

M 5104 
53 404 

25 7 M 
10 3 

10 TVk 
813 380 b 
28 ISVh 
42 12 
32 12 
32 14 V* 
27 3304 
1 Mb 


IV* 11 * 

204 » 

50 b 50 b— V 4 
27 27 V* + V 4 

7 Mb 1 Mb— I* 
1714 170 b+ tb 
1204 T 2 M— Ob 
404 M 4 
714 70 k— *4 

5144 5104 + 14 
60 b Mh-t- Vb 
71 * 7 VS 
3 3 — lb 

20b 20b 
3 BVb 3804 + % 
140 b IS + 1 * 
1104 12 + lb 

114 b 12 + Ik 
tHk 14 — V 4 
330 b 3304 4 - 0 b 
PH PH*- M 


14 % 

14 % 

14 % 

3 % 

3 ft 

3 % 

4 % 

Aft 

4 % 

Oft 

Aft 

Kb. 

AV* 

AV* 

6 % 

4 ft 

Mb 

Aft 

lift 

lift 

11 % 


ZV* 

ft 

2 Va 

ft 


100b 4<A HAL .109 1.1 B 
15% 9*4 HUBC 60a 4.1 11 

llVb Tti Hamuli Tit 87 8 

24V. 1604 HonfnSs SB 2a 12 

TV, IVb Harvey 

3tRi 9v* Hosurs 12 

35M 221* Hasbrpi 


13 91 b 9 Vb 9 Vb 

ID 1404 14 H I Mb 
45 1 00 k in 1004 4 - 0 k 
22 2 Ke 2 SVS 25 *k— lb 
4 10 k !V> 10 b 

BSD JT 2 PH 31 + 1 H 

19 14 W 3404 34 S 4 4 - 1 U 


U.S. Futures Feb. n 


Reason 5aasan 
Hum Low 


Own Kish Low dost as. 


Grains 


Smon 

Smon 






High 

Law 

Open High Law dose 

Chg. 

woo 

xw 

JUl 1 IH 

JIM 

4 MP 

4 MJ 

— M 

2415 

2053 

Sep 2143 

2143 

2121 

2121 

—04 

2337 

1999 

Dec 20*5 

3045 

2032 

2036 

—12 

2145 

Too 

M or aD 41 

3041 

2038 

U 92 B 

—10 

2138 

2 ®B 

May 



3828 

—10 

ssas 

ms 

Jul 



2028 

—10 

EsS 1 . Sates 

Pm. Sales 2060 




Pm. Dav Open int 2 X 477 





ORAN 6 E JUICE OfYCE] 
liOBOtta.- cento per fe 




-235 

1 BS 50 

11850 

Mar 16 X 50 

14670 

14355 

14435 

1 RX 00 

151 JO 

May 14970 

14970 

14450 

160.10 

—175 

J 84 B 5 

15100 

Jul 16975 

16975 

16770 

J 49 J 0 

-JO 

18 X 00 

15775 

SOP 14 X 50 

149.10 

14775 

146.10 

—US 

isi jn 

157 JO 

Now 



16450 

— 1.15 

180 X 51 

15 X 00 

Jan 14525 

16575 

1(525 

14578 

—40 

17750 

1505 

Mar 145-50 

16550 

14550 

14538 

-40 

1*250 

16000 

May 



14570 

—JO 



Jill 



14570 

—50 

EsL Sales 

Prey. Soles 

500 




Pm. Day Ooen Int. 7,725 up 388 





Metals 


13 % 


3 ft + 

% 

B% + 

% 

Vft 


lift + 

ft 

3 % 


13 ft 


i au 

% 

% 

9 ft + 

ft 

22 ft— 

ft 

S% 


21 % 


22 ft— 

ft 

lift— 

% 

14 V*— 

% 

4 %— 

% 

19 %— 

% 

17 % + 

ft 

27 — 

% 

15 % — 

ft 

37 ft + 

ft 

10 


5 %— 

% 

2 ft— 

% 

2 ft 


10 % 



A 5 

4 % 

Aft 

14 

4 % 

4 

134 

17 V* 

17 % 

21 

lift 

IS 

A 

1 % 

1 % 

A 

14 % 

14 

75 

4 ft 

4 ft 

19 

15 

14 ft 

284 

43 % 43 

20 QZ 

46 

44 

114 

Oft 

au 

55 

8 % 

4 ft 

at 

11 % 

11 % 

3 

1 ft 

IV 

a 

14 V* 16 V* 

2 

1 % 

1 % 

50 

23 

22 % 

8 

29 % 

29 ft 

20 

4 ft 

4 % 

10 

4 ft 

4 ft 

17 

30 

29 ft 

4 

29 ft 

29 

ns 

7 % 

7 ft 

107 

14 ft 

15 % 

123 

21 % 21 % 



USA 90 b ' 
2704 151*' 
WS 404 ' 
5 V* 20 b ' 
730 b 141 b 1 
B 7 * 4 1 
TSVb 111 * ’ 
JVb 30 b ' 
1004 Mb 
94 b 51 b ’ 
7 204 ' 

400 b 45*4 ' 
19 % DM 1 


48 WA KM W 4 ■ 
M 17 U 313 249 b 24 H 260 b 
208 5 H 50 k 51 * 
HUM 3 Vk 3 Vb- 
JtUM 279 221 * 20 % 21 % ' 
lffl 5 ft « 5 
JO 17 9 <1 120 b 12 n - 

JO U u 514 5 Vh 51 A 
I M lb B%- 
13 U 814 814 814 - 
14 Mb Ml 4 % 

1 4m 48*4 40*4 
JO 43 10 11 T 9 IL 19 19 - 


JO 

u 

JO 

27 

.14 

A 

74 

17 

UO 

44 

JS 

10 


Jul 
Sap 
Dec 
5940 Jan 
SUB Mar 
4 U 0 May 
Jul 


XO 

8 

5 

18 


97 

47 

10 

64 

U 

67 10 

1 J 

14 

47 

4 

17 

15 

117 

0 


MHW KNKS 38 

AniCMiltad BOM Inti *BancmFnd Mmb v pb . 

CanSHEqut OertcCcM OawCnni CcnWIl 

OlonvndBnWi Dvnwr Okmtfiiad Hortnis 

Hasfanipf IRTCarpn KnawfnSh Lorlmor 

NHampBB OWttdAn OddtaBs gwEn Mf 

RvtaUavpr PlwMBnev RaMSskCP ftgqn O . 

Sndrai TydnM UnOo*H«» HBShPWI 

WWdtran WacoFin 


Asian Commodities 

Feb. 28 


Industrials 


LUMBER 
130000 bd. 
22040 
22500 
23150 
19750 
1B6.1Q 
1B7JM 
IKJXJ 

Est. Sales 
Pro*. Day 


CCME) 

h.-Sper UX3Cbd.fl. 

13750 Mar l^affll 14030 
14 &A 3 May 14750 14940 
15100 Jul 1 SSOO 15740 
15750 Sen IML 10 162 LB 0 
16100 Nav 14200 163 JO 
166.90 JCO lttno 16 A 50 
17100 Mar 17400 174.10 
Prwv. 5 otes 1854 
OpenlW. 9774 up 9 V 


137 JO 137 AD 
14400 14700 
15100 15500 

uau 16000 
16200 16200 
14*00 14400 
17140 17100 


London Commodities 
Feb. 28 

Figures in Berlins par metric ton. 
Gasoil In US. dolhBS per metric tan. 
GoW in U^. dottars per ounce. 


Livestock 


CATTLE ( CMC ! 

40000 R»..€xn&MrrB. 

6900 61* Anr 45S 65A5 

S 3 SSS 

B ss ts 2% as 

FEEDER CATTLE ICMEJ 

44000 Ua^cants pw H. __ 

7475 6175 Mar «O0 MJ0 

74J0 SJ A0 APT nOO 7100 

7175 44*5 MOV 70JS 7035 

7UO 6440 AM 7Z** 

7300 47 JO SP 7]^ 71AS 

72J2 47.10 OCf 7100 7105 

nS 7000 Mov TLM Tl OS 

pA KtAmm prrv. Sales 1J34 

Prav.DorOpen IhL 14813 «•** 

HOGS ICMEJ 

w^aarJfc ^ 

SM 4440 JMI 51-^5 51^ 

§77 48J95 JOl M 090 

S4J7 4700. AUB 5^0 5158 

5175 4500 Od 4700 4770 

Sod D4C 47.63 

4970 4423 Feb 4800 4800 

pre*. Day Open InL 27JM OH337 
PORK BE LLIE S ICMEJ 

1088 

B 2 O 0 AMS May 7U0 TOM 

S£ SI S S |S 

75.15 43.15 F*B 7CLT0 7045 

7140 440a Mar 

E^Soles Prpy.Sotes 7871 

ProwjOOYOwn InL MOM UP® 


6477 4582 
47.18 C7J7 

45.97 6412 

6435 *452 
45T8 64.10 

mss use 


4880 49.15 
7105 7037 

<M2 69T2 

7145 71 TS 

7100 7105 
7045 7005 

7140 71 JO 


5130 5145 

52 J 2 5277 

5133 5175 
4*75 47 . 1 S 
4745 4748 


4940 7035 
7000 TOTS 
4905 7040 

*7.90 6B45 

70 PJ 7030 


Financial 


COTTON 31NYCEI 
50000 lbs.- cents aer lb. 

7931 6261 Mar 6340 4440 

7770 6378 Artav 6373 6435 

7745 63.K JUl 4430 6475 

7740 6470 OC1 1450 6495 

7X00 4473 Dec 6506 45L29 

747S AXIS Mar 4430 6620 

7000 6670 MOV 4685 6685 

7005 47.16 Jul 

Esl. Sales Pm. Sales 2-500 

pm. Dor Caen int. 19526 up 1794 

HEATH HC OILINYMB) 

<3400 go i- cecti our aoi 

8340 4743 Mar 7570 76*0 

8275 5525 Apr 7075 7170 

8243 4450 MOV 4833 69JS 

78JS) 6345 Jun 66» 6X90 

6945 1135 Jul 6690 6870 

71 JQ 6*40 Aug 6835 6X3 

Esl. Sales Prcv. Sales 10369 

Prew. Day Open Ini. 1*4*4 wo 490 
CRUDE OIL CHYME) 

1 5300 OI3L- dal lors oar b*L 
3 1 AS 2447 Aw 2644 2476 

3038 2423 May 2623 2u20 

2945 2423 Jun 2SJ3 2545 

2954 3410 Jul 2541 2544 

2948 2428 Sec 2SJS 2505 

2940 340 Npy 2545 2545 

79-50 2483 Jen 2540 2560 

ESL Soles Prrv.sam 12.W 

Pm. Day Open InL S4J04 up 397 


Paris Commodities 
Feb. 28 

5boar ta Frm* Ftaa per cubWc Ion. 
Otter Beam In Frowsier MBta. 


SUGAR __ 

May 1408 1398 1» —n 

Aug • 1495 1415 1475 1485 —29 

Oct USB 1425 LSM LS« —21 

Dec H.T. N.T. 1480 1495 —30 

Mar 1700 1495 1494 SJSB —21 

MOV N.T, R.T. 1735 1755 —25 

Ep.nA: LOSJtatsof 50 tans- Pm. actual 
mM: 1385 lots. Obwi Interesf. 19338 

mrw« 

Mr 24M 3393 3391 33M —A 

MOV 2380 2363 2370 2372 —7 

Jly N-T. H.T. 2340 _ — —JO 

Sep N.T. N-T. 3330 2348 —4 

Dec N.T. N.T. — 2395 —15 

Mar N.T. N_T. — 1198 —10 

May M.T- H.T. — 2385 —15 

SM. you no loll of W lanxPrev. actaal . 
sales: 83 Ms. Open bdenstt 1062 


Mar 2468 24B0 2455 Z90 —20 

MOV 2410 2400 2415 2423 —15 

Jly 2458 2450 — +5 

Sea 2495 2495 3492 — —3 

Now N.T. N.T. 2493 . — —2 

Jon N.T. H.T. 245* — —I 

Mar H.T. K.T. -2498 — —2 ■ 

Esl. voL: 29 IW» of 5 tprrv Prev. actual 
srdR 15 lots. Open fttterast: 167 
Sauremi Boons do Cottamerat. 


Cash Prices Feb. 28“ I 


1MB 

CoFEw 4 Santos. Bj 

PriWdatb 64230 3# 1*. vd — . 

Stool Wllets (PlltJ, ton 

tnm2Fdry.FtilkL.ian 
SMd scrap Hal bvy PHL- 
Lead Spat, A 


Tin (Straits), tb 

Snb^st.k. Basts, tb. 
POfWtoOUfll ' . 

Sliver N-Y^ar 

Smjrcm: AP. 


U3 132 
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47 X 00 * 5 X 00 

TOJOO. 21100 
79 - 80 - UHH 
m® 24-TS 
6*47 490*32 

*« « 

115-1 « 155 

5445 9425 


Dividends Feb. 28 



70 - 1 * 

70-24 


77-19 

77-28 

^ 

1 77 

77-9 

—4 


74-17 

— 4 


76 

— 4 


75-17 

* 

i 60-21 

68-28 

—9 

1 67-21 

67-28 

-9 

1 66-30 

67-3 

—9 

64-10 

**-15 

—9 

45-28 

45-30 


45-14 

* 5 - 1 * 

—9 

65-4 

45 + 


*M 6 

* 4-26 

—9 

46-17 

64-17 

-9 

44-9 

44-9 

—9 

44-2 

44-2 

—9 

Sf? 

48-30 

— e 

60-7 

68-9 

~4 

67-16 

47-19 

1 

66-30 

67 

■1 

* 6-13 

66-14 

J 


65-29 

, j 

69-11 

65-14 

— 4 j 

90*6 

90*8 

— m 

E-P 

■954 

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*M 6 

ma 

—.10 

3 X 95 

B 3 JD 

—.10 


HUD 

—.13 


8827 

—.12 


HUM 

— .D 

9 U 0 

9071 

— AS 1 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMEC1 
points and cents 

IBS -45 15 X 30 M=r 1 BO -55 183.90 

12875 15610 Jun 18450 1 B 630 

191 DO 16 X 00 So 18 SJB 18953 

19490 17 X 70 Dec 

EH. Sales 19354 Prey. Sates 79.127 
Prev. Day Caen im. £7398 up 237 
VALUE LINE IKCBTJ 
points and cents 

a»D3 16X10 Mar 19750 T99.15 

219*0 17X00 Jun 302.90 20X95 

21230 18 X 75 Sep 

210-0 509 50 Dec 

Ea. Soles Pm. Sales 5766 

Prey. Day Opon IM. 7.175 up It* 
NYSE COMP. INDEX I NT F El 
po Ints one cetifs 

1 MX 0 3 X 29 Mar 10460 10550 

W 9 J»S 9030 Jun 10735 1 CXM 

11130 9 TJ 3 S 5 cD 10970 10970 

11275 10170 Dee Til .43 111-43 

Es>. 5 e lei 14321 Pnrw. Skies * 4^37 
Prr*. Dm Ooen Ini. 11.173 un 65 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody's 950.70 I 

Reuters 2-01550 

o-l. Puturps J2CJ7 

Com. Research Bureau _ 23670 

WJtodv s : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 
o • preliminary ; I - final 
Reuters ; base IM : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


13645 181-80 
18440 1 B 635 
18 X 30 18939 
19 X 83 


Volume: o lots ot 25 tons. 
Source: Rev tm. 


17745 19 X 95 
70 X 20 20 X 90 
317-65 
21148 


104*0 10550 
10730 107.95 
10920 1D970 
11130 11148 


PTCVlOUS 

950301 

Z02040 

13033 

336.90 


Market Guide 


DM Futures Options 

Feb. 28 

W. Sermn Mart-ISOO tints esntt iw mat 


5Rfke Cain- Settle PafeSMk 

£rle* Mar Jan SM Mar Jaa m 

a it: us - u a g« 

29 0.94 1J3 110 om 054 071 

M 024 too 150 040 075 L17 

11 0X8 04S 1.10 121 L57 140 

r U! JO QJl LI5 2.19 724 

S * 021 0*3 XU 1W xgs 

Estimated tom voL ixm 
cans: Arc. rot- M4* epea hL 6X073 
Pets: Wed, val. 4*10 OPW InL 20505 
Sawre; CME 


Australia. Soviet Flan Talks 

■Iprwce France Press* 
CANBERRA. Australia — Aus- 
tralia and the Soviet Union are to 
hold talks from March 20 to 22 on a 
wide range of disarmament and 
arms control questions. Foreign 
Minister Bill Hayden said Thurs- 
day. 


S&P 100 Index Options 
Feb. 28 


KJ 2J IS — — — — — — 

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ns 9% ii nv - vn* *y p; 

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199 I 'M H 1* . » - n — — 

199-5716 DA* TV* — - — — 


TeM (All vaftmt HMB 
IbMcsil < 0)01 Nd OWNS 
TlMMI vokow JMM 
Total ait opm kit 417447 

HkVIln Low 17729 OawlUMTXB 


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AUTOS TAX FREE 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCS 1^ 1985 


NYSE Hires Nicolson as Europe , U.K. Consultant 


By Brenda Hagerty 

Itutmtmonal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — In line with efforts 
to bnild up its international role, 
the New York Stock Exchange has 
narrated Sir David Nicolson to act 
as consultant for it is Britain and 
Europe. 

Sir David will advise the NYSE 
[ on rhanys in the British and Euro- 
pean b usiness nnmronnirir*, the ex- 
change s Rid 

Sr David. 63, is a former mem- 
ber of the European Parliament 
and founds 1 and chairman of the 
American-European Community 
Association, which seeks to devel- 
op closer political and industrial 
relations between the United States 
and European officials. 

He was also recently appointed 
chairman of Werthrim UK Ltd, a 
Loudon-based unit of Werthrim & 
Co. International Inc. of New 
York, which plans to expand in 
Europe. Sir David is also president 
of the Association of British Cham- 
bers of Commerce and holds a 
number of directorships. 

Hutchinson Joins 

Merrill Lynch 

MemB Lynch Europe said John 
Hutchinson will lead its foray into 
the British gilts markets when he 


joins it as managing director of gilt 
sales and trading activity. In Sep- 
tember Mr. Hutchinson announced 
that he would be leaving his post as 
senior gills partner at weda Dur- 
lacber, a leader is the naikeL 

Bentfix Europe has appointed 

F.P. (Rick) Yota to the new post of 
European computer-aided design 
and manufacturing coordinator. 
He moves to Paris from the com- 
puter-aided design and manufac- 
turing technology center near De- 
troit. Bendix Europe is the 
European automotive sector of Al- 
lied Coip^ a New Jersey-based 
chemicals . oQ and gas. automotive, 
aerospace and industrial and tech- 
nology company. 

Security Pacific Coqj. of Los An- 
geles has set up a subsidiary in 
Singapore that will serve as a bro- 
ker of financial futures contracts 
on the Singapore International 
Monetary Exchange for its custom- 
ers in the Far East and Australia. 
Yeong Wai Cheong, formerly assis- 
tant general mana g/»f of the ex- 
change, will be managing director 
of the new unit. Security Pacific 
Aria Futures Inc. 

Quaker Oats LftL. the British 
arm of the diversified Chicago- 
based maker of breakfast cereals, 
Quaker Oats Co, has promoted 
Robert Thomason from deputy 
managing director to managing di- 


rector. He succeeds George Yaws, 
who returns to Chicago to head the 
parent company’s U.S. pet-food 
business. 

Algemene Bank Nederland NV 
said Robert van Zinnicq Berg- 
mann, senior representative of its 
investment-banking representative 
office in New York, is moving to its 
Amsterdam headquarters as chief 
manager of directorate securities. 
Succeeding him in New York is 
S.W. Oost Lievense, formerly 
ABN's investment hanking repre- 
sentative in Hong Kong. 

