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PARIS, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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. /i Bernard Gwertzman - 

Vex- York Tima Scrntx 

- H1NGTON — The Reagan 
"'I'm:, itration tuts told Congress. 

" ;w ^ad has failed so far to make 
;c: '.'v , prepress, in its eccmoiriii;.- 
Is 'Wrr* i>- plan for the United StatesC 
Israel’s request for a major 
, • l ; - in economic aid. \ 

" ; - ' \w'- ig a House of Represents- 
• • ' •LoTjijJ /bcommittee that was rirAr 

.^anixnous in advocatix^ ap- . 

of the S2.6 billion in new 
. ~ ought by Israel, the State 

[‘“t' \\ r meat's senior economic of- 

• - \ v.hifil id Wednesday that the new 

: 1 ‘b ‘ i .would be wasted because erf 
' failure to cope adequately 

■ '■'vlccir.n.bdgaary and fiscal prob- 

,.i j^.moaey, said Allen WaDis, 
l-edi-r i'v weretary of state for eco- 
' would “disappear 

• \\. t ‘ ,. w 

- W.-x. i received S1.2 billion m 
- 1'. -i _ a ;iic aid for the 1985 fiscal 
“*iiich began Oct 1, and Sl.4 
. .. ' ’ ' l ">n mfliiarv aid. It has asked, 

• : I." i' ' jillis said, ior S800 million as 
' .* '[[ * ememal econcmic grant for 
..." t S1.8 billion in economc 

. • \\ , : ' : ^the 1986 fiscal year. 

"^"v Reagan administration has 
1 '■ ^-'de a decision, Mr. Wallis 
gjtfjgr the. supplemental 
, c -ther^ularl98orequesLll 

'"'-ady submitted aprpposal to 
. ’ « to increase military . aid 

1 ‘ : ‘ J 71-4 billion to J1.8 bfllion. 

•> have been difiereoces be- 
Toogress and the State De- 
before over the size of aid 
"" ‘ "id. This year, however, the 


.i --V i . ; 



Tht Asoeialcd Pro* 


RETURN TO REMAGEN — In Remagen, West Germany, William E. McMaster, 
left, embraced Mayor Hans Peter Kuerten on Thnrsday, the 40th anniversary of the 
U-S. capture of the Remagen bridge, shown above in a photo taken dining the fighting. 
Mr. McMaster, who lives in New Jersey, took part in the battle as a lieutenant Page 2. 



Reagan Receives 
2-Party Support 
For Arms Talks 




Iraqis Bomb 
2 Iran Giles 
To Retaliate 
For Attacks 


First MXs to Be Deployed Before Being Fully Tested 


‘is been intensified because 
Yowr Classified Ad Quickly aze of the Israeli request and 
in Kim » the arimfnis tratifm has he- 

MfflNATtCNAl HERALD deeply involved in consulta- 
iih the Israelis on the type (rf 
T" -^ n > c policy changes that. 
" be introduced in their codn- 


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T elaying its formal submis- 
Congress, .tlte. admim&tnt-- 
s "ims to be trying to apply 
: on Israel to lake more 
law* steps. But the admmistra- 
r.vrt* turn, is being pressed by 
?-•••’»»» supporters to go ahead 
. with a large aid program. 
^T’-ly every one of the dozen 
-Its of the House Foreign Af- 
v«. *»* - bcommittee on Europe and 
v-v cp jdic ^ who auenoed the 
^ Fa ' 5 * conrolained about the ad- 
mswtion s attitude. Several said 
ynhe administration did not 
a formal request for the' 
;Uo- Vjid money within the next 

- so. they would do so them- 
■ - 

^^JflVallis said that while he was 
.. a i >»d” by the efforts the govern- 
or Prime Minister Shi mem 
--id made to reform the Israe- 
krc'cF - omy, and was optimistic 
long-term prospects, “in 
v, Israd has not yet reached 
in the evolution of. its 
-f\/y program where additional 
ppon will be helpfuL” 
ii^sraeh economic plan — to 
national budget and insti- 
i^T. her austerity measures — 
do the trick," Mr. Wallis 

1 if we give them $800 mi]- 
. ip; : supplemental aid as the plan 
L-^ands, we're convinced that 
• -'appear and their economy 
I*, -.uje any better off, and theyll 
'jigger problems later on, 

'■* r ' ' be back for more money 
wse problems." 

. - Wallis said that Israel had 
. : United States it could not, 

. deal reasons, go any further 
' had in its austerity mea- 

: basic problem is that 
consuming quite a lot more 
'tinned on Pace 2, CoL 4) 


Reuters 

BASRA, Iraq — Iraq struck 
Thursday at the Iranian cities of 
Dizful and Abadan and warned of 
further retaliation for attacks on 
civilian targets in Iraq as Iranian 
artillery again pounded this south- 
ern port aty. 

Residents huddled in shelters as 
Iranian shells fell at the rate of two 
a minute in a bombardment that 
began around mid -afternoon. 
More than 60 shells hit the city in 
an eariier attack just after dawn. 

An Iraqi military communique 
said that warplanes flew 257 sorties 
Thursday against Tranian posi- 
tions. The attacks were.called-.the 
most intense since the start of xhe 
Gulf war four and a half years ago. 

According to the communique, 
the Iraqi planes inflicted heavy 
losses on the Iranians. It did not 
say winch positions were attacked. 

The authorities imposed a 
round-the-clock curfew on Basra. 

“Iraq mil punish the Iranian rul- 
ers severely far their crimes.” an 
Iraqi miliiary spokesman said in a 
statement in Baghdad. 

Iraq, which earlier warned that it 
would larmch retaliatory strikes on 
30 Iranian dues and towns, had so 
far restricted its attacks to Dizful 
and Abadan “out of mercy toward 
the people of Iran,” he said. 

He warned Iranians to “bridle 
their rulers,” adding that Iraq 
would “use eQT its potential to shell 
Iranian dues, which would cause 
heavy losses that Iran could not 
sustain.” 

- An Iraqi official in Basra said 
that Abadan, 32 miles (50 kilome- 
ters) away, across the Shatt al-Arab 
waterway, was “devastated” by the 
shelling.- Dizful is about 140 miles 
to the north. 

Iran said eariier that at least five 
persons were killed and more than 
70 were wounded when eight Iraqi 
missiles hit Dizful early Tbursday. 
and that three persons were killed 
in Abadan. 

Iran which said it would shell 
every inch of Basra in retaliation. 
Shelling was reported in the Iraqi 
border town of Mandali on Thurs- 
day but there was no immediate 
confirmation from Iraqi officials. 

Basra was shelled Tuesday night 
in what Iran called retaliation for 
Iraqi raids on a sted complex at 
Ahvaz and an unfinished nuclear 
plant at Bushehr, both in south- 
western Iran. 


By Wayne Biddle 

Sew Yak Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The first 
MX missiles will be deployed next 
year before their warheads and 
guidance systems have been fully 
tested, according to a draft of a 
General Accounting Office report 
given to the Senate Appropriations 
Committee. 

“We asked GAO to tell us what 
they knew." Senator Lawton 
Chiles, a Democrat of Florida who 
is a member of the Appropriations 
Defense Subcommittee, said 
Wednesday. “They see some prob- 
lems in the testing area. Tests have 
been successful but have only 
shown that the missile can fly. It's 
on a very fast-track schedule at this 
stage. We’re rushing toward de- 
ployment” 

A committee staff member said 
the report which has not yet been 
made public, indicated that techni- 
cal questions about the new mis- 
sile’s MK-21 nuclear warheads and 
its guidance system will not have 
been answered by flight tests be- 
fore the first 10 MX missiles are 
deployed. 

The General Accounting Office. 


a congressional investigative agen- 
cy, raised s imilar issues in a study 
cit the MX program last year. 

“Several major missile compo- 
nents bring changed or redesigned, 
such as the re-entry vehicle and 
guidance and control components, 
will enter production before flight 
testing," the 1984 report wanted, 
calling particular attention to an 
increase in the warhead’s weight 
(bat has drastically decreased the 
missile's range. 

The committee staff member 
said the draft report contended 
that only the last two of the seven 
MX flight tests so far have carried 
more than one of the new war- 
heads. And those warheads were 
prototypes that may differ from 
those eventually used in the field. 
Moreover, the test flights carried 
only six warheads each, instead of 
the full complement of 10 for which 
the MX is designed. 

Congress has ordered the air 
force to complete deployment of 
the first 20 MXs uH^Mmutemc . 
missile silos in the northwestern 
United Slates by the end of 1986. 
Seven of a scheduled 20 test flights 
have been completed, and the air 
force expects to have completed 1 i 


tests by the time deployment be- 
gins and to have finished perhaps 
14 by the end of 1986 and the rest 
in 1987. 

The MX tests have been 
launched from above-ground sites 
at Vandenberg Air Force Base in 
California. The first launching 
from an underground sOo is noi 
scheduled until the ninth test 

Although the missile is said to 
have a range of at least 6,000 miles 
(9.700 kilometers), its longest flight 
so lar, on the third test was 4,800 
miles, from Vandenberg to a point 
375 miles northwest of Guam. 

The fusing mechanism for the 
MX warheads, which would deto- 
nate them at predetermined levels 
on or above the Earth's surface, has 
yet to be tested. Detonations above 
the ground are preferred for most 
types of targets, except for missile 
silos. In some cases, the only way to 
destroy specially hardened silos 
would be to dig them out of the 
Earth within a crater caused by an 
cxplosion oa the surface. . 

■ Question of Vulnerability 

Earlier, The Washington Past re- 
ported 

The head of the Strategic Air 


Command, seeking to overwhelm 
critics of the MX. told Congress on 
Wednesday that the question of the 
weapon's vulnerability was ~no 
longer an issue, in part because “we 
have discovered that existing silos 
are harder than originally 
though t.” 

General Bennie L Davis, the 
SAC commander, also tola the 
Senate Subcommittee on Strategic 
and Theater Nuclear Forces that he 
was in favor of the United States 
continuing to abide by the provi- 
sions of the unratified strategic 
arms limitation treaty, known as 
SALT-2, that expires at the end of 
this year. But he also indicated that 
President Ronald Reagan should 
keep his options open. 

General Davis said the survival 
of individual MXs under a Soviet 
first-strike attack “is better than we 
projected and can be further en- 
hanced.” 

He ascribed this partly io 'im- 
provements, in the U.S. command, 
control and communications net- 
work and early warning system and 
partly to the “discovery" that exist- 
ing silos were more resistant to at- 
tack than previously thought 



Ha Amoontad Pru 

Rich Texans with woes, from left: H. Ross Perot, Nelson Banker Hunt, W. Herbert Hunt 

The Money Woes of Texas Moguls 

Even Billionaires Can Have a Hard Day at the Office 


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t” WT 

Hi California most visi- 
‘ re “ever see has yine- 
forests and vistas 
•primitive as those first 
frewed by voyagers four 
-jtoturies ago,' Page 9. 

Sr “ — 


INSIDE 

■ Lech Walesa was summoned 

to a prosecutor’s office on 
rhar ys of inciting public unrest 
in Poland. - Page 2- 

■ U.S. fanners denounced 
President Reagan’s veto of a 
farm credit program. Page 3. 

■ RHk in the House and Senate 

would prohibit new American 
investments in or loans to South 
Africa. PageS. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ British Petroleum Co. PLC 
reported earnings in the final 
quarter of 1984 climbed 41 per- 
cent from a year ago. Page II, 

■ Barclays Bank PLC reported 
a 17.6-percent rise in pretax 
profit in 1984. Plage 13. 

TOMORROW 

For decades, Austria has lived 
with a half-truth that has en- 
abled it to skin the part it 
played in the crimes of the Na- 
zis. But no longer. 


By Paul Taylor 

H'ashmgtort Post Serrire 

AUSTIN. Texas — Even billion- 
aires. even real live Dallas ones, 
bave bad days at the office. 

Several Texas moguls have suf- 
fered an assortment of degrada- 
tions, embarrassments and set- 
backs in recent weeks that, taken 
together, make the television- 
screen reversals of J.R- Ewing in 
“Dallas” seem mere irritations. 

It is possible that nothing of cos- 
mic importance is hidden beneath 
the tribulations of H. Ross Perot, 
Clint .Murchison Jr. or the Hunt 
family, all of Dallas. 

Stan, in asccnding order of grav- 
ity, with Mr. PeroL Last month, 
when he announced that he had 
bought a 6,000-acre (2.400-hectare) 
tract north of Dallas for $110 mil- 
lion, everyone figured. it was, in 
local parlance, a done deal. 

Mr. Perot did not say what he 
was going to do with the land, but 
since he sold his computer compa- 
ny, Electronic Data Systems Coip_ 
Tor $1 J billion last year, he has had 
plenty to spend. 

The day after his announcement, 
the seller of the land. Gulf Broad- 
cast Co, announced that it bad 
indeed sold the tract — to Gibral- 
tar Savings Association of Hous- 
ton. for S 1 30 million. 

“If that’s the case," Mr. Perot 
said, “then.they sold the same land 
twice.” 

'.Gulf Broadcast said Mr. Perot 
had only submitted a bid on the 
land. Mr. Perot said he had a con- 
firmed sale: “I have a great deal of 


experience buying land, and 1 cer- 
tainly know the difference between 
buying and bidding.” 

Mr. Perot has more limited expe- 
rience buying museums. Bui that 
has not kept him from getting onto 
his second flare-up of the week, this 
one involving his effort to move the 


'Money is like 
manure,’ said one oil 
giant. Tf you spread it 
around, it does a lot ol 
good. But if you pile it 
up in one place . . 


Museum of the American Indian 
from Manhattan to Dallas. 

Mr. Perot reportedly wrote the 
financially troubled museum, 
which houses the world’s largest 
collection of Indian artifacts, to 
iropose a deal: He would give it 
~ million if it moved to Dallas. • 
The museum is weighing the of- 
fer, but it may be bound by a stipu- 
lation in its original charitable trust 
that obligates it to benefit the peo- 
ple of New York state. Mr. Perot’s 
associates hint that both matters 
may end up in court 
Court is also where to find the 
Hunt family, which, according to 
Forbes magazine, has turned out 
four of the nation’s 10 richest peo- 


S3 


pie: Nelson Bunker Hunt (51.4 bil- 
lion in net worth), Margaret Hunt 
Hill (51.4 billion), Caroline Hunt 
Schoellkopf ($1 J billion) and W. 
Herbert Hnnt($l billion). 

The Hunt family was stung last 
month by an Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice order to pay more than 5200 
million in back taxes Tor the years 
1972 to 1980, an order that family 
lawyers are contesting in 18 suits.' 

Hum International Resources 
Inc., a bolding company of broth- 
ers Nelson Bunker and W. Herbert 
told the Securities and Exchange 
Commission last month that it was 
in default on 5295 million of debt 
and unlikely to repay it all. Hie 
company, which operates a sugar 
refinery, is one of several family 
holdings under severe pressure 
from deflated commodity prices. 

The Wall Street Journal esti- 
mates that the two brothers and a 
third Lamar, have seen their net 
worth decline by 54 billion in four 
years, to an estimated S1.6 billion 

The final tycoon in distress is 
Clint Murdiison Jr., founder and 
former owner of the Dallas Cow- 
boys football team. His story is the 
saddest. 

Mr, Murchison has been so be- 
sieged by creditors, all suing over 
highly leveraged deals that went 
sour, that this week he put his 
house up for sale, intending to use 
the proceeds to pay off his debts. 

The sad thing about Mr. Murchi- 
son. 61, son of a legends^ oil wild- 
sauer. Gim Murchison, is dial his 
travails appear to have been 

(Co n tinu ed oo Page 2, CoL 6) 


East Germany 
Says Emigres 
May Return 

Reuters 

BERLIN — East Germany, in a 
major policy change, said Thursday 
that it would allow emigres living in 
the West to return home and that 
families with children would be 
given priority. 

The government announcement, 
carried by the official ADN press 
agent?, came a day after the Com- 
munist Party daily Neues Deutsch- 
land printed a full-page article say- 
ing that 20,000 former East 
Gorman citizens living in the West 
had applied to return. 

ADN said the policy change had 
been agreed upon to mark die 40th 
anniversary of the liberation of 
Germany from Nazi rule. Emigres 

East Germany appears ro back 
easing of Brezhnev doctrine on 
limited sovereignty. Page 2. 

were formerly refused permission 
to return, partly to discourage peo- 
ple from applying to leave. 

Speaking of the families of emi- 
gres. ADN said: “It is to be as- 
sumed that the affected children 
and youths were exposed to life 
under capitalism through no guilt 
of their own.” 

Western diplomats said the East 
German move was a gamble, since 
it might encourage further applica- 
tions to leave. Emigration has been 
a problem since the formation of 
East Germany in 1949. The main 
flow was curbed with construction 
of the Berlin Wall in 1961, but 
applications to leave are still cause 
for serious concern. 

Visa restrictions were temporar- 
ily, eased last year, allowing about 
40,000 East Germans to leave for 
the West. Western diplomats be- 
lieve that that move, rather than 
ridding the country of malcontents, 
as some had seen tire motive for the 
change, spurred applications from 
citizens who had previously balked 
at the risk. 

Neues Deutschland said 
Wednesday that the 20,000 appli- 
cations to return resulted from per- 
sonal desperation, unemployment 
and disillusionment with capital- 
ism. 

Many of the 80 cases singled out 

K " ues Deutschland from the 
involved families with chil- 
dren. Checks with some of the peo- 
ple quoted by the newspaper sug- 
gested that some had been 
misquoted, while others confirmed 
that they were eager to return. 


By Bill Keller 

York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has won warm 
pledges of bipartisan support from 

congressional leaders before send- 
ing his negotiators to a new round 
of arms control talks in Geneva. 

The House majority leader, Jim 
Wright, Democrat of Texas, emerg- 
ing Wednesday from a White 
House meeting with Lbe president 
and his negotiating team, com- 
pared the prospects in Geneva to 
President Richard M. Nixon's re- 
opening of relations with Oiina. 

Mr. Wright said that “nothing 
should be permitted to stand in the 
way” of success at the talks with the 
Soviet Union, which begin Tues- 
day. 

Mr. WrighL and other Democrat- 
ic leaders stopped short of offering 
the president the one token of sup- 
port he wants most an endorse- 
ment of continued production of 
the MX missile. 

The president's campaign for the 
missile got major support Wednes- 
day when five influential members 
of Congress met privately and 
■agreed to postpone any full-scale 
review of the MX until the summer. 

According lo a participant who 
refused to be quoted by name, the 
five were Les Aspin, Democrat of 
Wisconsin, who is chairman of the 
House Armed Services Committee; 
Sam Nunn of Georgia, the senior 
Democrat on the Senate Armed 
Services Committee; Senator Al- 
bert A. Gore Jr.. Democrat of Ten- 
nessee; Senator William S. Cohen. 
Republican of Maine: and Repre- 
sentative Norman D. Dicks, Dem- 
ocrat of Washington. 

(Leading House Democrats said 
Thursday that despite the stance of 
Mr. Aspin and other Democrats, a 
solid party bloc opposed plans for 
the MX. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. House 
Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. of 
Massachusetts said he had 200 
Democratic votes against the weap- 
onj 

Congress is expected to vote-the 
week’erf March 17 on releasing SI. 5 
billion for production of 21 MX 
missiles. The president also has re- 
quested S4 billion for 48 more mis- 
sies as part of the military budget 
for the 1986 fiscal year, beginning 
OcL 1. to be considered later this 
year. 

"Everyone in that meeting 
agreed that the 1986 authorization 
was the time to review' the weapons 
system," said the participant in the 
white House meeting Wednesday. 

Administration officials said the 
president was still reviewing a list 
of options presented to him after a 
National Security Council meeting 
Monday for the opening American 
position in Geneva. 

Pentagon and State Department 
officials said the list was longer and 
more complex than normal The 
officials said both Defease Secre- 
tary Caspar W. Weinberger and 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
had requested private meetings 


with Mr. Reagan in hopes of influ- 
encing the outcome. 

The chief negotiator is Max M- 
Kampelman. Former Senator John 
Tower, a Texas Democrat, will 
head the delegation on long-range 
missiles, and Maynard W. Gliunan 
will head the talks on medium- 
range nuclear forces in Europe. 

Several U.S. officials said there 
was a strong feeling in the adminis- 
tration that the negotiating team 
should “sumd pat” on the propos- 
als that remained on the table when 
the Soviet Union broke off talks in 
November 1983 and should wait 
for the Russians to take the initia- 
tive. 

“You can make some very strong 
arguments for staying where we 
were when the Soviets left.” said 
Richard R. Burt, assistant secretary 
of state for European affairs. 

“We have not wanted to reward 
the Soviets Tor reluming to the ta- 
ble,” he said. “At the same time, we 
hare told the Soviet Union that wc 
do want to make progress in these 
negotiations and that were they to 
return, they would find us flexible 
and ready to move ahead.” 

■ Reagan, Russian Meet 

Mr. Reagan met for 48 minutes 
Thursday with a Soviet Politburo 
member, Vladimir V. Shchurbitsky. 
for what a spokesman called a 
“frank and lively" discussion. Reu- 
ters reported from Washington. 

The White House spokesman. 
Larry Speakes, said the meeting 
dealt mostly with Mr. Reagan’s 
plan for space-based missile de- 
fenses and the opening of the new 
arms talks Tuesday in Geneva. 

Mr. Shcherbiisky, speaking 
through an interpreter said after- 
ward that the Soviet Union was 
“ready to agree to a number of 
compromises, and if the United 
States government would go along 
that line, then a compromise deci- 
sion could be reached and people 
could breathe freely." 


Weapons in Space 

The 'Star Wars" . ^ , 
Controversy 



On Monday and Tuesday, 
the Herald Tribune will publish 
a thorough examination of the 
Amercan proposal to render 
nuclear weapons “impotent and 
obsolete” through a defensive 
system based on advanced tech- 
nology. 

Attention on both sides of 
the Atlantic is sharply focused 
on the plan as the Americans 
and the Russians resume arms 
talks in Geneva on Tuesday. 

Because of the seriousness of 
the issues, the Herald Tribure 
will devote this major effort to 
explaining the background, the 
technological systems, and the 
questions that such a shift in 
basic deTense strategy would 
raise for the future. 


Poll Finds Uneasiness 
On Reagan Budget Cuts 


By Michael Oreskes 

.Vcw York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — From students 
worried about paying Tor college to 
elderly people afraid they will not 
be able to make ends meet in their 
retirement, more than hall of all 
Americans polled last week were 
concerned that they, their families 
or Lhe nation will be hurt if Con- 
gress accepts President Ronald 
Reagan's proposals to reduce do- 
mestic spending. 

That is one of the key findings of 
the New York Ttmes-CBS News 
Poll which tapped considerable 
uneasiness, some of it exacerbated 
by misconceptions about the presi- 
dent’s proposed cuts in government 
spending. 

But fear about specific cuts was 
countered by agreement about gen- 
eral principles. Four in five of those 
polled agreed with Mr. Reagan that 
spending cuts, not tax increases, 
were the way to reduce the deficiL 

The survey round overwhelming 
suppprt for’ federal subsidies to 
farmers, which Mr. Reagan wants 
to reduce, and a continuing erosion 
of Support for the military buildup, 
which Mr. Reagan wants to contin- 
ue. Thirty-three percent of those 
polled considered the deficit the 
nation's greatest economic prob- 

Dollar Bounces Back 
In New York Trading 

' Untied Press tuimiaiipnul 

NEW YORK — The dollar re- 
bounded Thursday in trading in 
New York as central banks failed 
to intervene after comments 
Wednesday by lhe Federal Reserve 
chair man, Paul A. Volcker. Details, 
Page 11. 


lent, second to unemployment, 
which was chosen by 39 percent. 

The telephone poll of 1.533 
adults conducted Feb. 23 to 27 has 
a margin of sampling error of plus 
or minus 3 percentage points. 

When pressed on the issue of the 
budget cuts proposed by Mr. Rea- 
gan, 45 percent identified specific 
reductions that they believed 
would hurt them or their family if 
enacted. Eighteen percent identi- 
fied cuts they say would hurt the 
nation even though they did not 
expect to be personally affected. 

“I've got the proposals nailed to 
the kitchen wall here," said How- 
ard H. Hntby, 63, a cons miction 
superintendent in Denver. 

As with’ many of those surveyed. 
Mr. Hruby. a Democrat who voted 
for Mr. Reagan, was concerned by 
reductions that the president has 
urged and some cuts he has not 
proposed. 

Mr. Hruby said he was worried 
about cuts in the Medicare pro- 
gram of health care for the elderly, 
which is on Mr. Reagan's list for 
holding down costs. The president 
wants to continue the freeze on the 
level of fees paid to physicians and 
to freeze fees to hospitals. 

But Mr. Hruby also said he was 
worried lhai his retirement in two 
years might be endangered by cuts 
in Social Security, which the presi- 
dent has said he will not touch. 

Indeed, when asked to cite pro- 
gram cuts that would hurt them, , 
more respondents. 19 percent, cited 
Social Security than any other pro- 
gram. even though Mr. Reagan's 
budget proposals contain no cuts in 
the program. Some Republican 
congressional leaders have pro- 
posed a freeze on benefit increases 

(Continued oo Page 2, CoL 7) 









Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1985 


** 


IS. -German Reunion Marks Capture of Bridge 


By William F. Drozdiak 

UoifangdHt Pint Service 

REMAG EN. West Germany — The be- 
draggled men in an advance patrol of the UJL 
9th Armored Division could scarcely believe 
their eyes: After righting their way through 
the maze of valleys in the Eifel region, they 
had stumbled across the last intact bridge 
spanning the Rhine. 

The iron and wood structure had survived 
repealed demolition attempts by its Nazi de- 
fenders. who were retreating after a failed 
offensive in the Ardennes. The prospect of 
seizing a key supply link made the bridge, in 
the words of General Dwight D. Eisenhower. 
"■Worth its weight in gold.” 

The unexpected capture of the Remage n 
bridge on March 7. 1945. enabled the Ameri- 
cans to put 25.000 combat troops across the 
river before the structure collapsed 10 days 
later. It established the first Allied bridge- 
head into the heart of Nazi Germany and 
hastened the demise of Hitler's regime. 

Forty years later, hundreds of American 
and Gorman soldiers who participated in the 
battle gathered for a poignant reunion at the 
foot of twin stone towers on the west bank of 
the Rhine. 

The bridge was never rebuilt: the towers 
serve as a peace museum and a memorial to 
those who died in the fighting. 

Gazing across the river lo the chilly fog, 
veterans reminisced about the assault. For- 
mer Sergeant Alex Drabik, 74. (he Fust Amer- 
ican to cross the Rhine, recalled racing across 


the 350-yard (320-meter) span and expecting 
to get hit by machine-gun fire or blown up by 
a mine. 

“It felt like an eternity.” he said- “1 was 
shaking the whole way." I never thought I 
would make history.” 

He added: “This time around, it’s safe ro 
walk around here. It sure beats shooting at 
each other.” 

William E. McMaster. a lieutenant who 
was pinned down while trying lo provide 
covering fire for Sergeant Drabik. said he 
experienced such fear that “only my laundry- 
man knows bow scared I really was.” 

Underlying ihe swapping of stories about 
fear, heroism and camaraderie there ap- 
peared to be a genuine sense of peace and 
reconciliation in the encounters between Ger- 
mans and Americans who fought against 
each other 40 years ago. 

“This is an intensely private and difficult 
period for Germans.” said William 
Woessner, deputy chief of mission at the U.S. 
Embassy in Bonn. “There is hardly a German 
alive over the age of 50 who does not bear 
scars, either psychic or physical, from that 
dark era.” 

Many of the U.S. veterans seemed solici- 
tous of German sensitivities about the anni- 
versary of the Nazi surrender on May 8 . 
Germans have become embroiled in a diffi- 
cult stru gg le to reconcile joy over (he collapse 
of Hitler's tyranny, and the birth of a genera- 
tion of peace and freedom, with sorrow over 
the defeat and division of their narion. 


Friedrich Hoppe, a German pilot who was 
shot down in a bombing raid near Remagen, 
was badly bunted when his plane caught fire. 
He said" he went to the reunion to meet 
Americans. 

“We had to do our duly for our country, 
just as the .Americans had to do theirs." he 
said. 

David Keith, a former U.S. Army medic 
who retails rescuing 26 men on the fust day's 
assault on the bridge, said he was surprised at 
the hospitality accorded the visiting Ameri- 
cans by the Germans. 

He embraced Hans Peter Kuerten, the 
mayor of Remagen, and said: “These people 
are now our friends, and you don’t go around 
cheering a victory over friends." 

Mr. Kuerten said be conceived the idea of a 
40th anniversary reunion as a way of burying 
past enmity and toasting 40 years of peace 
and friendship between Germans and Ameri- 
cans. 

It was also Mr. Kuerten who came up with 
the idea of a memorial to those who died in 
the battle for the bridge. When no money 
could be obtained from governments or pri- 
vate donors, he raised S30.000 by selling 
small pieces of the bridge's stone pilings as 
souvenirs. 

On Thursday, Mr. Keith and Mr. Drabik 
laid a wreath before a new plaque embedded 
in one of the stone towers. Paying homage to 
the Americans involved in the battle, it reads, 
“To the quick and the brave belong the re- 
ward.’’ 


East Germany Appears 
To Back Easing Soviet 


WORLD BRIEFS 


> ! 


Vietnamese Driven Out, Thais Say 

BANGKOK (AP) — Thai 

IirtiAct innirnAn in f n six 


Walesa, Allies CaUed by Prosecutor 
On Charge of Inciting Public Unrest 


United Press International 

WARSAW — Lech Walesa, 
founder of the Solidarity trade 
union, was summoned Thursday to 
appear at a state prosecutor’s office 
with a group of other Solidarity 
members to face charges of inciting 
public unrest, his spokesman said. 

The spokesman said Mr. Walesa 
received the written summons 
Thursday morning at his home in 
Gdansk. It informed him that he 
would face charges of inciting un- 
rest for calling for a 15-minute gen- 
eral strike to protest food price in- 
creases. 

He said Mr. Walesa had been 
ordered to appear in the Gdansk 
prosecutors office Saturday togeth- 
er with Janusz Palubicki from Poz- 
nan in western Poland, and Jacek 
Merkel and Bogdan Olszewski, 
economic advisers to the union . 

Mr. Walesa was previously sum- 
moned to the prosecutors'office 
Feb. 16 after he attended a strategy 
meeting to prepare for the general 
strike that was scheduled Feb. 28 
but later called off when the gov- 
ernment agreed to concessions over 
the price increases. 

He was warned that he would 
face areest unless he halted his ac- 
tivities. Mr. Walesa’s spokesman 
said the summons informed him 
that he could face a maximum two- 
year jail term if convicted. 

The summonses came as the au- 
thorities Thursday delivered a vitri- 
olic attack on the country’s pro- 
SoUdarity priests and published a 


report charging that they persecut- 
ed nonbelievers and spread fanati- 
cal ideas. 

■ Attack by Official Union 

Robert Gillette of the Los Angeles 
Times reported- 

Evidence of a factional split in 
Poland's official trade union move- 
ment has emerged in a bitter attack 
by one of the unions on the govern- 
ment's economic policies. 

In a formal statement reportedly 
barred from publication by govern- 
ment censors, the Federation of 
Metallurgical Workers accuses the 
government of “deviating from the 
principles of a socialist economy” 
and lying about the public accept- 
ability of food price increases. 

It carries a veiled warning that 
bitterness among its members over 
Poland's declining standard of liv- 
ing could lead the union to support 
protest strikes as the only way of 
preserving its own authority. 

“We do not want to be, and can- 
not be. a mere paper tiger.” the 
statement says. It claims the right 
not merely to consult with the state 
on economic policy but to “con- 
dun negotiations” on matters af- 
fecting its members’ welfare. 

The six-page document made 
available to Western reporters, is 
signed by Wlodzimierz Lubanski, 
chairman of the federation, which 
claims 367.000 members in 524 in- 
dustrial enterprises. It is dated Feb. 
18. two weeks before the govern- 
ment on Monday, imposed price 
increases averaging 35 percent on 


basic foods like bread, milk and 
flour. 

The metallurgical federation is 
one of 120 new. official trade 
unions the government has culti- 
vated since 1982 in an effort to 
replace Solidarity. 

The attack goes beyond the na- 
tional trade union council's stem 
but polite criticism last month. 
That critique limited itself to wor- 
rying that the price increases would 
bring a further lowering of the 
country's standard of living with- 
out lasting economic benefit. 

The metallurgical union warns 
that to accept further increases in 
food costs could mean the end of 
the new trade union movement. 

“As a trade union, we can scarce- 
ly accept such a solution if we still 
want to remain a union and pre- 
serve at least our previous author- 
ity among work crews.” the docu- 
ment says. “Acceptance of a 
further lowering of living standards 
is a straight path to self-annihila- 
tion of the unions.” 

The documents says “we are as- 
tonished aad frightened” that the 
state has not recognized this. 

Although the oconomic effects of 
the food price increases are painful, 
it says, the “social costs are more 
dangerous.” It speaks of “voices or 
bitterness” among the union’s 
members who suspect that Po- 
land’s bureaucratic elite is interest- 
ed only in preserving its own com- 
fortable position. 

Such bitter words, the paper 



Doctrine on Sovereignty * 

certainly have achieved control of the three hills, said Major General . 
and other border regions on full alert. ' } 

B omb at West German. Store Hurls 8 ■ 

DORTMUND, West Germany (AF) — A bomb «^°ticdThur^y •; 
afternoon in a department store here, injuring etghtpmon^pouoe ^ ? 
Seven were hospitalized, two in senous condition. A leftist group claimea - 
responsibility for the attack. , „ , , .... 

An Interior Ministry spokesman, Wigbard Haerdtl, said “ 

could signal the start of a terrorist campaign against the w hole 
non.” It was the first leftist attack on a West German department stare, } 

1969. . . 

The bomb was under a counter ai the Hertie department store m ) 
central Dortmund, a police spokesman said. He said two seennear^ 
the counter shortly before the bomb went off were being sought. A group 
calling itself Action Christian Klar, after a man accused of bemg a leader ^ 
of the Red Army Faction urban guerrilla organization, claimed it nan ■_ 
planted the bomb and said others would follow. j 

Pakistan Sentences 54 to life Terms j 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (UPI) — A special mflitaxy coart in Lahore | 
has sentenced 54 people to life imprisonment on charges of conspiring to ■■ 
assassinate President Mohammed Zia uI-Haq and other leaders, court 5 . 

The accused, most of whom have been under arrest for more than ^vee 

years, had been charged with targeting judges, police and ranking anoed * 
forces officials for assassination- The trial, wmat began m Kot Lakhpat j 
prism in the Punjabi capital of Lahore in August, concluded m Decern- ? 
ber. The sentences were imposed Wednesday. . ? 

S imilar rharggs were nmde a gains t 42 others who are other living in V 
exile or are dead. Among those charged in absentia were Murtazs Bhutto 4 
and Shahna waz Bhutto, sons of Prime Minister Zulfikar Ah Bhutto, who J 

was hanged in 1979 two years after his overthrow by General Zia. ^ 

Press Institute Urges Easing of Curbs < 

CAIRO (Reuters) — The International Press Institute has passed 
several resolutions drawing attention to cases where it finds press 
freedom or individual journalists to be at ride. 

Tlic 34th general assembly of the institute, at the end of a three-day 
me eting here Wednesday, urged Chile and South Africa to relax their 
controls on the media; appealed for the release of a Philippine journalist, 
Satur Ocampo, held for more than nine years; and deplored Britan s 
Official Secrets Act. It also voiced concern about the state of free speech 
m Paraguay. ... 

The institute's goal is to promote the Dow of accurate and fair news ■ 
among nations. Uhas a membership of nearly 2,000 editors and pubtish- 


Lech Walesa 


warns, “may turn into deeds.” It 
appears to suggest that the union 
would support any legally orga- 
nized strike initiative from its more 
than 500 constituent factory units. 


By James M. Markham 

New York Tima Service 

BONN — East Germany’s Com- 
munist Party daily. Neues 
Deutschland, has reprinted re- 
marks by a Hungarian official that 
seem to question the so-called 
Brezhnev doctrine of limited sover- 
eignty for Eastern European coun- 
tries. 

Specialists on Eastern Europe 
said the East German move ap- 
peared to reflect a debate withm 
the Warsaw Pact over renewing the 
pact, which expires in May. 

In an interview last week with 
Nepszava. the Hungarian labor 
union newspaper. Istvan Roska, 
the deputy foreign minister for So- 
viet bloc relations, defended Hun- 
gary's attempt to forge somewhat 
independent policies. 

When asked whether the alliance 
bad attained enough tolerance so 
that differences did not become ob- 
stacles. he noted that the alliance 
members had similar principles 
and goals. 

“One must add," be said, “that 
the member slates are independent 
and sovereign countries that, with- 
out exception, respect the principle 
of noninterference in one another* s 
internal affairs. From this it fol- 
lows that our alliance system is 
characterized by the constructive 
cooperation of sovereign states.” 

To some analysts, Mr. Roska's 
words challenged the premises of 
the Brezhnev doctrine, formulated 
after the Soviet-led invasion of 
Czechoslovakia in 1968 halted the 
liberalization policies of Alexander 
Dubcek. then the Czechoslovak 
party leader. 

The doctrine, named for Leonid 
1. Brezhnev, the Soviet leader at the 
time, contends that other members 
of the Soviet bloc, notably the Sovi- 
et Union, have the right to inter- 
vene if they fee) that the Commu- 
nist system is threatened in a 
member country. 

Neues Deutschland reprinted ex- 
cerpts from tite Roska interview 
Monday, signaling approval. The 
gesture recalled a debate last year 
when East Germany invoked Hun- 
garian statements to justify its dip- 
lomatic opening to West Germany. 

The excerpts focused on Mr. 
Roska's discussion of preparations 
for the renewal of the 30-year War- 
saw Pact He said members had 
agreed in principle ro extend the 
alliance For “a further period." 

Diplomats say Romania. Bulgar- 
ia. Hungary, East Germany and 
Poland have expressed reservations 
over the Soviet wish to extend the 
pact for 15 or 20 years. 

Romania, which does not take 
part in many military activities of 
the Warsaw Pact, was the first lo 
make known its preference for a 
five-year extension. The Roma- 
nians most recently expressed their 
views to reporters accompanying 
Britain's foreign secretary. Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, on a visit to Bu- 
charest last month. 


Western diplomats say the pref- 
erence of the other countries for a 
shorter renewal has also become 
known. 

“Everyone had thought it would 
be an automatic extension,” a 
Western diplomat said. “This de- 
bate may be one reason why the 
Russians came back to the negoti- 
ating table in Geneva. They may 
have fell their own camp was not so 
easy to keep together.” 

A Soviet bloc summit meeting in 
Sofia to discuss renewing the alli- 
ance was postponed in January be- 
cause of the illness of KonstaninU. 
‘Chernenko, the Soviet leader. It has 
not been rescheduled. 

Vladimir Kurin, an analyst at 
Radio Free Europe in Munich, said 
he believed the duration of the re- 
newal was probably not the main 
issue. Rather, be noted, members 
have to agree on the wording of a 
new preamble to the treaty and 
other divisive matters. 

It was not dear whether Neues 
Deustcb land’s embrace of (he 
Hungarian stand portended any 
improvement in relations between 
the two Germanys. West German 
officials have disclosed that in Jarir 
uary and February about 2^00 
East Germans were granted visas 
to emigrate. 

Among them are people who 
sought refuge in West German em- 
bassies in Eastern Europe last year 
but had to return home to obtain 
permission to leave, officials said. 
■ Poland Praises Geascher 

Poland's state-run newspapers 
said Thursday that the brief visit to 
Warsaw this week by West Germa- 
ny's foreign minister. Hans- Die- 
trich Genscher, was a significant 
event that could lead to improved 
relations between the two coun- 
tries, The Associated Press report- 
ed From Warsaw. 

The official government daily, 
Rzeczpospolita. said Mr. 
Geoscber's talks Wednesday with 
the Polish leader. General Wpj- 
ciech JaruzdskL and other senior 
offtdals would “help invigorate 
contacts in all areas of bilateral 
relations.” 

The newspaper praised Mr. 
Genscher for reaffirming his gov- 
ernment's commitment to the 1970 
treaty in which West Germany rec- 
ognized Poland's postwar bound- 
aries. Nearly a third of modern 
Poland was German territory be- 
fore World War II. 

Rzeczpospolita said Mr. 
Genscher* support for the Ostpoli- 
tik treaty “makes this relatively 
brief get-together quite signifi- 
cant.” 

Rzeczpospolita said it remained 
10 be seen “whether the barriers 
which have been blocking the road 
toward further normalization be- 
tween the two countries” for three 
years were removed during the 
Warsaw talks. 

“The Genscher visit may prove 
to have been a litmus test in this 
respect,” it said. 




[At? \\ 


ers_ 


Scottish Miners Return; 
Union Meets on Closures 


The Associated Press 

SHEFFIELD, England — Most 
of the 11300 coalminers in Scot- 
land went back to work Thursday 
for the first lime in nearly a year 
while miners' union leaders re- 
newed their vow to cany on their 
battle against mine closures. 

In other regions, most of the 
90,000 striking coalminers returned 
to work Tuesday after the union 
leadership voted to end the 51- 
week strike. But the Scottish miners 
had held out for amnesty for about 
700 strikers who were fired during 
the strike. 

As the miners returned to work 
in Scotland, leaders or the National 
Union of Mineworkers met for the 
first time since the strike ended. 

“We shall do all we can to secure 
a resumption of negotiations to 
deal with outstanding issues in the 
industry.” the union president, Ar- 
thur ScargilL said after the meeting 


The home 
of Burberrys Paris, 
since 1909 

(Near the Madeleine) 



The full range of 
traditional Burberrys Mens. 
Ladies & Children clothing. 

Burberrys 

8 , bd Malcsherbes 
Paris 8 -266.J3.0I 


in the northern England industrial 
center of Sheffield. 

Less than 4 percent of Britain's 
186,000 miners remained on strike, 
according the National Coal 
Board, which runs tire nation’s 174 
state-owned mines. 

The union's national leaders or- 
dered the return lo work last Sun- 
day. admitting they failed to win a 
management promise never to 
dose mines solely because they lose 
money. The strike began March 12 
to protest the coal board's proposal 
to close 20 pits unprofitable pits 
and eliminate 20,000 jobs. 

The end of the strike followed a 
deadlock in negotiations and a 
surge in defections that brought 
more than half of Britain’s miners 
back to work. 

The return to work Thursday by 
most of the miners in Scotland left 
the small Kent coalfield, where ap- 
proximately 2,000 miners work, as 
the only region bolding out solidly 
against the end of the strike. 

However, a decision by a mine 
foremen's union to cross 
mineworkers' picket lines Thurs- 
day allowed coal production to be- 
gin at one mine in Kent for t be first 
time since the walkout started, the 
coal board said. 

■ Coal Discovery in Ulster 

Officials in Belfast announced 
Wednesday the first big discovery 
of coal in Northern Ireland, The 
Associated Press reported. 

The estimated one billion tons 
(902 million metric tons) could 
drastically cut energy costs in the 
province, officials said. They said 
the reserves of the soft lignite coal 
could generate one-third of the 
British province's electricity within 
10 years. 

John Gaston, chairman of the 
Northern Ireland Electricity Ser- 
vice. said that the reserves of the 
woody-iexturcd coal were found 
□ear Crumlin on the eastern shore 
of Lough Neagh. 

Energy costs are 20 percent high- 
er in Northern Ireland than in the 
rest of Britain because of the cost of 
transporting the coal. 



Zimbabwe Identifies 
Bodies of 3 Tourists 


RmMt, 

Juan Carlos Diaz Arkotxa 


Bomb in His Car 
Kills Police Chief 
In Basque Spain 

United Press International 

VITORIA, Spain — The head of 
the Basque region's police force 
was killed Thursday by a bomb 
that exploded as he stoned his car 
near the Basque capital of Vitoria, 
authorities said. 

The bomb apparently was placed 
under the car of Lieutenant Colo- 
nel Juan Carlos Diaz Arkotxa. 52, 
when he slopped at a roadside cafe 
on his way to the police academy 
near Vitoria, the police said. The 
police said the explosion was trig- 
gered when Colonel Diaz put the 
key in the ignition. He died in a 
hospital minutes af ter he was taken 
there by the police. 

He was the first member of the 
autonomous Basque regional po- 
lice. created in October 1982. lo be 
assassinated. The creation of the 
force, the Ertzantza. was a long- 
standing demand of Basque na- 
tionalists in their bid for greater 
independence from Madrid. 

Officials said no group took im- 
mediate responsibility for the at- 
tack but they suspected it was the 
work of the separatist group ETA 
which stands for Basque Homeland 
and Libertv. 


United Pms Inicnunniuil 

HARARE Zimbabwe — Three 
of six bodies found in shallow 
graves last week were identified as 
those of American. British and 
Australian tourists kidnapped by 
dissidents in July 1981 Prime Min- 
ister Robert Mugabe said Thurs- 
day. 

He said the bodies of Kevin Ellis 
of Bellevue. Washington; William 
Butler, an Australian; and James 
Green well, a Briton, bad been posi- 
tively identified. Pathologists still 
were working to identify three oth- 
er bodies believed to be Brett Bal- 
dwin of Walnut Creek. California; 
Tony Bajzelj. an Australian; and 
Martin Hodgson, a Briton. 

At a news conference. Mr. Mu- 
gabe blamed the dissident support- 
ers of an opposition leader. Joshua 
Nkomo. for kidnapping the tour- 
ists. who he said were murdered 
three days afleT they were abduct- 
ed. Several villagers who failed to 
report the murders were under ar- 
rest. Mr. Mugabe said. 

Mr. Mugabe said five of the tour- 
ists. who disappeared while travel- 
ing from Victoria Falls to Bula- 


wayo on July 23. 1 982. were shot to 
death. The sixth was strangled. 

He said investigations revealed 
they were killed after trying to at- 
tract the attention of military air- 
craft searching for them. 

The bodies had been exhumed 
and reburied a number of times 
since July 1982. Mr. Mugabe said, 
and a number of bones and two 
skulls stiU were missing. 

He said villagers, who had 
known of the deaths all along and 
had reburied the bodies, failed to 
confirm the murders, even when 
some were arrested and questioned. 

Mr. Mugabe said the six were 
abducted by 22 dissidents led by a 
man known as Eskimo Wasi. 

The security minister. Emmer- 
son Munangagwa. said that 16 of 
the kidnappers had been killed by 
security forces in the past three 
years. Two. including Mr. Wash 
were under arrest and four were 
still unaccounted for. 

Mr. Mugabe said letters making 
political demands in return for the 
release of the tourists and signed by 
dissidents supporting Mr. Nkoma's 
party had been received by the gov- 
ern menu 


Billionaires 
Have Woes 

(Continued from Page I) 
brought on by a brain disorder — 
cerebellar degenerative disease — 
that has confuted him to a wheel- 
chair. slurred his speech and left 
him able to sign his name only with 
an illegible scrawL 

Doctors say be is still a^ert. But 
associates say (hat as his physical 
condition has declined, he has re- 
lied more on outride advisers, who 
have led him astray. 

Ironically, his sale of his beloved 
Cowboys last summer for S80 mil- 
lion seemed to have made matters 
worse. He used the cash to liqui- 
date some of his debts, but the 
publicity made other creditors ner- 
vous and “created an effective run 
on his estate.” an adviser said. 

Mr. Murchison's- father, one of 
the giants of Texas oil field lore, is 
known for his pithy sayings about 
money, one of which seems espe- 
cially ironic now: “Money is like 
manure. If 
does a lot oi 
up in one place. 

The Young Mr. Murchison 
spread it all over — in resort con- 
dominiums in Key West, Florida, 
in construction companies in Ha- 
waii. in a ritzy Washington devel- 
opment. AO have had to be auc- 
tioned or sold; the Murchison 


U.S. Is Cautious About Mubarak 

WASHINGTON (AFP) —The State Department said Thursday that 
it might be premature to hold talks in Washington between the U.S. 
government and a Jordanian-Palestinian delegation as proposed by 
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt. 

A Sore Department spokesman commenting an the Mubarak propos- 
al said that “at this, delicate stage of disensaons among the various 
parties, we should guard against premature activity winch could be 
counterproductive.” Mr. Mubarak, who is scheduled to go to Washington ‘ 
on Saturday for talks said last month that a dialogue between the United 
States and a Jordanian-Palestinian delegation could be a useful first Step 
before direct negotiations between Jordan, the Palestinians and Israel 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres of Israel has said that he is willing to 
meet Jordanian and Palestinian representatives, but notmembets of the 
Palestine liberation Organization. King Hussein of Jordan accepted Mr. 
Mubarak’s idea during a meeting with the Egyptian leader Wednesday in 
Egypt King Hussein and the FLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, baveagreed 
ona plan for a joint deflation. 7 ' 

IN icaraguan Rebels Assailed on Rights 

WASHINGTON (Combined Dispatches) — An independent New 
York lawyer's investigation of assertions that anti-government rebels in 
Nicaragua violate human rights has produced 145 sworn affidavits that 
he says document “a distinct pattern” of murders, kidnappings, assaults 
and torture of civilians. 

The report by Reed Brody, 31, a Former assistant state attorney general 
in New York, was to be released Thursday by the International Human 
Rights Law Group and the Washington Office on Latin America, which 
endorse the findings. J- 

The report is the latest in a soies of studies, testimony and speeches by 
both the Reagan administration and its critics over U A aid lo guerrillas 
fighting the Nicaraguan government. Mr. Brody’s report is the first to 
include sworn affidavits from witnesses, wham he said were available for 
further questioning. The issue of aid to the guerrillas is scheduled for 
congressional debate next month. (WP, LAT) 

Shultz Opposes Sanctions on Mexico 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State George P. Shultz said 
Thursday he was opposed to tiring economic sanctions to force the 
Mexican authorities to crack down on illegal drag dealers or to remove } 
corrupt government officials. 

But he told a UJS. Senate appropriations subcommittee that the 
kidnapping and murder of a VS. drug enforcement officer in Mexico, 
threats against other U.S. agents and inaction by Mesdcan authorities os 
illegal drag production might demand a U.S. response. The drug enforce- 
ment officer's body was found Wednesday, with that of a Mexican 
government pilot, on a ranch where four persons had been killed in a 
weekend shoot-out with Mexican authorities. 




. , ' 




U.S. Opposes New Israel Aid 


I hat to make of all this? 


(Continued from Page I) 

than they a re producing^ he said. 
“Their consumption in the last 
three years went up 27 percent and 
output only 5 percent. They are 
consuming more than they are pro- 
ducing. plus aid and gifts from 
friends. 

“There is a tremendous drop in 
productivity. Israel used to have a 
remarkable rate of positive eco- 
nomic growth, around 8 to 10 per- 
cent a year. It is well down, and 
even in some years it has been neg- 
ative.” 

The most forceful critic or Mr. 
Wallis's presentation was Repre- 
sentative Tom Lantos. Democrat 


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of California, who said that Israel 
had gotten “into this' situation be- 
cause in 37 years they absorbed 
new people, amounting to five 
times their original population” 
and because it has had to fight wars 
repeatedly against its neighbors. 

“The realities of the situation is 
that this is a small country, which 
has been at war since its inception.” 
Mr. Lantos said. “It has absorbed 
many times its initial population, 
and it is trying to maintain a politi- 
cal democracy.” 

But Mr. Wallis said that Israel 
continued to print money to cover 
deficits and this would only be- 
come worse. The drop in published 
inflation rates of recent months, he 
said, was artificial because they 
were the result of price freezes and 
did not reflect the true cost of 
items. 

And. he said. Israel needs to cut 
back sharply on the number of peo- 
ple employed by the government 
but has not worked out a plan for 

handling and re-employing the un- 
employed that this would create. 


“I i*s a tough time to be a Texas 
billionaire,” said William E. Gib- 
son. chief economist at Republic- 
Bank Corp. in Dallas. 

“The downturn in the energy 
business is a factor,” he said, plus 
at the same time, these people got 
into “deals that seem to have down- 
turned.” 


China Eases Restrictions 
On Foreign (Wency 

The Assoctoicd Press 

BELJING — China has eased 
some restrictions on the possession 
of foreign currency, allowing resi- 
dents who receive funds from fam- 
ily members overseas to withdraw 
the money from the bank, the eco- 
nomic newspaper Jingji Ribao re- 
ported Thursday. 

Previously. Chinese residents 
who received foreign remittances 
had to deposit the raoney.in state 
bonk accounts and could only 
withdraw Chinese currency. “This 
move will help the hanks gamer 
more foreign currency from private 
hands,” the daily newspaper said. 


For the Record 

FBI offiefab investigating a shot fired through a window at the home of, 
Justice Harry A. Blackmon of the U.S. Supreme Court have told him 
they believe the shot was random and not aimed at him, said Tom Bd £ 5 
spokesman for the Arlington County police force in Virginia. 

Ten death row inmates in Huntsville, Texas, have asked courts to drop 
appeals on their behalf and allow them to be put to death. One of the 
inmates said he and the others were tired of “fining the pockets” erf their 
attorneys. (UP!) 

Salvadoran guenfflas ItiBed the government military spokesman. Lien- 
tenant CotoDd Ricardo Cienfuegos, oh Thursday af a San Salvador 
tennis dub. Witnesses, said three gunmen shot -Colonel Cienfuegos from ’ 
dose range as he rested, bemeen games. 

Oraning employees at Charles de GauUe airport north of Paris re- 
mained on strike for a 10th day Thursday Hcm a n/ 4 w better waves - 
.Passenger lounges at the airport are littered with debris. (Hpj 

Poll Finds Unease on Budget 

able to identify specific budget cuts 
thmi whites, as were older people,- 
and people with lower incomes. 

But while respondents fearei 
Wj the proposed budget cufr 
34 perceQt suggested programs tfSr' 
they considered worthwhile but 
could still be cut. Military spend- 
ing. picked by II percent iedtiie- 
list. 

, Th f J Tin *^< :BS News Poll also- 
^showed a slight deefinein approval 
of Mr. Reagan's han dling of ■'hi*-, 

down from 65 percent at the begin-' 
mng_<rf January, Twenty-rirSer- 

“ n < * M**. to fcafu, 
hfr first term, approved. 

.^ttepreriden^ 1 ^.. 

sized curbs m domestic spending.' 

, public support for mare^&^. 
sperahng fen * the lowest poinT 
preidency.^n 
"Spending sal* 

.^creased and only > - 
PgJf^iirtwuldbeinSS.* ’ 



(Continued from PageJ) 
for the aged and disabled receiving' 
Serial Security. 

Many of the respondents cited 
more than one threatened cut. 

Seven percent cited education 
generally, 6 percent died Medi- 
care, 4 percent each cited college 
loans and farm subsidies and 3 per- 
cent mentioned programs for the. 

elderly in general Other prog rams 
mentioned by at least 2 percent of 
the respondents were welfare, d<> 
mestic programs, veterans bcatfits. 
Medicaid health insurance for the 
poor, unemployment benefits and 
cuts in wages for federal workers. 

For the fiscal year 1986, which 
begins next Oct. 1, Mr. Reagan has 
proposed the smallest increase in 
spending in two decades, a total of 
1-5 percent Since this includes t 
12.7 percent increase 'in-, .military' 
spending, a number of domestic 
programs would be reduced. 

Over all, those surveyed, who 
were concerned about cuts tended 
to be more economically vulnera- 
ble. Blacks were more likely to be 


W-. 









INTERNATTfOWAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8,1985 


PageS 


armers Decry Reagan’s Veto; 
Won’t Seek to Override 


I)riv,*„ <) 

«AP* *■ r yf 


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’<jpmas 1 
override was 


Las Angeles Times Smtee 

i:i r ..j * PHOENIX. Arizona — Presi- 
vu :,Cf V*< Ronald. Reagan’s veto of 
M ', n ?" ^neigency legislation to provide 
* '*lcd edit relief for fanners has been 
■Vrihu K-'Jii!.,!,.. rnO^uerly denounced by farm leaders. 

5,|?I Mu^i'lias the decision by the House 

^^mocratic leadership not to seek 
override the veto. 

Carpenter, president of the 
lonal Farmers Union, said 

. .. .Wednesday the veto was “a sadistic 

ptdf> r \|, iw ( . 

MtftRtn 'p.tkrM?,.,.. » . 



fcftiM k*it:M k ; “jjgie display of weakness." 

" , ' " e ' ! ^Mr. Carpenter urged farmers 
W undr; raral businessmen to con- 

sul, a pn!; v , .. s ,- ht ’[ lllr f| crj , , ssmen returning to their home 
Fill tvti’ir Hi,’ i s ... 1 ' -1, J }^7j\tricts this weekend a “rural re- 

riftji <1uivis^Ti k_: ,. y ::! "tf D^otion" and “demand accotmt- 
w Favtivi: „n,,;V 1 ,ri -"nji^iOiiy or those who did not^sup- 
^ and ^ 

o led 

fl >1 1 | . 'sbington and in rural regions to 

O h- . . , 10 mress support for an override of 

S,,' lA, \ w } *"•' •- \>rw..' 7^ veto. But in toe capital, the 
iV 1 .’ ,U5f ,ri » sponsors announced immedi- 
**** w M,\ui:uiir.: / :j L ;.i, that there would be no over- 
■ ^ re attempt. Mr. (yNeilLa Massa- 
nwM«! j,...,, isetts Democrat, called Mr. 

NL'fotiird wnh taijirj::... ;y i,” ^Eigan's ability to sustain the veto 
tut adj\%m.iK.«i; ; , j ■ ^foregone conclusion-" 

«4»hi «apitjs t'f * . l h.. r /,V, JCh ^n Phoenix, where the National 
iCf% *nc imp* comers Union ended its 83d an- 
K* were made jv.ui.m 4 ■ '7 J h ' ti meeting Wednesday, the 900 
A AitKini’ itb.se ju-v 1 j” ' k approved a statement 

' ‘ 11 ^^luijing the veto “approaches a dec- 


sures of agricultural loans by feder- 
al lending agencies and the quasi - 
governmental Farm Credit 
Administration, the largest holder 
of such loans. 

■ Budget Panel Rejects Cuts 
' Helen Dewar am I Margaret Sha- 
piro of The Washington Post report- 
ed from. Washington : 

The Senate Budget Committee 
rejected Wednesday proposals by 


i farm relief measure.” 


^tel'^esEasinojST^ 

l-r .UiCiV.t.-:' . 

•u.iIim* u* c 


estic-spending 

a most unfortu- ductions to match the big mwtary 
cut. S79 billion over three years, it 
approved Tuesday. 

The panel voted. 13-9, to ng'ect 
Mr. Reagan's program, which in- 
cluded So billion m deficit reduc- 
tions for next year. It then ap- 
proved, 14-8, a proposal to cut 
deficits by $200 milli on by freezing 

_ farm programs at current levels for 

Carpenter had ongmalfy; a year 

for a huge campaign in' The' committee’s bipartisan re- 
jection of Mr. Reagan's farm pro- 
posal, coupled with earlier votes on 
other domestic programs, left it far 
behind the goal for domestic 
; cuts set by the committee 
Fete V. Domenici, Re- 
publican of New Mexico. 

By combining spending cuts for 
defense and domestic programs, 
Mr. Domenici hoped to cot n ext 
year’s projected deficit of $227 bil- 
lion by $50 billion to S60 billion as 
a first step to halving the deficits to 
less than 5100 billion withto three 
years. 

The committee exceeded Mr. 

DomenicTs goal cm the mili tary but 

began losing ground Wednesday 
on domestic spending. 



Arizona Man Gets an Artificial Heart; 
U.S. Warning May Have Been Defied 


‘IhuiliWtiNi'fl'r !<ii'\| in , u — ri — 

1«79 t*,i vrj r . ju c , ;';-'Tu%tion of war on ratal America.* 1 

fcrhe d invention also approved a 
on the adminis- 
__ ; to impose 

' morruoriinnon foredo- 

vtonal i« mi 

VV:c'S \^$ritidi Commons Report Criticises 
i&n Student Aides as Uninformed 

A« 1 1 sImj % . «u c»: 1. . • : u or ^ .ik , u: jkj. * 


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lt*hflN a inv‘.tt;v:%:; p . .! ’■ iC^rk for a few months as research assistants in Britain’s House of 

n ommons as part of their education has been criticized in a report by 

e Commons Services Committee. 

i k v ,11 1 Americans constitute about a third of the more than 250 assistants 
41UUOU?* ADOUI 'lllfljho work in the 'House; The report singled them out as being 
t)N |At r, - * s. r n, i- . |w, rv , tinfonned-and ill-prepared for such work and of creating “acute , 
matu't if I-.-. 1 : • k . ^ V^^oblemsm thehbiaiy. 

« , ... • ... *, ‘r- The report said that the assistants lacked “a basic grounding in 

MuKdi^i i» 1 .. . ■ u; ^“iblic affairs” and have overburdened the library staff by “asking 

' ' 1 . . lastions of asomedmes disconcenrnriy umnitnicted diaracter." It 

'I, ' ; --''!; r 'V’^ l p 0rte dacaseinwindiawoniancal]ediierniemberofPariiamentto 

, , ' ac \ l 1,1 1 •■ivtoNC 1 ^ a hout her pension and "a young trans-Atlantic fresh voice said: 

* W : rfihat is a pension?* " 

* T . MT -' T :l ■' ; ■ ^The report continued: “The problem is so acute that there is dear 
taifcv. «!« •• v t • ■> •'■-"■^-idence that members’ permanent staff are being deterred from 

H-j* -!;-;.., . . .- v * ycVjn* the facility because it is too Ml of pet^jlc." 

fiii. 1 1 . . •. :r; —Christopher Pond, head of library services, said that “one vety 

w StHM*-'-*’ I** 1 - ‘ * 1 ^-ten hems conversations about American football, or the latest 

. :?•*.*■ V ’-orts results, or where they are going to the theater tint evening, or 

k. .. ii:.-i’.r.-!ttrtv possible rt.js to visit Stratford-on-Avon on Sunday.” 


Washington Post Service 

LONDON — The behavior of American students who come to 


«rtd I'.V-’V* 

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ix. 


By. voting only to freeze farm 
spending. Senator Slade Gorton. 

Republican of Washington, said: 

“We're going to fall far short of the 
necessary goal in deficit reduction. 

Simply voting for a freeze on every 
budget [category] down the line is 
simply gang to be inadequate." 

On the administrations behalf, 

Mr. Domenici had proposed sharp- 
ly reducing price-support pro- 
grams, terminating direct operating 1 
loans, phasing out federal crop in- 
surance and establishing various 
user fees. 

Mr. Domenici said it is too early 
to predict failure for deficit-reduc- 
tion efforts on domestic spending. 

“1 didn't expea anything better 
than this in the midst of an agricul- 
tural crisis," he said. 

He said the committee could still 
regain lost ground on such major 
issues as Social Security and Medi- 
care, the health care program for 
the elderly. Mr. Domenici is pro- 
posing major Medicare cuts and 
elimination of cost-of-living in- 
creases for Social Security retire- 
ment and disabili ty benefits for one 

’"The farm vote Mowed a pattern FIGHTAGAINST — The West German 

in which committee members of economics minister, Martin Bangemann, talking to the 
both parties generally embraced a Italian environment minister, Alfredo Biondi, who chaired 
budget freeze but rejected more an EC meeting in Brussels on Thursday on auto pollution, 
drastic cuts proposed by Mr. Rea- The pin on Mr. BiondTs tie says ‘Stop Add Rain’ in Dutch, 
gan in his fiscal 1986 budget. 

The committee voted to reject 
Mr. Reagan's proposal to elimina te 
the Small Business Administration, 
instead recommending a two-thirds 
cm in its direct-loan program. 

The panel voted, as Mr. Reagan 
wanted, to end direct loans under 
the Export-Import Bank but ap- . „ 

proved additional funds to help fi- By Chnsrophex S. vvren 
nance foreign pu rchase of U.S. Wr* - 1"«* Times Semce 

OTTAWA — The Canadian 
government has announced a ma- 


By Lawrence K. Aleman 

Aw York Ti>nes Service 

NEW YORK — Doctors in Ari- 
. zona have implanted an experi- 
mental artificial heart in a 32-year- 
old man whose body had rejected a 
transplanted human heart within 
22 hours. 

The operation to implant the ex- 
peri menial heart was carried out 
Wednesday ai the University of Ar- 
izona in Tucson, apparently in defi- 
ance of a UjS, Food and Drag 
Administration warning against 


pure*; 

products, including increased in- 
terest subsidies and a Si billion 
fund to protea domestic producers 
from “predatory" overseas compe- 
tition. 

It also ngected Mr. Reagan's 
proposals end funding for the Stra- 
tegic Petroleum Reserve. 

In many areas, from energy con- 
servation to water- project con- 
struction, it rgecied Mr. Reagan’s 
proposals for spending cuts, derid- 
ing instead to freeze spending at 
current levels. 


Canada Plans Cleanup 
Of Acid Rain in the East 

oney’s 
the U 


jor environmental plan to reduce 
airborne emissions of sulfur and 
aittogen oxides, better known as 
add rain, by 50 percent in eastern 
Canada over the next nine years. 

The program, announced 
Wednesday by the environment 
minister, Suzanne Blais-Grenier, 
includes contributions amounting 
to S109 million by 1994 to clean up 
Canadian smelters. It also includes 
the adoption of emission slan- 


[Thursday, the committee voted, dards. like those in the United 
13-9, to rqect Mr. Reagan's pro- States, aimed at reducing nitrogen 


ian Rf*ix*!s A>sailedc 


WORLDWIDE EBTIMTADEMENT 


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TRIO TZIGANE 
JOSEF SALLAI 


posal to terminate government sup- 
port of the Am trak passenger rail 
system. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. The pan- 
el adopted a proposal to keep sub- 
sidies at current levels of about 
$600 million a year. The vote also 
kept alive the bulk of federal mass 
transit aid for cities.] 

In initial votes on notunilitary 
spending, the committee approved 
only half of the spending reduc- 
tions proposed by Mr. Domenici to 
achieve a target of more than $50 
bUHon in deficit reductions for next 
year. 

After voting on foreign aid and 
trade assistance, science, energy 
and environmental spending, farm 
programs and commerce, the com- 
mittee had approved about $4.7 
billion in deficit reductions for next 
year. This fell about S9.6 billion 
short erf Mr. Domenici’s goal for 
these areas of spending. ' 

By contrast, it had voted Tues- 
day to approve even bigger cuts in 
Reagan's military buildup than Mr. 
Domenici ‘had recommended. 


oxide ermsacQS from new cars and 
light tracks by 45 percent It would 
take effect for 19S8 models. 

The announcement at a news 
conference, coining II days before 
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney 
meets with President Ronald Rea- 
gan in Quebec, seemed timed to 
strengthen Canada's case for more 
joint action. Mr. Mulroney said in 
December that the subject of arid 
rain would be at the top of his 
agenda with Mr. Reagan. 

However. • Mrs. Blais-Grenier. 
carefully avoided linking Wednes- 
day's announcement to the Quebec 
meeting. She insisted that the pro- 
gram resulted from six months of 
work since the Mulroney govern- 
ment came into office last Septem- 
ber. 

Mr. Reagan has said that more 
research is needed into the causes 
and effects of add rain and has 
rejected Canadian overtures for a 
joint cleanup of airborne pollut- 
ants. 

Canadian officials have been 


Mulroney's policy of closer lies 
with the United States. 

Canada has estimated that add 
'rain causes $180 million worth of 
damage a year and puts at risk 
agriculture, fishing and tourism in- 
dustries covering more than one 
million square miles (about 16 mil- 
lion square kilometers) and ac- 
counting for more than 8 percent of 
the Canadian gross national prod- 
uct, the total output of goods and 
services. 

The environment minister said in 
response to a question that half of 
the arid rain was borne by the wind 
northward from the Untied States. 

Michael Perley, the executive co- 
ordinator of the Canadian Coali- 
tion on Arid Rain, a lobbying 
group, said that meeting the goal 
outlined by Mrs. Blais-Grenier 
would be a problem without Amer- 
ican cooperation. But he welcomed 
the program announced Wednes- 
day. 

