Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


iy \j£t> 


it*ng$.r S[ (Us * 

Mh&itwi «4-.- ■vf 


*4f,. 

'&■.«*! -,&;. • 

%rtnf, : . .-. 

fJKfWi } i - ^ . .. 
a*n* tv,- , ,j.v 

V\r'\-. . ' 
Iw W MjH ; V 

*** *HfWW 

i V *«■*?. V . 
UV. ... 

*«*•*'•, ,■■ .- 
iS » .** \, v-.. 

{. 

jlf.it . v*aJ A ■■ 
l~i*V rf ■_ ] ... . 

:* * ■ 1 v «■• - .-. 

kf »*:, - ‘ ; . 
Hfc •■> . • - . 
»?V' 

*'U.' »:... 

**; 4V.-:. ., 

* : V ., 

j - h*« r H.ti \ 

-*t* *1, .^ , _ 

M*’»* t’ 

ih%v>TQ^v\ .. , 
:** "Ipt.'- 

1 i*.T i'«i i; 

ii»* V : ‘‘ u - ; 

:*• ' \ 

* 

s.A -5 *.; •.> .- . 
to \J6* | -.“0 . ■ 

Sr ‘ , 

K' *{V.H| •!-.; 
4J1** -,t 

I »il? m-i-i;: ;,- 
f J* Vf » ; 


HTtaopu „,«{*. 

> ; d*-^* 

Ctli.%Vi At iir • -. , 

tfc rdf-ti tf* v - 

* V»wfc. j-. 

W !«• L-;- • 

U«t! K»r*C N\ v. 
«¥.Vvi!> . . 

Wff tol.iV « 
otqjrc^ti. -• v 
MKi -Tt hK-.i. 

ww wbfc nn RtvtaSd 

«* ;W '- r* : : 

'Arm. .«. .i z- ■ 
W ifn • 

1 «ra*v ‘s. • - .- 
:***.*». *- • 

Ht|M ! •■ 

* -Nr-« a* : ■ ■ 

Jwlawi >; . 

«*$ . . 


*| AI > 

|ll*IM “ 


SThe Global Newspap^J 
Edited in Paris 
Primed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 

| The Hague and Marseille 

WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE I 8 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


Afcirio jSJ»Dn tnaL. LSJSD Nm V _7i»NJu. 

Am _301 aj, „I500 L»i Qto« OJtDE»± 

DAu n — OASDDa i — i— jqi cx totgai Wbt 

“sA" feM__s 8 . isfl) Qsw 6S)&ah 

GnAi C1IJD Z T S^rfWmJJOP. 

haat_UBDA- r^- ^TTZ Spm Wtto 

b« n joop, r ^~, — s-*«_7ioiKf 




lnenboat~4SLEr. 


bmtriand^ZBSft 


Published With The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 


fp. 31,745 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


Gamory 2-5DDJA Meka *&* Twtay_T£ 4flM0 

a«o(»«>n_3Dr. Meem i*Oh. UAL ABO* 

Am SO Dr NHhMbKh_27SH. US. Ui (Evc^BSS 

m. 115 Reb Mfl*nc Vvgahmo flttt 

V\ ESTABLISHED 1S87 


Britain Proposes 
\bolition of State 
Jil-Trading Firm 


By Bob Hagcrty govemn 

■ International Herald Tribune mg prK 

■ . ' LONDON — The government, ^d “a 
■. oving lo a more free-market ap- less ovt 
( nach to oil pridng, said Wednes- r 6 ? 011 . 
;■[>• that it planned legislation to commit 
Polish Britain's state-owned oil- 
. . jding company. the QP£ 

. In a statement that surprised the The coi 
“■'I industry, Alick Buchanan- pnces c 
- niih the energy minister, said the ccoootn 
. . • risiation would call for abolish- cmnpan 
'"Jijg British National Oil Gjrp„ 

^ town as BNOC and transferring , 1 

• ftne <rf its functions to a small ‘“JLio; 

*. . . ivenunem agency. °f P 3 ™ 

i., ‘ • The change would remove the OD £J". t 
Wei v j^ivemment from the oil-trading Tne_c 

• • Cosiness and presumably end offi- 1 

‘ • , .ai efforts to lean against market *so h<or 

• essure for lower prices. It is rimi- “en sel 
. -T to a decision by Norway earlier me m»J 

.. is year to stop announcing offi- f* 55 * 
al prices for ml each quarter and Recei 
1 ‘ ‘ . stead quietly seD its od al prices ers for i 

. ore elesdy reflecting day-to-day ot the i 

",'ictuations in maAet prices. oil has i 

• ." Both countries appear eager to at $ l u 
-V.wer their profile and avoid produd 

"ur ges that they are propping up than $7 
v... jvxs. months. 

^ Oil traders struggled to assess the losses a 
-to I . ^lplicationsof Britain’s move. On tax bent 
! ...ti ii irJ j ^ e New Yak Mercantile Ex- fro® he 
.4. >c, ;; . 'tange, prices of oil-futures con- the mar 

... v.'; acts izntially dropped about 40‘ F«1 

. . / ‘-jits a barrel before rebounding official 

•arply. Late in the afternoon, but the 
' -'est Texas intermediate crude for average 
. ,, .'“^ril delivery was iradingat $28.12 Mri 3 

‘ - banel up from Tuesday’s settle- British 


government has come under grow- 
ing pressure from both Parliament 
and major oil companies to take a 
less overt role in the market. A 
report from a Commons energy 
committee this week accused the 
government of ^coBaboraticn with 
the OPEC cartel” to prop up prices. 

The committee argued that lower 
prices on balance would help the 
economy, notably by encouraging 
companies to hire more people. 

“We are not just sheltering under 
OPEC’s umbrella,” complained 
lan Lloyd, a Conservative member 
of Parliament. “We are supplying 
one of the rite of that umbrella.” 

The araipahy buys about 51 per- 
cent of the dl produced in the Brit- 
ish North Sea at official prices. It 
then sells some of the oil back to 
the major oil companies and sells 
the rest on the ope® market. 

Recently, it has had to find buy- 
ers fa about 800,000 barrels a day 
on the open market. Most of that 
oil has been sold in recent months 
at SI to $2 below official prices, 
producing losses estimated at more Vice President George Bt 
than $75 mOHon over the past sly Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the 
months. About 80 percent dl the 

losses are offset, however, by the 

tax benefits the government derives 

from holding official prices above J • /r 7 

the mariret leveL AjiUn {jUlCSlS 

Fa January and February, the 
official price was $28.65 a barrel, Tkjr nn • 

but the company sold its oil at an JHjOSCOtV X TIT) 
average price erf about $27. JT 

Mr. Buchanan -Smith that A / tf • ,» 

British National Oil would set a jrLS fAiTlStUttlS 



Soviet Burre# 


enko: 


Gorbachev^ etsmeetings 


The Associated Press 


Mr. Gorbachev said that Mr. 


MOSCOW— The Soviet Union Chernenko was “associated with 
buried Konstantin U. Chernenko major initiatives aimed at ending 
In a hero’s grave on Red Square on the arms race and eliminating the 
Wednesday in an elaborate state threat of a global nuclear nolo- 
funeral at which the new Soviet raus l/’ 

leader. Mikhail S. Gorbachev, “Our party and state,” he said, 
praised Mr. Chernenko as a man of “will continue to increase their ef- 
peace and a “faithful servant” of forts in this direction, doing eveiy- 
communism. thing to preserve peace.” 

Mr. Gorbachev, at 54 the youn- Mr. Gorbachev said the Kremlin 
gest Soviet leader in 60 years, be- was ready “to main tain good neigh- 

S a series of meetings with world borly relations with all countries on 
ers following the ceremony. the basis of peaceful coexistence.” 
The Tass news agpncy said that He asserted that the Soviet 


Mr. Gorbachev held talks with Union threatens no one, but 
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of warned, “No one will ever succeed 


India on Wednesday evening. 

Mr. Gorbachev was scheduled to 


in threatening us.” 

Moments before the coffin was 


Vice President George Bush of the United States; left, expressing Ins condolences to 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the new Soviet leader, at the funeral of Konstantin U. Chernenko. 


•ent price of $27.91 Wert Texas price for March sales but that the 
- termediatc is the most widely level had not been decided. 


a****..- 

* •***■ y * 

•• 

* **-*-. • 

Pfc - 


tr.i* t * ; i 

uw w. ■ 

i— • 

ti rt..-. 


■ aded U.S. crude, and its price 
- jmii y reflects demand in the in- 
j , % . t ' rnatioual market 
■ >' Britain, which knot a member of 

~e Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
. „ V irting Countries, has been caught 
’ "-'nween OPEC demands thatit re- 
in its price-siabflizmg role and 
a nands at home to end that role. 
“■The country’s daily production 
' about 18 million barrels of oil 
: akes it the world's fifth-latest 
. ~^oduoer and bigger than all OPEC 
V_!embers except Saudi Arabia, 
. iw . . -ritish National Ofl sets an official 
“ ice fa British oil, usually in 
High alignment with the official 


d had not been decided. 17 _ O !•- 

iustifying the turnabout in po- M. uUc CL uDUi 
r Mr. Buchanan-Smith noted -* 


f — t — T 

» . •> tte* try.*#*:#* 

" T *’ ' 3» ■ '?% T 

U#i»v4r» ■.>.-*««* _ 

. i j, 

^ •" £ ,A -T"-* 


Justifying the turnabout in po- 
licy, Mr. Buchanan-Smith noted 
ih»t the company tradhiocally has 
sold oil under contracts fixing the 
twice fa months at a time. With the 


Reuters 

BEIRUT — Shops and schools 


*•" 

an* 


price fa months at a time. With the shut Wednesday in most of Chris- 
industry’s shift toward buying dl tian East Beirut and soldiers and 
under short-term contracts, howev- g unman set up roadblocks north of 
er. the company could avoid losses the capital as a political crisis 
only by dunging its prices fre- threatened to split Lebanon's 
quentiy. Thus, he argued. British Christian community. 

National (Ml could no longer play G unmen anpeared on East Bei- 



National (Ml could no longer play 
its former stabilizing role. 


Gunmen appeared on East Bo- 
nn streets after a Christian militia. 


producer and bigger than all OPEC But he said the government the Lebanese Faces, announced it 
_ embers except Saudi Arabia, would retain powers to eusnre that was distancing itself from the Pha- 
ritish National OH sets an official od companies supplied enough ofl iange Party, the main Christian po- 
lice fa British oil usually in to Britain in an emergency. litical grouping, which in recent 
nigh alignment with the official The government puns, to set up months has sought a rapproebe- 
ices OPEC tries lo. enforces. an Gil. and ESpdioes Agency to ment with Syria after years of cool 

- The government’s line has been handle production agreements with relations. 

: j at Britain follows the market in oil companies, sell the small President Amin Gemayel, a 


,,<x .Vat Britain follows the market in 
- 1 pricing but tries to avoid sharp 
uvement in either direction. 

-In recent months, however, the 




A -- 

•» i" 


T%\ 

*f‘-u * i 


iisav n; 

5VW Vl\!‘ \ 


amount of dl received as royalties Martmite Christian, canceled a trip 
to the gdvennnent and manage the to Moscow for thefuneral Wednes- 
govenunent pipeline system. day of Konstantin U. Chernenko 

: and remained in Lebanon to attend 

a meeting of the Phalangjsl leader- 

^J.S. GfUeges Redefimng JsSoSSKSS 
Content of Curncuhuns 

v the outskirts of the city, militia 

T Rv Edward B Fiske to restore some structure to cunic- sources said. 

• " J y Neyf York rimes Service ulums that had been denuded of An official of Mr. Geagea’s of- 

vjpni vno v QiuHmfc it requirements in the student rebel- fice said Mr. Geagea was not op- 

■ ,, aS« ta of .he previous to * >««t vi* by <bc Pto- 

- ■ aihematiS^ofessoreat Stan- rc Ff nl wavc cha ?8 e ^ W 51 ^erslnp toSym, but that 





meet with Vice President George lowered into the grave, Mr. Cber- 
Bush of the United States. Prime nenko’s wife, Anna, stood by the 
Minister Margaret Thatcher of side of his open coffin, stroking his 
Britain, President Francois Miner- forehead and bending several times 
rand of France. Chancellor Helmut to press her cheek against his face 
Kohl of West Germany and Presi- and to kiss him. 
dent Mauno Koivisto of Finland, 
officials from their governments’ 

Set Gorbachev Invited 

peace and a “faithful servant” of __ 

communism and underlined two 'm g T C* X. _ ^ 1 9 _ 

lo Ll.b. by Reagan 

my. 

He promised to reward the Sovi- By Bernard Weinraub 

et people for hand work and inno- New York Tima Service 

vation and vowed to combat ,,i A( . u ,xr/'TAM ■ 

-showiness end swagger." The WASHINGTON - White 


The 10 surviving members of the 
Politburo stood at attention, their 
aims raised in salute, and Mr. 
Chernenko's coffin was lowered. 

Flanked by Prime Minister Ni- 
kolai A. Tikhonov and Foreign 
Minister Andrei A. Gromyko. Mr. 
Gorbachev then moved to the 
Grand Kremlin Palace fa a recep- 
tion in the gilded St. George's Hall 
With Vasily Kuznetsov, who is 
the equivalent of a vice president in 
the Kremlin structure, they formed 
a reception line for brief exchanges 
with hundreds of visiting leaders. 
Delegations from at least 42 na- 
tions attended the funeral. 

Moscow residents interviewed 
on city streets said little about Mr. 
Chernenko's brief tenure. 

“It’s the right thing that they 
chose Gorbachev " said a bearded 
young man in his 30s. “He's young 
and energetic. We ore putting all 
our hopes in him. os they say.” 


funeral of Konstantin II. Cher- 
nenko, who died Sunday. 

A While House official said Mr. 
Reagan “was beginning to think 
about his legacy.” The official add- 


ceeded by Mr. Chernenko. lween L 

The coffin containing the body The < 
of Mr. Chernenko, who was the last that Pre 
in the line of Soviet leaders bom a meeti 
under the Russian czars, was cause ti 


between US. and Sovi- 


p laced near the right end of a row et leaders over the part decade have 
of hero’s graves between the Krem- taken place abroad. 


tin wall and the tomb of Lenin. 


The officials said Mr. Reagan’s 


Mr. Chernenko’s wife, Anna, bei 
grave after bis state funeral in R 


Th» A mri al rfi Prao 

led from her husband's 
Square on Wednesday. 


New Soviet Leadership 
Faces Daunting Agenda 


ms 


~ • aibematics. professors at Stan- wavc “ 

ri University are dusting off Mth sWictiM io a degree But in be would not accept a : 
teir Greek and Roman texts and, many cases it Ixas also resulted m a winch Otnstians dep« 
- .Minnesota, Gustavus Adolphus re-exaganatiimofcontmt and an way on Synan support 
ollege has thrown out its mtire attempt to address in the curncu- Last month s Phalan 
r mreel rauWand started over. ^ issces ¥ ^ of P™» 

These andliundreds <rf other in- .u ^ leasc - 50 &»* **' 

i unions, from tiny liberal am art- £ 


Bv Gary L Lee - « . - 

Washington Pm Service lowing the death of Konstantin U. no greater nope and no greater 

WASHINGTON — The swift Chernenko on Sunday, will rooye goal” than peace with the Russians, 
ascent to power by Mikhail A Gor- early to establish his authority in Mr. Gorbachev, wearing a gray 
bachev presents the new Soviet several areas or domestic policy, Persian lamb hat and using Ins 
leader with a daunting gg enri* of Those areas include economic and gold-rimmed reading glasses, 
long-term d omesti c problems that agricultural planning, raising Sovi- opened the ceremony with a eulogy 
have confounded his predecessors et morale and rejuvenating the bu- to Mr. Chernenko, who had been 
and the prospect of having enough reaucracy. the Soviet leader for only 13 

time attne Soviet helm to do some- atUOTpls by ^ Brezb . months when he ^Sunday at 73. 

ihmo ahniit them *7,- .... r “At this hour nf enef. Mr. Gor- 


of the Soviet Communist Party fol- 


SSciristimsTracS^anv ascenttopower by Mikhail A Gor- early to establish his authority in 
winch Qmstians d^mled in any nresems the new Soviet several areas of domestic policy. 


VX"\. 


wotus-nrirs 

*+4* *«-- r •• 


ges to huge state universities, are " r 

Mtofa^- wave of cuniSlum ^Sher educauon equivalent of the 
fora that is radically changing j»ck-to-baacs movement at the 

■ hot U 4 college *|^Sc£3S3^ 

armngrn canmg yen. w Seb&mT said Joan Sngd 

In the past couple of years, hun- M ass j stam jean at the Colorado 
reds of collegps, including virtual- campus of the University 

kberal arts mstitu- ^ cdbiado. which has the six- 
on, have -stepped up the number QQQfjg humaniti es component of a 
’ m a nda te d courses, redesigned core curriculum in place and is 


technology on society. lease of 50 Syrian soldiers taken 

Some college officials view the prisoner by the party during Leba- 
fluny of curriculum changes as the aoo’s civil war. 
higher education equivalent of the Mr. Geagea’s aides said the Pha- 
“back-to-basics" movement at the lanmrt leadership had lost touch 
elementary and secondary leveL with the feeling of ordinaiy party 
“We're bade to a classical approach members since the assassination in 
to education,” said Jam KlingeL 1982 of Amin Gemayel’s younger 
an assistant dean at the Colorado brother, Bashir GemayeL the presi- 
Springs campus of the University dent-elect of Lebanon who was the 
of Colorado, which has the six- military commander of the Leba- 


hv the n*- long-term domestic problems that agricultural pla nnin g, ra isin g S 
oy inc re- con f oim d et j hie nredecessors ct morale and rejuvenating the 


have confounded his predecessors et morale i 
and the prospot of having enough reaucracy. 
time at the Soviet bdm to do some- rv_ ; ,. 
thing about them. . w 


ung itooui uicm. . nevand his successor, Yuri V. An- 

Since Leonid 1. Brezhnev’s tiropov, to bring about some eco- 


with the feeling of ordinary party health began to decline nearly a nomic reforms, the Kremlin has 
members since the assassination in decade ago, the Kremlin has had lo lacked a leader who could push 

1QR3. nf Amin Gemavel’s vounser fnnie nn th»» iKwUnbin ctaVrs and forward over the lone term with psop*®! a Sianncn cnampion a UK 


1982 of Amin Gemayel’s younger focus on the leadership stakes and forward over the long term with 

brother, Bashir GemayeL the presi- succession. Momentum and the forceful, new policies. Consequent- “ears oi communism. 

dest-dect of Lebanon who was the ability to cany out long-term plan- ly, economic growth, which is dra- 

military commander of the Leba- ning decisions have bees lackin g, matkaily down from the peaks of 
nese Forces. 4 everts on the Soviet Union say. two decades ago, has dragged. 

Even the limited economic ex- 


speech recalled the torn* stand JJ 005 ? 0^°^ say that President about his legacy.” The official add- 
nff.ir.rt indi tripling taken by Yuri Ronald R^gan. has extended a ed, “He wants to meet Gorbachev 
V. Andropov, who was considered. "P*** 01 ™ mv ? taUon to Mikhail S. at a mutually agreed-on date; he 
to be Mr. Gorbachev’s mentor in Gorbachev, the new Soviet leader, wants to work out an accommoda- 
tbe nfling Politburo. Andropov J? meet r in die United States in tion on arms control.” 
died in Febraaiy 1984 and was sue- ho P es ® r ^proving relations be- ^ ^ ^ the while 

ceeded by Mr. Chernenko. twocn two 001111 * House said Mr. Reagan would wel- 

The tiffi n mnia.nfng the body The officials said Tuesday night corne a meeting with Mr. Gorba- 
of Mr. Chernenko, who was the last that President Reagan would prefer chev if it benefited “the cause of 
in the line of Soviet leaders bon a meeting in the United States be- world peace.” 
under the Russian czars, was cause talks between U.S. and Sovi- The White House spokesman, 
placed near the right end of a row et leaders over the part decade have Lany Speak es, said^ Mr. Reagan 
of hero’s graves between the Krem- mlwn place abroad. “welcomed the tone” of Mr. Gor- 

lin wafl and the tomb of Unin. The officials said Mr. Reagan’s 
Artillery salvos thundered across message would be delivered Sr ^ succeed 

Red Square, the Kremlin bells Wednesday to Mr. Gorbachev by . 

pealed in the stfll afternoon air on Vice President George Bush, who ts it m Sri 

the Ueak winter day. and factory, leading the U.S. delegation to the rcac ^ lcss - 35 P u . 1 ll - 10 paroci 
ship and railroad whistles bleW S ^ P atc “ a ““““““ <* * e P^ 

across the nation. cess of estabtehmg peaceful, mutu- 

. . . . . .. ally beneficial cooperation, Mr. 

The cxpre^ions of gnef at Mr. INSIDE Speakes said He added that the 

O^^sd^-wereovenihaJ UlOlUlh ^m5>herics”betwe«uheUmt- 

owed by t^ s^fti^^d vi^of ^ norennes ed States and the Soviet Union had 

teS?™ Mr ' GorbacWs arrival of UJS. stopiiy improved over the last 

In W a s h i n g t on, U.S. officials cruise xxtis&lea. Plige^ In public and private comments, 

said that President Ronald Reagan ■ Whaf sinaname? Sometimes White House officials made it plain 

had sent Mr. Gobachev a personal a hoax, some notables have His - Tuesday that Mr. Reagan saw the 

message proposing a summit meet- covered. Page 3. coming to power of Mr. Gorba- 

mg in the United States. Mr. Rea- chev, coupled with the start Tues- 

gan said Monday that he was ■ Ministers of the European day of the new round of U^.-Sovi- 

“more than ready” to meet with Community failed to agree on cl talks in Geneva, as a 

Mr. Gorbachev. f*nn pnces. Page 3. chance to seek an early meeting 

A UBl Embassy spokesman. Jar-, g nw™> mpean to be groan- Mr- Gorbachev . 

odav Werner, said that Mr. Bush ing a new generation of leader- Mr - R« l San, according to While 

would hold a press conference stfU Page 4, House aides, is sensitive about be- 

Wednesday evening after his meet- the only president in more than 

ing with Mr. Gorbachev. SCIENCE 50 years who has not met his Soviet 

Mr. Bush said he came to Mos- » A Sti-mflSoo study of Thomas ^ un ^f r P art M*. Reagan has raid 

cow tearing “a meaage of peace" Edison’s papers show he had an ** “ >n l tan . 1 of leader- 

from Mr. Reagan, who he said “has unrecogiSknack fa reason- ^ “ *}* ^^ on . m r r^ 01 

no greater hope and no greater through analogy. Page 8. ““.““f 1 ® ““ff for h,ra 

goal” than peace with the Russians. to meet the Kremlin leaders. 

Mr. Gorbachev, wearing a gray BUSINESS/FINANCE Tuesday, Mr. Reagan 

Peraan lamb hal and uang his ^ Unitt d gSiKKSSSi.'S- 

gold-nmmed reading glasses. States dimbed 1 4 nacent last Lx ^ oacnc *. wnenever we can. 

opened the ceremony with a eulogy month, the larkes^^rease Responding to shouted ques- 

toMn Cbemenko, who had beS S^NovotIw ^9 iromr^orta, afier a farew-ril 

the Soviet leader for only 13 smceNovOT&er - reremonyforPrisideotHosmMu- 

monihs vdten he died Sunday al 73. 'rnMnunnw barak of Eg^n. Mr. Reagan said: 

“At this hour of grief,” hfr. Gor- TOMORROW T? wflhng to mm with 

Colombia has reached a rtak- anTyes, I woSdTookforw^d tTa 

Ti SEPSIS malc ? lUwar on ^ tTafI * ck : meeting with him." 
a faithful wpram a our party and cts, whose power seems to rival Asked when, Mr. Reagan said: 
people, a staunch champion of the die government's. ^ c n 

ideals of communism.” (Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Artillery salvos thundered across message would be delivered 
Red Square, the Kremlin bells Wednesday to Mr. Gorbachev by 
pealed in the still afternoon air on Vioe President George Bush, who is 
the bleak winter day. and factory, leading the U.S. delegation to the 
ship and railroad whistles blew 

across the nation. — " — 

The expressions of grief at Mr. TTVSTDr 

Chernenko’s death -were overshad- 
owed by the swiftness and vigor of . _ 

the transition to Mr. Gorbachev’s ■ B^au town oJ Ftorennes 

leadership. ' . wfll welcome arrival of U.S. 

In Washington, U5. officials cnilxtI ^ e& - P ** e2 ‘ 

said that President Ronald Reagan ■ Wfaafsinaname? Sometimes 

had sent Mr. Gorbachev a personal a hoax, some notables have dis- 

message proposmg a summit meet- covered. Paw 3. 

ing in the United States. Mr. Rea- ^ ^ 

ff»n said Mondmr that he was B Ministers of the European 

“more than ready” to meet with Co mm u n ity failed to agree on 

Mr. Gorbachev. farm prices. Page 3. 

A Ui Embassy spokesman. Jar-. ■Oana appears to be groom- 

oslav Wemer, said that Mr. Bush ing a new generation of Jeader- 

would hold a press conference shm. Page 4. 

Wednesday evening after his meet- 

ing with Mr. Gorbachev. SCIENCE 

Mr. Bush said he came to Mos- a a Sti-mffioo study of Thomas 
cow braring “a menage of aace” Edisai’s papers show he had an 
from Mr. Reagan, who he said “has unrecognSl knack for reason- 


INSIDE 

■ Belgian town of Florennes 

will welcome arrival of UJS. 
cruise missies. Page Z 

■ What’s in a name? Sometimes 

a hoax, some notables have dis- 
covered. Page 3. 

■ Ministers of the European 

Community failed to agree on 
farm prices. Page 3. 

■ China appears to be groom- 

ing a new generation of leader- 
ship. Paged. 

SCIENCE 


“At this hour of grief,” Mr. Gor- 
bachev said, “Soviet men and wom- 
en are paying their deep respects to 
a faithful servant of our party and 


■ A Sti-miBioa study of Thomas 
Edisai’s papers show he had an 
unrecognized knack for reason- 
ing through analogy. Page 8. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Retail sales in the United 
States dimbed 1.4 percent last 
month, the largest increase 
since November. Page 9- 

TOMORROW 

Colombia has reached a stale- 
mate in its war on drug traffick- 
ers, whose power seems to rival 
the government's. 


—’"trir general education programs 
id proclaimed that graduates 
nisi now possess skills ranging 


working on those for the social and 
natural sciences. 

Other reasons cited for the 


nese Forces. 

Mr. Geagea commanded the 
Lebanese Forces in the Christian- 


Moscow already has signaled 


-Droze mountain war of September thatthe changein leadership this penmen ts attempted, during An- 
,go 2 week should bring no immediate dropov s 15-month retgo have not 


A statement Wednesday by changes in policy. 


been very thoroughly carried out. 


UHllCtt' 

m* 



“What we have done, in essence, 
to redefine our concept of what 
^ Constitutes an educated peream” 
lid Joseph C. Palomoantaia Jr n 
resident of Skidmore College in 
aratoga Springs, New York. The 
, oUege’s new curriculum is con- 
V < 1 reeled around four areas, inchid- 
ig <me called “science, society and 
; liman values,” and indudes more 
xjuired courses in the arts, foreign 
mguages and non- Western cul- 
me. 

. Ac Gustavus Adolphus, faculty' 
4l /^embers were told four years ago 
' - .» “ntjustify" any course they 
..ranted to continue leaching or, 
' * etter still, design new ones. A new 
xrc curriculum of required courses 
.is drawn up and wifi be added to 
udent graduation requirements 
f< Jisfall. 

,w - ”■ ‘'We hod to restore some coher- 
- r. ice to the curriculum.” said David 
' > Johnson, dean of the 2,300-stu- 
... -rat college. "We had too many 
: - - Jperfidal survey courses." 

Survey courses cover a wide 
wge of material within a given 
lending to be more sweep- 
tg than deep. 

> The State University or New’ 
t , *V ok at Stony Brook has a new 
irricuium based on six themed 
«n “understanding the natural 
odd” to “techntrfogicai literacy.” 
ficr a decadekxtg hiatus, Stan- 
Uaivernty has revived its 
culture” requirement. 

, in curriculum change 
stirred , in the laie-1970s when 
CbBege and others moved 


>fiucs to marketing and reennting Fuad Abu Nader, commander of But specialists on the Soviet 
seds at a time when the number of the Lebanese Forces, said the mill- Union said they expect ihat Mr. 
(Continued oo Page 2, CoL 6) (Continued 00 Page Z C6L 6) Gorbachev, niio became the chief 


Bu, ou M. 


Beijing Discloses That Corruption 
Has Increased Among Its Officials 


□udgiiig them along.” said Ed 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 



By John F. Bums national product in the United 
New York Tima Service States, had increased 13 percent to 

BEUING — The scale of the 548.5 bflhon yuan. GNPis the total led by Li 
official corruption that has swept value of a nation’s output of goods 
C hina in recent years was partly and services, 
revealed Wednesday when the Apparently, not all of the 3.4 
Workers’ Daily newspaper dis- billion yuan in irregularities uncov- 
dosed that auditors had uncovered ered by the auditors were due to the 
irregularities amounting to nearly “epidemic” of fraud that has al- 


national product in the United professor were the 17th century re- 
states, had increased 13 percent to beUion against the Ming Dynasty 


gaud theTaiping 


3.4-biIIion yuan ($1.2 billion) in traded the wrath of officials in 


1984. 

The disclosure provided the first 
objective measure of the financial 
skulduggery that has alarmed polit- 
ical leaders in Beijing. 


t value of a nation's output of goods Rebellion in the middle of the 19th 
v and services. century. It was plain that Mr. Bo's 

Apparently, not all of the 3.4 intention was to warn of the dan- 
[lion yuan in irregularities uncov- gws ahead for a more modern re- 
ed by the auditors were due to the beflion, the one that brought the 
pidemic” of fraud that has at- Communists to power, 
icted the wrath of officials in “We will not follow their foot- 
ijing, steps,” he said, referring to the 


Beijing. steps,” he said, referring to the 

The Workers’ Daily said that peasant rebels whose insurgencies 
nearly 1.6 billion yuan was due to collapsed. 


skulduggery tnai pas alarmed pout- “excessive operating costs, unre- Alarm among Mr. Deng and his 
ical leaders in Beijing. ported or concealed profits, fake associates is such that they have 

Recent speeches by Deng Xiao- losses, tax evasions and issuing of ordered an intensified crackdown 

a and other Communist Party goods to employees” — the sort of that could involve a much broader 
■s have made it plain that they finagling that has been condemned pullback from recall reforms, 
regard the wave of corruption by Mr. Deng — while the rest was When he spoke on the matter to 
among the country’s nine million due to “actual accounting errors” a conference on scientific work 

,L . A < ■ t i rs ■- j .v.> 


officials as a threat to their pro- and other routine shortcomings. 


gram of economic reform. 


Bo Yibo, a powerful ally of Mr. 
mg’s who has become a sort of 


here last week, Mr. Deng said that 
the party had to begin a general 
attack on “capitalist thinking" and 


Although the figures appear 10 Deng's who has become a sort of attack on capitalist th i nkin g and 
reflect a pattern of corruption that watchdog over official corruption, remind people, particularly the 


item of corruption that watchdog over official < 

has Jong been a feature of Chinf gt* has described it as a “new evil young, mat whatever form current 
official life, Mr. Deng and others wind" that noil overwhelm the par- reforms might lake, “the ultimate 
have acknowledged that it has bo- ly itself if it is not checked. goal is to implement communism.” 


“new evil young, that whatever form current 


come more widespread because of Mr. Bo. 77, offered a startling 
new policies that have relaxed ccn- analogy in a recent interview with 
tral control of economic enterprises the Hong Kong Communist week- 
and encouraged local imitative, ly, Ta Rung Pao. He said that a 
free enterprise and foreign invest- “well-known professor” who had 
ment attended one of a series of meetings 

How serious the problem has be- that party leaders have held with 
come was suggested by a compari- eminent non-Communisis had 


son of the Workers’ Daily figures 
with the statistics on national eco- 


f it is not checked. goal is to implement communism.” 
n, 77, offered a startling Since Mr. Deng’s speech, there 
in a recent interview with has been speculation that he was 
; Kong Communist week- acting to preempt a fresh attempt 
ung Pao. He said that a by opponents within the party to 
»wn professor” who had roll batit his reforms, possibly even 
one of a series of meetings to try and dislodge h fin as leader, 
y leaders have held with In this interpretation, the heighi- 
non-Communisis had ened anxiety about corruption re- 
drawn a comparison between the fleets concern that “leftist” offi- 
high living of “some old comrades cials uncomfortable with the 


nomk performance in 1984 that in high positions” and the behavior economic relaxation might use it as 
were released during the weekend, that had brought about the down- a cover to attempt a broader come- 


were released during the weekend, that had brought about the down- 
The Stale Statistical Bureau said fall of two of the most famous peas- 
that “national income;'' an ae- ani rebellions in Chinese history. 


Israelis away bKndfolded Steute Modems detained on suspicion of guerrilla activity In southern Lebanon. counting concept similar to gross The revolts referred to by the 


a cover to attempt a broader come- 
back, just as they did with a brief- 
lived “spiritual pollution” cam- 
paign that sputtered out last year. 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 



A Town in Belgiun 
Welcomes Missiles 


Florennes Rejects Outside Protesters, 
Hopes Cruises Ignite Economic Boom 


By Richard Bernstein 

■Vch- York Times Service 

FLORENNES, Belgium — A 
weatherbeaten house of white- 
washed brick just down the road 
from the large Belgian air base here 
contains a new cafe, called the 
Florennade. It was opened by a 
group of young anti-nuclear activ- 
ists from elsewhere in this country 
who hope it will become a center of 
local opposition to tbe expected 
installation nearby of 48 U.S. 
cruise missiles. 

But Florences, an economically 
depressed town of 11,500 set 
among gentle, pastoral hills in 
southern Belgium, is not the kind 
of place where the peace movement 
gets a very warm reception. 

It has reacted to the probable 
arrival of nuclear weapons with 
calm, with acceptance, even with 
signs of welcome. 

“Tbe anti- missil e people say that 
the population is resigned to the 
missiles,*' the town’s conservative 
mayor, Louis Timermans. said. 
“The truth is that they never did 
anything to express any ideas 
against them.* 1 

“There were foreigners who 
came here,” Mr. Timermans went 
on. referring to people, not just 
from the Netherlands and West 
Germany who have come to the 
town to take pan in demonstra- 
tions, but also to Belgians coming 
from other parts of the country. 

Recently, Mr. Timermans said, 
“they held a demonstration, but 
when they marched, the streets 
were empty. Nobody from Flor- 
ences was there.” 

In fact, on some other occasions, 
particularly on once-a-year. na- 
tionally organized marches that be- 
gan in Florennes in 1983. as many 
as 12.000 people have turned up 
from around the country, including 
small numbers who came from 
Florennes. 

In addition, there is a local paci- 
fist organization, consisting of 
about 10 people — some school- 
teachers. a member of a church 
organization working in rural ar- 
eas, a conscientious objector doing 
alternative service in the town — 
who organized a Committee to 
Safeguard the Region of Florennes. 
The group holds discussions and 
disseminates anti-nuclear pam- 
phlets. 

In 1979 Belgium agreed to the 
decision of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization to base 48 
ground-bunched cruise missiles in 
Florennes, long the site of a Belgian 
air force base where about 800 U-S. 
personnel are normally stationed. 

The Belgians also said, however, 
that they would review the decision 
every six months before carrying 


out the deployment, thus leaving 
open the possibility that the coun- 
try might not proceed with the ac- 
tual installation, a possibility that 
causes other members of the alli- 
ance considerable concern. 

In recent weeks. Prime Minister 
Wilfried Martens has been presid- 
ing over meetings of government 
ministers to make a decision on 
whether to proceed now with a fust 
deployment that, according to the 
NATO schedule, should begin be- 
fore the end of this month. 

Some are said to be pressing for a 
postponement to give the renewed 
Soviet-Araerican negotiations a 
chance to produce results. Others 
are reported to be arguing that Bel- 
gium will lose influence and credi- 
bility within the Western alliance if 
deployment does not go ahead on 
schedule. A decision is expected 
any day. 

Meanwhile, in Florennes, the 
place where the missil es would be 
placed, townspeople have shown 
something dose to indifference, 
tinged with annoyance, at the ef- 
forts to turn the place into a center 
for anti-nuclear sentiment. The 
major such effort, they said, is be- 
ing pressed by a group of pacifists 
largely from the university town of 
Louvain in the Flemish-speaking 
part or Belgium. 

It was the Flemish pacifists, for 
example, who recently opened the 
Florennade cafe just down the road 
from the air base. 

“Our main prindple is just to be 
here,” Kris van Hoeck, a member 
of the group said, “to be a protest 
a gains t the base. We also want to 
create a center for people to caipr 
out actions here. We believe only in 
nonviolent actions.” He said there 
were about 30 regular members in 
the anti-nuclear group. 

Mr. van Hoeck said that, using a 
personal loan from a bank, he 
bought tbe building housing (he 
caf&. In its first few days of opera- 
tion, he said, only about 15 custom- 
ers have come for coffee. 

“The reason people here are for 
the base is because they mak e mon- 
ey from the presence of the Ameri- 
cans,” Mr. van Hoeck said. 

Others here agree that tbe influx 
of money from the base is a factor 
in local acceptance of the missiles. 

Florennes, which used to depend 
on dairy fanning and steel mills in 
nearby cities, has seen many of the 
mills close. 

But the factors operating in Flor- 
ennes also seem to include some 
strong memories of occupation 
during World War IL good feelings 
toward the United States, which 
liberated the place in 1944 from the 
Nazi occupation, and a sense that 
Belgium has given a promise that 
must be kept. 



" - f * - * -• ABoatfad hi 

Hostages are released and guided to safety from die Turkish Embassy in Ottawa after they 
were held for four hours by three Armenian gunmen who later surrendered to the police. 


Arme nians Charged in Ottawa Attack 


United Press International 

OTTAWA — The police have 
filed murder charges against three 
men who stormed tbe Turkish Em- 
bassy. killed a security guard and 
held 12 people hostage for four 
hours. 

Tbe men. who surrendered to the 
police Tuesday, identified them- 
selves as members of the Armenian 
Revolutionary Army. Tbe three 
were identified as Kevork Mara- 
chetian. 35, of LaSalle. Quebec; 


Rail Panes Titizian, 27, of Scarbor- 
ough. Ontario; and Ohannes Nou- 
barian. 30 of Montreal. 

Turkey’s ambassador to Canada, 
Coskun Kirca, 58, was injured dur- 
ing the incident when be jumped 
from a second-floor window of tbe 
embassy. He was to undergo sur- 
gery. Tne police said none of tbe 
other 12 hostages, including the 
ambassador’s wife, teen-age daugh- 
ter and 10 embassy staff members, 
was injured in the incident. 


The police said the gunmen ap- 
proached the gate of the embassy in 
a rented van at about 7 A.M. and 
were confronted by an embassy se- 
curity guard. The guard was shot 
but managed to sound an alarm 
before he died. 

Tie three gunmen then blew the 
embassy door off its hinges with 
explosives, authorities said. A po- 
lice officer said the men were 
armed with numerous firearms, in- 
cluding shotguns and revolvers. 


Gorbachev Is Invited to Visit the U,S. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
“Whenever we can.” 

Mr. Bush, who arrived Tuesday 
in Moscow, hoped to meet with Mr. 
Gorbachev late Wednesday, Mr. 
Speakes said. 

“If the opportunity presents it- 
self, we will weigh all of the factors, 
pro and con, and the president will 
make a derision on whether it 
would be beneficial to the cause of 
world peace to participate in a 
meeting with the Soviet leaders,” 
said Mr. Speakes. 

“If it is possible to arrange such a 
meeting with full and careful prep- 
aration.” he added, “it could make 


a constructive contribution to the 
relations between our countries.” 

Mr. Speakes was asked if the 
president was, in fact, “seeking a 
summit at an early or a mutually 
convenient date.”" He responded, 
“The latter — mutually conve- 
nient." 

His comment endorsing a meet- 
ing with the new Soviet leader was 
the fust time the administration 
had said precisely that conditions 
had changed somewhat over previ- 
ous years for a summit meeting: - - 

Administration officials had 
been saying a meeting between the 


two should indude a specific agen- 
da and would have to bold good 
chances for a constructive out- 
come. 

Mr. Speakes conceded there was 
"a slight change in wording a year 
or so ago.” but repeatedly refused 
to say the White House had altered 
its position in hope of arranging a 
meeting with Mr. Gorbachev. 

“It's not that our position has 
changed," said Robert S ims, anoth- 
er White House spokesman and 
foreign policy specialist. “It's that 
the nature of their leadership has 
changed." 



Keep up with the Joneses. 

When you keep up by phone, you stay close to the people you miss in the States 
You trade your latest experiences and share your everyday lives. But, best of all. you hold 
on to that special bond that joins you in spile of the distance between you. 



AT&T 


Mubarak Says 
U.S. Should 
Take Active 
Mideast Role 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — President 
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt said 
Wednesday that those who wanted 
tbe United States to hold bade 
from Middle East peace efforts 
were advocating “almost a defeat- 
ist approach.” 

Mr. Mubarak, in a speech to 
members of the National Press 
Gub, criticized the view that the 
parties to the Arab- Israel conflict 
had sole responsibility for moving 
the peace process forward with the 
United States playing only a sec- 
ondary role. 

Mr. Mubarak was speaking on 
the final day of his Washington 
visit during which his proposal for 
a more active U.S. role was re- 
ceived cooDy by the Reagan admin- 
istration. 

Tbe United States has rqected 
Mr. Mubarak’s proposal to receive 
a Jordanian-Palestinian delegation 
to explore peace prospects. The 
US. position is to urge direct nego- 
tiations between Arabs and Israe- 
lis. 

Mr. Mubarak said that Jordan 
and tbe Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization had made a firm commit- 
ment to a peaceful solution of the 
conflict that would lead to direct 
negotiations with IsraeL 

But he said that supporters of the 
view that the United States should 
wait and see how things developed 
in the Middle East were advocating 
inaction as a line of policy. 

He said tbe argument that re- 
sponsibility for moving the peace 
process forward fell squarely and 
solely on the parties to the conflict 
inferred that the United States 
could play only a secondary role. 

But Mr. Mubarak said: “You 
cannot say, ‘I am waiting until tbe 
parties agree on everything before l 
step in.’ The role erf a great country 
like the United States is not simply 
to endorse what was agreed upon. 
Rather, it is to help the parties 
reach agreement” 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Czechoslovak Police Raid Film Shov, 

PRAGUE (AFP) - Two of A. 4* - J— 

“*£ a letter of protett to PreaKtett Guata. Hugh the Jgd 
Fetruska Sustrowa, named her two arrested c °Beagues as^ house 

^mmrkcm^da former journalist.ifiriraaB^m^whor^^^ 1 ^^^^ 

in Prague where the screening was talmm pfe«*. Smmadko who 
writerTfer Kabes, and a former policc coW, Oldnch Hromaoao. 
was dismissed from the police for signing Charter ' /. evening. 

The arrests occurred when police raided 
taking away all 48 peoptepresenL OT those -3? * Agence France- 

bours of interrogation, according to a letter recaved try Agm* 

-Presse. 