Ramada inns lot has riTPfd 
Dan Moszyts to the new post of 
senior vice president for develop- 
ment in Europe. Africa, the Middle 
East and South Asia. Mr. Moszyts, 
who is based in London, was Xa> 
mada’s senior vice president far the 
Caribbean and South America, 
based at the hotel chain's head- 
quarters in Phoenix, Arizona. 

Matsons Phenlx has named Gil- 
bert Simonet to succeed Jean- 
Claude Romain. who resigned as 
president. The move is the first step 
m a planned restructuring of tne 
troubled French homebuilder, 
which is more than 30- percent 
owned by Compagnie Gtnriak des 
Eaux. Mr. Simonet joins Maisons 
Pbenix from Campienon Bernard 
Construction, whose parent. Cam- 
pen on Bernard, also is a unit of 
Compagnie Ginfcrale des Eaux. 


The Y east That Made the D ollar Rise 


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(Contraned from Page 13) 
meats that are not available in most 
other countries — such as certifi- 
cates of deposit. Euronotes, or 
Coating-rate notes. 

These enable companies to maxi- 
mize their interest income by stay- 
ing in the dollar and remain com- 
fortable with the exchange risk, as 
the paper can be sold at a moment’s 
notice and the funds converted out 
of the dollar. 

Equally important, the exchange 
risk can be hedged thanks to the 
highly liquid futures and options 
markets in the major currencies. 

Bankers throughout Europe 
complain that tbeir corporate tal- 
ents lack outlets at home to advan- 
tageously use temporary cash sur- 
pluses. In most countries, a 
corporate treasurer would have 
only two choices: first, to make a 
time deposit with a bank — which 
is not very remunerative and, worse 
yet, not liquid. If the funds are 
suddenly needed, breaking the de- 
posit before maturity entails a pen- 
alty payment 

The only other choice is the gov- 
ernment bond market — which en- 
tails a capital risk, since the price of 
the bonds could fall just as the 
treasurer needed to raise cash. In 
addition, substantial purchases or 
gales of government securities in 
most European markets outside 
Britain run the risk of artificially 


increasing or depressing the price 
because the markets lack the li- 
quidity that typifies the market for 
U.S. Treasury bills and notes or 
UJC. gilts. 

Last, but not necessarily least in 
creating demand for dollars, is (he 
burgeoning currency-swap market 
These are any number of variants 
of currency swaps, not all of which 
need to affect the spot foreign -ex- 
change market But one that some 
bankers say is gaining favor is the 
swap out of existing dollar debt by 
European borrowers into local cur- 


countries). Its friendly bank would 
borrow ECU and self the proceeds' 
for dollars. (The dollars would then 
be invested in U.S. Treasury securi- 
ties. The interest income would be 
used to service XYZ’s dollar debt 
and the capital repayment would 
be used to retire XYZ’s debt at 
maturity.) 

XYZ and the bank swap. The 
bank gives XYZ the dollars to re- 
pay its dollar debt and XYZ takes 
on its books the ECU loan ar- 
ranged bv the bank. 


reacy debt. 
The bulk 


The bulk of the existing debt in 
the Eurobond market is in dollars 
because that is the only sector that 
assured continual access for large 
sums of money. But with the rise in 
the value of the dollar, the cost of 
this debt translated back into local 
currency has been increasing — 
bearing heavily on the liability side 
of European corporate balance 
sheets. 

The ever-increasing ™ of the 
debt resulting from this currency 
translation, bankers report, is driv- 
ing treasurers to find ways to end 
the upward spiral — currency 
swaps. 

By way of example; XYZ compa- 
ny with $100 million in debt would 
seek to convert this into European 
currency units (the composite cur- 
rency of the European Community 


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(Cwitinofd from Page 13) 

heights and weights were asked to 
sit down and adjust the seat to the 
most comfortable position. 

The designers found that most 
people were more concerned with 
their feet reaching the pedals prop- 
erly than with the relationship be- 
tween their arms and the wheel 

If ibe pedals were moved 45 nril- 
limeters (1.77 inches), the seat was 
pushed back 20 to 24 millimeters. 
Bui if the wheel were moved 45 
mfllimeters, people adjusted the 
seat only 5 to 10 mfflimeiers. indi- 
cating that most were willing to 
overextend or compress their arms 
to keep their feel within easy reach 
of the fool controls. 

There is some advantage, the 
GM designers learned, in making 
seats higher, because that puts peo- 
ple in a more chairlike position and 
allows the wheel to be placed far- 
ther forward and closer to the ped- 
als. Bat there are limits on bow 
high a seat can be; higher seats 


brought complaints that drivers’ 
thighs were hitting the steering 
wheel whenever they used the 
brake or dutch pedals. 

The designers conduded that, al- 
though it was posable to introduce 
steering whed and fool pedal lay- 
outs different from those used in 
the past, no reduction in seat ad- 
justment would result So taller 
passengers in ihe back seats of 
small cars will probably still wind 
up with their duns resting on their 
knees if the driver insists on being 
completely comfortable. 


Japanese Exports Rise 

Ream 

TOKYO — Japanese exports of 
videotape recorders rose 58.9 per- 
cent to 1.64 million sets in January, 
from 1.03 million a year earlier, but 
were down 19.6 percent from 2.04 
million sets in December, the Elec- 
tronic Industries Association of Ja- 
pan said Thursday. 


■ The company forgoes any hope 
of seeing any reduction in the tne 
size of its debt as expressed in do- 
mestic currency when the dollar 
ultimately does slide on the for- 
eign-exchange market- But it also 
has arrested the possibility of fur- 
ther increases due to the dollar’s 
advance on the foreign-exchange 
market 

No definitive figures exist on the 
size of this swap market but bank- 
era report that it is running into the 
tens of billions of dollars annually 
and growing. And they suspect it is 
dramatically and a rtifici ally in- 
creasing European demand fw dol- 
lars. 

Critics say that European central 
bankers have not been responsive 
to the changes moving the ex- 
change rate. They say deregulation 
of domestic financial markets 
should permit introduction of 
money-market instruments (certifi- 
cates of deposit, floating-rate 
notes) such as exist in the dollar 
market; restrictions on swap trans- 
actions need to be lifted; currency 
options and futures markets need 
to be developed, and minimum re- 
serve requirements on non-resident 
deposits (a holdover from the days 
of unwanted dollar influx) should 
be eliminated. 

Bankers are also critical of Euro- 
pean corporate treasurers* timidity, 
compared to Americans’, in using 
currency futures or options mar- 
kets to protect the high profit mar- 
gins produced by the cunent high 
value of the dollar. Such forward 
sales would help counter the forces 
pushing the dollar up and cushion 
the companies against the adverse 
impact of a decline. 

When the dollar slides, these 
profit margins will drop according- 
ly. Thus, hankers argue that Euro- 
pean exporters to the United States 
should be selling now part of their 
future expected dollar income. 

The problem with this argument, 
bankers admit, is that European 
treasurers who have done no hedg- 
ing have reaped big profits from 
doing nothing as the dollar soared. 


Royal Rnk of Scotland Group 
PLC said John B. Hyde, chairman 
and chief executive of Charter- 
house Japhet, has been appointed 
to its board. Royal Bank of Scot- 
land recently bought Charterhouse 
Japhet, a merchant bank, from 
Chartethouse J. Rothschild, which 
is bring renamed J. Rothschild 
Holdings. 

Pear Marwick Mitcbefl St Co. 
said P. J. (Jim) Butter will succeed 
Sir John Grenride as senior partner 
in Britain when Sir John retires 
from the New York-based account- 
ing firm Sept. 30. Since 1981 Mr. 
Butler has served as senior Lon- 
don-region partner. 

Mercantile House HohSngs PLC 
has appointed Robert D. Ward 
group financial controller for the 
London-based financial services 
group. Mr. Ward was group chief 
accountant al Henry Ansbacher 
Holdings PLC. 

Association of British Consor- 
tium Banks has elected Sir John B. 
Hafl, managing director of Europe- 
an Brazilian Bank LtiL, as its chair- 
man for 1085-1986. He succeeds 
Garrett Bouton, chief executive of 
Scandinavian Bank Ltd. Thomas 
F. Gaffney, managing director of 
Libra Bank Ltd., has been elected 
deputy chairman of the associa- 
tion, previously the Association of 
Consortium Banks. 


SEC Expected 
To Study Rules 
OnDisdosure 

Roam 

WASHINGTON — The Securi- 
ties and Exchange Commission was 
expected to approve Thursday a 
study of ways to harmonize disclo- 
sure requirements for securities of- 
ferings that are made both in U.S. 
markets and those of other coun- 
tries, commission officials said 
Thursday. 

The commission staff has pro- 
posed that the agency seek public 
comment on possible approaches 
to reconciling the differing disclo- 
sure requirements set out by differ- 
ent countries. 

Among the approaches to be 
studied are whether a U.S., Canadi- 
an or British company could pre- 
pare one prospectus that would 
meet the disclosure requirements of 
all three countries. 

The prospectus is a document 
prepared by corporations with se- 
curities to sell, for the use of inves- 
tors or analysts. 

Hunts’ Woes 
Deepening 

(Continued from Page 11) 

27, 1980, had outstanding silver- 
related loans of more than $12 
billion. 

Moreover, the complaint alleged 
that the defendants attempted to 
circumvent actions directed at 
them by die Commodity Exchange 
Inc. and the Chicago Board of 
Trade: 

Sanctions available to the trad- 
ing commission include civil penal- 
ties of up to 5100,000 for each of 
several violations alleged in the 
complaint and prohibition from 
trading on markets regulated by 
the commission. 

Separately Thursday, paychecks 
for some employees of Hunt Inter- 
nationa] Resources Coro., one of 
the billionaire Hunt brothers' chief 
operations, bounced last week after 
bonks cut off financing to some of 
the company's operations, bank of- 
ficials said. 

The CFTC allegations and the 
bounced paychecks were the blest 
in a series of financial embarass- 
ments for the Hunt family, who are 
based in Texas. The family has suf- 
fered massive losses in oil and other 
commodities. 


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TEL 4011507. CREDIT CARDS 


ZURICH 

CAROtME ESCORT SStVKE 
Tel: 01/252 61 74 


HtAMGUKT + SURROUNDINGS. 
CaroWi Escort & howl senfce. En- 
^ T#L 


GENEVA -HBBC ESCORT SERVICE 
Tel: 36 29 32 


ZURICH 

SsMdbeh Escort * Guide Sendee 
Teb 01/56 96 92 


ZURICH 

A1B0S ESCORT SBVK3E 
TEL 01/ 47 55 82 

RANKRJRT AREA 


OtAMJME GEFCVA 
Guide Service. Tel: 283-397. 


DUSSBDORF - BBtUN - KOBN 
Earn. 0211-395066. Parnate Eicort 
Agency. Al trail cards. 


I 


BUSH 


AMSTOCAI5 

t e n dow Escort Service 
178 Wpaare St- Undan W.l. 
Al major Credt Cards Accepted 
lS 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 naan - midnight 


BaJwve 

Teb 


uai escort senece. 
/ a 88 05. 


MAYFARCLUB 

14D6 SrtMCE foto 5pm 
nBmAM[0}JM54l55 
HAGUE (0)7040 79 96 


Tel: 736 5877. 


* Z U R I C H * 

GNGSfS ESCORT SBEVfCT. 
IB: 01/363 OB 64 

MADRID APPLE 

IBs estt&S? asnrcMss. 


SOME CUB EUROK ESCORT 
& Guide ServiceJeb 06/589 2KX- 589 
1146 {from 4 pm to It) pmj 

_ MAMLRUSA 
EXCLUSIVE SCQRT SBMCE 
Soot 520554 Mtem, a 331S2 


GENEVA - BEST 
ESCORT SBMCE 
TH_- 022/29.1 3 J4 


AMSTERDAM JASMINE 

ESCORT SBtylCL 020346655 

GENEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tel: 46 11 58 





.T- ' -J, T V7. ' . , 7.V ’ 


£npbh Escort Senate DZ13/38 31 41. 





OBSEA ESCORT SBMCL 
51 Peoud wo Plow, London Swl 
odpeoan-] let 01 584 65l3®49 (L12 pmj 


E5CORT SBVKE 5BWICE. T* 46 1 1 58 Wr *** 

IBs 2503496. CRBXT CARDS. 0f9/»6P6a. 

- ntAMCRJET - SONJA ESCORT Ser- 

DIBSSHDOBF - COLOGNE - BOW voce. Teb 069 68 34 tL 

CC Escort Aoencr. 0211/30 43 69. iaoSESl« TS; HUMCRBT + SURROUNDINGS 

&•* ouds&ued 51ATOfC - 31 CHraano's Escort Service. 069/364656 


NEW YORK: BBS's Escort Semce. 
Teb 212-581-1948. 

COMMA, AMSIBHMM ESCORT 
Guide Service. P2P) 762842 
RANKFURT/MUMCH Mm Esarrt 
Service. 0W/38&441 & 089/3518226 
KARBI - FRANKFURT E5CORT Ser- 
vkw. TeL 069/B8 42 88 

LONDON LIICY ESCORT & Gude 

Service. Teb 01^73 0211 

VCNNA'S FIRST ESCORT Serwe 
022444191 or 722-432. ~ 


FRANKFURT -ANNE'S Escort Service. 

Teh 069 / 288143. 

VBMA ETOOE ESCORT SBtVKE. 
Teb 56 78 55. 


T'?rrr'?TrT7i j.'.' 


vice. Teb 021 4557584 

MADRID. MAJUYN beat W 
Cradb cards. Tel: 4564187. 


8RUSSBS. ANTWBtP NATASCHA 

EKort Service. Teb 02/7317641. 

MtWSHS. CHANT AL ESCORT Ser- 
vgtt Teb 02/520 23 65. 

BRUSSBS, AMSTERDAM. 8B«UX 
Enart Service (020) 261202 

BRUSSBS. BRXaTTE ESCORT Sennet! 
CeiAiraterdaa 1020) 360629 


FRANKFURT JWNT ESCORT + trav- 
el service. Teb 0*9/5572-10 

FRANKFURT - PETRA Escort & Trwd 
Servo. TeL 069 / 68 24 05 

OEFCVA CHABBC GUDE «rwe. 
Teb 2 83 397. 

MADRID INTI ESCORT SBtVKE. 
Tel: 2456548. CresB arts 

MUNICH PRIVATE ESOIRT SStVKE 
__TeL 089/ 91 23 14 

STUTTGART MSS BEATRICE Escort 
Service. Teb 0711-262 11 50, 

MADRID IMPACT ESCORT A Gude 
Service. MitfSngwt. 261 41 42. 

LOFTON TRUCK ESCORT Srwica. 
Teb 01-373 8849. 

IOM»N ESCORT Sere* 

Teb 370 71 SI. 

V»MA VIP ESCORT SBtVKE. T* 
[Viermb) 65 41 58 




























































hi i tiKIN ATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1985 



2 

3 

4 


0 

0 

7 

6 

8 


10 

14 





19 






IS 

17 




1 

18 






19 

» 

1 



21 






23 



23 





24 



25 

28 

27 



■ 

28 

20 

30 

■i 

31 


35 




1 

36 




37 


1 

38 




40 







41 

42 



■ 

43 

L_ 





■ 

44 

AS 



46 


■ 

47 



.^^48 



u 

40 


so 


si“ 

62 



S3 | 

54 

55 




68 

37 





81 




1 

62 





| 

83 

64 





65 






BO 

67 





68 






B0 


10 | n M 2 |13 


PEANUTS 

Y£r MA'AM. I UJAl^EP TO 
SCHOOL IN THE RAIN BUT 
DON'T WORRY ABOUT ME.. 


A5 SOON AS 1 
5HAKE A BIT 
^ I'LL BE.. > 



p (.ALL R.6HT! 


BOOKS 



BLONDPE 

A BLACK CAT CROSSE IN 
FBONT OP ME ON MV y— 
j J 


—I AT -ID THEN, THE BOSS 1 

EN0ABQA5SED MS IN FOONT 
OP EVS7VBOOV TOD BEING 


: WHAT DID VOU OEODS TO] 
ft DO ABOLTF IT ? ; ' 




I STAI7TFJG -TOMOt?HCMt IW. 
p GONNA WATCH OUT POP t 
k^BUAOCCATG 


ACROSS 

1 Lima locale 
5 Asp 

10 Coin eater 

14 He was 
Terrible 

15 Sawlike organ 

16 Item m 
Caesar’s closet 

17 an ear 

theed) 

IS Ship's upward 
heaving 

IS Middle East 
gulf 

20 Crossword- 
puzzle fodder 

23 Grade 

24 Baseball 5 tat. 

25 Until now 

28 Ave. crossings, 
sometimes 

31 Type of orange 

35 Betsey . 

Dickens 

character 

36 Organic 
compound 

38 Part of 
R.S.V.P. 

30 More of 20 
Across 

42 Jailbird 

43 Transported 
horses, e.g. 

44 Nothingness 

45 Supply 

47 Image: Comb, 
form 


48 Mercator worh 

48 Fla.-Ore. dir. 

51 Topsound 

53 Still more of 20 
ACT0S5 

81 Tabula 

62 Quaker gray 

63 In a line 

64 Squirrel 
gatherings 

65 Peddles 

66 Kind of clock 
or bomb 

67 Siouan Indian 

68 Do a pupil's . 
chare up front 

68 Belgian river 

DOWN 

1 Stack 

2 Always 

3 Indian 
princess 

4 Like some 
collegians 

5 Have-not's 
need 

6 Waning, as the 
moon 

7 Zwei chaser 

8 Former 
lightweight 
champ 

8 Speeder's 
trapper 

10 "A Bom" 

11 N.J.city 

12 Curved 
molding 


13 Beach sights 
21 Com unit 
12 “Christ 
Stopped at 

25 Comet's milieu 

26 Synthetic 
fabric 

27 Ogre 

28 Wee 

30 Butterworts 

32". . . upon 

thine heart-": 
Song of 
Solomon 

33 Rita Hayworth 
role 

34 Hebrew 
prophet 

38 cane 

37 City off. 

40 Happening 

41 Plea 

46 Malaise 
48 River island 
50 Stagger 
52 Kelso or Alsab 
52 River to the 
Ligurian Sea 

54 Tense 

55 This, in Toledo 

56 Bakery worker 

57 Singer Turner 

58 “Exodus" 
author 

58 library item 
60 Pitcher 


BEETLE BAILEY 

X HATE GO\HG TO THE 
MOTOR VEHICLE BUREAU. 

IT'S BUREAUCRACY Q { 

AT ITS WORST j 


IT COULP 
BE WORSE 


BUREAUCRACY AT ITS WORST IS BETTER 
THAN BUREAUCRACY AT ITS BEST 




Veer /O' 


ANDY CAPP 

CHI ( 1 <30THEU> > 

V UP AT THE . 


EXCUSE 


iVeu- York Times, edited In Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 




WIZARD of ID 

m&rvtp&m HIM - ! 



-* THE ' 






N0W...BeF0®«3U'PlKg s 

troUrcFtiesHcW^aK, I 
l&u j 

l^y4||Z.50zVl5eilJeUWNce f 


! fe 





rr rex? 

WT& WP- a 



REX MORGAN 


NONE OF /W/ WIFE'S FAMILY 
LIVES IN THE AREA, A 
DOCTOR, THEY WOULD 
NOT KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT 
THE PERSONALITY CHANGES J 


-Haven’t sot time tdplw Hhen why don't they put 

BALL .60n0 FINISH THIS tXHH A SLOWER &WV 

BAPERWORK-' 


W TELL me 
I WHAT'S 
I HAPPENED 
I AND THE 
7 REASONS 
[ FOR YOUR 
CONCERN, 
LMR. BISHOP' 


MEANWHILE, IN ANOTHER CITY 


ITS GOOD TO SEE YOU 
AGAIN, MRS. BISHOP.' WILL 
YOU BE WITH US JUST 
FOR TONIGHT? 



