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INTERNATIONAL 



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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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No. 31,737 


ZURICH, TUESDAY. MARCH 5, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 





Gromyko 

Cautions 

Genscher 


Warns Against 
p Sfar Wars 9 Rede 
For W. Germany 


A protester paddled among boats that tried to hamper the 
U.S. destroyer Buchanan on its arrival in Sydney. The 
Buchanan and another U.S. destroyer, the John Young, are 
to take part in exercises with Australia later this week. 


Armmd ANZUS Meeting , 
<■ Set for July, Is Postponed 


The Associated Press 


CANBERRA, Australia — 
Prime Minister Bob Hawke said 
Monday that an annual meeting of 
the Australia-New Zealand-United 
States defense alliance had been 
postponed and that the alliance 
had virtually ceased to function be- 
cause of a dispute between New 
Zealand and the United States. 

“Australia has decided it is nec- 
essary to announce the postpone- 
ment of the ANZUS council meet- 
ing,’* Mr. Hawke said. Later, he 
said, “Insofar as ANZUS is a trilat- 
eral relationship, virtually nothing 
of it is operative now.” 

Mr. Hawke said there was no 
point in holding the annual meet- 
ing among the U.S. secretary of 
state and the foreign ministers of 
Australia and New Zealand. It had 
been scheduled for Canberra in 
July. 


INSIDE 


B Polish food prices were raised 
as much as 75 percent Lech 
Walesa called the action “a de- 
ception.” Page 2. 


■ US. House Democrats bdd a 
weekend meeting marked by 
squabbling Page 3. 


a A Chinese defecation began 
an official visit to Moscow, the 
first of its kind since the split of 
the 1960s. Page 5. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

fflCsri C fcaSm dropped his 
• Pfailli] 
Page 


hostile bid jo acquire Phillips 


Petroleum Co. 


■ The dollar rose rose against 
most other major currencies in 
European trading. Page 7. 


TOMORROW 


The onrush of affluence has 
transformed the lives of the 
Japanese. 


The ANZUS alliance, formed 33 
years ago, has been strained by 
New Zealand’s decision to ban vis- 
its by nuclear-powered or nuclear- 
armed warships. New Zealand’s 
prime minister, David Lange, says 
visits by those ships make New 
Zealand a nuclear target. 

As a matter of policy, the United 
Slates refuses to confirm or deny 
whether any of its ships carry nu- 
clear arms, and it has withdrawn 
from ANZUS naval exercises to 
protest New Zealand's decision. 

Mr. Hawke said that in light of 
the New Zealand decision on nu- 
clear ships and the U.S. response to 
it “it is dear that the holding of a 
regular ANZUS council meeting at 
present would be impractical." The 
postponement is indefinite, he said. 

Australian newspapers on Mon- 
day quoted government officials, 
whom they did not identify, as say- 
ing that the United States had told 
Australia that it would not take 
part ia the annua] meeting 

The New Zealand government 
issued a statement in Wellington 
saying that it regretted the cancel- 
lation. Mr. Lange, who is visiting 
London, said in an interview on 
Australian television that the alli- 
ance was intact and that none of 
the partners had given the required 
J2 months notice of withdrawal. 


The AssacUual Press 

MOSCOW — Andrei A Gromy- 
ko. the Soviet foreign minister, 
warned West Germany on Monday 
that it would become “an accom- 
plice" in violating the 1972 anti- 
ballistic missile treaty if it joins 
U.S. research on space missile de- 
fenses. 

Tass, the official Soviet news 
agency, said Mr. Gromyko deliv- 
ered the warning to Haas- Dietrich 
Genscher, bis West German coun- 
terpart, whose visit was announced 
only the day before. They met 
Monday for four and a half hours. 

Discussing anns-control negoti- 
ations between the Soviet Union 
and the United States, which are 
scheduled to resume March 12, Mr. 
Gromyko was quoted as saying 
that Moscow would act construc- 
tively. But be added that "success 
of the talks will depend on whether 
the American side acts likewise." 

Mr. Gromyko urged West Ger- 
many to halt deployment of medi- 
um-range nuclear missiles being in- 
stalled by Lbe North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization, Tass said. 
The missiles are being deployed to 
counter what NATO says is the 
threat from Soviet SS-20 weapons. 

“In the context of the problem of 
preventing a militarization of outer 
space," Tass said, “the Soviet side 
has expressed concern over the 
stand of the West German govern- 
ment on the American space 
plans." 

Mr. Gromyko said that West 
Germany’s “joining in ‘research 
work’ to create outer space weap- 
ons would actually make it an ac- 
complice in the violation of the 
treaty on anti-ballistic missile de- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 



Scargfll 
Vows f War’ 


On Board 


Pond Insists -I* 


o r; 


It Won't Rehire 
Dismissed Maters 


Andrei A. Gromyko, at left, faced Hans-Dietrich Genscher, across the table at light, at their meeting Monday in Moscow. 


The U.K. Coal Strike: Nothing to Celebrate 

By Bob Hagrrty 

temaiioruit Herald Tribune 


International 

LONDON — Last August, when 
British coalminers still thought 
they could win their strike, a Scot- 
tish miner’s wife paused with dish 
towel in hand to ponder the conse- 
quences of defeat. 

“if we lose," the Scotswoman 
said, “they’d have us back to the 
days when you had to doff your cap 
to the boss." 

Like most predictions about the 
51-week strike, that one probably 
will not come true. The Conserva- 
tive government has achieved a no- 
table victory in subduing the Na- 
tional Union of Mineworkers, 
traditionally considered Britain's 
fiercest union. But even Conserva- 
tive Party loyalists caution against 
concluding that the victory will 
transform the attitudes of British 

workers. 

Aside from its considerable eco- 


nomic cost, the strike has reaf- 
firmed the old social divisions in 
Britain and has sunk a large share 
of Britain’s 186,000 coalminers 
deep into debt and bitterness. And 
the decision of the miners to return 
to work without an agreement 
probably will make it difficult to 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


• • 


re-establish trust between miners 
and their masters in the National 
Coal Board. 

In certain areas. Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher's government 
appears to be the dear winner. 

“One lesson is that the country 
can survive a long coal strike" with- 
out disastrous consequences for the 
economy, said Christopher John- 
son. economic adviser to Lloyds 
Bank, Britain's fourth-largest 
bank. In 1974, a much shorter coal 
strike caused such disruption that it 
helped bring down the Conserva- 
tive government of Prime Minister 
Edward Heath. 


Killed in Lebanon Blast 


Now, Mr. Johnson said, the 
^iled coal strike has demonstrated 

that most of' Britain's trade unions 

are not prepared to act collectively people will be completely tarred for 
* - Jm * ! the rest of their lives,” a Scottish 


After this week’s forlorn return 
to work, “it’s hard to see the miners 
going on strike again for years,” a 
British labor-relations professor 
said. ■ 

The Confederation of British In- 
dustry hopes that the strike has 
convinced workers that profitless 
operations must be closed and that 
the government “just doesn't have 
a pot of gold at the end of the 
rainbow," said John Dunkky, a 
spokesman for the employers' 
group. 

Others are more skeptical. An- 
thony Sampson, author erf the 
“Anatomy of Britain” series, con- 
tended that the strike may prove to 
be a Pyrrhic victory for Mrs. 
Thatcher. The danger, he said, is 
that the ordeal has worsened the 
rancor between the tattered indus- 
trial north of Britain and the gener- 
ally prosperous south, making 
northern workers even less likely to 
accept the government’s free-enter- 
prise evangelism. 

At least in the muting villages, 
the bitterness is Kkely to remain for 
years. Union loyalists say thw still 
remember whose forebears broke 
ranks in- the strike of 1926T* 


prepare) 

consult with its allies forthwith or 
in the future," Mr. Lange said. 

Mr. Hawke agreed that the con- 
tinuation of the alliance was not at 
issue. "The ANZUS treaty re- 
mains. It needs to be emphasized 
that this point is not in dispute 
between any of the .ANZUS part- 
ners." he said. 

Mr. Lange said in London after a 
meeting with Prime Minister Mar- 
garet Thatcher that he did not be- 
lieve the postponement of (he AN- 
ZUS meeting signaled the end of 
the alliance. 

“The important point about a 
long-standing alliance is that the 
members must be able to talk cut 
their differences." Mr. Lange said. 

, the July meeting does 


By Edward Walsh 

Washington Past Service 

JERUSALEM — An explosion 
ripped through a Moslem Shiite 
religious and community center in 
the southern Lebanoa village of 
Marakah (m Monday, killing 12 
people, including a local leader of 
the Lebanese resistance to Israel's 
occupation of the area. 

Tbe explosion, at 10 AM-, oc- 
curred during a reported meeting 
of leaders of the Moslem Shiite 
Amal militia, which has been in the 
forefront of attacks on Israeli 
forces, and village residents. 

Killed in the blast was Moham- 
med Saad. 25. who was described 
by southern Lebanon sources as an 
“extremely important" Amal lead- 
er who was believed to have 
planned and coordinated many of 
the attacks on Israeli units in the 
area. 

There were unconfirmed reports 
that Khalil Jarradi, another promi- 
nent Amal leader from Marakah. 
was also killed. 

The incident came less than 30 
hours after the last units of a large 
Israeli force left Marakah after a 
search of the village. Reports 
quoted village residents as accusing 
the Israelis of planting a bomb in 
the center during the search, but 
this was denied bv the Israelis. 


nothing to help this. Nevertheless, 
. other wa 


we will find i 


ways. 


In a statement issued in response 
to questions, the Israeli Army 
spokesman's office said, the Israel 
Defense Forces categorically deny 
"the charge that the CDF was in- 


volved in the explosion in Marakah 
today.” 

“No IDF soldiers were present 
today in the village," the statement 
said. 

Israeli military officials said the 
explosion was caused by a car 
bomb, but Timur Goksel, the 
spokesman for the United Nations 
force that is stationed in southern 
Lebanon, said lbe blast occurred 
on the second floor of the center, 
where' the reported meeting was 
taking place. 

Mr. Goksel said UN officials 
had confirmed that 12 people were 
killed and 25 wounded in the explo- 
sion. Other reports put the number 
of wounded at more than 40. 

Mr. Goksel said the UN seat 
evacuation helicopters and 12 med- 
ical teams to Marakah, and later 
sent heavy construction equipment 
to the village to clear away the 
rubble. Reports said an outer wall 
of the center had been blown away. 

Marakah is one of a suing of 
Moslem Shiite villages in the hills 
east of the port city of Tyre where 
there has been a recent escalation 
in attacks on Israeli forces and a 
severe Israeli crackdown in re- 
sponse to those attacks. 

As pan of the crackdown, an 
Israeli force of about BOO soldiers 
and civilian security agents Satur- 
day entered Marakah. where they 
questioned about 350 men. arrested 
17 of them and blew up three 
bouses after searching the village. 

Mr. Jarradi. 25. who may have 

(Continued on Page 2. CoL 2) 


to press one another’s arms. 

In addition, the government 
avoided the appearance of caving 
in to the miners, though many ob- 
servers say that the union could 
have claimed a victory if it had 
accepted the peace formulas float- 
ed by the coal board last summer. 


union official said last summer of 
miners who shunned the latest 
strike. 

The coal board, meanwhile, most 
deal with a sullen work force. Ar- 
thur Scargill, president of the 
union, has warned that miners will 


wage guerrilla warfare against the 
board. 

Despite such threats, the board is 
refusing to grant a gaieral amnesty 
to the 718 miners fired during toe 
strike. 

The economic costs of the strike 
also have beat high, 

Lawson, chancellor of the 
quer, has described them as a 
worthwhile investment 

The costs included the added use 
of fuel oD at power stations and the 
deployment of thousands of police- 
men to try to keep order in the 
coalfields. In all, the stockbroker- 
age of Phillips & Drew estimates, 
the strike costs added £ 15 bflhon 
($ 2.7 billion) to the public sector 
borrowing requirement. a brood 
measure of Britain's government 
budget deficit 

A more serious worry is that the 
coal board win have trouble win- 
ning back customers that have 
grown used to using imported cool 
or od and do not wish to risk anoth- 
er disruption in supplies. The state- 
owned British Steel Corp-, for in- 
stance, has found that it can import 
Ugh-qualiQr coal with very little 
difference in cost, industry officials 
say. 

So there is little gloating at the 
coal board’s headquarters. 

“There isn’t anything to cele- 
brate," a board official said. "This 
is the end of one phase. The next 
phase is to get the industry back 
into shape as quickly as posable.” 


United Press Internatio na ! 

LONDON — The leader of the 
British miners' union, Arthur Scar- 
- gill, vowed Monday that his union 
would wage a "guerrilla war" 
against the National Coal Board 
despite a vote by union delegates 
Sunday to raid the strike and return 
to work. 

The coal board said about 900 
miners went back to work Monday. 

Speaking on a television pro- 
gram, Mr. Scargill said be was “so 
proud” of the min ers that “I am 
bursting.” Their 51 -week strike was 
the longest major industrial dispute 
in British history. 

Union delegates voted Sunday 
by a narrow margin to return to 
work Tuesday without an agree- 
ment about mine closures with the 
state-rim National Coal Board. 
The vote wait against the recom- 
mendations of the executive com- 
mittee erf the union and of Mr. 
Scargill. 

The delegates made their deci- 
sion after a surge back to work by 
thousands of miners in recent 
weeks. Only about 90,000 miners 
woe still cm strike before Sunday’s 
meeting, according to coal board 
figures. 

The strike began March 12. 1984, 
to protest plans to shut 20 of Brit- 
aurs 174 coal pits that were losing 
substantial sums of money and to 
eliminate 20,000 jobs. 

“People must understand that 
the greatest battle has been the 
struggle itself” Mr. Scargill said. 
"You have won the greatest battle 
of all by struggling against this gov- 
ernment's pouaes/L 

He said that the National Union 
of Mineworkers’ “campaign 
against pit closures and job losses 
will go on.” 

..“Miners will now conduct a 
guerrilla war against the board,” he 
said. 



lie did not explain what action 
he had in mind. 

Mr. Scares, a Marxist, said the 
country’s 186,000 miners would be 
“infuriated” if the board refused to 
make pay raises while any disrup- 
tion of tneiadostry was carried out 
A coal board spokesman said: 
“The surprising thing is that we 
had any return at alL* 

Mkhad, Eaton, the spokesman, 
repeated an earlier statement that 
there would be no reinstatement 
for those miners dismissed for 
“crimes of violence and serious 
damage against the coal industy.” 

About 700 oon&s were dis- 
missed, mostly for violence on 
picket lines during the walkout. 
The National. Union of 
Mineworkers is asking that they be 
reinstated. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatch® greeted the news of the 
end of the strike with “overwhelm- 
ing rdief." 

\ “We had to make certain that 
violence and intimidation and im- 
possible demands could not win,” 
said Sunday night. ‘There 
would have been neiurer freedom 
nor order in Britain if we had given 
in (o violence. There would have 


been no hope or any pros p e rou s 
industry if people would hi 


- - - r — . r — _—f have gone 
cm strike for bigger and bigger sub- 


CHILE HIT BY QUAKE — A resident of 
damaged in an earthquake that killed 124 


IhiAraMilta 

inspects his car after it mis 
le in central Chile. Pane 2. 


The strike provoked tiro nation- 
al dock strikes, a one-day rail strike 
and same of the worst industrial 
violence that Britain has known. At 
least two persons were, killed and 
.,1,746 injured in confron tations at 
pit gates between striking miners 

and police. A total of 9,750 miners 

were arrested. 


In Lebanon, aBoyls Wounded in a War Between Reluctant Soldiers and Guerrillas 


By Nora Bouscany 

Washington Post Service 

BRAJQAA, Lebanon — “You killed him. you killed 
him my only son.” the Lebanese woman screamed os she 
ran toward an Israeli patrol that had fired at hercarin the 
mistaken belief that it was carrying terrorists. 

A Tew minutes later, two reporters who were being held 
by the Israeli patrol tried to comfort the mother and aid 
her 1 1-year-old son, unconscious and bleeding from a 
bullet wound in his forehead. 

What had begun as an attempt to visit Marakah, a 
southern Lebanese village near Tyre that was raided by 
the Israeli Army on Saturday after guerrilla ambushes of 
Israeli troops, made ibe reporters unintended participants 
Sunday in the hostilities that have engulfed the area as 
Israel tries to protect its departure and Shiite Moslem 
guerrillas press their attacks. . 

Before being released after three and a half hours and 
allowed to return to Beirut, Julie Flint, of ABC Radio, and 
this reporter had long conversations with the young Israeli 
soldiers who detained us, and saw them capture, beat and 
kick three guerrillas who were canying weapons in their 
car. 

Shortly after the shooting, Israeli medics arrived to 
minister to the wounded boy, who appeared near death 
when we left- Then we were shot at by Lebanese Army and 
guerrilla forces when we left the Israeli-occupied temtoty. 

To get lo the area, the reporters defied an lsraeb ban 
that was imposed Feb. 26 on Beirut-based journalists 
visiting Israeli-held areas. When we were taken into custo- 
dy by Israeli forces, we were never asked our names or 
occupations or told to present any identification papers. 


and we did not volunteer the information that we were 
journalists. 

Israel, whose troops have been ambushed repeatedly in 
the area around Tyre, has repeatedly warned that it would 
act to protect the lives of its soldiers in southern Lebanon. 
It has said that the crackdown in recent days was z 
response to an escalation in Shiite attacks on its troops. 

At least 133 guerrilla attacks against Israelis and their 
allies were reported in February, and 17 have been report- 
ed this mooli). 

There was no report of the shooting of the Lebanese boy 
from Israeli officials. In Tel Aviv, a military spokesman 
said that grenades had been fired at an Israeli position 
near Tyre, in a separate incident, causing no injuries. 

We had driven from Beirut to an Israeli checkpoint at 
Froun, about 14 miles (22 kilometers) east of Tyre, a 
Mediterranean port city, and were stopped just south of 
the Litani River, the present Israeli line, about 25 miles 
north of the Israeli- Lebanese border. 

An Israeli soldier said that no care could pass. Fearful 
of the increasing raids against their forces, the Israelis 
were trying to keep men and cars from crossing into the 
regions they still occupied. 

We insisted that our driver. Mohammed, lake a liule- 
known route just north of the Israeli line to Zrariye. the 
last Lebanese Army position before Israeli lines. 'Truck- 
drivers and women working in the fields warned that there 
were Israelis ahead, but we kept going. 

We had just passed through Qsaibe. where villagers had 
warned us again about Israelis, when Israeli soldiers in the 
road, waving submachine guns, forced us to halt. 

TTie I8-year-old commander of the seven-man unit. 


Giddi. ordered us into an open-sided farm hut. The 
soldiers Questioned us rexatediv about whether we had 


seen a white Mercedes t rat had blocked the road. They 
suspected guerrillas wer< trying to ambush them. 

The Israeli soldiers, .-{early tense and referring to a 
plastic-covered map to pinpoint where they were, said 
they were not wearing bullet-proof vests because they 
were too heavy to walk in. 

They asked what we were doing. We said that we were 


French. I told him 1 am Lebanese and 
is British, said that I am a Christian Maromte. 

They told us they had girlfriends in Israel and that 
coming to Lebanon had been a mistake. Ari, who was 
the roof of the hut from a scaffolding, repeated 
“mistake" many times. 


the 


*Tell them that we are on a mission 
just like them/ a guerrilla said. 'It’s 
not our fault. We are just like them.’ 


traveling to the Tyre area to have lunch. We were both 
wearing jeans and' baggy sweaters. 

One of the Israeli soldiers, who said he originally came 
from England, said. “We’re sorry about this." 

Giddi asked our ages, radioed his commanding officer 
and said he could not let us go because we might give him 
and his men away to the terrorists. 

There was talk and denials by (he soldiers about killing 
guerrillas and it was difficult to tell when they were being 
serious or playing games. There was a lot or chuckling and 
furtive looks between them as well as Hebrew conversa- 
tion that we could not understand. 

Ari. 21. whose parents wo x French, askecHne if 1 were 


Then a white car drove up. 

One of the occupants tried to open the door. As the 
Israeli soldiers shouted at them, three young. Lebanese 
Shiite men walked toward us with their hands raised. They 
were taken to an adjacent room in the hut and were asked 
in hairing Arabic tor their names and birtbdaies. The 
information was radioed to Israeli commanders. After 
questioning them. Giddi rejoined us. 

Not until an hour later did Giddi search their ear. 
Grinning and shouting in Hebrew, he looked at us and 
said, “Guess what, they are the terrorists, I saw three 
Kalashnikova in their car.” Kalashnikovs, Soviet-designed 
assault weapons, are commonly used by the guerrillas. 

The other soldiers, y elling and falling names in Arabic, 
suited to lack the three men in the genitals and their lower 
backs. Ori, an Israeli medic, tied their hands behind their 
backs with a wire. One of them staned bleeding. 

The three were identified as Hasan Sabra, 19, from 
Qamara, Yousef Abu Zeid, 20, from Kfar Rumman and 
Baed Maatouk. 19, from Dir Gharbiyeh, where Israelis 
killed seven guerrillas last week. 

Mr. Maatouk, after being slapped around, said tha t 
they had been given 50,000 Lebanesepounds each (about 

53.200) by Abu Ah Hammond, an official in West Beirut 
of Amal, the Shiite militia, to cany out an operation 


against toaeli soldiera Mr. Abu Beid and Mr. Sabra 
began trembling and turned pale. 

I was asked to help translate their answax. The Israelis 
wanted to know if there was a bomb in the car. Mr 
Maatouk said there was only one rocket Ori checked and 
found a rocket-propelled grenade and two land 

The three Lebanese said they had been told to shoot 
down an lsraeb plane. 

. Wi* thar hands tied behind their backs, Mr. Sabra and 
Mr. .Aba Zad were kicked in the stomach and the gad tab 


Ori, seeing us gasp said: “f m a medic I don’t like this 
any more dun you do. Beheyeme I don’t like it, beam 

here, but look at thflai. I am young and f want to stay aKve. 

it makes me angry. 

Noting Wood dripping from Mr. Sabra’s hsmdsL he 
bandMed hm carefuByTMr. Sabra vmmted add coi- 
lapsed. Mr Sabra pleaded with me to have the Israelis 
send him a doctor. *«««* 

Ori, concerned abont Mr. Sabra hfcconditMw, mg 

to inquire haw he felL 

- ** « mission 

just like then. It’s not pur fault. We are just Eke thou." 

Aiew minutes later, the Israelis stopped a man waUdne 
dqwn the bill with crutches and took mm to the ctibicie 
with the guerrillas; 


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apjmMdhm.car, about 70 ystctfi <64 meters) away, 
we could see and heaif , dearly that the occr 

( Con ti nu ed M Page 2, CoL.I) 








Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL^ HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


Shamir Bachs Cabinet on Second Pullback 

But Israeli Official Indicates Reservations on Supporting Final Withdrawal 


By Edward Walsh 
and Jim Hoagland 

Washington Pm Service 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli 
cabinet dedsiofl Sunday to order 
the second stage of its uoq> with- 
drawal from southern Lebanon was 
supported this time by Yitzhak 
Shamir, the foreign minister and 
leader of the rightist Likud bloc in 
the national unity government; 

Mr. Shamir said be reversed his 
earlier vote opposing the withdraw- 
al plan because there was “no use 
in tnairing proposals without any 
chance of getting them through the 
cabinet.'' 

But Mr. Shamir, in an interview, 
stressed that he still bad doubts 
about the wisdom of the timing of 
the withdrawal He indicated that 
he was reserving judgment on sup- 
porting the final stage of withdraw- 
al to the international border until 
be learned how the army proposed 
to protect civilians living m north- 
ern Israel from terrorist attack. 


He said the retaliatory raids in proved the invasion of Lebanon in out 
southern Lebanon against Shiite 1982, but that government did not on i 
villages were intended to give the draw up a withdrawal plan. He L 
Shiites “a lesson for the future.” jomed five other Likud members of 


it portfolio — who did not vote 
i the issue. 

In the interview, Mr. Shamir said 



withdrawal plan presented Jan. 14. response to the Mubarak propos- 
Sxteen ministers voted for the als. From the outset, Mr. Shamir 


villages were intended to give the draw up a withdrawal plan. He In the interview, Mr. Shamir said 

Shiites “a lesson for the future.” joined five other Likud members of he would not criticize Prime Mnns- 
Mr. Shamir said be “would like the cabinet in voting against the ter Shimon Peres’s initial favorable 
to believe" that President Hosni withdrawal I plan presented Jan. 14. response to the Mubarak prppos- 
Mubarak of Egypt was sincere in Sixteen ministers voted for the ala. From the outset, Mr. Shamir 
offering new proposals for peace three-stage plan. has shown more skepticism toward 

tabes, but he added cautiously, “We tv cf 3 or that q^s antho- Mr- Mubarak's initiative than has 

are not naive.” rized Sunday calls for the Israeli **£'*■“■ . 

He said that Mr. Mubarak was Army to evaroale positions in east- Mr. Shamir insisted that the 

going to the United. States to seek em Lebanon and topuH back to a Egyptian envoys who visited Jem- 
new tad from a Congrcra concerned line that nmsjusi north of the town saksm last week had not presetted 
about the lack of progress on Egyp- of Hasbaya. The first stage of the formal proposals to the Isradigov- 
tian-Israeh issues. withdrawal in winch l3 troops erameat, but had merdy engaged 

He predicted that Egypt and Is- left the Lebanese port city of Sdoo m gmeral discussions about Egyp- 
rael would reach agreement "voy ^ ^ Hounding ark in the o^kraeK refctuxis. 
soon" on an mtenm status for the west, was accomplished Feb. 16. In mlemews with American and 


u ' : f 


Earthquake 
Hits Chile; 
124 Dead, 
2,000 Hurt 


WORLD BRIEFS 


British, Irish Armies SearcliBorder |l’ J* l! 


< Hum 

,n ! l* 

^ if i ;»rt^ 


BELFAST (AP) — British and Irish troops, hacked 1 
searched the Irish border Monday for IRA guerrillas who 
police officers and a soldier in recent days. 


The second stage that was autho- 
rized Sunday calls for the Israeli 
Army to evacnatc positions in east- 


has shown more skepticism toward 
Mr. Mubarak's initiative than has 

Mr, Peres. 

Mr. Shamir jp sfa flri thaf the 


and topuH back to a Egyptian envoys who visited Jcm- 


. j * withdrawal in 
He predicted that Egypt and Is- left the Lcbane 
rad would reach agreement “very ^ ^ S0ItQl 
soon" mi an interim istatu for tire ^^acco 
disputed town of Taba on the Gulf 
of Aqaba. He suggested a mmiste- The 
rial-levd conference to try to reach ^ 

a “package deal" That would re- Army well nort 
solve the final status of Taba and uignoimmedi 
all outstanding bilateral disagree- 610 Israel Tin: 
meats. vole was nertl 

Mr. Shamir warned that Ameri- c 9 ntr ®^ er sial a 
can failarc to provide $800 million P 1 ®*® “** 
in supplemental aid that has been Nevertheless 


The Associated Pros 

SANTIAGO — A nugor earth- 
quake has struck the larger does in 
central Otik, and; the government 
said at least 124 people have been 
killed and 2,000 injured. 

The capital Santiago, and the 
Pacific coast dries of Valparaiso 


kilometers) of the frontier between Newiy, Northern Ireland, where m 
police officers woe killed in an Irish Republican Army mortar atta 
Thursday, and County Fermanagh, where IRA gunmen shot and killet 
Roman Catholic police sergeant Sunday outside a church where he was 
attend Mass. 

“It’s a major operation, and we're coordinating oar dforts with t 
Irish Army and police on their ride of the border, said a British An 
spokesman. In Ireland, police sources said that raids were carried out 
isolated farmhouses and other suspected guerrilla hideouts. But 
arrests were reported. 


in general discussions about fcgyp- 
oan-Isradi relations. Yitzhi 

In interviews with American and 
Egyptian newspapas last week, the terms of the 


Yitzhak Shamir 


and Vifla del Mat, which have a ■ ‘ ' , _ . ,, 

Palme Blames Britain for Add Rain 


west, was accomplished Feb. 16. _ “* *? 4 “ v “ iWa auu v*ich stiwk at 7.47 PAL 

_ _ , . „ Egyptian newspapas last week, me toms of the Camp David peace Sunday. Deaths also were reported 

Tne first and second stage pull^ Mr. Mubarak outlined proposals accords, which call for a five-year in the dries of R an ca gu a and San 
backs wm stm leave the Israeli for involving Palestinian represen- interim period of autonomy for the Antonia 


Army wdl north of the border, pos- tatives in peace talks that would Palestinians of the West 
mg no im m ediate threat to north- indude. in different staaes. Jordan, fore the final status of that 


Within six hours, Santiago reri- 


REYKJAVIK (Reuters) —Prime Minister Olof Palme of Sweden s 
Monday that British industry was the. cause of much of the poOnt. 
affecting the Nordic countries and urged Scandinavia to increase p 
sure on Britain to act against “add ram.” 

In a speech prepared for the 33d annual session of the five-mem 
Nordic umncfl, Mr. Palme deplored Britain's refusal to join 20 Europ 
countries committed to reducing sulphur emissions 30 percent by 19 


controversial as a decision to com- 
plete the withdrawal plan will be. 


that said that Mr. Mn- on that baas. 


ors continued through the night 


“The evidence that pollution is destroying our forests, oar land, 
saw, lakes nnri rivers is overwhelming." Mr. Palme said. He shipped si 
of repeating earlier all egations that Britain was waging envi ron mq 
war on its neighbors. In December, the council members, Sweri 
Norway, Denmark, Iceland and F inland blamed Britain for lack 
cooperation in international moves to reduce pollution. 


called for direct talks But Mr. Shamir seemed to be and early Monday. 


“I hope the army will find an requested for fiscal 1983 would 
answer to this before we reach the have grave effects on the Israeli 


Nevertheless, Sunday's unam- between an Arab delegation and more optimistic that the impasse The government imposed a mid- 
ous cabinet vote was evidence of Israel But he rejected Mr. Mubar- Egypt and Israel have reached over night to 5 AAL curfew in the earth- 


international border,” Mr. Shamir economy, which is 


said. "We still have a few months ” spend' to the belt-ti; 


Mr. Shamir was prime minister sues that the government has car- 
ta the previous I.ilnid government ried out since taking office in 


and is due to return to that office 
under the coalition agreement with 
the Labor Party. 


September. 
Mr. Sham 


con tinuing , 

two former 


tion came from of Jordanians and representatives “We have 


defense minis- of the Palestine Liberation Organi- peace with 


lets — Ariel Sharon, now the min- ration. 


[ improvement of At midmarmog Monday, a gov- 
idations- eminent spokesman announced 

a heavy price for that the death toll had been raised 
t," he said. “We to 124, counting only newly found 


East Germans Getting Visas for Wes 


hirtm 


Mr. Shamir was a senior member Liter of industry and trade, and 
of the Likud government that ap- Moshe Arens, now a minister witb- 


have to give some substance to this victims in Santiago and Valparaiso. 


Mr. Shamir insisted that any new peace. It has to become a real As communications are restored 


negotiations be conducted under peace.’ 


Boy Is Wounded in War 
Of Reluctant Players 





(Continued from Page I) 
included women. Ari cheered, 
clapped his hands and shouted, "I 
hit the driver!” 

1 ran out of the hut to see what 
was happening. Women were cry- 
ing. Tne doors of the car opened. 
One of the women waved a white 
handkerchief. 

Running barefoot toward us and 
screaming, a woman cried, "You 
killed him. you tilled him, my only 
son. I have no other." 

"Why did you do it,” she asked, 
falling 1 to the ground and pounding 
her head on the grass. "Kill me too, 
kill me too. 1 have five daughters, 1 
waited 23 years to get a son.” 


Barney Clark’s Records 
Stolen From Hospital 


The Assodated Press 


She gave her name as Nur Sadeq. 
She said that her son, Hassan. 11, 
had been hit in the head and ap- 
peared to be dead and that one of 
her daughters was wounded. An- 
other daughter bad followed her. 

Giddi asked me to drive the 
mother and her daughter to their 
car. When we got than, there was 
no one in it The father had pulled 
his son about 30 yards back to get 
him out of the Israelis' firing range. 

The boy had an open wound in 
the forehead and appeared to be 
dead. One of his sisters was wound- 
ed in the ear. 

"He's alive,” the father 
The boy moved slightly. "Look, he 
is moving,’* his mother said. 
"Please save him. Take him to Isra- 
eL” 

We took them back to the Israe- 
lis. Soon, Israeli reinforcements ar- 
rived, about 60 men with older offi- 


< • . . 




Warsaw lilts 
Food Prices 
Byllpto 75% 


The Associated Pros 


and reports arrive from remote ar- 
eas. the government feared the 
death toll would increase. Officials 
said that at least 2,000 people were 
hurt. 

Melipflla, a town southwest of 
Santiago, was heavily damaged, the 
government said. 

The situation in dozens of small 
mral communities in central Chile 
remained confused because of the 
communications failures. 

People camped in the debris in 
city streets, away from their weak- 


BONN (Reuters) — A number of East Germans who camped otn 
West German embassies last year to press fra the right to emigrate hi 
already gained exit visas and arrived m the West, tire Bonn govenaa 
said Monday. 

A spokesman for the lnnex-German Relations Ministry said the 5ns 
more than 200 people who had sought refuge in missions through 
Eastern Europe had crossed the bonier in February. He refused to g 
figures, saying that the Beam government frit discretion was vital in. 
interest of those still waiting to leave. East Germans seeking to q n j gr 
moved into Bonn's embassies in Prague, Warsaw, Budapest and Bug 
zest last year. . 

All East German fcmigrfcs have to register at West Germany's trat 
ramp at Giessen. The head of the camp, Heinz Duerr, said that 30 to 
people were arriving each day and that the number was slightly ah 
average. He said he could not estimate how many of the arrivals had h 
involved in the embassy protests. 





WARSAW — Prices of 10 basic ened homes. The authorities 
food items rose as ranch as 73 per- warned that walls in many of the 


Shot Is Fired at U.S. Justice’s Home 


cent Monday in the first stage of adobe homes in towns near San tia- 
the government’s phased price-in- go were cracked and that they 


crease plan announced last week. 
There were no reports of pro- 


might collapse in the aftershocks. 
Ten people died when the front 


tests, although Lech Walesa, the section of a church collapsed dur- 
Leader of the banned Solidarity tag Mass in San Bernardo, just out- 


trade union, said he expected work- side Santiago, according to Jaimi 
ers to demonstrate their disapprove Garda, governor of the capitaL 


al of the increases, which he called 
a “deception.” 


The quake shook .Sa ntia go for 
.about five minutes. Jos6 Carcamo, 


Mr. Walesa said Sunday that he who lives on the sixth floor of a 
would not initiate protests but central Santiago apartment bufld- 


wouid participate in any that might ing, said: “All of a sudden, this 
occur at the lemm Shipyard in huge cloud of reddish dust came 


Th# Associated Pres 


Secretary of State George P. Shultz, left, greeting Vlazti- 
mirV. Shcherbitsky, a member of the Soviet Politburo, on 


Gdansk, where he is an electrician, from nowhere. I thought it was the 
“ITIioin in if anything goes on," end of the world.” 
he said “At any moment, advanta- Chilean officials said the quake’s 


SALT LAKE CITY, Utah — Dr. cers and two doctors, an W® arrival at Andrews Air Force’ Rase (or a 10-<lay visit k ^ . tead -' 

Barney B. Clark’s 1,000-page medi- ambulance and other vehicles. ~ 

cal record has been stolen along Hassan was taken to the ambu- • 

with other memorabilia of the lance. His mother was screaming TB_ | •■T _ Ri f, I 

world's first recipient of a penna- One of the soldiers with Giddfs jjOuICf ITOUtOUPO IrUSntUGT* 
nent artificial heart, a University of unit caressed her check as she sat -7 


gcous or not, I am always prepared epicenter was 23 miles (abbot 40 


kilometers) off the coastal resort 


The announcement of a plan to city of Algarrobo, 88 miles north- 
raise prices over four months came west of Santiago. 


nent artificial heart, a University of unit caressed her cheek as she sat 


Utah spokesman said. 


on the road and told hen “Don't be 


three days after - the government In a nationwide radio and televi- 
scrapped plans for across- the- a on address Monday, President 
board increases in the face of oppo- Augusto Pinochet announced the 


The 18-inch-thick (46-centime- afaid, don’t be afraid. The doctors 
ter- thick) record was reported have come, don't worry ” 

- — i tv. nr?i < i . i. _ i 


missing last summer by Dr. Wil- We had no idea what happened 
liam G DeVries, who was prepar- to the boy. The three guerrillas re- 


In U.S. 9 to Meet Reagan 


rition from Solidarity and from Po- appointment of a committee to co- 


WASHINGTON (UPI) — Jus- 
tice Harry A Blackmun of the US. 
Supreme Court, who has received 
numerous death threats for writing 
•the high court’s opinion legalizing 
abortion in 1973, confirmed Mon- 
day that a shot had been fired 
through a window of his home last 
week. 

In a statement issued by his of- 
fice. Mr. Blackmon confirmed that 
one shot had been fired Thursday 
through a front window of his 
home in Arlington, Virginia. No 
one was injured. The Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation is investigat- 
ing tire incident. 

A source familiar with the inci- 
dent said Mr. Blackmun and his 
wife were sitting in the room short- 
ly before the shot was fired. Mi. 
Blackmon had just walked out of 
the room when the shot was fired. 
Mis. Blackmon, who was described 


hind’s official trade unions: 


ordinate assistance to the homeless" ^ 


upseC’- was showered 
with glass. Tne bullet, which police 
said was a 9-miUimeter sing, was 
found embedded in a chair. 


In the first stage Monday, the &ud restore basic services. 


' C7 prices of 10 basic staples wore in-. President Pinochet called on 

Untied Press international younger colleague in the Politburo creased by an average 35 percent. C hile a n s to “remain c alm as you 
WASHINGTON - A Soviet did during a vSt to Britain in De-; tea rose 75 percent, and have done m the last difficult 

legation led by Vladimir V. cember. • “flkclnnbed 11 percent. hour t^ i to •***$£ 

teberbitsky, a member of the nil- Mr. Shcherbitsky, 67, is not con-' ^7*“* a deception,” said Mr. yourbrotbers who have been hit by 


ham G DeVries, who was prepar- to the boy. The three guerrillas re- 
ing vo move to Louisville, Ken- mained in Israeli custody, 
tucky, from Salt Lake City, the As we left, the Israelis ordered us 

spokesman said. to take the man on crutches with 


As we left, the Israelis ordered us delegation led by Vladimir V. 
to take the man on crutches with Shcherbitsky, a member of the iul- 



... <*|J 


i >i7ii» Tra 


Harry A. Bladamm 




Arsonists Attack Tracks, 
Railroad Cars In Geneva 

Agrnce France-Prase 

GENEVA — Six army trucks 


us. He told us he had come to check tag Politburo, has begun a 10-day sidered a contender for the top 
the road because his unde wanted trip to the United States that mil Kremlin position, because his polit- 

: . Lr_ . i m. • . :a.i l... J ~ w. j 


ilk climbed II percent. hours, and to show solidarity to t c V a i j mj i n*. 

“This was a decqition,” said Mr. your brothers who have been hit by JKUI H5RVS ITRCI AtlSCfeCd lillClCflr 9lt6 

ulom **Yl mnw i 1 n«< ** I ■ ** . . A . * 


Walesa. "It is manipulation." 

Last week, Mr. Walesa called off 


tragedy” 

Qectri 


-uuww >TUmvv WW UIV UU 11 W UlOh WUi - yvur I - - - . , ,, j 

to drive to Beirut with his truck He - include a meeting with President “*1 base is outside Moscow and F™? 5 a p-tamute nationwick put and 

1 11 t ■ .i n --la n 1_“_ „ m- - it • MTllfP aftW tilt* DAUMflmMl cuirf tf IflmmWl f 


ectrical power was knocked 
and telephone lines were 


said he would go back once the Ronald Reagan. 


Israelis had left 


In an arrival statement on Sun- Ukrainian, not Russian. 


because his nationality is officially strike aIte ? **•* government said it jammed in Chile, m a king if diffi 

in. ■ . n. - y J ' (WmilH mnea ife nlo«i fnr mitinn mil tn onthpr ffifftTmnfiAfi 


‘ ■ I" - 1 * **-•«*•** J MIM.IIH .Ail. VU UUU - *■ At 

With relief we reached the Lcba- day, Mr. Shcherbitsky, the Ukrai- Yet he is thought to have consid- -' °T P™ 5 ®- 

* - - — * 1- - — - — ■ ■ "w ■ — n ... a s ■ ■ ■ . . _ n PflVftfTH 


•would revise its plan for raising cult to gather information. Elec- 


parked at a Geneva barracks and Suddenly, shots wi 
five rail cars were set on fire in less Lebanese Army i 

than 24 hours during the weekend side and guerrillas from the other, next Tuesday, 
by arsonists claiming to belong to a “We stopped the car and threw up “A success! 
group calling itself the Autono- our hands, shouting at them to . talks would b 
mous Cells, the police said Mon- stop, 
day. One of the arm 

The group has chimed Tour oih- nized us and the si 
cr attacks in the post five days in We rushed bade to 
Geneva, tad tiding setting fire to ty of West Beirut. 

the building where ibe leader of the 

rightist French National Front, 

Jean-Marie Le Pen, was due to give Til - Tr« 
a speech March 13. UlaSt IVl 


nesc Army checkpoint in Zrariye. man Communist Party leader, era- erable influence in the Soviet lead- ^govenunemcammumquealso 
Suddenly, shots were fired at us by phasized Soviet commitment to the erchip. He ranks among the long- ^ for 


Lebanese Army troops from one arms talks due to begin in Geneva esi-serving members of the productewoold be ended and mation Center ta 


triaty was restored ta Santiago af- 
ter a cut of nearly three hours. 

The National Earthquake Infor- 


Polivburo, 


become a ItaQ P™ 5 *® 35 rawed to offset the ta- do, said the 

stopped the car and threw up “A successful outcome of the member in ApriTl97I. The repub- cn ^ scs : . , **“ Ricfaler acaic - 

hands, shouting at them to . talks would be a mqor contribu- lie he runs, the Ukraine, is second -Stamslaw Ctasek, the »wem- 

lion to solving the first priority mid only to the Russian Federation ta : 5** ?*’ 

je oT the army officers recog- the most important problem of lo- size and wealth, and Mr. Shcher- ■ authon 4 cs TT G TTanlv froirt 

) us and the shooting stopped, day whidi is removing the threat of bilsky is believed to be dose to ^““Pf^^pnce increases de- U.D« JU g fl LOUTt 

nehaA knMr .. Spite Public OOPOSltimL _ ° 


Colora- 


measured 7.4 on 


NICOSIA (AP) — Iraqi military planes attacked the construction . 
of an Iranian nudear power plant at Bushehr on the Gnlf, and kfflal*-, y 
persons ta a separate raid Monday on a gasoline station and steel pt • 
the official Iranian news agency reported. ^ 

The ageniw, which is monitored here, said the Iraqis fired a ai *' 
Exocet/missUe at the nudear plant, causing "some damage" but' - 
casualties. It was at least the third attack on the plant in the past ye • 

It raid that Iraqi planes earlier had bombed the gas station and s-v ■ 
plant taAhwaz, capital Of the southern Iranian oil province onOams 


I ■m. S If 


The jets fired six rockets at the-Ahwaz targets, killing 1 1 persons, :• 
wounding 30, the agency said It added that three units of thestedpi 
were damaged. 


'i •• 

Af’SBUl 

- 

- 

t ** 


of the army officers 


ty of West Beirut. 



Blast Kills 12 
In Lebanon 


five safe- nuclear war," Mr. Shcherbitsky 
said. 

Only one other Politburo mem- 
ber has visited the United Stales 
-■ ^ since 1973, Foreign Minister An- 
I A drri A. Gromyko. 


Mr. Shcherbitsky President Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko. 


spite pub 
Critics 


KJstaon. 

they could not ac- 


. 4 , oapi any m^’or price hikes at one 

The vunt is not expected to gen- time," be said on Polish television. 


erate substantive negotiations, and “We have largely met tins 
it is viewed by diplomats and offi- by dividing tne increases and im- 
oals m Mosco w as an effort by the piemen ting them gradually.” 


Rules Indians 
Can Pursue Claim 


U.S. to Reduce Lead in Gasoline 


The detestation was invited bv tTI T ^ piemen ong mem gradually.'' 

Congrerai3raSia^nS?taJrS ta a separate broadcari, Polish 

tbeloYtat (SSn ' ^ TV accused Mr. Walesa of attempt- 
hTi ™ negotiations m Geneva. tas to “cause unrest” over thennee 


(Continued from Rage I) 

been among those killed, has served 
as a spokesman for the Amal mili- 
tia ta the area east of Tyre. Before 
Saturday’s search by Israeli Army 


ta 1983. The delegates are members 
of the Supreme Soviet, the Soviet 
Union’s nominal parliament. 

■ A Classic Connmssar 


aiuo ucgouauons m ueneva. mg to "cause unrest” over the price 
Within the Politburo, Mr. issue. 

Sbcbcrbitgky has ranked among the "He calls for unrest, but adds he 
hard-liners on the central issue of is not proposing any protests,” said 



Miuroay-s scared by Israeli 
units, he was quoted in the 


press as predicting that there would broad-faced potitidaj 
soon be a search of Marshall but mold of the fcremlta 
that he would elude the Israeli not expected to attr 
tan* 5 - tion that MDchafl S. C 

Mr. Jarcadi also was quoted as - 
promising the Israelis “four suicide 
raids a wek." 3 



m a uassic '-onnmssar internal economic change. In con- a commentator on a Sunday eve- 

Serge Sdimemann of The New trast to younger, reform- minded ntag news broadcast. He added: 
York rones reported earlier from colleagues Hoe Mr. Gorbachov, "He tries to safeguard himself and 
Moscow: who have called for more economic avoid taking responsibility.” 

Mr. Shcherbitsky, a burly, decentralization and greater atten- Unannounced food-price ta- 
broad-faoed politician in the classic tion to market mechanisms, Mr. creases caused workers' protests in 
mold of the Kremlin commissar, is Shcherbitsky has maintained a 1970 and ta 1976. In 1980, cimiw 


Unannounced food-price in- 
awes caused workers’ protests in 
70 and ta 1976. In 1980, similar 


not expected to attract the atten- staunch Stalinist faith ta the power protests ta Gdansk and other cities 


tion that MDchafl S. Gorbachov, his of disdplirie. 


led to the formation of Solidarity. 


ptaK Gromyko Warns Genscher on Space Arms 

military officials said Sat- ^ want not only thor beta, ter also will visit Poland and B 

urday that large amounts of weao- ^ ^ msal aaentific exp^ garia before returning borne. 

oTLd Si ■tawMtmoc^rfdKta.uaon ra," Mr. ^anbosBr aid in . D^, n 


Untied Pros International 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court, ta a decision Monday 
that could have profound inmact 
on Indian land claims throngoout 
the eastern United Stales, narrowly 
upheld the right of the Oneida Indi- 
ans to pursue a 189-year-old c laim 
in New York. 

The court ruled, 5 to 4, that the 
Indians had a right u> pursue their 
claim against two New York coun- 
ties and woe not barred by a stat- 
ute of limitations. 

The case at the conn was a nar- 
row one, involving 872 acres (about 
350 hectares) in Madison and 
Oneida counties in New York and 
the use of the land by the counties, 
mostly as highway, for two years. 
However, the issues are similar or 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency-, - 
Monday it would require that virtually all lead be removed from gak“ 
this year. 

The federal agency announced final regulations reducing the pemr - 
ble lead concentration ta gasoline from the present !.l grams per .gr*---. 
(43 liters), to 03 gram on July 1, and to 0.1 gram next Jan. 1. 

A spokesman said the EPA was continuing to consider a ban on bx •' 
gasoline by 1988. Further review of tire relationship between kadr---_ 
various health problems and lead's role as a lubricant in 
needed, he said. 


p 

• ** 


Tn* 


Ex-ILS. Defense Official Pleads i 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The former deputy defense 

N. Thayer, and a Texas stockbroker, Billy Beta Harris, plead 
Monday in federal court to charges of obstructing justice • 
Securities and Exchange Commisaon investigation ot insider t 
U3. District Judge Charles Richey set April 18 as the 
sentencing. Both men face a maximum sentence of five years b 
meat and a fine of $5,000. 

Prosecutors charged that Mr. Thayer, while chairman of the I 
chief executive officer of LTV Corp- ta Dallas and a member of 
of Anheuser-Busch Co. of Sl Louis, and Allied Coip„ of Mr- 
New Jersey, passed confidential nonpublic information to Mr. 


nnc «T»I nmniii.ii‘fl.i.1 - *. jjiww uuma u uu UCULC, B/U. rrCUUOTSSa 

and^reduction of nudear weap- WestGemanyonFdj.il. 

including anti-tank weapons, rock- The ABM treaty was sieneri hv Genscfacr ’ ® l a P«ss 

ct-propclled grenades, a madune “ ’Monday after U« = 


gun and a mortar. 


Mr. Genscher, at a 
ezice Monday after 


r beta, ter also will visit Poland and Bnl- 
c expe- garia before returning home. 

^ “ ■ Reagan Poshes MX 

In Wariungtoo, President Ron- 
aid Reagan asked Congress on 


which his Moscow visit was ar- 


\7j j4* rfjjtjfa . tag or denloymeut of space-based WIura ms Moscow visit was ar- and counter a growing Soviet nrfli - 

W VisLimg ^ 2WBSS sySt gasL ?° ««y •*«—*. uSSdKTSSS- 

Yojjj fVrtniTTv Miri last iwniK HeJ- S i nki , where be arrived later in tional r«nnrt«t 


offer to participate m the U^. re- 

search, despite remarks by Caspar Jo® Boon. He wd raly flat both 


Gramercy 
Park Hotel 


tional reported 

With a series d vows scheduled 
on Capitol Hfll in the next several 


identical to other cases in the east- a 1 n l 1 r<i • n • # 

em United States in which a large AflgQian lieDelfi lialm LinW lling flf 

amoDot of land a at dispute LISBON (AF) - Angobo rcb& add Monday Oat thnshot 

J^SSurtSd g? vern 9«it frimer tast week, killing all ^pSas aboaS but l! 

m carner TAAG said there was only a minor accident with no ore 
sue isfirmlv ratabSred * ^ t ^.tafbon-based European spokesman for tire National Union! 

Total Independence of Angola said that the Boeing 737 was hit by 
^ “ti-airCTaftfireWednesday as it took off from Lubango theca 
Luanda, 470 miles (760 kflometera) to the nmth.^e^cesman sai 

question of whether there are de- ^ 
fenses available to the counties, we 
conclude that none has merit” 


For the Record 


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Singles $80-90 
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Suites $110-150 
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monthly rates available. 
Call Gen. Mgr. Tom O'Brien 
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Telex 668-755 
Cable GRAMPARK 
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search, despite remarks by Caspar Mr. Reagan simed a report 

W. Weinberger, the US. drfeSe “ ** mad i1 .*“ a 8^ that must be sent taCongress^c- 
I secretary, that West German coop- ™ ance to continue dialogue. fore efforts can be made to release 
I era tion would be welcome. The West German foreign minis- SU bflfion ta MX production 


I funds approved last year. 


'•Vv; 


; :£Y*- 


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BUSINESS PEOPLE 
APPEARING EAJH WH5NESCWT 
AMDFREmYINTWtHT 






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Ka k ne i Tanaka, a former prime minister of Japan, will require n^v 
FT n4wwnlifn«a m CnnriohiiiTiA three months to recover from a stroke he suffered- ^ Wednesday, docs” 

Y wueurauujic said Monday .TTiey had said earlier that Mr. Tanaka would be bade 

ori) . tT _ - . feet in three to four weeks. 

rulNTE-A-riTRc, Guflae- Foreign ministers of the Organizatixm of African Unity code . 
taupe — Foot firebomb attacks weekloog meeting MondayinAddLs Ababa, Ethiopia, by agreeing to! , ; 
caused heavy damage taut no taju- asimmnttnettmgmAddisAbabafiXhnJulylStoZltoseAnnnedie '.i' 
oes here, police said Monday, falling food output, stagnant economic growth and widespread htu V 
There ms no immediate daim of because of drought, (Ran l 

responsibility. dashes between snpportHs of Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and \ 

governing party ta the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh Wt two pen s 
dead Monday, the day before seven state elections, officials said. A n>' -\ 
of polling in four states Saturday caused at lost 20 deaths and 


There was no immediate daim of 
responsibility. 


ir 



55 e Salon 
de I’auto 

+ accessoires 

Geneve 

7-17.3.1985 


injuries, aD in the eastern stale of Bihar. 


AUTHORS WANTED 
BY N.Y. PUBLISHED 

lacrfng subsidy book pufattw saris manu- 
sov ft of afl two, fiction, rxwvfiction. poatry. 
jyvomla, xhofcrly and reHaio-jj wrfe, Me. Naw 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


P*ge3 



ILD 


— — 

fj mi ^eaiS"Meese Suggests Crime 

Monday ftirHu 2*^ h *»cU 

!**^ *£***** 

1 m an 

■ 

^ ^ B ^youiMd Ca ^^; By Loretta Tofani 

I* flmJ were L .v, Pj WaMnpm Port Service 

.ihe.rsidcV^H'Mir ' AMELIA ISLAND. Florida — 
dice souretN f 2 Ala bis first speech as attorney sm- 
other KUsn^i, ul Edwin Meese 3d has told a 

{xx,Ctl guerrilla ? C| ^puup of prosecutors that the Unit- 
ai States is at a “particularly aid- 


t Drop if Career 
3^S5E Fdons Wed Longer 


*1 juncture" m me quest for pub- 


f 1 hl t S n ^ Atijlffifl— said Sunday to 

-a 


unv. *«.-* ‘ 2,nj ^ justice system “gives valkfity, I 

Iforni 


“odd raui ’ . 

h«r the 33d animal ,scs. M .. hmk, to the need for new theories, 
K ! deplored Britain's refiiJii t H iew pi™*, new systems which wffl 
Wtwing sulpliur enurim* ft#* effective in protecting the 
Uulwn is destrv»> inir iiut r ** to*V l * Bc 111311 50016 °f the traditional 
Wwhdmtng," M r p a] Or ^i. t tiethods of handling crimmals." 
llkms that Britain The attorney general did not say 

n December, the c,'un^ asin ^' tirectly wbat t ^ s rf mah( ^ be 
»nd and Finland bhrn S n rD Q% TO old endorse. But he said he felt 
flal move* to reduce TVii .^UBi.hat ““e had decreased during 
F l, iiuiion. he past couple of yean because 
aCoH* i -c Hire people were going to jail or 

H veiling \ isac I prison and because career crimi- 

munber of EjS G,- m IOf P* ^ SS" 8 ?? “ P* 5 * 00 for 

Iasi wir . , ™ r anger periods of tune. 

j °. P res ; s f° r the right . He also lauded the Supreme 


vision, said: “These findings 
graphically illustrate the enormous 
impact repeat offenders have on 
public safety and die c rimin al jus- 
tice system.* 

Mr. Troll said the statistics “also 
give as some sense of bow much 
additional rrmw» ranM be reduced 
if crimfrtflk actually saved the in- 
creased sentences winch could be 
imposed under present law.** 

Lawrence A Greenf dd, a bu- 
reau statistician and author of the 
Study, said the survey by the bu- 
reau, an agency of die Department 
of Justice, nfitis the only national- 
ly representative “recidivism esti- 
mate 5 * ever done. • 

The study sample was of 5,357 
inmates of the 153,000 males who 
entered prison between Nov. 1, 
1978, and Oct. 31, 1979. 

The study estimated that 42 per- 
cent of those entering state prisons 
in 1979 were then an probation or 
parole for prior offenses. 



House Democrats’ Meeting Is Stormy 

Some Call Speaker a Racist; Others Are Upset About MX 


SELMA REVISITED — More than 2^00 marchers crossed the Edmond Pettus 
Bridge in Selma, Alabama, on Sunday to mark the dvfl rights march of March 7, 1965, 
when 600 black protesters were routed by stale troopers. They were led by, from left, 
John Lewis, an Atlanta councilman; the Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, and the Reverend 
Joseph E. Lowery, the president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. 


By Jonathan Fucthringer 

Sew York Tuna Struct 

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS. 
West Virginia — After a weekend 
meeting among House Democrats 
to begin a party revival, a search for 
new policies and a push for unity, 
the Democrats were still having 
their usual share of squabbler 

Lee A lacocca, chairman of 
Chrysler Corp., one of several ex- 
perts brought in to address the 1 35 
Democrats, just over haff the Dem- 
ocratic membership of the House, 
angered several members with a 
speech about free trade that fo- 
cused on Japan. 

There was also some dissent over 
the sponsorship of tbe meeting. 
National Legislative Education 
Foundation Inc, a private group 
that gets its money from corpora- 
tions and unions, paid Tor 60 per- 
cent of the estimated S 170.000 cost 
of the conference. 

“That is the exact opposite image 
we want,” said Representative 
Mike Lowry of Washington. 



wr 


Lee A lacocca 


-4* Farms Wither in Middle America, So Do the Small Towns 

rassss 


onn 


» government felt divaeuenf^ ^ r - Meese relied heavily during 
uig to leave. East Germans Jei ■“ sp®®* <® information in stod- 
ssw» in Prague. Warsaw 5 by criminal justice experts, es- 

xdally studies funded by the Jns- 
rts have to register at \y«, r ice Department’s National 
td of the camp. Heinz Duerr VJ S? SnstltDte “ Jo5tlc e. He trice men- 
i day and that the number R* 0 * 1 Corp. Sadies that had 

not estimate how many of IZz**** 1 by ^ ins tit ute, 
protests. ^ The studies indicated, he said, 

sat crime is a “far more intracia- 
f t o t _ le problem than we were previons- 

flt U*0* Justice g HV led to believe,” and that there is 
xlear room for i mprov ement in 
ur deployment of resources to 
ntrol c rim e." They also showed, 
said, that 65 percent of eliminate 
on probation are arrested 
febrile still on probation and 51 per- 
of diem a it convicted of new 


Vgmuon 

s the exclusionary rule” evidence 
^ (I,,, jr 1,1 iDegahy by police cannot be 

the border in February iS^Z-sed m court 


) — Jus- 
rihe US. 
■ received 
X writing 

legal i/ing 
led Mon- 
een fired 
nome last 



■runes. 


iy hw of- 
-med that 
Thursday 
n of his 
puia. No 
deral Bu- 
avestigat- 


the inci- 
i ami his 
XRSbt'rf- 
Ired. Mr. 
sd out of 
ns fired. 
dMcnhed 
rirawcrcd 
nil police 
«H*g,wa' 
ir. 



Study <rf Repeal Offenders 

Ronald J.Ostrow of, the LasAnge- 


Nearly 84 percent of criminals 
risoned on state charges in 
were repeal offenders, a na- 
I survey iqxxted Sumfiw. The 
tiding provides -substantial sup- 
art for the view that law enforce- 
t efforts ought to be concen- 
on those who make a career 
t of crime. 

About 46 percent of the repeat- 
wbo committed new crimes 
still hate been behind bars if 
had served maxfmmn sen- 
far the crimes for which they, 
is- ca^icted, -according to the 
rvey by the federal Bureau of 

Harr -' '• Bb(t! ^stofASmey General Sto- 
len S. Trott, who heads the Do- 

[Attacked >iR'iea r r m,ofjM1 “' s “ D " 


By Lacry Green 

■ Los Angela Tim a Service 

VERDIGRE, Nebraska — Main Street 
windows display the signs of trouble in rural 
America. 

Notices taped on plate glass storefronts 
announce the sales of farms and farm equip- 
ment: Two this week, one next week, three 
tbe week after. 

Tbe town's bank failed last year. One of 
the two gas stations is dosed. So is the coin- 
laundry and the local Chevrolet dealer. One 
farm supply store is threatened with foreclo- 
sure. Another farm supplier expects to file 
for bankcrapcy later tins week. 

A sign in the window of Heaton’s Food 
Center says: “Verdigre is farmers and busi- 
nesses working together.” But these days, 
Verdigre townspeople and farmers are with- 
ering together. 

And Verdigre, population 650, is not 
afon & 

Throughout the Midwest's grain belt, 
thousands of small towns — once the main- 
stay of traditional American values; grist for 
writers such as Sinclair Lewis and Sherwood 
Anderson; and way stations for millions who 
migrated from farms to urban centers — are 

cnrfnngcT wt 

Small town Middle America and its Main 
Street businesses are being eroded by the 
same waves of change that are washing fam- 


ily fanners from the land. High interest rates, 
low commodity prices, a in foreign 

trade, falling land values and ineffective gov- 
ernment programs are causing famil y farms 
to collapse at rates unseen since the Depres- 
sion. 

Lany D. Swanson, former director of the 


“The lax base is declining,” said Steve C 
Williams, a research analyst with the Ne- 
braska Department of Economic Develop- 
ment, “and that means it's much more diffi- 
cult to nMimawi basic infrastructure and 
public services like water and roads.” 

Umvoitjof NcbratosGrEU Pbms Mky Ki'of'uSSStfS 


rest of the 1980s, as many suggest, it will 
mean economic and soda! demise for many 
communities." 

Some sm»n towns, said Mark R. Draben- 
stott, senior economist for the Federal Re- 
serve Bank of Kansas City, “are not going to 
be viable when this is all over with.” 

The change for towns will come slowly. It 
win take a whSe before whole towns disap- 
pear. But tbe ripple effect of the v anishin g 
family farmer can already be seen. 

A recent survey by the Federal Reserve 
Bank of Kansas City found that one out of 
every five rural nonfaim businesses is experi- 
encing “severe” financial problems, nearly 
doable the rate reported a year ago. In the 
past six months, 2.9 percent of rural busi- 
nesses have failed. That is twice the normal 
rate. 

The collapse of rural business, coupled 


afford to repair potholes. It has stopped 
street paving and curb installation programs. 