U.S. Agrees to Clean Up Bikim Atoll 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) —The 1,200 exiles of ^ 

Bikini won a long struggle Wednesday to return home when the Lmiw 
States agr e ed to decontaminate ibdur island front atomic and hydrogen 

reached in the U.SL District Court b 
government yielded to the islanders’ demand that it pay ftrnhaWjugon 
of the atoD, contaminated by 23 nuclear tests between 1946 and iy>e. 

No figure was mentioned m the agreement, released m Washington by 
the lawyer for the Bikinians, but American specialists have : esnmatedttie 
cost at up to S50 million, mainly for stripping away topsoil 
ing “We are delighted," said Mayor Tomaki Juda, leader of the Btkm- 
ianc “We lode forward to working with the United States to restore 


New Grand Jury to Investigate Goetz 

NEW YORK (NYT) — A judge has authorized a new grand jury to 
investigate Be rnhar d H. Goetz’s shooting of four teen-agers on a^subway 
train in December, saying tbe Manhattan district attorney had “signifi- 
cant new evidence” against Mr. Goetz. . 

The district attorney, Robert M. Morgen than, refused to characterize 
the nature of the new evidence. Undra state law, a district attorney may 
seek « j udicial order for a new grand jury rally if evidence is found that 
was not available to the first grand jury. 

Mr. Goetz, a 37-year-old ebgmeet, was indicted by a Manhattan grand 
jury in January for illegal possession of guns, including one that he used 
in the stowing s The grand jury dwdmad to indict him fra attempted 
murder m the sto wings , which Mr. Goetz said stemmed from a robbery 
attempt by the four teen-agers. 


West Europe Group To Meet in April 

LONDON (Reuters) — Defense and foreign ministers of the Weston 
European Union, a seven-country group bong revived after long inactivi- 
ty, will discuss defense and East- West issues in Boon on April 22-23, 
sources in the organization said Wednesday. 

Members of the Western European Union are Belgium, Britain, 
France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and West Germany. They 
decided last year that the 30-year-old organization should play a more 
active role as a “European pillar” of the Atlantic Alliance. 


Christians 
Split in Beirut 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tia was reassuming its “prerogative 
to make indepen de nt decisions and 
take all measures to put these deci- 
sions into effect in the political, 
security, financial and information 
spheres.” 

Mr. Geagea’s men control a 
coastal checkpoint on the road to 
the northern port of Tripoli which 
the Phalangists want to dose under 
a Syrian backed-security plan. 

The news brought a suspension 
of foreign-exchange dealing. Cross- 
ing between East Beirut and West 
Beirut, which is mainly Moslem, 
was slow and difficult 

Militiamen shot and killed a mo- 
torist who failed to stop at a check- 
point in tbe Kesrouan region, secu- 
rity sources said. 

Israeli planes attacked a Pales- 
tinian guerrilla base Wednesday in 
the Bekaa Valley. 

A military spokesman in Jerusa- 
lem said Israeli jets attacked a 
two-slory building west of Bar Eli- 
as used as a headquarters by the 
small. Syrian-backed Saiqa organi- 
zation. Pilots reported accurate hits 
and tbe planes returned safely to 
base, the spokesman said. 


Suspect’s Son Testifies in Aquino Case 

MANILA (AP) — The Il-year-old son of Rolando Galman, the man 
kiDed with Bmigno S. Aqnino Jr., the opposition leader, said Wednesday 
in court that he has not seen his mother, T.ina Gahnan, fra more than a 
year. The family’s lawyer said that she, too, may have been killed. 

General Fabian G Ver, commander of the aimed forces, and 25 other 
persons are on trial for the two mnrderc. The military has claimed Mr. 
Galman’s was Mr. Aquino's 

Mr. Galman’s son, Reynaldo, broke into tears in court and said he has 
not seen his mother since Jan. 29, 1984, when four men took her from his 
home. Their lawyer, Lnpino Lazaro, said Lina Galman may have been 
killed becanse site knew too much. 


For the Record 

A Datisb anti-tax campaigner, Mogens-Ghstrup, 58, was freed from 
prison Tuesday after serving half of a three-year sentence for tax fraud: 
Last year he became (he first Dane to be elected to the parliament while in 
prison. {Reuters) 

Turkish Cypriots are to rotfe March 31 in a referendum on the 
constitution of the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cy- 
prus, it was learned in Ankara Wednesday. (AFP) 

A Danish naval commander, Henning Olsen, has been found guilty of 
dereliction of duty over an inodent in which a missile fired from a frigate 
exploded among holiday homes in Zeeland causing damage but no 
injuries. He was given a reprimand by a court Monday. (Reuters) 
Russia has deployed another 18 SS-20 missiles in Eastern Europe, 
raising the nttmbra to 414, the Pentagon said Wednesday. (Reuters) 
The Soviet and UA d e l e g ati o n s will meet in a single group in Geneva 
Thursday for a second session of disarmament negotiations, the U.S. 
delegation spokesman said Wednesday. (AFP) 

BraziPs president-elect, Tancredo Neves; appointed the members of his 
cabinet Tuesday. Among the most important positions, Francisco Dor- 
neDes becomes finance, minister ana Jo3o Sayad becomes plann in g 
minister. Mr. Neves takes office Friday. (NYT) 


Kremlin Faces a Daunting Agenda 


(Costumed from Page 1) 

Hewett, an economist for tbe 
Brookings Institution. 

Mr. Gorbachev already has 
shown an impatience far the slug- 
gish. bureaucracy and a general 
support for wage reform — both 
big concerns of Andropov’s. “I ex- 
pect him to push on both those 
issues and some others over the 
next few months,” Mr. Hewett 
said. 

Others consider it doubtful drat 
Mr. Gorbachev will stop at minor 
economic reforms. 

No long-range economic experi- 
ments have been introduced since 
1965. Andropov’s brief efforts con- 


centrated on setting the stage for 
broad reforms by persuading and 
aborting the Soviet populace to 
work harder and to drive corrup- 
tion out of the system. IBs death m 
February ! 984 halted longer-term 

p lanning. 

In his speech Monday, Mr. Gor- 
bachev stressed the need for eco- 
nomic changes. Experts on the So- 
viet economy pointed out Tuesday 

to be introducedal theStorimC^ar^ 
munist Party congress next winter 
would be the primary vehicle fra 
achieving such changes. 

They predicted that Mr. Gorba- 
chev would involve himself even 


more deeply in the adaptations of 
that plan that are now under way. 

One of the key economic policies 
under scrutiny, according to rate 
specialist, is agricultural policy. So- 
viet farm output has dropped to 
record levels in the last few years. 

- Jeny. Hough of the Brookings 
Institution said that decreasing So- 
viet dependence on a grain econo- 
my probably is at the top of tbe . 
new leadership's- agenda 

Moscow's East European allies 
are IBody to get a chance to evalu- 
ate Mr. Gorbachev at amajor War- 
raw Pact meeting that U.S. State 
Department experts expect to be 


U.S. Colleges Redefine Cinriculums 


(Continued from Page 1) 
university-age young people is de- 
clining. Patricia P. Cormier, dean 
of academic affairs at Wilson Col- 
lege in Pennsylvania, which has a 
stiff new genera] education pro- 
gram that takes up half of a stu- 
dent’s program, said, “We need to 
be able to say exactly what a Wil- 
son College graduate knows and 
can do.” 

Anxiety about the content of col- 
lege teaching has recently attracted 
national attention. Last month the 
Association of American CoDt 
issued a 
colic 

lowed their curriculums to slip into 
a state of “disarray” and “incoher- 
ence." 

This theme has been echoed by 
William J. Bennett, the new U.S. 
secretary of education. In Novem- 


ion of American Colleges 
report saying that ILS. 
and universities had al- 


UNIVERSTTY 



BACKLOGS MASTER SORpOCTOMTE 
Send detailed maim* 

(or a inn evaluation 
FAORC WESTERN UMVBttTY 

!6XD VV*™ 9d PpCZ* CA19VOS US*, 


bra, wttile still chairman of the Na- 
tional Endowment for the Human- 
ities, he issued, a report saying that 
U.S. colleges and universities were 
failing to give students "an ade- 
quate education in the culture and 
avflizanon of which they are mem- 
bers/* 

Several themes 'run' through 
many of the hew curriculum' 'ef- 
forts, including more attention to 
basic academic skills. Women's 
colleges, among them Bryn Mawr 
and Barnard, have been among the 
most conspicnous in adding mathe- 
matics. New York University, 
which adapted a new curriculum 
four years ago, is strengthening an 
already strong writing program so 
that it would apply “across the cur- 
riculum,” not just in die English 
department. 

After two decades in which col- 
lege faculties were gearing their 
courses more and more toward for- 
eign cultures, the study of Western 
traditions is making a comeback. 
Stanford's Western Culture re- 
quirement. which bad been part of. 
the curriculum for 35 wars until it 
was abandoned in 1970, was re- 
stored for the class of 1984, " 

Current efforts toward core enr- 
ricuhims seem to be producing rd- 


wuirwuium outage coi 
volte discussion, inch 
whethe r colleges shi 
common core of cot 
student* take. Can 
University has adop 
proech as a means of 
sense of “intdJectual 
among students in d 

deraic areas. 

Brooklyn College 1 
national attention fra: 
ulum dial indhi«i»s , 
things, , a course on gr 
literature that starts x 
Wright’s “Native Son 
Ellison’s “Invisible 
works backward* to th 
Romans. . 

The other big isr* 
handle the groi — 
technology. St 


tut, juhi in 

quire all graduates J 
in the production 

technology. “That 

and it comes from ; 
the educated petite 
the fnture,” said 0 


iumambes and Sciences. 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


Page 3 


,r <* Hi 


***** W* iV p . 

JSVfefM T.- 1\,.. . 

W*. V.. 

**• *%*!*' ■ v 

^ d* - Vs-vj. .. .. 
Nwt & \ » ... . " 

Mmtfviw.-'. . 


*** t« < 'Iran I 

to„ v . 1 

s 

ikfe»ii.v- 

Saii-uV,,',.'... 

fcWhfuiu . • 

s 9M,»*kat\, i ; 

4fei****fi. :1\^--1> ' r . . 
#*■}-" V^J , 
i.- ». .» 
fHMft Iv!. -.: .. 


I. 

That’s in a Name? Sometimes a Hoax Extreme Right EC Fails to Agree On Farm Prices 


By Steve Harvey 

La Angela Tima Sena 

>.N FRANCISCO — When Caspar W. 
vherger received a letter from 9-year-old 
' u- Fox asking bow he should handle taunts 
his fust name, the US. defense secretary 
d that he should take comfort in the fact 
■■ • ’ Caspar was the name of one of the Three 
■■ ;Meo in the Bible.” 

•■■ • -'«□ the evangelist Oral Roberts received a 
’’ from 9-year-old Oral Fox asking how he 

- r d handle taunts about bis first name, Mr. 

rts told him to have faith in God and sent 
' one of his books, “Don't Give Up. w 
«a Norman Mailer recaved a letter from 
r-old Norman Fox asking how he should 
e taunts about his first name, the writer 
lasted: "It’s a good name, not a wimpy 
■. When yoor mends start hassling you, teQ 
■ • that Norman Snead was a great pro qnar- 
in football 

- ' truth, the little Foxes did not exist, except 

: imagination of a San Francisco writer 
■: he unspectacular name of John Raymond 


Mr. Raymond revealed bis hoax recently be- scribed to autograph-collector magazines, 
cause he plans to gather the letters into a book, which supply addresses of celebrities. 


He hopes the introduction will he written by one 
of his unsuspecting pen pals, Gifford Ir ving 
“Can you imagine that? 1 fooled Clifford 
Irving!" Mr. Raymond said, aglow at having pnt 
one over on the author of a fake autobiography 
of Howard R. Hughes. 

Mr. Raymond still marvels at the length and 
dq>th erf sincerity of the replies he received 
“Names are such a personal thing," he 
thumbing through the fetters' “With some of the 
people, it was as if they had been holding 


Some of his subjects had no complaints. Zu- 
bin Mehta, the conductor erf the New York 
Philharmonic, reminded little Zubin Fox (hat 
their name “means ‘powerful sword' in andent 
Persian." 

Some were ambiguous. “Most of my friends 
call me Senator," said Senator Strom Thurmond 
of South Carolina. 

Not all of Mr. Raymond’s targets were fam- 
ous. He could not resist writing to Frinrg 0. 


Quits Some 
French Races 

Ream 

PARIS — Jean-Marie Le Pen 
said Wednesday that candidates of 
his extreme-right National Front 
party would choose not to run in 
favor of better-placed opposition 
candidates in the second round of 
local elections tins Sunday. 

Mr. Le Pen had said earlier that 


But Approves Modernization Plan 




she’s on a psychiatrist’s conch." who™ could recaDmany difficulties caused by 

TtetaS^WTOMiiloKttleCScrDaine th ““ nl «- . .. 

Fox: My mother is a very strange person but Only a few of Mr. Raymond s vjetuns were amj d’Esuunt refused an ;.nian«* 
although I've been veiy amqyedwrth her for aware of the hoax. In 198a the newspaper USA ^ National From for the 

nmstofttemvJifermnot^ sbesmreme Today published a short artidc about the rani- on Wednesday 

wonderful name, even though mv fnends lanty of the letters that two elected officials in - - - - J 

Washington had received from boys named 
Fox. 

Senator Alfonse M D* Amato of New York 


tins wonderful name, even though my - friends 
called me Germs." 

Of course, Mr. Raymond played on the emo- 
of his subjects. “My father named me;" he 
mentioned in each note: "He died so I didn’t ask 


... 100 luminaries, asking for advice an. how to 
-c the unusual first nam e they allegedly 
c _± Most wrote back. 


To research his project. Mr. Raymond stud- 
ied examples of the writing of 9-year-old chil- 
dren, contributed by a teacher friend, and sob- 


then wrote to Raymond’s address: “I sympa- 

L But that 


M Jury hi h^v^mate Panel Rejects Tax Rise, but May Reconsider 


■Hd If i iif!. 

* -.'tv M,. 

*#*»**: Mr * 
w . y 
Ww eivtr.u^ : 

^ }'# t m-* i- 
w st** r»rv. . 
W*t .no ctf 
f pt'vvrv'.. 

tlbr pin .1 . 

wha'h v- 

w wm *gr\- 


ppe(»niunTiiM»iuS 

IWHl - . % 


*WM«F VM | =■ 

4ttuauw> wo' 
* WiMrtr.r 1 

rite 

3t*i tf* It - t o 


: \\ 

t\ ; 


SwiTvsiifit-.! 


III 


rhf M vi‘ 

It** W*» ‘1,. 
ha! : : - 
Vfi »s-j‘o. 

3 M> *»• 

* 

IMH. 

U. 

?,• I 1-* - 

{*#+ Hf 



- By Helen Dewar 

^ Washington Pan Service 

- *■- tSHINGTON — The Senate 

at Committee has brushed 
--v by large majorities, initial 

- jeratic proposals for tax m- 

r 

• several committee members, 
■■ . v-blicans as well as Democrats, 
'. - lied Tuesday that they might 
- - to raise taxes as part of a 

• ced, comprehensive deficit re- 
ya package. 

votes came as the panel 
leted the first stage rfils work 
lan to reduce federal budget 
now estimated- at more 
r 5200 billion, to less than SI 00 
.-.’.nover three years. 

-.- .hough (be committee techni- 
was mly setting spending tar- 
:. orinduaon in a congressional 
. resolution, its votes are cx- 
' ' d to be the guides in the defi- 
.. Auction legislation to be 
' ’ d later by Congress, 
sday's votes on taxes fol- 
i ■ 1 a renewed effort by the’ 
House to curb pressure for 
g (axes, including phone calls 
'ounittee members from the 
. V . House chief of staff, Donald 

• .^-garL 

e committee rejected, 1S-4, a 
. ~>sal from Senator Ernest F. 
'ngs. Democrat of South Caro- 
. to raise taxes by $159 btOioii 
; ihe next three years by raising 
_ orate taxes, increasing tax 
-iliance and putting off the in- 
ig of. individual tax rates to 
non for a year. 

HoUiugs would have frozen 


tax rates for next year and then 
reduced them in future yean only 
to reflect inflation over 3 percent. 
He also would have modified the 
investment tax credit and imposed 
a Spereent. minimum tax for corpo- 
rations., 

A proposal horn Senator How- 
ard M. Metzenbaum, Democrat of 
Ohio, failed, 144. It would have 
frozen corporations' tax breaks at 
current levels and imposed a 15 
percent minimum tax on corpora- 
tions, raising revenues by $44.2 bil- 
lion over three years. 

- The initial votes on taxes came 
after the committee, continuing a 
pattern established last week of 
freezing domestic spending while 
rejecting Mr. Reagan's proposals 
for deep program cuts. 

It voted to freeze the pay of mili- 
tary and civilian government em- 
ployees and to freeze the civilian 
work force erf the government at its 
current level for two years. 

It rejected Mr. Reagan’s 
al to impose user fees for 
time for major government-assist- 
ed credit programs, including hous- 
ing mortgage wApwim, anorejecl- 
ed as wen the president’s proposal 
to kfil in fiscal 1986 the $4.fi billion 
program of revenue-sharing with 
local governments next year, 
choosing instead to let it die when 
its authorization expires in fiscal 
1987. 

Nearly two- thirds of the savings 
for fiscal 1986, which begins Oct L, 
came from the military. The rest 
came from a freeze on most areas of 
domestic spending. Nearly all of 


Mr. Reagan’s proposals for reduc- 
tion or elimina tion of programs 
were rejected. 

■ Reagan Budget Faces Vote 

Democrats on the Senate Budget 
Committee engineered a show- 
down vote Wednesday cm Mr. Rea- 
gan’s entire 1986 budget, The Asso- 
ciated Press reported from 
Washington. Committee leaders 
said the president would surely lose 
the vote. 

The’ committee rhairman Pete 
V. Domenid of New Mexico, pre- 
dicted rqection of the president’s 
plan by a wide bipartisan margin, 
but added that such an outcome 
“shouldn't surprise Ihe president” 

Mr. Rea gan, anticipating that he 
would be defeated in the vote, told 
a group of businessmen he was dis- 
appointed in the committee. 

“I have my veto pen drawn" for 
any legislation raising taxes, the 
president said. He challenged Con- 
gress to “go ahead, nuke my day." 

The issue was forced on the de- 
mand of Senator J. James Exon, 
Democrat of Nebraska, “to find 
out if there are significant votes an 
the committee to support the presi- 
dent." 

The vote was the first formal 
consideration in Congress of Mr. 
Reagan's budget proposal since it 
was to Capitol Hnl early last 
month. 


took the other parties by surprise. 

Although leaders of the conser- 
vative parties had rebuffed Mr. Le 
Pen, local candidates, particularly 
. . . In areas such as Marseille, where 

t hre e with your problem [the name]. But trial the National Front won a quarter 
isn't the biggest problem you have because if 1 of the popular vote, had favored 
ever got a hold of you Pm going to break your such a move. 

ncc *" If Mr. Le Pen had kept all his 

candidates in the field, dividing the 

parties of the right. Socialist and 
Communist candidates would have 
stood better chances of taking of- 
fice in some dose races. 

The vote is seen as the last na- 
tionwide political test before legis- 
lative elections in 1986, and thus a 
of whether the Socialists trill 


The committee still has not voted 
on an overall budget plan. Earlier, 
the commi rice's senior Democrat, 
Lawton ChDes of Florida, declared 
that the panel was at an impasse 
after rejecting most of Mr. Rea- 
gan’s spending cuts as well as two 
plans offered by Democrats to raise 
taxes. 


Complied b? Our Staff From Dnpaiebes 

BRUSSELS — Agriculture min- 
isters of the European Community 
failed to agree on prices for EC 
farm products in two days of talks 
that aided early Wednesday. 

The failure set the stage once 
again for intensive price bargaining 
before the 1985 fans marketing 
year begins April 1. 

However, officials said the min- 
isters approved a five-year farm 
modernization program that would 
cost 525 billion European Curren- 
cy Units ($35 billion). 

The program will upgrade the 

poorest farms throughout the 10- 
oation community. 

A negotiating session has been 
scheduled from March 25 to 27 to 
reach an accord on the issue of 
farm prices. 

The ECs Executive Commission 
has proposed a general freeze on 
farm prices to control spending on 
price supports and reduce the com- 
munity’s budget deficit 
The disagreements among the 
EC governments about the new 
prices are not unlike those in previ- 
ous years. The annual price setting 
exercise usually gets nowhere at 
regular meetings of the agriculture 
ministers but is solved m round- 
the-clock bargaining at EC head- 
quarters just More each new mar- 
- , keting year, 

be able to stay in power. The commission’s proposal lo 

In the first round oT voting freeze prices is opposed by most 
March 10, the right won almost 58 EC nations. Only the Nelbaiands. 
percent, the left, 41 percent. Presi- Britain, Denmark and France gen- 
dent Francois Mitterrand's Social- trally support the commission's 
lsis got only 25 percent proposal 


Among opponents of the freeze 
are West Germany, Italy and 
Greece. 

West Germany, the largest con- 
tributor to the EC budget has re- 
jected in particular a proposed 3.6- 
percent cut in cereal prices. 

It also opposes the plan to abol- 
ish export subsidies West German 
fanners get lo bring down their 


higher Deutsche mark prices to the 
lew of common EC prices. 

Italy and Greece, officials said, 
insist on substantial price increases 
to offset their higher inflation rates. 

The new five-year program of 
farm grams approval Wednesday 
is designed to modernize the 10-na- 
tion group’s poorest and most inef- 
ficient fanm. It will be in effect 
until 1989. (AP. Reuters) 


2 Get life Terms in Germany 

For Killing ol Schleyer in ’77 


The Associated Pros 

DUSSELDORF — A West Ger- 
man coun convicted two members 
of the leftist terrorist Red Army 
Faction on Wednesday of murder- 
ing the head of a German industri- 
alists’ ograiuzatios and bis four 
bodyguards. The two were sen- 
tenced to life imprisonment. 

Adelheid Schulz. 30, and Rolf- 
Gemens Wagner, 40, were found 
guilty of the 1977 kidnapping and 
murder of Hanns-Martin Schleyer, 
president of the Federal Associa- 
tion of German Employers. The 
four bodyguards were shot to death 
during the kidnapping oa a Co- 
logne street Sept. 5, 1977. Mr. 
Scbleyer’s body was found 43 days 
later in the trunk of a car in Mul- 
house, France. 

The Dussddorf state court also 
contacted Miss Schulz of involve- 
ment in the July 30, 1977, murder 
of the Dresdner Bank chairman. 


J Urged Pod to, who was shot at his 
home in Obenirsel near Frankfurt. 

The court sentenced Miss Schulz 
to three terms of life in prison, 
while Mr. Wagner was sentenced to 
two terms of life in prison. Their 
sentences could be reviewed for pa- 
role after they have served 15 years. 

Prosecutors said the Schleyer 
kidnapping was part of a plot to 
force the West German govern- 
ment to release convicted members 
of the Red Army Faction, includ- 
ing its leaders. Andreas Baader, 
Gudrun Ensslin and Jan-Carl 
Raspe. 

After the government refused to 
accept the demands, Mr. Baader, 
Miss Ennslin and Mr. Raspe died 
in their prison cells in Stuttgart and 
another gang member. Ingrid Schu- 
bert, died in a Munich prison. Au- 
thorities said that the four had 
committed suicide. 


VOURGUIDETOOiMNGWBl 
PATRICIA WELLS 
IN BKWT3WSCB4D SECTION 
OFTHEIHT 


SAUDI ARABIA NATIONAL GUARD 


An invitation for Qualification in Communication Systems. 


The Saudi Arabia National Guard is 
implementing continuous operations for the 
modernisation and development of its 
Nationwide Communications System. 

In order to determine companies and corporations 
of international repute capable of constructing 
and modernising the communications systems, it 
invites such organisations to submit details 
describing their capabilities. 

So that the qualification process is carried out 
correctly, it is necessary to submit the 
following information: 


1. Registered name and address of company, history, 
management structure and organisation, scope of 
products and services currently provided. 

2. Summary of relevant contracts with brief details 
of product or system installed together with name 
and location of purchasing administration. 

3. Registration authority and standard to which 
quality assurance organisation complies viz 
NATO AQAP L 4 or 9, United Kingdom DEF 
STAN 05-21. 24 or 29, USA MIL-Q-9858 or 
MIL-I-45208 or National Equivalents. 

4. Statement showing the finanrial position of 
the company. 


All information wifi be treated in the strictest confidence. Information and support documentation to be submitted to the following address: 
Director of Signals, Headquarters National Guard, Khurais Road, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 


Staffs: 


> m •»* 

* 4,4*. = * 


For the Kenyatta Conference Centre in Nairobi, Karl Henrik 
Nostvik was asked to design a complex which would echo the spirit of 
the African people, and also (because of high volcanic activity) meet 
the earthquake requirements laid down in California- the strictest in 
the world 

The centre consists of a circular amphitheatre - inspired by tradi- 
tional African houses - a plenary hall - for up to 4000 delegates - and 
a 24-storey tower block. For the lighting, we basically applied fluorescent 
lamps throughout diffused by wooden louvres, made of local timber. 

- We have also been requested to redesign and install the sound 

. . equipment, including separate multi-lingual conference and inter- 

lll II ll II!! Vi^ pretation systems for the Plenary Hall, the Amphitheatre and other 
1 v conference rooms. 

In Munich, the Hypo-Haus, head-office for the Bayerische Hypo- 
theken- und Wechsel-Bank, was designed by Walther and Bea Betz. 


ir . ». - 

•Wi 

4*4. * • 

* 

¥ *** * ■- 

I »M. ' • 

tin- — ••• 

•*»v 

■*' ■ 


the »:*f- - 
* 

P* ' 

Iti' .!•*:- 

i 

« M ■ • ' 
Obi I- *• 
w •«* «*»•-' 
rtw I T - *’ ■ 

: 1"-- 

f . 

8f» - 

i *rKj. • 



The Kenyatta Centre in Nairobi and the Hypo-Haus 
in Munich - two landmarks to our expertise. 


4 ic nv*- - * 


itU’ ( .iitfk’ 11 


a ,i th* *» 
*> «•-.■■■ 
w» ’» •' J 

pfci* •• M -‘ 

u *■ ' 

- ■ 

'v 5 ' 

s j |fl ■ > 

%■ -■ 

* : ; 

* i • • 

bh. V'*— ' 
itj* — 
5* i • > ••• 

“ - 

* 

■‘J** 4 

■ ;* • 

*»• i 5 * 
jr» *• • - 
j * * ! 

M 



The building-prism-shaped structures suspended between four cylin- 
drical shafts- is a striking landmark. 

The lighting and air-conditioning for this 26-storey office building 
demanded extensive discussions and month-long laboratory measure- 
ments. The result was the design and installation of some 7000 tailor- 
made air-handling louvred luminaires, for the integrated lighting and 
air-conditioning system. 

An additional problem was that the height of the luminaires was 
restricted to just 85 mm. Other landmarks to our expertise include 
Singapore’ s Raffles City project, the Palais des Festivals in Cannes, and 
the Banco Central in Ecuador For more information, write to the Philips 
organization in your country, or to Philips C.EM.S., VOA-0217/IHA16, 
Eindhoven, the Netherlands. 

Philips. The sure sign of expertise world-wide. 



PHILIPS 







,.i7ismniir5siJj?;3?miHusasi;?ss«f5;si55i isi 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


Beijing Aide Sent to Rite 
In Moscow Is Viewed 
As New Breed of Leader 


# il '' 


By Daniel Southerland Wan Li 

Washington Post Senice prime D 

BEIJING — China's decision to Mineral 
send Deputy Prime Minis ter Li Soviet 1 
Peng to the funeral of the Soviet 1984. Of 
leader. Konstantin U. Chernenko, minister 
appears to reflect efforts by Beijing Mr. L 
to groom a new generation of lead- nmlatinj 
ers at a time when Moscow is mak- fairs. In 
ing a generational transition of its Kong as 
own. date wii 

Li Peng, 56, will be the first Chi- the cons 
nese official to meet with Mikhail station i 
S. Gorbachev, 54, the new Soviet dcd as 
leader. West G 

Mr. Uis a technocrat typical of a nations. 

new breed of Chinese leaders. He is 

the type of administrator on whom 
China's a g in g leaders appear to be n 
counting to make their economic 
modernization program succeed. 

Diplomats view him as a possible pwjw 
candidate someday for one of the I f| 
highest posts. 

As China's leading nuclear pow- 
er expert. Mr. Li is known for his B; 
professional and administrative A 

competence. Unlike some of the WAS 
nation’s older revolutionary lead- Union i 
ers who gained their credentials tional ; 
through military or ideological coosorti 
struggles, Mr. U was trained as an live inf 
electrical engineer and rose ment tfa 
through a succession of technical Soviet t 
and administrative posts to reach tium. ac 
his current position in 1983. rial 

Diplomats speculate that by Josep! 
sending Mr. Li to Moscow, the Chi- strategic 
nese can make a serious offer to consorti 


Wan Li, a more senior deputy 
prime minister who attended the 
funeral of Yuri V. Andropov, the 
Soviet leader who died m early 
1 984. Of China’s four deputy prime 
ministers, Li Peng is ranked third. 

Mr. Li has been gradually accu- 
mulating experience in foreign af- 
fairs. In 1983, he went to Hong 

Kong as a deputy minis ter to nego- 
tiate with a British delegation on 
the construction of a nuclear power 
station in China. In 1984. he trav- 
eled as deputy prime minister to 
West Germany and four African 



Group Says It Pressured Israel to Accept Ethiopiam n ^ 


By David B. Otcaway take than we would make it a pub- 
1 Washington Pm Seme* lie issue,” sad Gaenum B«ger, a 

an Jews. “If it hadn’t been for our 


• > , . 


Jews, suspended in early January 80 JCW5 - u " “““ V rr. 
after i anbradi disclose abou ttte paasumt omosm they wouldnt 

operation, was undertaken only af- “y* fl g ae iL . - 

ter a ttecade of debate in vduch a 

email nf in-in** w nmc. the evacuation of Ethiopian Jews 


U Peng 


operation, was undertaken only af- 
ter a decade of debate in which a 
small group of American Jews pres- 
sured the Israeli government to 
help evacuate the Ethiopians to Is- 
rael according to Jewish sources 
involved in the dispute. 

The debate over the fate of the 
Ethiopian Jews focused on whether 
they were really Jews and whether 
they should be moved from Ethio- 
pia, where they had lived Tor centu- 
ries, to a “promised land” they 
scarcely knew abouL 

“We forced Israel to take them 
by indicating that if they didn’t 


Russia , Intelsat Work on Agreement 
That May Lead to Soviet Membership 


; and board meetings that 
Me to full members. 


Games, which Moscow 


The United States has no author- sponsored after withdrawing from 
ity to prevent the Soviet Union the 1984 Olympic Games m Los 


By Susan F Raskv planning and board meetings that mrough intersputniK ot me tinena- 
Nex- York 7 w semd * available to full members. ship 84 Games, winch Moscow 

Washington The Soviet The United States has no author- sponsored after withdrawing from 

Uriof^d Intekat. the mS *y » prevent the Soviet Union the 1984 Olympic GamesSi Los 
tional satellite communications from joiningor to resmet the flow Angeles, . 

consortium, have reached a tenta- of Intelsat technical reformation to Mr. Pei ton said the proposed 
live infomation-exchange agree- Moscow. But Intdsat officials ac- agreement did not involve a Soviet 
ment that is expected to lead to knowledge* that the U A Defense, oommnmenl : to become a member 
Soviet membership in the consor- Commerce and State Departments of Intdsat. But he said the agree- 
tium. according to an Intelsat offi- flight have concerns about the meat “looks toward the possibility 
c j a j_ transfer of American high-technol- of increased cooperation and im- 


the evacuation of Ethiopian Jews 
since the Ethiopian- revolution be- 
gan in 1974 with the overthrow of 
Emperor Haile Sdasac. 

He said the operation should 
have been carried out a decade ago. 
"They could have all come out in 
the tally years of the revolution,’’ 
be said. “It was chaos.” 

The Israeli Embassy in Washing- 
ton disagreed. An embassy spokes- 
man, Victor Hard, said mat for a 
number of years “Israel has been 
acting outside the public eye and 
doing its utmost to bring the Ethio- 
pian Jews bade, home.” 

“It's a fact that even before the 
big airlift tiwe were already several 
thous and Ethiopian Jews in Isra- 
el,” he said. 

Mr. Hard accused the associa- 
tion of «niing in “an irresponsible 
way by their publicity and their 
a uiflieurish actions,” which he said 
had jeopardized the evacuation and 
created “unnecessary risks." 




,^ lU 

lii* 11 






An lowii with an elderly Ethiopian Jew who arrived at Asbkeion, Israel, on the airfi 


The validity of these charges or .-ailing; on the world Ji 


Mr. Pd ton said the proposed 


ment that is expected to lead to 
Soviet membership in the consor- 
tium, according to an Intelsat offi- 
cial. 


Joseph N. Pdton, director of equipment or information to plies that if this works outsuccess- 


straiegic policy for the 109-country Union- 

consortium, said Tuesday that the Mr- Pdton salt 


fully, the Soviet Union might join.” 
Mr. Pdton said the main area of 


further improve relations with the agreement was worked out in Mos- 
Russians while at the same time not cow two weeks ago during a visit 


Mr. Pdton said that the Soviet Mr. Pdton said the mam area ot 
Union had expressed interest in be- Soviet interest in Intdsat was 
coming more involved in Intdsat at broadcasting rather than telephone 


appearing to be too eager. 

The Chinese could have sent 


1983 Crash in Madrid 
Blamed on Pilot Error 


WWW ITTV nvA4U ucv uuutlft U (WJL — ' * rn • "i j " 

there by Intelsat's executive direc- various times over the last two de- communications ana computers, 
tor, Richard R. Colino. cades, but that it appeared to have The United States is the largest 

Mr. Pel ton said that the agree- begun serious consideration during user of Intdsat. The consortium 
ment was awaiting the signature of the 1980 Olympics in Moscow. also provides the hot-line servios 


created “unnecessary risks.” in Sudanese refugee camps and The accounts nonetheless make they always do when they deo 

The validity of these charges or siting on the world Jewish com- dear that the Israeli government act,” Mr. Berger said referrii 

countercharges is difficult to aswffs munity to step in. periodically reacted to pressure the secret Israeli airlift that b 

N»rany. of fh* t<Yng4tfnn riingyr tefy The Israeli airlift got under way and undertook limited rescue at- in late November through Em 

surrounding efforts to smuggle the Nov. 24. But after an apparently tempts. One came in August 1977 an airports. 

“black Jews” out of Ethiopia and deliberate disclosure about it by an when 62 Ethiopian Jews were According to association 
in in IsraeL Bui the accounts of Mr. official of the Jewish Agency, the smuggled aboard a plane bringing dais and at lost om Ethic 

Berger and others f amiliar with the Israeli immigration office, the op- aircraft spare parts to Addis Aba- involved, one of the biggest o 

association's campaign strongly eration was suspended Jan. 6, with ba, Ethiopia. des to a mass rescue ojMratiw 

suggest that Israel railed to act de- 7,000 Ethiopian Jews evacuated to Two others occurred m mid- 1980 a top official in the Jewish Agj 
dsively for years and may have IsraeL and agam in mid- 1982 when the Yehuda Dominitz, who had 

deliberately helped to create a news The Israeli government's han- Israeli Navy took hundreds of Ethi- closed the arrival of Ethic 

blackout to delay action. riling of the Ethiopian Jews is still opian Jews to Israel from an ob- Jews. 

From 1979 to 1982, the assotia- at the center of Ihe dispute over the -scure Red Sea port in Sudan m The conflict between the ass 
tion brought out 280 Ethiopian fate of members of the s mall, “lost” small ships and submarines. lion and the agency came to a 

Jews, mostly to prove to the Israeli Jewish tribe, who have endured for Despite a ruling by the chief Se- at a meeting in Mr. Begin'? offi 


I in mid- 1980 


they always do when they deo 
act,” Mr. Berger said, referrii 
the secret Israeli airlift that b 
in late November through Em 
an airports. 

According to association 
dais and at least one Ethic 
involved, one of the biggest o 
des to a mass rescue operatior 
a top official in the Jewish Ag 


Srniii 


.v-aiy * 


and "E gin m mid- 1982 when the Yehuda Dominitz, who had 




very serious between Wa 


Despite a ruling by the chief Se- 
hardic and Ashkenazic rabbis in 


The conflict between the ass 
tion and the agency came to a 
at a meeting in Mr. Begia'sofB 


government it could be done and to centuries in Ethiopia as landless, pb arctic and Ashkenazic rabbis in late June 1979 that .Mr . La 
force its hand , according to Mr. lower-class potters and black- 1975 that the Ethiopian Jews were attended with Mr. Dominitz 


Agence Fnnce-Presse 
MADRID — Pilot error led to 
the loss of 181 lives when a Colom- 
bian Boeing-747 jet crashed near 
Madrid on Nov. 27, 1983, accord- 
ing to an official report. 

The pilot, Julio HemAndez, had 
lost his position and came in too 
low on his approach to Madrid's 
Barajas airport, according to a re- 


Vasily A. Shamshin, the Soviet “they began paying veiy serious berween Washington and Moscow, 
minister of posts and tdecommuni- attention to Intelsat when they The Soviet Unions interest m 
cations, and that formal approval found they had to come to us to more involvement with Intdsat 
was expected soon, perhaps by the obtain global coverage for the comes as the Reagan admmis tra- 
end of the week Games,” Mr. Pdton said. tion is promoting policies aimed at 


Jews and thus subject to the Law of leaders of interested Jewish or 
Return, the Israeli political estab- rations. 

. lui" (nr min* .rmninri/in unc h-uinn § 


end of the week. 


Intelsat, a nonprofit cooperative since toe nud-i y/lls the soviet ““'"“s , mgs between its leaner ana Israels rael had continued swung arms to jew wno lmnngnuts u> wan. 

open to all countries, provides two- Union has maintaine d its own sal- ^ satellite systems mlo interna- minister at the time, Mernt- Ethiopia and had maintain ed se- A former president of the associ 

ihirri« nf tlw wnrlrl’e it-lmhrtnt* «*r- ellire svstem In (woiiitnilf thmtioh Uonal communications. Rmin 19Sfl and nwi tt«s with its envernment even ation. Howard Lenhoff. wrote ifl II 


nmes,” Mr. Pdton said. bon is promoting policies aimed at 

Since the mid-1970s the Soviet allowing privately owned Amen- 


Berger and to others involved. smiths. Jews and thus subject to the Law ot 

T^e first major Israeli action, a The Israeli government’s ambiv- Return, the Israeli political es tab- 
daring operation from the Red Sea, aknee toward the Ethiopian Jews tishmeut “dragged its feet” for nme 
occurred in mid-1980 after five apparently was partly a result of its years on organizing a rescue opera- 
years of constant pressure, mainly dear desire to avoid offending non, according to Mr. Berger. The 


■'■fr- .att I 

<4 i 

• . 4 

..■oam 

.■ Ji 


by the association, nieluriing meet- pthinpi.'i . an old anti-Arab ally. Is- law grants Israeli citizenship to any 
ings between its leader and Israel’s rad had continued selling arms to Jew who immigrates to IsraeL 


ihirds of the world’s tdephone ser- eltite system. Intersputnik, through 
vice, almost all international televi- which Eastern bloc countries can 


i-httm Riyn. Between 1980 and cret ties with its government even ation, Howard Lenhoff, wrote m an 


The association was trying t ' 
the agency to take over the os j. 
tion while using association pi “ 
to run it. The agency agreed t 
proposal but refused to use " 
association employees, sever 
whom had hdped organize de - 






sion transmission, most telex lease capacity on Soviet-operated 
service and many kinds of data satellites. 


Turkish Forces Arrest 58 


1982, the Israelis brought nearly after a break in diplomatic rda- internal memorandum dated sepL 
2,000 Ethiopian Jews to Israel, ac- tions during the revolution. 17, 1 980. that on the issue of Ethio- 

cording to the association. The ambiguity also is reflected plan Jews “we are dealing with the 

Events took a sharp turn in 1983 by a dispute in Israel over whether most devious and inept elements in 
when the Ethiopian Jews began the Ethiopian Jews are really Jews the Israeli bureaucracy and with 
leaving their villages and migrating and over the wisdom of bringing a the most naive, in-informed and 


internal memorandum dated Sept stra tions against the gpyeramc 
17, 1980. that on the issue of Ethio- Jerusalem over the Ethiopian i 


port published Tuesday by the 
Spanish Air Safety Commission. 

He ignored an alarm warning 
him to gain height, idling the de- 
vice to “shut up.” the report said. 
The inquiry based part of its find- 
ings on examination of the in-flight 
recorder. 


transmission. It was established in 
1964 and is based in Washington. 


Industry sources suggested that 
the long-term Soviet goal might be 


The Associated Press 

ISTANBUL — Turkish security 


The consortium's members in- to merge the Intersputnik and In- forces arrested 58 suspected mem- 


dude Yugoslavia, V ietnam, China tdsat systems. 


Jerusalem over the Ethiopian i 
The association agreed to sh 
publicity about the issue in n 


for a pledge from Mr. Dotr 
that “60 to 100” Ethiopian 


and Nicaragua. The Soviet Union In recent years, Moscow has at- movements in operations here and 
is a customer of the system, and as tempted to encourage Western in- in the province of Bursa, the mar- 
such is entitled to attend meetings terest in its satellite facilities by rial law command announced 


bos of three outlawed separatist bv the thousands to Sudan. But primitive people, many of whom overcautious elements of world would be brought out over the 

__ _ . _ • . • . _ i . .t .i .'li ■ 1 * ii*. . _ ■ ■ t - __ T. 11 vnAr nP ldlfl n/wvivllwn Ift ilia 


there was still no organized system are illiterate in their own 


where traffic and frequency infor- arranging attractive terms. In 1984, Wednesday. It said the 35 arrested 
[nation is discussed. But it is not for example. Cable News Network in Istanbul were suspected of mur- 
gjven information from technical, arranged to receive a transmission tiers. 


Jewish leadership.' 
The association 


?ni7i»ri dem- 
on and Tel 


mer of 1979, according to the 
hoff memorandum. 

By October, however, “not ; 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


SERVICES 


COOPER ST JAMES 

OfflOM. AGENT 


YOUNG OCEANIC LADY 01-245 


for taking them to IsraeL to a modem society such as IsraeL The association organized dem- hoff memorandum. 

Then in early 1984, 12,000 Finally, there was the question of castrations in Jerusalem and Tel By October, however, “noli 
walked en masse to Sudan in what whether to bring them to Israel in Aviv, lecture tours for Ethiopian gle” Ethiopian Jew came to I 
Mr. Berger described as a “purely one big airlift or in small numbers Jews in the United States and pub- and none arrived till Friz 
spontaneous movement,” creating over a long period to allow Israel licity campaigns through ads and 1980, the document states, 
enormous pressure on Israel for ac- and the Ethiopian Jews to adjust stories in Jewish newspapers. Mr. Lenhoff said the “di 

don. “The Israelis felt it should be a Other sources said that plans for cross” led to an association 

In October 1984, the association gradual process of bringing them the airlift were discussed by the sion to take a more militant : 
ran advertisements in 32 Jewish in. They didn't realize the diroen- Israeli government last summer, “to force the Jewish Agency u 


MI 




licity campaigns through ads and 1980, the document states, 
stories in Jewish newspapers. Mr. Lenhoff said the “di 

Other sources said that plans for cross” led to an association 
the airlift were discussed by the sion to take a more militant : 
Israeli government last summer, “to force the Jewish Agency u 


In October 1984, the association gradual process of bri 
ran advertisements in 32 Jewish in. They didn't realize 


OF BMW IGB) LTD 
AND BMW NOltTR AMS 


(Continued From Back Page) 


WWW you ora in Europe, we can offer 
consderobh tamps an brand new US 
spec BMW cot wmh hil factory war- 
ranty and official US dedar bocx-up. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


BOOKS 


SERVICES 


We can aba wppiy right or lift hand 
Aiwa tax free BMWs at toond dock. 
We abo supply factory bid! outef- . 
proof BMWs and the Alpine BMW 
range tax free. 

