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The Global Newspaper 

WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 14 

No- 31,735 


INTERNATIONAL 




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PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


U.K. Strike Weakens 
As Miners Vote to Go 
Back in 4 Coalfields 


The Asu'ciuteJ Press 

LONDON — Four key mining 
regions, including one of 'the most 
militant. South Wales, voted Fri- 
day for their national union to or- 
der a mass return to work, ac- 
knowledging that there was no 
hope of winning Britain's 51 -week 
coal strike. 

Arthur Scargill, president of the 
National Union of Mineworkers. 
said the strike would end if dele- 
gates io a union conference on Sun- 
day voted in favor or a return to 
work without a settlement. But. he 
said in a television interview, the 
dispute over planned mine closures 
‘will go on." 

Michael Eaton, chief spokesman 
for the National Coal Board, said 
on the same program that it was 
“highly likely miners will return to 
work next week." 

Asked if the union had lost the 
strike. Mr. Eaton replied: **I think 
the coal industry- has lost." 

The votes by union leaders in 
South Wales, Scotland and the 
northern England counties of Lan- 
cashire and Durham increased 
pressure on the union conference to 
send Lhe remaining strikers back to 
work without a settlement. 

Emlyn Williams, the leader in 
South Wales, where 80 percent of 
the 20.000 miners are still on strike, 
said: "A return under leadership is 
better than a drift bade where the 
leadership will have been destroyed 
by the numbers going back." 

The National Coal Board report- 
ed that 1,510 more miners aban- 
, doned the strike Friday, bringing to 
\ . nearly 10.000 the number who went 
back to work during the week. That 
was the highest weekly total since 
the strike began March 12 to pro- 
test the planned closure of 20 mon- 
ev-iosing mines and the elimination 
of 20.000 jobs. 

The coal board says that more 


than 96.000. or 52 percent, of the 
National Union of Mineworkers' 
186.000 members have abandoned 
the strike, nearly a third of them 
since the beginning of this year. 

On Friday, leaders io Yorkshire, 
the home county of Mr. Scarp U. 
voted to continue the strike, but 
they were scheduled to meet again 
Saturday. Yorkshire is (he biggest 
coal county in Britain. Four-fifths 
of its 50,000 miners are still on 
strike, although they are retumhig 
steadily. 

A return to work without a set- 
tlement would mark a bitter end to 
the longest national strike in Brit- 
ish history. 

Some managers fear hit-and-run 
disruption tactics and fights under- 
ground between bard-Une miners 
and those who abandoned or who 
never joined the strike. 

Sid Vincent, a Lancashire leader, 
said at his headquarters in Bolton: 
“What the coal board has done is 
ruined this industry and the indus- 
trial relations situation which used 
ro be as bappy as any in country." 

He acknowledged that 5,000 of 
the 6,200 Lancashire miners had 
gone back to work. 

Since Mr. Scargill rejected an of- 
fer by the coal board last month, 
his options have narrowed rapidly. 

The union's 120 delegates who 
wiU meet Sunday are faced with (he 
choice of continuing with an appar- 
ently inevitable gradual collapse of 
the strike or of salvaging their au- 
thority by ordering a return to 
work. 

Energy Secretary Peter Walker, 
in a radio interview, said that last 
month's offer was the last that Mr. 
Scargill “will get." 

The offer left the final decision 
on mine closures with the coal 
board — the fundamental issue of 
the strike. 














Th» N*w Tori Tims 

Huckleberry Finn, in a drawing by Edward Windsor 
Kemble that illustrated the novel's first edition in 1884. 

When a President Finds 
The Moral in Hack Firm 


By Lawrence Feinberg 

Washington Pasi Service 

WASHINGTON — “We 
catch ed fish and talked, and we 
took a swim now and (hen to 
keep off sleepiness," President 
Ronald Reagan said. “It was 
kind of solemn, drifting down 
the big, still river.” 

In die ballroom of the Wash- 
ington Hilton Hotel, the presi- 
dent was reading Thursday 

President Reagan defends 
school aid cuts. Page 3. 

from “The Adventures of 
Huckleberry Finn.” 

Mark Twain's novel, pub- 
lished in 1884, has been both 
f hailed as an American classic 
v scornful of bigotry and criii- 
1 cized as racist. 

1 On Thursday, Mr. Reagan 
said he had read it in school He 
said the book, about the mis- 
- chievous Huck and his friend 
Tun, a runaway slave, floating 
down the Mississippi River on a 
raft, epitomized values that 
American schools should be 
leaching. 

“Huck works hard to keep 
Jim free, and in the end be suc- 
ceeds,” Mr. Reagan told the 
National Association of Indo- 
iv pendent Schools, a private 
school group. "I believe the 
book says much about the mor- 
al aims of education, about the 
qualitiesof bean that we seek to 
impart to our children." 

He said students at private 
schools, as well as at public 


ones, "should not only learn ba- 
sic subjects, but basic values.” 
The values to be taught, Mr. 
Reagan said, should include 
“the importance of justice, 
equality, religion, liberty and 
standards of right and wrong." 

In 1982. “Huckleberry Finn” 
was at the center of a dispute in 
Fairfax County. Virginia, when 
a junior high school named af- 
ter Mark Twain sought to re- 
move the book from its curricu- 
lum. A committee of the Mark 
Twain Intermediate School said 
the book was racist because of 
its demeaning portrayal of 
blacks and its Liberal use' of the 
word “nigger." 

Senior Fairfax administra- 
tors overruled the decision. But 
last summer the book was re- 
moved from school reading lists 
in WaukeegetL Illinois. 

“Much of what Reagan says 
is true." said Doris Grumbach. 
a professor at American Uni- 
versity in Washington and a 
former literary editor of the 
New Republic “But why would 
Huck run away if he was appre- 
ciative or life in America? He 
wants to be wild and free, to 
smoke when he pleases and not 
go to school" 

Professor Grumbach agreed 
that Huck “does have a purity 
of heart, but the point is that 
this boy knows more about hu- 
man good and evil than any 
schoolboy would ” 

"Mark Twain." she said, 
"had a deeply held belief that 
education doesn’t matter a bit." 


Shultz, 
Ortega 
To Meet 

Talks in Uruguay 
Will Focus on 
Peace Process 


Compiled fn Our Staff From Dispatches 

MONTEVIDEO. Uruguay — 
President Daniel Onega Saavedra 
af Nicaragua and the U.S. secre- 
tary of state, George P. Shuliz. will 
meet Saturday to discuss the possi- 
bility of reviving Central American 
peace negotiations. U.S. officials 
iaid Friday. 

Mr. Ortega and Mr. Shultz are in 
Uruguay for the inauguration of 

Uruguay has returned to civilian 
rule, but issue of political prison- 
ers remains divisive. Page 5. 

President Julio Maria Sanguineiti. 

The Nicaraguan leader offered 
Wednesday to order the withdraw- 
al of 100 Cuban military advisers 
and freeze the acquisition of weap- 
ons systems to encourage a re- 
sumed dialogue with Washington. 
He and Mr. Shultz later both ex- 
pressed interest in discussions on 
the subject 

The Reagan administration im- 
mediately dismissed the overture as 
insignificant and containing “a lot 
of air." It said, however, that Ma- 
nagua's move was evidence that 
U.S. policy of pressuring the San- 
dinist government was working. 

U.S. congressional leaders react- 
ed cautiously to Mr. Ortega’s Invi- 
tation to send a delegation of law- 
makers for an on-the-spot study of 
what Mr. Onega called "the defen- 
sive character of our country’s 
armed forces and defense systems." 

Mr. Shultz, on his way to Uru- 
guay. said he was skeptical that Mr. 
Onega’s proposals were a sincere 
effon to meet U.S. concerns but 
added that he was prepared to “lis- 
ten carefully’' to Nicaragua's views. 

He called the withdrawal of 100 
Cubaas a “token” gesture because 
"several thousand" Cuban military 
advisers were based in Nicaragua. 

Mr. Shultz and Mr. Ortega met 
in Managua in June and agreed to 
open a dialogue to ease tensions. 
Alter 10 meeting between U.S. and 
Nicaraguan officials, the United 
States suspended the dialogue 
pending an evaluation of Nicara- 
gua’s sincerity in negotiating a set- 
tlement with its neighbors in the 
Contadora peace process. 

The Contadora mediation effort, 
carried out by Venezuela. Mexico, 
Panama and Colombia, was sus- 
pended last month after a dispute 
between Costa Rica and Nicaragua 
over a political asylum case. 

Nicaragua has called U.S. sus- 
pension of the dialogue proof of its 
aggressive intentions and blamed 
the United States for the break- 
down of the meetings of the Conta- 
dora group. 

In Washington. Richard G. Lu- 
gar. the Indiana Republican who is 
chairman of the Senate Foreign Re- 
lations Committee, and Represen- 
tative Steven J. Solarz. a New York 
Democrat, said Friday that Con- 
gress was unlikely to grant a Rea- 
gan administration request for 5 14 
million in covert aid to anti-San- 
dinist rebels. 

The administration ran out of 
money last year to finance its co- 
vert assistance program to the re- 
bels. Congress refused to provide 
more money until at least this 
month, and then said that the ad- 
ministration could ask for only half 
the $28 million it originally sought 
for the 1985 fiscal year. 

A coalition of Nicaraguan oppo- 
sition leaders are to bold a press 
conference in Costa Rica this week- 
end to announce a plan of political 
action. 

Some of the opposition leaders 
have been feuding for years. The 
best-known rebel leader. Eden Pas- 
tors Gomez, said he was upset that 
he had not been asked to join the 
group in San Jose, the Costa Rican 
capitaL (AP. WP. UP/. ,V}Tl 



Peres Calls Egypt Effort 
"By and Large Positive’ 


President Daniel Ortega Saavedra of Nicaragua lifts a 
Uruguayan girl after addressing a crowd that vrelcomed him 
to Montevideo for Uruguay’s presidential inauguration. 


Economic Index in U.S. 
Soared 1.7 % in January 


By Jane Seaberry 

Washington Past Sen tee 

WASHINGTON — The govern- 
ment's main barometer of future 
economic activity jumped 1.7 per- 
cent in January, the sharpest in- 
crease in 20 months and an indica- 
tion that the economic rebound is 
underway. 

The Index of Leading Economic 
Indicators, which is intended to 
forecast economic activity about 
six months ahead, had dropped 0.5 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age rose 1535 points to ciose at 
a record high 139936. Fag£ 8. - 

percent in December after several 
months of erratic behavior, leading 
some economists to doubt that the 
rebound. from sluggish growth last 
fall would be very strong. 

On Friday, however, many econ- 
omists said the leading indicators 
confirmed other recent government 
reports pointing toward relatively 
strong economic growth, at least 
for the first half or 1985. Many 
economists are forecasting grow th 
from 4 percent to 5 percent for the 
first quarter after a surprisingly 
strong 4.9 percent increase in uie 
fourth quarter. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baldrige said: “After declining 
during the second half of 1984. the 
sharp pickup in January's leading 
index is a reassuring sign for the 
economy. Current data show re- 
newed upward momentum in em- 
ployment and output." 

■ But Mr. Baldrige added a word 
of caution. “While the index is 
pointing to continued growth." he 
said, “tiie recent strength in the 
foreign exchange value of the dol- 
lar may have a negative influence 
by contributing to price declines in 
sensitive industrial materials and- 
by diverting capital goods orders to 
foreign producers. - 

Economistssaid the leading indi- 
cators showed that consumer de- 
mand is still very strong. However, 
they echoed Mr. Baldrige's senti- 
ments. saying businesses and con- 
sumers may continue to buy large 
volumes of imports and thereby 
reduce domestic production. 

One of the key leading indica- 
tors. contracts and orders for plant 
and eouipmem. declined in Janu- 
ary following erratic changes in the 
previous several months. In addi- 


tion, another government statistic 
measuring new orders for nonde- 
fense capital goods, plunged sharp- 
ly in January. 

Some economists, such as David 
Jones of Aubrey Lanston securities 
dealers, said that the unveiling of 
the Treasury Department's tax re- 
form plan last November could 
have made businesses uncertain 
concerning the tax effects of their 
new purchases. 

In addition. Mr. Jones said, 
many businesses are purchasing 
equipment from foreign suppliers 
that, because of the rising value of 
die d 'liar, aril able to offerTes 
expensive capital goods. 

One of the strongest positive 
showings in January was the 8.1 
percent jump in new orders for 
consumer products and materials 
that cover industries accounting for 
more than 40 percent of industrial 
production. Mr. Baldrige said. 
That category has inched upward 
in recent months. 


U.S. Is Ready 
To Re-enter 
Peace Process 

By Bernard 'Gwcrtzman 

Ne*> York Times Semre 

WASHINGTON —The United 
States has expressed readiness "to 
re-engage in the peace process” in 
the Mideast in any way the Arabs 
and Israelis think appropriate. 

The statement Thursday was (he 
Reagan administration’s mast ex- 
plicit one to date on its willingness 
to play a more active negotiating 
role since diplomatic activity began 
to pick up m the Middle East in 
recent days. 

But adminis tration officials cau- 
tioned that they still bad many 
questions about the feasibility of 
undertaking a new initiative at this 
time, given the apparent dissension 
in Arab ranks, and particularly the 
strong possibility that the Palestine 
liberation Organization wfl] not 
support the idea of direct negotia- 
tions with Israel endorsed in recent 
days by Egypt and Israel 

For months. Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz has resisted calls 
by various Middle East figures to 
inaugurate a new peace effort. 

Still upset at what be perceived 
as the failure of the Arabs to sup- 
port his May 1983 accord between 
Israel aad Lebanon — later 
dropped by Lebanon under pres- 
sure from Syria — Mr. Shultz fell 
the United States should move only 
when the Arabs stated their readi- 
ness for direct talks with IsraeL 

State Department and senior of- 
ficials in the administration are 
now saying that there is enough 
movement in the region to raise the 
possibility that UJS. involvement 
might be useful. President Hosni 
Mubarak of Egypt has suggested a 
possible meeting in Washington of 
the Israelis and a joint Joraanian- 
Palestinian delegation. 

Richard W. Murphy, assistant 
secretary of state for Near Eastern 
and South Asian affairs, said this 
was a. possibility. - ■ 

“We’re ready to get moife active- 
ly engaged if the parties that have 
to be engaged are ready to do so.” 
he told a congressional committee. 

Unlike past years when the Unit- 
ed States cook the initiative in Mid- 
dle East negotiations. Stale De- 
portment officials said there was no 
urgency to do so now. There is no 
fear of an Arab oO cutoff, as there 
was in the 1970s. and U.S. relations 




Shimon Peres 

with Land and most Arab coun- 
tries are^good. 

The State Department said it 
was pleased by the high-level meet- 
ings ndd between Egypt and Israel 
and the comments by Mr. Mubarak 
and Prime Minister Shimon Peres 
of Israel in favor of direct talks 
between Israel and a Jordanian- 
Rafestmim delegation. 

Edward P. Djerejian, a Stale De- 
partment spokesman, said: "The 
United States is prepared to re- 
engage in the peace process when- 
ever the parties are ready and in 
whatever manner they deem appro- 
priate.” 

Senior administration officials, 
however, warned that there was' 
considerable uncertainty whether 
the cafl for direct talks — initiated 
by Mr. Mubarak and seconded by 
Mr. Peres — could be accepted by 
King Hussein of Jordan, who has 
entered into his own, somewhat 
ambiguous agreement with the 
PLO leader, Yjsser Arafat. 

The Jordanian-PLO accord did 
not call for direct talks with Israel, 
rather for negotiations to be con- 
ducted in an international forum, 
including the Soviet Union and the 
other permanent members of the 
UN Security Council. ; 

Mr. Mubarak, aware that the 
United States and Israel would ac- 
cg^pnly direct taDcsagd rejeettbe : 
Triteaiatibnal conference idea, said 
last Sunday said that there shoold 
be direct talks first, with the inter- 
national conference to be convened 
only to ratify any agreements. 

Mr. Murphy told the House sub-' 
committee on Europe and the Mid- 
dle East that “(here are questions 
about the Hussan-Arafat agree- 
ment, perhaps more questions than 
answers for tie moment.” 


But Israelis 
Rqect Part of 
MubarakPkai 

By Jim Hoagland 
and Edward Walsh 

Washington Past Semen 

JERUSALEM — - Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres tried Friday to 
keep alive a high-level dialogue 
with President Hosni Mubarak of 
Egypt alive as be rejected a signifi- 
cant portion of Mr.Mnbarak’s ini- 
tiative to start new Middle East 
peaceniks. 

Praising Mr. Mubarak's efforts 
as “by and large positive." Mr. 
Poes said in an interview that the 
week’s intensive contacts between 
Egyptian and Israeli officials have 
produced an opening for improv- 
ing bilateral relations and have 
turned "an icy situation into a dia- 
logue situation." . 

He pledged to work for "an hon- 
orable solution" to a continuing 
Egyptian-lsradi territorial dispute 
over the tiny Red Sea resort of 
Taba. 

' But in comments . that dispdfed 
much of the confusion and con- 
flicting assessments that have sur- 
rounded Mr. Mubarak’s sudden 
initiative, Mr. Peres disclosed that 
he had told Egyptian envoys who. 
came to Jerusalem that he could 
not accept Mr. Mubarak’s proposal 
for a three-stage negotiation that 
would begin with direct talks be- 
tween the United States and a joint 

Iftr riaitinn - RatoifinFan delegation. 
The delegation would indudesup- 
porters of the Palestine Liberation 
Organization, which Israel has al- 
ways refused to deal with. 

"The problem is hat to make 
peace between Jordan, and the 
United Slates.” but between Jor- 
dan and Israel, Mr. Peres said, who 
repeated his interest in opening di- 
rect negotiations with Jordan how; 

Leaving Israd oat of such talks, 
he added, would amount to a new 
attempt by the Arab side to per- 
suade Washington “tocomnBt the 
United States on behalf Of load 
and twist Israel’s aim.” ; 

*T said bo to this," he said. 

Both leaders suggested in sepa- 
rate interviews this week that the 
[red fonts of die Sony of conversa- 
tions has been-Egyptian-lsrarii re- 
lations, with the talks about the 
joint Arab’ delegation serving large- 
ly as a vehicle to probe each other's 

(Continued on Page 2, <3oL 1) 


Deficit Reduction Fails First Test in U.S. Congress 


By Jonathan Fuerbringtr 

,VfK- Ycrk Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — On the first poefcetbook 
issue of the year, the U.S. Senate and House of 
Representatives have voted to spend more mon- 
ey. not less. 

The farm lobby's success in pushing through 
expanded e'nergency assistance programs could 
encourage many other groups to fight to defend 
their programs from the Reagan administra- 
tion's proposals to freeze domestic spending. 
And it could further undermine efforts to cut 
the federal deficit. 

However, the issue is far from settled. 

The legislation — which would liberalize 
credit terms for fanners in debt, provide $100 
million for interest subsidies and speed process- 
ing of the aid — is expected to be vetoed by 
President Ronald Reagan once it is passed by 
Congress, probably next wed:. 

The effect of the veto could be to push the 
deficit-reduction issue to the fore, with the pres- 
ident directly enlisted in the fight to pare the 
budget. 

The votes oa the farm program illustrate the 
divided feelings and lack of will in Congress 
when it comes to reducing the budget at the 
expense of politically popular programs. The list 
of supporters of the farm credit program includ- 
ed some of the more prominent budget-cutters 
in both houses. 

Senators Charles E Grassley, Republican of 


Iowa, and Mark Andrews, Republican of North 
Dakota, for example, have been major propo- 
nents of a budget freeze. Representative James 
R- Jones, Democrat of Oklahoma, is the former 
Budget Committee chairman and Representa- 
tive Leon E Panetta, Democrat of California, is 
one of the House’s most respected advocates of 
balanced reductions of the deficit. 

All four voted for the farm program. 

While proponents and opponents argued over 

NEWSANALYSB ^ 

bow much the program would cost, it was dear 
that the votes were a signal for more spending as 
opposed to cutting the deficit 

In the House, where their package was passed 
Wednesday on a 318-103 vote, many Democrats 
believed that in the farm issue, and probably 
other issues such as education, they have found 
a chink in Mr. Reagan’s armor. 

“They have fumbled on this,” sad Represen-, 
tative Tony Coelho of California, the chairman 
of the Democratic Congressional Campaign 
Committee. “He is creating an opportunity for 
Democrats in congressional races, in stale bouse 
races, in senatorial races in 1 986. They're hurt- 
ing themselves." 

The effect of all this seems to be a lessening of 
the sentiment and courage needed to pass deficit 
reduction measures. 

“All the signals are wron& n said Mr. Jones. : 


“There’s not the kind of action going on Tor real 
deficit reduction right now.” . .. . - •• 

Mr. Panetla added: "It isn’t the best of sig- 
nals to start off with. Sure. it sends a signal to 
other constituencies that if they yell toad 
mough they can fall in line.” 

But he said the vote was justified: “This is a 
crisis and you have to respond to it." 

Senator Robert J. Dole of Kansas, the major- 
ity leader, who opposed the farm measures, said 
Thursday. “It’s probably not the best signal to 
send to anyone looking to us for deficit reduc- 
tion. It’s just the opposite." 

. But, he added, “It’s nor fatal.” 

Mr. Dole said he hoped that Mr. Reagan’s 
promised veto of the measure, and a Senate vote 
upholding the veto, would send the obrrect mes- 
- sage- The majority leader- said Thursday that he 
was “110 percent” sure of the veto and that he 
had more than enough votes in lhe Senate to 
sustain it. • • •. . 

. Democratic leaders in the House, moved 
Thursday to dear the way so such a veto could 
be tested. They decided to accept the version of . 
the farm package approved by the Senate, which 
means it will not have to go to a conference 
committee, where opponents might have tried to 
kill the package. 

_ The episode overall reveals the.damage done 
by the refusal of the White House, so far, to 
back tfad Senate RepuMicaris in. their highly 
touted effort to put together a deficit-reduction 
(Condoned ob Page 2, 0>L7) 


Naples Seeks to Uncover Treasures , Replace Image of Squaloi 


By EJ. Dionne Jr. 

New York Times Service 

NAPLES — This city has a reputation for 
crime, violence, gangs, traffic, pollution, 
smuggling and disorganization raised to the 
level of principle. City governments seem to 
collapse every few months, and artworks are 
allowed to decay in crumbling churches and 
palaces. 

The image of squalor is pervasive, and 
many Neapolitans, asked about their city, 
will rattle off a list of ills and then shrug their 
shoulders. 

The shrug comes less from despair than 
resignation, in the last decade, there were the 
tragedies of a cholera epidemic and an earth- 
quake. 

Yet many here insist that if all this is true, 
so is its opposite: Few places have such a rich 
artistic and intellectual tradition or such a 
boisterous street life — all of it set on a 
mountainside that drops off into crystal 
Mediterranean waters. 

"My Naples is the Mediterranean city that 
is in the splendor of the sun." said Raffaele 
La Capri a, a novelisi who has set his work 
here, “and the splendor is there like a sort of 
accusation against the misery of the town." 

Some Neapolitans are getting angry that 
only the misery survives in the public mind. 


One of the reasons the bad name endures 
is the extent to which the city’s treasures are 
hidden or ignored. 

“This is a place of discoveries." said Carlo 
Knight, a Naples-born businessman who has 
retired to dedicate his life to academic pur- 
suits and to the smjggle to restore the city’s 
cultural legacy. “It’s not a place that serves 
you things on a plate. You have to conquer 


the lime has come to treat their city like die 
cultural center it once was. 

Paolo Amalfi tano, a professor of litera- 
ture, is also part of this group, and be is on 
the board of Naples 99, a foundation that 
has dedicated itself to restoring some of the 
city’s monuments to a decent state. The “99” 
is for 1999 as well as 1799. the year of a failed 
revolution. 


Naples is r in the splendor of the sun and the splendor is like 
a sort of accusation against the misery of the town. 9 


everything, you have to find out everything 
yourself." 

The church of Sant’ .Anna dei Lombardi is 
one of many such examples. It is in the 
guidebooks, but until recently it looked left 
out. with little piles of fallen plaster and 
cobwebs scattered about. 

Off in a comer is Guido Mazzoni’s “Pie- 
ta.” a striking sculpture of Jesus and Mary 
with other mourners whose grief is captured 
** dramatically that the stames seem ready 
to move. 

Mr. Knight is part of a small but apparent- 
ly growing group of Neapolitans who think 


"In Turin or Milan or Florence or Venice, 
if you had all the things we have here, you’d 
have millions of tourists, these dungs would 
be very well known," Mr. Amalfi tano grid 
“But we’re off the beaten trade, the periph- 
ery, so no one knows." 

The foundation was founded by Maurizio 
and Nfirella Barracco. who are of old aristo- 
cratic stock and live in one of the city’s most 
beautiful villas. It is trying to gather money 
for specific projects. One such effort is tak- 
ing place at the, cloister of Santa Chiara, a 
14th-century monastery where the 
tiles that cover benches and archways in 
greens, blues and yellows have caught a mys- 


terious disease and are stowly decomposing. 

Mr. Amalfi tano said the foundation in- 
tends to remain in private hands and is 
focusing its efforts at outsiders in the hope of 
raising the money h needs and altering the 
city's unage among non-Neapolitan opinion 
leaders. Foreigners wise? have come to love 
Naples are »Im pitching in: the histori an 
Fernand Braudel, the tiov^sis Gore Vidal 
and Shirley HazzanL -the art hi»ttm»n John 
Pope-Hennessy and others. 

Aware of the dry’s reparation for corrup- 
tion, Mr. Amalfitano said the foundation 
was aeatihg situations in which donors 
would pay directly to contractors for specific 
projects. 

Insofar as they know about Naples 99, 
Neapolitans wish h welL But at lease some 
here see it as too little; too late. - 

“It’s not their fault," said Manrizio Ya- 
lenzx, a painter and a Communist who was 
mayor for eight years in the past decade. ■* 
“But ifs like a drop in the sea.* - 

Other see the organization as a symptom 
of what has been wrong- with Na»te afl ' 

along. ' 

“Naples has always been two towns Bring' 
together” said Amato Lambexti, who nms-a- 
research center for the Roman CadhoEc trade 
(Continued on Page 2, G»L 5) - * 


INSIDE 

V Britain and. Ireland con- 
demned the IRA attack in 
Northern Ireland. : ; - feg*2. 

■The White House is p ressing 
Congress to end a moratorium 
bn tne production o( chemical 
weapons. Page 3, 

ARTS & LEISURE ' 1 ■ 

■ Woody Allen’s new- 1 film, 
‘The Purple Rose dtCarroH 
may be has best ever,- Vincent , 
Canby-says. •- page 7..! 

business/finance ; I 

■ Sir James GoMsmithTs said 
to be -cookfderibg jobing Carl 
C leafin m grijing to take over 
PfarBips'PUrofemn Co. Page 9: 

MONDAY 

The US. debate over trtifitary " 
appropriations, Henry Kisan- 

§ie red isSuE <-4- how tOTriate 
defeaseantfcatPEiCQnaoI policy 
to nw^teciuwfogics. -* y 


.V f V 






r - v_ 









Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


Thatcher, FitzGerald 
Condemn IRA Attack as 
'Barbarous,’ 'Murder’ 


I'nueJ ftre tiirenuiriptlijf 

BELFAST — British and Irish 
politicians condemned on Frida\ 
an Irish Republican Army mortar 


force our deicrmi nation that the 
terrorists must never win and ter- 
rorism must be destroyed." 

Several Roman Catholics drove 


attack that killed nine police offi- past the scene of the attack and 


cere in Northern Ireland. 

The British prime minister. Mar- 


honked their car horns in jubila- 
tion. witnesses said. One woman. 


garet Thatcher, who survived an when told how many officers had 
IRA bomb explosion last October, died, replied. “Oh. there are still 
called (he attack in the border town some left then." 
of Newry on Thursday a “barba- A group of Catholic teen-agers 
rous deed.” She said it was “yet cheered the attack. “I hope they got 
another chilling reminder of the 15 of you." one youth shouted as 
sacrifices" of Northern Ireland's ambulances ferried the injured to 
police in their “fight against terror- hospitals, 
ism." The IRA is fighting a battle to 

In Dublin. Prime Minister Gar- overthrow British rule in Nonhem 
ret FitzGerald described the inci- Ireland and unite it with the pre- 
dent as “the mass murder of fellow dominantly Catholic Irish Repub- 
Irishmen." He said the IRA was lie in a socialist state, 
engaged in “the most cruel and The outlawed guerrilla organiza- 
cynical exercise carried out in this tion struck again later Thursday. 



island within living memory. 


killing a member of the Ulster De- 


The Irish Republican Army fired Tense Regiment, a local militia un- 
nine home-made mortars from a der British Army control, and 
stolen flatbed truck at the fonified wounding two others in a bomb 
police station in Newry. a predomi- blast in Pomeroy in the northwest- 
nanily Roman Catholic town on cm part of Northern Ireland, 
the border between i Northern .Ire- Michael McAtamany. deputy 

Und and the Republic of Ireland. r hj c f constable of the RovaJ Ulsiw 
One shell scored a direct hil i on a Constabulary, the police force, 
canteen where about 30 officers vowed at □ press conference Friday 
were eating. w the IRA bombers. 

Nine officers, seven men and wo . ■„ 

women, were killed and 3: people . T he ‘^jonsts responsible wUl 

were injured, one seriously. 5* ht y£ l 10 “L 4 

The IRA immediately claimed L de . b . ** ow . e u ro * h ° 

responsibility and said ihe attack ^ iheir ^ the debt we fee 1 

hJ “V»ur aWlin, nCver 


LOOTER ATTACKED — Victims of a fire in Manila beat a youth who tried to flee 
with a television set Police later arrested the looter. Thousands of people were left 
■homeless by the fire, which burned for eight hours Thursday night in the city’s crowded 
Paco district No deaths were reported hut more than a dozen people were injured. 


Bonn, Paris Reach Pact 
But Upset EC on Budget 


had demonstrated "our ability lo 
strike where and when we decide." 


A militant Protestant politician. _ BRUSSELS — France and West 


France and Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of Wesi Germany. 

The EC has been run on emer- 


Kyprianou 
Rejects Vote 
Of Censure 


The Associated Press 


D^SSTSiS!rSi Ian &h*5ltod for G~«J fin^gsincej^ L To NICOSIA - Presided Spyros 

mister for Northern Ireland, new * return of the death penalty for SS ease the financial pressure, the Mil- Kyprianou rejected Friday a car- 
om London to msnecL the scene murder. ° tertand-Kohl accord envisioned liamentary motion calling on him 


mimsterror Northern Ireland, new Community's budget problems. 

from London lo mspecL the scene ' pushing unresolved issues over the 

and to conduct an emergency meet- The Newry attack was die worst * | f s pain ^ imo 

mg with army, police and security single blow against the police force lhe f, ac v CT .t, UI1 d 

officials. The Ulster Chief Consta- in the violence that has been “oing y 

ble. Sir John Hemtoo, cut short a on since 1969. In Lhe worst single Diplomats said Friday there was 


iuuiuvi- , . . ■ ■ • icrr^uu-ivum aktuill uuuivhiui i vmiumjj ■ 

The Newry attack was the worst SjS'JTS? advance payments from member to resign because of the failure of 
single blow against the police force SHLSS?* ^ states for this year. talks with the Turkish Cypriots for 

in the violence that has been going ^ The biggest surprise was the reunification _of Cyprus.^ 

France’s agreement to block any “ r '"~ - L ' 1 


the reunification of Cyprus. 

“Even though 1 have reached the 


trip to the United Stales. incident against security 

“The effect on me and thousands soldiers were killed in a 
of others in Northern Ireland." Mr. explosion at Warrenp 
Hurd said, “will be simply to rein- Newiy, in August 1979. 


incident against security forces, 18 confusion over the meaning of the increase in EC funding until Spain conclusion that I must not alienate 


soldiers were killed in a land mine accord, which was reached at talks 
explosion at Warrenpoim, near in Paris on Thursday between Pres- 
Ncwty, in August 1979. idem Francois Mitterrand of 


and Portugal join. 


my authority, nor resign from my 


“They are wrong if they think office.” Mr. Kyprianou said in a 
this could push forward ihe en- radio and television address. “I rec- 
largement negotiations, a diplomat ognize that there is a political crisis 
said. “It could lead instead to fi- in the country. 


nancial catastrophe.'' 


“It is not with ease that I make 


SSSZSZTt 




„Pt- 


^7^ ' V 


Reaction to the French-German my choice today." he said. “I am 
accord has underlined internal di- concerned with the political crisis 
visions and revived fears that the and 1 am fully aware ofjJte conse- 
two countries are trying to domi- quences of my decision." 
nate the 10-member EC. diplomats Mr. Kyprianou. who has three 
said. years left of a five-year term, was 

Foreign ministers were dead- responding lo the parliamentary 
locked in talks Thursday on fberian censure vote of Feb. 22. approved 
entry. Thev will meet asain March 23 to 12. Eleven members of the 
17 for what they plan as a last Democratic Rally, which is pro- 
round of talks with Spanish and Western and rightist, voted against 
Portuguese negotiators. The lberi- him in rare unanimity with the 12 
an countries are scheduled lo join members of the pro-Moscow Akel 


by Jan. 1. 

The diplomats said the French- 


Communist Party. 

The motion held Mr. K\ 




German accord might harden posi- partly responsible for the failure of 
lions on enlargement, cause new the summit meeting with the Turk- 
friction over Britain's budget con- ish Cypriot leader. Rauf Denkiash. 
tribution and disrupt a possible atthe United Nations in New York 
timetable for ending the group's in January, 
cash crisis. It also demanded that Mr. Ky- 


• ^ 


Tba AuocoM Fisa 

A police officer looks over the truck from which the Irish Republican Army launched a 
mortar attack by remote control killing nine officers of the Royal Lister Constabulary'. 

Peres CaUs Mubarak Effort f Positive ’ 


anon. Mr. Peres said he decided to 


(Conthmed from Page t) anon, Mr. Peres said he decided to we kept postponing [the retaliation} 
flexibility. Taken jointly, their stress « n ^ P ublic response his to rive them achance" 
mmmmtji wipp«i thm Mr'Mubar- agreement with reports published Mr. Peres spoke a few days be- 
“aMK™ earlier in ihe weekthai^aid Mr. to. d. Isnaffi tau -U» 
track effort to improve relations Mubarak was proposing direct Is- ^ uhak Modai. is to depan for 
writh Israel and. if possible, to eet raeJi-Jordanian talks with Palesun- Waslungton for discussions on Isr 

* an participation. reel's request for increased eco- 

litical dialogue with the PLO with “The idea of meeting straightfor- nomic aid. including a proposed 

ward with a Jordanian-Palestinian special appropriation of SSOO miJ- 
On V^Sav in Cairo Mr ^legation, or a Jordanian delega- lion this year. 

Jj Sic StL as es- “ on included Palestinians — The prime minister acknowl- 
Mubarak described ^siep_as«- bw QQ( ^ PLO __ r gj a dly re . edged that the economic austerity 

S*Si.5 q l-Uh ceived it immediately ." Mr. Peres measures his goverament has taken 
to indude Israel n the mtts with ^ have not completely satisfied Rea- 

the joint Arab deleppon toasa- specified that he would agree gan administration demands for 

ratify lo such a raaetingm Cairo, tallby Cdamenatl changes ,n Disraeli 


On Wednesday, in Cairo. Mr. 

Mubarak described this step as es- 
sential to his strategy of moving on 
to indude Israel in the talks with 
the joint Arab delegation in a sec- 
ond stage and finally convening an 
international conference to ratify 

Peres indicated, was the only one ak md Mr 

m - b > Mr - P ^,Jd & 

u inHirulnn that month -old coaliuon government 

t. 8 ™ “JSS ? !z beaded by Mr. Peres to .itbdraw 

^Mamoities lo ttnprave relations lsraeU t ™>f? from » lh “ 

since Israels 1982 invasion of Leb- ^ ^ cou ^ rie 

— I by a U.S.-sponsored peace uealy 

since 1979. 

CHURCH SERVICES Mr. Peres said Israeli troops 
^ — — — ^ — J would hall the retaliatory raids and 
PAUS other harsh measures imposed on 

ambucan cathedral in Paris. 23 Ava. Shiite villages in southern Lebanon 

Gmrgi-V, 75008 Paris. Tt» Very Rev. jf Shiites Would Slop their Jt- 

Jana R. lea. O wn. M e»a SwyV or on J srae Ji iroops preparing 3 

SSTSr.S'SSre ^ w* n« stage of the nithdranai. Bn. he 


ian participauon. raeis request tor lncreaseo eto- e ff or i s locate Mengele and mT ^ rv •» 

“The idea of meeting straightfor- nomic aid. including a proposed would urge Mr. Suroessner to coop- J\ V/T/iI*g 

ward with a Jordanian-Palestinian special appropriation of SSOQ rail- cra jg. ’Ul/ICo FLU 

delegation, or a Jordanian delega- lion ihis year. "The federal chancellor will n ± r 

tion that included Palestinians — The pome minister acknowJ- ceruutl i v le j) his visitor that nflffW IHI/YO'iP 
but not the PLO — I gladly re- edged that the economic austerity we ^ s^kirie the extradition of x **>*'*' Cf limij-C- 
ceivned it immediately." Mr. Peres measures his government has taken Mengele with all our energy “ Mr. . __ 

said. have not completely satisfied Rea- g^ard said. iContinued frwn Page 1) 

He specified that he would agree gan administration demands for Chancellor Helmut Kohl is to union. "There has always been an. 
to such a meeting in Cairo, held by fundamental changes in ihe Israeli ho |d wuh Mr. Stroessner dur- intelleciual and cultural elite that 

Mr. Mubarak and attended by the economy. But he indicated that ihe a h v ihe Paraguayan leader grows in on itself and has no rela- 

United Stales, if Mr. Mubarak pro- differences over this issue were not dial has come under sharp criticism uonship with the other Naples. ' 


cash crisis. It also demanded lhai Mr. Ky- 

prianou accept a preliminary draft 

agreement presented by the United 
Nations secretary-general, Javier 
ijQ Tin X 1CQS0S Perez de Cuellar, which Mr. Ky- 
O prianou had rejected. If not. the 
rp U nT1 f motion said. Mr. Kyprianou 

X U kjllul XXitllL should resign and seek approval of 
A his policy through an early presi- 

F or Mengele d ^l?dnS5wided for a bizonal. 

” federal republic. Other points in* 

Rttaen eluded a Greek Cypriot president, 

BONN — The West German representing the 80 percent major- 
government pledged Friday that it iiy. with a Turkish Cypriot deputy 
would press President Alfredo and a two-chamber parliament 
Stroessner of Paraguay for the ex- with equal representation in the up- 
tradiuon of the Nazi war criminal per house and 70-30 percent reprts 
Josef Mengele when the South sentation in the Greek Cypriots' 
American leader pays a visit in favor in the lower house. In addi- 
July. rion. the Turkish Cypriots would 

Benno Erhard, a state secretary have had some veto powers. 

in the Justice Ministry, told parlia- 

meat thai Bonn had stepped up its 

efforts to locate Mengele and _ - 1 O I 

would urge Mr. Suroessner to coop- /VriTltPS jGPKS 

“The federal chancellor will « «- 

most certainly tell his visitor that hZgjffgrr fyn/f ff£> 
we are seeking the extradition of 
Mengele with all our energy." Mr. _ . 

Erhard said. iContmued from Page 1) 


CHURCH SERVICES 


PARIS I 

AMERICAN CATHEDRAL IN PAMS, 23 Ava. I 
Gmraa-V, 75008 Paris. Tt» Very Rev. I 
Jonas R. lew. Dean. Mefroi George-V or 
Aln uj bMoreeou. Sunday: 9 a.m., 11 a.m. 


days: 12 naan. TaLi 720.17.92. 

CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 13 Rue du 


indicated ihai he did not expect 
such a truce 10 be reached. 

“The Shiites misinterpreted our 


aSMSttWMS patience.’’ Mr. Pc« said. -Y« 
ajwRev. a. SommerviRa. TbL= «J7 67.02. won i find an army in the world 

