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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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WEATHS DATA APPEAR ON PaGE 16 


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PARIS, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1955 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


Miners Return to Work 
Amid Fanfare, Cheers, Tears 


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uiui.i, ' '•'■'■a i n , h.'^-iay in much the same way lhai il 
m/ ti^' -Vgan a year ago, with confusion 
■:, ,,/* bitterness. 

Aliuh , •■ At dawn, in dozens of mining 
■n»m- '^SJnuniraities around the country, 
mndreds of chanting miners pa- 
[- Tided back to their pits bdnndcol- 
iery bands and union banners to 

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run community kitchens which at 
times fed hundreds of people daily 
and distributed food parcels 
throughout the strike. 

Television films showed people 
in windows above the parade 
routes weeping as the processions 
passed as wen as throngs of villag- 
ers often jaming in behind the min- 
ers. 

Many miners acknowledged that 
they were gang back with nothing 
to show for the yearlong strain, but 
said that they at least found dignity 
and fellowship in the ma.« return 
to the coalfields. 

But at some fields, there was still 
resistance to going back to work 
until an amnesty for 718 workers 
fired during the strike was de- 
clared. In some cases, tiny bands of 
pickets were enough to turn back 
long columns of miners who re- 
fused to cross picket lines. 

Late Tuesday, it was estimated 
that about 85 percent of the miners 
were working, with about 27,000 
still out. 

On Sunday, a national delegates' 
conference of the National Union 
of Mineworkers voted narrowly to 
reject the views of the union leader- 
ship and to end the strike without 
readiing a settlement with the sta- 
te-run National Coal Board. The 
miners were 
dose20nnL 
in Britain and eliminate 20,000 
jobs. The delegates ordered a re- 
turn to work for the 90,000 to 
100,000 miners who were still on 
strike out of a total mining force erf 
186.000. 

But in Scotland, with about 
12^00 miners, and in Kent, the 
smallest region with 2,000 miners, 
regional union officials voted Mon- 


ere protesting plans to 
aprofiiable pits of the 1 74 


Margaret Thatcher said that there 
“cannot be an amnesty in any way 
for those who have committed seri- 
ous criminal offenses'* during the 
strike, such as assault and arson. 
But coal board officials have indi- 
cated that miners accused of minor 
offenses might be reinstated. 

Small bands of pickets traveling 
from Kent, in southeastern En- 
gland, to several of the bigger coal- 
fields in Yorkshire in the north, 
prevented the return from bring 
larger. At Cononwood colliery in 
Yorkshire, where the lint walkouts 
in what was to become a much 
larger strike began on March 1, 
1984, a column of about 850 re- 
turning miners Luraed around at 
the gate rather than cross a line of 
three Kent miners. 

At Barrow colliery, about 1.000 
miners led by a Scottish piper and 
the miners* union president, Arthur 
ScargQL turned around when they 
reached the gates where a few Kent 
and Yorkshire miners were picket- 
ing. 

At two pits in Northumberland, 
hundreds of returning miners were 
turned back by managers when 
they arrived late for their shifts, 
causing angry exchanges and calls 
for a renewed strike locally. 

Mr. Scar gill, a Marxist, who has 
warned the cool board that it will 
now face “guerrilla war” by miners, 
said: “It is evident that you get 
problems when you don’t have 

negotiated settlement." 

Nevertheless, despite the confu- 
sion and emotion, there did not 
seem to be any major confronta- 
tions between returning miners and 
thousands of miners who had re- 
turned earlier. 




Russia to Counter 

“'ll 

U.S. Space An 


Miners climbed into the pit cage at Cynheidre colliery in Wales on Tuesday at the end of 
Britain’s 51-week coal strike. They were obeying a call by rbeir union to return to work. 

Support for Reagan on Funds for MX 
i Is Growing , Leaders in Congress Say 


day not to return to work until an ■ ^e coal board spokesman, Mi- 
n»c n-mtivi hu iVip ™ a i ™ael Eaton, said he 


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WASHINGTON — South Ko- 
-arpa plans to lift its political ban on 
' opposition political figures, in- 
•- .-.v arduding bouse arrest restriction* on 
- ; :: Vim Dae itmg. the US. State De- 
• - artment said Tuesday. 

“We had publidy expressed the 
iT ^JJupe that these restrictions would 
PARIS Re Bfted, so. of course, we welcome 


was granted by the coal 
board for miners who were arrested 
during the strike for a variety of 
offenses. 

On Tuesday, however, Scottish 
solidarity appeared, to be crum- 
bling as more than 700 miners went 
back to work. According to coal 
board figures, this meant that a 
majority of Scottish workers, num- 
bering 6,800. had returned. There 
were also moves to reverse Mon- 
day’s vote. 

In Pazfiament, Prime Minister 


was encour- 
aged by the orderly return to work 
in so many places today." He said: 
“Il is now' in the interests of may- 
one in the industry for normal work 
to resume quickly." 

Mr. ScargUL who has sought to 
picture the miners' stance as a vic- 
tory, has said that his union fought 
the coal board, government, police, 
judiciary and media. He said they 
were all biased against his cam- 
paign to prevent any mines from 
dosing. 


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^ 1 ,” said the department spokes- 

jan, Bernard Kalb. 

Mr. Kim was placed under bouse 
UJXEMBIbest on his return home to Seoul 
• apge aPAP Feb - 8 following two years of 
, >v .,-tile in the United States. 

* - In elections four days after Mr. 

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U.S. Suspends Payments 
To General Dynamics 


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By Jeff Gcrdi 

Nat York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger 
announced Tuesday that he was 
suspeudingfor 30 days a fraction of 
the Pentagon’s ] 
al Dynamics 


not to be bona fide wffl. be with- 
drawn immediately.’' 

Tuesday’s suspension is the lat- 
est in a series of efforts by the 
Defense Department to hold back 
payments from con tractors when 
the Pentagon is not satisfied with 
the contractor's work or procure- 


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rp. while the De- 

pAGE ^ a al the polls when a fense Department looked into pos- meat practices. 

pw opposition part)', the New Ko- sible improper billings by the Last August, the Defense De- 
” *“ ‘ J nation’s largest military contractor. 

In a speech before an American 
Legion convention here, Mr. Wein- 
berger also ordered a review of bill- 
ing procedures and a tightening of 
expense claims involving general 
and administrative expenses of all 
major military contractors. 

The General Dynamics suspen- 


By. Steven V. Roberts 

Nor York Tunes Servke 

WASHINGTON — Congressio- 
nal leaders say that the momentum 
on Capitol Hill seems to be moving 
in favor of the Reagan administra- 
tion's request to release SI J billion 
to produce 21 MX missiles. But the 
vote counts in the House of Repre- 
sentatives and the Senate are still 
Quid, the leaders warn, and could 
go either way. 

The key factor working for the 
administration is the arms control 
talks with the Soviet Union, Sched- 
uled to begin in Geneva next week. 
Representative Jim Wright of Tex- 
as, the Democratic majority leader, 
expressed the common congressio- 
nal view Monday when he said the 
arms talks “enhance the likeli- 
hood” that Congress will approve 
the request, which was formally 
submitted Monday by President. 
Ronald Reagan. 

Representative Olympia J. 
Snowe, Republican of Maine, who 
supports the missile, observed: 
“Who wants to be in the position of 
voting against the MX and getting 
blamed for the failure of the talks? 
That’s an unpalatable position for 
many members.” 

However, a coalition of 90 orga- 
nizations that oppose the missile 
maintained at a press conference 
Monday that the weapon could still 
be defeated because public semi- 
mem is against it “There is true, 


observers is still planning to attend 
the talks . 

The latest round in the long tor- 
tuous debate over the MX missile 
was set up last year, when Congress 
agreed to allocate the S1.5 billion 
needed to build 21 new- missiles. 
Bui under the pact the money 
could not be spent until the new 
Congress voted to release it some- 
time after March 1. 

Hie administration has request- 
ed $3.2 bilBon more to finance con- 
struction of 48 more missiles in the 
1986 fiscal year, beginning Ocl !. 
That issue will be debated as pan 
of the military budget bier this 
spring, and some lawmakers al- 
ready are concentrating on reduc- 
ing that spending requesL 


spending requ 
a tough budg 


“In a tough budget year, 48 
won't happen," predicted Repre- 
sentative Norman D. Dicks of 


Washington, a key Democratic 
supporter of the weapon. 

The vote to finance the 21 mis- 
siles will probably take place in the 
next two weeks, and the first battle- 
ground will be the Senate. Last 
year, a move to quash the weapon 
lost when Vice President George 
Bush broke a 4&-48 tie. 

MX opponents contend (hat as a 
result of changes in the Senate. 51 
of the 100 members now are likely 
to vote against the weapon. But iO 
of those are Republicans, and they 
already are being subjected to 
heavy administration lobbying. 

In the House, attempts to kill the 
missile last year lost by six votes, 
and a gain by the Republicans of 14 
seats in the November elections has 
clearly bolstered the adnunistra- 
tion's’eause. 


By Waltcf ^incus 

U'^xfcjiTg.V'R Ajm Service 

Washington — The soviet 

Union “will develop and perfect 
strategic offensive arms” if the 
United States continues with its 
Strategic Defense Initiative pro- 
gram. 'Colonel General Nikolai F. 

Soviet officials seek equality 
and compromise. Page 8. 

Chervov. a member of the Soviet 
General Staff, said Tuesday. 

“We are not going to sit on our 
hands and wait” until the United 
States "decides to deploy" a missile 
defense system. General Chervov 
said in an'imerview. “We'll start to 
perfect our strategic forces before 
that time.” 

The Russians already have two 
new intercontinental ballistic mis- 
siles in early production, with de- 
ployment of one projected by Pen- 
tagon officials as coming by the 
end of this year. 

General Chervov 's forecast of a 
Sonet arms buildup appeared to 
contradict predictions by Reagan 
administration spokesmen that 
once Moscow realizes Washing- 
ton's seriousness about building a 
defensive system, Soviet leaders 
would reduce their strategic force. 

Inst November, for example. 
President Ronald Reagan said that 
if a defensive system could be de- 


General Chervov is in Washing- 
ton as a member or a Soviet delega- 
tion beaded by a member of the 
Politburo. Vladimir V. Shchcr- 
biiskv. The group is to meet Thurs- 
day with Mr. Reagan and Secretary 
of State George P. Shultz. 

The general, who speaks authori- 
tatively for the Soviet military com- 
mand. met Monday with U.S. arms 
control officials including Paul H. 
Nitze, a special adviser to Mr. 
Shultz and coordinator for next 
week's U.S. -Soviet arms ulks m 
Geneva. Richard R. Bun. assistant 
secretary of state for European af- 
fairs, and Lieutenant General John 
T. Chain Jr., director of politico- 
military affairs for the Sure De- 
partment. 

General Chervov said that exten- 
sion of present missile limits and 
other provisions of the unr a lifted 
strategic arms limitation treaty 
known as SALT-2 "would be one 
of the subjects for negotiation." 

■ Reagan Plan Criticized 

David Otimay of The li’ashutu - 
ion Post reported etirl:erftvm Majii- 
ingion: 

A group of U.S. arms ex pens, 
not all of whom are in agreement 
have published a report 'in which 
the majority of them conclude that 
the Reagan administration's Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative appears un- 
realistic. It urges that it be scaled 
down to pursuit of a more limited 
defense system. 

The report, issued b'- the 


veloped. it woufd be an incentive to _ r _ 

the Soviet Union to reduce or elim- Geowwwn Center for Strategic 
inaie missiles, "since we've proven Intemauonal Studies, says: 
that it's possible to be invulnerable . °«P. ,te adv “ ces m wchnologj.a 


to such an attack. 

At another point in the inter- 
view. General Chervov called such 
Reagan administration justifica- 
tion for the research program — 
popularly known as “star wars" — 
“primitive." adding: ‘To put it 
mildly, not one of these arguments 
can stand up to criticism." 

“You develop one system," be 
said. “We are going to develop an- 
other system to counter il" 


ballistic missile defense that could 
protect American and allied popu- 
lations with tolerably low- leak rates 
does not now- appear to be a realis- 
tic possibility." 

It seems “illusory to expect that 
we can escape the condition of mu- 
tual vulnerability that has pre- 
vailed through much of the nuclear 
age," the report says. 

The report said that while going 

(Comiinsed on Page 2, Col 61 


U.S., Israel 
Will Phase 
Out Tariffs 


ypv opposition party, me new ivo- 
FORWia Democratic Party, supported 
CLASSIC Mr. Kim and other opposition 
gures won a large number of seats 
sjuu^ the National Assembly. 

— » "It is our understanding that the 
, i lorean government plans to an- 
£*OJ»I titmice very shortly the lifting of 
: political ban on the 14 Koreans 


( t ,., 1^0 remain affected by it, includ- 

, t . fin ^ former opposition party leaders sion involves only payments’ for 

tim Young Sam and Kim Dae general and administrative ex- 

and forma Prime Minister prases, which represent- 8 percent 


T=im Jong Pfl," Mr. Kalb said. 

. ' [But Mr. Kim wffl still be pre- 
•- ailed from joining a political par- 
or directly influencing pohiics 
: x-y '.rcause of a suspended 20-year 
.. 'alienee for sedition, diplomats in 
•’ vV ^jouI idd Reuters. 

* BiiiiJsu**"' [Mr. Kim, 59, a former presiden- 
K ' 1 ' . r .al candidate, said: "The mtlng of 
■ .v'tie political ban without amnesty 
•; -.r the suspended jaD sentence is 


Jgfp 

, -a ? y The uftmg of the political ban 
• -‘:;.'^ould come in advance of the 
->nt vis jtf'kednled April visit to Washing- 
•.-»> ’J'<n by Mr. Chnn. The administra- 
y^xt has been amrioos to dear up 
psTOtroversy concerning the Kim in- 
CiP v>.^' dent so as not to doud that visL 




of the billions of dollars in govern- 
ment billings by the company, ac- 
cording to a General Dynamics 
statemenL 

The suspension will continue if 
the review takes more than 30 days, 
but it will not likely have a great 
impact on the company's cash flow. 
The vast majority of the company's 
Pentagon payments, for direct la- 
bor and equipment costs, for exam- 
ple, will not be suspended. 

General Dynamics's statement 
also said that the company “be- 
lieves that it will be able to satisfy 
the Defense Department’s con- 
cerns regarding me validity of its 
billing procedures and slates that 
any b luin gs that are dete rmin ed 


panmen I suspended payments on 
three missiles under contract to 
Hughes Aircraft, citing serious de- 
ficiencies in the company's quality 
assurance system. The payments 
were resumed recently. 

Mi. Weinberger’s announcement 
came after various investigations 
and audits of the company by the 
Pentagon and Congress have un- 
covered millions of dollars in possi- 
ble mischarges. 

Last week, in a congressional 
hearing, company executives ac- 
knowledged that a few charges 
were improper and would be with- 
drawn but defended the company’s 
overall performance. 

On Monday, another large Pen- 
tagon contractor, the Boeing Com- 
pany, said it was withdrawing 
about S61 ,000 in expense claims for 
political contributions after Penta- 
gon auditors had challenged a 1 982 
bill for $126,000 in contributions. 

But the company said it was still 
seeking reimbursement for the re- 
maining $65,000 in political ex- 
penses, which it believes are legiti- 
mate overhead expenses. 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Tunes Servuv 

WASHINGTON — .Ml tariffs 
between the United Stales and Is- 
rael would be eliminated within 10 
.°EF> years under an agreement the two 
siuon to the MX missile, said Fred haw im mnri..d«t 

Wertheimer, the president of Com- 


mon Cause, a public affairs lobby- 
ing organization. 

In a related development House 
Democratic leaders announced 
that they would not send a delega- 
tion of observers to the Geneva 
talks, which are scheduled to begin 
March II At a press briefing, Mr. 
Wright accused the administration 
of deliberately circulating stories 
that described the delegation as a 
‘junket" and a “circus" with no 
serious purpose. 

In fact, Mr. Wright said, the del- 
egation was organized at the re- 
quest of the administration, as a 
way of demonstrating unity to So- 
viet negotiators. 

“You can’t have it both ways," 
Mr. Wright said. “We don’t mind 
being used by the administration if 
it serves a national purpose. But we 
don’t want to be used and abused 
by the administration at the same 
time" 

The Democrats' decision appar- 
ently means that House Republi- 
cans will have to stay home, too, 
because there will no official House 
delegation. But a group of Senate 


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* Video cassette recorders are 
_ Americans’ use of 
their leisure time. Page 2. 


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• : in D-S. policy brine rebr 

■ : ’• ■;.:. t * ons lo 4 crncal sta^. Page 3. 

The nflqipine laborministcr 

• • ;’l ' offered to resign after he was 
■•'.V criticized bv PresideaL Terdi- 
,> cand E. Marcos. PtogeS. 

■ The U^. Air Force destroyed 
|a tape showing the radar track 

• the downed Korean Air 

Lines Flight 007. Page 5. 

, ->f ' ;i ■An oU Southern town ad- 
justs, somewhat painMly, to a 
^-black-dominated county gov- 
t'»‘* l, .',-'r.. eila DOiL Insigibts, Page 8. 

• r ■ .‘;^business^wance 

.^■Utflever topped most fore- 
! {\ '■■■; <asts by reporting a 16-percent 
-•!T HSe in fourth quarter-pretax 

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ISRAELI CRACKDOWN — Israeli soltfiers strapped three men to an arnrored vehicle 
in Tyre as part of a crackdown in Lebanon. On Tuesday, ShStes marched to protest an 
explosion Monday at a village religious center in which 15 persons were killed. Page Z 


|Xt‘ 


countries have just concluded. 

It is the first free-trade pact that 
Washington has reached with any 
country, administration trade offi- 
cials said Monday. 

President Ronald Reagan will 
formally submit the accord to Con- 
gress dus week. Most legislative an- 
alysts expect relatively easy and 
quick approval before the summer. 

Israel sought the agreement as a 
means to promote economic devel- 
opment and to cement economic 
and political ties with Washington. 

The pact comes as Isrnd is expe- 
riencing a severe economic crisis. It 
has submitted its largest U.S. aid 
request — $4 billion for 19S6 and 
an additional S800 million in emer- 
gency financing for 1985. 

“This is going to help the Israeli 
economy in the long run," said Dan 
Hal pern, economic minister at the 
Israeli Embassy in Washington. 
But be insisted that the benefits 
would be mutuaL With a rising 
U.S. trade deficit, he added, it was 
essential for the United States to 
maintain its 20 percent share of the 
SS billion Israeli import market. 

One of the big arguments that 
Israel has advanced in favor of the 
pact is that, if its exports grow at a 
faster rate than its debt payments, 
it would need less foreign aid from 
the United States in the future. Is- 
rael owes foreign creditors, chiefly 
the United States, more than S22J 
billion. 

The two countries now exchange 
about 53 bfflion a year of products 
ran g in g from office machinery and 
CAT scanners to swimwear and 
frozen chickens. Last year the 
United States had a trade surplus 
of S400 million with Israel It sold 
Israel £L2 billion and bought S1.8 





Rising crime bus led to a recommendation for using soldiers to patrol the Paris subway. 

Subway Security: How Some Cities Fare 

N.Y. Crime Rate Is High; Metros Are Safe in Some Capitals 


By Charles J. Hanley' 

The Assocvned Press 

NEW YORK — The subway mugger, that Ameri- 
can symbol of crime beneath city streets, is now 
spreading fear through metro systems around the 
world. 

But even in Paris, where the French are talking 
about calling in the army to control subway gangs, the 
rate of transit crime still falls far short of New York's 
14,000 underground felonies a year. 

A check of cities around the world found that some 
subway systems ore almost crime-free. This is because 
of relatively small size, limited times of operation, 
heavily middle-doss ridership and new designs that 
make the subways easier to patrol. 

In some cases, as in Japan, the subways are safe 
because the society is safe. 

When a Tokyo youth punched an elderly subway 
rider in the face two months ago. he touched off a 
national furor. This breach of Japanese decorum was 
described by police as the first serious crime in 10 
years aboard Tokyo’s crowded underground system. 

Japanese subway passengers “take care not to trou- 
ble others," said Shoichi Tanaka, a transit system 
official 

In Other cities, however, subway assaults and rob- 

_ _ _ beries are a major and growing concern, just as they 

Sifion. In 1 98]~the’u.s7 £ surplus ^ “ tite United States following New York's 

' had been as great as $12 billion. ^sWv publicized “subway vigilanle" episode, in 
_ , . _ , , which a passenger shot four alleged muggers. 

•Die U.S. penetration has been ^ ^ ^ 

be put in the 

Paris Metro was made last month by a special transit 
authority panel that studied rising crime in the 
subway. 

Die number of reported robberies and other attacks 
on the Paris subway rose from 803 in 1980 to 4.101 in 
1984, the authority said. 

A spokesman for the Paris transit authority, Jacques 
Barrot, attributed the increase to “a new phenomenon. 


Bui the crime rate on the Paris subway — one attack 
pa 575.000 riders — still is only one-eighth of New 
York’s rate of one attack per 71,000 riders. 

“New York is unique," said Ed Silberfarb, a spokes- 
man for that city’s transit police. “There are few 
systems of its size and complexity. And the New York 
subway may be the only one of anv size that operates 
24 hours a "day." 

Here is a look at other subway systems: 

• London: The 122-year-old London Under- 
ground, the world's first subway, is comparable to 
New York’s in size and in total" reported crimes — ■ 
about 10.000 a year. But most are offenses b\ 


pickpockets. 


London “Tube" had fewer than 600 reported 
robberies in 1984, compared with 5,999 in the New 
York subway. 

• Rome: The Italian capital's 15-mile (24-kilome- 
ter}, (wo-line subway system, most of which was 
completed only five "years ago. experienced its first 
major crime on Feb. S, the firebombing of an empty 
car. A leftist group claimed responsibility. 

• Moscow: The Russians do not publish crime 
statistics, but the 125-mile Moscow metro network, 
which carries 15 billion riders a year, compared with 
New York’s one billion, is considered practically 
crime-free. There is a heavy presence of patrolling 
militiamen. 

• Mexico City: Although economic hand times are 
driving more Mexicans to street crime, few serious 
crimes are reported among the four million riders 
crowding into the metro each day. But transit officials 
have had to take one preventive step. During rush 
hours, to protect women from physical advances, men 
and women must ride in separate cars. 

• S3o Paulo: The subway crime rate has increased 
fivefold over the past five years, wh3e annual ridership 
doubled to 409 million. 

The system’s chief manager, Isidore Teles de Souza, 
said that the subway recently was extended into low- 
income, high-crime areas, where it attracts more peirv 
criminals, and that the subway's 415-person security 
force has not increased with the rising ridership. 

• Rio de Janeiro: Its six-year-old, 18-mile subway 

v — -— — ->u»i<..uon. 6 i> uuwi uuuaum^ mu uiuuui wui svsiem serves mostly middle-income areas. The ooor 

for five years on products deemed hire 800 out-of-work youths as an auxiliary patrol people take the bus. and shoot-outs occur rwilarivon 
* force - " the buses between muggers and passengers “ ■ 


1 by producers in Europe, 
who already enjoy tariff advan- 
tages over the united Slates be- 
cause of an Israeli- EEC free-trade 
agreement that will eliminate all 
tariffs on manufactured goods by 
1989. The U3.-Israeli agreement 
covers farm goods as well as manu- 
factured products. 

To protect sensitive products in 
both countries, tariffs will be pro- 
gressively reduced to zero over 10 


organized gangs carrying out purse and jewel-snatch- 
ing, with a network of recei 


m 


recovers to get rid of ihejcwelry 

icular." 

ansion of the Metro security force, from 430 in 


years under a four-stage process. 1980 to 630 today, has not kept pace with the upsurge 
There would be no duty reduction in crime, although the transit autnority this month wSl 


the most sensitive. 


w)i 

* S. I- • 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIB UNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 



House Approves Measure to Bail Out 
Farmers, but Reagan Veto Is Likely 


WORLD BRIEFS 


The Anodtned Pros 


WASHINGTON — The House crabl needs. 


adequate to meet spring-planting 


approved Tuesday a credit plan to That program provides at least 

* r _ « ■ 1 - J .. milliArt I.-i-it* m n i— i ntirir In 


[) Is Likely 22 Die in Election Violence in India \ 

lion proposed by Mr, Reagan and 

the n«myS25Q billion ihatU would Minister Rajiv Gandhi's Congress (D Party surged to a lead tn three 


rescue fanners and their lenders 5650 million in loan guarantees to 
and sent it 10 President Ronald banks itaai agree to write off at lept 


Reagan, who was expected to veto 10 percent of a farmer's loan prin- 
the measure. cipaL or an equivalent amount in 


reach under current spending and 
tax policies. 

Among the features of Mr. Do- 
menici’s plan are: 


''cashes between rival party thugs and 

d aimed at least 16 lives in the eastern state of Khar and jhree each m 


aannea at least io uvra m ~ ii n :t«i 

northern Uttar Pradesh and southern JR3 k 


. _. norm era uiuu obwbsu ouu . n n 

• Increases of 3 percent in mOi- Q f India reported. The violence raised the unofficial death toUm 


. m«*.a<aire_ tn«u. or an oiwv«cui mwuui um - »***'■“*-“ ^ i\cws ui loom rcpoiicu. ii» . — . 

Mr. Reagan “seems to want the interest, in return for federal back- tary spending, adjusted for infla- the three-week campaign and election to mmethan 70, anmog 
* _ , _i l _r l. inn nf ori ki m wni nf ih» hulaiw rion in of the next three years, hl oo di***?! c * a *f* ti ff?' 00 * sin 0 ? fnd* a a independence m . _ 


farmers to' cry ‘uncle’ before he ing of 90 percent of the balance, 
gives them the help they need,” said ■ Panel Offers Budget Han 

f Karen Tumulty of the Las Angeles 


the House speaker. Thomas P. 


O'Neill Jr. Mr O'Neill decided to -fimes reported earlier from tVorA- 
bypass normal procedures and mrXon: 

J lUIr Dma««% nf!lVimit ® .. ... - a 


send to Mr. Reagan, without 'p^ v Domenid, chairman of 
changes, the version approved in ^ SenaK Budgel Committee, has 
the Senate The House approved presenled a p^posal that would 
^ fill 25> 168. freeze Social Security benefits for a 

Mr. O Neih said the president year hold nexl year's military 
“can veto the farm btfl, but he can t increase to about half of 


lion, in each of the next three years, bloodiest state elections since India’s independence m 1947. 

• No cost-of-ilving increases Of 144 races declared in Madhya Prad«h by Jj 1 * 
next year in federalbeoeBt pro- Congress (I) had won 124. The party ahjo had taken 16oE 21 ^dared 
grams except those for low-income seats in Uttar Pradesh and 11 of 17 in Khar. Gouge® (H was repo - 
people. Against Mr. Reagan’s wish- leading in most outstanding constituencies m all three states, 
es, me proposal would include next __ 

Security ta Youth Charged in IRA Raid on Police 


• A restructured military retire- 


BELFAST (UK) — Police charged a 17-year-dd security ! 
tesday in connection with the murders of three of the nine pc 


ment system, to give incentives to Tuesday in connection with the murders « uuw or me 
officers to remain on active duty killed in an Irish Republican Army attack last week on a police station m 


The Anocmed P'w 

Fanners held up crosses during a demonstration outside the Agriculture Department in 
Washington. More than a thousand fanners then marched Monday to the white House 
calling for higher guaranteed prices for their products and strict controls on production. 


veto the problem. 


“If we can spend hundreds of 


JUVUUUlfL IUVIVMJV W MVW>il v» ■ - 

what President Ronald Reagan has P* 51 die age of 55. 


billions putting missiles Lathe Domenici, a New Mexico tary 


groimd,*' the Massachusetts Dern^ Republican offered his commit- Reagan 


Thousctnds March in Beirut, Accuse 
Israel of Fatal Blast in Shiite Village 


crat said, “we can spend half a 
billion to put seed in the ground. “ 
The credit provisions, appended 
to a measure for African relief, are 


Nm York Times Service 

BEIRUT — Chanting "death to 
Israel” and “America, the great Sa- 
tan,” thousands of demonstrators 
marched through West Beirut on 
Tuesday to protest the deaths of 15 
people in an explosion Monday in 
the Shiite village of Marakah, in 
southern Lebanon. 

Shops and schools were closed 
here and in two other large Moslem 
cities, Sidon in the south and Baal- 
beck in the east, after Moslem cler- 
ics called for “a day of anger” 
against “Israel's murderous crime.” 

The Lebanese government said 
Monday that the explosion, at a 
Shiite religious center in Marakah. 
had been caused by an Israeli 
bomb. Israel denied the accusation. 

Five of the victims of the blast 
were buried in a common grave in 
- Marakah. while the others were 
taken to their villages for burial, 
according to state and private radio 
stations. 



Large crowds gathered around 
the mass grave to pray, and to listen 
to recorded speeches of Khalil Jar- 
radi. one of the Shiite leaders killed 
in the explosion. 

Mr. Jarradi, quoted by the radio 
stations, urged Shiites to keep up 
their armed struggle until the last 
Israeli soldier leaves Lebanese ter- 
ritory. 

Another local leader who died in 
the blast was Mohammed Saad, 
who newspapers here said was as 
the commander of the Shiite guer- 
rilla movement south of the Litani 
River. 

Mr. Saad was believed lo have 
coordinated many of the attacks on 
Israeli forces in southern Lebanon, 
and some reports had linked him to 
a car-bomb attack in November 
19S3 that demolished Israeli mili- 
tary headquarters in the southern 
Lebanese port of Tyre, killing 45 
Israeli soldiers. 

He and Mr. Jarradi were among 
the leaders in southern Lebanon of 
Amal. the mainstream movement 
of Lebanon's one million Shiites. 

Newspapers said the explosion 
in the Marakah religious and com- 


to a measure tor Aincan reuei, are m ; Q p U t together a deficit- 

rf- A />/n f p/i intended to ease creek i require- reduction package that could gain 

Arm S±ULUM2 meats for fanners whose debt loads enough supponfo pass the Senate. ITnvSWl 

' are preventing them from getting “iHsiiow impossible to have any OtWlAil UfUAJil 

•- new loans for spnng planung. The more meetings with Republicans, ^ _ 

Village bill would mw.de SIM mflhon in ^ DenSs, with anyone, and Tn 

r in l crest subsidies, $1.85 billion m coroe „p ^ numbcre J we can -ID LOII/WFf 

new loan guarantees and about S7 0 T” Mr. Domenici said. He _ . 

m unity center had been caused by a billion in immediate advances on j t was up w ^ committee lo Vri/y/vi A nn e 
bomb that was detonated electroni- CT0 P j 02115 normally not received a bucket that was “mean- Of/Cld? HW 

ii.. v.. ... I w. until hflrvKt trmp - . ,1 I . J j .1 J.r. * 


• rieniT of the 3-percent mfli- Lawience Peter Paul CTKeefe was charged in Banbridg^O nrites (32 

kOomelCTS) KHiriiwesi of Belfast. He w*s kept id police custody pending a 

a ^ federal SSSSS 

fiscal 1 W«>. attadt. Police said they had evidence lrakinghan with the attack, by gave 

no details. A lawyer for Mr. O’Keefe denied the charges, saying that the 
v i . rr • vnnth had oniv “nerioheial icvolvienieni n in the incident. 


youth had only “peripheral involvement*’ in the incident. 

U.S. to Deport Ex-Croatian Official 


caUy, by remote control. Mr. Jar- 
radi ana Mr. Saad were holding a 
meeting there at the time. 

In a letter Monday to the UN 
secretary-general, Javier Perez de 
Cuellar.’ the Lebanese government 
accused Israel of bombing the cen- 
ter. 


until harvest time. ingfuL tough and reduces the defi- 

Congresstonal economists say 


the measures cost to the govern- Mr. Domenici’s proposal opened ahead with research on a “broad 
ment mer the next five years wul be w jj at probably be several technological front,” the United 
about S429 million, after loans axe wee j cs 0 f meetings by the budget States should focus instead in the 
repaid- The admuustranon believes d t0 oul proposals for near term on protecting its missile 
the cost Mil be higher, about SI spgndjpg cuts. forces as well as its command, con- 


(Conthmed from Page l) 
ahead with research on a “broad 


near term on protecting its missile 
forces as wen as its command, con- 


bQlion to S2 billion, because of ex- h c he was offering his plan iroJ and ooanmutucatioms facilities. 


The letter, which was quoted by loans. 

Beirut radio, said it was in coned v- Robert J. Dole of Kansas, the 

able that Israeli troops would not majority leader of the Republican- 
have noticed such a large device in controlled Senate, reiterated his be- 
searching the Marakah religious lief that Mr. Reagan would veto the 
center. About 800 Israeli troops en- bill as a “budget-buster.” 
tered Marakah on Saturday, in a “Within the next few days we are 
crackdown on an escalation in the going (o lav to rest this so-called 

■ f .... • r i!. ’ _• W T\J- t.li M 


peered defaults on guaranteed t0 ^ ac u 0 n ou the bud- The 32 members of the panel blind and suiters a nean caramon aw pwiu«a w 

, « , . „ . get for fiscal 1986, which begins included two former defense secre- , , . . 1TT .. i j r 

Robert^ J Dole of Kansas, the oct 1. taries, Harold Brown and James R. Pakistanis Attend Hijacker S FllHeral 

ijortty Uader of the Republican- His plan would cut the federal Schlesinger; Helmut Sonnenfddt, „ p, a m TVN.'Lr^t; of neoDle. mem 

n trolled Senate, reiterated his be- lie ndtwhich is estimated at S227 a former exiiert on Soviet affairs . KARACHI, Pabstan (AFP) -^Jhousa^^pecrpKi^^^ : 


amend its murder compteunt to a 
Artukovic’s direct invotvement in 
blind and suffers a heart condition 


periods of mental confusion. 


ouaget-ouster. sional action, to SI 65 billion. Mr. Brent Scowcroft a former arms 

“Within the next few days we are has proposed a deficit for control adviser to President Jimmy 

iinn lav (n FKf fhl« Civril M ^ a ■ _ » t- 


□umber of anti-Israeli attacks in 
the area. 

Israel has denied any involve- 
ment in the blast Israel radio, 
monitored here, said that the For- 
eign Ministry director. General 
David Kimche, discussed the inci- 
dent Tuesday with ambassadors. 

The radio quoted Mr. Kimche as 
saying that Lebanon was responsi- 


fann credit crisis,” Mr. Dole told a 


1986 of SI 80 billion. 


Carter, and Geraldine A. Ferraro, 


By 1988, Mr. Domenid’s plan Democrat of New York, who was 


"S3 1 * US - Fwd Sde^noi^bfl- tbel9MDe mra d C ^r«to 


-Obviously some fanners are not fo°, compared with the SI44 bU- 
going to make it, and that's unfor- 


lunate. But I don't know what the 
answer is,” he said, adding: “I 
don’t think there are any.” 

The administration contends 
that its own credit-relief program. 


tial candidate. 

Two supporters of the adminis- 
tration's Strategic Defense Ini lia- 


ble for events on its territory, and first announced during the fall 
that Israel was determined to pre- presidential ca m paig n and modt- 


vent terrorist acts against its sol- fied at least twice since then to uy 


to entice banks to participate, is 


trail on s Strategic Defense Imoa- 

Fabiufi to Visit Soulh Korea ^ W. Warner, Re- 

publican of Virginia, chairman of 
Reuien the Armed Services Subcommittee 

SEOUL — Prune Minister Lau- on Strategic and Theater Nuclear, 
rent Fabius of France is to visit Forces, and Senator Jake Gant. 
South Korea April 7-9. Seoul's For- Republican of Utah, a member of 
eign Ministry said he would meet ^ Appropriations subcommittee 
President Chun Doo Hwan and on defense, disassociated ibem- 
Prime Minister Lho Shin Yong. selves from the <vmrhirinny 


of a man executed for Ms pwfmhyadring an a trimer four years ago. 

Nasir Baluch was hanged at Karachi prison on Tuesday after tang 
sentenced to death by a military court. He bad been a supports of the 
late Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, who was also executed by the 
current regime, and of Mr. Bhutto's Pakistan People’s Party. 

President M ohammed Zia ul-Haq eadier rejected a plea fa mercy by 
Mr. Batucfa, although he commuted the death sentences passed on three 
of bis co-defendants to life imprisonment. Mr. Baluch, 44, was convicted 
of helping three guerrillas of the Al-Zulfikar movement, who hijacked a 
p wifician Ynteni» ti onal Airlines plane to Kabul and Damascus in Febru- 
ary 1981. 


French Ask $769 Million for Oil SKdk 



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Video Recorders Change Leisure-Time Use in U.S, 


By Robert Lindsey of our weekends,” Mrs. Lyle said as 

Aff*- Vw* Times Sent* she scooped up dollar-a-day rental 

TORRANCE. California — Un- copies of “Raiders of the Lost Ark” 
! til they bought a video cassette re- aQd “AD of Me” and pressed 
ier a year ago. Gretchen and through a bustling throng of pa- 
gg Lvle of Los Angeles went to ^ons selecting other films at the 
raovi'es two or three times a Warehouse Record store here, 
ath. Now, Mrs. Lyle says, they cheaper than going out.” 

dly ever go. Instead, they rent at she said. “We don t have to worry 
;t one movie each weekend and about baby sitters, and I make the 
ch it at home. popcorn myself instead of paying 

It’s changed the whole pattern 51.50 for it” 

The video cassette recorder is 

changing the way the Lyles and 

W ORUJWIDE millions of other Americans use 
iKTERTAINMm | their leisure time. Experts say it has 
— brought about the roost fundamen- 
tal change in the way Americans 
enjoy filmed entertainment since 
the postwar expansion of commer- 
cial television. 

More than 17 million video cas- 
sette recorders are now in use. new 
units are being sold at a rate of 
more than than 20.000 a day. and 
the film rental business is booming. 

Peter Evans. 47. a Boston physi- 
cian. calls the VCR “one of the 
handiest Utile contraptions ever in- 
vented.” 

Before be bought one last year. 
Dr. Evans said, he seldom went to a 
movie theater. 

“Now I can watch a two-and-a- 
balf-bour movie in my own home at 
my c*wn convenience.” he said. “I 
don’t have to pul up wiih commer- 
cials and I don't have to miss out 
on the most important scenes just 
because the phone rings.” 

According to Tiro Baskerville. 
editor of Video Marketing News- 
letter. an industry publication, the 

number or tapes rented by Ameri- 

cans for showing in the home has 
~ ~ — — ~ • — risen to 304 million in 1984 from 26 

FYM IF Pfl CC P million io l^- 

l UL1L |\Jj»jL In the same period, he said, rent- 
* al prices have fallen to aD average 

CABARET of S3 from about S8. Retail revenue 

* from the rentals has increased to 


cottier a year ago. Gretchen and 
Gregg Lyle of Los Angeles went to 
the movies two or three tiroes a 
month. Now, Mrs. Lyle says, they 
hardly ever go. Instead, they rent at 
least one movie each weekend and 
watch it at home. 




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tunii Leaders Vow to Posh 
■ an Eeoaoiinc Recovery 










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more than $900 million from $206 of the motion picture house and its 
million. big screen. 

No one has been able to measure They predict there wQl continue 


CHICAGO (AP) — More than $769 mtiHon in damages from the 1978 
wreck of the Amoco Cadiz oil tanker arc bring claimed by the govern- 
ment of France, about 90 French coastal communities and a group of 
businessmen and individuals, their lawyers announced. The deadline for 
submitting claims in the case was March I. 

Oil from the tanker spilled into waters off die coast of France in the 
March 16, 1978, shipwreck, creating a stick 18 miles (29 kilometers) wide 
and SO miles (130 takxneters) long, winch polluted the French coast 
Parties in the case are to meet Wednesday with UjS. District Judge 
Frank McGarr. He ruled last April that Indiana Standard and two of its 


, . , . subsidiaries, Amoco International Off Co. and Amoco Transport Co^ 

No one has been ableto measure They ^predict .there wffloMtmue th* raw Jnrfgp McGarr said that the Chicago- 


vision or movie theaters, but there fuS-size screen, and if anything the 
are indications the impact of the VCR may expand their business by 


VCR is growing. leaching more older Americans, an 

At a convention of movie theater a^race that as a group goes to 
owners two weeks ago in f Ve- raovies ^® ss frequently than youn- 
gas. Jack Valenti, president of a ger people, the eqoyment of mov- 
trade association of movie produc- 
ers, announced that the amount of StilL the rapid gre 


Paraguay Denies Harboring Mengele 


BONN (AF) — Paragnay has told West Germany that Josef Mengcle, 
the most notorious Nazi war criminal still at large, is no longer living 
there, a Bonn official said Tuesday. _ . 


ere, a Bonn official said luesday. _ 

Jflrgen MODemaim, minister a stale in the Faragn Mmixtry, said 


money Americans paid at movie 
box offices passed $4 trillion for the 


box offices passed $4 billion for the many theater owners and caused 
first time in 1984, an increase of one to warn his peers at their recent 


< 2.111 ranirl pmwth of the muuauwiu, 

J5 fofrSl tronb£' Paraguay was replying to an rnernny by the Bonn government on the 

whereabouts oftt.Mcngde.13ra "is accused of oondneting mrfical 


rcSl 


W .'32#^ vs’ 


more than 7 percent from 1983. 

But the record box office receipts 
resulted largely from increased ad- 
mission paces. The number of 
movie tickets sold remained almost 
flat in 1984 for the third year in a 
row, at billion. 

For movie production compa- 
nies, the boom in rentals has been a 


mixed blessing. Although sales of bold use appeared almost a decade 
tapes are bringing them millions of ago. Ameneans who wanted to see 


.dollars in additional revenue, the pornographic movies were largely 
studios do not receive any of the relegated to dingy urban theaters. 


rental revenue. 


a«iSSRRSflfta« ? 

“most 5 seme competition since Iraq^ Vows to Bomb 24 Towns in Iran 

Sss,-asa 

port of Bun In' lnmu utaim eefier in the diy. 

the market for pornography that ^ nujitary connmmiquft catted ot. Iranian civilians to evacuate 
have ctan wwned. the towns, which had yet to be identified, before 7 AM. GMT on 

Until a VCR designed for bouse- . Wednesday. 

hold use appeared almost a decade ^ s bdimg Basra, Iran had said it was responding to alleged Iraqi ail 
ago. Americans who wanted to see OT on the lown df Ahwaz, in wttidi Tehran claimed J1 

pornographic movies were largely civilians were killod, and on die unfinished Iranian nudear power reactoi 
relegated to dmgy urban theaters, M Bushehr on the Gulf. * (AFP, AP, 


Statistics on network and pay neighborhoods. 


often in run-down, crime-ridden 


mi HORSE 


television are ambigurais but sug- Now explicit films are 

gest that the film renti business is sold side by side with more 
cutting .into their audience. The conventional Houywood offerings 


For the Record 

The Voice of America began construction Friday rtf a relay radio 
station in Sri Lanka to beam programs to Aria. The aireotor of the U BL 


" far and away 
the best node revoe 
in the universe' 

...inys th» pra« 


slowlv declining for most of the ^ w pornographic films, theater, 
past decade, and the growth rale of owtiers patronage has fallen 


pay cable services has slowed substantially at theaters showing 


sharply in the past year or so. them. They say the same thing An Astrafiau went arf trial Tuesday i 
The Electronics Industries Asso- could happen to theaters showing charges only hours after his 5-year-old 
elation recently predicted that sales films of general interest transplant in Britain. Robert Matthews, 

of VCRs should exceed 9_5 million Whatever the future bolds, inter- the robbery to pay for die operation. His 




CABARET 

* 


v ““ u, t lu,v .I . *“■ conventional Hollywood ouenngs station in Sn Lanka to beam programs to Aria. The director of the VS. 

proportion of Americans patching m shops from coast to coast Information Agency, Charles Z. wide, said die station marked a “riemfi- 
pameume network shows has hera Because of this easier acoessibili- cam step” in ties between the Uiritod States and Sri Lanka. (Reuters) 

slowlv declining for most of the ^ w pornographic films, theater. president Nkobe Ceansescq of Roraanb and the Libyan leader 
pasl “ d ■ Lhe e gl i?r fa t f le °1 owners say. patronage has fallen Colonel Moamer Qadhaa hdd talks on intexuational issoramTrooli tin 
fh/mfv f OWCd substantiafly al theaters showing Monday, the news agency JANA reported Tuesday. (AP) 

sharply m the past year or so. them. They say the same thing An AnstraEan went on trial Tuesday in Melbourne on armed robbery 
The Electronics Industries Asso- could happen to theaters showing charges only hours after his 5-year-old daughter had a heart-and-lung 

ciation recently predicted that sales films of general interest transplant in Britain. Robert Matthews, 39, has said that he out 

of VCRs should exceed 9_5 million Whatever the future bolds, inter- the robbay to pay for the operation. His daughter, Brooke* was reported 
this year, increasing the market for views around the country indicate w be making good progress in Harefidd Hospital near Loadoa.(Iiaaers) 
home film rentals by more than 50 that many Amenra^have already Theboffles of three West Geman searchers whowereinaplaneshot 
percent in a single yean sales last begun to use ( the VCR to exerase down by Polisario guerrillas in ihe Western Sahara have beeKmLa 
year were 7.6 milhon units. more control over how they use spoken fof tbe rirtiraft's manufacturer, Doniier, said Tuesday in 

But theater owners say that leisure time. Munich. fap\ 


of VCRs should exawd 95 million 


this year, increasing the market for views around the country indicate 
home film rentals by more than 50 that many Americans have already 


□ My payment 
Kendosed 
(check or 
money order 
id theltfn 


LOEWS MONTE-CARLO 

presents 


Americans, e 
pies, love the 


illy young cou-. 
ess and solitude 



Reuters M^qt General Nimeiri said that 

KHARTOUM — The United Mr. Bosh bad brought a message 
Stales has pledged continued sup- from President Ronald Reagan re- 


port for 


General Nimeiri said that giQn’s capital of K*»a»ia to inspect 
i bad brought a message the refugee situation there, 
adent Ronald Reagan re- (At a refugee camp near Kassala, 


to help solve its iterating U.S. support “and willing- Mr. Bush made a personal appeal 


Gaafar Nimeiri said Tuesday after 
talks with Vice President George 
Bush. 



/VENUE IQUiSE 

INlLftfM 


2K Anruetflttie -NSDBnsstis 

no2ie«a.9i 


needs to solve its problems." 

He said the visit by Mr. Bosh, 
who arrived Monday night at the 
start of a tour of African nations 
hurt by a drought, underlined dose 
bilateral relations- Mr. Bush will 
also visit Mali and Nigpr- 

General Nxmeiri also told Mr. 
Bush that an influx of hundreds, of 
thousands of famine victims from 
neighboring countries hariadd wi to 
Sudan’s ectmomic problems. 

Sudan, which receives about 
S250 million, in U.S. aid annually , 
plagued by trade and budget defi- 
cits, debts of about $9 hfllirm anri a 
simmering rebdliaa. 

General Nimeiri said that Mr. 
Bush, in talks lasting' an' hour,, 
briefed him on a “great project” 
that the United States planned for 
Sudan to boost agricultural output. 
He gave no details. 

The presuteur said they also dis- 
cussed African and Middle East 
develop moils, adding that- there 
were “no great differences in view- 

points.” • 

After meeting General TTanon, 
Mr. Bush! left for the eastern re- 


tenant Colonel Mengistu Haile 
Mariam, to permit the safe passage 
of food to rebel-controlled areas 
inside Eilriapia in the hope of stop- 
ping tire flood of mote tha n one 
nrilfian refugees across the bonier 
-into Sudan, United Press Interna- ,, 
tional reported. /, 

{Mr. Bush termed - tire scene at 
the refugee camp less than 15 mil* : 

(24 kilometers) from the Ethiopian 
border “awesome.” He vowed that 
the United States would seek beTp 
from tire international community 
to alleviate the catastrophe. "Whim 
you see this, the tragedy just shat- 
ters you,” Mr. Bush said. 

{He returned to Khartoum after 
his visit to the camp.] 

Sudan is strongly ahti-Coonriu- 
nist and dosely aligned with Egypt, 
Washingt on’s leading ally in & 
Arab world. Washington and*/ 
Khartoum also share security inter- 
ests m the region, including opposi- 

tion to Libya and Ethiopia.' 


M ORE News IN1E5S TIME 

WE WORLD IN T6 RAGES 


vie. charted witn tne mump « oKnueiiua m . 

C roatiadiSng World War LL has been ordered by a U-& magistrate to be 
returned to Yugoslavia to face trial on a angle count mmOcr. 
Reorder ot Monday by VS. Magistrate Votacy Y Brown fr.was 
only the first step in what is expected to be a fengdiy sen^ 
proceedings in the (Jutted Kates before Mr. Artukovic, 85, can actually 
be extradited oo the Yugoslavian war crimes drerge. Deputation pro- 
ceedings against him began nearly eight .yem mo 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


Page 3 


ScUon Viol enc .. 


Relations to Crucial Point 


* mil* Sc^ 1 '^ 


ftn and me ■ 


By Joanne Omang 
and Edward Cody 

h ' WASiSgTON - The United 

ed^M, tu * ‘^pcnJcnJ^ ^'States and Honduras have readied 
p/ tk? axfll ' a h? |® IV a cnirial stage in thdr ridations as i 

JL, 7J“ JW’ had t-i Jff k 'Honduran leaders, especially in the | 
"i; J ■ 1/ Bihar r.J^ H *; mibtaiy, continue to hesitate over. ; 
winfi constituencies m alh^Ult the country's Hippo rt of UiL ef- 
% V ” I{ * w' forts against Nicaragua and leftist 

red in TO A D . , ‘insurgents in H Salvador. 

11 UUV |\0| A Officially, relations between the 

* Pnhce charged a i- u jj United Slates and Honduras could 
with the murders' „r ,1? ^ wearily be wanner, 
hcan Army attack l a Ji , 01 It! Bul Honduras, which has be- 
' "*** on in come a major ate for U.S. mOitary 
O’Keefe was clurtv i ^exercises, naming, intelligence and 
f^t.HewaTfiV.n^ ^ ^supply, now is seeking economic 
-jjjjy 1 1 ,n Potiiv-!** and military conccKiniK- . 


Mceftf; and military concessions. 


O'lvcrfe m - . ■ 1° the words of one knowledge- 

wssbsslS^ 




• Mt n'tJ , ‘9S himwiiij.r^IornKjre-ecoQomicandrQilhary aid 
Jc " lcd ,hc has sought a written U.£ do- 

mvnlvcnwnr m lhc coStmenL 

Honduras has also begun to 
show more independence in hs ac- 
w Jjions, most notably last November 
LD ■ — An accused v-ai criimnsi Twefta barred Salvadoran soldiers 
ifling of thousands of Serbrui'^fron 1 the Regional Mflhaiy Train- 
V»r II, has been ordered b\ a i ft * mg Center. The center, set up with 

. funds ai Puerto Castilla on the 
coast, was established to 
Salvadorans without increas- 
tfid States before Mr ^nolSSS^B *e number of UiS. advisers in 
•ugoslavian war crimes cWC® Salvador, 
egao nearly eight vears Honduran and US. sources also 

■ onvnnmn. .s V ‘ sav the commander of the Hondu- 



General Walter L6pez Reyes 

But many in Honduras and the 
United Stales believe that the prob- 
lems between the two countries will 
be solved, because senior Hondu- 
ran military officers share U.S. 
concern over Nicaragua and have 
become dependent cm U.S. leader- 
ship *nd financial aid. 

The relationship between Hon- 
duras *wd the United States h»g 
developed rapidly in recent years. 

When the leftist Sandinists took 
power in neighboring Nicaragua in 


5214.7 million it gave Hooduras 
this year. 

Honduras was also reported to 
have asked for a separate security 
agreement with the United States, 
and for F-5 fighter jets for its sir 
force. The United States has re- 
fused these requests, while talks cm 
aid continue. 

The response in Washington to 
Honduras’ demands has beat wea- 
ry annoyance. 

‘They’re already getting what 
they deserve. They’re just seeing 
bow far they can push it,” a State 
Department analyst said. 

On Jan. 18, the Hondurans 
pushed it too far. for Robert C 
McFarlane; President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s national security adviser. Mr. 
McFarlane stalked out of a meeting 

during a visit to Tegucigalpa when 

Honduran officials insisted on a 
written promise of U.S. military 
support in the 'event of outside at- 



U.S. Rights Group Says 
Sandinists Have Curbed 
Abuses, Rebels Haven’t 



edveraen i in alleged anSfaWP® resolvedto 

. . ■ | ¥!•■ | , jased there unless the U.S. Con- 

Lueufl Hijacker s endorses ariiniiristialion po- 
ll (AFP) — Thousands ™ 

provide fire 

his part m hijacking an aiihacrfmidclitionar S14 mitt inn that the 
utgM at Karachi prison on Tuadjiteagan administration wants for 
* *™ 2J arl * He had been a »4c program, these rebels would be 
nfjkaT Ah Bhutto, who tins aho^roke, jobless, homeless and 
Mr. Bhuttos Pakistan Peoples ginned, posing a serious problem 
<1 Zia ul-Haq earlier rejected a rt,i' or Honduras, 
i e commuted the death wDiencohL 0fficials already have charged 
life imprisonment. Mr. Baluchi 1 dre rebels have murdered left- 
las of the Al-Zulfikar mncu££p Honduran pohdoans on beh^f 
Airiinc plane .o Kahn, 

xbanon,” one officer said. 

- One Honduran source with ao- 

$769 Million forOI^^^" 

More than $769 million in daitugsbetenmnsd to reduce or end Hon- 
!adiz Oil tanker are being dairacdhluran suppon for the Nicaraguan 
1 90 French ciustal communities ajebels, and has notified President 
\duaK thdr lawyers announceilleiJamel Ori^a Saavedra of Nicara- 
K case was March 1 ua of his intention through a pri- 

gslled into waters off the coasidfcate channeL . . 
roA. creaimg a .slick IS miles 129 it But another source explained 
meters) long, which polluted the Fctiai the general has not gained 
tie to meet Wctlnc*!.t\ wth USDigh-level sj^pwt in tbe.army for 
ad I*** Apnl that Indiana Standari: 1 ® st f“d and said that. the genanl 
(HeftMUonal 0.1 o. and Arw Tc^plf^d to a reemt viator that 
I in thecae JuJcr McOarr^idila^f^y ^ OTe ^ ^ . 
ittsohiadiavics were ncgUceniiiulsj The Reagan arummsuation has 

ot worked out what it would do if 
® y* ‘ tonduras were lost as a base far 

• . f - . ijlicaraguan rebels and for U2S. 

priiAa Har DOF ins Mftffilaiy maneuvers aimed at pres- 

.sing the Sandinists, a US. offi- 
iguav ha udd M iwt vu-rmam tnn^aj said. 

|g» liar criituiuil Mill at large. t*n- in t h a t event, he said, there 
igjd Tucsd.1% .ould be little choice but to adopt 

minuter nf slate m hk ■ “long-tenn containmeat : policy” 

’ " ■*" military and 

and political 

_ neighbors. 

0-P»rigua> in die l ,J N»> This would be difficult because 

,osta. Rica, to the south, has a 

o Bomb 24 ToM-nsm^X^S. 1 ^ 

bined Dispatches' - »rw wjjrth.- rests on a young and uncer- 

• •sk 

-r-rj- 

"i^'S^oviet Official Orders. 

tdOtt the unfinished lra» iannl ® B! ^ 

If- 


d uras. Honduras, worried that it 
was the left’s next target, welcomed 
the US. attention. 

Now, about 1,300 U.S. military 
and ISO diplomatic personnel are 
stationed there, and the number 
grows to around 5,000 during the 
nearly nonstop military maneuvers. 

Exercises such as the current Kg 
Pine 3. winch is to involve up to 
4,500 UiL soldiers using tanks and 
armored personnel carriers, have 
cost the United States at least $100 
million. 

Further millions of dollars have 
gone into housing, two radar sta- 
tions, a field hospital and into 
building or improving right air- 
fields. Most of this is said to be. '&S^^6££}i 
tenrnnrstrv consfnicaion for the ex- F MartimaTas chief of the 


The Hondurans told Mr. McFar- 
lane that they trusted bis word and 
the word of Mr. Reagan, but 
were worried that a future UJ 
president “might not be as strong” 
and would fad to act in a crisis, 
according to me person who was 
present at the meeting. 

The Hondurans also said they 
were worried about military 
threats, from H Salvador as wefl as 
Nicaragua. The two countries 
fought a brief wax over disputed 
territory in 1969. 

The observer said that Mr. 
McFarlane replied that the 1947 
Inter-American Treaty of Recipro- 
cal Assistance, which considers an 
armed attack on one American 
state to be in attack on all, binds 
the Western Hemisphere together 
well enough and would suffer if 
there were bilateral agreements be- 
sides. He expressed annoyance that 
the president’s word was not 
enough and left. 

But- the Hondurans had made 
their point. “I wouldn't rule out a 
written statement of some kind 
now ” a State Department official 
said. 

UiL attention to Honduran de- 
mands was focused by the barracks 
coup on Match 31 that removed a 


Thu Wntmonn Pos 

Nicaraguan guerrilla recruits carrying outdated rifles train in a camp in southern Honduras. 

3 Years After Civilian Ride, Military 
Stdl Guides Honduran Foreign Policy 



temporary construction for the a 
erases, but sometimes it is used to 
support U3. aims elsewhere in 
Central America. 

An airfield at Palmerola that was 
expanded with Uil. military con- 
struction funds has become head- 
quarters foe a 1,200-man U.S, mili- 
tary presence, including a field 
hospital and a U5. air reconnais- 
sance squadron that flies regular 
missions in support of Salvadoran 
Army troops. • 

Another airfield at Aguacate in 
central Honduras, improved far 
what the admmistration said then 
was support for the Big Pine2 exer- 
cise in 1983, has become the main 
base for ami-Sandinist airdrops to 
guerrillas in Nicaragua, according 
to a knowledgeable rebd official. 

As theU-S. involvement in Hon- 
duras grew, Honduras asked for 
bilateral talks to redefine its overall 
relationship with the United States, 
and discussions began in August. 

It has been reported that Hondu- 
ras has requested a doubling of 
economic aid, to $1 3 bQBon over 
four years, and a sharp increase in 
military aid to S100 million a year 
for the next four years. 

For fiscal 1986, however, the 
Reagan administration has .pro- 
posed $142.9 milli on in economic 
aid, considerably less 'than .the 


Vnti-Comiptioii Drive 


ftl*d 

. f-'nifiv d : Raaert 

ho&an '• fhc ^ MOSCOW — Interior Minister 


; Mikhail N. Rutkevich, a so- 
sdentist and member of the 



varez Martinez, as 
armed (races and replaced him 
with General Ldpez, an officer 
much more skeptical of U.S, goals 
in the region. 

General L6pez is considered to 
have at least as much power , in 
Honduran affairs as the president; 
Roberto Suazo CArdova. . 

Many Hondurans insist that 
they must prepare for the day when 
the US. attention wanes in the re- 
gion and they are left to their own 
devices. Then, they argue, they will 
be threatened not only from Nica- 
ragua but from El Salvador. . 

“If Nicaragua ever invades us. it 
will be an international problem 
immediately, and the U.S. or the 
Organization of American States or 
something will be on hand,” rea- 
soned a conservative Honduran 
businessman. “But if we have prob- 
lems with H Salvador, it is only a 
local affair and we wiD get no 
help.” 

Honduras and El Salvador are 
Soon to end five years of direct 
t«n« on thdr disputed border, and 
no agreement is in sight 

Now the Hondurans see what 
used to be a shabby, corrupt Salva- 
doran Army becoming a formida- 
ble fighting (race with UJS. aid. 
Convinced that El Salvador’s leftist 
rebels win eventually be eliminat- 
ed, fhe Hondurans worry about the 
■ new Salvadoran strength. 

That position is greeted with 
skepticism at the State Depart- 
ment, where ills believed that while 
the Honduran government tray be 
divided on the surface, it is first and 
foremost terrified of Nicaragua 
«nd -wifi do nearly anything to 
strengthen itself against any future 
Sandinist threat. 


By Edward Cody 

Washington fast Service 

LA PAZ, Honduras — From the 
marble chapel built by President 
Roberto Suazo Cdndova atop a hill- 
side on the edge of town, it is only 3 
few minutes’ walk down newly 
paved streets to where a 30,000-seat 
stadium is rising alongside Roberto 
Suazo C6rdova Boulevard. 

From there, it is another short 
stroll to Roberto Suazo Cdrdoya 
Hospital, with Mr. Suazo’s bust in 
the driveway, or to Guillermo 
Suazo Cbrdova Park, named for 
the president's brother, perhaps by 
way of the new town hall named 
after Mr. Suazo, served by Roberto 
Suazo Cordova Avenue. 

But despite the many signsiu his 
hometown of Mr. Suazo’s exalted 
position as his nation’s president, it 
Is the makeup of the nation's mili- 
tary leadership and its links to the 
United States that remain decisive 
for foreign policy and internal se- 
curity. 

At the pinnacle of Honduras' 
military establishment is General 
Walter L6pez Reyes, 44. He re- 
placed General Gustavo Alvarez 
Martinez, the armed Traces com- 
mander who for two years em- 
braced Reagan administration pol- 
icies as Us own. 

General Alvarez was sent into 
exile by younger officers who be- 
lieve that purely Honduran inter- 
ests would be eclipsed by regional 
UR. interests. 

U.S. diplomats have said that 
General Alvarez's removal last 
March caught them by surprise. 
Perhaps more important, it also re- 
versed the military leadership from 
General Alvarez’s one-man rule to 
the collegial decision-making that 
had been traditional in the Hondu- 
ran aimed forces. In addition, the 
move altered relationships between 
the U.S. Embassy and the Hondu- 
ran officer corps. 

U.S. officials “still have access, 
of course, but it is not the same as it 
was under Alvarez,” sad a Hondu- 
ran source who is well-informed on 
miQtaiy matters. “There is a son of 
tension now ” 

Under the 1982 constitution, Mr. 
Suazo — the first popularly elected 
Honduran president since Jose Ra- 
m6n VrUeda Morales was over- 
thrown by the Army in 1963 — 
became commander in chief of the 
armed f races as well as bead of the 
civilian government. 

In practice, however, the army 
has retained its traditional control 
over military affairs and shares 
power with the president in securi- 
ty matters within limits set by the 
army's. sense of constitutional rule. 

A Honduran source with years of 
experience with the military said 
that an important consideration for 
Honduran officers is a widely 
shared sentiment that the military 
as an institution is ultimately re- 
sponsible for the country. 



background, ac- 
5. ana Honduran 
i of Hon- 
lring the 
reflected 


A Honduran coload, said, for 
example; that the army would only 
transfer responsibility for internal 
security from the military to the 
civilian government when it felt 
that civilian politicians were ma- 
ture enough to be entrusted with 
the task. The idea, discussed last 
spring, has been dropped. 

Against this 
cording to U.S 
sources, the key dements of Hon 
duran foreign policy during the 
past several years have 
decisions in which the army had the 
major role, even though the policies 
may have beat carried out by the 
civilian government. 

Foreign Minister Edgando Paz 
B arnica, for example, recently de- 
clared that a Misldto Indian rebd 
leader. Steadman Fagoth M Oiler, 
would be expelled from the coun- 
try. Hus statement was followed by 
prompt action by military security 
forces, indicating that the foreign 
minister was acting in concert.with 
the military. But lus simultaneous 
threat that all Nicaraguan rebels 
would be thrown out as well if they 
violated Honduran law has had no 
effect, indicating that he had got 
ahead of military policy. 

The arrangement between civil- 
ian and military authorities here is 
reflected in the composition of the 
National Security Council, the 
highest decision-making body in 
security or foreign affairs. Mr. 
Suazo presides over it. He and 
three other civilian officials are 
joined by General L6pez, the head 
of the joint chiefs of staff, and the. 
commanders of the army, navy, air 
force and public security forces,- 
giving the military a 6-4 majority. 

According to Honduran and 
U5. sources, however, broad po- 
licy tines on security affairs first are 
settled iu the Superior Aimed 
Forces Council, the collegial body 
revived by General Ldpez. 


ler his 5-%cjr 
Robert ManhfV 


tea and thf^Jcts tough, concerted action 

Caww 1 »« crime and corruption, the 

iafi. hdd talk- k ' n i: . ~jn. mspaper Sovietskaya Rosaa re- 
*ry JANA rejvrtw ]^ utW tVjmed Tuesday. 

trial TiicmIu^ >n 1 ,‘ hI1 (uJ it Mr. Fedorchuk, a former head erf 
iirftie KGB security police, made the 
’ n ( Brcdtfl at a meeting Monday of beads 


the «|i<fJti»in. H'." ^ .Interior Ministry departments of subordinates, 

m H '*T i throughout the country. In- f — : 


goods. 

. Mr. Rutkevich’s article called for 
a drive against corruption at all 
levels, and echoed the Andropov 

policy that senior officials should 
bear responsibility for the actions 


III j •klUfc- — - « •— - 

rr’WJrvber"*"' aided were commanders of the 

wntl ' 1 ’ .The department heads were told 

especially combat economic 
: -5S, “particularly in agriculture 
trade,” said the newspaper, 
is published by the Commur 
si Party Central Co mmitt ee. 
i*Mr. Fedorchuk was deputy head 
... t-apiu 1 ‘ the KGB when it was headed by 

■'i‘. u .{ U av V. Andropov. After Andro- 

i-vi i ii'toP-T 'd? became party leader in No- 
/ B j„h tuber 1982, Mn Fedorchuk was 
Ml k i j,’ li'M^pwed to the Interior Ministry to 


dAidfor 



an Mid rtw* 
X a niowgc 
l Reapio it- 

‘and willing 

ijrnvT SudJ**' 
tonv** 
y Mi B*i"h. 

ttain A n s 

frlmcv! 

f . Bu*h *■**' 

10- ti^d M* 
hundred:* 
.(Clip.' irotit 
ud t.’ 

1 an*!U4liv, «* 
dt’fi- 
bifluni anil ■' 

id rtMt Ml 


in*"** 


u -int v V *e po&e and cranbat 


IV . m !«’ r 1 ’ j .^n^ption itt the ministry and else- 
i/rri^tereinSoviet society/. 