CaB London {Oil 09 6699. 


10 YEARS 

W> Mmt On to Bm Wbrid 


HHIO FKANCESCO MR£ Bocfe. PAMS VW SOPHBItCAIH) YOUNG 
£5* P* ftP. PF* >*V companion. Why don’t you 

Baabm Arden, Esthetic* of WcUng, phone 27/01-69 for your days, eve- 


PAMS MTL PBSONAL/BUSNE5S 
Assatmt Tet 8287932 

LONDON HUNCH IADY VB> Axm- 
tart- TtL UK 723 02 72. 1 

NUBS IADY MiaDWBL Travel 
campanian. Para 633 68 09. 


newspapers around the the United sons of the problem,” Mr. Berger however, suggesting that it had its ry out that work that the} 

m. . - nnA r.l ■ - un. ... • ■_ , J_«. 1 P in _l L.. ,k. 


States saying that 2,000 Ethiopian said. “Their view was it couldn’t be own reasons for deriding to act. 
Jews had died in terrible conditions done massively.” “They, did a magnificent job. 


m reasons for deciding to act charged by the Jewish people I _ 

“They, did a magnificent job, as Le^ the rescue of Jewish lives' i • 

1 : — w.A i \ 


; it; 



Tint [fir* ectoont Lebanon. Hang- 


lady companion. Why don"! you PAMS7HJ 51 TTWAitahiio. Ba- 
phone 277-01-69 for your days, iwb- pant lady, owneift dwiera, trowk 



l\i\ 


TRANSCO 


Bax 205. HaraW tribune. 
Mercade 55, Rome. Italy. 


i & we efcm rfc ? An i 
guide, even for ya 


747 59 58 TOUMST GUIDE Paris, 
a i r par t v 7 mrL/midnght. Int LtroveL 


NEW MERCEDES 


Keepmg a constant Ood of more thm 
300 bnxid new cot. 
nxddng 5000 happy tfienb every year. 


SERVICES 


PAMSs SJO 97 95 

BILINGUAL YOUNG LADY 


TOKYO IADY COMPANION. PA 
Pinond Antaii 03456^539 


mdang 5000 happy chonts every ync 
. Send for free tnukiookxjMhJog. 
Traruoo SA, 95 NaonWami. 


YOUNG LADY COMPAMON. tixv 
don/Hoathrow. Tefc 244 7671 


POtSOC, BMW, EXOTIC CARS T d 323^ tOduft B 

FROM STOCK 


YOUNG IADY 

PA/ Interpreter A Tourisn Guide 

PAMS 562 0587 


„ YOUNG SOPHBTKAID VIP lady. 

YOUNG HEGANT LADY ^uoIp/cpot.soobvtz 

B MM togi w d PA. We 525 81 01 TOKYO 645 27 41. Tou ring & drop. 
peg guiefcs, erlei proton, etc. 


for IMMBHAIS drfvery 
BEST SBtVICE 

RUTEINC 

TaunuHtr. 52. 6000 Fraolrfutl. 

W Germ., tti ffl 69-232351. lb 411559 
Informatxxi only by pliaM or telex. 


3 X 500 SEC, NEW, 1989 
2 X SOO SB, NEW, 1W 
2 X 500 SI, NEW 1985 
2 X Pendw Turbo, New T9«5 
1 X Pared* 944, NEW. 1915 Vi 
l - D.O.T. + ERA. 


** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

FOR A REAL VJLP. YOUNG LADY 
; Dotmgushod. Educated. MMmguaL 





NEW A.M.G. MBICHJES 


All options - D.O.T. + EPA 
Atao shooing avalable 
SOUTHVVBT BROKERS 
Am Hohbuxh 99, 4)50 KmMd 
W. Germany. Tlx 8531187 CUC D 
Teb (0)2151-562751. 


VIP LADY GUIDE 

Young, educated, elegant & ltd 


DOYOUPBD AHHENCH-4NGU5H- 

^ tsgfsr vh,lr ’ M 


BRUSSRS. YOUNG LADY VJJ. 
Compaiion Tali 347 358 49 
H/KONG CHARMMG BJROKAN 
lody guide / compgiiotL 3682483 
PAMS YOUNG UDY 341 21 71. 
VP PA & bfamud erierpWer. 


An International Conference 
Organized By 

Plant Location International 
In Cooperation With 
The International Herald Tribune 


S I AVI: 

\1WV( 


LEGAL SERVICES 


500 SEC WMe/Paktmino DM 13 
500 SB. While/ PiAwxno DM 12 
SOO Sa Blodirttack DM 122J 


Al options mdudmg board campUer 
AMG. factory fitted Steerxig wheel. 


AM.G. factory fitted sleereig 

as3fs?sSf. s 3fei 

ImmerSate delivmy- 


EXPHUB4CH) CAR TRAD«S hr 
Mereedei, BMW, Panche, ofc M 
service enport / export US DOT & 
H*A tor tourist & dealer. Oceamede 
Motors, Tersieegensir. B, 4Di^ucl- 
dorf. W. Ge nnonv. Tel: (0] 211 - 
434646. Telex: 85Bft74, 


' mg cat services, Sam - 12 pm. 33129. Tel; {305) 643W00. bi 44Mtf. 


PJL YOUNG LADY 
PARIS 565 03 80 


IflNDON. Young German/Fiench db- 


ance to meet you on your vidt to 
London. Tel: UX01-381 JB52 


SINGAPORE INTT. GUIDES. Cal: Sbt- 
oepore 734 96 28. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 

NY ONE WAY 51 Sa Everyday N.Y. - 
West Good *139. Paris Zfe 92 90. 


XA L AUTOMOBU, Teh M 
(0J89-95 85 10, Tbr 524566. 


EUROPORT TAX HUS CARS 
Cal hr free catalog. . 


* PARS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY TMUNGUAL VtP-PA L^MON .y, 


HONG KONG (K-3) 723 12 37 


TO USA FROM £119 arse way. 

NATC London 01-734 8100. 


The investment Climate 
And incentives in Europe 


MERCEDES 1985. LARGE stock. ^ 

TRASCO, GB. BJLD. CH. CcM John ei NEW ’MO, MERCEDES, BMW, jjqg 


PARS 704 SO 27 
VIP PA YOUNG LADY 
MuHSngud- 


724 1859 Airports / Tree! 

HtANKTURT YOUNG IADY 


CanbbZZfyOU HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 

i/ Travel CHARIBt A YACHT M GRECE. Di. 


tuNKniKr toum* uujt compan- 
ion + travel guide. Tel 069/628432 


HtANKTURT. Yo 
free to travel I 


tel: 44-1-208 0007, tbu 
T2ASG 


imuvwi huh |ww| 

toiMS’-rSf®® 1 "gsjSBSJS'Ssa"’ 



April 25-26, 1985, Brussels 

The conference will provide senior executives with an in-depth analysis of the current 
and future investment climate and the incentives offered in sixteen 
European countries. Question and answer periods will follow each session. ■ 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS ft GUIDES ESCORTS ft GUIDES ESCORTS A GUIDES ESCORTS ft GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 


LOfDON 


ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA A WORLDWIDE 

Head office ei New York 
330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C 10019 USA 

21 2-765-7896 
212-765-7754 


Poftmaa Escort Agency 

67 Odhem Street, 
Louden WJ 

Tek 486 3724 or 486 1158 
AS major credrt cards acce p ted 


BHJS5&S MK2B1E ESCORT AND 
GUIDE saVMX. IBj 733 07 98 


SWTTZBUAND 


★STAR ESCORT* 

Service Tab 01/ 55 11 49 


MATOR CRHMT CARDS AW 
CHECKS ACCEPTED 
Private Me m benh lpi Avdhdde 


LONDON 

BE5T BCORT SKVICE 
TEL: 200 8585 


ZURICH 


ALEXIS E SCO RT SERVICE 
TEL 01/ 47 55 82 


been feat u red im the tap A mod 

•xduxtve Escort Service by 

USA A Momaliond runes media 
ndwfrig rmfia md TV. 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SaVKE 

to KBGMGffON OUCH 5T,Wfl 


* AMSTERDAM* 

SHE Escort Sendee. 227837 



Norway: Mr. V. Hvcdi 
- former Mimrtcr cf 
Demuric Mr. M. Ost 


Thursday, 

Chairman, Christiania Bank Oslo, 


April 25, 1985 


Demuric Mr. ML Ostergaard, Managing Director, Industrial 
Development Council of North Jutland. 

. Belgium: Baron A. Bekaert, Presidau, Bdcaert N.V. 

The Netherlands: Mtr. AAJvL van Agt, CGmmissaoner 
of the Queen, Governor of N. Brabant Province, former 
Prime Minister. 

Guest hmcheon speaker: Prof, Dr. P.Mathijsen, 

Director General of The EC Regional Policies. 


Austria: Mr. G. L Genn, General Manager, ICD, fornier General. 

Manager, General Motors Vienna. 

Swkzeriantk Mr. Carl Meyer, Vico-Presktent Finance. 

Swiss Asuag-SSDHL 

Sweden: Mr. IC Lewenhaupt, Tbe Wyatt 
Company AB. 

Luxembourg: Mr. Z. Magnus, General Manager, 

KrediedMnk, Luxembourg. 


lqr Minister of Brussels, Mr. P. Hatty. 


Escort Sorws 021 1/38 31 41. 




Friday, April 26,1985 


ID MfDItWIUI UMW1 31, (1 

m: 937 9136 OR 937 9133 
AR motor credit conk ococptod 


ROME CUM ajRO« ESCORT 
& Guide Sordco-Tot 06/589 2604- 589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pm] 


A-AMER/CAN 


ESCORT SBtVICE 
EVBWWHB5 YOU ARE OR GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Call frw from Ui 1-600-2374892 
CaB freo from Rondo: 1-&D-282-0891 
LmreU Eastam v wle omg you bqdd 


ARISTOCATS 

London EhoH Sorvfct 
128 Wigrnore St. London WJ. 
Al mqar Credit Cords Accepted 
Tab 437 47 41 l 4742 
12 naan • midnight 


CHB5GA ESCORT SBEVKX. 

51 Doaudtomp Place. London SW3. 
TebOl 584 6513/2749 (4-12 pai) 



HmNKFUltr - ANNE'S Escort Sew*. 
Tot 069 / 28-81-01 


HAMBURG -BHGtTTE Escort Santee. 
Tot 040/58 65 35. 


HIANKHJRT - PEIRA Enort & Travel 
Service. M 069 / 66 24 05 



GENEVA ESCORT 
5BMCL Tab 46 11 58 


GBB/A QURUNE GUDE twwce. 

Tek 283 397. 




France: Mr. J. Paul Home, Senior Economist, Smith Barney, 
Harris Upham & Co. 

WestGennaw: Mr. B. Layton, former President, Ford Europe. 
Portugal: Mr. E. Lopez, Mmister of Finance. 

Spain: Don Leon Bendbas, General Assistant Director 
of Economic Planning, Ministry of Economics. 

Guest luncheon speaker: Mr. W. Martens, Prime Mmister 
of Belgium. 


Italy: Dr. Gianni Varati, President of the Federation of 
the Chemical Industry, Italy. 

Greece: Mr. S. Papaefstathiou, Deputy Governor, HeUcnique 
Industrial Devoopment Bank. 

United Kingdom: Sir Edwin Nixon, President, IBM (U.KJ. 
Irefand: Mr. L. P. Doyle, General Manager, Allied Iridi 
Banks limited Eiffope. 



HIANXRJBT - JBNnarS Enort & 
Trod Swiee. 069/44 77 ^ 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 


MAYFAIR CLUB 


GENEVA •BEAUTY* 
BCORT SERVICE 
TB.- 29 51 30 


GUIDE S ERVICE from 5pm 
ROTTBtDAM (011IK2S4155 
^oj7oior 


IN NEW YORK 


GSCVA-BE5T 
ESCORT 5BVKX 
TE: 022/29 13 74 


LONDON BABB. BCORT Sotrb. 

Tek 01-625 4387 

LONDON PRIVATE BCORT Savin. 

Tek 402 7389. 

VKNNA BORE BCORT SBtVKL 
Tek 56 78 55. 


Hi" I ki 



LONDON 20E WBT heart Agency 
Tek 01-579 7554 


vm. Tet uZZ / 31 26 73. 



TEL: 212-737 3291. ZURICH 


CAROUNE BCORT SSVKE. 
Tofa 01/252 61 74 


AMSTBDAM JASMINE 

ESCORT SBtVICE Q20-366655 


LONDON JACQURWE BCORT Ser- 
vice. Tek 01-402 7949. 


LADYB03RT MVIO. Murkh Tek 
089/47 77 51 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Service. 
Heqttoaur/Gcdtodi Tek 834 7941 


LONDON BAY5WATB BC0RT5 

TeL 01 2290776. 


LONDON 

BGLGRAWA 

EmbH Service. 

Tek 736 5877. 


ZURICH 


G84EVA msr BCORT sanKE 
RoOTvotton TRAVEL/ WfflCH® 
A SM STATIONS. TEL 31 49 87 


Sa n cei flw' t Eworf 8 Guido Servieo 
Mdo A Fomole. Tdk 01/56 96 92 


HUNKPURT + SUnOUMXNG5. 
Goratne'i Escort & trawl savin. En. 


MUNICH HHBCS Escort + Guide 
Service. Tek 089/4486038 

HtAMOUtf SONIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tek 069-68 34 42. 

AAtS7SKUM OTY Escort Service. 

, Tek {020)34 05 07. 


VB4NA - DBBtS ESCORT Service. 
Tek 52-30-355. 


:■ 25^,39^ l.-H-gt- ^ g:: f At ; Misassii srcnb^lii®^'lxfiete*dmli3 

— — 

PhstName — , Substittltii^mavbeLtta^^afirvthii^ 


Poadon » 


TOMA’S RUST ESCORT Serwc 
02244-4191 V 722-432. muBinDuaL 


Cao^niiy 


’ ^ " 

stikfirs cogfetimpg ihe jrfarinatinri^': 


BASB - BON - ZURICH Escort Ser- 
vice. Td 0049-221399296. 


Street 




LOMX3N TRUtitt ESCORT Serviaj. 
Tefc 01-373 8849. 


HtANKFURT AREA, PEMA1£ + Mdo 
Escort &travd service. Tel 62 84 32. 




ZURICH-GENEVA MADRID STARS 


LQHD S2JS£5?S£ ^CORT Ser- 
wx. Tek 01-229 6541. 


gg Postal Code Chy ' 1^ 


GMGBTS BCORT SERVICE. 
TSj 01/363 08 64-022/34 41 86 


Tel: 2503496. CRBW CAWS. 


°SS^S t SSS A Tm\.\ VWNA W Bgm SBtVICE Tefc 
{Vienna) 65 41 58 


VA.T Nr (canyames in Bdginm) 


14-3-85 


I 










s# 


u,l »c 

[^^Kirkpatrick 

P lanning 

f To Become a 
^Republican 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


Page 5 



$ 


>U 








it 7.1 

f K . .... 

fT4:ir,» 

♦ iM!Vi 1} : 

i*«« i.- ■ 

4- 5. s- 

"*vJ * '■ 

It...- . 

• IkVllffV’.f *. : 

**tM i'Jf, i,;. . 

*'* f'» . 

► Ins.; : 

* s- < I*’ 

if! . 

u%*>>$ Sv 

i ?.•« • 

wj-'.ri : u- ; . 

JV.il ..■ 

afctf 

ait*; * • ...• 
K.-\ 

|T*io L 

; . 

» • •. 

, i ■ . • • 

tn+- ■ ’ 

*'• Ci ti • 

*.» 

t--. 

* Ji. • -- ’ 
rk'rrtrv. i « 

*r" 

*** r.. ! •• . 

W.t V*:. • 
jw ’Jw.-C .-!■ . 
ill 4*-% 1. 

i44--.' r ■ 

i •• • 

i*r* •■•S'- • ' 

r fi -• • 
s 1. ; . 

- 


s 


By Dan Balz 

K'teAugtt’t "ftw Service 

WASHINGTON — ieane J. 
the U.S. delegate to 
oited Nations and a ufelong 
plans to switch parties 
month. 

Mrs. Kirkpatrick, who cast the 
J.S. veto Tuesday of a resolution 
(ffldemrdng Israeli actions against 
ivilians in southern Lebanon, will 
ve the Reagan administration at 
end of tins month to return to 
_ and writing. Mrs. Kirk- 
atrick. 58, is on leave from 
University, where She 
a professor of political science, 
is to make her debut as a 
blican at a fund-raiser for the 
Vhkil-,.. i GOP Women’s Political Ac- 
' lvr Q- 1 ion League on April 3. GOP 
lands for Grand Old Party. The 
' . . roup is a political action commit- 

j-^se that will contribute money to 
. vomen Republican candidates. 

■ ■ ■■■-■ Tm not denying it,” Mis. Kirk- ' 
atrick said Tuesday of reports 
'. lat she would switch parties, ac- 
. ording to The Associated Press. 

- ’ I’ve been making fairly dear that I 
. ad to think seriously about bring- 

, . ‘ig my formal registration into line 

- - . nth my behavior and my views.” 

.-. Mrs. Kiikpatrick’s party inclina- 

on has been the subject of discus- 
sion smee her speech to the Repub- 

- v can National Convention in 

" • . )allas last August. 

"• The UN envoy, whose Demo- 

■ ■ ratic mentors included the late 
' “ enalors Hubert H. Humphrey of 

Minnesota and Henry M. Jackson 

■ - (Washington, brought roars from 

te convention with a speech in 
' • - which she blistered the Democrats 
.-s the “blame America first" party. 

• She has since become me of the 
" .are on the Republican Party dr- 

• • ait 









* - k 


mm 

m 






r ’ ~ * 




.mtLTC* 





rite 


TTn A n oonted frr» 


Jeaoe J. Kirkpatrick vetoing a resolution in the UN Security Counti) on Tuesday. - 

Security Council Condemns Pretoria 


The -Associated Press 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — The UN Security Council 
has unanimously passed a resolu- 
tion condemning South Africa for 
killing protesters and arresting 
black, opposition leaders on treason 
charges. 

It was the first time during the 
administration of President Ron- 
ald Reagan that the United States 
has voted in favor of a resolution in 
the council condemning South Af- 
rica for its domestic policies. 

{Pressure on South Africa in the 
form of disinvestment campaigns 
and condemnation in the UN 
would hit South Africans hard. 
Foreign Minister RJF. Botha said 
Wednesday, Reuters reported from 
Cape Town. 


[‘The progress and stability of 
the whole of southern Africa is 
threatened,” he said in a statement 
commenting on the UN condemna- 
tion.] 

All 15 council members ap- 
proved the resolution _ criticizing 
South. Africa for the killing of what 
it called defenseless African pro- 
testers. 

The council also criticized the 
regime for arresting 16 leaders of 
the United Democratic Rout and 
other organizations opposed to 
South Africa’s policy of apartheid. 
It called on Pretoria to withdraw 
the charges of high treason- against 
them. 

The U.S. delegate, Warren 
Clark, said the United States was 
voting in favor despite the resolu- 


tion's “deviations from language 
proper to a Security Council reso- 
lution.” 

It was believed he referred to an 
article (hat appeared to call for 
violent revolution in commending 
as legitimate “the massive united 
resistance of the oppressed people 
of South Africa against apartheid.” 
Mr. Clark emphasized that the 
United Stales wanted peaceful 
change in South Africa. 

■ Signs of Panic Seen 

A South African industrialist 
said Wednesday there were signs of 
near paiuc among some govern- 
ment offi cials and businessmen 
over the growing anti-apartheid 
campaigns in the United States, 
Reuters reported from Cape Town. 


Marlboro 



m « 



Join THe Prestigious iNTERNAnoNAL Companies 
Who Have Purchased Thhr Offices In 
New York's Premiere Locale. 


slI l-Ri v. I 

/rru 

id Trim m 





'• ‘‘s 




V 4 


OCCLTANQ fPPiXG r- • 0\ \ T : 0F?!CF \0- • 0 P :.‘ 



ij 





...» 


N EURO 


b . -v 

[r ' i 

-ri \ 


- ,-tsr 


■ • . * • _ . -A 1 • 

Y •- •- 

'. .-i' , 4 . 
v'.vM- 

• . r r - . if ■ f - 


l 


f.-a:. it i.‘ • 


i iifti- * 

M 

!. jtrt M 

Si if 


/ SlM.-'- 


^siri ~y* 

I •**’- ’* 
is?.' 11 -" : - 

I .4- iv 








William Zeckendorf is 
making available an 
unprecedented op- 
portunity to own of- 
fice space at Delmon- 
ico Plaza, the excep- 
tional new office tower 
central to New York's 
most important office, 
retail and cultural 
establishments. 

Delmctnico Plaza is 
located at 55 East 59th 
Street between Park 
and Madison Ave- 
nues, a location so 
eminent, nine floors ? 
have already been 
sold, including to 
such internationally 
renowned companies 
as Christie's ana BHF- 
BANK. The building's 
management system 
has been planned to 
provide the ultimate 
in security, operation 


;aSV2Gt£ 


■ i»«h J r 1 


and communication 
capabilities. Building 
services will be avail- 
able 24 hours a day to 
insure that businesses 
operating on an inter- 
national timedock 
can function effec- 
tively around the 
dock. 

Consider owner- 
ship at Del mo ni co 
Plaza, New York's 
most private, pres- 
tigious and modem 
office tower. And 
participate in this 
most sensible concept 
in commercial. real 
estate. 

. Refer all enquiries 
to^Wm. A. White & 
Sons/Ttshman East, 
Inc, (212) 682-2300 or 
The Trump Corpora- 
tion (212) 832-2000, ex- 
clusive agents. 






Contact Sponsor Cozwil & Associates, Telex 353-172 [Answerback: ZEQCDORF] 






'f rt 1 



. k -i • 


55 East 59 Street. New York, NY 10022 
The complete offering twins are m an offering plan available from sponsor. 


. 


«‘‘ < SA a t5- 



larlboro. the number one 
cigar elU» in the world 






; v V > 



^w- 






El 


<u* 

MB 

«!» 

«o* 

Ml 

Mr 

Bni 


Can 

Co* 


lai 

Flo 
Fra 
0 «r 
Ml 
ini 
Ln 

Ltd 

LH 


Mif> 


Nte? 

out 


Fro 

in 

iru- 

STk 

«n 

VH1 

V>K 

ITS 

Zor 


Ml 


■cu 

Jtn 

TH 


oc 


Aoc 

!« 


ote 
PA I 


OSr 

tec 

IBB 


Page 6 



THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


-i s' 


\T !»■ 


Jtcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PnUvfaed With The New York Time* and The Washington Rial 


Cleani ng Out the Stables 


The decision by President Reagan to stop 
limiting imports of cars from Japan should 
occasion mild rejoicing. For four years a 
professedly liberal administration prevented 
Americans from buying aQ the Japanese 
automobiles they would have liked, and by 
so doing raised prices in America and profits 
in Japan. Have we now started to cleanse the 
Augean stables of protectionism? Up to a 
point. But there remains a smefL 

Lifting the restrictions leaves Japan sdQ 
aware that if its producers take full advan- 
tage of their new freedom, some sort of 
control is likely to be reunposed. Big Brother 
is still watching. More complex, but again 
unfavorable to free trade in cars, is the 
probability chat the more Japan's automak- 
ers take advantage of their new freedom, the 
heavier will be Washington's pressure on 
Tokyo to allow American industry to com- 
pete freely on the Japanese market in a wide 
range of manufactures, of which telecom- 
munications is perhaps the foremost. So 
Japan, less than pure when it comes to 
exposing its own new industries to competi- 
tion, is tempted still to restrain car exports 
to keep out American high-tech produce; 
car sales have to be sacrificed to help protect 
other Japanese industries. Mr. Reagan’s 
long-sought lifting of auto controls may 
make Tokyo recall a Chinese proverb: Be 
careful what you ask for — you migh t get it. 

In a larger sense, we cannot blame Wash- 
ington and Detroit, nor Tokyo, for the per- 
petual s traitjacket around international 
-trade in cars. The real Augean stables are in 
Europe. While America limited Japanese 
cars to some 20 percent of its market in 
recent years, most European countries were 
— and re main — far meaner. The only 
Common Market country which allows un- 
impeded entry of Japanese cars is West 


Germany. It believes that its own producers 
are efficient enough to up to the chal- 
lenge — which probably raises West Ger- 
man efficiency. France and Italy limit Japa- 
nese cars to under 2 percent of their market. 
How could America be expected genuinely 
to open its borders to the Japanese without 
let or hindrance, when Europe does not? It 
would be swamped by Japanese exporters 
with no other place to go. 

Even inside Europe, the car' trade is far 
from free. Identical models sell for very 
different prices in different countries. Con- 
sumers are thwarted , by industry at every 
turn when they try to buy from the cheapest 
suppliers, and haws not yet seen their rights 
defended strongly by die EC authorities. 
There is now a further threat, stemming 
from West Germany's desire to run ahead of 


its European partners on pollution control. 
Given the hr 


havoc that exhaust fumes are 
on the Black Forest, one can un- 
the German pressure to get some- 
thing done quickly. But unilateral action on 
emission standards risks blunting — to West 
Germany’s advantage — the free competi- 
tion that Bonn has long .supported. Other 
European governments are moving regretta- 
bly slowly toward adequate environmental 
safeguards, but Bonn is not all that blame- 
less. It could reduce pollution — and acci- 
dents — by imposing a speed limit. Unfortu- 
nately, Goman voters like to drive fast. 

If all goes well — which is not certain — 
there will be negotiations in GATT next year 
to reduce the general obstacles to world 
trade. But the negotiations will be lengthy, 
and their effects will not be felt much before 
the end of the decade. Why not a quick mini - 
round to straighten out trade in particular 
sectors, starting with automobiles? 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


The Greeks Have a Point 


1 What is it with the Socialist government of 
Andreas Papandreou in Greece? He is capable 
of the most blatant anti-Americanism and 
anti-Westernism; he attacks Solidarity and 
charges the United States with "expansionism 
and domination." True, be has been careful to 
maintain structural links with NATO, renew- 
ing American base leases and undertaking to 
buy aircraft that will tie Greece to American 
suppliers until the end of the century. Yet 
there is an unsettling erraticism in Greek pol- 
icy under Mr. Papandreou. a hint that he 
might lurch far left past a point of no return. 

His latest act, an internal one, ordinarily 
would not draw foreign attention. It is so 
typical and disturbing, however, that it has 
been widely noted. Mr. Papandreou had prom- 
ised to support parliament's re-election of 
Constantine Karamanlis, the conservative el- 
der statesman known for his emphasis on 
keeping close ties with the West The prime 
minister stunned his countrymen, however, by 
dumping Mr. Karamanlis. The president now 
due to be chosen, being beholden to the left, 
will not easily be able to perform Mr. Kara- 
manlis's balancing role, even if be chooses. 

This is no small matter. Mr. Papandreou’s 
PASOK movement is heavy on Marxist and 
Third World slogans and heavily influenced by 
the Communists. By his overt anti-American- 
ism, some say. he buys political room for the 


pro-American strategic connection, which is 
vital for Greece to defend itself against its 
NATO partner and regional rival, Turkey, and 
for general reassurance in a corner of the world 
where Soviet power is strong. But this is an 
inherently unstable arrangement. A respected 
Greek analyst, Panayotc Dimiuas, using War- 
saw Pact analogies in an article in Foreign 
Policy magazine, fears that "NATO’s Roma- 
nia” may become “NATO’s Yugoslavia” — a 
reference to Belgrade's break with the PacL 

So the United States has reason to be con- 
cerned about Greek policy. But it also has 
reason to be concerned about UJL policy. The 
question that too Tew Americans ask is how a 
friendly democratic country such as Greece, 
which fought with America against fascism 
and which. America then helped save from 
■ communism, came to its present confusion. 

The key part of the answer is that' Washing- 
ton carelessly aggravated the fears and frustra- 
tions of Greeks of all parties by appearing too 
friendly to the colonels who ruled from 1967 to 
.1974 and to the Turks who invaded Cypres in 
1974 and hold part of it to this day. Nobody 
ever said the Greeks were easy to get along 
with. But they have the leadership of their 
democratic choice and they have grievances, 
legitimate as well as illegitimate. The former 
need to be attended to, the latter dismissed. 


— THE WASHINGTON POST. ' 


Doctors and the Courts 


The number of medical malpractice suits 
filed in America and the size of the jury awards 
are not of interest to doctors only. The cost, in 
terms of extremely high insurance premiums 
and the practice of expensive “defensive medi- 
cine'' designed to avoid suits, is passed on to 
patients and taxpayers. Some physicians in 
high-risk specialties and in certain areas of the 
country pay as much as $80,000 a year in 
malpractice premiums. Still, insurers report, 
they pay out more in claims under these poli- 
cies than they collect in premiums. 

Last month a task force of the American 
Medical Association issued recommendations 
for addressing the malpractice problem. Public 
education and quality control within the medi- 
cal profession were stressed. So was the need 
for tort reform — the revision of laws and 
procedures governing negligence litigation — 
to make the resolution of these cases faster, 
less burdensome and fairer to all the litigants. 

In the mid-70s, when insurers first balked at 
providing this coverage, most states enacted 
some kind of tort reform, but many of these 
state laws are still being tested in the courts. In 


California, a leading state in terms of volume 
of suits and the sweeping nature erf the reform, 
the constitutionality of the statute was re- 
solved piecemeal, with the final state Supreme 
Court judgment handed down last Thursday. 

The California law has three major provi- 


sions: Attorneys' fees in medical malpractice 
:ftom40 


cases must be based on a sliding scale ! 
percent of the first $50,000 recovered down to 
10 percent for awards over $200,000. Pay- 
ments are made over the lifetime of the plain- 
tiff, instead of in a lump sum, and cease when 
he dies. And recoveries for pain and suffering 
cannot exceed $250,000. Other states have 
adopted similar, although generally less strin- 
gent, forms of these controls, and encouraged 
arbitration and the revision of statutes of limi- 
tations mid rules of evidence. California wiO 
be the state to watch. Its reforms have been 
upheld by the highest court of the state, and 
they are major changes. If, over the next few 
years, they facilitate settlements, reduce litiga- 
tion and stabilize insurance premiums, they 
will provide an effective model for other states. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR MARCH 14 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: British Railways Bank on Coal 

LONDON — Compared with previous weeks, 
the market in British railway snares has been a 
centre of some interest. To begin with, there 
was the setback caused by the fear of a great 
coal strike in South Wales,' but later there came 
a fairly good recoven', taking into consider- 
ation the fact that the state of the coal trade is 
so unsatisfactory and that there still remains 
the danger of a big strike. However, as none 
of the matters at issue is of such a nature 
as to make a strike necessary, and as a satis- 
factory settlement may reasonably be expect- 
ed, it is pretty generally agreed that, trouble 
out of the way. everything points to an im- 
provement in the British railway market. 


1935: Frenchmen Try American Jazz 
PARIS — American jazz, bom on the Missis- 
sippi, reared in the Southland and sent to 
finishing school in New York, where it got 
smooth and sophisticated under the tutelage of 
George Gershwin, has come into Its, own in 
Paris. Paris has had jazz for a long time but 
until recently it was just a land of haze in the 
wake of American tourists. Frenchmen neither 
tried nor desired to understand it and the very 
suggestion that a Frenchman was going to play 
a saxophone was enough to make a man rise 
and depart for a more peaceful locale. Wander 
around the night dubs of Paris and where you 
found all-American bands four years ago, 
French bands hold forth, and not bad either. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1938-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

Executive Editor RENE BONDY Data y Publisher 

Ediior ALAIN LECO UR Associate Pvbbshc 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate Pub&sher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director td Operations 
Associate EsSur FRANCOIS DESMAISGNS Director c/Qmdaton 


ROLF! 


KRANEPUHL Director of Ad v ertising Sola 

Interna lion*! Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Gunks-de-GauDe, 92200 NauBy-sar-Sdnc, 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Telex: £12718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 

Director de b pubboOwn: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Hennexsy RtL, Bono Kang. TeL 5-283618. Telex 61170. 
MaiagmOr. UK: Rabin MacKkhan. 63 Lang Acre. London Wd TeL 8364*02. Telex 262009. 

SLA. an capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nartierre B 732021 126 Commission Pariudre No. 61337. 

U.S subscription.' 3284 yearly. Seamd-dass postage paid at Long Island City. N.Y. I] 101. 

© J98$, International Herald Tribune. AS rights reserved 




Four Saudi uist Reasons for Washington to Let Up 


N EW YORK — President Rea- 
gan asks the people of the Unit- 
ed States and the UJ5. Congress to 
continue financing the CIA’s coven 
war agains t Nicaragua. He says his 
aim is to bring about a "restructur- 
ing” of our government. Here are 
four reasons why the American peo- 
ple should refuse to comply. 

Firstly, the covert war is illegal. 
The World Court, on May 10. 1984, 
ordered the United States to stop its 
aggression. It cited the charters or the 
United Nations and Organization of 
American Slates, winch prohibit the 
use of force a gains t the territorial 
integrity and political independence 
of another nation. The U.S. adminis- 
tration walked out of the court 
The war cann ot be justified as 
“self-defense." The Reagan adminis- 
tration now admits that its purpose is 
to overthrow our government —not, 
as Congress and the American people 
were told, to interdict an alleged flow 
of aims to Salvadoran rebels. Even 
while it maintained this pretense, the 
White House never produced real ev- 
idence of an arms How — because it 
does not exist The U.S. administra- 
tion knows (his:- If it bad evidence of 
arms trafficking, it would have tried 
to prove it in the World Court 
Why care about international law? 
Because disrespect for law breeds 
chaos. When a powerful oatioa repu- 
diates international law — and its 


By Daniel Ortega Saavedra 

The writer is the president of Nicaragua. 


vote and now hold 35 of 96 seats in 
our legislature: Mr. Reagan predict- 
ably called the election a** sham," but 
hundreds of international observers 
— including private American aca- 
demic and human rights groups — 
cJosdy watched the electoral cam- 
paign. and said that it was fair. 1 
The third reason why Americans 


pended in January *85, we have made 
it dear that we are willing to address 


American concerns. We have repeat- 

mifilar y 


ed that we want no foreign military 
bases on our soil that we would agree 
with our neighbors to a reasonable 
balance of aimed forces and arma- 
ments in Central America and to the 
removal of aO foreign military advis- 


I he problem is not forcing Nicaragua to negotiate 
but persuading the United States to negotiate. 


should reject the plea for more funds 
Nicaraguan rebels is that the 


to aid 

covert war is futile and unnecessary, 
in more than four years of fighting, 
and despite more than $100 million 
in American aid, the “contras" have 
failed, to capture or hold any Nicara- 


guan territory. Tliere is only one ex- 
3: They have no popular 


planation: 
support As an artificially maintaine d 
force, they would cease to exist when 


ers. We will never be an aggressor 
nation. Our arms are defensive. 

One pretext for the coven war is 
the supposed need to force Nicaragua 

to the negotiating table. However, as 
Representative Michael Barnes, 
Democrat of Maryland, has said, 
Nicaragua already is there. Nicara- 


gua is fully committed to a political 
solution. Nil 


Washington ended its support. 

T or Washington 


highest symbol, the World Court —it 
threatens the entire legal order' and 


There is no reason for ’ 
to continue tins support. Nicaragua 
represents no threat to any of its 
.legitimate security interests in Cen- 
tral America. In the Contadora pro- 
cess and at talks at Manzanillo, Mex- 
ico. begun in June 1984 but sus- 


firaragna alone accepted 
the September 1984 proposal of the 
Contadora countries — Colombia, 
Mexico, Panama and Venezuela. 
America sabotaged the accord by 
pressing its Central American allies 
not to accept America, not Nicara- 
gua, broke off the Manzanillo talks. 

The problem is not forcing Nicara- 
gua to negotiate: It is persuading 


sets a dangerous precedent 
The second reason is that the co- 
vert war is immoraL This war is di- 
rected against Nicaraguan civilians, 
not our military. The ‘'contras’’ pene- 
trate our territory from bases in Hon- 
duras and Costa Rica to murder, tor- 


How Pressure on the Sandinists Can Help 

By Susan K. Purcell 


tune, and kidnap women, men and 
children. They-blo 
food 


low up farms, health 
centers, food depots and schools. 
Thousands of caymans have perished, 
while damage to our economy is in 
the hundreds of millions of dollars. 

Mr, Reagan calls these terrorists 
“freedom fighters." Hi s administra- 
tion tries to cover up their atrocities, 
dismissing them as oandinisi propa- 
ganda." But reports of “contra'’ 
atrocities, published last week by 
U.S. human rights organizations, re- 
veal the truth to the American peo- 
ple. who are financing these crimes. 

The “contras" are led by ex-offi- 
cers of the bated National Gu 


juarvi, the 


main prop of the Somoza dicta tor- 
i that brutally i 


ship that brutally oppressed our peo- 
ple for more than four decades until 
our Sandinist revolution in 1979. 

It is immoral and contrary to 
American values for the U.S. admin- 
istration to attempt to impose a new 
government on Nicaragua. Our gov- 
ernment was elected Nov. 4, 1984, in 
the freest, fairest elections in Nicara- 
gua's history. More than 1.1 million 
people voted (75.4 percent of those 
registered) and seven political parties 
participated. The opposition parties 
received more than 33 percent of the 


N EW YORK — There is a wide- 
spread perception that pressure 
on the Sandmists — including sup- 
port for the “contras" — undermines 
the Contadora countries' effort to 
promote peace in Central America. 
In fact the opposite is erne. 

Without such pressure, U.S. securi- 
ty interests are sure to be ignored. 
With it, they are more likely to be 
reflected in talks that could lead to an 
acceptable negotiated settlement. 

Consider the Nicaraguans’ reac- 
tion to Mr. Reagan's recent comment 
on the need to remove the Sandinist 
government in “its present struc- 
ture”: Within days, President Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra announced an “in- 
definite moratorium" on the acquisi- 
tion of arms and said his government 
would send home 100 Cuban military 
advisers. He promised “some initia- 
tives in favor of the Contadora peace 
process,” directed by Mexico, Vene- 
zuela. Colombia and Panama. 

Ibis could be an important chang e 
in the Sandinist position. In Septem- 
ber 1984, Managua accepted a draft 
of a Contadora treaty that called far 
an end to support for subversion 
across borders, the elimination of for- 
eign troops and advisers from the 
region, limits on the size of Central 
American military establishments 
and support for political pluralism. 


America criticized the treaty — and 
rightly so— for failing to provide for 
adequate verification and implemen- 
tation of its measures. 

Critics ri aim ed that W ashingto n 
itself bad the technology necessary to 
monitor events in Central America — 
and that it was evidently trying to 
undermine the Contadora process. 
Both points are debatable, but beside 
the point Washington is right to wor- 
ry about compliance by the nondem- 
ocratic governments of Nicaragua 
and Cuba and should not assume sole 
responsibility for monitoring a multi- 
lateral treaty — particularly in Latin 
America, where America is mistrust- 
ed and criticized for intervention. 

The Nicaraguans accepted the 
draft treaty on condition that it not 
be changed. The other Central Amer- 
ican countries, backed by Washing- 
ton, refused to sign. With United 
States help, they drafted their own 
treaty, which seemed to both Nicara- 
gua and Contadora countries to favor 
Washington’s interests. The result 
was a stalemate, broken finally by 
Mr. Ortega’s announcement. 

The connection between U.S. pres- 


Contadora countries began their ef- 
forts in January 1983. Their initial 
emphasis was on potential United 
States aggression, and it was not until 
Washington increased its military 
presence in the region by military 
maneuvers in mid- 1983 that they be- 
gan to show any concern for Cuban 
and Nicaraguan behavior. 

Critics of the U.S. administration 
argue that it hopes to overthrow the 
Sandinists, not settle with them — 
and that it prefers that the Contadora 
negotiations be stalemated. There is 
some truth to this argument. But the 
a dminis tration is si gnifican tly divid- 
ed over how to deaf with Nicaragua. 

Some officials believe the Sandin- 
ists cannot be trusted to abide by a 
negotiated settlement. These officials 
may indeed be using their professed 
support for Contadora as a cover for 


a policy that they believe can over- 
throw me “ 


sure and progress toward an aocept- 
incetbe 


able treaty bis been evident since i 


Beware , Ignorant Geniuses at Work 

N EW YORK — Technological 
genius is one of the glories of 


By Tom Wicker 


mankind. It has subdued geography 
with flight through the air, expand- 
ed the limits of human skill with the 
computer, made it possible via sat- 
ellites for comfortable Westerners 
to watch Ethiopians starve. 

But proud man is far less able to 
predict or control the consequences 
of his own genius. Therein lies the 
tragic irony of his plight 

The computer, with its chip for a 
brain, can mistakenly order weap- 
ons launched. Flight, manned or 
ballistic, may then be the screaming 
bearer of its designers' extinction. 

Half a century ago, no one calcu- 
lated that the success of the am bi- 


outlet through which it can run off 
to the sea. So the trapped poisons 
are making the soil barren a gain. 

If a workable drainage pipeline 
or canal could be buflt, at enormous 
expense, it would be opposed by 
coastal communities and have its 


Man seems fated by 
the Everest syndrome 
todimbmost 
technological peaks. 


tious Central Valley Project in Cali- 
lia bore within it the 


fonua bore within it die seed of 
its own futility. The 270-mile-Ic 
(430-kilometer) Central Va 
been a desert; the vast irrigation 
system, bringing water from distant 
mountains, turned it into a garden 
spot. So the valley has been a prin- 
cipal source of America's Fruit, veg- 
etables and fiber — a mainstay of 
the good life. But that hidden seed 
is all the time bearing disastrous 
progeny, salty, chemically polluted, 
unwanted water that threatens to 
make the valley a desert again. 

The irrigation water picks up salt 
and toxic chemicals from valley soil 
that was once an ocean bed. A hard 
layer of clay just beneath the sur- 
face keeps this polluted water from 
percolating harmlessly down into 
the earth; and there is no natural 


own environmental consequences. 
Alternatively, stopping the inflow 
of irrigation water would also re- 
claim the valley for the desert. 

Man does not always rush into 
the technological unknown. Hot 
ideas such as diverting the Yukon 
and Fraser rivers from Alaska into 
the Weston states, or exploding a 
nuclear device on the moon to find 
out what is inside it, have so far 
been fended off. But man seems 
fated by the Everest syndrome to 
climb most technological peaks be- 
cause they are there, despite his 
mortal inability to predict what he 
may find at the summi t. 

jh iheyears since World War IT 
a beneficial revolution in farm pro- 
duction has resulted in the poison- 
ing of lakes and streams by agri- 


cultural chemicals. America's in- 
dustrial might includes power 
plants and factories emitting huge 
quantities of sulfur dioxide and ox- 
ides of nitrogen; in the atmosphere 
they combine with water vapor to 
shower the earth with an “acid 
rain" that- is almost certainly the 
cause of dying forests and streams 
in the U.S. Northeast and Canada. 