- -* — that will not protect the lives of its 

bjrope soldiers, and somehow the Shiites 

uw-AWAN^ivsBAt^^ip and fo yule. The army 

protects itself. As a matter of fact 


Pkfc.Serra»t>«at20, 1271 NC HuiMfl, Pte 
Netherlands. Tel.: 1+31) JO) 2152 55073. 

~~~ ~ GENEVA 

CHURCH OF CHRIST ■ Meeting* in Engbh 

Sunday evening* of 6 P »V 26 n* d- lo 

Temmiera, 1207 Geneva. Tetr Doyle Kee, 

0X2/937537. Fn*e BiWe wreipondari^ 

court** EneW* and French. Write to dw 

above. 

STOCKHtXM 

IMMANUEL CHURCH near eily renter. 
FrienRy ehristian tellavnhip. Sunday 1 100. 
Tel.: (08) 316051. 151225. 

top ou 

UNION CHURCH OF TRIPOLI, PO. Bo* 
SS^Andolu*. Tel.' 71 A 68 . Friday -nncre 
10 JO ajn. 

To place of* adiwtitefwnl 
fit this tection 
please coutoKii 
Ml EUzabeih HERWOOD 
182 Aw. Ch.'Je-C*“l | *' 
92521 Pteuilly Cede*. Frant*. 
Td.: 747. 1 2.65. 


differences over this issue were not 
a major source of friction in L [ .S.- 
Israeli relations. 

■ Rejection by PLO Aides 

Two senior PLO officials rqect- 
ed in statements published Friday 
the suggestion by Mr. Mubarak for 
direct talks between Israel and a 
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation. 
United Press International report- 
ed from Amman. Jordan. 

“The PLO affirms its complete 
and categorical rejection of the re- 
cently published Egyptian initia- 
tive that calls for direct negotia- 
tions with the Zionist enemy," said 
Khalil Wazir. deputy commander 
of the PLO forces, in a statement 
published by the Arabic daily Sawt 
Al Shaab. 

A member of the PLO executive 
committee, Mohammed Milhem. 
also expressed strong rejection for 
Mr. Mubarak's proposal. He said it 
was “in conflict with the Jord 2 ni- 
an-PLO accord for joint action" to 
achieve Middle East peace. 


from opposition parties and some 
of Mr. Kohl's own allies. 

Mengele. w-ho would now be 73, 


w uic muiucr ct wu.uw jews jh strong. 

Al He h ^'Sid to have fled to Para- history that Mr. Limbmi 

guav after World W ar fi but the refereed to ~ the an siocrai.c world 
3 li ihoriiies there sav thev have no of high cul ure set far away from 


authorities there say they have no 
knowledge of his present where- 
abouts. 

Mr. Erhard said that West Ger* 


many and the U.S. were now coor- cullu . ral heri,a & e their raain 

dinating their hunt for Mengele preoccupation. 


more closely. 

He said that a learn of U.S. in- 


vestigators held talks with West nation. But as the capital of the 
German officials earlier this week Bourbon Kingdom of the Two Sid - 
in which ihe two sides had dis- hes. which covered southern Italy, 
cussed their future strategv. Naples was what Mr. Knight called 

Mr. Erhard said that Bonn had " aver ? P arasi,ical P lace -“ 
recenilv sent me.vsa°es to 12 na- drew on lhe wealth of die rest 


SSrffv kX * 


uons in which Mengele might be l ^ e kingdom, 
hiding to remind them of Wesi That era ended with the reunifi- 
GermanVs deiermi nauon to track cation of Italy in ihe l^th cemuiy. 
him down and to seek their help, an event some Neapolitans still see 
Government officials said the a northern Italian “im- 

messoges wenl io all the South P* n >th # m against ihe south. In the 
American countries and to Italy P r< *-'ess- Naples lost its special role 


jnd the United States. 


X- 




and never quite found another. 


BRGADCAS77NG TO CABLE COMRANIE5 
IN EUROPE &THE UK VIA SATE LUTE 




PROGRAM. SATURDAY 2nd MARCH 


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Gromyko Says 
Space Arms 
Could Incite 
Nuclear War 


Reuters 

MADRID — The Soviet foreign 
minis ter, Andrei A. Gromyko, said 
Friday that President Ronald Rea- 
gan's proposal for space-based mis- 
sile defenses could push the world 
closer to nuclear conflict. 

Speaking at a lunch given by 
Foreign Minister Fernando Moran 
on the second day of a three-day 
visit to Spain, Mr. Gromyko said 
the possibility of nuclear war 
would not be an exaggeration if the 
arms race were allowed to spread 
into space. 

In a clear reference to Mr. Rea- 
gan's plan, the Strategic Defense 
Initiative, Mr. Gromyko said: 
“Projects to achieve military su- 
premacy will not materialize other 
on Earth or in outer space." 

He also praised the Spanish So- 
cialist government's decision to 
keep Spain free of nuclear weap- 
ons. 

He said his talks in Madrid had 
dealt mainly with ways to prevent 
the militarization of space; to con- 
tain the arms race and avert nuclear 
war. 

Without specifically mentioning 
the United States, Mr. Gromyko 
scorned Washington for maintain- 
ing that disarmament could be 
achieved -by manufacturing more 
sophisticated weapons. 

He said that if the spacr defense 
plan were canceled, this would 
open the possibility of agreement 
between the superpowers on a ma- 
jor reduction of strategic and me- 
dium-range nuclear missiles. 

In his toast. Mr. Mor&n said 
Spun was a Western country but 
aspired to maintain a margin of 
autonomy in its foreign policy. 

Spanish officials said they were 
delighted with the progress of talks 
with Mr. Gromyko, who has played 
down Moscow’s criticism of 
Spain's decision to remain in the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion. 

Mr. Morin said there was “abso- 
lutely no pressure" when the ques- 
tion of continued Spanish member- 
ship in NATO was raised twice 
during talks with Mr. Gromyko. 

Spanish government sources said 
Madrid was left with the impres- 
sion that Moscow had now come to 
terms with Spanish memboship in 
the alliance, which it joined in 
1982. A referendum on NATO 
membership is due next year. 

Mr. Gromyko’s visit was the first 
high-level contact between Madrid 
and Moscow since Prime Minister 
Felipe GonzAJez decided in Sep- 
tember to urge continued Spanish 
membership in NATO, reversing 
Socialist Party policy. 

Mr. Gromyko, who met Mr. 
Gonzalez after his arrival from 
Rome on Thursday, spent an hour 
with King Juan Carlos I on Friday. 


The other Naples refers to the 
vast slums, tough neighborhoods 
like La Sunita. where the organized 


u wanted on charges of taking pan crime gangs of the Camorra are 
in ihe murder of 400.000 Jens in siaing. 

Auschwitz. , . . . . . . , , . 


the world of the poor dependent on 
this aristocracy — is not disputed 
by those who have made saving the 


Like much of southern Italy. Na- 
ples was often under foreign domi- 


Kasparov 
Seeks New 
Rules by May 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — The world chess 
challenger, Gary Kasparov, said 
Friday that rules for his new con- 
test against Anatoli Karpov, the 
defending champion, should be de- 
cided no later than May. 

Mr. Kasparov, who is due to re- 
sume his challenge against Mr. 
Karpov in September, told Tass, 
the Soviet news agency, that a con- 
gress planned for August was too 
late for the International Chess 
Federation 10 set rules Tor bis new 
title bid. 

The president of the federation, 
Florencio Campomanes, halted the 
match last month, after 48 games, 
saying that the players were Loo 
exhausted to continue. He said that 
they should start again at 0-0 in 
September. 

Mr. Kasparov, 21, who had re- 
cently won three games, bringing 
the score to 5-3 in Mr. Karpov’s 
favor, objected angrily to the deci- 
sion. saying he was fit and able to 
continue and that a delay benefited 
Mr. Karpov. 33. whose endurance 
seemed to be failing. 

Mr. Kaipov insisted that he, loo, 
was ready to play on. 

Mr. Kasparov told Tass that he 
divided the match into three stages: 
“The first was characterized by my 
nervousness and a high number of 
mistakes. The world champion 
found his game earlier and his 
much greater experience told." 

“The second stage." he added, 
“was the long series of draws. Here 
ihe art of daense reigned. . . . The 
last third of the match was marked 
with the most interesting games 
from the point of view of play." 

Indians Will Vote 
In State Elections 

Reuters 

NEW DELHI — Millions of In- 
dians are to vole Saturday in state 
elections that may indicate how 
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi's 
popularity is raring alter his recent 
victory in national elections. 

Almost two-thirds of India's 
electorate of 380 million will be 
eligible to vote in the polls in II 
states Saturday and Tuesday. Elec- 
tions for 940 seats are being held on 
the first day and for another 1,580 
on the second. 

Mr. Gandhi, whose Congress (I) 
Party won an overwhelming victory 

in December, has returned to the 
campaign trail urging voters to 
elect state go v e rnm ents led by his 
party. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

— - _ P 

Zimbabwe Graves May Hold Mlsshig6 

HARARE. Zimbabwe (WF) — Government investigators have located 
graves in southwestern Matabdeiand that they believe may contain me 
bodies of six foreign tourists abducted here by armed insurgents in July < 
1982. diplomatic sources said Friday. 

They said the minister of state for security, Emmersoo Munan^agwa, 
has told diplomats from the United States, Britain and Australia that 
forensic experts were sent to the southern city of Bulawayo earlier this 
week to examine remains from two grave rites. Diplomatic sources 
> cautioned that the case was still far from resolved. “We've been on this for 
two and one half years and we’ve had a lot of false alarms,” a diplomat 
said. y 

The kidnapped tourists, all of whom were men, included two Amer,^ 
ran.*, two Britons and two Australians. Their abduction was one of the 
earliest acts of political terrorism in Zimbabwe after Prime Minister 
Robert Mugabe dismissed from his cabinet the opposition leader, Joshua 
Nkomo. Mr. Nkorao was his former political aUy and a fellow leader ot 
die successful liberation struggle against white minority rule here. 

Aquino Defendants Excused by Court 

MANILA f AP) — Judges hearing evidence against 25 tmtitaiy mei 
and one civilian accused in the assassination of the Philippine opporitior 
leader, Rftnignn s. Aquino Jr„ ruled Friday that the defendants do not 
have to attend the trial, citing a precedent set by Mr. Aquino himself. 

The three-judge panel ruled that the accused need appear only when 
called “for purposes of identification." Justice Augusta Amores, who 
wrote the ruling, said that all defendants would have to appear when 
testimony resumes Monday because a witness at the as s assin ation scene 
may have to identify some of them. 

The court cited a 1 975 case in which Mr. Aqnino refused to participate 
in a military trial in which he was accused of conspiring to seize power 
from President Ferdinand E. Marcos, who was then ruling under martial 
law. Prison guards brought Mr. Aquino to court each day until the . 
Supreme Court upheld his plea not to appear. £}. 

*r 

Iraqi Diplomat, Son, Slain in Kuwait i 

KUWAIT (Reuters) — An Iraqi diplomat and his son were shot 
death by four gunmea in their home here Friday, the Kuwait News^ 
Agency reported. 1 

The agency said that the motive for the slaying of Hadi Awwad Saeed, t 
the assistant cultural counselor at the Iraqi Embassy, and his son Hosni : 
was undear. Diplomats said that if the attack was politically inspired, 5 
then Kuwaiti support for Iraq in its war against Iran could have been a 
motive. 

The diplomat's wife escaped unhurt She apparently was not seal by 
the attackers, who sped away from the apartment in a waiting car, 
according to diplomats. 

Bangladesh to V ote on Ershad’s Role 

DHAKA, Bangladesh (Reuters) — President Mohammed Hussain 
Ershad banned on Friday all political activity and said he would hold a 
referendum March 21 to seek a vote of confidence on his policies. 

Lieutenant General Enhad told the nation he was reimposiiig martial 
law, which he relaxed last month, and was a g ain setting up summary 
military courts and special tribunals. He also denounced opposition 
parties that had threatened to stall parliamentary elections punned for 
April 6. A seven-party alliance Jed by Bcgnm Khaleda Zia said Thursday 
it would block any move to hold a ref gendum that bypassed a pariiamen- < 
tary election. S . 

The president spoke shortly after he dosed six universities, apparently 
to prevent any anti-government protests following his broadcast He also 


imposed a five-hour curfew on Dhaka on Friday night. He said that a 
referendum was the only way to ascertain public opinion. 

Gonzalez Is Cleared of flick Charge 

MADRID (NYT) — The Cortes, Spain’s lower parliamentary cham- 
ber, has overwhelmingly cleared Prime Minister Felipe Gonzitez of 
charges that be illegally received money from a West German industrial 
conglomerate. 

In a vote of 263 to 7, with nine abstentions and one null, the deputies 
late Thursday approved a parliamentary investigating commission’s 
conclusion that charges that Mr. Gonzalez received a satchel of money. 
from the Flick conglomerate woe false. 

The charges were made in October by a West Goman legislator in 
what be later said were jesting and nrisrcported comments mated to a 
scandal in West Germany. Mr. Gonzalez, who was present in the Cortes, 
said afterward that Lhe whole case was a “miserable polemic” He added: 

“f am the person who has the most tranquil conscience in this debate and 
1 will maintain the answers that I gave in the month of November because 
I can stand by them and no one can show the contrary.” 

Breakaway Democrats F orm Council 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — In defiance of the national party leader- 
ship, a group of Democratic officeholders from the South and West have 
announced (be formation of an independent council to help shape party 
policy and rules. 

Organizers of the group, the Democratic Leadership Council, said* 
Thursday that many elected officials who viewed the national party as a 
political liability in their regions had expressed support for the initiative. 
“W e view the council not as a rival to any other party entity but as a way 
station or bridge back into the party for elected Democrats,” said 
Representative Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, who will serve as 
chairman of the organization. 

Other Jeaders include Senator Sam Nunn of Georgia, Senator Lawton, 
Gules of Florida, Representative James R. Jones of Oklahoma, Governor’ 
Charles S. Robb of Virginia and Governor Bruce Babbitt of Arizona. So 
far, they said, the council's membership indudes 10 governors, 14 
senators and 1 8 representatives, many of whom want to push the party in 
a more conservative direction after last year’s overwhelming victory by 
President Ronald Reagan. 

Mr. Nunn suggested that the group would go beyond policy questions 
and attempt to change party rules to encourage moderate candidate; to 
compete fen: the Democratic presidential nomination. Both Mr. Gephardt 
and Mr. Robb have been, mentioned as possible candidates in 1988. “The 
moderate and conservative Democrats didn’t make it past the first round 
in the primaries in 1984 and we want to dumgr that,” Mr. Nunn said. 

Toronto Court Convicts West German 

TORONTO (AP) ■ — Ernst Zundet, a German-born co mmer cial artist, - X 
has been convicted of “publishing false news” in a pamphlet declaring - 
that accounts of the Nazi Holocaust were a hoax. 

Thursday’s verdict from a District Coon jury of 10 men and two- 
women ended an eight-week trial during which Mr. Zundd's assertions 
that there were no gas chambers at the Auschwitz concentration ramp 
and that Adolf Hitler had no intentions of exterminating Jews captured 
front-page attention across Canada. 

Judge Hugh Locke set March 25 for sentencing and freed Mr. Zcndd 
on bail of 1.000 Canadian dollars ($720). Mr.Zundd.46, a West German 
citizen, faces a maximum two years in prison. He was charged with 
publishing false news, defined as “a statement or tale that he tows is 
false" mid that is “likely to cause mischief to the public interest in social 
and racial tolerance.” 


Congress Fails Test on Deficit 


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(Continued from Page 1) 

package independent of the admin- 
istration’s own proposals. The 
president's unwflfingaess to com-, 
promise on his military budget or 
on the Social Security program of 
retirement benefits and disability 
payments has left the Republicans 
in disarray. 

Senate Republicans will get a 
chance to nim this aro und qcxi 
week, when the Budget Committee 
is scheduled to start writing a defi- 
cit-reduction package. However, 
they may have to look to Demo- 
crats on the committee for help if 
they want to assemble a realistic . 


tary budget has made it impossible 
to reach a compromise that the 
leaders say is necessary to win sup- 
port for many of Mr. Reagan's pro- 
posed uoamuitaiy spending reduc~* 
lions. .. . t 


_ The Republican leadership is. 
limping into tins effort. Mr. Dole 
has failed to gain a consensus on 
reductions in advance among his 
Republican chairmen, although he 
has worked on it since January. So 
the Republican deficit reduction, 
learn will have to work without a 
leadership plan. 

The main reason is that the pres- - 
deni’s, refusal to discuss the mill* 


3 New Cages of Polio 
Suspected in Finland 

Reuters 

HELSINKI — Three more sus- 
pected cases of polio have been 
discovered in Finland, which has 
been affected by a newstrain of the 
disease known as polio-3, medical 
officials said Friday. 

They co nfi r m ed that five-persons 

have been affected by the paraJyttt 

form of the disease, inclu ding ojgf 


The tttnejpopulatktt of Finland is 

being vaccinated against pcffio^ Nil 
a medical official said that a new 
vacci ne may lave to be developed 
from the. new virus strain, winch ^ 

not known to have occurred in any 
other part of the wodd. 


• -I S6I 
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a 




^^® ea S afl School Aid Cuts 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


Page 3 


Sees losses Offset by Gains Due to Economic Recovery 


let Ilf 

Wl tlicTn ,!?, ^ Un »'. Erw ^ ®y B - Richbm S 

SL (tin niVS*?-' WASHINGTON - P«sid«! 

Pav: Ronald Reagan says ibai the na- 

, juj. i „ . , J * J r ' *■» res .ij* Dta£ l : tiqp.*-s colleges have gained far more 

1 ' c Hjii a li,| { , die economic recovery than anew <«» curricula to I 

■ ,j| Sf aw^rihey will ever lose in budget cuts, “ined by narrow interest 

. 1 1 . ™ u b».||, Weri . _ : .8nd be has called on' educators to - — 



\as hit fnrmrr ** bad - 

n nnigglr .!»> im-c! „ i‘ , iJS Id a speech to theNaii 


endants Kxc Use ,, 

I, cu»n^ .• p|r.,« i ,hjt thejr 

Kt ruled that the .tciiT 

•if tilfntirk.ition •• j J* ^ J(k. 
Ih ,* ,t dricn.iam> 

jwicrihcm " n ‘" a 'U**£ 

*a v,n%c in which . 
htch he was .,u-u^]^ U . ,nnr< V 
Mar.,, 

r»nipht Mi .\a mn f 
1 his pica no, w '“ n 

I 

mat. Son, Slain int 

) — An lraq t diplonui w l- ^ . 
'" >n .her home l,„ c Fn £{“% i 

Uhe motive ror the s! 3 M nEofHt . 
xunudor at the Iraqi FaXl™ 4 * 
tlNsatd Hut if thcatiS^^ 


speech to theNarional Asso- 


ciation of Independent Schools, a 
private school group, on Thursday 
that ranged over some of the touch- 
iest issues in American ahy-a ti on . 
Mr. Reagan declared, “We cannot 
allow our curricula to be deter- 
groups." 

Children should leant tharair 
and water pollution have de- 
creased, he said, and “our children 
should know that, because Ameri- 
cans abhor disc rimination , the 
number of black families living in 


AMERICAN TOPICS 

• _ ** .*•** 

m mf. 


f*>r Iraq in us war 


m 


Jg-utui IrancS 


.•scaped unhurt. She apparent^ 

*d au:,v I mm the apS^j 

i to Vote on Ershadi 

fth iRcutcrM - President McfcJ 
ida> all political juivu\ and 

k.^ki^ieofconndmceoah 

! Fr*h.id iota the nation he»asi» 

1 last month, and was again smtl 
spcvul (nbiuials. He al» dmn9 
itencd ic stall pariianieman elecSl 
•’ alliance led bv Reeum Khaleda M 
i\c In hold .i referendum thal bypsJ 

e short In after he eKvscd m\ uiuibkJ 
ivcmtwm pi. 'tests f. 'Slowing hubs! 
imrfew on Dhaka or, h'ndjj ni-k| 

‘ftht was lo.i'icrum public vpu*« 

i Clean'd of FlickQ 

-- Hie l ories. Spain'* lower parte 
r.jth cleared Prime Minister Fdp 
Hi revmnl mono front a ttoifc 

with rune .dMs-mions and one e 
wnl a p.u!ia:ueniars imcstipim 
■#s that Mr cion.Mle: revi-tu-d asj 

Wctale w. o’ »al>c 

made tn • Vto^er hs i WeMiiox ferent baggy, green plaid jacket. 

rrf jc«it!;: ,n:d r.iisteporied ounc ^ ^ • 

Uftv Aft i 'oit.alc.'. whi* wj\ press 
c urhoic s isv w as a ' misiraNc pdfl 
has the tit* ’.; sianquils.inwicniYB: 
s*crs ilial 1 t;.isi- in '.5a ntiMtib <£ ^ 
and no one sa:i show the o'mun 



SOFT SELL — Geraldine Ferraro, the 1984 Democrat- 
ic nominee for vice president, is now appearing in a 
television commercial for a soft-drink manufacturer. 
Hie commercial shows her dismissing choices with her 
two daughters, , bat she does not mention the drink. 


Democrat* Form l 

NVr» — In Jc!'.»:u\ *’ IU,I * C 
0XT.it Is' oil i» s-t»'‘!ilris ''•’in 

iliou of ,!j; iiitiejw'itkni »*■ *uncu 
vr.mp, tbr 

rlii led e?iuiuls wh, sirweJ ilrn? 
mr iQi'ii' hjd ovpN'"i‘kl wipp 1 ^ 
r»i| as :i rit.i: !»■ ■»*" 

^ ,nui the pat!' 

.ird A i ft-phat.J: oi Mt^'jn. 

idc'SciUUV Sain Nunn ,-t Ojg. 
my-iutnc •amc*' K J.'no . M 

fS-uHV ^ 


'•tfTiISlIIVCN. 
dstfi'tirn afts" 
4f.tn 

:d that the »■!. -up « 
s;c (»•»»!' iuK' 


i v jPl k'h 

UMu-a.--.^ 


*ii 


t '*i" rPiJ^ 


Federal Bureaucrats 
Are Out of Fashion 

The debate ever whether ca- 
reer professionals or political 
appointees make the most ef- 
fective ambassadors goes on. 
Bui according to at least one 
reader of The Washington Post, 
when it comes to how civil ser- 
vants dress in Washington, the 
appointees have it 

Mike Causey, a columnist, 
reports receiving a letter, signed 
“Very, Very Anonymous,” say- 
ing the capital scene at hmcb 
hour is “polyester heaven." 

“Guys wear baggy green 
plaid trousers with a totally dif- 
plaidjackeL 
Plastic ‘bbricTed 'zipper'^dLets, 
like the kids wear to play in the 
snow, serve as outercoats." 

The letter said “civil servants 
who you know earn $40,000 per 
year and up look like something 
out of a World War II newsreel 
about displaced persons. 

“The political appointees . . . 
might not break any reeprds for 
brainpower, but at least they 
know , to wear their poplins in 
the summer and tweeds in the 
winter.” 

By comparison, the writer 
said, “their lifer colleagues . . . 
came to work in plum-colored 
leisure suits and Hush Pup- 
pies.” Cloches “may have little 
to do with the wearer's compe- 
tence,” the writer said, but “if il 
looks like a schlepp, walks like a 
scbJepp. and Quacks like a 
schlepp, it must be a schlepp.” 


«n, ru-niviKiU . 

mrt Coiirirt’* 

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if “jTuKl^^r* f ' ,: i ,, 

t l,.un .1 l\'ii k 1 i ‘ uMrff 
:ft! vicrk !fi:u / .^r - r “ 
j. J;.unbcr' J» • • * 

- no intent'. 

i .ri.nl.* 

; virl M.l!< «* I',' 

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imu !»*• 'i;;'' 

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Short Takes 

Trying to make a dent in the 
graffiti that defaces so much of 
New York City, .the city parks 
department is staking out spots 
likdy to be struck by graffiti 
artists. Offenders 16 or over are 
charged with criminal mischief. 
The parents of youths under 16 
gel a choice of faring a lawsuit 
or having the youths do eight 
hours of light work in the park 
on a Saturday, including scrub- 
bing off the graffiti. Virtually 
all parents opt for the cleanup. 

The town meeting of Sher- 
rodsviOe, Ohio, population 400, 
broke up without reaching a de- 
rision on disbanding the two- 
man police department after 


these events: Councilman Rich- 
ard Richardson Jr.’s father, had 
a heart attack at the meeting; 
the coun cilman, whose motion 

to dissolve the two-man police 
department had provoked an 
argument with Mayor Joe Stull, 
jumped the mayor, causing 
both men to fall on a pod table, 
which immediately collapsed; 
the village solicitor was pom- 
meled in the fray. The soliciior. 
Brad JfiDyer, conceded that 
*Tm not used to having that 
kind of breakdown in author- 
ity.” 

Frank A. Messina, an unem- 
ployed sawmill worker, con- 
tends that his driver’s license 
was unlawfully suspended 10 
years ago when he refused to 
pay $800 in damages after an 
accident, and thal the subse- 

3 ueni red tape and run-ins with 
te police have ruined his life 
He has sued the state of Penn- 
sylvania for more than 5 qua- 
driHion dollars, or, to be pre- 
cise. $5,764,609,563,143,70048. 

Avery Fisher HaB at Lincoln 
Center in New York City pro- 
vides free cough drops in handy 
bins. Musicians say the drops, 
wrapped in noseless paper, ap- 
preciably lower the audience’s 
decibel output “We should 
have them at Carnegie Hall.” 
said James D. Wolfensohn, 
chairman of rival Carnegie. 
HalL “It’s a brilliant idea.” 

Shorter Takes: Despite can- 
cellation of the Inauguration 
Day parade in January because 
of bad weather, the committee 
for President Ronald Reagan’s 
inauguration says it spent $9.5 
million and caraa oat in the 
black. ... The New 
shrimp catch, down to a i 
pounds (450,000 kilograms) 
eight years ago, may reach 10 
mtlKnn pounds tins year. Ma- 
rine biologists credit fewer 
predators Ske cod and had- 
dock, Iarger-mesh nets and 
stricter supervision by authori- 
ties. ... Golden Gate Bridge 
officials calculate tha t as of last 
month one billion people had 
used the span across the pas- 
sage to San Francisco Bay since 
it opened in 1937. 

— ■ Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE: 


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Tap level jobs 

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NEW YORK 


PARIS 


White House 
Presses Again 
ForFunding 
Of Nerve Gas 

Washington Post Srrrkr 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration, citing the dangers 
of chemical warfare and the superi- 
ority of- Soviet stockpiles of nerve 
gac, hue began a major campaign to 
persuade the Congress to end a 16- 
year moratorium on the production 
of chemical weapons. 

Thomas J. Welch, the deputy as- 
sistant defense secretary, told the 

Senate Armed Services Committee 

on Thursday that the stockpile of 
U.S. chemical weapons, last tested 
in 1969, was no longer useful. 

“It was designed for a different 
war «nH a different fight plan.” he 
said. “We do not have a militarily 
usable retaliatory capability.” 

The administration is seeking 
$174 million in fiscal year 1986, 
beginning Oct. 1, to produce new 
chemical weapons that it says are 
necessary to deter a Soviet nerve 
gas attack in Europe. 

Similar pleas have been rejected 
in the past three years, and con- 
gressional opponents in both 
chambers expea a bitter fight over 
the weapons system, in President 
Ronald Reagan’s $31 3-biDion mili- 
tary budget. 

The size of the U.S. stockpile is 
classified, but it is generally be- 


U.S. Pair Indicted for Illegal Export 
Of Sophisticated Military Equipment 


our suburbs has grown more than 
three times the rate of white fam- 
ilies living in the snbrabs, and that, 
between 1960 and 1982, the num- 
ber of black Americans in our col- 
leges more than quadrupled.” 

He also said that he had ordered 
Attorney Genoa] Edwin Mecse 3d 
to examine “possible modifications 
in federal law” that would expand 
the rights of teachers and adminis- 
trators to fight violence in schools. 

Mr. Reagan said that the eco- 
nomic recovery has produced the 
largest one-year increase in 17 
years in the value of college endow- 
ments. 

He also said that, because of the 
rind™* in inflation, the purchasing 
power of total U.S. spading at 
education has increased $18 bulian 
in his administration, even with 
cuts in federal aid. In the Carter 
administration, he said, when infla- 
tion reached double digits, this pur- 
chasing power decreased $17 bil- 
lion. 

In Ins address, Mr. Reagan de- 
fended his proposals to cut college 
student aid. education Secretary 
William J. Bennett faded the fight 
over that issue two weeks ago when 
he acknowledged that there might 
be hardships for some families, but 
the cuts might simply force some 
students to give np cars, stereos and 
vacations. 

Mr. Reagan's proposed budget 
for the 1986 fiscal year, beginning 
Oct-1, calls for a 523-billion re- 
duction in financial aid for college 
students, largely by eliminating 
federally subsidized, guaranteed 
loans for students from families 
with adjusted gross incomes ex- 
ceeding $32^00. Essentially, there 
now i$ no income limit, but a stu- 
dent must demonstrate a fmanrini 
ne ed. 

Under Mr. Reagan’s bndget, 
there also would be a $4,000 annual 
limi t (mi any student’s lota] federal 
assistance. By contrast, students 
can now receive up to SI 1,000 from 
various federal sources. 

In other remarks, the pre sident 
decried a “learning gap” b etw e e n 
students in the United States and in 
the Soviet Union, where he said 
children are taught algebra and ge- 
ometry in elementary school 

He called for a back-tobasics 
curriculum to ensure that all stu- 
dents “become fully c o n v ersant 
with science and math, as well as 
history, reading and writing." He 
also urged a return to “discipline” 
in classrooms, saying “there’s no 
need to call in a grand jury every 
time a principal needs to check a 
student locker." 

Mr. Reagan also renewed his call 
for tuition tax credits and educa- 
tional vouchers as two proposals to 
“expand parental choice” and “fos- 
ter greater diversity” in the educa- 
tion system. 

JrSSS'^XTS Sea Off California 

Was Toxic Dump 

mg loopholes that lead to abuse 


is 

ly be- 
lieved to number 35,000 to 45,000 
tons (16 kilotons to 20 Itilotoas). 
This would be less than one-twenti- 
eth of what the Pentagon estimates 
the Soviet arsenal to be. Military 
experts say that little oi the U.S. 
arsenal is usable hwany ibe Army 
no longer stocks weapons designed 
years ago to deploy the gas. 

Mr. Reagan, pledging his “vigor- 
ous efforts” to correct the “asym- 
metry” in superpower stockpiles, 
sent a later Tuesday to the Armed 
Services Committee chairman. Sen- 
ator Barry M. Goldwater, an Arizo- 
na Republican, in which he empha- 
sized his commitment to “regaining 
a chemical warfare deterrent.” 

Mr. Welch, who heads the Penta- 
gon’s chenncal weapons division, 
led a panel of military officials who 
described what they thought would 
happen if deterrence failed. 

A retired general, Frederick J. 
Kroesen, former commander of 
U.Sl Army forces in Europe; testi- 
fied that the impact of chemical 
warfare on an unprotected civilian 
population would be “devastat- 
ing." 

He said that U.S. forces, 
equipped with protective glows, 
masks and uniforms, would survive 
but that their effectiveness would 
be diminished by the equipment. 


and error and cutting excessive 
subsidies to banks and others." 

Mr. Reagan criticized the cur- 
rent system thal he said gives feder- 
al aid to some students from fam- 
ilies earning more than 
SlQO,000-a-ycar. “This defies com- 
mon sense, insults simple justice 
and must atop," he said. “Govern- 
ment has no right to force the least 
affluent to subsidize the sots and 
daughters of the wealthy." 

(The White House, however, was 
unable to provide any data about 
federal asststancegoingto students 
from families with incomes over 
$100,000, the Los Angeles Times 
reported. A spokesman, who did 
not want to be identified, said that 
“it’s theoretically possible if the 
parents had several children in pri- 
vate schools with high tuitions, this 
could show need.”] - 

■ Protecting School Officials 

Larry Speakes, the chief White 
House spokesman, said that Mr. 
Reagan's comments reflected a de- 
sire by the president “for the attor- 
ney general to continue to work on 
the protection of school authorities 
who engage is disciplinar y prac- 
tices,” The New York Times re- 
ported. 

Mr. Speakes cited a Supreme 
Court rating last month permitting 
public school teaches and officials 
to search students as long -as there 
were “reasonable grounds” for be- 
lieving that the search would pro- 
duce evidence of a violation of law 
or school rules. 


For 2 Decades 

Los Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — A large area 
off the Southern California coast 
near Santa Catalina Island served 
as a toxic waste dump with govern- 
ment knowledge for 20 years, ac- 
cording to a television report cor- 
roborated by biologists. 

Dr. Robert Risebrough, a marine 
biologist at the University of Cali- 
fornia, Santa Cruz, called it “the 
worst case of pollution that we 
know of.” 

Dr. Rimmon Fay, an indepen- 
dent marine biologist, said: “1 had 
known there was a dump rile there, 
but none of us knew before this 
story broke of the quantities or the 
nature of what was dumped out 
there. The water pollution is far 
more severe than any or us had any 
idea of.” 

He was reacting to the television 
program broadcast by KCBS in 
Los Angeles. 

KCBS said it based its report on 
government documents proving 
that for two decades beginning in 
1947, such agencies as the Southern 
California Regional Water Quality 
Centred board were aware and ap- 
proved of the du mpin g by private 
companies of large quantities of 
tootic wastes. 

These included barium, formal- 
dehyde, rmpuhn, cyanide and “tens 
of thousands of pounds of add, 
solvents and pathology wastes that 
were never identified/* the station 
said. 





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A'fw York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — A U.S. 
grand jury has indicted a couple 
from Missouri for illegally export- 
ing an anti-tank missile-guidance 
system and other advanced mili- 
tary equipment to South Africa and 
other foreign countries, the U.S., 
Customs Service has announced. 

The indictment, announced 
Thursday, charges that Werner 
Ernst Gregg and his wife, Roswitha 
L. Gregg, exported the equipment 
from 1980 to 1984 without obtain- 
ing the licenses required under laws 
that regulate the export of military 
items or of high-tedmology items 
that could be used in weapons. 

The indictment also charges that 
the Greggs failed to report more 
than $1 million of income on their 
federal tax returns over the same 
period. The Greggs surrendered to 
U.S. marshals Thursday. 

Bond was set a: 5400,000 for Mr. 
Gregg and 51 00.000 for Mrs. Gregg 
by Magistrate Calvin Hamilton in 
U.S. District Court in Kansas City, 
Missouri, according to Customs 
Service officials. 

A customs agent said that the 
indictmem stemmed from a two- 
and-a-faalf-year investigation that 
was triggered by information sup- 
plied by “a disgruntled employee.” 

Customs officials brought the in- 
dictment to the attention of report- 
ers following complaints by the 
Commerce Department that cus- 
toms agents have been dilatory in 
pursuing tips about illegal exports. 

A Commerce Department report 
made public this week asserted that 
customs agents knew about and al- 
lowed strategically important heli- 
copters to be shipped to North Ko- 
rea via West Germany for 16 
months without doing anything 
about it, until finally the Com- 
merce Department itself forced ac- 
tion. 

The investigation of the Greggs 
was part of Operation Exodus, a 
program in which the Customs Ser- 
vice tries to intercept high-technol- 
ogy items and military equipment 
thal are barred from export to 
many foreign countries unless spe- 
cial licenses are obtained. Agents 
from the Internal Revenue Service 
joined the lata stages of the inves- 
tigation. 

Operation Exodus has been 
credited with some major seizur es 
of equipment but also has been 
criticized for not intercepting more 
than a fraction of the flow of illegal 
exports. 

Thursday’s announcement did 
little to resolve disputes ova the 
program's effectiveness. A customs 
official said that much of the equip- 
ment already bad left the country 
before the Greggs’s activities were 
described to federal investigators 
by a forma employee. 

The indictment charges that the I 


Greggs unlawfully exported a 
TOW anti-tank missile system, mi- 
nus the warhead and launch tube, 
to South Africa. The warhead and 
launch tube could be obtained or 
manufactured elsewhere once the 
Test of the missile system was in 


hand, a customs spokesman said. 

The indictment also charges that 
the Greggs exported nighi-vision 
goggles and a Tacan air navigation 
system to South Africa, 16 military 
radios to West Germany and three 
military radios to Singapore. 


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Page 4 


S ATURD AY-SUND A Y » MARCH 2 - 3, 1985 


a- 


Herald 


FUriUini WfthThf Vw York Timet and Tie tCwhin^Toa Part 


Stibune 


Europe, Don’t Despair 


Does Europe have an inferiority complex, 
or is it really inferior? Ronald Reagan as- 
cribes the strength of the dollar to poor 
European performance. Margaret Thatcher 
(aments the time it takes to revive an ailing 
economy. A top-level business meeting in 
Switzerland diagnoses fundamental weak- 
ness. If the patient is not sinking — which 
General George Marshall rightly feared in 
1947 — it is held to need intensive care. 

We believe the reports of terminal sick- 
ness in Europe are premature. America's 
rejuvenation is being hyped up while Eu- 
rope's successes are played down. A few 
years ago the story was different 

In the early 1960s, the talk was of a 
widening technology gap, of the United 
States outdoing Europe. This never hap- 
pened. and America passed into its own 
troubled time. Now it is Europe’s turn. 
Fashion changes as fast in economic analy- 
sis as in haute couture. 

Is there, today, a difference in the essence 
of the two continents — a distinction in 
nature rather than degree? Europe' s achieve- 
ments in the nuclear power and aircraft 
industries, to take but two examples, hardly 
suggest so. Nor, except in the short term, 
does the macroeconomic record. 

Through the 1960s and 70s, Europe out- 
paced the United States in terms of the per 
capita growth of gross national product and 
the proportion of that growth devoted to 
productive investment. It was Europe that 
bad the higher rate of saving, and it was the 
United States that had to devalue its curren- 
cy because it could not earn enough from 
abroad to finance the outflow of capital to 
more profitable countries. 

In recent years, the superior U.S. record in 
output, jobs and price stability shows that 
the wheel is turning again. But this appears 
to be the result of U.S. policy changes, not of 
deep-seated structural differences between 
the two continents. It is only natural that 


The MX in the Real World 


Congress should remove the fence it placed 
around the Sli billion needed to produce the 
second batch of 21 MX missiles. It is one of 
those dose questions that turn out finally not 
to be dose. Everyone knows the limitations of 
this 10-warhead machine. Il is provocative and 
destabilizing: provocative because its high ac- 
curacy gives it a first-strike potential, destabi- 
lizing because its relative vulnerability might 
tempt a president to use it early in a crisis 
rather than risk losing it to a Soviet firs: strike: 
In a world where strategic decisions were 
based on qualities of weapons alone, this 
would be enough to doom the MX. But the real 
world is a different place. 

The real world is a place where things have 
not only qualities but connections. The MX is 
connected in the Erst instance to the heavy 
Soviet missiles, the more than 600 SS-18s and 
SS-19s whose first-strike capability il is meant 
to match. Granted, the new weapons ordered 
up in the Ford and Carter years are now 
nearing deployment and so the moment is 
passing, but the fact is that the United Slates 
has no heavy missiles of its own. 

The MX is further connected to the arms 
control talks that are to open March 12 in 
Geneva. A prime American purpose there is to 
induce the Kremlin to make deep reductions in 
the heavy missiles that have long given it, and 


it alone, a chance to knock out all of its 
adversary’s land-based missiles in a surprise 
attack This is the very definition of the Soviet 
threat. No one in his right mind can believe the 
Russians would reduce these extra-threatening 
heavy missiles — the numerical and political 
heart of their strategic force — if they did not 
have to worry about a similar American threat. 
Ronald Reagan thinks this. Andrei Sakharov 
thinks it too. Absent a successful anti-missile 
defense; this is what deterrence is all about. 

Mr. Reagan has been criticized for failing to 
keep arms- building and arms control in rea- 
sonable balance. Whether in his overall policy 
be is now heading toward such a balance is a 
fair question. On the MX, however, he has a 
record Many times he has said the missile is 
essential for defense purposes. On July 16, 
1983. be said: “If an agreement is reached 
which calls for deep reductions — which, of 
course, is our goal — the number erf [MX] 
missiles could certainly be adjusted down- 
ward. ... As opportunities permit, the U.5. 
position will continue to evolve." That state- 
ment reflects the obvious and sensible consid- 
eration that American forces are necessarily 
related to Soviet forces. A freshening of the 
1983 statement would surely quash most resid- 
ual congressional misgivings about the MX 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


More Advice to Ism ore? 


If President Reagan pays no more attention 
to his new chief economist than be paid to the 
last one, his selection of Beryl Sprinkel for the 
post should do no lasting damage. Mr. Sprin- 
kel, nominated to be chairman of the Council 
of Economic Advisers, is a dogmatic monetar- 
ist, given to bashing the Federal Reserve Sys- 
tem and foreign finance ministers. He may 
ruffle feathers, but an adviser has little influ- 
ence if the advisee does not listen. 

The White House says the president will 
quickly nil all three council seats, and the 
depleted staff will be rebuilt to u fuD strength." 
That’s nice. But if Mr. Reagan really cared, he 
would not have left the chairmanship vacant 
for seven months: no one was even designated 
as acting diairman after Martin Feldstein re- 
turned to Harvard last summer. Nor would 
Mr. Reagan have said two months ago that he 
might want to abolish the council altogether. 

The Sprinkel council will surely not commit 
the sacrilege that Mr. Feldstein committed by 
disagreeing with the president in public about 
raising taxes. But Mr. Sprinkel a Chicago 
bank economist before becoming the Trea- 


sury’s undersecretary for monetary affairs in 
1981. has strong views and has had to be 
squelched at times. He is often more conserva- 
tive than the administration and is commonly 
at odds with mainstream economic thought 

Among other things, he spawned the widely 
discredited argument that big budget deficits 
do not cause high interest rates, so why worry? 
And he itches to leach the Federal Reserve a 
thing or two about managing the money sup- 
ply, but has been restrained by higher powers. 
It is not clear who will replace him at Treasury: 
with luck, someone less rigid. 

Presidents of both parties have customarily 
stationed strong economists at their elbow — 
Arthur Bums, Walter Heller, Herbert Stein, 
Alan Greenspan and Charles Schuftze among 
others. Mr. Reagan makes clear that he has 
little use for any economists, weak or strong. 
No one can force a president to listen to 
unvarnished professional advice if he prefers 
to rely on instinct and political advisers. As 
long as Mr. Reagan feels that way. what Mr. 
Sprinkel says wil] not make much difference. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR MARCH 2 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Big Rubber Profits in Ceyton 

COLOMBO— Ceylon's first 100-percent rub- 
ber dividend was declared by the Ceylon 
Planters’ Rubber Syndicate [on Feb. 28]. Al- 
though big dividends by the rubber companies 
in Ceylon are the rule rather than the excep- 
tion, the amount of 100 percent is striking 
proof of the flourishing stale of the industiy. 
The shares of many of the Ceylon companies, 
which have risen to seven times their nominal 
value, are becoming rather unwieldy, and ar- 
rangements are bang made for splitting them 
up. As an instance of the increasing value of 
rubber estates in Ceylon, a member of English 
society told the Herald’s Colombo correspon- 
dent that he knew of three estates for which, 
about six years ago, a man refused to give 
£150,000, and which are now worth £600,000. 


1935: Hiller’s Victory in the Saar 
BERLIN — Redeeming the promise he made 
to the Saarlanders that he would visit them in 
their first hours of “freedom,” Adolf Hitler 
made his triumphal entry to the Saar [on 
March 1] and so furnished a climax to the 
celebration of the return of the province to the 
Fatherland after sixteen years of separation. If 
Herr Hitler’s visit was a great day for the 
Saarlanders, it was also a great day in the 
FOhrer’s life. The return of the Saar represents 
his first great international victory and the first 
territorial gain registered by the Reich under 
the Nazi regime. Herr Hitler made a plea for 
peace with France: “This is a happy day for 
Europe, because by the return of the Saar to 
the Reich the tension between two neighboring 
nations of Europe has been lifted." 


international herald tribune 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n I9SS-I982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOIS1E 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL AFT 
CARL GEW1RTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PubGAer 
Executive Editor REN £ BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 


Deputy PuHaher 
Aaodoie PMuker 
Associate Pubhsher 

Dtrttuw of Openmorj: 
Director of Circulation 
Director of Advertising Safes 

• 1 u ««u Tribune. 181 Avenue Char ks-de-Ga oik, 92200 NeuiDy-sur-Sdne. 

(Herald). Cables Herald Pans. 

rl ^ ■ L I n U Tl MHT 


France. TeJepnone: ihi - iwj . ^ — 

U.S- subscript"*. rights reserved 



- 

ABC 


striking economic recovery results if first 
you wring out inflation, as the Fed has done 
through its monetary policy, and then im- 
part major stimulus to demand, as the Rea- 
gan administration has done by moving into 
large budget deficits. 

Do profound differences in personal be- 
havior explain the divergent trends of recent 
years? This is far from dear. Europeans still 
want the things that money (and credit) can 
buy. There has been no sudden loss of the 
work ethic. There is no great gap between 
the comportment of labor union chiefs on 
the two rides of the Atlantic. On both rides 
they ask for high-productivity jobs in manu- 
facturing (service jobs are Crowned on), ris- 
ing public investment, and safety nets for 
the poor: on both sides they oppose labor 
market flexibility, which is seen as cutting 
real wages and union power. The only differ- 
ence is that unions have obtained their wish- 
es less often in America; the U.S. govern- 
ment has been less accommodating. 
Arguably this reflects a weaker union posi- 
tion in America, but this is not fundamental: 
The unions are weakening in Europe too. 

Europe has much to do. Capital markets 
ought to be allowed to work more freely. 
Regulations (hat limit initiative should be 
relaxed. Rigid wage rules must be eased. 
Above all the countries of the European 
Community and the European Free Trade 
Association, which outweigh America in 
population and about equal it in production, 
need to make a reality of their free-trade 
arrangements, breaking down barriers that 
prevent their high-technology industries 
from enjoying the benefits that a single mar- 
ket confers on their American counterparts. 

Steady progre ss in these fields can work 
miracles. In a few years, the geographical 
balance or pessimism can shift enormously. 
Temporarily out of sorts, Europe should not 
become prey to melancholy. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


One Who 
Fell Out 
Of Step 


By Philip Geyelin 

W ASHINGTON — Nothing is 
more bean-rending than the 
cry of a disenchanted true believer 
m the Ronald Reagan of yesteryear 
— if you counted yourself among 
them. But if you were not of that 
persuasion, there is also quite a lot 
that is heartening in an article in the 
year-end issue of Foreign Affairs by 
Norman Podhoretz. It is an emo- 
tional experience and a rewarding 
intellectual exercise. 

Mr. Podhoretz is the prestigious 
editor of Commentary magazine, 
the literary home port of neo-con- 
servatism. This is a cult largely com- 
of prominent, fafien-away 
Tats who thought back in 
1 980, as Mr. Podhoretz puts it, that 
they had discovered in Ronald Rea- 
gan (a former Democrat) “a more 
legitimate heir to the mainstream 
democratic tradition in foreign po- 
licy — the commitment to contain- 
ment [or communism] running from 
Truman through Kennedy. Johnson 
and the late Sol Henry Jackson.” 

And Mr. Podhoretz was pleased 
with the original thrust of Reagan 
policy: the avoidance of arms con- 
trol negotiations that might have 
“jeopardized” the buildup neces- 
sary to redress the U.S.-Soviet bal- 
ance of military power. He liked the 
way Mr. Reagan went about rekin- 
dling America's patriotic spirit in 
the interest of restoring confidence 
“in the utility of military force as an 
instrument of worthy political pur- 
poses." He applauded Mr. Reagan's 
reinstitution of the East-West ideo- 
logical conflict as the centerpiece of 
US. policy concern — in contrast 
to the preoccupations of his prede- 
cessors with geopolitical power-bal- 
ancing or superpower rivalry. 

So what's bis gripe? That the pure 
conservatism of Ronald Reagan, as 
private citizen, has given way to. 
God help us. the practical political 
imperatives imposed on a president. 

Detente, as practiced by Richard 
Nixon and Henry Kissinger, never 
lived up to Mr. Podhoretz's hopes. 
Now, it is Mr. Podhoretz's fear that 
in his second term, Mr. Reagan, 
“overwhelmed by the pressures of 
the political present, and perhaps 
lured by seductive fantasies of what 
historians in the future might say of 
him as a peacemaker . . . seems 
ready to embrace the course of de- 
tente wholeheartedly as his own.” 

Warning signs, as Mr. Podhoretz 
sees them, are everywhere in the 



'Pick it up, note — this is the new revotutumT 


record. Economic pressures are a 
key part of the linkage essential to 
“hard-headed” detente. 

“Yet the enormous irony is that 
in the economic sphere, Ronald 
Reagan, the great critic of ditente 
... did not even measure up to the 
standards of toughness required by 
Mr. Nixon’s theory.” 

Having promised linkage, he un- 
linked Jimmy Carter’s gram embar- 
go from the grand scheme of U.S.- 
Soviet relations. He caved in on the 
Siberian natural-gas pipeline to 
Western Europe out or some mis- 
guided concern for “alliance soli- 
darity." He would not even bring 
economic pressure on Poland by 
dedaring the Poles in default on 
their Western loans. 

Mr. Reagan hailed the Afghani- 


stan “freedom fighters,” but did not 
do nearly enough to help them, Mr. 
Podhoretz complains. Mr. Reagan 
is excused for not toppling the 
Marxist Sandinist regime in Nicara- 
gua — but only because Congress 
got in his way. 

But Mr. Reagan was not even as 
bold as John Foster Dulles (for 
whom Mr. Podhoretz has a low re- 
gard as a risk-taker) in Lebanon. 
Worse, “in spite of all the talk about 
retaliation that came from the Rea- 
gan administration, and despite the 
high priority it had always given to 
combating international terrorism, 
when those marines were attacked 
by terrorists, the United Slates 
did nothing.” 

Mr. Podhoretz grants that under 
Mr. Reagan. “America was bade — 


While Others Kept the Faith 


By Andrew Hacker 

N EW YORK — Americans clearly feel better about “the way I 
are going" than they did a few years ago. Inflation has been brought 
under control; even if inflation did not impoverish anyone, these double 
digits portended the collapse of an orderly economy. Ending that anxiety 
was enough to raise the optimism index by several fractions of a point. 

Secondly, the United States has leadership — it can only be called 
