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No. 31,739 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Urge V^likdo^pe 

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Reagan 
To Veto 
Farm Bill 


l g MK 
hard imw 


The Associated Press 


* - ;■* v 

Mr. Mubarak s &m'if lcr his arrival 


Mould 

W eider 


.. Ml . — . President to Cite 

. J u d HURGHADA, Egypt — King ai mite (530 I kilo- , T , D , 

* rc ' s u Tinh /fassein of Jordan has endorsed towers) southeast of Cairo. Egyp- It66u tO m$£UUC€ 

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Federal Deficits 



l aid >■“ 

‘.’Pwaic ..Jiast peace talks with Israel 


step 


reviving 


-coordinated 
doa was 
talks with 
President Ronald Reagan begm- 


of the Uboniong— - izz. 

Dr. Philip i !V n « Israd has rejected talks that in- 
Man ;ird vif; Eluded PLO representatives, 
der-irtmcnt Sfjf. Hussein began private talks with 
11 a& winners of iw — 

prize. Bnsiol.toj*’;. 

™^€raxi Says 


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JEAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ITALY 


‘■ n, HdUd» The Arab leaders, ■speaking mngTueday. 

'^Vcdnesday after a meeting in this The long sai 
D led Sea resort, also insined that United States to deride 
Tw.j M.ientki< he Palestine Liberation Organiza- respond favorably to Mr. Mnbar- 
thai cancer on *^on play a major role in thed^- ok's proposals, and to the Feb. 1 1 
low* c.introlfj ^ogue. agreement between Jordan and the 

cial g tne w ^ “1 never said that the Palestinian PLO cm a strategy for peace. 

BriMol-hhert s*** 'iekgaxes should not be PLO mem- “This may be the last c h a n ce , in 
March. UflKW^lwiV Mr. Mubarak said. “I said fact it is the last chance." Hussein 
uh^rJ.- (tfwre <han mice that the PLO is said. “I cannot guarantee anything 
the West Rank in in advance." 

He added that "there is a very 
□arrow window for hope" for suc- 
cess in peace talks. 

Mr. Mubarak said that the Arab 
League recognized the PLO as sole 
representative of the Palestinians 
and "we cannot deviate from this 
because this is noi our right-” 

He has said he win try to get the 
United Stales to open a dialogue in 
Washington with a Jordanian-Pal- 
estinian delegation as a prelude to 
peace talks with Israel 
“1 share President Mubarak’s 
feelings that the dialogue he sug- 
gested is a very vital element for 
progress,” Hasson said. "Once 
again, we are in the position of 
having made the first vital move. 
We have to wail for the reaction 
now” 

The United States refuses to talk 
with the PLO until h recognizes 
land’s right to exist Israd says it 
to Palestinians not 
the PLO. 

In Jerusalem, the Israeli defense 
minister, Yitzhak Rabin, said 
Wednesday that "some problems” 
exist with Egypt’s proposal. 

But, Mr. Rabin told leaders of 
the United Jewish Appeal, "1 be- 
lieve it’s in our interest to explore 


SwSKkrms Talks 

insight-, into acim* 

IKlS^hould Cover 

found nure aboui s-, 
strains oi cancer. ^ 


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MONACO 


REALiitialive was consistent with the 
F0iy72 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, 
^ut he added that it "must never- 


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of Monaco 


Idess continue to constitute an every ave nu e, every slightest posa- 
iportant reference print in the bifity to move toward peace.* 

His remarks appeared directed 
against the rightist Likud bloc of 
the coalition government, which 
has said the proposals raised by 
Mr. Mubarak are a public relations 


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Hire negotiations in Geneva.’ 

MOMHSpeakmg to a joint meeting of 
Pri^jpog-pngress, the Socialist prime mm- 
f-r ubTiZlj 0 ^hai “any future result 
>F«-Ast.'nn<cid application" ri the research 

! “ Pri^iariy known 8S -pley anndf at tire United States 

^ tar wars" — should fall within 
! Excuisvtwfc fidd of negotiations in view of 
j mc wont b 6 necessary solutions to be agreed 

®*He welcomed the resumption of 

clear arms talks between the 

tiled States and the Soviet Union 
Geneva next Tuesday as a “wise 


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INEMS SERVICES 
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p.«d right deririon, greeted every- 
HW iere with a feeling of relief and 

FOR**." 

cU WrTbe dialogue with the East rep- 
vuw ;ents an essential channel to 

the risks of a conflict and to 

“ TTjld, in a climate of securin', a 

BLSINESjxj and solid peace," Mr. Craxi 
d. 

“The security of Western Europe 
VfQttd North America is inc 


it can only be guaranteed by about 12 
engthening the bonds which 


■ UN WlAdraws Americans 

More than 30 Americans work- 
ing with UN peacekeeping forces 
in southern Lebanon have been 
withdrawn to Israd following Shi- 
ite threats to attack or kidnap 
them. United Press International 
reported Wednesday from Jerusa- 
lem. 

Timur Goksel, spokesman for 
the UN Interim Force in Lebanon, 
confirmed that a March 1 directive 
from UN headquarters in New 
York bad ordered 16 U-S. military 
observers and 17 civilian employ- 
ees to stay in Israd and not repent 
for work at UN offices in the south- 
ern 1/tbanese village of Naqoura, 


Untied Pros Intenuuwnal 

up to the WASHINGTON . — President 
to Rooah* Reagan pla nn e d to veto a 
f, u n k» farm-credit relief package on 
Wednesday, his chief spokesman 

caiH Thy a/tmrnioralirm qj]ed 

the measure unnecessarily expen- 
sive. 

Larry Speakes. the deputy White 
House press secretary, said. "I an- 
ticipate the president will be pre- 
pared to take action on it virtually 
immediately after its arrival at the 
White House” 

Then Mr. Speakes, with slashes 

The U.S. farm crisis burns 
across the prairie keeping hot 
fines busy In 10 states. Page 3. 

of his hand, drew an “X" in the air. 

He said the cerem on y in which 
Mr. Reagan would sign a veto mes- 
sage would be broadcast live, “be- 
fore God and everybody,” as a 
demonstration of the president's 
determination to hold down federal 
spending. 

It did not appear that supporters 
of the measure had the two-thirds 
vote necessary in both houses of 
Congress to override Mr. Reagan’s 
veto. 

The credit provisions of the bill 
are designed to make it easier for 
farmers already heavily in debt to 
obtain new bank loans for 
planting. They include S100 1 
m interest subsidies, S1.S5 billion 
in new loan guarantees, and about 
S7 billion in immediate advances 
on crop loans normally not re- 
ceived until harvest lime. 

Agriculture Secretary John R. 
Block and other Reagan adminis- 
tration officials have argued that 
the farm-credit measure would cost 
S2 billion, while Democrats say it 
would cost less than $500 million if 
most fanners repay thdrloans. The 
adminis tration has offered a less 
extensive program of credit aid. 

The measure is attached to a biB 
to provide relief to victims of fam- 
ine in Africa. The Senate majority 
leader. Robert J. Dole of Kansas, 
said the Senate would be prepared 
to act quickly to provide African 
relief after the veto. 

■ Democrats See Pofitkal Gain 

Dan Bat af The Washington Post 
! Washier, 



Bush Visits Famine Victims in Sudan 

Vice President George Bush of the United Stales poured mSk Tuesday for Ethiopian refugee 
children at a camp in Sudan. The vice president was greeted Wednesday by thousands of 
Sudanese when he visited a second camp at H Obeid in central Sudan and pledged that the 
United States would do its “level-best" to help wipe out a food deficit of almost two million tons. 


Thailand Sends 
Jets to Repel 
Vietnamese in 
Border Battle 


Senate Unit, Opposing Reagan, Votes 
Cuts in Arms Spending of $79 Billion 


By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
Budget Committee, a£ pan of its 
efforts to restrain the federal defi- 
cit. has voted, 18-4, for a military 
budget ceiling that would cut S79 
billion over threeryears-from Presi-»>Agti thepu^denl u> compromise 


tions in nonmiliiary spending if 
they were combined with substan- 
tial savings from the military bud- 

g«- 

Tbe strong Republican support 
also rieans the Senate leadership 
may have the lev erage it has wanted 


!. tngtofi : 


miles sooth of Tyre. 


reported earlier from 
From the 

over farm credit, Democrats in 
Congress havb seen an opportunity 
to make political gains agunsl Mr. 
Reagan and Republican members 
from farm states who face re-elec- 
tion next year. 

Mr. .Reagan has been forced to 
choose between yielding on his 

(Cbutinned on Page 2, Col 6) 


dent Ronald Reagan’s plans. 

The proposal offered Tuesday 
by Senator Ernest F. Hoffings of 
South Carolina and backed by the 
nine other Democrats on the com- 
mittee, was supported by eight Re- 
publicans, including the committee 
chairman, Pete V. Domeniri of 
New Mexico. Four Republicans 
voted no. 

Approval of the proposal which 
is opposed by the White House, 
could open the way for a bipartisan 
pac kage of measures to cut project- 
ed deficits more sharply than the 
president's plan. Many Senate Re- 
publicans and some Democrats 
have argned that they would sup- 
port most of Mr. Reagan's pro- 
posed cuts and program dintina- 


on military spending. But Senator 


increase in a military budget that 
Mr. Reagan has sought to raise by 
5.9 percent, after an increase to 
account for inflation. 

In 1987 and 1988. the Bollings 
proposal calls for the military bud- 
get to increase 3 percent each year 
in addition to the increase for infla- 
tion. 

Because the Budget Committee 


By William Branigin 

H tishwgutn Pnu Sertice 

BANGKOK — Thai forces 
called in air strikes Wednesday in a 
fierce battle to repel Vietnamese 
units that crossed the Thai-Cambo- 
dian border in a drive to wipe out 
die last Cambodian guerrilla base 
along the embattled frontier, the 
Thai military reported. 

lhat .Air horce fighter-bombers 
flew missions against about 1.000 
Vietnamese troops who crossed the 
northern Cambodian bonier Tues- 
day in two places, as Thai ground 
troops backed by artillery fought to 
dislodge them, said the army 
spokesman. Major General Nani- 
don Dqpradiyuih. 

He said that more than 60 Viet- 
namese soldiers were killed in the 
fighting, while Thai losses were two 
killed and IS wounded. No inde- 
pendent confirmation of the figures 
was immediately available. 

[Meanwhile, a U.S. State De- 
partment spokesman said the Unit- 
ed States was speeding up a ship- 
ment of equipment, including 
armored vehicles, artillery and oth- 
er priority items needed to 
strengthen the Thai forces. It is 
now expected to arrive early next 
month, Reuters reported from 
Washington.] 

The main Vietnamese incursion, 
in which about 800 troops were 
involved, was aimed at surrounding 
the Cambodian resistance base 
called Green Hill on an escarpment 
about two miles (three kilometers) 
across the border from the Thai 
village of Tauim. the Thai military 
said. 

The base is defended by as many 
as 5,000 Cambodian guerrillas loy- 
al to Prince Norodom Sihanouk, 
who heads a three-party resistance 
coalition recognized by the United 


Nations as Cambodia's legal gov- 
ernment. 

The Vietnamese, who mudeJ 
Cambodia in December 1*TS and 
installed a government in Phnom 
Penh led by Heng Samnn. are 
fighting to complete their mo>t suc- 
cessful dr. -season offensive of the 
six-year war by wiping out alt the 
lesisian.-e bases of the three guer- 
rilla groups along die 45i*-mi!e 
Thai -Cain kxli;in border. 

As a result of the talcsi fighting, 
about 00.000 Cambodian reiugees 
have been forced to mine deeper 
inside Thailand from evacuation 
sites at three points along the bor- 
der. Western relief officials said. 

Besides the attack on Green Hill, 
Vietnamese troops Tuesdat over- 
ran the camps ol Sanror Chun gun 
and Dong Rak. about 40 nu!e\ 
northeast of the Thai bidder town 
of Aranyapralhet, Thai military 
sources said. 

Both camps already had beer, 
evacuated by their civilian inhabit- 
ants. but several hundred guerrillas 
of the anti-Communist Khmer 
People's National Liberation Front 
at Sanror Chun gun reportedly fled 
the Vietnamese assault. 

About 50,000 Cambodian civil- 
ians in the area were forced to 
move further inside Thailand when 
their evacuation sites on the Thai 
side of the border came under Viet- 
namese shelling Monday and Tues- 
day. relief officials said. 

They said about 32,000 Cambo- 
dians were evacuated farther inside 
Thailand's Surin province from a 
rile nine miles across the border 
from the Green Hill base. Farther 
to the east, the relief officials said, 
about 10.000 followers of the Com- 
munist Khmer Rouge guerrilla 
group were moved a few miles after 
their Sam Peeka evacuation site in 

. '(Continued on Page 2, CaL 4) 


Domenici warned that the proposal oecansc me Budget committee 

“won't fly" if it was not combined onty sets pending ceilings m its 
• - - — budget resolution, there is no out- 

line of what programs would have 


with enough nonmilitary spending 
cuts. 

Senates- Robert J. Dole, a Re- 
publican of Kansas, the majority 
leader, said lhat there would have 
to be negotiations with the White 
House before a final package could 

be approved. 

Larry Speakes, the While House 
spokesman, said after the vote that 
Mr. Reagan "stands squarely be- 
hind his budget." 

Under the Hollings proposal the 
1986 military appropriation would 
be increased over the 1985 level 
only enough to make up for infla- 
tion. Thus there would be no “real" 


FufnW twi Mate us,” Mr. Craxi added 
■ “JJMr. Craxi spoke to 
■ 1 gffav after meeting with Mr.: 

• t*im issuing qualified support lor 

SP 2 ™ defense plan. 

* Sw " Later, at a pros conference, Mr. 

the 

guaran- 
“ not 

j, ^jiach the 1972 treaty. 


SSS SLH HaS5 ■dnmristration’s plan SO 

U>= rarcmJ, stage — at a 
of more than $33 


Baniv. 7W ’ • 


■ £6S@$' aaX *“■ 


ion over 



U.S. Holds 
Colony Aide 
Over Drugs 

By Jon Nordheuner 

Neve York Tima Service 

MIAMI —The chief minister of 
the Turks and Caicos Islands has 
been arrested by U.S. federal un- 
dercover agents and charged with 
plotting to use the island chain 
south of the Bahamas as a base to 
smuggle narcotics into the United 
States. 

Agents of the Drug Enforcement 
Administration said Tuesday that 
Norman B. Saunders, 41, the high- 
est elected official in the British 
colony 600 miles (972 kilometers) 
southeast of Miami in the Atlantic 
Ocean, and three others, including 


[M fluriND* rreCJ-SSf 

I AM Mg ; 'J2 \ meeting with Mr. Reagan 
rr?, „^Ai ^ i ^ '■■'k ^Tuesday, Mr. Craxi said the two 
’piv*virtil ' r -2i lJSSdershada“hroadandencourag- 

fetf convergence" of views. 

vlV ESTM & — — | i rie . am convinced lhat the basic 
* unw"**. j ROf't, ;ii >Usof the United States policy 

i said that Mr. Reagan had were arr«iedai a Miami hotel afier 

these same goals accepting cash payments from un- 
through the Straie- dercover agents. The islands have a 
Initiative, from whose population of about 7^00 l 

U.S. officials said the payment 
was part of $50,000 accepted by 
Mr. Saunders during the past sever- 
al weeks to protect a proposed base 
for transshipment of cocaine and 
marijuana the agents said they 
wanted to establish on the Turks 
and Caicos archipelago. 

Mr. Sqnnrigr^ was held under 52- 
mfflion bail set Tuesday evening by 
a federal magistrate. 

Stanley Marcus; a U5. attorney, 
id the British government, which 
represented on the islands by a 
had been noti- 

^ be no proShTrcdnc- of the ndomr opoMron 
strategic and Intermediate- and had cooperated with American 
anns if the United States affinals, 
not curb its space weapons Andrew Bums, the. press coun- 




to be cut to achieve savings of $79 
billion over three years. These deri- 
sions would be made in the Armed 
Services and Appropriations Com- 
mittees and then voted an separate- 
ly in the Senate. 

But Senator Hollings said after 
the vote that his proposal would 
probably mean the elimination of 
some weapon systems and slowing 
down the acquisition of others. 

Tuesday’s vote was the first of 
many and the ceiling proposal 
could be changed. The committee 
could take the rest of the week or 
longer to get through the entire 
budget, and would then see if there 
are "enough” nonmiliiaiy spending 
reductions. 

Senator Domeniri is aiming for a 
spending reduction package that 
would reduce the deficit by be- 
tween $50 billion and $60 billion in 
1986. 

In accord with the the presi- 
dent’s budget. Senator Domeniri 
has proposed a freeze or cuts in 
most domestic spending, in addi- 
tion to seeking savings in the mili- 
tary budget. 

Tuesday’s vote could revive the 
budget assembling process in tbe 
Senate, which had been bogged 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Government-Backed Cupid 
Misses Mark in Singapore 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE —The Singa- 
pore government, which had 
hoped to improve its gene pool 
by encouraging the island’s bet- 
ter-educated citizens to many', 
now acknowledges that match- 
making is not easy. The pro- 
gram of candlelit dinners and 
cruises has resulted so far in 
only two marriages. 

Dr. Eileen Aw, head of the 
government’s Social Develop- 
ment Unit, said Wednesday 
that the cost of the two mar- 
riages between people who met 
through the organization’s pro- 
gram was almost 300,000 Singa- 
pore dollars (about $150,000). 

And Tony Tan. the minister 
of health and education, had to 
defend in Parliament the gov- 
ernment’s attempts to play Cu- 
pid against assertions that the 
program was a waste of time 
and money. 

Mr. Tan maintained that the 
unit was doing nothing wrong 
in organizing the activities to 
allow graduates to “interact.” 

He acknowledged, however, 
that tbe activities, including 
tours to holiday resorts and din- 


ners at plush hotels, bad met 
■with limited success. “Bui the 
objectives’’ of the official 
matchmaking by the Social De- 
velopment Unii, he said, "are 
long term." The program was 
launched last year by Prime 
Minister Lee Kuan Yew. 

Mr. Tan said the government 
would not force marriage on 
graduates, "but we would not 
give up so easily." 

A member of Parliament. Jek 
Yuen Thong, criticized the pro- 
gram by quoting a Chinese 
proverb: “II a cow doesn’t want 
to drink water, it is not possible 
to press its head down. And it is 
more complicated if the cow 
doesn’t want to mate.” 

Dr. Aw said lhat although 
only two sets of graduate stu- 
dents in the scheme had mar- 
ried so far, a dozen others had 
shown interest 

The unit has organized lours 
for single graduates to tbe Mal- 
dives, Manila, Australia and 
Malaysia. 

She said most of the partici- 
pants had paid some expenses, 
Nearly 5,000 graduates of uni- 
versities have taken part. 


Poles Appear to Accept Higher Prices 

Sour Shrugs Greet Third Increase for Food in 3 Years 


i. - 1 _j,earcb program we will draw nrn- 
Jw-’S advantages in the scientific 
technolo g ical field." 

■*i,>jTus fell snort erf on explicit en- 
butMr. 


* «ad b">V J V 

1,1 

^seemed satisfied that Mr. 
? had given even this limited 

-.awirt* v | ^foreign Minister Andrei A. Gro- 
8'fc" — '! TjsVl^o of the Soviet Union, who 

ss 


leoKryUmed Ptea hl niol' o nd 

Norman Saunders, the chief minister of the Turks and Caicos Islands, a British colony in 
die Atlantic, is escorted by a U.S. official after being arrested in Miami on dmg charges. 


Tied Italy last week and met with 
»!?_• «... 




srior for the British 


Mr. Saunders 



^ ** ut rnvna 

MM (kKUn* 1 M - ■“ WVIIb'O. «jUM,UlVI 

Tv. i lhat the Soviet strategy-will 

->§5^«^ewedgesin tbe alliance.” 


criminal conspiracy in the case 
were Stafford A. Missick. 47, the 
minister erf commerce and develop- 
ment; Aulden L. Smith. 33. a mem- 


ber of the Titties and Caicos legisla- 
ture; and Andre Fournier, 46, a 
French-Canadian businessman liv- 
ing in the Bahamas. 

Bail of SI million each was set 
for Mr. Missick and Mr. Smith. Mr. 
Fournier was held without bafl. 

[Britain called on Mr. Saunders 
to resign. United Press Internation- 
al reported Wednesday from Lon- 
don. • 

[“The government’s view is that 
it is inappropriate to have a chief 
minister in these circumstances," a 
Foreign Office s pok e sm a n said, 
adding that Britain would also like 
ihe other arrested officials to re- 
sign.] 

Mr. Fournier allegedly ap- 
proached undercover agents in 
their negotiations with the officials 
from the Turks and Caicos and raid 
he could provide pilots to help 
transport drugs from Colombia to 
the islands and from there to the 
United States. 


“He told the agents he had access 
to large amounts of cocaine in Co- 
lombia," said Peter F. Gntden, spe- 
cial agent in char ge of the Miami 
field office of tbe Drug Enforce- 
ment Administration. 

The smuggling of drugs from the 
Caribbean ana South America 
through the small nearby islands 
has increased in recent years. 

In recent yean, Mr. Saunders 
reportedly came under investiga- 
tion by American law enforcement 
agencies in connection with this 
(bug traffic 

In 1983, his government agreed 
to cooperate with the Drug En- 
forcement Agency to help reduce 
the flow of narcotics through the 
islands, and federal agents were in- 
vited to the islands to assist in the 
effort. 

U was.suspecied that Colombian 
drag smugglers were flying large 
amounts of cocaine to the islands, 
where the cargos were broken up 


for delivery to South Florida by 
fast, small boats. 

The operation began several 
months ago but accelerated in early 
January, when a Drug Enforce- 
ment Agency undercover agent and 
a drug informer, saying they were 
transporters of narcotics with ac- 
cess to planes and pilots, got in 
touch with Mr. Smith. Mr. Marcos, 
the U.S. attorney, said Mr. Smith 
was paid $2,000 as as incentive to 
put other officials of the island in 
touch with the agents. 

In subsequent meetings, accord- 
ing to Mr. Gruden. Mr. Smith ar- 
ranged for tbe undercover agents to 
meet with Mr. Saunders, who was 
paid $30,000 Feb. 6 to cooperate in 
the proposed venture. 

The lour suspects were arrested 
Tuesday afternoon at a hotel near 
Miami Internationa] Airport after 
Mr. Saunders was handed another 
520,000 payment, according to Mr. 
Marcus. 


By Robot Gillette 

Las Angela Tima Service 

WARSAW — For the third time 
in three years, the cost of food in 
Poland has suddenly gone up 
sharply. But Poles appear to be 
swallowing the government’s latest 
dose of harsh economic medicine in 
a mood of sour resignation. 

On Monday, the price of bread 
was raised 30 percent, sugar went 
up by nearly half and flour and rice 
now cost 41 percent more than they 

did last week. 

The only cheering news is that 
the government has lifted the ra- 
tioning it imposed on flour and 
most grain products in 1981, al- 
though most people were already 
able to buy all they needed. 

Overall the price of 10 basic 
food items rose by an average erf 35 
percent. The cost of coal and elec- 
tricity will go up in April followed 
by a third set of price increases 
affecting meat and butler, among 
other items, in June. 

“The mood in the shops is very 
dark," said a Warsaw wo man car- 
rying several loaves of bread. 
“We’ve been cheated again." 

But, she added. “It will take time 
for people to figure out what this 
will do to their budgets.” 

Food price increases have been 
the traditional spark of popular un- 


rest in postwar Poland, igniting ac- 
cumulated resentment among 
workers in 1970. 1976 and 1980. 
This time, as in the past two years, 
the government of General Wqj- 
ciech Janizelski appears to have 
finessed its political opposition and 
avoided significant protests. 

Through the state-controlled 
press and television, the govera- 


INSIDE 

■ Rajiv Gandhi’s Congress (I) 

Party leads in state elections in 
India. Page 2. 

SCIENCE 

• The structure of the sweetest 
substance known has been de- 
termined, and may prove key to 
research on taste.’ Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Paul A Voider, chairman of 

the Federal Reserve, warned 
that excessive growth in the 
U.S. money supply could reig- 
nite inflation. Page 9. 

■ Tbe dollar feO sharply on the 

strength of Mr. Volcker’s com- 
ments. Page 9. 


ment devoted a month to “social 
consultations" with the public, ar- 
guing the need for higher prices to 
ease the burden on the state budget 
caused by large food subsidies and 
to bring prices into line with pro- 
duction costs. 

Then, three days before a sched- 
uled IS-minutc, nationwide protest 
strike called by tbe outlawed trade 
union Solidarity, the government 
agreed to reconsider. 

The new official trade union 
movement, which the government 
hopes will supplant Solidarity, also 
had criticized the proposals, and it 
was to this criticism —not Solidar- 
ity's — dial the government said it 
was responding. 

Claiming a tactical victory. Soli- 
darity called off its strike, onlv to 
have the government introduce the 
same increases it hud proposed, al- 
though they were spread out in 
three doses over four months rather 
than all at once. The lowest pen- 
sions and some benefits will be 
raised, but this was not expected to 
help much. 

The Polish people said Lech Wa- 
lesa, the Solidarity leader, were de- 
ceived once again. "This was ma- 
nipulation,” he said. 

Mr. Walesa said he would sup- 
port and even join any protests that 

(Continued on Page 2, Col. 5) 


'-Pf* 


1 -- — 





Sgsvssava v,iiR qmiE IS I 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


Gandhi Well Ahead in State Vote in India 




By William Claiborne 

H asha igion Pail Service 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi's governing Congress 
(I) Party was poised Wednesday to 
daim majorities in all but three of 
the 10 states of India and one union 
territory holding state legislative 
elections. 


in the state assembly of Madhya 
Pradesh, in central India. 


As expected, the Congress party 
st in the southern states of An- 


Early results indicated Mr. Gan- 
dhi would consolidate the political 
base he set for himse lf in Decem- 
ber's landslide parliamentary dec- 
don. 


In many state races, the Con- 
gress Party appeared assured of 
two-thirds majorities or even great- 
er, burying opposition parties de- 
moralized and divided by the earli- 
er parliamentary rouL 
While results from some states 
that split potting between Saturday 
and Tuesday were still incomplete 
late Wednesday. Congress (I) had 
token irreversible leads in the Hin- 
di-speaking belt that stretches 
across northern India, and had won 
a stunning three-fourths majority 


lost in the southern states of An- 
dhra Pradesh and Karnataka, 
where linguistic pride and regional- 
ism run strong, and in the tiny 
Himalayan state of Sikkim, where a 
former Congress (!) chief minister 
who. was dismissed for party indis- 
cipline 10 months ago led a rebel 
party to victory. 

In the mid-southern Slate of Ma- 
harashtra, of which Bombay is the 
capital, Mr. Gandhi's party was 
running nearly 2-1 ahead of the 
opposition. 

In Andhra Pradesh, the Telegu 
Desam Party led by N.T. Rama 
Ran, a former film idol, appeared 
assured of a two-thirds majority, 
while Congress (I) was struggling to 
win enough sots to remain a recog- 
nized opposition party. 

The opposition Janata Party was 
assured of its majority in Karnata- 
ka when it won 1 13 of the first 160 
seats declared 

The Congress Party won solidly 


in the union territory of Pondicher- 
ry and was assured of overwhelm- 
ing victories in Bihar, Gujarat, Hi- 
machal Pradesh, Rajasthan, Orissa 
and Uttar Pradesh. 

In violence accompanying the 
elections, at least 50 persons were 
reported killed in campaign and 
election-day dashes in the 10 states 
and one union territory voting. 
Elections were suspended in scores 
of districts after assaults on candi- 
dates or because of “booth captur- 
ing,” in which party workers seize 
polling stations and either destroy 
ballot boxes or stuff them with bo- 
gus ballots. 

In Andhra Pradesh, Mr. Rama 
Rao's linguistic-based Tdegu De- 
sam party soundly defeated Con- 
gress (I) for the third time in two 
years and consolidated its position 
as the most formidable opposition 
party in the country. Tdegu Desam 
removed Mr. Gandhi's party for 
the first time since independence in 
the January 1983 stale elections 
and again in December's national 
parliamentary elections, and later 


formed the largest opposition bloc 
in parliament with 30 members. 

For Mr. RamaRao, 62, the char- 
ismatic former screen star, the vic- 
tory was another negation of the 
Congress Party’s attempts to top- 
ple his popularly elected govern- 


ment last summer by luring defec- 
tors. allegedly with bribes and 


Dismissed as chief minister in 
August by a state governor ap- 
pointed by Prime Minister Indiin 

Gandhi before her assassination, 
Mr. Rama Rao led a “save democ- 


racy” campaign and in a surge of 
public support was reinstated with- 
in a month. In the stale ejection, be 


In Amman 

we delight in our traditional 
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So will you. 


HOTEL JORDAN 
INTER • CONTINENTAL 


in a month. In the stale ejection, he 
repeated his colorful campaign tac- 
tic of tonring the state, sitting 
cross-legged and saffron-robed on 
the roof of a 1947-model van and 
drawing crowds that totaled in the 
tens of millions. 

He appeared to have won a big- 
ger national role for himself and a 
better position from which to begin 
bis planned national opposition 
party, which he has said will push 
for decentralization of power and 
more state autonomy. 

The campaigns in two of India's 
22 states, Gujarat and Madhya 
Pradesh, were dominated by large- 
scale student protests a gains t a 
quota system in which more than 
half of the admissions to universi- 
ties are reserved by statute for stu- 
dents of the so-called backward 
castes. 

Student protesters, saying that in 
reality 70 percent of university 
openings are reserved for backward 
castes aid tribes, forced the dosing 
of many colleges and led statewide 
strikes, but for the most part the 
political parties discreetly side- 
stepped the issue. 



THt Anobctfad Pm 


An Indian votes in die western state of Rajasthan. 


Poles Apparently Accepting 
Another Food Price Increase 


(Continued from Page!) 



Thais Attack 


take place, but he stopped short of 
calling for a revival or the canceled 


Vietnamese 


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Sisakct province was shelled. The 
number of casualties was not im- 
mediately available. 

According to General Narudon, 
five Thai civilians were killed and 
about 4,000 were evacuated from 
their villages when “hundreds'* of 
Vietnamese shells landed on Thai 
territory. 

■ C hina Warns Vietnam 

C hina warned Wednesday that 
its border forces were prepared to 
“give a due p unishmen t" to Viet- 
nam for what it described as fre- 
I quenl armed intrusions bio Chi- 
i nese territory along the 
Chinese- Vietnamese frontier. Unit- 
ed Press International reported 
from Beijing. 

“The Vietnamese troops are car- 
rying out frequent armed provoca- 
tions along the Sino- Vietnamese 
border.** said the Chinese Foreign 
Ministry spokesman, Ma Yuzhen, 
“and are engaged in repeated intru- 
sions against Chinese territory.” 


calling for a revival of the canceled 
strike. 

Although Mr. Walesa had called 
off the threatened strike 36 hours in 
advance, the government spokes- 
man, Jozy .Urban, nevertheless lat- 
er portrayed h as a “failure.” Con- 
tending that relatively few workers 
had gotten word of the cancella- 
tion, Mr. Urban said that the gen- 
eral absence of factory protests 
meant that workers simply did not 
respond to Solidarity’s tall, a daim 
the outlawed union disputes. 

Asked bow the higher prices 
would affect consumers, Mr. Ur- 
ban said that they would remove a 
total of 125 billion zlotys ($905 
million) from their pockets. If so, 
that will put a sizable dent in the 
state's 1 38-biHion-zioty budget def- 
icit and offset nearly half the 302 
billion zlotys now spent on food 
subsidies each year. 

At the same time. Mr. Urban 
insisted, the new food prices will 
raise the overall cost of living this 
year by only 3 percent He ac- 
knowledged that this low 
is a figure that “public opinion will 
not believe,” and some observers 
agreed that his conclusions were 
difficult to accept 






Keep up with the Joneses. 


When you keep up by phone, you stay dose to the people you miss in the States. 
rou trade your latest experiences and share your everyday lives. But, best of all, you hold 
on to that special bond that joins you in spite of the distance between you 






Move to Prolong 
U.K. Coal Strike 


Appears to Fail 


The Associated Press 

\ LONDON — Resistance to 
the end of the British coal strike 
crumbled Wednesday when 
hardliners were unable to pre- 
vent a return to work at all but a 
few of the mines where they had 
succeeded a day earlier. 

More than 92 percent of the 
country’s 186,000 miners were 
bade at work Wednesday, the 
National Coal Board reported. 
On Tuesday, the official end of 
Britain's longest and bloodiest 
national walkout, about 26,000 
miners, or nearly 15 percent, 
had held out. 

The holdouts had been de- 
mandrng amnesty for about 700 
miners dismissed for criminal 
offenses during the 51-month 
strike, which bad started in pro- 
test against planned mine clo- 
sures, or were refusing to cross 


picket lines set up by militants 
refusing to end the strike. 

In Scotland, where the area 
leadership voted late Sunday to 
hold out fra- amnesty, a confer- 
ence of shop Stewards in Edin- 
burgh reversed the decision 
Wednesday. and ordered tire 
men back to work. 


Veto Is likely 
OnFarmBiU 


(Continued from Page 1) 
budget priorities and adopting a 
veto strategy. The Senate can be 
cram ted on to sustain such vetoes. 

To an unusual degree. Demo- 
crats in both houses of Congress 
have presented a united front in the 
face of veto threats. Many believe 
that the more they help publicize 
problems in the rural United 
States, the more they can tarnish 
the president. 

Administration officials concede 
they are worried that increasing ex- 
posure of farmers’ plight means in- 
creasing political dinger to the 
president. “No question that a veto ■ 
will certainly heighten the risk,” 
said Edward J. Rodins, a presiden- 
tial assistant. 

The officials say that so far, Mr. 
Reagan’s political rating has not 
been touched by the farmers' an- 
ger. They rite a recent survey of 
ratal areas in right farm states by 
Richard B. Wirthiin that showed 
the president’s popularity ratings 
at more than 60 percent, and higher 
among farmers than nonfarmers. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Gam Reassigned to Discovery Missioi 


CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) — Senator Jake Gam of 
bo was to have flown into space this week aboard the shuttle Chail* 


who was to have flown into space this week aboard the shuttle ChaUen 
er. will be in the crew of a Discovery mission later this month, the spJ 
agency announced Wednesday. i 

The entire crew of this week’s canceled shuttle mission, with I 
exception of a French physician, Patrick Baudry, was named to thecj 
Of the Discovery flight Bte mission will combine some of the task? 


Senator Gam, a Republican, will make tire : 
observer, a role he was to have played on the 
because of a design defect in a tracking and data 
was to cany. ' 


t as a coogtwsHs I 
it that was cancel 

y satellite ChaDeof 


Lange Warns Moscow on Propaganda 

SINGAPORE (UPI) — Prime Minister David Lange of New Zeala I 
said Wednesday he has warned the Soviet Union against attempufl 
propaganda gams using New Zealand's anti-nuclear stance and cxparfP 
ing its interests in Southeast Asia. v 

“1 have called the Soviet ambassador in New Zealand to my office rf 
told him that our government specifically raects any voice of coramem 
lion from than." Mr. Lange said- “We wQl not accept it. It is mischi : ' 
matin g anH disinformation.** . *. 

Asked if the Soviet Union also was cautioned not to expand itsmOin . ;• 
interests in Vietnam, Mr. Lange said: “We have already taken that si-’ ,' r 
We have also bad personal meetings with the Soviet ambassador, W ' 
.will not seek a promise from the Soviet Union.” .*■ " 


. * . .it* W 




.will not seek a promise from the Soviet Union. .*■ " ^ rt 

Australia Reveals New Caledonia PloLj ( [7^ ^ 


In a detailed analysis of the Po- 
lish economy issued last week 
through the underground press. 
Solidarity said that it is doubtful 
that Polish consumers could bear 
the added burden of higher food 
costs. 


BRISBANE Australia (AP) — Four men were charged Wedaesc " 
with hostile actions against the government of New Caledonia af 
Australian counlerintdtigence agents seized money and an arms cachei *• 
a raid an a Brisbane house. 

New Caledonia, a French island territory in the southwest Pacific, I 
been upset by dv3 disturbances between tbe native Melanesians a 
want independence and European settlers wbo oppose it A federal pol 
spokesman said that agents of the Australian Security Intdliga 
Organization and police found shotguns, automatic rifles and anrmn 
tion hidden in 44-gallon (166-liter) drums during a raid Tuesday on r 
house at Yatia. 43 miles (70 kilometers) sooth of Brisbane. 

The spokesman said three men were charged with accumulating ar 
and ammunition for tbe purpose of engaging in hostile activity agat * 
the government of New Caledonia. A fourth man was charged with grvr 
money to another person to commit an offense in connection with! 
case. The names of the suspects were not released. 


[In ' 


V i f lb 


East Germans Said to Seek Return 


Since 1982, when the govern- 
ment raised food prices 150 percent 
“under the shield of martial law,” 
the overall cost of living has grown 
420 percent while real income has 
fallen 24 percent. Solidarity said, 
describing it as “a situation unique 
in Europe.” 

While there is little evidence of 
real hunger in Poland, many Poles 
are eating less. Relying on official 
figures. Solidarity said that per 
eapftp food consumption has fallen 
15 p erce n t since 1979. now that a 
typical family spends half or more 
of its income cm food. 

At the same time, the analysis 
said, the state bureaucracy has 
grown 29 percent over tbe last four 
years, much of it due to a huge 
craps of workers hired to adminis- 
ter the food rationing system. 


BERLIN (Reuters) — East Germany said Wednesday that more It 
20,000 former citizens now living in the West had applied to return ha 
complaining of unemployment, loneliness and misery in the capita' 
workL 

The daily newspaper Neues Deutschland published what it said » 
extracts from about 80 letters to the country s leaders asking penmss- 
to return. “The Foreign Ministry is ordered to consider the application 
it said. Most of those died were manual workers. Others indudet 
doctor, several technical workers and a schoolgirl who said she \- 
deceived by her parents’ hopes. 


At least 40,000 East Germans have left in the last year — thcbtjs 
wave of emigration since the Communist authorities built the Berlin w 

* t 0/1 J! Vj. .L . . — s « It.. L. 11!— J* 


in 1961, dividing the city and finally sealing the border. Weston dip 
mats said the temporary relaxation of strict visa regulations appeared 
have encouraged further applications to emigrate, many from people 
key areas of the economy. 


Greece to Buy U.S., French Fighters 


ATHENS (AP) — Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou said Wat 
day Greece has signed letters of intent for the purchase of 40 US.-m 
F-J6C and 40 French-made Mirage 2000 jet fighters to update its 
force. 

Greece may also buy an additional 20 combat aircraft at a latent' 
said the prime minister, who also serves as defense minister. The me . 
purchase is expected to total around S2 billion. Mr. Papandreou said I 
Greece also pkuxs to build four new frigates for its navy and five land 
craft at Greek shipyards. T 

“Our country is under a permanent, continuing intense threat 6 
our neighbor and ally, Turkey.'’ said Mr. Papandreou. “This sue 
problem isn't recognized even within the framework of tbe Alla 
alliance.” 


For the Record 


A former board chairman of United American Bank of Knoxvi 
Te nne ssee. Jake F. Butcher, and two associates. Jesse A Bare and Gea 
W. Ridenour Jr., have been indicted on tax fraud charges, the Just 
Department announced Wednesday. (4 


a^OXUiiUlL riUilUUULCU ntUilCXUlJf. : 

The trial of the PUfippines aimed forces chief. General Fabian CVjV^' -0, * ** 

and 25 others for the murder of the opposition leader, BeoigaoS. Atpr’ v ?v Cjt ncwffM ( 
Jr, was suspended Wednesday for the second time in two weeks becatV-. , ' 

of a lack of witnesses. fill . moftfr 

TVn 1 1 C CMtn ** L.:i I nr i ii_ i.i.» ». . . . 


Tbe US. State Department hailed on Wednesday what it calk IrcC’-a*' t nnlvai A 
dramatic improvement in 135. ties with Mozambique and said that VW. ‘ ' * ‘'* ,, ** t *■ 
policy was aimed at reducing Soviet influence in the Marrim natUn a ‘ '■^ rn jpir?r*:r>o !l < 


policy was aimed at reducing Soviet influence in tbe Marxist natioo a * crn ft affQ I 

in southern Africa. f/tate^yoo only 0 ., k ^ 

A rrrrv at 1 imAnn'a OM R.n<> v P f. 7 ' ” PQVM 


wOI be announced later.” * " (Bern ?. Qr bfakwtg 

The U.S. Senate has confirmed President Ronald Reagan's lb. urt iQ W 1 1 

negotiators for the U5.-Soviet arms control negotiations beginning** Acre ~ . 

Geneva on March 12. They are Max M. Kampdman, a Washing! 1 1 ^ O 


lawyer; John G. Tower, a former U5. senator from Texas; and Maynt 
W. GUtman, a career diplomat. (A 

Iceland's SfiOO fisbennoi have gone back to woik after the gownnnj 
intervened to end a 15-day strike that had paralyzed the country’s bigg 
industry. The fishermen bad demanded an 80-percent monthly w 
increase but settled for a 30-percent increase. {Resit 

In Palm Beach, Florida, a freighter, tbe Mercedes I, which had bi 
beached behind a seaside home since a November storm, was hauled f 
Wednesday and salvage officials said it would eventually be sank 
create an artificial reef. (O’- 

Governor Robert D. Orr of iiwBana jj suing the U5. House 
Representatives over its refusal to seat Richard D. McIntyre, a Repd 
can who is the certified winner of a disputed In diana coagresdo 
election over the incumbent Democrat, Frank X. McCloskty. U 
Voters in Burfingtoo, Vermont’s largest city, handed the nation's o 
Socialist mayor. Bernard Sanders, a second re-election victory. At less 
communities approved resolutions calling for immediate action agai 
arid rain. fi 


ETC - g: . , » 


Senate Panel Votes to Trim 


Arms Budget by $79 Billioi 


(Continued from Page 1) 
down without a Republican con- 
sensus for a month. 

■ Cats to Be Considered 

Jack Nelson of the Los Angeles 


Times reported from Washington: 

The White House chief of staff, 
Donald T. Regan, said Mr. Reagan 
“would have to” consider any cuts 
approved by Congress. 

Mr. Regan's comment is the first 
indication the president might ao- 
cept military cuts if approved by a 
bipartisan congressional majority. 


replied: “No. And I don't th 
you'll ever get him to say he w* 
either. 

Max Friedersdorf, the V 
House congressional liaison d 
said: “I don't see any dimimsl 
of the president's stand on that 
remains very, very firm on defe 
You can’t expect a wink on 
fense; that would be a last resc 


It may be the “wink" Republican 
senators say they need from the 


2 UJ$. Justices, Senate 
Get Threatening lette 



UNIVERSITY 


for 11 *. <— 

Vdu auairykef 

guCHEirara M*SttffSORJ»CTO»WF 
Send detailed mum* 
foe toe avaiuetlcin. 
PACIFIC WESTERN UMVERSTY 
maVUnK^fimCMltauH 


senators say they need from the 
White House before voting on a 
budget package that would include 
further military cuts. 

Mr. Regan suggested that the 
president himself would not pub- 
licly acknowledge that he might ac- 
cept additional military spending 
reductions. Asked whether the 
president would consider a $10- 
biDkm cut if approved by a biparti- 
san majority, Mr. Regan said: “1 
suppose he'd take a look at iL He 
would have to.” 

Reminded that the president has 
never said he would consider ac- 
cepting such reductions, Mr. Retail 


United Press fnierwiipnal 

WASHINGTON — Two 
preme Court justices and Sen 
Alfonse M. D 'Amato, Repobl 
of New York, have received id; 
cal threatening letters “to s 
you dead,” according to the Fe 
a! Bureau of Investigation. 

The letters were received by 
D’Amato, Justice Hatty A. Bl 
mun and Justice Lewis F. Powe 
at about the same time a gun 
came through a window in 
Biackmun's apartment in Ar 
ton, Virginia, on Thursday. 
Baker, a spokesman for the 
said Tuesday. 


~1 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


Page 3 



lha Aswooad tana 

MESSAGE FOR MOSCOW — Protesters in New York stage a sit-in at the Soviet 
Mission to the United Nations to protest the treatment of Soviet Jews, which protest 
organizers called “a new wave of anti-Semitism and barbarism." About 180 people, 120 
of them rabbis, were arrested for disorderly conduct after crossing a polire line. 

Farm CrisisBums Through the Prairie 

In 10 States, Hotlines Are Busy With Calls for Help 


By Ward Sinclair 

Washington Post Service 

WALTHILL. Nebraska — There’s a lire burning 
oui here on the prairie, the Tire of a farm economy in 
deep trouble, but one would never know it for all the 
outward tranquillity. 

But when you come to the old hotel in Wai thill and 
go up to the second-floor offices where Judy Dye 
holds forth, the smell of the prairie Tire becomes 
pervasive. 

“Have you ever sat down. Tom, and worked out just 
what you want to happen?" sbe is saying to the farmer 
at the other end of the telephone line. 

“O.K_" she said. “Let's get you some immediate 
help — the beck with Legal Aid. I would definitely see 
a bankruptcy attorney. Yes, it's like going to a special- 
ist in medicine. 

Every day is like this for Ms. Dye. Having been 
through a farm foreclosure herself, she knows the 
emotion and distress that drive farmers to call her. 

Farm crisis hot lines, now set up in at least 10 states, 
are a phenomenon of the economic distress in agricul- 
ture. The hot lines, financed through churches, rural 
advocacy groups, contributions and some public mon- 
ey, are pan of a new network that is showing farmers 
where they can turn for help, if there is any hope of 
help. 

The Nebraska hot line was started last October and 
Ms. Dye bas had little rest since. 

“The callers are getting more desperate, because 
their notes are coming due," she said. “The rural 
banks seem to be our prime problem. What we're 
hearing now is that they're really tightening up, even 
on farmers who aren't overdue, ana leaving them no 
money to pay all their local bills. That is what is going 
to bring so many of them down." 

Not Si of this involves money, however. As Ms. Dye 
explained, the trauma of losing a farm that has been in 
a family for generations is making flinders of rural 


U.S. May Ask Asians to Assist Nicaraguan Rebels 

__ ..... AH four-nation Conudora 


strength. The results are estranged children, marital 
breakups, aicohof and physical abuse, depression of 
thespiriL 

“I see a real correlation between the breakup of the 
farm and the breakup of the marriage,” she said. 
"Believe me. I've been there.” 

“We find that quite often the man gets in a quanda- 
ry over the problem,” she added. “He becomes immo- 
bilized. The woman assumes a role she's never had 
before and she becomes very angry at the husband, 
angry that she is the one who is carrying on because be 
can't.” 

The farm crisis hot lines, wherever they are. produce 
messages that sound like broken records. 

Over in Iowa, at Rural America's Des Moines office 
it was late in the evening and Dan Levi Las. who has 
manned the hot line for more than two years, respond- 
ed to a caiL A fanner, tentative and afraid, wanted to 
know what could be done to combat pressure from his i 
Production Credit Association, which was ordering 
him to sell out. 

Mr. Levi las heard him out and treated him softly 
and kindly. The farmers's wife came on the line to 
write down the names of lawyers and farmer-counsel- 
ors. She wrote down what Mr. Levi las told them about 
the credit association's apparent abuse of its rules. 

“We're getting a lot of these PCA calls,” Mr. Levitas 
told the family. “They want to make you feel that this 
is your fault ft isn't your fault and there are a number 
of things you can do to deal with this.” 

Mr. Levitas sighed deeply and shrugged after he 
hung up the phone. 

“That was fairly typical," he said, “but each call has 
a mix of emotional distress and information need. Of 
course, we also get calls involving very serious emo- 
tional stress, the threat of suicide or family trouble. 
We just learned the other day that in three counties of 
southwest Iowa, suicides are up 38 permit” 

“This whole thing is blowing families apart,” he 
said, “and who knows when it will end." 




By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Times Seniie 

WASHINGTON — The White 
House is considering a bid to 
friendly Asian countries to help 
channel aid to the Nicaraguan 
guerrillas, according to a Reagan 
administration official. 

The official said Tuesday thai 
the request was being weighed 
along with other means of support- 
ing the rebels, as the Reagan ad- 
ministration seeks to persuade 
Congress to release S14 million in 
coven funds for the rebels. 

Another official said the admin- 
istration also was considering more 
joint military exercises with Hon- 
duras and an increased concentra- 
tion of naval power off the Nicara- 
guan coast to step up pressure on 
the country's Sanduust govern- 
ment. 

Another possibility being 
weighed by the administration is to 
help the rebels in the form of “hu- 
manitarian aid,” such as food and 
medicine. 

In the last few weeks. President 
Ronald Reagan and Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz have begun 
to press for congressional action in 
support of the guerrillas. Congress 
voted last year to halt further distri- 
bution of covert aid. but it allocat- 
ed S 14 million, saying that the 
money could not be released until 
Congress voted to do so after Feb. 
28. The measure is expected to be 
taken up in ApriL 

“We have got some very good 
ideas” from Capitol HilL the ad- 
ministration official said, “and 1 
would think that by the end of the 
week we will have a legislative for- 
mula which we will seek to promote 
between now and the end of April 


Legislators have voiced doubts 
about the use of third countries' to 
channel American aid to the guer- 
rillas, but one official termed this a 
“promising" possibility and said 
that “ Asian countries" were under 
consideration. The countries were 
not identified. 

It was left unclear whether the 
Asian countries were to pass on aid 
provided directly by the United 
States or assist the rebels out of 
their own resources. 

The official who spoke about 
having Asian countries assist the 
guerrillas said the White House was 
considering not only those with 
military ties to the United States, 
but also those “where we don't 
have any military assistance pro- 
grams.” 

“There are countries that might 
have an interest in freedom wherev- 
er it might be,” he said. “They 


might be inclined to provide raon- bas reportedly increased its aid, AU fm*r . states, which is 

ey” countries, which have denied a&ceau£al in Cen- 

Acconding to law. countries pur- aiding the guerrillas, are dependent p aiu . 

chasing equipment and weapons on U.S. aid. ““ ™ 


phasing equi pme nt and weapons on u.b. aid. 

from the United States are barred a Honduras Gets Transcripts "^Honduran officials said that ac- 
from ^uranrfening themto another Nicaragua’s leaders have deliv- ^umce of the transcripts did not 

country without approval. But cot- floras top-secret Iran- "Scale the country was cfcmgmg 

gressorial aides concede that the qj la rks they held with the anti-Sandinist position or mov- 

issue becomes fuzzy when a ooun- United Slates in Mexico last year. ? away from the United States, 
try receiving American awnoonc 5 ^,. Hoodorajl officials have dis- ^Qne Honduran official said that 
aid sends money or other assistance dojol according to a Remers re- Nicaragua's stated intention in 
to another counuy. port from Tegucigalpa, the Hondu- banding over the documents was 

Although the official declined to £n capital. how difficult it is to bold 

jjjjf “fn Diplomats said the move was the , H ib s with the United States.” 

■ Nicaraguan Dissident freed 

Taiwan could face congressional Honduras, Regan administra- Jose Urbina Lara, 24. aNicanr 
opposition — and aid to them aiivinTentral Amen- euan whose arrest Dec. 24 ai the 

could be held up —if they helped 2?n,e tt^ndghbor nations have ESa Rican Embassy m Mareagia 
the Nicaraguan rebels. S' tinL aonSedto bTon the triggered the collapse of a regional 

Within recent months. Honduras brint f peace meeting, was released Tues- 

and El Salvador are reported to T Honduran officials said day by the Nicaraguan authorities 
have replaced the UmtaiSiates as Tu ^ y ,£ 3 ? the transcripts were and sent into exile in Colombia, 
sources of aid to the Nicaraguan banded to their Foreign Ministry United Press International report- 
rebels. At the same time Israel also V)teks just before the ed from Managua. 


gressona* awe mnuxxc umi me . ^ ^ ^ ± fcdd ^ the 
issue becomes fuzzy when a conn- y ^ Slates m Mexico last year, 
try receiving Amenran econonnc Honduran officials have dis- 

aid sends money or other assistance doscd _ 3 ^ to a Reuters re- 

to another counuy. port from Tegucigalpa, the Hondu- 

A1 though the official declined to -,-1 ^ 

. Diplomats said the move was the 


Apartment Blocks to Be Razed in Chile 
After Quake; Typhoid Warnings Issued 


United Press International 

SANTIAGO — Officials in one 
Chilean dry ordered the demoli- 
tion Wednesday of apartment 
blocks damaged by the country’s 
worst earthquake in 23 years. In 
another, they ordered mas vacci- 
nations and warned of an outbreak 
of typhoid if water and electricity 
were not restored. 