' at Monday’s meeting was 

,1.» J ”JS°r K. ligachev, another An- 
jf°P 0 v protege Mr. 
aural Connnittee s 


mi 


Sisri' 11 


«io> 


u.wi.il ref* ” .tf&itx 


' «K«ing was 

- -**«nnov nm.loi I iparhftv , a 

secretary, was 
.iiered to have won Andropov’s 
jv tariff bv cracking down on corrup- 
}M f 1 while he was party chief in 

the re"*!/ ‘ " 

,24 kii , ' lllt w — r 

S«i .ter ”■* , ^cember 1983, two months before, 
she : c ifli | ^idn>pov died, He-was given the 
rr.wii thr ™ scnitinizing progress in An- 


Siberia.. 

^ *Mr- ligachev was promoted in 




■’s campaign to enforce dis- 
s,-u v. “d honesty in 

u-r'" 1 * 1 - rtt fJ economy. 

, j re* u °r. ,-jitf*«ts appointment was interpreted 
. v ,»it i‘‘ , ^ ; *hetimeaspartof anattemptby 
” ’ < t ,vU n " ^ in' fading health, to 


w .‘t^.j^wparate arudejn Sorie 


ahead 


Utfii! nnsf 

ties *l»‘ ^ r ’ 
Mhts- s 

I ibid 

f«! N.iww* 
* ejwUTH rt 


^ — j Sovietskaya 

^i^ssia quoted. Andropov’s harsh 



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Colonel Cesar Elvir Sierra, the 
army spokesman, said the council 
includes 30 to 40 officers, depend- 
ing on the subject under discussion, 
and most hold at least the rank of 
lieutenant colonel 

Interplay between groups of of fl- 
eers within the council has been the 
major factor in determining Hon- 
duran policies toward the United 
States and the ami-Sandinist rebels 
since General L6pez took over as 
commander, according to diplo- 
matic and Honduran sources who 
have followed the changes. 

The council, they 1 added, has be- 
come a forum for a group of mid- 
dle-ranking officers who were long 
unhappy with General Alvarez's 
enthusiasm for U.S. goals but shut 
out of command decisions by his 

autocratic management. Their rela- 
tive influence with senior officers 
on the council, more inclined to- 
ward U.S. policy, is likely to affect 
where Honduras goes in the 
months i>hi*-iH 

Mr. Suazo, meanwhtie. has fasci- 
nated and infuriated Honduran po- 
litical circles with skillful back- 
room maneuvers that have male 
him master of the country’s party 
politics. 

Efrain Diaz Arrivillaga, the only 
Christian Democrat in the Nation- 
al Congress and a frequent dissent- 
er from government policies, says 
that Mr. Suazo, S6, commands loy- 
alty from opposition politicians 
through the granting of public 
works projects. 


Thr AuiKuiied Freu 

WASHINGTON — .Ml sides in 
Nicaragua's conflict have violated 
the laws of war, but the country’s 
leftist Sandinist government has re- 
duced its abuses while those of the 
U.S.-backed guerrillas have contin- 
ued unchecked, a private human 
rights group said Tuesday. 

The New York-based Americas 
Watch Committee also reported 
that the United States has “aided 
and abetied” the guerrillas, known 
as ’■contras.” “in committing 
abuses by organizing, training, sup- 
plying and financing them, and by 
serving as their rigorous and enthu- 
siastic public relations advocate." 

Americas Watch, which moni- 
tors human rights in the Western 
Hemisphere, also said that by pro- 
ducing a manual for guerrillas with 
advice on “neutralizing” Nicara- 
guan officials, tbe U.S. Central In- 
telligence Agency “directly solicit- 
ed the contras to engage in 
violations of the Laws of war. 

In a 97-page report, entitled "Vi- 
olations of the Laws of War by 
Both Sides in Nicaragua." Ameri- 
cas Watch said the rebels have 
launched indiscriminate attacks on 
civilians, tortured and mutilated 
prisoners, murdered wounded sol- 
diers, taken hostages and raped 
women. 

Among the five rebel groups, the 
Nicaraguan Democratic Force, the 
largest one, and Misura. an Indian 
group, committed the most viola- 
tions. the report said. 

Americas Watch accused iltc 
Nicaraguan Democratic Force, the 
group most closely tied to the Cl A. 
of “the deliberate use of terror tac- 
tics to disrupt the cofree harvest.” 

The Hondnras-based group, 
with an estimated 12.000 fighters, 
also is accused of attacking un- 
armed civilians, forcibly recruiting 


young men and attacking dearly 
marked humanitarian vehicles. The 
report also said that List month, a 
Nicaraguan Democratic Force, or 
FDN. unit kidnapped and raped 
two West German women who 
were involved in relief work in 
northern Nicaragua. 

“The insurgents have only rarely 
taken prisoners in combat.” the re- 
port said. “They claim to disarm 
and release them on the spot. In 
regard to the FDN, however, credi- 
ble testimony indicates that, at 
least on some occasions, their 
forces have actually ‘finished off* 
wounded opponents.” 

■ Statement by Rebel Leader 

The chief Nicaraguan guerrilla 
commander declared Tuesdjy th.it 
his forces were willing to accept 
heavy casualties in seizing and 
holding territory inside Nicaragua 
if that was needed to gain renewed 
U.S. aid. The Associated Pros re- 
ported from Washington. 

"It would be costly for u.s. but to 
get the funds, we’ll pay that price.” 
said Enrique Bermudez, null tar \ 
commander of the Nicaraguan 
Democratic Force, 

Mr. Bcnnudc.' also called allega- 
tions that his troop-s are continuing 
to comma serious human rights 
abuses “propaganda" bs Nicara- 
gua’s leftist Sandinist government 

However. Americas Watch re- 
sponded that none of its informa- 
tion came from the Sandinists. 

Mr. Bermudez appeared at the 
Washington press conference as 
pan of the guerrillas’ campaign to 
persuade Congress that the insur- 
gents deserve renewed U.S. hack- 
ing. 

The CIA Tunneled SSO million n» 
them from 1**SI to lost June, before 
Congress stopped the aid. Mr. Rea- 
gan iv seeking $14 million more. 


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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


Ttcral 



tribune 


PidilMwd WUfa TV New York Tlxno* and TV Wadni^M Pou 


Afghanistan’s Long Fight 


“Afghaflistanisrn” is a word sometimes used 
.to designate an excessive interest in exotic 
places remote From American interest But the 
real Afghanistan is a place of very great Amer- 
ican interest moral and strategic. This is so 
because of the epic struggle the Afghan people 
have been waging against the Soviet invasion 
or their country for more than five years — the 
Kremlin now has been fighting Afghans longer 
than it fought Germans in World War II. 

The Soviet Union, naturally, prefers to con- 
duct its depredations quietly and in the dark. 
To avoid having to cope with an international 
public stirred by pictures of war on television, 
it has made a strenuous effort to keep indepen- 
dent observers from viewing its .Afghan cam- 
paign. But some observers do penetrate, and 
die millions of refugees — as much os a third 
of the Afghan population has been forced into 
foreign exile — also provide information. The 
latter sources enabled a law professor from 
neutral Austria. Felix Ermacora, to prepare 
what the U.S. delegate calls an unprecedented- 
ly “full and fair" report on Soviet conduct to 
the United Nations Commission on Human 
Rights, which is based in Geneva. 

Tlie new report accuses “foreign" troops — 
they can only be Soviet — of bombing villages, 
massacring villagers and summarily executing 
guerrillas. It lists instances in wltich 100 or 
more civilians at a lime were murdered. It 
documents some of the specific actions by 


which the Soviet forces have evidently at- 
tempted to destroy the food-producing and 
irrigation systems so that there would no long- 
er a viable countryside: a policy of drying 
up the sea in which the guerrilla fish swim. 

Mr. Ermacora's findings are sure to rein- 
force the deep sympathy that Americans feel 
for the victims of Soviet imperialism in Af- 
ghanistan and the desire to do everything that 
prudence allows to even the odds. Fortunately, 
there is a broad American consensus on this 
score. On the crucial considerations — the 
heroism and nobility of the Afghan resistance, 
the absolute wrongness of the Soviet invasion 
— there is little of the sort of wearing debate 
that marks the American attitude (o. say, Nic- 


aragua. The Afghan people are fighting a 
clear-cut, unadulterated foreign aggression. 


clear-cut. unadulterated foreign aggression. 
Americans are, without argument, helping out. 

What will make Moscow desist from its 
aggression in Afghanistan? Its casualties and 
economic costs go on. It continues to pay 
heavy political costs for despoiling an Islamic, 
Third World country. Fair, internationally 
supported terms for a negotiated solution re- 
main available: withdrawal of Soviet troops, a 
return of refugees, self-determination, non- 
alignment. But first the Soviet Union must call 
it quits to its campaign to conquer Afghani- 
stan. depopulate the country ana reduce it to 
the status of a satellite state. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Throwing Away an Ace 


Congress denied President Reagan's repeat- 
ed requests in his first term to produce new 
chemical weapons, and now he is back with the 
same request. The tone this year, however, is 
subdued. The president says his chemical war- 
fare program has a high priority. As these 
things go, “high" is uot very hi gh- The indica- 
tion is that the administration will give it the 
old college try but will save its heaviest artil- 
lery for various other causes. 

The case for breaking President Nixon's 
moratorium on production of chemical weap- 
ons is no better than it was in the past The 
basic argument is that to deter the Russians' 
use of their considerable stores of chemical 
weapons, the Americans must have a credible 
capability to retaliate in kind. 

The familiar response, and it is still a good 
one, is that deterrence can be maintain^ bv 
other means: by the old stuff still in the Ameri- 
can chemical stockpile or. if the Pentagon is 
right that the stockpile has deteriorated, by 
anti-chemical warfare measures and by threats 
to use other types of weapons. 

Resuming production or chemical weapons, 
moreover, would convulse Europe, the princi- 
pal place where the United States might plan 
to conduct a chemical defense. The Pentagon 
has lots of arguments about bolstering deter- 


rence and raising the nuclear threshold, and all 
of (hem ignore the central political reality that 
a new chemical program would drive up the 
wall the people in whose behalf the program is 
chiefly justified. Surely it is not necessary to 
point out that, with the nuclear and space talks 
about to resume, this is a peculiar moment for 
the United States to hand Moscow a powerful 
new propaganda club to wield. 

After aU, a powerful old propaganda dub 
already exists. Fortunately, it is in American 
hands. The Kremlin's continued production of 
chemical weapons and its alleged sponsorship 
of chemical warfare against local peoples in 
Indochina and Afghanistan enables and re- 
quires the United States to portray the Soviet 
Union as the planner and perpetrator of a 
dread outlawed form of warfare. 

Recently Pravda again indulged the Soviet 
practice of seeking to deflect world attention 
from its own chemical-weaponry polities by 
accusing the Reagan administration of “pre- 
paring for a chemical rearmament of Ameri- 
ca. 1 ' Let Mr. Reagan back off his proposals, 
which are unlikely to go far anyway, and keep 
the heat where it belongs: on Moscow. Cam- 
paigning for a new' chemical weapons program 
amounts to throwing away an ace. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Traitorous? Nonsense 


The head of the Slate Department's Bureau 
of Politico-Military Affairs has personally in- 
dicted, tried and convicted Leslie Gelb of The 
New York Times for what be considers irre- 
sponsible. even traitorous conduct. What was 
Mr. Gelb's offense? He did his job as a respon- 
sible journalist by reporting on an internation- 
al controversy over nuclear weapons. Thai is 
no offense at aB. What is offensive is the 
behavior of the official. Lieutenant General 
John Chain. It calls out for repudiation. 

General Chain is displeased with The 
Tunes’ account (1HT. Feb. 15) of US. contin- 
gency plans to deploy nuclear depth charges in 
Canada, Iceland, Bermuda and Puerto Rico 
without consulting their governments. 

The story noted that disclosure of the plans 
by William Arki/z, a critic of U.S. weapons 
policy, had caused a considerable amount of 
public and parliamentary debate abroad. 

The general ordered his staff to stop talking 


to Mr. Gelb — an order now rescinded. He 
went a shameful step further. Mr. Gelb once 
held the same job the general now occupies. 
His photograph therefore hung with those of 
other predecessors in the bureau's waiting 
room. The general replaced Mr. Gelb's picture 
with this notation: "Removed for Cause. The 
P.M. Director. 1977 to 1979. did willingly, 
willfully, and knowingly publish, in 1985, clas- 
sified information the release of which is 
harmful and damaging to the country." 

Removing the photograph is childish. But 
by posting that notice, hke an indictment, the 
general appoints himself prosecutor, judge and 
jury. It is a gross abuse of authority and an 
undeserved, official slur on Mr. Gelb’s distin- 
guished government and journalistic service. 

Mr. Gelb dealt most responsibly both with 
the Arkin documents and the officials be con- 
sulted to verify these papers. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


The Hungry in America 


America's hungry citizens do not look like 
the starving stickpeople in many Third World 
nations, but they do exist, standing in the long 
soup lines of urban cities and sitting on the 
porches of rundown shacks in rural areas. 

A task force on hunger in America recently 
released found that “up to 20 million citizens 
may be hungry at least some period of time 
each month." Though this natioa's problem is 
less dramatic than the plight of the hungry 
worldwide, it is just as real. 

In some of the poorer areas of the United 


States, the doctors discovered reported cases 
of kwashiorkor and marasmus, two diseases of 
advanced malnutrition usually found in devel- 
oping nations. In other locations. Americans 
were found with vitamin deficiencies, diabetes, 
lethargy and other medical problems directly 
related to inadequate food. 

Given the mood in Washington, the report's 
call for increased domestic funding {to fight 
hunger] is likely lo receive a negative recep- 
tion. Still, there are too many people going 
hungry ia this country* Perhaps a start can be 
made on fashioning a solution. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 


FROM OUR MARCH 6 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Senator Decries Federal Waste 
NEW YORK — Senator Aldrich's figures of 
Governmental extravagance caused wide com- 
ment. The New York Tribune says: “Senator 
Aldrich says if he were permitted to run 
the Federal Government he could save 
S300.000.000 a year. By all means let his bill 
for the appointment of a commission to intro- 
duce business methods be passed." The Hart- 
ford Times remarks: “This annual waste of 
$300,000,000 is nearly as much as the whole 
cost of the Federal Government during the 
first term of President Oevdand. We think the 
Rhode Island Senator understated rather than 
overstated the actual wastage that has grown 
up during the period of ‘expansion’ since 
1898." The Washington Star adds: “Money in 
large sums is necessary for the Government. 
But if there is waste it should be stopped." 


1935: Hitler Has Diplomatic 'Cold" 
LONDON — A certain amount of bewilder- 
ment was created in British official circles {on 
March 5j by the announcement that Chancel- 
lor Adolf Hitler was suffering from a cold and 
had requested a postponement of British For- 
eign Secretary Sir John Simon's visit to Berlin. 
The question London is now- pondering is 
whether the Fuhrer's illness is real or diplo- 
matic; and its sudden onset following Prime 
Minister Ramsay MacDonald's warning [on 
March 4] that Great Britain was rearming 
largely on account of Germany, tends to in- 
cline the British toward the belief (hat Hitler’s 
cold comes within the latter category. It is 
therefore being asked whether the latest effort 
toward European pacification is in process 
of being sidetracked, and if so. what the 
repercussions of this development will be. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chaumm 1 958-! *82 


Katharine graham, william s. paley. arthi/r ochs sulzberger 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEW1RTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Pubbdur 

Executive Editor 
Editor 
Deputy Editor 

Dtpu rv Editor 
Associate Editor 


International Herakl Tribune, 181 Avenue Ourles-de-Gaullc, 92200 Neuflly-sur* Seine, 
FStSS-l2d5. Tata: 612718 (H«aJd>. Cable HcraW Paris. 


Depmy Publisher 
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Director tf Circulation 
retatr of Aihtrasmg Soles 


Direciatr tie la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

'!!“ jj’iS&i’Sb SHai 

sTm%paaI * IJOOMO F. BCS Nmum B 1 1IIBIIX. WJJ- 

us. * nm 




Making Law 


Instrument 


Of Injustice 

By Anthony Lewis 

W ashington — in the world 
of political tyranny, the famil- 


Keeping the Peace in Divided Cyprus Falls to UN 


N ICOSIA— The United Nations 
troops have been keeping the 


By Jonathan Power 


peace in Cyprus for 20 years. They 
could be here another 20. Brought in 
to stop the killings between the Greek 
and Turkish communities, they are 
now manning a buffer zone that ex- 
tends 217 kilometers (135 miles) 
across the border. Cyprus, for hun- 
dreds of years one countiy. is now 
split into very different regions. 

The negotiations at the end of Jan- 
uary. the first direct ones in five 
years, between the leaders of the two 
sides and the UN secretary -general. 
Javier Phrez de CueDar, came to noth- 
ing. Although there is talk of renew- 
ing this effort, die differences in out- 
look. years of mistrust and the not 
disagreeable aspects of the status 
quo, mean the UN may be here for 
the foreseeable future. There are 
2.600 UN troops — British, Danes, 
Swedes, Canauans, Austrians and 
Australians under die command of 
an Austrian general Gunter Greindl. 

The center of Nicosia is like the 
center of Berlin — a derelict strip of 
no-man’s-land and abandoned 
houses, devastated by the bitter fight- 
ing 10 years ago when the Turkish 
army invaded Cyprus with the big- 
gest para troop drop since World War 
II to protect the Turks. 

Every day the British 10M troops 
drive in armored can down the nar- 
row road that separates the opposing 
sentries. On one side, under the deep 
red crescent-mooned flag of Turkey, 
are the alen and sharply dressed 
troops from the mainland. On the 
other, under the blue and white flag 


of Greece and the paler flag of Cy- 
prus, are the Greek Cypriot troops, 
lazy and careless. 

We stop at a Canadian-manned 
observation post, an abandoned 
bouse, skin a whisky bottle on the 
stairs that the officer believes is boo- 
by trapped and clamber onto the 
roof. In the Greek Cypriot pan of the 
city are the chaotic concrete symbols 
of heller-skelier economic growth. 
On the Turkish side is the elegant 


British were so obviously determined 
and that severe political repercus- 
(S, to sure they are not intimi- sions would have resulted from an least tolerant oniaais. 
daied by the Turkish patrolL Every assault stayed the Turkish hand. The Starting out in. law 15 years agg as 
week there is some incident — an UN troops are. as General Greindl a prosecutor in the town of Ostjek, 
attempt to challenge a farmer or an observes, a “human trip wire, the Mr- Seks found that the security po- 
increase in the fortifications. Each crossing of which raises the political Bee bad been opening private letters 
time the UN’s junior officers try and stakes for any contending force." — 100.000 letters by his reckoning, 
sort this out with their opposite north The UN presence has a dominat- That was against the law, so he pre- 


iar forms erf law may be used as 
instruments of persecution. That tru- 
ism was brought home to me recently 
by painful cases from two very differ- 
ent countries. Yugoslavia and South 
Africa. In both cases Ufe is at stake. 
In both, the authorities would serve 
their own interest if they tempered 
power with humanity. 

Vladimir Seks is a Yugoslav law- 
yer. He was the lead defense attorney 
in the lag political trial that ended 
recently in Belgrade. The evidence of 
even mild dissidence was so weak 
that the prosecutors scaled down the 
rhnrff*, and the three men convicted 
got tighter sentences than expected. 

But after the trial Mr. Seks himself 
Was imprisoned And last week he 
was disbarred permanently. It was 
a signal to all the country's lawyers: 
Do not defend dissidents. 

Mr. Seks. who is 42, suffers from 
an ulcer and a heart condition- He 
has been on a hunger strike since Feb. 

12 . Friends say fcns life is in dang e r . 

What 'has he done to bring such 
cruelty down upon him? He has been 
too faithful to the ideals of law; be 
took too seriously the promises of his 
country’s legal rode. This was espe- 
cially dangerous because he is a 
Croat, and among Yugoslavia's con- 
stituent republics Croatia has the 
least tolerant officials. 

Starting out inlaw 15 years ago as 
a prosecutor in the town of Ostjek, 
Mr. Seks found that the security po- 
lice bad been opening private letters 


sort this out with their opposite num- 
bers. In most cases they succeed, win- 
ning free passage for a fanner or 
dismantling some new sandbagging. 
Much of the day-to-day work is hum- 
drum. There are 150 observation 


observation 


The UN troops are, as their general observes, a 
"human trip wire, the crossing of which raises 
the political stakes for any contending force, ” 


ing influence on the island's politics. 
Cyprus is in hock to die Security 
Council Opinion there for once is 
unanimous on what to do. Mr. Pfcrez 
de Cuellar used to be the permanent 
representative in Nicosia and sees it 
as an important part of his hfe’s work 
to bring the two rides together again. 
Cyprus cannot afford to walk away 
from the UN and if it- cannot find a 
final peace through UN negotiations 
it win probably live with the tempo- 


That was against the law, so be pre- 
pared a prosecution. Officials or- 
dered him to give it up and apologize. 
Rather than do that be resigned. He 


rary peace imposed by the UN army. 
No one would want the whole 


somnolence of a besieged economy 
with its 19th century stone mansions 
and red-til ed-roof magnificence in- 
tact. The two worlds no longer touch 
except to provoke the other side. 
Without the UN troops, the verbal 
abuse and the spitting would flare 
into real fights. The UN is throwing 
sacking onto glowing embers. 

Out of Nicosia peacekeeping is 
more complex. In the countryside the 
buffer zone widens to up to seven 


posts along the buffer zone and sol- 
diers, often on their own, man them 
in 12-bour shifts. In the Danish sec- 
tor, in the hilly west of Cyprus, four 
men spend two weeks at a stretch on 
an isolated hilltop post cooking for 
themselves and being resupplied by 
British helicopters. 

This is low level stuff, but without 
it there could be conflagration. It has 
not always been so easy. One officer 
who has stem 17 years in the British 


buffer zone widens to up to seven who has spent (7 years in the British 
kilometers. It takes up 3 percent of army recalls the most terrifying mo- 
Cyprus's land surface. More signifi- meni in his whole career as bring 


candy it contains some of Cyprus's 
most productive dims farms. The 
UN troops are not only making sure 


pinned down in Nicosia's airport by 
Turkish paratroopers. The UN 
roops. although undent 


atroopers. The UN 
gh underanned, were 


the two sides keep apart but work prepared to fight to the last man to 
with the Greek farmers, whose land it protect the airport. The fact that the 


No one would want the whole 
world run by the UN. The idea of 
world government would be tbe ulti- 
mate abhorrent bureaucracy. But 
when tbe UN is brought into keep 
the peace and all sides accept it is 
quite amazing what it can do, both to 
those it seeks to help' and those who 
are sent to work for tL 
At one point I asked the young 
British officer who was accompany- 
ing me if he thought the British 
troops found tbe job a strain- “Brit- 
ish?” be said, unself oonsdously cor- 
recting me. “We’re UN.” He was 
only in tbe third month of a six- 
month duty, but already was infused 
with a spin! that is not picked up on 
the streets of London. 


International Herald Tribune. 


Winners Can Be Losers in Game of Hostile Takeovers 


M inneapolis — on a recent 

visit to New York. I picked up 


AVA visit to New York, I picked up 
a newspaper and discovered in the 
business section that my company 
might be the target of a takeover 
attempt. It caught my attention- But 
it was no surprise. 

Control Data, like almost every 
company in America, no mailer bow 
large, is vulnerable to the tidal wave 
of hostile takeovers that we have seen 
in recent years. Some may find this 
ironic. For more than 10 years, as a 
critic of corporate raiders, stock-mar- 


By William C. Norris 


ket speculators, opportunistic bank- 
ers. lawyers, arbitrageurs and other 


ers. lawyers, arbitrageurs and other 
power-hungry players in the real- 
money monopoly game of hostile 
takeovers, I have argued that such 
takeovers loot corporate treasuries, 
cheat shareholders and undermine 
our ability to compete. 

I have warned that they lead to the 
misuse of capital: force management 
to sacrifice long-term strategy and 


the development or new products and 
services for short-term gains; inhibit 
innovation, and cause job losses and 
economic upheaval that disrupt the 
lives of employers and communities. 

Nobody seems to have paid much 
attention. Last year, for example, a 
record number of companies repur- 
chased their own shares. Many did so 
as a defensive measure against real or 
implied takeover threats, paying a 
higher-than-market price to buy back 
stock from an unwanted suitor and 
thereby coining a new word in the 
corporate lexicon — “greenmail," a 
form of legalized banditry that has 
mainly rewarded its practitioners. 

The inescapable conclusion is that 
hostile takeovers are undermining 
our economic system and our com- 
petitiveness. But there is a ray of 
hope: statutes enacted at the state 
level, including Ohio and Minnesota. 


The most important component of 
the Minnesota law is a requirement 
that the acquiring company publicly 
disclose its plans and goals for the 
target company, its employees and 
the communities in which they live. 
This is obviously a critical require- 
ment in unwanted takeovers. But I 
also believe that even in the case of 
friendly combinations, tbe acquisi- 
tion should not be consummated if 
the negative aspects of the takeover 
cannot be resolved in an economical- 
ly and socially acceptable manner. 

What we need now is federal re- 
form along the same fines: a national 
response to the economic and social 
damage caused by hostile takeovers. 

The damage is real Recently, for 
example, a New Jeraey company 
called Edudata tried to take over a 
Minnesota company called Scientific 
Computers. Scientific Computers 


had about 250 employees and earned 
SO million on sales of $14.9 million 
in fiscal 1984. Edudata. by contrast, 
had few employees, virtually no track 
record and had been losing money. In 
another case. Cardiff Acquisitions 
came after Conwed, a Minnesota- 
based forest products company. 

Both of these takeover attempts 
would have succeeded had it not been 
for the Minnesota law, a law promot- 
ed by business. labor, academe and 
stale government, and upheld by fed- 


state government, and upneid qy tea- 
eral district and appellate courts. 
Cardiff, for example, failed in its first 


B rinkman ship, Not War, in Desert 


M arrakesh. Morocco — 
“The question." said a Mo- 


iVA “The question." said a Mo- 
roccan journalist, “is whether real 
war is inevitable." Everybody here 
understands what is meant by "real 
war." It is war between Morrow 
and Algeria, not just the pursuit of 
.Algerian-supported Polisario guer- 
rillas in the western Sahara. 

As it is. the effort to absorb the 
former Spanish Sahara into Moroc- 
co is involving 75 percent oT the 
Moroccan Army, and draining 
practically all development funds 
away from the rest or the country. 


By Flora Lewis 


away in the hoi air. Slate national- 
isms are raking root and therefore 
so are state antagonisms. 

Moroccans are proud and ambi- 
tious. Far from wing appalled at 


Part oi the danger now comes 
from Morocco’s su _• *41 fencing 
off the Western Sahara from what it 


considers Algeria’s proxy war. If 
the Polisario achieved its aim of an 


explosive population growth. King 
Hassan says that with proper in- 


Uh proper in- 
r coiud support 


Stilt, it has undeniable popular sup- 
port. Kina Hassan 11. who narrowly 


vestment the country could support 
80 million people. Half of the na- 
tion's population of 22 million is 
under 20 years old. 

In addition to the Western Saha- 
ra. there are old claims to the Im- 


port. King Hassan 11. who narrowly 
escaped well-armed coup attempts 
in 1971 and 1972, is more firmly in 
control than ever. Moroccan na- 
tionalism is running strong; he is its 
unchallenged embodiment. 

That is why the country gave 
overwhelming support to tbe s lar- 
ding treaty with Libya ratified last 
September. It was seen as a master 
stroke to outflank Algeria. 

The talk of a threat of war should 
be alarming u? Washington. Ameri- 
ca has made Morocco a linchpin in 
iis global strategy, a key way siation 
to the Gulf, anna kind* of substitute 
for Iran if the United States should 
want to send forces to the Gulf. 

Bui the view from here focuses 
on rivalry with Algeria to dominate 
North Africa. This is a fact of life of 
the post-colonial, superpower 
world. There is a struggle now in 
almost every area to become the 
leading regional power. That brings 
inevitable divergence of interest 
from the U.S. search Tor mainte- 
nance of (he status quo. 

Exhortations continue for unity 
of the Maghreb. But they float 


douf region of Algeria, which prob- 
ablv con Utlns the world's richest 


deposits of iron ore. Once Morocco 
extended as far as Senegal River, 
the southern border of Mauritania. 
Algeria is huge, nearly five times 


the Polisario achieved its aim of an 
independent Saharan state, it 
would no doubt be under Algerian 
tutelage, in effect providing Algeria 
with an Atlantic coast. Tbe series of 
bulwarks that King Hassan bufll in 
the desert have reached tbe Moroc- 
can-Algerian border. That means 
the guerrillas must attack from 
within .Algerian territory, and when 
the Moroccans hit back, they hit 
Algeria. Almost certainly, neither 
side wants a head-on war. But both 
sides are tempted by brink m a n ship. 
Both are aware that they may well 


slip over tbe edge. 

Libya has a vast arsenal of mod- 
ern Soviet weapons. Its neutrality 


the size of Morocco and more than (at the least) vis-a-vis Morocco 


four times as big as France. Tbe 
French annexed it as part of the 
metropolitan territory in colonial 
days, and therefore expanded its 
borders at the expense of both Mo- 
rocco and Tunisia. 

Algeria and Morocco have about 
the same size populations. Senior 
Moroccan officials claim the rivalry 
reflects Algerian “jealousy," be- 
cause before its war of liberation, 
there had never been an indepen- 
dent Algeria. The Turkish Empire 
never overcame Morocco, which 
has a thousand-year national histo- 
ry and many superb medieval mon- 
uments to show- for it. 

There is also a political conflict 
between conservative, monarchical 
Morocco and revolutionary, social- 
ist Algeria. But that weighs far less 
than nationalism in the present ten- 
sions between the two. 


comforts Rabat's calculations of 
the military balance. At best, from 
the Moroccan view, the thought 
that Libya might come to Moroc- 
co’s aid and threaten Algeria with 
war on two sides could drive Algiers 
to drop tbe Polisario. 

So it is a foolish mirage for 
Washington to think Morocco can 
be weaned from its new Libyan 
connection because tbe West disap- 
proves of such a tie. . 

American preoccupation with its 
own East- west rivalry too often 
overlooks the real terrain. Local 
ambitions are troublesome for U-SL 
planning. But if they are not taken 
into account, tbe plans are as reli- 
able as desert sands. It is in every- 
body's interest to press for a politi- 
cal settlement that would prevent a 

Moroccan-Algerian war. 

The iVen- York Times. 


Cardiff, for example, failed in its first 
attempt to acquire Conwed. It later 
succeeded, but only after raising its 
original bid by one-third. 

Yet even with die aid of the new 
law, companies can pay dearly to 
remain independent- Take Scientific 
Computers. Before die raid, the com- 
pany had little debt and a healthy 
cash reserve of S3.7 million. But it 
ultimately paid $6.4 million, to buy 
back stock held by Edudata and affil- 
iates; plus $500,000 in attorneys’ fees, 
by borrowing $4 mSfion and taking 
the rest from cash reserves. 

In a sense, therefore, Scientific 
Computers won. But even in losing, 
Edudata made off with a big haul of 
cash, and the lawyers got their cut 
And there were hundreds of small 
losers. The long-term stockholders of 
Scientific Computers got clobbered. 
As a result of the cash paid out. and 
the reduced earning power of the 
company, their shares are now worth 
less. Tbe company's employees lost 
because their employer was left with 
decreased resources with which to 
compete in the marketplace. Finally, 
the community and state lost — for 
the reasons cued here and because 
capital was removed from the state. 

The need for a law requiring a 
raider to disclose his intentions seems 
obvious, but it is driven home when 
you read, as I did, a letter from an. 
employee of another Minnesota tar- 
get of a hostile takeover attempt The 
employee asked why dedicated work- • 
ers who had invested both money and 
lives in the company were not enti- 
tled to an explanation of the raider's 
plans for their futures. We canribl 
responsibly ignore the devastating ef- 


Rather than do that he resigned. He 
since has become one of Eastern Eu- 
rope's leading defense lawyers, but 
the police never forgave him. 

In 1981 he was convicted of “hos- 
tile pro paganda” — criticizing the 
government in a caff conversation. 
Tbe two witnesses against him were a 
thief and a. man who said later that 
the police had told him wha t to say. A 
Yugoslav federal court ordered tbe 
conviction reexamined, but the Cro- 
atian courts sidestepped that by re- 
ducing the sentence to eight months 
— less than the level required for 

' federal review. That is the “crime’’ 
for which be has now been impris- 
oned and disbarred. 

Mr. Seks can be freed, and his right 
to practice law restored, if the presi- 
dent of Yugoslavia, Veselin Ujurano- 
vic, grants him a pardon. The bar 
association of Croatia has asked the 
president to do so. The president of 
the American Bar Association, John 
G Shephend, has made the same ap- 
peal: tbe first such intervention made 
abroad by tire American group. 

Will the Yugoslav government re- 
spond? If it does not — if it allows 
Mr. Seks to suffer, perhaps to die— it 
too wiD pay a price. Yugoslavia wants 
respect m the Wes, bat it cannot 
have that if it crushes Vladimir Seks. 

The second case concents Ishmail 
Mohamed, 54, a professor of mathe- 
matics at the University of the Wit- 
watersrand in Johannesburg. He is of 
mixed race: colored, in the official 
South African classification. He 
played a part in the' United Demo- 
cratic Front, .the multiracial group 
that in the last two years has been the 
main proponent of nonradal democ- 
racy in South Africa. 

On Feb. 19 the security police ar- 

■ rested Mr. Mohamed. Along with 
seven other leaders of the front, he 
was accused of high treason. They are 
to be tried in Durban with eight oth- 
ers arrested earlier. 

Inhuman terms Mr. Mohamed’s is 
ah e^xciafly angnishing case. He had 
a heart operation 18 months ago, a 
double bypass, and he needs a special 
diet and treatment 

But tbe point is broader than Mr. 
Mohamed. It is a point of law, of due 
process. The 16 accused of treason 
are mostly professional people: pro- 
fessors, lawyers, businessmen. They 
have never been connected with vio- 
lence. They stand accused of treason, 
a capital crime, but they have not yet 
been told what exactly they are sup- 
posed to have done. 

In security cases, moreover, Smith 
African prosecutors can effectively 
deny bail, removing that issue, from 
tbe courts. This case is likely to go tc 
trial next summer and . then take 18 
months or more. Unless, they are al- 
lowed bail, the defendants will be 
locked up and out of politics all that 
rime — however flimsy the evidence. 

The Reagan administration hat 
rightly objected to the South African 

■ practices of banning and detention 
without trial: Bui the tactics used ir 
the treason case so far arc also offen- 
sive to Western ideas of due process 
and Pretoria should be under no illu- 

. sions about that. The first test — 
important to South Africa as to tin 
defendants — will be the prosecu 
don’s willingness to lei bail be dead 
ed in the normal way, by the coarts 
The New York Times. 


LETTER 
Famine Factors 

- Flora Lewis, in her. opinion column 

-rtf ir- ■ 




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r 


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ft 

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unr *. 


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fects of corporate raids on employ- ’ “Cycle of Famine Defies a Sin ale 
ees, communities and thefuture vital- Solution" (Feb. I9k is an uncritical 
tty of the company itsetf. reporter of the Woridwaiefa Insti- 

Morsover, if we fad to respond tote’s report on tbe ‘State of the 
qmckly and sensibly, public outrage Wprid”U is absurd to blame ec£ 
taible logical factors and population growth 
,Con- for the insufficient iwrvWrS^, 


will lead to punitive and ir 


gress should enact a law that inhibits 
hostile takeovers while assuring some 


for the insufficient production of 
food in many countries in which gov- 
ernments habitually kffl and impris- 


flexibility for friendly mergers and. on their populations, impose stuck! 
acquisitions, winch can be critical to regulations to inhibit aOlprivate mi- 
our competitive strength. . tiative and, most imponamly. ttpect 

My response when asked about peasant farmers to grow /oodfo! 


takeover romots is: Anyone who pnees set at less than the cost of its tf 
tn« to take over Control Date will be . production. Flora Lewis and the ' 
m for a worid-dass fight". ■Waridwatcii Institute wifi find ojmL 

■ ' . •" ^ ® htstoty of rapid population 

The writer Is chairman and chief SKJWth accompanied by io creasing 
executNectfficer of Control Data Com . agrwiftiiral productivity.: • ' - 6 

in Mirmeepobs. He cmtribmed thb . PERRAN PERckp - 

comment to The New ’ V/: ' Cambridge, 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


Page 5 


s Begin Offensive 

/v « * O • 

vi , Against Sihanouk Loyalists’ Base 

’ n,. W/lllIflm RiMninin i.in » w • ... n- . ■ 




y Ai„h 

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V ■•Uliinif c.i n, «i 

'‘■UU*u.,Mh, VVfc, 

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*W1IK m 

7*" "••« 

ClMl-cv , lud lh 
f™ lighter xfnk'i!,. ^ 

Uul .iU« Uu- inauS:- 
*■»* iinpn\.,|, c . The Vietnamese alted on Prince 

a.in ilish.irrcii p, ^ I*, Sihanouk’s Green Hill camp on an 
a signal to all ihJ TnQn ^ 1 escarpment about 1.8 miles (3 kllo- 


4:30 A.M. with a heavy anil] cry 
barrage followed by an infantry 
thrust, said Truong Mealy, a 
spokesman for Prince Sihanouk 
He said, that guerrilla defenders 
had inflicted “quite, heavy casual- 
ties” on the Vietnamese, who had 
not yet penetrated the camp's “first 
line of defense” about 7 miles from 


f 


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per cus- 
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id. The 

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k away 
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whole 

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: ukiPt'. 


By William Branigin 

W ,„. — l*Hv] ' Washington Post Sen-ire 

BANGKOK — Vietnamese 
forces in Cambodia turned their 
guns on Tuesday on the Last resis- 
tance base still intact bn the Cam- 
bodian side of the bender with 
Thailand, attacking guerrillas loyal 
to Prince Norodom Sihanouk at a . 

northern stronghold opposite the Jts headquarters. Mr. Mealy said land according to reports from the 

Thai village of Tatum; 1 resistance fighting was also going on farther border. 

and Thai military sources said made Cambodia about 17 miles Currently, according to Western 

tv,- tv,.,; miiitnrv r-nnrt«i i a t-r Gran Hill Camp and that relief officials . and resistance 

The Thai military reported later &miXlas ^ fowid Uu/bodfes of 

some Vietnamese soldiers and re- 
covered their weapons. 

Thai military sources confirmed 
that the Vietnamese had begun' a 
long-awaited operation against the 
camp but had no details of the 
fighting. No estimates of casualties 
on either side were available. 

The Thai military charged that 
Vietnamese artillery shells landed 

. .in Thailand's Surin province when 

Do mu do! end Ji l ,Illln raters) from the northern Cambo- gunners overshot the Green Hill Tuesday. 

Mr ScU » ho iS ^ dian border with Thailand began at camp. It was not clear why the Vjei- 

■m ulcer and 
^K-.en.jnahun^J 

‘u-k ncU u S ^ h ' ; liS f; 

What has he a Jr i#| : 

cruelly down uihoTEJS 1 
'W raiiMm 
UV>k too HThMish 
^! im > MavlS 1 

cijIIx dangerous v. ■ 


that about 800 Vietnamese soldiers 
had crossed (he border in the area 
or the fighting. Thai troops backed 
by artillery were fighting to dis- 
lodge the in traders from three hills 
on Thai tenilonr, the military' said. 
No other details or confirmation 
were immediately available. 


Vietnamese shelling was also re- 
ported on Cambodia's western bor- 
der with Thailand north of the Thai 
town of AranyapratheL Refugees 
from Cambodian resistance settle- 
ments overrun earlier in the current 
Vietnamese dry season offensive 
were forced to flee two evacuation 
Sites and move farther inside Thai- 


sour ces, there are no civilians left in 
the Green Hill camp. Prince Siha- 
nouk, 63, has said, the camp is de- 
fended by about 5,000 of his guer- 
rillas. with the rest of his guerrilla 
force operating inside Cambodia. 

■ Thai Fishermen Freed 
Vietnam has released 229 Thai 
fishermen who were captured by 
Vietnamese naval vessels Feb. 24, a 
fisheries association official said 



Filipino Labor Minister Offers to Resign 


Prince Norodom Sihanouk 

namese were relatively lenient with 
the fishermen. The Associated 
Press reported from Bangkok. Thai 
fishermen who intrude into what 
the Vietnamese claim as their wa- 
ters usually must spend months in 
jail and pay large fines before their 
release. 


Albania Reports Official p liquidated 9 


C ro.it. jiul jnu«ne\2S' 
Million republic; fT. - 
least toleum iiificiak* 

Starting ,.ui m | 3H ,, 

a prosecutor in [k. . * 
M r * ^-‘ks fnund ihj| ^ 
hi* had been .ipeninc ^ 

-lixmv. | (1 ,& 
That wa^agaiiw^J* 
pared a prosecution. ftr. 
deredhim logiwuupj 
Rather than do that W 
since has become one dfc 
rope's leading defense 
the poluc richer fiipiLnch 
in IIS | he tta>c.’nvi£t 
tile propaganda” - ^ 
govern men t in a cafe * 
The two witnesses 
thief and j nun who cs 
the police Ii.iJ ikIJ him«t 
Yugoslav federj) cow# 
ci'iniclion riHx.imined.lt 
atwn courts sidestep c 



Mehmet Sbehn 


By David Binder 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A longtime 
prime minister of Albania was “Hq- 
uldaied” as a secret agent in 1981. 
according to Albania's principal 
Communist Party newspaper. 

The report conflicts with the ear- 
lier Albanian explanation that 
Mehmet Shehn committed suicide 
during a Central Committee meet- 
ing in December 1981. He was 68- 

The new version appeared al- 
most casually on Thursday in Zeri i 
Populht, the party daily, m a long 
article critical of Yugoslavia. 

Almost immediately after the Al- 
banian radio announced on Dec. 
18, 1981, that Mr. Shehu, the prime 
minister since 1954, had taken his 


life, there were unconfirmed re- 
ports from several capitals that he 
had been killed. 

The suicide version was reiterat- 
ed in November 1982 in a speech 
by Enver Hoxha, the Albanian 
leader, and the following month 
again in a book by Mr. Hoxha. On 
both occasions. Mr. Hoxha said 
that Mr. Shehu had been a spy 
successively for the United States, 
the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. 

Mr. Shehu was the commander 
of the Albanian Communist guer- 
rillas during World War II and Mr. 
Hoxha's close political associate 
for four decades. 

In the original account of the 
death of Mr. Shehu, Albania said: 

“During the night dawning on 


Dec. 18, 1981. in a moment of ner- 
vous crisis. Comrade Mehmet 
Shehu, member of the Politburo of 
the Central Committee and chair- 
man of the Council of Ministers of 
the People's Republic of Albania, 
killed himelf.” 

Then came reports from Bel- 
le. Athens and Rome saying 
it Mr. Shehu had been engaged 
in a dispute with Mr. Hoxha over 
the direction of Albanian foreign 
policy, with Mr. Shehu purportedly 
advocating an opening to Western- 
Europe, Yugoslavia and the Soviet 
Union and Mr. Hoxha defending a 
policy of isolation. These reports 
held that the dispute led to a fight 
in a Central Committee session in 
which Mr. Shehu was shot to death. 


U.S. Air Force Destroyed Tape of KAL Flight 


By George G Wilson 

' Washington Post Service 

. . .. - WASHINGTON — The .U.S. 

diianp the H. - nwni.« wit Air Force destroyed the tape show- 
k'-> than the lod ting at -least part of the radar track 
federal rev ic» Thai is fc 0 f Korean Air Lines Flight 007 that 
for which he has rnw Sewas shot down over the Soviet 
oned and disbarred Union's Sakhalin Island in ■ 1983 
Mr SckscanbefreftLiwith the loss of 269 lives, 
to practice law restored. I. The destruction of the informa- 
deni ,*f ^ uui'daux Yoifion by the air force soon after die 
vie. pranij him a pit disaster came to light Monday in a 
av* vi at mi >'f Oiuiub lawsuit brought against the U.S. 
president n* J>< v Thcpgovemment and other parties by 
the \inau an Bat Aswrine victims’ families. 

C. Shepherd. ha> nudei Accbrding to testimony given in 

peal . the lira :-uch inioir, j 

,thr.*.ui h\ i he \ntcrwr? I - 

Will tlu ft’s 

Npi'iiii' ll it d*y- m«-: 

Mr. Sekv io vuti or. jvrinp: 
liv will p.iv jpncc.li®>: 
respivt if. the 
have that d 1 1 eni'hr*Vbr 
1 lie sCv'iiJ CaVCWKE 
Mohatned .. 
nuises at the I.'iiiutw? 
ttater^rand m Jk*tunn»S 
mixed race volorcJ. 

South \fn»an iW 
plaved a p.»n m iheW 
ciatic l rout .the 
ihat m the !a*-t two vurt 
num piopoitem af »«»• 
raev in S'lith Mncx 
On » eb l‘»thf«J» 
rcMcd M. 

.jc\kv. oil'Ci leader' « ® 

wav i , Ll -uH\5>’i!M4»'5 
10 be tneil in Purban** 

t -:s .irrwtoi! earlier* 

j., nr-vj"' 

he at .>p-> ,Ib ^.L5 
double bvpa % ' 
die: and luatmein^ 

Um the P." ' ‘ ^ 

an: 111.-10 i 

luu- n.-'-" 1 Kl - . ^ 

kiwi- l '>-' ' un M lot 

P*'^ 1 •' , ,, t >. IB* 

III hCCH" ,v c3 : 

African 
,le„v K.4- ^ 
the com 1 ' ‘. r3 rJ^ 
in., I «H-v: 
monih' • r 

locked ui’ '- ,,b 
nine jjnof 

Hu- 

fiylilb -’bio 
piav'ti- 1 * ‘ . , w i ihf & 

W nh.w:t J 

MW I*' \ 1 .. Hiljb . 

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Sll'fiv v«llh - * 

upp.iru" - ‘J tf i|l b • 

A-fenda 1 .'*' 


UA District Court in Washington on tape “which is recycled every 15 
last week, the U.S. Air Force Re> ' days." 
gional Operations Command Cen- 


ter at Anchorage, Alaska, tracked 
Flight 007 by radar after it uxtic off 
from Alaska. It tape-recorded at 
least part of its flight path before 
the jet was downed by a Soviet 
fighter on tJhenight of Sept. 1, 1983. 
- The air force, which customarily 
impounds any information relating 
to an aviation disaster, did not save 
the radar tape. 

Tan K- Von Flatem, a Depart- 
ment of Justice attorney, told the 
court that the radar data was kept 


Mr. Von Flatem said that “after 
some specific effort to preserve” 
the tape, an attorney for the family 
members who filed the suit and 
others were fold “that such preser- 
vation had not taken ptace because 
within 15 days of this incident, the 
air force, the Regional Operations 
Control Center, had no idea that it 
was going to be involved or that 
that data would be useful in the 
litigation at any point." 

Mr. Von Flatem added that offi- 


cials at the center have said that 
they did not see anything unusual 
on their scopes when the airliner 
was shot down and were not re- 
sponsible for keeping track of such 
outbound civilian aircraft. 

Attorneys for the families insist 
that the full story of the tape’s 
destruction has not been told, and 
they want to talk to more air force 
officials. ' 

Later m the court hearing, Mr. 
Von Flatem said that the air force 
keeps its tapes for 30 hours, not 15 
days as he nad said earlier. 


United Press latcrttalioati 

MANILA — Labor Minister 
Bias F. Ople offered his resignation * 
Tuesday after President Ferdinand 
E. Marcos criticized him for saving 
that the 20-year-old Marcos "ad- 
ministration was heavily depen- 
dent on political patronage. 

Mr. Ople’s letter of resignation, 
released to the press, came a day 
after ihe president fired Foreign 
Minister Arturo Toleniino for op- 
posing his sweeping emergency 
powers. 

There was no immediate com- 
ment from the presidential palace. 

Mr. Ople. 58. said in a recent 
speech that he believed [he Marcos 
government was heavily dependent 
on a sy stem of political patronage. 
He said he had received a letter 
from the president on Monday ad- 
monishing him for ihe statement 
and asking for an explanation. 

Mr. Ople said that since the pres- 
ident's letter had been made pubiic 
"and it might constitute in the 
mind of thepublic an issue of presi- 
dential confidence. I would like io 
reiterate my resignation from the 
cabinet." 

In December. Mr. Ople had of- 
fered to resign after he received a 
presidential rebuke for saying that 
the country lacked leadership be- 
cause of the president's failing 
health. 

Mr. Tolentino. 74, a maverick 
within the ruling party, wrote to 
Mr. Marco* on Monday, saying he 
accepted the president's decision to 
dismiss him. 

Mr. Tolentino said Tuesday that 
he had opposed the president's ex- 
ercise of legislative powers and his 
immunity from prosecution. 

Separately, the mother of the al- 
leged assassin of Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr., the opposition leader, 
defied a third court order on Tues- 
day to testify, saying that Mr. Mar- 
cos had already fixed the trial of 
General Fabian Ver, the armed 
forces chief, and 25 others allegedly 
involved in the 1983 killing. 

Saiurnina Gal man, the mother 
of Rolando Galman, the alleged 
killer, said for the first time that 
Mr. Marcos had ordered Mr. 
Aquino's killing and had already 
arranged for General Ver and his 
co-defendants to be acquitted. 

“President Marcos, liken woman 
with a long tongue, told the world 
my son Rolando killed Senator 
Aquino ” she said in a written plea 

to the courL 

The military contends that Mr. 


Galman shot Mr. Aquino at the 
Manila airport on Aug. 21. 19S3. as. 
he was reluming from three years 
of self-exile in the l nurd States. 
Soldiers shot Mr. Galman to death 
minutes after Mr. Aquino wa> 
killed. 

Mrs. Galman said “wicked” .sol- 
diers had killed Mr. Aquino on the 
president’s orders. 


General Ver's lawyer. Antonio 
Coronel. said the pleading “bristles 
with calumny” and appealed lo 
Chief Justice Manuel Pamaran 
“that thi> garbage be expunged 
from the record.”* 

■ Anti-Riot Bullet Developed 
The Filipino military has devel- 
oped a non lethal ami-riot bullet 
that causes extreme itchine.ss. the 


Philippine news agency said Tue* 
day. 

it quoted Colonel Jt*c Vi!!.so 
hos. head of milil.irx resears h. .i- 

saying ih.u the shell s.irnes a sur*- 
stance extracted fnm: a !«v,il w: 1 ^ 
fruit, which would cause estrone 
i tchines^ all o* er the b.J> for hoars 
unless the victim bathed, but would 
not affect vital orujn.s. 


Tfoull always be recognised by your taste in Scotch, 


Chinese President in Burma 

A genet Fnmcc-Prcssc 

RANGOON, Burma — Presi- 
dent Li Xiannian of China began 
talks here Tuesday with U San Yu. i 
the Burmese head of state. Radio j 
Burma reported. 





Johnnie Walker Red LabeL Since 1820. 
Recpgnised for good taste throughout the world. 


john walker & sons ltd . scotch whisky distillers, kilmarnchtk Scotland 



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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6. 1985 


Melanesians 
Dispersed 
In Caledonia 
Police Raid 

VnircJ Pres.-: Inu-nuilu^iaf 

NOUMEA. New Caledonia — 

Police used armored vehicles and 
tear gas on Tuesday to break up 
crowds or Melanesian separatists 
near the east coast mining town of 
Thio. They then searched homes 
for weapons and made eight ar- 
rests. 

About 600 police equipped with 
gas masks, six tanks, and two heli- 
copters raised roadblocks around 
three Melanesian villages around 
Thio, a separatist stronghold, to Police guarding one of I 
conduct the searches. 

Thirty Melanesians, known as 

Kanaks. were taken for question- • O- 

ing. Eight were arrested on charges J. Cff O#*o/*X Ol 
of sabotage, illegal possession of 

arms and involvement in the Jan. /» j ■* a 

S d “ ,h of 3 >ounss ^ ’ Of Asylum p 

The Kanafcs. many of them ** ~ " 

women, retaliated by throwing By Richard Bernstein 

stones and bottles at cars carrying A« >'«* Times Sow 

police or white settlers returning PARIS — The family of Kadim 
from work in the town's nickel Latifi, a former cook at the U.S. 
mine. Embassy in Afghanis tan, recently 

The Freach government envoy, spent eight days in a transit lounge 
Edgard Pisani. said at his weekly at Orly Airport trying to win ad- 
press conference that the operation mission to France as political refu- 
was “a little push to help normalize gees. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) " 


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Police guarding one of the three villages where searches were conducted Tuesday. 

Terrorism, Strains France’s Tradition 
Of Asylum for Politically Persecuted 


life'* in the region. 


The Thio area was disrupted by and two children were not permit- 
violence two weeks ago, wnen po- ted to enter France. The French 
lice fought to prevent Kauaks fa- police put them on the weekly 
voting independence from France night to Iran, where they had lived 
from reaching rightist French loy- after fleeing Afghanistan, where 
alisrs who had been taking part in a Soviet and Afghan government 
banned rally. troops are fighting anti-govem- 


Eleven persons were injured in merit rebels. 


the clash, and five loyalist leaders 
were ordered expelled' after the in- 


By Richard Bernstein months. The Italians have publicly 
Sew York Times Sen-u-e charged that the French are lax in 

PARIS — The family of Kadim P UI *uii of suspected members 
itifi, a rormer cook at the U.S. of Italian terrorist organizations, 
nbassy in Afghanistan, recently s . Ul *^ •*? & e d Brigades, who are 
ent eight days in a transit lounge ** v *£8 hi France. 

Orly Airport trying to win ad- The French, apparently m re- 
issio'o to France as political refu- s P OQ5C 10 Italian coraplawL 
K have asserted, as Roland Dumas. 

In the end, Mr. Latin, his wife ,he minister for external relations, 
d two children were not permit- in Rome three weeks ago. that 
i to enter France. The Trench n P l dra g ««£ ® 

lice put them on the weekly an u-terronst struggle, 
ght to Iran, where they had lived p 3 * 1 m°mh- the French polio: 
:er fleeing .Afghanistan where * eizet ' Massimo Sandruu. a -4- 
viet and Afghan government J ,ear '®^ 1 tab an who had been sen- 
>ops are fighting anti-govem- ,ence ^ 10 absentia to a long prison 
*nt rebels term by an I tab an court for com- 

A few davs after Mr. Utifi's plicityjn the killing of a policeman 


A few days after Mr. Latifi's 
forced departure, the French police 10 * 977. 


cidenL One turned himself in and announced the arrest in Paris of /* ve •ttlm's wanted on 

received permission to stay in Nou- Sergio Tomaghi. a former leader of charges of terrorist crimes in their 
mea under police surveillance, the most radical fringe of the Red o'* 0 ®te now being held in 

while the four others defied the Brigades, who is wanted in Italy for French jails for possible extradi- 
orde r. They remain in hiding. murder and insurrection. u °n- . __ 

Separatists increased acts of civil The two incidents illustrated the ^8°’ “.i? 5 ? ^ w Dan ‘ 

d/'solxdience after the Thio inci- current situation of the question of S er - was the headline oT one Front* 
de.nt, burning three schools and asylum and refuge in France, the P?6 C a ™|f' e ■? Monde recently. 
sev v -rr.il abandoned homes of white country with perhaps the proudest Tne article said France was prepar- 
resiJe nts and keeping their chil- tradition in Europe of offering pro- in S n \ casi ^ s l ,° decrease nura ‘ 
dren home from “colonial lection to the politically persecut- her ofpoUticaJ refugees who come 
school s,” which opened Friday af- ed. ^f re - Jj 131 w< ? u |d be done, the aru- 

ter a vacation. The questions of who should get c * e by giving local authorities 


dren home from “colonial teciion to the politically persecut- 
schools,” which opened Friday af- ed. 

ter a vi ication. The questions of who should get 

On Monday. 80 imprisoned sep- asylum and under what circum- 
araiists in Noumea began a hunger stances, who should be extradited 
strike ui protest prison conditions and who should be harbored, have 
and demand political prisoner sta- become matters of contention bo- 
lus. tween France and Italv in recent 


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ing measures to decrease the num- 
ber of political refugees who come 
here. That would be done, the arti- 
cle said, by giving local authorities 
the right to deny asylum to those 
who seem not to be' in imminent 
danger of political persecution but 
are rather seeking economic better- 
menu which is what the French 
police derided in the case of Mr. 
Latin. 

The atmosphere throughout Eu- 
rope these days, and particularly 
the recent spate of terrorist attacks, 
has something to do with this. Di- 
rect Action, an extremist group 
with ties to other European terror- 
ists. took responsibility for the kill- 
ing in January of a French general. 
Rene Audran. Also, a bomb explo- 
sion recently in the Paris branch of 
a British department store killed 
one person and injured 15 others. 
Blame for that bombing was never 
fixed by the French police. 

It is against this background that 
a problem For the government of 
President Francois Mitterrand has 
emerged. The tradition of provid- 
ing asylum has been followed by 


< 5>*i ; •. 


; • Y " t ' 





the seat cushion tiJts up. 




4 

8 


both leftist and rightist parties in 
France. But it is the Socialists, with 
their his lory or welcoming Spanish 
exiles during the Spanish Civil 
War. that are arguably most at- 
tached to it. 

Since comina to power, ihe So- 
cialists have in Tact actually carried 
out extraditions only once. Thai 
was last September when, amid 
considerable controversy, Mr. Mit- 
terrand decided to extradite three 
Basque separatists wanted for a 
killing in Spain. 

In recent months, Mr. Mitter- 
rand's government has taken two 
approaches to the issue. One has 
been to restate the country's com- 
mitment to Tight terrorism; the oth- 
er. which has received a little more 
emphasis, has been French offi- 
cials' reassertion of the right of asy- 
lum for those who. in the rather 
broad French interpretation, have 
taken actions in other countries be- 
cause of political goals. 

Mr. Mitterrand struck both 
themes at a joint press conference a 
week ago Friday with Prime Minis- 
ter Betiino Craxi of Italy, during 
which the French-ltalian differ- 
ences were the main subject. Mr. 
Mitterrand said France would re- 
fuse asylum to any terrorists ac- 
cused of “blood crimes.” He also 
said that Italians living in France 
who have renounced earlier lies to 
terrorist groups would not be extra- 
dited even if they are wanted in 
Italy. 

“All blood crimes on which we 
are asked for justice — from what- 
ever country it may be. particularly 
Italy — justify extradition as soon 
as French justice has decided it” 
Mr. Mitterrand said. 

“The particular case before us, 
which sustains our conversation, is 
that of a certain number of Italians, 
most of whom came to France 
some time ago.” Mr. Mitterrand 
went on. He said there were about 
300 such people, who. he went on, 
“have in a clear fashion broken 
writh terrorism.” 

As long as they have not been 
implicated in direct participation 
in blood crimes. Mr. Mitterrand 
said. “Thev will not be extradited.’* 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Discs, Book Pay Tribute to the Duke and the King 


By Michael Zwerin 

International HemM Tribune 

"P ARIS — In Alabama in 1956. a 
A. curtain was hung between Ted 
Heath's British big band and the 
Nat King Cole trio, appearing tn 
Birmingham on the same bilL De- 
spite this nominal segregation on 
stage, as James Haskins and Knih- 
l«n Benson write in “Nat King 
Cole” (Stein and Day): “[Colei wai 
launching into his third song. 'Lit- 
tle Girl’ when suddenly four men 
rushed the stage. A woman 
screamed. . . . Then a micro- 
phone hit [Cole] in the face, and he 
fell backward over his piano 
bench." Cole’s lip was bruised and 
his back injured. He returned to the 
stage and told the audience he 
could not continue. “I just came 
here to entertain you. That was 
what l thought you wanted. I was 
born here." 

Today. Eddie Murphy, starring 
in the hit film “Beverly Hills Cop, 
which has grossed more than 5150 
million in the United States, kisses 
a white woman, beats up white men 
and makes (he kind of money pre- 
viously reserved for white people. 
In addition, about half of the Unit- 
ed States's top ten records in the 


past year have been by black art- 
ists. 

The United Stales has come a 
long way from the lime when a 
black crooner who made white 
women swoon could be physically 
assaulted for it — though Cole's 
assailants were arrested and sen- 
tenced to jail — but Eddie Murphy 
notwithstanding, a black genius 
can still be neglected unless he is 
fortunate enough to have a white 
patron. 

Only last year it took a lot of love 
and perseverance on the pan of 
Henri Renaud, a former jazz pia- 
nist and an executive for 
CBS/ France over the last 20 years, 
to convince his company to allow 
him the time and expenses to go to 
New York and fina and remaster 
an unreleased collection of Duke 
Ellington tapes. 

The tapes have just been issued 
as a five-record, three-album set — 
two doubles and one single — 
called “Duke 56/61" 

Some of the cuts were marked 
“untitled." Listening for the first 
time to one such track. Renaud 
exclaimed: “Lotus Blossom!" A 
classic. He was amazed. Nobody 
had bothered to find out the Lilies 


of. let alone release, material by a 
man some regard as .America's 
greatest composer. Would similar 
George Gershwin material have re- 
mained unreleased and untitled? 

This sort of inventory is general- 
ly dismissed as “slow-moving prod- 
uct” in the profit-oriented atmo- 
sphere of the recording industry. It 
took all oT Renautfs experience in 
the labyrinths of corporate power 
to pull the project off. The material 
is prime, not a collection of out- 
takes. It is from Ellington's golden 
age. when the most exciting soloists 
— Clark Terry, Juan TizoL Johnny 
Hodges. Jimmy Woode and Paul 
Gonsalves, for example — were 
combined into the most precise and 
powerful ensembles Ellington ever 
had. Ellington and Billy Strayhorn 
were at the height of their composi- 
tional powers. Volume 3 features as 
vocalists Rosemary Clooney and 
Johnny Ray, and' two tracks on 
Volume 2 combine the Count Basie 
and Ellington orchestras. 

There are no plans to release 
“Duke 56/62" in the United 
States. 

The Cole biography focuses on 
the same period as the Ellington 
collection. This was the high point 


of his career, after he began to sing 
commercial hits that were also mu- 
sical gems, before rock competition 
began to push him into golden exile 
in Las Vegas. 

The reader is reminded or black 
baseball players before Jackie Rob- 
inson. The word "waste" comes to 
mind. Though Cole was wealthy 
and famous, he smoked too much 
and worried too much, trying to 
keep his dignity as a black perform- 
er while catering to a white-domi- 
nated industry by coming up with 
more commercial material. He died 
of lung cancer at age 45. in 1965. 

He started as a jazz pianist in 
Chicago. Like the guitarist George 
Benson (who would still be playing 
in organ trios in smoky lounges, the 
musical equivalent of the Negro 
baseball leagues, had he lived in 
those days). Cole became underrat- 
ed on his instrument when many 
critics and fans called him a sellout 
for singing. Like Benson, he was a 
master instrumentalist. 

His fugue with Lester Young on 
“Indiana" is one of the greatest 
examples of collective improvisa- 
tion ever recorded. The critic Barry 
Ulanov called Cole's trio with Os- 
car Moore on guitar and Wesley 


Prince on bass “as good as the An 
Tatum trio.“ Thar fabric was so 
tight that one voice could hardly be 
distinguished from another. 

Cole began with charming novel- 
ty tunes like “Straighten Up and 
Fly Right.” then hit his snide with 
a series of ballads including “Na- 
ture Boy." “Sweet Lorraine." “For 
All We Know" and “Mona Lisa." 
in a sensual voice that crooned too 
early for its own good. 

He was a private man. The Has- 
kins- Benson biography rarely gets 
behind the facade: insights are gen- 
erally limited to such stuff jis “He 
was a nice guy to work for," and it 
is full of laundry-list details: “The 
gross was S17.562. At the usual 60 
to 70 percent rate. Cole could nave 
made between S 10,500 and 
SI 2.250.” 

When the dvil rights movement 
began, Thurgpod Marshall said 
that all Cole needed was “a banjo 
to complete his role as an Uncle 
Tom." Cole said that if he had been 
more outspoken on civil rights he 
would never have become the first 
black entertainer to have his own 
television show (in 1956). The 
show, however, never attracted 
enough sponsors, who worried 



Fugard’s r Road to Mecca 9 Is an Absorbing , Lyrical Account of Old Age 


By Sheridan Morley 

Inienuiiionol Herat J Tribune 

L ONDON — For reasons having 
/ more to do with political fash- 
ion than theatrical justice, Athol 
Fugard tends to be admired in Brit- 
ain more for his directly anti-apart- 
heid tracts than for his poetic dra- 
mas. His new play. “The Road to 
Mecca" (on the National's Lyitle- 

THE LONDON STAGE 

ion stage), has therefore had a pre- 
dictably rough ride from many crit- 
ics. but it is a marvelously lyrical 
account of an eccentric old Afrika- 
ner sculptress who finds the cour- 
age to stay well away from the old 
people's home to which the village 
pastor, her longtime admirer, wish- 
es to commit her. 

Put as bleakly as that, “The 
Road to Mecca” may not sound 
especially compelling; what makes 
it such an absorbing and unmissa- 
ble evening is the playing of 
Yvonne Brycdand as tne old lady. 
Bob Peck as the pastor and Char- 
lotte Corn well who completes the 
cast as a young radical teacher who 
comes back to give the old lady her 
independence again. If you can 
imagine “The Cora Is Green” in an 


African setting, that is one pan of 
this “Road": but it also manages to 
be a play about loneliness and ec- 
centricity and the arrogance of 
church commissioners, the claus- 
trophobia of village life, the hatred 
of the artist and the Tear of some- 
one who abandons religion for art 
It is a play about faith and old age 
and courage and tolerance and big- 
otry that manages, in a moving eve- 
ning directed by Fugard, to say 
rather more about the human con- 
dition than has been said ai the 
National by a new play for a very 
long time. 


Having been away from the Lon- 
don theater and therefore this col- 
umn for a couple of months. I had 
expected certain minor re-entry 
problems. What I had not antici- 
pated was the time warp involved 
in a reconsideration of “The Caine 
Mutiny Coon-Martial'' (at the 
Queens). This, you may recall, was 
the stage adaptation by Herman 
Wouk of his 1950s best seller about 
the mad Captain Queeg and the 
lieutenant accused of having im- 
properly deposed him during a ty- 
phoon. Lloyd Nolan created the 
role on stage in New York and 
London 30 years ago. though the 
memory that sticks is the one of 


Humphrey Bogart raiding those 
ball bearings in the movie. 

Now we have Charlton Heston 
making his London stage debut as 
Queeg, in an admirable trans-At- 
lantic Equity deal whereby he and 
an American team are allowed to 
play a season over here while Glen- 
da Jackson and a British team do 
their classic “Strange Interlude" on 
Broadway. The only problem with 
this arrangement is that, for rea- 
sons unclear to me, Heston has 
chosen to come over with a play 
that creaks more loudly than the 
ship in the middle of its typhoon — 
and to come, what's more, without 
a director, other than himself. 