that — for the first time in many years. Ronald Reagan's presidency, 
a unique and fascinating phenomenon, has most Americans feel 
better about their public and private lives. Even critics find him to 
be an invigorating target. , 

Mr. Reagan's impact hinges less on his policies than on his personal 
presence. The very tune ana timbre of his voice reassures a nation weary 
of worries that nothing horrible is going to happen, either at home or 
abroad. Hence the lack of widespread reaction to being run out of 
Lebanon, to budget deficits and to shortfalls in foreign trade, along with 
relief that Americans need no longer fret about society’s unfortunates. 
And. despite hard-liae talk, few people really feel we will get overinvolved 
in Centra] America or do something rash with the Russians. 

That people believe conditions wfl] be even better in five years 
expresses more a desire to preserve present satisfactions than any fore- 
casting skills. Needless to say, not everyone has fared well But from the 
outset America promised only opportunity, not equal results. 

The writer is a professor of political science at Queens College in New 
York. He contributed this comment to The New York Times. 


in at least the sense that it would no 
longer passively acquiesce in the 
achievement of an irreversible mili- 
tary superiority by the Soviet 
Union." Bui he fears it has not been 
prepared, as it was 20 years earlier 
under John F. Kennedy, 10 “pay 
any price, bear any burden, meet 
amr hardship, support any friend." 

The truth is, of course, that Mr. 
Kennedy himself was not p rep a red 
to live by that inaugural rhetoric 
three months later when he fatally 
scaled down the U.S. role in the Bay 
of Pigs. There lies (he real flaw in 
the Podhoretz analysis. His dream 
is not of a different Democratic 
Party but of a different day when 
the United States had overwhelm- 
ing mili tary superiority, a near-mo- 
nopoly in nuclear arms. 

What Mr. Podhoretz seems to be 
deploring is that Ronald Reagan, as 
president, has come torecogmze the 
necessity as & practical matter of 
reconciling his cad ideology with the 
new realities. Mr. Podhoretz sees 
Mr. Reagan moving not only to- 
ward arms control but maybe even 
broader accord with the Russians 
on the rules 'of East-West engage- 
ment. He sees the president headed 
toward a deal in Central America, 
accepting a communist Nicaragua 
in exchange, for something rather 
like the pr esc rip tions of the Conta- 
dora countries. If he should “move 
in this direction, he will cruelly dis- 
appoint those of us who once hoped 
that he might lead the Republican 
Party into assuming a responsibility 
for resisting Soviet imperialism that 
he himself had so often and justifi- 
ably attacked the Democrats for no 
longer wishing to carry." 

And so he mighL But that would 
not be too heavy aprice to pay for 
those of us who bebeve that if Ron- 
ald Reagan should move in the di- 


rection Mr. Podhoretz so deplores, 
he would be on the right trade. 
Washington Post Writers Group. 


U.S. Aid to Egypt Is a Double-Edged Investment 


N EW YORK — Egypt's request 
for a SI -billion increase in U.S. 
economic and military aid next year 
obliges Washington to re-examine its 
ties with Cairo before President 
Hosni Mubarak visits in March. 

The U.S. record in dealing with 
Egypt in the years after the October 
1973 war is one of the rare success 
stories of the period. Camp David is 
not “dead." as is often suggested, but 
rather stands as a buildingblock for a 
wider peace settlement Indeed, the 
agreement this month between the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
and King Hussein of Jordan indi- 
cates that the Egyptians are making 
progress in prodding other Arabs to 
join the peace process. 

In truth, aid more than diplomacy 
is the glue that binds the United 
States and Egypt together. Since the 
1973 war. Washington has commit- 
ted SI7 billion in military and eco- 
nomic assistance to keep up Egypt's 
interest in peace. 

Thousands of .American bureau-' 
ctais. businessmen, consultants and 
military personnel have moved to 
Cairo "to administer dozens of pro- 
jects, from power plants to family 
planning. Washington plans to lavish 
52.2 billion on Egypt in the current 
fiscal year — more than double the 
level of U.S. aid to anv country - but 


By Stanley Reed 


Israel which is to receive S2.6 billion. 

Egypt's relationship with the Unit- 
ed States now resembles Israel's in 
many respects. Egyptians have be- 
come only slightly less proficient 
than Israelis at lobbying Congress. 
Washington now accepts Egypt as a 


Egypt has become 
increasingly dependent 
on the United States 
— and more resentful, 

ward that is entitled to a much big 
chunk of the foreign aid budget 
many poorer countries. Together. 
Egypt and Israel draw one- third of all 
American foreign assistance. 

A decade ago, extensive aid to 
Egypt was justified as necessary to 
belp it stand on its own feel But 
American help has produced the op- 
posite result: increasing dependence 
on the United States for food and 
military equipment 
Thus, the Egyptian authorities, 
counting on huge shipments of subsi- 
dized American wheat are allowing 


domestic production to decline. The 
Egyptian government also refuses to 
raise the ridiculously low prices at 
which it seQs electricity, water and 
other services — and as a result can- 
not finance maintenance. The as- 
sumption seems to be that someone 
else will eventually pay. 

American policy-makers deariy 
believe that the money that goes to 
Egypt is well spent In their view, a 
couple of billion dollars a year is a 
small price to pay for peace in the 
world’s tinderbox. Certainly. Egyp- 
tian leaders would think twice about 
doing anything that might risk an aid 
cutoff. Unfortunately, this emphasis 
obscures the original motive that in- 
clined Anwar Sadat toward peace — 
the developing national consensus 
that Egypt could not afford to go on 
spending its limited resources on con- 
frontation with IsraeL 

Egyptian leftists have now dis- 
avowed that consensus — and the 
peace it produced — and have come 
to resent the United States. 

The American presence in Egypt 
feeds this resentment The individ- 
uals involved are generally wdl-in- 
temioned and competent, but many 
Egyptians have come to see their ef- 
forts as those of an American raj. 


There has been a rash of artides in 
the Cairo press attacking the aid pro- 
gram as part of “a shadow govern- 
ment" and charging that much of the 
American-sponsored social research 
in Egypt is really disguised inteQi- 
gence-githering. 

What can be done? In framing an 
answer to the Egyptian request for 
increased aid, the Reagan adminis- 
tration most ay to reward Mr. Mu- 
barak’s diplomatic efforts while also 
giving him the ra-egage that more 
self-reliance is in order. In the longer 
run, Washington should consider 
making Egypt’s aid program more 
like Israel's — putting it on a strictly 
cash basis, without stipulations that 
it must be administered by Ameri- 
cans and spent on American goods 
and services. - ' 

Egypt is not a hotbed or anti- 
American sentiment, but the 


ria of the mid-1970s is a thing of the 
past. What a shame it would be if the 
United States were to follow in die 
steps of the Soviet Union — to bo- 
come yet another victim of the Egyp- 
tians’ tendency to blame their pa- 
trons for their own shortcomings. 

The author, who writes frequently on 
the Middle East, yisited Egypt in No- 
vember. Re contributed this comment 
to The New York Times. 


A Libyan Friendship Tilts Hasson to the Tough Side 


M ARRAKESH. Morocco — Al- 
most everybody who talks 
about Morocco's surprise treaty of 
union with Libya tries to explain il as 
a tactical, temporary move. But not 
King Hassan II. who signed it last 
summa - . The Moroccan king insists it 
■should be taken very seriously, that it 
is the beginning of a “fine cons [ruc- 
tion" that will take solid shape within 
“a few months." He plans to visit 
Tripoli in March to sign a whole 
series of annexes. 

They will include an agreement to 
submit disputes to the World Court 
in The Hague, statutes and a budget 
for a joint secretariat, and accords on 
economic, cultural and labor matters. 

The king was evident!) offended 
by Western reactions of distaste at 
his sudden link with Colonel Moamer 
Qadhafi. which conferred a certain 
legitimacy and respectability on the 
Libyan troublemaker. But in a lone, 
late-night imerv iew in his omate pal- 
ace here, he appeared even more an- 
noyed ihat his new friendship was 
being brushed off lightly. 

Libya was the main supplier or 
arms for the Poiisano. which has 
been fighting a guerrilla war for nine 
years in the Western Sahara, the for- 
mer Spanish colony that Morocco 
claims and that the Potisario wants to 
make independent. King Hassan said 
thji Libyan support had completely- 
ended (which is disputed by some 
Western sources), and more impor- 
tant. that he can rely on Colonel 
Qadhafi not to Man it up again. 

He said the Libyan leader "may 
have his moods, as we all do. but he 
keeps his word. He is a man of his 
word." Nor was he concerned by the 
fact that Algeria has filled the’ sap 


By Flora Lewis 


and is giving the PolUario even better 
equipment than it had before. The 
king said he was "sitting easy,” and 
he did appear very sure of himself. 

[t is odd that be stressed the dura- 
bility and growing sturdiness of his 
Libyan accord, when his foreign min- 
isters went to Washington recently to 
give assurances that the pact was only 
transient. But it fits with the tough 
position he is taking in negotiations 
with Algeria on the Saharan issue. 

Algeria has proposed a compro- 
mise that would recognize a “person- 
al union” under the Moroccan crown 
with separate status for Ihe Western 
Sahara, something like the old Aus- 
tro-Hungarian dual monarchy. But 
Hassan is having none of it. He wants 
to organize a referendum which, he is 
convinced, would lead to complete 
absorption by Morocco. He is in no 
hurry to end’the wjr. and indeed his 
army and his public appear quite 
con ten i with the way it is going. 

So he is snuggling down with Colo- 
nel Qadhafi. The king claims credit 
for arranging the recent release of 
four Britons imprisoned in Libya. 
But he does not pretend, as his stip- 
po rters do. that he may tame the 
Libyan leader, either in terms of slop- 
ping terrorism or bringing modera- 
tion in Arab arguments about Israel. 

Instead. Hassan ducked the terror 
issue. “Do you really think Qadhafi is 
behind every terrorist act in ihe 
world?" he asked sarcastically. 

As for Arab- Israeli negotiations, 
he said flatly that Ihe idea of Presi- 
dent Hosni Mubarak of Egypt to 
start direct talks in Ihe United Stales 
“doesn't stand a chance.” He looks 


instead for an Arab summit in Saudi 
Arabia in the next two months. 

Nobody elsewhere believes the 
long-delayed summit meeting can be 
convened any time soon because of 
the sharp quarrels anxra° the leaders. 
But Hassan said it would be the place 
to bring the Arab position “up to 
date.” seeking to implement it and 
find “bridges" to President Reagan’s 
proposal of September 1982 Tor ls- 
raeli-Jordanian talks. 

The Tact that Israel rejected both 
the Reagan plan and the 1982 Fez 
summit plan should put the United 
States and ihe Arabs “on the same 
side," he said. 

The king gave the impression that 
he thought Arab and American views 


could be brought closer without re- 
gard to IsraeL 

He was hard on Egypt, hinting that 
be would continue to oppose its re- 
turn to the Arab League, though he 
helped obtain Egypt’s readmisaon to 
the Islamic Conference Organization. 
He was hard on any compromise in 
the Saharan war. He spoke warmly of 
his “special friendship" with the 
United States, but said it should 
bring “special understanding." 

It’s a dame. Hassan has msutn im- 
portant contributions to promoting 
moderation in the Arab world. He 
has been quietly helpful to IsraeL 
Now. instead of restraining -Colonel 
Qadhafi, Hassan appears ro be tilting 
to the tougher side. This is not helpful 
at a time of delicate diplomacy. 

The New York Times 


For France, 
A Tragedy 
Repeated? 

By Dominique Moist 

P ARIS — As tension grows in 
New Caledonia, one is reminded 
of Karl Mara’s remark that history 
repeats itself, “the first time as trage- 
dy, the second as farce." 

For France. Algeria was the trage- 
dy. Will New Caledonia be the farce? 
This tiny Sooth Pacific island, locat- 
ed 23,000 kHataeters (14,250 miles) 
from Paris, is a case unto itself. Given 
its demographic equilibrium and the 
size of the European community, 
which represents nearly 40 percent of 
the 145,000 inhabitants, any compar- 
n should be with Northern Irc- 


4 


tson 


land, not with Algeria. 

by local injustices, encour- 


j a regional environment that 

seems to foster independence, and 
prompted by the presence in Paris of 
a Socialist government haunted by 
retrospective guilt over the Algerian 
war, the island’s “Kanaka" have 
called for wnmediatg independence- - 

New Caledonia embodies contra- 
dictory hifftf»rfc*d logics. Democratic 

wouldjxjint to a French future for 
New Caledonia; but the overpower- 
ing trend toward decokamzation, and 
the huge distance between the island 
and France, suggest independence as 
the long-term solution. 

The New Caledonian quagmire is 
further complicated by domestic, 
strategic and economic factors. -• 

In France, with legislative elections 
due next year, the opposition has 
seized the New Caledonian crisis - 
with delight, only too happy to criti- 
cize the contradictions and hesila-- 
tions of the Socialist government. 

An unhealthy dialectic of passion, 
between Metropolitan France and- 
New Caledonia is favoring the rise of 
extremists on both sides. If the pro- 
independence movement was encour- 
aged initially by the uneasiness and • 
guilt feelings of the Socialists, the., 
anti-independence factions are now 
playing for time, hoping for a return 
to rightist rule in France. 

If the weight of the past hangs over- 
political debates, the stakes of the , 
future are in every discussion. Can, 
France give up New Caledonia with- ' 
out losing its middle-power stature, 
precisely when history appears to be 
moving toward die Pacific? What 
would happen if French Polynesia 
and Guyana were to be lost next, thus 
jeopardizing French nuclear experi- 
ments and die European space "pro- 
gram? Worse stiD, what if New Cale- 
donia were to • fall . under Soviet 
influence, becoming a base for re- 
gional destabilization? 

As pacifist and anti-nuclear waves 
reach the South Pacific, shaking the 
stability of the military alliance that 
binds the United States to New Zea- ■ 
land and Australia, such worries are 
' aor titogedierffi l ?6foBsr / ' T= ^“ ' r=r=1 "-(P 

Economic factors have alsoplayed ' 
a negative, if marginal role. The de- ■ 
dine of nickel fortunes since the* 
1969-70 boom has increased the is- 
land's dependence on French aid, . 
and aggravated the social climate. 

In the face of all this, the Pisam 
plan, named after France’s special 
envoy to New Caledonia, is an at- .; 
tempt to combine independence and 
association, to preserve the rights of a 
sovereign .state while protecting the 
European population and French * 
strategic interests. It appears more ■ 
and more to be outdated by events. ’’ 
Edgard Pisam is the likely scapegoat 

It may simply be that .indepen- «■ 
dence is not the ideal outcome for 
New Caledonia. The importance of .' 
other minorities (Asian and Pdyue- ■ 
dan), the tribal realities erf the Kan- " 
aks- in . the multiracial society that > 
constitutes New -Caledonia, and the : 
existence of divisions within each 1 
community, seem to suggest that re- 
inforced autonomy, strengthened by ' 
economic and social reform, could be . 
a better outcome for now. 

But, as passions mount, both in *. 
France and - New Caledonia, it may . 
already be too late for com promi se. *■ 
Some farces" have tragic endings. 

The writer, associate e&rectprofthe ■■ 
Ihstitut Francois des Relations later- * 
nationals, contributed this, comment •- 
to the International Herald Tribune. 




A t~. 


V - . 


1 . 


. . I ". 

■ i j v. 


/a 

r. 







v-Xi 

*.-■ 

r 

' r -* j 

■■ : 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Abe Was Kind — Honest 


Regarding the opinion column 
“ Why Americans Remember Lincoln " 
(Feb. 12) by Wiliam Safire: 

So much has been researched and 
written about this great American 
president. that it is difficult to under- 
stand a phrase such as "Lincoln 
chose war." or the assertion that he 
“was willing to pul America through 
the brutality of . . . total war." A 
careful reading of the first inaugural 
alone would refute these imputations. 
And does Mr. Safire really mean to 
say that the U.S. Constitution — not 
to say democracy — is “an abstract 
political theory?* 

A more just and accurate descrip- 


tion of the character of Abraham 
Lincoln — of his infinite kindness 
and compassion — which Mr. Safire 
surely is capable of rendering, would 
be a valuable service in explaining a 
major source of the spiritual strengzb 
and vitality of democracy in America 
today. It would also hdp to fortify 
freedom for the world of tomorrow. 

YU-TANG DANIEL LEW. 

Taipei. 



news of opposition movements 
brought hope: But after six years of 
exile, I see nothing bm consolidation 
in Iran. Therefore I have derided to 
return home. Please do not keep peo- 
ple hoping any longer. 

HASSAN ALTZADEH. 

• London. 


Returning to Iran ‘ 

In response to “ Internal Unrest 
Adds to Warring Iran’s Miseries” 
(Feb. 4) by Drew Middleton: 

For six years thaw been reading 
conflicting reports about Iran. The 


teaers imended for publication 
should be addressed Letters to fte 
Editor* and mat contain the writ- 
ers signature, name and JuB air 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We carmot 
.be ■ responsible for the; return of \ 
u/isoSdted manuscripts.' " ' 










^.° r ^ta^France Faces Defiance 
^ ' ag^By Ani l-Independ ence 
^ e peai^Forces in New Caledonia 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


Page 5 


By Richard Bernstein "It is inconceivable that the Pi- 
AKIS — a * up % New York Times Setrkt saai mission would be curtailed bc- 

New CaicUvih,,^ , EARIS — France,. which has fore Marti 31,” the official said. 
Karl M arx \ ’“■'He g Seeanyiogwseiileei^^ , hi France; parliamentary dec- 

jPcats it^if . "the ivtaHs fcarific territory of New Grie- ^ons are to be held late in the 

«>. the second ."to i^ijoni^basin tbeTasifewdaysfaced spring of 1986, and the opposition 
For France Vi, adear movement "of defiance lo its parties appear to have a twofold 

d.V- Will New OilT? 13 fro™ antwndependeoce sfrategy. They are trying to force 

This tiny South forces oil the island. . . the Mitterrand government into a 

cd 23.000 kiUti ^uit T&c government seems blocked retreat from its pledge of granting 
from Paris is a pT 1 ' 15 U4>jy die impasse. on the island and independence to New Caledonia, 
its demogranhi ■ “ n to|jas 110 alternative approaches to The anti-independence groups are 
m?c of th L . | , ^ uil >brfche problem right now, French oBi- evidently Ltymg to mamtam the 
which rmre^n, ^ Mak said Wednesday. status quo until the ejections in the 

il i IP .... _ Urtrl,. .t ' 1 A ...n. n. nh-illrt iir ift tn Cit fill An tit'll fk* nnk#!ptA mTTl 


slrai^y. They are Hying to force 
the Mitterrand government into a 
retreat from its pledge of granting 


unu. not wuh auT 7^ j ’ j w smoe last tall, New Caledonia 

Spurred hvluT 3 - I 0 - 000 opponents tf mdepradencc has been in the grip of a conflict 
aged by a c ? pitaI ^ between the largely Melanesian 

seems to f osier ; ? u %.' toumca ’ m vtoIadOD of a stare of grams, known as Kanaka. who are 


prompted bv the ' nde Pe^® ,fa 8P n Q' ^ forbids ga t he ri n g s dem anding independence from 
a Socialist i a Ft3XIC ^ 31111 ®ti«r poops, most of 

retrospective c ui h mcn ' £ **»* ^onsttation, lead- them consisting of European set 

!*■£ i ^^°SSnt.hSS < SS3^ 5fL Wh ° “ indfi F ra - 

u&kat of the territorial government, . . *„ k. 



New Caledon,; !^ 

dictory hisioncal iSgS 


they would no 


nrimEiT a™ '^alvith Edgard Pisani, the French 

pnuaples and the la** ^overammt’s special envoy to The S®* 300 ? 5 ™ h®? 

sShe.™ “ « his ift- , »“ *feisai 


At first, Mr. Pisani seemed to be 
succeeding in opening indirect ne- 
gotiations with both groups. 

But the killing in January of a 
tearfmg Melanesian activist by the 


wumu pomi to a FrendShnd, and they demand^ his re- , ™ f uun ? m **puary 01 a 

New Caledorua- hui d* all to Paris. 3 leading Melanesian actmst by the 

mg trend toward The defiance in New Caledonia Fr “f h P® 1 ** “““ w *** *B- 

the huge distance beSas been matched in France by the “RJ P°“ L ^ 

Md France, suggo., i^jbvioos eagerness of the rigW the defiance of Mr. PisanTs anthor- 
ihc long-ienn soluijoT’Swosititmre make use of g* ***** MWP ® [ 

The New Caledonian gainst the Socialist government of P°sh^ past Frmdi se- 

funher complicaiert L^Sent Francois Mi tterra nd «My P®b« to hold a picnic m an 
sirateva 


area considered a stronghold of the 

in trance, with legjbw3iirac of Paris, a major GauHist “dependentists. 
due next year, tiie^rg^position te«dgr, announced that Mr. Pisani ordered the five major 
seized the New CaWnl* wonld travel to New Caledonia organizers of the picnic expelled 
with delight, only uv hJr irrt a plan dennmwwt by from New Caledonia. They refused 
dze the contradictions^** spokesman of the French gov- to leave and apparently took refuge 
lions of the Socialist ^jannatt, Geargjna Dnfoo. somewhere on the island. 

An unhealthv dialffu^ French officials said that the ■ Schools Boycotted 

between Metropolitan P ^ “ *» °® nrinue Militant Melanesians boycotted 

New Caledonia u> f av .^r. Pisaiii s efforu. A former primary sdiods ^ New cSSonia 
«iremists on both ^jjaullist ramsrer, te ?® on Friday in a new blow to Mr. 

indoeiitoihrininianeii^nv CUedran twornomfas ago p^s efforts. Ranm rqiorted 
aged initially by the un^h milhonty to negonate a plan frwn Noam&L 
gu.ll feelings of the s^or mdepm^ He is sdiedided Mr.Pisanisaidonthefirstdayof 
anti-indenendm.-.' r Ml .^o return March 3J. .u_ 


Edgard Pisani, France's special envoy in New Caledonia, 
greets children at school on the nearby island of Mark 


Vietnam Army Journal 
Cites Troop Indiscipline 


somewhere on the island. 

■ Schools Boycotted 


A genre trance -Prone 

HANOI — The Vietnamese 
Army suffers from indiscipline in 


Militan t M elanesians boycotted the ranks and officer brutality, the appropriate educational and disa- 


"White Critic 
Released by 
South Africa 
Urges Boycott 

Roam 

KIBBUTZ MAY* AN BA- 
RUCH, Israel — Dennis Goldberg, 
South Africa’s longest-serving 
white political prisoner, called Fri- 
day for a tight economic boycott 
against that country in his first in- 
terview since being released. 

The 51 -year-old anti-apartheid 
campaigner, who was freed Thurs- 
day after 21years in jail arrived in 
Israel on Thursday night. He is 
staying with his daughter on this 
remote collective farm on the Leba- 
nese border. 

Sentenced to life imprisonment 
for plotting to overthrow South Af- 
rica’s white rulers by force, Mr. 
Goldberg confirmed that he signed 
an agreement renouncing violence 
to gain his freedom. 

“I had a most terrible desire to 
live, to be with my daughter again, 
to see the light,” be said. U I needed 
to be out of prison-” 

Nelson Mandela and other jailed 
black leaders of the African Na- 
tional Congress, convicted with 
. , . .. _ , . . Mr. Goldberg in a 1964 treason 

ml envoy m New Caledonia, trial, have retoed to sign the agree- 

the nearby island of Mare, mwi r 

“I wish l had been as strong as 

they are. I admire them. I have not 
-M- -m changed my commitments.” he 

n /\f i martini said, dabbing tears from his cheeL 

'J O UlM IliW “I hope they understand.” 

r -w m m -m m He was held in a white prison in 

In niomThhim Pretoria, wink Mr. Mandela and 
.1 iAAtis&tsl/LwlA/i My the other members of the African 
-*■ National Congress were held on 

But bis superior, a lien tenant just Robben Island, off Cape Town, 
out of officer-training school, treat- and later in a prison in Cape Town. 


Uruguay Is Returned to Civilian Ride; 
Problem of Prisoners Remains Divisive 


By Alan Riding Mr. Sanguincui’s immediate But human riah'ts groups are also 

. VfH Y ork Times Server challenge may therefore be to find demanding investigations into the 

MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay —A a way to satisfy the public's de> cases of about 80 prisoner, who 
new civilian government took of- mand forjusuce without provoking died under tenure; between :? and 
free here Friday amid a growing a confrontation with the departing 44 w ho disappeared in Uruguay 
debate over how it should handle military rulers. and a further 123 Unicuavans who 


the problem of thousands of citi- 
zens who were imprisoned, who 
disappeared, or who were forced 
into exile in the last 12 vears of 

on urgency 


44 who disappeared in Uruguay; 
and a further 123 Uruguayans who 


The opposition Broad Front and disappeared in .Argentina, appar- 
National Parties have pressed for a cntly as a result of collusion be- 


“complete and unrestricted" am- 
nesty since Congress reconvened 
Feb. 15. The Sanguineui adminis- 


because the army is still holding tmtion_ is expected to propose an 
more than 340 political prisoners, immediate amnesty only for those 
including about 60 Tupamaro imprisoned since 1973. with a dif* 
guerrillas who were arrested before ferent judicial mechanism used to 
the military seized power in 1973. permit the release of former guer- 
Julio Maria Sanguineui, 49, the rillas - 
centrist who won November's pres- The president-elect has often dis- 

idential elections, has promised a unguisbed between “those who 


tween the military regimes then rul- 
ing the two countries. 

Mr. Sanguinetti. whose own po- 
litical rights were proscribed be- 
tween 1976 and 1981. has proposed 
that all inquiries be carried out by 
the judiciary. Human rights activ- 
ists and some opposition politi- 
cians. however, want a congressio- 
nal investigating commission to 
prepare a report to decide whidf 


propam of “national padfleation” fought democracy and those who SSmtldbepuKued 
to deal with the legacy of the dicta- fought the dictatorship," arguing 5000111 K pursued 
torship and to dismantle the army’s that ethically society cannot con- -The is t0 ™ e ^ ^nrxvt 
repressive apparatus. done the use of violence. .Whether t0 lhe familics JJfecteSVv 


repressive apparatus. 


done the use of violence. Whether 


But the armed forces are not his position will prevail will be de- 
leaving power in disarray. Last cided by Congress, where opposi- 
month, the army commander, uon parties have a majority. 


the dictatorship because, on ihetr 
own. thev are still too weak to con- 
front such a powerful institution as 


month, the army commander, uon parties have a majority. front such a powerful institution as 

Lieutenant General Hugo Medina, At one point in 1975, more than the armed forces," said Efrain Oli- 
stirred a potmen sionn by warning 7.000 people were being held, mak- vera, who works for the chuich- 
thES “if we are obliged, we will have ing Uruguay the country with the linked Peace and Justice Service, 
no choice but to carry out another Largest number of political prison- "The military apparatus is >ull verv 

mm iTStM..** - i..: r v - 


coup (f&tat.' 


ers relative to its population. 


much intact.' 


Flying in the Face of Chaos in Beirut 


ed him brutally instead of imposing 


Mr. Goldberg strongly attacked 
the United States and Israel for 


primary schools in New Caledonia army newspaper Qnan Doi Nhan n Unary measures, the paper said. It “~eX~r\ r ■ nra . 

on Friday in a new blow to Mr. Dan has cS&nrf. kaid the officer insdtedSnd hit the d ^ 

PisanTs efforts. Reuters reported The Vietnamese Army, whose returning soldier, and had him do economic °° ycoiu 
from Noamia. 12 million troops constitute the three consecutive days of hard la- . “I believe massive economic ao- 

Mr. Pisani said on the first day of world’s third larges 


ntute the three consecutive days ot hard la- * dcuctb massive economic ao- 
y, behind bor, gathering wood for fud, with- ti.on against South Africa would 


gum i«aings 01 tne Soct” 1 Mr. Pisam said on the first day of world’s third largest armv’, 

arrti-independenic „ ofr ■ , the new primary school year that those of China and the 

“.Tfl only pacent of the children had Union, hns.been engaged i 


Soviet out a midday rest. 


give such a blow,” he said, “by 


to rightist rule in Franc*. “Pisani wffl return saying et- 
If the wvieht nf „,„ v her that he has or does not have a 


turned a 


up at country schools, 
Melanesians are the over- 


Union, has been engaged in fight- Some month 
mg Cambodian guerrillas since No- took criticized 


Some months ago, the paper showing the bitter condemnation 
ok mrlfwwi “cadres behaving of the world for its indefensible 


r ranee give up Nee Calak™*."^ 
out losing its middle-put at 11101 toDC - 
precisely w hen hisunv om. 
moving’ toward the Pa<4 TUa i 
would happen if Fiend c 1 

and Guvana u ere to he lou ]l|6WS 
jeopardizing French nuefc 
ments and the nuropona 
gram? Wttrse still, wfuitf^ 
donia were to fall mi 
influence, becoming 3 k 
gional de'ctahiliration" 

As pacifist and jnu-nub 
reach the South Pacific. 4> 
stability of the million & 

binds the United Sijio : 

land and Ausualva. sud w. 
nnt altogetlwr triv.doiK mmm 

F.cononuc f act » t% h £ 
a negative, if nurcmjLr.4 
dine of nickel lonuws: 

Uvnt hj' iiktoi 
land's dcpettdciKc *>n Ft 
and aggravated the w«j!l 
hi the fate >M all iha; 
plan, named after Friuc- 
cm ov to New Calcd^na 
tempt to combine mJcpfC 
a^M.vialnMi. to proven ettr 
sovereign v *aic while p® 

Euiopcjn pi'p'datu'n *' 
strategic interests li W 
and mote to be inu«W 
Idpard IVmi o thelibjs 
It ntav vimph be 
deuce f. not the td^jJ 
New t '.ilcdoma 
other 1111 non 1 ics 
si.in). the tribal reatajj 
aks i« the iimtaHOj?- 
e.»nsiituti> New taWJ 
existence oi tor*** 

eommumt'. “ S’ 

.uforced atitoaoim.^J. 
evomnnic 

a better outi-oim ttf. 

i&ysng 

[hi- writer, 

tutu I Hrfi* 


vember, and they periodically dash hke latter-day village gentry, 
with Chinese forces on the border “Because 
north of here. The Vietnamese Junior,” the 
Armv is also deoloved in Laos. cere are inc: 


policy of refusing democracy to the 


The Global 
Newspaper. 


The ' K a nak Socialist National north of here. The Vietnam 
liberation Front, which wants im- Army is also deployed in Laos, 
mediate independence, warned Several articles in the ar 
. Thursday that it aimed to setup an newspaper have described pr 
alternative school system to fight jems in the rank* The paper 
colonial teaching.. reminded troops that serii 


“Because of their unpleasant be- great majority of its people." 
wior," the paper said, "some offi- The Reagan administration's po- 

re are incapable of instilling dis- ljcy of “constructive engagement,” 
jline in the ranks." he charged, “effectively provides 


Several articles in the army dpline in the ranks." he charged, “effectively provides 

newspaper have described prob- The paper reported that inqui- very strong support for South Afri- 
Icms in the rank* The paper has ties had shown that certain ranks ca and delays change," Mr. Gold- 
reminded troops that serious behaved brutally. Another article berg said. 

Meanwhile, one of five French breaches of discipline could result told of on-duty soldiers wbo spent rwnrt. the ml? nlaverf hv ™r 

settlers ordered to leave the territo- in stringent punishment, and in their time chatting in tea-houses . 
ry Friday emerged from hiding and some cases execution. and restaurants, not wearing full 

gave himself up. Emile Lebaigy. Tbe paper recenUjrfaiedihau unifom,. 

yoimg vwmamese uldier slipped mp^rwMedttutdisdpUp. 


some cases execution. 
The Daoer recently i 


K himself up. Emile Lebaigy. The papa- recently relaxed that a uniform. 

of the rightist Parachutists young Vietnamese soldier slipped The paper warned that disciplin- 
Union, was allowed to return home away from his regiment to take ary infringements in combat or in a 
and was placed under house arrest unapproved home leave. Realizing war zone — if followed by serious 


Israel for providing military equip- 
ment and training to South Afnca. 
In recent ^ears in prison, Mr. 


Officials said he would be allowed his wrongdoing, the paper said, he consequences — could lead to jail Goldberg said, he was permitted 
to remain in the territory because returned to the army to be pun- terms of 12 to 20 veare, or the firing only one visitor and did not receive 

t: T. - I I.L - I ■ r I - nmiBiMfUK imlil Cpnfomlvr lOSA 


his wife is in poor health. 


newspapers until September 1980. 


By Hugh Pope 

Reuters 

BEIRUT — When a uni- 
formed airport immigration offi- 
cer drew his revolver and com- 
mandeered a Boeing 707 because 
he wanted more pay, Beirut In- 
ternationa] Airport switched into 
a chaotic hijacking routine. 

Passengers scrambled off tbe 
plane. Police and militiamen 
opened fire. The blast from the 
jet engines killed an elderly man 
as the airliner took off for a 20- 
minute flight to Cyprus, trailing 
an orange escape chute from one 
of its three open doors. 

Radio stations spread the 
news of the airport's fourth hi- 
jacking in seven months, broad- 
casting control tower conversa- 
tions to alL Gunmen, as usual, 
brushed aside government secu- 
rity forces and took over the air- 
port. 

A dozen men toting Kalashni- 
kov rifles joined journalists and 
other onlookers crowding into 
the control tower. Militia leaders 
started bartering for the plane's 
return as it circled for nearly five 
hours between Cyprus and Bei- 
rut 

The day after the Feb. 23 hi- 
jacking, the gunman calmly ap- 
peared at a press conference; in 


uniform, silting nexi 10 a govern- 
ment minister, the Druzc leader 
Walid Jumblat, who said he sym- 
pathized with the man's de- 
mands. 

But Aker Haidar, a senior offi- 
cial of the Shiite Moslem militia 
AmaL who was on the hijacked 
plane and twisted an ankle on an 
escape chute, did not dismiss the 
matter so lightly. 

“There is a plot to dose the 
airport and suffocate West Ba- 
re l.” Mr. Haidar said. “A plot 
that pretends there is no security 
in order to justify opening a new 
aii port elsewhere" a reference to 
Christian areas to the northeast. 

An official of Air France, one 
of right foreign airlines still us- 
ing the airport, said, “If these 
local Wild West shows continue, 
soon nobody will be flying here 
at all” 

The last airline to suspend 
flights to the Beirut airport, 
which once was the busiest in the 
Middle East, was Cyprus Air- 
ways. It gave up after Feb. 7, 
when gunmen took over one of 
its planes on the tarmac and held 
it and its crew for six hours. 

At the point on the airport 
perimeter where the gunmen 
drove in, four L ebanese Army 
soldiers playing cards among the 


dilapidated bunkers of an old 
U.S. Marine base saul that they 
could not have stopped them. 

"We have a deficiency in men 
and materials.' said Captain 
Abdel Hamid Darwich. com- 
mander of the 327-man army 
unit that patrols the perimeter. 

“The government is neglecting 
the airport." he said. “It's so easy 
to get in. We don't have a fence 
or any obstacles to anything, be 
it guerrillas or animals," 

Captain Darwich said that ca- 
bles and even aiiport lights had 
been stolen. 

“When we stopped them by 
patrolling at night." he said, 
“they started thieving by day 
when we were busy elsewhere.” 

He also said that the govern- 
ment had not responded to his 
requests for electronic equip- 
ment to search passengers for 
arms and explosives. 

Spring grass pushing up 
through the tarmac may soon at- 
tract the cows and goats that 
graze unconcernedly beside the 
main runway. 

The situation so appalled the 
airport security chief, General 
Yassin Swrid, that he tendered 
his resignation four months agp. 
The Lebanese cabinet is still con- 
sidering whether to accept it 


■THIS IS ^ ANNOUNCEMENT BY TOE MINISTRY OF INFORMATION, QAT^ 


QATAR MOVES INTO A NEW ERA OF EDUCATION 


.-u;- v : ■ - 

• 


r ‘ 

? •; ■ . 


\ - 


nrrou 


HH the Emir addressing the opening assembly. 

H QATAR UNIVERSITY 
3 OPENS NEW CAMPUS 

^ QATAR entered a hew era in the pursuit of knowledge when 
y the Entir HH Sheflth Khalifa bin Hamad al-Thani opened the 
\ 1 I new campus of QATAR UNIVERSITY In the prestigious West 
h Bay district on February 23, 1985. 

Y February 22 is usually celebrated as the Accession Day and 
jgf ! this year marked the 13th Anniversary of HH the Emir’s 
]L j accession asruler of Qatar. The opening of the new campus of 
C7 ' Qatar University on February 23 was thus a part of the 
5^ ' ; Accession Day celebrations. 

Jf'i In his opening address HH tfte Emir Sheikh Khalifa 
'X 1 ^appealed to lhe youth of Qatar to purstie knowledge 
vigorously adopting the highest human values and 
inteBeduaf. social and moral principles. 

Ui*^ j "The rale of universities is," HH the Emir observed, "to help 
jferm creative minds, providing them with ample education, 
and promoting the virtues of morality and conscientiousness 
htheindividuaL" 

} HH the Bnlr noted that the state recognised education as a 
, „ : ii^ ,, bask: tenet for development and as such exerted the utmost 
IM ^ to strengthen the bases of general education, expand it 


“Our Nation gained that stature by virtue of being the first 
Nation to convey the noblest message: encouragement of the 
pursuit of knowledge, honouring of men of intellect, adoption 
of highest hianan values, and intellectual, social and moral 
principles. 

“This message was then, and stm Is, an inexhaustible well 
for contributing to human development Our youth should 
keep these facts in mind and be proud, in order to intensify 
their determination and confidence in achieving our 
aspirations to progress.” 

The opening ceremony of the new campus was attended by 
Qatar Heir Apparent HH Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, 
Minister for Education HE Sheikh Mohamed bin Hamad al- 
Thani, and education ministers of the Cooperation Council of 
the Arab States of the Gulf. 

Educationists and academics from 30 countries across four 
continents and from 12 international organisations attended. 
Apart from Unesco director general Dr M*Bow, director 
general of the Arab League Educational Cultural and 
Scientific Organisation (Alesco) Dr MoNdeen Sabir, and 
director general of the Arab Bta-eau of Education for the Gulf 
States Dr Mohamed Ahmed ai Rasheed, were also present 

Qatar University president Dr Mohamed Ibrahim Kazem 
said: "The University Is a Bving being. The University of Qatar 


There are now a Gttie more than 5,000 students at the Qatar 
University studying to various faculties for higher education. 

The high point of the prestigious new Qatar University 
campus complex is of course its architectural designs. Built at 
a cost of over QR700 mflfion, the new campus refyesents, 
according to Dr Kamal Kafrawi the architect, “a marriage of 
modem technology with traditional Islamic design." 

Kafrawi has taken great pains to ensure that the new Qatar 
University campus biddings are not only different to their 
design concept, but functionally useful for all those who wffl be 
using the university campus. 

The university buflefings are located on a commancfing ridge 
1 5km north of Doha and are constructed out of white precast 
units distinguished by an array of towers derived from 
traditional wind towers called Badgirs used to the region for 
hundreds of years. 

The building orientation is essentially inward looking 
following Islamic traditions and designed to respond to the 
strong heat and wind conditions common to the area. 

Architectural forms are unique in concept and shape with 
the towers projecting above the octagonal base structures. 
The new campus buildings located in a 100,000 sq. meters 
area create a new image In the eyes of the country without 


'Sr. 



r 4.' 


Aerial view of the new campus. 



academic goals 


tinilif •* 
leiri'u -- 

vm* 1 * 


u ; ! X,X .!* ■ Jifluests, Which included Unesco director general Dr Amadou 
r !C 1 1 'Mahtar M’Bow, HH the Emir said: “The means for our Arab 

and Islamic nation to regain its historical stature among 
^ nations is to catch up with modem scientific progress. 


Arabic tradition inc o rporated In modem 


was located in buildings not meant to house it Now, after all 
these years, we celebrate the move to a purpose-built 
university campus.” 

Prof. Kazem added: “It Is a campus designed and equipped 
to foster a productive Rfe for a collegiate sodety entrusted with 
a mission, proud of Its heritage, and faithful to itstracition, yet 
part of the tones. It is a society aware of issues, and preparing 
children to achieve its goals." 

Qatar University has faculties in engineering, science, 
humartities. social sciences and Islamic studies. 

■ A new college of Economics and Administration is to be 
added by the start of the next academic year. 


One of the lecture halls. 


disguising the past It brings references both subtly and openly 
to traditional forms thereby giving a cultural continuity to all 
who will be part of it 

The buildings foster an atmosphere that transcends time. 
Students, teachers, administrators and viators will 
undoubtecBy be stimulated by Qatar’s unique historic 
perspective. 

The octagonal plan of the Modular Education Unit derives 
from the application of fractional principles of ventilation 
through wind towers and of lighting through indirect sunlight it 
also permits any number of desk groupings to suit the 
lecturer's needs. The ingenuity of the modular shape is that it 


fulfills environmental needs and academic goals of 
excellence. 

The wind-tower structures, one of the outstanding features 
of the university, also provide cover for the university ' 
buildings. The shapes are based on traditional Arab 
architectural devices, adapted for use with contemporary 
technology for providing cool air, and for reducing humidity 
inside the buildings. 

The towers of light on the other hand also help control strong 
sunlight and keep electrical consumption to a minimum. 
Overhead fight fixtures reflect sun's rays to create indoor 
fighting that is natural, not harsh. 

Some skylights are combined with wind towers to promote a 
dynamic flow of air and HghL 

“Moushrabia" screens on vertical windows act as light 
filters, providing privacy for those inside the rooms. The 
carved timber screens are taken from Islamic styles and adorn 
the campus. 

Courtyards are open and yet partially covered, displaying 
gardens and fountains, and are like small oases throughout 
the campus. The university grounds in time will make a 
distinctive contribution to the landscape of Doha. The environs 
will be made green by planting suitable vegetation and 
growing grass areas. 

The silhouette of the new campus buildings against the 
skyline, the graded incline which slopes to lowlands, and the 
visual impact of the sea beyond, all contribute to aspectacular 
panorama. 

Truly the new campus heralds Qatar’s future aspirations 
vividly. Indeed a new and promising chapter to the country's 
higher education policy has begun. 


rrattott 




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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


'Cotton Qub’ Leaves 
Cab Calloway Cold 


By Jacqueline Trescotr 

Washington Past Service 

W ASHINGTON — In ihe 
movie “The Conan Club," 
one scene depicts the band leader 
Cab Calloway. But while the (Bid 
by Frauds Coppola may have used 
Calloway’s name, it does not use 
bis or the era’s real history. 

“It was a movie — that's all I can 
say about it They made it the way 
they wanted to make it They por- 
trayed what they wanted to por- 
tray. It wasjnst a movie, and it was 
a good movie." Calloway said. 

He said the word “movie" in a 
flat noncommittal way, adding at 
one point “It’s a picture. It could 
be ‘The Seven Dwarfs’ and it 
wouldn't make any difference. It is 
just a picture." Underneath the 
neutrality is a tremor of disgrun tie- 
matt He has seen the movie five 
times, mainly at celebrity opening 
nights, and has been cart in all his 
assessments. “They were looking to 
make a few million dollars oat of it 
as far as I can see. I don’t think it 
was done for any cultural purpose 
or any other purpose but commer- 
cial," he said. 

Calloway is one of the giants. He 
knew the scene of blade and white 


Finland Marks National Epic 

United Press International 

HELSINKI — F inlan d is cele- 
brating the 150tb anniversary of 
the publication of its national epic, 
the Kaievala, which has inspired 
Finnish design and music. The Ka- 
levala's preface was finished on 
Feb. 28, 1835, by Elias Lonnrot 
who collected the medieval verses. 
President Mauna Koivisto led fes- 
tivities Thursday in Helsinki, in- 
ducting a recital from the Kaievala. 


entertainers, businessmen and 
racketeers in Harlem that the film 
uses as a setting for a story of 
romance and crime. 

The Cotton Qub story hasn’t 
been told." he said, emphatically. 
Thepicture wasn’t about the Cot- 
ton Club. The picture was a gang- 
ster picture." His mammoth faugh 
tells how simplistic and unfortu- 
nate was the result, in Ms view. 

Other black performers who 
danced and played at the landmark 
night spot nave spoken out about 
the film’s emphasis on the under- 
world. the focus on a white musi- 
cian played by Richard Gere, its 
timidness at exploring how the 
black talent Influenced the tunes, 
and the oversimplification of char- 
acters in what was a complex racial 
situation. 

But Calloway is not going to be 
drawn into the debate. Asked 
about a scene where the white own- 
er physically threatens the charac- 
ter played by Gregory Hines, 
Calloway says only. That was all 
wrong. The part where they abused 
the performers, that never hap- 
pened.” 

Calloway, 77. has been perform- 
ing for six decades, years that 
might show in his girth but not in 
his spirit His calendar is booked 30 
to 40 weeks a year. “Much as I want 



Prices StiU Low for Charles X Furniture 


Imemanoatd Herald Tribune 

P i ARIS — The prejudice against 
French furniture of the early 
1 9th century is so strong that it 
defies both inflation and the drying 
up of the market, which has less 
and less to offer in such areas. Two 
auctions Wednesday at Droooc, 
conducted by the Oger-Dumont 
group and by Hubert Le Blanc, 
leave little doebt on that score. 


Yet, two decades ago. the style 
sday 


best represented Wednest 


SOURJEN MEUKIAN 


to — put it that way," be said of his 
lien span sympho- 


engagements, which 
nies to dubs. 

Last saxnmer he organized a 
band for three weeks of appear- 
ances on the West Coast On Feb. 
17, he danced with the Rockett es in 
New York for the second “Night of 
100 Stars” benefit 

The active roster of his genera- 
tion of entertainers, including Im? 
Home and Lionel Hampton, still 
has a huge cross-generational fol- 


lowing. Calloway does not have to 
reshape his shows for the young' 
sters. “No, I don’t change. You see, 
I have done it alL My reputation 
has carried me over 60 years." 

A link between the ages of jazz, 
swing and good sound, Calloway 
has made Ms mark in several me- 
dia. His songs “Minnie the Mooch- 
cr" and “The Reefer Man” are clas- 
sics, and he invented the 
unforgettable phrase “Hi-de-ho" 
one night when he forgot the lines 
to “Minnie.” In 1943 be appeared 
in the musical “Stormy Weather” 
and in the 1950s he sang the role of 
Sportin’ Life, a part be ted been an 
inspiration for, in a revival of “Por- 


seemed to stand a fair chance of 
getting off the ground. Character- 
ized by the use of yellow veneer— 
satinwood, elm, ash — on which 
linear patterns in dark-brown 
wood stand out. it is aworiarcri 
with the reign of King Charles X 
(1824-1830). Some of it, however, 
was being produced under Louis 
XVUI, whose reign began in 1815 
after the final fail of Napoleon L 
Nor is 1830 to be considered as a 
dear end to the period; the Charles 
X style lingered for a few years 
under Louis Philippe. Even so, it 
covered a limited span of tune, and 
rarity should increase prices. In the 
early 1960s an intensive promo- 
gy and Bess." He later appeared on donal effort was made by French 
Broadway in “Hello, Dolly!" dealers, backed up by art monthlies 
A discussion of reviving art such as Coonaissance des Arts. A 
fnrm< a* ta p danrm g , n( which decorator who had talent and a 

he was a master, is *l»>n to him “It forceful personality, Madeleine 
has always been. People have been Castaing, gave this effort a helping 
tapdancmgforl00years.lt started hand. 

out with the jig.” Commodes and secretaries Start- 

Leaning back in a wing chair and ed selling in the range of 30.000 to 


Doogfcs Owvdar/Tha W Lal ii ^ on F*oB 

Cab Calloway: The Cotton Qub story is still untold. 


ny orchestras he has perfi 


symi 


“Sl 


James Infirmary" with, he said he 
describe 


could not describe the source of the 
energy that keeps people calling his 
performances electrifying. But it is 
all natural: “If 1 have to force it, I 
don’t do iL I have never gotten to 
the point where 1 have to force it." 


50,000 francs (then roughly S6.000 
to 510.000) for the better pieces — 
a lot for furniture in those days. But 


gating close to those for important 
lSth-cenmry furniture, while 
Charles X pieces go for not much 
more than they did a decade ago — 
not even keeping up with inflation. 

On Wednesday the proceedings 
started with the Oger-Dumont 
wares. The first item, a fireplace 
s cre en built tike a porch with a 
projecting tablet of brackets to be 
used as writing desk, was a master- 
piece of early j9th-ocntiny cabinet- 
making. The satin wood veneer, set 
off by amaranth-wood moldings, 
was superb. The screen went at 
13,500 francs (now about 51,370). 

It was succeed e d by a pair of 
sofas called canapes panamers, of 
boat-shaped design, one end higher 
than the other, the long side, set 
against the wall, upholstered. The 
yellow wood, not identified by the 
experts, was inlaid with a Brazilian 
rosewood pattern of a rosette 
flanked by neo-Roman palmettos. 
Pairs are rare. At 66,000 francs, this 
pair was cheaper than it might have 
been in about 1970. 

Next came a set of four tables 
gigognes, or nested tables, in satin- 
wood with black fillets around the 
rim. The set appears to hare left the 
experts in some doubt as to its 
exact period, which was broadly 
stated as “1 9th century.” The slen- 
der, columnar Iqgs and the flat- 
tened, cusped arches at the top 
vouch, however, for its being from 
the Charles X period. The price, 
13,500 francs, was more than rea- 
sonable. 

Rarest of aQ in the Oger-Du- 
mont sale was an oval table with 
four bow-shaped legs. A smalt oval 
tablet Imlcs the legs halfway up. 
The amaranth feet, carved like lion 
daws, and the capitals point to a 



are complex. An important fad 
is that the entire range of **Fh 
Restoration" furniture was unit? 
ed under the “Second Res ten 
non." the period of Louis Phitipr 
1S30-1S4S. The models are. bros 


ly speaking, the same, but in a si 
plified versi 


Table sold at 27.000 francs. 


in another room. Among the earlier 
pieces was a large table, its round 
top supported by three sinuous legs 
terminating in ram heads. The 
dark-brown amaranth pattern of 
neo-dsssical inspiration, set off by 
the mellow golden veneer, is su- 
perb. So is the quality of the carved 



ram heads. The only flaw, literally. 

i. It 


is a crack in the veneer on top. 
may be impossible to repair the 
table to perfection, not even by 
, this may ai 


the fashion was short-lived. By the period shortly after the Napoleonic 