The program announced 
Wednesday is based on a commit- 
ment that the U.S. government 
made to the seven of Canada's 10 
provinces that are most afrecied by- 
acid rain. 


{Early Thursday, surgeons trans- 
planted a second human heart into 
the patient, who had been kept 
alive for II hours by the artificial 
bean. The Associated Press report- 
ed. The patient was listed in critical 
condition with complications that 
include congestive heart failure 
caused by fluid in the lungs, said 
Allan Biegel, a University of Arizo- 
na vice president. . 

[Mr. Biegel said that Dr. Jack 
Copeland, the surgeon who per- 
formed the transplant, reported 
that the complications were “a di- 
rect result of the length of time that 
the patient spent on the heart-lung 
machine" oq Wednesday while 
awaiting implantation of the artifi- 
cial heart and then his second hu- 
man heart.] 

The artificial heart used Wednes- 
day had been under development 
for about 18 months but had never 
before been used on a human, said 
Vern LamploL a spokesman at the 
University of Arizona Hospital. 
The device, which differs from the 
earlier Jarvik-7 artificial heart in its 
valve and bladder structure, had 
been implanted successfully in a 
calf “for a short period of time." be 
added. 

The Jarvik-7 heart is the model 
that was implanted in Dr. Baraev 
B. Clark at the University of Utah 
in 1982 and in William J. Schroeder 
and Murray P. Hay don at Humana 
Hospital Audubon in Louisville, 
Kentucky. Both Mr. Schroeder and 
Mr. Haydon remain patients at 
Humana. Dr. Clark died in 1983. 

Dubbed the Phoenix heart, the 
device implanted Wednesday was> 
designed by Dr. Kevin Cheng, a 
dentist associated with Su Luke's 
Hospital in Phoenix, Mr. Lamplot 
said. It was implanted by Dr. Cedi 
Vaughn of SL Luke's with the assis- 
tance of Dr. Copeland, head of the 
transplant surgery team at the Uni- 
versity of Arizona. 

David L Duarte, a spokesman 
for the FDA in Washington, said 
that his agency had warned toe 
hospital not to use an artificial 
heart without official permission 
and that no permission had been 
granted. 

“We fed the law has been violat- 
ed," he said. “We're going to get 


the facts and decide what to do 
about iL“ 

The patient, whose identity was 
not disclosed, suffered from car- 
diomyopathy. which destroys toe 
muscle cells in the heart As a com- 
plication of the disease, he devel- 
oped a potentially fatal heart- 
rhythm abnormality called 
ventricular tachycardia. 

Dr. Copeland's team completed 
a human heart transplant at 5 AM. 
Tuesday. But the patient's condi- 
tion worsened early Wednesday 
and at 3 AM. the heart slopped 
beating. Mr. Biegel said in a state- 
ment Wednesday. The doctors used 
their hands to get the heart beating 
again. 

Subsequent tests showed that 
“other vital organs were function- 
ing well." Mr. Biegal said, and the 
doctors decided to move the pa- 
tient to an operating room where he 
was put on a heart-lung machine 
while a search was made for a new 
human heart. 

Mr. Biegel said that Dr. Cope- 
land had told him that two patients 
“essentially died immediately fol- 
lowing transplant surgery because 
of a failure of a transplanted 


heart," Dr. Copeland, Mr. Biegel 
said, staled after those events that 
he had decided “if this ever hap- 
pens again. I will do evoything in 
my power to see that this does not 
occur.” 

After the cardiac arrest Wednes- 
day, Dr. Copeland's team called 
“all the possible sites where hearts 
for transplants could be found." 
Mr. Biegel said, “and after several 
hours it was apparent that no heart 
was available. 

While the team searched for a 
human heart and while the heart- 
lung machine look over the essen- 
tial task of carrying oxygenated 
blood to all toe cdls in mail's body, 
calls were made to Phoenix and 
also to the University of Utah, 
where the Jarvik-7 heart was im- 
planted for the first time. 

Mr. Lamplot said that Dr. 
Vaughn arrived in Tucson at 9 
AM. Wednesday and installed the 
mechanical heart, which he 
brought with him. in an operation 
that lasted about three hours. 

The team of University’ of Arizo- 
na surgeons implanted the device 
after deciding against using a Jar- 
vik-7 artificial heart. 



Baume & Mercier 

GENEVE 
1830 



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Aldebert 

PARIS: 16, place Vendome 1, bd de la Madeleine 
70, fg Saint-Honore Palais des Congres, Porte Maillot 
CANNES: 19, La Croisette 


amounting to $79 billion over three concerned that the lack or any pro- 
years instead of Mr. DomenicTs grass on the issue at the meeting in 
proposal for a $66 billion cut over Quebec on March 17 and 18 could 
toree years. undercut public support for Mr. 


Fund-Raiser for Reagan 
May Be Envoy to France 


By James R. Dickenson 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Joe M. 
Rodgers, thefounder of a Nashville 
construction company and a na- 
tional fund-raiser for President 
Ronald Reagan and the Republi- 
can Party, is expected to be named 
the next U.S. ambassador to 
France, according to White House 
and party sources. 

A source said Wednesday that 
the appointment was “a done 
deal.” Another said it awaited only 
Mr. Reagan’s final action. 

Evan O. Galbraith, the corneal 
ambassador, said on a French tele- 
vision program Tuesday night that 
Mr. Rodgers would be his succes- 
sor . 

A longtime supporter of Mr. 
Reagan, Mr. Rodgers, 51. was fi- 
nancial chairman of the Reagan- 
Busb Campaign Committee for the 
1984 presidential campaign. In 
1976, when most Tennessee Re- 
publicans backed President Gerald 
R. Ford, Mr. Rodgers supported 
Mr. Reagan for the Republican 
presidential nomination. 

From 1978 to 1981 he was fi- 
nance chairman of the Republican 
National Committee, which has 
raised more than $100 million for 
the party since 1978. In 1981. Mr. 
Reagan 'named him to the Intelli- 
gence Oversight Board, 


Governor Lamar Alexander of 
Tennessee noted that Mr. Rodgers 
has been “a very close and loyal 
friend of President Reagan, and the 
French should be delighted to have 
someone that close to the president 
as their ambassador." 

What the French will have is a 
man who is a Christian fnndamen- 
talist. deeply conservative, 
staunchly pro-American, j>ro-busi- 
ness and anti-union- He is consid- 
ered a highly energetic, driven mao,- 
and he had a heart attack and by- 
pass surgery eight years ago, at the 
age of 43. 

“He'll have an interesting time 
with the Socialist government of 
France," said Richard Lodge, the 
Tennessee Democratic chairman. 
“He’s 100 percent all-American 

Mr. Rodgers, who was bora in 
Alabama, received a degree in engi- 
neering from Alabama University 
in 1956. 

In 1966, Ik founded a construc- 
tion company in Nashville that had 
total sales of $230,000 that year. 
Ten years later, its sales were $140 
miUioiL 

When Mr. Rodgers suffered his 
heart attack, however, be sold 85 
percent of the company to a Leba- 
nese entrepreneur. He has since 
formed another construction com- 
pany and two financial firms. 


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Page 4 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 


Puhliwhtd Vitfa TTmt !Sy Yoik Than «nd The WasMagtoa Pom 


Sri butte 


Intervention Could Help 


What in the world is happening to the dol- 
lar? It is being bid up relentlessly. Does that 
matter? A great deal although President Rea- 
gan does not concede iL Should anything he 
done? Several things, but they need a push. 

The dollar's cost in other currencies has 
risen about 70 percent since 1980 because 
foreign investors want their money and credit 
in America, whose strong growth, low infla- 
tion. high interest rates and social calm make it 
the most dependably profitable haven. The 
president takes pride in this, as he should. But 
he should also take protective action. 

In Mr. Reagan's view the dollar's proper 
value is whatever the world market says it is. 
and if that causes trouble it is someone else's 
responsibility. But it is America's trouble; 
Fanners and businessmen are finding it im- 
possible to compete overseas because the ris- 
ing dollar keeps raising the price of their pro- 
ducts; domestic industries. like textiles, are 
being wiped out not by inefficiency but by 
imports, whose prices decline every time the 
dollar goes up. Friendly struggling countries 
that owe America so many dollars cannot bear 
the burden of owing it more every week. And 
allies Teel trapped and resentful; they are 
afraid to reduce their interest rates to stimulate 
growth because that would send still more erf 
their capital fleeing into dollars. 

As Paul Volcker testified on Wednesday, the 
dollar's strength also hobbles the Federal Re- 
serve's effort to resist inflation. When the Fed 
wants to restrain the money supply — now 
expanding faster than intended — it fears 
making the dollar still stronger and further 
damaging the trade balance. That imbalance 
already finds Congress threatening a disas- 
trous across-the-board increase in tariffs. 


The overriding danger of a soaring dollar is 
that it must eventually Fall. There is surdy a 
limit — -although no one knows precisely what 
it is — to the demand for dollars and the 
patience of the allies. The higher the dollar 
rises, the farther it might one day fall causing 
even more damage. like higher American inter- 
est rates, if it falls too fast. 

What might be done? President Reagan is 
right to ted Western Europe and Japan to whip 
up some economic energy and to permit the 
flexibility in labor and investment that could 
bring faster growth and reinvigorate their cur- 
rencies. But Mr. Reagan ignores the damaging 
effect of his own inadequate actions to reduce 
his budget deficits. Heavy federal borrowing 
and the expectation of renewed inflation are 
keeping America's interest rates high, thus 
adding to the dollar's magnetism. 

Last week half a dozen central banks tried to 
brake the dollar's rise by selling several billion 
dollars from their reserves. That increased the 
supply and undercut the price. The U.S. Trea- 
sury pooh-poohs this intervention, which 
means that the Federal Reserve could proba- 
bly give only token assistance to the effort. 

intervention is, admittedly, a stopgap that 
works mostly to discourage spot speculators, 
not true investors. No one contends that such 
market manipulation can be a sturdy dike. But 
it may hold back the waters for a time, which 
would help if they are nearing their natural 
crest. Central bank intervention can be useful 
insurance and it costs relatively little. But the 
Reagan administration will not think about 
insurance until it is made to recognize that 
there is a problem. Too much pride in the 
rising dollar risks a painful falL 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Thatcher’s Mixed Results 


.The collapse of the British miners’ strike, 
after nearly a year of extraordinary turbu- 
lence. is the kind of event that permanently 
marks a country's political life. It was unques- 
tionably better for Britain — very much better 
— that the strike failed. 

For one thing, the leadership had com- 
menced the strike by overriding the union's 
own rules and refusing to hold a strike vote. It 
relied on very rough picketing, rock throwing 
and threats to try to enforce the decision of the 
most militant on the doubters. Hus did not 
work. The implications would have been omi- 
nous if it had worked. But that is why the 
union was never able to hold the allegiance of 
its full membership and why it got only the 
most tepid support from other unions. 

The strike was not only an attempt to bring 
down Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and 
her Conservative government It was a coun- 
terattack against her faith in economic ratio- 
nalization mid against her determined drive to 
accelerate British economic growth. 

The union’s overriding purpose was to per- 
petuate present jobs in the mines, including 
mines that produce unneeded coal at huge 
losses to their owner, the government The 
union said it intended to secure jobs not only 
for the men now holding them but for genera- 
tions to come. You are entitled to ask whether 
it is enlightened social policy to continue send- 


ing 16-year-old boys underground to spend 
their working lives in the harsh and dangerous 
world of a miner, producing coal that cannot 
compete with that of other countries. 

The union, under its Marxist leaders, was 
insis ting on tradition and the observance of 
past usage regardless of cost It was the gov- 
ernment in contrast that kept pressing for 
radical reform in the name of efficiency. 

The end of this strike is the most important 
of the victories that Mrs. Thatcher has won for 
her economic program, but there have been 
others. Unfortunately she has less to show for 
them than she hoped. The long decline in 
manufacturing continues; the number of man- 
ufacturing jobs is almost one-fourth lower 
than when the Conservatives took office six 
years ago. Unemployment is nearly 14 percent 
That is what makes it so difficult to move labor 
out of overmanned, money-losing industries 
like coal — there is not much demand else- 
where. Britain’s economy is currently expand- 
ing but as usual less rapidly than the other 
major countries of Western Europe. The min- 
ers’ strike itself is pan of the explanation of the 
disappointing performance of the past year. 
With her campaign to cut down subsidies to 
uncompetitive producers. Mrs. Thatcher is on 
the right track. The puzzling thing is that so far 
her achievements have had little visible effect 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Case Against Lead 


The U.S. government’s Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency has built such a solid case for 
its new tighter limits on lead additives in 
gasoline that the only remaining question — 
which EPA Administrator Lee Thomas says 
he is still weighing — is how soon leaded 
gasoline should be banned altogether. 

Four years ago. Vice President George 
Bush’s regulatory relief task force recommend- 
ed that the EPA consider relaxing or rescind- 
ing restrictions on leaded gasoline. Since that 
time, agency policymakers and researchers 
have amassed evidence that the health costs to 
the public of leaded gasoline are so great — 
and the benefits to vehicle users so slight, if 
they exist at all — that nothing but the practi- 
calities of an orderly phaseout should stand in 
the way of eliminating lead from gasoline. 

Lead has long been recognized as highly 
toxic to human brings. But only recently have 
scientists produced strong statistical and ex- 
perimental evidence that lead from vehicle 
emissions can be absorbed into the body in 
sufficient quantities to cause serious health 
effects. Last summer, on the basis of studies 
showing that even minute amounts of lead can 
permanently reduce mental capacity in chil- 


blood pressure, the agency has brought for- 
ward the deadline for meeting that goal and is 
considering a total ban by 1988. 

The EPA does not rest its case on its health 
findings alone, persuasive as they are. Its stud- 
ies also show that increasing numbers of mo- 
torists have been illegally using leaded gaso- 
line in newer cars, thus damaging the catalytic 
converters needed to reduce other automobile 
emissions. Leaded gasoline is slightly cheaper, 
and some motorists believe it improves engine 
performance. But the EPA has demonstrated 
that most of these savings are offset by the 
need for more frequent replacements of eDg^ne 
oil and mufflers in cars using leaded gas. 

The agency has even undermined the case 
for retaining some leaded gasoline for use in 
older vehicles. Lead additives were previously 


thought essential to prevent excessive valve- 
seal wear in heavy-duty trucks and in cars 


dren, the EPA proposed to cut lead in gasoline 
bv more than 90 oercent by next January. 


by more than 90 percent by next January. 
Now. armed with additional studies showing 
strong links between lead exposure and high 


seal wear in heavy-duty trucks and in cars 
produced before the mid-'70s — at least if they 
ran continuously at high speeds. But the EPA 
has discovered that both the Pentagon and the 
U.S. Postal Service have been using unleaded 
gasoline in their extensive fleets without any 
indications of unusual valve wear. 

A Final thing that EPA has demonstrated is 
that its own sustained investment in good 
research and staff development pays off hand- 
somely in sensible policy decisions. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR MARCH 8 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Official Is Shot in Guadeloupe 
POINTE-A-PITRE — .An attack was made on 
M. Philippe Henry. Secretary-General who 
was seriously wounded by two gunshots [on 
March 6J. One charge struck him in the right 
arm. and the other in the back. When the shots 
were fired M. Henry was on the veranda of his 
residence at Basse-Terre. The situation re- 
mains very critical. The town is calm, but in 
the country there is much disorder. The plant- 
ers. under the protection of soldiers, who un- 
fortunately are far from numerous, will this 
week resume the gathering in of the sugar crop. 
M_ Henry was appointed Secretary-General of 
the Guadeloupe administration on November 
22. 1907. He is a functionary of great experi- 
ence. having been several years in Indo-China. 


1935: Land Speed Record Bettered 
DAYTONA BEACR Florida — Sir Malcolm 
Campbell. British racing motorist, smashed his 
own world speed record here (on March 7] 
driving his giant Bluebird car at an average 
rate of 276.816 miles per hour. Moving north- 
ward over the hardpacked sand and with the 
wind behind him. he attained the fastest speed 
ever traveled by man on land when he flashed 
through the measured mile at 281.030 miles 
per hour. This figure, averaged with an earlier 
southbound run of 272.727 miles per hour, 
established a new mark. The previous record, 
set by Sir Malcolm in February. 1933. was 
272. 108. Sir Malcolm said that during the runs 
thin threads were hanging from the walls of 
the tires “like the fringe of a rug.” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1953-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Ckanrntn 


Deputy Pabhsho 
Associate Publisher 
Associate Publisher 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

PHILIP M. FOISIE Extxume Editor RENfi BONDY Deputy Publisher 

WALTTRWELLS EOUr ALAIN LECOUR _ „ Associate Publisher 

si^ cCABE S5SSS »»!»*««& 

Dirraeur tie la pvbticatian: Walter N. Thayer. 

, Uendauartert 24-34 Hewtessy Rd- Hong Kong. TeL 5-285613. Telex 61170. s34«1 

us. XT. mot. 


FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 













In Victory , Ariel Sharon 
Would Not Stand Alone 


By Joyce R. Starr 


J. against tne ideas of Meir tva- 
hane. 1 think be doesn't have a right 
to be here in IsraeL . . . The Arabs 
living in Israel must have aP the 
rights of citizens, as welt as the obli- 
gations. including army service. Yes. 
[ would like to see all of the Pales tin- 


tank or {he deadly sting of a scorpion. 
Yet the odds are good tha t he will 
succeed Yitzhak Shamir as leader Of 
Likud, and he might well be prime 
minister within a few years. 

“In many ways, this debate about 


ians now living in Israel join the Is- 
raeli Defense Forces." 


f If you can't stand the heat, file a lawsukT 


raeli Defense Forces." 

Shimon Peres speaking? No. Arid 
Sharon, who is now minister of com- 
merce and industry, during a recent 
interview at his ranch near Ashkelon. 

The words “Arik Sharon is a threat 
to democracy in Israel" have been 
repeated so often that they are almost 
a cliche. Books have been written 
about excesses in the execution of 
power, stories abound about disre- 
gard for people and rules. Mr. Sharon 


whether I am for or against danm- 
cv is artificial” Mr. Sharon said. All 


H Allies Don’t See Advantage, Why Remain Allies? 


O XFORD. England -—The meaning of alliance 
has been brought into question by New Zea- 


has been brought into question by New Zea- 
land’s Prime Minister David Lange, whose govern- 
ment refuses to accept port visits by U.S. vessels 
with nuclear weapons aboard. He argues that nu- 
clear weapons "are morally indefensible." He 
made that case last Friday in an Oxford Union 
debate with the Reverend Jerry Falwell of Lynch- 


By William Pfaff 


burg. Virginia, and the Moral Majority. 

Mr. Lange won the debate, according to the vote 
of Union members. Mr. Falwell voiced the senti- 
ment that freedom is better than tyranny and 
Western values are to be preferred to those of 
Leninism, drawing from that the conclusion that 
what defends the former from the latter must be 
moral. Mr. Lange was more subtle. 


are launched, allied governments are pressed to 
reconvert their wavering citizens. No one in Wash- 
ington has been brave enough to teD people to 
make up their own minds but also be prepared to 
take the consequences of their decisions. Yet what 
is at slake is tne health of the Western alliance; 
which is not as good as it could be. 

The Oxford debate between David Lange and 


less thinks, is not so wonderful when even the one for expressing bis views. • - , 
British Tory subconscious rises in revolt “During the peace with Egypt \he 

The time has come to reconsider what the sys- Labor Party organized demon stra- 
tera of Western alliances really is worth to its lions dema n d in g that Israel give 
members. A situation has been allowed to develop more and faster. I did criticize that, 
in which some allies fed dragooned imo actions J said it made it harder to get better 
that serve only U.S. security rather than their own, terms in the negotiation. No doubt I 
while some Americans feel exploited by those criticized the Labor Party for criucjz- 


rif my life I have been struggling.-*? 
express my opinion, both u» the mt»- 
wry where it was closed to public • 
discussi on and later in politics. 

“ii was I who came to Menachepi 
Begin with the idea to bring together 
the smaller opposition parties in fif- 
der to form a two-party system in 
Israel. This is when the Ukud wps 
created. It was a major contribution 
to Israeli democracy, because l?- 
bor Party had been ruling the coupwy 
for almost 50 years, when you com- 
bine their pre-state rule with their 
years in power after 1948 .... . 

“I do not believe that you will ever 
find in one article I wrote, nor in apy 
speech I gave, that I criticized some- 
one for expressing his views. . . 

“During the peace with Egypt, ihe 
Labor Party organized . demonstra- 
tions de manding that Israel give 
more and faster?! did criticize that. 


Jerry Falwdl was preceded by a brief preliminary 
bout between two undergraduates on the proposi- 


He offered no judgments upon how Americans 
id Europeans, m different circumstances from 


and Europeans, in different circumstances from 
those of New Zealand, have chosen to defend 
themselves or their values. He said that his own 
country's hostility to nuclear weapons has been 
made clear for many years. Previous governments 
opposed nuclear tests in the Pacific. He himself 
campaigned for office with a promise to ban US 
nuclear weapons from New Zealand waters. 

“The people of New Z ealan d reached a straight- 
forward conclusion: The nuclear weapons which 
defended them caused more alarm than any which 
threatened them, and it was accordingly pointless 
to be defended by them.” Mr. Lange wants a 
nuclear-free zone in the South Pacific, but he also 
states that New- Zealand will honor its commit- 
ments to conventional defense and to the support 


tion that a special relationship no longer exists 
between America and Britain. The proponent con- 
ventionally argued that the relationship which ex- 
isted during World War II lapsed long ago, and 


a and Bri tain. The proponent con- 
ventionally argued that the relationship which ex- 
isted during World War II lapsed long ago, and 


contribution. American pushing, wheedling and 
threats will not correct this. They make it worse. 

An alliance is an arrangement of mutual advan- 
tage, or it is not worth having. If a positive wall to 
be allied with America no longer exists in a given 


demonstrations that were organised 
during the siege of Beirut, The terror- 
ists themselves said these demonstra- 
tions were their only hope. 

“But you will not fuid that I ai- 


isted during World War II lapsed long ago, and 
that Britain no longer enjoys either spatial atten- 
tion or special affection in Washington, Mr. Rea- 
gan's and Mrs. Thatcher’s mutual admiration not- 
withstanding. The opponent said that a special 
relationship does exist: that of master to savant 
In the principal debate, one of the participants, 
Julian Critchley, a member of Parliament and a 

y+- ■ ' j_r ; 


There is absolutely no reason why they should not 
do so. There equally is no reason why Americans, 
in all friendship for the New Zealand people, 
should not themselves decide whether alliance with 
New Zealand contributes to American security. If 


Conservative Party specialist in defense, inadver- 
tently referred to the United States as “the 
U-S-SJL," for which he quickly and gracefully 
apologized. The state of the alliance, one nonethe- 


Washington were to take this position, and mean 
it, the air could be cleared of much present un- 


certain hours. I would like someojle 
to show me one event in which I acted 
in an undemocratic way .1. ” !l ‘ 
Yet there are figures m both Likfld 
and the Labor Party who fear Mr. 
Sharon's rise to power more than jirty 


it, the air could be cleared of much present un- _ 

pleasantness, and the Western alliance could be “When I read these things I don't 
placed on a sounder footing than it now possesses, know what to do” he said. “How do 
© 1985 William Pfttff. they dare to write these thing? about 

me? Isn’t it these people who atrf m 
the most undemocratic way?" ■ < 

• Mr. Sharon nurtures a grievance 
jgfff against the U-S. government for die 
CriSaBth cold shoulder accorded him since the 
wPVh Sabra and Chatfla massacre in S&- : 

tember 198LHisopdhH^'heffiaA : 
after a cordial hello and even befrire 
he settled himself in an armchair, 
was: ‘‘I haven’t seen senior people 
from the U.S. government for o»fcr 
two years. Sure, some congressmen 
come by. But not the top officials, 
jjgfe They don’t want to speak with mb, 
iSIot but wity? The USl ambassador does 

MV | * — - . not uvea invite me to las annual 4th 

w L — I I of July cdehration_f don’t care about 

celebrations, but how can you ex- 
plain it? Is this democracy?" «» 
Perhaps, it is suggested, thus uoat- 
y 115011 relates to the fact that Mr. Jftrar- 
J on wasarchitect of the war in-Lebl- 

. .. noo«Wasitn<^af^afiii4fi^fogpl 

war, in disregard for democratic pro- 

cesses, that led to today’s chaos? 

- * • - Tf it was a dear-cut victor^, 1 ! 

would not be alone,” he said, “^he 
<ky w ® come when the written mm- 
wtM by cartoonists & writer* syndicate. utes of the cabinet meeting will ‘be 

known. Since the beginning of"jhe 
^ mm m . 1950s, though stiH very young, [w^s 
TOTI? mrrAD quite c*ose to Ben-Gunon and there- 

I ri-Ti LDllUu . . fore always involved in derisions that 

had broad influence: And I do npt 
The National Medical and Dental think that any of the wars were &- 
Association (NAMDA), a profes- cussed before and daring in inbte 


single Arab threat to IsraeL 
“When I read these thing: 


of social and economic development in the region. 
The United States has retorted that New Zea- 


Tbe United States has retorted that New Zea- 
land’s action will not be without costs to New 
Zealand. Wellington will not be furnished certain 


US. intelligence data. New Zealand can no longer 
exited the U.S. government — Congress as well as 


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BtU40»«0?e©UARS 
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expect the U.S. government — Congress as well as 
the a dminis tration — to look with the old warmth 
toward New Zealanders and their exports. 

This American retaliation, according to Mr. 
Lange, expresses “the moral position of totalitar- 
ianism.” America, he says, is insisting that New 
Zealand “must be obliged to be host to nuclear 


weapons," and is attempting “to compel an ally to 
accept a position against the will of its people." But 


accept a position against the will of its people." But 
that plainly is not so. Washington is saying that 
New Zealand can choose the course it wants, but 
must accept that choices entail consequences. 

There is a larger issue in this. Washington has 
fairly consistently taken the position that when 
trouble arises in the alliance, the alliance must be 
defended — even against the allies themselves. 
When public opinion moves against an alliance 
derision — the last case was that of Pershing 
missiles in Europe — and campaigns of persuasion 



By Mlrctnrli in 7 be Australian isvdner). DfsMbutad by Cartoonists % writer* Syndicate. 


Programs for the Future 
Of European Television 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


By Giles Merritt 


B RUSSELS — When television 
soon starts to change almost 


out of recognition, what son of 
programs will fill Europe's extra 
air time? There could be a new 
genre of television education that 
transforms the medium’s value, or 
there could be rubbish galore. 

Few people outside the closed 
world of broadcasting know much 
about television, so tfie temptation 
is to shrug and leave ihe future in 


Europe risks being 
swamped by low-cost 
American material 


the hands of the entertainment in- 
dustry. But we are about to witness 
dramatic changes in the nature of 
television, and these raise political 


television, and these raise political 
issues that should be widely aired 


rather than derided on by the pre- 
sent cosy circle of vested' interests. 

The next tup or three years mil 
determine whether television, in 
Europe at any rate, stagnates un- 
der the control of the existing au- 
thorities, is exploited by profiteers 
or comes at last into its own. 

By the early 1990s. if not before, 
the television screen will hang on 
the wall like a large picture and its 
control terminal will as often as 
not include a video recorder and a 
computer keyboard. The medium 
will have become “inter-active.” 
meaning that the viewer will be 
able to ask questions and make 
sophisticated choices. 

In most European countries the 
experts forecast a spectacular 
boom in the number of channels 
available to viewers. In addition to 
the established national channels 
there will be some 30 cable chan- 
nels and at least three “direct 
broadcasting by satellite" stations. 

The growing worrv is that this 
technological revolution will mean 
added air time that can only be 
filled by importing still more 
trashy serials and soap operas from 
Hollywood. At least 1.5 million 
h<:»urs of television programs will 
be needed every year by the end of 
inis decade, according" to a recent 
EC Commission report. Assuming 
that a third of that time is devoted 
to fiction programs, the EC ana- 
lysts foresee an annual shortfall of 
125.000 hours of entertainment. 

As a drama series m3de in Eu- 
ropean studios can cost up CO 


5250.000 an hour, compared with 

57.000 an hour for a package of 30 
episodes of "Dallas,” there is alarm 
that Europe will be swamped by 
the sort of low-cost, lowbrow 
American programs that already 
saturate many European channels. 

The concern is not simply that 
the S250 million that Europe al- 
ready spends annually on Un- 
made television material could 
double, but that from a cultural 
standpoint such a development 
would be less than desirable. 

Europeans are right to worry, 
and so should Americans. Yet the 
European response has been inade- 
quate: implying cultural protec- 
tionism rather than positive coun- 
termeasures. The call is for 
Euro-programs — in the words of 
the EC Commission, television 
that fosters “a European aware- 
ness." The Commission proposes a 
$20-miUion pilot fund to finance 
up to 25 percent of around 40 
cross-border co-productions. A ri- 
val French scheme would pay “ad- 
vances on revenues." 

For political reasons, one of 
these ideas may eventually be 
adopted, even though respected 
British experts like David Barlow, 
the BBCs controller for interna- 
tional relations, say that European 
co-productions find backers easily 
enough if the project is viable. 

At a recent meeting in Brussels 
Mr. Barlow warned that subsidiz- 
ing contrived Euro-programs may 
mean bankrolling unwatchable 
television. What European broad-? 
casting bodies should instead do, 
he says, is encourage the growth of 
independent program- makers as a 
dynamic new sector. That could 
help Europe's independent studios 
establish an early, world-beating 
lead in the technical, educational 
and special interest programs that 
cable television promises. 

The future of Europe's television 
industry depends on the outcome 
of a somewhat different battle now 
being fought out in deadly silence. 
What is really at issue, beneath the 
talk about co-productions _and cul- 
ture. is whether the established na- 
tional broadcasting authorities and 
lhcir privileged licensees can retain 
control of television. In the Euro- 
pean Parliament and in the Com- 
mission there is strong support for 
turning the Community into a 
“single broadcasting zone" by 
scrapping national restrictions. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Medicine in Sooth Africa 

in ^S^f^ricn Need Outside Medical 
Hdp" (FA 2Ci by Robert Coles. : 

While I am in full agreement with 
Dr. Coles in his abhorrence of the 
apartheid system — which I have 
consistently opposed — it is impor- 
tant to set the record straight. 

The latest statistics available 
(1982) show that, of a total papula- 
tion of approximately 31 million, 218 
people died of cholera, 50 of typhoid 
and nine of malaria. Gastroenteritis 
is not a notifiable disease, so l cannot 
cite statistics; however, medical au- 
thorities conduct a vigorous cam- 
paign of education and treatment 
As for infant mortality, the figure 
for blacks per 1,000 live births is 90 
(not 190) — still appalling, but de- 
creasing year by year, which shows a 
commitment by the authorities to im- 
prove health standards. 

I am unaware of white doctors who 




sional organization of prog 
health professionals at m n 
South Africa, challenges the 
dons in Dr. Barnard’s letter. 


jgressye detail than peace for Gaffiee. Th&ei', 
races in arc lies against me, involving mteraal ' 
le asser- politics, a Wist£n£ bf^ lfctffaWS?^ J/ f 
But Arik Sharon is seen as the man 


Wittingly or unwittingly, be has let *(ho would totally destabilize the re- 


bis international position as a trans- 
plant surgeon be exploited fay the 


i u he had die power to do s otto 
point of destroying the Hashefei- 


state to undermine the credibility of ite regime of Jordan, unseating the 
scientifically based arguments that king if he could. Is that tbecase?-' 1 
prove the link between apartheid and “No. Hussein is very brave and 
disease. That link is vay real " courageous, though he participated 
Resource allocation for health is inaDibewarsagainstus.Ihavea4ot 
small try international standards and of sympathy for Hussein. Bui he plus 
little of it is for primary health care, it in awaythat Jordan is not reaardhd 


Resource allocation tor health is in 


little of it is for primary health care, it in awaythat Jordan is not regardhd 
There is- gross inequity of resource as a Palestinian state. As I sec it, the 


distribution for 


Palestinian problem has already bepn 


And South Africa is nor a poor solved. But 1 would not take action 
country — and thus is not compare- against him. If they want him as their 
Me with Third World countries. . . , kmg, that’s their problem.” 


High-technology medical rarecob-V - Mr.. Share® is said to be trying to 
sumes 97 percent of the health, bud- bring down the national unity gov- 


get This trend, for which Dr. Bar- eojmenc as a firet stem in his march 
nard is partly responsible, is contrary toward the premiership. 

frt fhp olnKtil trPn/1 fAxtronH rvunnrw. * “ f TKic ie nrliaf hau* 1 -- — 


treat only one race group. If they 
exist, I have never met them. Such 
behavior would bean infringement of 
the Hippocratic oath. I have treated 
more blacks than whites. Does that 
make roe a “white” doctor? In 1983 
there were 16,736 doctors registered 
in South Africa. Assuming that 90 
percent were active, that gives a ratio 
of one doctor per 2,050 people. 

True, the level of. medical treat- 
ment varies greatly from place to 
place, but that is due more to the free 
enterprise system than racial segrega- 
tion. Doctors practice where they 
wish, and most wish to practice in the 
cities. The result is that rurally we are 
a Third World country, while the 
cities grab the largest share of skilled 
personaeL The alternative would be 
forced job allocation for doctors, as 
practiced in the Soviet Union. 

The statement that whites are not 
permitted to teach in black schools is 
nonsense. Hundreds of whites teach 
in black and “colored” schools. 

The thrust of Dr. Coles’s argument 
is that disparity exists, hi that he is 
correct, Kit Ire suggests that it is 
entirety due to the apartheid system. 
On those grounds, perhaps be can 
explain why there is ethnic disparity 
in health figures for blades and 
whites in the United Stales. 

I am not proud of my country's 
health statistics, but they are the best 
we can do with the resources we have. 
South Africa devotes 4.6 percent of 
its GNP to health services, as op- 
posed to the 2 to 3 percent in other 
Third World countries. 

Speaking as a doctor, I am far from 
satisfied with our achievements, but 
allow at least that they are the best in 
Africa and better than in many other 
countries elsewhere. 

Dr. CHRISTIAAN N. BARNARD. 

Emeritus Professor of Surgery. . 

University of Cape Town. 


to the global trend toward compre- “This is what they say,” he com- 
hensave, community-based care ' men ted. “But the troth is that one 
Dr. Barnard attempts to distort week after the elections it was I whq 
reality by citing deaths due to chol- held a secret meeting with Shimon 


era, typhoid and malaria — diseases Peres on behalf of the likud. It has 
with low mortality that have readied never been publicized. And at that 


emdenuc proportions m recent years. . meeting we laid down, only the two 
These infectious diseases are pax ex- of us, everyttog that would happen 
ceflencc related to the poor environ- later-^-'the inner cabinet of five men. 


mental and sodoecononric rircum- the methods of derision -making, how 
stances that .area direct consequence we. were going tp- solve problems 


of the policies of apartheid. 

Dr. FAROOQ MEER. 
Durban, Sooth Africa. 

Dr. Barnard's statistics, taken ^from 
official sources, are inherently biased 


when the approaches woe different 
“It was vay interesting, becanse I 
had been bitterly attacked by Peres 
over ihe last decade and I had re- 
sponded. But we bad dose relations 
during Ben-Gurion’s time, and now it 


by virtue of their source. Statistics for wasjustthe twoof us. 


blacks are everywhere deficient, but ~It was very exdting. Therefore 

fWr rural me ann fh* • ^1 r 1 , j wm . 


for rural areas sad the so-called; When X read that. Sharon iscomSg to 
homdmds toy are almost . entirely undertone the government, I hmsS. 
rilmL Such data as are avadabJere. Ask abotit this secret meeting oftwo 
fled a situation no more favorable : Bouis.No one will deny iL” 

rican states is inappro pria te. . The 


he cmi .to makeit succeed," said 


South African advanage in health is an. Israeli industrialistwfaoSs 


a reflection of a huge disparity m ade through several wars, 
economic development andhas tittle ‘ “If Sharon had notbersonaltv 

to do with medical practice. South 

Africa is “rurally a Third Worid maSSS/S 118- 
country,” as Dr. Barnard says, bm 

that is became ■ tte apartheid system ‘fS^S^SSSVlSS 


serves and ensures the mafcnstit- 
icra of poverty and tfisease. 


«*. qui instead be gave his 
support. People underestimate Shar- 


mcm or poverty ana disease. on’s desire for hen* KmTI. 
establishes his terms. It 

>EticaL sorfaL residential and nrai. lorm a— r_ . ^ m 


pohdcal soos!, residential and oau- 1SW) that Arafat should berivS^h! 
pational segregation, prohibits free, chance to take 
movement m search of worit, eu- n0 f hr popular nomt' 


mmewem m seaicn or wore eu- not a r popular point ryfTJT 
forc« rewdemeni in desolate places taagjne tE £££ 


aodhlodts access to education and Sha£n S ultiSSy 

other services that promote wdfare one bv nnr e ^ er y- 


however, I regret his. defense of the 
inequity — the “best we can do with 
the resources we have.” . 

I W 


tbafs his special 


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ArUig 

fVpf Sfa, lrf &. House, 

Senate Seek 
Sanctions on 
South Africa 


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.: 1 ‘. ' • :•■» ’ By Margaret Shapiro 

1 ' li- v H«*Aini;/i« Pan Semite 

« V WASHINGTON— Uberal law- 
' , • Mr 5/ takers have agreed on the terms of 
* t -. Jlcnucal bills to be introduced in 
i v m House and Senate that would 
’rohibit U-S. businesses and banka 
■«.; ''-om making new investments in or 
■ ■. A ‘ 1 " s.nJ'Mns to South Africa. 

" • ii.., . ri ::,f| ^.\ The move is designed to put 
, '^v,’;iessurconthe South African gpv- 
»■ m... : :Ojrnment to end apartheid, the offi- 

1 . ■ 1, ' system of racial segregation. 

' The legislation, introduced 
:* }■■],' , .'' ,u .:;^'hursday 1 would prohibit further 
. ‘ - ‘ Whiles of Krugerrand ©aid coins. It 
! . C . : “ set out Steps South Africa 

' r / • follow to ha ve the sanctions 

I .:;_' : fted. sources f amiliar with the 
(i V V i Jills said Wednesday. 

’. ! 1 CoDgressional officials said it 

- u i i 1 ;; ] ;as too early to tell bow the iegisLa- 

I I ’ |,‘ on would fare. A less camprcben- 

■ . " 1 1- : , l, ve effort to ban new investments 

* ■*' I . ,r !i ' Cixulh Afri/*n txopmJ «Ua 



An Israeh soldier in an armored personnel carrier in Lebanon prepares to catch an orange. 
In the background are (he Baronk mountains along the Lebanese border with Syria. 


the House 
led in a confer- 


Secrets on a Lebanese Mountciintop 

Israeli Army to Lose Key Observation Post in Pullback 


, v South Africa 
^styearbul was 
^ ice committee. 


Israeli Unit 
Clashes With 
Lebanese in 
2-Hour Battle 


The Associated Pms 

BEIRUT— Lebanese and Israe- 
li troops dashed Thursday for 
more than two hours in a south 
Lebanese village on the edge of 
Israel's occupation zone, the Leba- 
nese Army announced. 

Major Zein Khalifa, commander 
of the Lebanese Army garrison at 
Kawthariet Assay ad, said that he 
saw Israeli medics evacuating two 
of the Israeli soldiers from the bat- 
tleground near the village. He said 
be could not tell whernn' the two 
were dead. 

[An Israeli military spokesman 
in Jerusalem said that one soldier 
had been killed. United Press Iruer- 
national reported. 

[Two militiamen of the Shiite 
Moslem Axnal movement were also 
killed in the fighting. Lebanese se- 
curity and Ama] sources said, Reu- 
ters reported from Kawthariet As- 
sayad.j 

A communique from the Leba- 
nese command said Israeli forces 
advanced behind a screen of tank 


U.S. Aid Makes a Dent in Sudan 

Bush' s Visit Focuses Attention on Severe Food Shortages 


By Jonathan C Randal 

i VdjJii»gt'-<n Pott imuf 

EL OBE1D. Sudan — The sign 
in rudimentary English greeting 
George Bush here read. “You are 
mostly .welcome. Mr. Vice Presi- 
dent." 

In fact, the Reagan administra- 
tion and Americans in general have 
been received warmly here in cen- 
tral Sudan because of the U-S. de- 


auention on the lack of help to 
Sudan from other nations, al- 
though recent pledges from tile Eu- 
ropean Community, the United 
Nations World Food Program and 
Canada indicate they may supply 
as much as 229,000 tons of grain/ 

Watching the rice president w alk 
through a sandy, windblown camp 
for 27.000 Sudanese who are vic- 
tims of drought, Eric Witt, a U.S. 


livery of food to Sudanese who are official who was instrumental in 
starving because of drought. getting the grain shipments, said, 
A long-distance transportation "*-^ ow - because of his visit, I feel 
system his been steadily delivering confideoj of continuing American 
surplus American sorghum and support." 
wheaL In the central and western [Mr. Bush said Thursday that the 
provi oces, as many as 1 .4 million of United States had released S 1 5 rail- 
the 4 million inhabitants have re- lion in suspended economic assis- 
crived American grain and the ra- tancc to Sudan. Reuters reported 
lions are being increased to cover from Khartoum. He said the mon- 


cannon fire on Kawthariet Assayad 
at 8: IS A.M. and “our 'army units 




i.u » 


■ 1 x .'-‘■Diesis in the United States. The 

‘^eagan administration has op- , ^ l ^ n risncr attacks by Lebanese villagers, in the evacuation of Mount Baronk. 

i'^-'-sed using economic sanctions igriZSttSFr £ er T*. ^. e ? SI lh ^ [*“»» mahanized -Well take almost eveiything «- ...... . r - -u 

, ^lainst Somh Africa, committing ^ OU ^T BAROUK. Lebanon divisions of the Syrian Army. So ceptthe building and the roadi" be “J/beyiUage are returning flic with 
' fUl v ielf to a policy ctf^oHistructi^ —To a first-time visitor approach- there is more equipment to be said- - all available weapons. 

yi ^gagemem” deigned to cnconr- Y* .**“ Bekaa X aUey far ^ mc ^ A - oul ?° d ** ^Sger. more While they wail for the spring A btCT communique said at least 

by ^Sdng with the ?if u 5 ,ire °? titesnow-cov- sophisticated and better fortified, ^ Scops on Mount B^ouf 25 ^ sheUs Wl riUage. 

H,, *‘ credBenitt of southern Lebanon s Nowhere is that more true than have a coSroie aTSSsSirnd- ----- - ^ 

high«t mountain ndge looks like here. 6J63 feet (1.944 meters) ligence and communications du- 

above sez level at what was orip- ties. They are expected to prevent 

infiltrators from moving through 


r.ijp, 

•"'I' 


U1 , a " ,: ioth Africans. 
v> The House 
T: psiatija,all 


rs of the new 
wereun- 


j^ at Ne to win support from 35 Re- 


I , ~ iMicans who m December signed 
•i.. w J^ietter to Sooth Africa’s ambassa- 


so me thing out of science fiction. 

Lane antenna towers reach sky- 
ward from the four corners of what 


appears from a distance to be a 
v : r ’®:c to Washington, Bernardos G. SUf 1 ’ wciangnlar buMmt On the 
r i../ . , ‘‘. - r‘ l ' v rarie, threatening to back eco- I ^ a ^®^ at ®’ a gc devices that lorft 
>•' "* *i • if gallic sanctions unless Ms govern- » x Jcrf ^ ant .J )uc balls, 
'si ; :rs ' r P =1- at took immediate steps teSd ^ ^ one side more electronic 
"'F •r-«7hSi ^ hardware scans the honzon. 

leuer surprised many in - ^ goes on inside the 

kv rt | , i^mgress because most erf the sign 
■■ '• w® 1 ® fr° m the Republican Par- 
n ’ conservative wing, winch has 

• • rr-^ported administra&cm policy on 

“J. 1,1 Cr " ; «s.uth Africa. 

• r ‘‘ r w^in the letter, the Republicans 


nally a French-built radar station 
known in Arabic as Mashroua d 
Nana, or Mint Camp. 

A popular travel map of Leba- 
non marks the spot, at me end of a 
narrow trail that climbs steeply 
from the village of Kafraiya. as a 
poini devue. 


their positions on their way to at- 
tack either Israeli military targets 
in Lebanon or civilian ones in 
northern Israel's Galilee region, the 
commander said. 

As for entertainment, the officer 
said that “as we are in a very high 




Mr****- ■** 


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:v . -jf that did not occur, the letter 

i ! -red, the Republicans would reo- 
i: -v. .?v i v : '■-r^mend that the United States 
s -: ; - vnrt economic sanctions.' 

... . i.., ... jq Rgjreseniative Rob- 

>• '••S. Walker of Pennsylvania, who 
•• ' • n.'i ' ^anized the letter, said Wednes- 
• i. ■■ ■ y that the Republirans had de- 
■ • ■ .'■•■■ !.ed not to co-sponsor the new bill 

.• i.-.ause they were working on 1^- 
: ■ ■ L.T-r.tion that would focus not just 
v ■ > .;cr:South Africa but on other hu- 

t - rights violators such as the 

: . ;.. . -del Union. _ 

-Br^wllejectsKenncdy Plea 
: , . jOUth Africa has rriected a plea 

:m Senator Edward M. Kennedy, 

jnocrat of Massachusetts, and 
' • / . . other U.S. senators to release 

•' — i-aparthdd activists facing trial 

treason, Reuters reported 

t v.- :n.- ... - - — — 


the 


■ : iirsday from Cape Town, citing 
" ■ " . 'ers given to news raganizations 

• r '- •'■/■.diplomatic sources. 

‘ ' ! i letter to President Pieter W. 

1 r ; na from the senators, most of 
' 1 ; > Democrats, sought the release. 

United Democratic Front lead- 
■ / who are among 16 persons 
' r ■ : jiing trial for hi^b treason. The 

' rge can cany the dead) penalty. 

sf- " ; fr. Botha’s reply, sent last week, 

• -tsed the senators of ignorance 
•* ' ut South Africa and said the 
■•/■■■_ of the prisoners was in the 

• ds of the Sujyeme Court 

• |,; fr Kennedy visited South Afri- 

;in January and condemned 
- rtheid. He in turn was accused 
■■ ' tsing the trip to court liberal 
l; ’"'srican voters, and even some 
k South Africans protested 
nsi his visit 


small group of foreign jour -. _ . . , 

nalists was allowed to approach no ne sc avil war in 1976. and then the 
closer than several hundred yards who invaded in June 1982. 

during a visit Monday. It takes no more than a few nrin- 

“We are, going to lose a very utes here to understand why those 
important observation point when who want to control southern Leb- 
we withdraw from here,” said the anon quickly seek to control this 
base c ommander , who cannot be peak, 
farther identified under Israeli mil- 
itary censorship rules. 

Mount Baronk is one of the most 
important areas to be evacuated 
under the Israeli government’s de- 
cision Sunday to immediately be- 
gin .the second stage of its planned 
three-phase withdrawal from Leba- 
non. 

There is no announced deadline 
for completion of the pullout, but 
senior defense sources said that the 
goal was to finish the second stages 
within 12 weeks. That would leave 
the .Israeli Defense Forces de- 
ployed along a new east-west line 
running north of Hasbaya and Na- 
batiyeh between the Syrian border 
and the sea. 

The final stage of the pullback, 
which is to bring most Israeli 
troops back across the internation- 
al border, is expected by late next 
summer, although the timin g still 
must be approved by the Israeli 
cabin eL 

'Swiss Arrest 40 Kurds 
Demonstrating in Bern 

Reuters 


where the Lebanese Army mam- 
tains its closest position to the oc- 
cupation zone in south Lebanon. 

The communique said the fire- 
fight occurred when the Israelis 
stopped their advance and pulled 
back to Israeli lines in the village of 
Sharldyeh, about two biometers 
(12 miles) from Kawthariet As- 
sayad. 

Reporters who reached Kawth- 
ariet Assayad shortly after the 
fighting died down said they were 
told by villagers that at least five 
people suffered shrapnel wounds in 
the village. 


nine days' needs each month, rath- 
er than six. 

U.S. officials have estimated that 
throughout Sudan, at least one- 
fourth of the 22 million citizens 
could be in danger of starvation. 
Their plight thus surpasses the 
problem of the estimated 400,000 
to 500,000 refugees from neighbor- 
ing countries who have sought asy- 
lum in Sudan since last fail. 

“American aid came just is 
time,” Fatih Bashir Bushara. gover- 
nor of the Kordofan region, told 
Mr. Bush on Wednesday. “Without 
this assistance from your adminis- 
tration, our people could hardly 
have survived." 

“The people of this region will 
never forget what the Americans 
have done for us,” he said. Noting 
that the area still faces a shortage of 
more than 400,000 tons (362JXH) 
metric tons) far the remainder of 
the year, he said, “We hope the 
outside world wQl not forget us.“ 

Mr. Bush replied. “We'll do our 
level best to help.” He said that 
Americans wanted to “hotd out our 
hands and open our beans to the 
people of the Sudan.” particularly 
because Sudan had taken in so 
many foreign refugees during its 
own plight. 

The Bush visit has helped focus 


ey would be used to import pesti- 
cide and fertilizer. 

(The United States allocated 
about $250 million for aid to Sudan 
in 1985. but froze more than S100 
million until Khartoum put eco- 
nomic reforms into effect.] 

Mr. Witt 44, an agricultural de- 
velopment officer at the U.S. Agen- 
cy for International Development 
mission in Khartoum in January 
1984, was sent to the Darfur region 
to check the provincial governor's 
prediction of a serious shortfall in 
grain production. Mr. Witt re- 
turned to the capita] convinced that 
the situation was serious. 

His projections prompted ap- 
proval in Washington in July of an 
initial 82.000-ton shipment of sor- 
ghum. 

Now, more than one million tons 
of donated U.S. grain have arrived 
in Sudan, or been shipped or 
pledged. With the exception of a 
shipment last January that failed to 
arrive from Texas on time, the 
grain pipeline is said to have func- 
tioned efficiently. 

During a drought in sub-Saharan 
countries 10 years ago. local offi- 
cials often diverted aid shipments 
for their own profit. This time, the 
agency contracted a local trucking 


company to deliver the grain from 
Port Sudan on the Red Sea to 22 
district centers as far inland as 850 
miles ( 1,380 kilometers). 

A U.S. official described the 
transportation obstacles this way: 
“imagine shipping food to New 
York and transporting it to Minne- 
apolis. Chicago and Sl Louis when 
the only two-lane road stops in 
Pittsburgh.” 

A foreign relief worker, referring 
to the minimal role of the Sudanese 
government, said: “If this is neo- 
colonialism. then make the most of 
it” 

“People realize that foreigners 
do a better job than their own gov- 
ernment would,” the worker said. 
“.Any foreigner visiting a village is 
automatically greeted with 'tush.' 
meaning grain. They know it comes 
from America." 

Hie needs of the Sudanese are 
expected to increase. Even if rains 
are abundant this summer, it would 
not have sufficient efiect on the 
harvest in October. And famine 
also now threatens Sudan’s entire 
northern tier. 

.Already Farmers in the western 
region are eating up what was left 
'of a meager harvest. Nationally, the 
sorghum crop was so poor that the 
year's grain deficit of 1.9 million 
tons was only slightly below an 
average year's production. 

Mr. Witt and other AID workers 
have set aside grain for feed stock 
and are revising their crop projec- 
tions. 

Asked if Port Sudan and the ten- 
uous supply lines could handle 
even larger grain shipments, Mr. 
Witt replied. “Transportation 
problems arc the kind of problem I 
would like to have.” 

■ Bash Goes to Niger 

Mr. Bush arrived Thursday in 
Niger from Sudan, United Press 
International reported from Nia- 
mey, the capital. It was the second 
stop of his three- nation Africa lour. 


a clear day, according 
the Israeli commander, it is possi- 
ble to see the Syrian SAM-6 and 
SAM-9 missile batteries on 
flanks of the mountains formin 
the eastern side of the Bekaa V, 
ley. 

Mount Barouk is only about 25 
miles (40.5 kilometers) from Da- 
mascus. 

“We don’t use binoculars,” the 
commander said. “We just have to 
look down and look at the Syrians 
from the back. When you under 
stand this fact you can see the 
stralegicimpo rtance of the camp.” 

From another vantage point only 
a few yards away, one can look 
west through a (repression in the 
Chuf Mountains and “see the 
Coca-Cola signs in Beirut,” the Is- 
raeli officer added. 

The commander said there are 
“very detailed plans, a very strict 
timetable” already drawn up for 


is to evacuate Mount Barouk, the 
Bekaa Valley and the area around 
Jesrine, would be more complex 
than the first-stage withdrawal 
from the port city of Sidon that was 
completed Feb. 16. 

Several thousand Israelis are de- 
ployed in the so-called central and 
eastern sectors of the occupation 
zone compared with the hundreds 
who were around Sidon in the west- 
ern sector. More soldiers mean 
more camps 3nd more equipment 
to be evacuated. 

Also, while the army’s main con- 
cern in the Sidon area was guerrilla 


BERN — Swiss police arrested 
40 Turkish Kurds during a demon 
stratum Thursday in front of the 
parliament building in Bern, a po- 
lice spokesman said. 

The police also used tear-gas 
canisters to force some of the 60 
demonstrators into police vans. 
They were protesting death sen- 
tences imposed against Kurds in 
Turkey and wanted the Swiss gov- 
ernment to join a call fora commis- 
sion to investigate Turkish prisons. 




S <: . 
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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


Thursday 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


ow hmi low Loa am 


VoL nMi Law Last am 


Indus 1Z76X3 T2S324 1245X6 1271.53— U4 
Truitt «ww 43LD0 414X0 51158— US 


4f% 49% 

54 so% 

vm 13 
<j% vm 

2 P* 32 
27* 26* 
133% IX 
tv, m 
21% 21% 
32% 31% 

48* 48% 
17% 17% 
33 Hi 32* 
»% as% 

4* 41% 


49* 

si* +% 

13% — % 

«zh +i* 
zn% — * 

271% — 1% 

i aw. -v* 

V —14% 
21 Vi 

31* — % 
484% — 1% 
17% +% 
321% — 1% 
36 — * 

41% + 1% 


Util 14175 149X2 147.41 MB- US 
Com* 51923 522.10 514XS 517X4 — US 


Composite 

Industrials 

Tramp. 

utilities 

Finance 


HWi Lew dose Ca'm 
104X0 104X7 104X7 —057 
12137 129X3 TMXJ-M1 
10021 99X0 99.95 — 0X5 
<r« an q.« — QJJ 2 
107 JO 107.48 107 JO —042 


Qosng 


Total IMS 
New ttiebt 
IM LOW 
volume up 

voumdowt 


m 236 

m yi 

234 229 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

u Hi It tea 

Bonks 

TlWW. 


Close dTW AM 
28X19 — 2X4 284.17 
XUS — 117 304J7 
33057 — 1X8 32852 
322X3 — 1.94 322X8 
242J? — L7I 21156 
34M& +055 2tt.« 
2*1.19—3X4 265.10 


AMEX Most Actives 

VOL HUB LOW iMt ChoT 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Advanced 
Detained 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
V olume dawn 


594 577 

m 946 

432 466 

2006 2009 

48 66 

4 9 

13X41300 
60946550 


'included in the soles figures 


Boy Soles *»H 

185510 501.220 1,147 

2KU34 513X74 IJOt 

203579 534X63 S7S 

217.191 525X03 1X77 

K4J09 05X70 2382 


VbL at 4 P J* 112,180X08 

Prw.4PJA.voL llfcHMOB 

PravcamondOioddosa wuarai I 


Standard & Poor's index 


BAT 30626 4 3* 3% -fc 

WmB 5276 25* 24% 55% 4 V, 

T16 2713 7V. 7 71% 

VTOtaltl 2342 12 111% 111% - li 

WhEnto 2W 57V. 27 27» _w 

viAlwtv 2051 1% 1 U% +w 

GdCdg 1934 13 12* 12* -2 

OomeP 1463 2t% 2 29. 

Debited 1613 4 3% V* —y, 

CfflPCn 1233 TO 9«% 9% 

HovOT 981 48% 41% 4* — * 

Unimi-n 980 99% 94% 9 % + JJ 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


i ndustri als 
T reran. 

Ut limes 
Finance 
Composite 


High Low C10M C*M 
2P7B 200X4 20076-1X7 
158X3 157X9 157.1* — 1X1 


[pow Jones Bond Averages I 


AMEX Stock index 


78.17 77X7 77.91—0*2 
30« 20X0 2M7-MB 
U0XS 179X4 17951 — 1J4 


Bends 

Utilities 

industrial* 


flirt Law Close arg* 

212*8 22658 22652 -JJ? 


311 * 


c; 


CJUonm 
nigh Law Sack 


Sis. Close 

Die. TM.PE IMBHtgiLOTr QuOLOW 


N.Y. Stocks Drop on Rate Fears 


r . 
• . ' - 


12 Month * 

HWilXw Week 


Dtv. YW. PE was High Lew Quot.Oi'gr 


MW AAR AM* 
91% ACS 11 

11 AMCA 

13W AMP JO X0 37 
24*4 AMR 9 

18% AMR Of 2.18 1U 
239% ANRpf 2X7 10X 
19 ANRpf 112 10.1 
81% AJ»L 3 

44% ASA 2X0 A3 
1* AVX 52 IX 14 
36% AM Lab 150 25 15 
ltw ACCnWd » X4 IX 19 
121% AcnwC A0 23 _ 


01b AcmeE 52b 35 12 
15 Ada Ex 2.1 Tel 25 . 


111% AdmMl 
04% AdvSn 
2SW AMD 


52 1J I 
XU 7.1 u 

- 12 U 13 


27V. AetaLf 2X4 66 39 
52% Aen.pt 5X34M5 


1546 Ahmra 150 45 16 


384% AtrPrd 150 24 11 
13 AlrlMFrt X0 2X 13 
* AIMaas 23 

AloPdPf X7 12X 



AtaPdPf X7 12X 
MaPaf 11 XQ 1U 
AloPpf 050 12A 
Atones .92 75 II 
AtskAtr .14 X 9 
Altrtgi 58 2X 17 
Albtsns Jt 2J 13 
Alcan 150 45 10 
AJooStd 1.20 35 12 
AlcxAlx 1X0 95 
Alexdr 25 

AllgCp 2X64 2 x 31 
Atplnt 1X0 55 
AtBln Of 2.19 11.1 
AlalnfC1155 115 
AtlpPw 250 85 0 
At tonC X4U35 13 
AlkKPS 1X0 45 0 
AMCppf 654 105 
AtdCppfUXO UX 
AUCot 1259*12.1 
AttdPd 

AlktStr £12 35 9 

All 1*01 

AltaCnf 

ALLTL 1X4 7.1 8 
AtahPr -BO* 15 13 
Alcoa 159 3A 11 
50 15 
1.10 35 14 



United Press Unemotional 

N EW YORK — The slock market skidded to 
9 lower close Thursday against a backdrop of 
renewed concerns about interest rates. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 8.S4 to 
1.271.53. Since closing at a high of 1,29936 last 
Friday, the Dow index has registered a net loss 
of 27.83. 

The New York Slock Exchange index fell 


M-l Rises $ 3.6 Billion 


319% 204% EMrtno 52 XI 11 79 23* 22* 23* 

38* 30 Ethyl 1.12 U 11 349 3746 37* 3786+1% 

79% 2U EuonP 1364 24% ZW 24%+ 1* 

9V, 29% Evan P I 1X3 344 3 3V, + V. 

14 41% EvnPfB 142 5* 4 Vj 514+ V* 

41* 30 ExCctO 1A0 45 10 490 304% SO* OT% + W 

16 % raw ExtPfsr 1 X 601 IX 4 TX 159 % J* 

494% 369% Exxon 3X0 7J 7 CM 48*4*48*+* 


0J7 to 104.07 and the price of an average share 
decreased 19 cents, standard & Poor's 500- 
stock Index dropped 1.14 to 179 .51. Declines 
topped advances by a ratio of 9-5 among the 
1,997 issues traded by dosing rime. 

The volume totaled 112.1 million shares, 
down from the 1 16.9 million traded Wednes- 
day. 

Jerry Hinkle, of Sanford C. Bernstein Co„ 
said the stock market still was feeling the effects 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — The basic money supply 
measure rose $3.6 billion in the latest w«k, 
more than twice the expected increase. The 
jump left M-l far above the upper limit of the 
Federal Reserve’s growth targets. 

M-l, which includes cash, checking accounts 
and NOW accounts, was a seasonally adjusted 
average of $5717 billion in the week ended Feb. 
25 compared with a revised S569.1 billion the 
previous week. Last week's number was origi- 
nally reported at $5693 billion In the latest 13 
weeks. M-l averaged an 83 percent rate of gain. 


of testimony Wednesday by the Federal Re- 
serve chairman, Paul A- Volcker. Mr. Volcker 


serve chairman, Paul A. Volcker. Mr. Volcker 
repeated warnings about the size of the federal 
budget deficit, and added that there was a 
possibility the dollar could fall from near-re- 
cord levels. 

Mr. Hinkle, who expects economic growth of 
only 2 percent in the second and third quarters, 
said the stock market could have some short- 
term problems if that forecast proves correct. 
However, he said, the slower growth would be 
good for the bond market and eventually for 
stocks, with a more favorable outlook for rnter- 


cantly more negative than reality might justify." 

He said an upturn could take place as early as 
next week “when investors overcome short-term 
pessimism.'’ After such a rally, Mr. Nurock 
said, there could be a correction amounting to 
about 5 percent 

On the floor. Phillips Petroleum was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, unchanged at 49%. A 
block of 1 million shares crossed the tape at 
4954. 


“Prospects favor a further rally,'* said Robert 
Nurock, editor of the Astute Investor. “Expec- 
tations for the economy, interest rates and a 
political solution to the budget crisis are signifi- 


Sperry Corp. was second, up ft to 5158. An 
early gain was trimmed near the end of the 
session when Speny said it has not been en- 
gaged in merger talks. This speculation devel- 
oped after a recent anno uncement that merger 
talks were held with ITT Corp. without produc- 
ing an agreement. 

Middle South Utilities was third among the 
actives, off Vi to 13ft. 



800% PROFITS 
FACT, NOT FANTASY 


4A * 

35 8 
LI Z 

45 8 446 
40 10 13 

IX 16 682 
S3 29 713 
15 430 

X 

8 262 



10 363 
7 43 

• 239 
2X2 *5 214 

1X4 4X 15 37 

X4 3J ♦ 342 
150 46 I 842 
&2S 12X 5001 

1X0 IS 36 71 

XS* X <7 

152 4.1 8 X 

Fleet E/i 56 IX 9 2924 

Flomno 51 25 

FlMdV 50 2X 

50 X 


In March 1982. the world’s largest investment sendee published a roster of 67 
stocks which they claimed would “underperform the mar ket". C.G.R. contradicted 
their pessimism, challenging their thinking; urging, as contrarians, our readers to 
buy. not to sell the equities on the “sick" list We triumphed; all but a handful of the 
stocks advanced, some quadrupled. False modesty js as misleading as excessive 
arrogance. Our success is pradiefated upon simplistic fiscal gospel, the adage that 
investors should emulate "Elitists", buying into weakness, selling into strength, 
mocking prevailing opinion. C.GJT's analysts will “take , on" any market letter, 
regardless of size or reputation. Since late 1961, approximately 90% oflhe shares we 
recommended subsequently advanced and as a corollary, 92% of issues castigated 
as ' classic shorts’ have buckled. 

When APPLE, COLECO. COMMODORE and TANDY were mesmerizing the 
-Street" at bloated Price Earning levels, we "attacked" the Quartet, characterizing 
APPLE $56. as a “Lemon". Today's quote. $27. COLECO coHapsedfrom $50 to $12, 
COMMODORE capsized from $52 to $14. TANDY, which C.G.R. dissected at $54, is 
currently $32. . 

As mavericks, we stunned the “Street" in the summer of 1982, by predicting that 
the "DJI WILL TOUCH 1.000, BEFORE HITTING 750". The Bufl rampaged, the rest Is 
hlstory.The same scriptwas repeated when theDOWtemporarilydlpped below 1100. 
While the majority of pundits were cringing.C.GFl. noted- “BUY NOW- "THE MARKET 
WILL ERUPT. VAPORIZING PROPHETS OF DOOM". Our forthcoming report reviews 
"Big Board" companies that predators may be coveting at premium prices. In 
addition. C.G.R. focuses upon a low-priced venture capital equity, with the dynamics 
to spiral, as did a recently recommended “special situation" that escalated 800% In 
six months. 

For your complimentary copy please write to. or telephone; 


8 CAPITAL 
_ GAINS 


RP.S. Financial Planning Services bv 
Kalverstraat 112, 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) -27 51 81 
Telex 18S36 




12 Month 
HfttlLOw SI OCX 


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kofits 


raham Greene: Waiting for the Words 


by John Vinocur 


' I.s* iVr- 


M nBES, France — Graham Greene 
is 80 now. For his birthday last fall, 
the brewery his great-grandfather 
founded in 1799 made a special 
I:,., ^ ^edition of its light Sl Edmunds ale for hnn 
•.j i , ' a special label He liked that and the 

r,. ,' ^beery lunch in the English countryside that 

. 1 1,1 'niHit nnth it Ttvrpdnf lh#hirtMAUnnc«ni 


ten*? 1 ivtt.i. 

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‘ r " : "rSO you are more likely these days to beat out 

* ' r, i encountering your end in a nuclear war. The 

•i ^ -other side of the problem, Greene goes on, is 
‘ ‘ - : 'i that “I really don’t want to survive myself’ 
> — a phrase that doesn’t have anything to do 

nukes, but with the body bangmg 
while the mind departs. 

His 90-year-old unde, on his way to a 
^ •’-meeting at the Admiralty to discuss whether 
'o introduce reindeer in Scotland, fell under 
i train in a wartime London tube station. He 


•*«.»** r:w., . n l7 . . pr^^wefy reason to suppose he means iL 
+ ; ,! Jl ' He talks simply and economically. He 

' r - i! -::: 2 isi| c ^hmks his books have bedi more honest than 
, .... , iis life, which has been truthful enough. In 

* '■ 1 ’ •' he 1930s, after his third novd, a reviewer 

__ Ascribed him as an Imitator of Joseph Con- 

F PS. Fin.incral Pl.tnnmo “““S far 100 ““<* mcla P hor andpatch- 

K*dwet'atia;»i a3W *oeng his books with false poetic-prose. The 

1013 PK Anv.tordum Th P ,eview ^““d Greene deeply, and he talks 
pfKmr: (0;-0) r 5 i si if he had read it for the first time yesier- 

Tf te t ifisBti lay. and wanted to make sure his conversa- 


Hus sparseness, this sense of control, of 
distance, is very much a part of his “new 
book” — “The Tenth Man,” a story outline 
for an unmade film written just after World 
War II that is now being published as what 
Greene calls a short novd. He thinks it goes 
“along qiritenicely," although it is a piece of 
work he had completely forgotten, written, 
as it was, for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in the 
gloom of 1944 London on what Greene 
remembers as an “almost slave contract.” 

Greene left England in the 1960s for An- 
tibes and a mediocre apartment building on 
a mediocre street. He is still there, sitting 

most mornings at his desk that faces a yacht 

basin, an old fort, and the Mediterranean. 

Both the light and the view are good, but 
they don’t necessarily help. He felt his last 
book. “Getting to Know the General,” about 
die late Panamanian President Brigadier 
General Omar Torrijos, was “very unsatis- 
factory,” too dispersed, not dearly enough a 
memoir or an autobiography or a travel 
book. 

It is late to be thinking of failure, but 
Greene insists it’s a natural situation for 
novelists. He likes a line from John Mase- 
field — “The long defeat of doing nothing 
weft.” In another person, the combination of 
the writer’s enormous reputation and the 
flirtatious talk of being a flop would be 
outrageous, but Greene manages it After all 
these years, after all this time m which some 
final wisdom might have washed ashore, the 
theme of his last novd, “Monsignor Qui- 
xote,” he paints out, is just plain doubt. 