Earlier, the plough that broke the 
plains in the American West soon 
resulted in the Dust Bowl of the 
'30s — from which' not a few 
“Okies” fled to the Central Valley 
of California. Now the Great Plains 
have been farmed for years with 
irrigation -water from the undedy- 
ing OgaRgla Aquifer — which wifi 
run dry by about the year 2000, 
probably creating a new and per- 
haps worse DustBowl. ‘ 

The world's profligate burning of 
fossil fuels — coal; (til and natural 
gas — is releasing so much carbon 
dioxide into the atmosphere that a 
greenhouse effect could produce a 
dramatic and disastrous warming 
of Earth. Some scientists warn that 
in the next century the polar ice 
raps could melt, with the oceans 
rising and coastal cities flooded. 

President Reagan has declared 
an ultimate goal of “complete elim- 
ination of nudear weapons.” The 
tragedy is that for more than 40 
years the United States, in particu- 
lar. has been devoting some of its 
finest minds and best resources to 
buDding those weapons. • 

The New York Tuna. 


Sandinists. Others believe 
that a negotiated settlement is both 
posable and preferable, provided the 
treaty is subject to adequate verifica- 
tion and based on all 21 points pro- 
posed by Contadora — including po- 
litical liberalization that would “alter 
the structure" of the Sandinist gov- 
ernment without overthrowing it 
These supporters of a negotiated 
settlement may be a minority and 
may need allies — those critics of 
U.S. administration polity who also 

advocate a negotiated settlement. 
There are good arguments against 
supporting the guerrillas. But the 
critics too should nave an interest in a 
good treaty —based on the 2 1 points 
with adequate provisions for verifica- 
tion and implementation — 
should think twice before 
any United States policies that < 
help produce such an accord. 


and 


The writer directs the Latin American 
profftm at the Council on Foreign Rela- 
tions, an indepaukrti orgtgiizatian of 
Americans interested in lipbmay. She 
contributed this to The New York'Ttmes. 


Old Virtues 


Survive 
In Britain 




....park Ot 


h 


By Michael Getler 

L ONDON — Out of aQ the hanJ- 
j ships and hatreds spawned by 
the yearlong coal miners' strike that 
ended March 3 ; emerges something 
oddly reassuring about Britain. 

It is not so much that a strike led 
by a Marxist union chief, Arthur 
ScargjU, has been defeated, although 
most Britons seem relieved that it 
failed. “SrargUtism" came to stand in , 
many minds for the vanguard of a > 1 "‘ 
revolutionary political effort aimed 
at overturning the Conservative gov- 
ernment of Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher and defeating her enthusi- 
asm for a revival of capitalism. 

Rather, it is a sense that old virtues 
of tenacity, loyalty, dedication to col- 


i 

emiiMh' 
■ •**. & * 

^ t 


. . * 


* • 

. L.'r TV* A 

. i *m 

J#*'' 

, **» « 


r* .an* 41 


leagues and community and plain 
1 admired nere. 


Washington to negotiate with .Nica- 
ragua, and to give more than lip ser- 
vice to the Contadora process. 

The fourth reason for stopping aid 
to the “contras" is that the covert war 
is counterproductive. If Mr. Reagan 
really wants us to reduce the size of 
our army, stop acquiring arms and 
send home foreign military advisers, 
he should end his covert war and his 
unprecedented military buildup in 
Honduras. If there were no war 
against us, we would enthusiastically 
divert manpower and' resources, now 
consumed by defense .requirements, 
to economic and social development 

The U.S. administration complains 
that we obtain arms From soaatist 
countries, but Washington makes 
this necessary. Are we not entitled to 
obtain arms to defend ourselves? 
Washington has pressed its allies not 
to sell arms to us. 

Mr. Reagan calls us “totalitarian" 
because we imposed a state of emer- 
gency that restricts certain rights, in- 
cluding press freedom with regard to 
military and security matters. The 
state of emergency was imposed in 
1982 in direct response to the covert 
war. If Mr. Reagan really wants the 
fall restoration of political and dvil 
rights, he need only stop the war. 

We seek peace with dignity from 
the United States. Despite the crimes 
committed against us, we extend our 
hand in friendship. 

The New York Tunes. 


toughness are alive arid ; 

Whatever the long-term political 
and economic implications of this ex- 
traordinary dash, it seems chat the 
vast majority of Britain's 186,000 
coal miners — including those who 
struck and endured extreme financial 
hardship and those who kepi working 
and endured sometimes fearsome in- 
timidation — acted with a brand of 
personal courage that has oftra dis- 
tinguished Britain in trying times. 

The National Union of Mine- 
workers has suffered what appears to 
be a severe defeat. The idea that this 
once all-powerful union could never - 
be successfully faced down by a 
tough government has been laid to 
resL And yet the mystique of the 
mineworker remains. It may even 
have been strengthened. 

There were lumps in more than one - 
throat around Britain as television, 
recorded scene after scene of miners, 
arms locked together, parading back - 
to their coal pits behind off-key col- 
liery brass bands and battered local - 
union banners after the union's deri- 
sion to go back without a settlement. - 
In a way it seemed pathetic. Him-' 
dreds of men in dozens of mining 
villages gathering in the pre-dawn 




.1 

. *r ; - mm I 
■ *<&#« 
• *-wiV* 

;?** m 

. •* tb« 1 
y 

w 4 

, juCtVl 
* i «•***■! 


M. « 
wi>S l«i 
. -. a wAjM! 
_• . ' -S#f 



l or A 


darkness, their lunch in plastic shop-. . 
ping hags, and then marching back to - 
work, cheering and chanting slogans 


Peering and chanting slogans 
as if they had won a victory. 

Said one miner, with typical Welsh 
eloquence, “We may nave lost a ' 
year's pay but we’ve retained the" 
things that matter most in these vaT' 
leys — our dignity and self-respect"' 
The strike spawned violence that • 
jolted much of more comfortable ' 
Britain; there was arson, assault, van- 
dalism, even a murder. The violence - 
often overshadowed the personal suf- " - 
feting. It may also have produced ' 
cadre of future young radicals whe 
will come bock to haunt another gov- — 
eminent on other picket lines. 

The vanguard of the most mflitam 1 - - 
backers of Arthur ScargiU thai- 
manned the picket lines was sizabk . 


•r I 

.v 'ft! 

- ■ 


: -it Mdh 

r -*• V 




■ --i *dl 

ft 


and undoubtedly helped mtintidaU- 
who might 


some miners who might otberwis . . 
have gone back to work. But it cannot! " 
fully explain why more than 12Q.00C 
stayed away, with no strike pay front 
their union, having to subsist on per " 
haps $25 a week, plus food handouts 
for a year in many cases. - V 
Essentially the strike was an effaik. 


St 




v -ret i 

M' Ml 


to postpone the inevitable and pre- 
serve a way of life. Most Britoot 
understand that coal pits that requirr 
huge taxpayer subsidies and operate; 
at a big loss have to close in favor d, 
ones that can make a profit and com-, 
pete in the marketplace. But dosing e 
pit means dosing a community, anc 
there are important social costs. _ i 
Britons are not as mobile as Amen- 


to go to. and there is nobody to buy- ± K < 
their homes if they leave. The nnnin^Jte' 
communities are tightly knit, some 
what insular, centered around nun- _ 
ers’ welfare clubs, the local pubs, tlx* ~ 


bands, banners, sports dubs and cefc^ 
turies-old tradition and comradeship 


anyi 

their children to become something 
else, but many in Britain struck sc 
that their children and grandchildren; 
could work in the mines. They wsrc> 


they said, “fighting for our class/ 


i some ways tins was a strike iba, 
did not seem to make sense. It waA 
called in March, with spring ap| 
preaching, when cool stockpiles wexri » 
rail at electric power plants. Record 
13-percent unemployment made i 


employment 

unlikely that other unions woukj I p 
walk out to support the miners. ' - 

Most important, it began with . 
fatal mistake. Mr. Scargili ordered f . ■ j 
nationwide strike without a nation'’--. 
wide ballot of the union’s members. , p ^ 
One result was that some 45J30T; 
miners in Nottinghamshire 
against what they saw as infringe 
l rule 


ment of union rules and democracy 
They kept on working, riding buses , 
with steel grates on the window: /; 
through fierce picket lines and fre 
queut threats against their lives, fam 
dies and homes. Here, too, wascour 
age of which Britons could be proud 
The Washington Post. 



> ! 


t ‘ 


t,( 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Two Mandates at Odds 

Imperial 


! •••-at* v*t 

• • --••• t>*i 
••• '-*■+ 


R 

and 


g the editorial 
Sflffioasr” (Feb. 25 ): 

Thank you for injecting some com- 
mon sense into me debate on the 
growing conflict between Nicaragua 
and the United States. If memory 
serves, most Nicaraguans voted in the 
November elections and most of 
those who did so voted for the San- 
dinists. This would appear to be a 
stronger mandate to govern than 
even that received by Mr. Reagan. 

I would suggest drat not only were 
the Nicaraguan elections honest, as 
attested by teams of international ob- 
servers. but that no “tyranny” would 
wish to arm its entire population. 

P. McNOLL 
Fribourg, Switzerland. 


Chile. Ask Nicaraguans if they an 
better off now than under Somoza. . 

T. ROBERGE 
Paris. • 


*"■= - -'■"■I 


Uniforms Underground 


The report “Subway Security 
How Some Cities Fare"’ (March 6 


President Reagan rails the govern- 
ment of Nicaragua “repressive, to- 
talitarian and cruel," while be not 
only remains silent but supports the 
reign of terror and state of siege in 


speaks of a “heavy presence of pa 
trolling militiamen" in the Moscow 
metro. There definitely is not I an 
certain that you can count man. 
more policemen per number of pas 
sengers in the New York subway oru 
our own mini-subway in Ams tertian 
The confusion may stem from th 
fact that the Soviet street scene show 
man y more uniformed people than r 
the West. Most of them are associai 
ed with the Soviet military or th 
Ministry of Internal Affairs. The] 

too. take the subway. Rarely does on 
see patrolling militiam en in a Mot - 
cow subway station or car. 

JOHN LOWENHARDT. ■ 
Amsterdam- 


' •*-- £* 

• tVea 




■ !• -IllJ 


• t.- ; j , 
■i \ : ; 




r • t V 




S '1 -lM. 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


Page 7 


/ . 


^Giorgio Armani Adapts 
| n Sporty Daytime Line 

Vor After-Dark Glitter 


'Up 



is? 

tr,> 


if ^v:/( V.,: 

* '-*>*. ■ vy •. j 

«r?»'rvA 

1 i. ».< :* «• ;.J 

Mr . 

* rtu- *:>• >-■ 

5*1* 

t dl.-H-’ V 
s .*, 
HIVC 7*:- a,- 

-i 

k’STO ;..-v 

|npk\>)>>i> *• , 
■W uVr^'*.-: .• 
tMW y't-a':' - 
P*f. -Jir- 
ai fninw,' :, • 
i 

rlt >■•• 

iTTfcii #•;•*•. 

srtr.rf I; 1 -*. 

A *. 

(IK f**.*'!; i- 
Mini *V 
KtftVW*-* 

tit ife* .. .v : 
k 

jH A*: ■ . 


»«■*» * • 
♦tn?**? 


> 


■t& ■'*«.• 

fef •• 

-*1 » V.. 

it **»« -.v--- 
* ’ r -" “ 

i* »K •• >• 

if* * •,*■» 

.<#»**• 

iM*- 

a i*w • 

f ?Hf:. "• 
V». ?• 


f, ■ /«"»* 
r ,.\t i !.s 

T '«l" 

»» *V- •»-•«■ 
4 I* •■- 
*1 *, trf- v ■ t '-- 
. ; 
V- .’ 
i > ■■ • 
J: ' •:* 
* l,; 7 ” 
*# 1 

■N j* r 1 -•■ 

* ^e>- ■ r- • 

rr**- . .< 
i- 

• l 

- - «r«.‘ • 

W*'** 4 


if* ^ : 



V By Hebe Doist 

1 InScmattonal Herald Tri 

MILAN — Giorgio Armanfs 
- Election shown Tuesday evening 
' -as a knockout — one of the best 
i years and the Idiid that will make 
s mark on the Milan season. 

This Italian designer, whose 
- . une started with a simple bat su- 
*' erbly tailored blazer, has now 
. ranched out into evening wear as 
ell, and for the first time he has 
• .it it right, as -borne out by his 

MILAN FASHIONS 

- Election shown Tuesday evening. 
The Armani woman, is gping to 

. . >ve all the Armani offerings for 
vening. Very single, really, they 
■ -■ •ere straight translations of his 
3orty daytime shapes into evening 
litter. For once, Armani, who has 
..ften tried his hand at evening wear 
; ut flopped, has given np gimmiefc- 

- . Instead, he has drawn on his 
. eerless taflor's talent. And Lhe 
une look ran through the whole 
. Election, giving it backbone and 
-..uihorily. • 

. Anybody who fretted that Ar- 

• uni’s tailored look might have 
.. one sterile need worry no longer. 

* le had enough variations to please 

. .vcn the most difficult customer. 

.. If anybody can handle the an- 
togynoos lode, Ar mani can. De- 
dte the pants and square-shonl- 
ered jackets, the general effect is 
. . rft and tender. This is achieved 
-V !' ith delicate silk blouses, in exqui- 
te prints, soft colors — a pink and 
_ Tay tweed jacket, for example — 
!.;nd fluid pants. Showing 
. loulders, Armani had 
ecklines and pure, uncluttered 
nes. 

' - Jackets ranged from hip-length 
•hh as many as four pockets to 
; icit and curving around the waist 
abrics were of his own design, 
ith the same eye for refined pat- 

- ms and color combinations. Big 
Mts, with back bdts, were either 
■iade of tweed or menswear fabrics 

• ich as whipcord and worsted, and 

* ften worn over ski pants. 

In Milan, where designers tend 
> go overboard with flashy effects, 
xmani stands out ior ms great 
mse of restrainL IBs models, well 
•• 1 roomed but natural, were exactly 
‘ le kind one should take home to 
- wther. All thisis paying off! 

A spokeswoman revealed thai in 1 
976, when Armani started, the 
usiness turnover was 10 billion 
-re. In 1981, it had jumped to 100 

•11 Die in Brazfl Jailbreak 

United Press IntemaaonoJ 

SAO PAULO — Guards at a S§o 
hulo suburban prison shofand' 
tiled 11 inmates armed with 
omemade knives who tried to es- 
ape Wednesday, officials said, 
our convicts got away. 


billion and in 1984 to 240 billion 
(about 5120 milfioa). 

The Genny collection, desig n^ 
by the prolific Gianni Versace, is 
another success stay. It really 
boiled down to a ampler, cleaner 
Versace collection — full erf the 
same ideas but more understand- . 
able and commerdaL 

The key point was the rounded, 
three-quarter coat which was 
shown in gray flannel, black shearl- 
ing, purple wool and mauve fox. It 
looked equally good an short skirts 
and -pants but did not quite work 
out with mid-calf skirts. 

This is a season of glitter for 
Milan and the opening tnhi«n 
with gold and blue lamfe scarves 
over tailored suits, set the tone. 
This was followed into evening 
with xnQes and miles of gold lamA 

There were also rivers of silver 
sequins including skintight skirts 
topped by loose, Triads satin shirts. 

Gigi Monti, an entrepreneur who 
backs fjidano Soprani, said the 
other night that the marg i n of cre- 
ativity in Milan is limited because 
designers work dosdy with manu- 
facturers. This could not be more 
accurate in the case oT Soprani, 
who is constantly — but only gent- 
ly — held in check by the man who 
holds the purse strings. The result 
was good quality but no ad venture. 
The look closely followed last sea- 
son’s hits, very handy for the many 
women Who warn, fashion without 
risks. 

The Milan collections end 
Thursday, with London taking over 
during the weekend and Paris com- 
ing up after that. 



ChorfaGw* 


An evening dress from Giorgio Armanfs Milan coHectfon. 


Reagan to Pressure Congress Anew 
For Aid to Guerrillas in Nicaragua 


By Joanne Omang 

Washington Post Sendee 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 

flriminis tnilymj discarding the inrii- 

siden^^dedded to makea ma- 
jor new i 

to approve fimds for anii- 
guemllas in Nicaragua. 

The administration has consid- 
ered and apparently, rqected, at 
least for now, several alternatives 
to the funding. These include using 
U.S. allies in Latin America or Aria 
as conduits for rebel aid, the possi- 
ble suspension erf US. relations 
with Nicaragua, and recognition of 
a rebel government outride the 
country. 

Senior administration officials 
said last week that the stakes of 
U5. credibility and national inter- 
est have grown high enough to con- 
stitute what one adled “a fine in the 
dost” that Mr. Reagan can draw to 


)OONESBURY 



^ WMBBTlOl /Wtm 

weorem- sane, 
omce! 

FOR-mCHCRUS? 



■advertxsement- 


" POSH ” VERSUS “GOSH* 



■- 


;.«r '.f . 

*f ;i - ‘ 5 
■,fa 

* Vb> 
hf. ■ 

\ 

> *rs, 
w 1 * 


if i- 

sf*«; 


i tt: 


1 


TO THE EDITOR OF THE TRIBUNE. 

Sir, — The origin of the acronym POSH is widely known. 

Coined by the Victorians from the initials of the phrase 
'Pori Out, starboard Home ' it got its present meaning from 
the fact that these were the cooler and more comfortable — 
hence more select — sides of the ship on which to travel 
to and from India. 

However 1 have long felt there was something amiss 
with this sentiment. 

It seemed to me that no true Victorian gentleman or 
lady would ever feel entirely at home aboard a ship that 
only served port as a refreshment. Especially when that 
ship was bound for the land of quinine and tonic water. 

So backing my Hun ch, I have spent many years research- 
ing intensely into that era. 

I am now pleased to be able to publish the results of 
my enquiries. 

It is apparent that shortly after the discovery of Bombay, 
POSH was superseded by GOSH, as in 'Gosh, I could do 
with a drink!’ or 'Gosh ! That's smooth!’ 

Perhaps I should make clear that the BOMBAY I am 
referring to is, of course, the GIN. 

It is a particularly fine gin with a deli- 
cate bouquet that is imparted by the 
*botanicals' used in its manufacture. 

As it is claimed, it is indeed BOMBA Y 
, GIN's unique distillation that keeps one 
amused. 

And that may explain the origin of 
GOSH. It stands for "‘Gin Out, Starry-eyed 
Home.“ 

Dr. Hilary Snell *** vac.. 

Theodolite College. -Oxford. 



find out who stands with him and 
who does not 

They said the president would 
spearhead a major “public educa- 
tion" effort To pressure Congress to 
provide S14 Milli on for the Central 
Intelligence Agency to keep the 
guerrillas supplied. 

“Now it's just a question of tim- 
ing,' 1 a State Department official 
said. 

Much is at stake. Terms of the 
debate were set in last year’s feder- 
al budget resolution, which banned 
aid to the guerrillas unless Mr. Rea- 
gan reported it was necessary and 
then gained the approval of both 
chambers of Congress. Once the 
president's report is submitted, 
votes follow automatically after 15 
days, with no amendments al- 
lowed' 

To lose a head-on confrontation 
after picking the date for it would 
be a serious embarrassment and 
Mr. Reagan’s first major congres- 
sional defeat iii foreign policy. 

Guerrilla spokesmen say the 
ueed for funds is urgent. The final 
CIA payments went out in May. 
the last of about 580 million that 
built the rebels bum a band of 
about 200 in 1981 to an estimated 
14,000 trained fighters. 

Enrique Bermudez, mill' 
commander of the largest 
group, the Nicaraguan Democratic 
Force, said last week that “the psy- 
chological and political effect” of 
renewed congressional 
would be critical to the gui 
private fund-raising effort. 

“Then other friends of our cause 
will support us also,” he said. 

As far as has been determined, 
the guerrillas have been operating 
on private donations. 

But that flow will falter if Con- 
gress blocks funds because the rest 
of the world will see it “as a signal 
that the United States is withdraw- 
ing from Nicaragua,” Mr. Bennfi- supposed ujgp around us and con- 
dez said. tmue the pahey." 

In addition, Nicaraguan govern- — - 
ment forces are reported to be jjjre- 

{jorder meursiercis ^^eguerrillas, 
who operate from biases in Hondu- 
ras ana Costa Rica. 

Mr. Reagan has given emotional 
endorsements to the rebels at least 
nine tunes over the past two weeks, 
calling them “our brothers' 1 and 
the “moral equivalent of the 
Founding Fathers” and urging 
Congress to support their drive far 
a democratic Nicaragua. 

There has been little visible re- 
sponse on Capitol Hill, where crit- 
ics complained that the administra- 
tion has not tried seriously to 
negotiate a settlement with Nicara- 
gua, either bilaterally or through 
multinational efforts such as the 
Contadora talks started by Mexico, 

Panama, Venezuela and Colombia. 

Congress has refused four times 
to give further aid to the guerrillas, 
finding that the three-year LLS. aid 
program is illegal ami the rebels' 
campaign brutal and counterpro- 
ductive. 

Faced with a margin of 50 to 60 
negative votes in the House of Rep- 
resentatives and hostile leadership 
in the cmtial Senate Select Com- 


mittee on Intelligence, where the 
funds must originate, the White 
House cast about for two months 
or so for alternatives to cougressio- 
nally approved funding, but found 
nothing workable. 

On Friday, a White House legis- 
lative strategy session formalized 
the decision to abandon, at least for 
now, the creative financing ideas 
that surfaced recently as possible 
ways around congressional objec- 
tions to not-so-secret CIA involve- 
ment with the guerrillas- 

Curtin Winsor Jr, the LLS. am- 
bassador to Costa Rica, had 
pushed informally for a suspension 
or a break in LLS. relations with 
Nicaragua, aigumg that such ac- 
tion would allow controls oo U S 
merchants who now provide Nica- 
ragua with about 60 percent of its 
foreign trade. 

It also would pave the way for 
recognition erf an alternative rebel 
government, perhaps in Costa 
Rica, that then could receive UJL 
aid openly. 

But the idea foundered on mis- 
givings by Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz about the prece- 
dent u would set and the inability 
of Nicaraguan guerrilla factions to 
work cooperatively. 

Robert C McFariane, Mr. Rea- 
gan’s national security affairs ad- 
viser, is reported to have suggested 
that funds could be moveato the 
rebels through US. allies in Asia, 
disguised as additional foreign aid. 
Other officials proposed ymilar 
phony aid grants to Honduras or 
Costa Rica under unwritten “gen- 
tlemen’s agreements” that the 
funds would be passed to the re- 
bels. 

But members of Congress react- 
ed strongly against the idea. “Once 
we vote against something," a se- 
nior House Appropriations Com- 
mittee official said, “they’re not 


Bolivian Strikers 
Move to Block 
Food Supplies 

Agenct France-Pnsse 

LA PAZ — Farm workers have 
begun blocking Bolivia's roads to 
stop food delivery to cities, their 
iiniftrt has announced, saying the 
move began Tuesday cm the fifth 
day of an unlimited general strike 
against the government of Presi- 
dent Hernia Sfles Zaazo. 

The powerful leftist Central 
Workers' Confederation is de- 
manding the president’s resigna- 
tion because of the country’s run- 
away inflation. Prices rose 2,700 
percent last year. 

■The general strike is intended to 
obtain - an escalating minim um 
wage to keep pace with inflation. 
Other demands include stopping 
payment of the foreign debt and 
nationalizing banks and trade. 

Police moved into Bolivia's cen- 
tral bank Tuesday to keep its staff 
from paying salaries to striking 
state employees. 


SK/ 

ICHA NNE L 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE &THE UK. VIA SATHJJTE 

“Europe's Best View" 


PROGRAM, THURSDAY 1«h MARCH UK TIMES 


FAMILY 
STAR FLEET 
SKYTHAXl 
SKYTRAX2 
IB. 30 SKY7RAX3 
17.30 MR ED 


1335 
M 30 
1500 
1545 


1800 THE LUCY SHOW 
mao CHARLIE'S ANGELS 
lfl.20 SKYWAYS 
20.10 THE UNTOUCHABLES 
2105 FUJI DOUBLES TENNIS 
22.00 SKYTRAX 


SKY CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING S&i5 PRODUCTS FAST- FOR MORE IStfORMAnCN, 
RATE5.MARKETNG A AUDCNCE DAA CONJACT THE 5ALE5 D£WRTMENT. 

SKY CHANN0L, SWaUTE T&EVtSON Pl£ 7U : LOWXJN (m) 636 4OT TELEX 2E6943 


Turkey’s Ozal Calls On Papandreou 
To Meet Him ’Anywhere, Anytime’ 


By Henry 

eric Tin 


Kamm 

Imo Service 


cated that originally Mr. Ozal had Senior Foreign Ministry offi cials 

New Yoffe Times Service planned Vo make a conciliatory ges- used strong lan g na g p in wa rning 

ANKARA — Turkey’s prime hire Tuesday to encourage Greece Greece against measures in the Ae- 
minister has called on his Greek f° negotiate. He refrained, accord- gean that would make the sea in 
counterpart to meet with him “any- “E to the officials, because such a effect a Greek lake 
where, anytime" to discuss the is- Suture, after Mr. Papandreou’s Turkey would consider action bv 

sues dividing their two nations. move Sator^yibni led to the resg- GrercewSwnSwSSw- 

. ..T propose here and oowto the nation of President Constantine 
Greek leadership to proceed to Caramanlis, would have been det 
comprehensive negotiations,” nounced in Athens as Turkish in- 
Prime Minister Turgui Ozal said terference in a volatile internal $itu- 
Tucsday. “We are ready to partid- ation. 
pate in such negotiations any- ^ Ozai, Foreign Minister Va- 
and at any lev* ^ Ha J^ u ^roS^dals 

tL T«rWch * ,! expressed concern in conversations 

r A~% Tnrb “ Ieade * appeal- ^ over Mr. Caiamanlis’s resignation, 
foil Fw such a amferme^oc- ^ ^ United Suues anfwest- 
onred at a luncheon to which he ^ £^0^ county Turkey 

^asideredthe former prcsidmtro 
m Athens. He attached so much ^ ^ what it 


lets based 
.. so much 

Mf. fepraWs I«li- conoani daogpr of armed incidents 

immediately for the airport to fly to 


ters or assert claims to the conti- 
nental shelf as cause for war, the 
officials said. 

Greece has not formally made 
such claims but has consistently 
contended that it has the right to do 
so. 

Turkish officials said that in view 
of their heavy military superiority 
they did not fear a Greek attack. 
But they said they were worried 
that the disputes over territorial 
waters and airspace contained a 



calism. 


that might get out of control. 


Tin-gut Ozal 


Moscow fix- the funeral of 
stan tin U. Chernenko. 

Mr. Ozal also condemned what 
he said was Bulgaria’s campaign 
against its Turkish minority. Tur- 
key's Communist ndehbor is ra- 
in a drive to force ethnic 


Turks, dose to one million in num- 
ber; to “change their Islamic Turk- 
ish names to Christian Bulgarian 
names." the prime minister said. 

“This is not acceptable,” he add- 
ed, saying that Turkey had not re- 
ceived satisfactory answers to sev- 
eral complaints. 

If no guarantees erf minority 
rights can be obtained, Mr. Ozal 
said, Turkey is ready to accept 
them, “whether it’s one million or 
more." 

[A Bulgarian official ruled out 
discussion with Ankara on allow- 
ing the Turkish minority to emi- 
grate, Yugoslavia’s Tanjug press 
agency reported Wednesday from 
Sofia, according to The Associated 
Press. 

[“There is and there will be no 
emigration of Bulgarian citizens to 
Turkey," said Dimiter Stanishev, a 
Central Committee secretary of 
Bulgaria's Communist Party.] 

The principal objective of the 
Ozal meeting was to make Turkey's 
case against Greece. Turks fed 
frustrated by what they believe is a 
general Western bias in favor of 
Greece and the frequency with 
winch Andreas Papandreou, the 
Greek prime minister, has succeed- 
ed in publicizing his accusations 
against Turkey, while Ankara's 
side gels little hearing.. 

In a series of briefings by senior 
officials, as well as Mr. QzaTs 
speech and replies to questions, 
Turkey defended itself against 
Greek accusations that it threat- 
ened Greek islands in the Aegean 
Sea and accused Mr. Papandreou 
of breaking off even such low-level 
negotiations as were under way 
whra he took office in 1981. 

Foreign Ministry sources indi- 



In Jakarta 

there's a superb hotel 
that is more like a 
luxurious country dub. 

HOTEL BOROBUDUR 
INTER* CONTTENTENriAL 





THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 

•> INTER-CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

Jalan Lapangan Banteng Selatan, (P.Q Box 329), 370106, Telex: 44156 
For reservations call: Hong Kong: 5-8440311/3, 

Tokyo: 2150777, Singapore: 2202476, Osaka: 2&J0666. 
or call your nearest lnfcer*Continental sales office. 



Before you take off 

on business, make sure 
youVe got everything 


Make sure you've got express check- 
in, a luggage allowance of 30 kilos and 
special lounge facilities. 

Make sure yoi/ve got a 
seat where you want to sit 
(Upstairs if you don't smoke, 
downstairs if you do.). 

And while you’re 
‘ selecting your seat, make 
sure you’ve got the widest 
Business Gass seat in the air. 

Make sure it’s got a generous recline 
and you’ve got the comfort of extra leg 

room. 

Make 
sure you’ve 
got a choice 
of menus, 
and that 
the food is 
served on elegant china with fine cutlery 
and table linen. 

Make sure you’ve got French wine 
and champagne from Moet and Oiandon. 
(Don’t forget the cheese board 
and fruit basket) 

Make sure 

you’ve got a compre- . , , 
hensive selection 
of business reading 
material 




Make sure you’ve got an electronic 
headset and a pair of comfort socks. 

Make sure you’ve got 
someone to fuss over you. 
(Only an airline with one 
cabin attendant for 
every ten passengers 
can mate 
sure 
you’ve 
got that) 

And mate sure you’ve 
got an airline whose route network can 
take you to 40 different destinations 





across, four continents. 

In short, before you take off 
business, make sure you’ve 
got a ticket flying 
Royal Executive Gass 
on Thai. 

And youll know 
you’ve got everything. 





.•WAfcJOJ* 


Smooth as silk. 


* L - 

* *»••" 

t* if** 





Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


El 


M 

Pm 

A!% 


Mrr 

Bn 

Ik 


Ck 

Cm 


Ml 

F, 

fra 


1118 

LM 

UU 


Hk 

OtH 


Fro 

Rat 

«T 

SfR 

HR 

v*« 

Mhn 

ttm 

ter 


Ml 


Ant 

ML 

Oar 

Jan 

TM 

oc 


Am 

in 

t' 

F* 


PHI 


MC 

PAl 

(It 


Of 

lie 


SCIENCE 


Edison’s Papers Reveal He Invented by Analogy 


scope had film that wound back 
and forth on rollers, allowing a 


By William J. Broad 

New York Times Service' 

N EW YORK - Insights into s p mt ° r “JJfT 

the creative genius ofThoraas tough a peephole mtfatop of the 
Alva Eton, onfoTthe most pro- Ituw machine. From this (few 
lific inventors of all time, are 


large 
was but a short s 


from a 20-year, S6-miI- 
iion study of his personal papers. 

The new portrait of Edison is 
marked by ms powerful ability — 
□ever fully recognized until now — 
to reason through analogy. It was 
perhaps this trait more than any 
flashes of brilliance that accounted 
for his great inventiveness. It is 
now thought that this ability is 
what transformed one successful 
invention into another, eventually 
producing the phonograph, the in- 
candescent light bulb, systems of 
electric power generation and mo- 
tion pictures. 

Edison was bora Feb. 11. 1847, 
in Milan, Ohio. He devoted himself 
to the quest for invention while still 
in his 20s. At his death in 1931 he 
left behind more than 3.5 million 
pages of notebooks and letters, 
much or it documenting his 1,093 
patents. No one has ever produced 
more. 

“These documents give you en- 
try into the mind of one of the 
world's most creative people," said 
Dr. Reese V. Jenkins, a historian 
and director of the Thomas A. Edi- 
son Papers at Rutgers Universityin 
New Brunswick, New Jersey. “In 
fact, they tell a lot about (he very 
essence of invention itself." 

Edison’s inventions were often 
much more closely related in their 


tep to 
/ them 


levice it 
motion 


origins than anyone had suspected, 
to clu 


ithered 


according to clues being _ 
by Dr. Jenkins and his colleagues. 
For example, early drawings of tbe 
kinetoscope, a prototype movie 
machine, reveal that it evolved 
from the successful phonograph. 

The First commercial kineto- 


pictures as we know them today. 

Dr. Jenkins and his team discov- 
ered that the device had evolved 
slowly. Tbe dues were found in 
preliminary patents, known as ca- 
veats, Tiled by Edison on the ki- 
netoscope from 1888 to 1889. The 
Hist caveat looked nothing like tbe 
finished machine but showed a cyl- 
inder covered with a spiral of im- 
ages meant to be viewed through an 
eyepiece. The resemblance to Edi- 
son's fust phonograph, made a de- 
cade earlier, was striking. 

Each of the two inventions had 
on axle and a cylinder. Each had an 
instrument (stylus or eyepiece) that 
deciphered a spiral of information 
(grooves for sound, images for pic- 
tures). 

Dr. Jenkins said that no histori- 
an, on the basis of the visual resem- 
blance alone, would suggest that 
Edison had been inspired by Iris 
own earlier woric. But Edison also 
left a written record. The first page 
of Edison's motion picture caveat 
begins: “I am experimenting upon 
an instrument which does for the 
eye what the phonograph does for 
the ear." A few lines later: “The 
invention consists in photograph- 
ing continuously a series of pictures 
. . . in a continuous spiral on a 
cylinder or plate in the same man- 
ner as sound is recorded on the 
phonograph." 

“if we didn't have tbe earliest 
sketches and notes,” Dr. Jenkins 
said, “we wouldn’t be able to see 
the genesis. This is what I mean by 
being able to get into, the creative 
mind, watching it work by analogy 
from one very successful invention 



With the electric light, he tried to 
create a means of controlling the 
amount of current that went into 
the lamp by the samesort of regula- 
tors." 

Eventually, as work progressed, 
Tyilcnn chose i btn carbon filaments 
for his bulbs, their hallmark bang 
very high resistance. After that in- 
sight. all the regulatory apparams 
was abandoned. The end result was 
a simple parallel system that 
looked nothing like what Edison 
started with. 


Bymaking Edison's personal pa- 
pers available I 


U. S. NcttxxJ ft*i S«va 

Edison with wax-cylinder phonograph in 1888. 


to another. Edison didn't ultimate- 
ly solve the problem that way. The 
finished kinetoscope looked very 
different But you can see tbe cre- 
ative process." 

Paul Israel, an assistant editor of 
the Edison Papers, said another ex- 
ample of innovation by analogy 
was seen in Edison's work on the 


incandescent light bulb. Although 


his final invention was a simpl 
bulb, the early versions had devices 
to regulate toe amount of current 
flowing through them. Sketches in 
the Edison notebooks show that 
these regulatory ideas were drawn 
from mat at fust glance looks far 
removed from electric lights —ear- 
ly work on the telegraph. 

Regulatory devices were needed 
for the lights because Edison want- 
ed to employ parallel rather than 
series circuits. When one bulb in a 
series circuit failed, as often hap- 


pened in the early days, tbe rest of 
the bulbs would go ouL In parallel 
dreuits, however, the rest would 
stay on. The modem system of 
lighting is basically an elaboration 
of Edison's original idea. 

But each ffHdcd bulb reduced the 
total resistance of the parallel cir- 
cuit. This meant a huge current 
would be needed to power a long 
siring of lights. The power lines 
from such a central distribution 


to scholars and histo- 
rians around the world, the Edison 
Papers project aims to facilitate in- 
sights into how the inventor 
worked. So vast are tbe Edison, ma- 
terials that the process of publica- 
tion win take 20 years. In addition 
to papers found at the Edison Na- 
tional Historic Site, in West Or- 
ange, New Jersey, tbe project is 
gathering materials from hundreds 
of other sites around the world. The 
main sponsors of the project are 
Rutgers University; the Edison 
National Historic Site, part of the 
National Park Service; the New 
Jersey Historical Commission; and 
tbe Smithsonian Institution. 

In February, Dr. Thomas E Jef- 
frey, microfilm editor of the Edison 
Papers, released the first part of a 
six-part microfilm edition. It con- 
sists of 28 reds of film recording 


system to even a modest system of about 40,000 pages of documents, 
parallel lighting would require and costs $1,650. The publisher is 


in 


requj 

more copper than was available 
the wo rid. 

To solve the problem, Edison in- 
creased the individual resistance of 
his early lamps by building current- 
limiting regulators. “It’s dear that 
his original idea came from telegra- 
phy," Mr. Israel said. “Electronx- 
chanically, he used the same ap- 
proach he bad already perfected. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


High Calibre 
Account Executives 


for 


High Net Worth 
Investors 


• Merrill Lynch require a number of Account 
Executives to introduce high net worth investors 
and service their investments in line with 
agreed financial objectives. 

• These positions are all London-based, 
although in some cases New York training may 
be necessary. 

• Applicants should be in the 25-35 age range 
with a good level of academic achievement 
They must also be ambitious self-starters with a 
professional and sophisticated approach to 
offering investment analysis advice. 

• Preference will be given to candidates with 
previous experience of providing financial 
services to high net worth individuals. 

• Current registration with an NYSE member 
firm would also be an advantage. 

This is an excellent opportunity to join a 


dynamic and growing international company 
with the top rated research team on Wall Street 


Please apply in writing giving details of your 
career to date to: Mr. Jack Landau, Merrill 
Lynch, 25 Davies St, London W.l. AD applicants 
will be treated in the strictest confidence. 



Merrill Lynch 


MANAGER 


MARKETING EUROPE (South) 

A boding US company in the BeM of airborne navigation, avionics 
and C 1 lyrinn, mta a Manoger to join their Europea n M m fatting 
Office located in Brunek. 


The successful applicant, directly responsible to the Director Interna- 
tional, should hove a backgro u n d in the marketing of navigation, 
communication or avionic equipments/ systems in the European area, 
and preference will be given to individuds with current marketing 
experience in Germany, tidy, Spain ond F r an c e . He should have the 
ability to seek out and to assess m a r k et in g opportunities in his area of 
operation, to negotiate agree me nts at the highest levels and to have a 
record of converting marketing o pp ort uni ties to successful business 
conclusions. 


Sakrry a negotiable and bene fits wifi be appropriate for such a senior 

appointment. 

Candidates wishing to be considered for this position 
should send their detailed resumd/ curriculum vitae m 
strict confidence to: 

Box D-2137, International Herald Tribune 
1 92521 Neuidy, Cede* France; 


SINGAPORE AIRLINES 


Invites applications from suitably quaBfied cant fe fates for 
employment in Sngapore at: 


B747 COMMANDERS 


REQUIREMENTS: 

Valid ATPL acceptable to licensing authorities in Singapore with 
endorsement for B747 aircraft and current instrument rating. 
Minimum 1000 flying boom in command i grinding al least 500 
boms in command on iheB747. 

TENURE ET PROSPECTS: 

Minimum 2 yean with possibility of extension. Applicants should 
be aged 57 years or below. 

GROSS SALARY (SJ PER MONTH) 

Include expatriation allowance, «m™l wane supplement, monthly 
company contribution to Provident Fund, school fees ft rental 


company 

subsidies. 


Single: 

Married:' 


Approximately 10,000; 

Approximately 11,000. 

SERVICE BENEFITS: 

* Monthly company contributions to Provident Fund; 

* School fees and rental subsidies 

* MesL night-stop and productivity allowances while on flying 
duties; 

* Transport allowance payable on a round trip basis; 

* Free medical and denial treatment for employee; 

* Free insurance scheme for eligible dependants and, 

* 6 weeks' ■"""■1 leave with provision of air travel for employee 
and family. 

APPLICATION: 

Please submit your application br 

Manager Personnel Services 
Singapore Airlines Limited 

P.O. Box 5Q1 y 
Airmail Tiinuif Centre, 
AIRLINES Singapore 91 81. 


* *eiuMj ■ 

1 


Our dient k a major multinational company, manufacturing end mar- 
keting consumer goods, whose international headquarters are located in 
the french speaking area of Switzerland. As a result of continued 
expansion, the following key management positions are requited: 


MANAGER OF COMMUNICATIONS 

SWISS BASED 


Reporting to the Director of Corporate Affairs, the position h responsible for the duigpi and 
commwricotior of corporate messages, including s peec h es , presentations, h house puMcations and 
the management of toe Medio Relations, Corporate Contributions and Cufturd Affairs pro gra ms. 

Candidates should have 5-7 years experience in communications, journalism, presentations and 
reeda management. Creative writing obSty in English and French is essential. 


CORPORATE AFFAIRS MANAGER - MIDDLE EAST 

BAHRAIN BASED 


Reporting to the Director Middle East operations, the posfion is responsible for developing and 
dEnscting toe corporate affairs cmd corporate communications program throughout the Middle East 


Candidates should have 5-7 years experience in corporate affa irs , communications or a related 
function which has involved the Middle East area Fluency in spoken mid written English and Arabic 
is essential. 


Candidates are Invitee/ to forward their detailed 
continence, to the Cons u ltants to the Company, 


s, which will be treate d in strict 


JOHN FEARN ASSOCIATES 

Management and Executive Search Consultants 
P.O. Box 255, 1009 Lmsanne-PuDy, Switzerland. 
TeL (021) 2948 21. 


Sales Representative Wanted 


Hester Data Center. Inc. an estabbshed and respected supplier ah 

• IBM PC and mainframe patent and trademsrfc record management 
systems. 

• Worldwide patent and trademark lax payment services. 

Oeeaminat to rsprsssm UiO spectrum a i potent tna uwfsnur* raoonf rntnegeaeat system* 
plus payment smview in Wnsrsm Bumas. Soil Id corporals pstenumdsmam Mpwtiimfiti 
and law Hem. 

Products ted senrteei sit wsu promt site documented, cam psOUvely pncWt assy n kmtei 
■nd hum 

Ej per isacs m legal market*, faftwam and same# ula* ted IBM PC ramUy la halpTul. 

■ CommsMHied Mhware and eantce sale*. 

■ CompHna sottwara product and aaivtc e Bn* for petant and tradaniarii support 

• Aggnwttva lead generation program 


Scheduling European to t etstewa for April teas. 
Contact Pater J UcAteer. Prasmeet 

Master Date Cantor, las. 

88100 NonrtwMimn Highway. Suite W0 • SautMiefd, Ml 4M34 
Phone 313-392-5610 • TLX. 23-5670 • Cable. MA$TERDATa 


Geneva 

SENIOR MARKETING-PORTFOLIO OFFICER 
highly competitive + extensive fringe benefits 

Swiss citizen or holder of work permit. 


Opening for professional with established Middle East clientele who enjoys 
travelling and personal contacts. Will be working closely with the Chief Executive 
Officer. 


Please send yourc.v. including details of current remuneration to Yannic P. Merrier, 
C.E.O. 


SAUDI FINANCE CORPORATION 


Member of Al Saudi Bank Group 
2, rue Thalberg, P.O. Box 901 
1211 GENEVA 1 - Switzerland 

— : — 


"INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS" 

appears every Thursday A Saturday 


TO FIACE AN ABVBtn5EMB<r chiM year 
181 Ave. OwriaedwOorik 93531 


htawdond Horrid Tribune lejeemitoliie or Mat Te nan t 
Front*. ToL 747-13-65 - Tateec 613595. 




i,.i- 

A.v. Hull Bin 

®r k< 1 


...khmR 


,.u 1 


•. s 


-ri'fe* to 


X 






i ii(*irF9b tiA 

Mirr* (4 AC 



University Publications of Ameri- 
ca, in Frederick, Maryland. 