GLITZ 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
9 by Henn Arnold and Bob Lee 


KNOCK 

KNOCK 


r WHO'S 1 
THERE? 


> OMHH... 
CANDV GRAM? 


Unscramble these tow Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to torm 
low ordinary worda 


HUBOG 


TULFE 


7JT 


isi j*» 


l44U a ^ X.V 

K <• :....**** 


1 YOU CAN'T FOOL 
Mt/VW STERY MEAT 
n YOU WANT OUT TO 
X-WREAK HAVOCS, 


r TOPAY THE 

//{ refrigerator. 

Cl TOMORROW, 
o - v ^jeW0RLP/ 




By Elmore Leonard 251 pp. $14.95. 

Arbor House. 235 East 45ih Street, 

New York, N. Y. 10017. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

T i HE worid of Elmore Leonard, which read- 
ers in steadily growing mxmbeis are coming 
to know and love, continues to expand, ffis 
previous novels have found him primarily in 
Detroit and Miami, with occasional forays to 
the Caribbean and other places where the high 
life is lived. Now, in ^GHu." he turns his 
attentions to Atlantic City. As nsuaL his atten- 
tions are keen: 

“Vincent found the house on Caspian where 
i mda was staying with the band: another 
wooden relic somebody had painted ydk>» 
about twenty years ago and since then said the 
heQ with it wait for the casinos. He was begin- 
ning to get the fed of Atlantic City and its 
surrounding geography and wasgettmg to like 
it At least it anaTM him, hdd his attention, to 
see an old seaside resort being done over in Las 
Vegas plastic, given that speedline look gam- 
blers were supposed to love. Here you are i n 
wonderland, it told the working people getting 
off the tour buses, all those serious faces com- 
ing to have a good time. That was something 
dse that didn't m«lre sense, nobody smiled.” 

Vincent is Vincent Mora, a police detective 
from Miami who a few weeks back bad kffled 
his first man in the line of dniy and bad himself 
bf»ti seriously wounded in the encounter. He’d 
recuperated m Puerto Rico and had fallen for 
Iris, whose “lodes could stop your breathing^ 
and who had it in mind to work as a “hostess,” 
for which read call girl, at an Atlantic City 
resort fronted by Tommy Donovan. Vincent 
had tried to uiy her out of it, but tbe bright 
lights beckoned and off die went 

Off the Lop floor of a high-rise apartment 
budding. Now Vincent is m Atlantic City, 
hunting down her latter and des cribing him- 
self, not entirely sdf-modringly, as “Vincent 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


□ESQ □□ana nano 
qohe aacDDQ nano 
□noQaaanicjnaataaQ 
□eh QBaaa aatana 
□□□a nan 

□□□□□□33E3Q313EI13Q 
□Baca nQBCi ana 
□hq 0 aaaaa naan 
□no osaa aaaaa 
BEEaacouaDaaaaa 
naa □□□□ 
oenna anano non 
BQEBaEaaaaeiaaaE 
□ebb oanso □□□□ 
□Baa □□□□□ □□□□ 


the Avenger.” In this worid of glitter and glitz 
he’s the quiet man, unobmifl^y ptaang 
the city's seedy and dangerous dark places: 
he’s also, in an odd way, the guardian angel « c f 

the damned, trying to put sufficient fear in*. =■_ 

would-be malef actors so they decide not to do 
thing s that could get them lolled. 

Principal among these is Teddy Magyk, a 
pathological rapist with a taste for old ■women, 
whom Vincent had pot into the penitentiary 
seven years before. Teddy has revenge on ms 
mind, but with a twist: “He wanted to see the 
cot’s eyes again just before mid wanted the cop 
to see his. Hi Remember me?” Teddy believes. ? 1 

as so many of the other crooks in this tale do. , 
that “it’s not my fault” all these messy t hings #^ 
are happening; Vincent knows otherwise. at 

Along tbe way to tbe final conftvnistion wj, 
between Vincent and Teddy,, Leonard compli- “ , ; 
cates matters with an agreeably disagreeable 
cast of character: Donovan, the alcoholic 
front man , and his tough, resourceful wife; 

Ricky Catalmo, “Ricky the Zit,” a homicidal 
mobster; and Jackie Garbo, the chubby and 
fast-talking twanagw of the casino and hoteL 
Jacki e: is an especially appealing char acter be- 
cause Vincent — like Leonard himself — just 
can’t help finding him appealing: 

“Vincent liked the way Jackie came right at 
him. Fat little guy with bis pinky ring, his 
pictures of stars — wanting to sound tough, hip 
— with lifts in his alligator shoes. He mode 
assumptions and liked to talk. And Vincent 
Hknd to listen. He had known many Jackie 
Garbos in Miami Beach; they were ran. You 
could act just a little naive and they’d perform 
for you." 

The truth is that just about everybody in 
“Glitz” is putting on one kind of act or anoth- 
er. Leonard cuts through all the tkky-tacfc of 4^ 
ihe casino world to expose the essential pboni- " 
ness at its core; tbe poses that aS its inhabitants 
adopt in hopes of making the big score and as 

about the^dw&ii^a^rorid where’peqpie 
talk not to each other but around each otner, 
din ging razzle-dazzle that, when you subject it 
to cold analysis, doesn’t mean a thing. 

Leonard is terrific at depicting - this in 
“Glitz”; along with the suspense that Tie clever- 
ly maintains to the last page; it's the novel's 
strongest quality. But by comparison with the 
rest of Leonard’s recent work, “Glitz” is rela- 
tively shallo w For one thing, he’s got to guard 
against dipping into his own pose; the haid- 
boiled number seems artificial here, and tbe 
staccato prose eventually becomes tiresome. 

For another, “Glitz” is entertainment without 
thematic Mis; hwifl make a temffc movie, but 
it’s not about anything in the way that Leot- 
ard’s mare serious wore is. 

But these reservations apply for the simple- 
reason that in recent years Leonard has repeat- 
edly raised our expectations. If he’s merely at 
crTnsmg^peedin“G2itz,"sayrtfcH'hhntliat tbe n 
speed is still very fast. *- 

Jonathan Yardley is on the staff of The Wash- 
ington Post 




By Alan Truscott 

W HEN one partership 
monoplrazes the action, 
'almost every maple sequence 
has a standard meaning. But 
when both sides are in the act, 
it is another story: There are 
many situations that are not 
covered by the textbooks, and 
even the experts are often 
groping uncertainly. 

Suppose that you have a bal- 
anced hand and that an even- 
ing weak two bidonyour left is 
passed around to you. How 
much strength do you need to 
bid two no-trump? 

In the direct position, you 
would bid as over a one-bid, 
but with a dash of caution. In 
the pass-out seat, it is a differ- 
ent story. A player with a band 
worth a weak no-trunm is 
forced to pass, although he 
would bid one no-trunm if the 
opening had been at the one-' 
level. 

Most experts but not all. 


BRIDGE 


consider that a reopening two 
no-trump bid is roughly equiv- 
alent to the same bid m?de in 
the direct seat It shows a 
strong no-trump opening 
treated rather flexibly. There 
could be as many 19 hjgfa-card 
points and there could, as in 
the diagramed example, be a 
singleton somewhere in the 

hand 

As it happened, all roads 
were due to lead to three no- 
trump. South would have 
made dial call if North had 
shown spades at any point in 
the auction. . . 

West made the passive lead 
of a spade, and south won in 
the dummy. With entries to tbe 
dummy in short supply, he led 
a diamond to the nme and lost 
to the singleton queen. West 
shifted to the dub king and 
was allowed to win. His next 
lead of the dub jade was also 
ducked, and be shifted back to 
spades. 

South won in dummy and 
(fiscaided a heart. He entered 


his hand with a diamond to the 
ace and reviewed the situation. 
It seemed likely that West had 
begun with 2-6- 1-4 distribu- 
tion and was about to be in 
trouble. That proved to be the 
case when the dub ace was 
cashed and another dub was 
led. West had to win and lead a 
heart to give the declarer his 
contract. 

NORTH 
+ AKJ99 
or m» 

4 J 8 8 2 

* Q 

WEST (D) EAST 

*KJM8 *883 

'‘-SOOTH _ 

*8 

<?AQ8 
0 AZMI 

* A 8 7 B 4 

Naltbar aids w*a votaanbta. Hie 


Wot lad tbe spade wnu . 


iGONNIG 


IPAWDUR 


FYint answer hero: 


HOW THE ASTEDNAUTS 
WIFE Y/AS ALWAYS 
HAPPY TO SEE HIM. 

— J 

Now arrange Ihe circled letters to 
term the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by me above cartoon. 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomonpw) 

Jumbles: BLIMP MAUVE HOPPER SUBMIT 
Answer. What those twins were as alike as— 
“T OU-PEES" (two peas? 

WEATHER 


EUROPE high low 

Algarve *2 § ’I 3 *0 bSSw* 

Amierawn i 2 i 2 a Moao Kong 

Athens .1 S 7 is p Manila 

Bc rctorw “ 5 i g a NnrDcmi 

B !5T* ,e ? 34 A 30 r MNl 

Benin I n a 73 to swaghal 

Br Wts i 1? 14 3 fr Stnoappr* 

2E£f : £ - * i % ZSZ 

" S l S % AFRIfiA 

HSJJErt 7 45 0 M cl cap* Town 

ESS?” s 41 -3 27 o canhiimoi 

HrtSSl -i 30 -2 3 sw Harare 

1 34 -3 27 rr ldoos 


2 90 -« « ^ ~ 

1 *U .1 3D r 5W* 

1 » o 22 to 

-7 IV -w 3 F SSS?*™ 


7 45 o 32 ci cape Town 
S 43 - 3 27 a casofaloncD 


MMoM -1 30 -2 “ MOmre 

1 34 - 3 27 rr lmos 

“JSL. 72 14 41 fr Harrow 

1 S 'l S « 7Mh 

K3 i « £ ? 

SJSSSU \ ^ sr* 

Murk* 3 2 - J g *, Mexico 

Hic* “ “ a o 

I 3 S S to SeoPa* 


HIGH LOW 
C F C P 

34 73 24 75 a 

0 32 - 2 28 3w 

21 70 14 57 a 

32 90 24 75 tr 

31 ■ 12 54 fr 

10 50 4 » fr 

7 4S 5 41 o 

29 84 24 75 st 

20 48 17 A3 a 

3 37 1 J4 r 


» 44 5 41 lr 

IS 44 14 41 fr 

31 88 17 63 Cl 

21 70 V 48 fr 

34 75 15 59 fr 

31 BB 25 77 d 

& 79 14 57 fr 

18 44 4 39 fr 


V\4>Hkl Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Feb. 28 

CZosui^ prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


LATIN AMERICA 


ABN 

ACF Holding 
Aeeon 
AtUXJ 
Ahold 
AMEV 
A "Dam Rut) 

Arnrabanfc 
BVG 

Quenrmann T 
CaPond Hklg 
Eliev»er-NOU 
Fokker 

Gist Brocades 
Heine ken 
HooTOvons 
KLM 

N Barden 

Net Necder 
Ned Hard 
Oca v wider G 
Pakhoed 
Phlifcw 
Robeco 
Rodamca 
Rollnco 
Roranlo 
Ravel Dutch 
Unilever 
vanOmimran 
VMF Slark 
VNU 

ANP.CBS General Index : 19838 
P r evio u s -.M.H 


Brussels 


Milan 7 S ta fr B«eno» Aires 28 79 15 S9 fr 

msw ■» H « a Lime 37 81 22 72 to 

Munich 3 37 - 1 30 Mexico CHv 23 73 8 46 r 

Nice “ 2 '! a t Hlo de JoaeTro 31 88 24 79 r 

«!» I S i S «o SoaBaoto ~ 

I 34 -l » a NORTH AMERICA 
,4 57 6 S cl AnoonM 0 » -5 D PC 

s- 1 2 -1 S s STaT 15J.il l 

8 44 2 34 a Chlowo » « •] » 

SL 1 " -I 30 -1 30 o Denver 14 S7 -5 D Jr 

-3 IB - II 13 O Detroit 3 37 -7 17 lr 

7 45 1 34 o Honolulu 24 79 20 48 PC 

“'** . _ Housfoa 16 41 8 4J cl 

MI DDLE EAST LMAimtas 23 73 II S2 to 

T . . 19 .32 -10 fr Mlatal 36 79 18 44 PC 

14 57 4 39 d MlnnaapoUs B 44 -6 21 Jr 

12 54 - 5 23 d Montreal I 34 -9 16 fr 

Domosart If S in d Nauau 25 77 15 S> d 

3 « 6 43 d Now York 4 39 - 3 27 fr 

Tef Aviv is » San Francisco 21 70 11 S2 fr 

OCEANIA seatff. » « J J » 

Auckland jo S Jf a d Woshhvirton 9 48 -» 30 fr 

S, 3 SLdv: to-foSr/ V»ol«MaBi ««-««»»■■ »e-Por»iv cfoudv: r^aln; 
SShSSrs; avsnow; d stormy. 

CHANNEL 1 SIMM. FRANKFURT: Font- Temp 

FRIDAYS fpReCAgT—KJ^^np. 7-3 (45-371. MADRID; 0«r<»st 
7 — 1 145 — 34L LOHDPM. N ^w YORK: Fair. Tamo. 9- 1 («— J4». 

and rain. T emd. 15— (50 _ jrj. ROME: Ctoudv. Temp. 15 — 7 
PARIS: Overeag. Temp. i« - (57 — ai. ZURICH: Fosav. Temp. 

ISV-4S1 TEL AVlVjOgJ^-,™* T M v HONG KO NO: 

7 — 1 145 — 34». BAHONOPt. ™«». |||LA . Twm>l Jl—23 (90 — 73). 

cicudv. Temp A**. .3 "1 cs—371- SINGAPORE: Fair. Ttmn 31 —IS 

SEOUL: Rain. 

(BE— 7^1. TOKYO: Hal*'. Tern*- 4 — « »■*» 


Arbed 

Bskoert 

Cockerlll 

EBES 

GB-lmo-BM 

GBL 

Gevoert 

Hoboken 

Krod let bonk 

Pelrollna 

Soe Generate 

Safina 

Salvor 

Traction Elec 
Vteilie Manlaene 


1490 1670 
5250 5240 
774 276 

7930 3720 
29 95 2975 
3135 2150 
3850 3850 
5980 4020 
BOM 4050 
7140 7050 
1915 1910 
7530 7500 
4305 4370 
4000 4020 
S3D0 547Q 


Frankfort 


AEG-TefeHmken 

Allianz vers 

Bast 

Bayer 

Bcvrr.HvDo. 

Bavar.Vcr.Banl 

BMW 

Umnwrasn) 
Canttoummi 
Daimler-Benz 
Deat rua 

Deutsche Babcscfc 
Deutsche Bank 
Dresdner Bank 
OUB-Schulhe 

GHH 

Hoehllef 

Hoechsl 

Hoesdi 

Hoizmonn 

Horten 

Kail + Salz 

Karsiadt 

Knvfho) 

KHD 


10850 110 

10i7 1017 
204 300 

204 201 SO 
31250 112 

312 322 

38250 380 

163 16L20 
13053 120 

65250 C525G 
36250 35950 
ltd 16850 
407 404 

1 9050 1*0 

31S50 2<6 

154.40 153 

468 460 

1*9.40 194.90 

10950 1C630 
4C0 397 

16600 16170 
367 26350 
214 217 

21450 215 

760 340 


Close Pres 

Ktoeckner Werfce 7LW 74 ^ 
Krueo Stahl 7120 79 

Unde 4)750 419 

Lufthansa 19080 ;B8 

AWN 16 3 >4) 

Mamnmann 15750 15250 
Mefallacsellschatf 243 2M 
AAuencn.Ru#0< ’’S 

Preusscm 257 JO 3S7J 0 

RuetaarvvVerke 33S 331 

RWE 15980 140 JO 

Setter ina 465 46350 

Siemens 54050 543 

Tbvssan 10050 ioa» 

Varta 18050 177 

Veba 16550 16550 

VEW 12250 12250 

volkswaoenwer*. 192 19150 

Commeriboafc index : 1.17180 
Previews : 1.17080 


Bk East Asia 
Chevna Kona 
Chino UoM 

Cross Harbor 
Hone Sera Bank 
HK Electric 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK snanahaJ 
HK Telephone 
HK Wharf 
Hutch wncmooa 
Jardlne AAahi 
jardlne Sec 
New Wood 
Show BfOS 
SHK Prows 
Sima Darby 
Stefu* 

Swire Pacific A 
Wheel Mar 
wtwatock 

Winsor 
World I nr I 


NA — 
1350 1380 
1480 1450 
NA — 
4650 46 

7 AS 755 
J0J0 XI 50 
4825 455 

NA. — 
*3 44 

585 5.90 

20.40 23.70 
9-D 95C 

955 953 

S.75 585 

NA — 
« JO 9.45 
NA — 
NA — 
24 2A40 
NA — 
7 JO 7 JO 
*575 *85 ; 

184 1.92 


Hana Sena Index : 1 J7L3 
Previous : 1 J3783 


AECI 

Barlows 

Blwaor 

BuHo*S 

Elands 

GFSA 

Harmony 

Klcd 

Nedbanv. 

Pst Sfuyn 

Rustsltd 

5A Brews 
St Helena 
Sasol 


490 710 

97* 910 

14C0 1600 
6800 6400 
13)0 1765 
26C0 3® 
2525 7450 
7375 TOT 
9K =00 
57D0 5050 
1535 153 
600 600 
3275 3259 
570 565 


Composite STOCK index -93960 
Previous : 72254 


L ondoP 


** Coro 

Allied-LraiK 

Anglo Am Gold 

Babcock 

Bor da »s 

Boss 

BAT. 

Beecnam 

BiCC 

BU 

BOC Grauo 
Boors 

Bormtor inevs 
BP 


511=6 SM 
176 177 

S33 J701-I 

1*5 

612 604 

4*7 497 

33 3M 

155 35C 

233 231 

29 39 

295 294 

170 171 

245 245 

530 533 


Clew 

Bril Home SI 
Bril Telecom 
BTR 
Burmafi 
Cadbury 5chw 
Charter Cons 
Ccats Poloos 
Cans Gold 

Caurraulds 
Daloerv 
De Beers* 

Distillers 
Drlefonfein 

□unloo 

FI sons 
Free 5IGed 
GEC 
GKN 

Gtoxai i: 

Grand Mel 
Guinness 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hawker 
ICl 
lmos 

LiDrds Bank 
Lonrho 
Lucas 

V-jrks and So 
rAeiol Box 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bonk 
Pilkingion 
P lesser 
Ratal Elect 
Rcndionfein 
Rank 
Reed Inti 
Peuters 

Porol Dutch t 41 
PTZ 
Shell 
STC 

5 Id Chartered 

Tate and Lvle 
Tesco 
Thorn EMI 
T.I.arouP 
Trofatoor Hse 
THF 

U I ira mar 
unnevor t 11 
unlied Biscuits 
Vickers 
Y.'Deep 
W.HOIdlnas 
war Loan J'i ( 

Wool worm 
ZCI 


Air Uaukto 

AW mam AfL 
Av Dassault 
Bcncatre 
SIC 

Bouvvues 
B5NCD 
Correfaur 
OubMed 
Caff meg 
Dumex 
EH-Aauitalne 
Europe ) 

Gen Earn 
Mochehe 
I met of 
La Faroe Cop 
Lea rand 

roreal 

Matra 

Michefln 

MM Pernor 

Moet Hemessy 

Moulinex 

Nord-EW 

Ocddemale 

Pernod Rlc. 