mid-1970s, not much was heard era. perhaps around 1820. The ele- 
aboat Charles X furniture. The talk gance and the rarity of the model 
was about Art Nouveau and Art make the knock-down price of 
Deco. The latter is now solidly en- 27,000 francs a joke, 
trenched. It sells at prices that are Hubert le Blanc then took over 


IMKBSATIOMI. EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


BKLOIUM 


BILGIUM 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY BRUSSELS 

a partnership of 
Boston University and 
Vrije Universiteit Brussel 

offers 


/ CUT THIS OUT 
i TO LEARN FRENCH 


T 


The newly-redeveloped Master of Science in Management 
(MSM), a master’s degree in business administration pr ogram 
stresses, an international perspective, a managerial problem- 
solving emphasis, and an interdisciplinary approach. 


The newly offered master of science in computer information 
systems (MSGS) program stresses the expertise to manage 
computer-based informatio n systems in a complex business 
environment. 


Distinctive characteristics of Boston University Brussels programs 
include*. 


Ceran, a chateau in the Belgian Ardennes where you team and Bve 
in French. Small groups and private lessons, with tailor-made 
programmes for individual needs, ensure real progress. Good food, 
good company, good teachers. Come and team, and enjoy yourself. 
We teach private people, companies, embassies, EEC, SHAPE etc. 


I 


For complete documentation, send this coupon or phone : 

I am interested in courses for : □ Adults □ Young People 

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- Students enter in September, January, or May. 

- Gasses held on VUB campus. 

- Instruction in English. 



NAME 


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ADDRESS 


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Avenue du Chateau. hfivezA B-4880 Spa. 
Belgian. Tel: 087/77 39 16. Telex 496S0 


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For more information contact the Director, 

Boston University Brussels, 

Avenue de la Tohon d*Or 17 A, 

Box 69C, 1060 Brussals. TaL: 322/511.18416 


GREAT BRITAIN 


AUSTRIA 



WEBSTER 
UNIVERSITYcusa) 

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Next 8-week term begins: January 14 
Dr. Robert D. Brooks, Director, Schubertring 14 
Phone (0222) 52 11 36 A-1010 Vienna, Austria 



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UJA. 


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Spanish - Italian - Mathematics - Private instruction 


All sports 

e.g Tennis - Wateiskting - Surfing 


Riding 


Contact: 0. Gademann/Mrs Schmid. Hohenweg 60. 
CH-9000 St Gallen 
CH Tel. 071-27 9291 


rk Instihit 1 

ttosenberg 

since 1RS0*-* 


stripping. This may account for the 
price — 44,500 Cranes. 

No such excuse can be pm for- 
ward regarding an excellent com- 
mode. whose two doors open to 
disclose three English-style sliding 
drawers. The palmette-and-scroll 
pattern in amaranth is the Quintes- 
sence of Charles X design. The 
price of 51,000 francs may be good 
as the market stands, but it does 
not do justice to the work. 

The 19th-century masterpiece in 
this sale was another center table. 
Its hexagonal top rests on six 
bronze winged busts supported by 
tapering pmnrs that nse from a 
shaped base. A mixture of Empire 
influence and the English idea of 
the hexagonal top date it to 1815- 
1820. Its execution points to a great 
cabinetmaker — the name of 
Georges- Jacob- Desmalter springs 
to mind. Characteristically, it was 
bought by Jacques Perrin, one of 
the world’s leading dealers special- 
izing in 18th-century furniture. 
Anyone used to the great creations 
of the grandfather, the first 
Georges Jacob, who worked for 
Marie Antoinette at Versailles, or 
to those of his sens, Georges II 
Jacob and Fnmfois-Hooore, who 
signed “Jacob Frtrcs, rue MesUe," 
would find something familiar 
about this table. It was knocked 
down at 140,000 francs, to which 
should be added a restoration bill 
of 15,000 to 20.000 francs. That, 
again, is very low for 3 piece that 
may be rated one of the finest of its 
time. 

The reasons for such disregard 


version; this was the bea 
rang of the mass-production age 
French furniture. M ahogan y j 
placed the earlier yellow rent 
with amaranth marquetry, or 
reverse; which came into fashi 
about 1827: dark Brazilian ro 
wood veneer, inlaid with ydi 
wood patterns. The heaviness 
Louis Philippe furniture has hue 
the perception of First Restorer 
furniture. It has also given, wro 
ly. the feeling that Charles X pie 
are available by the hundreds. 

A second factor detrimental 
Charles X is its architectural qu 
ty and its strictness in ornamei 
design. The current mood is gea 
to the baroque rather than thecj 
ricaL At the end of le Blanc’s i 
came one of the most besot* 

Louis XVI period commodes 
fered at auction in recent ye 
Carrying the mark of GttiJIai . 

Beneman, it combines architect! ‘ . .jj if 
perfection with lightness. The t . \ l J * J 1 
tral portion of the facade pny» ' 1 * 

slightly forward, and orin « 4 . > I I*! *■11 

mountsemphasize the main 1 \ J 5 \ I I L f l*ll 

ly -Jl 


or 


I run 


stons. The motley 
seer has just the right meBow I 
“Too banal" “No imaginaik 
leading dealers said of this pi 
echoing the verdict of the mar 
This is as good as saying Qu 
fugue by Bach lacks the fantasy 
Cimarosa concerto. At 400-. 
francs, Beneman’s commode x 
to an unidentified private bt 
who may congratulated for mai 
the year 1 s most resounding bar 
so far. 


* .ill 


Pantheon Focus 
On French Wori 




N; 


New York Times Service 

EW YORK. — The list of 
rent and scheduled w 
from Pantheon has a strong Fr 
flavor. This spring’s Modern T ' 
ers series in chides works by M 
Toumier and Simone de Bern, 
as wdi as the late Julio Cortfci 
Argentina, and others. • 

This summer. Pantheon 
publish Marguerite Durass 
Lover." which won the 1984 
court Prize, France's top lit 
award. 

Later this month the coir 
has scheduled “Neuronal 
The Biology of Mind," by Dr. - 
Pierre Changeux of the Paste) 
stituto in Pans. In April it wfl.' 
lish “The War Diaries of Jear - 
Sartre: November 1939-1940 


>■ 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


Page 



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ARTS /LEISURE 


tv and JlN 


s,r ‘iincvs 


‘kaisn. Thc cun^ 11 ^ 

*"** one of V 

Louis NVl nJ*, 1 ®** 

the matv J? 
Bcnenian. u Liimblnef ' 4 
perfection with hjjjjj. 



Enchanting 'Purple Rose 9 May Be AUen 9 s Best Ever 


France Gorse in ins studio in Soetschah. 


David Hamgm 


tral portion of the r 

^Slovene Sculptor France Gorse, 87, 
S "cjJSflfl 11 Productive Austrian 'Retirement’ 


rut for- 
i own- 


uinto- 
n. The 
•c good 
it does 


«j^oing the verdict _ 

This is as good as nw By Alan Levy 
fugue by Bach lacks iSt' Intern ational Herald Trii 

Cimarosa concerto lQUETSCHACH, Austria — This 

francs '’ll ( 3nmn«--cn«ilris9® viHaev- Cram 


imts and in the Slovenian 

capital In the 1930s. he discovered 
Ernst Barlach’s Goman Expres- 
sionism wild took it as affirmatio n 


burdened and burdening with arti- 
ficial creations twisting and hiding 
humankind's truthful image. He 
decided to create his own ultimate 



, d m£ * >ant h eon Foffib ¥ ' 


me 


^International Painters Week, to ex- 
ud sell what theypamL One 
first landi nail re these paint- 

ire 

A prize pi^ctf Ivan Mestrovic 
ww of L^rcnt and M.h<il* i 883-1962) in Zagreb six decades 
pccul- irom 1 amheon has 3 st rrign. rv»rgA-r »iTim^ tn mote fn 
flavor. This springs Mod 972 after two decades m Geve- 
ers senes includes noifa-and and R mplfl yn He wwm to 
TiHirnicr and Simone ispend the «m» nin of Kfe in senn- 
as well as the late Julio (retirement in Suetschach — a 
Argentina, and other* noun tain pics distant, but a poHti- 
This summer. Paeal world removed. from his native 


nuurc. 
rations 
• ' first 
ed for 
Iks. or 
rges II 
fc, who 
eske," 
imiliar 
locked 
which 
on bill 
That. 
x that 
a of its 

regard 


Pracal worid removed, from his native 

C i Wish Marguerite Delovenia in Yugoslovia — and in- 
wer." which won ihefctead has been carving away steadi- 
coun Prirc. F ranee's iry in a winter of con tent, mHng the 
award. Toon’s churches with modem, in 

loiter this month ikiovadve crucifixes and Stations of 
has scheduled "Neon-he Cross and giving his village a 
The Biology of Mini'br^Watex Spirit” fountain. 

Pierre Channeuv of ihrfc France Gorse (pronounced Gor- 
sdlutc in Paris. In ApiflpHEEfy was born Sept 26, 1897, 
lish "The War Diaiierf** son of a rural bookbinder, in a 
Sartre: November lOSfegion where wood caning came 
aster than words or writing. After 




nflitajy service on the Italian bar: 
ler in Worid War l he attended 
jehool in Ljubljana and then en- 
S!f |% * I «« gt . - xred the Acadoxty of Hne Arts in 

vi ly lUH ■. ;Zagrd), where Mestrovic eacour- 

jaged him to stick with wood and 

lit 1 4-adri> ' «•* tottoy acceomated the suggestive 


In 1963, he moved to Brookl 
but haunted the galleries of “ 

( <J1M „ _ _ hattan. While he objects to anyone w 

. ^p^^nd figurative aspects of his work. calhng his art abstract, the trends converted into a public gallery 

rA 1 in 1925 as winner of the trines loosened his work and housing 53 of his works. Even the 

gave it new vigor. Though less liier- 



Most of his utterances are devoid 
of omament, though not mnrinn 
Asked if he ever married, he an- 
swers; “I am 50 years divorced. We 
had a child who lived a week.” 

Fifty years ago ins work focused 
on the female form, and much of 
what he did from the nrid- 1930s 
into the 1940s concentrated an the 
nude. During World War IL. he ran 
his own art school under relatively 
benign Italian occupation. In 1945 
he moved to Trieste as a professor. 
In 1952 he set sail for the New 
World —in quest of new materials, 
new media, new freedom. 

In his 11 years in Cleveland, the 
world capital of inngrt Slovenia, 
he did not find freedom. Cleve- 
land's urban industrial atmosphere 
and the formal commissions he re- 
ceived inhibited his freely flowing 
contours and rendered his sculp- 
tural forms rigid unto rigor mortis 
or, at best, clenched in some of the 
mental struggle the artist was en- 
during. Toward the end erf his Ohio 
stay, however, he broke through 
with aneo-Godric style and a mate- 
rial he invented to express if Wal- 
nunstic, a mixtur e of walnut-wood 
sawdust and plastic glue molded 
over wire mesh and wood- 


its politics.’ 

Moving into the oldest farm- 
house in town, he renovated it by 
hand, slowly but steadily convert- 
ing it into home, studio and muse- 
um. One enters through a sculpture 
garden of artificial-stone busts of 
Carinthian poets and painters 

flanlrfng n a o n f Antra* td Snowman 

culture. Downstairs, where the 
cows used to live, is Gorse’s atelier. 
Here, mu rmuring “aha, aha” to 
himself on Ms constant voyage of 
discovery, be works in bronze, 
wood, copper, terracotta, and Wal- 

nnhsrir, using a ntrrm r fnr “quality 

controT (a term he picked up in the 
United States) by viewing his 
works from afar as others see them 
instead of losing himself in details. 
“Aha!” he exclaims. “I find myself 
out with the mirror." 

Barely 5 feet (1.5 meters) tan, 
slightly stooped, and looking a lit- 
tle like a garden dwarf, he hardly 
bobbles cm the artificial leg he has 
worn, or uses the cane he has car- 
ried, since his left leg was amputat- 
ed below the knee in 1977. With- 
ered by osteomyelitis, since 1924, 
the leg caused him more than half a 
century of pain before he gave it 
up, and, “Aha, I haven’t nad a 
minute of trouble since." 

Up a hand-hewn outride stair- 
case is a raftered hayloft he has 


By Vincent Canby 

Hew York Tunes Service 

N EW YORK — Everything 
about Cecilia (Mia Farrow) is 
tinged with melancholy, including 
the time — the depressed 1930s — 
and Lbe place, a drab little New 
Jersey town where even the sun- 
light looks gray. Her husband. 
Monk (Danny Aiello), a big, short- 
tempered lug, isn't a bad son. real- 
ly, and, like almost every other man 
in town, he's out of a job and not 

MOVIE MARQUEE 

looking for work. However, when 
he's had a few beers, he's inclined 
to push her around a bit 
Cecilia presents her objections to 
Monk in the form of extremely ten- 
tative observations: “AH you do is 
drink and play dice and 1 wind up 
getting smacked.” Replies Monk 
with reason: “I always warn you 
first," Cecilia is even a failure as a 
waitress in the town's single, very 
greasy spoon. 

It's no wonder that Oriiin like 
millions of other Americans of her 
time, finds life cm the silver screen 
not only preferable to but more real 
than the worid around her. One 
day. after going through a bad 
patch at the diner and with Monk, 
she is sitting in the Jewel Theater, 
watching something called “The 
Purple Rose of Cairo” for the ump- 
teenth time, when the film's hand- 
some, four-square juvenile, a piib- 
helmeled character named Tom 
Baxter (Jeff Daniels), steps down 
from the screen and into Cecilia's 
life. As Cecilia later confides to her 
sister, “I just met a wonderful man. 
He's fictional but you can’t have 
everything." 

This is the real “Purple Rose of 
Cairo,” which is the title of Woody 


Aden's new comedy as well as of 
the movie within it. 

To be blunt about it. “The Pur- 
ple Rose of Cairo” is pure enchain- 
ment, It’s a sweet, lyrically funny, 
multilayered work that again dem- 
onstrates that Woody Aha is the 
premier American filmmaker. 
Standing something over 5 feet tall 
in his sneakers, he lowers above ail 
others. 

“The Purple Rose of Cairo” is as 
fine as anything he's ever done, 
from “Take the Money and Run." 
“Annie HalT and “Manhattan," 
through "Zehg” and “Broadway 
Danny Rose." Quite possibly it is 
his besL I would even go so for as to 
rank it with two acknowledged 
classics, Luis Bufiud’s “Discreet 
Charm of the Bourgeoisie" and 
Buster Keaton’s “Sherlock Junior," 
both of which it recalls though in 
no way imitates. 

It also recalls Allen’s own small 
classic of a siory, “The Kugdmass 
Episode,” about a professor of hu- 
manities who becomes so infatuat- 
ed with Madame Bovary that he 
finds himself inside the Flaubert 
novel making mincemeat of the 
plot line. 

Though Alien does not appear in 
“The Purple Rose of Cairo,” his 
work as writer and director is so 
strong and sure that one is aware of 
his presence in every frame. It does 
not overwhelm the contributions of 
the others, but illuminates them, 
particularly the glowing funny per- 
formance of Farrow. It's as u this 
wonderful actress, in spile oT her 
English stage credits and all her 
earlier films, was finally awakened 
only when Allen cast her in “A 
Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy,” 
“Zdig” and, most spectacularly, 
“Broadway Danny Rose.” 

My admiration for Allen extends 



Reiner (right), Daphne Zoniga, John Cusak during filming of “Sure Thing." 


to everyone connected with “The 
Purple Rose of Cairo" — all of the 
actors, including Daniels, Aiello. 
Dianne Wrist and the players with- 
in the film within: Stuart WunzeL 
the production designer and par- 
ticularly Gordon Willis, the direc- 
tor of photography, who has great 
fun imitating the look of the movie 
Cecilia falls in love with as well as 
creating a style fitting to the de- 
pressed times that frame the interi- 
or film. 

■ A Beguflmg Comedy 
Rob Reiner's new- film, “The 
Sure Thing," is glowing proof, 
writes Janet Maslin in The New 
York Times, of two things: Tradi- 
tional romantic comedy can be 
adapted to suit the teen-age trade, 
and Reiner's contribution to “This 
Is Spinal Tap” was more than a 
matter of humor. Thai film had its 


Filmmakers Meet Obstacles in Kenya 


the Mestrovic Prize; however, 
HSorse sought to distance himsdf 
Srom tiie master and become Ms 
3>wn man. 

€ He left for Italy, where the Ital- 
ian Commission on War Damages 
, ' . A_ Sissigned him to create works lor 

churches. Returning to Yu- 


al than ever, it took on a new reli- 
gious tyrirism. . 

In 1970, he visited the country- 
side in Austria’s southernmost 
, CarintMa, and immersed 
summer and autumn 
in the mountains and valleys, 
woods and farmlands, unspoiled 
villages and alpine lakes. Upon his 
return to the United States, New 
York City struck him as a place 


iFolger Theater to Stay Open 


The Associated Pros 

(TT/ASHINGTON — The <Ereo- 
|YV tor of the Fdger Shakespeare 
try says Amherst College has 

d to demate 5560,000 to en- 

, nun « ^ Folger Theater to remain 

the IHT at fapcV id! jgj. jpm two more yean. The Amherst 
30TS and save alinesi - xustees had said earlier that the 

Mill most Europe taalg draeal The ead of 

nnev The trustees, who administer the year during its 15-year existence. 
Ch news for youi ^xolger Library, will donate Die trustees’ decision to keep the 
J300,000over thenext two years, in theater open was apparently influ- 
enced by public uproar over the 
announcement that the theater 
would dose. 


sheimer, the library’s director. 

Gundersbeuner said an anony- 
mous donor had pledged 5100,000, 

to be matched on a 3-1 basis, to 

hdp the theater survive the transi- armr^mryJ 
tional period. 

In January the trustees said the 
theater was an unacceptable drain 
on the library’s resources. The the- 
ater has lost 541^968 to 5493,000 a 



7«.07.ra.Tl*.i«-j^ iani ( ? 


fce to vote WT 9 ■ fc xnca 

Work to Be Restaged bm 


The Associated Press 

IW* .. A ’■ -*.<;p RANKFURT— The Bolsboi 
rv-- 1 v Ballet choreographer, Yuri 
-- - --' v: J . -•••! - ^higorovich, outlining a an 11-day 
.. • ^jnr of West Germany, has dis- 
'■^tosed plans for revived work by 
- i^taitii Shostakovich. 


miuu ‘ T 1’ vi : j>bnkfurt and DOssddorf starting 
iViiMKi L . : - U* today. The March 3-7 perfar- 

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The BdshaFs performances in 
West Germany mil indude “The 
Golden Agft” a ballet by Shostako- 
1930 in Lenm- 


rafters are sculpted. The exhibits 
range chronologically from a 1937 
terracotta bust of a young boy in 
Ljubljana to a Wahmtistic work-in- 
progress of three skaters. 

Some of the 1970s sculptures are 
displayed in the spots where he 
chiseled them before putting to- 
his museum. They include 
fegative and Positive,” a furled 
copper sheet resembling a sail “but 
you can imagine most everything”; 
"The People of Today,” with fal 
bodies ana tiny heads; and a touch- 
ing “Terrified Satyr." 

“What terrifies him?” a visitor 

nslcs. 

“Something beyond his imagina- 
tion.” 

His TnnQ>nffl char g e no admis- 
sion and keeps no regular hours. 
While unfailing ly hospitable to utt- 
ers, be prefers ad- 
vance notice, preferably by tele- 
phone (Austrian area code 04228, 
local number 2186), “so I can tell 
you when the light is best for view- 
ing. In the beginning, I pin electric 
light into the museum, but then I 
tome it away becanse it doesn’t do 
the figures justice." 

The artist will give a glided tom 
in English, German or Slovene, “if 
I'm in good condition. Right now, 
my condition is not the best I 
mean, I can only woric two hours at 
time before I have 10 take a 
break.” 

Over his door, he has carved the 
inscription “Ars longa, vita brevis.” 
Having fulfilled the first half, he 
doesn’t worry about the big “Aha!” 
at the end of the second half. Last 


By Barry Shiachter 

The Associated Press 

N airobi — The shooting of a 
film starring Robert Bedford 
and Meryl Streep is under way in 
Kenya — presenting a special set of 
obstacles not usually encountered 
In Hollywood. 

The makers of “Out of Africa" 
put false ears on Kenyan extras, 
because most tit them no longer 
stretch their earlobes. The film- 
makers imported eight African li- 
ons from California because the 
local rates were not tame enough. 
And the film, due for release in 
December, has met charges of wage 
discrimination: A white adult extra 
earns two and a half times more 
than an adult black Kenyan. 

The co-producer, Terry Clegg, 
.said the wage gap stemmed purely 
from supply and demand. In Eu- 
rope; be said, where the situation is 
reversed, an African would receive 
a higher daily rate. 

Several weeks into the shooting, 
500 white men got Edwardian 
short-back-and-sides haircuts from 
abaitery of barbers. Dressers fitted 
them out in jodhpurs, leggings, 
bush jackets and pith helmets or 
floppy “double-terai’’ (two-lay- 
ered) hats, which early Kenyan set- 
tiers thought gave better protection 
from the sun. 

Several dozen African men had 
their hair fixed according to the 
tribe they represented. Some had 
drooping artificial rare, made of 
foam latex, filled with sflver-dd- 
lar-sized wooden rings or beads. 

Peter Njau, 22, a mechanic, sat 
patiently as ears were affixed to his 
head. Africans who their heads 
shaved or false ears glued on re- 


The white extras, who ranged 
from the local Morales Benz deal- 
er to an American Presbyterian 
missionary and a West Goman 
backpacker, received the equiva- 
lent of 525 a day. 

“I hate this business” of charges 
of discrimination. Gegg said. “It 
happened in India with 'Gandhi.' ” 
Gegg was associate producer for 
that film. “I have learned that I am 
going to get the stick for it and I 
have to be thick-skinned because 1 
can't actually solve the problem.” 

Gegg. 37, who is from Sheffield, 
England, said that if he paid whites 
the same baric rate that the Afri- 
cans received, he could not recruit 
the hundreds of white extras he 
needed, but that if he offered black 
extras 525 in a country where many 
earn less than S3 a day, “it would 
cause a riot” 

He said government officials 
urged him not to offer pay above 
the local scale, since it would en- 
courage Kenyans to abandon their 
regular jobs for a few weeks of film 
work, disrupting business. 

Die ruling-party newspaper. The 
Kenya Times, attacked the film for 
its pay policy and charged that 
blacks were traced to perform in 
ibe nude, charges that Universal 
Pictures denied. The government, it 
said, “should not allow foreign film 
firms to come here and insult us rat 
our own soil just because some rac- 
ist author wrote a racist book ages 


ago ” a Kenya Tunes editorial said. 

“Out of Africa” tells of the love 
affair between the Danish writer 
Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen) and 
the Oxford-educated hunter Denys 
Finch Hatton. Die 528-mil lion 
production is directed by Sydney 
Pollack, whose films include “Ab- 
sence of Malice” and “Tootsie.” 

Kenyan officialdom, not the pay 
controversy, has been Gegg’s big- 
gest headache, the producer said. 

“The government doesn’t seem 
to realize bow much hard currency 
we are bringing into the country, 
he said. 

Instead of offering material in- 
centives to aLtract business*, as do 
some U. S. state film commissions, 
Kenya imposes restrictions, he 
said. He cited curbs on the move- 
ment of trucks ar night and import 
taxes that he said were more than 
100 percent on raw film stock. 

Kenya has been the location of 
many European and American 
films with an African theme be- 
cause of the moderate climate, 
good hotels and modem communi- 
cations. But Gegg said that the 
Ivory Coast now had similar condi- 
tions and might win business away, 
since, unlike Kenya, it offers in- 
ducements that save large amounts 
of money. 

Of the' 528-million budget, about 
56 million will go into the Kenyan 
economy, said Monty Ruben, 59, a 
Nairobi businessman serving as a 
production consultant. 


515 instead of the roinimnm 59. or 
half of that for a child. 

“They are paying very low ” be 
said, even though be had been in- 
structed by the set's public rela- 
tions officer not to discuss the sub- 
ject “The white people are getting 
much more and they don’t have to 
put anything onto their ears. 


vich first Staged in _ 

grad. The stoiy fra this production year, when he took his passport to 
was written by Grigorovich and ^ u.s. consulate in Vienna. 220 


>1': 


The ballet craps of Moscow’s 
^blshra Theater tours Duisburg, 


Ivan Glikman. 

Other performances on the tour 
will be “Swan Lake;" “Giselle’' and 
“Romeo and Juliet." Natalia Bes- 
mertnova stars in “Swan Lake" and 



are the male leads. 


mites (3601riknneteis) away, he was 
asked how long he planned to stay 
in Austria and was told he could 
still take the cheaper five-year re- 
newal instead of the new 10-year 
extension. 

“I will stay in Austria until my 
Gorse replied, “and I 
! back to see you in 10 years, 
please." 


Opera Season Cut 
In Washington 

The Associated Press 

W ASHINGTON —The Wash- 
ington Opera has announced 
that it will present two fewer operas 
than usual next season, and cut the 
number of performances 38 per- 
cent, because of reduced federal 
funds. 

Martin Feins ion, general direc- 
tor of the company, died tisin; 
expenses, reduced government aii 
and what he said was the prospect 
of a 25-percent cut in private con- 
tributions U the Reagan adminis- 
tration’s tax simplification plan is 
approved by Congress. 

The company is reducing its 55.4 
million budget to 55 million next 
year by trimming the number of 
productions from seven to five and 
the number of performances from 
72 to 45, Feinstein said. 


^iOONESBURY 


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INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 

GALERIE GEORGES LAVROV 


42 Rua Baaubourg 75003 Paris - Tel.s (1) 272.71.19 

Malcolm MORLEY 

Paintings 

„■ i ■ - ■ . — Until March 25 — ■— ■ 


■GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


■ 6 # Rue Jean-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. TeL: 359.82.44 


MUSiE RODIN 


77, rue da Varenne, Pari* 7*). Metro Yarenrm 

Robert JACOBSEN 

Daily (except Tuesday*) 10 am - 11-30 am and 230 pm - 5 pm 

JANUARY 16- APRIL 15 


STOCKHOLM 



STOCKHOLM 
ART FAIR 

20-25 MARCH 
1985 


Head Office . 

Leif SioWe 

SOLiENTUNAMASSAN Ab 

Bo* 174 

$-19! ?3 Sclleniuno 
Sweden 

Tel - 16 896 0040 
Tele* 12*55 Safcnr £ 


PARIS 


Ga lerie J. MASSOL 
12, rue La Bo6tie 8*. 

Tel 265 93 65 

POUL ANKER BECH 

Until March 30 


February 28 - March 30, 1985 

Raul Russo 

Argentinian Painter 


Galerie Fr. Roosevelt 
12 Ave. Franklin-Roosevelt 
75008 PARIS 

Last exhibition in Paris 


laughs but it also bad enough 
sweetness and cohesiveness to 
make an audience somehow core 
about its characters, even at their 
most idiotic. “The Sure Thing" 
brings the same affectionate style 
to bear on a charmingly mis- 
matched collegiate couple. They 
spar their way through a cross- 
counu\ journey to California to see 
their respective mutes, falling in 
love with each other along the way. 

The title refers to the gorgeous, 
promiscuous surfer girl to whom a 
cutup named Walter (Gib) Gibson 
(John Cusack) has been promised 
an introduction by a high school 
buddy. Gib's classmate Alison 
Bradbury (Daphne Zuniga), who 
has the hainlo of a Breck girl and a 
matching sense of humor, has her 


own beau in California — a high- 
prep law student who hates panics, 
enjoys lea. plans to have a hound 
and a farmhouse some day. and 
shapes up as the consummate stiff. 

The surest thing here is the inspi- 
ration guiding Reiner, and the 
screenwriters Steven L Bloom and 
Jonathan Roberts, in recalling “It 
Happened One Night" as a con- 
temporary adolescent love *lor>. 
To that film's foolproof on-thc- 
roud romantic formula ihe film- 
makers have added a moral dilem- 
ma for Gib. who isn't enurely 
comfortable with the frat-pany 
ethics of his friends. That he and 
.Mi son come to understand them- 
selves w hile discovering each other 
makes the film all the more beguil- 
ing. 


AUCTION SALES 


M* Pierre CORNETTE DE SAINT CYR 

A u tHo m tr 

24, Ava. Gaorga-V 75008 PARI5 
TeU 720.15.94, 72X47.40, 723.47.42. 
Talax: 21031 IF/608 


HOTEL DROUOT - PARIS 

MONDAY MARCH 25, 1985 at 2.30 p.m. - ROOMS 5& 6 

COLLECTION OF MARQUIS DE G. 

from the Chateau de Terraube 
(former collection of Firmin Didot) 

ESTATE L. and others 



DESPORTES Alexandre-Frongois (1661-1743) 

Still life of fruits and silver 
signed and dated 1720 (1,58 X 2,10 m.) 

OLD MASTER AND MODERN .PAINTINGS 
IMPORTANT SET OF OBJETS D’ART 
HISTORICAL MEMENTOS 
AND VERY FINE FURNITURE 


Pubic viewing: 

Saturday March 23 from IT cun. to 6 pjn. 
end from Ppm. to 11 pan. 
Ca kday va on toques* F.J50 


M" S Hipbone Deurbergue 

Auctioneer 

19, BIcL Montmartre 75002 PARIS Tel.-. 261 .36.50 

HOTEL DROUOT PARIS 

Friday March 22 - ROOM 2 

DRAWINGS - PAINTINGS - FURNITURE 

GOYA: a sculptor 

sepia drawing, N°90 of the album F (205 x 14 cm] 
Expert: M. de Bayer 
Catalog on request: 56 




Jewellery Auction 


rp INTERNATIONAL =n 
JEWELRY AUCIION 

on Saturday, March 9, 198S, 2 pan. 
at Hold Enropaiscber Hof 
in 6900 Hnddberg 

On view: 

Wednesday, March 6. to Friday, 
March 8, 1985 
daily from 11 ajn. - 7 pjn. 
Antique Jewelry from 
Aristocraf s Private Collection 
Distinguished Diamond and 
Gemstone Jewefay 

Brilliant-cut solitaires to 6 ct, finest 
Burmese rubies and sapphires, 
(Mflahiin *HKTRMSl ^ !M p ll "i !l "'— 5 
and other precious jewels. 

Snuffboxes - Silver - Watches 

Dissolution of a collection of gold, 
gold/ enamel & porcelain snuffboxes, 
Fabcrgi silver, 18 th century silver, 
pocket watches with rmealer & musical . 

chimes, and other object* of virtn. 
Cebdoose with color fflnsteukms of all 
Jewelry (DM. 20) on request. 

Trettsch & Krauth GmbH 
Jewelers & Auctioneers 
Sofienstnfle 29. 

0-6000 HrifWbqp, W. Gammy. 

■Me 0C2[r2WM& 0211/492964 
Tdac: BSSMSfenopd 

=T* AaetaSfmiteteilMky AShcr = 




I 










Pages 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-S UNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Iridays 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


VOL tush Law 


40% 3W 
22 21 Hi 

54 50 

38% 25Vh 
45* 

34* 33 

30* 39ft 
SO 49% 
42 4m 
134* 134 
W* MM 
54W 51ft 
■44* 42* 

90M 54 

2** 2» 


to* +lft 
21 % + % 
53* +4tt 
2SU. 

45% + % 
33% + * 
30 

49* + ft 
41% +1% 
135% +1% 
14% 

S3 -HU 
43ft + % 
am +4 
24% + % 


L"*» ™gJ4 1WM 128249 129931 + 1538 

Trvna 63L2Q 44249 52544 ffiS + 4J2 

Ufll 147 Jl 149J4 147J6 14U0 + MB 

Comp 92X45 53234 53140 3BL1T + 434 


Composite 

Industrials 

Tramp. 

Utilities. 

Finance 


HWi Law Oese eft's, 
10533 10527 UUM +1.11 
12230 12200 12255 + 1 J? 
10124 101JU 11004 +0.93 
5272 5255 5272 + 024 

nan 109.72 1100s +i.u 


MSE 


AMEX Most Active 




354 Ml 

ZK 379 

217 2SD 

M3 790 

34 - 30 

I 1 


NYSE Diaries 


Closing 


anaia 

■ 0444430 


Composite 

ifldusrrtoit 

Finanoi 

insurance 

utmtios 

Banks 

Trans. 


Cm* aw 

+ 299 284.15 
+ <M 30059 

+ L79 mn 

+ 1.49 32726 
■9 343 MJXZ 
+ 045-349.11 
+ 244 2*581 


Odd- Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dedtned 
Undwneed 
Total Issum 
N ow Hi on* 
New Laws 
Votumeim 
Volume down 


1111 814 

405 714 

414 4B 

2010 3014 

155 78 

4 3 


. 100,474410 
. 2347X180 


indudM in me satos Hsures 


Boy Softs *5im 

154J09 43SX7D 1282 

185807 447479 1343 

197,154 484474 1477 

1*9474 491395 14M 

175,984 434J05 1713 


VoLaf 4 PJB 137470400 

PT8Y.4PJ4.yot 100720000 

Prw consolidated dose IZU4M3D 1 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


w 

Htab 

Lew 

Lett 

33311 

4* 



9789 

a* 

7* 


8004 

38* 

25 


■wn 

M* 




3* 








Zlfr 



M48 

5ft 

Sft 



MW 



I2K 

12* 



ia 

13% 

12% 

12% 

13 

U* 


NW Law Oosa area 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages I 


Tables include tbe nationwide prices 
ap to tbe dosing on WHO Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


incMtrtmi 

Tramo. 

UifHties 

Finance 

Cocnaasuu 


20589 30244 SOLIS + 347 
W2J2 15941 141.17 + 1J1 
7844 7U5 7850 +042 
2137 3197 3L21 +033 
MOB* 181.14 18133 + 2X5 


Bonds 

UIIIHfts 

Industrials 


AMEX Stock Index 


.. ..jSsi-tt 11 * ** 


HWonfti 
HWlLtw Stock 


Sts. OOM 

lOOsHlatiLow Buat.OrM 


AAR 48 

AOS 

AMCA 

AMF JO 
AMR 

AMR Pf 118 l 
APL 

ASA 100 
AVX 42 

AWLae I JO : 
ACCOWdS 44 


AIMH9 
AJoP pf A 3.92 13 
AtaPdpf J7 11 
AlaPpf 838 12 
Atopies SI 7 
AlskAIr .14 
Aibrtoa M 2 
UMsns 48 2 
Alcan 1J0 4 
AlcoSM 120 X 
UtxAli LOO X 
Aftxdr 

UtoCp 1041 2 
UaOiPt 254 11. 
Uglnt 140 & 


80 Z2 181 18% 

J2» 3J 12 13 M 

2.11*1X6 120 16* 

18* Uft + ft 
9ft 10 + ft 
16* 16%+ ft 

JZ IX 8 22 19* 

Xlt 7X 19 3S4 ii% 

M 3843 34 

.12 1.1 2906 IT* 

19% If* + % 
11% 11*— ft 
33% 33ft + % 

10* n% + ft 

- h . m- I 

13* 13*— % 

2X4 62 41 2666 47* 

5X3*1 HI 9 55% 

1 JO <4 U 15X7 38% 

30 33 3 

120 U II 440 49* 

X0 25 U 69 24% 

41ft «nt + * 
55ft SSW 

27ft 27ft— ft 
3 3 

to* 49* + % 
23* 23*—* 


iff di Si 

■Hz Lit JT 


UointCHJS 11 
UtoPw 170 8 

ubmo 40b a 

UldCas 150 4, 
ItdCppf 474 ML 

uacppfiuo iu 
uocpi ll39ell 
JWPd 
kIWSIr 112 37 
JUsCh 
JlsCpf 

U-LTL 154 7. 

Jeoa ijo n: 

hmsx JO i.i 

jntfts 1.10 XI 

tnAflr 
Bt*r 11 

.Brand UO M II 
Brdpf 175 105 
Brd of 247 19 
BdCSt T40 ZX 10 
JBWM 54 13 13 
SusPr 54 14 14 
mean IN U 11 
Canpf 2J0 125 
Can Pl 150 44 
Canpf 1175 125 
CapBd 2J0 114 
CapCv 454*317 
ContC 

Cyan 150 15 
DT 52 34 
ElPw 2J4OI05 
ffiExp 1J8 25 
Famll 44b 12 
SflCP 150 13 
SnJ wt 

3nl ptA 478ell4 
SnlPfBSJOe 7J 
Snip* 3J5 55 
SflPfD 244 43 
ftrtt 158 34 
loW 

lam* 350 85 

tow 1.13 13 

nrfcti 450 75 
nGfP 44 4 

Sppf 555 44 
41 72 3 JO 

1 Mat 

ltRS8 122 4.1 
'rwW Jit 15 
LFIa 

LRpf 3.19 111 
Mo 50 13 
iStd 140 47 
i Star m U 
trofA 430 47 
Irpm 450 137 
BT 1J0 U 
STpf 144 181 
LT pf 174 HL2 
Mr 250 44 
atpf 175 104 
USpf ITS 11.1 
Hotl 240 85 ! 

•Pr 52Se 81 
■Sc 

Un use 45 
•ran 140 45 
■SO 8 JO 4 1 
not S3 2 54 
itak 50 25 1 


Dow Ends at a Record 1,299.36 


n Mourn 

HlOB Low stack 


5b. C hm 

Dw.YM.PE WfcHba Lew QuoLOlW 


l3Mandi 
Hlghlm stack 


ft Clot 

Dty.YW.PE TOBiHWl Law QuoLCftW 


17 Monti SU. r im . 

| HI»a LOW Stock Dft.YWPE WOONMllen ^ 

: *m 51% MataaE 5r JU 3438 40 a* 

M 4% Matftl 11 3834 13% (3% S? 

W% 4% MaMwt 88 9* * *£J 

32% 14% MnttlPf 350 13 414 30% 10% JM 

15% 9% Mcutom 7 41 14% U% 14 

Mft 30% MavOa 172 14 10 M0 47% 4M 

34% MBVt* 2400 54 U 303 48 m Ok 

am Mcorpi 130 73 a » 

23 am McOrpf 240 115 3 

31% 21ft McOorl 150 45 II 847 37 % 27ft 37* 

12 iUMCDTIWl 1H 8% 8% K 

10ft 4ft McOM 70 11 30 39 9% «% % 

41% 49% McDflll 52 U 14 3143 43% 40% 479 

03% 47% MCObO 154 U 10 1927 83% 82% BM 

*an 31% McOEd 250 44 47 839 44% 43ft m 

48% 34 McOrH 140 XI 14 2000 45% 44% «V 

34% 19% MCMIp 5 Xt% 23% 3» 

AM 32% MdCm 340 82 11 975 39ft 5ft S* 

44% 54 McKnf 150 25 4 41ft 41ft 41V 

Uft 10 McLOOn 10 147 14% U% 14V 

4ft 3% McLoawt 40 5% » » 

XA% »% mcnoh 50 u 4 1 

41% 27ft Mood I JO XI « 1208 39ft » a» 

M% 13% Mann J« 15 14 334 33ft 21 23 

34ft 24ft M tdll II 74 15 9 3d 30ft 30% W| 

51ft 33ft MeHoa 240 14 9 303 50ft 49% J8 

27 S% Motion pf 250 104 1 34% H% S« 

45ft 30% ftWMH 144 U 12 1423 43% 42% JT 

83% 40% MorcST 179 1.9 11 131 44% 43 44 

101% 71% Marck 3JO JJ 15 395 Ml T9HH0 
48% 39ft Moram 150 17 14 M8 48% 40% 80* 

34% 27 MarLVn 50 U 34 98S8 35ft 33% M 

3ft 2 4AM0OI 1393 3% 3ft a! 


14 —1 
11ft— ft 
17% + % 
43 +}% 

30ft 
10 % 

47%+ % 
34 

48ft + % 
34ft + % 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Tbe stock market rolled up a 
broad gain to a record high Friday, dosing just 
short of the i ,300 level in the Dow Jones indus- 
trial average 

Analysts said new evidence of strength in the 
economy helped inspire investors. 

Tbe Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, 
which traded as high as the 1,304-005 range at 
midsession, closed with a 1535-point pa in at 
1399 36. 


But stock traders evidently read it as a posi- 


41% 38 Ex Ccta 15 tin 314 39ft SPft 39ft + % 

]££ 13% Exeats- 154*115 73 15% 15ft 15% + % 

48ft 34% Exxon 140 75 710141 48% 47% 48% + % 


tive portent for corporate profits in the months 
al read. Malcolm Baldrige, secretary of com- 


11% 17% ICMn 

11% 5 ICN 

27% 33ft ICN pf 238 105 

17% M INAJn 177 117 

28 14 IRT Pr, 150 83 


25i if mb n%— % 
517 9% 9ft 9% 

28 27% 31% 37 + % 
I lift 14ft 14ft— % 
» 19% 19% 19% — ft 


That topped the previous closing peak of 
1,297.92 reached on Feb. 13, and brought the 
average’s net advance for the week to 23.52 
points. 

Volume on the New York Stock Exchange 
reached 139.87 million shares, up from 100.T2 
million Thursday. 

Advances outnumbered declines by a 2-1 
ratio in the daily tally on the Big Board. The 
exchange's composite index rose 2.03 to 106.04, 
just below its Feb. 13 peak of 106.08. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department reported that the Index of Leading 
Economic Indicators rose 1.7 percent last 
month. 


£ 





31 

7ft + ft 
47%— ft 
12ft— ft 
19ft + ft 
14ft — - ft 
31% + ft 
28ft + % 
J5%+ ft 
28% +1% 
2J%— % 
78% + ft 
24% 

Z7U 

19% 

M 

18% + ft 
19%+ % 
19% + ft 

a + % 

■« 

+ ft 

+ % 


al read. Malcolm Baldrige, secretary of com- 
merce, said the figures signaled “renewed up- 
ward momentum in employment and output/* 

CBS jumped 4 to 88Vi amid reports that Ted 
Turner, who owns Cable News Network and 
other broadcasting properties, might be seeking 
to lake over the company. CBS said it had had 
no discussions with Turner about any such 
move. 

Other broadcasting stocks got caught up in 
the same takeover speculation. Amen can 
Broadcasting rose 2 Vi to 69K and RCA, parent 
of NBC 114 to 40 3 4. RCA led the active list in 
trading that included a 1.8 million-share block 
at 4014. 

Among the bine-chip industrials. Interna- 
tional Business Machines rose 171 to 135%; 
General Electric 'A to 64ft; Minnesota Mining 
& Manufacturing 2 to 84, and American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph ft to 21ft. 

On the down side, Varian Associates fell 2ft 


to 35ft. Tbe company said its earnings for the 
quarter ending March 29 will fall short of ex- 
pectations. 

Nationwide turnover in NYSE-listed issues, 
including trades in those stocks on regional 
exchanges and in the over-the-counter market, 
totaled 165.16 million shares. 

. Standard & Poor's index of 400 industrials 
climbed 147 to 205.15, and SAP's 500-stock 
composite index was up 105 at 183.23. 

The NASDAQ composite index for the over- 
the-counter market gained 199 to 287.16. At 
the American Stock Exchange, the market value 
index closed at 288.48. up 1.05. 


Ii 

i 

Ip? 

it 

1 * 

i 

$ 

1 1 



It was the largest increase in the index, which 
is designed to detect future economic trends, 
since it jumped 1.9 percent in June 1983. The 
latest figure came in well above most advance 
estimates on Wall Street 
The new drew a mixed response in the credit 
markets, where interest rates lately have been 
rising on fears of a tighter Federal Reserve 
credit policy and the prospect of increased loan 
demand in an economy growing faster than had 
been anticipated. 


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13% 9% FobCtr 48 22 15 8 T2» n» Hfe— % 

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M* 15ft FafncM 50 42 1033 19% 18ft 19ft + % 

39% 33* Foot: Of 140 93 ST 38ft 38 38% + % 

Uft 9* Fa! rid .18 1J 10 55 15ft 14% 15ft 

23ft FamDil 28 2171 24 2m 29% + % 

is* If* FaraHn J mi 17 14 U U 

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28% 14% Fbrufl 58A19H821%31 31% + % 

13 8% FavDra JO 13 71 244 lift lift 11% + ft 

7 4% Fader, 9 354 <% 5% 4% + % 

37% 29% Fadteo m 44 7 85 34% 35% 34 +Tft 

45% 27% FedEx? 22 4327 37ft 35 35 —2 

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39 29% FOMOB 1J2 41 ID S3 37% 3S% 37ft + ft 

19% tt% F*dNM .W L0 13754 14% 14ft MH 

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?3 14 Ftffitt 154 87 14 40 ZTft ZIft 21ft— ft 

19* CTb FdSsnl 50 42 14 224 19% lift W%— % 

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2* 51* UO Mil 89 27ft 27% 27% 

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5* MM3 20 5ft 5ft 5ft 

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W% W% Flmbl 50 4J 9 1214 lift 18% 18ft + ft 

28% 19 FiAHlR 152 37 8 29 27ft 27ft 27ft 

£ 2£ EKSL* 150 *3 8 513 33% 33ft 33ft + % 

33 MJ F«Pta 120 45 10 21 30ft 30V, 30% + % 

JX* T-20 1J II 314 49% 48ft 48ft— U 

77 18ft FlTCMc 1X2 SJ 19 3529 23% 27% 23 — % 

5 ™ 551“ U0 75 9 1M17 16ft 14% + ft 

2L. ES BSP a 80 12% ii in*— % 

20% 10ft FFadAz 5 7 224 18ft lift 18% + % 

48ft 30% FlnWe 2X4 43 8 3035 4Sife Jj Jim + % 


42% 20% ITT Co 150 XX 814727 10% 29ft 38% + ft 

44% 40 ITT pfK 450 85 17 58 57 58— ft 

4* 44ft ITT pfO 550 84 5 58% 91% 51%+ft 

51ft 28 ITTpfN 225 5X X 43% 41ft 42ft — ft 

71 42ft ITT mi 4J0 7J 3 40% M 40 - ft 

23% 15% IU lot I JO 87 44 544 18 17% 17ft 

48ft 30ft IdOhoP 3J8 83 I 117 39% 38ft 39% 

23% Ulb IdaolB 843 14% 14ft 14ft— % 

21ft 17% lOPowr 254 IU 4 814 23% 23 29% 

19 14ft llpowpf 213 115 3400c lift ms. 1H8 + ft 

52% «% IfPBWpf 5J5 11.1 - IK 51% 51% 51%— ft 

S. 3? 'IFowoI 457 125 HOC 35 34% 35 

33V, 35ft llPowpf 450 125 I 32 32 32 

34% 2tft ITW* 54 15 15 144 34 35ft 3Sft— % 

30% 37% ImpCbm 250 85 ID 3999 34% 34% 34% + % 

9ft 9% IntatCo 13 Hi A H 8ft— ft 

Uft 8% INCO JO L5 1889 13ft 13% 13% +% 
4T% 49 IndiMuf 734 V2S 26Sx 48 40 40 —1 


U2ft 91ft IIMIM pfT2iM> IV 
17% 14 IndlMof 2.15 1X4 
78% 14% IndlMpf 233 127 
28ft 21ft IndlM pf 353 122 
28% 17% indices M> 7.1 
U 5ft Inexca .14 XI 
2«% 13% Inftntc 


120x100% 100ft TOOft— ft 
3 17ft 17ft 17ft— % 
1 17% 17ft 17ft— % 
44 21ft 38% 28ft 
43 34ft 35ft 24ft + H 
544 7 4ft 6% 

418 UU 14ft 17% + % 


m 35ft liwm 250 S3 18 187 49% 48ft 49 + % 

37ft 7ft laaRpf 235 44 2 34ft 34ft 34ft 

15ft 1M inarTec J4 4J 31 11 17% 12% n%— % 

29 !» InMStl J0 25 441 25ft 35 35% 

«ft 38% InMSIpf 875 IU 2 44 44 44 


inallCD 150b 43 11 171 31ft 20 ft 21%— % 


12 3ft m»Rs 
36% 11ft intaRsc 
30ft 19 IntaRpf 353 1X4 
54% 42 IntaRpf 4J88U9 
37ft 25% IntaRpf 425 MJ 


14% 7% IrttRFn ... 

19 15ft IlcpSa XIOdllJ 17 18ft 17ft 18ft + ft 

45% 53 IntfCP .MS 45 12 201 42% 42 42ft + ft 

15% 9ft Intrfft 40 55 7 1324 13% lift 12 

53ft 41 luhUs 250 SO 8 293 52ft 51ft 52ft + ft 

14ft 8% utfnwd 38 471 13 11% 11%— ft 

24ft 14% IntAUl 32 Xt 10 28 21% 31ft 31ft— % 

38% 99 IBM 440 12 13 13028 134% 134 135* +Tft 

24ft 14% Intctrl 30 1J 1) ua 24ft 33ft 23ft— ft 


83 5 4ft 4ft 

51 14ft 14ft 14% — ft 

5 » 24 34 

3 44% 44% 44% + ft 

107 30% 30 30%+ ft 


111 121 12% 12 


17 18ft 17* 78ft + ft 


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sm 37% FNSJB 358 45 7 She 4Bft 47ft 47ft + % 

7ft 4ft FstPa 9 245 7ft 7ft 7% + % 

S' 6 SU 243 U 202 2fft 29ft 3% + ft 

FtJJaR] 1J4 45 15 117 31ft 30% 30*— % 

£* Jf* gyuB O 54 43 8 39 20% 20ft 20ft + ft 

2P 4 1J0 45 7 134 25* 2S% 25% — % 

52 45* FWbcpf 4JS 125 W0X 49ft 49ft 49ft 

3 2?t 750 25 34 1352 39* 37 39 43ft 

72ft w FbbFd 55* J S3 11 10ft 11 + ft 
j** FltFriGl 1X2 45 9 144 33%32%33% + ft 
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SJ I2£ Hsi? ’<1 M 3 12% 13% 12% 

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53* 41 InMk 
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24ft m% Intctrl 


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57ft 47ft MfE PU 8X3 MJ 
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lift 5ft IntHarv 11988 11% 10* 11% + * 

7* 2* IntHrwt I IX 7ft 7ft 7% + ft 

■ Bft IntHtfC 47 SO 49* 49*— ft 

42* 20% IntMBfA 110 42 40ft 43 +1% 

34% 17% IntHpfD 171 34* 33% 34ft +1 

44* mb IntMla 280 80 13 904 43ft -C% 43% + ft 

m 30% IntWtapf 4J» 115 3 34 34 34 — ft 

29ft 33 IntMult L74 83 9 194 28 Z7% 27*— ft 

57* 44 IntPapr 240 45 27 3449 51% 51* 57ft + ft 

77% «* I rtf Res 18 340 14* Mft M* + % 

44* 32% InfNrtn 248 SI t 809 42% 42V. 42ft + % 

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28ft 22 MWE 288 100 10 111 28* 34* Jflt 

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31% 23% MInPL 374 95 8 55 30* 30% jn 

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20% 15 MflPSv 7 J2b 85 7 7 28% 20* JM 

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20% lift FTaStl 
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32ft 22% 
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40% 25ft 
17% 12 
22* 13* 
17* 15ft 
21ft 14% 
30ft 23 
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18ft 12% 
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J2 24479 381 


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42ft 41ft 
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17% 17% 
20% 18% 
27% 24* 
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20* 19* 
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358 105 7 28 38% 30ft 30% + % 

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7J6 6.1 4 274 32* 32 32% + ft 

5.138108 90 49ft 49ft Mft 


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74ft 71ft ChrtEJt IJB 708 
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69 W Dutapf 7 JO 11J 
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lift m DycoPt 80 <6 ll 
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’5 fLc%tzs t 1M u 3 i£ i5i%iQ2%i E 

“ j" 4 .-to XI -4 217 18* 18ft 18ft + * 

J-* 1?* '•* JJ .’ 1 Hi “ 18 + % 

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4ft i Kcnal 

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w 20* Kvutll Ul U I 
16% 11 Karrd 84 X8 


71 33 M 69 31% ZIft 31 

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X8 2X 9 8014 30% 30 30 

9 7 21* 21* 21 

JO 17 1142 11 11% n 

2L32 A9 ■ il 34% 33% £ 

380 1ft 1 t 
raw wn nwa X0 2X 18 3038 45* 44% 4, 
to* Mft NatecB 288 <9 11 J7U 55W 54% J3 

rat 31 Nairn UO <5 14 860 34* 35% S 

29ft 20 Nahua 7 41 39 28ft Z 

38% 30% NatCon 1X0 2J 9 983 37ft 37 X 

Uft lift NtCnv a J6 2X 11 780 14 15% V 

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TO% 14% NDMpt 1X9 103 1 17ft T7» L 

333 11% NotEdu 11 86 13* 13* U 

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45% 27 NqtGvp 2X0 <8 8 2M M £* S 

49 _?ft _«ft : 


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4ft 3ft NtHom 
33* 23ft Nil _ 
89 58 Nlipf XOO 

29* 17* NMod 
11% 8* NMIM- 


- I-N| 

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1034 31^ 30* 3 


J2 1.9 15 3595 28* 27% * 
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1 01 81 81 
3 81 80 8fl — 1 


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■ taX4' 


3* 8ft N 
39ft 28* N 


rat 9I * N 


26* 20% N 
23% 14% N 


£2 £23 


M 24 NYSpf X75 1X4 

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28 a 20 -SR - 


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- 



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150 
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WJ 


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At 


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7X 


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118 



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98 18* Uft 
3 45ft 45ft 
* » 


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44 49* + 

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14* 14* h 
12ft 11* e 
42ft 42* « 

31 31 T 
36 34ft » 
61ft 61ft I 
M 37* I 

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45* 4Sft 4- 
54% 54ft 5 
23 H 2 
23% 23* 2 
12* 13* l 
34 35* I 

Mft 25ft 3 
29ft 29% J 
37ft 37 3 

4% 4* 

soft rat I 




» - 1 _ 



ifg 









11X 


118 

13 

11X 


1X3 


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147 

138 


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364 

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1X4 


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1 





Statistics Index 


S| * 

IS 

s 


■ *££x prices p.J2 Eorohw* resorts P — 
i -WMOC hW«no>«PJD FUw tbM notes P .13 
L’kYSe Price* P* GoUUncrkeK P.9 
I'tlYSChUhUlows P^P p .9 

| CoobcBon iteckft P.U Market fumtaory PI 


Currency rates 

M . 

Mira 

P.10 

Commodities 

PM 

OTC stack 

P.U 

Dividends 

P.W 

Otter motets 

P.U 


F™ w n xnmsim vn 


is 


<71 |L mmaiinuM »4 

ncralfrg&.enbmtc 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


Dmc Above 1,299 , 
^4 Record; Page 8. 


Page 9 


ECONOMIC SCENE 

Economic 'Fundamen tals’ 
-vvvJC- ^ een 38 keeping Dollar High 

|SS , »r u !i! SS-- By LEONARD SILK 

l? «S v0 * 173 3 ? 4 *t . New York Times Seniee 

2ft«!c£!* w 2 T EW YORK - — Is the hi^h-flying dollar about to come 

J* *>wnn f52 11 J *5 s 5,. ■ I down? Despite the erratic swings in the currency mar- 
wv aSi IS" 1 n, 4-S " IS ftfc’ -I ket this week, exacerbated by the statements and 
& «£ JSkfSk* * Ij u & i 1, - ' interventions of central bankers, the general view of 

JjJ u* “ afi is ,B «S g i Baders and bankers aronnd the world is that the “fundamentals” 
•m «5»* Mcinr" t» & Sis * not changed and that a steep downfall of the dollar is not 

s s* ss^nr rs « ». H ftl “w™** 4 - 

»» « Metoon z * 4 S?;- - Those fundamentals include United Slates advantages over 
"2 * fe" 1 10 IS ut, other msgor countries, such as a more dynamic economy, lower 
US, it J , J ft S' inflation, higher after-tax real returns on capital a positive 
;*£ £ 1 * it 1* '* g spread in interest rates, the size and diversity of the capital 


Mena 

»«*_**»,* 

SlS c 

gig as* 

VH Si* «“"5S 


gRSS 1 IS.P* 2%i 
?' SS ten; M? U " 2 5J- 
y* 3USK? rs B , s s. 

S-gSB. s «» 

** ^ Mctton .-f* j U IV l 


i 111 IS 

"* Ml; ZSSSS riS rl 

!. «h *uiion n ,;iS ,5* 


» nn Stolls; d * * 8 8* market and the nation’s politi- 

12 St SSffl 5 ’S3 „ ,2 a t «1 stability, whkfcmakcita 

li More* mo V* •» a? safe haven m turbulent times. 

a 5 awTlCIi ’3 Jj d jS Ik; Those are the factors, opti- 


"• a itam' "uj, 

USSEST 
15 S12 » ™ . 

■ <* MIC a\P *1- 

* «Vi MIC f*G ?ie lh 

pi 47W MIC plj ili 
7 SP M,c »«> au ilt 
!£ «« 5'tm e^ US 

W4 MaxFcl IT, 

K n^ 1 * »‘l* >2j 

E5 aSl !“ 11 


loose are the factors, opn- 
14 ^ 55§*” mists say, that have attracted 

* ^ a huge influx of foreign 

* £ ^5-- capital, and nothing has hap- 
lil »i^ pared to change than. Central 

av|^. banks can alter the daily flow 
of events but as has happened 


Hie capital to cover 
the American trade 
deficit is going to be 
harder to get. 


IV. MKn M j'ln^ IS? 1 a *»i before, this too will pass. 

n* w MtaSi, '2 *-* * II But this may be a case of euphoria built on a mistaken view trf 

«S “5 MtSsui ?■“ s ' » t£ Ts what has bro^hi the tidal wave of coital to this country. 

** uh mmkms 53 'll 1 ^ ft l The widening trade deficit of the United Slates has been the 

n? uu MHtnR ^ ’ft 1® <<i ft S prime cause of the inflow of capital For, as a matter of double- 

Ito 35 JuUpl uJ F 11 *i» 8 f & entry balance-of-payments accounting, the deficit on current 

bm it 4 * 8 1 il account, of whidi the biggest component is the trade deficit, must 

1 ini m£p| m -2**,^ 7 i ftl be offset by a surplus in the capital account, corrected for 

ES St » ft? statistical discrepanciesL 


tv* SB*. Mops 5 Ji; iw » Jl*? *uuisutiu uuMcpaucics. 

avk»M«MMi x» ft 1 And, as the US. cnnenl account swung from a surplus of S6J 

4 Trillion in 1981 to a deficit of S103 billion in 1984, net private 

» u2 mm£k 40 1 * la S Si capital flows swung ftxnn an outflow of S24.4 billion in 1981 to an 
UdftSSSS * inflow of $91 billion in 1984. 

J** =jo « ‘j 3m Foreign direct investment in American industry, banking or 

" “ * zn It,' jSfsU real estate did not account for the big swing since, in 1981, net 


W iS K * u « « iSS- “Hiw or syi muk 

1 . «** M«t»n » uo u j ®fr Fores en direct jj 

T 13 ft ,? «*!»,; real estS did not 

*52 S MONY 'So* 1 ** 1 a foreign direct invi 

U ?55 i! \l ft i? “ 19 

M MV* MorMpf jjo M ' 5 s ?. niircbases of Unite 

W Mil Moron t Mo u 
4*i 7SM Monmol T.'Tt *J 


So** 1 ?:! B 5 'M" foreign direct investment in the United States totaled S23.1 

ia 1 : 2 M n ? billio n and in 1984 only $20.7 billion: nor did foreign net 

in u* m 3 ’e gjlv purchases of United States securities, most importantly Treasury 

• 1 V7, Jj " ^ jjts*- securities, which increased by just S12J3 billion from 1981 to 

Id 141 17 in irU ?_t. 1H04 


fspsssr'fi S3 ’sH l9M - 
W.'ffKSafej m 

££ r«£ fiSK,* iL M II SJ; r I 


ISM MvnPd 
UW Muang 


i4b II u 
KS 


2H« MumhC I 40 14 It IB 


I HE most important factors in the upswing of net foreign 
investment in the United States were the actions of Ameri- 
can banks, which, as the Morgan Economic Quarterly 