About 145 people were killed, 

2.000 were injured and more than 

163.000 were left homeless Sunday 
when the quake struck central 
Chile and its Pacific coastline, reg- 


istering 73 on the open-ended 
Richter scale. 

In the coastal cities of Valparaiso 
and San Antonio, most of the pop- 
ulation slept in the streets in make- 
shift tents Tuesday night, for the 
third success. vc night, fearing (Ik 
collapse of weakened buddings. 

In the seaside resort of Vina del 
Mar, officials ordered the demoli- 
tion of two blocks of heavily dam- 
aged eight-story buddings. 

The mayor of San Antonio, Do- 
mingo Garcia Huidobro, ordered 
officials to carry out mass vaccina- 
tions against typhoid. 


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SAUDI ARABIA NATIONAL GUARD 


An invitation for Qualification in CfommunicationSy 


V 

The Saudi Arabia National Guard is 
implementing continuous operations for the 
modernisation and development of its 
Nationwide Communications System. 

In order to determine companies and corporations 
of international repute capable of constructing 
and modernising the communications systems, it 
invites such organisations to submit details 
describing their capabilities. 

So that the qualification process is carried out 
correctly, it is necessary to submit the 
following information : 


1. Registered name and address of company, history, 
management structure and organisation, scope of 
products and services currently provided. 

2 . Summary of relevant contracts with brief details 
of product or system installed together with name 

atifl Irvarinn rtf pnrrhatmg arimtnitfra riftn- 

3 . Registration authority and standard to which _ 
quality assurance organisation complies viz 
NATO AQAP 1, 4 or 9, United Kingdom DEF 
STAN 05-21, 24 or 29. USA MIL-Q-9858or 
MIL-I-45208 or National Equivalents. 

4 . Statement showing the financial position of 
the company. 


i?lSl 


All information will be treated in the strictest confidence. Information and support documentation to be submitred to the following address: 
Director of Signals, Headquarters National Guard, Khurais Road, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 




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.Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


EXPERIENCE COUNTS! 
NON-RESIDENT1AL 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Qny fWd nay Opdr far I 


Pm f in oii u l t in any fatd im q 
tbtx m» BotM wi, ttemPior 
VM! pretpnm n 


U.S.-Japan Whaling Pact Is in Question 

By Philip Smith wide whaling ban that is to go into Alan Macnow, spokesman for tbe appGcaiion of U5. Fordgi 

wLhiapon Pan Service effect next year. the Japanese whaling industry, exit- bey. 




By Philip Smith wide whaling ban that is to go into Alan Macnow, spokesman for the appGcaiion of US. foreign po- 

wLhw&rm P<m Service effect next year. the Japanese whaling industry, exit- Bey. 

wacuWtan a iic j:- A Commerce Department icized the decision as a “rather nar- Greenpeaceand II other oonser- 
. ■ ™ spokesman said the Reagan admin- rowly based” legal interpretation, vation groups sued last year to 

met judge, in a victory for comct- pj^ w seek an immedi- • “It appeals,” Mr. Macnow said, block the agreement between the 

if are swy of the decision, pending an “that Judge Richey vrasradterun- 

aware or unconcerned that the contending that the pact was tin- 


Bonn Opens Campaign / r 4 
To Widen East Bloc Ties 



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gan administration is required 
under law to impose economic 




“Obviously, we’re jubilant,” said whales hunted by Japan are no lawful and too lenient. 

Mark Cheater, wildlife legislative longer in danger of extinction or The federal law involved is the 


Genscher’s Trips to 5 Capitals Is Called 
A Basic Shift in Diplomatic Tactics 



- . - -I 2_ _ 1 " .jM-t. IVUlft VUMIU, VfUUUJU 1UAU1DU1U WUfibl Ul VI WAUi|VMVtf VA A Uv AUUJOl 14W lU^Wirui U utt 

Internationa] baling restrictions, of Greenpeace, a conserva- even depletion. Richey has an es- Packwood-Magnuson amendment. 

The decision by Judge Charles tion group. “We fed it’s a land- tablished reputation as an environ- added to the Fishery Conservation 


R. Richey appears to overture a mark victory for whale conserva- ment-oriented judge. 1 * 
U.S.- Japanese pact last fall that demists and a dear signal that The dispute touches 
would have enabled the Japanese pirate whaling is not tolerated by issues of U.S.-Japanes 
whaling industry to skin a world- the United States." tions and the role of 


and Management Act in 197 9. It 


ANNOUNCING THE ROYAL ORCHID SHERATON IN BANGKOK 



cent cut in rights to fish in UJS. 
coastal waters. 

Only that provision, according to 
conservationists, strengthens the 
| whaling commission's himiing lim - . 
its, since the 40-nation body has no 
enforcement power. 

I The Commerce Department ar- 
gued before Judge Richey that 
Commerce Secretary Malcolm Bal- 
drige should decide whether and 
when to apply the sanctions by cer- 
tifying a violation to the president. 

Judge Richey disagreed, saying: 
“It is inconceivable to this court 
how the secretary can reconcile his 
decision not to certify . . . Japanese 
sperm whaling with the dear pur- 
pose, intent and history of the law 
be is charged with enforcing." 

The International Whaling Com- 
mission voted in 1982 to declare a 
worldwide ban on commercial 
whale hunting, effective next year. 
A ban on hunting sperm whales, 
effective this season, was approved 
as a first step. 

The commission's action fol- 
lowed strong pressure from envi- 
ronmentalists. The scientific staff 
of the commission reached no 
agreement in its conclusions. Japan 
objected to the ban that, under the 
commission’s rules, grants it an 
automatic exemption from the lim- 
its. 



Oleg G. Bitov 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Past Service 

BONN — After enduring a peri- 
od of estrangement imposed by the 
Soviet Union, West Germany has 
apparently started a new diplomat- 
ic offensive to improve relations 
with its East European neighbors. 

Foreign Minister Hans- Dietrich 
Genscher’s tour through Moscow, 
Warsaw and Sofia this week, fol- 
lowing earlier visits to Prague and 


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Soviet Editor 
Accuses QA 


Bucharest, is intended to dispel the 
imsresaon that the Soviet Union 


In Pope Case 


Last fall Japanese whalers began 
the new sperm-whale season, ex- 
empt from the international mora- 
torium but subject to the Pack- 
wood-Magnuson sanctions. 

By ordering the sanctions into 
effect, Mr. Macnow said, “Richey 
is saying the Japanese cannot exer- 
cise a right contained in the treaty.” 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — A Soviet literary 
newspaper editor who returned to 
Moscow last year after defecting to 
Britain said Wednesday that West- 
ern agents kidnapped turn to testify 
against a Bulgarian accused in a 
pot to kill Pope John Paul II. 

Oleg G. Bitov, 53, wrote in the 
weekly Uteraturnaya Gaze La that 
Western intelligence agents seized 
him in Italy after be uncovered 
signs that the West was behind the 
assassination attempt on the pope 
in May 1982. 

Mr. Bitov disappeared while in 
Italy to report on the I9S3 Venice 
Film Festival and later arrived in 
Britain. Last September he ap- 
peared at a Moscow press confer- 
ence, at which he alleged that the 
British had abducted him after mis- 
taking him for a spy. 

He has since written in Liieratur- 
naya Gazeta, of which he Is cultural 
editor, that be was given mind-al- 
tering drugs and forced to write 
anti-Soviet articles for the British 


press. 

Mr. Bitov said the Western 


agents wanted him to testify 
against Sergei I. Antonov, an offi- 


The Associated Pita 

MOSCOW — The president of 
the World Chess Federation, Flor- 
encio Campomanes, says he is “al- 
most 100 percent certain’' the next 
world title match will be limited to 
24 or 30 games, the official Soviet 
press agency said Wednesday. 

Tass said Mr. Campomanes, a 
Filipino, stopped Tuesday in Mos- 
cow to talk with representatives of 
'Anatoli Karpov, the world chess 
champion, and Gary Kasparov, the 
challenger. Their match was called 
off Feb. 15 after 48 games, with the 
score 5-3 in Mr. Karpov’s favor, on 
the ground that both players were 
exhausted. 


against Sergei I. Antonov, an offi- 
cial rtf Bulgaria’s state airline in 
Rome, who was arrested in 1982 on 
suspicion of complicity in the at- 
tempt to kill the pope. 

He wrote Wednesday: “Anton- 
ov's case is a villainous provocation 
organized by the CIA in alliance 
with the reactionary press and sup- 
ported by efforts of Western spe- 
cial services to hide their involve- 


impresson that the Soviet Union 
can freeze Bonn out of East-West 
diplomacy as punishment for de- 
ploying Pershing- 2 nuclear missiles 
on its soiL 

Mr. Genscher's trip is also aimed 
at defusing the propaganda attacks 
accusing Bonn of seeking to regain 
East bloc territories that were once 
part oF the Third Reich. West Ger- 
man officials expect the hostile 
ffharg gs to intensify in the weeks 
leading up to the 40th anniversary, 
on May 8, of the defeat of Nazi 
Germany. 

But policy-makers in Bonn said 
Mr. Genscher’s quest for dialogue 
with all East bloc states also reflat- 
ed a more fundamental change in 
Bonn’s diplomatic tactics toward 
Eastern Europe. 

By pursuing a policy of building 
separate relationships with East 
bloc states across the board, Bonn 
believes it can defied the kind of 
intimidation from Moscow on indi- 
vidual capitals that led to the can- 
cellation of trips to West Germany 
last year by the leaders of East 
Germany and Bulgaria. 

Mr. Genscher’s meeting Monday 
with the Soviet foreign minister, 
Andrei A. Gromyko, is considered 
a success in Bonn regardless of the 
content or tone of their exchanges. 
A senior official said, “Other War- 
saw Pad states will now see that 
our days of isolation are over and it 
is no longer politically troublesome 
to calk with us.” 

Mr. Gromyko warned Mr. 
Genscher against West German in- 
volvement in the proposed U.S. 
space-based defense system, and 
the official press agency Tass is- 
sued a critical report on Mr. 
Genscher’s positions. 

At the same time, the West Ger- 
man government of Chancellor 
Hdmut Kohl sees a possibility to 
extract greater cooperation from 


Bast Germany by making the Com- 
munist authorities there “feel the 
competition" from East bloc allies 
eager to reap the potential econom- 
ic benefits of dealing with Bom, 
officials said. 

Last September, after several 
months of rapprochement between 
the two Germanys at a time of 
protracted East-West tensions, the 
East Goman leader. Erich Hon- 
ecker, bowed to Soviet pressure 
and canceled his long-awaited trip 
to West Germany. Later, Bulgarian 
leader, Todor Zhivkov, also 


dropped plans to visit Bonn. 

The experience reminded the 




Kohl government not only that it 
must work with Moscow if it hones 


. 4 .-.Trfw* *NP 


must work with Moscow 
to restore detente with E 


rope, but that too much emphasis 
on the German-German rmtion- 


on the German-German rdation- 
sbip evokes poisonous suspicions 
throughout the rest of the East 
bloc. 

Bonn officials said they realized 
now that the exaggerated expecta- 
tions aroused by the glare of pub- 
licity on the two Germanys only 




contributed to the pressures on Mr, 
Honecker to put off the visit. 


Honecker to put off the visit. 

Since that time. East Germany 
has acted with great caution in its 
approaches toward Bonn and has 


ISllKNi 


dutifully, if reluctantly, joined iu 
East bloc allies in the campaign 


against Bonn’s alleged territorial 
designs on Eastern Europe. 

With East Germany still shying 
away from enhanced ties with 
Bonn, Poland has become one of 
the key priorities in West Germa- 
ny’s new diplomatic approaches to- 
ward the East bloc. 

Last week. Chancellor Kohl 
sought to alleviate tensions with 
Warsaw by rebuking rightist mem- 
bers of his party who insist that . 
postwar borders are still undecided 
and that Silesian areas of western 
Poland are still German. In hds an- 
nual state of the nation address, 
Mr. Kohl said West Germany ac- 
cepted present frontiers and would 
faithfully abide by its treaties 
signed with Soviet bloc states. 

Chancellor Kohl’s cooriliatoiy 




• 

. » -«i« 


: i - U* M 

v.. ••T'kHiW 


statements prepared the ground for 
Mi, Genschers six-hour stopover 


Mi, Genschers six-hour stopover 
in Warsaw on Wednesday. 

The visit is expected to lead tot 
fun-fledged official visit soon by 
Mr. Genscher. who postponed a 
trip to Warsaw in November. 


ment in the preparation of the 
attempt to assassinate Pope John 
Paul 1L" 

Mr. Bitov said that inquiries 
made by Uteraturnaya Gazeta and 
Bulgarian officials into the true cir- 
cumstances had driven the plotters 
to the brink of exposure. 


“So they then resorted to a new , . _ , . — 

gangs ter-uke method,” he said. By Robert Lindsey ^ows how much - goes for m- 
They abducted the weekly’s cone- New York Tima Service der-the-table payments to program - • • 

spondeni and for almost a year LOS ANGELES — Sales of re- directors and other executives « 
held him so as to force or bribe him cords have begun to boom once key radio stations in some atitt. 
to testify against Sergei Antonov again across the United States, Some of these “independem pro- ~ 
and to slander Socialist countries.” ending a four-year dump that was moters," said Rick Soar, an indus- 
Mr. Bitov also wrote that Mr. painful for musicians, singers and try consultant and former pro- 
Antonov was in poor health in pris- the recording industry. But along grammar at station WABC in New 
on. alleging that the Bulgarian was with this commercial revival, pay- York City, are largely “money con- r 1 ' 
being given the same psychedelic ola is back in a big way. drats,” who, by mating regular 3^ 

drugs as British agents adminis- According to sources in the mu- payments to radio exercise told : 
tered to himself. sic and broadcasting business, U.S. control over the stations’ play lists. . 

record manufacturers are paying James Carnegie, publisher of Ra- _ 


Radio Payola Is Back - 
As Sales of Records Boon% 


i. -> • 


7^ 


■.•.--"Hi) 

M.v tv. e wm 

■ ■- — -^1 


By Robert Lindsey 

New York Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Sales of re- 


The two players say that a sched- 
uled federation meeting in August 
is too late to settle rules for the new 
match set to begin Sept. 2. Mr. 
Campomanes said federation offi- 
cials were aware of this concern. He 
said he hoped that a meeting of the 
I “executive committee in Tunisia in 
May should produce relevant rec- 
ommendations" 


held him so as to force or bribe him cords have begun to boom once 
to testify against Sergei Antonov again across the United States, 
and to slander Socialist countries.” ending a four-year slump that was 






Mr. Bitov also wrote that Mr. painful for musicians, singers and 
Antonovwas in poorbealth in pris- the recording industry. But along 


•- — * *4 


drugs as British agents adminis- 
tered to himself. 


Bdgjan Shrine Damaged smi 

Reuters pro 

BEAURAING, Belgium— An- 8« 


of Pope John Paul It to Bel gium the top hits of the week in trade 
have sawn off the hands of a statue newspapers. 


ola is back in a big way. duits,’’ who, by malting regular jas, 3 

According to sources in the mu- payments to radio exercise tidal 
sic and broadcasting business, U.S. control over the stations’ play lists. . 
record manufacturers are paying James Carnegie, publisher ofRa- . _ 
more than $50 million a year to a dio Business Report, an industry ^7 . ' 
small group of freelance record newsletter published in Arlington, ' 
promotes around the country to Virginia, sard that “it’s done mostly 7 
get public exposure for their re- in cash" and appeared to involve *-•- - . 
cords and have them listed among minion!! of dollars annually m 
the top hits of the week in trade transactions between a “Mafia-like *■«- - _ 






1 

... -j*. ,4- 




network” of independent promot- 


of the Virgin Maty that draws an Much of the $50 million is spent era and employees of radio stations ; v> ; 


' e *« ■■***•» 

■ 4 1-1 

■ ri •-* 


annual pilgrimage to this southern legitimately, according to radio and record manufacturers. 


Belgian town. John Paul is due to and record industry sources, 
pray at the shrine on May 18. But a sizable portion — a 


DOONESBURY 


/ ARtvoumm* 

GtAPYOU nmatTHAfe 
CXUPWXB MB5BP1H&RK 
IT IN, JIM- /mm,QUN&! 


id record industry sources. Current and former employees ’ ri. * ' 

But a sizable portion — nobody in the radio industry corroborated 

these allegations, but spoke on coo- _>T7.V 

diiion that they not be identified . - . 

- Recording company executives - .? mr 

/ CAHYOU0BJB/EU&GOT said in interviews that they did not 
ML THESE PEOPtS IN THE condonepayoffs to station employ. 3** ^ 

SM&FOOM? PfLAN.BHC/ ees, if in fact they were being made. > r 

JOB^M/Gmez, am Radio executives said their rules ; 
3 prohibited such payments. ^ 7 * ■ 

Independent promoters who 7 


'"*•*'*> is..:*.* 


were questioned either denied tnak- 
mg the payments or refused to dts- 
cuss the matter. -* : - 

In Congress, the staff of 
House subcommittee on Oversight wlAt, 
and Investigations concluded 
year that it could find no abuses, J 11 
but many in the industry say 
its investigation was superficial and 
missed evidence. 

Allegations involving impropri- i)j- 4 ' 
eties by some of the promoters have v 
centered on two points: 

First, money paid by some of the 
promoters has been used to bribe ^ * 
— with cash, drugs, automobiles,. 
real estate and other items — 
ployees of selected stations broad- V^i 
casting the “Top 40” disks «fc°N;;v 
agreed to add records that were nbl ■* 
hits to their play lists or to report 
fictitious plays on the air. W 
Second, some independent prov 


□ 


..BETTE 


HBf* (TSBFUC& 


WCHAO. BOXBfSf&E! 


tiJEUrOF COURSE, NO, NO, BRUCE 

mi eusauarr maae.-m 
vomurmour amt bo/! 

THE, BOSS'! mj.fTSBEEN 

.. Uk A 6 &> — 


'•'* ’ v A * I If** 






•W;-. 


..LONDON 

***:: vwwc* 

u ' ‘Y 


'<****! 


cm me money to employees ot re-'.tTi 1 
cord companies. 

In 1960, after disclosure that cef- ‘ 


v- V *WtW* 

- 7-- , , •**!*• **». ern 

^ ->n T. 4 •'* »** to 


lain disk jockeys were accepting, 
payments for playing new records,; ; 
Congress banned the accqptance or •. 




payment of bribes designed to prch 
mote the broadcast of records, 


term used to describe such pay 
men is brought a new word into the 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE (COMPANIES 
W ajROPC ATOBUK VIA SATELLITE 


PROGRAM. THURSDAY 7th MARCH 


UK TIMES 13J5 
14J0 
154D 
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1&00 
1830 
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20.10 
21J35 
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THE LUCY SHOW 
CHARLIES ANGB3 
SKYWAYS 

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10*5 FUJI FUf WORLD DOUBLES TGNNtS 

SKYTRAX 


American lexicon: payola. ^ ^ 

After those scandals, major sta- ^ 
tions rook from disk jockeys the^ 
authority to select the records they ; K, 
broadcast and assigned it to spe- ■ . • 
aalists, known as program direc-, 
tors and music directors, who wereftu^ 
prohibited from taking payola. 

Although many in the rodusiov% 
acknowledge that payola was prob->\ 
ably never fully extinguished, they 
say it has surged dramatically ini 
the last two years because of a * 


f-m i um 




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the last two years because of a- V . 
comeback at many FM radio sta-'^_. 
tions of the “Top 40“ format ot 
broadcasting ’-v. 


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cns Caimw 

1 East BO KimGreete 
nai v 1 1 Supporters as 

t Diplomatic t * ^ Ho^ Arrest 

lak tasHiernunvv, ^ Ends in Seoul 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


PagcS 


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{W and «Lcr. h<n U .j 

snctUw a **d Canceled W i ^ > 
bn r J^'csiGernunV'S 

***** leader. TodoTlSHf 

for tie- *‘TP«tf plans Uu *K 

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> aimed muM * ork « „ h M J* <*. 
attacks wreNiorcdrien lc 2j!/ 

• regain rope, but that 

rc once the Gurhian-rJJ?' 

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attacks 
» regain 


By John Burgess 

WaMjsgua Pan Serna 

SEOUL — Hundreds of elated 
supporters of Kim Dae Jung, a 
leading dissident, crowded into his 
Seoul home Wednesday to cele- 
brate a government decision io free 
him from house arrest and restore 
the political rights of 13 opposition 
figures. 

police blocking access to Mr. 
Kim's house withdrew at 10 AMI. 
giving supporters their first ehaneg 
to meet with him since his return 
ope month ago bom two years of 
exile in the United Stales. 

Ml Kim embraced Kim Young 
Sa m, with whom be shares leader- 
ship of the opposition movement. 
The two men said they would pot 
aside past rivalries and work to- 
gether to “restore democracy” in 
South Korea. 

President Chun Doo H wan’s de- 
cision to ease op on the two Kims 
and the other leaders is the latest in 
a series of cautious concessions he 



China Holds Its First Beauty Contest 

10 Men and 10 Women, None in Swimsuits, Seek Title 


Cempiitd tr Our suff From Dtspacha thing they like, but no swimsuits a spokeswoman for the event. She 
BEUING — China held its first and no bikinis,” Miss Swung said, said they would also be judged on 
beauty contest Wednesday, with 10 On Moadav% Guangdong pro'- of a wide range of 

mm and 10 women competing m incc . s Forci g n £££ 5 f ficc . Jopics. mdudmginaihefflatics.gc- 
the southern aty of Guangzhou for which handle? press ramests. an- °grap h > and politics, 
trophies based on their good looks pounced that oniy Chinese report- “Modem thinking," or devotion 
and bowibei- answered questions ers could attend. M the state above self, also willbe a 

sudi as W hat s y our nwttoT' reauets we cril ® 00 ibr Communist Youth 

™%Tr C ° m ? mUS ' P ^ offi - JftdvSS E IrtP* me of the spoaxHv The 
aals of Guangdong province were aumbc _ - ^ chie r Hc ew. league is the stepping stone for cn- 

MBfc talE <rf q«m. Hii “»>>«, miim- uN'iiHPCfa'sffinumi! P^rtv. _ 

hou’s luxurious 1 000-room China Miss Sheung had another expla- Siniflg said uie prizes were or leisure, you 
Hotel but the Foreign press corns notion: “Tte sponsors do not want qualify fobuv 

was barred rrora allending the topromoic further puWraty o this the ^orW Cup. uni some small R "T™ J 
event. 6 issue. It seems they arc afraid the souvenirs she did not describe, car tax-free. 

Earlier, a hotel spokeswoman, press would repon jt m a negative There is no cash reward, she said. Buying Itthl 
Lisa Sheung, said the contestants, *¥■ A beauty pageant would have V/rJvftTVMirSstl 

drawn from the Guangzhou area, The candidate s, ranging in age ^ lccn unheard of in China a few * wivu luunai c 
would sing, dance, model fashion- from 18 to 22 , will be paraded and yea™ 3 S°- when the Communist Diplomat Sale 
able clothes and answer questions interviewed on stage and asked to Party decreed that concern about _____ v 
from 10 judges. riuj. dance, play a musical insteu- physical appearance was decadent r **" 5 * “ 

“Actually, they on wear any- ment or read a classical poem, said and vain. lAP.AFPl bother. Youca 


rapny ana pomics. , , 

“Modem thinking," or devotion VOfVO /OU wit.; 
the state abovi: self, also will be a r__ f__ __ 

tenon for the Communist Youth tuX-liwvi * 

ague, one of the sponsors The \iil__ 
gue is the sfeppingstone for cn- W t he, J abroad, 

into China's Communist Party, whether for work 

Miss Sheung said the prizes were or leisure, you may 
*phies “that look something like 

» VXiirIH r iin " .'init dime (mill qualify TO DUV O H8W 


“Actually, they can wear any- meal or read a classical poem, said and vain. 


(AP, AFP ) 


Surrounded by sup|KMters, Kira Dae Jung, cento-, embraces Kim Young Sam as tbe two 
opposition leaders odebrated Soatii Kwrea’s lifting of a ban on some of their activities. 


• u.rcLi bliK ^ 1 ” c tea of. ^ „ The ruling Democratic : Justice Par- Wednesday warned against rever- come and go for the first time in 

D._ nn .. _ President Chun Doo Hwan’s ds- ty retained its majority but was sion to whai it called old-style poli- five years, the government stopped 

rersary, n 1 HioaK ^ ^ cison to ease op on the two Kims dealt a heavy psychological Wow. tics of “corruption, demagoguery, short or restoring his political 

» Naa J" inai ,h f evagtoJ^’ and the other leaders is the latest in Mr. Chun s move also coincides violence and intrigue." rights. 

non? ornu^d hv the S 5 a cautious concessiens he with his preparations for a meeting Mr. Kim was convicted of sedi- He will remain under dose po- 

nn said nai V on the i * 0 has made to the opposition. with President Ronald Re^an in tioa by a military court in 1980. lice surveillance. He will be free to 

lalogue conmbuicd io ih^p rc ^ The move comes three weeks af- Wash i n g t on in ApriL Mr. Chon is Two years later, the government address small groups of people, 
reflect- Honecker to p ul ter a new opposition party loyal to anxious to project abroad an image suspended his 20-year sentence and government officials said Wednes- 

ange in Since that n mc cT'i the Kims swqjt South Korea s at- of flexibility and reform. allowed him to go into exile. day, but not to hold party office or 

toward has acted with pt^., ies in National Assembly electi on s. A government statement issued Though Mr. Kim is now free to to form DoHtical oreanizations- 

approucho loZrt ■ " ' -- - . 

J™ _™pmvMwr i nvTFRiVATrnivAT. rT.A«sinrn?.n shmooes — 


statement issued 


h East bloc 3 IIicm 7X'£ 
U Bonn agamM 
kind of on Eastern ST 

anindi- ^uh U<[ OcrmaDva 
he can* away from enhuncril 
ermanv B 0110 . Poland his bcuto 


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Though Mr. Kim is now free to to form political organizations, 
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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


Published VdhlkVr York Tin** and The Washinplnn Port 


A Deficit’s Consequences 


The American trade deficit is widening 
again, the January figures show. Last year's 
deficit was a record by a wide margin, with 
imports running 5 1 23 billion ahead of exports. 
This year, with the dollar’s exchange rate high- 
er than ever, it will probably be even larger. 
Trade deficits on this scale are unprecedented 
in economic history, and no one really knows, 
what the full effects will be. But important 
changes in the traditional patterns of Ameri- 
can trade are becoming visible. 

It is not only that the volume of imports is 
larger than it has ever been. The composition 
of those imports is also quite different. Until a 
couple of years ago. Amerira imported chiefly 
consumer goods and oil; it exported capital 
goods — mostly industrial and business equip- 
ment, usually at the high end of the technology 
ladder — and farm products. But within the 
past two years America has changed from an 
exporter of capital goods to an importer. 

Still more startling, the imported equipment 
increasingly comes from the most advanced 
areas of technology. Stephen S. Roach, an 
economist for Morgan Stanley, the investment 
hanking firm, points out that last summer, the 
latest three months for which detailed figures 
are available, the United Slates imported $69 
billion worth of capital goods (excluding cars 
and trucks) and that nearly two-thirds of it was 


classified as high technology. What was u 
specifically? Computers, office machinery, 
communications equipment and instruments. 

A tremendous boom of private business 
investment in computing and communications 
equipment began about a decade ago. With the 
high dollar, the proportion of this equipment 
supplied from abroad has been rising dramati- 
cally. Does this mean that U.S. producers in 
these crucial fields are becoming less competi- 
tive? Not necessarily. Much of this imported 
gear is bong produced abroad by American 
companies, with American technology and 
management but foreign labor. The United 
States, in the geographical sense, is no longer 
as dominant a source of supply for advanced 
electronics as it was earlier in this decade, but 
the American companies that make these 
products are another matter. The trade num- 
bers alone do not Idl much about their stand- 
ing, for the companies are now operating with 
little regard for national boundaries. 

The huge trade deficit means that America 
is living well, for the present, on a flood of 
goods for which it has not paid. This is a 
pleasant time for consumers. But the wave of 
imports is Ran gin g the structure of American 
industry, and the effects are no longer limited 
to aging factories with obsolescent technology. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Help Latin Democrats 


With the inauguration of President Julio 
Maria Sanguineui on March 1. democracy has 
been restored to Uruguay alter nearly 13 years. 
Uruguay becomes the sixth South American 
country in less than six years ta shed military 


rule, and further progress is on the way. Oh 
March IS an inauguration in Brasilia will 


end 


21 years of military rule in Latin America’s 
biggest nation. The constitutionalist current 
that began in the Andes has triumphantly 
swept eastward to the Atlantic. 

Uruguay's democrats, like others across the 
continent, inherit a difficult legacy of repres- 
sion, recession and debt. But its people ore also 
buoyed by a belief that there is nowhere to go 
but 'up. They launched democracy’s return in 
1981 by daring to reject at the polls the mili- 
tary's offer of an authoritarian constitution. 

Some military regimes, Brazil's in particu- 
lar. brought economic development, but in the 
end they have all proved political and financial 


failures. Everywhere the democrats are being 
served with the bills for the generals’ excesses. 
That is unfair, but private bankers, and even 
the International Monetary Fund, cannot be 
expected to give much weight to unfairness. 
For Washington, however, the political goal of 
sustaining democrats should be primary. 

Any of the presidents assembled in Monte- 
video last Friday could elaborate on the partic- 
ulars. They stagger under the burdens placed 
on their economies by high interest rates and 
the strong dollar. They need fresh infusions of 
public and private capital to offset the flow of 
funds to the United States. And they know 
that undue pressure for austerity could com- 
promise democratic survival. 

The Reagan administration, with its power 
to complicate or ease the Latin democracies' 
plight, expresses pleasure at the democratic 
developments. It needs to do more than that. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Fight Narcotics at Home 


The latest reports indicate that Colombia's 
war on the drug trade may be faltering. This is 
ominous, since Colombia is the funnel of most 
of the South American cocaine that flows to 
the United States and Europe. 

Spurred by the assassination of its minister 
of justice. Colombia conducted a prodigious 
ami- trafficker campaign last year, losing 140 
policemen to gunmen and starting to extradite 
major suspects to the United States, since 
drug-bought corruption immunizes them from 
prosecution at home. Yet a fugitive trafficking 
suspect has just proclaimed his defiance of 
Colombian law on local television, and identi- 
fied coca planting as a patriotic protest against 
“American imperialism." A new study by the 
Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House 
of Representatives concludes about Colombia 
that it has “not yet demonstrated a serious 
resolve to confront the major traffickers." 

Certainly Colombia and other countries in- 
volved in the drug trade have a heavy responsi- 
bility. The burden on them is not of their own 
making: It results from the immense demand 
for drugs generated primarily by ibe U.S. mar- 
ket Still neither the source of their discomfort 
nor the difficulty of the task relieves them of 
the obligation to enforce the law vigorously. 

At the same time, as the House Foreign 
Affairs study. “U.S. Narcotics Control Pro- 
grams Overseas; An Assessment," makes 
clear, the United States is itself laggard. The 


study's first general recommendation goes 
right to the point: “The United States should 
better demonstrate its own commitment to the 
fight against narcotics, including spraying do- 
mestically the herbicides it uijges other coun- 
tries to use on illicit crops, increasing asset 
seizures and wiretaps, devoting adequate re- 
sources to the agencies involved in anti-narcot- 
ics work, and prosecuting narcotics offenders 
to the fullest extent of the law." 

The matter of resources is a litmus issue. 
Some aspects of enforcement are bound to 
come hard. For instance, the U.S. system does 
not make it easy to ensure tough sentences for 
the big offenders. But why is there “a lack of 
coordination between responsible U.S. gov- 
ernment agencies, poor program m an agemen t 
and a lack of support from U.S. agencies’ 
headquarters in Washington for their front- 
line officer in the field”? Why are there only an 
“obviously inadequate" 16 agents of the U.S. 
Drug Enforcement Administration in Colom- 
bia? Why do they lack secure telephones? Why 
have there been no recent aerial supeys in the 
four big producing countries “despite repeated 
requests from U.S- embassies”? And bow long 
will the State Department countenance a situ- 
ation in which “narcotics assignments are 
viewed with distaste from a career stand- 
point"? For these lapses there can be no ex- 
cuses. The war on drugs starts at home. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Disruption Is Unprecedented 


The World watch Institute has taken a sec- 
ond look at the “Stale of the World" and 
found new reason to be concerned about the 
population growth that is straining resources. 
H postulates that “human population growth 
may now be driving climate change." The 
evidence is strongest in Africa. But there are 
implications for every part of the Earth as 
tropica! forests are depleted, arable lands 
turned to deserts, temperate-zone forests de- 


pleted by overharvesting and pollution. “Al- 
though human activities have always altered 
the natural environment, the scale of disrup- 
tions in the late 20th century is unprecedent- 
ed," Lester R. Brown, the project director, 
concludes. There is no doubt about the mes- 
sage: Society as it exists around the world 
today will not survive unless leaders pay more 
attention to resources and undertake the cost- 
ly. complex task of “restoring the natural sys- 
tems that ultimately sustain all societies." 

— The Las Angeles Times. 


FROM OUR MARCH 7 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Boxer Dies After London Bout 1935: Dollar Talk Scares "Wall Street 


LONDON — Curly Watson, the former mid- 
dleweight champion of tire army and navy, 
who hailed from Chatham and who was 
knocked out by Frank Inglis, middleweight of 
Birmingham, th a boxing contest at Wonder- 
land, Whitechapel, died at about 1 :30 yester- 
day looming (March 6]. For nine rounds, Wat- 
khi was a good leader on points. In the tenth 
round Inglis sent his opponent to the floor 
with a right-hand swing on the jaw. Watson 
arose, but Inglis put the right hard on him 
again. Still Watson came up. Then an upper 
cut put him down for the full count. He was 
carried to his corner unconscious. Two doctors 
were summoned. By their orders Watson was 
carried to the dressing-room, where every ef- 
fort was made to restore animation, but with- 
out effect. Inglis was arrested by the police; 


WASHINGTON —The New York Stock Ex- 
change was given a mid-day inflationary whirl 
{on March 6] as a result of a news agency 
misinterpreting the remarks of President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt. It was not until a 
White House statement was issued, giving as- 
surance that no further devaluation of the 
dollar was contemplated, that the market re- 
turned to its routine. During a press confer- 
ence. the President was asked if he felt the time 
had come to stabilize commodity prices. He 
said they were still too low to relieve the debt 
structure. Asked if this meant a further dollar 
devaluation, the President laughed and shook 
his head. As a result, a news agency reported 
that the President felt that the dollar was not 
sufficiently low, rather than that the price of 
commodities is not sufficiently high. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M.FOIS1E 

WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
Samuel abt 
CARL GEW1RTZ 


Dtp OfPvbBAtr 
Ajvhau Pt&bher 
Asuaate Publisher 


LEEW. HUEBNER. Pabldher 
Ex name Ediior RENE BONDY 

Editor ' ALAIN LECOUR 
Depm Editor RICHARD HI MORGAN 

Draw* Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DE SMA ISONS Dataar of Gradatim 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL DineUr of A<t*ertittng Sola 
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U S. subscription: $284 yearly. Second-doss postage paid a Lang Island City, S.Y. 11101. 

® 1085. Imermiional Herald Tribune All rigto rtserted 




Proposal: Apply Reserve Ratios to Control Flows 


G ENEVA — The troubles tha! 

swamped the world economy in 
the 1970s, leaving behind a debris of 
monetary, fiscal and trade disloca- 
tions. policy conflicts and slower eco- 
nomic growth, have vastly expanded 
the bureaucratic structure that seeks 
ta restore an international balance. 
But the summits, groups, committees 
and working parties, far from aHevi- 


By Nicolas Krai 


(ration in the non-tradable goods sec- 
l Japan 


ating economic ills, have increasingly 
' [life’s ed°e on which 


become the knife's edge 
private markets totter in alternating 
spasms of hope and agony. 

There is little reason to expect that 
traditional economic diplomacy will 
change things. As long as America 
continues to De the world’s economic 
locomotive, it is both temptin'* and 
possible to paper over the inability or 
present bureaucratic tools to bring 
about international cooperation and 
adjustment History, however, shows 
that such expediency rarely pays off. 
Financial hegemony can prevail for a 
time, and prosperity can be generated 
in the short run. but the future is 
shaped by “real world” consistencies 


tors. Western Europe and Japan are 
developing an excessive dependence 
on export-fed economic growth, and 
the non-oil developing countries are 
squeezing debt-service obligations 
out of a trade surplus that is wom- 
somely cyclical. Meanwhile, the criti- 
cal function of international resource 
allocation is being performed by fi- 
nancial-asset preferences rather than 
by comparative advantage. 

Excessive exploitation by the Unit- 
ed States of Lis dominant financial 
position will further enlarge its bal- 
looning external liabilities and even- 
tuallyroose grave problems for both 
the Federal Reserve and the domestic 


U.S. economy. The consequences will 
vne 


over the longer term. Indeed, pres- 
: balance 


be felt elsewhere. Already, monetaiy 
policy in Europe is undercut by capi- 
tal exports and the consequent eleva- 
tion of real rates of inlensL 
Neither the meetin g of the finanm 
ministers of the five leading Industri- 
al countries in Washington last Janu- 


sures to restore a sustainable I 
are budding up right now. 

Sustained deviation of exchange 
rates from long-run purchasing pow- 
er parities is forcing the United States 
into protectionism and over-concen- 


ary nor Prime Minister Margaret 
That 


itcher’s recent visit to Washington 
produced a serious joint effort to 
grasp the initiative in the freewheel- 
ing foreign exchange markets. Dear- 


ly then, until a system of complemen- 
roree ‘ 


tary economic policies is worked out. 


the elements that spontaneously fo- 
ment distortion and instability 
should be curbed unilaterally. 

A solution cannot be found in an 
unsustainable two-tier exchange rate 
system, or in more-or-less coordinat- 
ed central bank intervention in the 
exchange markets. Since the markets 
will not and rales cannot as yet pro- 
vide the necessary curbs, constraints 
should be provisionally imposed 
upon the sources of economic insta- 
bility. Joint European control over 
the volume and use of international 
capital flows through variable reserve 
requirements cm both international 
bank assets and liabilities would limit 
instability in one critical area. 

In the past proposals to regulate 
international capital flows largely 
aimed at providing an optimal level 
of international liquidity. Use of the 
reserve ratio would seek efficient use 
of capital, although it could be used 
for liquidity purposes as well 

By effectively lowering the return 
on purely financial lending abroad, 
and by raising the cost of purely fi- 
nancial borrowing overseas, the re- 
serve ratio would largely insulate 
trade and domestic policies from 
short-term financial distortions. In 
effect, it would be an extension of 


familiar domestic monetary policy 
operations to the international 
sphere. It would seek to maximize the 
real income of- the world as a whole 
rather than the return of a number of 


privileged players in the game. 
Given the leadership position of 


tup po 

the United States, much of the diffi- 
culty encountered in efforts at inter- 
national cooperation arises from the 
of the loneer-term wel- 


fare 


term U.S. interests. But the regula- 
tion of capital flows is always less 
costly in real terms than errors in 
resource allocation or loss of output 
and capacity. Fiscal measures can al- 
ways oe used to round up additional 
savings, but jobs and markets, once 
lost cannot be so easily restored. 

Without the support of the United 
States there can be no escape from 
unilateral policies when the market 
or the rules cease to work. Europe 
would do well to opt for the limita- 


tion of purely financial flows as a 


means of returning to currency sta- 
bility, normal real rates of interest, 
freer trade and the full contribution 
of finance to sound economic growth. 


The writer is general manager of Guff 
and Occidental Investment Company in 
Geneva. He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


Action on the Budget Deficit Becomes Less Likely 


W ASHINGTON — Prospects 
for dealing effectively with the 
U.S. budget deficit are slipping away. 
The situation is not yet irretrievable, 
but some of the momentum the Rea- 
gan adminis tration had going after 
the election has evaporated. 

Political attention drifted away 
from the deficit to the need to dead 
with an immediate crisis in the farm 
community. Influential congressmen 
demand more cuts in defense spend- 
ing and fewer in domestic programs 
than Mr. Reagan prefers. 

“Wbat we get now will have to be a 
bipartisan product, and the question 
is whether [Congress] can agree on 
anything the president can agree to," 
a key policymaker says. 

The performance of the economy 
has also proved a distraction: It is 
hard to get politicians to focus on the 
long-range dangers of a S200-billion 
deficit while economic growth accel- 
erates and the Dow- Jones index flirts 
with new daily highs. 

So for the moment the administra- 


By Hobart Rowen 

lion seems almost immobilized on its give the rest of the world “because 


jor policy objective of getting the 
deficit reduced. Yet the urgency of 
deficit reduction is underscored by 
the extraordinary performance of the 
dollar. This in him is causing serious 
problems for major American ex- 
porting industries and for industries 
that compete with imports. 

Even IBM, which cannot be ac- 
cused of being an inefficient produc- 
er, has not ban immune to the bur- 
den of the high dollar — a burden 
that economist C. Fred Bergsten lik- 
ens to a 40-percent tax on exports. 

The trade deficit is stimulating 
rotectionist sentiment that even a 
ree-trade-oriented administration 
will find hard to resist. And the trade 
deficit, which is likely to continue for 
a long time, will be exacerbated so 
long as the budget deficit promotes 
high interest rales and a high dollar. 

“Getting a start on deficit reduc- 
tion is a very important symbol” to 


even as your own policymakers say, 
the deficit is unsustainable in the long 
Jean-Oaude Paye, secretary- 


run. 


general of the OECD, said after a 
visit with U.S. officials this week. 

The interrelation of the trade defi- 
cit, interest rates and the dollar’s ex- 
change rate is more generally accept- 
ed as a fact of life among top Reagan 
administration officials now than it 
was before the switch that brought 
Jim Baker to the Treasury Depart- 


ment and Donald Regan to the job of 
White House chief of st " 


S 


staff. But the 
intellectual acceptance of the connec- 
tion has not brought today’s policy- 
makers any closer to a solution. 

“The danger," says an insider, “is 
that the adverse effect [of the overval- 
ued dollar] on domestic producers is 
such that we will be pressured into 
some ncm-market reaction.” 

One quick fix that some American 
companies have been touting is a sur- 


Just a Soviet Game of Chess Politics 

By Charles Krauthammer 


W ASHINGTON — Capital- 
ism's vice is that it turns ev- 
erything — even a woman’s first 
historic run for the White House 
— into cash. Communism’s vice is 
that it turns everything — even 
chess — into politics. 

Americans think chess is a game. 
The “Great Soviet Encyclopedia” 
defines it as “an art appearing in 
the form of a game." Like all art 
under socialism, it is to be turned 
into an instrument of the state. 

Said Nikolai Krylenko, commis- 
sar of justice, in 1932: “We must 
finish once and for all with the 
neutrality of chess. We must orga- 
nize shock brigades of chess players 
and begin the immediate realiza- 
tion of a five-year plan for chess." 
Consider the Karpov affair. 

On Sept. 10. 1984, the world 
chess championship begins in Mos- 
cow. Both players are Soviet citi- 
zens: the champion, Anatoli Kar- 
pov, vs. challenger Gary Kasparov. 
To win, one must win six games. 
Draws do not count After nine 
games, Mr. Karpov is ahead, 4-0. 
An astonishing lead. 

Mr. Kasparov launches the most 
relentless war of attrition in the 
history of championship chess. He 
deliberately forces draw after draw 
— at one point 17 in a row — to 
exhaust the older and frailer cham- 
pion. On Nov. 24 Mr. Karpov does 
win a fifth game, but he will not wi 
again. On Dec. 12 Mr. Kasp: 
wins his first The score is 5-1. 

Then come 14 more draws — and 
something extraordinary happens. 
Mr. Karpov, known for his metro- 
nomic logic and unshakable com- 
posure, loses game 47, playing “as 
though in a daze," according to a 
chess master, Robert Byrne. In 

JO Ik. • I - ■ 


wm 

tarov 


48 the champion loses a gain 


[score ts now 

By this time, says another ex 
Anatoli Karpov “looks like 
nenko." The Russian leader, Kon- 
stantin Chernenko, looks bad at 73, 


but Mr. Karpov is 33. Still, he has 
lost 10 kilos (22 pounds] and did 
not have very many to start with. 
He is close to collapse. He is about 
to faff, as Nabokov’s fictional 
champion. Luzhin, fell, into wbai 
the novelist called “the abysmal 
depths of chess.” And Gary Kas- 
parov is on the brink of the greatest 
chess comeback ever. 

And on the brink both men will 
stay. For on Feb. 15 the president 
of the international chess federa- 
tion, who is under great pressure 
from Soviet authorities, snows up 
in Moscow and declares the match 
a draw — and over. 

Mr. Karpov is saved by the belL 
except that here the referee rang it 
in the middle of a round and at an 
eight count. Why? One can under- 
stand the Party wanting Mr. Kar- 
pov to win in 1978 and 1981, when 
the challenger was Victor Korchnoi 
— defector, Jew, all around trou- 
blemaker. Trotsky at the chess- 
board. But Mr. Kasparov? 

He is a good Soviet citizen, a 
party member and not known for 
any politics. But he is half Arme- 
nian and half Jewish. Until age 12 
his name was Gary Weinstein. He is 
no dissident, but he is young (21) 
and independent He is not reliable. 

Mr. Karpov, who needed to be 
named only once, is. Twice the con- 
queror of Mr. Korchnoi, holder of 
the Order of Leni n , ethnically pure 
(Russian) and politically pliant (a 
leader of the Soviet Peace Commit- 
tee), he is the new Soviet man. 

And he receives the attention fit- 
ting so rare a political commodity. 
He says he was told of the match's 
cancellation over the phone in his 
car. Cellular service is not widely 
available in the Soviet Union. 

This is the third time that Soviet 
authorities have tried to undermine 


official reason — later pressed into 
service for the Olympics — was 
“lack of security." Only a sports- 
manlike opponent and accommo- 
dating chess officials (they resched- 


uled the match without penalty) 

imp in the 


saved him from defaulting 
candidates' round and losing his 


chance to challenge Mr. Karpov. 
But challenge & dii ’ 


did. The finals 
were held in the prestigious Hall of 
Columns in the House of Unions — 
until Mr. Kasparov’s rally in the 
47th game. Soviet authorities then 
moved the match to the Hotel Sport 
outside the city center. “Like mov- 
ing from Carnegie Hall to a gin mill 
in Poughkeepsie," sa ys Larry Parr, 
editor of Chess Life magazine. 

1 interpreted the move to mean 
that Mr. Chernenko was about to 
die, since the HaQ of Columns is 
where Soviet leaders lie in stale. 
1 was insufficiently cynical about 
Soviet behavior. The reason was 
not to bury Mr. Chernenko but to 
save Mr. Karpov. The move look 
eight days —right < 


days of rest for Mr. Karpov. 

It did not help. Mr. Karpov 


was 


iv. n 

too far gone. Mr. Kasparov de- 
stroyed him the very next day in the 
48th game. Soviet officials then 
made sure it was the last 
A month ago I would not have 
believed all tins myself. Fix the big- 
gest chess match in the world? Steal 
the championship from me Soviet 



episodes like these tend to fuel 
paranoia about bow far the Soviets 
will go in relentless pursuit of even 


the most speculative political ad- 
r. Next .thir 


xpert Mr. Kasparov's shot at the champi- 
Cher- ooship. In 1983 they stopped him 


vantage. Next .thing you know 
someone trill claim that the KGB 
got the Bul garians to hire a Turk to 
shoot the pope to pacify Poland. 


from traveling to his quarter-final 
match in Pasadena. California. The 


The writer is a senior editor of The 
New Republic. He contributed this 
comment to The Washington Post 


resist such pressures, and 
will be able to bold them off. It stuck 
to its guns — and deserves credit for 
doing — in abandoning “volun- 
tary^ quota limits on Japanese cars. 

Despite reports to the contrary, 
there has been no change in its basic 
opposition to massive U.S. interven- 
tion in exchange markets to bring the 
dollar down. White House officials 
are willing to see the Europeans inter- 
vene heavily if they choose. That 
keeps the markets on their toes and 
denies speculators a one-way bet 

Ultimately, Reagan administration 
officials, expect the dollar to ease 
away from its peaks. Bui that will 
require “a change in the fundamen- 
tals" — that elusive 550-billion re- 


Yes, Erosion 

InEthiopia ... r-.jr*** 
Is Germane 


1 V* - 






By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


W ASHINGTON — Ping a wine 
glass at your next dinner party 
and invite the company's attention to 
soil erosion in Africa. Veiy briefly, 
perhaps, you may be able to quia the 
table. But your spouse is not going to 
let you do it again soon. 

Actually, a part of the U.S. govern- 
ment did ping a glass, so to speak, 
and invite the company's attention to 
soil erosion in Africa bade in 1978. 

Lester Brown relates in a new 
Worldwatch Institute study. “State 
of the World 1985." that the Agency 
for International Development re- 
ported that Ethiopia was losing a 




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billion tons of topsoil a year. It fore- 
al ni 


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c. 


saw “an environmental nightmare 
unfolding before our eyes ... a re- 
suit of the acts of minions of Ethiopi- 
ans straggling Tor survival." 

la due time the nightmare arrived, 
in Ethiopia and elsewhere in Africa. 
Television injected it into the main- 
stream of Western consciousness. 

Lester Brown suggests that what 
Americans and others reacted to so 
instinctively and generously was not 
simply the spectacle of suffering but 
the spectacle of a tysiemic break- 
down. a continent-wide overload of 
historic dimensions: too many peo- 
ple, too little food and now the possi- 
bility that population growth is driv- 
ing climatic change — the number of 
people seeking to survi ve on marginal 
land is drying out Africa. 

Is he right? A premonition is in the 
air that & deterioration is beyond 
the reach of relief or development 
that the laws of progress have beat 
suspended across broad swaths of Af- 
rica and that an indescribable long- 
term tragedy is in train. It is a tragedy 
that African leaders may be unable to 
do anything effective about 

We foreigners, meanwhile, will put 
in some conscience money and will 
continue to address the South Africa 
question, politically more urgent and 
potentially rewarding. Otherwise, we 
may quietly remove Africa from the 
list of places of full engagement and 
slip into an undeclared policy akin to 
battlefield triage, in which the med- 
ics. realizing that they cannot save all 
the wounded, tend first to those with 
the best chance to survive. 

Perhaps this represents an over- 
reading oC the African scene. Certain- 
ly it represents a fundamental revi- 
sion of an American outlook on the 
Third World that was blooming as 
recently as 10 or 15 years ago. 

I return to Lester Brown, whose 
book of 1972, “World Without Bor- 
ders." caught many of us in a mood 
of readiness to explore new and 
cleansing modes of cooperation far 
peace and development 
This, and a pro- environmental 


top- 






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charge of. say, 20 percent on imports. 
The administration, although op- 
posed to such a tax. has not been 
above using it as a threat in negotia- 
tions with Japan and others. Most 
trade experts agree that it would be 
hard to find a worse idea: A sur- 
charge, which does not deal with the 
underlying matters of relative effi- 
ciency and exchange rate problems, 
would invite retaliation. Some con- 
tend that it would boost the dollar 


wave, helped produce Jimmy Carta’s 
victory over Gerald Ford in V 
Later came an Africa policy en^ 
siring a strong and positive American 




1 -. 

in 


rate even higher by bringing a quick 
trade balance. 


improvement of the i 
Yet the surcharge has a certain 
appeal Timothy W. Stanley, presi- 
dent of the International Economic 


■ .V 


Policy Association, puts it this way: 


“Something can and must be done 
about the trade deficit — in addition 
to, not in lieu of, cuts in the domestic 
deficit — in the short term, even if in 
some instances that involves thinking 
about the heretofore unthinkable." 