Peiraies (fse) 

Pcuaeot 

Poctoln 

Prlnfemns 

Radlatechn 

Redoute 

Roussel Uclaf 

SkW Rassionol 

Sdur.Perrfer 

Telemecan 

Thomsen C5F 
Valeo 


■>23 424 

72650 225 S3 
1050 I960 

576 580 

543 545 

439 641 

2425 2435 

1900 1900 

1170 1172 

244 26510 

415 616 

241 244 

♦90 993 

549 555 

1760 1760 

84 87 

418.10 422 

2076 2077 

2385 2415 

1613 1638 

82S 825 

87 £8-50 

1895 1900 

111.50 111.60 
77.60 77 

769 74V 

720 724 

245 244 50 
76P.5D 273 JO 

49.95 4980 
194 1*4 

240 243 

1770 1770 

1555 ISffl 
1930 1922 

532 528 

2375 2390 

496^9150 
23580 238 



CUn* Prev. 

Asm 

335 

32S 

Astra 

38S 

380 

Atlas Copoo 

109 

no 

Boikton 

NA 

2m 

E*-ctroft/x 

309 

31) 

Ericsson 

275 

276 

Essofto 

375 

375 

Handel sbken 

no 

169 

Pharmacia 

701 

201 

Scab-Scxile 

440 

445 

Smdvik 

NA 

390 

Skcnska 

95J 

956 

SKF 

199 

200 

SwvdtehMatch 

233 

233 

Volvo 

265 

NA 


Aeeff index : 198AS 
Prevfaas : mja 
CAC Index : 307 JO 
Previous : 309 JO 


Bousieod 
Cold Sforooe 
DBS 

FrcsarNedva 
How Por 
Inchcooe 
Kvpoei Shlo 
MOI Bonklna 

oese 

OUB 

Semn Snlovora 
Sime Ocrbv 
S Steamship 
St Trodlna 
JOB 

OUB Index : 491.53 
Previous : 420A5 


AG* 

370 

370 

Alto Laval 

190 

180 


AftanvorMen index : : 
Previews : 397 JD 


[ Sydney 

ACI 1 

ANI 3 

ANZ 4 

SHP i 

Boral : 

Souoatnvliie 1 

Brambles ■ 

Cotas 

Coma lea : 

CRA 1 

CSR 3 

Dunk* 2 

Elders ixi 3 

Hooker 5 

Mooelkin 2 

MIM 2 

Myer 1 

Oakbriooe 

Peta 4 

P esa l dun 2 

RGC 4 

Santas 5 

fiefeh l 

Soutmond 
tvoodsw# 

wcrmold 3 

All Ortflnarles index :7 
Previous : 78680 


Afcai 

AsatWChem 
Ascn< Glass 
Bonk of Tokyo 
Brtdoesfane 
Conan 
c. 1 loti 

Daf Nippon Print 
Dalwa House 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 
Honoa 
IHI 

Japan Air Unas 
Kollmo 
K onset Pr v«r 


KooSoop._ 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin B re w er y 
Komatsu ltd 
KubOtO 

Matsu ElecJnds 

Matsu Elec. Works 

Mitsubishi Bex* 1 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Cart) 
Mitsui and CO 
Mltsufcoshl 
Mitsumi I 

NEC 

Nikko Sec 
N Japan Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 

Nomura Sec 1 

Olympus 1 

Ricoh 

Share 

Saar 

5umltaina Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tatsel Core 
Talsho. Marine 
Takedo Chem 
Tallin 

Tokyo EJec Power 1 
Tokvo Morfna 
Torny Ind 
Tosh too 

Toyota 1 

YamaicMSec 

DJ. index : R32M1 

previous: T2JS7J1 
New Index : 977 Ji 
Prey tom : 97483 


145 144 

564 545 

433 439 

330 31* 

7620 1560 
734 752 

1580 1420 
410 415 

390 390 

243 2(3 

525 537 

326 332 

444 444 

It?- ”52 

1310 1180 
680 675 

744 144 

20 242 

605 811 

1100 1120 
1336 1310 
930 093 

1060 1058 
4840 4400 
1900 1890 
205 207 

144 144 

199 MB 
ao 4TO 
853 SS5 
430 433 

1600 1540 
850 830 

444 422 

424 415 

1310 1330 
455 as 


I BMlAMTPrcol 
UoOOOAckJands 
|645DAankOEl 
1 1500 Aora Ind A 
§9954 Alt EnerBY^ 
15*30 Alfa Nat I 
■ JO AKwCentl 
aw WSS 


Sir 


4700Br<xTtol 

SOBrendel 

6831 BCFP 

25690 BCRa 

|H462BCPbol 
2000 Brurtswkl 
29230 Budd Com 
58641 CAE 

■ 1400CCLAH 
|6000 CDtettj bT 

3600 Cod Prv I 
22*00 C Nor West^ 
200 C Pockra | 
33088 Co n Trust! 

Vsk^om 
-2400 Ota Nat Res 
58096CnreAfH 
18HMC UHI Bl 

■ 1200 Cara ■ 
^9100 Cetanesel 
H500 C Dtstb A| 


3700 3750 
M15 1605 

an 2900 

Credit Suisse 3395 NA 

Electrowaft 2640 2640 

Gears Fischer 750 753 

Jacob Sochcxd 6225 4310 

jet mad 1970 M90 

Landis Gyr 1670 1640. 

Nestle 4325 OM 

OertrkorvB 1475 1480 

Roche BCCV *75 HA. 

Sandax 79SD 7*50 

ScWndler 3*75 37*0 

Sofzer 345 343 

SBC .366 370 

SwfSSOfr 1145 1830 

Swiss Vdlksbank 1490 14*5 

Union Bank 3658 37*8 

Winterthur 4270 tm 

Zurich ins 20600 209) 

SBC index : WAS 
Previo u s : 434.18 
NA: not minted; NA: not. 
available.- at: ex-dfvIdemL 


Banco Comm 

Cenlrale 

Cioahalels 

Crea Hal 

Farmitdia 

Fiat 

F insider 
Generali 
IFI 

Italcrmenil 
Mediobanca 
Monied non 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnosccnle 

SIP 

5nla 

Jianda 

MIB index : 1J12 
Previous : U11 


19000 18800 
3401 1405 
8050 7905 
2271 22*5 
121DS 11900 
2774 26W 
SO S3 
41010 40800 
7605 7585 
83850 83360 
87500 07400 
ISxO'i 1535 
6*30 6SSS 
2231 2220 
70650 69000 
4H 658.75 
2095 7393 
7*00 2550 

12320 12770 


V.S. Cuts Figure For Productivity 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — VS. busi- 
ness productivity in 1984 was up 
for the fourth consecutive year, by 
2.7 percent, but the figure' was re- 
vised down significantly from a 
preliminary rate, the Labor De- 
partment announced Thursday. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics 
reported in January that prelimi- 
nary data showed productivity in 


the nan-farm business sector had 
increased 3.1 percent in 1984 from 
tbeprevioos year. 

The downward revision, said a 
bureau spokesman, Larry Folco, 
stemmed from tbe fact that the 
agency underestimated the number 
of hours paid for agricultural ser- 
vice employees, who perform work 
for fanners such as harvesting and 
crop dusting. 


Canadian stocks via AP 

Hlit LovOowOm 

um 48U 

S16VY Wfr MW— V, 

513 1ZM 13 — Vbi 

W M4+16 

2D 1944 20 + 18 
IlSVfi 1514 15U 
S20H> 20W 20Vi_to 
52134 2114 71)4— 9b 
S24H 2464 2454—14 
SI 814 1814 1814 — 14 

57 7 7 + 14 

Oft Ift M 

527 26VS 27 +14 

55* SV, 54k | 

51314 MM 73H— V4l 
137 135 137 +2 I 

485 405 405 +10 

5514 . 514 5Jb 
51714 tm 17KV-14 
I10V4 lOMi IWi— V4. 
SiBKt 1814 mo- lb 1 
257 250 2S0 — 1 

*2214 2314 2Z»6— 14, 
51514 1514 1SV4— 14 
523V; 2314 2314+141 
5148b 1614 1414— Vb 
07 2S» 2614+14 

5614 614 «4+ 14 

51514 IS . 1514+ 14 
*2314 2314 2314—14 
529 29 29 

53214 32 3214+44 

SMM UI4 1414 
13M4 3014 3014— Hi 
28 28 
894 9 . 

517 169b 1494— 14 

ST214 U 1214+ H 
S6W 6to 6ta 
5414 614 614 

5614 614 £9A+ J4 

SUM 1114 IlS+fi 
5814 814 Wb+14 

273 27] 272 

$1794 1794 1714 
158 155 156 —4 

150 325 350 +30 

410 37S ■ 380 — 50 

514 1314 14 + Vi 
51314 1294 1314+ 14 

S994 BN 914— W 
490 490 490 +18 

475 475 475 

245 344 345 

52894. 2B4- 3BW+ V. 
51714 1714 T7V4+ N 
SARA 39H 3914+ 14 
579b 7. 714 

S7V» 7 7 

SZTVt 2114 2114 
5179k 1714 rife 

9314 934.+ 16 

S* 5 +* 

21 21 . 

SOW 13*4 1316+14 
S7&W 18V. 18*1 
521*4 3T* 219k 
52814 28V. 2H4+ te 
31216 114k 12. + ft 
260 256 2S6 + ) 

*10 nk 9*4 

*514 59k 599+ M 

*3116 3116 3116+146 
59 58 — 3 

48 -48 —1 

(8914 8996 8914+16 
53414 24ft 2414 + 16 
5714 7V4- 714 

130 128 128 

*21 ft 21ft 21ft + ft 
*255% 24*4 24(6— 94 
*1714 1794 1794 
*539k S3W 5394+ ft 
*13*4 WJ* 1514—16 
16ft toft— ft 
15te to 
9 - 9 + ft 

339b 33ft— ft 
23 22 + tb 

lift llft+94 
Sate 3Ste+ te 
S3444 24 te an 
S26ft 26ft 26ft + ft 
(lift 1114 lift + ft 
510H 10ft IN. 

S27te Z7N 2794— te 
SWte 1014 1814- te 


B.. 


6T7SMOSH A 
31029 Melon HX 
ItHMoGrowH 
llXMerimS E 
22661 Motaon At 
700 Morphy 
30500 NQbJVML 
2M30 Norondo 
5710 Moreen 

3692Z3 Nva AltA f 
2535NOWSCOW 
4641B NuWftxpA 

650 OakWOOd 

82DOO*bawaAf 
36725 PanCanP 
*00 PtmWna 
2300 Phonfx Oil 
UlJOPfttoPofiit 
800 Rloca GO a 
TIBO Plocor 
100 Prnvtoo 
1500 Que Stare a 
11400 Ravrockf 
59l7Radpatti 
W330 RdStafih* A 
3077 Rofchhold 
24800 Res S*rv# 

177 Revn Pro A 
2S25Ra0tr*A 
2100 Roman 
6100 Rothman 
19000 Soxgifra 
6680SCDttst 
M6SB Sears Cm 
15251 Shell Cm 

saoishxrrm 

2300 Southm 
SOSIBrmlcsf 
2S2955tofCO A 
4300 Sutatro 
3950 StOOP R 
MO Suncorpr 

3T7QDSvdOMPa 26 24 36 — i 

500 Tal core 94 94 94 

15812 Txdc B t 
232T«tortvna 
mXTex Can *33ft jj 33—94 

JIWThomNA- S54ft S4ft 54ft + ft 

43735 To r Dm Bfc .51916 1SN 191 %+ X 
54BTonrtarBf • yiffft 18ft left 

^TjamreAl 5ZH4 2294 2294+ lb 

M OO TrrMM) 57ft 714 7ft + ft 

5300 Trinity Res 460 468 440 +5 

■C779TnAtfa UA 24ft 24ft- ft 

71975 TrCan PL E2 211b 23 + ft 

m 460 470 +l" 

» irtzKAt 
M70DTort»f 

sSSiftSSfi Si* 

300 U Kena 

1487 U StKM - no 

400 Van Du -275 
334BVarMI At 

2SXSKS3 .« 

MOOWattarte 

USDWahitfn . __ ._ _ _ 

- SBWMtan *75te 75 7514. 

SSJSJFM 8 510ft lift 117ft 

Z 2 S 0 VkBaar siiv, nft lift— k^' 

Total xalas Hj55aj47 share* .. . . 


*20 19ft 19ft— ft 
525ft 2SH 25*4— ft 
XQft 22V. 22V+- ft 
425 425 425 

516ft 159k 16 +16 
522ft 22ft 22ft + ft 
526 25ft 25ft — Vi 
*10ft 10ft 18ft + ft. 
5149k 14te 14te 
Sift 6ft 6ft 
IZlft 2Jte 2196+ ft 
63 58 58 — 3 • 

S5ta 5te 5ta 
Sfft 34te 3414+ V, 
*28 TTti 28 + ft 

517ft 17ft 17ft 
57V. 7 . 716+ Vh 

*27 27 27 

1W_ 105 105 —4 

S23ft 23ft 23ft 
51914 1914 19te 
355 350 33 +5 

$8V» B 8ft+ U . 
Sllft lift 1194+ ft 
52294 2216 2216— ft 
514ft 14ft 1-Jft 
IBS ■ 177 . 185 . 

115 115 115 — 5 

1916 9ft 916— ft - 
Sllft 11 lift + ft 
542 471* 43 —te 

55ft 5ft 5ft 
521ft 21 31ft + ft 
71b 7ft 
22V* 22ft 

$714 7ft 714 
557 57 57 

51214 12N 1ZA 

251 251 2S1 + 1 

320 315 315 

5241* 24ft 24 V. 

26 24 24 — J, 

94 94 94 

lift M + a 
109b 11 — ft 
533ft 33 33 — 94 

554ft S4ft 54ft + ft 
. 51916 15ft 1914+ vi 
510ft 18ft 18ft 
3CTi 2294 2294+ lb 
5794 714 7ft + to 

460 460 460 + 5 

*2444 24ft 24ft— ft 
S22 311b 22 + ft 

47S 460 470 +10 

526 26 26 + ft 

56 SS 56+1 
Sllft JIM 1)94- ft 
192 lift 12 — ft 
» J* 9 + ft 

TOO 99 1D0 

• 275 275 275 +20 

*716 7ft 7V. + -I4 
*H lift.. 12 . + ft 
16 16 
23 23 +3 

32 11.— ft 


IMk+ft 

3814+ 14 


44598 Bonk Mont 
5S6C1L _ . 

I 1466 Coo Both 
. 43*6 DomTtdA 

« 00 Mnriret. ’ 
262885 Mats* Cdn 
. 113*8 Power Carp 
-BOD RaBandA 
IBP RoHooob 
72271 Royal Bank 
S326 RavTrstca 


lNdastitatsW*K 


Htah LowOonqno 

«gft Mb 26ft . 

18ft Wft— to 

Ha }»■ jwb+ g 

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JB. RJRtS- 

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(Georgetown Routs St. John’s to Regain Basketball Leadership 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


RwtorfrlMad hm b w .i n4m«i4 


„ s l Tgetown's Reggie Wflfiams, the game’s high scoter, strips Chris Muffin <rf the ball as 
a tfick Ewing gnards the St John’s star daring Georgetown's 85-69 victoiy in New York. 


• c u 
t« u 
?c d 


h nc » 
n k. 

r, t 

a *■ 


ii 
\r 
l 

u * 

i f. 

IC Ii 
4 1 

l % PETERSBURG, Florida 


\ooden — a Bit Ahead of Schedule 

By Joseph. Durso 

New York Tones Service 


1 «*e 
(k 


“My father,” he said, “is the 
most important influence on my 
life and wort” 

In one dazzling year, Dwight 
Gooden has become famous as the 
kid from Tampa who won 17 
games, shuck out a record total of 
276 hatters, struck out the side In 
the All-Star Game, averaged a re* 
cord number of 1L39 strikeouts 
every nine innings, struck out 32 
’ jtd come a long way to come batters in 2 consecutive games and 
*' " 43 m 3 consecutive games, won a 







40 


fio 

Ml 


IdJVM 


•V ' fil* 
J*l irfll 




ia» 


- > 


Q g Gooden leaned on his cane 
s searched across the four ball 
f t » oF Payson Held. Somewhere 
' £iere in the dusters of players, 
a was playing the lead, draw- 
r ^ns and attennon the way Tom 
f, 5-r did nearly a generation ago. 
E "pan Gooden aHowixi that his 
?• f.‘ 
e a 
13 I'U 

be was pitch- 
the little League,” he said, 
couple of times he quit He 
better than the other 
« * and they weren’t playing 
A ball would be bit to a kid, 
e’d miss it, and Dwight would 
s should’ve caught tt- 

[y said to him: 'Go back 
lere and play your position. 
N r» hiow i one more time, and you 
* good. Thai’s it* ” 

3 SSJ has come a long, long way. 
'tffSi ear ago, Dwight Gooden was 
ear-old rookie from the mi- 
agues who wore No. 64 in 
training and was barely 
med in the backpages of the 
media guide. Ibis year, he 
No. 16, and it takes five 
in the guide to list the high- 
t i».h IVitf-' of his first season in the big. 


if all the incentive bonuses 
,., 0 . 17 01,1 contract be signed Wednes- 
r V* ~j. 'i .“ 2 - the presence of his parents 
ST.^ecUheuulleain lOtimeshis 
•I.* : s'* ^.alary of 540,000. He report- 
■ i '^iHearnS275,000inbasesala- 
• . U* 31 k® 5 * 560,000 in guaran- 
endorsements plus other 
•— ives. 

l year, Dwight Gooden was 
ally mistaken for another 
' wStowy young player, Dar- 
iawbeny, and sometimes he 
11)£ i igned Strawberry’s name to 
5 modate the believers, 

year, Dwight Gooden is the 
. • „ ; t of a portrait on “60 Min- 
> ' ^fthat CBS plans to broadcast 
"* ;Kf : i opening of the season, he is 
-.'oof a forthcomingbook that 
-r v serialized in Playboy maga- 
^ ■ nd nobody mistakes him for 


pitdres, and we talk for maybe an 
hour, win or lose. If he loses, hell 
go back over the lineup and say, T 
shouldn’t have thrown such a 
pitch.’ 

“After he struck out 16 of the 
Pittsburgh Pirates last September, 
he called and said: 1 was pretty 
sharp.’ I told him: Those guys 
couldn’t hit* 

He is stiD growing at 6 feet 3 
inches taQ, half an inch over last_ 
year. And he weighs 198, a gain erf - 
eight pounds over last year. 

Iasi year, base runners stole 
against him 46 rimes in a row be- 
fore Ins catcher threw anybody ouL- 
And, in a season filled with jitter- 
ing numbers, be had one spectacu- 
larly bad number at the dose: 47 of 
SO base runners stole against ban. 

His problem may be eased .by the 
arrival of Gary Carter from the 
Montreal Expos, a rod: of a catcher 
with command and a bullet throw. 

“He’s young, "he’s still a baby.” 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Ditpmcha 

NEW YORK — As both No. 1 
St John's and No. 2 Georgetown 
are Catholic universities, neither 
could claim that Gcd was on its 
side Wednesday night at Madison 
Square Garden. 

The Redmen did, however, have 
the entire dly of New York behind 
them, which they figured would be 
mare useful in their anticipated 
street brawl against the Hoyas 
from Washington, D.C. 

But the Hoyas had the indomita- 
ble Patrick Ewing. 

It was no contest The 7-foot 
(113 meters) senior center's 20 
points, 9 rebounds and 6 blocked 
shots were mote than enough in the 
85-69 victory for the Hoyas. 