He is not writing now, and that is no 
incidental problem. Greene mentions it, and 
that he feds depressed. A visitor, un comfort- 


ion, like Ms writing, was stripped of span- 1 able with the dead weight of a writer telling 
;les and bows. him he may not have anything left, says 


something about everybody feeling a bit 
burned out, daily, weekly, monthly, whatev- 
er. 

“No," Greene says, his voice even, con- 
trolled. “I want to feel it but 1 don't fed like 
•it," he says about writing. 

Does that bother you very much? 

“Yes, it does. Tm afraid of living too long 
away from writing.” 

The silences are strong. Greene continues. 
“1 once thought I was finished, after ‘A 
Burnt-Out Case.’ It wasn’t a pleasure to 
think, Tve had iL’ But 1 haven't got much 
confidence in another one now.” 

Greene looks up as he says this. His eyes 
are very pale blue and do not blink. His 
mouth is expressionless. It is a still look, and 
it shuts the door gently on the subject. 

S O he is waiting and doing other things. 
Since he has described writing as 
something like squeezing a boQ. the 
wait now is for the irritation to develop. In 
the meanwhile, he writes letters. Or he reads 
— recently a book by H. G. Wells on his love 
life, and another bv fhapman Pincher on 
moles in the British secret service. Or he 
makes entries into the journal he keeps of his 
dreams. There are more than 800 pages and 
they are indexed by letter, like the phone 
book, so that he can find a dream about the 
sea or a hotel or Khrushchev or Haiti. 

“It passes the time when I’m not work- 
ing,” he says. 

Talk is also a relief. With the door shut on 
troubles with writing, he seems to want to 
spend a little time setting some loose bits of 
information about him in order. It is not 
necessarily the most affecting side of his 
personality. He speaks rather more kindly of 



Kim Philby, the Soviet spy he knew as a 
young man and with whom he still corre- 
sponds (“he was a traitor for a cause he 
believed in”), than of those who have some- 
how miscast what Graham Greene remem- 
bers doing or saying. Greene notes that Paul 
Theroux, m his novd “Picture Palace,” over- 
did the British novelist's relationship with 
Fidel Castro; Au heron Waugh wrote that he 
slept with a revolver next to his bed — pure 
invention, Greene insists. Gabriel Garcia 
Marquez, the Colombian Nobel Prize win- 
ner for literature, told Castro that Greene 
played Russian roulette in Vietnam; wrong 
again, 

“Garcia Marquez gets things wrong. He’s 
a nice man but he gets things wrong,” 

There was more. It had been made out 
that he didn't like the United States, which 
he last visited in the 1960s. and that be once 
said he preferred to wind up in Russia than 
in California. The nuance was that he didn’t 
much like parts of America, such as New 
York; San Francisco and San Antonio were 
O.K. He placed President Ronald Reagan on 
the same levd as Pope John Paul II, men he 
didn’L care for a biL “This pope is a horror,” 
he said, and Reagan, with the same false 
smile as the pope. well, he owed all his 
success to television. 

As for Russia and California, “it was 
meant to be an ironic remark, i would end 
my days much quicker in Russia than in 
California, because the Russians take writ- 
ing seriously, so I would soon find myself in 
a gulag, which is in a way a compliment to a 
writer. Whereas one might drag out one’s 
years in California in some backwater." 

While Greene spoke, he had been sitting 
in a deep armchair. He looked a little melan- 



Graham Greene. 

choly. Then he moved to his desk with its 
papers and a small statuette in rough stone 
sent to him by someone in Yugoslavia. Sit- 
ting near his notebooks, he seemed elegant, a 
handsome man with a long face and a long 
body wearing a tweed jacket in gray-blue. He 
spoke of a “working vacation,” maybe the 
Capri, where things have always gone well 
for him, and his voice sounded lighter, less 
monotone. 

Suppose you couldn't write again, he was 
asked. Suppose it didn't happen again? 

“It would worry’ me a lot,” Graham 


Greene said. He paused a bit and then said: 
“I’m Hying to see if I can get on with a book 1 
abandoned 10 years ago in order to write 
The Human Factor,’ or it may have been 
‘The Honorary Consul.' No. I "think it was 
‘The Honorary Consul.' ” 

And you’re looking . . . 

“I’m looking at it. but I’m not sure.” 

The writer paused. He was closing the 
door gently again. 

“I'm jus: seeing whether it will — whether 
it will come alive.’’ ■ 

*■' IWS Thf .vw York Tmio 


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Jewison’s Conscience 

'■"lb ARIS — In 1967 Norman Jewison timing was right, with a black running 
1. _j9 made a h i the Heat of the Night” in president, a blade Miss America, and v 

* I winch Sidney Poirier, as a detective the Bin Cosby show, which is just an o 

-JL. named Viral Tibbs, slaoned Rod narv domestic enmedv. one of the most r 


"■"lb ARIS — In 1967 Norman Jewison 

B made “In. the Heat of the Night” in 

’ which Sdncy Poirier, as a detective 

named Virgd Tibbs, slapped Rod 

;teiger, the redneck sheriff, in the face. “I 
-hint the audience gasp was audible,” Jcwi- 
• : on says. 

This was the time of Mack supermen, 

: Maky blume 

> Ran g in g from the inmrobably perfect Poatier 

•; •*. -rtf “Guess ’Who’s Gmring to Dinnet?” to 
: ;i ^ShafL" Then blacks faded out in serious 
. j p! 1ms until “Ragtime.” with Howard E. Rol- 
; - v<ns Jr n who won an Oscar no mination as 
oalhouse Walker but waited four years for 
vis next film role, in Jewison’s “A Soldier’s 
- :> lory.-^iwhichisjiow bcsDunos its European. 

. •! ;*ireer after winning three Oscar nomina- 
>"on s. 

; RoQins plays Obtain Davenport, a Pcn- 
i '-.er-like righteous man who is sent south 
£ ' om Washington in 1944 to investigate the 
r .‘ flirder of a black sergeant. To Jewison, “A 
•’ 'ddier’s Story” marks an advance from “In 
■ Heat of the Night” 

“Davenport seems better educated than 
• ■;* whites, that’s a siinflaxity, and like Tibbs 

r-s comes from the North to the South to 
i.dve a murder. But I think this film is more 
. j r e aman than a black-white film. It’s a Wack- 
. f’: ^lack film and it’s the relations between 
: - T y acks that are important Audiences talk 
;; ( : ;,3out the people in the film.” 

11 — To Jewison, Davenport is not as interest- 
’ — ig as the murdered anti-Negro Negro ser- 
V* “ant or the toudnng figure of one of Ms 
• i,:)ldier victims, the farm boy C. J. Memphis. 
V- ^Hc’s Billy Budd, the Mirivme innocent, and 
“ r : 1 Person [a coldly fierce soldier in Malcom X 
-• v/^lassesl is the militancy that was to come 
. - -.;ath from that period.” 
v . With rare exceptions such as Robert Alt- 

• aa’s “Streamers,” dramatic films about 
'-.lacks still seem stuck with a credit-to-his- 
•• ; ice type like Davenport Jewison thinks this 
. '- coming to an end. 

;■ l:‘ “When I made Tn the Heat of the Night,' 
fobby Kamedy said, I think the timing’s 
j- ’;ght, and it was. It wasn’t *Star Wars’ but it 
. - .on an Acadamy Award. And this year the 


timing was right, with a black running for 
president, a black Miss America, and with 
the Bin Cosby show, which is just an ordi- 
nary domestic comedy, one of the most pop- 
ular shows in America. 

“So maybe we’ll see more films that deal 
more with the humanity and less with the 
racial aspect" 

But can a film that has black chararter s 
but a white director and producers really be' 
considered p ro g ress? 

“Forty per cent of the crew were black. 
That’s progress,” Jewison says. “Eighty per- 



N orman Jewison. 


cent of the cast was black. That’s progress. 
The writer is black. The director is white, 
and somehow that’s not progress.” 

In “A Soldier’s Story, . however, Jewison 
says that the important thing is not that the 
director is white but that the writer, Charles 
Fuller, is black. 

“The director is only the interpreter. 
There was a feeling of trust and understand- 
ing from the start.” 

Fuller’s Pulitzer Prize- winning play was 
first presented in New York by the Negro 
Ensemble Company in 1981. T noticed that 
there were more and more whites appearing 
at the theater,” says Jewison, who read the 
pday before it opened. Despite public enthu- 
siasm, Jewison's film was turned down by 
three studios and he was only able to make it 
by taking minimum pay and by bringing in 
the film for a rock bottom $6 million. ■ 


T HE story, set in Louisiana in World 
War n, is about an all-black company 
whose sergeant, a tortured and fero- 
cious black World War I veteran, believes 
that “niggers” (by which he means all South- 
ern blacks and any others who do not try to 
act white} are holding the race back and 
should be exterminated. Instead, he is killed 
— “I didn’t kill much.” his murderer scorn- 
fully says —and the film becomes a suspense 
drama in which obvious suspects, such as the 
Ku KIux Klan, are quickly eliminated. 

“Klan boys usually take the stripes off 
before they lynch us,” one of the soldiers 
laconically explains. The sergeant still has 
bis stripes. 

Throughout the war, the black soldiers 
have been doing menial jobs. At the film's 
end, they are shown marching proudly off , as 
Jewison says, to fight for a republic that 
didn’t even give them full citizenship. 

In World War n the U. S. Army was still 
segregated. It was not integrated until 1948, 
during the Truman administration — late, 
but still earlier than the desegregation of 
schools, Jewison points ouL In World War L 
Jewison says, the situation was even worse: 
His sergeant wears a Croix de Guerre be- 
cause in the 1914-18 war he was not allowed 


Continued on page 8 


An Actor of Many Tongues 


by Thomas Quinn Curtiss 


V IENNA — Like most screen ac- 
tors, Horst Buchholz has often por- 
trayed characters of other lands 
than Ms own. Unlike his fellow 
thespians. however, he is rarely obliged to 
have his voice dubbed when his films are 
translated. He can speak in five languages — 
au international actor in the larger sense. 

He has played in En glish on the New York 
stage as effectively as in his native tongue on 
the Berlin boards. At the moment be is the 
Bluntschli, the chocolate soldier of Shaw’s 
“Arms and the Man,” in the company of an 
otherwise all-British cast at Vienna's English 
Theater. This is his first time “in person” in 
Austria. 

A shrewd student of philological ways and 
| means, his English can adopt with equal ease 
| the modulated speech of a Cambridge don, 
the lazy drawl of the Deep South, the stri- 
dent New England twang or the lingo in 
which theatrical agents converse. 

“This audience, though it knows English, 
is largely German- speaking, so I have taken 
a slight liberty with Shaw’s anti-hero, a Swiss 
mercenary in the Serbian Army when it 
invaded Bulgaria in 1885,” he explained in 
Ms dressing room as he preparcd .to go on. 
“Shaw wrote him as the Schweizer of legend, 
a hotelier at heart, efficient in his military 
duties and managing his courtship with the 
same measured logic. IBs cool professional- 
ism is in contrast to the Bui gar officers, with 
their bombast and boasting, and to the ideal- 
istic romanticism of the Bulgar maiden who 
falls in love with him. 

“To distinguish the foreigner from the 
natives 1 play him with a Swiss intonation. 
Austrians recognize that as a. character trait, 
while in London it would only suggest that I 
have an accent in English.” 

Buchholz is 52, though be might still be 
taken for a jeune premier. He was born in 
Berlin of unwed parents. His father disap- 
peared and his mother married a cobbler 
who was called to the front The real father 
never returned and the foster father, after 
the armistice, was long held a prisoner-of- 
war in Russia. To support his mother and 


half-sister the boy at 12 look employment as 
an extra in the Metropol Theater, a former 
music hall become a playhouse for juvenile 
audiences. He soon graduated to speaking 
parts. 

The family found themselves in East Ber- 
lin at the war’s end. Under Soviet rule, Buch- 
bolz learned to speak Russian quickly. 

“It was a simple thing to cross to West 
Berlin in those days. No wall divided the city 
and there were few restrictions on passing 
the border. One just took the U-bahn. I took 
it and joined Reya Holsty’s classes for 
youngsters with acting ambitions. I was the 
only boy in my class so I was always in 
demand and got more practice than the 
girls,” Buchholz remembered. 

He was chosen for a Mt in a Georg Kaiser 
play at the Hebbel Theater. Helena TMmig, 
Max Reinhardt's widow, attended the pre- 
miere and invited him to study at her Salz- 
burg seminary', but he preferred to stay in 
Berlin. He found parts in the plays of Schil- 
ler, Brecht and Barrie and even played Peter 
Pan, a role traditionally cast with an actress. 
In spare afternoons he dubbed English, 
American and French films into German, 
tr aining his voice for drama. 

Julien Duvivier, the French director, visit- 
ing Berlin saw him and asked him to audi- 
tion. Buchholz had picked up some French 
from his dubbing work and spoke it suffi- 
ciently to win the leading male role in Duvi- 
vier’s film, “Marianne, the Key to Dreams,” 
which was awarded a Cannes festival prize. 
This brought offers for German films and he 
was soon starring as a sort of Teutonic James 
Dean in a series of movies about youthful 
unrest. Outstanding among these German 
films was “The Confessions of Felix Krull,” 
based on Thomas Mann’s humorous novel 
about the adventures of a young imposter. It 
was an immediate success home and after- 
ward abroad. 


4N offer from England came to play in a 
British film, "Tiger Bay.” and he 
J- Jl went with his agent to Loudon to 
confer with its director, J. Lee Thompson. 

“Neither I nor my agent knew much En- 
glish and we tried to decipher the contract 


J- by Anna Kissdgoff 

J. '*K -T- EW YORK — “Is dance dead?” 

I Martha Graham was asked the 
•' * - I M other day. The modem-dance pit>- 
L ” neer, who began her own profes- 
: , anal training in 1916, laughed and replied, 
■: ? ’d say it’s just kicking op its heels.” None- 
'• ; el ess, the talk in some quarters is that the 
^ .'•face, boom is over. The phenomenal in- 
tjease in activity and audiences within the 
: ' ’dd since the 1960s has leveled off, some 
■■rist, and part of the old euphoria is miss- 

... h True, chang e, is in the air. The superstars 
• . yesteryear who created much of the ex- 
:• element are no longer visible. The prima 
;tilerina seems an extinct species, with uo 
- ; iJaigQt Fonteyn or Maya Plisetskaya to visit 


Is The Dance Boom Still Booming? 


our shores. Rudolf Nureyev does, but not 
quite as we knew him, while Mikhail Barysh- 
nikov has been curtailing his dancing of late. 

Despite the fact that New York is begin- 
ning one of its busiest spring dance seasons 
in years (with the Joffrey Ballet and Merce 
Cunningham), there is a well-founded per- 
ception that the economy — through cuts in 
■government- and foundation funds — has 
affected dance touring and opportunities for 
creative work. And while creativity on the 
highest level — be ginning with Graham, 
Jerome Robbins. Cunningham, Paul Taylor 
— is not at issue, no new giants appear to 


loom on the horizon. Moreover, while 


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^e/re Cunningham. - 


meat for the Arts’ Dance Touring Program. 
That program has since been discontinued, 
his ballets, Ms death in 1983 has been keenly making local arts presenters outside New 
felt as a watershed. York sometimes less willing to take a finan- 

Yet every art survives its geniuses, a wise dal risk on dance which is an expensive 
man once said. “Balanchine knew that the attraction to sponsor, 
classic dance is stronger than any individ- Yet as the economy has improved, dance 
luti,” Lincoln Kirsten explained recently companies report increased bookings and 
with respect to Ms co-founder of the New better box office this year. Attendance at 
York City Ballet. As Graham has often not- dance performances rose to 58 million peo- 
ed, “If the dance will die, it win die from pie in 1984, according to a survey by Louis 
within.” Harris' and Assodates. The effect on the 

In short, any discussion of whether the anist ( wilicfa actually began with the artist’s 
dance boom is still booming must clarify the effect on the public) is seen in one example, 

distinction between thekilttrent anform — Last year, the Paul Taylor Dance Company 
its creative res pn re — and the way it has “tended its season for the fust time to four 
been presented, funded and marketed. "“k at A* City Center and opens there far 

The troth is that these two aspects are now four weeks again on April 9. Eight years ago, 

marked by change. The extraordinary cm- cwld not afford regular New York 

alive upsurge that has defined dance in the s ^ asons - He has now obviously readied his 
last 25 years continues unabated. But there audience. 

has suddenly been a shift of focus, indicating The real reason the dance boom seenu to 

new a^cfbarirg and new centers of activity k® booming less loudly is that we perceive 
that are not yet universally accepted. The things are not what they used to be; 
avant-garde that grew out of the Judson ^ith B a l an chine gone and great choreogra- 
Dance Theater in the 1960s is now v-fag . P h ®s such as Frederick Ashton and Antony 
invited into Establishmen t dance com panies. Yudor barely crea tin g new works, an end of 
The chief new trend is the European “dance- an era does seem imminem. Yet it is just as 
theater," which is accompanied by the aston- foolish 10 announce the show is all over. The 
ishing growth of hundreds of dance compa- history of dance is strewn with the famous 
nies in France and Germany. iast words of critics who did just that. 

One has only to recall the p essimism that 
permeated the American dance scene in 

Q UANTITATIVELY, the last 25 years 1962. The heroic pioneering period in mod- 
saw an undisputed and astounding ero dance — symbolized by Martha Graham 
growth. There was an increase in the and the recentiy deceased Doris Humphrey 
number of American dance viewers from one — seemed to have just closed. Hanya Holm, 
million to 20 rmUion by the mid-1970s, another pioneer, was working in musicals 
There was a rise in the number of dance Balanchine had yet to receive his complete 
companies and in the number of dance per- recognition. Rudolf Nureyev, unknown in 
formanoes. America, had defected a few months before 

More Americans were exposed to dance from the Kirov. American Ballet Theaters 
through comp a nies funded by the Ford financial difficulties forced oem«a'nn.->l dis- 
Foundatkffl and through extended touring bandments. Cunningham’s revolutionary 
— subsidized partly by the National Endow- ideas were misunderstood or denounced, ft 


there was any proof that dance had “degen- 
erated” it was in the activities of the Judson 
Dance Theater, formed in 1962. Here was a 
loosely knit group of young choreographers 
who incorporated nondancers and nondance 
movement into their work and played games 
with chairs and mattresses. What (hey did 
was not “dance” by the then current defini- 
tion. 

Now we see these same choreographers 
creating works for major ballet companies 
throughout the world (Ballet Theater pre- 
sents a premiere with chairs by David Gor- 
don, a Judson alumnus, at the Met this 
spring) and in major houses such as the 


' written in legal terminology beyond our col- 
lective powers.” Buchholz laughed. “Mv sal- 
ary was in figures and we derided it would be 
clever to ask for more. That was a mistake 
for below it was stated that if I accepted the 
proposed amount I would share in the prof- 
its. I got the raise but lost the profits wMch 
were considerable as the film became a Ml 
T hai was a language lesson in itself and I 
applied myself to seriously learn English.” 

His system of learning languages is to 
listen to it bong spoken. He was taught 
Russian in school, but he grew fluent in 
English. French and Italian by hearing them 
in action and in joining in conversations 
even before he had acquired a wide vocabu- 
lary. His gaffs in using words and his mis- 
pronunciation at the start caused him to be 
laughed at He took that as part of Ms 
education and corrected his errors rapidly, 
having a quick ear, a sense of nuance in the 
use of a language and being a good mimic 
with a retentive memory. 

By the rime “Tiger Bay" was completed on 
location at a seaport he could imitate what 
he had heard from the cultivated English of 
the director to the salty slang of the native 
dockers. Filming in England, he believes, 
was one of his most valuable experiences. 

After finishing work on "Tiger Bay” he 
received a wire from Anita Loos, the author 
of “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." to come to 
New York. She had dramatized Colette's 
novel about a Parisian gigolo of the Belle 
Epoque and, having seen him in “Felix 


Epoque and, having seen him in “Felix 
KjuII,” thought he would be right for the 
role. But did he speak English? By then he 
could truthfully reply that be did. 

Anita Loos’s scenarios had contributed to 
the success of such early screen personalities 
as Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, 
Dorothy Gish and the Talmadge sisters. 
More recently she had chosen an unknown 
Belgian girl, Audrey Hepburn, to be the 
heroine of another of her dramatizations of 
Colette, “Gigi.” “Cheri” bad only a brief 
Broadway run, but Buchholz received enthu- 
siastic reviews and bids from Hollywood. 

In Hollywood, where only "Felix Krull’’ 
had been seen, it was probably thought that 

Continued on page 8 


Brooklyn Academy of Music. And so when it 
seemed all over, it had really all just started: 
Cunningham. Judson Dance Theater, Nure- 
yev, Balanchine all at once. In sum, it was the 
dance boom of the 1960s. 

Why, then, is there a sense that this explo- 
sion, in some respects, has run its course? 


impact Nureyev had in the 1960s and “70s — 
in attracting millions to dance worldwide 
and in raising the level of male dancing — 
should not be discounted. At 47, he can no 
longer play that role and Baryshnikov, a 
counterpart, is hardly as ubiquitous. The age 
of the ballerina is also over. We will not see 
the likes of Fonteyn, Plisetskaya, Galina 
Ulanova, Alicia Markova, Alicia Alonso and 
Carla Freed in their prime. The retirement 
Continued on page 8 




Twyla Tharp. 








ss?i?52i'i «,»RamfBWf»HiniiifKKii!i»ininmiii isi 





INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 




VIENNA, Koozenhai»(id:72.l2.1 I). 
CONCERT — March 14: Vienna 
Symphonikcr, Martin Sieghart con- 
ductor, Dimimis Sgouros piano (Bee- 
thoven. Strauss). 

RECITALS — March 10: Malcolm 
Fragcr piano (Brahms, Haydn). 

March 13: HaydnTrio(H^dn,Tdud- 

•Muakverein (tel: 65.8 1 JO). 
CONCERTS — March 11 and 12: 
BBC Welsh Symphony Orchestra, 

Roger Noningion conductor (HandeL 

Haydn). 

•Volksoper(td: 53240). 

OPERA— March 13: 

"The Barber of Seville” (Rossini). 
OPERETTA — March 15: “The Land 
of Smiles” (Lehir). 


BELGIUM 


ANTWERP, Royal Flemish Opera 


(tel: 233.66.85J. 
OPERA—] 


■ March 8 , 10: The Rake’s 
Progre s s" (Stravinsky). . 
BRUSSELS, Opera National (tel: 
2R22.I1). 

OPERA— March lOand 15: “La do- 
menza di Tito (Mozart). 

•Palais des Beaux Arts ( td : 51 1 29.95). 
RECITAL — March 9: Brigitte Fass- 
bander soprano, Irwin Gage piano. 


and Renewal: Contemporary Art m 
the German Democratic Republic.” 
March 12-April 14: "Mahler, Vienna.” 
Barbican Hall — London Symphony 
Orchestra — March 10: Sr Charles 

Groves conductor (Beethoven). 
March 14: C 1 * lu,in Abbado conduc- 
tor, Salvatore Aocaido violin (Berg, 
Mahler). 

Barbican Hall — March 13: English 
Chamber Orchestra, Jos 6 -Luis Garcia 
conductor (VivaldiX 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 
speare Company — March 15: 
■Twelfth Nighr (Shakespeare). 
March 9, 11-14: "Mother Courage" 

(Brecht). 

•British Museum (tel: 636.I5J5). 
EXHIBITION —To March 10: “The 
Golden Age of Anglo-Saxon ArU 966- 
1066." 

•Hayward Gallery (teh 92857.08). 
EXMBmONS —To April 21: “Re- 
noir," "John Walker Pam rings from 
the Alba and Oceania Series." 
•London Coliseum (tel : 836.0 1.11). 
OPERA — March i3.-“Comu Oiy" 
(Rossini). 

March 9, 12, 14: “Xercs”(Handd). 
March 15: “Fidelio" (Beethoven). 

• Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734-90.52). 

EXHIBITION— To Maxdi31 : "Cha- 
galL" 


•Salle Gavean (id: 563 20 JO). 
RECITAL— March 14: David Nonb- 


HELSJNBJ, Finlandia Hall (tel: 


40241). 

ICERTS — 


CON< 


March 


Radio 


factor, Bruno Canino / 

Antonio BalHsu piano (Boulez). 
March IS: Leningrad Philharmonic 
Orchestra. Jevgeni Mra vindti conduc- 
tor (Mozart, Tchaikovsky). 


How Club (td: 23 3.84 JO). 

JAZZ — March 9: Jod Lacroix Jazz 
Orchestra. 

March 12: Stardust 
March 13, 14: Claude LuterSextet, 
March 15: Royal Tencopators, "Jazz 
Des Annies Folks." 

•TbiStre du Rond-Point (te! 


256.70.80). 

ICEkT — March 10: Emerson 




CON. 

Quartet of New York (Beethoven, 
Tchaikovsky). 

•ThiStre Musical de Paris (tel 


LYON, Maison de la Danse (tel: 
829.43.44). 

DANCE — March 14. 15: Lindsay 


261.19.83). 

(CERT — March 1 1: Lyon Na- 


CON. 

tional Orchestra, Maurice Arena con- 
ductor, Margarita Castro- Alberty so- 
— »(VenJiT 


UAhUt — Marcn ta: Lanasay prano(venu). 

Kemp Company (“Midsummer OPERA —March 9. 10. 12, 14: “La 
Nighrs Dream”). Traviata" (Verdi). 

NICE, Galme d’Art Contemporam 


To March 24: 


(tel: 


tel: 6237.11). 

EXHJBmON — 

"Christian VialaitL" 

■Galerie des Pocchettes 
6231.24). 

EXHIBmON — “Gfcrard Titus Car- 
meL” 

PARIS, Cave Au de la Huchette (td: 


GERMANY 


COLOGNE, Opcr der Stadt (tel 
21.25.81). 

OPERA — March 8 , II. 13.: The 


i). 


(Mo- 


• Royal Albert Kali (td: 5S932£3> 
CONCERTS— March II: East Sus- 
sex Youth OrchestrafOrfi). 

March IS: London PnOhahuonic Or- 


326.65 .05). 
JAZZ— March 


GHENT. Royal Opera (tel: 25.24.25). cbestra, Philip Fowke piano, Bany •Centre < 
OPERA — Marchl5: The Rake's Wordsworth condnctor (Delius, 277.1233). 


9: Fox Trocde Mont- 
pelier 

March 10: Mady Swing College 
March 1 1: Jod Lacroix Jazz Orchestra 
March 13,14,15: Dany Doriz Sextet 
:ges Po 


•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 


PA —March 9, 10: “Grffin 
Maritza" (Kalman). 


EXHIBITION —To April 8 : 
Rinke.” 


“Klaus 


LIEGE, Thau* Royal (id: 23.59.10). 
OPERA — March 14: Turandot" 


(Puccini). 


DBUHUUK 


bird” (Foldnc, Stra' 
the Strange Land” 
“New Ballet by 
(Confer, Profokicv). 



16: 


COPENHAGEN, Nikola) Gallery 
(td: 13.I6J6). 

RECITAL — March 10: Harry Spar- 
nay clarinet, Rosalia Bevanj ‘ 

•Radio House Ccmccrt 
35.06.47). 


The Seeping Beamy” 
(Ashton, Tdrikovsky). 

OPERA— March 13. 15,:“ICapu]etie 

i Mantccchi” (Bellini). 

March 8 . 11; “Samson” (Handd). 


i piano. 
HaB (td: 


•Tate Gallery (td: 821.13.13). 

[BmONS — To March 31: 


March 9. 10,: “Die 
zan). 

FRANKFURT, Alte Oper Frankfurt 
(td: 134.04.00). 

BALLET — 13 March: “Giselle." 
(Adam). 

CONCERTS — March 10 and II 
Frankfnn Opera and Museum Or- 
chestra, Yuri Ahronovitch conductor, 
Brigitte Enserer piano (Tchaikovsky ). 
RECITALS — Web 10: Gerhard 
Man td cdkx Zuzuna Ruzidcova harp- 
sichord (Bach, Zimmerman). 

March 13: IvoPQgordicfa piano (Cho- 
pin, Prokofiev). 

•Cafe Theater (td: 77.74.66). 
THEATER — Through March: “The 

Mousetrap” (Christie). 

Musfe de la Public^ (td: 246. f ran £? rt (■* 25*23 JS)- 

13.09). OPERA — March 10: Eugene One- 

EXHIBITION — To April 15: 


•Galerie 55 (teh 326.63 31). 

1 30: Bruno 


THEATER— To March : 


Balp as “Herr Kart” (Qualringer) 

Mod erne (tel: 


»Mus 6 e d'Art 
723.61.27). 

EXHIBITION— To March 31: “Gus- 
tav Mahler. 


EXHIBITR 

"William James Moll er,” “John Walk- 
er Prints 1976-1984.” 

_ .. _ , _ • Victoria and Albert Museum (id: 

CONCERT — Radio Symphony Or- jg 9 ^3 7 j\ 
diestra — March MiJhmra GaJway EXHIBITIONS — 1 
conductor (HandeL. Schubert). 


'French Film Posters. 

•Musfce du Grand Palais (tel: 


26 1.54.10). 


(Puccini). 
Staatsoper (tel 


•Rosenborg Castle (td: 15 3236). 
EXHIBITION —To March 31: ^Am- 
ber at Rosenborg." 


EXHIBITIONS— To April 14: “Mi- 
chad ‘Angelo’ Rooter (1743-1801) 
and JohnVariey (1778-1842)." 

To June 9: “The People and Places of 
Constantinople: watercolours by 


ENGLAND 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). 

'“Tradition 


Ho guitar (Bach, Vflh-Lobos ? 1 * 3 
March 1 1: Hiromi Okada piano (Cho- 


VW.U r mtEmAgm 

Barbican Art Gallery — To April ! 
"Munch and the Workers." “Traditk 


15: Nigd Kennedy violin, Peter 
Petringer piano (Bach, Brahms). 


EXHIBITIONS — To April 15: 
“Edouard Pignon." 

To April 22: “Impressionism and the 
French Countryside." 

•Mu$£e dn Louvre (td: 2603936). 
EXHIBITIONS —To April 15: “Hol- 
bein at the Louvre.” 

To May 6 : “Frendh Engraven from the 
XVm Century." 

•Music Rodin (td: 705.0134). 
EXHIBmONS— To March 18: “Ro- 
din Drawings." 

To April 15: "Robert Jacobsen." 
•Opera (td: 7423730). 

OPERA — March 9: “Wozzeck" 
(Berg). 


cl 

14: “La 
HAMBURG. 

35.15.55). 

OPERA — March 10: "La BohAme" 
(Puccini). 

March 13: “Arabella" (Richard 
Strauss). 

March 15: “Cosi Fan Tutne.” (Mo- 
zart 1 

MUSICAL —March 9. 12: “My Fair 
Lady” (Lemer, Loewe). 


ITALY 


BOLOGNA, Galleria d'Arte Mb- 


denurttd: 50-2839). 
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The Global 
Newspaper. 



;mON — To March 18: “U 
Corbusier: Journey to the Far East, 
1911* 


GENOA. Teatro Margherita (tel: 
58.9329). 

OPERA — March 8 . 10:“LeNozzedi 
Figaro” (Mozart). 

MILAN, Padielione d'Arte Contan- 


poranea (tab 78.46.88). 

UTIONS — March 14-April 


EXHIB 

28: “AfraandTobia Scarpa: architects 
and designers,” “The Imaginary end 
the Real: Paolo De Poll, Candidi Fkjt, 
ToniZuccberi." 


•Tcairo alia Scala (td: 80.70.42j.^ 


BALLET— March 10: “Swan 
(Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA — March 15: “Die Zauber- 


flOte” (Mozart). 

PARMA. Teatro Regio (td: 22003). 
RECITAL — Maxim 10: Edita Gru- 
berova soprano, Friedrich Haider pi- 
ano (Debussy, Mozart). 

ROME, Accadcmia Nazi onaiediSan- 


ta Cecilia (td : 679.03.89). _ 


CONCERTS— March 10-12: Bruno 
Aprea conductor, Masamiliano Da- 
merini piano (Ives. Magler). 

TURIN, Teatro Regio (td: 54.80.00). 
OPERA — March 10, 12:“Khovaqsh- 
cfama” (Mussorgsky). 

VENICE, Palazzo Fortuny (tel: 


70.99.091 

IBfriON— To 


EXHIB 
Fashion: 1950’s and 1 


28: “High 


NETHERLANDS 


AMSTERDAM, Concert gebouw (td: 
71.83.45). 

CONCERT — March 12: Amsterdam 
Phflharmonic Orchestra, Exnmanud 
Krivine con ducior, Dcszo Ranki piano 
(Mozart, Schubert). 

RECITALS— Mar 
CzafaSflf 
March 11: Imogen Cooper piano 
(Schubert). 

•Rqksmuseum Vincent Van Gogh 


March 10: Chistopher 


(td: 76.48.811 
EXHIBITION— * 


mo: 

Identity." 


■To April 15: “Dutch 


SPAIN 


BARCELONA. Centre d’Estudios 
d'Art Coutemporani (td: 329.19.08k 
EXHIBITIONS — To March 10: 
“Joan Mird” “Richard Hamilton's 
age and Process’." 
iron 21-May 19: “Anthony Caro." 
MADRID. Auditorio Segunda Plarua 


CERT — March 12: Gnqx) Cir- 
culo. Pura Maria Martinez soprano, 
RogelioGavOanespiano, “Homage to 
Juana Mordo: Early Avantgarde 
Moac." (De Pablo. Barce). 


iblioteca Nadonal(te] :275.68^0). 


To March 31: 


EXHIBITION 
“Francis Picabia. 

• Fundacion Juan March (tel: 
225.44J51 

EXHIBITION —To March 24 “Da- 
vid Hockney Photographs.” 


SWITZERLAND 


ZURICH, Opemhaus (id : 25 1 .6920). 
OPERA — March 9: "Rigoletta” 


(Verdi). 

March 10, 14: “The Escape from the 


Seraglio" (Mozart). 

March 12: “Fiddio" (Beethoven). 


•Tonhalleftd: 22122.83). 

T — March 10: Beethoven 


CONCER. 

Qu artet of Rome (Brahms. Schubertl 
RECITAL — March II: Kun Woo 
Paik piano (Bach, Busoni). 


UNITED STATES 


NEW YORK, Guggenheim Museum 
(id: 360.35:00). 

EXHIBITIONS— To March 24: “Ree 
Morton.' 


To Ajufl_ 14: “Kandinsky in Paris 


1934-1944. 
ToApril21:“Frankenthaleroc Paper. 
A Retrospective, 1950-84." 
•Metropoliian Museum of Art (td: 
535.77.10). 

EXHIBITIONS —To April 14: “The 
Age of Caravaggio.” 

To Sept. I: “Man and the Horse." 
•Museum of Modern Art (tei: 
708.94.00). 

EXHIBITIONS— To March 11 : “Jo- 
sef Penndcert Cinema Posters from 
Berlin." 

To May 14: “ Henri Matisse." 

To June 4: “Henri Rousseau,” 


A 'Modem’ Cafe for Paris 


by Patricia Wells 


P 


ARIS — Although the current con- 
dition of the French economy has 
done little to encourage or foster 
culinary revolutions, Paris being 

Paris, there is always a new wine bar or caffe, 
or an undiscovered ethnic restaurant to ex- 
plore. 

And there is always a chef on the move 
from one arrondissement to another, or a 
shift in ownership to make diners just a bit 
teary-eyed to see bistros they love change 
leading characters. Alain Sender ens of L'Ax- 
cbestrate is preparing his kmg-talked-about 
move to the grand Lucas-Cartom Paul and 
Catherine Blache of La CoqmUe have, re- 
grettably, retired from the restaurant busi- 
ness (the new owners promise to keep menu 
and staff intact, at least for the present), and 
Guy Savoy, Tan Dinh and Le Petit Bedon 
are reveling in the new Mich din stars award- 
ed them on Tuesday. 

Meanwhile, we can sit and ponder it all at 
the six-month-old Cafe Costes — billed as 
“the first modern cafe in Paris” — wonder- 
ing if we are not witnessing the beginning of 
an Americanization of French restaurant de- 
sign. This hn gp. peach-toned, double-decker 


else about Cafe Costes has that totally and 
distinctly Parisian air, albeit the 1980s Les 
Halles version. The menu, thank goodness, 
could not be more classic (there's a pretty 
good croque monsieur made with pain Poi~ 
l&ne), the light French music adds a romantic 
touch, and one decides that at last Paris has a 
cafe that bridges the gap between the classi- 
cism of the Don Magots and the comer cafe 
with its pinball clientele. One could do with- 
out the rather obnoxious waiters, with their 
punk haircuts, sirinright jeans and tradition- 
al bistro jackets sporting leather lapels. But 
then this is 1985, Square des Innocents. 


restaurant worth putting on your "to try” list 
is Aasha, a pleasant place featuring the cook- 
ing of northern' India. 1 could dine here - * ‘ 
often, sampling the warm and savoiy bread ' 
known as masala kukha (leavened bread 
sprinkled with onions and fresh green chi% •. 
and baked in a tandoori oven): the livdy ' 
buyam (a generously seasoned rice pfcf, - 
tossed with spices and vegetables, lamb! 1 - 
chicken or shrimp);. the heany chunks of ’ 
lamb blended with spinach; and a proces- 
sion of delicaie curries, including a soothing- ’ r 
dal (lentils) and mildly seasoned epgpHni 





The homemade yogurt makes a nice fofl for 
i the assortment of breads and. 


HE dty continues to spawn new wine 
bars, and a fine little spot for a simple 
snack or liudi is Gourmet’s, on Place 
Da up tune. This is a cramped, casual, con- 
temporary place, with mirrored walls, fold- 
up chairs, a nice wine list and friendly ser- 
vice. Gourmet's is a good place to go for a bit 
of celebration. Try the pressed Iranian caviar 
with warm Minis and a glass of champagne 
or, slightly less indulgent, a platter of deli- 
cate smoked Norwegian salmon with freshly 
toasted slices of Poufine’s bread and a glass 
of 1983 white CM teauneuf-d u-Pape, Vieux 
Tfctegraphe. 


the biryani and ! 

should a first visit please you, the menu ' 
extensive enough to merit a return trip. 


n 

- 

•i\iV 




Art Deco space would look right at home in 


Los Angeles or Manhattan. Yet everything 


Ethnic cuisine is receiving slightly more 
attention here these days, and an Indian 


Cafi Costes, 4 Rue Berger, Paris /; td; 
508.54.39. Open daily 8 A.M. to 2jLM. No " 
credit cards. About 50 francs a person 
Gourmet's, 26 Place Datphine, Paris I: let ' 
326.72.92. Closed Monday. Credit card: Vim. ■' ' 
From 100 to 150 francs a person, including - 
wine and service. - 

Aasha, 18 Rue Greneta, Paris £ ieh _■ 
236.71.55. Open daily except Saturday after-? _ 
noon. Credit cards: American Express, Diners- 
Club. Visa. Vegetarian and nomegetarim 
menus at 80 francs, not including beverage or 
service. A la carte, about 125-150 frtmes a ' 
person, including beverage and service. R 






Horst Buchholz 


Continued from page 7 


the imported star had a thick German ac- 
cent. When he first met Billy Wilder the new 
arrival sought to contradict that supposition 
by affecting the tone of an English lord. 
Wilder was bonified. 

“Is that the way you always talk in En- 
glish?” Wilder asked. “1 had you in mind for 
a picture, but not if you sound like John 
Gielgud.” Buchholz quickly changpri into 
Broadwayese and Wilder breathed a deep 
sigh of relief. 

The dexterity with which be can switch 
from one dialect to another drove Bette 
Davis into a tizzy when they were together in 
a film shot in English in Rome. 

“She was a wealthy American widow and I 
was her playboy son,” be recalled. “Just 
before our fust scene which was at a break- 
fast table she nnnnurnra-H, ■( think ffl do it 
Southern.’ When the cameras rolled she ad- 
dressed me as though she had turned into a 
■you-alF mother in a Tennessee Williams 
play. So L, being her son, came bade in an 
exaggerated Dixie drawL She jumped up and 
shouted, "That man is insulting me! and 
walked off the set She was coaxed bade, but 
she never spoke to me again except in the 
scenes.” 

Buchholz made a more favourable impres- 
sion on the French actress, Myriam Bru, 
when she requested him as her leading man 
in an Itafian-German coproduction of Tol- 
stoy’s “Resurrection." They were married 
during its making. Their two children, Be- 
atrice and Christopher, are now studying for 


theatrical careers in California. Both have 
inherited their father’s linguistic gifts. 

He has portrayed such diverse figures on 
the screen as a Mexican bandit ("Toe Mag- 
nificent Seven”), a Marseille youth who 
longs to saD the seven seas (in Marcel Pag- 
nol's “Fanny”), Gandhf s assassin (in "Nine 
Hours to Rama" ), an East German Commu- 
nist in love with an American girl (in “One, 
Two, Three”) Marco Polo and a dozen of 
others. On the German stage he has recently 
been an irate juror in “12 Angry Men,” 
Walter Hasenklever's double-dealer in "A 
Charming Fellow” and the nightdnb master 
of ceremonies in the musical “Cabaret” He 
has acted, Hanmri and sung on American 
and European television spectacles and con- 
ducted his own TV show in Berlin. 

“Every sound role is open to multiple 
interpretation,” he said. “The actor must 
find the key, but there are apt to be many 
keys. Every actor wants to play Hamlet and 
so do I — and before long, for the crack in 
“The Dresser” about the actor who played 
Hamlet until he was 68 haunts me,” he 
laughed. “I want to do “Richard IF as a 
start, for that is a test for Hamlet. I love to 
vary parts and playing in different languages 
is a stimulating challenge.So is the musical. 
If and when there is a German production of 
“La Cage aux Folles” Fd like to be that 
outrageous drag queen. 

“Tonight, however, l am that Swiss cava- 
lier of Shaw bringing civilized thinking to 
Balkan barbarians." He answered his en- 
trance call ■ 



-.-'w 

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Horst Buchholz. 




Norman Jewison 


Continued from page 7 


origms-and confusions and. asked, 4Mhat is r , 
Jew? '‘Anybody who is crazy ciiough to w* 
to be Jewish is Jewish.” Bea-Gurion decreet - 


to fight alongside white Americans and was 
obliged to flight with the French Army in- 
stead. 


Jewison, a Canadian, hitchhiked through 

i War 


the American South at the end of Wodd War 
H at the age of 19. “Maybe some of the 
impression stayed with me,” he says. After 
working in British and Canadian televirion, 
be became part of what is known as the 
golden age of American television before 


going on to Hollywood. “I got very interest- 
hesays,* - 


ed in America.” he says, “I made lots of films 
about it starting with The Russians Are 
Coming’ ” (1966). 

He even thought of taking American citi- 
zenship, but the murder of Robert Kennedy 
began a period of disillusion. He left the 
United Stales in 1970 and now lives on a 
farm outride Toronto. His -farm manager 
cannot understand why he is hanging around 


Europe when 36 of his Herefords have 
calved or will calf soon and when the maple 
syrup run is about to start 

A cheery man who was bom and raised a 
strict Methodist Norman Jewison has 
known a unique sort of prejudice: People get 
cross with him for not being Jewish with 
such a name. Early in Ms career, his agent 
urged him to change Ms name. “living Cfiris- 
tiansonF Jewison suggested. 

The Jewisons go bade to eariy- 13th-centu- 
ry Yorkshire, but Jewison wonders if earlier 
ancestors may not have been Jewish. “All my 
life I have been searching for my own Ju- 
daism,” he says. 


Jewison’s films are a mixture cl soar-' 
conscience (‘‘FXS.T.") and fantasy (“fic 1 
dler on the Roof”). He has just complete " 
another Broadway adaptation, “Agnes r- 
God,” with Jane Fonda as a psydn&tris - 1 
Anne Bancroft as a mother superior, ^ 


Meg Tilly (the young giii in “Tbe^ ^BigCMF- 
as a novice whose baby 1 


iy has just been strar-' 
gjed. He will do an H. G. Wells story, Tfc'--. 
Man Who Could Work Miracks," next 


Except for his film “The Cincinnati KkL 
Jewison is not loved by French cm6ph3eri 
but “A Soldier’s Story" was gwenTpedC^ 
screening at the Cinematheque. Jewisos wC. 
still elated about it 


In Israel, where he has spent considerable 
time, he met the former prune minister, Da- 
vid Ben-Gurum, who asked him what sort of 
a name Jewison is. Jewison explained his 


“AD of a sudden people were taDdr-’*:. 
about films I’ve made,” he said. “It was vs^ 
exciting to realize that films are forever, th 
they do have a life of their own.” 


Dance Boom 


Continued from page 7 


I HE big shift today is toward rod 
theatrical values, as evident evt 


of Erik Bruhn, Peter Martins and Helgi To- 
masson removes male dancers of exceptional 
caliber. 


masson. Oddly, they are criticized by Balan- 
chine’s loyal admirers for following Ms ex- 
ample — for not bring Balanchine, that is. 


M UCH of this star-centered excite- 
ment was stimulated by foreign 
companies that visited here under 
Sol Harolds aegis. Such visits are no longer 
to be taken for granted and some of these 
companies are no longer what they were. But 
if Alessandro Fern of the Royal Ballet Al- 
tynai Asybmiratova of the Kirov, Jean- 
Charles Gil and Patrick Dupond from 
Fiance as well as the new crop of the Paris 
Op6ra Ballet's stunning young dancers (Syl- 
vie Guillem, Elisabeth Mamin) were seen 


Nonetheless, there are three names to keep 
in sight among rising ballet choreographers: 
W illiam Forsythe, the new American direc- 
tor of the Frankfurt Ballet and the Canadi- 
ans James Kndelka and Robert Desrosiers. 


here regularly or even at all, then a new 
anon of s 


generation of stars might actually be recog- 
nized as such. 

At home, stars are downplayed by compa- 
ny directors intent on coherence and unity. 
More than any other companies, the City 
Ballet and the Joffrey Ballet have empha- 
sized that the ballet on view, not the individ- 
ual dancer, is what really counts. This is a 
splendid policy so long as each company 
presents splendid woiks. When regional 
companies do the same with more mediocre 
ballets, the results can be stultifying. 

Once past the level of Balanchine, Rob- 
bins, Tudor and Ashton, the ballet scene is 
studded with excellent choreographic crafts- 
men of varying inspiration. The nest in the 
neo-Balancninian van are Martins and To- 


The boom mentality is most evident in 
modem dance. Several layers of creativity 
are obvious. Among the Graham alumni, 
Cu nni ng h a m and Taylor are doing their 
strongest work — it took them 20 years to 
become established. The ballet audience, 
with the help of subscriptions, has crossed 
over to modem dance in such cases. It knows 
the names of Alwin Nikolais, Alvin Alley, 
Erick Hawkins, Murray Louis and it shows 
marked preference for popular yo ung er^ 


nova tors such as T 


e for pop ul 
wyla Tharp 


and! 


tn- 


us. 


The ideas of the Judson Dance Theater 
have filtered down to the so-called “New 
Dance” Generation, misleadingly r~nW<v\ 
“Post-Modem.” Lucinda Childs, David 
Gordon, Trisha Brown and Meredith Monk 
from the Judson nucleus are now more cre- 
ative and more employed than in the past, 
receiving commissions both here and 
abroad. Laura Dean and Senta Driver 
emerged as names of the of the 1970s while 
those that followed are different manifesta- 
tions of the formalism that took root in the 
1960s. 


T , 

X. among the formalists in the Broddh. — 
Academy's highly successful Next Wave j 
lies. The typical marriag g of pop — 

garde in such performances will be se^ ' _ - 
again when Dean collaborates next fall dty 'i r.. , 
Andy Summers, the guitarist from the to 
group. The Police. When lesser chonogr' .. 
phers are involved, and they often are. t- ~~ , 
results look more like trendy packaging this. . 
originality in choreography. Yet the wra-' . -1 
pings reflect a punk-art style that appeals i 
young people and gallerygoers — at wftc-. ; 7. 
the Academy has deliberately aimed a|V 
thus added to its dance audience. Becas-. 
such work skirts the edge of the "perfi : * ./ 
mance arz” genre, these dance expenmer."..': 
are not to be dismissed. They may wdl bet;- ■. :*■’ 
Judson Dance Theater of the future. 

The principal new dance trend, howw ' 
has not yet round acceptance in Amerif--.-- ’ 
dance circles. This is the movement caff;/. . ' 
“dance-theater," a term first used to desed'. 

Pina Bausch’s work in Wuppertal, West G>/ ■ : - 
many, and now current inFrance and 'Cat:/." - 
da. It can also be applied to the Japan' 1 .,/ - 
Butofa groups. Basically, it reflects a 



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Expressionist esthetic. 
It is 


— i dear that a focus of dance actrnt' : . 
located in Europe and Japan. After dr.. . 
decades of American dominance, this isnt u 
The dance boom today is in France — wh'. : ’■ 
200 companies have sprouted up in 10 W ' 
— and in Japan, where at least five ha,. - -* 
companies exist in Toyko in perfect isolate 
from the Butoh movement ” 


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OJ985 The New York runes 


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FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


High-Speed Trains Bring 
^ : 4 l ?^:Trardfere Back to Earth 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 

TRAVEL 

The Northern Charms of California 


Page 9 ! 


»«d ■ ■■'=■* m. r 

iltuLrn l . ! 

Usui* K i r , ;> t ; ■ 


by Roger ColKs 




u ^ 

t’rr,:.; , 

J _v- v v 

lil-f" ,,5. 


uiri» K ‘ ; ‘ ;, -r“ .!“ V; ' ▲ TRAIN is a train is a bain, Gertrude 

'' . ' ‘ 7 : ’ ■' ■:*i . v **£ i\ S*** 11 “febt have said But not to- 

/-\ day. Trams are called TGVs (Train 
i.vr.T’S, J..,, ; ;;, r..Ov- X .Vi Grande ViresseL AFFs (Ad- 
v-3 ■'vanced Passenger Train), lCs (InterOty) 
- and HSSTVs (High Speed Surface Transport 
•< ff - l ’ :ia ^|y' : • Vehicle). What they have in common is the 

opacity to travel at speeds in excess of 125 
'mixes (about 200 kilometers) an hoar, and 
' 0 some a great deal faster. Germany and Japan 
^ ■ l ' r ', l , . are each developing an HSSTV that will run 
■ •' 1 i;'/- without wheels by magnetic levitation at 
' '!*■# experimental speeds approaching 300 miles 
• *.an hour. 

'-,i The railroads have discovered high tech. 

;r .« L As a result, the business traveler j$ rediscov- 
-ering the train, which can often beat air 
t „ r travel, center to center, in twins of weed, 
s comfort, convenience and cost, especially for 


’■ ■ Vi.- 
“ : »o 

Vi: I,' 


*1. ir. 


cost-effective. 


n WTT» nw .TTTca m 




/ *«r . 



Whc V« : : 

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tiler »-<n K ■ 
itnuh.-; v 

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*t 4 ji.’i:. r • 

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Ian Wh.i •» 

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JfWTfe-K «*. •' ■: 

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wnrrn:»:j:.i: 

Milt rlat.M ■ 

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ntSmi : '• 

et t. 1 '■ ■ ■ 
lhc\ »ii* •• ■ 


(which is SO percent more expensive than 
second class) costs less than half as ranch as 
' business dass in a plane. A supplement far a 
first-class single-berth sleeper is cheaper 
|hNL than a night in a hmrf 

||||B British Rail has developed an InterQty 
network of 125-mph trains and wll intro- 
■ dace a new IC 225, winch is capable of 

OS we’rerpanmng to* run it at 125 mphMhm: 
.'*^5 extra L5 mph has to be Justified m extra 
business,” a British Rail executive says. 
“We’ve found that it is no good just knock- 
■T^Sj ing a few minutes off a journey. What is 
.. . . j inqjortantis being able to create newjoumey 
oppo rtu nities. If you’re able to gpt a journey 
•vSB down to, say, three hours, yonVe broken 
throurii a barrier. ” This can make the differ- 
’■*11 ence between a business trip that gets you 
- ' back home the same day, and a journey that 

,JH - would otherwise be unfeasible. 

London to Paris is now possible in less 
MM: than five and a quarter boms by train and 
f«- hovercraft, whereas you would need to allow 
iiB' three and a balf hours by air from Heathrow 
ppyET or Gatwkk airports. The first-class return 
jp fare by rafl is £54 ($58) against £168 for 
Wm ! . business dass by air. 
w:/. London to Brussels by train and Boeing 
Hr -J . jetfotl (which takes just 100 minutes to cross 
f •* the P-ngli-A Channdiram Dover to Ostend) 

* . r can be done in less than five hours compared 

with three and a half hours by plane. Hus 

* service, called the Saphir, connects with the 
■: Belgian InterGty network to Antwerp, Lux- 
/ embourg, Cologne, Koblenz, Bonn and oth- 

* er destinations that arc not easily accessible 
;■* by air. Leaving London at 8 AJwL, you 

•L-mmld arrive in Brussels at 2:00 PJvL or 
/A Cologne at 4:48 PJVL The inclusive first- 
. dass return fare by rail and jetfafl is £51 
against £162 for business dass by air. There 
is a special five-day return by rail which 
costs only £32 to Brussels and £42 to Co- 
logne- 

; • .rJ itoi '-T^-mos^oonofeulaWe pf all tbe'diaiiDd 
• ‘ ■ -- crossings is a luxury overnight service' from 
London via Harwich and the Hook of Hol- 
land to Amsterdam, TheTIague, Rotterdam, 
Antwerp and Brussels. The advantage here is 
•; ?w i , r being able to get a good aigfrfs sfcqi on the 
!1 ' ~ six and a half hour crossing. A “European 
Executive” package from London to any of 
'" v " the above stations costs £99 return. It in- 


luxury Rhdngold Trans-Europe Express, 
which travels along the Rhine Valley to Hei- 
delberg, Stuttgart, Munich and Basd. 

But the most dramatic effect of high-speed 
trains on business travel has been in France, 
where the national railways* (SNCF) TGV 
service between Paris and Lyon, a distance 
of 265 miles, takes just two hours. Center to 
center, depending on the time of day, this 
can be faster than by air. 

The TGV, which rides os its own special 
track, anises at 167 mph and is capable of a 
top speed of 237 mph. The SNCF has an 
exTensive program to build new track for the 
TGV, linking major cities in France. But 
even on ordinary rails it travels at 125 mph. 

Unlike the Trans-Europe Express and 
other luxury trains, the TGV is democratic. 
There are both first and second classes and 
there is no across-the-board supplement, al- 
though there -are supplements on certain 
trams and a reservation fee is required. 

According to an SNCF spokesman, the 
TGV service between Paris and Lyon has 
captured 40 percent of the air traffic between 
these cities since it started in September 
1981. And on the existing TGV network, the 
SNCF says, executives represent 45 percent 
of passengers compared with 35 percent on 
regular trains. TGVs cany 40,000 passengers 
a day, 27,000 of whom previously traveled by 
car or plane and 8,000 of whom are first-time 
travelers. 

Although its special track does not yet 
extend beyond Lyon, the TGV runs as far as 


Rail is now often 
faster than air 
for certain trips 


Toulon on the Mediterranean coast, which it 
reaches in five hours, 27 minutes from Paris. 
The journey time to Marseille is four hours 
and 40 minutes. With the extension of the 
TGV into Switzerland, you can now reach 
fjuisaime in three hours, 31 minutes, which 
makes it competitive with air travel It is 
even possible, using British Rail Intercity 
trains and jetfoil across the channel, to make 
Edinburgh to Marseille, a distance of 1,000 
miles, a one-day trip. 

Paris to Bordeaux wQl be the next major 
TGV Kne to open, in 1990. This will cut the 
journey time from four hours to two hours 
and 58 minutes. North of Paris there is a 
project to build a TGV track into Belgium, 
tin Netherlands and West Germany. The 
SNCF says that a decision will be made by 
the end of tins year and the new line could be 
completed by 1 992. This would mean a jour- 
ney time of ^ris to Brussels of one hour and 
30 minutes and Paris to Cologne of two 
hours and 50 inmates. Both these tunes 
would beat the plane in terms of speed and 
convenience as well as cost. 

Another exciting possibility for high- 
speed trains is linkai to the revival of inter- 


by Robert Lindsey 

T O many outsiders, California means 
Hollywood and Disneyland, cable 
cars and desert spas. North of San 
Francisco, though, there’s a Cali- 
fornia that most viators never see, where the 
land rises, then flattens, (hen reveals a be- 
guiling and quiet universe of vineyards, red- 
wood forests, rocky shoreline ana vistas as 
primitive as they were when English, Rus- 
sian and Spanish voyagers first saw them 
four centuries ago. 

On a tour of three or four days (laager, if 
possible), viators can explore groves of red- 
wood trees .as majestic as vaulted Gothic 
cathedrals, retrace the steps of California’s 
colonial pioneers, dine well at any number of 
restaurants and collect driftwood along de- 
serted beaches as ruggedly beautiful as any 
in America. 

It is a pari of America that is changing, 
but not very fast. 

, Wise making, once mostly limited to the 
Napa and southern Sonoma valleys, has 
swept northward into Mendocino County 
and previously remote areas of Sonoma 
Copnty. 1 .flaking for cheaper land and new 
challenges, vintners are developing a new. 
California wine country, along with fine new 
wines. More than 100 of these wineries open 
their doors to viators, offering, along with a 
friendly welcome, a glass or two of wine: 

Emigrfis from the cities are slowly coloniz- 
ing some of the old logging, fishing and 
vineyard towns of the region. In the heart of 
the Napa Valley, tourist traffic can be mad- 
deningly heavy on gmrmnw weekends. But 
less than 200 miles to the north, backpackers 
and campers are warned by local policemen 
to avoid the most remote redwood forests 
because of danger from armed marijuana 
growers who cultivate an illicit billion-dol- 
lar-a-year crop. 

For the most part, California’s north coast 
is unspoiled by incursions of the urban 
world. While Los Angeles and San Francisco 
throb more than ever with the energy of 
urbanization, life there remains anachronis- 
tically rural 

Spring and early summer are particularly 
enjoyable times to visit the region. The win- 
ter rains have passed. Rivers and lakes are 
brimming. The vineyards are turning green 
again ana the dense winter fog that shrouds 
the rocky Mendocino coast has begun to give 
way to snnHght Midsummer brings tem- 
peratures in the vaDeys that often approach 
100 degrees, along with peak tourist traffic. 
Fall — especially during September and Oc- 
tober, when the grapes are harvested, the 
vines are beginning to turn a reddish gold 
and coastal Fog is less common — is also a 
pleasant time along the north coast. 

After leaving San Francisco, you may 
want to make the town of Sonoma your first 
stop. Take U.S. 101 across the Golden Gate 
Bridge to where it meets State Route 37 near 
the town of Novato, turn right and then 
follow the signs to Sonoma. 


T HIS disarming town of 5,000 people 
45 miles north of San Francisco is the 
site of the last and northernmost of 
the 21 adobe, tile-roofed missions built in 



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'/.'...'.vi-rV'S': ^ -.y*’ Wi* Jf f. . f « v- -Vr ■' ^ , , t- 


Vines and Victorian architecture. 

decade as Mexico's military co mman der in 
Sonoma; the Blue Wing Inn, a hotel whose 
guests included Kit Carson, the bandit Joa- 
quin Murietta and John G. Fremont: the 
Sonoma Barracks, where Mexican and later 
Yankee soldiers were billeted, and the Bear 
Flag Monument, commemorating a Yankee 
revolt against the Mexican rulers that led to 
the proclamation of a short-lived California 
Republic. 

Antique stores line parts of the plaza. For 
a pleasant lunch, you can buy a loaf of the 
excellent sourdough bread made by the Son- 
oma Bakery on the plaza, fill it with meat 
and cheese purchased at one of the delicates- 
sens and, on a bench in the center of the 
plaza, wash it down with a bottle of local 
wine. 

Situated about five miles north of the 
plaza at 18140 Sonoma Highway, the Son- 
oma Mission Inn (707-996-1041) is an excel- 
lent base from which to explore the southern 
part of the region, which includes small win- 
ay towns such as Kenwood and Glen Ellen 
in the Valley of the Moon, made famous by 
Jack London, whose grave, under his red- 
lava fire-gutted home. Wolf House, is main- 
tained as a state park. 

The pink, Spanisb-style Sonoma Mission 
Inn was nicely restored several years ago. 
The rooms are not large, but the hotel mixes 
sophistication and the relaxed feeling of a 
country inn, and has a good restaurant, - 
called Provencal 


many local people, who have tried to limit 
the growth of tourism by making it difficult 
for entrepreneurs to build additional hotels 
and inns. Thus, there is a scarcity of first-rate 
accommodations, especially on weekends 
and during the summer. 

Two of the Napa Valley’s most pleasant 
and popular inns, the Bordeaux House and 
neighboring Burgundy House (707-944- 
2855), were developed by a Yountville cou- 
ple, the architect Robert Keenan and his 
wife, Mary, with what appears to have been a 
calculated effort to simulate the atmosphere 
of rural France. 


T HE Napa Valley is compact and can 
easily be seen m a day. To resume 
your exploration of California’s north 
coast, drive north from Yountville on Route 
29. stopping, if desired, at more wineries 
between Sl Helena and Calisloga, a spa 
town some Californians have been visiting 
for years to “take the waters." 

At Calisloga head north on Route 12S. 
Route 128 joins US. 101 at Healdsbuig, and 
.travelers leave the wine country to enter 
what local people call the redwood country, 
which stretches more than 200 miles to the 
Oregon bonder. 

An attractive base of operations "from 
which to explore the region is the Benbow 
Inn (707-923-2124). which is on U.S. 101 
beside the Eel .River near GarberviDe. From 


country, a 45-minute drive on U.S. 101 from 
Garberville takes you to the town of Scotia, 
where the Pacific Lumber Company allows 
visitors to watch some of the giant trees 
being cut into lumber for fences, decks and 
houses. The sawmill is open from 7:30 A.M. 
to noon and 1 P.M. to 4 P.M. weekdays, but 
because of recently reduced work schedules, 
it’s best to call ahead to see if men are 
working (707-764-2222). 

After you've hod your fill of (he redwoods, 
you can return to San Francisco via the 
northern coast, making the transition at Leg- 
gett, from which State Route 1 winds its way 
almost 15 miles to the windswept Mendoci- 
no County shoreline 

Near Rockport, a once-thriving lumber 
town that is now nil but a ghost town, a great 
coastal panorama unfolds. Except for the 
occasional farmhouse or grazing cattle, the 
region seems undiscovered. Beside the high- 
way, waves pound into the continent, con- 
aiming a process that over eons has sculp- 
tured a rocky shoreline of slab-sided 
headlands and huge offshore formations. 

In December and January, giant Pacific 
gray whales make their way south within 
sight of the coast to calving grounds in Baja 
California; in March, April and May they 
return, migrating north to their home 


return, migrating nort 
grounds in the Arctic. 


"SEi' I CaBfo™> tarRomanGaihoik pries* under • ■ : f ° L ' 


chides first-class rail travel a 


^ single-berth 

• ; ■ : ‘ 1 ' cabin on board the mini-liner Sl Nicholas, 

• ■' r (which has conference facilities far daytime 

• .. i F. '' travel and even a casino) and gonnnet meals. 
. ’ t\ . • l V::*- You leave London at 7:40 PJi and arrive in 

... .... n v- Amsterdam at 9:03 or Brussds at 9:56 the 

; next morning. 

.u jhcre ^ connections to Hanover and 
' N ^ Frankfurt that would bring you there in time 
i vru.ii — for a business hincb. From Amsterdam you 
can ride the West German railways' (DB) 


a tunnel under the channel. Both rides are 
committed in principle, although the ques- 
tion of finance has yet to be settled (this will 
probably be private capital). An official An- 
glo-French committee is dne to report in 
March and both the SNCF and British Rail 
have prepared revenue forecasts. According 
to a BR spokesman, the project is serious 
enough to have assigned David Williams, 
BR international director, full-time on plan- 
ning for the tunneL 

Gertrude Stein may have witnessed the 
inauguration of the fust scheduled air ser- 
vice between Paris and Loudon in 1919. The 
plane flew at an average speed of 100 mph 
and the flight took nearby three hours. Tne 
SNCF has plans for nmnmg a TGV between 
Paris and London, under the channel in a 
mind-boggling two hours and 35 minutes. ■ 


Father Junipero Serra between 1770 and 
1823. 

Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma 
has been restored along with houses and 
other 19th-century adobes erected when 
Sonoma was a center of Spanish and Mexi- 
can colonial power in die New World. In 
these premises in an hour or two, visitor* can 
absorb much about thehistory erf California. 

Flanking a spacious Spanish-style plaza, 
the buildings are now a state historical park 
that is open dafly, 10 Ail to 5 P.M. except 
Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New 
Year’s Day. Admission is 50 cents, 25 cents 
for visitors under 17 and over 60. Children 
under 6 are admitted free. 

Highlights include the home of Gen. 
M. G. Vallejo, who served for more than a 


root in Sonoma in the mid- 19th centuiy..- 
Sebasriani Vineyards & Winery, 389 Fourth 
Street East, open 10 A.M. to"5 P.M. daily 
except holidays, offers free tours that place 
special emphasis on the evolution of the 
industry. Brochures given away in hotels and 
stores list wineries that areopen to the public 
and their hours; some accept visitors only by 
appointment 

From Sonoma, it is a brief drive east on 
State Rome 1 16 to the Napa Valley, a sweep- 
ing tableau of vineyards flanked east and 
west by tree-studded hills. 

Yountville, a small town on State Route 
29 in the heart of the Napa Valley, makes a 
good beachhead from which to mount year 


T HE first community encountered on 
(he drive south is Westport, an old 
logging town whose saltbox and Vic- 
- _ad inn oi surpnsmgiy mgn quauty consid- torian architecture is reminiscent of New 

errng its remoteness, the 59-year-old hotel _ England; next is Fort Bragg, the largest town 
was restored several years ago, furnished in this pan of California 
with anuques and gm* the warm atmo- There is a frontier spirit in this comer of 
sphere of an old English mn. America: Despite chronic troubles in the 

.^.Alxmt imdway. between Hraldsbura and . .. logging and fi&g industries that have left 


exploration of the valley. 
The discovery of the Na 


The discovery of the Napa Valley by tour- 
ists en masse in recent years has troubled 


N-i '• i 


Vinifying Mendocino County 


OREGON 


T ilt t:; 

. — ***$ r| iHERE is a magic place in CaKfor- 

I Of Navarro, where Route 128 
“ . i . Vv ' . bursts out of the redwoods on its 

^ way inland from the sea. Suddenly the dap- 
• V i.' sV. w \ ^ pled Kght and coolness of the forest give way 
gjiii-.p > > il to bright sun, golden hills — and grapes. 
pf»cr , > as* y ‘ This is the Anderson Valley, one of the 
;"■ * ’■■■ • _ . most beantifo] wine roads in the world, and 
.'.one of the most varied. Following 128, a 
retie* J ” • ".-^i^' travder can leave a dn Tl fog on the Pacific 

FtMl'" ' ,'.;Js,r^' v Coast, slip into the redwood forest, then 
jiK • • ■* tanerge into rolHiig farmland and pasturage, 

thu v andiu :• ’ : “J :• : afl in less than an hour. In the same time, the 
ui»-ii « : 5 ' . j\, t te*'] temperature can climb 30 degrees. 

Itutmr r' r - ' The Anderson Valley is one o! California’s 

air nt»i (. • !*■ * ! 1 'rl ;■*> newest wine regions, fostered by overcrowd- 
Jifdfcir j-.-. ^ ingin Napa and Sonoma counties, directly 

Dir p »"« '* ■ to the south, and the wine makers constant 

»i k *i xn 1 ‘ «v- search for better growing conditions. When 

ju, u < ^jicU • * ‘ ‘ Leon Adams wrote the second edition of his 

*- s "’ ^‘..-^'“The Wines of America," he noted that there 
BaUM f» '■ M : k - : ' were three wineries in the Anderson VaEey. 


