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PARIS, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


ood in Russia: Life Goes On 

lion Conveys Sense of Business as Usual 


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By Seth Mydans 

. Vw York Timet Service 
. COW — For the taxi driver 
•van, the main question of 
y was whether the Ararat 
team would go ahead with 
’ ■ .* k Monday mghL For the 
mother in Moscow, it was 
. r Chekhov’s “The Sea GuiT 
' 1 . be canceled on evening tefe- 

■ughont the mtgor cities of 

- viet Union, red flags with 
‘ jorders were hong out, and 

, .. music was played on radio 
-Revision. 

^ t has been for a series of 
' deaths in the ruling Polilbu- 
. . House of Unions was pro- 
.to receive the body of Kon- 
- U. Cbcracnko, the Soviet 
who died Sunday, 
throughout Moscow and 

• we in the nation, the over- 
• -ing sense was one of bua- 

• s usual, of people turning 
■■ dial to another station 

- “ : m as they heard the an- 

• r. sment of their Leader's death. 

ps and offices remained 
and people strolling in Red 

- i seemed hardly aware that 
-• : other ride of the red-brick 

in walls, a change in leader- 
’•-'-•yas taking jdace that could 
.their lives for the next decade 
■ - re. 

s, yes, we’ve heard,” said a 

: wn man “ AnrKtwr ha? die d " 

Kremlin leadershq) itself 
; o remarkable lengths to f os- 

- *• sense that business was be- 
nducted without a break in 

* lie midst of approving a new 
-ship and umVirig funeral ar- 

nents, two members of the 
nro found rime to meet with 


President 
to attend the 
aL 

T V KremKn 
peared to be 
since Lenin. 


The 
hopeful 
Moscow. 


decided not 
emenko funer- 
Page 2. 
transirion ap- 
the smoothest 
Page 2. 

administra tion is 
better relations with 
Page 3. 


MikhaB S. Gorbachev, the son 
of a Russian peasant, made a 
dramatic rise to power. Page 6 l 


the visiting French minister of ex- 
ternal relations, Roland Dumas. 

The impnesrion grew that Mr. 
Chernenko, 73, bad been an inter- 
im leader of convenience to the 
Politburo, that he had been Ql when 

named to the post 13 months ago 

and been nmp ly marking rifrw- 

In a break with precedent, his 
successes:, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
was named within horns of the an- 
nouncement of Iris death. The ly- 
ing-in-state was reduced to one day 
from, the fan or five days accorded 
to Mr. Chernenko’s two immediate 
predecessors, Yuri V. Andropov 
and Leonid L Brezhnev. 

An nffidul annmmeBiiMit that 
schools would be dosed in honor of 
the late leader on Wednesday, the 
day erf the funeral, was later with- 
drawn. 

And within moments after his 
black-bordered portrait was shown 
on the evaring television news; a 
more brightly colored photograph 
of his successor filled the screen. 

Under Mr. Gorbadiev, 54. who 
represents a new, younger genera- 
tion of Soviet leaden, the Soviet 
Union 
orously 


eager to move vig- 


When Muscovites awoke Mon- 
day morning, it was not an official 
announcement, but music; that 
told them their leader had died. 

For 13 bouts, solemn music con- 
tinued on radio stations, ami nor- 
mal mooring television shows were 
replaced by nature fjlnyi and classi- 
cal music, before the 2 PJvt an- 
nouncement of Mir. Chernenko’s 
death. 

On the evening news program, 
the members of the Politburo were 
shown lined up stiffly at Mr. Cher- 
nenko’s bier in the House of 
Unions. 

As with his predecessors, Mr. 
Chernenko's body lay on a 
frier decorated with boughs erf 
red flowers and wide red ribbons 
bearing gold-lettered tributes. His 
16 medais, including four Orders of 
Latin, lay on red sarin pillows at 
Iris feet 

Mr. Gorbachev led the mourn- 
ers, pressing the hands of Mr. Cher- 
nenko's widow, Anna, and offering 
condolences to other members of 
the family. 

V Mourners View Body 

The widow, daughter and other 
family members of Mr. r*hf^-n>>nirn 
kept vigil Tuesday by the trier as 
thousands of mourners filed past, 
Reuters reported from Moscow. 

Outride on a cold, overcast day, 
two long lines of selected mourners 
wound through the streets of the 
city center, dosed off by police 
since Monday nighi 

Although the nation was in offi- 
cial mounting, the press broke with 
tradition and did not publish 
black-bordered portraits erf the late 
leader on their front pages. 

Instead, Pravda and other news- 
papers carried front-page pictures 
of Mr. Gorbachev. 



U.S., Soviet Open 
Talks in Geneva 
On Arms Control 


The heads of the Soviet and U.S. arms control negotiating teams, Victor P. Karpov, left, 
and Max M. Kampehnan, met Tuesday for the opening of talks on nuclear weapons. 

East Europe Sees Gorbachev 
As Sign Uncertainty Is Over 

By Heruv 

vemaiomd fit 


ubarak’s Peace Plan, Aid Request 
eceive Lukewarm Welcome in U.S. 


NX. t 


they 

rislai 


-• Bernard Gwcrtzman 

New York Times Service 

tSHINGTON — Senior ad- 
tralion officials have told 
lent Hosni Mubarak xrfl 
have serious _ 

_jhs latest peace proposals for 

- fiddle East and that the UJL 
my would not support the 
of large-scale supplemental 
*. is seeking. Slate Department 
.rissaid. 

- erident Ronald Reagan on 
lay praised Mr. Mubarak’s 

in the Middle East peace 


meeting Mr. Mubarak's political 
and economic requests: 

A high- r anking administration 
official said that although the Umt- 
etT Slates regardecTMi/Mubarak's 
peace proposals as “highly con- 
structive,” it was cod toward the 
idea of having a joint Jardanian- 
Palestinian delegation come to 
Washington. The United States re- 
fuses to deal with the Palestine lib- 
eration Organization until that 
gray explicitly accepts United 
Nations Security Council Resolu- 
tions 242 of 1967 and 338 of 1973 


*i^ss but did not publicly accept and publicly acknowledges lsraeTs 
' .ill for U.S. talks with a joint right to exist 
F& toian-Palcsrinian delegation, 

CUi; 3 * report^ ^ rom Washing- 


Arab “interlocutor” to talk directly 
with Israel, as Egypt had done be- 
fore the 1979 peace treaty. He said 
that Washington saw no advantage _ ^ 

in delaying such a direct dialogue- ^ 
by havmg the United States be- ^ aews P a P« r - 
crane the mediator, as Mr. Mu- 
barak advocates. 

The administration has deliber- 
ately refused to go along with re- 
quests by Arab nations that ii re- 
peat the diplomatic shuttle activity 
of previous administrations. It con- 
tends that the time has come for the 
Arabs to follow Egypt's lead and 

negotiate with 


Tanner 

international Herald Tribune 
LEIPZIG, East Germany — The 
speed with which the Soviet leader- 
ship announced the choice of Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev as the new Com- 
munist Party chief, only a few 
hours after the death of Ins prede- 
cessor, is being welcomed by East 
European officials as a reassuring 
sign that the period of uncertainty 
in the Kr emlin has ended. 

Neues Deutschland, the nffiant 
East German newspaper, displayed 
photos Tuesday morning of Mr. 
Gorbachev and Konstantin U. 
Chernenko with symmetrical 
equality on its front page. 

The “fraternal good wishes” to 
Mr. Gorbadiev from Erich Hon- 
ecker, the East German head of 
state, also were on the front page. 
And the text of Mr. Gorbachev’s 
speech outlining his program to the 
Soviet Central Committee look up 
the better part of an inside page of 



The official said that the 
the United States was to 


of 


an 


On the aid question, the high- 
ranking official said while Mr. Mu- 

(COntmned on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Although there has not yet been 
any official comment, the message 
behind the display was dean This 
time, the paper said, there has been 
none of the delays, doubts, rivalries 
and background struggles that par- 
alyzed the Kremlin when Leonid I. 
Brezhnev and Yuri V. Andropov 
died; an uncontesied new man is in 
charge, the transition has been 
smooth. 

The Russians “could have an- 
nounced Chernenko’s death on 
Monday and Mr. Gorbachev’s ap- 


r. Reagan called Mr. Mubar- 

-rc cent suggestions on the a ^ 

■KlSt Guns Fail Sdent in Civilian Sectors 

ad Mr. Mubarak agreed that 

As Iran, Iraq Observe UN Cease-Fire 


1 sU.-i • 


■ 

• l**«s • - r- 

c i’ : 




"lath to peace was through di- 
Israel- Arab negotiations and 
not mention Mr. Mubarak’s 
■or U.S. talks with a joint Pa- 
\.i*- uan- Jordanian delegation.] 

r. Mubarak arrived here on 
tday, hoping to persuade the 
inistration to play a more ac- 
mediating role in the Middle 
and, as a first step, to invite a 
.--anian-Palestinian group, in- 
71 .ing Palestine Liberation Orga- 
cioaa representatives, to crane to 


United Press International 

BEIRUT — Iran and Iraq ap- 
parently observed a fragile cease- 
fire on civilian areas Tuesday, only 
reporting fresh strikes on cities and 
towns shortly before a United Na- 
tions-mediated truce wait into ef- 
fect at midnight 
The Gulf News Agency, report- 


Iran Iftimpfad a Similar attack on 
ad. 

.’s official Islamic Republic 

News Agency said that five persons 
were killed and four others were 
wounded in the first Iraqi strike on 
a “purdy residential area” of the 
capital since the start of the Iran- 
Iraq war in September 1980. 

Iraq asked the United Nations 


Zanjan in the north, Arak south- 
west of Tehran, Bushehr an the 
Gulf, and Dizful and Masjid Sulei- 
man in the south. Iran listed six 
Iranian cities as attacked but made 
no mention of Zanjan and Bushehr. 

In Tehran, a nrihtaxy spokesman 
said that Iran retaliated with a 
ground- to-ground missile attack on 
oil installations near the northern 


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hington. He has also asked again Tuesday to work for a more liam rity of Kirkuk and mounted 

7 ’ hington, in advance, for $1.6 5®^! “2 SS eferive accord between the two fraE ground offensive in the soutl 


r ' • 


m •fTf"*' 

! I *l«4 •* -*• : 


Htflry 

trank aid for the 1985 and 1986 

-1 years, above the $43 biffion 
*dy appropriated or requested. 
Jt as Mr. Mubarak met Mon- 
with Secretaiy of State George 
Shultz, Defense Secretaiy Ca- 
W. Weinberger, Treasury Sec- 
■ ry James A. Baker 3d, and oth- 
ffidals, it became evident that 
tdounistration had difficulty in 


that pounded the city for a week 
fell silent after midnight Green- 
wich Mean Time and that “fife be- 
gan returning to normal at day- 
break.” Iran is three and a half 
hours ahead of GMT. 

Less than an hour before the 
deadline, Iraqi warplanes dropped 
rockets and bombs on the Iranian 
capital of Tehran and at least five 
other Iranian dries, shortly after 


nations, but stopped short erf say- 
ing that it would break the cease- 
fire and risk retaliation from Iran. 

The Ir anian news agency said 
that since the breakdown of the 
UN-brokered agreement to avoid 
civilian targets, both countries hive 
raided more than 20 dries each and 
Iraqi attacks have laded or wound- 
ed more than 1,000 people. 

Iraq said its aircraft nil Tehran, 


ground offensive in the south- 
era part of their border battle- 
ground. 

An Iraqi mifilary spokesman 
said the Iranian attack was 
“crushed and many captured or 
wounded.” But be denied any mis- 
sile attack on Kirkuk, saying that 
explosives were detonated in the 
dty by guerrillas to give Iran the 
pretext for reporting a missile at- 
tack. 


Erich Hooecker 


poiatment on Tuesday.” one East 
German visitor told another over 
breakfast. Replied his companion: 
“The point is that they didn’t" 
“Nothing is more important 
than to know that there is someone 
in the Kremlin who can take deci- 
sions and that the era of side old 
men is over,” an East German offi- 
cial said with unusual frankness. 
He pointed out that the nuclear 
talks in Geneva were resuming on 
schedule and he called this a “most 
it sign of continuity 
st Bloc officials began telling 
visitors several months ago that the 
changeover in the Kremlin after 
Mr. Chernenko’s death was going 
to be different from the past 
They said ai the time that inter- 
nal debate within the Kr emlin was 
abating and that Soviet leaders 
woe moving toward a consensus 
that they did not have when Brezh- 
nev and Andropov died. 

These officials reported that the* 
Soviet leadership already was mak- 
ing preparations then foi a smooth 
succession. Advanced preparations 
of this kind in the past would have 
been unthinkable m the lifetime of 
an ailing leader. 

East Europeans like to point out 
that stability and derisiveness in 
the Kremlin are essential to the 
East European n^nnes for die sake 
of their own stability. 

Most East European leaden, 
with the possible exception of Gus- 
tav Husak of Czechoslovakia, fa- 
vored Andropov over Mr. Cher- 
nenko when Brezhnev died. 

They regarded Andropov as 
more pragmatic and less ideologi- 
cal than his rival. They favored ms 
appeal fra more discipline and his 
drive against corruption. 

They expected him to make basic 


reforms in the la gging Soviet econ- 
omy and to have more understand- 
ing for unorthodox economic poli- 
cies in Hungary, East Germany 
and more recently Bulgaria. 

Last year when Mr. Chernenko 
succeeded Andropov, reports from 
East European capitals made it 
clear that most leaders in the region 
would have preferred Mr. Gorba- 
chev. 

They suspected Mr. Chernenko 
of wanting to reverse Andropov’s 
reforms while Mr. Gorbachev was 
seen as a disciple of Andropov. 

There are powerful reasons for 
Eastern Europe's preoccupation 
with Soviet economic policies. 

East Germany, for instance, re- 
ceives most of its raw materials 
from the Soviet Union and most 
pay fra them with industrial ex- 
ports. Almost 40 percent of its 
trade is with the Soviet Union. 

If the Soviet economy is in disar- 
ray and unable to reform itself be- 
cause of ideological strictures, it 
remains a drag on the economies of 
the East European countries and 
robs the governments concerned of 
what economic leeway they have. 

Contrary to East European ex-, 
pectations. Mr. Chernenko merely 
slowed down Andropov’s initia- 
tives and did not reverse them. 

An East European diplomat re- 
cently explained that by not trying 
to impose his will on the divided 
Soviet leadership Mr. Chernenko 
permitted a healing process that 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


By Bill Keller 

New York Tima Service 

GENEVA — Negotiators for the 
United States and the Soviet Union 
met Tuesday to begin negotiations 
on nuclear and space weapons, re- 
suming a formal quest for arms 
control that broke off 15 months 
ago. 

Three American negotiators 
headed tty Max M. Kampelmau 
met for two hours and 45 minutes 
with the chief Soviet delegate. Vik- 
tor P. Karpov, and agreed to meet 
again on Thursday. 

Mr. Kampehnan said later that 
“the two sides had a serious and 
businesslike discussion of the is- 
sues.” Another official said the ne- 
gotiators discussed technical ar- 
rangements for the talks, and the 
“concepts” they plan to explore in 
future meetings. 

The talks are the first since the 
Soviet Union walked out of negoti- 
ations on missiles and strategic 
ms in Geneva in 1983. The 
r-I strategic arms accord in 
1972 was the last arms control 
agreement between the two sides. 
The SALT-2 agreement was never 
ratified by the U.S. Senate. 

The meeting took place just two 
days after the death of the Soviet 
leader, Konstantin U. Chernenko, 
one day after the swift succession 
of Mikhail S. Gorbachev, and 
against the backdrop of bitter pub- 
lic exchanges over American mili- 
tary programs in space and alleged 
Sonet violations of the past trea- 
ties. 

But despite these circumstances, 
Mr. Karpov bantered easily in En- 
glish as he waited to welome the 
American delegation, answering — 
or more often eluding — reporters’ 
questions with a disarming infor- 
mality that American officials said 
was extraordinary for a Soviet dip- 
lomat 

At cme point asked if his spirits 
were lifted by meeting in a room 
where much of the SALT-2 treaty 
was worked out, Mr. Karpov 
chuckled that if negotiators are of a 
mind to agree, they could do their 
work “on the kitchen floor.” 

Asked if Mr. Gorbachev had a 
hand in the Soviet team's negotiat- 
ing orders, Mr. Karpov said yes. 
“He presided over the meeting of 
the Politburo that approved our 
instructions — it was last Thurs- 
day,” he said. 

American officials said later that 
Mr. Karpov’s performance may 
have reflected a sense of relief at 
the unusually smooth passing of 
power in Moscow. It also seemed in 
keeping with the more affable, 
Western style of public relations 


that Mr. Gorbachev himself dem- 
onstrated in a trip to London in 
December. 

Moreover, by making himself the 
center of attention Tuesday. Mr. 
Karpov underscored, that in the 
Soviet view, this is a single negotia- 
tion, in which curtailment of Amer- 
ican plans for defensive weapons in 
space will be inseparable from the 
effort to reduce stock piles of 
bombs and missiles. 

The Americans have argued that 
none of the three separate sub- 
groups of the talks — on strategic, 
or long-range nuclear arms, medi- 
um-range weapons, and space 
weapons — should be held hostage 
to an agreement on the other areas. 

Mr. Kampelmon. who is usually 
voluble and much at ease in public, 
was cast Tuesday in a more formal 
role. In a conference room 
thronged with 200 journalists, he 
read a brief statement saying that 
the talks had begun and announc- 
ing that the delegates had agreed to 
impose a rule of confidentiality 
that prevented him from answering 
questions. 

The two nations resumed their 
22-year formal efforts to limit nu- 
clear weapons divided as never be- 
fore over the very nature of arms 
control 

President Ronald Reagan, skep- 
tical of the traditional approach of 
putting ceilings on existing stock 
piles, has proposed a new approach 
that relies on his Strategic Defense 
Initiative research program, popu- 
larly called “star wars." 

In his virion, the superpowers 
should fust reduce their offensive 
weapons, then gradually install 
space-based defenses that would 
render the remaining nuclear weap- 
ons useless. 

Mr. Karpov greeted Mr. Kam- 
pelman to the talks saying. “I hope 
that our meeting will not be the last 
one. but (me of the first in a series, 
that we mil negotiate and reach an 
agreement.” 

“Our objective is to reach an 
agreement, loo the head of the 
American delegation replied. “1 
hope this is a good omen.” 

■ Letter to Gorbachev 

In Washington, Reagan adminis- 
tration officials said Tuesday that 
Mr. Reagan had sent a personal 
message to Mr. Gorbachev suggest- 
ing the possibility of a future sum- 
mit meeting. The Washington Post 
reported. 

The message was carried by Vice 
President George Bash, who ar- 
rived in Moscow on Tuesday to 
attend the funeral Wednesday of 
Mr. Chernenko. 


Report Says U.S. to Employ Leverage 
To Encourage Change in Philippines 


ouisiana’s Era of p Outsized 9 Politicians Is Ending 


By Don Obcrdorfcr 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — U3. policy 
toward the Philippines is to use 
diplomatic and economic tools to 
encourage a peaceful and demo- 
cratic succession to the weakening 
rale of President Ferdinand E. 
Marcos, according to an official 
paper made public by a Washing- 
ton lobbying group. 

Hie 1983 assassination of the 
main opposition leader, Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr, the report said, “de- 
stroyed most of the political credi- 
bility the 19-year-old Marcos gov- 
ernment enjoyed and exacerbated a 
shaky financial situation." In this 

situation, it continued, Mr. Marcos 
“is pan of the problem” but “also 
necessarily part of the solution” 
reforms can be undertake n 
only with his assistance or acquies- 
cence. 

U-S. support is “one of Marcos's 
;t remaining strengths." it 


tual transition to a successor gov- 
ernment whenever that takes place. 
Marcos, fra his pan, will try to use 
us to remain in power indefinitely.” 

Leverage mentioned as available 
to the administration and which 
has been employed in the past sev- 
eral months included: public state- 
meats such as various press state- 


al of Mr. Marcos from power or 
destabilization of his government. 
Rather, the goals were listed as “re- 
vitalization of democratic institu- 
tions, dismantling ‘cr on y 1 capital- 
ism and allowing the market to 
respond to free market forces, and 
restoring professional, apolitical 
leadership in the Philippine mili- 


ments and a full-scale Philippine taiy to deal with the growing Com- 
poiicy speech Feb. 22 by toe assis- munist insurgency.” 

Should Mr. Marcos refuse to un- 
dertake reforms desired by the 
United Stales, the paper recom- 
mended that the Reagan adminis- 
tration “discreetly publicize” its 
views to increase the pressure on 
Mr. Marcos, and send tangible 
“signals" of noncooperation by 
such tactics as delaying U.S. funds 
and voting against the Philippines 
in multilateral institutions. 


taut secretary of state, Paul D. 
Wolfowitz; a letter from President 
Ronald Reagan stating U.S. con- 
cerns and policies that was deliv- 
ered to Mr. Marcos by Mr. 
Wolfowitz in Manila on Jan. 16, 
and upgraded U.S. assistance pro- 
posals that were sent to Congress in 
early February. 

Immediate U.S. goals, according 
to the paper, do not include remov- 


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■JL *ff 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Post Service 

EW ORLEANS —Half a century ago. 
. -sy Pierce Long emerged as governor from 
muck and misery of the Depression to 
d a political dynasty as gaudy and grand, 
,.otica and fiavorful, as any dot Lo uisian a 
.' - be nation has seen. 

he Long era came crashing to a dose Iasi 
.. „ k. Its passing is being treated here with 
; ->' kind of chic sobriety that Lomsanans 
e been hell-bent on avoiding since well 
■ are the man nicknamed “Kmgfish" was 
- led governor in 1928. 
hi Feb. 25, Huey Long’s son, Senator 
Sseli B. Long, 66, unexpectedly an- 

- meed that he plans to retire in 1986 after 
years in the ILS. Congress. 

rime days later, Huey Long's spiritual 
" 1 stylistic heir, Governor Edwin W. Ed- 
rds, also a Democrat, was indicted by a 
eral grand jury on charges that he ured 
Jtical clout to pocket S2 million for him- 
r : and another S! million for his brother on 
' !pital construction deals from 1982 to 
14. Mr. Edwards. 57, pleaded not guilty on 

day and was placed under 5100,000 bafl. 
Soth events followed by Iras than two 
*ths the death of Representative Gillis W. 

- ng. the senator's distant cousin, a Dcmo- 
•t who was just starting his eighth term m 

• ngress. - 



TfcsAoooaarfFmj 

Huey P. Long of Louisiana and his son, Russefl B. Long, in 1935. 


“It's as if the whole state is unraveling," 
said Ed Ren wick, an independent pollster. 
“Fust Gillis Long, then Russell retires, now 
Edwin is indicted. We’re a slate that likes our 
leaders outsized. It will take rime to adjust" 
The adjustment must include dealing with 
unfamiliar new jitters about the state’s image 


and respectability. Louisiana is running out 
of oO and gas. and hs leaders warn to diversi- 
ty the economic base. They have begun to 
fret that Louisiana's long love affair with 
political scoundrels has become a dangerous 
indulgence that might keep new 
away. 


*T suspect we're in for an age of less 
flamboyance and fewer " said 

John Magmnis, a biographer of Mr. Ed- 
wards. 

The Long era paraded an assortment of 
populist demagogues before a cynical and 
adoring public, mule chicanery and bossism 
were elevated to high art, huge programs of 
highway, bridge and university construction 
lifted the stale out of mud ana ignorance. 

And the era spawned Huey Long’s incipi- 
ent presidential campaign whose slogans of 
“Every Man a King” and “Share The 
Wealth" amounted to what one chronicler of 
the day called “inUbifly Marxism." 

Perhaps even more memorable was the 
riveting human drama: 

• The assassination, 50 years ago this Sep- 
tember, inside the 34-story state capitol tow- 
er he had built in Baton Rouge, of 42-year- 
old Huey Long, then a UJS. senator at the 
height or his popularity. 

• The involuntary instim ii nnalTTariftn in 
1959 of his younger brother, Governor Earl 
K. Long, who, af terfulmmazing incoherently 
for horns one evening on the floor erf the 
state Senate, was whisked away by friends. 
Placed under heavy sedation, he^ was flown to 
a menial hospital in Galveston, Texas. A 
week later he talked his way out and retained 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 51 


“An overriding consideration,” 
according to the report, “should be 
to avoid getting ourselves caught 
between the slow erosion of Mar- 
cos's authoritarian control and the 
still fragile revitalization of demo- 
cratic institutions, bong made hos- 
tage to Marcos’s political fortunes, 

bong saddled with ultimate re- 
sponsibility for winning the insur- 
gency or tagged with the success or 
failure of individuals in the moder- 
ate leadership” 

The document, drafted by the 
State Department cm Nov. 2, ap- 
pears to have been prepared fra 
recent interagency meetings arising 
from increasing concern about poi- 
iiticai and economic stability in the 
Philippines. 

Reagan administration actions 
and statemen ts regarding the Phil- 
ippines in the past four months 
have closely followed those set out 
in the paper, which was obtained 
by the Philippine Support Commit- 
tee, a research and lobbying group, 
and its co-chairman. Dr. Walden 

Bella 

“We need to be able to wodc" 
with Mr. Marcos, the paper said, 
“and to try to influence him 
through a weD-orchestraiad policy 
of incentives and disincentives to 
set the stage for peaceful and even- 

& 



The Anooottd Prsu 

Eugene Onnandy, 85, who conducted the Philadelphia 
Orchestra for 44 years, tied on Tuesday. Page 3. 

INSIDE 

■ MUBoos of Ethiopians in rebel-held areas are being denied famine 
relief, George Bush tells a UN conference in Geneva. Page 3. 

■ President Francois Mitterrand may introduce a degree of propor- 
tional representation in France before the 1986 elections. Page 5. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ A much-heralded “Tosca” at the Metropolitan Opera in New York 

fails to live up to expectations. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ A report Warned the high dollar for the loss of 2 million U.S. jobs. 

Meanwhile, the currency rose in volatile trading. ' Paige 9. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


Reagan Rejects StaffAdvice, 
Won’t Attend Moscow Funeral 


By Lou Cannon 
and David Hoffman 


desire for good, relations with the 
new Soviet leadership. Late in the 
day he visited the Soviet Embassy 
Wathmgm Post Service in Washington to sign a book of 
WASHINGTON — President condolences. He also sent a condo- 
Ronald Reagan overrode the rec- fence message to the Soviet head of 
ommendatkra of his national seen- state, Vasily Kuznetsov, repeating 
rity adviser and decided not to at- a commitment*^ reduce and etim- 


tehd the funeral of the Soviet 
president, Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko, because, be said, “there's an 
awful lot on my plate right now 
dial would have to be set aside; I 
didn't see that anything could be 
achieved." 

Among tbe items that might pre- 
vent him from going to Moscow is 
his meeting Tuesday with President 
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt and his 
scheduled overnight trip to Canada 
on Sunday to visit the new Conser- 
vative prime minister, Brian Mul- 
roney. Mr. Mulroney is to play host 
to Mr. Reagan after returning from 
the Chernenko funeral. 

Sources said that Mr. Reagan's 
national security affairs adviser, 
Robert C McFariane, and other 
White House officials believed that 
Mr. Reagan could show “open- 
ness" to the new Soviet leadership 
by attending the funeral. 

But they said that Mr. Reagan 
decided Monday that it would be 
“a grandstand play" that would not 
make a lasting improvement in 
U.S.-Sovjet relations. One official 
said Mr. Reagan also was con- 
cerned that he world show “over- 
eagerness" by traveling the 1 


ug 

foi 


distance to Moscow for a 
meeting with the new Soviet leader, 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

Mr. Reagan will be one of the 
few world leaders not to attend the 
funeral. Governments of most 
West European countries an- 
nounced Monday that they would 
be represented in Moscow by tbe 
head of state or the prime minister. 
President Francois Mitterrand of 
France, who din not attend the fu- 
nerals of the two previous Soviet 
leaders, Leonid L Brezhnev and 
Yuri V. Andropov, announced he 
will attend. 

However, in Mr. Reagan's state- 
ments Monday he emphasized his 


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inate nuclear weapons" at the arms 
control talks in Geneva. 

Mr. Reagan was somewhat less 
affirmative about the prospects for 
UJL-Soviet relations at a luncheon 
meeting with journalists from 28 
s tat es. 

“You have to wait for a new man 
uow to get in place and establish 
bis regime," be said, “and then HI 
be more than ready, because I think 
there's a great mutual suspicion be- 
tween the two countries. I think 
ours is more justified than theirs.” 

Mr. Reagan told his audience 
that he had wrestled with the ques- 
tion of going to Moscow for the 
funeral after he was awakened by a 
call from Mr. McFariane a: 4 AJvL 
Monday and told of Mr. Chernen- 
ko's death. 

The president chose Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush, who was al- 
ready in Geneva, to head a U.S. 
delegation that indudes Secretary 
of State George P. Shultz and Ar- 
thur A. Har tman, the U.S. ambas- 
sador to Moscow. Mr. Bush headed 
similar rMpgatinm^ for the Brezh- 
nev funeral in 1982 and the Andro- 
pov funeral in 1984. 

Addressing the group of regional 
journalists to which Mr. Reagan 
spoke, Mr. Shultz said the presi- 
dent was not attending the funeral 
because such action is “not condu- 
cive” to a full exchange of views. 

“It has symbolic significance and 
perhaps a little content," Mr. 
Shultz said, “but it simply isn't a 
setting in which you can have a 
good, thorough and searching ex- 
amination of problems.” 

Mr. Reagan is the only U.S. chief 
executive once Herbert Hoover 
who has not met with the leader of 
the Soviet Union during his presi- 
dency. Mr. Reagan did not meet 
with any member of the Soviet 
leadership during his first term un- 
til his White House meeting with 
the Soviet foreign minister, Andrri 
A. Gromyko, in September. 

Officials said Monday that there 
is little likelihood of a meeting be- 
tween Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorba- 
chev soon. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, said “nothing has 
changed” in the Reagan adminis- 


tration's that any meet- 

ing have a definite agenda. 

Mr. Reagan was asked Monday 
what changes he expects under Mr. 
Gorbachev. 

The president replied that the 
Soviet leadership is “a collective 
government” where the policy is 
“really detenmned by a dozen or so 
individuals in the Politburo." 

“And while an individual, once 
chosen by them, can undoubtedly 
influence or persuade them to cer- 
tain thing s that might be particular 
theories or policies erf his,” he said, 
“the govern m ent basically remains 
the same group of individuals.” 

■ Views of Reagan’s Decision 

Kevin Klose of The Washington 



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Soviet specialists across the 
Uni ted States were divided Mon- 
day over Mr. Reagan’s decision not 
to attend Chernenko’s funeral. 

Some Kremlin experts, such as 
the president of Oberiin College in 
Ohio, S. Fredrick Starr, said that 
Mr. Reagan may have missed a 
historic opportunity to make an 
early, positive gesture toward Mr. 
Gorbachev, who presumably will 
be in power for many years. 

Mir. Starr said Kranlin fu- 
nerals have a unique importance in 
Soviet life. 

“In an old-fashioned society 
with very few sacraments," he said, 
“a civic death like tins takes on 
heavy significance. For Reagan to 
attend would have been a gesture 
of grandness and decency, not an 
acknowledgment of weakness." 

Others say the president’s deci- 
sion to stay home will have tittle or 
no consequences fen: Soviet-Ameri- 
can relations. 

Made Garrison, former deputy 
chief of mission at the U.S. Embas- 
sy in Moscow and now head of a 
foreign policy research center at 
Brown University in Rhode Island, 



Soldiers fifing into the HaD of Unions to pay last respects to Konstantin U. Chernenko. 

Power Transition in Kremlin Appears 
To Ham Been Smoothest Since Lenin 


Beaten 

MOSCOW — The transition of 
power from Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko to Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
was the smoothest in Soviet histo- 
ry, apparently free of the it 
and power struggles that 
past leadership changes. 

Mr. Gorbachev's election to the 
leadership on Monday within 
hours of the announcement of the 
death of Mr. Chernenko was re- 
markable for its swiftness. 

The only previous transition 
comparable for speed was that 
from I-enin, the founder of the So- 
viet state, to Stalin. 

But I^nin had lived for two 


iffli d .faraewr that Mr B wigan had years in semiretinemgnt on his 
missed “an opportunity to explore death in 1924 and Stalin was the 
a fresh start with a fresh lace." leader of the party and had sur- 
Nevertheless, he added, “we're pressed a letter from Lenin wam- 
aending the rice president, mg of his ambition. In the next 
that’s approp riate " three years, Stalin removed his old 

Bolshevik rivals, Grigori E Zinov- 


Mr. Garrison recalled that Presi- 
dent John F. Kennedy’s funeral in 
1963, which attracted one of the 
largest garlwfngs of worid leaden 
in recent times, was not attended 
by Nikita S. Khrushchev, who was 
then in power in Moscow. 

T frankly thmlr ft would be a. 


ievand Lev B. Kamenev, who were 
later executed, and Trotsky, who 
was murdered in exile. 

When Stalin died in 1953 as be 
was about to launch a fresh purge 
of party ranks, a power struggle 
developed between his old 


opposition. He was removed in 
1964. 

A “collective leadership” re- 
placed him, made up of new party 
leader, Leonid I. Brezhnev, Prime 
Minister Alexei N. Kosygin and 
Nikolai V. Podgorny in me largely 
ceremonial post of president. 

In 1977, Brezhnev removed Pod- 
gorny and assumed the title of pres- 
idenL His 18 years in power saw a 
personality cult recalling that 
which had surrounded Stalin and, 
as ill-health incapacitated him, 
stagnation in political and econom- 
ic life. 

Brezhnev's death in November 
1982 had been long anticipated and 
speculation over a successor was 
rife. 

Yuri V. Andropov, who had 
beaded the KGB secret police, was 
quickly named. But he was also ill 
and remained in office only 15 
months. 



Mfidzafi S. Gorbachev 


WORLD BRIEFS 

• i 

Soviet Aide Cites Cam Ranh Bay Rq 

TOKYO (AF) —A Soviet mOitaiy official said Tuesday that tix: S 

Union uses the former U.S. base at Cam Ranh Bay in Vietnam onh 
liberty port far its navy and denied that it serves as a base for wars 
“It is not a mOitaiy base at all,'' said Colonel Yuri F. DanOov 
senior military and air attach^ at the Soviet Embassy in Tokyo. Co 
Danilov said mat Soviet ships stiy at Cam Ranh Bay only on p«t ca 
provide rest and relaxation for their' crews. 

“If you rail it a military base, it means we have such bases m r 
countries,” be said. “Tt is not a home port in the context of bring use 
strategic purposes.” His remarks ran counter to assertions byU & ] 
officials that the Russans have fumed the base into a naval base 
poses a potential threat to sea times in the region. The base on Viecn 

eastern coast was built by tbe United Sates in tbe late 1960s 
abandoned before the communist takeover in Vietnam in May 197 

EC Hoping to End Border Checks 

STRASBOURG, France (AF) — Jacques Ddon, president of the 
Community Executive Commission, said Tuesday that 


controls by 1992 wxQ be drafted 

Mr. Doors, a former French finance minister, told the Earn 
P arliam ent that the creation of a borderless Common Market wi 
commission’s highest priority. 

He acknowledged, however, that reaching this goal presupposes 
the 10 EC governments agree to lift trade barriers, unify IegislatiM 
tax structures and strengthen monetary cooperation. 

Gandhi Names New Punjab Govern 

NEW DELHI CAP) — The government appointed the top d 
official erf the central state of Madhya Pradesh as the new governor ( 
predominantly Sikh state of Punjab on Tuesday, a day after it order? 
release of eight imprisoned Sikh leaden. 

The home affairs minister, Shankarrao B. Chavan, in announdD 
appointment of Ajjun Singh, did not explain why the govern 
suddenly decided to replace K.T. Satarawala as Punjab governor, 
release of eight Sikh leaders and tbe appointment of a new stale govt 
were seal as an attempt by Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi to settle the 
demands for autonomy. 

Earlier Tuesday, the president of the main Skh political party, 
riiirnl Singh Longowal, along with seven other prominent Sikhs, 
released after nine months of imprisonment, a government spoke 
said. The Sih leader said after his rdease that his party would not rt 
tallrc with the government unless all innocent Sikhs arrested by sec 
forces were freed and a judicial inquiry was ordered into last year’s 
Skh riots in northern India. . 

U.S. Rules Drug Is Not Tied to Defec 

CINCINNATI (AP) — A federal court jury derided Tuesday afv 
hours' deliberation that the anti-nausea drug Bendectin taken by 
nan t women did not cause birth defects in their children. 

The civil case consolidated about 1,000 individual lawsuits. Tbe u . 
facturer, Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals Incx, said the drug was sale ft 
estimated 33 million pregnant women who took it from 1967 until . 
when the company voluntarily took it off the market. 

The jury’s decision riimmatgri the need for another trial If thejur 
derided that Bendectin caused birth defects, a second trial would' 
been necessary to determine whether it was unreasonably dangerout 
whether Merrdl Dow could be held accountable: 


mistake for him to go," said Brent such as the chief of state security, 
Scowcroft, who served as national Lavrenti P. Beria, and reformers 
security affairs adviser to President headed by Nikita S- Khrushchev. 
Gerald R. Ford and headed Mr. Hie party leader, Khrushchev, 
Reagan's commission of strategic had Bena arrested and executed for 
weapons experts. excesses under Stalin. In 1955, 

“While there are some obvious Khrushchev removed Prime Mims- 
political advantages” for Mr. Rea- or Georo M. Malenkov, with 
gan in attending the funeral and 
meeting with Mr. Gorbachev, Mr. 

Scowcroft said, “it would be pre- 
mature” to expect then* to have a earned him enemies and his years 
substantive talk. in power were marked by internal 


Flamboyant Era Fizzles For the Record 

J The United States and Spain have ratified a Council of Et 

t X * • XU 1 • _ • convention that allows prisoners to serve out their sentences in their] 

In Louisiana .Politics — — • 


whom he had been allied. 

Khrushchev’s radical debunking 
of Stalin and flamboyant style 


U.S. Aides See Problems 
With Mubarak ’s Plan 


( Continued from Page 1) 

bank's “economic needs are com- 
pelling, we must consider our own 
budget" problems. Other officials 
said that tbe United States believed 
that Egypt’s economy was in worse 
shape than Israel's, the Israelis are 
also requesting large-scale supple- 
mentary aid. 

A Slate Department official said 
that he could foresee perhaps an 
addirinnal $200 milli on or $300 
million for Egypt, bat nowhere 
near tbe amount being sought by 
Cairo. 

Mr. Mubarak, whose govern- 
ment has had difficulty meeting its 
debts to the United States for past 
loans, has asked to have its debts 
wiped oat, but an administration 
official said this was impossible un- 
der U.S. law. Egypt, which accord- 
ing to State Department officials 
owes $285 mini on to the United 
States, is in danger, if it does not 
keep up its payments, of being 
found in arrears for a year, which 
automatically would mean the loss 
of future American aid. 

Administration officials said 
they were concerned that Mr. Mu- 
barak, who is regarded here as a 
strong friend of tbe United States 
in the region, not go home empty- 
handed. Not oily is he unlikely to 
succeed in chang in g the adrnmis- 



(Cantinued from Page I) 
to the governor's mansion in Baton 
Rouge to dismiss the stale hospital 
commissioner to keep from bring 
recommitted. 

• Tbe grand jury indictment this 
week of a governor who has made a 
career of daring trouble and skat- 
ing away. Hie indictment was Mr. 
Edwards's first, but tbe grand jury 
was at least the 10th that has inves- 
tigated Mm. 

Although the state legislature 
once tried to impeach Huey Long, 
he was hugely popular with the 
citizenry. He was never found to 
have acted illegally, allhough he 
ruled by a “deduct" system wherein 
each state employee tithed 10 per- 
cent to tbe Long political organiza- 
tion. 

His son, Russell, elected to the 
Senate one day before he turned 30, 
also is a Democrat but has never 
been the same sort of radical popu- 
list 

“He wanted to tax it away from 
those who had it" the senator once 
said of his father. “I wouldn't kero 
anybody rich from getting richer. 
Russell Long's chief failing. 


taste for dke, women and chica- 
nery. 

First elected in 1972 after a suc- 
cessful French-speaking campaign 
through his home area in -southern 
-Louisiana, Mr. Edwards was re- 
elected in 1975. Ineligible to run in 
1979 for a third consecutive term, 
be was returned to office in 1983 
with 65 percent of the vote: 

Once in the middle of an earlier 
grand jury investigation, he was 
asked d he worried that the gover- 
nor’s mansion might be wire- 
tapped. “I can't image who would 
want to" Mr. Edwards. shot back, 
“except maybe some jealous hus- 
bands." 

And he has kept on wisecracking 
through the current investigation, 
recently noting: “Any jury in this 
state is bound to have right Ed- 
wards supporters." 


coon tries, the council announced Tuesday in Strasbourg, France. ( 
A bond) was found at a US. Army officers’ dub near Stuttga . 
Tuesday and defused before it could explode, West German police 
U.S. and NATO installations recently have been the targets of bond, 
arson attacks by the Red Army Faction. (Rbl 

The lands have begun dismantling their sophisticated elect! 
surveillance station on the label Barouk range as part of the second) 
of their withdrawal from Lebanon, a Lebanese radio station said ! 
day. 

A Danish naval commander, Henning Olsen, has been found _ 
dereliction of duty over an incident in which a missile fired from a fi 
exploded among holiday homes in Zeeland canting damage " 
injuries. He was given a reprimand by a court Monday. (Rd_ 
The White Home counsel, Fred F. Fielding, found “nothing p 
illegal or unethical" about the purchase of nine luxury automobiles, 1 ^ 
deputy White House chief of staff, Michael K. Deaver, and s 4 
associates on a trip abroad, but Mr. Fidding ordered the rules dung 
prevent it from happ ening 3 gam, it was announced Monday. ( 

Correction 

Because of an editing error, a New York Times dispatch from Roc 
the Herald Tribune of March 11 erroneously reported the date tk- 
American tax lawyer was arrested in Italy. Instead of March 
pubHshed, he was arrested on March 2. 


U.S. Senate Panel Votes for Pay Frees. 


The Associated Press 
WASHINGTON — The Seriate 
viewed from New Orleans, was a Badger Committee, continuing to 
bland and inscrutable personality, reject President Ronald Reagan's 
For flair, I.omsianansof the cur- recommendations, voted Toesday 
rent generation have relied on Mr. to maintain the federal rev enne - 
Ed wards, the irreverent, charming, sharing program for one year, and 
perpetually tanned Cajun who ney- for a one-year pay freeze lor d vil- 
er misses a chance to advertise his ian and military government work- 
era. 

Tbe votes came as 


in domestic cuts that the president 
wants. 

The committee’s pattern last 
week was to generally freeze pend- 
ing on domestic pro g rams next 
year. That meant defeat after de- 
feat for Mr. Reagan's proposals to 
end some federal programs and to 
cut deeply into others. 

The panel was deadlocked last 


Hosni Mubarak 

tration’s policy toward the PLO, 
officials said, but he is also not 
going to receive the kind of eco- 
nomic help he is seeking. 

In addition, the death of Kon- 
stantin U. Chernenko, the Soviet 
leader, which was announced Mon- 
day, has had the effect of upstaging 
Mr. Mnbarak in Washington. 
Egyptian officials had hoped that 
Mr. Mubarak, who met with Amer- 
ican Jewish figures and the Con- 
gressional Blade Caucus on Mon- 
day, would create significant public 
interest in his crip. 


itheadminis- MStantj. f *bngto 

(ration spoke out against the grow- * nuy°my for any of tfiree 

mg sentiment on ^rommittro f^ separate proposals: one to cancel 


Le Pen Speech Barred 

By Geneva Authorities _ . . 

J higher taxes. The chief White 

Roam House spokesman, Larry Speakes. i -v - 

GENEVA — Gty authorities, to said that Mr. Reagan was “strong . _ . 

ert what they termed a serious as 10 pounds ofomous against it" - Wtho “l any changes, the defiat 


nte pr 

next year’s cost-of-living increase, 
one to modify it and a third to 


avert 

threat to public order, have barred 
Jean-Marie Le Pen, the French ex- 
treme rightist leader, from speak- 
ing here cm Wednesday. 

Officials, slating that Geneva 
could not be used as a battleground 
for confrontations “against the 
backdrop of a foreign state’s poli- 
tics,” said Monday that they had 
also withdrawn permission for Mr. 
Le Pen’s adversaries to address a 
protest rally. 


i against i 
In addition to the vote on the pay 
freeze for government workers, the 
committee, which is drafting a bud- 


is expected to rise above $230 tril- 
lion next year. 

With several Democrats and at 


“The committee should 
taxes as an answer to the dt'- 
and get down to business cuK 
spending,” he said. 

Mr. Reagan “doesn't like " 
corporate taxes, he doesn't Kkc ’ : 
es on the oil industry, he do^ 
like consumer taxes, he doesn’t 
individual taxes,” Mr. Spe* 
said. -- 

“If there is (me tiring he is, 
manton, it is no — and I repea 
— new taxes- He is strong- 8; 
ids of onions on this,"-’ 
es added. 

As the Senate worked de - 
budget, a House appropriate 
subcommittee voted 7-4 on T-. 
day to accept Mr. Reagan's m 
mendation for spending $13 


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an. Roe. fay Mdidfa, Good tfiai. Corny and N.Y. 
Tmov Mon-Sat mmsoOom. Tdj 01-8286360. 


LONDON SW3 


BEWICKS RESTAURANT 

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KBIVANSARAY 

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toridd.il.irsM nsu. indicated tbe tutanniara- 

lne vote on revenue sharing m don’s plans to halt any move in that 
trie Republican-controlled commit-' direction. 

tee, on a proposal by Senator J. 

James Exon, a Democrat of Ne- 
braska, WOUld maintain the $4.6- 

bilUoa revenue-sharing program 
for local governments only through 
the 1986 fiscal year. 

With counties and cities relying 
on the money, Mr Exon said that 
Congress should give them a year 
“to get Lhdr house in order" before 
tbe funding is cm off. 

Committee aides said spending 
decisions made so far would save 
$113 billion from domestic pro- 


opened what is forecast as a c 
and bitter battle in both the Hi . 
and S enate later this month. . 


(Continued from Page 1) 

eventually led to the consensus that 
brought Mr. Gorbachev into the 
top post. 


For the East Europeans the most 
grams in the 1986 fiscal year' on important turning point under Mr. 
top of a recommended S21.1-bil- Chernenko was the decision to ra- 
tion reduction in the administra- him to the aims negotiations in 


lion's defense buildup. That meant 
the panel bad rejected S2L1 trillion 





HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE, 


B Grand Loxe 

* The Place to Stef 

• The Place to Meet 

M.Qoai Gtnfnl Guinn 
1211 Geneva 3 
TeL 022/21U344 
Td*= 42LS50 


East Europe Sees Gorliadie 
As Sign Uncertainty Is Over 

sions that existed in theKremli . 
the time. 

The next test in relations 
tween Moscow and Eastern Eur . 
win come very soon. The War. 
Pact, which was concluded 30 y<.. 
ago, will have to be renewed » 
this summer. 

Quiet consultations between 
East European capitals and ' 
Kremlin have been going on . 
over a year with the Soviet Un 
pressing for an extension of 2 
not 30 years and most of the £ 
Europeans holding out for 
shorter period. 

■ West German Comment 
West Germany’s economics r 
ister, Martin Bangesnann, and J- 
Honecker of East 


Geneva. 

East Germany, Hungary and 
Romania had urged the Russians in 
1984 to do so. Toe issue had led to 
tension between Moscow and the 
East European capitals. Several of 
these governments resisted the de- 
ployment of ever greater numbers 
of Soviet missiles cm their sod. 

Mr. Honecker felt impelled to 
adopt a high-risk, high-visibility 
policy of campaigning insistently corned on Tuesday Mr. 
for closer ties between East and che/s acceptance speech as a p« ■ 
West Germany as a substitute for live sign for East-west rdano. 
tbe discontinued dialogue between The Associated Press repcrr , 
the Soviet Union and the United from East Vrim. 

States. 

Mr. Honecker came under 
strong pressure from the Kr emlin 
to call off his viat to West Germa- 
ny. East Germans blame the unnec- 
essarily public and embarrassing 
nature of tins pressure on the divi- 


The Gorbachev speech *. 
“what we are waiting and hop? 
for from Soviet politics, name' 

the beginning of a lessening cfb 

nous," Mr. Ban y - n i am i said af 
meeting with Mr. Honecker in E. 
Berlin. 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


Page 3 



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|j.S. Is Cautiously Hopeful 

r Ties With Gorbachev 





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rV By Hedrick Smith that. after several years of drift and 

New York Timet Service transition, the Kremlin did not 

“ . WASHINGTON — The shift to turn to yet another of the aging 
rw generation of Soviet leader- mtmbere in the Politburo as a iran- 
. ’ has raised cautious hopes in sstional leader or select Grigori V. 

Reagan administration that Romanov, the former Lenin gra d 
'/■-r the long run this wfilbring party chief, who is regarded as 
c vigor and decisiveness in the more of a hard-liner than Mr. Got- 
• jnlin and could lead to tin- badhev. 

_ rements in Soviet-American re- “Gorbachev is from the younger 
ms. generation, maybe more interested 

hit President Ranald Reagan m tedmological improvements in 

r ( 111 hi* aihncm mtuv> ♦ «rt tfiC 


his chief advisers expect no 
lificant changes in Soviet for- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 


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. " '•••5r . a policy to emerge over the next 
v. end months from the new lead- 
‘ aip of MDdiailS. Gorbachev, 54. 
- any official with a reputation 
-"'.-. J interest in modest internal cco- 
1 •*' nic changes. 

Ire Soviet dedsicm to pmsue 
Ulliokfts ta ^ ts m Gtaieva, with <mly a 
J^ben ceremonial interruption, is 
. . ' : ; .n by goventment spedmists as a 

" . t ' •■■■ - .liberate Kremlin move to project 
- .^'h strength of leadership and 
" Stinaity of txdicy despite the 
1 - ., th of a third. Soviet leader in 28 

r/oths. 

. i\ 'Preserving the image of cond- 
'. ty at this point is at least as 
- ~ .'Tortant as the fact of continu- 
a State Department official 
1 L Another government spedal- 

„ _ -said, “They are embarrassed at 
• succession of infirm leaders 

- v _ ?Yve had and they don’t want 
v .-' ernenko’s death to look as 
. .... ''-ugh it’shampering them." 

'''"The speed with which Mr. Gor- 
hev was named the general sec- 
\ T'* i iry of the Commimist Party was 
' n » id] fcien as evidence by officials here 
.. .t the Politburo made the key 
isum to select him as the new 
.■.‘■.“■ler in late February, if not be- 

n . 

v ~ -Moreover, they see evidence that 
Gorbachev had been perform- 
' ‘ ' as the effective leader of both 
; ~-' r party and the Soviet Defense 
■ .“rr.mcfl in the nwnrhs of 
• -maantm u. Chernenko’s life, 
h of these developments adds to 
ptkasm that policy changes of 
•stance are in the wind. 