The administration is bracing to 
it thinks it 


duction in this year’s budget deficit 
1 billion itself 


(not so much for the £50 1 
but for what the step promises in 
future years) and a resurgence of Eu- 
ropean economic growth. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


role in a continent on the upswing.- 
In public opinion as wdl as po&y, ■ re- 
tire pendulum has since swung bad ; — 
toward a focus on a great-power po- ■ 
litical framework. This has happened 1 , , s 
for reasons little related to Africa. 

Few foresaw, for instance, that the 
“flickerings of universal consckm- » . . 
ness” spotted, approvingly, in the .* 
1970s by Stanley Hoffman of Har- ] > 
vard University would come to selfless *> 
not so much <m economic develop- '* ' 
ment as on nuclear survivaL 
All the same, the effect oa attitudes 
toward Africa has been substantial, 
and events in Africa —tire East-Vest 
proxy contests, the famine, the seme 
of headlong deterioration — have re- 
inforced the trend. ' — - 

In the 1970s the idea came that 
Africa would profit greatly from a . 

grand North-South “dialogue” to >** 

oversee a redistribution of inter- 
national income and economic op- “ ■ 
poruinity, but the idea went nowhere. : t 
It was replaced in the 1980s, at 1.^“ . 
least in official American eyes, by the 1 L ; 
idea that the marketplace should.be c 
allowed to doits magre. Butin Africa . , 
the promised fruits are not yet in * j ^ . 

view. Nor was there establishedin the . 

more upbeat years a broad-based jy^ 
American political coalition able to t ' ■* ; 
see adequately to the continent's « ; 
need for aid, credit and trade: : 

Still, the coalition that has been >! v; 
assembled is at least something. As- .• ■ *■ ^ 
sorted softhearted and hardheaded ^ 
groups, both in and out of the Rea- , ^ L 
gan administration, have on interest > - , 
in the continent's welfare. _ > • .j 

There may be no great ideas anng ; - 
bm there is no fence around Africa, ? - \ 
either. It is part of the world, part of '. f i . > 
us. Ping that glass. - w : •• • 

The Washington Post ; j , ■ . 




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LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

Frightened in Seoul 


•?- ■■'V 


As a member of the American dele- 
gation that accompanied Kim Dae 


forces in plainclothes violently divid- . .' 
ed our delegation, holding most of m »’■* 
on the gangway while others forceful- } . 


Jung on his return to South Korea, I 
wotuc 


ly separated our chairmen, Ambassa- \ 
dor 



id tike to present some facts. 

Our delegation served to demon- 
strate that there 
ca 

that supports dictatorships, 
lieve in the worldwide practice of 
democracy and civil rights. We did 
not go to South Korea to interfere in 
that country’s internal affairs. Giving 
public support to a world leader and 
a citizen of South Korea should not 
be construed as such interference. 

We were aware of the lessons to be 
learned from Benigno Aquino’s re- 
turn to the Philippines. Raul Mangla- 
pus, former foreign minister and later 
a senator in the Philippines, was a 
member of our delegation. 

We perceived — and continue to 
see — one principal threat to Mr. 
Kim’s life: the leadership of the 
South Korean government. In its 
claim to "protect” ten, that leader- 
ship wanted to separate him from bis 
American friends. His “safety," it is 
claimed by South Korean spokes- 
men, was their reason to separate us 
at Kirapc International Airport. 

Yes, physical force was used. At 
least 50 members of the security 


Robert E White and Represent*;, t 
live Edward F. Feighan, from Mr-- ? 
Kim and his wife. It was a frightening^ ' 


*- -- 


fc rs 

•r .4*: 


South Korea's government, but ^ 
does not alleviate the oppression of l i 
ti>e people, the leadership of the , : 
church, labor, civil libertarians and-,^ 
opposition political parties. The Feb. ‘ i ■ 
12 elections, which barred die demo- ' 
cratic leadership from running or, ; 
campaigning (mostly by house 
rest), still registered strong oppoa-' 
tion to President Chon Doo Hwan- ' 

Of all the things we saw and heard, 
what impressed me most was the 
pea tod warning that although the. j , 
United States is highly regarded an°£ - 
South Korea is mum indebted to it, iL ; . 
is fast losing respect and trust be-,' 1 * 
cause of its government's support (or<) ' 
Mr. Chun’s repressive regime: _ -y. 

I believe we played a major role to ', * ' 
Mr. Kim's survival on his return. Our ' ^ , 
concern now is not with the airport.* v ■ 
incident but with his future safety'll 
and thefuture of Korean democracy-..'! ' 

ROBERT J. SCHWARTZ. F? 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


Page 


SCIENCE 


hC„ 


IN BRIEF 




World’s Sweetest Substance Could Be Key in Taste Research 


W 

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Sweat Bees’ Anti-Aphrodisiac Studied 




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WASHINGTON (NTT) — Watching a male sweat bee mate with a 
female sweat bee, Pendope Kukuk, a Cornell University entomologist, 
noticed that, once the? had mated, the female seemed to lose her appeal 
to male bees. 

Dr. Kukuk knew it had been suspected that male sweat bees could 
recognize and remember the odors of their mates, she reported in Science 
magazine. But the males would have to learn an incredible number of 
odors to avoid their past mates. 

Since male sweat bees also tend to avoid females that have mated with 
other males. Dr. Kukuk, suspected that the might deposit a 
pheromone after mating, an odor or liquid that would be a signal to other 
male bees — in effect an anti-aphi rahriup 
With the aid of Professor George Eickworl, Dr. Kukuk treated nylon 
„ U] models of sweat bees with varying concentrations of the odor of virgin 
-l V 1 lw • females, extracted from dead bees. The stronger the concentration, the 
»,,!«* „ ' Ll1 1 hi.w-L, ^ more males were attracted, but once a model was visited by a male, the 
^' n ' • > , ‘pv.,( A * - number of suitors fell dramatically. 

Si: 1 , - tiZ ^ H® 3118 Kept Alive After Brain Death 

.«.!% *;i OSAKA, Japan (AFP) — A team of Osaka University m e dial experts 


•Wilt ,!),{ 
•«lt !«l ;n 

Iftlcs’ 
"oil 
J I t!u* 


By Sandra Blakeslee 

New York. Times Service 

L OS ANGELES — T&e threc- 
/ dimensional structure of the 
sweetest substance known has beat 
determined, a feat that promises to 
shed light on how the molecules of 
some substances interact with hu- 
man Laste buds to produce the sen- 
sation of sweetness. 

The compound, thaumatin, 
comes from the katemfe bush, 
which grows in West African rain 
forests. Its structure, full of wildly 
shaped loops, is described in the 
Proceedings or the National Acad- 
emy of Sciences. 

The research was led by Sung- 


hou Kim, a chemistry professor at 
the University of California at 
Berkeley. He was assisted In' Mar- 
cos Haiada and Abraham de Vos. 

Of all the taste is die least 
understood. An enormous variety 
of widely different compounds, in- 
cluding natural sugars, artificial 
sweeteners, amino acids and inor- 
ganic compounds such as formal- 
dehyde, can elicit a sweet taste. 

A compound tastes sweet when 
some of its molecules bind to sweet 
receptors on taste buds, on the 
tongue. The receptors initiate nerve 
impulses to the brain, which recog- 
nizes the stimulus as an encounter 
with something sweet. 

A barrier to studying sweetness 


has been that it takes a lot of most 
sweet compounds to elicit a sweet 
taste. Sugar and saccharin, for ex- 
ample, mil bind to many receptors 
on the longue, including those for 
temperature and pressure, as well 
as to the sweetness receptors. 

But the taste buds can detect 
thaumatin as sweet at extremely 
low concentrations. Molecule for 
molecule, it is 100,000 times sweet- 
er than table sugar and 600 times 
sweeter than aspartame, the major 
ingredient of the artificial sweeten- 
er known as Nuirasweei or Can- 
dareL The taste buds can detect 
thaumatin at the same concentra- 
tion as that at which hormones are 
active, one molecule in a milli on 


Professor Kim writes that this 
should prove useful for isolating 
the many properties people asso- 
ciate with sweetness, such as speed 
of onset, intensity, a feeling of satu- 
ration, lingering time, aftertaste 
and influencing other tastes or fla- 
vors. 

To study taste receptors, Profes- 
sor Kim said, the receptors must be 
stimulated with pure, active chemi- 
cal compounds of known structure 
and shape. Thaumatin is the first 
such substance to be described in 
this fashion. It is a. protein that 
belongs to a rare class called, taste- 
active proteins. Most proteins have 
little or no taste. 

The large thaumatin molecule 


Prenatal X-Ray Cancer Link Backed 


ncwrtk 

frj"?- 

« twoi 


!:i , .j‘ l " 1 •unu 1 j-‘' say they have kept the hearts of “brain-dead* 1 patients alive for up to 54 

m I “ l l l: 7 ,|l i l: % 1 . days- Tw team said at a meeting of researchers in Osaka that it was the 

1 vw-vim. ■!>" , | > . w °rid's first such experiment. 

Mrc.iisi ,.f v."!!': lo: Jh® experts, led Ivy Dt. Tsuyoshi Sugunoto. said. they kept six hearts 

i 7' 1 Tli '"V. a l* ve for between 9 and 54 dayswith the aid of a hormone that main rains 
\mt-: ' ’\ u '“sSftb >. a certain level of blood pressure. Normally, the heart stops beating a few 

Hu -7 ,A : 1 days after the brain’s death. 

Carbohydrate Snack for Some Dieters 

•» n , J " v! «s. CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts (AP) — One candy bar a day or an 

omu i^;:: English muffin eaten as part of a kw<a]qrie diet should satisfy the 

pic. l:i: •; tl , \ !"■%■ brain's need for caibohydrales and could help people lose weight, 

i' u; .p.i/,1, ,v,, t according to a study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

tm* « l. v « t About half of all fat people crave sugar or starch and eat between-meal 

pLMFU '^.snadts because these foods increase levels of brain chemicals that 

land „!n '’V improve their moods, said Dr. Judith Wurtman, who conducted the latest 

«- i-„ : • \T,’ r . ::i a series of studies of the subject with her husband. Dr. Richard 

.in ih.i: ;;!■ Wurtman.^ The study was published in the International Journal of Eating 

the ii:.un !•; 1 7 ! l " r “ ll ‘" lf : Disorders." y~ 

thai 1 ll,' i .7. -f 'i ,n J[ldit b Wurtman said penile wlm “dearly are eating the food because 

Mivtvr.ii ,i , - 1 ?,6 ‘ « of ahiolo^cal need to inmrove their feelings” can lose weight if they go 

Ui .t .m„i ;»r’V* ^ on diets that letjhem satisfy their cravings- She suggests a low-calorie diet 

U-n* !■ W- i- 1 . l! ■ except for one snack a day that would satisfy the demand for carbohy- 

thii Air "■ 77 ’ !l; 1 ’ 6 -- drates. 

1n.11 lc.uMi.nvft l*,. 

,7 ni '- 7 BOSTON (AP) — Onldren exposed to nodical X-rays in the womb 

v ,. ;il .. u . c , . 7,’v't -7 ■h'i? T:face afa oat two and a half times the usual risk of cancer, and even low 
>n 7. ■■■• ■ , 1 '7 'wx ( ^ oses ra£ Saiion tasy be harmful to the unboni, according to a study at 

it women, 
decades of 

-debate. Though ihc latest research found a statistical link, it did not 
" ->• -’«u ^conciusjvelY prove that low-levd radiation during pregnancy increases 
1 ; r •bar a* ^ds trf cancer later. 

::.i 1 “I don't think anything definitive can be said from this study because 

.- -::.i ,t%i u-L-^rf the small numbers involved,’* said Dr. Elizabeth B. Harvey, the 
•- '-“ni research director. The study, published in : the New England Journal of 
- -t -M edicine, was the first conducted on twins. Doctors once routinely used 

- v n, - yj-. x-tays to see if women were carrying twins. 

^'Amniocentesis Substitute Developed 

.■ -."j.v WASHINGTON (UPI) — Mkhigan - scientists are working on a 
I.-.;.- k,v l ^ iea P er - less-complicated substitute for amniocentesis, a technique used 

- v, " \ c \\ .To check a fetus for inherited abnormalities such as Down’s syndrome. 

• j. V The new test involves taking a blood sample from the mother and 

. . r ,, ' isolating cells from the fetus that migrate into the mother's bloodstream. 

‘ 7rThe test can be done when the fetus, is eight weeks old. 

7 ■ ’ ~ The two Michigan Stale University professorawho developed the test, 
n -, 7 -however, say the analysis takes houra.soitisnotyet practical forgenaal 
77 ’: T - use- Dr. Harold Miller, one of the two, said the researchers were woriring 
7 . 7 '\ - Mrahidng the tune needed for the test to five minutes, using lasers and a 
7 rompiiter ' system. " 


Boning Up on Smithsonian’s Skeleton Collection 


T. Dale Stewart with cast of 
20,000-year-old skeleton. 




Fagl HoHCrm/The New York Tims 


By Dena Kidman 

New YerJi Times Service 

W ASHINGTON — There are 
30,000 skulls in the Smithso- 
nian Institution, and Dr. T. Dale 
Stewan Jr. knows them alL 
An anthropologist at the muse- 
um since 1924 , Dr. Stewart, 84 , has 
probably studied more chin bones 
than anyone else at an institution 
that is said 10 have the world’s 
largest research collection of hu- 
man skeletons. 

He is theoretically retired. But he 
shows up for work every day and is 
one of the Smithsonian's best 
guardians of institutional trivia and 
cranial intrigue. 

“You see that fellow over there?" 
he announced, pointing to the cast 
of one of many skulls on his file 
cabinet. “It's 45,000 years old." 

Dr. Stewart's office is on the 
third floor of the National Museum 
of Natural History at the end of a 
dusty corridor filled from floor to 
ceiling with human bones, mostly 
American Indian and Eskimo, 
some from as far away as Peru. 

At once macabre and intriguing, 
these remains help document hu- 


man existence and seemingly con- 
firm the anthropological maxim 

about North America: that hu- 
mans' appearance on the continent 
was relatively recent. 

The museum’s collection of 
North and South American human 
fossils dates back 12,000 years, pro- 
viding the earliest evidence of hu- 
mans on the continent. Knee Dr. 
Stewan rose from temporary aide 
to become the museum’s director in 
1962 he has traveled the world in 
search of older bones and other 


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Timed-Release Local Anesthetic Develo 



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r. 


The Associated Press 

C HICAGO — Scientists say 
they have developed a tech- 
nique for enveloping a local anes- 
thetic in timed-release ‘^microdrop- 
Iets” so that it works for up to 40 
hours with a single injection. 

The technique should relieve 
chronic or surgical pain without 
hindering healing, said one of the 
developers. Dr. Anthony Kirkpat- 
rick, assistant professor of anesthe- 
siology at the University of Illinois 
at Chicago. Later the technique 
may be applicable to anti-cancer 
and anti-fuwritis drugs, permitting 


direct injection into affected areas 
to avert side effects and deliver 
medicine only where it is needed, 
said another developer, Dtmcan 
Haynes, professor of pharmacolo- 
gy at the University of Miami, 

He said about one- third of til 
drugs have properties that might 
allow them to be introduced into 
the body this wav. 

Using the technique would re- 
quire less anesthetic and so would 
be less costly, the scientists said. 

The method involves enclosing 
tiny droplets of a drug in mem- 
branes resembling those of a hu- 


man cell. The idea is at least 20 
years old, but Professor Haynes 
said the droplets he and Dr. Kirk- 
patrick developed can carry much 
greater amounts of drug than previ- 
ously developed particles, generally 
known as liposomes. 

When a local anesthetic is inject- 
ed, it spreads to surrounding tissue. 
To increase the effect and duration 
of the drug's action, a higher dose 
may have to be given. Higher doses, 
however, can produce dangerously 
high blood lews of the drug and 
can lead to convulsions and heart 
problems. Dr. Kirkpatrick said. 


it came to identifying the 
war dead in Korea, the Ttntagon 
sent Dr. Stewart. When a set or 
bones was discovered at the bottom 
of a well in Manassas, Virginia, Dr. 
Stewart found the clues that deter- 
mined who the dead man was — a 
Prohibition-era bootlegger whose 
assailant had remained at large be- 
cause there had been no proof that 
the bootlegger had died. When the 
U.S. Army discovered a mass 
grave in Europe and questional 
whether it was a result of some 
modern-day atrocity, it was Dr. 
Stewart who laid the incident to 
rest: They were bones from the 
Franco-Prusrian War. 

This passion began in his youth, 
when he and a friend who worked 
at his parents' pharmacy in Della, 
Pennsylvania, unearthed arrow- 
heads and shards of Indian pottery 
along the banks of the Susquehan- 
na River. His friend, later an ar- 
chaeologist at the Smithsonian, 
helped Dr. Stewart secure his first 
job there. Dr. Stewan later attend- 
ed medical school at Johns Hop- 
kins University, where he graduat- 
ed in 1931 , and returned to the 
Smithsonian. 

Most recently he has been assess- 
ing a mass of bones from Egypt He 
figures they are 20 , 000 years old. 

Asked what is his fidd of exper- 
tise, Dr. Stewan responded firmly: 
“Mankind." 


consists of 207 amino adds. Using 
X-ray crystallography, in which a 
crystal cif thaumatin was X-rayed 
and its atomic structure deduced 
from the patterns observed. Profes- 
sor Kim and his colleagues learned 
that the molecule had two structur- 
al features: long sheets of amino 
acids, resembling the slats of a fiat- ’ 
tened wine barrel, and two regions 
of complicated loops. 

Professor Kim said the loops 
were structurally s imilar to otto 
potent proteins, such as snake ven- 
om and ragweed pollen, that also 
bind to specific receptors. 

It is “nearly irresistible,” he said, 
to suggest that the thaumatin loops 
are the molecular structures that 
lode onto sweet taste receptors on 
the tongue, but (his theory has yet 
to be proved. 


A similar analysis, now under 
way in Professor Kim’s laboratory, 
of the second sweetest known sub- 
stance may help prove the theory. 
The substance, monclUn. is another 
taste-active protein. It comes from 
the serendipity berry, found an yet 
another West African bush. Monel- 

lin and thaumatin. Professor Kim 

said, seem to share five regions of 
identical amin o add sequences. 

By comparing the three-dimen- 
sional structure of monellia with 
that of thaumatin, he said, it may. 
be possible to discover which seg- 
ments of the molecular loops pro- 
duce sweet receptor binding. 

Both sweet proteins hare poten- 
tial commercial value os low-calo- 
rie sweeteners or os blueprints for 
designing artificial sweeteners 
based on a belter chemical under- 
standing of the sense of sweetness.' 


Fossils Link Tarsier to Egypt 

New York Tima Service 

L ONDON — A researcher exca- 
* v a ling fossil beds in Egypt has 
found what he believes to be jaw 
bones indicating an African origin 
for the tarsi cr, one or the smallest- 
and least known primates, accord- 
ing to the British journal Nature. 

The big-eyed, nocturnal tarsier 
has twin leg bones that -serve as 
springs, enabling it to leap from 
tree to iree, and with adhesive pads 
on its toes it can stick to whatever it 
lands on. The only larsier-like fos- 
sils had been from Asia. North 
America and Europe. 


Now Dr. Ehvyn L, Simons of the 
Duke University Primate Center in 
Durham, North Carolina, who for 
20 years has excavated a 33 -mil- 
lion-year-old deposit in the Fayum 
fossil beds southwest of Cairo," bus 
found evidence that he said “puts 
the earliest apes, monkeys and tar- 
si ers together in Africa,” suggesting 
that early tarsiers were an interme- 
diate stage between early and high- 
er primates. Modern iarsiera are 
native to the Philippines, Malaya. 
Borneo and the Celebes. Finding a 
tarsier fossil in Africa was “a com- 
plete surprise,” Dr. Simons said. 


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FREE-STANDING EMERGENCY ROOM 



,,.J[ 


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NYSE Most Actives 


- 

■ •.. . r t r..- r_"J 


VOL 

HU 

Law 

Late 

am 




MJdSUt 

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TSttk 

13 

13 % 

+ to 


Phil Pet 


49 % 

49 % 

49 % 

+ % 

I i « : 

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ANtRSB 

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60 % 

21 ft 

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32 % 

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CIGNA 

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90 

49 

49 * 

— * 


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11044 

SI* 

58 % 

51 

— % 

i %; l r * V 


KaaGE 

11299 

17 % 

17 % 

17 * 

+ to 

1 .(,,1 t • 

... » ,% . • \ * j. 

TevOGc 


19 * 

19 

Wto 


* ■ 

AMPS 

■ IP 

31 % 

29 % 

31 * 

— % 


• • 

Am Exp 


41 % 

42 % 

42 * 

— * 

>.* t to 

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IBM 


135 * 

m% 

03 

-a 

.* : • 

Exxon 

■ t i i 

49 % 

4 M 

48 * 

— % 

V- :!• 

• • . ■/ r%i?» •" 

TncUtll 

9862 

76 % 

26 % 

76 % 

+ to 


1 Dow Jones Averages j 


Indus UnjS T 2 KJ 1 Win 1 *J- 11.4 
Tram OSM 432.97 41 9 JO 43223 — 120 
U 8 .U 1406 14257 148 L 39 + 021 
52251 S 222 J SW 27 53039 — 44 M 


& 


NYSE Index 


Prwlow _ Today 
HI* Low Om 3 P.M. 
Composite 1 QSA 5 1 D 5 L 09 1 Q &47 1 D 47 B 

Industrial* 12114 1 ZL 47 12152 121 JS 1 

Trausp. 101.45 101 jOS 10112 IJM 

Utilities 5253 5139 5153 53*1 

Finance • 10930 10272 I 09 j 04 10127 


NYSE Diaries 


DocOnad _ 
Unchanged ' 
lUd Issues 
NSW Highs 
New Lows 


723 


570 
947 

444 US 

2 Pg» 2021 

44 75 

* 7 


1 Odd-Lot Trading In N.y7 


March 5 . 
March 4 . 
March 1 . 
FeftuZi 
Feb. 27 


'Inducted hi me sales figures 


But Soles *»H 

71034 511474 U 0 S 

203579 534 JA 3 STB 

217,191 52 X 003 U 77 

52709 435 JJ 0 2282 

185407 447,379 2343 


Wednesd ay?* 

MSE 


VoLatSPJUL 


93450 , 0 m 

i Prov.3P44.raL 91440400 

Pnw coajoUdated dose 14 U 22840 

Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to ttw dosing oa Wall Street and 
do oof reflect late trades elsewhere. 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 

Declined 


Total ^ 

New Highs 
New Lows 


234 274 

342 200 

323 229 

m 7 B 5 

32 31 

4 2 


NASDAQ Index 


week Year 

Close Nam Age Ana 
Composite 287.10 25744 28540 25254 

Industrial* 31024 309.95 30742 28544 

Finance 33147 — 3294 S 3 WJ 6 

Insurance 324 J 7 — 32447 24544 

Utilities 26445 — 24548 22049 

BOOKS 24848 — 247.25 M 

Tronsu. 24842 — 24546 ML 7 B 


Standard & Poor's Index | 


Previous 



H * gb 

Low 

CHMi 

3 PAL 

Industrials 

204^3 

mu 

204.14 

20374 

T reran. 

1 AO -47 

U 977 

1 S> JO 

15861 

Utilities 

7834 

7759 

7 X 11 

7 X 01 

Finance 

2 UI. 

2 X 84 

3 X 97 

2 X 80 

Composite 

18245 

18172 

1 KL 23 

18 X 93 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages | 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Close 

7248 

4940 

75.96 


t T SS 


TUI 

4942 

7403 


I AMEX Most Actives I 



VOL 

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Law 

Last 

due 

BAT 

smn 

4ft 

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4 



5713 

25* 

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TIE 

3396 

7% 

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DUIrds 

3236 

50* 

49 

49* 

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Amdom 

3828 

16* 

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16 

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DomeP 

2944 

2ft 

3 

Sft 


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DM 

26 

2SM 

35% 

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1787 

ito 

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7% 

7ft 

7% 


1165 

n 

12% 

13 


NYTlme 

1119 

42* 

41% 

41% 

— * 

EchoBa 

1184 

9% 

9* 

9% 

+ * 


'5‘ . ' 


■ ■■ ■ i 


I 


| AMEX Stock Index 


High 

228.90 


Previous 
Law Clast 

227 .HI 22888 


Today 
3 PM. 

227.74 


2 Month 

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Stocks Jittery in Slower Trading 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock trehauge were rapidly losing ground late 
Wednesday as investors weighed new testimony 
by the Federal Reserve chairman, Paul A. 
Voicker. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 
10.71 to 1 .28 1.14 about an hour before the close: 


Although prices m tables on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. dose In Sew York, fir time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3- 
P.M. 


Declines led advances by a 9 -to -5 ratio among 1 
the 1,955 issues traded. 

Volume amounted to about 94.57 million 
shares, compared with 98.24 mOtion in the like 
period Tuesday. 

In new testimony Wednesday, Mr. Voicker. 
snirf a sharp decline in the dollar would endan- 
ger the present economic situation. However he 
did not predict a decline in the dollar and again 
called for cuts in the federal budget defiriL 

Mr. Voicker told this House Budget Commit- 
tee present conditions do not allow for easing of 
credit controls. He said he did not know what 
credit stance the Fed would adopt in the future. 
He repeated that the Fed stopped easing and 
said that does not mean it is tightening. 

Alfred Harris of Josephthal & Co.. Sl Louis, 
said the modest retreat of the past few sessions 
is a prelude to another move toward and finally 
through 1 , 300 . 

He said the Voicker testimony indicated in- 
terest rates will not go much higher due to 


worries about worsening the dollar situation. 
Mr. Hams said be expects to see lower interest 
vales later in 1985. 

He said the next advance in the stock market 
will be broad, as many stocks benefit from the 
low inflation environment. 

Some analysts said stocks will be unable to 
make much progress until bonds snap out of 
their slump. 

A Merrill Lynch analysis stud a reverse in the 
long-term rates may take place in late spring 
due to improved inflation news, a reduction in 
money growth and the possibility of lower ener- 
gy prices. 

One uncertainty that could worsen the situa- 
tion. the publication said, is a sharp drop in the 
dollar, which would bring upward pressure on 
rates and revive wearies over inflation. 

Occidental Petroleum was near die top of the 
active list and up a fraction following a block of 
2.7 million share at 2854 . 

Phillips Petroleum was up a fraction at mid- 
day after a block of 450,000 shares at 49 %. 

Schering-Plough was lower at midday. An 
analyst reportedly issued a sell recommenda- 
tion on -the stock. 

Elsewhere in the oil group, Unocal Mobil 
Exxon- and Chevron were lowo- at midday. 
Indiana Standard and Texaco were higher. 

Heritage Communications was higher at mid- 
day. The cable TV company will buy 1.37 mil- 
lion of its own share from Equitable of Iowa 
Cos. 

Technology issues weakened with IBM, Digi- 
tal Equipment and Hewlett Packard lower at 
midday. Texas Instruments and Motorola also 
lost ground. 


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1 & 


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TO 39* Damon _ w H20 «to a* SSHjfi 
(Cdntmoed on Page g) 




Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


Wednesdays 


IZMontn 
HUhU» Shdt 


St Clow 

MBahWl LOW QuotPlV# 


Q Month 
HMllW 1W 


5t Clna 

Ow.YB.PE lWaHWiLouf Ouof-t 


H Month 
HishlWoStedi 


st aw 

BW.YM.PE IjteHirtlM# OwLCKfe 


12 Month 
WjfaLow Stack 


5b. Oa 

Ote.YM.PE WhHMiLwr OontQffe 


12 Month 

ijya »» 


DW.TM.PE HEWTOUn. £5!c Ha 


MSE 


Tobies iRdottt tt» notionwfde prices 
up fo ftie dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 Month 
HMh Low Stack 


SB OM# 

DW. TB PE WUHWiLaw duct. OiH« 


(Continued from Page 7) 



155* 

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24ft 


GksrtP’ 74 

GObrPn 5 1294 

GOTHB1 42 24 2D 12* 

Glltofle 240 44 II *55 

GlaasC 39 

GtoMM 44 44 394 

GlobMPf 30 1£4 34 

OMNUO 12 2970 

GMNwJ 287 

GMWF JO 4 8 404 

Gft-fdl 146 54 11 tO 

Goadyr 140 £8 7 2038 

GcrflnJ A 34 * 64 

Gould 41 19 59 1126 

Grot* 240 64 10 W60 

omnr 14* 14 M 25 

G*AP*f 40 59 8 114 

OtAIPC 9 278 

GlLkln 140 25 M 17 

GNIra 1458 94 7 13 

GtNNfc 252 *2 8 284 

GINNkPl473 8J » 

GfWFM 48 AS 10 1151 

OWH» 44 500 

GMP 142 104 10 10 

Grwn 140 42 II 1200 

GrtvfiPf 473 HU ,10* 

Graltar _ II Wf 


lift + 16 
Oft 

at- m 

57ft— ft 
Oft 

4ft- ft 
22M 

10ft— ft. 
2ft 

a -ft 

27ft— 16 
T7ft— ft 
23ft— 1» 
41 —88 
64ft— ft 
mt + ft 

1518— ft 
39ft + ft 
WV + ft 
3398— ft 
at 

25)8— ft 
15*— 1% 


158*104 
40 14 a 

208 54 


14S 54 31 BSI 


42 U 9 910 
142 27 8 0 

42 23 17 » 

240 -4-1 12 2535 
42 4 25 16*9 

144 44 12 345 
224am 309 

240 27 10 1203 
40, 14 10 2293 
40 25 12 56 

140 5 1784 

X 4 19 94 

216 64 11 574 
10 367 


15ft— ft 
aft + 48 


GrowGa JO 24 l* 111 
Grub El 48 7 11 m 


Grwm MO 34 8 282 
Grump# 210 187 2 

Granted -1* 23 U3 
OuntTfl 48 25 9 -CD 
GtfWtf 40 27 10 2892 
GHWpf STS U 1 

GuHRl 26 12 23S 

§«WI 144 115 6 1271 
GtfSUpf 440 134 350z 

GHSt/pr 345 134 13 

QtfSU pr 440 134 1* 

OAn 4*, 43 10 158 
Cotton 40 34 13 11 


4ft— ft 
12ft— ft 
10ft— 1A 

a —ft 

aft 

27W + ft 
33ft— 16 
65ft + ft 
1488 + ft 
13ft + ft 


2798 — ft 
32 

1* — ft 
17ft— ft 


EootaP 144 44 
EQSCO At 23 


EtntAIr 

EALwfO 

GALwtA 

EQKn 

EsAIrpf 

EAb-pfB 

EAtrntc 


48 14 a 325 38ft 

40 17 14 1471 28ft 

44 44 9 a aft 

A* 23 1*8 19 

1*94 6ft 
165 218 
117 1 

1065 17ft 
13 1248 
184 14)8 
10 17ft 


EcntG-F 140 54 a 367 HU 

EostUtt 144 114 6 90 1788 

EsKod 120a 44 12 9079 70ft 

Enron 130 21 7 448 58ft 

Ecfllln 74 29 12 BOI 3698 

Eck»rd 144 33 13 1907 3148 

EdtaBr 140 41 H 48 33ft 

EDO 34 U 11 68 16ft 

Edward a 25 21 2*5 Sift 

CPGoat US 10A 4 22ft 

EPGPT 37 27ft 

errora is 0 14% 

Elcor J6 U V lift 

ItKAs 30 5ft 

KAMA 32 511 8 

EMM pf 148 184 3 18 

Etd*p» 48 J 31 99 36ft 

eWn 0 W 14 32 15ft 

Etsctnt 36 7ft 


3816 + ft 
20ft + ft 
2618— ft 
1898+ ft 
6ft— ft 

% 

17ft + ft 
12ft— ft 
14ft— ft 
17ft— ft 
Sift + ft 
17ft + ft 
69ft— ft 
57ft— ft 

au + ft 

31ft— ft 
33ft— K , 
16ft 

31ft— 16 
22ft 1 
« «r. 27ft— ft ; 

0 14ft 14)8 14ft— ft ! 
V lift Tift lift + 16 
30 5ft 516 5ft 

ill > 7ft 7ft— ft 

3 18 9)8 10 + ft 

99 2tft 26ft 26ft + ft 
32 15» 15ft Kft + ft 
M 7)6 7ft 7)8— ft 


23 

140 37 856 

140 57 11 5599 
■00 54 962 

-56 6.1 64 

7 2892 


I AMU 42 
144a 97 63 

42 17 17 226 
46 15 78 ft 
40 17 38 187 
140 17 14 275 
46 24 19 321 
22 20 
40 24 14 * 


0 29 13 

313 

8 

Z73 

10 4A « 

0 

10 *0 10 

203 

10 11J 11 

a 

144 8.1 9 

. 55 

0# IA 7 

1Tb 

0 14 15 

22 

32 Zl 11 

4 

0 23 X 

10 

30 1J 34 

5B7 

ABb 27 10 

130 

0 1J 14 

33 

140 un 

B34 

16 

44 

J4 17 24 

354 

19 

455 

10 44 10 

■QSa J 36 

327 

10 54 

0 

140 U U 

300 

15 


_ 7ft 
32 4 17 *641 37ft 

40 2.1 17 40 29 

SO 27 24 133 17ft 

J5 U 9 43 

St 2.1 13 73 

140 3.1 13 14*3 

70s 4 II 607 

140 24 14 3140 

140 14 13 14 

35 10 
7 823 
1.10 124 72 

JO S 39 959 

AO IS S 268 

Jto 7 10 380 

150 34 12 *56 

144 3.1 13 509 

1.12 44 8 3t 

2789124 2 


40 1J 14 2272 
240 94 U 28 
M 24 IS SO 
40 13 11 573 
175 44 9 819 
6J5 8J 0 

248 114 6 1089 
2.12 44 11 590 
244,147 42 

-40 22 24 42 

220 8J 12 49 

AO 34 9 114 

AS U 7*8 
J2 14 10 7 

48 23-14 1302 
50 19 1* 27 

40 2.1 10 1343 
142 80 8 39 


Sft 

26ft— ft 
31ft 
lft 
9ft 

28ft + ft 
13ft 

18ft— ft j 
53ft + ft 
18ft— ft 
21 

52ft— ft 
28ft— ft 
lift— ft 
JTft— 16 
30ft— ft 
17 —ft 
27ft — ft 
3216 + ft 
16 

20ft— ft 
12ft 

26ft— ft 
lift 
tZft 

15ft + ft 
17ft + ft 
306+ ft 
47% + ft 
15ft + ft 
20ft + ft 
6—18 
34ft— ft 
ZM8+48 
27ft +Hk 
48ft— ft 
7ft— ft 
36ft— ft 

aft— ft 

17ft— ft 
lift— ft 
2598+ ft 
0 +ft 
33ft— ft 
SOft— ft 
aft + ft 
19ft + ft 
21ft 
8ft— ft 
23 +98 
14 

57 — ft 
63ft— ft 
a +ift 

aft— ft 

26ft 

45)8 46ft 
2898 2898— ft 
Mft 36ft + ft 
17ft Tift 
3616 36ft— ft 
75ft 73ft— ft 
22ft 22ft 
46ft 46ft + ft 
12ft 1216 
17ft 18 + ft 

a a 

13)6 1316— 18 
15 15V8— ft 


JS *3 9 3 

160 tf 11 440 
40b 15 19 158 
440 155 92 

116 1M 127 
244 94 7 223 
J2 1.1 17 479 
1.16 49 14 239 
54 U 20 » 

1.16 54 11 
0 S3 184 


S 316 
14ft 14ft— ft 
13ft 13)8 
aft 3418+ ft 
37ft 17ft + ft 
32ft 32ft + ft 

am am— ft 

« 48ft- ft 

31 3116+16 

77ft lift— ft 
38ft 38ft— 1ft 
42 42ft - 
2ift a +% 
68ft 6816—116 
5818 51 —1ft 
31ft 31ft— 16 
44 44 —ft 

ft 

» —ft 
2398+ ft 
2ft — ft 
23ft 
0ft 
4V+V 

23ft 
42 

1798+ ft 
17* + ft 
17ft— 16 
Zlte 
1716 

Uft + .ft 
106+16 
51ft- ft 
3198—16 
1216— ft 
3498— ft 
22)8— 16 
am— ft 
21 -ft 
27 + ft 
2816— ft 
23ft- M 
29ft— ft 
20 +ft 
14ft— ft 


Oft 7 
36ft Sft 

at 5ft 
20ft 14 
33)8 aft 
25)6 19ft 
139b 598 
27ft 1 9ft 
13ft Sft 
1048 6ft 

31ft a 
21ft TO* 
aft T7 
a 13 
37 2SY8 
4616 31ft 
77 15 

ia a 

16ft 10ft 


f JO 94 
UO 42 


30 1211 
40 52 10 a 


200* Sft 8 8*6+ ft 

614 2598 Kft 3Sft + 16 


Sft 718 7ft+ H | 
15)8 15ft 15ft— ft 


104 sm 3116 31ft— 16 


244 82 9 117 25)8 B B — ft 
43t 47 U 219 lift 11)8 lift— ft ! 
•78 11272 43 Mft 04ft Mft+fe 

0 417 11)8 lift Tift— ft 
JB 44 II M M m— ft 
275 92 m « 29ft 9ft— ft 

44 22 IB 40 25ft 29ft 2M6— ft 

M V14 176 Kft 13ft a + ft 

30 24 II 12 1798 17ft 17ft— *8 

140 44 8 291 32* 3318 32)6— ft 

148b 43 9 821 41ft 4m «ft— ft 

440 53 2 75ft 7516 75ft 

475 34 1 ttl m 121 — a 

44 35 9 B 12ft 12ft Kft 


JB 44 
275 92 
44 22 10 


i! 

m 

P® 




4+ U2 



3 IB 656 
54 9 *1*4 


U PHH 
24)6 PPG 
15 PSA 


13)6 PSAde f 
lift PacAS 


48 25 12 362 
140 42 * U84 
40 25 170 

140 102 300 

134 122 29 


13ft PODGE 172 M 7 2561 
30)8 PncLIn IS 81 11 OH 


30)8 30)8—18 

a am+M 

22* 3558+ ft 
1H8 Wft + ft 
12)8 12ft 
17ft 17ft 
*m 4i —1% 
27 Z7 
7ft Sft + ft 
18 16)6+16 
15* 15)8— ft 
47)6 48ft— 1ft 


29 —ft 

a a + * 

3718 37ft— ft 
22)8 23* — ft 


EmnEI 240 14 14 371 76 73ft 75ft— ft 


Emppf 
Emppf 
Emppf 
ft EnEnc 
22ft EnnICp 
1816 EnloBn 


Em Rod 44t 64 T7 133 1418 13)8 13*— ft 

ElWYA JO 24 11 434 1616 17* 1818 

Emhort 148b 44 9 382 30ft Xft 30ft— ft 

BmpOs 176 8.9 7 140 19* 19* TTW+ ft 

Emppf A 7 tA 62Qr 5 4ft S * ft I 

Emppf JO 104 506i 5 4ft 5 

Emppf 41 105 lOOz Sft 8ft 8* 

129 16 

72 2517 154 29ft 28ft 29ft + 18 ' 
-56 U 15 10 0 37ft 37* + ft I 

27 —ft 

99ft— ft 


I7ft Emwdi 140 54 16 483 27ft 
71* EmdipflMMlM 10 99* 
118 Enra 24 t\ TA 

9ft Entoru 40 18ft 

16ft EnbtEn 1J5P64 42 1916 

16 Enftxln 14 U t IS 19* 
2314 EOlrtfax ITS 44 15 21 38ft 

3 Eoutmh 10 4ft 

1118 Eomk nf 241 14J 7 14ft 

28ft EbfRp* 172 44 4 137 39* 
9ft EOutlcn .12 14 8 132 12ft 
m Ertmrnt J2t 14 17 237 12ft 
12ft ESaBsn A4 11 12 TM 2Dft 


■Clnds 1J0 4.1 11 1014 
ICMn 40 

ICN 56 302 

I CN pf 270 1U 25 

INAIn U2 114 U 

IRTPr* 140 84 7 X 

ITTCp 1J» 34 915262 

ITTpfH 440 6J 1 

ITTpfK AM 64 124 

ITT pfO UO u a 

ITTpfl A® 7J 6 

lUInt 1J0 6J 0 2473 


2ft 

10ft— 16 

18 


l*ft + ft 
016 + 18 
6ft 

U18+ ft | 
39ft— ft 
12 +ft 
12U 

20ft + ft 
24ft— ft 
Dft— Hi 
STM— ft 
2ft— ft 
3ft— ft 
4)6— lft 


IS* EMnC 

2D* Esfrtnp _____ __ _ 

30 Ethvl 1.12 U 11 3B5 37ft 
2ft EwonP 1119 2ft 

Sft Evan pf J70 3ft 

5ft EvnpfB 118 S 

30 EX Cato 140 42 IB » M 
13)8 EMalar 146all4 14 16 

108 Exxon 3A0 74 7 9911 49* 


A4 11 12 1M 2Dft 
40b 13 13 140 24* 

72 3.1 11 126 23ft 


16 

41ft— ft 


M 4ft FH tad 2 40 

67ft 41ft PMC 2J0 3A 54 383 

EJ8 51ft FMCPf 2JS 24 S 

22ft 17* PPL OP 10 94 9 2184 

14* 9)8 FPOto 42 

30* 15)8 POlrchd 40 42 M79 

39* 33* Polrcpf 340 9J 0 

14ft ** Erf rid .10 1J 10 40 

2£8 10ft PpmDIo V 1600 

33* 26ft PrWltF 4 3 

am 14* Poroii m 4.1 9 m 

IS 8* PovOta 4 17 17 an 

7 4Vi Podars ■ 209 

»* 29* FodlCa 144 44 7 115 

«ft 27)6 FOOEXX 21 270 

— — PdHmpf 32 

FdMbP 1JQ 4JB 10 58 

PadNM .14 17 045 

FodPBi TV 34 7 40 

FodRIT 1A4 64 14 12 

PdSonl 0 4AM 9 

FodOSi 20 47 9 566 

Form 10 4 A 11 119 

Fktcsl 20 54 U 183 

FIPCM 30 24 6771 

FUtepf 40 114 3 

FinCppi 474004 519 

FflSBor 21 

FlTWMn 0 44 9 4M 10)8 

. 5 * ii. E^*!" 172 24 ■ V 26ft 

* 21ft FBkSyi 10 41 ■ 4to aft 

FBkFto 10 X9 10 IS XM 

■ 71ft Ml PM 10 14 II 01 48ft 

• » F*fCWc 10 54 » 1477 24 

.F.. "ft FCftlopf 577*117 372 49* 

IW* *6 FOX PfCIOJUal 17 70 92 

5 i** FWT8X.10 41 I 206 

» 38ft FWTxn# 534*124 an 

21 11 FICIty a 34 

»* »ft FPOdAc .15* 4 6 535 

ft* MM Plntot* U4 U 8 91 

30ft 3} FIRM pf 237 84 226 

1» 71h FIMM S Zl It W 

am aift FNsm u u i « 

107)8 9M8 FtiSTB Pi 143*114 40 

7* 4ft FltPa 8 325 

. 30ft 30ft FstPapf 242 9.1 241 

31)8 aft FtUnRl 10 44 is n 

. 3ES J** £*V*»r 0 3.9 9 8M 

Mft 14 FIWtK 10 47 8 3S3 

' 53 45ft FWHCp! 6J5 12J lOOz 
Mf 30ft Fftctlh 10 U 37 40 

!?}? J* 1 •'W* 1 ™ 75* J 63 

J6ft 20ft FHFflGa 1J2 44 8 575 0* 

. 38V UM Fj**tEn J6 U 9 1930 23* 

55 5 S? ES fT ?n B ■“ u « ia a* 

Mft 234. FWhIV 0 24 14 M 30* 

is Iff 1 ElKiS* 1 -* 1 1*J 31 12* 

37* 19ft FllptSf 0 J If 56 34* 

■ 2i W 25 Ftogft 14 340 JTft 

?W6 FlaEC .16a A 12 102 31* 
2* 1836 FtoPr* 2.14 9.1 9 3S4 24 

“ ii* EJ?sn 0 23 16 10 IT* 

* S* FWKtoa U* Sft 

ZL. JUJ £*«"■» *2 11 J5 *5 20 

2* g'vy. 70 7.1 875 2724 lift 
M Oft FaatwC 230 44 12 34 SS 

■ 51? 33 FordM 20 45 3 5542 45ft 

'J* 10ft FtDaOT 10 117 « 

SS S E**S*S 10 as 18 129 
'Jft 10 FajJWTl 4 10 14 
lift 4H FoxStP 0 74 11 4 

JS 1 »ft Fortrp 10 3J 71 874 

11* Sft FMOG Iimh 312 

grewc 0 34 15 3891 

Frtrfm SI 24 H 0 

FrwMs 41 2J i 19 

FruMpf 20 74 5 

Fuoua A0 17 9 59 


9ft— ft 1 
65 — M ; 
Wft— 36 
21 . 

12* + ft 
19ft—* 


15* 

23ft— ft 
aM— M 
21ft — ft 
lift 

6 


33ft— ft 
36 +1 
27*—* 
16*— ft 
19ft— ft 
21M+ ft 
Mft— * 
S6ft+I 
27*— ft 
306+lft 
7*—* 
5M 

32*—* 


I data P 3Ji 83 9 377 

I team 424 

lUPawr 20 115 4 708 

UPOwpf 221 1U lOOz 

HPawpf 573 11.1 450 

liPowpf 441*11.1 660 

llPOWPf 4A7 T2A 3S0z 

HPawpf 40 124 3 

ITW J 0 14 15 19 

ImpCfcm 0* 2A 8 1412 

imp! Co 12 411 

INCO JO 15 1099 

IncOMpf 2.15 12A 2 

IndlMpf 225 124 1 

IndKfts 10 49 7 ■ 

Ima .14 24 203 

lafmtc » M 

InoarR 20 53 19 411 
InaRut ZJ5 41 4 

Inkcot 0 24 MI 

InidStp# 475 10A 3 

InxltoJ 140b 44 11 0 

InauRs 308 

IntBRK _ 7 153 17* 

JntpRpf 373 116 11 M 

IntpRPf 6J9B154 2 44M 

IntoRpf 475 134 3* 30* 

IntRFn 109 M 12* 

ItcpS* 2.10011A 37 l*u 

Inforco 30 54 12 10 62ft 
Intarnf 775 54 9 135 

InTrM JOS 0 7 100 12* 

Intrlk 240 54 8 43 ST* 

lntm*d a 0 11* 

IntAJu 33 3A 9 6 20 

IBM 4A0 u 1218307 135ft 

IntCm Jt Ull 230 24ft 

IntFtov 172 34 15 30 3m 


31ft— ft 
W*— ft 
18*— ft 
27 

Mft + ft 
Wft + ft 
33* +1* 
65 — 1 
40ft + * 
60 

62 +1 

18* 

am—* 

Mft + ft 
23 

18 —Vi 
51* + ft 
61ft + ft 


13* MACOM 0 12 « 1123 
34* MCA 0 18 34 1773 
16* MCsTP 10 67 7 1236 
34 MCorpf U0 M 3 

7* MJDC 72 2J 11 368 
U MEI 0 1J 15 297 
9M MGMGr A4 37 35 IBB 
9 MGMGr pL44 37 6 12* 

10 MGMUo JO* 14 a 53* 13ft 
2ft MGMuwt 36 2* 

17ft MGMMo ADO 27 16 230 23ft 
17* MB UP TSt 146 10ft 

26* Mocmll 10 1.9 15 319 53* 

38* Mocy 1J6 24 11 2549 47ft 
36 MPcypf 425 114 Ote 39 

II* ModR** SO 

34 MdSiCr 10 21 4 1297 
3ft MPtAst 1870c 1058 

12ft Monti tn JOto 2.1 4 547 
13* AVsnbNI 72 1 A 19 293 
10* ManrC » .16 7 24 26i 24ft 

22ft MfrMmi U0 BA 5 *93 3M 
41 Mfrttpf 643*123 50 53ft 

40 MfrHpf 542* 12A 71 0 

lift Sft vjManyt 3 2926 7* 

28ft 18ft vIMnvtpf 994 23ft 

21 MAP CO 10 U 8 343 31ft 
* Atarcte 341 

IP* MarMJrf 10 44 8 479 
40ft MtrM pf 579,104 113 

27ft Marlon SI 4 38 154 
9ft MorfcC 32 UU 64 
14ft Mark pf 170 7A 1 

58ft McBTtof 0 3 14 140 

35ft Mmh M 20 34 39 346 
SOM Mcrttt 10 27 1124 

55 MrtMcf 447 6A 137 
m MoryK 72 17 16 435 
22ft MB8CD M 14 IS 629 
7ft MamMr 30 14 15 S3 12ft 
15* MCSM 10 94 12 908 18ft 
2ft ManvF ZRI 

20* MccCP 20 107 9 

9* Maine 132 117 51 

51ft MatWB ASr 7 12 206 

6ft Mattel II 1639 

4M MctBfwt IB 

16* Matt! pf 20 92 a 
9ft Maxam 7 100 

Xft WlbyOs 172 34 10 646 

36M Mavtp 2A0a 55 10 1M 

25* McDrpf 20 74 209 

20* McDrpf 20 114 7 

23ft McOort Ui till 464 
6ft McDrlwf 4 

6ft MqDtd 0 2.1 0 8 

40ft McOnls 0 U 14 1976 
47* MeOnD 10 23 10 1124 
McGEd 20 47 M 641 
McOf+l 10 U 15 1444 
Mdnta 54 

McK*80 20 4.1 11 1M 
MdJwn 9 10 

Mcttotl 0 95 6 6 

MMd 10 U ■ 1525 

MbOnn 0 U 15 4178 

M lilt 1 11 76 24 9 214 

_ _ Mohan 20 S3 9 237 

27 22* Mellon pf 240 10L6 1 

45ft 30ft M*Will 10 1A 12 50 

64ft 40ft MsrcSt 10 24 10 116 

Man* 30 3J 15 308 MO* 99M iw t •» 

«M 39* Ntordlh 110 UH 55 61ft UFA 60*— ft 

36* 72 Mart-yn 0 2A 31 7540 34ft 33 33 — 1* 

3ft 2 MesaOf 1317 2H 7ft 2ft 

22 13* MesaPt 5 2257 19ft 18* lift— ft 

25* 25* MOOR 1708 59 9 29ft 29ft 29ft— M 


19ft— * 
47*— * 
23*+* 
39 +ft 
14ft + ft 
39* + * 
13* 

12 

a*— ft 
2M— M 
22*- * 
18ft— M 
53 +1 

44*+ M 
38*— ft 
13*— * 
35ft— 1* 
3M- M 
16*—* 
30 *—* 
23*— ft 
■ — * 
53ft + ft 
47* 
7*— * 
22 *— * 
Sift + M 
1 

32*— M 
40* + ft 
56*— * 
10ft + M 
15* 

82*— lft 
63*— M 
SO*— H8 

?m—* 
12 — * 
20*— * 
12M + M 
18* 

m— ft 
26* + ft 
11M+ ft 


30* PncLfP 3J2 8.1 12 219 

21ft PcLwn 19 4A 16 697 

5)4 Paeftos J Hr J 73 

13ft PacRspf 20 1U ■ 

IT* PocSd 0 25 12 32 

S3* FoeTala 50 75 8 2065 

Zl Pn cttm 2J2 87 8 255 

27ft PecHpf 4A7 QA 16 

25 PabiWb M 1A 66 566 

9ft Pa tow pf 20 7.2 TV 

25* PalmBc 10 XI M 73 

2 Oft FtonASk 0 26 9 57 

4 PanAm Z282 

1* PanAwl 357 

13ft Prftockn 9 !.! 18 » 

31 PanbEC M8 6J 10 W 

3 PnnfPr U 813 

12 Paprcft 0 67 15 13 

10ft Pardvn X 798 

J2ft ParfcEB H V 15ft 

5* ParkOrl ,U U 181 6* 

25ft ParkH 112 OO 12 338 27* 

T2Va PaiicPn J2 U a K1 Mft 

lft PolPM U 168 2ft 

16ft PovINW 0 1J 18 23 26* 

lift POVHP M 45 12 96 13ft 

13ft PoyCdi .16 J 17 938 9 .r» 

6M Poobdy 9 25 51 B 7* 7*— * 

PM8B 1« * * * 

P*nC*n 12 SZ5 54* J2ft 52ft— 1* 

Panmv 20 so a its* 4tft 47* 47ft— 1 

PbPL 20 10.1 8 3163 25* 26* 25ft + ft 

PBPLpf 4AS 124 30Or 34ft 0ft 34ft— * 


0 1.1 17 

s as 


zSUiS % 

10 4J 1 

30 U 3 
42 25 11 OT 
11 207 

14 65 

8 83 

13 102 
2 


57M + ft 
34*— M 
181* + * 
29ft 

15ft + U 
35 * + * 
IS*— ft 
Mft— M 
59* 

34ft + * 

9ft— M 

a 


10 5.1 K 331 35ft 


37* Mft TfTMd 0 1.1 11 1350 35* JSft M* + S 

Sift 23ft Twtdpf 20 6A 4 3lft 31* £*+ 2 

17* U* Twtdpf 10 109 101 17ft 17ft 17* + H 

45* Mft Travtor 296 48 10 32M 44ft 62ft 4SM-4* 

mb TOM TVM*M 10.1 lit m ML Ma. HKJT 1 ™ 


2fflk W TnCM 3 SHU* 






a* si*— ft n* 
am aw— * am 

lift— * 19 

38ft 36 

27ft + * 37* 

4*+ ft 36ft 

2*+ ft 34ft 

ism— ft a 

33 26ft 

4ft + ft 18 
17 9* 

16ft— * 54ft 

u —ft a 

4*+ ft 22ft 

37ft— M 15 

lift 75ft 

288 27* 


PbPU 256 10.1 8 
PoPLpf 4A0 124 
PaPLpf 850 127 
PaPLdpr3A2 127 
PoPLdprtTO 12.1 
PaPLpr 8A0 13.1 
PaPUdpr325 129 
PaPLdprtTS 1U 
PoPLpr 80 1U 
PaPLpr 870 1U 
P enwt) 20 57 12 
Psnrpf 1A0 47 


Sit 67ft 67ft 47ft +1M 

7 mm a* am 

22 24 23* 34 + M 

"*■ 64ft 64 64 — * 

.. a 25 25ft— M 

» am 2m a* 

life 60ft 60 60ft + ft 


29* 25ft PoPLdpr3J5 1X2 9 0* 2m 

65 54ft PoPLpr 80 OJ life 68ft 0 .... . 