This is more than a little unfortu- 
nate, because both the play and his 
performance could do with some 
backstage guidance. Heston is a 
considerably more interesting actor 
than those who have only seen him 
apparently posing for Mount 
Rushmore through those intermi- 
nable Hollywood epics lend to real- 
ize: anyone who survived stage 
training with Katharine Cornell 
and screen training with Orson 
Welles is bound to know a bit 
about theatricality. The pity of it is 
that we only have him at tne front 
of a waxwork display cabinet. 

The English actor Ben Cross 
turns in a somewhat wooden per- 


formance as the defense counsel 
who has to prosecute Queeg in or- 
der to gel his own client off the 
hook of a court-martial. Among the 
Americans, the only more- than -ad- 
equate performance comes from 
John Schunck as Queeg's counsel. 
It would have been good to wel- 
come Heston to London in a better 
production of a better play. 


A play about the sad life and 
Hollywood times of Montgomery 
Clift” must have seemed a good 
idea, given at least two major biog- 
raphies packed with alcohol and 
drags and wasted promise; sadly, 
however, Neil Norman, whose new 
drama “The Misfit" is playing at 
the Old Red Lion pub theater in 
Islington, has managed nothing 
more than a lightweight canter 
through the known facts with no 
attempt to explain what made Clift 
so haunting as both actor and man. 

In the title role, John Cassady 
makes no attempt at imperson- 
ation. rather resembling instead a 
taller Mickey Rooney; and. given a 
patchy script that seems to have 
been typed with one eye on a libel 
lawyer and the other on Madame 
Tussaud. it is difficult to fathom 
quite what this is supposed to be. 


The chronology of Clift's life has 
been radically altered, directors as 
diverse as George Stevens and John 
Huston have been merged (pre- 
sumably in the interests of casting 
economy) into one all-purpose 
grizzled bully, and an actress called 
Barbara Kinghorn intriguingly 
doubies as Clift's appalling mother 
and a drama coach apparently 
modeled on Lotte Lenya's role in 
"From Russia With Love." 

The result is a mishmash that 
does little credit to its director. Ned 
Vukovic (also billed as the man 

DOONESBURY 

_ SOR&ItoLATB, 
JEL,. QMC/.IHAPA 
i UmBTROUBLB 

umsecum. 


France Michelin Adds 
19th 3-Star Restaurant 


Thu Aaaodol Pr*n 


Nat King Cole in 1956. 

about Southern markets, and ii 
went off the air after a year. 

The book is short (179 pages, 
with photos, plus a discography). Ii 
is a modest but often moving por- 
trait of someone who tried to bal- 
ance family responsibilities with 
artistic ambitions, and it provides 
an insight into a society that de- 
stroyed its own artistic royally. 


who conceived the show, which 
makes you wonder what Neil Nor- 
man did. since the writing is mini- 
mal). or any or the others involved. 
Tbe sad thing is that there could be 
a good play in Clift. Moments here, 
such as the legendary and well- 
documented confrontation with 
Marlon Brando, in which Brando 
tells Clift not to die since all great 
actors need a rival and Monty is 
his. suggest that, given a writer and 
a director and a cast and a budget, 
there could have been more to “The 
Misfit" than a mistake. 


rvBBBSNREnm? > 
msoumiHAT 
NO ON£ ATTHG DOOR 
&C06WZEPME. 


By Patricia Weils 

.Vfii York Tinm Senw 

P ) ARIS — The 1955 Michelin 
Guide for France, published 
Tuesday, awarded its highest rat- 
ing. three stars, to the Auberge du 
Pere Bise in Talloires. There were 
no demotions from the three-star 
ranks, so the move raised the total 
of three-star restaurants to 19. four 
of them in Paris. 

One three-star restaurant in Par- 
is. Archestrate. owned by Alain 
Sender ens. will soon change its 
came and move from the 7th arron- 
dissemeni to the space occupied by 
the restaurant Lucas-Carton on the 
Place de la Madeleine. The new 
restaurant, to be known as Alain 
Senderens Lucas-Carton. is sched- 
uled to open April 15 and is expect- 
ed to continue serving Senderens* 
personal and dramatic style of nou- 
vel]e cuisine. 

Lucas-Carton. which had two 
stars in the 1984 guide, is therefore 
listed without stars in the new 
guide. Because of the timing of 
Senderenss decision to change lo- 
cations. a flier noting the change is 
bong inserted into the 1985 guide. 

The guide lists numerous promo- 
tions and demotions. The most no- 
table include the upgrading of 
three Paris restaurants — Guy Sa- 
voy. Le Petit Bedon and Relais 
Louis XIII — from one star to two, 
and the demotion of several well- 
known two-star restaurants — no- 
tably Barrier in Tours, Chapon Fin 
in Thoissey, Hoslellerie de la Poste 
in Avallon and Auberge Bressane 
in Bourg-en-Bresse — to a single 
star. Restaurant Gerard Pan gaud 
in the Paris suburb of Boulogne- 
B ill an court, which had two Miche- 
lin stars in the 1984 guide, has been 
deleted from the new guide be- 
cause, Michelin said, Pangaud 


MAN. CHANGES? u 

FAST. TmRCkXf/fOLLSCBm 
IS COMPIS1BX PlFF&ENT FROM 

0 around. 


plans to move back, to Paris. - 

Auberge du Pere Bise in the 
Haute Savoie region held three 
stars from 1951 until 1983. when it 
was demoted to two because. Mi- u 
chelin inspectors explained, the 
owner. Francois Bise. was too often 
absent from the kitchen. 

Bise died last year at age 55. The 
restaurant by Lake Annecy, con- 
sidered one of the most beautiful 
dining spots in tbe country, is now , 
directed by his wife. Cbarlyne. and . 
their 21-year-old daughter. Sophie, r 
who since age 16 has worked as an 
apprentice in restaurants through- . 
out France, continuing a family 
tradition began in 1901. when her . 
great-grandparents opened the res- , 
taurant. GiDes Furtin. who has di- ” 
reeled the kitchen since 1980, when 
Bise became flL remains head chef. V 

Michelin lists 12 new two-star r- 
resiauranis. In the provinces, new 
promotions from one to two star ,, 
include Cbabran in Pont-de-l'lsire, 
not far from Valence in the Rhone .. 
valley; Jean Bar del in Ch&Leau- , 
fowl in the southern Loire: the - 
Pyrenees in Saim-Jean-Picd-de- 
Port in the Pynfcntes Mountains: .. 
and the Bretagne in Questembert. ‘ 
Brittany. 

In Paris, 12 restaurants woe pro- 
moled to one star, including the 
Jules Verne, in the Eiffel Tower; • 
Tan Dinh. a popular Vietnamese ; 
restaurant in the 7th orrondisse- .. 
menr, the Pavilion Elysees, pasuy *. 
chef Gaston Lendtre's new restau- ’ 
rant on die Champs- Ely sees; and 
two restaurants devoted to fish and 
seafood, Villars Palace in the 5 th 4 > 
arrmdissemeni and La Cagouille in .. 
the 1 4th arrondissement. Timgad, a : . 

Moroccan restaurant in Paris, re- • 
gained the star it lost in 1984. 

Outside Paris, other notable one- .- 
star promotions include the Gill in . 
Rouen and the Rivage in Gieu. 


h&.wta 
mm - r 
(M&AHEAP 
mm/rmi. Aeourimr. 





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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1985 


INSIGHTS 


<£2> frJ 
ML/ % 


od Life for Japanese: Better Products and Changing Values 


By Sana In meson 


T OKYO — Wlw.! Tjr:.i>hi Watarai was a 
student .ii l imcr.Miy two decades 
ago. iher^ y.tTi- da;... when he did not 
have enough monj, i«.» bu\ a 20-eeni bow] of 
noodles for lunch. \r.J he 'till remembers an in- 
filling shirt he nuiic u a., j gift from a friend. 

"The slve.es were !•••'• long, he said, “but I 
pulled them up at the shc-uldcrs and wore it. 
anyway." 

The third child -»f ^ M->-<juce maker who 
wem bankrupt Mr. Waur:i was fortunate to be 
. in college tit all. for .-cl;. o.Z percent of Japan's 
• college-age south, then juended a university. 

Those day i of poteny ended for Mr. Watarai 
. in 1*365. when he quit his first job and joined 
four friends in establishing a market research 
‘ company, h was Jv.ut the same time that the 
economic status umn other Japanese began 
' to improve ->ub>umia!K. 

The average Japaiie-v.- family in the early 
l^Os not only did vi;lt.<ur a car. a telephone, a 
refrigerator .utd -a -tov- but did not even have a 
. private hath. When Mr. Watarai. now 45. took 
his first job. mure ifiar half of Tokyo’s popula- 
tion used the public baths 
Since then, many luxuries have become com- 
monplace nece.-sttiei. and Japan's affluence has 
brought not only vast material changes to the 
Japanese but iia*. huu a profound psychological 
impact on them ,i* well. 

Today. Tokyo Sur.c;, Research Corp., the 
company that Mr. Watarai and his four partners 
established, operates seven subsidiaries. It em- 
ploys 2U5 full-time naff members and 5.200 
pan-time survey imerviewers. Last year it regis- 
tered sales of 510 million. 

Mr. W aurai no longer worries about how to 
pay for hi> next meal. What he is concerned 
about is w hether his company will be able, in the 
next 10 years, to do l‘J times is much business 
with only three limes as many employees. 

-Any "goal lower than that!" he says, “would 
hardly be worth working for." 

Mr. Waurai's jituudc and ambition have 
parallels through*- ji .bp ir.ezv society. The aver- 
age Japanese worker earned 515.000 last year, 
13 times the average wage of l°t»0. Japan's gross 
national product, the told output of goods and 
services, has increased lb-fold over the same 
period, to SI. 2 trillion. 



: •• •••^7 • 


v •• *. .. y 

• • T >2i 

:*■ r : - ‘ •’ • 


Pedestrians and shoppers on the sidewalk in Tokyo’s affluent Ginza district 


age Japanese worker earned 515.000 last year, ness leaders, government bureaucrats and the 
1 3 times the averaae w u_v of } Japan's aross general public. 

nauona 1 product, the i^l roiput of goods and Today h b M lo rtnd me ‘ outside the 
! .-.-told over the same ^on's two leftist opposition parties, the 

period, u J- .nd.un. Marxist-oriented Japan Socialist Party and the 

The accomplishment of >.» much in so bule Japanese CommunisiParty. who worries about 
ume has spawns a new confidence that Japan j*. reverlin n l0 ^ authoritarian style or 
can find us own wav into the luture. or, at the g ^ ernment and utilitarian that precipitated its 
least, continue to rank among the most dynamic defeat in World War U. 


vending machines, Japanese politely wait in 
lines of manageable length. 

Tokyo, in the early 1960s one of the filthiest 


now, according lo the Japan Shoe Commerce 
Newspaper. 

One weekly magazine reported that when a 


Television, now available everywhere, has 
spurred a move away from traditional written 
culture, and many teenagers and adults read not 
the Japanese classics but comic books, many 
with pornographic themes. Teachers and em- 
ployers complain that young people can no 
longer write the traditional characters properly. 

The Japanese propensity to save as much as 
20 percent of disposable income continues, de- 
spite affluence, mainly because a new incentive 
to savings has replaced the old one. 

Formerly, the lack of welfare and pennon 
programs was the primary incentive to save. But 
a sharp expansion of health insurance, social 
security and corporate pensions have virtually 
^iiminqffH the need to save for medical care or 
old age. 

The expansion of medical care also has 
helped giw Japan the longest life expectancies 
for any country in the world — 79.8 years for 
women, 74.2 years for men. Spending for a 
nationwide health insurance system, which was 
introduced in 196 !, has risen from SI. 4 billion in 
the first year to an expected $62.9 billion in 
1985. 

The main incentive to savings is the rapidly 
rising prices of land and housing. The spiral 
itself is ano ther by-product of affluence. The 
average Tokyo resident, who wonts to buy a 
home with a wnafT garden now has to wait until 

be is nearly 41 years old to afford such a place — 

and to look for it 76 minutes' commuting dis- 
tance from his work place. The likely cost: 
$140,000, or 521 years’ wages. 

The Japanese propensity to work long hours 
has .slucfcflrrcd The Japanese workweek has 
dropped to 41 boors from 48 hours, on average. 
But only a fourth of the people who work get 
two days off every week of the year. 

Workers still forgo 40 percent of the vacation 
days to which they are entitled and willingly put 
in overtime, paid at only 125 times normal pay. 
But the Japanese dte the South Koreans, with 
their 66-hour work weeks, as the world's real 
workaholics. 

Household conveniences, combined with a 
decreasing birthrate, have given housewives new 
freedom to work. Married women working out- 
more than 10,000, with sales to taling more than side a family business accounted for only 40 


* :1 


J ’ 

‘it ?! 


nations. Catching up i* no longer the name of 
the game. 

Only in car ov ner.-.hip t about 65 percent of 
Japanese familie ; <vw nu can and size of housing 
units ian average of °2" .quure feet, or about 86 
square meters, of floor space i does Japan rank 
noticeably belov. the l' rated States. A college 
graduate still has to spend hair of his starting 
salary of $550 j month to rent an apartment in 
Tokyo — but the apartment wili be twice the 
size of the standard l-ne-ruom dwelling of 1960 
and it will have a bath. 

American uv.nieiit.*. Swedish furniture. 
French perfumes and designer fashions from 
around the world are available in Japanese 
shops. But as for the recessities of life, the belief 
that Japan alread> ma-isr* virtually everything it 
needs — and doe* n l m e rter and more cheaply 
than anybody e\>: — h._- emerged among busi- 


Tokvo. in the early 1960s one of the filthiest ™ reported mat wnen a 

cities in the world, today is rated as one of the Khari teacher scolded a pupil forwear- 

deanesL The change came mainly from the t?f> dirty a jWetic shoes, the pupil appeared the 
provision of such elemental public facilities as following day m a new pair, 
ashtrays, waste baskets and toilets, which for- “1 threw them away,** the pupil told the teach- 
merly were nonexistent. er. “You said my shoes were dirty, and I told my 

Driving habits and pedestrian discipline im- mother. So she bought me a new pair.” 


$] 2 billion a year. 

Most Japanese — today better educated, on 
the average, than Americans — are less willing 


ercent of the female work force in the eariy 
MOs, compared with 65 percent today. 

Since 1960, the number of married women at 


than before to do the dirty jobs of society., work also has risen 71 percent to more than 15 J 
Maids have all but disappeared. The quality of ntillion, and last year, for the first time, sur- 
servicc has deteriorated in many wwtanrwt, and passed the number of housewives, 
it often costs more to get something fixed than More personal time also has led to a boom in 
to replace it. - a variety of businesses lamped into what has 

Today, nearly a quarter of college- age Japa- become known as the “leisure industry.” Al- 


And while the word nationalism still strikes a proved sharply after lane stripes were painted Japanese businessmen who once pressed their nese attend college — three times the number of though Japanese rank among the world's great- 


discordant note in some circles, there is hardly 
anyone who is not proud to be a Japanese. 


on tbe roadways and city roads were fenced off under their mattresses and transferred the eariy 1960s, and about the same as in the est overseas travelers, fi 
to provide sidewalks. Drivers now stay in their from bus to subway to train rather than take a United States. Ninety percent of Japan’s young den until 1964, who 


T was not Lhai wav in the earlv 1 %fk when awn ' no longer stroll in road- have given up such economies, 

l was not tnat way m the early 19WK, when way expecting cars to get out of the wav. 

pnde m Japan and its traditions was com- ’ m .... ■ . . -m -r QW. they are likely to spent 


people have a high school diploma. 


den until 1964, when 128,000 
abroad. Last year, more than four 


travel was forbid- 
300 people went 
four million Japa- 


raonly equated with discredited militarism. 
Abject humility and national self-deprecation 
were standard then. 

Other psychological changes are also appar- 
ent 


Some Japanese, whose homes are filled with 
gadgets and have few material needs still to be 
fulfilled, are beginning to lament the loss of 
spiritual values, a loss that they say has come 
with affluence. Juvenile delinquency, although 


with 75 percent of young Americans. In 1960, nese made overseas trips, 83 percent of than 


Affluence has brought a civility to public United Stales, is on the rise. 


nitu oinuLUvy. uvuumuuuvTi oiuivuui . • ■ 

negligible compared to such behavior in the owns a 561 c u ^ s_ 


manners that the constraints of poverty did 
allow. In 1960, large groups of Japanese res 


^ of money on other things. lney_ wui with junior high school Yet it has been only in the last two or three 

X l equip themselves, for example, with the with affluence, even the nature of public years that ordinary Japanese have come to ac- 
best and most expensive golf eouipmcDi avail- has changed, from the political to the cept the fact that affluence has arrived, 

able: one in every four employed workers today economic. Rights for which the Japanese did not “When I go to Tokyo, normally once a year, I 

owns a set of golf clubs. even have a word two decades ago — such as am staggered by the luxury of daily life there,” 

The new Japan can be seen even in the kitch- “the right to s unshine,* * the right to have light Funriko Mori, a Japanese author, xecentJy told a 


H* 


? i i V* 

l 

1 ft - - -7"'-?- 

• if 


The new Japan can be seen even in the kiteb- 


Extravagance, too, has become a way of life, en. Increasing numbers of young housewives unobstructed by a neighboring building — are symposium in W, 


“When I go to Tokyo, normally once a year, I 

am staggered by the luxury of daily life there,” 
Fumifco Mori, a Japanese author, xecently tokl a 
symposium in Washington, where &e now lives. 


5 !&. 

'a • * ’ 

If 'av! : - 


resem- some say. 


.can cook nothing bey ond the most rudimentary regulariy demanded. The great economic devd- One reason is that corporate profitability and 


bled mobs. Only by battling one's way through a Putting new soles and heels od old shoes has dishes, so companies have sprung up around the opment projects that were so recently sources of national strength came to Japan long before 

crowd, for example, did anyone manage to get fallen out of fashion, for example. Only about country to home-deliver food for the family national inspiration, such as Bullet line rail- personal affluence — as a matter Of policy. 

to a ticket window at a commuter railroad or half of the Japanese who regularly had their table along with instructions on how to prepare roads and petrochemical complexes, have bo- Another is that many Japanese still low upon 


subway. Now, with an ample supply of ticket shoes repaired m the early 1960s bother to do so it- Shops offering prepared food now number come sources of conflict 


their affluence as If it were ephemeral. 


Moscdw Looks to History as Talks Near 

Soviei Officials Say They Seek Respect, Equality and Compromise at Geneva 


By f.aicfcaei Geller 

M OSCOW— “Vi her. Germany attacked 
without v.. mini in t941." vtid Vladi- 
mir B. L- n\‘tko. the head of the Soviet 
Foreign Ministry ;• pr-.v. department. “Hitler 
had been eon* i need h„- v.a? Ntrc-naer than Rus- 
sia. We do not want i«'- repeal itself, and 

for that reason *\e v.iii never permit anyone to 
have superiority over u>." 

Soviet iiff<ci.'d> say that hi?lor> weighs heavily 
on their mind> as the;, head into arras talks with 
the United Stiie* on March 12 in Geneva. 
Chances for success in the talks. Mr. Lomeiko 
said, will depend largely on whether the U.S. 
approach “is aimed at ireatin^ us with respect 
and equality" or “aimed at achieving superior- 
ity." 

To the Reagan ad rara miration, the Soviet 
Union's missile force.* already are superior to 
their smaller and less numerous .\merican coun- 
terparts. But through the Russian end of the 
telescope, a combination of new U.S. weapons 
and protects threaten to lip the balance against 
the Soviet Union m the future. 

As they we it. new U.S. medium-range Per- 
shing-2 missiles, being installed m West Germa- 
ny are meant to knock •jJ'. civilian leadership 
and military komnanu po>vv. New long-range 
MX missiles, would I*, ta r tiled on Soviet missile 
silos. And Preside r. t Ron-Svl ueagan's new Stra- 
tegic Defense Initia'.i’-v. ••r “.•tar wars," project 
to develop an jJe rhield around the 

United State*: couiii. even if no! perfect, handle 
whatever the Rus-ian* iiad left to fire in a 
retaliatory strike - . 

In interviews here lost week. Soviet officials, 
specialists on arm> coptr.<l and U.S. affairs, 
academics and journalists, made or suggested 
several points. 

o Moscow ts prepared to “go very far.” as one 
Soviet official put it. in making “more radical” 
cuts in Soviet strategic offensive missile forces 
to get a three-p»an agreement at Geneva that 
would prevent a "star v.ar:." defense and include 


cuts in U^. long-range and medium-range mis- 
siles. 

The official, who stressed that no final Krem- 
lin decisions had been made, hinted that the cuts 
could go from the 20-percent reductions pro- 
posed by Moscow last year at the now-aban- 
doned Strategic Arms Reduction Talks to per- 
haps 25 percent to 30 percent The last Soviet 
START proposal included a reduction from the 
current level of 2250 Soviet missiles and bomb- 
ers lo 1,800. 

if anything, Moscow appears to be more 
adamant now than in tbe now-defunct discus- 
sions on intermediate nuclear forces, known as 
the INF talks, on being compensated for British 
and French missile forces. Both the British and 
French missiles, totaling 162, are being modern- 
ized and are aimed at Soviet targets. The Soviet 
officials said they would agree to an equal 
number of allied medium-range missile war- 
heads in Europe matched against theirs, but 
would insist on keeping their SS-20 missiles 
targeted in Asia out of such calculations. 

• While concerned about U.S. nuclear forces 
in Asia, the Russians seemed to be more con- 
cerned about possible new Chinese missiles. 
Western sources said they sensed that the Krem- 
lin is worried about a growing U-S.-Chinesc- 
Japanese triangle on its Asian flank involving 
technology, money, military assistance and raw 
material resources. 

• Moscow has not lost interest in a ban on 
testing anti-satellite weapons, despite an abrupt 
and mysterious silence on the subject in recent 
months. U.S. and Soviet officials said an Ameri- 
can delay in testing a U.S. system is the result of 
apparent technical problems, not any secret 
deal. 

S OVIET officials said it is simply that the 
Reagan anti-missile defense plan had 
overwhelmed other aspects of arms con- 
trol. But another Soviet specialist hinted that 
Soviet interest in developing anti-satellite weap- 
ons could be increased if it becomes necessary to 
target space-based elements of a “star wars” 


Reaching More 
Than aThird of a 


in 164 Countries 
Around the World. 


lUMHinlkV. 


defense. The Russians already have a crude 
system but are Hying to stop a more sophisticat- 
ed UJS. version. 

• The overwhelming priority of Soviet tactics 
is to stop the Reagan space defease initiative. 
But many Russians interviewed said that Mos- 
cow understands the impossibility of cutting off 
with certainty all research and is ready to accept 
that some could go ahead. What they want 
ended is the awesome financial commitment to 
the project, currently $26 billion just for re- 
search, and an agreement that bans production. 

The impact of the Reagan program here goes 
well beyond Soviet concern over American tech- 
nology' and the potential impact on superpower 
relations in a crisis if one side has a defense it 
thinks will work. 

There is a widespread view that the program, 
as another official put it, is “a cynical attempt to 
economically bankrupt” the Soviet Union and 
delay what another called “socioeconomic pro- 
gress” by forcing an economically strapped 
Kremlin into either concessions or a costly arms 
race. 

One specialist said that new missile projects, 
once under way, probably are harder to stop in 
the Soviet Union than in the United States. He 
added that the Kremlin would soon have to face 
decisions that would have financial implications 
for decades on whether to build more offensive 
weapons to overcome the “star wars” defense. 

Several persons interviewed resented the im- 
plication in statements by U.S. officials that the 
project frightened Moscow and forced it back to 
the negotiating table after a Soviet walkout from 
arms control talks in late 1983. The Soviet 
officials suggested that such statements were 
condescending and added to the suspicion that 
Mr. Reagan is not serious about wanting an 
agreement. 

Indeed, some Western diplomats, not .-yneri- 
cans, say they have heard Russians say privately 
that riw emergence of the Strategic Defense 
Initiative provided Moscow with an excellent 
excuse to return to the Geneva talks without 
drawing too much attention lo the reasons why 
they walked out in 19S3. 

In this view. Moscow realizes that its 1983 
decision worked against it and that in removing 
itself From the arms negotiations it also had 
removed the focal point and forum around 
which Western peace movements could rally. 

Throughout the interviews, however, there 
was a sense of defensiveness in Soviet state- 
ments. from Mr. Lomeiko’s emphasis on being 
treated as equals to resentment over the implica- 
tions that the Russians could be economically 
squeezed into concessions. 

• A number of experienced Western diplo- 
mats in Moscow said that the Soviet Union is in 
trouble, with economic problems at home, prob- 
lems in Eastern Europe, and no leadership at the ' 
top. The Ru>sians. in this view, want an arms 
agreement to buy time to emerge from their 
other problems. 

Although the Russians said their leadership is 
intact and their policy consistent despite the 
illness of President Konstantin U. Chernenko. 
Western diplomats said that Mr. Chernenko’s j 
illness means there is no one at the top who | 
could take a decisive and imaginative decision , 
to cut through the arms control issue and the 
Soviet bureaucracy and grab at an interesting , 
new solution if one were available. , 

Even if Mr. Chernenko dies jnd a new leader : 
takes over, it would lake time for him to consoli- ' 



K, 


Black Power Brings New Fears 
To County of the Old U.S. South 


Ths Tort Tmwi 

Vladimir B. Lomeiko 

date power and might even be more difficult for 
a new Soviet leader to make a deal than tire 
present one. Thus, both Soviet and Western 
specialists said the chances of reaching agree- 
ment are slim in the near future, even though tire 
first two years of Mr. Reagan’s second term, in 
which congressional support for him is likely to 
be most secure, could be the best time from 
Washington's standpoint. 

• The Russians said they do not believe that 
Mr. Reagan wants to be remembered as having 
gained an arms agreement. Rather, they said he 
would rather be viewed historically as the presi- 
dent who made America invulnerable to attack. 

Despite recent warning by Mr. Chernenko 
against being too gloomy over arms control 
prospects, many Russians are pessimistic. 

They cited the size or the U.S. defense budget, 
the extraordinary technical complexity added 
by the Strategic Defense Initiative, the unwill- 
ingness of Washington to take a good-will first 
step by signing unratified nuclear test ban trea- 
ties and the prospect that the momentum of new 
weapons projects on both sides wfll outpace 
arms talks. 

They also cited recent statements by Mr. 
Reagan and other U.S. officials suggesting that 
the space defense program is not negotiable as 
poisoning the atmosphere after Secretary or 
State George P. Shultz and Soviet Foreign Min- 
ister Andrei A. Gromyko agreed on Jan. 8 to 
work toward “preventing an arms race in space 
and terminating it on Earth.” 

Mr. Lomeiko. the only one interviewed who 
was willing to be quoted by name, said there 
“are certain facts that are encouraging” and 
added that “the Soviet side is sincerely interest-, 
ed in success in negotiations and in improving 
relations with the United Slates." 

Apologizing for dwelling on World War U, 
Mr. Lomeiko insisted that history is important 

“For our part.” he said, “we've never forgot- 
ten the meeting on the Elbe River” in Germany 
between U.S. and Soviet troops in the closing 
days of the war. “We do not and wiU not ever 
forget those Americans who fought at our side 
in the struggle against fascism." 

But the “objective truth is." he continued, 
that Americans never underwent all the hard- 
ships. Including 20 million dead, that the Rus- 
sians did in paying the price for being viewed as 
weak. 


By Bill Peterson. 

Washington Pan Server 

E DGEFIELD, South Carolina — A sign 
just off the courthouse square in this old 
Southern town boasts that Edgefield has 
produced 10 governors and “more dashing, bril- 
liant, romantic Figures, sta t es m en, orators, sol- 
diers, adventurers and daredevils than any other 
county of South Carolina, if not of any rural 
county in America." 

It is a place of large; ihan-life figures. One 
Edgefield boy 1 commanded the state militia at- 
tacking Fort Sumter in the Civil War. Three 
died as heroes at the Alamo, the San Antonio, 
Texas, building that was overrun by Mexicans 
in 1836 and coat served as a symbol of Texas 
resistance to Mexican rule. 

But mostly, the town is known for its politi- 
cians and its racial strife. 

The local high school is named after one 
favorite sou, Strom Thurmond, the senior Re- 
publican in the Senate and a man known for his 
conservative views. 

Another hometown senator was Benjamin R. 
Tillman, who also served as governor, and who 
led a successful campaign in 1895 to disenfran- 
chise black voters in the state. He explained how 
on the floor of the Senate: “We took the govern- 
ment away. We sniffed ballot boxes. We shot 
them. We are not ashamed of it." 

The United Daughters of the Confederacy 
maintains the mansion of another local hero. 
General Martin Witherspoon Gary, as a historic 
shrine. General Gary is best remembered for 
driving blacks from office in the last days of 
Reconstruction. 

Under his guidance, the county Democratic 
Party passed a resolution in 1878 declaring that 
“white supremacy is essential to our continued 
existence as a people.” 

For more than a century, whites retained 
control of Edgefield County, a peach-growing 
area about 60 miles (100 ltiUuneusrs) southwest 
of Columbia. 

But last raR a political revolution of sorts 
occurred. Three blacks were elected to the for- 
merly all-white County Council. 

B EFORE then, blacks, who make up 
about half the county popnlation, had 
won a 10-year legal battle against an 
election system that they said shut them out of 
political decision- making. Under a Supreme 
Court decision, the county's old at-large voting 
system was replaced with five single- member 
districts. 

Three of tbe districts had blade majorities, so 
the election results had been expected. 

Bui the new council's assertiveness has 
shocked many. In its first meeting, on Jan. 1, the 
council’s black majority removed the white 
county administrator and the white part-time 
county attorney. 

The administrator, H.O. Carter, was replaced 
by Thomas McCain, a black who initiated the 
legal battle that led to the Supreme Court deci- 
sion. 

This set off a wave of indignation among 
whites. “I was scared. A lot of us were. We were 
worried about what else they’d do,” said Barry 
Ouzts. manager of B.C. Restaurant. “I thought 
it might be the first of 10 things they wanledto 
do r 

Dozens of whites have packed into the two 
council meetings held since Jan. 1. “Thai 


doesn’t intimidate me,” said Willie Bright, the 
new couocfl president. “I know some whites 
haven’t accepted the. results of the election. 
They don’t like what happened. They don't 
worry me." " 

But Mr. Bright’s political survival and that of 
the other two black council members may de- 
pend on how they resolve two thorny issues.' 

The first is a Lawsuit filed by Mr. Carter, who, 
as administrator, ran the county government foT 
12 years. He is seeking payment for a two-year 
contract he signed with the previous counciL 
Blacks argue thatthe contract is invalid because 
it was signed after white council members lost in 
an October primary election. 

Mr. Carter was to be paid $26,204 a year, 
about $6,000 less than hu. McCam, a former 
teacher who holds a doctorate degree in mathe- 
matics. 

T HE other issue is what to do about legal 
fees resulting from Mr. McCain’s legal 
battle with the county. Mr. McCain sued 
after he ran unsuccessfully for the council in 

1972. He ran again in 1976 and 1980. \ . 

Mr. McCain’s lawyers contend that the coun- 
ty is liable for his legal fees and sal/ they tare 
willing to settle for $48 1,000. The county budget 
last year was $1.9 nuUion. • „ 

and smaflousmessman, has voiced cxiocenilSit 
the two issues will dominate thc cotlndFs atten- 


tion so much that it might handicap effortS4o 
help county residents in such mattere as attract- 
ing new industry. 

"I don’t know how much we'll be able to get 
done as long as those two things hang over us,” 
he said. 

But others, including some whites, say they 
believe, that the new council wilt resoto its 
problems, and that a permanent political *€- 
alignment has taken place here. W.W. MIrns, 
editor of the Edgefield Advertiser, is one.- - 

“These blacks are very smart. They’re well- 
educated and dedicatedv” hesaid hms officebn 
the courthouse square. “They're aping to try to 
be wise so they come up on top during tbe next 
election.” 

Meanwhile, blacks are euphoric about their 
new political power. 

“For Macks, it meant everything. We’ve never 
had any representation,” said Mr. Biight, who 
remembered having to pay a poll tax to vote- in 
the county. “It means my kids can bedected to 
public office. Before, it didn’t matter if you were f ' 
good or bad, you couldn't hold pubBc office if 
you had black skin." 

“Somehow, some way, we want to give people 
hope that life can be different than.it has been." 
said Mr. McCain, who also is the Edgefifeld 
County Democratic chairman. 

Change is not easy in a place snrroupded 'by 
so much history. But there are signs of if in 
unlikely places. 

One is the changing view of a son of Edfee- 
field, - whose bronze sraroe is in the counhoJE 
square. It portrays Senator Thurmond: as one 
visitor wrote, “fixed in what could be a . 

tam Jus 24-hour, filibuster against the Civil 
Rights Act of 1964." 

Among tiKBevming for Mr. Thurmond lWr 
m 1 M 5 Cam -J ie he did so because 

St i — j — -• - 


\ * 


changed- his philosophy, Mr. McCain said 















^Statistics h«3ex 

‘jMEX«icH . f.M Cantnn rapom p,T2 
ui£X aipsMPJl Fttoc rate notes p.is 
HVSeprfcai no Cota marten p. 9 
[lYSE hatanbws.F.n Mens! ram P. 9 
MkK starts PJ4 Moran summary p. 10 
Currency nM P.9 Orttoos PJ5 

CMMW fities P.15 OTC start P.n 
CMvtamfa p.15 Otaer martets P.U 


ImliXSribnnc 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report; Page 10 . 


Television. »u*u 

iuliur«. i md mi | lr «m A 
^.^nese • 

phnm ConipU in T&V. 

lOOKCf write I hr IV ’•"UnrV .: 


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


** 


Page 9 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


*S 5 1 ??§fcP° r P ora > e Patronage 
*SS$il«ainsS«n.eAllnre 

.avharp^pjnvii.^W 

Srtlmtv 'I... i . 1 ncjlik ... 

P 


wnniv anjc^”’«ta l 7.'.: 

rilillWJlftt ll K - n'. n | ' 

Old aw 

The 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

Inumatumtd Hcndd Tribune 


c 'pansu- n ii| 


''Vnj £ ^ ARIS — Large companies with big adver tising budgets, 

for ■ E Jp such as Internal ional Business Machin es Corp. audOh- 

■ Cob A — ^ 4a — A. .t * _ • 


_ t 4 vetti SpA, can afford to .promote their corporate image 

Mpcd give Japan iii L . i"^ J by sponsoring art, music or educational projects that 

for unv couturv iri >\ don’t have the instant pay-back that product advertising can 
women. 74.2 \|> , r% c " ,,r Kl >, have. IBM's fonnnla is to spend 1 percent of its net profit a year 
nation* idr hcnliii m «° r ntfa sU °° diese projects. IBM France, for example, spent an estimated 
introduced in i k' UrjIk ' e ^ ““Dion francs (S2L96 million) in 1984. 
tlw hr>t vear t0 in ,l ' . Gerangyoor name known through good works is no longer the 

19RS l 'P l- nrj privilege of only very rich individuals. Some companies are 

The main mu-niii .hoping that creativity and originality will help 

V njt ^IXStaSKE* nmch “ — — 

average Id eas for exotic projects Some Companies 

home with J small , „‘? t * h » ^.sometimes come from top ex- jU, 

he is nearly 4 i Tcar^oM? 1 n f l * £?* ecn ^J res * Alain D. Perrin, ™P*rem&r 

and iu_hwL for ii 7 r , nil?? 1 * 9 * mer ^ re : competition winners 


to work for them. 


tarn* from his 311 es * n f t t d 

S14II.000. or s i v ,; . N i;. 10 “Hhw ■ V** of the 

« . ~ 1 , jewelry companys money in a 

hwsTu ■T ln ‘T P r ‘TenMi\ u , village near Paris where con- 

iSwaaai Cn *i Jj Fancy ?•, temporary artists can live, work and hold exhibits. The concept is 
oroppeu to 4 1 hours tr*sni 4fi 'radically different from the traditional corporate-sponsored an 
Bui only J fourth of lhe jJ®*.- .exhibit. 

two duvs off ei en ^ ^ - .Sometimes, convincing top management to back an innovative 
w often. Mill forgo 40 pm*.: J project can be a problem. But some imaginative managers make a 
«Ja>-s to which they arc ciJS? good corporate living out of it. 

in overtime, paui ai onl\ i.yj “When you start with flaky ideas, you never know how they are 

But the Japanese cue the gj]!; going to turn out and you think to yoursdf, *WD1 1 look lflce a 
th«r 66-hour work weeL. as r^: total fool a year from now when the whole thing bombs?* ” said 
woreahivlics. ^ '.^Geoffrey S. Carroll, senior noliev adviser far Hrmeviwrf! fiA ii«» 


Household conveniences. Cog ^, Brussels-based European subsidiary of the U.S. computer com- 


the 


decreasing hinhrjic. have - JJ5 pany- 

freedom io work MurnoU - bfr. Carrofl recently sponsored a successful futurist 


side 


competi- 



Gne. 


compared «nn n? pcnvwh, ”, — * — ; — — — — 

Since I960, the number rfSS “* nnrelAted to Honeywefl’s 
work also has risen 71 nercmii ' ° ne *e wmnere, Fran^cdse Bourely, came up with a salt- 
huIIhmi. and last vear foTih/ f 5 water hiigAtion idea for developing countries that need to grow 
passed the nunibci of jU-2? ^ fo£ S 3® do - not c f ou f h “ water - 

More personal innc alio hIS: JmSSIF** ^ t0 3 com F m ? s P roduct often 

lun^'u ih* i? 1 ^ ?- “If you can relate the project to the product, your chances to 
!SL\ n h U r , i it to top management increase one hundred-fold," said John 

diSaor of commtmications for Geneva-based Hevriett- 
.fSn \ u2.i tf k “^Packard SA, the UA computer company’s European subsidiary, 
den until when M pjjp has, gmong other prqjects, financed concerts and product 
•broad. Last year, more than fan recor^TZwput^d music. 

w»ema ei*cr>ui» npy^ipoos;. Some companies require their competition winners to work for 
v-, i„ v k,.,... ink m th in them - Others are xwlling to sponsor someone’s creative or scien- 

^ , 1 ^.u amiiviiLehasaBHoneywdl, but that’s not one of the conditions” Mr. Carroll 
When 1 g*» to lokvo. ninraalBcr^j^ • , 
am st.n’gered h> tVieWxun nlte 
FumikoNfon..iJ.tpjnocjulMut 

symposium r.i W.iNhin£i«»n. «ku£ A tahtanidi exhibit for young West German artists sponsored 
One rcas.in K th.u eorporaiepa by Hiilips NV ctf me Netheriands a few years ago, an 
national Mivngih v.imc io . lap*: -4. -B-cxolo(Aer wondered if PW%s had betta ways to spaid its 
personal .ltfliicncc — •» 3 mar money. The onlooker was staring at simple painting s of three 
Another is ih.u m.mv Jjpania s-Iarge bamnas. Photogr^jhs showed the artist at work stripped to 
thezr affluence .«•> if >( «erf cplwc the waisk in sado-masochistic gear with ankles and wrists tied. 

' .painting with a.brtxsh in her mouth. ... 

John/on France SA, a subsidiary of Johnson Wax Inc., of the 
■w~i Uni tedj States, has had two hits, one near-miss and one bomb 

IPIf A M -I (Continued on Page B, CoL 4) 


Dollar 
Continues 
To Rise 

Central Banks 
Keep Hands Off 

The Associated Press 
NEW YORK — The dollar 
surged Tuesday in the absence of 
central bank intervention, doting 
in on the record heights it reached 
last week. 

As the dollar rose, gold fdL Re- 
public National Bank m New York 
said gold bullion was bid at S286 a 
troy ounce as of 4 PJvL, down 30 
cents from the earlier dose of the 
New York Commodity Exchange 
and a drop of $4.20 from the late 
bid Monday. 

Last week, the dollar reached aD- 
rimg highs against the cunendes of 
Britain, France and Italy before a 
massive intervention by European 
central banks balled the climb. 

But the dollar showed continued 
strength despite the sale of about 
$4 billion on world currency ex- 
changes by central banks in the 
Anal three days of Last week. It rose 
again as central banks stayed out of 
the currency markets this week and 
as U.S. government officials and 
economists voiced skepticism 
about the impact of intervention. 

“When there's no sign of inter- 
vention,” said Jeffrey Brommette, a 
corporate trader at Irving Trust in 
New York, “the bolder and bolder 
we’re going to get.” 

For example, the dollar rose to 
3.417 Deutsche marks Tuesday in 
Europe, op from Monday’s 3 J73. 

David Mulfoid, assistant Trea- 
sury secretary for international af- 
fairs, said after the initial shock of 
last week's concerted intervention, 
the centra] banks’ assault on the 
dollar turned out to be “totally in- 
effective.” 

Mr. Mulfoid told the House sub- 
committee on international eco- 


As World Uranium Prices Drop , 
Canadian Mine Is Sitting Pretty 


By Douglas Martin 

Mrw York Times Service 

KEY LAKE, Saskatchewan — In this outpost 
600 miles (720 kilometers) north of the VS. 
border, there appears to be little besides sub-zero 
cold, driving snow, the odd moose and the much 
more numerous ravens. 

But, underground, there is uranium, enough to 
fuel every U.S. nudear reactor for more than five 
years. Even the boulders on the ground and the 
needles of the black spruce are radioactive. 

“Just make a note, 1 ' said Josef Spross. opera- 
tions manag er for the giant uranium mine here, 
pointing to a large outcropping of steel gray rock, 
is dm richest uranium mine in the world.” 

It also is one at the few with a huge customer 
base —and thus, a seemingly guaranteed future. 
Last year, Canada leaped ahead of the United 
States to become the largest producer of urani- 
um, supplying one-third of the world's needs. 

Despite an international glut that has reduced 
worldwide ur anium mining to 70 percent of ca- 
pacity, Canada has found export markets for 85 
percent of its output The richness of its ores 
makes it the undisputed low-cost producer of 
uranium. “Nobody nas the ability to compete toe 
to toe with the Canadians,” said a UA trade 
association official. Canada's ur anium output 
has gone from 17.7 million pounds (8 million 
kilograms} in 1979 to 29.1 million pounds last 
year — nearly twice U.S. output 

That has been a blow to such U.S. corpora- 
tions as Kerr-McGee. Standard Oil ctf Ohio, 
Phelps Dodge and Union Carbide. Anticipating 
a booming market, U.S. companies invested in 
the development of uranium mines in the 1970s, 
only to watch the price of uranium drop well 
bdow production costs. 

By mid large, the U.S. uranium miners feD 
victim to optimistic forecasts for uranium de- 
mand. In the 1970s, acting on predictions like 
that of the Organization for Economic Coopera- 
tion and Development, which In 1970 said in- 
stalled nudear capacity would multiply by a 
factor of 34 in the next 15 years, U A mining and 
energy companies rushed to open uranium 
mines. 

In fact, nudear . capacity, according to the 
London-based Uranium Institute, is about one- 
third the expected amount, and nudear utilities 
worldwide are swamped with six years of urani- 
um inventories. Spot prices have plummeted to 


Uranium Prices 

$45 — Estimated market price at 
end of month for uranium 
concentrate; doflara 
a pound 



*aa *84 

Source- Nuexco 


Unilever Posts 
16% Rise in 4th 
In Pretax Profit 


Tha IMa» YorV T>m*i 

about $15^0 a pound, about a third the level of 
the late 1970s. 

Most people expect the supply and demand 
curve to intersect a g ain by the end of this decade. 
By 1998, predicts George White, president of 
Nuexco, a big California-based uranium broker, 
uranium consumption in the non-Soviet world 
will outpace production by about IS million 
pounds { 123 million pounds consumed. 105 mil- 
lion pounds produced). And many experts worn 
that the United States will find itself dependent 
on imports. 

U.S. uranium miners, unwilling to absorb 
losses until consumption catches up with produc- 
tion, have either dosed or mothballed their oper- 
ations. In the last five years the number of U.S. 
mines has shrunk to 15 from 362. Today, there 
are 4,000 U.S. uranium miners, one-fifth the 
number in 1979. 

Last week the UNC Corp. wrote off S1S2 
million against its fourth-quarter earnings to 
cover losses from shedding uranium mining op- 
(Confhmed on Page 13, CoL 4) 


By Bob Hagerry 

International Heru&l Tribune 

LONDON — Unilever, continu- 
ing to shake oil its reputation for 

sleepiness, topped most forecasts 
Tuesday by reporting a 16-percent 
rise in fourth quarter pretax profit. 

The Brilish-Duich food and soap 
giant benefited from currency- 
translation gains and strong perfor- 
mances in frozen foods and in its 
L'.S. operations, particularly the 
Thomas J. Lipton tea unit. 

Pretax profit in the quarter rose 
to £201 milli on (S213 million) from 
£173 million a year earlier. Sales 
totaled £3.95 billion, up 13 percent. 
Aided by favorable tax adjust- 
ments, net profit gained 44 percent 
to £124 million. Earnings per share 
increased 50 percent io 34.73 
pence. 

Unilever also reported an ex- 
traordinary charge of £86 million 
in the fourth quarter. The charge, 
which Unilever described as 
"house- tidying,” reflects reduc- 
tions in the book value of peripher- 
al businesses that are to be sold. 
Unilever has already sold most of 
its European transport businesses, 
as well as such odds and ends as 
computer and poultry operations. 

For the full year, pretax profit 
climbed 20 percent to £924 million, 
about a third of the increase com- 
ing from currency-translation 
gains. Sales rose 21 percent to 
£16.16 billion. Net climbed 30 per- 
cent to £497 million, and per-share 
earnings increased 30 percent to 
!3?.8 pence. 

The results do not include 
Brooke Bond Group PLC, a Lon- 
don-based maker of tea, bouillon 
cubes and canned meat acquired 
last October for £389 million. The 


company said the acquisition will 
exceed its earlier expectations and 
contribute strongly to 19S5 results 
after taking into arcount financing 
costs. 

Buoyed by the results, shares of 
Unilever PLC, the British amt. 
surged SO pence to dose at £1140 
each. Shares of the Dutch arm. Un- 
ilever NV, gained 8 guilders |S1 10) 
to close at 345 guilders. 

In the United States, profit 
growth for the year was restrained, 
as Unilever's Lever Brothers unit 
spent heavily to promole new prod- 
ucts, such os fabric softeners and a 
detergent. Surf, to take on Procter 
& Gamble Co.'s dominant Tide. 
Lever Brothers also faces a daunt- 
ing challenge to its Whisk liquid 
detergent from a new liquid form 
of Tide. 

David Lang, an analyst at the 
London stock brokerage of Hender- 
son Crosthwaite & Co., said Lever 
Brothers could slip into the red in 
I9S5 after showing operating prof- 
its estimated at £10 million to £15 
million in 1984. But he defended 
Unilever's policy of gyving head-on 
against P&G on mass-market 
items. 

"They've got no choice, really,” 
Mr. Lang said. On an overall basts, 
he added, Unilever was outper- 
forming PAG and such other U.S. 
giants as Colgate-Palmolive Co. 
and General Foods Corp. 

Disappointing results in Canada, 
particularly from margarine and 
detergent, prompted Unilever to 
dismiss several top managers there 
recently. Sir Kenneth Durham, 
chairman of Unilever PLC. said at 
a press briefing. 

UAC International, a variety of 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


ic policy and trade on Tuesday 
“The dollar is strong because TB 


nmnia 

that, “The dollar is strong because 
of outstanding U.S. economic per- 
formance, the best for the past 
quarter century." 

In Tokyo, the dollar dosed at 
260.75 yen, up from Monday's 
260.05. By the end of the trading 
day in New York, the dollar had 


111) I 


in Is Ready to 'Go It Alone 9 on Auto Emissions 



Old V.S. .So< d I Currency Rates 


doesn't intimul-ik' n,l ‘. 
new- council pu'Mdeni 1 , "^5 pjwl 
haven't accepted the rc>uli> •< - 
They don't like *li.u tupTW; 
worn me" . , , 

B»it Mi Hiiitht - -Tl . 
the other tw.' bl.uk 
pend on how tlwv ZZ* 

IV fmt i** ■' iawMiii Wcujy®’"*' | 

as adminisir.iioi. f-* 11 J tie—- 1 ■ 

livean He !■> NCCkuii 
contract V w,lfl l kt E SDR / 

swujrsiif «!>■" 

ysi k “ iL. u. 

teacher who ll.-K- jHfDmWiKrt** 

maiicv M 


Late interbank rates on March 5 , excluding fees. 

I fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Pans. New York rales at 


c 

4.111 

7103 


HI 

fix* 


•ilur 

fCMtllll'r 


■ nil.ll Haag Koagf 

.mM, 


S 

3X735 

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IMS 6 

2,127 JO Z2S9M 

I 10545 

104575 TLA. 
2HU5 27342 
19145 3JJW1 
U] &4U7 
0951184 08K24 


USJ 

141H 

2U7 

6017 

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12219 

7005 

14028 

7J03 


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11326* 

20.12 


FJ. IU, 

37JJ7- 0.1823 
0581 3231 ■ 

3222* 1407 x 

114199 224930 

20X65 

1049 ZUUX 

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24 74 ' 1244* 
27925* 01372 
07909 1284.15 
9947 Z0ZL8S 


ua Irish c 


IN ICMllll'-r yjtjjwnosu 

h-ilt'c » ilh ll'-'.i'Un ' MComnunial franc (M Amounts nocAxMo buy dm pound Cc] AmsnntsnMdcdiobovoradoltar (*I 
1 ' iiilb ’'.orbofinwujwfsaruMfvtUfiitaoriam 


T 

, . ■ , OW n» 14/ unn m uw ill um 

Utter IW r.i.l 1,1 ■ jTiJ iV- nol auatotfi MJO: natavnliaUL 

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fcj > 14 ' l,«WM*r* .jlfanBtata* »»«*. tttnrlml. IIICi 
Mr. Mrt ji'i . i 

iv is liable b't i jwi i4*s Tk*', 


10218 
6XU0 
3435 

1056 
7726 
85233* 

22239 
12502 

Dollar Yahies 

* comnev f * r - 
BtaW- Uil 

Q.981 UWht U«1 

U0TI faraOstHricM 77735 

X2S2 KinmQt dinar 03075 

03844 Motor, rian It 160 

0.1825 Manr.KrOM 9J575 

OB547 niMM 10217 

OOQSS PatlCSCMta 181 SO 

02777 Saadi rival 16015 


Otar. ILF. 

5431 * 

179645 

8X30* 4*71* 

4JD995 7286 

54985 30942 

3887 6007 

16997 15.1965* 
6001 383L3S* 
75375 • 43375* 
29187 447452 
16144 654938 


SJ. Yen 
13282*14040* 
21605 20381 * 
11731 *13115* 
10893 275475 
72935 tld 
2924 261.10 
35874X075 
8990 

11177 

18962 169847 
27718 247383 


By Warren Getler West Germany’s competitors in 

international Herald Tribune the EC have voiced several com- 
FRANKFURT — West Germa- plaints about Germany’s hard-line 
Ynrir th#. Hniiar hari uy will continue to work toward its approach. In general they say that 
tn 2fii to wn un fmm 8°®! °f requiring automobiles to catalytic converters may not be the 
y “P®® meet strirt nesTemission control best way to combat poflution. They 
standards in 1988 and 1989 even if also argue that a West Germany 
no agreement is reached at an com- tax-incentive program puts imports 
mg meeting of European Commu- at a disadvantage. And finally, they 
nity environment ministers, says say that small er cars, many of 
Fnedrich Zhnmermann, West Ger- which are exported to West Gennar 
many’s interior minister. ny from France and Italy, are not 

Peter Boemsch, a West German easily outfitted with catalytic de- 
govemment spokesman, said Tues- vices and stand the most to lose in 
day the cabinet supports Mr. Zim- price competition, 
mennann’s view that Boon will Mr. Boenisch said there was only 
have to “go it alone” if there is no about a “40 percent chance” of an 
accord at the EC meeting, which agreement in Brussels. And he said 
begins Thursday in Brussels. that if an accord is not reached, 
Mr. Boenisch aid requests by other EC countries might try to 
other EC members to exclude small block Bonn's plan in the European 
cars from Bonn’s {dan is “folly out Court of Justice, 
of the question.” The firm stance expressed by 


climbed 

260.10 late Monday. 

In London, the British pound 
slipped to 51.056 from $1,068 
Monday. Later, in New York, it 
slid to 51.0565 from 51,0715 late 
Monday. 

Other late dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with late rates Monday, 
included: 25145 Swiss francs, up 
from 2J89; 10.4574 French francs, 
up from 10312, and 2,12730 Ital- 
ian tire, up from 2,099.00. 

Other late dollar rates in New 
York, compared with late rates 
Monday, included: 23240 Swiss 
francs, up from Z8955, and 10.490 
French francs, up from 10325. 


Mr. Boenisch and Mr. Zimmer- fishin g stringent emissi on controls 
mann reflects two concerns in West of some type is now 1 995. 
Germany: The first is that Bonn is Industry sources say that Bonn, 
increasingly worried about the as a result of its insistence upon 
damage that car exhaust is doing to installation of catalytic converters. 


i- Export Controls Slow China Trade 


* 

Eqotv. 


Q ™ (L&S 
0438! Stanoarat 22715 
A4S3 S.AMCH not 20783 
0X012 LKnnawa 84795 
8X053 Span.paKta 18695 
0.1033 8 wad, troop 968 
00254 TMwaBS 3937 
00356 TlMl baM 20125 
03723 lUkLCUnan 3X728 


( Brussels J; Banco Cammerdale ttallana (Milan); Bantam 
fthnute do Parts (Paris); IMF (SDR); Bantam Arab t at I n tema t le n ato d’lnvostissomtirn 
tnar, rM cBrham). Other data from Reuters and AP. 


MSI' 


Willing lOMNtb'l 
l*«y ™**> 1 . ^ 

Mi. Biir,’- 1 *. :**•„**** 


Interest Rates 


] 


Deposits 

* Him *»p IlU'4'b tb.1- > ^ |R ; Ul :!il1* Ponar CHWorC RrSe 


Mardi5 


Mp count' 

„, g -,cw «ndi»'«»' A lWk h«g; 
doll t k:i.*« ■“ 


Dollar p Martt Franc Starilna Franc ECU SDR 

VHi .'914, Mh - SV. 5V. ■ 59k 14V. ■ 1438 101b- 103b 101b- 10 H. B3h - 9 
9 a. 1 9»k 6 V. - 6 to so,. SH 14 M.- 14 to 11 - 11 to lOVb - 10U 8 to - 9to 

W6 -93b - 6W 53b -6 14 - 14Vb 11W - 11 to 10to- 10 to 91b - 93b 

... . 1038- 1M4 6 to - iW 5 4> - «to 1310 - n» n to- 12 10 to- 10 to 9V> - 936 

»li>nc a** llto-llto 6 to - 6 to 5 to - 5 to 12 to- 13 to 12 to- 12 to 10 to- low 93b - 101b 

he sjivl , .flx aptntaM* to Interban* deposits of ST million minimum (oroautvaimr). 

u . i'll. in A *«*•■- 8*oraaii Guaranty ( dollar i DM. SF. Pound. FF); Uovds BaM (ECU); ClUbonk 

«U‘ tM . ll . ... » 

M «' c ‘"’iJ.'Vi ■ = = 


By Daniel Southerland 
and Stuart Auerbach 

fVashingtan Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States and its allies are working to 
break a logjam of applications for 
high-technology sales to China that 
is choking the West’s export-con- 
trol apparatu s, according to admin- 
istration. officials and diplomatic 
sources. 

The heavy increase in high- lech 
sales to China, which nearly dou- 
bled last year from 1983 with the 
majority coming from U3. compa- 
nies, threatens to overwhelm the 
Coordinating Committee for Mul- 
tilateral Export Controls. 

The Pans-based organization, 
made up of NATO numbers and 
Japan, controls the flow of strategic 
products to Communist nations. 

One U.S. export specialist said, 
“We’ve become so concerned with 


“COCOM is smothered," said an 
administration offidaL “We're not 
implementing (he president’s liber- 
alization pohey. We're just paying 
lip service to it 

“The situation is serious, really 
serious," be continued. “We’re 
talking about a year’s delay on li- 
cense approval” for even the least 
sophisticated types of technology. 

, - *■ The U.S. allies, who also are be- 

cent of all COCOM license appli- ginning to see an increase in their 
cations, had 877 cases pending last rhmn ' 
month, 807 for products destined 
for China. 

William Schneider Jr„ undersec- 
retary of state for security assis- 
tance, science and technology, said 


China we can’t focus on the more 
important East Bloc” — the Soviet 
Union and its Warsaw Pact allies. 

During a meeting in Paris last 
month, high-level representatives 
from the 15 members of COCOM 
set a May 1 deadline for proposals 
to speed up the China licensing 
process and dear away the backlog 
of license applications. The United 


the nation’s forests. That feeling is 
brightened by the electoral threat 
pored to the government by the 
enviro nmen talist Greens party. 
The second concern is that Bonn 
recognizes that the prolonged gov- 
ernment debate about emission 
controls has sharply depressed do- 
mestic orders for West German 
automakers. 

“We have the bad luck that other 
EC governments don’t have the 
same problem with dying forests, 
or in some cases, don't share the 
same concern,” Mr. Boenisch said. 
“Car buyers here need to know’ 
once and for all what the new emis- 
sion standards and tax incentives 
are going to be. The discussion can- 
not be carried on much longer from 
one government body to the next.” 

Mr. Boenisch stressed that Bonn 
sees little chance for further con- 
cessions on its deadlines, which 
have already been pushed back 
from 1986. the current plan calls 
for large cars to have conveners in 
1988 and for smaller cars to have 
than in 1989. 

The EC’s target date for estab- 


may face increased demands from 
other EC countries to impose a 
speed limit on its highways as an 
alternative measure fra- reducing 
car exhaust. West Germany has 
been cod to the suggestion, but has 
started a limited test todetennineif 
slower speeds help lessen the prob- 
lem. 

Mr. Boenisch said that Japanese 
cars with catalytic converters have 
been selling well in West Germany 
in the past six months, providing an 
incentive for European manufac- 
turers to put them on their cars if 
they hope to hold on to their share 
of the West German market. Most 
West German companies are ex- 
pected to offer a full line of con- 
vener-equipped models within the 
next few months, according to 
company reports. 

West Germany’s Automobile In- 
dustry Association last month re- 
ported a drop of more than 20 
percent in domestic orders for the 
fourth quarter last year, chiefly as a 
result of consumer uncertainty 
about emission control deadlines 
and tax breaks. 


OutputFaBs2 c 7o 
bi January in 
West Germany 

Rauers 

BONN — West German in- 
dustrial production, seasonally 
adjusted, fell a provisional 2 
percent in January after in- 
creasing a downward revised 
0.4 percent in December from 
November, the Economics 
Ministry said Tuesday. 

The ministry had originally 
estimated December produc- 
tion at 03 percent above the 
November level It said the pro- 
duction index fell to a provi- 
sional 99.8 in January from 
101.8 in December and 101.4 in 
November. The provisional 
January figure is 0.9 percent 
higher than the level in January 
1984, when the index stood at 
98.9. 

The ministry said the fall was 
influenced by extreme winter 
weather. The major factor be- 
hind the drop was a 27-percent 
fall against December in con- 
struction. 

Overall manufacturing in- 
dustry output fell 0.5 percent 
against December - 


ible to halve 
to get most Ii- 


pntt<icm>. ' ' pi.irf D> .- , 

alignment h.v . ,,j vc^tfaii Dollar Rates 

cdiwr .4 if Jf .. 1nuL l 3inDL 

-niC.*- bl. uk , • 91*. « 9to -9to 

edik'dieJ tf 11 *’ “fi 1 ? jww; Refers. 

the Lourri^ 1 "' • f 


March 5 


3 max. 
936 -9W 


6 max. 
103a -im 


educed an , 

the lourd'-** 1 " ”, 

f r 

election . •. ,;t. w , J 

':;; k , k Ui - 

rtf* {vllllC.t’ I* 

*'Ior 

h,id 

tliciyun 1 ' ( . :i 

public 

.vJ bid 


Bjoney Rates 


ti1lliu.fi i v Jtrf* 

IN U‘pl6 4 !■' f- 1 Ljm t 

ibcTixi ,. v ,v> M** jjawt Ptatr. 



s » 

8 7/16 m 

10 ta Wi 

9W-9W 9U4% 
9.10 M3 

' 8X6 868 

891 897 

835 835 

• 8 » 8S9 


Britrin 

Bank Base Rate 
Call Mamry 
sn-day Treasury BUI 
hnoMh intartxB* 

Japan 

Dbeounl (tote 
Coll Money 
MMtav interbank 


dose 

Pm. 

14 

14 

14to 

I4M 

Wi 

13to 

14to 

14 

5 

5 

6 to 

64* 

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6 to 


..kirypHoo Rate 

Crists t 


One «*• ■*; 

:- ,N f-r- 


6JU 

6.W 


lOKi 
IWfc 
103* 
10 to 

KM. 


800 

810 

620 

6J0 

855 


10V7 
10 to 
103* 
10 to 
total 


Gold Prices 


] 


Hang Km 
Luxembourg 
pgris (125 kUo] 
Zurich 
London 
New York 


am. PM. c trite 
29800 20860 -0,90 

2887S — — 050 

28805 —000 
28125 —050 
20750 —BITS 
28630 - 350 


square 
;i”"” 

Ru'hi‘ V* 1 . ,,.t 

fail « -l' 

Ml 

Kn-.b^ V! 


Gevttn, CommcrzbajK CrOdit Lv 
“kjr Ueyas Bank. Bank at Tokyo. 


Official Bxinas <w London. Porb usd Lrncm- 
boura, opening onddastaB prices tar Hm Kong 
m Zurlen, Now Yon Gamex curreni contract 
All urtew ta UiS oer ounce. 

Source: Reuters. 




Market Closed 


phi* 1 : .u-' 1 '* 

-I IlfUl-- * ; * .....pi! 
■iHL'ltl hi' I ■ 


\*t' 

.frJ 

M« ^ - ,;:i . i i.‘ markets were closed Tuesday in Thailand for a local 

-Widay. 


Non-Durables 
Lead Decline in 
Factory Orders 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Orders 
to U.S. factories for manufac- 
tured goods dropped 0.9 per- 
cent in January, the seventh 
time in the last 10 months that 
orders have dropped, the Com- 
merce Department said Tues- 
day. > 

The department said that 
new orders, which jndicatepro- 
dnetion levels, fell $1.7 buuon 
in January to $1922 billion, fol- 
lowing a decline of 0.1 percent 
in December. 

Unfilled orders at the end of 
January were about unchanged 
at S355J billion. 

The decline In orders came 
from a 19-percent drop in or- 
ders for nondurable goods sneb 
as chemicals, food and paper: 

Orders for durable goods, 
major consumer purchases ex- 
pected to last three years or 
more, rose 1.8 percent to 5103.9 
bflliou. The increase was due 
mainly to the primary metals 
and electrical machiner y indus- 
tries. (AP, UPI) 


trade, support American ef- 
forts to speed the COCOM process. 
initi ally administration officials 
said they were concerned that the 
Western European members would 
seek concessions on sales to their 
primary Communist markets in 
Eastern Europe in exchange fra 
streamlining the China licensing 
procedures. 

“Thai never materialized," an 
administration official said. He 
added that France, West Germany 
and Britain pressed the U.S. drie- 


that it might be 
the time require 
censes approved. 

“We made a decision to improve 
the administrative apparatus,*’ Mr. 

Schneider said. “It should be posa- 
ble to process applications faster." 

The problem has intensified with 
China’s decision to make high-tech f&wZZtoSZ 
purchases a prime element of its 
modernization program. China 
bought $101.2 million worth of 
U.S. computers last year, and the 
U.S. Embassy in Bqjing expects 
sales to double this year. 

China's leader, Deng Xiaoping, 
made the ability to get high-tech 
the United Sta 


products from the United States a 
condition of closer ties between the 
two nations, and President Ronald 
Reagan approved a liberalized ex- 
port policy for Beijing in 1983. 

But administration officials said 
the delays are tmderminmg the 
president’s policy. 


The, . 

Carlyle 

Hotel 


HadUofl AvrniM 
at 76th Street 
Now Ybrkt0021 
tt»TN Ca rt y*» Wo w Vofte 
International 7Mox S20692 
Ho 6o ph ono 2t2-M4.1SOO 

A nMmbtrol th« Slurp Group 
since 1467 


jtfpTAPMAN 

MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 


PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTOENBII 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR. 

yielded the inflowing 
after afl charges: 

IN 19801+165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: -24% 

IN 1984: -34% 

FEB. 28 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S- $10579835 
Mere then 550,000,000.00 
currently under management 

Cal or wrto RoyaD Frazier at 

WMAN. Ita-w Analysis and 

Portfolio Management ha, 
VWd Street Pta2», New Mxk, 
New Mxfc 10005212-269-1041 
■fete BM1 6671 73 IM 


OPPENHEIMER 
OFFERS YOUR IRA AN 
ALTERNATIVE 
TO GUARANTEED 
LOW RATES. 


F or IRA investors seeking the 
assurance of a fixed rate, we 
suggest a bank* 

For those investors more 
concerned with how high the 
rate of return is, than with how 
fixed, we suggest another route. 
The Oppenheimer Special Fund. 

Because over its life, the 
Special Fund has the best perfor- 
mance Tecord of all 361 mutual 
funds that have been in existence 
that long— an astonishing total 
return of 940%?* 


So if you had been able to 
put $2,000 a year into a Special 
Fund IRA since the Fund’s 
inception, your IRA would have 
been worth $104; 570*** as of 
December 31, 1984. That’s an 
average annual return of 21.5%. 

The Special Fund provides 
an IRA investment based on the 
philosophy that the 
opportunity for a 
higher return is pref- 
erable to the certain- 
ty of a lower one. 



, 

6/3/85 | 

I 
I 


E To M-Tucker Smith 

I Oppenheimer & Gi. 62-64 Cannon St. London EC4N 6 AE England 
I Telephone 01-236 65 7S 

I Please send me an FRA application and s Special Fund prospectus with more coraplttt irtforma- 
| tloa, including allchaigoand expenses. Til read it carefully before I tnvew or send money 
j □ IU like io open an IRA. □JUUScto switch my IRA 


| Km 


Arkbtss 


I OlY 


Swe 


m 


Phone 


J 


THE OPPENHE1 MER SPECIAL FUND. 