<fr. Reagan decided not to al- 
d Mr. Oienienko's funeral in 
.Ux . •scow on Wednesday because he 
r . r 7 a ceremonial meeting with Mr. 

. ■ ■..’Trbadbcv would not bring any 
.■rv ^ ductive results. But Ids asser- 
j that be would “vny much” 

J to meet Mr. Goibathpv somc- 

""‘e later was intended, an aide 
. .. i, to signal that *we’d like to get 

. . on the right foot” with the new 
. . " dership. 

' The White House is encoun^ed 


Soviet economy” a While 
House official said. ’There's some 
underlying feeling here that he is 

more fikefy than Romanov would 
have been to put together over time 
a repine inclined to constructive 
relations with the U.S. And there’s 
some hope he’ll be more decisive.” 

Nonetheless, White House offi- 
cials cautioned that Mr. Gorba- 
chev, in public statements at home 
and on tnps to Britain and Canada, 
had been just as critical of the ad- 
ministration’s polities, most nota- 
bly the research program on a 
space-based defense, and just as 
quick to bristle at Western criticism 
of Moscow’s human rights record 
as his immediate predecessors. 

Some experts on the Soviet 
Union point oat that it would be 
quite consistent with Soviet history 
for him to take a fairly hard line on 
foreign policy in the period he is 
consolidating his own power inter- 
nally to reassure other Politburo 
and party leaders that he will effec- 
tively protect Soviet interests. 

Some academic specialists, such 
as Thane Gustafson of the George- 
town Center for Strategic and In- 
ternational Studies, say they regard 
Mr. Gorbachev as an advocate of 
more investment in the ci vilian sec- 
tor of the Soviet economy and of 
slowing the growth of military 
spending. 

But government specialists dis- 
pute any implication that he would 
be less demanding or more flexible 
than other Soviet leaders in arms 
negotiations with the United 
States. 

T don’t see any due to his bong 
softer,” one official said. 

Nonetheless, given Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s reputation for modern- 
minded pra gmatism on economic 
policy, Ms education in law at Mos- 
cow State Umveraity and the favor- 
able publicity he got in Britain and 
Panada for civmty, fashionable 
dress and a sense of humor on dip- 
lomatic missions, many American 
officials expect a change in style 
from the stodoness of Mr. Cher- 
nenko and the hard edge of Yuri V. 
Andropov. 

'This guy is skflffiii,” an admin- 
istration official said. Tie is going 
to try to win the hearts and minds 


of Western public opinion. He’s a 
terrific PJL guy and certainly able 
to seQ soft soap to the West. 1 think 
we’re in for kind of a dangerous 
time with Gorbachev.” 

After meeting with Mr. Gorba- 
chev last year, Prime Munster Mar- 
garet Thatcher of Britain said she 
felt the West could “do business” 
with him. On a recent visit to 
Washington, she shared her view of 
Mr. Gorbachev with Mr. Reagan. 

Now, some government 
ists suggest that Mr. Gor 
could be more flexible than iris pre- 
decessors because so few of the. 
established polities are identified 
with him. “He doesn’t have the 
same vested interest in polities that 
Brezhnev, Andropov and Cher- 
nenko did,” . an official said. A 
widespread expectation is that he 
will try some modest economic re- 
visions fairly soon. 

But specialists caution that be- 
fore he can put his own imprint on 
policy, he must consolidate his per- 
sonal power. For unlike many na- 
tional leaders, be does not have the 
automatic power to replace the top 
of the government and 
party apparatus. 



Ethiopian Victims Denied Aid, 
Bush Tells UN Relief Session 


TTw AawooMd Finn 

CONDOLENCES — P resident Reagan signs a condo- 
lence book for Konstantin Chernenko at the Soviet Embas- 
sy. Behind himjs Soviet Ambassador Anatoli F. Dobrynin. 


17.5. Is Intensifying Efforts to Transfer 
Public Services to Private Contractors 


Eugene Ormandy Dies; 
Philadelphia Conductor 


m 


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The Associated Press 

’H1LAJDELPHIA — Eugene 

nandy, 85, who conducted die 
laddphia Orchestra for 44 years 
n his retirement in 1980, died 
: sday at his home after a long 
ess, the orchestra association 
* lounced. 

"he cause of death was listed as 

*umonia, a complication of a 

rg-standing cardiac condition. 


rg-sianamg canuac conaiuou- 

* _ - . , P 1 1. 1 fdr. Ormandy led a major worid 
#jw£-*4t [Iff It*' ‘hestra longer than any other 
rm .r • due (nr and became the Phila- 


* i -.-V ■ : 

. 1 ■ 

Mr ^ v.- •■- 
??!*'«. »*“• 

A**- “* 1 


iducior and became the Fhfla- 
phia Orchestra’s conductor lau- 
. te when he .was succeeded by 
xardoMuti. 

Jndcr Mr. Ormandy’s baton. 
. orchestra developed a distinct 
. ility that became known as The 
mandy sound.” The description 
jliod specifically to the strings 
j to the volume that the si tire 
hestra was capable of produc- 


‘For 44 years, he personally 
' Of this orchestra into one of the 
• lid’s greatest orchestras, devot- 
.■ ■ his entire life to maintaining ming 
it excellence,” said the Phfladd- heart problems. 


Orchestra’s executive director, 
Sell 

Mr. Ormandy was bora in Buda- 
pest on Nov. 18, 1899, and made 
his debut as a concert violinist at 
age 7. Three years later, he was 
performing for the royal family of 
Austria-Hungary. 

He came to the United States in 
1921, seeking fame and fortune, 
but found himself without work. 

- His biggest break came in 1931, 
when he was asked to fill in for the 
ailing Arturo Toscanini as guest 
conductor of the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra. Later that year, he was 
appointed conductor of the Minne- 
apolis Symphony. In 1936, he was 
asked to succeed Leopold Stokow- 
ski, who had resigned as conductor 
in Philadelphia following a dispute 
with the orchestra board 
' Under Mr. Ormandy, the Phila- 
delphia Orchestra recorded hun- 
dreds of albums, three of which 
topped the Jl-miDion sales mark. 

Mr. Ormandy retired because of 
failing health, hampered by dim- 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 
adminis tration has brightened its 
efforts to transfer a wide range of 
U.S. public assets and programs to 
private enterprise, and it estimates 
that th e changes will save more 
than S200 million a year by 1989. 

As a major part of this strategy, 
the administration has identified 
11,000 commercial activities to be 
performed by private contractors 
when economically feasible. These 
include movie making , health ser- 
vices, fire protection, medical. lab- 
oratories, geological surveys, in- 
dustrial shops, maintenance, 
landscaping, protective services, 
laundry and food services, data 
processing and transportation. 

The administration also has in- 
tensified efforts to put entire pro- 
grams in private bands. Officials 
contend that business and industry 
often can do a better, cheaper job 
than government in providing such 
services as rail transportation and 
space satellites, prisms and low- 
income housing, health care and 
education. 

In addition, the administration is 
experimenting with a wide range of 
voucher-programs that would en- 
able recipients of federal services to 
turn directly to private providers 
for housing, health care, supple- 
mental education, and health and 
imcmploymeni insurance. 

These initiatives have brought 
criticism from liberals, who fear 
that the administration seeks to ab- 
dicate governmental responsibility, 
and from conservatives, who say 
government still is trying to do too 
much. In addition, some in Con- 
gress fear a loss of control over 
policy and personnel 

Joseph R. Wright Jr., deputy di- 
rector of the Office of Management 
and Budget, said of the Reagan 
administration: “Our philosophy is 
that we should not be competing 
with the private sector ” 

This philosophy has wide sup- 
port among Republicans in Con- 
gress, but some Democratic con- 
gressional leaders take a different 
view. 

“What they really want to get rid 
, of is domestic government,” said 
Representative Jim Wright- of Tex- 
as, the majority leader. “All they 
want Is the military.*' 

With congressional approval, the 
administration has placed both 
Conrad, the freight rad system, and 
Landsat, the land-mapping satel- 
lite, on the market. It has placed 
aliens in detention centos owned 






7.5. Hid Nazi Identities , Papers Show 


and operated by private industry. 
Dim & Bradstrcet Corp„ TRW Inc. 
and five smaller consumer credit 
companies now screen all appli- 
cants for government loans, grants 
and contracts. 

Administration officials have 
proposed the sale of Amtrak, the 
rad passenger service; urged the 
sale of public housing to low-in- 
come tenants; suggested that veter- 
ans be treated in hospitals other 
than those of the Veterans Admin- 
istration, and proposed that private 
insurance companies handle pro- 
grams ranging from Federal Crop 
Insurance to Medicare, the pro- 
gram of health insurance for the 
elderly, and Medicaid, which pro- 
vides medical assistance to the 
poor. 

In addition, the a dminis tration 
has put new rigor in a 30-year-old 
government directive that sendees 
be performed by private contrac- 
tors whenever it is posable to save 
money that way. The federal gov- 
ernment spent $1002 billion in 
contracting commercial services in 
the fiscal year 1980, before Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan took office, 
according to the Onice of Manage- 
ment and Budget. This year, the 
office estimates, the figure will be 
$173 billion. 

The administration estimates 
that it can save $33 j million by 
contracting nonmtlitaiy commer- 
cial sendees in the fiscal year 1986, 
and 5217 miDioa in 1990. 

Those who favor the transfer of 
assets and functions to private 
business and industry say that the 
government’s role is not the deliv- 
ery of services, but the assurance 
that services will be provided. They 
say that this strategy enables gov- 
ernment to provide the same goods 
and services at lower costs, reap 
additional taxes from the profit- 
making companies that provide the 
services, and loosen the grip of 
public employee unions. 

But critics contend that cost 
comparisons can be misleading be- 
cause the government often is un- 
der constraints not borne by pri- 
vate industry, such as preferable 
treatment for veterans and affirma- 
tive action programs. 

Critics note that private industry 
has charged the government $9,000 
for a 12rcent wrench, $1,000 lor a 
plastic cap for a navigator's seat, 
and $110 for a 4-cenl diode. And 
they say that the public employee 
lobby now is rivaled by lobbyists 
to big contractors tike Boeing, Co. 
and Lockheed Corp. 

observed ^slip wben work shifts 
to private firms, in part reflecting a 
contractor work force that has less 
experience, a higher rate of absen- 
teeism and a greater employee 




l 


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By Ralph Blumenchal 

New Yak Tones Service 
NEW YORK — American in tel- 
enet officials concealed the Nan 
^ »rds of hundreds of former ene- 
/ scientists tony to get them into 
1; United States after World War 
contrary to a presidential order 
d against the objections of the 
iaie Department, according to 
vemment documents. 

The documents, disclosed in a 
igazinc article, reveal that the 
nerican authorities knew that 
toy of the specialists were u ar- 
m Nazis” implicated in atroc- 
es, and altered their dossiers to 
detbefaa 

. How many such scientists got 
to the United States because of 
•ssier changes is not dear. Not all 
the dossiers were declassified 
. ft also is unclear if the State 
epanment was able to prevent 
ty of the Nazis from entering, 
ossiers were changed to get 
bond anticipated State Depart- 
ed objections. 

, The documents also shew that 
nong those hired for American 
search were several specialists 
- ho were later charged with war 
unes at Nuremberg and one who 
as convicted and sentenced to 20 
Brs in prison for medical experi- 
-£nts on prisoners at the Dachau 
mcentration camp. At least one of 
«se men got into the United 
totes. 

Also among those whose files 
ere upgraded^ the records show, 

. us Dr. Werner voo Braun, a major 
. » the Nazi SS who developed the 


V-2 rocket in wartime Germany 
and later headed the American 
space program. Von Braun, who 
(tied in 1977, was initially labeled 
“a potential security threat" but 
the assessment later was revised on 
the request of U.S. military offi- 
cials. 

From 1945 to 1955, abont 800 
former enemy rocket experts and 
other specialists — and nearly 
2,000 of their dependents — were 
brought uito the country under an 
American intelligence program 
first called Overcast and then Pro- 
ject Paperclip. By order of Presi- 
dent Harry S. Truman, the pro- 
gram was barred to active Nazi 
Party members or supporters of 
Nazism. 

But documents disclosed in an 
article to appear in the April issue 
of the BuUetm of the Atomic Scien- 


tists show that officials of the Joint 
Intelligence Objectives Agency un- 
der the Joint Qriefs of Staff 
practice of requesting changes in 
negative dossiers on spi 
wanted to recruit. The 
to dashes with State 
officials'- 
The artide, by Linda Hunt, a 
reporter and documentary produc- 
er who has spent several years re- 
searching Nazi war c rimin als in the 
United States, quotes from hun- 
dreds of declassified documents 
obtained through the Freedom of 
Information Acl 
T he issue of the recruitment of 
former German and Austrian spe- 
cialists developed against a back- 
drop of growing tensions with the 
Russians, who were eager to gather 
for themselves as many enemy ex- 
ports as possible. 


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turnover," said a 1984 study by the 
Congressional Budget Office. 

“In addition, managers caution 
that reduced control over support 
services and the prospect of strike 
action at private firms, an option 
not readily available to federal 
workers, threaten those firms ’ abili- 
ty effectively to tarry out basic pro- 
gram responsibilities,” the study 
said. 

According to the Office of Man- 
agement and Budget, 300,000 fed- 
eral workers are involved in com- 
mercial activities similar to jobs in 
private enterprise. The Congressio- 
nal Budget Office study found that 
could shift nearly 


By Iain Guest 

international HeraU Tribune 

GENEVA — Vice President 
George Bush of the United Stales 
has told a United Nations confer- 
ence that as many 35 !L5 million 
people suffering from famine in 
norifaera Ethiopia are being denied 
relief aid. 

Mr. Bush made his remarks at 
the start of a United Nations ses- 
sion in Geneva called to raise emer- 
gency funds for 20 African coun- 
tries. About 100 nations are 
artending the two-day. meeting. 

Mr. Bush told the UN represen- 
tatives that the United States 
would provide three million tons of 
emergency food aid to Africa this 
year. He then charged that 2.5 mil- 
lion people in northern Ethiopia 
are not getting relief aid. 

He said, “We respect the sover- 
eignty and territorial integrity of 
Ethiopia. That is not the issue. The 
issue is that we cannot accept si- 
lence" while the victims are not 
receiving help. 

The statement was later disputed 
by Goshu Wolde. Ethiopia's for- 
eign minister. Mr. Goshu said thaL 
most of the famine victims in Ethi- 
opia were receiving aid. “The vice 
president was not correct," he said, 
the food “readies these people and 
we are determined that it will reach 
these people without discrimina- 
tion.” 

However, Mr. Goshu said, his 
government would not halt its long 
war against separatist guerrillas in 
the northern provinces of Tigre and 
Eritrea to make the delivery of re- 
lief aid easier. 

The UN meeting was opened 
Monday by the UN secretary-gen- 
eraL, Javier Perez de Cuellar, who 
said that 30 million Africans have 
been affected by the famine. 

“Thousands have already per- 
ished; others are slowly dying, and 
uncounted more are sick, ravaged 
by disease bora of slow starvation,” 
be said. 

UN officials said that approxi- 
mately 4.6 million tons of food had 
been pledged so far, including the 
three million from the United 
States. Hie officials estimated that 
an additional $1.7 bQlion would be 



Th» AuoootttJ Am 

A shipment of wheat from the United States destined for 
famine victims arrives at a warehouse in Ethiopia 


contracting could shift __ „ 

165,000 federal jobs to the private .needed this year to purchase anotb- 
sector, reducing total federal costs er 2.4 million tons of food, to set up 


by approximately 4 percent, $335 

milli on. 

The President’s Private Sector 
Survey on Cost Control known as 
the Grace Commission, proposed 
that the federal government could 
save nearly $5.6 biDioa this year 
with these additional contracting 
procedures. 

But a 1984 joint study by the 
Congressional Budget Office and 
the General Accounting Office es- 
timated the maximum savings at 
$1.1 trillion. 


emergency water and health pro- 
jects and to improve roads and 
ports. 

Members of the U-S. delegation 
to the conference met with Mr. Go- 
shu and other Ethiopian officials 
on Sunday. Officials said Mr. Bush 
did not attend that meeting, but the 
vice president on Monday softened 
his criticism of Ethiopia by drop- 
ping from bis prepared text a refer- 
ence to a “conspiracy" of silence 
over the relief operation. Ethiopia 
has been widely criticized for alleg- 


edly withholding famine aid from 
retiel-held areas in the north. 

■ Program Called Voluntary 

A senior Ethiopian official said 
Tuesday in Addis Ababa that the 
government would act to halt any 
forced resettlement of famine vic- 
tims. 

Berhane Deressa, deputy com- 
missioner of the Rdief ana Reha- 
bilitation Commission, told Reu- 
ters that forced resettlement was 
not government policy. He said he 
had no way of knowing whether 
reports of coercion were true. 

Aid workers have reported nu- 
merous cases of famine victims be- 
ing forced to sign up for resettle- 
ment, and say food is being 
withheld from those who refuse. 

“The resettlement program is 
carried out on a voluntary basis,” 
Mr. Berhane said, but added that 
families sometimes disagreed 
among themselves over whether to 
move hundreds of miles from areas 
suffering from drought to more fer- 
tile ones. 

Mr. Berhane said the govern- 
ment planned to move just more 
than a million people from the 
north, where it has not rained to 
up to three years, and that 280,000 
people had been resettled in the 
west and southwest in the last three 
months. 


Mr. Berhane said the worst-hit 
areas, such as Wollo and Tigre 
provinces, had experienced disas- 
trous land erosion and overgrazing. 
“There isn't really much choice for 
these people except to move away 
from these places," he said. 



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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


Heralh 


INTERNATIONAL 


Eribmtc 


With The New York Tbrand IV W^hinstoc FW 


Wishing Gorbachev Well 


The Soviet system of government churns 
with no more flexibility than freedom, a hrer 
and graceless dreadnought riveted with bolts 
of steel But the system also possesses the 
stability of a dreadnought. It functions. New, 
for the third time since 1982, it has manned a 
rapid change erf command. Even before Kon- 
stantin Chernenko’s burial on Wednesday, the 
Soviet leadership has named his successor — 
Mik h a il Gorbachev, the youngest member of 
the Politburo and the first Soviet leader in 
years whose health is not an issue. 

Still, if the generations are starting m change 
in the Kremlin, the dreadnought is not. The 
Soviet Union remains an amalgam of secretive 
bureaucracies, its policies shaped by a collec- 
tive of old men. Survivors of Stalin's tyranny, 
they revile even hints of one-man rule, and the 
brash adventurism of a Nikita Khrushchev. 

Continuity, caution and consensus cfaarac- * 
lerize a system revolutionary in doctrine but 
deeply conservative in practice. Whatever bis 
ambitious, Mr. Gorbachev is unlikely soon to 
make waves. A shrewd Kremlinologist has 
remarked that the Soviets reverse the tempo of 
innovation experienced in democracies. A 
president moves quickly to rfahn the 
of election before his honeymoon fades. A 
Soviet leader, chosen by a small group, builds 
power with time and use; his first years are 
necessarily devoted to neutralizing rivals. 

This dilution of power limi ts the chanraa for 


a single leader’s tyranny, but it also blocks 
needed reforms. The only place the Soviet 
economy has shown an impressive capacity for 
competing with the West is in weapons pro- 
duction. The weapons make it a superpower, 
but a superpower that cannot feed itself, pro- 
vide adequate consumer goods or even main- 
tain the simplest gains of modem society. 
According to Soviet data, life expectancy for 
men dropped from a high of 67 years in 1%4 to 
less than 62 in 1980 — the sole known instance 
of such a decline in an industrial society. 

In foreign affairs, collective leadership has 
produced collective debacles. The brutal inva- 
sion of Af ghanistan brought a miserable gain 
of territory at the cost of bogging down the 
Red Army in a stalemated war. In Poland, a 
coup engineered with Moscow’s complicity 
has subdued Solidarity but not the spirit em- 
bodied by communism's only free trade union. 

There are few hints in Mr. Gorbachev’s 
utterances or record of his ideas on these or 
most other world issues. He has dealt mainly 
with agriculture — hardly a commendation, 

considering the Soviet production record. He 
has made a favorable impression in foreign 
trips, notably in Britain. Perhaps a younger 
man, hemmed in by caution, can bring the 
Soviet Union a securer leadership and thus one 
able to narrow the risks of conflict. In that 
spirit, it is right to wish Mr. Gorbachev welL 
— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


With the replacement of Konstantin Cher- 
nenko by Mikhail Gorbachev, generational 
change has finally come to the K remlin. 
Among those who look on. the tendency has 
been to confer a greater openness to reform 
and accommodation on the new guard, which 
presumably, unlik e the old guard, has not been 
touched by the dark inheritance of Stalinism. 
But the ostensibly greater energy, education 
and ambition of the younger generation, plus 
its lack of firsthand adult exposure to the 
rigors of the Soviet past, may yet make its 
membra* more formidable competitors, more 
careless and more prone to risk. 

It pays to recall that Konstantin Chernenko 
himself confounded some of the stereotypes. 
He was 72 and ill when be took over barely a 
year ago, known as the man who had earned 
Leonid Brezhnev’s briefcase but had been 
passed over for the top spot when he died. 
When Yuri Andropov died, he made it. He 
proceeded to deliver more change, in the cru- 
cial arena, tlmn anyone had anticipated. Mr. 
Andropov had pronounced Ronald Reagan 
anathema and stopped dealing with him. The 
renewal of Sovict-American talks in Geneva 
shows how Mr. Chernenko changed the line. 

Who is Mikhail Gorbachev, besides being 
54? We know he is a good organizer: the 
Centra] Committee promoted him “unani- 
mously’' only four hours after Mr. Chernenko 


died. He has the technical education common 
among C ommunis t Party bureaucrats. He sur- 
vived the no-win agriculture portfolio and got 
good press dippings on unde manding mis- 
sions abroad. As a secretary of the party ma- 
chinery and a member of the Politburo, he has 
lived in the Kremlin's fastest lane. 

Young and modem-looking, the Gorba- 
chevs surprise a world accustomed to stout 
Kremlin seniors. Mr. Gorbachev's public 
statements reflect themes — an interest in 
ditente Soviet-style, an em phasis on domestic 
priorities — associated with the Brezhnev rath- 
er than the Androprov line. His true views and 
his capacity to operate in the thick-as- thieves 
Soviet political environment are unknown. 

It will be important to leam whether the new 
guard, in the person of Mr. Gorbachev, has 
any intention or strategy to tend to the eco- 
nomic lag, the soda! rot and the political 
debility bequeathed by the old guard, whose 
only real area of achievement has been the 
accumulation of raw power. But it will be well 
for Westerners not to expect the new man in 
the Kremlin to deliver them from old East- 
West cares. This is a major moment for the 
Soviet Union and therefore, unavoidably, for 
the United States as wdL It is one that the 
United States can best influence by ensuring 
that its own policy is fair and firm. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


No Unemployment News 


The news on unemployment in America in 
recent months has been that there is not much 
news. After its rapid drop during the first year 
and a half of the recovery, the unemployment 
rate leveled off last summer. Since that time it 
has bobbed around in a narrow range. The 
Bureau of Labor Statistics reported last Friday 
that civi lian unemployment last month was 13 
percent, slightly higher than last November 
but slightly lower than in January. 

Of course there was a time — and not very 
long agp — when unemployment exceeding 7 
percent would have been big news, a veritable 
disaster. Between the Depression of the '30s 
and 1975, unemployment never climbed so 
high. Now that level is an accepted fact in an 
economy that, by most other measures, is 
humming along. Economists hope that with 
fewer young people entering (he labor market 
and with continued economic growth, the rate 
will drift downward in future years, but efforts 
to accelerate that trend are no longer consid- 
ered a suitable concern for policymakers. 

This month’s unemployment figures, how- 
ever, contain a reminder that for certain 
groups the unemployment situation remains 
very bleak. The bureau notes that, while the 
rate for white workers declined slightly, on- 


employment among blacks rose by 1.4 per- 
centage points to a level of 16J. The sharpness 
of this rise, most of it associated with job losses 
among black adult men, may prove to be a 
temporary aberration. Black unemployment 
has declined sharply from its record peak in 
1982. But the enormous disparity between 
black and while unemployment rates has re- 
mained at historical highs in recent years. 

There is another worrisome trend. Despite 
big growth in military manufacturing and con- 
struction, employment in goods production is 
still below its 1981 peak and it actually de- 
clined last month — not a surprising trend, 
given the flood of imports stimulated by the 
overpriced dollar. Fortunately, continued 
growth in retail trade and other services keeps 
the employment totals looking healthy. 

The unemployment totals will probably re- 
main relatively unnewsworthy for some time. 
But the aggregate statistics do not reveal the 
disruption of lives and communities that lie 
below. Some of the biggest shifts in policy 
during this administration — big cutbacks in 
job programs, de-emphasis of affirmative ac- 
tion efforts — have surely had something to do 
with the severity of those dislocations. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Gorbachev Has Rare Incentive 

The swift emergence of Mikhail Gorbachev 
is an event of signal and stretching impor- 
tance. He may only be able to move slowly, but 
he will move, and, as Mr. Andropov's natural 
heir, he may be expected to take the same 
reforming course. At 54, he is not, of course, 
young; but he is 20 years younger than the 
president of the United States. Mr. Gorba- 
chev, at least, must foresee an end to the long 


days of Geneva talking, and the chance to reap 
benefits from it at the close. No Russian leader 
for a decade has had such an incentive. 

— The Guardian (London). 

The speed with which Mr. Gorbachev was 
elected leads one to believe that be has elbow 
room. However, we wQJ only have a clear idea 
of the size of Iris maneuvering space at the next 
plenary session of the Central Committee. 

— La Libre Belgique (Brussels). 


FROM OUR MARCH 13 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1910: Dust Clouds Pall New Orleans 1935: Rebellion Collapses in Greece 
NEW YORK — The city and surroundings oF ATHENS — Following the defeat of the rebels 
New Orleans were plunged into gloom [on in Macedonia yesterday [March 1 1], the Veni- 
March 11] by a phenomenon of a supposedly zelist revolt collapsed. Former Premier Beu- 
volcanic nature. Dense leaden clouds, at a therios Vemzdos fled from Crete on the cruis- 
considerable height, obscured the daylight, er Averoff, together with his wife and about 
producing sensations of suffocation and de- sixty officers and civilians. The party landed 
pression among the inhabitants, who were on the Italian island of Kasos in the Dodeca- 
forced to mate use of artificial Buminants. In nese group, and all members were interned by 
places, a fine dust is said to have fallen. The the Italian authorities. The rebel leader will 
scientific exp lanation of the visitation is that qol be extradited, since Italian law forbids 
continuous currents in the upper atmosphere the extradition of political refugees. Accord- 
brought vast quantities of fine dust from the ing to a communique of the Ministry of War 
volcanoes of Central America and Mexico, the casualties during the week's revolt in Mac- 
which, owing to a chang e of wind conditions, edonia and Crete were nine killed and 96 
remained held in suspense over the city. wounded among troops and civilians. 


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JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chatma n 1958-1982 

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m You... 
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tom?... 

) 


Gorbachev: The Gleam ^ 
Atop an Opaque system 


By Philip Geyelin 


f Hooray! They're talking ! 9 


Gorbachev: A Strange Soviet Sequence 

May Now Give Slow Change a Chance 


W ASHINGTON — A few days next to notmng. o 

before the death of Konstantin idneiy befaeveffiat 
Chemenko, Richard Burt, the US. cracy is bwo^ Mnagj 

assistant secretary of state for Euro- ment, or at «ast J?j^wffltiire 5 ideo- 
pean affairs, said at a press briefing effecuw reform w *^J e 3^f rtures 
on the coming arms control talks that logically nna F c ^*^l®„^SP_,- lSao t 
there was a “lot of evidence” that from communist 
Soviet decisions were being tnade “at something any new Sonet 
the lowest common denominator — couki expect to do.^thtmtr 4f 
that we are not dealing with a fully ta Wi s hing a firm $n p on powei^ 
functioning government." S i nce nobody is prepared 

The Soviets could make a decision how longlhat might tste ^ 
to return to the bargaining table. Mr. Mr. Goriachev is 
Burt went on, but whether they had ing rntolus own hands the 
the creativity to move into construe- that has been practiced ^oUecuwaj 
uve negotiation was not at all dear. It recentyears — we 
is. he said, an “opaque system." oat The elevation of Mr. 

You can say that again, after Mr. is one more reminder of how Muc 
Chernenko's death and his replace- know of the i^er workings of in 
ment by Nfikhafl Gorbachev, some 30 Soviet system, and hence howbanai- 
years younger and supposedly repre- capped the West is when it comes 
senxative of a different generation of knowing how to deal with lL . 
Soviet leadership. It will be many This is not a new handicap. But ure 
months, perhaps even several years, burden it impos es on policymakers 
before we can 6c certain whether Mr. does vary with Circumstances- So per- 
Gorbachev’s arrival signals funda- baps there is one more thing that *? n 
mental changes in Soviet policy. be safely said about this latest Soviet 

rrm _ " . ■ , » i ■ is : .... - I* mniH ot a nartirailariV 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachusetts — 
Konstantin Chernenko was al- 
ready seriously ailing at the time of 
his election as general secretary in 
February 1 9S4. It was only a question 
of time before the other oligarchs of 
the Politburo would be electing a new 
head of the Soviet regime. 

Let ns review the recent sequence. 
It is rather weird, not only to a West- 
erner but also to a Russian. 

Leonid Brezhnev, chosen as gener- 
al (then called first) secretary in 1964, 
established his position as more than 
just fust among equals only at the 
end of the '60s. Under him the Soviet 
system congealed into a classical oli- 
garcho-bureaucratic pattern. Mem- 
bers of the ruling elite, unless they 
were personal rivals of Mr. Brezhnev 
or enemies of his policies, could feel 
secure in their jobs, no matter what 
their age or, short of complete debili- 
ty, then physical condition. 

Doubtless this situation arose as a 
reaction to the purges under Stalin 
and to Nikita Khrushchev’s high- 
handed and whimsical ways with his 
Politburo colleagues. 

The Brezhnev pattern thus led in- 
evitably to the top ruling group be- 
coming a gerontocracy. As some of 
its members passed away they tended 
to be replaced by Mr. Brezhnev’s old 
cronies, usually dose in age to the 
men they replaced. When Prime Min- 
ister Alexei Kosygin died ai 76 he was 
replaced by Nikolai Tikhonov, 75. 

It is a mystery how a youngster in 
his forties like Mikhail Gorbachev 
managed to get into the PoliLburo in 
the late 70s. One possible explana- 
tion is that his job then — secretary 
of the Central Committee in charge 
of agriculture — is one of the most 
taxing and. usually, most unreward- 
ing in the entire Soviet structure. 

With Mr. Brezhnev visibly failing 
during his last two years, collective 
leadership took on a new meaning: 
The 13 or so full members of the 
Politburo became joint proprietors of 
a vast country. Their own job security 
became the uppennosl consideration, 
shaping their personnel policies and 
affecting strongly their pqhcv views. 

When Mr. Brezhnev died, his el- 
derly colleagues proposed to contin- 
ue the same pattern; to select as his 
successor a man who would be chair- 
man of the board rather than a real 
boss like the younger Brezhnev. 

By then it had become almost a 
rule that a candidate for the post had 


By Adam B. Ulam 

to meet two pr elimina ry conditions: 
be a full member of the Politburo and 
a secretary of the Central Committee. 
Three people in November of 1982 
answered to those qualifications: Mr. 
Chernenko, 71, Mr. Gorbachev, 52, 
and Yuri Andropov, 68. 

Mr. Chernenko had long been a 
dose associate of Mr. Brezhnev and 
was undoubtedly his choice for the 
succession, something which obvi- 
ously did not work in his favor. Mr. 
Gorbachev was Loo young. And so 
Mr. Andropov was chosen, although 
his colleagues must have known that 
be was already in frail health. 

There obviously followed some 
rather involved maneuvering within 
the ruling elite, because the office of 


no doubt try to keep him from be- 
coming a real boss. But in Mew of the 
age of most of them, in a year or two 
we should be able to speak of the real 
be ginning of the Gorbachev era and 
see what will be its affect on the 
Soviet economy, on foreign relations 
and on other areas of pohey. 

Presumably a younger man could 
be expected to be impatient with the 
immobnism that characterized 
the Soviet economy and society in Lbe 

last decade or so and to be inctined to 
take a fresh look at the risks and costs 
Of erpanannism and the amw build- 
up. We must hope so, but let us be 
cautious when it conies to predic- 
tions. The Soviet rulers have a knack 
for surprising us, and their own peo- 
ple, and not always in pleasant ways. 


erable — assuming that Mr. Gorba- 
chev does entrench himself in a way 
that actually replaces with a younger 

generation the aging old guard that 
has held sway for so many years. 

There is recent evidence of the new 
direction Mr. Gorbachev would take. 
Specialists point in particular to 
a speech in Moscow m December. 
They note that Mr. Gorbachev used 
the same citation from Larin that 
Yuri Andropov used early in his brief 
tenure: “Socialism has exerted and 
continues to exert its 
on world development through its 
economic policy and through its so- 
cioeconomic field.” Authorities on 


decision how long that might «**-^™^* 
able. Mr. Mr. Goriachev is capable of gaJhw 
they had ing into his own hands the leadership 
construe- that has been practiced oollecuvdy in 

Udear.lt recentyears —we are back at square 

an." one, The elevation of Mr. Gorbachev 
after Mr. is one more reminder of bow hide we 
replace- know of the inner workings « “ e 
.some 30 Soviet system, and hence how handi- 
Qy repre- capped the West is when it comes to 
ration of knowing how to deal with il 
be many This is not a new handicap. But the 
ral years, burden it imposes on policymakers 
Ether Mr. does vary with earcums tanc r s Soper- 
s funda- haps there is one more thing that can 
ilicy. be safely said about this latest Soviet 
is consul- transition: It comes at a particularly 
■. Gorba- precarious time in U.S. -Soviet rela- 
in a way rions. Just about everything tides on 
i younger the only real relations that now exist: 
laid that the Geneva arms controls talks get- 
fears. ting under way this week, 
f the new A lot of experts were already argu- ^ 

mid take, ing that the conditions for bargaining 
mlar to cm so comprehensive a nuclear arms 
ecember. negotiations agenda could hardly be 
hev used less propitious. The divisions, as ch ief 
min that U A arms negotiator Max Kampel- 
i his brief mm pot it the other day, are “deep 
rled and and deeply held.” The outlook was 
influence for prolonged sparring, probing and 
nugh its propaganda point-scoring evm.be- 
jh its so- fore the Soviet rhany in leadership. 
Authorities on A case can be made that Mr. Gor- 


the subject read into this an inward- bachc/s accession might hasten the 
turning Hm pha.qs on economic re- day when decisions could be made at 


The writer is 


of history and 


chairman of the Presidium of the Su- political sdentx at Harvard. He coatribut- 
preme Soviet — president of the ed tins comment to The Washington Post. 
U.S.S.R. — remained unfilled until 
the spring The office is mostly cere- 
monial. but Mr. Brezhnev chose to w- * ■ nr 

add it to his other duties in 1977. It I pt 'GL l-l j 

was bestowed on Mr. Andropov in M-Kjl, O I 

the spring of 1983, when il already u 

must have been known that he was VCFASHINGTON — The ex- 
not merely ailing but mortally QL At W chang e between the Ukrainian 
the same time the pool of possible Communist Party boss, Vladimir 


form as a p rerequ i site to an effective 
Soviet role worldwide. 

Mr. Gorbachev spoke of “deep 
transformations" not only in eco- 
nomic policy but in the “entire sys- 
tem of social relations.” He talked of 
“restructuring ... the forms - and 
methods of economic mimagcakDt n 

That could mean everything or 


something better than the “lowest 
commo n denominator.” But that as- 
sumes that the power struggle in the 
Kremlin has in faet been resolved. A 
lot of expats will tell you that, in a 
real sense, it may only nave taken on 
a different form as Mikhail Gorba- 
chev sets out to oousoBdaie his hold. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


Let’s Hope the Negotiators Do Better J 


the same time the pool of possible 
successors was slightly increased by 
making 60-year-ola Grigori Roma- 
nov, until then the boss of Leningrad, 
a secretary of the Central Committee. 

With Mr. Andropov’s prolonged 
“cold” and then death, the logical 
choice seemed to lie between Mr. 
Gorbachev and Mr. Romanov. The 
latter, authoritarian even by Soviet 
standards, did not endear hims elf to 
his colleagues in his new position. 
The choice fell again on an aged and 
previously bypassed invalid. 

That is the background of the ele- 
vation of Mr. Gorbachev. With Mr. 
Romanov unacceptable, be was the 
only possible choice. 

The Soviet Union is now headed 
by a man who was too young to serve 
in World War II and was barely more 
than a boy when Stalin died in 1953. 
Other than that, we have little on 
which to speculate concerning his 
views and probable policies. 

Even as general secretary he is but 
the first among equals unless he can 
build up his power base, bring his 
own people into the Politburo and 
secretariat and thus put Ins stamp on 
domestic and foreign policy. 

Barring that, his colleagues would 


W ASHINGTON — The ex- 
change between the Ukrainian 
Communist Party boss, Vladimir 
Shcherbitsky, and Ronald Reagan in 
the Oval Office last Thursday was 
more spirited than reported- 
Mr. Sbcherbiisky, a high-ranking 
Politburo member whose visit was 
cut short by the death of Konstantin 
Chernenko, had been sent to Wash- 
ington to test President Reagan's 
mood and mettle on the eve of the 
resumption of arms talks. 

Mr. Reagan, as usual, began to 
ladle out the charm, but the viator 
did not respond with the crabbed 
stolidity of a Gromyko. Mr. Shcher- 
bitsky had been instructed to cat 
through the small talk with a harsh 
threat about the huge buildup and 
odd war in store if America pursued 
its new space-defense strategy. 

The president’s memoirs will draw 
on a “memoon” that shows how the 
charm ladle was promptly set aside. 
Mr. Reagan jaboed back, and Mr. 
Shcherbitsky renewed the verbal at- 
tack, inskting that the Russian peo- 
ple would not permit tins new threat. 
Mr. Reagan replied sharply to the 
effect that “the people in the Soviet 
Union don’t have much to sot about 
what their government does/ 

The Kremlin likes to measure 


By William Safire ^ “re™* ” 0 * a “ w .T 8 ?? 

J and m battle-management radar pror 

lection of those missiles las ended; 
American leaders by shaking them the decade of defense has begun, 
up. John Kennedy reloaded too Many Americans resist that reality, 

mildly to the verbal testing by Nikita some wnb sQly scorn at “star wars.” 
Khrushchev in Vienna in the early Others, with reasoned argument 


American leaders by 
up. John Kennedy i 


Khrushche v jn Vienna in 


ment and the Cuban missile arias. A 
decade later, Richard Nixon replied 


Others, with reasoned argument 
against tire abandonment of Mutual 
Assured Destruction deterrence the- 
ory, hold that Mr. Reagan's new sp- 


icily to the furious initial bombast of preach threatens the Russians by re- 
Leonid Brezhnev in his dacha outside moving their ability to retaliate if 


Moscow, and that led to a realistic America launched n first strike. 
Russian assessment and a period of The serious objections have 
detente. Mr. Shcherbitsky has un- weighL But Mr. Realm’s proposal to 
doubtedly reported to the Politburo baud up defense and reduce affensq. 
that P n-gwVnt Rw i gan, when pnyhfd has an intellectual underpinning, and 
hard, pushes back hard. the added weight of an deetkm. The 

Afterward, Mr. Reagan was t run- president's judgment is chaflenge- 
bLed by the Ukrainian’s tough gambit able, and his budgeting is debatable,' 
and wondered if be had been wise to but in the end most Americans ac- 
let Ml Shcherbitsky get his dander knowledge that he has been elected to 
up. Secretary of State George Shultz be responsible for unclear strategy. : 
assured Mr. Reagan that his natural Mntual Assured Destruction^ ^ 
response was an target It had been. dead. It started to die two years ago, 
important to signal to (he Russians in March 1983, when President Res-: 


the sort of talk they ever get to hear.” 

The Shcherbitsky report will : be 
useful to the Kremlin, because .die 
arms control negotiations due to re- 
sume in Geneva are based on a new 
reality. The decade' that led to Rna- 


Time to Get Steamed Up 
For the American Train 


By Ray Bradbury 


L OS ANGELES — Trains are. to 
/ me, a philosophical retreat, a 
movable feast of sight and silence 
and time to be with your thoughts. 

Away from telephones, late at 
night, now fine to watch the land- 
scapes of small towns, front yards, 
populated porches, three-o 'dock- 
in- the- morning lit windows and 
know that you pass through towns 
where most of the people, think of 
it, are good and not evil at alL It is a 
journey of rediscovery, made in the 
most comfortable way possible. Jets 
□ever see this America. And buses 
see it, sad to say, in an agonized and 
much too prolonged fashion. 

Americans are faced with an ad- 
ministration and a wavering Con- 
gress that are tempted to destroy the 
only humane way of traveling in our 
society. So I am master-planning a 
dreadful event that will undermine 
nervous systems, destroy thinking 
capacities — and change the minds 
of all members of the administra- 
tion and Congress. Now hear this: 

I will, at some hour in the near 
future, pack Ronald Reagan’s ad- 
visers and all the legislators into 
transcontinental buses for a four- 
day, four-night journey to Los An- 
geles. They will be forced to enjoy 
each other's company hour after 
hour, night after nigh u enefi ess noon 
following endless noon. 

1 will show no mercy. They must 
sweat, chum, twist and ferment 
through some 100 odd hours of pe- 
nal travel to stagger forth and kiss 
the earth in California, glad the long 
journey is escaped, and resembling, 
more or less, a ragtag team of mad- 
men. redolent of fungus. At which 
time we will take a vote. And Am- 
trak, the railroads, will be saved. 

We the people know about jet 
travel which is white-knuckled, and 
bus travel which is white-knuckled, 
and many of us hate both. We do 
not want to be forced to choose 
between two soul-annihilating ex- 
tremes. We do not wish to be 
freighted across the clouds, or 
dragged down a freeway, nailed to 


the cross of boredom, to be deliv- 
ered like unwashed laundry at some 
dilapidated terminus God knows 
where. There are several million In- 
Betweens out there. I am one of 
them. We want our trains. 

And yet even as I write this, the 
administration is cranking up to 
shove our locomotives on land's 
end and buiy our Pullmans at sea. 
Which is what we did with our trol- 
leys some few years back. 

I realize, in saying all this, that 
President Reagan, as always, is 
faced with a nest of magpies, each 
of us squawking and wanting our 
worm. The temptation is to shrug, 
step back and try to accept the de- 
struction of our railroads with good 
grace. But as soon as 1 move aside 
one inch. 1 hear the sound of the fast 
train speeding across Japan and a 
simil ar bullet r ushing from Paris to 
Lyon, and I wonder why we, who 
helped invent the train and brought 
it to its greatest power, should now, 
late in the day, watch it founder and 
sink Like a dinosaur into the sump. 

Can passenger railroads ever be 
profitable? This summer, like last 
the trains will be full-up. If you 
want to travel cross-country you 
wiQ have to make your reservations 
many days or weeks ahead of time. 
As for the rest of the year, lower 
fares should encourage higher ticket 
sales. What you lose at the front end 
you make up with greater volume. 

But then, remember this: Very 
few if any passenger train systems 
in the world survive on pure profit 
Most if not all are subsidized. 

At this very moment the airlines 
are subsidized in favor of one group 
of Americans. Why not give some of 
the subsidies back to the middle 
group who want and need the 
trains? Some of the mail that was 
handed over to the airlines can sure- 
ly be delivered back to the railroads. 

Then, too, it is hard to believe 
tha t a little imagination might not 
cure some of the ills befalling our 
continental track system. Would 
not the American equivalent of the 



ked-io-nnoe-enemy deterrence made 
ratt l ing sounds when Walter Mom-r 
dale supported it in televised debate;' 
The old tfaeciY died forever .with Mt. 
Ragan’s landslide redaction. 

The new idea made possible by 
technology — a defense snidd to pro- 
tect most of -to against incoming misf 
siles — is now unstoppable. It pn>; 
tects both snpeipowas against the 
greatest immediate nuclear danger; 
from a terrorist nation armed with 
bomb and nrissQe and no concern for 
retaliati o n, as there will sorely be 
soon. Because it wQl no longer de- 
pend on the sanity of dictators or tire 
kindness of strangers, it returns de- 
f ense to the hands, of the defender. 

; Hiisgalls the Russian leaders, who 
spent 20 years : catching anti-passing 
the -Americans in nuclear -offensive 
power. Strategic dominance was in 
sight now here they are, either 
obliged to compete in an expensive 
spaco-defenre race, or forced to settle* 
for permanent nnriw^ equality; 

No wonder they bluster and glower 
at the new reatity. They win tiy, for a ; 
time, to preserve their land-missile 
advantage, raffing - against the sea 
change in nndear strategy. No nation 1 
resists change tike the UASJL But' 
one day they will deal with reality; 
We will recall then what Mr. Reagan 

Caul ilwhr CL«I L*. i e ■ * 






f If it doesn't cany missiles, what good is £f? r 


rejuvenated Orient Express be a 
profitable venture? With high fares, 
with sleepers only between Los An- 
geles and Chicago and New York, 
with the best international cuisines 
served with fine silver and the best 
wines, we could lure back some of 
the rich folks who now fly over the 
United States and never see it- How 
about one train a week like this? 

This would only be the cream at 
the top. One train does not a system 
or a solution make. But Amirak is 
already more than halfway to where 
it needs to go. New cars, added to 
the line in the last few years, are 
beautiful functional anti comfort- 
able. Many rooms have showers. 
Might not more be added, perhaps 
one to a chair car, to provide that 
freshness and cleanliness we all long 


for while sweating in busloads from 
Amarillo to Paducah? 

We invented the robots that we 

teach U5^our own trad?^) let ns' 
import French and Japanese techrri- 
rians to torch ns how to build and 
operate faster, more efficient and 
more profitable trains. With a areal 
swallow of pride and a great burst 
of wiQ, thejobcanbedone. And for 
peanuts, compared with the sabady 
we less into me air to fly onrjrts. 

This is nett nostalgia ya t t n^ 
When I get on a French, train, o* 


The New York Times. 

'^T. v -':tFnER' v; 

Skin Behind the Scene : : 

I am auAmencaii citizen married 
to a dipkanat from a small Fnoiicf^ 
speaking anmtiy. For 31 ySmTS 
•SfWj* <* Europe, I KT 0 £ 


^mddedicatkmwith which-tbese 

■■5»sjB3gaas: 

unemotional scene, cush^Sr 

■BSSj^-sSs 

a - amustTand 


\ ~ ,vTt,.V r Zi" - 01 nmust and ' 

mioeservwv ennrism on me -front '-j 

- newspaper ^ *■ 

• ATSS^J* distant damase/T^ 


dream of the Tokyo^Osakacxpress, .■» andwomen of the Fori 

his not tire I^vdrispeonglttrtthq . ^pfflService are a credit in t w 
Future shouting at me. _ - ygyimdit wpidd be-.Wen fQr 

The t vnUr, a nmeBs andpoet.,cm- jffint gurcy to keep that in mad. — . 

tra^BtistOthtlmAMS^Tbiiev^ g: :TiffiRESE LAt v y BRENtJ^t V 

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O' 


an 


v: *]0 — 

Opa<{ lle Aaeli Patrol 

* * *’ hil T « rIi ^ Attacked 
3«L*r*“,' •: ' : : =, .. y Shiites in . 

eprisal Raid 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


Page 5 


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J ‘ ••>' Reuters 

•s!DON. Lebanon — Shiite Mos- - 
- T -. gttefriUas attacked an Israeli 
-. ,cl in southern Lebanon on 
■ t .' .. sday in reprisal for a raid on a 
,■’ . ee. Two Israeli soldiers were 
V./uted killed. 

'■ -sbaoese security and militia 
. «s said the dash look place 
'•■■■ lit three miles (4.8 kilometers) 

: ctf Zrariyeib, what; Israeli 

. . ps killed 34 people on Monday. 
; '..’' : cidr biggest raid since they 

' (Hied ft n off e nsive against gTifr - 

. * ! resistance three weeks ago. 

* r . jiiite gnenillag attacked the par 
.: . near the Qasxniyeh Bridge on 
^ Litani River north of Tyre. Is- 
'■ ~ 'i sources said two of their 
os woe killed and two injured 
'•■■he attack. Suite sources said 
Y-*v guerrilla was injured. 

. • rj 5 «tly afterwards, witnesses re-' 
'■:'ed seeing IsraeH ambulances 
. -.y wounded soldiers through 
/ the main southern Lebanese 
' .la still in Israeli occupation. 

• t xadi troops IriDoj 17 guerrillas, 
~ ;,.*ast 16 dvitian villagers and a 
■; ..'anese soldier and arrested .SO 
' -.. 'pie on Monday in Zrariyeh, ac- 
-.- : .iing to Lebanese security 

■ - "I xes. Five persons were lolled 
■„ In a Lank drove over their vehi- 

’ • ‘-.Purees said Israeli troops have 
: Yj attacked at least 90 tunes this 
Tyre rcsdoits said Israeli 
• - ^ .‘ps appeared very tense since a 
' ^Tide-car bomber k 21 ed 12 Israe- 
ITiear the frontier on Sunday. 

- xadi troops at a smmmxrint 
v - 1 - Tyre fired at a Finnish United 
-- - . "ions ambulance carrying a sick 
her father and a doctor to the 
. : Ijx at dusk Monday , sources 
r Bullets ricocheted from the, 
,'md into the vehicle. 

■ - he doctor, driver and father left 
.* vehicle, which was flying a Red 

. ss medical flag and snouted 
r identities at the checkpcont, 
the Israelis continued fixing 
^ _ sources said. 

g\**LL I I (J imor GdkseL, a spokesman for 
JllalUf > Of United Nations peacekeeping 

e, confirmed that a UN ambur- 
e had been fired at and that the 
'ted Nations would -protest to 
^Israeli Army. 

. "he United States vetoed Tues- 
. ' a draft resolution in the Seam-, 
Council that condemned mea- 
s by Israel against civilians in 
.. '_*Jieni Lebanon. Reuters report- 
from United Nations in New 
. ‘ . 

. Eleven of the 15 Security Coun- 
. nembers, including France, vot- 
; 'jo censure IsraeL Britain, Den- 
’■ -Jc and Australia abstained. ] 



An Isaradi tank crushed a car and -poshed It onto the body of a man they shot during a raid 
on a village in southern Lebanon. Thirty-four people were reported killed in the attack. 

New Technology Is Called a Failure 
In Serving Third World Education 


By Fred M. Hechinger 

New York Tima Serrice 

AJDIC, Mexico — Advances in 
communications and inf ormati on 
technology have been of little help 
to developing countries dying to 
educate (heir children and illiterate 
adults and train their unemployed, 
educators and journalists said at a 
seminar here. 

Their frustration was reflected 
last week in a meeting sponsored 
by the Ajijic Institute of Interna- 
tional Education and the Interna- 
tional Council for Educational De- 
velopment It brought together 
education and news media repre- 
sentatives from seven. Latin Ameri- 
can countries, Britain, Fiance and 
the United States. 