70 58ft PoPL pr 878 112 50z 66 46 66 

40ft 31ft P enwt) 20 57 12 173 am 3BM 38ft— M 

25* 0 Penwpf 150 47 18 34 24 24 — M 

47ft 30* Pansrf ZZI 44 21 1661 41 47 47ft + * 

17* 9ft PoopEn 170 7.1 S 349 17* 16* 16* + ft 

38 23ft P*p80V 0 U 14 36 36* 38*36*+* 

49ft 35* Prod Co 158 3J 21 20M «ft 48* 48ft— * 

30ft 17* P*rkEI 0 U 14 3893 25 34ft MM— ft 

7* Printer! U5 U3 ■ 148 9* 9ft 9ft— ft 

1?* PwyDr 0 IS 14 239 0 JBft 18* — I 

27* Petite 10 39 M a au a 36ft— ft 

24* P*tR3 372*145 44 25* 25ft 25ft + ft . 

14 PatRapf 157 WU 37 15*15ftl5*+Ml 
7* 4 PtTInv 153*20.1 349 5* 5ft 5*— M 

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26* 22ft MftOlPf 3Jf 122 76 

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28* 22 MWE 20 10.1 W 57 24* 26* Mft— M 

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31* 23* MtaPL 276 97 ■ 118 30ft 30* 38*- * 

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34* 2m MoPSpf 4.12 137 4 32ft H* 31*— * 

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* SS Ii* S25?* .'H 17 

' 25 I* 9««B *0 1M 23 

' S* ®*tpf Ml 74 1 72 mm. — 

’ n* m SSS* '12 If 35% Ji* SS + % 

3W IS GaPBC JO U TJ 4197 jok 23ft 24 — S 

i! s 

JTft GaParPt 236 123 ID 20 

• SLi. 20 121 9 21 

, SSt SS 275 11J 2 24 

, 25 2 1 * S* rW ** ** 11 473 39 


L7 13 4M 58 49ft 49ft— H 
13 67 9* Sft Sft— % 

4 a 1298 17ft 16* 17 — % 

■ , a%- % 

■6 2 22 22 22— ft 


4 16 479 22 


2 Wt JPU» 

™ 2* 1 x mu— % 

73 a 2fft 29% 

ID 20% 3X8 20% + * 
9 21ft 20% 20%— % 
2 24* a* 24*+ % 
ta » 28% 28% 


$m 22* 

IS* 7* 

17% n% 

4% 3 
17% 8% 

X 18ft 
69 50% 

lift 12 
17 10% 

29* 1» 

13% 8% 

31% 23* 

18% 12% 

4 I* 

14% 10* 

TO* l»b cirr i ja » 13 473 
a* M% L*grPnf 2JP 1T7 n 
3% 37% Leorta 10 XS 10 Ht 

25 h WR 2L* 0 U 15 X 
am a* LsanrTr 10 4J U 67 

M* 20% LteEnf 32 73 M 50 

1X4 9 LteMen JO IA 2S a 

31 15% LesPtat 0 23 9 217 


UfelU 10 If 27* 27% 27* + % 

L22eUA 239 15% U* iSS + * 
13 4 3U 4 a u 

fBBU 

10 73 77 16* 15* 15V^% 

, 14 M6S 11* II lift— ” 
TO 7 82 5m 2X8 a%+% 

0 24 41 8* Bft B* 

IM-m 540 34% a 24% + * 
34 UM 67 18 18ft + ft 

_ IN 185 3% 3* 3* 

0 43 K «5 72% 12% 12*— ft 
JB 3 13 473 23% 23ft 23% 

IIS’S iFPEs 

0 4J 13 67 33% 33* 33* 

32 73 U a 32% a m + % 
0 14 25 X lift 14 tSb + % 


am 40 * ocdppf xiB 45 1 44 % 44 % 44 ft _ 

111 amocdPef40 is 1 as* ra* wh-4S 

S* * 259 Ppf n x SS x +u 

SS 2SE2 3-5 111 17 17* 17% 17% + % 

23% 18% OcdPpf 20 1Z2 U 19 u* 1B%+ ft 

S% 4m OccJP pf 60 127 45 48V 48* 41*+ * 

113 IDS* OccJP pfl50 743 3661 U6* 106% M6V + * 

££ S., ODKO 10 38 16 63 24* a 26*— % 

31% Wt Ogden 10 S3 15 8tt Xft 30% 30%— V 

VS. I? 1 * ^ ,4V3 TOTO 14* 

M 25* OhEdpf 40 129 TOOK it a 34 + ft 

33 35% ObEdpf 40 13.1 80z 34 34 34 ™ 


a »k OhEdPf 4A0 129 
2* 25% OhEdpf 444 111 

D* 41 OhEdpf 70 133 
55 « OiEdpf 70 UO 

in# 43 OltCdpf 80 141 
av 18ft OflEdS 150 134 
am X OftEdpr 332 UI 
“» OhEdPf 10 124 
63 £* OnEdpf 80 142 

91 77 OhEpf 1076 123 


12 TSJ 30% 30% 30* + % 
TO SUOLP 172IJ7*K2l¥a20*X+te 
11* L. ’-TO 11J S7 TO* KF* 10V + ft 

11 3% w I Solan) X5 S 4V 4% 

■iSi .16 j 15 202 28% Z7* » 

fJS fonMpf 40e 7J 100 53* 57* S3ft— % 
»6 17* SWeGs 2.10 JJ 8 191 23* 2TV8 23ft 

Si"*®® J48 94 W 612 r* S* IV— te 

If 4 4^ 5- ru ?! R .. 0 4 9% 9* m— V8 

lasses ■ss'assra 
saust^r is sis 3041 

3<3% 13* SouIRE 0 U 44 , „ 

StftlSTC 12 2J 7 45 

11* 9* SowEpf 10 113 

8% 4* Savin 523 7* 7% 7* 

« Savin? IJO 123 , H 12* 12 12V + * 
25 IP* SCANA 2.16 97 7 819 23* 22% Bft 

£** S*?rPto 148 4J II 599 39* 3m 36V — 7* 


XS 5 4V 4% 

4 15 202 20* 27* B 
'4 1500 53% 57* 52ft — te 

JO 8 IX 23* 27% 23ft 

0# 94 TO 612 r* S* 5ft- % 

.0 1J 18 329 42ft 4TO4 41*— % 

li to oa 23* a + ft 

L7 TO 3048 TO 27% 27% — % 

1 30% 30% 30% 

- - 5 17 17 T7 +te 

IS 7 45 1X8 If* 18% + * , 

» 19* 19% 19V— ft | 

3 II Iff* W* 1 

523 7* 7% 7* 

a _ a 12* 12 12« + * : 


SS Mft 
13* 7ft 


34% ScZifmb 10 UUM X* 40% 40% — I 
_7ft SdAtl . .12 3 33 733 13* 13 T3%— V 


ITOfe 92% X 52% + % 
20te 52* 52* 52* — ft 
40* 58 58 30 — ft 

TO ££ a* a%+ * 

20 27% 27* 27% + ft 
4 14% 14% l«b 
life 61 61 61 

120Z 87* 87* X* 


ES IE? J* 24 13 a31 30% 29% 29%— % 


ISA 12* _■* 23 » XI 15% 15V IS*— 


217 20* 20% 20* + ft 


,W* U OhP pfG 227 12J 
JOj " OhPpfAU*715 
w% OhppfFuoo iaa 

«% M OhPpfe B40 127 
23% 19% OktoGE 20 93 


TO 18* 1|% M% 
1Q0ZTO4 1H IW +1 
6feTO5 70S MS +1 
IQz 67 <7 67 +| 

147 21* X* X* 


60% 39% Serf F el 10 487 mu, uu. 

1» f«ttP U2 3J 10 555 X m 3798- ft 

IS? Seettw 0 as Ii 103 15 U* 14% + % , 

4}ft 2K8 Bcpyfll U2 37 14 14 40% 40% 40% 

45 10% SeOCntn ,42 1 J 7 56 41% 40% 40*— 9b 

IS* ,2% S^TPf i-46 110 4 IT* 11% lift + % 

J2S SUSSES 2 -]? TOJ 15 15% 15ft 15% + * 

125 W BeoCptClMlU » 15ft 15% 15ft 1 

27% im 5«UJn 0 17 7 95) 25ft M% 75 

J% 2% 580Con 353 5* 5% Sft— % , 

«% 30 Souortn 0 17 10 10W 42* 42ft 4J*+ ft 1 

££ 32? 16 97 10% 10 18 — V | 

»* Wl SeolAlr J U Ii 117 » 25% 2S%— * 

32% 19* StelPw 10 37 9 396 79 3X6 28* I 


... .. 3S <87 40ft 60% 60ft 

1.12 3J ]0 555 38 37* 37*— ft 

,-S K 3! 183 15 U* 14% + % , 

U2 37 14 16 40% 40% 40% 

.42 17 7 36 41% 40% 40*— 9k 

146 U7 4 It* 11% Itft+ % 

2.W 13J 15 15% 15ft 15% + * 

1»13* . » 15ft 15% 15ft 1 

0 17 7 95) 25ft M* 75 

3BS 5* 5% Sft— % 


,3**^ iy 


53Vk 
Xft 
12 * 

60% 30ft 
X* TO 
22* 14% 

m 3% 

Xft 2TV 

a aft 

16% 7% 
59% 43% 
49% 34% 
15% 7V. 
3A*. 2ZVi 
35* 19* 
17* 


11 661 
n 218 

X 406 
M 1791 
U 15 

14 30 
7 569 

15 5406 
11 V 

18 
12 

10 Z71 

11 32 

0 39 

a 3a 
7 3523 

4 3319 

7 30 

10 390 
10 
12 

14 113 
9 W 
TO 1957 

5 5N 
14 

14 433x 
19 -04 
IM BA 9 134 
50. 77 B 798 
0 17 12 119 
10 9J ■ 380 
J US 93 

a loo 

10 U M1TO41 
152 42 f 5 
10 4A 11 1153 
10 U 15 4S4 
0 A0 It 1859 
J4 24 12 442 
32 27 9 ltn 
130 SJ I 3612 
20 62 7 1512 
375 18 MK 
W E83 
32 33 » 74 

34 13 11 173 

10 27 12 13 

1J0O12O 13 

IA4 52 1102 

.12 34 4 

36 37 11 50 

36 63 10 12 

1.16 44 12 8368 
UO &3 11 281 
10 SA 17 29 

10 a j sox 

10 26 9 -1* 
0 22 11 799 
10 22 10 824 
10 93 14 40 


X%— * 
7H+ V 
14*— ft 

15% 

X*— % 

2*13 

37V» + V> 
3X8 + 18 
1516— % 

n 

61»— te 


22% 12% TrtaJnd 0 22 44 5 lift lift iK_ w, 

Xft 20* TrtaPe 10 32 9 ax Xft 30* 30ft + U 

Xft a Tram* 0 22 15 193 39* 38% Bh-lS 

4% 4 Tricntr AlU I 15 4ft 4ft Mb- 

9ft 5* Trice .U 1117 11 4V 4% M * 

22 Uft Trlnfy 0 34 84 14* U* - 

i*% 11ft TfflB# .in j as 1123 a TO* mt + tt 

12% a* TTtte pf 1.10 U 336 12% 12ft wS I 5 
38ft 39* TimsEP 10 M 9 244 36% 35% 35* + £ 

30* U TwMte 0 4J M 14 17* 17* n% * 1 

*1 2648 TvcoLb 0 22 9 540 37% 36% 37 _l 

33% 23% Trior 73 27 9 1U 33* 33* X%— % 


30* 16 TwMte 
41 26* TvcoLb 

35% 23% Trier 


,;lH> 


MirtilH 

I j .ill of Di 


49* 30 UAL 75* IA 7 1433 47% 46% 
Mft 24* UALnf 2A0 72 41 33% 21 


39* 

35%— ft 
1X8— ft 
2M+ ft 
37 


ini 7 % uccel “ to 3i is u* 14*“ ft 

21% 14% UOl 204 87 11 597 23% 23ft Z3*+ 2 

M 19% UGI pr 275 124 12DZ 23 23 2}Z u 

11% 3 UMCRas S 9ft 9% M * 

14 M URS AUK M 13ft 12* lav^u 


Z7% 

46ft— * 

38 — ft 
7* 

22ft 


14 ID UR3 ADD XI te 56 13ft 12* 13*—* 
Bft 17* U5F08 20 6730 3M2 X* 38% 31 _ 5 

71K 45 USG U4 47 7 49D TV* t*% 7W+ift 

M% 13% UnlFrat 0 l.l 14 98 1X8 IS* 3*+ ft 

54% 45 UMIvr 10# 3A 9 2 52 57 S +1 


.. . . v J-rfte i 
" 


A0 3 *03 

M 

0 4A 36 05 

29 

10 37 10 148 
At 15 73 6 

19 

20 45 11 1875 
10 4.1 12 413 
13 336 
0 2.T 11 ITS 
A2 1.1 15 XI 
Jt 65 10 .5 



Sift— % 
sm+ift 

3416— % 
23*—% 

a* + ft 
X* 

14*—% 
7*— ft 
50 

MV— ft 
1 » 

14*+ Ml 
72*—* 
26*+ «8 
am-%- 

15% 

am— * 
am— 1% 

35*— ft 
40%—)* 
53% — * 
1998—% 
2D*— 16 
Mft + % 
43ft + * 
45*+ % 

MK— % 

ffl-* 

34*+ ft 
ID 

27* 

3% 

19ft + ft 
11 


56% 45 Unllvr 10*34 9 3 32 Si 5 +1 

94* 75 UnIMV 30* 4J 9 10 If* 89% «*+ * 

41ft 30% ITCompi 10 4A 10 1667 Wk 35% £ 

58* 3zft Uncart 30 37 0 MW 39ft 3m £ 

7ft 4* UntonC __ « » » ft 

16* 12 UnEtac 172 138 8 1775 15% IS* 15% + «, 


29* X UnEI Pf 150 1U 
33 25% UnEtpf 40 05 

30% 24% UnElpfM40 TOA 
61% 48% UEIpfL 30 OJ 

24% 18% UaElpr 20 UI 

17% 13% UnEI Pi 2.13 1X7 

23% 19% UnElpf 272 117 

41 43 IMElPf 7Af UI 

61* m UEI PtH 80 132 


TOOK 27ft 27ft 27ft _ £ 
l«fe 32% 32 S 
26 29* 79 29*— u 

MB Xft 59* XVk+lft 
U 23% 22* 22V- ft 
7 IW 14* S*— S 
2 23ft 23ft 5ft * 
lOOz 56V 54* 5i* + B4 
40* 60% MV. «%+1U 


m 


61* m UEI PtH 30 132 4008 60% «0% ffl* +1 2 

50% 34ft UtlPae 10 37 12 2545 49% 4m 4pfc-t” 
111* 82 UnPCPf 7J5 4A 127 1ll%l«9ftlorft— lft 


20 7J 11 

152 3A 14 BM 

36 1J 16 113 



T9V6— % 
29*— % 
11* + * 
44% 

27%—* 
46%—* 
19* + * 
3% 

59*—* 


111* 82 UftPCPf 7_23 6A 127 111% 109ft 109ft— lft - 

16% •* Unlroyl .18 U M ItH M% 15 Bft- ft . 

53% Unrvtpf 80 1L9 Bfe « 67% «7%- ft 

3ft UnffOr 48 32 4* 4* 4 V . 

20* loft UnBrnd U iw 13 13* «%— + - 

17ft 9* UBrdpf 31 13 13* 13 + ft 

37% 2098 UCWTV .14 A 49 B7 38ft 37ft 38ft +m •' 

30% 22% UnEnra 40 77 X 1792 X* 30* X% +1 

22% 9 U I Item 20 11J 3 08 17* 16% 17 

3m 19 UlltoPl 3L97 1SJ If 24* a a — ft : 

16% 11 Ulltopf 2JD 14J 9M* 15* 14* Bft + ft 

■mil 20* umupf LOOl&D 8 26* 26ft 26* ** » 

14% 10 Ulltupi 10 U6 9 Uft 13 11 — ft 

a* 14% Unltlnd 0 2A 13 X X* 21% 71* + ft l 

37* 29% UJ*rBk 10 4A ■ 41 fete 35* 35*- ft 

16% 9V UtdMM 8 63 14)8 M* 14* - 

3ft 3ft UPUMn 1 40 2* 2* 2V + ft 

Xft 22 UtetrO .« J 7 2135 36* 35 35 -lft 

10ft 5% USHom _ 5157 7% 7 7ft— ft 

42% 206 USLM8 X UU 811 41% Xft 41ft+ ft 

34ft 23 USSbo* 0 2.9 12 223 30 29V 39V- ft 

X 22 USStert 10 37 18 4554 27* X 27*— 1 • 

5X8 49* USSttpf 40# 9J 852 Kgk 51)4 52ft + * : 

Mfft 115V USSHpr 1275 97 U TOJV131 131%-a 

30 22% USSh pr 20 31 697 2* 27* Z7ft— 1 :■ 

39* 31ft USTob \M 4J 13 1£ ■* OTk 37* 

73 55V usvytet 572 77 I 1173 74 73* 7X8 

13 Sft UStcfcn X ■ IT* 11% Tift— * 

45 29% UnTche 10 32 9 13% 43* 43% 43ft— ft. - 

39* 2m UTdipf 23S 65 X 30% 37ft JTft— ft 

24% 17* UnlTrf 10 35 9 1078 33ft 22* 22*- ft 

17*8 12 UMfRB 10 74 10 41 16* M 14*—%. 

3X8 22 unttnt# 30 7 18 84 30* 29* 29V- * 

m. M* untear Art 37 13 25 TO* 18% Kb- ft • 






30 22* USSHpr 

39* Xft USTob 
73 55V U3Vy*a» 

13 Sft USWcn 
45 29% unTdie 

39ft 2m UTdipf 
24% 17* UnrtM 
17V 12 UMfRB 
33* 22 Unttnt# 
22* 14* untear 


. .-«*** 
^-wi'T iist 


30 7 18 

Art 37 13 


27* 18* UntvFd LM A0 17 65 26* Mft toft- ft 

22V 15ft UnLKtf U» U.| XI DVttem 


T7U+ ft 
5% 

30V— * 
X 

9H— % 
X 

44ft— V 

m— % 
xv + % 

36V— ft 
16*— % 
30ft— % , 

au— * | 

TO*— Vk I 
54* — * 
35 *+ * 


Unocal 10 2-1 12 TOO 
UPtahn 25* 3J 13 .03 


XI 23ft 21* 


39* 23V USUFE L04 24 11 1434 39* 38* 


0 47% 47ft- ft 

76* 76ft N% 


7 25 USLFpf 225 66 

9* 8* UdtoFd 14MOI09 
25% 20* UtaPL 232 TOS 
25* Zl* UtPLpf 20 114 
IM 15* UtPi.pt 2M 117 


770 34ft M Sk+ ft 
» «* 9ft +S 

418 22% 22 23 — ft. 

13 25% 25 25 

X lift 18 IM + ft 



. 59m 6 21 X 
2J0 77 8 614 
17 Tta 
133 85 8 35 

10 4A 16 463 
30 3J 11 309 


4m 4m— * i 

28ft 28% 

11 11 — * 1 
14V 14*— % 
32% 22V— % 
79% 79V— 1 

1.12 1J 13 88 62% 40* 61 —lft 

-05* J 13 91 16* 16ft 16%— ft 

70 12 12 19% 19ft If* 

3J0 45 13 140 71% 70% 70V— ft 

13 3930 32ft X X*— V 

12 8 13* 13* 13* + ft 

10 17 0 675 62* W 60*— TV. 

8 79 4* 4% 4ft 

10 298 265 260ft 260V— 4 
32 13 » 3430 19* 19* 19*— V 

14 SU 47 45* 45* — IW 

M U 8 1576 3Sft34* 35ft + * 

292 7J 18 2953 48* 39ft 39V— * 
14 2062 26 *5ft 25ft— % 
0 34 0 984 12V II 11V + V 
2.14 93 77 24ft 23% 24% +1* 

30 84X8866 35V 35* 35* + % 
10 43 f 173 36% 36% 36% + * 
1-56 16 B 1221 0 42% 42*—% 

2J0 7JJ 8 1024 31% Xft 31* 
60*114 200 55V 53* 5X8— ft 

0b 24 TO 12 30* 30* 30*+% 
20 17 I 1307 109ft 106ft 186ft— 3ft 
741 2% 2 2% 

.18 9 1210784 19% 19 17ft 

A0 1J 17 13 30* 30% 3X8 

232 94 6 ^ OTfc 26*+% 

10 43 TO 1575 42* 41* 4TV— V 

# * 44 id 4 ® isui+a 

10 27 S 45 

17V 17* 17)8— ft 


32* 21* VP Carp 1.12 34 
15V 5* Valero 

23* 14 Voter pf 344 157 
5% 2* Vateyln 
Sft Uft VanDri .92 34 
6* 2ft varco 

19* 5* Varco pf 

46% Xft Vartan 36 3 
13V 9% Voro 0 13 


494 31ft 33ft am 
763 10* 10% TOV+V 

S 

8 43 35* 35* M?-* 

0 12% 12 Q —* 


36 7 13 843 35* 35 

0 13 16 0 12% 12 


25* 17* Veeco 0 14 16 199 MV 24% *%- * 
6* 3* Vendo 12 49b 4% 4% * 


1DH SV VestSe 1700114 X 10* 10% 19» + ft 
43* 25% viocom A 2 14 19 723 43ft 0* 47V- ft 
75* 60% VaEPpf BJU VIS lOz 71 71 71 -A 

66% 53% VaE p fj 772 127 300Qz 63ft 0 6ZV+M 

XV 49% VoEPpf 7 JO 113 3300Z 59 5X5 *%-* 

63% 51V VoEPCf 7 AS 124 6Bz 60 M U — « 

24V 14V Vbfwy IJSf 7J 14 12 24V 24* 24*- V 

41* 2S* Vornod IS 41 40% « It -* 

70 30 VUIcnM 30 34 II 30 77% 77* 77*-* 1 


X W1COR 270 45 
34% WDtaRpf 4J0 9.9 


10 27% 77 27ft 
TOOz 45% 44ft 45% 


35* 2D* Wodnrs 92 29 10 260 31V 31* 


sra:: 


25ft 14% WDckM 0 38 M 20% 19V mt- ft- 
9* 6ft WoflMC 171 15K2 TO* 9* Bft + *• 

47* X WolMrt 31 J a 801 45* 45% 45ft- ft . 
54* 28* Wotom 0 1J 17 418 XV 49* 49ft -Sft 
71* 15* Vt+HRsolAO 84 20% »U 39* + ft 


84 20% 20ft 28ft + ft 


38% 23* VTOICSv 45 1J 18 1* 36V 35V 36ft + ft 
X 72 Wattle 10 4.1 7 417 34V 34* 34ft— K ■ 


|m 17* Warnco 0 19 11 119 73 


1404 24V 34% Mte— K 


38* 21* WvnrL 10 4JD 13 1305 Sift 37ft 27*-# 


.18 9 121 

0 1J 17 
252 94 6 


19V 14V WortiGs 10 SJ 
2Sft UVWBflHat 10 LD 
30* 18 WlhWt 20 124 


52% 77ft Waste 


176 19 is* it + M; 
in 27* 27ft 2m-* 
118 19V 19% %ft + N- 


252 

10 4J 13 1575 


18 8» 


L5 TO 574 52% 51* SWk- 


13% mWarGa 
12% 4 WeonU 


0 14 13 
30 20 n 


9* Wucnpf , .. 

23* 12% WttabO JOB 1J 13 130 

37% 29* WtetsMA 30 19 14 60 

54% 30V MMtoF 20 45 I 207 

■ avssssngn ,s a* 

— ^ktbSdTBlS a 9 ^ s* 


189 12% 11V Hft+ *- 


0b 37 9 19 17*17*17*— ft 

duii to jpUftSBza 

10 2.1 14 Si 49^-^ Jhi 

uo 27 u a.sssas*- 1 ' 


100 34 U 204 SO* 49% 


z mat x%— ft 
2J2 VLB 5 XM IS* lift 18ft 

172 145 21 » 25V 25*— % 

J5 144 0 aft 25* 26% 

347 144 ■ Mft 24% 31% 

TOM 5 X ~ “ 

136 142 12 14* 

2J3 IL0 12 15* 

0 7 25 Ox M 99 99 — % 

0b 1 J 12 144 38% 35* J7* +2* 
10 24 13 W 47 41V, XV— ft 
0 XS 11 1*1 17% 16V 17% + % 
350 IV IV IV 
XI 12* 72 U — % 
24 3215 31ft 30 30ft— I 

34 UO 14 591 34* 34* 34*— % 
73 “77 13 17* 12ft + * 

255 162 91 U 13V 13V 

223 9J 238 34 33* 23* 

144 .57 11 7J1 29V 2m 2m— % 
2J2 114 22 19% 19ft 19% 

10* BJ ■ -10 13* 1Z16 12ft— % 
XTO 44 18 529 53* 53% 52*+ % 

.12 4 ™ *1* Xft— ft 

220 9.1 165 34V 24* 34%— % 

... . 4 n*iivii%+ ft 

645 84 ,225te 77% 77% 77% + V 

844 9J 158401 92V 92 93V +1* 

13 72 12% 17 12V + % 


27% am 

27ft a 


£22% 


17* 13ft 
17ft 13% 
65% 26* 
35 17 

44ft 19% 
TO* 9* 

32 10ft 
35ft 23 
35* 18% 
13V 7* 

14V IT* 
25 16% 


252 132 5 

332 1*5 

333 MA 
347 144 
40 143 
236 1*2 
221 1*0 
0 3 75 


,FFF=: 


70 16V 

12V 10* 
55% 37* 


25V 17% 
13% 6% 
77% 63 
92 77 

12 6% 




«r 

rE 5 “” J 


|p: 

¥ • 
a so -i- V • 
» 39 -r. 


ft 8ft WAlrpf 
19V ■* WAV- Pi 
.11% 4 WCMA 
11S* 05 WPOCI 
» SV Mf Union 

15% 4* WnupfE 

Sft. 38(0? 


IV 1% in- lb. 

ISteSv-n' 


lmilSVlWk 
9* m an- 1 


- '*)1 


m an— n 
a a *\ 

3ft 3*-U 

1H 


" a & S£8 

5* IW6 WrioEe 10 32 10 304 31* 30* sT^lb. 

JI' 4 *■” 10 34 ■ 317 39V 3B6 JB5-H* 
“ a , Were rti 10 *4 19 3009 30ft 29% 29ft- ft 
18? 2S5 46 40* 40* 4Mb- ft 

S' 4 gy* r. l* 420 9.1 U 49V 49% 4m-18 

” T7 WbejLE 5J3 *3 Mr 89 09 

sag* tzunn-. 


-a . 1 


WwF 40 9.7 

92 77 WtwUJE 575 «J 

33* 12V WhelPtt 
41% 30 WPftOfB 
30 23 WhPRpf 


53 * W68' 46% 44 4M 
22S 38? 3S5K 1J0 M 44 X* JBU Jftt 


U 49V 49% «n-V 
Mr 99 09 TO -f 

270 Oft 12% nn-I • 
TBz 32 X% XI +.B 
520r 23% 32ft IM-IU 


Urrrno 


I^b WhftolU 19 102 zm 26* 27U + 5 

T 2£ IKSESf M H 11 1370 a% »+* 

w 3 11* 11* im+5 
TOJ 8 Wptrdn 13 10 is* 13% Oft- n 

*225 ^ 10 3L1 4 120 Z7% 27ft 27% ^ 

*J?. * WfenEl 160 3V 3* Mk + s 


U.S. Agency Finds . 
Import Violations 
In 6 Textile Cases 


14* f Wtlfrdn 13 

% 2KHS? ' M M * 

fW . 2 WHmEl 
9* m wmtro .n 14 IB 
•g 15ft WtaDU 10 SO 12 
»* 7* Wtonbo -10e J 18 
13* 5% Wlmer 10 

8 3V WkitarJ 
M* 25ft WtecEP 228 72 7 

SS SS Cpf M* 10J 

X 25* WtsePL 264 BJ 8 

SS 28? 23S? 5 tm %a t 

«% 17* Wllco 10 38 9 
17V 9% MtoterW 34 23 14 
1?* VVoodPt 0 15 13 


.. 160 3ft 3* JU+%; 

.H 14 18 72 7* 7M 7U-J T 

148 ia 12 56 Mft 33% 33%-*'; .. 

-10e J 18 830 19* Htt mi + % ■'- 

19 X 7* 7* 7U ■ < ■ , 

5 4% 4% 4% . ' L 

13 72 7 TO 31* XV 31V- ' .' 

10 102 « 34* 24% Mft + V* T 

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TtlecamGD 


By Sruarc Auerbach » i» 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Commerce Depart- 1 — 

meat on Tuesday found illegal subsidies in six g% n* 
cases involving imports of textiles and apparel, «* ^ 
but reported no violations of trade laws in x* im 
another six cases. D3 x* 

Penalty duties equaling the amount of the 

subsidies, which range from 1.23 to 9.87 per- j 

cent, will be imposed. | NYSE 

The findings involved 6 of 12 countries that 
wereaccusedby U.S. textile and apparel makers 
and their unions of illegally subsidizing their 
products. The accused countries had not signed 
an anti-subs dies agreement and therefore could Anra™ FS* 
be assessed penalty duties without U.S. mama - ^giSS, 
facturers having to prove they suffered injury 
from the unfair trade practices. Ga pwaam i 

The American Textile Manufacturers losti- uickyst r 8 * 
tute, the Intonaticmal Ladies Garment Work- nnu! 
ers Union and the Textile Workers Union ex- 

? ressed “bitter disappoiniment’' with the 
onunerce Department dedsion for not going wws«mS 
far enough. 

The department reported textile subsidies by AmsLno 
Argentina of 4.53 percent, Peru 2.88 percent {JnSSffL, 
and Sri Lanka 5 percent, and apparel subsidies 
by Argentina of 9.87 percent, Sri l^uika 3.06 
percent and Thailand 1^3 percenL The penalty J Z, 
duties will equal the amount of the subsidies. I CaO 
Ln the cases of Malaysia and Singapore, sub- I 
adies on textiles and apparel were considered I R * v * nu 
so small as to be negligible, while complain is I' cun 
against Thailand” s textile makers were suspend- 
ed when the exporters promised to give up 
subsidies. Aush 

In addition, Indonesia, Turkey and Portugal « 
agreed to phase out their illegal subsidies, thus w 
gaining the extra protection of the so-called w mi 
injury test requiring proof that their imports 
hurt domestic producers. P9r B|UIB “ 

The textile industry and unions attacked the , 

decision. “Shipments from the four countries onm 
which have been let off the hook have increased . 

272 percent in the past two years," James H. M ” 8 
Martin Jr_ president of the textile manufactur- ixqoqt. 
ers' institute, said. nStuS^Z 

But the Commerce Department reported that WB,UWI " 1 
imports from all countries in which decision 
were announced Tuesday accounted for just Yw 
2.32 penxmt of all textile and apparel products Rffww— 
imported by the United States. RpsSwfr 


46ft 33V XBrax 30 67 18 2576 45* 44* 41 — Jk, - 

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NYSE Highs-Lo wb 


March 6' 


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Company Earnings 


Rmanue ond profits, in millions, are In )«»' h l " lt v 
curr«Ki«s uniass otherwise indicated • 


Australia 

NvwsCorp, 


Midland Bank ^ 

Year IfW JJ • , 

PnHax Nd- . 

Par Bhora 0 371 W0, 


IX Half 

Revenue— 


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Angto^wrgy 


19M JJ8'* 

SKU 429.* 


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Revenue^ 22.7 23A RMsmut 1,100. 10 

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Results in UJ. OWttrt, PwShare-. M5 M * 

WHOM «W 

BIB "«wto# — 

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Year »tt 1982 PfeShara— «*’■*%, 

Revenue 1A90. 1770. 

Pretax Nei„ 26*0 I71J J2T nUlHon vt poftw of SO. 

Pft Stare 0J66 0JS4 million. 


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friM ■ -ftlfl Hornings resorts P. 8 

amex hWMMP.il) FnagraMnotts p.u 

N YSE prices P. ? Cold markets P. 9 
MYSE Wgteflow* P. * ■«•«** raw P.9 
Cmdkm stocks P.M Mortua summary P, ? 

Currency roles P , 9 Ootkw M2 

CommodUtos M2 OTC stock P.10 

□hridsnts . P.t2 Other markets P.14 

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


WALL STREET WATCH 

Advice That Might Outwit 
The Rise and Fall of Dollar 


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M t 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — With the muscle-bound dollar kicking sand now 
in every other currency’s face; memories o? just bow 
much a pantywaist the greenback used to be have faded 
like a suntan in winter. 

And exactly a year ago this week, after a month-and-a-half 
decline that flexed the dollar down to what turned out to be its 
1984 low, buy lists on -Wall Street began to bulge with stocks of 
multinationals and other companies whose profits would 
strengthen in the dimate of a weakening U.S. currency. 

But these so-called dollar plays turned out to be bad bets, with 

issues such as Caterpillar ; 

Tractor bulldcwuig down to i ■» 

around $30 a Share now after An ana lyst sees more 

“WSMSv™ investors buying 

hoped the dollar plays would stocks unscathed 

work, the non-douar plays, if 

you will, remain on a rott,” hy a strong dollar, 
observes A. Marshall Acuff J _ 

Jr^ portfolio strategist at 
Smith Barney. 

He thinks this favoritism in the market will continue if the U.S. 
currency’s strength is sustained, with an increasing number of 
investors “coming around to participate in stocks that are rela- 
tively unscathed by a strong dollar. 

Individual issues he sees benefiting over coming months are 
Tribune Cb„ Ryland Group and Marion Laboratories, in addi- 
tion to utilities, regional banks and selected multiline insurance 
companies on Smith Barney's recommended list. 

Yet, Mr. Acuff does recommend some exposure now to stocks 
that would gain “by a loss in the dollar’s momentum.'’ There is 
the drug group, which he points out would need only stabilization 
in the dollar to produce better results through currency transla- 
tion. Also, there’s the “deep-doHar plays.” And he notes that a 
stock that has remained on the firm's buy list is Caterpillar. 

F RANCIS ELM. Kdly, chairman of the investment policy 
group at Oppenhdmer, also believes investors are likely to 
^focus on equities that do not come into direct competition 
with imparts. 

“Once the dollar decline begins,” he says, “market leadership 
can then center on sectors that will enjoy pricing power, improv- 
ing foreign earnings, faster unit growth or widening margins ” 
Asked when the dollar will weaken, Stefan D. Abrams, chair- 
man of the firm’s stock selection committee, replied: “When 
people least expect it” 

Stocks he recommended when it does happen are Alcoa and 
Chesapeake Corp., along with Pfizer and Warner-Lambert in the 
drugs. Generally, he also likes the bank stocks, emphasizing Bank 
of Boston, “under a doud but statistically very cheap.” Other 
issues he mentioned are Macy and U.S. Tobacco. 

“But Tm not wildly bullish now on stocks,” Mr. Abrams 
cautioned “The Fed has stopped pumping and the market’s 
breadth will narrow.” 

E.F. Hatton expects the dollar to decline 15 to 20 percent in 
1985, yet research director Thomas B. Stiles is positive about 
Wall Street and suggests that investors “stay with the winners of 
the 1980s — but get mote aggressive within the favored groups.” 

A sector Hutton aggressively recommended in early January is 
semiconductors. “In a sense, the semiconductors represent, in 
today’s world, an ideal play on sentiment regarding the economic 
outlook,” Mr. Stiles said “What steel was to the economy in the 
1960s, sendconductors are in . the 19805:” 1 ' 

Michael A Gumport, who rovers the- semiconductor industry 
for Paine Webber, also recommends the group, but cautions that 
the stocks could still gp 5 to 10 percent lower in a flat overall 
market. 

The trigger for a big rally, he said will be a major recovery in 
orders. “That didn’t happen in February, but it could in March,” 
he added “Hie question is when, not if. One day in the next two 

tContiuned on Page 11, Col 3) 


Currency Rates 


V‘-2P.M. 

— . V, 


Late interbank rates an March 6 . excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rata at 


f MH-lirJI 
WM- •• 
tow:*— 

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m «uum>i 

fH* 

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■1% MMUI*' 

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Hu »i*> i r 

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f 

Mil — 


X DJA. F.F. IU_ GHftv 

CUM Hi 1 15- 37JH • aiBlfr 

71965 20.10* 6JB13 12278* 17J7V 

XU5 3274* 1J07X RLG 

— - 34ZU 11JJ773 1241^3 4.105 


•;* ; Milan . 113450 1257 JO 

n. ■> MiWYOrtKCI 1 J73 

-Ports 10JKS 11 JO 

: J. Tokyo' 261775 275J9 

ZartcA 1919 3JBP2 

."if 1 ECU 0L4482 DUUS 

^ : .1SDR 0.950*01 0897471 


6 Mr. BJ=. SJ=. TN 

5525 * 13273*140259 

17J79 235915 24J73* 

RLG* 4J74* 117J5* UU * 
4.105 7ZZS 3.10*1 27000 
*3048 30945 729 JO 0148 

3J3 **39 2J875 7 4 flJB 

17005 15195* 3J84540105* 

S7J5 377 J7 ■ 89 JB 

75255 * 4J4* 1.1149* 


ew Mi> 


1257 JO 42125 203J5 45048 30945 729 JO 0148 

1J73 3J85 1034 110500 3J3 4&2S 2J875 24080 

11J82 10538 191 x 17005 15195* 358454JU5* 

27559 7SJH 3479 1125* S7J5 377J7* 8978 

3J892 85115* J7J73- 013*2 752S5 * 474* 1.1149* 

04135 27257. 4J97B UHX54 15179 447343 1 J95 14042B 
J97471 37537 9.94048 103119 34895 455967 37747 34034 

Dollar Values 

<* *• • • 'J t • Par I . Pw i Ptr 

‘ D,TO,0, ILU Ewhr. ° KnaCf UJJ Iwtv. Cwlw UJJ 

i - % 44742 AMtransQS 1JB2 07129 Irhkf 1795* 5437B StoapnreS 1284 

m * 1 08*15 AwtrtonadriHhg 34.11 00013 UnMUstwkal 78275 04875 SJUrlcaa rwd 18512 

' T . f 08144 Metaa Ha. fmc 4949 3751 Kmuidtoff- 0J074 Bam OKweaawM 85040 

k 07125 CnwdkmS 1M03S OJS* MaKnr. rtowoft 1404 08053 Span. Desrta 18975 

unit DcaMikrMK 11205 OitOW Norw.knmi 97M 0103 SwcOkrana W 

• .--<01411 Flnnllfe markka 78875 00547 PMLPMO 1*2845 00254 TBHwnS 3939 

^Suw GfWk dmcftM WJO 880» Pwt «M»dO 1B3JN 88353 TM MM 20325 

■' f. >0(281 Hoot tans 7 JOS 0277* SawArtroI 34025 02722 UAE.<UdnM 15733 

■ . .. 4S 

* 5tortUi*:l.lM2 Irttfi E 

' ^•la>C«iM«rcM<ranc(b) Am«MsnM(MiltDbuvaraB(uiiil(cl AmawitinMiladlobuvmdollor<-> 
- rumtisr no (xl Units at IJOOWl units of 10800 

- « *? " NJO: not quotad; N JL: nor ovoflrtXx. 

3 • • , ■' Sovran: Boom* On Benelux f Brussels}; Banco Commercial Itattana (Mi fan); atomical 

r- \ .; ::: '!*p fiani (Now rant}; Bonmte NaUonale do Paris (Paris}; IMF (SOU}; Bantam Araoe et 
*” .- re ■ Intmntaffonalmd'lnvostifsomant (dinar. rtvoL tSrhcm}. Oder Bata Ann Reuters andAP. 

- { Interest Rates 


Hi^ ^ 'Z—*** 0 * Eurocurrency Deposits 


March 6 


Swiss P Fraadi 

DolUgr B 4 Mr k Pranc SterUu j Franc 



, :»!-> » 


; . , Rates UBOUaMeia Irrtatvonk dopants o/SI mUtton minimum t or oauivatont). 

J'. . • bime Monxm GuarontY (dollar, DM, SF, Pound, FF); Uords Bank (ECU); Citibank 

r..-,T; fSD/u. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


March 6 


?ft-9* 

; i Source: Rooters. 


inm. 

9P.-9K. 


lines. 
99L -99b 




C.onip'V 

ii^; '• ' ' r - -- 


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samp-v* 




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»*• “" • 


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»iP«-*P iOm - 

anw ^ 




Key Money Rates 

United S*tp« c 


Otoownr Rato 
PMeral Funds 
. Mm# Roto 
Sraktr Loon Role 
t Comm. Poser. 30-179 days 
*™onHi Treasury Bills 
•■monm Treoiwrv Bills 
i C3Ts 3059 Mvs 
;®V4t«dovs 
West Gennony 

; Lombard Rate 
Ovtmiom r««« 

.OneMemn Interbank 
.J-montti Interbank 
. 8moni)i infer b m k . 


.■otonmiian Rate 

r ( CMl MOMV 

Interbank 
, *as»«h IMorteA 
""““•i Interbank 


Bib 8 7/14 
10ft 10ft 
9VbMrft 916J9VII 
IKS 9.10 
841 84* 

084 091 

8-50 035 

145 099 


6M 400 
415 410 

4 35 435 
450 458 

480 480 


. 10ft 10ft 
10ft 10ft 
10ft Mft 
111/1410 11/14 
10ft 10ft 


Bank Bose Rate 
Cali Money 
91-day Treasury Bill 
iHnentti Interbank 

Japan 

Discount Rota 

Call Money 

40-day Interbank 


14 1* 

14ft 14ft 
13ft - 13ft 
14 lift 


5 5 

*n 4 9/i* 
* 7/14 4ft 


Gold Prices 


Sar Cm Reuters. Cu aimorXbanl u Credit Lw 
w ®®«, Una Bank. Bonk of Tokyo. 


AJ4 PAL Clrte 
Hang ON 38495 21440 — 2B0 

Luxembourg 28475 — — 2J0 

Parb {125 kilo) 28434 . 2HJB — 1A7 

Zurich 38435 38755 -070 

London 28470 3SM0 — 450 

New York — 891 JR + 5.10 

Official flxbns tor London. Parts and Luxem- 
Mura. ooMilna and chains prices tor Hans Ksu 
ana Zurklt. Now York Comex current contract 
4U prices to UAS err ounce. 

Source: Revton. 


lleralfroajBfaiSrymiie 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report; Page 7. 

?age9 


BTR Lilts 
Profit 
By 62% 

Target Dunlop 
Nears U.S. Sale 

By Bob Hagcrty 

Imemmonal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — BTR PLC reap- 
ing benefits from its acquisition of 
Thomas Tilling PLC topped its 
own forecast Wednesday by an- 
ntxmcmg a 62-percent increase in 
1984 pretax profit 
Meanwhile, Dunlop Holdings 
PLC, the rubber-products compa- 
ny fighting a takeover bid from 
BTR, confirmed press reports that 
it is at “an advanced stage” in ne- 
gotiations for the sale of its UiL 
tire unit to a group of U.S. inves- 
tors including executives of the 
uniL Dunlop did not dispute a re- 
port that the U.S. group would pay 
about 5120 million and assume 
debts of $60 milli on. 

The sale would help reduce Dun- 
lop's debt of nearly £400 million 
(5424 million). The news sent Dun- 
lop shares 5 J pence higher to dose 
at 51 pence each on the London 
Stock Exchange as investors rea- 
soned that BTR would have to 
sharply increase its bid, a share 
swap valuing Dunlop at about 22.6 
pence per ordinary share, or a total 
of £32-5 million 

BTR, a London-based industrial 
conglomerate, said its pretax profit 
surged to £284 million from a re- 
stated £176 million in 1983. The 
result was £14 million ahead of 
BTR’s January forecast and helped 
. lift BTR shares 23 pence to dose at 
667 pence on the London ex- 
change. 

More than half the profit ad- 
vance relates to Thomas Tilling, an 
industrial holding company ac- 
quired in mid- 1983 tor £660 mil- 
lion. The 1983 results included only 
a six-month contribution from Till- 
ing. In addition, a change in ac- 
counting for exchange-rale transla- 
tions accounted for about £14 
million of 1984’s advance. 

Earnings per share rose to 36.6 
pence from 25.4 pence, while BTR 
sales ballooned 77 percent to £3.49 
billion. 

Sir Owen Green, BTR’s chair- 
man, said in an interview that trad- 
ing profit grew 108 percent in the 
construction division, 80 percent in 
energy and electrical, 42 percent in 
both industrial and consumer-re- 
lated, and 86 percent in financial 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 4) 


mmm. 




I J," >v> • . r AVAvv-'-'^v.tf J;” 


Howttia FftdPraMnts Money Growth Targit Figures Now j%\ 

Tha "Cone": two lines originating from a base 

equal to the average level of the money supply 

in the fourth quarter of the previous year, and | 

widening throughout the current year. The 

narrow “cone” sometimes falls to fence In 

the rapid path of M-1 figures. ^ 

/ s' 


Yolcker Says Fed 
Ends Easing of 
Monetary Policy 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — Paul A. 


lease resources to meet investment 
and federal needs,” Mr. Volckcr 


Actual Ml / /rf ' 

\/ /i.'lLsr The Alternative Proposal 

The "Band”: parallel lines 
/V creating a band around a central 

target — currently a rate halfway between 4 
and 7% growth. This band, originating from the 
same base period, maintains a constant width through- 
out the year, and Is thought more likely to contain the actual 
growth line despite occasionally wide short-run fluctuations. 


V olcker, the chairman of the Fed- sai ^- , . , 

eral Reserve, Wednesday warned Such exosave monetary- growth 
that excessive growth in the U.S. wou ^? ipute infiauonary fears un- 
mcmey supply could re-ignite infla- dermimng capital inflows and ac- 
tion and said that the Fed had atin 8 adverse implications for w- 
siopped the wiring of moneiarv po- ,ercsl rales - “The risks of more 
licy undertaken Iasi fall. inflation and less growth over time 

His comments brought a swift would be increased, not reduced, 
reaction on foreign-exchange mar- he «“d. 
kets. where dealers said the dollar Turning to the dollar, Mr. 
Fell sharply on the belief that the v okker said, “The dollar has gone 
Fed may tighten money-supply up so much recently you could have 


mm 


growth to prevent a new inflation- 3 retracting of that without infla- 
ary spiral ' tionary consequences.” 

In testimony to the House Bud- Bul h* stressed that a 10-percent 
get Committee Mr. Volckcr said to 1 5-percent decline in the dollars 
that growth of reserves and money va ^ ue would be tolerated only if 
in the United States has been “at olher factors considered by the 


Tl» Nw Ywk Tin 


Debate on Fed’s Targeting Heats Up 


By Robert D. Hershey Jr. 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A long-simmering and 
technical debate in professional journals over the 
way the Federal Reserve presents its monetary 
targets has now entered the arena of practical 
economic policym akin g. 

Some analysis think the U.S. central bank may 
be on its way to embracing a new method of 
defining and portraying its targets for money 
growth. Proponents say such a change will greatly 
enhance U.S. economic performance. 

Others, however, suspect the Fed has little inten- 
tion of changing its method and will use the issue 
this year as a smoke screen behind which it wifi 
conduct an overly expansionist policy motivated 
by political and economic expediency. 

The issue, in the Fed’s vernacular, is whether the 
traditional “wedges” or “cones" used by the cen- 


New Envoy to U.S. Says Japan Must Open Markets 


By John Burgess 

Washington Post Service 

TOKYO — The new ambassa- 


Mr. Matsunaga will arrive in 
Washington late this month, as ne- 


dor to the United States has prom- of U.S. telecommunications prod- 
ised to work to open Japanese mar- acts in Japan. That has been one of 
kets further to U.S. products and the thorniest trade disputes be- 
said his government’s past efforts tween the countries in recent years. 


tant Width through- m aiy spiral ■ uonaiy consequences. 