For most of this season, the word 
“awesome,” so often used to de- 
scribe Georgetown last year, had 
fallen om of use. It was restored 
Wednesday as the Hoyas tamed in 

Some Pros 
May Compete 
In Olympics 

The Amodated Press 

CALGARY, Alberta — The In- 
ternational Olympic Committee's 
executive board today agreed to 
permit professional ice hockey, 
soccer and t ennis players to com- 
pete in the Olympics, starling with 
the 1988 Calgary Winter Games. 

The agreement ««ns for players 
in those sports to be under the age 
of 23. 

Walter Troger, the IOC’s sports 
director, said the executive com- 
mittee’s decision could be reviewed 
after the Calgary Games if other 
sports federations request similar 
treatment for professionals. 

IOC President Juan Antonio Sa- 
maranch was expected to discuss 
the issue at a news conference to- 
night hx Calgary. 

The executive board’s decision 
requires ratification by the IOC 
Ccngress at its meeting this sum- 
mer. 

Earlier today, Walter Wasservo- 
gd of West Germany, secretary 
general of the Inter national Ice 
Hockey Federation, said the HHF 
had asked the IOC to allow profes- 
sionals under the agp of 23 to com- 
pete in Olympic hockey. He also 
asked that the same privilege be 
granted, to former professionals 
who have been retired for at least 
one year. 


a stunning exhibition of speed, 
grace and muscle to most likely win 
back the No. I nation?! ranking 
they lost almost five weeks ago in 
Landover. Maryland, in a 66-65 
loss to St. John's. 

Except fora point midway in the 
first half, the hot-shooting Hoyas 
(26-2) controlled — no, do minated 
— Su John’s (24-2). 

Georgetown hit 37 of 62 shots 
for 59 percent while holding the 
Redmenio 43 percent on 22 of 51. 
Reggie Williams scored a game 
high 25 points. 

There are certain drawbacks that 
come with bring the toast of New 
York. Sl John’s Coach Lou Carne- 
secca, who has become accustomed 
to being ignored outside of the uni- 
vereity’s small Queens «irap»*, had 
complained in recent days of claus- 
trophobia. 

That can happen when six televi- 
sion crews appear at one of your 
practices. 

Madison Square Garden offi- 
cials said this was the honest ticket 
in the history of the arena. Tickets 
normally priced at $12^0 were be- 
ing scalped before the game for 
$300. 

As an example of the privilege erf 
power, the current governor of 
New York, Mario Cuomo, man- 
aged to get tickets, but the former 
governor, Hugh Carey, didn't. 

But the Redmen Mania that had 
swqrt the diy began to evaporate 
with a little less than three minutes 
remaining, when most of the 19.591 
fans who had filled the Garden 
began to look for the exits after the 
Hoyas built their lead to 21 points. 

Georgetown Coach John 
Thompson suggested later that the 
Redmen will benefit from the hu- 
miliation because less will be ex- 
pected from them in next week's 
Big East Tournament at Madison 
Square Garden and the subsequent 
NCAA tournament. 

Minutes later, Camesecca ap- 
peared before approximately 300 
members of the media who had 
gathered for this game. 

T understand Coach Thompson 
said be may have done us a favor,” 
Camesecca said. “He can keep his 
favors.” 

Thompson already had upstaged 
Camesecca by appearing on the 
court before die game in a $9 T- 
shirt that matched the St. John's 
coach’s lucky sweater. St John's 
had won 19 straight games, the last 
13 while Camesecca was wearing 
the sweater. 

Aside from the T-shirt, Thonm- 
son had the best athletes, led by the 
improved play of Ewing, who had 
only eight points in the first game. 


But he played with even more in- 
tensity man rami, malring second 
and third efforts for offensive re- 
bounds and diving for loose balls. 

The results were impressive. He 
not only displayed his considerable 
defensive skills but also showed off 
an improving and varied offensive 
game. He made 10 of 13 shots from 
the field. 


Thompson said: “I told Pat, ‘We 
need you tonight. You have to play 
for us to win.’ That's the fust time 
I’ve ever said that to Pat because he 
always plays hard.” 

The man who tried to guard him, 
Sl John's 7-0 center Bill Warning* 
ton, »id he had never seen Ewing 
play so well “1 tried everything I 
could," he said. “Nothing worked." 


By contrast, almost everything 
Georgetown tried against St. 
John's leading scorer. 6-6 guard 
Chris Mallm, worked. 

Using several different men 
against him, the Hoyas were able to 
wear him down. Mullm still scored 
21 points, but he was only 8 of 16 
from the field. (LAT, N >7) 



UratadPma kMittoivI 

The Mahre twins, Phil, left, and Steve, after a one-two finish in the 1984 Olympic slalom. 

Retirement Is Golden for the Mahres 


By Bob Lochnex 

Los Angeles Times Service 

DILLON, Colorado — Phil 
Mahre, the best American skier in 
history, retired last spring. Like 
most retirees, be look a cut in pay. 

At 27, the three-time World Cup 
champion and his twin brother, 
Steve, derided to chuck it all and 
embark early on their golden years. 

Trouble is, the year since hasn’t 
been as golden as, say, the five 
preceding it But do they miss the 
rat race that annually extends from 
Val dTsere to Aspen by way of 
Japan? 

“Not a bit," Phil said the other 
day at Keystone, Colorado, where 
he had just finished greeting 35 
students in his weeklong Mahre 
Training Center program. “It’s 
really good, now. Fantastic. I 
watched some races, and I was glad 
it was them out there, not me. Ste- 
phen feds the same way.” 

Phil was wearing a beige pullover 


Bulls Fading as NBA Enters 'Crunch Time’ 



SCOREBOARD 


NHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
mtrWc OMdon 



v®* 1 1 


dy else. 


r.C**' 


rr 


j l year, Dwight Gooden was 
Sre he would have a career in 
: { leagues, or even a job in the 
; jgues. This year, he has a job, 
; jer and a Mercedes. And he 
\y/ endowed Dan Gooden 
tangible bits of appreci- 
? ?a new car and a four-bed- 
. ; three-bathroom house. 


landslide victory as the rookie of 
the year m the National League 
and broke records set in this centu- 
ry by Grover Cleveland Alexander, 

Sandy Koufax, Seaver and Nolan 
Ryan. 

He is, bis father suggested, ahead 
of schedule. 

“But he always was,” Dan Goo- 
den said. “When he was 3 years old, 

I was the coach of a semi-pro team 
called the Tampa Dodgers, and 
he’d sit in the dugout with me. 

“When he was 6, 1 took him to 
Lakeland one spring to see the De- 
troit Tigexs play die Boston Red 
Sox. and A1 Kalme hit two ouL He 
said to me, ‘Dad, I want to be like 
A1 Kahne.’ He'd get out his bat and 
I'd lob the ball to him, and he'd 
announce: Tm AI Kalme:' 

“When he was 8, be started play- 
ing third base and shortstop in the 
Little League. Pretty soon, we 
knew he had a good arm. When he 
was 12, he became a pitcher, and he 
even struck me out one day in this 
field out back erf our house. 

“When he was 15, 1 got the idea 
that he might make a good major 
leaguer someday. 

“When he was a junior, he 
pitched in high school and was No. 

2. Wien he was a senior, he became Campbell conference 

No. 1. Then I knew hecotdd make M8r 5? ^^5° m ™ ~ 

the big leagues. I figured he'd make a mm 

it, league by league.” Detroit ra u « 237 •m 

Dan Gooden paused, and said: 

“I figured he’d make it around 
1986." 

“He never gets too excited,” Dan 
Gooden said. “Neither do 2. He’s 
no trouble. I never had to punish 
him. No spanking, or anything like 
that. Even in the big leagues, he 
doesn’t get upset He knows they’re 
not going to win all the time. 

“He was always a tall, skinny kid 
who wanted to play ball all the 
time. When he was following my 
semi-pro team around, he’d play 
with older guys all the time. He 
played against men. Thar s why he (owjijiLsiiatiDawii.-Mimieaotatan B«m- 
did so well so young. - - - - 

The father added, “He always 
telephones me after every game he 


United Press International 

PONTIAC, Michigan — Ac- 
cording to Chicago BoDs coach Ke- 
vin Loughery the NBA season has 
reached the point where teams had 

NBA FOCUS 

better put up or shot up. It may be 
a quiet time in the Windy Gty the 
next two mouths. 

“Ibis U crunch tune, the last 25 
games in the NBA are a little bit 
different than the first 57” said 


108-99 derision to the Detriot Pis- 
tons Wednesday night. 

Chicago, which fell to 26-31 and 
lost its 12lh straight on the road, is 
mired in third place in the Central, 
Division, 14 games behind first- 
place Milwaukee. 

Center Bill Laimbeer led De- 
troit, scoring 20 of his 28 points in 
the second half as the Pistons 
notched only their third victory in 
11 tries and snapped a three-game 
losing streak. 


Detroit tot* the lead for good at 
the start of the fourth quarter as 
Dan Roundfidd, playing in only 
his second game after missing 16 
following knee surgery, scored 7 
points in a 12-6 spurt, giving the 
Piston a 93-87 advantage. 

Elsewhere in the NBA, it was 
Boston 111, San Antonio 102; New 
Jersey 114, Atlanta 92; Milwaukee 
119, Utah 100; Indiana 108, New 
York 106; Houston 1 17, Los Ange- 
les dippers 109, and Denver 124, 
Washington 111. 


sweater with the inmaU TWN. 
Thai also happens to be the name 
of the holding company that he and 
Steve and their business partners, 
Barry Gordinier, BQJ Kirshncr and 
Teny Heckler, formed in Seattle to 
handle the twins' business matters. 

TWN’s current activities in- 
clude: a line of ski and apres-ski 
clothing; the Mahre Training Cen- 
ter; water-ski boats and sailboards; 
commercials for companies such os 
DuPont and Canon; and continued 
tie-ins with ski equipment suppli- 
ers. 

Obviously, there's no need to 
take up a collection for the Mahre 
brothers, even if they aren't eligible 
for Social Securitv, yeL 

But Phil said: *Tm malting less 
money now than when I was rac- 
ing. For one thing , there’s no more 
bonus money from tire victory 
schedules.” 

Top-level ski racers on the World 
Cup circuit are technically ama- 
teurs, but they are permitted to 
enter into contracts with various 
companies in the ski industry and 
receive money in the form of “bro- 
ken-time payments” for using these 
companies’ equipment or clothing. 

Although nobody still active will 
admit it for the record, these agree- 
ments also contain clauses that give 
racers additional sums, on a gradu- 
ated scale, for first places, top-10 
finishes, Olympic and World- 
championship medals. 

According to Phil Mahre, the 
victory clauses hdped boost his in- 
come to about $600,000 annually 
toward the end of his career. 

One source on the UJ5. ski team 
said: “Phil won so many races and 
tides that one company wound up 


having to give him stock to cover 
the victory schedules." 

Steve Mahre, the same source 
estimated, earned about half as 
much as PhiL 

PhD Mahre has always preferred 
to keep a low financial profile, in 
contrast to Olympic do wnhill win- 
ner Bill Johnson, whom Mahre calls 
“young and imma ture." 

However, now that he is retired, 
PhD is out there hustling with ev- 
eryone else. 

When not pursuing his TWN in- 
terests. PhD has picked up some 
loose change by finishing fifth 
among 20 entrants in the “Super- 
stars" TV competition, and be has 
become a journalist, teaming with 
Steve as contributing editors to Ski 
magazine. 

“I’m also writing a book, with 
John Fry," PhD said! “It’s about my 
career, but it indudes a section on 
skiing technique. 

The ski training center at Key- 
stone, operates as part of tire re- 
son’s regular ski school, using in- 
structors who have received special 
training from the Mahres. 

IThe program is for skiers at all 
levels of ability, not just racers," 
PhD said. 

By next season, it is htmed, there 
wiD be Mahre Training Centers in 
the Midwest and in the East 

“When that happens, well prob- 
ably schedule four weeks at Key- 
stone and three weeks at cadi of the 
others," PhD said. 

“I’m still on the road a lot, but at 
least now l can get home. And Tm 
on my own time. Someone isn't 
idling me where and when to go 
someplace." 



National Basketball Association Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AHoOttC DtvtNM 


U.S. College Results U.S. College Basketball Leaders 



w 

' L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 


W L 

PcL 

GB 

Washington 

37 

16 

9 

S3 

258 

183 

x -Boston 

47 

12 

J97 


PhDadelniiia 

37 

19 

7 

II 

257 

in 

Philadelphia 

45 

13 

-776 

in 

N.Y. Islanders 

32 

26 

4 

66 

281 

243 

Washington 

30 

29 

JM 

17 

N.Y. Rmoers 

20 

31 

9 

49 

224 

256 

New Jersey 

27 

29 

.500 

im 

Ptttiburah 

30 

35 

5 

45 

213 

202 

New York 

20 

39 

jm 

27 

New Jersey 

IB 

35 

9 

44 

206 

254 


Central DhrisJen 




Adams Dtrttaon 



Milwaukee 

41 

11 

JOS 



Montreal 

32 

21 

10 

74 

242 

207 

Detroit 

33 

25 

569 

7V, 

Buffalo 

29 

20 

12 

70 

321 

179 

ChJcoao 

34 

31 

A56 

14 

Quebec 

31 

24 

a 

TO 

3*0 

228 

Atlanta 

24 

34 

XU 

!6Vk 

Boston 

36 

26 

8 

60 

219 

214 

Cleveland 

21 

37 

JS2 

19VS 

Hartford 

30 

34 

7 

47 

207 

263 

Indiana 

If 

39 

J328 

21 Vi 


WISTERN CONFERENCE 
MMwest Division 


Minnesota 

Toronto 

x-Edmonlon 
Winnipeg 
Caloory 
Los Anodes 
Vancouver 


212 254 
200 m 


M 3* II 47 

IS 40 7 39 

Smvftm dmum 

43 13 7 93 319 216 

32 24 7 71 2S4 215 

31 25 7 t!t 283 248 

29 24 11 £7 277 240 

19 37 9 44 218 325 


Donvor 
Houston 
Dallas 
San Antonio 
Uinta 

Kansas atv 


39 21 
34 24 
33 26 
29 31 
19 31 
ir 3t 


.552 

.475 

.475 

J33 


3*1 

5*1 

10 

10 

78 


Ix-cUadiea playoff spoil 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
WttniMO 113-4 

nttstaerob o J 7-4 

Turnbull 3 (TO.'BosefMMm C25), Small (25), 
Lundhoim (11), Howerchuk (39); Shedden 2 
[33). Looey no I. McCarthy 17). Stots on soal: 
WlniUpeo (on Romano) MI-8— flfc Pittsburgh 
(on Haywanf) 1D-T1-11 — 32. 

Mhwtsota 1 0 9—1 

Toronto 2 1 3-4 

LMman (5), Brubaker (4L Anderson (T9). 
Terrfon (11). Nytund (3), Courtnall (10); B*l- 


LA. Lakers 42 17 J12 — 

Portland 27 3) A66 14*> 

Pfwwdx 27 32 ^9 15 

Seattle 25 33 .43) Iflfc 

l— A- Clippers 22 37 -373 29 

Golden State 14 44 341 27*, 

(x -clinched Mavoff berth! 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Denser 15 37 29 34— » 

Woshlagten 3i 21 2f 34—111 

EnslMifr414422,Natt9-14fr521; Malone 
tt>24 3-3 S0 l Gut Williams 6-21 9-12 21- Re- 
boaedt: Oenrer <0 (Caooer TD: Washington 
31 (Mnhorn. Robi nso n 121. Assists; Denver 14 
(Lever «); W as h lug Ion » [Gui Williams t). 
Atlanta 38 M 19 19-91 

36 » 27 Z«— 114 


william 7-11 9-12 22. Cook 10-14 04)20; Wh 
Mas 10-23 5-7 2 £ Mills 9-13 1-2 17. Rebatuidt: 
Atlanta 36 (WUi1s7>; NewJ«rsav53 IWlDlam 
12). Assists : Atlanta 24 (Johnson 6) ; New Jer- 
sey 32 (Rontev 17). 

CMcaee 31 22 21 19— 19 

Dtlroll 8MB 27— IN 

Laimbeer 12-194-629. Lons 9-12 2-2 19; Jor- 
don 1-17 8-9 24. woofaidoe 10-22 2-3 22. Re- 
boaads: Chicago 29 (Jonkev SJotmson 6); 
Detroit 57 (Laimbeer 14). abUb Ctikcaso 17 
(Whatley 8); Detroit 21 (Thomas 11). 

lie 34 29 26 36— »2 

*37 26 33 36—111 
Bird 13-277-9 K, Parish 4-16S-11 20; MUdwil 

9- 29 2-2 SOL lavaranl 17. Rebounds: San 

Antonio S3 (Janes 131; Boston 64 (McHMe. 
Bird 14). Assists: Son Antonio 27 (Moore 9); 
Boston 26 (Alnge 12L 

New Tort 23 26 34 27-106 

ladtana 31 w 26 33-4M 

Kellogg 9-15 3-5 71. williams 8- 13 3-4 19; Kina 

10- 23 9-8 29. Walker «-» 9-10 20. Rebounds: 
New York 57 (Cummings 15); Indiana 51 (Kei- 
togg 10), Assists: New York 21 (Soarrow 6); 
Indiana 25 (Shilling 4). 

Milwaukee 29 32 37 23— 1H 

Utah 37 25 23 25— HO 

Cummings »-22 4-7 30. Pierce 8-U 33 20; 
GrtffHti 11-20 M 21 Green 10-15 54 21 Re- 
bounds: Milwaukee 59 ( Cummings 16); Utah 
49 (Kellev. Eaton 9). Assists: Milwaukee 27 
(Pressor 9); Utah 31 (Green 7). 

35 3) 39 29—117 
31 21 37 10— W 
Sampson 12-25 6-7 30. Lloyd 13-16 3-3 26; 
Smith 9-15 6-M26. Nixon 9-17 1-220. Rebounds: 
Houston 57 (Sampson 12) ; la. aimers 39 
(OanoSdcoa 13). Assists: Houston 31 (Lloyd 
I); LA. Clippers 33 (Nixon 14). 


M 


Goalie Leads Blues to Victory 

The Associated T^as 


associated Press 

itoLDS —Last week, Greg 
% y ’’’ jjwas tepding goal for a last 
•iV t ‘ram with n rahing much, to 
_ !■■ „ i-e j f :®>rcrd to except the end of 
; • * u ; i Hockey League sea- 


A*** 1 ' 

ie.n^' 




? NHL FOCUS 





he was traded and new 
tank about the race for the 
^^^yCup. 

pn was dealt from Hanford 
last Friday, going from 
taaenders to 
-dW !? iS?® NwTis woor. He 
,^Sp^^ efa B l . for Blues on 


t, stopping 33 
L Louis to a 3-1 


, wer Buffalo, breaking the 
/‘^game road winning 




winning 
a ® ts ®d, Mflka thrust hri 


arms in the air, was mobbed by his 
t eammat es and Coach Jacques 
Demers, and received a standing 
ovation from the 12,103 fans at tire 
St, Louis Arena. 

“I was very nervous at the start 
of the game.” said Mdea. Tl 
wasn’t hard to get op for this one. 
“They didn’t get any second 
chances and that's a big credit to 
tire guys in front of me. 

Millen hasn’t been in the play- 
offs since 1981, wirile with Pitts- 
burgh. This year, before being trad- 
ed for goalie Mike Liut, he was 
16 - 22-6 m 44 games. 

Elsewhere. in tire NHL, it was 
Toronto 6, Minnesota 1; Winnipeg 
6, PiU 5 biugM: Quebec 5, Los An- 
geles 2; Detroit II, Vancouver 5; 
Montreal 4, Edmonton 1, Calgary 
3 tbc New York Islanders 1, and 
Chicago 6, New Jersey 3. 


hordt) 11-16-19—45; Taranto (on Metamon) 

10- 9-8 — 27. 