• v 


by Frank J. Prial 


T 


vjiii’ 1 ' emerge in 

aridrti ’• ' \ - :■ ' all in less i 

w | k -, t tc^erati 

x .rt " r '.‘‘j The An 

oi newest wi 


Coast, slip into the redwood forest, then 
emerge into rolling farmland and pasturage. 


"' all in less than an hour. In the same time, the 
' . j! .," t - temperature can dhnb 30 degrees. 

The Andoson Valley is one of Califonna’s 
r:'' newest wine regions, fostered by overcrowd- 
‘ k .' ing in Niqia and Sonoma counties, directly 
: to the south, and the wine maker's constant 
5 v- search for better growing conditions. Wheat 
‘ Leon Adams wrote the second edition erf his 

u' r-.''- ; '“Tbe Wines of America," be noted that there 
L . ;"hp were three wineries in the Anderson VaEey. 


dessert wine sold in half bottles for about $6. 

In 1982, the French champagne house of 
Louis Roederer bought 584 acres cm both 
sides of Route 128. Some 60 acres are plant- 
ed in pinoi noir and chardonnay and Roe- 
derer plmis to build a wineiy that wih be 
devoted to California champagne just across 
the road from Husch. Of course, Roederer; 
like its competitors. Piper Heidsdck (Piper 
Sonoma) and Mofit et Chandon (Domaine 
Chandon), who earlier built sparkling wine 
facilities in California, will refrain from call- 
ing the California product champagne. 

After a couple of winery stops, BoonvQle, 
about 20 miles east of the wine country, 
becomes a logical place for lunch. The re- 
cently restored New Boon vide Hotel is yet 
another offshoot of Berkeley’s Chez Panisse, 


Anderson Valley, one 
of the newest wine re- 
gions, is like ‘California 


simple but elegant 


popular enough to warrant reservations, es- 
pecially during the summer tourist months 
(707-433-8281). The menu is relatively sim- 
ple, with tight, Americanized French dishes. 

Simi Winery, on 101 in the center of 
Healdsbuzg, is one of the best-known winer- 
ies in northern Sonoma and a convenient 
stop for travelers headed toward San Fran- 
cisco. Just sooth of Healdsbuig, a brief sortie 
on the Old Redwood Highway leads to Son- 
oma Vineyards and its neighbor. Piper Son- 
oma. 


i DEL 
NORTE 


'Prairie CreelT - ? 
Redwood* State Park 


HUMBOLDT » 


AT Santa Rosa, the wine trail leads east 
and south into the Sonoma Valley, 
J- JA- with the Mayacamas mountains 
along the eastern horizon. Near Kenwood is 
Chateau Sl Jean, where some of this coun- 
try’s finest white wines are produced by the 
vintner, Dick Arrowood. 

Glen Ellen Winery, near the Jack London 
Ranch, in the hamlet of Glen Enen L u mn by 
the Benziger family. New Yorkers who wel- 
come visitors every day. Two or three blocks 
from the center of the town of Sonoma, 
which has become a focus of arts and crafts 
and good (fining, is Sebastiani Vineyards, 
one of the most popular stops on all the 
winery tours, with its handsome carved bar- 
rels and doors and its new Indian museum, 
with its impressive collections of arrowheads 
and other artifacts gathered in the vineyards. 

Just over the Mayacamas Mountains from 
Sonoma lies the Napa Valley. Driving north 
on Route 29, after leaving the city of Napa 
behind, the road becomes a moving gallery 
of the most famous names in American win- 
emaking: Domaine Chandon, Far Niente, 
Robert Mondavi Cakebread Cellars, Beau- 
lien, Lnglenook, Grgtch Hills, Sutter Home. 
Heitz, Louis Martini 

Beyond Sl Helena tie Spring Mountain. 
Christian Brothers, Beringer, Freemark Ab- 
bey, Schramsberg, Stonegate and, perched 
atop its own hfll the Greek monastery that is 


V s **?,. O vi. : >- • : j> In fact, a few of the valley’s wineries are 
tE n ’* -J feiriy well known: Husch, Edmeades and 

' ... >-Navairo have followings around the coon- 

2 f* < iiwni i u J ; t v ' try. But most of the local wineries are far 

wu * 4 * • '" ,,v Ironi being household words: Handley Cel- 

. . lars and the Christine Woods Winery, both 

fM n *"*■ . * ‘ founded in 1982; Pqiperwood Springs, 

- y^Wch dates from 1981; Greenwood Ridg^ 

whose vineyards date from 1972 and winery 

from 19S), and Las^ Creek, with vineyards 

nee 1974 and a wineiy since 1979. 

Greenwood Ridge, on a hilltop about six 
• ^ .'jUales from the Pacific, is the westernmost 

''.wineiy in the United Slates, according to its 
t /TV ow ner, Allan Green, a graphic artisL . 

t 7 - a 4 " . Edmeades, Husch and Navarro have tast- 

j ^8 rooms op ax dafly, usually from 10 AJd. 

ef-.f PAL Qinstine woods is not open to the 


out Qlifnnufl and across the country, often 
at the hands of Panisse- trained chefs. Char- 
lene Rollins, New BoonviBe’s co-owner and 
chef, apprenticed at Chez Panisse. (707-895- 
3478. Reservations advised on weekends and 
are necessary for rooms.) . 

From Boonvflle, 128 meanders southeast 
to join Route 101 neardoverdale. North on 
101 is the center of the Mendocino County 
wine country. Fetter Vineyards maintains a 
tasting room at Hoplands for those who 
don’t want to drive the extra 25 miles north 
to visit the wineiy itself, in Redwood Valley. 
The solar-powered McDowell Valley winery, 
four miles east of Hoplands on Route 175, is 


CALIFORNIA 


Aft (Mhrooifs State Park , 

^vmuaofttwGIante 

/ 

arvilla 

daon fiitwa State Park 


Garberville, a sign beside UJS. 101 directs 
travelers to Redwood Valley, one of (he 
fastest developing grape-growing valleys in 
Mendocino County’s relatively new, but 
booming wine industry. 

A few miles north of Redwood Valley is 
Willi is, a logging and farm town and eastern 
terminus of the California Western Rail- 
road's Skunk Line, which hauls tourists on a 
three-hour excursion through forests to Fort 
Bragg on the Pacific Coast. Diesel-powered 
cars have replaced the steam locomotives 
that once served the route, but the scenery it 
traverses is as spectacular as ever. The one- 
way fare is S12; round trip: 516. For sched- 
ule information call 707-964-6371. 

Redwood trees first appear sparingly 
along the highway: then, at Leggett, about 
30 miles north of Willits and 30 miles south 
of Garberville, they seem to be everywhere. 

About five miles north of the Benbow Inn, 
U.S. 101 bisects Richardson Grove State 
Park, an 831-acre preserve with 10 miles of 
trails. It offers some of the most accessible 
redwoods for the casual tourisL If its trees 
are not enough to satisfy your interest in 
redwoods, drive about 15 miles north on 
U.S. 101 until a small green sign appears: 
Scenic .Alternate. It is an invitation to the 
Avenue oT the Giants, a 33-mile detour 
through the Humboldt Redwoods State Park 
that meanders past some of the largest and 
most spectacular coastal ted woods still ex- 
tanL The detour can take an hour or much 
longer, depending upon how much you enjoy 
being among these amazing trees- 

For another aspect of life in the redwood 


many people unemployed, residents boast 
about their quality of life. Fort Bragg is a 
good place to sample the salm on, Dungeness 
crab and other seafood yielded by local wa- 
ters, perhaps at The Wharf restaurant, 780 
North Harbor Drive (707-964-4283). 

At 90 West Redwood Avenue (707-964- 
5651) the Georgia-Pacific Corp. operates an 
free museum about the logging industry that 
can be toured in 15 minutes or so. It is open 8 
AJM. to 5 P.M. weekdays except holidays. 
Beginning in late spring, there's a lavish 
display of rhododendrons, begonias, fuch- 
sias and other plants that flourish in the cool 
moist coastal climate at the Mendocino 
Coast Gardens, two miles south of Fort 
Bragg on Route 1. It is open 8:30 AM. to 
6:30P.M. during the summer and closes as 5 
PAL in other seasons. 

All of the elements that give this region its 
charm — rocky headlands, distant marine 
vistas, architectural curiosities — come to- 
gether in Mendocino, a town perched on a 
bluff south of Fort Bragg and surrounded on 
three sides by the Pacific. Like Westport, it 
has a feeling of New England, which Holly- 
wood directors have frequently borrowed 

A century ago loggers felled redwood trees 
in the nearby hills and turned them over to 
mill workers, who cm the logs into building 
materials, then lowered the lumber down the 
high cliffs onto waiting ships. To serve the 
loggers, mule skinners, mill workers and 
fishermen, there were 8 hotels. 17 saloons 
and legend has it. more than 15 bordellos. ■ 

© JW The AVw York Tuna 




lENOOCfNO 


. Redwood Vattoy 


PS >Wf A 

V3ayaanrille ^jy- 


t — / 
dCafisto 




v;V 


i5 PAL Christine woods is not open to the 
abBc- The others in the valley can be seen 
appointment only. Both Husch and Ed- 
faraes have picnicking facilities. All three 
ssaes make a range of good wines, includ- 

gGewtatranuneE, the famous wine of (be 
Swer^ioaof France. The grape hasnever 
taken off elsewhere in this country, but 
docs excepti onally well in the Anderson 
adley. One of the most attractive is the late* 
“vest Gewtirztrandner of Navarro, a rich 


worth a visit if only for the view of the actually Sterling Vineyards, 
vineyards and mountains from its tasting Paralleling Route 29, across the 
room. floor, the Silverado Trail beasts il 


WountvHI 


F ROM Cl overdaie south to Santa 
Rosa, Route 101 is the main stem of 
Sonoma County’s wine country. 
There are dozens of wineries along the high- 
way or a short detour from iL 
Geyser Peak, built to resemble old Son- 
oma hop kilns , is just west of the highway 
near Geyserville. A bit farther south, near 
Healdsbuig. the hug e Souverain Cellars of- 
fers lastingva gift simp, and a restaurant 


Paralleling Route 29, across the valley 
floor, the Silverado Trail boasts its own 
famous wineries, among them Clos du Val 
Stag’s Leap and Joseph Phelps. 

m afl, the Napa Valley has more than 130 
wineries, more than half of which are eager 
to welcome guests and turn them into cus- 
tomers. Most wineries along the maip roads 
receive visitors from 10 /LM. to 5 or 6 PAL, 
every day of the year except Christmas and 
one or two other major holidays. ■ 

© 1985 The New York Tuna 


Oakland 


• Hi# Now York limn 


■ ADVERTISEMENT. ■ 


“MAKE MINE A LARGE ONE ” 

BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF HAPPIER TIMES. 
Who WOULD have thought a new play on botany would prove a 
source of constant hilarity throughout the evening ? But despite the 
lethargy the topic instantly induced in one at school, such a subject is 
keeping audiences rolling throughout Europe. 

. ON TOUR 

PART OF ITS immense charm is that “Make mine a large one" has 
such a wide appeal. (Though one must confess that those with a more 
cultured taste will probably find it wittier than those who labour 
under the misconception that Shakespeare’s 'Taming of the Shrew' 
is a course in animal husbandry.} The plot, has an international 
flavour. The main personalities are drawn from ufa 

countries as diverse as Morocco, Saxony and Indo- 
China and feature such characters as Coriander, 

Angelica, Orris and Jumper. Although at first sight 
such , a mixture might appear a little uncomfortable, 
it is the skill . with whitih they have been seamlessly 
blended that guarantees the end result! 

I raise my glass to the creators of the production, 

Bombay Gin. It is indeed their unique distillation 
that keeps one amused. 

And I iorone shall oft return to my favourite bar 
to watch it run and run— into my glass. . 



\ • - 



®*H'* *«« *H«B rffffgffWiiimiEiifHStmSHtKK 15 1 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDA'S, MARCH 8, 1985 


** 




I 


Thurstfeofe 




Closing 


Tables include tti* nationwide prices 
in> to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


i? Month 
Nigh LOW SlOCS 


Sis One 

Di«. Ybf. PE lBOSHflh LOW OwLOi^o 


(Continued from Page 6) 


21 12 

Jlft 20 
44% 79V. 
25% 15%. 
ZM Mft 
43 Z7ft 
ISM 2JV5 
23% Mft 
IJft II 
11* 3ft 


MroRtV IJM 80 II «6 
Mortens M 23 13 209 
MotrMB M 2 a 1012392 
Munfrd J* 22 12 75 

Morans «S 

MurptiC WO 24 10 
MurpO 140 14 11 
MurryO 1JD SX 11 
Murom imioj 
M varLn 


233 

434 


m ISM 
29% aw 

32V 31* 
24* 24 ft 
Ml* 19* 
41Vi *1V. 
29 28* 

22* 22 
13* 13% 
4* 4 


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29*+ * 
31*—* 
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20* + ft 
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29 +* 
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13%+ Vb 
4* 


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32to 17* NCH 
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28* 21 NalCO 140 4J 13 1247 25* 25 2SU— % 

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64% 54 NCon ut 149 12 10 47* 45* 47* -M 

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If* 13* Newell JO 14 12 


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32* 16 Nortln 


24* 26* + * 

18* 10* 18* + * 
13* 13 13* + * 

27 26* 27 + * 

42* 41* 42 — * 
... 3ft 3% a% + ft 
35 X 21 1023 30* 29* 30*— * 

100 11 20 42 41* 42 

S3 L9 14 437 27* 24* 26*— * 
18 10* 10* Wft— * 

4 27* 27* 27* 

II* 10* 10*— * 
29* 38* 28*—* 

10 15* 15* 15* + * 
39 II* 11* 11M— * 
« sm 27* 27*— * 
130Z 14* 14* 14* + U 
1002 17* 17* 17* + * 
3 16* 16* 16* 

a ii to* n + * 

743 37V. v 37 

8 25* 25* 25*+ * 
552 22* 22 22* + * 

7 17* 17* 17* 

5 29 29 29 + * 

18 18* 18* 18* + * 

7 45* 45* 45*+ * 
■ 15* 15* 15* 

9 9 9 

42* 42 42*— * 

2* 2* 364 + * 

17* 17 17* + * 

3Dz 25* 28* 25* 

!& 38 30 30 

5001 33 33 33 + * 

3 24* 24* 24*+ * 
--- IDOttr 57* 57* 57* + * 

175*112 16 * 15* 14 + * 

.12 J 23 121 14* 16* 14*— % 

3D4 10.1 2038 30* 30* 30* 

.12 M 34 583 15 14* 14*— M 

5.1 9 056 67 45* 47 +1* 

727 14%. 14* 14V 


12 Mown 
Hist. LOW Sloth 


SB. 

Iflfa High Low 


CUM 

QuoLOHn 


8* 4* NutrtS M 7.1 
80* sm NYNEX AM 77 


8 S 


4* 4* 4* + * 
7146 7746 7*H + * 


544 2 
35* 23* 
35% 23* 
17 9* 

am it* 

SI* 48* 

113 10546 
108*10116 
34* 22 
31* 34* 
14* W* 
34 25* 

34 a* 
34 a* 
83* 41 
SS 43 
40* 45 
26* 18* 
2846 21 
14* W* 
46* 81 
63 47* 

17* 12* 
31 25* 

19* 13 

106 98 

107 98* 

68* a 

61* 51* 
23* 19* 
8* 7 

34* 25* 
a 5* 
20* 14 

33* a* 

2S% 19* 
13ft 5* 

ZTto 19* 

13* B* 
10* 6* 
3i* a 
31* 18* 
33* 17 
20 13 

17 25* 

44* 31* 
135 96 

im ion 


Oak Ind 418 

OaUteP 1X2 XJ 12 8 

OcdPef 239 10 9 1794 
OcdRwt 
OcdPpf 2.12 Til 
OedPpf 625 129 
OodP PflSSO 165 
Qedl* I64fl 161 
ODECO IDS XI T7 


Ogden 
OWo Ed 

Ohfidnf 430 111 
OtlEdpt 434 133 
onedpf 454 168 
OtiEdPf 724 161 
OhEdPf 734 143 
OhEflpf 820 161 
Oh Ed pi 350 1X9 
OhEd pr 392 161 
Oh Ed pf 130 123 
OtlEdpt 9.12 133 
OtlEdpt 834 145 
OhMotr 30 25 18 
OllPpfH 3JS 123 
OhPpfO 227 no 
OtlP pfAlXXO 1X5 
atiPpflPUin 135 
OhPpfE 838 1M 
Otlp pfD 7.74 129 
OfcJaGE ZOO 93 9 
OklaGpt 30 TOO 
Olki 150 62 9 
Omnat 31 

Oneida JO 62 10 
ONEOK 236 82 9 
OranRk 2J4 XI 9 
Orange Mt 63 15 
OrtanC M XI 272 
Orton P 38 

Orton pf 50 60 
Orton pf 295 92 
OuttiMs 34 U 18 
OvmTr 3« 20 14 
OvShip 50 23 11 
OwenC 130 63 8 
Owen III 138fa 42 9 
Ownllpf 675 X9 
Oxford 34 35 9 


2* 2 256+ * 

35* 35 35* 

28* M 28* 

1 11* 11* II*—* 

3 17* 17* 17* 

72 48* 48* 48*— * 

3574 *4*104*104*+ * 
80 103*183*103* 

838 24* 25* 2*46+ * 


150 U 15 1453 316630* 31* + * 
158 1X4 6 43*3 14* 14 14 — * 

lib 33 33 33 —1 

280c a S 33—1 
HME 32* 32* 32*— 1 
24000c 52 81* SIM— 1 

1001 SI 51 SI — 1* 
Hka 9 a 

37 25* 25* 25*— 1 
9 27* 27* 27*—* 

14 14* 14* 14*— M 

W 44* 65* 66% +1* 
230*42 40 40* — * 

30 16 IS* 15* 

3 29* 2PM Z9M 

15 Wft It* 18* + * 

10x104 104 104 
30X104 104 Y04 —1 

40* 44* 44* 44* — * 

100* 40 SO 40+1 
2013 21M 2146 Z1M 

• 88 — * 
MU 38* 36 + * 

I* 7* 8 +* 
15* 19* 15*— * 
3186 3166 31*— * 
25* 24M 25* + * 
1286 11* 12* +1 
34U 24* 24* 

11 * 11 * 11 * 

8* 8* 0* 

.. asa am js + * 

540 30* 29* 30 +U 
341 33 32% 32U— * 

174 17* 17* 17* 

247 32* 32* 32M 
411 4M 40 40*— * 
1 120*120*120*— * 
50 12* 12* 12* + * 


£ 

*§ 


I 

a 

40 


II 
384 
572 
6 1753 


2* gt”* 1, .J* U ■ 39* 38* 39* + * 

2 £ Nor^rpt 6^1161 200 44* 44* 44* +* 

19 n Norfefc JB J 7 141 14* 14* 16*— * 

StM 42 NACoal UN 15 7 120 54* 54U 54*— * 

jJSU 28* NAPWS 1J0 24 10 223 42* 41* 42*—* 

21U 13* NEorO 154a 9J ID 125 17 14* 14* + * 

15* 10* NOBStUI 1 JB 106 5 1066 14* U* 14*6+ * 


IS* 11 NlndPS 1-56 13X 

44* 33* NoSIPw X2I 7J 

3S* 31 NSPwpT 611 U4 

* . 32 NSPpf 616 I1J 

78 62* NSPvrpf 680 11R 

43* 29* Nor Tel JO 

5* 2* NttaolB 


7 5180 12* 12 12 

7 1464 43* 42* 42*— * 

» 3A 36 M +1* 

50z 37 37 37 +1 

Wte 75 75 W 

2216 36* 35* 35* 

373 3* 3* 3*+ U 


4Wt 2346 Nortrp * 120 19 12 1274 42* 41* 42 —1 
SS fS 288 SO 14 116 54* 54 54* + * 

35 P'*?’ Pf ajO 10J 100 21* 23* 23* + * 

25 J& * * 3 ™ .... 2 12 * 12 * 12 * + M 

38* 30* Norton 3J0 SR 12 42 35* 35 35*— U 

32* 21* Norwot 1 JO 7J 14 344 25* 25* 25* + * 

58* 4M N wit of 611 ell 4 157 52* 51* 82* + * 

34 a*k Novo at 1.1 10 4046 27* 26* 26*— 1* 

38* a Nucor J6 1J H 1031 34* 34* 34*— I* 


31* 18 
40 24* 

24* 15 
19* 13* 
13* 11* 
17* 12* 
42* 30* 
29 21V6 

10* 5* 
19* 13* 
17* 11* 
73* 53* 
27* 21 
33* 27* 
43* as 

34* 26* 
39 25* 

7U 4 
4 1* 

21 13* 

39* 31 
5* 3 
17* 12 
Iff* 10* 
23* 12* 
12* 5* 

39* 25* 
17* 12* 
5* 1* 

27* 14* 
17* 11* 
2>U 13* 
13* 6* 

1* 

55* 38* 


25* 19* 
37* 30 
27* 23* 
21* 30 
26* 22* 
29* 25U 
96 01* 

70 58* 

40* 31* 
25* TO 
M 30* 
17* 9U 
38 23U. 

49* 35* 
30* 17* 
10* 7* 
22* 12* 
38* 27* 
31* 24* 
17 14 

7* 4 
42* 29* 
27* 12* 
48* 34 
41* 20* 
14* * 
32* 24 
35 25 

42* 50* 
10 * 9 * 


PHH JB 2J 12 
PPG M0 61 V 
PSA JO 14 
PSA dpi 1.90 103 
POCAS 1J4 1X1 
POCGE 1R2 99 7 
PocUp 332 61 12 
PcLum IRQ 4A 15 
PdCRm J5r J 
PacRapfXOD 1U 
PoeScI JO 15 12 
PocTete id 78 8 
Pod ftp 2-32 BJ 8 

PadfPf 44)7 1X8 
PolnWb JO 1J AS 

PalnWpf 125 73 

Palm Be L20 XI 10 

PanAm 

PtpiAwt 

Ponddcn 30 U 17 
PanhEC 230 63 9 
PonfPr 15 

Paprcft JO 4R IS 
Pardyn 32 

PorkEs 10 

ParfcOrl .16 23 
PorkH 1.12 11 11 
ParkPn 92 XI 28 
PotPtrl 14 

PaytNW 34 13 18 
PCTVNP JO 66 12 
PavCah .16 J 17 
Paabdv 30 2J 
Prats© 

PenCen 12 

Paamy 236 5J 8 
PaPL 2.56 100 8 
PaPL pf 680 129 
PBPLdPd42 133 
PePLdoiXM 12J 
PaPLdprSRS Tiff 
PaPLdprX75 1X8 
PaPLprllJO 1X1 
PaPLpr 670 133 
Penwtt 220 SR 12 
Penwpf 1J0 AS 
Pemtxal 230 4R 21 
PeopEn 1.20 7.1 fl 
PeoOoy 36 1J 16 
PepsiCo ISC 39 21 
P«rkEl JS 23 U 
Prmian 135 1X8 • 
PoryDr 30 1J 15 
Petrte 1J0 60 15 
PrtRs 322*149 
PttRspf 1-57 103 

Ptrinv Miami 
Pfizer 198 39 13 
PlWlpO 

Ptvrtp or 500 11J 
PhtorS 94 1J 24 
Phi lad 230 164 6 
PhllEpf 630 1X8 
PtOIEpf 640 115 
PIUIEpf 675 149 
PWlEpf Ml 1X6 


310 31 

In S 

36 18* 

M ia* 

949 17* 
173 4TV6 
225 27* 
U 8* 
66 17 
22 14 
3002 59 

294 am 
17 31* 
758 38U 
105 31U 
127 38* 
9595 4* 
710 2* 

338 17* 
503 37* 
475 4* 

244 T7U 
1240 14 
54 14* 
M2 7 
664 37* 
178 1C* 
94 2H 
32 24* 
124 13* 
583 19* 


s \ 


512 S3* 
1064 47* 
2953 25* 
IB 38 

12 as* 

44 24* 
35 25* 
14 28* 
IB 90* 
300* AS* 
219 39 
2 24* 
1295 47* 
216 17* 
109 34* 
2443 40* 
1441 35 
215 9* 

Z77 19* 
411 36 
19 25* 
21 15U 
96 5* 

2350 41* 
4m 19* 
182 46 
5308 37 
4169 15* 
lOOQz 31U 
lOQz 32* 
IB 60* 
27 ID* 


30* 31 + U 

3H6 38*+ * 
2ZU 23*+ M 
W* 18*— * 
12 * 12 *+ * 
17* 17* 

40* 41 
25* 27* + * 
8 8* 

UU 17 +* 

15* 16 + * 
47* 48*+ * 
M 24*+ U 
31* 31*— * 
37* 37*— * 
30* 30*— * 
3TW 30*— * 
4* 4* + * 
2* 2U+ * 
17 17 — IU 

34* 34*— * 
4* 4*— U 
17 17 

U* 15*—* 
14* 14*— * 
4* 7 + * 

34* 34*— * 
14* 14*+ * 
2* 2*+ * 
25* 24* 

13 13M— » 

19* 19*— » 

H Hi* 

52* 53* +1 
47* 47* 

25* 25*+ U 


25* 25*—* 
24 21* + * 

24* 25*+ * 
28* 28* + * 
90* DM- 3* 
45* AS* — * 
38* 38*+ * 
24* 34*+ M 
44* 44*— * 
W* 14* 

34* 24*+ N 
47* 48*—* 
24* 24*+ U 
9* 9* 

IBM 19* +1 
35* 35*—* 
25* 25* 

15 18*—* 

5* 5* 

40* 41 + * 

18* 18*— M 
4SU 45*— 1* 
U to — * 
15* IS*—* 
31* 31* + * 
32* 32* 

40* 40* 

10 Wk+ * 


HMonOi 
High Low StOCh 


Ofy. YW. PE 


SIS. 

WOiHiaiiLew 


riwr» 

ooetaro* 


10* 4* Phi IE of 
57 43 PhllEpf 

10 4* Phi IE pf 

79 SS PMIE Pf 
68 51 PhllEpf 

56* 44 PMIE pf 
54* 40* PhUEPl 
M 15* PWlSub 
94* 42* PtillMr 
25 10* PhlWin 

40* a PhOlnpf 
M* 33* PhlIPPt 

a* is* PhnvH 

31* 2rn PledAs 
32* 23* PhiNG 
21 14 Plerl 

47* 33 POsbrv 
to 21* Pioneer 
43* 37* PltnyB 
15* 9* Pfltstn 
15* 8* PtonRs 
18* 12* Ptontm 
13* 7* PtaVtXJV 
35* 19* ptesey 
22* 15* Pope Pd 
32 24* Potorfd 

23* 11* Pondn 
22* 15 PodTdI 
19* T3* Pome 
18 13 PortGE 

22* 17* PorGpf 
3» 28* PorGof 

f * 28* PorCpf 
M 25* Pottfdl 
19* PotmEI 
78* X* PotEI pf 
£* 34 POIEIPf 
37* 31 PotEI Pf 
35* iff* Prwmla 
37* 21* Prlmrk 
30* 11* PrlmeC 
32* 14* PlKnM 
59* 45* PrectG 
15 7* PrdRah 

47* 3i Pretar 
19* 14* PSvCnl 
42 91* PSCalpI 

19* 16* PSCMpf 
9* 4* PSInd 
35 19* PJIfipf 

8* 4 PSInof 
■ 4* PSIn pf 

57* 44U PSIn pf 
11* 3* PSvNH 
4 P3NH Pf 
4* PNHpfB 
8* PNHptC 
7 PNHptD 
7 PNHpfe 
5* PNHpfP 
7*PNHpfG 
35* 19* PSvNM 

27* 20* P5vEG 

13* 10* PSEGPf 
to 28* PSEGpf 
39 39* PSEGpf 

42* 33* PSEGpf 
45* 35* PSEGpf 
18* 15 PSeG Pf 
88 44* PSEGpf 

44 55 PSEGpf 

43* 51* PSEGpf 
4* 2* Putrikk 

13* 8 Puebla 
9* 4* PR Com 
15 9* PuoetP 

31* 10* PiriteHm 
39* 23* Purokit 
10* 5* Pvre 


1J3 1X4 
7J5 MR 
MB 135 


9J2 1g 


9 JO 
7 JO 1X9 
7JS 163 
1J2 7 A 
6M 4J 
M 1A 
MO 15 
140 68 
JO LS 
3S J9 
2J2 7J 


184 U 
1R6 62 
130 XI 


JO 1J 
.14 M 


9Se XI 
90 39 


M0 XT 


90 ^ 
JO 63 
90 13 
M2 1X4 
290 ma 

490 m 




154 _ 
1H 64 
294 XJ 
680 168 
6J4 112 


2X0 SJ> 


rm 

1 1 


19* 

30 


S5 9* 9* 

nox sm S 

a 9* m 
TttZ 73 73 

1800c 64 64* 

t20z 54 55 

30z 54* 54* 
11 -11 U 17* 
13 7121 93* 92* 
11 1714 22* 30 
6 55 51* 

953967 49* 49* 
9 137 26* 25* 
9 548 30* 30 

9 47 31* 31 
13 63 10* 19* 
11 11X7 48* 47* 

6 2T73 30* 29* 

11 544 39* 39* 
346 ID* 10* 

12 7S 13 12* 
17 112 15* 15* 

3 100 1IM IT* 

10 4 20* 20* 

35 59 17* 17* 

31 1331 25* 25* 

8 4Wx 13 12* 

V 1M 18* 

17* 17* 
17* 17* 
21 * 21 * 
33* 33* 

.. 32* 22* 

13 IBS a* to 

1 &Z3 25* 24* 

1 74* 74* 
2O0x 41* 41 
200z 34 34 

17 38 25* 25* 

7 13S 34* 35* 

14 1748 W* 17* 

33 107 31* 31* 
12 3430 54* 55* 
25 24 13* 13* 

9 4 42 41* 

> IIS 19* 19* 
10B 58* SB* 
1 18* 18* 
7 844 7* 7* 

IOC 23 23 

T58B 7* 7* 
10B 7* 7* 
HB 54* 54* 

2 429 4* 4* 

900X 10* 10* 

39 W* 10* 
15* 15* 
1M 13* 
14 14 

i2* n* 
12 * 12 * 
24* to 


3 

434 

3 

21 

as 


*9*— * 
73 —1 
64*— 1* 
56 +1 
54* + * 
17*—* 
92*—* 
20 * - 8 * 
51*— 6 
49* 

am 

30*— * 
31 — * 
19*—* 
40 +* 

»*— * 
39*— U 
TO*— * 
12* 

15*+ * 
12*+ * 
20* 

17*— * 
29* + * 
13 +* 
18* 

17*+ * 
17*— * 
21*—* 
33* 

32H— H 
to — * 
25*— * 
74*+ * 
41*+ * 
36 +* 
25*— * 

as*— * 

17*—* 

31* 

55*—* 
13*— * 
42 
19* 

50*— 1 1* 
18* 

7*— * 


4 
4 

13 

10 

9 

a 834 

7 8901 
8 


IRA 129 
.12 R 
MB 69 


12 * 12 * 
45Bx 33* 33* 
2D90Z 24 33* 

58c 41 41 

100B 43 43 

12 17* 17* 
5402 55 54* 

2B0x 43* 42* 
5002 40* 40* 
86 I* 2* 

8 7 II* II* 

5 4 7* 7* 

9 377 14* 13* 

a 930 14* 14* 
11 154 27 26* 

8 74 9* 9* 


7*— * 
7*+ * 
54* 

4M— * 

MM— * 
TO* — U 
15* 

13*— * 
14 — * 
11*— * 
12 *— * 
Z4U + .U 
25*— * 
12 * — H 
31*— 1* 
33*— 1* 
41 
43 

17*—* 
55 + * 

42*— 2* 
40*+ * 
2 * 

11* 

7* 

14 

14*— * 
24*— * 
9* 


40* 28 OuokOs L24 XI 12 2817 40 39 

22 15 QuakSO JO 68 25 315 20* 19* 

11* 4* Quanex 37 31 9* 9* 

34* 23 QuMtar 190 67 9 154 33* 33* 

25* 14 «ReJ] R4a 1J 20 146 34* 24 


39*+ * 
20*—* 
9* 

33*+ * 
24*— * 


It* 6* 
41* 28* 
94* 47* 
31* 24* 

4* 3 

IS 12 * 
H* 4* 
39* 35 
8* 5* 
21* 14* 
9* 4* 
44 47* 

22 ag 
g£i& 

35 30 

W* 9* 
17* 9 
13* • 

T 7 3 

37* 23 
4* 3* 
3 1* 

25* 9* 

45* 31* 
24* 20* 
S3 40 
34* 21* 


RBInd 

RCA 

RCA pf 

RCA pf 

RCA Pf 

RLC 

RPCn 

RTE 

Rodlca 

RabPur 

Ramod 

Ranee 

RonsrO 

Ravan 

Rovmk 

Rayttn 

RjeodBt 

RdBatpf 

RdBatpf 

RHRef 

ReenEq 

Radmn 


.16 IX 
M4 29 
4J0 49 
X12 7.1 
395 109 
JO 29 


J6 X3 


190 3J 
90 61 

in ioj 

130*144 
1 JM 9 R 


JO XI 


JO XI 


Rem 

wtent 

RepAIr 
RwAwf 

RenGyp J4 12 
ReoNY 194 3R 
RNY pfC 112 1X1 
RNY pfB 497* 64 
ReeBk 194 5X 


13 

12 1824 
2 
274 
T78 

9 87 
459 

10 39 
0 119 

14 707 
53 588 
9 27 

lea? 
17 187 
17 
17 1372 
35 <558 
9 
80 

10 to 
16 348 
19 490 
21 18 

314 

10 21 

11 450 

» 

II 220 
a law 
n 
1 

7 309» 


8* 8* 
40 39* 

90* 90* 
30 29* 

35* 35* 
7* 7* 
4* 4* 
17 14* 

IO* 10* 
38* to 
7* «* 
19 18* 

4* 4W 
56* 55* 
12* 12* 
45* 45* 
9* m 
21* 2]_ 
23 22* 

13* 13* 
16 15* 

9* 9* 
9* 9 
1 * 
37* 37* 
4* 4* 

1* 1* 
25* 25 
43* 43* 
36 25* 

53* 53* 
32* 32* 


8* — * 
39*—* 
90*+ * 
30 

35V7+U 

7* 

4* 

16*— * 
TO* 

38 — * 
4*— K 
18*— M 
4* 

54*+* 
72*— * 
45*-* 
9*— * 
21*+ * 
22*-* 
13*— * 
14 


«*+ * 
*— * 
27*—* 
4* 
1*— * 
2S* + * 
43* + * 
25* 

53* + * 
32* + * 


U.S. Futures March 7 


Saoien Season 
Hloti Low 


Open Hl«ti Lew Cleat Cho. 


Groins 


5ea*on seam 
Hloti Low 


Open Htoh Low Oaee Chs. 


2130 


1960 May 
2035 1960 Jul 

Eyt.Satae Pnev. Sates 7933 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 2X854 up1JZ7 
ORANGE JUICE fNYCn 

16000 ibs^- cents per lb. 

18650 11650 Mar 16X80 16X00 


1977 

19*2 


+22 

+22 


WHEAT CCST) 

5X00 bu minimum- dol ion per buehel 
604 X27* Mar X49* 399* 

606 X32M May X39* X40* 

190 124* Jul 128* 129* 

174* 324 Sen 329* 3J0 

143* 134 Dec 139 390 

174* 390* Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 6398 

Prev. Dav Open Irit 35438 off 424 

corn (can 

6000 bu mtabnum-dollanpertwihef 
328* 291* Mar X7D* 170* 

130 299* May 173* 173* 

131 173 Jul ITS* 17S* 

121* 166* S«P 247* 297* 

195 141 Dec 141* 291* 

110 169* Mar 299* 2R0 

121* 2R4* MOV 275* 275* 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales 35.133 

Prev. Day Open lnt.lMJ7S w>400 


394 397* — vOI* 

X3K> 390* 

128* 129* 

129* 329* — vOO* 
139 3J9* -JO* 

395 +J0W 


294* 194* 
271 271* 

273* £73* 
144* 165* 
240* 290* 
249* 269* 
275 275 


— J4* 
-J2* 
— 101 * 
— XI 
-JO* 


+J0* 


SOYBEANS {CRT] 

S0OO bu minimum- dehon per buMtet 
7.90* 5J9 Mar STS 5R6 

May 5J4 SJ4 

jui xm sm* 

AUO 692 693 


7.97 

799 

7J4 

671 


5R0* 
5J0* 
5J2 
SJ1 
SJ3* 
479 XM* 

792 604* 

779 618 

Est Sales 


Nov 684 8J9* 

Jen SM* 600* 
Mar 607* 6D 
MOV 

Prev. Sales 3X186 
Prev. Day Open lot 6X415 atfljn 

SOYBEAN MEAL ICET) 

100 tans- del Ian per fan 
209 JO 12140 Mar 130X0 13X70 


599* 

STB* 

5J7* 

690 

544* 

SJS* 

694* 

607* 


672* —XI 
5J2 —00* 
691* 

X93 +01* 

304* +00* 
689* +JH* 
600* +JB* 

612 +.03* 

620 +03* 


20600 
19650 

naoa 

179 J0 
11X80 
TI4J0 
14300 
20650 

Est Sa ke Prev. Bales 1X359 

Pr«v. Day Open Int 42511 op 347 


129 JO 
1367D 
137 JO 
14000 
14280 
147 J0 
149 JO 


May 13560 13610 
jul 140J0 14180 
AUO 14X20 144J0 
SB* 14630 14630 
Oa 147 JO MATO 
Dec I SI 80 151 JO 
Jan 15X50 15X50 
MOT 18700 15700 


12890 139 JO —1J0 


13190 13650 
13998 14X10 —190 
14220 14290 — 1J0 
14400 14470 —100 
14630 14680 —MO 
18050 15100 —100 
152X0 15220 —JO 
18600 157X0 —MO 


L lv r' J ^- l| i' l, L j A^%W 

28J0 

2700 

38X7 

+X1 


22X0 


R-T-a 

2775 

96X3 

3773 

+J1 

30J0 

2270 

JUI 

2641 

26X0 

24fl0 

26X8 

+X2 





9605 


2*05 


2175 

22J0 

son 

35.15 

25X0 

25.15 

25J7 

+X2 


2270 

Oct 

KM 

9405 

24X5 

SUB 

+as 


22.90 

D*C 

2400 

24X0 

2400 

24X0 

+J2 


23X0 


23.90 

94X0 

2370 

2170 

+73 

EASdlei Prev. Sales 11701 

Prev. Day Open Int. 45092 off 11 J 


OATS (CRT) 

AM bu minimum- dollon per bushel 
1*4* IRS* Mar 174* 1R7 

w 197* May 1R1 IR1* 

171* 193 Jul 194* UA* 

g. I JO MO* 192* 

102* 1J4 Dec 1J4 194 

Es>. Sales _ Prev. Setae 279 

Pnev. Day Oeen Inf. 1440 off M 


176* 1.74* —00* 
199* 170* — 1« 
195 1J5 —J1 

191* Ml* -00* 
194 194 —01* 


Livestock 


— CATTLE (CME) 


6900 

63X0 


64X0 





6500 

Jun 

6675 

6677 


46J7 


6LIS 


6375 

*5X0 




41X0 

oa 

*405 




4705 

63X0 

Dec 

6577 

6575 


6107 


6535 

F*0 

65J0 

6150 

65X3 


_*7J7 66.10 Apr 

Kit Sales UX12 Prev.Satas 9092 

6600 


PEEPER CATTLE tCME) 

44J00R»r cems Per la. 

7475 6X75 Mar 47.90 4700 

7430 4790 Apr 49 JO 4970 

55 44.95 MOV 4975 4900 

7330 4490 AIM 71J7 7197 

7M0 47X0 S*P 7190 7190 

7232 47.10 OC1 7X90 7X90 

7090 New 7190 7190 

Etf. Sales L4S7 Prev. Sales 1087 ■ 
Prev. Day Open int. 1X734 ua5 
HOGS (CME) 

30000 IDA. cents per 1b. 

S40S 

5X90 
9677 
5407 
SIRS 
5005 
49 JO 
4703 
4700 


47.10 6702 

49X5 *9X7 

49J0 4990 

71.10 7100 

71XO 7100 
70J5 7090 
7198 71-SO 


— R0 


Art 

4777 

47X2 

4700 

47.15 

—77 

Jun 

53X2 

S2J7 

52.10 

53X3 

—.13 

Jul 

5370 

5X90 

5X45 

53X2 

—.08 

AUO 

5302 

5115 

57 07 

5342 

—75 

oa 

48X2 

48X5 

48X5 

4860 

+JS 

□ec 

4807 

4900 

48X5 

4802 

+07 

F«D 

4850 

4150 

48X0 

4U0 

+-Q5 

Aar 45.95 45.95 
Jun 

Prev. Satei 1I.12S 

4505 

45-95 
47 JO 

+.15 


MOV 7300 7418 


POS 1 “ELLIES (CME) 

3BX00K>s^ cents perns. 

JIM «.» MW 7140 7610 

£00 41.18 

££ 4115 

SJS 

7X90 

_ 70.90 7X90 Jul 

EH. Sales 6849 Prev. Seles 6904 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 1X156 up 1X45 


— 7400 7405 

4020 AM 7107 723S 

4600 « « 

7X40 May 


7230 7605 
7X2S 7X95 
7X45 TWO 
7U5 ?1 M 
7X00 7105 
70.43 
4900 
*9 JO 


+45 
—.10 
—00 
—01 
— 02 
+00 
— 1.10 
— 1.10 


Food 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE) 

37J00lbv- cents per lb. 

15370 11150 Mar U1J0 14JQ 

12201 Mav 14280 14309 
12100 Jul 1048 1075 
12700 Sep 141 00 14X50 
12705 Dec 1010 14105 
128S0 Mar 13X7! 13900 
131X0 Mav 
13580 Jul 

Prev .Sales 1059 


15200 
14900 
147 JO 
t«05 
141X0 
13900 
13680 

E sl sates . „ 

Prev. Day Open inf. 12653 up 20 
JUeARWORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 
112800 Ibx. amis oer ix 

ixso 

975 

9.75 
90S 

7.75 
903 
7.18 
499 


U1J0 1 4280 
TORS 14193 
14290 14397 
14100 14294 
14X10 141.10 
138JI 139.91 
139S 
137 JO 


+U7 

+14# 

+1R7 

+1J4 

+173 

+105 

+US 

+1.17 


Mar 

4,15 

A17 

449 

4.14 

—05 

Jul 

4X6 

4X7 

4JS 

4X2 

—47 

Sea 

676 

476 

4X5 

4X5 

—.12 

Oct 

403 

A93 

477 

481 

—.16 

Jan 

sxs 

SXS 

5X5 

5J3 

—.19 

Mar 

503 

893 

874 

STS 

-74 

MOV 

ATO 

814 

60S 

641 

—71 

JUI „ , 4X1 471 

Prev, Sales 9714 

6X1 

677 

—73 


COCOAfNYCSCS} 

TO metric hxts-s permo 
3530 WB Mar 3H5 2020 


2570 

2400 

2415 


1998 

!!* Jm 


2145 


7030 3059 

3025 2045 
2015 302S 

1970 1974 

1956 Mat 1970 197* 


2005 2020 

Mil 2054 


1987 Sea 
IWi Dec 


2015 

soiol 

1954 


1940 19*0 


+35 

+41 

+31 

+28 

+26 

+22 


18800 15100 

18405 15500 

182X0 15735 

181X0 157X0 

100X0 156X0 

177 JO 15630 
16280 14X00 


MOV 147X0 14X20 
JUI 16000 16900 
Sep MBJ0 14880 
Nov 16490 144RS 
Jan 16123 16808 
Mar 
Mav 
Jul 

EeL Sales 200 Prev.Satas 333 

Prev. Day Oven Inf. 6410 un43 


16405 16408 
167X0 16705 
14803 14150 
14800 14008 
14600 16805 
16500 14110 
16500 
16530 
14500 


+JS 

—as 


— X5 
+X5 
+15 
+.15 


Metal* 


COPPER (COMEX1 
25X00 cents per lb. 


9370 

62X0 

5150 

&25 

Mar 

Apr 

6000 

60.10 

59X5 

59X5 

5975 

—75 

—35 

92J0 

5670 

Mav 

60X0 

6100 

60.15 

6025 

— 25 

882S 

5740 

Jul 

61X0 


60X0 

6070 

-40 

82.10 

8475 

8420 

57 JO 

59X0 

Sea 

Doc 

Jan 

6170 

6335 

6173 

6275 

41X0 

6170 

610S 

6170 

6100 

— XJ 
=•? 

8040 

69X0 

Mar 

6300 

6200 


6270 

—JO 

7440 

61.10 

May 

6375 


6305 

6200 

— X5 

74X0 

6170 

Jul 

6309 

6305 

ii cn 

63X5 

— XO 

7890 6270 Sep 643S 4425 

mro 4400 Dec 

*570 ffrV Jan 

EH. Sales 9000 Prev.aatos 807* 

6425 

6400 

6485 

65.15 

— XO 
— xo 
-xo 


Prev. Day Open Int. 8190a off 581 


SILVER (COMBO 
5X00 trey q*.- cents per Irey ex. 


16200 
581 X 
15130 
1441 X 
118X0 
123X0 
1215X 
119X0 
10480 
945X 
9400 
7680 


Mar 5785 57X5 
Apr 

May 8760 S78J 
Jul 3860 8880 
Sep 8960 89VJ 
Dec 4165 4165 
Jan 6110 6180 
Mar 6120 6XZ0 


5660 87X7 
5740 


571J 57*0 
581 X 5B7J 


59X0 5IIX 
4090 4160 


618X 4200 

mu tent 


6S7X 659X 


ia jui 

3 sip 

A Dec 
Jan 

Est. Sales 11000 Prev.Satae 2U22 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 72090 up 435 
PLATINUM (NYMR) 

50 frav azr dollars per trave* 

28200 25X00 Mar 24900 24900 

447J0 244J0 Apr 25100 2S1J0 

253X0 25000 May 25100 151 JO 

44900 349 JO Jul 23600 25600 

39300 25600 Oct 24IJ0 24100 

37X50 , 241 JO Jan 24X50 26170 

Est. Sales 965 Prev.Satas 1741 
Prev. Day Open Int. 14012 off 81 
PALLADIUM (NYME7 

100 tray ez> dollars per az 
16X50 10300 Mar 10800 M80O 

159 JO 10650 JUh 11100 1HJD 

149X0 10650 SOP 11000 11000 

141 JO 10475 Dec 11000 110X0 

127 JO 10875 Mar 11X00 11800 

E«. Sales 430 Prev. Sales 370 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 6473 0(177 
GOLD (COM EX) 

100 trov ox* dollars per fray az. 

31100 28U0 Mar 209X0 28990 

51450 mu Apt 29100 27190 

292X0 291X0 MOV 

510X0 287X0 Jun 29120 2MJ0 

485X0 271X0 AUO 30X50 30X30 

49X00 297X0 Oct 30620 MSRO 

419 JO 401-50 Dec 311X0 311X0 

4B650 306X0 Feb 31620 31620 

31470 APT 321-50 321.90 
320-55 Jun 32700 32700 

331X0 AUO 

39570 33600 Oct 

347 JO 342X0 Dec 34600 34600 

Grt. Sales 26000 PiWV.SataS 48701 
Prev. Dav Open irn.1 45071 up 19 


4570 4870 
66S0 6TO0 


— XIJ 
—20 
—00 
— TX 
—10 
—10 
—10 


48X8 

497J 


— 20 
-00 
-20 


24900 249 JO 
349JD Z5Q90 
251X0 25190 


■100 241.10 
36000 24XW 


— 1J0 
— 1J0 
— 1J0 
— 1JO 
— 1J0 
— 1J0 


10800 W7JD 
109 JO 10970 
10975 TOB0S 
108R5 10895 
10908 10705 


—IRS 

—IRS 

—108 

—105 

—105 


31900 2B9U 
28900 29100 
„ _ 29X20 
»O0 29590 
299 JO 20X10 
30400 80620 
310X0 31070 
31620 31630 
m SO 321X0 
327 JO 338.10 
33490 
34UW 
34650 347 JO 


—100 

—100 

—100 

—1.90 

—100 

—100 

—100 

—100 

—100 

—100 

—100 

—100 

-100 


Financial 


82-3 

81*13 

80-22 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

Si mutton* pte of MO pet. 

9X21 8709 Mar 9129 9101 

9101 87.14 Jun 9X59 9X40 

+03 8*04 Sep 9X17 9X17 

7000 8677 Dec 8907 8908 

9005 UU Mar 89J4 89 JA 

9027 87X1 Jun 8908 8908 

7X00 ML0Q 5+P 1921 89J] 

B9J3 89X9 Ok *9X8 89X8 

Est. Sales 17099 Prev. Sales 19774 
Prev. Dav Open InL 43071 off XU 
18 YR. TREASURY (C8T1 
Siooxoa prtn- ate &32MS of TOOBct 
S3 TOGS Mar 70-20 78-21 

70-9 Jun 77*14 77-25 

W-TO gP 74* 74G, 

73-18 Mar 

77*22 Jun 

„ , Prev. Sales 13LI42 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 8X448 up 2.145 
US TREASURY BONDS (CUT] 

(8 PCf-SlOOXOO-otS 6 3Ms of 100 pet) 
77-JS 57-77 Mar 48*14 48-22 

77-15 57-70 Jun 47*15 47-23 

N-2 57-W Sep 66*19 66-29 

7+5 57-1 DM M 66-9 

72-00 57-2 Mar 65-15 65-23 

70*16 54-29 Jun 68 659 

70-3 5 +29 Sep 44-21 4+29 

69-24 5+25 Dec 

69*12 56-27 Mar 

69*2 6+3 Jun 

68-26 63-28 See 63-22 6308 

get. Sales _ Prev.SatosUI.14! 
Prev. Day Open IM2260OO Up 364 

GNMA (CBT) 



79-24 

EaLSalt 


78-12 78-17 
77*11 77-19 
74-84 74-31 

74- 11 

75- 26 
75-11 


—7 

—7 


M 48-20 
47-8 47-21 

66-16 64-21 
65-28 664 
65-15 65-23 
45 45-9 

4+21 4+29 
4+19 
44-10 
44*2 
43-22 6MB 


-3 

—3 


5100000 prtn-'ptsli Sndi uf TOOprt 


70-17 

J7-5 

Mar 

69-4 494 

69-1 

69-27 

57-17 

Jun 

*8-12 68-13 


69-4 

59-13 


47-19 67-20 

67-16 

66-13 

SM 

Dae 

67 67-1 

66-30 

60 

47-8 

670 

50-20 

58-25 

65-11 

Mar 

Jun 

Sea 

66-14 66-15 

66-13 


694 

41*11 


—1 

—a 


65*28 

65-13 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 5219 aH 177 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 


SI million* alt of 100 act 
9170 83X3 Mar 

*OJ9 

10X1 

V0J2 

9170 

■570 

Jun 

19 J2 

89 J2 

8979 

9060 

8540 


BUS 

■804 

now 

90.17 

8574 

Dec 

S8J9 

MMt 

B8J4 

8978 

86X4 

Mar 

8879 

8879 

8171 

89X6 

86X3 

Jun 

8845 


■80S 

NX8 

8746 

Sob 

8707 

8707 

8707 

Est. Sates Prev. Sales <77 

Prev. DorOaen Int. 11,171 off 154 


+03 

-<0I 

—07 

—07 

—04 

—JB 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

Si million-woof 100 pet. 

23 15.14 Mar 9X19 9X20 

9008 8209 Jun 8909 89.12 

9X33 8683 Sep 8X57 8BJI 

BJ07 66X0 Dec 8X24 RN 

5*08 BAM MOT 8704 87.97 

89.15 8473 Jun *774 8774 

*6*4 87X8 Sep S7J3 87J4 

9730 Dec 8703 8706 
Es* Srtes Prev.Sales SSJRl 

Prev. Day openlnt.ll 3.151 UP4042 


9X13 9X18 
8X97 8908 

a 47 8854 
12 8820 

S X8 *703 
65 8772 
87 JO 87J1 
8708 >703 


+02 

—XI 


—04 

—04 
—02 
— 02 
—01 


Season season 
Htoh Low 


Opm High Law Ctose Che 


BRITISH POUND (IMM) 
iper pound- 1 pakrt equals 80X001 
LSI 70 1X345 Mar 1X435 10300 10105 10438 

10350 10235 Jun 10820 10420 10505 10540 

1+450 10200 Sep 10000 1X535 1X480 1X510 

10710 10300 Dec 10510 1X510 1X510 1X500 

EsL Sales 12031 Prev.Satas 11024 
Prev. Dav Oaea Ini. 24748 offUXB 


—40 


—55 

-65 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

S per dir- 1 point equals 100001 


4030 

7100 

Mar 

7135 

7171 

Till 

7153 

+12 

7835 

7054 

Jun 

7084 

7136 

7083 

7115 

+14 

7585 

7025 

bOP 

7051 

7112 

7050 


+20 

7346 

7006 

Dec 

7106 

7105 

THIS 

TMl 

+20 

7304 X981 Mr 7030 7030 

E9t. Sotos SX33 Prev.Satas 6494 

7030 

TOO 

+17 


Prev. Day Open int. 12X79 up 740 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

8 per franc- 1 point equals 10.00001 -- 

.11905 09405 Mar 0*410 09410 A9&05 09405 

.11020 X9410 Jun 09570 0*570 09570 09570 

.10430, 09480 Sep 09530 

Est Sales 242 Prev.Satas 4 
Prev. Day Open InL 2727 
GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Spar mark- 1 point equate 800001 
0110 0881 Mar 0914 0947 0933 0934 

0733 0(03 Jun 0941 0976 0940 0943 

0545 0930 Sep 0990 0003 0990 0994 

0SS9 0771 Dec 0024 0031 0024 .--324 
0251 0040 Mar 0070 

Est Soles 22041 Prev.Satas 34044 
Prev. Day Open Int 47X65 up 1048 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Spar Wfl-1 point equalsSOXOOOOl • • 

004495 XQ3794 MV XQ3B30XO3817 003825X03825 
004430 X03B34 Jun 003843 X03*70 J838STX03BW 

004150 X03B70 Sep XOCN05 X0J907 XOdflH X03900 
084350 X039D5 Dec 003950 X08 9S 8 XC 3 9S0 X03958 
Est. Sales 10024 Prev.Satas 10X03 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. )A177upl8 


—73 

—70 

—70 


—27 

—24 

—29 


SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S p er fr anc- 1 paint eaual e 1X00 8 1 
sms 0400 Mar 0445 0452 

0900 0439 Jim 0478 0488 


0340 0531 Dec 0570 0575 

Est Sales 11902 Prev.Satas 34045 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 29.148 up!J44 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130000 Dd-rL-* per 1000 bd. ft. 

12X10 Mor 12400 12X00 


May ixuo 1347U 
Jllf 14040 145X0 
Sep 148J0 15000 
NOV 151X0 I52J0 
Jan 15650 154J0 


13400 
ZUD 14030 
197 JO 14800 
186.10 15000 

18700 157X0 

1MJW 161-00 

Esl-Sotas UH Pw. Sales 2X16 
Prev. Day Open InL 1X66 up 190 

COTTON l(NYCE) 

50X00 fta^ cents per IX 
7905 42X1 Mar 61X0 43X0 

7900 4304 MOV 64X2 64J3 

7905 4185 Jul 44X5 44X5 

77JO A4J5 Ocf 44X5 6473 

71X0 6470 Dec 4408 4+91 

7475 6592 Mar 4400 4400 

7000 46J0 Mav 

70X3 MRS JUI 

EN-Saja 0100 Prev.Satas 2038 
Prev. Dav Open Int 1X117 up 107 
HEATING OIL (NYMS) 

42X00frai- cemsper not 
8273 65X5 APT 7690 73J0 

KX 0 44X0 May 7100 73X0 

7M0 63JD Jun 7200 7115 

7093 4503 Jul TUB 7190 

£-00 035 Auo 7200 72JO 

71X0 7005 3W 

7530 7200 Dec 

Est. Soho Prev.Satas 7X97 

Prev. Day Open InL 18098 off 231 
CRUDE OIL (NYM8D 
ixoo bbi> dollars par bbl. 

31X5 2+47 APT 27X5 2X10 

2628 May 27X5 27X4 
2+20 Jun 2701 2705 

2610 Jul 24X8 27.15 

2405 Aua 27X0 27XO 
24X6 Sep 2675 24X4 
34X5 Ocf 24X0 24X0 
JW 0 Nov 2670 2705 
2390 Dec 2675 2675 
3685 Jon 2675 3475 
3650 F«J 2675 2A7S 
26*2 Mm- 3675 2475 
Jul 

EN.Sotas Prev.Satas 130** 

Prev. Dav Owm Int. 54X80 off 0209 


123.10 127X0 
13200 135X0 
14100 144X0 
14400 149.90 
149X0 131X0 
15370 157 JO 
. U 20 Q 


+050 

+X0 

+00 


—so 

+00 

+100 


4500 6808 
43X7 6408 


4630 
4443 
64X1 
45X8 45XS 


+XS 

+-W 

—07 


6443 —02 


46X0 


7445 75X4 
7245 7X34 


T\M 72.13 
7100 71X0 


+103 

+101 

+X3 


7100 73J0 
7300 


SS 


7305 

74X0 


as 


3008 
29X5 
29 J4 

SS 

27 JO 
2950 
29 JO 
29 JO 
29X4 
29X5 


27X3 200* 
2702 2745 


37.10 2703 
24X0 27J0 


2690 27X0 

2673 26*4 


2403 26*0 
2670 2705 


2475 2475 

2675 2675 


2673 2673 
2675 2675 


a 

+02 

+01 

£3 

+JB 

ts 

+X5 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cents 

183J5 15300 Mar IBAJO 18101 

189,10 15610 Jun 18620 1B10S 

19X70 14000 SN> 187X0 188.10 

19640 17570 DSC 19108 19100 

E«- Satan 71.197 Prev.Satas 81X31 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 46X58 up 539 
VALUE LINE (KCST) 
petals and cants 

20680 161.10 Mar 194XS 19805 

TO4Q in.00 Jun 20200 2B11S 

V.lr’S, S«* 20405 206X3 

21BXD 209 JO DSC 

Ejt.Sqlea Prev.Satas 7017 

Prev- Dov Open im. 8094 Off B1 2 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NY PE) 
points Bid ce nt s 

109X0 B&30 Mar 106S5 105X5 

llOXO 90X0 Jun 104X5 107X5 

iiw®, wiao Dec 11100 11100 

E3f. Sales 14X73 Prev.Satas 18738 
Prev. Day Open Int. 12JBB up 3 


T79J5 179XS 
1B3JS 18275 
1873# 11705 
191X0 19100 


=100 


194JO 197.15 
281 JO TO20D 
2Q5J0 20A40 
210JB 




—73 
— RS 


10615 10405 
10000 10405 
10800 TO8JB 
110X5 11085 


—05 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's. 


Reuters 


DJ. Firtures. 


Close 
954JQ f 
2M1.1Q 
120X4 


Com. Research Bureau. 239 JO 

Moody's : base 1Q0 ; Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - Final 
Reuters : base 1QQ : Sen. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Previous 
948.90 f 
2J30.96 
12C55 
239 JO 


Market Guide 


car: 

CMC: 

IMM! 


NYCSCE! 
NYCE: 
COMEX; 
NY ME: 

KC6T: 

NYFE: 


Oitawo Board of Trade 

Chkasa M erca ntile Exchanoe 
inMmoNMMri Monetary Marker 
Of Oitaaoo Mercantile Exehaipe 

OBrnmodlhr Exchanoe. New York 
New York Mercantile Ex chans* 
Kamos aiy Baart of Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


H Month 
Kxnuw Slock 


□iv. YkL PE 


Ns. T* ” 
MOsHWiLOW 


Ocoe 
QuM.Cn* 


00 


12 11 3084 

784 


2*04 30% RenOkPfZU >73 
194% 8fl& ReoBko^ROe IX __ 
20TO UTOJfsnCOt 02. IX 22 
33* 22ft Revco 
T-M 9W v| Rover 
40Ri 299k Revlon 
34V> 1786 Rohm 
20 mb RexnrfT 
sm sm Reynio 
49)k 44 Reylnpf 
4114 24 RayMH 
30V2 24U RctlVcK 1X1 -40 
3498 1814 RleaeiT 100 9.1 


4x2fc 
X 9> 
45 


33ft I7ft RRaAld 
7ih 5ft RvrOkn 

3492 am RetHhw 

,48ft 35V4 Rebfsn 
24ft 12 Robins 
20V. 12V. RochG 
35 27ft Room 
29ft 23 RockwT 
71ft 48ft RohmH 
SM 27V* Rohrin 
21ft 10ft RolCmn 
21 4ft RoitaES 
13ft 4ft Rollins 
4ft 2ft Roman 

19 12ft Rooer 

34ft 34 Rarer 
14ft 8ft Rowan 
Sft 41ft RPVlD 
50 32ft RtJbrmd 
24 13 RussQP 

20 15ft RusTaa 
28ft 17ft RvanH 
37 38ft RvdBfS 
24ft 12ft Ryland 
ITU Bft Rymara 


X4 J0 TO 
3X0 62 8 1533 
610 IS 2 
100 20 4 298 
9 147 
173 


28 28 

02 92 — ft 

20 19ft 19ft— ft 

2W 23 2m + ft 

13ft 12ft tZft— 1 

1X4 S0 12 1912 35ft 35ft 35ft— ft 

JJ 13 II 12 30 19ft Wft + ft 

— ^ J3ft 13ft— ft 

Oft 81ft lift— ft 
48ft 48% 48ft 
37ft 34ft 3494— ft 
2994 2fft 29ft— ft 
. 19ft »ft 19ft + ft 
18 718 319* 30ft 30ft— 1ft 
• 16 191 4ft «k 4ft 
M2 S3- I «33»»ft»ft+ft 
1X0 *1 20 195 39V* 39ft + ft 

Jfc 35 16 1384 22“ 41ft 2Jft + ft 
200 HJ 3 110 19ft 19ft 19ft- ft 
2X4 70 9 44 33ft 33ft 33ft + ft 

100 27 10 ms 37ft Mft 35ft— ft 
2X0 29 10 2B4 49ft 47ft 68 —1ft 
9 35 52ft 32ft 32ft 

21 20ft 2Bft— ft 
2094 20ft 2014 
lift 10ft 10ft— ft 

2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
14ft 14 1414 

30ft 30 30 

. 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

2X7* 5 X 5 4532 33ft 32ft 33 
X4 1R 18 S 40ft 4 m «Vd— ft 
T7 734 25H 94ft 2A4 
R4 65 > 30 17ft 17 17 

1X0 43 14 803 24ft 33ft 23ft— ft 
100 22 10 158 54ft Sflk Sift 
XO 2X 14 377 B 33ft 35 +lft 
5 to Mft 14ft 14ft— ft 


00* IX 30 
X5e 0 » 
X6 60 17 


49 
3S9 
110 
40 

Xi 19 10 423 
1.12 17 14 734 
JM J1T9 13*2 


224 

1*3 

112 

144 


83 


50ft 35M SCM 200 40 13 
? 2ft 7ft 5L IndS 00b 10 10 
» 19ft 5PST*C 00 30 13 

36 13 SODJne 04 0 29 

75 14 SabriRy 2X0*150 

TOft lift SiedBk 04 IX 14 

10 3ft SfpdSc 41 

2ft ft sfsdswt 

33ft 20ft SafKIns X0 10 24 

3494 2114 Setawy 

35ft 25ft Saga 

ZTU 14 SLloLP 

10ft 9 SPaul 

11 3ft visaiant 

34ft 22U SalitaM 

aft 17ft sDtaG* 

10ft 6ft SJ irons 
10ft 8ft SJuanR 
51 31 Sandrs — 

24ft Uft SAnltRf 1J4 

30ft 3H4 SFaSaP 100 37 10 2071 

34U 23ft SgfWM 1X0 4X IS 1 


19ft Uft SavElP 

Bft 4ft Savin 
12V. 9U. Savin pf UD 120 
23ft 17ft 5CANA 2.14 9R 
41ft 33 SchrPto 1X8 


SM 49ft 50ft + ft 
10ft in* 10ft 
27ft '77% 27ft— ft 
17ft 14ft 17ft + ft 
Uft 17ft 17ft + ft 
17ft 14ft 14ft— ft 
7ft 7 7ft + ft 

1ft 1ft 1ft— ft 
32ft 32M 32ft+ ft 
1XO 67 TI 1834 33ft 33ft 33ft 
52 1R 12 171 30ft 30ft 30ft— ft 
29 30ft 20ft 20ft— ft 
40 10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 
18 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 

710 28ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
340 23ft 23ft 23ft 
148 Oft Mb Bft 

1 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 

446 41ft «ft 40ft— 1 
71 24ft 23ft 24ft + ft 
27ft 26ft 34ft— 16 
30ft 30ft 30ft 


1R2 85 
100 11X 


.14 X 14 
2.10 9X 8 
04* 9X 10 
20 

JA IX 17 
75 12 


1X0 80 


4 30 

1415 
45 

_ 7 458 

63 11 3014 


55 34ft Sddmb 
Uft 7ft SdAtl 
32ft 19ft Scoalnd 
40ft 39ft ScotFct HI 

39ft 25ft ScortP 1.12 20 TO 
16ft lift Scotty* J2 33 IT 
43ft 20ft Scovlll 1J2 37 14 
102 54 Scavflpf 2J0 25 

45 18ft SaaCntn X 14 7 
12ft 9ft S*oCf pf 1X4 127 
13ft 121* SoaC DfB 2.10 13J 
15ft 13 SeaCpfC 21D 13X 
27ft Uft 5*aLdn X8 10 7 
SVi 2U SeaCan 
43ft 30 S*oarm 
71ft 12ft Seaoul 
25ft ISA SealAlr 
32ft 19ft SK1IPW 
45ft 37ft SeartaG 
37ft 2«ft Sears 


18ft Uft 18ft— ft 
Bft 7ft 8ft + 9b 
12ft 12 12ft + ft 
22U 2Zft 22ft 
3Bft 30ft 38ft + ft 


100 3X TO 6*32 39ft 39ft 39ft— ft 
.12 IX 22 418 13 12ft 12ft— Vi 
74 28 12 3514 29ft 27ft 27ft— 2ft 


4016 


534 37ft 3716 37ft— ft 


00 


100 

32 

174 


10316 97 Sen pf 894* 80 


10 10 
14 
10 U 
33 ■ 

0 17 HZ1 
5.1 9 4091 


14ft Uft 
41 40ft 41 + ft 

99 9fft Mft— 2ft 
41ft 39ft 41 + ft 

Tift lift lift + ft 
19ft 15ft 15ft 
I5ft 15ft 15ft 
25ft Sift 25ft + ft 
5ft 5ft 5ft — ft 
42ft 42 42 — ft 

Uft 18 1816+ ft 

25ft 25ft 25ft 
20ft 3m 28ft— ft 
57ft 56ft 34ft— ft 
35 34ft 34ft — ft 
1019b 101ft 101 ft 


31% 19 SecPacs 



1695 

29% 

79 

29 — W 

22 lift SeloLt 



30 

15% 

14% 

Mft— % 

35% 22ft SvcCps 

XO 1.1 

17 

92 

1.1 

34% 

3Sn 


30% 11% Shaklee 

73 44 

34 

134 


15% 

Uft 


l 7M--J1 ■ -M 

X0 2X 

B 

m 

24% 

B3 

24 —to 


240 3X 

10 

im 

1.1 

ril 

59ft 



lYJm 47 

5 

1837 

34 

*Wr 

TOto— % 

30% 17% SbalGfo 

00 20 

7 

293 

28% 

27*6 

27ft- 

ft 

35% 23% Shrwfn 

02 20 

11 

215 

31% 

31% 

.11 to 


8% 4to Shoefwn 


11 

338 

7% 

7» 

7ft 


Uft 12 Stwwbt 

X0 44 

15 

13 

Uft 

14% 

14ft -1 

to 


16ft 12ft StorPoc 1X0 100 7 315 
37 24Vk signal 100 XI 13 1480 


59ft 48ft signlpf 612 7.1 
72 50 SlgnlPf 200 XI 

38ft 21ft Singer .10 0 11 

31ft 24ft Slnorpf Sill HR 


18 lift Skyline 
20ft 9ft SmHtiln 
42ft 50 SmkB 
56 ft 34ft Smuckr 
41ft 28ft SncvOn 
38ft 27 Sana! 
19ft 12ft 5onyCp 
29ft 22ft SooLln 

SM 27ft Source 

21ft 18 
23ft 22 


02 

2X0 

04 

1.14 


XI 35 
27 21 
4J, TO 
IX 14 
10 13 


95 

4 

422 

4 

716 

40 


16 13ft 15ft— ft 
32ft 31ft 32ft + ft 
9 57te 58 — ft 
44ft 43 44ft+lft 
37V. 3fft 37ft— ft 
30 29ft 30 — ft 
15% 13ft 15ft 
12 lift lift— ft 
41ft 41 41ft — ft 
32ft Sift S3 — ft 
.... — - — 39ft 39» 39ft— ft 

105 50 7 1092 34ft 35ft 35ft + ft 

.15* 9 14 4297 17ft 17ft T7ft— ft 

100 47 11 90 25ft 25 25ft— ft 

300 87 33 3716 36ft 36ft— ft 

SrcCPPf 2X0 110 5 20ft 20ft 20ft 

SaJerln 2X8 90 to 31 27ft 27to 27 to— ft 


17 

311 


49ft 39ft Saudwn 100 XI 11 26 47 46ft 47 + ft 

30ft 72 SaetBk 100 43 9 149 28ft 28 Mft + Hi 

lift 5ft SoetPS 1XN21X to 13 7ft 7ft 7ft 

24ft 1716 SCalES 204 9.1 7 2288 22ft 22ft 2Zft + ft 

19 14ft South Co 102 UU & 1744 18ft lift 1 Bft— ft 

36 25ft SoInGE 2X8 70 7 11 34ft 34ft 3416 

3816 27ft SNETi 272 7.1 * 344 38ft 37ft 38% — ft 

24ft 21ft Salty pf 2X0 100 5 24 34 24 + ft 

31 2116 SaUnCo 172 4X17 75 26ft 261* 26ft + ft 

Uft 35 Soutfnd 100 XI 9 3098 32ft 31ft 32ft + ft 

■TO 0 18 2015 14ft 14 14 —ft 

-28 2X 5 285 “ ^ “ 

.13 J 14 296 
19 180 
104 BX 9 93 

5X0 
J2 


18 lift So Roy 
9ft Aft Soumrk 
26 14ft SwAIrl 
22ft lift SwtFor 
15 10ft SwtGas 
75ft 55 SwBell 
27ft 19ft SwEnr 
22 17 SwtPS 

17ft lift Spartan 
27ft 18 Specif 9 
Sift 33ft Sparry 
38 30ft Springs 
43ft 31 W SquarD 
5516 37to Saulbb 
24ft 17ft Sfatav 
32 Uft SKIP of 
21 13 5IMo(r 

43ft SOU S tO Ind 


7ft 7ft 7ft 
24ft 24 24 — ft 

15ft 15to 15ft + Ml 
„ 14ft Mft 14ft + Mi 
77 8 1190 73ft 72ft 73ft + ft 
10 12 94 27ft 24ft 27 + ft 


20ft 20ft 20ft + to 
19% Uft 15ft 

19to 20 —ft 
54 58ft 51ft + ft 


17ft + ft 
to 


9.1 

J2 3X 52 34 

24 1«] 

102 X7 1121303 

1J2 40 9 3 3Sft 35ft 23ft— ft 

104 47 11 302 4Dta 38ft 3*16— ft 

1X0 30 M 336 53ft 52ft 52ft— ft 
X0 4X 14 749 20 19ft 19ft 
04 XT II 294 20% 20% 20ft— ft 
02 27 9 22 14% 14% Mft 

50ft 39ft SWOOh ZW 40 7 MW 45ft 44ft 

^ Sssssr jo »ii 

30% 19ft stanWk 06 XJ II 
35to 23ft SfnrreN 1X0 29 12 
Wto 8% SloMSto 1700122 
27ft 15ft SlmrtCh 1X4 57 
4% 2ft 5taega .12 X6 

- J* 30 11 

76 40 10 7 

l.U 48 12 4130 

100 4X 11 77 

1X8 56 17 30 

OX 100: 

3X * 

22 12 
20 10 
»X M 


20% 14% StarcN 


12% ^9% StrlBCP 


30 23ft Start Da 
22 13% StaVhJ 

36 25ft StwWm 
12 BtoStkVCpflXO 
45% 32ft 5*oneW 1X0 
40 25% StaneC X0 

53ft 32% StapShp 100 
20ft 15ft StarEa 104 
12ft 2 VlSIarT 
40ft 30% Starar 
2ift 20 Slrnwtn 
22ft I4to SfrMRf 
■to 3ft SuavSh 

31% 21ft SunBks 

34 24% SunCh 
14ft 7ft SunEI 
43ft Sunca 
la JB* Simcp* 

4*ft 34ft Sundstr 
15ft 7ft SunMn 
34ft 23to SuprVI 
30ft 19ft SupMJct 
Uft M Swank 

2lft 14ft Svbran 

55% 28ft svbmpf 9X0 
15% 10ft SynisCP 
59% 37ft Syntax 
30ft 25ft Svsca 





XO 7 


00 47 24 


100 


30 11 

ix a 


130 

203 


40 11 
. 20 
100 40 12 
12 

20 11 
« 15 
SX 10 
53 12 
70 

33 

102 34 14 
04 10 14 


115 

2 

76 

24 

147 

573 


43 

00 

1X8 


19ft 1: 

.ft 

30 44% 

413 28% 27 

049 46ft 46ft 

479 191b 19ft 

003 3ft 2ft 

1102 59ft » 

” Uft 16ft 17% — ft 
5ft 5ft 5ft + to 
Uft 301b Sift + ft 
33ft 33 33%+ % 

9ft 9% 91%+ % 

.30ft SOft ,50ft— ft 
1 IBS 104 104 —1ft 
455 44to 43ft 44ft + % 

500 >ft Oft 8%— to 

31ft 31% 31ft— ft 
34ft 35ft 361%— ft 
Mto Uft 16ft— % 
20 % 20 20 ft+ ft 

14ft 34ft 34ft— ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
36ft 55ft 54 - ft 
JSft 35V. 35%— ft 


153 

1 

140 

1 

90 

745 

75 


62 35ft TDK 
319b 24 TECO 
13ft 71k TGIF 
139% lift TNP 
27ft 17 TRE 
Uft 88ft TRW 


270 


X 21 
70 I 
17 

105 u a 

100 44 16 
200 30 11 
10ft 3ft TacBOOt . 