€1 1985 Oppenheinufr Invcuor Service*, Inc. ‘Bank IRA's arc insured and generally have lixed imeresi 
rotes, whereas ihe Fund’s net asset value fluctuates and may be subject to loss. ** March 15, 1975-Deceinbcr 
31, 1964. Upper Analytical Services, Inc. ***Anumme a S2jb00 investment on March 15. 1973 (inception 
of fundi and SL000 annual investments on first business day of each year thereafter with all drvulendsand 
distributions reinvested. Pan performance It not an Indication of future results. In the period shown, 
stock prices Uuertwwd severely and were generally higher » the end than at ihe beginning. 


Ml 


dun> >ctt 





. r Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HKRALP TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages \ 

Om HU Law ixa* dm 


NYSE index 


Tuesdays 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


VdL hWi Low Last Chra 


50ft 49 

27% an. 

tort 45ft 

30ft 8ft 

Sift to% 
ii% srv» 
Oft 13 
10ft 10 
19ft IV 
35ft 35ft 
30Ui 27ft 
135ft 134ft 
35ft 25ft 
17ft 17ft 
19ft lift 


49ft —ft 
Sift -1 

40 40M 

30ft + ft 

21ft + ft 

41ft +lft 

13 -1 

lift —ft 
19ft — ft 
35ft —ft 
30ft +m 
135ft + ft 
2Sft + ft 
17ft 

19ft + ft 


Indus 1290X0 1300X2 1*103 tglto + 122 

Trans 0017 43430 42400 42043— 177 

UNI 14790 1090 M7.ll 14010+ 0.15 

Coma 52441 52006 52651 35443+ 621 


Composite 

industrial* 

TronsA 

ummes 

Flnonca 


HlOtl Low CtOM ore 
10045 10509 100X7 +0X4 
rK-14 121X7 12192 + 009 
101X5 101 JOS 101X2—021 
93JB 5139 5353 +002 
10950 10822 10954 -0.14 


N1SE 


Closing 


Undmoad 
Total bauas 
New HUM 
flew lows 

Volume up 

vshrawdoam 


m 247 

200 347 

ZZ9 230 

im 824 

ai as 

2 3 

2237,190 

2 X 30595 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Bonks 

Transo. 


Week 

Clow CtfW Asa 
287.10 +604 28590 
31634— HO 307X3 
331X7 +638 33901 
32457 +611 334X7 
244X5 — 614 24528 
24*54 +048 34725 
9* 477 +0X4 


AMEX Most Actives J 

VBt Hrtti Law low 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading In N,Y. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total lt*«» 
New Highs 
Now Laws 

vniumoup 

Volume down 


B*r Sorts *StlTT 


52X33X00 


20X579 534943 
217,191 5250® 

1 ISSS 5 S 

197,154 484X74 


VoLOM PJ 4 1 I 437 WKM | 

PRV.4PJA.VQI. UUHLBOB I 

Pm coomIWoTbO dose mown 


Standard & Poor's Index 


4497J 4 

W14 34ft 
4*14 7ft 

§04 Ife 

2379 14ft 
.3649 46ft 
1341 13 
1327 2ft 
W» 18ft 
1017 lift 
WOT 8ft 


3ft. 4 
74ft 24ft 
7 7ft 
» 4ft 

lk Uft 

{tt 

2 1 s5 ^ 

wjft m 
wft lift •. v, 
* Jft +ft 


•inehtaad in me tarts Haures 


Tables includt me not ton wide prices 
up To Tbe dosing on Wall street and 
do not refled kite trades elsewhere. 


Ind us trials 

Transo. 

Utilities 

Finance 

CamoaeH* 


High Law Oom CJifte 
304X3 20113 20AW +634 
140X2 159X7 159 JO — 627 
7854 77.99 7611 —619 
2101 1004 2097 — 602 
182X5 1B1XS 18223 +617 


1 Dow Janes Bond Averages! 



CtOM 

CB'M 

Bonds 

72X6 

—003 

Utilities 

69X0 

+ 0.19 

industrials 

7506 

—0X6 


AMEX Stock index 


TI 


12Monftl 
HttlW Week 


% OdM 

ON. YKL PE V»».HWHjw ftwl.aras 


XB 2J It 
11 


23 9ft AG5 11 » 

18ft II AMCA S 

17ft 13% AMF J» 30 38 73* 

4314 241* AMR 10 3933 

20V. 10 V. AMR Bf 618 18* 

25ft 22ft ANRpf 2X7 106 221 

23 19 ANRpt 2.12 99 „ 4 

14ft SVi APL _ 3 34 

49ft 44ft ASA 2*0 49 400 

27 14 AVX J2 IX 14 06 

494k 36ft AMLnb 1X0 24 15 3470 
2Sft 16ft Aceawa I M 10 19 149 
22ft 12ft AcmaC X0 22 « 


UP& 8V. AcrrwE 53b 35 12 1 

17ft 15 AdaE* 2.11*125 _ a 


20 lift AdmMI 52 IX 8 8 

!*ft Bft AOvSvS *1t 75 II 394 

41ft 25ft AMO „ 13 SBXV 

12ft 6ft A Ovest .12 U 5K 

14ft Oft AWflex 13 71 

42ft 27ft AetnLI 2X4 64 40 123 
58ft 52ft AeTL p( S03D1O5 150 


32ft 15ft Alunns 1X0 45 16 454 
51 3Bft AirPra 1X0 64 11 149 


24ft 13 AtrbFrt X0 25 13 


Ak.PrtA3.92 126 24 

AlaPdSf 57 1IJ 51 
AlaP pf 900 166 830 

AiaPpf 1100 110 100 

AMP Of 628 122 218 

Atones .92 7X II 3S 
AbkAIr ,14 J 9 067 
Altwfos JO 2J 10 29 

Albtans 68 23 T) 309 
AMI 150 45 II 2121 
AlCDStd 1J0 3X 12 24 

AJexAbc 100 35 S17S6 

AlBXdr 26 97 

AllgCP 2061 2X I 8 

AlsCPRf 2X6 11J 540 

Atglnt W E 770 
Ahllnpf 219 115 16 

Aisiufcnxs 11.9 11 

AnpPW 170 90 I 699 

AlrtflG XOb 13 12 391 

AildCa* 100 44 8 MU 

AWCPBt 474 109 


AWCp of 12JD0 11.1 60 

AWCpI 12J9eT21 64 

AIMPd >5 

AlMStr 112 39 9 409 
AlllsCIl 100 

AOsCpf 2$ 

ALLTL 104 7.1 9 66 

Alcoa 150 35 12 2420 
Amax JO 1.1 473 

Amaxtf 300 17 1 

AmHa 1.10 39 14 4*83 
AHcspf 650 29 I 
AmAor 87 

ABakr 11 100 

A Brand 390 57 10 361 
ABrd pf 179 10.1 2 

ABrdpf 2X7 30 2 

ABdcst 1X0 14 ID 11S4 

ABMM 06 3J 12 II 

ABusPr 04 16 14 I 

AmCan 290 50 11 1389 

ACOnpf 180 119 2 

ACanpf 690 67 19 

ACan pf 1175 117 3 

ACaoBd 720 110 3S 
ACopCv 6568219 33 

ACsntC 13 32 

ACran 1J0 35 12 2145 

ADT 92 17 27 91 

AElPw 12*010.* • 3599 

Am Exp 1XS 30 15 3125 

AFamtl 04b 25 U 142 

AGnCp 100 35 V 2106 

ACnl Wt 114 

AGnlptA 6X0*1 10 16) 

AGnl pfB 590* 75 3) 

AGnpfD 204 44 272) 

AHertl 100 14 13 16) 

A Holst 60 

AHom* 390 50 12 1351 
A Hasp 1.12 35 10 1944 
Amrteti 600 70 s 532 
AlnOrp X4 0 16 001 
AMI 92 60 14 1955 
AmMot BS 1666 

ANtRas 2X2 66 1216626 

APraskf 74t U 5 M 

ASUFla 5 1402 

ASLPIPf 2.19 16.1 610 

ASMP 00 50 16 49 

AmStd 1X0 40 13 1735 
AmStnr X4 IX 11 577 
ABfTPfA 450 6X 149 
ASfTPfB 600 127 132 

ATS.T 1X0 55 1817349 
AT&T pf 3X4 161 250 

ATATpf 374 161 317 

AWofrs 7 305 

AWatpf 1X3 25 20ft 

AWolPf 1X5 166 31ft 

AmMoH 640 89 II 202 

ATrPr 555* 61 0 

ATrtc 11 

ATrUn 555* 69 1 

Affloron 1X0 49 1 48 

AitmOs XO X II HM0 
AnMSRf 5X2 10 2 

Am*t*k 00 M IS 2J0 
Am lac 88 

Amine 5 213 


20ft— ft 
15ft + ft 
lift— ft 
16ft — ft 
41ft— ft 
20ft 

25ft— ft 
21ft + ft 
10ft— ft 
46 —1 
22ft— ft 
49ft + ft 
24 

18ft— ft 

10 +14 
16ft + ft 
19ft 

lift— ft 

32ft- ft 

11 — ft 

1344 

41ft— ft 
55ft + ft 
27ft + ft 
49ft + ft 
23ft + ft 
lft 
31 
7ft 

71ft +1 
96ft 

67ft + ft 
13ft— ft 
101k— ft 
14 +ft 
20ft— ft 


35ft— ft 

f v> +2ft 
ft— ft 
ft+ <4 
25ft + ft 
26ft 
19ft 
94ft 
30ft 

18ft— ft 

39ft 

61*8 

108 —lft 

102ft— ft 


54ft + ft 


7 — ft 

29 — ft 
26 

34ft + ft 

T7% 

34ft— ft 
20ft— ft 
122ft 
lft— ft 
19ft— ft 
6Hk 

27ft— ft 

69ft— ft 
67ft 

25ft + ft 
24ft + ft 
50ft— ft 
23ft— ft 
44ft— ft 

■?Sft + *: 

30 + ft 

53ft— ft 
24ft 
20ft 

42ft— ft 
20ft— ft 
aoft + ft 1 
lift 

53ft— ft 
B0ft+ ft 
60ft + ft 
31ft + ft 
9ft— ft 
50ft + ft 
33ft + ft 
Sift 

71ft— ft 
23ft 24ft + ft 
3ft 3ft— ft 
59ft 41ft +lft 


39ft 40 + ft 

7ft 8 + ft 


13ft + ft 
14ft— ft 
33ft— ft 
55% + ft 
66 +1 


21ft + ft | 

§ “* 

22ft— ft 

2»-*| 
77ft— ft 


X0 10 22 
7 


AMPS J2 25 17 4270 

Amoco JO 10 22 40S 

Amraoi 7 to 

AmSM 1X0 55 a 57 

Amstod 1X0 4.1 13 299 

Anacmp looi 

Analogs If 96V 

Anchor 1X8 4X TO 
An Clay 152 3J 19 73 

AlKlrGr JO IX 16 13 

Angalle 56 20 12 *5 

Anhavt 200 20 10 1641 

. Anh*UP< 3X0 63 04 

22ft 13ft Artxtr X0 IX 22 113 
16ft Eft Anttwm 04 J |5 115 
15ft 10ft Altmuiv X4b 30 7 7* 

Mft 9U> Apache XI 25 11 182 

3 ft ApChPwt 3 

19ft lift ApaiP un20O*11 5 296 

64 55ft AoPwpf 612 12X tOOc 

39ft 17ft AlHDta 1.121 61 22 56 

nu f APPlMo 260 60 

21ft 15ft Arch Da .14b 7 14 3850 

®ft MW ArlzPS 640 T2X 7 911 


91ft 71 Art Pot 1051*110 
29ft 21 ArtPpf 358 129 
97 79 ATlPpt 1070 11,1 

23ft 13ft ArkBst X0 1.9 


34ft 16 ATkio 100 SX 1* 1366 

.ft 16 ArtnRf 114 

Sift * Armen 764 

30ft IS Armcpf 610 165 17 

34 15ft AnnsRta XI 60 9 130 

38 22ft Arm Win 1X0 35 10 734 

34ft lfft AtoCd 1 JO 17 I 7 

26% 13ft ArowC X0 IX 8 31 

22ft 16 Artru J2 1.1 lw 

22ft 14 Arabia 00 35 9 97x 

54ft 34ft Arab pf 600 60 Sx 
34W 17ft Aaorco 4140 

29% 20ft Ashton 1X0 SX 235 

42% 33ft AMhIO pf 4JB 16* 70 

39ft 31% Ash to Pi 696 102 13 

Mft 45ft AUOG 2X0 45 9 410 

Mft lift AHlton* 1X0 75 10 2 

UW 19ft AtC v El 2X1 90 I 130 

,n% 40ft At! Rich 600 4X 22 US4 

125 97 AtlRcPl 600 64 2 

20 lift AtlOSCp IS 

34ft 18ft AUOOT JB IX 20 1018 

4616 29ft AutoOf X2 U 20 22S 

»W l?ft AVEMC XO 62 14 11 

77ft 23 A very XO IX U 166 

15ft TO Avtatln 7 38 

41 27 Avnot 50 15 IS *58 

Sft 19ft Avon 600 69 10 1337 

3sft 11 Avdln 13 153 


sB^ 11 

vi. i«ft+ft 


j k:£ 

z 


p» + ft 

11 —Hi 


Mft— ft 
13 — ft 
19ft— ft 
21ft + ft 
If +1 
27ft+ ft 
96 

21ft— ft 
20ft— ft 
» + 

9ft >0 +1% 
23 20 — ft 

23ft » +ft 
M 36ft— ft 
33% 32ft + % 
Mft Mft + ft | 
20ft 20ft + ft I 
22% 22ft + h 
S3 53 — ft 
24% 24ft + ft 
29 29ft , 
41ft 41ft + ft I 
E. HP 
5714 57ft— ft 
21ft 21ft 
24ft 25 + ft 
47ft 48W + ft 
14 1M +J 
13ft Mft + ft 
26ft 27 — ft 
45 45ft 
Mft MW— ft 
Mft 36W+ ft 
Uft 14ft— ft 
HH 33% — ft 
22ft 22ft + % 
23% 25ft + ft 


20ft 10U BMC 
J3% Mft BOlriKB 
21% is Bkrlnri 
24ft Mft Bauer 
m ft viBauu 
9 2 BMU PT 


» 20ft BOHCp IJS 67 
23% 11% BOllyMf X0 15 
15ft 7ft (URvn 
41ft 30ft BURGE 3X0 61 
44ft Mft BOIf PfB 450 10X 
30 20ft BncOne 1.10 67 
5ft 3ft B0nT« 

<3 39% Banda* 1J0 20 

Oft 29 BkBos 2X0 55 
53% 43 BkBO8Pf613ol0J 
54 49 BkNEdPBXMlOX 

41 26ft HKNV 604 52 
26ft 15ft BOfcVO* 100 40 
31% 14% BaKAm 1J2 7-8 

52ft 40 BKAm Pf 619011J 
86 66 BKAmpf 638*161 

IMS lift BKAmpf 208 
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882 15ft 
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103 BW. 

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M 250 22ft 
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14ft 14ft 

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39V* 39% 

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29ft 29%+ ft 
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19ft lfft 
42% 43% 

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15% 15ft 
30W 31 + % 

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23W 23W + % 
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25W 36% + % 
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49ft 4F%— % 
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30ft 30%+ ft 
56 54 — ft 

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5ft 5ft 
Mft 10%+ % 
141* 14ft + % 
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82ft 82ft— % 

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33% 33% + % 
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Dow Gains in Active Trading 


United Press IniematwuJ 

NEW YORK — The stock market finished 
with mixed results in generally lackluster trad- 
ing Tuesday. 

03 issues were in the spotlight as merger 
speculation shifted from Phillips Petroleum to 
other companies. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which fell 
9-83 Tuesday, gained 2-32 to dose at 1,291-85- 
The blue-chip indicator had been up about 4 
points in the Cim hour, then went into a modest 
deficit for most of the session and turned higher 
late in the day. 

The New York Stock Exchange index gained 

O. 04 to 105.47 and the price of an average share 
increased 1 cent Standard & Poor's 500-stock 
index rose 0.17 to 18223. Declines topped ad- 
vances 8 to 7 among the 2,009 issues traded at 4 

P. M. 

Volume totaled 11637 million shares, up 
from 10208 million traded Monday. 

Hildegard Zagorsk: of Prudential-Bache said 
the stock market appeared to be in a further 
consolidation following recent gains. An ad- 
. vance Friday took the Dow index to a record 
1299.36. 

"There is still a lot of uncertainty around,*’ 
she said, covering such areas as whether the 
Federal Reserve wb tighten the monetary reins, 
and worries about the U.S. dollar. 

The major trend is still very much on the 
upside,” Ms. Zagordd added, with a break 
above 1JQQ likely within a short period. 

Before the stock market opened, the Com- 
merce Department reported new factory orders 
declined 0.9 percent m January to SI9218 bil- 
lion. In December new factory orders declined 
by a revised 0.1 percent. 


Sit. QOflfl I IT Min oli 

Dhf.YM.PE HftMHhUtw OuotOiHt 1 hjSilIw Stock 


DM. YM. PE HHHtahUm 


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lift 3ft 
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i y 


12 Month 
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qoh i 

PHlYM-PE M6tWfltlLa« Qanl. OTve 




Harry Villec of Sutro & Co~, Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia, said the 1^300 level on the Dow industri- 
al index is a “psychological barrier only.” He 
said the stock market had a good chance of 
dosing over 1,300 on its next attempt. 

Mr. Villec said there seemed to be too much 
emphasis on money supply as a toed in analyz- 
ing stock market movements. Some analysts 
have said increases in the money supply win 
lead to higher interest rates. 

Composite volume of NYSE-listed issues on 
all UJ5. exchanges and over the counter at 4 
P.M. totaled 137-35 million shares, up from , 
128.03 million Monday. 

On the floor, Phillips Petroleum was the most 
active issue, dropping % to 49%. The company 
will increase its debt as a result of the settlement 
announced Monday with the investor Carl C 
Icahn. 

Occidental Petroleum was second, off % to 
28%. 

Unocal was third, jumping 2 W to 47% on 
renewed takeover speculation as interest in 
Phillips as a takeover play came to an end. 

The Texas oilman T. Boone Pickens has a 9.7 
percent stake in Unocal. Mr. Pickens’s Mesa 
Petroleum gained % to 19%. 

Sun Co., sometimes mentioned as a takeover 
candidate, rose 1% to 51. 

American Namral Resources advanced IK to 
61%. The company’s chairman has said a $60- 
per-share merger bid from Coastal Corp. was 
inadequate. 

Crown ZeQerbach (ex-dividend) jumped 2% 
to 35%. A block of 500,000 shares crossed at 35. 
There was speculation that Sir James Gold- 
smith was increasing his stake in the company. 


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U 

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200 

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3 7068 

1X6 117 


52 

1X4 

25 

14 

122 

X4 

30 

U 

921 

XI 

70 

11 

4 

104 

30 56 2418 


15%— ft 
24 + % 
16 

36%— 1» | 
22 +ft 1 
lift 
6 

35%+ ft 
34 — % 

3§U + W 

uft— % 1 
18ft— ft 
SSft— ft , 
27ft 

33ft + % 

Oft— ft 

sa+a 

54ft— Tft 

£*+ft 



€T^V 


in iirt C 
; :ruJ 


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2X2*230 396 

X0 30 15 611 
XO 20 14 201 
X0 25 * 679 
200 60 S3 
XI IX 9 35 


23% + % 
75ft— % 
lift — ft | 
4* +% 

lift— ft 
II — % , 
46%+ ft 
29% I 
lift 

47% + ft | 
101ft +1 I 
7ft 

2B%— % 

30ft 

20 %+W I 
25ft— ft 
«%+ % I 
10% 

32%— % 1 
23%—% | 
38 +ft ! 
31 - % 
12% — ft 
34% 

29%+ ft 
30% — % 
23%- ft 
17%— % 
5W+ ft 
20Vk 

18% — ft 
54% 

45ft 

U%+ ft 
66% — % 


V'if it u 




if Your mission is to get to earth and work out the details 
to bring the GrmPak Enviro-spray System to Mars ” 


GrowPak" from our Enviro-Spray Systems, Inc. 
subsidiary, is the most innovnrive and versatile 



technological development in pressurized packaging 
in 40 years. For our 1984 Annual Report write: 

Grow Chemical Europe N.V., Oudestraat 8 
B-2650 Aartselaar. Belgium. DepL G 


’Sift 

27ft +lft 
9% 

20 

24ft— ft 
23%— ft 


Grow Group 

Awlgrip, Alumigrip, Devoe, three of our well-known ■ brand names. 



GAF .15* A 11 156 
GAFPf 1X0 U 19 

GAT X 1X0 30 15 IKS 

GATXPf 200 50 1 

GCA 14 1254 

GEICO 100 IX 11 137X 
GEO 412 

GF CP 28 

GTE 300 7.1 I 2044 

GTE pf 200 77 26 

GTEpf 240 1 1X 53 

Gomtt 1X0 2X 30 530 

GapStr 00 11 13 11 

G*amt X0 3X 14 73 


56 11 15 203 


GnCara 100b 3*121 416 


GAIOV 1X3* 95 
GnBcSh 100 24 I 


aanrn* xo ix a 285 


GCtipfs X6 IX 


GnDva 100 IX 10 7974 
G«nEI 2X0 15 13 6416 


GnFd* 200 41 10 852 


GnHotJ* X4 10 18 173 


Gnlrat "00 2X 19 936 
GftMllb 2X4 4.1 13 995 
GMot 50Or 6X 4 5923 
GMEfl .10* X 049 
GMOfPf 373 90 3 

OMoTpf 500 93 19 

GHC .16 20 17 33 

GPU 6 400 

Own* 156 21 22 1327 

GfiRatr 6 315 

GitStonl 100 3X 13 194 

GTFI pt 1X5 114 TO* 
O*nsco 13 208 

GnRoO .10 X 25 1037 




QanPt * 1.H 24 16 I191x 
GoPoc 00 32 26 2521 
GaPepf 2X4 *2 7 

GOPwpf 3X4 12X 19 

GaPwpf 276 127 I 
GoPwpf 256 125 21 

GaPwpf 252 120 7 

GaPwpf 27S 11J 2 

GaPwpf 772 124 100* 

GaibPI 1.1* 4,1 11 394 
GwttS* .12 5 16 332 

OtantP • 

GOn-Ffl 5 1004 

GttfHIll 52 20 20 322 
Gllrttt* 260 45 11 630 
GrttsC 21 

GtOWM 04 40 004 

OlDbMpfUO 15X 30 

GIONIJ0 12 2431 

GUN Wt 773 

GMWF X0 0 4 645 

Gdrtcti 106 54 11 502 

Goadvr 10 U 7 4811 

GardhJ 52 30 9 24 

GOUM XI U U 33W 

Grac* 2X0 as itf an 

Grnlngr 1X4 i.« u 266 

GMFst 40 29 0 725 

GtAfPe 9 276 

GtLUn 100 25 10 52 

GNIm 1X3* 90 7 9 

GtNNk 102 4X 0 1770 

GfNNkPf475 21 146 

GTWPM 00 15 10 3249 

GWHsp 47 315 

CMP 172 100 10 37 

Grayh .1X0 40 11 1100 

Grayhpf *75 T0X IM* 

Grallar 11 744 

GrawGs 00 24 17 88 

GrvtoEl 01 7 14 150 

Gnunn 1 00 15 a 501 

Gram pf 200 107 1 

GnmM .16 25 95 

GuIHrd XI 25 9 329 

omwjt 00 27 W 1331 

GuNRB 2X 12 110 

GUJfRRl 1X0 60 2 

GMStUt 1X4 126 « 930 

GlfSU pf 305 130 9 

Otrau pr 4X0 Ml 50 
GA*ro X9*4J 10 97 

GtlHon 40 2X 14 2* 


29ft + ft 
36%— ft 
34ft + % 
42ft + % 
29 — % 
70% 

5%— ft 
7ft+ ft 
43% — ft 
26% + ft 
71%— ft 
56%+ ft 
24ft + ft 
11%— ft 
10ft 

7Dft— ft 
10 

n + * 

T7%— ft 
41%—% 
34 +% 

33 

17%+1U 
79ft— 2% 
63% + ft 
60%+ % 

- 6% + Hr. 

12% • 

12% — ft 

jri a 


12 Month 
Hlaii Low Modi 


St*. d*M 

Dtv. Yld PE 1006 Histi Low duoLOrW 


n Month 
High Low SlOCfc 


Dlv.YM.PE WteWnhUtw QMte 


57 419 
270 100 11 

102 110 13 

Mffl 0J 7 11 

100 21 9 7624 
400 47 3 

500 IX 20 
4JQ 74 1 

1X8 65 68 234 


79%+ ft 
64ft— ft 
30%—% 


12% 

74%—% 

low 

49%— ft 
11 —ft 
5% 

17ft— 1% 

22% — ft 
34%+ ft : 
24%— ft 
3*ft + % 
27%+lft 
»ft— ft 
HRfe— 1% 
» + ft | 

24ft 

62ft +1ft 
20ft + W 
* ! 
10% 

9W+ ft 
25ft— ft 

hit 

2%— ft 
24% + % 
20ft— IM 



24% + ft 
41ft + ft 
64%—% 
13%+ ft 
Mft— ft 
30ft+ft 
10%— % 
36%—% 
59 —I 
25ft + ft 
16%— ft 

27% — ft 

"4%- % 

un* 

lift + ft 

am— ift- 

26ft 

7 — % 

2SW + % 
33% + ft 
Mft + ft 
»ft— ft 
13 

20 —ft 

82 + ft 

Mft— ft 
17ft 


264 115 6 683 
204 13J in 

113 115 TOOr 

2X1 110 140* 

4.12 12X ms 

447 126 880* 

B4 10 IS 24 
060-25 9-3172. 
_ H 
JO 15 . 2908 
700 12S 1508 

215 12A 15 

225 12X IS 
3X3 12X 300 

101 60 7 25 

J4 20 161 

21 97 


2X0 5J 11 630 


235 60 22 

-54 43 Z1 2 
50 ,20 722 

475 104 12 

um *S II 140 

7 ’m 

a® , if 

2700117 1 47 


300 40 12 123 


770 50 10 

A3 40 7 922 
2X0 U I 4b 
. 37 321 
72 26 9 93 

4X0 13 1310MB 
XO IX 11 63 

1.12 30 11 997 
71 55 
306 
17 
19 
34 

260 40 13 6301 

408 nx 1 

176 AX 9 79 
240 40 21 3460 
10 91 

2X1 27 0 333 
100 20 12 189 
36 


Mft 

10ft + ft 

37 

Mft— ft 
19%— ft 
32ft 

59% — ft 
(SB +1 
41 +ft 
10ft 

39% + ft 
14ft + ft 
23 —ft 
16W— ft 
10ft + ft 
IBft+IM 
30% 

35ft + ft 
35ft— ft 
35 —ft 
•ft— ft 
Uft 
55ft 
17ft 
17% 


XSW 20ft 
lift 9 
21 15ft 
4ft 2ft 
37 25 

I6U 13ft 
15ft 9% 
24% 10% 
30 2SS 
36% 23 


30% 25% 

am 19ft 

79ft 64 
30% 21ft 


20% + 1A 

3£+ft 

SStS 

34ft— % 

<5»— ft 
»ft— ft 
5 + ft 
Mft+ft 
29ft— ft 
30%— ft 
12ft 
M 

82ft + ft 



134ft -Oft 

R + * 

135 

Mft + ft 
20ft— ft 
W% — ft 

w 

% 


3-04 94 8 1445X 
X4 27 12 45 

10* 50 4 192 
5.15*1 OX 200 


39% 15ft 
45ft 26ft 
22% Mft 
■> 57ft 
53ft 30V* 
43ft 30% 
46 23ft 
34ft M 
33ft 19 
24ft Mft 
2% 2% 
20ft 17ft 
53 44 

1% 3% 

40 21ft 
30 23% 

21% Bft 
21ft V 
21% Tft 
27 lift 
20ft 0% 
59 27ft 
15% 6 

17ft 7 
55 34 

33ft l«ft 
15 10% 

a 22ft 

25% 17 
32ft 20% 
23ft M% 
20ft 22% 
49% 36 
X Mft 

25% in* 

32 23% 

19% 15% 
M 10ft 


Latent 02 20 M 
LnMu X0 IX 24 
LagPlat XB 2J * 
LatiVal 
LVlnaf 

Lefttnn 106*100 
Larmar XB 10 » 
LaueMli 7 

Laucdpf 200 SX 
Lavllt 105 57 * 
L*vH* 72 10 9 
LOF 1X2 27 I 
LOPPf 475 6X 
UbtyCp 72 2J 17 
UBv 3J0 41 12 
Umlfad X2 0 » 
UncNfl 104 4X 12 
LhwPI 2J40KLS 
utton 200 20 10 
UKkbd XO* U M 

Lacttf* 00 20 n 

Lawns 100 5 

Lag icon X0 X 19 
LamFtn 1.16 40 11 
LomMts M 

Lom 4* wt 

1J0 A0 6 
... Pf 5X7 109 
LI LCD 2 

LILpfJ 

LILpfK 

LILpfX 
LILpfW 
ULpfV 
UlpfU 
ULlrfT 
LILpM 
ULpfP 

LILpfD 

Longer 1X0 24 14 
Loral . XI 10 19 
LoObM 55 44 1 
La Land 100 20 11 
LaPoc 00b 25 19 
La Pl-Pf 400 150 


22M 12% 32% + 

14ft M 14% + 

20% U% 5% 

3ft 3 3ft + 


n 31 u - 

M%f4ft 14%— 
13% [13 Uft— 
24ft 04 24 

37 l34ft 37 


LaPLPf 216 140 
LOuWa 2X4 9.1 


r „.. 2X4 9.1 7 

Lowstl 200 41 7 

LOW** J2 1.1 T7 
Labrtl V16 40 M 
Ulbn* ,04 10 X 
LuckyS t.M 50 11 
Lutara X8 12100 


32% 02ft 32% 
3m ,08% XM + 
40%'xm 4%— 
76ft Mft 76ft- 
31 0M 31 + 
79 77% 71% 4 

40ft M 40 4 
42% Q% 42ft- 
21% m* 2T%- 
70% (9% m- 
92% 6% S2%4 
X fl% »%w 
45% 41% 44*4 
32ft X 3216+ 
29ft 2% 29%+ 
23% 3ft 2m 
2% 26 3ft 
24ft m 2H- 
49% 496 9ft 
7 6* *•- 

42% 42 42 
42 43 41 + 

17% 17 0 — 
17% 17V 17ft 
17% TO 17ft 
21% 71V Bft 
17ft 1« 17» + 
53% 32V feii 
13% 13V Oft+ 
14ft MM 14ft-: 
53% sntflft— 
33 3Z%a%— 

12% UftWk + 
35% 34% 35ft— 
23% 

32ft 31%K- 

23ft 21% im- 
am 24% am 


45% 48ft Ml 
73 XftHft- 
38% 331ft ^1 + 
X 29%Stt + 
19% 19ft fft + 
IS 14% S 



27%—% 

ft-* 

16%—% 
18%+ % 
19% 

27% 

9M + ft 
30ft— ft 

Si- ft 

8ft +! * 


23ft 13% MAC0M. 24 U * 
51 34% MCA M 10 21 

2fl6 16% MCorp 1X0 60 7 
14% 7% MDC X2 2J 11 
42 34 MEI 00 IX 15 

Mft JV. MGJWGr X4 U 35 
12ft 9 MGMOTPL44 37 


24 U * 995 20% 11% 2 

M 10 33 6S3 49% 48ft 4j 

1X0 60 7 171 23% 33% » 

X3 2X 11 47D Uft M 1 

00 IX 15 54 40 39ft * 

.44 US 62 14 13% 


16ft 10 MGMUa X0* 15 24 70S Mft U 


361 3% lft 

316 141* M . Uft. 




30ft X 
34% 23% 


24% 13% 
14% 10% 


14% 10% 
43 25% 

»% 24% 

67% 54% 
X 46ft 
Mft 90 
1*% 12% 
9% 5% 
40% X 
46% 37% 
29% X% 
Wt 15% 
28% 27% 


L 12 37 
0 * 2.1 
r .10 x 

1X4*110 
1X2 3J 
400 14X 
9X6 MX 
8.12 M2 
1190 130 
2.11 127 


13 179 30% 
9 969 37ft 
11 237 24% 
73 12% 
t 2046 41% 


I®s as 

arte 57 

21 49 Bft 

14 4554 39% 

■ am 4tm 

17 0 24% 

15 147 35% 
15 1694 27ft 


29% X + % 
27 Uft— % 
23% 23% — ft 
12 12 % 

40ft 40%—% 
X X 
65 *S — 1 
56% 57 
97ft 97ft— ft 
M M — ft 
■ft 0%— ft 
am 39ft— % 

39% 39% — 1% 
24% 24%— ft 
Mft 24% — ft 

26% 27ft + ft . 


5ft ,2ft fAGMuwt 79 3 Ilk M 

S% 17ft MGMHO X08 2X 15 54 23U 23 2- 

2t 17% MB U O J8t 1 18% 18% 16U 

100 10 « 343 52 51% B.+ 

»% 38ft Maev . Lit 25 11 9M 46% 46 4M 

** X Macvpf 4X5 100 1001 39 39 » . 

I9J6 11% MadRM 28 14 13% 14.4 

39* 34 MMKf 100 27 6 469 X 36% ‘ 

2S ,2U >*52® 361 3% Jft 

SS JSS Manluri Job Zl 6 316 14U U U16. 

2M* 13% MantlNt J2 U 30 167 21% 2014 21 W 

i2S J 24 456 24% 24 24% 

115 ^ Mt"*?! ?■» M * 760 38ft Xft jm 1 

3P* U *f? rH P* 603*122 245 53% 50% 

S,. ^ MfrHPf 802*124 378 49 47ft C* 

Uft .5? »l««wl 1 642 1ft 7% 7ft 

Xft 10% VtMnWj>f 70 23ft 22% 2«- 

“ “ MAPCO 100 3X • 266 31% 31 % 31% 

2% % Mo redo 538 1 1 

31ft IN* MarMM 1X0 40 0 39 33ft J3 S 

S* 4n* MarMPf 5X6*100 263 40ft 40% 4J% 

5S *2? H2SP 01 0 39 591 ant 37ft OTJ 

12% 9% MortcC 31 UM 67 10% 9% Mh 

II. ««>rtc.p t 1X0 7X 14 I6ft 15% IM 


245 53% 50% Bft 
378 46 47ft 47% 
*42 7ft Tft 7% 
70 23ft 22% «+ 
264 31% 31 ft 31% 
2 3% 1% ?% 


aS 


x33 3^iS ^ Si* .... 

Sf* 5 “* iSE Si. m H i^*n% u s% 

83 B Mrmpf AB7 6J 94 78ft 77 77ft 

in* BJ* ManrK .12 10 l« to iaft 12% UM 

»% aft Masco 0* ix 16 3574 X 70* Mft 

13ft 7ft MomMt JD 10 15 13 73 12 U 

^0 IS* MMM IX *0 12 98* lftl»« 
m 2ft AtawP 175 3 2* 3 

-» ■ 7 i?^ 

US' 171 fit » » 

32ft Maltl of 200 U 79 30% 30 

13ft 9ft Maxam 7 55 14 13% UM 

49ft 30ft Mavp 9 L72 30 10 991 48% 47% fl% 

49% 36ft Marta 2400 50 M 157 47ft 4lft £% 

Xft Xft McDrpf 2X0 70 5 Xft M% 9% 

» M% McDrpf 2X0 I1X 6 22% fi M% 

31% 23ft Mcoert 100 *4 18 812 28ft 7ft 79 


4ft HRTlt 

19% HallFB 100 27 
Xft Hofbfn 100 57 
% Hallml 08 50 

stsss?* « 

lift Manas ixmix 
19% Hanoi 104a 97 


.» 23ft Hancllai .92 \J 
M 15ft HanaH M 30 


1 in* Hanna X0 10 
l 23% HarBrJ 100 10 
1 16% Hwlnd* 06 10 
. TO Hambh 
1 lft HrpRW 

22% Harris 

. 10% Harorn 
1 19 Horses IX 46 
1 Mft Mortal* 1J8 40 
1 13% HottS* IX 11J 
1 15% HawEI • 1X4 80 
t 8 HOVMA XO* IX 
> 20ft Hazrttn XA IX 
1 9 Hcrrt.nl> X2 30 
1 98* Hocks 39 20 

1 13ft HockiM 29 IX 
14% H*Jlnm XO> 27 
15% H*IQg — - - 
32 H*ta2 
Uft H*tn*C 
18 HstalP 
3% HeniCa 
27ft Hcrarts 1X0 44 
Mft H*rttC JB* 3 
19ft HwItCpflJD 57 
20% Hantir 1X0 xx 

5ft Hass tun 
31% Henri Pk 22 X 
17ft HexaH 00 2.1 
12 Hishwjr ^ 33 
Bft HlVWr .15 IJ 
17ft Hlrtbra 04 2.1 
45ft HIHan 100 3.1 
31 HIIacM X08 0 
35ft Holiday 100 20 
HotiyS 100 U 
12 HamaO 
11% HmFSD 
8 HnwGpf U0 124 
20ft Hmsttce X0 9 
Bft HmstFn XO 20 
43% Honda J8* 7 
ffftHanwett uo 14 
20 HaavrU 104 33 
Mft HruiBn L12 46 
» HnBnpf 2088120 

3% H ort bjn 

HQjaCfl xo IX 
n Hotel In 140 90 
toft HwatiM 06 24 
13% HauPab X0 2X 
34 Hauslnt 175 47 
54ft Holntpf 2X7 20 
'1 Holntpf 6X5 SX 
.7% Houind 2X1 110 
39% HouNG 2.12 40 
3* HfluOR 2J0e17.1 
13% HowtCa XO 2X | 
20ft Hubfart 2X0 8 l 5 
9% Huffy X0 U 
13ft HUBhTl X8 11 
17ft HuaMe X2 IX 
21ft Human XB 2J 
17ft HuntMf 00 10 
33% HuttljF 00 U 


Mft Hydra I 102 80 


5ft 5ft 
24% 26ft 
31% 31% 
Vft 1ft 
9U 9 
279* 27% 
Mft 13 

19 IBM 

54 53V. 

Mft 10% 
21ft 20% 
53% 52V. 
29ft 20% 
lift 11% 
32 31ft 
31% 30% 
77% 17ft 
20% 27ft 

32V, 31% 

16 15% 

20ft 20% 
12% 12ft 
2*% 26ft 
11% lift 
T2U Uft 
15% ig* 
17% 17ft 
24ft 34ft 
48 47ft 
15ft Mft 

20 19ft 
Wk 6ft 

35 34 

23 22% 
2616 Mft 
41ft 40% 

W* 

37% 

29ft 
17% 17ft 
13 11% 

M 35% 
37% 55ft 
33% 35% 
52 50% 

79% 79 
19% Mft 
21% 21 
0% 8% 
22% 22ft 
14ft 13ft 

58 57% 
«S 63ft 
34ft 32ft 
24% 24ft 
24% 24% 
5ft 5 
47 46ft 
29 28% 

Kft 36ft 
Mft in* 
37ft 35ft 
Bft ID 
Mft 75ft 
22ft 22% 
4*ft 45% 
IS* 12ft 
17% 1716 
»ft 24 
13% 13ft 
15ft 15 
20ft 20% 
20ft 29% 
26ft 25ft 
38% 37ft 

24 24 


3T%— ft 
1% 

914+16 

27% — ft 

Mft + ft 


lift + ft 
21 + ft 

52% + ft 
28%— ft 
11%— ft 
32—16 
31 —ft 
17ft— ft 
20ft + ft 
31ft— ft 
14 + % 

30ft— ft 
Mft 

2 n*+ ft 
U%+ ft 
IZft 

Mft— % 
T7ft + V* 
24ft 

47%+ ft 
15ft + ft 
19% — ft 
6ft 
35 

23 + ft 

26% 

41 +ft 
7%+ ft 
37ft + % 
29ft 

T7ft + ft 
12 

25% — ft 
57ft +1ft 
33ft + % 
50ft— ft 
79 —ft 
Mft— V* 
21ft + ft 
nt- ft 
22ft- ft 
14—16 
57ft— ft 
44 -1 
32% —2 
24ft— ft 
24% 

46%+ V, 
29 +ft 
toft— % 
17% — ft 
37 +1 
83% +2% 
75ft + % 


KDI X0 
KLMl 
KMIpf 408 
Kmart lh 
KM Ena 
KatsrAl X0 
KotAlpf 4J2 
KalSfnf 4JS 
KOI 66pf 473 
Kabtto jo 

WL 2X6 

KCPLpf 2X0 
KCPLpf 2X3 
KCSau 100 
KanGE 2X6 
KanPLt 206 
KaPLpr 2X2 
KOPLpf XX3 
Katvln 
KlllYjpf 1X6 
Kouffir X0 
Kfllrfpf 1XD 
KCMfpf ITS 
Kattoaa 106 
Kalhwf 1X0 
Ksned 

Konmt 00 

KVUfll 2X4 
K*rrGJ X4 
KarGpf 170 
KOITMC 1.10 
KOVBk 1X0 
KXVGan 


20 10 2*3 
.. 13 1719 
120 2 

3L5 9 2421 
„ 17 9S 
A2 617 
BX 2 

80 2 

90 1 

U 25 

1* 580 

117 5 490 
120 Me 

U0 on 

124 1 

130 54 

20 10 417 
MX 6 9502 
,90 7 ISO 

’M is 

nx 7 

229 

L( 2 

72 6 133 

07 2 

104 1 

17 14 611 

W ? » 

166 


Vi 


Kl Me 1X0 

KM no 400 
KMofC 400 
KimbC* 2X2 
KitoMM 76 
KOBW 2X0 
Kalmar X] 
K8MT1 JB 
KOPPr PflBOO 
Korean 
Kraaer 200 
KuMrns xo 
Kyaenrs .141 
KYlar jo 


87 2 

3X 3f 1760 
U I si 

• J5 20 2B 

u nm 

50 4 

43 7 

47 10 793 
SX 16 630 
84171 TM 
U 10 31 

4X 24 M71 
10X 4 

50 12 1494 
24 13 66x 
X 27 24 
U 7 IN 


,8ft Ml— ft 
15% 15ft— ft 
37% 37%— ft 
25ft 25%— ft 
37% 37% + ft 
13% 14%—% 
50 50 — 3 

Sfft 56 —2% 

S3 SI -3ft 

16% 17+1% 
in* Mt%— % 
19% 20U + % 
34 34 

34% Mft+ ft 
17% 17% 

17% 17% + ft 
KW 50ft— ft 
17ft 17ft 
31 33 — ft 

20ft 20%+ ft 
19ft lfft 
.29% 39%— ft 
102ftlaZft +1% 
17% 17% — ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 
Mft 84ft— ft 
47ft 47ft— ft 
33% 24 + ft 
1ft lft— ft 
23ft 23ft— ft 
24% 25 

lift lift 
Mft 19ft 
>1% 32%+}% 
26% 26ft— ft 
2ft 2ft— ft 

Wft w *+* 

34% 3«%+ ft 
m Mft— % 
80 81 +1% 
49 49ft + ft 
33% 34 +% 
27% 27% — ft 
19% 19%— ft 
ink 19 
Mft 9016— 1ft 
12% 13 
40% 40%— H 
23% 3M6- ft 
49 49 — ft 

Mft -20% + % 


12 4ft McDflwf 44 Bft 6ft n 

Mft 6ft McDM X0 2.1 20 31 9% 9ft 9ft 

«H 4n6 AncOnlS 02 IX 14 IKK 63 4H* 41W 

8» 47S* Medio 1X4 22 10 448 84ft 811* 

£ft JT% McGEd 200 4X *J 167 I 47ft 

48% 34 McGrK 10 U U MO 44% Xft 44ft 

34ft 19% MclntO 2 33% 0% 32* 

40% 32% MCK*M 2XG 6.1 11 44 29% 9/ 2% 

5* HtCKPf 108 25 1 62V. m 

15% 10 McLaon 9 1S9 14% II 14ft 

4% W Mclxawt 28 f% S* » 

2«% 1W McHtU M U I 11 26ft 2» 24U 

41ft 27% Mood IX) 11 I 4299 38% 3* Ml* 

24% 13 Mtwux 24 U U 49 23% SI 3, 

to% 24% Madirn _J6 20 9 510 30% 30L Wi 

51% 33% Met tan 2X1 SX 9 ISO 50ft 4 9b 50% 

27 Uft AM tan Pf 200 MX 55 26% 3f% 


36ft 19% MclntO 

«% 32% MCKUS 2X0 6.1 11 

?S£ S SS 41 * ^ U 

15% 10 AAcLaon 9 

.6% 3ft Mclxawt 
toft 19% AAcH*U A U i 

41ft 27% Mead IX) 11 1 

24ft 13 AAarux J4 10 u 

toft 24% Medtrn 76 20 9 

51% toft Mel tan 2X1 S3 9 

37 22ft AM tan Pf 200 MX 


45ft »% AMvM 1X4 3X 12 130 62ft 414. 42M 

66% ®m AAarcSt 1J0 20 10 191 62 608 61H 

01% 78% Merck 3J0 3J 15 3200 100% 99M 99U 
68% 39ft Manfth UO IX 14 127 61% 6H 6116 

36% 22 Mert-vn 00 20 33 3415 34% 34 34% 

3% 2 MffitaOf 838 2ft 2W 2ft 


46%+ ft 
12%— ft 
17% — % 
to 

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31 Mft 
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St 57Ml 

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27% 27% 
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?& ** 
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3ft 3ft 
lift lift 
24ft 24ft 
64% 64% 
Mft 16ft 
lift lift 
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24% 34% 
M. 17ft 
9% 3ft 
13% Uft 
23% 23% 
24 25ft 
soft 50U 
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33% 33% 


27% 

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9ft . 

16 — % 
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11% 

34%+ % 
64% + ft 
16ft 

lift— % 
34 +ft 
lft— ft 
34ft— ft 
M + ft 
3ft 
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23VS+ % 
25ft— ft 
SDft + ft ' 
30% 

toft— ft 


3% 2 MesgQf 838 2ft 2W 2% 

32 TOhMPiDPt S 9W 19% WAW* 

35ft 25ft AAeaaR 170* 50 09 29ft 291*29% 

8ft 5% Utab • TBs MX 7 135 Tft 7% 71* 

5rt 2rt AAostek 17 3% 3H Jft 

to 31% AAtEpfC 3X0 MX 101 27 27 , V 

57 4* MtEpfF 872 UX 50z 55ft 55% 15% 

54 44% AAtE pfG 7X8 1+1 20ft 54% 54 54ft 

57% 4J% AAlBpfl 8.12 Ux 2508 56% 56%%% 

58% 48% AffEofH 8X2 H4 36SR 58 57,7, 

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Hft ,9ft AAMSUt 178 137 5142158 13% U 

17ft AAMR88 100 SX 21 1914 Mft 1ft 
Mft 22 MWE IM KLO 10 IIS 27 26ft » 

17% 11% MIHnR XO 21 M 52 Mft Mft M 

86 69% MAMA 350 4.1 U 25P« Urt >3% g* 

31% 23% AAlnPL 276 13 I 204 30ft 30ft *6 

toft 6ft Mist Ins 633 7% 7ft % 

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to . 17% MaPSpf 2X4 123 1 19% 19ft »t 


toft 22 AAWE 268 MO 
17% 11% MIHnR X0 28 
86 60% A4AAM 250 4.1 

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to . 17% AAoPSpf 2X4 123 


22% 10% MOPS pr 261 ux 10 21% 21% toi 

11% 4 Mlftl 632 7 6ft 7 

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(Continued on Page 12) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


Pag* 11 




- # 

4 and work out the 
Q-sprtry System to Man; 


Knviro-Sprjv Sxmchk. lr K 
st innuyuiivc and versatile 
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one N.V., Oudcstu.it s 
clgium. Dept. (J 


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3f our well-known I ore 


brand name* 


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TURN NCW THAT 
THE CHIPS ARE DCWN? 


If you knew America’s smokestack indus- 
tries were in trouble, you may have thought that 
at least Silicon Valley was safe. 

It isn’t. 

This week Business Week examines 
Silicon Valley’s international trade crisis, how it 
happened and how a resolution might be 
engineered. 

Part of the problem is Japanese 
trading practices. They’re prompting 
even the Valley’s traditional free traders 



to start calling for protectionist measures like 
import surcharges. 

And in a report just released, the 
President’s Commission on Industrial Competi- 
tivenesspinpoints other problems. In technol- 
ogy, capital, people and trade. - 

But Business Week also looks on the 
brighter side. With possible solutions ori how to 
bring peace to the Valley once again. 

This week’s Silicon Valley cover story is 
one more instance of the authoritative, 


in-depth reporting on major issues that you’ll 
find every week in Business Week. The only 
newsweekly of business. 


BusinessWeek ri 

THE VOICE OF AUTHORITY 




ly ~~ ■ f \ K 1 . V ’i".-..' - * ,, - N 





B 1985. MCGRAW-HILL INC 




ft. 



Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


Tuesdays 


13 Month 
HWWJM 


Sis. Oral 12 Marts 

TflBHWLm QuM-OTOi HHBUw Sfcdt 


Sis. Ossa 

Mb re* iMMO^t 


12 Month 

Won low stock 


Dhr. VU.PE taa WflfiLOM Ouet-Orw 


12 Month 
Him Low Stock 


SIS. r*fa 

Dtv. Yft PE IDOsHim Low Outft. Qrt 


12 Month 
Him low swat 


- Sis. 

DtV. YW. PE JOMK 


MSE 


Closing 


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27ft 19* OrtonC M 3.1271 43 24ft 30* 30* 

la* 8* DricnP „ 7« im 1 i£ + £ 

1QH 4ft Orton pf 30 59 4 Bft 8* Bft— ft 

31* 24 Orion ol 235 JJ 2U 3SS 2* jg% + * 

31ft 18ft OutbMs M 12 18 10} »* » »* .. 

33ft 17 OvrnTr .44 16 14 331 331b 32ft 32ft— ft 

2D 13 OvStilp JO 26 II 421 17% 17* 1W 

37 28ft OwrnC 148 43 # 351 33ft 33ft 33ft + ft 

44ft 31ft Owen I II MU 4.1 9 483 <1* «4 41V*— % 

14ft 10ft Oxford 94 34 9 25 12ft 12ft— ft 


40ft 28 QuakOs L24 IT C 1344 W »i 39ft- ft 

aa 15 Qw«0 » » 35 4» 3Dft »ft as*— ft 

lift Sft Ouancx 31 95 *ft *ft 9ft + ft 

34* 23 Guestar 148 47 9 212 34% W« 34%+ ft 

2S 14 QkRell 64a 16 X 304 S* 24U 25* + * 


3 3*8» i5 8 

44ft 31U Owenlll MBb 41 
14ft 10ft Oxford M 33 


TabfM induce tiw natiamride prices 
up to the dosing M wall Strati 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


□ Month 
HWlLwJW 


y, Cton 

Dhr. YB. PE 1005 Utah Low Oiwt.QlX 


IS PHH 68 26 
24* PPG \M 42 
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lift PacAS 164 122 


68 2S 12 425 31* 30* 31 
MO 42 9 1175 38ft 37ft 38 — ft 
iO U 197 ZJft 22ft 21 — ft 

1.90 1QJ 204x lift IBft lift 

164 122 41 lift 12ft 12ft 


12ft PacGE 122 M 7 SW4 17* 17U 17ft+ ft 
30ft PacUB 332 U 12 SU 41ft «% 41ft + ft 


(Continued from Page 10) 


21ft Pd-um 190 44 14 397 »U W* IT 


52 34* MoonC tOO 19 19 ISO 51* 51ft 51* + * 

25ft 18ft mSSm 25+ » 

SB* m MorMPf ’’** U 49x PU 27 97* + U 

49* a* Morans 220 48 8 70S 44ft 45ft -®% — % 
Ml lik. umnoITTii 95 1 fi S IE +* 

C% Sft SSS^Knd Ca 17 10 478 40ft 40*4 ££ + ft 
31ft lBVk MonaS 30 14 13 19 22ft 32ft 92ft— ft 

21 12 MttWV 1JT.W II 3D5 Xft 2M »ft 

31ft 30 Mortons A* 13 12 1078 »% »% g£— « 

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SSSSIK&aiili ssslSls 

lift ’jft WWLII ,l44 " 38 4ft 3ft 4 + ft 


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13ft PacRspf 260 115 . 
lift Pa<Sd 40 15 13 


41 7* 7ft 7* + ft 

144 14ft 15ft 14 + ft 

BU 14ft 14 14ft + * 


53ft PaeToto 590 76 8 1219 70* 49ft 4?*— ft 


9* PocTIn 40 40 
71 PocHee 232 19 
27ft PocHsrf 407 127 


1 MV. 10ft TO* — ft 
194 34ft 24 24ft + ft 
13 32ft 32 32 + ft 


25 PDlnWt) 40 M 47 573 40 38ft » — * 
24ft PaMWpfZ2S 7.1 133 32* 31% 311k + ft 



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lift 
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240 42 7 134 

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220 86 18 392 

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32 16 14 1332 

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104 75 10 9 25* 

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375 134 00170 

160 115 2002 64, 

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112 122 20 17ft 

37S 13X 2 28* 

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3ft— ft 

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20ft PonABk 70 24 9 
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31 PontiEC 2J0 47 10 
3 PontPr 15 

12 Popreft JO *7 15 
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12ft PorkEs 11 

5ft PorkOrl .14 14 
25ft PorkH 1.12 U 12 
12ft PorkPn J2 02 28 
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14ft POYlHW J U II 
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47 18ft 38ft 38ft 
2 24* 24* 24*— ft 
3429 4ft 4 4 —ft 

150 2ft 2 2 

425 19 18* 18*— ft 


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37% 33 


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PontiEC 2J0 4J 10 1044 37ft 37 37— ft 

PontPr 15 494 4ft. 4ft 4*— ft 

Paprcft JO 47 15 133 17ft 17 17 

Pordvn 34 19 14ft 14ft 14ft + ft 

ParkES 11 29 15ft 15U 15ft 

PorkDrl .14 14 185 7 4* 4ft— ft 


.14 24 115 7 4* 4ft— ft 

1.12 U 12 532 37* 37 37ft + * 
J2 02 28 88 14ft 14* 14ft 

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J* 14 18 20 24* 24* 24* 

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PoPLdnr2J0 12J 
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PoPLdnrUS 121 
P0PL(tpr273 112 
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15 152 SM 

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47 8 2357 48ft 
103 8 42S0 24ft 
114 240z 35 

129 480z 35 

110 40z Mft 

119 14 34ft 

122 513 21* 

120 &5QZ 44* 

lit 41 25* 


54ft— ft 
48ft + ft 
34* + ft 
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.14 1A H 9 8* 8*— ft 

104 14 12 3434 40ft 39* 4M 
112 7.1 Z74 30ft 39* 30ft— ft 

145 104 M Bft 35ft 35ft 
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1-00 14 14 419 39ft 38ft 38*+* 
54 475 7ft #* 7 —ft 

J4 45 9 145 X 18ft It*— 3 
199 4ft 4ft 4ft 

M J 17 4884 57 53 55ft— 5ft 

10 12* 12ft 12* + ft 
MO 24 17 ZU8 47ft 44ft 44*— * 
JO 4J at 109 10ft 9* 10 
112 IftO 12 2TU 28* lift + ft 
330x1+4 300 22* B* 22*+ ft 

1 JSx 93 10 12 13* 13* 13ft + ft 

14 503 16 15* 14 + ft 

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27 1 1 1 

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1! M «* 4ft Cft 

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I4< U I 40 43ft 43 43ft— ft 

112 111 5 24 25* 25* 

4J7e 8J 353 53 52* 53 + * 

M4 5j 0 7 255 33 32* ft 

112 7J 7 38* 28* 28* — ft 

J2 M 22 54 19* 19ft 19* + ft 

JO 11 11 2514 25* 25ft 25*— ft 

42 13* Uft 13ft 

TJ4 52 U 1238 35* 35* 35ft— ft 

JO 14 11 10 19* 19* n* 

J4 17 ID 1953 14ft 14 14ft 

148 4.1 8 230 84ft 82* 83ft—* 

Alt 85 4 48ft ftft «ft + ft 

1JD M 4 1222 38ft r* 37*—* 

<50 *5 2 82 82 82 +1 

1J8 5J 9 154 X 29ft 29*— ft 



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MO 3J IS 1301 
f U M 1313 

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ant— ft 
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Pxnwn 130 5J 12 103 39 


Pxnwpf MO 14 54 34ft 

PXnraol 230 +7 21 524 47ft 

PeonEn 130 73 8 418 17 

Pen Boy M M 14 18 3<ft 

PepsiCo 1J8 3J 22 2843 49ft 

Perk El 36 22 14 3433 25* 

Frisian 135 113 8 142 9* 

PerVDr 38 1J 15 209 20ft 

Petrie 7 JO 3J 16 187 36ft 

PxtRs 3320147 56 25ft 

Pettfepf 1.57 1QJ 5 15ft 

Ptrlnv 1JJ3X79J 34 5* 

PftMT MS 36 13 4586 41* 

PhelpD 2414 19ft 

Pheippr 5L00 119 3 44 

PhttjrS JS* 1J 25 6492 38 

Philo El 230 143 4 2228 I5ft 


J« 1J 20 144 45 
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UO 24 X 306 43* 

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100 110 4 891 14* 

160 I3J 30z 27* 

274X11J 1 34 

1060 116 220z 92 

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.12 7 24 630 17* 

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140 53 0 1251 65ft 
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J» 5 7 113 17ft 171 


17* 

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24ft 19ft 
94ft 75 
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38*— ft 
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44 
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102*— IU 
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111 


60 M X 392 
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1.12 3J 8 118 
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36 36 W 1172 
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264 7J 9 4851 
IJN 26 10 1775 
200 25 10 IX 
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2J7o SJ 5 3742 
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US +1 14 421 
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60 26 15 423 
5 118 


32ft— ft 

6ft 

33ft— ft 


22ft— ft 

19ft 

S3*— ft 
37* + * 
70ft + * 
52* + ft 
21 

20*— ft 
TO*— ft 
Z* 

lift— ft 
X —ft 



10 324 
.32 U 19 334 
Jt 33 II «K 
UO 19 11 24 

UOeTZD 17 

164 S3 4725 

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140 46 2 

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AMU 121 




18*+ ft 
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14* — ft 
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24ft— ft 
15* + ft 
14ft— ft 
73ft— ft 
24* + ft 
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41ft + * 
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42*+ * 
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19 — * 

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19*+ ft 
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3ft 4- ft 
60* + * 
20*— ft 
17 — ft 
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am 16 TWlnDO 
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15ft 23ft Tyler 


60 45 ID T 17* 17* 17* 

60 11 10 516 38* 37* X — * 

JS U 9 m 34 a* 33*— U I 


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24* UAL *>i 2J0 72 149 

7* UCCEL 30 94 

16ft UGI 264 86 11 2S 
19ft UGlpf 275 116 15* 

3 UNCHaf .. „ im 


47ft— U 
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14*+ ft 
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3316— * 


17* VISPG8 2JB Um 3318 


45 USG 
22ft USG wl 

is* uniFru 

45 Unilvr. 
75 UlHNV 


JO 1.1 14 
2J8e«0 0 
4200+7 9 


30* UComBl 164 46 10 948 


31*— U 
37ft — ft 
lift— ft 
20* 

35 — U 
13*+ ft 
57ft— ft 
35ft— * 


53 

49 

34ft—* 
1714 — ft 
24ft- ft 
SSft— * 
zm + ft 
1416 + ft 


9114- « 
IS*— ft 
17*+ ft 


14ft— U 
45 — * 
lift— ft 
X — V. 


<73x102 IDO 44* 44* 44* 

M J 7 113 17ft 17* 17ft— ft . 

UO II 7 19 54* 54* 54* + 14 

UO n 10 273 43M 42 42*— * 

164a 96 9 83 14* 14 14ft + V6 

US 106 3 2353 14* 14* 14* + Vi 

1-54 136 7 1522 12 II* 12 

324 76 7 284 42* 4244 42*— ft 
<10 116 2001 36 36 36 +1M 

<11 1M 20z 34V. 34ft 34ft 

<16 116 lOOz 37 36 34 — W 

494 119 3000Z 39M 39ft 39ft— 2 

40 3* 3ft 3ft + ft 

1J0 18 12 1707 43* 42* 43ft— ft 

5J4at26 W 45ft 45ft 45ft— * 

268 <9 VS 244 54* S3* 54* +* 
134 109 473 22* 22* 22* 

13 12* 12 12* 

260 56 12 201 M# 35* 3Sft 

160 76 13 442 25* 2Sft 25*— ft , 
J9# 16 12 1491 29ft 28* 28*— * 
J fii no 

92 7.1 63 


660 76 I 1053 


28*—* 
38* — ft 
4ft— ft 
79 — ft 


5* 2 
35* 23ft 
35% 23ft 
17 9* 

112* X 
23* 70 
22ft 18ft 
51ft AIM 
113 109ft 
108M 101ft 
34ft 22 
31* 24* 

14* 9* 

X 22ft 
X 25* 

34 25ft 
53* 41 
40* 43 
24* 18* 

28* 21 
14* 10* 

61 47ft 
17* 12* 

19% 15 OflP 
Mft 56 OhP 
lift 19ft OfelQ 


508 2* 2 2 — ft 

193 <3 12 4 35ft 35 35— ft 

Pat 250 86 92988X 29* X* 28*— 1 
P«rt 40 lift 11* u*— ft 

Pot 140 19 lx 92ft 92ft 92ft— 4ft , 

Paf 290 HO lit 20* 20% 2D*— ft I 

iPpf 2JD 129 4X 18% 18* 10U— ft 

P pf <25 129 47X48% 48* 4SM— ft 

P pf 1590 146 2188X104*104 106ft + ft 

pf 1462 Kl 4X183*103* 103*+ ft 

ECO UO- 36 17 320 24ft 24* 24*—* 
160 58 15 1383 31* 31ft 31*— ft 
160 111 6 3744 74ft 14* 14* 

190 136 lOOl 38 X X +1 

<40 136 lOte 3J* 31* X* +lft 

4J4 13.1 102Qz 34 33ft 34 

794 TX9 33801 53 51* 52 

890 14.1 K»z 58* 58* 58ft— * 

330 116 2 25ft 25* 25ft— ft 

T<2 12 27ft 27ft 27ft 

MO 126 4 Mft 14ft 74ft— ft 

864 M2 530z 61 40% 41 +1*. 

JO 25 18 16 M ’ll* 16 

297 T25 2 18*18* lift— * 

8J8 T2J 10te 64 44 44 +1 

m ■»*» want 260 92 9 437 21% 21ft 21% 

IU 7 OkMGpf JO 106 1900k 8* 7% I — * 

2e* 2!L" 1 Jl <2 * TO 35* 35* 35* 

V 5ft Omncre 29 493 7% 7M 7ft— * 

»* 14 Oneida JO 51 11 44 15* 15* 15%— » 

33ft Mft ONEOK 294 86 10 127 37* 31* 37*+ * 


PMlEpf 4J0 13.9 30z 31 

PW1E pf 4JD 13.1 140z 33* 

PhllEpf 468 136 200 k Mft 

PhllEPf 760 117 lOz 51ft 

PhUEpf HJS K4 Eta 40% 

PhllEpf 161 136 51 10* 

PhllEptl<42 M2 44 104 

PhllEpf 1J3 136 77 9% 

PWiept 198 139 107 9% 

Phil pf 17.12 149 50Z11S ... ... 