> contain the actual '' , -.'M In testimony to the House Bud- ** stressed that a 10-percem 

rt-run fluctuations. " Xl get Committee Mr. Volckcr said w 15-percait decline in i!k dollar s 

, , , , , , , xzifM that growth of reserves and money v^ue would be tolerated only if 

- in the United States has been “at {“tors considered by the 

r r > r '.■ijjJB*®* ‘ 9 quite a high rate recently.” Never- Federal Open Market Committee 

= *"• j theless. the Fed, he explained, had ' m monetary policy were 

ceased the progressive easing (rf aLs ? B oin E W ^L 
t>» nm y<«v monetary policy and been more In a reference to the U.S. budget, 

cautious Mr. Volcker wanted that credit 

nr fUi/tfo T He the Present situation was “ ar *“ ts 1 . 3lre 2 d a r l . ^ discounted 

cf neats C Jit unlike the conditions last fall when the likelihood that Congress will 

" JT the Fed began easing. “Now we make 501311 budget cuts, and they 

iy its urge's should be Mpphm- ^ “diodons of arongcr w ir 

' j - ^ nonuc growth and stronger money reductions were not large. 

anaO diametion is importanu “<* «> U™ in ihe fall/- ■*!«“«> »“ thal * 

Dvides little room for the Fed to be said. (Continued on Page 11, CoL 4) 

trly months of the vear when the Mr Volcker told congressmen, 
s are extremely narrow. “We stopped die progressive pro- 

riant, related issue, however, is cess of easing, 1 (hdn t say we went JJoUor DeCUneS 
s is a question of determining mt0 re^® 1 ** . , - , 

lie wedges or parallel lines V oSftan AgOOlSt PoUIld Oil 

23 appeared in the academic Sd ‘Sv^piiro 1 SroS^he U.S. PoticY FcOTS 
ast a dec^e, it was only last strong dollar and import comped- yx, <aoctllIB i Pms 

tiposal to change existing prac- ^ 0Q exmed doWnwardpres- . OM n ll T “ . .. 
ic attention. sure on prices in some manufamur- «i£! 

vas contained in the annual re- ing and mining industries, he said. «2? c f??i y i f ^ a i TT fJI^ I - n E JS S 
Ronald Reagan’s Council of He also cited commodity price SVSJSb' ' a ESE?Z wl 
which offered an dtemauve mdjn^peudlenni and againafKL^d whin ^ 

ned on Page 13, CoL 1) “^SdfaSi snareinable ' * Federal Reaeree 

growth, money creation cannot re- S^tooMighS^ 

ipan Must Open Markets Stesias “ 

. M. M. day. In Frankfurt, the dollar closed 

der the United States created. He nations here that blame the deficit higher at 3.4235 Deutsche marks, 
offered no specifics on how trade largely on the United States: the from 3.417 DM previously. In Par- 
could be liberalized, beyond noting strong dollar, the budget deficits is, it ended at 10.4805 francs, up 
that his government is working on a and the allegedly lackluster prod- from 10.4575 francs, and in Tokyo, 
variety of market-opening mea- uct quality and marketing skills of flu* dollar finished at 261275 yen, 
sures that soon will be made public. U.S. firms. These factors play a up from 260.75 yen earlier. 

Mr. Matsunaga, 62, a career dip- role, Mr. Matsunaga said, but do European Hank* unloaded 54 


tral bank to portray its targets should be supplant- 
ed by “parallel bands.” 

This seemingly small distinction is important, 
for the “wedge” provides little room for the Fed to 
maneuver in the early months of the year when the 
wedge's boundaries are extremely narrow. 

The more important, related issue, however, is 
“base drift.” Ibis is a question of deter minin g 
from what point the wedges — or parallel lines — 
are drawn. 

Although the idea has appeared in the academic 
literature for at least a decode, it was only last 
month that the proposal to change existing prac- 
tice attracted public attention. 

The challenge was contained in the annual re- 
port of President Ronald Reagan’s Council of 
Economic Advisers, which offered an alternative 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


quite a high rate recently.” Never- 
theless, flu Fed, he explained, had 
ceased the progressive easing (rf 
monetary policy and been more 
cautious. 

He said the present situation was 
unlike the conditions last fall when 
the Fed began easing. “Now we 
have indications of stronger eco- 
nomic growth and stronger money 
and debt growth than in the fall/' 
be said. 

Mr. Volcker told congressmen, 
“We stopped the progressive pro- 
cess of easing, I didn't say we went 
into reverse. 

Explaining the Fed’s action, Mr. 
Volcker said a number of factors 
that may not last are helping to 
bold (tavn price increases. The 
strong dollar and import competi- 
tion nave exerted downward pres- 
sure on prices in some manufactur- 
ing and mining industries, he said. 

He also cited commodity price 
declines, including petroleum and 
several raw materials. 

“Beyond fostering sustainable 
growth, money creation cannot ne- 


gotiations come to a head over sales ' could be liberalized, beyond noting strong dollar, the budget deficits 
of U.S. telecommunications prod- that his government is working on a and the allegedly lackluster prod- 
ucts in Japan. That has been one of variety of market-opening mea- uct quality and marketing skills of 
the thorniest trade disputes be- sures that soon wiU be made public. U.S. firms. These factors play a 

Mr. Matsunaga, 62, a career dip- role, Mr. Matsunaga said, ' 


to do so “have not been sufficient.” Offering generally conciliatory lomat who will be serving his first not excuse Japan for failing to biBion m three days last week to 

'kltlJ. llta T Inrioil Clnfor TT L J * 4* 1 J V T ' 1 Ax-4 ! J T_ _1._ M ««.«■■■■ J . ■ « 


“We owe to the United States : words dunng a tune of heightened tour in the United States, said Ja- make efforts on its own. 


our present proroerity,” Nobuo 
Matsunaga said Tuesday. “I be- 
lieve it is our own responsibility to 
open up more (of) our domestic 
market to foreign products.” 


check the dollar’s record gains, but 


trade tension, Mr. Matsunaga pan has no desire to continue the Mr. Matsunaga replaces Yoshio were not sighted in the markets 
stressed Japan's long f ri endship trade unbalance that resulted in the Okawara, a personable careerist Wednesday, dealers said, 

with the United States and ways his United Stales’ S34 billion trade who has traveled widely in the “I believe concerted action end- 

country had benefited from the- deficit with Japan last year. United States since his appoint- ed last Friday,” a senior Frankfurt 

postwar economic and nnHtary or- He played down common expla- ment in 1980. deala commented. 


Ripples Spread From Closing of Securities Dealei 


New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — The dosing of 
ELS.M. Government Securities Inc, 
a little-known securities deala in 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, has be- 
gun to ripple throughout the US. 
financial system. 

A number of local governments, 
as well as financial institu tions, 
that had lent the company more 
than SI billion face losses and fi- 
nancial hardship, according to 
E-S-M.’s court-appointed receiver 
and the Securities and Exchange 
Commissi on- 

The city of Beaumont, Texas, for 
example, was put on a credit-watch 
list by Standard ft Poo’s Corp- 
because of a loan of 520 million to 
ESAL 

There also were signs that 
E-SJM.'s losses, stretching ova 
eight years and possibly costing in- 
vestors 5250 mtllinn to 5300 mil- 
lion, might push the U.S. govern- 
ment to rein m a business that until 
now has been almost unregulated. 

EiLM's problems follow other 
failures of government-securities 
dealers in recent years, which also 
caused large losses for banks and 
other creditors. 

in fact, some customers of lion 
Capital, a New York broker that 
collapsed under similar circum- 
stances last year, may have moved 
to doing business with EfLM^ ac- 
cording to Michael Wolensky, the 


regional administrator for the SEC 

in A tlanta . 

E.SJVL’s closing Friday and the 
court order on Monday that pul it 
into receivership are starting to dis- 
dosc a trail erf mismanagement and 
possible fraud, according to SEC 
officials and Thomas Tew, a securi- 
ties lawyer who is the court-ap- 
pointed receiver for ESJM. Mr. 
Tew is a partner in Finley, Kuxnble, 
Wagner, Heine, Underberg, Man- 
ley & Casey. 

The company, part of a group of 
financial entities, appears to nave 
been hiding huge losses by its gov- 
ernment securities unit in another 
unit called ELS.M. Financial Group 
Inc. 

“It appears that ES.M. was 

Financial Group, and that t§e Fi- 
nancial Group was where the losses 
were buried," Mr. Wolensky said. 

While EiLM. was losing millions 
annually, said Mr. Tew, it was pay- 
ing imHion-doDar bonuses to its 
officers, tearing a number of Mer- 
cedes-Benz and Jaguar automo- 
biles for its executives and paying 
salaries of 5500,000 a year to offi- 
cers. He said EAM. made a profit, 
of just mean than 5700,000, only in 
its first year of business, 1976. 

He also said the company’s offi- 
cers had taken loans from ERM. 
totaling 530 million, with SI0 mil- 
lion more in unpaid accrued inter- 
est He said the company was able 
to do business in this fashion for 


□early eight years because of the 
way it ran its transactions through 
F-S.M. Financial 

Meanwhile, the balance sheet of 
ELS-M. Government Securities was 
being audited by the Miami office 
of the accounting firm of Alexan- 
der Grant ft Co. Alexander Grant 
also did the tax returns for other 
members of the ES.M. group, in- 
cluding ESJvL Financial Group, 
according to Mr. Tew. 

In describing the chronology, 
Mr. Tew said he was called last 
Thursday by a friend who had bbeo 
contacted by George Mead, the ex- 
ecutive vice president of E5LM. 
(The initials stand for the compa- 
ny's three founders: Ronnie Ew- 
ton, Robert Seneca and Mr. Mead.) 
The friend said .there were prob- 
lems at the firm that he could not 


handle, because he was not a secu- 
rities lawyer. 

Mr. Tew said Mr. Mead told 
him, “We just want this mess 
cleaned up.” Mr. Tew begin inves- 
tigating the situation Friday and 
was surprised to find that one of 
ES.M.’s creditors, a savings and 
loan association in the Middle 
West that he would not identify, 
had sent two lawyers to pick up the 
tardy balance sheet 

“They were very anxious," Mr. 
Tew said. 

On Thursday, Alexander Grant 
had sent 25 copies of the balance 
sheet to ESJvL, and one was given 
to the two attorneys. The next day, 
Alexander Grant’s resident partner 
in Miami, Jose Gomez, asked that 
the statement be returned. Mr. Tew 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 2) 


n 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on March 4 # 1985: U.S. $139.59. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Infor mati on: Pierson, Hokfringft Pierson N.V n 

Herengracht 214,1016 BS Amsterdam. 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


We Aiesdays 

AMEX 

Closing 


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Tablet include the nationwide prices 
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21 10ft ITO 10*+ M 
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111 30* 30ft 30ft— ft 
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28 20* 20ft 20* — ft 

13 ITO Uft U*— * 

43 21 2Dft 20ft 

44 21ft 21* 21ft + * 

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490* Mft 63 O —l* 

40 LI 22 SOB 37* 37ft 37*— ft 

24 112 1 7ft 7*— ft 

8 4 9 TO 9 

400279 1 22 22 22 — M 

23 236 12* 12 12*— ft 

35 5B TO W 4*+* 

JB 74 23 35Br lift 11 11 — ft 


1J2 II J 
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1.19 114 
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251 114 
740 11 J 
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PBEONALTflS PLUS 

MARYBLUME 

IN Trt WfflOJD SECTION 
OF FROAY*S IHT 


Over-the-Coimter 


NASDAQ NaNonol Mortcet Prices 


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MO* HIM LOW 2PJM.CTM 


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140 (J 3 Uft Mft UM + * 
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160 7* 7 7 — * 

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.190 1J 32 17* M* 17* 

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I A0 33 128 38 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


Page 11 


ijlMufland Profit Falls 40% 
hiDue to Loss at Crocker 


v "> «• ; 

,!j ^ 5; /Jewto Midland said Its Northern Bank 

♦ £ *Ji LONDON — Midland Bank Ltd. snbstdiaiy retained its posi- 
■>, £ >pLCs pretax proCt for 1984 fell 40 tion as markei leader in Northern 
■u ,'s Nijaceni to £135 mfflfoa (S143 mil- Ireland last year and increased Hs 
u l ii; 'y'ion) from £225 tmUionayear earli- pretax profit to £14 million from 

: {- ■« p, the rhainmn, DonaJd Barron, £10 minion. 

!; |£ Aiaid Wednesday. In Scotland, the Clydesdale 

■ i.-j’; The results included a less, of Bank PLC subsidiary made signifi- 

• 1] 222 million by its U.S. subsidiary , cam progress and raised pretax 


pretax profit to £14 million from 
£10 minion. 

In Scotland, the Clydesdale 
Bank PLC subsidiary made signifi- 
cant progress and raised pretax 


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c ijsan Francisco-based Crocker Na- earnings to £24 million from £18 
11 ":*! visional Cotp. million. 

1 '"<■ Eammgsper share fell to 27.1 Elsewhere in the groan, its travel 
:^- N »ence in 1984, compared with 60.6 subsidiary Thomas Cook Group 
i V ’«nce a year earlier. Ltd. and its finance subsidiary For- 

4 , ( S Performance in 1984 was very ward Trust Ltd continued to m»irp 
!S V &hm, apart frotn Crock- market inroads with new products. 
■■ L*v!r loss. Mr. Barron said. Pretax Cook made £17 million pretax 
\nofit for non-Crocker operations against £15 million in 1983. For- 
* !fv increased 48 percent to £357 mil- ward Trust made £40 million 
’ k s it® and several sectors achieved againci £36 muii™ 

Record results. Midland said Samuel Montagu 

- Several analysts had been ex- in 1984 faced difficult trading con- 
i, veering 1984 pretax profit of about dhioas in the capital markets and 
million to £95 million. dull market activity in bullion. 

[; icf> In January, a definitive agree- Montagu’s operating expenses 


Swiss Bank Pasts 
17%RiseinNet 

The Associated Press 

BASEL. Switzerland — 
Swiss Bank Corp., Switzer- 
land’s second largest commer- 
cial bank, said Wednesday that 
1984 earnings rose to a record 
■503 million Swiss francs (S 1 73.4 
million), a 17_2-percent rise 
over 1983's 429 tmllioa francs. 

Assets totaled 119 billion 
francs, a 132-percem increase 
over 1983. The bank said more 
than half of the increase was 
due to the rise in the value of 
the dollar against the franc. 

The bank’s board proposed 
lhai the dividend be raised from 
1 1 francs to 12 francs a share 
and that the capital be in- 
creased. Approval of the pro- 
posals by tne stockholders this 

spring is considered a formality. 


CBS Issues Turner Subpoena 
In Purported Takeover Bid 


c , ^ in January, a aeanxuve agree- Montagu s operating expenses 

. , v :v ^ iljent was signed for Midland to rose substantially due to its expan- 
s Assume full ownership of Crocker, ston plans in capital markets 
r ;■ \ Vabject to shareholder approval at worldwide, particularly in the Lon- 

1 9 ; Ath kanlrc u i , r V « CfWnrllf 


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> t ) bth banks. don securities market. Recently 

i? j v Commenting on 1984 results. Montagu readied agreement to in- 
'i -SCdland said in a statement that it aeasc its ^ake in brokers W. 
} >Side successful progress proraot- - p rccn ?'?^ & Co. to 100 peront 
— — new sainngs plans in the British from 29.9 percent as and when 
— -Z^arkeL For example, its high-in- s^ck exc h a ng e rales allow. 

’’ ^ >rest checking account, aimed at Midland’s international banking 
s ,fj ^ ijiposits of 2,000 or more, has was affected by volatile currency 
> |;,^ixacted more than £1 billion in markets and narrowing of margins 
^ v-posits. in the European, Japanese and US. 

'$ * ^Another plan, called Saver Plus, markets. But the division showed a 
■ ^{tich aims to compete with build- notable improvement in perfor- 
in 'Jg societies, has attracted more mance over 1983. 
k i t. an £150 minion. Midland Bank shares were last at 

1 

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* >4 • Awl* *n 


Midland Bank shares were last at 


1 1 tTunese Airline Reports 
| warnings, Expansion Plans 

,S J ';> Reurea it had bought three European A- 

^ ^JBEUING — Civil Aviation Au- 310 Airbuses, seven Boemg 737- 
parity of China, the national air- 200s and nine Soviet Tupolev Tu- 
t* U i e, will buy more planes and open 154Ms. 

“ ^xe airports and international Industry sources outside China 
£ ^utes, its director, Shen Tu, said expect the airline to buy two more 


w™* 1 1- !2 ‘ »Anp<Ai*y after annn nndng a nft- Airbuses, 

. - ■ rd profit for 1984. some erf ti 

St S* x .. .■ ;*’•» Mr. Shen tdd the official Xinhua 146 jets. 

r— — — . T^Livs agency that his airline, one of The air 

’ — — : country’s biggest foreign-ex- that it is 

m ft %■ -mge earners, recorded a profit of from Chu 

. 7 million yuan (about Sill mil- dustrialB 

Z n\ three and a half times as Mr. Sh 

AKIrA «•'* - 'hch as in 1980. He gave no 1983 next five-; 

i|ftgPftftwMH^^ftir& to 1990, i 


expect the airline to buy two more 
Airbuses, more Boeings and at least 
some erf the British AoospaceBAe- 
146 jets. 

The airline has already reported 
that it is borrowing $600 million 
from China's Commercial and In- 
dustrial Bank to fond purchases. 

Mr. Shen said that during the 


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*bch as in 1980. He gave no 1983 next five-year plan, covering 1986 
tfjre. to 1990, China would open more 

Mr. Sben reaffirmed CAACsde- local airlines. Boemg said it has 
to buy more planes, and enter already sold two of its 737-300s to a 
.sing , technical and loan agree- local airline recently set up in Chi- 
^nts with foreign arid Chinese na’s southwestern Yunnan prev- 
ails to upgrade its obsolescent ince. 

•eL He said that CAAC will also Mr. Shen said that last year 
“y some transport planes and spe- CAAC carried 534 milli on passm- 
1-purpose aircraft. geis and 150,000 tons of freight and 

..last month, CAAC announced mafl. 


MARY SlUAtt 


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■jSj Subscribe to the IHT at spec^ introductory 

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■HKIKIK] 

— I HIM HI ■ 1 I 







359 pence, lcvd with late Tuesday, 
after briefly touching 369 pence on 
the announcement of better-than- 
expected results, dealers said. 

Michael Julien. Midland’s fi- 
nance director, also announced 
that the bask was devising a form 
of perpetual floating rate note to 
S200 million to S300 million 
around the middle of this year. 

The form of the floating rate 
note will have to fall within Bank of 
England guidelines os perpetual 
loan notes from commercial banks 
which are still in preparation. 

Midland is also considering sell- 
ing some of its trade investments 
and property, Mr. Barren said. He 
did not say how much the sales 
•might raise. 

COMPANY NOTES 

Bert e lsmann AG of West Ger- 
many, Europe’s largest publishing 
group, said it expects world group 
net to rise 24 percent to 360 million 
Deutsche marks ($105.8 minion) in 
the year ending June 30 from 289 
million DM in the previous year. 
Sales are seen increasing to more 
than 7 billion DM from 6.72 billion 
DM. 

Bond Corp. Hokfings Till., the 
diversified Australian mining and 
energy group, said net rose 45 per- 
cent to 93 milli on Australian dol- 
lars ($6.6 million) in the first half 
ended Dec. 31 from 6.4 millio n 
dollars a year earlier. Bond expects 
its annual dividend mil be main- 
tained at 10 cents a share on capital 
increased by a recent one-for-two 
bonus issue. 

Chib M6ditemn£e SA, the 
French leisure concern, said it 
plans a two-for-one share split to 
replace each 50-franc ($4.80) nomi- 
nal share with two 25-franc shares. 

First National Bank of Boston 
said it has selected Boston law firm 
Palmer & Dodge and accounting 
firm Ernst & Whinney to assist in 
the review of the reporting of its 
currency transactions. The move 
follows a charge by the U.S. Office 
of the Comptroller of the Currency 
that the bank violated some curren- 
cy regulations. 


Outwitting 
The Dollar 

(Contmned from Page 9) 
weeks to two months people will 
wake up to find there's been a sad- 
den influx of orders.” 

His favorites are, in order, Texas 
Instruments, Avnet, AMP, Ad- 
vanced Micro Devices and Motor- 
da. Among smaller semiconductor 
issues he wees Micro Mask, then* 
Veeco. GCA. if it drops to $25 a 
share, would be a “very attractive, 
aggressive play.” Mr. Gumport 
noted that in buD markets for semi- 
conductors, the stocks have outper- 
formed the general market by seven 
to one. 

Antondlo Zanino, portfolio ad- 
viser at S.LGiL. a Milan' invest- 
ment consulting fins for Italy's 
first and third largest mutual funds, 
said the two. Fonditalia and Inter- 
fund, have been overweighted in 
U3. slocks relatively unexposed to 
a strengthening dollar. 

The funds, totaling $160 million 
now in Wall Street investments, be* 
gan purchase programs last Sep- 
tember after largely getting out of 
U.S. stocks, be said. Now they are 
almost folly invested with accumu- 
lation directed at publishing, ad- 
vertising and airline issues, along 
with telephone companies in the 
new deregnkied Bell system. 

“Buying non-doQar plays has 
been part of our investment strate- 
gy,” he added. 


By Elizabeth Tucker ' 
and Mark Forts 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — CBS Inc. 
has subpoenaed Ted Turner, who 
owns various broadcast enter- 
prises, in an attempt to determine 
whether Mr. Turner’s purported 
plans to make a takeover offer for 
CBS are connected to efforts by a 
politically conservative group to 
gain control of the concern. 

Mr. Turner could not be reached 
for comment. Sources dose to him 
have said. that he is not allied with 
the conservative group. Fairness in 
Media, which numbers among its 
supporters Senator Jesse Helms, a 
Republican of North Carolina. 

The subpoena was issued Tues- 
day as part of CBS's suit against 
Fairness in Media. The suit charges 
the group with violations of federal 
securities laws, improper political 
activities by tax-exempt organiza- 
tions and illegal corporate political 
contributions. The charges all re- 
late to Fairness in Media’s drive to 
take over CBS to correct what the 
group sees as the CBS Network 
News operation's liberal bias. 

Mr. Turner, the owner of Cable 
News Network and the Atlanta- 
based WTBS cab! e-TV “supersta- 
tionT is considering an attempt to 
take over one of the three major 
television networks, most likely 
CBS, it was disclosed last week. A 
representative of Mr. Turner has 
met with members of the Federal 
Communications Commission in 
an attempt to determine whether 


General Electric Ca PLC, the 
British dectrical-eqiupment maker, 
said it has bought 9 million of its 
own shares totaling £17.7 milli on 
(SI 83 million). GEC has authority 
from shareholders for 18 months 
from last September to buy up to 
250 million of its own shares at not 
more than 300 pence a share. 

International Business Machines 
Corp. introduced two desk-top ver- 
sion s of its Series/1 computer and 
enhanced programs for its general 
purpose Series/] machines. IBM 
also said networks of IBM personal 
computers now can use larger Se- 
ries/ 1 processors as “gateways" to 
communicate with other PC net- 
works or IBM mainf rames. 

Kodak Japan, a unit of Eastman 
Kodak Co. of the United States, 
will pay 135 billion yen (S4.8 mil- 
lion) for a 73-percent stake in 
Chinon Industries of Japan as a 
way of entering the 35mm-camera 
market. C hino n said Chinon win 
issue 23 million shares on March 
26. of which Kodak Japan will take 
2 million. The remaining shares 
will be acquired by Hachijuni Bank 
Ltd. of Japan. 

RCA Coqx, the UB. diversified 
high-technology research and de- 
velopment concern, said its chair- 
man, Thornton Bradshaw, was ex- 
pected to step down from 


the commission would block an un- 
precedented hostile takeover of 
broadcast properties. 

Industry analysts say they doubt 
that Mr. Turner is working with 
Mr. Helms and the Fairness m Me- 
dia group. Bui Wall Street sources 
say that Mr. Turner probably 1 
would have to bring in outside in- 
vestors to enable him to acquire 
one of the networks. 

Mr. Turner is restricted by the 
terms of a stock offering his Turner 
Broadcasting System conducted 
last December to raise money for 
general business activities, accord- 
ing to several analysts. The cheap- 
est of the networks would seti for 
$2J billion. 

“It's highly unlikely that Turner 
could go ahead,” said one banker, 
who asked not to be identified. 
“There are restrictions placed on 
bis use of any money be draws 
under the bank indebtedness.” 

According to a prospectus of 
that Turner Broadcasting System 
Inc. stock ofiering. Mr. Turner 
raised $191 milli on to repay bank 
debts and build up exisung com- 
munications businesses. But after 
paying $133.7 million in bank 
debts, the company was left with 
only S57J milli on m cash. 

With an additional S ! 90-milIiofl 
credit tine, that leaves Mr. Turner 
an acquisition fund of S247J mil- 
lion. 

Mr. Turner is also prohibited un- 
der the terms of the loan from 
spending more than $15 million in 
any fiscal year oo anything except 
what is needed for his business. 


day-to-day management of the 
company. The board was expected 
to name the president. Robert R. 
Frederick, as chief executive. Mr. 
Bradshaw, 67, will retain the title of 
chairman 

Son Hung Kai Finance Co. of 
Hong Kongnas sold its 20-percent 
stake, or 84 million shares, in HK- 
TVB Ltd. to local and overseas in- 
stitutional investors for 480 million 
Hong Kong dollars ($61.5 million). 
The company plans to use the 
funds to reduce its short-term bor- 
rowings and to finance its general 
expansion. 

United Press International says it 
has held talk* with Lois G. Nogal- 
es, dismissed Monday as company 
president, about bringing him back 
to the company as part of a plan to 
resmicture.the news agency’s own- 
ership. But the agency dismissed as 
“purely speculative” a report that 
Mr. Nogales would return as chair- 
man, president and chief executive. 
UP! has said it is seeking a buyer 
for the concern. 

WaR Disney Productions said it 
has-fermed a division- that roll pro- 
vide Disney cartoons and movies 
for television syndication for the 
first time. Robert Jacquemin. who 
has inaugurated more than 40 syn- 
dication projects as a vice president 
of Paramount Pictures, was named 
to head the new division. 


Volcker Says Fed No Longer 
Easing Its Monetary Policy 


(Continued from Page 9) 

Congress wanted to make some im- 
pact on the credit markets over the 
next 12 to 18 months, “You’d bel- 
ter be thinking of more than $50 
billion fin budget cuts] rather than 
less.” 

If Congress could not achieve a 
meaningful reduction in the budget 
deficit by reductions in spending 
alone, then it should look at the 


possibility of some selective tax in- 
creases. Mr. Volcker told the bud- 
get paneL 

“while a large tax increase 
would have some negative effect on 
the UJS. economy. thaL impact 
would be less cosily than not com- 
ing m> with a sufficient reduction,” 
the Fed chief said. 

In addition, an oil import fee 
could be used to raise revenues, he 
said. 


BTR Has 62% Rise in Profit 


(Continued from Page 9) 
services, which is principally BTR’s 
Comhffl insurance unit. 

“We had a good run in the 
U-S.A-.” helped by the strong dol- 
lar and a turnaround in energy 
equipment. Sir Owen said. 

In South Africa, trading profit 
expanded 25 percent from 1983's 
depressed level to about £8 million, 
but economic prospects there re- 
main bleak. Sir Owen said, adding: 
“We’re just digging in." 

BTR also announced a bonus 
share issue on the basis of one free 


ordinary share for every one held. 
The company raised its total divi- 
dend for 1984 to 13 pence a share 
from die year-eariier 85 pence. 

Sir Owen declined to comment 
on the Dunlop plan to sell its U.S. 
tire operations, saying be needed 
more “concrete’' information. 
Dunlop has sold its European tire- 
making operations to Sumitomo 
Rubber Industries Ltd. of Ja pan. 

In its defease against BTR, Dun- 
lop is expected to release shortly a 
report on its 1984 results and a new 
refinancing plan. 



NIKKO GROWTH PACKAGE FUND, SICAV 

Registered Office: Luxembourg, 16 BtaL Royal 
R.C. Luxe mbourg B 210.433 

Notice u hereby given, that the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

of the shareholders of NJkko Growth Package Food, Stcav will be held on 
2Stit Much. 1985 at 1L00 aan. it the registered office of the company with 

the fallowing agenda. 

AGENDA 

1. SQhDusek»(rfilieieporoofilieboaricrfdirectDi8,oftbestatDtoiy 

auditors and die iudepeadant espert, 

2. Approval of the sTaiemau of net assets aa of December 3L 1964 
the statement of operations for the period from 2nd April, 1984 to 
31st December, 1964 and allocation of the results as at 31st 
December, 1984. 

3. Discharge to the directum, statutory auditor and independent 
e xpert. 

4 Paction of the board of directors to serve until the non animal 
general meeting of shareholders. 

5. Election of the statutory auditor and iadependanl expert to serve 
until die animal pmer al meeting g[ iMiAllibi 

6. Amhtwiraiion to he granted to the board of daecion io appoint one 
of its members mu i nking director. 

7. Miscellaneous. 

In oxdn tp take part m the general messing of afcanbdldttB fln 2Sth March. 
1985, tiie owners of bearer shares are required to deposit their shares three 
business days Wore the meeting at the reg istere d office of the com pany or 
with any nf rlu» information re n lrw nf fhe fnnd- 

Beaier or registered shareholders should lodge their proxies with the 
company three business days before the meeting. 

The Board of Diroeton. 


PETROLEUM EXPLORATION OPPORTUNITIES 
IN NEPAL 

The Department of Mines and Geology 
Ministry of industry 
of 

His Majesty's Government of Nepal 
wishes to Invite 

Management and Senior Exploration Personnel 
of interested Petroleum Exploration companies 
to a series of 

PROMOTIONAL PRESENTATIONS 



The presentations will review the results of recent 
seismic and geological evaluation work. 

A Promotional Brochure covering regional aspects 
of the work and outlining bidding procedures will 
be available to interested companies. 

Schedule for industry Presentation Meetings: 

London Thursday, March 21, 1985 

Houston Thursday, March 28, 1985 

Kathmandu Tuesday, April 9, 1 985 

inquiries should be sent to: 


Dept of Mines and Geology 
Mr. J.M. Tater 
Deputy Director General 
Lalnchaur, Kathmandu, Nepal 
Tel: 413S41, 414740 
Telex: 2320 MINES NP 


Tetra Tech, Inc. 

Mr. j.r. Harris. Suite 505 
295G North Loop west 
Houston, TX 77092 
Tel: 713/957-7550 
Telex: 775010 TETRA TECH 


Atlantic Research corporation is offering 

LICENSING OPPORTUNITIES 


For a A lew low Cost Oil substitute in selected Countries 

Atlantic Research has developed a new energy source, ARC-COAL* a 
proven oil substitute. 

ARC-COAL is a family of coal-water fuels that can replace number 6 residual 
oil for industrial and utility boiler applications Additional markets indude the 
use of arc-coal 3s 3 alternate fuel for the direct fire market such as: blast 
furnace application, iron ore pelletizing, nickel roaster^ etc 

The ARC-COAL advantage: bums, handles and transports like oil, low cost 
conversion, realistic short pay back periods, substantially tower price than f 6 
oil, non-hazardous transportation rating. Decreases the need for dependence 
on Imported olL 

Requirements for candidate licensee 

• Have a financially stable entity with resources available that can be applied 
to the commercialization of arc-coal 

• Have a demonstrated marketing and technical capability to 
commercialize fuel within a specified country or countries 

New applications for licensing are now being accepted 

Qualified and interested candidates should respond in 

writing to: 




5390 Cherokee Avenue 
Alexandria, Virginia 22312 

Attention: Mr. A.D. Mattox 
Director of Marketing 
ARC-COAL® 

Telephone— (703) 642-4591 
Telex— 248893 


A subsidiary of Atlantic Research Corporation 



FACT: 800% GAIN 


The markei is crammed with timid souls, with investors who refuse to challenge the ersatz 
gods of prevailing opinion. In the summer of 1982, C.GLR. rebuked the "consensus" predicting, 
while the DOW was hovering around 800. that the "DJI WILL TOUCH 1,000, BEFORE HITTING 
750". 

After we released our projection, BARRON'S financial weekly commented The market 
seems to be saying it's seen the future and it doesn’t work". The rest is history, the Bull rampaged 
to record-highs. Joseph Granville, who had in November 1982, envisioned the DOW Collapsing 
under 650, wasamong the pariahs of pessimism who eventually hid behind a barrierof semantics 
to justify their myopia. Despite toe cascading bull market, present day fears about the market 
proliferate. We may be unorthodox In debunking toe pessimist, but unorthodoxy has biblical 
support “What is man’ asked the Pasaimist, and replied ... "A little Lower than angels, crowned 
with glory and honor". 

Six weeks ago, our researchers mused ... "The West has not wined. Evangelists of despair will 
be converted, as the market is being primed tor a gargantuan dimensioned, upside breakout, one 
that will propel secondary and conceptual shares'. And now? 

The DOW will catapult over1500 enrouteto 2500, tor toe American market is being catalyzed 
by factors as pervasive and powerful as economic forces, Europe's darkening negation, the 
suffocation of hope in toe "old worid". The 'revolution of riding expectations' has not uprooted 
centuries of European prejudices, of self-defeating chauvinism. Once again the "new world' 
shines, the loud irrational discords of the Woodstock era have silenced. Ourforth coming report 
discusses toe renascence of North America, focusing upon equities that could dramatically 
outperform toe DOW, as did a recently recommended, natural resource, "special situation” that 
spiralled 800% in a brief time-span. 

For your complimentary copy, please write to. or telephone: 


CAPITAL 

GAINS 


RR& Ftoan c tol PIam tog Services bv 
Kahrefstraat112, 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) -27 51 81 
Telex 18536 





















«5?v«s,'i ,,hr ms* s is i 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


Over-the-Counter 


Mardi 6 


NASDAQ- National Markot Prices 


Sates In Hn 

Itts Hfefi Law lP-M.org* 


(Continued from Page 10) 


QMS* 

Quadra 

QuakCs J1 

QualSv 

Qnfmxt 

Quanta* 

QlIKtM 

Quixote 

Quote n 


36315% 14% 15% + % 
1H S 4* -Ok— % 

xuu o im 

3S 2% 2% 2W— V, 

ai»U» IM— 14 
779 31 3AM am— 1% 
w m m 3ft— VA 
119 lift lift lift— ft 
M2 lift lift lift + ft 


12S 
41 

1* 171 

J 530 

izs a 

U 1M 40 39 39% 

M MO 14ft 14ft 14ft 
64314 ft 13ft 14 
tvru 27ft Z7M 
54 2ft 2ft 2ft 
14 54414ft 14ft 14ft 

3.1 S03 33ft 32 32ft 
317 Sft ■% M 

A 10714 12 13ft 

54 
344 
5 9 U 
U 54 

13 a 

ZS 7 
Z6 74 

1.1 1*4 
154 

92 
24 
22 
33 
6 
64 


u 

162 

45 

4.1 

am 

18 

+2 

332 

254 

435 

U 

514 

84 

A 

24 

IX 

IW 

1J 

X 

4J 

19 

101 

X 

161 

3.1 

2J 

14 

275 

17 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
6 March 1985 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(w) AJ-Mal Trust. S- A— - -- 


S 15042 LLOYDS BANK I NTL. POB 43L Geneva II 

* ,3UJU — +(w) uavds inn Dollar s 10440 

Kw) Lloyds Inn Europe * ' 


BANK JULIUS BAER SCO. Ltd — HwJ Lloyds Inn Europe SF 11050 

— (d)Baerbend SF 944J0 ~Hw) uoyds Inn Growth _ SFilMOO 

—Id I Con bar __ 5F 1237 JO — Hwl UavtU InH income SF 32050 

— (OlEwlBaer America S 1154 JO — H«) Uovds Infl PocMk SF 15030 

—Id 1 Eauibovr Eurooo— SF 1 21 [L00 

— Id ) Equtboer Pacific SF 1218JD 

-Id) Grater 5F 1147.00 

— (d ) Stockbor SF17B6O0- 


BRITANNI/LPOB 271. St. Heller. Jereey 

~(w) BrltJJPlInr Incoma S0444- 

— Iwl BfltJ MonaaCwT — SO* 

—Id I Brit. IntU Monooaarlt 10.973 

—Id I Wit. wtli Manaa Portf- 11024 

— Iwl Brlt.Unlwersal Grawth___ S0560 
— Iwl Brll.GoKt Fired. ■ . ■ *6694* 

— (•») BrnManaaCurrancy C 1547 

—Id ) Brit. Japan Dir Part. Fd 11002 

-Iw) Brit Jereey GUI Fund— - toil** 

— ldlBrR.tNandLeH.Fund SUBS 

—Id) Brit. world Techn. Fund - S0JKS 


SKANOIFOND INTL FUND (445-26270) 

— (w)lnc: Bid MX Offer SS.10 

— (w)Acc: Bid SUB Offer— SS.10 


— IwlAcc: Bid SUB Offer. 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 


17 Devonshire 5<LLondon4)V377-a040 
—lb 1 5HB Band Fund S 


— <b ) 5MB Band Fund 

— (wl SMB InH Growth Fund 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— Iwl Capitol Inti Fund 

— Iw) capital llalia 5A 



SF 45705 
DM 11302 
S 12003* 
FL 1 14.99- 
3 F 9475 
SF 90903 


SF 15LS4* 
SF29L2S 



DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
— +ld l Concentre - - - 
— +<d ) Inn Ronlen l ond — 


UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

— IdlUnlrertO DM41J0 

— IdJ Uni fends — dm 2260 

— IdtUnlrak DM 7905 

Other Funds 


Dunn A Haratn 6 Lloyd Gearae. Brussel* 
-Im) O+H Commodity Pool.. S2W.19 — 


—(ml Currency A Gold Pool _s 13237 **■ 
— tm) winav Life FuL Pool— *58637*“ 
—Iml Trans world Fur. Pool- *952.12 — 


FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Laurence Pouatv HIR, EC4. 01-4324440 

-<w) FAC Atlantic S 1200 

— Iw) FAC European . 1*27 

-fw) FAC Oriental *2272 


FIDELITY POB 670. Mam II ion Bermuda 
—Cm I Amertcan Values Common— S+L50 

— Im) Amor Values CunvPref S 101.14 

— id) FMeHtvAnier. Assets *47.26' 

— id 1 Fidelity Australia Fund S7A3 

—Id I FMelltv OHcoverv Fund S KU3 

—Id i Fidelity Dlr.Svps.Tr S I2M5 

— MIFutaiNy Fm-Eatf Fund *20.13 

— Id I Fldeilrv Inn. Fund S54JXP 

— Id I Fidelity Orient Fund—-. *2449 

—Id I Fidelity Frontier Fund S 1X70 

—Id I Fidelity Pacific Fund—— S133S5 

— fd I Fidelity Socl. Growth Fd. *100 

-Id ) Fidelity world Fund *3650 



GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— (wt East Investment Fund 135556 

— (wl Scottish World Fund E 12145 

-4w» state SL American *15137 

CapfLGufcLLftLLMLAMnfJT-49T42X 




U.S. Futures March 6 


Ooan Htah Lew Clote CtM. 


5eaun 

Smen 


HUt 

Low 

Dean High low aese an 


2145 INS Itw 1*65 1919 1955 

2130 19H May 1*0 WS »U 

EsLSafee Prev. Sales ATTO 

Prev.Day Open inf. 24827 UP 746 


O M IW E JUICE UtVCE) 
ISAM lbA> cants pot lb. 


WHEAT (CBT) 

&0O0bu mini mum- daftes par Dushol 
40* 337ft Mte M 133ft 

405 332ft Mcv 33K 141 

690 324ft Jut 337ft IX 

174ft 336 Sop IX UOft 

163ft 336 Dec 3Xft 3AM 

374ft 3A0ft Mar 344 341 

Eof.Setoo Pfev.Sates 5700 

Prow. Day Open ltd. 36384 off 815 


IttS Mx 14630 144.15 16450 

m3 MOV 146® MUD 167 JO 

1S5J0 Jut 169 JO M9J0 14835 

15735 SoP «8J0 148J0 MR® 

157 JO Now 


147% 349ft +J2 

338 340ft +JBM 

S 339ft +J3 

339ft +J3 

3X 340 +J3ft 
344 344ft +JEft 


18BJ0 156J0 Jan 

17750 \5tX Mar 

7*250 14000 May 


Est. Solos 300 prow. Saw ,803 
prow. Day Ocen luL 4J67 off 114 


CORN (CBT) 

*000 bu minimum- dollar, per baehel 
125ft 241ft MOT 248ft 272 


Metals 


125ft 241ft 

130 249ft 

U1 273 

331ft ’ 244ft 
295 241ft 

110 270 

331ft 275ft 

EsLSoW 


MOT 248ft 272 
May 273ft 276ft 
Jul 274 274ft 

Sep 247ft 249 


3*3*8$ 

225ft 235ft -fcMft 
247ft 247ft 4-JOft 
241 241ft —JM 

249ft 249ft — Jlft 
274ft 274ft— Jlft 



214 8ft Oft 
17810ft ion 
44011ft lift 
910ft Wft 
154410ft 17ft 
017 17 

92615ft 14ft 
17 7 

71134ft 34ft 
1726 24 

M 13 13 

36 9ft Ift 

11 MU 14 
32 9 Sft 

1 14ft 14ft 

12 ft ft 

28 16ft 14ft 
7436 «ft 4ft 

X 17 14% 

S3 ft ft 
X 3ft 3ft 
396 25ft 24% 
263 5ft 9ft 
1*0 12ft 12ft 
127 12% 11% 
4117 1<ft 

29 6ft 6ft 
2*4 2 1ft 
19211ft lt« 
137 20ft ftft 
23131% 31ft 

11 9ft * 


Ift— % 
16% -t- ft 
lift 

10ft 

18 —ft 
17 + ft 
ISft +1 
7 + ft 
34ft+ft 
26 — % 
8 —ft 
Oft— ft 
14ft— ft 
»- 

left— ft 
ft 
16ft 

4ft + % 

Vtf 

2ft— ft 
24ft— 1 
3ft 

12ft— ft 
10ft— 1U 
lift— ft 
4ft 
Ift 

11 — ft 
20*6— ft 
Jlft— % 
9ft 4- ft 


3.10 270 Mar 271ft 271ft 

331ft 275ft May 276% 274% 

f-rt. Safes Prow. Safes 34*98 

Prow. Day Opart W.1U975 offZITS 

SOYBEANS (COD 
MOO bu minimum- dollars por bwbo l 
7.90ft *39 Alar 374 *74% 

777 SJOft May 3J3 *06 

779 SJOft Jul *93 574ft 

7J6 *22 Auo S73 A95 

*71 *51 Sap 5J7 SJ* 

*48 *33% NOV &0% 570 

679 574% Jon 579% 670 

772 &OS% Mar 6.11 472 

779 A1S May 

Est. Sales Pruv. Safes 31476 

Prow. Day OponlnL 66.665 aff4V 


*7lft 373ft +JZ% 
*81 522% -672ft 

370ft 371ft -672(6 
571 571ft AJOft 

*BS STSft — 70ft 
526% *36ft — JOft 
S«ft 576ft — 71% 
670% 670% -Ml 
AIM +20% 



15U0 

+J8 

15UN 

+S0 


Est. Sales Prev. Sale, 15729 

Prev. Day Open Int. 722SS aft 12*0 



PLATINUM CHYME) 

50 trw at-tfeUars portray a*. 

28270 23320 Mar 251 JO 

44770 24450 APT 2S0J0 2S3J0 24* JO 25170 

May -v°m man ugnn 25290 
44*70 249 JO Jul 2070 299JCT 2S450 257 JO 

39X00 25670 Oct 26*40 26370 26X40 26270 

37X50 261JO Jon 26770 27X00 267 JO 20970 

Cat. Safes L764 Prew.Sde* 1J16 
Pr*y. Day Open ln». 147» o«2T7 


OATS (CBT) 

iOOObumbitoium- dollars par biaM . _ 

176% lJOft Mar 177% IX 1JM 174ft —00ft 

171 177% May 171 172 171 171 +T0VI. 

171% 173 Jbl 176 17M 174 176 +J0% 

IX 170 5ep 172ft 172ft 172ft 172ft +J0ft 

172% 174 DOC 175 175 17* 175ft +J0ft 

Es*. Sales Prpw.Sales 322 

Prev. Day Opart la). 3746 upX 


CATTLE (CME) 

4*000 tb,.- cents per lb. 

6* JO 6X40 Apr 6A3S 6472 6430 6472 +75 

69 JO 65J0 Jun 6670 6677 66.47 66J2 +70 

6777 *3.15 Auo 4370 6570 6*52 6570 +73 

6*90 6170 Oct 64J7 64.10 63JS 6472 +J2 

6775 6170 DOC 6535 4*17 6*15 4*30 —US 

6775 6*25 FOB 6*60 4370 6*50 6570 +.10 

ast 66.ro Apt 6A90 +J5 

Est. Sales 1045* Prew.SalOt 11X4 
Prev. Day Open Int 57783 off 1344 


REEDER CATTLE (CME) 


Financial 


* «|TW| 


6*75 Mar <770 67X <737 4777 —05 

6770 Apr 69 J5 <9J>5 MS 6970 +JB 

64.95 May 6970 69.95 6970 *900 +70 

6670 Aug 7L25 7L85 7U5 7177 +£3 

am Sop 7uo 71 jo 70Js 717s +75 

<70 D Oct 7035 71 X 7X25 70J7 +77 

7070 Nov TU3 7X00 71.10 7170 +50 


US T. BILLS (UNO 
SI mlHEon-ptsoflOOpct. 

9121 B7X Mar 9137 9170 91X 9132 -M 

FIJI 37.14 Jun 9CL74 9078 9059 9071 —.11 

9133 SAM Sep 9X33 «J4 90.18 9021 -.10 

9090 8*77 Dec «0J0 90J2 B9J4 09.91 — J7 

9055 1AM Mar 89X 89X B972 8975 — J6 

9027 B7J1 Jun 8972 8972 8*72 8*70 — J5 

9M0 8000 SOP 8936 8936 8935 8931 — JM 

89-53 89.12 Dec 89.1 B 89.18 89J9 89.16 —.01 

Est. Safe, 19750 Prey. Sale? 1X539 
Prev. Day Open Int. 44301 oft *33 


798 4ft 6ft 4ft— ft 
740 IOft 9H fft- ft 
48515ft Uft ISft— ft 


t jg” , ,^ n inm?n y 8 90JB 8000 Sec 8936 8936 8*35 8931 -^CM 

Pnrv.DayOpenlrd. HL729 ofix w53 89. ,2 Dec B9.1B 89.18 B9J9 B9.U —.01 

HOOS (CME) Esf.Safe, 1*750 Prey. Sales 1X53* 

3OJ0O lbs.- cents cor lb. Prow. Day Open Int. 44301 oft *33 

Ibt? jST S2 no nu OS 18 TIL TREASURY (CB71 

S« ££ 2-2 SS ±5 H00J«prln-p1sA32nd.oflD0PCt 

52 SS £5 SS tS m-s mot tm 701a 7B-2S 78-26 -* 

25 t-S 0-3 70-* jun 7012 78-17 77-27 77-29 — * 

S« im «H3 73-18 50P 77-23 77-24 77-5 77-4 —9 

40B <7^ +JB k -22 75-13 Dec 76-18 -9 

4?X 4635 Feb 4M0 4*50 47 J5 4875 +JS 75-jg Mar 76-1 —9 

79-26 77-22 Jun 75-18 -9 

Est. Soto Prev. Safes 7329 

Preu.Oay OponlnL 48JZ3 off 135 

YlowR IX *7. Ill 36ft 36ft 36ft- ft I PORK BELLIES (CME) 5S*3SS5l5I.¥?2S.SS!2?«ei 

YOrkFd M 17 13513A 73 U — » - (lOCt-SlOOJOO-pt, A32nd,Of 100 PC» 

rorar-a ab */ IM H a « L OBJOO cmti per £b. 77-, 5 57-27 Ntar 69-13 69-17 60-24 48-25 —14 

52 Zf-lff 5S 52 jJ2 77-15 57-m jun <»-t2 *8-is 47-a 67-25 —14 

VS* 5S 5n ^ il-S 7*3 57-10 SOP 67- U 67-24 66-29 67 —14 

USLICO IX IS 5134ft 34H 34ft + ft ZonLJM 261 31 30ft 30ft— ft KS a5o 7TJ0 7X1B 7?S 7TJ7 +1X SI ESS E.n Jtil ’ 

UTL 1222ft Uft 21ft- ft Zantac ■ 61 4ft 4ft 4ft- ft 7115 Ftb nj! SS la Wor 66-1 66-15 65-25 65-26 -14 

UHrBcp IX AS 828ft 21 2tft 23eolor J8a *9 6 12ft 12ft T2% 7Xtt 64J0 mS 69X MM 7BX +X Si 6 S2 £2 SH 1 St? SJ ^ 

Ultrsy J6P J 433 ift t% (ft TkxiUI IX U Z7 37 36ft 37 70*5 704C ^ ^ £me 7W Sep «-7 »;7 6M 45 -13 

Unamn U5*20ft 19% 19ft-lft ZBol S 4ft 4ft 4ft 7*90 7090 Jul TWO “■?? - J3 

SISK U.U t!2ft S* 2* SSST ^ M \ ^ "■ JS w « -» 


49X 4635 Feb 48J0 4850 4755 48A5 +75 

47X 4550 Apr 4SJ9 +.10 

(7 JO <7 jo Jan Oja +35 

Est. Sales 9X1 Prev. Salas A090 
Prow. Day OponlnL 27X8 up 47 


UnPIntr 

UnTTBC IM * A 
UAOns 


920ft 20ft 20ft Zondvn -34 33 219 

• 54ft 54 54 Zymcs 47 

11417ft 17ft 17% — ft Zvtrex 228 


Floating Rate Notes 


March 6 


Dollar 


fasior/Mat. 

MWIrWifs 


AfllodlrWtlffll 
Aided IrMiE 


Coupon Next Bid Aftd 
99. IM 99X *9 JO 


72-30 57-2 Mar 66-11 66-15 65-25 65-26 —14 

XU 54-29 Jun 6*31 66-2 65-11 65-12 —13 

70-3 56-29 sec <3-7 65-7 6631 <5 —13 

69-26 56-25 Dec 65-7 65-7 64-21 64-22 —13 

69-12 5+27 Mar 6+30 6+30 44-12 4+14 —12 

69- 2 64-3 Jun 6+22 6+22 6+4 464 —12 

4846 6348 Sop 6+7 6+8 64 64 —12 

EitSafe, Prow.Salas154J8d 

Prev. Day Open int33A416 offlJBl 
EMMA ICED 

SKXUOO prlo-pts A 32nd, of 100 Pd 

70- 17 ShS M or 4*-l4 69-14 <96 6+7 —4 

COFFEE COfYCSCE) 6M7 57-17 Jun 6+21 6+25 6+13 4+14 -5 

37jse Ibfc. cento per lb. 49-4 5+13 Sep 68 6+1 63-23 67-23 —6 

15X70 12150 Mar Max 141 JO 14058 14L13 +M 4+13 5+4 Doc 47-4 —5 

15X00 122X1 May ML5D 142fel 14X45 I42J3 +J0 48 . 5+20 NOT 4+18 —5 

149 JD 72 UN Jul Ml JO Ml JO 147 35 Ml JO +J0 67-8 5+25 Jun 6+1 —5 

’-47 JC 127 JO Sep 14X60 14075 14035 V40J3 +33 C7-3 6+11 Sep 6+11 —5 

14275 12935 Doc 139A5 779-45 139A5 139^45 Est. Sale, Prev. Sale, 103 

141-00 12*50 Mar 13*06 —.14 Prwv.Day Open Hit. 5396 off 5 

139 JW 131-00 MOV 1 37-50 ravT nTwiMT n— 

136J0 13*50 Jol 13A13 +J3 S?JmiiS?2TaK!i! M 





1 





rL Vfrt- 





«r%%\ 


Commodity Indexes 


Allied lrWiB7 9ft 

AlHed Irish Ptrpl 074 

Arab Hta Carp 19*61 2(6 

Atlonilc Fin lot 19*41 Mu 

BcaCoam.ltnLM ** 

Btn NazLavoroTl Mr. 

BaxpDl Rama 91 91U 

Ben DJ Santo SoL 91 W 

Bara Pinto 15 TO) 

flank Of America 97 9ft 

BkW Great* 91/** *ft 

Bk Of Greece 97 9(4 

BkOf Ireland I* »ft 

Bkotirefeaan 9 

BiMootnrtW 9ft 

BkOt Montreal *6 Ift 

BkOfMadroolfT 10ft 

Bk Of New York 96 Ift 

Bk Of Nova Scoffe B/93 UFk 


& 


Esi. Safes 1325 Prev. Safe, 1X78 
Prev.Day Open Int. 12332 up 66 


K 

a a* k ! 