Starting in about a year, the pro- 
ject will publish the first of IS to 20 
hard-cover volumes that will con- 
tain a selection of the Edison Pa- 
pers and will indude background 
and biographical information. It 
will be published by tbe Johns 
Hopkins University Press. 

Dr. Jenkins said the papers had 
already provided other insights 
into Edison's inventive process in 
addition to his powerful ability to 
reason by analogy. 

“We have this imagg of Fdi«m as 
tbe lone inventor,’' said Dr. Jen- 
kins. “That's not the case at afl. 
One of his real talents and inrights 
was that be saw he could accom- 
plish so much more by working 
with a group. He's really a pioneer 
of team research. That's probably 
one of the most important things he 
did." 

Edison set up laboratories first in 
Newark, New Jersey, then Menlo 
Park, and finally West Orange. At 
times, he had more than 100 work- 
ers and assistants. There are more 
than 3.000 laboratory notebooks at 
the Edison National Historic Site. 
Dr. J enkins said more than half of 
those were filled by Edison's assis- 
tants. 

“This does not diminish Edis on 
at alL.” he said. “There's no doubt 
about his . genuine creativity. Even 
those around him with enormous 
technical education in mathematics 
and science had great admiration 
for his skills and intuition. But at 
the same time he had many han ds 
and many minds that he was work- 
ing with. And, dearly, that gave 
him an advantage. That has to have 
been a major factor in his enor- 
mous productivity." 

Edison himself characterized his 
laboratory as “an invention fac- 
tory." 


BEAUTIFUL MUSIC — “Wasubot,” an organ-playing robot, is among exhibits iat 
Tsukuba Ev no *85, a six-month international science fair opening Sunday on a 108- 
hectare site near Tokyo. On the theme “Dweifings and Surroundings — Science and 
Technology for Man at Home,” the exhibition will include efisplays by Japmiese 
government a nd industries, 47 other countries and 37 international organizations. 




'ton 




Seen as Never Before, Auroras Yield 
Clues on How, Whence They Appear 


t At 

f ArMPfcl tH 

-Vrifc ti 


By Walter Sullivan 

New York Tima Sorrier 

N EW YORK —The aurora bo- 
realis. or Northern lights, 
among the most spectacular of ce- 
lestial phenomena, have been seen 
since the beginning of time. Now 
they are being seen as never before, 
as scientists observe them from 
above, below and within. 

A 0. S. satellite. Dynamics Ex- 
plorer 1. in photographs from far 
out in space, records small auroral 
events about twice a day and a 
laige “storm" every four to six 
weeks. 

The ultraviolet scanner on HI- 
LAT. the High Latitude satellite, 
transmitted images in 1983 that 
showed for the first time that anro- 
ras occur as often over tbe sunlight 
side of the planet as on the night 
ride. Because Earth observers can 
see the Northern Lights or South- 
ern T i ghts — the aurora australis 
— only at night, it had previously 
been impossible to show that they 
occur as extensively in the daytime. 

Other spacecraft, seeking the 
source of the energy that drives tbe 
Northern Lights, have identified 
two regions where the atomic parti- 
cles that produce auroras are accel- 
erated: one in “fireballs” hundreds 
of thousands of miles from the 
Earth and the other in the final 
plunge of such particles toward the 
atmosphere. 

Anroras have always delighted 
skywatchers, terrified the supersti- 
tious and puzzled scientists. They 


conducting material, such as a hot 
gas, is directed through a magnetic 
field. 

In a similar f ashi on, electrical 
energy is pumped into the tail of 
the magnetosphere as the solar 
wind crosses magnetic field lines 
derived from the Earth. Dr. Frank 
says this energy is stored, then re- 
leased in “fireballs” that send jets 
of protons and electrons both out- 
ward and Earthward along the tail 

Such processes are of more than 
academic interest. Auroral displays 
can heat the atmosphere over the 
arctic enough to affect the trajec- 
tories of ballistic missiles, or induce 
currents strong enough to cause 
corrosion in north-south pipelines 
or blackouts in power lines. 


take many forms: rays that form a 


curiam of light hundreds of mOes 
high; a many-colored arc reaching 
from horizon to horizon, a pulsat- 
ing, diffuse glow. 

Auroras are caused by very high- 
energy particles, chiefly electrons, 
plunging from space into the atmo- 
sphere along the outermost, dosed 
force lines of the Earth's magnetic 
field. Those force lines enter the 
in circular zones sur- 
each polar region. 

When these plunging dectrons 
hh atoms of the high atmosphere, 
tbe atoms glow in colors indicating 
their composition and the electron 
energies. Dr. Syun-lchi Akasofu, a 
veteran aurora-watcher at tbe Uni- 
versity of Alaska, likens tbe effect 
to that of the “gun" that fires a 
stream of electro ns~at the fluores- 
cent screen of a television seL In 
both cases the ever-changing im- 
ages are produced by magnetic 
fields that control the impinging 
dectrons. 


The auroras are also of interest 
to those seeking to emulate the en- 
ergy process in tbe sun by using 
magnetism to compress and heat 
hydrogen nuclei enough to make 
them fus: into helium nuclei. These 
scientists would like to know how 
magnetic fields downwind of the 
Earth compress and heat the dec- 
trified gas. or plasma, in the tail 
with such effidency. 

Dr. Frank said he suspected tha» 
“fireballs” of energy may occur a. 
far as 400,000 miles downwind of 
the Earth because some auroras ini- 
tially appear in the sky on magnetic 
field lines that lead to a source far 
out along the tafl. 

Jets of protons and electrons 
from “fireballs” are f minded by 
the closed force lines of the Earth’s 
magnetism into auroral zones sur- 
rounding each pole. These oval 
zones are centered on the Earth’s 


magnetic axis rather than the axi 
of its rotatioo. The northern zoo- 
crosses northern Alaska, Hudsot 
Bay, southern Greenland an* 
northern Eurasia. 

Closer to the poles, the magneti 
force lines are not dosed. That i: ‘ 
they are not linked to the regiona ’ 
the ride opposite the sun where th ' 
particles are accelerated, and tin ' 
do not receive auroral particles. - 

When the magnetic envelope c 
the Earth is disrupted after a flar ' 
erupts on the sun. magnate lint'* - 
guiding auroral particles into tit • 
atmosphere may be shifted awa'- - 
from the poles, in the norther.' 
hemisphere producing displays a :: 
far south as Rome and Florida. 

At times the total flow of energ . 
into the auroral zone may reach .; 
billion kilowatts, only part 1- 
which produces visible auroras. < . 
major recent discovery has bee. 
that electrons destined to produc 
an aurora get their final burst i 
acceleration along the last fe . 
thousand miles of this flow. 

The acceleration, as propose ~ 
years ago by the Swedish Nob ' _ 
laureate Hannes Alfven, resuL 
when the incoming jet of dectror 
passes between layers of dea r. 
current that have opposite polar 
ties. These currents, aligned wit [ 
field line of the Earth's 

accelerate electrons dow^™** 1 ** 


. the nil 
. ■ wtedMt 

-vAiMt 






-"•Jr.; 



H.itra 


tism, 

ward and positively charged pari -’’ 
cles upward. 

Last week Dr. Forrest S. Mon 
of the University of California i 
Berkeley said direct measurernOT- ‘ 
with the Air Force satellite S3* 
had “pretty well proven” this h]‘ - 
potheris. . _T‘ 






•- ^ * - 

> -s 


3 


IN BRIEF 


• •» -.U 

: » 

" ■ mw Wtt* 
Ml* 


Laser Used Against Endometriosis 








WASHINGTON (UPI) — Lasers are increasingly replacing traditioi. 


al surgery for treatment of women’s reproductive problems, such i* 

Te kind of 


endometriosis, a condition in which the kind of tissue lining die uten 
grows outside the uterine cavity. It often leads to infertility, and sonz 
times can be arrested only by a hysterectomy. ; 

Surgeons who advocate them say lasers offer the advantage of spec 
cause little or no bleeding and can reach tissue that scalpels could non 


1 ■ 

* *rm m 

»*•* hi* s.a 

■ VM A 

-*-* m 

■ — » 


touch, as well as areas affected by endometriosis where it would t 

.such; 


»■* % 


dangerous to use other methods, such as cautery. 
Dr. Joseph Beilina, co-director of the 


What has long puzzled scientists 
is bow these particles, which hit (he 
atmosphere at 1,000 miles a sec- 
ond, gain enough energy to pro- 
duce their dazzling effects. It now 
appears that the aurora's original 
energy source is the swift motion of 
the solar wind past the magneto- 
sphere, the area of space affected 
by the Earth’s magnetism. On the 
sun-faring ride tbe magnetosphere 
is flattened by that wind, which 
moves at more than a million miles 
an hour, ou the opposite side it is 
blown into a comet-like tail proba- 
bly more than a million miles long. 


Institute, a fertiKl « .. . 

treatment and research center in New Orleans, did the early develop met' 
work on laser treatment for endometriosis in 1978. He mid the lechniqi'- ^ • 

will probably become widely accepted by next year. Its chief disadvm 
lages, he said, are that it requires special training and constant prsctic''- — 
and is costly. . 

New Oil Absorbent Tested in India L nu ' 


-A* 

•■*•■ •m Ok 


Hutv# 


NEW DELHI (AFP) — I n di an scientists sav they have developed 'v, i. 
reusable material that absorbs oil and could be used to combat ofl spill ‘ ■ l - , » i* 
^Hydrophobic silicate material" has been tested at a refinery, the sria * 


They said it absorbs the oil and forms a thick sludge that remains fort 


long as six days on the surface of water, where it canbe skimmed off om 
a technique for doing so is developed. Dr. s. K. Sbarma told the Pre ' 
Trust of India that the material would snnn he imimI nruW “«m wal* 
conditions.’ 


He said experiments showed that the silicate material was superior i 
oil absorbents such as polyurethane foam, polystyrene powder an 
shavings. It can remove up to 95 percent of an oil sack even when d 
slick’s concentration is as low as 15 liters of oil to a million liters of watt ' 
the news agency quoted Dr. Sharma as saying. 





inreSSiOTai^-Sth&^S j Cheap Computer Receiving Device 

was sent to intercept the comet — - — • ° - 

Giacobini-Zmuer, u repeatedly 
the tan, tracing 


passed in and out of the tafl, tracing 
it for 850,000 miles, far beyond the 
orbit of tbe moon. Its data and 
those collected in 1974 by Inter- 
planetary Monitoring Platform 8, 
or IMP 8, have helped explain the 
energy-generating mechanism. 


As Dr. Louis A Frank of the 
University of Iowa interprets these 
data, electrical energy is initially 
pumped Into the magnetosphere 
along the bounckry of the tail, in a 
process resembling magpetohydro- 
dynamics, which physicists have 
sought to use for electric power 
production. 

An ordinary dynamo makes elec- 
tricity when an armature of materi- 
al that conducts electricity rotates 
in a magnetic field. In a magneto- 
hydrodynamic generator, a jet of 


CANNES (AFP) — A Dutch engineer says he has developed a £ 
device that can locate, receive and reproduce text typed on a comput 
terminal anywhere within a one-kilometer radius (about 1,000 yards).; 

The device could oblige users of terminals handling confident] 
information to screen their tubes with al uminum foil or with a mo 
sophisticated device called a Faraday ra ge 
Wim van Eck of the Nebcr Telecommunications Laboratory dono 
straied his device in Cannes al the Third-World Congress for 0 
Protection and Security of Information Technology and Communic 
lions, or Securicom. The technique was brown to military specialists, 
Securicom official said. 








H*l : 


Cordless-Phone Warning Repeated 

WASHINGTON (AP) —The danger of severe damag e to the brant 
from cordless telephones, first reported almo st two years ago, is stiQ . 
extreme concern, federal authorities and industry spokesmen say. 

More than 100 cases of bearing loss hi«mpri on the popular pbpn 
have been reported. 

The problem involves phones with the bell inside the earpiece. Mar 
cordless phones require toe user to switch from the mode for iucorau. 







***': 

mm 

mm 


tp* 





ESE 


»•»*■■■ -.4, ^ __ 


X [ideal P,W 
X htaM/low*P.l/ 
E vrfctt WO 
E WgM/taw P.M 
don stoda P.M 

rotes -P. 9 

■nattas p.m 
P.M 



Earnings war* P.M 
Fltng njta rata P.M 
GchJ -mflrteft p.9 

Intanst two* P. V 
Martlet summary P.1D 
Ogdon P.14 

OTC stock P.15 

Otter mortal* P.ll 


licralb^fifeSribunc 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 10 


DAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


Page 9 


WAU. STREET WATCH 

ew Analysts See Decline 
ifter Market’s Bull Run 

By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

International Herald Tribune 

HARGING bulls may flash their hems while thunder- 
ing ahead, but they can't change directum quickly. 
Matadors stake their lives on it And it's something 
market technicians are staking their reputations on. 
WaQ Street’s, breadth and momentum earner in the year 
cate there's more bull market to come,” says Robert Farrell, 
Till Lynch’s chief market analyst. 

Moreover, he thinks any pullback would be contained: "There 
no precedent in recent history for such a powerful breadth 
' : being followed by an immediate large reaction.” 
the strong positive ratios of advancing stocks to those 

in daily January- 

ruary trading, he said that 
nine times that such 


were reached in the last 
a major market de- 
nevex developed in the 
three months, 
chard Russell, editor erf 
Theory Letters, says that 
odds favor at least one 


Breadth stampedes 
have tended to come 
in dusters, often in 
dusters of three. 


pU'iB; 


wit! 
and 


uujiaii 
■ 7 hi?, n 


re, 


iumrns Ij; 
met> Thi-vApB 

.. t, * * 1 airing 


t w 


breadth stampede.” The advance-decline figures attained' 
mluiiuu.' » r ‘ ^ir.n'rher this year constituted “the longest period of uninterrupted 
ix;j y yceadth in market history," he said, adding that "breadth stam- 

_ «tu1 v. S!l . ' :-des have tended to come in dusters <rf more than one and often 
MtoM mti kk ,« ‘j- "^clusters of three.” 

. ' • .'-Martin Zweig, another market adviser who praised the power 

l lin ^ the six-week surge, says he also believes “January’s great 
- — momentum may produce another rally.” 

■"However, conviction that stocks still are to exhibit substantial 
Ilow-through after the strength earlier in 1985 has waned lately 
*, stocks chum on lower volume. 

Mr. Farrell says thqt while more attempts at penetrating 1,300 
the Dow average are probable in coming weeks, unless a new 
for the index also shows “good breadth, Fd look for a 
Traction of 5 percent to 10 percent” • 

blames the market’s recent weakness on the “bond market 
along and interest rates belting up,” but concluded: “We have 
.. ore upside to come, probably in the next month or so.” 

- Mr. Russell says flauythal “the market looks good,” and rites 
ck of selling pressure since stocks peaked in February. “We 
iven’t had a single day since then where stocks hitting new lows 
>ve outnumbered those reaching new highs.” 

' A LL he sees the market suffering from now is “exhaustion” 
(\ after its runup and he believes that the rally could resume 
w later this month. 

Mr. Zweig, less a market technician than the other two, shares 
r -x. Farrell’s concern about any rally stalling at the 1,300-bairier 
id he agrees that there is little risk of stocks plunging after the 
sir's early momentum. 

“But for now, it looks like a trading-range market, with swings 
-) more than 40 points of where we are here,** he said. 

‘ - However, Michael Sherman, portfolio strategist at Shearson 
dunan/ American Express, disputes the glowing image painted 
i market technicians of the January-February surge. 

“I never felt the breadth figures were saying all that much,” he 
tid. “There bad been a tremendous purge of small stocks in 
toil accounts and it was natural to see a bounce after the tax 
■iling for 1984 was over." 

Yet Mr. Sherman, a long-time bull who takes a fundamental 
Tproacb to the stock market, remains optimistic. He predicts 

- iterest rates will fall and beheves that could take the Dow up to 
350, perhaps next month. 

He warns that Wall Street will “narrow," however, with the 
Tpact of a strong dollar continuing to divide performance in the 
artel. between companies affected adversely and those sot. 
“Overall, there’s going to be a real problem determining where 
iu will want to be in the market,” Mr. Sherman added. “Take a 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL I) 


*«• h 

A. tni) 

•till .ht. 

r a :b 

4rtK 

«. *r.‘. ■ 

- "•s.^r v-.: 

£*/•«»* >-. ;•• 

id 

• 

W-r* -I*'* 

rv •• 

. 

t*f. i ur: 

«H' - • 

i 

P«l a' 

■■■■ • 

*' V t*- r' 

pte*'-* 1 - - 
;} Wi; i 


Bank Sees 
Shift on 
Debt Cost 

Receipts Less 
Than Servicing 

Agence Fnmce-Presse 

PARIS — The cost of debt ser- 
vicing to developing countries in 
1984 for the first mne surpassed 
total funds received from industri- 
alized nations, World Bank statis- 
tics indicated Wednesday: 

The bank report also said that 
Third World indebtedness would 
rise to $970 billion by the end of 
this year. 

Third World countries last year 
made debt-related payments at $92 
bilEon while receiving S85 billion 
in investments, credits, aid and oth- 
er capital flows, the bank said, cit- 
ing statistics covering 104 develop- 
ing nations. 

In 1981, net transfers to the 
Third World were valued at S3 1.2 
billion, but by 1983 that figure had 
been reduced to SI bfflkm. 

The bank said the cost of debt 
Servians rose 7.7 percent in 1984, 
principally because of high interest 
rates. The bank’s figures, however, 
do not take into account the in- 
crease over the year in the value of 
the U.S. dollar. 

The bank figures revealed a 
sharp decline in credits to develop- 
ing countries from richer nations m 
the 1980s. From 1981 to 1983, sta- 
te-backed guaranteed credits 
dropped 21 percent Mule private 
credits fell 27 percent. 

In drought-stricken sub-Saharan 
Africa, the decline has been espe- 
cially pronounced. The value of 
private credits plummeted from 
$1.5 Union to S149 million be- 
tween 1979 to 1983. 

But the bank found considerable 
im pr ovement in the financial situa- 
tion of Latin American countries 
where some of the most beavihr 
indebted nations are located. It 
said such a trend has yet to be fell 
among all poor countries, notably 
in Africa south of the Sahara. 

Persistent depressed world prices 
for commodities last year prevent- 
ed many Third World countries 
from improving their terms of trade 
and overcoming their financial dif- 
ficulties, the bank found. 

■ Mexican Aceotri Seen 

Mexico is expected to reach 
agreement shortly with the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund on a letter of 
intent for the thud and final year of 
its extended fund facility, Citi- 
bank’s senior vice president, Wi- 
liam Rhodes, said Wednesday. . 

“It’s my understanding (hat a 
letter of intent will be signed within 
a week.” 


uny*: • 

► rr-i •- •- 

s.dk*wc!*. . 

jW ••• 

* ' ~ ■>' : 
4 - 

• ■ ■ 

: : *- V ’4*U •• f 

:*/>. i 

i ~- 
* i F -’ • .• 


Currency Rates 


] 


M. 


Uardom 

ndett] 


IN lilt 

I * 

i rv 

»•. i • 1 ■■ 

■l r <• • 

■* • - 


. ... 

? rr s'H •- 



s 

t 

DM. 

F.F. 

ILL. 

GW r. 

BJv 

SJ>. 

Y«a 

1395 

4.131 

113.17* 

3705 * 

0-1*07 

— 

5020* 

13304 *14417 y 

67.Z1 

73.14 

20J995 

40755 

33045* 

1737 

— 

23678 

2504 * 

3354 

X6C 

— 

32725* 

1-594 X 

8807* 

4075* 

11705* 

1392* 

1«4> 


46*73 

11.1245 

238235 

4.123 

731185 

30933 282675 

2.10200 

238220 

427.08 

HUM 

— 

554.15 

31304 

73700 

8084 

— . 

1J0B95 

3354 

1035 

2.10100 

3393 

6703 

20525 

2ML10 

T025 

11.137 

30558 


4077a 

20993 

15314* 

368153.9478* 

25935 

3ttS4 

7703 

3541 

1209* 

<049 

387.15* 

9V74 

— 

2JS3 

10914 

84.97 • 

27035* 

0.1351 

75. W* 

433* 

— — 

W 

04409 

04105 

2325 

43987 

109231 

2017 

447897 

IJ854 I72J92 

0.9573S1 

oar si 

331104 

901314 

NA 


440371 

23257 249015 



Dollar Values 






t t. 


daa CS) 


/Yort(c) 

H 


Cetmcr UAJ 
s ixm 

U AHtriMccMinag 2157 
<7 Mttetelrm OJi 
Caaodkai U« 

u artAtaw IU«2 
li FteUteiaartta tMi 
> Cntedrodmu UZK 
tt Ham Kraal 7JBJ3 


E Vte*. Oil 

M3I5 MAS IJHM 

0J0R bntelitetei IQSJt 

12753 KmBIta OJOS1 

CJD7 Matey, riravn 2579 

«.!«» Horw. lavra 9J725 

tOSS PUL MH 1755 

aOM PortracMto mao 

02719 StoOl rtyad teW* 


Corrracr 


s 

EteW. 

U4Z3 iterant 2341 
QJ0J XAIrferarrad UM 

OflOU M tera— ULifl 
10054 SMBLneuta 1S100 
0.1MB sraKLBran 9M 
UOS* TMl 3M2 
SjB 3S4 TM bolrt 200)5 
02721 UXE.Wltam 14725 


Mtea:l.uniri*ic 

ConunraeM Iranc (HI Amounfs noctWt fo buy am sound {el Amarals mated to buy one daUar (•) 

. Hal 100 (x) thrift of IAS |v) Units of 10000 
not aootid; NAu not ovotKririe. 

tw: amove no Omte IBrvtseU); Banco CommefOolo ItoUaro (Miian); UrnnHxa 
* (New York): Banaue Notional! A Parti (Parts): IMF (SOR); Boom Aratia et 
vTKttl o noio trinvasMssemenr (dinar, rlrat dhltoml. oner Orta from Roofers andAP. 




Interest Rates 




\ il,: 


urocurrency Deposits 


March 13 


,!u.- 


-■t / 

zt ■! “ i- - 




[Hitt 


<V£y Money Rates 

. r lU ct 


>.*{;• 

'i ;* 

ri. 

st. s: < 

(lilt 


vrvontlra note 


Boesky Takes 

late intarbaik rates on March 13, enducfing fees. _ C* 1 • 

Widal fixingj for Amsterdam, Bruaels, Frankfurt, Mton, Poris. New York rates at StOKS Tib 

Energy Turn 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — Ivan F. 
Boeskv, a New York Gty investor, 
told tbe Sccnrities and Exchange 
Commission on Wednesday that be 
had acquired 3,743,300 shares in 
American Natural Resources Co„ 
or 9.9 percent of the total shares 
outstanding. 

Mr. Boesky said a group of com- 

K 'es he controls paid $229.5 mil- 
for the dares, which had been 
purchased in the men market since 
Feb. 14. 

The board of American Natural 
Resources, a Detroit-based pipe- 
line company, was meeting 
Wednesday to deride how to re- 
spond to an offer from Houston- 
based Coastal Corp. to buy all 
stock outstanding in American 
Natural Resources for $60 a share. 
The offer from Coastal another 
energy company, was announced 
Mara 1. 

■ Signs of Wanning Seen 

Earlier, Robert J. Cole of The 
New York Tams reported from New 
York: 

Americas Natural Resources 
said that its chairman and chief 
executive, Arthur R. Seder Jr, had 
met Tuesday with Oscar S. Wyatt 
Jr., head of Coastal Corp. 

Up to now Mr. Seder bad re- 
fused to even meet Mr. Wyatt and 
American has been vigorously op- 
posing his unwanted advances. 

Whether the meeting meant that 
Mr. Seder had now decided to ne- 
gotiate a deal with Mr. Wyatt could 
not be d etermin ed American said 
only that the discussions deal! with 
“matters pertaining to Coastal's 
tender offer* for the company. 

American acknowledged that the 
top executives had met Tuesday in 
Detroit after American’s stock 
price started advancing an the ba- 
as of widespread Wall Street re- 
ports that talks were underway. 

By the end of the day Tuesday, 
American’s stock stood at $62 on 
the New York Stock Exchange, up 
S1.25, with nearly 1.6 million 
shares changing hands. 

Two weeks ago Mr. Wyatt of- 
fered American's stockholders S2J 
billion in cash, or S60 a share. He 
also announced plans for a proxy 
fight to oust American's board. Mr. 
Seder spumed the takeover bid as 
“entirely inadequate” and immedi- 
ately began working on a number 
of other possibilities in a move to 
frustrate Mr. Wyatt's offer. 


I rSSc Starting Fric ECU SDR 

Stt - 5% MW - Mte lOte- Wow 10W- 10W mfc 

5W -5ft I3fe-13te. Jtlte- ID iw 10 (w - ion. Ite 

5nv - 5te 13ft - 13ft 11 -lift 10ft- TOM. 8te 

Ste-5te 12ft - T2ft lift- lift 10ft- »ft 9ft 

10 ft- 10 te 6 te - ite Ste-Ste 12ft - 12VS lift - 12 10ft- 10ft 9ft 

tearawMcabte Bo hdortiank deposits oft I mfflwi mtaftwm (or oaatvotoat). 
trees: Moron Guaranty (doHor. DM, SF , Pound, FFJ: Uerdt Bonk ( ECU): Reuters 
3 R). 


D-Mark 
• ■ft - Sft 4ft - AW 
9 . Vft St. - 4V. 

9ft - 9ft 6W ■ 4ft 
9te - 9te »ft - 4ft 


8ian Dollar Rates 

1IM. 2 row. 

Oft-Bft Ite-Ote 

•roe: Reuters. 


Sum. 

9 ft -Oft 


4 mot. 
9te -9te 


March 12 
lyosr 
10ft -10ft 


BUI Rota 
tens Funds 
. Im« Kate 
tear Um Rata 
wn. Ponar, 30-179 deva 
kkrih Trtoracv Bills 
teilh Treasury BIUs 
""t 10-59 nan 
‘‘s 4049 days 

«t Germany 

ntwu Rat* 

■nrigM Rata 
• Month Intartxmk 
-no«h Interbank 
J >,'!* iiomh Jntartta* 
i» I 1 '- 


I 

I 11 AS 
raft 
9ft 
US 
lit 
M0 
M0 


0 

•ft 

10ft 

9ft 

US 

ut 

439 

13 


*** ** IlftertOAk 

tenth Interbank 
■*"hl Interbank 


400 400 

4 at 4 to 
US 440 
450 US' 
*30 475 


Wi TDft 
Mft 10ft 
10 11/1610 11/14 
10ft 10ft 
10 9/14 10 9/U 


Britain 

Ctosa 

Pnv. 

Bonk Bora Rota 

14 

14 

Cod Monw 

1416 

Uft 

91-OCV Treasury Hill 

13ft 

13ft 

Ararat!) interbank 

Jnwn 

Hft 

13ft 

Discount Rata 

5 

5 

Cali Manay 

4ft 

4ft 

M-day Interbank 

4 ms 

4ft 

J Gold Prices 

J 


W- 
.? -.iv -• - : 

xii. »• ■ 


“*•»: /teuton. Co t n m e n benK CrmtBl Lr- 
- "“fe Uartti Bens. Bonk et To*** 


AJM. PM. Chtaa 
Hans Kras TIQM 190.W -M0 

LiucnAam 2JU0 — + 

PtalsOUkllal J«J9 28971 -134 

ZurfcJl 29035 29173 - + 3J0 

Cooaw 290. M 29025 + MB 

No* Tort — —0.10 

Otfltifij ftahm tar Londw. Rorl* and Lwran- 

brarg. aranbm am dating artaes tar Hraa Kraa 
and ZurtOL N«w vart Cam aarani controd. 
Mi ratara In. Oil net amen. 

Source: Reuters. 


Mexican Firm Sues Japan’s Mitsui 

Trade Relations 


Unravel Over 
Textile Machine 

By Richard J. Meislin 

New York Tima Srruce 

MEXICO CITY — An Rafael 
AUcOn wanted, when he ordered 
his advanced Japanese textile 
machines four years ago, was to 
make a new type of high-quality 
flocked fabric — the sueoe-Kkc 
cloth used in rinthing and uphol- 
stery. His ambition, "he says, was 
to herfifpg the only maker of ex- 
port-duality flocked fabric in 
Mexico. 

What he got instead from Ja- 
pan's Mitsui Trading Ox, Mr. 
AUcOn praiwiHf . is u yri and de- 
teriorated equipment that has 
not worked smee the moment it 
was installed, and a key role in 
an international trade disaster 
the likes of which have seldom 
bees seen here: 

Following legal action by Mr. 
AlkOn, two of the Japanese exec- 
utives of Mitsui's local subsid- 
iary have been jailed under Mex- 
ico's fraud statutes for a month; 
a third, who also is the president 
of the Japanese Chamber of 
Commercehere, was jailed brief- 
ly and released. 

According' to Mr. AlkOn, his 
most recent success was to have 
the assets erf Mitsui in Mexico 
frozen by a Mexican judge. 

By most accounts, the incident 
has already strained relations be- 
tween the two countries. The 
Japanese Forei g n Minister, Shin- 
taio AJbe, has written to Presi- 
dent Miguel de la Madrid about 
the «i s c t bnt the contents of his 
message have not been revealed. 

However, a spokesman for the 
Japanese Foreign Ministry, Yo- 
shio Ha tan o, said in Tokyo re- 
cently, “We hope that this ques- 
tion will not have an unfavorable 
impact on the relationship be- 
tween our two countries, and we 
have expressed our hope, but this 



IteKtew Y«i Tran 

Raul Alk6n looks over textiles stored in his warehouse 
in Tohicx, Mexico. He says be cannot process them with 
the machinery purchased from a Japanese company. 


is simply an ex p ress i on of our 
hope.” 

For Mexico, the incident has 
come at an inopportune time. 
The government has been trying 
hard in recent mnrnh* to encour- 
age more foreign investment 
from Japan, and is seeking to 
increase its oQ exports to Japan, 
which currently buys 160,000 
bands a day of Mexican petro- 
leum. Mitsui does considerable 
business with the Mexican na- 
tional oil company, Petrdleos 
Mexican os, and other govern- 
ment jt gpnri es 


Mr. AlkOn talks of his case 
with a mixture of fury and des- 
peration. “We’re not any” he 
said. “We're normal people. 
What is happening to us we don’t 


Lawyers for Mitsui of Mexico 
did not return repeated tele- 
phone calls over a two-week peri- 
od, and a request through an 
intermediary for an interview 
with Nobuo Fujiwara, the execu- 
tive who was jailed and rdeased, 
was rejected. 

But documents and corre- 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 3) 


U.S. Retail Sales 
Increased 1.4% 
In February 


lane 

Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Retail sales 
in the United States climbed 1.4 
percent last month, the largest in- 
crease since November, suggesting 
renewed buoyancy in consumer 
buying, the government said 
Wednesday. 

The strength of the February 
spending figures surprised econo- 
mists who thought that economic 
activity was beginning to slow. 
However, consumer spending num- 
bers have been erratic in recent 
months, following the steady, 
strong surge in consumer spending 
in the Hke period last year. 

Consumer purchases rose QJ 
percent in January, the Commerce 
Department said. 

Automobile sales remained 
strong in January. Excluding those 
purchases, retail sales rose 1.7 per- 
cent, the sharpest rise since Sep- 
tember, the Commerce Depart- 
ment said. 

“The advance in retail sales 
should help bring retailers’ inven- 
tories down more in line with vol- 
ume and dear the way for further 
growth in domestic output and em- 
ployment,” said Commerce Secre- 
tary Malcolm Baldrige. “With con- 
sumer confidence high and 
employment and incomes rising, 
retail spending should continue to 
grow.” 

Economists said they expect con- 
sumer spending to continue to 
grow moderately this year, at a rate 
of about 3 j percent compared with 
42 percent last year. That forecast 
could be threatened by slightly 
higher inflation, a decline in sav- 
ings, a rise in interest rates and an 
increase in the debt burden, the 
ratio of consumer debt outstanding 
to disposable income. 

Generally when 'debt burdens 
are high, consumers stop spending 


until their personal finances are in 
better shape, economists said. 

However, economists said that 
several reasons could cause con- 
sumers to increase their debt bur- 
dens beyond the record. Credit 
cards are being used more and ma- 
turities mi consumer loans are be- 
ing lengthened to lower monthly 
payments, they said. 

Additionally, alternative debt in- 
struments such as variable rate 
loans are being used and many 
states have raised usury ceilings, 
which in the past have constrained 
lending activity, they said. 

Other factors affecting contin- 
ued consumer spending are in- 
creases in employment and higher 
disposable incomes. Consumer 
confidence also remains high, econ- 
omists said. 

Sales of durable goods, items ex- 
pected to last at least three years, 
rose 1.7 percent in February. 


Bonn Weighs Plans to Boost Economy in 1986 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

BONN — West Germany’s Eco- 
nomics Minis try is considering 
“contigeocy plans” to stimulate 
die economy next year, including a 
sizable increase in public- works in- 
vestment and the moving forward 
of a major tax cat, in the event that 
the US. economy turns down 
sharply in 1986. 

“A cyclical downturn of the U.S. 
economy next year, which cannot 
be ruled out, would take away a 
major impulse to our economic re- 
covery hoe and force us to consid- 
er measures that would ensure that 
the steady pace of the recovery is 
not upset, 4 said Otto Schlecht, 
state secretary and chief economist 

in the ministry. 

“When setting domestic eco- 
nomic policy, one can’t lose track 
of tinting,” Mr. Schlecht said. 

In an interview, Mr. Schlecht 
said Bonn would seriously consider 
pushing forward a two-stage tax 
cut of 2Q billion Deutsche marks 
($6 Km i nn) Rather dividing 
the tax cut, as originally planned, 
between a decrease of 11 billion 
DM in 1986 with the rest following 
in 1988, Bonn may seek to concen- 
trate the bulk of the tax cut in the 
coming year if external factors 
threaten the economy’s export-led 
growth. 

“If it were technically, legally im- 


possible to shift the time schedule 
■ of the tax cut in the parliamentary 
process, we would also consider 
measures, such as temporary in- 
come-tax cuts limited to one year, 
aimed at providing a short-term 
boost,” Mr. Schlecht said. 

The notion of combining the tax 
reduction into a lump sum could 
encounter resistance from the Fi- 
nance Ministry. Finance Minister 
Gerhard Stdtenberg has indicated 
his strong reservations aboot 
Bonn’s ability to absorb that large a 
loss in revenue in one or two years 
without running up a major budget 
deficit. 

Ou the demand side, Bonn 
would weigh the prospect of sub- 
stantially increasing public outlays 
for modernization of the nation’s 
transportation and communica- 
tions networks, for public con- 
struction projects and for environ- 
mental-protection programs, Mr. 
Schkchl said. 

Domestic demand has suffered 
in recent months from flat private 
consumption and from troubles in 
the home, automobile and con- 
struction industries. Capital invest- 
ment, expected to increase 6 per- 
ceat or 7 percent this year, has been 
daw to pick up in the first quarter, 
possibly because of uncertainty 
about the dollar's future course. 

But Mr. Schlecht stressed that 
Bonn sees no reason to deviate this 


year from its' “supply side-orient- 
ed” policies. These policies center 
on the further reduction of the fed- 
eral budget deficit and the reduc- 
tion of the budget’s share of the 
gross national producL, a measure 
of the total value of a nation's 
goods and services. 

Last . year Bonn’s center-right 
government reduced the federal 
budget deficit to 28 5 billion DM 
from 31.9 billion DM in 1983. Die 
government's share of the GNP fefl 
to 48 percent last year, from 50 
percent the year before, and Mr. 
Schlecht expects it to fall to 45 
percent by 1988. 

“I cannot understand President 
Reagan's recent statement that Eu- 
rope mnst increase the rate of 
growth of its economies if its cur- 
rencies are to regain strength 
against the dollar,” Mr. Schlecht 
said. “We are not in position to 
generate a huge deficit and then 
finance it with massive capital in- 
flows, and we are also not prepared 
to play the role of locomotive’ in 
Europe, as has been asked of us 
before.” . 

“This year, with all indicators 
pointing to steady, non inflation my 
growth of 2.5 to 3 percent, there is 
absolutely no need for the govern- 
ment to ay to run up the growth 
rate,” Mr. Schlecht said. “That 
would be counterproductive — ex- 
actly the contrary signal to con- 


sumers and investors here who 
have regained confidence in the 
German economy because of the 
government’s program of 
back the role of the public hi 
and providing a positive environ- 
ment for burin ess investment.” 

Mr. Schlecht said that cozporate 
profits will rise 7 pacent tins year 
after a 9.5 percent rise for 1984. 

Franz Schoser, executive direc- 
tor of the Association of German 
Chambers of Industry and Com- 
merce in Bonn, said it was essential 
that Bonn stay with its current eco- 
nomic orientation this year. 

“The government’s efforts to re- 
duce the budget deficit should not 
be broken on,” Mr. Schoser said. 
He added that Bonn should make 
dear how it plans to cany out the 
20-bilhon-DM tax cut without de- 
lay so that companies can gauge 
their investment strategies accord- 
ingly. 

“Midterm expectations are the 
decisive factors in formulating in- 
vestment strategy," he said. 

Mr. Schoser said a sharp fall in 
the dollar or a dramatic turnaround 
in the U.S. economy would by no 
means be a “disaster” for the West 
German economy, which, he said, 
is well placed to benefit from ex- 
pected steady recovery in the Euro- 
pean Community. 

More than half of West German 
exports are sold to EC members. 


Dollar Higher 
In Europe in 
CkdmTradmg 

The ilwnuKd Preu 

LONDON — The U.S. dol- 
lar was slightly higher in calm 
European trading Wednesday. 

Currency dealers said trading 
was quiet in contrasted with the 
first two days of this week when 
there were sharp smugs in the 
U.S. currency's value. “Quite a 
number of traders remained on 
the sidelines today licking the 
wounds they suffered Monday 
and Tuesday,” a banker in 
Frankfurt sai d 

The dealers could not explain 
why the dollar reacted the way 
it did to Wednesday's an- 
nouncement in Washington 
that U.S. retail sales rose 1.4 
percent in February. “The bet- 
ter-than-expected retail result 
showed that the American 
economy is st£D more buoyant 
than many thought,” a trader in 
Frankfurt feid. 

Late Wednesday in London, 
the pound was trading at 
SI. 0868, compared with 
S1.0885 late Tuesday. Other 
late doflar rates, compared with 
late Tuesday: 3-354 Deutsche 
marks, up from 3352, ami 
10.250 French francs, from 
10338. 

Gold prices rose in strong 
baying, bullion dealers said. 
Gold was quoted in London at 
a late bid of $293.40 an ounce, 
up from $288.40 late Tuesday. 





PARIS 

The "SUR-MESURE" 
in Ready-to-Wear 
Men's famous artisanal 
handmade clothes 

TORREGIANI 
Designer for men 
38, Rue tranfofej*, 75008 PARIS 
Tab 72376.17. 


EPS Reportedly Sells Some Assets 

Move May Be Sign of Dutch Investment Business Shakeout 


By Bob 

Intematioeal Herald Ti 

LONDON — A new subsidiary 
of Aubert &’Ge_, a Geneva portfo- 
bo-management concern, plans to 
take a roie in (he administration of 
investment accounts currently han- 
dled by Financial Planning Ser- 
vices BV, or FPS, a controversial 
Amsterdam securities firm. 

Aubezt, in response to questions 
from the International Herald Tri- 
bune, said Tuesday that it had en- 
tered into a business relationship 
with Leyton Investments Ltd. of 
Guernsey, in the Charm*! inlands. 
The owners of Leyton have not 
been identified. Aubert said that it 
had been informed that Leyton had 
acquired “certain assets" of FPS. 

The sale of assets, details of 
winch remain un c lear, appears to 
be an early sign of an expected 
shakeout among unregulated Am- 
sterdam securities firms. Such 
firms, whose salesmen typically use 
telephones to solicit unsophisticat- 
ed investors across the globe, have 
been hurt during the past year by 
bad publicity. 

Prodded by complaints from in- 
vestors and the financial communi- 
ty, the Dutch government late last 
year promised legislation requiring 
that firms offering investments to 
the public ether belong to & recog- 
nized exchange or obtain a license 
from the government. 

Sources dose to FPS said that its 
owners might have wanted to sell 
partly because the business had 
been affected by bad publicity. 
“They just don’t fed there is any 


future,” suggested a source, who 
asked not to be identified. 

Some investors have complained 
of long delays by FPS and other 
unregulated Amsterdam securities 
firms in executing orders to sell 
shares. 

* Walter Fan tin. interim manag- 
ing director of FPS, acknowledged 
tins problem in a telephone inter- 
view. Mr. Fan tin said be had a 
“mountain of mafl” and added, 
“There are some (clients) that have 
sent two or three letters, but we are 
getting to them.” 

Aubert’s involvement is through 
a new unit, Aubert Capital Venture 
SA. A statement from the unit said 
its role “is limited to ensuring that 
the client's money has been trans- 
ferred and that the bookkeeping 
has been properly performed.” The 
statement added that Aubert “nev- 
er has had the intention to deal 
directly with Financial Planning 
Services BV or with any other com- 
pany of the same type.” 

Jean-Pi erre Aubert, who heads 
Aubert & Cic^, said in an interview 
that his company agreed to the ar- 


rangement partly because it hopes 
that it will gain new clients outride 
its traditional base in Europe. He 
said he believed that many wealthy 
people would welcome the chance 
to West through a conservative 
Swiss investment manager. 

FPS’s Mr. Fantin said that FPS 
would cease to operate under that 
name but that its clients would con- 
tinue to receive investment services 
from Caphal^Venturc Consultants 

using the same tdepbonc wjS?ie£i 
The owners of that concern have 
not been named. 

A letter from Aubert Capital 
Venture to FPS clients said that tiie 
new Aubert company is “designed 
to combine Swiss soBdity and dis- 

(QntiiBied oa Rsge 13, CoL 3) 


|| Cold OptiOOS (friactaS/erj. 

If ^ rai 

Wbr 

A* 

ft* 

II 30 

I325U75 

22839 

... 


600-9.50 

K2M7J5 

ajawifln 

II 3U} 

43- 409 


nwnm 

H 32D 

ZS- 17S 

625- 975 

U76W2S 

M ^ 

075- 1.75 

575-73 

1193300 

H-34J 

— 

375- 53 

875-103 


Gti&2KS>-ZQO> 

|VUcDiWUleWeU&A. 

1 1, Qn dn Moot Ptenr 
1211 Cooi I. SataoW 
|T*L Jl«5t .Tdn2S3B5 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INGEBSflU-RAAO COMPANY 

(GDR*a) 

The uodmigDcd announces tfiM as from 
21 gt Much 1985 a Kw-Assodatie 
N.V., Spuifitraat 172. Amsterdam, 
dW.ro jk>. 47 of the CDRs Inger- 
poQ-Hand Company, each repr. 5 
shares, wiU be payable with ufk. 
10,67 net (div. per record-date 
2L2.1985; grass S -,65 pah.) after de- 
duetioa of 15% USA-tax = S-,4875 — 
DOb. L38 per CDR. Divxns. bdoBguK 
to Don-residents of The Netherlands will 
he paid after deduction of an additional 

15* USA-m (= S-.4875 -= Dfls. 
L88) with Dfl». 8,79 net. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSIT ART 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam. 7th March, 1985. 