i*h Murrro !3 u 55 m notes, sharply reduced their new lending to foreigners as a result 
’»* “ St of the international debt problem, the drop in borrowing require- 

JL * ‘ meats of oil-importing countries and the faster growth of U$. 

credit needs. In the last two years, this produced a turnaround of 

m nbd CO 1 3 « 1 \ a ft i" S78.9 bOlion, with the net outflow of $45.1 billion from American 
!££ 2?l " yj „ ]j bonks in 1982 becoming a net inflow of $33.8 bOlion in 1984. 

is u i * Si p 

■BB :» « «0I4 XII' 


MM MM NBO 
M 14V* NBI 
bn* UB NCH 
g* 11 NCND 
Wrt vm ncri 
m* ia m ind 
17 low NL Ind 

it as'* nu. 
*.* wvr 

4«Im M* i N«* 


» 36s ai' But while the United States has bearable in the last two years 
\ mt 7 S': to poll in enough capital from abroad readily to finance its trade 
, deficit and even bid up the dollar, it seems unlikely that this can 

a »' continue for more than another year without a deterioration in 


m>-5 n!«£. o : S ;« 1‘ Si the dollar’s exchange rale. In January, as the Commerce Depart- 
so riavnuo 1,20 4i '* It *5 meat reported Thursday, the United States sustained a $103- 


M III. Null au II h U*< 

*Ct% 174* Koii k-T m "I : 3 Mi 

49 ht Jl Nn»l'.» o :ou 44 4 W 41 * 


41* TV: NUHnn 

XM* Si'* mi 
•B U Nllft4 

MH in* NWnll 

IIM •** NMIIW' 


?E)1 5JS?nfl 1 v ; i il ^ r? billion trade deficit, 28 percent higher than in December, and 

m* ni. N.i'C'i ii ii«a Secretary Malcolm Baldrige estimated that the deficit for 1985 

3* ui; SSf®? ii fc 35 would reach about $140 bSion. 

J5 ”** :S ii ; yi ?l ' The capital to cover that is going to be harder to get For one 

mm sjll S'.'. H,,n -v b -i no! *i dung, pressures are bidding on the goverament fram American 

Sr” N.itJ s«; exporters — with hard-pres«jd fanners in the spotlight this week 

n 2 ! »i* nSSto*. x ' 4 wi -= r to rescue them, whether through subsidies, import taxes. 
£b *Sm 2 IK ,nc 76 1 imI“ ** quotas.or othCT-fonns <rf protection, oe by pressing foreigners to 
m* av. m i.m jj m qjeed up, and open up, tnehr econouries to U.S. goods. 

U * *f i k g; Other fundamental factors also seem Hkely to push the dollar 

?l?5 5S5!r7* i ieS ill r ’«!*; lower. A growing number <rf American economists expect a 
ii* ‘ill! JS"w 'I* 'IS • i fi recession before the end of 1986, and that would have a powerful 

m£ wh wniVi jio *4 » & »* effect in reversing capital flows and driving the dollar down. 


JO Vi *tl-rr>l 1IW 7* '3 IK *F 
•i i Mllrnil IIMIP UJ' 

JV, NiTvim I.M 34 :: M jj. 

ir» NT.hli... 41* .4 ID •»« Jgf 

Ui NMTCV*. 4»««J • g *,' 

31 U Nvv'-M ;?*«* r ,IE. £■ 

lll^ IJjr.l’lW 1 eO Ilk 1 °®“?, 


9n* l(t* UnPol l«> 

Ml* ill -V 4i 

in* tth, ni .«iri :tp ** 

M*. 71'- Ml ni-m ' * ’1 J 

M*k 9B*1 N.iN-’* -M * 


FFSistf ws! ? yi 

m «'i » '• ••» j 7 * sl- 

um i»-j imm ■ , iui 
3’ j4 nvsikp ’ • „ 2 £ i 

Mi* ir- nb»«ii -v •• « ", g,l 

47 ST* HWM *4 14 ™ ; a:l 

UP-4 III* NB»hll 4 a p|l| 

w* r- n»h. r.» «r & (T 

Jt m •»'"* ,w •’ 5 nl ft’ 

*r* 1M NwtMik ,. H M | 

.7 Mia vi* :« 


Tru :: n.j*vi>i 'J? 

1*U J? 1 ; NlrtM*4 J.M' *■> 
Sr, NH j HVilW * ■" 


J4V, M** nmMH 
I*** IW NUUjifi 

in* UB* MU-rtw 
m s«** niii'i 

19 1JI-] IM»»I 

41 Min NprniYi 

ajk* u kb n» 

41 w W*« MOiali 
If 13 Nin1»* 
U h 4| HAIB'I 

4V* Mi* 

III* IT** "I 


]Zol '%Lj Offiddfi^h 

IZWI -f ?!•■•- 

: -4*ii • J 1 

i cvi;. !* {TiAmxnrdani 3X04 

.1; ‘ 3 “ s IBbiweWrt AIM i 

j H S’ * ^nwMurt . SMJS 
jii 7.’ ' 5*;uw»04i th> 1JD715 

lllMlMl • 2J6SJ0 

'I ’ 143 IM,»wY««CC) 

« 1 3 » rtrii - 10245 

IN "J ’J " i.TBkw 24HJ0 

l <** lj|.J J u^ Urich 24775 


( C o nti n u ed on P^e U, CoL 3) 


Currency Rates | 

Late interbank rates on Mar. 1 , excluding foes 
Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, -Pars. New YarV rales at 


Itto 13 ** N! n >0 j , „c tt!i Zertcll 

S3 r-asA v -u; 
SSs^BSCPiSlIf M»‘- -- 

SIH N«.r«i*i fir ■ 

Ml *1 N' 1 ’**" ID V 1 

4|- 4 3*'M NO. lr. v IX 

M*k 3.1** ] ..MC 4* 2|WO ‘ 

J T 41 MNtrjrt » 10 f iuot t 

ii'* *5? S^;^l : V 13 4 J 5-MM7 1 

85 t& KSJ-Si : - * 

fii* in n»m« i: j* 1 

&* »■•* r-r’ '% If 'J ,2 I 

5 * 3 B-* no»o io i: 'JJ »»jua« i 

in, Tfc Nvo- . ■ “ Jjr*™* 

l 4 % hull >*' ; j i ^ 1 

«*wiKiNr'"« - .—-"r»4rti 


3X04 4477 

<7X0 7248 

13*35 1507 

1X715 • — 

J JIMW 123570 

3X755 

102*5 11X0 

. 2*050 27058 


« DM. 
4X77 11113* 

7248 20.11 

1507 


FM. 1U. 
37X15* 01821 
0585 32425* 

3223 ■ 141 X 


34008 109888 2239.50 ' 4X78 

*21X0 20170 5*9.17 

1347 1023 2X82X0 1793 

IDS 4J025 x 2201 

77.19 2528 1245* *7.92 


GUT. OF. 

5431* 

17X0 . 

8050 • 427* 

' 4X78 7228 

5*9.17 NA 

1793 *740 

2201 15.195 * 
*7.92 38194* 


2X775 10836 85405* 20X3* 03374 75455* 4253* 

04419 04183 2222 42885 1282X4 25134 442052 

0555964 8X9399 121538 9X1297 N.O. 343S 444232 


IF. Yea 
13250 *14547 y 
21517 25X93* 
in.!5- 1284* 
10*75 270775 
.727X0 0X03 
2X44 2*015 
15725 193* 

9038 

1.1006* 

1X993 173.023 
17412 249X29 


Dollar 

Continues 

Strong 

j Bolstered By 

Economic News 


The Associated Pros 
NEW YORK — The dollar 
turned in a mixed performance in 
hectic trading on wodd foreign ex- 
changes Friday as central banks 
intervened against the U.S, curren- 
cy for a third straight day. 

But analysts said trading had 
calmed down and that the dollar 
was showing considerable strength 
as a result of new signs of a healthy 
economy in the United States. 

The dollar rose in the Far East 
and during eariv trading in Europe 
before central banks dumped as 
much as SLJ billion on currency 
markets. The dollar then bounced 
up and down before drifting lower 
in quiet trading by day’s cod. 

Some foreign-exchange dealers 
said the Federal Reserve Bank of 
New York, which is the currency 
trader for the U.S. Treasury De- 
partment, was among the central 
banks taking part in the interven- 


Japanese Women Struggle to Win 
Equal Opportunities in Business 


tion. But, following usual policy, 
the New York Fed on Friday re- 
fused to either confirm or deny 
those reports. 

David Arbesman, a first vice 
president at Prudential-Bache Se- 
curities Inc. in New York, said he 
believed Friday’s intervention was 
much smaller than the 51.5 billion 
widely reported by European mon- 
etary sources. 

But Mr. Arbesman said that if 
the figures were right “it’s a very 
strong signal for the dollar.” He 
said that in the face of such action, 
the dollar should have been 
knocked even lower. 

A strong U.S. economy, attrac- 
tive returns on doUar-den omina ted 
investments and foreign investor 
confidence in the policies of Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and the Fed- 
eral Reserve chairman, Paul 
Volcker. all have contributed to the 
dollar’s rise. 

Currency dealers said the dollar 
was supported Friday by a Com- 
merce Department report that the 
main economic barometer for the 
United States, the Index of Lead- 
ing Economic Indicators, shot up 
1.7 percent in January, the biggest 
jump since June 1983. 

Late Friday in New York, the 
British pound feQ.to $1.0755 from 
$1.07(50 Thursday. 

Other late dollar rates in New 
York, compared with late rates 
Thursday, included: 3347 Deut- 
sche marks, down from 3354; 
2.866 Swiss francs, down from 
18675, and 1033 French francs, 
down from 1034. 

The pound fell against the dollar 
in London, dropping to $1.0715 
from $1,082 Thursday. 

Late dollar rates in Europe, com- 
pared with late fates Thursday, in- 
cluded: 33635 DM. up from 
33225; 18775 Swiss francs, up 
from 2.8445; 10365 French francs, 
up from 10.182; 3.804 Dutch guil- 
ders, up from 3.768, and 108530 
Italian tire, up from 1070. 


By Susan Chira 

Nov York Tima Seni or 

TOKYO - When Mitsuko 
Anzai was 25 and still answering 
id ep hones and booking tickets 
for her travel agency employer, 
she took a step that astounded 
her colleagues: She asked for a 

promotion. 

“My supervisor just stared at 
me with hxs month open,” Miss 
Anzai said, smiling at the memo- 
ry of 28. years ago. “He said he 
though l h would be too much for 
a woman to handle, and b ad nev- 
er dreamed of giving me a re- 
sponsible job. But he said he rec- 
ognized my good work and 
would give me something when it 
opened up.” 

Six months later Miss Anzai 
found herself in charge of a team 
of eight people. Now, at 53, she is 
the highest-ranking woman in 
the Japan Travel Bureau. Japan's 
largest travel agency, r unning a 
68-person office with annual 
sales of $19 milli on (5 billion 
yen) — the company’s thud most 
profitable branch. 

In Japan, women who aggres- 
sively pursue promotions are the 
exception. More typical is a 
woman who has been a reporter 
for a Tokyo television station for 
23 years, and has watched men 
younger than herself promoted 
above her. 

“Even though I feel I should 
be promoted, 1 couldn’t say so.” 
she said “I don't have enough 
self-confidence. I think I am held 
back.” she said, “but at the same 
time I wonder if my ability has 
been found wanting" 

Most large companies in Ja- 
pan will not hire women for any- 
thing but clerical work. The fast- 
est-growing segment of the 
female work force is part-time 
workers, with average salaries of 
less than $230 an hour. College- 
educated women have a hard 
time finding work, and when 
they do, they are often required 
to report early each morning to 
prepare tea. 



Mitsuyo Yoshimura heads software development. 


Over the years, there has been 
a slight but steady trickle of 
women to management. More- 
over. this spring after nearly a 
decade of lobbying by the Minis- 
try of Labor’s Women's Bureau, 
a bill on equal employment op- 
portunity is expected to become 
law. 

But the bill was fiercely op- 
posed by Japanese employers, 
who managed to remove most of 
its sanctions. Government, they 
say. simply cannot legislate away 
customs. 

“We are frustrated that com- 
panies are always blamed for dis- 
crimination,” said Hiroshi Kita- 
mura, director of the personnel 
management division for the Ja- 
pan Federation of Employers' 
Associations. “This law asks us 
to treat women completely the 
same as men. We can’t enact that 
kind of drastic change at one 
blow.” 

Companies have traditionally 
assumed a paternal role. Not 
long ago. a male division manag- 
er of a large auto company found 
himself on his knees, bowing 
apologies to the parents of a fe- 
male employee who had been 


jilted by a man in his division. 
The manager considered himself 
culpable for his male employee' s 
behavior, and answerable to his 
female employee’s family. 

Japanese managers wfllingh- 
discuss their reservations about 
promoting women. “E'en if a 
woman says she will work until 
retiremenC if she falls in love, she 
could easily quit.” said Mr. Ki ta- 
rn ura. “Generally, women lack 
loyalty to the groups to which 
they belong They are extremely 
egotistical and individualistic.”' 

According to the Ministry of 
Labor, in 1983, women account- 
ed for about 35 percent of the 
salaried work force in Japan, yet 
only 6 percent of its managers. 
Moreover, female managers 
made up less than 0.1 percent of 
all working women in the coun- 
try. 

But a slow change in altitudes 
is taking place. For the first time 
last year, more than half the mar- 
ried women in Japan held jobs. 
In 1972. 31 percent of women 
polled by the prime minister's 
office believed women should 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 6) 


Briton Considers Joining Icahn Bid 

By Robcrr J. Cole Mr. Icahn. claiming victory at the controlling stockholder in : 

New York Tima Semtv the polls, told a congressional com- Grand Union supermarket chaij 


NEW YORK —Sir James Gold- 
smith. the multimilljonaire British 
businessman, is considering wheth- 
er to join Cari C. Icahn in trying to 
take over the Phillips Petroleum 
Co„ according to a source close to 
Sr James. 

“We have been approached and 
we are considering it.” the source 
said Thursday. 

Mr. Icahn, the New York finan- 
cier, confirmed the negotiations, 
remarking, “We’re talking to a 
number of investors, and the Gold- 
smith group is undeniably one of 
them.” 

The disclosure came just one day 
after Phillips closed the polls on a 
controversial recapitalization of 
the company — thought to have 
been defeated by stockholders — 
and said it would announce Mon- 
day how the vote came oul 


Mr. Icahn. claiming victory at 
the polls, told a congressional com- 
mittee Wednesday, “I think I won 
iL" 

Asked what Sir James was con- 
sidering, the source replied “To see 
if we would come in.” The source: 
who asked not to be identified by 
name, declined to say how muen 
money Sir James might invest or 
when he would decide, but added, 
“It’s a fairly active situation." 

Reports have been circulating 
for more than two weeks that Mr. 
Icahn was on the verge of attracting 
foreign money. Ten days ago. the 
Belzberg brothers of Canada 
agreed to invest almost. $300 mil- 
lion. Now Sir James is said to be 
considering a $400-million outlay. 

Sir James operates through a 
number of foreign organizations, 
including one in Panama and an- 
other in Liechtenstein, but is 
known best in the United States as 



JW 

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Dollar Values 

i Ptr 

I 

Per 


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& H-y. C#nW 

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EtorfV. 

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to 

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2571 


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2350 

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759A0 

4*925 5. African rand 3X304 


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12448 Kuwaiti dinar 

4300 

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64480 


1 

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a 

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40054 Port.ascwio 

18490 

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24125 

17 

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7J0T5 

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28013 

42723 U-AJE. dfekam 

38724 


Euroyen Decontrol to Be Proposed 




V, j 11^ "■ 

■' L — ’UtwlbWl.UTl Iridic... 

-<(ol Commercial frim: ID) Amounts n*#d*(J to twyoro sound (cj AmouiK nMdad to buy oro dollar t’J 
:l* ^ , Until (4 IDO (X) Units of U00 (vj Units OHUBd 
4 j i; : ftKA: not Quoted; NJL:rat available. 

dJ if 43 g Sotrcwr Banme do Benelux (Brussels); Banco CammenMe NaUana (Milan}; Chemical 
, ^iXarifc (New Yort); Bonaue Natkmate de Ports (Paris); IMF (SDR); Bantu* Aral * et 
■Jrtemottonate tflnvestiaemenl (dinar, rival dirham). Other data from Reuters aoOAP. 


'ril j Interest Rates 

Hl“ SB?- if ;ii * *5:' 1 [Eurocurrency Deposits 


ii 4i : -'p t 1.1m 

S* O owe*'; n* ? ?2*- 

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r sftrl- «■* .f : ! Sfc 
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Donor P Mtott Franc Sfarflno Franc ECU SDR 

m - f 5*t-4lt 518 - 5Hl MU - 1414 KN8-1D9V70 - 10M 841 - 8 tt 
9W - 94* 5 ** - 4 h 5 9* - 59* IM-MVi 104*- 11 10B.-lDW.B8ll -91*1 

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.... * ion. 

fcirss? 

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j Reuters. 

« r- 

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■Key Money Rates 


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f ^ft*coont Roto 

it ffS™ 1 Funai 

m« Rot* 

V juXmkor Leon Rata 

“2 *»*• »■«* W> 

li £ “ifrimi Ti-ootaFV BIUS 
j! Treasury Mils 

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nuAYi ntM* 
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8X0 8X0 

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Bank Boh Rata 
Call Money 
9i4tav Tnaurv Bfli 
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□facounl Rata 
Call Money 
today Intertonk 


yrc \SBUBm 

“ft Rota. . 

14 * 2 *taral 8 M Rolf 

# ;2^**«w* latartw* 
ln ** rtioBk 


Gold Prices 


C Hot* • 

' ,F *oroy 

: *2 " rt ^ 0rtk 
4 ii .‘it w? * In ’* rtwnk 
a >£**Mm-iMart)ank 


10*4 TOMl 
101* W9* 

mo i oh 

10 9* 10 9* 
10*4 MW 


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Linemooura 

Ports (IIS Mlo) 
Zurich 
London 
now vortt 


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WM 288X5 —£70 

■ 90**4 - — 110 

289X7 2B7XS - 304 
28820 287-50 — OlSD 

3*810 287X5 — 0X0 

— 28920 + 190 


^ Reuters, CtmrmentmtK Credit Lv- 
U*rd» Bat*. Bank of 7Wrva. 


OHKlai firings far tendon. Paris and Lunwn- 
Murg, opening and elKlng arlees for Hm Kano 
and Zuneh. Nt« vo *0 Come* currem contraa. 
4 H gricn In U.SX acr ounce. 

Source: Routers. 


TOKYO — An advisory council 
to the Japanese Finance Ministry is 
expected to propose introducing 
medium- and long-term Euroyen 
loans, floating-rate Euroyen bonds 
and Euroyen certificates of deposit 
with maturities of more than six 
months, its draft recommendations 
show. 

. The Foreign Exchange Council, 
whose proposals guide ministry po- 
licy on foreign exchange, is due to 
submit its recommendations Tues- 
day. Finance Minisiry officials de- 
dined comment on the contents of 
the coundTs six-page draft, which 
was obtained by Reuters. 

The draft also calls for studies on 


U.S., EC Agree 
On Steel Plan 

Raders 

BRUSSELS — The Europe- 
an Community and the United 
States agreed Friday to a com- 
promise plan for settling a dis- 
pute over EC steel exports to 
America, the EC announced. 

The EC’s executive body said , 
that 209,000 tons of steel pipes - 
and tubes blocked in U5. Cus- 
toms warehouses since an im- 
port ban in December would be 
allocated on the basis of 65 per- 
cent to the community’s 1985 
U3. export quota and 35 per* 
cent to its 1986 quota. 

The EC had been demanding 
that the steel be divided evenly 
between these two years, while 
the U3. had been pressing for 
almost all of it to be lumped 
into this year’s quota. 


= CHARTER 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE” 

i 

125 Ft 12 w«ons go anywhere j 
Wc arc die best in Greek Islands. 
Mediterranean Cruises Ltd. 

3 Stiufiou SL, Athens. . 
TeL: 3236494. Tlx: 222288. 


creating an offshore financial cen- 
ter in Tbkya 

The draft proposes immediate 
liberalization of medium- and long- 
term Euroyen loans to nonresi- 
dents. Short-term Euroyen loans of 
less than one year were permitted 
first for nonresident borrowers in 
June 1983 and for residents last 
June. 

The council said it was difficult 
to maintain a complete ban on me- 
dium- and long-term Euroyen 
lending by Japanese banks when 
there are no such controls on simi- 
lar loans by foreign banks to non- 
residents. 

Such decontrol would help Japa- 
nese financial institutions expand 
their international operations, the 
council said. 

However, the council citing the 
need for a separation of short- and 
long-term banking in Japan, did 
not propose the immediate end to a 
ban on medium- and long-term 
Euroyen loans to resident borrow- 
ers. 

The council called fra further 
liberalization of the Euroyen bond 
market. It said it was meaningless 
to separate Euroyen bonds from 
other datotninations because of the 
increasing use of swaps, which 
make foreign currency bonds effec- 
tively yen-denominated. 

On nonresident placements of 
Euroyen bonds, deregulated in De- 
cember, it said further decontrol 
such as easing criteria for borrower 
elif^bOity, is already scheduled for 
next month. 

Euroyen bonds currently must 
have five-year maturities or longer 


Gold OptlOlkS (prim ia S/a/.). 


with fixed interest rates, in line 
with existing Japanese market 
practices. But Euroyen bonds 
should be issued in the same way as 
other Eurobonds such as with 
floating rates, the council said. 

The council said it would be'de- 
sirable for banks to issue Euroyen 
negotiable certificates of deposit 
with maturities longer than the cur- 
rent limit of six months if ihe medi- 
um- and long-term Euroyen lend- 
ing market is deregulated and 
expands. This would give banks 
stable fund-raising sources, ii said. 

But the council calls for full con- 
sideration of domestic banking po- 
licy, which separates short- and 
long-term banks. 


U.S, Will Not Ask 
Japan to Renew 
Its Auto Quotas 


Tht Aaonaied Pros 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan said Fridav that be 
would not interfere with the lifting 
or Japanese restraints on automo- 
bile sales to the United States and 
that he hoped for “reciprocal treat- 
ment” for American products. 

The decision was expected to 
lead to an increase in less-expcn- 
■she Japanese cars being sold in the 
United States, generally bringing 
down auto prices for U.S. consum- 
ers. 

“It is my decision not to urge the 
Japanese to extend their voluntary 
export restraints on automobiles to 
the United States,” Mr. Reagan 
said in a brief written statement. 
“In taking this action. I hope that 
we can look forward to reciprocal 
treatment by Japan.” 

The United Slates and Japan re- 
cently agreed to discuss lowering 
Japanese trade barriers to U.S.- 
made electronic and telecommuni- 
cations equipment, forest products, 
medical equipment and pharma- 
ceuticals. 

Those talks still are in the pre- 
liminary stages and have not yet 
resulted in agreements that would 
permit greater U.S. exports to Ja- 
pan. However, Marlin Filzwater. a 
White House spokesman, said that 
Mr. Reagan’s decision was not 
based on assurances from the Japa- 
nese that they would agree to ac- 
cept more UA products. 

The president's decision, Mr. 
Fitzwater said, was based on his 
conclusion that it was “in the best 
national interest of the United 
States.” that it would benefit 
American consumers and Lhat the 
UJS. auto industry, having recov- 
ered from a long recession, is now 
“able to compete in world mar- 
kets.” 

The action also was consistent 
with the agreements and spirit of 
the last two economic summit con- 


ferences ai which the industrialized 
democracies agreed to remove 
trade barriers between (hem, the 
spokesman said. 

Under a system of “voluntary 
restraints” adopted with adminis- 
tration support four years ago in 
the face of almost certain congres- 
sional action to impose import 
quoins, the Japanese limited their 
sales in the United States to 1.85 
million vehicles a year. 

The restraints are due to expire 
March 31. Administration esti- 
mates varied on how many more 
Japanese cars might be imported, 
ranging from 400.000 to 750.000 on 
top of last year's 1.85 million. 

William E. Brock, the U.S. trade 
representative, predicted Thursday 
that without the restraints, sales of 
Japanese imports are likely to rise 
to 2.6 million a year. 

Mr. Filzwater said that the 
American auto industry sold 11.5 
million vehicles, a 22. 3-percent an- 
nual increase, at <i profit of $7.6 
billion through List September. 

Asked about the effect of the 
decision on employment in the 
U3. auto industry, the spokesman 
died a Federal Trade Commission 
study indicating 4,600 workers out 
of a work force numbering more 
than 700,000 would lose their jobs. 

Opponents or Mr. Reagan’s de- 
cision. which has been expected for 
some weeks, have suggested it 
would have more dire conse- 
quences. 

The chairman of the Ford Motor 
Co.. Donald Peterson, said the de- 
cision “will create jobs in Japan at 
the expense of jobs for American 
workers. Ending the Japanese ex- 
port restraints means the roles have 
changed.” 

Ford and Chrysler Corp. favoi 
continuing the import restraints 
while General Motors Corp. ha.> 
opposed the quotas. 


the controlling stockholder in the 
Grand Union supermarket chain. 

Wall Street sources said that, if 
Sir James decided to invest, it 
would probably be in a new Icahn 
company being formed to buy Phil- 
lips, with Mr. Icahn also investing 
$400 million. Other investors 
would put up an additional S2Q0 
million. 

The new development appeared 
to have reached Wall Street traders 
late in the day Thursday, with Phil- 
lips climbing $1,125 to $49, its first 
strong advance in more than a 
week. 

Two weeks ago. Mr. Icahn. who 
already owns 5 percent of Phillips 
stock, told investors in a formal 
tender offer that if be could raise 
the money, he would pay $60 a 
share, in cash, for 70 million shares, 
or 45 percent of Phillips shares out- 
standing. 

If successful he would then have 
half the company at a cost of 543 
billion. He said be would then buy 
the other half for $50 a share, in 
securities, for an average price of 
$55 a share. 


Flemish Trade Fair a Symbol 
Of Area’s Economic Vitality 

By Sreven J. Dryden 700 companies from 22 countries tc 

International Herald Tribune Ghent's Congress Center. 


GHENT, Belgium — The huge 
technology fair here this week 
sponsored by the Flanders regional 
government has been as much a 
celebration of economic recovery 
as a chance for professionals to 
trade ideas. 

“In terms of economic behavior, 
our country is in the process of 
becoming a country divided, with 
two different acceleration rates,” 
Gaston Gents, the pres dent of the 
Flemish regional government, said 
at the opening of Flanders Tech- 
nology International *85. 

“Flanders is now playing the rede 
of the economic conscience of Bel- 
gium,” Mr. Geens said, contrasting 
the growing strength of the Dutch- 
-speaking north to the economic 
problems of the French-speaking 
Wallonia region in the south. 

The seven-day exhibition, billed 
as the largest technological trade 
fair in the world, drew more than 


700 companies from 22 countries to 
Ghent's Congress Center. 

The Flemish organizers of the 
event saw the fair as a chance to 
display the results of their govern- 
ment's drive to attract high-tech- 
nology investment and boost for- 
eign trade. 

Industrial investment in Flan- 
ders increased 22 percent in real 
terms in 1984, three times the Euro- 
pean Community average, Mr. 
Geens said. “While unemployment 
rose in the rest of Belgium Iasi year, 
it decreased by 4 percent in Flan- 
ders.” 

Melchior Wathelet. regional 
minister for new technologies, said 
last week that he disagreed with the 
implication lhat Wallonia. which 
has suffered in recent years from 
the decline of its traditional steel 
and coal industries, was lacking in 
high-technology development. The 
Wallonia region also has strengths 
in biotechnology, microelectronics, 
and space technology, be said. 


OPPENHEIMER 
OFFERS YOUR I RA AN 
. ALTERNATr/E 
TO GUARANTEED 
LOW RATES. 


ft** 

Ha/ 

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Nor. 

390 

1425.1575 

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225 - 375 

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101235 

535 475 

HUB -1150 

340 


375 525 

775 - 935 


Got* 2 RS )- 28900 



RES IN DEP 

An Account for the Cautious Imutor 
to Protect and Increase Capital 

U.5. Doflar Denominated 
Inured by U2L Govt Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 

Competitive 
Money Marker Yields 
No Market Rede 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute Gonfkfcmtia&y 

CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

RES IN DEP 

Case Pbstaie 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus and 
account application tot 


F or IRA investors seeking the So if you had been able to 

assurance of a fixed rate, we put $2£00 a year into a Special 

suggest a bank.* Fund IRA since the Fund’s 

For those investors more inception, your IRA would have 
concerned with how high the been worth $KH570*** as of 
rate of return is, than with how December 31, 1984. That’s an 
fixed, we suggest another route. average annual return of 21.5%. 
The Oppenheimer Special Fund. The Special Fund provides 
Because over its life, the an IRA investment based on the 
Special Rmd has rhe best perfor- philosophy chat the 
mance^ record of all 361 mutual opportunity for a 
funds that have been in existence higher return is pref- 
that long— an astonishing total erable to the certain- 

return of 940%.** cy of a lower one. 

f"To M .Tucker Smith ' ikt 2/3/bs ! 

I Oppenheimer & Cn. 62-64 Cannon St . London EC4N 6AE England 
I Telephone 01-2 36 6578 

I Please send me an IRA application and a Special Fund prospectu* v’fch nrore complete infornu- 
| ikm, indudingaD charges and expense*. Ill read it carefully before I Invest or send money 
, DIU like to Open an IRA. □ IU like to switch my IRA- 




Vafem White WdiSJL 

I, Qtori *ta MM*Bfcac 
1211 Gmmm IMieM 
T«L 3I8&5I - Ticks SMS 


Afar oteMfa tartan Ae USA 


| THE OPPENHEIMER SPECIAL FUND. | 


© 1985 Oppenheimer Investor Service*. i n c. *Rank IR Vs are insured and generally have lixed interest 
rate*, whereas ihc Fund’s nei asaci value fluctuate* and may he subject n> kea. ■"March 15. 1973-Dec ember 
31. Upper Analytical Service*. Inc •■*Ai^iinunpai2jD00inve»memoo March 15, 1973(lnocpnm 
of fund| and $ 2,000 annual tnvestmens on br*t bu*in*u day of each year ihereatier with all dividends and 
distributions reinvested performance is not an indicatum future result* In the period shown, 
stock prices fluctuated severely and were generally higher at the end than at the beginning 


5S SUr VV»i.« , ' a "‘ 






jl. jl j iuAn,V(p 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY^ MARCH 2-3, 1985 


Fridays 


MSE 


Oosii^ 


rabies include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


37% 17 
43» 27*4 
86 55 
15V. 9% 

15% *% 
191* 1 M 
1M 7% 
22% 15* 
32 26% 

22*T1% 
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19* 13* 
78 13 

99 90 

zi* nv> 
xm 28 * 

33% 28* 
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12 
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130 125 
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pf 130 10 J 
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22 U QuakSO JO U 26 128 21 20* 21 +* 

lift' «* Ouanex 37 a V* 9 v% + % 

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24* 14 QfcRoll 34a 19 X 1168 2 24 24% +1 


18% 6* 
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38% 
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7ft 5* 
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i .tk«* * * 


H*h IM Oom Qj 


88*881 JUIC E UjYCE) IJmo 1JD09 Die MSS 8 105*8 lJOS 15534 — 

'$g5£*-%!5r& rft.16IO.aoiM. 

{Boo 15100 MS IT 16800 UUO 167.10 M7.« -JO r. ». Xra .77T. - — 

16445 135J0 M U8L90 12000 14*60 1*9.95 +JS 

1830G 157J5 Sap lOO +J 6 S Wr O r- in oM O rtunh 18 JBffl 

UVOO 15700 im 16690 +J0 » 25 5S S 'JS " 

taooo 15400 Jon 143.75 +05 ■*“* £"» JW -JJf* — 

177-50 15430 Mor 14475 +05 -g* ■«*> JJM — 

16150 u fllXT MOV 165125 +H -7566 JO06 D9C -71*5 JIM JIM JOtl — 

"J" i2jS +£ _J504. 0981 MO T .710 -7130 .7015 .70U _ 


1 D*C 10558 10560 10530 10554 — 

l Pro*. Soft* 11083 
ML 33011 efl 396 


Season Season 
HJoh low 


Oowi HtoB LOW owe OlB. 


Grains 


WHEAT (C OT3 

5000 bu mtefama-aeikirs Per Busiwl 




a ru t "m e. a war 141 H4S%i JUT-q +JJ 

in xS% 3*” § 0 % if? Sft ^ +“* 

176ft 306 S«P JOT* 128ft 32 4 % 32T-+ —00% 

303ft 136 CMC 137 30ft 136% 127% +00*- 

324ft 300ft Mar 143 143 341ft US +J 0 ft 

EsL Sales Prav.Sola* 4713 

Prev.Oav OP*n Inr. 38235 oH597 


Est. Softs 700 Pray- Sates IM 
PrK.OayOMOlnt 660 no 89 


e s t S o ft s U 61 Prav. Softs 2-940 
Prav. Day Open tnt. 12009 o«*2 


Mefgjg 


COPPER (COMBO 
25000 ibA- cents per IBv 
*320 ESJO Mar 5800 58.95 5820 
6240 Aar 

30*— ft CORN ICBT) 9U0 5420 Mar 9*00 5*05 5*25 

«k+ ft S4M0b«ajlirfB»on>-daltor»»erbtBftel 8825 5700 Jut 6030 4005 5990 

49% +■ ft 125ft 161ft Mar 2*** 165 263% 204% 82.10 57 JO Sep 6000 61.10 6050 

90 + ft 320 269% MOT 170% 271% 270ft 170% —MM »62S 5U0 Dec 4 1.90 6100 6UD 

14 — * 121 273ft Jul 174 Z34U 873W 173*. -00% B6J0 5900 Jan 

30 — ft 321* 2-67 Sea 204% 204% 207% 207% —20ft -nao spjo MLar 6300 6200 PUB 

34 —1ft 1*5 202 Dec 202% 203% 202% Zo3% —-00% 74J0 61.10 May 6X00 6X00 42.K 

48% + » 110 17* A «r M 172 271 171% 00% 74>0 6130 JU? 6X40 6300 4JO0 

30*+ ft 121% 235ft _May_2Jt _2-77 X74 X76» +J0% ?a9Q 6230 S« 

40% + % esLSrtea Pr C' *?” 7OJ0 64J0 Dec 

36*—' i Prav. Day Oran im.1 17033 a«2097 jan 


- PRBNCN PHAM C1MM1 

Spot franc- 1 MWeawalsSftWOOl 
- .11*05 -0*405 Mar -Otne B*7 a JBfTSa J09744 _ 

.1)020 .09410 Jwi ,09790 JD9759 419750 09700 

.1040 0900 SOP 479*40 4 

Eat. Soles 3 Prav. Softs 371 
+15 Prav. Dor Open Hit. 1733 OHIM 


WhPlfpf 19401 

WlKrhrf 200 4.1 9 2428 


49% 

34% 

12% 

7% 

0 

19ft 

26 


72 

16 

18% 

11% 

10 

5% 

2% 

% 

32ft 

20% 

33% 

21% 

35ft 

0ft 

Zlft 

14 

H>% 

9 

11 

Mk 


34ft 2Z% 
53% 49% 

a% it* 

ID* 6% 

ion ■* 
a a 

24% 18% 

30* 20% 
34% S* 

77* 13% 
19* 14* 
20ft 15% 
«ft 4ft 
12% 5ft 
23* IT* 
40* 33 
55 34ft 
13% 7% 
32* 19% 
60ft 39* 
39% 25% 
16* II* 
43% 2D* 
45 lift 
UH 9* 
15ft 12ft 
15* 12 ‘ 
27ft 14* 
5* 2* 
43ft 30 

aft 12 ft 

n% u* 

32* 19% 
65ft 37* 


103% +7 
a% 19 
a 11 % 
35 * a* 
20% 11* 
25% 10* 
61ft S* 
39ft 28ft 
30% 17% 
33ft 18ft 
35% a 
8% 4ft 
18* 12 
16* 12% 
37 34* 

59% 48* 
72 SO 

38% aw 
a* a* 
18 12* 
30ft 9% 
41* 50 
56% 36ft 

a* 28* 

38% 27 
18* 12* 
291ft 22* 
38ft 27* 
21% IS 
20* 32 


(y \]£t> 


WMtC ISO +9 105 

WNfCPfOJO 7.5 5 

Wtlltehl 11 95 

Whlttak JO 16 10 740 

WUbM 18 16 

Wllfrdn 15 a* 

William 1.40 5J 4 2070 

WlhnEI 95 

WlbftrO .10 1J 19 101 

WHlDtx 141 41 u a 

wirnibe .1* -5 u 1306 

Winner a 67 

WtaterJ 4 

WtocEP 298 73 7 1247 

WISE of 890 114 6* 

Wise Pi 7.7S 113 20x 

WbcPL 241 u > HO 

WtscPS 154 82 7 rn 

Wltco MS 33 9 296 

WotvrW 24 Z3 15 218 

WotxJPt JO 15 14 1293 

Wofwm 1 JO 45 10 1359 

Wtriwpf 730 39 5 

WrWAr 14 

Wrtsty IJOall H 10 

Wurrtzr 19 

WVIeLb J2 23 II 52 

Wynns JO 29 7 170 


48*+ * 
30*+ ft 
40% + % 
3Mk— 1 
23ft 

llft + % 
14%+ ft 
27*— ft 


7ft— ft 
36% + * 
19% + * 
7*+ ft 
4ft + ft 

a% + * 
a — ift 
0 + ft 

a + ft 

aft 

39W+1U 
10*+ ft 
22*— ft 
40% 

57 

3ft + ft 
58* + ft 
3ft— ft 
13% — % 
20ft— ft 


SOYBEANS (CBT) 

54X10 bu mini raom-dol ton per ocohel _ _ 

790* USB IWriil 9£ leg* 5JSft +J4% 
797 172 MOV 174ft 178 SJ2 ft SMM +«ft 

799 SJ2 Jut 5J6 SJt 5J3 SJ7% +412% 

7 J 6 tS AuS 5JS 590 SJ4 SJBft +4)1% 

6J1 ISft SOP SJSft 5J7ft SJS SJ7 +J3ft 

64* S«6 NM 5«t 592ft SJ9 591ft +JJ2% 

6^ 490ft 503 dStt 540 +J2W 

7J2 510 jCSr 513 5M 512ft 6.14 +m 

799 424 MOT 432 +■“ 

Eit. Sates Prav. Sales 7J332 

Prw. Day Open tnt 7U38 us 33 
SOYBEAN MEALCC8T) 
i00 toR*-<taifcraetr hxi 

209-00 12540 Mar 1200 T2M0 WOO 12410 +1J0 

20500 B$L5Q AUV 13020 13150 13110 13200 +170 

19450 Q4JTJ Jul 13500 13800 13560 Q7JQ +1JB 

1BOJO IrJO AUP U9J0 VUL50 138J0 14030 +190 

•mss ufio SW 14lS 142JD 141X0 14230 +130 

1800 lmw OCT 14590 14590 14350 14470 +1J0 

18490 W JO Dec 149 JO UEJO 148J0 1 49 JO +l» 

16390 149 JO Jan 15X50 752J0 15? JO 15) JO +90 

30550 15490 MOT 1570 1570 1570 15890 +L90 

E*L5ai*s Prav. Sates WJ10 


7440 610 Jin 4140 430 630 

7898 5230 sea 

7030 6490 Dec 

Est- Sales Prav. Sales 40*0 

Prav. Day Open lot. 82.10 afflTS 


—JO } OERMAN MARK flMM* 

— JS I I per mark- leetnteewXs 509001 _ 

.4110 081 Mar 087 0 *f 071 0BS 

J733 005 Jun 013 0Z7 0*7 013 

045 038 Sap 035 JWI JO » 0 % 

018 071 Dec JQ 0 093 J069 083 

— . J2S1 J04Q MOT J134 

— 0 EsL Softs 401 Prav. Sole* 34411 
—JO I prav.DavOaanim. jits* off aou 


SILVER (COMOO 

5900 tray asvesnt s per travel 


20590 

I960 

1800 

1770 

1800 

1840 

TIUO 


M3+fi 

M3 

MOT 

5600 

5)50 

581 JJ 

SWA 

apt 



15110 

558.0 

May 

3680 

5830 

146 LD 

567 J) 

Jul 

5760 

5*20 

USXO 

3740 

Soo 

500 

6010 

12300 

5930 

Ooc 

61Q5 

6140 

I215J0 

61+0 

Jan 

61*0 

*7*0 

mu 

6100 

Mar 

62115 

<99 A 

10(40 

6300 

MOV 

6385 

6345 

9450 

6(00 

Jul 

6660 

6570 

94CL0 

6500 

Sap 

6740 

6750 

7640 

6670 

Doc 





Jan 



EsL soft* 


Prev.Oolas 2447* 


-^9 I JAPANESE YENflMMI 

> oer two- I poin t equal* w J W OM 

1 004695 J017M 640T JXD833 03Bj8 903134 JM6q _ 

004430 JXD836 Jft» 903*3 03889 03857 0301 _ 

OOWO 90870 Sep JD03W8 903925 9039059039a 
57X6 +9.1 I 00430 MHOS Dec JB3951 0W51 903951 9BBW 

5710 4*9 e»L8W** 1V». g*fr8gl0. SJBO 

5799 +99 I Prav. Day Oaanint 15206 afllfO 


5985 +92 SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

6155 +*5 s per t roQCflpelnt — note * 80 01 

6212 492 035 2400 Mar 2«* JSJO 074 J43 

632J +102 5900 J439 Jun 2S23 2560 2308 2521 

644J +102 5*30 94B0 ftp 2562 26M 2360 JK3 

ISA +W5 5Q60 J331 Dec JAM 2638 2631 J409 


<78J +116 EsL Safes 3007 Prav. Soft* 16282 


69) J +11.1 
49*9 4112 


Prav. Dor Ocea inx 389*8 up 993 


Prav. Day Open ln». 7X646 off 5933 
PLATINUM CMTME1 
0 tray ax- donera per tray ex. 

3C 20 25390 Mar 


46% 33% Xerox 30 15 18 3949 46ft 45* 45* + ft 

57% 45% Xerox m 555 119 1099 47* 49ft 49W— * 

73 19 XT HA -44 22 10 114 27ft 26% 27% +1% 


2040 1540 Mar 1570 1570 1570 1580 +U» 

E*L5aies Prav. Sates 19210 

Prav. Day OpontaL 43,110 up 853 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

60000 dollar* per 100 lb*. 

3840 22-95 Mar 280 2850 2893 2118 — -14 

30.7 a 220 Mar 7730 77 AO 27-07 27.14 —.12 

300 23-70 Jul 26J3 3870 2655 2456 —.15 


2530 Mar 3490 4J0 

2440 Apr 2490 2510 3470 250.10 +0 LUMBER (CME) 

3490 Jul 2540 2550 2520 2540 +0 UO9OObd.fL-Slwrl0Obd.lt. 


industrials 


3*30 2549D Oct 2SS0 2610 2580 2600 +10 

37X50 261.70 Jan 3660 3680 3640 3160 +10 

E*L Sale* Prav. Sale X251 

Prav. Day Open InL 14131 afflB4 


0 24 ZaftCp 10 49 9 0 29* 29% 29* 

24* 14ft ZCBWhi 0 55 18 940 IS* 15% 15W 

SB » zayre 0b J IS 1246 57% 56% 57 + ft 

31% 18ft ZcnlttlE 8 a*4 TB% 22ft 22* 

27% 18 zero AO U 17 15 a% 25* 26% + ft 

21 ft 20ft Zero wl 4 aft aw aft 

aft aft Zumln 10 45 11 239 30ft 29ft 30ft + % 


300 

2205 

Mar 

2430 

2440 

3110 

230 

Mar 

270 

27® 

3030 

270 

Jui 

2453 


270 

220 


2410 

2415 

2425 

2® 

Sep 

35® 

2565 

260 

220 


2510 

2575 

340 

220 

DOC 

3465 

3465 

3470 

2360 


2455 

245 

Est. Solos 


Prav. Salas 1100* 


NYSE ECgh«-Lows 


March 1 


Prav. Day Open lot 4403 of 1403 
OATS (CBT) 

500 1» mtalosam-danarspm bmbN 
1.96ft L70% Mor X»% X77 1.75ft 1J6% +91 

10 197ft MOV 1JDW IJlft IJOft 1J1 +0% 

1JSW 143 Jin X65 145% 145 145ft +0% 

1.79 10 Sep 10 142% 10 142ft +0% 

142ft 144 Dec 1-65 145 144% 10 +0ft 

EsLSales Prav. Sole* 590 

Prav. Day Open Inf. X77S up £5 



070 Mar U70 1380 13150 13LM — t 

1440 Mav 14828 148JB U20 14U* — J 

1530 Jul 1550 154.90 1510 15X10 —4 

1570 Sep 1610 1610 1550 15810 -4 

1610 NOV 1620 1*20 1*7.10 1J70 _4 

168*0 Jan 1670 1670 14X70 16440 — 1 

1950 17X0 Mar 1710 1710 119.10 1690 -2 

Ext. sale* 2570 prav. Sale* xxn 
Prav. Day Otwn bit. 8984 off 290 


1110 1110 UttBO 1100 —35 " 

11025 11CJ0 11Q.W 109.90 — X00 . 

11X25 11025 11025 1090 —10 COTTON UNYCC) 
v. Soles 2531 J04Wib*.-cenhPW > 

8728 UP 137 770 6241 4 


COLD (COMEX) 


10 troy ax.- deUcn per tray ol 
3110 2810 Mar 28840 2870 2840 

5140 28260 APT 28120 2930 2880 

May 2*20 2*20 2920 
5100 2870 Jun 29X00 2960 2920 

4850 2910 Aug 2980 3000 2970 

49S0 2770 Oct 30240 30890 XXH 

4890 010 Dec 070 3100 30890 

4850 3080 Feb 31X0 31X00 31X00 

49A0 31X70 APT 

4350 32050 Jun 

42850 3310 Aufl 

3950 3350 Oct 

1*1 nn -law iw 

Esr. Sales Prav. Safes 29 J43 

Prav. Day Open |nLV48l39 up 1039 


NEW HIGHS 10 



Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

4Q0D I bar cents Per lb. 


6300 


6507 

650 

64*5 

6507 

+0 

1400 


67.17 

6703 

5705 

67.12 

—as 

63.15 


64KJ 

5427 

5590 

6415 

+0 




6465 

64*0 



530 

Dec 

65+5 

5412 

5515 

5402 

-0 

6525 

Fao 

6455 

6470 

54® 

64S5 



50000 tos.-contapw 15. 
790 5X61 Mar 

63JS 

6430 

6175 

•411 

7930 

6128 

May 

6424 

64M 

6421 

*427 

79+5 

62.95 

Jul 

6465 

64** 

6460 

600 

77 SO 

647V 

Oct 

65.12 

*425 

4410 

•4*5 

7100 

6470 

Doc 

4525 

6450 

6415 

6115 

7473 

6415 

Mar 

660 

6AM 

660 

460 

7000 

6470 

Mov 

47 JH 

67.15 

6705 

6613 

7005 

67.16 

Jul 

670 

6760 

670 

67.15 


EsL Sales 200 Prav. Soft* 2508 
Prav. Day Open Ini. 17460 oH8 


6747 6115 Aug 68 HI 6827 650 6815 +0 — . 

6590 6140 Oct 4450 6445 6450 6855 +0 FlnailCial 

67J5 6340 Dec 6585 6812 6185 6802 -0 I C B WBW- 

4455 US T. BILLS (IMM) 

amnnon-PttotlWPCt 

Prav. oay open inx 57 jm or 185 pjjn in 5* Altar ftji 9 

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 91 Jl 87.14 Jun «L82 91 

4400 lbs.- cent* Per lb. 910 8894 Sep 9032 * 

7473 6875 Nor 4895 69.15 6845 69.12 —0 «O90 8SJ7 Dec 89.96 m 

7420 6750 Apr 7055 TOTS 030 7050 +0 90J55 8860 Mor 8956 V 

7X75 6495 May 69JS 780 690 *9.75 —.17 9027 87 Jl Jun B95I f 

7X0 6860 Aug 71.55 7145 7152 710 +0 900 880 Sen 89a « 

7X0 670 Sen 7095 7155 7X95 7155 +0 8943 89.19 Dec 

7X32 67. TO OcT 709S 7X97 7X70 7X95 +.10 EltSates Prav.SaMS 1447 

7X20 7050 Nov 710 710 7145 710 —.10 P rev. DOT Open IflX 48336 0R418 

xT 464 » YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

Prev. Day Open InL 1QJ43 op a 5iotMMopr1n-pfss3XKiiofWOpct 

HOGS (CME) 83 70-25 Nor 78-14 71 

3LQ0Q tbs^ cants Per tb. *2-3 IM Jun 7M 71 

5455 45.10 Apr 4645 4645 4835 4877 +.15 81-13 73-n Sep 77-11 7i 

S5A0 4850 Jun 5150 51-95 51 J5 JTJ7 +J2 00-72 75-13 Dec 

55J7 4895 JUI 5X57 5120 5255 5X15 +0 B0-8 75-18 Mar 

5437 47.J0 Aug 510 5252 51J7 52J7 +0 79-36 77-72 Jun 

510 4S0 Oct 470 <70 4895 <70 +0 EsLSaleS Prev.Sato 1842! 

5085. 4830 Dec 470 <70 <70 47J5 +15 Prav. Day open Int 48J<7 un U35 

Jl- Ilf “* “ 

77-15 57-77 Mar 4+6 61 

Prav. Dav open InL 73 KD UC271 77 .n ojwi um mj u 


7475 

6535 

Nor 

7420 

670 

Apr 

1235 

64*S 

Nat 

7370 

5460 

Aua 

7100 

67.00 

Sop 

7X22 

57. TO 

Oct 

7X20 

7060 

Nov 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 
n manor- pts of in pcl 

9X21 S7J9 Mar 9151 9X44 910 91 Jl — J| 

91 Jl 87.14 Jun 9082 90J3 9043 9047 —.13 

91J3 8894 Sep 9032 90J2 90.11 9832 — 0 

9090 1577 Dec 89.96 B*J>6 1946 890 —M 

90J55 860 Mor 8*46 890 890 8949 —M 

9037 8741 Jun 0951 89 48 IMS 8950 — 37 

900 880 Sep 89a 8935 89.1* 0933 — J7 

890 89.19 Dec 79J06 —0 

Ext Sates Prav.SaMS 14475 

p rav. Day Open t nx 48336 aftot 


-100 HEATING OIL (NTMC) 

+x*a < 200 aal- cent* per aal 

+20 8X75 *505 Mr 7X75 7X*0 7XX TUB +1 

+X70 820 640 MOY 00 00 00 0934 + 

+30 78.40 6X50 Jun 680 6BJ5 68M 6848 + 

00 IMS Jul 4855 6860 6815 «8G + 

710 6835 Aua *9.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 + 

710 1035 S8P 6945 + 

1 730 7XM Dec 7130 +. 

} Feb TUX 

■ £sf. Sates Prav. Sale* *03 

Prav. Day Open Hit 16452 up 106 


i }> Iff 


CRUDE OIL (MY ME} 

1 00 box. dollars per ML 

3155 2457 Apt 37.04 373? 2883 t7.tr 4 

3038 2428 MOV 2835 3647 2815 2858 4 

2*45 2420 JUT 2803 26J2 2X*3 260 4 

7334 2410 JUI 250 280 2X71 2598 ? 

2947 2435 Aim 25J4 2SJ4 2534 3534 + 

3940 24 40 Nov 2530 2530 2549 25J0 4 

Ext.sahn Prev. Sale* 1X615 

Prav. Day Open Ml. 57579 up 670 


n YR. TREASURY (Cm 
510000 prln-ms & 32ndief WOpG 


S3 

7+25 

Mar 

7+14 

79-5 

7+14 

7+1 

82-3 

7+9 

Jun 

7+3 

7+8 

77-18 

7+6 

81-13 

75- Jl 

Sop 

77-11 

77-16 

770 

77-14 

80-22 

75-13 

Doc 




75-26 

K+8 

75-U 

Mar 




7+9 

79-36 

77-22 

Jun 




7+26 

EsL Sates 


Prev.sato 1452S 




Stock Incte) 


SP COMP. INDEX(CME) 


r£f Sta* S*7 P^eafM 89M **" (FpSSoSbKn ASS«NTO?Ptfl E5LSale> 2703 Pravtoto^ftlOO^' +l 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 7+2 57-10 Sep CH4 67-21 6+Z 006 +Q ualno » imp ruj-.i-i 

3000 IbS.- cents Ptr lb. 7+5 5X8 Dec 46-9 6+31 66-4 6+27 +13 V ^V IB UNgf KCPT} 

010 6X10 Mar 7040 7232 7025 7160 +US 720 57-2 Mar 6+25 6+T2 *+» 6+10 +12 P2!j** ond ^2 1 _ ’ 

8X00 61.15 May 7055 7X62 7035 7X55 +10 70-16 56-29 Jun «7-5 67-5 6+5 65-28 +12 ’«■» Ma 1*9 a0 200 T9J0 30245 + 

*257 6X15 Jul 7035 7733 7025 7X15 +1J5 7M 5+29 Sep 4+27 65-10 4+27 65-16 +12 BU0 M40 M73J + 

8065 6020 Aug 6S53 7025 *050 7010 +145 026 5+25 Dec 6+29 6+8 6+39 6+6 +12 2*20 WS75 See 20855 2090 20855 21130 + 

75.15 6X15 Feb 00 7X25 6930 71.18 0-12 5+27 Mar 6+29 +12 21040 20-50 Dec 71543 4 

7X40 4400 Mar 7000 7060 700 7037 +37 0-2 6+3 Jun 6+22 44-Z3 6+14 4+71 +12 Prnv.Sgtoi 439* 

Ext. sales 8217 Prev. Sales 7472 6+26 6+2 S«P 6+13 4+16 6+7 6+14 +12 Prev. Day OP4A Int. 721? up 157 

Prev. Day Open Int 14384 UP III Est.SateS Prev.Saies22743f 

Prev. Dor Open \oS33A332 UP 2471 MY SB COMP. INDEX (KYFE) 

I 1 , GNMA (CBT) points ond cents 

Food SH» 0 Opiin-B( 8 AX!nd 3 ofiWPcr wub 8 U 0 Mar 1050 1870 W535 10635 - 

““ TO-17 57-5 Mor i+M 0-4 4824 0-4 44 W935 900 jun 108JQ 1100 10830 100 - 

COFFEE CWYCSCE) 69-27 57-17 Jun 68-4 68-18 6+3 88-14 +5 U13C 9135 Sep 11045 11130 11055 1110 - 

37300 t&Sr cents Per tb. 69+ 59-13 Sep 67-14 67-24 67-13 67-24 +5 11X95 1013D Dec 11X35 11335 11X35 TWO • 

15X78 12X50 Mar 13830 U045 13840 ML39 +3* 6+13 59-4 Dec <73-13 EsLSales 30.U4 Prav. Sate* MSN 

1520 12X01 May 0*45 14030 13935 14055 +39 68 56-20 Mar 6+1* +5 Prev. Day Open Int. MJ84 off 219 

14930 12X00 Jul 13955 160JS 090 UX62 +49 0-4 5+25 JUn 6+3 +3 

14740 1270 Sep 13X70 13944 13845 139J7 +43 67-3 65-11 Sep 63-1* 43 

14275 12975 Dec 13+0 13+15 13775 13879 +51 EsLSaleS Prav. Sates 655 

14X0 12850 Mar 13744 +56 Prav. Day Open InL 5756 off 142 1 _ — 

as ss 5^ as :s L commodity md«« 

EsL Sales _ Prav. Sates 34B1 „„ «... ,, 


19X55 15X0 Mar 18XM 105.10 18230 10X71 41 

JR» I56.IB Jun 116.95 10.10 W4S 117 M +| - 

1910 1600 SOP 19030 19X70 190J0 17X50 +).. 

'J*®. WMO Dec 1*340 1*640 1*100 1*540 +) . 

... Ejt Sales 27403 Prav. Sol** 86. IM 
tH Prev. Day Open Ini. 6X14? upSJU4 


+T2 VALUE UNC (KCBT) 


AmfeMD 

WIUbPNOpI 


Cana I R 68c 
WNaPttspf 


+n 17X00 Jim 2040 20850 HUN 30735 +• - 

+12 2120 U5J5 Sep 20845 2090 20855 31 UO 

+12 21X40 2090 Dec >1545 4. 

+ 5 Est Softs Prev. Soft* 4799 

+12 Prev. Day Open int. 773? up 157 


Complaint Against 
Hunts Took U.S. 

5 Years to Compile 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A government com- 
plaint filed against Nelson Bunker Hunt and 
other big-money silver traders paints a picture 
of high international finance replete with secret 
Swiss bank accounts, wealthy Arab sheiks and 
meetings in Paris. 

The detailed 46-page document, not counting 
1 1 pages of charts and tables, reads like the 
skeleton of a best-selling novel 

Kathleen W. Hathaway, a spokesman for the 
Commodity Futures Trading commission, said 
it took investigators five years to put the case 
together because of a “complex trading pal- 
tenT that required extensive international trav- 
el to track. 

The nine defendants include the Texas-based 
Hunt brothers. Nelson and W. Hebert, and Naji 
Robert Nahas, a Brazilian the commission char- 
acterized as another big silver player. 

After a detailed listing of the people and an 
explanation of how the complicated silver fu- 


1520 12X01 MOV 13*45 1 

14930 12X00 Jul 13955 1 

14740 1270 Sep 13670 T 

14275 12935 Dec 1380 1 

14X0 12840 MOT 

090 1310 May 

11+50 13550 Jul 

EsL Soft* Prav. Sales 34 

Prav. Day Open InL 12454 OP 211 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
points ondaanis 

n>80 8838 Mar 10588 18740 HB75 10+75 

10955 TO0 Jun 10630 1100 19830 lofx 

1110 *10 Sep 1)165 1110 11055 1110 

JIMS, HM> -O ^ 71335 11131 11338 

Est. Sales 20.144 Prav. Soft* 14396 
Prav. Dav Open lot. 10464 off 2*9 


SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 
11200 kb+- rants per lb. 


935 A22 JUI 442 442 458 +56 +.15 

975 445 Sep 463 <88 433 442 +.13 

, 9JB 47D Oct 4» SJB 4*0 5JE +J9 

775 5 l 26 Jan 544 +.11 

933 570 Mar 531 S84 5*0 543 W0 

7.15 634 May 6.15 630 6.13 630 +0 

46* 427 Jul 650 6 l50 650 438 +0 

EsL Sales 1L8S0 Prav. Softs 11434 
Prav. Day Open WL 8X892 up 10 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tans- s per tan 

2570 1981 Mar 2138 2138 7127 7133 —7 

2370 2020 May 2146 2161 2140 2146 — 7 ■ 

2*0 2049 Jui 2127 2137 2121 21XJ —8 1 

2415 2053 SOP 2115 2720 21 D7 2117 —* 

2337 TV99 D#C 2026 2D35 20TB 2B21 —5 

2145 200 Mar 2015 2028 2015 2027 —1 


*1 mlOton- ptsol 1 OS pet 

*170 8543 Mar 9X65 9066 *854 *054 —.14 

*10 050 Jun 8952 8952 09M 8949 —15 

9060 850 Sep 89.16 190 89.13 89.12 —.13 

90.17 8534 Dec 8076 . 8076 8076 8072 —ill 

• 8*0 8+56 Mar (BAl -J* 

8*56 8443 Jun 88.16 —.11 

M58 8746 Sep 8754 —.10 

EsL Sates Prav. Sales 109 

Prav.Oav Open Int 12.328 off <3 


Commodity Indexes 


EURODOLLARS (I MM) 

St milltan-pts or in pcf. 

910 ts.14 Mar 90S* *037 9015 9016 —.15 

9048 825* Jun 8951 8956 8931 |90 —.17 


Close 

Moody’s 950.90 f 

Reuters 2JJ20.70 

p J. Futures 1 20 37 

Com. Research Bureau- 239.10 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
o - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Janes : base 100 ; Dec 31. 1974. 


U5) S6P 8646 8846 M46 8174 —.72 


8947 840 OK 8854 8855 8834 8833 —.11 

■*51 86.18 Mar 8847 M-15 8847 BXC 2 -vlD 

89-15 8633 Jun 8741 87 SO *741 8777 —.70 

®44 870 Sec 8750 4744 0740 *745 —.11 

8827 8742 Dec 8759 8759 87 AO 870 —.13 

EM. Sates Prev. Sates 40182 

Prav. Day Open InLMS^ST up 707 


Market Guide 


Z130 2000 May 

2035 2815 Jut 

E*L sales Prav. Sales 137 s 
Prav. Day Open int 2X817 up340 


307 —1 

2027 — ll 


1060 X0695 
1055 100 
1040 1060 


HYOCB: 
NYCB: 
COMEX: 
-35 NYME; 
-30 KCBT: 
—35 NY PE: 


Board nlTYods 
OtoiWMKtwIlH Exctwnpe 
Wtatrwflonol Monetary Market 
OfChtaMo Mmcantlie Excftmg* 


Asian Commodities 

March 1 


London Commodities 

March 1 


Paris Commodities 

March 1 


Cash Prices 


HONO-KONG GOLD FUTURES 


explanation of how the complicated aivo fu- uxnwoma 

turns market works, the complaint launches into hm low aw °*A*k buT'a* 

"4«* :» —Tt. rn — -e J Mar_ N.T. NT. 2870 2890 2900 2920 


Ftam in sterling per metric ten. 
Gasoil In dollars per metric Ion. 
Gold In UJ. doHais per ounce. 


Su^ to French Fiona pit metric ton. 
Other Rgure* In Frma par NO kg. 


what it calls a “summary of respondents’ tna- Z r Z z&x two 2 ^S§ 

mpulative scheme. **«- n-t. m.t. 2900 2 ?xdo hsw — 


Commodify and UnH 
Oritoe 4 Sanlra, Rx— 
Prlntdotti 64/S » Vj. vd — 

Steel billets (Pitt.). Ion 

iron 2 Fdrv.Pnila, ton 


1515 13*2 1500 1505 +7 ?ES!f2S p ^° 1 ^ plw - - ?K? K 


Jun — N.T. N.T. 2*10 27100 Z«60 2980 SUGAR 


It says the defendants established a pattern jw - n.t. n.t. 2970 2990 3000 3020 mov 12000 11440 11 * 0 12000 11&0 11+40 

airtinl C^nfj.nilu .1 1070 9? — *{-J- N.T. 3020 3040 3050 3070 Aug 1270 12440 12740 1270 12450 1250 

starting in September ly/V of accu m ulati ng o»c _ n.t. n.t. 3080310031002120 on 1150132501350135012201 x 250 

“ . — — — . - ■ ■ . « Mb TW nn lU nn mtn m M u+m fW uflat lift an 1x1 nn in it m vn am 


futures positions, using a procedure that kept 
the silver bullion “unavailable to the market/' 


f=«b H40 3!f» 3110 3150 New — I Dec 1*050 14050 1410 14250 1! 


Volume: 25 iota of ioo oz. 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJ per ounce 


It said their trading “represented such a large p *‘ owcp 

demand for alverbuEion over a period oi a few HlB „ 

months that the market was unable to meet ' 

their demand at non-anifidal prices" and that Jwi rxr. r 

flgy auyd pnett l o.“wvfa n Jraiam a 
arufiaal levels from September 1979 to mid- cenn m- uio 

March of 1980. i3°* * 

When market exchanges “took steps that }l 

threatened to upset the manipulative scheme,” 
according to the complaint, the defendants volume: 4 ion. 

“tried to neutralize die impact of the exchange 35 ££SBLK£Jm£ 
actions upon their scheme by, among other £*** 


Pray. coc 

Low Seltiv Sadia Mor 


J SX «^f>^0*'W«.:2ai32 

"" - ^ OCOA «95 2385 2JB5 2J95 

cocas. M9T 7J70 X3M 2 JM 2362 

2«9 US 230? NJL - By NT #Es 


1595 1585 1587 1594 +T2 XfOd 5p0l» lb 

140 14« 1439 445 +5 Coppw oftet_ lb 

1400 140 415 1417 +35 Tin (StTOltol, lb 

1.720 iSoo 1 JM 105 +T< ZJnc. E. St. L. Basts, lb 

U6S 1^ IjS ijm +20 fSS!2??® , 5 

Li *0 loft at n ion*. Prav. actual SlNer N.Y.ai ■■■■ 


MOV 1385 1,750 

EM. VOL'. 90 loft Crf 


S&-. 
s : 
,,5 3 


N.T. 2270 2910 MOV X]« Z169 XI 09 XI 90 N5X — 


AM 2900 288.90 28940 2910 JIV 

Jwj N.T. N.T. 2*30 2*70 Sep 

Volume*. SZi lots of 10 oz. Oec 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 


Ask COFPEE 


1 XI 73 XI® X167 XI 68 NA 

P 1155 X136 X139 X740 NA 

tC 2 STB 2JQ0 ZS520 X028 NA 

BT 25)17 241? 2415 2320 NA 

W 2410 2410 2410 2420 NA 

3306 lots of 10 tana. 


COCOA 

jss'v ss ss iss ss -4 j — 

& n:t: K: is Z 3 X ^ I Dr 

Dec N.T. NT. XW — Unch- ■ 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 1180 —10 ^*Ni 