“One of the most devastating things we're 
finding is the outlook of people in these 
email communities,” said J.M. Whinner, an 
Iowa State University political scientist who 
works with rural local governments. “People 
feel there is no future there. It ripples into 
churches, bond issue votes. People put im- 
portant things off for a year like school 
construction, road work, bridge repair." 

Other institutions will feel the effects as 
wdL 

Local school districts will be unable to 
maintain their autonomy because of declin- 
ing enrollment, lading to reduced state aid. 

“Kids growing up in these small communi- 
ties don't see their future there.” said Mr. 
Williams, tbe researcher. “Towns under 


with the coDapse of f amily farms, has long- SjOOO are rapidly losing their younger people towns can’t survive. I don't know that they'll 
* ’ ' --J the balance of their population is in- become ghost 


term implications for local, county and state 
heartland governments. 


and 

creasingly elderly.” 


like they were. 


Drug Traffickers Are Escalating Violence Against U.S. Agents 


the public and the press, except for 
Also, to the embarrassment of one. This was a presentation by 
some, all the sessions were dosed to David R-Gergen, the former direc- 
tor of communications in the Rea- 
gan White House, who was brought 
in to explain why tbe Reagan ad- 
ministration has been so successful 
Mr. lacocca's speech to the 
Democrats was closed to the press, 
but several people who were pre- 
sent said it contained language of- 
fensive to tbe Japanese. 

Representative Robert T. Matsui 
of California, said that Mr. lacocca 
was trying to create “an anti-Japa- 
nese feeling,” 

“I don’t like people who try to 
exploit this issue," Mr. Matsui said. 
He called Mr. lacocca a “racist 
and said “be was saying the same 
thing my parents heard and I heard 
before we were sent to internment 
camps.” 

Several people who heard the 
speech said Mr. lacocca used the 
word “sayonara” in a way that was 
offensive to tbe Japanese. 

Representative Jim Wright, the 
majority leader, who said Mr. la 
cocca’s speech outlined the prob- 
lems of the trade deficit “eloquent- 
ly." said he told Mr. lacocca of tbe 
criticisms. Mr. Wright quoted Mr. 
lacocca as saying that he "didn't 
intend to be a racist” and that he 
was “dreadfully sorry.” 

According to another report of 
the speech. Mr. lacocca said: “The 
Japanese are coming-in. While 
we’re trying to deal with things in 
the front yard, they’re in the back 
yard taking over tbe country.” 

Between speeches from a range 
of experts, who spent much of their 


Tbe collapse of family farms is hurting 
churches, too. A University of Nebraska ag- 
ricultural economist, Paul G erman woo 
conducted a seminar for rural pastors recent- 
ly, said: 

“They were talking about merging, about 
how they couldn't see bow they’d pay their 
ministers in tbe next Tew years. These 
churches, and social institutions like garden 
chibs and women's dubs, arc doomed to 
disappear.” 

The effects will reach county government 
in a few years when tax revenues begin to 
decline as a result of Main Street business 
losses. This will result in reduced law en- 
forcement anti less toad waimmanw of into 
higher taxes for those who remain. Already, 
schools, counties and stales are beginning to 
feel the pressures from reduced income be- 
cause land values have dropped and are 
generating lower property taxes. 

“There is a potential for a collapse of the 
total economy in some areas of Nebraska,” 
said Larry L Bitney, a University of Nebras- 
ka farm management medalist'. “So many 
people are going out of business that there 
are no buyers for land or machinery. 

Main street businesses, the feed dealer, tbe 
grocer, are feeling it.” be said. “Some of the 


time telling the Democrats what 
they were doing wrong, the coming 
vote on the production of 21 new 
MX missiles was one of the chief 
topics. President Ronald Reagan 
was expected to send his request for . 
approval of production of the 21 
missiles to Congress on Monday. 

Representative Les Aspin or 
’Wisconsin, chairman of the .Armed 
Services Committee, said he was’ 
still undecided on his vote. 

But several House Democrats 
who supported Mr. Aspin in his 
unseating of the former committee 
chairman. Representative Melwn 
Price of Illinois, are saying that Mr. 
Aspin plans to vote for the MX 
breaking an agreement they said he 
made in exchange for their support 

Mr. Wright said the vote would 
be dose, adding that the beginning 
of the Geneva arms talks next week 
“would increase the likelihood it 
would be approved in each dum- 
ber.” 

Mr. Wright said in the next sev- 
eral weeks the leadership would 
canvass Democrats on specific 
spending cuts to reduce the lateral 
budget deficit. On the trade deficit, 
he said tbe leadership would ap- 
point a task force to study solu- 
tions. 

On the farm crisis, Mr. Wright 
said the House was expected to 
pass the emergency credit proposal, 
aimed at helping fanners obtain the 
financing they need for spring 
planting. 

Then, referring to President Rea- 
gan's threatened veto, he said. “If 
he vetoes or signs it. fanners will at 
least understand who their friends 
are in the Democratic Party.” 


towns but they’ll be nothing 



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PrllkmumtSS, B-2018 AntwnpJ 
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Telex: 71779 «rl b. 
at the Diamond Club Bldg. 



, ; By Mary 'Thornton 

Washington Post Soria 

WASHINGTON —Tbe Drag 
Enforcement Agoicy, which has re- 
ceived an increasing number of 
threats from Latin American drag 
traffickers, has been forced to di- 
vide its efforts betwe e n combating 
the drag trade and prelecting itself. 

Tbe agency’s Miami office, for 


=a^,2«£ 

Monday mi .i , l, n ^ A-War Evacuation 
agency repotted . 

monitored hcic, mu! iiic lr*|ufc I/ntferf Pros Inwnumonal 

ic’ltuf plant. c-tUMit!’. "vitw dime WASHINGTON — Thegovem- 
thc third attack on the plant m iktent has quietly shelved a plan to 

s earlier had ivinfv! i*u- cj»>uij'vacuate wide cities to rural areas w 

the southern lra:n:i!‘ >' 1 the event of nwdearwar, officials Ctosed-drcnit television cameras 

at the Ah*ai urjciN kilhiie i iff the nation s cml defense agency ^ ^ At the street entrance 

11 ' Ttk proposal aroused ranch re- 

stance, with several states and rit- 


door to discourage car-bomb at- 
tacks. Inside the van, «rmari guards 
wait behind darkened windows. 

Parking spaces around the budd- 
ing's perimeter have been Nocked 
to prevent bombing attacks. 



to tbe parking lot, an armed state 
wildlife officer, temporarily reas- 
signed from hunting drag traffick- 
ers in the Everglades, guards the 


_ traffickers have esca- 

— iik mi’ih'"--;- .... iaiea mar war in recent months. In 

that xitttuiiv .t» fcr-fci *'• ,ru ie first tone Iasi week that the plan December, about the time plans 

L ad been largehr diminated after a ^ completed to extradite four 
IA official said that budr accused Colombian drag traffick- 
ers to the United States for trial. 


ounved final Kpilnu-s* ^ “ d ^ bud_ 

gasoline from the 1 1 cuts had killed it anyway. 

aJuiv 1. ami t.-0 > 

LPA wav iwnwiiiinf 
r review of the rc!.ii» '*«P 
nod hud‘v r.»!c •.’* 


word began circulating (bar the re- 
puted iwwW of the Colombian 
drag racket, Carlos Lehder Rivas, 
had financed one or more assassi- 
nation squads bang sent to tbe 
United States to kidnap, torture 
and murder agents of the Drug En- 
forcement Agency. 

Federal law enforcement sources 
said that information rndir^twt 
that some Colombians were also 
interested in blowing up agency of- 
fices or other federal braidings. 

Colombian drug smugglers have 
announced that they will kill five 
Americans for every alleged drag 
trafficker- extradited to tire United 
States. 

On Feb. 7, a veteran Drug En- 
forcement Agency agent was kid- 
napped from a street in Guadalaja- 
ra, Mexico. The agent, Enrique 
Camarena Salazar, who had been 
involved in a successful investiga- 
tion of local cocaine and marijuana 
traffickers, is presumed dead. 

Within the past two weeks, the 
agency has received word that Co- 
lombian drug traffickers have 
placed a price as high as $350,000 
on the heads of top agency offi- 


cials, including the administrator, 
Francis M. Mullen, who retired 
Friday, and tire deputy admuistra- : 
tar, John C. Lawn, whom the Rea- 
gan administration plans to nomi- 
nate as Mr. Mullen’s successor. 

In November, a car bomb ex- 
ploded outside the UX Embassy in 
BogotA, lolling a woman and even- 
tually leading to the departure of 
17 U.S. officials and then famili es- 
bom the country. Federal law en- 
forcement officials Mamed drag 
traffickers for the bombing. 

In November, 19 members of a 
Unsupported program to destroy 
coca plantations in Pern were lolled 
in the Amazon jungle. 

Although security has been in- 
creased in federal courthouses and 


offices of U2L attorneys and in 
Drug Enforcement Agency offices 
here and abroad, most officials said 
little could be done to protect tbe 
agents. Danger is part of their job. 

“It’s an escalation of the drug- 
trafficking battle,” Mr. Mullen 
said. ‘They make a mistake when 
they do it. They'll end up the los- 
ers.” 

In Mexico, law enforcement offi- 
cials said Mr. Camarena was in- 
volved in an investigation that in- 
flicted huge losses on drug 
traffickers. Because of Drag En- 
forcement Agency efforts, one 
group recently lost $26 milli on and 

6.000 pounds (about 2,700 kilo- 
grams) of cocaine. In November, 

10.000 tons of marijuana plants 


were seized in Chihuahua. Colom- 
bian police said they seized 40,000 
pounds of cocaine and its precursor 
products last year and destroyed 
27 J million coca plants and 262 
cocaine labs. The first four Colom- 
bians to be extradited to the United 
States appeared in federal cotins 
here ana in Miami last mouth. 

■ Security Stepped Up 
Security at border stations be- 
tween the United States and Mexi- 
co was stepped up and nine border 
-crossings were dosed Saturday 
night after threats were made 
against U.S. Customs Service 
agents, officials of both countries 
said Sunday, according to a New 
York Times report from Mexico 
Gty. 


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Page 4 


TUESDAY, MARCH 5,1985 




In'W' 


h 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune 


hUirid Vida The New York Time* ud The Vuh^tM Poet 


After the Coal Strike 


Decisive events are rare in Britain’s econ- 
omy. The normal reaction to challenges has 
been to shuffle and compromise, or else to 
fudge the issues. The resolution of the year- 
long coal strike has departed from this mold. 
The longer-term implications may be mixed. 
Bui it represents a major victory for Marga- 
ret Thatcher’s Conservative government. 

The dispute was about the right of the 
government, acting through the stale Coal 
Board, to decide where to dose money- 
losing pits. The Mmeworkers* Union denied 
this right, despite the promise of reasonable 
treatment for the threatened miners. On the 
local level miners refused to concede that 
the tightly knit mining communities should 
be broken up, however compassionately; at 
the central level miners were led by a per- 
suasive thinker with Marxist underpinnings 
who did not believe in a market economy 
and who therefore rejected what economists 
call the principle of comparative advantage. 

The miners are going bade, but without 
conceding the stale's right to run the indus- 
try on market principles. They see them- 
selves as having been ground down by the 
remorseless financial pressure of a year-long 
strike, yet living to fight another day. They 
threaten local actions to oppose specific pit 
closures as they are announced. 

This reaction is hardly surprising. But 
whether, in the foreseeable future, the mo- 
rale of the financially battered miners or the 
state of the world energy market will be 
conducive to such rearguard protest actions 
is highly uncertain. 

We believe the first winner of this battle is 
the British economy. Whether the pound 
will recover durably now that the strike is 


over cannot be predicted, with currency 
markets in their present confusion — but It 
would if this were a rational world. 

We :ue less certain about the political fall- 
out. If another election were approaching, 
Mrs. Thatcher would benefit enormously, 
just as she benefited from the “Falklands 
factor” in the last election. But the next vote 
is probably far off, and much can happen. 

More disturbing may be the effect of the 
miners’ strike on the general configuration 
of British politics. There has been a basic 
refusal of the center-left — the increasingly 
conservative majority of the labor unions — 
to support there more extreme colleagues. As 
a result, the left may become increasingly 
splintered. The far left, led by Anthony 
Bean, may turn viciously on the moderates 
who refused to provide any meaningf ul sup- 
port for the strike. And this may lead to yet 
another step toward the disintegration of the 
already weakened Labor Party. 

British democracy will not prosper if the 
traditional two-party system breaks down. 
The Hanger now is that while the left is 
splitting, the right mig ht do the same, be- 
cause the need for party discipline will seem 
less. It is very doubtful whether, tn a time of 
difficulty, Britain would prosper from such 
an unknown political configuration. 

But sorely it would have been worse if the 
Thatcher government bad been obliged to 
concede the principle that people have the 
right to decide where they want to work and 
to demand that the rest of the population 
subsidize them if they choose an unprofit- 
able occupation — which is what the British 
miners were demanding. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Why Tout South Africa? 


There may be a hidden purpose in the zigzag 
maneuvers of South Africa's president, Pieter 
W. Botha. He may be embarked on an effort to 
camouflage what is most outrageous in the 
apartheid system — the denial of all political 
rights to 21 millioQ blacks. Or just possibly, be 
hopes that some modest reforms may acquire a 
momentum of their own and begin to enfran- 
chise blacks. But if that is his vision, as some of 
his countrymen hope and others complain, he 
conceals it well — even from his well-wishers 
in the Reagan a dminis tration , 

The best that can be said for now is that 
Mr. Botha is all over the lot He promises 
blacks some form of “participation’' and he 
talks vaguely about changing their legal status 
as “citizens" of the bogus tribal homelands. 
He has suspended some of the forced evictions 
of Hacks from areas designated for whites. 
But he not only refuses to bargain directly with 
any opponents of apartheid, snch as the Unit- 
ed Democratic Front, he also threatens to 
uy them for treason. 

Put the best possible face on all this and you 
have a case of a leader struggUng to find ways 
to ameliorate the lot of the minims whom Ins 
government intends forever to treat as chat- 
tels. Call him locked into an evil condition, a 
man more humane than his policies. But why 
should the U.S. government be the foremost 
champion of his alleged reforms? Why should 
it resist the efforts to dissociate Americans 
from this hateful system and to ostracize its 
sponsors? Why insist on a “constructive" dip- 
lomatic engagement that then has to be justi- 
fied by celebrating every alleged reform? 

The only respectable explanation is that 
some wider American interests of security and 
diplomacy require tL There is a fair chance, it 
is said, that by preserving influence in Pretoria 


the United Slates can help to end bush wars in 
Mozambique and Angola, thereby ridding 
southern Africa of Soviet- bloc influence. 
South Africa has already strode a deal with 
Marxist Mozambique, and a truce of sorts 
prevails in Angola. Perhaps all this foreshad- 
ows <a larger bargain in which South Africa 


gives up its illegal occupation of Namibia and 


gives the leftist regime of Angola cause for 
dismissing the 25,000 Cuban troops that have 
protected it against tribal antagonists. 

This hard-boiled calculation, however, has a 
soft center. Pretoria is not being sice to its 
black neighbors as a favor to President Rea- 
gan. It wants to end its isolation in Africa and 
make it worthwhile for even Marxist neighbors 
to withhold aid from South African guerrillas 
in need of sanctuaries. This defensive diploma- 
cy is openly acknowledged by President Botha. 
Insofar as Americans function as a useful 
intermediary, they are helping South Africa, 
not benefiting from its help. 

Thus the puzzle remains. In the name of 
realism, the Reagan administration argues that 
pressure on South Africa is unlikely to hasten 
constructive change. In the name of fairness, it 
points to some recent progress, such as deseg- 
regation m factories and the rise of blade trade 
unions. But the touting does not stop at that. 
When Mr. Botha offers a political crumb to 
nonwhites, the State Department rushes to 
discover “a new dynamic for change.*' 

That is not the language of analysis but of 
advertising, and on behalf of a regime that has 
ample resources to conduct its own public 
relations. The American apologias arc neither 
effective in South Africa nor prudent in the 
rest of the world. If Mr. Botha intends to 
dismantle apartheid, let him prove it. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Tlie Pressure on Managua 

The Reagan administration, increasing its 
threats to Nicaragua, has scored an important 
victory. Managua’s announcement that a first 
group of 100 Cuban military advisers will leave 


The Sandinists view their concessions as 
-major ones. But these moves might also en- 
courage the Reagan administration to pursue 
and intensify the strategic tension that places 
the Sandinists on the defensive. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


gives partial 
But the Sandinists have taken a big step 
backward. Had they announced the staged 
departure of all the Cuban advisers in Nicara- 
gua, Managua could have made a similar call 
for the withdrawal of all foreign military advis- 
ers in the Central American region. In B 
Salvador, US. advisers are helping the govern- 
ment in their war against the guerrillas, and in 
Honduras, the United States has set up a 
major military infrastructure that piatays that 
nation a possible future base of operations. 


The New Zealand Principle 


Norway and Denmark have long refused 
nudehr weapons. Belgium and Holland have 
been dithering as to whether to accept cruise 
missiles. Greece threatens to remove tour U.S. 
bares. A Labor-ruled Britain would probably 
do the same. Yet all these governments expect 
the United States to defend them, and to pay a 
higher cost for doing so. They cannot therefore 
be surprised if the United States pressures 
them to share the burden more equally. 

— The Sunday Tunes ( London ) 


FROM OUR MARCH 5 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Will Taft Stand on Irish SoQT? 

NEW YORK — It seems that a serious discus- 
sion has arisen as to the propriety of President 
W.H. Taft accepting the invitation of the Irish 
Fellowship Club of Chicago to “stand on Irish 
sofl" when he delivers his address on Sl Pat- 
rick's Day. The dub intended it to be a sur- 
prise, but it leaked out after the departure of 
the steamer Su Louis with “Irish soil” and 
shamrocks. Legal wiseacres declare that it 
would be a breach of the Constitution for the 
President to step on foreign sofl, which the 


transplanted grass plot would be. This objec- 
: be takes seriously. But there are 


tion need not! 
likely to be some nice squabbles among the 
Irish, many of whom are offended at the idea 
of an attempt to place Ireland, even if only a 
small portion of it, in a foreign country. 


1935: Britain to Raise Anns Spending 
LONDON — The British government served 
notice [cm March 4] of its plans far increased 
expenditures on armament, in view of tbe state 
of international politics and tbe increased ar- 
maments of other powers, particularly Germa- 
ny. The warning was contained in a “white 
paper” addressed to the Parliament and signed 
by Prims Minister Ramsay MacDonald. Tbe 
“white paper” said, in part: “Public opinion 
in this country has tended to assume that 
nothing is required for the maintenance of 
peace excepting the existing international po- 
litical machinery, and that other methods of 
defense— navies, armies, air forces — are no 
longer required. The force of world events, 
however, has shown . . . that we have Car to 
go before we can find complete security.” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chmmmt 19581982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
» Co-QuUmen 


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EseaOrvf Et&Ur RENE BOND Y 

Editor ALAIN LBCOUR 

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Associate PutBsher 


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Writing die Ugliness 
Out of the Budget 


THE ernes ? 

W CAST AfaPD 'EM. 


eWCWieH ? 

tfeCAH’TAFFopP IT- 


The Case ' 


N 


By Archibald L. Gillies - 

EW YORK— Budgets, wheth- war, why spend neariy S20 billion this 
er f amily , business or national budget year to deploy destabmzmg 


reveal more troth than any finely spo- first-sflikfi weapons Hie the Indent 
ken words. The raw numbers in the D-5, MX and Pershing-2 nri-ssflfs, 
1986 Reagan budget dearly bdie the which will only increase the luwj- 
presidsnfs fbeton& hood of wart If America’s inalann is 

Mr Reagan says Americans are to try to influaice Soviet behavior, it 
“on the verge of greatness." But the should offer promises of mfliiaryre- 



For Force " 


1 


^ ‘id!* 


Nicaragua 




4*V 
I ' 1 ^ 
.•4BS- S 


By Joshua Mnravch 

N 




EWYORK— Bysheddm 
pretense that UA aid tc 


facts show us an ugly America — a 
nation driven by uncharactecutk 
paranoia, questing for elusive mili- 
tary superiority, mindless of the dan- 
gers of huge deficits, disregarding hu- 
man needs at home and abroad. 

On tbe one h»nri, the adnnmstza- 


1 trade and more sri- 


stramu 

If Westenn^nope is the world’s 
largest economic entity, with s cos- 


ing America's, why must the United 
States spend more than $130 billion 


UU LUC UUC UOUU, USA/ fl Ui i m UJUB-. ----- 

tion raifc for major cuts in domestic annually for European defense, sure- 

a IZm _ X- .i — _rr l. — X . nMwnliw 



ly, farmers and city dwellers. On the 
other, it ads for broad increases in 
weaponry, which will destabilize 
what is leh of deterrence, abrogate 
existing arms control treaties and 
threaten America's allies as much as 
its supposed enemies. All this is to be 
for, if not by domestic cuts, then 
j new levels of deficit spending that 
win add to the largest accumulation 
of debt any president has ever be- 
queathed future generations. 

Some members of tbe administra- 


years . 
cades of 


_ cose 

any case, after 40 
and neatly two de- 
L-Wesi dfcteme, is it nec- 


TfadW*Wi<>t* ? 
mCfJU'TtffrFP IT. 

fW 9>K»ies ? 

Vie tm tffoPD ‘efA. 





has 


more than 300,000 troops and . 
tactical nuclear weapons in Europe? 
If Washington's goal is to prevent 
war, it should initiate troop reduc- 
tions and remove nuclear weapons 
from Central Europe. If the real UiL 
concern is to preserve the affiance, 
Washington should deal with the ma- 
jor irritants in Amcrican-Europcan 
relations: high UJ>. interest rates, for 


E-lWlPoHMfcHTM- 

VfoTECTiof* ? 

«£ CM*T tffoftv IT. 


tion consider the ntilitanr portion of example, and creeping protectionism 
the budget sacrosanct They should on both sides, 
remember Dwight D. Eisenhower’s If Hurd Worid countries — con- 
words: “The problem in defense is servative or radical — want normal 


how far you can go without destroy- 
ing from within that which you are 
trying to defend from without." 

Must America put at risk the es- 
sential goodness of its character? 
Must it become a militarized society? 
No. Tbe nation's obsession with mili- 
tary strength wounds the economy . A 
wiser approach could start with elim- 
inating waste in Pentagon procure- 
ment, which would save mflH rms, 
even billions. But it should not stop 
there. Much more could safely be 
saved by a more common-sense ap- 
proach to the most basic issues of 
national security. 

Since the planet's life-support sys- 
tem could be destroyed by as few as 
250 nuclear warheads, why deploy 


political and trade relations with the 
Unit 


Jnited States and pose no mflitary 
threat, why spend $59 billion annual- 
ly on forces that would intervene in 
those countries? If the U.S. goal is to 
minimize Soviet influence, why push 
countries like Nicaragua into Mos- 
cow’s aims? If Americans truly wish 
to promote democracy and stability, 
they should end military support of 
dictators and promote international 
programs of economic assistance, in- 
cluding major debt relief, that would 
reduce social inequities, strengthen 
the political fabric of these countries 
and increase their capacity to boy 
American goods. 

Tins approach — reductions in the 
US. nuclear arsenal fewer overseas 



pef etise? atcwiT Afftfo 
IWT T* ppoTecT oug CiTieJ, 
| SCHoo^, TFMSPoPlMietf, 
IftFMS AND WWPWT. 



10,000 now and build 4,000 more by miliiaiy commitments and apoUcyof 
1988? If the goal is to deter nuclear nonintervention — suggests a major 


reorientation in foreign policy. Such 
an approach could save $470 billion 
over the next five years and upward 
of SI triffiou during the succeeding 
five. One and one-half triffiou dol- 
lars, spent wisely over the next de- 
cade, would let America move 
against many problems that now 
seem insoluble. This could help re- 
duce the dpfirit, modernize baste in- 
dustries, help finance high-tech de- 
velopment and retrain displaced 
workers. America could begin to re- 
build its roads and bridges, its hous- 
ing stock and, above all its citizens' 
dignity. We could avoid an ugly 
Amenta and make possible once 
again a growing, competitive and 
caring society. 


Do you remember Frank 
1941 film “Meet John Doe”? 
Cooper, playing a nameless represen- 
tative of an America that is unem- 


the case for aid. He has 
helped us foots on the heart o 
matter: Should the United Static 
courage the overthrow of Comm 
governments where it can? fc 
boffi the history erf U.S. relations 
the Soviet Union and the parti 
rirniomanres in Central Amcrh 
gue strongly that it should. 

Both sides of the debate have 
clarified in recent weeks. The I 
majority leader, Jim Wright, to 
soe with the pteskient: “I don't 
we have any call to appoint ooc ■ 
as God's avenging angels and n 
by force any government with i 
we disagree.’' Secretary of 
George Shultz spoke for the 
side, noting that to oppose zridt 
“contras” is in effect to acccr 
“Brezhnev doctrine.” 

It is, as Mr. Shultz aptly mri 
accept the Krenflm’5 notmJ 
“what’s mine is mine. What’s 
up for grabs.” i 

The implications of this dot 
have grown more ominous tint 
American policy of “contain; 
expired on the battlefields of. - 
nam. In adopting the contait 
policy, the United Slates deck! 
avoid 

Soviet empire — wb 


■'if 

y— * 


— «*l 

MM* 


■W 


.-t > 

■.Or 


pirijins! $ 


■be 


plpyed and numbed by the Depres- 
1 by the 


sion, and muffled by the razzmatazz 
of Washington, promises to jump off 
the top of City Hall to make his 
country see the misery of the “little 
guy” It must not take that land of 
desperation'' to force us into action 
against the Reagan program. 


The writer is presidem of the World 
Policy Institute, which is sponsoring a 
five-year study to devekp new ap- 
proaches to U.S. foreign and military 
policy. He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


The overthrow of ec& 
one communist natm 
by indigenous forces 
could incalculably he 
communism 9 s mystiq 


■ -V 


tirely under the shadow or the 


ly undo- toe soar 
the Red Army — but to tot 


Deficits: Using Longevity to Beat the Bloody Things 

By William F. Buckley Jr. 


EW YORK — The story went around^dui> 

1930& n ^be $Lyear5>ld ^asl^lus father, a 
retired senior diplomat: “Daddy, what was your 
role in the world war?” Lord Cedi looked up 
from Ins newspaper “I tried to prevent the 
bloody thing." 

If some day we run into Apocalypse Now 
because of tbe national debt, consdentious ob- 
jectors mil wish to point to what they did to try 
to prevent the bloody thing. 

Critics of big spending (and friends of high 
taxation) have been heard from ad infinitum cm 
the subject, this writer included. But as the story 
unfolds — the story of trying to lower federal 
spending by trimming the grants to the Minne- 
apolis Ballet — one heeds wise men’s counsel 

Four years ago, Irving Kristol the distin- 
guished godfather of the neo-consa^ative move- 
ment, observed that shirttail-type budget cuts 
tend to generate opposition out of proportion to 
their yield. Yon can — the analysis goes —make 
it to the wire and succeed, say, m trimming food- 
stamp spending, but by the time you have com- 
■ pleted that race you win arrive out of breath, and 
the enemy, once weak and disorganized, wfll be 
highly consolidated. 

A different approach, dealing in large catego- 
ries, should be explored. And the key to it is 
the study of longevity. 

For every decade, beginning in 1940, Ameri- 
cans' life expectancy increased by about erne 


year. This was so until 1970, when life expectan- 
cy began to increase more quickly. The increase 
between 1970 and I98G was on the order of 1 1 
years. And from 1980 to 1985, by extrapolation, 
the figure would be about half a year. Adding 
these figures together, one sees that since the. 
inception of Social Security, the human life cyde 
has advanced by about four years. 

Suppose that the implications of that longevity 
scheaule were uniformly applied, where relevant, 
to federal disbursements? Suppose, even, that it 
were done gradually, say a year at a time. 

This would mean that Social Security refire- 
meat would begin this year not at 65 but at 66, 
and, correspondingly, eady retirement would be- 
gin not at 62, but at 63. 

In federal service, where retirement is now 


ant colonel in his rmd-40s who retires with 20 
yean* service receives $20,480 a year. Critics of 
the system cite the 1984 Grace Commission re- 
port, which said the military pension plan was six 
times as gpod as the best private-sector plan.". 

The attraction of the categorical reform, lies in 
the difficulty one has in arguing against iL The 
ad absurdum tend 

• > . . * 

:e 


permitted after 20 years (at age 60), tbatjigure 


would rise next year to 21, and on up to25. 

i (2 percent of 


ad hoc and complicated formulas i_ 
pay per year of service and afl the variations), 
could easily be adjusted. 

In tbe army, retirement is permitted after 20 
years’ service, and this also should increase. Tune 
magazine last month cited an example of the 
scale in which we deal: “In 1983, 90 percent of 
mflitaiy retirees were younger than 50, and some 
200,000 of diem were ‘double-dippers,’ who had 
taken new government jobs. Currently, a lieutcn- 


argument ad absurdum tends to reveal this. : 
pose that, 50 years from now, the scientists n 
tbe average hf crime 100 years. Obviously 
would not think in terms of generating an econo- 
my that wduld permit us to retire at the equiva- 
lent of young middle age, measured back when 
the average Me expectancy was in the 60s. 

Tbe pursuit of such a reform has the added 
advantage that those who oppose it would be a 
relatively small number, ana in a democracy it is 
realistic to drink in terms not only of what is 
“right," but of what is doable. The first year's 
opposition in the Social Security field would, of 
course, come from 64-year-olds planning to re- 
tire at 65 who now need to work another year, 
and frwn.61-year-oMs who planned to take-early 
retirement the following year but now most 
work another year. 

And, of course, those just a little younger 
might oppose it. But soon you are talking to folk 
in their nrid-50s, for whom the question of 
whether they retire at 65 or 70 is a moderately 
remote concent. 

And the dividend? The deficit gpes away. 

Universal Press Syndicate. 


expansion. As George F. Ki 
who first formulated die poBc 
it, America would “confront th 
riani with unalterable countt 
at every point where they sbov 
of encroaching upon the mtere 
peaceful and stable worid." 

Tbe hope, said Mr. Raman, 
“increase enormously the stxad 
der which Soviet policy must 
ate" and thereby “promote t 
cies which must eventually fin 
outlet in either the 






v s;a 
■ 


Some significant 
the Soviet domestic system e 
deed occur after Stalin’s dex - • 
the Soviet Union’s relentless <: 
expand its empire and to al 
seizure of power by Cctmr 
wherever possible has oufliv 
policy of containment. ^ 

As a result, in the mid-WWS t \ ,i * , h \ \ n 
United States turned away ^ W » t «. - i 1 1 i l 

tainment and toward dAtent( 


mg, as Henry Kissing* pnLT 
i vested interest in mat’' 


Two Voices From Out of the Democrats’ Wilderness 


W ASHINGTON —To the wide- 
spread belief that the Demo- 
crats have lost both their voice and. 
their sense of direction, there are now’ 
at least two important rebuttals. 
Governor Mario M. Cuomo of New 
York, the keynote speaker at last 
summer's Democratic National Con- 
vention, and Senator Gary Hart of 
Colorado, the leading challenger al 
the convention, have given speeches 
that dearly suggest that two potential 
leaders of the Democratic comeback 
effort have not lost their compasses 
or their rhetorical command. 

Even though they avoided many of 
the troublesome specifics, there were 
differences in empli isis in the speech- 
es Mr. Hart delivered at Boston’s 
Faneufl Hall last month and Mr. 
Cuomo gave a few days later at Yale. 
But it is significant that these two 
men, stereotyped as the spokesmen 
for the “revisionist'' and “traditiooal- 
ist” wings of the party, found com- 
mon ground with each other — and 
for a challenge to Presidem Reagan. 

Obviously there can be nocEeap 
consensus within the Democratic 
Party based on the perceived conver- 
gence of two leaning figures. The 
more conservative views of Sen ator 
Sam Nunn of Georgia or Governor 
Mark White ct Texas, the urban and 
minority perspectives of PhiladeJ- 


By David S. Broder 


oots, these two Democrats, at least, 
will be in a position to say that even 
when Mr. Reagan was riding high. 


cx- 

Mr. 


tir rejection of 

tends beyond words to 
Cuomo last week challenged the 
ideal to his face, in a White 
colloquy on the budget. Mr. Hart, 
wbo has consistently voted against 
Reaganomics, also voted against en- 
trusting the leadership of the Justice 
Department to Edwin Meese 3d, wbo 
echoes Mr. Reagan’s views on social 
policy and constitutional issues. On 
all these fronts, tbe lines are drawn. 

The second point on which Mr. 
Hart and Mr. Cuomo agree is that the 
values for winch the Democratic Par- 
ty has fought for the past 50 years 
remain valid. “Despite the events of 
last November, I haven’t changed the 
underlying tenets of my political phi- 
losophy, ” Mr. Cuomo said, “why 
should 1 seek new principles?" 

You say this is not surprising from 
the governor who sits in Albany, 
where Franklin Roosevelt once sat? 


Perhaps not, but Mr. Hart voiced the 
same view. Though saying that we are 
“in an era ofprofound transom,” he 
reaffirmed one of the purest old 
ideas,” the belief that “society as a 
whole, through oar government, has 
a moral responsibility ... to achieve 
real justice . .. and assure the basic 
necessities of life.” 

The third point of agreement is 
that government mast conceive itself 
as a partner in furthering, not frus- 
trating, the powerful forces of eco- 
nomic change and growth. Predict- 
ably, Mr. Hart emphasized the need 


that the test of credibility 
wflf- 


for policies that “encourage im- 


proved productivity” to meet compe- 
its. That 


titkm in international markets, 
is the ideology of a politician from a 
high-tech growth state. 

but Mr. Cuomo, a “rust bdt" gov- 
ernor, was equally clear in saying that 
“programs and policies change,” and 
boasting that his administration’s 
“new ideas” indode “new centers for 
innovation that win spur tbe growth 
of high-tech in the state:” 

Both Mr. Hart and Mr. Cuomo 


far the Democratic Party is the __ 
bigness of its leaders to put the tut- 
tumal interest above any constituen- 
cy interest. Mr. Hart gave evidence of 
ms seriousness by introducing leeisla- 
tkm for “a new system of national 
service," both mflitaiy and civilian, 
that would ask young Americans 
{among whom he had his greatest 
support in \9M) “to return some of 
the advantages and investments they 
have received from our society 

Mr. Cuomo demonstrated his 
grasp of the same point in a more 
dramatic way. He told his labor- 
union backers — without whom he 
would not have been elected in 1982, 
he acknowledges — that be would 
not support their candidate for the 
chairmanship of the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee, or even the disput- 
ed right of the at-large labor members 
of that committee to vote in the con- 
test in January. 

Two speeches — and two men — 
do not a consensus make. But they 
are a start and, for Democrats, a 
welcome sign that all may not be lost. 

The Washington Pcbl 


create a vested interest in unf 
strainC But even had it prat 
detente offered little hope for i 
the problem that containment 
to solve: Soviet officials stai 
peatcdly that dftente did not a 
them to cease supporting eft 
Communists to seize poa 
they did not already hold iL 
Jimmy Carter tried his own ver 
dfitente, more conciliatory th 
Kissiimer version, but its futi 
its uselessness in inhibiting So* . 
pansion — became apparent t 
Mr. Carter himself with the '/ 
invasion of Afghanistan. 

Since then, American 
grown more assertive and 
uals are bring restocked. But ' 
no prospect of a return to 
meat It is impossible for ‘ 
to parry Russians al every 
thar choosing. 

Have we Americans, then, 
native but to resign ouxsdfo 
gradual and inexorable incr- * 
the number of Communist cc, 
— an increase that could eve 
shift the balance of power de 
against the United States? H 

we accept asymmetrical rales . 
low countries to go from beif 
C ommunis t to P mrmiania t, bl 
the other direction? 

There is an alternative. T 
weak of Communist goverun. 
the Soviet camp now extends 
yond the shadow of the Red ., 
into Africa and Central A 
This network can be attache 

fring es , if ther e are infftg pnou 

' to do so, without the 
_ a mflitaiy confrc 
the United States > 
Soviet Union, This offers tl 
for a strategy that, in the abi 
containment, might still piei 
relentless accretion of Soviet 
And the successful oveitb] 
communism by indigenous 
even one country might do ity 
ble mage to communism's 
dst mystique. 





:-a 


phia’s Mayor Wilson Goode or __ 

resentative William Gray, have to 

blended into the mix before anyone 
can claim that the Democrats have 
their act together. 

But the Cuomo and Hart speeches 
do rebut the notion that the Demo- 
crats as a species are still reeling in 
shock from last November’s presi- 
dential shellacking and do not know 
which way to turn. 

There are four principles on which 
Mr. Hart and Mr. Cuomo dearly see 
eye-t o-eyc. The first is the belief that 
President Reagan’s policies endanger 
the long-tom economic health and 
social stabihty of the American soci- 
ety. If events in the next four years 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

On Nicaragua’s Election 


prove this view incorrect, then tbe 

Demi 


'eurocrats' prospects of a 1988 


ts prospects oi 
comeback will indeed look bleak. 

But if ^the economy sours as a result 
of soaring deficits and the nation 
polarizes between haves and have- 


The editorial “A Middle Way in 
Nicaragua” (Feb. 14) accepts the pre- 
mises of President Reagan's critique 
of Nicaragua, mduding his statement 
that the ' Sandinists have "chased 
democrats into exile and refused to 
subject their power to the consent of 
the Nicaraguan people." This is re- 
peated so often in. W ashing ton that it 
is no longer questioned. 

No one has been forcibly exiled 
from Nicaragua. Arturo JosA Cruz, 
who decided not to participate in the 
Nov. 4 elections, has traveled fre- 
quently to Nicaragua and sought to 
organize support. Vrrgffio Godoy 
Reyes, another democratic politician 
who chose not to participate in Sec- 
tions, continues to live in Nicaragua, 
and his party is participating in the 
political process. 

With respect to the elections them- 
selves, I was a member of an observer 


delegation sponsored by tbe Interna- 
tional Human Rights Law Group 
and the Washington Office on Latin 
America, which found several flaws 
surrounding the electoral process. 
Yet, with £ its flaws, the elections 
provided tbe Nicaraguan people an 


to express their disap- 


proval of the Sandinists, and over, 
percent of those who voted did so. 

Virtually all the independent ob- 
servers who prepared comprdiensive 
reports on the Nicaraguan elections 
concluded that the elections repre- 
sented a positive political develop- 
ment and compared favorably with 
the 1984 elections In E Salvador. 

LARRY GARBER 
Washington. 


_ a U.S. Air Force base in Britain in 
1943. They were using wind every- 
body considered the most enormous, 
sophisticated and expensive plane in 
the worid — the B-17 Flying For- 
tress. A young captain told me in 
awe: “You know what one of these 
planes costs? Two hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars — a quarter of a 
miDkm dollars!" Tunes mange, but I 
wonder if the F- Id’s price is any more 
justified than that of the hammer 
GORDON GAS KILL. 

Rome. 


Pentagon Prices 


When I learn the Pentagon pays 
$400 for a hammer and $50 million 
for an F-I6 fighter, I remember visit- 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed* betters to the 


Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er’s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject lo editing We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


Nicaraguan rebels as 
as they need is very muen 
interest of the United States.! 
is not the only reason to 
contras. Tbe well-being of th 
raguan people is also at issue 
The Sandinists have not yd 
Nicaragua into a tolaUiansu 
but thoe is little doubt that 
their goal. The repressive au 
tion of food rationing, the ere 
a vast network of internal es] ■ 
and coercion, the mfiitariza . 
society, the vicious use of 
mem-organized mobs to assfl 
sidents —all are duffing aug 
the brutal future that the Sat 
have in store for the people c 
ragua. A fighting chance U 
themselves that future is at 
much in their interests as tty 

of the Sandinists is in Amerw 


The writer is the author of 
coming book about U.S. hum 
Ucy. He contributed this con 
ie New York Times. 


IiVMI 

!£ 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 

F or p^Chim Group French Right May Profh From Leftist Plan 

TAT# ^Visits RllSSlfl ? By John Vinooir rand’s most Kkdy choice would be Coinraimistvoters switch lo Social- “slight Favorable tremor” in the 

yf.!., T« Ntw York Tma Semce 10 avoid “soiddc” by replacing the in candidates in the second round popularity polls for them. 

’ 4w| I'n. I fin IS rlrST PARIS — More than most tw* nresenl majority votino svstem. and wfusiher ihp Natural Front But itw> S/vi-iKct* h»i* * mnn> 


5, 1985 


Page 5 


• T T^* a Aw *"* ‘ una Semce 

caftl 'IHD Is rirst PARIS-Moretbanmost 
Qft IT pte could have imagined awar 

{i5 n :“? ie .K, Pe ? *“!>. 


rand’s most Kkdy dioice would be Communist voters switch to Social- “slight favorable tremor” in the 
to avoid “suicide” by replacmg the i$t candidates in the second round popularity polls for »hwn 
present majority voting system. and whether the National From But the Socialists have a more 


Bv I^i vrt* l/'A y , Jean-Mane Le Pen and his far- 

v JJ?*^** 1 hmee tll 6 DUS party, the National Front, are 

|VJ HW YOR|; ^ mflumnng the course of French 

By Cclesrine Bohlen P< w£, .boat 18 mfflion vmm 

goal Other itaniNv lfn Sr 03 March 10 and 17 in 

Sandinist «. IU ^(W MOSCOW— A Onncsejariia- two-stage regional elections, the 

n c* w »CTn^ rlMmfiAn nse imuMi m i 1 _ ■ _ « - , #. 


peo- present mqorhy voting system, 
uonal Front "about K^ereent of 


tether the National Front But the Socialists have a more 
ues with conservative and difficult time in explaining how 
te opposition parties are they could sponsor an electoral law 


handimst ^ 


on t, are the vote, and a proportional system factors that Mr. Mitterrand is ex- that might bring Mr. Le Pen into 
French would thus enable it to enter parlia- pected to take mto consideration in parliament. They argne that they 
menL The Socialists have called the shaping his electoral bill have always favored proportional 

votes party racist, dangerous and despi- Since June, when the National representation and that the major- 
1 17 in cable. Front won seats in the European ity voting system, snch as the one in 

ns, the Polls show that the National Parliament with 1 1 percent of the force in the regional ejections, re- 


Wben about 18 ntiDion votes party racist, dangerous and despi- 
cast ballots March 10 and 17 in cable. 

two-stage regional elections, the Polls show that the National 


ity voting system, snch as the one in 
force in the regional ejections, re- 


helned ,« T 10r M itlie first onts Kna since me un- 


last national political test before Front has capitalized on concern French vote, the share erf those ex- quires traditional conservatives to 
legislative elections in 1986, one of about the number of African and pressing fears about Mr. Le Pen in make comp romis es with the ra- 
the central dements in analyzing Arab immigrants in France, crime surveys has declined from 26 to 14 treme right if they want its support 


the central dements in analy 
the results will be the Naii 
Front’s performance. 


Arab immigrants in France, crime 
and unemployment. 

Alain Touraine. a sociologist and 


percent. 

According to a survey published 


in the second round. 

Distributing seats on the basis of 


And when President Francois political expert, said that if the left last week, 47 perceaii of those percentages of the popular vote 

j - - - - * . ? .1 :<..k l. i j v.. .v. _n i i i i ‘ u ■ t t i 


£3>-\ cue stromlk i! n ** Suiaeme Soviet, or par- 

\ *' V J 5 Uui V&ament, of the Soviet Union. 

At i-hrinJu*- of toeij The viat is another sign of a 

& 5 majoriX te"' ■g ffjji 1 ' 

.. — al " ^Begmg and Moscow, dthougfaCto- 

i JJL k '!? lhc P rei 'dem has said major obstacles stfll 

UTlES ;ln > g» , veij& President Konstantin U. Chcc- 


tbe main concerns wQl be whether Giscaid cTEstaing and the neo- only 14 percent predicting a de- mayor of Paris ana leader < 
bis proposal makes it probable that ' Gaullisis by letting the National dine. But SS percent said they Rally for the Republic, a 
Mr. Le Pen’s group mH enter par- From develop, it w£D render its hoped the party's popularity would Gaullist party, has accused ti 

Ha me n i. own fall both more probable and diminish. dalists of making “gigantic e 

“It’s me or suicide for the Social- brutal.” 


ists,” Mir. Le Pen has said 


Mr. Giscard d’EslaLng was presi- ing growth in influence of the N&- 


ily 14 percent predicting a de- mayor of Paris ana leader of the 
tie. But 55 percent said they Rally for the Republic, a neo- 
iped the party’s popularity would Gaullist party, has accused the $o- 

minish. cialists of making “gigantic efforts 

For the Socialist Party, the seem- to favor the extreme right." 
g growth in influence of the N&- He insists that there will be no 



siac. noting ihai to dations” with B eijing , citing “use- 
anuras ' is j n cff^nl steps taken in this respect last 
Brezhnev d,xinne.~ k «ar." The visit comes after a Sovi- 


In other words, if 'Mr. Milter- dent until 1981, when the Socialists uonal From has provided a dear alliances between his party and the 
rand’s proposal does not contain a woe voted into office. target The Socialists contend they National Front in the regional dec- 

measure of proportional represen- Mr. Touraine also said, however, have profited from pointing out dons and that Mr. Mitterrand can 

ration, the Socialists, in- Mr. Le that if the conservative and moder- that the traditional conservative hardly attack his party’s relatiou- 

Pen’s view, will suffer a catastroph- ate parties do not combat Mr. Le and moderate parties have been ship with the National Front 

ic defeat in 1986. Pen, then the dangers are great as less than forthright in attacking “when you've been prostituting 

Following Mr. Le Fen's reason- wdL Mr. Le Pen, since they do not want yourself with the Communists, 8 


Jean-Marie Le Pen and his daughter, Marie- CaroDne, who is a candidate of her father's 
National Front party for Neirilfy, a Paris suburb, in French regional elections this month. 


. ine tvrCT%,^* in P ov - visited Bating m De- 

' ‘what\ tnme is mj^anber. He was the highest ranking 

up for grubs." 'soviet official to go to China since 
. Th* ,m P^iionsA969 , , . 

ha ' ,e mrtrg Political consul tauons were re- 

American pohev J^umed. between the two capitals in 
expired on the baiij* 982, and so far five sessions have 
, nam. In adooune ^ tjecQ held in Moscow and Beijing. 
Capra s policy, the UmiJ ^ P«ss agency Tass re- 
• (jar S avoid challenauw o^KJrted that Mr. Zhang said on his 
eprcscn- Soviet empire -.^trival ^ Moscow mat this was 
s uncm- first meeting of tTihuw and 


But the leaders of other opposi- 
tion parties have been considerably 
less precise. One described Mr. Le 
Pa's candidates as “competitors” 
rather than “adversaries.” and an- 
other insisted that the “principal 
adversaries are the Socialists and 


Communists." This attitude is now- 
coming under sharp criticism. 
Alain Duhamel, a conservative edi- 
torial writer at Le Quotidien de 
Paris, said of the far right: “The 
parliamentary right facilitated its 
resurrection in zigzagging pitifully 


from excommunicating it to start- 
ing underground negotiations, it :<• 
now forced to cIkximt. U the Na- 
tional Front to be treated a> a mal 
or an adversary? The an over must 
clearly and vigorouvly be the lat- 
ter.” ’ 


Beijing Appears to Back Off Threat Against Hanoi 


By Jim Mann 

Lot Angeles Timex Service 


“Everything now is riveted to 
economic development, and any 


eprcscn- 
s uncm- 
Depres- 
zmatazz 
jump off 
lake his 
x /Tittle 
kind of 
o action 


he World 
ruonng u 

new op- 

i military 
mmnuio 


BEUING— Five weeks ago, the nnEtaiy action would divert re- 
Chinese foreign minister, Wu Xue- juices away from that,” a senior 
qian, warned publicly that China Arian diploma .raid. 


parliament members after might have to teach Vietnam 


A Western di plmriat said he has 


The Orerthmtrn* Io °8 years that have passed second lesson” if Vietnam did not concluded that Mr. Deng and his the resistance groups. when the Chinese withdrew afi 

"Mince the cessation of contacts bo- rein in its troops in Cambodia. senior aides — Hu/Ya oban g . the Defenders of China’s position, month, saying they had infli 
OnecOTnittUmn t ”eea us. It was a bhmt threat that China general secretary of me Communist including U.S. officials, have ar- “devastating blows” on the > 


one commumitt” esa ns - 

, . 1 “We are convinced that our visit 

ay infligenomjjjill play a positive role for the 
... . .deepening of mutual understand- 


■ j * . ' ut rn uwu uuuasu 

COIltd mCGlcvh^ig between us,” he said. 

During his visit to Begmgm 


rem in its troops m Cambodia. senior aioes — m laooaug. me 
It was a bhmt threat that China ^teral secretary of the Communist 
mi ght be preparing to go to war Prime Minister Zhiio 

When Deng ^Qroping, the para- Ziyang— do not want to take mfli- 
mount rhm^o> leader, said in 1979 “***» because to do so would 


In its public statements over the ber of factors underlie China’s re- 
past few weeks, China has suggest- 1 iterance to act one of them mill- 
ed that no military action is re- ury. In 1979, when they went into 
quired on its part because the Viet- Vietnam, the Chinese ran into 
namese offensive in Cambodia has strong resistance and suffered sig- 
not been successful in eradicating nilicam losses. The war ended 
the resistance groups. when the Chinese withdrew after a 

Defenders of China’s position, month, saying they had inflicted 
including U.S. officials, have ar- “devastating blows” on the Viet- 
gued that the criticism of China is namese Army. 


Where to go for the finest 
Polynesian cuisine 


that China wanted to "teach Viet- ^ragmen the pouucai position ol 
De- nam a lesson,” China mounted a opponems of ihe Beijing regime, 
ned large-scale invasion of Vietnam. panicularty within the People’s 


commwnmn *H«nber, Mi. Arkhipov signed large-scale invasion of Vietnam. particularly with 
greemems with the Chinese on Since the “second lesson" warn- Liberation Army, 
-oonomic, rerJuiicai and scientific ing, Vietnamese troops have routed China’s militan 


Ziyang— do not want totakenuh- unfair because China has in fact “Perhaps China learned bitterly 
tary acnon because to do so would stepped up the mflitaiy pressure in 1979 that it was not prepared to 
strengthen the political position of along the Chinese- Vietnamese bor- deliver a quick humiliation to the 
SHW-jgJWaSR .. ... yicinamee." a diplomat here said. 


their a- set 


urely under the duthpoperfltion. Cambodian forces from their a- set several of Beijing's friends and 

the Red Army —is, The Soviet {ness has recently car- campments and moved to seal the neighbors in Asia. Officials in 
expansion. A: Cw^ ed articles critical of China' s eco- Cambodian border with Thailand. Thailan d are reported to have com- 


China’s military inaction has up- recently, and be pointed out th 
i several of Bering’s friends and mid-February China sharply 


“It’s not lroe to say they have “They suffered a bloody nose last 
done nothing,” a U.S. official said time.” 
reantly. and be pointed out that in. facl 

mid-February China sharply in- m0Sl significant, 

< f aSCd ^ ^ e 5 Dg harmful impact that a war would 


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T he Ledra Marriott Hotel. Athens, offers a United States c ~' S00 : 
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expansion. A* Gtur^ ed articles critical of China’s eco- Cambodian border with Thailand. Thailand arc reported to have com- along the border. “They let the have on Clma’s economic roodcra- 

who first iormubted tomic reforms, which an article in Yet (lima has taken no military plained privately that China has Vietnamese know that they’re there j^Hnn program. Even a quick and 

it. Ameriiu »cuM \^Iovember described as “new action that would qualify as a Ies- failed to relieve Vietnamese mili- and that they'll be there five years war would drain off funds 


vilh 20 
iticsof 
iktfi re- 
wKtsix 
dan." 
sites in 
it The 
ts.Sutv 
laBUuic 
afy we 

«CdtK>- 
equxa- 
k when 
s. 

• a&lnl 
W be a 
■cyitis 
whit is 
t veai'x 
wld, u( 
g lu rc 
er ytw. 
tc early 
v must 

irtingcf 
;lo folk 
Hull of 
teratch 


as the. paramoonl, even imchal- public wanting to Vji 
lengeable, mflitaiy power in South- subsequent Mure to 
east Asia. “Continued Qtine 


Hcral h^lkSrib unc 


ess 


credibility 
s the will- 
ttt tlw IW* 

tnutiiucn 

vidcAcc 
mglcghld- 
1 natuvul 

d CIxillAD. 

AWOU'AR'* 

H f/MKsl 

n Miiar of 
nous they 
aet>- M 
ruled lu' 
m a nv*”’ 

fii% !4P»'f‘ 
whom hr 
\Mn !«!«. 

hf 

<tt I-’I" 
ijiatic Na- 
il* 

« miniu* rt% 

in the c-'ii 

tlk”‘ 

flu: ifes?' 

i.iiv .> 

not he i”- : 


who first iormubtedtomic reforms, which an article in Yet fhma has taken no military 
it, Aracrii'u vv^Id 'November described as ‘‘new action that would qualify as a les- 
wans with unfliembfe mrces of social tcnsioiis.” son. 

at every pomi where fe A long-term trade pact between Diplomats in Bering say that 

ofcnero.‘chmguprtnk»e two is expected to increase during the last month, perhaps af- 
pejrefu! and stable ircade between the countries (his ter some internal ddiate, the Chi- 
'Flu: hop-, Mr bear to SI.4 bilHon from SI.05 bfl- nese have decided not to l a un ch a 
"inci va'C eni-rmoush con last year. " military offensive against Vietnam. 

d?r uhu.li pife Bp g m g has TnciciM nn thiwg ran- They say it ropears that the Chi- 

ate" a:;u thereby " [tuitions for an inmrovemenl in po- nese have deridwl to avoid war and 
cic'* which tmi't etensttical relations between the two to pursue their long-range econom- 
kHitlci *u eiihvr tic feommimist giants: reduction of ic modentization program, even at 
iliadiMi meliiwing dioviet forces along tbe Chinese the cost of losing some Face and 
Sivnc '■iinifiraiil ’rraxier, withdrawal of Soviet sop- allowing Vietnam to be perceived 
Lie &*%wt donk-MK <^ort fw the Vietnamese in Cambo- as the. paramoonl, even cmchal- 
desd % after Srirla, and a Soviet withdrawal from fcngeaWe, mflitaiy power in Sonth- 
the S.m .ri 1 •'iiiir'ntfcfghauistan.. . . east Asia, 

expand empire ' ““ ^ 

-f {vusi hi ' u " - 

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tary pressure along tbe Thai bor- from now. 


Diplomats in Beijing say that der. 
during the last month, perhaps af- Prince Norodom Sihan ouk, the 


ear marked for use in building up 


ter some internal debate, the Chi- CamtwHaw resistance leader who across the border into Vietnam, 
nese have decided not to launch a lived for years in Beijing and was a and added that “they’re doing 
nntitmy offensive against Vie tnam, dose associate of tbe Chinese lead- enough to make sure it costs the 
They say it appears that the On- ership, appealed to China this Vietnamese.” 
nese have derided to avoid war and month to carry out its threat to According to*the Vietnam News 


_ ( ll/I IUW UJ UimuuiA u u 

Another diplomat raid Chinese infrastructure, upgrading taaSn*. 
troops have made bnrf forays overhauling the imdng system and 


cany out its threat to 


to pursue their long-range econom- teach Vietnam a second lesson. Agency, in . the period from Jan. 16 
ic modentization program, even at Diplomats here say that for the to Feb. 26, Chinese attacks killed at 
the cost of losing some face and last month they have been search- least 24 people and wounded 44 


j t T acr ““ , converting gradually to a market 

id added that “they’re doing economy 

ZtSZ ** " " , •*-»« ^.»y. m » 

According toWe Vietnam Nens fi?52!=?ffSL"aa 


J ing for explanations for China's others. It said China had fired ap- r . ii5noH/wn 
1- public wanting to Vietnam and its proximaidy 39,000 rounds of arm- ^ 


bsequent fhflure to acL ■ lay into Vietnam and intruded 

“Confirmed Chinese silence is into Vietnamese territory on 16 oc- 
mystifyina, to say the least,” an casions.- ' 
envoy said. “It is becoming increas- Nevert hd ess, China has taka 


the Vietnamese Air Force, which 
gets Soviet support, coaid attempt 
to strike at economic targets in 
southern China — factories in 
Guangdongprovince and (til rigs in 
the Smith China Sea. 


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fngl y embarrassing for them. Their - no mflitaiy action comparable to 
prestige as a regional power is at its 1979 invasion of Vietnam, 
stake.” Diplomats in Beijing say a num- 


Marcos Removes Minister 
Who Criticized Policies 


The Assodmed Press 

MANILA — President Ferdi- 
nand E Marcos dismissed Foreign 
Minister Arturo Tolentino on 
Monday, accnsmg him of taking 
stands that were ‘imcompatfblc 
with those of the party and the 
government.” 

The president’s announcement 
also said that Mr. Marcos has 
asked another member of his cabi- 
net, Labor Minister Bias Ople, to 
explain, statements he had wiydf in 
recent speeches about tbe country’s 
political system being “heavily de- 
pendent on patronage.” 

It quoted Mr. Marcos as telling 
Mr. Tolentino in a letter that he 
had “no other choice” but to dis- 
miss him. The foreign minister is 
the only government official who 
has pubhdy opposed some of Mr. 
Marcos’s policies. 

The announcement did not say 
who would succeed Mr. Tolentino, 
74. He was appointed foreign min- 
ister in Jane to replace Carlos P. 
Romuk), who retired in January 
last year. 

The presidential palace said the 
dismissal was caused by disagree- 
ment between Mr. Marais and Mr. 
Tolentino over Foreign Ministry 
appointments, which it described 
as “the latest of such ‘incompatible’ 


fcfcbedcar 


^’‘ntothelFfn 

htL • 


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>hr money cn 

fc 1 , 1 m'sM ' 1 '-t' 




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■till* I *- 


m iteJ 


The rest of Europe. North Afticw Swiner Ftendi 

Aftica USA. ptench PolYiissia. MddteEart 
I Si 284 


ReatofAIrfca. Caaadfc tana Amenea, Guff Sates 
AaiE I Si 3961 188 1 109 


positions" taken by the foreign 
minister. Mr. Tolentino bad also 
criticized several of Mr. Marcos' 
decrees as well as tbe president’s 
power to legislate by decree. 

■ Witness Testifies 

Ramon Balang, 30, an airiine en- 
gineer, testified in cram Monday 
that the opposition leader Benigno 
S. Aquino Jr, was not killed the 
way the Philippine military said he 
was. The New York Tunes reported 
from Manila. 

Five other workers assigned at 
Manila airport on the day of the 
assassination in August 1983 of the 


hsiPJlir* 


Arturo ToJentino 

political rival of President Marcos 
nave gone into hiding and refused 
to answer summons to testify. 

Among the witnesses who did 
not show up were the mother, sister 
and son of Rolando Galman. 
whom soldiers shot and killed at 
the airport, asserting that he was 
Mr. Aquino’s assassin. 

Mr. Balang said that soldiers dis- 
embarked from two vehicles and 
immediately cordoned off the 
plane Mr. Aquino was on as soon 
as it docked at Gate Eight of Ma- 
nila airport. 

He said he noticed Mr. Galman 
dressed in a cargo loader’s uniform 
and was puzzled that be was mov- 
ing around the soldiers, smiling at 
them as if he knew them. 

Mr. Balang said that Mr. Gal- 
man and these soldiers were near 
the mflitaiy van in front of Mr. 
Aquino when the latter was shot 
from behind, apparently from tbe 
service stairs of the plane. 



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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985; 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Fresh Designs of Marc Jacobs, 21 


frKtnuUHMal Herald Tribune 


N EW YORK — The search for 
fashion talent goes on in New 
York, with increasing success. 
Since Stephen Sprouse exploded on 
the fashion scene last spring with 
truly American, graffiti-inspired 
clothes, other young designers have 
been finding themselves in un- 
charted fashion territory, which 
could be the beginning of a differ- 
ent American market. 


This season. Marc Jacobs, 21, is 
the most talked-about new designer 
in New York. His story is almost 
too good to be true: Jacobs gradu- 
ated from the Faisons School of 
Design in April 1984, winning the 


signed a big sweater and had his 


grandmother knit iL We put it in 
the window. The demand was so 


Hebe Dorsey 


EST.4B. 1946 



Eurn/v't finest selection 
of beautiful fashion 
fabrics. 

rail and see iu tin your 
next London risit 


56/58 Duke Street 
Ciwvenar Square 
London W.1M.6H.S. 
Tel.: 01.629.3781. 


The home 
of B urberrys Paris, 
since 1909 

(Near the Madeleine) 


Perry Ellis and Chester Weinberg 
Golden Thimble awards and being 
named student designer of the year. 
It was the first time since 1967 that 
a New Yorker bad won all three 
major American awards for young 
designer. 

Shortly afterward, Jacobs got the 
backing of the Seventh Avenue 
manufacturer Reuben Thomas to 
design a line under the title 
“Sketchbook.*' Hjs first spring and 
summer collection, with sales of 
$400,000 to 5500,000, is in 70 stores 
in the United States, including 
Charivari, Bcrnwit Teller. Macy's, 
Neiman-Marcus and Saks Fifth 
Avenue. Henri Bendd plans to sell 
his dothes next season. Jacobs has 
also raxed ample coverage in the 
fashion media, including the front 
page of Women's Wear Daily. 

Jacobs said be was fascinated 
with fashion long before he went to 
Parsons. He was discovered in 1979 
by Charivari, whose owners are giv- 


ing a party for him today. “He is 
getting a tot of tmbUdty recently. 


the window. The demand was so 

r < that we took the sweater to 
Orient and had 300 comes 
made. Together with the Jean-Faul 
Gaultier sweaters" — which look 
like huge tapestry knits — “they 
became immediate best sellers.’' 

Jacobs was also lucky in that 
Reuben Thomas, a company that 
was into Establishment beaded 
evening dresses, was looking for 
younger talent and a more sporty 
line. Martin Thomas, who, with his 
father, owns the company, said: 
“My father was responsible for hir- 
ing Jacobs. There is such excite- 
ment about him. such sparkle, and 
at the same timp. a level-headedness 
often ladling in creative people. 
Also a confidence that he can do 
exactly anything be wants to do." 