Dr. Juan Carlos LavignoUe, an 
educator and columnist for the Ar- 
gentine newspaper La Pxeasa, de- 
fined as a basic problem the ten- 
dency to focus on the instruments 
of transmission, and to gloss over 
the fact that there is nothing of 
value to transmit. In communica- 
tion as in education, the high-tech 
hardware, such as computers and 
satellites, is starved by the lack of 
software, or content, he said. 

Conferees also reported that ex- 
pensive ahd elaborately produced 
educational television programs in 
developing countries reach less 
than V percent of the potential au- 
dience. 

Gandio de Moura Castro, a Bra- 
zilian economist with extensive ex- 


perience at U.S. universities, called 
for greater reliance on “low-tech” 
solutions, such as books, radio and 
the blackboard. 

Brazil, he said, has an elaborate 
computerized data bank, “but no- 
body uses it” Why lock to costly 
high-technology transmission of 
information, he asked, when the 
job could be done more easily and 
more cheaply through the copying 

rruirhinft and the mails ? 

Roberto Rondon Morales, a 
physician on the faculty of the Uni- 
versity of the Andes in Venezuela, 
estimated that perhaps 40 percent 
of all the technology bought is in- 
appropriate to local needs and is 
never used. 

Erinefltmnsl technology in the 
Third World, said Oscar Soria, a 
Mexican acadwYiiniim who is a di- 
rector of the Ajijic Institute, has 
gone through a period of progress, 
but disappointment has followed 
as hoped-for miracles failed to ma- 
terialize. Much technology “went 
into decay,” he said. 

“Successes have been islands in 
an ocean of failure,” be said. Spe- 
cifically, “there are no global solu- 
tions to illiteracy.’’' He thought de- 
veloping countries may have come 
to “the end of the importation ctf 
foreign solutions and that time and 
patience are needed to create local 
solutions.” 

The solution, be added, is not a 


satellite, but training people on the 
'ground to handle trcmiology. 

Dealing with educational prob- 
lems in Latin America is complicat- 
ed by intense national feelings, par- 
ticularly about airy suspicion of 
North American or West European 

TTIlp fl pyfl1lQfH_ 

“Sesame Street,” the US. televi- 
sion program for preschool chil- 
dren, is an example: Although ac- 
knowledged as one of the 
best-researched televised teaching 
aids, it was rejected by Mexico as 
incompatible with Mexican values. 
So Mexico developed its own ver- 
sion to avoid charges of North 
American imperialism. Subse- 
quently, the Merican version was 
rejected by other Latin American 
countries as Mexican imperialism. 

The word “dependency,” said 
Mr. Soria, “needs to be decontami- 
nated.” It is in the industrial coun- 
tries that much essential informa- 
tion is produced, he said, and 
“denying this is insanity.” 

In social science and educational 
research, there is often in the Third 
World “a mismatch between re- 
searchers and practitioners,” said 
Alain Bienayme, professor of eco- 
nomics at the University of Paris. 
Social science research, he said, is 
often perceived by those in power 
as dangerous. At the same time, 
researchers complain that those in 
power do a poor job of carrying out 
the programs recommended by re- 
searchers. 


French Vote May Mean Electoral Change 


By Joseph Firchert 

liuemanonal Herald Tribune 

PARIS —The weak showing of 
France's governing Socialist Party 
ir local elections Sunday is likely \o 
posh President Francois Mitter- 
rand to introduce a degree of pro- 
portional representation in time for 
parliamentary elections next year. 

Mr. Mitterrand has the option of 
idling parliament to introduce pro- 
portional representation, from win- 
ner- take-alL This would bring into 
parliament more smaller parties, 
potential allies for a Socialist-led 
coalition. 

Whatever changes Mr. Mitter- 
rand makes in electoral arrangs- 

NEVS ANALYSIS 

men is to compensate for the 
French left's slumping popularity 
could prove the most significant 
result of the local elections, in 
which the Socialists got only 25 
percent of the vote in Sunday’s first 
round of vo ting 

An alliance of conservative par- 
ties — the neo-Gaullists led by the 
mayor of Paris, Jacques Chirac, 
and the Union for French Democ- 
racy, led by former President Val 6 - 
ry Giscard d’Estaing — won 33 
percent of the vote. 

This tally, taken together with 
votes garnered by independent 
conservatives, would theoretically 
give the conservatives a strong par- 
liamentary majority after next 
year’s elections. 

A measure of proportional repre- 
sentation would give France more 
political flexibility and make par- 
liament a more faithful minor of 
political opinions. Certainly it 
would give Mr. Mitterrand more 
room for tactical maneuver. But 
detractors say it implies weaker , 
government. 

In most suggestions about a pro- 
portional system, for France, the 
degree of change is limited — per- 
haps 100 paduunemarians out of 
600 to be selected by party list 

Even this limited reform would 
increase Mr. Mitterrand's chances 
of finding splinter parties ready to 
join a center-left coalition led by 
the Socialists, which remain 
France's largest parly. 

The major practical impact 
would be to ensure that the far- 
right National Front, led by Jean- 
Marie Le Pen, gets into parliament 

About 10 percent of French peo- 
ple have been voting for the Na- 
tional Front 

If proportional representation 


The Associated Pros 

ST. PAUL, Minnesota— Gover- 
nor Rudy Peroich has accepted the 
resignation of state Supreme Court 
Justice John Todd, who was ac- 
cused of cheating by using refer- 
ence bodes during a 1983 multi- 
state bar examination. 


promised the National Front seats 
in parliament, it would draw votes 
away from the traditional conser- 
vative parties. So the electoral re- 
form that appeals to Mr. Mitter- 
rand is bitterly opposed by the 
conservatives. 

Mr. Chirac said Monday that 
changing the voting rules would be 
“immoral” His public criticism is 
that any change would damag e the 
constitutional system Introduced 
by de Gaulle in 1958 and credited 
with reinforcing stable government 
in France for the last quarter-cen- 
tury. 

■ The GauUist argument is that the 
system has fostered vigorous gov- 
ernment by encouraging electoral 
alliances between parties that pro- 
duced strong parliamentary major- 
ities. 

In contrast, proportional repre- 
sentation is associated with the 
weak governments that under- 


mined France in mud] of this cen- 
tury. Constantly changing coalition 
governments, based on tactical alli- 
ances between numerous <m»ll par- 
ties in parliament, failed to provide 
strong leadership or even political 
stability. 

Privately Mr. Chirac’s aides ac- 
knowledge that this GauUist theme 
is exaggerated lor public consump- 
tion; A limited amount of propor- 
tional representation would not 
fundamentally alter the composi- 
tion of parliament Nor could it 
affect (he presidential elections. 

The impact of the local elections 
was a psychological and political 
boost to French conservatives, who 
saw their national popularity, as 
indicated by opinion polls, con- 
firmed at the ballot box. In the 
runoff ballots next weekend in the 
current local elections, opposition 
political parties will take control of 

many district councils. 


But the hint of proportional rep- 
resentation is code for another, less 
discussed possibility: that Mr. Mit- 
terrand can lure some small parties, 
and even some nominally conserva- 
tive politicians, into cooperating 
with a Socialist-led coalinon next 
year. 

With the National Front in par- 
liament, some French liberals 
would be tempted to cooperate 
with die Socialists — now free of 
the taint of a Communist affiance* 
3 — to combat Mr. Le Pen’s extrem- 
ism, which for many Frenchman 
has fascist undertones. 

AD of these tactics will be swept 
aside if the conservatives maintain 


Domic policies start to produce re- 
sults and Mr. Le Pen's themes gain 
a wider audience. 


InParis 

the luxury of the last century 
is alive. And breathtaking! 

HOTEL 

I^^ER•CO^^TNE^LCAL 

PARIS 



THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 

0 INTER* CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

3 Rue de Castjglione. 75 040 Par-Cedex 01, (01) 260 3780, Telex: 220U4 
For reservations call: London: (01) 491-7181 
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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 




INSIGHTS 


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U.S. Cities 
And States 
Act Against 
Apartheid 

By Karlyn Barker 

Washington Post Service 

\%TT ASHTNGTON — When an alumnus 
W/ donated several hundred gold South 
IT African Krugerrands to the University 
of Nebraska a few years ago, Ernie Chambers, a 
barber and Nebraska’s only black legislator, got 
angry. That is how Nebraska, where blades are 
just 3.1 percent of the population, became the 
first U.S. stale to adopt economic sanctions 
against apartheid. 

“It was a hot issue to me years ago when 
nobody was doing anything,” said Mr. Cham- 
bers, whose nonbtnding resolution c allin g for 
the reinvestment of state pension funds that had 
been invested directly or indirectly in South 
Africa was approved in 1980 and made into law 
last year. 

Mr. Chambers does not feel so alone any- 
more. 

In the past four years, five other states and 
numerous towns and rilies have passed similar 
measures aimed at challenging Smith Africa's 
policies of racial segregation, according to the 
American Committee on Africa, a New York- 
based lobbying group that monitors state and 
municipal divestment legislation. 

Ami-apartheid demonstrations and arrests 
are an almost daily occurrence outside the South 
African Embassy in Washington, and Congress 
and more than 20 state legislatures are consider- 
ing bills that would curtail or sever financial 
investments in South Africa. 

Liberal lawmakers in the U.S. Senate and 
House of Representatives have introduced iden- 
tical bills last week that would ban new UJS. 
investments and loans in South Africa. A less 
comprehensive measure failed to pass both 
houses last year, but a new wave of anti-apart- 
heid sentiment has taken hold in the United 
States. 

Divestment is u a phenomenon gripping the 
country,” said Joan Specter, a Philadelphia City 
Council member and the wife of Senator Arlen 
Specter. Republican of Pennsylvania. "Now ev- 
eryone is getting cm the bandwagon.” 

In 1982 alone, states and cities withdrew more 
than $300 million in publicly controlled funds 
from companies doing business with South Afri- 
ca. Critics of apartheid said the overall financial 
impact of such action now exceeds $2 billion. 

In New York City last month. Mayor Edward 
L Koch and senior City Council officials an- 
nounced proposals fra some of the toughest 
anti-apartheid sanctions yet, including a ban on 
buying goods and services that come from South 
Africa. The city was embarrassed recently when 
a worker in a city shelter discovered pineapples 
from South Africa being served to the homeless. 

N EW York City’s government already 
has voted to phase out, over the next 
five years, pension fund investments in 
companies doing business with South Africa, a 



Paulas Stephanas “Oom PauF Kruger, on the head side of the Krugerrand. 


move that means reinvesting about 51.5 billion 
in pension funds now held by 148 companies. 

Earlier, Citibank, acting under pressure from 
the city government, said it would liquidate its 
loans to the South African government by the 
end of March. Gtibank said the amount of its 
loans outstanding to Pretoria was “modest.” 

New York Gt/s policy could have required 
the sale of 222^00 snares of Citicorp, Gtibank’s 
parent company, that are held by a city pension 
fund. The stoat has a value of about S10.2 

milli on. 

A CCORDING to Federal Reserve data, to- 

/% tal American bank loans to the South 
XX. African public sector dropped from 
1623 million in June 1982 to S343 million last 
September. 

Mrs. Specter successfully led efforts in 1981 
to get P hilad elphia to sell more than S90 million 
in city pension funds of a total stock and bond 
portfolio of 5650 millio n that had been invested 
m South Africa. 

“It’s an abomination,” she saw tersely of 
South Africa's apartheid system. That is what 
she told South Africa’s ambassador to the Unit- 
ed Nations when he traveled from New York to 
try to talk her out of sponsoring the legislation. 

“He told me they were doing all they could, 
that the issue was much more complex than I 
knew, that they were making reforms,” Mrs. 
Specter said. “I told him. You’re the only coun- 
try in the world that legislates discrimination.’ ” 

Provisions in the anti-apartheid bills vary. 
Massachusetts approved a blanket prohibition 
against investments in South Africa. Nebraska, 
however, exempted companies that have at- 
tained a “good progress" rating under terms of 
the SulHvan Principles, a voluntary code of 
conduct for UJ>. companies operating in that 
country pledging them to desegregate their fatal- 
ities and pay equal wages to blades. 

Massachusetts, winch enacted its sweeping 


J 




INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR 
COAL MINE DEVELOPMENT IN PAKISTAN 

THE WATER AND POWER DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY (WAPDA) OF 
PAKISTAN PLANS TO INSTALL A 300 MW CAPACITY INDIGENOUS 
COAL FIRED POWER GENERATING STATION IN SOUTHERN 
PAKISTAN. 

The quantity of coal required will be about 1.4 million tons per year and is to be 
supplied from the Lakhra Coal Field situated 150 Km North East of Karachi, 
Pakistan and within 50 Km of the proposed power plant site. 

A notice inviting expressions of interest from the private sector in investment, 
development and management of Lakhra Mines to supply coal to the proposed 
power plant was published in the international press in June 1984. Response to the 
notice was favorable and a number of interesting proposals were received. 

However none of the proposals was sufficiently complete to permit a formal 
prequalification decision. 

It has therefore been decided to keep open the process of soliciting expressions of 
interest in the Lakhra Coal Mining Project while additional information is obtained 
from the respondents to the original invitation. 

ALL COAL MINE INVESTMENT/DEVELOPMENT PARTIES FROM THE 
PRIVATE SECTOR SERIOUSLY INTERESTED IN INVESTING AND 
PARTICIPATING IN MANAGEMENT OF THE COAL MINE(S) ARE INVITED 
TO CONTACT THE UNDERSIGNED AND ENTER INTO DISCUSSIONS AS 
SOON AS POSSIBLE BUT NO LATER THAN APRIL 15, 1985 AFTER 
WHICH FINAL PREQUALIFICATION DECISIONS WILL BE MADE. 


Available background data will be provided on request and/or during discussions in 
Lahore. 


KHAWAJA DAOOD 

GENERAL MANAGER (THERMAL GENERATION) 
WATER AND POWER DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 
ROOM 197, WAPDA HOUSE 

I AHORF PAIHQTAW 

TELEPHONE: 213676, TELEX: 44869 WAPDA PK 


/ 


Gorbachev: The Son of a Peasant 
Makes a Dramatic Rise to Power 




divestment biU two years ago, began selling 
about $180 milli on in direct and indirect South 
African investments even before the bill became 
law. A state senator. Jack Back man, a sponsor 
of the measure, said that the state “got a book 
profit and our new investments wiD enhance our 
portfolio.” 

South African government officials have said 
that neither the demonstrations nor present and 
future economic sanctions win influence the 
country’s policies and that such actions might, 
instead, create a harirlath against current re- 
form efforts. Divestment measures, they con- 
tended, are opposed by the majority of blade 
South Africans because such bids would result 
in a loss of jobs. 

A Democratic Gty Council member in Wash- 
ington, John Ray, said he has heard those argu- 
ments before, and that they did not stop him 
from sponsoring legislation, enacted last March, 
that prohibits the District of Columbia from 
banking or investing in companies that do busi- 
ness with South Africa or South-West Africa 
(Namibia). 

“Black South Afr icans are concerned about 
more titan a few jobs,” said Mr. Ray, who has 
met numerous visitors from those regions. 
“They’re concerned with their dvfl rights and 
human dignity.” 

Mr. Ray is drafting another bill that would 
penalize companies that do business with South 
Africa in competing for dty contracts. He said 
that American companies account for less than 
l percent of all jobs in that country, usually the 
lowest-paying ones. The law is bdng applied 
gradually over two years. So far, the dty has 
divested itself of $35 million of stocks, with 
about $17 mfllinn more to sdL 

According to a recent study, 284 UJS. con- 
cerns operate in South Africa, of winch 57 are 
among Fortune magazine's top 100 corpora- 
tions. 


By Serge Schmemann 

Netr York Tima Seiner 

M OSCOW — Official Soviet biogra- 
phies make for specialized readme, 
somewhat in the styleof classified ads: 
“Gorbachev, Milch. Ser. (b. 1931), Sov. Part, 
Govt- Official. Mbr. CPSU 1952. 1970 1st Scc’y 
Stavropol Kiaikom CPSU. 1971 Mbr. CC 
CPSU. 1978 Sec’yCC CPSU. 1979 Cand. Mbr. 
Politburo CC CPSU. 1980 Mbr. Politburo CC 
CPSU..." 

With practice, a message emerges from those 
stilted lines. CPSU is die Communist Party of 
the Soviet Union. CC is its Central Committee. 
And Mikhail Sergeevich Gorbachev is the yonn- 
gest of the 11 men who sit at the pinnule of 
Soviet power, the Politburo. 

Those few lines bracket a career that has 
become the focus of some of the most intensive 
speculati o n ever c o ncern in g the future of the 
Soviet stale. The generation that led die Soviet 
Union from the ravages of Stalinism and World 
War n through the enormous expansion of 
power and might over the past three decades has 
ended. 

Now a new guard stands poised to take 
charge, a generation of men in their 50s and 60s. 

capablcof breathing newtife inttfasystem that 
seems to have followed its leaden into debility 
and fatigue. More than any other Soviet leader, 
Mr. Gorbachev has come to personify the new 
breed. At only 54, the peasant’s son and career 
party official has emerged from the shadow of 
Kremlin politics to succeed the late Konstantin 
U. Chernenko, a man 20 years Us senior. 

It was as if in recognition of his importance 
that a group of heavyset men in dark coals and 
heavy fig hats marched across the frozen tarmac 
to the waiting Aeroflot plane in December. At 
the foot of the forward ramp, they bid goodbye 
to Mr. Gorbachev, who mounted the steps, 
panting for the stiff wave required by the cere- 
mony of a Politburo member setting off on a 
Kremlin mission. His wife, Raisa, unobtrusively 
mounted the bade steps. 

In London, the front door opened and the 
two popped out together, jubilantly waving to 
the welcoming officials and the banks of pho- 
tographers- 

Few in Britain were disappointed in the visi- 
tors. The Gorbachevs oohed and aahed at West- 
minster Abbey and at Chequers. She ventured 
charmingly halting words in Englis h and dem- 
onstrated a keen interest in literature and phi- 
losophy, which, it tamed out, she had studied at 
Moscow State University. He suavely checked 
swarming photographers, saying, “Comrades, 
economize your supplies. That’s enough-" 

It was a measure of Mr. Gorbachev’s success 
that he managed to generate excitement without 
diverging from standard Kremlin lines. He 
faithfully pushed Moscow's propaganda cam- 
paign against President Ronald Reagan's space 
defease project, and he turned huffy at any 
mention of Moscow’s repression of human and 



one member of Parliament who raised the issue 
in a private session. “For example, you pose- 
cute entire communities, entire nationalities.” 
After some thought, his listeners concluded be 
probably meant Northern Ireland. 

That was hardly enough to darken the cheery 
glow of the visit. “A Red Star Rises in the East,” 
declared The Sunday Times of London over a 
profile of Mr. Gorbachev. But it was Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher who provided the 
most fitting epitaph to the visiL “I like Mr. 
Gorbachev, said she. “We can do business 
together.” 

~W%TT HO is the real Mr. Gorbachev? The 

%]L/ Soviet politician poured from the same 

TT mold as his comrades, except to a bit 
more polish and pizzazz and a knack to public 
relations? Or the nice man who did the sights of 
London with bis wife, bantered easily with the 
high and mighty, and charmed the British? 

Political analysts are waxy of spotting another 
“liberal” in the style of the late Yuri V. Andro- 
pov, and the debate over the real Mr. Gorbachev 
has gone on. But if the outlines of the man 
remain fuzzy, what emerged with startling 
clarity is that this peasant's son from southern 
Russia, with his pleasant style and calm face, 
has achieved one of the most dizzying rises in 
modem Soviet politics. 

At a meeting erf party workers last December, 
Mr. Gorbachev spelled out his program in un- 
usually dear terms: 

“We will have to cany out profound transfor- 
mations in the economy and in the entire system 
of social relations. Hie process of the intensifi- 
cation of the economy must be given a truly 
nationwide character, the same political reso- 
nance that the country’s industrialization once 
had." 

Snatching up the banner of Andropov, his 
late mentor, Mr. Gorbachev argued that the 
Soviet Union would never achieve its global 
ambitions if it were unable to feed and clothe its 
own: “Socialism has exerted and continues to 
exert its main influence on wodd development 
through its economic policy and through its 
successes in the socioeconomic field.” 

Certainly nothing in Mr. Gorbachev’s ap- 
pearance betrays a radical departure. Basically, 
he looks to be what he is, the son of Russian 
peasants. 



renowned for its sheep and grain. It was a region 
overrun by the Germans. One unanswered ques- 
tion is whether Mr. Gorbachev lived as an 
adolescent through the occupation or whether 
he was evacuated to the east 

His official biography says (hat he worked at 
a machine- tractor station while still a studenL 
Real advancement started in 1950, when at the 
age of 19 be entered the law school of Moscow 
University, a dramatic shif t from the agricultur- 
al hinterlands to the most prestigious Soviet 
institution of higher learning. He is the only 
graduate of Moscow University in the Politbu- 
ro, and the only member with legal training. 

Even with his degree in hand, Mr. Gorbachev 
started his party career at the bottom, as the 
secretary of a Komsomol, or Yoong Communist 
League, organization in Stavropol Ten years 
later be still deemed it necessary to enroll in a 
correspondence course in agriculture. 

On the other hand, Soviet law studies axe 
highly politicized, and the record of Mr, Gorba- 
chev's career in Moscow suggests that his real 
major was politics. Within two years of entering 
law school. Mr. Gorbachev joined the Commu- 
nist Party and became Komsomol organizer for 
the school, a position that marked him as a 
promising politician. 

These were particularly interesting years at 
the university. Stalin died in 1953, and the 
discontent and rumblings that eventually found 


Thoughts of Gorbachev 


Nat York Tima Service 
Here are some remarks by Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev on various topics, taken frorh public 
statements in the last two years. 

N EGOTIATIONS between the Soviet 
Union and the United States of 
America will open in Geneva tomor- 
row. The approach of the UJS.SJL to these 
negotiations is weD known. 1 can only reaf- 
firm rimt- We do not strive to acquire unilat- 
eral advantages over the United States, over 
NATO countries, to military superiority 
over diem; we want termination, and not 
continuation of the arms race and, therefore, 
offer a freeze of nuclear arsenals, an end to 
further de ploy ment of missiles; we want a 
real and major reduction of the arms stock- 
piles, and of the development of ever new 
weapon systems, be it in space or on Earth. 
We would like our partners in the Geneva 
negotiations to understand the Soviet 
Union’s position and respond in kind. Then 
agreement will be possible. The peoples of the 
wodd would sigh with relief. 

— From a speech on Monday to the Com- 
munist Party Central Committee after being 
appointed general secretary. 

If people don’t like Marxism, they should 
blame the British Museum. 

— December 1984, on a visit to the British 
M useum reading room used by Karl Marx. 

We will do everything that depends cm us 
to expand cooperation with socialist states, to 
enhance the role and influence of socialism in 
world affairs. We would like a serious im- 
provement of relations with the Chinese Peo- 
ple's Republic and bdieve that, given red- 
prod ty, this is quite possible. 

— From the speech on Monday to the 
Central Committee. 

I could give you a few facts about human 
rights in the United Kingdom. For example, 
you persecute entire communities, entire na- 
tionalities. You have 23 million unemployed. 
You govern your sodety. You leave us to 
govern eras. 


— December 1984, responding in Britain 
to criticism of Soviet repression of human 
and religious rights. 

We will have to carry out profound trans- 
formations in the econotnyand in the entire 
system of social relations. The process of the 
intensification of the economy must be given 
a truly nationwide character, the same politi- 
cal resonance that the country* s industrializa- 
tion once had. 

Only an intensive, highly developed econo- 
my can guarantee the consolidation of the 
country’s positions in the international arena, 
can permit the country to enter the new 
as a great and flourishing state. 

— December 1984, at a meeting of party 
workers. 

Comrades, economize your supplies. 
That’s enough. 

— December 1984, chastising photogra- 
phers covering his visit to London. 

Inertia of thinking, as a rule, generates 
inertia in practical deeds. Questing and ae- 
ativity, sensitivity to new phenomena and 
processes, the decisive eradication of formal- 
ism, red tape, and idle talk — such are the 
demands ofBfe on all workers on the ideolog- 
ical fronL 

— December 1984, in a speech to the' 
Central Committee. 

This document has underlined once again 
how important it is to make fuller and more 
effective use of the tremendous ideological 
and organizing potential of party propagan- 
da in solving the qualitatively new tasks of 
devdopingSoviet society. 

— From the same speech. 

Nonsense, fit for the speech of uneducated 
people. 

— 1983, responding mx a trip to Canada to 
a question about KGu activities abroad and 
whether the Soviet Union was exporting rev- 
olution. 


expression in Nikita S. Khrushchev’s secret 
speech attacking Stalin's “cult of personality” 
are said to have been strong at the law faculty. 
Russians who said they knew of Mr. Gorbachev 
in those years said he was a critic of Stalin even 
before official de-Stalmization. That possibility 
is moot, however, by the record, which 
shows Mr. Gorbachev to have been active in the 
Komsomol by 1952, when paeans to Stalin were, 
still mandatory to any young Communist 
From Moscow. Mr. Gorbachev returned to 
Stavropol and began a classic rise through the 
party, advancing m steady steps from Komso- 
mol secretary to first secretary of the regional 
party organization and a seat on the Central 
Committee by the age of 39. 

P ROBABLY the most si gnifican t aspect 
of Mr. Gorbachev’s 22-year service in 
Stavropol, however, was the patronage of 
Mikhail A. Suslov, the powerful ideologist un- 
der Leonid L Brezhnev, whose power base was 
in StavropoL Mr. Gorbachev’s election to full 
membership on the Central Committee in 1971, 
without the usual stint as a candidate member, 
was rate rim of special favor. The major break 
came in 1978, when Fyodor D. Kulakov, the 
party secretary to agriculture and yet another 
Stavropol man, died. Mr. Gorbachev, 47, Le- 
nin's age at the time of the Revolution, was 
tapped to take over, and he moved to the center 
ot power in Moscow. 

In the waning years of the Brezhnev era, Mr. 
Gorbachev managed a program of massive in- 
vestment in agriculture personally sponsored by 
Brezhnev as his “food program.” He pushed 
new ideas such as shifting control over 
Itural operations from ministries in Mos- 
cow to regional agro-industrial authorities. He 
also moved to shift agricultural work to die 
“brigade method,” giving groups of workers 
responsibility to a specific piece of land and 
paying them according to the results. The thrust 
inboth these reforms was to restore some of the 
bonds that had once finked the peasants to the 
land, and which Stalin had so bloodily severed 
in the collectivizalion drive cf the 1930s. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s experiments brought mar- 
ginal improvement in some areas of agriculture, 
but not enough to offset a succession erf crop 
failures. 

What did work well to Mr. Gorbachev was 
the accession of Andropov. 

Hie shrewd, tough, farmer KGB leader found 
in Mr. Gorbachev the perfect lieutenant to exe- 
cute his ambitious efforts at sorting out the 
corruption and stagnation that Brezhnev had 
left behind. 

Taking advantage of campaigns then under 
way in the paity, Andropov and Mr. Gorbachev 
replaced one-fifth of the regional first secretar- 
ies and nine of 23 Central Committee depart- 
ment hods. They cracked down on corrupt 
officials and an laggard workers, and launched 
experiments to inject more incentives into in- 
dustry and agriculture. As Andropov’s health 
deteriorated, Mr. Gorbachev’s role expanded, 
until at the end, he was the sote link between the 
dying leader and the party hierarchy. 

Then is no evidence that Andropov meant 
for Mr. Gorbachev to succeed him. But to many 
in the party and in the white-collar intelligen- 
tsia, Mr. Gorbachev was the logical heir to bis 
policies, the oik man who could sustain the 


Exactly what happened in the Politburo can- 
not be known, but the popular interpretation is 
that the old guard concluded it was not yet time 
for a man so many years their junior to saze the 
power they had wielded for some 30 years, and 
they opted to delay the inevitable with Mr. 
Chernenko, the oldest man to come to power, 
who was already ailing. 

Bat Mr. Gorbachev emerged as the effective 
second in command, with more responsibility 
than any previous leader in a similar position. 

Impressive as Mr. Gorbachev's rise has been, 
the evidence is inconclusive about his skins in 
political combat Several times this past year, he 
seemed to slip. His speech nominating Mr. 
Chernenko after Andropov’s death was never 
acknowledged in the Soviet press. At one 
awards ceremony in the Kremlin, he mysteri- 
ously shifted from the center of a Politburo 
lineup to the Adelines. At the October plenum 
of the Central Committee, his name was not 
mentioned even though the subject was agricul- 
ture, his fiekL 

There is also the impression among Russians 
that he lacks an element of ruthiessness. His 
rise, after all was due more to patronage than to 


brute force. Suslov and Andropov may h* 
launched him into an orbit far higher than 1- ~ 
could have achieved on his own, while In. * 
celebrated but tougher members of thePoStb - 
ro, like Grigori V. Romanov, the former Lent ■ 
grad party chief, made it to the top by clawii 
their way up. 

What he does have, probably to a great _ 
degree than any previous Soviet leader; is 
platform. He is identified, more closely than ax •• 
member of the Politburo, with calls to fund ~ 
mental changes in economic, organizational at , 
social thinking . He has the mantle of Andropa 
whose memory has swelled into a legend of — 
man who combined the stick ofjoughdisdpHi — _ — 
with the carrot erf economic reorganization. 

Nobody in the Soviet leadership is again 
economic chang e- The long lines outside stop 
alone make any other position politically unto 
able. Bat Sonnet thinking on the issue has spl 
roughly into two trends. On one side are ti 
“hard-liners,” men like Prime Minister Nikd 
A. Tikhonov, whose solution has been to urj 

rnorc discipline within existing structures, stra 
ger centralized control increased party sunerv 
son and ruthless treatment of ipanagen who c 

not achieve. On the other side are the “ref ore 
ersT with Mr. Gorbachev at their head. Thf 
advocate a loosening of centralized control 
less party meddling, more self- 
greater use of market mechanisms and 
incentives. 

A RDENT as Mr. Gorbachev has been i 
criticizing “inertia, conservatism ( 

/ A thinking, inability or unwillingness I 
change established ways of wade and shift i 
new methods,” there are distinct limits to vha 
he would, or could, do. 

The greatest barrier before the reformers i 
the institutional resistance of a party bureanen 
cy that derives its power and privilege fror 
keeping things the way they are. Arkady > 
Shevchenko, a defector, wrote in his recec 
memoirs that it is an elite that “will permit n 
one to transform that sodety or alta its foreig 
or domestic policy in any way that may affet 
their perquisites.” 

It was this ossified elite that smothered Aid 
sei N. Kosygin’s attempts atretomin the 1960 
simply by doing nothing to carry them on 
Andropov, too, recognized its force and, paraft 
with bis campaign to discipline and motivaJ 
workers, he set about firing party secretary 
and cracking down on the corrupt 

What makes the prospect of internal chant 
more propitious now is a sense of crisis tin 
seems to be spreading among economic mana? 
era, a sense that something must change an 
change fast Oil production has faUen. industrii 
output is dunbing at a snail’s pace and agricu 
tore remains in dismal straits. The nrimaty : 
asking for more money to match President Ret 
gan's military buildup, and consumers axe b( 
coining more vocal in their frustration. 

On the political front the 27th Party Cm 
grass, which is said to be scheduled for Noven 
ber, is expected to adopt a new party prograi 
and to name a new Central Committee. Awe* 

15 percent of the current Central Comnritte 
membership is dated for replacement. 

AH this could give a new leader — Mr. Gorin 
chev — some scope for action. Yet in setting u 
the centralized and overlapping system of bt 
reaucratic control that still holds sway ow 
Soviet life, Stalin ensured that chang e coradb 

who could gain control over the enonnoos app* 
ratus of power. 

Foreign affairs is the field least likely t 
change under a new generation. Mr. Garbs 
chev’s public statements on foreign issues hav 
not shown any marked nri gmnlity , and his idee 
logical discourses on differences between Coni 
munist and democratic systems have beat du 
and standard. He would likely favor dfetentej 
only to give breathing space to domestic prtj 
grams. But nothing suggests that be will reac 
any differently from fits predecessors to th 
insecurities, expansionist forces or sensitivity t> 
loss of face mat govern so much of Sow 
behavior abroad. 

A Soviet Union under Mr. Gorbachev wil 
not be radically different in the immediate fo 
ture. Yet Mr. Gorbachev is a man Mis. Thatd 
found likable and possible to do business wi 
and that, coupled with his youth and the p 
matism his statements reflect, probably mak 
him as good a Soviet politician as the West cai 
expect 

(Excerpted from The New York Times Magazine 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


of a P 


Page 7 


eas ' 


ARTS / LEISURE 


t> V^ os Shows Stunning Sweaters; Marsha Norman’s r 5 Night , Mother ’ Is a Thin Drama 

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By Hebe Dorsey 

% " s S l International Hamid Tribune 

I LAN — Bybks is a name to remember. This 
1 1 -year-old bouse has bad a series of designers, 
ling Gianni Versace, but it is only in the last five 
that, under Keith Varty, it has achieved promi- 
. This season ByWos is pushing to the front line. 
. x last year, Varty has been backed op by Alan 
>v' sr. Both are British, products erf the excellent 
a fashion school program. Their collection is a 
tix of rugged yet sophisticated outerwear and an 

y MIL AN FASHION S 

- - 'S' fie Dickensian look. The faded floral prints are 

“■ /al <rf William Meeds tapestries. 

early part of the show consisted of stunning 
' ;rs inspired by kilim mgs. They were handmade 
mtry women outside Perugia “who knit away 
'..-•.looking at television,” said Nando MjgKo, 
■ v.nnan for the GirombeUi group, which owns 
>’ s. The sweaters were topped by rounded sheari- 

- ^oosons and worn over big, swirling skirts — a 

- - \Vent shape in Milan this season. 

; -w.-l Lagerfdd is reviving the opulent days of the 
" 'ctr Fendi furs. The combination of his unbridled 
and the Fendi sisters’ (echmque and sense <rf 
. .hire had, once again, spectacular results. The 
' 3 have revolutionized the world of furs, and 
, _ „ s come from ah over the worid to see what they 
' "ji to. 

“"-s season they have done several unusual things, 
s crushing Persian lamb so that it looks like gray 
/ ' ^ 4 , or shaving furs — including mink, which 

- - ‘.>1 like dark tortoiseshdL 

- " ‘i silhouette was always larger than life, and all 
'■^'teached to the floor. There was a slim coat, and a 

one either tent -shaped or cinched at the waist 
ir swirling skirt, reminiscent of what the Russians 
vhilft riding in their troikas. 

' - re and there, Lagerfdd also showed a shaped 
oink jacket, with a sable shawl collar and a sable- 
edge that showed a very controlled hand. He 
- -V. lot of fake fur, including fake Persian l«mh for 
■ bonnets that all but covered the models' 
fun touches included fur-rimmed sun- 
V 5 and Persian-lamb attach^ cases. 

: - quality of the furs was out of the ordinary. Fox, 
ample, twisted around and around, has an un- 

- bristle and movement to it, looking as if wind 
onstanfly Wowing on it The end of the show — 

. u sable, including two pullovers, the ultimate in 
'away elegance — brought down the house. 

-- only drawback of tins collection was the Fen- 
••• . jdstence on showing their ready-to-wear, winch 
.. Xlly consisted of the sank shapes they shewed in 
snslatfidinto fabric. The result is decidedly poor. 

- — .Jade velvet and white satin numbers were so 
jsly inspired by Lagerfeld’s other bouse, Chanel, 
.. tey drewa smne from Kitty (TAlessio, president 
; iand USA, who flew in by private jet with 
■feld and Catherine Deneuve. 

: same Balkan spirit prevailed at Missom. Full of 

. ackets over swirling fkwal slrirts, rids was a very 
collection and showed that Rosita and Ottavio 
ni had not lost their touch. They (fid ItiHm -like 
with success, as wdl as a very full plaid knit oat 
i deep back pleat 

: *re was a trace of “Amadeus” (another rampant 
) in big shirts topped by long jackets. The Mis- 
trademark odors, a mature of orange) purple, 
-tod maize ydkw, made this collection distinctly 
own. 



By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Though it might just about 
/ get by a$ a short radio dialogue on a 
quiei afternoon, “Tfigfat, Mother" (at the 
Hampstead) leaves so much to be desired as 
a play that the Pulitzer Prize it won in 1983 
comes as a considerable amazement. 

A prime requirement of a stage drama is 

THE BRITISH STAGE 

surely some sort of theatricality. Marsha 
Norman has achieved a one-act ofay stretch- 
ing to an hour and a half in which a daughter 
informs her mother that she is soon to corn- 
mil suicide and then does so. 

It is the kind of issue that might get debat- 
ed in about half an episode of the television 
show “Quincy,'’ but mere you would almost 
certainly get a subsidiary plot to relieve the 
tedium. I do not doubt that the author has 
thought long and hard about what makes 
one decide to put a gun to one's head, nor 
that she has managed to raise a domestic 
disaster to the level erf a moral debate about 
the rights of the individual to end an individ- 
ual life. 

But that does not make for a play: it makes 
for the kind of little scenario that in the 
earliest days of television would have been 
followed by a ponderous studio debate be- 
tween a psychiatrist and a theologian and 


maybe somebody from the crowd with a 
relative who once took that way out erf an 
unbearable life. 

Although the British premiere is quite 
wonderfully played by MatjorieYates as the 

bemused mother and Susan Wooldridge as 
the daughter, in a production (by Michael 
Attenborough) of considerable dexterity and 
intelligence, none of them can disguise a 
fatal lack erf tension or real drama. We are 
never in any doubt that the daughter is going 
to kill herself, nor can we be surprised at the 
mother's confusion and horror about an act 
that many of us sdll find pretty unforgivable, 
considering what it does to those left behind. 
Norman would seem to be arguing for a kind 
of suicide liberation, but this case history is 
so overloaded (the daughter is epileptic and 
her husband has left her and her son is a 
criminal and a drug addict) that it can hardly 
be regarded as representative. 

“It's my stop, and I'm getting off,” says 
the daughter. Anyone who sees his or her life 
solely in terms erf a bus journey ought per- 
haps to consider a career with a metropolitan 
transit authority, instead of death. 


It's dear that the arrival of “ 'Night Moth- 
er” and the Charlton Heston “Came Muti- 
ny” is the spearhead of an American inva- 
sion of the West End this summer. With the 
dollar and the pound approaching parity, a 


London theater ticket for an American tour- 
ist is about a quarter of the Broadway price, 
and It is therefore not surprising that the 
Americans should bring a few of their stars 
with them. 

We have Jack Gilford starring in “Look to 
the Rainbow ” a pub-theater siug-along an- 
thology of the great sohm of Yip Harburg 
.(locally known as “Yip Yip Hooray”) and 
soon we are to get Lauren Bacall in a new 
Harold Pinter staging of Tennessee Wil- 
liams’s “Sweet Bird of Youth.” This also 
promises to be something of a Pinter season, 
since he is represented, as author, by a triple 
bill of new short plays (“Other Places,” star- 
ring Dorothy Turin and Colin Blakely) as 
wdl as a revival of his 1971 “Old rimes,” 
starring Liv Ullmann and Michael Gambon, 
under the direction of David Jones, who did 
the film of Pinter's ‘'Betrayal.” Other Ameri- 
can imports include the return of “Barmim” 
with Michael Crawford still on the high wire 
for that one-man three-ring circus act. and 
“Guys and Dolls” making the transfer from 
the National to the West End by way of a 
regional tour. There is soon to be a revival of 
Williams's “Glass Menagerie” at Greenwich, 
and the Black Theatre Cooperative is bring- 
ing back Lorraine Hans bun's “Raisin in the 
Sun” for the first time in almost 20 years. 
“La Cage aux Folles” is still promised for the 
summer, but as yet there has been no an- 
nouncement of a cast or theater or date. 


There is talk of a “Kiss Me Kate” for mid- 
summer. 

This is a nostalgic time in the straight 
theater, too. Tom Stoppard's “Jumpers” is 
back, with Felicity Kendal and Paul Edding- 
ton, at the Aldwycb: Deborah Kerr is doing 
the old Eraiyn Williams Welsh-schoolmis- 
iress classic. “The Com Is Green.” at the Old 
Vic; and Nastassja Kinski is due in June with 
a “Seagull” revival A new production of 
“Babes in Arms” is ont on the road, while 
Chichester is staging Coward's 1930 stage 
epic. “Cavalcade, with a cast of 200 (mostly 
local amateurs). 

Amid this headlong flight into the theatri- 
cal past, new plays are few and far between. 
Those that exist seem curiously obsessed 
with Fleet Street journalism, the topic of 
David Hare’s forthcoming “Pravda” at the 
National and Stephen wakelam's “Dead- 
lines” at the Royal Court. Perhaps there is 
some justice in this: the British press has 
after all been fighting loudly recently on 
behalf of a lot of subsidized arid experimen- 
tal and fringe theaters threatened with ex- 
tinction as a result of harsh cuts by the 
government. 

In a time of considerable economic fear 
and chili, people seem to feel a lot safer, on 
both sides of the footlights, with classics 
rather than experiments. Audiences are pav- 
ing for what they know they like, and whin 
they know they uke is a good old musical. 


Zeffirelli f Tosca’ Overdressed, Behrens’s Singing Overprecise 


A ByWos sweater. 


OwfaGerf 


Versace has designed the Mario Valentino leather 
collection, which explains why, for once, that was 
more leather than suede. Versace knows how to handle 
leather, and came out with a strong, controlled look. 
The shapes — especially the long, belted jacket with 
shawl collar — were familiar, as were the big, comfort- 
able shearling coats in colors Hke red, yellow and blue. 
For evening, there were rhinestone-embroidered 
sheading bLausons aver skinny blade suede skirts. 

There are a lot of evening dothes in Milan, and 
some are better forgotten, especially at Laura Biagiot- 
tfs. She should stick to what she does best: cashmere. 
She opened with a nice array of cashmere outfits in 
soft gray and white argyll patterns and followed with 
interesting winter-whitejumpsuits. Unfortunately, she 
also showed falsc-ingenue black velvet gowns, com- 
plete with a huge satin bow on the shoulder. 

Ruth Rabb. wife of Maxwell M. Rabb, the U.S. 
ambassador to Italy, was in Milan with news that she 
dans to open a branch of the Fashion Institute of 
Technology, one of the best fashion schools in New 
York, in Florence, with Shirley Goodman, chairman 
of the schooTs foundation. "We just signed the agree- 
ment,” Mrs. Rabb said, “and hope to open within a 
year.” 


By Donal Henahan 

New York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — The two most 
presang questions about the 
Metropolitan Opera's much-her- 
alded new production of “Tosca” 
can be quickly answered. Would 
Hildegard Behrens, one of the fore- 
most German singers of our day, 
make a great Tosca? No, at least 
not yet. Would Franco Zeffirelli 
deliver another chic, overdressed 
spectacle disguised as an opera pro- 
duction? Yes, oh my, yes. 

Behrens, who played Tosca in a 
year-end Paris Opera production, 
sang admirably m her exciting 
style, with the bright tone ana 
house-fining penetration that we 
have come to expect of her. The 
voice, however, tended to hit indi- 
vidual notes precisely and then let 
than go, rather than connecting 
them in legato phrases. The result 
was a lack of the Italianale warmth 
that many a lesser soprano can pro- 
vide is this role. 

Behrens. It is generally acknowl- 
edged, is one of the more astute and 
intelligent actresses on the opera 
stage today. Why, then, did her 
Tosca make so little impact? Per- 
haps Zeffirelli’s unimaginative and 
often clumsy direction got in her 
way. It is difficult to believe, for 
instance, that the “freeze-frame” 


attitude she' struck upon first seeing 
the murder knife on Scarpia's din- 
ing table was her idea. 

Cornell MacNeil as Scarp ia sang 
mellifluously, but his wooden act- 
ing could fool nobody into believ- 
ing him a sadistic tyrant As Cavar- 
adossi, the performance was, 
fortunate to have Placido Domin- 
go, with his plangent tenor and 
general credibility. Italo Tajo's 
dithering Sacristan had his humor- 
ous moments, though the direction 
gave him too many distracting 
things to do when others were sup- 


posed to be the focus of the action. 

Giuseppe Sinopoli made a puz- 
zling Metropolitan debut as con- 
ductor. If he bad affection for the 
score or sensitivity to its ebb and 
flow, one could not discern it. His 
reading sustained a certain breath- 
less momentum, but there was 
slight feeling for the idiomatic Puc- 
cini turn of phrase and little sense 
of communion with his singers. 

Intermittently, the drama came 
together in traditional ways. The 
bonified Tosca’s exit, with cape 
swirling, in the second act, mir- 


rored what was happening in the 
hushed and scuttling music, an ef- 
fect often fluffed in routine 
“Tosca” performances. Too much 
of the time, however. Zeffirelli only 
succeeded in filling the space with 
distracting stage business. 

The scenery, designed by Zeffir- 
elli, is sumptuous but, in the first 
two acts, remarkable chiefly for its 
monumentality and almost photo- 
graphic realism. The final act is 
something else. Designed purely as 
a coup de theatre, it interrupts' the 
flow of the opera and effectively 


destroys one of Puccini’s most suc- 
cessful essays in creating poetic at- 
mosphere. 

It begins in the usual way with a 
scene on the ramparts of Castel 
Sant' Angelo, but with the help of 
the stage elevators we are then 
transported to a dungeon where 
Cavaradossi and Tosca plot their 
escape. After Cavaradossi sings “E 
lucevan le stelle” the dungeon 
drops and we are again on the ram- 
parts. Nothing is gained by this 
Meyer been an stunt, and a' good 
deal is lost. 


DOO NESBURY 

QUINCY, ON TUB 

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i; /HEARD. 





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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY 


X -U 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


Tuesday^ 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


Open MM) Lam Last cm 


IlKhrt RK7X6 1279 M 1210X8 1271J5 + 120 

Tram 41072 41SJI Mil 615X9 + 388 

Util U7M 14880 W4J5 14183 + 0J6 

(MM 514.18 519X4 51129 51444 + 1X4 


corneas! fe 

industrials 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Ftncne* 


t HMb Low Cht* Of** 

10430 1(070 HUN + 0X4 

120.10 IIP* 1W® +0* 


Si £3 SS tfcS 

10jjj2 iSS 107-91 +os2 


MSE 


Mvoncad 
Declined 
UKtanacd 
Tom issues 
New man 
'Now LOWS 


dosing 


vototneup 

VBHmKUOnn 


Composite 

industrial* 

Fifipnce 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banns 

T reran. 


r arts Ata 
l +022 207.10 
I +020 31024 
S +0J0 331X7 
i +122 32457 
1 —074 264X5 
S— 022 3403 
i-OX? 35022 


AMEX Most Actives 


VeL HHA LOW UM CMi 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


828 5M 

683 929 

499 4<fl 

2012 1*94 

44 24 

12 10 


Volume up 
volume down 


52.125870 

24786.130 


March 11 
March 8. 
March 7, 
March* 
MarchS, 


Bey Sotos 
181*38 365205 
187,969 475251 
181.915 4742196 
185.510 501226 
210234 513*74 


VoLaH PJUL. J22W2M 

Prev.4PJM.vaL H.11BM0 

PmcanseUdaMdOK MMMN 


72 

2210 l<*s 
1990 4 % 
1196 M 
1806 746 

1412 1516 
042 131k 
Jill W% 
1090 5V. 
KM9 7% 
tow vna 
low 17V. 
««9 12V. 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


Daw Jones Bond Averages 


Ilk 1% 

4 4 

7ft 7V, * 

1» UH +ii 

HS nw -5 

10V. 1IH6 — u 

5 516 * 

7K. 714 _ 

,» im + 

17V. 1714 _ 

12W 13% - 


-included In me tales figures 


Tables Include the nationwide eriaa 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


industrials 

Trams. 

ummas 

Finance 

Composite 


High Lew CUM Oils 
3J1X2 199 JO mU +0.91 
15SJ9 15442 155X7 +047 
7846 7724 7849 +059 
20J4 2027 20.70 +0.11 
180.14 17070 179X4 +027 


Bond* 

utinttes 

Industrials 


AMEX Stock index 







pfAim 
dot Jsr 
at 9M 
pf 11-00 
of 9X4 12X 
pf BJ8 12X 
.91 72 
.14 8 

28 29 
76 IS 
120 4A 
120 3X 
)J0 22 


NYSE Scores a Modest Rally 


* 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The New York Stock Ex- 
change used a modest upturn Tuesday to score 
its first gnin in five sessions. Trading remained 
sluggish. 

Auto, retail, oil and financial issues paced the 
gainers, but several computer stocks retreated, 
notably Wang Laboratories. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, off 
more than 23 points over the past week, recov- 
ered 3.20 to 1,271.75. 

Advances outpaced declines by about 8 to 7 
on the New York Stock Exchange Big Board 
volume swelled to 92.84 milli on shares from 
84.1 1 milli on in the previous session, which was 
the lowest volume in more than two months. 

The market’s recent slide, and the accompa- 
nying sluggish volume, reflects investors' confu- 
sion toward the outlook for the economy and 
the subsequent effect on stocks, analysts said. 

There is speculation that the economy’s ex- 
pansion is beginning to slow, which might help 
reduce upward pressure on interest rates. Bui 
the same slowdown could crimp corporate earn- 
ings. 

“I think it's kind of a very uncertain, ambigu- 
ous atmosphere,” said Michael Metz, f+4-hninal 
analyst at Oppenheimer &. Co. “I think a lot of 
traders axe looking for a signal " 

Later this week the government is scheduled 


Wang Labs* class B stock tumbled 3% to 20% 
and topped the American Stock Exchange's 
active list, with 2.75 milli on shares changing 
hands. The computer maker su'd fiscal fourth- 
quarter and full-year naming.; would trail year- 
earlier levels. 

The news soured investors cm several other 
computer makers as' wdL Digital Equipment 
dropped 3% to 102, Data General lost % to 48% 
and ComputervisioQ fell 1 to 33%. International 
Business Machines rose % to 131%, however. 

Phillips Petroleum topped the NYSE's active 
list and edged up ft to 48ft; a 600,000-share 
block traded at 47ft. Phillips, having just fought 
off a takeover effort, postponed its annual 
meeting by one month to May 29.- 

Chrysler jumped 1ft to 34ft in heavy trading 
after Chrysler’s chairman. Lee A. Iacocca, pre- 
dicted his company would beat General Motors 
to market with a high-technology small car. GM 
rose ft to 79 and Ford Motor gained ft to 44ft. 

American Medical International f eh ft to 
22ft; an 807,100-share block crossed at 22ft. 
Cooper Laboratories was unchanged at 14ft 
after an 810,000-share block traded at 14ft. 


14 4% EvnpfB 17 4ft 414 414- ft 

4194 36 ExC«fa 1X0 42 W 114 38ft 38ft 38ft + ft 

1646 13ft Excaw LBficILB 20 14 15ft 15ft + ft 

49ft 37ft Bacon X40 48 7 9710 39 «%*%+% 


2» lava Hydra! 122 82 8 5 23ft 33ft 23ft + ft 


Americana Hotels & Realty plummeted 4ft 
to 22ft after saying it might have to cut its 
dividend starting in 1986. 