PhllEpf 951 Vd 1501 44V. 44* 46* + ft 

PhllEpf 760 M2 T72Qz 55 54 55 

PNISub 192 72 11 30 IS* 17* 18 +* 

PtdlMr 460 49 13 2272 93* 92% 93*— * 

PWtPln J8 2.1 13 443 33* 22ft 22*— * 

Phi I Pet 2J0 <9 940281 50* 49 49*—* 

PhUVH JO U 9 X 24* 24* 24% + * 

PledAf JO 3 9 TOW 30% 29* 30ft—* 

RUNG 292 79 9 8831 X* 37 + ft 

Pier 1 13 ft it* 18* 19ft + ft 

Plisbry 194 39 11 2447 47% 47 47* + * 

Pioneer 194 46 6 1284 31ft 30* 31 — * 

PlfnvB UO 36 11 579 40* 39* 40 + ft 

PltnBpr Z12 27 3 80 79* X 


260 <0 73 724 SO 49* 33 + * 

JOh L9 ID U 10% U* 10ft 

JO 2-9 13 X 27% 27ft 27% + * 

64 J 29 127 17ft 17 17*— ft 

260x756 134 T7ft 17ft TTft 

94 1 J 17 IN 17% 17ft 17ft + ft 
40 125 7* 7 7* + ft 

25 1ft 1* lft 

JO 12 24 1» 3D 32% X + * 

160 46 71 5588 33% 32% 33* + ft 

92 19 71 76 30* 30* 30ft 

192 A2 7 41 27* X* 20*— M 

120 116 91 ID* 1 Oft 70* 

51 4* 4ft 4ft + ft 

.14 61523128 27* 20 — * 

<836 76 250 53* 53* 53*+ ft 

2.10 96 I 1990 23* 21* 23ft— * 
64x 92 11 733 9 8ft lft— ft 

X 40 9Vi 9M 9M 

96 12 18 522 43* 42 42ft— % 

164 82 72 2lx 23% 23* 23ft + * 

UO 36 11 2425 27* 27* 27ft 

140 4675 25 30* 30* 30* + ft 

JO 12 43 2 7 4* lift 74* 

160 8i 6 23 18ft 18* l«ft + * 

LX 1M 4 70% 10ft 70ft 

590 7ft 7* 7ft + ft 

190 726 2 lift 11* 11*+ ft 

2.16 93 7 4883x 22* 22* 22ft— * 
168 4J 12 1295 47* 40M 40*— ft 
UO 73 10 5034 42 41* 41*—* 

.12 J 21 441 13ft 13U I3U 


-52 1.7 12 
M2 82 7 
MO 116 


PhmRj 90 U 72 
Ptantm .16 16 14 
Plavtxny 3 

PIxsoy 6Set1 10 
PoooPd M 33 34 
Polar Id 160 19 37 
Porxfrs JO 4 7 
PooTol jo <2 


759 10* >0* 10* 


U 72 44 13 72% 13 

74 14 53 15ft 79* 15ft— ft 

3 28 12 11% 11*— ft 

tl 10 21 21 21 21 — ft 

33 34 83 lift 18 lift + ft 

19 37 1291 24ft 25* 25*— ft 
J 7 7940 13* 12% 12*— 1% 
<2 45' 19* 18* 19*— ft 


24 17ft 17* 17*— ft 
278 77* 77ft 17ft 




Pertec JO U M 24 77* 

POrtGE 1J2 70J 6 218 17* . .... 
Port? Pf 260 716 27 ZZ* 21% 22* + ft 

Parc Pf <40 13J 13 33* 33ft 33ft— ft 

PorGpf 493 133 27 32% 32ft 32% 

Pott) til 194 42 13 123 37 36ft 34% — ft 

PatrnEI 2.14 86 I SM 29* 25ft 25*— ft 

PotEIPf 264 13 I 74 74 74 — 1* 

PatEipf 490 116 iixa 40 eo « > 

Premia 77 at 2S*2Sft2S*+ft 

Prlmrk 260 56 7 77 37*37 37— ft 

PrtmxC 15 1472 10% 78* lift— ft 

PrtmM J2 A 23 448 32* 31* 31*— ft 
PrmM wf 4 24* 24ft 24*+ ft 

ProUG 260 45 13 1554 57* 56* 57*+ ft 

PrdRxti 92 23 25 25 14 13% 13* + * 


17* 
33 

SO 34ft 
13% 7ft 
32* 19% 
40ft 38* 
39ft 25% 
IS* 11* 
dft 20ft 
45 10ft 
72% fft 
15ft 12* 
15ft 

27ft M* 
5* 2* 
43ft X 
12ft 


.74 29 73 570* 
IB MB 

1.12 36 10 903 
92 15 11 107 

192 JJ 14 4 

92 U 7 301 
194 13.1 18 


1 94 13.1 
2.70 Kl 
118 136 
68 M 7 


Pretar MO 39 
PSvCoi M2 93 
PSColpf t» 116 
PSJnd IJO 126 


PSInpf 390 1S2 
PS In pf 164 I4J 


PSInpf 168 146 
PSInpf 964 1AA 


25 14 13% 73* + ft 

X 43ft 42 42 -TU 

>44 Mft 19ft H* 

«* ’“*■ 18% 18* 

7% 7% — * 
23 23 —1 

7ft 7ft— ft 


llOz 21* 
2340k 7* 


7Wte 7* 7ft 7*+ * 


PSInpf 036 146 

PSvNH 

P5NH pf 


oxn St 

IlOQz 94ft 
527 4* 

lOOz 70* 
74 70* 


37 4* 4* 

00z 10* 70* 

14 70* 10% 
11 15% 15* 
5 14ft 14 


58ft 59 + ft 

51 54ft— ft 

4* 4*+ ft 


190 136 
490 136 
4J4 13.1 
7J4 IU 
UO Kl 
390 136 
192 7 <2 
160 126 
864 M2 
90 25 18 
127 125 
898 126 
UO M I 


25% Ifft PSvNM 
27ft 20* PSvBG 


fh 


35% 231fi 

Sit ** 

18* 

14* 13% 
37 34ft 


60 M 10 298 
14 74 

90 19 15 117 
UO 35 9 40 

92 3 It 05 

794 49 9 3900 
864a 16 IN 
471 
136 

90 1J 18 574 
92 <9 34 47 

60 29 8 207 
ZD0 39 70 38tt* 
2.12 b 46 5 3224 
JO 26 7 215 
190 49 1 

US u 2 

62 26 11 350 

}° ^ 


73 ft 

X +* 
48ft + * 
37*—* 
1«W— * 


41ft—* 
11* — * 
14*— ft 
15ft + ft 
25 —ft 
5*+* 
42ft + ft 
18* + ft 
25*— ft 

am— « 

57 —ft 
3S*+ * 
181ft— ft 
29ft + ft 
15ft + ft 
34%+ ft 
1S*+ ft 
25* 

59* + ft 
33*+ ft 


£ + *- 
32%+ ft 
m-ft 


42* 33ft PSEGpf 565 129 
lift 15 PSEGpf 2.17 12J 
20ft U* PSEGpf 293 126 
44ft 53 PSEGpf 7JD 125 

44 55 PSEGpf 760 T2J 

47 55 PSEGpf 000 129 

45 • 51 PSEGpf 760 126 
4ft 2ft Public* 

Poebta .14 16 
PR Cam 

PTJOXtP L74 117 


30Qt 34* 36* 
20r 41 47 

54 17* 77* 
1M 19ft 19 
1CCZ 41* 67ft 
lOOx 45 45 

UQz 44 45 


SM 


Pi 




Ji ill 29 49* 48* 49*—* 
16 77 I 7k 28* X* 2HVt— ft 

18 44 17* 17% 17%— * 

US 16 8 a 74* 74% 14* + ft 

UO <2 77 41 23ft 22* 21 — ft 

LOO 17 11 447 81% 79ft I0%— * 

490 36 1 IN IX IX +4* 

710 4ft 4* 4ft— ft 
U2 U U 334 6Zft 40% 42ft +lft 

65e 6 13 51 16* 76* 16% + ft 

UO SJ 27 19% 19* 79*— ft 

330 45 13 IX 77* 71 71* 

73 4252 31% 31ft 32%—% 

11 2 73% 73% 73% — * 

UO 16 9 7338 44% 62% 42*— 7* 

8 775 4ft 4ft 4ft 
70 323 272ft 244% 244% —6 
62 M 29 *974 79% 19ft 19ft 

M 922 47% 44* 46*— ft 

64 16 8 M 35* 34* 34*— % 

262 7J 10 4432 <1* 40 X*— ft 

760 99 4 77* 77* 77ft— ft 

14 2207 26% 24% 25% — % 

60 36 44 731 11 10% 71 + ft 

tl* 99 3* 23% 22% 22% 

100 85 3411990 35* 35% 35ft— ft 

792 <2 9 21 34% 34* 34*— ft 

196 14 1 7297 d 42 43 +% 

2.20 76 8 1*37 37% 30* 37% + ft 

695*779 481 55% Bft 55*+ % 

60b 26 U 279 37* 30% 30%— * 

tN 11 I 7098 no* 709% 709ft— 1* 
249 2ft 2 2M + ft 
.18 3 1213104 19% 79 HU— ft 

90 TJ 17 11 30* 35ft 30* + ft 

2-52 99 * 945 24* 26% 24% 

» 3* 3% 3*+ft 

160 <2 14 1974 42* 42% 42* + % 
84 Oft 8* SM + ft 
<15 15.7 8 26% 24* 24% + ft 

25 537 26 25% 25ft + % 

1-24 U U 241 40 39% 39ft— ft 

-68b 36 70 19 18% 17* 17*- * 

90 26 8 S3 17* 17* 77% — * 


32% UnCarh 390 BJ 8 7049 
4ft UntanC 32 

12 UhElK US IU 4 137° 
25ft UnElpf 460 125 72to 
28* UnEJ pf <50 106 am 
24ft UnElDfAMJH 1US 14 

18* Ulteipf IN UO 30 
45 UnElpf 764 133 20* 

49 UEIpfH 868 104 10ft 
34ft UnPoc 160 36 12 1787 
■2 UnPepf 7J5 46 

9% Unlrcm .18 70 11 1408 
53ft unrylpt 860 116 2349* 

3ft IfrritDr 41 W 

10ft UnBrnd 14 » 

9* UBrdPf 39 

20* UCHTV .14 J SJ 101 
22* UnEnrp 298 81 24 1075 

9 UlUirm tBO 116 1 M7x 

19 UIKu pf 097 15.1 <0x 

11 Ulllupr 730 l<7 »70v 

28* UlllUPf <00 156 9x 

10 UlllUpr MO 14-3 lSx 

14* Unltlnd 64 26 13 48 

25ft UJerBk 164 <3 8 11 

9% UfdMM 8 131 

2* UPkMn 1 21 

22 UulrG J2 J 7 1036 

5* USHom 1300 

28% USLxos 60 XO 10 151 

23 USShOe 64 26 12 81? 

50 UA Mx xl 160 36 W 3506 

49% USSTt pf 4M* 96 307 

115% USStl pr 12.75 96 92 

22* USSttnf 025 73 Id 

37ft USTob 7-72 4-5 73 158 

55% USWeSt 562 76 8 954 

Sft USfdtn 33 7 

29* UnTchi 190 02 9 2692 

38% UTchpl 165 *6 503 

17ft UnlTxl 162 U 9 849 

2ift unrrapf us u t 

12 UWRs 768 76 18 X 

72 Unttrde 2D J 18 35 

74% UnWar 68b 36 13 28 

18* UntvFd 164 09 17 51 

15ft UnLxaf UO <6 I 200 

X Unocal 160 2.1 1220M4 

45 Upfohn 266 02 13 254 

23* U3LIPE 164 27 11 974 

30% USLFpf 033 702 15 

25 USLFpf 225 46 24* 

» UjtfXFd 164011.1 25 


13*— * 
51*+* 
«ft— ft 
35 

T8M+ M 
ST +3 
I9M+ * 
34*—* 
39*-* 
5* 

19* 

H +1 
33ft— 1 
J9M+ ft 
22*- ft 
54 —1 



WmCm • 1377 

wam-L 198 09 14 1519 
WtamO»164 83 8 133 
WUNM .1J8 09 | 1« 
WlttWl 268 126 8 739 
Wait# JO 16 II M40 
WaitLla J6 19 12 JBx 
WavGa 60 00 W 2 
WecrvU 120 

Warn at 6lk ^ 2x 
WxbbD JOx .9 13 330 
WttaMk 60 M M 72 
WMtaF 290 <5 8 294 
WxtPpf AJNxlU 201 
WtlFM tN 105 12 200 
Wxndys 68 16 18 34N 
WHlfVWi' 271 

WxtfC a M 73 13 21 

WPmPpKJO 116 IT* 

mtPtP 220 56 I ITS 
Wslcflo MM a 

WnAJrL 7a 

WtAlrwr 282 

WMrpt tN 11.1 155 

WAIrpf X14 116 a 


28* UtoPL 2J2 709 f 3579 


21% lltPLPt 260 IU 
21* UtPLpf 290 116 
15* UtPLpf 004 116 



49%— * 
1MM+ ft 
\5ft— ft 
40 -1 
4% — * 
13 — ft 
12% + * 
37ft— ft 
Mft +1% 
TJ +U 

aft— ft 

15 — * 
36ft— % 
lift— ft 
23*— % 
36ft— ft 
14%— * 
2ft 
34% 

7*— * 

30*— ft 

51* + ft 
134ft + ft 
28*+ * 
37*— M 
73*+ * 
lift— * 

43% — * 

**— ft 
23% — * 
28ft— ft 
76ft 

30*— ft 
lift— * 
24*— ft 
21%+ * 
48 +2ft 
76ft— ft 
38ft +1 
32ft +1 
33 + * 

9* 

21%—* 
24ft + ft 
25 + ft 

18 


WCMA 1212 

WUntan 3139 

WoUnpf 5 

WnUptC 5 

wnunfS 75 

wnuptE in 

WUTlPtA 44 

WstuEs UO U 10 3937 

wxstvc 162 U I 1145 

25 Wayaiti 160 <3 X 2871 

34ft Wavrpf 260 46 IN 

43* Wavrar <50 9.1 31 

77 WhelLE 565 84 90a 

72* WhxIPIT 428 

x wpttptB rm 

23 whPitpf uaat 

36ft Wldrtpt ON <3 9 7482 

24ft WhttC 160 U 278 

26* WNICDfOM 76 35 

17* WtlttxW » 146 

WfilMok 60 15 10 1490 

WtaWdl 09 57 

wntrdn 13 in 

Wnilam 190 5.7 4 1354 

WlhnEI 40 

WllihrO .10 U 19 7 

WbiDlx 168-46 73 S4 

wmnbn JOX J 18 857 

Winner 19 44 

WlntarJ 1 

WtaeEP 228 76 7 638 

WUEPf 860 119 82S0z 

WbG pf 2SS 106 4 

WtaePL 264 87 I 48 

WftxcPS 266 82 7 44 

Wltoa 198 36 9- 294 

WMvrW 64 26 IS 187 

WoadPt 60 05 15 7587 

Wotwth 160 49 10 572 

WrtdAr 22 

Wrlply 160a Ol 10 53 

Wurttsr 85 

WvtaLb 62 tl 11 40 

Wynne 60 26 ,1 55 


Sit. 

raU 

11%—* 
lm-S 
21* • 

SWi— » 

% 

g*SJ +w 

3 

m 

w » +% 

29 29 — u> 

J«>- £ , 

J* «S + * 1 

a* 

3^26+^ , 

39* + * ' 

SiJSS-'* 

4W.4JU-* . 

ra r 

73 ZUi~ y. 

44 «**— I 

XU 30% 

40ft 40% 
2w.am-i% 
21* 34ft + % . 

lift 11%Z% 

13*— 1* 
77ft + % 

7* +1 * 
2*+ * - 


tiy\ t 

iJ AXt- 

51 - -,lil*^ 


i 


mu 


71% +% , 

24*— * . r.“ : 


34*— * . r; 
30%+% ft,- 

mu + ft-f 

39 + ft 1. 
W*-* 

33 + % s 

•BiSt 

58ft + ft . 
» + % 

3l% + % ;• 


1 * _K 

44ft xft xerox 300 46 IS 1742 4gi> 45* 45* i 

51% 45ft Xerox pf 595 7 U 425 49% 49* 49%+ % -- 

29 19 XTRA 64 29 10 IN 27* 2S* 26ft + % - ' 


21% VP Carp 1.12 14 
5* Valero 

14 Voter Pf 394 156 
2ft Vataytn _ ‘ 
15ft VanDr i A U 

2ft vara 
m vnrconf 
38ft Vartan 64 J 
9ft Voro 90 JJ 
17% Vexes 90 16 


8% VxftSx UOalU 
25* Viacom 92 U 
48* vaep Pt 965 129 
52ft VaE PfJ 762 126 


64 6 11 1482 

90 U 74 47X 

90 16 14 267 
13 

160alM 19 
92 M 19 1811 


49* VoEPpf 720 12.1 

57% VaEPpf 795 12J 79001 

14* VUhav 1657 79 14 W 
25* Vamad 75 14 


58 VlifcnM 260 36 12 


31* 32* + M 
18*. 70*— * 
27% 22*+ * 
2 * 2 * - 
25% 25% — 7 
3 3 l 

7ft 7ft 
35 25% — ft I 

72 12ft + * 
24* 24*— ft , 
4* 4*— ft 
10* 70ft 
41ft 43ft 
78* 78* 

42 43 —lft 

SB* 59* 

59% 40% +1 
24* 24*+ ft 
40ft 40*+ * 
77* 77% 


X 24 ZstaCp 162 <5 9 11 29* 29ft. 29* 

24* 74* Zapata 64 56 18 1324 15* 15* 15%+* . 

58 X zavre 9» 6 M 331 54* 55% 55%-) 

31ft 18* ZmlthE i 909 22* 22% 22%+% , 

21% 14% Zeros TO 223 21% 21* 21% + £ 1 

31* 21* Zumln 132 49 71 29 X 39*X+%t 


NYSE High-Lows 


March 5 1 


NEW HIGHS 


68 17 IS 524 2274 2T% 22 
60 <9 137 lift 78* 18ft 

72® 9% 8% 9%+l 

7707 9* 9 9* + % 

160 tl 14 746 49% 48% i*%— % 
19 79 19% 78* 19*+ * 

164 t7 15 425 50ft 49% SO + * 


28 21 W1GOR 260 86 7 72 27% 24% 27* + * 

25% 20* Wodivs 62 26 TO 112 32 31* 31%— ft 

25ft 74* Wocttit 60 36 II 72 20ft 19* 20ft +1* 

9% Aft Wftrtnoc 751 537 9* 9ft 9* + ft 

47* 31 WWMrt 61 6 24 1928 45% 44* 4S%— ft 

54* 9* Wofgrn 60 M 18 477 53 52* 52*— * 

21* 15* WkHRsaMO 208 20% 19% 20ft + * 

38* 23% WolC5v 95 16 18 105 34* 35* WW + * 

37 22 WOftlS 190 <0 7 1774 35ft 34% 34%— ft 

9% 7* WoltJPf UO 106 100* 9* 9* 9* + % 

48% 29* Wottjpf MO 39 2 44* 44* 44* 

28* 17% Warms X 36 II 372 23 22* 23 + % 





TJOalA 73 179 5Dft 49% SO —ft 
762 34 I 342 39* 38* X* 


762 39 8 

62 29 11 
262 U6 5 
172 149 
133 U4 
397 146 
461 IO 
236 MO 
221 MO 

jo 3 at 

98b 14 11 


342 39* 38* X* 

21 X 29% X 
422 78% Mft 18ft 

MS 36 25* 25% + * 

22 24* 25% 24*— * 
47 24% 34* 24*— ft 

9 X 27* 29*— ft 
4.17 M% MU— * 
21 15% 76* 75%+* 

23 40 tO *0 + * 

45 35 34* 35 + * 


Company Earnings 


CampbRapf 
Far West Fn 


CanalR&Bc 

OcdPpfj 


Ewans Pd 
Texas Inst 


Revenue and profits, in millions, are In local 
currencies unless otherwise Indicated 


160 26 13 s« 42ft 41ft 42 +1 
60 26 11 717 17* 14% 17 + * 
NO IU 1* I*—* 
723 72% 71% 12* 


Australia 
. . Sartos 


Canada 
Royai Bank Can. 


64 56 M 7*7*7* + % „ 

25 3387 37% 30* 31ft +U ProftM_ 

64 16 14 858 35 33% 34*— * Per Shore — 

74 443* 12* 12* 12*— * 

265 146 in 14 UUI3U+* - ■■ . 

225 96 424 23% 23ft 23*+* BfltCSn 

164 56 11 7029 29* 28% 29*— ft 


19M 1983 IxtQuar. 198$ HM 1 

28797 14665 Profits 126.1 1X61 

8364 4868 Per Share M3 7.14 

0937 0617 I 


ss*=s 

t 




^s* 

41% 28* 


^rz% 


PUSXtP L76 
PMixHm .12 
Poratat |Ji 


3 at sn i«u 


<7 13 194 
■ 179 


59* — 1* 
1§ + " 

J»+ * 
14% + U 

27*—* 

9% + * 


SF 

22 * 20 

30* 22 


g +% 

11*15 

55t5 

i- 5 

x* + * 


262 179 
UOeS.1 8 

276 <0 18 

367 43 15 41% 41 

220 9.1 182 24% 24* 

6 UO 17* lift 

■64 96 . Wi 91 91 

U »0 72 72 

760 SJ 79 477 35* X 

90 LI 11 972 35* 25% 

*7 78* 78* 

LN 49 3 31ft lift 

IJO lDJ 121 77* 17% 


n if* if* 

3 12% 12ft 




Britan 

Cons. Gold Reids 


Singapore 


Development Bk 


Sales nvurm ore unofflttaL Yearly hlsta and kwn reflect 
the previous 52 weeks plus the current week, but northe toted 
trading UOv. Where a soil tor stock alvtaend amaunltne to J5 

percent or more has been paid. Itw yean hipiMowranM and 

dividend are shown tor the new stock only. Unless oflMneia J 
noted, rates at dividends are anraal disbursements bated ao . 
the latest deciaroi ion. 3 

a— dividend aisoextrots). . S 

b—anmial rale of dividend Plus stock dividend. * ^ ’ 

c — Uauidotles dividend. 3 

cld — called. B • 

d — new yearly low. *(■ . 

e— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 monHis. A 

a — dividend In Canadian funds. sublecMo 15* rHMvresideaaq.-. 

i— dividend declared after splltupar stock dividend. : 5. 

I —dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or no odtoix 
taken ot latest efivtoend meet Ino. V.9 


41* + ft 

?f£=5 


1st Half 
Pretax Nel_ 
Per Share — 


Per Share 06044 06051 


72095 13065 1 k— dwwend aectarod or poM HiVs year, an > 


Natl W es t m i nste r 


23* +1* 

it?5 

“IS 

Bft * 


260 49 3 

1J8 106 121 

264 <7 10 2931 
363eKl 253 

260 109 7 

*64 23 14 458 S* ^ 39U- % ^8 IAN 

U S S 2S+U PerShoreB. 3463 X9A 
60 39 47 74% 74% 54% — % a: PerahonnsuHaofUnft- 

J Ob 6 22 983 19* 79* M + * over (He, fn sterUnq; t>: per 

M 96 W 72* n* U + ft Shore resorts of UPlbvernv, 

LOO IS 9 TC4x^5 3A* X*-U Tn ouPO rrs. Ml other ,esuJts 


253 24% 24V 
725 ^ ^9 

l£ “S! 


§*— * Pretax Net_ 
19*+* Per Share __ 

i5J— lft Bri»ONi/t 

Ur 


South Africa 
’ ScaoJ 


U8 Turnover — UAL U0Q.I ei*_ scum. 


Issue with dividends in arrears. 

n— new issue In the oast 52 weeks. The high-low range DM 

with the start of trading, , 

nd — next dav dellverv. 

P/E — prlce-oomlnps ratio. 

r— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 montl* t 
stock dividend. 

■ — stock soUL Dividend begins with date of split. 


Britam/NeHwritmb 

UnUsver 


Profit—— 
Per Share 


iMl r— dividend paid in stack In preceding 12 months, estinxrtwl 
M*3 J com value on ex-dlvldend or ex^lstrtbutlon dote. • - -A 


United States 


u — new yearly high, 
v— trading hatted! 


Year iih nn 

Revenue— — 1 4.14a 1X390. 
Pretax Ned 9246 7 896 

Pec Share A- 7638 16384 
Per Shore B_ 3463 3094 

a: Per shore results of UnH- 


Foxboro 

ethOuor. ltM 


vl — in bankrurttYor receivership or being rwgontad un-o,. 
d®Mthe Bankruptcy Act. or securities assumed by sudicen/j- • 

1»S3 wd— when distributed. 7] 

157.9 wl — when tvsued. -. 

3.15 ww — with worrtxrts. 1 

064 x— ex-dlvkJtnd orex-rlofits. 2- • • 

xdis — ex distribution. , H ' 

LLTT xw — without warronis. 1 

yog v— ex^Jividwkl and soles In hilL T7 - 

JS vld — yield. 1 -■ . 

“* *— Mies in lull. j 

+S‘ . 

SOtesia M 

19* Him low jpjKaret *-;• . 


1 i fVBu Rwvwwc ■ 

iS x32 Si'is — 


7.70 96 
160 82 9 
J2 36 11 


13* 13% 13% 


Per Share— 
Year 

Rrnonue 

Net Inc. 

Par Share — 


Over-the-Counter 


March 5 


ShleeU Net 

taas Him Lew 3PJH.arae 

QiBstlS 162 56 1427 27 27— * 

CFdBk 7.72 37 XX X X 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


CFdBk 7.72 37 
Gentran 60 17 
Centiirt 


1** HMk Law SPALarge 
21ft 21% 


tit* High Law 3P.M. CVge 


18B( HM Law 3 pm Ore# 


1998 High Law 3PM.CTW 


S*Nl» Net 

«•» High Lew 

- - - Avntofc 

A I Avatar 

, AvIotGo 

32 5% 5* Xfe— ft AztcM 

62 26 19 MW 14* 14*— * 

27 X* 25* 24 —ft I 

8122 27% 21%—* * 

372 29ft 23* 24 + * 

90 9 4 4 

122 22 22 — ft 

60 17 944 11% 11* 11%+ ft 

»4» 10* 10ft 10* + ft 
60 3 88 22% 22* 22* 

137 18* 77* 17*— * 

44 25% 25ft 25% + ft 
212 7* 4% 4*—* 

34410 9* 9% 

70 26 2 34% 34% 34% — % 

1074 9 8* 8% + * 

I37S1 5% 5* + * 

42 4% «* 4* 

13 4% 4% 4% + * 

84 2% 2* 2* 

30 SJ 49 75* 15 15 

t 3 33 32 32 

13 4* 4* 9*—* 

,10e 6 45 13 12* 12*— ft 

. t 894 13* 12* 13 


Solatia Net 

m Higk Lew j pm cm* 
439 25* 35* 35*—% 
17917ft 17 77ft + * 
38118* lift 18H 
M46 20S 5 5 + ft 


1014 34 30 —ft 

182 7% 1% 1%—* 

aim ii% nu 
9 a a a + u 
12412* 72% 13% 

M 2ft 1% 2 + ft 

2 7ft 7ft 7ft 
4 4% 6% fft + ft 
W 6* 4 4th 


ChodTh 

OimpPt .10 19 

OmcCp 

QnaEn 


as az» 

<7% 47%+ * 
4ft 4%+ * 
5* 4 + ft I 
23ft 23*+ ft 
23* 24 
73* 11% + % 


OirmSs .18 16 31717* 17* 17% 


S IT* 77* 77% 

25% 35* 2S*— ft 
198 37 lOOOXft 37* 37% — * 
241 21% 21* 21*— fe 
117 4* 4* 4% 

60a 6 953* X 53* +2* 

720 tv* IS* 19 — * 
90 26 113 XU 20 30* 

98a 6 5 54* 54* 54* + * 

64 36 398 25* 25ft 25%— * 
160a 47 5 21* 21* 21* 

90 4ft 4* 9* 
795.7ft 4% 7* + ft 

3382 13* 13 13* + * 

90 29 2234 17 ’*■*- ■" 

783 8ft 
X 71* 


60 36 

149 14 

13% 13ft 


19 73 



10 8 

UU 

.60 46 

19 14* 

TlMTTT 

162 56 

nan 


t 

1 7 


191 36 

4 41* 

IU 41* 

30 26 

4312 

1% 12 


13* + * 
14% — % 
8 — * 
10 % — % 


260 49 74750% SO 50*— ft 
143 1% 1* 1*— * 

220 8* 8* 8* 

107 3* 3 3* 

140 U* 13 13* + * 

12 8 7% 8 + ft 

1600 28 8 35* 35* 35*— ft 

1 m 9* 9* 

65e 6 144 19% 19* 19% 

70 <6 94 31ft 20% 77ft 

164 49 346 29 ZB* 28*—* 
37571* 10% IT — ft 
60 119 141 7% 7 7 — * 

90 17 94 29 22* 24 

264 46 3 44% 44ft Mft— * 

Mb 26 2 24ft 24ft 24ft 

160 87 7211% 11* 11*— ft I 

31 11* 11 11% + % 1 

73 26 43 32 31% X + ft 

783 9* 9 9 

24 3* 3* 3*— ft 
14 9ft 9 9 — * 

199 9 8* S* + % 

.600 22 219 XU 35% 35% 

260 46 U 44 45* 45% — ft 

.12 i6 44 a 7% m + ft 

24 12% 13* 73% + ft 
31 5% Sft 5* 

.10b 16 107 lft 8ft 8ft— ft 
57 9% 9ft 9%— * 
334 2ff% 19* 20ft + ft 
5814ft 13% 14 + * 

62 ZD 37 15% 15* 15%— ft 

”° W i"* 


Oxovok 10314% 14 14*+% 

OtattUVl J0o 36 1*2 % 22% 22% 

Chottm 91 73 1717* 17 17% + % 

S3S2 i7%i7%— * 

ChhTch SO 0 0 

OiLwn 68 16 83 X »* 29% + * 

Ommex 128 4% 4* 4% + ft 

<5Fob 178 7* 7ft 7*— U 

a*n;e .72# 3 213U 72% 72% — ft 

°| ?I 9S9T1* nu 11%+ u , 

a me 17 82 81% 81% + U I 

OUHS W 24 23% 24 + * ^ 

Ctawirh _ Z17 9 t% 8%—* OBA 

atrDwi JJ 15 » 15% 15 is* DEP 

Oiyrns JO 3 14412 11% 11% DLlte* 

OnnFln 298 27 47 90% 89 90% +1* DMA PI 

gnhn .129 9 732U 37% 32ft + % DairtM 

amer 7X9230% 27ft X —a Ootiysv 

Ctortco t 24 11% 10% 10%—% Dctasp 

Orcon 140 » 4% 7 DmnBio 

Way 160 36 4933% 33* 33* DortCo 

C«Ga 74 36 534 20ft 19% x — % Dafert 

C tKF Vde 164 A0 558 as* 24 24U— * DtO IO 

CtoOJP Ate 23 7 17% 17% 17% DtSwteh 

CtxUtA t 709 32ft 31 37* + ft Dotowr 

CfcrUt B 164 46 6 2B% XU 28% + ft Datecs 

atyFed 2 Sc 2.1 284 12ft B 12 DtaSttl 

CtvNCp 68b 36 248 25 24* 25 +* Datvtn 

amate .10 6 34279ft 18% 78% +* DovMW 

OwrlcJ 68 36 M Z7* 27 27* + * Dawson 

CtaarCh 194 18 77ft 17% + ft OabSh 

Ctavtftt 762 76 719* 19* 79* DectaD 

gthfm e 39 72 11% 12 — U DekSk 

SS"= 40 16 15% V5%— * r— _ 

CWSav 75 14* 14 14* + * 

0>d«Ld 10713ft 12% 12% 

CocaBt B 64a 16 14 35% X 38% + % 

Coeur t 1415 l«% 74% 
gemlc 76 3* 3 3* 

COJWTrte 6725% 25ft 25* + ft 

CotabR 133 5% 5* 5* 

rSiST 7»* U%+ ft 

S-g to .. . . 22 5 4% 4%—* 

™an> A 9M 46 2712% 72* 72* 

CrtnGra 1JJ 86 X 17ft 77ft 77ft 
CoJGepf 160 10J 117* 17* 17*+* 

^UAC 1 60 3.1 *8137% 32 32ft + * 

CafrTTs 907 20 19* 19* + * 

" ** ^5 

M 160 26 IP 

— r , M W? tt 14*+ ft 

Comur 62 .1 13 15* 15 15* + * 

^ 11 li ^J+ft 

2.10 59 “aS XU 3B4-* 

g^ii Sb?i ^rsis 

CmdBn 260 5.7 2 39 7« £ — * 

ClhlShr 60a <2 U12ft 72 72 

CwllhF 164914 3 59 9* 8% 9 

ComAm 84 4 4 4 + * 

Cemlnd 64 16 25320* 20 x — * 

Cemsys 31511% 11 tl* +* 

ComSta- 60 56 2 1 0ft 10ft 10ft 

CmpCrd nan » 29* 

S?3gy.». SJ «» + * Ctarhan 

Loraeay 124410 9% 9%—*. 

W S r !9 SOSSS^^-U 

\ — - 

Cantoue 44 3% 3* 3U 1 

;CTC 548 73U 13ft 73% + % 

JaPte 7443 X 28* 29% +1 

rPTAvt _ 156 8 7* 7*— % 

68 6 X 13ft 13% ime— % 

totsnt 48 7% 7ft 7ft 

* f* SU+M 
^moian 140 I* lft 8* + U 

SM 17 u » S 'L. 2S + * 

^K=Pd MWMX-S 

?t.T«k 65 6 5l Sft 

S" ivei0% 16ft 70*- ft 

vIKL 9? 7% $% 7%+ft 

ggn 3 9* 9* 9* 

5222 » 4 4* + * 

■wnW JJ M KVt ev 

=£££, wwuiS'iSi+u 

****> 517 3* 3* 3*. 


CtvNCp 68b 36 
Ooirati .10 6 

aorlcJ 68 36 
CtaarOi 

7 * 

% Jiwnn 


160 33 704 37% 34ft 34ft— 1* 
8 S% 5* 5*—* 
60 36 47 79% 19 19 — % 

9214* 15% 13% + * 
534 5 4% 4% 

3224 25% 20 + ft 

509 4* 5% 4*+ ft 

74 7% 7% 7% 

722 76% 15% 14 — * 
X 4* 4ft 4* + ft 
38 9ft 0% 9ft + ft 
.105 8% 8% 8* 

» 31 7 * \ 

jo n&i&s 

.14 M 17 8% 8* 8* 

I at 4% 4% 6% + % 


68 13 1348 34* 33% 34%+ ft 
90 26 191 13% 13ft 13% + % 

JBb XI 14* 4* 4*- U 
17 10* 10* 10*— ft 
„ . 1221*31*21*—% 

.16 16 22 75* 1J% 75* 

3N % h N + 

168 11 204 34% X 34% + % 

jn 6% 4% 4%— ft 
.. 7202 1* % 1* + * I 

162 56 X 20% 20* 30* 

2718% IBU II* + ft : 

ft ft 

■ 4* + * 


CjtSav 

CobeLb 

CocaBt s 64a 16 

Coeur I 

Oogenic 

Gohrnte 

CalabR 

Calonen 

Collins 


Amrwct 

Amgen 

AnwkB 62 03 
Amesk 120a 18 
Amgads 90 27 
Anadlte .10 16 
An loo lc 
Army! 

Aoaren 

Anatvr 

Andrew 

Anarai 

Aaeoee .13 16 

ApeteC 

AcolrC 

ApIDIo 

Antacm 

AefdMT 

ApWStr 

AMSWt 

Archive 

ArgoW 

ArtlB 606 36 


606 36 XI 25* 
2515 


HU I* 
227 9* 
.9 373X4 
27 8* 
142 5* 
9 147 II* 


SBft + ft 
23ft— ft 
5%+ ft 
18*— ft 
4J —2 

H* 

7%— ft 
14* 

9ft + % 
14* + ft 
■*+ ft 
XU 
5*- ft 
70 

27*— % 

25 %+ * 

40ft— * 
17ft— * 
28*- ft 

8ft— ft 
% 

6ft— % 
21* 

25 +% 
15 +1 

ftu 

Oft— * 
uu + % 
8U+* 
5* + % 
17*+ * 


IX <4 369 3}* 32 32* + * rnmT«t . TS C 

1 ^igigiKtS ^ K 

ZZ 70 . .+% 


M 1-1 ll* “W- ft I Q^paa 


» 4. fiP Xft S +'% 

«=» Sii 


2 26ft XU 24ft 


64 16 
160 46 145 
37 
359 
443 
143 
SZ 

an 

294 

174 


Bft K +U, 
81 31 


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m2 il* SM 

7 716 QnoNM 

9* 9*+* SOT 

g* »■*■** S£?Si k 
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MJ *% ■*-* 
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262 86 15339* 29 29U 

60b 26 183 Mft 19% Xft + * 
90 34 2t 38* X X I ft 

siou lou nu 

8311 10ft 10U— ft 
17639% 39ft 39* 
347X 19% x + * 

70 4U 4% 4%—* 
417% 17* 17* 
111* 11* 11* 

»1* » +U 

734 8U 7% 8 — * 
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15 7% 7% 7% * 

17313* 13ft 13ft 



18* 18 5 * * 

5 * 3 *- * asc? 

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ig%im+ft gSST 

3%is m Lit SEr 

12% 12H 12% + * CwHrs i« 43 

» 8ft Bft + * cS 96 


It* 20U+1U 
13* 75* — ft 
MU 28ft— ft 
13 13 

34* X*+ ft 
27 27 — ft 

22* 23 +% 

■ , JS— * 

33% 23% — ft 
1ZU 12*—* 
3U 3% — U 


740 U % * 

63 16 73 74ft 74ft Mft— ft 

45 If 18% 19 
47 3* 3ft 3* 

8 924 25* 25%+ ft 

9420ft 19% 19ft— ft 
114% 14% 14%—% 
51520* 19% lf%— ft 
30 26 MS 4 7% 7% + * 

640 36 907 Jlft 31* 3t*— * 
1 99 99 99 +1 

AIM 14* 14* + * 
38314* 14% 15* +1% 


S+u* 

27ft— % 


Ml 15ft 14* ISA + ft 
a 9* 9 9M + % 
57312% 12* 12*+ U 
34 4% 4* 4* 

7 70* JO* 10* 

019 34* 34% 35ft—) 


164 IT 159457* 
64 2J 32 11% 
J0e 26 9513 


57ft — * 
11 *+ % 
17* 11%+ % 
.... 29% 30% + * 
94 4 5* t + * 

4014% 14* 74% + % 
37 49* 48% 49* 

34 44* 44% 44*— ft 


2 12 12 12 
«77* 17 17* + ft 

209 * hi * 

7199 15U 15% 15* 
3413* 13* 13*+ * 
7* lift 18 18 — ft 

X 13% 72% 1* — ft 

X 70ft 10 10 — * 

148 8* 8% 8% + U 
1811* 11* 11* + * 
934 5* 5U 5% + * 
710% 70% 70% 

47 »% 9* 9* 

SO 19ft 18* 18* 

«1S 14* 15 

52 7 4* 7 + U 

13520* 2D 20*+* 
59 Sft 5 Sft 
2211 10ft 70U + ft 
34 a* 5ft 5ft— fi 
790 13* 73% 73%— * 
787 71* TB* 78*— * 
44 8% 7% 8% + * 
3579 W% 14* 14% — * 
X 2ft 2ft 2ft + * 
12 12 II* 11* + * 


72518* 17ft 18U + * 


21* 27% — * 
14 14 — ft 

MU 71* +1. 


IwnSoU 360 9.1 

Isofndx 
I tel 
1*1 pf 


1330 IJ MU 71U+1 
154 1* lft IU— ft 
21 8% *% 8% 

4620 Ifft X + % 
244 7ft 4* 4*— U 
48 4% 4* 4%+* 
11 5* 5 5*— ft 

923 T3 I2U 12*—* 
a 40* 39* 39*— ft 
812ft 12ft 12* 
IX* U Bft + * 
24514* 35% X 


. 13 4* 5% S%— * 

-13 .1 15HCIQ 91 98 

64 16 820 2S* 25% 25ft— * 

44913* 13% 13*+* 

W * 78 7ft — ft 

30 4ft 4ft 4ft 

217* 17* 17* 

55 4* 4* 4ft— * 

. 274 8* 8* l%— ft 

.We 1.1 9417*14*17 +* 

. 42 7 4% <%— ft 

■Xe 16 7220 79* 20 

_ 99419* 78* 19* + * 

62 2.1 54 23ft 23 23ft + ft 

61 16 7318* 77% 17*+* 

, 2 1* 1* 1*— * 
164 96 1611* 71 II 

_7? 1* I* I* 


CotrTle 

cSSto M “ 

CohiFd 

CotoMIt 160 26 
Compir r 
Comor 62 .1 

Comats .12 6 

CofTNlto .14 16 
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X - 14 

9 

4 + * 
70 — * 

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6 6*— * 
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5* 5U+ * 
32 32 +% 

4* 4* 

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11% 11% 

4* 4* 

30U 30*+ * 
13 73 — U 

13* 13% 

7 7* + ft 

21 23 —1 

25* 24*- * 
10 10 
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7 7ft + ft 
9* 70 + ft 

m ju + * 

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27 21ft + ft 
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74 14 +U 

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j0 12* 71ft 73ft— ft 
272 17 14ft 17 + * 

62 2.1 74414ft 14* 15*— 1 
62 16 7« 27* 27* 27*— ft 
36 34 XII* 17 11 — ft 


19* + ft 
19% — ft 

22*— * 
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32* 32* — * 


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120 4.7 167 

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9* 9U 14 S 0 ?? 136 7*9 302 24% 23* 24 + ft 

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13% 13% * QPtYTN 10219*18*18*—* 

W4 41% CoPfB k) n 4* 4% <%— * 

CoweB M IS 720 76% 74 14ft + * 


« 7% 2% ZU 
. 4 5* 5* 5* + ft 

■H 9 J 14 14 14 

35 3* 3* -3*+ * 

36 7* 7 7 — * 

70 10 9* 9* 

M 4$ 4$ 48-* 

2600 76 227% Z7% 27% + % 

164 36 gunman 

■ u u !? r_* 

1X5 106 

678 6 7 8% I* a*— ft 

. . 4010U »* 10ft- % 

62b 16 1 14 14 14 + % 

■140 6 1017* 17*17*— ft 

9 Sft 5% 5% 

IS K » 

260 86 34 30* r 30* 

99 Rh IB* 10* 

% % % 

» 9* 9 9ft 
497 II 10* 10% 

137 S* Sft 5* 

71 m r* 7U.+ ft 
204014* 15 14* +1 

219 29* 28% 29 + U 
7410 9% 9%— * 

2S2 9Jk 9 * 


290 4J 3149* 48% 

230 39 36 44* Mft 

60 26 77 33% Xft Xft—* 

7217* 17 17 —ft 

90 29 14417 14* 14*— * 

20 49 It *% 4ft 4%+ft 

.13* 16 CM 18 «*+* 

J I 4 4 

254 I 7% 7U — * 

... 30 1 3* 70% 70% — * 

L12 49 429 25% X 2SU + * 

L2D 46 7 29 28% 2S%— * 

62 25 29 29* 38% X%— 1 

1.10 <1 XI 24% 24* 24% + U 
275 75% 75 15 ft 

ix 44 15 at at at 

160 29 77 35% 34* 2SH 

134 33% 23ft 23*— ft 

165 43 14 31* X* X* 

727774* 74% 74* + ft 
7405 72* 72 12* + % 

754 78 T7 17 —lft 

70 15* M 7944+14 

JOB 16 35 a 

30 36 19021* 

1521 

.90 16 25723 
160 <9 25 20% 

14918* 

f 210* 10 10 

160 55 IU 33 32* 3Z*— * 

... 3 25% 2Jft 2SU 

160 SO 19532* 32ft 32ft 
160 46 519 19 19 — * 

1 4* 4* 4*— ft 
168 14 6 45 45 45 

95 5% MX BU— ft 
290b SJ 959% 50% 50% 

AX -1 24 UU 14% 15ft + * 

606 3.1 119ft 19ft 19ft 

-40 36 1 75 U IS 

160 46 UN 39 39 +* 

X 55 MPfflfcSB-* 

U. 45 '2XJ&J&+* 
_9Sr 10 5 74* 14* KM 

M0 <9 90 33ft 32* 32* 

l. 12 36 317238U 38 X — * 

_ 223 lft 7% 7* 

•48 36 200 K% 14* 14% + ft 
-54b 76 22 28% 28% 28% - ft 

J5s 6 IX 17* T7 17 •- * 
_ 45 If* 75* If* + * 

62 2.1 134504ft 31* 33% + ft 

70921U 20% 21Ul+ ft 
30 M M 12% 72* 12% + U 

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67 A 17714% — ’ - 

m. a 57 is 

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JodtLfe ■ 23439* 37* -38 — 1* 

Jactan 90 2.1 741 10% 78ft 18* + % 
JomWIr .... 10519* 79 19 + U 
Jeffim 190 <4 9 34 35% 34 + % 

JeHNLS M 16 5723* 22% 23* + % 

sr 2 £ 2 &-* 

■jhne nE 44 7* 7 7 — % 

Jonlcbl t 99 6 5* 6 + * 

JmelA t 778 5* 5* 5% + U 

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247 
144 

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27*+ * 
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27ft 20* 20%— * 
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5* 5ft 5* + ft 
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28% 2t 28U 
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14ft 14 14 — U 

% ft istii* 

34* X 35 + * 

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41* 48% 40*— ft 
7ft 7 7U + * 
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9* 9ft 9ft 
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160 46 45421ft 
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16 754 23ft 
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XNTEJRIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


Page 13 •; 


| 15 !? *S & 

* ■# l D 


Business roundup 



I1K 1 ! I BM National Westminister 

St teZ JJfi M 0 ; ™ 41 * 

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ir . H 'LONDON — National West- 
'S li 4 " poster Bank PLC reported Tues- 
iti? Ly that pretax earnings rose 29 


iiji 


* ij'* { i ticuU ^,_ 1 __ t nr - 1301 Britain arising from corpo- 

— - — ra[e ^ chagge^ . 

The FuU dividend was 2S.6 pence 

* _, on increased capital resulting from 

* * [ feent to £671 minion (S718 mil- last year’s rights issue, compared 
**C fci®! from.£5 18 million the with an adjusted 24.1 pence for the 

'm *• devious year. an increase well • previous year. 

»3 **S i * 1 .o v ‘ e ^“OSi analysts’ predictions. National Westminster’s group 

10 ^ 2, Si’The company’s net, however, chief executive, Philip Wilkinson, 

n. in. a.--, ’! l! gjfi £286 million, down 38 percent said the 1984 pretax profit meant 

na a# 5^ «-|)ni£396 million a year ago. Earn- that the bank's current trading po- 

L ii u . 3L iis per share were at 88 pence, sition was extremely good, continu- 

m v* wniit ; 2 wn from 128 pence. mg the momentum from the record 

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■t*fc lift VWnm 


- u ,» «# t ' • nas x.i Dim on spare capacity for 

M ** " - N * ‘ S • home loans. “All in afl, prospects 


iL 4 * 'J a» "s r- J 

» *2 "5 yjhs bank reported toat its tax ^ looking very good," Mr. Wil- 
* rose to £377 mfflion from i ^ iSOB 6 

! $ *n mimon, mainly because ol a -rj,- 


J.a 

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«§S, )S §-17 nnUiou, mauuy peca use a\ a - chairman. Lord 

4 ^ J54-mUlipn charge for deieneo Boardman, said charges against 


Renault Drops 
ff met Project 


> s, 77if Associated Press 

3 AR1S — France's state-owned 

2^ 5??* pi sS5 ito 11 "S ^>nanli anto group disclosed Tues- 

* v X TW * ^ s* io g s-S;- 

Jjions with the Soviet Union on a 

p««p i-K 7Tr^a« to set up a car engine fac- 

• 90 Zovri 
Jit ZantThE 
lilt I4*t Zing 

nw am zumm 


S!* y, * T °* 300 


tn j.y that ii had backed out of nego- 

4-s v ii 

” 5! 'sS^- 

4 g a-5 |;n a letter to the Soviet jcuthon- 


profits for bad debts of £351 mil- 
lion reflected a continuing cautious 
.view erf world trading conditions. 

“We’re not gloomy or depressive 
but prudent and property cau- 
tions, Lord Boardman said. The 
bank's exposure to bad debt is sig- 
nificantly less dian other major 
British or U.S. banks, he said. 

National Westminster is taking a 
longer-term view of the Third 
World debt situation, said Ron 
Bennie, the international banking 


Grand Met Sees 
Decrease inNet 

Reuters 

LONDON — Grand Metro- 
politan PLCs profit for the first 
half of the current year will be 
significantly lower than that for 
the like period last year, the 
chairman, Stanley Grins lead, 
said Tuesday at the company's 
annual meeting 

He said the decrease was be- 
cause of a previously reported 
$20-millfon fall in first-quarter 
activities in Grand Met 
ILS-A/s consumer products, 
mainly due to lower profit mar- 
gins on sales of generic and pri- 
vate-label cigarettes. 

In the first half ending March 
3T. 1984, the London-based 
brewing, tobacco, dairy prod- 
ucts and hotel company had a 
pretax profit of £147.0 million 
(5157 million) on revenue of 
£2.44 billion- That was up from 
profit of £1 13.6 million and rev- 
enue of £2.09 billion in the pre- 
vious year’s like period. In the 
year ending Sept 30, 1984, 
Grand Met’s pretax profit was 
£334.3 million on revenue of 
£3.08 billion. 


Digital Upgrades Rainbow PC 
In Bid for Office Market 


By Donald Woutat 

Los Angela Tima Semte 

LOS ANGELES — Digital 
Equipment Corp. showed off 
equipment Monday that is intend- 
ed to give it a major role in the 
growing office market by rnaming 
its Rainbow personal computer to 
its bigger minicomputers. 

Digital, the nation's No. 2 com- 
puter manufacturer behind Inter- 
national Business Machines Corp. 
hopes to silence critics who say that 
the company, winch is the lading 
maker of minicomputers, has fallen 
behind in the emerging market Tor 
smaller, cheaper personal comput- 
ers. 

.The system unveiled Monday 
was an upgraded version of Digi- 
tal’s Rainbow and related software 
and other equipment. 

Kenneth H. Olsen, chairman and 
founder of the 28 -year-old compa- 

■ ny. said the products are “one more 
step toward rally integrating per- 
sonal computers into [the work 
place] in a disciplined, organized 
and consistent way” 

Digital pioneered the minicom- 


puter, which is sized between big 
mainframes and the new. smaller 
personal computers. A minicom- 
tuier costs from S30.000 to 


Digital's VAX series of mini- 
computers dominates the market, 
especially in engineering and other 
technical fields, and has been cen- 
tral to the success of the S6-billion 
company. But the minicomputer’s 
future is questioned by some who 
say that the increasingly powerful 
personal computer is encroaching 
on the mini’s turf. 

The potential threat took on ad- 
ditional significance for Digital 
when the Rainbow, its entry in the 
personal-computer market, did 
poorly in retail stores. Critics said it 
did not seem to fit ir. Digital's line- 
up of computers or meet the needs 
of the company's traditional, so- 
phisticated customers in industry. 

The equipment displayed Mon- 
day represents Digital's' effort to 
meld the personal computer with 
the minicomputer in the office, 
which is one of the fastest-growing 
computer markets. 


Alcatel Thomson 
And Fairchild to 
Pool Resources 


Reuien 

PARIS — Alcatel Thomson and 
Fairchild Industries Inc. agreed to 
pool telecommunications technol- 
ogy and marketing worldwide. Jac- 
ques Irnbcrt. Alcatel's chief execu- 
tive. said Tuesday. 

Under the agreement, scheduled 
to be approv ed by both beards by 
the end or March. Alcatel Thomson 
will market Fairchild products out- 
side North America. 

In North America. Fairchild will 
market ground stations and corpo- 
rate telecommunications services 
supplied by Alcatel Thomson's 
transmission subsidiary. 

Mr. imbert declined to give fi- 
nancial details but said the two 
groups had set up four joint subsid- 
iaries. 

.Alcatel Thomson is getting an 
initial 20-percent stake in Fairchild 
Communications Products Co. and 
Fairchild Communications Net- 
works & Services Inc. Its stake will 
be raised to 40 percent bv the end 
of 198 b. 


Despite Glut, Uranium Mine in Canada Is Booming 


I-K *4 ii 


(Continued {rum Page 9) 
erations. Kerr-McGee attributed a 


NYSE Highs-Low; 


division manager. 

i - b" r . Renault said its dedaon was Mr. Be nnie said the debt picture „ 

xd to difficulties in getting the belter now than in 1982 but infla- large pan of an S88- million charge 
,iet Union to agree to purchases tion rates are still not under con- against its fourth-quarter earnings 

i- to uranium shutdowns. PheJps 


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.French capital goods. The pro- 
Vd prefect would have required 

tantial investment merely to 

ry out design work and initial 
a^noirm, ^ls, Renault officials said. 

E55P!*e« ^he Communist-led union, the 
£neral Confederation of Labor, 
bounced a few weeks agp that 
^ contract was worth between 6 
fdon to 7 billion francs (up to 
^0 million), and that with assort- 
ed contracts could be worth 15 
yon to 20 billion francs. 


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troL The bank's cumulative provi 
si on of £918 milli ng for bad debts 
represents 2.1 percent of amounts 
due from customers, up from 1.9 
percent in 1983. 

Mr. Wilkinson said toe bank had 
no acquisition plans at present fol- 
lowing contracts to expand its op- 
erations in Spain and Australia. 

The bank said it also bad no 
plans to follow Midland Bank in 


Dodge's Nuclear Inc. unit. Union 
Carbide; Sohjo. UJS. Sleeps Con- 
oco division and Chevron's Gulf all 
have either shut down mines or 
reduced production to a trickle as 
eanungs evaporated. 

But ur anium mining in northern 
Saskatchewan, where production 
costs are one-third those of the 
United Stales, is humming along 
services to per- quite nicely, thank you. The mine 
at Key Laie, opened in 1983, last 


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163 70ft 10k. 

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Zytrex l* 9 1* 2 


year became toe world's biggest 
producer of yellowcake, as semi- 
processed uranium is called. Two 
nearby mines at Guff and Rabbit 
Lakes are doing nearly as well. 

Furthermore, a recent discovery 
75 miles northeast of here at Cigar 
Lake appears to be toe greatest 
concentration of uranium ever 
found — at least six times more 
prolific than Key Lake, with ore 
almost 100 times richer than toe 
average uranium mine. That find, 
jointly owned by the Saskatchewan 
Mining Development Corp., a pro- 
vincial crown corporation, and Co- 
gema, the French utility consor- 
tium, might be just the be ginnin g. 

Saskatchewan may become toe 
source of most of toe United Slates' 
uranium needs in the near future. 
U.S. industry officials suggest that 
U.S. dependence on imports could 
quickly grow from about a quarter 
currently to more than SO percent. 
This would happen, they say, as 
long-term contracts now being 
filled from inventories by compa- 
nies no longer digging uranium 
come due. They would then have to 
be renegotiated with foreigners, in- 
cluding South Africa and Australia 
but mainly Canad a. 

. “Didn't we learn anything from 
oUr Senator Pete V. Domenict, a 
Republican of New Mexico, the 
leading uranium state, has asked. 

Th toe 1970s, Washington an- 
swered the threat of non-American 
dominance in uranium markets 
with import restrictions. Since toe 
United States is by far toe largest 
user of uranium, the restraints gave 
UJS. producers more than hall of 
worldwide uranium sales. 

Those restraints have been re- 
moved by toe Reagan administra- 
tion, as part of its free-markei phi- 
losophy and push for increased 
peaceful use of atomic power. Cur- 
rent IegisJarion.calls fen 1 a review of 


The World’s Leatflng 
Producers 

Uranium cutout in matrlc tons 



1078 

Extended 

IBM 

Canada 

6,803 

10,790 

United State* 

14,200 

5£90 

South Africa. 

3,961 

5,700 

Australia 

516 

3,650 

Namibia 

2,697 

3,650 

Sources; NucteerEnwpy Agency. 
Marnaftanaf Atomic Entrgy Agency 


A* IT 

uranium imports only if they ex- 
ceed 37.5 percent of consumption. 

Industry experts say toe cureem 
level is between 20 and 25 percent, 
but could shoot upward. 

But more than trade restraints 
are at work in the U.S. uranium 
miners' problems. Many utilities 
that have abandoned nuclear reac- 
tors are stuck with nuclear fuel that 
is being dumped on the market at 
spot prices of around SI5.50 a 
pound compared with prices of be- 
tween S29 and S35 for long-term 
supply contracts. 

Many tough state public utility 
commissions are pushing utilities 
that continue to operate reactors 
into this cut-rate market, although 
toe utilities might prefer the long- 
term contracts to assure greater se- 
curity of supply, according to Jack 
Edlow,- president of a- Washington- 
based uranium services concern. 

Washington policy itself has ore going in. 
been responsible for some of toe Rio Tmto's Rossing mine in Na- 
uramum inventory gluL In the mibia is richer in unmilled materi- 
1970s toe U.S. government held a aL But Canada's ore yields more 
monopoly on enrichment services, usable uranium per pound, 
a kev process in making uranium Only three people run the so- 
usable as fuel. phisticated crushing plant, while 

Utilities would buy' their urani- the computerized null is operated 
um from toe mining company of by 17. A radiation-sensitive device 
their choice, and then pay toe gov- initially grades toe ore. 


ernment to enrich it. They normal- 
ly signed fixed commitment enrich- 
meni contracts with the 
government that obligated them to 
send a specified amount of urani- 
um for enrichment each year. 

Because of these contracts, even 
utilities that deferred or canceled 
nuclear plants were forced to con- 
tinually add to their store of en- 
richedfueL 

Bui now France, the Soviet 
Union and the European consor- 
tium. Urenco. all offer enrichment 
services, and few require long-term 
commitment contracts. 

Any discussion about uranium 
centers on Canada, whose uranium 
production has jumped by per- 
cent over the last five years. The 
main reason is the surge of activity 
in Saskatchewan, which overtook 
Ontario to become Canada's lead- 
ing uranium province in 19S3. 

Key Lake is the mother lode. 

Last year toe mine — which is 
half-owned by Saskatchewan Min- 
ing. a provincial government com- 
pany; a third by Eldorado Re- 
sources Ltd., a federal crown 
company, and a sixth by Uranerz 
Exploration & Mining Ltd., owned 
by toe West German government 
— produced 10.4 million pounds, 
just below its capacity of 12 mil- 
lion. 

Whether it is the biggest uranium 
mine in the world depends on 
whether one measures the amount 
of yellowcake coming out of toe 
mine's mill, or toe amount of raw 


Unilever Posts 16% Rise in Profit in 4th 


(Continued from Page 9) The company reported overall 

trading and manufacturing inter- progress in its British and Dutch 
ests, snowed improved results but operations but conceded that some 
remained depressed by drought 0 f its West German operations re- 
and recession in its key West Afri- ported lower results. Analysis say 
can markets. Unilever is looking ihe company's margarine sales 
for ways to slim down UAG and were wok in West Germany, 
analysts sav prime candidates for „ , .... .. 

sale may indude building-supplv Sir Kenneto said Unilever is con- 

and motor-dislribution units. ' 

Higher palm oil prices boosted they would consider spending as 
results from UnDever’s plantations. muc h ^ $j billion for toe right UJS. 

In Europe, margarine sales suf- acquisition. Last year. North 
feted as Ihe European Community America accounted for about 20 
sold cbeapi butler from its huge percent of operating profit, still 
inventories. In addition, EC efforts well below toe 45 percent from Eu- 
to restrain milk production hurt rope. 

Unilever’s animal feeds sales. Unilever PLC plans a total divi- 


dend for 1984 of 35.52 pence a 
share, up from 30.86 pence for 
1983. Unilever NV is to pay 14.11 
guilders, up from 13.02 guilders. 


Gold Options (prices in VctLL 


hm 


30 

3C0 

3» 

33) 

330 

340 




12731425 
773 925 
375- 525 
200- 150 
im am 


** 


21 255273 
W»17f0 
11731325 
823 975 
523 675 
373 525 


3003*50 
18231975 
I4SM&00 
11231275 
823 975 


Gakt2B825 2S875 

VfcleanWUteWeM SA. 

L Qini *1 Matf-Bhoc 
1211 Centra L Switzcriaad 
TcL31«2SI - Trim 2*3*5 


NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

FIDELITY 

SPECIAL GROWTH FUND 

Registered Office: Sockte dlims&Kmau a Capital Variable 37. Rue Notre- Dame. Luxembourg R.C. 

Luxembourg B 20095 


that the Annual 
"the shareholders of 
GROWTH FUND, a 

sotiete dlflvestissement a capital variable 

organized under the laws of the Grand Duchy 
ofLuxembourg (the “Fund”), will be held at 
the principal and registered office of toe 
Fund. 37, rue Notre-Dame. Luxembourg, at 
1 1 :00 a.m. on March 28, 1985, specifically, 
but witoout limitation, for toe following 
purposes: 

1. Presentation of toe Report of the Board of 
Directors; 

1. Presentation of toe Report of toe Statutory 
Auditor; 

3. Approval of toe balance sheet at November 
30, 1984 and income statement for toe fiscal 
year ended November 30, 1984. 

-4. Discharge of Board of Directors and toe 
. Statutory Auditor; . 

S. Election of eight (8) Directors, specifically 
toe re-election of all present Directors, 
Messrs. Edward C. Johnson 3d. William L. 
Byrnes, Charles A. Fraser. Hisashi 


Kurokawa. John M. S. Patron, Harry G. A. 
Seggerman and James E. Tonner and 
Fi mm trust. 

6. Election of the Statutory Auditor, 
specifically, the re-election of the present 
Statutory Auditor. Maurice J. Sergant. 

7. Authorization of the Board of Directors to 
declare a dividend in respect of fiscal |9S4tf 
necessary to enable the Fund to qualify for 
“distributor” status under United Kingdom 
tax law. 

8. Consideration of such other business as may 
properly come before the meeting. 

Approval of the above Items of the Agenda 
will require no quorum and will be given by 
the affirmative vote of a majority of toe 
shares present or represented at the Meeting. 
Subject to the limitations imposed by law and 
the Articles of Incorporation of toe Fund, 
each share is entitled to one vote. A 

roxv. 


By order of the Board of I 


Dated: February 26, 1985 


FIDELITY SPECIAL GROWTH FUND is an Im^stmern Company wito toe 

investment objective of seeking long term capital growth bum a drrersiffed portfolio of companies 

technology primarily * Japan. 

At February 1, 1985 the portfolio was ^>Ut between toe foOoiring sectors: 35% in Constuner, U%in 

EkctricdrilftbGBen/MltErbls, lift in Financial, 10% in Industrial, 8% in Services. 5% in 

Mercfaaa<fising,3ft in Chem kail s and4%incashandmisceflaiieoi»s.Thegt«^niphkalsptitwKas 
follows: Japan 72ft, USA 12ft, Hong Kong 6ft, Australia 6ft, casta and nusedianeons 4ft. 

The Fund was bunched in February 19S3 at S12 per share. Since branch, the offor price of shares has 
risen 18% to $14.12 at February 1, 1985. The Fund is now valued at WOm. 


Pan Am Attendants Set Strike Date 


ImudPrvn ialrmaluvu! 

NEW YORK — Pan American 
World Airways flight attendants 
Tuesday ret an April 1 strike dead- 
line. saying they would join striking 
mechanics whose six-day walkout 
has shut down toe carrier's domes- 
tic flights and sharply cut its over- 
seas operations. 

“We offered a multiatillion dol- 
lar concessionary package and they 
spit on us and threw it buck in our 
face," said Brian Moreau, chair- 
man of the Independent Union of 
Fiicht Attendants of New York. 


“We have been released b> the 
National Mediation Board to strike 
as of April I. At that time. »e w ill 
have no choice." he void. 

The Transport Workers Unior .. 
representing S.HdO mechanic s. 
walked out Thursday after conir jci, 
talks broke down. Pan Am» o’ .her 
four unions, representing M .000 
flight attendants, engineer., nu- 
cmnists and pilots, hare ho nored 
the mechanics 1 picket lines. .• \]1 fiw 
unions* contracts ran oui Jar l i. No 
talks were scheduled utth e ither the 
TWU or the I UFA 


To our Readers 
in Germany. 

We would like to hear 
from you. 

If you are having difficulty 
obtaining the International 
Herald Tribune on a timely 
basisplease let us know. 

This applies whether you 
buy your copy at a nev /sstand 
or are a subscriber. 

Our representative, in 
Germany will try to solve any 
problem you may have in 
getting your paper pr omptly 
and will do everything possible 
to improve quality o f the 
service. 

Please contact: 

Foreign Press Servi ces 
Gleisstrasse 5 

6832 Hockenheim -Talhaus 
TeL: 06205 20131 
Telex: 465826 

HcralbSSribunc 


>Wkik1h.ra|IW1 


ADVEmri5SrMENT- 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supptiteid by Funds Listed 
5 March 1785 

TIib not aiut value quotations rtown b«M t arc fopal lad bv 71 m FbihU HUM! wlliiitw 
exception ol tame fond* whose quotes are based on Issue prices. The following 
marginal symbols indicate freeuena < or wotaitont smiled tar me INT: 

Cd) - dotfv; twj -weekly; lb) - bt-mon tbly; (r) - ream arty; (I) - irreeutarty. 

AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
iw) Al-Mal Trvsi, SA_ 


BANK JULIUS BAER X CO. Ltd. 


—Id > Bacrtxmd-. 
— - Id ) Conear. 


115042 LLOYDS BANK INTL. POB 4)8. Geneva 11 

—riwlLiavds I nil Dollar *ioo> 

— Mwl Lloyd* I nil Euraoc — 5F UNOo 


sf *45.10 — +<w) Ltovds mriGrowm_ sfiwoo 

SF I22SJOO — K»] Ltovds '.nl'l income SF 2)800 

1 1)5000 — +Cw) Uoyds Inri Poclllc SF W7J0 

SF 1209X0 


—US ) Eouiborr America 
—Id) Equlbaer Europe-— ar i«rw 

— Id I Equlboer Pacific SF 1214X0 P ^?! SBA5— G ROUP . 

—id ) Grobar— SF 116400 “M ] 5“^ ffxd inlemal tonal 


-Id ) Stockbar. 


-IdlC SFFQPfl -. 
—Id I CrossOow Fu 
1 1 IT 


SF 177500* —C*) OBLI-DlW — — — 
SF 1775X0- «. tW )OBLIGtlSTION. 

_ SF2SJS — Iw) OBLI-OOLLAR. 
SF1X31 — Iw) OBLI-YEN 


—Id ) ITF Fund N.V— _ 
BANQUE IMDOSUEZ 
—Id > Aston Growth Fond 

— Iw) Dlve-mcnd 


S 9131 

DM 1.14841 

— SF 9185 

- 81X9121 
Y 105.13100 

FL 104019 
SI0U7 


S14J2 — Iw) OBL1-GULOEN. 

—Id I PAROI'L-FUND. 

Slow —Id ) PARINTER FUND S 101 42 

—Id ) PAR US Treasury Bood_. S 10070 
11940 ROYAL B. OF CANADAT’OB 346GUERNSEY 

_ *973 +(wl RBC Canadian Fund Lid. *11.19 

11S7S +(w) RBC For EasIXPacMIc Fd. *1074 

*8547 -H w) RSC Ini 'I Caplfol Fd *2809 

S 140.7:- +« w) RBC irr'.-'l Income Fd— 1 1Q.9J- 

BWTANNI*POB271,SI.Hrtler.JKlov +{2,i RBC KSth 


-iw) FI F— America — 

— Iw) Fi F— Europe 

— Iw) F IF— Pacific 

— idl indosuex MultlbondsA 
—Id ) HxtosuM Mulllbonds B. 


— Iw) BriLOaUar Income, 

— Iwl BrtUMpnooXurr 

—Id ) Brit, mil J Manooxortl . 
—Idl Bril. lnUXMonaB.Forft. 
— Iw) Br iLUnlvorMr Growth—. 
—Iwl Bril.GoM Fund. 


— Iw) BrllJMnao.CorTencv — 
—Id j Brit, japan DJr Perf. Fd . 
— (w) BrlUersev Gilt Fund. 


—Id ) Bril. World LeK. Fund — 
—Id > Brir. Wtortd Team. Fund. 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
—Iwl Cmiliai int'l Fund ■ . _ 
—Iwl Capital Ittrtio SA — , — „ 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 


*0X44* - rl ** 1 ■»*J |||| - ,|| p. r 'u.. 19 Jd* 

S8JI- SKANOIFOND INTL FUND (464-234270) 

. 10.983 — (w)lnc: Did.. *480 OHer _*i!0 

C 1.227 — IwJAcx.: Bid S4JOOffer S11C 

SOJ09? 5VENSKA ‘.NTERNATIONAL LTD. 
IA5A7 17 DavonSb ire StuLondon-01 -377X0*0 

. IIJN) —19 1 SMB Bond Fund _.*2119 

coxii- — iwl SMB. infiGrowtn Fund SI9.94 

SWISS BANK CORP. 