Jacobs can be found at his studio 
on 34th Street in the heart of the 
Seventh Avenue district Wearing 
solid black, he is tall skinny, dark 
and handsome, with his hair pulled 
bade in a ponytail and with the 
sauntering grace of a gazelle. His 
favorite one-liner is that he makes 
children’s dothes for grown-ups. 

“As a child, you’re allowed to 
live your fantasies, " he said. 
“‘Sketchbook’ translates this 
idea." 





The Case for Lower Case^ \> ^ 


By Susan 3 . Smith 

The Associated Pros ‘ ■ 


Gerhard Mfliler, an adviser ' ( ,ij* 

the Wiesbaden Society for the G 1 

man Language, said in a nttf; * 


B ONN — Officials from Ger- 
man language institutes in 


getting a tot of publitity recently, 
but we've known him for a long 
time,” said Barbra Weiser; she and 
her mother, Selma, and brother Jem 
are responsible for the success of 
the six highly fashion-tuned Chari- 
vari stores. Barbra Weiser, who is 
in charge of discovering young tal- 
ent, said: 

“In 1979, he came in on the day 
we opened Charivari 72, on 72d 
and Columbus. He was 15. He was 
so excited at the idea that he was 
going to see Thierry Mugler and 
other avant-garde Paris dothes. He 
kept coming after school every day. 
His grandmother wanted us to give 
him a job, which we finally (ha- 
first as a salesman. Then he de- 


His fantasies this season, which 
he defines in movie terms as a 
“combination of ‘Amadeus' and 
‘Purple Rain,’ ” are romantic 


•Woman's W«ar Da»y (2) 


Marc Jacobs and one of Us designs: Young Americans “have a better chance today.’ 


clothes, strongly inspired by Lon- 
don's street fashion without its sin- 


ister edge. Using damasks, bro- 
cades and Iinens.be designed a big 
white ruffled shut and long waist- 
coat meant to resemble the dothes 
worn in “Amadeus." Pale and sub- 
tle colors, such as oyster, bisque, 
gray and salmon, give the dothes 
added freshness. “With the excep- 


cotors, yet stronger than pastels 
and very flattering." he said. 

The main feeling of this collec- 


tion is one of young couture, with a 
silhouette updated with couture 
touches, such as the intricate gath- 
ering of a sleeve or the detailing of 

The ornate romantic look has 
been around Europe and Britain 
for a while — the London firm. 
Grolla, did it first, os Jacobs ac- 
knowledged. “But it was in the air," 
he added. “If you went out, you fell 
people were tired of wearing b lack 
There was a reaction, regardless if 
it was in New York or London." 

Jacobs said young American de- 
signers are coming into their own. 


"Stephen Sprouse was first. He 
broke the ice. Many more are fol- 
lowing, such as Diane Pernet, 
who's been in business three years, 
and Sally Becks, who does charm- 
ing takeoffs on '60s stewardesses. 
It's time for a new guard. The other 
designers, such as Ralph Lauren, 
Perry Ellis and Calvin Kirin, are 
now Establishment. 

“Young American designers 
have a better chance today, basical- 
ly because fashion editors and mag- 
azines have looked all around the 
world and are now ready to look 
into their own back yard. After all, 


Americans invented sportswear." 

Asked which designers he ad- 
mired, Jacobs, came up with the 
Tunisian designer Azzcdine Alaia 
(“terrific”) Yohji Yamamoto (“but 
I find his clothes a Utile religious”) 
and Karl Lagerfeld. “Lagerfejd is 
my favorite," hesaid. “The couture 
is becoming very influential again, 
largely thanks-to Lagerfeld. His last 
collection for Chanel was so young 
and r omant ic 

‘‘Couture was influenced by 
street fashion in the last few years. 
Now, I think it's going to be the 
other way around.” 


D man, language institutes in 
Wiesbaden and Mannheim met re- 
cently at the Conference of State 
Culture Ministers in Bonn to dis- 
cuss new proposals for ridding 
written Goman of an antient 
scourge: all those capital letters. 

With at least 78 rules governing 
capitalization of nouns — and al- 
most any word in German can be 
turned into a noun —the language 
experts contend that some relax- 
ation would hdp make -German 
easier to leant and would do away 
with ambiguity. 

Supporters of reform charge (hat 
the ca pitalizat ion of nouns in mod- 
ern Goman makes it increasingly 
difficult for Germans and foreign- 
ers alike to learn the language. The 
weekly magazine Der Spiegel re- 
marked last year that even the 
18th-century poet Goethe “would 
not have tested well'’ in the morass 
of existing regulations. 

Errors occur dafly in German 
schools and offices, even in graffiti 
on the Berlin WalL' And mistakes in 
capitalization «um dramatically 
change the meaning of & sentence. 

The most celebrated example is 
“Ich habe in Berlin tiebe Genos- 
sen,~ meaning “1 have dear com- 
rades in Berlin." If one capitalizes 
“Uebe" and lower-cases “Genos- 
sen" the sentence means, *T have 
enjoyed love . m Berlin.” 

The .burden that all tins creates 
for German schoolchildren was 
recognized in 1908 by Konrad Du- 
deu. one of the authors of the Du- 
den lexicons codifying the lan- 
guage. 

“The writing of nouns with a 
capital letter (fornays the mental 
and physical health of our young 
people through useless burdening 
of tire memory, as ir robs the 
schools of valuable time and the 
child of the toll to learn and joy in 
doing so.” Duden wrote. 


ill \\ t!ld 

tl Mivm 


interview: “The system has bccorf 
very complicated." Still, the Wm 
baden group favors only partial i 
form. For example, it would alk 
nouns lo be written in lower « 
when they are used as adverts. 


“Asking for a complete char 
to lower case is like asking foi * 
cultural revolution," Mfifler s&k 


But proponents of drama 
.change, including the Institute 
German Language m Mannhe 
scoff at such fears. After all, so 
point out, the capitalization star 
only in the 17th century. 

German writers have Hiigd up 
both sides of the question. Lo\ 


.... i 

. i 

*••"1 


case supporters have included f 
toll Brecht and Heinrich BOIL 1 ' 
per casern have included Uur 
Mann and GOnter Grass. 


The Grimm brothers, who . ■■ 
their rime were perhaps be 
known as linguistic scholars that 
collectors of fairy tales, were dn 
ed on the issue: Jacob wants! 
lo wer-case but Wilhelm liked . 
capitals. 

The argument is aggravated V 
the lack of a dear legal autboi * 
There is no West German cull - 
ministry, so the states are stud} 
the matter through the (Were . 
of State Culture Ministers In 1 
and 1973, the conference made 
form proposals that were f . 
away and forgotten. Ultimat ~~ 
the Bundestag might have to y" 
the final go-ahead for any subsr 
tial reform. 

Denmark changed to lower f 
nouns in 1948 without much tr : 
ble, but Danish involved coly 
country. German is spoken mV * 
Germany, East Germany, Aus-' " 
and Switzerland, and any cha : 
would ideally apply in all four. l-~ 
German officials have signaled t • 
they favor lower case, but they 
not want to go it alone. 


all* >4*4 it 
, rt JhtT 

- **J# to 




&;■**** 




I Classical 

[ B urberrys 
■ rainwear j 
V from 

1.730 FF\ 


Texas Resort Braces for Student Invasion p oonesbury 


- -m 

* -■ aw 


By David Sedeno 

The Associated Press 


; The full rangeof 
traditional Burberrys Mens, 
| Ladies & Children clothing. 


S OUTH PADRE ISLAND, 
Texas — This five-mile stretch 


Burberrys 


8, bd Malesherbes 
Paris 8 r -266.13.01 


O Texas — This five-mile stretch; 
of southern Texas paradise will be' 
transformed next week into a party 
palace for college students seeking 
“suds, sun and surf," as the local 
police chief put iL 
In March, more than 100,000 
people, mostly students on spring 
vacation, flock to Port Isabel ana 


South Padre Island. The biggest 
week this year is Match 10 through 
17, when an estimated 50,000 peo- 
ple will visit the Texas version of 
Fl Lauderdale, Florida. 

“Spring break is hectic for every- 
body, but it's good,” said Kathie 
Hawkinson, executive director of 
the Port Isabel-South Padre Island 
Chamber of Commerce. “It’s a 
busy time, but it’s an economic phis 
for the community.” 


Captain Tommy Atkinson, the 
acting South Padre Island police 
chief, said officers would be work- 
ing 12-hour shifts. Asked if alcohol 
played a role in the celebration, 
Atkinson said, “You'd better be- 
lieve iL It’s suds, sun and surf." 

Local condominium and hotel 
rooms are bodied solid for March, 
Hawkinson said. Last year almost 
$4 milli on was pumped into the 
local economy during March. ■ 


‘/r sipujg? urn a cull. 

FROMT&PRO-^^ 
JS ID 85 ON THE 


USA FOR AFRICA? U&l.SOFAR 
6&,IP0HT W&EGOT 


MOW, QUINCY. 
tm snu, sort 


LIONEL RICHIE, 
BRUCBSPftm- 


CFREnmno steen, bob 


all are you- 


ASKING? 


JFflAN* 


MCNAEL JACKSON.RAf CHARLES 
siEUEumzx, mjBMiPLBR. 
•DBm ROSE, &UYJOEL, PAUL 
SIMON. KENNY ROGERS, WILLIE 
-NE150N, TINA TURNER, SMOKE/ 
.ROBINSON ANt? f , 

fifiONNE WARWICK. 


MJteTOUGH,'. 

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. •... <*• n 


■ m 

' i-t>> { 








ANNOUNCING THE ROYAL ORCHID SHERATON IN BANGKOK - 


Rfl 







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AMEX msmAmRS nw rat* «M pji 
uyss orton ME Cold msrksh P. 7 
IIYSE Wstaflow* ME Jntanm rote P, 7 
Cavdlon Hacks P.I4- Atortat summary p.io 
CurmcrratM P.7 Wm» P.n 

UHMtfllK P.12 OTC stock PJ4 

gWMC P.X2 oitsr marturts P.u 


4o |k »1»VnlinuM 

Hcrala«a^.(tnbunc 


TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.5. Stocks 
Report; Page 10 


Page 




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whc " 

lO IoWit JjJ **^ 
cullur.,, 


to ills- 

ridding 
unctcni 
(tiers, 
waning 
and sl> 
l can N> 
dnguage 
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iicrman 

do away 


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KS 

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age. Tire f J jf^ u rr - tick JJ* 
iegcl re- lo 1 Brivh ' and Hew 
the F ^ luve^i 

stake* in ^ on ,h - :s 'ue-‘w'’' 
laticaliy 1 ow j-t-C3n.- h U i \\vu“r 
alienee. Ca P ,lals ** 


“would 
: morass 

German 
n graffiti 


Internflfmiial 
ittvestors are playing 
a larger role in 
futures markets. 


oitence. 

ample is 
• Gcnos- 
!ar com- 
ipitalizes 
"Genos- 
“I have 

s creates 
ren was 
trad Du- 
the Du- 
the lan- 

i with a 
s mental 
ir young 
uroetung 
vbs the 
and the 
nd joy in 


the lack ..i a ^ £r- 
There is \\ cs , > 

form pr.ip.HaK a? 

!l e Buni| iMae rnigi, ( 

the final headToti 

iial reform 

Denmark chanMv. 
nouns in M4S mC. 
ble. hue Danish ■**! 
ciiunin. German i i5K i 
Ge ™ J "v l j»l Go* 
and awn^criand. ^ . 
would ideal I \ apply 

t-ierm.in offiiiaij, hav^j. 
they fa% or It'uereajti 
not want logo 


-■■V 


6i*f' 


ws: 



JON IN BANGUI 


FUTURES AMD OPTIONS 

'Audit Trails’ Will Wind 
Through Animal Meeting 

By HJ. MAJDENBEBG 

New York Tones Same 

N EW YORK — When (lie leaders of the futures indus- 
try gather Tuesday at the Boca Raton Country CInb in 
Florida for their 10th annual conference, there will be 
many new faces and accents seen and hear d among the 
roughly 1,200 participants. 

Many of the newcomers at the Futures Industry Association 
conference will be bankers and other members of financial 
institutions who until a few years ago would never have associat- 
ed publicly with anyone involved in futures trading. Such deal- 
ings were then considered to be gambling. 

But Richard L. Sander, senior vice president of Diexel Burn- 
ham Lambert Inc., observed last week: 

“Given the uncertainty of the 

financial markets these past 
few years, the only gamblers 
are those with fiduciary re- 
sponsibilities who don’t use 
the futures and options mar- 
kets. That many do use them ' 
explains why the volume of 
Treasury band futures alone 
was S31 billion in 1984, com- 
pared with $30 billion for all futures traded in 1975.” 

As for the foreign accents at the meeting they will reflect the 
growing international scope of the futures business. 

“While the coumuxlities futures business has always been a 
global affair, it is only in the last year or so that the financial and 
stock index markets have leaped frontiers,” said John M. Dam- 
gud, president of FLA, a Washington-based trade group. 

Among the international linkages effected or initiated in the 
past year are those bet w een the Chicago Board of Trade and the 
London International Financial Futures Exchange; the Chicago 
Mercantile and Singapore Monetary exchanges; New York’s. 
Commodity Exchange and the Sydney Futures Exchange, and 
the Philadelphia Stock Exchange and the Hong Kong Futures 
Exchange. 

Basically, there are two kinds of linlmgfs. Hie Chicago Merc- 
Sizxgapore Bnkage. for example, permits a gold futures contract 
bought on the Chicago exchange to be s old in Singapore or vice 
versa. In the case of the Chicago Board-LEFFE arrangement, the 
London exchange received permission to trade the Chicago 
Board’s highly successful Treasury bond contract 
«. “But these linkages are not without potential legal and regula- 
tory problems,” Mr. Damgard noted. “Many of our members are 
unfamiliar with foreign legal systems and market regulation, two 

lies that will definitely be discussed at Boca Raton.” 

most sensitive topic, however, will be the problem of 
“audit trails,” a trade euphemism for tracking the timing of 
trades. It is a sensitive subject because traders on the futures 
exchange floors traditionally execute orders for both their own 
accounts and those of outride hedgers and speculators. 

“It’s a very tough issue, but maybe (be Chicago Board Options 
Exchange has the answer ” Mr. Damgard said, noting that floor 
members there can trade for their own and outside accounts, but 
not at the same time. 

Don L. Horwitz, of die law firm of Kaye, Scholar, Herman, 
Hays & Handler, said: 

“The futures industry should seize upon the current investiga- 
tion of the audit trails process, by the Commodity Futures 
Trading Commisrioa as an opportunity to settle the matter once 
and for all” : , 

He continued: “While the CFTC may be on the right track, 
their solutions majrnot be .the, answer to. the problem. For 
example; most of us in. the industry cannot see, given the volatility 
in many of the futures markets, how exchanges can impose a one- 
minute time stamping of orders. Zt won’t work, nor will the 
present 30-minute system continue to satisfy everyone.” 

Federal regulations require that all orders be time stamped 
within 30 minutes erf execution. Same rcgnlatora would prefer thus 
period be reduced to one minute. 


Currency Rates 


mrrrrrr’ 
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Sat uu'LL^r’ 

swser—^I 


2 P.M. 

* 

8 

DJA. 

FJ. HJ- 

owr. 

BF. 

If. Yea 


30715 

4089 

TTU&J* 

3705* 03819 

— 

5422* 

13113*14638 9 

Bnmrtrta) 

470575 

7347 

20.117 

4077 3329* 

17383 

— 

23057 24059* 

Frakfwt 

3372 

1412 

__ 

3232* 1407 X 

88305* 

4073* 

11445*13955* 

louden (bl 

UMS 



34058 

11011 233835 

400 

72495 

30921 27756 

MBan 

209900 

204740 

42238 

*nn 

54945 

30055 

72501 8051 

MrwYDrfc(c) 

— 

10725 

33725 

103225 209S0O 

282 

4205 

2891 25900 

Porto 

10312 

110275 

30S7 

4014SX 

20994 

15302* 

354530438* 

Tokyo 

21005 

28338 

7701 

25J3 1204 * 

4539 

38707* 

9004 

Ztartdt 

2389 

3095 

MW 

2X04* 03371 

25305* 

434* 

13114* 

1 ECU 

A4S87 

04155 

33231 

4394 108258 

25178 

443851 

10044 171089 

1 SDR 

8054771 

009204 

332044 

90454 200431 

14487 

643884 

27422 248013 




Dollar Valnea 








DJ 865 Motor. I 
B. 1 B 1 S Nano, tom* 
cuaz phlmm 
anus foiihcia 

asm Sh* rival 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Asian Dollar Rates 


9*-9V4 
Sum; R e ut e rs. 


Irons. 

Wfc-*vs 


IBK. 

m -r* 


(ML 

VM -IB* 


Much 4 

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10 * - 10 * 


Key Money Rates 

United Sates 


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1 Nderel Funds 
f Rat# 

: ink* Lena Rata 
t pomt, 30-179 days 

“WanUi Treasury Bills 
m»t*i Treasury Bills 
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Lombard Roto 
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doss Prr r. Britain 


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Gold Prices 


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Hnuht% Cqm m s ra Oan fc Cntoff 4^ 
H *tofc-Umfc BanJt Bonk at Tokyo. 


AM PM ent 
Hang Kona 3M» 38950 + U5 

ummboura 289 35 - +» 

par* (US Utol 2B » *6 m35 + 1.10 

Zurich 739SS SUM + US 

linear 38830 38US + 1*48 

MtwVork — 39030 +030 

Official (Wool tor London. Paris end Lax»n> 
Oom.easnlnaaiidctoslMH'leKtor Hena una 
am zurldv >ter Vgrk caamk corrtnt eamracL 
AH priCMto UU rer ««m>. 


] 


Late iateixBik rate* on March 4 , exducSng fees. 

Offidd fbangj for Aimterdom, Brusseti, Frankfurt, Mian, Paris. New York rates at 


Dollar 
Rises in 
Europe 

Central Banks 
Remain Inactive 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The U.S. dollar 

rose against most other major cur- 
rencies in European trading Mon- 
day as central banks ref rained from 
maj or ftcJlar sale s 

Currency dealers said there was 
no repeat of last week’s concerted 
intervention by European central 
banks, during which the banks sold 
more than S2 billion in a bid to 
drive the dollar lowo - . 

The effort worked for one ses- 
sion, with the U.S. curr e n cy suffer- 
ing one of its worst oneday de- 
clines in years. But the dollar then 
rebounded late last week. 

While there was no evidence of 
major intervention Monday, the 
possibility that the central banks 
would again launch big sales of 
dollars kept traders nervous. 

“The big question hanging over 
the maiket is whether central banks 
will re-enter the market again in a 
j" a F rankf ort dealer said. 
Tokyo the dollar finished the 
_ day at 260.05 yen, down 
from 26050 yen late Friday. 

In London, the pound fell to 
SI. 068 Cram Si. 0715 late Friday. 

Other dollar rates in late Europe- 
an trading compared with late Fri- 
day were 3.373 Deutsche marks, up 
from 3.3635; 1889 Swiss francs, up 
from 18775 and 10.312 French 
francs, up from 10165. 

■ U.S. Refraal Seen 

The United States has refused to 
join in major currency intervention 
to drive the dollar down, despite 
suggestions from the Federal Re- 
serve that such action might be 
useful Reuters reported Monday 
from Washington, quoting admin- 
istration sources. 

Pan] A. Voider, chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, last week 
whether recent sales of 
by central banks had been 
forceful enough. But this view is 
not shared by the a dminis tra tion, 
the monetary sources say. 

Mr. Vokkefs remarks provoked 
market speculation that the United 
States would join its allies in Eu- 
rope. and Japan in selling huge 
quantities of dollars to prop up 
weaker currencies. 

But later, when central banks did 
launch a major assault mi the dol- 
lar, monetary sources reported that 
dollar sales by the Fed were insig- 

nifitynt 

“I don’t think you’re going to see 
a change in our behavior that’s 
reaDy substantial” one senior ad- 
ministration source said. 

But the adnrin i stratian-Fed split 
is important because it tends to 
confuse the markets. Moreover, 
monetary sources say, several U.S. 
officials believe Mr. Yakker's com- 
ments may nltimaidy undermine 
efforts to bring the dollar down 
once the markets realize they do 
not foreshadow significant U.S. 
sales of dollars 


Supercomputers Are Suddenly Hot 


Even Hollywood 
Has Discovered 
Speedy Machines 

By David R Sanger 

Yew York Times Strike 

NEW YORK — In iust the 
last 18 months, all three of 
America’s largest automakers 
have installed supercomputers in 
their design centers, seeking to 
test-drive their prototypes with- 
out ever building them. 

Aerospace, chemical manufac- 
turers and even movie companies 
seeking to create three-dimen- 
sional special effects for science 
fiction films also are buying the 
machines, which provide far- 
greats- computing power than 
any mainframe comjHiter can de- 
liver. 

Suddenly, supercomputers are 
hoL This year, Cray Research 
Iocl, Control Data Corp. and a, 
handful of smaller makers of the 
world’s fastest computers will in- 
stall about 45 new machines — a 
r emarka ble number ertntidt-rjftg 
that fewer than 120 supercom- 
puter exist in the world. 

“It's dear the market is poised 
for explosive growth, because 
now it’s not just the Defense De- 
partment and the uni vers ties 
that are grabbing them up," said 
Jeffry Canm, an analyst at Ham- 
brecni & Quist Inc. 

The demand has sparked 
scores of new supercomputer 
projects, ranging from tiny Sili- 
con Valley start-ups to a major 
effort by International Business 
Machines Corp. Among the most 
promising entrants: Convex 
Computer Corp., Scientific 
Computer Systems Inc. and 
Deodcor, Inc. 

“There’s no question it will be 
our best year ever, in terms of 
shipments,” Robert Gaertner, a 
Cray vice president, said in a 
recent telephone interview from 
the company’s Minneapolis 
headquarters. 

Wall Street appears to feel the 
same way. Cray’s price on the 
New York Stock Exchange has 
soared to mop ih.m $78 in recent 


Number of Supercomputer^ 
Class Processor 

installations 

unit shipments 

per year 



1MO im IBM IBM 

1 “Pojecte 

i Sourea Woodman Ktrtontnai 4 oereatn 


a Cray X-MP supeiccmpL ie: tnai 
perfwms. 300 to 9 CC 
million cakutelions per second 


PuttfnfirSup*rcornpcrtbr« to Work 


Meteorology: Prodictjno the 

movement of storms and 
do to cting broad changes in 
atmospheric conflOtfona and 
temperatures. 

Automobile and Aerodynamic 
Design: Modeling the flow ot air 
over a wring or the stress points 
on an entire automobile, making 
rt possible to test designs 
without buikflng prototypes. 

Oil end Geophysical 
Exploration: Using sonic and 
other data to predict the 
characteristics of underground 
reservoirs and geologic faults. 
totatBgence Gathering: Sifting 
through minions of satellite and 
other transmissons — 


particularly data traffic — as 
part of routine electronic 
spying. 

Code Breaking: Testing 
milfions of combinations in 
sophisticated efforts u cradt 
ciphers. 

Nuclear Energy Research: 
Simulating the actions of atomic 
particles, both ter weapons 
research and nuclear energy 
projects. 

Graphics and Film Animation: 
Creating three-dimensiona] 
models used in apeeial-etteets 
work, particularly m science 
fiction movies, and In CAT 
scanning and other medical 
techniques. 


Icahn Drops 
Hostile Attempt 
To Buy Phillips 


months, from the mid-540 range 
last summer. It closed Friday at 
S76. 

But if boom times have finally 
caught up with what was once a 
tweedy, academic niche of the 
computer industry, there also 
has been a profound sense of 
unease. 

When the National Science 
Foundation announced last 
week that it was spending $200 
million to buQd four National 
Advanced Computing Centers at 
universities around the country 
— a move that seems Hkely to 
benefit corporate researchers as 
much as academics — federal 
officials made it dear that U.S. 
supremacy in the world of super- 
computers was threatened. 

Defining what a supercom- 
puter is is like shooting at a mov- 
ing target: They are simply the 
fastest machin es at any pomt in 


IHi Nr* fert Lfiiai 

time. But today's supercom- 
puters differ markedly from oth- 
er computers in design and use. 
They excel at highly specific, re- 
petitive mathematical problems, 
but are inefficient at the tasks 
performed by general-purpose 

machine. 

Whether the United Stares re- 
tains the lead in malting them is a 
matter of pride, but it is also a 
matter of practicality. Not only 
are they key to research in a wide 
range of scientific tasks, from 
nuclear research to meteorology, 
but they are a critical tool in 
weapons systems and intelli- 
gence. 

“Do you really want to depend 
an a foreign nation, even an ally, 
for the computers that launch 
your missiles?” a National Sci- 
ence Foundation official, speak- 

(Coatfimed on Page 15. Col 1) 


The AuocrtiJcd Press 

NEW YORK —Carl C Icahn, a 
New York investor, agreed Mon- 
day to drop his hostile bid to ac- 
quire Phillips Petroleum Co_, avert- 
ing the oil company's second 
unwelcome takeover assault in less 
than three months. 

The joint announcement of a set- 
tlement came after Phillips 
launched a sweetened, S4 5- billion 
offer to buy back nearly half of its 
stock and also disclosed that its 
shareholders had rejected an earlier 
recapitalization plan to keep the 
company independent. 

Mr. Icahn, who owns 4.85 per- 
cent of Phillips stock, agreed to 
withdraw his offer of S60 a share 
for 70 milli on shares, or 45 percent, 
of Phillips, which was part of an 
S8.06-billion bid for the company. 

On Friday. Phillips stock closed 
at $49,375. It was up 51.125 to 
$50.50 a share in heavy trading at 
midday Monday on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

Mr. Icahn also said that he 
would not go through with an at- 
tempt to unseat the Phillips hoard 
and agreed not to launch another 
hid for Phillips during the next 
eight years. 

Drexel Bu mham Lambert Inc., 
Mr. 1 calm's financial adviser, 
agreed not to finance any takeover 
attempt against Phillips for the 
next three years, Phillips also said. 
Both Phillips and Mr. Icahn agreed 
to dismiss lawsuits filed in the take- 
over attempt that began Feb. 4. 

Under terms of the settlement, 
Phillips will pay up to S25 million 
of Mr. Icahn’s expenses. 

Mr. Icahn said that his expenses 
were larger than $25 million and 
refused to comment on his profit 
from the transaction. But Wall 
Street analysts estimated that he 
earned between $50 million and 
$60 million before taxes. 

In December, Phillips negotiated 
the settlement of a takeover at- 
tempt led by T. Boone Pickens, the 
chairman of Mesa Petroleum Co_ 


that produced a pretax profit of at 
least S89 million for that takeover 
group. 

The rejected SS-billkm recapital- 
ization plan had been designed to 
give employees control of Phillips 
and stabilize the stock at $5? per 
share. If it had been approved, it 
would have derailed Mr. Icahn's 
bid. 

The company said Monday that 
while a majority of the votes cast 
favored its proposal, the plan fell 
9. 1 million votes short of the major- 
ity of outstanding shares needed 
for passage. 

Meanwhile Monday. Standard & 
Poor's Corp- 3 tnJjor credit-infor- 
mation service, slashed its bond 
rating for Phillips, citing the huge 
debt burden envisioned by the new 
offer. S&P cut Phillips* rating to 
BBB from AA. 


Singapore’s GDP, Payments Surplus Grew in ’84 


Rouen GDP measures the total value of a 

SINGAPORE — Singapore's- -nation’s goods and services, eut 
gross domestic product grew 8JI eluding income from foreign in- 
pereent last year, slightly better vestments. _ . 

than the IS percent rate in 1983, Construction activity unproved 
the Ministry of Trade and Industry by 15 percent compared with 29 
said Monday in its annual cconom- percent a year earlier, while manu- 

lacraring grew by 9 percent against 
2 percent m 1983. 

Cumulative foreign investment 


ic survey. 

The survey also said Singapore 
posted a balanced-payments sur- 
plus of 32 bilKon Singapore dollars 
($1.41 bQlian) in 1984, up from 12 
trillion in 1983. The growth was 
attributed to an improvanent in 
foreign investment and continued 
large capital inflows. 

■Financial and business services 
grew by 11 percent against the pre- 
vious year’s 13 percent and contin- 
ued to be the leading sectors in 
GDP, accounting for about a quar- 
ter of the growth, the survey said; 


in manufacturing as measured by 
gross fixed assets stood at 11.1 bil- 
lion dollars at the end of 1983, an 
increase of 16 percent over 1982. 
Total investment in 1984 was the 
same as the previous year's 1.8 bil- 
lion dollars. 

Total external trade increased 8 
percent in volume, almost twice the 
1983 volume. Bat this growth was 
modest compared with double-dig- 
it increases m the years after the 
1975 recession. The survey attrib- 


uted the lower figum te the drop in 
oil.trade. 

Crude and petroleum products 
were again the major commodities 
traded with a value of 30 billion 
dollars. Crude imports dropped 1 
perc en t after a 12 percent decrease 
m 1983. 

Foreign reserves stood at 22.7 
billion dollars at the end of 1984. 

The current-account deficit wid- 
ened marginally to 2.14 trillion dol- 
lars, about 5 percent of GDP, 
against the 2J09 billion recorded 
the year before, the survey said. 
Current account measures trade in 
goods and services as well as inter- 
est, dividends and certain transfers. 

Net earnings from services fell to 
7.6 billion dollars from 10.9 billion. 

Larger interest and dividend 
payments as wdl as freight and 


insurance costs and a fall in re- 
ceipts from shig^ repairing and rril 
contracts alio contributed to the 
deficit 

Capital inflow increased to 5.4 
billion dollars from 4 J billion, with 
foreign banks bringing in substan- 
tial nmds to strengthen their base 
fra: reasons of prudence and to fi- 
nance credit operations, the survey 
said. 


Fraser Backs 
TakeoverBid 
By Egyptians 

Complied bi‘ (tar Sunf Fmn Dupaidtn 

LONDON — The board of 
House of Fraser PLC said Mon- 
day it supported a takeover bid 
of £61 5 million ($66 1.4 million) 
from the al- Fayed family of 
Egypt far the group, which 
owns Harrods and 106 other 
stores in Britain. 

The al-Faycds own shipping, 
oil banking and construction 
interests, with office buildings 
in London, Paris and New- York 
and the Ritz Hotel in Paris. 

A Harrods spokesman said 
the Fraser board would recom- 
mend acceptance “in absence of 
any unforeseen ctrcumsiances’' 
of the al- Fayed offer of 400 
pence a share for the 70.1 per- 
cent of shares outstanding that 
the family does not already 
own. 

Fraser shares rose Monday 
from 346 to 410 pence on the 
London Stock Exchange. 

(AP. UP!) 


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Murdoch Is Beaming American TV Into Europe 


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Dollar D-Mark Franc Martha Prone ECU SOU 

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Saunas: Montm Guaranty (dollar, DM, SF, Pound. FF): Lkrvds Bonk (ECU): Citibank 
(SDR}. 


By Michael Schrage 

Washington Post Service 

LONDON — Armed with a 
three beautiful wom- 
a communications satellite, 
Rupert Murdoch is zapping the 
fear of competition into Europe’s 
traditional television broadcasters. 

The Australian press baron, best 
known fra 1 a newspaper empire that 
stretches across three con t inents, 
also is principal owner of Sky 
Channel — an English-language 
television network beaming Ameri- 
can television programs like “Mr. 
Ed,” a show about a talking horse, 
and “Charlie’s Angels,” featuring 
three female detectives, to cable r 
systems across Europe. 

Although only a fraction of Eu- 
rope’s estimated 100 million televi- 
sion households are now on cable. 
Sky Channel reaches nearly 3 mil- 
lion viewers and is growing. In the 
past four years, it has become a 
medium that has piqued serious 
advertiser interest while poring 
thorny challenges for countries that 
want to continue to strictly regulate 

the sort of programming their citi- 
zens can watch. 

“There’s no reason why a pan- 
Enropean entertainment channel 
shouldn’t work, and Murdoch has 
the lead service in an expanding 
market.” said John Howkins, exec- 
utive director of the Internati o nal 
Institute of Communications in 
I . Ofi don. 

If Mr. Murdoch can continue to 


increase Sty’s audience and reve- 
nue while avoiding political com- 
plications, he could well become a 
profitable and influential broad- 
caster, much as he cow is a profit- 
able and influential publisher. 

But despite initial enthusiasm 
from advertisers and viewers, there 
still is significant concern over the 
future ctf Sky and pan-European 
television. Some advertisers still 
view Sky as an experiment and the 
growth of cable television in Eu- 
rope has been far slower than ex- 
pected. 

Sir James Carruthers, who si is on 
the board of Mr. Murdoch’s News 
Corporation Ltd, conceded that 
“we were very hopeful that we’d 
have half a million homes in the 
UJC. by now — now we have only 
100,000.” 

Mr. Cox said he expects Sky to 
reach more than seven million po- 
tential viewers by the end of this 
year if it gets permission to link 
with Belgium's cable systems. As- 
suming it meets projections. Sky is 
expected to break even this year rai 
revenue ofjust under $10 nuUioa. 

“If in five years, we’ve got 15 
nriBion connections and good rat- 
ings, this could be a very, very good 
business fra: us,” 5Br James said. 

Sky Channel was conceived 
about five years ago by Brian 
Haynes, a British televirion jour- 
nahst who had filmed a documen- 
tary on Ted Turner, the American 
cable television entrepreneur. 


Noting that Mr. Turner had 
transformed his local Atlanta tele- 
vision station into a national “su- 
per station” by using a satellite to 
beam its programming to cable sys- 
tems around the country, Mr. 
Haynes reasoned that the approach 
could work in Europe. He figured 
that television advertisers, frustrat- 
ed by local advertising restrictions, 
would leap at the chance to bypass 
the tightly controlled national tele- 
vision broadcasters. 

After considerable bureaucratic 
wrangling, Mr. Haynes managed to 
secure a slot on a satellite owned by 
. European postal agencies, and, in 
1981, Satellite Television PLC was 
beaming a few hours of program- 
ming a day to a handful of cable 
systems across Europe on an “ex- 
perimental” basis. 

Two years and $6 million later, 
nervous' Satellite Television inves- 
tors decided to turn to someone 
willing to spend enough to boost 
the service into profitability — Ru- 
pert Murdoch. He paid roughly S8 
millio n for a 65-percenl stake in 
Satellite Television PLC and re- 
named it Sky ChanneL 
Sky, as the channel is called, 

poses an interesting set ctf opportu- 
nities and problems for its owner. 
On one hand, its satellite signal 
blankets Europe, allowing Sky to 
reach all the cable systems it needs 
to build the jnass audience adver- 
tisers desire. On the other hand, if 
cable systems won't pick up its sig- 
nals, Sky will have no audience. 


Most European countries ore re- 
luctant to nun over their cable lines 
to foreign programmers. Moreover, 
different countries have radically 
different television regulations on 
everything from foreign content to 
number of advertisements allowed 
per hour. No single television ser- 
vice could comply with all the rules. 

Despite this regulatory thicket. 
Sky has successfully negotiated ca- 
ble links with West Germany, Brit- 
. ain and the Netherlands, and a 
□umber of Scandinavian countries 
(Contmoed on Page 15, Col 5) 


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SHAREHOLDERS AND BENEFICIARIES OF 
TRANSGLOBAL FINANCIAL SERVICES LIMITED 

(Formerly Investors Overseas Ser v ices Management Limited] 

THE CLARKSON COMPANY LIMITED, in its capacity as Court- 
appointed Liquidator of I.O.S., Ltd. and at Agent of the Trustee of the 
resets of Transglobal Financial Services Limited (formerly Investors 
Oversees Services Management Limited), has importa n t information to 
report to dl persons who have on interest in either of these two 
companies. 

Such persons should immedwlely send their full names, mailing 
addresses raid particulars of their shareholdings or other interest to the 
fallowing address: 

THE CLARKSON COMPANY UMITH> 

Attention: 105/ TR 
P.O. Bax 251 

Toronto-Dominron Centre 

Taranto, CANADA 
M5K1J7 

Upon receipt of your name and address, o written report on the 
current position of these companies and the potential value of their 
shares will be sent immediately. 

You are urged to respond to this notice immediately. The informa- 
tion is essential to pay any money which may become payable to 
shareholders as a result of recent developments. 

This notice applies only to L.O.5., Ltd. and Traisgiabal Financial 
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i'5*i i 5 -.-.WR *-mt\s 115 1 


Page 8 


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


1985 Leipzig Spring Fair - Top products Made in GDR 


,,tron 

► :? * V ' 


The famous 


Bruehl 


Swan Service 


Comeback at the 1985 Leipzig Spring Fair: Coffee set production resumed 
at the Meissen porcelain manufactory. 


On June 6, 1985 the 275th anniversary of the 
foundation of the first European porcelain 
manufactory in Meissen will be celebrated. On this 
occasion the Bruehl Swan coffee service will be 
recreated and on the market again. 

Count Bruehl’s (1700-1763) well-developed sense for 
luxury and presentation can still be seen today. As 
Prime Minister and the most powerful man in Saxony 
for 30 years, he was also successor to August the 
Strong in his capacity as director of the Meissen 
manufactory from 1733 until his death in 1763. 

The king, August III confirmed both in 1737 and 
1740 that, as a special favour every piece of china 
which Bruehl had and was to receive had to be given 
to the king as a present 

With this generous gesture the foundations were laid 
for the world’s finest and most renowned service. 
Ordered in 1737 and completed in 1741, this 
magnificent service consisted of more than 2000 
pieces of sculptured ornaments depicting the flora 
and fauna of the sea. Johann Joachim Kaendler 
created it assisted by Johann Friedrich Eberlein. 
According to a note made by Kaendler in January 
1738 he spent three days in Dresden’s natural history 



'--M K 




m 





275 Years of 
Exquisite Meissen China 


Technology cannot replace 
artistic hand painting. "Dres- 
den China”, “Vieux Saxe”, 
"Porcclaine de Saxe” - these 
terms are known to lovers of 
fine china, to collectors of 
porcelain sculptures, an inter- 
national high society which is 
aware that valuable china 
turns a dull table into a festive 
one and makes eating a feast. 
These terms are established 
names for the china of the 
crossed blue swords trade 
mark. Taken from bis coat of 
arms, they are a reminder of 
the china manufactory’s 
founder, August the Strong. 
The crossed blue swords ace 
synonymous with the 
world-famous Meissen china . 
Europe’s first porcelain 
manufactory was established 
in 1710 under the name of 
"Royal-Polish and Elector- 
al-Saxon Porcelain Manufac- 
tory” following a decree issu- 
ed by August the Strong, 
Elector of Saxony and King of 
Poland. This year the Staat- 
lkhe PorzeUanmanufaktur 
Meissen, which always be- 
longed to the state, first to the 
king then to the treasury, 
celebrates its 275th annivers- 
ary, a jubilee worthy of such 
an old and world-renowned 
manufactory which still ad- 
heres to its traditional meth- 
ods of production. 

Meissen china, one of whose 


outstanding features is its 
hand painting, cannot be 
technologically produced. 
Every piece leaving the manu- 
factory is an original — unique 
and of supreme quality. This 
also determines the top-level 
circle of customers. In the 
18th century European kings 
and queens bought Meissen 
china, today it is the people of 
a modem world, lovers of the 
exquisite quality of Meissen, 
people who in a technological 


world still yearn for the unus- 
ual and the special. 

Prior to the foundation of the 
Meissen porcelain manufact- 
ory, Johann Friedrich Boe ti- 
ger invented porcelain in 
Europe in 1708. His invention 
was long acquiring world 
fame but Johann Gregorius 
Hoeroldt developed a wide 
scale of colours and introduc- 
ed them in numerous forms 
onto the porcelain. 

Johann Joachim Kaendler 



Traditional hand patndne 


created forms and figures 
which still delight today. 
These three important char- 
acters devised the traditional 
methods rigorously employed 
by teams of artists since the 
foundation of the Meissen 
manufactory 275 years ago. 
Thus, on the one hand classic- 
al creations dating back to the 
Rococo period abound and, 
on the other, modem forms 
and designs. 

The Scaatlic h e Porzdlanman- 
ufaktur Meissen has a great 
range of models, styles and 
designs created during its 
long history and soil used 
today. 

Many famous museums, in- 
cluding Dresden, Hamburg, 
Vienna, London, Amster- 
dam, Munich, Paris and Len- 
ingrad consider themselves 
fortunate to possess a collect- 
ion of Meissen china. The in- 
ternationally renowned Lon- 
don auctioneers also value 
Meissen as a highlight of their 
porcelain auctions. 

Meissen rightly has a reputa- 
tion as a rare item and it will 
remain so as the china js pro- 
duced in a manufactory and 
this limits production. Thus 
every connoisseur of Meissen 
chin a knows that buying die 
exquisite porcelain today 
means possessing the antique 
of tomorrow. 


o* 



museum copying rare shells in order to depict this 
image on the service. 

The service got its name from the swan which was a 
favourite relief motif. 

As regards the form, Kaendler had been influenced 
by the Louis XV style as well as by the artists Aur61e 
Meissonier (1675-1750) and Francois Cuvillies 
(1695-1768). 

The large size of many of the dishes such as the 
tureen preclude their being considered for modem 
use, but this is not true for the coffee set ordered in 
1739. 

The coffee service is most impressive, like all the 
other pieces of the service, for the noble beauty of its 
relief, the combination of white and gold, and the 
sparse ornamentation of the so-called “Indian 
Blossoms”. 

Exporter: 

GLAS — Keramik 
DDF — 1080 Berlin 
Kronenslrasse 19119a 
Phone: 205 70 

Telex: 114 661; 114 662; 114 663; 114 664; 
Leipzig Contort; Maedlerpassage 


THE INTERHOTEL BELLEVUE 


On March 6, 1985 the open- 
ing of the Hotel BELLE- 
VUE, on one of the prettiest 
parts of the banks of the Elbe, 
will coincide with the 
GDR/Japan . Economic Com- 
mittee meeting. Residents of 
Dresden have watched with 
excitement this attractive 
hotel being built between the 
time-honoured Blockhaus and 
the Japanese Palace. Of par- . 
ticular interest was the arch- ' 
itectural feat whidrincorpor- 
ated the historic town house 
with the two courts of the for- 
mer Grosse Meissner Strasse 
into the modern long group of 
buildings. The cosy rooms, 
luxurious interior, excellent 
service and friendly hospital- 
ity of its numerous restaur- 
ants, combined with a rich 
touristic program will quickly 
ensure the international rep- 
utation of the Hotel BELLE- 
VUE, and certainly win new 
friends for Dresden, its art 
and culture and ma gnrfirmir 
surroundings. 

Id the hotel’s health centre, 
which is equipped with the 
most up-to-date gadgets, 
guests can follow the multi- 
step oxyigen therapies of Prof. 
AL v. Ardenne as well as the 
^Kneipp cures, medicinal bath 


and massage. Doctors and 
physiotherapists are available 
for guests’ medical care. 

The fitness club includes a 
sizeable swimming pool, sol- 
arium, ladies’ and gents’ 
saunas, bowling alleys and fit- 
ness apparatus. Outdoor 
sports include jogging, tennis 
and horseriding. The Hotel 
BELLEVUE has a well- 
equipped conference and ban- 
quet centre with a maximum 
capacity of 335 delegates. Six 
exdusive reception rooms for 
individual parties, business 
lunches and presentations are 
also at guests’ disposal. Much 
in demand are hotel programs 
for conference delegates or in- 
dividual travellers which in- 
clude a visit to foe renovated 
Semper Opera, rounding off 
the evening with a festivity at 


the Hotel BELLEVUE. 
Rent-A-Car, hotel limousine 
services and Elbe boar trips 
are also on offer, as well as 
world wide reservation facilit- 
ies within the scope of SUP- 
RANATIONAL and GOLD- 
EN TULIP reservations. The 
Hotel BELLEVUE can be 
reached from the airports of 
Berim-Schdnefekl, Leipzig 
a nd E rfurt by the new 
JNTERFLUG, type L-410 
saloon aircraft. 

For reservations or further 
information , please contact : 
HOTEL BELLEVUE 
DDR -8060 Dresden, 
Kopckestrasse 
Telephone for Sales Office: 

6562734 
Telex: 26271 

“I much appreciate the fact 
that the GDR makes so 


For further information, see 
the Trade and Technical Re- 
view — News on Foreign 
Trade of the German Demo- 
cratic Republic 1/2 1985 
p.p. 55/56 New Highlights 
of Dresden, metropolis of 
the arts. Reading this article 


you will learn more about 
world famous places of cultu- 
ral interest in Dresden as e.g. 
the Zwinger with the art galle- 
ry “Old Masters”, the Green 
Vault and not forgetting the 
Semper Opera House which 
reopened February 13, 1985. 


great an effort to preserve 
outstanding artistic monu- 
ments and buildings of the 
past in villages and towns 
which have an historic and 
cultural tradition in order to 
hand them down to future 
generations. Furthermore, 
as one' personally involved I 
am very proud of the fact 
that die Hotel Bellevue is 
being built in Dresden, at 
one of the most representa- 
tive places of cultural inte- 
rest. It will be a new and 
modern element of Dresden 
but in harmony with its sur- 
roundings. 

After its successful comple- 
tion the hotel will make an 
essential contribution to the 
further promotion of tou- 
rism to the GDR. 

More and more tourists will 
come to Dresden and for 
them a stay in this hotel 
will be most appealing. 

The rapid construction 
work done so for reflects the 
excellent co-operation 
between all of those invol- 
ved as well as excellent ma- 
nagement by the GDR. 

So, on the occasion of the 
topping-out ceremony I 
would like to express my 
most cordial gratitude to all 
the GDR employees and 
workers concerned,” 
President: 

Japan GDR Project Co., Lid. 





m* * 




£ 


jrid renown 

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275 YEARS 


MEISSEN 


PORCELAIN 


EUROPE’S 


FIRST 


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VEB STAATLICHE 

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PORZELLAN-MANUFAKTUR | 

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E I S S E N 

GERMAN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC 


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


Page 9 



1985 Leipzig Spring Fair - Top products Made in GDR 

Robotron - Microcomputers of Dresden 


JE. 

HOC 

rips 
l as 
Hit- 
L/P- 
-D- 
rhc 
be 
t of 

Mtig 

sew 

410 

r 

i; 


ict 

so 


SEreat an eitV.ri lo _ , 
outstanding 
nwats and buddineJ 
P«t m villas 3“ 
which have SThSl? 
^lunUuadiuonl^ 
hand them down 
generaDons. FunW 
as one' personally in^j 
am very proud of £/? 

1 .f {orcl Belltnj 
being built m DreajJ 
<me of the m.ist rcprt» 
nve places of cultural t 
rest It will be a ofy.i 
modern clement of rW 
but in harmony with it 
roundings. 

After its successful qJ 
lion the hotel will nnf 
essential contributiw to: 
further promotion eft] 
rismtotheGDR j 
More and more murisui] 
come to Dresden and-; 
them a stay in this hJ 
will be must appealing I 
The rapid construd 
work done so far tt-flana 
excellent coHipax 
between ail ot thu* ® 
ved as well as escellenu 
nagement by tlu- GDR. ' 
So, on the occasion ai.. 
topping-out cert-moot 
would like t.# cxpnss- 
most cordial cniniiukr 
the GDR implovctt 
workers concerned." 
President: I 

Japan GDR IViijeci Co.. It 


The bcaaty and splendor of 
Dresden on the River Elbe - a 
flourishing metropolis of the 
arts and custodian of a proud 
tradition shaped by famous 
artists, architects and scien- 
tists in past epochs - leave a 
lasting impression on visitors. 
Yet Dresden is also a modern 
dry characterized by a vigo- 
rous growth and technical 
progress. And it is the centre 
of the data processing indus- 
try of the GDR since Dresden 
has become the seat of the 
nationally owned combine 
Robo tron. 

WEB Kombmat Robotron 
ranks among the largest in- 
dustrial enterprises of the 
GDR, About 70% of Robo- 
tron’s products are dispatched 
to more than 60 countries in 
four continents where they 
are proving their worth to the 
complete satisfaction of the 
buyers. 

The production program of 
VEB Kombinar Robotron in- 
cludes main frames for elec- 
tronic data processing sys- 
tems, small computers, 
microcomputers, peripherals, 
typewriters, measuring and 
testing instruments, commu- 
nication equipment, drawing 
machines, filing and other or- 
ganisational aids, a large as- 
sortment of OEM units and 
assemblies, and consumer du- 
rables in the entertainment 
electronic field. Robotron ’s 
activities axe by no means li- 
mited to hardware. It also of- 
fers complete software sys- 
tems and p r ogram packages 
covering specific problem- 
orientated solutions. The ex- 
port range of VEB Kombinar 
Robotron therefore encom- 


machjnes, data collecting ma- 
chines, terminals of varying 
levels of intelligence and in 
differing configurations with 
the corresponding software 
backing to tailor them to the 
demands of specific applica- 
tions. 

— Complex problem-orien- 
ted solutions based on small 
computers for agriculture, 
transport and the service in- 
dustries, and to automate en- 
gineering work. 

— Medical and image proces- 
sing computer systems and 
other highly specialised appli- 
cations. 

— Peripherals, including 


v' -v 


printers, eyreragl stores and 
punch-tape devices. 

— Mechanical, electric and 
electronic portable and office 
typewriters, word processors. 

— Electronic measuring 
equipment, particularly for 
ac o us t ics, fault localisation, 
board checking and repair 
services. 

— Drawing machines, 
boards, tables and other items 
of equipment for the drawing 
office based on the traditional 
principles of fine-limit engi- 
neering and incorporating the 
very latest advancements 
madg in microelectronics. 
Furthermore, VEB Kombinat 


Robo ironies offers the follo- 
wing comprehensive services 
for its entire production pro- 
gram: 

— Consultants for project 
planning and applications en- 
gineering. 

— Project management, ins- 
tallation and operating 

— - Staff training for machine 
operation, maintenance and 
repair. 

— Establishing and maintai- 
ning dependable after sales in 

other countries. 

VEB KOMBINAT ROBO- 
TRON offers advisory, pro- 
ject management and training 
services, and it commissions 


delivered complex solutions 
ready for service to ensure 
that the highest standards of 
operating efficiency are 
always achieved. 

Robotron is the general 
contractor for: 

— Complete computer cen- 
tres. 

— Technological equipment 
for the manufacture of final 
products of computer and of- 
fice machinery, engineering 
as well as electronic consumer 
durables. 

— Organisation solutions 
and compuier hardware for 
the health service 

— Complete production 




— Accounting and invoicing 



World renowned and internationally revered 
Musical instruments made in the GDR 


ROPES 
: R S T 
R C E L A I N 


Musical instruments made 
in the GDR enjoy a high re- 
putation ' worldwide and 
have won the appreciation 
and confidence - of imany 
music-lovers for their excel- 
lent quality. 

Upright and grand pianos, 
historical keyboard instru- 
ments, organs, electronic 
keyboard instruments and 
amplifiers, . accordions, 
mouth organs, string and 
plucking instruments, 
woodwind and brass as well 
as percussion instruments 
are supplied to customers in 
80 countries in all five conti- 
nents. Great artists and 
world-famous orchestras 
play them in the concert 
halls, music schools and 
conservatories the world 
over. The USA is one of the 
main overseas trading par- 
tners and Hanseatic Over- 
seas Trading Inc. of 212 
South Magnolia Avenue, 
Tampa/Ftorida 33606 repre- 


sents the GDR locally. 

In the mid 17th century the 
first violins were, made in 
Markncukirchenin the Vog- 
tbnd and here the founda- 
tions were laid for the 
world-famous musical ins- 
trument industry of the 
GDR. Begun more than 
three centuries ago and han- 
ded down from generation 
to generation, the rich pool 
of experience of the 
Marknenlrirchen string and 
plucking instrument makers 
formed an important basis 
for top quality products. 
There is a long tradition of 
wind as well as string instru- 
ments, and production for 
these also started in the Vog- 
dand, at the beginning of 
the 18th century. All kinds 
of fhues, picokxs, clarinets, 
bassoons and double- 
bassoons, oboes and cors an- 
glais are produced. Rigorous 
processing techniques en- 
sure pure pitch after long 


: * %/zry 


ZIMMERMANN 

pianos have been 
produced for more 
than 100 years. 




use, precise and easy play 
and the wide compass of 
these internationally estee- 
med "sounding treasures”. 
A woodwind instrument on 
the American market is the 
Sonora 1359 bassoon. This 
instrument has been develo- 
ped and further developed 
in close cooperation with 
such famous bassoonists as 
Prof. Cooper of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan. 

Another interesting product 
of the wide range of Vog- 
tland woodwind instru- 
ments are recorders made of 
the best, impregnated wood 
carrying the labels of Venus, 
Saturn, Jupiter, Musima, 
Alexander Heinrich, Wer- 
ner Schneider or Adler. A 
wide range of models is on 
offer, recorders for school 
and home, chamber orches- 
tra or solo playing. Another 
hit is the baroque recorder 
“Master Werner Schnei- 
der” whose wide compass 
and powerful sound are 
much admired in the USA. 
The whole range of brass 
instruments is produced in 
the Vogtland area and distri- 
buted to 60 countries. The 
latest model is a 5-valve C- 
tuba which has aroused 
considerable international 
interest and is already 
played in the USA, in Japan 
and numerous European 
countries. It was developed 
through the dose coopera- 
tion of tuba players from the 
GDR, France, the FRG and 
the USA. 

Since 1852 accordions have 
been constructed in Klin- 


genthal and are exported to 
many countries, among 
them the USA. The instru- 
ments produced today with 
the label of Weltmeister, 
Barcarole, Firotti, Royal 
Standard, Gatorta, Band- 
master and Vogdaender are 
the result of many years of 
experience and continuous 
improvement. Piano and 
button accordions, Viennese 
and other kinds of concerti- 
nas are on offer. Special 
concertinas and ladies' mo- 
dels are produced especially 
for the American market. 

Kiingenthal also produces 
mouth organs of varying 
sizes and designs. The ins- 
truments include the world- 
famous brands Bandmaster, 
Weltmeister, Olympia or 
Vermona. 

Upright and grand pianos 
have been built in Leipzig, 
I-oebau and Eisenberg for 
140 years - pianos for the 
home, school, music 
schools, concert halls and 
conservatories. Their labels 
carry a guarantee of quality 
- Bluethner. August Foer- 
ster, Zimmermann, Roe- 
: rrisch., Hupfeld, Geyer, 
Fuchs St Moehr, Alexander 
Herrmann and others. 

The Zimmenztann piano, 
for instance, has long been 
one of the best-selling ins- 
truments on the European 
market. These experienced 
piano-makers guarantee the 
best quality of sound. 
Complex acoustic specifica- 
tion, particular methods of 
production and wcli-cboscn 


plants, buildings and equip- 
ment for the assembly and 
testing of electrical and elec- 
tronic instruments; technolo- 
gies covering the entire pro- 
duction process; organisational 
conceptions and aids; social 
and medical facilities. 

— Complete design, techno- 
logy and project -planning of- 
fices, including the requisite 
drawing machines, compu- 
ters, office machines, office 
furniture and other items of 
furnishing. 

— Complete training esta- 
blishments and special clas- 
srooms for university and col- 
lege engineers, for skilled 
workers in the fields of elec- 
trical engineering.' electronics, 
electronic data processing, in- 
formation and organisation 
techniques, and for designers, 
project planners and draf- 
tsmen 

— Measuring and training la- 
boratories for general and spe- 
cialised fields of electronics, 
microelectronics, and for 
measuring electronics such as 
sound and vibration measure- 
ment, nuclear radiation tech- 
niques, etc. 

— Servicing stations for elec- 
tronic measuring instru- 
ments, data processing har- 
dware, radios and television 
sets. 

Exhaustive scientific re- 
search, and the rapid transfer 
of scientific findings to pro- 
duction level for the manufac- 
ture of highly competitive 
products, are the reason for 
Robotron 1 s growth rate in the 
order of 2 digits and for its 
success in the world market. 
And this is where the Robo- 
tron combine is participating 
in international fairs, or is or- 
ganising its own exhibitions, 
to present its latest range of 
products to the general public 
and its foreign buyers. 

Exporter: 

ROBOTRON EXPORT '! 

IMPORT 
DDR- 1080 Berlin 
Friedrichstrasse6l 
Telephone: 200031 1; 2071996 
Telex: 0112311 
Leipzig Contact : 

Technical Fair. Hall IS 



Complete Range of 
Modern Typewriters 


Apart from the traditional 
range of practice-proven por- 
table typewriters and electric 
office typewriters currently in 
operation worldwide, VEB 
KOMBINAT ROBOTRON 
will also exhibit at the Spring 
Fair in Leipzig its latest series 
of electronic typewriters of 
varying capacity and sophisti- 
cation. These modern electro- 
nic models ensure maximum 
output with the minimum 
amount of effort. The Robo- 
tron S6011 and Robotron 
S6010 electronic typewriters 
have all the facilities required 
of a machine of this class — 
automatic paper injection and 
advance to the first line, auto- 
matic underlining and double 
character spacing, as well as 
freely selectable insertion of 
standard text sections and text 
alterations, high-speed auto- 
matic text typing which re- 
lieves the typist of a vast 
amount of routine work. 
Instant correction and a cor- 
recting fatality in conjunction 
with the relocate function 
make it possible to produce 
error-free masters and copies. 
The typeface wheel can be ex- 
changed by the user in a mat- 
ter of seconds to permit the 
use of different keyboards. 


Internationally raummed 
grand and upright pianos in- 
clude the names of 
BLUETHNER , AUGUST 
FOERSTER, FUCHS & 
MOEHR, EISENBERG , 
GEYER , ALEXANDER 
HERRMANN, HUP- 
FELD , NIENDORF, 
STEINMANN , ROE- 
NISCH , ROEHMHILDT, 
SCHILLER and ZIM- 
MERMANN. Produced by 
the GDR piano industry, they 
are exported to more than 40 
countries by the GDR foreign 
trade enterprise DEM US A, 
KHngenthai. The firm's export 
program nmges from upright 
pianos between 98 and 123 
arts high through to grand pia- 
nos varying between 135 and 
278 ems in length. Some 40 
models are available with 
numerous different cases and 
excluding concert grands, with 
various veneers and surface 
designs. 

The GDR piano industry is 
doing a lot to keep its models 
in line with contemporary 
trends m furniture. This is re- 


Upright and 
grand pianos 
for music 
at home 

fleeted in a number of new 
piano cases produced in recent 
yean. In partiadlar , models 
wish pillar supports have been 
added to the existing range. 
ZIMMERMANN pianos 
are in great demand interna- 
tionally. More than 350,000 
pianos of this make haste been 
produced over the last 100 
years. They are popular with 
music lovers at home , m 
schools and conservatories m 
many countries. Substantial 
sales are due not only to their 
high quality of lone but also 
the continuous improvements 
made to the instruments. One 
of the most recent examples is 
the ZIMMERMANN III 
piano range. The various types 


and cases of this range have art 
improved acoustic mechanism 
which, together with the other 
construction modifications , 

have produced better quality of 
sound and playing compared 
with the previous ZIMMER- 
MANN 105 range. The new 
model was awarded a gold 
medal at the Leipzig Trade 
Fair in recognition of its out- 
standing quality. 
ROENISCH pianos, manu- 
factured since 1845, are also 
popular. Some 175,000 of 
these pianos have so far been 
sold throughout the world. The 
outstanding quality of tone of 
ROENISCH instruments has 
been praised by such names as 
Richard Strauss , Giacomo 
Puccini, Hans von Buelow, 
Anton Rubinstein, Edvard 
Grieg and Wilhelm Back- 
ham. 

The manufacturer of ZIM- 
MERMANN, ROENISCH 
and ROEMHILDT pianos is 

the nationally-owned Deut- 
sche Piano-Union Leipzig, 
one of Europe’s largest piano 
producers. 


materials ensure outstan- 
ding qualities of tone and 
sound with both Foerster 
and Bluethner instruments. 
“August Foerster” grand 
pianos are offered in four 
different sizes from the 


275cm long concert grand 
“Super Mondial” to the 
170cm long model for the 
music room at home. Mo- 
dels 170 and 190 are avai- 
lable in Chippendale, anti- 
que and Rococo styles. 


Exporter: DEMUSA 
DDR - 96S2 Kiingenthal , 
Lenmstrasse 133 
Telephone:234l 
Telex : 77 920; 17 952 
Leipzig Contort: 
Petershof 



Leipzig Fair 

German Democratic Republic 


10/16 March 1985 
1/7 September 1985 


Business is all... 

..at the world centre of trade in Leipzig 
We have a Fair experience of 819 years 
...this is your advantage today. 

Leipzig offers you 

in one place and within only seven days 

• negotiations with the efficient GDR industrial 
Vvorid 

• best presentation of your export goods 

• excellent information facilities for your import 
intentions 

• specialised talks with economic expens and 
specialists from all over the world 

• information on developments in science and 
technology. 

In the focus of 1985: Raw materials, fuels and 
energy - to be extracted, processed and used 
efficiently 

For worldwide trade and technological advance' 
Book a ticket- to success 1 
Book a ticket to Leipzig 1 

Fair Cards and information may be obtained 
from the agencies and representatives of rhe 
Leipziger Messeamt in 90 countries and at all 
frontier posts of the GDR. 

Furher information from Leipziger Messeamt, 
DDR-7010 Leipzig, Postfach 720. Tel. 71810, 
Telex 512 294 


The Robotron Sfttilti model is 
currently available in the fol- 
lowing bilingual configura- 
tions: Arabic: Latin; Cyrillic 
Latin. This model can also he 
fitted with a V24 interlace and 
thus assume the functions of a 
data receiver. 

The Erika Electronic 
Compact is ideal for oc- 
casional typing on a semi pro- 
fessional basis, and where j 
high quality of typescript is 
required. It is fined with a 
correction memory ol' one line 
capacity. 