Walt Disney Productions gained 1ft to 75ft. 
The company said its Disney Channel on cable 
TV has reached the break-even point with 1.8 
million subscribers. 

West Point Peppered feQ 2ft to 35ft. The 
stock lost 2 Monday on a report of lower sec- 
ond-quarter net JJ\ Stevens, dropped ft to 18. 


to report on retail sales and industrial produc- 
tion for February. 


tion for Februaiy. 

There also are fears that if the dollar’s recent 
decline accelerates, foreign investors would in- 
creasingly withdraw from d ollar-den ominated 
investments, including equities. 


12 35ft 35ft 

2 22ft HI* 

3 32 31ft 
48 2591 25 
IBM 27ft 27 

41ft 
38V6 
37ft 
15 
17ft 
T7VS 
18ft 
24 
51ft 
4ft 

so 

15ft 
40ft 
19ft 
4ft 

lift 


35ft + ft 
22ft— ft 
31ft— ft 
25 — ft 
27ft + ft 
41ft— ft 
38ft 

38ft — ft 
15ft + ft 
17ft 
17ft 

18ft— ft 
24ft— ft 
52ft + ft 
4ft 

50ft + ft 
15ft— ft 
61 +ft 
19ft 

4ft— ft 
lift 


20ft 10ft 
Mft i»ft 
23 Vi IS 
24ft 18ft 
2ft ft 
9 2 

SO 2 8ft 
23ft lift 
15ft 7ft 
41ft 30ft 
30ft 30ft 
5ft 3ft 
42 39ft 
47ft 29 
531« 4] 

41 34ft 
36ft 15ft 
71ft 14ft 
53ft 40 
14 64 

169b lift 
33ft 23ft 
44 37ft 
34ft 19ft 
129b 7ft 
31ft 19 
24ft 18 
SO 32ft 
33% 19ft 
lift 8ft 
28ft 17ft 
18ft lift 
25ft 17ft 
30 19ft 
38ft 29ft 

33ft 24ft 
62 44ft 
48 30ft 
13 4ft 
10ft 9ft 
18ft 12ft 
30ft 30ft 
B4ft 00 
28ft 22ft 
27ft 19ft 
37ft 27ft 
50ft 35ft 
S3 73 
37V* 23 
38 32 

8 3ft 
2214 714 
Oft 3ft 
17ft 1094 
2814 14ft 
58ft 37ft 
28ft 18ft 
36ft 2014 
2494 19ft 
24ft 17ft 
30ft 20 
40 14ft 
50ft 37 
46ft 35ft 
44ft 32ft 
57 46 

39ft 15ft 
70ft S3 
»ft 14ft 
8% 4ft 
36ft 25 
75ft 63 
Wb 9 
T3ft 10ft 
3594 Uft 
31ft 25ft 
5644 43 
Mb 3ft 
30 21ft 
15ft 9ft 
6ft 2ft 
30ft 14ft 


ft 


m 




% 


rh- 


ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 

w 

M94 + 16 
lift— ft 


23 91 

9 249 

2X2 9.1 6 1482 

284 118 5 72 

CtnllLf 2J2 10J I 194 

Oil IPS 1X0 9.1 7 14a 

7ft CdLaEl UN IX 6 T24 

9ft CLflElPf 4.18 127 

714 CcMPw 1X0 14X7 4 

X4 45 13 

1.90 112 5 


JO 77 8 
2X0 12J 9 
70 28 11 
X0 2J0 35 
X0 IX 
Oimlpf 1.20 5J 
Cftmlpf 4X0 91 

XO 4X 12 







1X2 

4J 

.16 

18 

JO 

3X 

1X4 

&X 

80 

4X 

2X0 

48 

120 

4X 

200 

58 

JO 

13 

X0 TL7 
4J4019X 


2X2. 

98 

182 

63 

84 

38 

ue 

<5 

180 

IS 

85* 

X 

1J2 

43 

84 

L5 

88 

2X 

80 

24 

JO 

X 




GAInv 1X38 93 
GnBcsh 1-00 11 B 


33 


29ft— ft 
34ft + ft 
31ft— ft 
50 —ft 
27ft + ft 
7H4+ ft 
554+ ft 
7ft— ft 
4394 + 94 
259b 

2194+ ft 

1257 S 

65ft + ft 


30ft 20 
34ft 23ft 
2494 13ft 
14ft 10ft 
43 25ft 
67ft 54ft 


16ft 12ft 
40ft 28 
46ft 37ft 
2994 2114 
24ft 15ft . 
28ft 21ft 


13 235 30ft 
B 533 25ft 

11 84 2314 

42 12 

4 84 401b 

acffit 65ft 
17 14ft 

14 2659 39ft 
8 734 40 

17 5 25ft 

14 203 24ft 
14 1702 24ft 


2914 X — ft 
24% 25 
23ft 23ft + ft 
lift 12 
4PH 40ft— ft 
6594 6594+ ft 
15% 1594- ft 
3896 39ft + ft 
39ft 40 + ft 
25ft 25V4 + V4 
24 2494+ ft 

25ft 24 — ft 




fe* 


7t*T 


+44 


+ M 


40 

l£+ft 
1114— V4 
17ft— ft 
55% +1 


79 +ft 
44ft— 94 
51 —ft 
6ft— ft 
12ft 

sr* 

48ft + ft 

JE+ft 

5% 

T7ft 

2114+ ft 
34ft— ft 
23ft + ft 

24ft— ft 
2894 + ft 
20ft 

28 — ft 


6094—194 

60 

25%+ ft 
19ft— ft 
lift 

19 + ft 
25%— ft 
58ft + 94 
13ft 

5 + ft 
21% + ft 
10ft + ft 
3ft 

27ft + ft 
28 + ft 
9 —ft 
26%— ft 
1696— ft 
23ft + ft 
4114 + 98 
41ft— ft 
14ft— ft 
14ft + % 
41ft— 1ft 
18ft— ft 
34ft 

54ft— ft 
24 —ft 
15ft— ft 
15ft+ ft 
28%+ ft 




X0 13 
Jfpf 1X0 8 3 
if Pf 175 10X 
lOM 1.76 37 
Iwd ID 37 


try 


J0 X4 
2X4 93 

K * rr ° l 170 87 
1.10 3J 
I JO 5.1 


8ft 8ft— Vb 
16% 14ft + ft 
3496 35ft + % 
39 39 — ft 

Oft 14 

14ft 16% + ft 
16ft 14ft— ft 
10 10ft 
93 93 + ft 

2096 20%+ ft 
17ft 17ft 
4896 4894— ft 
18ft 

32ft— ft 
19% 






62ft 42 62% 

12% 12% 12% 
8% Mb 8%. 
JO 3®. 38 

14ft 13% 14 • 
46ft 45% 4Sh 
47 4S% 47 

28 27% M 

21ft 2TH 21%. 

27ft 27ft 27ft 




3Mb— ft 
1798+ ft 
17ft + ft 
83 —1 
47% + ft 
3294 + ft 
lft + ft 
23ft— 94 
25ft 
11% 

19ft 

Jlft+ft 

25ft 

2% 

19 + ft 
3414+ ft 
00 + ft 
SB + ft 
49 + ft 

32ft + ft 
2798+ ft 
19ft— ft 
19ft 

98 +94 

13ft 

40ft + ft 
22 

47 — ft 
20ft— % 


12ft— ft 
lift + ft 
27%+ ft 
Oft + ft 
24ft— ft 
32ft— ft 
1498+ ft 
Uft— ft 
33 —1 
46 —ft 
28% + ft 
32ft + % 
15% — % 
17 + ft 


t*b 


H 




r* 




4 5ft 5ft 
54 36% 36% 
I 1930 31ft 3096 
ST 194 1% 

IB 9ft 8 
I US 3094 2996 
73 13% U 
243 19% 19% 
F 123 54% 5494 

> 82 19% 19 

I 33 21ft Zl. 

I 197 52ft 51ft 
I 89 27ft 27 
I 207 lift 11 
» 4 30J8 3®5if 

I 500 2996 2998 
' 60 16% 16 
l 101 27% 27ft 
I 104 3296 31% 
I 36 15% 15ft 
» 197 20 19% 

' 144 URb 11% 
I 401 2498 23ft 
I 23 lift 11% 
I 23 12ft 12 
. 205 1S4 1394 

I 937 18 17ft 
I 36 25 24% 

I 615 48ft 47% 
I 30 15 1496 

I 1046 2851 19% 
14 4ft 6 
2 12 lift 
) 810 36% 31 
I 213 22% 21% 
. 1 26ft 24ft 

I 113 41% 41ft 
79 7ft 7ft 
4 12 11% 

i 5006 34ft 35ft 
’ 6 28ft 2Bft 

l 44 17ft 17 
I 42 11% lift 
I W 2S 2494 
1 5S0 » 58ft 
170 MW 32% 

I 378 50% 50ft 

> 33 78ft 78% 
i 917 19ft 18% 
I WM 22ft 22% 

43 8% 8% 

1 784 23ft 22ft 

I 1239 55ft 54% 
! 8« 43% 41% 

! 2417 33ft 33ft 
I 55 24% 21ft 
93 5ft 5 
4010 46% 45% 

I 29 29 28% 

' 24 34% 34ft 

64 17% 1798 
1374 37% 34% 
16 74% 76 

> 1309 22ft 23% 
1340x45% 44ft 

■2 12ft 11% 
I ID 18% 18 
! 1173 24% 2* 

' 142 13ft U 
1710 15% 15 
I 20 aft 20ft 
2372 29ft 2B» 
20 2596 25% 
l 1253 3796 36% 


5ft 

26%— ft 
31ft 
1% 

9ft 

20ft— ft 
13 

1996 + ft 
54%+ ft 
19V. + ft 
21 — ft 
5196— % 
27ft— ft 
lift 

30ft— % 
29ft— ft 
14 

3796— ft 
3294+ 94 
15% + 9b 
® + ft 
11%—% 
33%— % 
lift 
13ft 

159b— ft 
T7ft— ft 
23 

48 + % 

1496— ft 
19%— ft 
6 
12 

34ft + ft 
2196— % 
24ft 

41ft+% 
7ft— ft 
12 

35ft— % 
28ft 

17-98 
lift— ft 
24% 

58ft— % 
32% 

S0%— ft 
78ft 

19 + ft 
22% + ft 
8% 

23ft + ft 
13% + ft 
55ft + % 
42ft + ft 
3318+ ft 
24VS+ ft 
5ft 

44 + ft 
29 

34%+ ft 
17%—% 
3798 + % 
7494 + % 
22ft 

45%+lft 
11%— % 
18 — ft 
36ft + ft 
13 —ft 
15ft- ft 
20ft— V& 
2894+ ft 
25%+ ft 
37%+lft 








“ y 


IMF* 


59% 

32% 

2ft 
18% 

am . ... 

6% 7ft 


2&S& 


54ft 56ft 
24% 24ft »% 

’3 W* 

49 48 49 

19% U 1316 
18ft lift Uft 
27 34% 2496' 

1496 14ft 14ft 
B3ft 82% 82% 
31 30% 31 . 

9% 898 m 

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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 8 


fcDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


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WTEMUnONAL MANAOCR 

iccruiters Are Reading 
ore Into Handwriting 

By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

International Herald Tribune 

ARIS — Revealing your darkest secrets may be the price 
that you have to pay for corporate bliss. Handwntkg 
analysis is some European companies’ way of grn in g to 
know the Real You before malnng you a job offer. These 
ies say that handwriting tests .help fit executives into the 
t suited to their personalities. 

By lookin g at how letter formation and pen pressure differ 
un the handwriting taught m schools, handwriting experts say 
-* they can detect certain personality traits not always visible 
an interview. He analysis can sometimes h*fp an over- 
* job-hunter who failed -to show his best side in the 

v. On Ae other hand, 

experts say, it can hinder a 

roaster role-player with hid- Tfl mnh n jmnbo’ or a 
insecurities, for example. , J _ . 
though there are no sta- YalnaiMe tOOl HI 
s available, the Sorifeti 
-anqaise de Graphologie 
reach association of hand- 
iting experts) estimates that 

majority of French compa- : ~ 

es use handwriting tests to recruit executives and that th«r 
tmber has been increasing during the past five years. 
Companies include L’Or&aJ SA, the cosmetics group; Compag- 
e Genferale des Eaux, the laige, private water company; Thom- 
*“ SA, one of the world’s leading electrical groups; Tttfanecani- 
Hectrique, a leading maker cl electrical systems; Les Grands 
llins de Paris SA, a large agribusiness concern; Lyonnaisedes 
inx et de L’Eclairage, the Lyon electricity and water authority, 
state-owned auto company, 
companies in West Germany, Swi tzerland, Bel- 
Spain, handwriting analysis is rarely required by 
either Britain or the United States for executive 
sertntment. This is because of skepticism there about the rdi- 
— -oOity of handwriting analysis and, in the United States, to the 
— ~jge number of con men in the handwriting-analysis business. 

- lere are an estimated 50,000 handwriting specialists in the 
—United States. 

. i “The handwriting thing here raises some eyebrows as to its 
. ■' Jidity says Joseph McMahon, a vice president with the 
; ecative-semch firm Kom Ferry International, in New York. 

: To our corporate clients it's in the same category as Taurus vs. 
quarius vs. Aries. Or it’s like having your palm read.” 

RAFHOLOGY originated in France in the late 19th 
century and was later used by Freudian and Jnngian 
psychoanalysts for confirmation or detection of various 
mioses and defense mechanisms. 


executives? 



i stressful situations, energy level, degree of maturity 

- -id self-confidence; and preference for managing or bong man- 

• >cd. . 

. In some extreme cases, handwriting experts say they can finger 
croc*. • ‘ • 

’ — “A few years ago I warned the president erf a company I had 
jen working for for 20 years that the executive he wanted to hire 
" as a crook,” says Eliane Petit deMiibeck, a French graphologist 
" ho has been in the business for 25 years and has several large 
ompames and recruiting co mp a n ies as her clients. “The compa- 
y president told me he didn’t need choir boys in his company 
id went ahead and hired him. Three to four years latex, the 
’cecutive left with the company’s money." 

; . Thea Stem-Lewinson, a handwriting psychologist for more 
' ian 50 years, recalls telling a company not to send an executive 
' aroad because he was mentally unstable. Any move would break 
J m. “They sent him anyway. He got to Spain and ended upina 
; lental asylum,” she says. 

- fit spite of skepticism in the United States, several U.S. 

(Contumed on Page 11, CoL 3) 


Currency Rates 


] 


Late interbank rates on March 12, exdudmg fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan. Paris. New York rates at 
M. 


BJ. 5J=. You 
£43 • 132J»*14UBy 

2X43 2£92 • 

4J73- 117^5 • 1J08- 
71105 1MB 282J5 
31.13 73143 HA. 

ax 7M\ v&n 

11213 ■ 3JS3JS7S* 

392J0* 31^5 

42125* 111*45* 

447BS7 TJW 1723*8 
IU» 22327 347257 


Goldsmith 
Considers 
U.S. Firm 

Group Buys 
Into ZeUerbach 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — A group 
controlled by Sr James Goldsmith 
said Tuesday it had acquired an 
8.6-percent stake in Crown ZeQer- 
bach Ccorp. for about S76.7 million. 
Sir James’s Goldsmith Group said 
this initial purchase was for invest- 
ment purposes but that the group 
may consider other actions, includ- 
ing seeking control or simply trying 
to obtain seats on Zellearbach’s 
board. 

General Oriental Investments 
Ltd. said earlier Tuesday in Hong 
Kong tha* it had purchased a stake 
in ZeUerbach bat it did not sped, 
out its intentions. The stake cranes 
out to about 23 millio n shares. 
General Oriental is an affilia te of 
Goldsmith Group. Zellerbach 
dosed Tuesday at $37 a share, up 
75 cents, on the New York Stock 
Exchange. 

Goldsmith Group told the U.S. 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion it was also considering putting 
pressure on ZeUerbach to redeem 
right s previously issued by the 
company. It said the rig hts offering 
was “detrimental to and destruc- 
tive of the interests and rights of 
shareholders.” In a rights i«aw l a 
company gives its shareholders the 
right to boy a new issue of stock at 
a “subscription” price somewhat 
lower that the market price. 

The group said it may buy more 
ZeUerbach stock or rights, depend- 
ing on market conditions and other 
factors. 

The group said it received clear- 
ance from federal regulators Jan. 
11 toraiseitsstakeinZdlerbachto 
up to 25 percent of the total com- 
mon stock outstanding. 

Other options bong studied by 
the group, according to the SBC 
filing , include a merger with a 
Goldsmith Group member, or an 
affiliate, or an attemp t to influence 
Zdlerbach’s management to en- 
hance the value of the company's 

shares 

Sir James is a British-French 
businessman with along history of 
audacious investments and take- 
over bids on both tides of the At- 
lantic. 

His interests include L Express, 
a weekly French newsmagazine, 
and Grand Union, a New Jersey- 
based chain of supermarkets. In 
Britain, Sir James has a stake in 
Aspinall Holdings PLC, winch 
owns a London casino. 

Last year, Sr James acquired a 
small stake in Colgate-Palmolive 
Co. and applied to U.S. authorities 
for permission to increase the hold- 
ing to more than 10 percent Col- 
gate has since made moves to de- 
fend itself from unwanted takeover 
bids. 


U.S. Economists at Odds on Timing 
Of Next Downturn in Business Cycle 


jane 

Washington Pott Strike' 
WASHINGTON — The 
United States has had 44 of than 
in 200 years, and what wiD hap- 
pen to the c urr ent one is a mys- 
tery to many economists. 

It is the business cycle, that 
recurring pattern of recession, 
recovery, expansion and reces- 
sion, that has become the center 
of ddiate among economists. 

Some economists see imbal- 
ances in the U.S. economy that 
they expect will lead to a reces- 
sion in a year or two. They are 
challenged by supply-side econo- 
mists and President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s economic advisers, who 
maintain that the econ om y has 
undergone fundamental 
that will prevent a recession for 
the next six ra seven years. 

Stin other economists say that 
there Imij been no underlying 
change; it is just that several pos- 
itive dements in the U.S. econo- 
my, such as moderate hiflatinn 
and low business inventories, 
have overwhelmed such nega- 
tives as the continuing $200- bil- 
lion federal budget &fitit and 
hi gh interest rates. 

The current recovery, which 
began in November 1983, was 
snpposcd to be cut short by a 
recession in 1984, according to 
many economists. Then thy said 
h would end this year. 

Now, many economists — not 
just ttww in the administration 
— are saying that ther e is no end 
in ti ghr to recovery. The admin- 
istration maintains that (here is 
no reason that the expansion 
cannot last for another six or 
seven years if government poli- 
ties are followed and the federal 
budget deficit is reduced suffi- 
ciently. Such a recovery would 
match the record postwar expan- 
sion between 1961 and 1969. 

The length and strength of the 


REAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT 

(IN BHUONSOF 1972 DOLLARS} 


1800 


1600 


1400 


1200 


1000 



'70 *72 *74 *76 

SOURCE; n« KPMTTMDfT Of COMCKC 


•78 


'80 


business cycle not only affects 
the level of output, unemploy- 
ment and tnmgrips but also will 
have a major effect on the size of 
• the federal budget deficit. The 
Reagan a d mink t ra tjon ’s hopes 
for substantial reductions in the 
budget deficit depend on avoid- 
ing a recession between now and 
1990. 

“Many of those who predict 
another recession starting thk 
year or next seem to do so from 
the view that a business expan- 
sion has a natural Hfe, after 
which the economy win inevita- 
bly turn dowxL” said the eco- 
nomic report of the president is- 
sued last mouth. “This view is 
probably wrong. If bnsmess ex- 
pansions die of old age, the prob- 
ability that a recession will begin 
rises as the expansion a ges In 
fact, the evidence suggests that 
the probability of the onset of a . 
recession is only weakly related 
to the age of the expansion.” 

“There’s no reason to believe 
we can't continue an expansion” 
as long as the one that lasted 
from 1961 to 1969, said Manuel 


H: Johnson, assistant Treasury 
secretary for economic policy. 
“We don’t see any reason on the 
horizon why there should be a 
downturn.” The only threat is 
the unpredictable possibility of 
an extonal axsnomc shock such 
as as oil crisis, Mr. Johnson add- 
ed. 

Since the end of World War n, 
the principal reason for reces- 
sions has been a tightening of 
both monetary and fiscal policy, 
as U.S. authorities rfatnmwt on 
the breaks to control rising infla- 
tion. 

That could happen again. Or a 
recession could be triggered by 
the high federal budget deficits, 

. which would lead to high interest 
rates, a reduction in spending 
and, subsequently, a dedine in 
business output. 

Finally, a new recession sce- 
nario, focusing on the unprece- 
dented flood of imports entering 
the United States, has been gain- 
ing currency. According to this 
scenario, the risk is that the suc- 
cess of imports will slow the sales 
(Continued od Page 11, CoL 1) 


Study Ties Loss 
Of 2 Million Jobs 
In U.S. to Dollar 


U.S. Accuses France of Blocking 
Accord on Curbing Trade Subsidies 


Tie Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — An official 
in the Reagan administration ac- 
cused France on Tuesday of takin g 
a “highly unreasonable attitude" 
toward the. elimination of terrain 
government trade subsidies. 

David G Mulford, the assistant 
secretary of the Treasury for inter- 
national affairs, charged that 
French intransigence was blocking 
a new international agreement to 
restrict the use of government sub- 
sidies in trade sales to developing 
countries. 

At issue are so-called “tied-aid” 
arrangements in which an export- 
ing country cuts the price of prod- 
ucts being sold to another nation as 


a way of subsidizing the sale of 
those goods. 

Such aid is currently allowed as 
long as it amounts to at least 20 
percent of the value of the product 
being sold. The United States is 
pushing' to get that limit raised and 
proposed last year a level of 50 
percent 

In this way, the Reagan adminis- 
tration believes, subsidies would be 
limited to valid cases of foreign aid . 
to another nation and could not be 
used just to promote a country’s 


exports. 

Theiss 


: issue is being considered at a 
p reliminar y meeting in Paris this 
week of the 22-member nation Or- 
ganization for Economic Coopera- 
tion and Development 


t 

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Dollar Values 


m — . 


: . Corroncr 

. 4v. 

Per 

UAS 

s 

Boofv. 

eonwer ^ E 


S AMtlVUml 
U Amato* tchimna 
-47 

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71 cnrtdractaM 
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2U 
47J8 
13935 
1LM 
424 
Ml JO 
7 JOTS 


0233 irtrtl 
OAOI3 hmUME 
12723 KMMdtaar 
83877 MAtaf-riMSlt 
81037 NmtaH 
08538 PMLMM 
0J0S4 PntacMto 
02771 SOWS rival 


USI 

U7I8 04431 Sl na a wira s 22548 

mjn OSD45 8 African read 1.9742 

03054 00012 S.Kor*an won 85810 

2439 OBB54 5— ».*« » ■*» 10520 

*44 81045 Start. Urine 957 

105W5 80254 Taiwan S 3*42 

18500 00354 TlufMW 280*5 

340 82723 UJLE.dMum 14728 


•;l.UM Irish C 

CammarciDl franc (b) Amounts naadedtataav one pound (clAinaunis necdedtalMv’ am dBitart*) 

ii of IN (x] Untti of LOOO (V) UWIs of 18000 
not quoted; Na: nol avolktata. 

iron: ganaue du Benelux (Brvsseis); Banco Comm&rckti e /Mono (Miami; Banaue 
Hanot* de Pari ■ (Parts): IMF (SDR); Batm* Amb* *t International a iflnvestisaement 
nor. rtytAdjmantKOm*r data from Reuttn end AP. 


Interest Rates 


.urocurrency Deposits 


March 12 


SwftS 


D- M ark Franc Starflaa Franc ECU SDR 
.. 8H - K 4 -4K Ste - Sffe 134k- 14 H. 1091.- 1K% 131% - TOW 8M 

, m - * 4 Hi .6 th j* -5* 13VU - Uta Utah - 11 M. W»% - 1014 840 

U m - 9<A 6¥. - 4 tv sw - 591. 13H - OV4 11 - 11 H. 10th - 1018 Sta 

. »«.-*«. Ah -4 te SV. -5H 12H - nth 11th -Utah 10 It - MS *Vh 

_ uu - I0H AHi -69W 54h - 5K 12 - 12Vh 1TV. - T2 lDH-Ute *H 

' <t*s aprMcatd* r* tntoroonk Awt»4ffl mflUon minimum (oreavfvaiuntl. 
ureas: Morgan Guaranty (dollar. DAL SF, Paus/L PFi: Ltayds Bant (ECU); Cfttoant 
DR). 


Central Bankers 
Boost ECU Role 

Agence France' Pnsse 

BASEL — Central bankers 
of the European Community 
Tuesday put the final toadies 
on a package of technical mea- 
sures designed to promote the 
use of the European Currency 
Unit between central banks. 

Bankers stressed that they 
were discussing the “official” 
ECU — a European Monetary 
System instrument used in cen- 
tral banks' interventions to 

main tarn EC oirr enries inri de 
the fluctuation limits set by the 
system — rather than the “pri- 
vate” ECU, which is used in 
commercial transactions. 

The package discussed by the 
central bankas would raise the 
interest rate for officially held 
ECU balances close to market 
levels to make it more attrac- 
tive: The interest paid is now 
based on a weighted average of 
the discount rates of member 
central banks. 


Sinclair to Form Company 
To Make Computer Chips 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Sir Clive Sinclair, 
the British inventor and business- 
man, $aid Tuesday that he planned 
to form a company to develop and 
make semiconductor products. 

To head the company, Sir Give 
has enlisted Robb Wilmot, a Texan 
who is chairman of ICL PLC the 

British com puter makw taken over 
last year by Standard Telephone ft 
Cables PLC 

Sir Give is the founder and chief 
executive of both Sinclair Research 
Ltd, a maker of home computers, 
and Sinclair Vehicles LttL, which 
produces a new three-wheel electric 
car. He said the sarri conductor 
company would take over research 
and development work that has 


been handled at Sir Clive’s Metalab 
research unit in Cambridge, En- 
gland. 

The* research has focused on 
what Sir Give described as “revo- 
lutionary wafer-scale integration 
semiconductor products.” 

Before moving to ICL in 1981 
Mr. Wilmot was an engineer at 
Texas Instruments Inc. After STC 
acquired ICL last year, Mr. Wfimot 
said he would relinquish day-to- 
day responsibilities at the comput- 
er maker. 

Sir Give also announced that 
Sroclatr Research showed pretax 
profit of £132 million ($8.6 mxl- 
Hon) ext sales of £8 9.5 million in the 
nine months ended Dec. 31. He did 
not provide year-earlier figures. 


Mr. Mulford said that virtually 
all countries agree that tbse subsi- 
dies should be curtailed but that 
France is blocking resolution of the 
dispute. 

“France alone is blocking pro- 
gress in this area.” Mr. Mulford 
said, suggesting that the issue is 
likely to be taken up by the finance 
ministers of OECD countries when 
they meet in April 

“We think the point has been 
readied where this highl y unrea- 
sonable attitude is going to become 
a major issue.” Mr. Mulford told 
reporters during a briefing in his 
office. 

Mr. Mulford pointed out that the 
Senate Budget Committee last 
week endorsed the idea of provid- 
ing $1 bflhon as a “war chest” for 
the United States to counter for- 
eign subsidies. 

“The frustration level, as we 
have tried to warn people in Eu- 
rope, is rising in the United States 
an this question. We are sick and 
tired of this unfair treatment.” 

“Everybody, with the-exception 
of the French, want to accomplish 
a solution to this.” 


By Hobart Rowen 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — The strong 
dollar has cost the U3. economy 2 
million jobs since 1980 — 1 3 mil- 
lion igjnanufacturing — a subcom- 
mittee of the Joint Economic Com- 
mittee of Congress was told 
Tuesday. 

The same report said that the 
United Stales will become less 
competitive if tax-revision propos- 
als divert cash flow from the corpo- 
rate sector to individual taxpayers. 

The report prepared by Data 
Resources Ina, a Massachusetts 
economic-analysis firm, said that a 
dollar over-valued by an average of 
40 percent against a basket of cur- 
rencies had hurt a wide range of 
U.S. manufacturing and agricultur- 
al enterprises, and that the trend 
would be difficult to reverse be- 
cause affected companies are mov- 
ing abroad, or buying more parts 
from foreign sources. 

Roger Brinner, chief economist 
for DRL and Edward G. Jefferson, 
chairman and chief executive for 
Du Pont Ctx, agreed in testimony 
that the high dollar is the rhi^f 
culprit in the huge U.S. trade defi- 
cit. 

Mr. Jefferson noted that the U.S. 
high-technology sector, which had 
a 527-billion trade surplus in 1980, 
had seen the positive margin slip to 
just $5 billion in 1984. In his own 
company, Mr. Jefferson said, the 
dollar “has forced us to shut down 
U.S. facilities resulting in loss of 
jobs. And it has put increasing 
pressure on us to make new invest- 
ments overseas rather than in the 
U.S.” 

The Du Pont executive referred 
to “the abnormal strength” of the 
Hollar anH said that ibe dollar 
could tumble at any time.” He 
agreed that “as presently designed, 
tax reform is unsound from the 
point of view of international com- 
petitiveness.” 

Mr. Brinner warned that if the 
Investment Tax Credit is with- 
drawn, and the Accelerated Cost 
Recovery System is made more 
generous, as recommended in the 
original Treasury tax-revision pro- 
posal last fall, that would further 
raise the “high cost of funds in the 
United States, already 4 to 5 (per- 
centage) pants over our competi- 
tors.” He said that the first draft of 
the Treasury tax proposal “would 
shift $30 billion in cash flow from 
the corporate sector to the house- 
hold sector." 

Mr. Jefferson, like Mr. Brinner, 
called for an attack on the budget 


Dollar Stages 
A Late Rally 
In New York 

The Associated Pass 
NEW YORK — The dollar 
staged a late rally in volatile, specu- 
lative trading Tuesday, reversing 
sharp losses from earlier in the day. 

Some currency traders said con- 
fusion was widespread in currency 
markets, “Banks here are running 
around in circles,” said Howard 
Kurz of Bank of America. 

Dealers said that following a 
steep dollar decline on Monday, 
speculative selling forced the U.S, 
currency even lower as trading re- 
sumed Tuesday. For example, the 
dollar plunged as low as 3.2750 
Deutsche marks early Tuesday. But 
then it recovered. 

In late European trading Tues- 
day, the dollar slipped in Frankfurt 
to 3352 DM from 3362 DM Mon- 
day. The dollar also weakened in 
Paris against the franc, dosing at 
10338 against 10269 a day earner. 
In London, however, the dollar 
gained, with the pound trading at 
$1.0885, against $1.0895 on Mon- 
day. 

In late New York trading, the 
dollar dosed at 1025 francs, up 
from 10.165 Monday. The U.S. 
currency traded at 33535 DM, up 
from 33275 a day earlier. And the 
pound ended at $1,084, down from 
51.095 on Monday. 

defidi that would allow the Federal 
Reserve to continue to relax mone- 
tary policy. But if spending cuts 
can not bimg the deficit down to 2 
perce n t of gross national product 
in 1988, “some revenue increases 
may have to be considered,” he said 
said. Grass national product is a 
measure of (he total value of a 
nation's goods and services. 

In testimony before the House 
Ways and Means Committee Feb. 
27, Treasury Secretary James Baker 
HI said he would look carefully at 
the final Treasury proposal “to 
make sure we don i do some thing 
that affects capital formation, or 
that makes ns even less competitive 
overseas. There is a need of balanc- 
ing interests and equities." 

Mr. Brinner conceded that the 
original rationale for the ITC and 
ACRS — concern ova high infla- 
tion — was not valid today. But 
trade considerations, he argued, 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 3) 



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him. 

. 8H -*K 
area; R*vt*n. 


2 me i, 
8*b -Mb 


smss. 

9 M, -?«. 


. (am. 

9 Y. -98b 


March 12 


1B» -13*1 


Ley Money Rates 

' abed States 

teeuni Rote 8 8 

tarol Fuads SH 8 5/14 

'tale Rota I8V> IOVj 

ofcrr Loan Role m nt 

mm. Paaer. 33-179 dan 885 875 

•’ nonrti Treasury Bills 849 845 

■. ;noMh TraMWV OH It 879 877 

1 Vs 30-5* dan 128 835 

'.XftM-Btdm 844 157 

■ t, 


Britain 

Bank Base Rate 
Coil Money 
91-aav Tnnun Mil 
3-monHi Intarnaiik 

Japan 

Discount Rote 
Coll Money 
Meet Iniereenk 


14 14 

MU M 

MM m 
13ta 131b 


5 S 
m 4* 
Wx 4 7/14 


gt Germany 

vnberd Rota 
nratahi Rota 
* Month intweonk 
.nonm mtertenk 
wwn intartenk 

nme 

tanranttqn Rota 
'« Money 
“-nwotti interbank 
-Monti InlortjORk 
""•ntti Interbank 


fdOQ 800 
4.10 810 

840 850 

855 845 

875 890 


MTS 10*7 
10*810 11/14 
N 11/1410 11/14 
WK Uta 
W 9/M W 9/14 


Gold Prices 


] 


Hone Kong 
Luxamoaoni 
Park ms VBo) 
Zorich 
London 
New Vert 


aM. PM. Cteg* 

290JS 293JO +0» 

28945 - - 

291.17 290.12 — 1.13 

7*1.05 MAS -155 

25875 ttd —155 

— - 291 JB + 110 


.tentw: Bnflat Cw wwta a i t CfKBtLy 
Llards Bon*. Bank of IWm 


Official fiitagi fa* London, vnrt* and Luxonv 
Mur*, opontng ana dosing pricn lor KonoKono 
«id Zorktv Mow York Cemex currant contract. 
Alt arKat kt 1/iS *er ««*• 

Source: Reuters. 


HIptapman 

MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDn 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded the Waring 
. alter al charges 
M 1980; 4-165% 

M 1981; 4-137% 

M 1982: 4-32% 

IN 1983: -24% 

M 1984: —34% 

■ of 

MARCH. 7 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U3. $708,397.70 
More Sion $50,000,000.00 
currently under management 

CeS or write RqyaB Frazier at 
TAPMAN, Uwxf Anafcsis and 
PwitofoManaoerrtert, iticm 
V*8 Street Baza. New Ibfk. 
New ybrk 10005 212-268-1041 
667173LJW. 


l Burnham Lambert 


are pleased to announce 
that the following have joined 
their Zurich office 


Mr. JiixgGdtze 

Manager Eurobond Department 

and 

Mr. Daniel Hendry 

Drexel Burnham Lambert 

incorporated 

lJmmafqnaiU2r MM Zurich, Switzerland 
Telephone; (01) 251 35 05 Telex 815 270 


OPPENHEIMER 
OFFERS YOUR IRA AN 
ALTERNATIVE 
TO GUARANTEED 
LOW RATES. 


TJor IRA investors seeking the 
Jl assurance of a fixed rate, we 


suggest a bank? 

For those investors more 
concerned with how high the 
rate of return is, than with how 
fixed, we suggest another route. 
TheOppenheimer Special Fund. 

Because over its life, the 
Special Fund has the best perfbr- 
mance "record of all 361 mutual 
funds that have been in existence 
that long— an astonishing total 
return of 940%?“* 


So if you had been able to 
put $2,000 a year into a Special 
Fund IRA since the Fund’s 
inception, your IRA would have 
been worth $1(H570*** as of 
December 31, 1984. That’s an 
average annual return of 21.5%. 

The Special Fund provides 
an IRA investment based on the 
philosophy that the 
opportunity for a 
higher return is pref- 
erable to the certain- 
ty of a lower one. 



ToM-Tuckcr Smith 

I Oppenheimer&Gt. 62-64 Cannon St. London £C4N 6AE England 
I Telephone 01-236 6578 

I Pleue pend me an IRA oppliearion and a Special Fund prospectus with more complete infc 
l tioa, iocluding all charges and expenses. HI read ii carefully before I iwen or s«id money. 

, DIN Him to open on IRA. p I'd like to jm 


13/3/85 


n 


like M twitch my IRA 


Non 


Addro* 


Oiy 


Sotte 


\Jif_ 


Phone 


i:: OPPENHEIMER SPECIAL FUND 


© 1985 Oppenhdmer Investor Service*. Inc. ’Bank IRA's are insured and generally hove liked interest 
rates, whereas ihe Fund’s net asset vahie fluctuates and may be subject 10 loss. “March 15, 1 973- Dec ember 
31 , 1984, Upper Analytical Service*, *”AwumingaS2fl00inveotiiieiM on March 15. 1973 (inception 

Of fund) and $2,000 annual mvesmaenis on 6m business (fay of each year thereafter with all dividends and 
distributions reinvested. Past performance is nor an indication of future results, in the period shown, 
stock prices fluctuated severely and were generally higher at the end than sr the beginning 


.... 







Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


Tuesday?? 


13 Month 
h tan low Stock 


Sis- Close 

Dfv. YM.PE IQItaHtahLowQwUC 


JOB 37 17 
ZOO u 0 


MSE 


IM RdBotpf 212 105 
30 RdBolpf XOOtHO 
9Vfe R It Ret 1738100 TO 
9 RrcnEq 15 

B Redmn JO 12 10 
7ft Reace 20 

It Royal 


Closing 


Tonies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on woll Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


RaTaiC JO 33 10 

ReaAtr 11 2fi9 6M 5ft 6 — ft 

RepAwt It lft life 11k— ft 

RppGjfp X6 23 11 52 231k 23ft 23* 

ReeHY lit U I 1H 42ft 42ft— ft 

RNY PfC J.T2 T26 1 24ft 14% Mft 

RNYpfA6X5e12l 353 55 54ft S3 + ft 

RepBk lit U 7 79 33 3Z*k 32ft 

RapOk 1*1112 7J 21 28% 38 Taft + ft 

RstlCtt JQ T X 72 321 »ft 19* 19tfe 

Ravco JO 13 11 1135 25* 24ft 25 — Vk 

v|Rcvaf 35 13ft 12% 1214 — ft 

Revlon lit U n MSS 35 Mft 34ft + ft 

Rexhm 72 U 12 30 3014 20 30ft + ft 

Rexnrd -44 3J 10 450 13ft 13ft 13Vi 

Reyn In 3-40 4.1 S 1275 13ft SZVfe «3ft+ ft 

Roy in m 4.10 *5 10 40V. 40ft «ft 

Ravin pf 3 107ft 107*h 107ft + ft 

Key Mt1 100 27 6 309 36* 36ft 3512— ft 
Rcnvck 1-48 50 9 55 29ft 2m 29ft— ft 

RleoerT 1J0 9X 34 19ft 19 1? — ft 


L12 105 24 20ft 20ft 20ft 

130*144 1 22ft 22ft 22ft+ ft 

738100 10 15 T3ft 13ft 1316— ft 

15 201 15Vfe 14ft 15 — ft 
JO 12 18 108 9ft 7ft «fc + ft 
30 25 9ft 9 9 

13 ft ft ft 


JO 12 10 115 37ft 37 


TtMcrrttl 
High Lew Stock 


as. am 

Dtv. Yld. PE IDOsKtoh LewOoot.Ch'oe 


(Continued from Page 8) 


1JQ 37 17 
1JQ 5J 15 
1X7 11 
1JS 1X4 6 
X» 1U 
<4Q 137 
Ut 138 
724 142 
774 1*7 
8-20 140 
150 115 
192 142 
1JQ 12-6 
9.12 143 
U4 142 
HW* 112 
-40 15 18 
804 111 
127 114 
200 9.1 9 
JO IDO 
1-50 47 9 
31 

JO 57 10 
134 8.1 9 

104 82 9 
-SJt 46 13 
26 1171 


04 11 10 
04 20 14 
JO 32 10 
1-43 4.1 9 

1086 41 9 
M 15 9 


26% + ft 
31ft + ft 
m-t» 
14 

29V(i +1 
33 +1 

32ft 

51 +» 
51ft 4- ft 
58ft 

25ft + ft 
27ft 

14ft + ft 
54 + ft 
51 +1 

85 

15ft + ft 
51ft + ft 
lift + ft 
22 — ft 

• 

35ft— ft 
8 — ft 
14ft 
31ft 

24ft— ft 
lift— ft 
24ft 

lift + ft 
8ft + ft 
30ft + ft 
30ft 
32ft 

15ft— ft 
33ft + ft 
41 + ft 

12ft 


.18 10 II 9007 
>40 1.3 18 14 

152 92 713719 
105 

MO 47 13 971 
208 47 1 

24 183 
124 12 U 255 
08B4J a 81 
-10 14 8 221 
00 2J IS 129 
20 52 223 

9.148 90 5 

999 
193 

100 11 14 1282 
18 277 
105 19 14 755 
1 JOB 30 13 435 
102 15 7 41 

72 25 W 29 


30 — ft 

108ft + ft 

214 

lift— ft 

31 

27ft + ft 
3ft- ft 
tmf a 
44 + ft 


U.S. Futures Man* 12 


Sawn Season 
Hiatt Low 


Open HMi Law Ctase ChS- 


Oaasea Season 
Hiati Low 


Season Season 
Hioh Law 


Rayinpt 4.10 SJ 
Reylnpf 

Key MM LOO 17 4 
RCflVdc 1-48 SO 9 
PJaaeTT 1J0 9J 
RltaAM JO lO 19 


19 19 — ft 

31ft 31ft + ft 
5ft 5ft— ft 


RvrOkn 14 Zll 4 5ft »— ft 

Robshw 1.12 XI 7 87 33ft 32ft 33ft + ft 

Robtsn 100 4.1 20 219 39ft 38ft 39ft + ft 

Retains 74 15 14 294 22ft 21ft 21ft + ft 

RodlG 120 117 5 937 19ft 19ft 19ft— ft 

Rodin 144 72 9 82 33ft 33ft 3346 


152 WJ) S 742 


372 144 

373 140 
307 MS 
428 UJ 
135 1X9 
121 144 

OO 7 25 


RoehTI 204 72 


086 10 It 80 
100 20 13 1817 
IIJMIOO 4 
00 20 11 111 


Radari 100 18 10 1045 35ft 34ft Uft + ft 


Rohr-ln 9 481 5146 51 57ft— ft 

ROICfltn JOB U 2* 505 20ft 2016 20ft— ft 

ROllftEt J5t 2 27 445 21ft 20ft 71ft + ft 

Roirtnx 05 40 14 508 10ft 10ft Iff*— ft 

Ranaon 29 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 


29 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
X4 40 10 182 14ft U 15 
1.12 XI 14 184 30 2 9ft 29ft— ft 
08 .9113 1555 9ft Bft 9 — 16 


Rowan 08 .9113 1555 9ft Bft 9 — 16 

ROVlD 2J78 SJ 5 4430 SSVfc 54ft 54ft + ft 

Rutarmd JH 17 II 138 48ft 48ft 48ft + ft 

RussB n 17 179 24ft 24ft 24ft 

ROSTOV* 75 40 9 41 mt 17ft 17ft + ft 

RyanH 1J0 4.1 M 46 24ft 24 24ft + ft 

RyderS 170 13 9 366 54ft 53ft Sift— 1ft 
Rvtand XO 14 14 407 2Sft 24ft 24ft— ft 
Rymers 4 49 13ft 72ft 13 —ft 


10 PHH J8 If 
24ft PPG TOO 47 
15 PSA OB 20 
1316 PSA dflf 1.90 iai 
lift PMCAS 1J4 111 
12ft PacGE 172 102 
30ft PecLta 332 10 
21ft PcLum 170 05 
5ft Poe Res J5r o 
13ft PftcRspf 2J0 117 
lift PoeScl OO 20 
54 PocTeie 500 70 
21 Pactfa* 132 88 
27ft PocHnf <07 12J 
25 PainWB OO U 
25ft PalllW pf 273 7.1 
2Sft Paint Be 170 37 
20 V. PanABk 7Q 20 
4 PanAm 
lft PanAwt 
13ft Pandckn 70 1.1 
31 PemtiEC 130 5J 
3 PantPr 

12 Panxft JO 47 
10ft Pardvn 
12ft PorkEi 
5ft Parked .14 13 
25ft ParkH 1.12 37 
12ft Park Pit X2 37 
lft PatPtrl 

lift PavNP OO 47 
13ft Pavcm .15 J 
6ft Peobdy 70 20 
Panoe 
PenCen 


PaPLPf 050 119 
PaPLpf BOO 1X0 
PaPLdpr3-<2 in 
PaPLdprZW II J 
PaPL pr 800 113 
PaPL dprJTS 119 
PnPLdPfSTS 13J 
PaPL or 11.00 111 
PaPL BT 100 1X0 
PaPLor 870 1X3 


Penwtt 270 57 


Penwpf TOO 50 6 24ft 

Pennzoi 220 <4 22 1704 48ft 

PeopEn 170 7J I 2M 17ft 

Pep Bay 04 U 16 17k 36ft 

PepsiCo 108 3-4 22 1179 40ft 

Perk El J5 13 14 2373 24ft 

P mi Ian 173 1X7 7 KU 9ft 

PefYDc Tfl 1 X 14 224 20 

Petrie 1-40 X9 14 423 36 

PetRs 1728147 57 25ft 


30ft— ft 
38 —1 
23 — ft 
18ft + ft 
12ft + V. 
15ft + ft 
41ft— ft 
25ft — ft 
7ft— ft 
lift— ft 
15ft + ft 
71 +1 

26ft + ft 
32ft + ft 
38ft + ft 
31ft + ft 
38 + ft 
25ft— ft 
4ft 
2ft 

17ft + ft 
35ft— ft 
4ft— ft 
17 — ft 
15ft— ft 
13ft— ft 
«ft 

35ft— ft 
16ft— ft 
2 — ft 
12ft 

18ft— ft 
7ft— ft 
ft 

51ft— ft 
4716 + ft 
25ft 

35 +lft 
55 — ft 
26ft— ft 
24ft + ft 
63ft— 1ft 
25ft— ft 
28ft+ ft 
90ft— ft 
51ft +1 
65ft 
30ft 

24ft— ft 
41ft + ft 
17ft— ft 
36ft 

48ft + ft 
34ft 
9ft + ft 


Filters JS4 1-4 
PlillaEI 270 145 
PhllEpf L41 14.1 
PhllE pf UB 114 
PhllE pf 7J5 M3 
PhllE nf 170 1X7 


M IX 

14 

234 

30 19V 

19ft— ft 

1X0 3 S 

16 

433 

35 34V 

35 +1ft 

3J3el47 


57 

25ft 25V 

25ft 

107 102 


M 

15ft IF) 

15ft 

103*1*3 


2D 

Sft 51 

Sft + ft 

1X8 17 

13 4210 
389 

40ft 3944 
lift im 

1 40V.+ ft 
Uft 

500 110 


14 

45ft 45V 

45ft 


PhllPf 17.12 14-i 
PhllEpf 1575 14J 
PhllEpf 9 JO lO 
PhllE pf 7 JO 147 
PhllSuB 1 72 7-4 


PtlllMr 470 44 


25 5521x37ft 
6 Z775 15ft 
154 lffft 
44 9ft 
1120z 55ft 
200 9ft 
401119 
IlOrlK 
lOQz 55ft 
22Dz 55 
11 92 18 

13 160 91ft 


Phil Pet 140 SJ 


PtlllVH 40 1J 
PledAs 70 Jt 
PleNG 132 74 


Plan 

PlWtrv 1-54 37 


Pioneer 174 47 
PHnvB • 170 XI 


Plant™ .150 1 J 
POBOPd _XQ 34 


PPG Pi II JO 11.9 
Port! pf «40 137 
PurGpf 472 137 
Potlfch 1J5 47 
PohnEI 114 BJ 
PotEIPf 470 ioj 
P otElpt 4JM 114 
Prtml s 75 17 
Primrfc 100 sj 
P rOneC 
PrlmMs 

ProctG 240 44 
PrdRsh 72 24 
Protor 1XQ 35 
PSvCel US 9J 
PSCcri pf 7.15 111 
PSCol Pf 110 114 
PSInd 1J0 1X1 


PSInpf 370 157 
PStnpf 1JM 147 


PSInpf 1JB 144 
PSInpf 7.15 154 


PSInpf 944 1X1 
PSInpf 172 147 


PSInpf 878 154 


PSNHpf 
PNHPfB 
PNHDfC 
PNHpfD 
PNHpfE 
PNHpfF 
PNHpfG 
psvnm iaa ii j 
PSvEG 172 185 
PSCG pt AM 124 
PSEGPf SOS 127 
PSEGpf 578 112 
PSEGPf 117 127 
PSEGpf M 1zi 
PSEGpnUS 111 
PSEGpf 7JV |24 
PSEGpf 772 127 
PSEG Pf 740 111 
Public* 

Pueblo .16 14 
PR Cam 

PwatP 174 124 
PuiteHm .12 3 

Purotot 178 47 
Pvro 


9539*7 48ft 
9 40 24ft 

9 1402 31ft 
9 52 31ft 

13 75 19ft 

’1 iS S' 6 

11 TE %ft 

13 52 Oft 

JS <£ ^ 

31 1720 25ft 

7 ”3 SS 

120*3 \jft 

1?Sft 

11 32ft 
13 154 35ft 

1 975 25ft 
lOBr 41V. 

17^3^ 

i3^j 38 

23 337 24 

12 2981 57 

34 J 13ft 
9 45 40ft 

8 437 19ft 
SDz 59ft 59ft 
4 TBft I IV. 

7 343 7ft 7ft 
2Qz 23 23 

20i 7ft 7ft 
190z 7ft 7ft 
ISO. 43ft 43ft 
18m 60 58ft 
3001 52 
53DX 50ft 

2 4ft 
1001 11 

32 10ft 
S3 U 

13 13ft 

3 13ft 

4 12ft 

14 12ft 

0 500 24ft 
7 498 2516 

7dz 33 
IQOz 41 
7001 43ft 
1 17ft 
I 19ft 
50il01 
lOz 4 3 
MMBta 61 ft 
Sfflte 41 
405 2ft 

a uv 12 

5 a 7ft 

9 322 14ft 

24 134 17 

13 165 27ft 

1 273 fft 


40ft 28ft QuofeOl 174 XI 13 821 40ft 39ft 40ft +1 
Vt 90ft QwoO Pf 976 107 50z 93ft *3ft 93ft— lft 

32 IS QookSO JO 44) 24 133 20ft 19ft 30 — ft 

lift 6ft Ouonex 34 28 9ft 9 9 — ft 

34ft 33 Questor 1 JO 47 9 275 3*ft 33ft 34ft 4- ft 

25ft 14 QkRell 7*a 10 at 55 24ft 23ft 34ft + ft 


18ft 6ft 
41ft 39ft 
31ft MJfe 
35ft 29ft 
946 4ft 
4ft 3 
18 12U 

lift 6ft 
39ft 25 
8ft 5ft 
21ft lift 
9ft 4ft 
44 47ft 
17ft Bft 
48ft 34ft i 
13ft 7ft 


21 8ft 
12 I572x 39ft 
154 29ft 
55 34ft 
9 144 7ft 
» 4ft 

10 29 15ft 

8 45 10ft 

14 790 3ffft 
52 2047 6ft 

9 85 19ft 

251 4ft 

17 1S8 57ft 
1 12ft 
17 892 45ft 
35 412 9ft 


8ft Bft-t- ft 
JMfe 39V6 + ft 
27 29ft— ft 

34ft 34ft 
7ft 7ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
lift 15V + ft 
10ft 10V 
37ft 30 + V 

5ft 4V 
18ft 19ft + 16 
416 416 
57 57ft+ ft 

12ft I2ft + ft 
44ft 44ft— Vl 
9ft 9ft + ft 


Seles Retires are unofficial. Yearly highs and laws reflect 
the previous 52 weeks plus the cunenl week. but not the latest 
trodlne day. Where a split or stock dividend amounting to 25 
percent or more hos been paid, the veer's hleMaw ranoe and 
dividend are shown lor the new stock only. Unless otherwise 
noted, rates of dividends ere annual disbursements based an 
tne latest declaration, 
a — dividend also evtraliMI 
b — annual rale of dividend win stock dlukleniiyi 
c— IkuiMatfno dividend./! 
ctd— called. /I 
d — new yearly low7l 

e — dividend declared or paid In prscedlna 12 months^! 
a — dividend In Canadian hinds, subiect to 1 5% non-residence 
lax. 