Mav N.T. N.T. — Xiao —5 _ 

ESL VOL : 55 tott ct 10 ton*. Prev. actual Company 
wles: 123 lotg. Open interest: 1472 
COFFEE 


Dividends 


19+75 19535 1*50 19535 Jft 2584 2552 

1960 1980 1*60 1980 Sep 2513 2585 

H. Nov 2510 2590 

RUBBER 1® 2585 145 2580 

it Mr ktto NT. N.T. 2540 

oree Prartow 3533 lets ot 5 tone. 

Ask BMArt OASOIL 


Mar 

May 

X580 

2615 

&g 

9,<ac 

X 6 M 

269* 

7JM 

Jly 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2665 

2690 

S*P 

N.T. 

N.T. 

26«5 

X704 

Nov 

2698 

2696 

2692 

2^15 

Jon 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2667 


Nor 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2663 

— 


+ 30 [Aetna Ufa Comalty 
+ VI I Amcost Industrial 


Pir Ant MT , 
USUAL 

Y Q 46 +15 


+ 3 S2»* IH+RMne 


thi n gs, qxning new accounts in the names of I Rff i mot. i633s muj i 6 x® 1420 mot 22*0 200 22+25 22 s® 225.75 22+75 


3*fs Us voL: 65 lots of S Ion*. 

2550 250 solas: X lots. Open Hrterast: «5 
Source: Boors* du Commerce 


otha- persons and entities.” V3£ !SS 1SKS X 

TTiccomplamt says ««tNdson {£f IM S fgS ^ 

Mr. Nahas in Fans — introduced by Maunce rsssmot-. 1450 100 14435 14435 a«o n.t. n.t. 21x75 . ziaoo 2100 7130 

ZHber, who trained horses for both of them — §5 Ki 

and that Mr. Hunt and Mr. Nahas subsequently ■E—Hr N#w * 

agreed “to act together to force the price of mot 1300 1335 uoo its c® ld 

«ilwr hJohwr" v *SL. }<}?9 !•??§ X17? ]J2S M »»0 »0 H Q. NJQ. NA — 


R5S2MOT- 15925 16X25 1580 159® May 2150 2VL2S 2140 21425 2120 21X75 

RSS3Mar_ 1570 15&2S 1560 157® Jun 2120 2110 21 135 211® 2100 71 1L75 


t 2120 211.75 21135 2130 209.75 210® 
« NT. NT. 21275.2160 2100 713® 
B N.T. N.T. 213J» 2190 2100 2160 

T N.T. N.T. 2140 2220 2100 «mn 

" N.T. N.T. 2150 2260 New 

1564 lots ol MO tom. 


1.1 to 1.160 1.110 1 . 1 ® 
1.110 1.10 1,110 1,160 


cilvn- hiohpr” 1,190 1325 1,190 1325 

suver nigner. mdv i.i 7 o 1320 1,170 1320 

After the Commodity Exchange Inc. in New J ,Y ? ];}2 liS i*JS !w 

York and the Board of Trade of the City of £” wg ’*™ ™ H S 

Giicago started steps 10 stabilize the silver mar- Nev— — - xiw i.’i® xho 1,140 

ket, the complaint says several of the defen- vU^ioftrfHioIi" 1,1,0 1,1 “ 
dants met m Zurich to discuss the silver market Seure *- infers. 

It said that the Hunts milled exchange offi- J " — 

rials about their intentions in a way that bene- I QApinn r„ 5 „Ant,‘ An ^ 
filed their trading and also began to buy silver I Index Optioiis 

in foreign markets. I 1 

“Through these and la ler purchases in Zurich | 

and London, respondents increased their ma- 
mpuiarive demand while avoiding the ex- __ 

changes’ efforts to decrease it,” the complaint Sw m*t 6S ah Sfa?jJ« or JB - 
said. » z. = — 1 - vi4 r/14 - 


1320 69 lots of 10 trey oz. 

100 sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Em- 
. 95 anno* (oasont. 


First Car Produced 
In Southeast Asia 
Shown m Malaysia 


FstWyom Bncrp 
Kewaunee Set Eaulp 
Looted# Go* Ca 
Llould Air Cora 
Marlin Marietta 
MEDIQ Inc 
Natl Go* & Oil Co 
New Century Ban* 
Pep Bays 

Subaru America Inc 
Toledo Trust core 
Torcfimark Cora 
Trico Industries 


8 5^ 
g f, 

0 32 +H 

M .14 +3 

M .M H 

M .14 W 

Q 0 +26 

Q .11 +S 

3 52ft 4-1 
M I-* 
a 0ft 3-29 

Q .05 

Q .10 3-» 


Q 37ft +10 
a 0 4-15 


Q 42 >3J 

Q 57 ft +70 

O 35 +1 

Q .04 5-4 


A-Aimual; M-Mowbiv; Q-QvarftrlyjS- 
AnramL 


London Metals March 1 

Figures to storlino par metric ton. 
Silver In pence per fnuv ounce. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Mar. 1 


Today Previous 

Hlab grade capper cathodes: 
tool 13640 .12650 13*90 13500 

3 months 13840 138S0 13700 13700 


Untied Press International ■ 

-KSiK Swiss Subsidiat 

produced in Southeast Asia and the s\£C: • . n ? 

product of a joint venture between L Pf OOVWt tHfflfi 

Malaysia and (he Japanese auto- n __ 

maker Mitsubishi, was presented to l O D4> (j/iKfin 

the public Friday. W UWSett 


To Be Closed 


78 


^Mj-S-^jra.Nor^J. 

* : Tnt'tA'™ Z 

™ IR5 !fc IL !• : IC3* > k 


curML^Lun.ijOBj* 00 l ' J85-0 ° };mM U 2 O 0 Official photographs showed a 
soot i39»0 >3610 134&0 i3<7» sleek four-door family automobile 

3 month* 13780 13800 13650 i3»0 with a 1 300-cubic-cfiniimeter or 

■nn: spot 18.1800 10,1 100103950 10,1 050 .rrJt Z. ‘ OT 

2 months 10.136010.127010.12501X1450 inw-oc engine, s imilar to a MltSU- 
LeadTsoat 3220 3210 3210 3220 bishi Lancer Fiore. The car will 

3 months 3330 3340 3310 3320, ™ 

zinc: soot 83u» 8380 8300 3320 retai1 for about 39.000 when the 


Bf IS* P* Uls n a : iiiii« zinc:soot 8S0 8380 8300 33201 reiaiJ tor atxnit 39,000 when the 

S 68 » !? !W, K X Jrs SS ISS SfS SS n^.^flJroUoff liBasembly 


S MS E S"R s B 
™ 5»;s“g g - r- z F 


TIM OB ntasa 414&2S 
TOW cafl fecn W.60347 
tow sol mm aua 

nwrat 0 M IBL4222M 

WW! 

MM 181® Lop 17866 CUM lllfll + 
Source: CBOE. 


Sliver: spot 5160 5770 5210 5230 
jmonttis 5430 5440 52*0 5*00 UBCJluyi. 

Attvninium: 1JWMB tMtja The S230-mUlion joint venture 

a mantis 1030 10*0 1010 1020 was a pet project of Prime Minister 

Nickel .soot 4J7tun +7750 4600 0000 Mahathir Km 

3 monftts 4050 45io0 47300 4735® Man3UUJ 0111 Mohamad, who IS 


Source: Reuters. 


DM Futures Options 
March 1 

W. Genoa Mart-BUm marts one aer merfc 


Taiwan Plans Reduction 
Of Auto Import Tarifis 


anxious to seed crate industrializa- 
tion to bolster the country’s tradi- 
tional commodity-based economy 
against turbulent world markets. 


The Asso ciated Press 


The car’s engine, gearbox and 
running gear will be wholly Japa- 
nese. It will be built by Otomobil 


of International Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 


E** '■*? SW Mor luo Sept 


uc U7 


S*S JU i.1) Oil 1L52 073 

!5 iffl ia 5J7 w i.i4 


TAinrr -n. Naskmal Sdn Bhd (ProtM) at a 

TAIPEI The government has newly built plant in Shah Alam 
approved a plan to reduce unpon near Kuala Lumpur 
tariffs on compact cars From 65 r 

percent to 30 percent by 1991 in an T®* L COI PP aoy 10-perceni 


105 +62 M2 

802 034 078 

1 830 056 


170 152 16? 

116 1U 226 
315 30 30 


Trib ads work. 


total vcLSJii 

IJ«re Wj- 10.120 open int. &J69 
»%tl! TIHiT8.Wl.4721 a pea InL 22379 
Source: CM£L 


The plan, approved at a weekly ^8 share rout between Mitsubishi- 
cabinet meeting Thursday, wfll go Motors Corp. and Mitsubishi 
__ into effect oext year. The impon Corp. 


Reuters 

BERN — The Soviet link 
foreign trade bank has Jed 
to liquidate its Zurich-ba 
subsidiary, Wozcbod Hand 
bank AB. following large lo: 
discovered last year, the di. 
tor of the Swiss federal bank 
commission said Friday. 

Bernhard M Oiler said i 
the losses from foreign 
change and gold trading v 
“very large." but he dedinet 
elaborate. He said that the 
eign trade bank. Vneshu 
bank, would take over all 
Wozchod’s assets and lia 
ities. that open a branch of 
in Zurich. 

Spokesmen for Wozcboc 
Vneshtorgbank subsidiary 
cotporated under Swiss 1 
were not immediately avails 
for comment. 

Swiss newspaper rept 
published in December esun 
ed losses at between 29 rail' 
and 1 bfllion Swiss francs ( 
millioa and $352 million!. 

































i | a 

£**: 7 l«a 

JlSj 


r 

MS 

S! 


MHISffffSS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


P*«cU 


w* 32 * 'i« jyi Jk »■ 

||1 


| Tamer Moving to Take Over 


CBS Television, Sources Say 


to 

tra 

wi 


3.S E®" 

j*m J0IJ __ 

... *ii 8& S ^ § ^leicvisiori network, which pub- 
oKVS'* 5«iw :«*„ ‘ * ^fished reports idaiify as CBS. 

■anm» „ '* Njl1 * James C. McKinney, diief of the 

^ FCCs mass media bureau, said 

K SS2 Charies Ferns, a Washington attor- 

wa 2 JS $ wSSS^fekBcy and former FCC cfcainnan, 

ogS®§!«vbo represents Mr. Turner, had • _ 

"•**'*- m. to* wit £ a number of currcm com- 10 83111 0001101 CBS, re- 


S .^*8^ 7V Associated Pros 

^ WASHINGTON — A Federal 
Ccjiranurii cations Conmnssion ofTi- 
dal says Ted Turner is considering 
xsr, jp t an attempt to take over a major 


cast properties, two years ago sug- 
gested a merger of his Turner 
Broadcasting System with CBS. 

The network is already the object 
of a takeover bid by Fairness in 
Media; a group of political conser- 
vatives who have received support 
from Senator Jesse A. Helms, Re- 
publican of North Carolina. 

Tun Cain, one of three men in- 
volved the Fairness is Media at- 


SJSflmss 

B 

*30 


E5 r°' 

f"-® «un 

‘mti 


& ■** 


_ S" 


mssioners to discuss the possible 
takeover bid. 

The New York Times quoted 


fused to say whether his 
organization has talked to Mr. 
^ Turner. 

JSB S£ SjiFCCsotTO.wio spoke oncomfr Tomer Brtedcasting issued a 

Jg 5ioa they not be idqnified, as say- Fnday m Atlanta con- 

^og Mr. Turner spent several utniuig that Mr. Ferris had made 
Says in Washington laftbig with 
ach of the five conunisaoners. 

They were advised that Mr. 

..timer has the intention of taking 
tun* CBS,” rate source said No 



inquiries on its behalf at the com- 
mission, but said they were general 
in nature and not related to “any 
particular broadcast group.” 
Regarding the mechanics of a 

^ 1JiS *sa ■* — — takeover, Mr. Stewart said the FCC 

no no {*1 * ;»i3 S' -CBS News also quoted an on- could demand that a trustee be 

in5 FCC source Thursday named for the propose of collecting 

-« ■». soV. 08 , Slight as saying an attorney for Mr. stock. If enough stock were ob- 

" Hmer had discussed a bid to take rained to gain controlling interest, 

■ver CBS with FCC commission- 


asjicMo 

s tarsi*. 

MB 
>10 


•Mi 

U» 


m 133 S $3 S-onnal proposal was presented. 

I?:*® son ui m me — -.j 


'V.OovOpen 


TTO« XHYCEI 

»ia*.«an' <M ,i b 

*S «•*» Mar 

5““ U« Mu, 

*« *1« Jut 

** M.TD ott 

M.70 Ore 
M.U Mar 
*4.70 Mo, 
« 14 Jul 


MO 

*»5 

&w 

on 


U’S 

(Ui 

44*4 

Ml? 

«S 

MJO 

*;jis 


, Mr. Ferris told The Times that 


MJ4 

M40 - 

S5 «3 Sir. Turner has never made a secret 


Airbus Names 
PierscfySchaffler 
To Top Positions 

Untied Press International 

PARIS — Europe's four-na- 
tion aircraft builder. Airbus In- 
dustrie. announced Friday the 
appointment of a new French 
president and its first non- 
French executive vice presi- 
dent. 

Jean Pierson, director of the 
French air and spacecraft com- 
pany Aerospatiale; win replace 
Bernard Lathi ere on April 1. 
Mr. Lathi&rehas been prescient 
of the consortium since 1975. 

Johann Schfiffler, an execu- 
tive with the West Goman air- 
craft company Messerschmitt- 
Bdlkow-Blohm, will replace 
Roger BetaHe as the firm s ex- 
ecutive idee president and gen- 
eral manager. 

The government-backed con- 
solium's main model is the 
Airbus 310. a wide-bodied, two- 
enejne wx.tfnw olane. 

France anowest Germany 
own 37.9 percent each of Air- 
bus, Britain owns 20 percent 
and Spain 4-2 percent. 


T.7S 

M.70 

«uo 

»eus 

4t.lQ 


the trustee could then file a formal 
application to get permission to 
transfer control to the new owner. 

MJS ^ — On the surface, there would seem 

S* S3 ? his interest in acquiring a net- to be no legal or regulatory impedi- 

“ Si Mj- Tumer w* BP Acqmres Solar Units 

The limits on the number of Sta- Umled Press International 

dons that an individual company LONDON — British Petroleum 
could own has just been raised and said Friday that it had acquired 
a combined portfolio of Mr. Tomer Tiddand Energy in Australia and 
and CBS holdings would be within recently start eowork on a new so- 
the limits. lar plan? in Spam 


Pan Am Has the Cash to Take 
A Long Strike, Analysts Say 

By Lee A. Daniels cash position, the more they’ll lose 

Sew York Times Service in advance bnolrfng ^, and the long- 

NEW YORK — Pan American er it win take them to rebuild bus- 
Worid Airways, cushioned by S4Q0 ness." 
minion in cash reserves, can with- Pan Am had a loss of $206.8 
stand a long strike, according to million last year, including $923 
several airline industry anal ysts, million in the fourth quarter. In 
But such a stoppage would proba- 1983 it had a lo&s of S51 milli on 
bly cost the abuse advance book- A study done for the company 
ings for summer and sharply re- by the investment firm of Lazard 
duce its chance of making a profit Freres & Co. estimated Pan Am 
this year, they said. would lose $77 milli on this year if 

The airline, which was struck revenues grew 9 percent, and would 
Thursday by its mechanics, flight lose Sill million in 1986 if reve- 
dispatchers, baggage handlers and nues increased 4 percent that year, 
food-service workers, has sustained Pan Am’s domestic operations 
heavy losses in recent years. were nearly completely shut down 
The summer traditionally is the by the strike, and its tnteniational 
airline industry’s best season, and operations, the backbone of the 
the coming one is expected to be company, also appeared to be 
highly profitable because the sharply curtailed, 
strength of the dollar is causing the strike began only 

millions more Americans to plan Thursday, any possible impact it 
va cati ons abroad. might have on advance-hookin g 

The major carriers have already cancellations and the plans of other 
added flights on certain overseas major overseas carriers has yet to 
routes and created new ones to develop. 


Japanese Women Seek Promotion 


meet whauhey say is an extraordi- 
nary demand m advance bookings. 

Louis A. Marckesano, who fol- 
lows the airline for Janney Mont- 
gomery Scotl Inc. of Philadelphia, 


[The strike forced Pan Am Fri- 
day to ground many of its 400 
scheduled international and do- 
mestic flights, leaving passengers 
stranded at airports worldwide. 


^velS^iS 5 ^* 5 53 * ! “ Ted J urner ^ “tK «f4 

0,18 ant to have a network, Mr. Fer- 

s said. “Mr. Tumer doesn't usual - 
„ ' start out on- something he can’t 

£]S 25 ttxomplish.” 

^ g* £ Mr. Turner, owner of Cable 
»i» sS Jfora Network and other brood- 


said Pan Am is “climbing out of Reuters reported from New York, 
such a deep bole to begin with that a Pan Am spokeswoman said the 
a strike of any duration will just airline was operating only about 50 
about min their chances for profit- percent of its 190 scheduled inter- 

•UHm .kl, < a- . 


•JHJ 


*yiMOOILHiYMCI 
Wool- canfi o#T oai 
ITS AS Hi Aar 

7*2 MOO Mav 

MO *130 Jun 

I-fi MJS J“l 

IS S 3 A « 

IDO TtH Sep 

VM TOM SSc 

. _ . F*b 

tSojM Prp« SaiK 

M.OovOfWnlnt 1435? UDlOt 

2fSS OIHHYMEJ 
aeiiai-i per bbi 
34.47 Apr 
*5 MS Mat 

34.211 Jun 

ns j '" 

^ rJRfcgSJp §3 ^DETROIT — A Chrysler Carp. 
-• xcutive said his ‘ * 


ability this year.' 

Robert Joedicke of Sbearson 
T-rfiman Brothers Inc. said dm 
“Pan Am can bold on for some 
time, but the longer the strike goes 
on. the greater the drain on their 


national flights.] 


(Continued from Page 9) 
quit their jobs after marriage or 
childbearing: in 1984. that number 
had shrunk to 22 percent In 1972, 
11.5 percent thought women 
should continue to work after bear- 
ing chSdren; by last year, that 
□umber had increased to 20 per- 
cent. 

“In this country, men are expect- 
ed to be competent until they prove 
they are incompetent.'’ said Yoko 
Ohara, an executive with the Asahi 
Chemical Industry Co. “Women 
are not recognized as competent 
until they prove themselves.” 

The women who broke through 
chose different strategies. Miss An- 
zai, the travel agency executive, be- 
friended younger onployees with 
the idea that as they rose in the 

organization, their support would 
be invaluable to her. khiko Ishi- 
hara, the highest-ranking f emale 
executive in Japan, used a blunt- 
ness thought suitable only for her 
male colleagues. Mitsuyo Yoshi- 
mura matched the long hours of her 
male colleagues, never complain- 
ing, and trusting that she would 
rise. And Yumi Okuma walked out 
on the existing corporate world, 
and founded her own company. 

Mrs. Ishthara. a managing direc- 
tor and board member of the giant 
Takashimaya retail company, 
earns 5120,000 a year. And like 
most top executives here, her influ- 
ence — or az least her access — 
extends beyond Takashimaya's 
board room, into government com- 
mittees and advisory oasts. 


A very different type of manager 
is Miss Yoshimuri recently pro- 
moted at age 45 to the equivalent of 
corporate vice president in charge 
of basic software development for 
NEC, a major computer maker. 
Where Mis. Ishihara is blunt. Miss 
Yo&himura is gentle. And where 
Mrs. Ishihara attacked what she 
saw as unfair discrimination, Mrs. 
Yoshimura kept a Ion 1 profile and 
just worked harder. 

She finally gpi her job after 
heading a team of researchers 
drawn from several companies on a 
project for Nippon Telegraph & 
Telephone. At the project's end, 
NEC was awarded the develop- 
ment and manufacturing contract. 

Mrs. Okuma's style is different 
still: She speaks with a self-posses- 
sion and quiet confidence that 
some Japanese find intimidating 
Mrs. Okuma, 35, recently broke 
away from her employer of 10 years 
and'founded a rival company. She 
earns S 56.000 a year. 

Her new company designs, edits 
and publishes Japanese corporate 
literature in English. She and her 
two male partners are each putting 
up $60,000 for the venture, money 
they expect to receive from cashing 
in retirement benefits and stock 
from thdr previous company. 

The controversial new equal op- 
portunity biQ wQl tiy to make the 
paths of women executives easier. 
In addition to asking employers 
not to discriminate against women 
in hiring and promotion, the bill 
would remove longstanding restric- 


tions on overtime and hue- night 
work For managerial women. That 
restriction, according to Ryoko 
Akamalsu. director-general of the 
Ministry of Labor's Women’s Bu- 
reau. was the most important barri- 
er for female managers. 


People Express 
Is Cutting Fares 
On Flights in U.S. 

The AuonatrJ Press 

NEWARK, New Jersey — Peo- 
ple Express Airlines Inc. said Fri- 
day it would reduce fares on select- 
ed fUghts in the United Sates, 

effective Tuesday. 

The airline said 00 c- way fares 
from Newark to Los Angeles and 
Oakland would be $99 on Tues- 
days, Wednesdays and Thursdays. 
The airline’s current fares on those 
routes are $129 during off-peak 
bouts and $169 during peak hours. 
The higher fares will continue to 
apply to (lights departing Friday 
through Monday. 

People Express said it also would 
offer the $99 one-way fare to Los 
Angela or Oakland from IS ocher 
cities that require a sum in Newark. 

In addition. People Express said 
it would reduce its one-way price to 
S89 for flights from Newark to 
Denver and Minneapolis- St. Paul 
on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and 
Thursdays. 


27 U 

aos 
70 m 
TWO 


772J 

2447 

2*JJ 


Chrysler to Step Up Imports of Mitsubishi Cars 


at. 


By John Holusha 


34.7s Auu 357J 5* Sew York Times Service 


•v. Oav Own mr. s?J<7« „pt7o 


COMP. INDEX (CMEI 
MMiondcant* 

Ijuo “or teas ns 10 

*2 is* 10 jua ihtj ip iQ FJJ 

tiO loom Sep i 4 ojo io-_-n ® 

* JO 175. 70 Ok 14110 146 cl 

i So to* 77 J 0 J Prev.Saict toiw ***■ 

rv. Oav Own I 111 A 1 U? urS £«4 

ULUI LINO CKCBTI 

Mioodiinis 

14010 Mar 
ivii rjm .lun 
ItM I« '5 
HO 10*50 

■t ieX* Pre« Sam tw 

’•v-OavOpeoim :JT uc ip 


ng to import 200 , UWJ more cars a 
or from its Japanese affiliate, 
jtsubishi Motors Corp, to sett in 
United States. 


Testifying Thursday before the President Ronald Reagan an- 
House Ways and Means Commit- nonneed Friday that he would not 
tee in Washington, Robert S. interfere with the lifting of Japa- 
Mfller, Chrysler’s executive vice nese anto-import restraints, which 


president for finance , said the com- 
pany would place the order in a few 
days. 

The decision was taken before 


-ADVER31SEMENT- 


aujo mx- 

7M00 TOa.43 21(19 7 * 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quototfons Supplied by Funds Listed 
. 1 March 19S5 


vrp 70*45 70**0 7a« cTbenef asset vahNoaotattain stum bcWw ora soppMbvftM Fttndsltalad with the 
C** . _ -nxcrtrtiaa of now tarts whose quotes are basrt oa Issue prices. The tottowtae 

marelafli sembalslMHcato freaomcr of qwtatKm janflrt tar tlw IHT: 

(d) -daily; (w]-we«fety; tbl-bt-maftltily; (D-ref Ntarfy; (O-Irregvtarly.. 

Vtt COM f. INDEX tNYPC) fmlflfNjilTVW ' j^f EWT iinn LLOYDS BANK INTL.POB US Geneva T1 

linsOmKeulV >w) Al-Mal TCNI. X X ■ * —«W) Uoyds mn Dollor STOOD 

«J 0 Mar jas^> 10740 HMVBANK JULIUS BAER xca Lid.- — «wt Lloyds (r«n Europe — 5F1WJH 

«DUI) .’in .OOJu 1 I 00 B HU »-|d ) BoortMndJ SFM&tO — Hwl Uoyds mn Srewtti SF)1£U» 

*1 V too 1104} 111.4# IH4 CIS I 
101. W tWv 113 » 11X75 UUt>— (d 
10.144 Pies 5am ujt 
, Qj»i Hit 1U5W nltSIV 


H tMN 10.1*4 Pm 5am uj*b — <d ) EauUwor JEdtom. 

r«¥rOa»r 





Co mmodity Indexes Z {S > 5 tf^S nl“ 



SFtmoo 


PARISBAS— CROUP 

—id ) Cartexo intomaOanal 

17JOOP ~ < w > OBLl-DM- 
i/ujit OBUCESTIONL 
5F3SL3* — (wlOBLI-OOLL - 
5F 12.11 —toO OBLI-YEN. _ 

S 1423 — (w) OBLJ-GULDEN. 


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neurf«t-> im-4- ;.hi if.. 

Daw June’-. l\r.c *CK> LVi 3VW4 


BAMQUE INDU5UEZ 
-<d I Aslan Growth Fund. 
cum —{mi p i ye r tond. 




) PAROIL-FUMO.55 
■d 1 PARINTER FUND. 


S9142 

. DM1.14141 


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FT-1 04Q.1? | 

s id 


c iiS —W > PAR US Treasury Bond— 5 10033 
Sl»30 ROYAL B. OF CANADA^OB 344^J E RJttEY 



Market Guide 


Mr. 


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“ir! AmS SVENS KA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

lIMEl 


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ft**? S£Hio E rJ«S * 4fl > Brif. World Ttdm. Fund S ORB -W I Amqrlca Volar. 

C-I cruiuou AWrcartilr ErtOCAPlTAL INTERNATIONAL 

NOW * 1*5 Ciuw 5u90i OwiloJ I pH Fund 

wvt iryii faiiiw tudunp -twl Cdoltol Itolta SA 
C.MTinuMI>> L«(i™rii»».Jtof ^DcmY <iiicep ii«ei 
N*» 


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Florin Bond S iNO o n_ 




— id ) fntorvcrtr, 
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<*1. * fST-(d I Actions Sufxns SF 35BSD- —id ) Swtss Forotao Bert Sol 

ratorNwJir. 


hcriwn CH> Paaia J" IJSi 

mm Yin* » un*'*s t-ciww 

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'feel r , ‘"-i'- ■■ 1 ... 



Bart vow Swf- 


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DM 10445 — (dlumv-BendSoliCL. 


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dm mm 
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FL1I4JB* 

SF9X00 

»Fr - ~ 

SF IIKSf- 
SF2S2JS 
, SF15J5 
SF 12151 


Convert Voter S»»f. 


SF 10750 


Bond Valor D-maric 

Bond Voter US-DOLLAR S 109JS — (d I Unhwrwl Fund 

Bond Vater Y*o_ Y«nT0331^0 UN fON BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

— (d ) Amen US. Sh. SFfSJS 

■ SF o&25 

SFmso 
SFMQJLSn 
SF496J0 
, SFWS50 


&nv«tVolor U5-DOLLAR.S 11228 ^ J 


CSForts- 


mds. 


CSFond*— inrl- 


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SF76JS 

SFU22S 


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— «> Jo 


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l ehotdIo— ' voter 

,-ldiiNMe — — 

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> podfle -Voter 

Vr INVESTMENT FFM 
> Concemra. 


— <q > Soflt South AIT. Sh.. 

DM 102450 

. SF 17530 UNION INVESTMENT Fnnkftirt 

SF KJ4S50 —(d ) Unlmito DM4150 

SFIKLOO — <d) ITnHond* DM2150 


SF 1 8225 — (d)Unlrak. 


17750 


■ ! L- m\ 


DM 2451 
DM *653 


Other Funds 


• — IhmnaHorBmOLtevdGcom.Brassets 

— Hm) dah Commodity pool, s 294.1* — 

•t — .-in) Currency A Gold Port — 11*277 — 

— ~HmJ Winch. Life Fut. Pool — S583J7-* 

• - -iml Truni World Fot Pooi_ S45212 — 

TC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
.LourodCi Pounty HIIL EC4. 0V62W68O 

i# f£ceSS££^= . VS &1 Ca ** a prfMrv 

12572 V 


jwj AcNboadB Inwthnonts Fund. ?XM5 


, Adtvoot inti 
(ml Allied Lid. 


11046 

Sl» 


,w1 Aouita I n tomotioncd Fund-. S1047B 

ir ) AnX> Finance LF 

(b) Arfono 

<w) Tnatcor Inf l Fd. (AE1FI 11032 

(w) BNP imorbort Fund * JB246 

(w) BortioloxfCMio Pr. — _ SF UX« 

(ml Canada Wd^AorloaoeFd if?? 

Caoital Prowv. Fd. mtl Si 7.16 

. ... atrtolFund S 1 ^ 

d I C-LR. Australia Fund AW 


uiO*!- 


American Values Oocnmon— S7S57 

-tar AmerVahMsOnnPrel S 10030 

ur^a FkMIfy Amor. Anois 14472- 

■W Pldenty Australia Fund 1770 

-id FWelHy Dbcoverv Fund J 1021 

.-id FMeHtyDlr.Svo4.Tr S 121 79 

!Hd J Fklolltv Fdr.EaW Fund S1954 

I FWelttv IntT Fund 15X69- 

•,-id > Fidelity Ortont Ftmd 124.10 

l-ia ) Fktoiffv Frontier Find S1236 

!rtd ) FWetity PacMc Fund___ SUU 

;-W > FideHly Sud. CnjwihPd. si AW 

;^d) FUNTIv Wbrid FumL 13031 

< DRBU PO B**7 BRAND CAYMAN 
: Orton AOent0W39-3913 

'■(wl GaH Income 17J4* 

C:4w)GoMAMradot1aa 1*3* 

iriwl Dollar Income S«42 

jj-imi sirateolcTrodlna SIDO 

^EF I NOR FUNDS. . . 

‘ j*i EasMnvostnwni Fund 134758 


Id I CJJL Jmxm Fund. 

jm> Cleveland Oftshore MJ 

far) Columbia Securities — 

b ) COMET 


. 19771 
1207571 
FL 12440 
, 195452 
_ St A* 
. S2SW 

S74A3 

.d ) D. Witter WW wide Ivt Tit »5* 

(b I DroMcar invesLFuntf N.V_ SI.1M37 

d ) Drertu* Fun d Int T- JJSJj 

,w> Dreyfus (dmnp s^M 

— - - 1157 


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[wl First Easts Fu nd— 

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(d l FandlMla. 


\-tW) Scott Hh Worid Fund. 
jKwl Slote SL American 


£12056 

11477* 




•apH.CalilUriLoaAoeirtJI -4*14230 
't'lLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 

- > B lit. st PWer Port. Guernsey. 04TFWT5 

” Ji J FuturGAM SA S 12X30 

n>GAM Arbltrnoe Inc — s 11971 


twa 


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fust \ 
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a»>f*» j 

St'fltwr! I"'' - 

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■GAM Boston Inc 
GAMErmHage- 
OAM Fronc-vaL. 


J1 GAM International tne 

. ‘EQ GAM Norffl America Inc. 

UnU Trust. 


U nil Trust. 
dam System* Inc., 

GAM WortdwMe Inc. 


. L , .in<Hr' CAA ' !f- A,T * rltD 
ii.-.Vtf GAM Pacific HlC, 

S|/ |,S> “ >1 BAM Start A Ml 

- 1 rijn) GAM Systems In 

r»fr‘K 


S13S72- (r 
S 10353 (r 
. S 1373 s 
SF 9733 (w] 
1 10054 Id 
S 102.16 (w 
101/4SO id 
S11SJ0 .. 
125500 id 
S 10776 


nl GAM TWIN SA. CkW A-^. 

.T.A 6 ANAGEJWEtri~rUK) LKL 
(**) Berry Poe. FdL Ltd.. 

G.T.i' 

G.T. Asen HJC.1 
G.T. Asta Fund. 


. 111 ! 


g.t! Euro. Small Co* Fund. 


In.;-”* 1 -' 

. 1 , 


«<i| 


S 12977* (w. 
. S 11871 (ffl 
«t 

<b 


GT. Australia Fund. — J2JJ8* 

GT. Europe Fund. 


G.T. OoHor Fund, 
G.T, Bert Fundi 


■ A: ’ • 


,;;5» 


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■j3^EDCURRENO^Ha| 

BW SlOU Otter. 


wt Convert Fd. Inti A ( 
w) Convert. Fd. InTI B ( 
w] D.G.C. 


Finsbury Gnus Ltd. 


. LF615T 

S 137*470 

_ 187679 

_ 11155* 

SF22B7S 

S7.W 

. SF 8176 

S 22 . 1 * 

Governm. Sec. Fund- SC.72 

Fronfcf-Trusl Interzlns DM 4ft2S 

Hautsmom Hide* N.V *1093 

Hestia Fund* 

tv) Horizon Fund SLOKLJM 

ila Inti GoW Bond 

intortund SA .11271 

Intannomot Fund *?7Z-52 

Wl Currency Fort LM 1755 


. Inn securities Fund. 

(d 1 Investa DWS — 

Invest Attest tiaues- 


ItaHortune Inn Fund » 
Japan Selection Fund- 
Japan Pacific Fun d— 
Kiobwiart Benson Inti I 
Klefcnmrt Bon* Jop. Fc 
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" UpuHxter 

Uoyds InU. Smaller 1 
Luxhmd. 


Moorwttlrt N.V_ 


MotflolanumSeLFtL. 
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S*71 

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. S 17250 
1177850 
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Nlkko Growth PDCkaueFd SW4962 


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12 *.W 
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S 14855 
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G.T. Hmhu Pomflnder 530 3 Btq K ind *1008 

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G.T. Soutt, China Fuad — — SU07- &' ‘Krt!^ 

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\ ' index Jan.: • — 

worldwide Fund ud: 9—ottar Price ind. 3% pnoHm-dhargo. ++— daily 
Amsterdam stock Exchange 


expire March 31. 

“In our estimation, the restraints 
are coming off.” Baron Bates, a 
Chrysler spokesman, had said 
Thursday. 

Mr. Bates said the additional im- 
ports from Mitsubishi would be 
mostly smaller cars, such as the 
Mitsubishi-made Colt subcom- 
pacts it now sells; These imports 
total 87,500 cars a year. 

Chrysleris taking the action, Mr. 
Miller said, despite its previous op- 
position to increased imports, to 
counter what he termed the “Far 
East strategy” of General Motors 
Coro. 

GM has been importing subcom- 
pacts from two Japanese compa- 
nies, Isuzu and Suzuki. The cars are 
sold as the Chevrolet Spectrum and 


Sprint models. GM officials have 
said they will increase the volume 
to several hundred thousand cars a 
year if the import restraints are 
ended, as GM hopes. 

Mr. Bales said no decision bad 
been made about Chrysler’s forth- 
coming “P car,” which is to replace 
its subcompact Omni and Horizon 
models. ’ 

The P car had been scheduled to 
be assembled in the United States, 
but Chrysler officials have said 
they might have lo shift production 
overseas to match Asia's lower pro- 
duction costs. “There is no secret in 
building products in undervalued 
yen or Korean won or whatever 
and selling them in overvalued dol- 
lars." Mr. Miller said. 

Chrysler has been importing cars 
from Mitsubishi for more than a 
decade and owns a 15-percent in- 
terest in the Japanese company. 


AUTOMOBILES 


tm many rotation ia 
Tht Made East 

WORLD CAR 

IS NOW LOOKING fOR 

CAR IMPORTERS 

MIX USA 
fo export iMd eon from Europe lo *o 
LBA. WOOD CAR a awtSugmzid 
purdwpng organization in Holand. 
Bwgwm tnd Gamaiy. 

WORID CAR 
FOB 99 2*10 AS Roowwfc HoBwd 

Tel lOj 1829-23 24 Tlie 42175 


«W CARS, DOT CONVOIB) 
Far export to the US. now onafefaie 
500 SL Buo*^Womino leather, 
My equipped. US$37,000. 

SaSHr* - *** 

500 9. Qtarapefppmeioftc brawn 

K^to^S 7 ' ooa 

loaded. LBS 39,000. 

500 sa, Noubfrbkje, am tooth 

USS37JOQ 

we* Awo Corrverson, Export. Shppira 
7 SMtgori 70. P.O. BraTO offi." 
Tel 0711/760966/767815. 7b 7255968. 


MBKBB hoot EUROPE 

WE FED3AUZE CARS TO MEET US. 
SAEE1Y STANOAH7S 

D.O.T. l LPA 

5 YEARS EXPBKNCE 

X FRANK INC 

fat fa ngpoh , IrKfana 317-2917108 


Fundamentals Buoy Dollar 


(Continued from Page 9) 
provided that foreign economies, 
whidi began their expansions wdj 
after the American recovery began, 
do not take a nose dive when the 
United States turns down. But even 
without a recession, slower growth 
here is likely to weaken the dollar 
by the end of next year. 

The Reagan administration 
seems likely to continue to exert 
strong pressure on the Federal Re- 
serve to keep interest rates down. 
The securities markets are con- 
cerned that, if Paul A. Voider 
should resign and be replaced by a 
Federal Reserve chairman more in 
Hue with President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s expansionist views, there 


would be an upsurge of inflation- 
ary expectations, which would him 
the dollar by curbing foreign in- 
vestment- A falling dollar would 
itself exacerbate inflation. 

Conversely, measures to reduce 
the federal budget deficit would 
strengthen the dollar by curbing 
inflationary expectations. But the 
outlook for shrinking the budget 
deficit significantly does not look 
bright, with Mr. Reagan and Con- 
gress headed for a stalemate on 
budget priorities, and a tax increase 
most unlikely. If insignificant ac- 
tion is taken to remedy the lax 
American fiscal policy, this would 
weaken capital inflows and hurt the 
dollar. What gpes up will come 
down. 


IVORY COAST 

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS, 
CONSTRUCTION, POSTS AND 
TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

NATIONAL OFFICE OF 
TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
IVORY COAST 

INTERNATIONAL INVITATION TO TENDER 
No 3290/84/ONT/DFB/M/03 1 


(ONT) in v ites anemilioiiai 


1- OBJECTIVE 
The National Office of Tel< 
leaden for the supply. imtaThttion and connection to the telephone network 
of an SPC dfritoi local/ transit cacrhange of 10,000 lines, cxtrwfahle to 
60.000 fines, m Altaian and other optional exchanges or equipment a* may 
be reqained by the ONT. 

2 - FINANCE 

Finance for the project is assured jointly by the African Development Bonk 
(ADB) and the Ivorian GovernmenL 

3 - TENDERING CONDITIONS 

The tender is open to manufacturers and suppfieis ol digital ex ch ang e 
systems in member commies of the ADB and whose egnipnent is produced 
in these countries. The digital ex ch a n g es offered most nave been already 
proven in service. 

4 -TENDER DOCUMENT COLLECTION 
The tender documents are available to be collected from 
SERVICE ESS MARCHES 
BUREAU DES APPELS ETOFFRES 

11® ETACE PORTE 11-04 

POSIEL2001 

ABIDJAN 

on payment of 20QJXX) FCFA by cheque or bank older, signed by the 
manufacturer or suppliex; made payable to: 

"OFFICE NATIONAL DES TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
DE COTE DTVOIKE" 

5 - RETURN OF TENDERS 

The tenders must be delivered not later than 17.30 on the 3 June 1985 1 « 
DIRECTION DE L’OFFICE NATIONAL 
DES TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
SERVICE DES MARCHES 
BUREAU DES APPELS D’OFFRES 
II® ETACE PORTE 114)4 
POSTEL 2001 

6 -ENQUIRIES 
All enquiries dur ‘ 


i of tendca must be made in writing or 
by telex to the ” service des marches” for administrative information and to 
the "Department de h production, project plateau TIL postd 2001”, 
concerning all other matters. 

DIRECTOR NATIONAL OFFICE 
OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


POSTS. 2001 
AHDJAH 
01 B.P. 1838 
COTE D’IVOIRE . 

TELEX; 23790 OR 23758 


JAGUAR 42a 1947, imfoBc fray, 
red Iccflicr interior, ajrrcwf, autoroaJ- 
ie.EttArtcnadtoon.USSi £ 00 . CoB 
Pont after 8 pm 293 55 31 


JAGUAR 47 COUPE 1975 Brifeh 
roangjjreeiv W brtrior. F55.000. 
tessfil gaffes houn 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAHC RB4T A CAR. Prestige an 

wMi phone: Roll Spirit, Mercedes, 
Jaguar, BMW, Bnounw* *aoS mr* 
' 46 r Pierre Chrt gL 750 06 Pfe. Teh 
72QJ0.40. Teton 630797 F CHATCOC 


AUSTRIA 4 EAST EU ROPE USS1 5D0 

per day. Autohooa, Fraruerhrueck- 
enitr. i, A.1Q20 Vienna. Trf: 241694. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR BfTO THE 05JL 
Tm document aqRam fuCy wta one 
mat do fo bring a aw rto US. 
lately legtwy. It mdude new & 
.isad turopeon auto prise* buywg 1 
DO T & B*A cw nuen ion ort raaet. i. . 
lam dearance & thipping procedires 
at «dl at togef poink. Seoicen of the 
Prana doBcr, ycu an we up to 
USS1«p90 vmm buying a Mercedet, ar 
BMW n Europe & mportng it to the 
Stotot. To roCBMi (hit manud, tend 
LSS1B5D gddaHJ P fa jp aj^ to- 

7000 Stuttgart 1, WeV Germany 


Wariwile Cor SUpolng 
Dredfy in (he tecporti - hst i rafichle 
fuS documentolion 
TRANSSHIP GMBH 

■SrrudJ-Slr. 5860 

Bremen 1, W. Gennony 

Tel; 0421 71426f, Tbt 246584 


SMPPMG CARS WOBOWDE 
We SNpprt 29,750 ToorW Can 
W» bwe Veneh ■ 19*3 

CALL MATINA AT 
ANTV#HtP20 fine* (3) 234 36 68 


SHP YOUR CAR TO A ROM USA 

VIA ANTWERP ANJ SAVE, Free te- 
leL bgto talngL Airport deSvery. 
AMaCO, KribbamrtT Antwerp 
Belpiun. fefe 231 42 39. fk 71469. 


FRANKFURT/ MAU4-W. Germany. K 

Hewn GmbH. Ti 069 J 48371 . 
Kctoup ofl over Europe -ra/ro^hip* 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTO SHIPPING 


WOR1DWBSE SHWPBB Of MOTOR 

WvIb & colaaer t con. ANGLO 

B PAQnCShpppia. Umdon96P8201 | 


WOR1DWBE Cor ih^png & remmt- 

ob ATK. MV, Ankerrw 2? 2000 Art- 
wrp, Belgum. 03/231 1M3Tx31535 


TRANSCAR 20 me Ip Sueur. 75116 
Pori* Tab 500 03 04. Pfe; 8395 33. 

Antwer p: 233 99 85. Ccmnat 39 43 44 


AUTO CONVERSION 


HAVE YOUR BMW, 

PORSCHE, JAGUAR concerted to 
meet US-5cftty & emiaion p onder d t 
lor rtpon to tna U5. Oor work ■ hily 
documented & guorartead to be ap- 
proved. Far ran 5 years Bolder, only 
safety cttacaes are requrad. Ptoaw 
col or wntefor appcnnnrt. WES 

auto coNVBtsoBT p.o. sea 

700344, 07000 STUTTGART 70. Tet 
jQ7U1760M6or 721013.6* 725996B. 


DOT/H’A CONVBSIONS to UA 

mac* A cca pten ce guaranteed. VIA 

Carp, 6200 Freupcrr Centre, Bab- 
more. MO 21224. Tet 301-6334611. 
Tbc 4995689 VIA US. Autos avorittoto 
in Belgium. Tet 32-5U7T5071. Ik 
82209. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EXCAUBUR 

AUTOMOBUB 
are conrtrtely hatoWIt in Ameria* 
Only 44 p 8 rernammg } of the 25 0 unit 
pradudkxi tor 1985 are beeig aBocat- 
ed to the European and Miodto EaP 


New for 19B (tor Europe onto] it a 
special Guneral Moton 5J toe W en- 
gr» producing 300 KP. in its natural 
forwar 425 HP. when supercharged. 
Pdcei OSS65JOC - 85J00 FOB factory] 
on ecpnpawnL 
r ouin ctaly B wedo from 
afcatai lass. For mom 
mformafion oo n too the tale aidesctr* 
»ve dufrtoutorei 

EXCAUUR MOTOR CAR 
DtSTtHBUTORS 

Part Pdaa, Ave dt la Carta 
Marte Carte, Menam 
Tefc 3X - 91- 25 63 91 
Tetote 46M70 MCS 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


10 YEARS 

We Detner Can to the Worid 

TRANSCO 

Keying a condom dock of more the 

^Trwo Sa! 95 Noordelotm. 
2030 Aiewwp, B^nmi 
Tel 323/542 62 40. Tb 35207 TRANS 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTT DELIVERY 

We keep a toot dock of 
mat* car S-andt 
Tet 02/648 55 13 
Teton 66658 
42 rue tom, 

1050 


EUROPE A USA SPECS. 

i makes tor worldwdo dekvery fro 

tod. Send for o TAX-RE ertria) 
BMW - MERCH3E5 - PORSCHE 
rw - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEO 

BIROPE AUTO BROKBS 
POB 2T4, 3430 AR hieuwefei Hofe 
Tet (0| 340241346. Tht 7068 £A 8 N 


torijo look. DMA*#*}. 

- ROUS Raya Shadow 1 74 DM65K 

- 2BO TE M), DM21 JMO 

GeMngiarUtt 

D-4330 Moefcmm Xd JL, W. Gerraor 
tet |D) 206-434099, lb; 8561188. 


NEW 19CS MERCEDES - FERRARI 


bfadc USS34^oa 500Sa Nome j 
+ whno/Prdomna USS32JXX). 
rari 308 GTS onthraoto-'bl 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

for tMMBJUklE defvery 
BESTSBMCE 

mane* bond, 
et U-SA. 

RUT1MC 

Taunuatr. 52. 6000 ftanUwt. 

W Gen*, tel tO] 69-232351, lb 4ll559 
Infunnuiiu n any by phene or tele* 


• TAX RE NEW MOCEDES • 
500 SB, SEC, St, etmfoe dekvery 
hi export service. Save money) 
Uii lurt i AU who l e* *P*tel 
New 1985 modeb far extsopto: 
1900 - S9,30M92b / 200-2000 
SI 21 60-SI 2J00 / ^ 0 E from SI 8,100/ 
3000 from $15^50. Prices nitfad to 

d c3^SaECT10N, cafl experience] 
SaECTTON Wnnrt Bginrt GmbH 
P.O. Bw 13Z7 D3M Syte, 

W. Germany. Ti R 4242-60458. 
60459, 60450 The 24109. 


ROM STOCK 

Mercedes 290 SL new ugnd red. 
Mercedes 500 sTnm* biadt 
Mercedes 500 SlTSEL/SEC. new 
and many otfai a* 
CocSBa* Perro n , Jogurr, Range (toner. 
Land Rover, Pandit, Mercedes tmd 


Some day r rgid roaon p o ssib le. 

iczkovits 

GrtdBrtRBB 36 QiB027 Zurich 
Tefc 01/am 76 TO. Trtmu 8)5915. 


10. Tdw 52*566 UCAB. 


BMW, JAGUAR, AUSTM ROVB 
Land Rover. Al DO./RfO. But Price 
hraneefirte cMvery. Cad Hohad 

VAN LAARHOVB4 LID 

PO Bax 2171, 5600 CD Endhovec 
(0)40-4136)5 Tx 413615 Ifafia M 


RG TEAM 

free can a low 

makes & type* new & wed 

ery. PO Bcd»5D, 4800 C8BREOA / 
Hodcnd Tel R 76651550: fk 74282. 


EXPERBNCED CAS TIAOESS for 
Menmdes, BMW, Pond*, offer ful 
service report / report LB DOT & 
EPA far tourist & dealer. Ocemwide 
Motor* Tenteegensfr. 8. 4 Dumei- 
dorf. W. Gera&y. Tet {0| 211 
434646. Tetote 8587374. 


CAR TRADERS: New » Second Hoad 

AR feral and rim 
Ful service: shipping, tnurance 
BtMS Oe GoudtmST^ Schide, Ant- 
werp Below 323/658 12 tO, 8x32127 


BJROPORT TAX HS CARS 
Cafl for free catoiog. 

Box 1201 lJfattertlan ArponHolaid 
Tet 0)0623077. Its: 25071 ^CA* NL 


TRANSMUMDI KLORJM, 21 Gestei- 
sebocxL B-224T Zoers^, Antwerp. Tet 
0M84.1O54 TU 32302 Tmnsm B. In 
stock: Mercedes, BMW. ASQ 


| AUTOS TAX FREE 





- LEGAL SERVICES 

US IMMIGRATION visos, Altyt Sritos 
& Rodney. 1925 BndM Av.ftom. R. 
33129. Til; G0a 64396(XX tx 441469. 

DOM— CAN DIVORCES. Bax 20802. 
Sarto Domingo, Osnncan Regobtc 

USA (CONN, NY, FU) ATTORFCY. 
Richard E Bulk* Tet (203) 972-0000. 

LOW COST FUGHTS 



HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

SAA. TURKEY OR GREECE with any of 
Yachlourt' fleet of 51 motor &ia£ng 
boah bawd Bodnrn - from an amoe- 
mg S150 per person for two weeVs. 
Ang 01-2Z 1OT or Mre 268991 far 
brochure. Yacfoours, 309 Brampton 
Rd. Knrtfohndge. London SW3, UK. 
Tixtoy'i IcxokI nrel af bareboat far 
hire or flem using 

FRIBLDLY AMERICAN GUtDGS, Pans 

8 axmtryvde wi* car and gwde- 
Stashtrwet 224 77 72 ftp* 

HB1AS YACHTWG. Yacht Own. 
Acodeovas 28, Athens 10671, Greece. 

HOTELS 

SWITZERLAND 

GENEVA 

RESBB4CE DE FRANS 

4 Ax* be France, CH-1 202 Geneva 

Tot 0041 tem 1479 

Beautiful, first doss, rir^nmfoionei 
residential farnahed apartments and 
dvtioi. Fufiy uqripped kitchen, 
daily mod servic* 

Weekly end monthly rates. 

Exceflwu locoaea 

FOR SALE &. WANTED 

TRANSFStRMGTO US. Mist sal Kfce- 
new appiance* Tet Paris after 6 pm 
566 41*87 

ANIMALS 

SAMESE/BAUNESE/ ROYAL real 
poirt kitten waited Para 2S920 07 

BOOKS 

mmSH BOOKSHOP, FRANKFURT 

offers a w«to selection af Bntoh / 
American bools (also dridren's). Brit- 
uh tourist pubfcapxm- Mcri order wr- 

vioe-Germony orfy. Tel 069-2aO*9Z, _ 
Boeraenstr 17, 6000 fenkhet/MI F 

EDUCATION * 

yiiilsl 

MIBOIVE SPANISH Coda dd SoL 
AuSownf lab, .board mcdabl* p 
Groups of 7. Acodetna Oxford, Co- 
iDedas 9, Mriaga Span. Tet 212309 - 


NEW PEUGEOT, Lund Rover. Range 
fear. Toyota 4x4, tropica spec. 
Britos. Zormebom 18, Mocraen- 
broek, HoOrnid DD0445492. rx 47082 


19tS SUMMB SCHOOL in potoert 

phiosopfiy. Write to The Summer 
pth oot He rtford CrAege.Odord. UR 
for dstofli 


PENPALS 


OMU AMP GUYS al BOrteterti see 

E pafe. DetaJi hoe Hermee Vertng, 
M 066 QIN, 0-1000 Berta XV. 
Wets Genaony. 


SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA' In terprxSer & Towtsm Cud* 

PARIS 562 05 MT 


PARIS S57 56 09 

SepM rt lcrted B Eriusrtiri 
tody* 


• • NOTE PARIS SS3 63 63 *» 
POR A REAL V.LP. YOUNG IADY 
Sapfashooted. Educated, Mdat n guot 
Abo Your InH Trowel C e^ fS ea. 


YOUNG B£GANT UOY 

MULTILINGUAL. PARIS: S2S 81 OI 


PAMS WP lophafecrted yOueg lady 
companion. Why don't you phone 
2774)149 far your days, «w> ‘ 

weekends? An dreri bi 

gude. even far your shoptreg. 


PAHS 704 B0 37 
VIP PA YOUNG LADY 
MuWmgucA 


AMSTHDAM 182197 

TRUSTHil IADY COMPAMON 


Elegant, eckwrtd, m uhi ng yoL for 
days & deem & travels pomUe. 
Pais X Atrportv 527 90 95. 


UhRTD. USA & WORLDWIDE 

21276S7793 1 7657794 


young b^t rJngual i nto pre ter aid 


757 62 48. Trustful VJJ. lotto, tortf 


iTSSuf sr vu 'v* 1 


Sopf wi icoted 


re to mart you on you rial to 
London. Tet UK 01-381 6852 


gapore 734 96 28- 


Prtl Nades, rterpreters, etc. 


Free to trmL (Mfl 44 77 75. 




Asoslart. Tet 82B7932. 


7 cgnVmKtniflte. BvlreveL 


Tat Paris 807 84 95. 


companion. Pont 633 68 09. 


bdy componon. 


ion + intoefBudB- 


* IADY n m a v 

Tel: 069/628432 


fOaontal/Epropean) compomon. 


don/Haathrowr. Tet 244 7671 


a mutotnouoL Tefc 27 04 570, 


EuropWPi/Oiemrt compomon 


mq pude. 574 81 


tody 


VIP PA 8 . bftnguol rterprster. 


A3VGNS. 

d 


ossotonr. Tet 


i194. 


and 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS A GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 

330 W. 56ft Sf* NYU 10019 USA 

2T 2-765-7896 
212-765-7754 

MAJOR CRBXT CABS APR) 
CHECKS AOOTH). 

LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Servic* 

Tel: 736 5877. 

MADRID APPLE 

ESCORT SSVKE 

IBs 2503494. OBXT CARDS. 

MADRID TOP 

ESCORT/GUDE SBTVKZ 

THj 4011507. CREDIT CARDS 

LONDON 

Partition Escort Agency 

67 Chlfom Sltae^ 

London Wl 

Tefc 444 3724 er 4S6 1158 

Al major aeri ads acreptad 

ZURICH 

CAROUIC ESCORT SHnnCE. 
Tefc 01/252 61 74 


been (tortured re & top A meet 
ueefoihre Eecert Servtae 1 if 

USA A eiltiierifaiial news maria 

todariag rariairiTV. 

LONDON 

BEST BCORT SERVICE 
TEL* 200 8585 

ZURICH 

AIEX5 ESCORT SBtVKE 

TR> 01/ 47 55 82 

* USA l TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

BCTqy ;pwt 
EV«YWF« YCXI ABE OR GOU. 

1-813-921-7946 

Oa free from U5= 1-800-227-0892 
Oi free from Rarite 1-800283-0092. 
Lowefl Eastern iveleonws you bodtl 

LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

BGORT SERVICE 

ZURICH 

Somrerihato Esrort & Guide Senfe 
Mate A Femate. Tab 01/56 96 92 

CAPRICE 

ESCORT S5LV1CE 

IN FEW YORK 

TEL 212-737 3291. 

ra.- 9379134 OR 9379133 

Al major aedb cards urre^ried. 

* AMSTERDAM* 

5NF Brad Senfe 227837 

AHSTOCATS 

Iwfart Etoref s«w» 

128 VWgmprt ^ London W.l. 

M W Accepted 

Tet 437 47 41 / Gtl 

12 naan - ariight 

ROME CLUB EUROPE BCORT 
& Gride SeoncoJaL 06/589 2604- 589 
1146 Prom 4 pm to ID pm] 

MIAMI, _FL USA 

EXCLUSIVE BCORT SERVICE 

Baa 520554 Mceri, FL 33152 

ZURICH-GENEVA 

GMGBTS ESCORT SBMCL 
1^01/9490884-022/3441 14 

FRANKFURT AREA 

bdiriva faSngud escort senfe 

Tel: 06 91 £2 88 05. 

ocuea escort ssnncE. 

51 Beauchamp Place. London SW3. 
Tefc 01 584 6513/^49 {4.12 ptnj 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


OBCVA-BEST 
ESCORT SBtVKE 
TEk 022/29.13.74 


AMSTERDAM JASMINE 

ESCORT SERVICE. 020-36665S 


GENEVA - WELCOME 
AuWfagurt toca rt G uide 
Tefc ix 1 35 93 68 


GB4EVABCORT 

SERVICE. Tel: 46 11 St 


FRANKFURT + SURROUMXNG5. 

CtsoSre's Escort & travel «rrict. Esv 
^wch^Gefmcm spoken. ToL 


DUESSE1DORF - COLOGNE- BONN 


GC 6 cort Agenc y. ^11/30 43 69. 

Ctku coras O0MH 


DUSSDORF - B0UJN - KQBN - 

Earn. 0211-395066. Ponelo Escort 
Agency. All a«fc cords. 


DUSSBDORMXXOGW-LONOON 


Exclusive escort service. Tet 0211- 
6799663. 


AM5TBDAM, 

Hot*. RcDerdoA. 
Serwo:. Amaerdom |0CG1 


VBMA OEOPATRA Escort Service. 
Tet 5273 88 . 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Service. 

Hcotfeow/Gduici. Tet B34 79fe 


DUSSaDORF/COLOGfC/BOfW 

R Engiah Escort Servtce 0211/38 31 41. 


VBMA - DESKS ESCORT Serwc* 
Tab 52-30355. 


MUMot wan ekoti + 

5eryic* Trti 069/4486038 


Gwdi 


lew YORK StenMbpdbnrito Escort 

Smvice. 212-22MWU 


FRANKFURT - SONIA ESCORT Set- 
vice. Tet 06968 34 42 


FRAMGURT + SURROUNDINGS 

Christina's Escort Service. 069/364656 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


NEW YORKi ROSE 1 ! Escort Serve* 
Tet 212-SB1-1948. 


PRANKRM/iWjraCH 6R*» Bcort 

Serve* 069/38O441 & 089/3518236 


KAREN - FRANKFURT ESCORT Ser- 
«* Tet 069/88 62 88 


MADRID. MARILYN Escort Senfe. 
Credit cards. Tefc <564187. 


TOKYOfc 442 39 79 European Guide 

Serw*. 


RRUSSBl ANTWBIP NATASCHA 
Escort Sonic* Tet 02/731 J&4I. 


BRUSS 8 S. CHANT AL ESCORT Ser- 
ver. Tel: 02/520 23 65. 


FRANKFURT JBMYE5CORT + trav- 
el service. Tet 069/5S72-T0 


FRANKFURT - PETRA Escort & Travel 
Service. TeL 069 / 68 24 05 


MADOD wrt ESCORT SBtVKZ. 

Tab 2456548. Credit cards 


MUMCH WPVATE ES C ORT S MW1 C I 
Tet 089/ 91 23 14 . 


STUTTGART MSS BEATXtCI Esrart 
Senfe. Tab 0711*262 11 50. 


N.EV- 


AM5I3DAM WELCOME Etcort Ser- 
«». Tet flfi 20-198737 


■RUSSBS.ttQITTE ESCORT S crvic* 
| Col Amsterdotn (MU 260639 ■ 


BRUSSBS. ANTWERP MriynEsoHi 
Service. Amsterdan J020) 261730 


HtAFMURT -TOP TOT Enort Scr- 
c* 069/5940-52. 


LONDON UICY ESCORT & Gride 

Service. Tet 01-3/3 0211 


MUMCH-BLONDY + XMA Escort 
B Service. Tat 311 79 00 or 311 79 36 


MUNICH. WBCOME Escort Scnio* 
Tel 91 81 32. 


NEW YORK arr.MOMOUEprefe- 
■tw, Beth Etcort Senric* 21^87-1756. 


MADRID IMPACT ESCORT I. Gride 
Senfe, MiABbbuoL 261 41 4 Z 


LONDON TMXE ESCORT Swfe 
Tefc 01*373 8849. 


VWNA W TOORT SERVICE. Tet 

(WennaJ 6541 58 





+7W 


Page 1 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


iridays 




VoL at 4 PJW. 

11540588 

Rrev.4P56.vol 

7513588 


Table* Include the netkmwMe prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 


12 Month 
hualjbw Stock 


St*. 

lBh High Low 


OvoLOiOt 


1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

3 

3 

3 

3 


7* 3** ADI n 

15V> 8* AL Uab 

30* 12 AMCn 
5% 2* AM Inti 
78*6 SB ATT Pd 3520 7 J 
* 2tt AcmePr 
MW) fflfe AemeU J2 U 
18* IS®, Adlan 
9* 3* Acton 

Sft fi Acta wt 
3% 1ft Admits 
28ft IS* Ad Rial .14 
24ft IS Adobe 23 
M 4ft Aeranc 
39* am AiHPbs 
9* 6 AlrExs 
14 5ft Aired 
5* 2 A lam co 

EDft ASft Almiton 
13* 6* AltxrtV 
9 5ft Aloha 
19 9ft Alahaln JH A 
lft ft Altex 
ft ft Allsxwt 
34 28ft Alcoa pf 175 112 


19 

16 12 
6 14 


J 20 
15 12 


US 5ft 5 3ft + ft 

111 12ft 12ft 12ft 

482 20ft 19ft 20 .4-1 
2303 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 
179 77 76ft 77 + ft 
5 4ft 4ft 44k 

16 Oft 9ft 9ft— ft 
303 17 16ft 16ft— ft 

Y 5 * % TCI* 

8 2ft 2ft 2ft + ft 

24 27ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
650 19 18ft 19 4- ft 

819 7ft 7 7ft + ft 

17 37 36ft 36ft— ft 
55 7ft 7 7ft + ft 

8ft 8ft 8ft + ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
82ft 81ft 82 4 ft 

8ft SM 8ft + ft 
7ft 7 7ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 


40 

37 

67 

105 


23 

133 

20 


It « 


28ft 11 AIzoCb 
19ft 9ft Amdahl 
16ft 6ft Amedeo 
8ft 4ft Am Blit 
8ft 4 Am Cap 
44ft 30 AContrl 
34ft 12ft AEspwt 
9 5ft A F roc A 
9 5ft AFruc B 
12ft 7ft AHHhM 
8 4 Alsroof 

19ft 12ft AMzeA 
18ft 12ft AMxnB 
2ft ft AMBId 
U 3 Am Oil 
64ft 53ft APetf 
Bft ft AmPtti v 
17ft lift APrecs 
8ft 6ft AmRtlV 
16ft lift ARovI n 
4ft 3 ASdE 
1ft Ampal 
3ft Andal 
3 AndJcb 
9 Anarea 
414 Angles 
ft Ansoiwt 
ft vIAnrt v 
3ft ArooPt 


3 

6 

10ft 

14ft 

14ft 

3ft 

2ft 

914 


7ft '3ft Art By n 


12 

12ft 

» 

lift 

lift 

3ft 

2ft 

5ft 

7ft 


6ft Antrim 
9ft AmtwA 
10 AruncN 
6ft Asmra 
8ft Astrex 
2* Astrate 
S AHsCM 
2ft Atlas wt 
4ft Audiotr 


22ft 13ft Avandls 


7D0z 34ft 33ft 33ft— lft 
55 311 26 25ft 25ft 
20 1J 29 1039 16ft 14 M — ft 
-08 S 15 9ft 9ft 9ft 

.15 U 6 35 8ft 8ft 8ft 

23 10 7ft 714 714 

160 22 12 4 44ft 44ft 44ft— ft 

515 34ft 32ft 33ft +1ft 
1277600! lft 8ft 8ft— ft 
123M0QZ Bft 8ft 5ft— ft 
7 1038 9ft 8ft 9 

2 1 6ft Oft 6ft— ft 

52 34 8 26 15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 

52 36 7 T? 14* 14* 14ft— ft 

1S2 lft iK 1ft— ft 

19 76 4 3ft 3ft— ft 

120 U 15 22 60ft MM 

10 ft ft ft— ft 

J4 15 16 3 M 16 14 - 14 

3 2 7 7 7 

258 16ft 14 Mft 

13 3ft 3ft 344 + ft 
J06 23 7 148 2ft 2ft 2ft + ft 

12 28 5 5 5 

16 4ft 4ft 4ft 

J2 45 16 12 14ft Mft 14ft + ft 

20 » 61k 6ft 6ft— ft 

2 1ft lft 1ft 
928 lft lft 1ft + ft 
IS 514 5 5ft + ft 
6 3 6ft 6* 6ft + * 

„ 15 4 7ft 7ft 7ft 

JO 2.1 9 5 9* 9ft 9ft- ft 

33 12 20 19ft 19ft— ft 

.15 22 121 6ft 4ft 6ft + ft 

1 10ft 1014 1814 
330 2ft 2ft 2ft 
77 lft 1 1ft + ft 

558 U 28 10 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
JO 47 7 5 17ft 17 17ft + ft 


4ft 2% BAT 
37ft 22ft BDM 
3ft 144 BUT 
5ft 3ft am 
2ft ft BTK 
13ft 714 Bodper 


.128 10 22282 4ft 3ft 4 +ft 


.19 5 23 

61 

37* 

36* 37*—'* 


7 

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3* 

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34 

54 

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4ft 

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40 

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60s 17 10 

4 

101k 

TO* 

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12M0fittl 
HtoLcw Stock 


Mu. YU PE UasHWlLow OuntCD'Ot 


19 Month 
Utah LOW Stock 


Ptv. YM. PE lOOlMtaniM 


E2 


520X4 


49 

9ft 

984 

9ft + ft 

26ft 

6* 

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59 

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3ft 

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25* 

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3 

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60 4J 

19 

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65 

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9* 







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33* 

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181 

3 

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22* 


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1B0 126 


17 

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13 

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Oase 


X 33ft BnfSMA 
SO Vi 33 Vi BnfSMB 
28ft 19 Bnar 
5ft 3* BettlCp 
30ft 16ft alcCo 
12* 9ft Slav 
6ft 4ft BUM to 
24 19ft BlnkMf 
16ft 14 BtoRB 
17 Mft BioRA 
»« 17ft Stasis 
3ft ft EUocfcE 
19ft 9ft BkwntA 