The Erika Electronic 
Compact is an economical in- 
vestment wherever the work- 
load does not justify a larger, 
more expensive machine. A 
correction memory with a ca- 
pacity of approximately 170 
characters produces faultless 
typescript. 

The range if complemented 
by the Erika Electric. A novel 
integrated typing equalzcr 
enables even the unskilled typ- 
ist to produce very neat type- 
script. The first Erika por- 
table was produced in Dres- 
den in 1910 and since then the 
company has distributed 
more than seven million simi- 
lar typewriters. 















Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Vot. HM Low iMl CtHB 


o«m MM low Lot am 


51V*? 49% 
61 58b 

35* 35b 
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32* 31 

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ub* a«* 

45* 4 4* 
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48b 48% 


4m + b 
M +4% 
35* + b 
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Indus 125901 130405 imu T*fl~ 9JB 

Trans «* MUM 62509 *3020— SLVJ 

UtU HUS 1 4984 H7Ji HUB- 077 

Comp SOUS 530*7 52137 53422- U9 


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Industrials B2J9 1220# ffiffl 121-4* 

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Flitanet 110.18 109J2 IHUI W9.1I 


Mandat 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


NYSE 


am Pm. 


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am Piw. 


dosing 


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Santa 

Transn. 


317.1* 28700 MLIB I7B-43 
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247X4 — 2*5X1 2*159 


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Standard & Poor's Index 


BAT 32735 4b 4 4 

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Tobias Maude the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing an Walt Street end 
do not reflea late trades elsewhere. 


PmKm Today 
KM Law am 3 PM. 
imkmrtafe 20539 30206 205.15 2BUS 

Tramp. ML22 157X1 1*1.17 159X4 

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I Dow Jones Bond Averages 1 


AMEX Stock Index 


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utflltta* 

Industrials 


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ON. YM. PE UBiHWlLOW fluctOUBe 


Volume Declines in N.Y. Market 


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23 nv ags ll 403 i4*h mia UKr-fii United Pros iiuarnanonal 

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m 2 ^2 APL Bf w ,M 3 m ™2 w!S mS-N new effort to crack through the IJQQ barrio: 

27*ff*Av}c w,— 2 proved unsuccessfoL 

49 m Auuoa o uusw 47« 47 4n* + h The Dow Jozies industrial average, which 

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Tivi uvi Amwc jo z 2 is im im in*— v* gained 15 35 Friday, was down 12 a) 4 to 

int i s'* 4 ££!* aifSiSI 12 is* ih im im" m IJ2B732 about an hour before the dose. The 


t, wSSISwS-n new effort to crack 
^ fi* 2S& S hi- 2 proved unsuccessful 


Untied Pros International 

NEW YORK — A decline in the stock mar- 
ket was picking up. speed late Monday after a 
new effort to crack through the 1,300 barrier 


The Dow Jozies industrial average, which 


20 11*% AtJmMI 

ms SHAdvSn 


4IW 251* AMD 

13b MV Aduot .13 1.1 Ml 11U. T1 UV«— V* 
M4fc Sb Awflax U 43 m 12V5 m + Hi 

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32W 1546 Alwins UO 42 14 2171 20 27b 27b + b 

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2 b AlMoas 25 300 lb lb Tb 


31 14 I 
Bit 72 IS 


19b 19% 19b— U 
1Tb 10% lib— b 


1^8732 about an hour before the close. The 


index retreated a few points in the first hoar, ing of credit by the Federal Reserve. They say 


,a *%* n2 n* im- b started to recover, then went into a new decline, 
u 43 miiui»+* Dedines led advances by a 2-1 ratio among 
40 '2S ss2 »b Sb“ * the 1,963 issues crossing the New YorkStock 


ft 2b AUoon 3® 

51 sab AlrPnl 120 24 11 

24b 13 AfreFrt 40 24 U 

3 b AlMoas 25 

32 36b AlaP P(A 352 12* 

7b « AlaPdPf 27 112 

73b *lb AiaP Pf 720 122 
4*b 57 AlaPnf LI* 127 
61 54 AioPpf *20 124 

13b 11 A louse] .92 72 II 
17b 7b AbkAIr .14 J 7 
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36 27b AknSM IJB 24 12 

27 17 AJcxAlx 14)0 32 


30 31b 30b 31 

[jJ i», 70b nb tS5 reasons this article is based on the market at 3> 

127 200c *5 Mb 64b— 2 P M. 

124 290Z 67 St *7 — Vi 

72 II 30 Ob 12b 12b 

3 7 2921 19b 17 19b— b 

un ^ s-t S SS5— b Exchangp tape. The five-hour Big Board vohnne 
si i2 3 2n Im m SbZZ b araounte d to about 86.90 million shares, com- 
ax 2» ssb 27b sib— b pared with 1 15.95 million in the corresponding 

26 Ilf 23b 231A 23b + b -- i - J 17 ■ j___ 

a At 3* 7*b 7*b 7*b period Friday. 


Although prices in tables on these pages are 
am the 4 P.M. close in New York, fir time 


from the 4 P.M. close in New York, fir time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3> 
P.M. 


28b 20b Aimfr 
■7b Aft AlblCp XOtt 2X 
26b 23 AtoCUPt 2JU 71 J 
28b 18b Alg tat 140 52 
22b 15b Alain of 2.19 1U 
Mb n AlalnK 1)25 112 
30b 24b AIIOPW 230 9JJ 


120 JU 11 3168 28b 27b 27b— M 

120 34 12 238 36b 3Sb 35b— b 

1J» 3X 230 28b 27b 27b— b 

26 Ilf 23b 23V. 23b + b 

2Mt 16 * 2* 78b 7Bb 7*b 

22* 113 1 24b Mb 2ft 

140 52 40 27b Mb 2fb— b 

2.19 U2 31 19b 19b 19b + b 

125 113 » 941* Mb MM + M 

130 42 8 925 30b 30 30b— b 

X0b 32 U 54 Ift 1CK 18b— b 


Prices were lower in active trading of Anted- weight of a floppy bond market for long.” 
a Stock Exchange issues. Other negatives, be said include an excess of 


23U, 15b AJfenO 40b 32 U 54 17b IM 18b— b 

39U 28b AIUCPB 1J0 4X I 2746 » irn 39b + b 

6ft 53b AldCnM 674 10.9 46 mb 61b 61b— b 

«7b 99 AUCnnflZjOO 112 11 I07b 107 107b + b 


10ft lDffb AMCnf 1227*12.1 
2Jb in, AIMPd 

SSb 38 AlMSlr 2.12 V> 9 

13b 51V AlllsOI 
36b 24 AUsCnf 

27 20 AU.TL 134 7.1 9 


• 94b 94b Mb + m can Stock Exchange issues. 

*| ^ « The Dow index has been over 1,300 a few 

4* «b 6ib 6ib— b tunes since mid- February but on a closing basis 
in lmioiim- b the recend is Friday's 1^299 J6. 

■oo Mb mw Sb— b "There’s no rational explanation for the fas- 
® 30* 29b 2ft— b cmariou with round munbere,” said Anthony 

57 26 25b 2* + b 


a Alcoa 

27b lft 
4ft 32b 
33b 22b 
2b 1U 
19b 15b 
«9H Sft 
27b 2ft 
69b 59 
77b 52b 
25b 19b 
2Sb 19 
av 4ob 
24*1 DU 
40 34 

110 101 
lft 16b 
33b 25b 
Ub *b 

56 b 4ft 
am isb 
21b 1JW> 

44U 25 

30 14 
3ft IM 
12b ft 

57 51b 

83b 58b 
*2 40b 

13b 7b 
59 4ft 

31 2*Uk 
Bft 6ft 
78 SHV 

no lift 

3ft 18V> 

* 3b 
54 2716 

43b 2ft 
1ft 9 
18b 15 
U 30 
35b 22b 
,55b 26b 
44b 46b 
S4 51 
22b 14b 
37b 30b 
30 31b 

2ft lft 
12 10 
27*4 20V. 

40 5ft 
lib 4b 
78b 58b 


ijo 3J 12 am aa 


KThMS’nSfi ilybous«iiiciea5cd2.6percezitinJanumytoa 
Mwle^ di H ^ y & T; ^ seasonally adjusted annual ram of 6M.000 

He said that at the moment he would not On the trading floor. Phiflios Petndeum was 


oprimism and too little cash. After the correc- 
tion, Mr. Johnson looks for a healthy, sustained 
move to the upside. 

Before the stock market opened, the Com- 
mas Department reported sales of smgJe-fam- 


07 17b 174V lft— 1 
2 34b 34b 34b— : 


L10 14 14 1004 29b 2ft 28M— b 


35 TTH 1914 19b 


3.90 5L7 10 524 09b 60b 48b— H 

2X5 m3 2 27b 27b 27b 

2X7 U 1 4ft 69b 4ft + b 

1X0 23 10 1449 4ft 47b 47b— lb 

36 14 12 113 25b asm 25b — b 

X4 2i 14 191 25b 3(16 24b— V> 

2-90 S3 11 303 51b 50b 50b— b 

280 11 J 17 23b 23b 2ft + b 

3I6S&7 2 45 45 45— U 

1173 128 3 MO 107b 107b 

220 118 36* lft lft lft 

4560228 22 30 29b 29b- b 

13 30 ft 9b 9b 

1.90 15 U 1390 54b 53b 54b + M 

82 17 27 103 25b 24b 24b— M 

226O108 • 2520 20b 20b 2ft— b 


hazard a guess which way the market was 
to go but he said if the Dow falls throve 


units. 

On the trading floor, Phillips Petroleum was 
□ear the top of the active list and higher at 
nndsesaon. Phillips reached a settlement with 


1*270 area it could wind up as low as 1,240 or Carl C. Icaim, who h*d been seeking to acquire 
1,225. On the other hand, if it holds above 1,270 70 million shares. 


12 Moult 
HWiLOw Start 


Dlv.YM.PE IBOsHMlUW OuoCCft'PB I HWlLuw Start 


SB. CMS 

Mte HWi Low QuqI.OAr 


128 38155149 43b 4ft 43 — b 
X* 23 11 13* 29b 28b 28V.— b 
180 JJ 9 17*9 30b 29b 29b— b 
448 lft lft Ub— b 
*80*118 *1 55b 54b 54b— b 

580* 73 59 8ft 81b 81b— b 

2X4 48 193 60b 40b 60b— lb 

290 58 12 1536 58b 57b 57b— b 

1.12 38 » 1559 34 33 33b— b 

480 78 8 1077 81b Sib 81b— b 

84 X 14 73*x 7ft 71b 71b— b 
585 43 1 (2Sbl2SVx1»b— 1 

37 36 14 942 23b 23b 23b— M 

M 997 ft 3b ft 

222 U 11 33445 41 9b 40 +Xb 

34t L9 5 3017 41b 39b 39b— 1b 

5 15V0 10 7b 7b — ft 

2.19 172 1513 15 13b Ub— 4 

.80 14 14 59 15b 14b 14b— M 


*b ft 
SOU lft 
36b 20 
32b 29 
26b 13 
32 2Zb 
43 26b 


2.19 172 
.80 14 14 


40b 25b 
17b 12 
22b 13b 
17b 15b 
31b 14b 
30 23 

58b 35 
7b 6b 
21b 19 
5ft 44b 
lft 12b 
65b 44b 
20b I2b 
11b ft 
15 10b 


47 3b 3b 3b 

L32 *9 2S 35x 19b 19b 19b 
112 ax B 923 36b 34 34b 

395 128 10 30b 30b 30b i 

80 8 11 a* 25b 34b 24b— b 

18* *8 11 234 2Bb 28V* 28b 1 

LOB 25 1* 1205 44 42b 43 + b I 

U)0 25 9 1730 40b 39b 3ft— b 

X8 L2 10 97 40b 39 39b- b 

84 2930 223 15bl5bl5b+b 
804X 8 31 17b 17b T7b + b 

2.14 128 5 17b 17U 17b+b 


IM Connie 80 3.1 4 303 13b 

22b Con* Ed 240 78 7 1*35 30b 

38 COHEpf 580 118 9 44b 

26b ConsFd 1X4 41 10 1202 36b 

20b CfttFrtl 180 Ll 12 213 31b 

31 CreNG 132 55 8 242 43b 

4b COnsPw 5 990 4b 


184 4820 321 77b 27 27b + b 
1X0 24' 8 1683 k 55b 54 54b— b 

5X0*112 821 50b 50 50b- b 

84 58 14 42 17 I4b lft + b 

160 41 12 2801 64b 43b 43b— b 

J2 Z447S 40 20b 20b 20b— b 

30 4b ft 4b— b 


194* 194*— b I 


lft CnP US® 450 178 

24 CnPpfC 452 113 
23b CflPnfD 7X5 ld9 
25b CnP PfE 732 178 

25 CnPpfG 7M 178 
Ub CnPpfV 4X0 178 


320r 26b 
2te 34 
107DZ 44 


13 — b 
30b— H 
43b 4- b 
35 -lb 
32b 4- b 
42 — b 
4b 

25b— b 
34 + b 


ft CnP prll 3X0 175 
10b CnP PIT 130 178 
11b CnPprR 400 170 
TO* CnPprP 38* 175 
10b CnP orfl 1*5 175 
7b GnPpTMUO 1*0 
7 CnPprL 253 148 
II CnPprS 402 1*9 
7b CnPPrK 2X2 17.1 
23b CntlCP 2X0 42 
4b Coo 11 II 
b Contllrt 
t2 Cntlllpf 
b CttlHdn 
4b CnHnta 


IS 12b lib 12b + b 


1X0 48 13 149 33b 33b 33b— b 
X4 15 11 304 54b 54b 5ft— b 


4 65b *5 65 — b 

10 5ft SM Sft 


18D 5X 1719113 22b 21b 2Tb— b 
1*4 111 18 3*b 35b 34b 


2X8 19 11 1 


135 S Mb 
was lib n 


35b sm 

35 n 
ll lib— b 




3ft 26b Anwron ixi 41 I 
* 17 AmtfD* 20 X 18 


Mb 40 Airntpr 582 59 434 

»b 21b Amttrt 80 29 14 32 

28b 11b Amfac 79 

I7H 10b ArnfsK 5 454 

Wb 26b AMP ■ 52 25 18 X149 

24 J4b Ampco 80 18 22 45 

21b lft Amraas 7 49 

28b 19 AfflStn 180 58 8 44 

3ft 25b Amstad 1X0 4.1 H 223 

5b lb Anocnw 517 

30V. 19b Anataai W 5*5 

3ft Ift Anehar 188 41 42* 

38b 24b AnCtay 182 15 20 14 

12b tb AndrCr 50 1.7 16 72 


lft* Mb ft 


KHv 3*b 33b 
434 M 90 
3? 2ft 2ft 




*6 lft 14b 
49 lft lib 
44 24b 24 


3ft 24b CBI In 180a 5.1 13 

90b 63b CBS 100 15 13 

50b 48 CBSpf 1O0 15 

SBb 27 CIGNA 140 55 la 

40b 2ft CNA ft 15 

1ft ft CNA I 1500119 _ 

ixo m” ^ 

loo % a3 S 

92 If ft S 

13b lb Conor 14 vm 

S»«SSFmdX« 4 m s 


IXOo 5.1 13 114 27b 27 27b— b 

100 15 13 700 87 84b IM— 2b 

LOO 1 9 J 3M9 59V, +5 

15 509 7b 7b 7b -f b , 
2X0 55 50 1201 50b 4ft 4916—1 

235 9.1 32 Sft 30b 30b- b 

74 * 5b 6 + b 1 

IS 8* 37b 36V. 37 — b 

1800119 24 10b 10b Wb 


I5tb 45 

115 25b 
10 21 
33 22b 
24 23b 

15 25b 
9 22b 

a 14b 

22 T3b 

16 23b 
11 14b 

» 42b 
ft 

478 ft 
52 40 
344 


^»3b'3b-b 
Oft 27 27b— b 

2ft Mb 2ft- b 
aft 37b Jft + b 


9b AndrCr 50 1.7 16 72 12b 12 
Mb Anoallc .84 28 12 497 20b 20 


434112ft 34b 
14 3ft 37b 


lft 17b 17b + b 
4ft 45b 4Sb+lb 


7ft Sft Anhow 100 IX 10 1319 78V. 77V. 77b 

57b 44 AnfNUPf 340 68 _ 117 57 54b 54b— b 

2Zb 13b AMxtr 58 18 22 M8 lft W* lft 

29b IftAnta 980c 1 lft 14b lft— b 

14b lb AMfwm 84 J IS 41 15 lft Ift— b 

15b TO* Anttanv 84b 14 7 U 11b 12 13 

lft *b AMCIM 58 25 11 520 11b II Ub— b 

3 V* AochP wf 32 1b lb lb 

19b lft AnrtiPuntMalU 190 17b 17b 17b + b 

« Sft A»PwpJ 8.12 128 2SBC 4ft Ub 4ft +lb 

3Tb 27b ApPwpf AM 111 3 3U*JTM3Ib + b 

19b 2* AoPwpl SA 13.1 2 39 39 29 

9ft 17b ApIDta 1.W 11 22 112 Sft 3k 34b + b 

Sft .L A*PftO LMt 68270 73 13b Ob 13b— b 

91b 19b AraiDn .14b 3 ]4 M37 20 19% 20 + U 

2JI 1ft ArtlPS 2X0 125 6 1735 20b 20b 20b— b 

2ft 23 AriPpf 156 1X0 13 25 27b 27b- b 

97 79 AUPpf 1070 1LI Hz 94 N M — 1 

33b 13b ArfeBlt 89 U * 51 22 21b 21b- U 

24b U ArLta 181 11 17 1214 21b 20b 21 

_b b ArfnRt 71 b — 

31b f Armco 1134 10b 9b 9b— b 

8HA 1* Artncpf 3.18 1*5 8 30b 20b 30b 

m, lft ArmsRb 8* 20 9 172 24 23b 23b + b 

» w* ArmWln 1 80 38 10 60S 34b 34b 34b— b . 

341* Mb AroCp 150 17 I 24 32b 32 32b + b. 

Mb 13b ArawE 80 18 • 30 16b 14b Mb— b 

27b 1* Artra 52 1.1 17 3Bb 35 Mb 

2ft 14 Arvln* A U 9 213 33 32b23b+b 

Wft Arvmof 280 17 5 53% 53% Sft + b 

34b T7b Ararat 2f6* 34b 2ft 24b + b 

m 3Sb AaMOH IX M 136 29b 2f 2»b + b 

SU Jft AJhIOpf 480 109 too 41b 41b 4IM 

lft »b A0MO94 3.9* 103 M 39 31b 39 — b 

41b «b AMD9 2X0 45 9 647 5ft sab OH- b 

S. **?!?"< 493 11 1 fft Ob 93b + b 

Sft IS* AJWOd* 1X0 78 ID 19 21H 21b 21b 

»b 19b AtCvEI 2X0 1O0 ■ 104 25 36b 24b 

Wb ft AtlFUdi 380 4522 2U3 47b47b47% + U 
» lib AIMlCa 11 14b 14 14 

3fb 1ft Auoal 82 15 20 136 27b 27b 27b— V* 

6*b !ft AWtaOt X2 IX 20 432 65b 45 41b— b 

gb 15b AVEMC A 25 M 65 37K> 27b 37b + b 

3ft 33 mm ja L7 IS 102 36b 36b 36b— % 

ift 10 Avion n a it is 14b Mb— b 

41 27 Aviwf J0 IJ 15 339 3ft 33b 33b— b 

2ft If'* Avon 280 98 10 MBS 23b 22b 22U— b 

Mb 10 Aram 13 178 2S3k 2Sb 25b + b 


24 lib Callhn 55r 1X402 44 

1«* 11b Camrni .12 8 25 

«3S|SW S. St 

TO* U Smsp° W 17 11 1« 

ss iffiasn’s ’g 

,59b 1ft On|R64c | 

Wb 12ft capan 50 .1 17 434 


m s KS 

s % 


10b Wb 

£ S*±S 
n» u*+ ft 


4b Cnflnto 6 159 

18 Control 192 78 9 1073 

24b CtfTdta 92 28 45 1417 

33 OiDtpf 450 11J 100Z 

23b Comsd T.W 3X 12 *5 

1 vICOoMJ 74 

26b Catpr 182 49 » 522 

30 CoOOlpf 290 00 114 

10b Coop Lb JO* 8 3 235 

lft CaprTr XO 28 I 49 

ink awnvb xe 18 16 M73 


lib iib— b 


5J % 

.7 11b 


11% 11b 71b— b 
Mb MU 14U 
43b 43V. 43b— b 
14U 15b Mb 
14U MU 14b 


21b Ub Comvtd X4 3J 2* 

27b 19b awrtdpf 2X8 118 9 

27b 14% Cardura Mi 18 U 113 

15b to* Caraln 84 39 13 99 

40 2ft OornGs 158 28 M 570 

44 22b CarBlk 180 23 520 


’S5=2 


Mb 30b CopMW 144 35 11 T 

MU Cartas XI 21p 10% Wb 10b— b 

4ft 24b Cartbta 1JQ 2X 11 43 39% 39b 39b— b 

7«* 1ft CaraFf X0 14 12 264 26b 26 26b + b 

JZSS2S?, 280 MX 7 3093 25!* 24b 2S +»? 

l?5 CarPpf 287 114 4 23b 23V. 23b— b 

£® rT * c 2-il L7 11 20 45b 4ft 44b— b 

]'*> ft Corral ,87 X U 144 lib 10b 11 — b 

3ft CarsPIr 180 29 19 44 AH* 4ft 42%+ b 

IS SSSSf ^ ft & 55! 26b 25 25b— b 

^ £"3KU ,J£L*12 307 34b33 33U + b 

JU CWCNG 150 BX 7 143 Mb 13b 14 

12? ,2U ... *1 ]«* uu Ub 

2£ IS S5JEE? 1 » iM “ I2 6 m» h%— b 

»* Mb CatrpT 40 IX 1205 22% 321* 31b— b 

27% 16 C*OB 94 38 11 lx 23 23 33 

94b Ctarm 4X3 49 9 1256 93b TO Wb-b 


25 St 25-.* 

IhbTit 


39b CaxCm 
4b Crate 
31% Cram 
Mb CravRs 
14% CrockN 


84 X 1* 3S7 
27 

IXM4X 11 T73 

24 817 
X0 IX 32 


45 

25b 

mi— b 
21b— b 
23b + b 
23b 

22%+ b 
14b + b 
13b + b 
23%+ b 
Ub— b 
42b— b 
ft • 

3b 

40 -O 
lb 

23b 

36b— W 
29b + b 
30b— b 
V* + fe 
Wb— b 
36b— b 
15b— b 

20 —b 

22b— M. 
13b ' 1 

21 +b 
2 ft— b 
Mb+ % 
38b + b 

3&?b 

«*+ b 
3ft 

74%— 1b 


43 39% 399k 39% — b 
M* 26b 26 26b + % 


15% CrefcNaf L18 114 
34% CramCk 11 

27% CrwZM 180 38 13 
« CrZMpf 4X3 9X 
50 CrZPiPfC4JD 79 
Mb Cuibra 80 38 4 
12b CuHmrts 40 

41b CuntEn 280 28 4 
8% currlnc 1.1M18 

3Bb CUrTW 180 34 10 
27b Cyclop* 1.10 28 11 



25b+ b 
ink + H 

50%—% 
33%— b 
4ft— b 
57b + b 
24% 

30b— % 
79%+ b 
» + b 
35b— b 
51 +T% 


w 7b ga my tl 84 4 34 Xfx 8% B% «%— b 
25 ?1U Mate 280 59 .9 502 41 H 41b 41%+ b 

£pfl 1/ vfflftX fl 


,9 502 41% 41b 41% + V* 
'S ® S3* 23% —1% 


23b 17 CmSoW 282 *8 7 1B3B ZRk 2Z% 2Zb 


25% Mb Crnmod 2X4 111 
23% 20b CHwdof 292*119 
2ft lav* ConllLi 252 108 
W 34 CnlUpf 450 109 


5 212 2ft 23b 2ft + b 
_ U52x 24% 24U 24% 

8 5* 2ft 22 22b— U 

30v 41b 41% 41% 


IS? S2! IP 5. ,49 v.i 7 1751 n% 17% m* 

23% 17% CnLo El _ 19k 49 4 352 22% 2ft 22% 


W% 17% CnLoEl 194 $3 
35 2»b CLaEtal4.il UJ 

JfVW .7% C*MPW 1X0 148 


352 22% 22% 22%— % 
* 33V. 32% 32% 


1ft l£ J 13 4M Ift lft lft* b 

£ w®. ^ ~ 

2xa iij 5 ’ll T g'g*** 


TO* 15% CrMMd J» ail 655 25b 24% 25 

IS? S?*** ? X0 IX 39 130 22% 2ft 2ft + b 

S'- lft OvniXn M 19 1172 23M 22b 23b— U. 


20% Wb 
Mb 18% 
2Jb IS 
24% lft 
2b % 
9 J 
50 21b 

22b 11b 
15% 7% 

41% 30b 
44 34b 

30 Sft 
5b 3% 
62 3*1* 

47b 29 

56 49 

61 WM 

2ft 15% 
21b Mb 
M 44 
Mb ub 
32b 22% 
46 37% 

24% lft 
17% 7b 
31% 19 
Mb U 
4fb TO* 
Sft 191* 
13% ft 
28% 17b 
lB4k 11% 
25b 17% 
30 19% 

MU 29% 
34% 247* 
44b 66b 
<9 3ft 
12 4% 

lft fb 
18b 12b 
30b 19% 
30 T*b 
■4b 4* 
28% 22% 
27% 19% 
37% 271* 
50% 35% 
29% 20% 
89% n 
3713 21 
36% »•- 
38 K 
144'+ 1041* 
2ft IT 
8 % 

22% 7b 
4% 3% 
17% 10% 
28b 14% 
Wa 37V. 
28% 11% 
a*?* iv% 

30* 19% 
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sou a 

40 14V. 

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64% 35% 
44% EL* 
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2fb 15% 
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241. 14% 
Ml 4U 
34b 25 
IS *3 
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12% in* 

25% M% 
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56% 63 
117b 91 
30 21% 

15% *1* 


xa 48 14 38 12 11% lib + b 

■S H U .32* 33U 33b 33b + % 

.92 58 M 1134 17% 17 17W 

84 IX 1* 1 2ft 2ft 2ft 

ai » m » 

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188 29 12 73 47% <7% 47% 

80 18 4E T5U Mb Mb— % 

__ __ 12 a uu io% ii — b 

38J M 7 3497 40b 40 40U— M , 

4X0 10.1 600x. 64b 46 46V* +1V* 

UO 17 w 132 29% 29b 29«— Vk 
1517 4% 4V. 4% + b 

150 28 13 170 41 60% 40b + b 

2X0 ,54 5 320 43b 43 43U— b , 

45J34HV5 300 34b 53% 54V. +1V. 

18* 5.1 « JU 48 39%35%+b 

1-D0 48 ■ 551 25 MU MU— b I 


27% If Chml pf 190 48 6 2«U 24% MU + U. 

« «U Ojm. of 4X0 B m , 46 CT* 51b Mb-1 
IS? ! C aSSSP X0 44 12 1503 ft ft ft 

a 's r ^ ^ 

assriss 2 “ ^^-5 

nJSbSuSu 

2 S Kr " f, i 5S«UX 741 55% 55 Kb 

51 SH5f* , -5* I 7X . 13 53% 53 3ft + % 

?l% M Owtam 32 14 9 8 20% 20b 20b— V. 

® S^ChNYi LM «J 4 3777 40b 39b 39%— % 
43b 2ft CONY pf 187 49 2 39% 39% 39%— % 

54% 44 OlNYOf 595*11.1 DO 54 sm Sft- b 

22 3JU gwrak 184 U 11 20 37% 33% 37b— b 

21? K? 2?^ « '."ffi 34% 33% 34b + b 

40U lb CtMvra 2X0 63 8 4081 35% 3*Vh 1A. — % 
“%,»% SJWtat 14 W1 Mb 20b »U- b 

SOD 112 CbOWw 69 22 157 155% 157 +2b 

73 53b CMMI Pf | « 67b « T, 

2SV. 16b CrilPnT .10* X 8 117 Mb 25 25b + % 

-m 2. ■SM® 27 fit tb 8%— b 

Wk Mb CnrlBCr xat 1.1 41 40b 42 47b— b 

J' 1 * ‘0U racijof 180 98 3 lltknn m* + b 

7] 7 1ST Chcrrpf 1X0 X 1 J12 312 312 

lft '2 T +K - 


am am ctwiir ixo ax a tmi 


1 5Zb 52b 5Zb+1W 


IJ2 78 II 3546 W% 19% Ift— b 


L3B*120 2 70 W 70 

JXi 209 15U 15b 15% 

3X0 7.9 II • 30% 30b 30b + b 

2JO 48 7 226 62U 62V. 43V, - b 

258 104 13 23% 23% 2Jb 1 

83* 8 IS 5 Ub Mb 11 Vi— . a 

X4 19 11 3*0 2*b 25b 26 — b 

80 14 9 IM 22% 22% 22% + b 

86 29 9 476* SO 49b 49b + U 


£% MOW ChoWj. LM 29 M 717 
37 21b Quire* 80 28 14 517 

35b OnBoR 


33b 32b 32b— % 
4ft 60% 60b— b 


lft ft ClnGE 


S U 20 QnMIl 
21% ClrclK 


Owe* 80 28 14 5T7 3» 35% 35b— lb 

SSS* J ? 78 8 H 44 43b 4ft— % 

ClnGE 2.16 16X 4 404 15 14b IS + b 

SSSS MO* M 30b »% T 2 

QflO p* 7X4 139 53te 33% 50 5ft +1% 

OnGof 9J2 148 100s 47 44% 47 +]U 

ClnMIl 92 28 32 527 24b 25b 0b+ b 

OffiK 94 28 M IM4 32% 31b W%- % 

ClrQty 80 8 15 1578 ai 30b 30b— b 


80 28 10 273 
80 IX 54 49 

180 48 9 1422 
44 67 

.11* IX 138 
434 AX 10 asa 
15 8925 
71S 

80 18 12 102 
84 IX ■ 119 
94 20 U 538 
280 13.1 7 322 
790 MX 1009 
787 1L5 2001 

8 U 17 1*5 
180 L2 29 2142 
182 09 8 961 
80 L7 7 1909 
39 

19* 29 M 201 

180 XX 12 £# 

nxa SJS 50 18 

1X9 108 7 813 


21 % , 
«%— % 


7% 

TO*— % 
92% — b 
54% +1% 
Wb 

11%— b ■ 

17U — U 
37%—% 
15% 

S7b— lb 
54b— b • 
33 +b 

449k— b 
4b + b 
6ft— 1% 
MW— % 
27 - b 
34b— b 
Wb 
70b 



992 118 4M0Z 
281 125 14 

80 38 12 45 

84 48 207 

295 88 TO 
196 98 T1 2501 
480 118 42 

180 19 12 ara 

13 6000 
180 IX 40 1551 
3X0 63 fc 49 
4 1301 
.12 . 359 

292 W8 a 2489 
X* 38 * 4 

LM 22 15 7B 
180 45 13 15 

82 Ll 1* 97 

180 48 10 4871 
98 18 23 174 
9 U. 870 
M 3JJ M 3844 
L08 118 17 

800 18 13 298 
100 59 9 1755 


L« *a 8 2395 
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X0 24 M 307 34b 23b 23b— 1% 

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.78 28 M 3036 27% 24U 27%— b 

87 2J 71 8553 14b Mb 14% + % > 

90* 9 21 37 27b 22U 23b— L* I 

240 9.1 1 36 TWi 38% 38V* + b 1 

180 U 11 30 35% 35% 35% — b 

190 54 9 1504 J0U 30b 30%-% 

388 68 S S6b 56% 54%— % 

180 28 15 395* 47% 46b 44% — 9k 
111 6% ft 5b— % 

190 14X 25 TOb TO* 10% 


190 14X 25 TOb 10% 10% 

X0 29 S 5 14b 14% 14U— b 

84 L» ID 122 30% 30 30 — U 

X7 28 1 29% 29% 29% — U 

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121 . 602 ftb 27% 21 + % 

82 IJ 13 22 34b 24% 34b 

280 7.9 ■ 3101 36b 3ft 15% — % 

MB 19 19 SI 47% 47 47 —1 

180 L5 11 44 29% Wk 38%- % 

>1 151 « U1B9UW w + % 
-P 280 SX f 178 37b 34% 36% 

Pf 490 138 733 33 33— b 

of 4J0 128 100Z 36b Mb MV* 

Pf SJO U 20z 144b M«b 144b +2b 

Pf 2-50 125 UWJj 20% 30 20 - b 

lb 32* 4J 30 101 4b 4% 4% 

U 505 22b 22% 22% 

_ 14 207 ft 3b 5% + b 

84 19 13 1309 12% 12% 13% — b 

,X5 U 31*0 18% 17% 17%— b 

580 118 ft 44% 44 44% — lft 

250 11 J 41 23 31% 21% 

-5 9 W 53* 34% 34 34 U— b 

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*0 25 13 2131 2Sb 2« 25 + % 

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rJn Jl U It m 34 2ft 23% 

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"■ }■£ H A *5% —1% 

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LW A0 10 IM 68% 47b 47%— % 

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280 U 4 40 
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1.10 14 19 334 30% 
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aa 11.9 ■ 3ooz 

rxo 118 ran 

US 119 4 

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106 139 7 329 


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XO 43 2 12% 

JS’W A 17% 
Lft 1* 11 473 34 
■JO* M 14 172 21b 
M MM 360 29% 

ift ax . 1 Mb 

xo JI 11 ,W 19% 
XOo 18 7 1134 32V* 
LT9 3J 1 34b 

183 S3 9 34b 
296 48 14 3378 46b 
550 M 

180 38 13 547 S% 
1 3Mb 5J 27 2239 23b 
84 39 8 3B 32b 
•M 8 16 193 m 
1X0 58 9 291 28i% 
UD 4.) 10 241 41% 
J-M 1QX * 1129 30% 
118 1 JO 

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12b 12b 12b 



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S 9.1 9 37k. 17% 

9X 18 15 25% 


25b + b 
7b— b 
30b— b 
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20b— b 
20% +1 
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Ub— b 
17b 

33%—% 

21 

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34b +1 

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23% — % 
22% + % 
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LM 138 
L10 1U 
LSI 180 
L79 1U 
1-50 110 
X0 40 10 
80 8 la 


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m + b 
Mk + H 
23% — % 
24 
24b 

30% + b 
31 + b 

104b— b 
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52% —lb 
109% -3% 
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17 

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EsotaP 104 30 

Earn xa 28 

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X5 18 ft 492 38b ft 39%— b 
JO IJ 14 lift 29% 28% 2S%- % 
04 30 9 86 24b24%24b+% 

XA 2JJ 151 W% 18b lM-ft 
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31! ?% 2» 7%+% 


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H& Htati I jo* Siate 


and breaks through 1300. the blue-chip indica- 
tor could hit the higher 1,300s. 

He said there were signs of a move away from 
the leadeis of the recent raQy and back to 
utilities and defensive issues that were in the 
spotlight in 1984. 

Some economists believe that recent in- 
creases in the money supply will lead to tighten- 


37% 29% Equifex 1 JO AX is 
IM lib ISnkPf 281 140 

a weft’s a 


ft 3ft 37% 3ft + % 
725 m 5b 6% + b 
4 15% 15% 15%+ % 
99 38% 38b 37%+ % 
25 TO* 114* 11%—% 


24% Ub 
2* 20 
10 3% 


g*Alr« .22 12% 12b 12b 

EAfrpnS 140 14b MV* Mb+ Vk 

EAlrpfC 47 17b 17 17% + % 

EostGF 180 5X 33 730 24b 24% H%- % 

BWUfl 104 11.1 4 134 17% 17% 17b- b 

Eaton 100 LI 7 037 50% 57% 5B%+ it 

gctllln J6 20 12 1177 25% 24 26 — % 

E Chert 1JM 3X 13 709 30% 30% 30U- % 

EtflBr 1X0 4J 11 ft 34% 34V* 34b- % 

EDO 84 10 13 1923 14% Mb 14%— b 

Etfyrt 00 15 21 369x 31% 31% 31%— % 

EPQdpf 385 180 2 22% 22% wtt. l, 

EPGW 3J5 1U ftftbft%»+b 


EPGdpf 285 100 2 

EPCpf 3J5 138 78 

EPGpr 11 

EITora 15 115 

EtecAl 54 


gTojo 15 115 M% U% M%— % 

SB" 1. 7§ 12 §5 atst 

actSPk ft J31 3W w* 37 m-b 

!£* * “ M » lft* S% Sk+ % 

tlscUlT 199 7\4 7 7 _ u 

EmnEI 2X0 34 M 431 76% 75% 7* — -2 
g"»«ft -WWl! 44* Mb Mb U% * 

EmryA ,J0 17 11 3$4 11% 10% 18b 
Emhort 1X00 46 9 23 38b 3o% sm* 
EmnOi 1J6 M 7 26 19% W% W* + M 


14% 9b Ewnen .a io i ft to* im* ii%— % 

14% 8% Ertunnf 80* IJ IS 1014 13% 11% 12 + % 

27% 12% EnBsn XI 24 13 121* 21% 21b ZIb— % 

21 15b Fn«xC 000 3X 13 ftO 24% 23 23% +1 

3I5& -m* Esfrbw J2 1! n 209 23b 22b 22b— % 

38b 20 Ethyl 1.12 19 11 182 3B% 37% ft 

184 104 ERiyt pf 2X0 18 2 175 1W 193 +11 

7% 3 EvonP 3074 3% 2b 3 — T% 

9b 4% Evrtipf 294 7b 3b 4%-»* 

M 10b BvnpfB 89 lib 9 9 —2% 

41% 30 P«Cah> 168 42 W 49 39b 38% 38%— % 

16% 13% Examr 106O1 1 J _ . 9 15b 15b 15b + b 


2 195 195 195 +11 
2074 3% 2b 3 —1% 
294 7b 3b 4%— 3b 
8V Ub 9 9 -8% 

49 39b 38% 38%— % 
9 15b 13b 15b+ % 


AM 39b Emn 3X0 70 7 120? ABb Aft 40%+ % 


the Fed has more room to maneuver with the 
pullback of theU.S. dollar on currency markets 
last week. 

“It makes no difference whether the Dow is 
above UOO or below 1,300, the economic back- 
ground music is the same,” said Hugh Johnson 
of First Albany Carp., Albany, New York. 

The leading indicators report Friday put to 
rest once and for all any lmgering fears about a 
recession and instead pointed to a growing 
economy through the second and third quarters 
of 1985, Mr. Johnson said. 

He said the bond market will have problems 
and, “I don't think the stock market can lug the 


EmryA ft 17 11 3ft n% »% lay, 
Emhort 1X00 46 9 M3 jfffe 30% 30% 

VS K 7 » S8 T9%+ b 

isss £iu iS & a an 

b InEtc ^ 

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10% EnhBw 81 18 15 257 31 fty* 371* +1% 

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91% Erach p nl 83*118 100 9* 99 S 

I? ft «4 2% 2b 2% 

2P* 9b Entora is im inu, 10b + ic 

20 14% EntxEn US* 70 57 lft inf 17%+ b 

21% 16 Entexm 1 JO 40 9 153 19% in. in*— % 


PH lnd 2 3 

FMC 200 3J 54 454 

PMC nf 285 27 4 

PPL GP 1ft 90 9 1437 


L* 


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Folrcpf 3X0 90 40 

Fabfd .18 18 10 257 
FamDI* 27 57* 

FrWstP 4 5 

Forah ft 40 9 96 

FovDro ft 017 113 
Fetters B 190 

FPrtCO 164 40 7 148 
Fad Exp 21 3MB 

FdHmpf 17 

FdMaa 182 40 10 3Z 
FMNM .14 10 1779 

FodPB 8 36 38 7 453 
FedRH 1X4 46 14 54 

FdSoal 00 AX M 215 
FwJOSt 1X0 43 9 TO 
Fsrro 180 AX 11 270 

Fittest 200 68 11 35 

PlDCPA 80 24 4331 

FlnCPPf X0 I1X 12 
FInCppf 484(008 318 

FnSBOT . 44 

Firestn JO 44 9 415 
FTAtlln US 31 I Ox 
FtAMpf *80*11.1 M 

FBkSyS 1X0 48 0 199 
FBkFla 180 40 10 16x 

FBaat 180 18 11 399 
PSfCMc 182 56 20 914 
FOll 0fB 0X3*1 U 300 

FOlIPtaOJBellf 22 

FI8TK IJD 70 9 m 
TOTH pf 581*12.1 95 

Ftaty 9 959 

FFadAz .15* 0 6 MS 
Flnteta 234 SO 8 2*6x 
Firm* pf 237 U 27 
FtfAtn ft 23 U MU 
FNStS 2ft 40 7 137 
FStPa 8 409 

IbfPopf 2X2 90 145 

PTUnRI 104 40 15 217 
PtVoBk 04 41 0 229 
FlWtec lft 47 I ft 
PWteepf 485 126 360E 

Ftadm lft 28 37 342 
FbhFd 05* 8 118 

FltFoGs 182 40 9 153 
Fleet En 86 18 10 10M 
Ftenute ft 28 U 230 
FloxfV 00 25 M 21 
Flexlpf 1X1 124 4 

FlhjtSf ft X 19 481 
FloalPf 14 tZ7 

FlaEC .Mo X 12 • 

FloPra 2.M 90 9 5459 
FtaSfl XO 28 14 331 
FlwGoi 4* 

Flown X0 20 ft 243 
Fluor X0 12150 *46 
FooteC 280 40 12 29 

FonJM 201 44 1 *855 
FTOtor 186 110 ft 
FlHowd 1X4 2X 14 119 
FasfWh X4 30 14 «B 


9b 

45% 

12 % + 1 % 
21 - b 
12% — % 
12% — % 
19%+ % 
38%+ % 
15%+% 
23b— % 
28%— % 
21% + % 
Ub— % 
4 — % 
ssb— % 

34% — % 
35b + b 
37%+ % 
16 — % 
71%— M 


39% 22 
37% 20% 
19% 13% 
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54% 34 
76 61 

23b 17% 
54b 39% 
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23% n% 
ftb ftb 
13% 9b 

zn* to* 

25 17% 

33 21M> 

27b I7b 
41% 23% 
25% 11% 


1.12 45 8 43 24% TO* 34% + % 

299BI20 4 34% 24% 34%— b 

15 5b 5 5 — b 

X0 18 M 2544 47 45% 44b— % 

260 90 13 25 an* 28% 28b— b 

04 2X 15 214 34% Mb 34% + b 

X0 23 11 312x 15% 17% 18b— % 
185 49 9 478 36%3S%36 — % 

2JB AX 3 54% 54% 54% 

US U 12 75b 75 75 

2X8 110 6 883 22% 22% 22M 

212 AX 11 1551 46% 45% 45%— b 

2100166 34 12% TO* 13% 

X0 23 23 2 17% 17% 17%+ b 

220 aj 12 55 26% ft 36. — % 

X0 30 9 159 13% 13b 13% — b 

XB 12 51S 15% 15 15 - b 

82 U M 17 30% 30% 30% 

XB 23 IS 1994 30 29b 2f%— % 

ft 19 17 23 36% 26% 24% 

00 21 It 3347 an* 38b 39V. — % 

U1 U a 1* 24b 33% 23% — % 


35% 21% 1C lads 180 41 II 434 k 32% 31% 32 — % 
19% 17% I CM n 59 18% 18b 18b— % 

11% 5b I CN 54 404 m* 9% 10 + % 

37% 22% ICNPf 270 100 33 27% 27 27 

17% U IN Ain 102 1 18 2 14% Mb lCH+% 

ft 14% IRTPra 1X0 12 7 10 19b 19% 19b + % 

42% 20% ITT Co LOO LT 913091 32% 31 32b +2 

66% 40 ITTpfK 40D £7 11 49 59 10 +2 

45 44b ITT pfO 500 BJ 5S9b9S9+% 

51b 29 ITT Of* 285 53 30 42% 42% 42%+ % 

71 42b ITT Pfl 450 74 3 40b 40b 40b + b 

23% 15% IU flit 180 *5 4B 13*7 Ift* 17% 1B% + b 

40b 30% kkMP UU I 15 31% 39b 39b— b 


Where Will You Be 
Without Gold If The . 
Dollar Drops Again? 

■ The “ almigh ty dollar" today is - 
not quite so almighty. 

Its recent fluctuations on foreigj ■ 
exchange markets may be just a 
hiccup. Or the beginning of tie 
greenback’s long-awaited decline. 
Whichever the case. Krugerrand gok 
bullion coins are your best 
protection against currency 
instability. . 

Can you think of a better refuge'' 


when the dollar is in doubt? 

Ask. your bank or broker about ' 
Krugerrand gold bullion coins. 


21% + % 
78% — b 

ss%— % 

27b + % 
32b+% 


5% + H 
33% 

A 

15% — M 
26%— % 
14 + b 
33%— V* 
29%— b 


zn* 13b MnlB 94 Mb 

23b 17% IIIPOWT 2X4 11X 6 4*2 33% 
» Ub llPowpf 204 120 7ft 17 

19% 15% llPowpf 285 128 lllffiE IWs 

25 27% llPowpf 482 S22 9h. 33% 

37 2B% 1 1 Row Pi 4X7 127 172ft 35% 

mb 25b UPonrpf 400 12X 2 31% 

34% 21% ITW* X4 10 15 108 35% 
39% 27% Impdlltl 200 56 9 1590* 35% 






FoxSfP X8 40 IT 27 
Fonbro 104 40 S3 *9 
FMOG TtittiUt Sft 
FrptAAc 64 10 15 2394 
Frtefra X0 ZX 14 215 
FnnMa XO 15 6 464 
Frahlpf 100 40 75 

Fuqua XO 18 9 44 
Fuqopf 185 28 1 



23%+ % 
78b— « 
90% +1 
14% 

44 +1% 

11 %+ % 
in* — % 

44b— % 
29% + % 
11% + % 
47% — % 

7 %— % 
29b— % 
30% — b 
20% 

25%+ b 
58b +1 
40 +1 
10%— b 
33% 

20b— 1% 
37% +| 
31% — % 
12%+ Vk | 
J4% + % ] 
29% — b I 
29 

ft — % 
18%+ % 
5%— Vk 
20b + % 
18b— b 
54% — % 
45b— % 
11b 

67% + % 
M%— b 
9% — b 
ft 

9 %—% 
ft — b 

u*- ,a 

53b— 1 


9b 5b ImpfCo 
14% Bb INCO ft V5 
41% 49 IndUMPf 776 127 
102b 91b IndlMpfULDO 11.9 
17% TA IndUMPf 2.15 125 
18% 14% IndMpf 205 124 
28% 17% IocCCk* s Ift 70 
15 5b Inaxco .14 20 
24% U% Infante 


94 Mb M 14 —b 
4*2 33% 33 23b— b 

7ft 17 17 17 — b 

10ft 19b ms 19b + b 
5ft 33% 31% 33%+ % 
172ft 35% 34b 35% + b 
2 31% 31% 31% — % 
108 35% 35b 3Sb— % 
1590* 35% 35% 23b— b 


International Gold Corporation 
Coin Division -1, rue de la Rotisserir 
CH - 1204 Geneva - Switzerland 


a 402 n m n*— b 

1912 13% 13% 12b— b 

90ft 41% 40 41% +1% 

mioovb loob ion* 

3 17b 17b 17b 
2 17% 17b 17b + b 

7 04 27% 25% 27 + b 

359 4% 6% 4b 

22 SB 179k T7% 17% 



JOb 35b IngarR 240 58 18 449 49% AM* 48b— J* 


37b 27% fnaRPf 283 6J 

ISb 10% InorToc 04 48 20 

29 1» InVJSH sn LB 


29 19% InWSII 3b LB 304 35 

4Bb 3B% InWStBf AJ3 WJ 2 44 

21% M Iraflea 100b 40 II 212 21 

12 3b Inrafta 140 5 

24% 11% InteRsc 6 62 14 

30% 19 liMsflPf 303 126 59 ft 

54% 42 InteflPf 4JBOI50 2 44 


37b 25% Intel* Pf 485 130 
14% 7b intRFn 


14% 7b IntRFn 
19 15% I tens* 

65% 55 intarco 
15% 9b Itdrfad 
53% 41 IMlfk 
14b B% inhnod 

an* M% int Aia 

138% 99 IBM 


2.10a! U 
300 49 12 
X0 49 7 
2X0 50 0 


M 35b 35% 35% — 1% 

3 TO* I2b 12b— % 
304 35% 75 25b— V* 1 

2 44 44 44 

212 21 20% 20% — % I 

160 5 Aft 4% 

62 16ft 16% 16% + b , 

59 ft ft ft > 

2 44 44 44 — % I 

45 30% am 30% 

Til 105 12b 12 12% 


KRUGERRAND 

Money you can trust. 


Please note that Internationa] Gold Corporation 
does not provides buying or ttUinK service 


57 iib 17ft 18 — b niterth 
98 42b 62% 62ft— b HWLOw Start 
570 12b 13 12b + b 

52 soft Sft sm 58ft 27* Mo 


Mv.YM.PE Wlh MMl Uw» Quae 


IVximn 


37 225 lift 11% lift— ft 


SBft 27ft Marten 33 0 39 15B 53% 5$ 

12ft 9% MarkC 82 Ll 33 38 IM Mb }»?. 

19 14% Mark pf 1J0 73 I 14 U U . - 

86% JBb Marrlor 3* X 16 333 Bt 85 K Z':?. 

47% 35% MrShM 2X0 3J 40 77 M 64% £%. 

54ft 30% MOTtM 184 24 2141 53 51% SSl 

83 55 JMTfMpf 407 68 IS 65 im StZ J 

13% Jft MoryK .12 10 M 204a 12b 12% T 

SS^SJSSk 5 \3}i V as*?:’ 1 - 

%k ’ssss^f ijo « » % t a ?'■ 


U n 41 21% 20% 20ft— ft: 19 14% Mark Pf 180 70 ~ 1 14 
38 13 0901 136% 134% 125 — % i 86% 56b Morriot 34 X 16 333 B6 


24% 15% IntCfrl JO 18 11 153 24b 20* 24b + % 
27b 22% InfFkJV 1.12 30 15 511 28% 20ft 28ft— b 




11% 5* InfHarv SM 11b 10ft 10ft— ft 

7b 2ft I nf Hr wf 671 7ft 7 7 — % 

50 23b IntHpfC 22 49% 49ft 49ft— b 

42 20% IntHpfA 31 42 40 40 -2. 

34% 17% InMpfD 49 34% 33b 33b— 1 

44 32ft IntMln 2X0 40 13 1044 43% 42ft 43ft + b 

29ft 23 Ini Mu It 1J6 *8 9 75 28% 27% 20 + b 

57ft 46 IntPapr 2X0 40 27 2607 51% 50b 50ft— 1% 
17ft 9% Inf RcS 18 40 M% 14b 14%— b 

44% 32% InJKtlh 2X1 5J I 577 43% 42% 43% + ft 

38 25ft intebGP 108 29 13 722 3Bb 37b 37% 

17% 10 IrtfSakr ISO ISb Mb 14b 


17% 10 IrtfSakr 
20 15ft IntatPw 100 102 8 

20 16% InPwpf 288 120 

19ft 14% IomcEI 100 99 I 
29% 21b JOWIIG 2J4 M.1 7 
31ft 25 I await* 308 KLO 7 
33% 26 Ipalco 304 98 B 
13ft 9% IpcoCP 84 27 12 


23ft IrvBkf 104 69 


150 16b Mb 14b 32% 16ft Mattlf 

8 198 18% iBb 10ft— b ISb 9% Maxar 

180V 19 19 19 — b 49b 30% AkavD 

S 44 19b W Wb+b 49ft 34% 'Mavta 

7 211 27% 24% 27b 32b 25b McOri 

l 4S Sft S* a 23 20b Mcorn 

12 TO 13 TO* a 

4 100 32* 32% 32ft + ft I mi. iii. uSu 




«* 5 


33b 22b Masco . 

XM ,7% MassAAr 80 IJ » 24 12b « 5 . 

assftp “ ” h s r a v 
« a Rsr 

00b 51ft MofsuE XST J 13 15M 65% 

U 4b MofM 11 MIS 11% 

Mb AHMoMwl 44 9ft n*H*-' 

Mft Marti pz 2S0 B8 a 30b 26% 3ft 
15b 9% Moxom 7 51 14b 13% U '• 

25 1J2 ax 10 MW 47% 47% in*.- 

49ft 34% 'Movta 2X0o5J 10 339 47ft 44% 47%- 
33b 25b Mcorof 280 73 21 29 28% 

21 20b McOTPf 2X0 110 4 22b 22 B " 

31ft 23b McOerl 100 40 18 TO 27ft 27b ZTft- 

12 6% McDi l wf . 57 D* 8b B6- 

sm* 6b McDkf 80 ll 20 27 9b 9ft 9% 

40% Menus 02 18 M 1309 43% 40ft Mb- ■ 


- *4 

-•-vw* 


5 




47ft McOnD 104 28 M 545 83% 83b B»-l 


29b 20 JWT» _ 

34b 21b JRtW 06 20 9 S72 28 27% 27b 

34ft 13b Jammy .10 X 11 axa 24% Mb 24 

Mft WftJmF 1X4O110 112 12% 12% TO* 

« 25ft JaffPlS 182 12 6 450 41b AIM Alb 


1.12 L8 13 436 30% TO* 29%+ ft Hffi H 25 S? S" - 


27% 27b — b 


30% 15% GAF .15* J 11 834 29ft 29 29 — ft 

X 20 ft OAFpf 1J0 38 37 34ft 34b 34b 

37b 25% GAT X 180 3X 14 98 33b 33b 33% + % 

47% 33% GATXof 2J0 48 141ft 41ft Alft+M 


McGrH 1X0 Ll M 1372 45b 44b 44ft. 

McKwa LAO 4.1 11 77 39b 39b IfftA.L 

MeKpf UP 20 1 42% 42% 43%4 . 


34ft 19b GCA 


29b 34b JarCpf 400 148 
47 54% JarCpf 986 M2 

55 44b JarCpf B.12 148 

MV> 12ft JarCpf 2J8 1X4 
9% sft Jowtcr 


14 542 3W* 29% 2»ft— ft 


71b 41ft GEICO 100 IX 11 150 71ft 70ft 70ft— ft 


10% 4 GEO 
13ft 5% GFCp 
44b 35ft GTE 300 7.1 I 
3flfc 21b GTE pf 300 73 
-23% 19ft GTE of -3X8-1L3 - 

10 4ft GalHau - . - . 

58 33ft Ganaft 1X8 26 20 

25ft 17b GOPStr 00 21 13 

30ft 10b Gasatt 

19% 13ft Cota 

70b S3ft GomCo 

10% 10 GomilC 

11 10 Goralll 


399 4% 5ft 4.. 

9 7ft 7ft 7ft— % 

308. 7.1 I 2149 44 43% 43ft + b 

300 73 10 Kft 25b 25b— % 

2XB1L3 - - 22 22 21* 22-"- 

5 4b 6 — 4- — b 

1X8 26 20 693 57b 54% 34b— 1b 

00 ZT 12 23x 24% 34 24%+%; 

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06 11 15 799 IBM U 1>% + b 

130 6 78% 70% 70% — % 

2B3 10b 9ft W — V* 

320 TOb 10b 10% I 


40% 28 Johnin 180 30 U 1966 60 jp 

44% 37b JetnOl T04o AS 9 1045 44% 40 

29% ara- Joraen 100 40 17 . s 25 as 

M* 15ft Jesten* 00 33 IS 118 25ft 25 


450 41b AIM 41M— % ’JJ? 

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3407 67b 44 44 —3 

2#0* 57 57 57 —I flj? 

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445 27b 2Cft 27 


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25 




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15b 10 Me L«m 9 215 Mft 

6b 3ft McLaowt 248 5b 

26ft 19ft /WCNoO 00 30 4 11 24% 

41% 27b Mead 180 Ll 9 683 39ft 

24ft 13 Rtasrux 84 10 U 97 23b 

Macttrt J4 Z5 9 341 30b 

Meflon 260 56 f 34* 50 

- Morton Pf 200 106 7 26ft 

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44ft 40% Merest - 180 20 M 44 43b 41ft tlft- 

01% 78% M*rdt _X20 12 15 1001 100% IBM 99b-, 

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MnrLvn 00 20 S3 7979 35 33ft 34b ^ 
724 2ft 2b 


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4 0ft 30% GnCora 100b 30121 1412 40ft 39% 39*— M 
17b 14ft GAJnv 1X3* 9X 30 17% 14* 17% + ft 


44% 2P% GnBcah LOO- 2 A 0 
34% 14% 601ms X0 18 11 
33 IS* GCnpfB AS IX 
21 12b GnDafs 


30 17% 14* 17% + ft 
• 74 42% 41% 42 —b 

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25 33b 33 33 +1% , 

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84 42 GnOyn 100 18 TO 77S 87ft 51 12ft + b 

6S% ft% GenEI 220 IS 13 4409 44% 43% 43M— b 

Wft 45% GnFds 200 48 10 770 i 99ft 60% + ft 

7„ 5ft GGfftn X0 *J 723 6ft Aft 4ft— b 

31% 26ft OOtflpf 100 60 1 9 20 28 + b 

73. _ TO* GnHost 0 11 2 Ml 19% W 19b 


KobrAI XO 40 442 

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KCSou 100 20 11 149 
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KonPU, 296 80 7 40 

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Kalyln 378 

Katypf 1X4 IX 3 
Kaufflr X0 28 6 627 
Kaulpf 100 KX 28 
Kaufpf BJ3 108 1 

Kojtoaa 1J4 3J 14 413 
Kollwif 185 L5 7 127 


W% Wb GnHoua 84 10 39 56 12% TO* TZft+ % 

27* 1?b Gninsf _0O 2X U IT22 19b l*ft 19b 


40 45b GnMIlb 284 AI 13 1963 54% 54ft 55ft— * 

» <1 GMrt S0W4J 4 5SB2 10 79 79%- ft 

W 33. GMEn .18* J 1K2 66b 43ft Mft— 2b 

51b 44b G Mat of 380 90 5 51* 51% 51% — % 


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78 41ft GTFIPf B.16 UJ 

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23* 15 GM( 100 

22* Mb GMpf 101 76 


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104 Z1 22 I U6 Sk 74b TOk + ft 

53* 39ft GftStanl 100 OX 13 TOk SOW X* 5M— ft 

12 1^ 100 200r lib 11 llb+l 

B.16 IIJ 70S* 70 70 70 

13 344 5b 5ft SM— M 

,J0 0 27 151 IBM IBM IBM— b 

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28% 22b GOPwpf 3X4 120 
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17% GOPwpf 204 12X 
17 GOPwpf 2J2 12.1 
21% GOPwpf 205 113 
52 GOPwpf 700 123 


33 24 1000 21 25 2Sb— ft 

48 4x 35b 35 25b— ft 

2» 34 24* 2Mb 2*9*— % 

33 7 2ta 29% 29M + ft 

24 6 20ft 3Dft 20ft + b 

U M 21 20ft 20% 

14 17 24b 34b 24b 

23 Mft M M M +1 


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KlmbC* 282 40 10 13B2X 
KnoWfU 04 28 16 683 
Kopor 280 BX172 179 
Kolmar 82 IX 18 78 

Kop*ra 00 42 44 443 
KMWrpfTOUO 100 2 

Korean IBS 

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Kaftbns X0 2X 13 171 

Kvocm-3 J4| 8 27 40 

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5Hk 42ft OlIHrt* 2X0 40 11 5B0 SBb 57b 57%- % 

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9% 4b CHUM 8440 1000 5 4*5— b 

26, 17% GfBbMpfLSO 15X 84 22ft Sft 22ft— % 

12b Bb GJdPuB 13 1106 IT* lift lift- % 

4ft 1% GMH wt 314 3b 2* 3 — b 

27VJ n GWWF 80 0 4 786 2*% 24ft 24b 

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29M 23 Gooityr 160 SJ 7 4568 28% 27ft 28 — ft 

« I** 9°^ S3 U 9 IB 17% 17% 17% — b 

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32% 19 Gould XB 20 61 1130 29 

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19 I9b 18* 19b + U 

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6 48 40 40 + b 

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17 *7 14% 17 

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2J t7 19 30ft Mb 30ft 
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11% 4% Graft El 08 J 13 418 11 

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45% 77 NafGyp 100 40 4 ST2 44% 43ft 44* 




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5* JjJf 0 21 5« 31% RpS 3K 

« 56 Nil of 500 70 18 48 83 43 

1 2S ■” 10 14 7973 28% 27% 27b 

>1% «6 N MlncS 49 10b 10b Mb 

^ I!!?'*? 100 SX 13 17 28b 28 28* 

M% 9b NHaml II 5630 lift 10* 11 

»% 21% NtSvcIn 100 3X 11 109 29% 29% 29ft 

M 11* NStOnd X0 2X 10 89 Mft 16b «% 

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21% NevPW. 736 M0 9 94 33% 27ft 27* 

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2 22% 22% 2» 
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38 32 NSPpf 414 110 50ft 

59% 51 NSPwpf 400 11X lft 

43% 29* NorTet 00 1432 

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23* Norms 180 20 15 983 

40* Nwtlnd 2XB 50 14 1119 

23% 19ft NwtPpf 304 100 1« 

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{Continued aa Page 12) 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1983 


Pag^ll 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Detroit Energy Firm 
Assails Takeover Bid 


Where Will Y 0l , h — 
Without Gold S 

Hnllar n a WT ? Ameri 


New York Tima Seruce 

NEW YORK — The chairman 
of American Natural Resources 
Co. told bis counterpart at Coastal 
Corp. that its S2J-mllkm takeover 
fed for American Natural Re- 
sources is “entirely inadequate," 
according to an exchange of letters 


The 


ur R. Seder Jn, chainnan of 
. „ American Natural Resources, sent 

'rOpg A ‘ a letter Saturday to 03, Wyatt Jr_, 
, . chairman of Coastal, Coastal said 

j almight v j. ji .. Friday that it would begin a tender 
not quit*? su uimiphu ^ o®® of $60 a share Monday lor 
Its nxvnt fluctu- V American Natural Resources’s 373 
tzxclianiro murkftu J 1,01,5 to. million shares outstanding, 
Hiccup. Or the ht tna - v W Seder’s letter said Coastal's 
ftironhuck's lon ! -.^" nin C'if b '- sub ™ I tted » ** 

u,,n- l,N • Kruofc? sources in due course. A spokes- 

- v,> ur man for American Natural said 
M *= si * ns t ‘‘Urrpnr, Sunday that the company was con- 
ihstaoility. ^ sideling several options, ig r|nrfmg 

when Uiodulla^isin^^ 

birv Food Giant Fails 


, 'Mt) 

Ask >-our bank" ^ 


Krugerrand jToidbuj| jon ^ 

International Gold J ° interest 

CH m r5?r n ' 1 ' njc de ^l ,VfK York ‘ rma Stnkx 
v-n UHUenei-o - SwW SAN FRANCISCO — Castle & 

* Cooke Ino, the troubled food and 
real estate company, failed to male 
interest payments that were due 
? Friday on 5106 million in publicly 
/held subordinated debt. 