1— dividend declared after spill -up or stack divldand. 

1— dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or no acilon 
taken at latest dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or paid thb year, an accumulative 

issue with dividends In arrears. 

n— new Issue In the nasi 52 weeks. The hioh- low raiiBe begins 

witn me start of trading, 
nd — next dav deliver v. 

P/E — priee-earnlnos rails. 

r— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, plus 
stock dividend 

s — stock spilt. Dividend begins with dote of split, 
ds— sales. 

1 — dividend paid In slack In preceding 12 months, estimated 
cash value on ex-dhrldend or ex-distrlbution dale, 
u— new vecrlv high, 
v— trading halted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being reoroenited un- 
der the Bankruptcy am. or securities assumed by Such com- 
panies. 

wd — whendlsfrlbuled. 

yvI — when issued. 

ww — trim warrants. 

x — e*<U vloend or en-rlghK 

xflls — e» -distribution, 

x w — without warrants. 

v — r» -dividend and sain In hill. 

yld — vletfl. 

r— soles mfuii- 


37ft + V 
15ft + ft 
TO -ft 
9* — ft 
55 + ft 
9ft— ft 
119 +1 

105 —IV 
5614— V 
55 
17V 

91ft + ft 

21 

4816 + ft 


200 XI 13 81 49ft 

70b U 9 20 10ft 

JO 23 13 3SS 2716 

04 7 28 52 lift 

278015J 81 17ft 

74 1J 14 51 17 

44 244 7ft 


49ft— ft 
TOfe— V 
27ft— ft 
lift— ft 


33V 
12 
33ft 
47ft 
28V 
22ft 
TJft To! 

24ft To! 

22 Tot 
20 TOl 
25ft TOl 
13ft TOl 
13ft To) 

26ft 
13ft 
17ft 
19ft 
92ft 

9ft TornCe JO 14 11 111 

1 Tosco 355 

lOlu Towle 164 

4 Towle Pf 44 43 5 

23ft TOVRU S 24 1307 

left Trocar 04 Li IS 512i 

7ft TWA 76 1552 

lift TWA Pf 125 M7 157 

15ft TWA PA 275 9-4 230 

20ft Transm 1J4 5J 11 567 

16V T ranine 272 115 4 

ID* TARItV 1080 87 8 5 

37V TRtnaco 116 XI 10 842 

44ft Tmecof 307 £5 24 

19ft TnrsiHx 270 19 348 

6ft Transoi 6 91 

53 TrGPpf 655 SJ 42j 

77 TrGPnf 8-64 9J 3ta 

20 TrGPPf ISO 105 1 

m TYnsOfl V 223 

28 Trunwr MO 57 10 93 

24ft Tmwtd JO LI 11 885 

9ft TWIdwtA 100 

22ft TwM Pf 100 55 41 

14V TWtdPf 1J0 KM 18 

25ft Trovier 104 X7 10 1917 

in Tricon XS3olX2 in 

20ft TrtCnpf ISO 87 29 


24ft— ft 

38ft— ft 

13ft- ft 

17 

21ft 

17ft— ft 

niv+ ft 

9ft 

n 

48ft +1 


Owen High Low Ooee Cnp. 

Groins 



5000 bumWmum-dollara per buehd E»t Sales _ 308 Pfav.»Bl« 203 

404 3J9V Mar 154 157ft 35g4 35S6 — . J1V pntv. Day Ooen int. X17J Off Jt 
3.37ft May 3J9 X39ft 3J5V 135ft —03ft 

374ft alrf S3 3» X25 375ft -Jg 

X25 Sea 129ft 329ft 325ft X27 —03 ■ 

I Metals. 


HM 14450 K470 15450 -05 

1870 14870 14X75 15705 —100 
IIS3S 14850 15775 MUB —10* 
(7J0 14759 147,70 M7J5 —755 
1500 15500 15500 14575 —05 

1500 15500 15500 14X90 —108 
16400 —100 
15X90 —100 
14400 —108 


— : .. 

Ooen Htah Law Obm Qv$ ^ 

iMUMOl . ^ . HI I 

10015 10905 10155 10840 -.V . , jb| B B* 

10715 10805 10OB 10740 IS • ill ** * * 

10700 10790 10445 10750 ZS fllM * 

WW? U8I 10WO 12 il . jV*" 


I BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

Spar pound- 1 paint eauabMUWOl 
1J170 10345 Mar 10015 10905 10155 10840 

10235 - JUh 10715 10805 10SB 10740 
10200 Sap 10700 10790 10445 10750 
10200 0*C 10885 1079S >0535 }07» 
I 10MB 10510 Mar 10735 10735 14735 10735 
BSf.Selaa WJ71 Prav.Soia* 1&I21 
Prev.DayOoanint 25532 un353 


45ft + ft 
491h— V 
37ft 

29ft— ft 
18 —IS 
25V 
26ft 
24 

29ft— ft 
17 + ft 
15V— 15 

55* +1 

29ft 

34ft— ft 
41V 41ft 
106 + ft 

MV- ft 
IV 

11 — ft 

7 

29V— ft 
31V— lft 
12ft 4- ft 
13ft 

24 4- ft 

29ft + ft 
11V 4- ft 
12ft 

52ft + ft 
40 — ft 
22ft— ft 
11V 

76V— ft 

92 

23ft— ft 
Oft+ft 
34ft— ft 
35ft 4-16 
1016 4- ft 
31ft— ft 
1714+ ft 
43 + ft 


Est Solas Prev. Sates 22.950 

Prev. Day Ooen Int. 35034 offUB 


I COPPER (COM ETC! 


CANADIAN DOLLAR tIMMJ 

snerauM pomteauan 200001 
■8050 JHO Mar ,7174 ,7212 0140 .7200 

J133 JDM Jun JIM .7174 Jill .7160 

0385 JOB Sap 0104 .7MS J082 JiS Z3 

MU MU Dec J073 J125 J075 J109 Zal 

.750* 4m Mar JM9 Zfl 

Est Sales M02 Prav. Sales 3517 u 

Prav.oav Open ink 1X329 off 509 


» m 



SOYBEANS CCBTJ 

minimum- doliori per boshel 
7.90ft 539 AflCT 5J7 SJTft 53«fe 

7.97 5J0V Mav 5J5 507 S82ft 

739 5J0V Jut 5.93 535 532 532ft —05ft 

734 502 Aua 535 538 533ft 533ft —05ft 

X71 SJ1 Sop 532 532 589ft 509ft -03 

5J8 503ft Nov S32 . S3S S3IV X91V 

6J9 5J4ft Jan 004ft 505 503 503 — 03ft 

7Ja 406ft A tar X16 6.16ft A 15 6.U — ^ft 

7J9 A15 May XB —03ft 

Est.Sales Prev. Sales 15087 

Prev. Dav Oaea Int 55313 off 4* 




1 25000 Ib*.eent* per b. 



&7S 






5550 

Mar 

59.15 

59X0 

5*95 

— xo 



52X0 

4235 

An* 




JM0 

— xo 

265ft 

248ft +0Oft 

9250 

5620 

ism 

5*10 


590(1 

5973 

—A0 

272 

273 

asjs 

5700 

JUl 

5250 

5000 

60,10 

MJO 

-JO 


274% —00ft 




5*95 

41.10 

6*55 

6*75 

—05 

266ft 

247ft —mb 




61X5 

4133 

•1X3 

4L50 

—00 

260ft ZAlft— JOft 

0*30 

59X0 

Jan 





— AS 

249ft 

270ft —0uft 

0*00 

57X0 

Mar 

5235 

4235 

4230 

—.10 

275 

275 —001b 


61.10 

May 

52*0 

4290 

5280 


^03 




6100 

Jul 

4360 

53X0 

5260 


—.10 



7*90 

5230 

Sop 




irf 

—via 









—10 



6500 

55X0 

Jan 





—.10 


FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Spertrano- 1 point eaualiKLOOOOl 
.«« 09405 Mar 09759 09730 09740 09720 ~m 

nim Mum inn nnan Mnm mim rmm ^ 


l UiiW W fc 


.11030 09410 Jun 09700 09700 09700 09700 

.10130 09680 S«P 09720 

Eat. Sales __ 3 Prav.SatM 18 
Prev, Day Open im. 2475 etf5 


Est.Sales 11000 Prev. Sales U47 
Prev. Dav Open Ink 81J7Q oBU5 


GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

5 per mark- 1 polnfeouauMJOOl 

4110 01) Mar 07! -*5= -2983 _T* 

3733 3905 Jun 30n J022 3984 JOOt _{a 

0545 3930 sea 3030 JM1 J02D JOB Zj, 

J510 3971 Dec 3045 0079 3065 3» ZjJ, 

■325T 3040 Mo r Jill ” 

Est.Sales 29384 Prev.Salef 34J73 
Prev.DavOaen int. 5X198 ua2574 


h* M 
* 



I2S0O 12800 127.10 127.40 -30 

13230 13100 122.10 13230 —JO 

13830 13800 137-90 138J0 — JO 

14100 14L40 14050 14100 —JO 

14X00 14330 14300 14X2D —JO 

14530 14430 14531 14630 +30 

[SOM 1 5100 15000 15100 

I523S 15270 15200 15230 

15730 15730 15730 15730 

lies 7035 

> UP 161 


SILVER t COM EX) 

5000 tray azr cents per tray ax 
15300 54*5 Mar 5500 55X0 54*0 5503 

5810 5570 APT ~ 54X7 

1S1U 5530 MOV 5543 54S0 5540 5455 

14410 5120 Jul 5550 5770 5630 57*3 

11810 57X0 Sea 5730 58*0 5730 5853 

12300 5900 Dec 5913 4030 5900 601.7 

12U0 4180 JOB 5950 5950 9950 607.4 

11930 6100 MOT 4070 6140 4070 61*1 

104*0 6250 May 6210 4270 6210 529J 

WSM &£ttB Jul 5350 43*0 5310 5410 

9400 ism See M&B 455.3 5410 55X3 

7650 5570 Dee 6760 5750 6740 673J 

Jan 5003 

Est.Sales 26000 Prev. Sales 2*571 
Prev. Day Open lot. 7*215 up 2A34 


'i-ftal 




JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

•per ven- 1 pofnieauala SO0OOOO1 
004595 003794 Mar 0038*4 003849 003813 003843 

004450 003825 Jun 003171 003878 003*19 003870 
004150 003*70 Son 003900 003913 001*76 003910 

004330 003903 Dec 003935003935003935003935 
Est.Sales 14J59 Prev. Sales 12050 
Prev. Dav Ooen ink 1MS1 up 1,9*5 


Ml 

!_ wwsfai 


SWISS FRANC (IMM) 
s per franc- 1 point equ als s n 0 001 
3035 3408 Mar 3501 3531 3484 J527 

JO 3439 Jun 3511 3562 3512 3558 

MSB 3480 5«P 0»O -3605 3563 3594 

3340 3531 Dec 3800 3430 3600 3530 

Eit. Sales 22377 Prev. Sales 20310 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 29392 UP M63 




54 

lft 

lft lft + ft 

XO 1J 23 

50 

32 

31ft 31ft— ft 

1X0 4-9 

10 

1849 

32ft 

32 3Zft— fl 

xa u 

12 

687 

30 

29ft 29ft + ft 

172 ax 

7 

21 

30ft 

20ft 20ft + ft 

100 11X 


23 

10ft 

10ft 10ft— ft 






.16 X 

14 

723 

27ft 

24ft 27 + ft 

4JOe 77 


95 

52ft 

53ft 51ft — ft 

210 90 

8 

8505 

23ft 

Zlft 23ft 

04e 90 

10 

1000 

Sft 

Sft 8ft— ft 


5 TrfSeln 6 3 

12V Trlalnd 30 23 44 4 

20V TrlaPe 100 *3 9 76 

24ft Tribune JM 11 14 985 

4 Trlcn fr jseiij 9 43 

5V Trlca M 23 17 122 

13U Trlnty 30 XI 424 

lift TrltEno -10b 3 25 1152 
UV TrltE pf 1.10 83 917 


4 Ttlcntr 
5V Trlca 
12V Trlnty 

lift TrltEno 
8* TrftEPf 


2BV+1V 
5ft— ft 
11 + ft 

20ft— ft 

40ft + V 


29V TuesEP 300 83 


20 12 
35 L€ 17 535 
134 70 IS 67 
!J» X7 10 2728 
MO 43 13 10 

00 13 44 17 

M0 SJ 6 27 

108 110 22 

1052 

130 113 54 

116 9 A t 1007 
IJ8 43 11 4911 
100 XI 9 5723* 
.12 10 21 5T8 
04 14 12 404 

la 74 

1.12 XI 9 427 


32 15 11 329 


132 17 14 32 

.42 10 7 109 

M6 130 21 

2.IQ 117 14 

110 117 91 

08 1J 7 587 
167 

JO 13 10 541 
16 50 

J 14 14 05 

100 16 8 51 

32 3 IB 200 

L74 50 9 3834 
*94e *7 510 


*94e *7 510 

1232 
32 

00 10 T7 155 
02 40 32 99 

00 20 I 441 
200 30 10 54 

112e 50 5 1922 
00 19 7 35 

32 23 11 142 
10 144 
15 12 


9V 9* 

40ft 40V 
2ft K + ft 
26V Z7 —ft 
SPA 30V— ft 
17 17 

T8V 18V+ ft 
10ft 10ft— ft 
0V + ft 
12V 13 + ft 

22ft 22ft + ft 
37ft 37ft— ft 
38V 38ft + V 
lift lift 
28 2SV+ V 
50ft 50ft— ft 
35 35U + V 

14ft 14ft 
41 41M + ft 

40 40ft— ft 

lift 
15ft 
15ft 

26ft + ft 
4ft— ft 
41ft— V 
18ft 

24ft— V 
27V— V 
57ft + ft 
35 + ft 
102ft + ft 
29 — V 
15ft 

34ft+ ft 
15ft + ft 
2Sft+ ft 
59ft + ft 
34ft 

27ft + ft 
X2ft + V 
7 — ft 

14ft 


lffft T11IUM 32 X5 14 002 

16 TwInDs 00 40 9 5 

25V TYcsLb 00 20 f 340 

23M Tyler JS 23 0 25 

2* UAL 05e 10 r 1401 
24ft UAL Pf 100 70 1301 

7ft UCCEL 19 143 

lift UGI 104 10 11 44 

19ft UGI Pf 205 113 2101 


lift UGI 104 10 
19V!i UGI Pf 175 113 
3 UNCRes 
10 URS 00b 30 


17ft USFCl 120 70395 7522 


40ft USC pf 100 19 


13ft Uni Frit 00 10 15 
75 UfllNV 335e 40 9 
30ft U Como 4 134 47 


32V UnCnrb 300 BJ ■ 1349 


4V UnfanC 
12 UnElec 172 107 
TBft un El pt 430 130 
24ft UflEl pfMXOB 130 
lift Unei Pf 230 130 
13ft UnElPf 113 130 
45 UtlEl Pi 704 1X0 
49 UEIPfH 800 1X1 


Aft— ft 
15ft + ft 
Ztft+ft 
Uft + ft 
35ft— ft 
19ft + ft 
17ft— ft 
36ft— ft 
32ft— ft 
47ft+ft 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

40000 lbs- dailm per 100 Bn. 
30X0 2295 MOT 29JS 

3*1 a 

29X5 

29-82 

—17 


2280 


2*25 

2852 

2*11 

2*19 

iH 


2270 

Jul 

2705 

27X0 

27.17 

2705 

—24 


22X0 


2570 

2500 

25X0 

25X3 

—32 

35X0 

2250 

Sea 

3505 

2505 

2505 

TAM 

—35 


2290 

Oct 

25X5 

25X5 

25X5 

2500 

—30 


2290 

Dec 

2475 

3400 

24X0 

24X2 

—28 


23X0 


2470 

V7B 

24X0 

24X0 

—05 

est- Sales 

Prev. Soles I <799 






24000 24540 
24130 24500 -KM) 
24X50 25100 +120 
25X00 25700 +300 
24000 25X10 +300 


Industrials 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 45055 off 682 
OATS COST) 

5000 bu minimum- dollars per b u N ie l 


14ft— ft 
23ft 

24 +» 
9 + ft 
lift— ft 
21ft + ft 
59 +ft 
61ft 

19ft + ft 
92V— ft 
34V— ft 


L96ft 

170ft 

Mar 

177 

171ft 

177 

178ft 


lXTft 


172ft 

170 

172 

178ft 

1X1 

Jul 

lX5ft 

1X7 

IX6ft 

1X7 

179 

1X0 

Sea 

1X2 

1X3 

1X2 

1X3% 

1A2ft 

1X4 


IX* 

1X5 

1X5 

1X4 

Est.Sales 


Prav.Sales 

125 




+02 
+01V 
+01 ft 
+0Oft 
+JBft 



KIA15 

10900 10930 10730 10005 
10730 10X25 10700 10735 
10730 10700 10700 "IMM 
10*10 

die* 528 
19 Off 27 


LUMBER CCME) „ 

130000 bd. ft- S pot 1000 bd.fi. 

1 — ~ 12X10 Mar 13130 13X50 13100 13240 

13200 Mav 13400 13730 13400 13730 

14100 Jul M330 14X70 144J0 I43J0 

14600 Sep 15100 15140 15000 15130 

14930 Nov 15130 15190 15100 15270 

15570 Jan 157 JO 13730 15700 15730 

14030 Mar 16230 14200 14140 14140 


Est.Sales 1JS2 Prev.Sam TJjn 
Prev. Dav Open int. 77*1 off 200 


COTTON 2 (IfYCE) 


Prev. Dav Open lot 1494 up 30 


Livestock 


31ft +lft 

T9ft + W 
47V— ft 

?»+ft 


17V + ft 

P — ft 

33ft— ft 
32ft + ft 
357*— ft 
25V| + ft 
41ft 

S ft— V 
ft— ft 
36ft + ft 
Uft— V 
24 + V 

54V— ft 
Uft— ft 
40 — V 
19ft + ft 
59ft— ft 
1SV+ ft 
TV 
23 
7ft 

7V— ft 
43ft 
SSft 

S1V+ V 
50ft+ ft 
4ft + ft 
11 + ft 

T+* 

13ft— ft 
13V 

12ft— ft 
12ft 

24V— ft 
24 + ft 
33 — ft 
41 + ft 

43ft— ft 
17V + ft 
19V 

101 + V 

42 +1 
40 —V 
61 

2ft— ft 
lift— V 
7V 
14 

15V + ft 
25V 

9 — ft 


7 

105 15ft 

15ft 

I5tt 

13 

1215 33ft 


33V. + Vi 


15 58 

57ft 


U 

308 35 

35ft 

SSft— ft 


4 29ft 

39ft 

29ft + W 

21 

120 15 

14ft 

14ft 

20 

298 lift 

lift 

lift 

10 

1545 60 

59ft 

59ft + ft 

14 

39 SSft 

53 

53 

13 

122 38ft 

38 

38ft + ft 

7 

1117 3Sft 

35 

35ft + ft 

15 2512 18ft 

17ft 

18Vb+ ft 

11 

2 25 

25 

2S 


24 37ft 

37 

37ft— ft 


9 21 

30ft 


10 

28 ZTft 

27ft 

11 

88 44ft 

15ft 

44 — ft 

■ 

204 28 

77ft 

28 + ft 

25 

S3 8 

8 

8 

7 3759 22ft 

6 2303 18ft 

22ft 

urn 

sr* 

7 

85 34ft 

m 

34ft 

10 

253 3Sft 

38ft 


3 36ft 

26ft 

36ft— ft 


5ft+ ft 
16ft 
34ft +1 
29V 

2Zlfe + ft 
161fe— ft 

45 Uriel pi 704 U0 30QX 57ft 57ft Sft + V 

49 UEIPfH 800 1X1 50z 61 41 41 

34ft UnPae 100 3J 12 1461 47% 44* 47ft + ft 
82 UnPcpf 70S 50 29 106ft 104V 106V +1V 

9V unl ray! .18 13 10 2£» 15ft 16ft 15ft + ft 

SSft Unryl pi *00 12J 20z 46 54 55 

3ft UnllOr 54 29 4ft «V 41b 

10ft UnSmd 16 174 13V Uft 13ft 

9* UBrd pf 54 Uft 13V T3ft 

20ft UCMTV .14 0 54 442 36ft 38ft 38ft— V 

2Zft UnEnni 208 *2 24 3132 30ft 30ft 30ft— ft 

9 uillwn ZOO 113 3 54 16ft 14V 16V— ft 

If UlllUPf 197 15.1 7 24ft 25ft 25V 

20ft UlllUPf 400 150 5 24V 24V 25V 

10 UlllUPf 130 MS 9 12ft 13V Uft— ft 

14ft unttlnd 34 20 13 63 21V 2114 21ft. 

34M Unlit nn 02 0 30 4 39ft 39ft 39ft— ft 

25ft UJerBk 136 43 8 40 35ft 35 35 

9V UtdMM 7 716 14V 14ft T4ft— ft 

2ft UPkMn 1 55 2V 2V 2M— ft 

22 UealrG .12 J 7 1304 36ft 35ft 35ft + V 

5ft USHom 1727 7V 7ft 7ft + ft 

281fe USLeae 00 13 10 69 41V 61ft 41ft— V 

23 USShoo 04 30 U 111 29 2SV 29 

22 USStael 100 3J 10 1827 27ft 25V 27 + ft 

49V USSttPf 4944 93 212 S2ft 51ft S2ft + ft 

115V USStl prllTS 99 127 130 UBftlMfe— V 


22V USSttpf 125 82 415 

31ft USTob 1J2 X5 U 767 

55V USWest 572 7J 8 1332 
Sft USIckn 33 8 

29ft UnTchl 100 34 9 5051 

28ft UTcbpf 235 59 125 

17V UiliTel 192 *0 9 1094 

12 UWRS 1.21 79 9 37 

22 Unltrde 30 J 17 41 

14V Unlvar 08b 30 U 21 


18V UnhrFd 104 40 17 
15ft unLeaf 100 X5 B 


Unocal 100 11 12 4703 
Upjohn 134 30 13 622 


23V USLIFE 104 17 11 507 


185 3 

100 1 
53 16 T19 
XI 10 340 

2? ’5 S 


32ft + V 
14ft 


3 IS 2900 
18 140 


-8^-1 

15 


lift + ft 
73V + V 


108 92 8 992 
32 X3 53 33 

24 124 
192 17 II 3*75 
152 44 8 123 
104 40 11 231k 
100 30 14 444 
00 XI 14 304 
34 27 11 95 

J2 12 10 293 
120 5J I 2073 
200 52 7 2569 


15V + ft 
nv+ift 
pft + ft 


32+ i£ 




ID 

152 

02 

30 

10 

359 

05 

24 

11 

307 

100 

30 

11 

7 

1000120 


53 

1X4 

50 


1107 

.12 

3X 


Tlx 

74 

40 11 

6 

74 

60 

10 

35 

1.16 

<1 

12 

1867 

100 

57 

11 

2007 

1X8 

U 

16 

73 

100 

87 


30z 

1X0 

3X 

9 

4 


00 22 11 553 

100 22 10 507 
104 80 15 342 


00 J 541 
92 

00 X7 24 123 

85 

120 19 11 145 
08 13 10 32 

101 

SJ0 40 11 450 
100 XI 13 992 
12 47* 
08 12 11 751 
02 12 14 383 
108 50 11 75 

20 11 
192 33 U 721 
J6 10 15 1*7 


«ft + V 
>7 +* 
15V— ft 
28ft + ft 
33V— ft 
10 

27ft + ft 
3ft + ft 
1* + ft 
11 

29 — ft 
llft+ ft 
43V— ft 
25V — ft 


25 USLFpf 225 50 
Sft UelfsFd 1040109 
20ft UtoPL 132 101 9 
21ft UtPLpf ISO 110 
Zlft UtPLPf 230 112 
17V UtPLPf 225 110 
15ft UtPLpf 104 110 
21V VF Gorp 1.12 30 8 
Sft Valero 

14 volar pf 304 159 
2ft Vo levin 

1415 VonDrs 92 30 7 
215 Varco 
3014 Vartan M 0 12 874 
9ft Vara 00 32 16 43 

17V Veeco 00 17 15 254 
3V Vende 

Sft VestSe 1200117 
25ft Viacom 02 10 19 
48ft VaEPpf 975 115 
52ft VaEefJ 772 120 
49ft VaEPpf 720 112 
5TV VaEPpf 705 122 
14V VHhay LBSt 70 M 

» VWIoSm 200 14 11 


74V + ft 
11V— ft 
41V— V 
36ft— V 
22ft + Vi 


CATTLE CCME) 

40000 cents per lb. 

4900 6X3$ Apr 5440 5*73 5427 5*27 —03 

4930 5500 Jun 5700 5705 5505 67.12 —03 

<737 6X15 AUB 6570 4527 6505 4X17 +02 

4590 6U0 Oct 6X95 6432 4X90 4X35 +23 

47J5 4X60 Dec 4500 iSJd ASJD 4528 +28 

6705 6520 Feb 4400 5A15 6X00 4555 +25 

6737 4X10 Apr 4X95 

Es). Safes 1X274 Prev. Soles 1X473 
Prev. Dav Open Int 50080 w 275 
PEEDER CATTLE (CM E) 

44000 Ibif cents per lb. 

7475 5575 Mar 4*35 6905 4825 6895 +73 

7420 6700 Apr 7000 7027 4900 4997 -»1S 

7175 44.95 MOV 7055 7062 7820 7050 —.10 

7370 5500 Aua 7100 7TJ0 7130 7170 —07 

7300 6708 Sep 71.15 7125 7L15 7125 —.10 

7132 67.10 Oct 7085 7095 M 7087 — JM 

7120 7000 Nov 7133 7105 7135 7100 —.10 

Est. Sales 1,158 Prav.SataS 923 

Prev. Day Open int. 100*2 off 26 
HOGS CCME) 

30000 no. cents per Bi. 

5405 45.10 Apr 4505 4725 4*75 4595 —07 

55.4S 4840 Jun 52.10 5208 5190 SW5 — J7 

5177 4893 Jul 5330 5393 5X30 5X45 —27 

5437 4730 Aua 5200 5115 5205 5202 —08 

5195 4500 OCT 4895 *873 4840 4*55 

5835 4530 Dec 4895 49M MIS 4B30 

4990 *425 Feb 4805 4805 4*55 4800 +20 

4725 4530 APT 4*10 4425 4X10 4X11! +.Tfi 

4700 4700 Jun 4795 +.18 

Eta.Sala 7.19 Prev. Sales 4352 
Prev. Dav Open int. 29J2S up 582 
PORK BELLIES (CMP) 

3*000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

8120 4X10 Mar 7X85 7400 7X50 7157 —03 

■200 41.15 Mav 7X78 7X45 7330 7XS7 — 78 

1247 5115 Jul 7300 7425 7X32 7102 —33 

8005 4020 Auu 7198 7115 7120 7127 —28 

75.15 43.15 Feb 7100 7105 7200 7155 +25 

7X40 440Q Mar 7125 

7800 7000 May 7200 

7090 7030 Jul 7150 

Ent Sales Prev. Sales 7384 

Prav. Dav Open inL 14073 off 51 


GOLD (COMETH 

180 tray az^ dollars per tray ee. 

31100 28100 Mar 2*700 28700 2*700 

51X50 2*200 APT 28800 2)230 28730 

29230 29200 Mav 

51000 28700 Jun 29230 29700 29100 

48503 29100 Aim 29700 30100 29400 

49300 29700 Oct 30100 30X00 30100 

48930 30130 DOC 30730 31030 30730 

48530 30500 Feb 

494J0 31X70 APT 

435l 70 Jun 

42800 33100 Aug 33100 33100 33100 

39590 Twin Oct 

34730 3*200 Dec 34308 34300 34X00 


50000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

>970 4X24 MOV 5X30 5505 4X29 4503 +41 

7905 5XS5 Jul 6435 4500 4*05 4*97 +.17 

7730 4X62 OCf 4X75 4400 4X70 4X95 +5 

7X00 4X61 Dec 6X94 4504 4409 4509 +jf 

7695 45.90 Mar 6530 6*10 6X90 4605 -05 

7000 5530 Mav 5501 5501 6601 4403 +£ 

70S 4475 Jul. 5600 6602 4530 5403 +0J 

Est. Sales 1300 Prev. SMes U31 
Prev. Dav Open InL 1*3*3 up 211 


i 

w. 


.17 

hPixWrr 

■03 ,t *■ ‘ 


on 


Est. Salas 34000 Prev. Sales 3X118 
Prev. Dav Open InL 151 7*8 up 20 


Financial 


HEATING OIL(NYME) 

CgOuo.-c^Perpal ^ ^ ^ ^ . +J| 

8140 6400 MOV 7125 7170 7100 TITS +jn 

7800 4330 Jun 7050 7105 78X5 7194 +57 

7130 4535 Jul 7070 7170 7000 71.14 +J9 

?tS *3 iff K £3 H 38 S:H 

7150 "" S3 


-Hh M 
W2t m- 
.-■-.ir. m&n 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

*1 mHHan-ptaof lOOPd. 

9121 87J9 Mar 9134 9134 9105 9109 -07 

9101 17.14 Jun 9003 9085 9095 9001 —06 

9153 8X9* Sep 9075 »35 9070 9033 —07 

9090 8597 Dec 900* 9004 89.97 9002 —04 

9035 8500 Mar 8995 1995 8973 8998 —05 

9077 *701 Jun 8901 1903 8907 8902 — 05 

9000 SMI Sep 8905 —.05 

8933 89JM Dec 8932 —04 

EsLSakn 18074 Prav. Sale* 12798 
Prev. Day Open MiL 39321 off 1015 


CRUDE OIL (NYME) 



Apr 2770 2803 

27X5 

27.91 

+J4 


UN 

MOV 27.13 27X3 



+01 




2572 

24.93 

+07. 



Jul 26X0 26X3 

2*X0 

254 « 

+JZ ' 



Aua 2555 2575 

35X1 

2670 

+01 


24X0 

NOV 25X4 25X5 

Prav.Satas 10X88 

2554 

26X5 

+01 



3105 2407 Apr 27J0 

3078 2X28 MOV 27.13 

2935 2X30 Jun 3482 : 

3934 2X10 Jul 2500 : 

2937 2X75 Aug 2535 , 

2930 2400 NOV 2434 : 

Est.Sales Prev. Sale* 

Prev. Dav Ooen InL 53038 oftlfO 


ZrX Ti 

-.mM 


18 YtL TREASURY (CBT) 


8100000 prfn- pts A 32nds Of 100 Pd 

79-7 

79-13 


70-25 

MOT 79-10 79-14 

82-3 

70-9 

Jun 78-12 78-14 

7*9 

78-15 


75-18 

Sec 77-19 7743 

77-19 

77-23 

BO-22 

75-13 

Dec 


77-3 


75-18 

Mar 


74-U 

79^U 

77-22 

Jun 


74-3 

Est Sales 


Prav.Sales 7,155 




Stock Indexes 


»n 


I \ M IS 


Prev. DavOpan Int. 9O0M off 71 7 


US TREASURY RONDS (CBT) 


SP COMP. INDEX CCME) 
p oI nfB un dent* 

18535 15330 Mar 17*95 10030 17*95 17905 +01 

189.10 15X10 Jun 18375 18575 18375 1*495 +L1B,3"-" 

19298 14000 Sep 18700 18800 18595 18*25 +Uf’.vi' 

19500 17590 D*C 19070 19030 19070 191J8 +UO_ . 

Est.Sales 75090 Prev. Sales 71055 Vi- 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7X235 up 702 


a - w 

74ft- ft 


77-15 

57-27 

Mar 

4M5 

*9-34 

69-14 

59-24 


77-15 

57-20 

Jun 

50-15 

40-25 

58-14 

60-34 

—5 

74-2 

57-10 

Sep 

47-24 

47-31 

47-20 

67-31 

—5 



Dec 

67-2 

47-10 

<7 

67-10 

— 5 

72-30 

57-3 

Mar 

44-17 

45-34 

44-17 

4534 

—5 

70-16 

55-29 


454 

44-10 

553 

459 

-6 

70-3 

55-29 

Sea 




55-29 

— & 

49-24 

55-25 

Dec 




55-19 

— 4 

69-13 

55-27 

Mar 




55-10 

— 4 

592 

54-3 

Jun 




55-2 

—4 

58-24 

5322 

5ep 




6528 

—4 

Est.Sales 


Prav.Sales 94X73 





VALUE UNBOCCBT) 

*20X00^16*% Mar 19X20 19790 195.95 19X00 +08. 

21900 17X00 Jun 20230 20430 20200 20X55 +.70 

21270 18595 Sep ' 2B7J5 +J0 ' 

21000 20930 Dec 21101 +UB . 

Est. Sale* Prev. Sales *183 

Prav. Dav Open int. 8304 off 345 


38ft + ft 
33 

Oft + ft 
21ft 

Bzl 

17ft— ft 
51ft + ft 
ID +ft 


Prav. Dav Open Infe227088 


COFFEE C (NY CSCE) 
37300 lb*.- cents per lb. 


GNMA (CBT) 


i NYSE COMP. INDEX (NY FE) 
potats and cents 

10*00 8*20 Mar 10305 10435 10395 104.15 

11000 9000 Jun 10*75 10730 10X75 1073S 

111.90 9175 Sep 10900 11*00 10900 10990 


SJi l ft 

23ft + ft 
4 - ft 
10ft— ft 
X2H+ ft 
71ft— lft 

s +» 

39 — ft 
77ft— ft 


15300 

12350 

Mar 

14150 

14304 

14200 

14308 

— X4 

15300 

12201 

Mav 

14450 

144 94 

14412 

1403 

-XI 

WJt 

12100 

Jul 

14450 

14500 

14418 

14405 

—03 

147-50- 

T270Q 

SfP 

14305 

14400 

14300 

14216 

—vlS 

14280 

T290S 

Dec 

14230 

14305 

14220 

142X0 

+.12 

14100 

728X0 

Mar 

14*0 

14200 

14*0 

14100 

—03 

13905 

17100 . 

Mav 




148X5 

+100 

13*50 

T3S50 

Jul 




13805 

+00 


EiLSMe* 2000 Prev.Salea 2955 
Prav. Day Ooen int 113)3 us 32 


sma»prin-pts Asamsof 100 pet 

5935 

6929 

70-17 

57-5 

Mar 

5925 

69-30 


57-17 


49 

693 

58-29 

691 


59-13 





48-8 




67-14 

67-20 

67-14 

67-20 


58-20 

Mar 

44-28 

67-1 

44-28 

67 


5B-Z 


64-8 

64-16 

44-8 

44-15 


55-11 

Sep 




66 

Est. sales 


Prav.Sales 

567 




1 11395 101.2s Dec 

Est.Sales 15703 Prev.Salea 14042 
! Prav. Day Open Int. 11776 up 510 



Commodity Indexes 


Prev. Day Open Int. 4983 off 180 


SUGARWORLD 11 (NYCSCK) 
1 112000 ibsr cents ear a. 


1*50 

UD 

Mav 

290 

295 

305 

305 

—01 

90S 

401 

Jul 

<11 

<18 

<06 

<07 

—m 

90S 

<22 

Sep 

402 

4X0 

405 

<25 

— 03 

90S 

4X2 

oet 

4X8 

455 

440 

4X0 

— 03 

703 

493 

Jan 

500 

501 

500 

404 

— 09 

903 

504 

Mar 

5X3 

5X9 

502 

504 

— 01 

7.15 

5X9 

May 

5X5 

505 

5X8 

5L59 


4X9 

5X4 

Jut _ 

594 

595 

583 

584 

—01 


EeL Sales 9788 Prav.Sales 11819 
Prev. Day Open InL 81748 off 1089 


CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI minion- pteaf 100 pet 

9190 0503 Mar 909* 9102 9092 9100 —01 

9170 B5J0 Jun 0994 8994 »JS2 890V —JM 

; 9000 85J0 Sep 8979 8979 8979 8973 —07 

9*17 8S74 Dec 8*99 —49 

8998 8X54 Mar 8805 —44 

0904 8403 Jun 8804 —11 

8808 8705 Sep 8*24 —10 

Eat. Sales Prev.Salea 451 
Prav.DoyQpenlnL 10020 Off 299 


Close 

Moody 1 * 949 JO f 

I Reuters- — 1,999 JO 

OJ. Futures ; 12009 

Com. Research Bureau. 23*50 

Moody’s : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sen. 1* 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Prtvtou r ‘ 
950J0. " ~ ' 
UBAJO f' ■ 

1 2001 

23300 a- 


••.V 


21 W1COR 270 85 
34ft WabRpf X90 100 


11 27ft 25ft 27 
20QZ 42 41ft 41ft— lft 


wochvs 92 38 10 440 31ft 31 


2ft 

58ft + ft 

3»-ft 

5ft— ft 
31 - ft 
33 

Sft— ft 
50ft + ft 
45ft+ ft 
8ft + ft 
31ft 

35ft+ ft 

29 

1W 

Sift— ft 
34ft 


I 


<2 35ft TDK 

09* X 21 39 

31ft 24 TECO 

200 70 8 801 

13ft 7» TGIF 

16 37 

19ft lift TNP 

05 *2 8 31 

27ft 17 TRE 

00 <3 17 52 

lift 58ft TRW 

LOO 30 11 253 

ISO no TRwpr 

150 .11 7 

10ft 3ft TocBaat 

85 

70 51ft TaffBrd 

1.12 19 12 57 


lift 10ft 
19ft 13ft 
72ft 45ft 
34ft 23ft 
15ft lift 
Uft 51ft 
5U 2ft 
302ft 147Vi 
22ft Uft 
48ft 19ft 
39ft 25ft 
44ft 32ft 
NB B7ft 
79 45 

35ft 21ft 
30ft 9ft 
35ft 20ft 
41ft Sift 
427, 33ft 
48ft 35ft 
SSft 26ft 
58 52 


JBe 7 12 32* 
1-00 57 190 

120 40 13 154 
13 3304 

12 45 
100 19 8 324 

■ 9* 

10 181 
72 10 20 473 

13 985 
0* 10 8 285 

192 77 10 5479 
1100 117 10 

700 90 ISO 
12 2902 
00 XI 51 438 
116 80 19 

U0 *5 34 3211 
1-52 47 9 10 

105 17 7 1535 
270 *8 8 250 
5750110 1 


Bank of Boston Defends 
Self Before Senate Unit 


The AssadateJ Press 

WASHINGTON — The chai rman of Bank 
of Boston Corp. told a Senate subcommittee 
Tuesday that poor judgment and carelessness 
led his bonk to violate the law designed to 
prevent money laundering — not a (Sire to 
help organized crime. 

But Senator William Roth, the Delaware Re- 
publican who chairs the Permanent Subcom- 
mittee on Investigations, responded that for all 
the attention New England's biggest bank paid 
to ihe Bank Secrecy Act, “They may as well 
have thrown the Comptroller's notices, the law. 
and the regulations in ihe trash." 

Meanwhile, the Comptroller of the Currency, 
G Todd Conover, tola the Senate panel that 
federal bank examiners in 1982 were un familiar 
with regulations requiring the bank to report its 
international currency transactions. 

The bank pleaded guilty last month to failing 
to report S1J2 billion in international currency 
transactions and was fined S500,000. Since that 
time, it has also been revealed that two compa- 
nies owned bya reputed organized-crime family 
were improperly exempted from currency-re- I 


25ft 14ft Wockht. 00 xa 5 
10ft 6ft Wolnac 500 - 555 

47ft 31 WalMrt 78 A 24 971 

WaHjrn 08 17 18 440 

WkHRl«10O M 

WOlCSv 05 10 17 80 

WatUm 109 XI 7 203 

WaHJpf LOO 100 30* 

WOttJpt 100 30 3 

Warned 00 40 11 153 

wmem 853 

WUrnrL 108 19 1* 1308 

WOshG* 105 82 0 57 

ft ISM WJtiNat 100 19 8 167 

20ft 16 WUlWt 208 114 8 1275 

52ft 27ft WOMB 00 U 17 1372 

28ft 19ft WOtkJn J4 10 11 207 

12ft 8ft WBvGe* -3 20 10 6 

25 20ft WovGpf 100 70 1 

12ft * WeanU 195 

12 941 WMnpf 71k 6 

23ft 12ft WebbO T0« 10 13 104 

38ft 29ft WMsMk 70 10 14 ? 

Sift 30ft WelUF 200 40 I 359 

2>ft 22ft WMFM 200 108 11 58 

23 13ft Wbntfy* 78 10 17 1590 

17ft Sft Wendy wl 150 

25ft 16V6 WestCo 04 11 12 40 

45ft 34ft WStPtP 220 XT 8 505 

11% 9ft WstdTB L04 25 

6ft 2W WiAfrL 2658 

lft ftWtAIrwt 125 

Uft BU WAIr Pf 200 11J 32 

19ft 8ft WAIr pf 114 1LI 235 

lift 4 WCNA 993 

115ft 85 WPqcl 7 76 

26ft Sft WUnlen 18® 

64ft 24ft wnUn pf 1 

5* 25 WhUpfC 24 

9ft 2ft WnUPfS 40 

15ft 4ft WnU PIE 35 

48 20 WUTTpf 1 

20 5ft VTUTl pfA 16 

32ft 19ft WitoE* 100 37 10 5754 

41 31ft WeSfvc 172 34 8 589 

3* 25 Waverti 170 44 19 2004 

44ft 3*ft weyrpf 2J0 70 336 

51ft 43ft Weyrpr X50 97 31 

WIMPIT 15 

WPttsfB mtz 

WhPItpf 4101 

WWrtpl 200 47 9 390 

WnHC 100 52 421 

WIHMU 9 153 

WMlIc* 40 24 10 IM 

Wlebldt X0 45 

WHfndn 13 8 

wnnom 100 50 4 ni« 

WllmEI 444 

wnzhro .10 u n 23 

Win DM 100 X9 13 213 

Wlmba .108 0 17 438 

Winner 17 419 

WbiterJ 4 

WtocEP 278 77 7 371 

WbEPf *90 117 3001 

WISE pf 773 109 202 

WtoCPL 204 *7 8 59 

WtacPS 255 80 7 17 

WUco 108 18 9 326 

Wohrrw 74 20 14 99 

WoodPt 00 30 U 1243 

Wolwttl 100 40 10 414 

WrtdAr. 9 

Wripiy 100a XI 10 49 

Wurtber 5 

WvleLb 72 20 11 350 

Wynns 00 20 8 71 


10 5 19ft 19ft 19ft 

500 ■ 565 10ft 9ft 10 + ft 
0 24 971 45U 44ft 45U + ft 
SDft+lft 


WCOA (NYCSCK) 






EURODOLLARS (IMM) 






ID metric tans- S perton 






S3 mlI11an-pti of TOO PCL 






2570 

1*85 

Mar 

2130 

2140 

2130 

2124 

—15 

9108 

85.14 

Mar 

9057 

9*51 

90X3 



2570 

1998 

May 

2140 

2179 

2125 

2148 

—85 

9088 

82X9- 

jBJl 

89X1 

89X2 

•9X2 

89X1 

—05 

MOO 

1998 

Jul 

2095 

2115 


2055 

—42 

90J3 

•4X3 


K195 

8*98 

MBS 



2415 

IW7 


2079 

2090 

2035 

2040 

—40 

8907 

84X0 

Dec 

0*40 

8*51 

8*52 

88X5 

—09 


1*45 

Dec 

2049 

2049 

1990 

2000 

—40 

•9X1 

0*10 

Mar 

8807 

8837 

8*38 



2145 

1955 

Mar 

2010 

2B14 

2010 

1995 

—37 

89.15 

■503 

Jun 

8*14 

8*14 

8805 

8806 


2130 

1960 

May 




1995 

—40 

8804 

8708 


8707 

8700 

8707 

8785 

—09 

2035 

I960 

Juf 




2000 

4 fl 

8907 

8708 

Dec 

87X9 

87X9 

8/X4 

87X8 

—09 

Ext. Sales 

<800 Prav.Sales 5091 




Est. Sales 3*545 Prav.SataS 31X49 



Market Guide 




20ft— ft 
34ft + ft 
33ft— ft 
9ft+ ft 
45ft— ft 
22 

Zlft— ft 
38M+ ft 
19ft + ft 

27ft + ft 

an + ft 
49 —ft 
25ft 

10 — ft 

2115 

lift + ft 
lift + ft 
20ft — ft 
37ft 

54ft + It 
25 

21ft— ft 
16ft— ft 
20ft 

35 —2ft 

10ft 

6 +ft 
lft— ft 
17ft+ ft 
19U+ ft 
5ft + ft 
114 +1U 
Sft— ft 
29VJ + ft 
34ft + ft 
3ft— ft 
6ft 
29ft 
BU 

30ft— ft 
38ft— ft 
29ft 

40 + ft 
Uft— ft 
lift— ft 
254fe— Ht 
10ft 

46ft + ft 

29 — ft 
24ft— ft 
Mft— ft 

11 

Uft— ft 
27ft 

0H+ ft 
7ft— ft 
34ft +lft 
19ft 

Sft— ft 
4ft 

31ft— ft 
79% + ft 
71 +1M 
30ft 

30 

39% + ft 
10ft + ft 
22 - ft 
39ft— ft 
Sft + ft 
57ft 
3ft 

13ft— ft 
21M+ ft 


Prav. Dav Ooen int 25008 up 48 


Prav. Day Open loLl 1X149 upll6 


NYCSCE: 

IfYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCET: 


Chicago Board of Trade 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
International Monetary Market 
Of Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
New York Cocoa, Sugar, Coffee Exchaaae 
Now York Cotton Exchange 
Commodify Exchange, New York 
New York Mercantile Exchange 
Kansas City Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 




Asian Commodities 

March 12 


Paris Commodities 

March 12 


London Commodities 

March 12 


VMM* 


Cash Prices March 12 j 


MONO-KONG GOLD FUTURES sugar""* ^ CT °“ Cr " e 

usjpermmce Prevftws IVaY 1 ‘ 370 l* 0 1-358 +10 SUG 

HM Urn BUM SwKc ftUB 1040 LOO 1022 1027 +2 Star 

Mar- N.T. N.T. 29*00 29200 289JM 291J® ’r"? +3 May 

API „ M.T. K.T. 291JW 29300 29200 27400 NJi , N -J; l«£g — * AH 

MOV , N.T. N.T. 29X00 29500 29X00 29500 JJ5T Iffi MS t S <» 

JIM _ 29508 295iB0 29500 29700 29500 2S7M JjE®, 

AH _ N.T. N.T. 30000 30200 29900 30100 octucU •Ur 

Oct — N.T. N.T. 305JJU 31700 30400 30X00 lot* Open Inlerait. 22008 May 

Dec _ 31100 311 rn 31000 31209 KW0O 31100 COCOA AH 


+ 10 SUGAR 
+ 2 Sterling per metric ton 
+ ? Mav 11X80 111 so 111 


Ceainwdltv and UnU 
OoffM 4 Santas, lh___ 
Prfntciolh 54/30 38 Vu. vd _ 


Dec -31100 31 100 31000 31 200 30900 31 100 CO 

FetJ - N.T. N.T. 31400 31800 31500 31700 Mar 
Volume: 26 tots of lOOox. Mav 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U0L8 per ounce 


low Settle Same 


Mar 

2080 

2040 

2040 

2055 

Mav 

2332 

2081 

2001 

2303 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2230 


Sea 

2010 

2075 

2255 

2057 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2145 

2159 

Mar 

NT.' 

N.T. 

2)35 


Mav 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2120 

— 


Yew'-.. 

Cmnmetfltv and UnU Tub Afff , 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb 102 10) 

Hloh Law BM Ask Bid Ask Printdoth 64/30 38 Va. vd — mo oj^r- 

i — . 5fBtl DJIletS IPItt.). toil 473M 40* •- 

I rametnc loa Iran 2 Fdry.Pmia.tan 213^® HMi- *.,. . . 

J® 11100 11200 11300 11100 11100 5 tael scrap No 1 hw Pin. - 7940 HO-lJ* +, * 

1 1970 1 1700 11*40 11*80 11X50 11X80 Lead Spot, lb 17-21 25E.;- T . ‘ . 

1K40 moo 12440 12500 12200 12300 Cower eled. lb 4+58 7MW5 x. : 

13*00 129JW 53000 13200 T2BJM 12900 Tin (Straits), lb 50007 ATW - ; - 

' /3M Mi" 14SJ0 Zinc. E. St. l_ Basis, lb *45 9S4 . 

14900 14800 14900 15*40 14700 14*23 Palladium, az - 115-118 159ft • 

15700 15500 15500 15700 15400 15500 Silver N.Y.OZ 5570 M8 . _ 

ne: 989 lots of 50 Ions. Sourer: AP- 1 ^ — 


•• Sn’.". 

1 •• ^--e' ,.i.. 

*>' 




Est. val.: 163 tots of 10 tons. Prev. actual 


Mar N.T. N.T. 289.50 28970 sales: 55 lot* Open Merest: 973 

Apl 292.10 291.10 29100 291 30 COFFER 

Jim- , N-T N-T. 29550 29520 Mar 2010 2010 2010 

Volume: 241 lots of 100 az. Mav 2035 2035 2035 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER JJ* N T N.T- i4OT 

Malavsln coats per Mta S-J" Hi H3S 

dose Previous "w JJ.T. N.T. 2 jw 

Bid AR Bid Ask -* an N-T. N_T_ 2071 

API 19100 192.00 19300 19X00 N-T. .3050 

I May - - — 19525 19400 19750 19800 ,E*L voL: 20 lots of 5 ton* 

7S. 19700 19*£5 19900 2M0O 6 tots. Open Interest: 156 

Jlv 19900 200 JW 20200 20300 Sourc»: Bourse dv Canmerot. 