70. 519% ToftSrd 1.12 10 13 
14*6 10ft Tolfty Mm 0 13 , 

19ft IK Talley pf 1X0 50 24 l*(b 19M 19ft— % 

72ft 46ft Taattrd X304X 13 7D 7W* 70 70 - ft 

36H 23% Tandy 13 7098 33W 31 32% +Tft 

139% lift Tnavcfl 12 2 13% 13% 13%+ ft 

68% 51ft Tekfmx 100 17 8 390 60ft 40 40% — ft 


40 

312 

27 

13 

470 

SOI 

91 

105 

93 

24 

TO 


40ft 4716 fito.— 1 

2m 20% 28% — % 

11% IT lift + ft 
IS 14ft U + % 
22ft 22ft 22ft— ft 
80 70ft TO%— 1 
4ft 4% 4% 

40to 59% 59ft— 1ft 


lift ^ 


II Month 
HtabLnw Stack 


SH. 

DtoYM-PE KIM High Lew QucLOY* 


Xto 2ft Teicom 
30216147% TeWyn 
2216 13to Tefroto 
68% 19ft Tktex 
2*to 23ft Tempi n 
44*6 32ft Tannea 
102 87ft Tencnr 1100 110 

79 65 Tancpr 7X0 9J 1 

35% 21% Tordvn .. « 2831 
20ft 9ft Teaora X0 20 33 2136 
34ft 20ft Tewrpf XI4 OX 1W 
45ft 31ft Tamar 3X0 
4211 32% TxABc IJ2 


8 130 4% 4ft ilfe— ft 

10 Ml 20 254 242 +1% 

-32 IX 21 MTS 19% 19ft 19*% + % 

u isb at 44% e —ft 
X4 10 8 SO Bft 35 36 — ft 

X92 70 TO 3745 40% 39ft 29V 
n 98 90. 

TO 70 TO + ft 

23 34ft 24ft— ft 
Uft lift 13% +1% 
25% 24 25%+lft 

8J 34 4943 35ft 35ft »%— to 
40 9 32 24ft 24ft 36ft 


>30 43% 42ft 42% — ft 
915 3U6 311b 31ft + % 
00 55% 35% Sm+ to 
47 30% 30% SOM — ft 
WHO lQSftlMVh-Kft 
89* 2% Zft 2%+ jb 


48% 36% TexCm 1J6 3X 

33ft 2SM TXEsf x 200 70 

M 52 TxETpf X35ellX _ 

35% 23 Taxlnd XDb 2X 17 

U9tol05ft TexImJ 200 10 0 
m r Tax Inf 

271b 161b TenOG* .!« 10 11 44V 1* *W ]» 

39 20% TkPac XO 10 17 M 31 309b 90ft 

28ft 20% TOXUIII X52 9X 6 1259 24ft 24% 24ft 

7ft 2 Turn In 30 3% 3ft 3ft— ft 

43ft 23ft Textron 100 47 13 1582 41ft 41% 41ft— ft 

48 28% T*xtrpf XH 4X J « « 4S%— to 

9ft SVk Tbock 108 9 8% 9 + ft 

27 23% Thacfcpf 4.15 UJ 2 Mb 24ft 24ft + Vi 

24 Uft nwrmE 25 107 

43% 28% TftmBts 104 32 IS M0 

18ft 12ft mamln XTO 37 10 72 

24to Uft TlunMed X0 X4 8 79 


24 15 

00 50 


22ft lift Thrifty 

20ft T7% Tkfwtr 
9ft 4ft Ttoerln 
9ft 8 TVorl of 
52ft 33ft Time 
23% n Timpix 
51 32% TftneM 

59to 47% Ttadwn 
39to 28% TddShp 
31% 22% Tokhm __ 

10ft 13ft TolEffls 2J2 134 


100 20 15 1310 
18 350 
104 XO 15 tot* 
100a 3X 13 220 
IJ2 IS 7 
72 2X 11 


X4 6.1 


7795 24ft ToiEdRf 302 144 
27% 22 TBlEd Pf 375 14S 
25% 20 TolEd pf 3X7 MJ 
31% 23to TolEd pf 408 14.1 
171b 13% TolEd pf X36 14,1 
17% 13to TolEd Pf 271 140 
Mto 24% Tonka XO 7 25 
38to 17 TppfRgl X8b U U 
44ft 19to Trchm* 100 2X 13 

109ft 92ft Trrtipf lixteiu 

17ft 9ft ToroCo X0 27 11 

4*6 1 Tom 

22 10% Tawta 

15% 6 Tpwtopf 
35% 23 Toy RUB 
ssft im Tracer 
13*6 7ft TWA 

Mft lift TWApI 

25 14to TWA PfB 205 9X 
30% 20ft Tramun 1X4 50 11 
20 14% Tmlnc 202 11J 

12ft 10% TARHv 100* 80 B 
35to 37*6 Tranai X16 40 10 
42 44% Trracpf 307 44 

25% 19» TrrniEx 200 97 
13to 6to Hanoi 6 

92% 77 TrGPpi 844 9X 
24% 20 TrGPpf 
T2to 6to TratOh 
34% 28 Tranwy 


74 


205 14X 


24ft 24ft 24ft 
39 381* am— ft 

10ft 17to Uft + % 
17% 14*6 Mft— to 
21ft 211b 21ft + to 

m ii n 

into 9ft 9ft + ft 
10ft 9to TO + ft 
4917 40ft 49% + ft 
19to 1ff% 18%— to 
49ft 48% 49%— % 
JOto 49ft 49ft— to 

34 38 37ft 37ft— to 

26 30 29% 29ft— ft 

1182 10ft Uto 18% 

58 26 25% 2»+ to 

If 261b 25*6 25ft— % 
10 Mb 24 24 — to 

4 30% 30 30% + ft 

27 17 16% 16% + to 

15 15ft 15ft 15% 

35 59 57% 50 —1 

173 40ft 37to «% +3% 
106 41% 41 41 — ft 

40 10S%TO5% 10S%— % 
BM 17to Mft T7Vb 
302 1% 1ft 1%+ to 
27 TO Hft lift— to 
3 7% .to 7%— ft 
24 3363 30ft 3Gto 30%+ % 
10 U 457 34ft 33ft 34ft 
75 4755 1291 12ft 12ft 


279 

134 

562 

31 

62 


14 Uft 13%— Vb 
24 23ft 24 + ft 
20ft 28ft 2m— to 
19ft 19ft 19ft— ft 
12% 12to 12% 


215 S3V5 53% 53 to— to 

10 61% 61% 61% 

UP 24 23to 23% — ft 

M lift llto Tito 

HkE 92 92 92 — % 


20ft 9ft TwUwtA 
31to 2Zto Twfdpf 

17% 14% TwMpf 

45% 2Sto Troviar 

24ft 19% TrlCOn 
6ft 5 TrlSoln 
22ft 12ft Trlolnd 
31% 20% Trio Pc 
41% 24 Tribune 
Aft 4 Trtcnfr 
9% 5ft Trlco 
22 13% Trtatv 

20 11% TrUEng 

12ft Oft TritE pf 1 JO BJ 
38% 29% TucsEP 3X0 83 


2X0 10X 

1 

TOto TOto 

13 

154 

nib a 

100 5.1 10 

144 

35 34ft 

M 1.1 Tl 

1777 

255 

30ft 35% 

18% Uft 

240 43 

16 

31% 31to 


14 

17% 17% 



42% 42 

3X3*143 

242 

24*6 34to 

6 

1 

5ft 5ft 


12 — to 


42to 


2 

122 


20 44 
100 37 9 
04 11 M 440 
■55*137 8 45 

.14 25 17 8 

JO SX 74 
.10b J 34 1394 
' 401 

9 411 


15 10% TulIJM J2 30 11 

20ft 16 TWtaDk 00 45 10 
41 26ft TycoLb XO 20 9 
35» 23%. Trier 75 23 9 


... 5ft 

18 10 10 —to 

am* sm 3o%+ % 

39ft 38ft 39ft +1% 
4to 4to 4to— to 
<to 4to 4U 
14% Mft 1416+ to 
201b 20 20% + ft 

13 Uft 12ft + ft 
36ft 35ft 34ft + % 
131b 13ft 13to + to 
17% T7to T7ft 
36ft 36 36to— to 

331b 33M 33% — ft 


U 


49ft 28 UAL 
34% 24ft UAL pf 
15ft 7ft UCCEL 
23ft 16ft UGI 
24 19to UGI pf 


7SB 1X 7 1343 47% 46ft 46% + I* 
2X0 77 115 33% 32% 33 

20 132 M% Mft Mft— to 

2X4 BX 11 154 23% 22ft 23%— ft 

275 1 IX 70S* Mft 23% 24to +lft 

llto 3 UNCRaa 169 to » 9 — ft 

M 10 URS XDb 30 18 17 n% 12ft 12ft— ft 

31% 17ft USFGs 2X8 6X392 3*85 31 to 30ft 31%+ ft 
71% 45 USG 3J6 4.9 7 *19 TOft 69% 69%— Ito 

35ft 22to USG wf 4 35ft 35 35 

10ft 13ft Uni Fret 00 1.1 IS 35 19 18ft 19 + % 

W4 75 UnMV 3XS* 40 9 90 09% 89 89to— ft 

41% 30ft UCaniPSlX4 44 10 1743 36 to 35% + % 

59% 32*6 UnCarb 3X0 07 8 2439 39 


7% 4ft tmlanC 
Mft 12 UnEtaC 172 100 
2916 21 UnElpf SJS 130 
34 27ft UnEIPt 4J6 13X 
30ft 241b UnElpfJSMXO T3X 
Alto 4m UEI PfL 000 130 
2Ab lift UnElpf 108 13 0 
17to 13to UnEJ pf XI3 1X8 
23ft 19ft UnElpf X72 117 
61 45 UnElpf 7X4 133 

61ft 49 UElPfH 000 130 


262 


6 BM 


4 Sto 6 + lb 

_ 16 15% 14 + to 

AM 27 27 27 — % 

lOOr 34 34 34 

5 29ft 29% 2916 + % 

200x fflto 60to 40to— % 

25 23ft 22ft 21 + % 

U 14% Mft 14ft— to 

10 23% 23% 2316 

Ito 5* 54 54 — ft 

1501 *0to 40% 4QVb 


sm 34% UnPac 100 30 12 1482x 48ft 48 48 — % 


J6 
1 J6 


45 ■ 


.12 J 


00 

04 

100 


10 ID 
30 12 


130 


111% 02 UnPcpf 72S 47 
lAto 9ft Unlroyt .10 10 
TO S3to Unryipf 0X0 110 
Aft 3% UnttDr 
2D% 10% Unfimd 
17% Oft UBrd pf 
3BV> 20ft UCbiTV .14 X 
31ft 22to UnEnrp 2X0 00 
2Zto 9 UUIum 200 H0 
28% 19 UlllUPf 307 15.1 
28% 20% UlllUPf 4X0 15.1 
Mto 10 UlllUPf 100 146 
22ft Mto Unltlnd 
37% 2Sto UJorBk 
Mto 9% UtdMM 
3to 2» UPkMi 
3m 22 UaairG 
10% Sto USHam 
42to 28% USLM8 
34% 23 USShae 
31 22 U5Sta*< . ... 

58to 49% USStlPf 404* 9J 
14998115% USSti pr 1275 90 
30 22ft USSflpf 205 03 SB 
39ft 31% USTob 172 40 13 249 
75' -J5% USWMi. 572-7J'X 2399 
13 5% usrcfcn J - -r. W. 

45 291% UnTdlt tM 

39% 28% UTdi pf 255 
241k 17% UoTTnl 102 BX 9 
17ft 12 UWR8 
33ft a Unltnl* 

22% Mft Unlvor 
27ft 18ft UnfvFd 
22ft 15% UnLoof 
SO .1® Unocal 
77 8 UPlahn 

39ft 231b U5L1FE 104 
37 25 USLFpf 205 . 

9ft 0% UsIftFd 1040100 
gft 20% UtaPL 203 1DJ 
K 21% UtPLpf 2X0 11X 
Mb 21% UtPLpf 200 110 
Wk 15ft UtPLpf 204 113 


4i HEftnetoiam— % 


10 

676 

15ft 

15ft 

15% 



121b 

47V. 

67 

67 — ft 

63 

70 

4% 

Xft 

4%— ft 

16 

313 

in* 

mb 

12*6— ft 



13% 

13 

«% + % 

71 

550 

40 

TOto 

39ft +1to 

24 

800 

31ft 

soft 

31 — to 

3 

109 

17 

16ft 

16% — ■ % 


18 

36% 

» 

26ft- 

ft 


5 

36% 

Mto 

TOft— % 


29 

13 

12ft 

13 


13 

149 

22 

11% 

21% 


8 

177 

35% 

34ft 

34%— ft 

a 

85 

14% 

uv. 

Mft— % 

1 

5 

7% 

3ft 

2%- 

ft 

7 

2294 

34ft 

34% 

34ft— ft 


1817 

7ft 

Oft 

7 — to 


2D 41to 41% 41% — to 


54 


... 2*ft 20% 29 — % 

37 TO 9484 27% 2Aft 25ft— % 
150 52% 52% 52% + to 
343 131% 12* 129 — B» 
27ft 37 27ft — lb 
30% 30 38% + 1% 

74 73to 73ft— % 
rm iii% n%— % 

£*£*£*7% 

S* m 55 w% Sm— m 

43 24% 36 36% 

30 39% 3» »6-to 
131 33ft 33ft 33to— ft 
TOO 9ft 9% m 
1355 22 21% 22 

9 24% 241% 34%— to 
27 25 - 24% 34%—% 
5 18 10 TO —to 


Ti sr 
30 .9 2938 

“ & 
100 70 10 - 

00 J 18 
X8b37 13 
104 40 17 
100 4J r 
100 XI 1 
256 33 V 
27 11 
67 


02 26 7 


76 

XO 

XO 


J 
30 17 
17 15 


33% 21ft VFCorp 1.12 X5 
15ft flkVoln 
23ft 14 Voter pf 3X4 140 
5Vb 2% Vatavln 
28% 15% VenOr * 

Aft 2% varco 
19ft 5ft Varaopf 
46to 30% Vartan 
13ft 9to Vora 
25ft 17% veeco 
,6ft 3% Vendo 
10% 8% vests* 

43ft 251% Vtacocn __ 

44 54 VaEP pf 772 12X 

40% VaEP Pf 8X4 1X5 
77Vb 67ft VaEPpf 0X0 11X 

79 47% VaEI pf 040 107 

83% 4m VaEP Pf 975 1X4 

64to S2to VOE pf J 772 1X5 
61ft 49Vh VOEP pf 700 123 

24ft Mft VtaflOY 1051 70 M 

41% 25% varnad 15 

TO SB VUfcnM 2X0 3X 11 


444 

435 


30 
90 
49 
1 

12 Z109 

“ 140 


1000117 
X2 L0 TO 


3&> 311b 32ft— % 
TO% 10 V* 18%— to 
211b 21% 21to— % 
216 2ft 2ft— to 
24% 25to 25to— % 
3 3 3 

7ft 7ft 7ft + % 
35 , 33ft 33ft— IV* 
12% 12 12% + % 
24% 23to 23% — ft 
4to 41% 4% 

10% 10% ltf%— to 
42*6 41ft 41ft— 1 
TOX 42% 6ZVh datb 
3401 72 71 71 

1 74 74 74 +1% 

SOOQz 80ft M 80*6 +6*6 
14Qz 79 TOft TO to— to 
nifl 61, 42 —1% 

sox sm Mb sm 

40 2<R6 2416 24ft + to 
75 40% 40 40% + % 

37 77to 77to 77%— to 


267 

7 

41 

912 


W 


3* 21 YfICOR 230 BX 7 

49 34to WabR pf 4JD 9 J 
35% SOft Wochve 02 20 TO 
25% lift Wbckhr XO 30 
10% 4% Wtanoc 


18 77V* 26* 26% — % 
TOO* 44 44 44 + Vb 

354 32 31% 31ft + % 

22 20 20 20 + 16 

790 10ft 10% TOto + % 


47ft 31 WalMrt 01 J 24 2404 4M 44% 44%— ft 


17 Month 
Mettle* ouch 


DM. Yld PE 


SB. 

HOI Won LOW 


On 

Quri-Oiw 


M 

sm 23ft WDtCSv 




05 10 17 47 36% 3S% 25% - ft 

V 22 Walt)* 1X0 40 7 30U 34 32ft 33 — 1U 

9% 7ft WaftJ pf 100 10X 2001 1% 0% 9ft + to 

40ft 29ft WWilPf 1X0 30 . 3 45% 45ft ft 

am 17% wwnoo jo 40 n n m m am- 5 

25% 17 wrnCm W1 »k» 3i%— u 

30% 28% Wornru 1X0 40 12 U43 37W 37 Sto— £ 

19% 14ft WObhGff 1J4 80 • 0ai9toUftl9to + Vb 

20% Ifft WNlNOI LOB 40 ■ — — 

2X8 1X6 ■ 

X0 IX 17 

06 IX 11 

00 20 TO 


am 14 Wihwt 

52ft 27% wosta. 
20ft 19ft WotkJa 
UVr OftWWfGOb 
I2to 4 weonu 
33% I2to WebbO 
31 39ft VfOtaMk 
54ft 30* WaON= 
31% 22ft WeiFM 
23 Uft WMIOVS 
17ft 9ft Wentfywl 
26% 14% W*ktCe 


134 

274 


27% 27 27% 

sm sm sm— 11 

156 24ft 29ft 25%- ft 
21 TOto TO TO -ia 
194 lift 11 lift- ft 
TO 2Hb TOto 20to_ ft 

3 g3*Sft?S 

10 TO 1788 »b 21% 3%-to 
X4 20 12 l3 SftSffi^S 


L0 13 
2 "6 



MB 100 11 


6t% 

1ft 

18% 

19ft 

lift 


lOQz 48 
30. 29 
W 11 
690 5% 
43 1% 

10 M 
TO 19 
619 Sto 


43 34 WPanPpfUO IU 

44to 34% WSfPIP 200 56 

lift 9ft WffCiTO 1X4 
2% WnAJrL 
ft WtAirwt 
8% W Air of 2X0 110 
■ft WAIT Of XM 110 
. ._ 4 WCNA 
115% IS WPBCi 
29 5% WUidcn 

441b 24ft WnUnpf 

49 24 WRUpfC 

9% 2% WMJpfS 

r m wnupfE 

StoWUTIpfA __ 

32 fk 19*6 WatgE * 100 as 10 5273 31% 30% 30ft— to 

XI 31ft vnatvc 102 30 0 JBx am sm 38% + to 

34 25 WkVefh- 100 4X- 19 1528 29% 29% 2>%— % 

44% 34% Weyrpf 200 70 32 JOto 39% 39%- to 

51% 43% Weyrpr 4J0 9.1 22 49% 49to xfto 

33ft 12ft WlyHPtt STO 12% tak 13% — ft 

Xlto X WPttpfB 478Z 31 Vb 30% 3m— lli 

38 22V. wnp»pr 1920x 22 20% 20% —7 

Xfto 36to WMrtpl 200 XJ 9 1W 441b 46 46 — to 

-- LS0 50 273 30to 29*6 29ft- to 

« ,,3 4! 27V, 26to S5- ft 
00 24 TO 374 
ax 8 
TO OS 


s% 5%— kb 

rn 1%+a 

17ft I7ft— to 
U% 19"+ R 

7 wJI iwftnmiilft- % 

2331 Bft I l%— to 

1 29 39 9* —i 

oh 

t &zl 



ith 


i- * 








34ft 24Vh WhKC 
32 17% WhMlM 

25ft Mto Whiffok 
12% 4% WtabMf 

lXft 0 Wttfidn - 
31ft 22*6 WUDoni 1X0 80 
4% 2 WtmEI 
9ft 61b WlbhrO .10 IX 10 

75 25*6 WlnOIx 1X8 SM 12 

20ft 7ft Wtantag .10* J 18 

13% 51b Winner TO 

8 3ft WtaterJ 
33% 25% WbcEP 208 70 7 

vm sm wtaEpf 775 110 
31 25% WtacPL 2XX 80 8 

33% 24% WbcPS 2J4 IS 7 
40 Vb 27% Wltn 
17% 9to wwvrw 

27 18% WoodPf 

4 3ft 29ft Wotwlti 
s% 2% WridAr 
61 45 wrialy 

6% 3% Wurtfzr 

18 Vb 10*. WyteLb 
21% 16*6 Wyrma 


271 

3*4 

48 

111 

251 

IM 

3 


25tt 34ft 23 — % 

7% 7 7ft + to 

« 8 S 88 + * 
2S 2S 

183 31ft 31% 31ft 
50* 49% 69% 69%—*% 
142 30% 2fft 30%+to 
57 30ft 30% 30%-% 
TO 39% 38% 39% + to 
— _ - 289 10% m 10 — % 

JO 30 15 2357 23% 22% 22ft— ft 
100 40 10 ZM « JWRJJ + to 
ft “'1 ill 3tok 

100a XI TO 86 51 57to 57%— ft 
69 3% 3ft 3ft + % 

02 20 IT 173 14% 13ft 14% + % 
XO 20 I 50 21% 21% 211b + 16 


- je grant 

•K kit jlK l W l 


.1 


iiJ-4: 




1X0 30 9 
04 24 M 


= «4» 


'•W <xm 


46% 33% XaraM 3X0 63 18 2843 45% 44% 44%— % 

51% 45% Xerox pi 5X5 110 S «% 49V, 41%+ to 

39 19 XTRA X4 24 9 52 24% 26% 24%— S 




30 24 ZoieCp 

24ft -14% Znpata 
58 30 Zavre 

31% im ZanHtiE 
21ft MM Zero) 
31% 21% Zurnln 


40 9 
50 17 
1 7 M 


19 

102 4X 11 


26 29% 29% 29%— to 
741 Mft Mto Mto- ft 
367 55% 54% 55% + to 
555 22% 21ft 22 —to 
29 21% 20ft 21 
97 30 29% 3D + % 


- -t* *9* 1 


.ft m 


Sale* Havre* are unofficial- Yearly high* and knre refitet ■ 
th* Previous 52 weeks P<uk the CUtrenl week, but not ItMlataN .. 
trading day. Where a Birt or stock drvktandamouating la 25 .. 
percent or more has been pold. the veorishfghJawiTnBe and ■ 
dividend are shown tor me new stock only. Untatc otfMKwtw .1'. 
noted, rule* of dividends are annual dliburaements bated an. ’ 
me lateef declBralicn. 
e —dividend aha *Mfra(s]7l 

b — annual rata of divUond plus stock dWMendJl ■,£ 

c — liquidating dlvktaixL/1 1. ■ 

dd — colledTl 
d— now veartYlowRl 

e— dividend declared or paid In precedfns 12 maothx/l 7 


--•»! a taa 






a — dividend In Canadian Hindi, sublect to 1 S% non+eNoma . 


tax- 


I— dividend declared after spilt-up or stack dividend, 

I —dividend paid inis year, omitted, deterred, or no odk» . 
taken at latest dividend meeting. , ’■ 

k— dividend declared or paid this year, an accumukdtvi ^ 
Issue with dividends In arrears. ’ ' 

n— new Issue In the pastSO weeks. The hlgti-lawronge begins sS 
with the start of trading. 

nd — next dav delivery. . x>’ 

P/E — price^arnlngs ratio. 

r— dividend declared or paid la preceding 12 months, pka . 
stock dividend. 

s — stock ram. Dividend beolns with data et lpilt. 
sis — sales. 

1— dividend paid instock In arecedlna 12 months, esttmaMd 
cash value on ex-dividend or ex-<flstrlbutian dafx 4;". 

u — new yearly hlglL 

v— trading halted. -u- 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganbed uo- !i 
dgr the Bankruptcy Act.erseairifies assumed bvsach cope 
conies. - - 

wd — when distributed, 
wi — when issued, 
ww— with warrants. 

-ex-dividend or ax-rlotlts. 
sdKk— ex-dbtrltwttan. . 
sw — without warrants, 
y — ex -dividend and sales in full, 
v TO ■+ yield. : 

1— sates In full. 


'l«NTOtf f 


f:. 



NEW LOWS 


- 


Far WesfFn Lafarge 


WheeiPfl 5ft WMiPttW 


j AMEX Higfas-Lowa 


Asian Commodities 

March 7 


HONG+CONG GOLD FUTURES 
UJX per ounce «, . 

Mtatl Low BW°*Alk BM V> aS( 

g- ff. Knsasssn 

MOV . N.T. N.T. 9300 2KM 290.00 29200 
Jun _ 29600 29600 9500 29700 29200 29400 
AUB_ N.T. R.T. 301 00 30X08 2960Q 29B0O 
Oct — N-T. N.T. 30500 30700 arunSSoo 
Dec - N.T. N.T. 31100 31300 30700 30900 
F*b — 31800 31U0 31600 31800 31300 3U0D 
volume: 24 lots of TOO oz. 

SINGAPORE GO US FUTURES 
UJJper ounce 


Prev. 

High Low settle Settle 
Mor — — N.T. N.T. 20900 285.9(1 

API 292X0 9100 91X0 mm 

Jim N.T. N.T. 2*500 291X0 

Votume: <19 lets of 100 oz. 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Motmkm cants per MTO 
ohi 

BM Ask 

MOT 19000 19075 

API 19100 19150 

Mav 19775 198J0 

Jun- 1 97 JO 199 J0 

volume: 36 lota. 


Previous 
■Bid . Ask 
1150O 18600 

19050 19133 
19533 17640 

19700 19800 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kBa 

Close Previous 

BM Aik Bid Ask 

RSS 1 MOI-_ 1&40O T64J0 161 JO 16200 

RSS 1 Api _ 16973 170J5 168JD 16873 

R5S2 Mar- 16200 16340 16075 16175 

R5S 3 Mar- 16000 16100 15875 15975 

RSS 4 Mar- 15450 15450 13300 15500 

RSS 5 Mar- 14900 15100 14775 14975 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian ringgits per 25 tans 

ant 


Mar 
ipl - 


Aug — 

5e» 

Nov 

Jan . . . ._ 

volume : 0 lets of 25 ton*. 
Source: Reuters 


1760 
1750 
1725 
1705 
1.185 
1,173 
U65 
1.1 55 
1.12 


T7U 

1785 

1773 

1755 

1735 

1723 

1715 

1705 

1705 


Prev lous 
BM 


17TO 

1710 

1700 

1.180 

1.160 

1.150 

1.140 

1.130 

1.130 


1770 

17U 

1750 

1730 

1710 

IJM 

1390 

1.180 

I.1B0 


SAP 100 Index Options 

March 7 


SMn CaftvLoH 
Prt» Mar AN May JOBgj 
2) — ■ 2| — 
um a im - 
Mft mi lift u 
iv, raw a me 
He M 6to U 

ft Hi £ 716 

in* n» 2% m 
in* 11/I6 ift 7% 
11/16 1% 


NS - 


-Jtatuxa 


1/16 7/16 % 
ft » 2 
£6 4 ito 

1% 1% 8% 

- in* in* 


TMIOHoebUH 25463 
into an *pm bn. nun 


Tetelpuf 1 


U9J9 

M.48UU 


MBbiajI Lew 17666 
Stm rce-.CBOE, 


OonITUS— 134 


London Commodities 


March 7 


Previous 
BM Atfc 


suoar"' 8 " ^ 
fferUng per metric tan 
MOV 116X0 11670 116X0 11700 118X0 11940 
12640 123X0 123X0 124X0 12600 126X0 
133X0 130X0 13000 131XO 133X0 13400 
N-T. N.T. 13700 13BJ0 139X0 14100 
15570 15270 15270 152X0 155X0 155X3 
WX0 157m 15770 157X0 160X0 161X0 
N.T. N.T. 16600 167X0 16900 171X0 


Alta 

OCt 

Dec 

Mar 

May 

Alta 


Volume; 1J10 Iota of 50 tans. 


COCOA 

Starting par metric ton 

Mer ZJSL 3-1S8 2-I9S 

2095 2070 2072 2073 2087 2088 

2478 2058 2462 2M3 2465 9/IS6 

2066 2050 2050 SSl 2052 sSa 

HS J'ES J-Jg ’-SS JOT ww 

1.980 1770 1,965 1,967 1,975 1X76 

1,965 1,965 1X60 1X65 1X65 1X80 


Mpy 

Jfy 

Sea 

Dee 

Mar 

MOV 


Volume: 5433 lots oflO tons. 


COFFEE 

Starting per metric tea 
Mar 2X14 2794 2X07 2X08 2785 2795 
1463 2X35' 2X56 2x58 2X33 2X35 
2X95 2X77 2X90 2X91 2X72 2X73 
2J23 2X10 2520 2X21 2J04 2X05 
2X27 2X11 2J2S 3X27 2X9S 3X99 
2X92 2X86 2X94 2X97 2X75 2X82 
N.T. N.T. 2X45 2X80 2X60 2X70 


Mav 

Jhr 

Sep 

not 

Jan 

Mar 


Volume: 3410 lots of 5 tons. 


GASOIL 

U S. dollars per metric tan 
Mar 23475 233X0 23575 23600 232.50 mi ni 
225X0 m» 22500 22575 222X0 22275 
22175 219XD 221 JO 221.75 719JD 21975 
5281® 21900 219X0 21975 217X0 21800 
22000 21975 219X0 21975 21800 21U5 
N.T. N.T. 22000 22S0O 21700 22300 
N.T. N.T. 22000 23000 21700 22700 
N.T. N.T. 23140 235' ' 21700 Trifn 
N.T. N.T. 22040 24040 21700 237X0 
volume: X145 lota of 100 ions. 

■Sources: Reuters ondLoMon Petroleum Ex- 
chomm (eosolll. 


MOV 

Jun 

Jiy 

Aue 

Sep 

oct 

NO* 


DM Futures Options 

March 7 


». Gamoi MoteOUannortiarftw mole 


Strike 


WWWtft 


PftMeffle 


™ ' 

Prio 

TO 

Mar 

Ul 

JHI 

1.9S 

Sept 

MV 

140 

Jon 

0J6 

SCM 

055 


39 

078 

170 

1.00 

QjflS 

870 

091 


30 

HP? 

0/7 

173 

0x6 

1.14 

17/ 


31 

140 

0X6 

0.96 

1X4 

IJC 

1.90 


33 

140 

036 

069 

2X4 

75/ 

764 

9716 

33 

LOO 

O.I6 

050 

304 

3X5 

147 


EstkneRd total nL 5X24 
Cell*; WML VOL 4031 open Int 470*5 
Pets : Wed. «pL 3731 BPM 1*0.22,1*4 
Source: CME. 


Paris Commodities 


March 7 


Sump In French Francs per metric Inn. 
Other fl Bures In Francs par 100 kg. 


sugar "** 1 ^ c *°“ 

MOV 1^0 1X00 1x05 1X07 — 1 

Auc 1X10 1X90 1X91 1x97 —6 

Ocf 7J50 1X50 1X47 1X50 — B 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1010 1XIO —5 

l^q 1,720 LTia L725 -12 
MW 1£*0 IJM 1780 -18 

. , E »t- 'S’--, i®* 1 of 50 tans. Prev. actuol 

■alas: 1726 lets. Open Interest: 22072 
COCOA 

Mar 2725 1335 2721 2730 +6 

Mnv 20WJ 1271 U83 2784 —11 

JIV N.T. N.T. 4240 — - 

Sep 2725 2725 9 ,yff 2740 —5 

Dec 2.1« 2.145 2. 143 2.147 + 1 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2.120 — unch. 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1115 - —5 

— Tom. Prev. aeiual 
sales: 459 tots, open Interest: 1086 
COFFEE 

Mar 2X30 2X20 2X30 ? X g +25 

May N.T. N.T. 9X01 2X70 Unch. 

Jly N.T. N.T tSe 2720 UfX 

Sep N-T. N.T. ZJT0 2730 —Si 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2710 2728 —TO 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2X70 2715 —20 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2X66 2700 — 25 

Est. vpL: 11 tots at 5 tons. Prev. actual 
Mies: 28 tots. Open interest: 173 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 




•■-s •■raw H 

r-.* 

•MM* 

*4 

m 


■ s: 

90, 

ft - • ' 

(,P ' 

. **T 


*N 

Ml 


l J*, 

af 

ieli 

m«i 

1* 

+ • 

■*.18 » 

A 

■’ *4 


m 

- 

1 ft!** 




•-* 

B.6-V 

*- irm 

** 



Mirlclon 


Spat 1030.00 103100 102800 1028X0 

forward 146640 1064X0 146440 144540 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 
Sterling par metric too 
Wot 170100 1X0300 1782X0 178150 

forward 171608 171700 1799X0 140040 

copper Cathodes (Standard) 

Starling per metric ton 
seal 179240 179100 177240 177440 

l onward 140100 140900 179340 1795.00 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ten 

33940 32740 327J0 

forward 33640 336X0 ri fm tkjq 

NICKEL 

Starling per metric ton 
Spat 402540 443540 406500 4X6500 

forward JXSUJO 408540 409040 4.90040 

SILVER 

Pence per tray ounce 

*«♦ 53140 53201 53440 53540 

forward 55000 55240 5S3JO 


TIN (Standard) 
Starting per mei 


metric tan 
10715 10720 

10000 10710 


spot 
forward 
ZINC 

Starting per metric tan 
SPOf 84440 84100 

Mriwara 81400 SI 6X0 

Source.- XP. 


10725 

10730 


10730 

10735 


MIMl 

80800 


82940 

80940 


ItCMTfXNATKSNAL 

MANAGER 

AVi/EBUyGUDEBTSHBRY BUCHANAN 

WfflNBDWINTHEIHr 


Commodity amt Unit 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb 

Prinlctorh 64/X TO to, vd _ 



•••■ito 


iron 2 Fdry. 

Steel scrap No 1 hvv Pitt. — 
Lead seat, lb 




Capper elect, ID 
TlniSlraHsl.lb 


Z>iK^E.St.l_Ba«*lb 
Pattodlimvaz 
Silver N.Y. oz 
Source: AP. 


* « uv W+wnq 



Per Amt Pay 
INCREASED 
Beatrice Companies a 
USUAL 

8 43% 5-7 

03 ft 4-15 

8 77% 3-2! 

35 +W 
B 65 +13 

O X0 4-15 

a 75 M4 

.42% 

O 35 

O XI 

Q .19 

Q X5 


P* N ils 


X5 +i J-H, - *! :*«» 


Alaska Airnnet 
Am Blltrife Inc 
Amerada Hess 
Colonial Petm 


•bft 




G Co 

Consumers Wtr C« 


is. 


Faster ( (LH^) Co 


Genetar 

Louisville G & E 
Medtronic Inc 
Pwinwcflt carp 
RCACorp 
Times Mirror Co 
Wallace Com. sv» 
woyne-Gauard Co 


76 

76 

! .11 % 

45 


§ f- 

si | V 

« W ia 


ft » I 
■“ft t 


+21 task i 


•? i 


At 1 


ApAnnuoi; NHMeflUv: OGuortartvl ««*•" 
Annum. 


Jounce; UPl. 


U.S. Treasury 

Bill Kates 

March 7 


% 


Bid Offer Yield 


prt< 

nut-. 


4% 


Svnenth 
tmentti 
One year 


871 

947 

9119 


130 

945 

9.17 


94* 

944 

MOO 


sir 

9J* 

Ml 


‘tW-Lr 


Source: Salomon Brolmrj 


Blast Reported in Baltic Port 

The AssnriaKd /*«w ) 

MOSCOW — One person died 
and five were injured m an explo- 
sion aboard a Soviet tanker, tht 
Ludvig Svoboda, in the Baltic pod 
of Veni^pils on Wednesday night, i, 
Latvian official told a Western re- 
porter Thursday in Moscow. ^ 
Finnish shipping source said that;., 
the tanker caught fire and sank. 


%.* 


'ey,.- 













if 


fe ' : 

■ 1 *1* ••• 

X »«'*'• * .r ■ 

<5 ®5 £?'"’* ■?: 

SEr" “ * 

*f ■ ... 

J™ •*% fnw!'.. .if 2 * ■ 
2* >»* m+n.* ! * ■ 

1 2*k 1* *’«», "J ■ 

I 3i? F 1 * •”*«* 1 

5 ; : 

ll*S 58 » ■: 


Najktks Index 

lEX price* P.W I 

isx M*o/to"* RT ® i 
' *, ee arte* p - 4 1 

i «,}se bW^>«*» P- 1 ® . 1 

J'SwJlon stock* PM ) 
i y-Teno rotes PXl < 
■i'mmoCBhss P.» < 
:?inw < 


Eorntnps ncortt P.T3 

nns km notes p.w 
Goto raortots P.U 
Interest rates P.U 

MorkftsonuTW p. t 

Options P.10 

OTC toads P.n 
other marfcftt* P.U 


BeralbSKSribune 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


I FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 


*8 SWSSTi i; 

ijk’casv 

3SV,*: 

Lfftn M Ksimi ■' 

i t* *’**' , " : • 

{ *£* Kto ««.•« 
t ** s- 

■ *te t*N irn-jj'. 

i n>. j»to=Hi r , r 
> *fte J**» **«<w » . 

-j 4*% “ft ft*»r fi - 

l **■ •».*.- ; 

t yi •** «s* i-i. 
'fits* MsPiipt p 
; ■ r. 4 «m<|i r| 

i #3 *■• . 

? «•* fr-s *■**«.. 
iff ftftiitk 

■ Jvsiiia un »»MS 
! If. 4W * W.n. 

1 *'*V flli kk-J-.B „ . 

. 1 MU-it , 

: C» S'-fc tt't»f>,.. 

; ft* ft»i.n„ , 
i tojte *ft» injure w 

! 'Ste ».fc Airuw. 

: * *»=«(»■ 

, i *Hto }» « % ifc f i- , 

I ’**•■'. M 'll' CM ’ 

i 2i r rt * *”'■ '■i . 

t U% to’i A tact-. . 


| 4;’i nn.d ' 

i15*S«r 
!ft-sas:2f 

( JK* 3at4 sum*.* , w 

i M PU ,M ■• t ' 

ll* l* * I «A m 


1 k\ TECHNOLOGY 

sStfi - - ■ 

' sSj: 

| .|lomputer Makers Go Back 

■ ?^o Basics With New Breed 

_ t s, 

i ^ By ANDREW POLLACK 

J ; *!.. b | New York Tima Scniae 

. .;, : s AN FRANCISCO — For years, computer makers raced to 

V, S build complex features into their machines . The trouble. 
-: jh J'tj according to some computer scientists, was that many of 
the features were rareJy used and only made the machines 
•t:V/»j,iwer and more expensive. So now, computer scientists are 
• ? y ;; si g nin g machines that are more streamlined and simpler, 
j. fining vast improvements in speed and cost The result is a shift 
J • -i ; jhc philosophy of contputer design. 

.« 1! ‘There's a wind sweeping across the conqj u ter business,’” said 

'ia : [. y win J. Basait, vice president of Ridge Computers in Santa 
?' y >ara, California, one of the companies employing the new 
^ • ilosophy in its machines. . ' , .... ■ ■ — 

■ .> ‘.The new breed of machines m 

y:\known as redu«xl-mstmc- lnere 18 great 

confusion abont 

f a-Wtionai Busings Ma- yfat a ^BC machine 

i *;-->nesCorp. s research labs m 
a - 7 , 1970s. and was followed really 18 . 

- - .i c. e a t J 


K~~~~ 

■ * 14 

J r*H Joprrtn 


I ft W /at ib lo '■ 

r J'to w»* S4ft-.ll 111. • ±‘ 

J ]i«b U)« ;«t4 ‘i 

( Jito JM« ■. - 44 ‘ s 


s ? y:\known as reduced-mstmc- mere 18 great 

confusion abont 

f dl^eniational Busings Ma- a RISC machine 

i ^vn^Corp. s research labs m 

r, « 'r7- 1970s. and was followed really is. 

“. i’^work at Stanford Universi- 1 

, 1 :, -^and the University of Cali- ; 

at Berkeley. Now RISC machines are moving into the 
^Ty^-rkeL Leading the way is Hewlett-Packard Co„ which thmks 
si ”jtl technology represents such a major advance that it is virtually 
" N ;ing its future m computers on the concepL The company is 
-lyyyel oping a whole fanuiy of RISC machines, starting with a 
,:5>T^ces5or to its aging HP-3000 minicomputer. 


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1 s s’aT BM has at least two RISC projects under way. Industry 
‘‘ * S officials say the company has already shown to potential 
. customers a high-powered RISC work station for engineers. 
•: ,,„ 4 s machine is related to one being developed jointly with 
■ - •Cr.megie-MelloQ University. IBM might also use RISC technol- 
to bufld a machine to handle input and output of data for its 
.< .. generation of mainframes, according to Gartner Group, a 
' • ' ^ikerage that follows IBM. 

digital Equipment Co. also has a major RISC effort under 
. ..... y. And several start-ups are getting into the business, among 

' m MIPS Computer Systems of Mountain View, California, 
nded by John Hexmessy, Stanford RISC pioneer. 

. P,-...joth large computers and microprocessors generally contain 
' ■■■si instructions, called microcode, (hat are etched into silicon. 

ien a program requests the computer to do something, it sets 
• : ' a sequence of these micro-instructions. Over time, such 

auctions have become more complex and numerous. Digital 
7 lip meat's VAX super-minicomputer, the computer most fre- 
1 r ,-ntly criticized by RISC adherents, has several hundred in- 
ictions. some doing arcane tasks such as evaluating complex 
ihematical expressions. But studies have shown that most of 
- •. ,-se functions are rarely used and providing them makes the 
iputer larger and slower. 

USC adherents advocate keeping the instruction set limited to 
• -'ic tasks, such as loading and storing numbers, adding oom- 
~ s and comparing two numbers. If more complex functions are 
ded, they can be provided by a combination of simple func- 

"’’is. 

Jot everyone is a believer in RISC. A professor of computer 
-nee at Camegj e-Mellon, E Douglas Jensen, said the concept 
; still unproved. Many of the increases in speed found in some 
>C machines, he said, result from other improvements that 
> could have been made on machines with complex instruction 
. “The research done in this field has been characterized by a 
J lack of any science, ” Mr. Jensen said. - - • • — . _ . i; - 

adeed, there is a great confusion about what really constitutes 
— ISC machine. Because RISC is now a hot concept, companies 
quick to call their products RISC machines. 

g^iitflSCs are not without their problems: Software developed for 
:r computers might not ran on RISC machines. Also, RISC 
" V,,J - iputers might also be surpassed by computers using several 
lessors working in parallel to achieve great speed. 


Currency Rates 


Late interbank rote on March 7 , exdudrng fees, 
dal (bangs for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Pan*. New York rales at 



• 

■ 

DM. 

FF. 

ILL. 

GW. 

■F. SF. Yta 

Abb 

18SA 

4.104 

113.15* 

37jB2* 

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— 

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4M9 

7234 

2H087S 

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32243 * 

17245 

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1404 X 

08395* 

4277* 11736* 1308* 


1.0473 

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4.1115 

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ran 

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55047 

31-011 73035 2124 

rf*(d 

— 

1-0645 

34205 

1045 

213X00 

32545 

4243 29105 26130 

W 

10.411 

11.074 


— 

4506* 

27011 

1530* 25002X8810* 


24140 

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^^OJl.1641 hUh t 

WBrcM fnne (b> Amount* moled ta bur cm pound (eJ Amount* iwftdad to bov ana dollar CJ 
in fxjimtt* oi ion i»j umtsof laooo- 
Iqaotod: HAi nafcrmUatolA. 

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vto do Paris (Paris); IMP (SDR); Banova Arabs at IntemotfonaKr mnvasltssanmtt 
rival, dirham). Othar data from Rmitwrs and AP. 

Interest Rates | 

ocurrency Deposits Man* 7 

^ DoBar D-Morto Franc STwUaa FrS? ECU . SDR 
•■■■ 1 - fte - 6U 5ftW ■ stw MW- MW. 10 W- ink MBk- 1014 ftfe - M 

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• vWatt* to hrtarbask BaposJts of SI mllUan minimum far eauMitam}. 

: Maroon Guaranty IDoDor. DM, SF. Pound. FF); Uords Bank I BCD '); OIMiank 


Man* 7 


n Dollar Rates 


Man* 7 


3 ran*. 

ft Hi -ft B. 


4 mo*. 

ID Ha -10 % 




fir"- 


& X 






Money Rates 

^iScttes ci 


jftote b a 

, ^ ir^ Funds B% *14 

i ,i c; wo io% 10 % 

. MBBROte . ft%. ftto 

ll,-- 4 "Wf. 3M79 don ft 75 IK 

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S£ ^ 


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wnr 

«i Intel bunk 
interbank 
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10% 10% 
10% 10% 
10 %. 10 % 
.10 11/1510 lt/U 
10 % 10 % 


Britain 


dose 

Prey. 

Bonk Base Roto 


14 

14 

Call Money 


14% 

14% 

8Mav Treasury oil! 

13% 

13*. 

Xnontn intortank 


13% 

14 

Japan 




Discount Rote 


5 

5 

Cot) Money 


4 7716 

6% 

404ov interbank 


0 7/16 

6 7/16 

j Gold Prices | 



AM. 

PM 

Oltee 

Hong Kora * 

398.90 


+ 330 

Luxembourg 

28M5 

— 

+ 270 

i»erb ins Mioi 

29204 

288.19 

+ 211 

Zurich 

29i m 

28035 

+ 280 

LoaUan 

38838 

38260 

+ 220 


„.- ' Commantronk, CrMt Ly- 

'-toteft Bank, Bank at Tokyo. 


Nsw York — 20ftJ0 — U0 

DfHdol ftehw tor London, Porto told l» 

btoMWOMntod Md eftaiM Brim tar Hois KMo 

onl Zurtdv Ha* Ysrte Own* curr»m tajiracL 
All prim to VAI P*r mibob. 

Sourer: Routers. 


Dollar 
Rallies in 
New York 

But V.S. Unit 
Falk in Europe 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — The dollar re- 
bounded Thursday in New York 
after central banks failed to follow 
through on a decline on Wednes- 
day with missive intervention as 
they did last week. 

“The dollar still is well bid, fun- 
damentals haven't changed,” said 
Carmine Roiondo, chief trader at 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust. 
“The only tiling that’s new is uncer- 
tainty over central banks and that’s 
keeping trading thin al the top lev- 
els,” he said. 

The dollar lost ground on 
Wednesday in New York and Lon- 
don when remarks by the Federal 
Reserve chairman, Paul A. 
Volcker’s, were interpreted as pre- 
dicting a decline for the dollar. A 
similar decline last week was fol- 
lowed by massive and widespread 
intervention by European central 
hanks. 

‘'Initially the market looked very 
uncertain on fears that the central 
banks might mount a raid to ex- 
ploit the sharp decline in the dollar 
that followed Volcker’s latest com- 
ment,” a dealer for Chase Manhat- 
tan Bank in London said. “When 
no intervention materialized a 
good recovery swiftly ensued.” 

In New York, the pound ended 
at $1 .0645, down from S1.0715. 
The dollar dosed at 3.4205 Deut- 
sche marks, up from 3386 DM; at 
10.45 French francs, up from 1032 
francs; at 261.60 yen, from 260.65 
yea; and at 2.9105 Swiss francs, up 
from 2.8915 francs. 

The dollar recovered some lost 
ground eariy Thursday in Europe- 
an trading but finished the day low- 
er against most currencies. 

In London, the pound ended at 
Sl-0673, down from S1.Q725 on 
Wednesday. In Frankfurt, the dol- 
lar finished at 3.4087 DM. down 
from 3.4235 DM. 

The Uil. unit ended in Paris at 
10.41 1 francs, down from 10.4805 
francs. In Zurich, the dollar dosed 
at 2.9025 Swiss francs, down from 
2.919 francs. Earlier in Tokyo, the 
dollar closed at 261.40 yen, up from 
261375 yen. ! 


De Beers Chief Has Stability as Goal 


Key Priority Is 
Reduction of 
Gem Stockpiles 

By Alan Cowell 

New Yori Times Service 

JOHANNESBURG — When 
Julian OgUvie Thompson dis- 
cusses his new role as chairman 
of De Beets Consolidated Mines 
Ltd, one of the world’s most 
secretive and successful cartels, 
be lards the conversation with 
notions like stability, continuity 
and order. 

Continuity is needed, lie says, 
to see the diamond industry out 
of its present difficulties. He sees 
his task bs giving “guidance an d 

stabDJty^Iigh priorities are a re- 
duction in diamond stockpiles 
and diversification of invest- 
ments outside the industry. 

Despite breaking the long dy- 
nastic rule of the Oppenbeimer 
family over much of the dia- 
mond business, Mr. Ogilvie 
Thompson nevertheless is a 
product of the Oppenheimer 
world. Harry Oppenheimer, 76, 
last month relinquished the 
chairmanship of De Beers to Mr. 
OgQvie Thompson. Two years 
earlier, Mr. Oppenheimer had 
stepped down at Anglo Ameri- 
can Corp., the aster company to 
De Beers. 

De Beers, which controls four- 
fifths of the world’s diamond 
trade through its subsidiary, the 
London-based Central Selling 
Organization, was founded by 
Harry's father. Sir Ernest Op- 
penheimer. 

Mr. Ogilvie Thompson was 
bom in South Africa, but educat- 
ed in England, at Worcester Col- 
lege. Oxford. His wife, Tessa, is a 
daughter of the late Viscount 
Hampden, a member of the En- 
glish aristocracy. His associates 
say that when Mr. Ogilvie 
Thompson heads for his private 
game ranch in the Eastern Trans- 
vaal, he would prefer fishing the 
waters of the River Test in south- 
ern Fjiglanii, 

Some business analysts say 
Mr. Ogilvie Thompson’s role is 
that of a caretaker ch airman un- 
til Harry’s son, Nicholas, 37, who 
is present head of the Central 
Selling Organization, takes over. 
The Central Selling Organization 


Major Swaps Dealers 
To Form Association 


By Cad Gewirtz 

Fmenmthmal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The major financial 
institutions active in interest rate 
swaps announced Thursday in 
New York that they plan to form 
the International Strap Dealers As- 
sociation. 

This follows a dramatic increase 
in swap dealing, where fixed-rate 
borrowings are traded for floating- 
rate funds or vice vena. Dealers 
estimate that in three years swap- 
ping has become an S80-hQlian 
market 

The complicated business of put- 
ting a swap together was fairly 
straightforward at first: company 
A would issue fixed-rate bonds, 
company B would raise a floating- 
rate loan, the institution arranging 
both deals would put A and B in 
touch with each other and they 
would swap. B would get fixed-rate 
funds at a lower cost than if it tried 
to float a bond and A would get 
lower cost floating-rate funds than 
it could otherwise. 

But with the market’s growth, 
putting two companies together 
has become more difficult As a 
result, dealers that want to actively 
engage in swapping now must tem- 
porarily stand in as a principal to 
the transaction, then drop around 
for an end-user. 

This need to go outride the bank 
or brokerage house to complete a 


deal has created problems because 
there oftm are big differences from 
one institution to another in pay- 
ment terms, definitions of base 
rales, conditions of ter min ation or 
how to assess damages in the event 
of default. 

Thus, the first aim of the associa- 
tion will be to agree on standard 
hn g mi g p and documentation for 
swap contracts This is a goal that a 
number of dealers have been work- 
ing on for about nine months and 
which, they hope, will be facilitated 
by creating the association. 

Dealers expect that standardiz- 
ing contracts will make the market 
more liquid by attracting new par- 
ticipants, such as smaller banks 
and other institutions that have 
stayed out of the market Ultimate- 
ly, the association’s founders hope, 
a secondary market will develop 
where dealers can buy or sell swap 
positions. 

The founding 10 members of the 
association, winch win be open to 
any bank or brokerage house want- 
ing to jean, are Bankers Trust Citi- 
corp, First Boston, Goldman 
Sachs, Kleinwort Benson, Merrill 
Lynch, JJP. Morgan, Morgan Stan- 
ley, Salomon Brothers and Lehman 
Brothers. 

Ultimately, it is expected, the as- 
sociation also will move to stan- 
dardize market practices in curren- 
cy swaps!. 


British Unemployment 
Rises to 3.15 Million 


Rouen 

LONDON — British adult un- 
employment excluding school 
leavers, rose a seasonally adjusted 
provisional 19,700 in February to a 
record 3.15 million, or 13 percent 
of the work force, the Employment 
Department said Thursday. 

In January, adult unenmloymeat 
rose an upward revised 19,900 and 
amounted to 119 percent. 

The unadjusted jobless total, 
which includes school leavers, feD 
17,282 in February to 332 million, 
or 13.7 percent of the work force. 

In January the unadjusted unem- 
ployment rate was 13.8 percent. 

The Central Statistical Office, 
meanwhile, reported that Britain 
had a surplus of £641 million 
(S685.8 nnliion at the current ex- 
change rate) in its current account 
in the fourth quarter of last year. 

That brought the current ac- 
count — a broad trade measure 
that hyfl ydff merchandise as well 
as noomerchandise items such as 
services — for all 1984 into rough 
balance with a £5 l-mUHou surplus. 

fix the third quarter of 1 984, Brit- 
ain' had a downward revised £621- 
rotOion current-account deficit. 


The current account for 1983 

had a £L5-biffion surplus. 

The government had forecast the 
current account would be in bal- 
ance in 1984. 

Britain’s merchandise trade 
showed a £I3-bfllion deficit in the 
fourth quarter after a £1.6-biHion 
deficit m the third quarter. The 
1984 trade deficit rose to £43 bil- 
lion from a £17-biHion deficit in 
the whole of 1983, the office said. 

Trade in nonmezchandise items 
showed a £2-bfllion surplus in the 
fourth quarter, up from a £1.02- 
billion surplus in the third quarter, 
while m the whole of 1984nonmer- 
chandise items showed a £43-bti- 
Eon surplus after a £3. 7-billion sur- 
plus in 1983. 

All figures for the current ac- 
count and its components are sea- 
sonally a^usted. 
vfrmrii Wholesale Prices Rise 

French industrial wholesale 
prices rose 03 percent in January 
after revised zero growth in De- 
cember, the natirajalstatistics insti- 
tute, INSEE, said Thursday, The 
Associated Press reported from 
Paris. 




Hu New Yori 

Julian OgDvie Thompson: “Guidance and leadership.*’ 


seeks to support prices by regu- 
lating the flow of diamonds to 
the market. 

Officials at De Beers and Mr. 
Ogilvie Thompson himself dis- 
miss the caretaker notion. 

“I am 51 years old now and the 
normal retirement age in our 
company is at least 60, so that 
could hardly be termed a care- 
taker period, could it?" the De 
Beers chief asked. 

The ruling aliianri- of the Op- 
penheimer empire these days is 
between Mr. Ogilvie Thompson 
at De Beers and Gavin Rdly. 
chairman at Anglo American. 
Both were proteges of Harry Op- 
penheimer. 

Mr. Ogilvie Thompson was 
appointed personal assistant to 
Harry Oppenbeimer soon after 
returning to Johannesburg from 
England in 1957. Part of the at- 
traction or working for Mr. Op- 
penheimer, be said, was that 
“one felt that one was participat- 


ing in S4>me thing that was mov- 
ing things in the right direction." 

A central creed of the Oppen- 
heimer legacy is a belief that eco- 
nomic growth on a large scale 
will do more to change South 
Africa's racial profile than pro- 
tests or violence. This is because, 
the theory goes, capitalist growih 
collides directly with those as- 
pects of apartheid that limit the 
economic and geographic move- 
ment of people. 

Despite keeping a lower politi- 
cal profile than ms predecessor, 
Mr. Ogilvie Thompson says pub- 
licly that South Africa needs 
“peaceful, evolutionary reform 
in a constructive sense” that will 
lead to “3 federal or confederal 
structure’' and power-sharing 
between white and black, rather 
than one-man, one-vote. 

But De Beers and Anglo 
American have sometimes been 
at the center of political contro- 

(Cootinued on Page 13, Col 3) 






m 


U.S. Stocks 
Report; M-l, Page 6 

Page 11 


BP Says Profit 
Increased 41% 
In 4th Quarter 


By Bob Hageny 

International lltruU Tnhunv 
LONDON — British Petroleum 
Co. reported Thursday that 1984 
fourth -quarter net rose 41 percent 
and the company hinted that it 
would be examining acquisition 
possibilities. 

The fourth-quarter net was £351 
million IS375 million). Sales in the 
period grew 22 percent to £10.83 
billion. 

On the year, the company, which 
is 32-percent owned by ihe’govern- 
ment reported a net of £1.1 billion, 
up 7 percent. This figure included a 
deduction of about £300 million for 
extraordinary items. 

Earnings per share on the year 
climbed ro 76.8 pence from 473. 
and sales grew 17 percent to £37.93 
billion. 

After-tax profit, before the ex- 
traordinary items, rose 62 percent 
to £1.4 billion. BP'S pretax profit 
grew 33 percent in I9S4 to £3.46 
billion. 

The gains were largely due to 
sharply higher profit from pump- 
ing crude oil rather than offsetting 
a downturn in European refining 
and marketing. 

BP also announced that its total 
dividend for 1984 would be 30 
pence a share, up from 24 pence for 
1 983. The dividend was a few pence 
above most expectations and 
helped boost BP shares on the Lon- 
don Stock Exchange to 553 pence, 
up 5 pence from Wednesday's 
close. 

BP'S reserves of cash and short- 
term securities os of Dec. 31 had 
more than doubled from a year 
before to £23 billion. Sir Peter 
Walters, BP*S chai rman, said the 
cash inflow would “strengthen our 
balance sheet for the next leap for- 
ward,” giving the company flexibil- 
ity to take advantage of investment 
opportunities. 

“Maybe when the world down- 
turn comes there will be some good 
bargains around,” be said. In addi- 
tion. the company expects to spend 
heavily on developing North Sea 
gas fields over the next few years. 
In 1985, overall capital spending is 
scheduled to rise about 30 percent 
to £5 billion. 

Some analysts say BP eventually 


is likely to buv the 45 percent it 
does not already own in Standard 
Oil Co. (Ohio), though BP officials 
repeated Thursday that they had 
no such intention at present. 

BP benefited from higher crude 
production in Alaska. Egypt and 
Indonesia, and the dollar's surge 
raised the price of nude in pound 
terms. Excluding Sohia BP'S oper- 
ating profit from oil production 
and exploration grew 27 percent to 
£1.4 billion. Operating profit from 
gas gained 19 percent to £95 mil- 
lion. 

But operating profit from refin- 
ing and marketing plunged 45 per- 
cent to £1 13 million, like its com- 
petitors, BP was unable to push up 
local-currency prices for gasoline 
and other oil products Tost enough 
to match the rising dollar cost of 
crude oil. 

BP has closed 40 percent of its 
European refining capacity over 
the past three years, but the indus- 

{ Continued on Page IS, CoL 8) 


U*S. Retailers 
Post Mixed Sales 

The AaoaateJ Press 

NEW YORK — Major U.S. 
retailers Thursday reported 
mixed sales results for Febru- 
ary, the first month of their fis- 
cal year. 

Jeffrey Friner, on analyst at 
Merrill Lynch, Pierce Fenner & 
Smith Inc. in New York, pre- 
dicted first-quarter profit 
would be significantly lower 
from a year earlier for many of 
the companies. 

Sears. Roebuck & Co„ the 
largest U3, retailer, said sales 
for the four weeks ended March 
2 rose 24 percent from a year 
ago. K mart Corp., ranked sec- 
ond, said sales rose 14 percent 
and the third largest, J.C. Pen- 
ney Qx, said sales were up 4.1 
percent. Montgomery Ward & 
Co, ranked sixth, was the only 
retailer among the top 10 to 
report a drop in sales, a dedine 
of 2 percent 




For the man with exceptional goals, 
anew dimension in banking services. 


TTThat makes Trade Develop- 
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start with, there is our policy of 
concentrating on things we do 
unusually well. For example, 
trade and. export financing, 
foreign exchange and banknotes, 
money market transactions and 
precious metals. 

Equally important, we are 
now even better placed to serve 
vour needs, wherever you do 
business. Reason : We have 
recently joined American Express 
International Banking Corpora- 


tion, with its 89 offices in 39 
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While we move fast in serv- 
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is the maintenance of a strong 
and diversified deposit base. Our 

S ortfolio of assets is also well- 
iversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a con- 
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deposits and a high degree of 


liquidity-sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust 
with your business, get in touch 
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TDB bank m Geneva, London, Paris, 
Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monte Carlo , 
Nassau,. Zurich. 

TDB is a member of the American 
Express Company, which has assets of 
US$ 62. S billion and shareholders? 
equity of US$ 44 billion. 



Trade Development Bank 


Shown at kft^the head office 
of Trade Development Bank, Geneva. 