19ft 10ft BEountB 
» 19ft BotarP 
20ft lift Bawvu 
4ft 2ft Bowmr 
19 12 Bowtte 

lift 5ft BradNt 
30ft 21ft Braatg 
15ft lift Brauns 
32 22ft BmFA 
33ft 93ft BmFB 

4 3ft BtnFPf 

5 2ft Buckhn 
5ft 3ft Bucktipf 

34ft 19ft Buell 


A U17 
69M1J 
J3 U 7 
40 U 36 
.15 £3 
1j00 A3 11 


5 

8 30 

1109 
■ 116 
8 37 


37ft 37ft 37ft— ft 
37ft 37ft 37ft— ft 
26ft 25ft 25ft— ft 
4ft 4ft 4ft 
22* 22 22ft 
12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
6ft 6ft 6ft + ft 
33ft 23ft 23ft + ft 
14ft Mft Mft + ft 
14ft Mft Mft + ft 
31ft 32ft 33ft 4- ft 
lft lft lft + ft 
18ft 17ft 18ft + ft 
18 17ft 17ft 


12ft Confetti 9 27 

ft Canadian 33 

lft CasCrn 49 

ft CosCrwt S 

5» CntCn! J4r 11 21 91 

7ft CrstFo -TSe 16 10 13 

33ft Crass 1-32 4J 15 75 

19ft CrawIM US 11 I 2 
9ft CreCP 74 

7ft CrCPB 173 

_ 16 CwCPPf 152 94 11 

16ft Bft Crown I ,28 \3 9 172 

4ft I CrurcR 3 54 

16ft 2ft OnrO 263 

Mft 13ft QMc J? IJ 13 265 

28 21ft Curtice JO 12 9 21 

9ft K CustEn MS 


3 % v 

7ft 7ft 7ft 
11 10ft 10*— ft 
31ft 31 31ft + ft 
92 32 32 — ft 

14ft 14ft Mft 
11 19ft 11 + * 

20ft 20 20ft + ft 
16ft Mft Mft— ft 
lft I* lft 
3ft 3ft 3ft 
32ft 22 22ft + U 
25ft 25ft 25ft— ft 

2ft 2* 2* — ft 


305 35* 34ft 35 + 4k 

JO 9 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 

19 28 3ft 3ft 3ft 

■44 26 16 810 17ft 16ft 17 + ft 

S3 Bft 8ft — 

160 18 24ft 34ft 26* + ft 

7 17 12ft 12ft T2ft + ft 

■SB ZB 10 6 31ft 31ft 21ft + ft 

SB 2,6 11 129 34 33ft 34 + M 

A0 103 1 3ft 3* 3* + ft 

13 4ft 4* — _ 

JO 94 13 SM 5 5ft + ft 

M 23 5 1 26 25ft 25ft— ft 


3ft 1ft DWG JOT 104 10 178 
26* 17* DaMEn 33 U 1 2* 

9ft 5ft DamnC 5 

10ft 3* Drnnewi 4 54 

.3* ftDamwtO 18 

32* 18* Dams pf 250 MB 1 

24* 20* Darnspf 175 15.1 4 


2ft 2* 9ft 
24* 24* 24*— * 
6 6 6 
5ft 5 5 


26 


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Jflb 14127 


34 20 17 145 
16 54 

5 5 

1J8 106 8 1274 
-60 26 26 


BOS 6B 
32 U 


18 


BO 4J 
220a 7.1 


19 lift CDI s 
Mft 9 CHS 
9* 5 CMICp 

4ft 2* CMX Cp 
19ft 13ft CRS 
19* 9ft CaesNJ 
8* 4* caalsA 
13ft 10 CalRE 
25 18ft Calmtn 
6ft 5* Callonn 
lft ft Canned 
10ft 7* caterao 
Mft fft Cornea 
4 2 Camprrl 

22ft 13ft CMaraa J8 
24 18ft CdnOcc M 
36* 25ft CWfne 
9 4M CarrS « 
s% 2% Conan 
lift 5* CoraEn 
43* 36 CaraPpf SM 11 J 
7ft 3ft Carillon 661143 11 
19ft 14ft CastlAs 
31ft 25ft CasFd 
7* 4ft Castlnd 
lft ft CaiM 
2M lft Centlpf 
13ft 9* CentSo 
9ft 6ft Cetec 
4ft 2M QunpH 
17* 12* ChnvP 
39 19* OirtlWA 

38* 19ft antMB 
20ft MM CWRv 
15 Bft OlfDVB 
46 36M CIlflDpf 4J5 

41 34ft CURD pf 4J» 

9ft OlUtns .15 3 21 

24* lift Citadel 
24* 16ft CltFst 
23ft 17 CtvGas 
42ft 28ft CJarmr 
lift 6* CkBicC 
44ft 21* Oarasf 
24* 13ft Clopav 
9ft 3» Coonltr 
6* Catni 
2 CdFwttS 
B Com fed 
BM Combi s 
M ComdrC 
7 Compo 
6* CompD 
7M CmpCn 
5M CmpFcf 
12ft Cnchm 
7ft ConcdF 
S» County 
20ft 12 ConrHm 
lift 5ft Conqst 

lft canqwt 
8ft COnsOG 
ft CanOGwt 
4ft VlCantA 
5ft vICntApf 


1600I1A 
JO 26 9 
17 

32 45 17 
J4 6 21 1147 
M 6 20 2 

1 JOa 6J 10 


18ft 18ft Mft— * 

14 13* M — * 

9ft 8ft 9ft- 
Zft 2* 7ft + ft 
17ft M* 17ft +1* 
lift 12* 13 — ft 
5ft 5ft Sft+ ft 
IZft 11* 12ft + ft 
85 23* 22ft 23 — ft 
69 5* 5ft 5ft + ft 

lft 7 I — ft 
9* 9ft 91fc— * 
M* 13* M* + ft 
2* 2ft 2* 

15* Mft 15* + * 
20ft 28ft 20ft + ft 
34ft 34* Mft + ft 
8ft Bft BM 

2* 2* 2*— ft 
10ft 10* 10ft + * 
12ttr 42* 42* 42U— * 
39 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
12 19ft 1 Bft 19ft + ft 
8 31 30ft 31 — ft 
17 4* 4* 4*— ft 

30 lft lft lft +* 
4 2 2 2 

68 M 13ft U +ft 
46 7* 7ft 7*+ * 

04 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 

7 15 15 15 

38ft 36ft 38ft +1ft 
37ft 36* 37ft + ft 


66 

11 

125 

13 

141 

4 

27 

43 

6 

1M 


Uft Data Pd 

3ft Datarm 
3* Deftase 
_ — 4* Decrats 
34ft 20ft Dei Lift 
15ft IT* Dental 
lift 2ft Dettnsd 
7 4 O, ii.li u 

lift 7M Desani 
M 9ft DevICP 
10* 5ft Dias A 
10 5ft Dlaa B 
lift 8 DftlBth 
9ft 2 Dlolran 
47* 21ft DairdS 
6ft 3* Diodes 
9ft 6 Dir ACT n 
m 5* Dlxleo 
3> lft DomeP 
29* 22ft Domtro 1 60 
13 6ft Downey 
3* 1ft Driller 
12ft 4* DrtvHs 
39ft 25ft Ducom BO 

_ft ft Dunlap 

30 22ft Duplex 
19ft 13 DurTsf 
75ft 9* Dynkt 


23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 
. 241k 34ft 249k + ft 
J 10 1177 17ft 17ft 17ft— U 
25 6ft 6ft 6ft + U 
■ 8 8 

6 6 4 -I- ft 

34* M 34*+ U 
14* Mft Mft— * 

3ft 3* 3ft— ft 

7 6* ilk 

Bft 8ft Bft + * 

14ft 14ft Mft 
6ft «ft 6ft + ft 
6* 6ft 6*— ft 
lift Uft lift 
2ft 2M 2ft 

138 48ft 47* 48ft +|ft 
111 5ft 4* 5ft— * 
45 8ft 8ft Bft 

96 8* Bft 8* 

2545 2* 2ft 2ft— fc 

M 58 M 28 + ft 
it IOTA, 10ft Uft— ft 
115 2ft 2 2* 

„ 2» W 13 t3 13 + ft 

JO U » 40 33V> 32Jk 33* + ft 

_ . 437 ft fc ft 

-92 JO 12 710 30* 29ft 30* + * 

Ata 25 M 17 Mft 16 14 — ft 

J7o IB 12 569 Uft 141k 15* + ft 


13 

13 

52 15 W 
168 115 9 

-231 3J 15 
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9 
U 

14 

JO 1J 12 

JO A U 
9 
7 

.170 2.1 11 


6 

2 

4 
82 

288 

26 

2 

33 

232 

5 
5 

31 


TO* 

7 

Mft 

15 

3* 

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12ft 

19ft 

10 * 

22 

12* 

9* 


7ft 

"ft 


8 19ft 19ft 19ft— ft 
1 9M 9ft 9ft 

180* Mft 36ft 36M — 1 
300Z 35 35 35 —ft 

82 21 20ft 20ft + ft 
U 1185 25ft Mft 25ft +1* 
1.00b 45 7 10 22* 21ft 22* 

1J0 £1 11 143 23ft 23 33ft + ft 

17 39ft 39ft 39ft + ft 

62 12 11* 13 + ft 

18 41M 40M 40*— ft 

99 25* 24ft 24*+ ft 
35 5ft 5ft 5*— ft 

62 9* 9ft 9ft— * 

623 6M 6ft 6ft+ * 

21 14M 14* 14*— ft 

9 9ft 9ft 9ft— M 

439 1* lft 1ft— ft 

IT 8* 8* 8* + * 

If 731 9* 9* 9*+M 

22 62 9* 9M 9* 

50eU 13 80 20* 18ft 20* +1* 

5 40 Bft 8* Bft— M 

9 18 9* 9* 9* + * 

»«»!»* 19*- * 
17 Sk 2ft Zft 

4 ^ * * TT* 

5 140 9* 9ft 9ft + ft 

11 * lift 11* + ft 


153e 45 
JBe 23 11 
33c L8 11 
.16 6 12 

JO 2.1 10 


1M 


TO* 6ft EAC 

16* 12H EECO 

7ft 3ft ERC 
6ft 2ft Eouta 
23* 15 EstnCa 
40 31* EstBP 

lift 6M Echoes 
3* 1* ElAudD 

2» 15ft EicAra 
5ft 3M ElecSd 
JWh 5ft Elstnor 
12* 10* EmMd n 
6 2ft EmCtar 
* EfSMgt 
Mk ft EnrSrv 
17ft 12 ESDn 
5* 3ft Enstrpf 
12* 5ft Era ins 
32M 1VM Espey 
7ft lft Esprit 
35M 27ft EsqRd 
12* 7ft EvrJB 
12ft 7 EvrJ A 
9* 7 Excel n 
6 2M ExotSu 


J2 


4J 17 
2J 31 
16 
15 

140 45 8 
65M205 3 


J2 


60S 20 10 
50e13B 

10 

AO i; I 

J2> 20 20 
.10 IJ 
-20 15 
J0B35 6 
IS 


1088 
84 

5 27 

11 17 

23 249 
1 

5 U 
22 
14 


27 9ft 9* 9ft + ft 
O Mft 14ft Mft + ft 
25 6* 6ft 4ft— M 

12 2ft 2M 2ft +M 

16 22 Zlft 22 +1 

2 33ft 33ft 33* + ft 


10 9* 9ft + ft 

lft 1* 1* 

21M 21 2TM + M 
3ft 3M 3ft 
7ft 7Vb 7ft + ft 
in raft 12 M + m 

4* 4M 4ft + ft 
M ft M 
lft 1 1 

15* 15 15 + ft 

3ft 3ft 3ft 
Ok 11* 11*— ft 
23ft 23* 23ft 
3ft 3M 3ft 
35V, 35ft 35* 

5M Bft Sft + ft 
BBS 
Sft SM BM— ft 
Sft Sft 5ft 


Uft 8* FPA 
5ft 2 Fatomc 
Uft 11 FWjrmB 
J7* 12* FtactiP 
1J* 7M FltcGE 
11* 8M FkmEn 
« 24* FlaRCk 

»ft 22ft Fluke 
Uft 6* Foodrm 
9ft 4M FlttlllQ 
112 66 FardCndAOOe 

ZUk IS FdrsICA .15 
2m is Femes m 
24ft 11* FerestL 

43* 29 Frantz 
Uft *7* FfMm 
A 9ft Frlma ” 


50 65 10 
AM 43 12 
3 

JO IB 10 
IBM 46 12 


JOB 

A138 

33 


1J»0 26 16 

2ff 

Jflb 36 13 


13 II* lift lift + ft 

5 41b 4 4 — * 

U Uft Uft 12ft— ft 

59 MM MM MM 

40 Sft I* 8* 

1 9M 91b 9M 

95 39* 38ft 39*+ * 
107 30 29* 30 + * 

131 13M 12ft 13* + ft 

415 9ft 9 9 

life 93 93 93 - M 

4 22ft 22ft 22ft 

2 22ft 22ft 22ft + ft 
253 19* 18* If + ft 

60 1* lft lft— ft 

10 42ft 41ft 41ft— lft 
23 22ft 22* 22M 

1 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

609 Bft 7ft BM + * 

91 18* IBM IBM 


12 Month 
Utah Low Stott 


Dm. YU. PE 


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M* 8* FratHd 1228 

7ft 4M FrfAwt -ITT 28 U 
19ft 18ft Fwrvttn 16 101 


30 lift 30 + M 
U* 13* Uft— * 
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21* 8 GnfYlg 
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33* 22* Ghtmr UOb X6 W 
6M 3* ClbNRn 30 

19* 1UM Glaser 4 U 12 
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2M 19* GwMT IA0T S3 9 

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6ft SM 6ft +1* 
3* 3ft 3* + * 
12* lift 12* + * 
2ft 2* 3*— ft 
28ft 20ft 38* + M 
12* 12* 12ft— * 
fft 9Vk 9M 
TIM Uft I1M + M 
4 4 4 

I5M 15 15M + M 

4ft 4ft 4ft— M 
lift 16* Mft 
4* 4M 4M— M 
14* MM t4* 

H 9ft W + M 
2M 3M 2M 
10 10 TO 

33* 31 33 +3 

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2Mb 39ft 29ft— ft 
27ft 27M 37*+ * 
3* Sft 3ft— ft 
Mft Uft 18ft 
SM ^ 5*+ M 

28* 21* 28ft + ft 
24* 2«M 3Ab— M 
31 31 31 + M 

M* M 14ft + * 
2IM 23* 21* + * 
lift lift lift + M 
2 * 2 2 — * 
Uft 12ft 13 + * 
32ft 33* 33* 


9* 9M 9*+ ft 
29M 29* 29*— M ! 
12ft 12 12 — ft 

12* I2M 12ft + ft 

3Mb 38ft 38ft— * 


k, A?oO 

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16 12 HMG 

15* 9* HUBC 
lift 7M Honpff 
26* 16* Honf ros 
31 91b Hoabri 

36* 22M Hasbrpf 
46ft 25ft Hastlns 


.Me LI 8 
60 4J 
60a40 11 
59t 85 7 
68 26 12 
13 

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21* MM HHhCra 3JBe 93 I 
9ft SM HHtlOl II 

l»ft Uft HJIhEx 32 

15ft 10ft HetthM 56 35 K) 
9ft 6ft HdnWr JOe 22 13 
15* 7* Hetofck .10 5 12 

21* 3ft HeOanf 37 

nk ft HeimR 
K 4* HershO 21 

Uft 9* HIptFOR 23 

6ft 2* Haftnan 10 

13* 6Jb HoUyCp 339 15 U 
34* 25* Harms 158 3J 12 
22* 8ft HmHor Jit 66 13 
0* 3* HrnHwt J7I 85 
lift lift HaHPfy 1J2 716 10 
4 lft HatIPwt 
.fft <* HoaOT U6e78.0 
IBM B HavnE 11 

U* «b Howlln JOe L7 I 
41* 2Sft KahefA Ui 36 12 
41ft 28* HabcIB 1-36 3J 13 
55 38 Hubbl pf 266 38 

21ft 16* HudGn 60 22 M 
10 7* Husky p ,U 


9ft Mb 9ft+ * 

12* 13* Uft— ft 

Mft Mft 14ft + * 

lift 10* 11 + * 

26 25* 26 + ft 

30ft 30ft 30*— * 
36* 36 36 — * 

41* 41 41* + M 

20ft 20ft 20ft + ft 
9ft Bft 9 
14* 14ft 141b— ft I 
14ft 14* M* 

9ft lft 9 + ft 
Uft 15M 15ft + ft 

r* ^ 7 * + * 

4ft 4ft 4*+ ft 
14* 14M 14* 

4ft 3ft 4ft + ft 
8ft 8 8 — ft 

15 32* 32ft 32*+ ft 
349 n* MV. lift + ft 
3* 3ft 3ft 
Uft Uft 15ft + ft 
Sft 3M 3ft + ft 
4* 4M 4M— * 
Uft 16ft 16* + * 
11* Tift 11* + ft 

39ft 39* 39ft + ft 

40ft 40lb 40ft + ft 
54M 541b S4M 
181b Uft Uft— ft 
7* 71b 7* + * 


U 

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31 KoeerC 

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51 

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115 

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9 4* ICO 13 

21b 1PM JOt 15 

6ft IRTCPn 25 

4W ISS .12 20 30 

lft ImpGp 
1ft Impintf 

Sift 25ft ImpOhe 150 
10ft 6M Inflow 
23ft 16M Instron 58 

3ft lft InetSv 
2ft InsSypf 
6ft lately a 
5 Inlrcle 
11 Intmfc 
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JOe 46 I 


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10 

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333 U8 104 107 +2M 

IS 6* 6* 6*— ft 
M 3* 3ft 3ft+ ft 

349 13ft lift T2M + M 

17 6 5ft 5ft 

1971 2* 2 2* + ft 

49 3ft 3ft 2ft + ft 

229 34M 33* 34ft + ft 
64 9* 9V> 9ft— ft 

49 20ft 19M 20ft +1* 
271 m 2 2ft+ ft 

1 2* 7* 2*+ ft 

14 9M 9ft 9ft 

12 8* Sft Sft + ft 

31 13* 13* 13*— ft 
367 3ft 3* 3ft 

33 9ft 8* 9ft + ft 


14M lift 

3ft lft 
9M 7ft 
3ft 1 
1IM 9ft 
5ft 3 
17ft IM 
3M * 
25* lift 
IS* 8M 
35 IT* 
9* 4ft 
22M 21* 
28* 18* 
19ft 7* 
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m 5 

22M 12ft 
19* 8* 
29ft U 
17* Uft 

40* 14* 

II* 8 
8* 4M 
3* 3* 
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lift 7* 
76ft 52 
18* T2ft 
TO* 5* 

n* m 
20 11* 
25 15ft 
BM 4ft 
lift 8ft 
24* 13ft 
44* 38M 
9ft 7ft 
24M 14M 
47H 33 
10ft Sft 
17 10M 

17 10M 

4ft 3* 
19ft 17ft 


MCOHd 

MCORs 

MSA n 60e 56 
MSA wf 
MSI Df 
MSR 

MacScn .14 16 


MePS JS 3 f 
Motart a JOe 
Maned 
MntrOf 

Marmpf 235 10.7 

Mrdiln 

MartPr 

Masind JOa U 
Matec 

IMatRsh ,U 6 
MatScn 

Matrix 1 

MavEng 260 127 
MOVflw B0b 2.1 
MCCOG 260^05 
IMCDqw 2J 

McRae A JOB <2 
McRae B 
Medabf .12 b 1.1 
Media 1.16 16 
Med* JO 1.1 
MercS L -371 49 
Met Pro .15 L2 
Mvtex 17 

MetrnC 
MchGn 

MhJAm 64 41 
MkHnd 60 IB 
MbiPpf 560 117 
Mtsarav mc 27 
MtchlE J4 16 
MiteOa 1-D0 21 
MORMp 56 54 
MOOBB JOb 1J 
MooaA Jflb 16 
MfaRtWt 
MIoGfti 164* 76 


7 5 

17 36 

33 
77 

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INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


ABU DHABI NATIONAL 
OIL COMPANY 

ADNOC is one of the major oil companies in the Middle East controlling 
the Exploration, Production and Processing of Oil, Gas and Associated Products in Abu Dhabi. 

The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company wishes to recruit a number of 
professional personnel in its Exploration & Production Directorate as follows: 


Are you a self-starter 
with drive and managerial talent? 

Internationally known Swiss Engineering Company, sub- 
sidiary of a large Swiss corporation, has immediate 
opening for qualified 

SALES - MANAGER 

to take charge of its world-wide sales activities report 
ing directly to the Chief Executive Officer. 


Ml 


PRODUCTION ENGINEERING SUPERVISOR 

Responsihle for conducting and evaluating studies of surface production 
facilities of oil and gas both onshore and offshore from the engineering and 
operational point of view. Also responsible for optimizing and evaluating well 
completions, well testing and logging programmes and all other aspects of 
Petroleum Engineering. He should be able to use computer programmes related 
10 me wore mentioned above. 

2Si^??„ ahou,d hav ® a &Sc - ,n Petroleum Engineering or equivalent with a 
minimum of 10 years experience in Production & Petroleum Engineering. 

RESERVOIR SIMULATION ENGINEER 

and eva,uatIon of reservoir engineering data for 
Sd mduaia' the raauits? ^ H ® Sh ° U,d 8,80 ** aWe to ran rwe ™ 0,r simulators 

Sh ? uld ha, f e a aSa ,n Petroleum Engineering or equivalent, with 5 
rSenroTrengKrin^ 0,1 0001 pany ’ lndudln 0 * minimum of 2 years In 

Strong computer background is preferable. 

RESERVOIR ENGINEER (PETROPHYSICAL ANALYSIS) 

IrrierDrefation SSSH?tl lnfl ADN ° C ' S data baae ensure that the log 
interpretation parameters are updated. 

P f tro l? um Enolnwrtnfl or equivalent, with 5 
yea£ fn lSgSy^^ maJor 0,1 ^“c'ng Company, including a minimum of 2 

Strong computer background Is preferable 

MANAGEMENT REPORTS COORDINATOR 

peSESSoto Uie ^S?k 0, O f O th? , ? a ? em .® nt ’ technlcal re P° rts on ma i° r Issues 

thatof V& sutafkS?<SLS5 Explora,,on sn d Production Directorate as well as 
prepaS of mSv companies. He should be able to supervise the 

shcSSd also te^hi2 h tn r ^ port and other related acth/ltlesT He 

atSidard^MtlD^ S mSirtSS ? ,ead ln ^ developing and Implementing 
a conmutSS I?"? 131 * for 0,6 companies In the ADNOC Group and 

microfilm ,nformatlon system, and document storage and retrieval on 


The candidate should have a asc In either PetroleumJMechanicai /Chemical 
S2!£f enn ? °L m i u,va l en t. with a m,n,mum of 8 years relevant experience in the 
2S5ja?S5 and t P™ duct '? n Industry- Knowledge of modem methods of 
imormatlon handling will be a distinct advantage He should have excellent 
analytical and communication skills. 


ASSISTANT MANAGEMENT REPORTS COORDINATOR 

P^C2?iiS e B. f0 D^? ,e fi t,on s^.^lew of information and data pertaining to the 
Exploration & Production activities and that of the subsidiary ope ratine 

58 Si® t0 prepare a monthly management report from 
InfonnSiOT S^Sn d ^ P re P aration of technical data for Management 

SfliSSrinrf SrSlSUlli ha y e *£? Cm efther Petroleum/Mechanlcal/Chemlcal 
^ 9 i!l! e " n9 ^u/valent, with a minimum of 5 years relevant experience In 

and production industry. Knowledge of modem methods 

aiihrfsISSiSI/ hand,m 0 w,! 1 be a distinct advantage He should have excellent 
analytical and communication skills. 

SENIOR PLANNING ENGINEER (SPECIAL STUDIES) 

broal^iesinn the Helds 1 developments which include 
kSq d fSSurSH t facilities planning, preliminary cost estimates for 

towers, flowlines, offshore structures, production and injection facilities, etc. 

I*lSiS^2 d ' dal f | hou,d h ® / o a RSc. in Petroleum or Mechanical Engineerino with 

lid oII2hIL? f 6 X 83 ” °' ? ald experience in facilities design and cost (offshore 
and onshore), and reservoir performance 1 

All these appointments require good knowledge of Arabic and English. 

S 8 ^J5^ in o tment ? 3119 based fn Abu Dhabi Cit y- However, the Production 
Engineering Supervisor will be requited to make occasional field trips. 

JJ'* nce wMI fae S iven to UAE nationals and then to other Arab candidates. 

nm«SS»S e E£i t l. in 6- ,u< ! e 3 co , m P etitive tax-free remuneration, good career 
pSd^me accommodation, fumhure allowance, 

paid home leave for the family and educational assistance for eligible children.- 

invUod to forward their detailed applications, together 
/?eLMo“ ,,0n a " d “ perien “ certl » e "««- ««"" «'« 


We are a totally integrated engineering com 
covering all disciplines from process engineering, 
and detail engineering through project and construe 
tion management. Our activities cover the non-ferrous 
and chemical process industry as well as specialize 
material handling. 

The position offered requires an engineering or husi 
ness degree and thorough knowledge of the engineering 
contracting field, a minimum of 5 years in an executivi 
position in engineering sales, including turnkey pro 
jects. 

Candidates must be fluent in German and English 
Remuneration commensurate with qualificatioi 
and experience. 

Write to: 

Cipher 44-62,871, Publidtas, P.O. Box, 

CH-8021 Zurich, 
giving background summary. 


OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENT 


^ougpoatiom are aw^We for qualified pibfessionalsV 

CaraKSSf ” ^ tfae ’ ^ a . ofic B * s ™ “d me Middle Ei, 
SiSlSS tave a fororouxn of 5+ years experience i 
Igjgmrotraimog or educational background in 
^^odimica L Comm unications, Logistics and most Medical i 
&J»noejTng (fcapfines. Housing, Travd, Medical Ihs^ce i 
exceUmt salaries are available. Some positions are tax exempt 
F&r coosideradoh forward resnme/CV. to: 


TANTALUS INTERNATIONAL 

THE TANTALUS GROUP 


I 3 Floor OTE! Towo 
H Ouocno Pood Co: 
Horg K ong 
&-21 J4-56 



L'AgMtcw M nflm i ul a Poor PEmplol 

AGHVCE SPfclAUSfe DCS INGtNIEURS ET CADRS 

IJ Rue Blanche, 75436 Para CEDEX 09 
Tel. : 280.61.46. Ext 71. - 285.44*60. Ex». 4Z 


EMPLOYMENT DIVISION MANAGER 
PERSONNEL DIRECTORATE 
ADNOC 
P.O. BOX 898 
ABU DHABI - U.A.E. 


f 4 * 6 YWl BX < wr * n » 

+ AlneaJ. iperio&I of Tropical 
Engflsh. In March of afl 
AWCA - **■' 

SALES AND MAR- 
KEni ^ MANAGER. INTERNATIONAL, 
" T T ° I*"? 05 "NHSaaltaiBt, taiecom- 
•™^coba r «. Fo onc ta, raid Head of Europe- 
an branch office In Part*. Engineering de- 
B r «>o, bu ^neii admlniifrotion. SEEKS 
cna llengOT g position French or USA or ae- 
ah. profit ceraer Europe. Proven organaer, 
wfareneei ovoOabW. Ret: 

4I4-pa&s cadres i/jcb. 

SP * aAUST EXPORT, 51, 
B.Sc. MBA. Ruenl In EngB*, Arabic 
good knaraUclBe of German and HaOan. 27 
y«r* experwKB In Marketing of eleclrieal 
woyftjtirarae equipment in ARAB COW- 
TOES. Well aapnkited wUh top level nego- 
fiahara r etofrie to supply and cenBrueHan 

owwoctL Exc^lemreloricm ip Arab World 

SEBa MatkeEng management pcoirion or 
consultant contract bated in pprfa wtih travel 
abroad Ret, 4ISPAUS CADRES t/Ot 


WOM *N PURCHASE 
OOTUTOR, 36. itagh, graduated 
new MA French frora Paris Douphine 
*ity (Management of the pure 
department). Fluent English. S| 
Knuwl_-Jgo of ItaOon, German and ■ 
Solid business experience in Europe 
ine world with mparf/expoet firms. 
«m 8 ar position with multinational or i 
HonaHy challenging. Ref.: SlAfARt 
RES l/MS. 

• EXECUTIVE, 37, Formation ft.Sc P 
cy, M.S& Biochemistry, business sch 
■cutiwe seminars. With 10 yesn exp 
In Inti business development sec tan 
care. Pharmaceuticals or Cosmetics, 
pawtian as Director of ImT Markefin 
neu deralapment far multinational < 
ny. Rctr 413*AMS CADRES l/JCB 

WROUUat, Store Kipper Chi. 
Production, Purchase material mono 
training. 1 2 years overseas services f ' 
ttanst to creole store and this ergon 
to create purchase departement a 
contacts nafionoh and htf ernat l enob 
60600 , contracts, orders, overseas et 
merit exduiif Ret, 41&PA1BS < 
UGR. 



































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Tables mcJodetb® nationwide prices 
up to me dostog bn wmi street 
aiid do not reflect kite trades elsewhere. 


sk due 

Pte.YM.PE MOHdohLow ftwt.QtW 


flk 3b 
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18b 10V. 
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10 

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33 22b 22b + b 

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91 If 11 

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42 

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66 4 b 
1 23b 
BB lib 
16= 7 

47 3tb 
122 5b 

10 2 b 

11 5 
14 3b 

TOte 30 
200z 54 
2ta 67b 

12 lb 
20 ran 
ioi b 

k un 
a un 
17 un 
s 7b 

27 5b 
43 2H 
173 MK 
7 ant, 
9* tb 


6b 6b 
23b 23b — b 

ldb tin + n 

m 7 40 

SM 3M+ n 
sb 5b+ n 
37b 2b + n 

5 s +n 

3 b 3 b + n 

37b 27b— b 
St St — b 
67V. 6716 4 V. 

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U 10 + u. 

u ttn + b 
u 16b + b : 

9 9 — b 

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13b 14b 4 n 
27 27n 

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tb in WTC 31 » 7to 7b 7V) 4- n 

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m b wmcwt u in in in 

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96b 68b WihP* 36 L0 H 69 97 Mb 77 +3to 

26 17 WRIT 140 64 74 IS 3 3fb 34b 

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MU 17b in*+ n 
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12b 12b 12b 
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22b Tin 22 
5314 52b 5314 + b 
sn sn sn 
19b 18b 18b— b 
2to 2b 2b 

153b 15Jn isov. —in 
2b 3b sn+ b 

2Pb 29b 29b + n 

n un ion + b 
raw. ion un— n 
4tt 4b 4b 


2 USRInd 
tb Uttmt* 11 

Hr Unleoro 15 

lin units of JS S.1 
3b UnJrrvn Me 52 
3 *n UaOBF 1J0&2J 9 
lb UPOOdA .10 S3 23 
m UFoodB 72 

KM HUM AS 4J 15 
ton USAGwT 
7tn U5AC FlUO 17 
4b UnlMV MI13J9 14 

Mb Unity B nunc 
7b UnvCir 14 

Sb ur I v Si* X! 

fb Urn Pot 


13 2b 3 

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41 14b 14b UH4 n 
s» fb 9b 9b 
4 46 4sn 45b + b 
55 lb ib 1*+ n 
30 lb lb lb 
164 Ub 13 Mb— n 

4S sb sin nn 4- n 
TO 111 1W 111 — S 
2» cb fib sn+ n 
4 2m 21 21b 4- to 

79 12b 12W 13b + b 
« lb tn m— to 
a Ub Ub 14b 4 to 


ub fib 
tb » 

27 uu 
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17b 11b 
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BU 4b 
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2sn un 
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30 16 

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11V. 7b WII 
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23U. 19b Wll 
40b 35V. 

15b u 
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34 27b 

28b 12 
7b 3b 


lib 11b 
4b 4W 

ii i7n 
2 2 
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7b 7b 
j 2b 
2Sb 2SVS 
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Page 14 


ITVTF.KNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUBDAY-SU1SPAY, MARCH 2^3, 1985 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


Star Tricks byjeanettek.brikjl 


PEANUTS 


lTree 

7 Something to 
be counted 
II Former 
featherweight 

cham p 

14 Metal fastener 

18 Small space 

19 Coxey’s 

(1894 

marchers) 

20 Under the 
weather 

21 Sei's cousin 

22 What Kojak 
watches? 

24 Golfer Calvin’s 
garden staple? 

27 Equal, to 
Pierre 

28 Landed 
properties 

30 Meter— — 

31 Actress Hagen 

32 Quaver, for 
one 

33 River of NW 
France 

34“ are the 

times . . 

36 Seed covering 

37 Chemical 
suffix 

38 Attic festival 
40 What singer 

Pat can do to 
seem busy? 

42 Placer 
contents 

43 Wild goose 

44 Bobbins 


45 Usually 

48 Raccoon’s kin 

49 Pouched 
racquet 

51 Smallest of the 
Cyclades 

52 Not curly, as 
hair 


53 Cnemis 

54 Famed skat- 
er's favorite 
game? 

58 Actress Mol- 
ly's favorite 
dessert? 

83 "The Love 


86 Howactress 

Dorothy stags? i 

89 Late bloomer 

91" Stoops to' ie 

Conquer" 

94 First name In » 

whodunits __ 

95 " Day’s z r 

Night," __ 

Beatles film 22 

96 Prefix with __ 

natal 27 

97 PhOCid 

98 Goddess H 

banished from mM 


18 I IS 1 13 


a 14 


IS 

,r 

r 1 




] 


TT“ 

__ 


IN A GOOPCOW^SWm THEN THAT PERSON 
ONE PERSON TALKS WHILE TALKS WHILE THE PtRST 
THE OTHER LISTENS PERSON LISTENS... 


I LIKE \ / I ' 
TALKING.; \( REALIZE 
I HATE JV THAT y 
LISTENING j 


WHAT? 




Olympus 
99 Noah's eldest 


1924 song 
64 Gung-ho 
85 Blazing 

67 Beloved of 
Radamds 

68 Boxer Billy’s 
racket? 


70 Newscaster 
Daniel's 
favorite meal? 

73 Midi city 

74 Old Norse 
poem 

75 Purloin 

76 Frugal one 
79 Small 

sandpiper 
81 William, Dick 
and Eleanor of 
filmdom 

83 Author Potok 

84 Ky. college 

85 Macaws 


100 Commercial 

section of a- 

London 

103 Household ST 

need 

104 JosipBrozon sT 

tbe wagon? 

107 What a racon- H 

teur shouldn't H 

dangle? H 

109 w.W.n locale mi 

110 "Exodus" hero S3 

111 Paddock papa 

112 Lustrous 88 

fabric 

113 Sneak exposed 94 

byMlcawber __ 

114 Precognition, 98 

for short 


BLONPEE 

> WH 

Os 


WHAT A *-> 

VJON06JFU-, 
7 DREAM . 1 r' 




176 177 178 


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ll . 4 



the B*fnos 
^ HSUSBl r 


MBJ OOEWflS ARe MV] 
-I NIGHTMARES 


■“"i 


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BEETLE BAILEY 


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ance gp. of 
W.W. II 

116 Tendencies 


101 





r^P 

103 

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r 

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107 





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111 




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112 





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118 






well, did Your survey 
TURK UPAMYTHIHS 
INTERESTING / 


A FEW 

observations 




x LIKE 
I WHAT 

f ? 


\ F VOU LAID THE SOLPlERS it 
THIS CAMPENPTO ENPTHE AR(V 
WOULP FI NPSOME WAY TO US 
v IT TO INCREASE ITS BUDGET 


\i*N 


I ‘tfrhi 


f 'n H» 


DOWN 

1 Connected 
series 

2 Webfoot's 
home 

3 Tell 

4 prosequi 

5 English urban 
district on the 
Ouse 

6 Enthusiastic 
review 

7 Leader of the 
28th of July 
movement 

8 Good Queen 
Bess 

9 Struck 


DOWN 

10 Actress Daly 

11 Cabin boy in 
“Moby-Dick” 

12 Antimony is 
one 

13 Give 
satisfaction 

14 Did some 
gardening 

15 Firth.e.g. 

16 Flogs 

17 Lozenge 

23 "Llebestod” 
singer 

25 Fit to be 

26 Soupy from 
N.C. 


DOWN 


ja Ermine in 
summer 

35" soitqui 

maiypense” 
36 Iron and Stone 

38 Tudor or York 

39 Totality 

40 Retard 

41 Site of U. of 
Maine 

42 Actor from 
Pittsburgh 

43 Fluffs 
45Fortbe 

problem at 


46 " evil . . .’ 


DOWN 

47 Starman, e.g. 

48 Receptacle 

49 Insect's trill 

50 Prepared 
potatoes, in a 
way 

52 Some Rialto 
seats 

53 Steeple 

55 Hymnist John 

Mason 

56 Winning hit. In 
baseball argot 

57 Native 
medicineman 
in Hawaii 

59 City on the 
Loire 


DOWN 

60 French pioneer 
In psychiatry 

61 Standard of 
perfection 

62 Hines and 
Warren 

86 Receptacle for 
holy water 

69 Former name 
of Communism 

• Peak 

71 Colonial 
broadcaster 

72 . . this 

’*: C.F. 

Adams 

76 Rather brief 


0 New York Tones, edited 

DOWN 

77 Actress 
Goddard 

78 Candy striper 

79 Calcbas was 
one 

80 Swap 

81 Obvious 

82 Prill or stibnite 

83 Grip of sorts 

84 Faultfinders 

87 Okinawan 
seaport 

88 Lobster claws 

89 Arabian ro- 
mance 

90 Metric meas- 
ures 


by Eugene Mabsha. 

DOWN 

91 Squid 

92 Greeted 

93 Terry and 
Glasgow 

96 Ancient Mari- 

ner’s cry 

97 Kind of fence 
99 Bus station 

101 Recess at 
Notre Dame 

102 Congress- 
man's reg. 

105 Violinist Bull 

106 VanWinkle 
108 Telpher 


ANDY CAPP 

C - I Iftl i eJU P U — 

L 1 j 


nmm 


Sr A4EAT7HEA4CA4ENT,— -J I > DIFFERENCE. 




IWO JIMA: Legacy of Valor 

By Bill D. Ross. 359 pp. Illustrated. $22.50. 
Vanguard Press, 424 Madison Avenue, 

New York, N. Y.10017. 


BOOKS 


Reviewed by Drew Middleton 

TJ ORTY years ago the U. S. Marines and Navy 
i ftTwirbryi their assault on the tiny Pacific Island 
of Iwo Jnna and opened one of die bloodiest cam- 
paigns in U. S. military history. When it was over, 
36 days later, there had been 25,582 American 
casualties; 6,821 lolled in action. 

The heroism, the sacrifice and the endurance of 
the men involved was of epic prop ort i ons. But 
although the official reports are accurate and de- 
tailed, there has been no an gle book that anight the 
flavor of the fighting, the sounds and rights that 
confronted theMarines as they moved ashore, the 
confusion, the brutality of battle. 

BDl D. Ross has written that book. 1 consider it 
the best book on a campaign and on a fighting force, 
in this case the Marines, since Alan Moorhead’s 
work on the battle of Alaxofiin. The author’s re- 
search has been thorough. He has read, as far as I 
can see, most erf the writing, published and unpub- 
lished on Iwo Jima, and he has given, us a splendid 
book. 


The battle scenes are excellent And Ross pays 
tribute to the almost inhuman bravery of the Japa- 


nese defenders. When the campaign began there 
were about 21,000 Japanese an the island. The 
Marines took just over 1,000 prisoners. The others 
died. 

This is more than a book about a battle. There 
was a public at home waiting for news. As the 
casualties mounted the public was appalled. Wil- 
liam Randolph Hearet opened a campaign in his 
newspapers advocating the appointment of General 
Douglas MacArthur as supreme commander in the 
Pacific ova- Admiral Chester Nlnhtz, who directed 
the Iwo Tima campaign. 


a useful reminder of .the damage one self-willed 
publisher can do. 

The first casualties stunned the high command. 
By nightfall on Feb. 21 American casualties on Iwo 
Jima woe 644 lolled, 4.108 wounded and 560 miss- 
ing. This in 51 hours of fighting. There was no 
doubt," the author writes “that Marines were in the 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


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bloodiest battle since Gettysburg." He means, of 
course, an American battle; losses on the Somme 
and ax Verdun in World War 1 were much higher 
than the Iwo Jima totals. 

Understandably, Ross ponders the motivation, 
the training, the morale that enabled the Marines to 
carry on day after day under a hafl of sheds, mortar 
bombs, machine-gun and rifle fire. He does a good 
job but no writer really can plumb the inner work- 
ings of the infantryman's mind although SOme good 
ones, and Ross is among them, have tried. 

To today's readers the behavior of the Marines on 
Iwo Jima probably seems incredible. The author 
tries to explain why they were able to do what they 
did by givmg a detailed description of the tr aining 
of new Marines in boot camp. It tells us a great deal 
about why they were able to fight and win at Iwo 
Jima, but not alL Great fighting units like the 
Marines and the Guards develop out of tradition 
and pride as much as from 20-mfie hikes with full 
packs. 

Why was the battle cf Iwo Jima fought at all? The 
question arises out of the stark figures of casualties. 
The answer is that the island’s airfields would pro- 
vide a launching pad for the Air Force’s assault on 
Japan. Does this suffice when, today, we know that 
work on the first atomic bomb was nearing comple- 
tion? This generation’s answer will probably be no. 

War. however, has its own dynamics. Looking 
back at the long, brutal drive across the Pacific, the 
recognized importance of Iwo Jima, the battle seems 
inevitable. 


WIZARD of ID 



IT 

Ftxx?.~tr 

nee&tio 

M£P-- 


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F^r 


REX MORGAN 


DID YOU TALK TO 
KENNY? 15 HE^ 
=7 ALL RIGHT?! 


YES, HE'S FINE/ HE'S 
GOING TO A /VKVIE 
T WITH A FRIEND/ jJ 


EOSMtfN, 
i*\3 2JA 


GOOD/ THEN YOU WONT HAVE TO M 
RUSH HOME AND WE CaN HAVE A ^ 
LEISURELY DINNER/ IlL BE LEAVING 
TOWN TOMORROW/ BUT, TELL ME ONE J 
THING/ IS THERE SOMEONE THAT ^ 
iT98T YOU'RE IN LOVE WITH? r^-9ll 


*rP 


The half-forgotten names and phrases and inci- 
dents return on these pages; the flag planted on 
Mount Suribachi, the Kamikazes sweeping down on 
the Saratoga in a raid that cost the lives of 717 
sailors, die cry, “The Old Man’s Got It" when a 
commander is killed. 

To those who, regrettably, know the face of bat- 
tle, Iwo Jima reinforces the memory of the dnE, 
stupid horror they know war to be. For those who 
do not, the book is required reading if for no other 
reason that it will show them what Americans are 
capable of in battle. 


GARFIELD 


Drew Middleton is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 



si I WONDER IF I SHOULD 
CLEAN THE 
REFRIGERATOR 


1 THE BACON 
GRAZING ON 
\ LETTUCE AN 
A ASKS IFT-- 
j/REFRJGERAl 
(needs CLtAl 


®1BBS IMM FeatumSvntM^MJnc 


World Slock Markets 


am 2J95 

2910 2900 
12300 13330 


StorldMfan 


Via Agence France-Presse March 1 

dating prices in local aurenaa unless otherwise indicated. 


MI*Iq4«x: 14J1 
I Previous ; 1X13 


'Can i Brins my dog next sunhav 2 

HE'S NICER THAN MOST PEOPLE-* 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


NISH LOW 
C F C F 
H 44 13 55 


COP 

Amsterdam 

3 

37 


X 

Cos 

Athens 

12 

54 


<3 

Dut 

Barcelona 

14 

61 



Edl 

aefarade 

3 

37 



Fta 

Benin 

1 

34 

0 

.12 

Fra 

Sniueh 





Ger 

Ouan; cst 

-3 

27 



Hel 

Budauast 

-1 

X 

-5 

7S 

l«o 

CBaentmaca 





Los 

Casio Del Sol 

1* 

44 



Ltal 

Dublin 





Lon 

Edinburgh 


41 



Mm 

Ffareoce 


57 



Mni 

Frankfurt 





Mot 

Geneva 

0 

X 

■3 

27 


mqkek 
online 
Hone Kom 
Manila 
Hex MM 


Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


34 93 M n a 

0 32 -2 28 a 

19 M 15 59 r 

33 91 24 75 el 

30 M 14 57 A* 

1 43 3 37 o 

7 4S 4 39 r 

X M 22 72 St 

23 73 14 dl <r 

11 32 3 37 fr 


ASM 

ACP HaMlng 

Aeoon 

AKZO 

Ahrtd 

AMEV 

A'Dom Rub 

Amrobank 

BVG 

Bwetirmarin T 
Colonel HMD 
ElSMler^IDU 
Fakkar 

GW Brocades 
He l noketi 
Hoogoveas 
KLM 
Noaraen 
Hal Nedder 
Nadliovd 
Oce Vander G 
Pakhoed 
Philips 


Rodamco 

Rollnco 


Kloockner Wefko 
Krupa Stahl 
Unatf 
Lufthanso 
MAN 

M onn osmawi 

MetallBeseMschaft 

Muencti.Ruock 

Prausooa 

RutmrvwetM 


75 TOO 
77 JM 7133 


RuetbBrvWerKa 

RWE 

Schorlna 

Siemens 

Thyssen 

vena 

Vfibo 

VEW 

VWK— DB— 1 — rfc 


77.20 7123 
42S 4T7.50 
19250 19000 
1A4 1*3 

1S7 I5Z50 
235 243 

1200 1205 
251 257-30 


151 15940 
4*350 445 

553 5*L50 
102^0 13050 
1HSJ0 13050 
1*750 1*350 
12120 122-70 
194 192 


Commenbank Index : 1,19*40 
Prevlaas : UIU) 


Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Nice 

Oslo 

Porta 

Prague 

Reykjavik 

Rome 

Stockholm 

strattaMn 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


•I 30 - 5 23 W 

4 39 - 5 23 fr 

24 75 19 66 o 

IS 5V 9 43 o 

8 46 2 31 o 

Id 41 10 SO r 

9 48 d 43 fa 

-I 30 -11 12 d 

14 57 0 32 fr 

14 57 B 4* o 

2 34 -1 30 w 

11 S2 4 39 d 

I 34 -1 30 a 

9 it 4 J9 r 


Algiers 

Cairo 

cape Town 

casaMopca 

Harnro 

Lam 

Nairobi 

Tunis 


21 n 4 39 fr 

14 57 7 45 Ir 

34 75 10 50 <S 

23 72 22 72 O 

27 SI IT *3 It 

30 84 35 77 O 

27 81 14 57 hr 

19 46 4 39 fr 


Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
VanOmmeren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


ANP.C85 General Index :2MJi 
Previous :!9U0 


Brussels* 


LATIN AMERICA 


■uwos Aire* 29 84 23 

Lima 27 81 30 

Mexico CHy 34 75 9 

Mode Jaadra 29 84 34 

Sob Paulo — — — 


it 61 9 48 ct 

1 34 - 2 28 s» 

4 3» -3 2» fa 

9 48 5 41 o 

0 32 - 3 28 O 

•T 30-10 14 a 

9 48 - 3 38 Cl 


NORTH AMERICA 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 

Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Avlr 


■8 18-22 -8 lo 
13 55 5 41 o 

■0 50 -1 30 cl 

9 48 3 37 cl 

Id 61 5 41 fr 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 24 75 19 6* y 

Sydney 29 B* 30 68 fr 

el -cloudy; fo-toggy; fr-folr; tt-halt; 
ui-sfiawers; wwnoe; sJ-slarmy. 


ABChoroge -3 

Atlanta 19 

BOStan 9 

ClUcnoo 10 

Denver 15 

Detroit d 

Honolulu 29 

Houston 20 

Las Angeles 21 

Miami 27 

MlnnaapaHs 9 

Mon treat 3 

Nassau 27 

New York 10 

San Prondtco Id 

Seattle t 

Toronto 3 

Washington 13 

Mivercost; pc-oortty i 


Arbed 

Bekaert 

Cockerm 

EBES 

GB-limo-BM 

GBL 

Govaert 

Hoboken 

Krodfanw* 

Pefruflna 

Soe Genurale 

Safina 

Scivay 

Traction Elec 
vlellte Montaane 


Bk East Asia 
Chauna Kong 
Chino Uolrt 
Crass Harbor 
Hang Seng Bank 
HK Electric 
UK Hotels 
hk Lone 
HK S narwhal 
HK Tefenhone 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 
Jardbre Math 
J online Sec 
New World 
Shaw Bros 
SHK Preps 
Sims Darby 
Sfalux 

Swire Pacific A 
Wheel Mar 
Wheejock 
winsor 
World Inn 


NA — 
U 11*0 
1450 1440 
NA — 
47.25 4450 
750 745 

30.75 3050 
S.1S 4925 
NA — 
44 43 

STS 545 
2050 2040 
10.10 9 TO 

10L10 955. 

5.90 5.75 1 
NA — 
5 JO 9 JO 
NA — 
NA — 
2350 24 

NA — 
7-25 IX 
440 4575 
157 154 


Bowaler Indus 
BP 

Bril Home St 
Brtf Telecom 
BTR 
Burmah 

Codburv Scfiw 
Charter Cons 
Coats PotoitS 

Cons Gold 

Court ouhls 

Daioety 

oe Besrst 

□ millers 

Dftafaotefa 

Dunlop 

Flsons 

FroeStGed 

GEC 

GKN 

Glaxo c 

CrtvxJ Met 

Guinness 

GUS 


148 T70 

245 345 

523 530 

347 248 

I1B14 119V3 


207 2D3 

'A % 

15? 143 


1» 

500 500 

445 447 

284 288 

S23W 523 P, 
44 44W 

295 XI 
520 V. 520%. 
190 202 

212 314 

11 7733 11 1/44 


Hawker 

ICI 

Imps 

uovds Bank 

Lanrho 

Lucas 

Marks and 5 p 
M glol Box 
AAldlond Bank 
Not West Bank 
Pllkingtan 
p lesser 
Racat Elect 
Rand fan l Hn 
Rank 
Reed Ini i 
Rearers 
Raval Dutch c 
RTZ 


345 34S 

7TJ2 702 

X9 208 

<37 43* 


Air Uwldo 
A Whom AM. 
Av Dassault 
BarojI/e 
BIC 

Bouygues 

BSN-GD 

Carrefaur 

Club Med - 

Can meg 

Domex 

Elf-Aauliolne 

Europe 1 

Gen Eotm 
Hochette 
ImetaJ 
Lafarge Cop 
U igrond 
ITJreat 
Matre 
Mfahelln 
MM Peanor 
Moor Hennesey 
Moulinex 
Kord-Egl 
Occident ale 
Pernod Rie. 
Petroles Ifse) 
Peugeot 
Poctaln 
I Prlntemps 
Rodlatoctwi 
Redoufa 
Roussel UeSaf 
SKte Rassfanol 
. Sour Jorrler 
Teiemeccn 
Thomson CSF 
Valeo 


AGA 

AHa Laval 
Aseo 

Astra 

AttasCapco 

Bonden 

Electrolux 

Erlcssofi 

Eswlte 

Handeisbhfin 

Pharmoda 

Soatt-Scanla 

Sendvlk 

Sfconsfca 

SKF 

SwedishMatcti 

Volvo 


192 190 

340 335 


I 09 109 
190 NA 
307 309 

287 275 

375 37S 

170 NA 
200 Ml 
440 440 

387 NA 
955 *5 5 
306 199 

233 • 233 
265 2*5 


Afforsvartdeo Index : 39758 
Previous : 39550 




Agefl index : 199 J4 
, Previous : 19B57 
I CAC Index : 38188 
Previous : W! 50 


AC I 
ANI 
ANZ 
BHP 
Boral 

Bougainville 
Brambles 
Cotas 

Comcrfco 
CRA 
CSR 
DuttlOP 
EWers- 
Hooker 
Magellan 
MIM 
Mver 
Oakbrfclge 
Pehn 
Pbseidon 
RGC 
Santos 
Siefah 
Soumjond 
wooasld* 

Wormaid 
All onUnartes Index: 79SJB 
Previous: 79U0 


Kalima 
tea mol Power 
Kao Sqqp 
K awasaki Sfaet 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu Hd 
Kubota 

Matsu Elec, mas 
Matsu Etec-works 
Mitsubishi Bonk 
Mltsubfstii Cheat 
/Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mltsubfstii Corn 
Mitsui and CO 
Mifsufcashl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

Nlkka Sec 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sac 
Oivmuus 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Stow 

Sumitomo Bonk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Metat 
Totaei Carp 
ToWio, Marine 
Tokeda Oiam 
Tell Hi 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tokyo Marine 
Toray Ittd 

Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yuma I chi Sec 


Gmadun stacks m AP 



Close am 
14*.+ V. 


OJ. index : 11412.14 
Previo u s : 11321 J2 
New Index : 9S1TI 
Previous : 977 js 


Nang Seng index : 
Previous : 157555 


C ur re n t Stuck Index : U52T9 
Previous : 2J4254 


iMUart 


SATURDJ 
Showers. ' 
MADRID: 
9-3 «- 
Tenw. 13- 
ZURICH-. 
197 — 771. 
Temn. 33- 
Stormv. Ti 



AE G-Teiefunfcen 
Allianz Vers 
Baal 
Bow 

Borer .Hypo. 

Bayer.VerAink 

BMW 

Commerzbank 

Confrgummi 

Dalmlee^eaz 

Degussa as 
Deutsche Babcod 
Deutsche Bank 
DrndnerBank 
DUB-sdtuthe 
Ghh 
H odlHel 
Hoecmt 
Hoesch 
Hotzmaim 
Horton 
Kotl + salz 
Karstodt 
i Kaufbol 
KHD 


lifiW 

204.90 204 

2KL50 206 

31850 31250 

38^38^ 
167J0 143 

12550 120 JO 
449 4S2.S0 
361 34250 


AECI 

Barlows 

Blwoor 

Buffets 

Elands 

GFSA 

Harmony 

Kloof 

Ncdtxulk 

Psi Slam 
Rustglol 
SA Brews 
StHeferw 
50101 


*80 0*0 
970 975 

1425 1400 
*750 *800 
1350 1310 


2S5D 

6950 7025 
90S 930 


Std Chartered 
Tote and Lvie 
Tesco 
Thorn EMI 
T.l. group 
Trafalgar Hse 
THF 
Ultramar 
Unilever I 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
W-Oeeo 
W -Holdings 
War Loon 3Ux c 
Woolwu r th 
ZCI 


Baustaod 
Cold Storage 
DBS 

FrosorNeavg 
Haw Par 
inch ante 
Keapel Shin 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 

Semb Shipyard 
SimeDorav 
S Steamstils 

as-** 


1TB 152 
149 176, 
4.15 AI5 
550 SJO 
255 259 

169 140 

155 143 

4 fr 
4JS 955 
198 4 

1-37 TJ1 
1.97 L97 

143 IJ1 
454 458 

45* 454 


Akal 

AsotriChem 
Asahl Glass 
Bank at Tokro 
Bridges tone 
Canon 
Cl toft 

Dal Nippon Print 
Dahvg House 
Full Bank 
Fmi pnoio 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 


OUB index : <2248 
Prevlaas ; <2153 


435 450 

820 720 

890 915 

720 719 

523 523 

7410 1430 
352 341 

iaio iota 
5<9 S59 

1*50 tooo 
IBM 1910 
1330 1340 
164 840 

1440 1430 
147 143 

5150 5390 


Bank Lou * 
Braun Baveri 
CUM G«igy 
Credit Suisse 
ElecTrowotT 
Georg Fischer 

Jacob Suchard 

JelmotF 

LaodtaGvr 

Nestle 

OorUkon-B 

Roche Babv 

Saadox 

Schindler 

Sulxer 

SBC 

Swissair 


Swiss Volhsbank 
Union Baik 


Union Baik 
wlfltorthur 
Zurich in 


3700 3700 
1660 1615 
2925 2890 
ZJ95 239S 
2650 2640 
745 750 

6200 6225 
1970 1970 
1670 1670 
6425 6325 
149t> 1475 

MS ^ 

3AM 3475 
347 34S 

347 360 

1145 1145 
1490 1490 
3650 3*50 
4250 4270 
30550 20*00 


SBC Index : 430.10 
Previous : «X**e 


nA: rut quoted: NA not 
avoUasle: xd: es4hrideno. 


«55 5200 
1550 1S3S 


1550 1S3S 
SBS 600 
3300 3275 
5*5 570 


FX 30 Index ; 97540 
Pre*taas : 981.18 


Swiss Advocate Stiff er Exchange Rules 


Composite Stack index : 939,80 
Previous: 92940 


149 1M 
418.50 407 1 

IJ5 190 JO 
215 21SJ0 
155.90 15440 
*58 4*s 

205.70 19940 
109J0 10950 
400 4Q0 

1*9 16*33 
3M 3*7 
218 3U 
215 21*50 
26850 2 tO 


, AACorp 
All led -Lyons 
Anelo Am Gold 
Babcock 
Barclays 
Bens 
BAT. 
Beeeham 

Pl* 

Group 


SHVb SIIVi 

174 17* 

STS SID 

145 145 

597 612 

494 497 

333 338 

346 355 

233 233 

39 39 

390 295 


Banco Comm 

Cenlrale 

Cigpholels 

Crod rial 

Farmitaita 

Flat 

Flnslder 

Ganergll 

IFI 

Itotcemcnll 

Mediobanca 

Manioc laon 

Oltveni 

Pirelli 

RAS 

RlnoscenJe 


18050 190Q0 ; 
BSD 3451 

SS ffiPi 

7W 2271 
11940 12105 
2889 2774 I 
Si SO 
40320 41010 
7853 7605 

BMW 87509 

2238 2331 
48950 70*50 
*53 456 


BERN —The president of the Swiss federal banking commission said 


Friday that the regulatory body advocates introducing stricter profes- 
sional rules far fora an-ex change dealers. 


sional roles for foreign-exchange dealers. 

Hermann Bodeamann said that the number Swiss foreign-exchange 
dealers who had caused their banks huge losses or otherwise exhibited 
unprofessional conduct had increased in recent months. 

He said the commission, in a joint project with the Swiss National 
Bank and the Finance Ministry, was studying ways of introducing stricter 
roles. He said, however, that creation of a full-fledged license for dealers 
was not under consideration. 


3CCLA 
3500 CDtStb B t 
28794 Cod Fni 
14000 C NOT WM 
3400CPoCtwg 
*500 Can Tract 
900 C Tuno 
I2CGE 
61106 Cl Bk Com 
toioo am Nat Res 
72838 CTlreAf 
6423 C Art’ll 8 
1450 Cora 
31002 Cefanew 
23 CHUM 
aSOQCDUtbBf 
3700 CTL Boik 
250QCO5OKOR 
5075 Crown* 

I 4100 CzOr Res 
| 269814 Doan Dov 
30QDoonA 
10450 Denison A 
38950 DonlsonBf 
35*0 Devetcan 
5871 Dick ran A I 
JOODtCknsnB • 
2250 Daman A 
26901 Da Iosco A 
4400 Du Pont A 
ISS Dy lex A 
2675EICThomX 
_390 Emco 
3250 Eaultv Swr 
1350 FCA Inti 
16S0C Falcon C 
3S231 Flcnbranv 
4800 Farav R«s 
*20 Fad Ind A 
frgO Fed Plon 
71050 F City Fin 
TOTS Fruenaui 
37D0GendlsA 
8165 Oecc Comp 
13292 Gooeruda 
*700 GlbralTor 
107D0 GoWcorp f 
5480 Grandma 
300Grandue 
8200 GL Forest 
723 Grvrhna 
MOO H Group A 
700 Hrdlng A f 
370a Hawker 
265 Haves □ 

193 h Bay Ca 
30501 imasca 
2700 Irtdal 
700 mails 
400 in rand Gas 
1 45100 Inti Thom 
22322 inter Pipe 
900 ivaoa B 
3*500 Jannack 
1300 Kgm Katia 
2800 Ketaev H 
U0 Karr Add 


t4bi+ *a 
13 

4*8+ W 
W8— Mi 
1548 4- \a 
22 + 1 
2048— 46 
2448 

18W + 'A 
Nil *9* *to— 4« 
5846 846 B46 

S27W 27V. 2754 + to 
Sffl% .Sto 5W 
51348 13V. 131A— V* 
137 135 135 —2 

410 405 405 

S5to 5W 5to + W 
S17V8 17to 17to 
mu. n me t- w 
SlOto 1016 1016— fa 
259 250 255 + 5 

522to 2ZVt 22to+ to 
SISto 15to 1518 — to 
52348 2348 23to 
51418 1446 1448 
S27to 2648 2716 + to 

56 U 6U 6 to— 18 

SISto 1 5V. I5W+ to 
S23to 2348 2348+ to 
SOSto » 2948 + to 

3248 33 + to 
aia 1448 15 + to 
S&Jto 4318 *3to — 2Vs 
53048 3(P8 3048+ to 
23 27 27 —1 

S9to >48 9to+ to 
517 1448 1648— Hi 

51218 1148 121b 
S7to 6to 7to + to 
54218 42to 42W+248 
WA «to 6i4— to 
SUto II to 11 to— to 
275 271 271 —1 

SIB 1744 IB + to 
141 156 1*0+4 

375 350 3*5 +15 

400 tOO 400 +29 

51418 T3>% 1348— to 
51318 12* 13 — 1% 
S9V8- 948 948 

SSto 480 518+22 

55 5 S + to 

250 240 2S0 + 5 

53944 3Sto 2948+ 48 
S17U 17to I7V8 
540 39 39*8+ to 

5718 7V. 748+ 18 

«*to 1BV8 lito 

57 *to 7 

5214. 21to 211? 
51748 174% 1744+ to 
S9448 «fa *444+1 
300 275 300 +25 


15113 Lobtow Cb 
1800 MDS HA 
305 MICC 
4251 9 Mdon HX 
41792 Mortond E 
7724 MolSOn At 
600 Murrhv 
4200 Nabisco L 
59482 Naronda 
. 410B7 Norcm 
123752 NvoAltAt 
I 23194 NawscoW 
36*41 NuWMSPA 
600Oakwaod 
32300 (tohawa Al 
4900Panwur 
700PonCnnP 
2400 PanWra 
500 Ptxmlx Oil 
ibid Pine Point 
25968 PIocbT 
7500 Provloa 
14010 Our Sturga 
100 Rom Pet 
1975 Rayrpcfc I 
I 2 0 2 0 0 Radpath 
<12300 Rd Sfantis A 
I 400 RMChhold 
19UJ2 RbsSkvI 
447 R«vn Prp A 


tm iw — - 

520 20 r; 

230 220 •• , ’ 

526 2» 'M-H 

05 4ffl V. 

51648 1* ' ' 

122V> 224k 
S26V. 2» 

Sltt8 1P» 

Slots iflf . 

5*44 <48, 


ard 




1312 Raman 
250 Rothman 
3*30SCTPtr< 
77t»Seattsf 
3746 5*ars Can 
24143 Shell Con 
10012 Sharrlli 
7bo Sigma 
4800 Slater B t 
9575 Sou nun 
300 St Bradcst 
51537 steles A 
4909 Su fairs 
2410 Slegg R 
376S2 Sydney a 
900 Tara 
15160 Tack _ 
48126 Tecfc B f 
*00 Taiedvne 
2037* Tex Can 
195*9 Thom N A 
90094 Tor Dm Bk 
29*MTars!or B I 
2586 Tracers A I 
3700 Trinity Rev 
31932 TraAltO UA 
27451 TrCan PL 

aSTOTrtmac 

S?4B Trljec A f 


5274. 22 * 
59 55 

B5V4 JVf 
525 2441 

470 4U 
523 ’•0 28 
SI7to 17V. 
174* 744 

527% 27 

5244-1 2»' 

*19to 19V 
360 340 . 
5548 5J 
57*8 TV 
Silt* 11V 
522 *8 22* 
$14to 144 
185 18S 

115 US . 
59to 94. 
*11*1 ll l 
542 42 

sr« 54 
521 '4 31 
*7to 74 
<231* 224 
17to * 
*7to 7* 
tlOto 104 
*48'.. ST" 
*12to 12* 


*12to 12* 

r 32' 
2SS 
JOS 
2* S 
5194* IP 
*12 ll> 
512 ll> 
SI I 11 
S33to 33 ^ 


24*0 Turbo I 
*750 unlcara A f 
301000 UACarbid 
S34S7 u EntprHe 
0758 U Keno 
USIscoe 
van Der 
WM versri A f 
9Q0Vestgron 
44Weldw0d 
344 Westfgrto 

3225 Washnln 
1105 Weston 
53*5 Waadwd A 

S0QV*. Bear 


2lto 21to+ ft 
13U 1346+ ft 
146 5146 
8 2* — ft 

1218 12to * to 
JS* 25* 

9ft 9V»— 41 

550* S4h 5ft + J* 

Hi *4+6 
41 4* —1 

«9ft 91 +lft 
53446 34V. 2*40- W 
5746 7ft 7ft 

IX 130 IX + i 

522 5lft X + to 
524ft 24ft 24ft 
M7H iWk VPk 
153ft 534* 534* 
siivj a i3ft— to 
517 17 17 + to 

51618 141* 1618 + ft 
59ft 9 « 

533ft »ft Xto— ft 
■ S22to 32 23to+ k. 

512ft lift lift 
m 105 105 

*J*V» MV8 Mto 
111 17 17 — to 

S2Sto 2448 25ft + ft 


17060 Lac Mnrto 
1001 LOnlCem 
4750 Locona 
HWLLLU 






BSift 54' 
S19to 19 
S19to 1* 
522ft 22" ■ 
*7D 445 

524ft 24' 
S»ft 22 . 
485 470 

126*4 3fr 

58 55 
SOto 8 

<11*8 U 
512 II 

59 » 

105 100 

2S0 275 

574* 7 ' 

112 11 
115ft 15 
18 18 
513ft U . 
576ft 74 
<11 II 
5IJ 11 


Total vafal I2J9*J02 jtttu 
Owe 

TSE 300 Index: 5.625J4 


M— ni wl 


30434 Bank Mont 
15000 Con Bo tn 
■JSOOamTxtA 
90QMMTrs1 


™*SB8Sli 


•oo/Q Power Carp 
MW RolkxxJA 
220*4 Raval Bonk 
1142 RoyTrslCo 


53748 341*i 2748 + ft 
■lift lift lift— H 
51088 10ft 10ft + to 
12*4* 28ft 2548 + 48 


Total Safas 2.173,982 shores. 


T 4 -j 

* . ta 

* <*» | 

: - ? 


Industrial Index: 


iy 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATITRQAY SUNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


Page 15 



SPORTS 

5 Nations Rugby Is Still Up lor Grabs 


Unfed Pna kfew xlmnd 


IF you LAIP THE Cn , 

■sssKSKig? . . .. 

' ' TOincrease its gjDetroit Tiger pitcher Denny McLain in action during his 31 -game winning season in 1968 . 

McLain — Now 'Pitching’ in Court 

Former 31-Game Winner, Tlat Broke,’ Faces 5 Charges 

By George Vecsey 

New York Tones Service 



rVtAXCHALKIE. 
W*S VsMSlNQ a 
N against 

OftAENT 



r 



TAMPA Florida — There are 
crowds, so banners, no swell of 
ho wtoVQP 11 muS i c as Dennis McLain 
* 1 TCLLTNfvallcs up the steps of the federal 
“ Ff TSB(purthouse. There are no echoes of 
^■968, when he won 31 games for 
he wodd-champion Detroit Ti- 

jHS. 

A few minutes later there is only 
brief “AH please rise” from the 
ofliff as the trial is resumed! the 
known as “United States of 
vs. D ennis McLain" and 
hree other defendants. 

■ Sixty pounds heavier than his 
laying weight of about 190, wear- 
-lg frayed shoes and 



you wom't H-vv-e to I 

wp WT. AN- t’A'.E a ■ 
WEE • I LL oE. L C ~\ i*J>j 

w k»ji «*■ -:>je 
IW Levs iV- jr 



I’m broke — flat broke,’ 
j charged with five counts of rack- 
. -Jeering, conspiracy, extortion, and 
ujug trafficking. 

r He pleaded innocent at the start 
*T the triaL Charges against three 
the original seven defendants 
i Jjave been dropped since the trial 
\Wmn in November. 

When be was winning two Cy 
y'oung Awards and a most valuable 
award with the Tigers in the 
McLain, now 40, was always 
He flew a jet plane to some of 
ones, he piayed the organ in a 
otd bar Lhe night before a World 
aies game, be ran a paint business 
aring the season. And in 1970 he 
as suspended for half the season 
shaving engaged in bookmaking 
the 1967 season. 

Hehashad a dozen business ven- 
since his pitching career end- 
in 1972, but now he focuses all 
energy on his trial. With his 
on and his tie unknotted, he 
to be a lawyer or 
as he coordinates boxfuls 
tapes and transcripts, bat he 
r^ces up (o 90 years in jail if con- 
aed on all charges. 

The charges stem from a period 
Ten McLam was the office man- 


H.V 

HE 

OH 


Awards, riven him by his former 
dub in 1982 after a Are had de- 
stroyed thei r home three years ear- 
lier. 

The couple have four children, 
and Sharon McLain says: “People 
have beengrcat with ns. No prob- 
lems at school or anywhere." She is 
saddened that the fire destroyed 
the scrapbooks from the years 
when McLain was a star, noting: 
“The children don’t even remem- 
ber those days.” 

The days woe not uniformly 
happy. The suspension in 1970 was 
accompanied by allegations dmr 
McLain’s gambling had been relat- 
ed to underworld connections, 
which he denied. In an interview on 
Wednesday, McLain said: “I do 
gamble and I have made book from 
time to rime. But this other stuff? 
Dope? Never. 1 am a dope, but I 
don’t deal with dope." 

McLain says his wife has “been 
my strength," daiming she spe d 
him for divorce twice, years ago, 
“hut that was to get my attention.” 
She says she has always known of 
his gambling but she adds: “Ball- 
players gamble. You go to the dog 
track, you see ballplayers. They 
play cards. What eke do you do 
with all that flee timer 

The other day, McLain said he 
had run a restaurant in Atlanta, 
been a host of a television talk show 
in Detroit, broadcast games for a 
minor league team in Iowa, dab- 
bled in baseball ownership and ad- 
vertising -in Memphis, then moved — 
to Lakeland, Florida, to open abig- 
soeea television appliance busi- 
ness. 

But in 1979, while Us family was 
in the house in Lakeland and he 