AW 20X00 20400 20500 20X00 

Sap 20500' 20700 20800 20900 

Volume: 58 lots. f 

SINGAPORE RUBBER H if., 

Stagapora cents per Ulo I WIKlOU ffllel 

dose Previous ■ 

. BU Ask Bid Adi I March 12 

RSSlAPl— 16*75 14900 17*50 17100 i 

RSSIMOV- 17200 17250 17400 17X50 MBHMMNH8RB 

RSS2Apl_ 14150 14X50 16425 16X23 n— 


292.10 291.10 29150 2*100 


IV 2X35 2435 2035 2540 +2 

r N.T. N-T. 2480 2,705 + IS 

» N.T. N.T. 2JKI 2J20 + U 

v N.T. N.T. 2J10 — +X 

n N.T. n-t. z&m — +ae 

IT N.T. N.T. 2050 2.700 + 15 

Est. voL: 20 lots of 5 tons. Prev. actual 


MM- 14U0 142.aa (4X40 14520 14200 14X40 Zinc E. St. L Basis, lb 

May 14900 14840 14900 15X40 14700 14*20 Palladium, oz 

AH 15700 15500 15500 15700 15400 15540 Silver N.Y.02 

Volume: 909 lots of 50 Ion* Source: AP. 

COCOA i 

SterUnv per metric Ion J n , . , , 

•Ur 2.150 2.110 2.110 2,120 1144 X14S I UlYldenOS 

tZ 3S «S «S IS IS Conw,OT 

Mar 2001 1059 1.H5 1040 1^ 1099 USU 

ySn 7X0 AECInc 




March 12 |-r.. 


Per Amt Par bbc,- 
usual ■+ 


>*ft* A*',, 
•-er . . 4 , 


London Metals 

March X2 


R553API. 15100 15200 16225 15X25 b«" Ask 

“Hi AM— 15600 lauw 134J5 15825 ALUMINUM 

RSSSAPf- 15*30 15250 1S1.2S 15325 StaffliW per metric t« 

KUALA. LUMPUR PALM OIL not 100100 100200 100250 100X50 

Malaysian ringgits per 23 tons forward 103400 103450 103*00 103900 

_CJo*e .^P'toos COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

XI— ■ .°y.. Ag, “« Ag. Sterling per metric ton 

ftter ^ 1^5 , - 3 * spot 124200 126X00 107800 108000 

’-3™ — torwort 127900 127950 109X00 129708 

jwjzz: {SI 1210 12S lass sasiffSXm"—" 

1 tv 1250 12914 1245 1255 Sterling per metric ton 

aw - M S 2S 1^ ?** 134500 124700 106900 127100 

g— T ™ w forward 125800 127000 128800 129000 

Nov 1220 1240 1215 1235 LEAD 

Jan. 1220 1260 1215 1235 Sterttog per metric Im 


VotanwiSJMtotsaflOtans. GSrt American 

COFFEE INTERCO Inc 

Starting per metric Im overmver Corn 

Mar 2285 2260 227* 7 r tsn X342 2270* Telephone Data Sys 

MOV X«6 X400 2X28 ZOO X«0 Z4H UPI 

J*v 2X73 7JSS 2X65 2X68 2X51 2X42 iCijre *' “"• 

Z50B 2X82 2X95 2X96 Z489 2X90 

NOV Z504 2X81 2X90 2X95 WW 2X94 

XL 2^5 2XS2 2X55 2X61 2X45 . rgl e 

MW 2X35 2X35 2X30 3X25 2X00 2X50 IflJ'IDiTWl 
Volume: *338 lots of 5 ton* KMM/U/I 

GASOIL 

UJL dollars par metric ton Pnaymti 

SJ-BJ S55S 2^73 2357s 23600 £voSISJk 

Art 22400 22275 22405 22400 22300 22X75 O 

Mar 2202S 21*50 2303S 22*50 21900 Z19J3 yy , 

•j™ 21*25 21700 21*00 21800 21700 21000 f /ffn/Ml 1 

Jly 21*ai 21700 21800 21900 21700 21900 \AJUfU*Y 

*“■ N.T. N.T. 21800 22300 21700 22300 J 

^P 22000 22000 22100 22X7S 21700 77* nn _ 

Od N.T. N.T. 21*00 23000 2170Q 22900 K 

Nov N.T. N.T. 31800 23500 21700 23200 TAIPPT — 
volume: 101B tats of 100 tons. lAirti — 

Sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- QOHUCS mints 

OWW* (PHd/JJ. . ■ I 


Q 08 4-30 +•-. - 

QJ7ft. +3 Mf-Vta 
Q .77 A IS 

B7 9S 46 Mf. 

Q JW 3-39 W '1 


1 *, -T-. tau^ g^ 

- M-'-um .. 


Taiwan Minister ■*- 
Resigns Over 
Cathay Scandal v 


- -=+e ft 

• ' 1>M -4|V .. . . 

-- 



T " . . 

■■ ■ -i* 

■ ■> . 


U.5. Treasury Bill Rales 

March 12 


Volume: 0 lots of 25 Ions. 
Source: Reuters. 


45ft 33ft Xerox 300 50 17 4755 44ft 43ft 43ft— ft 

51ft 45ft Xerox pf 5X5 110 S3 49ft 49ft 49ft— U 

39 If XTRA 04 20 9 148 26 25ft 26 + ft 


Canada’s Trade 

spot SOW 51100 51500 51700 

— I XWT" 1 forward 52700 53800 53300 53400 I 

Surplus Widens J sj 

M soot 10.140 10,150 10,135 10,140 I 

Reuters fonNartf 10.135 1*145 10J40 10.150 I 

OTTAWA — Canada's trade it^ng pot metric tan ■■ 

rplus widened 10 1.48 billion Ca- tonmra m5o we x Sm smc 

idian dnllait fSl (K hillirm^ in Source: AP. Prtee 


snot 31*00 31900 32500 33500 

forward 33550 32700 33200 33300 

NICKEL , 

Starting par melric tan wnamti 

»0t . f«50O *70000 40500 408SJJO ffmonffi 

forward 4J550O. X76O0O 4J3O0O 4^3500 rjoe — — 
SILVER «W»«W 


Frsv 
YleM View 


30 24 ZataCp 102 40 9 54 29ft 29 29ft 

24ft 13ft Zmds 04 *1 14 1243 13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 

58 30 Zayne XOb jf 14 510 54ft 54 Sift + ft 

lift 18ft ZoflHhe 8 596 23 31ft 22 + ft 

21 ft Uft Zaras 19 57 2DU. 20 20 — ft 

31ft 21ft Zurnln 102 40 11 253 29ft 29ft 39ft + ft 


Source: Satomon Brothers 


S&P 100 Index. Options 

March 12 


Company Earnings 


Revenue mid profits. In millions, are In local 
currencies unless otherwise Indicated 


Hong Kong 


South Africa 


surplus widened 10 1.48 billion Ca- forward thuo 79&50 00400 aoa 
nadian dollars (SI. 06 billion) in source: ap. 

January from a surplus of 1.43 bil- 

lion in December, the government J nu r /w+s 
statistics agency said Tuesday. I 1?ntnre ® UptiODlS 

The surplus m January 1984 was I March 12 

1.86 billion dollars. I W. Gernno ttrt-tKtffl imb ads per imrl: 

January 1985 exports, seasonally 

adjusted, were valued at 9.62 bil- cMMeme pummm 

lion dollars, up from 9J8 billion in £** gg ^ “J* $£ SS* 


SMke CsflUaH Pw«Ja«t 

Frtce *x AN WJMMrU Mar Jm 
IS2SIW----- 
lO lTlfe H — — — — ft — 

W lift H - - - I/ML ms 

n a m w tu un ii * in 

15 J 8 18 VW W Jl/uai 

NO sntlhSMiM 2ft BS -4ft » 

0B 1/16 life 2% 4ft ft 7ft I M 

12 - Vi HI 39/1 - 12ft 1» - 

m - <e 11/14 lft - ■ - _ - - 


Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan’s eco- 
nomics minister, Hsu Li-Teh, 
has resigned amid a growing, 
scandal involving the Cathay 
Group, one of the country’s ma- 
jor industrial companies, the 
government said Tuesday. 

In a statement, Mr. Hsu said 
he resigned because of an in- 
ability to stop unspecified vio- 
lations by the Tenth Credit Co- 
operative Bank, one of the 
group's banking units, during 
his term as finance minis ter. 

Tenth Credit was taken over 
by the government in February 
after depositors withdrew the 

equivalent of more than $250 
million following rumors that 
the bank had overextended its 
lending. More than a week lat- 
er, another Cathay hank was 
taken over by the government 
after the_ equivalent of about 
$350 mill i nn was withdrawn. 




-.*44 IV 

- . . 
-• 


**-* -** *+ -• 

’ 


'.j;.. *-*dk*M 


Hongkong Bedrk 

Tfeflf 1984 1982 

RSEr : % ® 

pgvShwe— IU7 071 


« _ M1 _ December and 8.82 biHion in Janu- » M ^ 

DeBoer* Mines ary of last year. 5 82 10 a = 

praST mj 1 1 * Imports were worth 8.14 billion 5 82 - 

"XZor'SLaX'i dollars in January, up from 7.95 EftSm eieOMuL779s 


ports were worth 8.14 billion § 


203 



002 

0X8 - 

IX) 

IK — 

OJB 

*81 - 

ftfll 

1X5 - 

*92 

1.16 - 

040 

Ufl — 

1X2 

1X8 — 

DJ5 

175 — 

205 

203 - 

*U 

US - 

1114 

307 - 


TOM colt MAM 1*5015 
TgM call wee Nt. Iffi 

tbmhi nun nan 

TMM BPIBM.47UM 


HWltaM Lwnu) OW17JJ9+1J3 
Source: CBOE. 


| Gold Options twtcM ia san-v 


'■’+*■ « Jtu/tv 

* --** <i: 

Ml. 


porting requirements by the bank. 

Mr. Brown said that in both the international 


HK. Shanghai . £**£''*''* eontoiidaM billion in December and 6.97 bil- JSlJSgtSsxfaSStaLSjn 


transactions and in exempting the wrong com- 
panies From reporting requirements, bank offi- 
cers inadvertently failed to follow the letter of 
the law — despite some warnings from federal 
regulators as early as 1982 


Year 19*4 1983 

Profit 2090. 2X9* 

Full name at company Is 
HonoKano A Snonotnl Bank- 
moCoro. 

NefherlcHids 


lion in January 1984. 


Source: CMC. 


United States 


Amro Bk 


Payless Castaways 

1 lttQaar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 355X 20*4 

Net Inc. 105 121 

1983 P«+ Stai re — *05 *10 

3090 Results restored. 


MORE NEWS IN LESS TIME 

THE WORLD IN 16 PAGES 

DAILY IN THE !HT 


Sales Up in Vegl Germany 

Reuters 

WIESBADEN, West Germany 
—West German retail volume pro- 


ftUH 

M* 

As* 

30 

135*1500 

220*2350 

300 

80* 950 

160*1750 

310 

45* 500 

117*1325 

330 

225- 373 

82*975 

330 

10*200 

575-735 

340 

__ 

40*559 


-* - -j — 

- "■+ : .'/to 




GoU 29075-2912 


visionally rose mi inflation-adjust- 
ed 4 percent in January from Janu- 


ed 4 percent in January from Janu- 
ary 1984, the Federal Statistics 
Office said Tuesday. 


Vaten Wklte WcM &A. 


1211 Genera 1, Su Nz tH— 4 
Trf. JI0251 - Telex 2*388 




3-4^ iy 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


Page 11 


iSINESS ROUNDUP 


COMPANY NOTES 






* TT»- 


ungkong & Shanghai Bank 
iporte 4% Rise in ’84 Profit 




rt 

1 :-r 


rt 1 


• fv-; ■; . 


. Af;-. 
-I*. . 


: Mfc-.ti 






}M«**1* 

. 

• !Wt- 

%Vtt.ih : 

. « •* 

** n 


1 : »r. . 

«WW;- 

* **. 

• : » , 

^ ^ * j 

■»«* 


Reuters ' 

>NG KONG — Hongkong & 

’• jhai Banking Coip. said Tues- 
ut its 1984 unanfflted aftertax 
- s, including transfen to rc- 
l rose 4 percent, to about Z59 
a Hong Kong dollars (S332 
* ,«). from 2.49 billion dollars 
1 ,33. 

: company said it expects 
5 lo continue at a satisfactory 
in 1985 and that it expects to 
. imcnd a full-year dividend of 
46 cents a share. That 
: * be a 10-percent increase af- 

te issue of about 280 irnTUon 
s in a l-for-10 boons issue. 

- bank said the recommended 






ns Products Seeks 
Iter of Chapter 11 


The Associated Pros 
AMI — Evans Products Co. 

. Tuesday that it had filed for 
i t action from creditors under 
':ter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy 

company said the 
tidon did not involve its' 
Transportation subsidiary, 
.,i operates and leases a fket of 
‘is and truck nailers. 


bonus issue would capitalize 714.97 
minio n dollars, from the reserve 
fund, which will be restored by 
transfer from retained profits. 

Hongkong’s riiBimwm Michael 
Sandbag, said the disappointing 
growth in profits last year stemmed 
from losses in foreign-exchange 
translations. 

He said profits of the company’s 
British Bank of the Middle East 
unit rose nearly 30 percent in 
pound staling terms, out only 3 
percent in Hong Kong dollar terms 
because of the impact of the strong 
U.S. dollar; ^ - 

Mr. Sandberg did not estimate 
the overall impact on of 

currency translations. He also said 
sluggish loan demand last year hurt 
the bank’s performance M 
some provisions were made for 
doubtful loans, mainly to Fact am 
European countries. He did not 
elaborate. 

He stod the Gbmese-Botish pad 
on tbe Hong Kong’s future, ini- 
tialled in September, helped restore 
confidence m tbe colony but that it 
came too late in the year to have 
ranch impact on the banks results. 
Continued economic growth this 
year should boost loan demand, 
especially in trade financing this 
year, he said. 


Ailing Muse Air 
Plans toMerge 
With Southwest 

CimpdedbT Ov Staff From Dispatches 

DALLAS — Southwest Air- 
lines and Muse Air Crap, have 
announced a merger under 
which Muse would operate as a 

wholly owned subsidiary of its 

former arch rival Southwest 
would help Muse li ghten its 
debts, estimated as highas S10Q 
million. 

Industry observers estimated 
that the merger, a combination 
of cash and stock, was worth 
about $60 million. 

■ But Continental Airlines, an- 
other competitor based in 
Houston, said it would object to 
the U.S. Transportation De- 
partment. It said it would re- 
quest that the merger be contin- 


gent upon the sale of gates at 
Love Held in Dallas and Hob- 
by Airport in Houston. Conti- 
nental said together, the two 
airimes own 30 of the 44 gates 
at tbe two airports. - 
Southwest stock closed Mon- 
day at $25.25, np $1,125, on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 
Muse stock, traded on the 
American Slock Exchange, 
dropped 25 cents, to S8J75. 

(UPJ, LAT) 


Asarco Files Suit to Block 
Takeover by Holmes a Court 


The Associated Press 

NEWARK, New Jersey — 
Asarco Ido, a major mining and 
smelting concern, has asked a fed- 
eral court to block tbe Australian 
financier, Robert Holmes 4 Court, 
from making any attempt to ac- 
quire the company. 

Mr. Holmes k Court has indicat- 
ed that he may try to acquire as 
much as 50 percent of Asarco s 
common stock through companies 
he controls. 


their holdings in Asarco common 
shares. 

Mr. Holmes k Court’s Bed Re- 
sources said Monday that it has 
asked for clearance from the U.S. 
Justice Department^ and Federal 
Trade Commissioa to raise its 
holdings in Asarco to 50 percent 
Bed, one of 12 Holmes-i-Court 
units named in the Asarco suit, said 

the Cling does not commit it to 
increase its holdings. 

- In trading on the New York 
Stock Exchange Tuesday, Asarco 


In its lawsuit, filed Monday in djares'cSSF up 25 cents, to 
District Court m Newark, 526.625. The company has a cur- 
rent market value of about $818 
million, based on its estimated 31 

milli on shares outstanding. 

Asarco reported a loss of $23&3 
million for (he fourth quarter and 
$306.1 minion for afi of last year. 
The results included a writedown 
of S2I6 million for tbe suspension 
or closing of some plants and 


U.S. 

Asarco contended that the Austra- 
lian financier’s filings with the Se- 
curities a nd PxHnmg^ Commission 
have misrepresented his intentions 
in awatfang a 10-percent interest in 
the company. ... 

The suit asks the court to compel 
Holmes4-C6urt affiliates to divest 


Phillips Pate Ofi Meeting 

The Associated Press 

BARTLESVILLE. Oklahoma — 
Phillips Petroleum Co. said Tues- 
day it has rescheduled its annual 
meeting to May 29, a month later 
than originally planned, to allow 
the company to adjust its records 
following the conclusion of a stock- 
repurchase offer. 


De Beers Consolidated Mines 
Ltd. reported that net income for 
1984 was 677.7 million rand 
($338.9 million), up 27K percent 
from 530.2 million rand in 1983. 
Per-share earnings were 18.4 rand, 
up from 147.6 million the year be- 
fore. 

Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette 
has fined $100,000 by the Com- 
modity Futures Trading Commis- 
sion for violating reporting require- 
ments on commodities trading 
between February 1982 and Janu- 
ary 1984. The commission said 
Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Fu- 
tures Inc. had agied an order in 
which it agreed not to violate feder- 
al reporting requirements. 

Dunlop Olympic Ltd. of Austra- 
lia said it will ALH Indus- 
tries LuL, an electrical wholesaler, 
a wholly owned subsidiary 
qtiiring SO percent of it from 
troo Ltd. for 39.6 million Austra- 
lian dollars ($27.3 million), 
effective March 3LThe company 
said full ownership wfl] facilitate 

^ First Nafio^ Bank of flnrinnflti 
announced that it is no longer con- 


after a three-day run on it Despite 
First National’s withdrawal. Home 
Slate officials said they still hope to 
sell the bank. 

Hong Kong Electric Hokfiugs 
Ltd said it has taken an exiraonb- 
naiy loss of 203 million Hong 
Kong dollars ($26 million) in ap- 
plying an equity accounting policy 
to its investment in International 
City Holdings Ltd, its 34.6-percent 
owned property subsidiary. The 
company earlier had said that it 
intended to change the accounting 
method fra the unit to dividend 
accounting. 

Japan Airlines Co. said it will pay 
a dividend fra the year ending 
March 31 after paying no dividend 
fra tbe previous two years. It did 
not specify the size of the dividend 
The company paid a dividend of 40 
yen (15 cents) per 500-yen share in 
1981/82 but reported parent com- 
pany net losses of 3.81 billion yen 
in 1982/83 and 6.42 billion in 
1983/84. 

Kawasaki Sled Crap.; Mitsubi- 
shi Corp.; Brazil's national mining 
company, Companhia Vale do Rio, 
and Metalur Administracao Parti- 


qterts Disagree on Timing of Next U.S. Recession 





v (Continued from Page 9) 
^mpeting UiL-made products, 
'ag to a buildup of domestic 
i tones followed by cutbacks in 
jetton and output, 
has been diffi cult to say what 
d past U.S. recessions, but 
.-.jmists have provided some 
[• about those that have oc- 
- d since World War IL The 
Lsion of 1948-1949 was attxib- 
to high interest rates and the 


end nf a spading ouyp hy co nsum - 
ers that was triggered by the remov- 
al of wartime rationing. ' 

Some economists have blamed 
the next recession, in 1953. and 
1954. on tight fiscal and monetary 
policies and reductions in milrtary 
spending following the Korean 
War. The recession of 1957 and 
1958 has been attributed to arise in 
interest rates and the subsequent 
tightening of monetary policy. 


The recession: of 1959-1960 was 
caused by tight monetary policy 
intended to slow slightly accelerat- 
ing inflation, economists say. 

The economy had rally a slight 
pause in its expansion in tbe inter- 
vening years until the recession of 
1969-1970: hie That downturn, 
economists say, was caused by a 


tight monetary policy designed to 
cool inflation brought on by Viet- 
nam war spending 
Economists contend that outside 
shocks were largely to blame fra 
the recession of 1974-1975, when 
the first Arab oil embargo oc- 
curred. Energy prices increased 
about 400 p ercent. 


it 




-ADVERTISEMENT 


-k * 




Pt .V 



INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Q uo ta ti o ns Supplied tnr Funds Listed 
12-March 1985 

iMtasMl vahM quotation* shown briw mawM by ft* Funds Quad wftt me 
eoflon of soma tanas wbos« mates art band on bsoa prices. The feuowtaa 
iraihial symbol* MM frawonev «f qaataHoao supnDod for Nw IHT: 
tea -rtaHy,- (w)-wmKIv) (M-M-montWv; (rt-rootitarfy; (O-irroouiartr. 

MALMANAGEMENT «o 

ai.Umi T„wt c a ,1M71 ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

AlMoITrusLAA PBHSl The HcmtOTOJ 44900 

NK JULIUS BAER & CO. Ltd. — (rt > Bmr MmSUmi** *3270 

ncStef !?- ' sfotS 

J) EquibOBr PacHIc SFIttSJO Iffl 5F,166J0 

si Gnbar sfuuao — 

i) sov-H yir SF 172200* Lloyd* lirri PacttK — 

ccvu PARUBAS— GROUP 

_ s»m 

iiiTECmrikiu ciiiw — (if} OBU-O M - . DM1.HU1 

1 1 itk FWM N.v OBLIGESTION SFtZ7S 

NGUE INDOSUEZ — (w) OBU-OOLLAR 5 1JBUC 

1 ) Asian Growtti Fund SI02J — obli-yen y iOWIQJM 

«r) Ohrttfbond _______ SFKL45 — (nr) OflLI-GULOEN FL ID37 j64 

«) Fl F — America SIM4 — (d } PAROIL-FUND S 100A7 

S9Jt — (rtl PAR1NTER FUNO__^_ J 100.15 

. . S ULS7 — 4rt ) PAR US Trwuurv Bonrt_ > M7J4 

ndoMzMumtwndi A SISN 


SF3HUJ0 

SF14L0O* 


- ; l^CSF Fund. 


) FI F— Europe. 
)FIF— PaciflL. 


i) indm^MttttaanSBlZrsi«DM ROYAL B.OFCANADAPOBNLGUERNSEY 

iMnnHomramn. RBCCanodlon Ftnd LW S11.1l 

iTANNlAPOB2n.St.HaMr.Janw -hwI RBC Far EottWodflc Fd 11044 

*1 BitMMIor Incoma SUtt* -Marl RflC Inn CopM Frt. 12040 

-I HHUMm.fwr Up -M»1 RBC inti IncomaM inn* 

1 1 Brtt [nils MTOGPom sam -KdtmcHoACumncyH S22J0 

I [ Brit. IfrittMorwaPortf cl J34 -fra] RBC North Amar. Fit. sta- 
ll 2^J!i^!^ GrOWrtn SKAMDIFOND INTLFUND UfrM3«2J« 

?! KtSSSSffiroirz. -w o«w, «« 


I > BrIL JoPtai Dir Part. Frt. 
a| BrlLJanav cm FuncL— 
I ) Brit. World Leb. Fund—. 
1 J BrIL Wortd Tactuv Fund. 
*ITAL INTERNATIONAL 
-il Capital Inti Fund-.-. . 
«> Capitol Iloilo SA 


15.10 

.15.10 


—t wlAco: BM MJO Oftar, 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONALLTD- 
iimo 17 Oaaonatilrs SaXondoo-OI-OT-ao* 

SUI5 — (b)SHB Bend Fund 521.19 

— (w) shb inM Grawtti Fund sltJt 


SU.17 SWISS BANK OORP. 

* HJ7 — (d ] America Valor. 


5F4J1J 


. “OIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

. ,!) Action* Satasss St 5 

TJ) Bond VOter Sad . . SF 10U0 

. 'A - -- -- - 


"‘“ssusaac-. 0 ^ 


d ) Dollor Bond 

a > Flortn Bond Selectoa- 

Bond Valor O-marfc DM 10*27 ” }9 j !E£yoE; 

Bond Valor USOOLLAR — 1 109.12 


FLinas- 

. SF9100 

sF was 


Bond Valor Yen Yon 1838X00 ZJd ! 

Convart VatarSwf SF 10945 ~)2 1 ‘ afmm 

Convert Valor US4M3LLAR. *11205 ~ }2{ c a iSrS 

fniirnnr - SF nun — »“ i untworwl runo. . — — Sr new 

C5 Food*— flon m . Sf.rHf UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 


cs Fonda— Is 


sf moo 


CSMonavMoriutFund__ SlM5oe 


(3 Money Mort al Food 
Enerota-Volor^^B 


Europe— Voter. — „ 

Padflc— Valor 

'INVESTMENT FFM 

(d J Concontra 

(di inn Ronloafond_ 


DM 102580 —id 
SF 17A7S -_?d 
sf io«ai» —ta 
SF 15L5D ZJd 
SFUL73 


AincaUS.^H 
BoMFInvost— 
FonwSwtaSb.. 


Japan-l nvori 
Sadt South AtrSlv.. 
Sima (stock price). 


UNION INVESTMENT Fmnkfur 
— (d Uni rente 

£*2f2 — (d UnHonds 

DM84.90 — <d Ualrok 



g, COM Pool _1 11984 — M/Wfead) liivoalHMIlll Fund. S2849 


i I : % iiicsiJ* 


m A Hnltt 4 Uert Gaorpa. Brumels 
nl D8H Conrnedltv Pool. 130077 
nl CinTancy A Gota Pool — S1WS* 
n) Winch. Lift FUL Pool— SMAOO 
111 Tront Wortd Ful Pool— 197926 — 

C MGMT. LTD. INV, ADVISERS 
ouiance Powntv Hill, ECA 01433-W89 

•J FAC Attantta 11225 

*] FAC Ettroueon- — 19^ 

•1 FAC Oriental 52173 

-1EL1TY POfl 471 Homnton Bermuda 
nl American Values Common.- SIA50 
m) Amar Vohiaa CwnPnrf— l ioi.il 

II FkMIty Amar. Assets 54189* 

11 FkJaWv Australia Fund 1776 


Other Funds 


w) Acnrflo Intamatlonol Fund— 9 W7.16 

r ) Arab Finance IF . .... 584887 

(b)Arime S1JD224 

wi Tnntcor Inn Fd. (AEIF) 110J0 


*3 ) Fidelity Discovery Fund 51034 

3>PkMUy01r.Sv8S.Tr— — 5 0141 C"{ 
1) FMelNv For East Fund SI9JI Pi 


l\ 


Fidelity \afL Fund. 


■ Fidelity Orient Fund J 
IV Fidel dv Frontier M 

J] Fidelity PodHc 
3) FkMIty SPcLGrawfliFd.- 
3) FkMHv Wortd Fuod.H 


15173 

12AD4 

51259 

513155 

SIAM 

538.13 



I III!"!' 


RBES PO 8887 GRAND CAYMAN 
K)Sn Aoant 0F819-3O13 

GoM taoame - — 5778* 

' «> Gold Aanredanan — S-US 

. r el Dollar Income sb.73 

tf-iw) strotaolc Tm5 ■ — ■ . ST .11 


... AcNveat inK. 
ml Allied Ltd. 


51074 

8350 


w) BNP IntertxMid Fund . 

Sid ' 


m) Canada GW-MdriaaBa I 

dl Capital Praea rv. Fd. int 
iBCtiodei Fund jammmm 




13940 

tuo 

S11H9 

SLB2 

1977 

5973 


FI NOR FUNDS. 


■ ri Eon I nvestmant H 
HMli Wortd Fund 


scottuhBmramm 
State SL American. 


AUGukUJd. LonJV»enUJl -49 TOO 


135051 
C 12158 
514848 


w%*** 


. OBAL ASSET A4ANAGEMENT CORP. 
k *''lW.Sl Peter Port, Goemsev, 9(8148715 

>’■) FuturOAM SA 1 128.19 

KsAM Arbtrrooe Inc s 17773 

GAMerlcoloc SI3SJB* 

'6AM Boston Inc — 518159 

■ CAM Ennttope S USD 

'GAMFrfovrt. SFW74 

1 Gam International Inc *18079 

• • GAM North Amorlco Jnc. S UMO 

_ » BAM N.AiMrica unit Tnaf. 10150 p 

' GAM Pocmc Inc *11350 

. 'GAM start. A Inti Unit Trust- 13250 e 
I GAM SvNana Inc.... . S I07JM 

<GAM«nrM«ld*lnc 812450* 

' ) GAM Tydie 57L Class A C119.M 

MANAGEMENT (UK) LRL 
. 1 lBerryPacFd.ua— — — 5959 
d 1 G.T, Appfled Sctence 51SH* 

-, &:Sy-F 

G.T. Eure. Small CoS. Funfl — -»JJ 

GT. Pallor Fund., — S1A49 

G.T. Bond Fund *955 

G.T. GMKri Tadmlov Fd - 513.17 


Gm»ernm. Sec. Fund* ..., — 1B7J2 
FronkFTruxt I rite n*a~ DM4076 

Ko mmiuu imi HktgV N.V. *18751 

HMtaR mds- l.SlgAg 

<b j I LA inti Gold Bond. *971 

dlintarfundSA— — Silas 

wl lntennqr k at Fund— *3l|55 

(w» InO Currency Raid Ltd *754 

’ Inrt Securities FMd 58.95 


P) 


G-T. Honshu P at h Un der ___. ..... 

6.T, Invastmant Fund— 51749 rwl 
G.T. Japan Small Co.Fund_ 54143* (r 

G.T. TeehndlOQV Fund **.91 Jr. 

G.T,Soutt China Fund— 11124' (b) 




Drakfcar Invoef^und N.v_ S 1.112.14 
_ . Oreytus Fund Inti — . . 53558 


J CJ.R.Ausfralto Fund 

) CJ.R. Jcot Fund — 

1 ) Oevalond Ofisfwre Fa — 52579171 

‘ Cotembla SncuittMLJ FL T25.H 

COMETE S935J# 

w) Convert. Fa Inn A Certs 5949 

;w) Convert. Fa nilhB Certs— . *2959 

D7T.C 57424 

D. Witter WM Wide IvtTst .8954 


First Eagle I 


FHtvStae 

Ptnstwry 


Stan Lta. 


W^^OTGnwpBI 

Fonselex Issue PrJ 
Forosfund-. — n — 9 
Fonnuki S electton I 
|Fondnnlio.^^M 


I Investa DWS 

invest Attflii 




(wl Jrnwn Padflc Fund 
w) Jotter Pins. Inti. Ltd. 

w)Le 
d>L» 


810758 



r 

\i 

I w 




C TRUST 0X1 JERSEY! LTD. 
Seol#SULH#»tar.H53M4331 

ADED CURRENCY FUND. 

Allocs Bin _..st44 Otter 597*4 

VOsu BU— 51 854 Oftar .818572 

TERNATIONaL INCOME FUND 

d) Start Term 'A' lAccum) *14554 

d J Short Term 'A 1 (DWr) I1W1 

dj Short Tertn •B'lAccwnl— *1 591 2 {d 

8 Start Term VIBMrl IID H, 

nl Lore Term — 52049 

ADINE FLEMING. POB 8) UFO He KB . W 

b ) j^ Jam Trust : Y4960 Iw 

b )XF South &BSt Ado *3847 jw 

5J J.F Jopwi TedwtoBY — YZW34 IW 
£1 J.F Podflc S»c4,(Acc) — - 
b) JjOAusmafig - *351 (d 


w) Novotac Investment Fund— 8 W44 

, w) KAALF 514770 

82A3D (m) MSP F.l.T *®W 

PANCURRI I DC— SUM. 

Partan Sw. R Ed Geneva 5FU9M0 
Period Value Fund N.V — 8142645 

ptetodos 598MO 

PSOO Fund N.V.- IJOABI 

Pumam InH Fund *544* 

Pri— Tech **]«» 


m**' 


: -• 

jdtotr* 1 

jssa^O:-- 

r**» *** 

: '<8? (ft "' 



/fWR 



■Deutsche Mark 
Florin ■ 
w) Swiss Front! 


. 53430119 
LF255A00 

LF I55JJB 

Reserve insired DeuaeiiB- SIM&g 
“SF 11070 


Quantum Fund N-V„ 

S3S££H 

Reserve liwfll 
Safe Trust Fund* 

Somard PartteitaJ 


sfflaatate.jjs 

ssm ssacii.’ja 

Tedew Growth Fund- — . *EJ2S 


*1: 


i ^ 


Tokyo Pot Hold. JSfoJ- 
Takye Pue Hdd. N.V- - 

Tm nsp o cHl c Fund 

Turoudae F un d-. . ^ 

Tweedv3rawn* RM gtara* *25M3* 

TWee dy Jtowne enflSSd *un*| 

UNICO Fund— DM./Wt 

uni Bend Fund *! 

UNI COPttol Fund— - * 

United Cor Invt Fund Ltt— _ 
wedge Europe N.V 

8SS08M&C= fSS 

1BJD 


— Oeuttdie MOTk; BF — Beteiuftt FfOttOS FL — DHlg? LP JI 

■Mmtaure Am: sf — s 
. WVswtonperunli; 1 

dwnie; ++— ddly SWA 

E)|F <*a*on A nwt ordna t Stock letJuanw 

vefrifijr— = 


Dollar Oted in U.S. Job Loss 


(Con&xued from P^ge 9) ■ 
ive us a sew reason to continue 


Senator Lloyd Beatsen, a Texas 
Democrat, riiFirman of the sub- 
committee on economic goals and 
intergovernmental policy, reacted 
sympathetically: 'Tax reform leg- 
islation is 180 degrees different 
from our present system — I un- 
derstand what youre saying," he 
told Mr. Brinner. 

The tine now has crane for the 
United States to demand eoual 
treatment from “partnos” it had 
helped achieve greater power, Mr. 
Brinner argued. “It’s a serious mis- 
take to assume that (today’s) recov-, 
ery represents the fid] potential of 
the economy. Things may look 
>g6bd compared tcr l982, but not 
compared lo history.” - 


Mr. Brinner, who said that “Ja- 
pan is the big winner," while the 
United States and Europe “are the 
big losers'* in global trade competi- 
tion, said that tbe Reagan adminis- 
tration had made a mistake in not 
getting a quid pro quo from Japan 
when n announced that it would no 
longer press fra continuance of vol- 
untaiy auto quotas after March 31. 

And although he labried as “ex- 
treme" the imposition of an import 
surcharge or tariff as a way of in- 
ducing Japan to provide greater ac- 
cess to its markets, Mr. B rinner 
indicated that he thought that such 
a tool would strengthen the hand of 
U.S. negotiators. Coincidentally,' 
Rep. Joan Dingell. Democrat of 
Michi gan chairman of the House 
Energy and Commerce Committee, _ 
said Tuesday that he was drafting’ 
such legislation. 


Handwriting and Recruiting 


(Continued from Page 9) 
companies operating in France use 
handwriting analysis in recruiting 
executives, including Korn Ferry 
International, Rnssell Reynolds 
Associates Inc. and General Elec- 
tric SA, the French subsidiary of 
the US. electrical group known fra 
its innovative approach to execu- 
tive recruitment and training. 

; “When in Rome do as the Ro- 
mans do, I suppose.” says Mr. Mb-. 
Mahon, of Rom Fdry Internation- 
al. in New York. “We’re an 
international company that will 
spread around successful methods 
initiated in any one of our offices. 
But I don’t see our U.S. dimes 
accepting graphology." 
m A good reason that some compa- 
nies” use handwriting analysis as 
part of executive recrating is that it 
is cheap for the company — rang- 
ing from 200 francs ($19.68) to TOO 
francs — compared to executive 
recruiters* fees and psychological 
tests. 

Companies resort to a handwrit- 
ing test raily after extensive inter- 
views with the candidate and thor- 
ough checking of references. 

“Out of 20 canriirfatfx , there are 
four left I am stiU seriouily consid- 
ering two with excellent results on 


their handwriting analysis and two 
where the expens had serious 
doubts about certain aspects of 
their personality" says Jean-Marie 
Arbefot, director of human re- 
sources at Lyomutise des Eaux. “I 
would never make a hiring decision 
only on the bass of a handwriting 
analysis." 

To some executives the use ra 
handwriting tests is an invasion of 
privacy. Toey don’t believe how 
they write has anything to do with 
how they are likely to perform in 
the job. A U.S. advertising execu- 
tive was told that he would have to 
take a graphology test to qualify for 
ajob with a french news organiza- 
tion. After the executive refused to 
take the test, saying that it was 
“mumbo jumbo, the news organi- 
zation withdrew its job offer. 

That attitude is not uncommon. 
“We tefl our candidates it’s non- 
nego liable," says Marc Lamy of 
Korn Ferry international in Paris. 

U^L executives wary of revealing 
their timer selves and who are look- 
ing fra a job in France can fed 
rdativdy safe. Many French gra- 
phologists say they can’t figure out 
Americans’ bandwriting. “They all 
write the same,” saysMrs. Pent de 
Mirbeck. 


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rc i n ss. In 1983, the company had a sidering buying Home State S&v- 

profit of $58 J million. ings Bank, winch dosed Saturday joint venture to produce 


opacoes, also of Brazil, will set up a 
ferrosOi- 


con beginning late in 1986, a Ka*.' 
wasaki spokesman said in Tokyo. 

Lockheed Corp. said it has re- ^ 
quested and will review f inancial ‘ 
information on Textron Inc’s Beil 
Helicopter subsidiary, which was’ 
pm up fra sale last week Lockheed T 
said it has made no decision about 
a potential bid fra BelL /• 

Smith International Inc. has ~ 
abandoned a 10-month battle to 
take over Gearhart Industries Inc. ’ 
Under an agreement between the 
two companies. Smith is to be paid 
$80 million, or $15.09 a share, fra 
its 5 J million shares of Gearthart 
stock, for which it paid about $160 
million. 

Sugrolnc., an association of sug- 
ar beet growers, is seeking to ac- ' 
quire the assets of Great western 
Sugar Ox, a major holding of the 
billionaire Hunt brothers. Great 
Western, the largest sugar refiner in 
the United States, filed last Thurs- * 
day for protection from its credi- 
tors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. 
bankruptcy code. 

Wang Laboratories Inc. said it 
expects its profit margin for the 
third quarter ending March 31 to 
be 5 to 6 percent, down from 9.2 
percent a year earlier. 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 

$ 200 , 000,000 

(SoperVision < e > 

8%% Convertible Subordinated Debentures due 2005 

(Interest payable March 1 and September 1 ) 


Copies of the Prospectus are (Attainable in any State from the undersigned 
and such other dealers as may lawfully offer these securities in such State. 


Drexel Burnham Lambert 

INCORPORATED 


March. 1985 


a lumam m mtt mum 

T8H& Vi mu- WL 





5 : 


iwitzeriand, Inc is alive 
'and well Despite tbe 
ted that attention often 
tends to be focused on other 
madeets, the country affords 
excellent investment oppor- 
tunities. 

With its relatively small 
size and diverse population, 
Switzerland- one of Europe’s 
major capital markets - 
is truly international in out- 
look. For example, of the 30 
laigest Swiss corporations, 

25 are multinationals, some 
of which generate only a 
small share of their business 
within the country. 

Yet Switzerland reflects 
the traditions of a sound 
currency good I^bor rela- 
tions, fiscal realism and a 
stable political dimate - all 


of winch contribute to sound 
prospects for exports and 
company earnings. Indeed, 
because of the convergence 
of a number of factors, the 
Swiss franc should be of _ 
special interest to the inter- 
national investor: 

Bank Jufites Baer 

As one of Switzerland’s 
most experienced and pres- 
tigious private banking insti- 
tutions, Bank Julius Baer is 
well positioned to provide 
professional analyses of 
trends in key international 
markets - including expert 
recommendations on current 
opportunities in Swiss francs. 

Tbe Bank’s international 
commitment rests on a cen- 


tury-old tradition, based on 
the conviction that excellence 
of service is tbe basis for last- 
ing relationships with its 
clients. 

“The International 
Investor" 

Timely, in-depth infor- 
mation has always been crucial 
to a successful investment 
strategy. 

lb provide the investor 
with reliable guidelines for 
decision-making, Bank Julius 
Baer publishes tbe quarterly 
“International Investor,” 
which supplies valuable 
background information. The 
current issue lakes a dose 
look at tbe degree to winch 
the serious.intemational in- 


vestor should include Swiss 
franc assets in a well- 
balanced multicurrency 
portfolio. 

We invite you to write to- 
day for a complimentary 
copy: 

f 

! Bank Julius Baer IHT 

Me )m A. Bieftnsfci 
Balmbojstiasse 36, CH-8QZ2 Zurich 
TeL (01) 22851 11, Ities 812115 

□ Send me infbmulion 

□ Ring me personally TfcL 


! Name (prim). 


Address. 


City. 


IDgqD BANK JULIUS BAER 

J 1—1 I— I For the fine art of Swiss hanking. 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


Page 13 


JSMESS PEOPLE 


lited Technologies Forms 
temational Business Unit 




.A . 




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' - By Brenda Hagcrty 

1 ‘ 'numanonat Herald Tribune 

, . , ; NDON — United Tecbnot- 
• ‘ Corp. has appointed Hubert 
chairman, and Peter K. 
man president, of a unit 
. d to coordinate the compa- 
. 1 Jobal business growth. 

■ new unit, to be known as 
»X’d Technologies International 
. .ess Cop., will be based at 
; ; > s headquarters in Hartford, 
1 \ecticuL Mr. Faure will con- 
as UTCs senior executive 
; -resident for building systems. 
~ i Chapman was vice piesident- 
1 • •' iational program manage- 
of UTCs Sikorsky Aircraft 

; r ML 

' ; ited Technologies said the 
" : xccurives will have responsi- 


bilities in the development and 
monitoring of global business strat- 
egies and also will coordinate die 
activities of its Pacific and Europe- 
an advisory councils, whose chair- 
man is Alexander M. Haig , a for- 
mer UTC president and former 
UjS. secretary of state. 

United Technologies a 
wide range of high-technology 
products, including Pratt & Whit- 
ney aircraft engines and Sikorsky 
helicopters. The company said its 
international sales in 1984 were 
$5.8 bfllion, or about 36 percent of 
total 

Tokai Bant Ltd. of Japan has 
opened a representative office in 
Bahrain ana appointed TakasM 
Fujie chief representative. He for- 
merly was based in Tokyo as the 


bank's manager for the Middle services group, said Darcy Ford 
East. has been appointed senior vice 

Gnif& Western Industries said president of the Tokyo branch that 
Franz J. Lulolf, general manager n plans to own in four to five 
and member of the executive board months. Mr. Ford previously was 
of Swiss Bank Corp-, has been Westpac’s New South Wales state 
elected to its board. G & W, based manager for corporate banking, 
in New York, has interests in enter- Previously, he was deputy manag- 
tainment, financial services, aspar- ing director of Kuwait Pacific ri- 
el, manufacturing, food products, nance Co., a Hong Kong-based 
bedding and home furnishings and merchant bank, 
automotive-parts distribution. Drew! Burnham Lambert, the 
Sperry Carp, has appointed Ray- New York-based securities firm, 
mond L. Coloui corporate vice said jt has named Juig Gotze man- 
president for finance. Mr. Colotti, ager of its new Eurobond depan- 
a director of Sperry subsidiaries in tnent m Zurich. He joins Drexd 



sne- 

who 


Burnham from White Wdd Securi- 
ties, in Zurich, where he was vice 
president and manger of the fixed- 
income department. 

We&s Fareo Bank of San Fran- 


Italy, Sweden and 
ceeds Thomas V. Hnsch 
has become chaimum of 

Capital Management Corp. 

ously, Mr. Colotti had been 

Sperry* svice president for pl anning cisco said Alessandro degH Ales- 
and bus i n e ss development. Sperry sandri, managing director of Wells 
is a U^.- based diversified comput- Fargo Ltd. in Lon don , resigned “to 
er maker. pursue other interests in Italy." He 

Westpac Banking Cool, Austin- has been retained by Weds Fargo 
Ea’s largest banking and financial- a s special consultant. 


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10 *4 9680 9175 

9H 214 9100 9980 
9% 293 9975 10675 
•% 04 9949 99 JT 

a% 114 noTDiotJo 
189 314 9670 91% 
11% >4 1161110628 

9 % im lnuoioan 


Non Dollar 


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BK Montreal 94 
Bk Tokyo BS/9B 
Ba lodasuez 91 
atom 89/91 
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CEPME M 
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Credit Matkxed 91/95 
Denmark SiVI 
LLLN 

KbMdtxn Belgium 9s 
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11% 27-3 9985 9985 
14% 2M *980 bid 
14% 21-S 9987 10657 
IM IM 9*21 9921 
U% 54 9125 9980 
M% 214 *98* 10600 
10% 94 9972 99X2 
9% 1*3 9983 10003 
14% 2H 106301 BLO 
CM IM 9972 9912 
10% IM 9978 9981 
14% 3*5 *979 99J9 
13*. 75 9987 10607 
12% 344 10627100/7 
10% 27-3 9*25 198$ 


Source : CrtdH Sutsse-Wrst Boston Ltd. 
UMUtan 


The Daily fe>ver-the-Gounter 
mtema&analfa 

^ NASDAQ National Market Prtcsn 


March 12 





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StrwCs 30b 18 
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Stuarttt 85 13 
Subaru 180 13 
SubUrt 85 13 
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SwmtBm 96 48 
SwiitHI 8% 8 
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480 7% 7% 7U— Vb 
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37*37 35% 35% — l\b 

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236 32% 329b 32% 
47130% 29% 30%+ % 
3617% 17% 17% 
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221 27 24% 27 + M 

10*15 14% 14% - 

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341 Mb 6 Mb + U 
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14519% 1694 1* 

154 7% 7% 71b 
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19 4M 4Vb 4M 

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400 3Vb 39b 3% 

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23* 7 4% «%— U 

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754% 5594 5594— Vb 

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16 7% 7% 7% — Vb 
11010 % 10% VM+ % 
4*6 15 U% 14% + % 
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31 4% 41b 4Vb — U 

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3S 3% 3% 3%— U 
521 21 21 

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14410 «% *94— % 

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57 4U 4 4% + % 

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7 4% 4% 4M — Mr 
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142 5 4% 494— U 

14UU MU 16% 

3623 22% 22% — Vb 

219 4U 59b 59b— « 

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61 7U 4% 69b— W 
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TCACb 

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TSR 

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Tanaott 

Tdtnal 

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TicmA 

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T«mDt 

Taodsta 

Texan 

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86 18 


J2 L7 


.92 48 

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12614 13% U%— U 

182 mb mb 19%+ % 
25 6% SU B%+ tt 
27 BU nt S — Vi 
4541% 4B 41% 
1710% W 10 
4*78 22% 21% 22U+96 
1547 4% 6% 4% + U 
815 MU 15 — U 

2 7 7 7 — U 

1130 16% 17% 18 

1U1M 23% 23%— U 
3614121b 12 12% + M 

4 0% BM ■%— U 
11716% UU HVb 
5D222 21% 21% + % 

275 3 2% 3 

muu » i*% + % 

X241S 17% 1794— % 

125 5U 4% 5% + % 

20 794 7% 7% 

41 3% 3 3% + % 

9621 21 9 — W 

3 BU ■% *% 

41 1% 1% 1%— U 

1* i% m iu— u 

33017% 14% 17% +2% 

HSU 13% V +% 
21114% U 15% + U 


Sdmia Net 

!••• Hurt LOW 3P84.QYM 


V 


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Thortec 
ThouTB 
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Tlereo . . 
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Tlprary 
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Trtan 

TnnJa 

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TuckDr 

TwnCtv 

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JD* S 
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180 3.1 


80 8 


150 *94 *% «% + % 
4136% 34% 3594 + 
1511% 11% 1T% 

44012% UU T2U 
35* 14% 14% 14% + U 
204 8M 49b ■%+ U 
25 BM 0% BM— % 
560 13 12 12% 

SC SU 

4414% MM 14%+ U 

430% 30% 30% 

2 4% 5% 4U 

in 17 17 

15 14 1394 1394— % 

40 3Vb 3 3U + U 

151 mb 16% 10% — % 

12 6% 6% 4%— U 
57 3% 3% 3% 
22VH4 *% 10% 

34 3*% 29 27% 

91329b MM 33% 

17. 7 7 — % 

22 1 % 1 % 1 % 

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UTC _ 

UtirBcp IH 48 

Ultrav 84a J 

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unibcp 

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UAQns 

UBArtr 86 29 
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UBkSB 

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UnEdS 
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UVaBe 184 <1 

UnvFm 

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UFSBk 

UpRsht 18 

UrwCr 

Uocafc .14* 27 
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17319* 31% 31%—% 
100520% 20% 20% 

10 26% 26 28% + % 
186 8% 6 8M+U 
161* 18% UU IBM +2 
511% 11% 11%+% 
106 16 *9b 10 + % 

24 21% 20% 2D%— U 

11 55% 55 55% + % 

71 17U 17 17% + % 

26 30 30 30 — % 

710% 10% 10% 
3313% 13% 13V.— % 
5325% 26% 25% + U 
413 13 13 + Vb 

73 3 2% 39b— % 

IS 8Tb 8% 8%— U 
7W2DU 1*% 1*M— Vb 
11511 109* 10%—% 

M KM 10% 10%— V. 
4 10% 10% 10%—% 
ISM W W 
8*5 30% 30 30M 
104 3% 3% 39* + U 

6 5 5 5 — U 

56 7% 7% 7%+ U 
137520 249b 27% — % 

17 4% 4% 4U 
3221*% 1BU 1VU + U 
HIM 1» 13 + U 
735 29 28% 28% — V, 

4*7 23% 22% 23% — M 
25719 T|% 16% 

6* 409b 409b 40M— % 
1635 21% 20% 21 
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20 4 4 4 

30 *M 914 9%— % 

12 5% 5 5 — % 

160 5M 5% S9b 

431 59b 4% SVb + % 
5925% 24% 25 +1 


VLI 

VLSI 

VMX 

V3E 

ValULa 

Vtdlen 

ValFSL 

ValFra 

VoMtl 

Valtefc 

VaILn 

Von Due 

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717 16% 17 

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26 4% 6 * — % 

7*934% 34 34M+U 

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213% UU 13% + U 
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4113% 13% 13%— % 


.STl % % 


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1*2 4% 4% 4% 

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10 3 3 1 — U 

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S56 3% 3Vi 39* + Vb 
* 12% 129b T2% 
1210% 10% 10%—% 
40617% 16% 17U + U 
4 4% *% 49* + % 

182 1% 1% 1% + M 

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244 17% T7 17 — % 
9231% 31% 31% + U 
1 1% 1% 69*—* 

16 7Y. 7U 7U + U 


W 


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86 8 

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J»U 

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WO 40 
WedbrC 
WTkrTel 
WshE 
WF3L4 
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WltlSCS .12 
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Wetatds jo 
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WKWW Jb 42 
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Wilton 

Whejnw h LD 
WhmEn 

WWfO 88 42 
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84 22 
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JO 13 


11 34% MU MU— U 

21 HU. 26% 26% 

145 99* 9% *%— U 
169 30 19% 20 +U 

15429% Z9U 29% 
35612% 11% IX 
SS 30% 194b 2BU + 94 
15 1016 9% 10 — U 
115 BM SU. BM 
617% 1714 17% 

220 V3U 12% p 

2 mb mb HU 

122 nu io% n — u 
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35 SU 6 IU 

27 0 7% 7% 

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1016% WU 19W 
161 16U 15% 16U + % 
1023% 23% 23% 

4134 35% 3SU 

80269b 26U 34U+U 
7304 4% 6 6U- U 

212 9 BM 8% — U 
30 MM WM 10% + % 
5739% J9 39% 

70% 13% U%— % 
343 MU I SVb MU 
1 9U 9M «U 

713% 13% 139* 

1 49% 49% +Ub 
54 9 SU 9 

41315 S% 139b— IU 

3 4U 3% SU — M 
1C 7 4B M 

40 4U 4% 4% 

420% 2BU 29% 

91 4% 4% 4M— U 
3117 16U T7 +» 

H2SU 2Kb 26M— U 
61 IH 6 6%+ U 

2 MVS 24H MVS 


MB tn Pel 

1*0* mmb Law SPj4.arw 
ITMUU T3% MU— % 


YtoorFt 

YorkFd 


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1*734 

2714 


3S9b 35% 

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ZenUrB 
Zentec 
zi eater 
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Z3yod 

Zondvn 

Zymos 

Zytre* 


a 


84 38 


0MU 30% 30M 
S 4M 4V, <M 
101 1291. 12Jb I2M — % 
3034% 369* K9k 
5 4M 4U 4U 
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-s 1 ^ va an* 

197 19b IM 1% 


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mnongi 

| Ita m l y ameemedBinmUSl. 

m OmOL- pwb OT plwBppnpri.Fienm.1h>. ■ 

! Kr Learn ! 
* a foreign; 
; language on; 
; your own! I 

■ m For CetoiogMe.cMI or wrta: | 
I Audio-Forum, Suite 364 “ 

B 31 Kdeekenten Owrah S t r eet, ' 
» London *A«X. (01) S37 1M7 I 


PAPER CUP PLANT 

FOR SALE 

Replacement vab»$8flQOtf)QaoO 
LjOOQyOOO-8 oz. cups per day 
Sale price -^500000 
One complete tine for 
9H000 cups per day — $370^100 
Start op and 

plant stiff operating 
for a touted time only. 