Castle & Cooke, best known for 
its Dole prodtu^s^ftisprotife 
l/m T/^ rrmT. ’ ited from paying interest on the 
IVlVUIjrlli\KAMpubIic debt until it first can pay 
X'Uilum.-u ^interest and principal on about 
i *v‘ iOnOV VOU ClntTc 5250 udhion m more-senior debt 
■WMt.ft. „ l “ d ^ P™“- aedi- 

■*fWS Uni |in<\ idi- .. !*„ ,„ t . , ims - 

— - 1 The company, which has not 

“ ~^made those payments rin« De- 

cember, is negotiating a repayment 
program with those creditors, a 
'h ^spokesman said, 
a ¥.! 



the adoption of anti -takeover pro- 
visions, in response to the offer. 

Both Coastal and American Nat- 
ural are oil and natural-gas compa- 
nies. Coastal is based in Houston 
and American Natural in Detroit. 

Mr. Seder’s letter came in re- 
sponse to a letter to him from Mr. 

Wyatt. In that letter, Mr. Wyatt 
said Coastal had “no intention of, 

H^uidaling or dismembering 

But Mr. Seder replied that 
Coastal would acquire so much ad- 
ditional debt in buying the compa- 
ny that it could not avoid “massive 

sell-offs of assas in order to service 

the debt.” This action, be said, 
would cause “a dismembering of 
our organization and further losses 
to the economy of Michigan and 
other states where we operate." 

In another letter seal to Mr. Se- 
der on Sunday, Mr. Wyatt repeated 
his assertion that Coastal would 
not break up American Natural. 

“I can assure you,” Mr. Wyatt 
wrote; “that Coastal's careful and 
detailed analysis, in which its com- 
mercial and investment bankers 
concur, shows that the cash flow of 
the combined company will be 
more than sufficient to service and 
repay the financing without resort- 
ing to asset sales." r . «_ . , 

In his first letter to Mr. Seder, Eastern Uners Special rare 


Strike Continues 
To Slaw Pan Am; 
No Talks Are Set 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways said Sun- 
day that it was trying to operate 
40 percent of its schedule! in- 
ternational flights serving the 
United States, as a strike by the 
Transport Workers Union con- 
tin oco. 

The carrier again haH iq can- 
ed all domestic flights with the 
walkout in its fourth day and no 
negotiations scheduled. Other 
unions are not crossing the 
picket lines, and Pan Am was 
trying to operate with manage- 
ment pilots and supervisors. 

On Saturday, there woe 14 
Pan Am arrivals and 14 depar- 
tures at New York's Kennedy 

ed the figures. 

“Pan Am is leading people to 
think they should fly Pan Am, 
when Pan Am is a grounded 
airline," said Mel Brackett, 
president of the Transportation 
Workers Union Local 504. 

The strike began after the 
union contract expired Feb. 28. 


UPI Owners 
Begin Steps to 
Yield Control 


Compiled by Oar Susff From Dtspattba 

WASHINGTON — United 
Press International told its clients 
Monday that its principal owners, 
Douglas F, Rube and William E 
Geissler, are taking steps “to relin- 
quish control of the news agency” 
and that its president and financial 
consultant nave been dismissed. 

Mr. Ruhe and Mr. Geissler led a 
team of investors that acquired 
UPI from EW. Scripps Co. on 
June 2, 1981 

The wire service’s statement, 
made available to The Associated 


IMttitti 

nan i.o- 


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Mr. Wyatt said the combined com- 
panies would have total assets of 

more than $7 billion and arinnal 

revenues of S9 billion. He said the 
companies would have combined 
gas reserves of 1 3 trillion cubic feet 
(368.1 billion cubic meters) and dl 
reserves of 40 million bands. 

American Natural Resources 
common stock dosed at 553.75 a 
share on the New York Stock Ex- 
change on Friday, up 54.125. 


.Vm- York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Eastern Air 
lines will offer one-way transcon- 
tinental fares of $98 on special, 
predawn flights, beginning April 1. 
All mil be routed to Houston, 
where passengers will have to 
ehatigp planes for their final desti- 
nations. Seven Airbus A-300s will 
be used to cany freight overnight 
for CF Airfr eigh t, a subsidiary of 
Consolidated Freightways Inc 


Press by UPI, said the move is pan 
of “a program to recapitalize the 
company and to guarantee its fu- 
ture.” 

A replacement for the news 
agency's president, Luis G. Nogal- 
es, will be named, UPI said. Its 
financial consultant has been Ray 
Wechsler. 

Mr. Ruhe and Mr. Geissler, in a 
joint statement quoted by UPI, 
said the company had ended a 
string of losses with an operating 
profit of SI.1 million in the fourth 
quarter of 1984. 

“We are beginning the second 
phase of the company's recovery 
program; we are capitalizing the 
company," the statement said. “We 
want to guarantee the future of 
UPI by taking aD the necessary 
steps to attract capital to what is 
now a viable company." 

UPI said steps to restructure 
ownership to attract new capital 
already are underway. UPI, which 

nrnrnlaink 190 domestic bureaus 

and 70 outside the United States, 
employs about 2,000 people. 

(AP, UPI) 


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China Orders 
2 TV Factories 

Room 

TOKYO — China has or- 
dered two color ideviskni-inan- 
ufacturing plants worth a total 
of more than 3 bflhon yen 
(SI 1.5 million) from Victor Co. 
of Japan, Victor said Monday. 

One p lant, for the Shang hai 
branch of China Electronics 
Import-Export Corp., will have 
the capacity to mat« 210,000 
televisions a year and is to Start 
up in September. The other 
plant, for Dadoog City Elec- 
tronic Industry Corp., will 
make 150,000 sets annually be- 
ginning in October. 


Textron Plans to Sell Bell Helicopter 


The Associated Press 

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island 
— Textron Inc. announced Mon- 
day it plans to seD its largest sub- 
sidiary, Befl Helicopter, to cover 
debts incurred by foe conglomer- 
ate’s 51.4-MQion purchase of Avco 
Corp., the Connecticut defense gi- 
ant, in January. 

Beverly F. Dolan, president and 
chief executive of Textron, said the 
company wants to raise about 51 
billion from divestitures. “We have 
decided to pursue the sale of Bdl 
because the sale would generate 
significant cash for debt reduc- 
tion," Mr. Dolan said in a release. 

“Bell Helicopter has long been 
an integral part of Textron and this 
has been a difficult decision to 
make,” Mr. Dolan said. 

Textron purchased the three di- 


visions of Bdl, based in Fort 
Worth. Texas, in 1960. Bell, which 
employs about 7,200 employees, 
makes a broad range of commaxaal 
and military helicopters. 

In the 1960s and early 1970s, Bdl 
grew rapidly through huge military 
contracts during the Vietnam war 
and from orders for hundreds of 
helicopters from the shah of Iran. 

Before the shah died, Bdl was the 
; employer in that country. 

Toward the end of the 1970s, 

Befl expanded even further as off- 
shore col drilling boomed and com- 
panies bought the helicopters to 
ferry crews from land to the float- 
ing oil rigs. 

Over the years, Bell has account- 
ed for up to 30 percent of Textron's analysts said at the time that it was 
earnings. Last year, however, the time for Textron to slim down by 
three Bell divisions accounted fra- selling some of its divisions. 


just 12 percent of Textron's earn- 
ings as offshore oil drilling con- 
cerns cut back operations. 

According to a Textron spokes- 
man. Raymond W. Caine Jr., Bdl 
contributed operating income of 
528.7 million on revenue of 5672 
million during 1984, compared 
with income of S36 million on sales 
of $540 J millio n the year before. 

Textron’s diverse other divisions 
indude Homelhe chain saws, Spd- 
dd waichbands, Jacobsen lawn 
mowers, Sheaffer Eaton pens and 
paper, and Gorham silver prod- 
ucts. 

Textron fended off a $ 1 .6-billion 
takeover bid from Chicago Pacific 
3. in October 1984, and some 


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J7ris maomcrmenl appears as a matter of record only. 


Near Issue 


4th March. 1985 



US.$30, 000,000 
OptecDai-Ichi Denko Co., Ltd. 

(Dabkhi Denko KabashUd Kaisha) 

8 3 A per cent Guaranteed Notes Due 1890 

uJth 

Warrants 

to subscribe for shares of the common stock of Optec Dai-Ichi Denko Co., Ltd. 
The Notes util be tmoondUkmatfy and irrevocably guaranteed by 

The Mitsubishi Bank, Limited 


hsne Price WO percent 


Yamakhi International (Europe) Limited 


BancaddGottardo 


RobertFlemmg& Co. Limited 
HandelsbankN.W. (Overseas) Ltd 
Morgpn Stanley International 


Tokai International limited 


Bayerische Landesbank Girozentrale 

Banquelndosuez 
James Capet & Co. 
Grieveson Grant and Co. 
hGtsuldshiFinance haematic il Limited 
New Japan Securities Europe Limited 
Wako International (Europe) Ltd 


Floating Rate Notes 


March 4 


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9% 174 99 1C 99 JD 
I?ft J6J lfl0Jgim.il 
fft 87 994: 138X7 
9ft 714 9942 *992 
19ft JW >00X1X15 
99 C? *9X7 
Fft 381 *9 13 9925 . 
99 JO 99.1 S 

94 7-5 9963 *071 
9ft 71-5 999] WS3 
Oft 224 9T_ 97ft 
9ft 64 9958 9961 

n 187 Pans 

11 XU 1X.1510C25 
fft 284 1001010029 
9ft S7 VIM* 9991 
fft 185 miTisex 
94 H-3 I 3055M065 
10ft U-5 9K80 9980 
9ft 34-5 1806110058 
900 37-1 100641 X. 71 
17 29-2 10CJ5100JS 
Oft H 99J5 9195 
O 31-3 99.15 9925 

£| 

Mft 774 100.1310033 
3 »4 <450 KJ0 

lift 5*4 99 A3 9963 
4ft 3-7 99X 9993 
100301X10 
fft 187 9925 10025 

12 94 UT. 1510030 

n 54 ibojobu 

UP* 20-5 1BUS13045 
12ft 16-3 IDBJCiOai: 
Wft 388 9962 99JS 
9ft 187 9966 9936 
BH 274 9925 HUS 
10ft 49 9995 0005 
13ft 713 100231X63 
9181 85 <910 9990 
' 5 1806310073 

OH VI 9961 *921 
Uft 85 U0J5U0JS 
28* 9990 18088 
fft 385 100.1510025 
13ft 27 3 1001810021 
U 86 9180 130 0C 
12 *4 9925 10025 

fft 12-6 99 JO 9990 
Uft 204 TOO *513055 


mr/Hei, 

UvtoW 

UovasO* 

LTCBluttt 

LTCB8S 

LTC8IU0 

LTCBI 6 

LTCS 92 

MkmioK.'Of 

Me lovilfl 06(89/92 

Mobvcio dadf.f: 

Malaysia SLU 
MenHanO/SMsU 

MannandVkhiH 

«M<4uiMiena96 

MarnaMidiandM 

Marina NUdlandN 
Mellon Bk 96 
MIOOM93 
Midland 89 


Mukuafi 
*umif9 
MinwFnn 
Msrean Grenftll ft 
Manoaae D«n 90,'n 
ManoaB*Df<i92 
ItalSiSetralifi 
Na)ComSdiArBMfi 
Natianel Was) 1991 9is 
NDllOlUlWHilffStft 
National vn»H9« lift 
NalunalKM IffiKft 
Nsumal fted Para Hr. 
mueOvft 
NewZcoundE 
Mr* Zealand 5tteiR 
hCMD trial Bk *3 
NUaanCretfilBklS 
NwnnCreaii Bklt 
mraioiMFUfl 
□KB 16 

DLB94 

□LB 95,-99 

OHuanMUlBeii 

OttiKiraMMflaU 

Plrdillli’M 

Pkoonken 99(91 

OuMnskmd9t 

■taM Bk CcsHdnOlfft 

So>kBno91i93 

Sanmi ini Fail! 

5amn M.70BI 
Sanwaini FU92 
ScareLiOTHSi F>nap(13 
Scandinavian Ftadufl 

Scotland Irrt Fn 93 
Stcurltv PocihcfT 
Sfusoaiul Corn 97 
5KCFM 
SEAT 90/93 
S.FJ 89 
S.FE 91 

Sdo*<« Geocrolt IC-95 

SecMnGanoraicW 

Coeut* ftaiN Mpr 94 

SocMaGorwroIanavU 

SecUHGtnrraifT 

SNCB91 

5POHS IKinaOKllI 92.9! 
a neoam OtS«aai91 
Spain 99 
Sana Otari 90 

Stand cnanfi 

Stand dun 91 
Stand cnarlmartfl 

snaadunptrp 
stela BkOlliiduD 
Sumlunw Trad 92*96 9ft 
SWMM191 

Svwden 90/35 

5n9BBiP.-N.-9l 

Si«Ml93.Ta 
SwroenBcrp 
Tom UD9 92/01 
10*11001*2/96 
TokaAMLW 94.-99 
Toronto Dn ml reon 92 
Tove Triad 93 (ff 
TVD96-M 

Union Bk Norway 99 
Unltad O-StOl Bkfl 
Ad* f area 97 
Wilfaont* * Gtyn»9l 
World Bank 96 
Voksnoma 8 l.Ni 
Tn iti i mminnniwi ti 


Coupon iMxt Bin ton) 

fft 64 1QDJ010Q4D 
lift H4 9997 10QJ7 
fft 727 99 95 IflttlB 
isft u.5 unmans 

io uoaiouc 

r.y 12-4 1X231SU5 
fft 31-s utanaan 

ft. It* 9961 99.73 
13 94 I30.131DDJ7 

10 8 t 9995 1X19 
W, » 9995 10831 
Vft 314 BBS IdOjV 

10 » U-3 9U5 9900 

OS 94 I0UI99.1I 
•ft 183 *995 IDOffi 
9t. 183 999; UUC 
9ft 214 IMflfllHl.Tl 
9 >7 KB 99.91 

fft 746 10025100*5 
9ft 74 130221X43 

11 B4 tOftraiODJO 
10ft 89 99E 99.97 
I3U 49 130071301’ 

9 11-7 <9X9975 

IT* 183 IBIS 19345 
9S M4 1DCJB1X23 
tS «Z7 tVE 

9ft 214 9921 996J 

1 187 9997 HU! 

r -6 IMJdlDOM 
1*4 130.67 130J7 
286 1016113161 
U-5 1 30X10093 

10 27-8 97.97 ISOS 

lift »4 iminaca 

t i 24* 99.95 10005 
91* 1H 99 J7 <997 
tie 386 WJ5W 
Vft 184 99J7lfr 
VH. 85 9925 1X25 
Kftb X-S 103X13043 
IQay 265 1D0271X92 
lis >14 utmitaro 
«S 64 lXOfllXlfl 
9ft 3-7 »T] NX 
13-1 27-0 97ft Uft 
fft 194 msnoojs 
«•- 85 waa:o(i« 

tail 27a 1002810069 
IS 1 94 99.99 1X39 
9 ft 86 1XJIWL4* 
US 2*3 ID? 60b id 
1U 287 9976 99J* 

9ft 181 9942 99-52 
Its 184 9971 13050 
fft ?U ftftMJS 
Uft 25-J ixuanata 
9ft 281 9922 99X 
9ft >-5 99X 99X 
II. 304 9986 9*94 
•ft 2*4 9995 1X05 
fft 34 9990 10013 
9S 1<4 99 75 18025 
■Dr. 49 IX651S1JS 
as, a-s loaanoair 
l?ft 183 1» 153825 
reft »-5 IMX100JB 
189 99X 99 90 
OH 288 1002318033 
3000 274 ’.SU518D.U 
ids »a iKLomaa 
•ft »5 »E 99 9? 

9S 194 1002*18031 
Oft 87 1X0*10014 

10% »5 UOUIOOU 
IT/, il l 1X651X71 
1DH 74 TOO 121X22 
9% 31 5 H63 10000 

12 1 99 76 9981 

OS 244 <966 99.01 
IS 1H 9U0 9U5 
91} 28 5 9915 9960 
i Oft ; >5 lwnuon 
fft 97 NX 9915 
IDS 20-5 1KL07IX17 
Uft 183 IK 171X22 
Fft 124 IK30\X« 
fft 144 100351X65 
TS 144 U020KXUO 
I*. 7-3 <aro fin 
9S 214 9100 <900 
fft 2*3 99.75 10068 
9ft 185 9941 9961 
UH 183 100651X7} 
889 315 9|2D <*90 
Uft 34 TW 1710027 

fft 187 ixoainjo 


Comma Nail BM juu 


Non Dollar 


hnaw/Maf. 

AITI 97 

BkManhtalH 
Bk Ta*ya x/90 
BalixOfurefl 
C4Karpl9.il 

CEPME 96 
Clean Foncjer** 
Credit National VI 45 
Ctanmor* 9191 
1.1.1. M 

kingdam Benoim 96 
iiona ta 

Mjoitobia 
5NCF B<] 
Yorkiauttl/V* 


a bu am 

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lift ra hjs t< x 
14ft U-5 (MB Bid 
Uft 2! 3 9990 ISta 

us in f>:« if J* 

(Oft 21 1 •<»; <99" 

I Oft 94 99*0 I9X 
«>. 183 IV J* 9917 
U*t 34 1*251*2! 
12 S 111 <965 99 *s 
lO-i T24 99* •• 6J 
lift >3 9923 99U 
US IS *99! ’3BJT2 
111* 24 4 1JC23!3U3 
N'9 27J ?VJJ «ti 


Sevres : 
Lctaon 


CrstVr Sease-f.nt Sss/6 n UtL 


Bofors AB Has a New Name 

AlllIlTi 

STOCKHOLM — The Swedish 
armaments and chemical group 
BoTlits AB said it will change its 
name to Nobel Industner AB 
Company officials said the name 
Bofors would still be used as a 
trade mark on weapons prixtuced 
hv the firm. 




Viking Rptourcn 

Intomotfonol N.V. 

NA.V. os oi 28-?-85 
$44.24 


INFORMATIONi 

Pier ion, Heldring & Pierson N.V., 
Herengrodil 214, Aiwterdom 


Gold Options Iprtmia S-ur I 


IVret 

Ate 

ft® j 


.Ml 

11*81425 

2325 2fS 


to 

S2S, V.*S 

r 60191' 


310 

4U am 

1753 14 ITT 


to 

2» 4fC 

lL*81J25 

ISM if v 

330 

1® ?* 

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4?8 

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VakvnWUteWcM&A. 

I. QuM to M— l flfcr 
<211 Urana I. SetawtaeJ 
Trl .M 02 SI - Trim 2 SJBS 


A 

new system 
for higher profits 
in wodd trade. 

Free. 


-^s;- v:>*ta W * 1 1 1 w ! ■ >>» . * - v*/. V riw.>.v > ) p—eik . i» » ..41 


y.W 1 






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NETWORK” 

E*tf» 0<M Twfcifl Itatwah n 6 remre nt 
5*o»*Y fttafii Wfcfl CwpnuhCHBS 


Cmertni But 

DnoiLML USA 

Ffarrti IrutSSaraBS 
OkagnlLUSA 

PKnmMlDn 

PrttsOarAPAUSA 


SacBrtty Pacific btinwl Bairii 
tisAqitoft CAUSA 

HhetovU Baak ud Hw Caaquay 
Wntx-SakBi, NC. USA 

Bam BtMd*re bpim 
Bmra Aku, Aigfotiu 


BunOsSan 
Boohs Aim. Argnttaa 
Bsocn OttigBiat 
SaangtiCUi 

BianhbMn 

ffflpini. rntiwtih 


Baikal CaatoB 

HxgKoog 

Tfcil Famon Buk 
Bfltflksk, TWnfl 
Baoca Lattna 
Cncn.Vmowta 


la saral. man cm rfttanaafarbufaafavB or Em Bate! litiqNmijrii 350 Stott Figaro SlretlSutoZltLtiBABgfcU MUIR, (7T31GT3-7006 71X7*11304958 EXTRA U0 






«S5i'55IV3 ,^II8*-imS5Sfl3if!l?IHIilEKS*SSr s 8SSJS5U!!Ii 151 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


-.ti 


J 


Mondays 


12 Mon Ol 
HiiMjWf SMCk 


01*. Y1X PE 


Hs. 

WBSHlBflUw 


Ctae 
Gg*,CWr 


UMarth 
M) um Stack 


D*v. YU PE 


9l 

WUHWiLw* 


Ooie 

cnwtcnte 


MSE 


Tables Include the natkmwKte Prices 
dp to the tioiim on wall street 
and do oat reflect late trades elsewhere. 


49* 25ft SCM 100 44 U 
72* 7% SL bids JOB UK) 
30 mb SPSTec X IV 13 

»' 15 SoWn# 04 2 39 

23 10 setonRv 240el5J 

%% 1W SMB# 36 IA 17 

10 M SfgdSe 57 

21b * StaSwf 

ZJVi 30% SofKIna 

1M 71 Ui Sotowv 

35% 25% SOOO 

7VA 14 StJeLP 

w% v smut 

11 W vlSakmf 
M% 22V, 


.40 

100 


317 

IS 

2D 

251 

m 

1VS 

263 

40 

7S 


50 48* 49* +114 

in m iw 
zm m m+ % 
17% 17 17* 

17% 17% 17% — % 
17% 16* T7%+ % 
7% 61b 6*— lb 
1% 114 1* 

32* 32% 32*—* 
33% 32% 33 — lb 

31% m 30%— % 

21% 21% 21% + % 
10% 10% 10% — % 
5 4% «1— % 

27 3B% 28% + % 


23% 16%. UGI 
34 19% UGI p) 

11% 3 UNCfiM 
W 10 UR3 
37V, 17% USFGl 
71% <5 USG 
10% 13% UnlFref 
56% 45 Unllvr 
M% 79 UnlNV 


204 69 11 
275 115 


H Month _ 
Hionum swell 


5b. 

MOsHMflLOW 


OM 

OuoL Ch'B* 


(Continued from Page 10) 


20* 17% OedPpf 2.1® 110 
22% 10% OedPpf 2J0 117 
51% 40% OedPpf 125 124 
113 IDS* OcelPoflSJO 14.1 
100% 101% Occlpf 1442 1X7 
34% 2! OOECO 140 XI 17 1127 
31% 34% Ooaon 140 5J Iff 


141b V* OhloEd 1 JO 1X1 
34 25% ObEdof 440 1X6 

37% 29% OftEdof 444 1X1 
51 42 Oft Ed Of TJU 130 

40* 49 Oh Ed Of tJO 1+0 
24% 10% OflEdpf X9Q 1X5 
25% 21 OnEder X«2 M® 

14* io% ObEeef uta 12a 

42 47% OhEdOf 164 115 

VI 77 OhEpf 107* 1U 
17% 12% OhMofr 40 25 10 


6 10% 18 10 — 
n 19% in 19% + % 
42 50% 50% SOU— % 
2224 lia%10V%lW% + % 
24 107% W6* 106%- % 
~ 27% 26% 26% — % 
31% 31% 31*— % 


41% 51% OhPplB 740 130 

■■ OhPpfG 237 


19% IS OhPpfG 127 124 
106 90 OftPpfAUJM 1X6 

21% 19% OUcGE TJX 9-2 9 

0% 7 OkJaGnf 50 90 

34% 25% Olln 150 12 9 

21 5% Omnere 30 

20% 14 Oneida 50 50 11 
33% 26% ONEOK 256 11 V 

25% 1VU OranRk 204 0.1 9 

17% 5% Orange 571 16 14 

27% 19% OrtanC 76 11271 

13% 0% Orton P 37 

10* 6% Orton pf 50 SO 

31* 24 Orton pf 275 90 
31% 10% OuKMs 64 22 10 
33% 17 Ot/rtlTr 64 1J 14 
20 13 OvSftta JO 25 11 

37 29% OnnC 140 13 0 

46% 31% Owanlll 140b 11 9 
M* 10% Oxford 44 35 9 


ISM 14% 14% MW— % 
1102 33 32V. 3211—1% 

260z 34 34 34 +1 

1500x 53 52% 53 + % 

5301 59 58% 50% 

44 36 25% 26 

25 20 27% 23*— % 

1 MW 14% 14%+ U 
lflOz 59% 59% 99% — 1% 
502 87% >7% S7%— % 
553 16 15% M + W 

2301 59% 58% 50% 

9 10* 18% 10* + % 
140x104 103 I IB - 
977 21% 21% 21% 

2001 0% 8% 0% + 4b 
35* 35% 35* 

0 7% 7% — % 

16 15% !5%— % 

31% 31% 31*— % 
25% 25% 2S%— % 
11% 11% 11% + % 
24% 24% 24% 

11% II 11 — % 
8% 9* Mfc + % 
30% 29% 29%—% 
29% 29U* 29%— U 
33% 32% 33%+ % 
17% 17% 17%+ Vb 
447 33U. 32% 32% — W 
303 42% 41% 47% — % 
29 13% 17* GT%— % 


12 24 
10 11 1830 

02 L7 12 161 

172 34 7 54 

100 116 46 

07 

.16 6 U S3 _ 

_]U 49% SWIMpf 103# 74 313 53% 53 53% + % 

32% 17* SOfeCs 2.10 VjO 0 3350 23% 2S% 33*+% 

10% 6* 5JU0flB 04# 95 11 710 9% 8% 9 

10% BVz SJuanR 20 .28 9% 9% 9% + % 

SI 31 Sondri 56 13 » 11S 41% 42% 43 — % 

24% 18% SAnifRt 154 10 12 31 34% 24 Zflb+% 

30% 20% SFeSoP 1 j00 36 11 3901 28% 27* 27%— % 

19% 14% SavElP 160 85 6 77 " *' 

11H 9% SovEpf 158 115 I 

1% 4% Savin 102 

12% 9% Savfnpf 150 120 13 

23% 17% 3CANA 116 95 8 3000 

«% 33 SdrPIo 168 11 12 873 
59. 34% 50)1 mb 130 25 10 4089 

.12 5 23 S54 

56 25 13 
10 


1.13 


13% 7U SdAfl 
33* 19% Seoamd 
60% 39% ScstFet 
39* 25% ScottP 

16* 11* Sarttn 
43* 20% SeovlII 
45 18% SeaOifn . 

IS* 9% SeoGpf 166 1X7 
19% 12Vb SeaCpfBZlO 130 




25 10 
35 II 
37 14 
15 8 


18% 18% W%-% 
10 % 10 % 10 % 

7% 7% 7%— % 
11 * 11 % 11 % 

23% 23% 23* — % 
41% 48* 11% + % 
42% 41% 42 + H 

. 13% 13* 13*— * 

589 30% 29% 29% — % 
60V, 60% 60% 


590 

473 

18 

1S2 

61 

321 

49 

451 

12 

148 

135 

331 

194 


15% 12 

27% 14* seaLdrn 
,5* 2* 3 000,0 
43% 30 Seaarm 
21% 12% Seasul 
iff* 18% SaalAlr 
32% 19% SeafPw 
65% 37% SeorteO 
37* 21% Sam 
101% 97 Soars pf 
31* 19 SaePacs 
22 11% StosU 

35* 22* SvcCps 
20* 11% Stxdctoo 
25* ink Shawln 

61% S3* ShetlO 

39* 29% ShaJIT 
30* 17* STMGto 


IXV 

15 


516 39 38* 38% — U 

98 15* 14* 14% 

13 41 48% 40%+ % 

181 43* 42% 42%—* 

14 11% 11* 11% 

49 15% 15% 15%—* 
82 15* 15% I5H— % 

7 1240 25% 25 25* 

239 S 4% 9 + * 

50 15 10. 972 42% 41% 42*— % 
14 «1 18% 18 18* + % 

60 15 15 134 26* 26 26% — % 
150 14 I 74 29% 29 29— % 
52 5 18 494 58* 57* 57%— % 

a M 9 4220 36 35% 35%—% 

17 1 102*102*102* 

— 29 28% 29 + * 

UW 14% 14%—* 
35 34% 34% 

75* 15* 15% 

25% 25% 25* + * 
99% 99* 59% — % 
33% 33* 33* 

29 28* 28%+ * 


41* 38% u Como 6 154 
58% 31% UnCart, 340 
7% 4% UntonC _ . 
16% 12 UfiElae 1.72 115 
35% 28% UnElpf 450 110 
61% 37% UnElpf 440 135 
30% 34% UnEI DfMUH 1X6 
34% 18% UneiPf 298 12B 
17% 13% UnEI pf ZU 1X4 
23% 19% UOElal 172 115 
61*. 49 UEIpfH 100 1X6 
50% 34* UnPac 150 " 
111% SZ UnPcpf 755 
16% 9* Unirovf .18 
78 53% unrvl pf 800 

6% 3* UnlfOr 
20% 10* Unflrad 
17* 9% UBnjpf 
37% 20% UCbfTV 
30* 22% UflErnp 
ZZ% 9 UP llum 
28% 19 UIKuPf 

16% 11 Utile* 

3% 20% Ulllupf 100 113 
14 10 UIBupf 158 1X5 

22% 14% unified 
41% 33* Unitian 
37% 25% UJerBk 
U% 9* UtdMM 
3% 2% UPUMn 
30% 22 UsoirG 
HI* 5% USHom 

43% 28* USLra 

34* 23 USShoe 

31 22 USStMl — 

58% 69* USSfl pf 456# 96 
149% 11S* USSftpr 1235 95 


359 23 3% 21 +% 

50 Qr 34 27% 24 +1% 

07 9% «% 9% — ■ IS 

.40b 18 18 23 13% ISJb 13*—% 

208 66397 S57 32* 31% 31%—.% 
3J6 18 7 431 69% 69 69% + % 

X 1.1 74 61 18% 17% 18 +% 

20% 43 8 22 48 48 48 —1 

4J0B 17 9 199 08* 88 80* — % 


A 


357 114 
Z20 115 


£ 

1-56 


.12 J 


30^ 22% USSHpf 225 75 


15 10 1159 36% 35% 36* + U 

87 8 2037 39* 39 39*—* 

102 5% 5% 5% 

6 2129 15% 15% IS*— * 
50x 34% 34% 34% +1* 
2008 47% 47% 47V,— 1* 
77 29* 29* 29%—' % 
1 23* 23% 23* 

IS 17% 16% 17% + % 

8 23* XI* 23* 

• 408 59 39 59 

16 a 4134 50% 49* 49%— * 

16 39 111 11186 1M* + 4k 

1.1 IT 3097 14% 15* W 

116 lOOz 69 49 69 

70 6 4% 4% 4% 

16 100 13* 13% 12% + % 
0 12 % 12 % 12 %+% 
38 37% 37* 37% 
794x29* »* BH + % 
874 17% 17* 17*+ * 
54 27* 27% 27%+ % 

~ 16% 16% 16% + % 

2i a a +* 

14% IS* 14% + % 

22% 21% a — % 

39* 39* 39*— * 
37* 31% 36* — * 
14% 14% 14% — % 
2% 2% 2% 

37* 36% 36*—% 
7% 7% 7%- % 
41% 41 41 — * 

31 M* 00* 

28* 28% 28* + % 
51% 51% 51% — % 
115 134*138*131*—* 
“• 28% S% 28% + U 


a a 
U S3 
1U 3 


U 13 
6 31 
42 9 


3 

43 

« 

9 

39 

189 

12 


1 u.s. 

Futures March 4 

Season Season 

High Lew 

Open Hieh Low aose Oig. 

Grains 


7 1533 
1072 

JD 20 18 41 

66 XB 12 649 
100 -X5 10 3X4 
HE 


131 


61 

211 


30% 18 PHH 58 18 12 1441 

40 24* PPG 160 12 9 1134 

26* 15 PSA 60 26 30 

19K 13* PSAdPf 150 100 2 

13% 11* PocAS 104 122 42 

17% 12% PocGE 152 HU 7 1879 

4Z* 30* POCLfB X32 XI II 679 

» 21% PcLum 131 U 14 343 

10* 5* PocRra 05r 5 50 

1M 13% PpcRspf 200 1X7 » 

17% 11% PocSel 60 3-5 17 68 

73* 53* Pot let* 560 75 8 1777 
27* 21 POClfep 232 90 8 1382 
33% 27% Podfpt 407 128 13 

43% 25 PoklWU 60 10 69 651 
34% 26% ParnWpf255 7.1 
39 25% Pain, Be 100 XI 10 

7* 4 PonAin 
4 1* PanAwt 

21 13% Ptnockn 00 1.1 18 

39* 31 PcpPiEC 230 <J 10 
5* 3 POntPr 
16% 12 POPCCft .00 
II* 10* Pordvn 
23% 12% ParfcEs 
12* 5* PorkDrl 
jv% 25* PorkH 
17* 12% ParfcPn 
5* 1% PntPlrl 
27% 14% PaylNW 
17% 11% PavNP 
31* 13% PovCsh 
13* 6* Peabdy 
1% Paneo 
55* 31% Pan can 


.16 

1.12 

03 


16 
17 15 
33 
11 
2J 

30 12 
13 a 


10 18 
15 12 
J 17 
20 


236 45 
206 106 


12 


25* 19% PoPL 

35% 30% PoPLpf 468 128 
37% 30 PoPLpr 400 1X5 
67% 37* PnPUpf 860 1X1 
27% a* PnPLdprX42 1X0 


31 30% 31 +1 

38% 37% 3nb— % 
23* 22* 23*+ * 
19 19 19 + * 

12% 12% 12*+ % 
17% 17* 17* 

41% 40* 40*— % 
27 96* 27 ■*> * 

7* 7% 7H+ M 
15% 15* IS* 

16* 16 16 
70% 69% 70 — * 
26* 35% 255V — * 
32% 3T* 31*— % 
40% 39* 39*—* 
32% 31* 31*— % 
35* 38% 38%—* 
4* 4% 4%— % 

Z* 2 2 — * 

.. 19% 1* W — * 
300 37* 36% 37* + U 
673 4% 4* 4% 

19+ 17% 16% 17 + % 

565 16% 16% 16* + lb 

3B 15* IS* 15% 

590 7 6* 6% 

235 37* 37 37% 

41 16% 16% 16% + * 

an z% 2% 2% 

53 26* 36% 26* 

214 13* 13% 13* 

500 10% 19% 17% 

157 8% 8% 8%— % 

14 1 % *+% 

462 55* 54% 54% — U 

2574 48* 47* 48 — H 
000x 34% 34* 24*+% 


20% 9* SmHflln 

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56* 36% Smuekr 
41* 28% SnopOn 
30* 27 Sonot 
18* 13* SoryCo 
29% 22* SooUn 
38% 27* Source 


513 

361 


289 34% 34% 34% + * 


46* 56% PoPUpr 860 |X9 


240y 37 34 34 +1% 

1109 65% 65 65%+ * 

2b 36% 26% a* + % 
SSOv 65 64 65 +1* 

114X 25* 24% 25% + % 
6x 28* 28% 28% 

1009 81* 81* II* + * 
909101% 101% 101% -M* 
1509 60 60 60 — 1% 

12509 47 65 67 +2* 

114 29% 39* 29*— * 
31 24* 31* 34*— % 
542 46% 45% 46*+ % 
1634 17 16% 16*— * 

55 36* 36% 36% 


72 

60 10 18 

02 40 a 

08 26 ■ 289 

200 30 ID 106 

X12P46 5 2004 

— . 00 20 7 171 „ 

104% 66* SbaIGpf 300 30 2 101 Ml 101 — * 

35* 23* Strwln 5225 11 330 32*31*33 — * 

8% 4% stioetwn II 116 7* 7% 7* + * 

18% 12 Sfiowbf 60 10 15 W9 15 14*15+* 

16* 12* StorPoc 100 HU 8 185 14 15* 15%+ % 

37 24% Signal 100 XI 13 2221 32% 31* 31*— * 

59* «8* Si art pi 112 70 6 58% SB* 58* + * 

72 a Stall Pf 200 XI 3 64 M 64 —1 

a* 21% Sfemr .10 0 IT 813 27* 56* 36* + % 

21* »* Stnorpf 300 110 10 30* 30 X — % 

18 12* Skyline 68 30 21 376 M 15% 15% — % 

02 20 21 446 13 174 12*— * 

2J0 15 10 4154 62% 61% 61% 

56 10 14 18 S3* 57% 52*— * 

1.16 30 13 ZB 39* 38* 38*+% 

105 52 7 658 36* 35% 35%— * 

.15# 0 15 8511 19% 18% 18* 

100 17 11 34 25% S 25% 

300 87 35 37 36* 36%+ M 

28* Z Sojorin 268 90 W lQSx 27* 27% 27% — % 

49% 39% Soudwn 100 XI II 183 47* 46* 46*— % 

30% a SaetBk 100 44 8 74 27% 27* 27% 

11* 5* SaetPS 1057200 25 a 8 7% 8 

24* 17* SCdlE* 204 90 7 1253 22% 22* 22*— * 

19 14* SouthCa 1.92 106 4 1406 10* 10% 18%— % 

36 23% SMnGC 208 70 7 12 34* 34* 34* 

37* 27* SNETt 242 70 9 414 37* J7% 37% 

MM 21% SaNE Pf 302 105 5 36* 36* 36* 

24% 21* SoRvpf 206 100 18 24 34 24 — % 

31 TV* SalinGa 142 40 1* « 24% TS% 76 — * 

36% 33 Sauffnd 100 34 9 526 32% 31% 31*— % 

.12 0 19 ,693 15% 14* 15 

00 20 5 588 7* 7% 7* 

.13 4 15 499 25% 25* 25*— % 

18 724 Iff* 15% 15*—* 
144 00 9 114 14* 14% 14% 

500 70 8 931 74% 73% 74%— * 

-52 20 12 102 26% 26% 26% + % 

108 9.1 8 839 20% 20* 20* 

02 30 51 140 IS* M% 15% + * 

a 305 21% 21* 21* 

1J2 20 1071880 51% 49% 51%— 1% 
702 40953834 36 36 — % 

104 40 11 528 41% 40% 41*—% 
100 30 15 1255 34*53*54 + % 

00 10 16 2218 20% 211 20*— % 

04 20 12 93 20% 20* 20*— * 

02 2J 9 683 16* 13% 14 — * 

300 50 I — — — 

200 12 7 
60 10 HI 


396 

.... 31* USTob 1.72 40 73 647 38% »% 5% + % 

75 55* USW«3f 560 70 8 1072 74% 73* 73*—% 

13 5* UStekn 9 47 12 11*11%—% 

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39* 2M UTcJl pf20564 142 38* 38 3ff* + M 

34% 17* UdiTP) 10283 9 862 23* 23% 23% + % 

~ " 708 70 10 41 14% 16* 16% + % 

00 J 79 596 30% 30% 30%+ % 

08b 30 13 4 18% 18* 18%+ * 

704 19 17 in 27* 26* 26*—* 

100 40 8 66 21% 31* 31* 

100 20 11 4277 44% 4SH 4S%— % 

256 X3 14 728 77 76% 76* + % 

39 23% USLIFE 104 20 11 2028 37* 37% 37% — M 

37 25 USLFpf X25 70 728 32* 37* 32%+% 


17% 12 UWRs 
33% 22 Unltnto 
22* 14* Unhror 
27* 18% UntvFd 
23* 15* UnLaof 
9 30 Unocal 

76% 45 U Pi atm 

23% USLIFE 104 
25 USLFpf 205 


9% 8% LWtoFd 104017.1 

25% 20* Ufa PL 202 100 
25 27% UtPLpf 200 1L7 

25% 21* UtPLpf 290 710 
21* 17* UtPLpf 236 110 

18* Iff* UtPLpf X06 113 


14 9% 9* 9* 

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3 24* 94 34 

142 25% 24* 24%+ % 

2 21 21 21 +* 

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23% 14 Velar p! 364 150 
SH 2* Valavln 
28* 15* VanOrs 08 36 
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73* 9% Vtro 

25% 77* Vaaoo 
6% 3% Vends 
TO* 8* v«*re* 
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90 

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60 13 76 65 

60 10 14 395 
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ISOallJ 9 
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29* 25* PaPLdnrX75 1X2 
84 65* PoPLpf 904 110 

102 94% PoPLpr 1300 1X9 

65 54% PaPLpr 800 1X3 

70 58% PoPLnr 870 1X0 

40* 31% Pamvtt 200 50 12 

25% 20 Panwpf 100 60 

46% 3D* Pannzol 200 4J 21 

17* 9* PnpEn la 70 a 

.» 23* Pup Bov 04 10 14 ... 

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22* 17H ParyDr 08 16 IS 472 

38* 27% Petrie 160 19 16 49 

31* 2C* PetRs 302bl40 50 

17 14 Pet Rapt 1.57 106 14 

7* 4 Ptrlrrw 103^00 61 

42* 29* PfUer 168 X6 13 5319 

27% 12% PhelpO 7170 

48* 34 Phelppr 100 100 150 

41* 20% PftlbrS 04 16 a 5776 

18* 9 PhHoEl 200 140 A 


29* 22 PMIEpf 200 111 
35 25 PnnEpf 460 130 

62* a* PIlilE pf 805 146 
10% 9% PMIEpf 161 119 
18% 6% PfUlE Pf 103 111 
57 41 PMIEpf 701 1+7 

10 6* PhllE Pt 108 130 

120% 97 Phil pf 17.12 140 
108% 87 PMIEpf 1505 1+0 
68 51 PhllE Pf 900 146 

86* 44 PhllE pt 708 1+2 
S 15* PhllSub 102 76 11 

•4% 62* PhllMr 400 

» ID* PMlpIn +> 

56* 33* PMIPef 
28% 16* PMIVH 
30% 22% PledAs 
32% 23* PleNG 
21 14 Plerl 

47* 33 PlUbrv 
34 21* Pioneer 

27* 17 P lore El 
43% 27* PltnvB 
15% «* Ptttffn 
15* 8* PtanRs 
18% 12* Plontm 
13* 7* Playboy 
35* l?% Pieiev 


32 19% 20% — 1% 

36% M 34 — * 
25% 25% K*— % 
15* 15% 15% — * 
5 4% 5 + % 

42* 41* 41% — * 
19% 19% 19% 

46 46 46 

38% 37* 37%— * 
25DB 15% 15* IS*— * 
2001 29 39 » +1 

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20* 40* 60* 60* 

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2001 55% 55 5S%— * 

40 9% 9* 9% 

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18 11* So Roy 

9* 6* Soumrfc 
a 14* SwAM 
22% 13% SwtPor 
15 10* SwfGos 

75% 55 SwBell 
27% IV* SwEir 
72 17 SwtPS 

17* 11% Sporfon 
27* 18 SeedP 
54* 33* Sparry 
31 30% SerinM 

43* 31% SauorO 
55* 37% Squibb 

2«* 17* Staler 

22 16% StflPnt 

21 13 StJMotr 

63* 50* StOInd 
50% 39* swoon 
26* 9* SfPacCp 
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17 Vl% Standex 03 XX 18 

30* 19% SfanWk 06 30 11 

35% 23* Starretf 100 X9 12 

10% 8* SteMSe 10Da120 
27V, 15* StaufO) 1+4 50 

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20* 14* stercM J6 XV 11 82 

12* 9* 3 in Hep .76 60 10 18 

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40 25* StaoeC 60 XI » 756 

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73% 2 vISferT 
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66 54 VaEPpf 702 126 

79 63* VaElpf 800 116 

83* 68% VaEPpf 90S 126 
66% 52% VaE D+l 702 120 
61% 49% VaEPpf 700 7X7 
63% 51* VaEPpf 70S 1X5 
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47* 25* Vbrnod 15 

78 35 VutcnM 200 X6 12 


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4302 78* 78% 78% + % 
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4202 59* 59* 59* 

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59% 43% SunCo 
49% 3m SwMtfr 
15* 7% SuoMn 

34% 23% SuprVI 

30* 19* SupMW 
17* 14 Swank 

21* 16% Syfarar) 

34% 21% Syhmaf 260 
15* 10% SymeCP 
59* 37* Syntm 102 
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28* 27* 28* + % 

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28* 19* WatkJn 08 16 12 326 

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27V, 20* WayGcf 160 70 
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3714 29* WetsMk 00 10 M 

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SO 40 WefFpf 400*100 

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22* 13% Wendrs 08 10 18 

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28% 18* WaxtCa 64 20 U 

43 34 WPenPpfC50 110 

48% sm watptp 200 50 I 

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102 706 6 28V 17* 16* 17% 

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10* 40 is as a 34*37— * 

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2* 11* PrhneC 15 2298 19* 78% 18* 

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8* 6 PSInpf 

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65 50* PSInpf 

3% P5vNH 

6 PSNHpf 
6* PNNpfB 
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7 PNHofD 
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35* 19% PSvNM 
37% 20% PSvEG 202 100 
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39 29* PSEGpl 400 11.9 

42% 33% P5EG of 505 12J 
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63% 51% PSEGpf 702 120 
01% 65* PSEGpf 962 1X7 
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21* 10% PultaHm .12 0 

39* 2J% Pu ratal 108 
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70 SI* TaftBrd 1.H 11 13 
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19* 13* Taitoypf 100 5-7 
72% 46* Tamhrd 300 
36* 23* Tandy 

15* 11% Tndydt 
68* 51% Tektmx 100 
4* 2% Tekcom 
302*147* Tektyn 
22* 13% Teirate 32 
48* 19% Telex 
39% Tenpin 64 
44* 32* Tonnes 292 ._ 

102 S7% Tencpr 1100 1U 

35* 21* Terdvn 14 

9* Tomto 60 3ff 42 

36* 20% Tempi 116 95 _ 

45% 31% Texaco 100 86 353107V 35% sm 3ff%+ * 

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41* 38* TexOn 106 17 7 U24x 43 42V 42H— * 

35% Wb T«e*t, X20 7.1 8 742 31% 30* 30% 

S2 TxET Pf 60*116 135 55* 55% 55% 

3SV 75 Texlnd JOb 26 IS 121 37% 30% 30% 

74V%70V% Texlnd 200 10 8 870 711% 110% IW*— * 
3* 1 Texint 382 2% 2 2 

27% 16% TexOGs .18 S 12 2715 

V 23% TxPoc 60 U 17 7 

28% 2D* Tex U Ml Xfi 96 6 304 

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80% 68% Wl»Epf 800 116 
70* «% WlaEpf 705 110 
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WHEAT (CRT) 

&MCbumMIn)um-aottar*p4rbu*het 
404 X37* HOT 367% US* 367 368% +01U 

+05 232% Mar US 301% 308* X* +00* 

190 304V Jill 306% 307% 306% 126* +00* 

306% 308 Sep 128V X3V 307* X27V 

303% 306 DOC 307* 308% 307 IS -JB* 

174% 360% Mor 142V —00* 

EaLSde# Prey. Sotos 47 47 

prev. Dav Open int. 37676 off 91 9 
CORNCCSTl 

5000 Du minimum- dolldrx Per bushel 
135% 261% Mor 264* 266V 263* 266 +07* 

300 269* Mar 272* 371 271 271 +00% 

301 273% Jul 2J3* 273* 203 203* 

301% 267 Sec 267 267V 268% 368% —00* 

205 262 Dec 282 263V 267% 261% —00* 

XT0 270% Mar 271 271 270V 230* —07 

301V 275% Mar 235V 235* 275* 235V —00* 

Est Sales Prow. Sotos 26398 

Pmv. Dor Open Inti 77014 afT3I9 

SOYBEANS (CBT) 

&000 bu mini nxjnv dal tan per buM 
775% 509 Mar 563 568* SAB S MV, +00* 

707 572 May 534 S76V 530* 575* —00* 

779 502 Jul 504 506% 500* 506% -01 

IM 504 Aua 504 £07% 502 507 —01% 

671 503% Sep 903% 504 501 504 —03 

868 506 Nov 577% 571% 504 508 —03% 

679 578 Jon 600 600 576 579 —03 

702 6. IB Mar 809 AID 800 6,10 —04 

779 804 May 6.18 -04 

Eat- sates P rev. Safes 32034 

Prev.DcnrOaen InL 78006 OH1032 
SOYBEAN MEAL COST} 

TOO hmv dollars per ton 

12X80 Mar 12600 73050 125-10 729-30 

May 13100 13500 mOO 135.10 

Jul 13700 14700 73*60 MOJO 

AUC 13900 14+00 13900 14100 

Seo 14X60 14X50 14100 14300 

OCJ 14+OD 14700 14400 14700 

Dec 149.10 15200 74900 15100 

Jan 15100 15400 75700 15370 

Mar 15700 16800 15600 14000 

Prev. Sales 17.133 


m 


*00 

* 8+00 

R«30O 

1 20600 ■ 
EsL Sates 


mso 

13+78 

18700 

14X00 

U20Q 

14700 

149a 

158a 


+X20 

+XU 

+300 

+200 

+270 

+X30 

4X10 

+200 

+200 


Prov. Day Open InL 44044 up 1034 


SOYBEAN OiLfCBT] 

60000 lb*- dot tars per TOOlbs. 

3060 2275 Mar 2775 

3X10 22a MOV 2670 

SUC 2270 Jut 2630 

37 20 2200 Aua 2505 

2+25 2200 Sap ■ 7500 

2600 2270 Oct 2400 

2+80 2270 Dec 2*60 

2+70 2360 Jan 2+33 

EsL Sales Prev. Soles l_ 

Prev. Day Open ltd. 4+986 up 181 


27a 

2605 


27a 

26AJ 


Z707 

2865 


2460 

2+33 


2+40 

2375 

2X90 


2044 

2500 

2+40 

2377 

2190 


OATS [CAT! 

5000 bu mtrt muov deflars per buahal 
1.98% 1J0V Mar 174* 178 178* 177V +00% 

177 167% May 171V 171* 170* 170* —00V 

U8% 163 Jul 105* 704 165* 105* +00* 

779 700 Sep 162* 162* 162% 162% 

102% 164 Dec 165 

Es*. Sotos -Prev. Seta 392 
Prev. Day Open inf. 2749 oN46 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMS) ' 

4QJS0 Bn.- cents per lb. 

8900 5X40 Apr 8470 8470 

8900 6500 Jun 6700 6700 

as 4X15 Aua 6800 4400 

6570 ' 6160 OC 4+21 4+45 

6705 6108 Dee 6500 4505 

8765 4575 Feb 6605 4655 

Est. Safes 16757 Prev. Sates UQ 
Prev. Day Ctaenlitf. 58.777 up 371 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

4+000 an- cents per lb. 


8X87 8377 —1.10 


6870 6670 —02 


Seam Season 
High Law 


Open High Lew dew Chg. 


2S2S 


VOS 

2025 


33 


an? 

2015 

apis 


2237 1999 Dec 

2145 ' 2000 Mar 

27» 2000 MOV 

JB3J 2013 Jui 

gsL Sales 16a Prev.Sata UB 
PTpv. Day Open Int. 23624 up W? 

ORANGE JUICE OTTCEJ 
1 &0DD Rii^ cents aer Rl 

lSS« ma MBT 16+78 16X35 14280 1650S 

■»» _ w 1MS5 JMS5 1*7 JO 188a 

Jul 17U3 17660 18900 170.10 

S«P 188a 1(8.90 14775 14890 

Noe 188.10 14800 186.10 VTAO 

Jgrt __ M80S 

MOT 76600 18800 1683) 14475 

Ho y 14605 

Jul W80S 

Est. Safes 450 Prev. Satas 8K 

prev. Day Open ini. 8653 off 37 


— 12 
— 12 
—12 
—12 


11500 

lias 

IBZ00 

nun 

1100a 

17700 

16200 


151 00 

1SUH 

75775 

137a 

15600 

156J0 

14000 


+JQ 

■M0 

ts 

ti S 
+00 
+06 
+00 


Metals 


COPPER (COMCX) 


L' f 1 ^ i’W^ 

5805 

5908 

5XB0 

5905 

+JO 

F,r -M 

wm 

A or 

5900 

4X25 

59+0 

S9JD 




6X45 

4X85 

4040 

*0+0 

++0 

K2.1D 

57+8 


6105 

61+5 

6100 

61.15 

++8 

8405 

a+D 

Dec 

6100 

6X00 

6175 

6100 

++0 

8408 

8000 

59+0 

59+0 

Jan 

6X7S 

6200 

6X75 

6X15 

42+5 

++0 

++5 

7400 

74+D 

7X90 

61.10 

4 LX 
6X30 

May 

Jul 

Sap 

64.15 

64+0 

64.15 

USD 

6X7S 

6400 

■ws 

+J0 

-4-05 

7800 

6400 

Dec 




6X+S 

+100 

+105 

Eaf.5atos 

>rev. Soles 7004 





5710 5840 5777 


ms 

5910 

80U 


82S0 

8480 

8820 


5840 

5930 

80+1 

two 

4267 


Prev. Day open Inf. 11084 off 7% 

SILVER CCOMS3U 
5000 tmy ol- cento oar iray e+ 

14200 5490 Mor 5890 

5810 B70 Aar 

151X0 590 MOV 5750 5850 

7+470 . 5470 Jut 590 5900 

11830 0780 See 5930 60X0 

12X0 5910 Dec 8110 83X8 

13750 6180 Jan 

119X0 6180 Mar 8250 83X0 

10480 6300 May 6460 6460 

9450 6400 Jul 6820 8820 

9400 6500 Sen 

7650 6670 Dec 8900 8900 

Eat. Sales Pmv.Salea 27JB3 

Prev. Day Open Int. 76013 offrn 

PLATINUMUfYME) 

50 tray ax- dal tar* per fr«v 0*. 

28200 25X00 Mar 25+30 

44700 24+50 APT 24(00 25600 2*00 25X20 

44900 24900 Jul 25300 26000 249a 260.10 

39200 25600 Oct 26L20 265a 26000 265+0 

37300 26170 Jon 26608 267a 26600 27X10 

ESI. Sales 1002 Prev.Sata 1J42 
Prev. Day Open I nL 1+277 up 146 


6900 


64X1 

8760 

8970 

7040 


+54 

+50 

+50 

+50 

+50 

450 

■US 

450 

+50 

+50 

450 

455 

455 


45.10 

+5.70 

4600 

4500 

45a 


PALLADIUM CHYME) 

ioo troy es- dollars per « 

I6X5S 10500 Mor 10600 18808 10600 187a 

159a >0600 Jun 11000 11100 109.23 71005 

149a 10600 Sep 109a 11005 109a H>905 

7+1 a 10675 Dec H805 11000 70A2S 10905 

127a 709a Mor 

EU. Soles 250 Prev.Sata 741 
Prev. Day Open ltd. 6066 off 162 


6500 4500 -05 


6X05 

6475 

4575 


8500 

6500 


—02 

—75 


7405 

(60S 

Her 

4X25 

*805 

67+2 

6X12 —100 

7+20 

67+8 

Apr 

7X75 

7X25 

4025 

69+2 — 1JM 

7235 

6408 

May 

69 JD 

40 JO 

4X85 

6900 — J5 

7170 

46+0 

Aao 

71+0 

71+7 

7X40 

7100 -00 

7100 

4700 

Sep 

7D0O 

7805 

7XX 

70+7 — JB 

7132 

47.70 

Ocf 

7X75 

7X75 

*905 

7XQS 

-.90 

7120 70+0 Nov 7107 7107 

EsL soles 3021 Prev.Sata 1+99 
Prev. Day Open int. 11025 up 182 

70+0 

7X75 

— JS 


GOLD (COMEX) 

WO trot ax- dofbrs per tray az. 

37ia 2Bia Mor 28700 28800 2BSB 29030 

7B3JA Apr 2B9O0 29200 28X90 297.90 

292a May 29+00 

287a Jun 29X20 398a 29X20 2AL20 . 

271 a Aua 29600 301.10 297a 30090 

297a Oct 30250 30+30 30250 385.90 

301a Dec 309a 311 a 208a 371 a 

306a Feb 317a 

31470 Apr 32200 

32008 Jun 32800 

33ia Aua 335a 

33400 Oct Ml 00 

342a Dec 347a 

EsL Seles Prev.Sata 30041 

Prev. Day OnntlnLl45«5 off 464 


SOS 

w 

48500 

4RWB 

40a 

485a 

49600 

*3570 

42X40 

39570 


+a 

+a 

+a 

+a 

+00 

+a 

+00 

+70 

+a 

+a 

+a 

+50 

+u» 


Season Seoeeq 
Hhm Law 


Op« Utah Low Cta* 


STX vjb 


JOS 87* Dec 8704 8704 

EsLSdn MU9 Prev. Sate* 5434 
Prev. Day Open intlKUMl up ASH 

BRITUM POUND (IMM1 ' 

Soar novM-!nMtatnto SUB81 

1-5770 m*5 Mar UMK 10920 10640 10710 

Jun 1J» U16M 105*0 10QS 

s«p uaw tag ugo inS 

Dec 10570 VOSTO UB* 1 Jflfs 



13050 10235 

104a 1JBB 

137W UQ00 

e*t Soles 8N7 Prev.Sata 8042 
Prev. Day Open l m. 23565 upS* 


CANADIAN DOLLAR OMM) 

*per dir- 1 palm eanaukiaol 

0650 7100 MOT 7177 

JP5 TOR Jun 77 2S 

7385 7025 HP JOBS 

7566 7006 Dec .7863 

7504 0081 MOT 7647 


esLSata 335S Prev. Satas L771 
Prev.DayOBMTiRf. 12074 01444 


FRENCH FRANC (I MM) 
ffnarfranc-1 Pelnf eauataaueOOl 
.11905 09405 MPT 09740 

.1KQ0 09410 Jun 09*76 09870 0*70 077M 

.10438 JNl.to.. ^ 0*5 



— * ,, i 

- (pM 


- ' 


Vf 1 


EsL Sales 1 Prev.Sata 

prev. Day Open InL 2724 up 1 


l 


7956 
7982 
M 10 
0043 


s 


GERMAN MARK (IMM) 
spot mark-1 potme nu o NOU WOI 
0110 7887 MOT 7*7 7975 

3733 790S Jun 7992 7002 

3545 0930 Sep J02B 0030 

0810 7971 DOC 0069 0069 

0257 0040 Mar 

EsLSata 1+494 Prev.Sata 31090 
prev. Day Open Int. 44087 VP 928 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S per yen- 1 paint equals 80000001 
804895 003794 McT 4103844003854 -003043 063849 
OOMTO 003824 Jun 003880 003889 003871 0O3t 
00*130 WO Sep 003921 010934 003928 003729 
00*350 003905 DeC 003972 003974 003967 0KB73 

Exf. Sales 71767 Prev.Sata 7010 
prev. Dav Open Int 16025 up 179 


7H0 - 


SWISS FRANC OMM) 

(per franc- 7 paint equals $80001 
-5035 0408 Mar 0460 0473 

.4900 0439 Jwo -3*93 0506 

0830 030 SOP 0544 0546 

0360 0531 DOC 

EiL Safes 11029 Prev.Sata 17090 
Prev. Day Open ML 28029 off 569 


0450 0441 - 


0528 


0501 

JS« 

0572 


1% 


Industrials 


LUMBER <CME1 
uaaobcL ft^loer iJOObd. ft. 

22IU0 UX50 Mar 13+W 13500 12X30 126+0 -+ 

225a 14220 May 745a U5.Q0 137a 137a -J 

330a isia Jui «xa lsxa 1*4.10 i*+ia 13 

197a 155a Sep 15600 15+00 151.10 151.10 -1 

1S6.1D 157.10 NOV 15>a 15X60 152+0 H1B Zu 

187a 76170 Jon 143a 76100 159a 159a — £ 

ifsa 169.10 Mar i7oa i?oa 16+20 14+20 -+ 

Esf- Soles 3044 Prev.Sata 3 +u 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8093 off 191 


COTTON KNYCEl 


58000 Itau- certs per lb. 
79+5 *2+1 Mar 

64+8 

6848 

US 

6425 

7920 

6128 

May 

64+5 

6425 

6807 

7905 

6X0S 

Jul 

64+1 

6862 

64+1 

6+57 

77+0 

6828 

oct 

6400 

6400 

687S 

6871 

7300 

6428 

Dec 

«IK 

6505 

6400 

648* 

7675 

7X00 

7005 

6X15 

6X70 

67.16 

Mar 

MOV 

Jul 

6X35 

6605 

6X10 

6X13 

46+5 

6709 


EsL Sales UNO Prev.Sata xass 
Prev. Day Open InL 17040 off 20 
HEATING (HL(NYMB) 

42000 gal- cento per got 


■ ii 




[7n| 



■ - in 






I 

K f S 
















J 










+L 

+L 

+L 

+. 

+. 

+. 