Mr. 3+4 100X61 OO 15 
9117*7-6 99J1.99J1 


TOft 70-5 KX »2S 
9ft 94 9970 9*J0 
*ft 184 9045 9160 
W KM WJ091AS 
•ft 11-5 9975 100.10 
9 2+7 *9JS 1D035 

R lw nudiSm 


Bk Ot Mora Scotia *4 
Bk Ol Tokyo 9Q 
Bk Of Tokyo I 


Bk Of Tokyo W 
Bk Of Tokyo 87 


Bk Of Tokyo febtefl 
Bk Of Tokyo docE/91 


II 3*4 1DO75M0JC 
ft 294 taOJElOLM 
•ft 297 99J0 W« 


Bk AnterioaH 
Bookers Trust 00 
Badcere Trust 9* 
Bankers Trial *6 


9% 64 1013016040 
9ft 724 NUtWn 
Bft 2M *9N 1DM8 

im. sa uunSSs 

9ft IM *9.*9 HU9 


BoArabeEt love* P/91 12 291 99J0 TOOJO 


BBL95 

BBLft 

Bqiodapjeil* 
Bolnduwer** 
BUEV 
BFCEI7 . 


9* 174 10OJ7 
lift 114 99X • 


SlISSSSb 


Oft 2M UAWIOUB 
Ift 297 *917 9977 


BFCEMnM 
BFCEff 
BNP *5 
BNP 17 
BNP 85/M 
BNPM/96 
BNP *9 
8NP8* 
BNPV/91 
BMP *6 


Bft 304 lBUSiaUS 
9ft 297 *937*977 
*»L T33 M0J5W025 


*ft « MUUSOil 
Hft S3 **75 bid 
Ift 3+4 9*79 I9M0 
MW 04 1005570045 
9ft 54 *969 9979 
NLM 95 180.12, 0022 
70ft +9 MOOT 00.97 
*ft ZW 9*36 9*86 
9ft 113 1085*10069 
ft* +8 **J0 9*^ 
9ft 3+7 1007710012 
9ft 174 1003810038 
Mft 1-5 1003010040 
UU +* **JI»».t* 
9% ]M *»JP 9970 
9ft H-3 7004810656 
9ft 293 997S 78018 
9ft. 31-5 1000010015 


8q Warm 89/94 

BarcbmOMosTS 

Barday,Owa»9B 


BartiariCbsasW 

Kino B eta pc re 

Khio Befe 99/04 

KfeoBefeV 

Beruan Bonk 19 _ 

Beraon8«s*OdW7i 

KM* B*fe 10*194/04 

Kina Beta 99V84 

Ccceft 

era 85 

CNCA98NS 

CNT90 

CUT 91 

gbcqs 

Carteret 5 +l W 
Chow Montanan 91 
Chaw 09 
Chemical Bk *4 
Chemical (WUrlfe 
CBriFtanloM 



Ift 1+4 9972 10800 
97 *977 *9 J2 
lift 174 1 00.1710037 
*% 124 7003570633 
F4 KJ 9962 9172 
*ft 74 MB2710OJ7 
lift 2*4 M02ST803S 
Wft +5 T0LU1U83S 
2+9 9985 9975 
WW 1+3 99 Jl 9933 
9ft 1+7 10600100.16 
•ft 2+5 *983 9*73 


9ft 1+7 
n 9* 
10 +6 
ISft 2+5 
77ft 1+3 
Mft 304 
9% 1+7 
10ft 274 
10ft +9 
72% 21-1 
915/1 95 
4/5 
•ft 1-8 
- 10ft 95 
2*9 
9ft 2+5 
72ft 27-3 
W 54 
72 94 

9ft 1H 
10ft 3+4 
9% 64 
lift 1+4 
♦ft 277 
IM lid 

11 U4 
fft 174 
9(4 Jl-J 

• *ft VW 

12 94 

N 56 
Wft 284 
9ft 31-5 
W% 11-3 
fft *4 
fft 1+3 
fft 193 
fft VS 
9 297 

916 266 
9% 74 
11 3+4 

10ft 64 
IM +4 
9. IW 
77ft IM 
9% 196 
ffft 2+3 
*ft 214 
9ft IK 
fft 274 
lift 164 
lift 254 
Oft 1+5 
1+ 274 
life 94 
9% 2+6 
9% 04 
9% 286 


SUQARWORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 
172J80 tbo^ amts POT lb. 


10-50 X90 May 415 433 4.12 Alt +JJ3 

9-95 42 Jul 443 L52 +44 44* +J1 

9X 4S Sep +77 477 472 4J77 +J1 

9J5 471 0(3 OJ tM Uf «7 +J1 

775 *26 Jan *45 *45 *45 *52 — J71 

9J3 570 Mar *93 *99 *S9 *99 +J2 

7.75 6J14 MOV A14 *25 AM A22 +J2 

669 A27 Jul A43 <50 645 A50 +JS 

Est. Sales 9JM Preft Safes 12X3 
Prev.Day Open Int. BASTS up 1372 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tan+Spor Ian 

2570 1980 Atar 2009 2018 1985 1985 — 35 

2570 2Q2S May 2030 2045 19W 2013 — 35 

2400 MB Jul 2020 2B35 im 2006 —S3 

2415 2020 SOP 2011 2025 1907 1*97 —25 


SI million- pts of 100 pet 

9170 BS63 Mar 906* 9073 9*58 9057 — J0 

91 JO 8*30 Jun 8974 8976 B*47 MJO — J7 

*060 8*00 SOP 89 J* 8*35 89.16 B*J4 —.16 

9X17 8534 OK B&B6 8*87 8U0 88J9 -.12 

■978 8654 Mar 8857 8857 8847 8839 —.11 

WM 8643 Jun 88.16 -.1] 

8848 S756 SOP 8735 —.10 

Est Safes IM Prev. Sales 722 

Prev.Day Opon Int. iijzs off 361 


Close 

Moody’s 948.90 f 

Reuters M30.90 

DJ. Futures N-A. 

Com. Research Bureau _ NA 

Moody's : base )00 : Dec. 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; ♦ - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 1&, 1931. 
Dow janes : base 100 : Dec 31. 1?74. 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

Slmllffon-ptsotioapct „ 

91X **M MOT 9832 9832 90.14 9ftU — J8 gRp. 

90JM 8249 Jun B9X 8937 »J4 «9J9 —30 

9033 8453 S*p 8883 BU3 8856 1859 —.19 «««. 

89J7 B4J0 Dec B 845 8845 1821 8824 ~M 

UM SAID A tor 88.0 88.14 8756 1757 —.13 JK£S CE: 

£2 £ £2 S3 SZ ^ §&& 

e». " ausflksr m ^ sb»- 


Market Guide 


IMS 1931 —15 [ Prev.Day OponlaLll«A89 atlU6« 


Oiteoao Board of Trade 
Chicago Mercant i le Exchange 
international Monetary Mur tort - 
Of cnicaoo Meraeitlfe Exctmoe 
Now York Cacao. Sugar. Coffee Exckooo 
Now York Carton ExchaMe 
Comcrwdtty Excbanea. Now York 
Now York Mercunttfe Exchanot 
Kansas ary Board of 7tado 
New York Futures E«dww 



'*4^! t hivt 
’ ihi. 


Asian Commodities 

March 6 


London Commodities 

March 6 


Paris Commodities 

Mardi 6 


Cash Prices Mardi ! 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U53 per ounce 

High Low BM^Ask BM Vi Mc 
I Mar _ N.T. N.T. 286J0 2B8J0 288J0 290J0 
I API - N.T. N.T. 2S8J0 29OJ0 290JB 292J0 
; May . N.T. N.T. 29000 29*00 79200 29400 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 29200 29400 29400 29600 


Figures hi sterling per metric Ion. 
Gasoil In U5. dollars per metric ton. 
GoW In US. dollars per ounce. 


Suw feFrandt Francs per mtrtric ton. 
Other figures in Francs per UO kg. 


Commodity awt Unit 
Coffee 4 Son hw. m 
Prlntcioth 64/30 38 t yd — 
Sleet Utfets 1 Pin.), ton — 


Hfeh Law 
SUGAR 


iron 2 Fdrv. PhllCL. ion 21188 .2 n. 

Cl ~ sssr ^- 1 iSj .. . 


■1421 1405 1406 1410 —17 Cooper elect, fb . 

1510 7495 14*7 1500 —IS Tin (Straits). lb „ 


Auo ~ 297J0 297J0 296J0 298J0 299X 301 JO JSS H5S JIMS JIT'S 22- V? 70 1560 - 1 6. gntE. SI. L. BoslHb 

OCt— N.T. N.T. 30200 30400 304JM 30600 I i« J2M2 ?“2 IS^ 0 T3iafl JtL |-*I5 >A30 Until. PallodlUfn.0* 


Dec - n!t! N.t! 30700 30900 310JO 31200 2^. ^5? 13 J,® } 
F «a - »VLB0 314J0 313J0 31*00 315J0 317J0 N.T. 1. 

Voiume: 21 krtsoi lOOaz. ™ r isioa 1: 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJperoonce 


Hfeh Low settle Settle i 

Mor N.T. N.T. 28*90 28X30 

API 28X80 28700 28770 29000 , 

Jun N.T. N.T. 291.90 29400 

vaiume: 207 lots of lOOn. 


mx 131X I33J0 134J0 13340 13350 Me"" 1740 1J15 1730 1738 —2 Silver N.Y.oz 

,0-Ti w,a '3*J» ItWJO Wo* 1-800 1780 1786 1790 +6 Source: AP. 

15*60 15100 ,5540 15550 15450 155J0 E*t. VOl.t t+00 Ion of 50 ton* Prev. ocfUOJ 
N.T. N.T. 1MJ0 161X 15950 liOJO sote: 1422 lots. Open tntered: 21382 

^^..N-T NX 169J0 17140 167.00 ITUM COCOA 

1X3 to*, of » tons. Mar 2060 2012 1315 2029 —St B n; ■ 1 

COCOA May 2020 2JB5 2794 2098 —51 | UlVldl 

Mar 2.735 2,100 £100 2,106 2.155 1156 J*Y N.T, N.T. . — 2790 —25 ■ 

May 2.124 2JS0 1087 2J8S 2.145 2.148 5 k 2765 2765 2740 1245 — 70 ■RBEBEBEEI 

Jlv Z101 2060 2J45 2J66 2,124 2.725 006 2. 1 ? 1139 2.M2 2.145 — 67 , 

Sep zan 2J51 2J52 Tjyj 2.103 iios MDr N.T. N.T. Z120 — _ company 

pec 1,998 1778 1.97B 1700 2J07 2J0I «« . N.T. NJ. Z120 — - 

M or 1.993 7773 7,973 1776 2J02 2J03 E«. vol.: 440 lots ol 10 to/vs. Prev. OCtUOi 

May 1,905 1,982 1765 1.980 1795 2jS sale,: 125 tote Open Interest: 1 J49 
BJ40 lot, of tu tan* COFFEE 


M-e 7* 

S5H9' S 
845-.’ 
115-I7B. r.-j 
*72 m 


A 


■• •v.Ajfcr $9i 

' »» |. rf| 

r ''"A Ljindii 

’ I 1 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER ..— , , lTOU , m , w 

Mfemratan cents mr kite 8J40 lot, ofti tarn. coffee 

■S*** J ratfUk i COFFEE . Mar 2420 1610 2405 2425 

yy— ill SJS5 !J« !« 18! IS! !Sg ST 5? : as %% 

Moy-=zz g .!« s ^ IS IS ^ ^ is ^ ^ %% 

.If 7 - 00 1KJ0 7 97 JO Nov 2J40 1JXB 2?W 24W 2^ 2J« N-T. N.T. 2490 2720 

volume: 9 feta j«n IS 24B2 2473 24S zsor Mar n.t. N.T. 2490 uoo 

SI NGAPO RE RUBBER W°J W-T. . jff. 2460 24TO 2475 2485 Prev ’ 

Singapore oafs per Ho 1031 lots of Stent . wee. biota open inJeraa; 160 

Cieea Praviau, GASOIL Source: Bourse <tu Commerce. 

B « 1Hnr ,ARr Bid ARC Mar OATS 23350 232J0 233J0 23375 2XL5P , 


Dividends 


Bft 3V7 FN I BUB 
9ft 56 9940 99 JO 
Fft IM UIQJBUXL® 
9% IU 99X9948 
Wi +9 HaHJTOaji 


OKeorp (Wkt vtouAlfW W6 11-3 *9.18 IUB 


□ticcrp Scot 96 
CHI OdM9l 

enrarew 

ClHcon»-Ui mul e d uWP 
CWcnrpT7 
CenxnenbenkN 
CammerzbnkNovS* 


9ft 1+3 9948 9958 
8ft 304 99X 9948 
9ft 12-1 101.7818170 
•ft 1+4 9MB 1 0858 
Bft 3+4 99X 99 JJ 
9fe 2M 99X9M8 


ORnmerdwdeNBVI* 10ft 3+S 186751*75 
CarxnUrbMeafraalfl 12ft 1+3 9965 1*10 


CCF 86/98 
CCF 90/93 
CCFWM 
CEPMEI7/92 
CEPME* 

Credit Ou Nerd 8M 
Crete RnderM/tt 
Credit Far Exr 92 
CrLrenn/W 
Credit Lyarrert, 87 
Crete Lvexnaf, 90/97 
Crete LvannabWm 
Crete Lyunnoi,91/B 
Crete Lyanmli dw79 


» 2M 1007378073 
IM0 94 1004270072 
9ft 2+» 99X 9971 
Mft 124 180611(871 
78 4-4 WU0K029 

9% 27-4 9970 MOJO 
12 9-4 MO2S10CJ5 

(* 1-7 99X 9978 



N.T. N.T. 2.120 — — Cempanv Per Amt 

N.T. N j. 2,720 — — 1HICBB4KBD 

L! +« lots ol 10 tons. Prev. octuol ,NC Re ** BD 

Iota Open Interest: IJM9 Brislot-Mvers Q 47 

0 Canad. Memoir Ind _ J7ft 

2420 2410 2405 2425 —2 CerUral Re-LUe A .11 


KOI 


+ 5 PM Union R.E. 

+ S HtnaWemanCo 
Heat) h-Mor Inc 
+ B inter oumae SI Bk 


SI NGAPO RE RUBBER 
Singapore am per kSe 


Jan N.T. N.T. 2490 2720 +15 UhCOln Fin. Core 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2490 TJQ0 +23 qwern+Mjnor Inc 

Esr._yoL: 20 lor, at 5 loro. Prev. actuai UFS * G Coro 
Krtts: H lat+ Open brteraa; 760 , 

Source: Bourse au Commerce. __ 


® J7% W ! 

S 

Q Jt +70 

Q S +S' 

- 2D +B 
Q 45 +1 

o .10 s« 

q SS 4-38 


MW..M 


H 


nil| , aS r “ JSl-SS T4 '- 50 ffL gJ“I212S2Bi!l2B75 22Lai2in 

Stt'AF*- l«^ 748J0 76050 May 220X217^ 37*50 21975 21975 22030 

5?tlSJ2r- 3S3 }££! 167 -°° Jun 21+25 21+25 277.50 21*00 27*50 217JB 

SHeuSC' - 15+M i*Y 217J0 21*50 218J0 21BJ5 776J0 H7J0 

wlsXSfz }<7% i*S i2S US -- s-i-22-bmmw 

... „ Oct 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian rfaegit, per 25 terns 


7X0 U70 7X0 7X0 
7X0 7J6Q U10 1760 


Sep N.T. N.T. 217J0 227 JO 21BJ0 w*nn 
Oct H.T. H.T. 217JD0 2XU» T1BJB 22*D0 

Now N.T. N.T. 217 JO 237 JO 21BJ0 232J0 

2J19 lots Of TOO ton* 

Jounces.* Reuters and London Petroleum Ex 
eftanoe (gasolll. 


London Metals 

March 6 


SPECIAL 

Owermyer Coro - J7W ** 

STOCK 

Peniair „ 25ft W9; 

STOCK SPLITS 


ft 


Prev loot 

ALUMINUM «»« A* B« Ate 

STerilae per metric Ian Asamera Inc 

WP> 1 J20JO 1J3J0 7JQ6J0 1J2A50 Bk N Hamptelre 

forward 1JW450 7J65J0 IJ62J0 1J6U0 Brwnng-Ferrfe ind. 
COPPER CATHODES (High Graael £°k ro ^J^J5F h 

Starting par metric fan °g rntaoeJ> _ 

^ T« as 
^ a p^^‘ SteoM tsstSF*- 

w>t 1X2J0 7X-U0 1X3 JO 1X5JM Kerr-Mc Gee Core 

fomwrd 1X3.00 }&5M 1J94J0 1J9S00 Landmark BnSfe, 
LEAD LowenMeln Coro 

SMtIIrb per metric tan_ MoM-iman Inc 

SPM 227 J0 327 JO 328JQ 32&2S MCA lnc 

forward 33*00 335JO 33600 336J0 M S A M, **l Grp Cl-A 

NICKEL • MlckemJ^C?^ 1 ' 3 

Sterling par metric tan ^Cwfconi CO 

soot 445*00 446*00 +84*00 4J5UJ0 parkSTfSTcn 

forward 4J90J0 +900JJ0 4X500 44*0 JO Kt^-sSfeSon lnc 
SILVER Piltteurv Co 

Pence par fray oaace PLMFlnciSvs 

seal 534J0 53*00 53350 SWJfl »Owo Furniture Co 

forward 55150 55*50 5S15D SS2JS Wlleo Chemleal Co 

TIN (Standard) 


Everoeen Fund— 4-for-l 
HonUtmcm Co — 3-tor. 1 
LYbtemed lnc — 3-for-2 
Network System Carp — Morfe 
Republic Gvpmm — 2-for-l 


1XD 1^ 1JD0 1JS0 
7.1 BO 1X0 1,100 iS 


1.160 1X0 1.160 1X0 
1,150 1700 1,150 1X0 


17(4 11+ 10040658 
lift ZJ-3 UUS100J3 
M 9-4 1*5210662 

*ft 9-7 188X10030 
fft 79-S MOAflHLN 
9ft 274 99X 99* 


Crete LYOtaabtanWf 9 1+7 99X 99X 

Crete LyaaxahiiM92m 9fe 1+4 ISLsnBEX 


£ 


— — - 

;-w 




EBC TRUST COJJER5EV) LTD. 

1-3 Seal* SI-SI. Heifer: 05+4X131 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

gldtinc.: BkL S941 Offer S 9.71 2 

SldlCOP.: Bid S10J1 Offer 510X0 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

— ? 5 ho !l! 1“™ (Accum) S 14537 

—id I Sheri Terra A* (Dtatr)— _ SIJB5B 
-Ho ) snort Term ‘B* (Aecum)__ SUBSO 

—Id) Short Term *B'(Dlstr)_ S0J280 

— Iw» » I«« Tww 82049 




— (b i j.f South East Asia 


— (b ) J.F Japan Technology —— Y 23972 


— fb ) JlF Pacific SeeJL(Aecf 
— (0 ) j.f Australia—. 


NIMARBEN 

—Id ) Class A 

— (w ) Class B - U J. _ 
— (w I Class C - Japan. 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PS BS$7& T1» Hogue KM) 449670 
“(o ) Sever Baleg8inpifl+f __ 


si - p F Si LF HM 


Crete National 88 
Crete Nalleael 10/M 
Crust NdTtawl® 
CreteenRoHM 
CredHemtoit 91/97 
CredhonstteN 
DeUdtiKomaW 
Derek* Ofe 99 
OeBNarekanovfB 
Den NarikededB 
Danmark MU9B 
DenaterkeensM 
DmmarkBf 
Denmark p«ip 
Die Erst DeH 92A4 
Drafter Ba*93 
DrHdner 01(89 
Dreamer flwk 92 
EbtaraftMedeerit 
EOF 99 
EDF9S 
ENEL 08 
EABB3 
EAB9B 

EECR/TO 
Exterior Inti « 
FwrevfeW 
Rmish Paper 95 
FlnlBaAM lnc 91/84 
FkEBankSrttaiaR 
FMCUcapef? 

FI rp Chicago 94 

FltfatyTemK 

Rrst IiiIb jlote 95 

Full W96 

CMfinonCer 

Genflnone* 89/93 

GceflnoKe 93/94 

GZBI9 

GZB92 

GZBptfp 

GZBB6 

Wrefl 

QrkxBmn 

Gftedfen94 

Gram western Fta ?4 


f 1+7 99X 99X 
77ft 11-3 imUTTOCLK 
955 2M 99X9950 
9. 11-7 99X WJ* 

?% b- 3 rauennjn 

m. 278 9955 59.95 

nft ns THunn.11 

1080 9-1 NBJ1M0J1 
fft 13-5 99.95 1*59 
fft IM 9955 10050 
fft 9-7 KRH1Q630 
lift K4 1*4310652 
9fc 19-8 1 90.771 00J7 
» U 99X9950 
Bfe 2+7 99,4! 9953 
life W6 WtEnO.95 
Hk » 99X 99 JO 
IB 374 9953 XUa 
Fft 3+6 9935 9950 
UUB374 *05775677 
9ft 734 9953 9953 
MX +9 99JB99X 

n. 17-6 99^2 9953 

12ft 2H IBOXnail 
9ft +7 99X9957 
fft 214 99.16 9954 
10ft 3+8 100.1010629 
_ 99.33 99.43 

«k 2+6 99.10 99X 



1.140 1,7*0 1,140 1,190- 
1,1X UBO 1,138 U80 


Volume: 0 (ots of 35 ten*. 
Jimw: Reuters. 


1,130 1480 1.130 Lin 


DM Futures Options 

March 6 

Vt German NaMKU ntri+cotfs per ink 


S&P 100 Index Options 

March 5 


Ortfeseme Pets-Stme 

MOT Joe Sept Mor Jun Seyf 

161 117 — OJl 0J1 6J4 

664 7AI 1JS 0J4 0A1 056 

0.12 051 1A5 053 IJ3 1J4 

OX 656 IJ5 U2 U7 IX 

IX 632 OJl U0 U 2J 

IX ail 055 148 135 124 



Strike OfeiBi pguw 

Mttltark*! Nor N* Mar W Hn fe 

® - - — 1/14 1/16 - 

waaniitie-^k. 
W J£S WN -- l/W 1/16 ft vs 

J » Bl u»li 1/1J 14 fe 1 

75 R R M W 8 ISfli 19/142* 
S *> 15W1/163VS M 


191 1/16 IVk 

1*5 — fe 


rat,.,,.. EsttWed total vuLltU53 

Sum ixwm Cefli; Toe* veL 1249 opa hit £7,1 H 

- im trt? 1 Fa**: Tore. yeL 6635 ep*n tot. J2A 15 


Source: CME. 


USUAL J 

O J7WS* 

t 1 3 1 

a 32 *3 

I* s.n| 

Q J» *4l 

1 § 1 m 

O 2 US 
, - X 44 

j : - 07 % 

• Q J» T a iS 

0 jt +1+ 

a -njfl 

- g j*4 

> s 

, O 37 M 


-'tea n 


**l Hn 


J* 27/MJfe Sft J Sft 6 J 


fft 9ft 9(6 _ 

- Mft - - 


TMaXwferee 32U34 
Trt4 art opwiet 706690 
TWNMnkae lfe» 
Traret ereekrt. 457582 


Toshiba Acquires £""3^ H H 
Computer Firm o«x 84^ 

*■ forward N&00 80* JO 8I4J0 815X 

Source: AP. 


MI0E03S Lm»77U2 C3Dfenan+U( - J „ , . > „ . 

tZEftSlflZaZZ U.K. May Aflow Banks 

rn« ^ w re, ^-computer maker, aiacwt of Fmm JananespRpnkpro nor. Abdul AazTaha, has res 

Quna Cuts Import Taxes 3 bm T 3F W 5 aLon) * 10 Japanese Brokers and succeed by J 

streogthcQ its small-sized computer *w« Hussein the chairman and 


Return 

TOKYO — Toshiba Coro, said 
nt of Sore 


New Central Bank Q 


Is Named in Malayan 

Reuters { 


Non Dollar 


9ft 1+5 99X 99.10 
9ft W 99X 9937 
feVi 71-5 *953 18UT 
8ft ZM 97V. 97* 
9ft 64 9954 99 J4 
8fe 15-7 9958 99X 

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WL W-5 9M0 99X 
fft 294 1X4IIB85 
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12 294 1002710637 
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Useor/MoL 
Am 97 

Bk Montreal W 
B* Tokyo mm 
Belndreumfl 
CUIcerp*/?! 
CBmalftMedaold 
CEPM896 
Credi Fonder 99 
Credit HaHora 91/95 
Denmark 93/fS 
LLLW 

Ktoedom Behdum 94 


US* It 


streagihcQ ns smaB-sned computer *ew« Hussein, the chairman and 

Bnn xrr bo f JSSS -L -j ■. ■ l. i TOKY0 - The Bask of En- executive of Malayan Bai 

DtLJJNO — Import duties will A spokesman said n might later gland probably will allow one or Bhd„ it was announced Wo 
be cut an average 10 percent, effec- raise its stake to 50 percent. To- two Japanese securities houses to dav 

BVe Slinriav snH rmnrt i«r!tfn —It .Uka n>1i i ' u il . . . _ 


Mfelfteia 
SNCF 90/93 
Ybrttetre91/94 


cmn km bw Asiut *■ strengthen 

• Sft ^ Reiam business. 

§ 2* BEIJING — Impon duties will A spoke 
wlSIwSnj? be cut an average 10 percent, effec- raise its s 
IS “3 ni 7 99 * p 1 *' 2 Sunda y, and export tariffs will shiba will ! 

be ranoved from all but a few com- and peril 
uft 2-5 ]Hj 5 ioa 3 s modities, the official Xinhua news semicondc 
S5 184 99 X reported Wednesday. The Sordcoi 

nt w "n wSi ,rcductI0n i™P^n duties willde- tal of 160 
wft ZM wlawx 3 011 how badly Chiip needs the ployeesan 


) Sord. > financial daily newspaper Nihon signed for personal reasons 

has paid-in capi- Keizai Shimbun has reported. would step down this June. Hr 


Source : Credit Sulste-Rrst Boston LKL raised. 


1984, the spokesman said. 


monetary policies. 


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Long Debate on Targeting 
By the Fed Is Heating Up 


■ CBV-C-t 
1 

n ! 


^ (Continued from Page 9) 

-T. parallel lines" approach and a 
i * ' ” * rong argument for enlisting this 
•vice in (he battle against ■‘drift, 7 ’ 
tuaily upward, in the base. 

• •: h, It is mostly economists of the 

• ^jonetarist school who support 

ich a change. They argue that the 
rd's current practice resulted in 
v'J o much money being created dur- 
‘J: v'g the late 1970s, which in turn 
Siused a rise in inflaticm. To sub* 
ie the double-digit inflation, the 
ai was required to take ligjht- 
■vii,. oney countermeasures. 

■ j>!The council’s report attracted 
' ne attention not only of 'Wall 
'reel but also of the central bank, 
hen Paul A. Volcker, the Fed 
«- . airaun, told the Senate Banking 

• ^jmmittee on Feb. 20 the 19&5 
^rgets for money growth, his pre- 

red statement contained four 
arts showing the 1985 trajector- 
based on both wedges and par- 

•-■^d lines. 

'Mr. Volcker was noncommittal 
:■;« ijOut whether he thinks the mone- 

• * •j-iist proposal is a good idea. ~ 

'^•‘We have sometimes consul- 
. rid,” he said, “and others have 
, v*t“ ‘•'jgested, a bettor ‘pictorial’ ap- 
>ach would be to mustrate the 
gets by a different, but also nec- 
** a arily arbitrary, convention.” But 

• ■-:* *•. Volcker’s mere mention of it 
\ “x Jj’.y prove to have been an impor~ 

• - brealohrongL 

\ocording to William Poole, an 
bor of the cotmtiTs report who 
i since returned to being a pro- 
j«: ^sor at Brown University, the 
:,; ef goal is to attack base drift. He 
in tains that not only is it impor- 
t to set the proper rate of money 
wth — the Fed has fixed a 4- 
cent to 7-percent range for M-I, 
narrowest of the measures, for 
• . .5— but to link it to the previ- 

" ’ ja*. year's target M-l includes cur- 
in circulation, travelers 


: £The present system codifies the 
V S takes into the next year's lar- 
is” Mr. Poole said in a telephone 
a srview. He likens his proposal to 
“quality controT practiced by 
^ company. 

haste d present, the Fed takes the 


Gold Options (pin* ■{/<&). 


** I N»»- 


actual fourth-quarter level of the 
money stock as the starting point 
for the following year's target 
ranges. Mr. Poole, however, would 
employ, say. the midpoint of the 
19S4 target range in setting the 
range for 1985. 

Drawing parallel lines from this 
point, supporters main tain would 
not onlyprevem overshoots — or, 
as in 1981, undershoots — from 

leeway in whidfto 
operate during the first few months 
of the year. 


Closing Has 
HI Effects 


(Continued from Page 9) 
said be had never beard of this 
happening before. 

James F. Strother, counsel to Al- 
exander Grant at its headquarter 
in Chicago, said the Miami office 
h ad asked that the finanrr»i state- 
ment be returned after an E.&M. 
creditor had raised questions re- 
garding the securities dealer. 

Mr. Strother said Mr. Gomez 
asked ES.M. about the issues, 
which Mr. Strother would not ex- 
plain, and when there was no an- 
swer he requested that the state- 
ment be withdrawn. He 
that there was no wrongdoing on 
the pari of Alexander Grant 

Mr. Tew said that by late Friday 
be found the situation at ES.M. so 
serious that be called for the firm’s 
immediate closing and asked an- 
other Miami accountant Holtz Sc 
Co., to send five senior accountants 
and several associates to the office 
Saturday. 

“By noon on Friday, we had 
found the fraud.” Mr, Tew said. 



*ncm 


7S0 

300 

310 

330 

330 

30 

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WO® 
*00 550 
ISO- 275 
040- IS) 




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VihnsWUteWdi&A. 

. t Qua *■ Mm Wmt 
' 1211 GcMn t SnifHriaa* 

'{TeL 310251 - Telex 2030S 


(CDR’s) 

The underaumed announces that as bom 
Much 7, 1985 al Kas-Aawciatie 
N.V., Spnietrul 172, Amsterdam, 
dhxpjio. 43 of the CDRTa Xerox 
Corporation, each rrpr. 1 share, 
will be payable with Dus. 2J17 net 
(dhr^per rreo id-dale 12.07.1964; Does 
S -.75 pah.) after deduction of i.5% 
USA-tax - 8 .,1125 = DCs. -,4l per 
CDR. 

Drv.cps. beloaejng to non-residents of 
The Netherlands will be pud after de- 
duction of an additional 15% USA -tax 
(= S -,1125 - DCs. -Al) with DCs. 
1,96 net 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amstetdam, February 26, 1965. 


New Computer Institute Aims to Promote Circuit Design in Malaysia 


By Juris Kazi 

Irutnujuonal Herald Tribune 

KUALA LUMPUR. Malaysia 
— A British-educated Malaysian 
prince, helped by Swedish funds 
and technical assistance, hopes to 
turn Malaysia into a major center 
for the custom design of Luge-scale 
integrated microcircuits. 

Malaysia currently assembles 
and exports about $1.5 billion an- 
nually in semiconductors, mainly 
through subsidiaries of U.S. and 
Japanese electronic companies. 
These send “wafers" etched with 
hundreds of circuits to be pro- 
cessed into finished chips by semi- 
skilled labor in Penang or Kuala 
Lumpur. 

Tuoku Mohd. Azarian Sharif fa- 
deen, 38, director of the newly 
formed Malaysian Institute of Mi- 
croelectronic Systems (MIMOS). 
said that within a year, Malaysian 
designers could be marketing cus- 

ADVERT1SEMENT 


BASS PUBLIC LIMITED COMPANY 

(CDR’s) 

The undereumed mm||||fW ihat »« from 
March 13, 1985 al Kas-Assodalie 
N.V., Spuiotraat 172, Amsterdam, 
dlv.cp.no. 23 of the CDR’s Base 
Pnblk Limited Company, each 
rear. 50 share*, will be payable with 
Dub. 19,71 (re final dividend lor the 
yw ended September 30, 1984) 9.6 p- 
per share. 

Tax credit £ 2,0571 “■ DOs. £L52 per 
CDR. 

Non- rosi denis of the United Kingdom 
can only claim tins tax credit when the 
relevant tax treaty meets this facility. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam. February 27. 1985. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INDUSTRIAL CO.. LTD. 

(CDR*) 

The under signed announces that the 
77th Ordinary General Meeting of 
shareholders was held in Kadoma Gty, 
Osaka Prefecture in Japan on February 
19, 1965. 

A notice of the meeting of Matsushita 
Bectric Industrial Qk. Ltd. will be 
available in Amsterdam at 

Pierson, Heldring & Pierson N.V., 
Algemene Bank Nederland RV_, 
Amsterdam-Rott erdam Bank N.V^ 
Bank Meea & Hope NV, 
Kas-Associatie N.V. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, February 28, 1985. 


tom-designed microcircuits for 
production by mternarioual semi- 
conductor maker s. In the medium 
terra, Mr. Azzman hopes MIMOS 
will spin off small specialized Mar 
laysian microcircuit-design compa- 
nies, breaking U^, European and 
Japanese dominance of the market 
for chip designs.’ 

One of several European compa- 
nies offering technical and finan- 
cial support to MIMOS is Ericsson, 
the Swedish telecommunications 
and electronics group, whose RIF A. 
components subsidiary may be one 
of the first foreign companies to 
benefit from MIMOS. 

Malaysian scientists visited Swe- 
den in late 1984 and obtained com- 
mitments by Ericsson to give tech- 


nical and financial assistance to the 
institute, which was officially 
formed as a public-research insti- 
tute on Jan. l, 

. "Our focus is now to train people 
and create a pool of creative de- 
signers.'' Mr. Azzman said. He said 
the institute would run three 
courses in large-scale integrated 
microcircuits and bad bought more 
than \2 million ringgits ($460,000) 
worth of computer equipment. 

Mr. Amman, who has a doctor- 
ate in computer-assisted design 
from the University of Manchester 
and is professor of computer sci- 
ence at the University of Malaysia, 
said that at least three universities 
in Malaysia could start leaching 
microcircuit design. "With just two 


universities giving courses, we 
could have 100 designers by 1986." 
he said. 

“The assembly and encapsula- 
tion of microcircuits may be worth 
around $1.5 billion annually, but 
the value added is very' little," Mr. 
Azzman added. “They call Penang 
Silicon Island, but to me. it is just 
doing m3 mini work." 

Some observers caution that the 
world market for semiconductors 
has proven volatile, and that multi- 
national producers operating in 
Malaysia could cut back their pres- 
ence due to rising labor costs and 
lower demand. The English-lan- 
guage Business Times in Kuala 
Lumpur recently reported that 
some semiconductor makers were 


shortening shifts at sites in Malay- 
sia. 

Mr. Azzman said the institute 
would be an incentive for interna- 
tional manufacturers to remain in 
Malaysia despite rising costs. 

“If you upgrade the work done 
here, then you justify the higher 
labor costs." he said, noting that 
one major manufacturer is already 
designing process-control equip- 
ment in Penang with Malaysian 
help. Basic assembly is already 
automated in many Malaysian 
semiconductor plants 

Ericsson is a leading supplier of 
telecommunications systems to 
Malaysia, with around 640,000 
lines served by the Swedish compa- 
ny’s digital AXE switching system. 


Ericsson officials in Malaysia said 
they were hoping for "concrete 
forms of cooperation" with MI- 
MQS. The Malaysian agency could 
train designers to work on signal- 
processing chips, a RIFA specialty. 

The idea for the institute, Mr. 
Azzman said, was discussed by Ma- 
laysian engineers and scientists in 
the early 1980s hut his connections 
with government officials played a 
key role in setting it up. 

Other foreign companies that 
have funded MIMOS include Mar- 
coni-hatiana of Italy and a consor-' 
tium of Britain’s General Electric 
Co. and Marconi. Ericsson, Mr. 
Azzman said, provided know-how 
and assistance in computer-assist- 
ed microcircuit design. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


AID CONTRACT ASSHNMENF - ABROAD 

Portugal institutional Advisor 

AID seeks an incEvidud experienced in finance management and implemen- 
tation of low-cost housing programs for a minimum two-year assignment in 
Portugal. Will be a key advisor to public sector agency. Must Wave 
substantial appropriate experience in developing countries, sane combina- 
tion of trailing in urban planning and architecture, and fincmcaJ manage- 
ment, and be fluent in Portuguese. Salary commensurate with e x perience. 
Benefit package similar to ooeneat VS. Government employees. 
Forward detailed resume and salary history and earliest date maJablo tor 

Dean Swerdfin, PRE/H, Room 625 SA-12, 

Agency for International Development, Washington D.G 20523. 

AJJ). Is an equal opportunity employer. 


MOLYCORP INC. i— — — 

A subsidiary of UNION OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 
seeks a 

TECHNICAL SALES REPRESENTATIVE 

For its Molybdenum products in Europe working out of Paris, France. 
The desired candidate will have an engineering degree in metallurgy 
or chemistry and will have several years sales experience in the 
European Iron and Steel Industry. 

Inngnagft requirements are English and si least one other European 
la ng uage. 

Please send, your Curriculum Vitae Uk 

MOLYCORP SJLR.L 
1 5 r Boulevard do Labour Maubourg, 

75007 PARIS - FRANCE 


IYFERNTATIOMAL POSITIONS 


1 


MARKETING DIRECTOR 

MIDDLE EAST 

Leading U5. Aerospace Company specialising in aircraft 
navigation systems requires an individual with proven history of 

sales to Middle East commercial and military 
customers. 

The position Is London based, and offers an attractive 
compensation package. 

Hmm send resume in confidence to Box N° 34809. 

The International Herald Tribune. 

63, Long Acre, London, WC2E 9JH, England. 


Audit Manager 


O ur client, a major American corporation with wide-spread international 
operations, seeks an energetic, highly motivated chartered accountant to 
manage their well-respected internal audit function. Challenging 
assignments, upward career mobility, international travel and competitive 
compensation make this an outstanding opportunity for a chartered accountant, 
aged around 30. with at least (bur years’ post-qualifying experience in a supervisory 
audit role with a top professional practice. 

Rerouting to the Corporate Director of Auditing in New York, the Audit Manager 
wifl be responsible for financial and operational audits throughout a range of 
European companies and subsidiaries with diversified operations. Due to the 
geographical area involved the person selected must be prepared to spend a 
significant amount of time visiting their extensive operations. 

Fluency in French , excellent communication, interpersonal and management skills 
and self confidence are also required for success. These qualities will enable you to 


ITiT rut;Ty *(• ii 


SV'jl ri n 4 |T J fi; I r -J I 


executives on their European management team. Based on prior experience, a 
Financial ControHership position may be anticipated within a reasonable period 
of time- 

This position, based in the South East of England, offers a competitive 
remuneration and benefits package, including a company car While commensurate 
with experience, the salaiy is geared to attract the right candidate. Relocation 
assistance with also be given as appropriate. 

Candidates^ should apply in confidence enclosing a full C.V. and details of current 


Hunt, Executive Selection Division, 
Price Waterhouse, Southwark Ibwers, 

32 London Bridge Street, London SEl 9SY. 





rtNtflili'’ 


•»’ ; ' 

■* i 


MtiA 
* • 


■/A Yl! 




King Saud University 
(Formerly University of Riyadh) 
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 



King Saud University has openings on contract basis for faculty members (Professors, Associate Professors, Assistant Professors) who hold Ph. D. and/or academic titles 
from accredited universities, and also for English language instructors who have at least a bachelor’s degree in English as of commencement of the academic year 1985 -- 1986 which 
starts on July 27, 1 985. 

The language of instruction is Arabic throughout the University except irt the colleges of engineering, science, medicine (in Riyadh and Abha), pharmacy, dentistry, allied 
medical sciences, computer and information sciences, planning and urban designs and the M. S. program in hospital administration in the college of administrative sciences where the 
language of instruction is English. 

Interested candidates are kindly requested to send non-returnable copies of their academic diplomas and specialized experience certificates together with their resumes 
(including lists of their publications and references) and written applications indicating the position applied for and the subjects the applicant is qualified to teach, to the Dean of the 
college concerned c/o the P. O. Box number indicated against the designated college. His/Her address should also be indicated so that he/she could be contacted if selected for 
Interview. 


Following is a list of the KSU Colleges and departments : 


COLLEGE 


Science 


P. O. BOX 
2456, Riyadh 


2455, Riyadh 


DEPARTMENTS 


Administrative Sciences 2459, Riyadh 


m * 


Pharmacy 


Agriculture 


Engineering 


Medicine 


Education 


2457, Riyadh 
2460, Riyadh 


800, Riyadh 


2925, Riyadh 


2458, Riyadh 


Arabic — English — Geography — Mass Communica- 
tions - Social Studies - History- Archaeology & 
Museology. 

Chemistry - Biochemistry — Physics - Astronomy - 
Botany — Zoology — Geology— Mathematics — 
Statistics — Computer Science. 

Law — Business Administration — Public Administra- 
tion — Economics — Accounting — Quantitative 
Methods — Political Science — Hospital Adminis- 
tration. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry — Pharmacology — Phar- 
maceutics - Pharmacognosy - Clinical Pharmacy. 

Animal Production — Soil Sciences — Plant Protec- 
tion — Food Sciences — Agricultural Engineering — 
Plant Production — Agricultural Economics and Rural 
Sociology — Nutrition and Home Economics 
(Females Only). 

Architecture — Civil Engineering - Mechanical 
Engineering - Electrical Engineering - Chemical 
Engineering — Petroleum Engineering - Computer 
Engineering - Nuclear Engineering — Industrial 
Engineering. 

Anatomy - Physiology - Pharmacology - Patho- 
logy — Parasitology - Gynaecology and Obstetrics - 
E. N. T. — Forensic Medicine — Community Medicine 
- Ophthalmology and Eye Surgery - Surgery - 
Medicine -Pediatrics. 

Education - Psychology - Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion — Islamic Studies - Art Education - Physical 
Education — Instructional Media and Educational 
Technology — Special Education (for die handi- 
capped). , 


COLLEGE 

Dentistry 


Allied Medical Sciences 10219, Riyadh 


Computer St Information 
Sciences 


Planning & Urban Designs 800, Riyadh 


Education at Abha 


Medicine & Medical 
Sciences at Abha 


Agriculture & Veterinary 
Medicine in Qasseem 


Business and Economics in 
Qasseem 




Noteworthy Benefits : 


P.O. BOX DEPARTMENTS 

5967, Riyadh Operative Dentistry — Oral Diagnosis/Medicine — 

Oral Surgery — Oral Pathology — Oral Radiology — 
Oral Biology — Removable Prosthodontist — Fixed 
Prosthodontics — Endodontics — Periodontics — 
Pedodontics — Orthodontics — Community Dentistry 

- Dental Public Health. 

10219, Riyadh Clinical Laboratory Sciences — Radiological Sciences 

- Rehabilitation Sciences - Community Health 
Sciences — Biomedical Technology — Dental Health 

- Nursing - Surgical Technology - Medical Assis- 
ting — Anesthesiology — Emergency Medical 
Technology. 

2454, Riyadh Computer Engineering - Computer Science - Com- 
puter Technology — Information Science. 

800, Riyadh Architecture and Building Sciences — Planning — 
Regional Design - Interior Design. 

157, Abha . Education - Curriculum and Instruction - Psycho- 
logy — Instructional Media and Educational Techno- 
logy — Art Education - Physical Education - Bio- 
logy - Chemistry - Physics - Mathematics - 
Geography — History — English. 

641, Abha Anatomy - Physiology - Family and Community 
Medicine - Biochemistry - Pathology - Micro- 
biology and Parasitology- Pharmacy - Medicine - 
Pediatrics - Surgery — Medical Education. 

1482, Buraidah Animal Production and Breeding - Crops and Range 
Management - Crop Protection - Veterinary Medi- 
cine - Horticulture and Forestry - Water and Soil — 
Agricultural Engineering - Agricultural Extension 
and Economics. 

505, Onaizah Accounting — General Economics — Applied Econo- 
mics — Economic Analysis — Quantitative Methods — 
Finance — Public Administration - Business Adminis- 
tration — Marketing Management — Behavioral 
Psychology — Sociology - Operations Research. 


Free return air tickets annually for faculty member and family. 
Furnished accommodation or housing and furnishing allowances. 
Monthly transport allowance. 

Relocation allowance. 


End-of-service gratuity. 

Free medical and dental care covering family. 

Contribution by University to tuition fees of non-Arabic-speaking Children. 














Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


Z Brief breath 
5 Palm off 

10 Shortcoming 

14 Second of a 
Latin trio 

15 Forster’s “A 
Passage to 

16 Inauguration 
ritual 

17 Reek 

18 Saltations 

19 Tom Joad, e.g. 

20 Decoration 

22 Two-point 

football score 

24 Old salt 

25 Cherubini 
product 

27 Sculls 

29 Panicky 

33 Non com rank 

36 Indigent 

38 Thick woolen 
fabric 

39 Magician's 
sion 

41 

jealous 

kali 
things": 
Apocrypha 

43 "As you " 

44 Semirural 
region 

46 T. Firefly, 

Groucborale 

48 Atrabilious 

49 Make 
reparation 

G New York 


53 Madrid 
museum 

55 Tex. river 

59 Milquetoast 

62 Decoration 

64 Wheel 
connection 

65 Bottom-line 
figure 

67 Both:*Comb. 
form 

68 Dread 

69 ‘‘You 

Fair,” 1937 
song 

70 Footnote abbr.- 

71 Up-tight 

72 Take up again 

73 D.C. nine once 
in the A.L. 

DOWN 



BOOKS 


/ i 


1 Spars 

2 Stubborn 

as 

3 Pacific island 
group 

4 False 

, 5 Decoration 

6 Numerical 
openers 

7 The Gem State 

8 Drink a little 

9 Mortarboard 
decoration 

10 Decoration 

11 Geneva or 
Constance 

12 Keep 

(persevere) 

Times, edited by Eugene Malabo. 


40 Decoration 
42 Decoration 
45 Negri 

contemporary 
47 Put in order 
50 Dental 
calculus 
52 Arthur's 

nephew 
54 Time after 
time 

56 City in S 
Malawi 

57 Glenn's path in 
1962 

58 Hit the 

(fail) 

50 Bistro 

60 Fired 

61 Cinder 
63 Make an 

incised mark 
66 Pay dirt 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


WIZARD of ID 



REDESIGNING THE WORLD: 
William Morris, the 1880s, 
and the Axis and Crafts 

By Peter Stansky. 293 pages. S 22.50 : 
Princeton University Press, 

Princeton, N. J. 08540. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakueani 

P kOET, designer, businessman and tireless 
pamphleteer, William Moms was one of the 

^tiie > a^xit^lct(^p& He pubUshod vol- 
umes oF poetry and fiction and translation. He 
gpar>r<»H the restoration movement in architec- 
ture through his founding of the Society far the 
Protection of Ancient Buddings, and through 
the Kelcoscott Press he helped revive the an of 
fine printing. As an ardent socialist and utopi- 
an, be was a prophet of social change, and as 
head of the famous design firm Morris & Co, 
he effectively altered the way we decorate our 
homes and think about our lives. 

Though Marxists have tried to ignore Mor- 
ris's fame as a designer of wallpaper and 
chintz, though hardline aesthetes have tried to 
dismiss his socialism 8 S the dflhhlmg a of a 
political naif, recent biographers have argued 
that bis wildly disparate interests actually re- 
flected a an g le , unified vision — a vision of a 
better society that would be more democratic, 
more beautiful and more pleasant to live in 
than the shoddy, dass-rioaen world of late 
Victorian England. As Morris saw it, true art 
could not flourish without a total overhaul of 
society, and by defying the established order, 
artists might actually help bring about that 
revolution. Looking back, writes Peter Stansky 
in this book, William Morris will be remem- 
bered best as "an innovator, an influence, a 
precursor of the age of the Modem in art and 
politics." 

As he demonstrated in a two-volume biogra- 
phy of George Orwell — written in collabora- 
tion with w niiam Abrahams — Stansky ha* a 
talent for taking a representative figure and 

ncing that life to illuminate larger wirial mid 

political igoies in "Redesigning the World." 
be uses this gift to examine the legacy of 
•William Mams. In the book’s preface, he 
points out that he has not aspired to write a 
traditional biography, but rather a monograph 
focused on the social and aesthetic changes 
wrought by Morris and groups like the Century 
Guild, the An Workers' Guild, and the Arts 

Solution to Previo u s Puzzle 
TlTgTaI 


GDSD □!!□□□ □□□□ 
□EHQ □□□□□ □□□□ 
□ESBHHnaQG □□□□ 

dbeeeb OBaaana 

□H33 QS0E3 
BEonaEiaanaa □□ 

□ 

□HJBHB □□□ Sanaa 

□DOB □taCKD □□□no 

□□□ □□□□DQBQQQQ 

□□□H □□□□ 

□no □□aasa 


and Crafts Exhibition Society, which devel- 

op S^ 1 ^ 1 S£w-s foois is so nar- 
the World” occasionally 
feds padded — oveisnifFed. with repetii^ 
and Semeats of theme, mid wanmiirm- 
dered with minute details about umbrellas lo» 
at munemorabte guild meetings. Sudt manenL 

however, amount to little was Han mnocuous 
distractions. Afl and all, Stansky s mihn^sm 
for Ms subject, combined with his fomib^ty 
with the intdiectual background of Victonan ^ 
Fnpianrf, make for a narrative that is as lively , 
andunpedantic as it is persuaave. . 

In stansky*s view, the artistic and poutical 
reforms envisioned by Morris and his col- 
leagues reflected the democratic impulse that 
hadbegmi to surface in England during the 
]880s — the expansion of the political fran- 
chise, resulting from the recent Reform Acte, 
and tbs growing pressure from lab or an d the 
intelligentsia for more equitable wonting con- 
ditions. Stansky, in fact, goes solar as to argue 
that the Arts Mid Crafts movement can be 
“viewed as the cultural parallel, if not the 
actual organ, of the socialist movement of the 

Certainly the Arts and Crafts movement's 
aim* — and to some degree, its accomplish- 
ments — were flavored by the new mood of 
egalitarianism abroad in the land. It assaulted 
die el ass system in British culture, by chipping 
away at the hierarchical terriers that hadtradt- 
tkmflUy separated the "higher * 1 arts of painting 
and sculpture from the ‘lesser” ones of archi- 
tecture and the crafts. 

By invoking the example of medieval crafts*^, 
manghip as an alternative to the mac hin e- 
based model of Victorian England, it refocused 
attention on the dynamics between tire worker 

3o d hi s work, calling for a "relation to art” that 

"was personal and not mechanical.” And in 
championing the values of practicality and 
simplicity, it helped English de si g n achieve a 
more vernacular, ahistorical style — a style 
that signaled the rise of a new public (less 
in dineato ostentatious displays of status) and 
hence opened the way for the future innova- 
tions of the modernists. 

Many of the ideas in "Redesigning the 
World” are hardly new. In “Romantic to Revo- 
lutionary,” first published in 1955, the histori- 
an E. P. Thompson showed how thoroughly 
Morris’s socialism permeated every aspect of 
his life. And as early as 1936, Nikolaus Pevs- 
ner, the author of "Pioneers of Modern De- 
sign,” was heralding Morris as die founder of 
the Modem movement, as the forerunner of 
Gropius and the Banhaus schooL 

What distinguishes "Redesigning the 
World” is that Stansky builds upon this earlier 






R A F THHli Is iPfAlNl I lOlLlAl 


DEZjDB □□□HD 

□□□□ 

bodb taaaaa 

□aaa 


3/7/as 


scholarship. . In doing so, he shows oat only , 
how Morris’s social ideals evolved, but also V 
how those ideals were assimilated by Ms fol- 
lowers. Many of those followers in the Arts and 
Crafts movement, argues Stansky, probably 
did not share his desire to transfxom society, 
and yet by pairing his ideas accessible to a 
mace general public — in mnch the same way 
thatMorris many of Rutirin's ideas prac- 

tical — they "helped drape how we see the 
worid today.” 

Michiko Kaktaani is at the staff of The New 
York Times. 


BRIDGE 


‘The first thing rau 6 oita lwm about cars is 
tw THERE'S MOWING 'YOU can monkey with that 

WONT eET'ttXHNno TROUBtE." 