* 0JAI — Id ) America Valor 

—Id ) D-Mark Bond Scfection 
*35J7 — IB l Dollar Bond Scried tan _ 

S 11X8 — <»> Fto.-ln Bond 5elrcton_ 

—Id ) iniiirvator. 


—id) Adlans Suisse*. 
—Id) Band Motor f 


—Id | jar on PofrtoHa. 


SF 45X25 
DM 113X9 
. S 120X8* 
FL 117X6- 
SF9SXQ 
.SF 90625 


SF 36325* —Id ) Sw iss Foreion Bond Sei SF 1044#* 


SF 10X55 —Id ) Swt» valor New Ser.. 
DM10441 — Id) Univ. BondSeted 


SF39SJ0 
SF 86.75 
SF 12654 


—cal Booa valor D-mark , „ . 

-Id) Bond voter US- DOLLAR S10«.79 —Id I Un Ivenal Fund 

—td» Bond voter Yen Yen ikssms __ 

.-Cd) convert Voter Swf SFIt^JS VWT2ERLAND 

-id) Convert Voter US-OOLLAR. S1 1131 ” S ! 

1 CoroMC SP9TQQD 5? ! wWHBWlI SP 4t2S 

— Id ) cl'pDnds— Bonds SFTlS “H { 

-Id l cs Famta— Inn — SF 113.7! -W 1 s fc 

—Idles Monev Market Fund— *104X00 ~ g | S*M» So^i Air. SF 49. oa 

—Id ) CS Money Morkel Fund DM i034j» — 1 w > 51 "w istocknrlcel SF 195X0 


—Id) E no rgie— Voter, 
—id > u* 


—Id 1 Eurood— Volor- 
— Id I Pod lie —Valor. 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 


— +ld) 


Id) Cancel 
Id > inn Ro 


tr o s 

iMdtniond ■ 


,SF T77.W UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

WL’ttJJ- “ — W » UnlnntB DM41.90 

DM22J0 

SF I84J5 j Einlrok. DM78.90 

OM34JI Other Funds 

DM B7.1S *wl AC IIBonai Invntnwnl* Fund, t HUS 

(wi Ac Hunt inti — S iom 

Un) ai lied Lid-— Sl*o 

Iw) Aq Uila lirtBrnaltonEU Fuoo„ S 10427 

Ir I Arab Finance I.F SS4SJ3 

lb I Ar tone *1X1224 

. *1032 
t I03A6 
SF 13845 
5 890 


Dunn 8 Herts III 4 Liovd Georoe. Brussels 
—Cm) D&H Commodity Pool.. 4594.19 ■ 

— Im) Currency X Gold Pool — * 133.77 ■ 

— Iml WlnotUle Ful. Pool _ *58X37' 

— im) Trans World Ful. Pool. *952.12'" iw) Tr intcar int'l Fa. (AE IF) 

FBC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISE R5 {"{ £ JP Infer bond Fund 

1. Laurence Pountv HIIL EC4. B)-6ZW*« {”> 

— Iw) F8C Attonlic *1220 }i! , | 

-Iwl F&C Eunwoon **■» 11 } p ^ ,n " I'll? 

. — r., t-KTi iwr citoani Fung. . *1J2 

— (V.I NH.U.WUOI id ) Cj.r. Auslrolto Fund — __ S9£i 

FIDELITY POB A7BL Hamilton Bermuda id ) C_|,R. J<rpon Fund S 9J9 

— im) American Voiuot Common- 484X7 (m) Cleveland Onshore Fd. 42X75JI 

— imlAnw Values Cum J>rel 4101.1* Iwl Columbia SecwrlHev__ FL 12*48 


— Id I Fidelity Amer. Assets — 4 67.11* 

— Id) Fidelity Australia Fund 47J4 

—Id ) Fkl* III V DUajverv Fund S 1038 

— Id) Fidelity Dtr.SvW.Tr 4721.45 

-Id I Fldemv Far East Fund * 2026 

— Id ) Fidelity Inti. Fund 154.11- 

— Id) Fioailrv Orient Find 4247 

— Id l Fidelity Fronllw Fund *1X70 


. .. /Pa eld 

—la ) Fidelity Sod. Growth Fa — 41438 


—id ) FkKHirv Pacific I 


4134.76 


—Id ) Fidelity World Fund. 


*30X4 


FORBES PO 8887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Aoenl 01-839-3013 

— Iw) Gold Income 4 7 J6* 

— fw» Gold Appreciation JU9 

—Iw) Dollar income 4862 

— iml Strpteete Trading S 1X0 


BICOMETE. 


4 968X1 
. *9X5 
12605 

d ) D. Witter Wld Wide Ivt Tst^_ *9js 


w) » ton vert. Fa inti A Cerr 
wl Canvetl. Fa mil B 
Wi D.G£. 


a I Drakkar mvesi.Funa N.v^ s 1.105X7 

d ) Drey hn Fund Inl l 4 3412 

wi Dreyfus Interconnneni 43X69 

~ The Establishment Trust 41X7 

Europe Obltoat tons LF 6150 

First Eaete Fund *1X31830 


Iw 


FHt* Stars Ltd. 

FlrtSbury Group Lid.. 
FonMlen l*s«e Pr™_ 
Farexfund. 


Formula Setectian Fa . 
Fond Italia. 


— 487479 
S 11X47 
SF 539.15 
4 7 IS 


GEFINORFUNDX 
— Iwl East tnwslment 
— Iw) Scottish World Fund 
— Iw) Slate Si. American 


SF 8561 

. 42221 

Id I Governm. Sec. Fund- 4 87.72 


Id ) Fronki -Trust Inlerxlns.. 
435X56 Iw) Hoiussinann Hides. N.V_ 

c 12765 iw) Hesiia Fun d *. — 

* 151X7 Iw) Horizon Fund. 


id 1 1 LA I Irtl Gold Bond.. 

Id ) Iniemma SA 

lw> imermorkei Fund. 


DM 40.79 
. *10923 
. *10497 
SIX85J4 
_ *9.78 
_ 112X1 
*317X0 


Cool LGuidXtd.LaitAoentXl-49 14230 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 

P 8 , 1 ? ■5L^t ^ fS rt ■ Gu,^, * ev, 04 *L' i SJ? S . «•»» ,n, 1 Currency Fund Ud_ *7X5 

I" 1 } PuyjeAM aA ■■■ ■_■ * t24*8 [r I mil Securilm Fund 19.51 

m >GAMArtltrDoe Inc * TO® Id I I nvesta PWS — — DM 4X*4 

Iw) GAMerko Inc IJ33J5' Ir ) invesi Allonttoues *466 

<r 1 I tailor tune Inrl Fund SA * TOJa 

I"’) Japan Selection Fund *105X2 

s . F .5?4y Iwl Joran Pacific Fund-. 


Iw) GAM Boston Inc 

(Wl GAM EronitoD* 

iw) GAM Fronc-vol ... 

Id ) GAM International Inc. 


* Cd > Klelnwori Benson Int i Fd.' 
*101X0 iwl Klelnwort Bens. Jan. Pd— 


Iwl gam Nariti Amerlea Int 

iwl GAM N. America Unit Trust. 100X0 D id) Leleom Fund. 

tw) GAM PocKIc Inc .... — S11SJS u«) Leverage Can Hold 

Iw) GAM Start. & Inn unli Trust, l^xp.p (,i I LlaulhoS- 


*10424 
*2224 
* 71X6 

- S 1,13171 

— 1172X8 


im) GAM Svttami Int. 

Iw) GAM Worldwide me 

(m) gam TvcheSJLOats A 

G.T. MANAGEMENT |UK) Ltd. 

— Iw) Berry Poc. Fa Ltd. 

-Id ) G.T. Applied Science 

—Id 1 G.T. Asean H.K. GwIti.Fd— 
— Iw] G.T. Asia Fund. 


,**07X4 (<v! Ltovas IMI. Smaller Co*. S 1429 

•JSJE l'»l LUHlund 4/1X9 

S1WJ72 im) Maanatund N.V.___. 4194.19 

Id I Mediolanum Sel. Fd *1328 

— Y 117X14 
*1022 


*9 94 l‘»1 M aleore. 
14 »S IW) NAAT— _ 


— Id ) G.T. Australia Fund. 
—Id ) G.T. Europe Fund. 


—iwl G.T. Euro. Small Cot Fund 
— Id ! G.T, Dollar Fund 
—Id > G.T. Bon 


11x2* j d ) Nlkko Growtti Packaor F-'d IULI4962 

SX94' iw' Nippon Fund 1J9.15- 

52074' •:*> Novotac inuestiwni Fund — *98.88 

19 13 IwJNJLMF 414X99 

! m .>JS l $PJyj.=« 


*14194 1*1 PANCURR1 Int 31X73 

' so a 17 j Porfon Sw. R E« Geneva SF 1297X0 

-Id 1 G.T. GtotxH TecnnlBV Fa — *1X98 1 ^?nrSi. VoJ “" Fund 

—Id ) G.T. Honshu. Poinilnder_^_ *24.99 °i ^5 vT^ ^hi 77 f " ■“ — ftSK! 

— Id ) G.T. Investment Fund S17J0 ?} KSSLf.Tf-irY^i VSJ9! 

-id ) G.T. Jooan Small Co.Fund_ *42X8- ? { EW 111 Fund * »•« 

—Id 1 G.T. Technoioav Fund *31.19 _*?i*xo 


— Id 1 GiT. South China Fund * U.1> {*{ gjK£ l g l ,B llia W ' V — 

ESC TRUST CO.I JERSEY I LTD. id) ReftHftveet 

1-3 Seale SUt.HeHer;0SJW633i 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

dldline.! aiier 

9 Id icon. ; Bid *10X5 Otter 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME.FUND 


, *3242.79 
LF 117X00 

LFIA55X8 

Cd j Rera rye Inwfed Doc-wti*^ *106321 
fd 1 Sale Troit Fund. 1 413 


.*9264 IW Samurai PwHnlto _ .1 SF 115X5 
11X372 « SCI/Tech. SA Lover nhouro™ *1027 

tw Slate 5t. Bonk Equi rv HdoiNV 19J9 

— Id 1 Snort Term 'A' I Actum) — *1X534 tw Strategy Investment Fund— S 1920 

—id ) snon Term - a; iDlitrl 41-005* id Syntax Lta-lOoM A)- jj.W 

—Id ) Short Term 'fl (A«um) *1X909 Iw Todwo Growth Fi-jrtd 5F 10222 

—Id ) Short Term ‘B 1 (Distr) 10X135 (w) Tokyo Pot Hold. -,Saa>___ S 101X6 

—Iw) LOAD Term S20X9 jw) Tokyo Pot Hold. N-V-_ 4 139X9* 

JARDINE FLEMING, POB TOGPO Hfl Ko mi TwSS52S f KJSe r,dl SSH2 

-lb) J.F Japan Intel V4976 TvaSoTHmwrS — * t; -— ■ . -» >X99 

—lb > J.F south East Asia— Iwl nj 

— Ib) J.F Jwan Technatoav . 

—ID 1 J.F Padflc SotS-lAce) 

—ID ) J.F AuSnoHa — 


iwfl Iw) Twnoo^Browno ruu.DtmA 4X041X5 

“““ Y Mn fwI Tweedr.Brownitii.w.Classa SU7X97 
, T ?v5 Id I UNICO Fund— DM 74.90 


NIMARBEN 

—ID ) Class A. 

— I w ) Class B - U.S. . 

— iw i Class C * Japan. 
ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB85S7X The HnswelDTO) 169678 
—Id) Sever Beuooin«iH+ 


W) UNI Bond Fum!!_ 
* 400 (b ) UNI Caoltal Fund. 


DM 7X90 

191728 

, *105X35 

w) United coo. itivt. Fund Ll*_ *120 

'wl Wedoe Eurar* N.V *4824 

1 10X41 MWBgSJOMdlN.y. *8X81 

.*74.91 wi Wedoe Paetlie N.V S57J0 

w) Wedoe U3. N.V. *5X43 

Iml Winchester Financial LkL«_ 19.96 

im) WlnatMter- Dlverphed— *22X3* 

*34X0 id) World FiPMSA *10X6 

(w) Worldwide. Securlt to* 5/S 3li. *4X75 
Iw) Woridwldn Soectol S/S 2%, HX63J9 

DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Bololum Franc*; FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
LutwnbQuro Franca; SF — Swiss France; a— asked; + — Otter PrlcK;o — bid 
c house p/v *10 to *1 per unH; na — Not Aval table; N.C.— Not Commun leal ed:o — 
New; s — suspended; S/S — Sroek Spill; - — Ex-Dlwl delta; ■■ — En-Rls; — — 
Grass Performance Index Jon; • — Redemot-Prfce- e.x-Caunon; ee — Fonturtv 
Worldwide Fund Ltd; & — Offer Price incL 3% prelim . eftorae; ++ — dolly stack 
price as on Amsterdam Stock ExOtoMW 


'Bn 






I SI SiSKSUMMsK&nSHifKIiffllgffg* i|S2Hg SI «“ LStHit 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


VoL ot 4 P.M. 

Pm.4PJM.V0l.. 


. l]il40j0K 

.1USUM0 


TabUM include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


T? Monti 1 

Hion Uh vKocfc 


CHtf. YKL PE IBBHMi LOnr 


U 17 

.49110.9 
J3 12 7 
JO 12 37 
22 

id II 


13 II 1 

5 

I 

14 a 7 

« 

25 B 44 

U S 2S 

.1 31 132 

53 

20 40 

UH ID 
St 
71 


631 
M3 
1 Bft 

351 m 

72 we 

at i?ft 
99 law 
30 19 
403 7ft 
SO 2ft 
179 9ft 

* ,ff 

3ft 
ft 

$ 

31ft 

14ft 
lift 
21ft 
4ft 


9ft— ft 
T9ft— ft 
10ft + ft 
I5ft— ft 

9ft~ 
9ft- ft 
lift 


Mft Found JO 12 7 
Tffft FfFSLn JOfalS 7 


Tl FWymB jo i3 10 34 12ft 
nft FbdiP Jflt AS n 40 14 
_7ft Rtece 3 40 Sft 


31ft ■* ft 
14ft + ft 
lift + ft 
21ft 
4ft 

left— ft 
1ft + ft 
3ft— ft 
21ft + ft 

25ft + ft 
2ft + ft 


7ft RteCJS 1 e Hi 

22ft FttGEpf *M ISA 2 2 4 

8ft FtonCn 3 9ft 

24ft Flo Ret JO M 10 35 « 

22ft Flufc# 1 J8t 45 12 334 39ft 

414 Ptwdrm 3d 12ft 

7ft FeotBM 2 9ft 

28ft Foote of 2x 33ft 

4ft FthHIG 22 43 9ft 

M FordCndAQOo ZOOOQz 93ft 
15 ForstCA .13 J7138 11 Hft 

15 FontCB » 4138 15 22ft 

lift FbrwtL 36 934 SSft 

ft Potwnt 153 1ft 

a Frants U»o 34 17 12 42ft 

4ft FTdMIv 43 27 4ft 

14 FraaEl 20 BO 23V. 

7ft FrMOm -28b U 11 17 M 

3 Fries En 297 9 

Vft Frtww JO 2J 10 115 18ft 

12 Frisch* 22 LI 17 7 20ft 

8U FmtHd 557 14 

4ft FrlAwt .171 It 21 dft 

10ft FurVTtn Id 20 19 


153 1ft 
JI0O 34 17 12 42ft 

43 27 dft 

20 BO 2314 
J8b 3J 12 T7 9ft 
297 9 

JO U 10 115 18ft 
21 II 17 1 30ft 

557 14 

.171 It 21 dft 
Id 30 19 


17ft 17ft 
29ft 29ft + W 
12ft 13ft + ft 
14 14 — ft 

8ft 8ft 
X » 

9ft 9ft + ft 
39ft Wft— ft 
»ft 29ft— % 
12 12ft— ft 

9ft 9ft + ft 
33ft 33ft + ft 
9 9ft + ft 
93ft 93ft 

22 H -ft 
72 H — ft 
18ft aid +lft 

1ft 1ft + ft 
41ft 42ft -MW 
d 6 — ft 

23 33ft— % 

9 9 — ft 

Bft Bft 

18 18 
«ft 20ft 4- ft 
13ft 13%— ft 
dft 6ft + ft 
18% 19 





450 133 

ttOz 33% 

33ft 

33% + ft 





13 

2% 

2% 

2%— ft 

14ft 

w KovCn 

30 

U 22 

97 

14ft 13% 

14V. 4 ft 



M 

311 7 

26 

13ft 

13ft 

13ft- ft 

IB 

10ft KUChm 

J*t 3J 

23 

15V. 

15 

W - ft 

9ft 

5ft Key Co 

JO 

U 

1 

- «ft 

1ft 

8ft 

17ft 


JO 

1.9 T7 

207 

10% 

10ft 

10% - ft 

15 

5 KayCa 


9 

13 

iVt 

-7 

7 —ft 

4% 

2ft KMdewt 



3S 

4ft 

4 

4ft + ft 

5ft 

3ft Kfamrk 


21 

13 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

6% 

3 KWV 



ISO 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft 

2ft KleerVi 

J2r 

J 

19 

3 

3% 

3» .. 

15 



15 

25 

13ft 

13 

13 —ft 

15ft 

Mk Knoll 


15 

8 

13% 

13ft 

13*k— ft 

27ft 

21 KooerC 

232 

M155 

79 

26ft 

2dft 

26%+ ft 

[m 



WBM 


— 

■■ 

rzzi 


ao 1.1 a 

25 


2ft 
13ft 
9ft 
4% 
ID 
lift 
5ft 
ft 
7ft 
9ft 
13ft 
25ft 
4ft 
2ft 
7ft 
SK 
43ft 36 
7ft 3ft 
19ft 14ft 
33ft 33ft 
7 ft 
1ft 
2M 1ft 
14ft 9ft 
2DM 14ft 
9ft 6ft 
4ft 2ft 
17ft 12ft 
« 19ft 
38ft 19ft 
TBft 14ft 
8ft 
9ft 
lift 
idft 


34 U 17 
Id 
5 

128 107 a 
jo 2d a 


18 

17 

500 11J 
J6H35 II 
JO A3 8 
220O7.1 


lJOellJ 

in 

a 2d|j 

22 48 17 
M A 21 
M A 21 
120a 52 11 


3 lft 
4ft 2ft 
7ft 2ft 
41ft 23ft 
14ft lift 
17ft 11 
16ft 9ft 
13 Bft 
dft 2ft 
4ft 3ft 
9ft 5 
3ft Vh 
39ft 21 Id 
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dft dft— ft 
dft dft 
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lift 12 
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34 34ft- ft 

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NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 


Sundsv allsbanken 


US$20, OM.OOO 

Floating Rate Ca pital Notes due 1985 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN fJia.t SundsvaJlsbanken has elected to 
redeem all of its outstanding Floating Rate Capital Notes Due 1985 
(the “Notes") on April 11. 1985. at the Redemption Price of 100% of 
their principal amount plus accrued interest 
On April 11 . 1985. the Redemption Price will become due and payable 
upon all Notes, and interest thereon shall cease to accrue on and after 
said date. AU Notes, together with all coupons appertaining thereto 
maturing on October. 1985 are to be surrendered for payment of the 
Redemption Price plus accrued in terest at the Corporate TVust Office 
of Bankers Trust Company in the ! Borough of Manhattan. The City of 
New York, or at the main offices of any one of 1) Bankers TYust 
Company in London. 2) Banque Imdosuez in Luxembourg. 3) Bankers 
Trust Company in Par is, 4) Bankers IhistA-G. in Zurich, 5) Banque du 
Benelux S.A. in Brussels, 6) Bankers Trust GmbH in Frankfurt am 
Main. 


BANQUE NATIONALE DE PARIS 


Floating: rate note issue of U.S. 9400 million 
September 1983/1991 


The rate of interest applicable for the period beginning March 4 
1985 and set bv the reference agent is 10ftd% annual! v. 


March 1. lPSa 


Sundsvallsbanken 
By: Bankers TVust Company 
os Principal Paying Agent 




73 

32 

AOb AO 15 
Ufa it ra 

130 65 10 
251-162 9 
240 AS ID 
At 35 24 
30 1J 10 


COMMERCIAL ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION 


Los Angeles, California 

is pleased Jo announce the establishment 
of their European affiliate 

COMMERCIAL ACCEPTANCE INTERNATIONAL HOLDINGS SA 


29, Raw Pfafippa II 
2340 Luxambaurs 
TaU 352/21581 
Telex: 3251 Ul. 




24ft 

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[«f vmiiiiini I* Hiiiiiumi 

...Jiiaiiai. i*i :.xn ,a*r,'iiiAV.iii 
Mini jbi iai."ik«; ■■■■! 

Vuuiiiiirrrmiui ■ siwtjrrmf 

V«w\i i urr//4A\\\ui iirr/xr/ 

- x\w 

— 




A- 


m 



CME OPTIONS ON 
BRITISH POUND AND 
SWISS FRANC FUTURES 



The CME now has two new 
ways to help you manage your 
foreign exchange exposure more 
effectively- options on British 
pound and Swiss franc futures. 

Both are firsts. 

But at CME we’re used to 
leading the way. Back in 1 972 we 
created the first financial futures 
market (the International 
M onetary Market) - one in which 
we traded a record 1 3.8 million 
foreign currency contracts in ’84. 

Last year we were first in 
offering options on Deutschemark 
futures - already the most actively 
exchange traded currency option 
in the world. 

And this spring we’ll be 
offerin g the first Eurodollar options. 

Th e reason for our success 
is simple. 


All our products are 
specifically designed to give 
bankers, dealers and institutions 
greater flexibility in managing 
theirforeign currency exposure. 

For further information and a 
free copy of “Options on Currency 
Futures: An Introduction”, write to 
or telephone Keith Woodbridge at 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange, 

27 Throgmorton Street, London. 
EC2N 2AN. (01) 920 0722. 




CHICAGO 
MERCANTILE 
EXCHANGE 



27 Throgmorton Street London EC2N 2AN 01 -920 0722 
30 South Wacker Drive, Chicago. Illinois 60606 
312/930-1000 

$7 Wall street New York 1 0005 21 2/363-7000 




"I 


































































p 


b S:5grSSS 4i . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1985 


Page 15 


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ToD to* Include M» nationwide priest 
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and do not reflect late trades ebewtiere. 






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^ AMEX Hi^ifrLoys 


March 5 




HEW HKHU 01 


Barry no 
Camwllv 

DwiMPrtti 

Hubei IA 
KnvCorp 
RuMicfcCn 
Teton Rnch 
WstnHItnn 


QeetrSnd 


BrawnForA 

CrpsxAT 

Giant Food 

Hubei IB 

MetPro 

RntkUckpf 

UnCosRa 


OmrtMMB 

OloiMBatti 

GeuMInvpf 

ichcotp 

NY Timm 
SOuttCp As 
WaOiPart 


WhertiMEnt, WIUowGtie 
NEW LOWS 2 


CtapavCorp 

Dmard* 

HelnicU 

Jupiter Ind 

Rockawav * 

SvxtEna 

Welmon 


. The Daily Sonrce far 
mtemanonal Mvesfxas. 



Qaimants Wait 
As Asbestos Firms 
And Insurers Duel 

By Andrew Pollack 

.Yew York Tima Smticr 

SAN FRANOSCO — In an ornately deco- 
rated auditorium remodeled into a courtroom, a 
trial is underway to determine who win pay 
trillions of dollars in injury claims filed by 
thousands of people exposed to asbestos. 

In the trial five asbestos manufacturers are 
contending against more than SO insurance 
companies, and the insurance companies are 
going against one another, in what is one of the 
largest insurance claim cases ever. While the 
dispute is mainly over who pays, the outcome 
could also help determine how much money wQ] 
ultimately be available to compensate those 
exposed to asbestos. 

The decisions by a jury and by Judge Ira A 
Brown Jr. erf' California Superior Court could 
also set precedents about liability in cases in 
which illnesses and deaths occur years after 
exposure to harmful substances. 

The special preparations for the trial which 
began Monday, bear witness to the size and 
complexity of the case. Because no courtroom 
could hold all the lawyers involved, a former 
high school auditorium was changed into a 
courtroom at a cost of $200,000. An intercom 
system is being set up so lawyers, sitting at 26 
tables spread around the room, can indicate 
they want to speak by pressing a button that 
turns on a light on the judge's console. Comput- 
er systems are being set up to keep track of more 
than 50,000 documents totaling more than 100 
milli on pages. 

To the victims of asbestos exposure, such 
elaborate preparations illustrate one of their 
principal complaints — that legal wrangling is 
enriching attorneys while delaying compensa- 
tion to victims. A study by Rand Corp. in 1983 
estimated that 63 cents of every dollar spent on 
asbestos litigation went to the attorneys on both 
sides, not to the claimants. 

“All the millions of dollars going down the 
tubes in attorney's fees, and the victims win not 
receive a dime," said James E Vcnneulen, exec- 
utive director of the Asbestos Victims erf Ameri- 
ca. Wearing a portable oxygen tank to help him' 
breathe, he led a demonstration of about a 
dozen asbestos exposure victims outside the 
courtroom. 

There are an estimated 25,000 claims for 
injuries or death blamed on inhalation of asbes- 
tos, a fibrous material once commonly used as 
an insulating material and fire retardant. 

Lawyers for the asbestos companies and thc 
insurers said that the trial was not delaying 
payments to victims. The real reason for the 
delay in compensation, they said, is that in 
1 982, ManviQe Carp., the leading asbestos mak- 
er, sought bankruptcy protection, which re- 
lieves it of having lo pay claims. 


7» tm 


BUSINESSPEOPLE 


Sir Kenneth Berrill to Head 
British Securities Board 


Imenunonal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment Tuesday announced the 
appointment of Sir Kenneth Berrill 
to oversee a new regulatory system 
for the British securities industry. 

Sir Kenneth. 64. is to set up and 
serve as the first chairman of the 
Securities and Investments Board, 
which is to regulate the industry 
under the supervision of the Bank 
of England and the Department of 
Trade and Industry. He has agreed 
to relinquish his position as chair- 
man of Vickers da Costa Group, a 
London-based stockbrokerage in 
which Gticorp recently acquired a 
major ohareholding 

Sir Kenneth began working in 
the City in 19S1, when he joined 
Vickers da Costa after being a lec- 
turer in economics at Cambridge 
University, as director of an invest- 
ment trust and as chief economic 
adviser to the Treasury. 

Martin Jacomb, vice chairman of 
Kleinwon, Benson LttL, was ap- 
pointed deputy chairman of the 
board. He will retain his post at the 
London-based merchant bank. 

At a press conference. Sir Ken- 
neth placed himself squarely in the 
London tradition of preference for 
light regulation. He said financial 
regulation was like “salt in cook- 
ing" and warned against overdoing 
it. 

Chase Manhattan Ltd, the Lon- 
don-based merchant banking arm 
of the Chase M anhattan Capital 
Markets Group, has appointed 
Thomas F. Gaffney to the new post 
of president. He wul bead the mer- 
chant bank's activities in Europe, 


the Canadian federal cabinet from 
1981 to 1984, he resigned from the 
Standing Senate Committee on 
Banking, Trade and Commerce 
upon taking up his post at Bank of 
British Columbia, 
the Middle East and .Africa. Mr. Rtfne’Potdeiic, France’s largest 
Gaffney returns to Chase after 13 chemical company, has named 
yeare’ secondment as managing di- Jean- Pierre Halbron. formerly fi- 
rector of Libra Bank Ltd. a Lem- nance director, to the post of depu- 
d on -based consortium bank in ty director-general, 
which Chase holds a 235 percent First Oscago SA in Geneva said 
stake. He is succeeded at Libra by Daniel Maret and Jean- Pierre Gir- 
Peter Belmont. Libra's general oud. of Banque Paribas in Geneva, 
manager. havejoined the bank as senior deal- 

Arbed Saarstahl GmbH has ers to increase fixed-income securi- 
namol Kun Kflhn. 59, chief exccu- ty dealing and distribution, 
live. The West German steelmaker Gticorp said Neil Mills had 
was left without a chief executive at joined the advisory board of Gti- 
ibe end of 1984, when Jurgen corp Insurance Group Inc., a New 
Krackow stepped down due to ill York-based unit. Mr. Mills retired 
health, and his designated sncces- as chairman of Sedgwick Group 
sor, Wolfgang Bernhardt, with- PLC in 1984. 
drew. Mr. KQhn was formerly a SKF, the Swedish roller-bearing 
member of the manag in g board of and engineering group, has named 
Manncsmann AG’s Brazilian uni t, Mautitz Sah^ 0 managin g director, 
in charge of technology. Exxon Corp. said Fred M. Per- 

Hongkoog £ Shanghai Banting kins, currently vice president Tor 
Corp. said F.R. Frame will join its gas. is to be dected nee president, 
board on April 1. Mr. Frame, who producing. Weldon D. Kroger, who 
has been the bank's group legal is president of Esso Middle East, is 
adviser since 1977. becomes an ex- to succeed Mr. Perkins. Jack D. 
ecuxive director, following the re- Crutchfield, vice president and 
tiremem of Tom Welsh. In October manager of the commercial depan- 
tbe bank said Mr. Welsh would be mem of Exxon International Co„ 
retiring this spring and that he will succeed Mr. Kroger. The 
would be succeeded by Robert Far- moves, subject to the approval of 
id! in the post of executive direc- Exxon directors, are scheduled to 


tor-Europe. based in London. 

Bank of British Columbia 
named Jack Austin to the new 


has 

3051 

of president erf its international di- 
vision. He will be based in the 
bank's Vancouver bead office and 


rake effect May 16. 

Mobil Polymers Internationa] 
ini in Brussels has named Thomas 
L. Stream controller and Charles 
R. Norman manager, administra- 
tion and external affairs. Mr. 


will be helping the bank to expand Stream formerly was financial 
the activities of its London and manager for the company in 
Hong Kong operations. Mr. A us- Greenwich, Connecticut, hfr. Nor- 
tin continues as a member of the man was project manager for Mo- 
Canadian Senate, to which he was bil Polymers International's head- 
appointed in 1975. A member of quarters building prqject. 


Executives 
As Patrons 

(Continued from Page 9) 

among the young playwrights 
wham it has sponsored over the last 
two years. 

"Thai a play doesn't work 
doesn't have a negative effect on 
our corporate image," said Georges 
Debontribe. a commercial execu- 
tive for the company, based in 
Cergv Pontoise. near Paris. "It just 
means the playwright probably 
isn't going to make it.** 

Keeping costs under control has 
helped launch new ideas, and one 
approach has been to tn to get a 
project to pay for itself. At the 
Cartier Foundation, for example, 
seminars and exhibits are expected 
to bring in revenue for the project 
being sponsored. 

Another example is the 250,000- 
franc scientific research prize 
awarded to Lbe Pasteur Institute, in 
Paris, by SOVAC SA, a Rans-tused 
tiiiance company. In 19S4 the prize 
was awarded to a research team for 
its revolutionary findings on AIDS 
— acquired immune deficiency 
syndrome. 

To help pay for the prize. SO* 
VAC offered loans with no interest 
for four months to clients who con- 
tributed money toward the prize. 

Other companies do not offer 
cash prizes. "As a reward, thev get 
honor," said a spokesman for Phil- 
ips, where the Young Scientist 
Contest has been running for mow 
than 15 years. 

According ui some executives, 
sponsoring art, theater, music and 
educational activities still is more 
common in U.S. companies than in 
some European companies. But 
that is changing. 


floating Rate Notes 


March 5 


Dollar 


■i 


14* 
14% 
■ 3 
14% 


^ 17* Sny.tri 


'.iie oj 


ll* 17 

*0 


U.S. Futures m™±5 


i: 


5th ■salllran 
% Sole 


ie 5 

ll 

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M l' 
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, , . in J/ibumlnlmum-deHarfior bu9b*l 
i.'o H ip 9. i-rru. iw id -149 


.<mm Season 

,'ffon low 


Own High Law Clo ee Os. 


Grains 


m* r* Serf Cap 


5CI«1p» 


ZV- 32 

\ n: n : 


to 
j n 
l 


266% 248* +JH* 
+JJ1% 


, . - 307% Mar X48 X4* 145* 2X7* —81* 

h : 122% May 157 3-37% 335% 137% —,00% 

124* JM 125* 327 125* 124* —40% 

'! 0ft 324 Sep 326% 227* 126 126* —SXWi 

"1% 126 Dec X36* 327* 326* 126% —JO* 

i n in * 340% Mar Ml 142% 141 347% +40* 

((. iKilinucu nn Pape 18 so** iuoo mev.sow mm 

j.DOVOwalnt. 37.099 off3T7 

M(CBT) 

- - bu minimum- doUareiwrlMUiel 

% 241% Mar 248 24* 

247% May 27V* 273 27V* 222% 

271 Jut XH Z7S 223% 225 +01* 

% 244% Sep 286% 247% 246% 247% +41 

241% Dec 242 242* 241* 242* +40* 

370* MOT 270* 271 270 230 * +J»% 

A 275% May 276 276 773% 276 +40* 

Sales 3S400 Prw.Saie* M422 - 
.Day Open lnU16J70 afflAM 
BEANS (CBTI 

Du mini mum- dot ton per biaftel 
A 559 MOT 544 5JT% 544 ^ 571* +JB 

570* May 575 541 573% 580% +84% 

580% M 545% 590 513 589* +JJ3 

s£ SMlft IS IS IS +!m 

5M 

Mar 510% 510% 506% 549% —88% 


)N 

’PORTUNUL 


524 


May 516 516 515 514 —82 


25000 Pwv.5ale» l Wg1 


.Day Open lot. 67.152 eft 
BEAM MEAL rCBTI 


nvdqtlgrtMrton 
M 120*0 Mar 

12*80 

129 JO 

1270 

1290 


» 

1290 


1340 

12S0 

13270 

1340 

—60 

B 

134JD 

Jul 

1400 14870 

1380 1400 

—30 

M 

1370 


LOfl 

1430 

W160 

uzu 

—56 

Hi 

1400 

Sep 

144*0 

1450 

1430 

1440 

-0 

» 

U20 

Oct 

1470 

M70 

1450 

1470 


» 

1470 

Dec 

1510 

1520 

1500 

15160 

— 0 

18 

1490 


1540 

1540 

moo 

1520 

—10 

W 

1540 

Mx 

1580 

1580 

1570 

1570 

—20 


Sales HKffl Prev.SalM 15890 
.Day Open Int 43799 off 1445 
BSAN OIL (CBTI 
1 Ita- dollars per 100 Bu. 


TRIBUNE 

IS 

OppOrhtMfi'* w i 

lotions - * tft tv*- ^ 

ss leaders toe'**' 1 v 
itemational eco»- '" ,,v 1 


w 




77 JO 

270 

27*1 




2*0 

2*42 

2815 

2459 

'9 

2870 

Jul 

250 

2*0 

250 

250 


220 


2567 

25*0 

3520 


j9 

220 

Sen 

340 

25.10 

2485 

2810 


220 

Oct 

340 

2451 

240 

2443 


220 

Doc 

330 

2410 

2375 


J| 


Jan 

2380 

220 

2375 

2383 


+.11 

+.14 

+.14 

+.14 

+.H 

+JH 

+83 


Sales 14400 Prey. Sates 17830 
■Day Open InL 45278 up 292 
i (CBTI 

bu mini mum- donors per buiM 

% I TV* Mot 177* 177% 177 177 — J»* 

147% MOV 170% 171% 170% 170% 

% 143 jm 145* 145* 145% 145% —J»W 

140 S mt> 142* 143* 142 143 —40% 

144 Dec 144% 144% 144% 144% -40% 

tales 300 Prev. Sales 189 
Day Open InL 3718 off 31 


Livestock 


i - fjWru (cmei 

less leaders her . . • ^ ST re S5o p ^5; 

nd return the cei ^' n 


, J x , n 6380 Apr 60S 

te**' B 6540 Jun 6 6g 


6380 

IKMI 

<3.15 

6140 

6380 


Apr 

Jun 

Auo 

Oct 

Dec 

Feb 


6375 

6550 

6555 


6575 

64.15 

6550, 

6543 


0rf.\)*y Fn'vdi" ,f * 

f Hungary 

P ftestdenr trtd v'-' 
fcVrew 

CrWftxr> atSr.rt ' r -' !r ' 

Kfcntriafoh 

i, Drrcrfi* ^' rf t 


IS,**' 1 


£ 6747 Apr 6510 6510 
les 1061 Prev.Sales TOM3 
. oay Open bit 898Z7 upUH 


6377 6*17 
6525 4682 
6575 6547 


65.10 

6545 

6510 


+.20 
+.12 
+07 

— 45 

6573 —.15 

6540 -JO 
6515 


DEB CATTLE (CM!) 

J Fbt^conts per lb. 

5 6575 tear 6500 <510 

® 6780 APT 6A32 6970 

A S 6*95 May 4980 <W40 

5 6560 AUO 5B73 7175 

M 4780 Sep 1U3S 7085 

a 47.10 Oct 4985 7035 

9 7080 Now KU0 71.15 

2402 Prev.Sales M23 
-Dav Open Int. 10745 off 260 

USB* pro, 

r n 5Sl nS SS 

■ RlV 40.95 Jul 32.75 53.12 


<780 

COTS 

6590 

7040 

as 

6985 

7045 


r , 


S-» 1 


•da Genm* ^Vv*' . 

ASfati. Mr**' et ' 


4740 

itlHI 

4530 

4525 

45L90 

4780 


AuB 

Oct 

Dec 

Feb 

Apt 

Jun 


5178 

4785 

4745 

4770 


4520 
5L15 
m’P 
5*87 5U5 
47.75 4725 
087 4745 
4770. 4770 



5217 Prev.Iofta UB 
•Dov Open Inf. 27731 off 205 
XKLUEStCME) 

Hbe.- cents per Ibi 

J® 40.10 Mar 7245 7320 

61.15 May 7230 7380 

42.15 Jul 7285 7110 

6020 Auo 7085 . TUB 

<115 Feb 7040 7080 

6480 Mar <940 040 

7040 May 

t, 7090 Jul 

Wh 5787 Prey. Sole* 5853 
pw Open InL U273 off 363 


7220 

7285 

7280 

7085 

7020 

«uo 


4782 
080 
49 JO 
7183 
7080 
7030 
7L10 


4550 
5180 
5207 
5283 
474S 
4787 
47 JO 
4570 
47.1S 


7290 

72J0 

7247 

7042 

7040 

085 

70.10 

7040 


+88 

+J0 

+85 

+J3 

+25 

+JS 


—.I? 

+JS 

4-M 

+87 

+.15 

+.10 

+85 

+.16 


+.15 

+.Q 

+27 

+27 

+20 

+23 

—.10 

—.10 


SiONPORM 

rt- ** «S?1 Nc« L 

tt* 1 


Go *,9257' 

few* 



Food 


'J 



C(HYCSCE) 

msn^Mor 14075 14085 14040 14045 

5^ U TSS iSS 


Mar 
May ■ 

Jul 

. Prey. Sale* 1800 
Open InL 12846 off 10* 


raw 

13750 

mso 


*83 

583 

IB 



,az.--— UtUVOCEl 
Mr amts per lb. 

3.90 May *» 

423 Jul 436 

470 Od 580 
£3* Jan SJ5 
5J0 Mar 680 5H 
086 Mav 522 524 

427 Jul 485 445 

Mar 1*7 500 

P«0Preft.Sala» 88ft 
Open ML *3203 up 1244 ■ 

UfYCSCB - 

mo 2100 

S-ST :« SB 
35 ft- SMS 


428 488 


*37 

475 

484 

S3S 

US 

5% 

537 

585 


2015 

2048 

707* 

mo 

1956 


+16 

488 

47* 

486 

153 

597 

<20 

*85 

597 


2020 

20a 

■xm 


—3S 

+84 

+85 

+20 

+87 

—23 


—.19 

—.16 

—.14 

—84 


— 95 


Season Seasna 
Htsh . Low 


Open H(Bh Law Ckae Chs. 


2145 2000 Mar 1998 3000 IMS 19*6 

2m 3000 May 2000 2G®S 1940 1943 

2035 2015 Jul 1970 1970 19M 1963 

EsL5ales Prev. Sates 1464 

Prey. Day Open ML 24867 op 141 
ORAMO£ JUICE fKYCE) 

15800 B»r cartfs per Ih. 

18550 11550 MOT 14480 14740 1*580 14425 

moo 15180 May 1080 17035 1*880 14845 

18*85 15580 Jul 17000 17125 149J0 16925 

18200 15775 Sep 1040 17020 1040 1040 

18180 15780 Nov 1*888 14850 1*800 167 JO 

18000 15400 Jan 1*4*0 167.15 14440 14425 

17740 15458 Mar 14740 14740 14740 14*25 

14248 MOM May 16625 

JM 1*425 

Est. Sates ' 400 Prev.Sales 382 
Pnev. Day Open inf. 4483 up 30 


—62 

—S3 


+120 

—.15 

—.15 

+40 

-.10 


— — - Me tals — — * 


COPPER CCOMEX) ■ 
31000 ibs^cenlspcr lb. 


9120 

550 

Mar 

5875 

980 

5820 

5835 

—JO 

*249 

920 

*225 

5*60 

Apr 

May 

59.55 

9tM 

59.10 

580 

00 

—JO 

—JO 

8825 

5760 

Jwf 

W25 

*00 

00 

00 


82.10 

570 

Ban 

*0l7B 

*165 

*00 

6045 

8425 

3*0. 

Doc 

(US 

61J5 

S13S 

6L2D 

—JO 

B431 

0060 

SOM 

S9M 

*Jan 

Mar 

6260 

«*»wi 

MM 

£L45 

Mm 

— 0 

7400 

*U0 

May 

*120 

*120 

6370 

*20 

7440 

CUO 

Joi 

*30 

630 

6335 

*365 

— JO 

7098 

auo 

Sen 

*415 

*415 

cus 

*1*5 

—MS 

7030 

*40 

DOC 

6310 

*310 

45.10 

*450 

—65 

Ext. Safa 

AUB 

LO0O Prav.Sales 7J74 

tSM 

*480 

—AS 


Prow. Day Open inf. BUS* off 220 
SILVER (COMBO 
JUJOOtroycttr cents per fray M. 


1*206 

5496 

Mar 

5*86 

5716 

5*25 

FT 

5816 

5S76 

Apr 

5696 

5*96 

5*96 


15116 

5580 

May 

5736 

5716 

5*86 

bi*' 

14616 

5576 

Jul 

5846 

5B85 

5786 

5811 

11836 

5786 

Sen 

5930 

5976 

5896 

W14 

12300 

5936 

DK 

<086 

*115 

<056 


12130 

4186 

Jan 




*156 

11936 

*180 

Mar 


*316 

*296 

*272 

W480 

*306 

May 

*426 

*426 

Aicn 

*3M 

9430 

6400 

Jul 




T^T 

9406 

*506 

Sen 




h’r 

7*30 

*576 

Dec 




I 1 



Jem 




m 

EsL Sates 20600 

Prev.Sales 20+09 



Prcv- Day Open Int 74,145 off 1817 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

0 fray ax- dollars per fray ax. 

2B1B0 2SMB Mar 349.10 — <20 

44740 24*50 Apr 25380 25380 24840 25000 -520 

44940 24940 Jul 25740 25U0 25*00 25500 —5.70 

39100 236J» Od 24250 26380 73930 2(040 —5.10 

37340 2*170 Jan 2080 27030 26780 26780 -4.10 

Ext. Salas Prrv.Sales 993 

Prev. Day Oaen InL 1+312 up 35 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 troy a» do) tars per az 
14340 10580 Mar 10475 10875 10475 10725 —25 

Aar 21 

15940 10440 Jun 10925 11040 109 JS 10925 

14980 10450 59P 1025 10940 10980 1D92S 

14140 10425 Dec 10885 1092S 10885 1087S —JO 

17740 10940 Mar 10823 10923 TORTS 10025 —M 

Est. Sates Z7I Prev. Sates 2« 

Prev. Dav Ooen InL 4434 off 32 

QOLOrCOMEX) 

180 tray ol-m lorn per troyox. 


31180 

51440 

29280 

51080 


49380 


Mar 28730 28720 28728 28420 -090 

APT 2020 2080 217 20 20.90 —480 

May 29080 -4JS0 

Jim 29*00 29*00 29120 29220 —480 

Auo 297 JM) 29840 29430 29480 —4.10 

Oct 30580 30580 30280 30120 — *20 

Dec 30880 30880 30440 307.10 — 420 

Feb 31240 — *4e 

Apr 318.10 —450 

Jun 32*80 — *40 

„ . AW 33030 — *70 

39170 33580 Oct 33440 — *80 

34380 34280 Dec 34*80 34*80 3*480 3*280 —490 

Est. Sales 48U Prev.Sales 3*125 
Prev. Dav Caen MLU4832 off 18*3 


49480 

t35JB 


Financial 


US T. BILLS C1MMJ 
SI million- pts of IMpcL 
9331 029 Mar 

9181 87.14 Jun 

9123 £4M. Sep 

90.90 8527 Dec 

9045 .0460 Mar 

9027 081 Jun 

9080 8880 S*P 

043 0.14 Dec_ 


9133 

9064 

9025 

082 

062 

065 

028 

0.12 


9124 

907* 

9021 

087 

020 

041 

027 

0.U 


Est- Sales l3jm Prov.SaJea CgU 
Prev. Day Open InL 45234 off 359 
IB YR. TREASURY (CWn 
SWUM prim pta AJBnds ®yj»re* 

83 70-25 Mar 71-30 7M 

82-3 , 70-9 Jua 782 JM 

81-13 35-18 Sep 77-12 77-14 

032 75-U Dec 

88-0 75-18 Mar 

79-24 7722 _Jun _ . 

EM. Sales Prev.Sales 12 . 223 

prev. Day Ooen let 48458 off 30 

77-15 57-27 Mar 0 *M 

77-15 57-20 Jun 67-31 48-10 

742 9M0 SOP 57-7 67-15 

764 57-8 Dec *6-19 66-27 

7200 57-2 Mar - 654 <40 

7M* 56-29 Jun 4S-H 45-24 

703 54-29 S*P 4W 4S-U 

49-2* 56-25 Dec 

*9-12 54-77 Mar 

0-2 4*-3 Jun 

48-24 43-28 SeP 46-11 **-13 

EsLSaiesi7S800 prev.SotesliaeSS 
Prev. Day Open tnt22Lll7 off22M 

GNMA (CBTI 

TO 57-17 Jun '68*11 *8*20 

494 59*13 sea 0 72 g-28 

68*13 SM Dee SHI a* 

<8 $890 Mar 

670 58-23 Jun 

47-3 *5-11 Sea 

Est. Sates SD0 Prev.Sales 205 
Pm. Day Open InL 5601 up 13 
CERT. DEPOSIT UMMI 
SI mil ntnvegaf IWwS 
9178 |S63 Mar 9040 9068 

9120 B20 Jun 063 J92* 

9060 8388 Sea 0.12 022 

90.17 8SJ4 DM 

028 8444 Mar 

064 8863 Jun ■ 

8848 8784 S*P VM *W 

Esf-Sales 838 Prev. Sales. 1837 
Prev. Day Open InL 11686 off 237 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

nmraiomatMfUOpct. 

9128 sfi.14 Mar eau 902* 

9088 8JL49 JUtt ' 020 0JB 

WJ3 8*5 Sw W69 

087 8*80 DM 8120 88^ 

068 8610 Mar 8804 8822 

89.15 8*73 jun H7J0 086 

■it gTM Sea 04* 064 

020 SE MB MM 

Est. Sales 02S Prav.Sales *3600 
Prev. Dav Open InJJ 13.153 n»Mf2 


*132 

9063 

9034 

082 

062 

063 

028 

0.12 


78-28 

77-31 

770 


68-28 

67-a> 

00 

44- 15 

45- 4 

65-15 

*5*3 


47-17 

0 


9060 

063 

0.12 


8858 8880 00 


90.15 

020 

8867 

8820 

no* 

S7J0 

064 

025 


9134 

9Q72 

W3S 

owe 

021 

043 

025 

0.0 


790 

784 

77-15 

76-27 

74*10 

75-27 


*9-7 

487 

0-U 

44- 25 
440 

45- 25 
<8-13 
45-3 
64-21 
64-18 
*4-12 


69-11 

*8-19 

*7-28 

174 

46-23 

*44 

45-23 


9065 

021 

020 

8881 

060 

8&27 

085 


9024 

029 


■KM 

087 

065 

067 


+8* 

+J0 

+.10 

+89 

+J0 


+12 

+13 

+11 

+11 

+11 

+11 


+0 

+17 

+17 

+1* 

+14 

-fcU 

+15 

+15 

+15 

+15 

+M 


+13 

+T ? 

+11 

+11 

+11 

+n 

+n 


+.ii 

+J7 

+.15 

+.15 

+.18 

+20 

+.19 


+.10 

tli 

+.i* 

Ml 


5easan Season 
HMl Low 


Open HMi Low Close Qe. 


BRITISH POUND (M6MI 
Spot pagnO- 1 aaMaquataSUMtl 
15170 18345 Mar 18575 18*15 18300 18545 —MS 

13350 10225 Jun 18475 18S20 10405 18445 —10 

16450 18300 Sep 1040 18470 18370 18410 —170 

1-2710 18200 Dec 10*35 1O4S0 18405 18405 —140 

Esl Sates 8823 Prev.Sales 9277 
Prev. Day Open InL 242*0 ua27S 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Sper dir- 1 paint eaualasojuoi 
80® J1W Mar 2150 J71A4 .7143 JUS 

-7835 .7058 Jun 2105 2130 2103 2110 

-7505 2825 Sen 2090 JD90 -7D41 J070 

-756* J004 Dec .7035 2035 JC35 2052 

250* 6981 Mar J03B JSSS, 2040 2032 

Est Sates 2873 Prev. So les uea 
Prev. Day Open Int 12279 up 10 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Sper franc- 1 Point eauals 3080001 
..1WQ5 _ 81405. Mar 89540 _ 89540 89540 89540 JD0 
.1100 89410 Jun 8*510 89510 89510 89500 — 

.10430 JMO Sep 89470 

Ext. Sales 14 Prev.Sales 14 
Prev. Day Ooen InL 2224 
GERMAN MARK (IMM} 

s per mark- 1 point equals S00001 


-01 


-02 

—01 


388 


<110 

2881 

Mar 

2924 

2934 

2910 

2914 

—54 


9% 

IL3 

Ktjrs] 

6733 

2905 


29*5 

29*5 

2930 

2941 

—M 


4ft 

*+ 


6545 

2930 

Sep 

2981 

2988 

2968 

2973 

—a 


9% 

307 


6*10 

2971 

DK 

2010 

2012 

2995 

2005 

—55 


9% 

17+ 


6251 

JM 

Mar 




2145 

+37 

BarehmOMMMre 

10«b 1+ 



Est. Sales 1587V Prev.Sales 2US* 

Prev. Dav Open InL 45815 off 072 
JAPANESE YEN [IMM) 
s per yea- 1 poM eauals RUM0001 

0U49S 803794 Mar 803933 803B42 803830 8Q3S34 
004450 803824 Jrtl MOM* 603974 .003844 80049 

OMT® 80 38 7 0 Sep 80)910 803917 800910 80012 
004350 801905 Dec 

Est. Sales 7291 Prrv.Sales 1,182 
Prev. Dav Open inL 14632 up 307 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Sper frano- 1 point equafarMUMBl 


— 17 
—14 


035 

208 

Mar 

2431 

6*42 

200 

24Z7 

—41 

2900 

2*39 

Jun 

24** 

6475 

2451 

24*0 

—41 

4830 

2480 

Sop 

2508 

2521 

2580 

2500 

—45 

63*0 




2550 

2590 

2541 

-+1 


EsL Sales 13827 Prav.Sales I860 

Prev. Day Open HO. 29890 up 541 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CMS) 

13O000 bd. ftrSper UWbdL ft 

52^S I52S S?" '*>-m i vso 

mm 137 JO Mar 13820 13960 13420 13760 

I£!2 J" 1 H 7 " Ttrm 14230 14460 

197-50 151.10 Sep 15120 15250 14810 15220 

J25-2S JS42 l ? ov F 2 * wo i5*^ 

IffiS J 5 *-*® ■»« 1»-09 14080 15800 15950 

££» « psusrissr ^ 1<SJ0 

Prev. Dav Open lot. 860 off 94 
COTTON SOIYCE} 

SUMO lb*- cents Per Ik 


7965 

4241 

Mar 

*400 

4469 

«37&- 

*468 


*328 

MOV 

*178 

*363 

*32* 

4315* 

7965 

6325 

Jul 

*425 

*420 

CUS 

(817 

770 

600 

DO 

*40 


*445 

4475 

710 

*40 

Dec 

*462 

*895 

440 

48*3 

7375 

*4.10 


*529 


*52* 

*465 

700 

4*0 

Moy 

*40 

<40 

4850 

*870 


*7.1* 

Jul 

*875 

4874 

4875 

4*0 


Ew.sales 2800 Prev.Sales 1810 
Prev. Day Open InL 17807 up 247 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

42800 pal- cents per sal 
0225 4585 Apr 7385 7*75 

8240 4*00 Mtty 7020 7230 

7H60 *250 Jun 020 7025 

«25 4S35 Jul ■ 080 7060 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales HL794 

Prev. Day Open int 14800 off 204 
CRUDE OIL CHYME) 

1800 bbL- doiiera per bbL 


+11B 

+.M 

+50 

+1.W 

+180 


+82 

+85 


+85 

-tlO 


7870 

0.10 


7275 —81 

7130 — .M 

RL18 +69 
7020 483 


3125 

2847 

Anr 

270 

270 

285* 


— .1* 

sue 

2828 

May 

270 

2764 

2*6* 

E/ii -■ 

—.11 

29-55 

2820 

Jun 

2871 

2761 

2857 

t T t '« ■ 

—63 



Jut 




m ' ^ B 


2927 

2825 


2*0 

2*0 

280 


+63 

290 

2868 


2815 

2M0 

2815 

2*0 

+63 

290 

2449 

Oct 

2*0 

2*0 

2850 

2*0 

+0 

290 

240 

Nov 

2835 

2845 

2*65 

280 


290 

2190 

DK 

2*0 


280 

2*0 


290 

28BS 





2*0 


284* 

2844 

Feb 




280 


29+5 

2452 

Mar 




2UD 


2845 

2892 

APT 




280 



2892 

MOV 




2 (0 



240 

Jun 




2*0 


EsL Sales 


Prav.Sales 19617 





Prev. Day Open InL 58104 oil 250 


Static indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CWIE) 
points and cenU 

18555 15320 MOT 18245 183211 18185 18215 +20 

10.10 154.10 Jun KUO 1060 18585 18*25 +75 

19220 14080 Sea 19030 19025 10*20 HR45 +25 

19460 17S70 Dec 19320 19320 H1S0 194.15 +65 

Cnt .Sates 75224 Prev^Safes 72801 
Prev. Dav Open int 4*221 uutK 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
polMs and cents 

20480 148.10 Mar 20050 20165 19985 2D07S +50 

21960 17380 Jun 2K7Q 207.10 20580 20425 +18S 

TtUO 1*525 Sep 2050 2050 2050 21045 +55 

21040 2050 Dec 21*45 +160 

Est. Sales Prev-SMee £339 

Prev. Day Open InL 0672 up 62 
NYBE COMP. INDEX WYFE) 
points and cents 

10880 0820 Mar 10580 1045S 10560 10585 +25 

11080 9080 JIM mSS 10.15 W7J5 10860 +25 

11150 9125 Sea 11060 110LB0 110.15 11045 +20 

11175 101*9 Dec 11275 11275 11225 11250 +.15 

EiL Soles 15J94 Prev.sadn 147*6 
Prev. Day Open lot 12829 offSM 


Commodity Indexes 


MOOdV^L 

Reuters. 

CU. Futures. 


dose Previous 

* 9501 f 954.90 f 

203050 2024 JO 

^ . . TOJ2 120.12 

Com, Research Bureau. vi&O 239 jo 

Moody’s : base 100 : Dee. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 700 : Sep. 18, 1931. 

Dow Jones : base TOO ; Dec 31, 1974. 


■CRT; 

CMS; 

IMM: 

NYCSCfe; 
HYCE: 
COM EX: 
NYME: 
KCST: 


Market Qulfo 


Okaeo {uwtf M Trade 
Qdcoee Mera anWle Emhcmw 
IMemaitanaf Monetary WM 
OfCMoap Menantfte Exchange 

zzvgzgss-ssx? 

EF&fflSsS&Sg. 


/MM. 

Allied Irish *5 
AMedlrUfi 1*921 
Allied irlUi 17 
AlOed Irish Pm» I 
Arab Bke Core i«aci 
AMonrtcFta inf 19941 
BaCBrnnUlaLN 
BrttNazLBvwafl 
Bones DI Roma 91 
Bca DI Santa SpL 91 
PfaitoSS 
Bank Of America 0 
Bk Of Grem 91/94 
Bk Of Greece 97 
BkOf IrekmdM 
Bk Of Ireland 92 
Bk Montreal to 
BkOF Montreal N 
Bk Of Montreal 91 
Bk Of New York** 

Bk Of Nowo Scotia K/92 
Bk Of Nsra Scetki M 
not Tokyo 93 
Bk Of Tokyo If 
Bk Of Tokyo 17 
Bk Of Tokyo fefaM/91 
Bk Of Tokyo detSB/91 
BkAmsricDf* 

Bankers Trust M 
Bankers Trust*! 
Bankers Trust 94 
Bo Antae El Inves 17/91 
BSLH 
BBL 19 

Bo f Ottawa W 
Balndosuei** 

BUEM 

BFCE0 

BFCEoan 

BFCEIanU 

BFCE99 

BNP95 

BNP0 

BNPISm 

BNPSt/9* 

BNP0 
BNP0 
BNP 18/91 


Coepon Host Bid Aikd 
9% 104 00 0.99 
Hft 174 180.1410024 
9* W 085 0JS 
0% 20-5 95JS9L25 
2% 1M 00 0JI 
Oh. n-5 1000180.15 
m 66 0JI 00 
10% 2*4 IHLOSmU 
911/47+ 087 067 
9% 295 00 0.10 
10% »5 025 U02S 
9W. 9-4 

9% 1M 9845 9848 
9% U4 9830045 
9* 31-5 085 uen 

9 35-7 WJ5 10025 

9% 38+ nunsaio 

1% 214 001100 
m 304 M8541BU! 
1% 154 00 00 
Mb 384 1*08810641 
94. 117 1003518845 
11 244 HB351D0.90 

Bk 294 1DblB1D0.lt 
8* 297 00 00 
9% *4 108010048 
9* D+ 10UB10a.il 
M, 393 10OB2WU2 
11 00 00 
0ft. 25-3 1IXLSIIIUS 
9% 13-5 0.95 10085 
D 293 00TRUO 
9% 17+ 180010049 
11* 114 095 t088S 
9% 157 BUXOM 
Us, 2V3 108781080 
0* 303 ma 1910830 
0H 29-7 00 00 
Wk 304 802710832 
9% 227 00 WM 
12% iM muioojo 
9% e-8 1084*1005* 
lilt 253 00 bU 
lft. 304 00 00 
9% 13+ 10055108+5 
9% 5+ 00 00 
180 95 1DQJ 018820 
Wh, 49 1OO01QQJQ 
9% 73-7 00 00 


BarckrysOseosW 

KtaoBMoPtre 

Kino Beta 0/04 

King Beta 90 

BermtiBaikn 

Btrgnn Bank ba 88/91 

Kino Bert 9404 

Kbs Bert 0/04 

CcceH 

CcceOS 

CNCA 90795 

CNT0 

CNT91 


UK 49 00 00 
9% 125 990 00 

9% iu uasraui 

0b 291 00 1000 
9% 3V5 HO0WL15 
M 104 00 TDt/C 
9% 97 065 00 
11% 114 100201000 
9% 135 1002510835 
9K 15* 00 00 
9% 7+ 1082510835 
118 244 1002510835 
Mb U 1OO0HOJ5 


r/Mat 
□6c 05 

ClbcIVVklyl 94 
dbCM 

CwlwetS+L« 


OeuP 
□wmteal BhM 
Chemical (Wktvlh 
Qirtpionla Bk0 

Christiania w 

Citicorp (Wkiyl0WLl9H 
CUksruSertM 
CHI OCt 94 94 
CHIcora W 

Cmcere-UndaiM eerp 

Cllkom TI 

ConenenBtmk 0 

Commerzbank Nov M 

Comm urb Montreal 0 

CCFMHB 

CCF 90/95 

CCFfPDH 

CEPME 17/92 

CEPMEU 

credit Chi More M/91 

Cnsflt Fender W93 

Credit FnrExn.92 

Cr Lyon 93794 

Credit Lvonoots *7 

Credll Lvaenols 90/97 

Credi LvapMtim/W 

Credit Lwnnols«/9S 

Credll Lyonnais deeff 

CreOH Lvunnab kai92/T* 

Credit Lwnnol* tuWZ/94 

Credit Naflonal B 

Credit Nrttanal 90/91 

Credit Motional 00 

CradltanstattM 

CradltansMH9i/97 

Credtftmttall 94 

Dal icM Kanayaftl 

DooakeOlleW 

Den Norske iuw90 

DenNorskedecH 

Denmark kuMAO 

Danmark ocrtS/W 

Denmark M 

Denmark eerp 

Die EniOest 12/M 

DrsidnerBankn 

Dmdner Banks? 

DrssdnerBartkf2 

EWoradoNudearl* 

EDF0 

EDFH 

ENEL 09 

EAB93 

EAB0 

EEC 81/90 

Exftctor Inti 9* 

Fenwie 99 
Flaniin Paper 0 
First Boehm me 0/H 
First Btmk Systems H 
Fmtauconon 
FirnortcneeM 
First Cltv Texas K 
First Interstate B 
Hill 9479* 

Oen fl ntcelT 


2+9 00 00 
9% U3 0 H025 
9% IS-7 1080010810 
9% 05 0J1 00 
1% 317 00 00 
9% 5+ 00 00 
■ft, JM 1082010040 
9% 1M 0.15 00 
9W 13-5 1081010835 

n% vt 00 moo 

9% 1M 00 0.M 
Hi 193 00 00 
h 30+00 00 
9% 133 101101010 
lft. 154 00 1000 
(ft 30+ 0+5 045 
9% 214 077 *947 
Wh 20-5 U005U815 
lift, <S3 00 10005 
D 24-3 U020100JO 
C+0 9+ M840KB20 
9% 23+ 00 00 
10% »+ 1 085710047 

10 4+ 1080710817 

0ft 27+ 0JS0.fl 

12 94 Totusmxi 

9% W 00 00 

n% 11+ inustmss 

12% 2M U025UKU5 
n 9+ 1005210042 
9% 87 1001510025 

0b 295 HUB 0072 
9ft, 27+ 0J7WJ7 
9 18-7 00 990 

99b 14+ 188010057 
9 1*7 00 00 

12% 113 1000970019 
90 20+ 00 00 
t. 117 00 00 
tft. t* 3 inunmoa 
m. 274 00 00 
Wb 134 WJQ5U015 
HUB 94 IBLUnUS 
91b 134 00 1000 
9% 1+3 00 18053 

9n 97 nausnois 

1i% 154 naSme 
0* 19+ 1 08 10 10020 
*% M 00 077 
19k 19-7 00 00 
11% 04 700*10890 
9% 3-5 00 00 
K 274 00 muo 
0b 30+ 00 HUB 
1800 ZH 1006710077 
9 % »+ 00 00 
100 34 00 00 
99b 17* 070 00 
12% 24-3 100018011 
91b *7 00 00 
9ft. 2V4 00 00 
10% 204 100010815 
00 00 
99e 2*5 00 00 
9% 134 9895 0.W 
9% 74 9962 0J2 
99b 214 0.93 WQflJ 
8% 22+ 97% 97% 
99b 4+ 00 00 
Hk 157 »J3 00 

11 20+ MU2ID822 


Genflnancest'92 

Cenflnanee92/U 

GZB0 

CZB92 

GZBperp 

CZB94 

CMTB9I 

Crmokmn 

CrmdievsN 

Great WesMmFInM 

Great WestaniH 

HID Samuel M 

Hlti Samuel Pare pare 

HNsonoAmertconoK 

HydreOueaec94 

ttvare Quebec U 

ic Indntrteekl 

Itiaoneita 11793 

IBJSJ 

IBJitawH 

Ire lond 94799 

Iretcndrt 

Rea iretandM 

IHI« 

Italy l RemibUc) 0 

CUOAC7 

intvH/ti 

JJ’.Marean 199795714 -2 

KOPteWJ 

KOPmoyf3 

KemlraOvU 
KJetnutart BemenR 
Kledwart Beraon N 
Korea Dev Bk0 
Korea EwinnaeR 
UoculnW 
Ltayds 93 
Lloyds 92 
UeydsO* 

LTCBIMI9 
LTCB15 
LTCBIimn 
LTCBM 
LTCB92 
Matvnsla947D9 
Motayst o o p r002 
Malaysia decS9792 
Malaysia M793 
MMHanO/Saas « 
ManHanfWk|y)H 
Marine MkSand ta 
Marti* MMtandOt 
Marina Midland N 
Malian BbM 
Midland 93 
MUflOMtn 
Midland 92 
Midland 91 
MJdlondW 
Mitsui Fin N 
Morgan Grenfell 91 
Manoaae Dm 90/93 
Monona* Den 92 
NatBkDMreHN _ 
Nat Comm Arabia 1994 
NaflWtstmftill 
Natl Westmkin 
NatiwestnbiN 
Nanwesmmn 
Nad westmla pare 
Nate Ov 94 
New Zealand D 
Now Zealand Steel 92 
Ntoeaa Credit fik» 
NkMan Credit Bk IS 
Nloeon Credll BfcU 
Nordic int Fta 91 
OKBU 
OLB9J 


9ft, 3*+ Harnoax 

9% 271 9971 99*1 
91b 131 WO 1010020 
t% 11+ 10001000 
Wb 144 9UB00 
9fb 01 10840 1000 
f« 27-3 1006510871 

& 2*-3 U8271MJ7 
K8 00 99 95 
1 * 21-1 0.W 0X1 

9fe *+ 

Wb 774 1080510825 
91k 2S4 9*50 910 
life, 344 00 00 
9b. 22-7 00 00 
1D8K1HU3 
9ft. 15-7 075 18821 
a 94 108)511830 
M 5+ WOOtbld 
1M 2*5 10835 WU5 

12% U3 nunotn 

IWMH41IM1 
91k 10-7 064 WJ* 
Mk 274 0010825 
Wb 44 00 10801 
t2Vb 314 1082010891 
915/1+5 00 092 
/ 5 108010873 

■ft 14 074 00 
10% 94 1O875HQ0 
214 0M mra 
0b 3*5 HU.15H035 
12ft. 27-3 1U1IN82I 
U 5+ 00 100 
n 94 W3s mm 
0b 12+ 0.75 9965 
109b 304 1084310853 
99b M 1083*1080 
11% 1M 00 1000 
9% 2*7 00 1080 
10% 144 UBOOUd 
10 11+ 1083410844 

0k 17+ HB30W35 
9% 31-5 UOOIMBJt 
0b 1*+ 061 071 
12 9+ U81310827 

I* 5+ 0.95 10810 

Hft. 2*4 9947 0.0 

9ft. 394 00 00 
H% 1M 00 00 
*9b 94 0.0 1000 
9% 03 99.95 10805 
9% 183 0.0 UBM 
9ft, 3M 1081019020 
9 29-7 00 00 

99b 34+ 1003510065 
9% 74 108321086 
11 3*4 10030100 

101b. *4 00 0.0 
11% 44 H8W02O 
9. 1M 00 00 
12% IN 1083510845 
99b 19+ 00010820 
19b 2*3 00 063 
9ft, 21*12 00 00 
9ft, 1*7 00 1800 
»ft 27+ 1003SM03S 
119b U+ 1084710857 
Wb 25+ laijnoui 
nib 04 100010890 
ML 27+ 00 10805 
11% 9+ 1081510825 
9% 24+ 00 1000 
9% 13+ 00 00 
9% 2*4 00 bid 
Wb 1++ 9937 99J7 
19ft. *5 00 10025 
H% 2*5 1 08350*15 
Wb 2*5 108731080 


liwar/Mdf. 