+.■ 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

n nunian-pto of 100 pcL 


HOGS (CME)^H 

2X000 l to+- cento pct fhi 

S-40 

fiL77 

54.37 

5175 

5085 

4970 

4705 


45.10 

Apr 

4X65 

6602 

46+0 

46+7 

—.10 

48+0 

Jun 

5100 

5100 

51.18 

5105 

— +2 

4X95 

Jul 

5112 

53.12 

5158 

5207 

— 08 

47+0 


5X30 

5721 

5100 

5105 

—A3 

4500 

Ocf 

4730 

4705 

4700 

47+0 

—A0 

4620 

Dec 

4775 

4707 

4705 

4707 

+02 

4X25 

Feb 

4705 

4800 

4705 

47+5 

-JO 

45+0 

Apt 

Jun 

4600 

47JH 

4X00 

4700 

4880 

4700 

4500 

4700 

—20 


EstSata 0434 Prev.Sata MSB 
Prev. Dav Open Int 27036 up 109 


PORK BELLIES (CME) 
38000 Itas- cants per Rl m 


8108 

4X10 

Mar 

7225 

7205 

7105 

7275 

+.15 

8200 

61.15 

May 

T»ec 

7205 

7107 

72+7 


82+7 

6115 

Jul 

72.70 

7185 

7100 

72+0 

+25 

90+5 

4020 


7X30 

7030 

4900 

7X35 

+25 

75.V3 

6115 

Feb 

7100 

7100 

78+0 

70+0 

—JO 

73+0 

6408 

Ma 

May 

Jul 

70+8 

70+0 

7000 

70+0 

7X40 

7000 

7X58 

7X40 

7800 

69+0 

7028 

7X70 

—07 


EstSata OEM Prev.Sata 8049 
Prev. Day Open Hit. 10*36 up S3 


Food 


COFPBS C (NYCSCE) 

37000 Dxl- cento per It 

75X70 12X50 Her |4UB 141.15 139a 14U0 

15X00 12X01 May 140+0 141J2 14000 Ml-59 

14920 1210a Jul V4Q-5Q 141/0 14025 1+100 

147a iz7a sen 139a ittuo 129+D 7+0+0 

7+275 12905 Dec 138 X 139 55 138a 13925 


Iff* 18* 18* 

7% 7* 7%+ % 
J9U* 7% 7% 7% 

4H0x 71 m TV 7U— * 
13* SBVj » 5B%— % 

nz a a do 
2 W4 4% 4% 4%—* 
690* 11V TO% IWb— % 
31 II 10% 11 
20 15% ISH im— % 
8 13% 13% 13% 
a 14% 13% 14% 

7 12 13 12 + * 

_ .29 12% 12% 12% 

8 1086 24% 24 24 

610187 25% 25% 25*— % 
• 13 12* 13 

Xta 36 36 36 + H 

7001 41 41 41 — % 

70 17% 17V 17V 
4 19* 19* 19* 

128Z 66 66 46 —I 

4fc 40 40 60 

lOOi 76 76 76 + % 

» 2 * 2 * 2 * 

33 11* UK 11*— % 

7 7% 7* TV 

232 14 13% 13*— % 1 

17% 15* 14% —7 
27% 27% 27V— V 
9% «% 9%+ tb 


40 

17 


12 . 

8" 


40 38* Textrpf 208 

38* 23* Textrpf l+o 

t* 5% TTtoC* 

37 23V Tltocfi pf +TS 75.9 

34% lWItotraB 25 

43V 28V Thmflfs 704 11 16 

18% 12% Thom In Mb xl TO 

26% 13% ThmMed “ 

22% 11% Thrifty 

28% 17* TWwtr 

9 4% Tlserln 

9% 8 Tturinf 
52% 33* Time 
23V 13 Timpto 
51 32* TlmeM 

59% 47% Timken 
31 28* ToOShp 

31* 22V Toklim 
31 14* Tofchwf 

18% 13% ToiEdta XS2 138 
37% 24% Tot EC Of 333 140 
27% 22 TotEd Pf 3-75 1+3 
20 TotEC pf X+7 143 


19% 19V 19% + % 
30% 30% 30% — % 
27 26* 36*— % 

3% 3* 3* 

4 43V 42V— V 

15 44% 46* 46* + % 
1 38% BH 38%+ % 
8 8% 7% ■% + % 

1 26% 26% 21% 

*25 29% 24% 25V + * 
75x 41V 39* 39*— 1% 
++x 18% 17% 18 — V 
116 18% 17* 17% — % 
272 22V 21% 22 + % 

59 18* 18 18V 


46V 33V Xerox 3a 64 18 2189 46 45V 45% — % 

51% 5* Xerox pf 5+5 110 151 49% 49% 49% 

19 XTRA ta 2+ 10 70 27V 26% 26%— % 


X 26 ■ ZoleO> 

■Wk Wi Zapata 

„ 30 zayre 

31V 18% ZonHtiE 
27* 14% Zaras 
31% 21% Zurnin 


LB 40 9 51 29* 39% 29% + % 

A* 55 It 13 15% IS* 15V— V 
00b 3 15 278 54% 54 56%— % 
J MB 22% 22% 22% — V 
20 W 27 V 2Kb 21% 

1.32 44 77 136 30V 29* 29% — V 


1J6 17 15 
I JOa 34 13 
10 W I 
02 24 I) 


■ 

5 

I __ 

_ » 1078 
+7 13 209 
8 179 


?]V 25% TotEC pf +28 1+2 


1^6 Totecof 206 


TptEC pf 231 1+1 


7 25 

i 1+ 11 

24 13 
24 11 


40% 28 QuohOs 104 XI 12 455 

22 15 OuokSO a 20 26 7635 

11% 6% Ouanex 37 57 

34* 23 Ountor la +8 * 313 

25 14 GfcRetl 04a 10 28 200 


40* 39% 39%— % 
21% 20% 21% + % 
*% ■% 9V 
33% 33V 33%— V 
24% 24% 24%— % 


65% 28* Tanka 
34* 17 TaatRol +B 
44% 19% Trchms la 
w% 9% ToraCe 40 
4* i Tosco 
22 10V Towle 

IS* 6 Towle pf +4 
35V 23 TovRUs 

1B% Trocar 04 
13* 7% TWA 

14% 17%' TWA pf 

25 16% TWA PfB 205 94 

30* 28% Transit) 144 54 II 1301 


655 9 ff* 9 

7a 20 15 3048 49* +9% 49% + % 
18 185 19% 18* 1(%— % 
342 50V 49% 49% — % 
179 50% 49* 50V— % 
3M 38% 36 38% 43* 

45 30% X X — % 
2D% 20% OTb— % 
18% 78* 78*— % 
at 25% 2S%— % 
24% 26 26V 

24% 24% am+ % 
30V 30% 30% + % 
17 16* 17 + % 

75% 75% «% 
tf 58* 59% 


j| NYSE Highs-Lows Mardi4 


420 

90 

52 

10 

8 

5 

25 

34 


NEW HIGHS TO3 


Tronlnc 202 VIS 


112 _ 
345 1X4 
70 2A 


5 
451 
16S 
12 10 143 
9 169 

2+ U 1464 
56 683 
40 10 61 

391 

J 18 397 

IS 


41% 38% RCA 

» 39 RCA pf 

ii* am rca of 

35* 29* RCA pf 

*% 6* RLC 

.4* J RPCn 

18 12% RTE SO 

1Ub 6V Rad Ice 
39V 25 RohPur la 
Mb 5% DbMd 
31V 16% Ronco 04 
9V 4% RonorO 
66 47% Rarcra +4 

17% 8* Ravmfc 

523" 1A0 3+ 18 1738 
13% 7% ReodBI a +0 34 163 

a% 16% RCBorpf X12 1X1 21 

2» 2D RODOI Of X3081+7 39 

SS l n £152 1JJ « ” » ii 

125: : 5S5? is 482 

* Rocmn x 33 W MS 

10% 7* Reece 30 M 

2 % Reoal | 

^2 ^ SeSf 00 XI 18 470 

m 52* lr i* 1141 

2 1% ReoAwr m 

23% 9% RtoGyp a 30 IB 105 
X5V 31% RcpMY 1+4 S I 3» 
24* 20* RNYoiC 2,13 1X1 
34% Jt% RosBk 1+4 50 7 
.29* 20V RepBk Pf X12 70 

K?‘ OOTJ08 w 

19% 14% RstiCot 03 10 22 
3TJ, 22% Revco 
141b 9* u I Rawer 
40% 39% Revlon 
24* 17* Rexfun 
20 11* Rexnrti 

85% 52% Revnln 

491b 44 Reyfn of +w 

110% 108% Reyinpf 
4iv 3a RevMti ia 

87 a* ftOVM Pf 400 
20% 24V R chuck 1+8 
34% 18* RligeiT ■ “ 

33* 171b RHeAM 
.7% 5% RvrOKR 
34% 25% ftobslw 
48% 35* Romm 


10} X6 13 5980 40* 40% 40*— * | 
308 100 200t 33 32% 32%— 1% 


3f% 77 Rootrn 
MV 13V RochG 
B 27% RotfflTl 
39% 23 Rocfcbri 
77% 48% RoIbhH 
55% 37V Rohrln 
■71% HTb Rot Cm n 
=0* 4V ReltoE s 
13% 6% RolHns 
4* 3% Ronson 
W it* Roper 
34% 34 Rarer 
74% 8% Rowan 
55% 41 v RoylD 
» 32% nubrmd 

» 15% RusTae 

17% RrtuiM 
» 38% Ryders 
J** <3% Rvtand 
•7% 8% ftymers 


30% X 30V 
25% 35% 2S%— V 
7% 7* 7% 

4* 4V 4% 

17V 17 17V 

11V 11 11V + V 

3M X 38V— * 
TV 7 7V 
31V 20% 20*-. V 
4 V 4% 4% — % 
43% 41% 41%— 2 
12% 12% T2%— % 
46 47 <7% 

10* 10 10 — * 
27% 71 31 — .. 

22% 23 23%+ % 

13% 13% 13% 

15% 15* 15* + * 
TO y* e%—* 
9 9 9 + % 

I I I 
37* 37V 37%—% 
4% 6 6* 

1% 1% 1%— % 
33* 32% 22% — V 
43% 42* 43% + % 
29* 29* 25*— % 
33* 33 33 — V 

28* 28* 28* 

« 93*4 «+ * 

19* 79% 19% — V 
24 23* 35* 

13% 13% 73% — V 
a 35v am— % 
I?* if* f 
14% 14 li%— % 

«a* MV 5* T +V 

MSflP'Etr* 
2 81 81 81 - % 
49 30 29* 30 + % 

mi 315 + » 

8» 32* 33 32* 

V9 ,4* 4* 6*—* 
»» JOb 34% S4V + V 

£ 2* 25* 

25 22% 22 + % 

4*5 20 IW, 19%— V 

177 34 xm 33* 

38* 37% 37V— 1* 
„„ ri «V MV-4 

210 S3 53 32%—* 

Ul 21% 20% 21 

21 20 20* + % 
11V 11 11 —V 

_ 2% j* 9* 

* « J5 J48 14% Id Id*- V 

L12 17 15 199 SM 30% 30%+ V 

08 0130 1061 9* 9% 9*— % 

207e 5+ 5 3904 S3* 53 53 — % 

04 LI 18 37 49V 48* 49 

M *2 24% 2B% 24%+% 

.! 17Vf LOb 17* 

'•S2 h* 3JS 24% 24V 24V— % 

100 23 10 424 56 55% 55% — V 

a 2d IS 475 24V 3% 23% — 1 

5 32 14% 14% 14% 


20 IMk 

12* IW TAR tty M0e 80 8 

55% 37% Traiaco 2-16 +0 TO 

0 44V TmaCPf 307 60 

25* 19% TnnEx xao 90 

U% 6% Troraen 6 

92 77 TrGPpf 804 90 

24V 20, TrGPpf 250 10+ 

11* 6% Tmon 12 

36V M, Trenwy 1J0 51 id 
5% 24%r Tmwtd A0 LI It 4547 
20* y* TWMwfA 4639 

31% 22% TwWpt 200 «+ 4 


780 34% MV 34% + V 
306 4m 40% 41 
164 16% 16* W% + V 
473 1* I* 1*— % 

,48 12% 11% 12% + % 
44 4.1 100 7* 7% 7V 

24 1303 30* JO am— v 
04 10 16 296 3S* 35 35% + % ., 

75 5391 15* 12% 12*— %, 
205 16+ 171 13* 73% 13*— % 

24* 23% 23%— 1% 
39* 29V 29*— V 


AbbtLobS 

AlltodCoe 

AmerHotol 

AVEMCO 

BeneflSPf 

CBS pf 

QirlsOrft 

cmsoisaso 

DeonFrfse 

EnMsBP 


« AJrt . 

ArnBrd267pf AmNafRess 
AndrioGrn 


entyi 

GrrQn 


_ anpfs 
Gteylmdpf 
Heovrunv 


JerC9 34af 
LaPwLt)93 


BattGEpfB 

BergCnt 

CTSOorp 

Otolsftono 

Combtolntl 

DetE973if 

Equifax 

EfftytCppfA 

Gen Pood 

Grumon 

InfControl 


19% 39Vb 19V + Vb 1 
9 12V 12% 12V + V 
452 53% 53* 53%— % I 
18 61V 49* 41V— V i 
445 24* 24* 24*— % 
54 13% 11* 11*— V 
160z 91 9T 91—1 
6 23% 23% 23% 
w ii* ii* ii* 

71 35V 35* 35% — V 
34V 35% 3594— % 
19* 18% 18%— % | 
31V 11V 31V 


... __H930 

Oh Etf 4 44pf 

Prlmark 

ttgutesEnva 

SmtfhBeck 

Srtxun Pt 

Trocar 

UpfefmCe 

Wean unit 

WnA»r2I4pf 


Munford 

OvernTr 

PrtmeMot 

SCM Carp 

SowCcni 

TbermoEl 

TronsO Fin 

vtocnm 

wencyylnt 

WnPoc tnd 


Barnet Bk 

O n m e T e r 

CdnPoCB 

aevEtoc 

CerreenB 

DtwermEnpv 

EquImrkCp 

Exxon 

GtmMotSPf 

HertfopCom 

IhtrpobGo 

Xuhtmans 

Mar ton Lob 

Nucor 

PHH Grp 

PrlmaMotvri 

SUnUPe 

5MOIIInC 

TodctShlp 

TrttonEnpf 

WtahNatpf 

WenC vs wl 

WTeEI77Spf 


Ai coS tanC 

AmWotrWk* 

ArmstRub 

BendUcvpf 

Burnt dpI 

CaruFrgM 

CacaCoia 

CyctanCp 

Orayfue 


HarltCanipf 

JWTGp* 

Limited 

McOonnDo 

OodenCp 


Shawl rut 
SturerBrCs 
Toots Roll 
Utdlllumpf 


WnAlrJpf 


AmSLFta 

EvarnPd 


AmSLFta pt 
EvanPdl«p 


CBmpbRspf 

evanP21QBt 


Canto r 48c 
Gem lie* 


17* 14* Twin Pf 
45* 25% Trawler 
24* iw Tricon X53ei++ 

34* 20V TrICnpf 29 HU 
Mb 5 TrlSoln 
22* U* Trtalnd 
31V 20* TrtaPc 
4iv a* Tribune 
Mb 4 Trtentr 
9V 5% Trtco 
22 12V Trlnfv 

19% UV TrltEng 

>T»k IP* Tmrcta 1.10 .. „ 

*2* TgoEP X00 80 * 3016 37% 37V 37% — V 

IS 10* TUIUM 02 30 II 77 13* Iff* 73* 

TwfnDs a 40 10 42 17% 17% 17% + % 

a XI 10 490 39% 38* 38* 

J5 12 9 344 34 33% 34 + V 


7-90 10.9 9 17* 17* 17* 

X04 45 10 3434 45*44*44% + % 
— 24* 24% 34% 

24V 34V 34V— * 
SVm 5* .5*— % 
16V 18 18 — V 

30 39* X +% 

47% 4BV 40%— * 
4* 4V 4*+ % 
6* «* 4*— V 
14* 14* 14* + % 
18* TO 18* +1 V 
11* 11% 11* + V 


a 22 44 13 

ia 32 9 180 
a XI 16 443 
05eT2d 9 25 

.16 25 17 27 

SO 3A 1141 
.tab J 22 819 
’ ■■ 9+ 201 


20* 16 

« 26* Tyco Lb 

35% 23% Tyfer 


4 
IM 

5 
70Q 

101 

a XI II 336 
33 

lit 50 T2 1151 
25 14 II B 
A4 XI 10 
X40 +1 8 
80 


. _ a UAL 
34V K% UM.Pt 
15% 7* UCCEL 


7M 1+ 7 1482 41% 47% 47*— 1% 
*45 73 W 33* 33 33 — 1 

U 91 15 IMS 14*— V 


185 

1831 


ia 

so 


1.12 


20 4 
50 
40 10 
80 

10 20 
16 

, - U I 
ia +t it 
.74 X3 17 
220 110 5 
2+4 70 9 
1* 27 10 2726 
200 U M 127 
9 

JOe 1+ 30 
05# 0 36 
+6 40 17 


Company Earnings 


Revenue and profits.' in millions, are [n local 
currencies unless otherwise Indicated 


Britain 


Roans 


Yenr 

Pretax Net- 
Per Shore 


Japan 

Sumitomo Chem. 


1984 

.480 

aira 


m 

310 

0.144 


783 

283 

28 

148 

199 


Year 
Pretax Net— 
Per Share 


Cl 


„T«or TOM n«3 

Revenue xnap 658030 

Profit U0SO. +70a 

Per Share — 9,17 2+5 


1988 

1030. 

0.982 


1913 

4190 

0+53 


United States 


Canada 

Can. General Bee 


Stop & Shop 

4th Guv, 1984 

Revenue 9450 

Net Inc. 31.1 

P«-5»wre 22S 

Year mt 

H«W»— 3050. 

Net tai 540 

Per Share _ +r 


1913 

noj 

mo 

X14 

2JW. 

500 

+10 


Seta figures are unofficial. Yearly highs and lows ret too 

Ihe preetous 52 weeks plus the current week, but not the latest 

trading day. Where a Mil tor slock dividend amounting to 55 

percent or mere bos been paid, the year's hloto-tow range caw 

dividen d ore shown for the new stock only. Unless otherwise 

ntoed. rotes of dividends ere oonuert disbursements based on 

the latest declaration. 

a — dlvldwid also extratsi+l 

b —annual rate of dividend plus stock dfvtdendJl 

c — UqutfoHng dlvldgntL/1 

ctd— celiemi 

d— new yearly law+l 

e — dhrktond declared or poto In preceding 12 manlti+yi 
8 - dividend in Conadlan funds, subiect to 15V natwnldenai 
tax. 

— dfwtdend declared offer talt-un or stock dividend. 

— dividend paid thto year. omiltBCL deferred, or no action 
taken at latest dividend meeting, 
k— dividend declared or oald mis year, on accumulative 
issue wtm dividends in arrears. 

n — new Issue in the post 52 weeks. The hteh-tow range begins 

with me start of trading, 
nd — next dav delivery, 

P/E — ortce-earnings rut to. 

r— dividend deefered or paid In preceding 72 months, plus 
stock dividend. 

s— stock sol it. Dividend beams with dote of uur. 
sts— sales. 

i - dividend paid In stock m a receding 12 months, estimated 
cosh value on ex^fiuideiid or ex^isfHbullai dale, 
u— new yearly high, 
v— trod kro halted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receive rah Ip or being reoreoniied un- 
der me Bankruptcy Act. or securlita assumed bv such com- 
panies, 

wto — when distributed, 
wi — when taued. 
ww — wfm warrants, 
x — ex -dividend or e»-rlghts. 

*0)5 — ex-dlslrtbiilton. 
xw — without warranto, 
v-ex-dividend ana sales In hill 
*td— Vtetfl. 

2— saies in full. 


141 a I2L5C 

739a Uia MOV 

13608 73555 Jill 

Eat . 5o)«S 7+75 Prev.SoM 3041 
Prev. Day Open InL 1X570 up 116 
SUGARWORLO 11 (NYCSCE) 

I IXOODta* cents per I b. 

1000 190 May 403 409 

905 422 Jul 443 +68 

975 453 Seo 497 494 

9XB +70 Oct 507 5.11 

7J5 526 Jan 5+0 5+0 

903 5JB Mw +03 +05 

7.15 604 Mav 600 600 

+49 +27 Jul 600 650 

EsL Sales 9+16 Prev. Seta 11/05 
Prev. Day Open InL 81019 ofT53 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tons-sperfon 

2570 198* Mar 21» 2120 

2570 2020 Mov 2742 774fl 

2400 2049 Jul 2722 2125 

2415 28S Sep BIB 2110 


13103 

10705 

736+4 


++1 

+104 

+48 

+43 

+M 

+29 

t\2L 


+2S 

+99 


435 

407 

+92 

+10 

+57 

+05 

+25 

6+9 


+06 

+09 

+.10 

+a 

+a 

+06 

+05 

+.11 


Z1QS 

2124 

2110 

2096 


3115 

3136 

2117 

2105 


—16 

—13 


9271 

8709 

Mar 

9105 

9109 

91+7 

9100 

—01 

9101 

■7.14 


9800 

9005 

9809 

9X62 

—05 

9123 

8604 


9028 

9X37 

9020 

9021 

—07 

9090 

0577 

Dec 

8902 

0900 

8901 

8909 

+07 

9X55 

B6+0 

Mar 

89+2 

09+3 

89+0 

89+1 

+JQ 

9027 

■701 


89+0 

89+0 

89+0 

0+2 

+03 

9X00 

8X00 

5ep 

8902 

■902 

8927 

006 

+03 

89+3 89.19 Dec 89.14 89.14 

Est.Sata 14+M Prev.Sata 1X540 
Prev. Day Open Ink 45+93 off 743 

89.14 

008 

+02 


TO YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

1700000 prtn- Pts + 32ndxto IMpct 
83 7CK23 MM- 79 7M 

82-3 70+ Jun 780 78-15 

87-13 75-1 B Sop 77-13 77-21 

80-22 75-73 Dec 

8M 75-78 Mar 

7976 77-22 Jun 

EsL Sata Prev.Sata 10.960 

Prev. DavOPen int 48098 oK49 


78-20 

77-22 

77 


78-22 

77-25 

77-4 

76-16 

7531 

75-16 


—11 
— ra 
—10 
—10 

—10 

—10 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) ™ 
(8 pcLSMOOIO-oto 432ndsof 100 oct) 


77-75 

57-27 

Mar 

6X8 

69-18 

68-19 

6+22 

—19 

77-15 

57-20 


48-7 

48-18 

47-18 

67-22 

— 79 

76-3 

57-18 

Sep 

47-77 

67-25 

6+25 

6+29 

—19 

7+5 

57* 

Dec 

64-30 

67-2 

6+5 

6+9 

— M 

72-30 

57-2 

Mor 

44 

66 

65-27 

45-24 

—78 

70-16 

56 -79 


65-38 

66-2 

45-10 

45-10 

—18 

700 

56-29 

Sep 

65-20 

45-22 

64-29 

6+30 

—18 

*9-26 

56-23 


45-18 

65-12 

64-20 

64-20 

—78 

69-72 

v» 

56-27 

64-3 

Mar 

6+17 

6+17 

6+11 

6+11 

6+3 

—18 

—18 

6+2 

Sop 

6+13 

6+19 

63-29 

63-28 

—18 

EstSata 

Prev.Sota79S.13* 





Prev. Day Open lnL23BL34l up +11 9 


GNMA (CBT) 

S1OQ0OO nrln-pls + 32nds of WO pet 


70-17 

57-5 

Mar 

694 

699 

6+28 

6+31 

6X27 

57-77 

Jun 

6+13 

6+18 

6+4 

6+7 

69-4 

59-73 

Sep 

67-23 

67-25 

47-13 

67-17 

68-13 

59-4 

Dec 

67-4 

67-6 

6+78 

66-30 

a 

67-0 

58-20 

5+25 

Mar 

Jun 

6+18 

6+30 

6+ TO 

66-13 

45-27 

67-3 

65-11 

Sep 

" 



65-12 


Eri.Saks Prev.Sata 974 

Prev. Dav Open InL 5088 up 38 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMMj 
SI million- ptsof laopct 


9100 

8X63 

Mar 

S3 

9000 


9054 


9100 

6500 

Jun 

005 

002 

004 

—.15 

9X60 


Sep 

001 

001 

0JU 

0JB 

—07 

9X17 

8X34 

Dec 

8X57 

8X57 

8X57 

8XM 

— 06 

008 

8656 

Mar 

8X38 

8X38 

SUB 

8X32 


0+6 

8643 

Jun 

8X0 

8X12 




8X48 5706 See 8101 8X01 

E it Sales 10*6 Prev.Sata 1.130 
Prev. Day Opsn Inf. 11.923 off 397 

8X01 

8704 

—08 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 
51 mTtttafVPhi of 100 Pet 


9108 

9X88 

9033 

890? 

89+1 

89.15 


8+14 

82+9 

84J3 

B4SD 

8410 

8+73 

87a 


Jun 

Sep. 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 


9+25 

8905 


9001 

■908 


88+7 

SUB 

0703 

87a 


18+1 

88.71 

87a 

■7a 


• 9X11 
■9.10 
Mil 


8706 

87-58 


» 14 — J02 

13 —.15 

8X63 — .11 
8X24 —J19 

8704 —a 
87 JO —JD 
8X48 — 4)7 


Prev. Day Open int. 1+106 off 1+46 
CRUDE OIL(NYME) 



2705 

7778 

27.HI 

2771 


3X28 

2X28 


2467 

2709 

2606 

27. 17 


2905 

2420 




2423 

2+n 


2904 

3410 

JUI 

2X10 

2675 

2609 

2600 


2907 

2425 


2504 

2+45 

2504 

2*45 


2908 

2408 

S«p 

2504 

2600 

2502 

2430 


2900 

2465 

oct 

2508 

2605 

2500 

2635 


2900 

2448 

NOV 

2503 

3600 

2500 

2458 


2900 

2300 

Dec 

26.10 

26.10 

2410 

2610 

+.- 

Est.Sata ' Prev.Sata 14073 

Prev. Day Open InL 5X671 ua 1,172 





Stock Indexes 


(Indexes compiled shortly be to re market ekes) 
SP COMP. INDEX (CMfi) 
points end cents 

18+55 15100 Mar 18+05 18+10 18700 18248 -4 

189.10 15+18 Jan 18800 18X20 18185 11+25 —7: 

79X70 76X00 Sep 1VL9S 19705 19X20 19828 -1 

196+0 17+70 Dec 19+00 19+00 19190 19300 —7 

Est. Sales Prev.Sata 9+530 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 6+025 uo3083 

VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
potato and cento 

20+a 16X10 Mar 20X80 20300 199a 20X30 -J 

219a 17XQ0 Jim 20X10 20X10 20440 38505 -J- 

21200 18+75 Sen 2)220 21200 21200 20*05 — 1 

Est.Sata Prev.Sata 7031 

Prev. Day Open Int 8410 up 1078 


V*' 


Imp * 
< wta 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYPE) 
pototocxTO cento 

10X00 8800 Mar 10+05 107a HUSO TOSJO - 

17000 9000 Jun 109+5 10945 10+05 708+5 - 

111.90 9705 Sep 11105 11105 11005 11040 -3 

11305 10100 DOC 11360 113a 11X50 11240 -I, 

Est.Sata Prev.Sata 20,144 

Prev. Day Open InL 12+15 up 1031 


1 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody’S. 


Reuters. 


CXJ. Futures. 


Close 
954.90 f 
2J324S0 
NA 
NA 


Com. Research Bureau- 
Moody’s : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p- preliminary; f- final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Daw Jones : base 10# Oac 11, 1974. 




Market Guide 


CBT: 

CMS: 

imm: 


NYCSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


Chicago Board of Trade . 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
tnfei i ml tonal Monetary Market ■ 

Of CMCOBO Mercantile Exchange 

New York Cocoa, Sugar, Cpthfi 
New York Caftan Exchange L 
Commodity Exchange, New- Yckl 
New York Meregnrito Exchange] 
Kansas City Board of Trade ■ 
New York Futures Exchange 


Asian Commodities 

March 4 


HONG- ICONS GOLD FUTURES 

‘“"'-M l» .s-«. Errs, 

Mor- N.T. N.T. »ia 287a 2B9a 
API _ . N.T. N.T. 29)00 29300 2SV0O 29100 
Mar _ N.T. NT. 29300 29+00 290JB 29200 
Jun — 29400 29+08 29500 29700 29100 29X00 
Aug - N.T. N.T. 30000 30200 29700 29900 
Od _ 30+00 30+00 30400 J0+D0 30200 30400 
Dee _ N.T. N.T. 31000 31200 30800 31000 
Feb- N.T. NT. 31+00 317a 31X00 31+00 
Volume: 23 tatoef IWol 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJ per ounce 


tot 


H ». 

29700 

N.T. 


Prev. 

Lew 

N.T. 

290.90 

N.T. 


Jun _ 

Volume: 400 lots of 100 ol 
KUALA LUMPUR RUB8ER 
Matayota coots per kilo 


Setft# 

&» 

290J0 

29+90 


Settle 

287a 

28900 

29180 


Mar 


Bid 
78400 
78900 

May 19300 

Jun 19425 

volume: 18 tots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Stoeesme ceato per kilo 

o 


Previous 


7 8450 

i8*a 

79408 

19+25 


18+00 

190+0 

I9+7S 

19600 


185+0 

197+0 

19X75 

19X00 


RSS 1 Mor- 
RSS 1 Apl_ 
RSS 2 Mar- 
RSS3Mar_ 

RS5 4 Mor- 
RSS 5 Mar_ 


Bid 
161 JS 
16+25 
159a 
757a 
15700 
14+75 


16205 

14X75 

74000 

15600 

15300 

14675 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Motoy M en rinagito per 25 tool 


PrevloiB 

1*|S lSS 

3p SS5 

15705 75805 

157-23 15105 
14500 147a 


API, 


Sep 

NOV 

Jan 

Volume: 0 lots of 25 tons. 
Source; RmAwr s. 


BU 

1010 

1.190 

1.7® 

7,170 

1.150 

1.140 

1.130 

U2D 

1.120 


7050 

7040 

1030 

7020 

iaa 

1,190 

1,7® 

U70 

7,770 


£ r** 


1000 

1.1*8 

7.770 
1,13 
1,140 
1,1® 
1,120 
uia 

1.770 


1035 

1025 

7020 

1JS0 

LI® 

1.7® 

7,770 

1,140 

1.1® 


Dividends March 4 




Company 


Per Amt Pay 
STOCKSPUT 
Imasce Ltd — 2-Far-l 

INCREASED 

AR'erttaYE g +9 5. 25 

A .15 3-29 

5 -25 «-*s 

o 30 4-1 

Q 07% +12 

USUAL 

Associated Hosts 
BRrir (John) 

Commerce Union 


Rec 


AmsrModSvc 
BPCcwuxta 
Crairt jersey Bk 
Erbomofrt N.V. 


5-10 

3-15 

3-15 

3-13 

»•« 


Crocker Barrel Str 
Equity Dll Co 
Psi Empire Slate 
Fit otilo Bkshn 
Green Mountain Pwr 

Meratxinto Bank NY 

Meftwde Elect A 
Rasoatoi Cerp 
Shell Oil Co 
Storrett (LSj 
Teno-Vlrglnto En 
Tri-State Motor 
Vartan Associates 


a 02 % 
<3 -IS 
a +0 

0 0S 
0 .15 

Q .10 

a a* 


a +1 
■u +22 

03 +1 

■« ^-28 
.10 +B 
X 3-2S 
45 3-75 
43 3-39 
05 3-25 


4-30 

+15 

3-25 

3-39 

+26 

+10 

5-1 


HI 

3-11 

3-20 

3-14 

3-15 

3-4 

& 

3- 15 
+15 
+15 
3-1) 
3-15 

4- 5 
MS 
+22 


AjtowlJ A+Monttly; <NW*r1r; S-SemL 


Source: UPf. 


India Palm Tender Expected 

Reuters 

LONDON — - India’s State 
Trading Corp. wil] hold an Import 
tender Tuesday for palm products 
te prompt and forward shipments, 
traders said Monday. 


London- Commodities 


March 4 


Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil in U+. dal tors per metric ton. 
Gold in U^.dol lars per ounce. 


Law 


cia 


Previous 


High 
SUGAR 

May 122a 12X00 721 riO 12100 11900 12X00 
Aua 129+0 127+0 72900 129+0 727+0 7E^B0 
OO 13+40 13+20 13600 134+0 13500 iSS 
14100 14700 142a 14340 14100 l^S 
157a 15+00 157a 157a 15+aa u+m 
i«up uia i62a i63a 7*000 141+0 
N.T. N.T. 17ia 17400 16800 17700 


Mor 

May 

Alta. 


X779 Into ef» tens. 


AM 


GASOIL 

Mor gJJO Jg,75 »0a 22X05 22X50 

« 25^ 5§iS 31? - 25 

21+75 2T7a 217a 274a 21403 
23+0 212a 2U03 21+00 21705 211+0 
212a 272a 2ua 21+50 71705 21300 
l+T. N.T. 277a 279a 21205 21+00 
212a 212+8 217a 224a 27 la 27900 
N.T. N.T. 217a 227a 274+0 him 
NT. N.T. 217a now 715+0 9%fi ja 


Jun 
Jlv 
Alta 
SOP 
OCt 

NOV 

7001 rot* oiia 

rs and London PgtmemnEJt- 


chano* (oasolll. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Mar. 1 


26U, - - _ 

2Z 21% 22 - 
in* tin b in* 

11W » », lift 

« » BW lift 
SR M Vi. 
11/1*2* 4h 5» 
** 7 5/1*21* F* 

l/tt 9/1* 7% 2* 


— in* in* — 

VI* 1/14 - _ 

1/h Jb sn» % 
If 1 * J* un* 1 
K 1 I* 2 
IVlUjj 3* M 

•% H4 — n 


0*015 

TeW col apeeht tCUff 
rawed rauee mar 
IMM eeeelnL4ZUM 


HIM 18191 Law 1714* 
Sparse: CBOC. 


f BT01 + 232 


Bonn Greens to Protest 
Meeting, Reagan Visit 


Reuters 


BONN — West Germany’s 
Green Party called Monday on its 
supporters to take part in a demon- 
stration May 4 against an economic 
summit conference here and a state 
visit by President Ronald Reagan. 

The Green Parly leadership said 
that both events were a “provoca- 
tion for all West German citizens 
who pursue the goal of a demilita- 
rized society, the abolition of the 
military blocs and an end to the 
repression of the so-called Third 
World by the industrialized na- 
tions." 


Paris Commodities 

March 4 


Suoorin French Rones per metric ton. 
Olher figures In Fames per ISO kx 


High 

SUGAR 
May 1+34 

Aug 1+30 

Ocf 1+75 

Dec 1+35 

1040 
1085 


Lew Close 


Ch*ge 


1424 

7+05 

1+65 

1+35 

1025 

1080 


M30 

1+10 

1+65 

U32 

1035 

1085 


1.432 

1+20 

1+75 

1+46 

1038 

1090 


+ 30 
+ 23 
+26 
+ 17 
+ 27 
+ 30 


0C * UB, 

COCOA 

VZ SS 85 §& °"?S 

Jlv NT. NT. 2+30 — +5 

Sep NT. N.T. 7.725 7342 +5 

25. £-1- zi90 - +10 

S5, £?: K: = 38 K 

sales: '56tato- 0^ 5 interKt^ 1 lT?2 r * V ' ° CtUD ' 
COFFEE 

Mar 2+50 2+00 2+86 2+95 + 1 

May 2+55 2+53 2+40 X652 +1 

JIV N.T. NT. 3+60 2 005 — 

Sep N.T. NT. 2+92 2004 — 

NOV NT. N.T. 2+80 2020 —1 

Jan N.T. NT. 2+60 — — 

Hoc H.T. N.T. 2+® — — 

-iflea'aMB?* 1 * 1 — , — 

Source: Bourse etu Commorca. 


DM Futures Options 

(March 4 

M® B ***RHHa*rtxcBfewmort 


»rlke 


Cabsffedle 
■wr Jun Sept 
749 200 — • 

003 1+B 202 

XI 1 a* 1+7 
am 056 146 

am #02 003 

ui iu 151 


„ Puto-smie 
tar Jm Ssst 
001 009 045 

005 0+8 DJI 
0+3 101 10fl 

,J8 
233 2J0 

Ul X12 


a 


tatotaM total *eL 4074 
CaB»: F«i. nx. 20S2 saw hri. 14387 
Puts: FrtveL 1+95 apwlnL 22+24 
Source: CME. 


Digital Announces 
New Rainbow PC 


Room 


MERRIMACK, New Hamp- 
shire — Digital Equipment Coip. 
announced Monday a high-end 
model erf its Rainbow personal 
computer with 640,000 bytes of 
njcmoryanda 1 0-million byte hard 
disk for storage. 

Company officials said the new 
Rainbow 190 system is a “top-of- 
ihe-line office work station for per- 
spnul computing.” The product 
likely will be positioned as part of 
the company’s overall office auto- 
mation strategy. 


WHAT WOULD LIFE BE LIKE 
WITHOUT IT? 

WEEKEND 

EACH FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


Cash Prices Mareh 



Commodify and Un!l 
Coffee 4 5pn1 a*. Ib_ 


IM 

000 

47100 

71308 


Prhtfckilti 64/3038 %. yd _ 

Steel billets (Pitt.), ton 

Iron 2 Fdrv. PlHIa- ton — „ 

Steel scrap No lltw Pitt.- 7M0 HE 

Lead Seat, lb 18-a . 

Copper elect, lb . .. 4+47 ttt 

Tbi(Stroltol.to 5557; Ij 

23nc. E. St. i- Basis. H> XC 

PoUodlurn. 01 115-111 

Sliver N.Y-oz 544S 

Source: aP. 


ie futu 


London Metals Abrch 


Figures In sterling per metric tnd) 
Silver In pence per trey owict; 


ifrfutll 


sdL 


Today 

High grade cooper cathodes: 
soot 107600 107700 1064+0 10*,,. 

3 monttlS 109500 1095JD 108400 10. - 

Cfinp>~ cofhodn: 

•Pat 107000 107100 105900 

0 monttos 109X00 109200 107X08 L2'<. : ’ 
Tin: 9POl 1X14+001 XI 5X001X100001X1 . 7 

3 months lX14S0OlXl7O0O1X134Jn««.' _ , 
LOOdtoPOl 328+0 339+0 3*2J» V • 

3 months 337+0 33X00 333+0 2 

ZIncispat 12500 82700 83200 

3 months 81 0+0 81100 11X00 

SllvWISPOt 2700 52X00 53L08 

3 months 545+0 547+0 543+8 

Aluminium: 
soot 101700 

3 months 105408 

Nickel: spot 4055JB 406500 4J760B 

2 months 400500 401000 40O$0O U 

Source: Reuters 


vr \t- U 


t/.. 

I 




1017+0 101700 . 

105*00 1051M U-'O 

404500 477600 V ' * .. 


wrl 

*•> 4nd 




Consumer Prices in E. 
Rose 0.6% in Januar-. 


- h‘t, hedd 
■* \'.ut?vr a 


The Associated Press 

LUXEMBOURG — Cooai 
prices in the 10-naiion Eurqf-.. 
Community rose 0.6 perceu ■ 
January from December 1984, 
EC’s statistical agency Eurostat \ 
nounced Mem day. 

The inflation rate within : ._ 
community was 5J percent . 1 
the last year, higher than the ii ' ' ■ 
lion rates of its main trading i “ 
ners. Inflation over the last ye: 
the United States was 3 j 6 per 
while Japan’s prices ras£ by 
percent over the same period, i 
ostatsaid. 


» j ut 


-V .Villttl 






i. to 


-Vfwfs ^ 


\ n 


Norway Agency Predi 
Higher Gas, Oil 0u^> 


Reuters 

OSLO — Norwe gian oil and •' 
production will rise slightly in 
to 61.8 miltion tons oil equiva,-, 
the government Petrolemn Di 
torate predicted. 

The estimate last week conn 
ed sharply with an earlier gov 
ment forecast that prodoc 
would fall in 1985 to 58.6 mil 
ions oil equivalent, against ' 
million in 1984. The direetc 
said that start-up from the I 

S iatform on the StatQord fid , k 
le North Sea would raise lev*. 


























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


Mondays 

AVI 

I 

• 

X 


VoLdt 3 FJA 8JXX0 

Pnv.3PJ8.voL— _ 

.UAM 

Pm. coraoMBtad dose 

TM4MH 


Tobies Include Hie nationwide prices 
op to ttoe closing on Wall street 
end do not reflect kne trades elsewhere. 


Jun w; 397. n wonts 

£*•' K Ao- bh hmbuw 

Bs :£® 


Pn>. YW. n WSHtetiLow 


SSI 19 
m 7K 
30 MM 
M 7ft 

a ra> 


-7H 

14th 13% 13% 
Mfc IM lft 
25% MM 24ft 
UN 15ft 1M 


SM 

7 IS fft 
91 fft 
» 1M 
7 14ft 
120 1ft 
22* 4ft 
14-1M 
90 1 

2B left 


U Uft 
3ft 3ft 
2ft 3ft 
4ft 4ft 
4ft 4ft 
14ft 14ft 
Oft Oft 
Ift 1ft 
5ft 4ft 5ft 
Oft Oft Oft 
7ft 7ft 7ft 
M M H 
19ft 19ft 19ft 
Oft CM Oft 
10ft 10ft 10ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft 
lft 


77ft 14 FraaEI 
IDft 7ft Frtwttn 
■ft 5 FrtuEn 
70ft 9ft Frtoaa 
Uft BU FmtHd 
7ft 4ft FrtAwt 
Wh lffft FurVHn 


21 50 23ft 23ft 23ft + ft 

Jtt) U 13 11 9ft 7ft 9M— ft 

481 t 8ft 8ft + ft 

JO It 10 31 lift 18 18 - ft 

1211 UVh 13ft 14 + ft 
.17! 27 51 Oft Oft Oft + ft 

H 150 W Wft 19 + ft 


3ft 
3ft 
Oft 
2ft 
19ft 9ft 
3ft lft 
33 20ft 
18ft ID 
10ft 7 
Uft 9ft 
Sft 2H 
17ft 12ft 
4ft 2ft 
17ft lift 
Oft 7ft 
10ft lift 
10ft 7U 
2ft lft 
10ft 8ft 
33ft ms 
21 ft 
30 


lft Sft 
9ft 9ft 
9ft 91h 
20ft 20 
8ft 8ft 
9ft 9ft 
19ft 19ft 
Oft 

2ft 2ft 


9ft 9ft' 
lift lift 
24ft 24ft 
ft 


9ft 2ft 
S4ft 25ft 
Oft 3ft 
lft 5 
3ft lft 
39ft 21ft 
Uft Oft 

raft «M 

10 10ft 
14ft 9ft 
35ft 12ft 
10ft Oft , 


10 131 7ft 7 7 — ft 

J09 A 11 22 52ft 57ft 52ft 

X 21 Oft Oft Oft— ft 

7 5 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 

S 2ft 2ft 2ft 

X 03S 38ft 38ft 38ft— ft 
M S 30 34 Uft 15ft 15ft— ft 

„ 19 U 1»11 12— ft 

will 15 9 US 12 lift lift— ft 
4 29 Uft U U —ft 

-IS J 34 327 34« 34ft 34ft + ft 
JO 2.1 9 X 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 


3ft lft 

24% lift 

J» 

3Zft Uft 
24ft 20ft 
20 13ft 
9ft 3ft 
lft 3ft 
Oft Oft 
34ft 20ft 
15ft ms 
lift 3ft 
7 4 

Tift 7ft 
10 9ft 
Uft Sft 
10 5H 
lift 8 
•ft 2 
2ft ft 
48ft 21ft 
Oft 3ft 
9ft 0 


U Oft 

30ft 22ft 
Uft 13 
15ft 9ft 
23th 18Vh 


W*? 


U 8 

u u 

M II 

4.1 11 

5.1 I 
L2 17 
17 9 

m 

23 

4J) U 

17 ■ 

1J 

27 9 
1J 12 
U 7 

1J 

u u 

U U 89 

140 

71 7 34 


98 

791 47 II 
79 03 10 
-20* 4J 10 
a UM 
-2S*4J 5 
-32 20 14 
JO 112 8 


3 17 

X 

9ft 

9M 

fft 


I 31 

3 

Uft 

Mft 

14ft 


11 

49 

IM 

Ift 

fft-F 

ft 

U 

X 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft— 

ft 

1 8 

n 

22ft 

22ft 

22% + 

M 

S 3 

7 

33ft 

33ft 

33ft 



480 

» 

9ft 

fft— 

M 


23 

lft 

1ft 

Tft + 

ft 

1 5 

3 

21M 

21ft 

21ft— 

ft 

11 

n 

Sft 

3ft 

Sft— 

ft 

a 

in 

7ft 

7ft 

7M— 

ft 

i 

T4 

12ft 

12ft 

t2M + 

M 

s 

1 

55 

T5 

Ift 

ft 

4ft 

ft 



3 

i 

1 

1 


1 u 

49 

15M 

Uft 

Uft — 

ft 


3 

3ft 

3W 

3M + 

ft 

10 

21 

Uft 

lift 

U + 

M 

F 8 

X 

23ft 

23ft 

23M— 

M 


43 

Sft 

3ft 

3ft— 

ft 

1 X 

5 

35ft 

35ft 

asft— 

M 

10 

* 

31ft 

31ft 

31ft 


[ 

U 

Bft 

Bft 

fft + 

M 

I 

132 

8M 

Bft 

■M + 

M 

1 I 

42 

8ft 

Bft 

m= + 

M 

u 

X 

5M 

Sft 

Sft— 

ft 


75 2 U 73 

13 475 
X 154 
.12 28 X 21 
.10* 4J I X 

IX 

110 209 

11 10 
■28 11 57 I 

10 222 
J5I 9J 2 
10 9 

771 U 10 41 

.12 .9 21 5 

113 
41 

27 I 
MUM W 
49 X 
5 
2 

X 

12 » 
7 139 

J* 20 22 40 


108 107 
Oft Oft 
12ft 12ft 

St & 

2ft 2ft 
15 Mft 
9ft 9ft 
20ft 20ft 
2ft 2 
2!ft 2ft 
fft 9ft 
Sft lft 
13 U 
3ft 3U 
1ft lft 
9ft 9 
10ft Uft 
Oft Oft 
2ft 2W 
7ft 7ft 

lft its 

27ft 27ft 
28ft 20ft 
Jtt 3ft 


Wft + ft 
12ft *f ft 

ffi— ft 

2ft— ft 
X + ft 
9ft— ft 
20ft + ft 
2ft 

2ft— ft 
9ft 

■ft— ft 
13 —ft 
3ft 
lft 
9ft 

Wft+ ft 
Oft + ft 
2ft 

7ft— ft 
lft— ft 
27ft— ft 
X +1* 
3ft 


UM OEA 
Uft Oafc wd Mb 

4 oa*wn 
Oft OOrfBi 
10ft OUalnd M 
13ft Otxtan JO 
Sft OOUan 
Sft OnKin 
Sft OrUH A .15 
Sft OrMH B X 
1 Ormond 
21ft OSulhm 72 

Oft OvwrSc 

Oft OkfrdF JO\ 
7ft OzorWi X 


X 20ft 
34 21 
487 18ft 
274 Uft 
IS Uft 

X 35ft 
12 lft 
2* I 
■it* fft 
to Oft 
51 2 

1 35ft 

2 Oft 
55 8ft 

221 9ft 


X 20ft— ft 
2Qft 20ft + M 
ft* 9ft + ft 
12ft UM— 1M 
19ft 19ft + ft 
25ft 25ft— ft 
Oft Oft f M 
0 I 

lft Oft -t- ft 
Oft Oft + M 
Ift 2 + ft 

35V, 35ft + ft 
fft Ift 
■ft lft— ft 
9M 9ft+ ft 


lift JOCtvn JOB 34 9 10 Uft Uft 14ft + ft 

Sft Jacobi 2 7 7 7 

10ft JMMtl 7 0 15M T5M 15M— ft 

3S6 Jot Am 0 53 3 2ft 2ft 

ft JolA wl 13 M M M 

Sft J*tFon .491 5J 17 152 8Vi Bft Oft + M 

7ft JohrtPd 18 Sft 5M 5M— M 

7M JoftnAm X 27 17 48 lift 11 11 — ft 

iftJmpJkn 0 3 5ft Sft 5M + ft 

21ft Jupttw I 11 31ft 31 31 Wi + ft 


UM Uft HM 

9ft 9 9 

2ft -2ft 2ft 
17ft 17ft 171h 
Oft T2M 13 
Sft 5ft Sft 
12ft lift 12 
23 22ft 22ft 
Sft Sft Sft 
1 1 l 

Ift W 9M 


IM FPA X 0 lift lift lift* ft 

Uft Foblnd M 23 7 2 17ft 17ft 17ft 

fft PtCont 100a 97 7 8 18M Wft lOlh— M 

Tl FWvmB m 04 U 13 Uft Uft 12ft Hh ft 

12M FbChP 4W4J U 32 Uft 14ft Uft— ft 

7ft FttcQE 3 U 8ft 8ft Pa 

22ft FJBGE pi 470 154 1 X » X 

lft FlooEo 4 ■ fft fft 9M— M 

24ft Fla Reft 70 U W X 39ft 31ft 39ft + ft 

22ft Flute 1 Jtt U12 » m 29ft » 

OM FtxHftm 17 13ft UM UM— ft 

7M FootoM 5 9M 9M 9M— ft 

Oft PthlUO X 33 9 9 9 

01 FardCntUM* lOlta 93ft 93ft 93ft -fft 

15 FondCA J5 7 IX 4 22M 27ft 22ft 

15 Fames m jix i 22ft 22ft 22ft 

lift Far**H_ 33 193 19M 18ft 18ft— ft 

ft Patent 197 1ft lft lft 

X Front! lJJOa 24 10. 7 41ft 41ft 41ft— ft 

Oft PrdHIy 44 10 OM Oft fft 


OPokC 

174 

Ift 

2ft 

ovCp X 1J 21 

It 

13ft 

13 

■am n M 30 8 

3 

13M 

13ft ‘ 

fflrasatn JDa 37 9 

2 

20ft 

20* : 

ttemn Jtt 37 

19 

Uft 

15M 

trCo X 24 

13 

9 

Bft 

tyPh X !J 11 

331 

11 


Iddawt 

201 

4U 

4 

Horn n 

1 

ift 

ift 

nark 31 

2 

ift 

ift 

rbv 

171 

1H 


tMtfl >9 

5 

5ft 

Sft 

wwVs JOr 7 

X 

3 

2ft 

MOD II 

19 

13ft 

13 

w\l u 

40 

14* 

M 

otjorC -272 84 154 

L 

M 

26ft 

Xft 


3 1ft LSB 
4ft ZVi LaBarv X 2J 
7ft 2ft LaPnf ■ 

41ft 23M LakcSo .15* 

14ft lift LndBnn JO 37 9 

17ft 11 Uktlk* .10* .9 

10ft 9ft Lawn- 50 

13 Bft Laumn 


6 lft 1ft ift + M 

33 2ft 2ft 2ft 

■ 2 Sft Sft 5ft 

2 27ft 27M 27ft— ft 

9 1 Mft Mft 14ft + ft 

02 17ft 17M 1711 -fft 
» 30 12ft Uft 12ft— ft 

II 12ft Uft Uft— M 


lift Uft 
Uft 9ft 
U Uft 
Ift Sft 
2ft ft 
11 lft 
fft 7ft 
M 7ft 
10ft 7ft 
lift lft 
Uft IDft 
2IM lift 
20ft 
75 

Uft ift 


i VST n 

I VoihrR 1.92 U 8 
i VaMpra 44 17 M 
> VafMIti 

i WlAmC 40b 1J W 
i VtRttl 
i Varna 

i v*mti X 17 9 
i Varm* .10 3 j0 
i vtatacn 

Vtam 13 

I VMM* 

i vires Mr 3 8 
volnn 

I VMUOIO X U 12 
VM On JO A5 13 
VuKCO X 44 It 


42 Wft 
S to 
I 2VJ. 
431 314 

4 lift 
21 Sft 

5 ft 

X 12 

3 Sft 

S3 Bft 
41 Ift 
47 Oft 
II II 

4 00ft 
1 Ift 


18 10ft- 

34 to 
XU. 2Jft- 
Sft ]U 
31ft 21ft- 

V 

Uft 11ft- 
Sft 5ft- 
Ift 7ft- 
8ft 8ft 
4 4ft- 
l*ft Uft- 
00ft MU 
7ft 7ft- 
Uft Uft- 
11ft 18*4 — 


vu. 

10ft 
Uft I2M 
19ft 19ft 
19ft 19ft 
73M 73M 
Oft Oft 
7ft 71h 
10ft Uft 
Bft 8ft 
Oft 4ft 

so aft 

■7 3ft 
34 23ft 
7 72ft 
IS UU 
42 


TOM Sft YmtkCo 9X7 

Sft 4 Yardnv M 1J II 53 Sft 


Ift Ift— ft 
SM Sft 


lift Sft Zlrmr .10 U 70 7ft 




AMEX Highs-Lowa 


111* 4ft T Bar 
12 7ft TEC 
21 Sft TIE 
Uft Oft Tit 


J5* 4 It 
70 25 10 
I 


felt 57 22 44 Bft lft lft 

.10a 3 23 Un lift lift Uft + lh 
IS 7305 7ft Ift 7ft— ft 
49 44 lift UM 1IM— ft 


NEWMMHI X 

AndraoRoa BJtodno* CanSacwr 

Ctork Cwu CroaaAT CrawtavMII 

EmoroMad ForattCtvA FrlMEntarn 

Homwn Ind Honnotnla Hainldi* 

JupHar Ind LondmkLd ■ Pantosota 

Plltawy Cp PrnR*al B SaabrdCs 

5 Bl . ltf0 " . SttWBInCoB SbuaraOwt 

Talon Rncti unCnoFln Vainil 

WBIman WTwrtttoEnt* WlIksxGbs 

NEW LOWS 3 
Caatftlnd IKoronSH Swan ton 


March 4 


OurtMadA 

DvnalactCP 

HU SCO 

HuballB 

FanabStw* 

SllwaCpAB 

StdSnam 

wodtactin 






A 


A A 


High Technology 


THE CONCORDE. THE MOST- 
RESEARCHED, FASTEST AIR- 
PLANE IN THE SKY, SPEEDING 
yOU PROM NEW YORK TO 
PARIS IN A REMARKABLE THREE 
AND A HALF HOURS. 

THE CONCORDE. JUST ANO- 
THER EXAMPLE OF THE HIGH 
LEVEL OF TECHNOLOGY YOU 
FIND WHEN YOU FLY 
AIR FRANCE. 


ii;#j 


snfM 




lijm 




[•iniii 




AIR FRANCE #/ 

WERE AIMING EVEN HIGHER 






; s.: 


'A 


'* 


1 -V- 


■ ’ 


% 






\mces 

k PC 


* Hit -ip : 

icm V.’T 1 

high' flit: ; 
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pttn * ■? ! 

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>i»r»s' 7 jl 

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London: 5 Burlington Gardens, England WIX ELE, Tel: 439-4191 Telex: 263779 
New York: 100 Gold Street, Special and International Accounts, U.S. A 10292 Tfel: 791-4425 
Zurich: VKasserwerkstrasse 10, Switzerland, 8035, let 361-4422 Telex: 81336 
Singapore: Wing On life Building, 150 Cedi Sl, Republic of Singapore, 0106 Tel: 224-6122 
Hong Kong: Shell House, 24-28 Queens Road Central, 9th Floor, Tel: 852-5-229051 
. Telex: HX 62201 

Q Financial Futures: German/ French/Engfish 

□ Metals: German/French/English 

□ Industrials '■ 

□ Grains and Livestock 

□ Food 




: 


Name _ 
Address 


Telephone 


Bache Securities 


International offices: Amsterdam. Athens. Brussels, Buenos Atres, Ckiasso, Cologne, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt, 
Geneva, Hamburg, Hong Kong, London, Lugano, Luxembourg, Madrid. Monte Carlo, Montevideo, Munich, New 
York, Ptiris, Rotterdam, SL Croix. St Thomas, Sanjuan, Singapore, Stuttgart, Tokyo and Zurich. Also affiliates in 
Melbourne and Sydney. 




f * 


X 


-•r v 'V 



























































Over-the-Counter 


March 4 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Sales hi Net 

!H| HlBh Uw 3 PM, Oi'bb 


.10* 

a 

1 


J5r 

14 

JDe IQ 



Soles in 

■ 

nil- 



TOO* 

Hfeh LOW 3PJW.Oi’se 

Ovfood 

J4 

15 3360 9V 

9V 

9* + V 




195 366 

3V 

3V— V 

! blrCOl 

M 

J 

173 26V 

2W4 

25V 

DomQ 

1J2D 

4.1 

61929V 

2BV 

29V + V 

DrdiH 

30 

1.1 

5918 

17V 

11 

DovBDB 

jsa 

4J 

1900 21V 

20V 

21 + V 


one 1J 




OrewNt 



334 IV 

IV 

IV— v 




130 13V 

13 

13V + V 

DreyGr 

DuckAs 

22 

1.9 

4114V 

31217 

16V 

W4 

16V 

16V— V 1 


22 

12 

309 27V 27V 

27*+ V 


IQS 

M 

64tm 

40 

40 

Durfran 

Jt 

£0 

IB life 

11V 

UK— V 

DurfHl 

.16 

IjO 

6015V 

15 

15V + V 


1 


346 5* 

SV 

514 — V 

DyntctiC 



133 2B 

27V 

28 + V 


m 

Sates M 

■ 

Net 



too* 

High Uw SPJVLCh'oe 




148 17V 

17V 

17V— V 

Forms 



SSI 264 

264 

36k 


.06 

A 

861 11 

IB* 

111* 


.10 

U 

IB «V 

6 

SW + V 

Fojonyr 



279 29V 

29 

29V 4- V 


AB 

IS 

902 25 

2464 

24* 




54711V 

N* 

10V- V 

FutHBS 

JO 

19 

lit 15V 

in 

m— v 


* 2 * 

34 
13*. 

6* 

TV 7* 
IB* 1<M 
32 * 2214 
15* 15V- 
34 33 

4* Ml 



210V M 
is . in 

10* 

in— * 

10* 10 

10*+ * 

■V 8* 

86k— Vfc 

264 2V 

26k 

IS4V 53V 

54 —2 

n n 

564 

BV 7V 

TV— 64 

364 3V 

3V— M 

3* 36fc 

5* 

BV 764 

7V— V 

6* 5* 

5*— V 

n 4v 

6* 

1166 11* 

1W4+ V 

766 7* 

764+ * 

35* 34* 34*—* 

2014 19V 

20*+ * 

10* M44 

106k + * 

17 16* 

17 + V 

12 1TK 

n 

17V l?jk 

17* + V 
V 

15* 15V 

15V— V 

1314 13 

UV + * 

18V 17* 

11 - V 

13V 1314 

13V + V 

in tov 

10V— V 

B* BH 

B64— V 

11V uv 

11V + * 

n 5* 

5* 

10* 10* 

1064+ V 

9* 914 

9V 

19* 18V 

18V 

14* 14* 

14*— K 

4* 4V 

4* 

20 V 19V 

20 + 14 

5* 5* 

5* + * 

5V 5* 

SV 

14* 13* 

1364— * 

19 IS* 
B* 1* 
14* 14* 

If + V 
B*+ * 
14* 

1* 1* 

T2 UV 

1*— V 
IT*— * 



Sates In 


Net 


100s Hlyti Law SPM.Ch'n 

IBkWSA 

20 9* 

9* 

9K 

Irttain 

16814 

13V 

1364 

IGame 

124 176k 

17 

17*+ * 

Inf King 

t 43 21* 21* 

21* 


113 14* 

15* 

14V + 6k 

InMabll 

44410* 

urn 

IBS* 

IMS 

227 I* 

IV 

1*— Hi 

TnNSL 

IS 8* 

8* 

8*—* 

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46 20 

19* 

19V— * 


2SS 7* 

7 

7V 

■twer* 

J01« J 230 464 

4* 

4* 

invstSL. 

41 5* 

5* 

56k + V 


121013* 

T24k 

12* 

fsamax 

5113 

12V 

12V 

Itel 

1568 SV 

BV 

8W+ V 

iWof 

130 36* 34 

34V +2* 


J a Rest 

24 

1.1 

209 21V 

21 

21V 

Jackpot 

f 


121 5V 

5* 

JV— V 

JaekUe 



232 40 

39V 39*— * 

JwnWtr 



3219V 

1866 

1864— V 

Jaff&afi 

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1.9 

323* 

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JefStnrf 

JOa 13 

4523* 

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JeflWart 



378 S* 

764 

764— * 

Jorlco 

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A 

704 19V 

19 

19V— V 

JKV* 



445 K 

U 

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24 7* 

76k 

7*— 66 

Jonlcttf 

f 


27 564 

5* 

5V— V 

Janet A 

r 


14 5* 

5* 

SV + V 

Jasptan 



141 9V 

9 

9—66 

Juna 



42294k 29V 

294k + V 

Jiaffns 

JIN 

13 

48 U 

17V 

17* + V 


PS 


BBDO 

220 44 

507 5064 50V 

50* — V 

BFICm 


293 1* 1* 

1H- V 

.- SGS 


90 8* BV 

8* 

■’_* BlWCb 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


Page 15 



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(Continued from Page 7) 
mg not for attribution, asked rhe- 
torically recently. 

Pan of the concern is sparked by 
the Japanese, whose first, govern- 
ment-supported entries in the su- 
percomputer race two years ago 
spurred broad support in Washing- 
ton for the National Science Foun- 
dation project. 

But pan of h also arises from the 
severe shortage of technical talent 
on American college campuses. 

“We have to focus fust on the 
academic community, because 
that's where it all starts," said John 
Connolly, director of the National 
Science Foundation's office of ad- 
vanced scientific computing. “Ulti- 


Over-the-Counter 


Sate* In Net 

lt»i Kfflti vow 1PJM.QTM 

(Continued from Page 14} 


mu mu is + fa 


New Markets for World’s Fastest Computers 


jnatdy, that's a way of aiding the 
industry, too " 

Analysts attribute much of the 
momentum now to the fact th at the 
Japanese, who appeared poised to 
level American competition two 
years ago, have not yet won orders 
here. Hitachi Ltd. has developed a 
fast and impressive machine, ex- 
perts say, but has held back on 
marketing in the United States. 