I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
|$ by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 

Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four oaSnary words. 


GARFIELD 


NACAL i 


TX! 

□ 

U 


ABDEK 


ZD 

_U 


TASSID 


znz 




( LETS BE HONEST WITH \ 
-r^-^ONE ANOTHER, LIZ J 

/ im A /WAN, \ 
VOO'RE A WOMAN. 1 
r^^\GETTHE PiCTOREp 

/that^thE poor. ) 

jr^>-x^GETTH£ PICTURE?^ 


? VOO'LL havetd; 
v Wy v SPRAwrrFDR) 

\ J) 


<D 1985 UniM 5<ni5C4M.lnc 


' By Alan Tiuscotc 


T HERE are a few rare cases 
in which a deceptive play 
succeeds only if the opponent, 
is an expert. 

An outstanding example is 
the diagram deaL West con- 
tributed a weak j ump overcafl 
and then foond himself on lead 
against sx spades. 

He felt sure that tin club 
king was on his left, so with 
rare aplomb he put the dub 
queen on the table. His hope, 
no doubt, was that East held 
the jack and South would play 
low from dummy. 

U might seem that this brave . 
shot offered no hope of beat- 
ing a slam that was "impregna- 
ble” against the actual distri- 
bution. And indeed it- would 
have failed against 99 declarers 


out of 100: They would have 
called for the king from dum- 
my and hoped to avoid a dub 
ruff. 

Luckily for West. South was 

ideas of his own. He^^cer- 
tain that West had led a angle- 
ton queen. It did not occur to 
him that be mi ght - have A-Q. 
Who would make that lead? 

Sooth now toed to find 
some ray of light on the as- 
•tion that the lead waa a 
and. found an imagi- 
native answer. If he played 
km. East would opt know that 
it was right to play the ace: He 
would Oink that the' lead was 
fromQ-J. Latex, perhaps, after 
trumps were drawn. East 
would dock when a dub was 
led from dummy. And die last 
dub in the closed hand would 


be discarded on dummy’s dia- 
monds. 

With his plot laid. Sooth 
played low from the dummy. 
West pramptiyr»sbcdhis dim 
ace, and the table erupted in 
post-mortem. 

NORTH 

+ U 

AS 3 
4 AX1 

. ♦ K 8 B 7 4 3 

WEST EAST 

♦ M 49733 

*752 *71994 

4 QJ 1084 Z *973 

* A Q - *182 

SOUTH (D) 

' * A KQ J 8 5 

. on • 

♦ J 6 B 

North and Sooth warn vntonhto. 
Tha bidding: 


A 


Sacdh . 

wm 

North 

1 * 

39 

' 4« 

4 N.T. 

PUB 

59 

f* 

Paso 

PUo 


Wwt lad the chft qnem. 


WHAT THEY CALL 
SOME OF THOSE 
| MEN WHO RUN THE 
©AMINS TABLES. 


Now arrange irie circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 




bn i H 

— T X riTf X X XU 

(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: GULLY AIDED MOSOUE OUTING 
Answer How the old curmudgeon stalked out of that 
restaurant— IN A DUDGEON 

WEATHER 


Yesterday’s 


EUROPE HIGH 

C P 

Algarve T7 *3 

Amsterdam 4 3* 


LOW 
C F 


A Unas 


Berlin 
Brussels 

Bucharest 


Copenhagen 

Costa Dei Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frank turf 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Pee mas 

Lisbon 


18 64 5 41 

13 SS 3 37 

TS 59 1 34 

4 39 3 37 

4 39 1 34 

2 36 -1 30 

B 46 1 34 

3 37 0 32 

18 64 5 41 

10 50 6 43 

11 52 2 36 

14 57 5 41 

6 43 6 43 


6 43 -1 X 

4 25 -6 21 sw 

1 34 fr 

Cl 


10 £0 


X 68 15 59 
15 59 7 45 


Madrid 

Milan 


52 
11 S3 


ManicJi 

Nice 

Oslo 

Pm* 


Revfclavlk 

Rome 

SIDCWioUn 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


2 28 

.. __ 2 28 

10 50 7 45 r 

■ 8 IB -16 3 fr 
4 39 0 32 a 

12 54 8 46 r 

1 34 -I X a 

10 SO 4 39 fr 

2 36 1 34 o 

j 39 3 37 sw 

15 59 8 46 o 

I 34 - 2 28 a 

8 46 5 41 o 

11 52 8 46 0 

4 39 2 36 O 

1 34 1 34 O 


II 


7 45 2 36 

MIDDLE EAST 



1 

34 -19 

-2 

fr 


18 

64 ID 

so 



12 

54 7 




12 

54 4 


tr 

TH Aviv 

OCEANIA 

X 

68 10 




24 

75 IS 

59 

lr 


22 

72 16 

61 

O 

cf<iaudv.- fo-fortv: fr-teJr 


sh-snowera; sunow; st-siarniY. 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 




F 

C 

F 



31 

88 

23 

73 

cl 

Betllna 

-1 

X 

-10 

14 

tr 

Hen 9 Keno 

IB 

M 

14 

57 

□ 

ManUa 

X 

91 

34 

7S 

lr 

New Delhi 

X 

91 

15 

SO 

fr 


2 

36 

-5 

23 

a 

Sbanubal 

10 

50 

2 

34 

r 

Slowaaore 

X 

82 

24 

75 

o 

Talprf 

21 

70 

M 

57 

o 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

“ 

46 

4 

39 

0 

a* fen 

11 

52 

1 

45 

r 


20 

68 

ia 

SO 

lr 

Cape Town 

21 

78 

6 

43 

fr 

Casablanca 

16 

61 

5 

41 

tr 

Harare 

V 

81 

12 

54 

cl 

Logos 

31 

88 

26 

79 

Cl 

Nairobi 

27 

81 

14 

57 

d 

Tunis 

16 

61 

13 

55 

a 

LATIN AMERICA 



Bneaos Aires 

X 

91 

23 

73 

d 

Lima 

28 

82 

21 

7D 

fr 


Z1 

HI 

7 

45 

cl 

Rio de Janeiro 

29 

84 

23 

72 

cl 

Sag Paula 

“ 

— 

— 

— 

na 

NORTH AMERICA 



Anchorage 

1 

34 

-3 

27 

sw 

Altortu 

17 

63 

4 

3» 

tr 

Boston 

0 

32 

-4 

25 

tr 


3 

37 

-9 

16 


Denver 

17 

63 

-5 

23 

tr 

Detroit 

1 

34 

-9 

16 

fr 

Hongluru 

» 

79 

X 

63 

cl 

Houston 

19 

M 

V 


a 

LOs Angeles 

16 

61 



r 


27 

81 

20 

68 

oc 

Mhaieapaib 

1 

34 

-10 

14 

d 



75 

-10 

14 

w 


27 

81 

i; 

63 

lr 

New York 

11 

51 

4 

39 

r 

San Francisco 

12 

54 

6 

43 

r 


9 

41 

2 

36 

r 

Taranto 


X 

-7 

19 

DC 

Wo*hir.53oa 

7 

45 

- 4 

25 

fr 

o-overcasi; oc-ccrtw cloudy; 

r-rain. 


THURSDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Very chappy. FRANKFURT: Fair. 
TiSA 9-0IW-32LI LONDON: Claudv. Temp. 9-9 t4»-32). MADRID! 
2EL* Temp. tl — .3 (54 — 271. NEW YORK: Fair. Temp. 5 — 1 Ul— 30). 
PARIS-Folr' Temo. 12 — 1 (54 — 341. ROME: ROlnv. Temp. 15—10 (59 — XI. 
raL f4™temp. 21-10 (70- Ml. ZURICH: Ctoudv. Temp. 8-1 
BANGKOK: FopaV. Temp. 33 — 24 191 —751. HONG KONG: Cloudy. 
,7 - UlfiJ - 59 J . MAN I LA Fair. Temp. 32-23 [70-731 SEOUL: 
cloudy. Tomp?2— - 5 (M-SL SINGAPORE: Stormy. Tcmp.39 - 24 IB4-751. 
TOKYO: Cloudy Temp 8— 5146— -ill. 


W)Hd Stock Markus 

Via Agence France- Presse March 6 

dosing prices in local currencies unless mhencue indicated. 


Amcnfrm 


Close 

Pr»v. 

ABN 

398 

396J0 

ACF Holding 

198 

198 i< 

Aegon 

H; 

IK 

AKZO 

HTW 

llOJt 



231 SI 

AMEV 

21+50 

31321 

A Dom Rubber 

7.70 

7 Ji 



75. U 

BVG 

227-50 

225JC 

Buetirmann T 

91-SO 

9C 

Coland Hide 

36-50 

sSlTh 

Elsevlsr-NDU 

115 

1128C 

Fokfcer 

10020 

100.9C 


188 

187 


159.40 

15728 

Hoogavens 

e3 

6L5G 



61 

Hoarder 

48-50 

49 JE 

Nal Nedder 

776-50 

269 

Nedlloyd 

17620 






68 

67 JO 





77 JO 

7730 

Rodamco 

139 JO 

139 JO 

Rollnco 

7080 

70 JO 

Toronto 

44 JO 

4+20 

Royal Dutch 

20580 

20+50 


348 

345 


X 

27-90 

/MF Stark 

143 JO 

145 

VNU 

204 

20230 


Previous : 20439 


Brussels 



TT 

E3 





►•r 

rr 








IE 

' * * » 



12 


JTr 

. . . 






- 



IE 




















B K t ■ 


viol lie Mon tog no 



Current Stock lades 
Praeiaas : Z3B » M 

: L30523 

l IVerfrfHtl 

__j 


AEG-Teletunken 
Allianz Vers 
Bast 
Saver 

Borer. Hvoc. 
Buyer. Vcr. Bank 
BMW 

Commorzbonfc 

Cantlavmml 

Daimler -Be ik 
D nuua 

Deutsche Babc o cfc 
DeuTsctw Bank 
Dresdnar Bank 
□UB-5cfxrffrr 

GHH 

HacMIef 

Hoertot 

Haescb 

HuLtn i o nn 

Kortai 


11311180 
1013 W20 
-W50 20980 
31650 314 

313 313 

33980 333 

387 386 

T 64.10 163 
13280 1X50 
097 67350 
50 358 

.70 14850 
419 41850 
19030 19150 
218 718 

15650 15050 
46950 461 

310 209 40 

10850 10850 
400 406 

17250 in 


1 CIOS* Pree 

Kali + Soli 

265 

265 

Korstadl 

21550 21850 

Kaulhaf 

716-50 


KHD 

771 

268 

i Kloeckner Werkn 

7851 

7840 

Kama StaW 

85 

8350 

Unde 

4255(1 


Luftnansa 

195 1*550 

MAN 

162 


Mannesmann 

ISE.70 158A0 

MetoligeMiischaf 

243 

744 

Muencti.Ruedc 

>200 

1215 

Preu&sog 

3t0 

260 

Rue Isers- Work* 

34D 

339 




Severing 

473 

472 

Siemens 

54820 54850 

Tttyssen 

102 10250 

Varto 

136 

196 

voba 


VEW 

12150 12250 

Velkswaaenwerk 

20050 

>90 

Commerzbank Index : LMlJU) 

| Previous ; 1,19510 



11 . B«K« 1 

Bk East Asia 

25 

25.70 



1150 

OilnaLtotit 







4650 

4455 


750 

7^0 

HK Hotels 

32 

31 




HK Shanghai 

870 

850 

HKTetoatiane 

7050 

6550 

HK Wtojrl 

5a5 

560 

Hutcti Wtomooa 


aun 




jaralnnSec 

9.70 

9.70 

New World 

530 

580 

Shaw aroihers 

3.125 

110 

SHK Props 

9 

9 

Sima Darby 

640 

6*5 

Slelux 



Swire Pacific A 

2180 

21.90 

Wheel Mar 

1.10 


When look 



wlmcr 



World Inti 

150 

1» 

Hang Sena index : 

1.787-8 


Previous : 1J67J4 



If **am«tar2 | 

AECI 



Anglo American 



Angki Am Geld 



Barlows 



Blvvoor 



Buttels 



De Beers 



□riefsntetn 




1356 





Harmony 


2616 

Hive hi Sleet 






Ned bank 



Pst 5lovr. 



Rustolai 



SA Brows 



St Helens 

3 ICO 





West Holding 

5350 

5900 

1 Composite Stock loam ■ sna se 

Previous : 93928 



11 1 1 



Allled-Lvans 



Anuta Am Gold 

*77 

577 


Babcock 
Barclays 
Bass 
BAT. 

Beecham 
8ICC 
BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Grouo 
Baals 

Bo«rator Indus 
BP 

Bril Home 51 
Bril Telecom 
Bril Aerosaoct 
BTR 
Burma h 
Cable Wireless 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Cons 
Coats Polons 
Commeroal u 
Cons Cold 
Court nulds 
Datoerr 
De Beers « 

Distillers 
Drletonlein 
Flsons 
Free Si Ged 
GEC 
GKN 
Glaxo I 
Grand Mel 
Guinness 
GU5 
Hanson 
Hawker 
iCI 
Imos 
Jaguar 
Uords Bcnk 
Lonrho 
Lucas 

Marts and Sp 
M idland Bonk 
Nat West Bank 
P and O 
Plikinelon 
Plessey 

Rocol Elect 
Bandtonleln 
Rank 
Reed inn 

Reuters 

Poval Dutch I 99<32 
RTZ 
Saalcm 
Tanuur* 

Shell 
STC 

s:o Chartered 
Tate and Lvle 
Testa 
Thorn EMI 
T.l. group 
Trafalgar hsc 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever t 
Uniied Biscuits 

Vickers JS5 255 

W-Dceo S34L, S34L, 

W .Holdings S26'« S24'-, 

War Loon 3*s 1 3J-‘s W, 

y.oalworth 580 574 

f.t. a lode* : 990.40 
Previous : *828 


CIOs* Pr*» 
145 142 

582 994 

509 507 

371 168 

366 351 

234 233 

45 42 

S21 510 

297 291 

171 168 

261 2M 

540 541 

247 247 

128 I23VS 

383 174 

664 644 

Xt 319 

sis SIS 

16B 168 

203 203 

16J 156 

177 177 

487 437 

157 10 

501 501 

438 443 

JB8 286 

523W 
296 J98 

820*1. 
198 leg 

316 213 

11 27/32 1 129.32 

280 778 

247 7 LI 

717 709 

213 213 

443 439 

« 849 

IBS IBS 

3S7 347 

537 544 

163 164 

267 266 

IX 137 

347 359 

642 652 

3oS 348 

303 398 

178 179 

216 210 

MJ**i 583'a 

353 349 

56 2 546 

365 150 

634 614 

90S 693 

296 2«6 

791 778 

an ita 

487 489 

«5 465 

228 227 

454 447 

Si rio 

3P 356 

160 IS 

208 2QJ 

12 35764 13*- 

194 195 


1 Oase Pm. 

Finslder 

54 

52 

Generali 

39510 39140 

IFI 

7673 

7575 

1 fa too men II 

81910 82000 

Italmoblllari 

73200 

NA 


BS010 114.99 

Monlealsan 

1481 

1478 

Olivetti 

6730 

6699 

Pirelli 

2189 

2190 

HAS 

66500 67400 


675 6S55S 


2067 

2031 


2830 

3814 

Standa 

11400 11750 

Slet 

2535 


MIB Index ; 1.194 



previous : 1.179 



11 1 

AlrLlauide 

635 

634 

Alsthom All. 

2*3 

349 

Av Dassault 

1130 

1090 

Bancatre 

576 

574 

BIC 

561 

564 


648 

648 

BSN-GO 

3408 

3400 

Car re four 

1950 

1920 

Oub Med 

1205 

1181 


Si TrocHna 
UOB 


OU8 Index : 43U4 
Previeos : 42847 


Storkbelm 


Coflmep 

Du mar 

Eir Aaullotoe 
Europe I 
Gen Eou* 
HocheftB 
I metal 
Lafarge Cap 


367 266 

60S 616 

238JW 24050 

101 Q mis 

557 557 

1770 1785 

86 B4J0 
422 41980 


*Wan 


Banco Comm 18200 18850 

Cert rale 3200 3200 

Cioahatefc 8045 8200 

Credital 21 M 2100 

Farmilalia 13149 11850 

Flal 2839 2799 



X78 

3071 

roreai 

2375 

2374 

Mafrts 

1606 


Michel In 

915 

857 

MM Pemar 

86.10 

89 

Moet HennB3Sv 

1985 

I960 



113 

Nord-Est 

7860 

7V80 

Ocel den tale 

769 

762 

Pernod Rlc. 

725 

726 

Pelroles rise) 

274.90 

273 


278 

777 

Pock) In 

5060 

SO 

Prtnlemps 

20050 

200 

Rocflotedw 

369 

266 

Redoule 

1260 

1270 

Roussel Udal 

1640 

1640 

Skis Rassignol 

19*0 

1970 

Sour.Pcrrler 

539 

533 

Telemecon 

£190 

2380 

Thomson CSF 


501 

Valeo 

237.80 

214 

AgeR Index : 30844 


Prevtoas : 20HJ9 



CAC Index : 303 M 



praeiaas : 30460 



1 Singapore 1 

Bousteod 

1J9 


Cold Storage 

2J0 


DBS 

030 

NA. 

FroserNeave 



Haw Par 

845 



ySpeTstilP 

Mai Banking 

OCBC 

oub 

Samb Shloyard 
Sima Darby 
5 Steamship 


777 

IAS 

6J0 

9M 

L66 

1J6 

2.08 

123 


1 76 
1.83 
4.15 
945 

4 

IJ9 

2 DS 

IJS 


AGA 

385 

375 

Alfa Laval 

19T 

191 

Asao 

340 

345 

Astra 

350 

360 

Atlas Copco 

109 

108 

Bollden 

190 

186 

Electrolux 

315 

312 

Erlcsaon 

299 

299 

Eswlle 

390 

NA 

Handel sbonken 

167 

167 

Pharmacia 

216 

215 

Soab-Scanla 

NA 

440 

Sondvlk 

400 

NA 

Skansko 

NA 

945 

SKF 

206 

710 

SuradlshMatoh 

227 

232 

Votva 

265 

286 


A W oer ivo ei l i ltn index : J97JB 
Previous : 398J0 


Sytfagy 


ACI 
AN I 
ANZ 
BHP 
Boral 

Bauoalnvllle 

Brambles 

cotes 

Coma lea 

CRA 

CSR 

Dun toe 

Eldars Ixl 

Hooker 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Oak bridge 

Pefco 

Posekfon 

RGC 

Santos 

Stakoh 

Souttirand 

Woods! de 

Warm old 

All Ordinaries index 
Previous :797.*e 
Source : Revlon. 


193 
255 
450 
566 
IX 

194 
155 
382 
745 
562 
XI 
230 
318 
MB 
230 
264 
177 
73 


329 

197 

370 

384 

260 

580 

282 

232 

315 

700 

ZB 


178 

72 
400 
300 
420 
548 
173 
22 

TV 81 
318 317 

: 797 JO 


300 

415 

544 

176 

23 


Tokyo 


Akal 

552 

511 

Asohl Chem 

823 

837 

Asahl G4ass 

890 

898 

Bank o4 Tokyo 

793 

740 

Brloaeslone 

519 

517 

Conan 

1490 

1470 

Cltoh 

340 

336 

Dai Nippon Print 

1070 

1040 

oohm House 

550 

545 

Full Bonk 

1630 

1630 

Full Photo 

1910 

1930 

Fullisu 

7340 

1360 

Hitachi 

874 

870 

Honda 

ISM 

1510 

japan Air Lines 

SI SO 

S17B 


1 One 

Pray. 

Kallma 

278 

274 

Kansal Power 

7370 

1360 

Kawasaki Steel 

146 

146. 

Kirin Brewery 

583 

585 

Komatsu ltd 

450 

450 

Kubota 

330 

319 

Matsu Elec lads 

1680 

1680 

Matsu Elec Works 

TBS 

715 

Mitsubishi Bank 

16X 

1570 

Mitsubishi Chora 

437 

425 

Mitsubishi Elec 

388 

388 

Mitsubishi Heavy 

XI 

248 

Mitsubishi Coro 

525 


Mitsui and co 

326 

327 

Ml toukashl 

443 

<8 


1190 

1190 

NEC 

1180 

1198 

NGK Insulators 

7030 

■020 




Nippon Sled 

IX 

149 

Nippon Yusrni 

244 

Ml 

Nissan 

612 

689 

Nani lira Sac 

1180 

1190 

Olympus 

1350 

USD 

Pioneer 

W- ,'j 1 

3000 

Ricoh 

■ 7-1 

919 

Sharp 

II " * H 

1078 


B • | 

4880 

Sumitomo Bank 

1820 

1810 

Somltoma Chora 

209 

X2 

Sumitomo Metal 

148 

145 


203 

280 


407 


Takedo Chem 

871 

NA 

Tdk 

r'-n 

6390 

Tellln 

Irrl 

432 


r i 


Tokyo Marine 

825 

827 

Toray Ind 



Toshiba 

418 



1348 

1350 

Yamal chi Sec 

710 

715 

tOkB-DJ. index : 

124VM7 i 

Previous : 7X47438 
New index : 990LS9 
PravUms : 984L2S 



II Zarteh 11 

A0a 


2820 

Bank Leu 

3715 

3715 

Brawn Baverl 

1775 

1740 

Clba Golov 

31 2D 

3DS0 




Elect rowan 

2710 

2695 


773 



1B2D 

1830 


6350 

6325 

Jelmoll 

1900 


Landis Gyr 


1700 


6400 


Oertlkon-B 

1500 

1505 


8750 

8658 

5ondaz 

8075 

SIX 

SrtVndler 

3900 

3878 


365 


SBC 

369 

367 

Swissolr 

1175 

1180 

Swiss Reinsurance 

9600 

9600 

Swiss Voiksbraik 



Union Bank 

3700 

3685 

Winterthur 

<230 


Zurich Ira 

20650 30650 1 

SBC index : OU0 
Pmrtoa* : 435J8 



NA: not auotea; NA: not 
available; xd: ex-dtvMend. 


Saudis Said to Pick Ghiyoda for Plant 

Reteeis 

MANAMA. Bahrain — A Saudi Arabian oil company has chosen 
Japan's Chiyoda group 10 build a 1.5-tnUUon-barrd-a-yeai fabricating ail 
plant at the Red Sea city of Yanbu aJ-Bahr, oil industry sources report. 

The project k one of two lubricating oQ plants expected to be in 
operation there by the end of 1987. the sources said Wednesday. 

They said Petromin Lubricating Oil Refinery Co. had swarded a letter 
of intent to Chiyoda for 5160 million. 


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•OKS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


Soviet Skaters Win 
Medal in Pairs 


-v-,. 


Bossy and Dionne Set League Records 


to Britain's Jayne Torvill 

' , 11 ‘ ' ' i ' TOKYO — Hens Valova and and Christopher Dean at the last 
f 1 - 1 5,i '* . u- , ’ Ic,! “nil’lkg Vasiliev of the Soviet Union three world championships and at 

I v...:ir . .." "■Mfr.^wo the first sold medal of the the Saraievo Olvmnies. W won 


J ra|u.-. vlir.r;-,! 

hstit Vp-;: i,.V 

-w !;u . 

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athi thr 

ihtiiuts 

th.l« '.lir \.»v , 

- 3 .-tH.ii, , 

till 

‘‘HIV- - .Its;* 

Vitrr.l* - . 


M.^ -mnance in the free-skating por- 
„ f on of the competition. 

, ! ' Ui b?.' Valova and Vasiliev had- trailed 
v ipOTipatriais Larisa Selezneva and 


from the compulsories finished in 
the same order in the original set 
pattern. 

Another Soviet skater, Kira 


impression, receiving four ahrad of Tiffany Chin of the Unit- 
f 5.9 pants out of a possi- ed States and Katarina Witt of East 


tin’ cl..-* .. ,;r . 11 


•; rtistic impression, receiving four 

* ‘-if ;. t ?l 'xte& of 5.9 pants ont of a possi- 

r ;>6. 

■ Sdezneva and Makarov finished 

^KOnd, and Katherina Matousek 
^ . }d Lloyd Easier of Canada were 
d eff|f> ®viri fifi Watson and Pete Opoe- 
■‘■•■•'-■Ui! f. 3 «d of the United States finished 

;ii l^.'^wrth. 


.iT. ■. • ^‘■.^hj.Tw atalia Bestesmanova and Andrei 

i / J \jkm mesved doser to the. title with 

' ’-i- 4^mostp^fectniarksiiuheo^mal 

irviiii.? '*• c- t pattern competition. Another 

in*. 'iuv. ■ e% wiet couple, Marina Klimova 

iiUMf-Si;:- .j. Sergei ftmomaranko, were sec- 

NlM' \ ..r.r^'^-td. Judy Bhnnberg and Michad 

attcniLv’ ' . -TSlsfibert of the United States stood 

4mjfcv-w. .k 

rrr-M ... Bestearianova and Bukin, run- 


ed States and Katarina Witt of East 
Germany. 

Ivanova. 21, who placed third in 
the 1984 ^Sarajevo Olympics, re- 
ceived 104.9 points from the 
judges.. . ; 

Chin and Witt each received 
100.4 for three compulsory figures, 
but when the judges drew up their 
overall rankings, they put Q»n sec- 
ond and Witt third. 

Japan's Midori Jto, a dynamic 
tree skater who finished seventh 
last year in Ottawa after placing 
16th in the compulsory, had to 
withdraw because of a broken right 
ankle. She suffered the injury while 
attempting a triple flip in practise 
Tuesday. 



Unod Pres. liPmnftfHOt 


Pam Striven Sometimes “it feels like I’ve beat around 20 years.” 

Shriver: The Comeback Kid 


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wa Valova and Oleg Vasiliev of Hie Soviet Union, 
oners of the gold, flanked by Larisa Selezneva and Oleg 
-akarovi, left, and Katherina Matousek and Iioyd Eisler. 


wans Once Again Leads 
Tie Nuggets to Victory 

A ”S eta ?~ ,ma Serna The Rockets, with Ralph s«mf 

irENVER — It’s one exciting, son, Akeem Olajuwon and Rodne 
* e after another these days for McCray leading the way, the 
... ^Denver Nuggets, and Mike Ev- dominated the first half, twic 
*- k is always the man on the spot building 14-porat leads. 
w 3^ vete ran backup guard sank ' TTjc Nuggets seem to rii^jaii 
_ 0 worn jumper with 44 seconds gudi handicaps. Calvin Natt, wh 1 
uning m the second overtime had 37 points and 15 rebounds am 


in 


a w 


32 - 

v~ 


NBA FOCUS 

^riay night to give the Nuggets a 
131 victory over the Houston 
1 kets. The victory pm the surg- 
. Nuggets games in front in 

>■ Vfidwest Division. 

! was also the third consecutive 
finish involving the Nuggels. 
; .ay night at Dallas, the Nuggets 
jo by 23 points in the third 
ter. Evans, who scored a ca- 
;:high 38 points, led the rally 
* led to the Nuggets' 141-140 
i aph in overtime. 

’ le next night at Denver, M3- 
.' cee had a nine-point lead with 
minutes to play, but Evans 
r-id half the paints in a 10-0 
i that brought the Nuggets a 
; 122 victory. 

- other NBA games, it was Bos- 
!110, New York 102; Kansas 
1 134vNew Jersey 113; Milwan- 
,'.102, Seattle 87; Dallas 108, 
tna 102; Chicago 104, Wasb- 
' <a 99, and Portland 100, Allan- 


act on Eagles Sale Reported 


’■ By Michael Janofsky 

New York 7 Wi Service 

■ iW YORK — Leonard Tose, 
wner of the Philadelphia Ea- 
who is more than $30 m3Bon 

readied an agreement 
% to sell the dub to a Mi- 
%{{ ^nrea businessman for about 
aQlion. 

?*der terms of the deal, the Ea- 
;Will remain jg Philariri phia. 
'ose, who bought the dub in 

■ for $16 million, then a record 
1- and his dau ght er, Susan 
.Iter, the club’s vice president 

■ egal counsel, will have no re- 
; ng ties to the team. 


■ ouyer, according to a source, 
tar with n<^otiations that 
* '■ ° cen gang on for several 

and the last two days in 
n. is No rman Beaman, a ntt- 
J Chester, Pennsylvania, 

, N . t0w lives in Mi ami Beach and 

‘ig.lt Sevm l car dealerships. 


The final sale of the Eagles 
would, at once, bring to an end a 
long and difficult period for Tose, 
whose current debts include sepa- 
rate loans of 518 million and S12 
milli on from the Crocker National 
Bank of California, and fa the 
NFL. which feared the possibility 
that Tose would move the Eagles to 
another dry if it meant he could 
re finance the team and remain in 
control of it 

For several months, he had been 
Hying to refinance his dub through 
a sale or minority interest or a mi- 
nority interest that would grow to a 
majority interest in rime, with Tose 
remaining in control of the dub; 

Several months ago, Tose came 
dose to selling a minority interest 
to James Monaghan, a real-estate 
develops and pan-time resident of 
Phoenix, Arizona, with the promise 
Tha i he would move the team to 
Phoenix. 



.By Peter Alfano 

New York Times Service 

PRINCETON, New Jersey — The Comeback 
Kid removed her pink sweater and walked on the 
tennis court in Princeton Tuesday, ready to play 
her first singles match in two ana a half months. 

She look a deep breath and exhaled slowly, then 
tossed a ball into the air, signifying, still another 
new be ginning in her career. And for those who 
believe in makin g a good first impression, let it be 
duly recorded that Pam Shriver served an ace. 

Tennis is a sport that has taken a toll of the 
young, especially among the women. In their haste 
to turn professional and make a small fortune on 
the year-round tour, players are exposed to physi- 
cal and wnnrinnnl stresses rh»t can drive ThVm to 
the sidelines, usually as a last resort and against the 
wishes of their agents, the sponsors and tourna- 
ment officials. 

Last year, women’s tennis lost Tracy Austin and 
Andrea Jaeger, who were among lie top four 
players. In late November, after playing in the 
Australian Open with what she called a “dead 
arm,” Shriver decided it was time to put her rackets 
away, too. 

It wasn't the first time, but it was with less 
reluctance than before. Since turning pro in 1978, 
Shriver has been bothered fay a chronic An nltfcr 
injury that she describes as a weakness in the 
rotator cuff. She also has tennis elbow, a result, she 
thinks, of trying to compensate for her shoulder. 

“At the Australian Open, the pain was from my 
wrist right up to my shoulder," she said. “It's bard 
to take a break, because of the commitments 
you've made. But yon also get to a paint where you 
don’t care. 

In the last month of her layoff she began to fed a 
competitive urge again, she said. Therapy had 
strengthened her shoulder and playing became 
more fan than work. She wasn't throwing her 
racquet, winch she sometimes did in frustration. 

She returned last week, playing doubles in an 
exhibition in California. Tuesday at the U.S. 
Women's Indoor Championship she played her 
first singles match anee the Australian, and she 
defeated Laura Arraya-Gildanoster, 6-2, 6-3. 

“1 was a little nervous before the match." Shriver 
said. “You Forget how nervous you can get. Bat I'm 
much fresher and I'm enjoying it. I don’t know 
how long this will last. Til always be emotional, but 
I show happy emotions and sad emotions. It's not 
just negative.’’ 


ShriveTs value to the women’s game transcends 
her talent She is a much-needed personality on the 
tour — bright and witty, a lanky, 5-foot- 1 1 serve- 
and-volley player with Shirley Temple curls, wfao is 
as outspoken as she is emotional. 

She said she felt a burden to fill the void left by 
Austin and Jaeger when they were injured, and was 
distressed when she could not fill iL 

“Women's ignnis lost two young, bright stars 
and that killed it, at least for a while,” she said. 
“And I think people expected me to move in. Well, 
I did in the rankings by moving up. but not in the 
results. 1 caught a Tot of the pressure." 

Her career » one characterized by broken prom- 
ises. She has won seven tournaments and 
Sl.207,961 in prize money in seven years, and 
added 38 titles and $478,000 teaming with Martina 
Navratilova in doubles. But she has never won a 
Ufi. Open or a Wimbledon singles championship, 
and that r emains a prerequisite for greatness. 

U bothers her, too, that people ihmk of her as a 
statistic — another one of the injured players, or a 
has-been because it seems she has been around 
since the advent of open tennis She is only 22. 

“I think back to 1978 and the U.S. Open." said 
Shriver, who was 16 then and lost in the final to 
Chris Evert Lloyd. “And I can remember every- 
thing as if it was Tuesday. Then I think of bow 
many opens I’ve played, my injuries and and all 
the emotions, and it feels like I've been around 20 
years. 

“Thai's why it’s so important for me to be 
healthy and able to play bard for two years, so that 
I can accomplish what people have expected of me 
— to win one of the nice championships. At least. 
I'd like to have had an opportunity to say I tried." 

.Expressing one's hopes and fears is often con- 
strued as a weakness, bat Shriver is willing to take 
that riumrw She canie to the news conference after 
her match with an ke pack on her elbow. Her 
sweater bulged where another ice pack rested on 
her shoulder, making it look as if she were a 
daintily dressed linebacker. She will play through 
the lingering discomfort, she said. 

But she is not going to be foolish, either. 

“I see football players and basketball players 
crippled at 50, ana that’s awful," she said. *If this 
shoulder problem means I have some pain when 
I'm 40 years old and just playing fun doubles, then 
1 don't care: But if someone idd me it could be 
worse, then I’d bag it now. It just wouldn’t be 
worth it to keep playing." 


Compiled by Ota- Staff From Dispatches 

UNION DALE. New York — li 
was another night at the office and 
another record for Mike Bossy of 
the New York Islanders and Mar- 
cel Dionne of the Los Angeles 
Kings. 

Bossy extended his own Nation- 
al Hockey League record for con- 
secutive seasons with 50 goals by 
scoring twice in the Islanders' 5-4 
overtime loss to the Philadelphia 

NHL FOCUS 

Flyers. He has scored at least 51 
goals in all eight of his professional 
campaigns and is the only player 
ever to make 50 eight timet. 

In Inglewood. California, 
Dionne scored the 620th goal of his 
13-year career and added two as- 
sists to reach the 100-poim plateau 
for a league record eighth time as 
the Kings routed the Pittsburgh 
Penguins. 6-0. 

Elsewhere in the NHL. it was 
Buffalo 6, Hanford 3; Washington 
4, New Jersey 1 ; Quebec 6. Boston 
4; Sl Louis 7. Toronto 2, and Ed- 
monton S, Calgary 3. 

Dionne went over the 100-point 
mark in the first period when he 
assisted on a goal by center Beroie 
Nicholls. He received a standing 
ovation. 

He held the old NHL mark of 
seven lOO-point seasons. 

“I’m a utile bit disappointed in 



my play,” Dionne said. “I haven’t 
bom sharp the last couple of weeks. 
But tonight I felt confident. 1 need- 
ed this game to get gong. 

“I think I was not sharp in the 
last couple of games. I'd like to get 
it back and finish out the season 
strong." 

Coach Pal Quinn said, “His con- 


IVfike Bossy 

sistency in his statistics is amazing. 
He’s one of the great athletes the 
game has seen." 

Bossy's second goal of the game 
and 51st of the season enabled the 
Islanders to tie the Fivers at 4-4 
with less than a minute remaining 
in regulation. Bui at 2:18 of over- 
time. Dave Poulin scored to give 
the Flyers the victory. 

Until Bossy amved on the NHL 
scene in 1977, a 50-goal season was 
considered an unusual feat. In the 
first 60 seasons the goal had been 
reached 33 times, most of the 50- 
goal seasons belonged to Bobby 
Hull and Phil Esposito. 

Nobody was prepared to have 
anyone do it in each of his first 
eight seasons. Until Bossy did it. 
only one other rookie had scored 50 
in a season. 

So until Wayne Gretzky arrived 
in 1979. Bossy was something of a 
phenomenon^ Although he has 


Marcel Dionne 

continued his prolific scoring. 
Bossy is now just the man who 
breaks the records before Gretzky. 

“I'm just his custodian," Bossy 
said. “Barring injuries. I'll only 
hold this one until Gretzky com- 
pletes his eighth season. 

“For the time being, though, 1*11 
cherish this. It proves among other 
things that I’ve been a durable 
player. I only wish I could have 
done it in a winning game." 

The Islanders trailed. 3-1, going 
into the final period against the 
Flyers, who had not won in eight 
previous overtime games. The Is- 
landers tied it on goals by Denis 
Potvin and John Tonelli, only to 
have Lindsay Carson put the Fivers 
ahead again with 95 seconds left in 
regulation. Bossy took a pass from 
Bryan Trotlier to tie it just 38 sec- 
onds later. 

But Poulin's 15-footer was the 
only shot in the extra session. 

(AP. LAT) 


2 Elected to Baseball’s Hall of Fame 


The Associated Press 

TAMPA Florida — Outfielder 
Enos Slaughter and shortstop Arty 
Vaughan were elected to the Base- 
ball Hall of Fame Wednesday by 
the Veterans' Committee at its an- 
nual meeting. 

Both will be inducted at Cooper- 
stown. New York, on July 28 along 
with the base stealing king Lou 
Brock and relief pitcher Hoyt Wil- 
helm, elected in January by the 
Baseball Writers Association of 
America. 

Slaughter played 19 years, the 
first 15 of them with the Sl Louis 
Cardinals, and had a career batting 
average of .300. He hit 169 home 
runs, drove in 1,304 runs and was 
famed for his hustling style of play. 
In 1942 he led the N animal League 
in hits with 188 and batted 318. 

Vaughan, who died in 1952. just 
four years after retiring from base- 
ball, had a lifetime .318 average in 
14 seasons with Pittsburgh and 
Brooklyn. He was the National 
Le ague batting cham pion in 1935 
and led the league in triples and 
runs scored three times. 

Slaughter, who lives in Roxboro, 
North Carolina, was bom in 1916. 
After craning up to the Cardinals in 
1938, he reeled off five straight 300 
seasons and batted a career-high 
336 in 1949, completing a siring of 


nine years in which he hit no lower 
than 394. He was traded to the 
New York Yankees in 1954 and 
completed his career with Kansas 
City, the Yankees and the Milwau- 
kee Braves. 

Slaughter probably is remem- 
bered most for scoring the winning 
run in the seventh game of the 1946 
World Series, when he scored from 


first base on a single by Harry 
Walker, beating the relay home 
against the Boston Red Sox. 

Vaughan, a flawless fielder, led 
the league in bases on balls three 
times and hit a career-high .385 to 
win the batting title in 1935. He Itit 
.300 or belter in each of his first 10 
seasons in the major leagues, fin- 
ishing over that figure 12 times 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

All-America College Team Named 

ST. LOUIS (UPI) — Georgetown’s Patrick Ewing and Oklahoma's 
Way man Tisdale were repeat selections on the All- America team chosen 
by the U3. Basketball writers Association. 

Ewing and Tisdale were named to the first team for the third consecu- 
tive year. Also named to the first team were Chris Mullin of Sl John's, 
Keith Lee of Memphis State and Xavier McDaniel of Wichita State. 

The second team consisted of Jon Koncak of Southern Methodist, Roy 
Tarpley of Michigan, Len Bias of Maryland, Dwayne Washington of 
Syracuse and Kenny Walker of Kentucky. 

Lendl Will Miss Davis Cup Match 

PRAGUE (UPI) — Ivan Lendl will miss Czechoslovakia’s Davis Cup 
competition against the Soviet Union at Tbilisi this weekend because of 
an inner ear inflammation, Czechoslovak tennis officials said. 

Lendl also plans to cancel his scheduled appearance in a grand prix 
tournament next week in Brussels, officials said. 


The Rockets, with Ralph Samp- 
son, Akeem Olajuwon and Rodney 
McCray leading the way, they 
dominated the first half, twice 
building 14-pram leads. 

■' The Nuggets seem to disdain 
such handicaps. Calvin Natt, who 
had 37 points and 15 rebounds and 
Alex English, with 39 points, led 
their rally. 

The Nuggets actually moved 
ahead in the last quarter, out a tip- 
in by McCray at the final buzzer 
tied the score at 1 17-1 17 and sent it 
into overtime. Evans made one of 
two free throw attempts with 30 
seconds left in the first overtime to 
tie it, 1 23-123. 

In the second overtime English 
made two jumpers to help Denver 
jump out to a 131-124 lead with 
2:43 left. The dogged Rockets 
fought back and forged a tie on two 
free throws by Olajuwon with one 
minute remaining. 

After Evans’s game winner. 
Houston missed a shot and then let 
the Nuggets tun out the last 22 
seconds without fouling them. 

Evans, who is playing for 
$65,000 this season, is in a contract 
hassle with the Nuggets. They re- 
cently gave him a bonus; but the 
longer they wait to give him a new 
contract, the more it is likely to cost 
them. 


re Skatu 


Hockey 


World Championships 

Finob remits of tt» noire OMiwttniM 
WwtaovtaT at me World Rears Skaftoa 
ttt WHi la Tokyo: 

1. Elena Valova and Oleg Vasiliev. Soviet 
Unlofb M onflnah, 2BU points. 

X Larisa Selezneva and Oleg Makarov, Sovi- 
et Union. ZA. 3010. 

X Katherina Matousek and Uoyd EUer. 
Canada. 4Z tots. 

4. jjii Watson and Peter Oppegord, UA, M. 
tTLf. 

5. MlUndo Kunheovi and Lyndon Johnston. 
Canada. 7*. mi 

6. Veronika Pershino and Marat Aidarov, 
Soviet Union. SA 1912. 

7. Cynthia Gouli and Mark Rowoom, Canada. 
BA. TWA 

& Manuefo Landraf and Inao Steuer. East 
Germany, 11A 189A 

9. Kola lie and Wayne SaybokLU^,l2Al«U. 
10. Claudia Mossarl and Dardefe Caprone, 
West Germany, UA. 1109. , 

ice dance standings after compulsories 
and Ortstad Set P a ttern Dance 
T- Natalia ncs tom l on ova and Andrei Bukin, 
Soviet Union. L0 points 

2. Marina Klimova and Sergei Ponomar- 
enko. Soviet Union, ZO 

1 Judy Bhnnberg and Michael Seibert, UA, 

XO 

A Tracy Wltanand Rob MeCoiL Canada. 4JI 
5. Petra Bant and Rainer SctnnDorti, West 
Germany. 10 

IKoren Barter andNIckv Slater, BrfftdnAD 
7. Natalia Annenko and Genrikh SrPienakL 
Soviet Union. 7A 


1 Isabella Michel i and Roberto Pettanta. 
Italy. 14 

9. Kattain Beck and QtrMoff Beck, Austria. 
1A 

KL KarvnGorocsinoand Rod Garanina. Con- 


NHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dhrisiop 


odo.ua 


w 

L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 


x-WOstiliWion 

39 

17 

9 

87 

247 

192 

Women's computers Ftwres 

x- Philadelphia 

38 

19 

7 

83 

247 

202 

T. Kira Ivanova. Soviet Union, 04 

NY islanders 

33 

28 

s 

70 

290 

254 

X THfanv Chin. UA- \2 

NY Rangers 

21 

33 

9 

Sl 

VO 

249 

1 Katarina Witt, East Germany, 14 

Pittsburgh 

21 

37 

5 

47 

221 

299 

4 Anna Kondrashava Soviet Union. 14 

New Jersey 

19 

37 

8 

44 

213 

244 

5. Claudia Leistner, Weti Germany. 10 


Adams 

DivUton 



4 Sandra Cartoon). Switzerland, 34 

Buffalo 

31 

21 

12 

74 

233 

185 

7 . Debi Thomas. U-S_ A3 

Montreal 

32 

23 

10 

74 

249 

217 

1 Natalia Lebedeva Soviet Union. Al 

Quebec 

33 

24 

8 

74 

270 

234 

9. Agnes Coeselln. Franca 54 

Barton 

28 

27 

8 

44 

333 

221 

11 ERzabettt Mimtey. Canada 40 

I I-. 1 «- , | 

nor (jwu 

21 

34 

7 

49 

220 

277 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


European Soccer 

x-S). Louis 
Chicago 

Norris Dtvl 
31 72 
31 30 

isJoe 

11 

5 

FRENCH FIRST D1VI5ION 

Minnesota 

20 35 

11 

PWte-St Germain Z Nantes 3 





smytbe Dtvltion 


x- Ed monton 

44 15 

7 


Catsorr 

33 24 

7 


Winnipeg 

33 24 

7 

Rouen 1, rc Porta 1 

Los Angeles 

30 25 

11 


Vancouver 

19 38 

8 

Lens X Laval 0 

x-d inched Playoff spot 


Batila Z Lille 1 

TUESDAY'S RESU1 


Point Standtogs: Bordeaux 4S: Nantes 40.' 
Au*erre34; Toulon 33; Monoco3T; Brest 30; 
Met* X: Lens 29; Paris SG »; Bastto 25; 
SochatM24: NancvU; Marsel Ue 23: LavolZJ; 
UlteTL- Toulouse 32; Rouen 19; Strasbourg 
17; Toure 17,-. RC Paris 14 


New Jersey s i s— i 

Washington I 1 3—4 

Christian (23), Froncesdwtll (3). Langway 
(31, Gould (12); Breton 19. Slwtsoa Goal: New 
Jersey tan Jensen) 4-11-5— 50; Washington 
(on Retch) 11*4-17—94 





Loic Amisse, left, of Nantes and GuiQochon of Paris-St Germain in daring their French 
Fust Division soccer match at Pare des Princes in Paris* which Nantes won, 3-2. 


Hertford 2 0 1—3 

Buffalo 1 2 3-4 

Tucker 05l, Ptayfalr a), Faileno (to). Cvr 
(l7),Oavls2 (T5) •' Dlneen 07), Neufeld 2 (22). 
Shots <n Goal: Hartford S-7-10— 23. Buffalo IS- 
472-OS. 

Philadelphia 12 1 1—4 

N.Y. Islanders 0 13 0-4 

praans (to). Canon U7J. Paulin (20); Pal- 
vin (ill. ToneiU (34). Bossy 2 (51). Stotts on 
Coal: PtilladetnhlB (on Hrudev) 1M4-9-1— 
34; New York (an Freese) 10-9-17-0-34 
Boston 1 3 0-4 

Quebec 2 2 3—4 

Mtran 3 mi. Morels (S), Lemitux (11), 
Cole (13): Donnelly (4). Simmer (29), Gorina 
OO). Crowder (271. Shots oo Goal: Boston (on 
Gosselln) 48-11—25; Quebec Ion Peeters) 13- 
10*13-35. 

Toronto 1 0 1—2 

SL Louis 2 3 

Pettersson (21) Wlekenihetser (20). P. Arv 
anrsan (tt. Mullen (31), AL Johnson (2D), Sut- 
ter? (34); Ten-ton [13>,Dooust (15). Shots on 
Boat: Toronto (on Womslev) 14-5-10—29; St. 
Louis (an Bernhardt) 10-15-10-15. 
Edmonton 4 1 0— S 

Co Iparr I 2 0-3 

nop tor IU), Anderson (34). Huahes (10), 
Kerri (42), Li nostrum (12); Reinhart (22), 
Seers (21). Hunter (10). Shots oa Goal: Ed- 
monton (on Lome) to 1 12-93—24; Cataary (on 
Zonlerl 13-10-15 — 3B. 

Pittsburgh 0 0 0-0 

Las Armeies 3 t 3-4 

Galley (0). Nicholls (41), Dionne (37). Mo- 
=Lellan (27), Pox (28). Hardy (12). Shots 00 
Goal: Pittsburgh (on Janscvk) 4-7-10-21: 
Los Angeles ion Romano) 13-14-9—37. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American Leasee 

Seattle— R eached agreements with 
Mart Langston. Dttetier. Dove voile, cotdior. 

Harold Reynolds, second baseman aid Don- 
oil Nixon, outflehtor. an one- year contracts. 

TEXAS— Renewed the contract of Mike 
Mason, pitcher, tar the 1985 season. 

BASKETBALL 

Norton) Bedcetbeii Association 

la. LAKERS-Stonsd Chuck ttovlrt, cen- 
ter. to a TOslay contrac t . 

FOOTBALL 

Na tion al Football Leeeee 

SAN DIEGO— Named Dav* Adolph coordi- 
nator of scarfing and plover personnel. 

HOCKEY 

NnHoeal Hockey League 

PHILADELPHIA— Named Bill Barber 
head axxJi ot the dub* Heroiey affiliate In 
the American Hockey League Recalled Len 
Hadtoorn, center, tram Hershev. Sent Paul 
Guoy.right wing, and Je* Patterson, left wing, 
to Nervin', 

COLLEGE 

ARIZONA — Named Chris Allen assistant 
football coach. 

FAIRFIELD— Announced » would not re- 
new the contract of Terry O’Cenwr, mein 
heaaDwketboll «och and assistant athletic 

MONTANA STATE — Announced me resig- 
nattoa of Jane Henman, women’s basketball 

. NORTH CAROLINA CHARLOTTE— 
Named Jeff Mullins athletic director and 
head basketball coach. 

PENN STATE— Mamed Frank RA&Coaufe- 
lont football coach. Named John Boveadmto- 
isi relive assistant in the athletic departrranl. 

SOUTHERN CALI FORNIA— Named Ron 
Turner osstsient Football coach 


Basketball 

NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Dtvtstoa 

W L PCt. GB 


x-Bastan 
X- Philadelphia 
New Jersey 
Wash lug Ion 
New York 


49 U 790 — 

44 15 754 TVs 

31 30 306 17Vj 

31 31 .500 IS 

20 42 723 29 


Central Diristoa 
42 19 


41 21 441 — 

34 25 SfO 414 
34 28 7 

31 31 JD0 10 
28 33 A59 12Vb 

21 40 744 IVYS 


29 33 A4B 14to 
29 33 MB 141b 
24 35 AH 17 
22 39 741 21 

14 45 742 77 


Milwaukee 42 19 469 — 

Detroll 33 27 5S0 BMi 

Chicago 2S 32 AO 13VS 

Allamo 25 36 -410 17 

Cleveland 24 37 J93 1* 

Indiana 19 41 717 22to 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 

Denver 41 21 441 — 

Houston 34 25 790 414 

Dallas 34 28 74*. 7 

San Antonio 31 31 700 TO 

Utah 28 33 459 12Vi 

Kansas a tv 21 40 744 IVYS 

Pact Be DtvMon 

l— A. Lakers 43 18 705 — 

Phaenbi 29 33 44B Mh 

Portland 29 33 Mi 14to 

Seattle 24 35 AH 17 

LA. Clippers 22 39 741 21 

Golden State 14 45 742 27 

x-O Inched playoff berm. 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
Boston 32 24 25 27— IN 

New York 25 to 2) 30-182 

McHato 15-21 IM442. Bird 7-16 4-9 2a Parish 
7-11 4-920; King 15-31 6-1138. Bambler 
11* Wilkins 4-n >4 it Rebounds; Boston 49 
(Bird 19). New York 40 (Wllklni IS). Assists: 
Boston 27 (Bird 10), New York 29 (Sparrow 
IS). 

New Jersey 30 10 33 33—113 

Kansas city 84 33 34 3V- tM 

Thompson 7-13 12-13 24. E Johnson 11-183-3 
25; Williams 8-14 M 14. Birdsong 8-18 W> 14. 
Rebounds: New Jersey 52 (Williams 10). Kan- 
sas City 62 (Thompson 13). AUiEs: New Jer- 
sey Z7( Richardson!), Kansas Cttv 37 (Thews 
11 ). 

MMhinetoli 34 30 15 20-99 

Chicago 10 31 23 32-1M 

Jordan 12 23 13-17 37. wealrldBS 8-17 U IB; 
Gus Williams 4-15 48 IK Ballard 7-13 2-2 17. 
Ktteands: Washington 47 (Mahore 13). ChV- 
eogo Al (Wool ridge, Jordan. Oldham 9). As- 
sist*: Washington 27 (Mahore 7). Chicago to 
(Jordcm, Matthews B). 