Buffalo 1 8 9—1 

SL Laaii 9 3 1—3 

W1ck*nhe1sor (19). Suitor (32), Anderson 
(5); Ramsay (lll.SbOfSMOoal: Buffalo (on 
MMofl) 12-H-l V— 04; St. Louis (on Borrawo) 

1 1- 14-4— 31. 

I6bw Jersey 1 I 1—1 

.Chicago >3 1-6 

T. Murray Q0).5ocant3(10LLaniur (36), 
(May* (IS). Fraser (33); Muller (14), Game 
(19). Adams (4). Shots «a goal: New jersey 
(on Bamerman) 9-16-14—39; Chicago (on 
Reach) 11-7-9-27. 

Vancouver 2 Z 1— S 

Detroit 3. 5 3—11 

Gore 3 (191, Yanon (33). Duooay (26). 
Larson 3 (IS), OgradrtWe 3 (41). Smith (2); 
Neefy 05), Wrtw n)).$wd*tiwn (20),SmW 
(21). Skrlfco OI). Shots an goal: Vancouver 
(on Stefan) 13-12-9— 3J; Detroll (on Brodeur. 
Canrlbe) 10-1 M— 29. 

Montreal 2 t 1—4 

McPhee (U), Gainey 2 07). Mendeu 06); 
Gnrtzkv (92). Shots on seal: Montreal (on 
Moogl 14-10-13 — 37; Edmonton (anSoetaert) 
7-10-5— (2SL 

N.T. istandn 0 9 l— l 

Calgary 9' 9 3-3 

Kearoyd (3). McDonald Z 09); B. Sutter 
(3B).Stwtsen4Mei;.N.V.i9imderf [enLeme- 
fln) 10 9-6— 34; Calgary (on Smith) 11-13-10— 
34. 

Quebec 2 • 9-9 

LOS Angeles 9 0 3-4 

Maher (6), Poferaent 04). P, Stcstny (29), 
Hunter im.GouHrt (42); Hardy Illl.MocLeL 
Ion OS). Shots in goal: Quebec (on Jmcyfc) 
55-7—24; las Anoetes (an Baudurd) 1-7-13— 
28. 



Alliance 96. si. Vincent 90 
CCNV 62. NYU 56 
Crenel 70. LehWi 69 
Georgetown 95. St. JOhnl 69 
Latayette 7tL Detamre 65 
Lavota. MCL 59. Tcwnon SL 56. OT 
NJ. Tech 89, Stevens Tech 69 
Rider 5». Hotelra 58 
Vltkmovo 90k Seton Hun 75 
Wagner 95. Long Island U. 91 OT 
Win lams SL Wesleyan 56 
SOUTH 

Campbell 6a East Carolina 58 
Canan-Newmon S3, Toon. Wesleyan 76 
Christian Bros. 61 Trevecca 66 
ColL el Charleston 46. WoHord 44 
Duke 91 QenuMXi 73 
Ptartda St 96. Clncinncrtl 60 
George Mason 99. Navy 77 
Georgia 94. MUelsippt 66 
Georala Tecta 97. North Carolina 62 
Louisiana SL 71 Auburn 73 
Maryland 71. N. Carolina St 70 - 
Nlcholts St 71. Prairie View 70 
Vonderam 81, MfanleslMl SL 71 
VMI 41 Richmond 47 
wake Forest 61 Virginia 65 
MIDWEST 

Bawling Green 91 N. ininoli 79 
Cent. Midi loan 91. Kent SL 69 
Doan# 92, Midland 79 
iliinolB SL 75. Indiana St. 44 
Karoos si. 61 low St. 67 
Kentucky SL 91. Cent SL. Ohio 63 
Morauette 91 Valparaiso 46 
Micro I. Ohio 76. W. MkMaan 69 
MicMoa) SL a, North w est ern 47 
OMo U. 64. Ball ST. 56 

SOUTHWEST 
Baylor 97. Rice 71 
Okfcshomo IV. OkMwme SL Si 
Texas ABM SL Houston 77 
Texas Christian 54, Texas 52 
Terns Tech 59, So. Methad la t 54 
FAR WEST 
Cotorado 81 Mlnourl 79. OT 
ColL of Idaho 93. NW Nazarene » 
Nev.-Lca Vegas 97. CaHrvine 95 


NCAA C o ll ege BeNuitbaU toaders ttvoegb 
Feb 25: 


TEAM OFFINSE 




G fW-U 

Pts. 

Awg. 

Oklahoma 

27 22-5 

247* 

9L7 

Alcorn St. 

26 21 -S 

2292 

SSJ 

Southern 

26 17-9 

2222 

855 

LovaJa-iiL 

26 21-5 

2220 

85.4 

UHl SL 

25 15-10 2123 

84.9 

Tutsa 

25 205 

20B2 

83J 

Htv.-Ue Vegas 

25 22-3 

2071 

BU 

Virginia Tech 

26 2B4 

2135 

■2.T 

Bov tar 

25 10-15 

2015 

81J 

Cleveland SL 

26 19-7 

2099 

107 

Northeastern 

26 185 

2071 

797 

Duke 

25 205 

1990 

794 

San Diego SL 

2t 21-7 

2228 

794 

Michigan 

24 21-3 

1901 

7U 

Indiana SL 

25 13-12 

1997 

794 

TEAM DEFENSE 




G (W-L) 

PIS. 

Avo. 


Klein*. Ark 
Winters, Bradlv 
Rogers. UC-lrv 
Hlruon. Boat 
Battle. Rutgre 
Taylor. BwtGrn 
McCattrv. HCrxs 
Hon. Conn 
Stevens, lowaSt 
Grtor. KentSl 
PUSS. Monmth 
Trvesuate. Cltadl 
Lee. Mem St 


3R 29 3G 149 633 21 J 
SR 25 228 89 565 2L9 
JR 27 225 135 585 31.7 
SO 21 343 HO 606 3U 
SR 24 203 113 519 2U 
SR 25 23 *4 531 21 J 
JR 27 213 153 S7S 21 A 
SR 25 189 157 535 2L4 
SR 21 240 118 5*9 VA 
SR 25 209 115 531 2L2 
SR 25 211 10B 530 21JI 
SR 27 331 127 569 21.1 
SR 25 303 130 536 21JD 


Fresno St. 



WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
Eeregean Grow Tbrae 
England 1, Northern Ireland 0 
Points Stondhnt: England 6; N. Ireland. 
Finland 4; Romania Turkey i 
Earepeoa Gragg Five 
Holland 7. Crams T 

Petals Standings: Hungary*; Hollana Aus- 
tria 4; Crams c. 

rrevlau Ma t ches: Mov 2: Cyprus l. Aus- 
trlaZ; Seat X: Hungary 3. Austria 1; Oct 17: 
Holland 1, Hungary 3; Nov. 14: Austria 1, Hoi- 
kudO; Nov. 17; Cyprus), Hungary 2; Doe. 23: , 
Cvww 1 Holland 1. 

Itaat Matches; Aar. UKunaarv vs. Crarus; 

Agr.1?, Austria vs. Hungary; May I.HoUand 
vs. Austria. 

flanmin Graep Sevan 

Spain 1. Scotland 9 

Petals Standings: Scotland. Spain *; Woles, 
Iceland 2. 


Cutout# 

Georaetoum 

Oregon Sl. 

Getuoao 

Illlnali 

Teroale 

Iowa 

Cornell 

Marita 

San Diego 

Morauette 

Virginia 

Wash i n g ton 


PotombizteBaiiSt 
Hughes. Lov-M 
McXTanlei WChSt 
Cmtedoe, USA 
Smith, Loy-CaJ 
TEsdoie, Okia 
Dumers. McNees 
Mitchell. Mercer 
Garvin. Tex-SA 
Harper, MiaO 
WDllams. Ind SI 
Robinson. Navy 
Hoooen. Neb 

Lewis, NEtttm 
Votes. GMasen 
Harris, Tulsa 

Beard. SamM 
Ceszens. Army 
Welker, Ky 
Saanefalnen. BYU 

Beniamin, Croat 

Person, Auburn 
Bradley, USF 
vtaeenb MichSI 
wntum, NM St 


25 19 6 1337 535 
31 9 13 1141 14.7 

23 5 19 1267 55.1 
27 25 3 1516 56.1 
25 19 6 1434 57^ 
25 15 10 1438 575 
29 21 1 1473 57J 

24 2D 4 089 SJS 
27 19 9 1566 SL0 
22 12 10 1292 S&7 
27 16 11 1593 59 JO 

25 16 9 1473 59J) 
24 H 8 1421 59,2 
27 15 12 1606 595 
27 19 ■ 1616 592 

SCORING 

Ct G FG FTPtsAva. 
JR 25 256 179 691 275 
SR 26 296 116 708 27^ 
SR 26 299 130 708 273 
«r 26 26* 145 673 25.9 

JR 25 270 106 646 219 
JR 27 271 155 697 2SS 
SR 25 222 199 633 2SJ 
SR 27 260 163 693 213 
|r 25 236 145 617 24J 
Ir 25 256 102 614 2C6 
JR 25 243 121 607 2*3 
SO 25 236 134 606 2L2 
JR 25 231 131 600 2U 
SO 26 345 131 <21 2U 
SR 25 215 163 593 233 
SR 25 219 147 585 234 
SR 21 284 B1 649 212 
SR 25 194 187 579 232 
JR 25 199 175 573 22.9 
ST 26 216 160 392 22J 
JR 29 243 164 6S0 224 
JR 25 249 62 558 223 

IT 26 219 137 57S 22,1 
SR 94 194 142 530 211 
JR 19 160 95 415 2U 


MCDanleL WtchSt 
Beniamin. Crain 
Scurry. V.1U 
Sanaere, Mis Val 
Towns. Monmth 
Stlvrtns, Cole 
NeaL Fulfill 
CrtaB, TermSt 
Robinson. Navy 
Caltaekn. USA 
Brown. Gwasa 


REBOUNDING 

Cl G 


No. A vo. 
SR 26 390 15JI 
JR 29 409 1A1 
sr 25 327 111 
SR 22 276 125 
SR 25 310 12A 
SR 34 3B» 12J 
SR 24 377 115 
SR 26 293 )L3 
SO 2S m 11J 
sr 36 292 115 
SR 23 257 112 


FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 



Cl < 

S FGFGA 

Pel 

Walker, UHea 

SR 

27 

154 

316 

71 J 

Moore, crotat 

SR 

29 

ZU 

354 

67 2 

Salley. GaTech 

JR 

25 

155 

233 

4*J 

Hopnen, Neb 

JR 

25 

231 

354 

65J 

RoMnson, Navy 

SO 

25 

236 

369 

64J 

Staves. Seuihn 

JR 

25 

141 

222 

634 

Ewing, Gtown 

SR 

26 

150 

237 

434 

Lavodrama. HBaal 

SR 

27 

171 

277 

617 

Tnamas. Cenrty 

JR 

26 

112 

295 

617 

Btauu, Coroll 

SO 

22 

144 

234 

617 

Bantam, Cornil 

SR 

20 

133 

200 

6L5 

Pinckney. Vina 

SR 

25 

133 

217 

4L3 

ScstL HewMu 

SR 

24 

W9 

228 

ilJO 

Smigk. Cards 

SR 

23 

140 

230 

609 

Deuoftarty, NoCaro 

JR 

27 

178 

294 

405 

Horaravee. Iona 

SR 

27 

139 

230 

4(M 


FREE THROW PERCENTAGE 



Cl 

G FTFTA 

Pet 

Cabins. PennSt 

SR 

24 

S 

17 

954 

CoveL wmMory 

JR 

23 

40 

64 

919 

Alford. Ind 

SO 

23 

•4 

90 

fU 

Nutt. TCU 

IT 

25 

70 

75 

93J 

Hogan. Weber 

SR 

26 

81 

97 

93.1 

Eggink. Marts) 

BR 

25 

7t 

D 

919 

Timko. Youngs 

Fr 

27 

68 

74 

91.9 

Sudor. Duane 

JR 

25 

119 

132 

907 

Brooks. Tenn 

SR 

29 

119 

132 

ML3 

Cox. Vandtt 

SR 

24 

MM 

117 

887 

Brawn. TesAAM 

ir 

2S 

79 

19 

EU 

Otsen, wit 

JR 

25 

71 

re 

Hi 

Webster, Harvrd 

SO 

20 

» 

79 

88* 

Burden. St L 

sr 

25 

83 

94 

S8J 

Hate, NoCaro 

JR 

27, 

.74 

86 

Hi 

Teague, Bastnu 

sr 

25 

W 

91 

S7J 



BASEBALL 
American League 

TEXAS— Traded Billy Samnle, out fi elder, 
and a ataver to be named later 1o the New 
York Yankees ter Toby Horrota. tafletaer. 


SeodandTs goafe «fim Lawton, in mid^five, wutehes Sprang 
vmdag god in a Wodd Cup qua&fymg match at Sevfla. 


FRCNCH first division 
• ortloaw 4, Baano 0 
PotataStandlnad: Bordeaux 45; NontesSi,- 
Aunerra 32; Toam 31 -• Mali 99; Mcnoco. 
Brest 29) Lem jj. Parh^SjG. 34; Bastta 23.- 

i “"•w-Atarectne. 

Lavrt 21 ; stracbeure. Reuwv Tour* 17 ; ILC^ 
runs ii 


new YORK— Started (Moftt Gooden. 
Pitcher, and Jeae Oeuendo, Shortstop, to one- 
voor conlracto. 

PITTSBURGH — Signed Rick Reuachrt, 
attcher, to a minor -4eoouc contract. 

BASKETBALL 

Motional Badeattoll AsseciatlM 

Kansas city— signed Eddie Nealy, for- 
worn. waived David pop*. tamonL 


FOOTBALL 

MaHoael Football League 
CHICAGO— Resigned Buddy Rvan, detan- 
stve c o ord tarter. 

U«tad States Football League 
ARIZONA— Wahrad Frwt Sim running 
few*. Asked Aten Rblier.auartofbock.to play 


HOCKEY 

Nohroml Hockey league 

LEAGUE— Fined Mtantsota SL5B0 (or a 
brawl with Detroit Red on Feta U 
COLLEGE 

MISSOURI— otunlseed £rfc Drain, hi»- 
backr front the ImH»U team lor dlsctaltaary 
reasent. 









.** 


Page 18 


OBSERVER 


On the Wrong Track 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Snowbound in 
the Washington unreality zone 
not long ago. I turned on the televi- 
sion Tor news of open escape routes 
only to Find myself being stared at 
by several media heavyweights. 
One was saying., “America feels 
good about itself again," and the 
others must have noticed that I'd 
lifted an eyebrow the way I do 
when I am thinking “Oh. bosh, rot. 
nonsense and so what!" because 
they all glared at me. 

1 had intended no disrespect. 
Later someone explained that this 
winter everybody in Washington 
walks around saying, “America 
feels good about itself again," the 
way people in New York say, 
“Lei's have lunch sometime" when 
they are trying to get away from 
insufferable bores. 

1 didn't understand the game. 
This was a time when the weather 
was very nasry. when I wanted ur- 
gently to get out of Washington 
and when the president bad just 
asked the Congress to abandon the 
Amirak passenger railroad service. 

Fortunately, Congress had not 
yet done so. Hence, there was a 
possibility I might get back to New 
York by train instead of having to 
fly. Though not chicken-hearted 
about air transport. I prefer not to 
suffer it in nasty weather. What 
makes me feel good about myself at 
such moments is a comfortable seat 
on a warn train. 


So naturally this fellow saying 
“America feels good about itself 
again" made me disagreeable. I 
spoke to the televised media heav- 
ies: 

“How can America fed good 
about itself knowing that it is so 
broke and tumbledown that it’s not 
going to have any nice trains to use 
when the next blizzard stokes?" 

Their scowls asked, “Why is this 
silly out-of-town ninny permitted 
to watch serious men on televi- 
sion?" but did not silence me. 

“What about John Madden, ex- 
football coach, TV football analyst 
extraordinaire?" I cried. “Nobody 
can be more American than an ex- 
football coach, yet Madden, fam- 
ous for bating air travel must al- 
ready feel absolutely rotten about 
himself now that the president has 
doomed the railroads." 

The media men had lost interest 


in me. They were important people 
with weighty intellectual baggage 
to deliver. One of them explained 
why all the moaey on earth, plus 10 
percent, would have to be scat to 
the Pentagon immediately to keep 
the Russian army east of Wilkes- 
Barre, Pennsylvania. 

“If the Russian army can’t even 
overpower a brier-patch republic 
like Afghanistan after five years of 
war. how can it hope to pass 
through ihe real-estate finagiers of 
New York City without being 
stripped naked? I asked. 

Apparently I misunderstood. 
The Pentagon didn't actually re- 
quire ail the money, plus 10 per- 
cent, to impede the Russians. The 
money was merely to buy bargain- 
ing chips. Once we were loaded 
with chips, the Russians would 
start throwing away some of their 
chips if we tossed away some of our 
chips. 

“How can America feel good 
about itself when all the money, 
plus 10 percent, is being tossed 
away as chips?" I asked, 

a 

Of course I was talking to myself 
now, and these good, serious tele- 
vised Washington news people had 
gone on to one of their favorite 
subjects, the budget deficit. 1 lis- 
tened with respect while one of- 
them, without giggling, explained 
that the president wanted the Con- 
stitution rewritten to outlaw bud- 
get deficits. 

Yes, he said, the president 
seemed earnestly to believe that re- 
vising the Constitution would pul 
an end to the record-setting debt 
that resulted each year from the 
president’s economic policy. 

“Do you mean they will pass a 
law that says. ‘Deficits, slop!’ and 
the deficits will stop?" 

A silly question, I suppose. I per- 
sisted. 

“And the deGcits would stop, I 
suppose, because if they didn't, the 
deficits would have to go to jail for 
violating the Cons titut ion.” 

There was a train lefL It bore me 
away in the blizzard. 1 felt good 
about myself for being on iL It took 
me back to New York where the 
real-estate industry quickly made 
me feel bad about myself again, but 
bad in a different way from the way 
I had felt bad about myself while 
listening to the thought' of Wash- 
ington. 

New York Times Service 



Her Words, His Music in Washington 

Most People in Washington Dance to a Political Tune, but Not This Cultural Duo 


By Barbara Gamarekian 

Sew York Times Service 

W ASHINGTON — Theirs is a world of 
music, poetry and literature — not gov- 
ernment and politics. Yet for nine years they 
have lived in a city that dances to a political 
tune without feeling like outsiders. 

Anne Lindbergh writes poetry and books 
for children. She is the daughter of the avia- 
tion pioneers Charles A. Lindbergh and Anne 
Morrow Lindbergh, also a noted author, who 
is now 7S years old. Her husband, Jerzy 
Sapieyevski/is a composer, conductor, teach- 
er and the artistic director of the Dumbarton 
Avenue Concert Series. 

“You cannot live in Washington without 
being involved in some way with political 
thinking, " said Sapieyevski as he and his wife 
sat in their bay-windowed living room in 
Georgetown. 

“Some of our best friends are politicians,” 
Lindbergh in rejected, with a grin. 

“But if I could fantasize." Sapieyevski con- 
tinued. “I would fantasize a Washington with 
a little fewer politicians, I would fantasize a 
little less emphasis on appearance. It is al- 
ways: ‘How do I look on TV?" And it is 
contagious — Washington is definitely con- 
sumed with image and power, and for some 
people it becomes a full-time preoccupation." 

Sapieyevski, 39, said he came to the United 
States from Poland in 1968 for professional 
rather than political reasons: to lecture at and 
participate in the music festivals at 
Tangle wood and Aspen. Visiting friends, he 
was so taken with the capital that he decided 
to make Washington bis home base. He con- 
tinued to travel frequently to Europe, where 
he met Lindbergh, who was living and writing 
in Paris. They married and went to Washing- 
ton in 1 976. 'He joined the music faculty at 
American University. 