OLB95.0 
Ottlhore Minina 91 

OKuiare MMna H 

PlreW9t79< 

Pkbmkennrfl 
Queensland M 
Rente 91 

Rural Bk ScdllondlLY! 
Soitama 91793 
Sonnet InL Fin ■ 

Sanea 94/001 
Soma InL Fla 91 
Scondfe ay tMi FlnoarW 
Scondtnovton Fin dec93 
Scettona lot Fin 92 
Seewity Pact lie 17 
Shaoenui Carpn 
5NCF0 
SEAT 1003 
5Ff.lt 

SF.E.91 

SocteiaOenerafeM/95 
Sactefe Generale 0 
Soctate Cenwafe Mar ll 
Sodete Generate nav9< 
Sorter* General 97 
SNCflfl 

Soodn iKfeadaml *2T7 
KlnadamOf Soaln93 
SMlan 
Stand Chan «0 
Stand CnartM 
Stand Chart *1 
Stand cnart morfO 
Stand Ctart para 
State Bk Of Indio *7 
Sumttomo Trust 12/94 
Sweden 91 
Sweden 10/15 
Swwten 0/94/0 
Sweden 9J7I3 
Sweden ptn> 

Talva Kobe 92/04 
Takaabil2/N 
Tokal Asia LH 9470 
Tarnato Dominion 92 
Tara Trust 92799 
TVOW/B4 
UntatBk Norway W 
United D/SeesBkM 
Wells Farao97 
WHIIam+Glvm9l 
World Bank 94 
Yokohama 91/94 
ZknfrotesoarkrmefI 


lift- u+ uuraon 
pft. *+ in woo is 

94b n-7 9173 00 
NHe :.’+ V7k tab 
9% 19+ HB0IRL41 
Me. 8] UBSMOrt 
124b 37+ HO30IB8N 
Oft 14+ 00 1IIW 
9% 5+ H836U8M 
ll*b 2*3 KROOOkl 
n 3*7 07100 
99b 19+ WO WJ2 

119b 15+0*9 1080 
9ft, 71+ 1877 NX' 
lift S3 100381080 
9ft 21+ 072 00 
9ft 75 00 00 
lft 3*4 00 092 
9ft 344 0.0 tons 
9% *4 00 10810 
99b 19+ 075 10RS 
10ft 44 1082510 125 

»% *] mannu 

12ft 1*3 1HISM87S 
HU 75 tOBStatn 
1*9 00 0.90 
Wk 2*4 10001083! 
1800 27+ 108101000 
Wb 3M 1083310a 
9ft 05 00 00 
99b 19+ UUTO80 
9U *7 1080210812 
18% 2*5 1081110821 
119b 11+ 108*510875 
H% 7-5 Mail ms 
91b 31-5 00 NB0 
9ft 12+ 061 091 
Vft 34+ 0.91 M061 
lft 1*7 9011 9814 
9% 3*5 0.15 00 
Wb 2*5 10812 10817 
91b *7 011 01* 
Mft 01 108*710817 
I2U 1*1 M813I0822 
99b 12+ MB2SID80 
«ft U+ MOJ7HXU2 
99b 14+ M8 20 MOM 
W 9+ 1800 WJS 
9ft 21+ 980 00 
9ft 39-3 99 JS 1000 
Oft 134 041051 
12% 1*3 1084510875 
4+9 31-5 98M98M 
11% 2+ 1081710827 

9ft 15-7 1084*100 


Non Dollar 


am 17 

Bb Montreal 94 
Bk Tokyo H/f0 
Bolndaeuezn 
(Xlairen/91 
ConoHdotadsaki 
CEPME 9* 

Crsdti Fonder 0 
Credit National 9U9S 
Denmark 93790 
LIJ.M 

K madam Betakwn « 
UoW»9i 

MMtaaiD 
SNCF90/93 
vorkstilre 91/94 


14% 1*5 10803012 
11% 27+ 020 990 
Mft 21-5 00 MO 
14ft 214 00 HUB 
IBft 154 00 WJt 
14% 5+ 

11% 21-3 W0 0.W 
Wb 9+ 00 00 
9% 1*3 00 00 
14% 225 M82SH83S 
139k 15+ 00 00 
MW UM 00 00 
M% 244 00 00 
lift 7-5 *9.92 taste 
12% 24+ 1083310843 
M% 27+ 00 00 


Soure* : Cnadr SulMsa-PIrtt Battan tkL 
Lo n do n 


Asian Commodities 

March 5 


HOMO-KONG COLD FUTURE5 
UJLSpor ounce 

Clow Prwrtou 
Hrtii Law Bkt Ask Bid Ask 
Mar _ N.T. N_T. 2B8H0 29000 7S9JM 291 MS 
API - 29100 29220 29000 29200 291 29100 
y - N.T. N.T. 29200 2MJM 25360 295J» 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 2WJ» 204.00 29SJM 29760 
AuB _ N.T. N.T. 299JB 3016® 300JH 302JB 
O a _ N.T. M.T. 30800 30*00 30400 30400 
Dae - 31100 31100 31000 31200 31000 31200 
Fab_ N.T. N.T. 31500 31700 31500 31700 
Volume: 22 lots of 100 az. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U06 per ounce 


Mar , 


Hrtb 

N.T. 

29130 

N.T. 


Law 

N.T. 

290.10 

N.T. 


Jun _ 

Volume: 20 lots of MO oz. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian coats par kilo 



BM 

Att 


1B93D 

1900 


Jun — — . 

1950 

1970 


Volume: 32 Ms. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Stnaenare cents par kilo 
aosa 


. . , Same 
288J0 28890 
39030 29090 
29420 29890 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
18400 1*430 

18900 100 
193JM 1W00 

19825 19*25 


RSS 1 Mar— 
RSS I Art _ 
RSS 2 Mar. 
R5S3Mor_ 
RSS 4 Mar _ 
RSS 5 Mar _ 


Bid 

14160 

1*820 

1*000 

15760 

15200 

14*25 


ARC 

1*10 

1*820 

161JH 

15850 

15800 

14825 


BU 

HI 25 
1*825 
159X0 
15760 
151 BO 
14875 


1*225 

1*875 

1*04)0 

15800 

153JWI 

14875 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MaSayslan linaatts par 25 toes 


Mar 

BM 

1620 

Ask 

1670 

BM 

1610 

Ask 

1650 


1610 

16*0 

1.10 

L240 

Mav 

1600 

160 

1.10 

160 

Jun 

1.180 

100 

1.170 

1620 

Jlv— 

1,1*0 

1610 

1.10 

160 

AuO 

1.10 

1600 

1.10 

1.10 

Sen 

LM0 

1.190 

1630 

1.10 

— __ 

UB 

1.10 

1,10 

1.170 

■«" 

1.130 

1.10 

1.120 

1.170 


volume: 0 loti of 25 Ians. 
Source: Router*. 


SAP 100 Index Opdozu 

March 5 


Ptm-unJ 

Prtte Mar MM mu Jm Mor AM Mn Jans 

155 25ft 74% — — -l/ttl/ll- 

ut n mm- - - * - 

11* 15% KM Wb - w* 1/tt % h 

in 1M IK IM IS Wt %_ % _ 1 

1» 5% M 9% Wi % 15/14 H/am 
W lft 4% M 7% 1VU29/WM 1% 
US % 577143ft Stir 5 5ft 4 7 

10 1/1* 1% • 1® 4 9% 9% 9% - 

19S - % ll/MS - 14% - - 

TWrialntamt S4» 

Tfeti ceO epee W. 701*90 
Tons pel nftsoc DUN 
TBMsat ssnMUSUB 
tedac 

HtabllUS Lsntlftf 
Spares.' CMOS. 


Out USJR+UI 


United Press latermnienai 

INDIANAPOLIS — Bi Lilly & 
Co. has muled letters to its 27,000 
shareholders asking them to ap- 
prove two measures designed to 
preven t possible takeover attempts. 
Frf g ur G. Davis, vice president of 
corporate affairs, said Monday the 
stockholder changes were a precau- 
tionary measure, since Lilly is not 
presently subject to a takeover or 
merger proposal. 


London Commodities 

March 5 

Fhwrts in starling per metric toa 
Gasoil In U .5. dollars per metric ton. 
Gold in Ui del tars per ounce. 


» 

Dec 

Mor 

MOV 

Auo 


May 

Jlv 

Sea 

Dec 

Mor 

Mav 


Hrtn Low dose P r evi ou s 
SUGAR 

MOV 12060 115J0 11760 11760 17160 12160 
12860 12460 12560 125+0 12920 1290 
13560 13200 13360 13360 13820 13860 
N.T. ILT. 13960 14000 14200 14360 
15460 15460 1546Q 155.00 15760 15720 
1*120 T SOM 15960 1001 1*260 1*360 
ILT. N.T. 1*760 17160 17160 17460 
2647 lots of 0 ton* 

COCOA 

Mar 7.197 2.147 8155 115* 2.192 2.193 
2.182 2.138 ZU5 ZUB £174 8176 
2,10 2.123 2.124 ZT25 2.154 2.154 
2.137 3.100 2.103 1105 1132 2.134 
2623 1000 2607 2608 1018 2619 
2613 1.04 1002 2603 1009 2610 
N.T. N.T. 1.995 2603 1.995 2610 
8475 lots of ID Ion* 

COFFEE 

Mar 1410 1400 1605 1401 1388 1394 
Mav 2662 1450 1454 1455 1445 264* 
Jly 1509 2694 2699 1500 2688 2687 
Sep 1542 1530 1537 1538 Z5U 1523 
NOV 2639 1530 2632 1535 ISIS 2620 
Jan 1503 2694 1500 2601 2685 26H 
Mar N.T. N.T. 1475 105 2640 140 
3JM4 lots at 5 Ian* 

GASOIL 

Mar 23175 231 25 23125 2XL50 72975 23060 
Art 22460 22125 Z2UO 22X75 22075 22160 
Mav 22160 21760 219-75 22025 21760 2170 
Jun 21860 71460 2180 2170 21 US 21460 
Jlv 21575 21475 23850 2170 21460 2140 
AUO N.T. N.T. 21800 22360 217.00 21960 
Sap N.T. N.T. 21800 22*60 21760 22460 
Oct N.T. N.T. 21860 22*60 21760 2Z760 
NOV N.T. N.T. 21860 23100 21760 23060 
3,132 leas at KB tan* 

5ourotf.- Reuters amt London Petroleum Em 
cnanoe toasoil). 


Dividends March 5 




Comp an y Per 

INCREASE 
Hotel Properties Q 

STOCK 

Inrtrchanoa 5t 8b 

USUAL 


Alfeofwav mil inc 
Anderson Clayton 
Anthony industries 
Chem lawn Core 
023.3. Inti Inc 

DWrtV (WJPrtd 

Economics Labor. 

FaxboroCa 
Grvntoi Foci Core 
Nocti Co 
MDCCarp 
Mobile Gas Servke 
N BSC Cora 
Petrolllo Caro 
Rpgan (Bratfl Inc 
Sdenflfte Com* 
unltradaCorp 
Washinoton National 
watxra lned-a 

wtabco incCH> 


Amt 

Pay 

Rec 

:d 



45 

4-tO 

3-15 

MH 

4-12 

325 

35 

M 

3-15 

-33 

4-U 

3-22 

.11 

4-7 

3-11 

smh 

4-15 

81 

32 

+15 

3-2* 

M 

4-5 

3-11 

6* 

4-15 

3-19 

6* 

3-29 

3-15 

64 

4-12 

3-1S 

0 

80 

81* 

0 

3-29 

MS 

64 

4-1 

3-15 

.19 

3-29 

M9 

30 

82* 

813 

63 

*■15 

3-19 

67 

85 

3-13 

65 

81 

3-13 

67 

81 

3-15 

65 

5+1 

MS 

64 

5+1 

5-15 


A-A ae nnL 1 M-Moothfy; O-Qoarterty; 5-Sanrt- 


ioww: UPl. 


SEC Names Chief Enforcer 

Rollers 

WASHINGTON —The Securi- 
ties and Exchange Commission an- 
nounced that Gary Lynch would 
become acting director of its divi- 
sion of enforcement, effective 
Tuesday, The previous enforce- 
ment director, John Fedders, re- 
signed Feb. 26 following media re- 
ports that he beatnis wife, 
Charlotte, during their 18 years of 
marriage. 


Paris Commodities 

Much 5 

SuBor In French Francs per metric ton. 
Otner frtu ra in Franaptr TOO kg. 



KM 

Lew 

Close 

cn*M 

SUGAR 





Moy 

1444 

1420 

1433 

1425 

— 7 

Alia 

1J25 

1610 

1612 

1615 

+ 2 

DO 

167* 

1670 

16*4 

1670 

+ 1 

DK 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1615 

14+5 

— 17 

Mar 

W43 

1.735 

US 

1635 

— 3 

MOV 

1695 

160 

1695 

-5 


Est. wo).: 1650 lots of 50 ion* Prev. actual 
sates: l+Bi lac* Own interest: 28989 
COCOA 

Mar 2605 1380 1371 2682 — 14 

MOV 1373 1341 1345 1346 — 23 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2J15 — —IS 

Sen 1320 2620 1310 2620 —15 

Dec 1190 1190 1175 1195 -15 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 1178 —id 

MOV N.T. N.T. — 1165 — 15 

Est. voL: 10 lets of 10 ion* Prev. actual 
sates: 30 tot* Ooen Interest: 165ft 
COFFEE 


Mar 

2405 

3400 

2407 

2412 

+ 21 

MOV 

24*5 

24+5 

2445 

24*5 

+ 5 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

240 

2615 

+ 20 

See 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2625 

2.750 

+ 27 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2622 

2650 

+ 42 

Jan 

N.T. 

N-T. 

2+75 

2625 

+ 15 

Mar 

N-T. 

N.T. 

24*7 


+ 12 


E it. vuL : 8 tort of S ion* Prev. actual rates : 
8 lot* Open interest: 141 
Source: Bourse t/u Commmrco. 


DM Futures Options 

March 5 

W. Cam MorUKM aorta, orti per mart 


Price 

MOT 

Jan 

Seat 

Mar 

Jaa 

Sect 

70 

1.15 

169 

tro- 

061 

841 

0*2 

29 

831 

117 

162 

817 

879 

on 

0 

nm 

871 

163 

8*9 

169 

141 

31 

801 

041 

0+9 

10 

LH 

£11 

32 

801 

822 

0*2 

2+t 

262 

£0 

33 

001 

812 

843 

31* 

2*1 

W7 


Estimated total raL 4674 
Cafl* Man. raL 1349 earn krt. *40* 
Pets: Man. nL 16*4 open tef.ZUJ? 
Source: CMS. 


Cash Prices March 5 


Commodity and Unit 


Toe 


Coffee 4 Santa* to 10 

Prliricioni 44/30 38 Vt.vti— . 0J0 


Year 

Abo 

162 


Steel billets (Pitt,). ton 47360 45360 

Iren 2 Fdry. Wllti*. Ian 21360 21360 

Steel scrap No 1 hw Pitt. „ 79 *0 kb-im 

Lead Sool. lb — — 18-21 24-21 

Conner elect, to .. 4 *-a 7 *9«b-r3 

Tin (Smuts), lb 55349 84M2 

Zinc E. SI. L. Ban* lb 045 osa 

PanodliMn. az 115-118 IS 

Sliver n.y.dx — 8*75 HUB 

Sourew: AP. 


London Metals March 5 

Ptoures In sterlino per motile ton. 
Sltoor in ponce pot Uw ounce. 


Today Pmtoas 
Hlah orada Conner cathadas: 
snot 161150 168350 167*60 1677.00 
3 month* 1600 1J0060 1J9S60 169S0 
Conner cathodes: 

■not 167360 167560 167060 167160 
3 monthi 16*460 169560 169060 169260 
Tin: spot 1819560 1060060 1814560 111 MLOO 

3 months 10615601062060181*5601817060 
LCOd.-nol 32860 32825 32150 3290 
3 months 33*60 33*50 3370 31800 
Zinc: snot HUB 84260 82560 82760 

3 months 8140 11560 1100 *110 

Silver: Spat 5330 5340 5T760 S2800 

3 months 5520 552.75 5450 5470 
Aluminium : 

wot 162*0 162*0 161760 16170 
3 months 16*20 16*100 16540 16540 
N level: mat 46*50 46500 46550 *6*50 
3 months 46850 4+9060 46050 46100 
Source: Rmiterj. 


WHAT ARE THE EXPERTS SAYING? 
READ 

WAUSTRHT WATCH 
BYHJWARDRORHBaCm 
IN EACH THURSDAYS MT 


-ADVERTISEMENT- 


BOTANICALS 


131 9J- Coriander 

-90 

3-8 

1-2 

28 

3 

23 

+ 50 

71 j 62 Angelica 

6-0 

8-6 

7 

69 

702 

80 

+ 9* 

361 18 Oms 

■88 

3-7 

542 

24 

65* 

93 

+ 26* 

24J 12 Juniper 

-40 

3-0 

no 

134 13 

562 

+ 432 

56 25} Licorice 

9-3 

16 

69-6 

17 

12* 

67 

+ 44* 

67J 12 Lemon Peel 

■90 

56 

132 

56 

23 

110 

+ 87 

38* 15* Almonds 

7-5 

67 

56-3 67 

40 

567 

+ 517 

231 I3J Cassia Bark 

■50 

6-8 

72 

822 231 937* 

+964 


Source: Any discerning bar in Europe. 

An encouraging end to the day with ail 
Botanicals showing strongly. 

The news of the Cabinet's new open 
door policy pushed Dry Martini cocktails 
in front of the gilt edged Gin & Tonics, 

Though somewhat surprised by this 
advance, the market remained calm. 

D. F. Glien burger Jr. of Glien burger, 

Glienburger & Glien burger commented 
“We are shaken, but not stirred.’' 

In general, spirits were raised by the 
performance of Bombay Gin. It's unique 
distillation keeps one amused. 



LLItll UWdklM 






** 


Page 16 



PEANUTS 










_ 




27 

20 

20 

30 


□ 



5* 


J 

■ 

IT 

33 

84 

36 





1 

38 




■ 

40 

37 




38 





38 



1 





41 




■ 

42 




43 





44 



■ 

40 





48 







47 

48 



m 

48 





50 

51 





52 


83 


54 

80 

B0 

67 

60 




1 

B8 


80 

81 







02 




03 





1 

04 




« 




00 





87 





, ACROSS • 

Z Ukrainian 
saint 

5 Fossil resin 
10 City on the 
Jumna 

14 Meager 

15 Guileless 

18 Percolate 
17 Expressed 

regrets 

19 Inflection 

20 Poe's lost 
maiden 

21 Marked by 
misfortune 

23 Expression of 
sorrow 
28 Eager 
27 Gen. 

MacArthur's 
companion 
32 And so forth: 

Abbr. 

35 Profit 
38 Coffee 
containers 

37 Minor 

38 Reveille 
instrument 

39 Pose 

48 Clutches 

41 Wings for 
■ Amor 

42 List of choices 

43 Former 
Broadway hit 

44 NASA 
vehicle's unit 

45 Gallic gala 


47 Russia’s 

Industrial 

Area 

49 Proofreader’s 
word 

50 Velasquez 
subject 

53 Outburst 

58 Float 

59 Haiti and the 
Dominican 
Republic 

82 French 
girlfriend 

63 Alliance 

64 Related 

65 Post 

86 First British ■ 
settlement in 
India 

67 Hazard 

DOWN 

1 Iridescent gem 1 

2 Run easily 

3 Sugar’s Alice ' 

4 Woody’s son 

5 State 

University, 

Tex. 

6 Juin 


7 Show- 

8 Twain’s" 

Diary" 

9 Railway 
porters 

16 Houston player 
11 Author of 
“Indiana” 


12 Clair or Coty 

13 Imitated 

28 Delphi resident 

22 Mature 

24 Maltreats 

25 Dashes 

27 Plot 

28 Small egg 

29 Tatterdemalion 

36 Longest river 

31 Understand 

Innately 

33 Leg bone 

34 One of the 
Jones boys 

37 Composer of 
“Rule, 
Britannia” 

40 Founder of 
eugenics 

42 Peculation- 
study pioneer 

45 Forbid 

46 Syria, Lebanon 
and neighbors 

48 Judged 

56 Retirement 
funds, for short' 

51 Appoint 

52 Hokkaido 
aborigine 

54 Pinocchio, e.g. 

55 Father of the 
Mldgard 
serpent 

56 Some Ivy 


57 Sudden pull 

60 Title for a 
baronet 

61 Ky. bluegrass 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maledta. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 





Unscramble these (our Jumbles, 
one tetter to each square, to farm 
(bur ordinary words. 


I LUGYL 


n 

n n 



I THAT SCRAMBLE) WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 

I’m not putting up with thlsi|^ 

it 


ADDIE 


ZD 

_U 


SEMQUO 



_ 

_n 



TUGONI 


| 

| 



HOW THE OLC? 
CURMUP&BOU 
! STALKEC? OUT OF 
I THAT RESTAURANT. I 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer here: in A ( X XXI 1 X J 


Yesterday's 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Atbans 

Barcetona 

Belgrade 

-Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copen haven 

casta Del sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frank fart 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las paimas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Mu nidi 

Nice 
Oslo 

Parts 


(ArtSwere tomorrow) 

Jumbles: DAISY FLAME CRAVAT MEASLY 
Answer What a practical |oker does— 

AIMS TO TEASE 


WEATHER 


HIGH 
C F 
16 61 
9 * 
13 55 

15 99 
W SI 
B 66 

9 68 

5 61 

6 63 
1 36 

16 61 
I 66 
B 66 

10 SO 

11 53 
6 39 

•S 23 
ID 50 
19 66 
16 57 
ID 50 
V 48 
9 68 
■ 5 23 
4 3* 
13 SS 
-2 28 
10 50 
3 37 
3 37 
13 55 
.1 JD 
8 66 
IS 54 
3 37 
3 36 
9 48 


LOW 
C F 


ASIA 


Bonskok 
Beilins' 
Hoag Knng 

Mwrtlo 

HewoeiM 

Seoul 

Shanghai 


Talael 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

turners 

Cairo 

Cape Town 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Logos 
Nairobi 
Tonis 


HIGH 
C F 
32 90 
3 37 
IB 64 

a 82 

32 90 
3 37 

6 63 
28 82 
IS 99 

7 65 


LOW 
C F 
22 72 
■ 9 U 
14 57 
22 72 
17 63 
-3 27 

4 39 
74 IS 
14 52 

5 41 


13 55 

17 63 
22 72 
16 61 
28 82 
30 86 
28 82 

18 64 


8 46 

9 68 

14 57 
16 61 
16 61 
27 81 


LATIN AMERICA 


B oenos Aires 
Lima 

Mexico city 

Rio ae Janeiro 
Saa Paulo 


32 90 20 68 fr 

26 77 22 72 cl 

28 82 0 46 lr 

30 16 23 73 O 

— — ra 


NORTH AMERICA 


Atlanta 

Boston 

Ckicooo 


cl 


tr 


Detroit 

HoaoMa 

Houston 

Los AaaeMS 


Reirk lav He 

Rome 
Staddiaim 
Strasbourg 
Venice 
Vienna 
Warsaw 
Zurich 

MIDDLE EAST 
Ankara -I 30 

Beirut J* $1 

Damascus IT « 

Jerusalem » « 

TelAvlv »8 « 

OCEANIA 

A iwk lumt 24 75 

-sssir— » 

stvsbowers; sw-snow. st-stormy. 


Montreal 


30 -4 
79 21 

to 
8 
22 
■ID 
-17 
20 


New York 
So* Francisco 


Toronto 

Washington 


•I 
26 

22 72 

16 61 

20 82 

-5 23 

.15 5 

27 81 

11 53 4 

12 54 7 

7 45 1 

■ 3 27 -B 

16 61 7 


Cl 


lr 


r,?-% c seouL?F3“' fc J-~« I 37 r^ , i«-rii PORE: Sh,rmv ' 

«jr 2 St 86 - J71TOKYO: FdgOV. Toma. 7-5 (45-411. 


UJMY DOES THE CONDUCTOR 
NAVE THAT STICK, MARGE? 


THAT'S A BATON. SIR... 
ME USES IT TO LEAD 
THE ORCHESTRA... 




Thev' All seem pretty 
WELL-BEHAVED TO ME.. 



BOOKS 


=f 


BLONDIE 



ONE THING LEADING TO 
ANOTHER 

Bv Sylvia Townsend Warner. 

199 P p. $14.95. 

Viking 40 west 23d Street, 

New York, N. Y. 10010. 

Reviewed by Isabel Colegate 

T HE NEW YORKER magazine published 
144 of Sylvia Townsend Warner’s stories or 
autobiographical pieces between 1936 and 
1976; she died in 1978. Bom is 1893, she was 
the only rfrilrf of a home master at Harrow 
school and his r ather formidable wife; she grew 
up into a person of lively, independent mind 
and an agreeable sense of humor. She' lived 
most of her life with another woman, whom 
she loved steadfastly through successive vicis- 
situdes of heart and health. Her first 'enthusi- 
asm was for muse; she was about to set off for 
V ienna to pursue her studies under Arnold 
Scbduberg when World War I broke out. 

She spent many years helping to edit the 
Oxford University Press 10-volume edition of 
Tudor church music, and living in London in 
fairly penurious circumstances. Through 
sculptor Stephen Tomlin, whom she had 
known as a Day at Harrow, she met David 
Garnett who encouraged her to find a publish- 
er for her first book of poetry and then for her 
first novel, “Lolly Wfflowesr which was pub- 
listed by Chatto and Windus in 1926. It coo- 
tains many of the dements to be found in her 
later stories — the interference on a thoroughly 
down-to-earth haste of supernatural powers; 
the quirky sense of humor, the impatience with 
every kind of pompousness and pretension; the 
fierce spirit of independence; the sympathy 
with the unconventional, the ne g lected and the 
scorned. Lolly WiHowes becomes a witch, sell- 
ing her sod to the devil in the process, and 
r emains well satisfied with her bargain. 

Most of her best stories werepublished in 
bo<A form in her Hferime. “One Thing Leading 
to Another” is the second posthumous volume, 
and there are moments when the light of her 
invention seems to be burning lower than usu- 
aL Where she uses recurring characters — the 
meticulous Mr. Edom of the Abbey Antique 
Galleries and his eager assistant Mr. Collins, or 
the inconsequential Mrs. Finch, whose Sights 
of conversational fancy lead to bizarre misun- 
derstandings — there are indications that they 
may be be ginning to bore her, and her treat- 
ment of them is sometimes a little perfunctory. 
In her 80s she discovered a new source of 
material; the last four stories in this volume are 
concerned with the Kingdom of F-fHn. “It is 
such a relief to escape from the human heart,” 
she wrote in a letter; and again, “I have been 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 

ImTaTI 


□BODD □□□□ 
DO □□□013 □□□□ 
0E3I3DaDG33nEaD3l3a 

□□□osna Qnaasnn 
□□□ □□□□ 
□EHD3 □□□ 3D3 


back in Qfhame again. . - - This one is abo? 1 ¥ 
Jhfdeatb of Tiphaine and estabfefosttet £ 
was she who beguiled Thomas of EiaMo*^ 

though for tte purposes the 

ing is 50-50. It is ratter beuxrtful andhas ia 
great deal of information about Eifbame and 
unknown till now as I havejust invented il Ufc 
how I long to rive it learned footnotes, so 
referHK*LThere is such heartless happiness m 
scholarship.” . r , , 

Every thing that she wrote bears the nrm 
imprint of her personality, and is convm'ed in 
the clean, dear prose of a true lover of 
writing and good reading. It is good to have 
these stories gathered together, and to be: able 
to hope that they will not only please Sylvia 
Townsend Warner's old adnurere. but also 
attract new readers. 


'ar- 

Washington Post. 


I 


ry,” wrote this review for 


BEST SELLERS 


The No* York Itas 

ThgfiMistMscdt»iq><TOljgpnkMcih3B2JOO hc»AtM ro 

Uumgfeautjhe Untied Stales. Weeks on let are w* wrassarUj 
consecutive. 

ncn0N w*. 

w«t 


Tkta 

VhA 


IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney 
Shddoo 


6 

-.4 

16 


2 GLITZ, by Ehnon: Leonard 

3 THE SICILIAN, bv Mario Pnzo 

4 THE TALISMAN, by Stephen Kmg and 

Peter Straub — — •'* 

5 SO LONG. AND THANKS FOR ALL 


THE FISH, by DongU* Adams 
THE LIFE AND HARD TIME5 OF HEI- 
DI ABROMOWTTZ. by loan Rivas 

THE FINISHING SCHOOL, by Gofl 

Godwin — — 

THINNER, by Ridunl Bachman 

MOSCOW RULES, by Rabat Moss --- 
SEE YOU LISTER ALLIGATOR. by Wil- 
liam BocUey Jr. 

LOVE AND WAR. byJotm Jakes _ — 
ILLUSIONS OF LOVE, by Cynthia Free- 

"... ANDTaDIEs " of THECLUBTby 

Helen Hooven Santmyer 

MEXICO SET. by Leo Ddghion 

THE FOURTH PROTOCOL, by Freder- 
ick Forsyth 

NONFICTION 

IACOCCA: An Autobiography, by Lee la- 

cooca with Wffliani Norik — 

LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Buscag- 

lia — ... — 

CITIZEN HUGHES, by Mkhae) Dnnsan 
SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 

Evan S. Connell — — — •- 

BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 
iN. Shevchenko . 


12 

W 

**■ 

.'.4 


10 14 


14 


38 
.- t 


it hi In Mi In i i In hi 


BdQnaananaHaaaa 

tuoaaaa aan □□□ 

□□□ □SHJIUQ 


IEIBISIE HM 

ElClOlNHTlElA 


EEonaHa □□□□as 
□□□□SBaanaariaan 

□anas □□□□ 

EESE □□□□□ □□□□ 


3/e/as 


BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Richard Bach 

P I ECES OF MY MIND, by Andrew A. 

AUG^lfavf THEAtnC bya^SBwr- 
stem 


MOSES THE KITTEN, by James Hanoi 
aids Texkri - 
4GE.by Dcn- 


“THE GOOD WAR. " by Studs Terkri - 
THE COURAGE TO CHANC 


nis Wboley , 

HEY. WATT A MINUTE, 1 WROTE A 
BOOfUbyJahn Madden «lh Dave Ander- 
son : ' 

THE SEVEN MOUNTAINS OF THOM- 
AS MERTON, by Michael Mon 

DR- BURNS' PRESCRIPTION FOR 

HAPPINESShy Georae Brans ... 

THE LIVING PLANET, by David Atten- 
borough - — 


13 2V 


1 TR 

2 27 

3 4 

4 12 
- •' l 

5 .*> 

10 ‘25 

6 U9 

7 21 
9 .20 

11 ,.3 

8 24 
W. 3 

12 17 


t 


i 


— i 


ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

WOMEN COMING OF AGE. by Jane 

Fonda with Mignon McCarthy — 1 13 

WHAT THEYDONT TEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by 

Marie H. McCormack 


NOTHING DOWN, by Roben a Alien 
TCHERS QUICK START 
>K. by 


Jean Ni- 


WEIGHT WA 
PROGRAM COOKBOOi 
dereb 

THE ONE MINUTE SALES PERSON, 
by Spencer Johnson and Lany Wilson — 


■ 

.-r'J* 


■■■*■= 


.'"sf.:' 





BRIDGE 


GARFIELD 


CAN WE 5AM 1 KISSED VOU 1 
tknno mfiUT7i — 


IF WE CAN SAM 
I SLAPPED YOU 



By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal 
West considered an on or- 
thodox lead. If the opponents 
bid four suits, the last of them 
tends to be the weak link, so he 
was determined to lead spades. 
But which spade? 

He thought about the ten 
and thought about the six but 
finally settled for the orthodox, 
three. As il timed out, his first 
thoughts were best, for the 
three blocked the suit in a fatal 
fashion. 

South played the seven from 
the dummy ^nd captured the 
eight with the ace. He then 
established diamonds, and 
when West took the ace he led 


the spade ten. Bus was cov- 
ered by the queen and king, 
leaving West’s six spot as a 
liability. The play was still 
tricky, but there was no way 
for the defense to take more 
than f oar tricks agains t careful 
play by Sooth. 

. But if West had led the ten 
or the six, the three would have 
crane into its own eventually, 
allowing East to score the J-5 
over dummy's nine. That 
would gjve the defense three, 
spade tricks, the diamond ace 
and cither a heart or a dob. 

West’s team did not, howev-' 
er, lose on the transaction. In 
the replay North was the de- 
er in the: 


had no trouble after a spade 
lead from file East position.. 

NORIK 

♦ Q972 
9AS 

b KQJ 43 * 

.*17 

EAST 

*KJB9 . 
97SS 
O US5 
♦ Q04 
SOUTH (D) 

♦ A 4 
9Q10B4 

♦ a a 

4> A K3 3 2 

North and Sooth wmm vahwrahle. 

Thu M 6n i^ | . 

tort Wort North Eatt . 

1* . Fn 1 0 Fan 

17 Paw IB Pan 

iN.r. poos SN.T. pan 


WEST 
BUSS 
OKJS2 
O A72 
BUBS 




darer in the »»nn contract and wok m tt» q»de three. 


W)rid Stock \brkete 

Via Agence France-Presse March 5 

dosing prim in local currencies unless otherwise indi c at ed. 


| Atenha | 


aoM 

Pr«if. 

ABN 

39650 

400 

ACF Holding 

19850 



182 

18! 


11050 

111.10 


22150 

21*50 

AMEV 

21120 

21050 

A’Dam Rub 

7.70 


Am ra bank 

75.10 

7450 

BVG 

22550 

226 

ftmhrmmi T 

90 


CctandHIda 

35.70 

3550 

EImvIbt-NDU 

11180 

11150 

Fokker 

100.90 

loam 

Girt Brocades 

187 

18650 


1S7.70 

15650 


6250 

6! 


61 

6220 

N Darden 

4950 

49 JO 

Nat Nrdder 

369 

268 

Nodlloyd 

17750 



30550 

30650 


*750 

*8 

Philips 

6130 

6350 


7720 

7740 


13950 

139 JO 

Rolineo 

7040 

7050 

Rorenta 

4450 






145 

336.90 

Von Omme ran 

27.90 

27 JO 

VMF Stark 

145 

145 

VNU 



ANP.CBS Geooral Index r7B4M 

previous 1K8 




Brussels 



1730 

1750 


5450 

5300 

Cockarlll 

284 


Cobeaa 

3500 



3000 

2970 

GB-litao-BM 

3060 

3050 


2195 

2160 


4330 


Hoooken 

5970 


intercom 



Kredletaank 



Petrollno 


7150 



2000 


7930 

7740 

Salvav 

4385 

4300 

Trod tan EtaC 




N-A. 


1760 

NA 

Vlellle Manlaone 

5070 

5800 

Current stack index : 228944 
Previous : 2270.12 

| Frankfurt 



AEG-Teietunkefi 

Allianz Van 

Bart 

Bavor 

BaverJ-hroa 

Bay or. Ver Book 

BMW 

Commerzbank 

Conttaummi 

Daimler-Benz 

Do * u * ,a 

Deulsene Babcock 
OmihM toil 

Dreidner Bonk 

DUB-Scliuttic 

CUM 

HOCtltief 

MOKttrt 

HCOKll 

Halzmonn 

Horton 
KOI I + SOU 
Karrtadl 
Koufhol 


11380 11380 
1030 1030 

209A0 30980 
214 71380 
313 314 

230 XU 
286 B4 
163 165.70 
13080 13180 
673 SO UV30 
350 360 

16880 ITS 
J1IL50 673 
19180 19380 
718 716 

IS8J0 14050 
461 666 

20*^0 710 

10050 11050 
406 «S 
171 I7D50 
265 249 

c’850 2I8J0 
714 215 



K.HD 

268 27050 

Ktoeckner Werke 

75.40 

7750 

KniPO Slohl 

6350 

80 

Unde 

420 42650 


I9S50 


MAN 

163 

165 

Ma nnesmann 

15840 16070 

MetaltamellSChof 


238 

MuenclLRueck 

1215 

1250 


260 26140 

RsietaervWerke 

339 

M3 

PWE 

153 

15» 

Sdierlno 

473 

472 

Siemens 

54850 56350 


10250 103.10 

varta 


VbOQ 

1*950 17050 

VEW 

12250 12250 

Vo Ikswnoemxe rk 

198 

197 

Commerzbank Index : 1.195.18 

| Previous : 1J87J0 



11 HongKoog I 


25.90 


Cheung Kona 

1X50 

1190 

Chtna Ub« 


1450 

Cress Harbor 



Hano Sens Bank 

46JS 

4*75 

HK Electric 

740 

755 




HK Land 

450 


HK Shanghai 

840 


HK Telephone 

6550 


HKVbhori 

540 

570 

Hutch Whampoa 

20 JO 


Jardine Math 

•40 


Jar dine Sec 

9J0 

10 

New World 

550 

590 

Shaw Bras 

3.10 


SHK Proas 

9 

9J5 

Slme Darby 

645 

640 

Stelux 

1.70 


Swire Pacific A 

21.90 


Wheel Mar 

12S 


wneetock 

7J5 

7J0 

Winsor 

450 

450 

World Inti 


159 

Han* seav Index 


Previous : 139944 



j 

t 

1 

AECI 



Anglo American 



Anglo Am Gala 

16QCO 





Blyvoor 









Drtetaniein 

4850 


E 1 arrets 

1340 





Harmony 

2610 

2615 




Kloo* 









Rustalot 



SA Brews 



51 Helena 






West Holding 



STyK^{3S , “* ,,: ’ w - n > 

1 Loadra \ 

AA Coro 



AlltflO-Lyons 

177 


Anota Am Gold 



Bobcock 



Borctays 









Seecham 




733 



42 

40 


BOC Group 


Bovmter Inaui 
BP 

Bril Home St 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Burma h 

Cadbury Sctrvr 

Charier Cans 

Coats Pntans 

Cam Gold 

Courtaulds 

Doloefr 

De Beersa 

Distillers 

Drlefantetn 

Dunlop 

Fbons 

Free SiCed 

GEC 

CKN 

Glaxo t 

Grand Met 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawt-er 

ICI 

inn 

1. lords Bonk 

Lonrtia 

Lucas 

Marks and So 
Metal Bo» 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 
Pllklnatan 
Plessev 
Racol Elect 
Randtantoln 
»Onx 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
Roval Dutch t 
bt; 

Shell 

STC 

Sid Chartered 
Tan and Lrle 
Tescn 
Thorn EMI 
T.l. Drove 
Trotaluar Hse 
TMF 

Ultramar 
Unilever [ 

United Biscuits 
Vickers 
WDeeo 
W.Moldmas 
War Loan 3^ t 
Wool worth 

ZCt 


Clew 

293 

160 

766 

541 

267 

1ZJVJ 

664 

2D9 

168 

aa 

156 
487 
159 
501 
463 
28* 
S2T • 
4SVj 
298 
I2IN- 
190 
213 
119/22 
271 
344 
709 
213 
629 
069 
189 
566 
146 
244 
137 
413 
359 
452 
298 
178 
210 
sun 

349 

546 

340 

491% 

436 

774 

198 

689 

465 

227 

667 

334 

666 

158 

323 

12-3 

195 
255 
S34*. 
CAV3 
36 Vs 
576 
17Vj 


147 

266 

530 

243 

12017 

662 

207 

168 

200 

156 
694 

157 
501 


523 V, 

45 

298 

ES*. 

196 

211 

119/33 

28S 

265 

707 

211 

637 

846 

192 

539 

167 

766 

137 

413 

349 

464 

295 

in 

204 

564 

152 
S44 
357 
49 7/46 
AT 
746 
196 
492 
445 
228 
667 
232 
462 
156 
no 
11 9,32 
203 
253 
535 
526 W 
35 
568 
!7Vr 


OH* 

Stria 2814 

Standa 11750 

Mediobanca Index : 1,179 
Frertoo s -List 

Prey 

2786 

11750 

| Prtrfs 

Zl 

Air Uqulde 

634 

635 

Aisttiom All. 

249 34950 

Av Dassault 

1090 

1120 


574 

57* 

BIC 

564 

557 

Bouroues 

648 

*49 

B5N-GD 

2400 

3434 

C amfour 

7*20 

1908 

Club Med 

1181 

1195 

Call meg 

266 

265 




CH-Aoultalne 

240J0 24080 

Europe 1 

1015 

m 

Gen Eaux 

567 

553 

Hotrtette 

1785 

1830 

1 metal 

8450 

BSJO 

LatorgoCoo 

41950 

422 

Leorand 

2071 

2075 

rOreal 

2374 

2401 

Metro 

1670 

1679 

Michel In 

857 

8«7 


89 

8960 

It. 1 ." 

I960 

1935 

Moulinex 

113 

Li>.' 11 

Word- E st 

7950 

7950 

Occldetrtale 

762 

768 

Pernod Rlc. 

72* 


Pelroles tfse) 

273 

267 

Peugeot 

277 579.90 

PotJaJn 

50 

4950 

Prlntimos 

200 

199 JO 

RotUotecBn 

266 26550 

Reaaure 

1270 





5k ts Rassignol 

1970 

I960 

Saur.Perrler 

533 

535 

Tetemecon 

2380 


Thomson CSF 

501 

SOI 

Valeo 

234 

235 

Aoefl Index : 20450 
Previous : 26176 


CAC Index : 2S440 
Previous : 2U440 


1 Shs&tm 

Zl 

Beu stood 

1 JO 

152 

Cold Storage 

2.72 

2.71 




FraserHeave 



Haw Par 

2149 


inehcooe 

270 


Keuael Stria 

153 


Mai Banking 

6.15 


OCBC 

955 

953 




Semb Shleyord 

IJ9 


Slme Dartov 

255 


S Sleamshio 

ITS 


St Trading 

454 

458 


4 A3 

452 

QUO Index : 42857 

Previous : 429.17 


1 Stockholm 

Zi 

AGA 

375 

370 

Alta Laval 

191 



Y ttUn 


Bunco Comm 
Controls 
Ctoahoiels 
Cred Hal 
Form Hal la 
Flat 

F Insider 
Generali 
IFI 

Itolcementl 

Mediobanca 

Manledison 

Dtjyetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlmncanie 

SIP 


1805D 13000 

3300 3160 

8200 7840 

2140 2135 
11850 11800 
2799 3700 
52 53 

39140 39105 
7J7S 7405 

83000 81550 

85000 85380 

1673 1470 

4499 *7*0 

2190 2172 
67400 67140 

W&25 444 

3011 2060 



Clew Prey. 

Asea 

345 

37S 

Astra 

360 

£ 

Atlas Coocn 

1B8 

Bdldetr 

186 

190 

Electrolux 

312 



299 

Esseite 

NA 

J85 

HondBli&ken 

167 

170 

Pharmacia 

215 

211 

Soab- Scania 

440 

450 

Sandvlk 

ila. 


Skanska 

945 

96 

SKF 

210 

212 

SvrrdtshMatctl 

232 

232 

valve 

286 

267 

Aftorsvarkten index 1 39850 

PtavlOOl : 39850 




1 Sy**ej | 

ACI 

193 


ANI 


ANZ 

460 

460 

BHP 

56* 

564 

Borol 

329 

322 

Bougainville 

197 



370 



384 


Coma Ico 

260 

265 


580 

580 




Dun Ion 

232 

230 

Elders lx] 

315 

314 

Hooker 

200 

203 

Magellan 

AN 144 

235 

2? 

Mver 



Ookbrtdgg 

72 

74 

Peka 

Poseidon 

400 

300 

3$ 

RGC 


415 

Santas 



Slelgtr 

173 

■175 

South land 

22 

27 

WoodsJde 

81 

01 

Wormaid 

317 

315 

AO Ordinaries Index 

•7*851 


Source: Reuters. 



1 T «*y 1 


Akol 

ASBhi Chem 
Asa hi Gksss 
Par* ol Tokyo 
BrldOestWJe 
Canon 
Cl loti 

Del Nippon Print 
Dotwa House 
FullBanT^ 
Full Photo 
Fulllsu 

Hitachi 

Honda 

IHI 

Japan Al r unes 
Kollmo 
Konsai Power 


511 

831 

■98 

760 

517 

1470 

334 

1040 

545 

1630 

1930 

1340 

870 

1510 

152 

5170 

274 

1340 

060 


I 

747 

520 

1470 

338 

1010 

554 

1430 

1950 

'SS 

1550 

151 

5350 

274 

1350 

845 


| Ciese 


Kawasaki steel 

146 

145 

Kirin Brewery 

585 

581 

Komatsu lid 

450 

450 

Kubota 

319 

321 


1680 

1690 

Malsu Elec. Works 

715 

728 

Mitsubishi Bonk 

1570 

1570 

Mitsubishi Chem 

425 

429 

Mitsubishi Elec 

388 

380 

Mitsubishi Heavy 

248 

250 

Mitsubishi Corp 

524 

523 

Mitsui and go 

327 

329 

AMtsukaehl 

438 

440 

Mitsumi 

1190 

NA 

NEC 

riw 

1180 

NlkkoSec 

740 

710 


149 

189 


741 

242 


609 

412 

Nomura Sec 

1190 

1170 

Olympus 

1320 


Ricoh 

919 

906 


1070 

1070 


4880 

5020 

Sumitomo Bank 

I81B 

1820 


JB7 

202 

Sum 1 tamo Metal 

145 

146 


200 

199 

Talsho. Marine 

413 

414 

ToksdaChem 

NA. 

875 

Tallin 

432 


Tokyo Elec Power 

1560 

1580 

Tokyo Marine 

827 

840 


470 

452 

ToshKra 

419 

419 


1350 

1380 

YomoMMSec 

715 

685 

I MBdCOMXJ. iBdCJlt T147658 

Previous : njofj 



New Index: 98455 



Prevleni: 99U9 



li Zoridh II 

Ad la 

020 

NA 



3700 

Brawn Bovert 

1740 

1700 

ObaGetav 

JBSff 

2080 

Credit Sutseo 


339 

Electro watt 

2693 

2660 

Georg Fischer 

745 

755 

Interdiscount 

1830 

NA 

Jacob Surtrard 

6325 

6300 

jet mall 

1970 

I960 

Landis Gvr 

1700 

169S 

Nestle 

6540 

6600 

Oerilkon-B 

1505 

1495 

Roche Babv 

8650 

■600 



8150 

Schindler 


3000 

Sutler 

3S5 

310 

SBC 


360 


1180 


Swiss Reinsurance 

9600 

NA 

Swiss Vdksbonk 

1490 

1490 

Union Bank 

3685 

3670 

Winterthur 


4250 

Zurich ins 

20650 20550 

SBC Index : 43520 



Previous : 494.18 






available.- xd: ex-dlvidend. j 


U.S. Car Sales Rise 2,6% in February 

United Press fnienarionol 

DETROIT — Six automakers in the United States reported Tuesday a 
16-percent gain in sales last month for the best February since 1979. 

The six companies. General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co., Chrysler 
Corp- Honda Motor Corp.. American Motors Corp. (which is 46-peicenl 
owned by the French automaker Renault) and Volkswagen of America 
reported combined sales of 645 J 17 can in the United Slates last month. 
This compares with 655.016 units in the same period a year ago. 

Arvid Jouppi. an independent researcher, raid there was a shortage of 
113 million cars going into the 1984 period and that auto makers have 
been been making up Tor il 


MarchS 


Canadian stocks riaAP 


1000 Baton A f 

SI 43 Bonanza R 
13000 Bratarrw 
100 Bramalea 
300 Brenda M 
6166 BCFP 
18810 BCROS" 
14375 BC Phone 

10100 Brunswk 

4370 Bodd Can 
BOBS CAE 

a COHbBf 
Cad Frv 
65600 C Nor W«st 
200c Padcro 
3296 Can Trust 
30223 C I Bk Com 
22DQ Cdn Nat Res 
647QS CT Ire A f 
ZUflQ C Util B 
300 Caro 
2425 Cotanev 
500C*tanl7Sp 
JBCHUM 
SlMOCDWbA 
SOOCDtotaBf 

8401 CTL Bank. 

600 Conwitrs 
900 Comwast A 
19730 cosetto R 
HU Conran A 
3764Cruwnx 
5050 Cmr Res 
393773 Doan Dov 
5416 Doon A 
2460 D*n toon A 
2B60Q Dwitson Bf 
1150 DwvBlcon 
8150 DlcJcnsn A! 
M58 Dlcknan B 
tow Daman A 
S2QDetascaA 
556 DuPont A 
IMP Dvtex A 
32SI Elcttnm X 
too Emco - 
MJ15 Ecrolty Swr 
2190 C Falcon C 

0258 FIcnbrdgB 

3833 Fardy Res 
6150 Fad tad A 
8750 F City Fin 
340 Fraser 
2000 Fruehaut 
17Q Gendto A 
8070 Geoc Comp 
1979? Geoevd* 
1080 Gtbr altar 
19750 Goktcorp t 
300 GoodVBor 
IM» Grandma 

2000Granduc 

6475 GL Forest 
783 Greyhnd 
10305 H Group A 
UOOOHrdlnu Af 
3400 Hawker 
mHa>WD 
0251 H Bar Co 
9817 imaseo 
imindol 

ir-- 

litprPtae 
4Wi Ivaco B 
22S0 Jannodi 
2000 Kant Katla 
HOO Keuev H 
860 Karr Add 
38034 Lubotf • 
2041 Lac Mnrts 

3370 LOnt Com 

37S0 Locono 
5<C5 LobliJW Co 
toO MICC 
*251 Melon HA 
61322 MertandE 
3S22MP6sOnAI 
1344 Motoon B 
11750 NobtocsL 

21492 NorpndQ 
293»Norcan 
81999 N VO AHA I 
, 71UJNOW9CSW 
148804 NuWBtxp A 
540Q oshawa A f 


HMh Low CtbM Chao 
*16 16 16 — T5 

395 393 

*5H SVk SW— Vh 
*1754 175k mfc+l* 
*109fc im lOH-to 
SlOVi Itftfc TOLi 
259 255 259 * 3 

*22 Vk 218b 22Vb— H 
*15to 14^6— 4b 

S22V, 221* 2246+ to 
3168k 1646 ldh+to 
Wt 64* SV»+ Vi 
SIS* ISto 15VS 

*2W» 2Jto 23to 
*291 * 2 9VS 29VV+ Vl 
*3316 328b 33 
*304* 304b 3Hh+to 
30 24 26 

Wto Vto 9Vk 

*17 n i7 + ib 


114 

7to 


64b 
4to+ Vk 


17 — to 
31 — 14b 

to 


SJZto 11M 
*74 * 7to . _ 

*171* 1746 TTto- to 
MO 40 40 + Ui 

*«to 44b 

nito lito lito 

SSto 514 5to 
a* sto _jto+ m 
£1 270 270 

SL J 1 11 

mv* law lBto 
IS VS US —3 
630 390 600 +20 

6S0 450 450 +30 

*13% 13to- 13to — to 
snjh nto 134b— to 
fto 94b+ to 

690 . 490 490 

230 283 210 —30 

*29to 29to 29to+ to 

S2S 12 _ 

SBVi 38 
sni 7V, 7to 

sioto in* iito 

57 68b 6to— to 

*18 17to I* + to 
W5to Hto 95to+ Ur 
305 300 300 

*22to 22 22to+ to 

M34* Uto 13to— to 
SIBto 1Mb ISto— to 
sa to 22to 23 + to 
OB* 28to 28to+ to 
*1216 12 12(6+ to 

266 260 262 +2 
Wto 9 Vi 9 to— lb 
S6to 58b 6 

S62to 42to 42to+ 1 
78 70 75 +5 

49. 40 49 +1 

W«b 94 96to+ 1 

O+to 24to 264b + to 

iS^l^l^-S 
sgfi 22to 221b— to 
asto 241b 25to+ to 
fl 71* 1744 17* 

*54 53to 53H + 4b 

sim mb i3to + to 

S17to 1716 . 1716+ to 
SWto 16 16to+u 
soto 9 9 

nfv* 33to 34 + to 
*23 23 23 + 46 

Sllto 114b 111b— to 
IM H6 HU 
*39 39 39 + to 

SITU 17 17*. + to 

32514 35* 35*+* 
*271* 27 27 —Vi 

SJlto lito 118b + Vk 
*101* 1046 104b— to 
*19 lHto I8to— to 
230 230 230 

*27 26to Z7 + to 
620 605 420 

SW4 U 16 to — II 
S16t* 16 Hto 
SHlib 35* 35* 

«m 194b 1944+ to 
S14* 14* 14*+* 
*W b 64b 444+ to 

*221* 22to 2214+ 40 
5* 53 SB +7 

SN4b 2*to 244b 


1600 Pamoer 
2480 PanCan P 

1000 Ptwnbi on 

565 Pino Point 
2500 Place GO o 
16665 Placnr 

50600 Pravtfla 

.90352 RAdpottl 
348226 RdStanhs A 
900 RelcMioid 
23500 RosSorvf 
5864 RevnPm A 
loan robots A 
1500 Roman 
550 Rothman 
5166 SaitTU 
200 scons? 

2023 Soars Con 
57509 Shell Can 
SH7Sherr1tt 
MO Stoma 
1500 siator B 1 
74675 Southnr 
1600 St Brodcst 
13609 S telco A 
6100 Sutpfro 
. 600 Staoa R 
3S0 Suncorpr 
5091 Sydney o 
19100 Takwv 
2093 TOC* Cor A 
45085 TbckB f 

TQOTetodyne 

10747 Tax Can 

9350 Thom N A 
55228 Tor Dm Bfc 
7440 Torstar B f 
44070 Trodara At 
1050 Trim Mt 
3100 Trinity Res 
172152 TitaAltO UA 
11850 TrCen PL 
41520 Trtmoc 
37306 TrtzpcAl 
53200 Turttaf 
2600 untaorp A f 
. 200 Un Carbld 
286926 u Entprbe 
7100 U Kcne .. 
3000 u Stscoa 
7M0VPTSH At 
1300 Vestaron 
SOOOWesttarto 
. 4670 WgrtrrHn 
3000 Weston . 

2356 Woodwl A 


TotafaaiBs 11,236504 oharas 


455 455 *55 —.5 

*28 274b 28 + to 

*7 7 7 

S27to 27 27to — to 

IK IK 105 
*24 2346 24 

*1946 I9to 194b— to 
350 345 350 

*746 746 746 + to 
*1246 lito 1246* 4* 
S23to 22to 23H+ to 
*1446 1446 1446—1* 

185 180 185 

120 115 120 + J 

THJ Iff Iff 
*1146 lito 1146+ I* 
*4146 4146 4146 .. £- 

*546 546 546 46*1 

*2116 21 to 21 to+ (k 
S7to 746 Tto+to 
XU* 2146 24V1+ >, 
_S7to 71* 71*- to 

■ SS I B + to 1 
Sllto 11 lito + to 
*914* 58to 59to+.to 
*7216 1316 7216 . 

*2346 231* 2346 + to 
2» 260 275 +« 

3m 300 300 — s 

S2S 25 25 +.16 

21 20 20 — 5. 

M 91 n —3 
Sllto lito 114* . 

*121* 1146 T2 + to 
* 111 * 111 * llto+to 
*33to 33 33 —4b 

M0 5B « +3to 
*1946 7946 !9to+ J 6 
*1916 191b 19V. +.U, 

*234* 2246 234b + to 
S7to 7to 7to - 
475 445 465 — ^r 

SB* 3446 249b +. 1* 

CTb MW ato+^* 

480 470 470 — * 

*2716 2646 27to++i 
61 56 » —4 

*816 lib ato^vh 
*1H* lito 114* 

'Sim lito lito— to 
*88b Bto BVf^H 
100 100 100 
STto 7to 7to 
W 216 12 1216 + to 

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SPORTS 



(Generating the Future , With and Without the Aid of Others 


International fferu.W Tribune 

LONDON — A concussed play- 
er can, ihank God, be given ibe kiss 
of life. A confused one may be 
straightened out by the team 
shrink. But what can save the coach 
whose players fail him? 

Trevor Francis, blessed with 
quicksilver skills that have been 
traded three times for a million 
pounds, ran into soccer's capri- 
cious fate again Sunday. He is re- 
covering In a Genoese clinic thank s 
to alert medical treatment includ- 
ing mautb-io-mouth resuscitation 
after a clash of heads during his 
game for Sampdoria. 

Following a brain scan, he is ex- 
pected to miss only one game and 
Che frightening blow over his left 
temple will be forgotten more 
quickly than the a gpnping uncer- 
tainties after knee and ankle sur- 
gery that previously deprived him 
of athletic prime for six months at a 
stretch. 

I have spent days — weeks — 
observing at first hand how inac- 
tivity strains the Frauds family and 
how single-minded is his determi- 
nation to overcome. Head injury is 


more personal but the first sharp 
sprint will erode the doubts, 
Trevor Francis has it within him- 
self to generate his own immediate 
future. Spam's Amaro Amende, 
once a winger and striking inside 

Rob Hughes 

forward of immense pace, is re- 
duced to praying that others will 
fight for his career. 

Wednesday’s UEFA Cup quar- 
terfinal first leg in London between 
Tottenham Hotspur and Real Ma- 
drid is Amando's Waterloo. If the 
Madrid team he coaches fails bad- 
ly, as it has in 10 of its past 11 
games, he is lost, 

Amando’s biggest task is to try 
to ensure that his own fear is not 
transmitted to players he intro- 
duced to soccer. The instant they 
cross the line, that fear will be writ 


face has kindly, lean, nor- 
mally enthusiastic features. There 
ore Laughter lines around the eyes 
and wisps of gray at (he temples. It 
is the face of a man who played the 
game as an entertainer and later 


found his metier in passing knowl- 
edge on to youngsters. 

Wednesday, and the second leg 
in Estadio ttemabeu two weeks 
from now, will tell whether the coa- 
ch and his men have been promot- 
ed loo fast against the burden of 
the sport’s most legendary dub. 

Madrid’s problems are not pure- 
ly about youth and in experience. 
The president. Luis de Carlos, well 
into his seventies, has announced 
his retirement from ibe impossible 
pretense that be is Santiago Bema- 
beu or that Real Madrid is the all- 
powerful force Bernabeu made it 

The wealthy racehorse owner 
Ram6n Mendoza is thought as Like- 
ly to succeed de Carlos as Javier 
Clemente, coach at Bilbao, is 
tipped to replace Amando. 

When votes are cast it will do 
Amando's cause no barm if Ma- 
drid has removed Spurs, the UEFA 
Cup holder, the way it eliminated 
past holder Anderiecht in the last 
round. 

Amando knows that for all the 
promise or apprentices, the attitude 
of his senior players is crucial. The 
erratic Juanito and the expensive 


Juan Lozano, sabotaged Amando's chief coach to the dub's affiliated 
early efforts bv expressingdissatis- Second Division tea m . Castxtia- 
faettoa publicly and were fined and 
suspend©' 

Lozanc 


tended. 

to has since spectacularly 
made amends as the creator of Ma- 
drid's 6-1 home victory to wipe out 
the 3-0 defidt in Anderiecht. But 
Amando agrees Real dare not fall 
so far behind Tottenham. 

So how much will his old pros 
extract from themselves? Goalie 
Miguel Angel. 38, has eyes on a 
coaching career; defender Uli Sue- 
licit e. 3 1, is showing; fullback and 
rep™ in Josfe Camacho, 30, some- 
times looks as determined to dam- 
age opponents as to concentrate on 
his own adventurous leadership, 
and striker Carlos Sanullana, now 
33, may have few of those salmon- 
like leaps left. 

Vagaries of aging stars, as much 
as unpredictability of new ones, 
doubtless fed the indecision that 
had jeopardized Amando's future. 

This is his first season coaching 
big time. When his Qluslrious 14- 
year playing career for Real and 
Spain ended in 1976, be became 
youth coach and. three years ago, 


Natalia Bestemianora and Andrei Bukin in ice dancing, 

Soviet Skaters Dominate 
In Men’s, Couples’ Events 


A Rare Playoff Fever 
Grips Cavaliers’ Fans 


Untied Press International 

TOKYO — Alexander Fadeev 
led a Soviet domination of the 1985 
world figure skating championship 
Tuesday, winning the short pro- 
gram to lake a stranglehold on ibe 
men's title. 

With Fadeev providing the most 
inspired performance, the Russians 
were in first place in all three events 
after Tuesday's competition — 
men's singles, pairs and ice dance. 

The women's singles, where the 
defending and Olympic champion 
Katarina Witt of East Germany is 
the favorite, begins Wednesday 
with compulsories. 

Natalia Bestemianova and An- 
drei Bukin won the compulsories in 
ibe ice dance in the first event of 
the day, and compatriots Larisa 
Selezneva and Oleg Makarov won 
the pairs short program in the eve- 
ning. In both events, the Russians 
also took second position. 

That the Soviet couples finished 
1-2 in the pairs came as no surprise, 
but the order of finish was unex- 
pected. 

■ Selezneva and Makarov placed 
ahead of the Olympic champions 
Elena Valova and Oleg VasQiev. 


Valova made a mistake on a double 
lutz, costing the pair points for 
technical merit 

In the evening, Fadeev outskaied 
Brian Orser of Canada in the short 
program to assume the command- 
ing position in the men's event. He 
received marks ranging from 5.6 to 
5.9 for technical merit, including 
two 5.9s. and marks from 5.7 to 5.9 
for artistic impression, including 
four 5.9s. 

Orser, who was second at the 
Olympics and last year’s world 
championships, placed second in 
the snort program to move up to 
third from fourth overall after the 
compulsories. He caught his toe 
pick during a spin. 

Jozef Sabovcik of Czechoslova- 
kia. second in the compulsories, 
was third in the short program to 
maintain his second overall posi- 
tion. 

Fadeev, who also won the com- 
pulsory figures on Monday, would 
have to finish lower than fourth in 
the long program on Thursday 
night — and Orser or Sabovcik 
would have to win it — for him to 
lose the crown. 


United Press International 

OAKLAND. California — 
Cleveland Cavalier fans are doing 
something these days they haven't 
done in years — checking the NBA 
standings. They have playoff fever. 

Cleveland, the last team to win a 
game this year, is no longer the 
laughing stock of the National Bas- 
ketball Association. The last time 
the club was talking playoffs, 
Lenny Wilkens and Austin Carr 
were the starting backcourt. But 
times have chang ed. 

On Monday night, World B. 
Free scored 25 points and the Cav- 
aliers continued their unlikely 
march toward the playoffs with a 
108-104 triumph over the Golden 
State Warriors. 

“The team is really coming along 
well now,” Free said. U A11 of our 
early season injuries have healed 
and we're playing well together." 

The victory was the fifth straight 
for the Cavaliers and sixth consecu- 
tive triumph on the road, a club 
record. Cleveland trails Atlanta by 
H6 games in the race for the eighth 
and final playoff spot in the East- 
ern Conference. 

Elsewhere in the NBA San An- 
tonio defeated Philadelphia, 109- 
103, and Dallas downed Phoenix, 
107-99. The game between Milwau- 
kee and Detroit was postponed af- 
ter the roof of the Sflverdome in 
Pontiac, Michigan, collapsed. 

“It’s exciting, and being the 
youngest head coach in the league 


we had to go through a lot of head- 
aches early in the year." said Cleve- 
land's 33-year-old coach, George 
KarL “Now we have turned it 
around and it really feels good. We 

NBA FOCUS 

didn't play well tonight and we stiD 
won. That's the sign of a good 
team. 

“If we keep playing this well, 
then well be playing games in the 
playoffs." 

Phil Hubbard added 17 points 
for the Cavaliers while Roy Hinson 
had IS and Ben Poquetie 14. For 
Golden State, Larry Smith led the 
way with 16 points while Purvis 
Short, Eric Floyd and Mickey 
Johnson had 15 each. 

Short was ejected with two tech- 
nicals with 1:37 remaining in the 
second quarter. Golden State, 16- 
45. also had to play without start- 
ing center Jerome Whitehead, who 
is suffering until a sprained ankle. 

■ Stadium Roof Collapses 

The weight of accumulated snow 
caused the roof of the Pontiac Sil- 
verdome to collapse Monday, forc- 
ing the evacuation of 100 people, 
the Associated Press reported from 
Pontiac. 

Officials of the suburban Detroit 
stadium said there were no report- 
ed injuries in the collapse of the 
fabric, air-supported roof. The col- 
lapse was the second at the 10-year- 



RouurvUnbwi Pm hfefnatkttB) 

The Cars' Ben Poquette, right, tries to stop Purvis Short. 


old Stiverdome, which seats 80.000. 
It also collapsed during a thunder- 
storm in August 1976. 

Matt Dobek. a spokesman for 
the Pistons said the root had been 
sagging and there “finally warlike 
an explosion in here, and it just 
came down." 