Qips are doable wrapped— 
recessed bottom— rolled Bps 

wtth map co covets, can be waxed 
(7 noo-w&xed — printed or plain. 

Write— Wire— Call 

Frank Micefi 
S&S MACHINERY CO. 

140 53 Straat 
BraoldyrvN.T. 11232 
~ 718 -492-7 400 

127S7D 


MTBMATKMIAL 

QEMMOLOQICAL 

m si 1 1 ute 

CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED AND 
RECOGNIZED ALL OVER THE WORLD 


ANTWERP 



NEW YORK 


k3 

ONE WEEK INTENSIVE 

DIAMOND AND COLORED 
STONES COURSES. 

For mote mtornuimn 
S tfcup Huia 1/7 - 201 1 Antwerp 
Tel: (0/232.0733 Beigium 


Xtaer 


482 4U 
26610% 


4 6 — % 

9% Iflb+M 


ainunmninmnimnniiimipimiiiwuii; 

1 WANTED | 

I INACTIVE OIL I 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


&31.7M464H7 


GREAT BRITAIN 


TNt houso donk in 1 oaocflond 
me belt private cul de toe rood. 

bedroom saitei with L 
baths, funhsr 3 beds, __ 

WO, magnfficBni oak 
(punge with toyed fi 
kitchen breakfbst rtv. H 
Gas central heating 


“our $; 

cou Mnoibe 
ham 527291 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


GOOD INV5TM04T 

VIBih A2EA near 

CHAMPS EYSKS 

• dutfc, 24 sqa. F400JJ00 
- jtwSo, 36 aim. F475JOO 

FRANKUN ROOSEVaT 

■ ttvio. 37 ajm. F790j000 

D. FiAU 294 20 00 

132 U llrpnimnmi 75008 Pan 


Immoafafe 

emtury 


Regal design 700 ayn. house with 
2 oardens + 


Superb Ihroughaut 

CABINET MARCEAU 


720 01 44 


FRONT DC SHNE 

BAGATH1E 

IE FRANCE 
EXCEPTIONAL VEW 
GN ALL PARS 4 BOB 
RONT TERRACE, RECEPTION 
AQNQ SOUTH, 3 bodroona, 2 bed 
orbine ■ NO WORK TO K DON 
EXCLUSIVE 

STJ*IBUtE 563-1 1-88 


BD DU CHATEAU 

NUU.Y MONO SOUTH 
HEGA NT APAR TMENT 
FOR RECEPTIONS 
• 2 B edroom* 2 BoH% 200 %» 

EMBASSY 562 16 40 


lenLYsr. iamb. 


on Bob de Boulogne, in high dan 
ing, eiegant +rwxn. 100 mm. on ca 
cony, parkin. Many other quaSt 
op or imeot i m 16th, 8th, KfaAi 
Agenop VANEAU 70428ID, 

64 Av Raymond Rflineor fe , Pars 16 


15th; {npor MAKE) 2 

floor tunny, eStrabw. 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA'S NEW 
SUP® PORT 

ta the bay of Una, 5 mini. Mma. 15 
mint orport, 664 bertta 8 to 38 metere, 
2 for up to 60 meters ooch. todyidicx 
TV/mami/waJcr/phone cxxmerJnm. 
Profeniorad port management to. Fail 
marine servicesi tower, ratio, dp, trow- 
e i+ft, re pair, fuel Cation, in & outdoor 
winter hon&tandv, Ltground oar- park. 
Lodmra. Cocn^enimiteey service & lei- 
sure tacMese medaA 

cing, entering, entertainment. 

terns nearby. Couriered area com- 
prises B5 unis an 13,171 sqjn. it dL 
Hus 21 uper apartments above & 78 m 
seperate Mary asndo - at in front Sne 
dang nan piers. Top ewed — ill 45% 
Hurry ny befor e next priceritel 
Contact ebredfy devdopen: 

macro funta portais, sa 

Director Comerriol 
C/ Marino 10T, Portofe Now 
Mallorca, Spain or ibt 66686 CAUU E. 


SWITZERLAND 


GST A AD 

A once in a Sfetkne opport u nit y 

SCHONRJED 

ar4y a few mexAes from lovely Gstood. 
Apartments at prices 
ngn dicu ia j y lower than Gstood. 
MOlroAG8 70%+NTBSST 5H% 

AVARABU FOR FORBG94HS. 
(KOBE FUN SJL 

Am Mon Rapes 24 
CH-1005 laflannflL Switarkmd 
Ttk (21)22 35 12 Tbe 25185 MBS CK 


LAKE GBCVA AREA (Montnoc Lou- 

sam^ + al famow mountam rn- 

sons. Foreigners can boy: APAOT- 

MB4T5/OttlETS/VlUAS. Prices 


614% interest. Contact H. 

SA-Taw Grim 6. OilOQ7 Uxarmne. 
Td 21/2526 11. Th 24298 SfflOCH. 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


va m ; \ II J i . NNrM 

- sunny sounem swnzBtLAM) 

_ GOLF HOUSES LUGANO 

5 oomfartubfe nia denoted houret 
* (Efcbon devricmwl]. At idyte loeo- 
"• hon e^onng me fmous getf Enta of 

10 uigcno. Al houses wrrti privoee garden 
fc & Oarage. Ben qut*y mdurina fire- 

m foreigner*. 

3 Morfgogei t* low Swss interest ratal. 

t EMERALD - HOME LTD. 

n- Via G. Catteri 3, CH-6900 Lugcno 
*. TeL- CH-91 -542913 - 

*j Tbu 73612 HOME CH 


Fi^Mi 


■■kTTT u r • vo i a 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

EXPBBB4CED NEWS BKTOR far m- 

JtaKrfiond desk positron. BringuaL 
Sard rrxnpirt* recome in confideiice. 
to Beer STHerdd Trfaune, 55 Vio 
defla Meraede. 00187 Rome. 





| SECRETARIES AVAILABLE j. 





DOMESTIC 
POSTTTONS WANTED 





AUTOMOBILES 


MRKBB BB4Z 500 5a 1985. 

Chtaipotae rratdk with Sriit fcrown 
iemher uphoidery. fuOy loaded. Of- 
fen invited. For detail td. London 
6420879. 

AUTO RENTALS 


AUTO SHIPPING 

HOW TO IMPORT A BJROFEAN 
CAR MTO THE ULSJfc. 

This document expfains faiy whet one 
mutf do la bring a cur into the US 
safely and legaly. It mefades new & 

tom deatonce 6 shipping procedures 
a wefi as legd pairas. Because erf the 
reona dollar, you a** save up ta 
USSlSfOOO wfien buymg a Mercedes, or 
BMW m Europe & importing it id the 
Shies. To receive the* manuafc send 

_v4- rDUioui JiJI — 

7000 Shrttgcrt 1, West Germany ' 


SMPPMG CARS WORUWDE 

We Slipped 29,750 Taarkt Care 0 
UM fawn Venek fa 1983 

CALL MATINA AT 

ANIWBV20 kto (3) 234 36 68 


AUTO SHIPPING 


ALTO CONVERSION 


more. M D 21! 


82209. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


FRANCO 

BRITANNIC 

TAX FREE CARS 


BB^TIEY 

JAGUAR 

ROVER 

RANGE & LAND ROVER 
European & Worldwide 
delivery 

21 Ave Kleber 

75116 PARIS 


PORSCHE. BMW. EXOTIC CAR 

FROM STOCK 

for MMdM/F debvery 
BBTSSTVKZ 

For thwin m a . nonance. bond. 


in U5JV. 

RUTEINC 

Tounuatr. 52, 6000 Frankfurt, 


10 YEARS 

Wp DaEvwr Cm to the 

TRANSCO 


300 brand now an. 
mddng 5000 happy diems every year. 
Send far free raj*tcatoro»aloa 
Traraco SA. 95 Noordelaan, 
2030 Artwraip, Beigium 


TAX FREE CARS 
P.C.T. 


* I n v ent ory 

Al mein, al models, brand new 
feerfa on l^OOjMntwwg Beigfam 

Ik 35546 PHCART B 
Apply far our colour cattdogue 
USS5 cesh 


3 X 500 SEC. ICW. 1985 
2 X 500 SB, FBV. 1985 

2 X 500 SI, NEW. IMS 
2 X Handle Turbo, New. 1935 
I X Porsche 944, MW, 1915 V4 
Al options - OO.T. + ERA. 
Also shewn avalable 
SOUTH-WKl BROKBtS 
Am Rohbusdi 99 41 50 XieMd 
W. Germany. Tlx B531187 CUC D 
Teh H21 51-562751. 


DAWAJI TRADE 

1NTLDBJVRY 

Wa keep o tape Hod of 
meet car branch 

Tel, 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 me Lens, 

1050 Brussels. 


We heepa^mge stock of brand new 
mvl good used obv We do the 1 
D-O.T. and ERA on our awn pre- 
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pmg enf bonefing in UAA. Cortaa us' 
rit these nunioers: teL Beldum 

050/715071, tel LLSA. 301/6338611, 

Ik Belgium 82209 EURQAU B, tbc 
UiA. 4995689 mb US. NV Ero Au-| 

Id's Memtaanai, Koringin Astricf oan 

47, 9990 Mnldcpem, B^um. 


for 


4 DuesseL 

, n 211 - 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


\ EUROPORT TAX 

p - FREE CARS 

j Cal or write for free cmriog. 

n Box 12011 

Rottodm itpurt. Hoiltad 
— TelXnete3Q77 

iv- Tetexibl ffCAR NL 

35 

, Far Dind Defivery 

g| 380 SE. 5ajp0 SE, sa 

- 380 SL 500 sT 380 SEC, 500 SEC 
PORSCHE 911 Carrara A Turbo 
_ Astahon-SuMt GmbH 

5, BochumerStr 103. 4350 RecUmghawen 

A Td 02341/ 7004 Tx 82995/ AfCD 

e BMW, JAGUAR, AUSTIN ROVBt 

R land (WrAfl Ltfo/RtCt. Best Prices 
han wEute deEvery. CaH Hafand 

_ VAN LAARHOVEN LTD 

- PO Box 2178. 5600 CD Endhown 
(0)40-413615 T» 51213 Hefia M 

CAU FORMA IMPORTS needs re+ 
ofcip lumber of new European mode! 
Jaguar. Mercedes, Porsche & U5 ver- 
sion BMW. Saferway fnc 415-94+ 
4866. tbc 314258. 

ICW PBJGEOT. Land Rover. Range 
fewer, Toyota 4x4, trajxa* specs. 
Britos, Zomeboan 18, Meassen- 
braefc, Holand 10(30445492. be 47082 

NEW RHD, MStCEDCS, BMW, most 
models tax free export UK. D93S 
76099, The 312242 MTO T1X 

TAX Free cars, al makes & medds- 
ATK. NV, Ankemj. 22, 2000 AnhMip. 
Befallen. Tel 03/231 16 53 Tx 31535 

MBLCeDES BENZ 1985. Tima, tefc 
01-208 0007. tbc 8956022 TRAS G 

LEGAL SERVICES 

DOMINICAN DIVORCES. 8o« 20802. 
Serto Domingo, Dorartcon Repubk. 

LOW COST FUGHTS 

NY ONE WAY SI 50. Everyday N.Y.- 
West Coast S139. Pons 225 W 90. 

TO USA FROM El 19 am way. 

NATC London D1J34 81 0a 

HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

A1L4N-OPE ferith gudanc^- Burgun- 
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equipped service flats in a rurd et- 
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Write YETA80 DOMAINS. Pt*»y, 
89140 Pont-sur-Yonne. France. 

THEATERS 

ASTORIA THEATRE 01-734 4287 

THEHIRB)MAN 

by Bragg & GoodaL 8v arronaemerT 
vSfr Andrew Uoyd Wfebfe 
“Best musical of the year - 
Memahtaal Herald Tribune. 

BOOKS 


SERVICES 

PARS YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. 
VP PA & bAnquai nterpreter. 

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PA/ Interpreter & Tourism Guide 

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** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

FDR A REAL VIA YOUNG LADY 
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VIP LADY GUIDE 

Young, educated, eiegort & trAngud 

PARIS iOlO 3b 


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YOUNG LADY TRILINGUAL VUM*A 


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LONDON. Young Oermon/Frendidl- 
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London. Tel: UK 01-381 6852. 


SINGAPORE INTI GU1DE5. CdL Sev 
gapore734 9628. 


HONG KONG |K-3) 723 12 37 

young tophstnntod companion. 


LONDON - Young Corfcbccn Lady 01 • 
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PARIS YOUNG LADY, rooms guide. 
TeL Paris B07 84 95. 


HUU4KHKT YOUNG LADT campon- 

ion + travel gude TeL 069/628432 


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Free to travel. (0o9) 44 77 75. 


HONG KONG 3-67 1 267 you ng tody 
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rOUNG OCEAMC LADY 01-245 
9002 London/ Axportt/Trawel 


PARS 574 81 98 YOUNG Educated 
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Axastont. TeL 828-7932. 


tont. TeL UK 723 02 72 


o omponioa Pans 633 68 09. 


gont lady, evening, tfaners. traw ilL 


airports. 7 am/ midnight. IntljnW 


PerwaL Assistant 03456^539 


don/Heathrow. TeL 244 7671 


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MIDDLE EAST 


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Qatta: 416535. 

Saudi Andricc 
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UAL Dubai 224161. 

MR EAST 


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Hong Kons 5420906. 
Man8ce8170749. 
5ooub 725 87 73- 
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Tafwwii 75244 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Sydaoy: 929 56 39. 
Mribwfm: 6W 8231 


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67 Chiton Street, 
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SWTTZBRAND 


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ZURICH 

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Tab 01/252 6! 74 

ZURICH 

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ZURICH-GENEVA 

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TEL 01/363 08 64-022/3441 86 

ZURICH 

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TH< 01/ 47 55 82 

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Tefc 2503496. CUBIT CABS. 

ROME CUM EUROPE ESCORT 
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EXCLUSIVE BGDCT SavtCE 

Ban 520554 Mura. R 33152 

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SBtVKX. Tefc 46 11 SB 

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G8CVA-HBBC ESCORT SBtVKE 
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DUSSBJXXfLGOLOGNGZONDON 

faduna BCCart rervta. Trii 0211 
6799863. 


FRANKFURT AREA - ANGWOUTS 
bfintad Eicort + travel mice. Tet 
069/6268 05. 


DUCBBDORF- COUX3NE- BONN 

GC Escort Agency. D 211/30 43 69. 
CraA avdi abwed - ESSEN. 


AMSTERDAM, L. 

Hague, Ro tterd u n. _ 

Serwce.A i mterda w |D0312 

DUSSHJDORF - BBQIN - BONN 
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LONDON ESCORT 
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AGB«rr. 


U3NDON ESCORT SBEVKE. Tri, 937 

6574. 


ZURK31 VB* ESCORT SE R V IC E . Tefc 

057/33 1 8 76| 1 1i3 D oral pm 8 6pm 


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UNION/ lEATMtOW GATWKX 

Ewart Servira Tefc 381 CM 08 


DUSSHDORF/ COLOGNE/ ESSB4H 

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NEW YORK feme & GabrieBe Esoort 
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FRANKFURT + SU8RQUNDMGS 

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ICW YORK: RBCs Escort Sereice. 
Tefc 212581-1948. 


BRUSSELS. ANTWSP NATASCHA 

■Escort Service. Tefc ttU73\JLA\. ■ 


fKANKRAT - PEIRA Euort & Travel 

Servo, TeL 069 / 68 24 05 


GBEVA OLARUNE GUIDE 

Tefc 283 397. 


NEW YORK aiT, MOMQUE. Orati- 
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FRAMCRJRT - JU4NIW& faeart 8 
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LONDON BAB. ESCORT Service. 

Tefc 01425 4387 


LONDON GABREUA BCORT Ser- 
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YIB4NA ETOOE BCORT 5SMCE. 

Tefc 56 7B SSL 


LOIOON ZOE WEST Esatri Agency 

Tefc 01-579 7556. 


U36HX3NJACOUHDC BCORT Ser 
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ESCORTS & GUIDES 


LONDON ZARA BOOST Service. 
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MUNCH mars Ewart 
Service. Tefc 089/4466038 


+ Guide 


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vice. Td: 069+8 34 42. 


FRANKFURT JENNY ESCORT + bw- 
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STUTTGART PRIVATE Eicon Serriee. 
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AM51ERDAM SYLVIA BCORT Ser- 
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Greek Servtoe. Td: (020) 762842 


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MADWO SELBCTIONS ESCORT Ser- 
wee Yet 401 15C Oedt Cardi 


TWXT5 ESCORT Service Dofi wtod l 
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li£Y ESCORT S8TVTOL Mundi Tefc 

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HOUAN D-JBgCORTSaVICTOTn. 
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‘ffi^ EBCoers *> ta - 




TEaMP""" 11 * 



















































Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


ft 12 13 [4 


IS Iff 17 fa MO Ml fix 


PEANUTS 


HOW ABOUT HELPING 
ME WITH MY HOMEWORK? 


IF YOU PQ, YOU'LL 
HAVE MY EVERLASTING 
GRATITUDE™ 


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BOOKS 


ratio 


fa 1 fa W 




^X3 


BLONDIE 


I 147 


r«i nr 


B lo vojuook up 
y w Pwacsste r* 

NUAASS3 

RWE? 


I WHY IS rr AS -you GET . 
OLOB3... ’ 


THE PHONE BOOK 
> GETS LABGEB ' 


, f AND THE' POINT GETS 
Sf-7 GAAALLSJ? > 


INVENTING THE DREAMi Calitoi- 
ilia Through the Progressive Era 
By Kevin Starr. 380 pp. SI9.95. 

Oxford Press, 200 Madison Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 

'"p HANKS to magazine pictures, old movies 
1 and the work of such authors as Joan 
Didion, F. Scott Fit^eialdL John Steinbeck, 
Nathanel West and Raymond Chandler, we 
tend to think of California in terms of certain 
metaphors. California as the final frontier, the 
western edge of the continent and die last hope 


for all those pioneers who wanted to shed their 
old lives and start over again, taWarasa. Cali- 
fornia as the Promised Land betrayed — the 
American Eden of orange trees and arroyo 
cabins transformed into a vast suburban 


The editor of Land of Sunshine mags' 
and an influential booster of the ne 
disks Fletcher Lnmrnis, helped se& toot 
and prospective homesteaders on the region 
celebrating its Danish heritage. And evo 
Art Deco orange crate labels of the ‘JQj 
which were seen by millions of American; “ 
grocery stores — helped foster die idea 
Southern California as “a place apart” by 
inn images from that same halcyon era: *• 
Paloma portrayed a Spanish dancer awm 
desert backdrop, “Mission Bridge 1 * a Span 
style bridge arching- over a blue river 
“Orange Queen” a Spanish woman .hokfe 

basket of oranges. These images, of course - 

only commemorated a vanished pastoral! 
but also saved as reminders, to a new gen 
non, of just how far that early California.' 
receded into the past. 


n -Hr* **** 

R. »’**■ 

, ; ^ 

ito.-taftsa 

• N-r ** mi 

, itiaeKW 
i w '■**&- 

... w# 


- *** 1 
mr 


.i 1m 




wasteland of shopping malls and freeways. 
California as Oz. a marie kingdom of Dim 


ACROSS 


' lU.S.Army 
vehicle 

S Chateaubriand 
tale 

9 Body of 
African 
warriors 

18 Transverse 
shaft 

14 Former PJML 
of Israel 

15 Short fiber 

16 Spoke 
slightingly 

18 out (stall) 

19 Letter from 
Crete 

20 Scriptures In 
Lat. 

21 Picasso, at 
times 

23 Set free 

25 Sandman 

of song 

28 Tomato blights 

32 Mine, in Metz 

S3 Vessel for 
hearing liquids 

35 Double-headed 
dram 

36 Shopping area 

37 Italian 
banking center 

39 Some Feds 

40 Spreads thin 

42 Pts. of aeons 


43 Beameand 
Fortas 

44 Ancient city in 
Asia Minor 

46 Orange shade 
48 Goes too far 
56 Scale 
520nehondred 
square meters 
53 Diamonds, to 
hoods 


56 Paint crudely 

57 Heaping dish 


57 Heaping dish 

66 Seed covering 

61 Nixies and 
pixies 

62 Hip 

63 Intricate 
passages 

64 Gypsy 
gentlemen 

65 Vienna, to the 
Viennese 


1 Nephrite 

2 Stage direction 

3 Maxwell or 
Lan Chester 

4 Go 

5 Down-to-earth 
6Humpty 

Dumpty 

7 Family 
member 

8 Bear 

9 Minor items 
10 Sounds from 

the barn 


11 Half 

(shrimp) 

12 Sort 

14 Pieces of 
burned 
woodland 
17 Biblical name 
for Heliopolis 

22 Gardens 

23 Big A event 

24 Overlays 

25 Parts of doors 

26 Town on the 
Tigris 

27 equation 

29 Cobra's cousin 

30 Emitting 
smoke 

31 Import 

34 Comments cm 
a literary work 
38 Declares 
41 Hindu god of 
destruction 

45 paratus 

(plea at law) 

47 Weapon for 
Athos 
49 Recover 
SOPoetTeasdale * 
51 Short test 

53 Territory in 
SW Morocco 

54 Clever 

55 N.C. college 

56 Hoover, e.g. 

58 Hail, to Caesar 

59 Brawl 


BEETLE BAILEY 


VOU HAVE 
TO (SO TO THE i 
POCTOR'i I 
HOPE ITfe MOT . 
SERIOUS J 


ANDY CAPP 


I'M NOT VERY BRAINY BUT 
TM FRO'JDA-YAND I — - 
; LIKE MEETING PEOPLE.} 



California as Oz, a magic kingdom of Dim 
makers and movie stars, both preying upon 
and inventing the nation's dreams. And Cali- 
fornia as Sodom and Gomorrah, a modern 
Babylon where Middle Western values and 
old-fashioned pieties turned rancid in the 
tropical air. 

What the historian Kevin Starr has attempt- 
ed to do in “Inventing the Dream” — a sequel 
to his earlier study, “Americans and the Cali- 
fornia Dream,” published in 1973 — is to 
examine those metaphors and their basis in 
historical fact He wants, he says, to write an 
intellectual history showing how “the Califor- 
nia of fact and the California of imagination 
shape and reshape each other.” He has turned 
bis attention, in this volume, to Los Angeles 
and its environs. 

A narrative history of the region, tracing its 
cultural, political and economic development 
— it seems like an inspired idea for a book. 


Michiko Kakutad is on the staff of The]-, 
York Times. 


BEST SELLERS 


Unfortunately, Starr never quite pulls off the 
task that he has set himself. The volume pos- 
sesses neither the personal point of view that 
^ves, say; the wont of Joan Didion its emo- 
tional power, nor an organizing thesis that 
might lend its narrative coherence and drama. 

The main narfnln^ss of “Inventing the 
Dream,” it seems to me, is that it assembles, in 
one volume, the historical background of 


r SHE’S -APPIYING 
FOR THE BARMAID 
VACANCY, ANCV — 


etwnd,H 
Me. »r **"*<■ 


r VOU 
SURE? 


SHE’LL 
r QOj ^ 
JACK \ 


POSITIVE- U 


IF I FEEL INTELLECTUAL,] 
► TWERPS ALWAYS — * 
THE PUBLIC LIBRARY) 


The New Yak Hms 

Tin* Bn is based on mem from not dm 2,000 boob ■ 
thMogbont die United Sow. Weeks an fat sc an an 
mnorntw e. . 

fiction 

•a* . tot • 

Wa* WHk l‘ 

1 IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney 

Sheldon — | 

2 FAMILY ALBUM, by DanieQeSted 

3 GLITZ, by Elmore Leonard , 2 

4 THE SICI LIAN, by Mario Puao 3 -"' 

3 THE FINISHING SCHOOL, by GaB 

Godwin . — 7 

6 THE TALISMAN, by Stephen King and , 

Peter Straub ■ ■ ... . 4 till 

7 SO LONG, AND THANKS FOR AIL Jh 

THE FISH, by Douglas Adams S «■ 

8 THE LIFE AND HARD TIMES OF HEI- 
DI ABROMOWITZ. by Joan River* ( - 

9 MOSCOW RULES, by Robert Mem $ 

10 THDtNER, byRkbaid Bachman g 

(1 SEE YOU LATER ALLIGATOR, by WD- 

Ham F. Boddey Jr. lit - 

12 THE TITAN. by Fred Mnsttrd Stewart 

13 ILLUSIONS OF LOVE by Cynthia Free- 

14 LOVE AND WAR. by John Jata “ II *. 

15 MEXICO SET. by Len Deighton — 14 

NONFICTION 


4 




<4 ft 

*4 it 


111 on 


tin 


Southern California, and in doing so. under- 
lines the devastating speed with which La CSu- 


WIZARD of ID 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Mnbxlm 


DENNIS THE MENACE 






^ 1 0»POP? _ J 


mb 

TH4T? I 


’fcXJ Mtfr TD&C* 

15pup#f^P 


lines the devastating speed with which La Ciu- 
dad deNuestra Senora la Reinadelos Angeles 
de Porriuncula evolved from a random couec- 
tion of adobe huts into the sprawling megalop- 
olis that it is today. This metamorphosis oc- 
curred within a angle century, and equally 
extraordinary changes took place in even less 
time. 


IACOCCA: An Autobiography, by Lee I*- 

oooca with William Novak 

BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by At» 

kadyN. Shevch enko 

ernZEN HUGHES. byMiehad Dronam 
LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Basest- 

lia — 

THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Richard Bach 

SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 

Eva n S. Cqdd cD ! 

MOSES THE KITTEN, by Jama Hcrriot 
THE COURAOE TO CHANGE, by Den- 



Hi' 


8 THE COURAOE TO CHANGE, by Den- 
nis W holcy 

9 A UGHtiN THE ATTIC, by Sbd saver- 


Sotntioa to Previous Puzzle 




IMS 


Sarwt 


REX MORGAN 


good morning, REX ! ) 
Martha pane just l 

CALLEDf SHE'S GOING,, 
IO yWARRY BERT VON f 
DALE— AND EVEN V 
KENNY IS THRILLED j 


f YES, 1 
KNOW' 1 
SAW HER A 
l THE 
¥ HOSPITAL 
1 THIS 







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10 THE SEVEN MOUNTAINS OF THOM- - 

AS MERTON, by Mthad Mou Li 

11 THE GOOD WAR. “ tw Stndl Tetkd _ E-. 

12 HEY. WAIT A MDriTTE. I WROTE A 
BOOKJbyJohn Madden with Dave Andcr- 

13 PIECES OF MY MIND, by Andrew * " 


14 CHOICES, bv Liv Ulhnan 

15 DR. BURNS* PRESCRIP 



DR. BURNS* PRESCRIPTION FOR ~- 
HAPPINESS, by George Bonn 1 . 

ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MlSCELUNEOd , 


uimm 


-TO AND MlSCELLANEOd 


WEIGHT WATCHERS WICK START h 
PROGRAM COOKBOOK, by John N> 


WEIGHT WATCHERS WICK START - - 
PROGRAM COOKBOOK, fay John NL 

dmdi ■?" 

WOMEN COMING OF AGE, fay Jane 

Fonda with MLmoa McCarthy 

WHAT THEYDONT TEACH YOU AT \ 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by s 

Mark H. McCormack 

NOTHING DOWN, by Robert G-ABen 1 
THE ONE MINUTE SALES PERSON, 
by Johnson —‘t Larry Wilson 























































tV&i i* 


BOOKS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 


Page 15 


MS*. 


SPORTS 


i New Generation Reflects High Mortality Rate of Big-League Managing 


ft* 

*• **■ {mar 


«F >vri»ti- 

**a**ih*v 

***■•*'.« 
HM'- : tV 

Tw*«o 

ft irf tito 
*0* tfK« 

Sum 

*■# *V 

i f* Thl 

*W*p- 
'■ * WftMp! 

— <» h* 

Wttr *fc 

Jt- 

u toG w i.Nt 

«rtsp^ 


v ‘ B f Murray Chass ' 

New York Tuna Sendee 

r.'EW YORK —The Milwaukee 
‘ vers in 1972 bad a coach named 
« Moore and a struggling 


“1 can see it now." Cottier said, Moore, Cottier and Rose moved bated, the four 


TTwnag* again. “Bullpen coach 


12 in the good job for somebody who irnnagp Milwaukee. 


' k Moore and a struggling' "calling the incident in which into their jobs during the 1984 sea- majors but nevertheless survived to doesn’t have any aspirations logo 
"•■'ier named John Fdske. Moore Haas broke Ins leg and effectively son, the others after the season end- tell about it, further,” he explained. “But 1 did. I 

■‘ a. pjgtg ^gjL shattered whatever playing career «L Thar mrgor-Ieagnc managing “J started out as a pretty good wanted a challenge.” Now he has 

■ ■ rhnT he might have had. ^He went back qualifications range from the rook- Jritter, and then I ran into the slid- the one he wanted. 

a H? baB- These was a support ie status of Felske, Haas andDav- a” raid Fdske, wbo had 14 hits in Losing teams breed problems in 
,r ° ~~ ^njn rj r n mir rjtrh pole at the fence, and some dirt hAri enport to the longtime service of 104 major-league at-bats.“He was the chibbouse and prompt manage* 

- been washed away from the bottom Mauch, who holds the major- better off than I was,” said Moore rial changes. Tim Davenport said 

i'SeSHS the win. when be went to league record for reaching 22 Octo- (5-for-53). “I couldn’t hit the fast- one ofhis primary goals would be 


jer was the man who re- “They said I could make more 
one, coming out of retire- money outside it I stayed in be- 
st as he has this year to causelftitlwasqualiffMtodothe 
Milwaukee. job. There are only so many people 



shattered whatever playing career ed. Their major-league managing 

he might have had. rle went back qualifications range from the rook- 

for a fly baH There was a support ie status of Fdske, Haas and Dav- 


“I started out as a pretty good 
hitter, and then I ran into the slid- 
er ” said Feiske, who had 14 hits in 


y ie, whose major-league catch- 
O aueer quietly expired after 21 
' ' ' es. “He was trying to make the 


rav from tin 
When be 


doesn't have any aspirations to go “Friends would ask me why 2 qualified to manage. Thai's wi 
further," be explained. “But 1 did. I stayed in the game,” Feiske said, some people keep coming back.” 
wanted a challenge.” Now he has 

*S2oS ta-4 problems in 

the clubhouse and prompt manage- f 




me 


throw the ball bads to the infield, bers without ' a pennant winner, ball, the carve or the slider.” to eradicate the negative attitude he 


. , j - uuuw luc dou uac*. lu UK nm tau, uns wivuvui a uauuiu wuuua. 

^ everything turned but iris fooL It They come dirretly from a variety 

- e on, tal he wun t amc of to Krtweda^inbetwtentheconcreie of places - managing in the mi- 


• tces. I was the catching coach, 
we spent a lot of time together, 
vent through this period where 


got wedged in between the concrete 
that held the pole and the fence.” 

Twenty-ax years later, Cottier is 
the manager of the Seattle Mari- 


I) t ■ ^ uk manager m uk acauic man- m lu 

1 m ST * su n *.“ e ^Bsg"ng to quit acre and Haas is the manager of the retxremenL 

AtotaBravet me manage™ me f 

* IwASS Moore, Feiske, Cottier and Haas lesser exter 

"■ . '&?£& 31,8 fonr of 10 major-leagne manag- comas enti 


They come threctly from a variety Cottier bad a 220 average for his said existed among the San Fran- 
of places — m a nag i n g in the mi- five-year career as an infidder, and cisco Giants last season. “I want to 
nws, coaching in the majors, map- b^ngd 70 rimes and had 17 get bade to the point where people 
aging in the majors, playing, work- ^ q| three seasons with are proud to put on the uniform,” 
ine in the front office and iwrt <m<t rhicMn r»r» He he said. 


vt4» 

^ j&! 




mg in the front office and the Brewers and Chicago Cubs. He be said. 

retirement. played another 10 years or so in the Davenport was a .258 hitter in 13 

Except for Rose and, to a far itiinn w Wic playing career “wasn’t seasons as the Giants' third base- 
lesser extent, Davenport, the new- very long — I had a couple of cups man. Like Haas, he has been an 
comas enter their jobs with node- of coffee and that was it” organization man — 28 yeais as 

gree of success as players. They also 


{*1 


something 1 
’•■I'a ing in the game.” 


current teams a year ago, a arcum- come with 


coffee and that was it” organization man — - 28 years as 

Why did he stick to it? “Who player, coach, minor-league man- 


rirtsen years later, Moore is the 

“gcr of the Oakland A’ s and 77^ ojhas who gamed thdr Because they achieved no 
. .. mis UKmanagex of the Pbfla- jobs since the start of last season as players, and because tb 
^.^ihia PmUjes. are Jim Davenport of San Francis- worked in virtual anonyi 

";~ :.3iick Cottier’s memory goes co, Buck Rodgers of Montreal, coaches or minor league mj 
’-vSl even funha, to 1959, when he John McNamara of Boston, Pete Feiske, Haas, Cottier and 


stance that harshly reflects the Bom the effervescent Rose to the 


ines ranging brows?” he replied. 


V — r, v , rmnaA Uooc Three yeais ago, when the Braves 

mortakty raw of mai or-league sfap- ught-hpped Haas. Deeded a new manager, many in the 

pas. The others who gamed tfiar Because they achieved no success front office wanted the job to go to 
jobs since the start of last season as players, and because they have p a a< a 17-year organcation man 
are Jim Davenport of San Francis- worked in virtual anonymity as ^ a coach and minor-league man- 


*4«| u* 

a h*il 

) ***. rh# 

** (taK 

m iba! 
4a mi- 
ll that 
ifftnau. 
mm UK 
3MN* »t 
«* 




uircc years i 

ightingln on the Infighting for a Site 


ager. Owner Ted Turner chose Joe 
Torre, but Torre’s outgoing person- 
ality did not produce a pennant, so 
three yeais later Turner consented 
to the promotion of Haas, 49. 
Whether he succeeds where Torre 
didn’t will be seen soon enough — ■ 


ager and scorn. *Tve always had 
aspirations to manage but I’ve ■ ■ 
never had a chance.” he said. “I felt 
one or these days my time would ^ 
come.” 

Chuck Cottier, who replaced Dd 
Crandall as the Seattle manager 
last September, drought his tirwa in 
basebal had passed when the Pitts- 
burgh Pirates dismissed him as a 
nurp a jy r in their minor-league sys- 
tem in 1973. 

He was out of baseball for three t\ 





/fid 


i 1 


Tha Niw York Time, 


XI. 

•liMilc 


' i lmanattaHal Herald Tribune 

London — Are the saujde 
* "rating pleasnres pure illusion? 

was when some of us thought 
‘v\. v \ 'i : s ' '.could escape from the real 

' 1 ^d, when because we followed 
Nus nr» ss we could be accused of being 
:v ‘ k v-v.-..^e fellows, attracted by the 
ii'W- " ~~ '"'ll" Zealand incapaMe of takmgon 
i a . ’. ,^.7 : “ the inidkctuaL 

: ' - longer. On Friday a final 

. s ‘ • n ’:'^.aon must be made on the ven- 

v,j .... t 4 , .. I. Sr the nex^socca chanqnon- 
»■ >.i. '^ r c between European nations. 

; ’’ ■■ . you or I will not understand 

' ; •’ ;iIob Hughes 


It, 


en highway congestion and in-town thanks tc 
holdups, four hours is a more rea- network, 
salable projection for any team Who 


and on TV sets across the country, Y eais ' then retu rned as a manag e r 
rinmirc to Turner’s cable- television in the California system. He even- 


sonable projection, for any team Who can explain the Earl 
not wishing to be fined for arriving Weaver-Sparky Anderson kind of 
after h alftime — the minor-league man- 

Still, there are no checkpoints 00 ager who never succeeded as a 
FjigHsh roads, no st^dias to detain player going to the majors and 


tually coached third base for the 
New York Mels fa three seasons. 
then moved to Seattle when the 
Mets dismissed Torre. George 


Two new major-league managers 
who bad Bttle success as players, 
Eddie Haas of Atlanta (right) and 
the PhDs’ John Feiske, are among 
a group of 10 who were not manag- 
ing their current teams a year ago. 






a motorist for 40 minutes, which showing outstanding managerial 
happened to me the last time I ability? Not Haas. “1 don’t know,” 
attended a match in Berlin’s west- he stud. “Who keeps that score- 
era sector, m know next time not card?” 


New Manager 


Managing 

Experience* 


Previous Job 


Manager 

Replaced 


When 

Replaced 


to take a Copy Of the Intemarinnar 
Herald Tribune (my issue carried 


John Feiske, at the Phillies' 
jring park, considered the ques- 


an offending article that caused the tion. “Wben a player isn’t a star, 
delay) thro ugh East German bar- you. tmdastaud more about the 

j ^ ~ 1 w V.I.Lm 


.•r** > 

-iW 


• decision without having a 
,-,y oof social and pcfitkalhistoty, 

■ ■ v an awareness of economics. 

. *•’; - lanewfaere alrag the line I siq>- 
. V. - : consideratians of sport eater 
- ,: 'iL Butpetty low down. Put 
•/' .e3y, UEFA, the European soc- 

inkm, has to choose between 
• .7 - ering its 1988 cham{»0nsUp 
West Germany’s hotbed of 
f. (i r..|v«'Wai politics or. into En- Helmut Kohl wav 

L ..;;TOweb*go(.oinei*y?an aid publkaUy that the FA should 
«««d cm M d o£fer to stage the 

, . 1 1 1 * eo ntroio chan^wnship if Bestia’s wxtem yourchoice. 

■ 3coSd»tbeoaeoftbesera yaniaw,tt 

.. . rd, the Netheriands and Scandi- m—mm 

a,^and chose to xecpmmciid «if the federation is forced to C 


dere. makeup of a player,” raid Fdske, 

And if MDHchip can guarantee 42, who moved from nunor-leagne 
trips between En g lish cities in a manager to dngout coach to man- 
couple of hours, maybe the FA’s ager Si the Phils in two years, 
pledge th*t it does “not anticipate “I know what it's like to sit on 
any crowd problems if our apphea- the bench and not play. I know 
lion is successful” will sway UEFA whai it’s Gke to go O-for-25. Maybe 
communists and capitalists alike , there’s more compassion for people 

It is worth another try on Friday, because I wasn’t a star. It comes 
provided tbe FA can spare officials down to taking lime to understand 
its own critical business. Friday, it each guy as an individual.” 
happens, is the date set for an ofS- FaiWe as a player, of course, did 

rial inquiry into last week’s vio- not daunt the rookie managers, 
[cnee at the Chelsea-Sunderland “Sometimes,” Moore said, “one 
MTlk Cup semifin al in London, in step backward is two steps for- 
which 43 people were injured and ward.” * 

107 arrested. Fdske began Ms forward motion 

Politics or hooligans: You t *k«s as a minor-league man age r in 1974, 
your choice. moved to the majors for two years 





'Major League 


■ . /> _ ■ ■ _ M uiv 1 VUV 1 a u va w sviwu vu 

' exdude Bcdin.” he added, “iheait 

-IvSSmSeS^S*iS-‘ would be good faihem to consider 


IRUNxI 


‘ led a “deal” whaiWcst Ga- 
— y withdrew itsT990' Worid Cup 
cation in favor of Italy and 
ired its intention to sedt the 
pean dtampkmriup. 


if the championship is worth, the 
price.” 

Social Democrat sports spokes- 
man Peter Btidmer. taking a harder 
line, accused UEFA of idling out 


ARP 

Basketball 

National Basketball Association Leaders 


Hockey 


A 


& »*.- t- 

m+% 

ftMM .» --i - ; 
w 

4’* p^«i •- 

mi lie .•!. ••• 

i 

‘j V* ’ 

namwil-v'- 

, *t Efc r WV- •- 

m m*’’ • 


oounettou^yrochpn- ^the UEFA committeeiTfi) in- 
. rran 8® Q ®t, jqjcatnig gentle- bv the political mienta- 

would xwver stoop to sw± tion of certain erf its members,” he 


js. West Gomany had applied 
( times for the European cfaam- 
ship and its turn had cane. 
, les, its level of hooliganism is 


'A as tbe second-best candi- ^ihicsf^proach^'iisbon with 

. rr .. two routes to goaL fie will appar- 

despite English chums that it - mt iy „k UEFAmce more u Jky 
-d run a more profitable, gome bv nlavine in Berlin, and 


turn of certain of its monbers,” he 
observed, “then the federation ua.u**v« 
must be prepared to give up the S“\£" tooW 


All of which leaves poor dd 


^ xr /odd ratify the choice in Lis- 

on Friday. masters. — 

^ A promise is a promise and, al- 

Berim Wall became, viabk. rboa § 1 VEFA Quires govern- *««• 

• e are dcctron nmm m W«t SmtsuRwn of 3e host fa its 

- nan pohtics too, and xn^a ev^C a rule may be more 

Idmut Kohl has stated there waived than a deaL Ether ***"• 

' ue no govemnttnt support for way/sovict influence is not gang 
■^joantament unless at least one ^ retreat. bm>m 

•b is playsd in Berlin. Meanwhile England, whose war 

' ^hl was not fint to mtroducc with Germany led to the division of pManto 

• ^^Ttowas, after 3^ prcparcs to exploit Neu- w»j«« 
' 1 deal bdween the W«| iGer- hover’s diCna. “We are vay op- 

•soccer federation and UEFA. timStic that we win be given the ZTiW. 
aent frota any aO^md trading drampio nriup now,” crows Pngjhdi «*« 
cen Italy and West Germany, FA Secretary Ted Croker. “We 
7 t deal neverthdess. have reminded UEFA that we have PortioKt 

: trans pire s that West German the necessary co mmit ment from CMwiand 

• ramait support —essential to our government" 

aid — was based on original Croker and his chairman, Bert son Antonio 
osals to open, the 1988 tonma- Millichip, told the committee that 5tat * 
in Bonn’s western sector, jn England “no team would have at v 

' was dropped in the face of more than a couple of hours’ coach 
rt-bloc o^jositkxi- ■ ride to any match.” Given the an- 

, imits Hermann Neubereer, nexing of Eland’s northeast — »uno. m.y. 
deni of tbe West German FA: arguably the most virulent support 
•• • used all the thinkable diplo- area for soccer in the coimtry, but p A n 
,c mwnw to convince UcFA no big pohtical deal— Milhclrros . *§* 
4a least «me game be played in claim that every ground was wimm -pniopm 

n. But <» all inqwrtant qnes- two hours from Loudon is possibly 
' it UEFA takes great pains to true. «... nan* mn 

jembeis to rote unanimously.” % helicopter, Bmmngham is 
the event, Neuberger sacri- 111 miles(178.6 kflomrtm) from 


^elmut Kohl has stated there 
'x no govenuneut support fa 
founamcat unless at least one 
‘h is played in Berim. 


|W»’ ■*- ’ 

a* ; r 


timiRt ir that we will be given the 
championship now,” crows English 
FA Secretary Ted Croker. “We 
have reminded UEFA that we have 


March w: 




Short. G5. 

61 638 400 1711 283 


TEAM OFFENSE 


English, Den. 

64 743 299 1786 27 9 


G 

Pt 

Avg 

Jwrhiu CM. 

61 642 461 1751 273 

Denver 

64 

7718 

1205 

WIHdns. AIL 

62 645 376 1685 273 

Detroit 

63 

7312 

1111 

AouFrrn, DalL 

<3 <23 341 K10 216 

UA. Lakers 

63 

7284 

1U6 

Malone, PhIL 

<4 500 W7 1597 253 

$ai Antonia 

65 

7504 

1154 

Cummings. MIL 

<2 465 282 1492 241 

Boston 

- 64 

7341 

TMJ 

Vfeoiridne. CM. 

58 528 320 1376 2X7 

Kansas CUV 

64 

7314 

7143 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

Portland 

65 

7388 

1117 


PG FGA Pel 

Philadelphia 

64 

7ZJ2 

1133 

Donaktm, LAC 

383 432 455 

Danas 

64 

7651 

1102 

GUmoro, SJL 

422 575 435 

Houston 

64 

7D16 

1094 

Nance. PBoe. 

515 848 JR 

Milwaukee 

63 

4690 

1095 

AbdM-JaMar, LAL 

584 985 593 

Chlcaoo 

63 

4844 

1093 

Tharae. ICC 

214 410 580 

New Jersey 

64 

«9S0 

1086 

Cheeks. PML 

317 553 574 

Utah 

‘ 64 

6948 

1085 

Metro to. Bus. 

458 798 574 

Phoenix 

64 

<925 

1082 

Worthy, lal 

471 823 572 

Gulden Slate 

63 

<790 

1073 

REBOUNDING 

Owetand 

63 

<773 

1075 

G 

, OH Del Tat Avg 

Indiana 

63 

<763 

lOW 

Malone. PhIL 

44 308 534 832 133 

Atlanta 

63 

6781 

1065 

WUBams, NJ. 

M 210 527 787 122 

New York 

64 

4753 

1K5 

La Un beer. Del. 

<3 212 549 761 1X1 

nuUINIVUEl 

64 

6729 

105.1 

Otatwwan. Haw. 

<4 353 419 77212.1 

LA. Clippers 

64 

6719 

1053 

Eaton. Utah 

64 170 544 736 115 

Seattle 

64 

<477 

1012 

Gilmore, SJL 

44 192 491 690 183 


National Hockey League Leaders 

NHL lecKlan fferemi ivmi of Sowfcnr. jomoi 

Morc * W: _ WadtlMtoa (5) 

WFEMSE FroeM 

OvwiOl UndborW* 

G a P Pirn J«w«n 

Gretzky. Edmonton U 115 I7f 3d PftllwMRfala CXI 

Kuril Edmonton M U 111 SI Roy 


GAP Pin J*ns«n 

Gretzky. Edmonton M 115 !7f 36 Pkllad 

Karri, Edmonton U 55 119 54 Roy 

Hawortiwk. wiimipoa 42 67 in 70 Porotov 

Dionne. Los Aiwofrs » 67 106 40 Sootaort 

Bossy. NY Istandsre 52 53 WS it ' Montn 

B. Sutter, NY Istondni 40 56 M ST Keans 

Cotter, Cdmonl u n 26 67 93 B> Ptotan 

SavordL CMcodo 34 57 PI 38 Sylvostrl 

Foderko. StXouls 26 65 91 23 Dasknlakts 

Kerr, ptdkxMphio 51 38 89 30 Boston CD 

Oonxlnk*. Detroit 47 42 S9 28 

N lotions. Loo Angel os 41 47 BS 56 

TonrtIL NY Istandors 36 52 tt >1 |\HI 

MocLorm, Winnipeg 35 S3 U 95 

Nilsson. Calgary 31 57 B8 14 

Gartner, Wastdngton 42 45 W 57 

P. Stoatny. Quebec 29 5B #7 87 

Corpontor. Wbstifngton 46 36 32 73 ..Phiiod 

Taylor, Las Angeles 36 45 31 110 x-wostiii 

Pnom, PMkxMpMo 37 43 SO K NY lota 

Mario Loralx, PttsbnA 32 48 00 29 NY 

PtWOMnay Goals 

Go Pag 

Korr. Ptia 64 19 

Garfnor. Woe 68 15 

Ha wendhuk. Win 69 15 

Andreychuk. But 61 14 

Stevens, was 68 14 

Swttor, StL 67 14 

TanM. Van 56 U 

TrwnMav, Man 63 14 

Short-Handed Goods 

Go sub 

Gretzky, Edm 66 10 

Prana PW 63 6 

Meoslor, Edm 43 5 

Bnmo Wlnwiuu Goats 

Co Gwa 

Karri, Edm 65 12 

PStastny, Quo 64 9 

Gartner, Was 66 6 

Korr. Ptw 64 8 

BOA1.TBNDIIIG 

tMmrtyeot goafs In oareattesM] 

MP GA SO Avg 
Barrnoso 2422 124 5 244 

Saw* 1.144 59 0 109 

aovttor AS 4 0 349 

BulWg (4) 4431 191 5 244 

Mason 661 31 1 241 

RJggtn 3MB 152 2 IX 



G 

Na 

Avg 

Bird, Bos. 

<4 125 553 <78 HL6 

Milwaukee 

63 

MM 

103.1 

Smith, G5. 

61 296 350 646 103 

Seattle 

64 

4707 

1043 

Sampson. Hau. 

<4 179 495 <74 105 

Washington 

64 

4747 

T05J 


ASSISTS 

Houston 

<4 

<884 

1075 


G No. Avg. 

Boston 

44 

<964 

1073 

Thomas, Det 

62 832 104 

PhlkMtotohki 

<4 

<921 

108.1 

Johnson, LAL 

60 746 124 

Dallas 

<4 

<923 

1082 

Moore, sjl 

<5 <55 KLT 

Atlanta 

<3 

4816 

1082 

Baokrv. Clev. 

<3 520 82 

New Jersey 

64 

4941 

1085 

Nixon. LAC 

63 515 82 

Phoenix 

64 

6970 

1083 

Rkhantoon, NJ. 

44 517 El 

.Chicago 

43 

4890 

I0M 

Thews. KjC. 