“There are so many different things going 
on here, culturally, politically, academically 
— more than I have ever experienced in any 
place I have lived before," said Lindbergh. 
44. who as a child divided her time between 
the Connecticut suburbs and Maine before 
spending 1 5 years in Paris following her grad- 
uation from Radcliffe College. 

“We were ail encouraged to write as chil- 
dren. and we were all great readers," she 
recalled. “I always knew it was what I wanted 
to do. So now I write children's books profes- 
sionally, and l write poetry for myself — 
poetry is personal." 

Three of her six books have Georgetown as 
their setting. She does much of her research 
walking the streets of her neighborhood and 
the wooded towpath of the Chesapeake & 
Ohio canal nearby, dreaming up characters 
and dialogue before sitting down at her word 
processor. 

In “Nobody's Orphan." one of her charac- 



Ptsd HmsfiWThe New York Tea 

Writer Lindbergh and her husband, composer SapfeyevskL 


tors is a garrulous older man who spouts 
invented aphorisms that he attributes to Cal- 
vin Coolidge and Robert Service, “the way 
my father used ro — he was very high on 
Calvin Coolidge." Lindbergh said. 

A Georgetown cul-de-sac. Pommander 
Walk, was the inspiration for “The People in 
Pineapple Placed she said. “My son and I 
discovered this little old-fashioned street with 
10 houses one day, and nobody was there at 
all. He said. ‘You could write a book about 
this street — it looks as if it were just visiting 
here temporarily from another time.' 

“I have always laved children's books, and 
1 was interested in them before 1 had children 
of my own.” she added, noting that with three 
children “and the whole neighborhood run- 
ning in and out of my living room." she had 
feedback as well as inspiration. 

The Sapieyevskis are also musical collabo- 
rators. “Whenever I use words I work with 
Anne.” said Sapieyevski. who composed his 
first piece at the age of 13. 

He is working on a siring quartet for a 
Library of Congress music festival. And he 
has set some of his wife's poetry to music. A 
series of “Love Songs" based on her poems 


bad its premiere at the Phillips Gallery m 
Washington, and another song cycle, “Noc- 
turnes,” was presented at the National Gal- 
lery of Art ■ 

Sapieyevski who also lectures and writes 
about the creative process, works in a studio 
in their garden. “A heated studio," he noted. 
“Composers shouldn't suffer.” 

“Music From Other Gardens,” a cycle of 
four songs composed by Sapieyevski for his 
wife's lyrics, “are really about my neighbor- 
hood,” Lindbergh said. “They are about 
keeping a sort of solitude, keeping a center to 
yourself in the midst of city life. 

“We've found that many of the people that 
we have met here working in politics are 
guarded, wary of exposing themselves," she 
said. “What Jerzy and I do is something that 
is just the opposite. We deal with emotions 
that reach out — with words and notes that 
touch. It is a release from being careful" 

“Music can give a person that private, 
healthy escape into himself,” Sapieyevski 
said. “That to me is the role of a writer or a 
composer. And. especially in Washington, 1 
find them very needed." 


'Precoutfonojy Landing J 


Prince Andrew made a precau- 
tionary limiting ” cm the Falkland^ 

Islands when the Royal Navy heli- 
copter he was Dying developed a 
fault, the Defense Ministry said in 
London. British newspapers vari- 
ously reported that tbe second son 
of Queen Efizabeth Q “crash-land- 
ed,” “ditched” or “made a dramat- 
ic forced landing.” The 25-year-old 
prince fought in the 1982 Fafklands 
war with Argentina, and returned 
to the South Atlantic last January 
with the frigate HMS Brazen on a 
five-month patrol- Tbe ministry 
said that on Feb. 15 tbe Brazen 
anti-submarine Lynx helicopter 
that the prince was Dying devel- 
oped a hydraulic fault. A ministry 
spokesman said: “He chose to fly 
to land, and get it patched op,” 
rather than try to make it back to 
the Brazen. “Afterwards, he flew 
the helicopter back to HMS Brazen 
and that was the end of it.” 

. . . Prince Charies Wednesday 
opened an underground NATO 
anminaiiH center. The S49- mil lion- 
computerized center at North- 
wood, on London’s outskirts, is 85 
fern below ground. 

O 

Sir Afister Hardy, 89„ a distin- 
guished British marine biologist, 

Wednesday won the Templeton 
Prize for Progress in Rdhtipn and 
said be w£Q use the $186,000 award 
to study links between faith and 
evolution. Hardy says he began re- 
search at Oxford University in 
1969 to reconcile the evohitkmaiy 
theories of Charles Darwin with re- 
ligion. “I want to expand the work 
of our unit to other faiths, Mos- 
lems, Hindus and Buddhists, and 
establish research groups around 
die world," he said. 

□ 

Conservative Republicans ap- 
parently like sex as much as liberal 
Democrats and rich pec^le seem to 
prefer it more than poor people do, 
according to a survey made by a 
conservative political pollster that 
was released Wednesday. Terry 
Dotai conducted his own survey in 
reaction to a widely publicized poll 
by the columnist Ann Landers. Do- 
lan, founder of the The Dolan Re- 
port, a publication that addresses 

conservative political issues, said _ 

his findings generally backed up too old to enter the contest, but df 
Landers's conclusions. In Dolan s permitted her participation 
survey, 36 percent of the 1,010 men Runnerup Tata LeiaiaDi Costa, 18, 
and women questioned preferred was named the hew Miss Hawaii 
being held closely, compared to 29 USA. 


percent who wanted the act of sex. 
However, 35 percent said they * 
didn’t know or refused to answer. £ 
Last month, Laudas released arajp, 
unscientific survey of 90.0QQ read- 
ers who had responded to tjfc ques- 
tion comparing cuddling, t» sex. In 
the Landers repeal. 72 percent en- 
joyed cuddling while 28 percent 
wanted sex. The survey was volun- 
tary, so there were no respondents 
who refused to answer. 

□ /■ 

The British Broadcasting Corp. 

is shelving its lora-nmaing science- 
fiction series, “Dr. Who,” for at 
least 18 months to allow other dra- 
ma television scries to b? mad e , the 
BBC said Wednesday. Within an 
hour of the announcement, angry 
fans bombarded the state-funded 
BBC with complaints, and a cam- 
paign was being organized to force 
the BBC to reverse its derision. 

Last month, Michael Grade, the 
BBC program controller, changed 
his mind about shelving tbe popu- 
lar American soap opera “Dallas" . ' 
for six months when he was inun-j£ 
dated with protests from viewer:: T 
The program will reappear d * 
March 27. \ 

□ 

Exiled Iranian guerrilla leady* 
Massoud Rajsri has divorced If 
daughter of his former ally, ous? ^ 
Iraman President AJx&assan 
Sadr, Rsriavi’s organization 
nounced Wednesday in Anvef 
snr-Oise, France. Rajavi, leader l 
the leftist Islamic Mujahedeu. 
guerrilla organization, and BaniS 
Sadr fled from Iran to Paris July 2% 
1981 and later joined farces in | 
National Council of Resistances 
The two shared a heavily guarded 
compound in Anvers, north of Par- 
is. Two years ago, Rajavi, 37, mar- 
ried Finwzeh Bari-SaAr, one of the 
former president’s daughters. Raja-, 
vfs first wife was kfikri during a 
guerrilla operation in Iran. Last 
year, Rajavi and Bani-Sadr fell out 
aver Rajavi's support for Iraq in 
die Iran- Iraq War, and Bani-Sadr 
moved to a home near Versailles. 

□ 

Miss Hawaii USA pageant offi- 
cials have taken away the crown of 
Tina Marie Machado after less than 
a week. At 25, they said, she was 


i 


i- 


! ■; 


I r - 




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HISTORICAL OPPORTUNITY 

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care d*azur 

REGION CANNES 
JOHN TAYLOR has a setoewm of *e 
fw ramdrma large property for sde 
in good co-won » suitable tar a golf 
course, sparling center, eroanon of 

“^JCWTAYUaSA. 

55 la Odette 

06400 Cannes 

Teh (93) 38 00 66, Teleo 47092F 


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M iring lovely We house 110 jq.ni. 

fa&sjsifuiV rasHmed rave-m condition. 
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roof terrace. tpafP..22 e 5£fJ2*' 
uu yjrormc wew. Pnce l»S 195JJ00. 


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cine was, 500 to. tea. P950JXJ0. Pens 
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FRENCH PROVINCES 


GOLF MGUGIN5 CANNES 
.Splendid 500 sqjn. ground-level prop- 
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boms, playroom, kitensn, 3 maids' bed- 
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0.000 sqm lancCrrioa FfcJOCflXX). 

Aaenaedtr Grasd f«M 
45 La Craisefts Cannes 
(93)48 31 34. 


DORDOGNE FOR SAlf CHARMING 
old village house. 4 bedroom, bath- 
room, kitchen, Ivina room. *wg 
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wilhopcrtwmntdy 1 hectne aiucSed 
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TP5 7AW, England. 


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WeWview Bo, IsSHWaW In- 
butte 92531 NtemHy Cede*. France. 


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central heatmg, sofid oak waxMmk. 
a/hedrd orfnes. F650000. Phono 
owner dayv New York (212) 975 
4954. Paris 256 34 9Z 


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FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNES CROKETT1 
Wei furnehed opartment l30sqm + 
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bathrooms, aimfs room, parking. 
F3 .000.000- IATOUR, 

20 rue Lataur Maibourg 06400 Cannes. 

Tel: (93) 94 « 51 


CAIWB/IE CANNET. ffigh doss 3- 
be d room op ui iment wrtfi 2 barh- 
rooms. 108 jam. + ter ace 40 sq.ni. 
overlooking Cimnev aid port Suaiet 
& mountains. Stixfo fiir staff. 2 ceBare 
4 teg garage FI.9SOJOOO. SS 47 La 
CroStfa l«55» Comes. Tet |93j 38 
1919. 


CANPS5 CAUFORfffi. In prostipous 
residence. Spiendd 2/3 room, 100 
sq.m. Recophan 45 iqjn. Beaunful 
South terrace. Marvellous sea view. 

Tennis. MogntSconf 
551. 47 La Croaette. 
Tel |93] 38 19 19. 


EXCHTtONAL - CAP D'ANTIBES. 
Sin^Xuous new property on the 
beach. 600 sqjn. Recaatnn with fire- 
piaas: 140 sqjn. 5 baiooim. 5 bath- 
rooms. Staff quarters. Heated pool 
Tennis. 44ia park. SSI. 47 La Croisetn. 
06400 Cannes. TeH93] 38 19 19. 


ACC EN PROVENCE center, owner 
»*% lawnhouie, 10 th century. 260 
sqjTL. reception 140 KjJtv. 4 bed- 
rooms. 2 baths, ceftjr. afi ajmta n s, 
perfed cnn*ion, mrapnand decor a- 
tion Write Dr. SaNmi, 17 R, Gay-end. 
13100 Am Ml Provence. France. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


UNK2UE OMNCE TO PUROW5C 10 
bed vido. lodge & (Founds rc ccnverr 
to re s taur unt/hoteTHats or sumptuous 
home. Prime location in valley. 50 
mnjtn fifa airport. W9 dvide. De- 
hJs - tek p9*q 46DOOO. TeHiord. 

Englrnid. 


COTE D'AZUR Chateauneuf de 
Grama, beoutriiH vJla, 200 sqjn, 4 
bedrooms, 3 baths. Irving & large 
equmed kitchen. 1,800 awn. garden 
in alive grove. Sacrifice pnam 
FIJOOJOQ. Tet (93)42 5303. 


YOUR CONTACT M PROVBMCE 

Homes with character. Chanting 
propertie s . Estatev Emile GA2QN. 
B>. 55. 13532 ST-REMY-DE-PRO- 
V&CE Cedex. Tel-. (90) 920158 +. 


NKX-FRENCH RIVERA penthouse. 1 
bedroom, lop dass, teg tanaee. pan- 
orarnc ocean view, cafin aroa 5 mrv- 
iW wdk to sea Very urgent by 
owner. France 93/75 52 41. 


IN IRAVANCHBL CHAMOMX 
Center vdtey. unique 19th cwd. form. 
Oi^nd state including Furnririmgs, 

MiStoJpv 


BUY FROM OWNER, V1LLA. VIEW 
and walking cSsfrmcB saa. Cap de 
fifae. 5*. lean, VBefranche, Cannes. 
Tek (93) 81 05 93. 


CANNES LUXURIOUS 57 sq-m. tfudte 
100 meters from oceav Decorator's 
*^rLF550reO. McDonald, tel (91) 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

Pu U b hyaurbu 


btteMBmoiiBMfNnwl^ 

buna, whore men than a third 
at o m3 Ban madam wwfd- 
wrda, mad at whom ora in 

buwnea mid Industry, win 

mod it. Just ftrfajr vs (Paris 

613S95J before 10 am, en- 

suring that wo tan talon you 
back, tmd your message wS 

appear within 4B hours. The 
rale is US. S9.80 or load 
equhndent per Bne. You mutt 
ktdude com ple te and wtS- 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


AMBUCAN COMPANY 04GAGH3 

since 6 years in research 4 develop- 

rnenl at a process for the production 
of lyrtherie crude 08 from cod (law 
made 4 others), ignite, oil shows & 
having dreader suraeded in demon- 
strating die efficiency & the Beononse 
profitoby of rim ample process, 

seats a torture investment e i 

J 0 CO.OOO for c omp teung 4 stertng a 
pSot plant. Time reqwea up to begm- 
nirig of iri^ 56 months as mcdimery 
& aqunmenf cbeody rnstafled up fo 
85% of the ptoni. Company has al- 
ready i n vited £3 m#on of its own 
money in the process. Investor can 

receive erckrsvrfy of process far one 
country [USA exduded). Terms to be 
negotiated. PVme write 10 Bcw 1822, 

Herald Triune. 9252! Neu*y Cede*. 

France. 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T-SHIRT FOTOS 
NOW IN FUU COLOR 

an ail-cash business ihat can earn you 
S800G . 51 0^000/ manrfi. New aid used 
systems from S1G.0CQ - SSJiffl- 

Drat. M1Z Fosrfaen 170340. 
4000 Fra*furr/W. 

Tek 049747808 TU, 


. Genww. 
<12713 KcMA 


M BEAUT1RA. LAKE TAHOE. CaHor- 

nto, French/ Corftnemai rastauront 

for sole, located wrtten 300 meters of 
Idtashorc on neariv 1 acre land (aid 

esSabtohed r estauram Ctow la numer. 

an sJa areml usdudes lujruncus man- 

agur uaxi mmodoaons & also 2 bed- 

room cottages & 1 stuefrs Far farther 
detaris write 10 principal ally at 
Apartment 141 1 1 177 Cckforria Sr. 
Son Frgncaco. CA. 94108 USA. 


BROKBB WANTH3 

to sen property iroa irvesmenfs. 
USS50OO arvestee prwdet USJ15.000 
bonded retaro guorartoetL Ptau Ion 
(ree amuri mcome of U5S.J» pius. 
Contact Argy« Comre end edeparr, 
LmB»d. Gfewcoe J aoomrtwy. 
4741 tantiate 

Phone 1079) 45763 Asatraia 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


WVE5T 2 WOKS m Belter Hecflfi. 
Enter Carckac Htsk Prevenwsn 4 

Health Kecordiuoning Proyar now. 

Began mansion, peaceful Surrey 
Countryside, teghhr quafrfied mecScd 
soperuisjcn. Viol 5 tfo n Medicd Cen- 
ter. Entan rw Goddrarrg, 5unay 
GU85AL 45 mm. Landcn. Rmg 
(047)8797233. 


U 5. MARKETING ARM mnsrested m 

buying Eurapeor goods far makewna 

m Ui We UI W*3 cep i t tfa d enfl 
can purchase goods oumgH or per- 
ridpate in a pint venture. Cdl our 
Zurich office oh 01.'2«2 98 81 Tele* 

814313 NCZ CH, or write; NCZ Zu- 

ridi, ffatwond Str.72. CH30« Zuneh, 

Switzerland 


FIDUCIARY BANKING an fcnje ipL 

latenriaed loom The only commer- 
cial bank with a feprosentafn*e office 
in London tpeadrar-g 1 r. tfas mme 

Arab Oversees Bant & Tr«p (WL) 
Ltd. 28 Block Prince 2d.. Lonson SE1. 
Tel m 8171 


FOR 5A1£ IN MJAML TWTCV?© cenv. 

pony fnmofting ewiuovetv from Co- 

lumbia) «■ asromig model agency. 
Rnest offices hi .Warn. For irrormc- 

her caB Hemy a 3B 3*fcjC<i (US). 

Great poterrji for Mpsssrar 


WANTED DISTRIBUTORS worldwide 

far poctnar 'SjfA" Srgcscre ire- 

pared de&oous Lvdsn fish, nsaron. 

dvdben nenes in Cars | W<a htt. Hoi. 

mfld). Wroe! Mr Srgncn. 0604 Cu> 

page flaco, Koek Zd, Sr^epcra. 


AGHfTS WANTS for a contprenen- 

srv-s muheneda. rnuEtdinguoi scnocLrg 
sreterr wi dl facets & levels of copied 

eteromo. Write Orevz'e* e e- rw- 

cations AG, SWfcr-jggsr. 70S. CH- 
4340 Boor, id- C-C-Sl lB V. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


wn 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMI1B} INC 
U4.A. A WOMSW1SE 

A ccm&me jood & tvs.-tesi serv-j 
a uneje colieeron of 
ictemes. verscnie & ■W.’-.irng-.al 
indfrvfacu fa'- 

FcsfiwrvCorrmercvjHpr.rs-P-a^mcira 
ConvermoiT-rrade Shcws-prau ?ame« 
Speoal cuentvJnvsge UcroPI ; 

50C0I ■-Omprmcv-i.Tour ^ 

212-76S-7793 
m 212-T6W794 

230 W. 5esh Sr. N.rC -COlf 
Sendee Secresenttnve' 
Needed Warfannce 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


FRENCH HIGH FASHION MODS. 
27. flL'PA esperience, Hfstary of Art 
graduate, free ta travel, blmgud, 
looks for London based oownne^. Tel: 
3 pjn. 9 pm. 01-225 0363 (UK) 


TAX SERVICES 


UK CHARIBB3 Accountaus provid- 

ing US federd tax senneas. Lovett 
Wftcmson 4 Co. Tek (070731 37320 

FRENCH AND USA TAX ADVICE 3 

returns. Porb based LG CPA 359&3QT 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


ARBITRAGE. Moor bank cutheirirco- 

tion of cotfaterol far or fa tfroep tranv 

actions provided, tap'd, "fetetie. 

Keroonable fees. London based. Tel- 
01-244 9592'Dl-385 5492.'01930 
892a. n». 8951622 TAJKCO G. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Tour best buy 

Fine d em ands m ofly price rtjnge 
at lowest wholesale prices 
eSreef from Antwerp 
□enter of ihe damond world. 
FuB gucrteeee. 