The famous Comm Coin Which. Apredous uhra- 
thin quartz movement inserted between the two 
halves of a genuine $20 gold coin. Water-resistant 
In ladies’ versions too. A subtle touch: each Corum Coin 
Watch has a pure diamond set in the crown. 


Coruin watches are on view at the fittest jewellers. For the 
SK address of the oat nearest you. contact: France, S.A. 
m Michel Nnrquin. 94100 Sainl-Maur. leL 1/S39J6 .16 - 
V Genaasy, Austria, HoOSod, Hchnui Term GmbH. 

4000 DusseidorT, leL 0211 320.444 - Great Britain. 

Saunders & Shepherd Lid., London ECIN 8SJ. id. 01-405 J6o6 - lul>. 
Corum Italia. 20146 Milan, id. 242.77.03 Other nitotnes. Corum. 
23011 Lu Chaux-de- Ponds, Switzerland, tel. 39)28.66 66. 








Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


N 


m 


( 


i 

OR 



NYSE Most Active 


VW. HIM LM 



Am E*p 
NoSfPw 
FardM 


Dow Jones Averoges 


Open High Low Lost Cbno 


Indus 137098 137027 1357 A3 1241 JO— 1005 

Tram 01593 410.91 00596 60BA1 — 4.98 

Util 1470? 149.11 147.11 U80a + 0.41 

Como 51429 51949 51041 51244— 3.78 


NYSE Index 


Prrriwi 

High LOW Cine 
Composite 10420 10170 . 

inomriab 12Q.10 11954 119. 

Trwtsn. 9940 9808 99. 

Ulllincs SUB 5143 

FI none* 10LJB 10752 107.91 



NYSE Diaries 


Ctosa pub. 


Advancod 
Dad mad 
Unchan p ed 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


402 

830 

1038 

682 

475 

500 

1995 

2X2 

44 

44 

11 

12 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


March 12 . 
March li . 
March 0 - 
March 7 _ 
March 4 . 


but Sales 
204219 554.732 
1112*38 54&FB5 
107.949 47U51 
181.915 476896 
JSfvSW 501424 


'inducted in the sales Houres 


•sim 

1.914 

427 

1445 

IASS 

1.147 


Wednesday?? 


MSE 


dosing 


Vd.on PJ* 53,150,001 

Prev.3PJA.v9i. 7602MM 

Prev cmsoflcMed dose 11 24 44448 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closinq on Wall Street aod 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

lln The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


A d vanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 
TWU Issues 
New Hiatts 
New Lows 


Choc 

prev. 

172 

340 

362 

277 

257 

257 

791 

774 

13 

M 


Composite 

Industrtola 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

T reran. 


Week Year 
Close Mm «* 

781.43 28054 287.10 SIB 
301.41 299.93 31024 JJUJ3 
331.15 — 33U7 329 JO 

S»J4 — 32457 31854 

- 2SMSS 
SHI - 8UWN 


Standard & Poor's index 


Previous Today 

Hlah Law One 3 PA 
Industrials 20102 19950 20003 1990? 

Transa. 15589 13442 15547 15434 

Utllllles ' 7844 77 JU 7149 78J9 

Finance 2074 2057 sscm mss 

Cameaslhr MBLW 17HJ# 17944 178.19 


j [ Dow Jones Band Averages] 


Bands 

Utllllles 

Industrials 


7245 

4954 

7545 




1. 


13 Mo nth 
High Law Shu* 


piv. vm PE 


& HIM, Lou 


r 


48 20 16 


Wk 1M AAR 

&SMS&3 HE 


23 IV ANRM 
*4(4 4% APL 

WV. 44% ASA 
?L J4 AVX 
»% 3414 ACS Lot, — 

«% Acsswds M 
12* Acmec 
1M4 814 AcmeE 

15 AdaEx 
» 111* AdmMl 

KS JO* AdvSvs 
25% AMD 
49k Advest 
IS JSf Aerflex 
*2% 27fa AMnLf 

S* AetLW 

3214 1514 Ahmns 
2% Al Iran 
SI 3854 AirPrd 
Z4* 13 AlrfiPrf 
3 * AIMons 

gW 21 AkiPpt 

» 2 6% AklP plA 3.92 125 

7W 4 AtaPdp) 87 110 

7316 6iy> aiop of 9xa tin 

£% 03* AklP p| 944 117 
IS 1 L "M»C9 .92 7.1 12 
19* fi* Ai5fcAlr 
ran AJ Ortas 
5* 22* ABrtsns 
*% 23V, Alcan 
Jfi* 27% AtcoStd 
22. 

an? aw 4 Aimutr 

64* aiibCp ... 

23 AlgCppf 2ft 114 
» IB* Alolnt 140 51 
72H 15V. Alain pl 2.19 114 
wft n Aiai wen as 111 
WU 24% AllaPw 170 92 8 
22 is* AltastG 40b 3.1 1} 


29 
94 
35 

30 33 tsr 
9 2537 
13 

2.12 1U 1 

3 7 

2J00 4.1 633 

82 18 12 703 
140 18 15 1434 
15 IS 149 
IS ID 
72b 33 12 2 

2.110128 137 

72 15 7 138 
811 45 19 20 

13 BB77 
.12 1.1 133 

13 un 
184 44 39 1754 
583el07 43 

IX 40 17 1375 
21 11 
150 24 11 
40 17 12 
21 

194ell5 


.14 


11 


8 V 
25 W 
74 15 13 1007 
120 44 II 1441 
180 35 12 
180 13 


25 

2841 17 30 


20 19* 20 + to 

UV3 14* 14V. — * 
1114 11* 11* 

17 la* i«i— m 
4| 39* 40 —I 

a i9% a + » 
25% 25* 25* 

21 21 SI — % 
10% 10% 10% 

49% 48 48% + * 

21 % 20 % 20 % — 1 * 
50 49* 49%— * 

25* 23ft 23* — % 
14* 15% 15*— % 

9* 9* 9* 

16* 16% 14% — * 
14* 14* 16% — Vk 
11* II* 11*+ Vk 
32* 31 31 -4% 

10 * 10 * HAk— % 
13* 12* 13 — % 
41 *tr 40%— * 
54* 54* 54*— * 
30* 29* 30 —1 
2 * 2 * 2 *— % 
49* 49 49 

22* 23* 22* + % 
1 % 1 % 1 %— % 
25 25 25 — 1% 

30% 30% 30%— * 
7* TV, 7*— % 
4503 70 69* 49*— * 

50z 74% 74% 74%— 1% 
19 12* 12* 12* + % 
143 18* 18% 18* + % 
"" 13* 13 13 — * 

30* 30% 30* 

27% 27 27* 

237 34% 33* 34% + % 
427 30* 30* 38*— * 


73 

5 

363 

2 

13 

17 


8 22* 22* 22* 

10 77 74* 76*— * 

1 39 25 25 

2D9 27% 24* 24* 

30 19* 19% 19* 

4643 93 92* 93 +1 

407 Wk 29* 79*— % 
56 19* 19% 19% 


40% 29* AlMCpS 786 48 > 2199 40* 39* 39*— % 

42% 53* AldCppf 674 108 22 62V, £2 62% 

1 07% 108* AldC of 113*111 110 102*102*102* 

23% 18* At Id Pd 54 21* 21V. 21*— * 

S» 38 AlldStr 112 48 9 4449 53% 53% S3*— % 
«% 5% AlllSCh 111 71k 7 7% 

27 20 ALLTL 184 78 9 53 26V. 25% 26V. + V. 

43 30* Alcoa 1-20 38 II 1765 34 V. 33* 33*— % 

27% 15% Amax 20 12 306 17% 17% 17V,— % 

43* 32% Amax pf KM 0.7 5 34 33* 33*— * 




33% 22* Am Has 
144 98% AHesnf 

2* IV. AmAar 

W* 15% ABalcr « 90 

69* 52% ABrand 3.90 U 9 196 
27* 24* ABnd pf 175 108 4 

69* 53 ABrdpf 287 19 1 

77* 53* ABdcsl 180 23 10 1B07 
25% 19% ABkJM 86 14 12 19 
25% 19* ABusPr 84 28 15 
55* 40% AmCon 2.90 57 11 
24* 21* A Can of 280 118 
IM 103 ACan of 1375 117 
19% 16* ACapBd 220 12.1 
33* 25% ACopCv 6J6o217 


11% 

J6U 


6% ACcntC 


i ACyan 


21* 


l^ADT 


. _ AElPw 
25 AmExp 
X 14 AFamll 
30% 19* AGnCp 
12% S* A Cnl wt 


973 


12 

ISO XT 12 
81 17 27 
226alOJ 8 ... 

188 11 1510931 

84b 25 12 255 

180 15 9 712 

4S5 

US 

, 58% AGnlpfBSJte 78 

62 40* AGdpfD 264 48 __ 

37* 2s* A Horll 188 13 10 5 


57^ 51* ACnl p|A&28ell8 


19 V4 3315 20% 27* 28* + * 
28 2 121*121*121* +3 

50 1* 1* 1*— Vk 

IS* 17% 18 — * 
68 % 68 68 % — % 
26% 26* 26% + * 
60 68 68 — % 
ID* 69* 70 — * 
25% 2S* 25*— U 
25* 25% 25% — % 
51% SOVi 51% + * 
23% 23% 23%— * 
( HM%iaa%ioa% 

67 18* 18* 18*— % 

49 30* 30* 30*— % 

B 9% 9 9 

472 51* 5He 51*— * 
38 2M 24* 24* 

21 20 * 21 + % 
41* 40* 40*— % 
27 26 ft — * 

29* 28* 2B% — * 

11 % 11 * 11 *— % 
54* 54 54 


7 

982 

6 


9 78* 78 78 — * 

362 38% 57* 57*— I* 


13* 

99 


7% A Holst 
46* AHoms 
24* AHcso 
62* Amrfch 
50* AlnGrp 
18% AMI 
3* ARlMot 


1195 

230 

37 


250 58 12 2ft«l 

1.12 3J II IMS 

680 78 8 1148 

84 8 17 2675 

72 11 1312796 

. 91 940 

63% 27* ANtRss 222 16 1228236 
43% 23% APresId 74t 28 4 4152 

13* 5* ASLFIn 5 

18% 12% A5LF1 pt 119 151 
16 10 AShlp 40 58 15 

35% 22% AmSH 180 44 13 
56 26% AmSIor 84 14 11 

66% 46% AStrplA 441 67 
54 5t ASfrpTB 640 126 
22% U* ATAT 15 _ 

37* 30% ATAT pi 384 1114 
38 31% ATAT pi 374 10.1 

24* 13* AWatrs 
12 ID AWOtpf ITS 117 
28% 20* AmHctl 288 117 
S3* ATrPr 5750 88 
4* ATrSc 

58* ATrtJn 575a 65 
26% Amanrn 180 54 



32* 32* 32* 

9* 9W 9%+ * 
58* 57* 57%+ * 
34 37% 34 + * 

11% 80% 81* + * 
71* 70* 70* — 1 
23 22* 23 + * 

3* 3% m 
66 60% 61*—* 
38* 36% 36%— 2 
6 * 6 * 6 *+ % 
14* 14% 14% 

14 13* 13*— % 

IBS 33% 33* 33*+ * 
295 55 S4% 54* 

65* 65 65%—* 

54 53% 53% 

21 % 21 * 21 *- % 
36* 36% X* + % 
37* 37 37 

31% 24* 24*— % 


2001 11% 11% 11% 





57% 44 AnheuPf 3.60 


13* Anlxtr 
29% 13% Anta 940c 

16* 8% Anthem 04 J TJ 

15* 10% Anttmv 846 15 7 

14* 9* Apache 70 24 11 

3 % ApchPwt 


16% 16% 16% — % 
IS + * 


19* 15% AochP UflZJDOeTiJ 
Pt 285 108 


APPwpf ... 
APPwpf 4.18 137 
_ . _ APPwpf SB0 113 

»% 17* APtDtO 1.121 3A TO 
AnalMS 


21 * 8 


240 


6 

175 

226 


15 14* .. . . 

12% 72* 12* + M 
12% 12* 12*— % 
II* 11 % 11 *+ * 
1 * 1 % 1 % 

17% 17% 17* 

25 25 25 — * 

11* 31% 31% 

29% 28% 2H%— * 
34% 32 33 — 1* 

12 * 11 * 12 + % 


21* If* ArtftOn _.14b -7 14 1808 20% ®* 28* 


_ _ 14% ArbPS 288 123 

29% 23 ArIPpf 358 134 

97 79 ArIPpf KUO 11.1 

23* 13% ArkBst 80 24 B 217 

- 16 Art la 148 53 16 2216 


2 % 


* ArmRt 
21% 9 Arnica 
30* 18 Armcpl 2.10 108 
24% 15* AnnsRb .88 2.1 
X 22% ArmWIn 70 35 
34% 18* ATPCP t» 38 
26% 13* ATPWE a 13 
22% 16 Artra 72 1.1 
23* 14 Arvlns 40 37 
54* 34* ATvIn pt 240 37 
33* 17* Asarao 
30* 20* Ash toll 180 52 
42% 33* Attic pt 650 10.9 
39% 31% AsMOPf 396 10.1 
61% 45% ASdDG 280 48 
98 73 ASdDpf 675 .57 

25* 19* AtCrEt 288 104 
88 67 AtICEPf 547 69 

52% 40* Ah Rich 340 47 22 3344 
347* 2B4 AfIRcpf 340 .9 

30 11* AllasCs 

34* IB* Auaal 
46* 29% AutaDt 
27% ISMAVEMC 
39* 23 Awerv 
is* ID Avtatln 
41 27 Avnet 

25* 19* Avan 
35* 18 Aydin 


6 2116 21% 21% 21%— * 
83 27% 27* 27% — % 
MB* 96 96 « — I 

20% 2Q% 20*— * 
20% 20 20* + * 
* + 

9% W* 9*— M 
19* 19% 19* + * 
23 22% 72% — * 

33 34* 34* 

32* 31* 31*— * 
16% 15* IS*— % 
20 % 20 * 20 *— % 


82 
830 
2 

8 11 
9 1075 

8 32 
8 62 

49 

8 111 
2 

2290 

351 

7 

14 

9 201 

3 

8 2020 
1 


21 * 21 * 21 % — % 
51* 51* 51*— 1 


80 

240 


17 19 

18 19 
28 13 
1J 14 

7 94 

17 14 1344 
97 10 2221 
II 150 


. . -1% 

26% 26% 26% — % 
31 30* 30% + % 

41% 41% 41% 

39* 38% 39% — * 
5BM, 57% 57% + * 
93 92 92 +1 

34% 34% 24* 

85% 85% 85%— % 
49% 48% 48% — * 
3 329 329 329 —1 
31 14* 14% 14* 

194 25% 2S% »%— % 
820 43 42% 42*— » 

42 2J% 25% Z5%— % 
7V 35V. 34% 35 + % 

34 14* 13% 13*— * 
30% 30 30%— % 

22 * 21 % 21 %— * 
22% 21% 22*— * 


B 


20% 

35% 

23% 

24* 


9 

50 

23% 

15% 

41% 

44% 

30* 

5% 

62 

47% 

53% 

41 

26% 

21% 

SJ% 


10* BMC 
18* Bonnes 
15 Bkrlntl 
18% Bolder 
% vl BaMU 
2 BidUpf 
20% BoltCD 
11% BollyMI 
7% BaJlvPk 
30* BaltGE 

39% Bandas 170 21 12 
29 BfcBOI .240 58 3 

6 

”i? 



16% 

32% 

66 

24* 

39 

12% 

31* 

34% 


DkAmpt 51W28 


66^ BkAmpf &38al 


19* BkTr p4 28? Ig 


33% 

13% 


25% 

36_ 


33% 

62 


12 

10* 

18% 


27W 

37* 


8 

22% 

6% 

17* 


58* 

20% 

36* 

24* 

26* 

30* 


66* 39% 


29* 

78* 

24* 


36% 

75% 

W* 

12% 


31% 

56% 


35 BkTr pf 4^ 

7% Banar JOe 7 18 

19 Ban* M 18 II 
IB DarnOu 40 M J 
32% Barnet 176 27 9 
19% BarYWr 80 U 14 

B* BAS IX ,12b 18 II 

17% Bausch 78 38 16 
11* BaxTTr 77 25 71 
17% Bov Fib SOm 9 21 
19* BcvStG 280 85 8 
29* BearkTS 180 U II 
24% BeatCa 180 All 9 
46% Beat pf 37B U . 
30* BednD 170 29 14 

9% Baker pf IJD 167 
13% BaMnH AD 38 B 
20% B«IHwl 86 28 9 

20 BelHwpt 87 24 

64 BatlAtr 440 77 1 
22% BCE a 378 . 

19% Behind J2 U U 

37* Senses 280 78 9 
35* BatoAH 80 18 20 
20% Bends 180 34 II 
73 BndxPt 484 A5 
33 BanfCn 280 .54 9 
X* BwMdPt 470 J2J 
17 Benafpl ^SJtZS ^ 
3* Benat B 72* 48 20 
7% Bai-pEn 14 

3% BerkOV . .16 

10% BeklPd 74 18 13 
Mtt Bemsrl AB 25 
37V. Betti SI Pt 580 12.1 

18% BelWt Pt28D U3 

20% Btwir 72 18 li 
19% BloThr 80 38 16 

i? 4 m h ’i 

,4* Blah-Jn ft U J7 

B 18 U I 

32% BolseC 180 A7 18 
46 Boft»CBf580 97 
15* Balt Bar .M A 30 

« ? 

toEd 3 124 98 7 
63 BooEpf 088 118 
9 BOSEpr L17 11 A 
10% BOSEpr 146 118 
14% Sowtrn J2 37 9 
25% BrleSI 180 U 8 
43 BrlsIM 188 14 16 
3% BrIILnd _ __ 27 

21% BrtPt 176e »2 ® 


SW 


304 48% 

2352 05% 
1789 41 
21 ft% 
45 27% 
135 48* 
I27B 21* 


Bigh-Tedi Outlook Slows NYSE 


United Press Intemuneetd 
NEW YORK — The outlook for slower earn- 
ings growth among certain high-technology 
companies triggered a sharp drop on the New 
York Stock Exchange late Wednesday. 

The Dow Jones industrial avenge was down 
8.72 to 1.263.03 an hour before the close of 
trading. Declines led advances. 948-478, among 
the 1.932 issues Lraded. 

Volume was about 83.040,000 shares, com- 


A /though prices in tobies on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at J 
PM. 


pared with 76,620.000 in the same period Tues- 
day. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department reported that retail sales increased 
1.4 percent in February to a record SI 12.1 
billion. It was the biggest increase since an 
increase of 1.4 percent in November. Depart- 
ment stores reported 3.7 percent higher sales 
than in January. Auto dealers said they did only 
0.4 percent better. 

“We’re reaUy getting climactic selling in the 
high-technology, computer and semiconductor 
slocks,” said Alfred Goldman of A.G. Edwards 
& Sons of Sl Louis. “We're seeing land mines 
going off in a very' indiscriminate fashion.” 

Mr. Goldman said the selloff in technology 
issues would serve to wring excess enthusiasm 
out of the market. 

“We have whittled down the over-bought 
condition, and after today’s disaster we mil see 


the reduction in interest in owning stocks that 
you usually see right before a rally." he said. 

He said with the stock market going down, 
the retail sales report would be interpreted as a 
negative rather than a positive factor. Investors 
would focus on the outlook for an economy 
expanding loo fast with upward pressure on 
interest rates. 

Phillips Petroleum was near the top of the 
active list and up a fraction at midday. A block 
of 225,000 was traded at 48'4. 

American Natural Resources was higher at 
midday in active trading. The company said it 
was discussing a merger in which stockholders 
would get 565 a share from Coastal Carp. Previ- 
ously, Coastal had bid 560 a share. 

Computervision was shaiply lower on heavy 
volume. The company said it would break etna 
in the first quarter, and revenue growth would 
be less than anticipated but ahead of last year. 

Other losers in the computer group at midday 
included IBM. Data General, Advanced Micro 
Devices. Hewlett Packard and Digital Equip- 
ment. Digital Tell 4ft Tuesday when on analyst 
lowered earnings estimates. 

Texas Instruments. National Semiconductor 
and Motorola were lower. 

in the auto group. Chrysler was up a Fraction 
while Genera] Motets and Ford moved lower. 

Veeco Instruments lost ground after an ana- 
lyst lowered his opinion on the stock. The 
company said new orders were improving after 
a decline in December and Januaty- 

Castle & Cooke was off a fraction after the 
announcement late Tuesday that the company 
had agreed to a merger with Flexi-Van. a trans- 
portation concern. Flexi-Van was higher. 


12Monltl 
Wall Low Slock 


Dlv. YkL PE 


SB. 

HUB High Low 


Ouot.Ortw 


15% 9% 
6% 2% 
20* 14% 
36* 28 
23* 19% 
32% 29 
26* 13 
30 22* 

44 26% 

40* 23* 
40* 25% 
17* 12 
22* 13* 
17* 15% 
21% 14* 
30 23 

5B* 35 
7% 6% 
22 19 

SO* 44% 
18% 12* 
45% 44% 
20 % 12 % 
11* 3* 
15 10% 


BrilTw 

Brack 

Brckwy 

BkYUG 

ElkUGpf 

BkUGof 

BwnSh 

BrwnGp 

BrwnF 

Bmswk 

BrshWi 

BueyEr 

Bundy 

Bu*rH 

Burma 

Burilnd 

BrINtti 

Bn Mo pf 

BriNof 

BriNpf 

Buredv 

Burrgh 

Butfrin 

Buttes 

Bufespf 


172 68 2S 
112 88 7 
287 117 
385 128 
.28 8 II 

176 58 IS 
1-flfl 28 16 
1J® O 8 
88 17 17 
M 28 37 
A U 1 
2.16 127 

12 

184 67 19 
180 37 7 
JS U 
2.12 98 
SJ0e1l7 
84 53 IS 




37646 


ZIO 187 


297 

15 

14* 

14ft— ft 

300 

3% 

2% 

1 


4 

19% 

19% 

19% 

- * 

103 

35% 

35% 

35% 


12 

1 

S2 

22% 

31* 

21* 

X* 

fa 

19 

J5fa 

24* 

24* — fa 

173 

37* 

27 

27% — fa 

402 

4J% 

41* 

41* 

- ft 

IM? 

a* 

.17 

37fa— 114 

8? 

3Bft 

37% 

38% 

• fa 

JI9 

MU. 

15 

15ft— ft 

1 

17% 

17% 

17*- 

- ft 

19 

17% 

17% 

17V. — fa 

45 

18% 

18% 

18*— ft 

4711 

Ufa 

25* 

25ft— fa 

1805 

n* 

Sfa 

52% — fa 

6 

6* 

0% 

Aft— % 

1 

X* 

X* 

X* 


73 

50% 

50 

a - ft 

10 

10 

15ft 

15ft 


1379 

41 

00 

60Vk— ft 

50 

19* 

19V. 

19ft 


15 

4% 

4* 

4% 


2 

HU 

11% 

IIU 



33* 24% CBI In 

TK c“ 

12 llACCXp! 

50% 27 CIGNA 
31 23% CIGpf 

40* 21* CNAFn 

SASH* 

21 14% CP Nil 

as** 

U% 8* Coosa 

19 11% Cal Fed 

47% 32* CatFdnf 4.75 118 
23% 12% CaMm 73b 1840] 


180a 57 13 
IM 38 13 
15 

ITS 118 
280 57 49 
27S 98 

15 

1700117 
270 57 11 
180 68 ' 
184 47 
180 27 



Canrnil .13 
CRLko 80 
9* 3% CmPRa .161 
14% 11* CpRpfp MO 
73% 54* CamSP 250 
45* 2B% CdPacv 180 
21% 14* CanPE D 80 
104*125% COPCIts 70 
48% 31% CssaHU 
16* 10% Cannon 
40* 24% CarllBe 
26* 13* CaraFI 
26% 19* CorPw 
23* 19% CorPaf 
48* 36% CorTec 
11% 7% Carrol 


36 13 


291 35 27 27 — % 

775 84 82% 82*— 1% 

117 7* 7% 7%— * 

220x 11% 11% ll%— % 
1461 49* 48* 48*— % 
451 39 25% 20*— * 

79 37% 37* 37*— * 
20 1ff% ID* 10* 

241 43 42% 42*— % 

143 21% 20% ~ ' 

3191 24% 24 
362 39% 37V» _ _ 

107 11* 11 II — % 

16 15% 15*—* 

43 42* 43 

16% 15ft 74%+ % 
14* 14% 14% 

10* 17* 17* 

3* 3* 3* 

11% II* II*— % 
70 69% 69*— % 

43% 43% 43*—% 


g *+ % 

5=3* 


35 

48 

501 

132 

M 

149 

82 


1-54 

88 

182 


.1 17 
37 If 


10 20* 20* 20*— % 
253 177*176 176*— * 


28 II 
18 12 
7 


44% 20% CarsPIr 
32* 18* 


260 last 
287 118 
ZU 58 10 
87 J 15 
170 28 19 
172 48 49 
-52 18 12 
B.1 7 


IB* CartHw 
34% 19% Canwi __ 

15% 9* CascNG 170 
18% 9% CaslICk 
32* 15* CSflCsrf 1X4 
53* 20% CatrpT SO 18 
27* 16 Coco 76 37 II 
94* 62* Cetera 480 49 8 
40% 34 Crkpipf 470 JIT 
15 7% Cenavn 84 J 23 

41% 32 Cantet Z3B 58 9 
26% 17 Centex n 10 

23% 17 CenSaW 282 97 6 

25* 16% CtoHud 284 117 6 

25* 20* CHudPf 289*115 
23% 10% CenllLt 272 108 0 
43 36 auupl 470 118 

17% 14 CniiPS lAC 98 7 
23* 17* CnLaEI 186 88 6 
35 39% Cl_a El pf A1S 127 

14% 7% C«MPw 180 148 4 

JP* >4 CU Sera 84 
10* 10% CVIPS 
14* 7% CentrDt 
10% 7* Cntry T1 

23% 18% Ccnvlll 
27% 15* Crt-tecd 
24% 17 CeSsAIr 

26* 16% ampin 
27% 19 QrntPf 170 
54 43* amfpf 480 

10% B ChamSa 40 


46* 4d* 46% 

10% 10 I0%— % 

39% 39% 39* + * 
25% 25 25*— % 

25% 25% 25% — % 
23% 23% 23%—% 
44 39* 39*— 4% 

10% 10* 10% 

42% 42% 47% — * 
26% 25% 2S%— % 
32* 31* 32 — % 
14% 14* 14* 

11 % 10 % 11 — % 
1268 20* 19% 20% + % 
1178 31% 30* 31% — * 
9 22% 22% 22%+ * 
860 90% 89% 90 — % 
7 30% 38* 30%+ % 
578 8% 0* B%— % 

302 41% 41 41 — * 

238 22% 22 22% 

1041 J2% 21* 22 — % 


ns 

53 

91 

155 

329 

6 

197 

125 

30 

123 

10 

65 

6742 


1.90 11.1 


10* 


10% 


1 

* v 
1% v| 


80 7.9 0 
260 127 9 
JO M II 
40 20 35 
80 IT 
57 
97 

46 12 


104 

34* 

24fa 

34% 



2 

34% 

24fa 

24 V. — ft 


TV 

22V. 

72 

Sfa 



lOU 

41 

41 

41 —1* 


175 

17* 

17% 

17* 


KCl 

W 

32ft 

22% 

ZFfa— % 

61% 

1 

X 

33 

33 


m 

242 

10% 

Vft 

10 


25 

462 

19 

18* 

19 


■ . J 

23 

17ft 

17 


25% 

143 

7* 

TVS. 

7fa— * 

25 

75 

10ft 

10% 

10W- 


■ - J 

48 

aifa 

20* 

Xft 



145 

25 

34% 

24%- 



184 

20* 

Xfa 

20ft- 

% 

X 


CbrtC 
Oitwl 

.Chrlpf 

56* 35% Chose 380 77 
70% 60% Chased 780 117 
45 36% Chase pf 575 IM 

50 48 Chase nt ATSelU 71 

57% SI Chase Pf 9JDel78 1006 
21% 14 Chetaea 72 17 9 3 

H* 24% Cheated 1.57 47 i« «9 
43 23% Chm NY 280 66 6 1770 

42% 23% CbNY Pi 187 50 7 

SS% 48 OlNYPf 6830111 86 

39% 31* Chespk 174 38 10 149 


280 

288 


. 10 e 8 ■ 

73t 48 S3 
801 13 


180 


38* 32% ChesPn 
40* 29* Chevrn 
36% 10* CNWst 
200 112% ClUAMw 
75 53% ChlMIpt 

26* 16% ChIPnT 
U 7% CJlk Full 
43% 24% ChrbCr 
12% 5 Chrlstn 
13% 9% Chroma 
54 42 Chrmpf 

36% 20% Chrygtr ... 

62% 34% Chums 270 
37 21% Church 

46 35% C In Bell 

is* an CtnGE 
31 34 etna pi 

60% 50 CtaG Pf 
sj 39 anGpf 

68 48 C%GPf 

69 50 ClrtGPf 

28* 20 OtiMil 
36 21% ClrclK 

31 16* Cli-CHy 

23* 13% Oreus 

47% 27% atterp 

99* 75% OtCPPlA974el06 
44% 32% Cltvlnv 

25% 21* Clylnpf 287 117 
11% 6% Clototr 


31% 20% 21 — % 
22% 22* 22%— * 
30% 49% SO + * 
B* 8% 8* 

1% 3% 2% 

% %+% 
3% 2% 2*— % 
52 51% 51*— * 

60 68 61 

42* 42 42 — * 

53% SJ* S3%— % 

53% S3* 53*— % 
19* 19% 19% — % 
31% 31% 31*— % 
38% 37* 37*— % 
37» 37* 37*— % 
54 54 54 — * 

36* 34% 34% — 2 
A1 10 3354 33* 32% 32%_ % 
7.1 8 1664 34* 33% 34 — % 
16 422 21% 20* 28% 

68 5 157*156*156*—% 

3 69% 69% 69%— H 
36% 36 26%— % 

7* TV, 7 »— * 
41* 41% 41% 

11 * 11 % 11 %— * 
11 % 10 % 1 B%— % 
51 51 51 — % 

34% 34% 34% + % 
58% 57% 58% — % 
35* 34* 35 + % 

42% 42% 42% 

15% 14% W46— * 
104 30 30 X + * 

lDte 64% 64% 64% 

?llh 50* SO% 50* 

10®h 63 62 62 —2% 

45114 65% AS 65% + % 

103 2*% 23% 23*— * 

199 31% 30* 31 — % 

~~ 30 29% 29% — % 

22% 23% 22%— % 
41% 41% *1*— % 
91* 91 91*— * 

__ 38% 38% 38*— % 

548 25% 25% 25* + % 

» 7* 7% 7* + % 

104 30 29% 30 + % 

' 12% 12* 12% 


388 
361 
18 
190 
99 

Z9 314329 
38 14 3» 
27 15 USD 
77 7 124 

6 


112 
116 145 
4-09 13J 
9J0 147 
784 147 
97B ISO 
982 143 
72 38 X 
74 28 13 
80 7 17 

13 

2JH 58 


579 


<11 
23 
6 1484 
IX 
9 1204 


72 9.9 

36% 23% aarkE 1.10 37 19 
16 6% OavHm 13 _ 

22* 17 CIVCH 180 58 9 02 X 19% 19% + % 
20ft 13* ClevEf 282 120 5 1473 19* J9% 19* + % 


16% 10 Clevpfc 80 47 
17% 15% Chart pf Z23 138 
30 14* ChfPft Pf 184 108 


IX 18 10 
-10e S 18 
180 M 10 
80 27 10 

80a 1.1 

1.19 31 
183 AS 
Z96 48 


IX 39 13 
170B 58 27 
84 25 B 
.16 8 16 
18 U 1 

Z50 42 10 

3.18 107 8 


34* 22% Clarnx 
21* 14* ClubMn 
31% 23 CluntIP 
21* 12* Cooctim 

38* 23% Coastal 

39 24* CWfpf 

40 24% Cstt Pi 

66% SZW Cocoa 
19% 9% Caisoa 
34 35* Colemn 

2 trn 20% CMsPaf 
22% 13% CcrfAlk s 
27% 9% Co) F(bS 
31% 20% Col Pen 

61% 39% Collind 
37% 27 Col Gas .... ... 

48% 45% CMGSPf 8.12 10.9 
55 40 CblGsof SJBell.l 

27 71* CSOpf 385 

45* 27* Camem 280 40 
37% 25* CtnbEn 184 57 13 
17* o Cemdis 
30 is% com mu 
39% 11% Camdra 
29% 71% GtihE 
16% 13 CwEPl 
17 13* CwE Pf 

68 53% OwE Pi 

25* 20% CwE Pf 
25% 16* ComES 
32% 20* Comsat 
34 17% CPBVCS 

36% 26 Compur 
17* 11 CnnpSr 
46* 29 Cprvwi 
30% 19% CanAas 
23% 13* Cano It _ 

18% 13* Conn E 5 180 
19% OmNG ZJ0 


92 
10 
6 
533 
29 
136 
. 219 
8 5323 
2 

14 4653 
795 

145 

1423 

362 


17 II 

28 13 


380 105 
1.90 111 
280 IU 
BJ8 128 
287 115 
272 108 5 
180 18 II SB 

74 8 25 3613 
80 18 11 40 

B 351 

10 17915 

87 XI 14 103 

74b 18 12 25 

' 98 8 
99 9 


17% 10% Conroe 80 38 

31* 22% CfxnEd 280 78 7 

43% 35 CtxiE Pf 485 109 

84* X CenEpf 580 1)8 

36% 26% ConsFU 184 48 10 


12 % 12 % 12 *— % 
16% 16% 16% + * 
17* 17 17 — % 

32* 31% 32 — % 
20 % 20 * 2 B%— % 
29* 28* 20% + % 
10 17% 17% — % 

37 35* 35*— % 

39* » 39 

39* 38% 30%— 1% 
65% 64% 64%— % 
14% 13% 14* 

31% 30% 30%— % 
»* 33 ZJ —Vi 
22% 21* 21*— % 
X* 20 20 — % 

27* 26* 26*— % 
60 59V, pt** * 

29% 29* 29%+ * 
47 47 47 +1% 

51 51 51 + * 

27% 26* 26%+ % 
44% 43% 40%— % 
35* 34% 34*— * 
IS* 14% 15 — * 
17% 17% T7% 

12* 12 12*— % 
20* X* 20*— * 
15% 15% 15*— * 
16% 16% 16% — * 
66* 66 66* 

23 25 25 

22* 22* 22% — % 
31% 31 31* — % 

30* 29 X —1 
33* X* 33% — * 
IS* 15* 15% — Mr 
25 23 23%-*% 

28% 28 X* 

23% 23 23 — * 

16% 16% 16%— * 

»* 24% 24* + % 

13* 13% 13* — * 

. . 30* 30* X% + % 

6004 43 42* 42* +1 

10 43% 43 43 — * 

059 36* 35% 36*— * 


355 

275 

102 

425 

1 

10 

680 

s 

225 

i£ 

‘“8 

t 

"T 

as 


3 

13 

36 

1360 


13 Month 
High lop Stock 


Dlv. VIA. PE 


Sts. 

U»l High Low 


Close 

GuoLCU'ot 


36 a* 
64* 31 
11% 4* 
28% 13* 
46* 23* 
46% 25 
35% 11* 
21% 9* 
22% 10* 
24% 11* 
34 10% 

2312 10* 
15% 7% 
14% 7 
24* 11 
15 7% 

43 23% 

10% 4% 
4* % 

48* 12 
4% % 

9% 4% 
» 18 
39% 24% 
33% 23% 
3* I 
34% 2A% 
37% 30 
27 JU% 
20% 12% 
34% 1t% 
31% 11% 
37* 19* 
27% 16% 
15* 10% 

40 30 

45 22% 

60* 39% 

9% 4* 
30% 31% 
70% 38% 

a m* 

23* 19* 
51 34* 

38% 27* 
51% 43 
63% 50 
ft* 10% 
33% 12% 
88% 61* 
10 % 8 * 

41 X* 
52* 27* 


CrtsFrti 180 
CnsNG 272 
CatsPw 

CnPPtB 450 17.1 
CnP pfD 785 178 
CnPpIG 796 178 
CnP BrV 480 17.9 
CnPprU 380 17.9 
CnPprT 370 178 
CnP prR 480 10.1 
CnPnrP 3.98 179 
CnPprN 385 111 
CnPprMMO 178 
CnPPTL 273 175 
CnP PCS 482 10.1 
C/lPPTJC 283 178 
CnttCo 280 68 
Conllll 
Conti I rt 
Cnilllpf 


li n 
58 8 


05 32* 
249 42% 
1291 A* 
120Z 26* 
10K 42* 
3001 44 
15 24% 


31% 31% — * 
42* 42%+ % 
6* 6% 
a* a*— * 

42* 42* 


CIIIHdn 
Into 


CnlH 
ContTel 172 75 
C tOotb 72 Z1 42 
Corned 1.10 17 II 
vICoakU 

Coopt 152 58 14 
Coaplof 290 88 
CoopUi JDe 7 3 
GourTr 80 18 8 
Cooavb 80 18 16 
Caowta 84 11 
CmeMaf 280 115 
Cardura 84 37 17 
56 48 II 
170 38 16 
180 28 
54 8 10 


20 X* 
» 21* 
22% 
22* 
21* 
14% 

13 

22% 

14 
42 

8% 
3 

41% 
1* 
8% 


a 

55 

s 

22 

19 

37 

B 

3329 

92 

251 

2 

342 

64 


1495 23* 
1113 34% 


22 30 
16 1% 
3957 32% 


_ 35* 
4591 14% 
69 19* 
401 22* 


80 

170 


Corel 
ComGs 
CorBI k 
CoxCm 
Craig 
Crane 
CrnvRs 
Crocks 
CmnoK 
CniwnCk 
CrwZel 
CrZelpf 443 
CrZeipfC450 
Culbro 80 

cuiinet* 

CumEn 270 
Currtnc UOuiiO 
CurlW IX 38 10 
Cvctaps 1.10 27 10 


39 14% 
16 22 
79 ft* 
92 13* 
1198 30% 


37 42* 

204 57 


180b 48 II 
X 

18 

M iS 

27 14 
95 
75 

“oS 

35 4 


X 8% 

28 as 

1043 73* 


24* 24%— % 
a 20* 

21* 21* + U 
22 % 22 *— * 

22 S* + * 

71* 21*— % 
14 14* + * 

12* 12% 

22 * 22 *— * 
13* 14 + * 

40% 40% — % 

8* 8% 

2% 2% — fa 
41% 41% + * 
1* 1*— * 
8% B%— * 

23 23 — % 
34% 34%— * 
2P» 2 P%- % 

Ifa 1% + * 
30% 30% — 1% 
32* X —2* 
14% 14%—* 
19% 19% + * 
21% 21% — * 
W 14 — % 

21 % 21 *— * 
a a — * 

12% 13% — % 

SSSi+5 

34% 35 + * 


244 25* 
19 21* 




180 


04 SO 
2116 37% 


25 49 
» 60* 
24% 


1790 a* 
672 76% 


16 10 
4 35% 
31 49* 


25% _ . 

21% 21% 

49% SO + * 
37* 37% + * 
40% 40% + * 
40 60 

24% 34% 

a% 26% — 1% 
73 73% —2% 

9* 10 + * 
35* 35% — * 
48* 49 + * 


■10b 15 
474 48 


23% 13% Dallas 80 
IB* V* DamonC 70 
30% 71* DamCP 178 
B% S% Danohr 
15 8* Daniel 

93 70* DartKr 

76 39% DotaGn 

25% 13% Datum 
12% 0% DtaDsp 

10 12% Daren 

39% 26* DavfMd 
16% ft% DaytPL ZOO 138 
56% 45* OPJ.pt 780 139 
59% 45 DPLpt 
33% 21% DeanFs 
34% 3*% Derm 
22% 17% DeUnP 
47* 27 DelRiAr 
0% 4* Deltona 
67% 33* DlxChfc 


70 18 
74 18 
74 28 


770 111 
88 18 
180 37 
1.92 08 
80 17 


174 27 


DenMfi 170 45 
DeSqto 180 38 
: Dei Ed 181 107 
DefC pf 952 IU 
DrtEpf 780 129 
45* DeIBnf 756 119 
19* DE «F 275 117 
DE nrR 374 138 
DE OIQ 3.13 129 
19 DE PtP 312 128 
DE pfB 275 118 
DE PfO 380 138 


170 

280 


24% DE nrL 480 138 
31% 24% DEplK A13 131 
88% 72% DelE pf 972 1U> 
10% Ufa DefEpr 278 IZA 
24 17% Dexter 80 16 12 

15% 9% DIGtor 84 45 
28% 21% Dicta Pf 275 85 
22% 14% DkroS 17» 98 
X* 34% DtaSh pf 480 107 

59 43* DMUds 180 28 

125* 77* Dtoltal 

81% 4S% Disney 

42 X DEI 

6% 3% Dlvrsin 
16% 6% Dome o 

X* 21 DOTlRs 

21* 16 Donald 

55 3<% Donley 

37% 23* Doner 

42* 2S% Dow 

33% 2S% Dawch 

51% 35% Dowjn 

14* low Drava 

23* IS* Dmr 

IV 14* OrexB 

4996 3% Dreyfus 

54% 4i* duPpnt .... .. 

Vi. 30% duPnt pi 350 108 

44* 39 duPnt pf 4J0 108 

30% 22% DufceP 288 B.1 

77 64 DuKeel 070 118 

72% 59* Duke pf B70 119 

25% 2196 Duke Pf 289 108 

34 2B Duke pf 385 128 

73 am Duke or sjb ri8 

73 51* Dun Qrd 180 7.1 

16% 11* Duo LI 286 137 

14% II* Dun pf 187 139 

16* 12 DUQRf 2XH 138 

17 12* Dun pi 287 138 

16% 12% DunerK Z10 110 

17% 12% Dun or Z31 138 

16% B* DvCdPJ 

25fa 17% amAm 


.12 

272 108 
86 37 
1.16 27 
170 45 
82 27 
180 6.1 
78 18 
50 48 
80 19 
280 115 
500 7.7 
380 58 


80 

70 


10 204 23% 
54 106 17 
8 349 39* 
45 IU 7% 
59 11% 
10 5ffi 92% 
13 3690 48* 
1468 X 
12 140 11% 
8 81 17% 

M 990 38% 

7 229 15% 
ante 54 

20z 59 

16 60 31* 

29 1532 31% 
■ IM 21% 
1 2133 47 
JSB 5% 
16 227 65% 
1 32% 
12 209 26% 
10 14 36% 

717395 16 

iso* ra 

TKz 60 
20 ttr 57 
7 a* 
12 25* 
31 24* 

x a* 

12 23% 
29 26% 
53 26% 
44 31* 
25 31% 
600ttr BB% 

4 15% 

56 22fa 
41 14* 

3 27* 
10 1958 l» 

5 37* 

12 557 51 
1211613 IX 
40 592 76% 

• 67 41* 

4 75 5% 

1749 7% 

8 1321 27% 

5 22 16 

15 578 53* 

13 101 M* 

13 122 37% 

10 2490 29% 
21 351 43% 

43 12 % 

16 3975 21* 

20 17% 
13 46 47 

« 1862 52% 
5 X* 
27 42* 
8 1272 30% 
S0Z 75 
30z 69 
12 25* 

4 X* 
20E 7tt 

21 1242 60% 
7 384 15% 
240z 13* 
TOO: 15* 
SOOz 15 
4 15* 
iooz rru 
to X 13% 
12 13 25% 


22 22*— 1* 
11% ll%— * 
a* 20% — % 

7* 7% — * 

11 % 11 %+ * 
91% 92*—% 
45 45% —2% 

19% 20 
II* 1!*— * 
17* 17*— * 
37* 37%+ % 
15* 15% 

54 54 

» 59 + fa 

30% X*— * 
31 31%+ * 

21% 21% 

46* 46*— * 
5* 5% 

64* 64*— 1* 
32% 32%— % 
a* a* 
a* a*— % 

15% 15% + * 
» 10 
59* 59*— * 
57 57 +1 

24* 24* + % 
a 25 
23% a* + * 
24* 34% + * 
23% 23% — * 

a* a* — * 
a* a* + * 
30% 30% 

31* 31% + * 

sa% n%+ % 
10* 10* + * 
X* X* 

14% H%— * 
27 37 — * 

10* IB*— * 
37% 37* 

49% so* + * 
99 99% —1% 

75% 76%+ * 
40% 41 — fa 

5% 5% 

7* 7% 

27% 27V. 