64 515 83 

LA. Udcere 

<3 

<899 

1095 



New Ya*k 

Utah 

LA. dippers 

44 

64 

44 

7K2 

7019 

1044 

1093 

109J 

Tlftl 

NBA Standings 

Perttcsid 

46 

7232 

711J 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

Cleveland 

63 

7012 

1112 

AHosflc DMsiae 

Detroit 

<3 

7130 

113L2 


W L Pet GB 

Indiana 

63 

7134 

1132 

x -Boston 

58 14 281 — 

San Antonia 

46 

7429 

1U2 

x-PMIodeteBia 

48 U 250 2 

Golden State 

63 

7305 

1163 

lilJiililnril, ie 1 
nuMiuunjii 

33 32 580 17ta 

Denver 

44 

7504 

1173 

New Jersey 

32 32 500 18 

Kansas City 

64 

7519 

1175 

New York 

Cm 

21 43 320 29 

itrtd DMstae 


SCORING 



xrMHwaufcee 

45 19 202 — 


G FG 

FT Pts 

AW 

Detroit 

36 28 56* 9 

King. N.Y. 

41 461 

372 1571 329 

Chicago 

30 34 J<9 15 





Cleveland 

26 38 406 19 


arguably the most virulent support SElS? 

College Top-20 Ratings — 

rlnim that every ground was within Tito tog W totem la H» final Associated 
two houre from London is possibly pnm’ i-ww pob cum m*. p«w 

oloOO eolefc. W06 polats based OB 20-1M8, Houston 
true. . recants thrown Sunday, Man* H and last Dalian 


363 20 0 3.13 
4.132 208 3242 

603 36 0 249 
3,196 166 1 3.15 
60 7 0 740 
4461 214 1 3.16 


1490 105 1 343 
1493 112 I 155 
33 2 0 344 
165 12 0 349 
60 5 0 540 


(Ftdir. Moao shared shutout Jan. 6 


Ed m onton (3) 
Halnz 

Mil ten 


Mlllsn 

20 D D 040 toimrUu 
2447 U9 13.15 ST" 
I486 84 0 139 „ lnn 


NHL S tandings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 


"T " St LOON (4) 

4453 227 I 348 Bouchard 
1.196 67 1 146 
M® 145 1 341 
102 6 0 153 ontoed) 

W 14 0 5.13 cPST 
***ra 2X42 Skoradendd 

Banrwrman 
Rang 

® Chicago Cj) 

' Lemolln 

ERENCE Edwards 

vision Calgary (11 


K-PtiUatWPhki 
z-Washingtoa 
NY Islanders 
NY Rangers 

Plttsbunm 
New Jersey 


jc-Montreal 
x- Buffalo 
Quebec 
Boston 
Hartford 


W L T Pt» GF GA Hrvdey 
3 41 19 7 09 291 214 SmMh 

39 20 9 67 277 208 Metaneon 

34 28 5 73 298 260 NY Us 

22 35 10 56 256 290 Molocho 

22 39 5 49 232 320 Beeupre 

20 38 9 49 226 260 Mefansan 

Adorns Division Soots 

34 23 11 79 262 227 MtaOesal 

32 21 13 77 314 191 Jmecvk 

33 25 9 75 275 242 Eilat 

30 28 8 *8 26S 229 IMAM 

21 38 8 50 228 290 Low 


25 39 491 30 

19 45 497 26 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


v*rnhm to muutimo usly.” By helicopter 1 , Birm in g h a m is 
the event, Neuberger sacri- 111 miles (178.6 kilometers) from 
i Berlin and tbe vote was five to the capital, Liverpool 19S ate 
’'or West Germany. A matter of Manchester 184 and Sheffield 1«J 
later, after a special sitting of — aB except Birmingham two^anfl- 
Bundestas. Chancellor Kohl a-half-hoor imercity journeys. Giv- 


alone Cheeks Jordan, Leads 
ullets to Victory Cher Butts 


VuAsaoetaedPrm Hsewbcre it was Ueveland IU, 

ANDOVER, Maryland — It Indiana 110; Mpwankee 121, At- 
« be Micfaad Jordan’s year, lanta 1 1_5; Detrc^ irn 
t was Jeff Makae's night geles Ciders IK and Dallas 103, 
alone, a second-year sharp- Seattle 100. , , 

ter, scored 37 points andlim£ Jordan, bdd seven points below 

•r-ordan to 21 fee Monday in bis average, spent most jrf the 


LGeoraefewa (63) 

30-2 

ran 

1 

LNdcMgan 

2H 

1775 

3 

35L John’s 

27-3 

mi 

2 

^Oklahoma 

206 

1061 

4 

SJWemphls SL 

273 

1004 

s 

LCtaoraSo Tech 

243 

901 

9 

TJIorth Carolina 

24-8 

794 

6 

ELautolana Tech 

27-2 

737 

1 

UMV4M Veoos 

27-3 

724 

n 

KLDutw 

22-7 

653 

7 

lLVa Commenwagltn 

256 

511 

12 

KJUlnote 

24-8 

518 

14 

njcansas 

25-7 

504 

10 

MJLPYOta, in. 

84 

'417 

14 

ULSyraaM# 

21-8 

351 

13 

14JL Carolina SL 

20-9 

262 

18 

T7.T6MOS TMi 

23-7 

222 

— 

lETuba 

23-7 

130 

15 

if.Gearata 

21-8 

133 

17 

20. Louisiana SL 

19-f 

165 

19 


TBo IMtod Pius l u MrnoHonaf board al 


Dmtr 42 22 456 — 

Houston 38 26 JN 4 4 

Dallas Vk 79 SS* Wt 

San Atfanlo 32 33 ^92 10 W 

um 31 33 Mi 71 

Kansas City 23 41 4 » 19 

pacific DMsIofl 

X 4 -A. Lakon 45 U 414 — 

Phoanbi 30 34 .469 lSlk 

Porttand 30 35 ^62 U 

team* 27 38 AI 5 19 

LAOlims 22 43 438 24 

G<ddwi State 17 46 470 28 

x-ciincited playoff bortti, 

MONDAY’S RESULTS 
CMcago 36 S 29 26-112 

WasMoftoa MU M 26—719 

Malorw 1 *^ 4 5-6 37 . Sus Wtlftams 6 - 11 10-12 
22 ; Dollav 7-16 U-T 2 24 , CerzJns 1 V 14 M 22 . 
Itteuusdi: CMcooo 56 {Corzkts •), washlne- 
ten 36 (Robinson 71 . Assisis:Cbfcaoo 25 (Mm- 
ttiows 5 >, Washlnrtan 20 (Gus WlUttnn* I 2 J- 
IsdlNtel 36 11 25 20—110 

OmUN 27 33 30 33-122 

Froo 10 - 198 - 1128 , BaOtoy 1-13 64 22 ; Kotlon 
12 - 192427 . H.wmlafnsS- 16 6 - 10 22 . RaMOSdS: 

iBdksoa42(KwniioniEK61lOfHbS1fgangvIch 


CA66PBELL CONFEBENCE Rosch 

Norris DfvJsloa Kommpurf 

*-St Louis 33 23 11 77 256 236 Hrw Jam Ml 

k-CMcago 33 32 5 71 278 267 Hayward 

Mlnmsata 22 36 II 55 234 273 Hokten 

Detroit , 21 36 1! 53 257 306 B«hnmd 

Taranto 17 43 7 41 m 290 WtonHwg Ml 

SanrtM DhrfaJoa Bornhoidt 

s-Edmentori 44 16 6 96 337 239 B ester 

x-Wlnmptg 35 27 7 77 305 296 WrogMtt 

x-Galaary 1 36 26 8 76 312 264 SL Cmlx 

Los Anaeles 30 26 12 72 295 279 Toronto (7) 

Vancouver 21 39 8 50 238 348 Stantowskl 

(x-dlnchod oiayoff berth! Milton 

MONDAY'S RESULT Uut 

CUOMM • 1 2 V-4 Weeks 

N-Y. Rsagort 1 1 1 o-3 Hartford (1) 

5utter(l9),Pnxs«r{2*),Savord(35].B.WII- Hanlon 
sao (9] ; Hafiwrg (16),McPtwa (11), PovoUcti VonBlesbroucfc 
not. Stmts on goof: CtilcoBo 7-13-19-1—49 (on NY Ronoers (4) 
Hgnlon); Now Yortt (on BoMM-mon) 11-71-9- Stoton 
0-31. Mk> 

Micotef 
Dotrntt (4) 
Wocmmo 
Dion 
Horran 
Ford 

Ptmtsrrgh (!) 
Bradsur 
dmrico 
Garrett 
Vancwmr (51 


4,121 239 3 14* 

70 3 0 257 

180 9 0100 

1457 103 0 116 
1J» 119 1 382 

4476 238 1 3J0 

1431101 0 349 

766 45 1 153 
1.575 9S 0 362 

4477 M2 1 346 

20 0 0 040 

1413 56 1 120 
3482 201 0 X91 
66 4 0 440 

4,175 264 1 X79 

2481 155 1 347 
1446 106 0 440 
4.127 264 1 IS* 

1495 120 2 341 
1445 103 D 374 
425 35 0446 
4465 M 2 18* 
1 an 96 0 341 
1405 92 1 347 
962 66 0 4.12 
139 14 0 646 
UO 273 1 XJ0 

2412 156 2 348 
1442 121 0 442 
4,154 279 24J9 
953 58 1 345 
2472164 0 398 
645 56 0542 
4476 226 1 4,13 

2401 186 0 443 
213 IS 0 423 
1.173 17 1 445 
4,167 276 1 4 M 

1455 105 0 159 
647 45 1 417 
1498 86 0 470 


11m Niw York ram 


Tennis 

Davis Cop Results 

WORLD GROUP 
Ecuador 4, ATgeottoa 1 
(At Buenos Aires) 

Andres Gomez. Bcudoor, dot Martin JcHlw 
Argentina. 6-L64. 6-4. 

Rart viver, Ecuador, del defeated Roberto 
AroueHa, Argentina. 6-1, 4-6, 63 (match short- 
ened la best of three sots). 

Poro Miu f 1 France 1 
(At Asuncion, Paraguay! 

Yamdcfc Noah, Franco, dof. Francisco Gon- 
zalez, Paraguay. H 6-1 17-15, 6-4. 

Vlcter PeccL Paraguay, def.Hmwl Uante. 
France, M, 64, 34, 7-5. 


EASTERN ZONE 
tsmnii Roma 
China 1 Hong Kooo 2 
(At Belling) 

You WeL China, dot Colin Grant, Hons 
Kona. 34. 24. 6-L 64, 6^. 

Mark Bailor, Hong Kona, dot XI* Zlkxv 
(Mna, 6-1 7-5 (match shortened to best of 
three sets!. 

AMERICAN ZONE 
Socoad RMad 
Co l o mb ia 1 Uruguay 2 
(At Punto del Este, Uruguay) 

Alwceu Jordan and Reno Gomoz. Cetambia. 
dot. Diego Parer and Hugo RovoraflO, Uru- 
guay, 84. 64, 34. 64. 

Poroz dot. Jordan. 64. 6-L 64. 

Urt* Gonzalez, Colombia, dot. Maroeio FV- 
I (cm Ini, Uruguay. 6-1 34. 64, 6-1. 


Golf 






1.173 87 1 445 Loadersoo the Professional Golfers Aamc*- 

4,187 276 1 Of attoo hmr Ihrooafi Sunday** Bay HID Classic: 

lJSS 105 0 357 EARNINGS 

667 45 1 4.17 l,Mark O'Meara S19442L 2. Lanny Wodkins 

UM 86 0 470 S1B5AKL 1 Curtis Strange S161J44. A Craig 
568 45 0 475 Stadler S136426. 5, Calvin Plate D07585. 6, 
4571 216 1 4JM Fuzzy ZoenerS96J847.Corev PovlnS83,165-8, 
20 1 0 3JH Mark McCumbtr S82433. 9, Larry Mb* 

2459 187 1 422 579,178. 10. Ron Shuck S78J92. 

306 22 0 4J1 — 

1597 79 1 03 SCORING 

4562 27* 2 456 1. Larmv WOdklriA 69.14. 2, Craig Stadlor, 

2528 139 0 4.11 69.16.1 Don Paoloy. 6946.4. Larry Mize. 67.76 

1598 143 1 429 1 Ed FtorL M79. 6. Corey POrtn, 6951. 7, Scoff 

4526 366 1 426 Slmpoo*u69Jxa,DanPahL695S-9,Gory Koch, 

1153 154 0 429 nxa. 10. 2 tied wtth 7028. 

376 Z7 0 43T AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 

1411 121 0 451 1. Jim Dent,2734.1Andy Bean.2734.1 Frod 

4,144 386 8 441 Couples and Bill Giassoru 271.7. 1 Gres 

1425 117 1 432 TmHods. 2214. 6. Don PoW, 2709. 7. Mac 
S3 43 0 467 0<Gradv.269JLl Joey Slndelor. 267X 9. Clar- 
1593 131 D 493 once Rase. 267JL H 2 fled with 2671 


fourth quarter sitting alongside l Georgetown m od-ts 


reaches toeoe ratings (win fH-pface vales 7LCNy« ! and49|Hlraonni.Asdsts: Imfluna 
ead recants toroggkaanMS Of Merck Hood 27 (HJWtlHonn, Flernhw i), Oevekmo 34 
total Patois based saUpoists hr iln*BtaCE,!4 (Boo ley 9L 

tor second, etcJ: Mltemefc— n 26 35 28-121 



4 . -•r' . 


I Football 
USFL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


tv 

* * * v ♦ *4' ■’’ j 


NRA FOOTS Coach Kevin Lough cry aftCT i^LJohn^wS 

f _ ™AI!UUJ3 Washington surged to a 103-88 4. Memphis state 127-3) 

ing the Warirington Bullets to a lead. , . J SSTrodTSf-T) 

1 12 Natifeil Ba^etinll Asso- “He needed a rest, and aw the 7. North CareHna 066) 
an victory over the Chicago same got out of hand I oeadca to 1 uvum T«h tv-n 

l ^ ^veit to him,” Lraighery raid of his tx 

f a plaw who scares plays roolde star. . . . it vfrgimo cammoowei 

are too, that’s a plus. and Jeff En route to his third snjght 30- iummomi 

nhisouriM. Malone iKto^Wash- 


i- / 
-V / i- 
■ •* 


»a* / r 

;-vf‘ - ’-n 


. F a player who scares plays rookie s 
’ are too, that’s a plus, and Jeff Bam 
a very hard on defense every phis out 
7 ‘ V* said Washington Coach lngton b 
•* & Shoe. • Chicago 

probahly appreciate that even the Bum 
•• s. but it sure a nice to see those to 80-70 
.jersfaHm.”. " odaheat 


afi5-59 


to 80-70 and entered the final peri- 
od ahead by 


ad ofhis 9. Nsvado-Log vsgas (2T-3) 

ia rninoa o*-t) 

. . It Virginia CBRmnmolth ( 2 M) 

Sgat 30- 12. Duke con 
i Wash- U Kansas raw> 

—M L»4 1* Tdtoo (22-7) 

iLsyracuso av« 

-70, but u. Tokos Teca CO-7) 
fbe riim 17. Lovota UIU 125-5) 

-_1 M. Norte Coraltea St (2M) 

*“1™' 19. urvwmio sto»* nwj 

20, Michigan State OH) 


27 (HJWtlUaim, Figuring i }, Omlona 34 
(Baglay 9L 

Mfteieekeo 31 26 35 29-121 

AHo ntu 21 25 27 31-113 

CummlnBs 12-193-226, Momrlat9.l98-10 26; 

Wtmns 7-26 ID-10 24 Lowtogriwi W 7-10 21. 

Rfltaogdt: MtouaukM 55 (LUtor 14), Altanto 
51 (Lavtogston m Assists: Whmrikoa V 
(Mmertof 7). Alfcnfa 23 (EJohnsaa 7). 

LA. atoms 23 M 26 75—114 

Detroit 28 21 37 13-121 

LohnMar 14-18 6-2 26, Tricucka 9-13 6422: 

Smith VW2 (HI 29, Brfdggman 9-15 30 ZL Rc- 
beeadc Log Angelas 44 CDanaUsen.9), De- 
tra(r43 (Udmboar n ). Assists: Las AnpotosM 

(Ntoen 12), DMrph 36 fltewwm w, 

SMdtlS ^ a|p ^ 'In nwMJmJ na 

Dauas jj am ji — hi With Marc Bereevin peused for a rebound, Ranger goalie 

wuiK^hur den Hanlon smothered this first-period but Hanlon’ 
K^n^Mta.48 couldn’t handle Behn Wilson’s 50-foot slapshot 1:36 into 
iLCtattas's# ^ (H,od * r5 “ overtiroe and Chicago registered a 4-3 victory Monday night 



w 

L 

T 

Pet. 

PF 

PA 

Memphis 

3 

0 

0 

LOCO 

45 

36 

Birmingham 

2 

1 

D 

MS 

95 

78 

New Jersey 

2 

1 

0 

MS 

91 

72 

Tampa Bay 

2 

1 

0 

Jgr 

04 

75 

Jacksonville 

1 

2 

0 

J33 

57 

79 

Baltimore 

O 

2 

1 

.167 

50 

40 

Otlanda 

B 

3 

0 

SOX 

27 

97 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Houston 

3 

0 

0 

MOO 

126 

a 

Dernier 

2 

1 

0 

447 

79 

71 

Arizona 

2 

1 

0 

Ml 

64 

44 

Oakland 

1 

1 

1 

500 

55 

68 

Portland 

1 

2 

0 

533 

30 

41 

Sen Antonio 

1 

2 

0 

J33 

37 

65 

Lae Anaetes 

0 

3 

0 

JDBD 

fit 

82 


Mo n davi Result 
Arizona 41. Jacksonville 21 


Transition 


221 26 0 756 DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
3592 328 1 431 L Lee Elder. 336-X Gene Utner. 306. 3. Tbn 

2518 195 D 446 Nnrrts. 716.4 MHce Reid, -786- 5, Calvin Peete 
1318 104 0 5.12 and Tom Kite, J82. 7. Jack Renner. JS7. & 
407 64 0 649 David Edwards. J32. 9, Dwg TewetL J46. KL 
4185 MS • 555 Halt Irwin. J40. 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
I, Don PohL J642.AI Gelbgrocr, J63.3. Jetifc 

I NIekleuS. JO. 4 Corev Pavln. Jsr. t Bruce 
uetzke. J47. 6. MIM Reid ml John Mahaftey. 
— ■ 346.8. Doug TewetL 741. 9, Sepft Simpson, 539. 

11 Budddv Gardnor, J38. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
1, Fuzzy Zoeller, 27.17. 2. Morris Hgtcrtsky, 
ENCE 27 JO. 3, Klkuo Are), 3754 4 Lflffliy WtaStlra, 

Pet. PF PA 2111 5. Crete Stadler, 2830. 6. Rrtaart Lohr, 
500 65 36 2842. 7, Rex CaJdwfHI, 2845. 8, Ron SlrgdL 


PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLU 
7,craig Stadler, J73.Z Lamv WadUm SO. 


Ed Fieri, J99.9,LaiTYMIze,a2B. 112 tied wtth 
537. 

EAGLES 

l,BixkiyGardnsrand[>onpeetav,6.2,Tain- 
mvvatanllna, Larry Rlnker.Corer Pavln and 
John Cook & 4 M had with 4 
BIRDIES 

1, Fred Cfiutrtes. 131. 2. CurIH Strange, 124 3, 
Uren Roberts. 12L 4 Larry Rtaker, m 5, 
Craig Stadler, 119.1 Larry Mize. 117. 7, Brad 
Fmian,llLlWlllla Weed, ill 9. Scan Stow- 
m. m W. Dan HaHderaon. 1CD, 


Exhibition BasdbaD 


: » • ■ . -s 


BASEBALL I LOIUDIUUU I 

Antorten LUM I— - 

SEATTLE— Slgnod third baseman Darnell __ 

MONDAYS RESULTS 

MlderiALL Qewtaid 1L CMcago Cubs 3 

BaskettMl) AnsclaHon ctnannart s. s. RvMo 4 

GOLDEN STATE— Stoned guard Terry t.^T^ 1 ° 

Wekmtiteremaln.torgfto.ltoeRGtaa. 1 flas* 


Battimore l Texas 2 
Chicago White Sax Z Boston 1 
Detroit 7. Ktam Cto 5 
Taranto 5 , Houston 4 


OLEMSON— Named Bobby Robtoton ottv Oakland & MHwaubee 2 . 


■ettc director. 


Alim la (al X New York Yankees D 













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WBI 

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PAI 

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C’7? 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1985 



OBSERVER 


An Age of (herstatemmt 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — We inhabit the 
Age of Overstatement. That's 
why I didn't pay much attention 
the other day witeo President Rea- 


said the people trying to over- 
Nicaragu 


of our 


the Nicaraguan 
were the “moral 
Founding Fathers. 

For years now presidents have 
been making extravagant state- 
ments like tins one. I recall Presi- 
dent Nixon, after the first moon 
landing, saying it was the greatest 
event since the Creation. 

It was the Creation recorded in 
Genesis that Nixon was tallring 
about, so, upon hearing him, my 
mind instantly switched from the 
stunning technological feat at hand 
and started combing through die 
history of events. Was the moon 
landing really as great, eventwise, 
as, say, the decision by a great part 
of the human race to believe in die 
resurrection of Jesus? 

As a matter of fact, coming down 
several rungs on die ladder of 
greatness, what about the invention 
of television, without which Nixon 
couldn’t have been seen malting his 
statement to all humanity? Was 
getting to the moon really any 
greater, as events go, than invent- 
ing a box that would show the land- 
ing right in your parlor? 

In those days, as you can see, I 
still listened attentively to the 


sayings of highly publicized per- 
sons — evidence that 


even then Z 
was out of contact with the Ameri- 
can masses. Hardly an American is 
still alive, if ever there was, who 
recalls hearing our president classi- 
fy the moon landing right op mere 
beside the Creation. 

□ 


Overstatement, of coarse, has 
been around since Bamum's time. 
Hot air and malarkey have always 
characterized politics, but it was 
not until after the Eisenhower ad- 
ministration that people who gov- 
ern us elevated overstatement to its 
present exalted level 
In the 1960s the government’s 
growing addiction to overstate- 
ment began to trap it in nasty po- 
licy positions that were very hard to 
escape. There was the domino the- 
ory, for instance, which held that 
the fall of one part of Indochina 
most lead inexorably to the fall of 
all the rest, then of the rest of the 
Pacific, then — who could tell? — 
might not the Americas follow? 


Talk of countries falling was part 
of the overstatement It came from 
cherished ano-Communist lingo of 
the 1950s, when nations “fdT to 
Communism. But in fact, countries 
can fail only metaphorically, and 
the domino theory's power to cap- 
ture Washington's imagination 
rested on its inherent imaged pre- 
cariously balanced objects knock- 
ing each other down — an over- 
statement of the reality. 

O 

Various presidents' efforts to 
arouse flapping public enthusiasm 
for the Asian war led to more over- 
statement. Secretary of State Risk, 
spoke ominously of a billion bellig- 
erent Chinese confronting the 
United States in Asia; President 
Nixon, justifying the Cambodian 
invasion, spoke of possibly captur- 
ing the enemy's entire command 
headquarters. 

Rusk overstated the threat; Nix- 
on overstated the possibilities. 
Long before the wars end, over- 
statement had become so common- 
place that people of the war party 
tended to the overstatement that 
the peace party was treasonous 
while the peace party freely ac- 
cused the war party of criminal 
tendencies, and people less pas- 
sionate about the matter began to 
cultivate the modem habit of ig- 
noring public controversy. 

The evidence suggests it is this 
last group that is hkehr to 
In any case, people Hke 
with messages to convey to the 
numbed masses make their over- 
statement increasingly outrageous 
in hopes of being heard. 

And so we had the president's 
overstatement of Lebanon’s impor- 
tance to the national security, 
which led him to place the marines 
there, thus mating than v ulnerab le 
to the attacks that forced him to 
withdraw them, thus demonstrat- 
ing that his policy in Lebanon 
amounted only to overstatement 

Fortunately for the president his 
overstatement did not awaken the 
numbed masses, who, except on 
one bloody weekend, nodded calm- 
ly throughout the exercise. 

Now he gives us Washington, 
Jefferson, Franklin, Madison and 
Hamilton in CIA disguise strug- 
gling to overthrow bad King 
George in Managua. Anybody 
want to bet? 


Edgar Reitz 


Portraying the Impact of War and Time 
On a Rural German Region 


By Maxine Pollack 

International Herald Tribune 

f UNICH — There is no eaqr 


A MUNICH— There is no easy 
1VX way to sum np the epic film 
“Heimar or the achievement of 


its director, Edgar Reitz. 

The saga of a rural German 
family , the Simons, spanmng four 
generations from the end of 
World War I to the early 1980s, 
“ Hflimu" runs more than 15 
hours and required upwards of 
five years to complete. It has been 
acclaimed by many European 
critics as the most important Dim 
from West Germany m at least 50 
years, and last s umme r received 
the international critics' prize at 
the Venice Festival. It has recent- 
ly been released in the United 
States, London and Paris. 

As an 11-part television series 
it scored a huge popular success 
in West Germany, where it won 
film and television awards. As art 
and entertainment, it seems to 
have countered the conventional 
wisdom that one can never please 
most of the people and most of 
the reviewers. 

There have been a few dissent- 


ing voices. For example, Hans- 
- - eWt " 


New York Tunes Service 


Dietrich Gcnschcx, the West Ger- 
man foreign minister, objected to 
the way die Free Democratic Par- 
ty was mentioned in one scene. 
And some Ger man television 
viewers complained about the 
q uali ty of tr nnsmiari ftn, appar- 
ently bewildered by the director s 
imaginative use of black-and- 
white with vivid splashes of color, 
and alternate color sequences. 

Cinema owners who bought 
“HrimaT after its debut at the 
Munich Film Festival last sum- 
mer have not drawn large crowds 
to their two consecutive eight- 
hour screenings. London and 
P ari* theaters, hoping to attract 
bigger audiences, are showing the 
film in four-hour parts. 

“Heunat" started out largely as 
a response to the 1978 U. S. tele- 
vision drama “Holocaust,” which 
Reitz disliked. But the meticulous 
process of making “Heimat,” 
with scores of professional and 
amateur actors on sets in five 
German villages, was siw an 


autobiographical journey. The 

Munich-based director was bom 

in the 1930s and grew up in the 
Hunsrfick region of Germany, 
where the film was shot. The dis- 
tinctive Hunsrucker fliniFrr was 
modified for the film, he said, “so 
that other Ger mans could under- 
stand it," 

While oversimple pa rallels 
should be avoided, it has been 
noted that Reitz left his village of 
Moorsbach as a young man, just 
as two principal characters in the 
film leave Shabbach, the fictional 
place where the stray unfolds. 

In German “Heunat" m«int 
home or homeland. It is a word 
that resonates with double mean- 
ings, which are explored in the 
film. “It is where one was safe 
and happy as a child , but aim 
where one was with Famil y, and 
no one can choose his family, ” 
Reitz did. Nazi propagandists 
often invoked the “h omelan d” 
theme to extoll the virtues of rnral 
German life. “It was a wodd de- 
stroyed by the war, along with the 
hopes and joys of its little peo- 
ple," Reitz said. 

That these familiar themes 
emerge so fresh and original in 
“Heimat” owes something to 
Reitz's choice of the Hunsrtick 
landscape as a setting. “It is the 
first time we have seen what hap- 
pened in the countryside, to the 
farmers, to the little people, in a 
family stray,” said Hans Kwiet, 
one of the film's editors, at the 
SFB television station in West 
Berlin. “The war was planned in 
Berlin, but in ‘Heimat’ we see 
how the poor people suffered iL 
That must be part of the success 
of this film for US and fra other 
countries. They have had Hitler 
films and soldier film* put not 
the fife of little people.” 

The Hnnsruckers. portrayed 
by professoral actors as wdl as 
amateurs who live and work in 
the region, hold the film together 
through a complex net of rela- 
tionships between mothers and 
sons, husbands and wives, broth- 
ers and sisters, lovers and friends. 
The length of the screenplay, 
written by Reitz and his associate 



Director Reitz, actress Marita Brener of “H eimat .” 


Peter Steinbacfa, necessitated de- 
vices for cohesion, such as a sin- 
gle narrative voice and segments 
that use retrospective snapshots 
of key characters and events. This 
became particularly important 
once the film was cut up for tele- 
vision in 1983. 


“Heimat” will be aired on Aus- 
trian television this summer and 
is reportedly under consideration 
by the British Broadcasting Corp. 
and U. S. networks. 

The film’s success in its own 
country may have startled some 
West German sociologists, who 
have noted in recent years a de- 
clining interest in war history 
among West Ger mans of all gen- 
erations. A poll last month by the 
INF AS Research institute in 
Bonn found that more than SO 
percent of Germans were tired of 
hearing about the country’s Nazi 
past. Yet it was “Htimat’s” de- 
piction of the Hitler era that drew 
the bipypy television audiences, 
Kwiet said. Few televirion series, 
other than hits such as “Dallas” 
and “Dynasty,” have sustained 
such high tarings, with about 45 
percent of West Germany's 22 
million sets tuned in during the 
film’s run. Young people were 
especially interested, Kwiet said. 


“We Mine to this, at the right 
moment,” said Joachim von 
Mengersbausen, the other editor 
of “Heimat,” at the WDR televi- 
sion network in Cologne. “For 
years, in the ’60s and 70s, young 
people in Germany were calling 
all the older gmaation Nazis, 
and in the 1980s politicians like 
Helmut Kohl were still saying it 
was all part of the past, behmd us. 
We perceived we must tell the 
story again, from the beginning." 

“H eimat ” is unflinching and 
free Of cliches in confr onting the 
Third Reich, though Jews and 
die “ final solution” are a remote 
reality in the village where the 
Simons live. 

One Sees the rnttmatii fa rming 
community give way inevitably to 
a highway, a factory, the intru- 
sions of tourism. Unlike the cen- 
tral characters, who gradually 
show their age and the weight of 
their experiences, the town re- 
ceives a postwar face-lift that 
leaves its houses and squares un- 
recognizeable and, in tire end, in- 
accessible to many of the earliest 
residents. 

“One knows one cannot re- 
turn,” said Reitz, echoing the 
conclusion reached by some of 
his protagonists. 


PEOPLE 



A Dallas journalist whose take- 
off on "For whom th 


the Bdl Tolls"' 

was the winning entry in the Inter- 
national Imitation Hemingway 
Competition says he captured a 
certain “insufferable macho” that 
linked Ernest Hemingway to Texas 
and Texans. Peter Apptebome, 35, 
a senior editor at Texas Monthly 
magazine, won the contest over 24 
other finalists in judging at Harry’s 
American. Bar and Grill in Century 
City, a suburb of Los Angeles. His 
prize is a trip to Florence. For the 
eighth consecutive year, a jury of 
four men and one woman con- 
vened at Hairy’s — a replica of the 
hangout in Venice where Heming- 
way often drank — to choose a 
winner in a contest where entrants 
are encouraged “to write one really 
good page of really bad Heming- 
way." There were 2,450 entrants in 
the contest, from all over the world. 
Applebome said his wife made him 
enter. “She thought I was so macho 
I could knock out Hemingway on 
the bade of my hand. It seems like 
the pidip in Hemingway is the 
any kind of insufferable macho 
that ™»kes Texas Texas." Part of 
his entry takes place on the Rue St 
Bnbba, “tbe little-known French 
section of Dallas.” A sample of 
Applebome’s winning prose: 
“There was a look of great terrible 

sadness in her eyes. She knew about 

the woman of the tollway. I knew 
not how. I started to speak but she 
raised an arm and spoke with a 
quiet and peace I will never forget 
T do not ask for wfaom’s the toll 


soiqjldichensdaymaiidd«you< ft 

tbe church spokesman said. “We i f I 1* 
saying you've got fo do nun.” ,,tfl 1 * ! 


in njiiuui mining viauas, IS ft b J 

selling single less than a week aP 

one million copies were rdeased^ t * » i if 

the United States, record deal <C I III il 

say. The video version of them * a v 

by Michael Jackson and Lfogp i 1 
due made its debut Monday oj| 

The single, recorded after! 

American Music Awards in Jat 

aiy, was reported to be sdlinz vi 

well in record stores and getd . • • 

heavy play on radio stations, it v ■ 

released Wednesday in New Yc - 

and Thursday nationwide. 1 

proceeds go to famine reEef, r 

manly in Africa. BiHy Joel, one . . 

the singers on the record, int 

duced the video, which was 

straight studio rendition of the a 

ists recording the song. 

□ 


Framer President Richard Nix 
is dropping Secret Service pn* 
tion, opting instead for private - 
curity agents, in an effort to sc 
tbe government about S3 iwaifr 
Nixon. 72. wrote to Treasury Si 
retaiy James A. Baker 3d to say 
was “declining Secret Service pi' 

lection from now on.” Heisroii 

swftfin 


way belle,’ she said. ’The toll way 
belle’s for thee.’ ”* 


The comedian 

whose Broadway show just cl 
was in a serious mood as she spoke 
briefly at the Cathedral of SL John 
the Divine in New York as pan of 
the church’s campaign to help the 
homeless. “Are you here because 
you care or because you came to see 
a show?" Goldberg asked 7,500 
people in the congregation. She 
said she wrote a plea on behalf of 
the b ranHc« to President Ronald 
Also taking the pulpit to 
cm the problem, in a Lenten 
lecture series, were the novelist 
James Cano! and several homeless 


people. A spokesman for the 


church said the series concludes 
March 31 with a service by the 
Rereicad Jesse Jackson. “We’re 
the people running shelters and 


ing his federal bodyguards wrap 
vate ones “at no cost to l 
government,” an uuidentifi 
source told tbe Daily News in Ni 
Yak. “He merely stepped bi 
and decided that the expenditnri 
too great, that he didn’t need i ■ 
the source said. “He doesn't-* - 
why former presidents must be p 
lected by such an expensive del 
for fife." Secret Service protect! 
for former presidents Nixon, G> 
aid Ford and Jimmy Carter, andl 
Lady Bird Johnson, widow ofjj 
don BL Johnson, costs aupajt- 
more than S26 million a year.i 
News said. Nixon’s protection If 
year cost S3 million, h said. Nix.,, 
canceled government security j 
his wife, Pat, early last year, * 
the private security agents will p 
tect her as well as his home- 
Saddle River, New Jersey. " 

□ 

Prince Charles of Britain and. 
wife, Diana, are vacationing ini- 
Jor daman resort of Aqaba - 
guests of King Hussein and Qn 
Nora. 


rratf 


t m ■ 


: jr: 


ci 


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systems. Gontoa At Henri, 

fo 297 5600 l 


CCS in fob : 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


CAUSBOG 

One o f Ccflenvo' s most successful Real 
Btote companies has a selection of 
kmd paxrh ovtiofcie for internatioad 
invasor*. The properties, located 


dmwghaut the state range n once 
from V 0J00 to S6fl0^3l anaSoth 
with terna. for inrarmeftton nrimu the 


ilQfiOO to 
is. for ii 
', toes r trade record and the 


CAU9BBG LAM) COW. 

PO Be* 412 
London NW3 4FP 

Tek 936 9119. Telex; 268048 (413013 


UMTR> STATES TRADING CO. 
Danr es lon g term rekaionship with trad- 
ing comptxiy mterexted xi poubry, 
axnd meal, vegetefcies and seafood 
iwth products suai as veneer, plywood 
& lamiter coffee, sport ing goods & 
erode orL (Uarert(yhoi Warwian and 
Anikte crude et below bendvwxk 

pneraj Exrmmr contacts in 

SOUTH AMSKAN AND CSS4T. 
Cortach 

Oifaiia Fcsafic Trading Corp. 
2485 Hunrirtoxi Dr. Santa Morioa. CA 
9110B IBA Tele 213-681^1324 
The 188743 PS8K3S SNCL 


IMVBBAL CONTAHB5 LID. 
High Interact Income Ffcm 

17%% P/A 


in US$ 


UQ. provides i nv esto rs with a high 
fiadmeant with security by operdng 


vice, favuries ot 19% offer wil 
conrinue to be iledt with as recenad. 
For detto of this fuly guaranteed and 
mraed mvcsXnmt pkxs. context; 
UNJVBSAL OTNTAiNaS LTD. 
P.OBQX 197 LONDON SW3 3ST 
Td 350 0667, Tbe 89675 7 


WTBWAJIONAL OFT5HOSE 

COMPANY MCOBPOttATlONS 

ROM £110 

Comprehensive A dni nb liuim 
Noncnee tsrwB. Povms of Attorney. 
Registered Telex, telephone, 
mod farwardna 
Watd Resource* 
Bdoarrie House. 
Suramerhtf. 

TetJD624] 28020-20240-23933 
Telex 628352 fated G. 


BMTBH PtOPBtTY COMPANY 
based in Wes End of London 
with proven trade record looking for 

FINANCIAL PAOTNR 


for small office cmd rnridenrid deuelop- 
merxs in London. 


Ided opportunity for private or ksitu- 
bord mvedor 


Plea» vvrito in first iratace: Box 40557 
LH.T.. 63 Long Acre, London, WC2£ 


EUROPEAN RETAILERS- Intemdion- 

d Galena is converting a historic 
~ England bncfanarlc. We seek 


New! 


.< retailers who wet vow wBti 
u*. Werrwiond GaBerta wt feature 


rekd spoee tiiot adheaicoly refkto 

the OnWorid Iradlfors and 


I cultures 

as wea as candoninum and office 

space. ¥£■ shafl oast you with every 
aspect afyaur Ui venture. Contort 
Bax 1847: Her old Tribune, 92S21 
Neufly Gecte, France 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

R41LS. - FOR MUUMA310NAIS 
CPA FUM 

Irtl & U5. tax planning, accounting, 
froiod t breineg services - red es- 
lotaL «ivatmcm^ opefoong cdrvisml 
HAROLD GODKTEN A CO. 

225 W. 34 St, New York. NY 10122. 
Tefc 212^943771. 

FRAGRANCE 

US. based cuumtu/fri^foncB *Wc- 
saler seeks export souran of ^estige 
INTO brand rragrances. Hw» for- 
wd derft Confidentidity aaured. 
Tdcx na 353240 dtrt Mr. Oxvle^ PA 
Bax 102, IMe Fafc. NJ. 07424 USA. 

AHUUD OF COMPUTBS? Let u* 
show you how frientfly they can be. 
For hitinea or persond urn. Autho- 
rired dectiers for EM, Apple, others. 
Huge dseourts. We con help deter- 
mew your need*. Co* Mr. Lawrence, 
Pori* 563 2989 or 348 3000. 

FRESH WATS PEARL strand and 
loose pearls an sde in Hang Kang. 
Own factory and best price. More 
derafe The 5771S POXAB WC TefcQ 
6832767. 9/F, Mfag Lot Maroon, 8* 
VUFdiig f^TST, lOn. Hong Kang. 

OLD TOWN MARB&1A. tetourart/ 
bar, venter cining sects, summer 
teigue wafled gcxdtn seas 110. 2 
liSSiL historic builting. UnSavted 
lecee. tl 50,000. low grewd rwrt. 
Present owner 7 yis. Spdn 952 
773289 pm 

EXPORT ASSISTANCE 

Mafceting in US 

or aetist with export, joint venture con- 
ddered. AIM. OT Ju28 Paris 







TOUCH DS1GPBL, good experienoe 
in lades garments. stxtrtswetr.sweQt- 
cn. Conrad 808 2359, Paris, during 
the Pretoif e Vision, bra before 9 ten 
afar 8 pm. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


PLACE VBOOME Dyrxmtic 

officer. Low coti. 


sda 


wll shoe 

nteretfed in JoinNtrturt 

Box 1891. Herdd Tstlwe, 92521 


NeuBy Cedex. France 


B8BUNG CATTLE RANCH startup 


in USA: frongus cottle and 
Bar W; Roiftel, Box 


embryos Contort Bar ....... 

146, Geneva, Alabama 36340. Tek 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


OfFSHORE 
LIMITED COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANKS 


Worldwide 
From £75 

Maing - Telephon e • Telex 

UX. Uejrf Mai , J ersey, G uemesy, Gt- 
brobor, Pon^na. Liberia. Luxembourg, 
ArtBev- Beady made or spedaL Free 


Axkxi 

5^ 


Company rorwofions 
* Tl. B Victoria S 




26591 

Telex 627691 SPTVA G 


BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMITB3 MC 
USA. A WORLDVVDE 


A comp t ete social 8> business service 
providing a urfoue co lec ti o n of 
talerXed, versatile & muMngual 
xxfividudi fan 


FcrfaanGanMierckd-PrintPramalion* 
ConventtorvTrode Sl w w v Pre n Parties 
Spedd EvertHmoge MakeroPtfs 

Soda) Hogs-Hotias mri i t ai fe w <et i 

Soad Comporioae-Tour guid e* , etc. 


212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St. N-Y.C 10019 


Service tteratetotivs 
ed Worldwide. 


Needed 1 


NTBWATKJNAl COMPANY 
FORMATION 

lAconparec from £75 LOAt Poxwra 
& al major art-shore c e nter * Fid od- 
■nababotw nonvise service*, powers 
of attorney, registered offices, accoun- 
tancy, confidential bark occourts 
opened, confid mdki teleph o ne, telex, 


fox & naj^ wwa. 


limited _ . 

43 Conrina Street, Liverpool L8 7W . 
Tet 051 7$ 148Ql Hx 62613 BUSS®. 
Few Ojl 709 5757 
Aaootod Qffiras Worldwide. 


EVHEV YEAR A MASTERPIECE. On' 


tide n ow 35 yeori of s toebncx kw 
irfumutior from 


1950 to 1985. to- 

dudes w eek l y s locfanate, monthly 

stocks quoteora. earnina etc etc 

Coti! 1950 to I960 USSlueadi 1968 
to 1980 S15 each. 1980 to 1985 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


OFFSHORE SBV1CE5 


UX non retider* ooraparees with 
nominee dkedors. bearer shores ond 
confidential bark aatxnts. fofl badtup 
S support servicB*. Pcncsna & Ifoerion 
compaveL Fvet retie co nfid en tial 
protested services. 


4J».CJL 17 Widetttie S«, London 
E17HP.Tet 01 377 Id74TTlxji&9391 1 G 


YOUR MAN W HMQPE . Ameriam 
raraar coralnsdnn msmager based in 
foris avaodse part Or TiA lime to 


repraent your business in Europe. 18 
yeexs offshore' 


... J experience with office, 

mepnano & unpnf racwricv mu® 
in confidence to-. MCX, AptC-47, Les 
Rh« de Sens, 4 Squire Alenda. 
94600 Chary le Soi. France. 


WE ARE LOFDON SOUOTORS who 
spaddne m ktivnotiond and aff- 
shore srtjteoo*. We speak and under- 
sted_ Endah, Frrach, Dutch and 
AmerittriWti dndd be ade to hdp. 

Sfreet, L^Sn 8865 

Tdem 8954619 ASTON G 


YawanoEin 

Fuly hrnished, — r , 
ftiete office services, 24 hour phone 
miex answering, telex ser- 


vra, mtina Corpor a te re nr es etti o - 
. Bwnem Aids Service*. No I, 


tion, etc. 

Cotomix 
0617. Tek 3374456. The 


Cdbmbo Cowl 09-04, Sinyyore 
- 270fSS 


COMF RgPg WE SHW1CB, bus- 

co mpi^^fi^ ^rJSqnjS^ 
ot jc Bi a i oa Ooickmca, insuranos 
and ro«uraMe. GfTECO Geneva. 
72 r. de Lewame, CP^ 881 . 1211 
Geneva 7, Svwtzer lend 


SECOND PASSPORT 

Toe. S»e 503, CertraL Hong Kong. 


tUSHBS JBNKB M OB4EVA. 
Secretond rannees / tims t aiiu m / 
phorte/ tdex / mail service /oooount- 


mg I company formations / tiorwe 
i2ii 


... sH^teiAan 

neva 1 1, 22/57 44 77 Tx <23 070 
HXTOR/ W07BL Successful in rm 

annu. textbook^, odvan isi tm, mor- 
fcetina. RA foafities eg. wordprooes- 
ior. Kaasonebie race. K Hams, 


Kronberaertfr. 5. 6232 Bod Sodnv 
T«l> ft 6 196.22224. w. Germcmv 


TRANSLATION ALL LANGUAGES 

Commercial, 


DOtorrts. speonnBora. TRANSCOM, 
™ 3Pc ~ 


MOWY AVAILABLE for vktet bud- 

pn»ch. Gmhil Irxer- 
3B17.E. 




Access. Writ* Nogghton 
Wfog^22. 


Advisory Services, Im 
8M9Zieich.Switnrtand. 


FR1VAIE DtTECnVE SCAMRNAVU 

& Finland, ad Norway; 24 hows 02- 

42 72 1 A Tb 18949 Acem. Monaoer 

G. Reklev, former potice/imiy tffi- 
oer, contacts worldwide. Post to Jem- 
bwetarget ^ NO! 54 Odol Norway 


FOR All YOUR NffiS of trerofotkn 
•rtwpretotion, and seaelarici ser- 

aasaat* 


mtOIJ KH EAS HION MODQ. 

27, PR/PA ypenence. History d Art 

easTis^ 

3 FJTL 9 pm. 01-223 



TYPMGMBIGUSHcfoae at home by 
& B fah B seo ^25» 10 1W* “peri 

J < i. HeroH T ‘™- 

92S2I Nealy Cede*. France 


XSK CAPITAL Expertise & etiics in 


TAX SERVICES 


Nffi> IBP WITH TAXBT Conrad. 
Daniel P. McGuire CPA, 378ol 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


DISCOUNT COMMISSIONS ON 
STOCK A COMMODOY TRADES 


We are gewed to hsnde imlvidud & 

corporate forwgn cherts aid are 
ecpipped to hedge your partfofio with 
currency fotaret Fast response to your 


texting needs. .Rfl savings Ihrau^i de- 
Pomoho man 


coieti conenaora. romoeo manage-, 
owti bv ottiade prohasiondi is avoil- 

C SSJY a r-' nqW ** f* 

Company, Inc. 

6320 Augusta Drive . 

r . Springfield . 9A22150 USA 
TeL /03-569-9300 Hx. 7NW320996 


OFFICE SERVICES 


WORLD-WIDE 
BUSINESS (BARES 

Fnm l di e d ExyeSva Office* 
C o nyl e to wNh Seowktod, Telex 
Adm toh fcHw . Ceeporate 
R ^wex ent d wo A Ohr FocStie* 


MEJOD AH Bgp.teinert Center 
fo™isa , 99, 1015 CH A m de utij n 

TgQXXZrtOL Tefex.- 16183 

ATrCC DcecufrvB Services Ashens 
B. Safe 504 Athens 610. 
jj^gJ^.^Telex; 216343 


Tet 244949. 

BBJSSHSt A Rue de to Preae 
1000 Broste. Tet 217 83 60 
Telega 25327 
DUBAI: P.a Bar 1512 
Axfine Certire Dubi __ 

Tet 214565 Tete 48911 
UMDONi 110 The Strand, 


15, DNATA 
*.UA.E 


London WC2R OAA. * 

918. Tbfc 24973 


Teh fOH 836 8918, 


t C/Orerae N* 6&A," 
56 00. 


Madrid 28020. T«i 270 . 
270 66 04. Trie* 46642 


tiWANfc Via BoOTCpp if 

®/B0 59 279 


20123 MBan.TdB6 75 
Tefee 320343 
NEW YORK OT Mxfiton Awrwa 
reSn Tet Q12) 605- 

0200. Talma 125864 I 237699 
PARK: 180$, 15 Awnue Vidor Huoo 
75116 Pte*. Tet 502 18 00 ^ 
Telex; 620893F. 

Tete 613458 

SINGAPORE 111 North Bridge Bd. 
—11-04/05 Pcxtirauto Pla^yPore 
0617. Tefc 3366577. Thema. 


z ^STfi K -" c ’ &h 


Tet I 

Telex, 812656/812981. 


ZURICH-ZURICH-ZURICH 

BAIMHOPSTBASSE 52 

w umoa/managanenT dbracu 
A Cen^rtty forextifonss 
• Hew to do Busmess in /or/ 

FROM 5WnaSAN0 

Tel 01/211 


BttehofsJrasM^J2«022 2uri5i. 
92 07. The 813 062 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Your Offica in Gennar 

we m “At Yoor Servira" 

■ Comple te office s enices at fo» - . 

• for u i . 

term or tne long tarnL V" 

• fctie m efionniy tramed rffia* «**~ 
profucorW staff of your (fcf®- . . 

• Can be bapRy used al yaur-co^^ 
rate domiSe tor Germany/fin ' ' 

• Your business operation ate * 07 : _ 
immedirteiy. 

lairea Rm foe w Service. - 

Umcd-Hous am Hohho m iyti^- . 
ji rffl ionarom 22 , 

6 (X» Frankfurt am Mari 1 fv 




Tefc 0611-590061 
Telex; 414561 


LOS ANG8B * 

Furnished offioK in Bewriy Hfe. £ r 
veriert, prestigious oddress. Th, »--. - 
secret u rid A lei~ 1 ~~ — 

Executive I 
9777 Wasted 
WfoCAT* 


khtre BfvdL, Se. < 509 , fcjr . / 


your warns aombi.^ 

IN THE NETHBHAMIS |1- . 
Fuly sarvicxd offices, woetorics* - 
busmen odvisery servos, phcx«tt: 


m n B na od d ress. 

EXECUTIVE ■■ 


SERVICES AMSTSn-:- 

P.OA. 703B5J [OtP KJ Afljtanb . ' 
HoBond. Tefc{fi|2B7165fi6.1h« te • -- 


gb«va ■"'lagg'.: .-' 

Fuly equfoped offices to rent Ite. . 
ctite fote^Mex flftere}- Trite,* - , 
odmirirstratign & seoetixitil rttwa. - 


YOUR LONDON OfflCf 

CMSHAM EXECUTIVE CDflfi 
C o mp rehensive ranos el service 
ISO Regent Street, London WJ 
Teh (01)439 A2U Tbe 2616; 



PARS ADDRESS, . 

Srnco 1 957 L5J 1 . provides r 
telex, meeting rooms. 5 tot ftp- 
750M. Tefc ^47Q4.TU 642ffl< . 


BRUSSELS ADORES! Nat oft' 
phones, telex, secrete d SUM. 
Contact: Men Busmen Gofer- ' 
517 9211 (12 tesf.T1fc 41344 B 


YOUR OR1CE M BANWCOtC F 

BfBSESftSHSr": 


OFFICES FOR RHN 1 


YOUR HEAD OffKE M FRAN 
PAMS T6TH 


Oafe office rentals, . 
Registration urth trade odhonto 




Tefc 651 


VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 


— VOKl.li EAMOES JFU FI I FILS — 
E\CU SI\ F JFU FFS A U VTCHKS 


LONDON 

I3A NFW BOND STUFF E. 

TFF.: 0 5-10 1 1 tO.» TFLFX; 2(.6U6: 



ImprimA par Offprint, 73 rue de rEvangile. 75018 Paris.