“I think they have smelled the 
political climate here," said one 
American executive close to the 
company’s sales effort in the Unit- 
ed Slates. 

Fujitsu Ltd. , which owns 49.5 
percent of Stmnwale, California- 
based Amdahl Coro, and makes 


most of that company’s IBM-com- 
patible mainframes, has been 
bolder. It has aggressively sought 
contracts in the United States, but 
has yet to announce a firm order. 

In short ruder, however, the Jap- 
anese may boast the most attractive 
supercomputers for commercial 
use. 

But the key question for many is 
whether, and when, IBM will join 
the fray with a supercomputer. 

Just what kind of entry IBM 
would make, however, is unclear. 
"We recognize that there are many 
different approaches," said Jack D. 
Kurhler, the IBM executive who 
heads the company’s mainframe ef- 
forts 


Unemployment Rate 
Fell in West Germany 

Realm 

NUREMBERG — West 
German unemployment, unad- 
justed for seasonal factors, 
eased to 161 million in Febru- 
ary from 2.62 million in Janu- 
ary. the Federal Labor Office 
said Monday. The total repre- 
sents 10 J percent of the work 
force, against 10.6 percent in 
January. 

The unadjusted figure com- 
pares with a jobless total of 154 
million, or 102 percent of the 
work Force, in February last 
year. 


March 1 


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INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
4 March 1985 

The net asset votoe aaatatfoas shown below are sappQed by the Fundi luted with the 
exception of mih fandl whose swoles ore baled on Issue prices. The following 
morainal ivnUMfE Indicate frequency of qaatattoas supplied lor tin IHT: 

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OPEC Output Seen 
As Up Last Month 

Reuters 

LONDON — OD production by 
OPEC in February may have 
passed 16 million bands per day, 
the cartel’s official after 

falling weHbdow 15 million during 
January, Petroleum Intelligence 
Weekly said. 

The weekly newsletter said the 
rise in February output came main- 
ly from Saudi Arabia, Iran and 
Nigeria. Saudi output was roughly 
4 million barrels per day against a 
deemed quota of 4.3S million, Ni- 
gerian production was over 1 5 mil- 
lion barrels per day in February 
from 1.3 million the previous 
month, while Iran's output rose to 
two million barrels per day, it said. 

The newsletter, published at the 


Exporting Countries believe a 
number of governments may be 
before 


OPECs newly 


appointed Dutch 
veld Krayenhof, 


Canada’s Surplus 


The Associated Press 

OTTAWA — Canada's cuirent- 
xount surplus widened in the 


The current account measures 


The agency said the current-ao- 
xmi surplus in the fourth quarter 
es 810 million Canadian dollars 


surplus! 
i dollars i 


iluses of 
in the 


Belgium Jobless Rate Drops 


Reuters 


BRUSSELS — Belgium’s unem- 
bvment rate at the end of Febru- 
lt of the work 
. with 14.7 percent 


meat 


or all of last year, the govern- 
announced Monday. 


ings 

Bank and IVust Company 

Cayman Islands. West Indies 
(Staling 

10 . 75 % 

180 Day 
Eurodepostt 
amounts over 
si 00,000 U.S. 


G&fo™ 22E« 


pvtccenuf a.iSstaa" 
lamP rtCy WttMawy 


lot 17141 


nCHARDSM! 

98*3*41x948 


r#\) 


Na tio nal N o derianden 


To holders of warrants entitling to beerer depositary certificates represen- 
ting shares in our company and issued In conjunction with: 

a) the US S 30,000.000 8% debenture loan 1876 issued by Natronale 1 
Nederland en Finance Corporation (Curacao) N.V., established at 
Willemstad (Curasao), and 

b) the share Issue by Natlonale-Nederlanden N.V. in 1978 with a nominal 

value of DFb 13J77.700. 

As a result of the split-up of shares/bearer depositary receipts in our 
company of DFls 10 JD 0 nominal value into denominations of OFte Z50 the 
warrant exercise price has been reduced as per 11 March 1985: 

a) in respect oi warrants 1976 from DFls 8850 per certificate of DFtalO.OO 
nominal value to DFls 2220 per certificate of DFls 2.50 nominal value 
■and 

b) in' respect of warrants 1978 from DFls 100.23 per certificate Of DFls 
10.00 nominal value to DFls iS.06 per certificate of DFls 2.50 nominal 
value. 

In consequence of this reduction the number of bearer depositary 
certificates representing snares o( DFls 2jo nominal value as per 1 1 March 
1885 amounts to 

a] In respect of warrants 1976: .5*1.054,054 

b) in respect of warrants 1978: 49.880,287. 


The Hague. 27 February 1985 


The Executive Board 


Beaming American TV Into Europe 


(Continued from Page 7) 
which also have a high proportion 
of English-speaking residents. 

“Sky has been the battering ram 
of television deregulation in Eu- 
rope,” said Claire Enders of Thorn 
EMI's Music Box channel, a pan- 
European cable service similar to 
Warner-Amex's U.S. service, 
MTV. She said Sky's existence had 
Forced television regulators to re- 
think their assumptions about the 
future of commercial television in 
Europe. 

“We’ve made compromises that 
we didn't have to," said Patrick 
Cox, Sky’s managing director. “We 
don’t cany ads For alcohol or phar- 
maceuticals, for example. I like to 
say that we make programs, not 
taw cases. You can’t slop and fight 
legal battles when you're Dying to 
build an international network." 

This get-along-gp-aiong policy, 
plus the quiet belief of many in 
Europe's television community 
that Sky just might win a legal case 
if it were denied access because of 
its foreign origin, has enabled the 
satellite broadcaster to gam the ca- 


ble access it needs to show viewers 
its brand of television. 

“We're Europe’s First whole- 
hearted television entertainment 
chan nel." said Mr. Cox. who came 
to Sky from Radio TeleLuxem- 
bourg. the Luxembourg-based tele- 
vision broadcaster. “It happens to 
be going through cable because it's 
the only way to go.” 

For nearly 10 boms a day. Sky 
offers its viewers a video potpourri 
American program reruns, old 
movies, sports' events and Sky 
Trax. a music video program pro- 
duced by Sky. 

"The Sty audience is the ‘Dallas' 
audience." said Ms. Enders of 
Thom EMI, referring to the Lori- 
mar soap opera series that has been 
an enormous hit in Europe. 

“It's advertiser-supponed tab- 
loid television.’* said Mr. Hem kins 
of the International Institute of 

Communication, alluding to Mr. 

Murdoch's shrill tabloids such as 
the London Sun and the New York 
Past, which are known for their 
sensational treatment of news. 

“What the audience tells us is 


that they love it,** countered Mr. 
Cox. who said he has the ratings to 
prove it. 

Sir James, who advises Mr. Cox 
on television programming, added. 
"These programs may be reruns to 
Americans, but nobody in Europe 
has ever seen them before." 

Since it began operating. Sky has 
attracted blue-chip multinational 
advertisers such as International 
Business Machines Corp.. Procter 
& Gamble Co.. Mars Inc. and oth- 
ers interested in global advertising: 
using a single theme to advertise a 
product around the world. 

"They're attacking the problem 
in a professional way." Andrew B. 
Dobbie. marketing director for 
Mattel Toy Europe, said of Sky. 

Thomas F. McGuire, a manage- 
ment supervisor of Batten Batten 
Durstine & Osborne's Internation- 
al Wrigley's Gum account, said 

“We take' Sky seriously. If this is 

going to catch on. then getting in 

on the ground floor is important. 

“it's the closest thing in Europe 
to .American commercial televi- 
sion." Mr. McGuire continued. 


STOCK 

DeVoe-llclU-ui 
[oU'matkHul La 
Cm -dock 
InienuibaoJ m 


BID 

LSI 

S‘-i 

2*4 


ASK 

I'SS 

6*4 


3t? 


Quoin* ib of: NLurh 1. 1985 


Invest w* seeking ahme at cr jgr 
cjpitjl gains m glutta! stiuk 
markets *an siniplv untv us a 
note and i hr urrklv 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 

will brsrm tire jmluuhtiur 
uhligaiinn 


First Commerce Securities hv 
Herengrachi 48.5 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
T rlrphonr: |0) 1 1 '0 2o0 4, 0 1 
Telex. 14507 fircun! 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


PLACE VENDOME 
SUPERB APARTMENT 

3 bodroam. (hart term igntaL 
F35.000 a monti. ABF 265 1199 


74 CHAMPS-ELY5EES 8th 

Studio, 2 or aroani o p art u m g . 
One Mli or more. 

IE CLAXDGE 359 67 97. 


LA MUETTE. JULY-AUG. luxury 2 
batfroe n ft pnvatt por bog, private 
gorden. retarenoB. d«po». Ppmuta 
ta pnvda, F25.000 per inuuc or 
eqmviMnL CtJ 878 2/ 28 


Saebiv 80 rue llniwmte. Pan 7th. 
Tel: [1) 544 39 4ft 


iKephan, 1 boaioom. ai convons. 
nPJOQ. V 577 90457. 


furraihed madam latdwL bath 
■' Tel 720 37 99 


i6iH nmuDBir whsonl 


19IR FOB 6 MOMHS. Apr. I /Od. 1 
3 bedroami, btdiM, bath, axnpietely 
eoiipoed. Bor feng V iew on Sacra- 
CoS^Tefc 8Q77S7. 


NEAR PARC MONCEAU- 2 bed- 


& Aug. I 


i evaninoi 


TR OCADBK). Luxunous & tunny 2 
roam, terrace. 647 52 82. + Near 
Pte Venailen Aroom heuw, gradag 


SHORT IBM «\ Latin Quarter. 
No opert*. Tet 329 38 81 


WAGRAM BEAUTUUL 5 rooms. 2 
bntht. F12J00. Tek 720 94 95 


1 6th JASMIN. Superb 2-bedraom flat, 
2 months. n3S0/mooth. Tel; 621 3^1 
NtiJILLY. tap floor, lowly 2 r oom s , 
with balcony. Ttfc 544 39 40 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


NRAU.Y 

baaulilii butfag. 3rd floor 
(ne-bving, tfio- 
, 4 bodroonivbath + shmwrroom. 
, Fl 4,000 mdudmg dxrgcs. 
SH 763.8170 


MARAIS NEW 

Double Sveig, 3 bedroo g a. duplex, 
parte*. ra500. 563 68 38 


16th MODERN 

Doubtatvino + 2 bedrooms, eqaippec 
latdiai. parting. F600Q 563 68 3B 


Mi Metro Monceau. 80 sqjn. pparL 
merit in modem buicfcig. entrance + 
iwng + 1 bedroom + anal Ebrary 

■ Intdien. F3006 

771 63 55. 


NHJILLY. Very ehorming 
2 bedroom, firepfac 
Near thaa; & transport. FIOJOC. Ti 
730 37 W. 


ST. GU3UD in private park wry lowly 

6 roora, 2 botfn, eqinpped latchen, 

pmteifl. R2JOO ndilrii 500 36 DP 


FAST EXECUTIVE HOMBWDMGL 

Pbrit & sufaurts. Eeati/iales 551 0945 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


V ICE P R E SPPffof lnter r >at i o mi ma>. 
pony rocurei furnidwd or wtfur- 
reshed 5/6 bertoom apartmenl / 
houw 250 njn. minimum n IWwly, 
l*Srh. bK 76$ Teb Fbrii 500 39 08 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

ADVBtTtSMG SALES esetant (nudel 
required For dieaor of Pcva-bosed 
Anierican pubUxu m. Indrviduol 
nut be perfeedy Efaigtxd French- 
Engiah, ooki lo hand# rteuave We- 
pbo«e contact wdh ctenb & detailed. 
foflowHip Salary + comraaeon nv 
eennve lo penon avoiabta to ton 
rafkdy. Send CV. reference* & K*ry 
requremenb to Bax 1887, Hencfd Ti> 
bun*. 92521 Neufiy Cedex, France 

RilBtNATIONAL REAL ESTA1E Para 
Agency loofara far perfedty bAngual 
French f Engfafi know how, mc*» or 
female well cor. to deal wsh tagh 
dou chenieL Wore- Box JS5V. Herod 
Tribune. 92521 NeuOy Cedex France 

WANTED FOR CUSTOMERS' order 
dept, bCngud EngWvfimch. typing, 
•omo experience & working paper* 
requved. heeraeeeng after 2 pm 
Thun, March 7 at Branlanpi Baek- 
nara, 37 Ave r Opera. Pam 2. 

GENERAL 

positions wanted 

DYNAMIC LADY goodJoakuig, fluent 
in levend longuom long experience 
at the executive Tend m the Md of 
tourimi 8. promoeon. Ewtelert knowh 
edge of Europe, Mddta EmtAAfrxa 
looking for new ehrienptig opportu- 
nity. Prepmd ta travel coiJd be 
based in Eixapa or USA (Green 
Ccrd). Bck 202^5 Via dela Mercode, 
001V fame 

ARAB LADY 3«, Fluent Erghh/ 
French, good praentenon, taw de- 
gree*, seeks nderegina poanon with 
eA cormxxiy. PO Box 13-5142 
(Shuron). Beirut, Lebanon. 

YOUNG G8IMAN ACTRESS, highly 
educated bob for an neeresO no pan- 
fan. London 26S0Q8L 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

■eakt qualified 

EJLE teacher or En(^sh with car, 
bra to tort now. 

CaHi 264 76 24 PARIS 

LANGUAGE SCHOOL seeks fufl tine 
mother-tongue Engfah teachen. Atad 
be in panesion or EEC passaorr or a 
vaSd carta da tnjvraf, Cafl 747 12 
80 after 10 art. SoFar lanoML 

DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 



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proof BMW, and Ihe Alpmo BMW 
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VIDEO 

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TBs 01/ 47 55 82 

ZURICH 

SuatsiWi Esoort 6 Guide Service 
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LONDON 

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L— don Wl 

Tel: 486 3724 or 486 1158 

AI major aiA mk nr repled 

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LONDON 

BEST BCORT SBMCE 
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* MADRID * 

TASTE BCORT SERVICE 

Tet 411 72 57 

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Teh 06 7/ 52 88 05. 

LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

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Tel. 437 47 41 / AMT 

12 naan ■ nuckkght 

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6799863. 


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LONDON ESCORT SERVICE Tab 937 
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Teb 935 5339. 


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Cede cteds. Teh 4564187. 


Service. 


: Tat 02/520 23 65- 


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Tet 069/ 91 3 14 


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vo. TeL- 01402 7949. 


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w Teh 401150? Credit Cards 


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,-rMl"^ l ’" L 






*s?i- Wli'i „ 1 |R |™ | 


1 

1 

1 

J 

z 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

4: 

4 

4- 

4i 

4’ 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


i 

2 

3 

4 

1 

S 

0 

7 

8 

9 

1 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 




IS 





IB 




”7 




IB 






19 





20 


J 





1 

21 








22 



23 





24 

29 

28 



■ 

27 


J 

8ta 

1 

28 

29 

90 

91 

92 

“ 







1 

38 






30 



37 

38 

_ 



38 







40" 






1 

41 




42 



43 





1 

44 



1 

49 

48 

48 





47 

48 



1 




80 

51 

52 

53 




1 

SO 

54 




os 

88 

87 

SS” 














53” 




1 

01 





1 

82 




5T“ 

— 

_ 



64 

— 

— 

— 

— 

60 

— 

a/s 

as 


PEANUTS 

EVERY TIME WE COME 
TO ONE OF THESE 
CONCB CTS, THEY PLAY 
‘‘PETER ANP THE WOLF' 7 


I PONT KNOW.. I*VE 
NEVER UNPER5TOOP IT' 


ACROSS 

J Atlas contents 
5 Excuse 

10 Stain 

14 Inter 

19 Unstable 
particle 

16 S.A. rodent 

17 Radio-comics 
character 

20 Annapolis 
graduates 

21 Jungle queen 

22 

Speedwagon 
(rock group) 

23 Lachrymal 
drop 

24 City on the 
Rhone 

27 Sun. talk 

28 Beethoven's 

Solemnis" 

33 Bishop's seat 

34 "Ode on a 

Grecian " 

35 Collar lining 
Claude 


43 He plays Matt 
Houston's 
unde 

44 Crazy Horse, 
to Custer 

45 Fastener 
47 Bus. -school 

course 
49 Afternoon 
reception 
'56 Eight-sided 
figure 
54 Distorts 
reports 


12 Newspaper 
publisher: 
1858-1835 

13 Makes lace 
18 Matures 
18 Usual 

23 Tautness 

24 crow flies 

25 G.I. therapy 

28 Salacious lodes 

27 Tanka 

29 What Eliza 
crossed 

30 Flowing robe 


58 Frankie Frisch 31 Trap 
60 Informal 32 Vice President 


goodbye 

61 Size of type 

62 Within: Comb, 
farm 

63 Neisse 

Line 

64 Jewish feast 

65 Profound 

DOWN 

Z Spiked dub 

2 King of 
comedy 

SGladys 

Knight's 

backups 

4 Caricature 

5 adds 

6 0ptical glass 
. 7 Doctrine 

8 Heating tank 

9 Gandhi’s land 


36 Early C__. 

Rains film 

40 Blonde 
bombshell of 
theSO's 

41 April 13, in 

Italy „ 

42 Victoria’s "We 10 Rotate 

not ll Youthful 

amused" att endan t 

© Nac York Times, edited by Eugene Malaka. 


before Ford 

34 Alphabetic trio 

35 G-men's org. 

37 duDiable 

38 External world 
38 Fish or suffix 

44 Caress 

45 Slave of yore 

46 Sent by wire 
48 Peannain 

centers 

40 More insipid 

50 Hahn or Kahn 

51 Libyan 
neighbor 

52 Pierre's head 

53 At a distance 

54 Ball-park 
figure 

55 Narrow way 

56 Padua 
neighbor 

57 Store 

SOStasbedaway 





THE ENCHANTRESS 


BOOKS 

nJ.itlU 

chan tress." To it in a very roundabont ■ • f H • ’ 

T> J f'jJim Cw.L» • . 1 W.,f| t 


By Han Suyin 345 pp. $16.95. 
Bantam, 666 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 10103. 

Reviewed by Faiga Levine 


cc 


come Bea and Cohn, Swiss twins who 
embroiled in its political and palace ii ^ri^ ' 
and ore caught in the whirlwind whcnXS 
is destroyed by invading Burmese mtss/* 
They are the children of a beautiful Ceh 
mother who practiced the ancient magic effa 
people and a freethinlring barm, whoSeijS 
by village neighbors turned into awiteb^f 

T „_ rj fj . . __ _ . ing mob. Cohn has inherited his faibavZ 

HE ENCHANTRESS^ by Han Suyin chanical talents, while Ba has herS** 

— rail it a high-class romance fany supern aiural powers. They share a s3g 

l» nr a Kirtnnn Fonmcif nr 9 mfmntv*- ' f .• «■_ Lf. <-■ . i'WllI 


■* +£ 


■* > T 




tale, or a historical fantasy, or a ronraotic- 
historica] fairy tale. 

But where does one go from there? How 
— — - - — — •*- j - ,: " u with the 



WIZARD of ID 



movie? She has written more than IS books, 
most of them based on her life as a Eurasian 
child growing up in China, her experiences as a 

young Western-educated medical doctor ob- 
serving the Communist revolution from the 
Hong Kong border and then returning to the 
mainland to live, work and write about the 
aspirations of its people, their high ideals and 
hopes, along with the pain, the excesses and 
horrors of the Cultural Revolution. 

Granted, the historical details of "The En- 
chantress” have been meticulously researched. 
But it is all for naught, because the plot upon 
which the whole exotic panorama lunges is 
almost laughable in its attempt to touch upon 
every facet of the 18th century, while the char- 
acters are no more human than the automata 
— robots that were the rage of the rich and 
royal of the day. 

Golden Ayuthia, City of Paradise — the 
ancient capital of Thailand — is “The En- 

Sohition t» Previous Puzzle 


IEODO □□□□□ □□□ 
□EQQ QHnOO HEIQ 

□non aaaaa ana 
oooraana aaaaao 
I 000 anaana 
□□□□□QacinaQB 
Bcmnn naacra ana 

□DQd □□□□□ QQIE30 

bed □□ana aaaija 
□□□□□□□□Pinna 
BEddOH E130 
□BQBaoa □[!□□□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□□ 00na 
BO □□ BDBBn □□□□ 

□nan aaaaa □□□□ 


3/5/85 


p, often speaking sflentiy JJJJ 

other — even ova peat distances, ahd^ 
dally at times of danger. .T 

Mistreated by thdr paternal unde, fl-i 
phans and Valentin, their half-brother, cam 
from the family estate and find thri /imr 
Geneva. There. Abraham HLrsch, their feife 
Jewish banker friend, arranges a mercer 
posting for Valentin, and for the twins to too 
on with on exotic business venture of a nofe 
Moor named Abdul Reza. By astonishm®! 
ddence, his plans involve the buQdjog ffl 
repairing of automata and clocks at the Q 
nese Imperial Coun. Subsequently forced 
flee China because of palace politics, Cdfr * 
Bea journey to Ayuthia 
Suyin ’s writing is often excessively sen 
mental. What has always saved her books iri 
detail, the depth of her characters, her abffi 
to create persuasive plots and her and sengti 
ity toward the world and people she is wri£ - 
about. : 

“The Enchantress” touches on many inft 


anaboa with all thin^ mechanical, and 
with other topics: the worldwide impact t&\ 
Jesuits; the perilous condition of Jews jgj 
rope; trade and cultural exchange bctweol' 
Occident and the Orient; Asian palacell 
including the many esoteric methods of todS 
and execution. And finally Suyin trilstkjU 
of how Ayuthia, of the 300 golden sprat 
because the king, so sure of his heavenly g " 
nipotence, refused to allow any defense am 
the invading Burmese. - ? 

But all of this teeming, colorful 
serves merely as a shallow, painted badnfc 
to Bea and Colin’s Happily Ever After od\ 
Shades of Voltaire! — who, by the way, jj 
a pail of the action. It’s as if the sto 
Candide and his sister Cuncgonde lad 
rewritten for the modem Har 
market * K 

Faiga Levine is theater critic for WTi 
dio. She wrote this review for The Wt 
Post. #5 


• ■ - "ow 


. . ht- 


' 

. ^ 
M 

I * 

. * '** 

- wwta. 

• 




CHESS 


IhwcramW® those tour J umbloa, 
ofw Mter to each squara, to term 
taw ordinary words. 

YAIDS 



| 

MEFAL 

_c 

tn 

RATVAC 


ZDT 

N 

MYSALE 


m v 



By Robert Byrne 

N IGEL SHORT, the Brit- 
ish champion, defeated the 
United States Champion, Lev 
Alburt, by a lopsided 1 7-1 score 
in the fust United States-Unit- 
ed Kingdom Match of Champi-. 
oos, in Foxboro Mass. 

Ih this variation of the Alek- 
hine Defease, Short’s 7 P- 
QR4!?, winch ori ginated with 
the late Paul Keres as an at- 
tempt to shake up the black 
position, had been out of favor 
for a long time before this 
game. La the Erft game, he had 
won with the usual 7 N-N5, but 
perhaps not as soundly as he 
would have wished. 

Alburt said that he avoided 
7...PxP?! because 8 P-R5, 
N/3-Q2(8 . . . N-Q4 is safer for 
Black, although White has a 
dear but small advantage after 
9 NxP); 9 BxPchlT, KxB; 10 N- 
N5ch, KN1; 11 N-K6, Q-KI; 
I2NxP yields White the ex- 
change, with exceDant chances 
of retrieving his knight. 

Alburt’s interesting solution 
to his problem, 1 ... P-QJ; 8P- 
R5, N-B5; 9QN-Q2, P-QN4 
(tried the less ambitious 
9 . . . NxN: lOBxN in the sev- 
enth g ame, but without suc- 
cess); 10 PxPe-P., NxP/3, en- 
sured that the queenside would 
remain open to allow Black ac- 
tive counterplay there. Howev- 
er, White's superiority in the 
center was untouched and 


Short retained kingside attack- 
ing chances. 

Alburt made no attempt to 
play 13 . . . P-K3, stopping 14 
P-K6, because it would have 
weakened his KB3 square, al- 
lowing 14N-B1 followed by 15 
B-N5. On 13...BN4; 14 P- 
K6», PxP; I5N-N5, be later 
thought that I5...B-Q2; 
16NxKP, BxN; 17 RxB, Q-Q2 
would have permitted a sound- 
er defense, but surely White 
keeps dear superiority here 
also. 

Short's sharp 24 B-K5! set 
up 24 . . . NxB; 25 PxN, R-B5; 
26NxP! which broke up the 
black king’s pawn barrier. The 
main tactical point was 
26 . . . KxN? would have been 
annihilated bv 27 Q-R5ch, K- 
Nl; 28 QxPcb, K-Bl; 29 Q- 
R6ch, K-KI; 30 Q-R8ch, K-B2 
(or30 . . . R-Bl; 31B-N6ch); 31 
P-K6ch, QxP; 32 Q-R7ch. 

Moreover, the venturesome 
knight could not be trapped by 
26 - .Q-N5; 27QxQ, RxQ; 28 
P-R3, R-KR5; 29 N-N5. which 
yidds White a winning ending. 

Shot’s indsive, no-respite 
attacking play forced Alburt to 
drop the exchange with 36 Q- 
R6! R/lxN (36 . . . RxKP?; 
37N-N5!); 37 PxRch, RxP. 

After 44K-N2, there was no 
use in 44...P-K5 because of 
45 Q-Q8ch. N-Bl; 46 R/3xP!, 
R-Q2; 47 RxPCh, K-R2; 48 
QxN, KxR; 49 R-K6ch, K-N4; 



50 Q-B 4 ch, 

R4mate. 

On 49 Q-N 6 ch, __ 
tance by Blade was 
possible in view of 
K 2 ; 50 R-B 3 , with theo-^. 
threat of 51 K-VhLM 
gave up. -X 

. 4.r 


AtuuuucuBnMi 


: iln 


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| WHAT A PRACTICAL. 
JOKER IPOB&. 



Now arrange Ihfl dieted lettors to 
term the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 

—ckoto mrrx 3 

(Answers tomonow) 

Yesterday s I JumWe3 " NAVAL JINGO BEYOND DEAFEN 

I Answer. People who are always flying Into ■ rage 
sometimes end up making this— 

A BAD LANDING 

W EATHER 

EUROPE 


World Stock Markets 

kia Agence France-Presse March 4 

Oosing prices in local cunmacs unless oAeradst indicated. 


ClM WlY 
11730 tan I 


cibm rm. 


MIB Index : Eli 
Preview: Uil 


Ala rm 

Amtvrdmn 

Attim 

BarcehMn 


LOW 
C W 


ASIA 


•win 
■mull 
JWWVrt 
Mmtl 
CMnhaon 
CntaoeiSM 
DvMx 
EdMmrM 
Ptorvoev 
Frankfknt 
Cwevs 
NMUnU 

■metal 

Lm Palana 

ur 


■anakak 

Billbw 

Haas Kang 

Marino 

NnrMhl 

Swwl 

StaaaM • 


HIOH 
C F 

IS 51 __ .. 

* « 7 « r 

13 55 10 50 a 

> 7 S3 6 43 a 

W SO I 34 I r 

! « -i » a 

£ 48 0 46 a 

s 41 -1 30 o 

3 3* t 34 r 

2 31 0 32 ta 

W Ad 9 48 tr 

V 48 3 37 *h AFRICA 

.5 46 5 41 

U 55 Q 33 

10 50 4 J? 

s 4i .4 as 

ifl m 'i 34 jSrare 


Totwl 

Tekva 


Atom 

com 

COM TOwn 
CnaUonca 


Milan 
Moscow 
Mortal 
Nk* 

Oho 

Part* 

Preeuc 

Rnkiovn 

Rome 

SMriknelm 

Wfwtaore 

VMa 

Vtariq 

Warsaw 

Zartcb 


» U IS 59 
IS 59 7 45 

» 50 4 39 
13 54 4 39 

10 M 3 37 
-5 23 -10 14 
3 45 -1 JO 
IS 59 a 46 


Logoi 
Nairobi 
Toots 

LATIN AMERICA 

BtMSM AJrw 


HIOH LOW 
C F C F 
34 93 20 60 d 

2 34 -3 27 lir 

17 63 14 37 a 

5 *T 23 73 fr 

32 m 16 61 fr 

* 43 -1 30 fr 

7 4S 5 41 r 

33 91 23 73 r 

18 64 16 61 a 

8 44 1 37 a 


19 66 3 37 o 

19 66 I 46 no 

22 72 12 54 cl 

15 57 11 52 o 

30 « 17 43 el 

— — 27 81 na 

28 82 16 41 h- 

18 M 7 4S fr 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Anon 

AKZO 

AhaM 

AMEV 

A'Dam Rub 

Amrabank 

BVG 

Bwtirmann T 
Caland woo 

S2 t ™S5S Kto 

ijoooovaw 
KLM 
Naartan 
Not Naddr 
JMrilavd 
OcvVandor O 

PtVIlp* 


Claw P row 

g T ,s SZL js ,b b 

nfl S m 

SJS MwnCtLWuaai 1250 1200 

261.40 

340 

133 151 

HU 

17040 167 JO 
12240 12240 
197 W4 


Rodamco 
Bollnai 
Ro lento 

53512^ 

vyp 


cl BMdOiAlnH 30 U 23 73 

a Lima 27 81 20 68 

; ~ r Marten CttV 20 02 6 43 

'l0 SB 'I 45 *“ ^ 0 ? J ? ntlro » B4 2S 77 

4 3? .1 M 


4 39 -1 ]0 r 

>7 43 3 37 d 

2* -6 21 d 
12 S4 5 41 d 

12 54 7 45 a 

3 37 I 34 D 

2 M -1 30 fa 

8 « -1 30 o 

middle east 

* ntar “ -1 30 - 24-11 fr 

« 34 i 43 fr 

U S3 -J JJ fr 

13 54 -3 28 


Sag Paolo - na 

WORTH AMERICA 

AKtarooe 
Atlanta 
Bert*, 

CMCOM 


■drat 
Bamascai 

■Jtraiotan 
Ttl AVIV 


OCEANIA 

akmom 
I wm 


19 44 3 36 fr 


W M H 44 

37 99 17 63 


Detrail 
Honolulu 

Houston 

Las Anna* 

Miami 
Mfaiaaaaalia 
Moatrael 
Nassau 

J 5 “* Y°rfc , „ , 34 

SaaPraaclsa 11 a » « 

J 45 1 34 

I?” !?"- -3 27 -8 18 

Buumaita 13 SS j 4 | 


-4 21 -12 U k 
21 70 10 SO pc 
-3 » -5 23 sw 

» 54 1 34 r 

3 34-11 12 ac 

3 37 .3 27 r 

34 79 21 70 r 

23 73 IB 44 st 

J* « S 41 pc 

» 5 IB 44 oc 

23 72 - 7 19 sw 

-7 19-12 10 fr. 

24 79 15 59 k 

i 39 1 34 r 


43 J. 6 UO Bk East Asia 
77 7420 9* w » Krtla 
13920 U9 OdnaUaftf 

msn 69J0 CressHarbor 
4410 4320 Hgrt.Beng. Bank 
oeate nug HK Eladrtc 
33490 HKKOMI 

27 JO 27M MKLond 
Ms 14250 * HK Shanghai 
28120 ® 

fiJ^SS.OglrtMjBdaxrtOUa HutfflStanmoa 

P ’** too » 528880 JOniinr Mattl 

IJardinaSac 

iSSLTO 

MM — - J ^ KPrOOS 

Behaart 
Cocker I ll 
EBES 

CS-lnno4M 
GBL 
Gevoort 
Hoboken 
KratfMtank 
Prt r p fli iq 
Sac Genera hi 
Safina 
solver 

USS. 


2150 NA 
1350 14 

1450 1450 
10 MA 
4S3S 47 JS 
755 

3075 3075 
A 2 S 5.15 
850 NA 
*150 44 

&7D 575 
20 L 7 D aasn 

3 u 

90S 9 JO 

tss 

”5 

050 450 
159 157 

i_ : 159956 


Boots 

Bowater Indus 

Bril Home St 
BrH^Talecwn 

Burinah 
Cadbury Schw 
Owtor Con* 
Coals Patans 
■Cone Gold 
Coyrtauids 

tie Baers* 

Distillers 

Drtafontrtn 

& 

Freest Ged 

GKN ■ 

Glaxo c 
Grand Met 
Gylrnien 

GUs 
Hanson 
Hawk ar 
ICI 
Imos 

Llovda Bonk 

Lemlw 

Lucas 

Marks and Sp 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 

pSJJSSn 110 "* 

Plesaev 
Hncal Elect 
Rondfontein 
Rank 

Reedhm 

Reuters 


Clow Prev 


248 


245 


r p** 1 

AlrUoukle 

63 S 


Aisthwn All. 

249 JD 


AvOonoutt 



Boncaire 

578 


BIC 



n Bouvaun, 

649 


g BSN-GD 

2434 


j Carrefaur 



7 Club Med 

1195 

1185 

, Cafbnca 

265 


Dumsz 



EJfrAqutialne 

240 J 0 


Euroeei 

992 


GenEoux 



Hactwtte 

1830 





LataraaCap 



Lrerand 



roraal 

2401 


Malm 



Mletirila 



MMPknmr 

B 9.50 


MoetHenneaxy 



Moulinex 

11280 




mim 

Ocddantale 



Pernod Rlc. 



Petratea (tee) 

267 


teuMi 

27980 

270 




PrirrtBmns 

19980 



26580 26220 

Radouta 

1270 


Hnuskel Uctef 



Skle Ronrtonol 



SourJ’errler 



Tetemecon 

2370 


ThomsanCSF 

501 


Valeo 

235 

235 

Aaert index : mji 


Prertaue ; T 9 VJ 8 



CAC. Index: 20 ui 



Previaae : 2 HUM 



i S torfcbobi | 


fhxafeod 

Crtdsmnme 

Inchcape 
Kernel Ship 
Ngtaridn, 

DUB 

Sen* Shipvord 

•SSS& 

WB Index: ess. 
Previous : 42258 


AC I 
AN 1 
ANZ 
BHP 
Bora I 

BauoafnvUle 

Brambiae 


283 


Kaneal Power 
Kao Soon 
Kawaiakl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu ltd 
Kubota 

Matn E lac. bids 
Matsu Elec. Works 
Mfrsubisw Bank 
MlisuWehl Cham 
Mtaublrtii Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
AUtsulandca 
MttsukasM 
Mitsumi 
N 8 C 

NlkkaSec 
Nlpcwn Steel 

K£S? V -" 

ttanuraSec 

Olympus 

Ricoh 
Sharp 
5 any 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
symltame Meiad 
Talari Cora 
Trisha Marine 
Tafceda Cham 

Tetlln ^ w 

Tokyo Elec P ower yam ism 

Tokyo Marine s*o m 

Toroy Ind 453 <59 

& S« 'S 'S 

i ,4swjn 

Mew l ed**: 99039 
Previous ; 98151 


1350 1360 

J45 845 

145 143 

531 564 

450 433 

321 320 

MW 

,773 .736 
’570 1580 
429 450 

» 388 

£9 247 

229 §7 

NA ^ 
.1180 1T80 
710 670 

146 
242 242 

*12 607 

1170 1130 
1350 1330 
906 909 

1070 1050 
A20 4790 
1120 1830 

262 m 

146 144 

199 199 

414 412 

075 868 

433 


March 1 


Canadian, stocks via AP 


Zurich 


Roto! Dutch £ 497/64 491/64 


Fmbfart 


aasfcww assSr* « 



AEG-Telefunken 
Allianz Vers 
Bart 
Hover 

Barer JHvpa. 
Bwer.VarAuik 

Ctemnarzbank 

Conftawnml 

Drimlor-Benz 

Deoyiw 

Deutsche Babeack 
Deutsche Bern* 

DretdnerBonk 

DUB-Sctnithe 
GHH 
Hochtief 
Hooctat 
Hoescdi 
HoUmann 
Horten 
Kail + Sriz 
Kontadt 
Kaufhaf 
KHD 


11X30 

1020 


WO 970 
WO 1621 
«75 6750 
1365 1350 
2600 25» 
2615 2550 
7m USB 

5250 52SO 

M * 


RTZ 
Shell 
5TC 

SM Chartered 

Tate and Lyle 
I ?* 60 
Thorn EMI 
T.i. group 

TndrioarHw 

Ultramar 
Unt lever c 
United Btsailts 
Vickers 
wjDeeo 
w^Wdinn 
war Loan 3Vi£ 
Wootworth 


632 _ 

IS? 734 

W 196 
492 49! 

463 

228 223 

447 444 

232 234 

*43 644 

j® 152 SssMCaiki 
1»S 119/64 f££ta 

* sL. h 


AGA 
Alfa Laval 
Asea 
Astra 

Allas Copco 
Bolfden 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 

Essetta . 

Handetttkefl 

Pharmacki 


370 370 

191 192 

% 340 

,45 NLA. 
JTO 109 
’99 190 

307 

25 287 

385 375 

170 170 

211 2W 
«5 440 

NA. 387 
W 9S5 

ZO 233 
387 263 


MB- 


J j sffiasnsi"** 1 *" 

17V3 m, 


Akoi 

AsahIChem 
Asahl Glass 
Bonk of Tok yo 
BrMDesiam 
Canon 
C.IIDII 

Dal Nippon Print 

BaSwa House 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Pulltsu 
Hitachi 
H onda 
, ,HI 

Japan Air Una* 

Kali mo 




£ S 

898 890 

747 720 

53® 521 

1470 1410 
338 352 

K»0 1010 
556 549 

1610 1650 
1950 1860 
1360 13X1 

m 8*4 

1550 1440 
151 147 

5260 5150 
274 274 


Bank Leu 3700 3700 

Brown Bower! 1788 

aha Gatov 30SB 2925 

Credit Srisu 3400 2395 

Clectrowsft Ml 2650 

Georg Fischer 755 745 

Jacob Swchard 6300 6200 

Jrimoll 1960 1970 

Landis Gvr 1695 1670 

N«JO _ 6600 6435 

OerflttwB 1495 1490 

Roche Baby 8100 8625 

Sandaz 8150 7850 

Schindler 3S00 3650 

Sulzor 350 347 

SBC 318 367 

Swissair 1170 1165 

Swiss VotkaCanfc 1490 1490 

Union Bank 3*70 3650 

Winterthur 4250 4250 

Zurich Ini 20550 20550 

SBC ladax : GUI 
Previous :OU« 

N -Q-^nat quoted: NA: not 
flvalloblej xd: eiKiividend. 


MBn 


nig tim 

SS Si 

SB SB 

2S IS 
39* m 

su 494 
368 333 

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*0 290 , 


Banco Comm 
Centralo 
Cieatialets 
Creditol 
Farm Holla 
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IFI 

Itricementt 

MadWbonca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirera 

has 

Rlnascante 


18000 I USB 
3140 33ta 
7840 7955 
2135 22 Q 
nno 11940 . 
2790 2889 
53 53 

39105 4Q32Q 
7605 7853 

81550 MIS 
B5M0 86400 
1470 1540 
*760 6030 

2172 2238 
*7148 *6950 
644 «S 
SMO 2071 
2784 39W 


EC to Raise Dudes on Canada Produce 

The Associated Press 

■ Con^nuinity will raise duties on a range 

£ terfSF for 0,2131118X1 “Port curtS 

its twef ana veaL the European Commission said Monday. 

The increases will take effect in 30 days unless the dispute is resolved, 

_EC and Canadian officials failed last week to agree ah the quantities of 
• 5 fenn "'•S ® 0 ex P ort Canada. Canada set beef inuxxt quotas at 
66 ’ 5( * y«r, but gave the EC just 2,700 tons, down from 23,000 

tons m 1 t 84 . 


2400 Ack lands 
WOTAflrien E 
1300 Aora Ind A 
10620 Alt Energy 
«0AtlaNat 
*0 Algo Cent , 
7*10 AHXHna St 

54S^ WAt 

ijsgissrr 

5900 BP Cfnxla 
^SBartkBC^ 
33866 Bank N 5 
33750 Barrick o 
31103 Bonanza R 
9960 Brolorne 
lODBramalao 

^JoBC^Snr 

MSOBrunswk 
■ M OOBuddCon 
22975 CAE 

«2 CCLA 
fWCDIrtftBI 
28796 Cod Frv 
14000 C Nor west 
3*00 C PacJcrs 
6M0 Can Trust 
900 C Tung 
12 CGE 
S!8S Sincere 
■°«0OCdn Nai Res 
72838 CTIre At 

642scuina 

.1450 Cora 

3ira2Celon«e 

25 CHUM 
KOOCDtsib B I 
3W0CTLBonk 
2jS00CosoJca R 
5075 CtQmix 
flWJCzar Kn 
2SK14 Doan Dev 
,.*500*1 A 
’WSODeriSonA 

W950 Denison B t 

35*0 Devri can 

5 SS5fet m ' n Af 

*5SDIcknsn B 
^ODomnnA 

*g Dvlex A 
2*75 Eletham X 
390 Emco 
32 a faulty Svr 
1JWFCA Inti 
^OCPalconC 
Flaibrdge 

,SgP«d ind A 

6400 Fed Plan 

rogOFCltvFh. 
JWSFruehauf 
WMGendtaA 
Geoe Comp 
'®97 Geocrude 
, ‘22 Gibraltar 
i^OOGaidcarp f 
5600 Grandma 
SOOGranduc 
MOOGLFarest 

auras* 

™ w 

M Haves D 
193H BavCo 
30501 Imosco 
27D0indal 
700 1 nulls 

intend 

IJMginttThwn 
2ZD2 Inter Pipe 
900 IvtriO B 

34500 Jannock 
uoOKamAafio 
2W0Kebay h 
100 Kerr Add 
25307 Labor! 

17060 Lae Marts 

WOlLOMCem 

67W Loeona 

lOOLLLac 


HIM Low Close Chae 
916U 1634 l*fc+iS 
Sim nw 13 
S«J 6 *k 6 te+te 
S198b I9M 19% — M 

03 31JS 22 +1 
*21 2 OH 2 mb- L 

S244fe 2«s 246k 

’J ? 1 IBVS+i* 
|«k 4H 44k— M 
5BJ6 8J4 8 % ™ 

OTJk 27JU 2714 + VC. 
S57k 5%. 57k 

13Vk 13V*— Vk 
137 135 135 —2 

Jin 405 405 

S5V. 51% 514+1% 

*171% 17«, 171% 

Sll'b 11 1114+1% 

5101% 10 U. 1011 - 1 % 
259 250 255 +5 

333V, 72V. SV%+ Vi 
S15£ ISJfc ISte-Vi 
5234% 2356 23V, 

16% 16% 

827 26* 27U+ V, 

. 1 ^* 6 'A— * 
S 15 W 15Vi 1SV%+ M 
3 % 235%+ Vk 
*29* 29 29 

*33 32* 33 . .. 

*15 1436 15+1% 

*«£ Sfi SSS-aK 

SS 27 27 —1 

*W4 81% + ii, 

*17 1646 1646— 1% 

SI2J* llte I2t% 

17V. «,% 7V> + 4, 

«2lb 421% 42V%+246 
S 6 U 1 616 6 U— 1 % 

S 1 IV% liu. nVk_S 
275 271 271 —1 

*18 1746 18 + %, 

IS IS «° +4 

375 350 365 +15 
fOO 400 400 +20 
Site 13ft 132% — % 
S13JJ im 13—5% 
*9VS 94fc 9» 

**«• 4* 51% +22 

^ , j S + U, 

M -‘I 250 +5 
2844 294fc+4fc 
17te 17% 

540 39 3Mfc+ 16 

>8£ £ &** 
*3 61% 7 

S?l¥ sub am 

*174. I7»k 1736 + v* 
WJlft 9446+ 1 
I* VS 308 +25 
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*14 nvi 1316 + vt 

S fc JPJF +yi 

wj 9Vj 50%— 6 % 

^ fiT 6f 6+v% 

« « 41 

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*34% 34J6 J4%-V% 
,gM TVt 7Vi 
1» l» 130 + } 
«■. 211% 22 +u 

§§?g?s 

S17 17 .. T «, 

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§ 2 $ 

“te 38K 3a»% 

*17 17 17 16 

SS- 24» 2SV* + 4% 

*?m 

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***> 28*H 383% + 3% 


15113 LeMow Co 
1800MOSHA 
30SMICC 
42519 MdanHX 
41792 Martand E 
7724 MolSon A f 
600 Murphy 
4300 Nabisco L 
59482 Noranda 
, 41087 Norcm 
1OTS2 Nvu AHA I 
1 23194 NowseuW- 
36841 NuWstsoA 
Aoooakwaod 
3 23 00 oshawa At 
4900 Pamour 
TOOPonCanP 
2W Pembina 
500 PhonlxOII 

7500 Provfpo 
i40ia Qua Stura 0 
100 Ram Pel 
1975 goyrock f 
20300 RwSpath 
412300 RdShmfts A 
480RrichhaU 
19102 Res sere t 
WRovn p rpA 

250 Rothman 
3*30 Sceptr* 

77D0 Scott! I 
37te Sears Can 
24143 Shall Can 
1D012 Sherrltt 
JS 5 Mama 

4800 Slater B f 

9575Sau!tun 
□oesf Brodcst 
5U375fe<COA 
4909 Sul Ptra 
2410 Sleep R 
3765? Sydney a 
900 Tara 
isxmi Tack Car A 
48126 Teen B I 
WOTriedvne 
20378 Tex Can 
19589 Thom N A 
90094 Tor Dm Bk 
29400 Tonrtor Bt 
MBA Traders A I 
_27DO Trinity Res 
31932 TmAlta UA 
27451 TrCan PL 
8870 Trlmac 
SWTrtacAl 
26300 Turbo I 
6750 Unlcorp At 
301000 UnCarbid 
53407 U Emprise 
82S8U Kenc 
2I00U Stscoe 
2500 Van Dvr 
9605 varatiAt 
*00 Vesta ran 
MWektwad 
364W#*tlorto 
3225 Wesltiiln 
ii05Mtetton 
SXUWoadwdA 
500 Yk8 


sin in 
*20 20 ■ » -V 

230 Z81 230.4 ^ . 

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435 420 

S1C46 16 gS 
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sn 64k g - 

*2246 72 H j . 
59 55 JO*.- ‘ 

ssv% .» 6. 
S25 Mt *3 - 
470 440 

*281% 28 28 V 

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174% 74fc J** 
*2714 77 27. 

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sin m% in ■ 

160 3* US - s 

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258 255 255 

315 305 - JW .4 

26 23 26. . 

1194% 1956 W* 

SIS 115% D . 

sn - irn « . , 
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fipu i« IVn * , 

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‘"14 



Total HIM I2J94J02 shares 


11 


131% — U 
17+5% 


tss 3io index: 


Close 

242540 


Pre 

IS 






‘ 5<e ... 

ta 


*** ». 


"V* MT 




30434 Bank Mont 
15000 Can Bath 

8720 DomTrtA 

HOMBlTm 
77111 MofBkQto 
40070 Power Cora 
3310 ReuandA , 

22064 Royal Bank 
1 M2 RayTrstM - — 

Total Sales 2.I73J82 shares. 


Hteh LwrCtat C 

swj Mg HI? ; 

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31S H ’ i 

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Indostrioit Index: 


dost 

I17J3 


PH 





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MU ^ ' 

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* • _ • 












►KS^S* — — — 2 

chamrev* T : 

m Bc:i Jnd tui ' n 4 v wy r . 

53 ^ 5 ^uIi , 3 §BtMeW^ , * Complicated Contracts: 
^S^^ing-Size Beds and Other Bonuses 

tiv villas n ru,^ h ’ nkl n|iK>5 07 . 


INTERN ATlQjN AL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


v r, * ™ ■ 




By Murray Chass 

New York Tbnex Sorter 


sign ing bonus. Kingman, who was could earn 525,000 if he were 
a _ free agmt , can pick up an addi- to lead Cobs* pitchers in ganu« 


•w -• even . HC r k^sUtthtly more than half a season ltut “ ; 

■*«“* •« *»nc, •iSflnS? teOtogP oL « SSSSSSMnnffi!! 

Misucaicd h% ii,,..; 1 Prepared to give him just about f ** 6 wXkh $2,000 to e 

pHansuiid Valcmu, inything he wanted to keep him 5?SSS c ^ {n ? nthc ^ 01 } ! 

ekeadrere SI free 

*"»* ‘uu^-V i'r^ iam HirS^^QjbSR^-ehimS? million for ^. Fof a Kk ? mi 


pea r anc e from the 501st through his king-size bed. 


mat will guarantee 
nual average of SI i 


■s anan- 
or more. 


M '** Ahd u i Ki . ni ;' '■nu^'ear and they said they wouU pay who could lose *«* players, and if the SLS mif 

luIcuo!, his plans , n ~ ““S 1 * roo P op . t f e ^ atL his in Cleveland to hon 3saaal ^ d contract 

ttpumns ,.f amurn.it., Inrf fifcSMoiwm* lave become some- ^ Snyder, a rookie, has <4*™* enough, te could pdc op as 
raise lnipen.il fuuu J u l ^h/dat commonplace u contracts thai would nav him 575 QQQ each if ranch as 5900,000 a year m award 
"«^h.X., tvumS V * b^ses: 5200,000 £Se Robtids 

Bea journo io AmuiI^'NS^ Notmg SutcKfes 6- if he rmichM fin*, second or rdief awaid - SI50 - 0C ® ^ *c Cy 

SjuinX wr , i ,,, l . | S il( thirds the leagne’s roost valuable Yonng award. 5150,000 each for 

mvnial. What has y nv ,, lcn ^greed to have tot angl e room player Bracc Be^ tf the ^“8 ^ most valuable player m 
detail, the depth of "* a New York Met* would earn ^ Sf 

to cream persuasix L n i i "*^5 Th« provision in Smchffe’s con- $10,000 for making the All-Star WorM Sene ^ 550,000 for the AB- 
itv toward the work ^ **“ xnorB unnsoal ^ and $moOO if he finished Star team and 550,000 for making a 

about. ,,na People f.^nses m contractstbat have been among the top five pitchers in the postseason all-star team. 

“The tincli.inirc.vs" i,....,. igned since the end o f last season. CjrYouug Award voting. Rollie Fingers, another rdief 

Wtingsubicav esnL'i,ii..^v , *“** unusual cl aus es m- Many Bystrom of the New York pitcher, isnl among the new mil- 

cinaturo with jll - Ulc , bonus payments for awards Yankees has a S25.000 bonus pro- W-doBar obyersThm he will ran 

with other ippk:.v jh.-'u "^kiidu hat lhe P^ 15 have hole chance vision for winning the Cy Young them belatedly if his bade, winch 
Jesuits; the peril, m. wnmuig. Award. Mark Davis of San Fran- was operated on last year, permits 

rope; trade and Lulmr'^i Iwriof h Th«e are some other types, dsco and Lary Sorensen of the him to have a full season. If Fin- 
Occiijem and the r, lc ' ch a%i B aoari , ,sudiasiheprowsionnnder Cubs each have a S50XJ00 Cy gets, 38 years old, appears in 60 
including the nnnv ■ T”* ^ - fhich the Oakland A’s will g^ve Young bonus. Davis would also games, which he has done nine 
and execution -in i r » nc mei Wc nKe Bodue a car to use dnnng recave 510,000 for being named times in his career, he would add 
of bow \Miihi , ' r i ul-'5^iniApringtrammg and the season. The the comeback player of the year, 5950,000 to his 5250,000 salary, 
because ifu- iinj ' . " e - ,fi 0 r 0 ldtj,i’s will also give Dave Kin gm a n , but where has he ever been? Once he has pitched in 20 games, 

nmnienrv '!i rc * ,f hu|Jjieir desi gn a t ed hitter; 5750 a Sorensen, who was released by be earns 520,000 a game for each 

^itiv-ufTnP R,?,!" a n " an ' daVionth for Bving expenses during Oakland last fall, not only could one through the 60th. He also has 

d„. ,, ae season, andma^s on top o£ the win $10,000 for being the come- clauses calling for as much as 

fiends is j ct4ab®87^00 he will earn in salary and back player of the year, but he also 5300,000 in award bonuses. 

roB^andCiilin'vH.sppliv {jjjj • • 

t^&SSMcHale Paces Celtics With 56 Points 

rewritten for the modem 

market. ul!I1 ^^O^^byOurSl^FromDtipa^ 



' > v a 

v ** 


Yankees has a $25,000 bonus pro- licm-doBar players, but he vriH ran 
vision for winning the Cy Young them bdatedly if his bade, which 
Award. Mark Davis of San Fran- was operated on last year, permits 
dsco and Lary Sorensen of the him to have a foil season. If Fin- 
Cubs each have a S50.000 Cy gets, 38 years old, appears in 60 
Young boons. Davis would also games, which he has done nine 

_ - “ ail/l MAA + m _■ _ _ « »_ ■ ■ _ _ _ «> « • 




Spaniard Wins Race 
In Giant Slalom 


OR* AT WAR t 


« « f* -- '■ : 


KB Shoemakgr astride Lord At War after winning the Santa Anita Handicap hi CaBfonua. 


Sff £ Shoemaker Passes $ 1 OO-MBion Mark 

The Auoautd Prat in, but I reaDv like this little horse, ing a length back of Greiman. 

« iSl ARCADIA, California - BID “I had won four straight stakes The time was 2:00 3-5 m the nee 
Jil J? 12 ™ " ajoemaker surpassed $100 million aboard him and I decided not to run before the largest crowd ever at 


The Associated Press 

ARCADIA, California 


e „ . nnu/iuirt, Lamoraia — mu i u«i wviuuui sujijul iuulq iuc unc »» „w w m uk nia 

rri°Kr^f, “ Sjoemaker surpassed $100 rmllion aboard him and I decided not to run before the largest crowd ever at 
»juu,uuu m swam oonuses. in career winnings Sunday when he desert him when the going goi a track in California. 

• ~ 1 ■ — ■ - guided Lord At War to a 1 ^length tough.” It was the 11th time Shoemaker 

victory in the Santa Anita Hanoi- McCarron wasn’t exactly angry had ridden the w inner of the Santa 


victory in the Santa Anita Handi- McCarron wa 
cap Sunday. tot Shoemaker 1 

Shoemaker had been given his choice of horses, 
choice of riding Lord At War or “To see him gc 


tot Shoemaker had made the right Anita Handicap, the previous vic- 
cboice of horses. lory having beat on John Henry in 


BOSTON — Kevin McHale, 
ip known as one of the leading 


r„,„ , * ..... eg known as one or tne leading 

a w . „ ‘ h ■ fl ' ,:ur wic jattxfii players in. the Natioml Bas- 
^ She w.i* lor r^i^tbaflAssodaiicm. has adjusted to 



iSS 


ngsuie allack- 
QO aiiaupt in 

l, wopning U 
1 Would 1 ij\c 
B 3 square, al- 
Wk»Til h\- 15 
, BN4; 14 !*- 
*N5. he Liter j 
15:. B-g:. 

17 RsB. w: ! 

litted A SOURi'* ! 

surd) Whit. * 

Xftartty hvu 


s new role as a starter. 

^Most of his five seasons with the 
>5100 Critics, McHale has been 

NBA FOCUS 

i unmg off to bench and igniting 
'e offense. But vton Cedric Max- 
dl injured bis knee two weds 
•o. McHale became a Critics 
arter. 

And in his sixth p™ as the 
placement for Maxwell at far- 
Jard, 6-foot- 10 (2.08-meter) 
*IcHale broke Boston's single- 


choice of riding Lord At War or “To see him get his SI 00-million 1982. It also was to fourth time 

McHale s performance put Mm Grain ton, who finished second un- milestone in the ‘Big 'Cap.* that he’d combined with trainer Charlie 
ahead of stzch legendary Celtics as der Chris McCarron. was kind of thrilling.** McCarron Whittingbam to win to Santa 

Bob Coosy, John Havlicek and Bill Shoemaker, 53, went into the day said. Anita Handicap. 

RusselL ’ needing $82377 to top to $100- Gate Dancer, the 3-2 wagering Shoemaker finished the dav with 

Tm basically a role player” nriffion plateau. He won an earlier favorite, was third in to ltt-mile 5100,208,023 in career w innings 
McHale said after the game. “I sup- race on to card Sunday, ton easi- race for 4-year-okls and up, finish- with 8,446 victories, 
pose it will gmk in tonight that for ty went over the mark by capturing 

JESS ^ r “ “p “ fc Milestones in Shoemaker’s Career 


a-JV ■ 2 ^“® **“ V?SS® a 138-129 tom into rebound baskets. 

.ctory over the Detroit Pistons. Elsewhere in the NBA, it was- 

McHale, making 22 of 28 tots New Jersey 117, Chicago 113; 


prMsfcmoiurS. P® to fi dd ana 12 of 13 free- Houston 99, Philadelphia 90; Kan- 


‘ row attempts, scored 56 points to sasC 

u »kc<i ... N lli ,r. - .• B .eak Lany Bird’s record of 53. He pas 
i). J.' U '*> “ 1« idxnmdv 10 m ihe E 

J rMN. K-t< Swr,i.:U 

broke up llic & LhNjAe. A ■TL'ZmT 1 

n harrier flic h\ BLdn: SCOREBOARD 

point W.l r - .n (i j 

)M have bent tv.’. K-lH mkt 
7 O-RSrh. K sirnv; .4 51 M? 


“The only time I ever scored that 
many points before was in a pickup 
game when I was 12. And ton we 
played almost five hours." 

McHale had 22 points in to first 
quarter, just one off the dub mark. 
He stole the limelight from Bird, 
who had a normal days — 30 
points. 15 rebounds and 10 assists. 
. In Iris three previous games as a 

Kevin McHale starter, McHale scored a total of 46 

points. In his six games as a starter, 
fenstve board, turning nine of he is now averaging 25.8, while 
em into rebound baskets. playing 38 minutes per game: He 

Elsewhere in the NBA, it was- was averaging 17.3 coining off the 
EW Jersey 117, Chicago 113; bench anrT playing 3ft Tniiintes 
Duston 99, Philadelphia 90; Kan- With Philadelphia lorinfr to 




Santa Anita Handicap. 

fjhnemalcer appeared not to be United Press Iniemaiioaol 

particularly impressed that he’d hit LOS ANGELES — Milestones in to career of Bill Shoemaker, to 

another riding milestone. first jockey to surpass 5100 million in career earnings: 

“Ten years from now, someone ■ March 19, 1949 — Makes riding debut aboard Waxahadriein to third 
will come along and hit S200 mil- race at Golden Gate; finishes fifth. 

Brat," he said after Iris victory. “But April 20th, 1949 — Saxes first victory, riding Staffer V at Golden 

obviously, it’s nice to be to first to Gate. 

do anything.” Oct. 26, 1949 — Records first stakes triumph, aboard AI in the George 

The victory was especially grad- Marshall Harming Handicap at Bay Meadows, 
tying to Sho e m a k e r because it Feb. 3, 1951 — Wins a 5100,000 race for to first time, riding Great 
came aboard Lord At War. “This Circle in to Santa Anita Maturity (now known as the Charles H. Strub 
little horse is great,” Shoemaker- Stakes) at Santa Anita. 

said. “1 love him. He’s one of my May 7, 1955 — Wins Kentucky Derby aboard Swaps for the first of hu 

favorite hones ever. To win this three Derby triumphs. 

race at my age and with a horse like SepL 7, 1970 — Passes John Longden in most career victories, winnin g 


The Associated Pros 

VAIL, Colorado — Blanca Fer- 
nandez-Ochoa, Spam's one- woman 
team, shrugged off a knee injury to 
win her first World Cup victory 
with two near-perfect giant slalom 
runs Sunday on Vail Mountain. 

Fernanda'- Ochoa, whose best 
previous finish in five seasons of 
World Cup racing was third, was 
docked in 1 minute, 1134 seconds 
on her fust run. giving her a lead of 
37-hundredths of a second over 
Switzerland’s Vrcni Schneider, 
with Swiss racer Maria Walliser an- 
other nine-hundredths back. 

In to second run, Fernand ez- 
Ochoa again set the pace with 
1:14.54, lor a combined time of 
2:26.88. Walliser. second-fastest in 
the second run. took the silver med- 
al at 2:27.49. Schneider and team- 
male Zoe Haas shared the bronze 
with times of 2:28.12. West Germa- 
ny’s Traudl Haecber was fifth in 
2:28.57. and Austria's Elisabeth 
Kirchkr sixth in 2:28.71 

“Between runs I just thought 
about attacking on to second 
run,” said Femandez-Ochoa, 21. 
“If you don’t attack, you won't win. 
1 skied to win. 

“In to first run. I bad a little 
trouble in making smooth turns, 
but in the second run I felt better. 

“This win will do my head good. 
I've been looking for this for two 
years. Now I feel confident that if ! 
did it today. 1 can do it again." 

Femandez-Ochoa, who was op- 
erated on last spring, said she may 
have to undergo surgery rat her left 
knee when the season ends. “The 
ligament isn’t right. My knee 
doesn't give me many problems, 
but once in a while it acts up." 

Femandez-Odxu is to sister of 
to 1972 Olympic slalom gold med- 
alist, Francisco Femandez-Ochoa. 

"My brother has been a strong 
inf] mice on me,” she said. “He has 
helped me train and encouraged 
me." 

Walliser "s r unn er-up finish came 
on to heels of her third-place re- 
sult in Saturday's downhill. “This 
was really a good week for me, and 
I’m looking forward to good results 
to rest of to season now," she 
said. “Mv first run today was not 
perfect, but my second run was 
pretty nice.” 

Michda Figini of Switzerland, 
who leads the World Cup overall 




Blanca Femandez-Ochoa 

downhill and mam slalom stand- 
ings. finished flih and didn't add 
to her point totaL 
The women's World Cup compe- 
tition now beads to Sunshine. Al- 
berta, for two downhills and a su- 
per giant slalom beginning Friday. 

The men's tour, after competi- 
tion in F ura no, Japan, win descend 
on Aspen, Colorado, for downhill 
and giant slalom races beginning 
Saturday. 


race at my age and with a horse like 
this, well, it’s just great." 