17% 1 7% — fa 
S2M, 53*— fa 

a% 26%+ % 

37* 37% 

29* 29*— * 
42% 42%— % 
12 % 12 % — * 
X* 20*— % 
17* 17% — * 
46* 46%— fa 
51* 51% — % 
X* X* + % 
42* 42* 

X* 30% + % 
75 75 

69 69 —1 

25 35 

S* 32% — % 
TO 70 — 1*4 
6B 68% — % 
15* 15% 

13* 13* 

15% 15*— * 
IS 15 

IS* IS*— % 
17* 17* 

12% 12% — % 
24% 249k— fa 


E 


40 

17* 

31% 

a* 

19% 

6* 

3% 

1% 

13* 

15* 

18* 

28% 

IB 

78 

60* 

»% 

32% 

39% 

!B% 

34* 

X* 

29* 

a* 

14% 

14* 

7* 

8* 

10* 

28% 


a* EGG 
17% EQKn 
31* ESvst 
31% EogteP 


80 18 14 
184 4.1 9 


019 a* 

"" a. 


12 Easoo 

04 

L3 


36 

18ft 

3* Ea»6lr 




1415 

6 







* EALwIA 




33 


6 ft EkAlrpt 




49 


0 * E Air pfB 




X 

14* 

9* EAh-RfC 




26 

10 * 

Si'- Castor 

IX 

60 

X 

Z L f- i 

23V* 

12* Eastuil 




Ip' jl 


i. ' 

170. 

60 


rf/M f 


r 'f.jTjvXW 

130 

ZI 

T 

24 3 


1 ».>■ 






Xfa Eckert 

UM 

Xft 


1340 



IX 

68 

11 

IBd 



-24 

16 

12 

161 

irsi 


19 Edward 80 25 22 
19* EPGctof Z35 108 
25% EPGaf 3J5 113 


18 


17% 

78* 

14% 

20* 

n* 

X* 


"5 

35* 

X* 

29% 

Ifa 

21% 

X 

21% 

a* 

6* 

17* 

41% 

14% 

14% 

22* 


23% EPGpr 
9* Err ora 
8 % Eiear 
2 % ElecAs 
4% EMM 
7% EMM pi 
li Elenas 
Ufa Elgin 
5% Else Ini 
SB* EmrsEI 
5% Em Rod 

Ufa EmryA 
24% Er w faon 

i*fa EmpDs 

3% Eiripof 

j Emppf 

* EnExc 
22 % Eng ten 
lBfa EnisBu 
17% Enserch 
T% Ensm 
9% Enlera 
16% EntyE n 
16 Entenln 
X* E etui for 
3 Enulmk 

11% Enmkpf 

29% EqtRes 

9% E quite r i 

0% Ertimirf 
15% EssBsn 


1 22* 
1 28* 
11 27* 
70 14% 


, 70 
IX 10.1 

m s » 

80 53 18 


a n* 

75 5% 


M0 13 14 

847 78 17 
•50 38 10 
1.40b 43 7 
1.76 98 7 
87 104 
.71 105 


687 X 


71 IS 17 
ft 10 14 
180 57 17 


13Se A0 
170 7fl 9 
1.70 45 14 


Z31 137 
172 48 6 

.12 10 9 

93* 10 16 
AA 14 II 


92 l«fa 
SOOz 4* 
mb a*, 
237 fa 
350 29% 
25 30 
5041 a* 
347 3* 

97 10* 
49 IBfa 
67 IB% 
11 38% 
169 0% 

19* 16% 
76 38* 
X 12* 
40 12 
405 19% 


37% mo 
17% 17% 

27% 77V* — fa 
2S% 25* 

18% 18% 

5% 5%— * 
3% 2% 

% %— % 
13% 12%— * 
14% 14% 

16% Ufa 
21* 71% —1* 
17* 17% + fa 
68* 68% — % 
56% 56fa— * 

a% Hr* + % 

2Sfa 28%— % 
33% 33% + fa 
16* 16*— % 
32% 32*— * 
22 % 22 % 
a* a* 

27* 27% 

14 14—46 

Ufa II*— fa 
5fa 5* 

J 7 - * 

9% Vs + i. 
2» 25— — fa 
15* 15* 

7 1 — % 

73fa 73%— | % 
13% 13% — % 
1 6% 16V)— I 

a* a* — i* 

19% 19* 

Ci 4* 

8* 8% 


S 29fa_ fa 
% 35%— * 
37 a +1 
2% V\ 

10% 10* 

18* IB* — * 
IB* IB*— * 
X* 375i— % 
6* 6* 

Ufa 16% 

37% 37% 

12 12 * 

12 12 

18% 18% — % 


Wv. no pe 


i Hlah Lew 


Gate 
Qua. Chip 


24% 15% EssexC 80b 38 13 X 
31% ZD* E shine 32 32 11 8S 
38* X Ettirl 1.12 10 11 «? 

7% 1% VIE van P 1271 

9% 2% vl Evan M 112 

M 4 fa WEmpfB 35 

41% X ExCeto 180 42 10 73 

16% 13% Excel sr Ij6ell0 21 

50 37% Exxon 380 AJ9 7 5242 


11 
67% 
S3* 
22% 
13% 
14% 
20% 
39% 
16% 
24 Vi 
19% 
32% 
28* 
13 

7 

37% 

45% 

39 

19% 

27 

23 

IS* 

57% 

31% 

X 

18% 

5* 

47* 

8 

19% 


a 

33 

■n% 

27 

87* 

106* 

X 

Sfa 

21 

20% 

«a% 

30* 

« 

50% 

7% 

X* 

31% 

22% 

a* 

52 

54% 

12 

34fa 

47* 

a« 


6* PH Ind 
42% PMC 

53* EMC of 
17* FPL Go 
9% FobCtr 
9% Facet 

ISVk Rprcnd .. 

33% FatrcPf 380 *A 
9% Falrfd .18 18 10 
10% FamOlt 
14% Fans tel 
M* FrWWP 

14% Parol, 

8% Fay Dm 
4<A Peden 
29% PedlCe 
27% FertExB 
29% FdMog 
10% FedNM 
16% FedPB 5 
16 FedRlt 
13% FdSpnl 
42% FedDSI 
22* Pen* 

»* FhScst 
4 FIOCPA 

3% FinCppf 

14* FbiCn Pf AJ3el98 
2* FnSBar 
15% Plrasbi 80 48 
19 Ft AH In 1JH 48 

71* PBkSVS 180 4.9 
a* FBkFto 170 38 
34% FBost 170 10 
18% FsfChlc 182 57 30 
70 PCM RfB B83el17 
ft FCM pfCIQJOelli 
13* FIBTex 180 03 8 
40 FtBTxpf A116114 
10% FtCItV 7 

10% FPodAz ,15e 9 6 
30* Pintsfe 284 5.1 7 
21 Plnfsfpf 287 88 
7* FtMIas 84 22 10 
X* PNStB 288 A1 7 
4% Fit Pa 8 



M* 

12% 

37% 

31* 

40 

25% 

2d 

8 

21 

23% 

55 

51% 

IZM 

67% 

15* 

Ufa 

35* 

11% 

25* 

34% 

28% 

32% 

36% 


20fa FstPapf 

ZA2 

9.1 

314 

»fa 


28% — % 


197 

6? 

15 109 

XU 

Xft 

X 

- fa 

14% FtVaBk 

84 

Lf 

9 290 

72 

X* 

X%- 

- * 

16 FtWbC 

IX 

66 

B 34 

Hill 

24fa 

26fa— % 

45% FWhc pl 

4JS 

120 

fiL 


a 

a* 

- * 

Xfa Ftachb 

IX 

?A 

20 82 



38*— * 

Bfa FIshFd 

05ft 

.5 

17 


Ivj 

10* 


20fa FEtFnG J 

IX 

61 

8 150 



Xft 

- fa 

42% FftFpf 

AASelOT 

UA 


t ill 

45% 

- fa 

14% FleefEn 

J0 

18 

9 l«l 


n* 

23 - % 


X 


14 198 

rTTTi 

37* 

STM 


23* Flax IV 

X 

35 

14 XI 

s 

|i , r J 

XVk- 

■% 


101 

1X8 

7 

12% 


12% 


>9% Fitotsr 

X 

0 

18 160 

33 

1-^*1 

3Zft 


12ft FloolPT 



15 182 



2610— Ifa 

29* FlaEC 

.lia 

0 

12 21 

1- |2M 

L 'l .~a 

37% - 

* 

IB* FlaPre 

Z16 

91 

9 1261 

1-71 

23* 

23% — ft 

11% Fiastl 

AO 

20 

13 72 

17V. 

T7 

17 — fa 


3* FtwGen 
11* Flows 
14* Fluor 
43% FooteC 
33 FardM 
10* FfOear .... 
48 FtHawd 184 
10 FBBlWh 
6% FaxSIP 
23% Frabro 
5% FMOG 
13* Frol Me 
20% Frtafrn 

19 Fruehfs 
25 

20 


80 29 19 
80 27 
3L2B 4.1 12 
M 4i 1 
186 117 

M 1A 
84 38 14 
88 70 11 
184 48 74 

ITMWII 

80 38 15 
MUM 
80 28 5 


64 

131 


54 

9245 .. 

34 11% 


248 47% 
905 14% 


7 9% 

493 U 


230 9% 

622 19% 


Frghfpf 280 7.1 
Fuoua 80 17 


_ 2S% 

944 23* 
137 28% 


30* 15% GAP 
30 20% GAP pf 

37* 25% GAT X 
34% 19% GCA 
71% 48% GEICO 
10% 4 GEO 
13% 5% GFCn 
44* 35* GTE 
3«% 31% GTE at 
Ufa 19% GTE Pi 
10 4% GatHQU 

SB 33% canett 
2S% 17% GapStr 
30% 10% Gearht 
18% 13% Gel ca 
In* 53% GetnCa 
10* «% Getndc 
11% 10 Gemil I 
40% 30fa GnCorp 
17* 14%GAIltV 
44* 29% GnBcsh 
34% 14% GCInma 
33* 14% GCh PlS 

8 12% GflDcts 

43* GnDyn 
65* 48* GenEI 
*1* 45% GnFdp 
7 5% GGttin 

14% 0% GHOST I 

18* 8% GnHOUl 
27% 15% Gnlrm 
60 
05 


.159 8 11 lim » 29% X% + * 


180 


37 

34 W 

13 .... 

10 11 1549 

388 7.J > 31 if 
Z50 A5 1 
208 11J 58 

29 19 1773 
Z1 13 37 

38 is — 
38 15 

134 


38% 38% 3B%+ % 
21% 21% 21% 


108 

ft 

.40 

ft 


324 

| 

m 


sS% 

w 


6 

54% + % 
2»- * 


11% 10% 11% + % 

i+ % 


04 


180 

270 


fte 87 
Iftb 38121 
183e 97 

’S ff 1? 

M ia 

17 9 

38 12 

280 47 10 

■ 4B " M 23 655 
74 20 36 11 

.. ft 38 16 1202 

45% GnMIlls 274 40 13 743 
61 GMOt &IHr 48 5 46X 


18% 18% 18% • 

48* 48* 60*— * 
10* W 10* 

11% 11 11 — % 
41* 48 40 — IA 

M2 X* 32% 33%+% 
3 32 33 X +% 

357 14% 15% 15%—% 
954 76* 74* 74*—r* 
4755 42% X 42 — % 
218 40* 59* 99*— * 
3V9 6% 4* 4*— % 

ASS 13 12* 13 +* 

12 11% 12 + Ml 


!7 * » iffi?% 


72 33 CM E n .IBP j 

39* 33% GMOt pf 375 97 
51% 44* GMatpf 500 


.16 


1ft 


100 


13 
0 25 


9* 3% GNC 

13* 7* GPU 

75% 44* Gen Re 
12% 5 GfiReir 
53% 39% GnStarW ... .. 

Y2 9* GTFIpf ITS 118 
12* 10 GTFI pi 1 JO 110 
8* 5* GcnXO 
29* 13% GnRtw 
23% 15 Gcnstg 
22% 14* GsfPf 
34 7A Gen Pi i 
27% 18 GaPoc 
37* U GaPCBf 274 60 
X* 22% GaPwut X 44 127 
X 25* GaPe.pl 376 137 
21 17* GcPfapf 286 1Z4 

21* 17 GaPwpf 252 120 
43 51* GOPWpf 772 129 

79 20% GerbPs 1.16 A1 II 


479 
11 

90 Zt 
M 19 67 

4 410 
22 71 1452 
A 142 
38 12 - 


56% 55* .... . 

79 77% 77*— 1* 

44* 44* 64* —ZU 
39* 38* 3S%+ * 
SI* 51 51*+ * 

A* 4* 6%+* 
12* 12 12* — * 
72% 72 72*+ * 


10% 10* 10%—-^* 


.10 
100 

108 At 
1.18 38 16 
00 


.12 


0 14 3516 
IX 
5 213 
21 20 263 
48 11 471 

19 

74 A9 1595 

17% GiabMPfMO 1A4 205 

8* GldNug 46 1178 

“ 221 


ft 

280 


a* n Geres s 
12% 8% GlontP 
11 5% GlbrFfi 

27 14% GfffMIII 

58% 42% Gillette 
17% 11* G lease 
. 9% 4* GlabIM 
26 

12* 

1* GUN wt 

27% 11 GkJWF 
J6fa 24% Gdrlch 
29% 23 Goodvr 
19 13% GardnJ 

35 fa 19 Gould 
44* 34% Grace 
W 47 Grainar 174 20 13 
15% 8% GtAFst 00 Z9 8 
IB 13 GtAIPc 9 

45% 27* GtLkln 1O0 20 1G 
43U 31 GtNNJc 1ft 40 7 
67% 51* GINNkPf473 87 
a* UW GIWFtn 88 M ID 
19% 9% GWHv 

16* II* GAAP 
a* 18% Grevh 
6* 2% G roller 
13% 8* GrowOs 
11% 6% Gru&EI 
30 2lfa Grumn 
8% 4fa Gruntol 
27% 20 Gulltra 
35 25% GlWhd 

24* 11% GulIRs 
14* 10 GlfSHJt 


42 

17 

7 

A 

so* 

165 


90B 4»% 44% 46% 

76Dz 11 10% 10% 

730z 12* 11* 11*— * 
75 -5* 5* 5* + * 
499 17* 17 17 — * 

342 21* 21% 21% — * 
1 »% 20 W 20 % — tt 
242 34% 36% 34% — * 
38 M 5218 23% 23* 23%+% 
264 35* ft X + * 
27 34* 27 + * 

28% SB* 28*—% 
a* a an* 

X* 20* 20* + u 
so m 

an a 20*— * 

19% 14* 18%— % 

11% li* 11%+ % 

to 9% 9%— % 
25% 24% 24*— * 
58% 57% 57% — * 
18% 13* 13%+ * 
5% 4% 4% — * 
21% 21% X%— % 
10 % JO* 10 *— % 
2% 2* 2% 

70 0 7 130 27% a* »W— 1% 
184 50 11 2SS 28* 28* 28% + % 

180 6.1 7 1444 27% 24* 24*— % 

ft 12 8 150 14% 14* 14*— * 

88 30 57 2213 23% 22% 2Z%— % 
200 A8 10 7ft 41* 41 41* + M 

122 61% 41% 41% — % 

250 14* 13% 14 — % 

IS* 14% 14% + % 

41* 41* 41* 


41 

172 110 8 


445 

3 

JH0 

7 

849 

97 

77 


34% 34% 34%+ % 


170 42 11 1572 


X 24 
33* Z? 

20fa 13% GAero 
19% 14 Gallon 


II 

ft Z4 16 
ft J 13 
100 30 0 
.14 M 
08 27 9 
JO 28 TO 
20 13 
184 IM 6 


GH5U pr 385 IM 


GHSU pr 400 130 
Me 47 


00 


_ 9 
30 10 


9 

359 

II 


54% 54%+ M 
25% 25* 25*— * 
15% 14% 14%— % 
15% 15% 15% 

28* 70 28*— % 

4% 4% 4% + * 
12% 12* T2* 

II* 10% lfffa— % 

20 2790 2190— !A 

6% 6* 4*— % 
26% 25% 25*— % 
X* 31% 3I%— % 
14* 1«% 14% 

13* 13* 13% — M 

28% a* 28*— % 

32* X* 32*— % 
15 14% Ufa— % 

I6W Ufa Ufa— * 


1070117 
184a 90 
1.13 20 
06 U 
00 1.9 
100 20 
84 27 


ft 

88 


178 47 
178 3L9 


76 

ft 


18 
29 

. 20 
70 17 
01b 27 
76 10 
i.m 37 
10 


17 


7 4* H»7 

27% 19% HallFB 1ft 30 
44 ft* Halbtn 180 59 
1% fa Kallwd ft 58 
10% Sfa HahndPl 84 6.1 
36% 2Sfa HamPl 
13% 11% Hanjs 
19% 15% Haul 
55fa 23* Hanuim 
TO 15% HondH 
23% 14* Homo 
53fa 23% HarBrJ 
30* Ufa Harlnds 
12* 7% Hambh 
X% 14% HrpRw 

35 23fa Harris 

18* 10% HartSrn 
28* 19 Harscp 
33V. 23% Hartmx 
23* 15% HuvrEIS 104 LI 
13% 8 HavesA 70s 17 
34% 23* Htaletn 
13% 9 Has Lab 
13* 9% Meeks 
23% Ufa HedaM 
33 14% Heilmn 

25 U% Helllp 
«15 ft Helnr 

77% Heinz of 170 
_ 13* HetneC 

25% 18 Helmp 74 
6fa 3% MemCa 
37* ZTfa Hereuis 100 47 
24% 14* Herttc OSe 7 
28% I Ufa HerllC pf 1ft S3 
41* 28% Hereby 100 30 
Ufa 5* Hes3fon 
44fa 31% HewfPk 
X 17% Hexm 
19* 12 HiBiwar 
13 Bfa HIV oil 
24% >7* Hllnbrd 

63% 45% HU tun 
64% 31 Hllactd 
52% 35* Holiday 
78 Vb 55% HlldvA 
81% S3 HOlIvS 
23m 12 Homed 
33 Ufa HmFSO 
9% 8 HmeG pl 1.10 129 

36 20% Hmstke 70 .9 

17* Sfa HfrtMFn 00 29 
Ufa 43% Honda 78e 7 
64% 46% Hanweli 1.90 XI 
35% 20 HOOvrU lft LI 
36% IBM HrznBn 1.12 45 

26 2D HrzBn pf Z9Bell5 

10 3% Horizon 

48* 36% HMpCe 
30% 22 Hotel In 
37* 20* HouahM 
19fa 13% Ha* Fab 
37Vr 34 Hauslnt 
5* fa fa Hointpt 
76*i 4) HsfnfPf 
X* 17fa Houlnd 

54* 39% HauNG 

19* 9fa HOUOH 
23fa 13% KoMCp -- 

a* so* Rubbra za so 

13% 9* Hut hr 00 10 


1 

X 

11 1497 


73 

8 127 
51 
47 

17 155 


II 57 
70 SB 
9 177 

7 29 

14 89 

18 14 

29 104 
35 457 
10 1483 

u no 

13 078 
1 

15 29 
ft 794 


12 


10 1113 
34 8B 
8 

12 142 


72 J 
AO ZT 
80 38 
.15 17 
04 27 
lft LI 
78e 8 
lft 28 
1J1» 22 
lft 17 


00 17 
280 98 
76 Z7 
00 27 

175 48 


IS 10943 
17 69 

24 30 

9 02 

13 13 

13 XI 

11 772 

V4 239 

3 

13 17 

34 140 

7 27H 
» 

40 733 
5 31 

10 4X 

12 1476 

12 030 

0 94 

70 

IX 

14 2779 

13 11 
U 84 

11 81 


9 649 


ATS BJ 

208 118 

Z12 47 

2JM178 
ft 27 


17 

a 

6 1474 

1l 236 


24 20 

12 74 

9 754 


5* 5* i% 

26* Ufa Ufa— % 
31% m 30%—* 
1% Ifa 1% 

9* 9 9fa 

30% 29% 29% ~ fa 
12* 17 18 

19% 19% 19*— fa 
55* 54% 55 + * 

79* 19% 19%— % 
21 fa 20fa 20%— % 
52% 49* 49fa— 2 
27% 25* 2S% — 1% 
11% II 11 — fa 

30* 30* 33* 

29* 28% a fa— Ifa 
14% 15% 159b— Vk 
27% 27% 27*— fa 
32* 32* ft* + W 
20% 19% 20* + W 
11% n% li*— % 

24 23* 23*— % 
11% 11% 11% 

12% 11* 11%— % 
14 15% 15% + fa 

17% 17% 17%+ M 

25 25 35 

4814 47* 47%— M 

104 106 106 +4 

14* 14% 14*— fa 
20% 19% 70 + % 

6 4 4 

34% 33* 33* — % 
32* 21% 22% 

Ufa Ufa Ufa— fa 
41% 41 fa 41% + % 
7% 7* 7% 

34% 33% 33% — 1% 
28* 28* 28* 

17 16% 1A%— % 

11% Ufa llfa— fa 
25 34* Ufa 

58* 58* 58*— fa 

33% Xfa 33* + % 

50% 50% 5D%— % 
78% 78* 7BM + % 
7Bfa 70 78%— % 

19% 18* IBfa— fa 
22% 22% 22*— % 
J5* JP 11 JS5“ * 

23* 23 23% + fa 

14. 14 14 + % 

56* 56 56 + * 

62 40% 40*— 1% 

33% 33* 33* 

25 84% » + % 

25% 24* 25%+ % 
Sfa 5% Sfa 
46% 45% 45%— fa 
29 29 29 

34* a 3b — % 
17% 17% 17M + % 
37% 36% 36H— * 
55* 54% 54%+ % 
74* 76* 74* + % 

22% a* 22%+ u 

45* 44% 45W— fa 

12 llfa 12 + % 
IS* 179k 17% — % 
»* »% U* + fa 
13* 13 13* + * 


Phi. YkL PE WtoHMlbOw ftrtt.CtfBt 


24% 24% M%— % 
X 22% 3%— % 
37V 37* 37%— fa 
2 1* 1% 

Sfa 99k 3 

4* 4fa 4fa 
3S% 38% 38%— * 
14 15* 15* 

499k 49V. 49U— * 


21% 12% HuptlTI 
75 I7fa Hupnsp 
X a* Human 
27% 17* HwitiW 
41% 23% HuttEF 
25% is* H rural 


08 M 2199 
ft 1 At It 
08 M 14 2061 
80 ZQ 16 41 

80 2JZ 18 1300 
1.92 LI 0 27 


15* 15 IM 

am mb i?% — * 

29* 28* X + fa 
25* 25* 25* — fa 
37*»fag*^W 


23% 23% 


9% 9%— W 
61* 61*—!* 
76 77 —Ifa 

20 * 20 *+ * 
12* 12* 

12 % 12 %+ % 
18* 18*— * 
37% »»+ * 
14* 14*— * 
23 22* + % 

15* IS*— * 
23* 23fa— Ifa 


35* »* 1C Ind » 180 42 11 713 
7916 17U I CM n 
11% 5* ICN 
27% 22* ICN Pt 270 9J 
17fa 14 INAIn M2 110 

24* 23 IPTImn 
20 14% IRT Pr* 100 U 

42fa 20% ITT CP 180 LI 
66% 40 ITT pfK 480 All 
65 44* ITT PfO 5ft L5 

57* ft ITT ptN 235 SJ 
71 42* ITT pfl 480 70 


1774 

tf 

749 
7 S 
9 7937 
160 
1 

3 

4 


2i* aifa— » 


10 * 10 *- 
5% 5* 

34% 349k— * 
ft 33%— fa 

a 3 a —% 

16 16*— fa 
19* 19*+ % 
21% Zifa— * 

17 17 — fa 
55fa 55fa— fa 
Ufa 26% 

32* 32fa— Ifa 
096 7 — * 
5* 5* + fa 

34* 34fa+ fa 
3* 3% — fa 
IB 18 — fa 
25* 25*— fa 
32* ... 

X* 32 + fa 
60* «6%— fa 
27fa 23* — % 
77 77 +1* 

92* 92* + * 
15* 15* 

45* 45*— * 
9* 9%— * 

17% 17fa— fa 


Xfa 15U IU lilt 1 JO 68 64 1286 

40% 30* IdaMP 3J8 SJ 0 IK 

23% U* tdeolB 42 

23% 17% IllPuw 204 tU A 1311 . .. 

18 UW IIPowPl lft 128 4089 17* 17 


S3* 48* HPOWPf 5.73 11.1 920 

33% 2S* llPpwpf 4J» 128 U 
Ufa 71* ITW3 44 1 J 14 209 
39fa 27* ImpChnt 846 28 fl 1239 
9% Sfa Imp! CP 
14* Bfa IN CO ft 10 
619k 49 InCflMpf 776 IZ1 
17* 14 IndIMpf 2.15 129 
Ufa Ufa IndIMpf 275 138 
28* 23* IndlM Pt 303 132 
25* 20* IndIMpf 275 11J 
28% 17* iraflGsa 188 7.1 
15 5* Inexeo .14 ZO 

Ufa Ufa InfmK 
50* 35* IngerR 
37% 27* InsRPf 
«* 10% IngrTec _ _ 

79 19* InMStl JO 23 

48% 38% InKStpf 475 109 
21V. 14 franco 180b 57 IB 

11% 3» HJSPR3 

»fa 11% into Rat 4 

30% 19 IntgRpf 383 1Z7 
54fa 41 IntuRPt OJOelS.1 


Xfa 30% 30*— % 
IBfa 18 IBfa— M 
11* 10% Ufa + fa 
27* 27* 27* + fa 
16* Ufa U* + fa 
25 24* 249k + fa 

19% 19W I9%— * 
32* X* 3216 + ft 
59 SO SB*+ * 
59 59 59 + ft 

43 4296 42*— fa 

40* 40fa 40* 

17% IA* 17*— * 
39% 39* 39% 

14* 13* U + * 
23% a* 23*+* 


X 

200 13 IB 
Z3S 70 
84 42 X 


_ Xfa 51% — % 
3ZVk Xfa XU— % 
34% 3416 34* 

35 34ft 35 + * 

12 X Bfa ■% Bft 
2347 13 12* 12*— % 

140z 99% 99% 99*— fa 
I Ufa Ufa Ufa 
17* 17 17%— fa 

27* 27* 27* + % 
24* Ufa 24* 

26% 24* 24% 

7% 7 7% + % 

17 Uft 17 


7 

X 

4U 

u 

201 

AM 

492 

5 

( 


14% 7Wi IntSpn 


27* 27*— % 
IBfa Ufa 
_ 47* 47V. — * 
7* 7* 7fa— % 


19 15% I tCPSe 

65* 55 InteTCO 
15% 9* Intrftt 
53ft 47 Intrtk 
16% Bfa I aimed 
24* 14* IntAJu 
lXfa 99 IBM 
M* Ufa intctrl 
29* 229k intFtav 
llfa 5* inmarv 
7* Z% intHrwt 
SO 23* IrttHpIC 
42 20* infHpfA 

34* 17* IntHpfD 
43* 32% IntMln 
29% 20 IntMull 


9 

U2 

157 

£16 

24 

3 

19 

U1 

SI 


37* 25fa IntgRpf 4J5 IU 

115 

Z1B011J _. 

303 <9 12 3959 
00 SJ 7 m 
£40 SB 5 13 

32 599 
71 16 V 14 


33* 33* 33*— * 
13 U 13 
73 22* 23 

43* 43% 43% 

19% 19 19% — fa 

5% 4ft 4ft— * 
16% 16V. Ufa— * 
23% 23* 23ft + % 
43* 43* 43*— fa 
30* 30fa 80*+ fa 
13 12% 12ft— % 

Ufa 18 18 —fa 

42ft 42* 42ft— * 
12 11 * 11 *— * 
5214 52 JDW+ ft 
Ufa 9ft 10 —fa 
19 18* Ufa— % 


400 30 1211948 132 129% 130 —1ft 


JO L3 18 M 
1.12 4.1 .U 180 
3294 
324 
42 
I 
59 

200 40 12 M3 
176 LI 9 30 


22ft 22* 22*+ fa 
27% 2716 27fa— fa 
10* 9ft 10* + M 
6ft 0% £%— fa 
4916 49 49ft— * 


3Sfa 38fa 38ft + fa 


57% 46 intPapr 209 48 24 1307 
17ft 9fa IntRcs 17 137 

449k 32* IntNrth 248 58 8 IX 
38% 20 IfltpbGp 188 38 12 X3 


5% 5* 5* 

1B9b 18* UW— fa 
18* 18* 18ft — * 
54fa 54fa 54fa 

43* 43%— * 
II* 11% 

66IA 44*+ fa 
14% Ufa + * 
9* **+ * 
35* 25*— fa 
9* 9* 

19* 19* + fa 
25* 25*— * 
23V. 23% 

a a — w 

433 3Bfa X* 31*— fa 


llfa ID IntBakr 
20 15% intstPw 1J0 HI 

20 16* InPwpt 230 UJ 

19% Ufa lowoEl 1J0 107 
29U X* lOWllG 274 97 
20ft 17 fowl! I Pf 231 118 
Xfa 25 lovkaRs 388 1L2 
33* 26 I pal co 304 97 7 
13% V* IpcaCp J4 U li- 
as 23* IrvBJf 3 18 if 7 
54 42* trvBk pf S-lSelOJ 


30* 30*— * 

Alfa 40% 40% — * 
28% 20* 28% + * 
41ft 49% 49% — * 
Ufa 13% 13% — fa 
44* 44* 44* 

36% 35% 35% — fa 
42 Ufa 16ft Ufa . 

a a u% is* is* 

fOQz 19% Ufa 19ft— % 
7 5059 Ufa 17% 17*— * 
7 145 a* a aft + ft 
200z 20% X* 20* 

7 24 Xfa X* 30% 

X* X* X*— ft 
12% 12 12* 

33* XU 33% + M 
50ft 58ft 38ft — : ft 


157 


.. 37 37* + % 

46 33* 33* 33%' — fa 
873 27* 25* 24* — * 
71% 71 71%+ M 

5% 5* Sfa 
7ft 7* 7ft 
44 43% 43*— fa 


30* 

34* 

Stfa 

M* 

43 

AT* 

U* 

9ft 

40ft 

46ft 

29% 

26% 

28* 


20 JWTS 
23* J River 
13* Jomtwy 
Ufa JmF 
X* JetfPI * 
34ft JarCoi 
12* JerCpt 
5% Trader 
X JahnJn 
37* JahnCii 
lift Jargon 
15% J asters 
X* JerAUg 


1.12 38 
86 U 
.10 A 
1046128 
M2 3J 
OJA 163 
ZU 137 


1J0 30 
184a 67 
180 60 
80 33 
100 50 


13 116 Xfa 
8 287 24% 

11 339 23* 
147 12% 
6 7M 40* 
®S5i 65% 
13 16 

20 25 8% 

14 75X 39* 

8 2D0 40* 
17 34 25% 

15 74 24% 

14 432 at* 


29ft 2916— fa 
34% 24% — % 
23* 23*— * 
lift 12 
40* 40% 

65% 65% 

16 16 + ft 

a a 
x am 

39* 39*— ft 
34ft 34ft— ft 
24* 34ft + * 
25% 35ft— * 


L 


30 20 


650 120 
174 as 


80 4J 
30 17 
M7 00 
08 61 


104 18 
00 23 
180 88 
U6 L7 
170 L7 


Ufa 7% KDI 
16% 9% KLMs 
39% X KM l pf 
X* 34* Kmart 
40% 27* KN Eng 
30ft TZft KofsrAi 
23* 14% KatoCg 
30* 15ft KafCnf 
14* 8* Koneb ' 

31% 1416 KCtvPL 2M IM 
X 25 KCPLpI MO 13.1 
18% 14* KCPLpf 230 128 
54% 36* KCSOU 188 Z1 
U* 12* KanGE 2J4 127 
35% 30% KonPU Z96 9.1 
22* 18 KaPZpf 2J2 110 
X 17ft KaPLpf 1 21 IM 
45 18 Katrln 

115 49 KatvM 

20 10* KoufBr 

1b* 12% Kamnf 
49 28% KeilaaB 

34* X KBitwd 
4* 1 Konai 

29* 19% Kenmt 
fa* 20% Kyuni 
10* 17 Kerr&l ... 

M* 18% KerGpf 170 _ 

3<fa Ufa Kerrtte UO L5 25 1032 
37% 16* KerBk 13 U I 32 
616 2* KavCon 
Ufa 14 Kevslnt 08b 28 19 
36* Ufa Kldde 13 U 9 
84 61* KMprfl 4Jffl LI 

84 62 KidpfC 480 S3 

S5 42ft Kldde pf 184 LI 
51* am KbnbCs 23Z 48 70 
35 21V KnohtRd 74 20 IS 

Sfa 17* Kogor ZX 83173 
29* 14* Kolmar 72 18 17 
23ft 17* Kopera 80 61 25 
35* 31* Kaprpf 4 JO UJ 
104 94* Kappr pflOJO 107 

10 12% Korean 

40% 29* Kroger 280 69 12 


9 113 Ofa 8* 8% + * 
11 1973 16* Uft 14*— ft 

1 3Jfa 27ft 37ft 

8 4069 35* K X —ft 

U 05 39ft 3* 39ft + ft 
Ufa 14 
Ufa Ufa . 

14 16: — ft 

9* 7ft— ft 

640 27% SB* 20ft- - 

3te 29 29 29 + j* 


... 14 

a 17 

1 14 
3300x10* 


T7* 17% 17* +j 


m* 


80 U 17 
204 97 8 
04 U 
— 87 


wo Ufa 

32% 32* 32fa + W 
20% 20* 20%+ ft 
Ufa W* 19% + W 

39* 37% a — m 

99 99 19 -+ 

17* 17* 17ft—* 
17* 17 17*— ft 

356 48ft 47* 47*— % 
28 3346 32% 32*— ft 
37 lft lft lft— ft 
23 22% 22*— * 

25% 25ft 25ft— ft 


?!* 71* + ft 



Growing with 
the need to manage 
our water resources 


Products from several Ametek 
Divisions are used to manage 
the capacity of deep wells, help 
farmers reduce irrigation 
needs and provide clearer, 
better tasting drinking water. 

Write for latest reports to: 


AMETEK 


Dept. H # 

410 Pork Avenue, 21st Floor, 
New York. NY 10022. 




4 i 

* j 

i 

{ 


i - An 


( 




! 1 


-■ :■ 1 


10 








UMonSi 
HtotaLoo Stock 


Dtv. YKL PE ItthHKfcLu* 


MO* 


07* 35* MreflM 
54% 30ft MortM 
83 55 MrtMpf 

13* BfaMarvK 
33* 22* MiBCO 
Ufa 7ft MaaaMr 
X 15% MasM 
Xfa 2ft MasuyF 
27% 20% MraCP 
IT* Ufa Moslnc 
80* Xfa MatniE . 
U 0* Mattel 
10* 4ft Matelwt 


200 L7 

40 

371 

64% 

44U 

64% 

1 34 Z7 


846 

50* 

49* 

<9* 

4J7 48 


483 

75ft 

74* 

74 fa 

.U 10 

14 


Ufa 

11% 

11% 

36 17 

15 

413 

30% 

X* 

X* 

X L7 

U 

74 

13% 

12 

13 

IX 90 

« 

61 

Mk 

IB* 

»* 



B91 

2* 

7% 

2W 

LM 10.9 


21 

24% 

25% 

30* 

UZ 117 


4$ 

11% 

n 

lift- 

0* 3 

13 

022 

43% 

42* 

42* 


11 

425 

13* 

Uft 

13% 



54 

8% 

■* 

a* 

230 10 


4? 

29% 

2Tft 

39ft- 


7 

50 

14 

13* 

13%- 

172 LA 

10 

300 

45ft 

45* 

45*- 

280b 58 

10 

351 

47 

46* 

4i*- 

220 79 


46 

78 

37% 

M 

ZU 1L3 


3 

XW 

Xft 

XW 

IX 08 

17 

3440 

27% 

77 

3716- 

. 


18 

a 

rift 

7ft- 

30 21 

X 

77 

9* 

9% 

FW- 



15* VIA Moxnm 
49* 38ft MOVDs 
49% 3fft Mavis _ 

32* 25* McDrPt 330 
X 30* McDrpf 
Xfa 23* McDorl 
12 6ft MCDfl Wt 
10* 6* McDtd „ _ 

62% 40% McDnra 82 10 U 1928 

84% 47% McOnD 184 U W 473 79% 79ft .. ._ 

44* 31% McGEd ZOO 49 43 1003 41% 41* 41ft 

48fa 34 McGrH 100 30 U 1252 41% 40ft 41 —1* 


,v 


59% 99% St*— * 


SJ 12 

9 


.. 7 

MB M 8 
J4 M U 
78 28 9 
248 50 9 


34% 19fa Mclntg 
41* 32% McKnd 240 
15* 10 McLcnb 
6* 3ft McLoowf 
Ufa 19% McNeS . SO 3J 
41ft 27* Maori 
24% uft Mrarux 
34% 24* MadM 
Xfa 33* AteOoa _ _ 

27 22% MafkMpflfO 107 

45* Xfa MalvM 104 30 12 

44% 40ft M il C M 1JD 2J TO 

101ft 78ft Mere* 

40% 40 Mordfti 

34% 23 MarLWi 

3ft 2 MasoOt 
22 Uft MOcPt 

2Sft 25fa MhoR. 

8% 5* Masab 
5ft 2ft Mastak 




Z5 X 4600 
2X3 
8 WSJ 
64 
7 



Ufa 12ft 
7% 

49 3316 

Ufa 9ft 

Ufa mjWHM 

yfo — - 


20* 72 

lift MHtnR 


84 49ft MMM 
X% 22% MhiPL 


8 32ft Uft 32ft 
988 4Wk 40% 41*+% 
72 W% 13* 13ft— fa 
n 3* 5ft Sft— fa 
43 27% Ufa 27ft + * 
X7 34% 36 34% — fa 

358 Xfa m* X — * 
182 31fa X X — fa 
W 57% 49% 4m— 1% 
T7 26ft Uft Ufa 
325 42ft 42ft 4Z%— fa 

174 57ft 54% 57 + % 

LX 13 15 2334 Wlfa 100ft 100%+ fa 
180 U 14 144 ASfa Alfa 61ft— fa 
' " 33ft 31ft 32ft— fa 

2% 2* 2ft 
Ufa 18ft lift— * 
29% 29* 29ft 
.7* 7 7 —ft 

3* _3* 3ft— ft 

108k. 27* 27* 27* 

- SOt. 5*. St -Si -7- ~ 
3108 SOW 57 50% +lfa 

144 2% 2% 2% 

252 26% Ufa 2f% 

5 «% JJFV Ufa 
245 7 6% 6%+ft 

U7Sx 48% 46% 47ft— lft 
5 3184 13% U U — fa 
12 18* It*. lift— ft 
2*fa 34% 24% 

14% 14ft 14ft— % 
Ofa 81* Xfa— 1 


as 


52 




!ft MB 18 » 
k M .9 33 
eaq ZJ6 58 9 
178 137 
MB 85 

248 M8 X. 67 
08- M 14 15 

388 47 13 34B7 


27* 87 t 77 31 Sofa- Xfa— ft 




23ft 11 Kidilma m un 
<7* 44fa K racer m .MI J 24 
33ft 13 Knar JO 48 7 


19% 19* 19% 

Xfa 30% 31 — ft 
25% Sft 25*— ft 
3% 3ft 2ft— ft 
Uft 18* lift— * 
34% 34* 34ft— ft 
19 79 79 ~ 

79 » 79 

53* 53* S3*— ft 
49* 40* 40ft— fa 
Eft 31 E — fa 
27% 27% 27% . 

19 lift UH— % 
_ 19ft 19* T*k 
150z 34ft 34ft 34% 

18 90 90 90 

132 Ufa Ufa Ufa— ft 
349 4g% 40* 40ft 


3 

55 

IX 

1 

2 

2 

402 

294 


5S9 


47 73 Xfa Xfa— fa 
32 47* 47 47 

IU 30% 19% X —fa 


284*107 9 


Stfa 22% LN Ho 
15% 790 LFE 
10 416 LFE pf 80 58 

17ft Ufa LLE Ry. 272*137 
4% 2 LLCCp 
17% Bfa LTV 
56* 45* LTV pf 
X IBfa LTVof 104 138 
49 50* LTV pf 525 69 

Ufa 13 LTVpf 1J5 8.1 
17 10% LSuhW 15 

29* 15ft LadGa IX 7.1 7 
12% 7ft Loftrue 30 20 
Xfa 23ft Lotra pf 204 98 
Ufa Ufa Lumpur M 1 J 14 
1% LomSra 204 

14* 10% LOwtlna 86 63 15 
25V. 13* LgprPi 30 9 13 

28* 20% LaorPpf Z87 110 
52* 37* LacrSg IX 17 9 
20* 14 LeaRril s 08 LI 15 
35% 24* LswvTr 180 45 13 
33ft 20ft LaaEnt J! 24 M 
T5fa 9 LaoMa 70 1.4 2* 
71 15* LM Flat A0 24 9 

Aft 2ft LObVtal 
16 IM Lchmn 188*117 
15* 9fa Lennar X )5 19 
24% 10ft LgucNtB 7 

X 20 LeucO pf 280 58 
34% 23 LevtSI 
38% 25% Lawftl 
soft 40 LOF 
79* 04ft LOFpf 
Xft Xft UbfVCP 
79 53 Lilly 

40ft 15ft L/mlfad 
*5* Ufa UncNH 
22% 18* UncPI 
57% UtlBR 


55 

TO 

2 

491 

37 

2115 

1 

in 


w 


am 24%—% 
Ufa Ufa + ft 


9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 
16% 14 16fa 
.3% 3% 3ft— fa 
10* Xfa low— ft 

fi% £6 49%+ % 
23 22* 22% — ft 

30 » +1 

15* 15* 

11 % 11 % + ft 
24 90 

Sft Ifa 

4ft Aft 
Ufa 12fa Uft + ft 
23% 23ft 23% 

Ufa 36 2516— fa 

4V* 48% 49 — ft 
19% 19% 19% + ft 
E* 33* 33* 

32% 32* 32* + fa 
Ufa 14ft 14ft + ft 
SB »% 19% + ft 
3% 3 Ifa + ft 


99* 

24% 

If 

Aft 


U* 14% UW— fa 


Ufa 13 +.» 