Three Detroit Lions football 


players, Gary Danielson, Eric Hip- 
pie and James Jones, narrowly 
avoided injury by scrambling for 
cover when the roof collapsed. 
They were playing catch Monday 
on tire floor of the stadium. 

• “1 thought the whole place was 
gang to cave in, and I quickly went 
toward the exit," Jones said. “I 
thought it was an earthquake." 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 


Basketball 


Figure Skating 


National Hockey League Leaders 


National Basketball Association leaders 


Thomas. Dal. 

Gs Williams. Wash. 


59 140 
58 136 


Notloooi Heater Lent m tenters mnwoh 
March 3: 

OFFENSE 

Overall 

GAP Plm 

Gretzky, Edmonton 63 113 176 34 

Kuril. Edmonton 65 55 116 24 

Hmerchuk. Wlanltm 40 64 104 70 

Bossy, N.Y.I. 40 52 101 IB 

O tonne. Los Angeles 36 63 W 40 

B. Sutter, N.Y.I. « 53 93 45 

Coflay, Edmonton 36 M 9a 88 

Nil son, Calgary 31 56 87 12 

N total Is. Los Angelas 40 46 86 51 

Sevan), Chicago 32 54 86 36 

Karr. Philadelphia 48 37 85 36 

Federico, St.LQUiS 74 61 85 23 

Tonelll, N.Y.I. 33 51 84 79 

MoeLean. Winnipeg 32 52 84 89 

- Powr-Ptay Goals 

GP PP 

Karr, Pfiltodelphlo 81 *• 

Hawardu*. Winnipeg 66 15 

Andreychuk. Buftolo 59 14 

Grotner. Washington 64 14 

Start- No w) Goats 

GP SH 

Gretzky. Edmonton 65 10 

Messier, Edmonton 40 5 

Promo, PhllottotoMo 59 5 

Oame-vnaaim Goals 

GP GW 

Kurrl. Edmonton 62 II 

P5lQ3tnv. Quebec *1 * 

Gartner, Wa shi n g ton 64 8 

Kerr, Philadelphia 41 8 


SvJvestri 
□onkoiakts 
Boston 131 

Mono 

Fghr 
Baron 
Reouti 


a 353 
0 5.12 
] 143 


102 6 
164 14 
W71 315 
1,950 105 1 123 
1.893 112 I 155 
33 2 
M 5 


National Basketed Association 
nuoooti March 3: 

TEAM OFFENSE 

G P». 


leaders 


0 164 
0 1M 


IFuhr and Mono stared shutout Jon. 41 


Denver 
Detroit 
Son Anion lo 
LA. Lakers 


7311 

6969 

7053 

7006 


Avg 

U9S 

1161 

1156 

114.9 


LA Lakers 
LA Clippers 
Chicago 

Ulan 

Cleveland 

Portland 

Indiana 

Detroit 


Edmonton Q) 

UH 227 

3 146 

Boston 

61 

49«4 

U4J 

San Antonia 

Bouchard 

IMS 95 

0 X 40 

Portland 

*1 

6«5 

1135 

GoMtn Stair 

Gasselln 

1,515 91 

a 160 

Kansas CIN 

60 

6797 

11 U 

Denver 

Stovtonv 

6«9 4J 

1 369 

PfiltaegtpMa 

60 

6776 

IIZ9 

Kansas C1 *y 

Quebec (1) 

1893 33Q 

1 35$ 

Dallas 

60 

6588 

1095 

— 

Milled 

128 5 

0 Z5Q 

Milwaukee 

60 

6551 

109J 


Hein* 

70 3 

0 257 

Houston 

60 

65*7 

109.1 


Wamsiev 

1,777 98 

0 U1 

Chicago 

59 

6433 

109 J) 

King. N.Y. 

Lint 

1,869 >19 

1 IQ 

Ulan 

A) 

6613 

1086 

Bin), Bos. 

St. Louis (4) 

3JQ4 229 

1 358 

New Jersey 

60 

6485 

108.1 

Start. G5. 

Sfcortxfcasfc) 

MW 54 

I 3J0 

Ptvttnfx 

61 

6592 

108.1 

English. Den. 

Banner man 

7,70 187 

D 180 

Gotoden Stale 

60 

6449 

1075 

Dan hey. utoti 

Pang 

«Q 4 

0 440 

Indiana 

59 

6338 

1076 

Jordan. Oil. 

Chicago (5) 

L99S 238 

1 US 

Cleveland 

60 

6445 

1076 

Wilkins. All. 


61 

6674 

1094 

Lever, Den. 

61 142 

61 

6684 

1096 

Conner, G5. 

58 1Z3 

59 

6475 

109.7 

Riven. Atl. 

47 99 

61 

6710 

1106 

walker, N.Y. 

<1 128 

60 

6663 

111.1 

BLOCKED SHOTS 

61 

6794 

1116 


G Blk 

59 

6667 

113.0 

Eaton. Uloii 

AT 3*4 

60 

6805 

1136 

Bowie, Port. 

57 154 

61 

6982 

1145 

Rollins. Atl. 

54 144 

68 

6937 

1156 

Coaoer, Den. 

A0 141 

61 

711$ 

1166 

Olaluwon, Him. 

AO IP 

60 

7028 

717.1 

Gilmore, SA. 

Hinson, Clev. 

60 134 
54 120 


SCORING 

G FG FT PIS Avg 
45 564 3C 1470 327 


Ab-Jabbar. LAL 
Sampson. Hau. 


137 

134 

133 

ZIZ 

111 

110 

Avg 


61 131 ZI5 
60 127 2.12 


GOAL r I 
* (Emctv-not goals 

Barrasso 
Sauve 
Cloutier 
Buffalo (4) 

Mason 

Rlggln 

Jensen 

WasMagtea ($) 
Freest 
Lindbergh 
Jensen 

Philadelphia 131 
Roy 
Penney 
Soetoert 
Montreal (41 
Peelers 
Keans 


iltDIHO 
In parentheses) 

MP GA Sfl Avg 
1106 117 5 139 
1.075 57 
65 4 

3A46 182 
661 31 
1926 139 
305 16 
1191 191 
664 25 
3,095 163 1 116 
40 7 0 7 M 

1819 198 1 XU 

20 a a <uw 

2662 129 1 H4 
1,426 80 0 137 
ISOS 213 1 127 

2X29 133 1 129 
1JI76 99 0 329 


0 118 
D 169 
5 184 

1 181 

2 185 
0 115 

1 234 
0 Z 26 


NHL Standings 


WALE5 CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T PIS GF GA 


Washington 

38 

17 

9 

B5 

163 

191 

PIMtodeiphJa 

37 

19 

7 

81 

762 

198 

■^SlN.Y. 1 sunders 

33 

27 

4 

70 

286 

249 

N. Y. Rangers 

71 

33 

9 

51 

239 

269 

Pittsburgh 

21 

36 

5 

47 

221 

293 

New Jersey 

19 

36 

8 

46 

212 

260 

— 

Adams Division 




Montreal 

J? 

23 

TO 

74 

2*9 

217 

Buffalo 

30 

21 

17 

72 

227 

182 

Quebec 

32 

24 

a 

72 

264 

230 

Boston 

28 

26 

a 

64 

229 

21$ 

Hart tort 

21 

35 

7 

49 

217 

271 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Norris Division 





Lemelin 
Edwards 
Calgary CD 
Hrudev 
Smith 
Mekmson 

N.Y. manners (2) 

Beaupre 

Mntoche 

Metanson 

Sants 

Minnesota (51 
Low 
Resell 
Komnpurt 
New jersey (4) 
Jonecvk 
EDO) 

Las Angeles (4} 
Bernhard! 

Better 
St. Crol* 
wraggett 
Toronto (SI 
VonMesbroudk 
Hanlon 

N.Y. Rangers (41 
Shai lowsk I 
Ulrt 
Mliien 
Weeks 

Hartford (1) 

Hayward 
Holden 
B eti rend 
Winnipeg (7) 
Staton 

MkJ 

Mlcafef 
Detroit (4) 

Rom one 
Dion 
Herron 
Ford 

pntsBurgh (11 

Brodeur 

Caprice 
Garrett 
Vo n coav er (« 


Atlanta 
New York 
Washington 
LA Clippers 
Seattle 


6411 

6430 

6411 

6395 

6075 


Milwaukee 

Seattle 

Washington 

Houston 

New Jersey 

Boston 

Dallas 

Philadelphia 

Atlanta 
Phoenis 
New York 


TEAM DEFENSE 

G No. 
60 
60 
61 
60 
60 
61 
60 
60 
60 
61 
*1 


6199 

6256 

6423 

6*35 

6445 

6573 

6476 

6481 

6505 


6659 


106.9 
1056 

105.1 
1046 
1011 

Avg 

1BJJ 

104J 

1051 

107J 

1076 

1076 

107.9 

mu 

1046 

1017 

109.2 


Mo tone, Phil. 
Aswl-re. Dali. 
Cummings, MIL 
Woairidea. CM. 
Johnson. K.C. 
watt, Don. 
Moncrlet. Mil. 
Abdul-Jabbr, LAL 
Griffith, man 
Sampson. Hou. 
Thomas, Del. 
Free, Clev. 
vondeweohe, Prt. 
Gervln. 5A 


61 697 286 1720 282 

58 612 373 1630 28.1 
41 JOB 794 16*5 276 
30 377 324 1078 276 

59 601 471 1627 774 

60 618 359 1612 26.9 
60 473 574 1520 253 
59 577 320 1494 243 

59 577 274 1428 243 
54 486 294 1266 23.4 

60 570 245 1375 233 

59 524 323 1371 212 
54 438 345 1224 227 

61 566 Ml 1373 229 
61 564 163 1364 224 

60 553 21C 1316 Z1.9 
59 477 318 1294 219 
49 412 197 1072 214 
51 433 254 >1)2 2 LB 


60 913 282 1308 2 Ul 
FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 
FG FGA 


Donaldson. LAC 
Gilmore, &A 
Nance. Phoc. 
Ahdul-Joobar. LAL 
Thoroe. K.C. 
Worthy. LAL 
Johnson. LAL 
Rulana. Wash. 
McHole. Bos. 
Cheeks. PhIL 


Pci 

768 40* M3 
389 618 629 
S15 868 573 
566 461 987 
260 451 574 
460 805 .571 
395 643 578 
250 437 5»9 
424 746 568 
29Z J14 568 


College Top-20 Ratings 

The top 20 towns in the Associated Press’ 
college basketball gen {flrst-ptoce votes In 
parentheses; total points Based on 20-19-1L 
etc,- records through March 4 and lost wwf* 
rankings): 

Record Pts Pvs 
1. Georgetown (60) 27-2 1200 2 

Z St. John’s 29-2 1127 I 

X Michigan 23-3 1087 3 

A Oklahoma 25-9 989 6 

S. Memphis SI. 24-3 937 4 

A North Carolina 22-7 756 8 

1. Duke 21-6 745 5 

& Louisiana Tech 25-2 732 7 

9. Georgia Tech 21-7 720 10 

10. Kansas 24-6 707 II 

11. Nev.-Los Vegas 24-3 699 9 

1Z Va. Commonwealth 255 472 17 

H Syracuse 20-7 397 12 

14. Illinois 22-8 337 18 

I i Tulsa 21-4 382 15 

16 Loyola, IIL 22-S 246 70 

17. Georgia 20-7 254 14 

16 N Carolina SI. 14-8 236 16 

19. Louisiana St. 19-8 151 — 

70- So. Me moaH t 21-8 126 13 


World Championships 

ICE DANCING 
Compatvnr 
lAt Tokyo) 

1. Natalia Bestemtonovg and Andrei Bukin. 
5 aWet Union. 04 points 
Z Marina Klimova ond Sergei Ponomar- 
enko. Soviet Union, 15 
X Judv B lumbers and Michael Seibert. UA. 
15 

6 Tracy Wilson and Rob McCall. Canada. 26 
5 l Petra Bom and Rainer Sc ho nbom. West 
Germany, XB 

6 Karen Barber ana Nkkv Stater, BrltabLLi 
7. Natalia Annenfco and Genrikh SrttenskL 
Soviet Union. 43 

6 Isabella Mtobeil and Roberto PaOzzota. 
Italy, 45 

4. Kathrtn Beck ond Christoff Beck, Austria 
54 

la Karvn Garnssinoand Rod Garussino. Corv- 
ette, 60 


PAIRS 

Start Program 

1. Larisa Sclezveva ond Oleg Makarav, Savi- 
et Union, 06 Points 

Z Elena Valova and Oleg VosIHev. Sovtel 
Union. 08 

X Kathertno Matousek and UoYO Efauer, 
Canada, 7.2 

4. Cynthia Coull and Mark Rowsam. Canada. 
14 

5. Veronika PersMna and Marat Akbarov. 
Soviet Union. 25 

6 JWl Watson and Peter OopegonL U5u 2 A 
7. Melinda Kunhegyi and Lyndon Johnston, 
Canada, 25 

6 Manuals Lgndgraf and Inga Steuer, East 
Germany, £2 

9. Natalie Sevbold and Wayne Sevtjokl, U5_ 
34 

16 Claudia Massorl and Danhrie Caarvw, I to- 
1V.4A 


REOOUNDINO 

G Off Dei rot Avg 
ne. Phil. 60 290 470 780 13J 

-ms. NJ. 60 240 484 724 161 

er, Del. 60 199 519 714 11.4 

HOU. 60 336 386 712 119 

61 163 536 644 115 

60 185 469 654 10.4 

60 150 504 654 10.9 

JU. 60 169 465 634 104 

ICC. 60 190 444 634 104 

58 278 333 611 105 

ASSISTS 


Football 


St. Louis 30 22 II 71 239 229 

Chicago 31 30 5 67 257 250 

Detroit 20 34 II SI 2*5 289 

Minnesota 20 35 11 51 233 265 

Toronto 17 40 7 41 204 274 

smvttie Divlstop 

a -Edmonton 43 IS 7 43 32S 226 

Cotgot-v 33 25 7 73 296 2S2 

Winnipeg 33 » 7 ^ 

tops Angeles 29 2S 11 tfi 2B2 771 

^Soncouver 19 38 8 44 22S 336 

ix-dlnchod MavoK wall 

MONDAY'S RESULT 

Montreal 
Minnesota 

Graham (61. Ac lan 2 (16). CleajretU ill) . 

NMlund 2 1351. RobhW til). 

Montreal tonMrtodw) 8-11-13-®! Mbineta- 
to (an Saelaert) I1-8-I3— 3’- 


1 1 1-3 
t I 3-4 


USFL Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE^ ^ 

Memphis 1 o 0 1500 4. 17 

Birmingham I 1 O -*J t 7 2 

Jacksonville 1 ' J ® ? 

New Jersey 1 I 2 "S « 5 

Tarnaa Bay 1 J ? S « 2 1 

Baltimore 4 l l m ti 

□ Hondo g 2 O 500 17 

O'™"™ WESTERN CONFERENCE 

Mieittan 2 0 0 1500 84 *ij 

Houston , . , HO 4* 

Oakland 1 ? I '2S E 

Arizona 1 1 0 500 23 

£”f“2r i 1 0 500 SO 

£S£d 1 I o 500 ai 

LOS AlteeMS 0 2 0 J*» 43 J 

Monday's Result 

MantPWs » M 



G No. 

Avg. 

3ef- 

59 

792 

136 

-A L 

58 

777 

125 


61 

624 

injj 

■»C 

bO 

49S 

83 

llev. 

60 

494 

BJ 

C. 

60 

483 

LI 

on. NJ. 

60 

481 

LO 

tan 

57 

451 

'.9 

\ Pen. 

99 

454 

77 

FREE THROWS 




FTM FT A 

Pel 

on 

127 

140 

.907 


2fie 

317 

.907 

Dei. 

its 

183 

.902 

•n* p 0 n 

259 

290 

293 

■toe. 

169 

190 

689 

(C 

24S 

271 

88* 

ing. 

99 

113 

284 

Pni| 

1S6 

143 

281 

wosn. 

113 

129 

274 


■ HREE-PoiNT FIELD GOALS 

FGM FGA Pet 
J< 7g M7 


'OH, 


“hit 

Ten. 


Utah 
• Dan 


90 

125 

84 

77 


STEALS 


«0 
SI 

33 84 393 
» 7? J9Q 
38 99 J84 
25 68 -360 
73 286 JS» 
20 60 S3 


Sian, NJ. 
SA. 

Chi. 


C Stl 
id m 
11 168 
» 140 


Avg 

253 

175 

237 


The United Press Infernaftonat board of 
epochal top-30 ratings (first-place vole* and 
recor d s through games <H March 3 In paren- 
theses; total nalntt based on 15 petntc for first 
place, 14 ter second. cteJ: 

1. Georgeiown (jsj (27-2) 565 

Z St. John's (21 (25-2) 511 

X Michigan (23-3) 419 

а. Memphis St. (1) (2*-31 631 

5. Oklahoma 125-5) 425’ 

б. Louisiana Tech 125-2) 288 

7. North Carolina (22-7) 275 

8. Kansas 134-6) 234 

9. Duke 121-el 230 

ia Nev.-Las Vegas (24-3) 22* 

11. Georgia Tech (21-7) 204 

1Z Syracuse (ttt-Tt 105 

IX Tulsa (21-61 96 

14. Illinois (22-81 80 

IS Va. Commonwealth (25-51 66 

16. So. Methodist (21-8) 63 

17. North Carolina St. (19-8) 5 1 

IE Laval a. III. 122-5) 44 

19. Louisiana SI. (190> *0 

70. Georgia (20-7) 34 

(Note; Teams on probation by the NCAA 
ana ineligible lor the NCAA Tournament are 
ineligible lor »p-2D consideration by UPI. The 
only such team this season is the University ol 
Akron i . 

Selected College Results 

Alabama 5L S3. Florida ABdVi 79 
Miss. Valiev 5t. 79. Grambffng SO 
Navy 84. Campbell 63 
Butler 5b, Valparaiso 50 
SI. Joseph's. InCL 71, Indiana Cent. 66 
TOURNAMENTS 
East Coast Conference 
Championship 
LBhtoh 76. Bucknetl 74. OT 

ECAC Metro Conference 
CmnvHomMp 

Falrleigh Dickinson 63. Larala. Md. 59, OT 
nurra Atlantic Athletic Conference 
Championship 
tana 57, Fonttom 54 

Third Place 
Army 71, Si. Pefer*i 66 


MEN'S STANDINGS 
(after compulsories and short program) 
L Alexander Fadeev, Soviet Union, 1 Ji points 
X Jozef Sabovcik. QgdxttJatiofcto. £4 
X Brian Orser. Canada. 32 

4. Brian Baitana. U-S. 44 

5. Vladimir Katin Soviet Union. 55 

6. Greecnre Flllpowskr, Poland. 65 

7. Heiko Fischer, West Germany. U 
X Fernand Fedronlc, Franca, 9JQ 

f. Richard Zander, West Germany. 1LD 
va Lars Aakcssoa Sweden. 115 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON— Aerate to terms with Roger 
aemera. pitcher, on a one-year contract. 

Motional League 

LEAGUE — Announced the retirement of 
Satoti Davidson, umpire. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Signed Frank Wil- 
liams, anchor, to a two-roar contract. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football Lean* 

league— N amed Jav Moyer executive 
vice-president league counsel and Joe. 
Browne, director at continunlcartons. 
united States Football League 

JACKSONVILLE— Stoned Ed Luther, 
amrlerbock. to a tour-year contract 
HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 

EDMONTON— Coiled uPMfteZanter-oooV 
tonder. from Nova Scotia ol the American 
Hockey League- Reassigned Marco Baron 
goal tender, to Nova Scotia. 

COLLEGE 

AUSTIN peay— A nnounced » tart ibe con- 
tract gt Howard Jackson, basketball aaadt 
would not be renewed. 

BOWDOiN— Announced the retirement ef 
Rav Mcfcneii, basketball com*. 

COLORADO— Homed Mike Hanfcwltt as- 
sistant (odtMtl epoch. 

FLORIDA Homed Jerry Anderson o*s»- 
ttnl toaitooll coach. ' 

GEORGIA STATE— Nbmed-Bob ReMwrt 

taeitaii cooch, - . 

PITTSBURG! ) -Named Sal Sunset) ossw- 
fant football conch. 


His boys swept the Second Divi- 
sion board, winning ibe champion- 
ship but being forbidden, as a nurs- 
ery team, to join ibe parent club in 
Division One. So de Carios. sack- 
ing Madrid's one-ume phenomenal 
center-forward Alfredo di Stefano 
as coach, promoted Amando along 
with starlets who had jumped into 
the first team. 

Had they succeeded .at once. 
Red's £3 miltion (S5 J million) 
debts would cease to be a millstone. 
But. as boys will, they will be scin- 
tillating one day. inadequate the 
nexL seldom all good on (he same 
afternoon. 

Emilio Butragueno, 21. “the Vul- 
ture," assumed SantiUana's mantle 
as center-forward of the Spanish 
national side. He also claimed three 
of the goals against Anderiecht 
and, having typically had his name 
written down tor Red Madrid chib 
membership at birth, is the future. 

So. possibly, are right back Mi- 
guel Chendo, 23; midfield prodigy 
Manuel Sanchis, 1 9, the son of a 
former Madrid great; and two oth- 


er vo ung midfielders Miguel Mi- 
dwi. 22, and Martin Vazquez. 19- 
Yet the future has to oe shown 
the way and there is none better m 
Sp ain , none more respected by 
Spurs, than Ricardo Gallego. He. 
at 26. has gufle. strength and World 
Cup know-how plus the vita* 
ingredient of knowing his prune is 
now. 

Real Madrid's very name 
prompted Spurs, a far-frotn-desti- 
tute dub, to almost double admis- 
sion prices. There is nothing tike 
getting in ahead of the scaipexs. _ 
However, should Madnd begin 
unworthy of that prestigious tag, 
will Tottenham offer a helping 
hand? Real’s dilemma, according 
to its agwri president, is mainly psy- 
chological. in which case Aroanao 
might cross the corridor to Spurs 
dressing room. , , . 

There he will find a psychologist 
or two, gentlemen whose business 
is the sporting bodymind and 
whose motto is sorting out Totten- 
ham players' mental blocks in Posi- 
tive Mental Attitude. 

Amando, if he is to regain Previ- 
ous Madrid Altitude, will need 
plenty of that 


VANTAGE POINT/ Murray Choss 

Baseball Talks Enter 
Realm of Uncertainly 


New York Times Serrw- 

FORT LAUDERDALE, Flori- 
da — Don Baylor, the American 
League onion representative, was 
talking Monday about the slow 
pace of labor negotiations. “You 
can miss four or five meetings.” he 
said, “then show up and you 
haven't missed a thing." 

That is the way it is with soap 
operas, too. but negotiators for the 
players and the owners would tike 
to keep their collective bargaining 
efforts from reaching' the soap-op- 
era stage. 

At toe moment, no one knows at 
exactly what stage the negotiators 
are in their attempt to forge a new 
basic agreement to replace the one 
that expired Dec. 31. The owners' 
representatives could pul some fo- 
cus on the matter at the next bar- 
gaining session, but evra if they do, 
the negotiators will most likely stiQ 
be traveling an uncharted course, 
with no idea of the time it will take 
to reach their destination. 

If the talks staggered akmg in the 
first three months, they entered the 
realm of uncertainty last week 
when the owners’ negotiators asked 
the players to help them find a 
mutual solution to what they said 
were the game’s serious Jinmrial^ 
problems. • ” 

That action was unprecedented 
because in previous negotiations 
the owners had always carefully 
avoided mentioning financial proo- 
letns at (he bargaining table, thus 
avoiding the need to cpdf fbeir 
books. 

In addition, last week’s move 
created a new direction for the ne- 
gotiators. Now, instead of address- 
ing the critical issues — the owners’ 
contribution to the pension plan, 
salary arbitration atm free, agency 
— they must first explore the so- 
called financial problems and, if 
necessary, find a sciutioxi. Thar 
promises to be a lengthy process. 

Perhaps in the owners' action lay 
the reason for the staggering talks: 
The owners simply were not sure 
how to bargain, under tbe econom- 
ic pressures they say they have, 
without coming out and claiming 
an inability to pay. They have not. 
accordingto their chief negotiator, 
Lee MacPhail, “technically” made 
that claim, which would automati- 
cally force them to open their- 
books to the union. . 

If the owners are ready to turn; 
over their books to tire players for 
study and audit, the talks will take: 
a new path. As one union negotia- 
tor said, “Any tune you go down 


this road, you get out of normal 
collective bargaini ng .'' 

A study of the books, for exam- 
ple. would have to be accompanied 
by a study of management, and of 
whether bad management had 
caused a team’s losses. Donald 
Fehr, the players* labor leader, said 
Monday after meeting with the 
New York Yankees on the first 
stop of his tour of spring training 
sites, “We're not going lo reward 
bad manag ement % taking money 
away from the players.'' 

Fehr (fid not cite examples, but 

players have raised questions about 
certain management practices. For 
example, 13 clubs employ Tal 
Smith, former president of the 
Houston Astros, as a consultant or 
representative in salary arbitration. 
Speculating that he earns hundreds 
of thousands of doHara, the players 
ask why they should make conces- 
sions so that the clubs could pay 
that kind of money to Smith, even 
though they have their own execu- 
tives. 

The players also wonder what 
land , of financial records they 
would see: They say they would 
insist on. seeing everything, and 
Rath Hernandez, tire Mots’ repre- 
sentative, said, “‘that means every- 
thing/! " . 

The players are thus indicating 
that where ownership is tied to a 
larger edrporation, such as the St 
Louis Car din als and Anheuser- 
Busch, they would fed it necessary 
lo go beyond dub fina nces a nd into 
the larger economic picture. 

■ Fehr indicated that if the players 
found that serious problems duly 
existed, they could be wilting to 
make concessions in the talks. 

But tire players may force tire 
owners to accept a plan that Kuhn 
could not accept- The owners 
would almost certainly have to take 
that step before the playcra would 
be wining to grant concessions. 

Whatever the two sides do, once 
the dubs start down the uncharted 
path, tire negotiations will auto- 
matically take considerably longer 
than before. Some members of the 
owners’ executive board have spec- 
ulated that h could take a year, but 
Fehr said Monday that Ire did not 
think the players would be wilting 
to wait a year. 

Nevertheless, the players are not 
muring and actina tnOitantlv. 

“We’ll keep at it," Fehr said erf 
the effort to get a new agreement. 
*Tf it ever becomes necessary to set 
a strike deadtine. we’U do it, but we 
won’t do it precipitously." 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Swedish Davis 

SANTIAGO (UPI) — Sweden’s Davis Cop tennis team, scared by. a 
major earthquake, decided to leave Chile Tuesday and not day 
Davis Cop first-round match, tire team’s captain announced. 

The decision was prompted by tire departure of the defending trophy 
holder's star. Mats Wdander, who flew to Miami early- Tuesday, fright- 
ened by aftershocks that have camraned to shake Santiago. 

“He was very nervous and scared. He didn't want to hear anything 
about tennis,” Hans Otisori, the team’s eaptain, said at apressomfer- 
ence. He said the match will either have to oe postponed or “Chile should 
amply be grwea a walkover.” • ■ 

The massive earthquake stnick Gate's central neon Sunday, hoars 
after tire Swedish team arrived here, kffline alleast 135 people and leaving 
more than 152,000 ho m eless. A strong aftershock hit Santiago Monday 

afternoon white the Swedish teams players wtae l ramin g ■ 

North StarsDeleat Ganadiens, 4*3 

BLOOMZNGpTDN, Minnesota (UPI) —Keith Acton scored two goals, 
including the game winner, to lean tire Minnesota Noth Stars to 
. victor^i^CTthe Montreal Gmadiens in the rally National Hockey 

. • ?}*» victory gave ^e North Standi points and moved- them into a 
thirdhplace tie m the Noms Kvtaonwxthpecrrat, Dae Canadicas i emain 
first in the Adams Division with 74 — - — 

The game was delayed an 
centimeter) soowfaT 
lis-St. Paul airport. 

Fire in Lendl Mansion Galled Arson 

GREENWICH, Connecticut (AP) — A fire that destroyed a hktnrie 
52-room mansion owned by Ivan Lendl has been attributedtn 

Free Marshal Joseph -Barit. .said Monday thaittegctS 
early Sunday lea; than 24 hours. after of 

surrounding Lendl s property had bom discovered removed 3h aS? 
cutters. Lendl, who lives m another house in Greenwich, hari 
repaired and had choked its-oondition Saturday, a fcaoc 

^fflreidMed house, w^Ladl had^ ^AiSSSSSSl 
ofasubdnFuaoacurre&dv being dr - “ B - wa 

beat vacant for neariy 30 years: - 


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OBSERVER 


Ferraro Generation Gap 


By Russell Baker 
\t EW YORK — The first de- 
feated vice-presidential candi- 
date to star in a television commer- 
cial was William E. Miller. 

A Republican from upstate New 
York, Miller was Barry Goldwa- 
ter's running mate in the debacle of 


1964. (Winners: Lyndon Johnson 
*" impnrey.) If Miller's 


and Hubert Hum 


impt „ . 
bell with "you, don't 


name rings no bell with you, t 

while he was 


fret about iL Even 
running in 1964, most Americans 
had never heard of him. 

Reporters from the flying poker 
game that was his campaign say 
that when Goldwater chose Miller 
for his vice-presidential candidate, 
nobodv was more astounded than 
Miller.' There is' a story, probably 
apocryphal, that Miller once said, 
‘Tam the only person in this cam- 
paign I've never heard of." 


hear 


At that time I was being paid to 
of people like Miller and 


people — 

therefore familiarized myself with 
his face. And so. many moons later 
when that dismal year had been 
mercifully forgotten by faithful Re- 
publicans, I was not mystified one 
night when a fellow, grinning in the 
pause between televised car chases, 
asked, “Do you know me?" 

“I sure do." I cried. It was Bill 
Miller, onetime candidate for the 
vice presidency of the United 
States, now peddling credit cards 
on behalf of American Express. 
The plot of these commercials 
hasn't changed over the years, but 
there has never been a more apt 
star for one than William E. Miller, 
because without the plastic proof 
that he had been officially certified 
famous by American Express, how 
many people would have been able 
to recognize him? 


This memory is roused by news 
that Geraldine Ferraro is being 
paid the big. big bucks to star in a 
Pepsi-Cola commercial. The ques- 
tion that leaps to mind is. why 
Pepsi? 

Whereas William Miller was the 
ideal defeated vice-presidential 
candidate for selling insurance 
against the perils of anonymity, 
Geraldine Ferraro strikes me as pe- 
culiarly unrepresentative of the 
~ i Generation. 

ae characteristic of the PG is a 


vigor that suggests everybody is 
Ifii 


bubbling over with carbonated fizz. 
They ooze a self-confidence that 


proclaims them winners. Though 
Geraldine Ferraro may have cam- 
paigned with fizzy vigor, she is nev- 
ertheless a loser on the same monu- 
mental scale as William Miller. 

What's more, as a person in life’s 
middle years, she can only be 
looked upon with suspicion and 
distrust by the Pepsi Generation. 
These are people who never tire nor 
experience an irrational craving for 
gin, and they are naturaDy ul at 
ease with people of the middle 
years precisely because those peo- 
ple do lire and sometimes cry out 
for drink more frail than Pepsi. 

As the advertising world got it 
exactly right in casting William 
Miller for American Express, it gpt 
it exactly wrong in plaimig Geral- 
dine Ferraro outside the Pepsi rent. 
Suppose she turned up on TV ask- 
ing, “Do you know me?" Most of 
us would immediately shout: 

“We sure do. Geny! You took 
that terrible shellacking in the cam- 
paign. You were clobbered by die 
press, and you had husband prob- 
lems — wow, did you have husband 
problems! — up to here. Til bet you 
could use faster, stronger relief.” 

The point is, Geraldine Ferraro 
ought to be selling aspirin tablets. 
□ ' 

After its excellent start with Wil- 
liam Miller, American Express 
went astray in casting Senator Sam 
Ervin as the lead in a “Do-you- 
know-me?" commercial. Having 
been on television daily for one 
entire summer as a star of the Wa- 
tergate bearings, Ervin was instant- 
ly recognized by every American 
old enough to have graduated out 
of the Pepsi Generation. 

The casting of Geraldine Ferraro 
is even more disastrous. It mokes 
you wonder how the ad world 
would have cast Vice President 
Bush if he bad been the loser; prob- 
ably as one of the old athletes of the 
Miller Ute gang crushing beer cans 
for the tidfladon of Mickey Spfl- 
lane's blonde doIL 

If out-of-work politicians, as ap- 
pears likely, are going to make a 
habit of cashing in Ihai fame for 
the big, big bucks or TV salesman- 
ship, somebody who knows politics 
ought to set up an agency to shape 
their new careers successfully. The 
ideal person for this job might be 
President Reagan, if snow ores or 
waffle batter doesn’t snap him up 
as soon as he leaves office. 


New York Tima Service 


Producer Gary Kurtz Holds 
America Up to a Film Mirror 




Washington Fosi Soviet 

G ARY KURTZ, 44, produced 
“American Graffiti," “Star 
Wars," “The Empire Strikes 
Back” and “Dark Crystal.” He is 
executive producer of "Return to 
Oz" for wait Disney Studios. 

He grew up in the suburbs of 
Los Angeles and San Francisco in 
co mmuni ties not unlike the one 
depicted in “American Graffiti." 
He had to finish paying his way 
through the University erf South- 
ern California because he insisted 
on studying filmmaking, a line of 
study his parents dismissed. Like 
many younger filmmakers, Kurtz 
apprenticed with Roger Connan, 
learning how to make low-budget 
films. In 1966 he was drafted into 
the Marine Corps, where he 
served as a photographer, and his 
attitude about violence reached 
the point where he would not car- 
ry a firearm; he carried a light 
meter in his pistol holster. 

Discharged in 1969, Kurtz re- 
turned to California, working as 
associate producer on several 
small-budget films, including 
“Two Lane Blacktop” and 
“Chandler." before teaming up 
with George Lucas to make 
“American Graffiti." 

Kurtz divides his time between 
homes in London, New York City 
and San Francisco. He was inter- 
viewed by Lawrence Meyer and 
Joel Garrean for The Wi 
Post. Following are exempts ! 

their conversation, 

Q: Not ody in the science fic- 
tion, but in “American Graffiti," 
you have heU up the cultural mir- 
ror to us and said, “Here’s who 
you are.” Did you do that con- 
sciously? Are yon surprised at the 
reaction? 

A: Initially we were very sur- 
prised. A lot of characters por- 
trayed by the great stars of the 
'30s and ’40s were mythological 
characters. Certainly the John 
Wayne character. The Western 
became the American version of 
Greek mythology because it had 
the same criteria. The heroes were 
masters of their own destiny. It 
was a setting that was historically 
f amili ar and yet distant enough tO 
allow romanticizing. 

Q: The mythmaking is totally 
by accident? 


A: No, not totally. But the cine- 
ma is a. very powerful medium 
and very realistic. The impres- 
sions that are made on people out 
of literature or out of the theater 
are more or less intellectual im- 
pressions. In film the visuals can 
just overwhelm you on an emo- 
tional level If it doesn't work on 
that son of gut, direct plug-in 
level first, you don’t have any- 
thing. 

Unfortunately, that’s been tak- 
en too far by television commer- 
cials and by just basic television. 
They work with extremely shal- 
low material. To jazz up what 
isn't there, they use all the tucks 
they have. You can see it on Sat- 
urday afternoon football They 
are not content to sit and watch 
the ga f p c, You've got to have slow 
motion, instant replay — any- 
thing to generate wonderful im- 
ages that they fed are the only 
thing that keeps the audience 
from getting bored. 

Q: You, the king of razzte-daz-. 
ade, think that’s bad? 

A: Sure. Look at the Coca-Cola 
commercials. They cram a tre- 
mendous amount of emotional 
content into 60 seconds. I'm not 
saying that that’s bad for a televi- 
sion commercial — or a political 
commercial A Reagan commer- 
cial is full of that. There's no con- 
tent at all, it’s all sizzle and no 
steak. Ads have had a bad effect 
on the audience. I worry that the 
young audience especially is not 
willing to sit still for a slowly 
developed story. 

Q: What share of the mythmak- 
ing is yours, as a producer? . 

A: It depends on the relation- 
ship between the writer, the pro- 
ducer and the director. I fed like I. 
contribute to the end result con- 
siderably. About half the time is 
spent on organization, adminis- 
trative duties, putting together 
and supervising the unit that the 
director can function within. 


that film because the script is not 
a linear story. It’s an atmospheri c 
piece. It ail takes place in one 24- 
hour period or less. The script 
jumps from incident to mcidenL 
The time thread is the radio disc 
jockey and the music, which 
makes a comment on each scene. 
That is very hard to write down in 
the script. So we made a tape of 
Wolfman Jack and a lot of the 
songs we wanted to use and we 
played that when we talked about 
the script. But still it was passed 
over by a lot of people. 

A lot of the incidents in the 


screenplay came from real life. 

to some- 


creenpiay came trom 
Everything happened 
xxiy. We worked for at 


E\ 

body. We worked for about a year 
in preparation. I looked into the 
purchase of old cars and fixing' 
them up, investigated the shoot- 
ing on the city streets. 

Q: You were really making a 

film about you idles? 

A: About the era, or about 
growing up. Filmmakers have 
done that for a long rime, com- 
mented on basically their own ex- 
perience in life. We felt in the 
early 70s that growing up in the 
’30s seemed to be like the ancient 
times. We'd gone through the 
Vie tnam War and the hippie era 
and it fdt like the world had 
changed so much that it was just 
an interesting idea to document 

what it was like to cruise on Satur- 
day night 

Q: What were your expecta- 
tions about the magnitude of tins 
movie? 

Ai None, virtually. We fdt that 
the characters were funny but re- 
alistic enough so that (hey could 
have some identity, especially 
with our age group, and that it 
could generate a small audience. 

Q: How much did it make? 

A: Eventually, over 563 mil- 
lion. 



W?*;- 




y >, ,• Vy.*.v 

•w / . * w, .aV 


Producer Kurtz; *You remember images. 


Q: Can you give me examples 
of problems that you had to deal 
with in making “Star Wars," espe- 
daBy in bringing across the emo- 
tional impact? 

A: “American Graffiti” is a 
better example. We had a difficult 
time getting anyone interested in 


Q: And now you have homes 
where? 

A; Several different places, but 
the main thing that came ont of 
“American Graffiti" doing well 
was that it was much easier to 
deal with “Star Wars." It was also 
turned down by several people. 
But Fox took the chance primari- 
ly because “American Graffiti" 
was successful 


cal views, but in your films 
no reflection of your views. 

A: Indirectly there is. “Star 
Wars" films reflect on basic atti- 
tudes of the individual characters 
involved. Luke Skywalker learns 
— certainly not a new lesson — - 
that each of us has to be responsi- 
ble for our own actions. 

We have a tendency not to Fed' 
responsible for the people around 
us — our community. That's one 
of the things that's told out of 
most fantasy stories by abstract- 
ing it out into never-never land. 
Same reason Clint Eastwood's 

Harry” char acter is SO 

■. Whether you agree with 
him politically or not, he's able 
to get results from doing some- 
thing. Most of us fed so frustrat- 
ed. 

Q: You are involved in the cre- 
ation of me of the most highly 
visible symbols of oar age. The 
defense initiative is called “Star 
Wars." What kind of feelings do 
you have about the creation of that 
symbol? 

A; I don’t feel good about how 
it’s being applied, certainly. The 


‘Dirty i 

xjpular. 


whole idea of weapons in outer 
space is very troublesome to me. 

The creation of symbols — 
that's one of the reasons film is so 
strong and popular — you re- 
member images. Everybody 
knows Darth Vader from “Star 
Wars." [But] there was no idea 
originally that these things would 
be created in a way that would 
make them like that. 

Q: What is the satisfaction for 
yon in waiting an “American Graf- 
fiti," a “Star Wars"? 

A: I came up through the ranks. 
I went to film school and worked 
as a came raman and an editor and 
a printer operator and almost any 
other kind of a job that I could get 

to gain experience. Seeing the nun 
come together from an idea to 
finish is vety satisfying. After a 
film is finished, the most satisfy- 
ing thing is that an audience ap- 
preciates or enjoys it. 

Q: Do you ever buy a ticket to 
yoor own movie just to watch the 
audience? 

A: I have, f won't sit through 
the films though, because 1 only 
see the things that are wrong with 
them. 



Ann Getty, Weidenfe 
Buy Grove for $2 MR 


A company headed by Ann ■ 
and the British publisher G 
Weidenfeld has bought 
Press, the publishing tea, 
brought Samuel Beckett, 
Genet and Bertolt Brecht to A i 


can readers. Barney Roiset *?. 
founded Grove Press in Gw#r. ' * ' 


\ 


y u l»ir<ik 

l lifllog 


Village in 1951 and remains i' 
dent and publisher under t, 
year contract, said the group' 

52 Bullion. Ann Getty is the*! 

Gordon Getty, trustee of, £ * _ ■ » g* 

billion oil-family mist. Rosce.i / i 1 1** 

also published D.H. L *3 Im 1 
"Lady Chatterley’s Lover" to' *** 
fended it in obscenity thauf' 



V 1 


the first project under the new 1 
raufd be 


ership would be publication 
Beckett’s correj 




volumes erf 
denoe and notes on products 
his plays. And Evergreen Revi 
magazine that appeared in 
1950s and '60s as a showca* 
Grove Press writers until it f< 
hard times in 1973, will be rev 
perhaps as a quarterly. Rosset 
Weidenfeld said drove I 
would operate independent! 
Weidenfeld Ltd., his British hi 
□ 


i t 

s ram 

- 

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Two scientists who he 
that cancer can result when t 
loses control of a normally be 
dal gate will share the S5( 
Bristol-Myers Award forcana 
search. WtHuun S. Haywird, 
of the laboratory of mdeculh 

netics at Memorial Sloan-Kettj 

Cancer Center in New York, _ 

Dr. Philip Leder, chairman a 
Harvard Medical School gejK 
department, will be honored > 

1 1 as winners of the eighth ah 
prize, Bristol-Myers Co, W'L* 
makes household and nag' 
products, announced. HayVi). 
and colleagues showed that a 
can activate cancerous potenff 
a gene called myc. Leder pro* • 
insights into activation of ntf ' in 1 ; 
its movement to another local ' 
the chromosomes, and recentn 
found more about the 
strains of cancer-prone 
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the 

: 


One week after winning a Q , 
my award for best new rec 
artist, the pop singer Cynil 
has been nominated ft* 


L ET«( 

•j. 4 


American Video Awards for ?• 


After Time” and “She Bop.? 
winners in the IS categories! 
announced at the 


co award ceremony .April 3 A 
ta Monica, California. % 


» 

* t 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


TROPICAL WATBRONT privacy in 
antique- filiad pfawt utk in hauia* on 
BhiaUd Bay. Janaioa'i impadad 
louftoatt axat Meal for directors' 
meatirn far 2 to 14 people. Priced 
ran 51.295 per couple per week; 
indbdes nno food & dnnk, tramporfa- 

hoe. lams court. Ron & Mcncur*. 

1)6 N. Scan Asaph, Alexandria, VA 

22314. Tefe &033&S276. 


«W PATBir IAWOFGHMA. OflC 
aefafrom she Owes* Patent office & 
agency vnrfmg London, Par- 

*. Oiweldorf & Munidt. Seffinm lefa 
- Body April 1981 Apply Bax 


A M43, UiT„ 63 Long Aow'ta 

•b Umdoa 638 3688 


WC2E 9JK or let I 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
Paris: 6345961 
. Rome 678 03 20. 


JACQUES COUSTEAU UCTUffi M 
EngSth, Amazon Hm Fri, NeuUy 
Morris 8. 8 pjn. Cot 722 94 31 


IBM/PC XT, AT. Sava. m. > 
Col B - 10 pm. 577 89 62 Paris. 


ATjwnoNEXEamves 


m &• ktf Jnofiona /H^y rl 

bams wfaremmttanenre 
of a m J C on readers war U- 
wtfss am# of whom am In 
faenm and Indue h y. wtt 
mad A inf Me n (Ptrh 

613S9SJ before IOoml. on- 

earing M wo tan Mw you 

bath, tmd yoor ru nups mi 

4 V «» wfmri 44 hows. The 

rafm k US. $9.80 or heal 

•anheahn# par fine. You mutt 
indudo anuri a *■ ori nadS- 


BU5INESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

tneerporefcon and nwwuatnart im UK, 
isfa « Man, Turks. Angufa. Oronnal 


Idonds, Parana. Ijberio ond mart otfw 
ofhhor# arm. 

• Confidantes) profes si onal 
advice 

* tnaned fa la ovnfabi i ry 

• Nonanee aamion 

* Boar RaOMrabeni 

* Accounting & o dnani i trariop 

• Mad, telephone ft telex 
hw wm fami lary bai Mrt farac 

5il£CT CORPOKATE 
SBtVKESUD 
Head Office 

Mt Pboeani. Oaaflka. Mo of Men 
Tab Douglas (06241 23771 
Tefaoc UUS4 SELECT O 


Usncksn Kopnorn u ive 
2-5 OU Bond S/.. landon SI 
Tel 01-493 4344, The 28247 SC5LDN G 


COMWTKAC. TV* leader in Stock ond 

Gomeority Analysis. IBM PC / XT 

/AT new veruoe now am i able. Cam- 


pwrade, PO Ba* 566. 1211 Geneva i 
jwgttfand. Cot (41/22)28 03 31 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FOR YOM 
NEXT MTBMAnONAL MOVE 


ro* a rm estimate cau 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHB4S: 

BAJKBjONA 

BONN: 

NEMBb 

nmiwm. 

CADGE] 

RAMCRJRTi 

MNEVA: 

LONDON: 

MADUDe 

MANCHBTBb 

MUNICH: 

NAPLES: 

PARS: 


VBMA: 

ZURKHi 


an^nMM 


95618*3144 

Miiiii mm I 


(01) 941.12.12 

|Q3|65 231 11 
■H1J66062 
0421)170591 

[02) 720.95.63 

El 

022V43.85JO 
[01I9A1v41j41 
[01)471^450 
[061)7072016 
■■■1415036 
CM 117501622 
WOM9000 
■■5269342 
■2)955520 

01)363-20.00 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


MOVING 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 

WHY USE AGENTS? 


The Beet Smdm ham Mw 

§ ^ J 9*4 — ej * /. am 

IVUNJWJIM INDIV 

ALL PAWS (3) 036 63 11 


CONHNEX Cotorian to 300 dries 
worldwide - Air/Saa Col ChorSe 
281 18 81 Pom frwr Opera] Cars too 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OONTAMStWOOD SERVICES UD 

HGH INCOME HAN 
EARN 17% POt ANNUM 
On I m e efm en ts al $5320 
fimn 5 la 15 yarn 
, Wfa fa i um faveriment $2730 
[Cor tf oin er worid Swvkm Ud moraga 
end operate O firri dens wldwidn 
conJomer letamg service n Alt 
sfapptng industry and spoeiaEu 


prewkfing invmsors w* a 

HIOH riXED 


■Hmcome 

wrm seanuTY ■ 


For fal detail of Ifas High hcoma Plan 
tOW INCORPORAflNG NEW 

CAPITAL REPAYMENT OPPORTUNITY] 


. REPAYMENT OPFCKIUNXY] 
(Mna coNTAietwoni} 

SBIVCE SOVKZ UD 

25 OUSTS TECRACZ. 

SOUTHAMPTON 
SOI 1BO, HWIAND 
Tab 0703 335322. 

Tbc 47616O4TWL0 O 


CONSULTANT 
HffiNCH BAKBUES 

If rtereo n d in opening o French Britery 
Goinanferie «i mis USA, seek die 


French Prafemanal to hand* ywir 
neo ds, P eraotwri Irani 

MASTR BAKSS and 

Loundi your bunness in one 


leave your problerra to US. 

Gri or wrta Main Ha i aanuterii 
HIB4CH HAKBtY «. PASTRY 


CONSULTANTS 
1211 D Kentwood Ave 
Soi Jese, Cd 95129 USA 
(408] 994-2507 


EXPORT ASSISTANCE 

JN buy Doode. for mafading in 
IS Of OH vrih enort, faW venhm 
considered AJJiAWB 27 M Paris 


DEMEXPOKT 

PARIS • LYON • MARSBUE 
UUE4NKE 

™l moving by jpeddel from 


awi moving oy speacMst Trom mrsor 

cities in Frcnce to dl cities in dm world. 

Tal fata from France 16 (05] 24 10.82 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS* SUBURBS 


Embassy Service 


4 Ave. <|» M— me 
75004Pwfa 

Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


AGENT IN PARIS 


FLATS FOR SALE 

PHONE 562-1640 

FLATS FOR RBIT 

PHONE 562-7899 

OFFICES FOR RENT/SALE 

PHONE 562-6214 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


GOOD MVESTMENT 

VflUh AREA necr 

CHAMPS aYSOS 


stwfo, 24 sqm. F40MOO 
' “• F475JOOO 


- studio, 36 tqjik 

FRANKUN ROOSEVaT 

- studio. 37 sqon. FTVOmO 

D. flEAU 294 20 00 

132 U Ha ass m r a w 75008 tots 


FOCH — ETOflLE 

300 sqjn, perfect conrftian l 48i floor, 
5 bedrooms, 5 baths, 2 mcafi roams 

EMBASSY SERVICE 

562 26 40 Ext. 367 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBUBBS 


4IHt fiGUSE SAMT MBH 

Historic X VRtft i 
restored freestone _ 

EXCEPTIONAL 90 [ 


Large fving On garden 

GAMb &7 22 48 


CHANIM1T. Private sels a moat prat 
figkxis rea d a it xJ atari, 6500 Main- 
land, 5 rnrn. frtxngoff chi, 30 min. 
drive from Peris. PsSOJOtLWrifa Bw 
1857, Harriet Triune, 92521 Nmfty 
Cedex. France 


PAIBS 61H ST. GERMAIN (near), own- 

er 1 sis in renovated b um tng, nri 
pieo-olene with dhmrier, Traom, 

t ob iui W wiiBn. bottL separate WG. 
B«c 1863, Horrid Triune, 9252) 
NeuByGedmt fiance 


(CAR PLACE DE5 VOSGES. 17i cen- 

tury. faufldsog, 4 room. Utdhen, both, 
— — s^m. 


perfari eontSBorv 105 
njOOJOQ. Tel 296 61 38 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


MONTPARNASSE VAVM. 150*^, 


froeikina, la floor, lying, 
mngmg room, mricTi rottev Teh 


PLACE VtCTOR HUGO (net*), high 
doss pied-a-terre, afl deconfled & 
furriroed, Ivmg + 2 bedrooms + 2 

balhx. Karin da Roien 272 40 19. 


PLACE DG5 VOSGES. Exopfanri 
bu3riKL45aue. 4- uieuiuna, luw- 
rious, Bgh proa- Tab 33353 03 

7TH WVAUDES. Ideri piedkslene, 2- 
room, comfort. R60^00 545 3428. 


5TIENCH PROVINCES 


CANNES CAJJPOWK. Fontaric 200 
etfjn. Qptetment fa ipiencfid end of 
ofaifciry resid en ce. Becepdon 65 «yn, 
3 bechaona. Private goRfar400 jjm. 
MarvrBaas A urnpaDabie soovmtw. 

SSI, 47 La Croisette, 06400 

|93| 38 19 19. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


BELGIUM 


HISTORICAL OPPORTUNITY 

Inilieiliim 

MMV8MI HVWWII MWlRRM 

avenue Louse, 7600 sqjrv. Prince Ho- 
tel. 1900 style lobe nmovded + shop- 
pfao certor/gdhry + offcro. etc. 

■xtccriori price US$55 muon, 
fafe. Dyfanan iTA Paris VA 34 93, Tbr 
642504 F. 5 rue iTArtafa, 75008 Ports 


GREECE 


HYDRA. BREATHTAKMGIY tfanled 

aland manor needs connoiBeurroho- 
bBafion. 1000 stun, ndased land 
with torrooed garden, 3 paticK- Roar 
450 jqet. lW5jpaQ._ Write 


T Boson Place. Condon SW1 or 
SOUK 


ring 01-235 2660 


WtST SHJb lajOOOSQAL of beach 

trorrf *■- — * ■ 


Pjmorty fa the Pelaponese, Lo- 
rsc Grf (Scria laaoraad. Great 
tetriri at an axtraraly favarobfa 


potenfiri r 

price. Please drib 0831 Z7242 be- 
tmen 7-ICfajn. (Gtoefc titee) 


International Business Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


IMVBBAL 00NTANER5 LTD. 
Writ Merartlneeme Nan 

\m% p/a 


in US$ 


UCL provides investors wUi a high 
feesdsicome wbh security by opening 


Inquiries at 19X offar wB 
continue to be otob 


writ as recehred. 
Far detail of this fafly guarotSteed end 
inured fave sw t en r plan, asuach 
UNJVBSAL CONTAINERS LTD. 

POJOX 197 LONTON SW3 3ST 

Tel 350 0667, Tbe 89677 


CARLSBBtG 

One of CaHorraa's mod eooetisfal Real 
Estate ccxnporia has a s ri edion of 
l*td peroeh avcdoble for in ternoflcxiri 
investors. The propert fa s. Vxded 
throughout the state range • 
from 510,000 to S600K, tel « 
with terms. For x uu mia ti on about the 
c o mp a n y, the ir tra ck record and the 
proper fie*, contort 


CAMSflBKS (AND CORP. 

PO Ba* 412 
Londoa NW3 4PP 

Tab 936 9119. Tafato 268048 ott3013 


PANAMA COMPANffiS with notrinee 
rfrocton and oanfidortial Swaa / Pars, 
ana bank account formed fa 48 hours 
or ready^nade. Offahota bratfa 
formed for S7000. Curranefas or fandb 
nawd into Euraeomncy tiew dapost 

accounts writ in free faterost end 

anonymity 


lOJrifc Jloce. gL ja mas . 


Londoa SW1A 1LT. Tot 01-408 2 


WALL STREET 
SOFTWARE 

This Market Analyzer system for manual 
or automatic, stock or commodity data re- 
trieval * — J * * ” ■ ■ 

studies. 


_ . many 

tes untk the Commodore 64, 


Current a 


Apple: or IBMTC. 
nd historical futures, equities. 


and indicator data is accessible from 5$ 
countries with a brief network phone call. 


■xniwcwpMihiiiiiMrw.-wMMy 



! CSi 


LPARKROAD 

m 


305/392-8663 
TELEX 522107 


n ma,aiak - 

PHONKt ) 


NAME . 


I 


ADDRESS 

(m 


.STATH, 


I 


Charge my; □ VISA □ MASTERCARD 
Acct # _ — Exp. Date. _ . 


.ZIP, 


| Signature . 


I Kill use □ 
Compaq, p 


>*c 11+ , lie, He 
ler compatibles 


□ AME RICAN EX PRESS 

IEE 3 




□ IBM PC. XT. AT, AT&T PC, 
u Commodore 64 □ Send more details 


I 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

THE RNANOAL TIMES 
EUROPPS BUSRrig HPN5PAPHI 
now operates a nxxring of pubfioohon 
deSvery «yvice ta subeeriber* Bring in 
Cologne ■ DunddorF- Frtxfcfwt ■ 
Stuttgart . Munich cite fa Northern 
Geraxxiy fa the cfly of Hamburg. 

For free kiab and 
farther detail please contach 
Berod W. Wotirto 

Fincxteid limes fiaxiUurT 

Tefc 0fl9-759fl.UK Trimc 416193 

No FT ___ no uxnment 

ISli 


AGENTS WANTED 

High aonenadan paid. Lahat stoteofl 

tee-ert seamy products. 

• hSgM vision 

• 5wMSIanae 

• Anthtenarism 

• Gxjrterfateligmce 

• Many, many more. 

fiasetfed oreca available to qunKed 
agents who wish to rep this exrieriva 
Fiadud foe af world fanxws security 
systems. Cortact M_ Henri. 

CCS in Peris, 297 5400. 

_ FOR SA1E M ROME I ITALY) 
Good budnem Inducing 400 sr^n. 

is^e yfSHffRiaa 

J®00Sa Stock coat pries 
US$200,000 neapriri*,. Writes 

Hems Reft 311, 4 roe del Wb, 
fifaripofity of Monaco. 

HM 


IHTBtNATlONAL QBE5HORE 
COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 
_ NKNH £110 

Conyrelvsneve Administration. 

p0wora Attorney. 
Regbtend effiom. Telex, tefaphoin, 
rooi fanetedna. 

Umri ReeauraK 

Brteaarrfa House, 

snnSi 

"S INDEX OP THE 

WBDDtE EAST PUBOCATK3NS" 
Seeks dbtrixXon workhvids to tnarkri 
K new & kitovobve trade guitfaa. 
Forhether mforaioSon please ooreadr 

14, me <fa Prony 

75017 Ptek 

Phcm m_ZZ7 62 62 

Trie* 64D756 9FT F. 

^^3 




nous, air axdriuned. fiSy equfaped 
fa the Grip cna. Intend start protect 
. June 85. Very high proforitety, fang 
tentL Tbc Free tsreq, no aimeney ex- 
rfange resfodfom. Gortaeti Hi. 
FAJifae*, 3 Owdaweod, Htxn> 

Trine 8813271 G6Q3M Q AHn 
Boon. 



BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


HUOKANOf 

U^. based oaanteics/froqrcncBv h ofa 
srier seek* export sources of prarifea 
none bneid rrojyraiccs. Please for- 
ward de Safa. Gjn l id e n ri iAiy mured. 
Telex no. 353240 atm Mr. Chorkn. P.Ol 
B ax 102, LMe fids, NJ. 07424 USA. 


MUTtriWUlON OPPORTUNITY fa 

CAO. Software sales. A UK aunpany 
fa adfafl ie world & devrloctog soft- 
ware for the ce ml r H dteii & ntfafag 
inrfaitry with vnB eriobEshad woddP 


atria reptfarion far the quefity CAO. 
seen area efiartbutan ar joint veriue 

partners Id form an fatenrahana! or- 

ganaotiorc Northontplgn 39955 UK 


■WESTMOIT OPPOR1UMTY- 
IMque, oorefaly structured favari- 
menlfte' xidhedurii who wah to oug- 
laens thee- portfofo wah U5. facome 

Pwudiq fmgile asset fa energy 

and security management. Bread pay- 
barf, pa*i«Si 
WEMS / «X he. 1820 Chapel Ave. 
W, Chary Hi, NJ 08002. 


PU3MDA- TEXAS. Iimutraenls fa land 

" oonmerdfal properties fa centrri 
Honda & Fort Worth/DoDca area. 
Lease foorfs showing good relunra, 
pu Swim bc>* guoniiteed retuna on 
otMDecdK papd. V/e mat fa ob- 
Jenfap^U-S. residence was. Write: 
fo* 1849. Harold Trfaune, 92521 
Cate. France. 


WC OFFSHORE OOMFANBI We 
prtmde narrinee Ofaedar & Sear.- 
taryl Complete dmiwflkfaonl London 
brak aeeounts opened lirouttanooody 
xriheampany being purdscead) Bear- 
er Shane aedkOTif. Congmy 


Begistufao'g Ixi, Hew Cbnp ai xes 
17 ' Widagate Sl^ Lorrfor El, 
_7H> TeEOI 377 UP4. Triem 8939W 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FRBH WATER PEARL strand and 
loose pearts on sofa fa Hang Kong. 
Own factory and best price. More 
driaSfc The 57719 POXAShX Tel ,Q 

683276-7. 9/F, Wfaa Lok Mention. B& 

A^UPe^gR^IST, Kin. Hong Kong 


OS. COMPANY CEAUNOfa wporV 
export bating far private finonefag 
bankers or mayor European insurance 
organization to confirm government 
centrri baric L/C largo amount fa 
USS. Telex fa mriidena) ta Intertrans 
France Tlx 204971 F or 600581 F 


HDUOARY BANKMQ on large ori- 
JotenAied loom. The ariy camner- 
riri bank with a rapnaseriadve rifiee 
fa London spedribarn fa tha serwos. 
Arab Overseas Bar* & Trust (WJJ 
Ud, 2B Kocfc Prince Rd. London SET. 
Tel 735 8171 


PRIVATE MME5TMMT BANKERS 

purchase rfffia* arrenaes & 
ritfigalians. Please famish compete 
dentes es confidence fa first fatter tor 
Bax 1804, Harold Tribune, 92S21 
NesJy Csosg. fiance 


YOUR OWN TEXAS OU. WBL- Shot, 
low, low rirf drflfing. 5-1 5 bmwH fteh 
production, 34 b 
dudfan. Wrfla V, 

Gas, P.O. Bate 1 
801 



BUSINESS SERVICES 


fan 

BEAUTIFUL PEOFIE 

UNUMDB} MC. 
IULA. 4 WORUNWDE 


A ooreplete social & busfaess service 
e coledlan of 

. A smASnguri 

fadhtiduab fort 


FasKon^fananeroriMiMVoniati 

CanventiotvTroda Stow P ress Parties 
Special Everix-benge MdwsJWt 
Sociri Hasts4iattesces£nle>toinan 
Sodri CompaniotsTaw" grides, etc 


212-745-7793 

212^765-7794 

330 W. 56th S, N-YjC. 10019 
Seneca Representatives 
edWoridvride. 


OFFSHORE 
L1MJTH) COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPAFBB 


RESIAUtANT PRBMSB YO I 

Brlgiian & London, 


puired Abo foreign i 

i Lendon&Sorihr 


to let fa i , , 

urn required. Fleam write tec 

558 Incorporated h Enrimd w 

tied fdMynt 91 Loowd 5f. I 
EC2A 4QS. Tab 01-622 7868 


COSTA RICA, KNIT/OASmtr u 

POriunity to ocq uir a pnol batting J 

flomera plai, writ esWbSshed r •' 

(ri & u T ternu t i mul morlc et s. 

only $100000. for axspiata <j 

Geneva 022782 79 03 or wii 
Carnro, 2 Pan. de la fin Ch 
MEITOi S w itzer l and. 


raSTRJSUTOR / MRTMR 


touttsa for ihe so fa t 

ry hondwrilten parrfanent 

loaiei and afasxraas et AH pc 
' ofahed wood deptot^aes. I 


DfljECT FAC WRY.P^ 

4or7idj^Dns^^CanvwtaJ 
eotac or wsa ri rig jyb assembly. ' 


Imprimi par Offprint, 73 rue de. 




, ORNEY, 
jna to estabfah a 
a boutique fa LA 
j far mtE u florion. 
Grass, Esa, fa Para 
. Tab 254% 62 or 
3- 15, Telt 4990HHL 
■9244 


SBVKS, bust- 
) fax. occouraaney, 
IronjWidtv sechnt 


. i Geneva, 

h ct&n, 1211 

and 


WANT in Au> 
r Reprttentefivo , 
JefodgeteMtof' 
treotioa North. 
.100 MOW St. 
d; 02-922 2555. 
--9572234. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ITALY 


COMPLETELY CONVERTED farm- 
house with central heafiqj, 13 ba 
southeast of Florence fa 8 acres with 
annex peal S solar panels, 6 bed- 
rocmt A baths. Swing, htdieiv dfafaa. 
SBOSm. TdCopponi 55/flW^ 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 


Prindpdify of Monaco 

SOUNG VW EXCEPTIONAL 
APARTMENT, PATIO, 


700 sqa wh ri ssadw 

, Carter at town, a 


to ad errfi sxeo. Carter of town, cofa\, 
300 sqjn. ivfag space, large enbsra, 
logo reception, library, (fining, TV 
room, 4 bedrooms, 3 brihs, 1 roan far 
staff with bath, spaaous modem fully 
equipped Ukhcn, 1 fame spexe roam, 
ana* office, large among room, 
l Kgh dan service: 

efadric bfindv tec 


garage. 

Air am . 

EXCLUSIVE . ._ 

W.S4 
MC 98001 MONACO CH3EX 
Tefc 193) 50 66 84 
Tbc 469477 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


PRIVATE DETECTIVE 5CANDMAVIA 
S Finland, ad Norway; 24 hours 02- 
42 72 1 A Tlx 18949 Agent, Mon 
Q. BeUev, farmer paeoe/ array 
oer. contacts worUwidei Pott to Jenv. 
banetorgrt 4, WI154 Odo 1 Norway 


BUSNE5S SBtVHXS M 084EVA. 

Seaotariri services 7 transkAons / 
phorm t telex / mat service ftmount- 


ng / company fa nnut i um 7 Oarage 
“ ‘211 Go- 


space. Novcmest, P.CXB.92, 1211 ( 
neva 11, 22^44 77 Tx 423 070 


WORLDWIDE VDEOTAPE systems. 
GmY ba an tocrifan far an fafoartart 
breiness ar fantey rneetfag? IMsH vid- 
ericroe rari ratrie, rxt eudions. etc. ta 


HQNQ tOQNtt, YOUR TAX Shelter, 
nwnvriong carter, nomi n ee s , trade 
W Ifadge far Qifap mariait, at roam 
9w. Skx House. TS.T. Hong Kar 

Tbr: 39644 DSMCT Tefc 3t72fl833 


TRANSLATION ML LANGUAGES 


Tefc HI 33? 89 W° ni ^ <l * ' 


MONEY AVAHAHE far virile bud- 

CamMI tater- 


nesxes or new srajech. Camhri Inter- 

nriionri finanoex Constants, 2B17 E. 


Oddand Peek Bhd, Fort Laurfxdafa, 

Fi 33308 USA. TLe 332425. 


US TAX OR 8USMESS 
Consult AJA. Mehrri& Co. 

AocountaRk Coital HurMa rfef 

Fface. Londo n W3. Tefc f)l| Wl 0305 


FINANCIAL 


TQl 

INVESTMENTS 

ADVE 

dNATKMS 

3 St 

Mn 

91 

VAG 

CANADA. Font favariment 50 aim 
East Montred. D*y estate laaeSad in 
a msligtous ana, 600 oarw, lovely 
old stone masters reaidenep. 3 am- 
ptoyns' homes 6 guests' home. Costt- 
pletriy oqulppod for immeefirie oper- 
tdotL Jocriyne Unord. Bromis 
Eerities he 239 Atafa Street, Cowans- 

OTBCE-On 

F .storfnxxket 
i to 1985. fcv 
vket. monthly 
■ng, etc. etc. 
0 each, 1968 
30 to 1985 
0 each, fa- 
safa: Vaud 

RNANOAL RWE5TMB4T aopanum- 
ty. New SpeoJ^nd cruise slap oper- 
ating crudes fa South Medharman 
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