Fen free pics kst write 
Joac hi m Gaidar 


&tatfahed‘??£ 
Pelfieaanrrap 62. B-2D13 Antwerp 
Bje fanm i - T«t ©2 31234 07 SI 

TH: 71779 syt b. At the Damard Oub. 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


euro busmss canER 

Relco j i hs i onUanee 
Formula hew 

99 Kebengnxht. 1015 Of Amsterdam 
Tel: 31.2026 57 49 Teton 16183. 
World-Wide Scares Cedars 


YOUR LONDON OFFICE 
a the 

CHE5HAM EXECUTIVE CENTRE 
Comprehensive range of service* 
ISO Regent Soect, London WT. 
TeL (01) 439 6288 Tim 261426 


PASQS ADDRESS, ChorncvSyufas. 
Smee 1957 liP. povides rrrx&.cbxn. 
retell, mee e tia rooms. 5 rue a Anas. 
75004 Tek 359 47 04. Hi. 642504- 


YOUR OFT KE M PARIS: TESt 

ANSWpQNG SSITCL sewxy. 

cirundt, irofaov- tve 24H-'dav 
TeL WT: 609 9595. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GERMANY 


MANOR HOUSE PEAR MUNiOf 

This aid Famous manor home (1919 a 
situated in a large private pork (5600 
stfrrvj m a Mutual suburb. 4Q0 sqra 
Swig area +• summer house. 30 min to 
Munch aty via cv, bus, rariroad. Tin 
generous sovereign house with 2 Boors 
and a smal smirrmna poof / sauna in 
the basemeiri isgjiiaqfe for private tesi- 
dence or for offics- 

Selfing pro* DM3 Ml 

LUEKEN & DUWE KG 

Dockenhudener Str 30. 

D-2000 Hqmira 55. W. Germany 
TeL D40fi636Z7, T fc 2173509 UJPD 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LUXURY APARTMENT, retard Lon- 
don. Large bright Bat in modern 
block. Superb mtnrior design, fieady 
far rmmedafe oacupracy. 3 bed- 
rooms, 7 marUe batfroor m (1 en- 
sutte), guest WC, mogniheorn double 
recratron room with bdeony. Large 
newty fitted Utefwri / bi o d dest roam. 
Fully furnehed to highest stondexd. 
E2IS«» (5235.000) tor quid sale. 
Tel: Q1-93S3708 


G 8 OSVB 1 IOR SQUARE MEWS. A 
modern Bat in imroaedde order «t a 
private, quel mews in the heart of 
Mayfair • atfioceni Oaridges. Own 
garden, privttt groagng twrd prok- 
rig. Ercellenl security. Large recep- 
tion with dnra area Bedroom, luxu- 
ry rable bathroom. Designer 
knehen. 86 year lease. £245 jOGO. Tet 
Ascot 28946 (UK) 


LONDON AIRPORT 2 HOURS: 18th 

centurr malihouse supeibfy converted 
pr evict nq tostefdfy modernzed ac- 

commodation in Own grounds over- 
looking bdd estacry. Dbaaver 
Drakes England by the lea. South 

Devon. Ncm n the nme to use rite 

dete. $250,000. Fufl details t* 054 

853606 


MARBLE ARCH/ HYDE PARK. A very 

desirable modern fawntousa, newly 

interior decorated, 3 beds with baths 
en Mite, modem kbefien/bredcfaH 

area, lounge, separate dnng room, 

srucfio room with patio. Ovencofanc 

B dens. Lease 60 years. £400.000. 
London (01 1 4Q2 5666. 


LOVH.Y LONDON APART MHVT. 5e- 
duded. quet in timeless Sfodfiealfi 
near Greenwich Park. 16 minute nan 
to Gty. 3 bedrooms. 2 baths, study, 
utility roam. Menctan Cresses 37 few 
t-mg rocmj Fulh equipped dus go- 

raqa. SU9J00. teT5l-3l8 gQl 


EATON PLACE. BELGRAVIA, 3 bed- 

rooms. ? bathrooms, interior de- 
ogned, hnury German kitchen, fully 
equipped. Very brt^ir 3rd floor , no 
5ft total outgoings per annum £200 
only. £I35.a5ra oifes. 0r-24S 0902 


LOOKING FOR A HOME? May we 

help? Town : country house > flat. 

Home Beavers provide a ipeoafcnd 

service la find the property rau are 
kximg^r^Tefi London (01 1 794 8439 


LONDON BBGRAV1A. Superb in- 

vestment property, prune location 
near Palace. Largs reception. 2 bed- 
rooms. kitchen, hath, fift. £185,000. 
Michoel Kalmar & Co. 01-581 2661 


LONDON KENSINGTON W 8 . Umury 
3 bedroom. 2 bathroom conversed 
mcrianerte, T23 yew tease. ClrtjOOQ. 
V*w Sunday 1 1 am - 4 pm. Tel 937 
8619. 


GREECE 


BEAUTIFUL UNRESTORBD townhouu 

with private access to tea in Cydadic 

bland of Syras far sde wnh k nmej - 

ate possessan. Contact Mrs. R. Mess- 

sounds. 4 Prcnteious Street, Mar- 

ouss. 151 26 Athens, Greece. TeL 

Athens 6023557 


ANDROS BLAND. RESTCXB) stone 

hovie on I acre land with ofive irees. 
3 bedrooms. 4 kms from port. 
USS53.000 or nearest offer. D. Tan- 
gos. 3 Tsoko poulou. FBatttei, 15232 
Athens. Tek 6828920 


MYKONOS: land far corstroracw. 

7500 scun, sea view, negatabia in 

France Bor 1846. Harold Tribune, 
92521 NteuiBv Code* France 


SALONIKA new luxury Fhls. From 
415.000. Td London 01-439-3185. 


ITALY 


CALABRIA - VIUA between Gitarv 

core* 5averan, pcnonjtvc ww saa 1 

km, 3 bedreams, 2 bathrooms, 
lounge, rorage. Price indu*tq farm- 
rue and fitted kitchen SaMWO Tek 
I mb <8 67 6529. 


SMALL RENAISSANCE erode. Tusca- 
ny 30 rales South Florence Courf- 
ysrd. qardca 70«rc w«d & akves, 
tveepfiand view. Write Romcgnrt. 
Via L Larotacd 33. Florence, tt»y. 


MONTE CARLO 
Prindqpcfity of Monaco 

SBUNG VERY EXCVIK3NAL 
APARTMENT, PATIO, 

700 sqm. private radon 
fe j i don k u l area Certwr c t Iowa odnv 
300 scldi. String space, large entrance, 
large reception, fibrarv, diiing, TV 
roam, 4 bedrooms, 3 bains, 1 room for 
staff with bath, spacious nwdrat fuBy 
equipped kridwn, 1 Iroge spae room, 
vmm offira, large aresang roam, 
parage. I lidi dass service: 

Air corafikantru, efedric bind s, etc. 
EXCLUSIVE AG&4CE MTBUW 8 DIA 
RP.S4 

MC 98001 MONACO CHJEX 
Tet 193) 50 66 84 
lot; 460477 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


Prindpafity of Monaco 

RARE OWORIUWn f 

Luxurious vffo tocaled one block from 
the tea 4 wShin 5 mm. weft from lacwi 
Hotel, Carino 4 Hotel de Paris. A verita- 
ble paface Louis XVI style an lOjOOO 

3 ft kni Fabulous bring areas. 3 brv- 
; with elevdar. Mobled Boars, large 
recepban room, music room, cfrnmg 
room far 20 gut 5 tv Central rumble ft 
bras Jtevrcose. 6 kuge bedrooms with 
ensmte modern barie. staff quarters, 
garage, landscaped garden Define 
deccrdkm 4 vakrabto pasimas. 

For dl nforraarian 4 brochure ptecse 
ad fatina agent: 

JOHN TAYLOR 4 SON 
20 Bed. dee Moufin. Made C«fo 
Tab (93) 50 30 70 
lot 469130 


Imp nme par Offprini. "J rue de !' Evan vie. 7 5018 Paris. 


MONTE CARLO 
Prinapa&fy of Monaco 

Far sofa in luxurious modern residence, 
pleasant 2 roams wih logdq, sea view, 
equipped kitchen, both, W1C, odor. 


i AC&tCE INIBMBXA 
R.P. 54 
MC 98001 MONACO (S3EX 
Teb (93) 50 66 84 

ltc: 4W477 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


VRbh Affifi nero 

CHAMPS B.YSH5 

7 ROOMS. 250 sqjn. 3 reew i bons 
+ 4 bedrooms, 2 bevhs. Vww an 
g e den. ctk_2 mcifi rooms 
Pro* Fiainjno 

- 5 ROOMS, 22S sqjn, largo Bring 
+ 3 bedroamv 2 btihLasfin 
2 mauTi rooms. F3£OOJX)0. 

D. FEAU 294 20 00 

132 £d Homikim 75008 Port* 


XVUth AVE Nia 

5TH HjOOR ON BALDCRfY 

vrewftswarr 

Entrance hoS, dining, Ivina, equipped 

Uehea WC bathragm . J beorara, 
mod’s mam. PERFECT CONDITION 
Office hours 627 91 41 
Home 763 33 13 


BOUGIVAL 

View an Seine, cha rm, perfect and- 
ean, beautiful r e cteft o n + 4/5 reams, 
3 baths + independent mead's roam, 
garage. 2350 sqjn garden oB around. 

LARGO 265.18-83 


94 JOMV1UE nev Mare Rner, own- 

er safe fagti doss house. Decorated, 
furnisted. ground 800 *, entrance, 50 
iq.m strion, btdten, laundry roam, 
drutg. 35 sqjn Wmg. large nrafoce. 

bay-wmdows, tarKtoma goraen 600 
sqjn, large pond first Door bed- 
room, terrace 25 suit, bah + Pudks. 
Grocge. FI JQQJ00- Wi 886-32-70. 


MONIRBUL W MIfttITB PARS. 3- 

Icwri high drss buidmg. 150 sqm. 
each. V broom apartiwete free now 

&CDraroerool premaes free end May 

1986. F10/M0 ner rafam/menth. Gar- 

den with trees- 150 sqjn, garage. 
FI.9M.MftM,. SALES, 18 an SK 

heibe, 931Q0 MoneeiJ. France 


ARCHnECTURE. 

SUPERB HOUSBOAT 
hub in 1580. 130 tqm., fitepface. sun- 

^n'SSW’Tt 


ctam Seire, beautiful 

wew. hare & gpdeo. 620 sqjn, 7 
roams, 3 brehs.z-ca garoge. 4 mins 
by cor ©L Tet (3) Q7M83& 


l6fh near BOB DE BOULOGNE. 

prefeiuliy owner fa owwvbeoiAfu 
e pa tment , sun, (tout 350 sun, 
large reception. Price to be negcwA- 
•d. write with spur phone amnr lb 
Bon 1819, Herat] Tifttun, 92521 
NeuBy Cedes. France. 


PARS 6 Hi ST. GOMAINfoBml, own- 
er sels in ronovat u d buictng. Bind 
piodoterre with dnacter. JroOTO, 

s rigfisaiftftsr'as 

Neu 8 y Ceaiw. France 


71H OPPOSITE PAGODA. By Owner, 
desirebte 3rtxm o pulum, gand 

■uV, nrrowce, wno qwa, war w 

sqm. RwljOOa. VW between 2 end 5 
5r* <»irf San 68 roe de Bofeyfane. 


PARC ROYAL 

in Townhouse, hiwious 2/3 roams. 
FI ,650,000. Tel 723 72-5B Ext 422. 


dOKMSOUmflfUaS. Becepliondan 

Seine bra*. 5 ninules AMut, in quota 
aid vflqge. romarfic 1920 Houml 6 


6063 5060/8538 


roomn 03 sq ja. • 
sqjn. lot F7B0JQ0L 


6 Gi LATM QUASIHI, owner sob du- 
plex of great charm. fiviM + 2 bod- 

rnam^Sfiy equipped latdtovt 

fireplace, wony. F 9 W 00 a Tet 
ends & evunexp 354 35 


week- 


SPAIN 


DREAM F OR SALE 

Mutysfkent Ihroe bedroemfed, air 
comtoned vSa far sde. Recently reno- 
vated la high est order, wbb superb 
swinaning pad, mature gardens, temis 
co urt, saunc^ stabfag &sepuiM staff 
qiKrters rad tiocr to frehiradble Son 
Pedro difricl of Afe.befo in fhe Casta 
del SaL 

Modem 4 FcAy equipped kddteCL three 

bdhrocxte, large storage tana rustic 
bar and a covered barbncuu/cbing 
area and is buBt on a 8 AM square 
meter plat vrithia easy roach of ihe seq, 
m o uLl uea, shop & Puerto Barn*, the 
irtomalionri leisure Marino 
Prism Freehold rad faBjr fonfahed to 
hi^iret stradord. Skvfag pounds 
50WOQ 

ffatg for mfcr m olion or rapo i a l n i w R 
to view: Mdoga teL 7W136 
Tefoer 776S zUSO E 


STATELY COUNTRY HOUSwilb ra- 
don, 18 roam* marbte floa% + JflH 
ovKury historic Cadio, good ajndtffal 
with guard4iouss & $Mss + 292 
acres of 1st dm irrigated Irad. Doa- 
ble river frontage, an loaned 8 mites 
m lend from world fanow Gwa 
Brora with airport & yudtf hartxjr 
neerby. Estate located in raley, dxo- 

firte piracy. Bredwre uran request, 

rfrect from owner. B ax 280 . Hereddi 
Padro Teixeira 84D, 28020 Madrid. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


TtMCMG ABOUT BETUttG ei 
Span* Sffrnfididea, 9 you ere head- 
ing for MateSa - Guta dd Sail 
Contact a* We buy, sell, nut, con- 
struct, vita* end apretnetas, beoefv 
■de, m the mauatani and on the raft 
We are rather sure to hove got whed 
you era looUra for rad if net vwsl 
produce 3 for yaul fltOMOIL® * 
Apartado 118, Marbela Span Tbe 
77610 OTUR E TheBBT- Property 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


TS OFF ROM YOUR nONT -ra 
kikfiart doorf in GwxUnina GoE 

MrabeQq me heme far rant or sdfc 

vBa, incomparady nia fha^ tom - ft 
penthauwH with ooeat vim*, rice »r- 
roundans ft i n temafionrf reridenls 
raound, beppify Fvmg toe easy Gi*> 
dafintawwoMlB. Mwiralion: 
PBOMOIIJR - Apartado 118 - Mor- 
beBa- 5pan. Tbo 77610 OTUR E~the 
BEST Propery Peopte", 


MARBBIA 11 KM. AtapAwt 264 

sqm. riBa 180 soa terroce, 2.175 
sqm, lovay sedated grounds + can 
loot. 5 bee*. 3 baths. docL paraai 

iSiar 600 m. beach, 8 Ion gbit 
US$225,000- Sun V i s, C/ finfanda 
' " “tjaa^MadteBa, Spain. Toll 


, . , -Gdf. 

beach, 1-bedracm to US* . 
Studio USS12jM0. 3-bedromi 
US$19JD0L ibedawn USS50D0Q. 
Co ne on od l ocation s, suitifoie hedlh 


SOUTHBW SRAM LA MANGA- 

Out bedroom condr^ M fnrrehed 
vg i i tarooejwwfoo fatg toe^ ocean. 

toe. $39/ul Ban 1854. HonJdTn- 
bune, 92521 NeuDy Cede*. Frraci 


■ POKTUGAL | 

PROramB THROUGHOUT 

ora pranofed » to IMed 
ft mocfiiMly through George I 


SWITZEBLAND 


swnmAND 

FAMOUS RE50RT AREA 


DO YOU WISH - 

• TO BUY AN APARTMENT 
OR A HOUSE? 

• TO RETIRE N SWITZBIAM* 

• TO INVEST IN SWITZERLAND 

CONTACT Ufa 25 YEARS OF EXPOS- 

B<E IN BJtDfNG AM) SBLUNG 

FINE SWISS REAL STATE 

SODiMSA. 

P.a Bra 62, 

1884 YBon, SwfizedonL 
The 456213 GESE CH 


GST A AD 
VALLEY 

YOCJR INVESTMENT IN 
SWITZERLAND 

We ore wSog wty exduhm & com- 
fartifole homes wRh 2 to 5 targe roams. 

Die cow ubx of 3 chalets is located 
dose to <ne heart of (fit vnage wAh a 
brec4hrtaidnq vtew over the ft dupes ft 
foe wide vtsBey. 

A comprthaisM range of servion "A 
la Ccrte’, such as reratenance, iervic- 
fag, hamg 4 managemart is mtdabie. 

Far farther inforetafion or 
ra appointment, cfcoso corttodr 
On Sfa s (8») 4 52 49 

pCaza Go*Sraucnons 
RUE DO RHONE 100 
04-1204 GENEVA d 
Teb (022) 21 60 44. The 421TJ, 


GSTEIG 

GeSaad 20 whmffSmmtm 90 ntas 

or Kvag iv wWiRncaL 
3 double bedroomL 2 brohroorns, 1 
Irage fivmgraoni vrith bdoony, 1 mod- 
em finny k&chen 1 entronae hal 1 

Mutpitnit muthfaang 

views. Far kromabott 
es Werre n. ImnmLCm * 
C34-S78DG5TAAD, 

Teb VWAA2M 


VALAIS / SWnZBLAND 

aUN5 MONTANA 
THYON, l£5 OOUON5 
ST. IOC VAL D'AMBVBB 
Ftats and dxtots 25 to 193 sqjn, 1 to 5 
rooBB. Cre* 60*. (merest rate 6J9X. 
Cfaration 15 gporo Owners buAWs. 

, VAL PROMOTION SA 
10 Aml do MfitCH-19» Skm, 
Teb 41-533 34 95 


APARTMENTS - CHALETS 

Awftt bfo P urd kne by » 

Prion from SFTbSo. Mortgages tf 
<B» etarost Write: 

GUME MANIA. 

Aw. MocvRepo* 24 
OH^IOOS ksKuws, Swiiradand 
Tek P2IJZ2 35jZ TftZSTffi MHfS Oi 
1970 ' 


4T -V 


'-si 


w . — . -ta-. 

h • . s’ 

i; - • •*. • 


Kr.;: 


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; 


PAGE 15 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW CXJST FLIGHTS 


USA «Jc 


EAST COAST FROM 
MID WBTROM 
WEST COAST FROM 

SOUTH EAST FROM 

Aw ire here to gnrwhere 
in USA on B&AMR? £95 

NATC London 734 8100 


£119 
£160 
£21 Z 
£195 


$2269 FIRST CLASS round the world. 

Also Stood low Concorde fares. FuR 
detofc Dun6s Trowel, London 01) 
4889011. 


NY ONE WAY $150. Everyday MY. . 
MfetfCtadSuP. Paris 2&P29CL 


HOLIDAYS ft TRAVEL 


CHAJtmt A YACHT M GRSCE. Di- 

rect ham owner of fargea toe. 

sa s^sae &JjS 

jmifib’tBiWfibt-- 


nEnur«ManwawB,ftn 

■ 4 eaureryride with era rad guide. 
SrastemviTaA 77 72 Paris. 


MIMS YAOffiNG- Yadd Oratw. 

■Amdemira 28. Athens 10671. Greece 


TUSCANY, wine .fam to, rgAPfar- 
ancAi padJ Mis, Mnch i3Q9093. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


NORTH SCOTTISH HK3HLANDS 





*™ t SSZ^8 nLM * 

MTHEWBraNEt'sECIKM 1 


PROVENCE VBVtmiAbd. Avalon, 

cSa/wedt.TeiICT^)N7B83067. 



ta let et rortugets Algarve, Brraes- 
meaped 4 tuner country, forir 

ograrctedtableTefi UK09QU14272, 

or 614367. 


HOTELS 


FRANCE 


WJW-PWMfotoau***NN,T0 


HOTELS 

FRANCE ' 

PAJOS-HOIH. DUMMY-', __ 

• w <anoHBBa.ii laKST -Of rav. 

Catwrie / Tderies. Gain 4ra 
From-FS&O. 3 rw Mont Thobor. 
lit Teb 2M 32 80. Uto 213492*1 


GREAT BRITAIN 


Ain i 

dryer, etc. fta touron t / bar / 1 




DTOXB1 HOUSE 2 » stool. ro«S: 


HOLLAND 



/ 






1