‘'There were a lot of things in- 


126, to Los Angeles Chp- Celtics increased their lead m to ~v<rived," Shoemake r said of his -Anita. 


SepL 7. 1970 — Passes John Longden in most career victories, winnin g 
for to 6,033th rime aboard Dared J. at Del Mar. 

. Mar. 14. 1976 — Wins his 7,000th race aboard Royal Derby II at Santa 


Goalie Injuries Plague Oilers 


and Portland 121, Utah Atlantic Divirion to one «nH a half 
games. (LAT, AP) 


choosing Lord At War. “I thought May 27. 1981 — Records his 8,000th victory, riding War Allfed at 
Greinton had to better of it going Hollywood Park. 


7 Q-RJvh. K tiitiv; 
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>e. it»wn*\pije J £“. 

reed Alton t*« « 

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V. 70 

^ IB- 1 6 
% t*t»- * 

It ■*- 


Basketball 


dected U.S. College Conference Standings 


rcH ivtMff ATLANTIC COAST 

ConlHMCiAII Gamas 
W L Pci. W L Pd 

tSn Tach 9 S AO Zl A J7» x-Tutea 

ST E ^Carolina V S AO 22 7 J» Illinois St. 

(MH a a Carolina SI. 9 5 AC 19 1 Jll Wlcbfto St 

nN Bgka ■ t S7t 21 6 779 Crriahtan 

JjS jgcYfand 7 A S3A 22 10 AU Bradley 


IHH 

Vd BfWw Forast 

SSs*»«o 


S 9 JS 14 11 JW Indiana SL 

S 9 JS7 IS 12 JSi s- Illinois 

1 » 21 14 U 5» V-W. Ttxa» St 

ATLANTIC H Drnko 


MISSOURI VALLEY 

Co af Tmca All Grsnat 
W L Pci. W L PC. 
n 4 JS0 T! 6 J7A 

It S Am 71 A J71 

II 5 ABA 15 12 .554 

9 7 Ji3 3D 11 A45 

9 7 .563 16 11 S92 

A V> 3TS \2 U Atl 

4 U ES U 13 E9 

si 4 i2 aso II IS JO 
4 12 XU 12 15 .444 


N.C. Qwrfofta I 13 J!7\ S 21 .179 
(x-eflnehad raaoMr-aanaon iHte) 

IVY LEAOUE 

Conference All Games 
WLPd W L Pet 
Pennsylvania 9 3 JSO 12 12 JD0 

Coroeli 7 5 Jn U Tl SQ 

Harvard 7 5 dm 15 7 id 

Columbia 7 S El II 13 49 

Princeton 7 5 583 II 13 ASS 

Yale A 7 At 13 H JB 

Brown 4 9 JOB ■ IB 30A 

Dartmouth 


S 5m 11 13 29 New Jersey 
5 583 11 U AS8 WaVUnoton 


7 542 13 12 520 New Yort 
9 JOB ■ IB 59 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AltaaMc OlvMaa 

W L Pet. GB 

x-Batfan <8 13 787 — 

x-PblladelpMa 44 14 J67 19s 

New Jersey 31 29 517 14V& 

wauilnatan 31 30 59 17 

New Yort 20 41 J2B 28 

Central Division 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Petrie* OMNon 

W L T Ptt GF GA 


WMblnoton 
Pnliodetphia 
N.Y. Islanders 
N.Y. Ronaers 
Ptttabursh 


3 11 514 S 21 .192 Milwaukee 



CmfenncoAit Gamas 

(x-d Inched regular-Maion title) 



s JJ 

JJJf. Vtralnto 
artTiota 

WL Pd 

W 

L 

Pet 

(y-won coin flip tor last tournament spot) 

16 

2 

JB9 

3D 

7 

Jfl 

PACIFIC COAST ATHLETIC 


15 

3 

533 

21 

5 

508 


Conference Ail Games 

cMJorapnY 

JKi Wortmrtn 

Sjjftwra 

n 

5 

322 

T7 

10 

530 


W L 

Pet. W 

. 

Pet 

9 

9 

-500 

U 

13 

519 

*-N**-Lo 5 va 

17 

1 544 2* 

3 

589 

9 

9 

500 

14 

13 

519 

Fresno St. 

IS 

3 533 20 

7 

541 

• (Kxiaehifietts 


9 

-500 

U 

14 

581 

Fuftorton SL 

11 

7 511 IS 

12 

554 

« JBonovmMr 

Jguxnnx 

7 

11 

JOT 

13 

14 

581 

Utab SL 

10 

8 5S6 17 

10 

530 

6 

12 

J33 

10 

17 

370 

Son Jos* St. 

10 

B 554 tS 

13 

554 

■n Sf. 


M 

322 

8 

18 

-308 

GaHrvtn* 

8 

10 544 13 

14 

548 

xk [stood 

2 

16 

.111 

8 

19 

394 

Cal-Sanfa Brb 

8 

10 544 12 

IS 

544 


raoulor-seaion (Hie) 
BIG EAST 


Poclflc 
N. Mexico SL 


Conference AU Games Lena Becb Si. 


5 13 JIB 9 18 -333 

4 14 322 7 20 -29 

2 14 .111 4 23 .141 


Davfon 
oePom 
Notre Dame 
Marauofie 
TnosSar Antnio 
aucooo st. 
Rodfard 
Utica 

SW Louisiana 

Brooklyn 

Booth! 

Pan American 
Stetson 


INDEPENDENTS 

W L Pet. 
18 • 592 


U 0 592 
17 I 59 
17 9 5S4 

17 IB 530 
14 IT .93 
14 11 591 
M 12 59 

14 13 59 

15 13 534 
13 IS AM 
12 14 542 
12 M 529 
12 15 AU 


;L John's 15 1 538 25 2 At 

ia 13 2 5S7 34 2 ,9» 

tl! -acme 9 ' 4 500 20 4 J49 

>*K -.kwo 9 7 543 IB 9 547 Southern Cal 

; iJsburnh B I 59 17 10 530 Oregon St 

l'ii -1 ^toa CoU. 7 9 59 IS 9 547 wa s h lnoto w 

»:•*" .nectlcnt 4 10 J25 13 14 581 Arizona 

L- fwUence 3 13 .19 10 19 J<5 UCLA 

twi Hall 1 15 JU3 10 17 570 Oreoan 

V' .punched reeutoneemon title) Arizona St. 

% » BIO EIGHT St 

ff ' Conference Atl Games 5 *' 

WLPd. W L PcL Stanlort 

V ;uoboma 13 I 529 34 5 59 3 

Ki-'Oas 11 3 J94 34 A 59 

O SI. 7 7 59 19 11 533 , . , „ 

vri 'isaarl 7 7 59 IB 11 521 Loutotana St. 

W "Yodo S 9 557 II 14 507 

. 1’ao.St 5 9 557 14 13 519 

fr--,nnka S 9 557 15 12 556 

*lf~ t*omo St 3 11 514 12 15 544 SSS— .. 

raioched resukr-season tlffel st 

l|rv BIO SKY 

?!■ - Conference All Games uMssloal 

t ' ■■ W L PCL W L Pd. CESS 

t' ■ -5vadD.ftano 11 3 7B6 IB 9 587 

v"- : ntona 10 4 .714 33 4 584 

•ft ;Nr SL 9 S 543 20 B 714 

t -_ Vtzm 8 4 571 16 11 593 

4 :'- ;.«ono St. 7 7 59 11 16 507 *-TnrCJtotfO 

i|' ‘8 SI. 5 9 557 15 12 JM *BrMl 

Jlhj'taa. i 9 JU7 n 17 533 

'.M 1 13 571 8 21 276 W- Conritna 

■ ftKtwtf fimlePseasan tffle) VMI 

v ■» ten APoatortlri St 

\ Conference All Games Davklson 

r W L Pet W L PcL Furman 

Si; i •etopon 14 2 J7S 23 3 589 f- Tf 1 ! *■ 

10 « 52S 22 B 7B (*-rf!tKtWd ret 

tit-1**. W I4S1I 8 591 

\*; j® 9 6 59 20 8 JU 

C’.-Woaa SL 9 7 543 11 8 592 

9 7 563 IS B 592 x-T4xSE TWl 
J-;. rona 7 B 547 IS 10 59 Sol Methodist 

& '-'Nsoto 4 10 J7S 13 13 59 Texas ASJIA 

{ -S n,ln 4 13 235 D 14 JOR Arkcmns 

i ■ l.frw act H a w .na 6 21 222 Texas Oirtsrtn 

ji * ii-^Nhed ngalar-Hasn title) Howlon 

l- METRO ATHLETIC Texas 

X i Conference AU Games Baylor 

< ■ w L Pd. w L PcL 

■r* L *nWUi St 13 1 529 34 3-589 Ix-dlnehed no 

Tech 18 4 JU 20 7 J4\ SOUTH! 

y Ji l**™ S 4 571 15 U 554 

;P*WW 4 ■ 529 15 12 554 

sV*? 4 B 529 15 12 550 x^AIcani ». 

l!i '^" hr 4 I 529 15 15 59 Southern U. 

‘l. - 4 10 29 12 15 JU Alabama SL 

J*- 1 11 JU 7 20 259 Mbs. voilv Sf. 

Hnoiod nwtaMieHn ttttel Texas Sauffirn 

MID-AMCUCAH Jackson SL 


L PcL Ix-d Inched r so uinr -season title) 




J .ujli 


i; ■- 
. X ; 

11 »7 T 

• 11 . « . 
* lCs - *• 
• ' 

i. •}■-, t • . 


l, l-i- * • ; 

*■ T31» * -v • 

i*i* t :* I 

IB. n * ;. ■ 


■n KCi S ! 

Mi.. n J 
“ t>i *• - 1 i 

^ 18 * f 
IM w * t 

J4. .1- ; 

- 4« ; 

t* «3-e-' ■ 

* ■*- ''I 


Dk • 11 ! 
1*4 •» I 
t8 ; - ■ 


Hi* r 


±i.‘ - acuss 
;.Wiova 
h;; ^tourah 
is - 1 =hton CoU. 
>ecticot 
;<vtde«ce 
tsn Hall 

jr .^Inched rgg 

s*. 

C; •- 

;Uobama 

B4.?» 

V >. » SI. 

>rado 

,5i i’**» St 
fT.' ;easka 
f'^tshanw SL 
t Jlached rea 

t* « 

»t : 

^ . 

C' - : 5*od»Rano 
l'* ;nteio 
«■:; ;Hr SL 
t -_ VIzm 
4 :'- ;.«ono St. 

‘N SI. 


fi 1 -tetoeon 

vS; -ut 

P-L 1 *. 

,V ■ jo 

tV’.'Woan SL 

>'dae 
1 JlSSOto 

f*n*» 

i.ftewstern 


-,■» ,'Oinahii st 
e>:.. Tech 
V\ idnnat; 
;pn»Bna 

Sv«!* 

I - <*** 

»- 

’VfiS-L 


PAC1PIC M 

Conference All Games 
W L Pet W L PCL 
12 4 750 IB 7 J20 

11 5 59 21 T 7S0 

11 5 5M 20 8 JU 

11 6 547 20 9 590 

10 « 525 14 12 53B 

0 B 59 15 14 517 


College Top-20 Results 

How Uw toa 9 teams In The Associated 
Press aad United Press tefsreotfoaal pods 
fared tor ihe week eadtaw March 3: 

st John* 05-21 last to Georgetown BS49; 
deL Pr o vidence IMS 


Milwaukee 41 19 583 — 

DatroM 33 27 550 I 

CNeooo 27 32 59 13Vd 

Atlanta 25 30 517 14 

Cleveland 23 37 JS] 18 

Indtana II 4 38 SIM 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
M to a f Dlvisiao 

Deiwor 40 21 554 - 

Houeton 14 24 59 3V» 

Dallas . 32 2B 533 TVs 

Son Antonio 30 31 592 10 

Utah 28 33. 559 12 

Kansas CKy 20 48 J3J 19V» 

PatSffle Dlvtstaa 

LA. Laksrs 43 18 JOS — 

Phoenix 29 32 575 14 

Portland 23 33 5» 15 

Seotfle 24 34 531 14kt 

LA. Cltaoers 22 39 J41 21 

Coideff Stole 14 44 747 241k 

(x-cU netted ntovoff berth) 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 


I ■ ™ ,s re ji7 n .I,, enjn rimf » r/ifin-t: ft-UTT- rimt McHale 22-28 12-13 54. Bird 10*23 9-10 9/ - — — — — r — — 

7 10 512 12 15 544 Tbentaa 11-25 11-11 31 Lataibeer 8-15 55 21. UvU*-l0-ll-l-ais Horttoid Con Caprice) 10- 

. .. .. ,, ... ...... ■■tMimite- nitmH «n n ni — — 1 — 13-20-0—43. 


Montreal 

Buffalo 


3B 17 9 9 243 191 PMsbureb 

37 19 7 81 2C 191 N.Y. Reapers 

33 27 4 TO 284 249 Sondstnom (23). Rooers 2 (241, Lorouche 

21 a • 51 239 24* 121). Ftorek UL Moloney (9), Ledvord (41; 

21 34 5 47 221 293 Lamtoux (31L Lomouroux (5). Bultanl 124). 

19 34 B 44 212 2U Shots on goal: Pittsburgh ton Vonbtov 

ibu Dtolston brouck) U4-12— 30; N.Y. Rangers Ian Hot. 

32 22 to 74 244 213 rent 16-15-14—4*. 


Kerr (9), Poulin (19). Shots to goal: Ptilladef- 
«Ma Ion RestW 1V4-TO-27; New Jersey (an 
Lindbergh) 9-11-9-29. 

Pittsburgh g 3 1—3 


United Press Iniemauaoal 

EDMONTON. Alberta — The 
defending Stanley Cup champion 
Edmonton Oilers are in a predica- 
ment tot even the Great Gretzky 
can’t get them out of. 

The Oilers have lost three 
straight at home, which hasn't hap- 
pened since March 1980. But more 

NHL FOCUS 

crucial is to loss of their top two 
goaltenders to injury. 

Grant Fuhr is sidelined with a 
separated shoulder and Andy 
Moog is out with strained knee lig- 
aments, so to Oilers were forced to 


30 21 12 72 227 112 

32 24 8 72 244 230 

28 24 8 44 229 215 

S 21 3S 7 49 217 77X 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Divtatoa 


72 227 112 Las Aogotos 
72 244 230 cah-jrr 


SL LOUIS 

30 

22 

11 

71 

239 

229 

OBooao 

31 

X 

5 

47 

257 

250 

Detroit 

20 

34 

n 

51 

245 

289 

MJnrwctn 

19 

35 

u 

49 

219 

242 

Toronto 

17 40 7 

Stnvtoe Dtvirton 

41 

204 

274 

e-Edmonton 

43 

15 

7 

93 

32S 

224 

Cotoory 

33 

25 

7 

73 

294 

252 

Winnipeg 

33 

24 

7 

73 

290 

288 

Lot Angeles 

29 

25 

11 

49 

282 

271 

Vancouver 19 3| 

(x-cM netted ptoyeff soar) 

B 

44 

225 

334 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Vokcouw 12 3 1—7 

HBrt ta wa 1220-4 

MeNob CULTonH (29). Holwgrd (4), Klrton 
(12).5undstran (21LSmvl (22), Lasiktor Cl); 
Turoeao 3 (24). Robortsan (SLSIltanwi (111. 
Foirara CD. shots o* goal: Vancouver (on 


LOS Aogotos 6 4 4-4 

Cotrjnr 4 1 2-7 

RlMbrough Oh Rginhort (2l).Macoun IB). 
Hu.rtcr (9), Psolloskl (14), Loah (27). Otto 111. 
Shots on goal: Los Angolas (on Lsmalln) 4-12- 
11—29; Caloorr (on Janacvk. Eliot) 1S-14-T— 
34. 

Wtontpsg 1 2 3-4 

Ednas ton ■ s 3—3 

Nil! 2 (4). Havwrchuk (48). Turnbull (30). 
wttoon (71. StoeLoan (32): Grstzkv (43). 
Mssutr (15), Cottov (24). Shots oa goof: Win. 
ntoao (on Rsaaoti) 13-11-13-34; Edmonton 
(on Havwordl 6*7 19. 

SL Louis 1 1 M 

Chicago 1 2 2—5 

OiCZVk (14L Lvslak (14). Lanmr (37), 
OTtoUahon l*J. Sscord (12); Postowskl 119). 
Muiton (W). Shots on goto: St. Louis (an Ban- 
mrmanl 44-7—23: Chicago (on Milled] 0-11- 
4—25. 


World Cup Ski in? 


National Hockey League start, as 
Jim NiQ connected on Winnipeg’s 
first two goals and Dale Hawer- 
chuk notched his 40th of to season 
to lift to Jets to a 6-3 victory. 

It was to Oilers’ first home loss 
to Winnipeg since October 14, 
1981. and was their first four-game 


winless streak at home since Dec. I, 
1981 ■ 

In other NHL games, it was Van- 
couver 7, Hartford 6; New Jersey 5, 
Philadelphia 2; New York Island- 
ers 3, Buffalo 2; Calgary 7, Los 
Angeles 0; Chicago 5, St Louis 2, 
and New York Rangers 7, Pitts- 
burgh 3. 

Barry Long, the Jets* coach, rec- 
ognized the difference in the Oilers 
with Moog and Fuhr out 

“It wasn’t to Oilers at their best 
but we are desperate for prams,** he 
said. “We’D take any two points we 
can get We’re in a dogfight far 
second place, so we can’t worry 
about Edmonton’s problems." 

Winnipeg is tied for second place 
with Calgary in the Snwihe Divi- 
sion. 20 points behind Edmonton, 
which has already clinched a play- 
off berth. 

Perry Turnbull, Ron Wilson and 
Paul Mac Lean also scored for to 
Jets. Wayne Gretzky netted his 63d 
and Mait Messier and Paul Coffey 
also converted for to Oilers. 


4 12 JSO 12 14 562 Michigan (23-3) dof. Wisconsin 88-66; ifcf. 

4 12 550 12 14 543 Nort b u nsfm 83-66. 


3 12 .118 11 15 523 
SOUTHEASTERN 

Coo l arance AH Gamas 


Louisiana St. 

Georgia 

Kentucky 

Alabama 
Florida 
Mississippi SL 
Auburn 

Mississippi 

Vanderbilt 


VMI 

AMNIiMfllfl SL 


5 J22 19 
4 547 20 


MeawMs SL (2*-3> drf. Souttwm Mississip- 
pi 78-53; tost to Detroit 71-46; dsLLoutsvUta 66- 
59. 

Duke ( 21 - 6 ) doLClKRSon WJ3; tattle Norm 


Robooods: DstroN 49 (Lalmboor *>; Boston *A 

a (McHoto 14). Ambtv. Dotrott 24 (Thomas •*■*■ iNsoaira 6 2 V-4 v un Vg». CotoaOo) 

11 ); Boston 31 (Bird 10 ). ^SStoygidM. Q Outw ( 111 - I. itara F«n«nd»Ort 0 to SPOhfc a o 

Now Jsrsoy 34 24 24 29—117 N utofc 2458 wcnnds. 

Chicago 35 24 32 32-113 ^ ioJsSm? ' 2- Mario wwnbor. SwdlTlond. KOM. 

Birdsong 1523 3-2 30. RJcbordson 13-19 M 12^3-23. Buffalo Ion smith] X Vrwl! scbnrttor. Swlfrorlow. 2:2B.n 

28: Jordan 13-21 11-12 37. HtoaCrtdoo 10-21 9-10 — L. - T . - . . _ (tlol Zoo Haas. Swltiortato. SOUX 

29. Rohognds: Now Jerssy 41 (WlHlains 101; , ‘ rj S. Troudl Haoctwr, WHI Gwmany. 2:8 

Oitoaoo 41 (Jordan 141. Assists: MwJsriwy _ 4. EBsobrih Klrehtor. Austria 2:2172 

u I BimirK— in - luuu. m AflorM 2 (71, HlBOlns (Ul. MOOUfltr 2 (91. 7 vM. 1 , bM. Vim nila. 2:2U4 


WOMEN'S GIANT SLALOM 

i lM VbH. CotaraOo) 

Iowa Fstnondp-Ocboa Scofn, 2 mhv 
utoa 2488 stcands. 


8 JO* Carolina 78-48. 


Oklaboaw (25 St dot OUahoma SL 89-84; 29. 


7 511.14 II 59J (M. Nsbrasfca 4542: d*f. Goorgto Tocb 87-80. Oilcooo 41 (Jordan 14). Assists: Now Jsrsey 


7 511 19 t 304 | niilitimnTsrli ITT TT riff rirtrtnunTI miff 34IRiebardson10).-OiicagD27(wtNittovIl). 


s: Nnv Jersey 41 (Williams 101; 


9 9 580 17 10 530 ana 72-65 l 

9 9 500 13 U Ml mm CanBaa (2B7) lost to Goorglo Tech 

8 10 544 16 11 593 47-42; (ML Dut4 78-48. 

B 10 544 17 13 557 Nrada-Las Vooas (3M) dsL CaUfomlo- 

5 13 578 11 14 507 irvl/vr 9755 ; dot. Lono Beach St 8*6). 


mtnmmmn 23 21 23 22-94 

oastoa 23 24 24 29-99 

Samoson 9-18 7-8 2& CMaluwon 9-19 45 22; 


Motor** 8-12 M3 25. Barttoy 4-15 1-4 18. R»- 


Transrtion 


4 14 522 11 16 507 Coorsia Tscb (21-7) dsL Nortt Carolina O- 


SOUTHERN 

CanfsrwotAll Gomos 


42.- del. SL Louis 4*54.- last to OMshoma 8F4& 
Kaosss (245) d*t- Nttnnka 7055; (tot 


L pet Oklahoma 5L 88-79. 


2 575 22 7 J39 srroam 

4 JSO 20 12 525 Goorootoxm 90-4 

5 588 IB 11 521 ***' 

8 .Fto 14 14 500 Todl 59-54; lost 

9 530 14 n 553 Omsk 120-71 1 

9 538 14 14 500 ; TonnsSEM 84«S. 


(Molono 4); Houston 22 (Hollins 7). 

Utah 22 28 24 31— 98 

P s rt W W d 31 34 14 24—131 

CottorB-i37A2S.Dmdsr9-l8l-l 19; Boltov 


X Vrtnl Scbnold*r. Svfilzoriana 2:28.12. 
(tlol Zo* Haas. SvrltzoriM. 2:28.12. 

& Traudl Haoriwr, W*sl Gorman v. 2:2857. 
4. EHsobrih Klixhtor. Austria 3:3SJ2 

7. Motolo Svst. Yugoslavia, 2:2874. 

8. Marla Eppto. West Gomaav. 2:2194. 

9. Pwrin s pstan. Franco, 2:28.9*. 

10. Carol* Mtrfi, Franc*, 2:2910. 

11. MlchslO Flolni. Swltz*riana 2:3950. 

12. Marino KtohL Watt Germany, 2:29.18. 
U. Dabbto Armstrong ILS. 2:2939. 

15 Cindy Noison. U5. 2:2954. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Strange Wins Golf in Sudden Death 

CORAL SPRINGS, Florida (UPI) — Curtis Strange sank a three-foot 
putt for par on to first hole of a sudden-death playoff Sunday to win to 
Honda Classic golf tournament over Peter Jacobsen. 

The playoff was forced when Strange missed a four-root putt on the 
17th hole to drop bade into a tie with Jacobsen and then made a six-footer 
for par on to 18th. He shot a 2-over-par 74 in to final round to complete 
to 72 holes in to tic with Jacobsen at 13-under-pax 275. Jacobsen, 
playing his first tournament in a month because of pulled muscles in his 
ride, made up six shots in the final round with a 4-nnder-par 68. 

Three shots bade, in third place at 10-under-par 278. was Willie Wood, 
who had a final-round 71. Next at 279 were Raymond Floyd with a 70 


NEW YORK — Slsttod Ron Porting, pttetwr. 15. Brigitte OertIL Swritnrtond, 2:2958. 


Svroane (20-71 d*L Ptttsburgfi BO-72; lost to nomw 31 34 M 24— OT 

Georgetown 90-43. CotlW 8-13 7-4 25. Drmtor 9-18 1-1 19; Boltov 

SBtfthfti Mribodlit (St-B) tost to T*xw 9-U2-42P. Griffith 4-20 7-7 19. Ro hc w x l i: (rtoh 
Tech 59-54: toot to Houston 79-74. S3(Eotonl3);Port1and70tD«gxtarl2).A4- 

Owrtto I2B7) itotMlsemiBOl 9454; toot to *hfctt Ufah24 (Eaton 4); Portland 28 (Coder 


Davidson 4 10 573 ID 20 533 

Furman 4 12 558 7 21 J50 

£. Tern. St. 3 13 .H4 9 18 333 

(x-rilncftod ragutor-soacon tm*) 
SOUTHWEST 


TOUa (2 L4) tod to West Texas SL 7052; (tot 
WkfctfO St 67-44. 

Merita OrthM St. (108) tori to Maryland 
71-70; do l Woke Forest 4*44. 


Kanos ary 28 H 31 31 13—128 

L5L CB eeer s XI 31 21 17 13-122 

BMmten 17-27 +5 -a, Dmv U-19 2-3 22; 


Uliuhilu ruiiimuir 1~ 1 " — SaJfft 13-25 9-1(1 35, MJohnson 19-22 s-S 25. 

minion 7154: dot North Carolina Chortotts HM m oWIs: Kanos CMv H tEjotnson. 


to a one-year ux i huU . 

BASKETBALL 

- H a tto e el BaMwtoall Aiiorloftoo 
CHICAGO— Susp*fsi4d Qwtothi Da) toy, 
awntlor heooomos wftoowtpoy far vtototina 
dub rules. 

HOCKEY 

■attowi Hockey Loo — 
BUFFALO— Slamd Bob Monaroln. cantor. 
COLLEGE 

NORTHWESTERN LOUISIANA-An- 


WOMBKT OVERALL STANDINGS 
1. Fhrtnl 221. 

Z Oerill 107. 

X Walliser 144 
4. Klrehier 154 
4 Ktohl 1XL 

A. ErBca htosv Switzerland, 134 

7. Olga awvatova Czechoslovakia. 121. 

8. Tamara MriCInnev, US. 107. 

9. Femand*s-Ocnoa 98, 

10. Haas 91. 


nouncedttwreslonollonorWeyneYatoatxis- 1L Enpto, 90 


r*.mfjfiu-y All Gxmm mouon sun; ae*. non™ uiraro uanw «... — >■- 

«uS» LW IW2; d*L Jacksonvlll* dri. OtoOomlrv Thomjtooii 10); la. QlnMre-6l ( 
7 ^ ion 07-82. AMtoto:_l(an»aty32(Dr-w9,; 


4 JSB 20 7 J41 

3 547 21 7 JSO 

A 525 U 9 547 

4 525 It 11 533 

5 500 14 11 593 

8 587 15 12 554 

9 538 U 12 538 

12 550 11 14 507 


7— . inteota (22-8) (tot Purdue BML 
£ Arizona (2B91 k»Mo Washington 4WI; toll 
533 toUCLASB-SL 

rn Loyola IHH»0fa (224) deL Oral Roberts 84- 
rr, 77: d*L New Orleans W1-8S. 

SX Loefataw. SL HM) *L Auburn 7V73; def 
or, Kentucky 6ML 


Assists: Kansot Qfy 32 (Drew 9); LA, a to- 
W1 » (Gordon 7). 


hotbol) coach. 

TEMPLE — Nom*d Mkrfkfd FeUd coonfl- 
ixtfor tor athletic promoffO M and aubllca- 


IX Christ*))* GtAgnara Franca 83 
IX Srirnktor, 74 

U. Peton. 71 

IS. Mlcharia Gwg, West Germany, 70 


Coif 


Football 


re Skatii 


LRL Rkt 3 13 531 n 14 507 

3-589 (x-dbdwd regular-season tlffe) 

7 Jn SOUTHWESTERN ATHLETIC 

a cu Conference Alt Gazoos 


Selected College Results 


T*o Hnbbers aad oarahw s fa too Hondo 
CtasNc tauranaMoB wtddi cnododed Saadoy 
on too 7537 vara gar-72 Eagto Traci Chib 
count at Cam Sgrtws. Florida Imwi wd- 


USFL Standings World Championships 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


W L Pet W L PcL 
13 I 529 22 5 JU 
9 5 543 17 9 554 


10 5B4 12 15 544 Alabama SL 7 7 500 11 14 507' 

11 514 7 20 359 MU- Voilv St. 4 7 542 W 10 583 

ion tittol Texas Suufhm 4 ■ 529 11 14 507 

fifty Jpdtson SL 6 B 529 10 16 J8S 

•throne* All Gomes Grambllnd 4 9 JOS A 18 JOB 

Pd. W L Pet. Prnlrt* View 4 10 386 5 32 .1*5 

4 jn a 7 741 {x-dlndMtf regular a e oio n fIHe) 

5 J22 IB 9 547 

7 xii i4 tl an Conference All Games 


‘.-.Hncfied regutar-season tith) Texas Sautor 

MID-AMERICAN Jpckson SL 

Conference All Games Grambllnd 
WLPd. W L Pd. PmrhVhw 
u - 14 4 J7B 20 7 J41 fx-dlndwd ri 

v' "H, Obto 11 5 J22 II 9 547 

/“*■ 11 7 511 14 11 593 

11 7 511 U 11 391 _ 

' Jtonloan . g g egg i> n ca x-Va Gommr 


»•-, i 

a « 
ft'i 
w. 


I- . 

vj 'OfcJifaqn 
iJkfats 
-JlnoGrasiv 
»?:; j£* I Rlebign 
v«,nna*a m, 


» n 5 J22 IB 9 547 suis wwlt _ 

M 7 511 14 11 593 Conference All Gama 

11 7 511 U 11 593 " L , P< L, « « ^ 

1 .9 9 500 15 12 554 *-VO- Comma 12 - 2 -JS7 24 5 JBB 

I 10 544 12 U 544 AftL-Wrm. 11 3 JtA 24 B JSt 

1 7 11 M 12 U 544 Ufa Dominion. 9 5 543 19 10 555 

7 11 509 n M 507 s. Florida . A I 529 16 11 

Ml 6 12 J31 12 is 544 Jacksonville 6 8 59 15 14 517 

to 4 14 322 9 It J33 S. Alabama 6 0 529 IS 13 -B4 

raswtor-seascxi mi#) W. Kentucky S 9 XT 14 14 500 


eabt 

■ da death Pfarsff) : 


Jortoenvlll* 

V* 

1 

V 

0 

T 

0 

PB, 

1500 

yy 

22 

PA 

14 

Georgetown *0, Syracuw 43 

x -Curtis Strange, 89G000 

4754-70-74-273 

Memsbb 

1 

0 

8 

UNO 

20 

3 

Hertford 77. Texas-San Antonio 73. OT 

Pater Jacobson, (54500 

4L71-7WS-J75 

Birmingham 

1 

1 

0 

500 

61 

48 

SOUTH 

WUto Wdod, 8M5D0 

45309071-471 

now Jersey 

1 

1 

0 

500 

54 

a 

Maryland to. Virginia SS 

Ray Ffavd. S225O0 

49-72-44-70 — 279 

Tampa Boy 

1 

1 

0 

500 

43 

57 

MIDWEST 

Frad Couples, 822500 

6M-709B-O9 

Baltimore 

0 

1 

1 

JSO 

31 

39 

Dayton 64. Xavier. Obio 54 

Tam Kite, S17J75 - 

4060-7557-280 

Oriendo 

0 

2 

0 

m 

17 

43 

Iowa 70. Indtana 50 

Gary Knch. 317J75 

48-48-73-72— 280 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Notre Dame 37, wafcfagton 50 ‘ 

Dan Forsman. (14500 

73-71 -70-44— B1 

HOurtan 

2 

0 

8 

urn 

84 

41 

SOUTHWEST 

Andy Bean. SU500 

70-4049-73 — 2B1 

Oakland 

1 

0 

1 

J9B 

48 

27 

Houston 79, So. MrtfxxUst 74 

Dave Barr. S14500 

47-49.70-70-281 

Arizona 

1 

1 

0 

500 

23 

23 

OUtownn 87. Geerata Tach 10 

Jim NdUord, **J3J 

49-71-73-49—282 

Denver 

1 

T 

0 

500 

50 

54 

Texas 7L 5outa*rn Cal 70 

Brae* Ltotifcak WJ33 

72-7V7049-EB2 

Portland 

T 

1 

a 

580 

21 

19 

TOURNAMENTS . 

NUk* Sullivan, W333 

71-4^7530-281 

Son Antonio 

1 

1 

0 

500 

19 

3* 

SuoIImts Ceatoraaeo 

Hubert Green, 39J33 

4434-72-70-282 

Los Angolas 

0 

2 

0 

500 

43 

48 

Bwiwpionlhlp 

Jim Colbort. 8*333 

7448-7070—282 


i peony* mhos 




n sn Mantull 70. VMI 45 

14 50 Se n irtt O mtorwnM 

» ChmrwIonsMp 

14 500 Va 87. Old Dominion 82 


Brad Fotelsutt 
Mark McCamber , » 30 
Scan Eimnsoa »J33 
Wayne LevL 01333 


72^49.72—222 

70-6MW73-2S2 

7D71MS-74— 292 
A9-47-7&74-2B2 


San Antonio 16, Arfzena 14 
Denver 40. Birmingham 23 
HMten SR Tango Bov 9 
Bolt) mere 17, Oakland 17. OT 


MEWS COMPULSORY FIGURES 
(Ai Tokyo) 

(.Alexander Fattoav.Sa via IfataatSooMs 
Z Jczef sobovcJk, dscboNovaUa, 13 
1 Fernand FMrenle, France, 15 

4. Brian Oner, Canada 25 

5. Brian Boltano, U5- 10 

4. Vladimir Kotin, Soviet Union. 35 
7. Grzegorz FHhxxeskL Poland. 43 
A Helko Fischer. Wen Germany. 4J 
f. Lars AakesoA. Sweden. 55 
10- Oliver Hoanor, Swttmrlend, 43 

11. Ridtara Zander, Wert Germany, 55 

12. VUttor Pefrtnka. ScnHrt Uakn 73 
IX Canton Fortes, Canada. 75 

VL Masaru Ogawo, Japan, Ba 
15. Nell Paterson, Canada. 95 
U. Mark Cortprell, Ui 95 
17. Cameron Mecturst, Aurtralla 102 
IE Petr Barna. CzectatovoWa. 10J 
19. Faiko klnton. East Germany. 115 
ZD. Alessandro Riecitein. lialy. HD 


who had a final-round 71. Next at 279 were Raymond Floyd with a 70 
and Fred Couples, who had shared the third-round lead with Strange, 
with a 78. 

Soviet Skater First in Compnlsories 

TOKYO (UPI) — Alexander Fadeev of the Soviet Union won the 
men’s compulsory figures Monday in the opening event of the world 
figure skatmg championships. 

Fadeev is now in a positron of strength for the men's world title, after 
bis main rival, Brian Orser of Canada, finished fourth in the figures. Ihe 
Soviet staler can place second in both remaining men’s events, the long 
and short programs, and still take the title even if Orser wins both. 

Jozef Sabcwdk of Czechoslovakia placed second in ihe figures, and 
Fernand Fedronic of France was third. 

McEnroe Defeats Curren in Houston 

HOUSTON (UPI) -Top-seeded John McEnroe captured the Hous- 
ton Shootout tournament Sunday, defeating Kevin Curren, seeded sec- 
ond, in straight sets, 7-5, 6-1, 7-6. 

McEnroe had only one easy set. He avoided a tiebreaker in the first set 
by breaking Curren s serve in the 12th game, then breezed through the 
second set Curren came alive in the third set, winning the first three 
games, breaking McEnroe for the only time in the match. Bui McEnroe ' 
broke back ana an ace in the 12th game forced a tiebreaker, which be 
won, 7-4. 

In a women’s tournament in Hersbey, Pennsylvania, Robin White 
scored a 6-7, 6-2, 6-2 victory over Anne Min ter Sunday. In winning. 
White became the first American in the five-year history of the tourna- 
ment to capture the championship. 

Russian Sets Record in Backstroke 

ERFURT, East Germany IL) PI)— Igor Polyanski of the Soviet Union 
broke the world record in the 200-meter backstroke with a time of 1 
minute 58.14 seconds at a Soviet-East German swim meet in Erfurt, East 
Germany. 

He was 0.27 seconds faster than the mark held by Sergei Zabolotnov 
also of the Soviet Union, set Aug. 21 in Moscow. 

Frank Balbusch of East Germany was second, finidmw T h aw 
four seconds slower in 2:0120. Dirk Richter of East Germany was third 
at 2:04.19 and Alexander Sdoienko of the Soviet Union fourt rjr 
2:06.91, the news agency ADN reported. m 




ft •• *4W* , '* ,f 1 







Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


The Situation Is Taxing Humidor-Room Closing Ends Cigar Era Mmhi ^ Noim 

Q By William E Gcisr { ...... > Kin, m ih« ninth Psts-Afr 


EX' 


TITASHINGTON — Democrat- 
▼ T ic Representative Tender was 
chuckling. 

“What's the joker’ I asked him, 
as we stood on the steps of the 
Capitol after lunch. 

“They're all coming up here to 
make their case and get relief.'’ 

"Who is iheyT' 

"The people who voted for Ren- 
al d Reagan in 
November be- 
cause he prom- 
ised to cut gov- 
ernment 
spending with- 
out raising their 
taxes. The joke 
is everyone 
thought Reagan 
was talking 
about the other „ , 

guy when it Bocnwald 

came to chopping off a federal pro- 
gram. The farmers voted for him 
because they believed he would 
eliminate urban transportation 
subsidies, and the Yuppies voted 
for him because they wanted him to 
cut agricultural price supports. The 
conservative students thought his 
economies had nothing (o do with 
school tuition, and the Republican 
governors still can’t believe the 
Clipper wants to do away with fed- 
eral revenue shar ing " 

"Bui the president has to cut the 
budget deficit," I said. 

"I didn’t say he doesn't. All Tin 
saying is that everybody who voted 
for him, except for the defense con- 
tractors. didn't r ealise they were on 
Stockman’s hit list. Come over to 
my office and see what’s going on." 
□ 

We wandered over to the Sam 
Rayburn Building. Trader pushed 
through the crowd to his office. 

“I make them take a number like 
you do in a Baskin Robbins ice 
cream store." He rang for his secre- 
tary. “Who’s out there this after- 
noon?" 

Railroad History Show 
Popular in Frankfurt 

The AuoctaieJ Pres 

FRANKFURT — About 
350,000 people visited the Frank- 
furt train station over the weekend 
to see an exhibition on 150 years of 
German railroading. 

Frankfurt was the second slop of 
the exhibition’s tour of 160 West 
German cities and towns. 


She replied. "There is a delega- 
tion from the Fraternal Order of 
Retired Military Officers, the Con- 
tractors to Save Federal Highways, 
the Tax Shelter Institute of Ameri- 
ca, the Tobacco Growers United, 
the American Medical Association, 
the Veterans or Foreign Ware, the 
Brotherhood of Real Estate Bro- 
kers. the U. S. Chamber or Com- • 
merce and the entire state of South 
Dakota." 

“Anybody wailing who voted for 
the Democrats?" Tender asked. 

“Not that J know of. The Retired 
Military Officers are holding num- 
ber 345 and are nexL" 

“Send them in," Tender said. 

□ 

The RMO delegation crowded 
into Tender's office. The spokes- 
man said, “Congressman, are you 
going to allow cuts in our fighting 
men's pensions?" 

"I hadn't thought about it until 
our commander-in-chief said it had 
to be done." 

“It's an outrage. We had a con- 
tract with the American people that 
if we served our country we would 
be compensated for iL Now they're 
trying to break the faith and it's 
your duty to stop it!" 

"Have you gentlemen taken ibis 
up with the Republicans?" 

“They have to support the presi- 
dent on this. Our only chance is for 
the Democrats to stop it before it 
becomes a fact." 

“I don’t know why you are so 
shocked. The president has to cut 
everything across the board." 

“Then why doesn’t he cut the 
weapons budget? As retired mili- 
tary people we can assure you 
there’s more waste there than any 
place in the government." 

“I didn't think I’d ever hear you 
people say that." 

“We wouldn’t before Reagan an- 
nounced he was going to cut back 
on our pensions. Congressman, 
you’re our only hope,” the spokes- 
man said with tears in his eyes. 

Tender put his arm around the 
man. “Ill see wbai t can do." 


After they left. Tender said. 
“This has been going on ever since 

budget. I knowTshoddn^enjoy it, 
but we Democrats have so little to 
be happy about. It isn’t our fault 
that the people gave the president a 
mandate and be gave them the 
sword." 


By William E Gtisr 

New York Times Stntce 

N EW YORK — Housekeepers, messen- 
gers. chauffeurs and ali manner of hired 
help are bounding up the plush carpeted 
staircase at Dunhill's on Fifth Avenue these 
days, dispatched forthwith to fetch their em- 
ployers’ cigars. 

The Dunhill Humidor Room, where mon- 
arcbs, presidents, captains of industry and 
Lhe merely rich have stored their finest cigars 
for decades, is closing. One does not wish to 
speak of such indelicate matters as financial 
affairs, but Alfred Dunhill of London can 
simply no longer afford to pay the soaring 
Fifth Avenue rents to store more than 
400,000 of its diems' cigars. 

In the Humidor Room, the private, cli- 
mate-controlled cedar lockers — or “keeps." 
as they are called — bear such names as 
President John F. Kennedy. Sir Winston S. 
Churchill, Alfred Hitchcock and Milton 
Berle. 

Trouble is, a lot of the clients are dead. 
Even some of the live ones have not been 
heard from for decades. The knobs on many 
of the keeps are coated with years of dust 
Meanwhile, the store must deny humidor 
space to new diems who actually buy cigars. 

The store assesses no maintenance charge 
for this “laying down" of cigars in its humi- 
dor, where the temperature is 65 degrees, the 
humidity is 68 percent and the air is so fresh 
that Nigel Calladine, the store manager, asks 
overly perfumed patrons to leave, so as not to 
contaminate the cigars. 

D unhill recently sent out a third and final 
letter notifying customers that they must 
clean out their keeps by the end of the month. 
“It's the end of an era," said a 66-year-old 
customer from Far Hills. New Jersey. 

David Lee. the altogether proper humidor 
director, said that a congressman he informed 
of the closing had been near tears and that 
about five people had threatened to file suits 
to stop the dosing. 

“U’s more chipping away of the gloiy. the 
graciousness that used to be New York." said 
Gene Shalil of NBC News, who was in the 
store to pick up 10 boxes erf 1 pre-Castro Cu- 
ban cigars that which he had stored there for 
21 years. 

Others picking up their cigars recalled that 
the room — which is lined with cedar ship- 
ping chests and furnished with leather Ches- 
terfield couches, an Oriental rug and cam- 
paign desks — had become something of a 
men’s club, with customers talking sports and 
business deals while smoking mellow cigars 
and becoming one with the woodwork. Some 
napped on the couches. 

"That would never happen now," said Cal- 
ladine, the manager. “Life is too rast-paced.” 

He said the store would give up the Z50Q- 
square-fool room, which opened on 42d 
Street in 1924 and moved to Rockefeller 
Center in Lhe 1930s. Dunhill's is planning a 



Six tv-one donated teams from best film at the ninth Pan-African 
se^^ns ^ mushing along film festival b Ouagadoiffidu, Bur- 
the I ditarod Trail across 1,135 kina Faso, for Histoue dW ren- 
miles (1.840 kilometers) of the eontre" (Story °fan 
Alaskan wilderness in the 1 3th an- The festival jury chose Rpy Duarte 
nual race from Anchorage to of Angola as best director for 
Nome. The Gist competitor off the “Melsita. 
line Saturday with his team of 14 □ 

dogs was Dave Aiseobrey, 52, of Women Against Pornography, a 
Montana Creek, Al aska , who lost ^ § feminist group, have criti- 
tais way during last year’s race. The Critvin Hein for sexism in an 
event commemorates the efforts of ^derwear a d featuring a nearly 
a handful of dog drivers who dur- ^are-breasted woman in what the 
ing the 1920s struggled over the called a “pose straight out of 

former maO and gold shipment p^ntimuse.” The otganization also 
trail to cany dtpthena serum to foim j a diaper commercial objec- 
Nome. The fastest posted ume is 12 donable- The group gave one of its 
days, 8 hours, 45 minutes and 2 “« Rg ie" awards to a Huggies corn- 
seconds. recorded in 198 1 by Rick showing babies in a beauty 

Swenson, who has won the event ad presented 

four times. The top teams usually uiiXlirls m objectifying cheese- 
travel in a pack to UnaMieei on ^ ^ wilich ignore the preva- 
il* 1 ™; Sound, about 269 miles lence i and seriousness of child mo- 
from Nome. Food is air-dropped at jg^tion.” 


27 points along the route. 
□ 


A disgruntled Chicagoan, newly 


A trip to Europe with a presiden- a millionaire, tried to pay his for- 
tial advance team is obviously a pjer wife's divorce lawyer with 
good time to go shopping for a new 750,000 pennies, but a judge told 
BMW. Newsweek magazine says the man to write a check for 57,500 


i 


Michael Dearer, the depa 
White House deputy chief of 


instead Peter Nonfby had the 
change delivered in money bags to 


and other members of the advance the divorce court where his case 
team arranged to buy nine erf the was being settled, and dumped 


WKan t Sa*n/Tba New Yrel Tim 

NBCs Gene ShaKt retrieving boxes of dgars from DunhflTs Humidor Room. 


more compact humidor, with space available 
only to regular purchasers. “We are trying," 
be said noting that expensive cigars are see- 
ing a surge in sales, “to reach the new wave of 
35- to 45-year-old heavyweights who see the 
cigar as a symbol of success." 

“The Duke of Windsor came here to smoke 
a cigar on many an occasion," said Lee who 
noted that some of the duke's cigars were still 
at the store. 

Dunhill's record-keeping system is a tin of 
old dog-eared index cards carrying the 
names, addresses, favorite types of cigars and 
scrawlings about the purchases and with- 
drawals of Rothschilds, Rockefellers, du 
Fonts and even a Caesar (Sid), among hun- 
dreds of other notables. 

“I wanted to computerize all of this," Lee 
said “but a video display terminal just 
wouldn’t do in this room." 

Sure enough, under W in the card file is. 
“Windsor, be Duke of“ Under H, “His 
Grace, be Duke of Marlborough. Blenheim 
Palace, England Flor De A. AU ones’’ (his 
favorite cigar). 


Shalil said he did not know what be would 
do with his cigars. Another customer is solv- 
ing be problem by splitting them up between 
the humidors at two of his private blew York 
clubs, the humidors in his homes in New 
York, Paris and Nantucket and the humidor 
on his yacht. “A sensible approach," com- 
mented Lee. 

“There used to be six or seven attendants in 
here to get your cigars," said another custom- 
er. David Bernard “and now there is one. 
Their whole lives were dgars. Now Dunhill 
sells clothes. and bey have brandies where 
you get some tie salesman who knows noth- 
ing about dgars. 

“So. thev will dismantle be famous Dun- 
hill Humidor Room and open a smaller one 
in be store, and two years from now I’D bet 
you they’ll be selling handkerchiefs in there. 
It's the way or the world.” 

“I feel like hell," said another customer, an 
imposing silver-haired man who allowed as 
how he might slip down to be first floor of 
be store and buy himself a 55.000 crocodile 
attach* case to cheer himself up. 


luxury cars in Munich — and, with bem at be lawyer's feet. Nordby, 
diplomatic passports, for a dis- 4], a machinery repairman, won f 
count of about 25 percent, be mag- 52.8 milli on in be minds lottety * 
azine said. The team was in West last October, six months after he/ 
Germany preparing for President and his wife were divorced His; 
Ronald Reagan's four-country visit former wife sued for part of bef 
to Europe in May. Denver said that windfall and the judge ordered; 
such discounts were a traditional Nordby to pay her 545,000 a year ’ 
peril for those holding diplomatic to help support Iheir three children, 
passports. □ j 

Q Yehudi M enuhin, who made his <' 

Alain Dekm was named best ac- Carnegie Hall debut as a violinist \ 
tor and SaMneAzema best actress at age 1 1 m J J27. presided over be - { 
at the 10b annual presentation of U. S. debut of Jin Li, a 16-year-old 2 
be C*sar awards to members of be violinist who flew from China to 1 
French film industry. The best film New 'York for be concert. Jinsprat ] 
of 1984 was judged lobe “LesRi- bis birthday in New York, but 
poux” by ChqA ZkE, a tale of a didn’t do any celebrating or sighi- 
nnJif»»man and ht« irkYwnmffhlf! as- stamsi instead be rehearsed Max 


policeman and his incorruptible as- 
sistant Z3di also was named best 


i’s Violin Concerto No, l.Me- 


director by the Academy of French mihinis on a three-week U. S. tour. 
Film Professionals. Deion was hon- conducting Londons Royal Phfl- 


ored for his role in “Notre His- harmonic Orchestra. He heard Tin 
totre” Azema’s rede was in “Un Li in 1980 on a trip to China during 
Dimanche i la Campagne,” (“A »Hch be listened to many young 
Sunday in the Country"). The Cfc- players, and suggested thatthe boy . 
sar for best foreign film went to be allowed to study at Menuhin s \ 
“Amadeus,” the US. film about school in England. The Chinese 


“Amadeus,” the U. S. film about school m t 
Mozart, directed by the Czecbodo- government 
vakian-born Milos Forman, for four yea 


government allowed him to do so 
for four years, ben requested that 


. . . The Al geri an filmmaker Bra- he return. He studies at the Shang- 
him Tsaki won the grand prize for hai Conservatory. 


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MONEY-8OX IN THE SUN 

Nice, &<oani rila, tprrfen poo I. far y 
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30 MMJIE5 TO SAMI RAPHAEL. 
Modern Provened v3b an 8800 sam 
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SWITZERLAND 

LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely apartments with mog w fic e nl 
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EriaUahed Sinn 1970 


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PARIS & SUBURBS 


LE MARAS, be det Archive:, 
kxqe studa. entrance, lotchen, bath, 
perfect axniaort. 45 sqm. FJ70J } GO 
NEAR PLACE DB VOSG& 
17th century. buCdng. 4 rooms, 
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Tel 294 61 36 


REAL ESTATE 
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PARIS & SUBURBS 
FQjniY ST JAMB. Very beaunful 72 

sqm. Icxae 6vmg + bedroom, nvr- 
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ST. GERMAIN DB PRES. 25 sqm 
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577 06 61 mommas 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
PARIS & SUBURBS 

AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

380 26 08 

AVE MONTAIGNE 

Evchdve. 135 sqm. apartment, 
Brii floor, tadt dass, mogntfic a nt vie 
TeU 730 Vu - TV 64 07 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE ! 

PARIS* SUBURBS | 

PARS 6 IH. ST. GSMAlNfaeai own- 
er safe in lerovafed bidcfina sndl 
pied-otere v4th daa», Troarm, 

NeuJy Cedex, Fttmce 

_BTHRYSHPAIACE (near) 

130 sqm. Svrrg. irmg, 2 bedroom, 
mads roam, top floar. sunny, cobn. 
exdusve. let 265 M fc 


International Business Message Center 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

PARIS A SUBURBS 

CHANlftLY. Private sets in moit pres- 
tqpom residentid area, 6500 sqm 
bxi 5 min. from qotf dub, 30 ran 
dive flans Paris. rgjC. 000 . Write Sox 
1 857, Herald Triune. 92521 Neufly 
Cedex . France 

GREECE 

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offices For sde. a* conabedna sec- 
ond flow-, 3B sqm Bedborpcm. Tet 
7214195k 

REAL ESTATE 
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REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

OtEAT BRITAIN 



REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED* 

AN ATTRACTIVE' BREAK from holds 
with Hototet for vow diort tor bag) 
dayi in Paris. Fuly eewipped studios 
to Sroam oRwheent^ inenefaa lokh- 


SARDM1A ITALY hmiriaus vik « 
pduiBbaboCosta5merddB5nen>Mi 
to Porto Rotondo, 20 minutes to Porto 
Cervo, 200 sqm + TOO sqm 
terrace, 3 double roams' eod) with 
own bathroom, one servia roam + 
WQ big kirn, brehea, private path 
to the wi 2 M fane mc& with tm 
own wr. Price per week July/ August 
USJ2/0Q. Ane/5epL tisfijDl 
rmnrraum 2 wnets. Tot Monday- Fri- 
dor 9.30 am -600 pm tidy- Venice 
(41] 31161 or The 41092 Fan 

PARIS AREA FUSMSHED 


ffq 38 1 9 19, 

MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 

SHUNS VERY EXCEPTIONAL 
APARTMENT. PATIO, 

700 eq-m. private garden 

Residential area. Center or town. calm. 
300 sqnL King space, targe entrance, 
large reception, ita-cry, citing. TV 
room, 4 bewoams, 3 bora, 1 room far 
staff with bath, spacious modem fuOy 
equipped btcheq I krge spare room, 
si nra office, large arerang room 
garage, fidi doss service? 



Ae oondhoring. dectne btndi. etc. 

EXCLUSIVE AG84CE INIBW5RA 
IlP. S4 

MC 98001 MONACO CEDEX 
Tab (93) 50 66 84 
7t 469477 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 

Far sale in Nmriaus modem reedence, 
pleQMnt 2 roams with loggia, sea view, 
equipped Wcfim brfr/W-C. eeBor, 
p3S£_n.600jM0 
EXOOavfe AGBKE (NTBUAB3IA 
B.P. 54 

MC 98001 MONACO CHJOC 
Tab (93) 50 66 84 
Tfc 469477 


GENEVA 

private wmvidual ohhs 

for sde in heart of Geneva, fiojevre 
residentid property of about 23.600 
sqFt. (wfveh codd be eady subdwded 
de penring on reqdrements) sfluotad in 
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qudity and is dso geogrrzMooly a 
certer at Iowa SubsfomxJ pice re- 
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dence Hr Bo* 1793. Heroic/ Tribune. 

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We have for Fotwctwtv A vwy bg 
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«cksive. Pnoe from about U5S40.GCQ 
Mo riga gee at 6Wt Please visit us or 
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K 5BSOU3 SA. 

Tom Gose 6, 041007 Lausanne. 
Tel: 21/25 26 11 Tb 24298 SSO Ol 


ST. MORITZ - MADULAIN 

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FIATS FOR SALE 

PHONE 562-1640 

FIATS FOR RENT 

PHOW 562-7899 

OFFICES FOR RBrfT/ SALE 

PHONE 562-6214 


BD DU CHATEAU 

MU1U.Y FACING SOUTH 
ELEGANT APART M&fT 
PGR SECEPTJONS 
4- 2 Bmfcaoms, 2 Bads. 200 sqm. 

EXCLUSIVITY 
EMBASSY 562 16 40 


DEAR CHAMP DE MARS Unqtm 
artst fait 80 Sqm. balavMt FI J25SXQ 
PLACE DB VOSGES [100 ml 3 mod- 
em Hats 3 bsdrooms + 25 sqm. ler- 
race FI ,200,000. 1 bedrorf + II 
sqm. terra ce FBSW50, (aft + I Bed- 
room PrtO.COO. 3H% norms 
Cabinet Pastori Your American 
Beattar in V*n 052 92 29 


NOW ON SALE AT 
All INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


WITHIN 30 DAYS - OR LBS 
You am have your awn buriness... 
-and packet mare money m c iar 

■ than mast people eorn w a weri. Howl 
&sy. fc's ncs had si efi when ran own 
a Kemc Computer Pcrt-oi Sycerr. 

A suer wmer wes car&nes' 3 ct to- 
day’t hattasr rrewii- video, czmoyt's 
end irmartt p»e% ret. (Pus me tto*- 
how <md gucrcrlees of Too list— j- 
"wm. Pantwjrvc 3rd Kema Ar dl raw- 
butmeo. CiAtamer; come :o >au No 
wring Norr-«i It inc» jharene All 
the nxmy ond the profit; rre I00*i 
youn. tdeal jar fcrrilms, b«.-vicjcI; a> 
p atentee owners Port-tu-w. faS-twre or 
weekends. Tru-es ro need to leave 
tour present /cb VVA the Kemts, SSm 
you take Mrwone’; scr.re »oh 3 7.V. 
camera and inrori, pr.n: -Tih a 
computer . It ; ;a pc-dvtcnon bmple o 
chtd con run u 3^.: rh* prtrri aren't ad 
auff The Kem: s/vem c on ilcble m 
btori and »hw v hjl cater: n botto- 
ble. tenito <n M mjrjie. -j ar/ . 
■W*. anywhe-e Trc »cHd t /-j ■«. n- 
lory. There &r ihevSatdl O’ k<cyzrs 
-nionq ro be hied — pte hmmios 
'™ l irstertz pr*« 

mart at US^sOO te USS265X) 
h^ma, Dept M35, Posdtxh 17034C 
60lW FtankFjrr 'tt Germsrv 
Tel 06® i 747508 71, : J1Z7I3 KtftA 


MAX* COM5TBUCHON FIRM 
teria amarwsen >qaA two STO 
mJSan m 3,-d World or Arab n=jonv 
We un FinaxE. Afco car e«hc«e 
«T> currency for U53 Co^- 
Tun th 


JOJOBA 

tejoba. the made bean grown m the 
U5A hs a ndutal lire tpai of 100 ■ 
200 yeari Uses: trinitarian cosnri- 
kq ph a m i us e nt ii 'rij . Food manu- 
facturing. Dr. D. Yermarv*. Crirfoaw 
Ursveraty, vrned. “No other piare 
produrt bi the v-orld i; capable <jf re- 
£toong petroletm besed Iuixicanf5“. 
sxbtmg fields provide return an in- 
vestment in first year. Ervue arros nt 
returned by 6th rear. Protscnars draw 
ennud income of 33V. 

Gneubres from m veslew and 
brokers welcome. 
for c o mplete detofc contao: AUOBA 
RESEARCH 3a» 1777, Herald Tnbune. 

9S21 Neully Cedex, franca 


MONEY TREES? 

YESI Inrest in cne of Arrenca ; moS 
exerting tactatologrcol breafcrhrnuriB ,n 
a talon data mdu^ry . 8.000 nui trees 
O’OTird 4 arid oand 20.000 ro be pkmh 
*d sacst. High annual earm^s cowred 
for many, many teen. 
BROKBS’S BIQIJIIUB INViTHS. 
Matend avtslabie rn EncWr. rterch, 
Germari Arctoc. Bo* 1/7B. Herald 
Tnbime. 92521 Nemlly Cedes, France 


THE BNAHOAL TIMES 
EUROPE'S BUSM5S fCWSr-APER 

now opnates a rrornng of gubhoxtan 
rielrrerv wr-vree to fcjbscnber; Irnna ei 
Cologne • DusMkfcvf ■ Fre*f..- . 
5Tun^rT . Munch and m Sorlfiern 
Germany m tfie err/ or Harr.taj-^ 

For free nidi and 
further dernh. pleare owttocr 
Bend W Wohulra 
Fmonod Tunes hartdua 
let 069-7598-105 Trie*. 414103 
No FT no Cammenl 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
. MADE EASY 

fcttmtt & Rcdrcr obtorrs An t per 
me re r* resderee. Helps la ser up USA 
businesses & locates armerai. me os- 
tod & mder-Ad real estate. For free 
bnxfiur* write- Dwnd hhrson. 1201 
Dare Si.. Sw 600. Newttort Beadi.CA 
W2660 USA. (714) 752 CFto* 


PANAMA IOBDA. COBPCSATIONS 
hom US4® aratebto no. Tel 
J0O241 aH40. Teto. 029352 ISLAND 
G [via UK) 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


1NTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMfTED INC 
U-S-A- 8 WORUTWtt* 

A compleie sood & business service 
provrdng a ungoe coSeoha of • 
trienled. versatre & muWmguri 
indnnduats for: 

FastaorvCommeroel-PnnlJVomotwrD 
Cartrenrion-Trade Shows-Prea Parties 
Speciri Erenri-lnvjge Mata-PRs 
Sopert HostvHoawse^Ertertatner; 

Social Canipcsvon^Tour 9 index, etc. 

212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th SL. N.Y.C 10019 
Servn Bspras^Tratvej 
Needed Woridrede. 


OFFSHORE 
LIMITED COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 

Worldwide 

Nc nani es H j—Wtor 
Rsadymode or Speari 

LONDON RS>BESnrrATTVE 

ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Depr HI. B Vienna St 
Douglas, hie of Man. 

Tri- 0624 36591 
Tries 627691 SPTVA Q 


INTERNATIONAL COMPANY 
FORMATION 

UK c omp u e es from £75 1.QM. Paiu n o 
8 aS major off-share certen. FuO ad- 
m m stratian. normrtre services, paws; 
of Briorne y. reg ix wred office^ acaxm- 
lancy, corrfidentcj bard accounts 
opened tme iden taJ telephone , taler. 

fax & moiling SOTice. 

tflS Lmrted 

4j Ccwwig Street, Liverpool, tf TNN. 
Tet 051 7w 1480. Th 6«6>^ 8USS&L 
Fro 051 709 5757 
Associated Offices Worldwide. 



TTX. Tri: nti 233 


YOU* tOtOON OFRO 

ta the 

CHE5NAM EXEamVE CBRIE 
Comprehensive rang e of services 
150 Regent Sfreet/Tondre, W». 
Tab (01f439 6288 Tbu 261426 



OFnCES FOR SALE 


LOUS BLANC - 1 300 SOM. 
Ground floor + 4 fiooo, renO«ed 

AGBrfCE CBrfTRALE 

208 12 53 Fbri* 


SECRETARIES A VAJLABLE 


SECRETARIES 

OVQISEAS 

Thraut Tyri the w orld w« introduce <£. 
wg to tardea recretoriK whew btv 

Pxyou ghfr tart ed. ff wo CUTS ®1 Am. 
ptoyer, q ontactjA far the bed odvbL 
tatavto^usteroTonflecmmtor. 

hSecncrional Seoeheies 
\n N *"Bond l Storat. taton W1 
Tet 01-491 7100 
■mcrutmm Ganuhantc. 


RANDSTAD 


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