was away, bis home burned down 
noth 80 televisions in the garage. 
Nobody was injured, but, he says, 
“I was dead in the water financial- 
ly. We were leasing the house, so 
that was all right, but I had let the 
insurance lapse on our belongings. 


baseball, and also I never knew 
how to bet that game." 

There are few references to 
McLain’s past role as baseball star 
in the courtroom. 

McLain says he has no contact 
with past teammates, and adds: 
“The only thing ] miss from base- 
ball is the one-to-one competition." 

“There was a rime when I was so 
if I could have found the 
!ets, there would have been no 
trial" McLain says. 


By Bob Donahue 

Iniematioml Herald Tribune 

DUBLIN — Both rugby sides 
think Ireland’s green team has bet- 
ter than an outside chance to beat 
seasoned France on Saturday. And 
spring-like weather this past week 
tackles the old notion that Five 
Nations rugby spans the winter. 
That makes two wonders. 

First the schedule. By early 
March in a normal year, eight of 
the annual 10 matches are past. 
One of the five teams has finished 
and fust place may already be set- 
tled. More often, as happened last 
year, suspense is funnded toward a 
mid-March showdown on the fifth 
and final Saturday. 

Well, March is upon us and $ev- 
2 n matches remain. Wales has yet 
to play at alL The Five Nations 
round robin, in which each team 
plays twice at home and twice 
away, will go on till April 20, which 
is 13 days beyond Easter. 

Snow in Dublin and frosL in Par- 
is prevented both matches on what 
was supposed to be opening daw, 
Jan. 19. The two scheduled for Feb. 
2 were played. Then snow in Car- 
diff prevented Wales vs. England 
on what would have been the third 
day. Feb. 16. Now we get Ireland 
vs. France and Scotland vs. Wales 
on the third day — or is it the 
second? 

The point is, it is not the fourth. 
France is not in Dublin to complete 
its too confidently desired fourth 
grand slam once 1968. 

During the long months after 
Scotland upset France in Edin- 
burgh last March 17, sewing up its 
First grand slam since 1922, the 
outlines of 198S action settled 
gradually into focus in the minrf« of 
hundreds of players on both sides 


of the Channel and in rugby com- 
munities around the world. ' 

Scotland and France would be 
the teams to watch. And also 
Wales, which aided on an upswing 
in 1984. So the key matches m 1985 
would be the three played among 
those three teams. Tne French, who 
occasionally looked first-rate on 
tour in New- Zealand in June and 
July, would be all the more the 
1983 favorites because they would 
play Wales and Scotland in Paris. 

France vs. Wales looked like the 
big match and wasn’t it too bad. 
one heard on all sides, that it came 
on the first day instead of the last. 
When Welsh lock Robert Norster. 
the best lineout jumper in Europe, 
had his jaw broken in a club match 
in December and was unavailable 
for Jan. 19. France's prospects 
looked all the better. 

David Waters, a 29-year-old 
truck driver who has never played 
for Wales, was dated when be was 
picked to replace Norster in Paris, 
but the match had to be put off to 
March 30. Waters was picked again 
to play England, but the match was 
put off to April 20. 

Now Noisier has recovered and 
is in the Welsh team that faces 
Scotland in Edinburgh this week- 
end. Waters may be the only inter- 
national rugby non player ever to 
be picked twice. 

Or the five coaches whose plan- 
ning has been undone by the sched- 
ule changes, two are new — Scot- 
land's Colin Teller and Ireland's 
Mick Doyle. Four of the five cap- 
tains are also new — England's 
Paul Dodge. France's Philippe 
Dimrans, Wales’s Terry Holmes 
and Scotland's David Leslie. Ire- 
land’s Goran Fitzgerald is the ex- 
ception. 


The Scots, it was widdy sup- 
posed. would go ofT the boil after 
peaking for their grand slam, but 
they would still give Wales a battle 
for" second place behind France in 
19SS. That may still be the script, 
but meanwhile the no-hopers. Ire- 
land and England, have helped the 
weather to confuse things. 

The English, with nine newcom- 
ers. surprised everybody bv holding 
France io a 9-9 draw at Twicken- 
ham on Feb. 2: they are idle this 
weekend, with Scotland next on the 
schedule on March 16 at Twicken- 
ham. 

Also on Feb. 1 the Irish shocked 
Scotland with an 18-15 victory in 
Edinburgh. Forced to rebuild after 
a rash of retirements by long-serv- 
ing forwards. Doyle has switched 
Ireland's style to a running attack. 
Right wing Trevor Ringhnd’s two 
tries agoinsi Scotland were one 
more than whitewashed Ireland to- 
taled in all four matches Last year. 

The upshot is that four teams 
enter March undefeated: France 
has won once and drawn once: Ire- 
land has won once; England has 
drawn once: Wales has not played. 
The only team that has lost (twice! 
is the one. Scotland, that swept its 
four matches last year. The madcap 
1985 race is wide open. 

Win or draw, none of the nine 
possible combinations of Lhis 
weekend's results would be a sur- 
prise. The only surprise would be a 
big winning margin. But even that 
is a possibility — if. say, the French 
finally settle down ami put points 
on the board to match tneir domi- 
nation of play, as they failed to do 
in New Zealand and again in their 
1 1-3 victoiy over Scotland in Paris 
two weeks ago. 





“D ennis McLain 
patsy for people 


wife. Sharon, says the family 


said, 
my life. 

I played golf every day far a year. I 
learned what Lee Trevino meant 
when be said, Tressure is pi 
for S50 a hole when you have ! 


Patrick Ewing — He Doesn’t Just Block a Shot 



By Tony Komhciscr 

Washington Post Service 

NEW YORK — You've shaken your man. and you're on your way 
to the basket. Finding an opening, you commit yourself to the air, and 
suddenly you're staring up into the fearsome glare of 240 pounds of 
face, jaw and hands. Patrick Ewing, you presume. And the next thing 
you know, your shot is bang swatted halfway to Australia. 

He is, as they say, a factor. 

He has, as they say, a presence. 

He doesn't just block a shot, he obliterates it He doesn’t just dunk 
the ball he pUe drives iLHe is one tough h ombre on that court. He is 
fiercely ana aggressively competitive, and nntike so many big men. 
he’s got enough mean in Mm to, like they say in baseball, back you off 
the plate a little. 

Someone gas in his way, someone “don't feel so wett," Ask Chris 
Muffin. Against St John's in Georgetown's 85-69 victoiy Wednesday 
night, Ewing pnt a shoulder into his Olympic rrammatr Muffin’s 
cheek away from the ball, and the first thing Muffin did — after 
scraping himself off the floor — was check to make snre he still had 
his face. 

. _ Thegam c Ewing had against. SL John's at Madison Square Garden 

E roved conclusively that basketball is now, was then, and always wifi 
e a big man’s game, and that while smaller men can sometimes 
control the action, only the big men can truly do minate it 

Whether it was Ewing's best game as a collegian is irrelevant, 
because his best games surdy are to come. But he played a great game 
against the top-ranked team in the nation, on the road, in an 
atmosphere that couldn’t have been any more highl y charged if it had 
been plugged into the main generator at the electric plant. 

And he had that great game — 10 for 13 from the field, nine 
rebounds and ax blocked shots against a team with three certain first- 
round NBA draft picks —al the express request of his coach, which is, 
when you consider the implications, scary in the extreme. 

With Ewing seated at his right in the postgame interview, coach 
John Thompson recalled their pregame conversation: “I told him that 
we needed to win, and I said, T need you to play weH’ That's the first 
time I ever said that to him. But h had gotten to the point where this 
game was important psychologically. " 

Thompson put it on Ewing. 

Ewing put it to St John’s. 

After the body count, Lou Caraesecca, the St John’s coach, 
shrugged and. referring to his value in the NBA draft, “Wejust put a 
few more dollars in the bank for him ” 



Irish captain, damn Fitzgerald, leads side onto field. 

Olympic Chief Backs 
Professionals in Games 


Georgetown defense, Patrick Ewing style. 


Lakers Fall Flat Against Phoenix, Ire Coach 


* J 1 '* 

3M 1 7; 

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* w* 1 

* 


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ll't I."' 


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EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 

W L Pet SB 

a n jn — 

V 'tadetaWo *4 13 JKJ i 

, MfWOft 30 29 JOB 17 

C * Jersey 29 20 500 I7V4 

•;*Yortt .30 39 .339 27 

*- Cmtrnl Dfvfcrio* 

.-■nuke* <1 18 MS — 

< nOt 33 25 549 7K> 

- moo 36 31 AS6 14 

f info 24 34 AU 16V» 

,'«e*qnd 2 J7 J73 If 

• Biw 19 3? J28 31% 

) WESTERN CONFERENCE 

V NUdWMt Written 

i-iwr 30 21 444 — 

■ton 34 34 .586 3te 

Tta 32 76 S2 set 

„ Antonio 20 31 475 TO 

> 0 20 31 .475 in 

tins Cltv 19 39 J28 18Va 

y. PdcWc DMslan . 

r- Lakers 42 18 .700 — 

i'-cnb ~ 28 33 MI U 

; Hand 27 33 49 14W 

i-W* 25 34 AU 1M 

t 'CUnars 22 27 J7J WVi 

“fen State 15 44 3S* 36Vt 

. cOnaied Dtomtf birth. 

Ttandart Rental 

f-teMpUa 34 24 37 30-127 

' Cfte B S 38 24—119 

hrtns 10-11 Ml 21- Matotn 0-19 7-933; Vtaacl- 
, H« M 2 t EJahnwi 9-20 M 21. R9- 
« MBu PNIacMohtaSl (Maton«15); Koran 
;•>'« (Thorp* 8). AMbti: PhHoaoteftta 34 
; fag B>; Kansas Otv 29 (Draw 9). 

0 Lakers 30 21 8 24—18 

38 M 29 n— ro 

10-173-323, Edwraros 8-12 5-721; Wbr- 
■18 2-222. McAdoo 9-U 2-430. Unbound*: 
tiLaAma (Worthy HI; Ftwsa be 54 (Nance 
' Aatas: ua. Ltduri 34 (Coeoer 9) ; Pho^ 
tetDotf, 91. 

-faW M 27 M 39-18 

Slate 36 8 8 JS— 124 , 

... tat 1*23 11-1235, FlOVd 11-17 4-8 28; POX- 
114D*n31.Draxtor 9-17+422. Reboonds.' 
ttand 54 (Cruder 71); CafaRn State 8 

1 fa l«. AttMtoi Portland 8 tVatentaw 
. Qofah State 23 (Floyd IS). 

• fated 8 8 M . 32-no 

» 73 19 24—95 

**Qn9.i2M22,Prae 8-175-t 21; Chambers 
*4 IS, Wood 5-1154 McCormick 4-12 M 
famadt: Cleveland 7fiwoot 14); Seattle 
141, AMMO; Cleveland 22 (Bagiev 
^Seottt* 27 ( H e n ders o n Tj. 

College Scores 

EAST 

•■teikfe 09, Hartford 45 
J.Meton 3t 06, Skidmore 41 
, fa Guard 40k Amherst $5 
rWkan Pteres 94, EL-Nannme 92 
;.«*« WasMigtoa 99. Cvavesi* M 
■i™* 0 **™ *0. Beslan U.49 
.f’jM.MIIdltwv 59 

8. Massachusetts 79 


SL Honnwenl ur e 03. Rhode Island S3 
Temple 57. Penn St. 51 
Wesleyan 00, Tufts 8 
west Wohiic 71, St. Joseph's. Pa. 67 
SOUTH 

E. Kentucky 7S. Austin Peny 46 
Kentucky 92, Tennessee <7 
Louisiana Tech 72. NE Louisiana 65 
LoutsvUI* TO. S. Carolina 54 
5X. State 06. Morgan SL 70 
SE Louisiana 89, NW Louisiana 81 
William 8- Mary 71. James Madison 10 
MIDWEST 

Butler TO, Notre Dame 49. OT 
Dayton 67. Cratohlon 42 
Detroit 71. Memphis SI. 46 
Indiana 7V. Minnesota 68 
lam 07, OMa SL 82 
Kansas 7S, Nebraska 65 
Midi toon OR Wisconsin 48 
SW Missouri 74, Evansville 64 
SOUTHWEST 
Brodtev 63. 5. linnets 55 
Lamar V. Arkansas SL 48 
N. Texas State BX TexasiArflnoton 77 
Texes Southern u, SW Texas SL 61 
W. Texas Si. TO, Tulsa 42 

FAR WEST 

Fresno SL 41, Coi-Santa Barbara 40 
Oroaon 70. California 53 
Oregon SL 54. Stanford 49 
Pepperdine 57, San Diego 54 
San Jose SL 76. New Mexico si. 64 
Southern Cal JO. UCLA 78. 40T 
UMi to. Air Force 59 
Utah St 81, Lons Beach St. <9 

WOshlneten 60, Arizona 58 
Wyoming 78. Brlaham Young 44 

TOURNAMENTS 

Metro Atlantic Ath. Coni. 

First Round 

Army 76. La Salle 64, OT 
St. Peter's 7a Holy Crass 44 
Iona 95, FotrfleM 51 
Fanttnm 44. Manhattan 42, OT 


K-dlnc±K<l atayoR spot 

Thursday's Results 
wnsUbaatoa 1 3 

N.Y. Rangers 1 2 1—4 

- Stevens (16t.Gannar2 141 1.Gwstatssen (71. 
McEwen (91; Huber (3),Gnesdiner (13), Hed- 
bero (14). Reaera 122). Stmts an goal: Wash- 
ington Ian vanbfesbrouc*] 14-10-12-34; New 
York (on Maatn) 11-8-*— 27. - 

POUadetPhla 8 1 8—1 

Boston 3 2 3 — 4 

Simmer 128), Middleton (21), Crowder 2 
124). Coring 2 (9); Howe (141. Shots aa goal: 
ptiiloaetphio (an Keans) 7-134-28; Boston 
(mi Llndberohl 14-11-12— 37. 


United Press International 

PHOENIX — The Los Angeles 
Lakers can scrap their vacation 
plans. Coach Pat Riley’s bool camp 
is about to commence. 

“If there’s anyone to blame for 

NBA FOCUS 


this [the loss], it’s me,' 
1 fouowii 


Transition 


the Laker 
coach said following a 1 17-105 de- 
feat by the Phoenix Suns Thursday 
night ‘Tvebeen too soft. The holi- 
day is over." 

Larry Nance of Phoenix was 
ready, supplying 23 points and 13 
rebounds to drop the Lakers to 42- 
18, the NBA’s third best record but 

“Wje had won ax otfdie road,’ 


bench. I’ve been giving them a lot 
of time off." 

James Edwards added 21 points 
for the Suns and Kyle Maty 17. 
The Lakers were led by James Wor- 
thy with 22 points and 8 rebounds. 

It was Phoenix’s first victory 
over the Pacific Division-leading 
Lakers in four meetings this season. 
The Suns, wbo are in a fight with 
Seattle for the last playoff spot in 
the Western Conference, are now 
28-32. 

“I think it shows we’re a team to 
be redeemed with, as long as we 
keep our mental sharpness," Phoe- 
nix Coach John MacLeod said. 

“We played the kind of game 
you need to play against the Lak- 
ers. We were in search of a win, and 


10:17 left in the third quarter. But 
Phoenix went on a 12-4 run. going 
ahead 73-64 on a free throw by 
Charles Jones with 6:39 left. 

Elsewhere, in the NBA. Philadd- 

? hia downed Kansas City 127-1 19, 
leveland routed Seattle 120-95 
and Golden Slate defeated Port- 
land 124- 120. 


Lotted Press International 

CALGARY. Alberta — Olym- 
pic chief Juan Antpnio Samaranch 
Thursday virtually guaranteed a 
place for young professionals ai the 
198S Olympic Games. 

The president of the Internation- 
al Olympic Committee was confi- 
dent a proposal to allow pros under 
23 years old to compete in Olympic 
ice hockey, soccer and tennis tour- 
naments would be passed by the 
IOC at its June session in East 
Berlin. 

The IOC Executive Board ap- 
proved the eligibility recommenda- 
tions by the international ice hock- 
ey, tennis and soccer federations, 
but. the full 91-strong IOC mem- 
bership makes the final decision. 

**I think the session will approve 
the recommendation of the Execu- 
tive Board as always." Samaranch 
told a news conference. “I thin k we 
studied this problem veiy carefully 
and we propose to the session what 
is the best solution. 

“We are following the desire of 
the international federations. 1 
think the decision we took here in 
Calgary 1 is a good step forward if we 
want to have Olympic events of a 
high standard. The Olympic move- 
ment must go with the times, it 
must move forward.” 

Samaranch was speaking after a 
series of Executive Board meetings 
with presidents or the six interna- 
tional Winter Olympic federations 
and officials of the Calgary Olym- 
pic Organoing Committee. 

Tennis was a straight forward 
decision, the format being the same 
used when tennis was a demonstra- 
tion sport at the Los Angeles Sum- 
mer Olympics. 

However, hockey and soccer pre- 
sent problems. 

National Hockey League play- 
ers, barred from the 19S4 Sarajevo 
Winter Games, can compete in the 
Calgary Olympics providing they 
are under 23 and come under the 
control of the IIHF for the dura- 
tion of the Games. 

However, European and NHL 
officials have voiced concern over 


proposals to stage the tournament 
over three weekends and complain 
they cannot afford to lose players 
for what could be as long as seven 
weeks. 

FIFA, world soccer's governing 
body, will have to change its stance 
to take full advantage of the free- 
dom to use young soccer pros. 

No World Cup players are al- 
lowed to take part in Olympic com- 
petition under FIFA retaliations. 

FIFA will find it difficult to lift 
the ban on World Cup players in 
the face of fierce opposition from 
the East Bloc. 

Caps Top Rangers 
Without Captain 

United Press Inierrunonul 

NEW YORK — After playing 
222 straight games for Washington. 
Rod Langway finally missed one. 

It is to the Washington captain's 
credit that after just one absence 
his teammates missed him Thurs- 
day night. “He calms us down." 

NRL FOCUS 

said the Capitals’ other All-Star de- 
fenseman. 20-year-old Scott Ste- 
vens. 

Still, the Capitals remained cool 
enough Thursday night to defeat 
the New York Rangers 5-4 on the 
strength of substitute captain Mike 
Gartner’s two goals. 

Langway won the NHL's Noms 
Trophy as the league's best de- 
fenseman and was named a firsi- 
leara All Star in each of the last two 
years. It took a stomach ailment 
severe enough to make Washington 
wony about food poisoning to 
keep Langway, 27. out of the game. 

Gartner’s second goal, a rebound 
or Murphy's point shot, was the 
game-winner at 11:24 of the final 
period. 

In the only oiher NHL game. 
Boston trounced Philadelphia 6-1, 
snapping lhe Flyers' nine-game un- 
beaten streak. 


For Chinese Gymnast, the Booty Is Different 


United Press International 

INDIANAPOLIS — - Li Nina's 
laughter conveyed more than me 
interpreter’s terse translation of bis 


Hockey 


NHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
PafrfcS tMvMm 



W 

L 

T PI* 

GF 

GA 

vwahliimwi 

38 

15 

9 

85 

243 

IP 

PtilhxtotohJo 

33 

17 

7 

11 

258 

IP 

ny ittamtera 

32 

24 

4 

48 

2 B1 

243 

NY RaflOW* 

20 

32 

9 

<9 

228 

241 

Plttoburon 

20 

35 

5 

45 

213 

382 

new Jener 

18 

35 

8 

44 

204 

254 


Adam DtebUn 




Montreal 

32 

21 

W 

74 

242 

207 

Buffalo 

29 

20 

« 

70 

221 

179 


31 

24 

8 

70 

340 

228 

Boston 

Z7 

24 

8 

42 

224 

215 

Hanford 

20 

34 

7 

47 

207 

253 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Norris Mvtsioa 




SI. Louis 

- - 30 

21 

10 

70 

233 

220 

Chicago 

- 30 

30 

4 

44 

348 

344 


American Leasee 

BALTIMORE— Agreed to contract terms 
witti Al Panto, catcher, and Nate SnalL pud*- 

or, 

CHICAGO— 51 good Tim HDtettlnfWiltr. to 
a one-vrar contract. 

CLEVE LAND— Stgnad Otto N ton, outfield- 
er, to a one-yew controcL 

N.Y. YANKEES— Signed RldiBardLpIteft- 
gr.JuanBanUaDanBrtaesafxIBabbvMeo- 
cMm. infMaeoL and Henry Cotta, outfMdar. 

Nattooal Leam 

ST. LOUIS — Stoned Tarry Pendleton third 
baseman, wtd Doviy Com, ottditr to anMpear 
contracts. 

BASKETBALL 

H g ttwmT BatksMI 1 — dufl w 

la CUPPERS— Activated BUI. Wallen, 
center. Waived atria Eneler, center. 

FOOTBALL 

Mitofed Football Loam 

BUFFALO— Signed Bruce SmUtutotofutve 
end. to a tour -veer contract 

MINNESOTA — Named Paul Wtgaln defen- 
sive line coach. 

WASHINGTON— Announced me retuono* 
ttofl of Edward Bennett Williams, president 
and aeneraldlrector, end the sale of tils stock 
Interest In the Morn to Jack Kent Cooke, who 
becomes sale owner of the team. 

United States Football League 

DENVER— Nanted Steve Annan offensive 
line coach. 

HOCKEY 


Riley said. “If we are looking to we needed to gel going here, and we 
make a dent in Philadelphia, Bos- needed to do it convincmgly.” 
ton and Denver, the time is now. The Suns polled ahead for j 
We’ve been winning in spite c£ our- at 50-48. The Lakers drew to 61-60 

nlin, .... Ill- .. ,L. T. .1 ! L., 


’s Olympic gold medal 
gymnast, in Indianapolis for this 
weekend's American Cup gymnas- 
tics competition, had just heard 


bronze medal in individual compe- 
tition and when his team finished a 
surprising second to the upstart 
American men. 

“My hie is just as before," li 


said. “I’m still keeping up with ray 
studies and with my training. I'm a 
post-graduate, studying gymnastics 
mostly, trying to get some prepara- 
tion for coaching." 


‘rccu WUUUUKlll pw IA1T- JVtO. 1UC jUOAGia UICW UJ ui-uu nlv,,,, aIvh.i rnm , rtf VrtrtH. 

.selves, now itfsbftclc totbc woric os. short jumper by Johnson fet = 


MINNESOTA— Recoiled Mine Santa goa>- 
toitfterv from Suriwflow of to* American 

Hockey League. 

COLLEGE 

FORT HAYS STAT E Announced that 
BoDbv Thomason, head football caadvhas 
resigned te become an assistant coach and 
buflneai m anage r at NaMoOmeiL 
M u m o d John Vincent interim footooiicoaeh- 

MtSSOURI— Named RayZfnaler astetant 
teaman co ach. 

SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI— Named Bin 
p-Aridf-eo aulstont foetoau coach. 


Cheerleaders Put on Hold 

Los Angftes Time Service 

LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles Express football players, keep an 
eye on your helmets. Somebody may want to sell than. 

The Express, suddenly budget-conscious after a year of signing 
high-priced talent, is pulling the purse strings even tighter. 

On Wednesday, the United States Football League team an- 
nounced that it bad, at least temporarily, fired coordinator Kathleen 
Lahy and her entire Express cheeri ending squad. 

Richard Stevens, the team’s chairman of the board, carefully 
worded his explanation for the move. 

. “We did not terminate the cheerleaders," he said. “We just pul 
them on a leave of absence. On a team that obviously has finanaal 
problems, every dollar counts. So, in part, this was done for financial 
reasons. There may be cheerleaders at the next home game” March 
16, he said. “We have some time before the next game to think about 

The 28 Express cheerleaders each earn $35 a game. 

The Express has made no secret of its effort to limit . r _ 
Before the season, it unloaded some big-salaiy talent — Kevin I 
Lee Williams, Dewey Forte — to trim the payroll . 

The team did not sign any of its draft choices this season and even 
uses leftover 1984 stationery, even though one of the assistant publici- 
ty directors listed on the letterhead now works for the University of 
Washington. 


American Mary Lou Ketton had 
received after her gold medal tri- 
umph in the Summer Games, 

U’s laughter was politely brief. 
So was the comment to his transla- 
tor. 

“He says different countries 
have different ways of honoring 
their athletes," the translator said. 

Then, perhaps afraid that Ameri- 
cans would think his homeland un- 
appreciative of sports heroes, Li 
quickly added his Olympic home- 
coming had resembled that of the 
United States' medalists in some 
ways. 

“He says that when he went to 
his hometown, it was like it was 
with your parades and things," the 
interpreter related. “Thousands 
and thousands of persons, perhaps 
200,000 or 300,000 persons, came 
out voluntarily to see him. " 

Li interrupted the translation. 

“He wauls you to know that that 
number is almost as many people 
as there are living in that enure 
province," the interpreter added. 

Still, Li acknowledged his life 
has c h a n t e d very little since the 

: ? Angeles Games, where he woo 
three gold, one silver and one 



UNMIWtaenraienal 

Chinese gymnast Li Ning works on the pommel horse. 












■>« R *WKB W H»K»!HliK£Sm»sn(nsii(K} |m | 


■ ^ 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 2-3, 1985 


11 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


The ? Uncle* Doctrine 


Sci-Fi Writers Split on 'Star Wars’ Plan Comet Sighting Oaimec 


- v u H (K Plr 


W ASHINGTON — When 
President Reagan was asked 


' h ^~Z- r 


W President Reagan was asked 
last week if be intended to over- 
throw the Sandinist government in 
Nicaragua, the president replied he 
wouldn't if they said “unde.” 

“What does he mean by that?” I 
asked my reliable State Depart- 
ment source. 

“Remember when you were a 
boy and you wre stled another kid 
to the ground? 

The first one 
who cried 'unde' 
lost. Then the 
winner got up 
without break- 
ing the loser's 
arm." 

“What has 
that got to do 
with Nicara- 

g “lt- s our new Budnwdd 
foreign polity. We’re willing to lei 
any country exist as long as it cries 
‘unde.’" 

“How do you get Nicaragua to 
cry ‘undeT’ 

“The best way is to support the 
'freedom fighters’ who are trying to 
overthrow the government there. 
Since Congress is reluctant to put 
up the money to make the Sandin- 
ists scream ‘uncle.’ the president is 
taking his case to the American 
people. He and Secretary of State 
George Shultz have warned that if 
Congress won't support this coun- 
try's Uncle Doctrine then we may 
wind up in an endless darkness of 
Communist tyranny.” 

□ 


don’t we overthrow the govern- 
ment of Chile?” 

“We can't go into Chile because 
the military regime there is on our 
side. Nicaragua, on the other hand, 
fits the ideological profile and is 
just the right size, provided we give 
their freedom fighters the strength 
to wrestle the current government 
to the ground.” 

“Why don’t we make South Ko- 
rea cry ‘unde’?" 

“Because our ‘Unde* policy is 
only aimed at Communist totalitar- 
ian governments that are not cho- 
sen by the people.” 

“What’s the legal basis for mak- 
ing a government cry ‘unde' if we 
don't uke what they’re doing ?" 

“The current poky is not predi- 
cated on legal grounds but moral 
ones. The president believes we 
have a moral duty to help people 
bring about freedom in their coun- 
try and overthrow the tyranny from 
the left by covert force." 

“What about tyranny from the 
right?” 

“We only deal with tyranny from 
the rigid by quiet diplomacy. If we 
made a right-wing government say 
‘uncle* publicly it might be re- 
placed by a left-wing government, 
and that is something we have to 
avoid at all costs.” 


By ‘William J. Broad 

New York Tima Service 


N EW YORK — Science-fic- 
tion writers are engaged in a 


IN tion writers are engaged in a 
war of words over whether gov- 
ernments should stress peace or 



war in the development of space. 
Whai makes their debate of 


:*Ll 



Whai makes their debate of 
more than literary interest is that 
writers of science fiction have 
foretold the advent of radio, tele- 
vision, tanks, helicopters, atom 
bombs, moon rockets, comput- 
ers, robots, satellites and so On- 
Now they are split into camps 
either supporting the Reagan ad- 
ministration's Strategic Defense 
Initiative, the so-called “Star 
Wars” defense against interconti- 
nental missiles, or urging alterna- 
tives such as cooperation in space 
with the Soviet Union. 



Sm KaguVlhe New York Tto 

Frederik Pohl: T ricking 
militar y to spend money. 


Geargi Brafr/The Nfrw Vo* tom 

Jerry PoarneOe: A strate- 
gy of assured survival. 


tod f. Gnod/lhe New Yo* Tmm 

Jsaac Asimov: Trying to 
make Russians go brace. 


“How much win it take to make 
the Nicaraguans cry ‘undeT” 

“The president wants S14 mil- 


lion to help the freedom fighters 
main* the Sandinists throw in the 


“If our policy is to make totali- 
tarian countries cry ‘unde,’ why 


Exhibit on Ex-Leaders 


Is Opened in Beijing 

The Astodated Press 

BEIJING — An exhibition of 
personal objects and documents 
belonging to Mao Zedong, Zhou 
Eniai and other former leaders 
opened Friday at the Mao Memori- 
al Hall, the Beijing Wanbao news- 
paper reported. 

it said the exhibit to commemo- 
rate Mao’s 90th birthday would 
also include articles belonging to 
former President Liu Shaochi and 
Marshal Chu Teh. Mao actually 
would have been 90 in December 
1983; the paper did not explain 
why the exhibit was opening now. 


malm the San drnKfs throw in the 
towel” 

‘That doesn’t sound like a lot of 
money. Does he really believe the 
Nicaraguans will cry ‘uncle* if we 
give the opposition $14 million?” 

“No, but it will get our feet wet 
Once they use ft up then the presi- 
dent can go back to Congress and 
ask for some real money to over- 
throw the Managua government If 
money doesn't do it, then we may 
have to send in American boys to 
do the job right It won't be the first 
time American troops made the 
Nicaraguans say ‘unde.’ ” 

□ 


As befits their status as 20th- 
centuiy seas, they and their 
opinions are being accorded care- 
ful attention by powerful individ- 
uals in and out of government, 
ind tiding President Ronald Rea- 
gan. 

“People are listening to sci- 
ence-fiction writers more than, 
they did,” said Janies Gunn, an 
expert in the genre at the Univer- 
sity of Kansas. “An element of 
soapbox mistionaiy work has ex- 
isted in science fiction back to the 
days of H.G. Wefls and Jules 
Verne. But today authors like 
[Isaac] Asimov, [Arthur C.] 
Clarke and [Robot A.] Heinlein 
have become credible advocates 
because, as Asimov says, we live 
in a science-fiction world and 
people are just starting to realize 
iL" 

Heinlein and another writer, 
Jerry Pounxdle, have been pro- 
moting the “High Frontier” pro- 
posed by a retired U.S. Army 
lieutenant general, Daniel 0. 
Gr aham, in which hund re d s of 
orbiting battle stations, some 
manned, would shoot down ene- 
my missiles. 


mov recently quit the board of 
governors of the L-5 Society, a 
space lobbying organization, be- 
cause it would not take a firm 
stand against missile defen sr, 

T don’t think “Star Wars’ is 
feasible and I don’t think any- 
body takes h seriously,” Asimov 
said. “It’s just a device to make 
the Russians go broke. But we’ll 
go broke too. It's very much a 
John Wayne standoff.” 

By some estimates, space- 
based defense could cost 3S much 
as $1 trillion, about five times as 
muc h as recent federal budget 
deficits. 

“The community is divided 
over this thing,” said Robert A. 
Collins, editor of Fantasy Re- 
view, a magazine devoted to the 


study of science fiction. 
The dispute centers 


The dispute centers on the 
Reagan administration's propos- 
al to spend $30 billion over five 
years for research into the feasi- 
bility of creating a defense to 
shoot down enemy missiles. Its 
forerunner was the “High Fron- 
tier” proposal put forth in 1982. 

Science-fiction writers are di- 
vided not only on the feasibility 
of the idea but also on how space 
in general should be developed. 


as anything more than a barrier 
to that.” 

Clarke, author of such bodes as 
“2001 : A Space Odyssey,” called 
plans for a space shield “techno- 
logical obscenities” and said that, 
inerwari, the U.S. government 
should emphasize cooperative 
missions with the Soviet Union. 

T am not so naive as to imag- 
ine that tftis could be achieved 
without excruciating difficulty 
and major change in the present 
political climate” he said, “but 
those changes have to be made, 
sooner or later.” 

One of the more outspoken 
“Star Wan” advocates is Pour- 
nelle, co-author with Larry Niven 
of such books as “Lucifer’s Ham- 
mer” and “The Mote in God’s 
Eye.” 

“The historic role of the mili- 
tary is to bufld roads to new fron- 
tiers and protect early settlers,” 
he said. “Today this is one of the 
best ways to get into space: This 


is the deepest pocket. But I sup- 
port SDI ror lots of other reasons 

Than that.” 

PoumeUe said that The strate- 
gy of assured survival is better 
Than assured destruction,” mean- 
ing that it is better to try to shoot 
down attacking miocifcg rather 
than to have the superpowers 
held hostage to the destructive 
power of one another’s missiles. 

“If we had 100 of General Gra- 
ham’s boost-phase interceptors in 
orbit with five or six American 
service people aboard each one," 
PoumeUe said, “we would have a 
much less amb iguous warning 
system of attack on this country. I 
keep hearing all fhi< ftiflr about 
not militarizing space: But the 


was opening now. 


“If we're going to go to that 
much trouble to overthrow a Com- 
munist regime in our hemisphere, 
why don’t we knock off Cuba?" 

“Because if we tried to over- 
throw Castro it might bring in the 
Soviets. Then the question of who 
cries *unde' first might be superflu- 
ous.” 


PoumeUe and Dean Ing are co- 
authors of a recent book, “Mutu- 
al Assured Survival,” an outline 
for space drf<m«« t hat Reagan 
hailed as “addressing with verve 
and vision the challenges to peace 
and to our national security ” 
Clarke, on the other hand has 
testified in Congress against 
“Star Wars” and on behalf of 
peaceful nrisaons with the Rus- 
sians to such places as Mars. Ari-- 


said Collins, a professor at Flori- 
da Atlantic University. Advo- 


da Atlantic University. Advo- 
cates of “Star Wars" believe the 
best way to speed the evolution of 
all lands of space technologies is 
with the aid of the military, he 
said. 

Detractors see such military in- 
volvement as soaking up all the 
money for real space exploration. 
“They think of space as a pio- 
neering thin g," Collins said. 
“They don’t see a ring of weapons 


oceans have been militarized for a 
long time and that hasn't fore- 
stalled their use by civilians.” 

The debate has spilled into Sci- 
ence Fiction Chronicle, a maga- 
zine that publishes the reflections 
of science-fiction writers. 

“Over the last year or two I’ve 
heard a good many of my col- 
leagues, tnd riding some who in 
previous encounters seemed quite 
sane, tell me that they really 
thought this *Star Wars’ thing was 
a pretty good idea," wrote Fre- 
derik Pohl. author of such books 
as “Midas World” and “The 
Space Merchants.” 

In a subsequent issue, Pour- 
ncDe replied, “We all love Fred 
Pohl. but I do wish he’d stop 
talking nonsense.” 

In an interview, Pohl said that 
what upset him was “that most of 
the authors supporting ‘Star 
Wars’ are not ana warriors but 
people who want to crick the mili- 
tary into spending money on 
space.” 

“2 do wish we had not canceled 
same of the space program.” he 
added. “We mould have a base 
on the moon, a mann ed landing 
on Mars and cooperative pro- 
grams with the Soviets.” 

Not all writers are taking rides. 
Tm somewhere in between,” 
said Ray Bradbury, author of 
such books as “Fahrenheit 451” 
and “The Martian Chronicles." 


An amateur astronomer has 
claimed the first visual sighting 
since 1911 of Halley's Comet, 
which swoops dose to earth about 
every 76 years. Stephen O’Meara, 
28, an assistant editor of Sky and 
Telescope magazine, said be made 
the sightings Jan. 23 and 24 using 
die University of Hawaii’s 24-inch 
(61 -centimeter) reflecting telescope 
on Mauna Kea. a 13.600-foot 
(4. 130-meter) peak When O'Meara 
saw the comet, it was about 40 
times fainter than any comet ever 
seen visually through a telescope, 
he reported in the April issue of 
Sky and Telescope. Halley's Comet 
will be visible to the naked eye in 
about a year, when it comes closest 
to the sun in its orbit. It was last 
righted visually by the astronomer 
E. E. Barnard on May 23, 1911. 


are among the artists who »■ 
formed. An LP titled “We Are i 
Worid” will go on sale April 
Columbia officials said. About 
percent of the proceeds win go : 
Africa: 10 percent is earmarked 


},Y.l 


in* 


the hungry and homeless in 
United States, the company si ' 
The album will feature prevkm'i 
unrekased song, by Prince, lb 
Roust** and Pw Bcnafar, who* 
not attend tbe 10-hour record 


isii. I” n 


iati 


session in January that prodnt 
“We Are the World." The pirate 
similar to the Ethiopia-aid rtc 
“Do They Know U s Christina 
produced by British rock sun. 


mem first detected the comet on its 
current sweep in August 1983. Oth- 
er astronomers, using an 88-inch 
telescope connected to an electron- 
ic cameralike device confirmed tite 
position of O’Meara's righting. 


Oleg Bitov, the Soviet defector 
who returned home and said he had 


been kidnapped to the West, is try* 
ing to recover the money he earned 
from anti-Soviet writings in Brit- 
ain, some of his former friends in 
London say. Bitov was foreign cul- 
tural editor of the Soviet Writers' 
Union weekly Literary Gazette 
when he defected in Venice in Sep- 
tember 1983. He was granted asy- 
lum in Britain and in less than a 
year had earned £46.000 with writ- 
ings that denounced Soviet censor- 
ship and restrictions on his work as 
a journalist. He left the money in 
London when he relumed to Mos- 
cow. The Guardian newspaper re- 
ported that Bitov, 53, had engaged 
lawyers in London to recover his 
money. 


An American who made a 
day “friendship ran" through ( 
na is embroiled in a dispute wii 
Chinese film company over a £ 
meatary about his trek. Sum X 
trail, 41, said the conflict had 
fee ted bis idealistic views at 
China. Cottrell ran from iheG 
Wall of China to Guangzhou 
last year on a 3,360-ktiomi 
(2,080-xnile) zigzag route that t 
him through many areas ordina 
dosed to foreigners. CoureU ? 
that he signed a contract vn 
S 173,000 with the Beijing Film I 
dio to chronicle the trip buz that 
studio broke the contract by 
signing him an incompetent di 
tor and producer ana refisug 
give him creative contnaLC 
PeSumg, an official at the Shut 
dio, said that "there were sc 
questions" over the shooting. 


“We’re trapped by drcumstance, 
aren’t we? Everybody has foreot- 


aren’t we? Everybody has forgot- 
ten that Russia helped start the 
second Worid War. And she’s oc- 
cupied all those countries for 
more than 40 years. Those are 
realities. That puts us pacifists in 
a quandary.” 


A single recorded by 45 Ameri- 
can pop stars will be released 
Maicn 7 with all proceeds going to 
aid the starving in Africa and tbe 
United States, Walter Yetxukoff, 
president of CBS Records Group, 
said. The day after the regular sin- 


gle and a longer. 12-inch version of 
“We Are the World" art released 


worldwide, Columbia will bring 
out a music- video version of the 
song written by Michael Jackson 
and Lionel Richie. Stevie Wonder, 
Bob Dylan and Brace Springsteen 


Chariton Heston’s Loudon st 
debut received a mixed aided 
ceprion Thursday night, bin the 
tor was undaunted “You don' 
it for the critics.” the veterai 
more than 50 films said at 
opening-night party for 
Caine Mutiny Court-Martial,” 
Herman Wonk play at Load 
Queen’s Theater that Heston £ 
in and directed. In the revival a 
1954 Pulitzer Prize-winning a 
room drama. Heston days I 
tenant Commander Quag, 
paranoiac Worid War II sxi 
played on screen by Hmapfarey 
gait. The critic Michael Core* 
The Financial Tunes was ban 
on Heston. “You wonder if Q& 


insanity could possibly surpas 
inanity’” Coveney wrote. The 
is in London for 13 weeks, 


is in London for 13 weeks, 
which Heston said he had a 
commitment. 


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furt/Mdn. 


” Was from SF123X0QL 
Uberd m o rtgog es at 6m ester esr. 
OU»>iANSJL 
Av Mon Repot 24, 

CH-lOte UMonne, Swteeriand. 
Tek (21) 22 3S TZ Tic 251 85 MELCS 
MtbbedSiMe 1970 


ty, 5720 JQ0. 916583-1721 
USA RESIDENTIAL 


KTB BRUM MAKBAARDU 



A nwte rdo re . Tefc O2W68022. 



S , living 100 sqjsu fimploco + 
sraora. Fr ce rtcn t condtion, pi 
vote atve free grave 15D0Q sam. 


vote atve free grave 1S/I0Q sqjsx, 
torge. pod, 2-car garaga. Urepaflo- 
fa sea v»w. Bat lB3CHerc4d Tri- 
bune, 92521 Neully Ceoex. Fnmce. 


International Business Message Center 


When in Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VELABRO 
Liaory cewtraent house vnth fa r teii e d 
flats, avofldble for 1 week and mare 



A ms terd am: 2636-15. 
Athens: 361^397/3602421. 
R n.i e eli . 343-1899. 
Cnp e n h^e n. (01) 329440. 
Tcankfurt: J069J 72-67-55. 
Inusoraim 29-58-94. 

Urban: 67-27-93/66-25^4. 
London: (01) B36-4802. 
Mnfad: 455-2891/455-3306. 
Men: (02) 7531445. 
NarwraiR (03) 845545. 
Romm 679-3437. 

Sweden: 08 7569229. 

Tel Afar: 03455 559. 
Vfams: Contact Frarikfret. 


Bogota 212-9608 
Bae n ee Afreet 41 4031 
(Dept. 312) 

Guayaquil: 431 M37431 
Umcs 417 852 
Panmiia i 644372 
San Jaeei 22-1055 
Smrt ia g u. 6961 S88 
Sao Paulo: 852 1893 


MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain: 246303. 
Juntas: 25214, 
Kuwait: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 34 00 44. 
Qatan 416535. 

Saudi Arabia: 

Jeddah: 667-1 SUL 
UAE.:Debd 224161. 


MR EAST 


UNITED STATES 


BenrfMfc 3904657. 
Heng Kaara 5-420906. 
Manflae 81? 07 49. 
Seoul: 7258773. 
Sngepera: 222-2725L 
Taiwtwn 752 44 25/9. 
Tebye: 504-1925. 


Phone: 6794325. 6793450. 
Write: Ya del Veiabro 16, 
00186 Rome. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


New York: (212) 752-3890. 
Woet Genet: {415) 362-8339. 


AUSTRALIA 


Sydney: 929 56 39. . 
Mefceeme: 690 8233; 


ATTENnON EXECUTIVES 




GREAT BRITAIN 


TSSSfS- 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


TAX SERVICES 


ROME 

RESIDENTIAL AKA 


CAfJTMURr ITIHa 
£ 28 / 300 . Teh Para 224 


PERSONALS 



GREECE 


ANDROS ISIANDl RESTDRH) ilorM 
fa«e on 1 acre land with ofive trees. 


3 4 Itms from part. 

USS51000 or naares: offer. D. Zan- 
9». 3 Tioiapodou. Fldhn, 15237 




bona, where mere than a RUrtf 
of a arSBan reader* world- 
nfa meat of nfant a re n 
bteehera and htdusky, wfl 
mad U. A mt Jeter a* (Paris 
613395) before TOajm, on- 
rating that we amt fete i you 
bade, card your mortage 
appear wiMi 48 bo on. Tbe 
rale it US. $9.80 or local 
equmdenf per fine. Yoo mutt 
bda dm cornpiota end werflf- 


AMBBCAN COMPANY B4GAGSD 
dnee 6 years in research & develop- 
ment of a process ter fa production 
d synfaSc crude ad from rod (low 


WANTED DST10BUTORS waridwide 


far popular "BJYA" Smp^xxe pre- 
pared detdms Indian rah, nwton, 
cbifan axries in cans (extra hot, hot. 


UK CHWOHtHJ teaeefas prorid- ■ _^ L . ■ 1 

no US federd tax s erviatt, Lovett . j y _ doy, fr " 

WSScxieon S Go. Tet IPIP3) 39330- hy.mfah. Deed phone. | Ajonoroa 

24 hour service. 


AAJ CORPORATION, an afaowL 
"Oder m deveJopnanr and 
nxentenance of eiRufaon system, 
training devices, aid twtomede test 
•tfamfa, is arrenliy seating techni- 1 


EMPLOYMENT 


EMPLOYMBJT 


. ■ ■ . - — . — . EDUCATIONAL , 

fa^SfagKn-SSTSd PORTIONS WANTED 

our rurd/suburfaan kxatiqn north of TEAOO OF CWCSE seif defase. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS AVA0AI 




raid). Write: Mr Snghdi, 0604 Cup- 
page Plcga, Koek Ra^ Sjngcpore. 

AGOIT5 WANTS for a rommehetY 
eve muttimecio, mdtSm^d icnooCng 
S^demmrf foctos & lev^bo fcpcfed I 
deefrorvo. Vriire OrteijJex roramurv- i 
cations AG 941rugratr. IQS. 04- 
6340 Bcvr, Teb 0<2Tn 8 21 


of fa sa npfa pro cess, 
viitfiw nvnfinrt of 


SOOOJDOQ for con^bna^Mna a 

ninnnf frink Umairihc pk mv^ww 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


RBTOKE OORTMA D'AMPEZZO 

P?-61 3387012 - 3387015 


BoKmora. AAI Ccxjxxatian offers 
oiMarefm bmafiB nckxfng depen- I 
dm meded and detfd coverage, 
educabafa rayUmKe rram- I 


Will fraveL 2 manthi iteerahw training I AU PM* OffU. For fa*, 
cowse. nghltop pring jfa , Taoist I many boy in June. WL 


ring oftrids, 56 months as madfriery SSJB ^ 18 21 

& equyment faody insfaed up to ART CONSIATANT IN ISBh « 19*1 



f*»t Far .rawdote 


SffA fajeeptond mew an FragGoa. 3 
faible befaorm, 4bafaoo n «, 1 stu- 
So with bed. Lege Suing. AfaTj 
raryoe. AwAfa June or Jdy. 


caB Dave MadSondd 
522 ar send resume in I 


Mamaa David & Bra. 


MOVING 


PABAareyi, super luxurious 
ontees for ide, ar conShaning, sec- 
305 sqja Ked bmgisn. TeL 


CONTOIEX (near Opera): Cosfas- 
ten to 30Q aties worldwide -Air/Sea 


POROS - ISLAND, dd *ilo restored, 
panorama gard«i. $130000. T Liver- 
me. Lungrtevere Ifai 3A. tome. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


8SK of fa planL Conpanv has al- cwtury Er^Sdi pdrdngi vriB execute 
raraly eweried >3 raite an of t ts own bids, eoranjosora etc, & advise an 

money m fa process, kivestor ran pudnses fa private or inwatraenr 
of proaa far one purpeaes. Bok «802, LHT, 63 Long 
eourfry (USA Bxduded). Terms ta b« Aane. London, WC2E 9JK 

negotiated. Pterae write to Bax 1832. '".Tr~ JIV— ■ . ! 

Herald Trfane, 92521 NeuSlyCedex, "g* 1 ® 


\£S£Q0 pte NifamLCd I Rome 
6382333 or Ctxtn Q81-8370M4 

te T nra T Cr TV f* W«CA. Wafafate POSmONS AVAILABLE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED DXL._h reerdting contfaSTfor =nrr= ■ 

-p^ Y TT j rTT - r , n.j I. n qudfad aiterncteond radio brood- fa ^ completel y 

T 05 acetets in fa Hungaram language. TZ&T?? j wt> » u Nt rroondy - 

JSn 1 rw 9“ f>om S2IJ04to fraborxi helping rTQCTttef^ 

526^1- Gnxfidate mutt have a flu- of fa home, some drrang j 

SSrSL MmT encr jn Hwigarion & a profiaency in ^ a T d i n - 

^tobe^atetefad^j, 

mnnfa Sinm T«t- tm xi xx hove experience n jooraebsm. tore- *"•” qe ranow 


DIAMONDS 


comptete confidence to AAI, E9 PO 


brarthing techn^ues, Qvnese miktory 
arfagy, pWogy^.jgycbology. Pri 
vote instr u ct i o n for gifted dtfd, inter. 
OdeA nfividudi & rStary or ffatna 
teoups. Far ido write or cot Mr. 


Beach area English . 
smoker. Send photo/resaff* 
Ban Ave. AUontc Boodv H 


DOMESTIC 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


purposes, box - 
Acre. Londo^v , 


CdlOtott 281 IB 81 Paris -Cars too Arcfxtect-brobgr, yfos, 

tond.C*taeho6oi042441447 


THIS WEEK 


dence so ybean r etire ond e njoy Kfef 
For free into send seif -odd essed en- 
velope to Matter, CP. 6298, 00195 


DIAMONDS 



March 11th 


MONEY TREES? 


Exclusive DAKS 
clothes and 
accessories for 
men and women 
available from 
DAKS stockists 
around the world. 



YE5I Invest in one of Americas mast 


BUSINESS WEEK 



GOURMET RBTAUtANT- Seals 200. 
Pukixj for 100 cars. 20 yea- hose. 
Near WaWa, Howai. Ham Strosser 
8C6-528-2S66 (USA) 


AMS9CAN BUSINESS WOMAN I 
baking for finendd bofars or dart 
partners. Tet US (919] 942-4681. I 


Your best buy. 

Fin* fa aonds m any price range 
at lowest wholesale prices 
direct From Artwerp 
center d fa dbmand worid. 
Ful guaramee. 

For free pra fat write 
Joadfa Gdrlsnitein 


Avdbtols Id March far 6 I 
months. 51000. Tefc 378 54 56. 


74 CHAMPSaYSEES 8fh 

Studio^ 2 or 3ro om gnr l w e nt . 
One month or more. 


loting/ inwrprgfcng SgSjT^Sio Hun- I ^ & 

garian^ teaching Hungarian above I "v 1 . Pu> !” * **?= v ! lc y* n B B "pn- 1 
jhe high schcto level or acting in | 


SST?d resumes to: Vove of Ofar da m esk. help i s kept Ba fi4y POSTTTONS^vSjV] 

America Remitmanr & Plocanart Dt- ..opettraert ■ naMfe ^ rnows WA> ‘ 

vmon. Room 1 192, 330 independence *«-WAYS AVAILABLE - Al 

Yla&in&on. DXL 2050. Tribune,92S21 NeuAy Cedex. Franra d*fren'i nwny. mum's hd| 
V.OA a an egud opportunity AU fa* IMMEDIATE- Necr NYC branches of Ijtdass Sv*« 

t *"P fa y r - Gee of Wont & 2S6 year old. Lirfit befa. wortdwxte. Col Steam 

OUR LEADERS REOUfRH) FOR bousekeeptog, ErgSsh Speotina. non- 


tidy. Duties far wife: wadeng S iron- 
mg to g high sSondord, Egfa droning 


& coating meds far a SmaK fanriy. 
Othv domeshc help is kept & a fuffy 



DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WAN! 


IE CLARIDGE 359 67 97. 


£*nbfahed 1928 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


62, 8-2018 Antwerp 
: p2 3) 234 Q7 51 


NEAR PARC MONCEAU. 2 bed- employer. ^ 

roams, ApnJ 1-H. 5750- Possfale July — — — — 

& Aug. Cal 27 0335 evengs T Ot* LEADERS. REOUTRH3 FOR 


INTERNATIONAL 


' America’s Kab-Tech Crisis: Why 
SSroo Vdtoy Is losing Hs Edge. 


COMPUTE? PORTRAITS 


• Stab Painti Trade Trffis WMi 
Japmt Om Heated. 


T-SH8T FDTOS 
NOW M FULL COLOR 
on oB-cash buseiBB fat can earn you 
56000 - SlOjnO/momh. New end mad 


R4TI 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPL£ 

UNUMITB) MC 
LLS-A. A WORmVflDC 


Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry PU1EAUX. 38 sgjn. studo, fully 
“■ 


DiAMOT®S & 
ESTATE AWHXY 


SHORT IBM in Labi Quarter. 
No agents. Tat 3293883. 


advenswe/ecenping torn m Europe. 
Age 21/35. PSV kence & langunm 
an advmtage. Season April/ Oc- 
tober. Apply m uniting to Trek Euro- 
pe, Trek House. The Bdhfa Dad. 
tfcigtan. Oxford, OX5 4 TT. 




C«6 Stems 
London 730 8122/5142 <24 
CfMP-AGY.Rfc 


A c om p lete mad & bushes service 


• Down A Notch: Europe Peoncw 
On The Mighty DeBwT 


geterns from SlOflOO - S30.000. 

Tefc 069747808 Thu 412713 XEMA 


proviefing a unique oofactior of 
ta lei Be d , vanotfc & tnuUngud 
kxfwduab fart 


S prrinfreri in Igrg e-gxed 
tfonanA cmd eaptiofld gsra 


6TH ST SUinCE. Mee stufa far 1 “***?*_ f lArpU T PasON 


Dr- Ugfa NJ 07605 USA. 

AU PAIR - bnmwSeto poritian. 5 emnfli 
rid baby. Need househrapho AA 6 
driven fcerae. Sokry 5325 rnydh + 


tTnZL *r r & AVAHABLE LOW 

CQ Gdf Carte \ bobyrmnden & lp dan da 
Cril Sloan# Bureou, lorv 
8122/5142. UCJEMP. AGY. 


• WteGmmqribM'sCMAimli 
m Jaapardy, 


NOW ON SALE AT 
ALL INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


BUYER WANTS 
.hupmces/flangeivticdi 
Mrior notional whriesrier & enparter 
in USA looktog far name frond fro- 
flrtmees- YSU Opum. Aranv, ESee 
louder, Lewren, ete. Also name brand 



KLOTZ DIAMONDS 
D61D8 WeteteS 
W. Germany 0049-61504652 


PORTUGAL 


mngue, good French. 


roo m 6 b o ard, tag speak Erv&sh & 

9toTO*Demoeet, M AN seeks 

Bfrd- farter Gty.CA 94404, Ste. 100- tol/restauran: 


TT-'il'H.U 

^5] 


21X765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 5«i St, KYjC 10019 


teutieafr. Squbfr Xey. Lederie, 
L Gmj etc. COD or L/CroB 
?J4)Wl651 or its no. 506176 


Service amrwenrativ« 

Needed Worldwide. 


228-1651 or Its no, 506176 
BSES. Our repretentotrva 


B8IBNA1WNAL COMPANY 


DeM!egm[ ne SrcSn , norrine e Z%1\ ZURICH-ZURKH-ZURICH 

ISgs 

Tet piq 3 63-9767. Telex: 730197. Rondo & ForrTItStti/Drfra traa. J Office/Ma nagenteW S enecas 

7”“^^— iMKa Iwwli e Arietetn ratrwl ev mfc— ® • ComOOflY 1 UUKlLflflTI 


DAKS-iimp^cn Limiled. 
. 3-4 Jtvrryn Street. 
Lcr'don SWi . 


1 8-17, 1985. 


USA-SUCCESSFUL DAUAS, TEXAS h? ” Engiond a Eorope Morchl UK eompani^mOSLO AL fauna 




rid Tifane. 92531 h 
B4GL^4 SPEAfONG 
Tefc 770-3106, or pre 


Work pmjert l 
Box 020^ Her- 
wayCedex. 
desrarl wrnried. | 
roay«MiB>n 


person of hmhtone, PARFUAtf 
ruedu Hrider, Paris 9. Meeo ( 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

posmor>« WANTED 


1 AU falls IMMOLATE. Entfsh 
s pee fa ng. 3 tanka unth young riri- 
dren toasted near NYC baking for 
minimum 1 yav stay. Send photo 
hotory, telep hone & refarenoM to 46 
Van OrdmRd, Har rin gton Pork. NJ. 
07640 USA. 


AUTOMOBUJ 


FOR MORE EXKUTIVE POSmONS 

LOCK UNDEX 

“WTHNATIONAL POSmON S" 
PAGE 14 


& dl mqor off -fare centers. Ful ad- 1 
melefr a tion, nominee servos, paws I 


I SOUTHERN SHAM LA MANGA- 

Oto bedroom condo. M fumahed FHMOI FflGH FA5HON MODS, 

Ulifn t flwwp p *- -t- - - tLw *T 7 DO f BA - . er . t . ■ 


EXECUTIVE 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 



SKMNG Al) PAS for minimum 1 year , 
far New York area sbrong er eiMtS - 1 


•a sbrmu em 
to look after 2 j 


gCth language rewired. Write vrth 
fid detatb to Cofce. P.O. 8ax 187, 


MBtCEDES 600 
8wlt 1976, silver, ikfcng r- 

•wSWTS'iJ’a 

(O) 5109-9400 


^ owtoo tertg fa ociarL 

Bc^aS^Her 
92521 Neuiy Cedes, France 


T7, PR/PA expe ri ence. 


yofatte, free to (ravel, fc 
tools For London based opens 


Lean bods shoring good returns, 
pta Swra bonk gumwtteed retuna on 
one speofic proper. We assist in ob- 


exes ror London based open u i ra . 

3 pjtfc 9 p*. Ql-225 tBdfiuiir 


taHH LLS. rewdetKe visas. Write 
Bae 1849, Horrid Trtxjne, 925Z1 
NernFy Cedex, Franea. 


ttsc & ralng l«r»* ca. 

EB.5, UmW 

aasSiK 


* Company Faneatsanss 

• How to do Business ml or/ 


Far: 057 709 5757 
Assooried Offices Worldwide. 


URim.7nDiru — : ATTRACTIVE, capable, edueried. LSSSaT 

UKJtn-iURiQl traveled Amenam lady warns ptw- JS? 

ORTRASSE 52 WANTS): fiNANOAL ANALYST / »n in Pans as and art or Girt Friday 2L Lg* 

AWAY FROM HOME Aaweita* far a centred Pars based for executive man /woman. Gray, irn ISmeLw 

goners Sana* moftmy. Knowledge of Er^bh B- 4847 W. Sunset BM, Ttxnpa ft. ^ ^ 8mok - 

moons nanad terms arriprocedurasnece)- 33629. Tet 813/B37-6266. .NJ-yOM USA. 

TOMSWrrZHLANn YOUNG GBIMAN ACTRESS, hij^ily 


NY, NY 10Q6Q USA. 

AUPAKCtRLOAkar^Mshousa- 
vwrk, nxot spew 6 write frigfaK be 
hdy, non-*naker, travel with family. 
30 iran. from New Yarfc Oy. 1 year 
ssoy. Seed tetier A picture to Fontos- 
hcAu Pars, P.Q. Box 773, Pbieftreok, 
NJ. 07058 USA. 


Bax 187, SUPBIB MERC 500Sa prat 

1 ssnMW 

USteari.m500aniv.Gri 




taefa e e . Ser vieex Ceactff Corp. numbera. Er^Soh Ffoency esenhri. STEStalSOTL ^ non ^«*». Must drive. Fteusri»tp- j 

S S’S&^ q Sfg3 Z Sf ET® ttfti a*® 

Neofiy Getta, France - rasy job far MmScte 327 0^ 5920 s!wj8S».Ptaftjtton,FL 33317. 


PAGE 1 1 
FOR MOR 
CLASSIFIED 


Box 1853. Hes 
NeoSyCedex.1 


Imprim& nor O forint. 73 w dp rp.ftmyle. 75Q18 Paris. 


Cy 


l- 


r 




lis M 




N h 


ntt; S*i 


’• "• r*8r 


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