An American Express Company 



* 





page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 


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2or 

MI 

Auk 

Bib 

Mr 

Jen 

Ttl 

oc 

*oe 

Ira 


end 

PA1 

i 5 *’ 

C-3* 

SEC 


Over-the-Counter 


March 7 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Sales in Net 

MQl HWi UK IPJM.C&'M 


A&MFd 

AECl 

ACL 3 

AFC 

ASK 

ATE 

AamRt 

Acad In 

Acctrtn 

aojHov 

Acetas 

Actmed 

AdacLb 

Ad m 

Adtfnw 

Advar 

AdvGen 

AdvTH 

Aamiten 

AcrSyt 

AHBsta 

AeevRt 

AlrMd 

Airwtsc 

AlskMt 

AlexB s 

Alfln 

Algorex 

Main 

AleeWI 

Alton Bw 

Aiktsri 


JO 2 B 




_ - 

— 




152 9% 

9 

9 — ft 






.12 

3 

128 13% 

Uft 

13% 



5* 

— ft 




183 8* 

«Hk 

8* 



14*+ ft 




58 5* 

5% 

Sft— ft 



26 

+ % 


.10 

J 

MM 

12ft 

12% + * 

53 222 

21* 21* 

— ft 





Bft 

8% — ft 



23 

+ ft 

Alesr 

.44 

2J 

2718ft 

18ft 

Mft- % 



4 



JR>4J 

319 

19 

19 —ft 


22 

22 

— ft 

AHGau 

252 

85 

35 29% 

29ft 

29% 


lift 

lift 

- ft 

AttAm 

job w 

108 20% 

20ft 

20ft 

1610ft 10* 

10% 


Alter Be 

.90 

10 


39* 

30 

649 22M 

2D* 

21 

-1M 

AiinFd 




lift 

11* 



17% 

- ft 

AltFIn 



pi ma 

9* 

9* — % 



25ft + * 

Art Res 




38* 

39 —ft 








167 20* 

30% 

20% 



9* 





on 

4% 

4%— ft 


34* 


AMOC 



2017* 

17% 

I7*+ ft 



9tt + % 

AlrtTrT 



1611% 

11% 

11% 



5% 

— ft 

AutoSy 



4412ft 

11* 

12 

97 6% 

6M 

6% 


Autrritx 




7* 



JO 9 J 

t 

.10* J 
t 

JSO u 


Alfnot 
AlfyGor 
AHMWic 
Altai 
Am coot 
AWAln 
AmAdv 
ABnkr 
AmCarr 
AQontt 
AFdSLi 
AFIlIrn 
AmFrst 
AFMc 
AFurn 
Afimt 
AmlnLt 
AlavLt 
. AMasnt 
AMS 
AMdSv 

• AMM1 

. AN tins 
APIWG 
■ AQuw 
■ ASoeCi 
. AraSoft 
. ASokir 

ASura 

• A WHO* 


103 4ft 4* 4* 

» 2V. 2ft + % 

92 15 141k MB— U 

20 JUS 31% 31*— ft 

36 » 11% ll%— % 

19213% 13% 13% 

_ . . X IS 17% 17ft— % 
1J0 3J 2303 30% m 30 + % 

02110 21 21 — % 

OM M A 

JOB A 4*1 a 53 + % 

243 19% 19 mi 

jo io 2330 mo mo— % 

J4 34 912425% 24% 24% — % 

1J0O 4J 1722 21 Vl 22 

131 4% 3* 4 — % 

10 12 % 12 % 12 % 

303 7% Of* eft— Vk 

773 13% 13% 13% + % 

333 MU 14 14% 

422 7% 714 7* — ft 

4010 % ID 10 ft— % 

322 13% 19% % 

121712% 12% 12% — M 

42 0 7% 7% — % 

14 M% 14% 14% + % 
• 24 24 24 — to 

354 7% 7% 7* + ft 

1041% 41% 41% 

U 12% 11% 11%— % 

44334V. 34 34% 

176)43% 13% 13%— ft 

17 4Vj 4% 4 %— % 
111 10% 9% 9%— % 
4 21% 21% 21% 
1915% 15% 13% , 
293 ft % ft+ft 
33134% 3416 34% 

23 6% 6U 4U— % 


JO 2 4 


JO 17 


JO 42 
1-33 5.1 
t 

V40 3J 
JO 14 
51 IJ 
JO 3J> 
20b 11 


.14 IJ 

1J> U 


MB IX 


ft ft ft' 

1220% 20% 20% 

18% — % 

3%— % 

nk 


'Amrttr 100 5J 

Amnwi 


n 3J 
JO 2.1 


Airafcs 
Am nods 

An took: 
Ancrtyl 


Amfovr 


Andres 
Apogee 
-AooSc 
taK 
Asm la 
Acid Cm 
ApMMf 
AoldSlr 
Archly* 
AraaSy 
ArtzB 
Amwl 
ArM 


7419% 18% 

530 3V. 3% 

103 1% U6 

7 416 6 6 — % 

11 50% 50% 50%— ft 
•022% 22% 22% + % 
44 5% 5% 5»k 

15210% IS 10%—% 
1 10% 10% 1*%— % 
190 Mft 14% 14% — % 
53 9% 9 9 — % 

78514% 14 14 — % 

107 0% 0% 0% + % 

440 34% 32% 33%— 1% 
05 5 4% 4»— % 

30 9% 9% 9% 
771024 24% 25% — % 

32234 24% 21% 22 —2% 
103 39 37 3716—1% 

37314% 15 14% — % 

837 27% 24% 27 
24 0% 0% 0% 

474 4% 5% 4 — % 

00 21% 21% Z1% 

JOB It 14424% 25% 25ft— % 
218 14 1516 14 

19 0% 0% 8% — % 


.12 12 


Sates In Net 

1004 HMl Law 3PJW.Ch*9B 


Avaere 

AvntCr 

Avntefc 

Avatar 

AviatOp 

AztcM 

AtMl 


JO 42 


20 8 7% 4 + % 

124 13% 12% 13% + % 
92124% 23ft 24 . — % 
517% 17% 17%—% 
148 10% 10% 18% — % 
11 4% 4% AS 
23 2% 2% 2%— % 


B 


130 AS 


124 4J 

JO 1IJ 
JO 15 
2J4 4J 
JOb 25 
150 04 

71 U 


50d 22 
2J0 AO 
.12 15 
J8 A3 


,10b 12 


Banhn wt 

Berk lay 22 21 

Basics 

Betz Lb 1J0 13 
BevHS 

Bibbs JO 32 

BloB 

BiBBIta 

BlBBeor 

Blllktoa 

undv 

Bio Res 

Biogen 

Blomet 

Blasrc 

BlotCR 

Blrdlnc 

utreGr 

Btarios 

BllssAT t 

BooTOn 1J0 A4 

BobEvn 20 15 

BeilTc .14 1.9 

BoonEl t 

Boottiln 

aostBc 


BBDO 

BFICm 

BSS 

BPISv 

BRCom 

BoirdC 

BokrFn 

BoltBcp 

Bancotd 

BcpHw 

Banctec 

BaasH 

BkGron 

BkME 

Bkdou 

BkMAm 

Bankvt 

BantaG 

BaranD 

Barton 

BsTnA 

BasAm 

BsetF 

BavBks 

Bayty 

IBS, 

BetlNt 

SelfW 

Bncha 


10150 
234 1% 
52 0% 
84 3 
3713% 
233 0% 
1435% 
5419% 

32 21% 
2920% 

10410% 

101 7% 
44 34 

3 45% 
54334% 
10211% 

311 

174 31% 

4 9 

3 3% 
2 9 
42 9 
135% 
24444 
HT1 ■ 
714 
29312% 
198 S% 

14 0% 
25 9% 

543 21% 
0415% 
22 15% 

102 ft 
29234% 
123 4 

319 
4914% 
2 1H 
212 
80 4ft 
30324 
225 4 
57 7% 
111 17 

15 4% 
4V 9% 
34 0% 

110 7 

Eft 

20133 
204 20% 

33 0% 
143 4% 

24 3ft 

2210% 


49% 49% — % 

1 % m 

Sft 5%— % 
2ft 2ft— ft 
12% 13 — % 
7% 0% + ft 
35ft 35% + % 
19% 19% 

30% 21% + % 

20% 28%—% 

10 10%— ft 
4ft 7% 

2S 24 +1 

45% 45% — % 
24 24 + % 

lift lift— % 

11 11 

31 31 — % 

9 9 — % 

3% 3%— % 
9 9 — % 

8% 9 + % 

35% 35% 

45% 46 
7ft 7ft 

14 14 

13% 12%—% 
Sft 5* + % 
8% Sft + Hi 
9% 9% 

20ft 21%—% 

15 1556 — % 

35% 34 + % 
5% 5ft— % 
19 19 

15ft 15ft 
1ft 1ft 
13 13 + % 

4ft 4ft + % 
25ft 25ft— ft 
5% 5ft — % 
7% 7ft— Vk 
14% 14% 

4% 4% 

9 9 — M 

flft 8%— % 
4% 4ft— % 
6% *-* 

32ft 32ft— % 
19% 19ft + % 
B% 856 
4ft 4ft + % 
3% 3ft + Vk 
IS 18%—% 


BlblFC 

BradyW 

BraeCp 

Bmohc 

Branca 

BrwTom 

Bruno 

Bufftan 

ButtdTr 

Bmhm 

BurrBr 

BMA 

Busin Id 

ButtrJ 

BvrtrMf 


Sales la Ml 

100s High L0f> IP.M.Ctl'M 

.10e 3 2515% 15% 15% — V. 

.I0ft J 1434% 35% 35% — I , 
8013% Uft U ft— % 
121 31% 30% 31% + ft 
44 4ft 4% 4ft + % 
224 3% 2% 3%— % 


128 XI 
.12 IJ 
t 

JO U 


82 24ft 25% 
74 m 1% 


jo u 
ue 4J 


J4C J 

1J2 5J 


50928 27% Z7%— % 

52918% 18% 18% 

3 18ft 18ft lift— ft 
47052 51ft 51ft— % 
1443 7ft 7% 7%— % 
717% 17 17 — % 

4024% 24ft 25ft ♦ % 


C COR 

CPRI* 

CBT 

CML 

CPI 

CPT 

CSP 

CablTV 

Cache 

CACI 

CbrySe 

Calibre 

CalAmp 

ColFBfc 

CalMIe 

Co IS vs 

Coiwtri 

CallonP 

Calny 

Cabmt 

CanonG 

CapSwt 

CapFSL 

CapCrb 

Card Of* 

Cardiol 

CareerC 

Coral In 

Cartert 

Coaevs 

Cencor 

CntrBc 

Ccntcor 

CenBcp 

CnBshS 

C FOBfc 

Can! i ui i 

Canturl 

CntyPs 

Centre 

Cert*- A 

Gsrmtk 

Cetus 

CbmpPt 

OmcCp 

ChapEn 

ChrmSs 

Cbarvaz 

OmthM 

Chuttm 

ChkPnt 

ChkTch 

CtiLwn 

Chemex 

OtfvE 

OtfCM 

ChIPac 

Chills 

Chorner 

Chranrh 

QifOwi 

Chyrns 

arm Fin 

antra 


150 A4 


TJS it 

250 7J 

.14 IJ 
.148 IJ 

.16C J 
JO 2.1 

SOt .1 

JH IJ 

f 

150 £5 

2J5P4J 
152 52 
L12 37 
JO L7 

591 J 
J2 L5 

.10 U 


500 U 
J8 25 


JO IJ 
-12» J 


JO 2 S 
.ID 5 
248 13 
.T2e J 


39 ■% 
100 9 
14139% 
27410% 
3811 19% 
534 7% 
230 9ft 
3 4% 
43 Sft 
83 5% 
141418% 
5 1% 

41 3ft 
SI lift 

30110ft 
138 Sft 
3537 
57 3ft 
19912ft 
23 8% 
700 23ft 
2917 
245 9ft 
414 2% 
410 
14712ft 
402 4ft 
132 1ft 
72110% 
53 U 
224% 
739 20ft 
331 13% 
104 42 

42 27% 


O erica 

Clreon 

ctzsoa ' 

CtxSGa 

CtzFIdS 

CJxUf A 

CtzUt B 

a tyFed 

CtyNCp 

CkrirSts 

CiarkJ 


ClevtRt 

atMmc 

CaastF 

CstSav 


1J0 3J 
36 U 
154 23 
t 

U4 63 
JSe 22 
5Sb X4 
.10 J 
J8 32 

M2 7J 


1534 
104 1ft. 
815 
2812% 
25 8 
3 2ft 
19012% 
53 7ft 
14 <ft 
T53 4% 
313 17ft 
214% 
10 22ft 
IP 

44917ft 
48 8 
1 29% 
215 4ft 
11 13% 
75011% 
29 82ft 
m 24 
3113 28ft 
159 8% 
11415% 
232 lift 
4392% 
4931% 
345625% 
2511% 
5 4% 
9 33ft 
430 19ft 
144 27% 


428% 
41711% 
37 25ft 
571 » 
100 27% 
14 18 
519% 
811% 
7814% 
103 14 


• B%+ % 

8% 8ft 

39 39% 

9ft 10 +% 
19 19% — % 

4ft 7%+% 
9 «%— ft 

4% 4ft + % 
3% 3ft 
5 5ft 
It 18ft— % 
1 % 1 % + % 
3% 3% 

18ft 18ft + ft 
w% io% — % 
3ft 3ft+ % 
35% 35% — 1 
3% 2%— % 
12ft 12ft— % 
BU 8% 

22ft 22ft— ft 
14ft 14ft— ft 
9ft 9ft + ft 
2 2% 

"ft 12 + % 

10ft T0% 

17ft 17ft 
24% 24% +1 
30% 30ft 
12% 12%—1% 
41% 42 + % 

36ft 27 — % 
29% 29ft 
35ft 34 + % 

1ft 1ft 
14ft 15 
lift 12% 

7ft 7ft 
3ft 3ft+ % 
>2 12 — ft 

7% 7%— % 
4ft 4ft + % 
5% 6% + % 
14% 14ft— ft 
14% 14% — % 
22ft 2Zft— ft 
17 17 

17% 17% 

7% 7ft— ft 
29% 29% 

4% 4ft— % 
12ft 13% 

11 11 — % 
S2 12 
23ft 24 + % 

28% 28% 

8 % 1 % + % 
15ft 15ft + % 
lift lift + % 
91% 92% + ft 
31% 31% 

2516 24 —ft 
10ft 10ft— % 
4% 4%— M 
33 33%— % 

19ft 19% — ft 
26ft 27 + ft 

32 32% 9- % 

28% 38%—% 
11% lift + ft 
25% 25ft + % 
18% lift 
27% 27ft + ft 
17% 10 + % 

19% 19% — % 
11% 11% — % 
16% 16% + % 
13% 14 — % 


Cob* Lb 

CoaaBts 

Caear 

C anonic 

Gohrats 

CototR 

Coksen 

CoiFdl 

Collins 

CoiABn 

CBcspA 

CalnGas 

GafGspf 

CglLiAc 

CoirTie 

QotoNt 

ColDfa 

ariuFd 

CatuMil 

Comal r 

Comar 

Camcsts 

Comdto 

Comdfai 

Canwre 

CmcsU 

CmOCoJ 

Cmd Bn 

CmlShr 

CwHhF 

GntwTI 

ComAm 

Comind 

ComSys 

ComSbr 

CmpCrd 

Compaq 

CmooT 

CmpCr 

Cmpcre 

Compeh 

Campus 

CCTC 

CmpAS 

CptAut 

CmnOt 

CptEiTt 

Cm pm 

Cmpldn 

CmsLR 

CmptM 

CrwNtt 

CmoPd 

CmpRi 

Cm Task 
Cmputn 
CptctT 
Cijintrc 


Sates In Net 

184s HMi Lew SPALOfne 
11 13% 12ft OV.+ % 
36a U 11 34% 34% 34% 
t 2515 15 15 

584 3 3ft 2ft— ft 
04725% 23ft 23ft— 1% 
118 5ft 5% 5%— ft 
23114% 13ft 14% + % 
8515ft 15ft left + ft 
IK 5ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
Mb 23 12 17ft 17 17ft + % 

J0e 4J 21 12% 12% 12% + % 
1J2 85 5917% 17% 17%—% 

MO MJ IT 17% 17 17% + % 

MO 3.1 4532% 91ft 32ft + ft 

44519ft 19 19ft— ft 

34 35 104419ft 19 19ft + ft 
48 1% 1 t% + % 
20 7 «ft 7 + % 
MO 16 2240% 29 29 

t 107X1 18% 11 

m .1 5015 IS IS —ft 

.12 J 49325ft 34ft 25ft 4- ft 

.16 1 J 137 13% 12% 13 — % 

94 3% Sft 3% 

ZW 55 2738% 38% 38% 

.92 10 5430ft 30% 30*4- ft 

2*1 IJ 6 IS IS IS 

250 5.1 729% 29 29ft + % 

JDo A1 *12% 12 12% -9% 

lJftlSJ 0 9 Oft Oft 
MO 55 14 29 29 29 —1 


36 15 
50 AD 


31r 
jo IJ 


J2 IJ 


55 J 


70 4 

3* 

3* 

22 20% 

20 

20 

321 11% 

W* 

n — ft 

5210* 

K 

18 — * 

28 29* 

p: - ~ j 

29* + ft 



fft—* 

14 13% 


13% 


Y>2\ 

2mt— * 

40212* 

12ft 

12ft 

432 1* 

1% 

1ft + % 

175 3ft 

2% 


34612% 

|V ^ 

12*— ft 

165529ft 


35*— ft 

539 7ft 

M 'y 1 

6*— % 

312% 


12ft— ft 

11 7ft 

7ft 

7ft— % 

245 Sft 

5* 

8* 


Cbmsfk 

OnashP 

Comte h 

Cancel I 

Gonlfrs 

CennWt 

CnCas 

CCapR 

CCmS 

CanFbr 

CnPaps 

Cera Pd 

Consul 

CenWIs 

CntiBra 

CMF5L 

aiHlls 

CHHItC 


150 A3 
148 » 
1340M.I 
lJOa 9 3 
336 1A1 

MO 32 
50 13 

1JD 4J 
25* 45 


ConvBt 


CoprBto 
Coors B 


185 8H 8ft «ft+ % 

14 7ft 7 7% + ft 

220 5% 5% 5%— % 

15 5H Fft Oft 

201 30% 1946 19ft— ft 
15 4% 4% 4ft— % 
34 20% 20 20% + % 

445 10% 9ft 9ft— Va 
94 7ft 7 7 —ft 

77 9% 9 9 

108 3ft 3% 3ft + ft 
39 Sft 0% 8% 
25411% 11% lift 
398 4ft 3ft 4 —ft 
130fl 2ft 2S 2ft +ft 
8 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
523% 23% 23% — % 
3215% Mft Mft— ft 
30 24 2 3ft 23ft— % 

44 17ft 17% 17% — % 
207 23ft 23% 23ft • 

75 8V. B% (ft 
65 41 40% 40V, — % 

13 4ft 4ft 4ft 
47 5% 5% 5V6 

4 23 23 23 —ft 

11734 33% 34 + ft 

1012% 12% 12% 4- % 
14413ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
132 4* 4ft 4ft 
100 7ft 7% 7% 

5233 ffft 8% 8%— ft 
2033 WV6 II 18%—% 
194 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
1311 14ft 14ft Mft— 1% 


Cepytcf 



14423% 21% 22% — ft 




3 7* 

7ft 

7ft 

Conn* 



283 Sft 

■ 

(ft— ft 

CoraS t 

2J8 

4J 

P/. f', ' 

47% 47ft— ft 

Corvus 



L » v r 


4ft 

Como 



Ci"Jf ' 

EJ 

5*- ft 

Cower s 

SO 

2.1 

4 T 

23% 23%— * 


33 

IJ 

N- V * 

23 

23ft— ft 

CrkBrl 

.14 

IJ 

7514 


14 + ft 

Cramer 



2 8ft 

PI Hi 

•ft— ft 


cmEd 
Cronus 
CrosTr 
CwnBk 
Crump , 
Cut In Ft 


138 21% 20ft 21% + % 
360 15% 15% 15% + ft 
502 20% 27ft 29% — ft 
3512ft 12ft 12ft 
28 27 24ft 27 
16 27 27 27 + % 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


Sale* la He* 

m HM Lew SPJAOM 

CaHum M 25 48 22ft 22ft ZP* + % 

Culp 58 15 2D 8ft 8 8 

Creare lonft 2aft 

cvwSv joe i J 2ii n% i» 12* -P ft 

Crerswt 43 4 3ft 4 + % 


0515% Mft 15% f % 
13 9% 9 m 

12% nft 

6 4% 

10% 10% 

20ft 31% — 2 
28ft Sft 
5ft 6 
98 98 

224349k 34% 34% . 
21313% 13% 13ft— ft 
183 7% 7 7 — % 

111 4ft 4% 4%— % 
2077ft 17ft 17ft— % 
43 (ft 4 4% + % 

12S 8% 8% 8% 


MM 9J 








87 41* 

41* 


j- i 

7 + ft 




43 2* 

2* 

191 19% 

r t ,i 

18% — 1 

ISC 



406 8* 

•ft 

1049 19 

r 

Mft— * 

IVBFn 

220 

7J 

2030* 38* 

5023* 

22ft 22* — ft 

loot 



4 tt SH 

S* 

•Sink 

17* 

18 —ft 

1 annex 




9* 


1% 

T% 






11 Uft 

11 

11 

Ifnueeo 



si 2 

2 



7ft— ft 






6 1* 

1% 

1%— % 


152 

U 

1836 

36 

263 5* 

5ft 

Sft— ft 

IndpHlt 



256 24* Mft 



7 — ft 








7H- ft 




49 Afc 

6% 

5 5% 

5 

5 

InCoRK 



90 31% 31 

1 31* 

31* 31* 




57 24 

23% 

4 S* 

5* 

S%— * 




11 7% 

7% 

55 4* 

4ft 

4ft ■ 

iRStNTw 



1621 24* 

23% 

4212 

11% 

11%— % 

Intean 




8 

801 4% 

4ft 

4*— % 

lotsDv 




10% 


150 33 


2230ft 30% 30ft + ft 
8913% 13 13%—% 

4613% 0% 13% 

18 7 7 7 

31523 20% 21 • _ 

1809 25ft 24ft 25 — % 
1328 35% 34V6 34%— ft 
9 7ft 7% 7ft— % 
3J 6070 10% 9ft 10 

lb 3ft 3ft 3ft f % 
J 170 25ft 25% 25ft— Vk 
4.1 3329% 29% 29% — % 

U 13 U% 17ft 18% + % 

ai an 8t% n zi% 

L7 sonft nv6 rift + % 
j 8915% 14ft 1*J4— % 




Hawk offers distinguished services for the owners and guests of our 
luxurious homes nestled in the Green Mountains of Vermont. Blissfully 
secluded, yet only minutes from Killington . New England's premiere ski resort. 
Cathedral ceilings. feldstone fireplaces and sky-lit rooms characterize these 
splendid retreats. And every effort is made to spoil you. from a wiue- 
and-cheese uvlcome basket to an old-fashioned hay ride through the peaceful 
countryside. Understandably, we are a Mobil Four-Star. AAA Four- Diamond 
resort. Exquisite Hawk homes from S150.000-S450.000. For ownership 
information call us called in the US. at 802-672-3811 or write Hawk Vermont 
Mountain Resort, 5th Floor, 87 fermyn St., London SWl Y6/D. 

TWX 710-227-0657. 



HAWK 


VERMONT’S MOUNTAIN RESORT. 


RO. Box 64- H GO 5. Plymouth, Vermont 05056 


Master plan and design ofHAWK homes and communities by 
Robert C art Williams, Architect and Associates. 


Forbes 
Lake 



OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 

Your own vacation land on the fabulous Lake of Ihe Ozark* In Central 
Missouri. Right In the heartland of America. Away from a ties, noise. 
poDubon and the rat-race of the workaday world. 

Forbes Inc., publishers of Forties Magazine, through its subsidiary. 
Sangre de Crtso Ranches Inc., is offering the opportunity of a fifetime for 
you to acquire one or more acres of our choice Missouri lakeland. 

There's no better time than right now to find out If Forbes Lake of the 
Qzarksis the place for you Afl our homes tes. Including lake front and lake 
view, will be a minimum stoe of one acre— tanging to over three acres. 
Cash prices start at $6,000. One or more acres of this incredibly beautiful 
lakeland can be yours lor the modest payment of $60 per month, with 
easy credit terms available 

For complete mlorniation. induing pictures, maps and full details 
on our fibers! money-back and exchange privileges, please write to: 
Forbes Europe fnc. Dept. H, P O Box 86. London SWl 1 3UT England 
OtJiiW 1 me Property Report required by Federal lew and read it before 
sigmrij anyjnrg No Federal agent/ has fudged Iho menis » vakie il any 
o> ims oraoerty 5qu3l Credo and Houang Opportunity 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 
COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 
IN BRITAIN 

will appear on April 25 


.. . . - . r j contact* 

SaUyann i 

International Herald Tribune, 

63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JB, 
7W-- 01-836 4802 , Tries: 262009 
or jour nearest JUT representative. 


SAN ANTONIO, 


Commercial property in 
the Sunbelt. Situated 
within the path of rapid 
growth. Land now priced 
by the acre soon to be 
sold by the square foot 
is appreciating at an 
unprecedented rata 
For information on 
specific properties 
contact: 

AS 

HENRY S. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS 9 

Kit Corbin 
8918 Tesoro Drive 
Suite 400 

- San Antonio, TX782T7 ' 
(512) 826-3251 


+ SWITZERLAND 

I FOREIGNERS CAN BUY 

i s T u oio. i- ?apt v. £ 

or CHAlET Of 

LAKE GENEVA MONTREUX cr 

r "I-.-. ‘sTiOui •vl.orts 

CRANS- MONTANA. 

LES DIABLERETS. VERBIER, 
VILLARS. JURA, o!: 

Wo*: ovocr- 60 ‘ •. at 6* .• m 

REVAC 

C-- 2 GENEVA 


^MUNICH 

Top location 

INNER CITY 


Studios, moisomeftes, 1,.2 & 3- 
bedroam apartments, modem, fully 
equipped kitchens and baths, quali- 
ty “made in Germany", Prices 
starting at DM 1 73,000 (opprox. 
U.S. $52 r 500). 

CttOet Ms. Grossman n, 
c/o AVAL GmbH, 
D-8000 MOndwi 40b Geo^mir. 8. 

T«L: (0) 89-341023. 

Tbt: 0529989 AVAL D. 


ONE OF THE MOST EXCLUSIVE 
PROPERTIES OF THE 

COTE D’AZUR 

Directly on the sea. between Cap Fenrat and Monte-Caxlo, for sale. 
Park 13,000 sq.m. The property includes S different houses (main 
house, 3 guests* houses, 1 house for personnel), tennis conn, 
swimming pooL c ine ma, port. 1,100 sq.m. living area. 

Asking price: U.S. SS5 milliotL. 

Please contact: Dr. ScHowb, 

Europaeisdi Ankrgen Verwattung AG & Co. 

MoehblrosM % D-8000 Muncban 80, West Gemwny. 

TaL: (O) 89-4706045. 


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45 Sft 
22 7% 
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1S2 4ft 
3 SV6 
7 4% 
41229ft 
10210% 
1311ft 
121 10ft 
371 14% 
297 8% 
12410% 
318% 
• 17% 
9 5% 
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13ft 13ft— % 
3% 3% 

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28% 29% 

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14% 14% 

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TO 10 —ft 
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17% 17% 

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15% 15ft + ft 
15% 15%+% 
17% 17% — % 
14 14 — % 

7 7 

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10 10 — % 
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79 9% (ft 916 + ft 
144918% 9% 9ft 
15 5% 5% 5% 

■4 1% ■ 8% + % 

177716% 15% 15%—% 
5428ft 28% 28% 

12 9ft 9% 9ft— % 
1 08 Sft 8% 8%— % 
70 ft ft ft 


49931 
428 15ft 
8915% 
2517% 
1714% 
49 7% 
530% 
15918% 


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451 37 85 35 — 1% 

178 22% 72 22% 

4110 9ft II + ft 
14924ft 34% 24%—% 
314% 14% 14% — ft 
J84 32ft 32% 32%— ft 
274 m 37% 37% — % 
MS 31% 32 + % 


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LONDON, BELGRAVIA, SWl 

A magnificent while stucco fronted residence occupying a 
commanding position facing west with distant views over one of 
Belgravia's loveliest Squares This superb period bouse has been 
decorated to the highest standards and is ideal for entertaining on a 
grand scale. The accommodation and amenities comprise: 

5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, drawing room, dining room, library, 
study, cloakroom, kitchen, food lift, staff suite of sitting room, 
bedroom and bathroom, stores and two terraces. 

LEASE 57 years- GROUND RENT £1700. PRICE £1 million, 

XAI A Kj'I T TC 174 Brompton Road Londoa SW3 1HP 
T lei 01-581 7654 telex 23661 WAE 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES 
ON THE FRENCH RIVIERA, PROVENCE REGION, 
CORSICA & LANGUEDOC-ROUSSILLON 

w ill bo pubBshed on March 22 ■ 

For advertising information, please contact 

Ms. Dominique Bouvet, 

International Herald Tribune, 181 Awe. Charies-de-GouIle, 
92521 Neuiily Cedex, France. Tel.: 747.12.65. 


GnPlrvk 

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5 3ft Sft 3ft— ft 
34 3ft 3% 3ft + ft 
538 8 7ft 7ft 
m 6% sft sft— ft 
24 4ft 4ft 4ft 
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204 17% 
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11 11 

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177 Sft 
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4279 65% 63 43%- 

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293 22% 21ft 21ft 
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138 23% 21ft 23 ■ 

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102 1ft 1ft 1ft 
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334ft 35ft 34ft- 


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536 30ft 
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12614 
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147 37 
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247 7 
11 14ft 
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134 
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494 9ft 
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13ft 14 
9ft 9ft— V 
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14ft 14ft- 
10* 10* 
34 34 • 

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9ft 9ft 
17% 17%- 
1ft lft- 
7ft 7ft- 
Bft 9ft - 


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11710ft W% 
138313% T2ft 
258431ft 19% 
40819ft 15ft 

40 41ft 41% 
919% lift 

7417% 17ft 
3815% 15 
93411ft 11% 
9914ft 14ft 
1515 15 

441 1(4% Mft 

41 7ft 7% 
851% 51 
1 7% 7% 

14 30% 29ft 
2823114 30 
518 6% 5* 
1314 13ft 
11 21 9% 9% 

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22 25314% 13* 
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S 4 43ft 43% 
34 4ft 6 
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IJ 156014ft 13* 
281 25ft 25 
7J 131 31 

28 102 5ft 5% 

J 506 33% 32ft 
J 4 14ft Mft 
230 9% 9 
4334 23ft 
408932% 29ft 
13919ft 19ft 


9ft— % 

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13 — % 
21 —ft 
19ft + ft 
41ft— % 
19% + ft 
17ft 
15% 
n%— ft 

14ft + % 

15 

16% 

7ft + ft 
51 —ft 
7% 
29ft— ft 
30 -1% 
5*— ft 
M 

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43ft + ft 
6 

14 

14 —ft 

+ % 


25%. 


Sft 
33 — ft 
Mft 

9% + % 
24 + ft 
29ft -2% 
19ft— % 


M 


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9551 fft 9% 
16 7 • 4ft 
30 6% 4% 
10121 22 * 
7114 13ft 
4tt 7ft 7% 
24414% Mft 
83 23% 22* 
7 7% 6* 
14820 18% 

7415% 15 
4811ft lift 
129 m 9ft 
7315% 15ft 
29512% 12% 
12122ft 22ft 
4515% Mft 

S 49ft 41% 
16 15* 

S 8ft 8ft 
lift 10% 
14* 14 
157 Mft 
19 47ft 47% 
439% 39% 
804 6% 5* 
118 Mft 13% 

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912 lift 
25S 5* 5ft 
5 17ft 17 
M 3ft Sft 
4334ft 34* 
8211* lift 
24113% 12* 
6*10 9* 

115 8* 5% 
18418ft 17ft. 

7 Sft 5ft 
113 33 31% 

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78918 17% 

1214 26 Mft 
53 36% 36U 
146 44 

10 7 7 

974 74% 

315% 15% 
344% 44% 
25 23ft 21 
431 43% 43ft 
7731ft 31 
41 15ft ISM 
2513% 13 
744 13 lift 
2 10 % 10 % 
20 3% 3% 
18 11 11 
1919ft 19% 
32 13 12* 

254 22ft 21ft 
1034 32% 31% 
495 5% 4% 
31 9ft 9% 
W « 5% 
299 11ft n* 
111 7ft 7ft 
484 2ft 2ft 
34 4 5ft 
138 6 5* 

45 20 19% 

77 30* 30* 
318 5% 4ft 
597 lft % 

2241 34% 33% 

4 3% 1 
14599* 99% 
472 4* 4* 
23*23 22* 

JIM 13ft 
B7 15 14* 

57 9% 916 
215 10% 9ft 
83 4% 6ft 
4351 50ft 
37W% 10 
54 34 33% 

27 48* 48* 
24 3ft 3% 
a is* tb* 
16 9ft 9% 
242714ft 13ft 
2430% 29ft 
119% 19% 
1213ft 12ft 
1318ft 17% 
90219ft 19 
IIS «ft 4% 
44 Mft 14 
13 Mft 13ft 
621% 20* 
53349 40ft 
130718% 17% 


9ft— % 
7 + ft 
6%— ft 
221ft— % 

14 + ft 
7%— ft 

14ft— ft 
a — ft 
6ft— % 
19 

15 — ft 
lift + % 
9ft— ft 

15% + ft 
12ft— ft 
22*. 

15%+% 
49% — ft 
15ft— * 
8ft + ft. 
10*— ft 
14*+ ft 
57 + % 

47*+ ft 
99% 

4 —ft 
13ft 

28 

2Mk— ft 
lift + ft 
Sft+ Mi 
17ft— ft 
3ft— ft 
34ft + ft 
lift— ft 
12ta— * 

9*+ ft 
8ft— ft 
Mft + ft 
5* 

33 +1* 

4ft— ft 
T7* 

25 —1 
34%+ ft 
44 

1 —ft 
75 +1 

15%—% 

44% 

a —ft 

43% 

31% + ft 
15ft + ft 
13%+ ft 
12* 

70ft— * 
3W+ ft 
11 +ft 
19* + * 
19 + ft 

22 -% 
n — ft 
4ft— 1 

9ft + ft 

5%— ft 
lift— ft 
7ft— ft 
29b+ ft 
5ft— ft 
4 

a + ft 
30*— % 
5ft+ ft 
ft—* 

a sr m 

39* + % 

4ft— % 

23 +% 

M + ft 
W% + ft 
9ft 

10%+ ft 
4ft+ ft 
51 + ft 

IS —ft 
33%- * 
41ft— * 
3%— ft 
Uft 

9* + ft 

Mfc * 

]»=£ 

18* 

19ft + % 

if- ft 

20ft— 1ft 
48ft — % 
17%—% 


NCACp 

NMS 

Napeoi 

Napes s 

NoshFn 

NBnTex 

NtlCfy 

NtOvpf 

NCmBc 

NCiMU 

n rente 

NDota 

NHHftC 

NtUimb 

NMJem 

NttPza 

NTedi 

NgteBfy 

Nmole 

NetaiT 

Nelson - 

NwkSee 

NelwkS 

NlwkEI 

N BrunS 


JO 24 

MU 
04 If 
ZOO 5.1 
3 JO SJ 
48 10 
220 S2 
JO IJ 
J4 4J 
J7# U 


JO 23 


4 8% 
97 4ft 

1 IS* 

22412ft 

9893% 

4121% 

115459* 

2 44% 
21322* 

SH 
35 23 
517 10% 

227ft 
19 4* 
314 4ft 

1 8ft 
10 4ft 
41 4% 
57 Sft 
147 7% 
153 8% 
119 8% 


42 4 
-94 9ft 


8% 8%+ % 
4% 4ft + % 
15ft IS* + % 
Tift 1* + * 
n aft— ft 
21% 21% 

Ite «e /TTV 

44% 44%— ft 
22ft 22* + * 

3* £ +«« 

22* a 

10ft 10ft— ft 
27ft 27ft 
4* 4ft 
Ak 4% 

Bft Sft+ % 
4ft 4ft— % 
4ft 4ft— % 
5 5 — ft 

7* 7%— % 
8ft 0% 

7* 8 

26* 27%— ft 
5ft 5ft— ft 
9 9ft 


” -- 

soles la 


Net t 



UN HM* Low 3PJA.are* 

NE BUS 

52 

15 

9034 

94 

94 -H 

NHmoB 

JB 

17 

38 32 

21ft 

21*— * 

^ MS? 

M2 

43 

27523* 
38 Sft 

22ft 

S* 

22* 

Sft 

NwOry 

UO 

64 

718* 

18* 

18*— % 

NwMBk 



1510ft 

» 

10 —ft 


Ji 

J 

289 2B6 

27% 

27* 

Nwpfti 



258 5ft 

5ft 

Sft— ft 

NiGole 
• NkkOG 



M 

** 

Kzl. 

NUceA 

JO 

o 

563 fft 

9* 

9* 

Nodwoy 



1 6% 

6% 

4ft— ft 


54 

24 

1734 

23* 

23*—* 


J4 

1.1 

wa 

39* 

40 —ft 

Norsk B 

.Ml 

J 

42* 

42ft+ ft 




MB Oft 

6% 

6*— ft 

I NaAMat 

Jir 

.1 

7 9* 

9 

9* + * 

NAM Ins 



3 7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

NCarGs 

144 

7J 

WO* 

23* 

23*—* 

NoFrkB 

L 00 e il 

532* 

as* 

32*— ft 

T NWstn 

Us 

6J 

133% 

23% 

22% 

J Netttv 




7* 

Tft— ft 

KwNG 

U4 

U 

14517ft 

17ft 

17ft 

NwfFn 

1J4 

26 

13053 

52* 

52%— % 

JO 

U 

334ft 

34% 

34ft— * 

NwstRS 

2.18 

9J 

4222% 

21* 

22% 

Norwss 

.14 

24 

* 7 

7 

7 

Novmtx 



30 4* 

4% 

4%+ ft 


JI 


34418% 

17* 

18* + * 

NowoCp 



4 3 

2ft 

2ft 

Maxell 

32 

24 

16744% 

45% 

454k— * 

NudMet 



16 IS 

Mft 

14%—* 

NudPh 



91 6 

Sft 

Sft 




41 7* 

7* 

7*— * 

MutelF 



95 7% 

7* 

7ft + ft 

MuMed 



251 WH 

Mft 

Mft— ft 

\ 



a 


1 

OCGTc 



99 2 

lft 

2 + ft 

OakHlll 




1%+ ft 




250 2ft 

3% 

2ft— ft 

Ocflisc 



23415 

14* 

14* 

i OfftLOB 



290 41* 

2* 

48* 

41% + ft 

onioCa 

250 

54 

381 32* 51% 

51ft— ft 




nEE-EM 

24 

a a Rep 

JS 

23 

55 35* 35% 

35%—% 

OkfSpfC 


Mli .1 

21 

21 — * 



A 

12914* 



OnUrw 



28.4* 

6ft 

4%— * 




108 2ft 
9817ft 

17% 

17%—* 




698 42* 

40* 

41ft—* 




11317% 

Mft 

17 + ft 

Ortjtr 



120 7* 

7ft 

7ft + ft 

OreeMt 

25Be 


145 ?* 

9ft 

f* + }* 

OrfoCp 



56 5% 


5 — % 




94 18 

17ft 





1318% 

18* 

18% 


774 


4727% 27* 

271k + M 



23 

■18 

14* 

14* 

Osaco 


281 4% 

3ft 

4 + ft 

1 



P 


1 




TOO 6* 


4ft 

PNC 

252 

46 

11750% 


50*—* 

Robot B 



47 9ft 





33241 



pocFsr 



w 


9ft 

PcGoR 

1 JOb 55 



PocTei 


S3 

MM* 



PocoPfi 



159 12% 


12* 

1 PoncMx 

.13 

IJ 

756 7ft 


7%— * 




10628 


19*— ft 




612* 


12ft + % 

ParkCm 



832% 


32% 

ParkOb 

JO 

4J 

8515* 

15 

15 — ft 




- 8 20% 

28% 

20% 

PatnfNi 



466 S% 

Sft 

5*— * 




32S 9* 

4% 

5* + « 

Ptrtrkl 



125 9% 

Bft 

Bft— ft 

Patriot 

urn 

37 

826* 

V *«/ j 

26*— * 




11517ft 

\ f 2Ti 

17ft 

PavIPt 



17 10ft 

I * Tm 

10*— H 

PayN 



522* 

y / .'i 

22* 




19513% 

n 

13 — tt 




4216ft 

M 

14 — * 

PeakHC 



345 M% 

LL, ] 

Mft— ft 




22827% 


27%—% 




140 6% 

6* 

<%+ ft 

PeteiVa 

MBS 35 

344 

45 

44 +! 







PenoEn 

228 

13 

30 28% 

B 

B — * 

| Pentar 

44 

24 

7129* 

29% 

29* + % 

Penwst 



4011* 






1653 8% 

a 

8*— ft 

PeacBa 

52 

U 

21 17 

16 

16 — % 

PeopRt 



244 % 

ft 

% 




144 7ft 

7* 

7ft + ft 

PeraA 



1191 OTk 

11* 

13%+ ft 




1912* 



Petri te 

1.12 

U 

28 29* 

39 

29*+ * 




120012% 

w* 

11%— 1 

Phrmkt 



1818 

9% 

9%— ft 

Phrmerf 



8 8% 

8% 

8% 

PSFS 



971 8ft 

8* 

Bft — * 

PWIGI 

JSr 

2J 

4553 16ft 

14* 

14% 




43 3* 

3V> 

3%— * 

PtrotoCl 



1 7* 

7* 

7ft— ft 

PIcSov 



938 25% 

f.E] 

25%+ % 

PtcCnfe 

M 

25 

141124 

E3 

34 + * 


JO 

IJ 

121 

21 

21 + * 

PtooHI 

37 

2.9 

574 32 

31% 

31*— * 

PlanSts 

.» 

15 

30 8* 

8* 

8* 

PiantrC 

Ji 

35 

20 37% 

24* 

27% 


54 

35 

12 28% 

LSI 

27*+ % 

PoFotk 



14 11* 

fill 

11*+ % 

PKvMfl 



37931* 

ai 

31*— ft 

Porex 



4923 

92* 

22* 




14 2ft 

7ft 

2*— % 

PctmtIc 



3619 

18* 

19 + % 




46 8* 

8* 

8* 

PrecCst 

.12 

J 

39 35 

34% 

34%— % 

PMRsk 

36 

2 A 

330% 

30% 

30%— * 

Premot 

50 

34 

63 Oft 
1416% 

6% 

14% 

4ft + ft 
14% 

Prevtav 



77 3* 

3ft 

1% 




764 6% 

Sft 

Sft— * 




9912% 

12% 

12*— * 

PrlcCos 



36460 

50% 

59*—* 

PrtrtvD 

M 

26 

593 6% 

6* 

4*— * 

Prfranx 


129 16* 

15* 

15*— ft 

ProdOe 

M 

33 

354 5 

4ft 

4ft— % 

Preftts 

JO 

34 

4911% 

11 

11*— * 




10 4ft 

«* 

4* 




0 5% 

5% 

5% 

PnoptTr 

UB 

8.1 

23 Mft 

14* 

14*+ % 

PnotCps 

J2 

23 

50623 


22%+% 




l 2% 


2% 

Prnvln 



3614ft 


14ft + % 

PrvLfA 


10 

27 95% 


94*— * 

PbSNC 

14 

17 21% 


21% + % 

PoSdBc 

1.12 

19 

30 29% 


29 — % 

*ullTm 



1222 6% 


6*— * 

PurtBn 

JO 

24 

133 28* 

W* 

20* + * 

1 - 



Q 


" 1 

QMS 3 



40115 

14% 

Mft— * 

Quadra 



320 5 

4* 

4*— % 

QuakCs 

JB 

29 

513 

13 

M — * 

QuatSy 



123 2ft 

2 

2* 

Qntmxs 



34 15* 

14* 

Mtt 

Quantm 



94526* 

25 

25*— 1% 

QuestM 



135 Sft 

3* 

3*— % 

Quixote 



4311* 

11* 

11* 

Quaten 



59011% 

HM 

N*—* 

R . 

RAX 



rjm 

8* 

**— * ! 

RUCp 

56 

27 


B- 

20% 

RPMs 

56 

32 

mm 

17% 

17%— ft 

sss 



11215% 

20211* 

15% 

12* 

IS* 

13*+ * 

Radian 



5 9ft 

9* 

9ft— % 

Rtnai 

Raters 

L00 

4.1 

126 7* 
660 34% 


7 — * 
34*—% 

Ranrtek 



52 5* 


5*+ * 

!»‘ 

JO 

24 

26 

111 27* 
a 18% 

L+i 

27* 




1021ft 


21% 

Recntn 



42 7ft 

Eij 


RedkitU 

M 

15 

1334* 


33ft— % 

Reeves 



484 8M 

i% 

8ft 

RncyEl 

JO 

34 

284 4* 

6* 

4*— * 

Regies 

XV 

J 

10414% 

M* 

14*— % 

Renab 



10 ■* 

Sft 

■%+ % 

Renal 



34 «* 

4* 

4* 

Repco 



2 4 

6 

4 — * 

RntCntr 



2718* 

r_.l 

18* + * 

RpAuto 

44 

46 

48 fft 

Li 


RpHIfti 




tJTl 

15ft— % 

Resblnc 

32a 13 

il* 

11*— % 

ResExp 



W- Li. i 

tft 

lft 

RestrSv 



n 

15* 

14 + * 

Renter! 

.I5e IJ 

lr • •.'i 

Uft 


ReoteH 

JOe 




ReverA 

1J4 124 

■r - M 


12 + % 

R exon 

1J4 




5*— * 



r~ 



Rhodess 

24 

1 J 


14%— * 

RBrtlm 



r" 



Rlcbei 



■K . ' l 


24* 




172 3ft 


2*— % 


40 

53 


EL. * 

15% + ft 1 

RaadSs 

1X0 

XI 

31% 

31*— % 


t 


40 8* 

Bft 


RafaNug 

J6 

5 

BIT* 

»* 


Rflbltar 



34712% 



Rocker 



M5 IS 



RdtwH 

54# » 

17 W* 




JB 

59 

611% 

1 

11% 

RosesST 

J8a IJ 

121 



RoseSB 

280 IJ 

35 34% 
1020% 



Rasotcb 

JO 

29 

- 


Rouur 

1X8 

16 

51141 



RtmePr 

.120 LI 

24310ft 



Royiot 



298 21% 



RayPtai 



1 8* 

Bft 


RovlRs 
RoylAIr 
Rate lad 



27 7 
6510% 
11 5% 

4ft 

10* 

10%+ * 







RyonFs 



2517% 

17* 

17*— *_ 

1 



S 


1 


S S SE 

S»n - 


Soctnm 

SneeCH JS J 

SnertlD 

Srtre 

StarSrs 

IhrfBtd JO U 
S la nifyt ljOO 17 
SMMk 
SMRen 




U 


SAB Ha » 
YM 
JiSy 
5EI 
SFE 
SPDcub 

*51 

Sofocrd 

Safeco 

SafHIMi 

suude 

5IPCXJI 

Sal cm 

5anB<*- 

SandChf 

satefco 

SateiSy 

SavnF 

SvBkPS 

SConOp 

SamTr 

Scherer 

SctrtmA 

sekned 

SdOyn 

sciCmp 

Sdlacs 

SdAAlc 

SciSySv 

Srtte* 

ScaGal 

Seagate 

Seal Inc 

ScNtem 

Sectert 

SecAFn 

SecTao 

SEEQ 

seftiei 

Select 

Sendcn 

senser 

STvmot 

SvcMer 

Sv mast 

Service 

SevOak 

stirMM 

Sftwmts 

Sridbva 

sneWs 

snoorre 

Sim Ses 

Srcsmt 

StomCi 

Sliieen 

Silicons 

SIFkVbl 

smenx 

Sfttec 

SimAlr 

Simp in 

W»pln 

Staler 

SkhMer 

SieanTe 

Smm»L 

SmtthF 

soaetv 

Soctrtv 

SeneOi 

SofTWA 

Sonckta 

Sonocp 

StnrW 

Savtert 

Sovran 


•lor lj 
r 

JS 43 
UO 47 


3J0 5J 
JSr j 


.12 U 
140a 4.1 
J4 X0 


U0 68 
UD U 
.10b 3 


XI 


JO J 
1.12 M 
t 

.» IJ 
At IJ 
IJ* SJ 
M 3 

.15 J 

.10# IJ 


JO 5.0 
J4 J 


8M Bft— ft 
13* M — % 
M* 14* + % 
Mft 18* 

Wft 10% 

16ft 14% 

14ft Mft— % 
Mft 18*— * 
3M* 35*—% 
17% 17*+ % 
MM 13%+ M 
S* 54 —ft 
3* 4 +% 

0% 8% 

8% 8%— Vk 
1% T% +* 
7* 7ft — % 
38* 39 + % 
2*ft aft— % 
9* 9ft— ft 
13* 13% 

9% 10ft 
18* 18* + M 
9% 9% 

Mft 10ft— ft 
6% 6*+ * 
Vt s 

4* 4* 

5 5%+ % 

11M 1IM— ft 

8 1% 

4* 7 —ft 
4% 4%— ft 
14* M* 

31 31 —1 

MM MM 
3% 3ft — % 
4% 4%—* 
25% 21% 

Mft 11 + 


15 1% 

4118% 

a 6* 

1015 
B31 

4 MM 
215 3* 

744 4% 

XX 25* 

511 

24 8* 8% 8%— ft 
1493 7% 7ft 7*- ft 
256 2ft 2ft 2M 
477814ft 14 14U— ft 

IM J7 34% 37 + ft 
7118% M M — % 
IM 16 IS* IS*— ft 
41532* 32ft 32* + ft 
17931 38* 31 + ft 

97 18ft Mft Uft— ft 
3412* 12% 12%— ft 
319 a* 25* 34M + M 
3415ft 15M 15ft— M 

2 5% 5% 5%+M 
13 6 to 4% 4%— M 

363 flft 3 Bft 
11314% 14% 14%—* 
878 IS* IBM 18% 
23319* 19 19 

302 8 7% 7*— M 

4410 9* 9* — ..M 

19 Mft 14 16 — % 

4216% 16* 14* 

61 W% 19ft 19ft — % 
17212 11% 11* 

» 6ft 5ft Sft— ft 
590 3* 3* Sft— M 
13 9 9 9 


154 

4J 

4940* 

19* 

99*— 

* 



7312% 

«% 

12* + 

* 



70 7* 

Tft 

Tft— 

ft 



3018* 

Mft 

18* + 

M 

JO 

13 

221 

21 



MOB 

23 

30 44% 

44 

44ft— 

* 

.151 

J 

1718 

If 

18 — 

* 



159 5* 

5% 

5%— 

ft 

J2 

IJ 

■4529 

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29 + 

% 

UO 

4.1 

4124ft 

24ft 

24ft— 

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.10 

IJ 

474 Oft 

7ft 

0 — 

ft 


iWflrthot 

sissm 

StafBG 

stetoor 


MO 

U6 

.15b 


StowSlY 

stwmr 

*»44 — | 

Mllfl 

StekYle 


stratui 

StaeC*. 

Stryker 


SobAIrl 

Sum 

Sudbrv 

SaffSa 

Swntna 

SumtBk 

SumtHI 


32 

.16 

JOb 

£ 

i£ 


3J 


SonMed 

SunSL 


sueskv 


.16 3 


SaerEa 

Sykes 

SymbT 

Svncar 

Syntoch 

Synfrex 

Svscen 30 U 

SvAmc 

Swtln 

Syslntn 

SvstGn 

Systmt J4 J 


: Hfth Low 3PJM.aU, 

I ulW 

AK OB C» 

3 7ft 7ft 7M+M 
30527* 27ft 2714 _ IJ 
24917% n T7ft- 5 
9414 S5ft 36 +t- . 

45 5* Sft VS , 

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23 6 ft 4 3 ? y. ■. 

17411 Mft te%_ - 
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aisiwi* «!»-*.< 

tiK S 

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^ n i T±$ 

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134 5 4ft i . 
4«23% Eft 

*345 a? 1 *' 

19414 Mft 






■ftp 


TBC 

TCACb 

TLS 

TSI 

T5R 

ToCVN 

Tandem 

T ende n 

Tchnol 

TctiCom 

TcCom 

TOilncs 

Telco 

TtanA 

TelPtus 

Teterft 

Telecrd 

Tetentct 

TeMd 

Tetabs 

TMxon 


Teedatn 

Tenon 
Texfne 
TherPr 
rtvmd j 


J2 J 

Ji u 


JB A 

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Jle 


.92 4J 
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MO 3J 


4 Mft 
10119% 

'U* 

30143 

710 

31020% 
4403 7% 
415ft .. 
4 8% 8 


TrakAu 

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MO 4f 


t 

Ml 4J 


J09 3 
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MO 3J 


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63 7 

Z7D19* 

27634% 

47111% 

MB 8ft 

am 

59021ft 

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648 M 

a e% 

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173 a* 
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30 Ml* 

30413ft 
3814% 
1310 
47184ft 
211* 
253 17* 
17317 
354 8M 
55714 . 
17 9* 
710 1ft 
0614% 

14 39% 

5 4* 
1417 
214 
12 4 
21 *% 

174 3ft 
230 lift 

10 <ft 
24 9% 

34 10ft 

iS* 

5 4* 
SOS 1ft 

a 16% 

71343% 


B* 32* 

1* 19 —ft.* 

* 4ft 

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2“ 

tel*: 

8ft 9% 
ft M 

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w* Ai”*-' 

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JB 25 

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UN 43 
MO 85 
J4 45 


1J4TM.1 
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MB 3J 


70 34* 34% ; 

1821* aft ; 
2a a : 

395 SM lft 
•9619* Mft ’ 
5 lift lift 
5013ft Uft 

no 10% 9* - 
son a* : 

28417* 17ft ' 
14130* 38% ; 
1710% 18 : 

4914 i3«-: 

259 25V. Mft : 
3017 16% ’ 

1913 IS* < 
49 3ft Sft 
SS fft 9ft 
M3i lift a* : 
24012ft Mft- 
2016% Mft 
59111 Wk 
48 fft Sft 
195139% 29% 

5 4 Sft 

ns 

n 7* 7ft 
554 29% 28ft 



.15e M 


..10 15 
130 35 
J9i U 
JO u 
JO 3J 

J4 5 

JO 4J 


VKorp 

VldBn 

victras 

VIedeFr 

VAinn 

viratek 

VnBeeti 

VWTech 


JO u 

J3e 5 
MO 43 


328 13 
Mr Vt 


• 110 % 

138617ft 
22015 
7*1 
673 34% 
3S 4ft 
4** 
M Mft 
BlMft 
« fft 
13715 
344 ft 
3914* 
981 4% 

87034ft 

la^g* 

son 

40 T* 

4a ii 

314 7% 


Sft 8 lft- if'-' ■■ 


UN— F u 
— KM + fe. - 

17ft Dft— Ik ., 

« «=h 

31 MO- h 
4ft 4ft-L'-, 
Sift 2M6 + 1-- - 
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xm m-fc, 
M - 

Mft 15 +!■■■: 
ft * . 

ts ’SSz^.. 

Mft 2t»+ 

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3ft 3ft V*. i 

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10ft 11 +;*•! ^ 

6 ft 4ft- ► 

1* 1ft 

MH 

71* 7ft+ 


35 

J 


3J 

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J4 J 
J» If 
U0 UJ 


254 4J 


St 

wft ft+^t:'- 


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WSfter 






ZetiLbB in go* 30 » 

zenhic so 4% 4M 4* 

ZMMer Jta ir 412 % W nft 
ZteftUt 134 3J 12937 3» » 

DW 12 4* 4% 4ft" 

ZJvod »» > 

ZflOdvn 34 14 174 WV 10 » ■ 

Z yrnra » 2U » Zft' 

Zvire* 332 in 1* ™ m 


TWAOflfore$ 499 Fai 
On Copenhagen Fligjj 

Reutm 

NEW YORK — Trails ^;:* 
Airiines said Thursday it will t ; ' j . 
introductory round-uip fare 
$499 between New York and 
haaen on Mondays thrt 
Thursdays starting April 28. T 
ets would have to be bough . v 
days in advance, with a stay c 
to 90 days. 

TWA will start saving Cope 
gen on April 28. with weekend I 
priced at $549. On May IS. « 
end fares vriD rise to $735 
weekday fares to $785. ,, 


- l: ", 




















1 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 


Page 13 


■| BUSINESS roundup 


Hoechst’s Profit Rose 45 % in 1984 


-j-; By Warren Geder 

sJV Intrntorianaf Herald Tribune 

, (1 FRANKFURT — Hoechst AG. 

:c \ij|ihe West German chemical and 
■: ^pharmaceutical concern, increased 
"li- pretax profit 45 percent in 1984 to 
' 1 bEuiort Deutsche marks ($390 
« J: ^raDlion), from 920 million DM in Lags 

;; 1 *$i983. the company said Thursday, year* 
4 


World group earnings were not 
available, but analysts said group 
profit was rot to be markedly bet- 
ter than the parent company’s 
earnings because of Hoechst's 
Strong international presence. 

The company said group cam- 
had exceeded the previous 
s in nearly every sector. 


advertisement 


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Hoecbst posted a record group 
profit of 909.4 million DM in 1 983. 

Hocch-st said cost-cutting mea- 
sures at home, world axmoroic re- 
covery and a surging U.S. dollar 
helped make 1984 “an especially 
successful year." 

News of the strongly higher par- 
ent company profit caused 
Hoechst’s share price to rise 2J0 
DM on the Frankfort Stock Ex- 
change, dosing Thursday at 2123 
DM. 

Hoechst said a dividend increase 
on last year's 7-DM payout is 
planned, but gave no details. 

Analysis say the dividend may 
be raised 2 DM, rather than the 1 
DM antidpaied earlier this year. 

An analyst at Westdeutsche 
Landesbank Girozeutrale in Dfis- 
sddorf sad Hoechst's pretax result 
is mud) in line with the bank’s 
recently revised expectations. 

“As a result of the dollars persis- 
tent alien glli , we have upwardly 
revised our profit projections for 
Hoechst and the other big chemical 
groups. Bayer and BASF,” the ana- 
lyst said. 

“Only a few months ago we were 
saying that profits at the big three 
ebennea] companies would show a 
real decline this year; we now see a 
real increase in earnings for 1985 
and further opportunity for share 
prices to ciimbT he said. 

Bayer’s share priced jumped S 
DM, to 2213. in trading Thursday 
and BASF climbed 3 DM. to 212.9. 

Although Bayer and BASF have 
yet to report preHxmnaiy 1984 
earnings, all of the “big three” 
chemical groups have seen their 
share price soar above 200 DM on 
market expectations that 1984 re- 
sults will be higher than expected, 
as a result of the strong dollar, and 
that 1983 earnings wifi remain ro- 
bust. 

Hoechst said world group sales 
advanced in 1984 by 11 percent, to 
413 billion DM from 373 billion. 


Iococca Says Barclays Says Pretax Profit Rose 17 . 6 % in 1984 
Chrysler Will 
Change Plans 


Unhid Press Iniemmketal 

NEW YORX— Lee Iacocca, the 

chairman of Chrysler CoTPt an " 

notmeed a new corporate strategy 
for the automaker Thursday, fol- 

RonaW^eagan last wok not to 
ask the Japanese to extend their 
voluntary auto-import restraints. 

Mr. laoocca said that most of the 
Chrysler’s subcompact cars will 
come from Japan, while the compa- 
ny’s U.i plants will shift to making 
more expensive cars. 

He said Chiysler is asking Mitsu- 
bishi for 200,000 cars in addition to 
the 87,500 annually currently im- 
ported from the Japanese affiliate. 
Chrysler also will reposition its 
mid- 1986 “P car” ori ginall y de- 
signed as a subcompact but rede- 
signed as a fimfliiw Chrysler Le- 
Baron GTS or Dodge Lancer. 

Earlier plans called for 300,000 P 
cars to be built at a plant in Belvi- 
dere, Ifim ois, where Dodge Omnis 
and Plymouth Horizons now are 
made. Instead, Chrysler will make 
only 150.000 to 160.000 P cars at its 
plant in Sieriing Heights, Michi- 
gan. alon g with the Chiysler Le- 
Baron GTS and Dodge Lancer. 

The Omni, Horizon, Turismo 
and Charger m o de l s will continue 
to be made at Belvidere for as long 
as they remain competitive, he said. 

He said about 7 percent of 
Chrysler’s cars now are imported, 
but that that will chang e “We’re 
good at adapting,” he said. “Things 
change, but what the bell — that's 
what makes it fun.” 

In the nexi five years, he said. 
Chrysler will invest S103 billion, 
with “the lion’s share” in the Unit- 
ed States and Canada for develop- 
ing more premium products . 


Return 

LONDON — Barclays Rank 
PLC reported Thursday a 17.6*per- 
cenl rise in pretax profit in 1984. 

The pretax figure increased to 
£655 million (S701.5 million at cur- 
rent rates) from £557 million in 
1983, the company said. The per- 
share earning after extraordinary 
items was 85.1 pence, compared 
with 84.8 pence in 1983. 

The hank said current tra ding 
was satisfactory and further growth 
was expected in Britain and over- 
seas during 1985. 

The bank plans to support the 
expansion of successful operations 
in Britain and plans important 
moves into the securities industry. 

Barclays said advances in tech- 
nology would also require invest- 
ment as the group redesigns and 


improves its services in persona] 
and corporate markets. 

It said the encouraging profit re- 
sult reflected a strong pofonnance 
from operations in Britain, despite 
a continued high level of provisions 
for bad debts at £525 million com- 
pared with £475 million in 1983. 

Internationally, there was a wel- 
come recovery in the United Slates, 
but South Africa had a difficult 
year. 

The bank also announced Thurs- 
day a deep discount rights issue to 
save underwriting expenses and en- 
courage wider ownership of its 
shares. 

Barclays said it believed a fur- 
ther strengthening of the group’s 
capital base would enable h to take 
full advantage of opportunities 


arising from the changes taking 
place in financial markets through- 
out the world. 

The rights issue will back an ini- 
tial investment in the securities in- 
dustry of £150 million, the chair- 
man. Timothy Bevan. said. 

This reflects Barclays' plans to 
establish an international securities 
and investment banking group, 
named Barclays de Zoetewedd, m 
which the bank, will have at least a 
controlling 75-percem interest 

Mr. Bevan said the deep dis- 
count one-for-one cash call at 150 
pence per share would raise about 
£507 million after expenses. It is 
the first since 1961. 

Mr. Bevan said that following 
the rights issue and sale of Bank of 
Scotland, Barclays’ free-capital ra- 
tio would rise to 5.7 percent from 


4.8 percent at the end 1984 and 3.9 
percent at the end 1983. 

The bank's equity ratio will rise 
to 2.8 percent due to the rights issue 
and Bank of Scotland sale from IS 
percent at end 1984. 

Barclays shares rose Thursday to 
597 pence a share shortly after’tbe 
announcement, but finished at 592 
pence compared with 582 pence at 
Wednesday’s dose. * 


Philips Net Rose 

67% in 1984 

The Associated Press 

EINDHOVEN. Netherlands 
— Philips NV. the Dutch elec- 
tronics company, said Thurs- 
day that its 1984 net jumped 67 
percent from the previous year, 
while sales climbed 26 percent 

Net last year totaled 1.11 bil- 
lion guilders (S286 million), up 
from 667 million guilders in 

1983. Sales rose to 53.8 billion 
guilders from 46.4 billion guil- 
ders, Philips said. As a result of 
the improved earnings, the 
company boosted its dividend 
for 1 9S4 to 1.40 guilders a share 
from the year-eariier payout of 
120 guilders. 

Philips is a leading European 
maker of electronic compo- 
nents and consumer electronic 
goods, which are sold under the 
brand names Magnavox, PhOco 
and Sylvania. 


Commercial Union Has Loss 


Reuters 

LONDON — Commercial 
Union Assurance Co. PLC report- 
ed Thursday a 1984 pretax loss of 
£72.8 million (S77.8 million) com- 
pared with a £9 3- million profit in 
1983. 

The British insurance company 
said it would maintain its final divi- 
dend at <L95 pence, making an un- 
changed 11.8 pence for the year. 

Commercial said this decision 
was based on the expected impact 
of premium- rate increases made in 
1984 and planned for 1985, togeth- 
er with other actions taken to im- 
prove operations. 

Last year* s loss was blamed on 
difficult trading conditions in the 
United States and Britain, along 
with further increases in U.S. 
claims provisions. 

The 1984 result has reinforced 
the company’s determination to set 
premium rates at adequate levels, 
even at the expense of market 
share, and to reduce the proportion 


of business written in the U.S. mar- 
ket. Commercial said. 

U.S. underwriting losses in 1984 
totaled £301.9 million, up from 
£245.4 milli on in 1983. The overall 
underwriting loss was £439.4 mil- 
lion, compared with £3143 million 
a year earlier. 

Exchange rates accounted Tor 
£63 million of the overall under- 
writing loss. 

Life insurance profit showed an 
underlying 16-percent increase, 
Commercial said. 

Despite the loss last year, Com- 
mercial forecast better results this 
year and further progress in 1986. 

Texas Firm to Sell TTiai Unit 

Reuters 

BANGKOK — Texas Pacific 
Oil Gx, a unit of Seagram Co. LtdL 
of Canada, has proposed selling to 
the government its oil concession in 
the gulf of Thailand, the industry 
ministry said in a statement Thurs- 
day. 


De Beers Chief Has Stability, Reduction of Stockpiles as Goal 


(Continued from Page 9) 
versy. Anglo American called in the 
police to break a legal strike by 
gold min ers last year and showed 
Utile patience with black union 
leaders’ protests that they were per- 
suading their members to return to 
work. 

And the policies of the Oppen- 
heimer dynasty have run counter to 
those of the South African govern- 
ment, loo. Mr. Oppenhdmer pro- 
posed integrated mines, where 
most workers would be permitted 
to live nearby with their famili es 
But the authorities insisted that 97 
percent of black mine laborers be 


migrant workers. Oppenheimer 
policies have also been attacked by 
the powerful white miners' union. 

Mr. Oppenheimer 's last two 
years as chairman of De Beers saw 
a rise in output from mines in Bo- 
tswana and Aust ralia high interest 
rates and the rise in the dollars 
value. These factors created bigger 
diamond stockpiles that cost De 
Beers more to finance. 

However, because of brisk sales 
of small diamonds in the United 
Stales, the world’s biggest gem dia- 
mond market, and slowly rising de- 
mand for high-quality stones else- 


where, Mr. Ogilvie Thompson has 
seen the situation improving 

According to the last annual re- 
port. published in June 1984, De 
Beers's net in 1983 stood at roughly 
S500 million, up 20 percent on the 
1982 figure. 

“I ihink the company is on the 
right track,” be said “What the 
whole diamond industry is looking 
for is continuity to bring the busi- 
ness through a very difficult time.” 

Some analysts, however, suggest 
that the company’s long-term pros- 
pects are troubled because the 
steady expansion of diamond pro- 


duction further strains the cartel’s 
ability to control the market. 

De Beers operating style has 
been described as mandarin. Some 
say it is Byzantine, built on a sys- 
tem of committees and rival power 
centers, presided over in a style that 
is. on the surface, as placid asa dub 
for gentlefolk. But people at 44 
Main Sl. Anglo American’s Johan- 
nesburg headquarters, admit that 
the diamond trade is rough. 

For example, when Zaire with- 
drew from the Central Selling Or- 
ganization in June 1981, it was ru- 
mored that De Beers somehow 
forced it back in Vo insure that its 


action be viewed as an exception, 
not a precedent This was achieved. 

Similarly, and despite the com- 
pany’s protests to the contrary, 
there is continuing speculation 
about the nature of the De Beers 
mining operations in South-West 
Africa, also known as Namibia, 
where a former employee has al- 
leged that the company is seeking 
to extract the maximum number of 
diamonds before the territory at- 
tains independence. 