Seattle H 17 38 20- 17 

Milwaukee ® M 20 28-1*2 

Cummings >0-19 34 23, Prtttev 7-10 54 19; 
Sobers 7-14 2-3 16, McCormick 3-7 8-10 U Re- 
bfemds: Seattle 48 (McCormick 9). Milwau- 
kee S2 (Lister 12). Assists: Seattle 22 (Cham- 
bers 4 ), Milwaukee 22 (Prassey 7). 

Indiana 23 2S 2S 28-MS 

Dallas 33 S 20 30—111 

Blackman JI-1B 5-4 27. Aguirre 9-18 7-10 2S; 
Kritogg M3 4-8 22. Williams 8-1? 2-2 ll. Re- 
bounds; Indiana 44 (Kellogg 11). Dallas 45 
(PerMmtt). Assists ; inatanoSi (Fleming T), 
□anas 27 (Davis io). 

Portland 31 14 25 30-108 

Atlanta 30 20 31 13— 9| 

VondeweaM 12-21 « 28, MJhgmMMl 7-14 
3-2 16; WilMitS 17-24 W 25, Rivers 5-9 34 11 
Rebounds; Portland 54 (Drexler 11). Atlanta 
a (A. Carr 11). Auhli: Portland 24 (Ore tier 
10). Atlanta to (E-letanMn 10). 

Houston 34 34 27 Je 4 B— 131 

Denver 31 20 37 29 4 10-133 

English 18-35 >539. Natt 14-299-1133: Sam* 
sen 10-34 10-14 3a MCCrov 10-14 54 25. Re- 
bounds: Houston 7B lOtaiuwon 251. Denver M 
(Noll IS*. Assists: Houston 20 t Sampson 81. 
Denver 2 a (Lever 6). 


Tennis 

Tour Leaders 

MEN 

Earnings 

(Through March T> 

1. Tim Mayo it*. 5127.102. 2. John McEnroe. 
SU30OO.3. Kevin Curren 76340. 4. Scott Davis, 
S76J6& 5 5teton Edbera. 166390. 6. Tomas 
SroM. 858.1 10.7. Lorry SlefanU. (534)43. L Van- 
nick Noah.S5B.94S. 9. Robert Seousa, 149.14a 11 
Ken Fkjcti, 844475. 

Teer Potato 

1. John McEnroe. 172J8 points. 2.1 wan LendL 
12434 1 Jimmy Connors. 12S57. 4 Mato WF 
lander, 9130 . 5. Andres Gomel. 8433. 6. Anders 
jarrvd, 49.09. 7. Henrik Sundstrom. 49.79. 8. 
Kevin Curran. 444)4.9. Pot Cash, 45J4.H Sta- 
ton Edberg. 45.17. 

WOMEN 
Bore togi 
Through March 3 

1. Martina Navratilova, S1B6A37. 2. Chris 
Evert Uovd. S99A37. X Hona Manailkova. 

847.737.4 Catarina Undaulst.sMLOOO.5, Kattiv 
Jordan, 834701 4 Carling Bassett, 834501 7. 
Peanut Louie, 531825. 1 Glgl Pomander. 
831.137. 9. Bonnie Godusek. 831837. 11 SteMl 
Graf. 831512. 

1984-85 Series Pouts 

1. Martina Navratilova 1440 points. 2. Chris 
Evert Ltovd.2ML 3. HanaMondllkeva, 1414. 
4 23 na Garrison. 4450. 5. Monueta Maleeva 

1.445. 4 Claudia Kahde-Kllich. 1425. 7. Helena 
Sukova 1408 . 1 Carting Basaetl. 1371 9. Wen- 
dy Turnbull, 1415. 11 Sylvia Hotilka 1493. 


Golf 


Official money wtaMngs for tbe ires POA 
Tour through ttw Hondo Classic, emptetad 
March l*. 

l.Mark O'Meara S19462S.Z Lcmny Wodklns 
S1KU5SO. 3. Cunts Strange 5137JU. 4 Craig 
Stodtor. 8133455. 5. Calvin Peett 8107485. 4 . 
Mart McCumber 581,332.7. Ron 5trrck 877.7*7 
1 Woody Blackburn 875.928. 9. Larry Mire 
572458- 11 Core* Pavin 849.145. 

SCORING 

Stott iticai leaders on toe Professional Golf 

ere Assectattae Tear thrauM Hn Honda Ck» 

sic: 

1. Lenny Wodklns. 4129. X Craig StoStor, 
6821. 3. Lerrv Mtae. 4944 4. Don Poole v, 4944. 
5. Corey Pavin. 49 J1 4 Scott Slmptan, 4921 7. 
Ed FtorL69j4.B.Oo!i P«lt).4»J& 9. Ron Street 
49.91. 11 Mark O'Meara. 4924. 

AVERAGE 
DRIVING DISTANCE 
1. Andy Beoa275i4. X Fred Couples, 2742. 3. 
Dan Pahl, 2743.4. Jim Dent, 2734. 5. Bill da*. 

son. Sli 4 Mac O'Grady. 2715. 7 . Greg' 
Twiggs. 2714. 1 JotV Sindefar, 2712. 9. Tom 
Purtzgr. 2701 11 Ronnie Blade, 2*94. 
AVERAGE PUTTS 
PER ROUND 

l. Morris HottrfskY.Z7.50. 7 Lamrv Wodklns. 
28JU. X Craig Stodler. 28.19. 4. Rex Caldwell. 
2IA5.5. Ron Streck,2B52.A Dan Poolev. 2154. 7. 
Frank Comer, 2US- 8.4 Tied with 
PERCENTAGE 
OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1 . Lannv Wddklns.J97 1 l Craig Stodler, J 9 i. 
3.TMnWotaan.254,4, Chip Beck, .244.5, Mark 
O'Meara J42. 4 Lfirrv Mice. _ 240 l 7 iw 
CH Morgan, 334 9 , Fred C*u- 
DM4 .233. 11 Ed Fieri. .232. 

BIRDIE LEADERS 

White Wood, 187. 4 lZ CS l* * 
Startler. , IteJ B^oS^a^H^S 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBl'NE, TI1LRSDAY* MARCH 7. 1985 


,K 


ART BUCHWALD 


Goodbye , Dan Rather 


W ashington — Three 

* ell-dressed gentlemen came 
to see me the other day. 

One of them said. “We're from 
the Jesse Helms Committee to Fire 
Dan Rather and we’re interviewing 
people to replace Rather on the 
■CBS Evening News.* " 

-Has Dan been fired already?” I 
asked. 

“It’s just a matter of time until 
we have enough 


One of them said. “Suppose a 
woman was raped and wanted an 
abortion. How would you treat that 
story?" 

“I'd interview Senator Helms 
and let him tell me why she was 
wrong." 

“How do you stand on the 
church-and-statc issue?" 

“I don’t believe in the separation 
of church and state. If I got Dan 


Omaha’s Inside Line on Toll-Free Calls 


stock to geL con- 



BochwaJd 


rk to geL 
of the 

pany. Your 
name was given 
to us as a 
staunch conser- 
vative who be- 
lieves in the 
American way 
of life, ana 
someone who 
won't sell out his 
country." 

I blushed. “That's a fair descrip- 
tion of myself." 

“Haw do you. fed about Dan 
Rather?" 

“I’d like to tear the sweater off 
his back." 

One of the gentlemen smiled. 
“We were hoping you would say 
that. The anchorman we're looking 
for is someone who will report the 
news without prejudice, whBe at 
the sam e time hi g hli ghting the con- 
servative side of the story." 

“That's no problem," I said. “If 
you can’t give the conservative 
point of view on the evening news, 
you don’t have the right to call 
yourself a journalist," 

“How do you fed about secular 
humanism?" one of the gentlemen 
asked me. 

“I don’t think people should en- 
gage in it until they're married,'' I 
said. “I wouldn't put a secular hu- 
manist story on the air because I 
know a lot of kids are watching." 

This seemed to please all three. 


Rather’Sjjob I would start off my 


show with a prayer every night. No 


prayer e 

one has the right to keep God off 


Driving in the Pink Rain 

The Associated Press 
UNION, New Jersey — Downs 
of motorists whose vehicles were 
stained pink as they drove along a 
highway during a rain storm will be 
reimbursed for the damage by the 
company whose truck leaked the 
dye. At least 1 14 drivers whose cars 
were splashed have contacted the 
Yellow Freight System Inc. of 
Newark since Monday. 


the evening news.' 

□ 

I could teU they were gating very 
interested in me. 

“Are you for an arms agreement 
with the Soviets?" 

“I am certainly not. And I 
wouldn't hesitate to read from the 
Bible where it says you can’t make 
a deal with the Russians." 

“How would you treat the apart- 
heid problem in South Africa?" 

“I believe an anchorman must 
present both sides of the story. If I 
had a film showing the South Afri- 
can police killing blacks, I would 
also make sure I put on President 
Botha to explain why he had to do 
it” 

“Suppose an official of the Rea- 
gan administration admits to beat- 
ing his wife? Would you report it?" 

“I don't consider that news. 
That’s the typical kind of character 
assassination that the American 
people are fed up with. A responsi- 
ble journalist should only report 
the good things about the govern- 
ment and not the bad." 

□ 

“You’re certainly a breath of 
fresh air," one of the men said. “A 
final question. How do you fed 
about cigarette smoking causing 
cancer?" 

“Why do vou ask?” 

“Jesse Hums represents the to- 
bacco interests, and I don't think 
he’d appreciate it if you ran any 
stories that would show cigarette 
smoking in a bad light-" 

“Tell the senator he won’t ever 
see the Surgeon General Of the 
United States on his network." 

“That’s good enough for us. As 
soon as we get control of CBS well 
be in touch with you." 

“You won’t be sony.” I assured 
them. “I can't wait to see the look 
on Dan Ra Cher’s face when I walk 
into the studio and make him yell 
' unde !'" 


By Charles Hillinger 

Im Angela Tutus Sffttr 

O MAHA. Nebraska — Loom- 
ing huge on Omaha’s skyline 
are two Northwestern Bell Tele- 
phone Co. buildings: one the cor- 
porate headquarters, the other a 
structure crammed with state-of- 
the-art switching equipment and 
crowned by a complex of micro- 
wave antennae. 

It is only fining that the phone 
company dominate the city's 
heart, for in the past 10 years 
Omaha has become the “800 
Capital of America," the largest 
telephone marketing center in the 
United States. 

Last year more than 73 million 
free long-distance phone calls, 
placed on lines reached with the 
800 code were transmitted 
through the Omaha microwave 
dishes and relayed to 19 individ- 
ually owned and operated tele- 
marketing centers in the dry. 

That is an average of 200,000 
such calls a day. 

Omaha's marketing companies 
employ as many as 10,000 opera- 
tors, technicians, salespeople and 
administrators during peak peri- 
ods. The industry injected SI 00 
million into Omahas economy 
last year, said Terry Sanford. 
Northwestern BelVs account 
manager for the 800 numbss. 

If yon call an 800 number in 
the United States to reserve a 
hotel room or in response to ads 
selling almost every conceivable 
type of merchandise, there is a 
good chance the operator taking 
die cal! will be in one of Omaha’s 
telemarketing centers. 

The largest .of telemarketing 
company is Wats Marketing of 
America Ino, a subsidiary of 
American Express. It employs as 
many as 2,000 operators on a 



Lary Bmri/La Angrira li* 

Operators answer toll-free calls at Wats Marketing of America Inc. in Omaha. 


supervisor's desk is a sign that 
prod aims: “Talk Time. Yester- 
day’s Average 66. Last Hour’s 
s 64. Previous 


busy day. Its gross sales for pro- 
800-line calls in 1984 to- 


Average 64. Previous Hour’s Av- 
erage 71." That is seconds per 
phone call. 

A call comes in. Zip, it’s done. 
On to the next. Name. Street ad- 
dress. City. State. Zip Code. 
Credit-card number. 

■“The busier it is. the faster the 
day goes,” said the supervisor, 
Jim Talbitzer, 31, who worked for 
five years as an 800 operator be- 
fore taking bis current job. “It’s a 
real challenge working with as 
many types of people as we deal 


taled S21 million, said Craig Ga- 
vin. 36, vice president for 
marketing. 

“It’s a bursting type of traffic 
on out phones/ 1 Gavin said. 
“We’re involved in high-vdume- 
type ad campaigns. As soon as 
TV commercials [featuring toll- 
free lines] air all over America, we 
get a surge of calls. Our operators 
average 43 calls an hour. Time is 
money. A typical call is less than 
75 seconds. The more calls that 
get through, the more potential 
orders." 

Posted on the wall beside one 


with. Many people can't take this 
W people here 


job. We have 
since the place opened seven 
years ago, and we have had others 
who did not make it through the 
first day of training." 

Gavin said Wats Marketing of 
America worked at any given 
lime with 50 to 75 companies. 

He said many customers would 
not abandon their television sets 
to call an 800 line during prime 
time: “It’s the midday and late- 
night programs, third time seeing 
an old movie, that often gets the 
best results." 

The biggest day for telemarket- 
ing companies in O maha was 


Aug. 16, 1977, the day Elvis Pres- 
ley died. “AD direct-marketing 
records were shattered the next 
three days," Gavin said. “Every- 
body started calling in for EMs 
records and tapes advertised on 
the air. Severe telephone block- 
age problems occurred all over 
the nation, caused by people try- 
ing to call O maha " 

Special campaig ns can result in 
heavy hiring, as when 1,200 peo- 
ple were hired to answer phones 
for Lorillard Corp.'s offer of a 
satin-wrapped pack of its new 
Satin cigarettes to anyone calling 
the 800 number. The campaign 
lasted five weeks and resulted in 
two million calls. 

Jim Venuto, 34, former nation- 
al advertising manager for Wats 
Marketing, recently started 
American Telemarketing Corp„ 
specializing in fund-raising cam- 
paigns for religious organizations 
and political candidates. 


Venuic, who employs 120 op- 
trouble 


erators, said he had no 
raising money to start his compa- 
ny. "Omaha people understand 
telemarketing. I told a few people 
I was going to start my own com- 
pany and within 24 hours had 
enough money to launch iL Peo- 
ple m this city have seen a compa- 


ny liirft Wats Marketing go from 
zero seven years ago to $21 mil- 
lion in sales last year." 

Why Omaha? 

Northwestern Bell's Sanford 
said: “The technology was here. 
We put in an inordinate number 
of lines years ago to provide the 
Strategic Air Co mman d with the 
best communications system 
money could buy. This is a spin- 
off from that effort." SAC bead- 
quarters is at nearby Offutt Air 
Force Base. 

Omaha's central location helps 
hold down the rates that clients 
sponsoring the 800 numbers must 
pay, he noted. Furthermore, 
“There is no regional dialect here. 
The Midwestern voice can be un- 
derstood anywhere in the coun- 
try, unlik e a Mississippi drawl or 
a New England twang." 

Revenue is divided between 
Northwestern Bell and American 
Telephone & Telegraph, over 
whose network the long-distance 
calls travel 


“The 800 telemarketing indus- 
try got its start in Omaha 10 years 
ago." Sanford said. “It has come 
a long way. . . . We expect 
growth to continue at a 10 per- 
cent to 20 percent annual rate." 


PEOPLE 



Prize for f Killing Fields : 


“The Killing Fields," set in Cam- 
bodia during the 1975 Khmer 
Rouge takeover, was named best 
film of 1984 at the 16tfa annual 
British Academy of Film and Tele- 
vision Arts Awards in London. Hie 
movie is considered a likely bet in 
the U. S. Academy Award ceremo- 
nies March 25. when h will com- 
pete in five major categories. It won 


how Jack Moncrief saw iL Mm 
crief. viefe president of a Iqc 
court-reporting firm, filed a S3 
million lawsuit against Ra? 
McNally. He said the rating wou 
hurt businesses in Yuba City, tl , 


i 


Tuesday night for best adapted 
screenplay by Bruce Robinson. Dr. 


Haing S. Ngor, a nonprofessional 
making his film debut as the Cam- 
bodian refugee Dith Pran, was 
named best actor and most out- 
standing newcomer. Nominated 
for an Oscar for best supporting 
actor. Ngor is expected to face stiff 
competition from John Malkorich 
of “Places in the Heart" and the 
late Sir Ralph Richardson for 
“Greystoke." Richardson was also 
nominated for a British award, but 
lost to Denholm Elliott of “A Pri- 
vate Function," which opened Fri- 
day in the United Stares. “A Pri- 
vate Function" won the British best 
actress award for Maggie Smith as 
a middle-class. 1940s Lady Mac- 
beth-like figure, and best support- 
ing actress went to Liz Smith — no 
relation — as her mother. Whn 
Wenders was chosen best director 
for “Paris, Texas," written by Sam 
Shepard. Woody Allen won for best 
original screenplay with “Broad- 
way Danny Rose." for which he has 
two Oscar nominations. The fla- 
menco dance version of “Carmen" 
by the Spanish director Carios 
Saura was named best foreign-lan- 
guage film. David Lean’s "A Pas- 
sage to India," the British film con- 
sidered the main opposition .to 
“The Killing Fields" in the Oscars, 
was ineligible for the I?84 British 
awards as it does not open in Brit- 
ain until March 19. 


MU.. U 1 M...UUW IUW Vliy, U|,/ 

seat of Sutter County, about Kilt 
miles (160 kilometers) northeast 
San Francisco. In the “Places R* 

ed Almanac." F ,L 

David Savageau 

City area last among . m 

eas of 100.000 or more people; a f 
ing tune criteria: climate, crim j 


In the “Places Ra I 
Richard Boyer ax 
«u ranked the Yulfft 1 
among 329 U. S. 


economy, housing costs, traospcjM 
ration, health care facilities, 4 
tion. arts and recreation. - 

□ / : v:. 

President Francois Mitterrand ‘ 
France made the Swedish direct 
Ingmar Bergman a commando 
the Legion of Honor cat Tuesdt - 
Bergman, director of such films IV 
“Wild Strawberries" and “Fan 
and Alexander” is in Paris dire, 
ing a Swedish-1 anguage version 
Shakespeare's “King Lear” at t‘ - • 
Odeon theater. * 


□ 


Yuba City, California, named 
the worst city in the United States, 
in Rand McNally’s “Places Rated 
Almanac." marked the distinction 
by burning more than 400 Rand 
McNally maps. The bonfire was 
described as "very upbeat" by 
Maty Knapp, executive vice presi- 
dent of the Yuba -Sutter Chamber 
of Commerce, a sponsor of the 
event. The purpose was not so 
much a protest against Rand 
McNally — which said Pittsburgh 
was the most desirable U. S. city — 
as it was to arouse “community 
solidarity," she said. But that's not 


Wham. Britain’s chart-bus^ 
pop duo, is to perform in Ch* 
their manager says. George 
chads and Andrew Mr* 
with a 14-member backup 
wQi play the People’s Gynn 
in Beijing on Apnl 7 and the < 
house at Guangzhou on AjhL_ 
Jazz StHumefs. the manager^ 

□ 

Bob Woodward and his i 
er, Simon & Schuster, say t 
filed a $500,000 suit against a L 
erly Hills doctor who claimed. 1 
he was libeled in Woodward’s fit 
seller. “Wired: The Short Life*. 
Fast Times of John BdnsfaL^S 
Robert Feder filed a $20-m2B 
lawsuit in Los Angeles in Dei 
ber against Woodward and^i 
publisher. Woodward, a Wash! 
ion Post editor, charged that 1 
abused the process of thet 
said in the suit, “We can 
strale that Feder kno 
luted and maintained a 
libel action against me and i _ 

1 is her." Woodward said that,'' 
informed that Feder was i 
ing action against him, he ; 
“extraordinary step of 
for Feder and his attorneys i 
view my research materials i 
terview notes relating to him. 1 ? 
ter three months, Feder 
libel action. 



-I 


2 !r,ut < ill 
l it jit-tali# 
it?:- \ I lilt’ll 


LEGAL NOTICES 


arArk»L The Petoe of the State of 
New York, By the Groce of God Free 


THWLoB^ rt UK8B address _ 
2165 TlmHetdrioDenbadc. GM 


SohrMd Sod. Germany, 


JOHANN BOCK - address tonowi 
OLiAN^ 


and JOHN DOt JOHN ROC. 

DOE oid JANE ROE, the mm 
''John Doe". "John Roe , “Jane Doe~ 
and "Jane Roe" bang fictitious and 
bang intended to be hariot law, next 
of fan or datnbutees of MARE 
HNQC. deemed, whale r esidenc es 
ml post office adekesses ore un- 
known and wriiit, with due dB- 
gence, be ascertained, and being in- 
tended to be dl dsnifarfees, pound 
representative s and successors in nt 
terra! of any of the above nomad 
persons whose names, residences and 
past office addresses are unknown 
raxJ cannot, with dra (Whence, be 
w c e r m ned; and to aM prawn who 
would have or drew to how raty 
interest in ties manor os distributees, 
hers at law amt next of Ian, or d». 
nwd through, m or from any distribu- 
tees. heirs at law aid next of km of 
the decedent. A petition and Affidavit 
hauma been duly Had byHVMAN C. 
. WHO IS DQMO.ED AT Jef. 


fersonvie. New York 12748, YOU 
‘ ' l SHOW 


ARE HEREBY OTED TO. 

CAUSE Wore die Surrogate s Cowl, 
Suftvcn County, of the County Court 
House m die Village of Momtarllo, 
New York in the County of SuAvanon 
March 25th, 1985 rt 2 pun. why a 
decree should not be made n the 
estate of MARE HINOC, deceased, 
lately damkrled at Codiecron. 
Town of Cochedan. in the County of 
Sufivan. odndnng to probate a era- 
torn wntatg datedhme 29, 1984, as th 
lost wa and Testament ratartg to 
red and personal property, of 
HNCX. deceased feed. Arretted 


and Sealed February*, 1985. (LS) 
L HANOrtt. Surrogate, 


EUGENE M. 

TOBY L RfiOSt OertL Attorney . 
teviNE. CAASS & MltlflL Tef Net 
(914)482 4200, Adctas- P.0 Bex 458 
• Man Street, Jeffenanvfle. New 
York 12748. Tha omm ■ served 
upon you as reflated by low. You <ye 
not obfcgtd to tfljpw w person. If 
you foJ to appear it wrl be resumed 
•hot you da not ofcytcr to the refief 
refloated You ham a nght to have 
an ottomev-ctf-faw appear for you. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO OS FOR YOUR 
NEXT INTERNATIONAL MOVE 


FOR A FTC ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHENS: 

BARCELONA: 

BONN: 

VBtBh 

era men «. 

CADIZ: 

nuramjRT: 

GENEVA: 

LONDON: 

MADRID: 

MANCHBIERi 

MUNICH: 

NAPLES: 

MRS: 

ROME: 

VIENNA: 

ZURICH: 


[0711 19.93.24 
01)961.12.12 
03 6523111 


■Tl 166062 

042111705911 

02)720.95.63 
956)8631441 



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OAT 


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■1)7072016 
089 1415036 
08117801622 
3)0149000 J 
06)52*93421 


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01)343.20.00 


ALLIED 


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(069) 250066 

MUNICH I.MLS. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON lBfl 

(01) 953 3636 

CAIRO AUtod Vrat lines (nfl 
(20-2) 712901 
USA AUMVosUwelnVIGrap 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 
FOUR WINDS INTL 


CAU US FOR YOUR NEXT MOVE 
PARS (3) 036 63 11 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


MOUdNS - RESIDENTIAL. Sumptu- 
ous pi warty 600 sqjn. an level with 
rile park. 10 rooms. Large receptan 
100 Sfljn, Rrepiaw. 5 Seriooiie, 5 
baths, playrooms xririi fireplace, Staff 
fluorfers. Guest roam. Pool-house. 
Tams court Swmvrira poof. 2£ 
acres. Mdn offer to SSI. 47 La Cras* 
setts. 06400 CANMES [931 38 19 19. 


CANFESCAlifOKNIE. High class res- 
idonas. Marvelous 3-bedioom apaf- 
mertf, 110 sq.m, 3 botta, equated 
fafchen. terrace 20 stun. Fantastic 
seowew. Garage. RJOOJMO. SS. 47 
to Oowsite, 0p400 Cannes. Tek (93} 
38 l" It. 


CAP FERRArs mast beautiful 403 
sqjiL luxury wderfront. 4500 


sqjiL uxvy MrigrtFom. sqm. 
scirden. Pmate port. Urgent: Ba* 
1882. Herald Tnburw, 92521 Nealy 


Cedes, Fronce 


COTE D'AZUR between Cannes & St. 
Tropex Magnifice nt 300 sq.m. vfllo 
4JOO sap. fenced land, trees. C 
ROUZEYKOl (731 79 61 65. 


CtA 


GREAT BRITAIN 


PHME LOMXM nfuttehed penod 
freehold 5 bedroom, 3 beds gents. 2 


reduced by 30% noworfy 
Contact Gtom “ 


05 NEWS A WORLD REPORT 
ON SAbE AT 
BRBfTANCrS 

37 Am. de r Opera. Paris 2 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS m 
Pont 634 3965. Genera: 
. Rome 678 03 20. 


JACQUES COUSTEAU IEC1URE M 
Engtoh . Amazon film, Fn, NaiAy 
Mcrch 8. 8 p.m. Cdh 722 04 35 


SUN. HY. 11MB - Em. 

Write Keyset. P08 2. B1 


W, A T. S ara, some, save. 
CaB 8 - IQ pm 577 8? & Para, 


MOVING 


0ONTDMX CoBbaiers to 3)0 atms 
wUwide ■ Av/Sml Gdl Onb 

281 188) Ftorefm^OpScXS 


tlx 894900 ALA8A Tell mSUsSf 

FAX: 01 631 3575 faraps 2 raid 3) 


GREECE 


HYDRA. 8REA1HTAKMGLY utuated 

atond maw needs ranratsseur roho- 

faktottoit 1000 «un. endoxd land 
wito lerraert flartsravjpotifli. Floor 
«K8 450 sqjtL L5S75JDOO. Write 
nor B. 7 Eaton Ptace London SWI or 
ring 01-235 2660 UK 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
Prinapality of Monaco 

For sede m iunmara modern residence, 
pkaant 2 roams wrih tara sea view, 
aelkr - 

KoSaV^A^KE IN1BUMHM 


BJ>.54 
MC 98001 MONACO CHJEX 


Tefc^W^SO « 84 


469477 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


MONTE CARLO 
Prtnapafrty of Monaco 


S81MG VHtr EXCBnONAL 
APARTMENT, PATIO, 

_ 7D0 eqjn. priv a te aarden 
Reodential area. Cimra of town, calm. 


staff with bath, s p nrifra t modern frafly 
efljpp edjBtc hen, 1 la rge spa te room, 
nitol office, lage dressing room. 


gar oge. l-tgh doss service: 
Air conditu^yi 


eledne bfinds, etc 


ExausvE Sfeap miaMatA 


MC 98001 MONACO CHJEX 


Tek (93) 50 66 84 
Tlx: 469477 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


PARIS 7TH 


BETWEEN NVAUDE5 6 
CHAMPS DE MARS 


Vent charming 135 sjjh. dwtox "artat 
amfcr styfe", reception + 2 bedrooms 


AGBKE VANEAU, 25 nraV. 
TEL: 555 46 63 


Embassy Service 


8 Avol de Marin* 
75008 PoS* 
Tetox 231696 F 


YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARK 


FLATS FOR SALE 

PHONE 562-1640 

FLATS FOR RENT 

PHONE 562-7899 

OFFICES FOR RHUT/SALE 

PHOFC 562-6214 


CLOSE AVEKLBS 

Fabulous duflfsx ui beautiful town 
house. 6wiwfinrng rooms. 2 bedrooms. 
Ueaf far ra M rat u k ikv- 766 33 00 


imdl 


PARIS 6TH. ST. GSMAJN 
er sells m reflated _ _ 
pmdrafarre with dxxaeJer, 3 ram 
equipped fatdwn, both, srawrate WC 
toi 1863. Herald Tribune, 92521 
Newly Cede*, Fronce 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ABEA FURNISHED 


NEW, HIS NOW. L^g +.2 bed- 

S I baths, equmperf kitchen, ka- 
fatohedPlANTH) TEBACE. 
H/5U^CC. Viet today & tomorrow, 


WAR PUCE BES VOSGES, 

room tfaptox, vwtfi prrvcSe 

Vral today 1 pjn - 4 pjn. 17 rue de 
Toumeies. 


USA GENERAL 


LAKE TAHOE, CA. Country mn. cot- 
tag« & r^nurori. Great opportuni- 
ty. 5720000. 916583-1721 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Loueiy rawrtBU t with magnificeni 
vwwi of U*e Geneva and mountans. 
Monfrrara, Via*. Verbier, Us Diabler- 
•1*. near G«oad, Ley- 

sn. Exceleat Opportond i tra far 


.Price* front SF123JOO. 

Av Man Repos 24, 

, QLVS-j U««*»e, Switeerknd 
Tefc py 22 35 12 Ibu 251 B5 MBJS 
rad Since 1970 . 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


GENEVA 


fWAlE INDIVIDUAL OFFBS 
far sde m heart of Graievo, Intone 


--- ntod property of about 21600 
sqlt. (which could be " ’ ' ' 


— ... eaaty mbdvided 

depending on requenmentsT dtuatod in 
tpobara wdled gaden. The* axque 
property offer* secwity/pTvacy / b cm- 
qdray and is also geogmphicsiy m 
orator of town. Suratanna price re- 


quired. Prindpab only reply m confi- 
aence to: Bae 1793. Her da Tribune, 


92521 


Bee 1791 Hera 
NeuityCedrai 


Fruut 


SWnZBUAM) / TESSIN 
Axena/ Raneeu lake Moggiore 
fcy dred tram buddra ksxwioiB opar*- 
merts with imique’ unimpeded view 
overioofaoo lake, beautiful para 
urith UmiOm raraon efimote. 


Amerrteii lfthole grf, honebodt 

reinq, travel, fisting. 

New Miai & Lurxjno. 


U<93toL 

Safa penwted to nocvSwni residrats. 


Uccv Via Motta 3. 

.. Of-6648 MJnasio 

let 093/33 37 60 - 33 42 51. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


ST. JEAN CAP FEBRAT, between hfcz 
& Monaco, luxurious modem wla, 
Juty & August, direct access to sea, 
pool, 5 bedrooms + service 2 tatdv 
erts, ar-concitianed, M TV dorm, 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LOF8X3N. For the best funrahed ftots 
and houses. Coreufl the Spcoafats,- 

Tet London 

352 


PHbp*. toy and lewi s. 

528111. Telex 27846 RBOE G. 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE AV. 

Pefctee rentals. Vetemastr. 174. 
Amsterdae. 020621234 or 622ZH 


ITALY 


When er Rome; 

PALAZZO AL VBABRO 
Luxiry apartmerri house with furnshed 
Hats, araJaUe for 1 week and more 


Phone: 6794325. 6793451 
Write Via del Vrfabra 16, 
0018b fione. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


TROCADBtO. luxunous S *uwj^2 


rooms, terrace. 6*7 52 82. 

Pie Vetscilefc 4-roam house, garden. 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


in Ohm fc ift g n i ot ionnf H m J d fri- 
bun+wh fm or m ditmatUrd 
Of a mftfan i mxfa rt iwrW> 
ifafa most of whom two fa 
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rood it. Just Wu vs ffae 
613595) before 10am, ms- 
evrfap that wo can ton you 
bosk, and your mOBa a o w0 
oppoar wfth 48 bom Ike 
rate m US. $9.80 at herd 
armhrdknt pmrbm. You most 
iw* nxiMjfafa and vordk 
abto bUBogdddrmss- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


LIQUID GOLD 


JOJOBA 

the nwode been grown in da 
i A fao* o noturd fife spar of 10Q - 

200 years. Umk Lobii ^ * 

phramaceuficul* 


Jaioba the 
USA. hast 


fuUuii i Ht . Dr. D. Yermanas, __ 

Umersty, stored, "No other plant 
product m the world is capable of re- 
placing petroleum based fab ricate ". 
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ann u al _ income ihereafter of 33%. 
Enarnea from ■ n e it c cs Bid 
Ixefars welcome. 

For complete detafa canfoct: ALJGBA 
RESEARCH, to 1777, Herold Tnbune, 
92521 Neuflfy Cede*, fans. 


MONEY TREES? 


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BROKB» SnunSMlffTB}. 

Material araUiie m Engfch, French. 
Getmon, Arafac Bax 1/78, Herald 
'rfautie, 9S2' 


Triune, 9B21 NeuDy Codex. Franee. 


THE RNANOAL TIMES 
EU80PPS BUSINESS fCWSPAFR 

now apnralm a morning of pufafaxion 
delivery service to wbxnber* Ewrxj in 
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further defeA, please eontad.- 
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Brand W. 

finanad Times Fronlrfrat 
Tel: 06197598-105 Teh* 416193 
No FT no ux tenent 


PANAMA LIBERIA. CORPORATIONS 
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I. hmslflq. 


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J Roger Gnffin UJ, F.CA. 
Braowre: Corporate Management Ltai, 
tom House, Victona Street, 
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Tetox 


Tet (0624) 23303/4. 
sBysf CORMAN G. 


MARKETING RBRSENTAUVE 
INVESIMBITS 


Energy ft security m onaflemenf carpL, 
bmeainUJS. seeks overseas ren es en- 


. . S8*)B 

-- — UNaRiRN proQKvni to bqk 

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SH OUR AD ON 
PAGE 9 

TRANS CONTAINS! 
MARKETING AG 


IMMIGRATION TO ISA 
MADE EASY 
Attorney ft Sector obt a ins wm ft 


Attorney ft Bbdtor afatams vnai ft per- 
manent residence. Helps to set up USA 

businesses ft looses rammer ad, 
trid ft rssdenhri real estate, far five 
brochure write: David ffasan, 1201 
Dove St, Ste 600, Newport fletrh, CA 
92660 USA. (7T4j 752 5«d 


to seS 


BROKOS WANTS 


fafl* anwd income of U552500 (An 
* Comyrti and ca np u y 
'Stoncoc". Bloomtoury. 
Cfatariaxi Ausfrafa. 

(079] 457(5 Austrafa. 


FRB4CH BUSINESSMAN teeb to rep. 
resenf American consumer products 
campaus et France. Wnt* Mr Chx- 
bfl. 15 rue DabcrlesVoboore, 75016 
Pons, Fraic* 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FD4ANOAL GROUP OR INVESTORS. 
We are looking for senaus partner* 
who ore wftng to invest ra a vary 
impart ant & firfl class red estate prto 
pet (d»ut IES6J milan) exdurive 
town, dare to the Swiss border. 9 
mfes from Geneva Write to FjQ 
to 56^ 1815 Cawn ^tont reux. Swit- 
xertond er tbu (45) 453280 00 CK 
SwfasriraA 


EXPORT ASSISTANCE 

W3I buy gooft, for marketing in 


US of arast with export, joint < 
cartudered A.LM. B78 V 28 Avis 


•TRAD OF COMPUTERS? Let us 
xhow you haw frtondy they cat be. 
far busmen er personal loe. Auttxj- 


raod deden far BAAApj*. atfarv 


Huge decourts. We eat _ r 

2*5 SUSS*- Afr - Lawrence, 
Paw 563 2989 or 348 3000. 


FRESH WATBl PEARL strad aid 
toose peto an sofa m Hong Kong. 
Own factory arri bar price. " 
deta*: Tbc 57719 PCKA8HX 
6832767. 9/F. ' 


32767. 9/F, Wry Lok Mauton, & 
14 PaktogRd. T5T, KK Haig Kong, 
long Peorfc Co. 


(L5. COW ANY DEAUNG in impart- 
prport oolong far private financing 
btoer* er mcpjr Ejropeai mnronce 
aganootian to confirm goramned 
ce nff d bmfc l/C large amount m 
U5$. Tele* m confidence to tntertrare 
France Th 204971 Fw 600581 F 


F8XIOARY BANKING an krg* col- 
laterofaed ten. The only commer- 
pd to* veto q rep nuuAte v L office 
in London yeriefan g in Ihs seme. 
Arab Ojervom Bonfe & Tnnt (WJ.l 

Ud '3S^ Pr,nce U * xk *' SET 
Td 735 8171 


MAJOR CONSTRUCTION HRM 
seeks cotoudwnprotecls over $in 
tnfion in 3rd World or And) nations. 


We eon finance. Abo am exdtange 
~ G* 3616500 


any amettey far L55- 
Zurnt\ 


BUSMESS WOMAN wqhing to repre- 
sent E u rapera or Int'l Ca waning to 
open office m new York. OutsfcnSna 
'Wi fien *n» + tetguaafa. ExceBent 

r^-enas. Tnbune, 

92521 Neuigy Cede*, tea 


--- — modem brass*- 

..j ratouranl for infc HauHon, «ri- 

jS n S m heovy traffic area 

Cdi Andrews ! Brown, Artys, Haw- 
tan, TX U5 713-227-8686. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


TBCTB E C0F B1AJANT IN fads/ 
ft leisure wear with the 
rvghest earrat caaorcre enrienoe 
■» merdxmdjang IT buymg s fn- 
P®* 1 ™» expertise ft oon- 

too% araridlie fln a ccnsdtoncy bass 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


KTL 

BEAUnHJL PEOPLE 

UhAJAVTBJ MC 

U-5JL 6 WOMLDWDE 


A complete mid ft buimess service 
P'owdng a unteie coHectaon of 
talented, ueriatue ft adtifingud 
irxfivtoud* for. 


FaihiOteCannierciaLPrmAProriiotioru 
Conv*r*iorvTrade ShowvFresi Parties 
Special Evenh-knage Mdters-PTs 
Sodd Hrrlr lfaitum CrHertiim .1 s 
Sobol Go mp oniore-Tour guides, etc. 


212-765-7798 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 5dfi 5f„ HY£- 10019 
Serriee Rraresentativei 
NeededWbridwide. 


OFFSHORE 
UMITH) COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 


Worldwide 

Adnirktrotaqn 


ReaJymade or Spodd 
LONDON REPRESENTATIVE 


ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Dept HI, 8 Victoria St 
Douglas, We er Man. 

T& 0624 26591 
Telex 627691 SHVA G 


HONA TIONAI COMPANY 
, .FO RMATION 

18C compames front C^5 LOM. Panama 
ft eft mgor off-shore certen. Fufl ad- 

nvrehafion, nornnee services, power* 

of attorney, regstered offices, accaun- 
tancy, confidennd bank accounts 
epened co n f ri enad telephone, telex, 
fax ft ntoSraj^i 


Iterated 

43 Catrang Street. Livemod. L8 7NN. 
Tefc Ml 709 1480, Tbc 628613 BUSSES. 
Fax: 051 709 5737 
Assadated Office Wdfdwide. 


Londoo-london-Lonclon 


CW Band Street. W1 
Mai, tefaphone. trie* service 
Secretory service, ad iie ni s tni n ai 
Farmanorp do mi dSa li an end man- 
agemert - Ut ft offshore companies 
Safer 


CORPORATE SERVICES IUK1 LTD 
UadaaVnXSTl 


2/5 QtdBandSt, 

Teh 01-493 4244 
TTb 28247 SCSIDN G 


YOUR GB4EVA CUKE 
writ 

„ , IAS. IX 

Comprehensive range of services 
7. Rue Muzy.GS'JP/A 1857 
Teh 22/36 05 40 Tlx: 23342 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


YOUR OFHCE IN NEW YORK. Fifth 
Awe. address <md / a phoras os yoa 
U5A ctffice. Mtri. phone aA reemed 
ft fcxwaded New York Mrd Service, 
210 Fifth Aye, NYC 10010. 

NEW YORK GTY. Unque Service, 
hfcfctown Eosl Side. 244r. Telephone 
Aniwnng. your number er ours. 
MoJ, SecretanaL Conpony Formo- 
taons. ft ConfitfantaEty. Brae’s Reas- 
5y.tot349 E. 52 St, t4v. N.Y. lo3£ 
(212) 752-7676. 

PBCSONAL LOANS even unsecured, 
mortgage toons, mortgages decorat- 
ed, buiumsj loans. B&tTRADING, 
Box 291, S751 05 Uppsofa, Sweden 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

ARBrfRAg, Major ba* arfhentico- 
lion of colatarcfl for aUicus front- 
ocbons provided. Rapid. Kritobto. 
Reawnable fees, London based. Tefc 
01-244 9592/01-385 5492/01930 
8926. Hx: 8951622 TA88CO G. 

WAU STRST: wto't nutt GNLLM- 
tar ha* the answer*. SEC registered. 
GML CP. 54, CH-1000 Lousonra 7 

DIAMONDS 

DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Hne (Somonds in any price range 
at lowed wholesale prices 
<Sred hom Antwerp 
cerMr of the domonri world. 

Ful guaratee. 

For free pnee fat wnte 
ioochan Goidenstem 
ftranratomrt 

Estabfahed 1728 

PeESmondrare 62. 52018 Antwerp 
Betoum - Tefc (fa 31J34 iff 51 

TIu 71779 sy< b. At the Diamond Oub. 
ffeart of Antwerp Diamond indudry 

OFFICE SERVICES 

YOUR RJRNBHS OHKE 

IN LONDON 

• 7 day 24 hour aeen ft mswerphone 

• Fall support sendees mcludmg: 
seeretond, telex, copying, re 

• Corporate Representotion Service 

• Short or -long term qteltoBy 
World-Wide Burineu Cradre* 

1 TOTtae Sferaid lewfan WC2* OAA 
Tek 01 836-8918 Tbc 24973 

YOUR LOMXSN OFRCE 
of toe 

06HAM EXEamVE CBTOE 

Comprehenpve range of services 

ISO fagm* Sfreel. London Wl. 

Teh (0T] 439 6288 Tl* 261426 

1MKRJS * ZURICH • 252 76 21. 
faorie / telex / meftox. 

OFFICES WANTED 

BORA OFFICE SPACE? 

&*4etashaemodefnspc«taoeco- 
mwfa» r 15peopleuTgenrtyf»ed§deefr 
he* Pons by US rnogaane braeou. Tri: 
563 10 70 - Ext 373 


REAL ESTATE 
TOJIENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FUBNISHED 


LUXEMBOURG 
LARGE APARTMB4T 


3 bcdrooriB, short term rertd. F25000. 
A8P> 265 11 99 


PLACE V9AX3ME 
SUPERB APARTMENT 


3 bedrooms, short term 
F35JM0 a month. ABF 265 11 


AGBttE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT - 

764 03 17 


UIXURY AT BUDGET PRK23I Try R» 
totari apatmerte near the BffeITt 


er. Front one week upwards, fully 
equipped studios to 5 roonH with or 
wdteut hotel service. Contact FLA- 


TOTH, 14 rue du Thtatre, 75015 
Tet J75 62 20. Tlx.- 2B21 1 F. 


faris. ‘ 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8lh 


2 or 3room apartment, 
toe month er more. 

IE CLARDGE 359 67 97. 


FOB SHORT TBtM STAY PARIS: Sta- 
das and 2 roant decorated Contact 
SafireatA oveDekrese, 75008 Pons 
Tefc (1 jS9 99 50 


DEAL FOR SHORT TERM STAY. Pare 
snxfias & 2 roans, decorated. Contact 
Sardtoi: 80 rue Unrfierrite, Boris 7th. 
Tefc PI S44 39 4a 


LE VEBNET. 120 sqm to sublet in 
pnvs te vft a, Victonon stylo, 2XCC 
(pram, tege yaruQ*. woods, 
month. Tel: 


Of ST. LOUS. Magmficent duplex on 
Seme, grerad sdan, 2 bedrooms, 2 


baths, beautifully furrashed. wy sun- 
try. F25JM0. Trf 720 37 99 


16TH TROCADOa Very lovely dou- 
ble twig, 2 bedroom, weB farruhed 


mo^tfiowf wew. sunny. F9 J0a 72j 


5HOST IBM in Latin Quarter, 
No agents-, Tefc 329 38 S3- 


NBIUIY. top floor, braly 2 rooms, 
with bcJgyty, Tefc 544 39 40 


ODEOH Roommate far high dots 
4 1301. 


eportment, F3A00. Tefc 634 

NEAR L UXEMBOURG 

sqm sunny, ednt ApriHst, 6S3 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


16* AUTHJLL Studio, bah, btehen. 
503 33 06. 


fast BCECUnVE HOMHWDMG- 
farn ft suburb*. Rerte/sdes 551 09 45 


SWITZERLAND 


WSSB»i (NEAR ZURICH) 

fa best faeoan, an shore of the beauti- 


W Lake of. Wdengadt pb ridte'fram 
wlogeafWie- 


Zund^, injhe medevd or «i w 

un. we oftv k>fwrt on apartmenf with 


2» rooms. 1st axity equipment, com- 
plete lotenen, with large sunny terras 


+ dl ccrnfart v mdoa svwmnmg pod, 

sanaran garage. Rant per atnunti 

raZl^UO, 5 yea* er mote. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD. 

Dorfiar, Q+8872 WEE5EN 
Tefc CH/ 58-431 778 
Tlx 876062 HOME CH. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


VKUTOIDB4I cf InteriiflMnri com- 


ptmy requires furmhed or vrtlur- 
5/6 bedroom apar tm ent / 


nshed . 

house 250 sqm mninuRi in Nrafty, 
16th. 8th. 7th. Tefc to* 500 39 08 


EMPLOYMENT 


FOR MORE EXECUTIVE PORTIONS 
LOOK UNO® 

“(NTSNAnONAL POSITIONS" 
PAGE 13 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


THE AMBDCAN COLLEGE to ton 
seekscondidreesFarpcsiionefDiree- 
tor/PuUc B el a t io n s. tecelent writing 
design, loy-oif, erStarid sbk re- 
quhed in En^sh / French. Back, 
ground in oMnu, martefing e- 
sentad- WjHt permirreqared. Send 
CV, wrting «mpl«, refareKH: Of- 
to of Oeral e pm e nt. 31 Awe. toquet, 

75007 Pans. 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and 
INTERNATIONAL HBUUJ> TRIBUNE 


By Phono: Gdl your bad 1HT repretentatave with your ted. 1 
wiH be iof o ui ra d of the cost iro ra e dm riy. ml once | 
mode your ad wiH appear within 48 hour*. 

Cofa: ti» baric rate is $9.80 per fine par day + bed tans. That ij 
25 ieher*. sign* and spaces m the first fine and 36 in th* 1 
Mmimuro ipocs is 2 fetes. No u b b i o viaticf oonpted. 

Craft! Card*: AnMrkn Express, Diner** Oub, Eurocmt i 
Card. Access and Visa 


HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMBKA 


Pari*: (For dassrfied only^ 
747-4600. 



EUBOK 


I2M6-15. 
Afftoam 361-8397/360-2421. 
: 343-1899. 

: (01) 329440. 
Frankfort: (069) 72-67-55. 
tonotno: 29-58-94 
Lfabew 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
London: (01) 8364802. 
Moftfct 455-2891/455-3306. 
MHon: (02)7531445. 
Norway: j03) 845545. 
Romra 679-3437. 

S w o d e n: 0B 7569229. 
TriArir. 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contact FranfcfurL 


_ : 212-9608 

BuonaiAkra: 414031 t 
(Dept.31^ 

Gu n y q wB. 431 943M3B .-S- 
UnM:417852 .A 

farara 664372 1 

Srei Jorac 22-10B 
Sanfiogra 6961 555 
Soaped* 852 1893 ,yi 

MIOOUEIMT f" 


:2463Q1 
Wat 2521 4. 

Kowraff: 5614485. 

: 34 00 44. , 

es 416535. 

Saenfi Anftne 
Joddak 667-15001 
UAX: Dated 224161- , 


MIMST 


UMTB9 STATES 


1 3988657.’ 
Hong Kona 5-420906 
Ma5raB170749. ; 

Sarah 725 H7 71 
flnpreinra 2222725. 
Toton 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


YoHe pi 2] 752-3890. 
(41^362-8339. 


AUSTRALIA 


Sydney. 929 5639. 
MNuCUsDA* 


6908231 


i' 

ifv 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTiyES AVAILABLE 


9RGFBSOR of appM physiology + 
■dental medone. tuaxterd, tori e» 

P aienee in ocodemic manogemanr, 

reridorrt W. Gwmcny ft Nfcw En- 


gland, USA. seeks ctaPengng pos- 
taan, potratoiy pat-tame, far exom- 
pe technology transfer in bomtood 
sdencm, Europe cr worldwide. PO 
Box 101213, D-S970 Bod Qeynfiousun 


HSNCH LADY DDECTOR press, 

togrop*V. odrertisinjj, fa 1 ' ’ 
toll inogaone. Fluent 


togrtoV. 

mil mogc H . 

Spanish. Htei level cankxss. Seefa 
position PR/PA at ebon. Bax 1072. 
Her o*d Tribun^92521 Netifty Cedex, 
44 20. 


France or Td 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MINERVE INTERIM 


SECRETARIES 

BOMGUAL S4GUSH SHORTHAM3 
KNOWLEDGE WOO PROCESSORS 
Very bng repfaonnanls 


138 Av Vidor Hugo. Peris 16th 
1 1 rue du Havre, Pom 8th 
727 61 W. 


aiQUSHqaedang executive lecrmay 
with work prama reanred far Preudeni 
of American firm headquartered m 
Brumeb. Management quaStia is- 
twired, high preraure |ob so aamnUe 
pew or* personalty a mus. Gomputer 
experience a pta Send reurne +■ irie- 
pnone naft pnem to Box 1883, Herald 
Tnbune. 92521 Neifty Codex. Fraa 


Miner vf ambucan 

miNtKVt pffiMS PARIS 


seaetones. 


Dutah or German 
of French re- 

. . _ - BSrigud 

triensli. WriMpr phone: 138 Avenue 
fans, France. TeL- 


quired. 


727 i 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


HOMME 33 an* Sre de voyqjer, hte 
borne presertolfan. experience dans 
de nonveux domanes, recherche 

^ waiter* avec resgonabilto. 
id. Tab Pan 254 7990. 


Don't mta 
MYBMATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITtONS 

TU5DAYS 

in Rw IHT OaraSed 5edran, 


EMHX)YMENr 


GENERAL -J". 
POSITIONS WANTR 


EXPEMBKB} BRITISH 
seaetcry/tramfata, 
Switiertond. no HS, 
man, Frendi (de lwnra^j 
mai, moderate Ita Ji tii, i*- 

cnfed. p-asentabte, wod^ 

soft* tong term rapi raA, 
NauiOy Odex, France. 


DYNAMIC LADY goodtoo^- 
m leverd l u n gm ne*, long ■ 
at the executive level plraS 
tourism ft prontafan. bteMJj .., 


ikma for new dafciUfBj 
n*y. Prnpcxad 


to trari 


toed xi Europe ra . 

CaA Box 20155 Via Wo w 1 
00187 Rome ' 


ADAWRSTRATJVE SKlgA® 

tun wanted in fare. W _ 


i'etopnienl Depf. t* «8 Jf j 

baS?NY.F 


Nationafcty! I T . , 
lege: Cotoniia Urw. 

, c/oMfeMcofa”-^ 
,2330027}. 


" o Am 


mai lady, top wti- a 

yowid, good 

rekrtwro, x ite r pre ter. high *? 
as with mil argontoioQ 
trovefied, fluent 
Greek, irek* Steady diotew 
Bon, no be*. Free to wvriW! 

Pan bated. 704 8176 befWL 


fn 


FR94CHMAN. 31&xap«" ' 
School, fluent Bteeh, Ger* 

to trtmel, 

experience in ja_ 
fifcm. env ir onment 


r 


BICUUUItED AnariCBL^j: ' 


pen web Amenam 


"Ti,.- 

\ 


YOUNG GOMAN.. 
eduatodlorittfarm- 
non. London 245-0060- 


attractive uurtSby#*, *, 

French, German, 
cammerad rapaneiawM . 
persond |jJu "tl 

SfcSaRsFlligYt 


N 

f i ’* \St f :- : 
ift 1 

X S .te tnbr- 1 

■' ’iMWMi 1 
' H--': 

l * 1 ft 


PA6E5 s: v - 


•« 


FOR MORe i \. 1 ,7 


ciassotedn^v^: 

-~&C: 


% i 

^ tees 
-H- 


Y-r 






Primed by gdz in Zurich (Switzerland)