Mr. Ogilvie Thompson has been 
a director of De Beers since 1966, 
and deputy chairman since 1982. 


Options (pice* to s/ m.) 


hot 

not 

tag 

Xtai 

30 

U7S1&2S 

227MCS 



300 

&7M02S 

17J5-1875 

3600253) 

310 

S* 6 K 

1225-137$ 

1900323) 

3Z) 

200-35) 

57511125 

ISSM4S 

330 

lOJ 200 

A2S 775 

11 TV) 125 

M) 

-. 

400 550 

*00 USD 


GcUe2914Q-2P15> 

Vatean White WcMSJL 

t, Q«ri 4a Mart-Mnc 
1211 CcMn L Suloi i tei* 

T«L 31 «25l -Trim 21305 


STOCK 

DeVoe-Holbdn 
International bv 
Grv-Oock 
Interna banal nv 


BID 

USS 

SV* 

2% 


ASK 

USS 

6% 


3*4. 


Quotes as of; March 8. 1965 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
nore and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter- 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone; (0)3 1 20 26090 1 
Telex; 14507 firconl 


ADVERTISEMENT 


m NIPPON PUNTING C1L, LTD. 

(CD Ho) ; 

The uodraugnrd aunouom rial as from 
Marcfa 15, 1985 at Ka* Awocutir N.V. 
Spuisinat 172. AnMrnhm. ifiv^pjia. 47 
(atnKnpuuFd br an “AHidixu") ol iheCDR* 
Dai Nippon Printing Gk. LftL, Mill Lr 

K aUr wiih DO*. 5,88 per CDR. regr. 

0 ah* and with DO*. %80 per CDR, 
repr. 1.000 alu. (tfiv. per iwwd-d}!'' 
30. J 1.1 98k pass Yea 5.- pah.) alter drdir- 
««r 15* Japanear u\_“ Ycn 75.-j^DRi. 
7 per (DR. rrpr. 

DH». 10.70 per life, i 
X Jan.V 
CUR, i 


R. rrpr. UXX) do. Without 
an Aflidavil 20* JarUa.\ “ Yen 100.- **■ 


DO*. 1.13 


rrpr. 100 do., len 


.-llper i 

1.000,- - DO*. I4JU per LOR. ivpr. IX 
ihL will he drdorled. Alter 30.6.1985 Ck 
dhr. trill onU be iuh! under dedurrina of 2(77- 
Jap-to nsp Dfk. 552; Dfk. 5&20 nrt per 
CDR rrpr. mn. 100 and 1000 ih. eirh'in 
arronfaner trith the Japanese lax FegutuiuV. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

AnwJmhm, Februart 28. 1985. j 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, are in local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 



Denmark 
Novo Industri 


British P e t rol e um 

err 1*M 1*0 

17X30. 32J80. 


i»*« mi 

_ _ XMJ 79U 

Profln 649 615 

p«r Shore — 240 2-55 

Resu/ts In US. doUars. 


_ V««r 19M 1M3 

Revenue WJ 4S9J 

Jjet Inc. 422 L27 

Par Share — 236 1X3 

Nets include • sains or 
S2BZOOO i is sxzooo lit Quar- 
ters and of SIS million vs V 
million In 


Year 

Rmnue_ 
Pretax Nat - 
Per Share — 


Netherlands oaar. 


Coastal 


0-768 


Cacftsury Sdiw. 


Pretax Nrt_ 
Par Share— 


omtL 

13LB 

11565 


■•fill 

Revenue. 

Net Inc 

Per Shore 

Year 

Revenue 

Net Inc 

Per Share 


0.136 


Canada 

On. 


Per Sham — 


Phifips GJooiL 
manor. im mi 

Revenue 16^74. K414. 

Prom — 32ft. 2*5. 

Per Shore _ 1.55 l^a 

Year im mi 

Revenue 53J00. 6LS10. 

Profit 1.1) a 6&7JJ 

Per Share 527 123 

United States 

• . Net me 

Per Share — 

Revenue — 

Net Inc 

Per Shore 


IMS 

1 . 33 a 

174 

054 

ms 

6260. 

1012 

LSD 


im 

1450. 

2M 

0.98 

im 

&960. 

*37 

3j6S 


••rial Bfc 

Qwb-. 

1!M 


IRS 

1*04 

Revenue 

lira 

11X0 

6SJ 

64.* 


2R 

022 

U6 


9m Shore — 

U6 

007 


Per Strare results adlustea 
kw io% stoat dividend. 

WaLMart Stores 
ms im 
zm. 1 A 60 . 

1W.4 84 J, 

077 aj* 
ms me 

L40CL 4660. 
2708 1962 

l.*l 1A) 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
SPECIAL REPORTS 


IVORY COAST 
9 MARCH 1985 


NIGERIA 
12 MARCH 1985 

SPECIAL REPORTS ON TWO OP THE LEADING AFRICAN 
ECONOMIES ARE TO BE PUBLISHED IN THE NEXT FEW 
DAYS AND WILL ENSURE OUR READERS OF A CHANCE 
TO COMPARE THE LATKT DEVELOPMENTS IN THESE 
STRATEGICALLY IMPORTANT COUNTRIES. 


Bgra8§S^bime 


PERSONAL INVESTING 

On Monday, March 11 
in the International Herald Tribune: 

When your broker or banker recommends a stock, it is usually because of research provided 

by one of the major investment firms. 

Personal Investing takes a look at the role of market research and bow it affects investment decisions. 

A talk with Mario Gabelli, who has ridden to the top ranks of money managers 
by spotting takeover and buyout candidates. 

His firm, Gamco Investors, has chalked up an average annual return of 30 percent over five years. 

\\ \ I )f ft ,p,r European insurance companies with a stake in the US. market have caug h t the eye of international investors. 
' -‘ r - : Led by the big Swiss insurers, this sector looks poised to continue its strong showing in 1985. 

Understanding the ins and outs ofzerocoupon bonds can beafrustratingtask. 

. Personal Investing offers a guide to these increasingly popular investments. . 

For investors with an interest in the Far East, a report hum Tokyo on developments in Japanese funds. 

And more. 

AU in the International Herald Tribune. 

The Global Newspaper. 

Bringing'the world’s most important news to the world’s most important audience. 


Hoare Govett 

Clos er to t he USA 

INDEPENDENT 

research staff 
IN THE USA? 


Funking 
By Number 
olAnalyri* 


Number ot 
Security 
AnaJyete 


IlC 


Number o( 
Com panlee 
Covered 

1.113 


Dnti’1 Burnham 

Liddrr lYabndv 
Smith Barm - * 
Shtarson Ivhman 
Salomon Bnibi-r* 

i«l*^« «, writ no** 








ihr« siraishi yca«- . 

= 235 = 


for our in-dcpdi research rep on^AJ^ 
we’re atwns ihe V*p firm* m number 
of CFA's on our sian- 

iMiepih. 

research on equine* 

secunues. If )-ou maws* *ny 

not have » "orlitig for you. 


lH>y; 


KlMll . 


s me. 




SJ f t* K LmftY Sued 


inn*>o MWl-l 


*12 » iblt* 


Hoare Govett and Duff & Phelps have 
created a joint venture to provide a United 
States Equity Service to the international 
investor. 

Duff & Phelps, based in Chicago, provides 
on-going, in-depth analysis of more than 475 
United States companies spread over a 
wide range of equity sectors. Hoare Govett, 
in London, adds the international economic 
overview necessary to the decision-making 

HOARE 
GOVETT 


process of financial institutions. 

Hoare Govett also provides comment on 
special market situations through its own US 
analysts working closely with Duff & Phelps 
research staff. 

The United States Equity Service is 
available through Hoare Govett’s newly 
created American dealing desk in its London 
office. Please contact Pierre Rudman, Mike 
Vallee or Peter Horsburgh on 01-404 0344. 



DUFF& 

PHELPS 


Hoare Govett Limited. Heron House, 319-325 High Holborn, London WC1V 7PB 

Member of The Stock Exchange 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 


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47* 33 
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T7 TO* 
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19ft 12ft 
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7ft 2ft 
7ft 4V* 
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Mldtafl . JB VI * 
MbanW JUelO i 
MI OW C M . 14 11 
MttOCD 10Q 11 11 
MMM» B » 7 
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8 Eft 22ft 
98 Oft 7ft 
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10ft 8ft PGEpfD 135 123 
HR* 59* PGEpfE la 113 
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34 38ft PGEpfF 434 03 
3216 24ft PGEptZ 404 U4 
27 21ft PGEPfY 130 124 


64 Uft 12 12ft + ft 
U 1M Wft 10ft— ft 
II Wft Uft 10ft + ft 
■ TO 10 M — ft 
13 33 32ft 32ft— ft 

40 am so* am*— V* 

31 am 25* 25ft— * 


[ansi 


Floating Rate Notes 


March 7 


17ft lift Jcctvn job 33 9 

9ft 5ft Jocota 

14 left Jansen 7 

5ft 2ft j«Ain 4 

2* * JetAwt 

HVi J59 Jotron 491 50 17 

4ft 279 JohnPd 

lift 7V6 JotwiAm JO 23 17 

716 4ft JmpJkn 5 

31ft 21ft JUPlter 4 


9 1516 15ft 1514 + ft 

39 4ft 4* 4ft— V* 

I 1514 15* 1516 

22 3 2ft 2ft— ft 

5 * ft ft 

59 5ft Ift 8ft 

II 5ft 5 5ft + ft 

40 11 18ft 11 +* 

12 5ft 5 5ft— ft 

1 31ft 31ft 31ft— ft 


12ft 016 FPA 
2216 Uft Fablntf 
lift 5ft Fldata 
II 9ft FIConn 
X IS* FfFSt.il 


78 14 lift lift 11* 

23 7 149 17ft 17ft 17 Vj 

200 7ft 7 7ft 
W 7 5 10ft 10ft 10ft 

20 7 25 29ft 29ft 29* — ft 


416 1ft 
lift 10 
14* fft 
18 10ft 
fft 5ft 
17ft I 
15 5 

4* 2ft 
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5ft 3ft 
Aft 3 
3ft 2ft 


KauakC 7 

KtrvCp 30 14 21 
KaorNn 40 11 7 
Ketetun JSt 40 
KavCo 3 d 25 
KoyPtt 30 13 17 
K*yCo 9 

Kkhlewt 

Kllem 3M 

Klnark 21 

Kirby 

KteurVs J)2r 3 


24 2* 2* 2* 

9 14ft Uft 14ft— ft 
8 13 13 13 

3 14ft 14* lift— ft 
5 (ft Ift 8ft— ft 
422 1W6 10 U. 10ft 
51 4* 8ft A* 

B2 416 ift ift 

1 ift 4* ift 
5 ift 4ft 4* 

IX Ift 3* 3ft + ft 

2 Ift 2* 2ft— ft 














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•ft 0-7 
10ft XM 
9M 194 
Wft M 
Bft » J 
Bft 144 
n 54 

AM 3 

fft 1H 
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fft IW ' 
lift 2M 
fft 

9ft 74 
Ift M 
fft 244 
m 34 
fft IM 
lift 44 

m w 

12ft 11* 
Wft M 
■ 1M 
m* 3M 
1600 274 
Wft XI 
fft XA 
Ift 1M 
fft 87 
IM 5M 
Wft IV* 
Wft H 
fft 314 
fft 1141 
Ift 244 
8ft W-7 
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Ift W 
Wft »s 

uu u* 

fft 04 
fft 141 
fft U4 
U 94 
fft 211 
fft 293 
fft 135 
Uft IM 
U» 355 
lift 34 
fft 157 


Non Dollar 


Pm Am Is Flying 


Between These Cities: 


I, r. 
‘.J 

- — 14. 


?tl8 


..'4-<e i.». s -. 


New York 

London 

Frankfurt 

Hamburg 

Munich 

Brussels 

Berlin 

Zurich 

Tokyo 

Hong Kong 

Boston 

Nassau 

Freeport 

St. Maarten 


Antigua 
St. Thomas 
St. Croix 
Barbados 
Port of Spain 
Pointe a Pitre 
Fort de France 


San Francisco 
Tokyo 
Hong Kong 
Sydney 
Melbourne 


St. Croix 
Barbados 
Port of Spain 
Pointe a Pitre 
Fort de France 


Honolulu 

Tokyo 
Hong Kong 


■n* . . * 

l* 1 


f »?*b 


* V-KteM*. 


«... ' '--I 


Los Angeles 

Sydney 

Melbourne 


Hong Kong 
Tokyo 


Boston 

New York 
Nassau 
Freeport 
St. Maarten 
Antigua 
St. Thomas 


Miami 

London 

Hamburg 

Brussels 

Berlin 

Rio dejaniero 
Sao Paulo 
Caracas 


Berlin 

Frankfurt 

Hamburg 

Munich 

Stuttgart 

Nuremberg 


V* 


* m in — 


“IK . - 

" v *s*ed 


3 i i - '. , - 

'**••■* ll ii 


i 


Tiisum 






‘"•I ! 


, -- V 


Pan Am is operating key flights between the above cities despite the current industrial action 

taken by some of our U.S. employees. We are also doing everything possible to resume our complete 
worldwide service. ° r 


Travel A° r ^ r ^ ier m ^ orma b°n and reservations, call your local Pan Am reservations office or your 



. 

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■ * 1 ‘ . 


■ ‘ » ~ 

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S » *S5S:;Sj? • 

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CVTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 

Page 15 



PEOPLE 


(Contmned From Back Page) 


AUTO SHIPPING 


Tamoil Italia Names Angelo Pileri as Head 




150, 5670 AD Nuonen, 


♦ Hh i Pte te 


♦te ► 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 




SWIT2BUAND 

EJ me famet* rima. turner resort and 
SPA of BAD SCUOL Nw DAVOS 
beautiful sunny 3» + 3» room 
Apartment* for Jala. Very reaunofale 
__gfe B« mortgage 
W for Mmr to boy. 
1GB CONSULTANTS LTD. 

P.O. Be* 4*0, 8034 Zurich 
Tat Zurich 69 33 96 or 
(London 368 34«5. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 



GBCVA Orf-COUNTHYSaJE, m 
' 2 fumdied 

,600 ■ 5P.30D. G* 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


LM.L5A 

mmm. 

ROU5 ROYOE 
DEAIBt FOB BELGIUM 


By Brenda Hagen)' 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Tamoil lialia SpA. 
a Milan-based unit of First Arabi- 
an Corp. of Luxembourg, has re- 
cruited Angelo Pileri as c hairman 
and chief executive of its oil-refin- 
ing and marketing business. 

He succeeds Matthew Steckel 
who remains a director of Tamoil 
and First Arabian. Mr. Pileri was a 
senior executive ai Italy's state- 
owned Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi 
SpA and has served as president of 
Agip Petroli. a unit of ENI. 

In 1983, Tamoil acquired the oil- 
refining and marketing operations 
of Standard Oil Co. (Indiana) in 
Italy for a bom S275 million. Last 
month, Tamoil agreed to buy most 
of Chevron Corp.'s refining and 
marketing network in the country. 
First Arabian, the parent, is an in- 
vestment company headed by Rog- 


er Tararaz, a Lebanese banker. 

Banque Nonfeurope SA in Lux- 
embourg has appointed Peter Mo- 
dem managing director, succeed- 
ing Dieter Engel who is joining 
Westdeutsche Landesbank Giro- 
zentrale in DOssddorf. Mr. Mo- 
dem previously was with Nordic 
Investment Bank in Helsinki 
where be was director in charge of 
finance and adminis tration. Ban- 
que Nordeurope is owned by Swd- 
bank, Skopbank and FaeUesban- 
ken for Dan marks Sparekasser 
A/S. 

Crocker National Bank has 
named R-A. Nigel Henley manag- 
ing director of its international cap- 
ital markets group with responsi- 
bility for its merchant banking 
Operations in the Asia-Pacific, 
based in Hong Kong. He is second- 
ed from Midland Bank PLC. W. 
Lindsay Rutherford, vice president 


and regional bead with Chemical 
Bank in London, has been appoint- 
ed area manager at Midland Bank, 
based in Hong Kong. 

Banque Rationale de Paris has 
named Emmanuel Philippon. 56, 
deputy director general ana head of 
the international division. 

National Westminster Bank PLC 
said Philip Walker has been ap- 
pointed to the new post of accounts 
executive and vice president of its 
Los Angeles representative office. 
He previously was an assistant 
manager is the energy section of 
NatWesi’s international banking 
division in London. 

Dunlop Holdings PLC said that 
after Pegi Malaysia Bhd’s decision 
to involve itself more closely with 
Dunlop. Phoon .Ah Lek. Pegi's 
managing director, has joined its 
board. Pegi is the largest single 
shareholder in Dunlop. 


?v r'a ittju.v 




1 / . 




BP Profit 

Rises 41% 

(Continued from Page ID 
try continues to suffer from enor- 
mous overcapacity. Sir Peter said 
BP’s return on capital employed in 
European refining and marketing 
was a “dreadful” 34 percent. 

David Gray, chief oil analyst at 
the London Stockhrokerage Of 
James Cape! & Co., noted that sev- 
eral other major oil companies had 
losses on European refining and 
marketing last year. BP “reallydid 
quite well in the circumstances.” he 
said. 

In dollar terms. Sohio’s perfor- 
mance was about wen with 1983. 
But currency-translation gains 
raised the Sohio contribution to 
BFs net 29 percent to £724 million. 

BFs chemical division showed 
operating profit of £70 million, the 
first full-year profit since 1979. af- 
ter a loss of £81 million in 19S3. 


7 

32 

.10 2.1 13 


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22 TotPtpl 2M tU 
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24 OH 0 Blk— 14 
2f 110b TIM 11* + ft 

2H W 7 7W 
< im mt im 

25 17* 17* 17* 

10 JH TV* 7Vi— ft 
5 tSk «ft I2tt 

4 4 2* 3ft— tk 

114 m m m 

■4 21 3Mk 204k— IV 

3 544k 54Vk 34*4- tk 

30 5ft 5 5 — ft 

M IM 10 left— ft 

lUDcwmunvusw +» 

7k 3 » ] 

44 2« » 294k + ft 
700 101k 10 Wft + tv 

42 fft fit «4V— tv 

3Z7 4 mm 

11 6ft 4VV 4ft + ft 
2 M flk 54k— W 

224 23ft 23 23Vk— tV 

473 lift lift 111*— ft 
*« 7ft 7ft 71k— Ik 
52 204k 201k 201k— ft 
614 54k 4ft 41k— Ilk 

43 7* 244 2*+W 

» 44k 44k «— Ik 

11 Jft 3ft Mm— IV 

2003 2*4k 29Vi 29VS 
ZlQt 6tft 46ft 64ft — 7 
11 M SA tft— IV 
356 114V 111* lllk— ft 
211 1 4k 4V — W 

4 23V, rXVx 231V— VV 
35 W « W+W 
35 -li- T745 174k— IV 
32 M 154k 1544— K 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 


« « 7 1 8 


Page 4 


Re 




Whaii 

lai? It : 
mat leu- — , 
gan <? 

donajg 

T 

rist so ~ 

■ *° 

U 54 ‘ 


ACROSS 
1 Tam worths 
„ f Type of energy 
1.0 Limited 
12 Tommyrotl 
14 Submissive 

15"... that 

religion" 

■16 Power agcy. 

17 RJU.’s 
dispensations 
16 Backyard 
sport 
20 Grate 

22 Suct ion-pipe 
strainer 

23 Lockup 

24 Idolize 

26 Bad , 

German spa 

27 Shades of 

brown 

28 Gymnasium 

30 Cross preceder 

31 Is conspicuous 
33 Celerity 

35 Hoosier 
38 Bridge 
46 Stout 

41 A daughter of 
Dione 

42 Former 
Baltimorean 

43 Type of lace 
45 Protuberance 


PEANUTS 

THEY took; our class 
TD A l 'TINV TOTS" CONCERT 
TDRW..IT WA5 IN A BIG 
AUPrrOEIUM DOWNTOWN 


THE AUDITORIUM HAP 
LONG AI5LE5 WITH 
A REP CARPET... 


LUHAT UJAr YOUR 
FAVORITE PART OF 
k^THE CONCERT ? . 


[21^B22 




BLOND IE 




uIAlkinS on the 

■w REP CARPET' 


BOOKS 



i44^H45 


|48^H48 


46 Maple seed's 
wing 

47 Actor in“The 
Green Berets" 

49 Accomplished 

56 Buff 

52 Puts up fodder 

54 Made tough 

55 Inventor 

Rudolf 

58 Perfume 
ingredient 

57 Ladies of Sp. 

DOWN 

1 Sunshade 

2 Nickname for 
Thai berg 

3 Storage- 
■ battery 

plate 

4 Concert 
performances 

5 Beaver State’s 
capital 

6 Automobile 
pioneer 

7 Garonne 
tributary 

.8 Grieg’s “ 

Dance" 

8 Lasts 

10 The Sagebrush 
State 

11 Occidental 

12 Counterfeit 


13 Safecrackers 

14 Wristlet 

ISTatouayor 

tatou 

21 Accounted for 

23 Part of 
Elizabeth II 's 
realm 

25 Billie Sol 

27 Cub, e.g. 

29 Little fellow 

30 Adult scrod 

32 Displayed 
d»- sd w in 

33 Italian olive- 
growing center 

34 Idle chatter 

36 Explores an 
idea 

37 Milton's 
"servant of 
God” 

38 The basics 

30 Lots and lots 

40 Forwarded 

43 Makes an 
escape 

44 Ancient city of 
Egypt 

47 Huns’ king 

48 River into the 
North Sea 

51 hill'n’ 

dale 

53 "The law 

ass": Dickens 




I'M GOING BACK TO THE 

HOME lAAPHOVeWEI^T t— • 

■ CENTS? _ J 


jWHVCN BARTH DO THEY J 
L__- CAU. IT THAT? } 


BEETLE BAILEY 



ANDY CAPP 




DJD-VOU HEAR HIM, 

WOUL&YOU? 


© New York Tunes, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



:*'! Clttt Dady Mira Ww-piplin. Lid 1 

• "Peri, fry N^oAm^acaimdlcf J 

WIZARD of ID 


f 

, of ’we\ , 


W-ft , 



-* HE 1 — 
WXJU5NT 
-7 CMREt--*^ 






REX MORGAN 


** J BELIEVE ME, 

BERT/ WHEN 1 SAID YOU'RE A VERY 
NICE MAN, I MEANT fTAS A 
COMPLIMENT' LET§ GO INTO THE 


| < Mm Am«c< SmdotM. 


until tonight, 

WHEN I TOOK KENNY 
TO A MOVIE. I 4 
HADN'T «SEEkl ONE 1 
IN MORE THAN J 
2 FIVE YEARS 


' WELL, WE'RE 5 
NOT GOING TO 5 
W4IT ANOTHER ? 
FIVE YEARS' f 
> HOW ABOUT S 
[ TAKING ME TO ? 
! SEE ONE T I 
l -TOMORROW 5 
NIGHT* J 1 


-ZW&s*r 


“ /'• ■//. . —* 


DO you MEAN 

THAT, MARTHA* 


THE INNER MAN 




By Martin Walser. Translated by. Leila 
Vennewitz. 276 pp. SI 5.95. 

Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 

521 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, M Y. 10175. - 

Reviewed by Richard Eder 

X AVER ZURN. a chauffeur driving his 
wealthy employer across the southern half 
of West Germany in a pale-green Mercedes, 
needs to relieve himself. But it is more than 
that. There are global aspects, universal dimen- 
sions to his abdominal agony. 

History furnishes a lesson for his retentive 
struggle. (‘'Xaver had read descriptions of bat- 
tles during the Peasants' War. Whenever the 
horde of peasants yielded a mere fraction, it 
would be swept away in headlong flight.") 
Religion is there. (“Think of Jesus Christ," he 
reflects, speedingtoward Stuttgart audits sani- 
tary facilities. ‘This afternoon you will be 
granted deliverance.") 

And. of course, it is a state matter. (“It 
always infuriated Xaver when some industry- 
oriented group lashed out on TV against the 
deficit of the federal railways. If only because 
of its public and almost always spotless toilets, 
be was happy to concede however many bil- 
lions of mans were required.") ■ 

Xaver, compulsive and touchy, is a model of ■ 
outward order and, inwardly, a raging hen At 
one level, he is Martin Water's comically in- 
ventive caricature of modern Germany. But he 
is more. He is imaginative and a yeamer. If his 
little- man megalomania makes hfm alterna- 
tively absurd and sinister, sometimes verging 
on madness, there is humanity to him. Hnman- 
ity reduced by out-of-scale circumstances; a 
Gulliver exiled from birth for fife in Brobdiiig- 
nag. 

Xaver has floaied modestly up on the tide of 
postwar West German prosperity; be lives with 
ms wife and two daughters in a house inherited 
from farmer parents. There is an orchard at- 
tached and a forest adjoining. He is well paid 
and weD treated by Gleitze, a successful indus- 
trialist^ whose consuming avocation is tra v e lin g 
to performances of Mozart operas; he plans to 
write a book about them. So far, so good. 
Xaver loves his wife, Agnes, and his daughters. 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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□blsq □[□□□□ □□□ a 

□□□□ □□□□□ D0D0 
□E0D □□□□D □□□□ 


and the farmhouse and the 1 , 
Gleitze with painful devotio; 
ness. He is pleased with every * 
thing torments him. Each tint 
pumps hfm up to fury. He gfc 
rant and flies into an interior 
the way somebcxiy looks or dres- 
a waitress. A painting of a count: 

ates him because of me angle at - 
are moving. 

He swells alternately with eup. 
ger. Sitting in the front of the car, 
nimseif joining in the con versa lien. 
d lover and stuests in back. He, too, 1 


trii, ideas about Mozart. interestin ; 
about his family and his experience 
nywwnt . he is burning wub reset 
cause he feds all but invisible 10 his p 

When Gleitze arranges for him t 
series of expensive medical tests for hi: 
indigestion, he is at first gratified- He 
treated importantly, be in inks. Grad 
grows angn er and angrier. What busix - 
of Gleitze to have his, Xaver’s. insidr! 
ined? Added to the indignity of proctc*. 
and barium enemas is his conviction the*, 
form of management espionage. Gleitzr 
h umanly concerned, he comes to believe, 
simply sending his chauffeur to be cbeci, 
he would his car. \ 

Xaver’s flayed skin, his conviction mat"- 
bit of he takes in is a signal, u* 
threatening, directed personally toward J 
a marie of monstrosity. The monstrosity ? 
his. thnngh, but society’s. It is like the } 
condition of the protagonist in “The, 
Drum." Water’s point is that the dehuma 
tion of modem lne, and jjarWailariy mo; 
German life, distorts the mdividuaL 

And as we follow Xaver along the highw. 
in the hospital, at home -with Ins family, 
gradually retdize that under the absurdity and 
the dangerousness, be is Water’s Everyman, 
possessing inn oce n ce and even nobility. But he 
is cut off From his natural bearings. Those 
things that he feels ought to have value — hiS 
job, his employer’s apparent benevolence, the 
order and prosperity of Gentian life, his family 
— all seem contaminated. Hence his mante 
pursuit of signals. 

Xaver is a derailed optimist, believing that 
what a person does makes a difference: So ft 
his devoted wife, Agnes, who works industri- 
ously by day «nd dreams at night that dis- 
graced public figures such as Nixon and Willy 
Brandt come creeping to her to seek comfort 
and consolation. The Znm faith is not absurd; 
the world makes it absurd. 

The recurring motif of the Peasant Rebdlioa 
is a key to Water’s intention in this ingenious; 
fmmy and finally vay moving book. The docii- * 
ity of the modem Goman masses, he suggoft, * 
is also a capitulation for fraudulent promises 
and rewards. Xaver’s perquisites ias Gleitze'a 
chauffeur — the splendid car, his expense 
account, his proximity to the rich and cultivat- 
ed— are just such a fake. And he finally finds 
release from his rage when he is released from 
his mock glory. He is demoted, at the. book's 
end, to an aEdmaryjob working in Gleitze’i 
warehouse. For the test time in years, he can 
mate peaceable love to Agnes. 

Richard Eder is on the staff of the Las Angeles 
Times. 


Brandt come ere 
and consolation. 


‘1 SHWEO Wf SHOES. WHRrtl IDO HEW V 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
« by Hard Amok* and Bob Lea 


Doesn't believe m 
having any fun 

I SOLOE I ___ V if- ■ 


REDEL 


GARFIELD 

PO WO THINK THE5E SHAPES 
MAKE ^M E MORE MYSTERIOUS?, 


HEy. GO OP- LOOKIN', 
WHAT TIME 90 YOU 
„ GET OFF WORK? , 


YOU JUST 1 
PROPOSITIONED 
MY COAT RACK A 


V UC might < 
GET LUCKY 
THIS TIME* 


cRJA S-B 





it IMS untm Fuwi Svrxtc*tt.inc 


By Alan Truscott 

S UIT oonbinatums are the 
building Modes of declarer 
play, and every expert thinks 
he knows all there is to be 
known about the subject 
Every expert is of oourse. 
wrong about this: There are 
are always dark comers await- 
ing inanimation. 

Consider, for example; the 
heart combination shown in 
the diagram. Assuming that 
entries are readily available to 
each hand, what is the best 
chance for South to score three 
tricks? 

Three no-trump would have 
been normal and easy, but 
Sooth was forced to play fair 
hearts by a partner who used a 
transfer bid. North should 
have f ollowed, with three no- 
tramp, allowing South to mate 


BRIDGE 


the final decision, buz he - bid 
four hearts, setting up an inter- 
esting play proHan. . 

1 South saw that his whole 
problem lay in the handling of 
the tramp suit After some 
thought, he won in the dummy 
and led die heazt jack. - But 
South was absolutely right 
With the distribution shown, 
he was due to gain, for he 
could ran thej arfranri lalcr u i e 
the ace to ranove the queen. . . 

As against the normal play 
of starting with the ace, he was 
doe to breakeven in neariy all 
situations. He was due to lose 
only if West held a singleton 
king or queen, two unfikely sit- 
uations in which -he would 
probaityfitilmaaynttnL. 

fo the actual deal. West tar 
gan with a doubleton ten.. 


■ ■■ • v.-.j'tiii/vmi ^nw-iila 

winch should have been a 
break-even sitnatkm. But East 
ducted and Toohshly played 
an honor when the sent was 
continued. Tins succeeded in 
rewarding South far ids brfl- ■ 
Eantins^iL ' 

IfOKTH 

• ! *A4a . 

• <7 JS S78 ■ 

«i^ : J 

*q to • 

. .. SOUTH (D) 

*xqus 

9 A3 
0 AZt 
SAIN 

^Boa Ate wan vatanUs. tup 


Wwt m tte dtaaaad Unw. 


TEMRIP 


TEOGUN 


WHAT AN 
INHIBITED PERSON 
USUALLY IS. 

V. „ > 

Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by (he above cartoon. 


Yesterday's 


EUROPE 


(Answers tomorrow] 

Jumbles: CANAL BAKED SADIST CHROME 
Answer: What they call some of those men who run 
the gaming tables— “DECK" HANDS 


WEATHER 


HIGH LOW 

C F C F " 

.igarve 14 61 8 44 d Bongtok 

Amfeniom 4 2 £ £ uffi^Kaiu 

ajMnl 14 41 9 48 fc Mono ItOOB 

bSSU. 15 W 3 w fr 

suiBvMto ll S3 I W Htm Detnl 

3 § 2 34 r UJOU. 

BrvxMti 3 17 0 B fa SS2JSSL 

Socbaresl 2 5 'l £ T^l 

C wSw n 3 37 j 5 *tr T °* Ve 

XT™ IS | 1 Si AFRICA 

CdMburali 11 S2 S 41 fr Algiers 

Florence 14 61 8 44 O Colro 

Frtjnktort I « j » ® Com Town 

<MNevn 1 34 ■] J J Cmootanea 

Helsinki -3 » 5 ® Hororo 

Istanbul T 45 .3 37 » Logos 


Cdiaburali 11 

Ftoronce 14 

FranktnT 8 

Oomvo 2 

Helsinki -3 

isSanbal 7 

Los Palmas 20 

LJsMn IS 

Lowfan J 

Madrid ’0 

Mlkm • 

Moscow -4 

MuB'cto 4 

Niea 13 

OtM i 

parts * 

Preou* 2 

Reyklavlk 4 

Romo 'J 

Stockholm 0 

Sfrastnarfl » 

vantae M 

viewo 5 

Wsrtnw ± - 

Zurich 7 4 

MIDDLE EAST 


20 48 16 41 d Nairobi 

15 St « 44 d Tools 


HICK ' LOW 
C P C F 

33 9] 23 73 d 

1 34 - 4 25 a 

22 72 14 57 cl 

35 95 25 77 It 

32 90 16 41 fr 

6 43 0 32 0 

10 50 7 45 r 

27 81 34 75 S> 

25 77 17 63 a 

11 52 4 39 o 


15 59 I « a 

20 48 7 43 fr 

24 7V 15 59 Cl 

15 59 8 44 fr 

27 81 15 59 cl 

33 91 25 77 a 

25 77 14 57 Cl 

16 61 9 48 cl 


W>Hd Slock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse March 7 

Closing prices in load currencies unless othennie indicated. 


10 § -l 28 d LATIN AMERICA 

J S.17 * «a BMoMAIre* 25 77 18 <4 a 

'a S i J o !-**»»« no 

,5 £ e a r MmeoCttv at 79 » 50 tr 

'i v a S a afa oe Janeiro 31 88 23 73 a 

J J 3 W .fa Son Paula no 

2 34 0 k o NORTH AMERICA 

16 61 8 44 a An e b u ma o 1 34 .6-21 oc 

0 33 0 32 0 Altauto 20 6B 4 39 fa 

7 45 5 41 o Boston 4 39 - 5 23 fr 

14 57 7 45 o Oilcooo It S3 - 1 30 d 


4 » 1 34 

12 54 9 a 

2 34 ? ?3 


16 61 8 44 

0 33 0 32 

7 45 5 41 

14 57 7 45 

5 41 2 34 

2 34 0 32 

7 45 4 39 


1 34 .6-21 OC 

20 68 4 39 fr 

4 39 - 5 23 fr 

11 S3 -I 30 d 

14 57 0 33 PC 

10 M -5 23 OC 

26 79 19 46 r 

21 70 13 55 Cl 


ABM 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

AKZO 

AnoM 

AMEV 

A' Oam R ubber 

Amrobank 

BVO 

SoenrmonnT 

Colend Hldo 

Ebevlor-NOU 

Fokkor 

Gist Brocedos 

Heine ken 

Hoogovens 

KLM 

Naarden 

Mol Noddor 

MedJkivd 

Oco Vander C 
Pakboofl 
Philips 
Robocn 

Rodacnco 

RtUlnco 

Rorenta 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
Von Ommeren 
VMF Stark 
VNU 


PrevtaM : 2B6S0 


Oos# Free. 

398 
198 
IBS 
111.70 
22580 
214J0 
7J0 

74.10 
27750 

91 JO 
3L5D 
115 
10020 
188 
159.40 
63 
41 
4SJ0 
27L5D 
176J0 
30050 
18 

64.10 
77 JO 

129JO 
7080 
44J0 
205 JO 
348 
28 
140501 
204 


Kali + saiz 
Karsiodt 
Kaufhof 
KHD 

Ktoeck ner Worke 
K man Stahl 

Linde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Monnesmann 
Metal leesellKhaf 
MuendLRueck 
Prsussog 
Rushers Werke 

Scherina 
Siemens 
Th risen 
Varra 
Veba 
VEW 

Volkswogonwerk 

Conimenbaak index 
Frevious : 1JS1J9 


Warsaw 2 36 0 32 O oetroH 10 SO -5 rt OC 

Zurich 7 45 4 39 o Honolulu 26 79 19 M r 

Minns p PAST Kooitan 21 70 13 55 cl 

MIDDLE EAST Les Angeles 16 61 6 43 oc 

Ankara 2 36 -« 3 to Miami 25 77 M 48 pc 

Belrul 17 43 8 44 fa SAInneapofls 2 36 - 4 25 cl 

Danancs* 14 57 - 6 21 fa Montreal -1 30-17 1 fr 

Jerusalem 13 55 3 £ fr Nassau 25 77 20 48 Ir 

TOAvlv JO 48 4 39 fa Mew York 4 39 - 4 25 tr 

nr-EAuis Sail Francisat 14 57 SB 41 r 

OCEANIA Seattle 9 JS 0 32 to 

Aurklona 21 73 15 » d Toronto -1 30-14 7 Ir 

sCSo?^ 22 72 IS 59 r Washington 13 55 1 34 fa 

aS ST— <wnraS * : PC ' Wt1V 

SSSy-Tomo. 15 — 7 159 — 451. HEW YORK: Partly aoudy. Toma. 12—1 
par IS: Fair. Toma- 9 — 3 (4S-~37i. dome; Rain. Tema. is — 8 
IB—Sl TEL AVIV: Pair- Temp. 19—5 I66 — 41J. ZURICH: Cloudy. Tama. 


Arbed 1738 1720 

Bekooti 5730 5800 

Cackerlll 278 237 

Cooeua 3555 3530 

EBES 3020 X1S 

GB-Irmo-flM 3210 3100 

GBL SITS 2205 

Gev«n 4300 4125 

Hoboken 6020 S970 

Intercom 2290 2305 

Kredletfaank 81« H120 

Petrofino 7140 7160 

Sac Generate 2030 2040 

Safina 7*30 7750 

Solvav 4140 4365 

Traction Elec 4290 4710 

UCB 5340 5390 

Unerg 1740 17« 

VMIle Montagna 6100 6120 

Current siocx Index : 2JKL4I 
PmM : LMA33 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kang 
enma Uahl 
Cross Harbor 
Mono Seng Bonk 
HK Electric 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shanghai 
HK Teteahone 
HK Wharf 
HutOi Whamsoa 
Jordlne Math 
JardlneSec 
Mow World 

SHOW Brothers 

SHK Props 
Slme Darby 
Stehix 

Swire Podflc A 
Wheel Mar 
Wheetock 
WInsor 
world inri 


25 25 

1170 1160 

14 1190 
10 10.10 
46.75 46=0 
7.45 7_S0 

32 32 

SJD5 SO 
880 870 

72 71L50 
SSS 5 AS 
2030 2070 
*60 *65 

965 9.TO 
US 580 
1175 1125 
9 « 

645 640 

170 160 

2180 2180 
Sirao. I.io 
SUSP. 7 JO 
4.15 460 

1.95 180 


Hang Seng Index : 1389.14 
Previous : 138128 


Frankfort 


AEG Teletunken 
AlllofB Vers 
BdSl 

Barer 

Bayer .Hypo. 

Baver.VarJank 

BMW 

C wmn OTxbonk 

Conttgumml 
Daimler Bene 
Deausaa 

Deutscho Babcock 

Dowtscne Bank 

Dresancr Bank 

DUB SChuthe 

GHH 

Hochtief 

Hoecmt 


112J0 113 

1013 1013 
31150 209.50 
22180 21680 
31180 312 

32780 329^ 
38880 387-j 

16380 164-10 I 
13480 13100 

690.90 699 
35780 15450 

169.90 170 

42100 41V 

19180 19080 
21880 21B 

ISAM 13680 
46780 469-50 
21130 210 

10880 10880 
39780 _4M 
17100 17150 


AECI 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am Cold 
Barlows 

Blwoor 

Buffels 
De Beers 
□rletomein 

E tanas 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Hlveld Steel 
Ktaof 
Neflbcnk 
Pst Stern 
Rusnfai 
SA Brews 
St Helena 

4IWJ 

West Hotatng 

campomite stock I 
Prevtaas : 930*0 


653 655 

,2275 2230 
16050 16000 
9M 965 
Itoa ItflQ 
6800 6750 
913 005 

4494 |RV 

1340 1110 
«S0 2750 
2550 2535 
375 375 

7050 7000 
WO ow 
4900 4750 
1515 1560 
595 SVS 
3200 3100 
560 575 

5500 5150 


BAT. 

Bcecham 

B1CC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Soots 

Sowater Indus 
BP 

BrirHomeSt 

S rjt Telecom 
rlt Aerospace 
0TR 
Burmoh 
Cawe Wireless 
Cadbury Scfm 
Charter Cons 
Coots Porons 
Commerddl U 
Cons Gold 
Court ou Ids 
Daigetv 
De Brers c 
Distillers 
Drlefontoln 
Flvxw 
Free St God 
GEC 
GKN 
Glcuo C 
Grand Met 
Guinness 
GUS 
Hon son 
Hawker 
ICI 
imps 
jaguar 
i.iDvas Bank 
LOnrho 
Lucas 

Marks and Sp 

Midland Bank 

Not West Bank 

P ond O 

Pllklngton 

Piessov 

Pa Co I Elea 

Randlonrem 

Rank 

Rted ini I 

Reuters 

ROVOI Dutch t 

PTZ 

Saatchl 

So<nsburv 

Shell 

STC 

Sid Chartered 
Tote ana Lvle 
Tesca 
Thom EMI 
T.l. grouo 
Trotaloar Hse 
THP 

Ultramar 
Uniie-er c l: 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
W.Deea 
A_Hotalngs 

VMr Loon 3W C 
Wool worth 


584 582 

512 509 

365 371 

365 366 

236 236 

43 45 

5U 521 

297 297 

171 171 

259 261 

551 548 

244 247 

12S 


IFI 

Italcemontl 

Italmooiltori 

Modtobcnco 

Monte di son 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascente 

SIP 

Snkt 

sranda 

SIB 

MlB lades : 1,231 

Prevtaas : i,m 


7820 7675 
849S0 81910 
7H100 73300 
86125 15016 
1491 1481 

6820 6730 
2262 2189 
63000 66500 
67980 675 

2100 2047 
2943 3838 
12400 11400 
2572 2535 


OUB Index : 43183 
Previous : 0084 


StodkMbn 


489 487 

157 157 

501 501 

448 438 

289 288 

523*6 S23*e 

395 29o 

DOta SIV’.I 
198 198 

216 216 
11 29. , 32I1 27.-3T 

285 280 

348 247 

714 717 

210 213 

441 443 

640 U7 

184 188 

25 357 

527 537 

lot 163 

265 247 

138 131 

344 347 

624 64] 

366 364 

Ml XU 

179 170 

216 716 

584 Vj S83W 

353 

558 5*2 

259 365 

49-V. 509/32 

642 634 

910 *05 

29e 296 

7M 791 

204 202 

477 487 

463 405 

228 228 

443 454 

230 234 

357 357 

159 160 

201 206 

12 29/6412 35/64 
200 196 

254 255 

S35i* W. 

577V, S26 1 . 

34', 34', 

596 580 


Air Uauldo 
Alsthom AIT. 

Av Dossouft 
Ban coir* 

BIC 

Bouvuues 

BSN-GD 

Correfour 

Oub/Med 

CoBmeg i 

Dwmer 

Eif-Aaultalne 

Europe 1 

Gen Eaux 

Hochone 

imefar 

Lafarge Coo i 

Leerand 
fOreol 
Moira 
Mlcheiln 
MM Pwot 
Moot Hennessv 
Moulinex 1 

•Nord-Esl 

■OccklenlolB 
Pernod Rlc. 

Pet roles Ifsei 2 

Peugaol 

Podaln 

Prlntemos 2 

Rodlolechn 
Retioirfe 
Poussel UOal 
Sxls Rosstonoi 

Sour Perrier 
Icifni eca n 
Thomson CSF 
Valeo Z 

Agefl Index : 20381 
Previous : 20184 
CAC Index : 20584 
Prevloas : 28580 


630 635 

264.10 263 

109S 1130 

580 576 

55a 561 

640 648 

239* 2406 

1958 1950 

1207 1205 

265>10 2*7 

605 608 

241 23880 
995 1010 

561 567 

1618 1770 

B9J0 86 
425.90 422 

3)73 2078 

2387 2175 

1696 1666 

925 915 

87 86.10 
TOCS 1915 
11170 11150 
79 7880 
764 749 

728 725 

771J0 77490 
778 278 

5030 5080 
20150 20680 
269 269 

1275 1240 

1655 1640 

1950 1960 

537 539 

2400 23»0 

49S 504 

23680 23780 


Chile Prev. 

S> Trading 840 482 Kolbna 

UOB 480 484 Kansol Power 

a , .m - — - — , n Kawusakl Sloe! 

OUB Ied og : 43 | 83 Kirin BrewtaV 

pnvKHfS . com* Komatsu ltd 

I Stoddwhn 1 mueik indi 

1 1 Matsu Elec Works 

AGA 385 385 MlrsuhWH BcrJt 

Alfa Laval 190 T91 Mlt»ubl*l Own 

Asea 335 30 Mitsubishi Elec 

Astro 150 350 Mitsubishi Heavy 

Alias Copco 106 109 Mitsubishi Core 

Balk) on MQ. 190 Mitsui end co 

Electrolux 316 J15 Mlfsukoshl 

Ericsson 277 297 M»t«ml 

rrielta 385 390 NEC 

Handel sbonfcen 165 167 NGKInsutatorg 

Phormccta 213 216 NlklcoSoc 

Soab-Sconla • 420 NA «>»»*»" Steel 

Sondvlk 400 400 NtoPonYusen 

SKonska 94 NJL Nlwon 

SKP 201 206 Nomu r a Sec 

SwedlshMcrfCh 228 227 Olympus 

Vobfa 260 245 

Artoesvartden Indn : 39580 Shore 

Prrrlotfj : 197 Jll Sony 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 

Asea 

Astro 

Atlas Copco 
solid on 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 
Fnelta 

Hpndelsbonkefi 

Phormccta 

Soab-Sconla • 

Sondvlk 

Skanske 

SKF 

SwedlshMcrtch 

Vofva 


Sydney 


ACI 
AN I 
ANZ 
BHP 
Borol 

Bougainville 

Bramble* 

C oles 

Comet co 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Eiders ixi 

Hooker 

Mogellan 

MIM 

Mvar 

Ookbrtaoe 

Peko 

POSekton 

RGC 

Santos 

Sleigh 

Southland 

woodside 

Warm a Id 


330 328 

191 194 


Sony 

Sumitomo Bo** 

Sum Ho mo Chem 
Sumitomo Metal 
103 iei TolMri Carp 
r2 is Tosha. Marine 
32 Takeda Chem 

567 sS Tdfc 

™ 3» T * | l |n 

im S Tokyo Elec Power 
AIA Ss Tokyo Marine 
55 S Torov ind 

i |w 

^ ^ Yamal Oil Sec 

230 NMd/DJ. Index : 128MJ0 
Sf JJJ Previous: 1289887 

i g zxssujssr 

"A ^ r~PmeUk ~ 

xo 300 t-o WR 2 

415 415 t onlc L s u 3715 .37 

534 54J Brown Buveri 1735 17 


6680 AMI pree 

MteAddonto ST7J8 17 17 — fc 

WKAanlcoE SUb U U — IV 

4535 Alt Energy S30U 20 30 — 

MAitatW STBk 151k 159h 

300 Algo Out m 21 21 +16 

” '**'**+* 

jffljju Sffi*-. . ^ w w“ h 

54451 Bonk NS . SIM U U — % 

1H7SJ Borricka 137 132 132 —3 

W0 Baton A f S MM 14Vk 141k -k Ik 

WMBonaMoR 400 390 398 • 

375 Brcrtorne *514 516 514 

3^ “ramxilea STSlk - 179k 171b— Vk 

600BrendaM 51 0W tovj loik+W 

107274 BCFP . nn 1016 101b— Ik 
■MOO BCRei 258 255 258 + 2 

lg70BC Phone 822 21 Jk ZHk- W 

ra Brumnrk *1*14 1*4 1«W— W 

^BuddCOB - 822V. 2216 2216— 16- 

«*0CAE SJ7 164k 1644 

BSO CCLA _ . 53714 27H 2714 

moOCDWbBf . SHA -44k 41b— U 

2000 Cod Frv SKife 1«4 14V4.+ Vk 

2045DC HorVWyt 12314 2316 23V4— 14 

6S3CtalTruM- 533 3714 3m 

300 C Tung . HI u II 

152142CtBkCcm S30W 30 ’ 30 —-Ik 

, «« Cdn Mqt Res TJ 26 26 

2T2573 CTlre A < SFK 9 916 f Ik 

6C5CUWB 817 169. TJ -~ 

IMOCaro TO 12 12 + Mi 

701 Cetanes* S7Vj 716 71b— lk 

2 0Q CHUM 842 42 <2 4216 

lOOOCOWbA SGh 6V5 Ofi 

moOCDtstbBf - 8416 «k 41b— 16 

^CTLBCBk si£34 l5» Ifffc- Ik 

1000 Conwn fas 5516 516 516 

UOCpnwesf A - 8816 ttk 814—^6 

16500 Coseko R 273 248 270. — 3 

20100 Conran A 51116 11 1116+16 

smcrewnn sim im u — v* 

SHOCznrRes 157 1S1 ■ 151 —2. 

203861 Doan Dev 445 415 440 -W5 

3900 Doan A 440 -430 430 —10 

2950 Denison A P 51316 13 13 — lk 

2300 Denison Br Sttjk 138k - WVk— S 

4750 Dewicon 591k 9 9 

-gsplctosn Af . SS6 51k 5tk 

3700 Dkfuisn B 5514 5 51k 

5734 Deman A 268 225 ]48 +30 

5580 Du Pont A ST716 17 1716+ lk - 

'80Ca Pylex A 539 3116 381k 

SKOElchvxnX 57 ikb -7 +lk 

51814 TSKx Wk. 

- OlOOeouttySvr 57 7 7 

laDOFCAIflfl 53014 an 6 3016— TV. 

575 C Falcon C XI 816 IB 18 ' - 

g* »»6 9596+- «. 

SSg-i^g&'tS 

sssissss 10 

• 

.•9B«cBSr 5^ s • -L ^ 

3100Grevhnd STS 3416 3416— 16 - * 

600 H rising A f w 120^5 ■ TTtWnfl 8 ■! 

6281 Hawker Mhk 11 

12116 Haves D $25y, M 25 34 . . • „ . 

J3Kl ,BovCo I7jfc OTk - . *** 1* 

TlllOlmaoco -X55 «Afc 35 + V r JM77 Bonfc Monh - *2St a 
200Qlndal ST3V» 13% 13Vb ^ _ • . J44.CIL • *38 51 

1«0 Inolls _ - ST7 taS .iftUfe- • ■S6.fi 


Ttwhb ~Mdrdi7\ \ 

CdnaSm stocks via AP 

ring 

donto TOJk 17 77 — (fc 


Zarleb 


Atflo 

Bank Leu 
Brown Bcweri 


^ ’g S5i ?S35, 

77 79 gfaUniwui; 


All OrdiBBrtos Index :797JO 
Previous : 79780 
Source: Reuters. 


Eiecfaowott 
Georg Fischer 
interdiscount 
Jocop Suchard 


2730 2770 
3715 .3715 
173S 1775 
SKQ 3120 
3416 3429 
2710 2710 
745 773 

i84o ina 

4250 4350 
1975 1990 
1710 1710 
4400. 4400 


Boustadd 

179 

1J9 

Cold SlordOB 

270 

Z70 

DBS 

670 

6J0 

ProserN«a«e 

555 

540 

Ho* Pot 

252 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 


Page 1 


SPORTS 


Soviet Figure Skaters 
Maintain Domination 
As Fadeev Wins Title 


Compiled fci' Our Staff From Ckspaicba 

TOKYO — With a nearly flaw- 


oi.uon won the men’s singles title 
Thursday at the 1985 world figure 
skating championships. 

Brian Orser of Canada glided in 
second with his dynamic routine of 
high leaps and graceful turns in the 
men’s final event, while the free 
skat in g V.S. national singles cham- 
pion. Brian Boitano, was third, im- 
proving From fourth place, where 
■ be stood after the compulsory fig- 
ures and short program earlier this 
week. 

The Judges gave Fadeev six 
marks of 5.9 for technical merit and 
six 5.8s for artistic impression in a 
performance packed with triple 
jumps. 

It was the Soviet Union’s second 
gold medal at these champions hips, 
following the victory in the pairs 
event Wednesday by Elena Valova 
and Oleg Vasliev. 

And Soviet skater Kira Ivanova 
t ht\d her lead in the women’s singles 
rgven though East Germany’s Ka- 
tarina Witt won top marks in the 
short program with a dazzling dis- 
play of flamenco dancing. Ivanova 
was third in the short program, 
trailing Witt and American Tiffany 
Chin. The women’s finals come 
Saturday with the free skating 

In the men’s final rankings, 
fourth place went to Czechoslovak 
skater Jozef Sabovcik, this year's 
winner of the men’s European fig- 
ure skating championship. He was 
second before the free skating. Vla- 
dimir Kotin of the Soviet Union 
was fifth. 

Chin held cm to her No. 2 overall 
spot in the women's skating with 
sprightly footwork to the strains of 
Tschaikovsky's "Swan Lake." 

Knight’s Penalty 
^Called too Mild 

The Associated Pros 

MINNEAPOLIS — The Uni- 
versity of Minnesota's Jim Dutcher 
says he or any other Big Ten bas- 
ketball coach would have been 
punished severely for throwing a 
chair during a game; an offense for 
which Indiana’s Bob Knight was 
given a one-game suspension. 

Dutcher. when asked what he 
thought the penalty might have 
been bad he thrown the chair, re- 
sponded: "Probably life.” 

Knight threw the chair during a 
loss to Purdue Feb. 23 but was 
allowed to coach against Minneso- 
ta Feb. 28 and then Big Ten Com- 
missioner Wayne Duke suspended 
the coach for a game against iowa 
which the Hoosiers lost. 

“If something else happens, he 
has got to expect a severe penalty.” 
Dutcher said. 


which earned her second in the 
short program, too. “I went on the 
ice to do wbat I always do. nothing 
particularly special." said the 
reigning U.S. singles champion. "It 
went well, 1 think." 

Asked about Wilt and Ivanova, 
who was third in the 1984 Olym- 
pics. Chin said. “We’re all very 
dose" in ability. 

American Debi Thomas. 17. also 
did well in the short program. 
Thomas, who came in second at the 
U.S. figure skating championships 
in Kansas City in January, moved 
up to fifth place from seventh Tues- 
day. Thomas is the first black skat- 
er to win a medal in a national 
competition. 

Wiu’s victory in the short por- 
tion makes the event a wide-open 
affair. 

“I like to come from behind," she 
said. “1 think its better to fight to 
win the world championships. 
When you win the compulsory fig- 
ures. I think you take it too easy. 

"I fed good. Now, it's the free 
skate with Tiffany and Kira and 
whoever wins that will win the 
world championship, i think it mil 
be very interesting." 



Nieklaus — the Graceful Decline of a Superstar 



fctfcn Unynd Ptct U n t il n a boni 

ASPEN CELEBRAD ON — Fireworks burst over the ski 
slopes at Aspen, Colorado, to celebrate this weekend’s 
World Cup races. Skiers carrying torches down the slopes 
form the zig-zag pattern on the mountainside at lower left. 


VANTAGE POINT/ Peter Alfano 

College Basketball’s 'March Madness ’ 


iV« M Times Serrur 

NEW YORK —Those engaged in higher educa- 
tion are about to enter a period known as “March 
Madness.” which not long ago meant a spring 
break spent on Florida beaches and the inspiration 
for movies such as “Where the Boys Are.” Now. 
where the boys and girls are, and for that matter, 
where the money is. are the various sites for the 
National Collegia ie Athletic Association basket- 
ball tournament starting next week. 

The tournament has become a sports Mardi 
Gras, and it is difficult not to be seduced by the 
trappings — pep bands, acrobatic cheerleaders 
imitating Mary Lou Retton and Mitch Gaylord, 
animated coaches and players motivated by school 
spirit instead of playoff shares. 

For example, the North Carolina basketball 
program may pride itself on the high graduation 
rate of its players, listing in the media guide the 
number who have been graduated and their cur- 
rent occupations. But in Chapel Hill, the sun is a 
basketball outlined against a Carolina-blue sky. 

Critics of the immensely popular March Mad- 
ness are to be considered boorish, as those who 
kick sand on a spring-break sunbather. Still, the 
postseason spectacle is not beyond scrutiny. 

What is questioned here are the postseason con- 
ference tournaments and the ever-expanding 
NCAA field, which includes 64 teams this year. 
The NCAA does not endorse the conference tour- 
naments and has no power to prevent them. What 
the tournaments — the Big East. Atlantic Coast 
Conference. Southeastern Conference, and Metre- 
Conference, among others — do is minimize the 
importance of the regular season and give reason 
to speculate why they bothered to have one. 


“In a long season like this." Chris Mullin said, 
reflecting about Sl John's inconsistent play re- 
cently, “you start going through the motions." 

The seeding process in the NCAA tournament is 
not so much a function of geography as it is a 
balancing act trying to insure that the best teams 
reach the Final Four, which will be in Lexington, 
Kentucky, at the end of the month. So either St. 
John's or Georgetown, the two top-ranked teams 
for most of the season, will be sent packing, proba- 
bly to the opening rounds in Salt Lake City. Utah. 
Houston or Albuquerque. New Mexico. 

In the past, other schools have been sent far 
from home, most recently Virginia and North 
Carolina State. Because of the travel costs and the 
advantages of preparing far from the madding fans 
and hoopla at home, teams often choose to stay on 
the road. 

What the NCAA should do is just invite every 
Division I school to the playoffs and begin them 
immediately after its 86 sanctioned, regular-season 
tournaments. Among these are the popular excur- 
sions to Hawaii that are used as a recruiting tod. 

With the elimination of the time-consuming 
regular season, the playoffs could begin in Janu- 
ary. with teams engaging in a two-of-three-game 
series that would protect against a freakish upset 
The final two could play three of five. 

As it is. the 64 teams in the’ NCAA field and ihe 
additional 32 who are invited as “lucky losers" to 
the National Invitation Tournament account for 
jus/ about everyone who chooses up sides. 

This is not an attempt to be a spoilsport. Bui as 
interest in college basketball grows, perspective is 
being cast aside. 


By Thomas Boswell 

Washington Peal Serrke 

MIAMI — Little by little, great- 
ness drips away from them all. But 
nobody, none of the kings and 
princes or cur games, clings to his 
glory with the tenacity, the style 
and the gracefully loosening grip ol 
Jack Nieklaus. 

Whatever it is that youth pos- 
sesses and middle age has lost has 
been taken from him by now. 
Whatever time could steal is gone. 
Yet he's still here. 

The Golden Bear's gone forever, 
but the Olden Bear's still around- 
And, to both his and our delighted 
surprise, he might be around a long 
time. 

Yes. the golf season can begin 
again. The first Bear of spring’s 
been sighted: the Franchise is back. 
Nieklaus. now 45, started bis sea- 
son with a credible third place fin- 
ish in the Dora! -Eastern Open golf 
tournament in Miami the end of 
last month. 

At DoraJ's Blue Monster, Nick- 
laus’ name was atop the leader 
board for hours and be could have 
won with more luck. “I like ray 
swing pattern better than I have in 
a long time." he said, adding, “In 
general Tm putting well too. and 
I’ve played better every tourna- 
ment — 57th. 17th, 15lh to third. If 
I keep up that progression — well 
the way I’m playing right now, I 
think I probably wilL" 

Since 1980. we’ve welcomed 
Nieklaus back each season tike a 
staggering warrior who’s on his last 
legs. Yet. every year be finishes 
between 12th and 16th on the mon- 
ey list, has a marvelous Varrioo 
stroke average and is a contender in 
most of the major championships. 

Maybe it's lime to reassess. 

Just because Arnold Palmer only 
won one PGA Tour title after age 
41 doesn't mean Nieklaus must 
pack his cue. too. Palmer never 
cracked the top 25 in money after 
41; Nieklaus hasn’t been worse 
than 16th since turning 40. 

From '62 through ’78. Nieklaus 
had 17 uniformly great seasons. 
They made him the best golfer ever. 
In 1979. he hit the wall finished 


71st in cash and faced jock mid- 
Ufa. 

The magnitude of the adjust- 
ment he made — playing less, prac- 
ticing more, revamping his swing, 
learning the short Mine — still is 
coming into focus. His next level of 
athletic erosion probably is five 
years away, or. who knows, maybe 
10 years if be stays as fit as Sam 
Snead The magic’s gone, but the 
craft and competitiveness remain. 

Is it possible this Olden Bear, 
perhaps winning a tournament a 
year and finishing on the top 10 
leader board every other time he 
tees it up, will stick around as long 
as the Golden Bear? Will we see a 
Masters win in '88 and an Open 
title past age 50? 

Don’t laugh. All Nieklaus has 
lef t to prove is that he’s the best old 
athlete ever. And he’s working on 
iL Last year, he won his own presti- 
gious Memorial Tournament, was 
15th iu money and. far more indic- 
ative, was second in stroke average 
on the tour despite playing the 
toughest courses. 

Nieklaus can’t hit overdrive on 
command any more. Sputtering 
down the stretch is his norm now. 
Luck and circumstance must at- 
tend him. Which, of course, makes 
him ail the more beloved. 

Every golf fan knows Nieklaus’ 
timits. He’s colorblind and has legs 
of different lengths. His back can 
lock up at times and a virus once 
dogged him a whole season. His 
course building and the rest of his 
mammoth business empire might 
sap him. 

Despite this, if any athlete is en- 
titled to wishes for longevity, it is 
Nieklaus. It is not too much to say 
he defines and protects what is best 
in his sport and in sportsmanship. 

Just seconds after Mark 
McCumber had holed out a chip 
shot for the birdie that virtually 
closed out the Dorai tournament 
Nieklaus — when be couldn't have 
thought the cantons were on him 
— put his arm around McCumber’s 
waist and squeezed him as he might 
a kid brother in a gesture of genu- 
ine congratulation. 

In victory. McCumber said. “1 



HU ft— In — Sow* 

Jack Nieklaus, in w inning form in a 1984 tournament 


always play my best with Nieklaus 
because he’s so inspirational. You 
just wouldn’t want to do anything 
less ifcxn your best around him.” 

Nothing in golf, ami not much in 
sports, approaches the excitement 
that's spanced when Nieklaus gath- 
ers his game and his glare one more 
time. 

When the wind blows or the 
rough is high or the greens are so 
bumpy that nobody can make any- 
thing — whan the game of golf 
comes down to ball-striking and 
shot-making, experience and com- 
pare. ball management and self- 
management, Nieklaus still can 


Fortunately, N iddaus brings far 
more with him than victory. With 
the sports pages full of stars in 
detox centers and coaches throwing 
chairs, he siting to show that some- 
body can do it all 
Be the greatest player his game 
ever saw. Stan out as a pharma- 
cist’s son and build an empire 
worth hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars. Loose 40 pounds after age 30, 
keep it off and discover, to his 
amusement, that be was more mov- 
ie star than falsa 
- And find a way to lade out of his 
game so gradually that the long 
slow going becomes as much a. 
pleasure as the years at the peak. 


College Is Battleground of Athletics vs. Academics 


The Associated Press 

CLEMSON. South Carolina — 
More than 1.500 Clemson Univer- 
sity students rallied to support the 
outgoing president. Bill AlcWey. 
and oppose what they called the 
trustees' support of athletics over 
academics at the school. 

"Sometimes l think the trustees 
are willing to allow this place to be 
plowed up and planted in turnip 


confidence during a seven-hour vices are keeping tabs on the story. 


“Here, it's about 30 percent. 
Athletes feel, that because others 
are doing it they have to try to 
catch up. he said: 


against three Former Clemson moved by tireirshow of support but 
coaches on charges of illegally dis- was sticking to his decision to 


greens, just so we can have a good championship. _ _ _ 

football team." Oran Smith, the The drug probe followed another 
former student senate president scandal ai the school — a iwo-vear 


meeting Friday in Columbia. Students upset by the controver- Athletes feel, that because others 

His resignation and that of Ath- assembled outside Aichley’s of- are dong it they have to try to 

lelic Director Bill McLellan cou- fice Wednesday and chanted his catch up. he said: 
pled with crimindl indictments name- He told the crowd he was , , 

against three Former Clemson moved by theirshow of support but lh f fr 

coaches on charges of illegally tfc- - Peking to his decision to 

E^^^The'ShooTS the 2 na- Rally wanner Danny fedtlhah 

lional spotlight in a way Chanson presented Atchley wiih-paruons. 

has not seen since its 1981 Football “&"«* by more : than iOOO Stu- 

-SSSW.* ^SSSSSS-JeteDefeated 

rXS, 2 A S -23 On Penalties 


Jets Defeated 


former student senate president sandal at ihe school -a two-year ^when you had the am™.*, 
told the crowd Wednesday. NCAA probation for recruiting v,- made ^ proud ^ enhanced 

Atchley resigned as Clemson’s u our academic reputation in the na- 

president elective July 1. after the down ,n November 1982. li(WU - t He petition read. “W — ’" 

schools 13-member board of trust- Major television networks, news- wish you had been allowed t 
ees refused io give him a vole of papers, magazines and wire set- rail your responsibilities in 


1 I I I • . . -« — | nnn %'MI MWUUWUUV IWUUIMUVU U1 UIV MU 

handed down m November 1982. lion .“ the petition read. “We only 

Major television networks, news- wish you had been allowed to cany 


IARD 


Hockey 

NHL Standings 


NBA Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 



Patrick DIvMan 




AltaMtc Division 




W L 

r 

Pts 

GF 

GA 


w 

1 L 

Pet. 

GS 

x-Waatilnolon 

3* 

17 

9 

87 

267 

193 

•-Boston 

49 

14 

-778 

— 

x-Ptlilogelpmo 

38 

19 

7 

83 

267 

202 

x-PhUattelphla 47 

15 

.758 

lto 

N.Y. lahmdcrs 

33 

2E 

< 

70 

290 

254 

New Jersey 

32 

3Q 

516 

UVj 

N.Y. Rangers 

22 

33 

9 

53 

245 

272 

Washington 

32 

31 

JOB 

17 

Pittsburgh 

21 

37 

5 

47 

221 

299 

New York 

20 

43 

-317 

29 

N*y Jgrggy 

19 

17 

8 

46 

213 

7U 


Ceati-al Division 




Adams Dlvttioa 




Milwaukee 

<3 

1* 

-689 

— 

Montreal 

33 

23 

10 

76 

253 

219 

Detroit 

34 

27 

-557 

8 

Buffalo 

31 

21 

12 

74 

233 

105 

OllCOBQ 

29 

33 

.475 

13 

Quebec 

33 

24 

8 

74 

270 

234 

Atlanta 

25 

37 

.403 

17V, 

Boston 

28 

27 

8 

64 

233 

221 

Cleveland 

35 

37 

>03 

171", 

Hartford 

31 

36 

7 

49 

220 

277 

Indiana 

19 

42 

-J11 

23 


x-St. Cauls 
Oileoaa 

Detroit 

Minnesota 

Toronto 

K-Edmanton 
Calgary 
Winnipeg 
Los Angeles 
Vancouver 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 

tils 31 23 11 73 244 231 


32 30 S 
21 34 11 
20 36 It 
17 42 7 


S » 242 354 

11 53 230 2*2 

11 51 227 270 

7 41 209 286 


smvttui Division 

44 IS 7 95 330 229 

33 24 7 73 599 2S7 

33 27 7 73 292 297 

30 25 II 71 288 271 

IV 39 8 46 228 342 


(x-dlnctwd playoff snot) 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Detroit 2 I 2— s 

Toronto I S 9—3 

Ogrodnlcfc 1441, SI mw 2 <9>. Gore (201. Fas- 
tor (12); Valve (30), Brubaker 2 (7). Shots on 
goal: Detroit (on Bernhardt, Bastar) 22-8-7— 
57; Taranto tan Stefan) 614-10-31 
Montreal I o 3—4 

Wtnntpog 1 l 0—2 

Flockhort (71. Naslund 2 137). TremWov 
(25>; McCLean 2 134). Shots on goal: Maiteal 
(an Hayward) 88-9—25; Winnipeg (on Pen- 
ney} 7-6-5— >6. 

Chicago 9 1 w 

Minnesota 0 1 *-« 

Larmor (38), B. Wilson (81. Paterson (6). 
Yeramenuk (MM. Seward 133). Bellows (25). 
Paynes (27). Acton (17). Shots on goal: Chico- 
BO Ion Mofoche) >2-6-13—31: Minnesota (an 
Bon n e rwionl 186-4— 20. 

N.Y- Rangers 2 3 V - 6 

Vancouver ■ 1 * — 3 

Ertxon (6). Maloney HOI. Ruatsalalnen 
(234. MePhee 110). Pavellch (91. S. Patrick 
(10): Hal ward 17). Petit 13). Taut* 1301. Shots 
on goal: N.Y. Rangers (an Brodwr. Caprice) 
9-11-4—24; Vancouver Ion Homan) 16-17-15 — 
41 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
National League 

CINCINNATI— Stoned Jett Russell, ptldv 
er. and Nick Esasky, third baseman, to one- 
year contracts. 

LOS ANGELES— Agreed Jo terms with Orel 
Her shlscr.plfclier.end Dave Anderson. short- 
mop, an ane-vear contracts. 

ST. LOUIS — Ag reed to terras with Rick Har- 
tal and Rick Ownbev. pitchers, on one-veor 
caitraels 

American League 

MINNESOTA— signed Kirby Puckett. Oui- 
ilelder. to a one- y ear contract. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

1 — A CLIPPE PS— Fired Jim Lvnam. coach, 
and nam ed Dan Chaney to replace him. 

| FOOTBALL 

NatteoM Football League 
*ySAN DIEGO Nn m ea John Butler, Dwtgnt 
Adorns and Steve Schnatt to rtielr smutlng 

stcH. 

united Stales Football League 
• oak land— T raded Marcus Ouirm, safety. 
c lo Tampa Bov tor undisclosed tolure wait 
fi j Ne ie cs. 

15- COLLEGE 

iri'-jRMAN— Announced itio resiadtion at 
SEQtl Davis, basektball coach. 

181—7 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 

Denver 41 2) — 

Houston 36 26 .581 5 

Dallas 24 28 342 7 

San Antonia 13 3| SOS **> 

Utah 7* 33 ,468 12 

Kansas City 21 40 ju 199* 

Pod fie Division 

I— A. Lakers 44 IB .710 — 

Phoenix 79 33 .468 15 

Portkew 19 k A0 Ift 

Seattle 2* 3* ,419 )8 

I— A. Clippers 23 40 J55 n 

Golden State 16 46 558 28 

<x -cl I netted playoH berth) 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Seattle 38 27 26 27— He 

New Jersey 37 32 » 31—129 

Richardson 8-17 6-6 23. Willwms 9-14 2-3 70; 
McCormick ?-l69-i027,Chambers 7-17 B-1022. 
Rebounds: Seattle 37 (McCormick 12): Now 
Jersey 63 (williams 2D). Assists: Seattle 25 
(Sund«old6>: New Jersev34< Richardson 10). 
Chi COW 28 » 24 26—107 

Boston 34 29 13 25—104 

Jordan 13-26 7-7 33. Woalridge 10-17 9-11 29. 
Parish 10406-786. Bird 11-74 2-235. Rebounds: 
Chicago 40 (Greenwood 8); Boston 51 (Parish 
13). Assists: Chicago 71 iWhattev 12); Boston 
31 (Bird 101. 

A Han to 22 20 16 28— *6 

Philadelphia 27 10 IS k-U 

Toney 7-1Se62I.Che*ks6 j 9 4-4 16; Rivers 11- 
19 0-0 34. EJohnson 6-t2 4-s 16. Rebaends: 
Alton to so iCarr. Hostings. Willis 9); Phila- 
delphia 40 (Malone 10). Assists: Atlanta 20 
IE Johnson 9): Philadelphia 23 (Cheeks 4). 
New York 16 24 28 28— «e 

Detroit 33 3S 22 24—114 

Johnson 9-12 3-4 21, Lolmbesr 517 4-4 7Q; 
Kino 1 T-296-7 28. Wilkins 9-15M 15 Rebounds: 
New York SO (King. Wilkins 10); Delralt 65 
(Laimbeer 16). Assists: New York 24 I Soar - 
raw 10): Del roll 29 (Thomas 9|. 


Portland SB 37 30 21 11 *—131 

W a shington 30 S3 25 26 n 18—127 

Malone 14-28 12-12 40. Gus Williams 13-27 1-2 
27: Colter 14-70 55 35. Vatdeweohe 1 1 -19 1-323. 

Rebounds: Portland so iCorr llj; Washing- 
ton 69 (Balkan lei. Assists: Portland 27 1 Col- 
ter 9) ; Washington 34 (Gus Williams 131. 
Indiana 22 28 31 21—102 

San Antonio 32 27 24 25-188 

MJIchell 71-30 7-9 29. Gilmore 7-14 510 23.- 
Stlonnovleh 17-19 1-s 37. williams 5-13 50 16. 
Kellogg 00 3 0-016. Rebounds: Indiana IMKel. 
loeg II; San Antonio 48 (Ml Ichell 10). Assists: 
Indiana 28 (Williams a): San Antonio 26 
(/Moore «. 

Utah 30 14 27 23-94 

Houston 26 ta 28 21—90 

GrlHIlft 10-19 56 27. Bolley 7-23 57 20. 
Okiluwon 8-16 5b 21. Samoson 5a 57 IS. Re» 
bounds; Utah 54 (Bolley ))); Houston *4 
v Sampson. Otaluwon 11). Assists: Utah 73 
(Green 7); Houston 24 (Lucas 61. 

Clevolimd 39 34 38 23—114 

LA Clippers 22 38 36 24-11* 

Free 8-18 57 23, Hubbord 9-16 3-2 TO: Smith 
12-22 541 29. Brkfeemon 515 5-5 17. Rebounds; 
Cleveland 58 (West 13); LA. Clippers 54 (Dan. 
aktson 9). Assists: Cleveland 25 (Frog 131; 
LA Clippers 77 (Ninon 71. 

GaKMn State 26 25 12 36—119 

LA. Lakers 30 3* 35 45-145 

McGee 11-14 7-7 39, Abdui-Jabbor 10-14 3-7 
23: Snort 514 510 22. MJahnson 512 4-J 31 
Ruboanas: Golden stale 33 (MJcrmsan 61; 
LA Lakers 60 (McGee. Kupchak 7). Assists; 
Golden stole 3 I Wilson 71; LA. Lakers 44 
(Lester to>. 


Basketball 

Selected College Results U.S. College Basketball Leaders 


Tennis 


WOMEN'S INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS 
Secood Round 
(AI Princeton. New Jersey) 
Martino Navratilova (1). U£_def. Peanut 
Louie. UJ. 54. 52. 

G*ol Fernandes. Puerto Rico. dot. Carilng 
Basse tt (51. Canada. 6-0. 53 
Camerlne Tanvler. France, del. Poscoie 
Paradis, France. 52. 53 
Wendy Turnbull 12), Australia. deL Steph- 
anie Re he. U.5. 52. 52 
Catertna Ltndavlsi 16). Sweden, oof. Wendy 
WWW. OS. 7-S. 51 

Sylvia Han Ik a, west Germany, del. Pom 
Cesote. UL 52. 53 

Hona Mandllhovo (4). Cxechoslovokia.dal. 
A I vda Moulton. U-S. 52. 7-a (7- 3). 

Pam Stirtwr 13 1. UJS. «ef. Setting Bunge, 
Monaco, 7-i 7-6. 7-a (7-3) 


Tottenham Hotspur goalie Ray dements saves a shot 
against Real Madrid in UEFA Cup soccer in London 
Wednesday night. The Spanish team blanked Spurs. 1-0. 


SOUTH 

South Florida 75. Radford 67 
MIDWEST 

Michigan 77. Oh-0 St. 72 
Notre Dame 66. Marquette 60 
TOURNAMENTS 
Atlantic Ten Conference 
First Round 

Duauesn* 7*. Pgnn Si. 64 
SI. Bonaventvre 6a Rhode island 55 
BID Bow Conference 
First Round 

Providence 77, Seton Hall 7S. OT 
Big Eight Conference 
First Round 

Iowa St. 76. Colorado 52 
Missouri 68. Kansas St. SO 

ECAC Division III 
Metro N.Y.-NJ. District 
Semifinals 

King's Point 72. Staten Island 71 

NJ. Tech 57. Lehman 55 

New England Division 
Semifinals 

Masv-Boston 75. Weslevan 6l 
Trinity, coin. Sa. Conned leu! Coll. Sl 
Upstate New York Division 
Semifinals 

Fred on to St. 7*. Rochester 67 
Hamilton 77. Union. N.Y. 56 

Mid-C on tinent Con f ere n ce 
Ftrsl Round 

Cleveland St. B5. wls. -Green Bay 67 
E. Illinois 66. N. Iowa 65 
SW Missouri 104. Ill.-Chicogo 86 
W. Illinois 76. Valparaiso 71 

NAIA District 7 
Cnompto n snlp 

Meso 95, Grand Canyon 78 

NAIA District IB 
Championship 

Fori Hays SI. 73. Wasitourn 54 
NAIA District If 
Championship 

Kearney SI 87. Wayne. Neb 72 
NAIA District 14 
Champlonshio 

wis. -Stevens Pi. S2 Wli-Ecw Claire <! 
NAIA District 18 
Chomp lonshlo 
Waynes t>urg 7A SI. Vincent 66 
NAIA District 21 
Championship 

ina-Pur.-inapts. 71. Tn-SI- ind. 6* 

NAIA District 22 
Championship 
Pio Grande HS. Walsh 68 

NAIA D (stria 23 
Championship 
Hillsdale 94. Siena Htv. 69 

NAIA District 31 
Championship 

Sr. Thomas aowios 83. Concordia. N Y. 74 
Sovlbeo stern Conference 
First Pound 

Auburn 64. Mississippi 60 
TwiMSsrt 71. Vanderbilt 51 

Western Athletic Conference 
Second Round 

New Me. ico »2, Colorado Si. S« 

Ulan 66. Air Force 64 


I European Soccer 

UEFA CUP 

(Quorieriinols. Firsl Legl 
Vonchesler United 1, Video Ion. Hungary 0. 
inter Milan 1. 1FC Cologne 0 
Tottenham o. Real Maand ) 

EUROPEAN CHAMPION'S CUP 
lOuarierlmals. Firs) Log l 
JFK Goieborp 0. Panartunan os 1 
Auilrla F.C. I. Liverpool 1 
Bordeaux 1. Dnepropetrovsk 1 
iuvenhjs 3 . Spuria Prague O 

EUROPEAN CUP WINNER'S CUP 
I Quarter I mall. First Led) 

Evert on 3. Fortune Sittard 0 

Dvnamo Dresden 1 Roald Vienna 0 
Barern Munich 2. Roma 0 


NCAA’tCoDeve BasketMl leaden throw# Robinson. Now 
March 4: Co hedge. USA 

TEAM OFFENSE Brawn. GWash 

G (W-LI Pts. Avg. FIELD G 

Oklahoma 38 255 2717 916 

Alcorn St. 77 72-5 2351 B7.1 walker. Utica 

Loyolb-IH. 27 22-5 232) UJ Mm, Crghf 

Utah SI. 27 17-ie 2809 SSJ Happen. Neb 

southern 37 17-1# 2308 B55 Lavr. Rrnctn 

Nev.-Los Vegas 27 24 3 2253 «3A Salley. GaTeCh 

Barior 27 1Mb 2213 DJ) Robinson, Navy 

Tulsa 27 21-6 221) B1J staves, Souttm 

Cleveland St. 27 28-7 2303 BU Ewlno. Gtown 

Virginia Tech 27 20-7 7196 I1J Bontvm. Coroll 

Michigan 36 DO 3053 80.1 Lovodroma. HBc 

Northeastern 27 19-1 2151 79J Pinckney. Villa 

5on Diego St- 28 21-7 2228 79A Thomav Cenrty 

Duke 27 21-6 2148 79.6 Dougherty, UNC 

George Maso^ 27 17-10 2144 794 Scott. NewMe* 

Indiana Sl. 27 13-14 2135 79.1 Boiusz. Comil 

TEAM DEFENSE 
G (W-L) 


RoWnson. Now SO 27 313 IU 

Co Hedge. USA sr 28 322 11-5 

Brawn. GWash 5 R 35 280 UJ 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 


lion." the petition read “We only 7V Assonaurd Press 

wish you had been allowed to cany WINNIPEG, Manitoba — 
rail your responsibilities in all ar- Montreal Coach Jacques Leoutire 
. ***; . was never one to take many penal- 

Soroe board members nave said ties during his 12-year National 

confidentially over recent weeks Hockey League career with the 

that Aicti ley's problems » the C^dHa^sSiTwiis with ailrigcof 

school were not purely with, the i^y that just bcfore lhe Cana- 

athletic department — that they (liens’ game with the Winnipeg Jets 

were concerned with overall leader- he discussed the sobject of penal- 

ship at the school. ties, . • . 

Bat Atchley warned trustees in a Latex, penalties decided the out- 

leuer Friday that the university come of the game when Mats Nas- 
could become known as “Clemson • 


Happen. Nab 
**-* Law. Prnctn 
»4 Sol lay. Go Tech 
510 Robinson, Now 
Stows, Souton 


’ercbntage Al ! ,, 1 eti 5 K University." “Uofortu- VChCTKr * 

ci g fg fga pci. naiely. there is only one issue today IxHJL. tOLUa , 

sr 27 is* 2 i 6 7u for die public," he said, "athletics . . 

gj versus academics." . hind and Mano Tremblay scored 

sr 84 i3i us os* The chairman of the state com- power^playgooU 15 sewods apart 
jr 28 i63 250 658 mission on higher education, Fred suriy w . the third period as ti*s 
jr 24 S S £! R- Sheheen, criticized the trustees Canadieos posted a 4-2 victoxy 
SR 21 166 263 63 .i Wednesday, for their handling of W^nesday night over ihe Jets. _ 

sr 28 177 *87 4L7 Agnation. He said be was 
sr 27 i4i z2* 6U concerned that Clemson was gain-'. 


Fresno Sl. 

Princeton 

Coloale 

Georgetown 

CXcgan St. 

Illinois 

Temple 

Ganioga 

Mdrtv 

lowo 

San Diego 

Marouetie 

Cornell 

Washington 

Virginia 


Hughes. Lov-111 SR 27 31 

McDaniel, watSt 5R 27 29 

PolomMxIo^allSI JR 27 26 

Smith. Lay -Col JR 26 27 

Catleoge. USA sr 28 28 

Garvin. Tb«-SA Ir 28 27 

Tlsdole. Oklo JR 30 30 

Dumarg. McNoes SR 25 22 

Mitchell. Mercer SR 28 26 

Harper. MtoG ir 27 27 

Yales. C Mason SR 27 23 

Robinson. Now SO 27 2S 

Hoc pen. Neb JR 27 24 

Lewis, Noreasi SO 27 29 

William s. ind SI JR 27 25 

Couens. Army SR 2* S 

Beard. Samlrd SR 30 30 

Harris. Tulsa SR 27 23 

Walker. Kv JR 27 3) 

Person. Auburn JR 27 27 

Wilburn. NM SI JR 21 18 

Tavlor. BwIGm SR 27 25 

Vincent. MlChSI SR 36 21 

Bradley, USF sr 27 22 

KJelne. Ark SR 30 S 

Saoreloinen. BYU sr 39 32 

Rogers. uc-(rv JR 2* 34 

McCaHry, HCrss JR 28 22 

Beniamin. Crghi JR 31 25 

Hinson. Baal SO 28 24 

Truesdoio, Cliadl SR 2* 24 

HolL Cants SR 77 20 

Stevens. lowaSt SR X 25 

Winlers. BradlV SR 27 24 

CarraMno. Hrvrd SR 22 17 

Pass. Monmtti 5R 26 23 

Battle. Rutors SR 26 21 

KrrslkvraLMnlna JR 28 20 

Grier. KenISI SP 27 23 

Moore. Crghi SP 31 25 

Krovnbrnk.Nolow JR 27 23 

Battle. Lay-Ill SR 27 3 

Newman. Rchmd JR 27 22 

Sourrv. LIU sr 28 22 

Lee. Mem 51 SR 27 21 

REBOUNDING 
Cl 

McDanleL WlchSI S 

Scurry. LIU • 

Beniamin. Crghf J 

Sanders. MisVai 5 

Towns. MONMTH l 

silwrlm. Cob) 5 

Neal. Fulrin S 


G (W-L) PlL Avg. 

27 20 71461 54.1 
24 11 131312 54J 
26 3 211451 5&A 

29 27 21648 565 

28 21 71592 5*.* 

30 22 81716 572 

26 21 51510 511 

27 15 121570 58.1 

29 17 121693 5L4 
39 71 81698 584 
26 16 101532 58.9 
26 17 91536 59.1 
24 13 111422 59J 
29 20 91731 S0J 
79 1$ 141734 5»8 

SCORING 

Cl G FG FT PIS Avg. 
SR 27 313 125 751 274 
SR 27 298 133 729 272 
JR 27 762 196 720 26J 
JR 26 279 110 668 2&7 
sr 28 285 148 718 254 
Ir 28 272 174 71> 2S4 
JR 30 301 167 769 254 
SR 25 222 1B9 633 253 
SR 38 268 162 698 24.9 


sr 28 It? 387 ^ tite resignation. He said be was 
SR 27 141 ^ 614 concerned that Clemson was gain-' 

jr 27 m ai 7 4 u ing the reputation of placing athlet- 
if 29 1?3 sis <u jes before academics. 

NewMe* SR » 150 245 6U 

- cornu - so 36 us 252 60 J ■ Drugs Called Commonplace 

FREE THROW ^ ^ ^ 


Collins. PerniSt 

SR 

26 

93 

97 

95J 

Allard. Ind 

SO 

2S 

92 

98 

919 

Hagan. Weber 

SR 

28 

14 

91 

923 

Egglnk. Marts! 

SR 

28 

81 

88 

920 

Nutt. TCU 

er 

27 

77 

84 

flj 

Timka, Youngs 

Ir 

X 

78 

86 

907 

Brooks. Tetm 

SR 

X 

126 

139 

906 

Sutler, Duane 

JR 

27 

136 

141 

89A 

Burden. 51 l 

sr 

27 

91 

102 

0*2 

Ohm m> 

JR 

27 

73 

82 

092 

Webstar. Harvrd 

SO 

22 

88 

99 

8BJ 

Smith. UNC 

SO 

29 

74 

84 

SOI 

Jennings. TxTecti 

SR 

27 

86 

98 

87a 

Elliott. TgnTch 

SR 

21 

56 

63 

873 

Cos. Vandlt 

SR 

26 

109 

725 

872 


lieves almost one- third of Britain’s 
international athletes, and as many 
as 80 percent of American. track 
and field competitors, have taken 
drugs to boost their performances. 
United Press International report- 
ed from London. 

"li’sa lot more serious than peo- 
ple think. The problem needs to be - 
tackled," Thompson said in a tele- 
vision interview Wednesday night. ’ 


." “T was talking to the players be- 
foce the gam e and I said the per- 
centage of penal tie isn’t always 
right,” said Lentahe. 

“I said a power play should worit 
at the time that you need it and I 
guess tonight, ir did. "■ 

. Referee Terry Gregson nabbed 
Winnipeg’s Thomas Steen in the 

third penod for a tripping infrac- 
tion and then benched the Swede 
for two more minutes for unsports- ' 
manlike conduct. 

After Nash md tied - the score at 2- 1 
2 'with his 36th goaL Tremblay 
scored the winnervnth Steen st31 in 
the penalty box to give Montreal 
the lead 

Elsewhere in the NHL. it was 


[ Figure Skating 
World Championships 


SR 25 222 IB* 633 253 MEN'S SINGLES 

SR 38 268 162 698 24.9 l. Alexander Fadeev, Soviet Union. 2J3 artrf- 
ir 27 272 116 660 244 nuts. 

SR 27 238 180 656 24J 2. Brian Orser. Canada. 

SO 27 2S4 137 645 23.9 1 Brian Boitano. ua. 74. 

jr 27 20 147 641 217 4 . Jtotri sobovok. CzetTiaslovchkL U 

SO 27 290 Ml 64? 217 i Vfocffmb- Kottn. SevM Union. 94. 

JR 27 258 122 638 216 6. Helko Fischer. West Gormonv. 110. 

SR 29 230 222 683 ns 7. Grxegarx FHipowskJ. Potond. 134 

SR 30 309 8S 703 ZX4 a. Mark Cockerell. U4. 204. - 

SR 27 232 159 623 211 9. Viktor Petrenko. Soviet Union. 214 

JR 27 2)4 in 622 210 il Neil Patenm Canada, 244 

JR 27 271 64 606 224 11. Richard Zander, west Germany. 2SJ>. 

JR 21 184 103 471 224 T1 Falka Kkrgten. East Germany, 254. 

SR 27 250 100 600 222 11 Petr Bama. Czechoslovakia 264 

SR 26 213 150 576 2U >4. Maseru Ogawa Jaoon. 27 JL 

v 27 227 142 596 211 15. Fernand Fedrankv Frwica 27 A 

SR 30 251 154 656 21.9 16. Lars Aakessaa Sweden. 284 

ir 29 229 176 634 21.9 17. Gordon Forties. Canada JUX 

jr 2* 241 148 630 fu ta. Cameron MeWwrst, Australia 324 

JR 38 223 163 607 21.7 19. Oliver Haener. Sw H xertoi a 3U. 

JR 31 251 169 671 21A 20. AlesnndrO RlcdiellL Italy. 484. 

SO 38 243 120 606 2U 

SR 29 M2 140 04 2IA WOMEN'S SINGLES 

SR 77 144 578 ! 11 (Alter CorapMsories and Short Program) 

SR JO 1?4 Ai? 21 A | Kira Ivanovo. SauM Union. 1 1 uriflnaK. 


SR 2* 2« l« 2« WOMEN'S SINGLES 

SR 77 144 571 ! ■* (Alter Comgulsories and Short Program) 

SR 30 259 124 643 314 i. Kira Ivanova Soviet Union. 1 J ordinals. 
SR 27 240 96 576 21J 7074 points. 

SR 22 170 129 4*9 273 j. rxfany Chto. U-i, 2A 2»4 

5R 2* 220 113 SS3 21 J i Katarina Wilt. East Germany. U, 204A. 

SR 26 318 117 553 21 J 4Anna Kandrashovg, Soviet Union. 44 1967. 

JR 28 200 1*3 593 210 s. Debi Tnomas. Ui. 6A 1914 

5 P 21 Hi! 1,9 571 1, 1 a Claudia Lettfner. Vh sf Germany. 74 IB84 

SP 31 255 119 649 20.9 7. Natalia Lebedeva So** I Union. 74 >04 

JR 27 230 105 565 2B.9 a Ellrabetft Manley, Canada RUL 184J). 

SR 27 239 S3 561 2(U 9. Agnes Gessella Franca ML6. 1804 

JR 27 226 108 560 20J> is. Sandra Carl bon I. Swtliertand. 114 1774 

sr 28 220 140 580 30J ||. Simone Koch. East Germoy. 124 I7S4 

SR 27 214 179 SS7 20* l2 . Susan Jackson. Britain. 134 14*7. 

UNDING 11 CkwcUa Vllliger. Switrerland. 112. 1674 

Cl G No. Avg. 14. Patricia Neske, West Germonv, 134 1784 
SR 27 «□ 149 IS. Cvnlhia Coull. Canada KA I71i 
V 23 394 14.) 16. Masako Ka*a Japan. 144 )<04 

JR 31 434 140 17. Elbe Ahonen. Finland. 154 1*34 

SR 2S 30* 124 fa Constance GertsoL Cost Germany, 16.Z 
sr 2 1 319 12J m2 J. 

SR 76 308 lli 19. Tamara TegkaSy, Hungory. 174 1564 
SR 25 292 llj 20. Llm Hoe-kyung, South Koraa 204 I4&3. 


He estimated that up to four out -Detroit 5, Toronto 3: Chicago 5, 
of every five American athletes had Minnesota 4, and the New York 
taken drags. Rangers 6, Vancouver 3. 

(MppersI^ Coach, StJM Lose 

United Press international Scfaeer. “But we deal in wins and 

LOS ANGELES— The Los An- losscs i ic » apparent this 
geles Gippers named a new coach te ^ m 15 n ^ Tun deriiig.” . . 
at noon, but nightfall brought the Scheer said he didn't expect 
same old resulL . Chaney to be a “nurade worker" 

Cleveland’s World B. Free for the final 21 games of the season, 
scored 23 points and banded out a adding, “I just wanted to see some 
season-high 13 assists Wednesday progress." - • 

ni^u leading the Cavalios to a ■ PhflHubbaid added 20 points to 

114,112 v,ctory over tire Clippers help the Cavalieta move toSSS 
1 " 1 " — ■ playoffs with their sixth strairfit 

NBA FOCUS • Cleveland is now-tied with 

— — Atlanta for tbe eighth and final 

to spoil the coaching debut of .Don post-season position in the Eastern 


Chaney. 

"We were very flat From the 


Conference. 
T3ie Clipj 


“We were very flat From the ine Clippers caught Cleveland 
start," Chaney said. "We were not at 103-103 with 7: 14 left in the 
aggresave early, we weren't getting fourth. quarter on Harvey Catch- 
re bounds and we let Worid.get.out injs’ l?y-up, but Cleveland ran off 
early and put us in a hole." - 6 straight points to take "a 109-103 


Chaney replaced Jim Lynman, . lead mth 5:41 lefL 


who was fired at noon yesterday Los Angeles was paced by Derek 

after the Clippers bad lost- six Smith with 29 points. . 
aratehL Los Angdes was 22-39 im- Elsewhere in the NBA. it was 

der Cynmi tors scawn, fifth in the Chicago 107. Boston 104: New Jr? • 
Pacific Diviaon and 21 games be-\ sty 129. Seattle log; PhnJCIS, 

rival 96. : Atlanta ^ w4wS^ . 

“This business is a wy ddficull Portland 121; 

one'and sometimes the goodpeople YoTk90; Utah 94, ’ 

are nor ul«-ay5. successful." said Antonio 108. Intliann^^lS 
Gippers general manager Cari : LX Lakers J45, GoMen&J^m 1 













Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Making a Difference Filipino Novelist Creates f 100 Years of Our Past’ 


PEOPLE 


i 


By Russell Baker 


XT EW YORK — Periodically 
IN somebody says, “Keep up the 


IN somebody says, “Keep up the 
good fight because one man can 
make a difference.” 

I have given this in explanation 
to the Internal Revenue Sendee 
agent who for months has insisted 
that paying 49 percent of one's 
earnings in income taxes, as I have 
done, is not gpod enough. Why do I 
keep resisting him, he asks, when 
by coughing up another 3 or 4 per- 
cent, plus interest and penalties, he 
can make the pain stop? 

“I am keeping up the good fight 
because one man can make a differ- 
ence,” I told him once. 

Why do I say this when I do not 
believe it for an instant? The uni- 
versal sensation of our age is a 
feeling of powerlessness. Even my 
Internal Revenue tormentor suffers 
from it 

□ 


it is because one man can make a 
difference. 

For the same reason, I resist the 
medical highwayman trying to col- 
lect an absurdly inflated hospital 
bill apparently assembled by an in- 
sane computer that, after giving the 
entire hospital staff a dose of ether, 
treated itself to a frolic in the bill- 
ing department. 


“We have ways of making you 
iy," says the human servant of 


Once in a joking spirit I asked if 
it did not take great courage to 
confront, desperate taxpayers with 
only a pocket calculator for self- 
defense. He did not smile; He said 
his superiors had armed him with a 
telephone number to call if his life 
was endangered by someone being 
rendered destitute. 

I could imagine his nightmares: 
Fleeing from a maddened citizen 
(“What! Forty-nine percent not 
enough to outfit Weinberger with 
$700 toilet seats! You propose to 
take it al!?”), in those nightmares 
he reaches a telephone, dials the 
life-saving number to summon the 
United States Cavalry, only to hear 
a robotic voice: “The number you 
have reached has been disconnect- 
ed.” 

□ 


pay," says the human servant of 
this mechanical idiot 1 know what 
be means: lawyers, judges, eterni- 
ties passed in courtrooms. The 
American equivalent of the death 
of a thousand cuts. 

Yes, it would be easy to sell the 
house, car, clothes, wife and chil- 
dren and avoid the agony of the 
American legal system, but there 
are some fraudulent claims 1 mil 
not meet 

In time, of course, I will pay, 
because, of course, one man cannot 
make a difference except in in- 
stances so rare that winning the 
lottery is, by comparison, a com- 
monplace. True, there have been 
instances in modem times where 
one man has made a difference. 
Martin Luther King made a differ- 
ence. Since Franklin Roosevelt 
there may have been a president 
who made a difference, but there 
probably wasn't. 

□ 

Until Ronald Reagan, all mod- 
em presidents have complained 
about their powerlessness. If a 
president earn make a difference, 
what chance has the ordinary crank 
who irritates the bureaucracy of tax 
collection, the organization of hos- 
pital-bill compilers, or the conspir- 
acy of time wasters that is the 
American legal system? 


By Christine Chapman 

International Herald Tribune 

M ANILA — “From the very 
beginning I had a novel in 
mind to look at our history," said 
F. Sionil Jose, the 60-year-old Fil- 
ipino writer who recently com- 
pleted a series of five novels re- 
creating “one hundred years of 

our past." 

“Frankie,” as the gregarious 
writer is known, talked about his 
writing and the situation in the- 
Pbilippines at his bookstore in the 
Ennita district of Manila. 

*Tm trying to express many of 
the angers that keep me alive 
without going beyond anger” 
Jose said. 

“For many of us it's anger that 
sustains us. The outrage is that 
there is no outrage. There’s apa- 
thy and frustration and feeling of 
impotence." He paused, then 
added: “Real nationalism should 


have developed a long time bade, 
but it didn't. Just the cliches. 


Since Aquino’s death there’s been 
a c h a n ge, but I'm worried that we 
may slide back.” He was referring 
to the assassination of- former 
Senator Benigno Aquino upon 
the opposition leader’s return to 
the Philippines in 1983. 

Jos£'s novels are inseparable 
from politics, past and present 
Known as the Rosales novels ba- 


the Texas Rangers al the Battle of 
TiradPass. 

"Tree” (1978) is subtitled 
“Love and Death in a Small Fili- 
pino Town.” The town is Rosales 
and the story concerns the grow- 
ing up of a land! ad’s son before 
and after World War 11. “My 
Brother, My Executioner (1979) 
is set against the background of 
the Commonist-led Hokbalahap 
peasant uprising of the 1950s. 
This nova was banned in 1973 
under martial law because, Jos£ 
said, it “reflected too much on 
what was happening then.” 

“The Pretenders" (1962), which 
concerns an intellectual who has 
cut himself off from Ms rural up- 
bringing, is Jose's most widely 
translated noveL It has sold 
200,000 copies in Russian and has 
had three Dutch p rinting s, as well 
as four printings in the Philip- 
pines in English. It has also been 
translated into Chinese, Japanese, 
German, Greek, Swedish, and 
several other lang uages , tnnindfng 
Ilocano. 

“Mass,” the final novel in the 
series, tells of student demonstra- 
tions in the late 1960s and early 
’70s against the Marcos govern- 
ment. It was published m The 



get a good job, so 1 left when I got 
one. nc explained. He worked at 


QmtoQnpnan 

“I do ray best writing when Pm out of die country." 


Netherlands in 1982 after Philip- 
pine publishers rejected it. The 


cause many of the protagonists 
come, as does Josd, from central 
Luzon near the town of Rosales, 
they revolve around the chaotic 
history of the Philippines from 
1880 until just before the procla- 
mation of martial law by Presi- 
dent Ferdinand E. Marcos in 
1972. Jos£ writes English, prose 
with a passion that in its best 
moments transcends the immedi- 
ate scene. He writes realistically 
of class — the abused poor, a 
diffident middle class, a guilt-rid- 
den rich — and sympathetically 
of the indivi duals who break from 
class- 

Although Jos6 is a masterful 
short-story writer as well as the 
editor and publisher of Solidarity, 
a quarterly magazine of current 
events, it is the Rosales novels 
that have brought him fame. The 
first novel chronologically, but 
the last written, isTo-ou," mean- 
ing "root" in Jose’s Ilocano dia- 
lect. “Po-on” takes place from 
1880 to 1901 during the Spanish- 
American War, when a small 
band of Filipinos was defeated by 


Yet every morning he goes off to 
work in the childish belief that one 
man can make a difference. His 
government, owing unpayable bil- 
lions, powerless to lay heavy hands 
on the nation's vast brotherhood of 
tax chiselers, either legal or crimi- 
nal. must keep squeezing more 
from those who are already paying 
or see the nation's fighting men 
demoralized for lack of S700 toilet 
seats and 59,000 coffeepots. 

And so he risks his safety for the 
cause, believing that one man can 
make a difference. The poor guy. 


Large inhuman organizations 
naturally like the world as it is: 


He applies the pain to me because 
he believes one man can make a 


he believes one man can make a 
difference, and I resist, telling him 


naturally like the world as it is: 
largely organized and inhuman. 
These organizations devote them- 
selves to instructing us that nobody 
can make a difference because the 
human condition today is pure 
powerlessuess. 

One is permitted occasionally to 
scream, “Fm mad as hell and I'm 
not going to lake it anymore!" Per- 
sisting in such behavior, though, 
leads always to very unpleasant re- 
sults. It is safest to shut up and pay 
after having your moment of fun, 
which is what I shall do eventually, 
though I shall hate selling the chil- 
dren. 


New York Tunes Service 


pine publishers rejected it. The 
assassination of Aquino “liberal- 
ized us,” said Josfe, and “Mass” 
was published in Manila last year. 

“'Mass' is catching up with 
*The Pretenders' in popularity,” 
Jose said. “French and Russian 
translations are being done. The 
Russians consider me a good 
Marxist writer,” he added with a 
grin. 

“I can say without Mashing 
that I'm the most widely translat- 
ed Philippine author now. I was 

rate of the first to get published in 
the Soviet Union. 9 “The Pretend- 
ers" was the first of the four nov- 
els to be published there. 

But “I'm not a Communist,” he 
said. Td resent any form of gov- 
ernment th»t would curtail hu- 
man rights. Tm a writer. I thrive 
on freedom. My politics? I'm 
right of the NPA” — the commu- 
nist New People's Army — “but 
left of Marcos.” 

“1 don't have a schedule, but I 
write all the time.” he said. “I do 
my best writing when I'm out of 
the country. 1 wrote The Pretend- 
ers’ in the Basque country in I960 
and ‘Mass' in 1976 in a room in 


Paris. I wrote half of ‘Eronta,' my 
new novel, in Tokyo in 1983. 
Here, I often go to Baguio in the 
mountains north of Manila. I 
need the distance, emotional and 
physical” 

Jos6 may be better known in- 
ternationally than any Philipp In- 
ewriter since Jos6 Rizai, the 19th- 
century national hero who 
devoted his life through meriirin*, 
politics and two novels to the re- 
form movement during Spain’s 
colonial rule Rizai was the most 
important influence on him Josfc 
said — including his first career 
choice: 

Josi originally wanted “to be 
the best neurosurgeon, this coun- 
try ever had” but flunked out of 
medical school. “Then I shifted to 
literature and started writing 
short stories in college to m*in> a 
living. I was also influenced by 
FanDmer, Willa Catheris ‘My An- 
tonia,’ and ‘Don Quixote.' I want- 
ed to get published in the United 
Stales. Thai was part of the colo- 
nial hangover. We thought unteK 
we got published in foreign jour- 
nals, we had no name. ‘But I de- 
cided my tradition is here, not 
with Chaucer or Faulkner. So in 
1955 1 started to write for my own 
people in English and in Ilocano.” 

Except for “Mass,” which is as 
much an ideological dialogue as it 


is the adventures of a young man, 
Jose's interest in writing seems to 
be to test the Filipino character in 


period of national stress. In “The 
Pretenders." the protagonist. An- 


Pretenders." the protagonist, An- 
tonio Samson, Harvard-educated 
but a native of poverty-ridden Lu- 
zon, joins the Manila elite 
through marriage and career. His 
bastard sou. Pepe, becomes the 
radical student in “Mass,” reject- 
ing middle rla« ambitions to 
fight for the people. 


"Fm uoiany of my characters," 
Josg said. “The feelings arc mine, 
die experiences are mine, the 
views are mine. But, my charac- 
ters have much more courage 
than I have. I compromise every 
day. I like sleeping in an air-con- 
ditioned room.” 


one. M he explained. He worked at 
the U. S. agency for a year. “It 
was a soft, easy job. I went in at 8 
A.M- and by 9 I'd finished my 
work. I spent the whole day typ- 
ing my stories.” 

He worked from 1949 to I960 

as an editor and reporter on the 
Manila Tunes Magazine, now de- 
funct: for Asia Magazine in Hong 
Kong; and as a public informa- 
tion officer in Sn Lanka for the 
Colombo Han Bureau. When he 
returned from Colombo in 1965, 
he established the magazine Soli- 
darity. named Tor a reform move- 
ment newspaper of 1889. He and 
his wife. Teresita. set up the book- 
store. also called Solidarity, and a 
publishing company that prints 
many of ms books and the maga- 
zine. 

The Joses have fire sons and 
two daughters, all living outside 
the Philippines, some at U.S. 
schools or universities. One 
American son-in-law works for 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust, 
which is an important lender to 
the Marcos government. “1 tell 
him. ‘You’re going to lose mon- 
ey,’ ” Josfe said. 

The second floor of the book- 
shop- is often used as a meeting 
place and seminar room; recently 
Jos6 sponsored a discussion with 
four survivors of the Huk rebel- 
lion. In 1958 he founded the Phil- 
ippine P. E. N. Center, part of the 
international organization of po- 
ets, essayists and novelists, and 
now he is its secretary. 

He is teaching a course in PfaH- 


2 Old Master Pahuint 
Called Fakes by DeaU ' 

An art dealer savs that 
multi million-dollar Old M, 
paintings purchased by the J / 
Getty and Norton Simon mat 
are forgeries, according to 

March issue of An & Auction h- 


1 -muioiui.ui rui« AUCllOn l-f 

aane. The dealer, Ahto TaUlZ 
Paris and New York, says thaT 


MK'i-ven 

Un-Mi 


by the same artist is also b 9 
Norton Simon, who has bee 
was unavailable for eouuneni.d * 

John Walsh, the Getty Musa# * 
rector, scoffed at Taricayas 
tions saying. “They have bee 

cause of general hilarity and 1 1 

shaking, lam so convinced of 
we know that the picture is ha, . 
in the gallery for anyone to ini . 

The consensus of my coUeam ■ 
that the painting is supertax 
thentic.” The two paintings 
lieved to be pans of a lost.- 
were discovered by the Lratdo ‘ 
dealer Derek Johns of Han 1 
Johns who refuses to discuss - ' 
origin. They found expert ar 
tancc as the work of Bouts, 
was bora in Haarlem and di 
1475 after working mainly in 
vain. The Simon picture wa 
quired at auction in 1980. TV 
ty picture was purchased lag 
from dealer Eugene V. Th**;' 


\ i.arafi 


ippine literature at the private De 
La Salle University. Since 1981, 


Frandsco Sionil Jote was bora 
in 1924 in the village of Cabugao, 
near Rosales. He recalls his fam- 
ily’s poverty, his father’s deser- 
tion, his reading outdoors under 
the streetlight when the kerosene 
lamp went dry. At 15 he went to 
Manila to get an education and 
serve as a houseboy to his uncle 

He studied literature at the 
University of Santo Tomas, drop- 
ping out to take a job with the 
U.S. Information Service three 
months before he was to gradu- 
ate. “I went to the university to 


La Salle University. Since 1981, 
be has been working on his first 
nonfiction book, provisionally ti- 
tled “In Search of the Filipino.” 
This year he hopes to finish the 
novel “Ennita,” about the for- 
merly elegant Manila district 
where his bookstore is. 

Josi has won several awards for 
his novels and stories, but the one 
he appreciates most is the Ramon 
Magsaysay Award, which he re- 
ceived in 1980 for literature. The 
award — nam^H after the Philip- 
pine president who defeated the 
Huk rebellion — is given in five 
categories to Asians. 


“The best part of it was the 
520,000,” he said. “If I depended 


on nry income as a wntex, my 
family would have starved long 
ago.” 


The novelist D.R. Lm&: - 
condemned in his lifetime i 
obscene writer, will bc.hj* 
with a memorial in Poets’ Ccbj.. 
Westminster Abbey in la’: 
during celebrations this yeara * 
birth centennial “The deril . 
accept Lawrence is iraarii 
news. We’ve been asking fjf 
memorial for three yeaixjj 
Leslie Psukes, secretaiy $ 

D. H. Lawrence Society, bis 
Nottingham, where Lawrcua . - 
bora in 1885. The cerenrafl - 
probably be in September. (X 
rence’s 12 novels, ‘The Rag 
was suppressed as immoraM 
years and “Lady Chatteiie^' 
er” for 32 years until I960.*® 
of tuberculosis in France i&F 

□ f : 

Princess Margaret, S4,isk» — 
London, sporting a healthy Sx 
suntan from a Caribbean vact < 
two months after under$Mgfc*yn 
surgery. Doctors said no mlgr * 1 
cy was found but she repor 


cy was found but she rep* 
has given up smoking. 


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COTE D’AZUR 

IECANNET 

A rare opportunity at a very reason- 
abie pnce. The famous porter Bonnard 
fcred here. 2 Roots fooraja a dufiex 
aparwierA 2 reoepeora & Sbedrooms. 
1 192 sqm. m dJ + balcony & terrace. 
Lowly view. 

Price only 1945,001 
Bef 247. Apply sale went: 
JOHN TAYLOR sX 
55 La Crooetfe 
064CC Cannes 

Tel: {931 38 00 66. Hu 470921. 


IN IHAVANCHEB, CHAMONIX 
Center valley, unique 19th cent. form, 
state mdudng funvsfags, 


BADGODBBOG/ BONN. lepre- 
sentotivo vflo, indoor swi mm ing pool, 


GREAT BRITAIN 


5000 sqjn. park, beautiful location! 
USS850.Q0Q.%ffi 228-32 20 13 
CONVERT YOUR US. $ now & invest 
in German rod estate. Contact: Kiel 


DORDOGNE NEAR IE BUGUE en- 


chasing rural fxcperty comp tang 2 
renovated cottages & krge patty 
rerobshed bam 16.000 sore. 
£65,000 induing furniture. Tefc 01. 
603 5667 UK 


ICnwjeJ, Amold-Heite-Str 10. '2000 
Hanbura 28 Tefc 040-4E775. 


tug 20L Tefc 040-4^275/ 
GREAT BRITAIN 


SIOANE SQUARE facing aver *300 
sq.FI. not lived in. Over £150,000 
spent ri mxitoi Suitable far e«- 
tertmng. Large entrance hail, formal 
<Wng roonv 20 sq-ft oanmneating 
with reception, X* 20 ft doak room. 
6 double & 1 snale beck-corn. 5 en- 
sure b u ttrooms. Comptefe new de- 
I m* ttdwn 14 x 13 h. Sepaate 


LOONNG FOR A HOME? May we 
help? Town i country ham* / Rat. 
Home Beavers provide a speesafasd 
service to fad the properly you are 
toctongfar^Tefc London fOT} 7W 8439 


499 2910- 


VWCE Provencal stone via. very 


STYUSH VICTORIAN 

PROPERTY avaaoOMNG 


I Owner p3| 25 00 


HYDE PARK 


IN ASIA AM3 PAORC 
contact our local 6stnburar a: 


tatarnotiona l Hera ld Tribune 
1008 Tai Sang Commend BuUuu 
24-34 nemieecy Read 
HONG KONG 


Tel: MC 5-286726 


MW PATENT 1AW OF CMNA. Offv 
ends from the Ounce Patent office 3 
agency voting London. Brussels, Par 
a. Oufseldarl & Munch. Semnars late 
Mach • Ealy April 1985. Apply Bo. 
40443. 1.H.T . 63 Long AcreTlondon, 
WQE 9JH. or tefc London 638 36B8 



PORT LEUCAIE, ne 
tales, righ t on the 


Pyrenees Onerv 

ra, 65 sam. do- 


pie*, mo, solanum. F3SOZod Bo* 
1869, Herald Trfcune, 92521 Neu By 
Codex, France. 


2 minutes from Harods e*c, 24 hour 
top security porterage servae & Eft. 
This newly decorated! st Root flat has 


GERMANY 


LONDON AIRPORT 2 HOURS; 18th 
centuni mdlhause si^aerbiy converted 
provitSng tastefully modemced ac- 
aJBsnodulion et awn founds over- 
looking tidal estaay. Discover 
Drake s England by the sea. South 
Devaa Now is the time to use the 
doBar. 1250,000. M detail afc 054 
6S3606. 


EATON PLACE, BELGRAVIA, 3 bed- 
rooms, 2 bathrooms, rlaor de- 
ngned. luxury Gorman Idfchen, My 
Wtapad. Very bright W Bocy, no 
Ht. total outgoings per annum £1200 
only. D35,000nocfWs. 01-2450902 


CHEAT BRITAIN 

EXCEPTIONAL PRIVATE SITE 2 Acres 
an brer Thames - 1000ft fever Moor- 
ing. BuUng Permission Granted. Tefc 
Mon. - Fri, after 6 pm. 01 570 7281 

BATH £60000 CITY CMS new 
wro-bedroom around Boor Bat m his- 
toric bwhfcig Tefc London 573 2921. 

GREECE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
PARIS A SUBURBS 


vmth A8EA near 

CHAMPS &YSSS 

■ 7 BOOMS, 250 sqjn, 3 receptions 
+ 4 bedrooms, 2 tathsTvirwon 


GOLF OF ST. NOM-IA-BRETEQTE 

LOVRY 7 ROOM HOUSE 

5 bedroom s , double fcvmg + garage, 
with 2500 Run garden, everyttwig of 
perfect condhan. 1^2.400,000. 
Prefs: 526 72 97 - 579 57 09 


1 16th MICHEL-ANGE. a 

roam borne «i calm repdi 
Good pnw. Fl ,900000 
22 - 222 31 14 


+ 4 bedrooms. 2 baths 
garden, cdm. 2 rads i 

Pnce F3J00.000 


16lh near BOB DE BOULOGNE, 
preferably owner to owner, beoutrfid 
Cpartmeiu, sun, about 350 sqjtv 
la-ge recaption. Price to be noocAai- 
ed. Write with your phang luriber to 
Bat 1819. HercM Trfcune. 92521 
NcuiBy Cedex, France. 

CENTER RAMBOMUET 30 m Mont 
pomasse railway station, 30 nti 
Champs Bytees, 2400 sq.m, of en- 
dasecT wood ed land, vdla 320 sqm | 
String space on 2 level* 4- basement, 
terra* 100 tqjft. 2-car gmage. < 
F2700JOO.Tefc483 135ft. ^ 



HYDRA, BREAIHTA K1NGLY situated 
dand manor needs eomoaseur raho- 
bStcbon. 1000 sam. endasad land 
with terraced gtwen, 3 pate Rocr 
grace 450 sqm. US575teO. Wnto 
FW B 7 Eaton Flora, London 5W1 or 
ring 01-235 2660 LB? 


- 5 ROOMS. 225 sqm, large Swng 
+ 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, adm 
2 maid's roams. F3DOD.OOO. 

D. FEAU 294 20 00 

132 Bd lla u ee mw 75008 Pori* 


2 LARGE TOP HOUSES. Brcmd new. 
1 5 rrw. from Frankfurt, avadobfe pay- 
ing for themselves, canty rented, 
good opporiwsiy for Americans sto- 
mmed over here or others. Tel: 
<0)6145/33425. 


nee work throughout, e*CBf*ona*y 
long lease at 97 yeors. Offers invieed 
n toe repen of £215,000. 


ST. JOHNS WOOD. 400 wvdsAfflBT- 

aan School in London, 6th floor flat ! 


School in London, 6th floor flat! 
- _ -i foe wBook. 3 bpu ble L 1 single | 
bwaani large modern brvnofi | 


IOMXJN CHELSEA SUPBB rewriy 
converted raasonette, dose Sktane 
Scyj»«, 2/3 betkrxxns, 1/2 recep- 


BURGUNDY 


MUNICH 700 sajn. basement, garage 
+. 2 remn tamior Act, net tents te- 
caved DM54,000 no. pnce 


PAYING QUESTS IN FRANCE French 


included Pirns* wnw: Mrs. Girar- 
deau, CorWJW. St. Mornn des 
Champs 73790, France 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS m 
Enabh Pam 6345965. Geneva; 
289286. Rome 678 03 20. 

JACQUES COUSTEAU LECTURE IN 
Engfah. Amaron Hm. Fri, NeuHy 
March 8. 8 p m. Call- 722 04 35. 


W THE WINE AREA 
The matt bwxAlul estate m a 
thermal v&me. 1900 style. 11 roams, 
outtxASngt. 8,100 sqjn. endued 
LwtHfa n J . Exdudvity 
SANTANOIKA-fRANCE 


DM900 ^0. Brofcr: Luchuig Dormer, 


Tefc 01-561 4500. 

L0MX3N W14 MUST BE SOIO da 
wedc wgatf sde td this vwniKM 2 

double bed Edeardan c p ortm e n i set 
in this pratoge purpose boil develap- 
meni. Oozing with cherader, ariaind 
floors, openlirapkxe, wtoncSd wdv 
es. cw spoee, indaxndentgtBcafltnd 
hertmg, porter, Hr, USM or offer. 
CoT Korade Estates pf myfarOT-4QB 
1033 


S<M^e. 2/3 bedaoms, 1/2 recep- 
twns, 2 btfhs, btchen, <Mng room, 
patio, lease 996 years. £249,000. A4- 
<hod Kafcnor £ Co. (Dl) 581 2661 


MUST SB1: H yOOO SO-M. of be odt 
fmnf property in toe Peloponese. La- 1 
mnic G trif (Scaia Loconiasj. Grp a 
pcieiiiitA (A an tartretply lover able 
price. Please col: 0831 27242 be- 
tween 7-lOpjn. (Greek timej 


AVERAPP-CHAMPMARS 


Irnmoariatr up ort nreit, ipiencid turn of I 
century bd&g. 315 sqm. F&004000 

I6TH NEAR TROCADSO 

Regal design 700 sqm house with 
2 widens + avetriors house, 
H 5,000.000- Superb throughout 

CABINET MARCEAU 

720 OT 44 


POHTUGAE 

PRIME PROPBOBS THRj 
Portugal ora promoted id 
Kingdom radiiBvaiy ihnM 
Kr»ght - Ownecq 155-1 
brictae. London SW1. Tdl 
5892133, Telex 25480 EQ 

SPAIN 


MALLORCA'S NEW ! 


■ndude carped & curtains. Weekdays 
4999981 weekend 228 8286 


BOURPBttOUTH. IK Hours landon, 
one of Britm'l Bnest modem resi- 
dena».wxyre eertrd pashicq 5 bed- 
rooms. ridoar torewd n g pool, snook- 
er raam, bw, 3 surury tmaces, 
landscaped garden, fatal security/cri- 
vqqr- Price 0SJUL Tel: 0202 2D1D1. 


LO NDON KP 6 RIGT0N W8- Luxury 
3 bedroom, 2 bofhroom conrersian 
marionette, 123 year lease. £177,500. 
View Sunday 11 om - 4 pm. Tefc 937 
8619. 


MAGNHCBfr SEASIDE ESTATE 
Crvstd dear tea with a view of the 
Holy SKMiken (Alho^. Ncrthem 
Greece, * ocres. Pnee USS36.000- 
Hecae contact Mr. S. Mo ricks. TeL- 
|031) 520410. Tlx 412350 GMKL GR. 


BIENNE MARCH, freestone buicfiito. 
18th centiey. 27/3 rooms, F715.0Ott 


■wuu. /spuninurei m perfect con 
ckhon, ed comforts, visit Sat. 9/3 from 


7J0 pm to 5-J0 pm. 236, rue SL 
Martin, or MAT1MO (I) 272 33 21 


In the bay of Pohna, 5 niMlin 
mins, a'rport, 664 herto»8to3B 
2 far up to 60 tnefett eods-fe 
TV/mare/vtotor/phone to® 
Professional port muuug egierf 
marine services: kwer, m*i^4 
eLHt, repair, furi statm, 
winter hordstandt. Ugroudai 
Vfidnrv Ompienniitory soda 
sura frriatei: n mfcnt toriii t 
png, cuiermg, etBrtannsLt. 
teniK nearby. Commerra/ nC 




PARIS T6TH 
SPONITNI 


terms nearby. Gommtraur a 
prises 85 units an 13.171 ij 
Plus 21 super apartnwiubM 


LO WWN Wa jS WgON Wl. Luxury 
3 bedroom, 2 biihrooni conversion! 
mttaonerte, 12 year feme. £179,000. , 
Vfew Sunday 1 1 ten - 4 pm. Tel: <G7 
861“ 


A DREAM IN TOSCANA 

Od famdrae. beautrfufty reconstruct- 


ed to the Ivdsest standards with mog- 
nrfieenr view rrom damrait position on 
0 hfl in Southern TaKOna between 
Rome & Rorenoe. 17 fen ife tan e n from 
a wekfaxjwn thermal bath. Living area 


HE DE LA CITE 

NEXT TO NOTRE DAME 
rare & ariond 
GROUND ROOR ON 
PRIVATE COURTYARD 

Aasourrav calm 


|3 d £S^?& 3 „e&” + - 

2 nxixfs rooms. Tefc 503 21 21 


Pea 21 Mtoer epartmertsdbart .• 
separate luxury axido -<ii» to. _ 
criong main piers. Top eisuMWlh - 
ioldl Horry now before nedprki*r 
Contact dredfy dmNapn . , . 


2« AVENUE HOCHE, 75008 PAWS 
TBj (1) 561 90 9T 


International Business Message Center 


Witolx mnovreed + 3 bedrooms, 
Wipwd btchen, 2 baths, inciridua) 
too**. F2^50flOO. GARAGE S^ 
QUtSD. Vmt Saturday 1 1 am to 
5 pm, 14 rue CLOTHE NOISE DAME 


about 260 sam. indudry separata od- 
roimng flat- Spacious oris spededy at- 
tractive sun terrace. 5 bedrooms, 2 
bretu, 3 Open Rreptooes. antique furni- 
tare- 37D0 sqjn. land with trees, murao- 
pci ejectriasy and wah*. Ta be soU 
Fuly furnished amf equipped DM 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN LINES 1NTL 


OVER 1,000 AGBLTS 
in U5.A. - CANADA 
350 WOiUD-VW 
msesriMATB 

PARIS Dih ordes Intamatiemd 
(Oil 343 23 64 


fRANKFURT 


1 069) 250066 

MUNICH i.m.5. 

(0S9) 142244 

WiNDON 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSS&S: ZtogtorSJL 

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(022) 32 64 40 

CAIRO AHad Von Lines lirll 
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TRANS PARK 4TH 

HEART OF ST GBMAIN 


PARS 6TH. ST. GERMAIN Jneori, own- 
er seb in renowttd b lAfing, onafi 
ptodo-tene with character, Jrooms, 

NauMy Cedex. Frmioe 

40 KM S«IIH PARIS. Exception* on 
SNnebcrk, 5 rrinutm Mehm. r quaint 
dd vSogo. romantic 1920 house, 6 
room. 200 tnjnu + ban an 1,000 

xy* fat F78q00a 6-063 5080/@ 


PUERTO FUNTA POSTAL^ ^ 
DHdcr Conrad f • 
aMorina 101 .Pbrtdri**; 
MoEoraLSpanarni 68®M? . 


* 

. -re* 

• : - 

• ■•->> 
• iT-Ti 

•it 4 m P 


PARTNHS 


Soccmsfd in buskure, is looking 
hr AREA-partners *i Germaiy, Aus- 
tria, BNgwxn & ebewto re . Mortnlyjr. 
epaw breed ai commission 58 - 1 OjOOCL 
Our bark procedures ccptai & hgh- 


FteUOARY BANMNG on large ad- 
laleroSwd toons. The only commer- 
oef bank with a representative office 
w jpeddrang rn this serrice. 
Arab Orenera Bank & Trust (WJ.1 

. L^aa ? dPrri«W,[pndon , Sa! 
Tel 7358171 



Please contact: Dr. Gerhard Hoed. 

Orfax-vai-Mflar, Kng 29. 
8000 Muenchen 2, W. (Setmary. 



TROCADraO (NEAR). Snrf 17 sqjn. 
I Jtadto.4^batcorry.lerroca.lraang 
fry- p«^<werrcL 
raO^OOO. Tel, 563 07 77 officu / 337 
67 57 eves ktoo ktod 


THNKING ABOUT ««■»•" 
Span? Sptorxfd khaif yw#.r- 
ing for Mabda - Castojl- 
Cooad ire We buy, ssLtof ' 
struc^ vflas and apa*«m#: 
side, ui the moumains gndaB. 
We are «*er sure to tamSf' 
rourn feoWng far ondf« 
produce R far yari rBv*4J 


7610 ORR 


l*utieq 

Viler ] 


yoking ■nieitaiaiti ta tovestors <d 
over tfie woHd. 

Brochures end sales raawrid avaiable 
in Engfeh + German. 


BUSINESS 

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Depout-guarontee ret um obto with 
totaresl, J7400 requked. 


Bl. 57400 requred. 

You rare be wfing to vait 
our Gorman effiens. 


MAJOR CONSTRUCTION FWM 
***** construdian proieds over 5700 
iriBon to 3rd Waru or Arab nabems. 
We cai (max*. Abe can exchange 
-any. currency fa USS. CdL 3616M0 
Zurich. 




MONACO 


DIAMONDS 


WITHIN 30 DAYS - 08 LESS 
You can have your own tmiimsi 
...mid pocket mare money m o day 
toon mod people earn m a week. Haw? 


FACLHC CHARTERED BANK UD. 
kA j e U ertaPPp 4 -^aOOO^Hontourg 60 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


wn 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 


Easy. Its not hard at aR when you awn 
a Kema Computer Portrat Systran. 

A sure wmner (hot combnes 3 of to- 


— Y* hottest trends— video, computers 
and instore pictures- pfca the know- 
how md guaantees of Texas fcntrw-i 
merts, PraxEaeie aid Kem. An cil cash j 
business. Customers come to you. No 
lefeng. No dress. Its not a franchise. Afl 
-he money and the profits are 100% 
tows. Idea Fa farrtes. nxfoduab or 
absentee owners. Part-Ana, WUona or 
weekends There's no nned ta leave 
your present job. Wrh the Km system 
you wte someone's peture wuh a T.V. 
camera and instandy prin it with a 


BCAUUEU SUR MSI {between hfce & 
Manos^. Hi 4fc apartment, front of 


tea. m a private park, bvimyraom 55 
Stun* 2 bedrooms, kitthen £ batfiTafc 


_ _ THs BNANQAL TIMES 
EUROPE'S BU5NESS NEWSPAPGL 

now operates a morning of pubkcreirei 

orrery service to subscribers kvtog in 
Cotaffw ■ D imo fcfarf - Frankfurt - 
Stuttgart - Muidi and in Northern 
Germany m toe aty of Hemburg, 


UNUMLITOINC 
UJ5.A. 6 WORLDWIDE 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Fme rfrrenonds er any pica root 
CP krwesl wheiaiato prices 
street from Antwerp 
center of the dia mond world. 

, Fill guarantee. 

For free price fat write 
Joadton Gotdmtafa 


PrindpdHy of Monaco 

RARE OPPOtmMTY 

Luxurious via located one blade from 
toe sea & within 5 min. wdlc from Loews 
Hotel, Cosmo & Hotel de Paris. A reritc- 
We palace Lotte XVI style on 10,000 


I sqJt land Fabulous Iving areas 3 tov- 
| ek with eleircMr. Afcrbtod floors. Inrae 


efr with elevreor. Marbled floors, large 
reception room, muse room, drang 
roam for 20 guetfs. Genlraf marble £ 


PLACE DES VOSGES near 

Luxurious renovation, coin), 
dxxnxng, sun. garden 
2 roams 44 *utl + terrace FW6J300 
2 roams 51 sam. F9 18,000 
3 rooms 60 sqjn. 

+ terrace, FiJOOffXl 

D. FEAU 294-20-00 


VHWrt AREA, alonfl Seine. beaufrM 
V * BW ' h ?? e 8P r * n * 620 sqm, 7 

SCEAUX, 30 MMJTES PARK. Lovely 
Sroom house, 600 tori'- garden, rw- 
denfial ^strict. n^OobOTei 61-4? 
67 05 or 61-53 64^/ 


ARE YOU BUYING F*0H|. 

IN SPAIN? 2 

CONTACT REAL COST# 
M MALAGA *• 

Tel: p4-5^ 386981 


<TH- PLACT DES VOSGES. Large 
bright, calm, 2-raom flat, on axrt- 


NEAR VICTOR HUGO, mple recap. 
ertt! no?*' ^ pn “ 525 


PAGE 15; 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIED! 


■ 1 •• *r 

^ 

--."tf. wt, 
1 .’I*, tort'll' 


I farces Starr cast 6 lene bedlams wrth 
ereute modem bteti, doff quarters, 
txdeti. Detune 


A complete social & busnas service 
ptovicing a inque cgUedxxi of 
tinted, nxteTnguot 

uxSviaxfa ton 


M feabishedT?23 
Pekkoaretrocr 62, B-2018 Antwerp 
Mgpxn ■ Tel: (§2 35 234 07 51 
Tlfc 7l7^ syl b. A» the Dxmond Obb. 

Heart of Artfwerp Diamond nctostry 


I For aS rrformatioa & fan 


cc9 fating agent 
JOHN TAYLOR* SON 
20 Bvd. dm MwEm. Monte Cafe 


[ HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 

LOW COST FLIGHTS | HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 1 HOT 


vtoi’ k» 

. ■ *u {ala 


Tefc 193) 50 30 70 
Toe 4691M 


. For free triofa and 
tixther detais. pfacse OOntact: 
Bernd W. WaCrfca 
financial Tones Frankfurt 
Tel: 069-7598-1 05 Telex: 416193 
No FT no commote 


Jrahton<«TgriereiaWfri/it4Vamohoni 
ConvonfioivTrode Show**e» Partes 
SpeacJ EwrtsJmage Mafcers-PITs 
-Scad HodsHostesses-Enter n gners 
Sood Cempantore-Tour guides, etc. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


USA 


cpttiputer. It's so push-button urn^e a 
aiu cat run it But ife profits arai't bd 


m i-TTTrrj 


REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 


RICHARD L WOB, successful red 
ratate executive prepares acqueaon 
Jspjwtion. mvetfawni strategies hr 
Caufanua red estate. Write: Red Es- 
tate Sttdegies ht, 624 S. Grand 
Are Las Angeles, CA 90017 213-189- 
634&U5A. 




duff. The Kema system is avoid* in 
gods and wtoe or fuB eatery is portto 
• ' .*4? ”30 tnmutes ar lest **V 


Jme. rerywhHB. The world 4 «ur terri- 
fwy. There are thoKtods of bdabons 
•wtong to be filled.., plus tremendous 

Kema fcpt M35, Pestfgdi 170340. 



212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 

330 W. 56fe St, N.Y.C 10019 



MONTE CARLO 


INTBNATIONAL COMPANY 
FORMATION 


BTRO BU5ME5S CENTBl 


6000 Frankfun / W, Gemany. 
Tefc 069 / 747808 Tlx.- 4lSl3ttMA 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 






Bd. Jem Mermac, 




IN BEAUTIFUL LAKE TAHOE, Ctffor- 
ma, Fr«h/<itnfcwiid rwtaurort 
far »da. located vnthm 300 nwers of 
Htetoora on nearly I acre land (dd 
rataUtoedrastarrantdase tonwner- 
04B do areas) vicktoes luxurious nrarv- 
ager aecommoditoous & aba 2 bed- 

toom. c artages S 1 staia Far further 

Son Frrocp, CA. 941Q8. USA 


RNANCIALGROUPOR BWBTOB. 
We are looking far serous partners 
wh o om wflng to invest m a very 
important & fevdera red estate pro. 
jeet (dtout US$64 mJSonl^exctoiw 
town, cfase to toe Swiss border, 9 
odes tram Geneva. Write to P.Q. 
Bax 56. 1815 Oarens-Mcvrsreux, Svret- 
larfand or fc (45) 453280 OD CH 
Switzerland 


companies from £75 LO-M. Panama 
3- dl motor offidsre centers. Fall ad- 
nwntoatein, nominee services, poitere 
d attorney, registered offices, acooun- 
fancy, cwmdenttd bank accounts 
opened, confidante! telephone, telex, 
fox & mdtng service. 

EA5. Unfed 


Formuia tom 

K 5?5?W J ??‘ I 015 CH Analerdom 
i 31-2026 57 49 Telex 16181 
Werid-Wd, Bmss Cenun 


Principality of Monaco 
sauna vky exctdonal 

APART MBIT, PATIO, 

700 eqjte. private gotten 

Rm*dentid area. Center or tavrrv cafcn. 
300 sqjn. King spam, large entranm 

room, 4 bedrooms, 3 bam, 1 raam for 
staff veto bath, spacious modem fuBy 
gripped kjtdm 1 large spare room, 
trie! office, large reesang room, 
garage, figri dan sevkfc 
Air candriiamig. dearie binds, etc 
EXCLUSIVE AGBKZINrBtMBTIA 
BJ*-54 ‘ 

MC 98001 MONACO CH*X' 


EAST COAST ROM 
MID WEST FROM 
WEST COAST FROM 
SOUTH EAST OOM 


NATC London 734 8100 



HOTELS 

FKANCK 


PARIS -Phxxa Mirdwar’*^ 

Are. E Zola. 1-MrgortW; 
kitchen, fridge. Tefc 577 7J«L' 


GREAT BRITAIN 



Tel* (93) 50 66 84 
n» 469477 


NEW YORK 

FI 990 ONEWAY 


«M> HpUDAT 8 TRAVEL ADS 
PLEASE TURN TO 

N THE SECTION 


hi? ‘WiSilfij 




OLD TOWN MAJQaiA. Beswamr 
bar, vrirtv dning seab, summer 

S ■rared garden seats 110. 2 
fastanc bulking. Urimitad 
1S0JXXK. taw gcund rant. 
Present owner 7 yis. Seen 952 


■ OST 7» T^OT. Til 6asi3 BUSSBL 
Rife 051 709 57S7 
Associated Offices Worldwide. 


YOUR LONDON Offla 

pSSHAM EXECUTIVE CWTte 
tojTBtenwe range af semen 
T J“ ^"rtSlrret.Torelon Wl. 
Td: (01 f 439 6388 Tlx: 261426 


MONTE CARLO 
Prindpdify of Monaco 

For sale in luxuriate undent residence, 


+ from London ta NYC FI 500 ■ abo 
Amsterdam, y* NYC, Ovcoqo. LA. 
HNTOW - Tefc 260' 40^1^) 


LOS ANG8E5 ATTORNEY, repre- 



mm 






mmbkh smsiA perthB*. 1 


fcVragiirile- lliraaraafl 


, Kin. Kang Kang. 





your off** 1 w muiIul 

as*if?sanSTi i tfi ^ 

Sw p^55292 S 44 Tet ™ *** _ OFFICES WANTED 


PAMS t SUBURBS 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 





TAX SERVICES 


r* '"i l . i 1 rnmf fi mii 


r-2 I'n-c lr.xc il 


EXTRA OFHCE SPACE? 

5vb-fat or shared modem space ta oc- 
“mitodate 1 5 peepte urgenriy needed 
central Para by US m ug cane bureau. 
Tefc 563 TO 70^&d 373 


FOCH — ETOUE 

300 sqm. parted COtxfift on , 4th floor, 
5-bedraace, 5 hafs. 2 marfs roams 

EMBASSY SERVICE 

562 26 40 ExL 367 


restaurants 

nightclubs 


theaters 


ASTORIA THEATRE OMW C 

THE HBffl) MAN; 


ri '* *>nknt !uS& 


of bareboats far 


Cy