23% 23* 33%— ft 
37fa 30* 34% — % 
32* 32* 32ft— fa 
38% X% 38%+ ft 
48 47* 48 + ft 

74% 74 74% — 9k 


W% 30* 30% + fa 


185 57 » 615 

72 18 9 620 

M2 2J ■ 38 

475 40 U 

72 24 17 13 

370 61 12 3408 79 78* 79 + * 

.32 S « 027 37% 30* 3S%— % 

184 64 U 262 41 39* 40 — 

2J4dlL4 4 »% X* X% 

200 LO W 484 67% 67* 67*— % 

80a U 9 1347 50 48* 49fa— % 

- 80 28 11 «3 31 x* 30*—% 

44 23* L o an s IX 5 1434 43* 42% 42*— ft 

34% 18 LoolCofl 30 0 If 180 32V. 22 32fa + % 

33ft 19 LomFln 1.16 40 11 187 29% 29 29 — ft 

24* M« LomiW S 10 253 23% 23* 23ft— ft 

2* 2* LomMwt 45 2% Wt 2ft 

Ufa 17% Lnsior 1.90 LI 6 IE 23* 23* 23* + ft 
- Lanes pf 587 107 . 4 4916.49 4916 


53* X* LOCkhd 


42V, 


Loctita 


8% 

M 

50 

X 

20ft 

20* 


,»6 LILCo 
M* LILPfE 
23* LILMX 
8* LILBfX 
9 ULRfW 
. 9ft ULMV 
25* lift ULpfU 

19% 8* LIL WT 

15% 4 LJLPfP 
17ft 7 LILPIO 
55 34 (jongOr 

3Xfa 18* Lora 
15 10* LoGenl 

22fa LuLond 

25% 77 Lap OC 

32* 28% LaPLpf 600 169 
23fa 16* LaPLpf 3-16 164 
28fa 23% LouvGS 204 9 J 
49* 36 Lawsta 
X 1&fa Lows 
25* l» Lubrzl 
32 23% Lutws» 

Xfa IS* LucfcyS 
1* TOW Lukcra 


2 1509 7 


** Jft— % 
am xi 23 23 — * 

20Qz 41 41 41 —1 

6 17* 17* 17ft— % 

10 17* T7* 17* 

42 IT* 77* 17* + ft 

11 31 20 % 20 % 

17ft Ufa Ufa— ft 
IM 13ft IM— ft 
.14% 14* 14* + fa 

S fa 49% 49* — I* 
* 29* 29*— fa 
U 11* 12 + ft 

34ft 33* 31*—% 
22 * mo 22 ft 
32ft 32 32ft+ ft 

. 22* Xfa Xfa— fa 

_ . ._ 7 3017 27* 27% 27fa 
2X .63 6 37 46* 46 46 — % 

A 1.1 17 an 28* X 20*+ fa 

l.U 52 13 5M 23* 73 22V.— ft 

04 10 X 03 38 lft 29%+ ft 

•JS ".11 1W 19% 19$ 19% + ft 


u un 

3 14 17 
40 » 
IX 38 11 
08b 30 M 


I 

XI 

863 

24 

847 

331 

11 

39 


33 W 


IS 


14ft + ft 


M 


X* 13* AAA COM M 

51 34* MCA X 

24* 14% MCOTP IX 
43 34 MCorpf 150 

14% 7% MDC 32 

34 MSI JO 
14* 9U MGMGr 64 
Ufa 9 MGMGTPL44 _ 

16* 10 MGMIlO J0e 10 20 
5* 2ft MOMuwt 
25* 17* MGMHa 80d Z7 14 
» mkMBLIa 7H 
54% 26* MacmJI IX 10 IS 
2716 Ufa Moemwl 


M 19 SAX 18% 17% 18 — % 
10 24 1857 47% 46* 47% + % 
68 7 IH 23* 23 23%+% 

M 6 38* 38* 38ft— % 

Z3 11 17 Uft 13% Ufa— fa 

M 15 30 39ft 39% 39% + ft 

U 34 39 13% 13* U% 

L7 7 lift 17% 11% 

SW 13fa Ufa 12ft 

3 2% 2fa 2% 

135 32* 2Z% 2M— % 

3 18* Ufa 18* . 

226 53* S3 Sfa— % 

_ 26* 26* 26* 


754 4696 4440 4** + % 
MU 40 40 40 —IVi 

14 13% 13% X3M— fa 
337 37* 36ft 3M— 1 . 
45 3* Sfa Sfa—* 

TU 14* U 14 — * 
217 X 19% W%— ft 


37ft 36% 

52 X* X 


+ % 


53ft 38* MOW 1-16 25 11 
42 36 Macypl 625 108 

19* lift Mod Ret 
39* 24 MOBlCf IX Z7 6 
2V* M Met Alt 1800c 
2M> 12* Manhllt JObZt 6 
XU 13% MonhNt 83 10 19 
24% M% ManrCS .1* J 23 
41% 22* MfrHw 370 L7 5 1453 
58ft 41 MfTHpf LStalU 409 
57 40 MITH pf L92B12J 451 

11* 5* vIManvl 3 151 7% 7ft 7ft 

Xfa IBfa ylMavl pt V3 22% 22* 23% + * 

» *i gyco 1» U I W mk M »5— ft 

2tf **”71” 4 7M 3% Sfa 

2% fa Marcda 150 lft l lft + ft 

35fa 19* MWMld 100 50 I 61 32fa 33 23fa+-fa 

S-.’SSSSS? ^ 18 ia looo wfa S* S*i» 

12% 9* MarkC 72 37 374 W 9ft U 

19 UfaMarepf 17 77 338 15* 15*15* 

80* a* Momot 74 7 14 190 n% «fa or*- % 


«% e . «tr + .|6 


tm 6% Mlanlnj 1181 9 8ft 9 + fa 

an* 15 MoPSv U2b 68 4 If W 90ft 20ft— ft 

a 17* MoPS Of 204 IM ■ 2 TO* 20fa 2D* + fa 

Efa Wfa McPSpr ZillU 4 X* X* X* 

Ufa 4 0IHbf n 4* 4* 4%— ft 

31% 23ft Mobil 2J0 70 9 5163 X 29% 29ft— % 

4 ft vISfeMH 61 1 1 1 

** M Modem .13 19 7% 7* 7% — ft 

27 10fa Mrtwsc M 17 18 441 3790 24% 27 + ft 

15 8* MobkDI aiES 9% 9 9V.— * 

X% 14% Moorch 80 67 24 » 16% Uft ]6%— ft 

X 40% MOrtoia ZX 5J 8 1773 44% 43* 43*— * 

31* X MADU 274 U 4 93 29% 20% 29 — ft 

Wfa U% MonP» U0 U 11 2787 22* 22% 22%— ft 

!»% im Mort* 1X0100 55 17% T7fa 17%- ft 

9fa Mi MONY X L9 8 165 9% ■% 9 + ft 

E M% MoaraC 280 19 12 234 Sift 50% Xft + ft 

2fft 10% MortM IX 47 U 16 X SO 23 
25 25? MwMof 270 97 34 27* 26% 27ft + ft 

48ft Xfa Moran X Z20 68 8 2D41 46 45% 45* 

iS? S orK 9 1 ’X LB » 361 38% 30* Uft- ft 

JJ* ink MarmS X 37 14 39 22 2H6 Eft- ft 

mu. ¥Lr H II JH i** W* 1996— ft 

JJ* Merton » 04 LI 13 WZ7 -30% J9% 30ft + ft 




f 


it 


29fa Mbtrfa i 04 20 11 7533 32% 31% 31% — ft 


/ 


Ml 15% Minin) 74b 27 13 
a% 15 Marana 393 

SS Wun> y U UU 

■Ji H* MarpO IX L3 11 
2Mh 18% MutTVO IX 57 W 
Uft 11 MufOni 1040117 
11% 3% MyarLn 


17 

294 

IU 


34% 34* 206 + fa 
•». 19% TV% — % 
42ft 41* 42 
29% 29% 29%+% 
Xft 30% 20ft — * 
12ft Ufa 12*— ft 
4fa 4 4ft— ft 


< 


»* 16 NAFCO 
«* 39% NBD 
34 1416 NBI 

22* 17* HCH - 

am a ncnb 

X* 20% NCR s 
17 10% NLlnd 

a ft NVF 
66W Eft NWA 


IX 49 11 2S3 
200 O 7 405 

— w tooo 

33 32 14 110 
172 U 9 107 

X 3J 8 52M 

X 17 3847 

X Z117 ^ 


am xfa 20 % — w 

5ft. 55ft 56V.+ H 
15ft 14% U -% 
22 - » 22 


/ 


» 27% 27*—+* 

"ft 1T X "ftXlf 
x* P' 5 iSK® is n s P* ™i+ % 

Tassay^e 

tSft ftft ’3 E U si I8S ^ ITift 

20% 22* NotDItf 220 77 19 677 Xfa 27* Xft + fa 

S* S?gtS2S!_fa 

SiSftiSES? 15,B 7 

2 JR m mmavl-v!.' 

58 Mild! XX LI X 42* 47 42 +1 

20 14 1245 34% 36 26ft + fa 
M 17. M% Iff* + % 
®1 








17% NMadE 
lift 0% NMteas 
» 2LW NtPrast IX LA . 12 


14* 9* NtSaml 
29* Xfa NtSvcIn 
M 11% NSfoud 
W 10 Norco n 
Xfa X* NevPw 
13* 8ft NevSvL 


11 4771 

1JXT-X4 91 97 

.00 Z8 9 IM 
X 40 A 37 
274 97 9 44 

47 7 44 


27* 27* 27*— fa 
Ufa W* M%— ft 
2W6 29fa Xfa— ft 
14* 14% 74% — ft 
lift W% 11 - ft 


39% 2B% N Eng El L40. 90 A. 


?* Xfa NBlPpf L7B IL5 


mwm 

30* 3816 Xfa 


24% 38* NJRae 284 LI 

Wfa Iffa N+SCO 204 iu 
E 24 NYSpf 175 112 
70 55* NYSpf 8X.13L7 

25* TO NYSpf A 301 0118 . 

r a;Baa,s{B 
s s^kss, * *** 

54% X Ncwmf 
5% 1% Nwporlc 

™ 12 NtaMP 
27* 72. NklMM 
E» 24fa NklMM 

2u. 2?* NlaMW 483 112 - 

41* 34 NfoAtaif 623 IU 
teft H NIMpf UX ILL 
61 48% NlaMBf 722 U0 

19* 15% NlagSfi 17S0U0 
Uft 18% Mtaaftf -J7 J 23 

3T 24% NICOR 384 1L1 

19 12ft NabMf .12 J 30 ms 
57 9 653 

> bS 

7 
7 



218 

J 34 24 24 +1 

9 30 2SW 25fa 2Sfa— fa 

6 4060 22V. 22 7210 

j3 *|ftaftXft + * 

W4 25* 25fa 25* 

34 Ufa 16* 17 — fa 

2»* 21* 2BVk+ fa 


» , 48* NcrfkSa 300 
3Zfa 1» Mart In 


^ 41% 4Uk-ft 

6 not llfa IM IMh— ft 
2Mk 28 3* S* * 
UOz X 30 30 

8*-i 

* Xft— ft 


5% 29* Norafr 240 0J 
^ S HSUS' P* 4728100 

V S JWfjm x 7 

6fa « NACoal 100 18 
J5fa 38* NAPBIa IX 20 
Xfa J3H NBurtJ 10% 93 
U% NoefaUi 178 1L5 

” SSSE 1-5S 

, , E% NoStPry 324 77 
** * HSE"F» LAO ILL. 
31 » MSP pf 610 1L9 

sssrsRtfEns 


HJ? lft Mft 

fa % 




’§? S8£ 


nu IM 5® <6 


Sft J*6 Nlhgatv. 

Norirpo IX 


”U’S 


45ft 33% .. 

4B% NwtliW 206 

hWlp Pf 270 UJ 
J* 2S JSS" 3X 58 II 
32* X% Naraw ix 78 14 


*JJglT7 

** ^ JBL B " 


f €PPi+ft 

SJJ S 40fa— iu. 

s5ii|=s 


80* 


70-8 


26* S- + % 

^4% M" » 

dJ? 4 % 4 *jt S: 

79% + £ 


8% 2 Oaktnd 


Ocdpfat 


63 U 

97 9 


Sift -to* OcdPm £3 isr 




^S; a* 


mz 


MMMv 






(Contmiiedi 


14 ) 


























INTER NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


Page 11 


Why multinationals seeking 
to buy or sell a company should 


begin at The Morgan Bank 



Shown in Paris are three Morgan bankers who handle European merger and acquisition assignments. From left, Georges van Erck, London, and Frank Beelitz. New York; Terence Eccles heads the bank’s European Financial Analysis group. 


4 ■ V • 

> »»■•- 

i m 


■a % 

*■ *■ 


■r*'* 

V : ' 


i.i * 




**• t:' z. 
& ’ - 


>a 

P*' • 
■«— 

».-» ■* 
■»■+ T 

a> i 

„ i v* 

d * •- 

Si- 

• • 

*«"T *" 

& **' 


lorgan is a major force in cross-border 
mergers and acquisitions and divestitures 
ecause we offer to buyers and sellers 
nywhere in the world key advantages— 
reativity, depth of experience, breadth of 
esources, attention to confidentiality, and 
objective advice. 

alk to Morgan’s M&A professionals in New 
ork, in London, in Tokyo and you’ll quickly 
iscover Morgan can help you in many key 
/ays— whether you intend to buy or sell. 
Morgan’s strengths include: 

□ Among banks and investment banks 
lorgan is a leader in cross-border transac- 
ions. Because we’re worldwide, the buyers 

nd sellers are already known to us, frequently 
s Morgan banking clients. And our contacts 
re at the highest decision-making levels. 

□ Morgan doesn’t just do deals. Our M&A ad- 
ice is objective, because our views of any trans- 
ction are based on your company’s long-term 
est interests. We’re in it with you all the way. 


□ Morgan’s Financial Analysis Department 
plays an important role in our M&A activity. 
Staffed with more than 100 professional ana- 
lysts in 18 countries, it’s one of the largest, 
most experienced research teams in the world. 
These experts understand financial planning 
and corporate strategies, specialize in key 
industries, and are completely at home in the 
countries where they operate. They take each 
analysis beyond the standard indexes of value 
to search out factors that aren’t immediately 
discernible and yet often reflect true worth. 
And they never base their valuations just on 
predetermined formulas, because they recog- 
nize that each company or division calls for a 
different type of analysis. 

□ Morgan clients also have the added value 
of Morgan’s extensive international electronic 
library that gives us-and ourclients-access 
to the current names, locations, industry, and 
specific acquisition or divestiture intentions of 
thousands of public and private companies 
located around the world. 


The Morgan Bank 


We offer a total advisory capability to help 
you thread your way through the maze of mod- 
em M&A requirements. You can use all our 
services, or part of them. Defining your crite- 
ria. Preparing industry studies. Identifying, 
screening, and approaching possible targets. 
Helping establish prices. Working with your 
legal counsel and accountants. Assisting in 
negotiations on price and structure. Closing 
the deal. 

Of course, Morgan fully protects each client’s 
confidential information and interests. We’ve 
set up special internal controls and safeguards 
to ensure strict secrecy of M&A assignments- 
from the first contact to the final handshake. 

Mobilize Morgan’s resources 
You don’t have to be a Morgan banking client 
to use our M&A services. We’re paid by fee- 
agreed on in advance according to the nature 
and complexity of the assignment. For more 
information write to Georges P. van Erck, Vice 
President, Morgan Guaranty Trust Company, 

1 Angel Court, London EC7R 7AE. 


Member FDIC 





















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 

IUSIVIESS ROUNDUP 



Page 13 


Castle & Cooke Agrees 
ro Flexi- V an Merger 


AT&T Talks Chrysler Says It Plans Small Car to Compete With GM Saturn 

mm y iv " ¥ M. 


By Bruce JKcppd 

Lot Angela Tima Semin 

LOS ANGELES — Castle ft 
*>ke Inc, rich inroad estate bat 
kw in cash, has announced 
cm on a merger plan with 
in Corp„ a transportation leasing 
■mpany based in New York that 
I headed by the Los Anjgdesmves- 
r and developer David HL Mur- 
ick. 

The merger would, among other 
. mgs, grant Flexj-Van cations to 
' ly certain Castle ft Cooke land 
. tidings for up to $300 million, 
nch of the company’s real estate 
in Hawaii. 

Mr. Murdock, who owns 33 per- 
nt of Flexi-Van and is its chair- 
an and chief executive, would as- 
me the same positions at Castle 
Cooke. Castle ft Cocke's chief 
ecutive, ELD. Cook, would re- 
am president and would also bo- 
rne chief operating officer. 

A statement issued Tuesday by 
r. Murdock and Mr. Cook said 
r. Murdock was “enthusiastic 
d optimistic" about the prospect 
investing Flexi-Van's “substan- 
1 cash Ocw in the attractive op> 
■rtunity provided by Castle ft 
joke businesses." 

Mr. Cook added, “The financial 
-ength and substantial oreh flow 
Flexi-Van will significantly en- 
nce Castle & Cooke’s ability to 
xi its current financial difficul- 
s and reach satisfactory terms in 
: debt- renegotiation discussions 
rrently under way with its 
nks." 

The plan calls for Flexi-Van to 
merged into a new subsidiary of 
istle ft Cooke, the nation’s laig- 
t producer of fresh fruits and veg- 
ables, including Dole-brand 
neapples and bananas. Each 
are of Flexi-Van common stock 
ndd be converted into 22 shares 
Castle ft Cooke common stock 


and U shares of a new series of 
voting, convertible preferred stock. 

As a result of the merger, current 
Castle & Cooke stockholders 
would own 55 percent of the com- 
pany’s stock. Flexi-Van stockhold- 
ers would own 45 percent. Under 
the plan, which is subject to ap- 
proval by shareholders of the two 
companies as well as Castle ft 
Cooke's lenders and regulators, 
Flexi-Van would have an option to 
acquire up to 4.725 million shares 
of Castle ft Cooke common stock 
for SI 1 a share in cash. Castle ft 
Cooke has about 25.6 million 
shares outstanding. 

In Tuesday’s trading on the New 
York Stock Exchange. Castle ft 
Cocke common stoat dosed at 
511-375, off 25 cents, and Flexi- 
Van closed at $30,625, off 12& 
cents. 

Castle ft Cooke had reported 
Friday that it was discussing a 
merger with another New York 
Stock Exchange company. 

In the past two years, Flexi-Van 
trimmed its debt from more than 
MOO million to abool $250 mffijon, 
according to the statement. It also 
sold off some lagging businesses 
and raised its earnings to $21 mil- 
lion last year from $14 milli on in 
1983, while increasing cash flow to 
582 million from 564 million. 

Castle & Cooke ended 1984 with 
debt totaling $468 million, includ- 
ing S258 milli on in private, unse- 
cured debt that it has been sedring 
to restructure. It missed a March 1 
interest payment on two series of 
securities mat could become due 
and payable by the month’s end. 

For the six months ended Dec. 
29, the company recorded a net loss 
of $63.9 million on revenues of 
$784.6 million, compared with in- 
come of $393,000 and revenues of 
$708.7 million a year earlier. 


To Toshiba on 
Joint Venture 

The Associated Prtts 

TOKYO — American Tele- 
phone ft Telegraph Co. and To- 
shiba Corp. ate negotiating a joint 
telecommunications venture in Ja- 
pan, a spokesman for the Japanese 
company said Wednesday. 

The spokesman said talks were 
gang on. but that he could not 
comment on them. He said AT&T 
might broach the subject at a news 
conference scheduled for March 
25. 

Asahi Shimhun the daily news* 

S pcr, and the Japan Broadcasting 
i. earlier reported that the two 

giant companies were planning to 
create a joint-venture concern in 
which Toshiba would market such 
AT&T products as digital tele- 
phone switching equipment in Ja- 
pan. 

The newspaper said AT&T also 
was considering similar joint ven- 
tures with Ricoh Co. and Olivetti 
Japan. 

Tbe reports come a month before 
Japan's teWn imw inirairirtn* mo- 
nopoly. Nippon Telegraph ft Tele- 
plume Pubhc Corp., goes public 
U.S. companies have been pressing 
fear access to the Japanese market, 
which could mean hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars in new business. 

The Japanese government is 
working out new regulations to 
govern Nippon Telegraph ft Tele- 
phone’s move into the private sec- 
tor, and the Reagan administration 
jm complained that the rules un- 
der consideration may dinfriminn^ 
against foreign manufacturers. 

The current U.S. share of Japan’s 
$6-biflion-to-$7-bfllion telecom- 
munications market is about S130 
mill ion, whereas Japan last year 
sold about S 2 bfltion worth of tde- 
ro rnmumeations eq uipmen t in the 
United States. 


By James Risen 

Lot Angeles Tima Savin 

DETROIT — Chrysler Corp.'s 
chairman. Lee A. Iacocca, has said 
that Chrysler would bufld a new. 
high-technology small car before 
General Motors Corp.’s highly 
publicized Saturn subcompact goes 
into production. 

The pledge move came less than 
a week after Mr. Iacocca had said 
that Chrysler would triple its im- 
ports of Japanese-built small cars 
in response to the Reagan adminis- 
tration’s decision not to seek a fifth 
year of limits on Japanese auto im- 
ports. 

In a speech here Monday night 
to auto industry analysts, Mr. ia- 
cocca said Chrysler’s new small-car 
program, code-named “Liberty 


Project," would develop models 
with more advanced technology 
than anything now offered by the 
Japanese. He indicated that the 
fiiift cars would be introduced be- 
fore GM‘s Saturn, which is sched- 
uled to enter production in either 
the 1988 or 1989 model years. 

A Chrysler spokesman con- 
firmed the details of Mr. Iacocca’s 
speech Tuesday, adding that the 
Liberty Project is an expanded ver- 
sion of Chryskx’s “Concept 90,” a 
two-year-old effort to develop a do- 
mestic small car that could be cost- 
competitive with Japanese imports. 

GM announced on Jan. 8 that it 
would spend S5 billion over the 
next three to five years to set up 
Saturn Corp., an independent, 
wholly owned subsidiaiy-io pro- 


duce and market up to 450.000 
front-wheel-drive subcompact cars 
a year. 

Intense media coverage over the 
last two months of CM'S search for 
a site to build Saturn’s manufactur- 
ing complex has brought a national 
spotlight to GM*s efforts to com- 
pete more effectively with the Japa- 
nese. 

Executives at both Ford Motor 
Co. and Chrysler have privately 
voiced skepticism about whether 
Saturn wanants so much attention 
and pointed out that both Ford and 
Chrysler have similar projects. 
Ford’s is called Project Alp hi 

Some analysts questioned the 
significance of Mr. Iacocca’s 

Chrysler can come out 


pledge. 

“Sure, 


with a new product before Saturn,” 
said David Cole, director of the 
Center for the Study of Automotive 
Transportation at the University of 
Michigan. 

“But Saturn is more than just a 
new car, it is an attempt to trans- 
form the manufacturing processes 
used in the auto industry,” Mr. 

Cole said. "And I would question 
whether Chrysler has the techno- 
logical resources that General Mo- 
tors has to do a total revolution in 
hs manufacturing processes of the 
kind that Saturn represents." 

Mr. lacocca’s promise came just 
days after he announced that 
Chrysler would triple its imports of 
small care from Japan while de- 
emphasizmg its domestic produc- 
tion of subcompacts. 


He said last week in New York 
that Chryslcr’s proposed “P-car,” a 
U.S. -built subcompact scheduled 
to be introduced late in the 1986 
model year, would be converted 
into a more expensive compact 
mode! that would not compete di- 
rectly vrith Japanese imports. 

■ Ford Profits Shared 

Ford on Wednesday distributed 
5360 million in profit-sharing 
checks to an estimated 170,000 
hourly and salaried employees. 
United Press International report- 
ed from Dearborn, Michigan. The 
pool reflected Ford’s 1984 domes- 
tic profits of 52.39 billion. 

Last year, the profit-sharing pool 
was S69 milli on. The profit-sharing 
plan was negotiated in 1982 


Pan Am, Union 
Schedule Talks 

Untied Prest International 

NEW YORK — Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways and striking 
mechanics were to meet 
Wednesday in an attempt to 
settle a two-week walkout that 
has reduced Pan Ant's flights to 
about 30 percent of normal lev- 
els. 

Officials of the Transport 
Workers Union, representing 
the 5,800 mechanics, said “ev- 
ery effort" would be matte iq 
comply with a directive by a 
U.S. federal mediator, Robert J. 
Brown, for the meeting. The 
two rides have not met formally 
since the strike began Feb. 28. 

Pilots, engineers, clerks and 
flight attendants honored the 
mechanics’ picket line until last 
Thursday when pilots and engi- 
neers decided to resume work. 
Pan Am said Wednesday that it 
would soon increase operations 
to 52 percent of normal. 


Il l 4th-Quarter Profit Falls 37% 


By Kathleen Day 

Las Angela Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Internation- 
al Telephone ft Telegraph Corp., 
which has undertaken a major di- 
vestiture program, has reported 
that its fourth-quarter profits fell 
37 percent from 1983 while profits 
for all of 1984 declined 33 percent 
from the previous year. 

The New York-based conglom- 
erate died “difficult conditions'* in 
several buaness areas, including in- 
surance, forest products and com- 
munications equipment. 

Net income for the three-month 
period axled Dec. 31, 1984, totaled 
5175 million compared to a profit 
of 5278 milli on in the like period a 
the coumanv sa id Tues- 



For the full year, net income 
came to $448 miilioa, compared to 
$675 millioa in 1983, ITT said. 
Revenue rose 5.1 percent to S19.6 
billion from $18.6 billion. 


“These results reflect the diffi- 
cult conditions we faced during the 
year in the property and casualty 
insurance business, forest products 
and in certain communications 
equipme nt ma rkets," said Rand V. 
Araskog, IlTs chairman. 

“In addition, we elected to pro- 
vide reserves for certain operations 
and businesses that have incurred 
losses for some time and show lim- 
ited prospects for a turnaround," 
he said. 

The company has been divesting 
itself of several units to concentrate 
on communications, insurance; fi- 
nancial services and industrial 
technology operations. In January, 
the company said it would seek to 
seO several units for a total of about 
S1.7 billion. 

“This program is proceeding 
well, with approximately $300 mil- 
lion under contract or closed and 
with active discussions under way 
for the sale of several other compa- 


nies on the divestiture list,” Mr. 
Araskog said. 

Included in the 1984 income is a 
$124- million gain from the sale of 
Continental Banking Co. Lo Ral- 
ston Purina Co. in the fourth quar- 
ter, the company said. 

TIT said net income for both 
periods was reduced by about $76 
million, refl ecting a provision for 
the sale of JTTs telecommunica- 
tions manufacturing facilities in 
Argentina and the questionable fu- 
ture of its consumer products com- 
panies in several countries in south- 
ern Africa and its nuclear piping 
equipment manufacturing plants in 
North Carolina, Kentucky and 
Ohio. 

The year’s net income also in- 
cluded a gun of $55 wifflinn from 
an increase in value of ITTs invest- 
ment in Standard Telephones ft 
Cables PLC, which arose from 
Standard’s acquisition in the third 
quarter of 1CL PLC, a British com- 
puter manufacturer. 


Peugeot to Build 

Cars in China 

Reuters 

PARIS — 1 Automobiles Peu- 
geot. subsidiary of Peugeot SA, 
said Wednesday that it would 
sign a 600- million-franc ( 55 8.5- 
nxOlion} agreement Friday for 
the production of Peugeot 504 
pickups and station wagons 
near Guangzhou, Chfoa 

The joint venture, Guangz- 
hou-Peugcot Automobile Co_ 
will have an initial capital of 
240 million francs, 46 percent 
of which will be provided by 
Guangzhou Automobile Manu- 
facturing. China International 
Trust ft Investment Corp. wQl 
provide 28 percent. Automo- 
biles Peugeot 22 percent and 
Banque NaiionaJe de Paris 4 
pcrcenL 

Full production will start in 
two and a half years, Jean Bal- 
lot, c hairman of Automobiles 
Peugeot, told reporters. 


-ADVERTISEMENT' 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied bv Funds Listed 
13 March IMS 

TH» MtasMf value mMIMMM MswarewvpIM bvfho Foods tided wtHi fte 
excwttoa of mrw fond* wtms quotes ora band as lane price*. Tbe M tfc rartn o 
manrtaal symbols Mkata ff weocy of q u o tattoo * taarttotf for H» iffT: 

(d)- dotty; |y)-w iM r; [M-M-awtiihr; {rl-rrautarty; ll) -trrogolorfv. 

AL MALMANAGEMENT 
Iw) AJ-Mnl Trust ! 


BANK JULIUS BAER ft COl Ltd. 

—Id - - - - 


31 


S M&n O RANGE NASSAU CROUP 

PB4S571 The HCW* [B7DJ4PB0 
— (d > Bern- Betaosmonri-K 


S3U0 


] Ecndboer Amarlcia 
—Ed I Equlboor Europe 


EL®! 

fc j«n Uoytk inti Growth.^. Sm’us 


—Id ) Equiboer Pocfflc SF 11*9X0 ■ ; :--i 

.suss ^siasssssfc- sVmBs 


— IdlStockbor 
-JdjCSFFund 


—Id ) Crossbow Fund. 
—Id) I 


I ITFFundttV. 
BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
—Id ) Aslan Growth Fund. 
Iw) DMrband. 


SF 173X00* — unw hit! Pacific SF 1 

iejui PAR ISBAS— GROUP 

— SF TTjm —Id ) Cortna International SBSJl 

- *.11-2 — (wlOBLI-OM DM1.M&41 

SF 0135 
tUMUD 




Fi r A wfa. 


S10LH 

SF 8285 
S IS JO — jd 


— Iwl FIF— Elmo SltU» — Id 

— iw) Fi r — P od fl e si&ci —id 

— <d j Indmuet MuttUxmdt A SB57] onv 

— W ) Indosuoz Multlbonds B » 141.15 


■e) OeUGESTlOA 
— Iw) OBLFDOLLACq 
—Iwl OBLI-YEM ■■ J 
— IW) OBLhGULDEN 
■ ) PAROI L-FUM 


UNO 

PARINTER FUND. 

PAR US Treasury Band— H01J4 

ROYAL B. OF CANA DAPOBULGUERNSEY 

•fiwl RBC Cnodlon Fund LM sil.H 

BRITAN NMLPOSS7I.SL Heller, JrNV -Hwl RBC For EaftWadflC Fd SIBuU 

~rw) BrUDailar Income jujus* -H») RBC Inti Cacnm Fa. 12000 

— Iw) BrH A MonaaJCWT IU* -Ww> RBC I - 

— (0 » Bril. InllS Monottportt SOJ0O -t(d| RBC/ 

—Id I BrIL Infix Maws svzss ■'Hwl RBC North Amor. Fd. SV2I* 

— Iwl Brtt.Untverii* Growth SOMO 

— Iw) BrtLGotd Fund 

— Iwl BrfUManoBJCumncv 

—Id j Brtt. Javan Dir P*rL Fd 10.971 

CUTT* SVEMSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

“iS HE!!* SMS 17 aiUanSan^xrt-ma 

—Id ) Bril warMTodin. Fund— SOJU — |b ) SHB Bond Fund S 21.1* 

—Iw) SHB mil Growth Fund S 1«Jt 


Inti Income Fd_ SIOJT 

-+ld l RBC ManCunsncy Fd S22J0 

■'Hwl RBC North Aim*. Fd. S*ai- 

S0.nr SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (4M-2Uara) 

S «&«==» K=H) 


SWISS BANK CORP. 

*11.77 —Id) America Voter SF 43125 

—Id » D-Mark Band Selection DM11127 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— Iw) Caudal inH Fund 
— (wl Capitol Italia SA_ 

w, -Id 1 OolRw Bond Seiedtan — *T2054- 

-Id) Bond Voter Swf 3F103JB — « ) FWhi Bond S«eelan_ FL 11722- 

_ld> _ - 

— Id)_ .... 

—Ml Band Votor Ysn Yea 1037AM 

—id) Convert Valor Swf 

— Id) convert Valor US-OOUAR. 

-Id)- 


I Bond VWor D-mark DM HUM \ i " 

I Band Volor US-OOLLAR — tljjlB ZjS fiST: 

I Rml IM» Van YM 10374M ~1S l 

* SF 10925 IT}! rElFlES 

-DOLLAR. S ill AS i KSKiSSril 
cp »oi eo HO I Universal f 


SF 9125 
SFH7L75 


Forehm Bond Sal SF WUf 

New Ser SF 27725 

Select SFiut 

SFISCtt 


-Id 
-Id 
— Id 
—Id 
-Id 

—Id _ 

—Id i Europa— Motor 

-<d) PocWc -Votor 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
Hd ) Goncontra. 


C5 FondS— Int1_e SF172IB _Kd 

CS Money Market Fuad — SIMM 
CS Money Market Fund DM102100 —id 

E nerd Is— V otor SF 17100 — <et 

SF 102200 _(d 


SFJPIM 

SF7US UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

Amos US.Stl — SF 4175 

Bond-Invest 5F 4725 

Fonsa Swiss Sh. SF I34J0 

Jqoon-IIWfl SF 1017JU 

wioa -...SamSawttiAfr.Sh. SFSttSO 

SFi77m IdJSmioWBCkBnea) SF26L5D 

51 UNION INVESTMENT Fronkturt 

H dJ LtrUrwiTta DMOOO 

DMJJ?? — (d)UnHonds DM2220 

DM87.14 — |d ) unlrak DM 7825 

Other Funds 

Iw) Acttbonds tnvastments Fund. S2ELSS 

|wk Acttvest lntl *WM 

Cm) Allied Ltd IU0 

(w) Aautta International Fund_ *107.14 

I r ) Arab Finance J.F S IAI2 

biAriSw S 141234 

-1«ngs gnmne » iwl Trujtar Inn pi lAEtF)- — *1030 

-Iwl FAC European yA7 \wi BNP Intsmond Fund *1*1.46 

— Iw) FACOrlentol. *3SJ3 (wl Bandsetox-iwue Pr. SFU7A0 

|m) Canada Gtd-Martaaae Fd SUS 


— Hd » inti R n tmtond 

Own A Horont i Uavd Gootob 

— im) DAH commodity Pool. * . 

— im Currency A Goto Pool. — S JlfM *~ 
— lm) wtnen. Llto Fut.Peol_ 

— Imi Trans World Fut. PooU J97S26 — 

FAC MGMT. LTD. I MV. ADVISERS 
_ ' r HJIL I 


m) OevekBid Ofhtarv Fd.. — SIM 

iw) Cotunfeta Securtttok FL 19936 

: comete _ 

(w> Convert. Fd. Inti A 
Iw) Convert Fd. Inti B 

b 


FORBES POM GRAND CAYMAN 1m\ 

London Aoent m-OFSOU Id 

—Iw) Goto Income — . *7Jg* 

—Iwl Gold Appreciation **35 lb 

— Iw) Poller Income .. *173 Iw) 

— I m) Strategic Tradtoa— — st-ti 

iw) 
d 

p 

lw> 


GEFINOR FUNDS. ._ 

-Iw) East Invatmmf Fund S390JI {h 

-Iw) Scatthh World Fund «}2tn 52 

“Iw) State St. American — . S14M8 ' 

casttoirii LM i pn.Agentm-imna 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT C ORP. 

PB IIS. St PwW Port Guernsey. 04II-3S7U 

IlWhANUlUl — llttB 

(cn)GAMArMtraae Inc *12223 

Iwj OAM^kSmTnc ZZ. *10*3* ‘w 

(w) GAM Emrftaae — *1330 tr 

Iw) GAM Praoc-voL^ SF 9734 

Id i GAM internoUonal I nr 
Iw) CAM North America Inc. — 

Iwj GAM N. America UnH Trust. 

Iwl GAM Poodle Inc 


Cna ltd Praswrv. Fd. mil. 


CJ.R. Japan Fund. 


FIDELITY POB <70, Hamilton Bermuda 

zjS) SSS JvShSfeSST"" j'lStw atoSS! 

^{tOSU!tZfSSSS~ Id MU.R. Australia Fund 

—Id ) FideHTv AushsHa Fund. S7A5 

-Id ) Ftdewy Dbawerv.Fund — *103* 

— Id) Fidelity mr.Sws.Tr *121 A3 

—Id J Fidelity Far East Fund *1MI 

— Id ) Fidelity Inn. Fund *53.9? 

— (d)FidelHY Orient Fund *Z6JM 

— IQ1 Fidelity Frontier Fund S11D 

—Id ) FlcWItv PocHIc Fund___ S 13147 
—Id) Fidelity Suet Growtn Fa. — *M.M 
—Id ) FldoirtY World Fuad *17)43 


S1U9 

SL82 
S 9 JO 
SMI 



D. wilier WM Wide ivt ... 

Drnfckar InvwLFund ILV_ J T.1U.M 
Dreytus Fund InTL s3S7Q 

Dreyfus IntercontlnanT *3928 

The Estobltotnaent Trust * Ifll 

«3BS»S&= 

Rfty Stars Ud. S89U9 

Finsbury Group Ltd S ITSJD 

PonstoM Issue Pr SFMW 

Foraxtund — — _. * 7.18 


Gawemm. Sec Pimae - 

Fron(rf-Tni*t Interzkis DM4080 

Haunmonn HMev N.V, *10754 

Heetla Funds SIOaOS 

Horizon Fund SlJteM 

I LA urn Gold Bond SJ28 

Interfund SA 11232 

li ii ei inu rha l Fund — S 319JH 

Inn Currency Fund Ltd *7*4 

loft Secur Hies Fund *«* 

tstoOWS. 


id ) Invest® I 


Iw) GAM Stsrt. A lntl UMt Trust. 

Im) gam SnNm Inc 

Iw) GAM Woridsrtde ine_ 

iBUGAMTvdMSjLCKMA 

G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 
-Iw) Berry Put Fd. Ud.. 


CUVL99 Ir) Invest). _ . 

Sltffjo ir ) ItaHoriui w ln tl Fund i 
IOtjdp Iw) Japan Setoriton Fund. 
* 11X90 (w) Jaoan PocfflcFimd. 
IjSsBP rw) -totter Pins. lntl. LM. 
*W34 Id I KMitwart Beneonlntn l 


S 130*0* 
f Ilf. 10 


»w (wl 


—Id ) G.T. AppHed Science ... 

—Id ) G.T. Aston HJC GwftLFd — ST144* (m 

— Iw) G.T. Asia Fund SUV US 

—Id ) G.T. Australia Fund - S20J0* (b 


. , Lloyds Hitt Smaller I 

iusr (wILUKltoHL. 


.Europe Fund. 


—Id 1 GT, 

-Iw) g.t. Eure Small Cos Fund 

-Id ) G.T. Della- Fund 

-jd)G.T. Band Fund. 


*JJ7 (w)NAAT 


Kiemwurt Bens. Jop. I 
Letcom Fund. 


Levare 

Ltoulbi 


ICOPHOM. 


a: 


DM 4473 
, SAM 
*1*59 

- *!5*'* 5 

„ S 10730 

rww 

*7023 

* 1,12474 
_ *17X79 
, * 127X00 
_ * 1452 
_ *71-13 
_ SW7M 

— SUM 

Y ??cS? 


—id) G.T. Gtobot Tectmioy Fd — SUM <wi Najulf_ 

— td ) G.T. Honthu Pal Min der — *2491 (m> N5P F.I.T- 

—id ) G.T. investment Fund—— X17m iw) PANCURRMnc 


|d I Nlkko Growth PoctaaeFd S10W43J 

*144? (w) Nippon Fund *2M5’ 

SVJe (w> Kovotec Investment Fund — S1KM 

- *14720 

* 152.97 

__ _ sun 

—Id I G.T.idocM SmaJl CajFund _ ML4T (r ) Parian Sw.R Est Geneva SF1WN 

—la I G.T. Technotoav Fund *WJ (r J Pormol Volue Fund N,V. W 

—Id ) G.T, South Chtno Fund—— S1«S* |b)P1etode*. J®* 

(w) PSCO Fund N.V.- S IMM 

Id > Putnam mn Fund ****• 

ibiPri— T*e» s fi ssi 

w) Quantum Fund N.V. |Xg*« 

id) Renta Fund LF2WU0 

Id » Bert Inves t Lf L 1 n£H! 

aBags agrsrW B 

w. VM 

» StrrteBT Invostmert.f und— *_1fM 
id ' 

Cw 


EBC TRUST caUE RSEY) LTD. 
KLSerte SLSL HMier.-flSHWU 
£RADEO CURRENCY FUND. 
fWIInc: Bid SOCOHer 

'nternatiohauncome fund 


.* *274 

*103*3 


-Id ) Short Term ’A 1 (DWtr). 


-Id ) Short Term V tOtttr}. 
~fw) Long Term.. 


*13070 


sons 

S2U9 


JAHOINE FLEMING. POflWGPO He Ko 


-lb I J.F Japan Trust. 


Y4M) 


) jr South East Asia *304? * 

-<b) J.F japan Tectmotoey— Y1OT14 twl 

Hb ) J.F Poeiflc SecS.|Ace) SSJf (d 

—lb ) J.F Australia SMI 


Syntax ud-'ICto* M'- 
Tecnno Growth Fund — 
(w) Tokyo Pod. Hold. (See). 


NIMARBEN 

~{o l CKasA 

-<«*)ClBBB.ua. M 
-t» i Chase .Japan, 
3BLIFLEX LIMITED 

*»rttanTBiCV_ 

-}w) Dollar Medium Term. 
-<»} Dollar Lona Term 
“J*l Japanese Yen__ 
Hwl Pound Steriln»_ 
-«w| DeutsctwMart_ 
-jwi Dutch Florin __ 

— Iw) Swiss Snw f 


1 3 


iW t 


j».n iw 


SfM 

.DM922 Jd 
-FL9J* JW) 
_5F9J3 W 


Tokyo POC- Hotd. N.V.. 

Transpacific I 

Turwelse Fund. 


_ S7JB0 
SF 97 Jfi 
. S99M 
tlXB* 
*17^1 
*95.13 


w) T w eed y Jrowiw avXIoma *20«M 
Tweedy Anr*nen.yXtesrt 

UNICOFund DM74.™ 

UNI Bond Fwid .*,!!&£ 

UNI Capital Fund- ■ . . *15^5 

united Cap. invt. Fund LM SUO 

wedae Europe N.V. 

Wedge Japan N.V — 

wedee Pacific N.V. *57M 

Wedae UAM.V — 

- - - 1 Financial Ltd — *1053 


iua im) wlBdiester FlnonetotlJd — *iO» 
ioS im) WMehMter DtoersWledee-^ S23JT 


VunN Field 1 

Worldwide S ecuriH 4B5g.3Wu 
W o r ld wid e SPOClat STS 2to. SLS1J4 


lark: BF — Belgium Frants: FL — D«l£ FtaWi LF — 
ir SF — Swiss Francs; a — osled; +— Offer Pric es. b ^ bM 
Per unit; njl— Nat Available: N.C.— NutCommunJcoJed.o— 


■*** — Deutsche mark: 

-uxrmBoors Francs; SF 

Jwnoe P/V410 tan per untt; NA- Not AvaHaMa: 

*iw; s — amended: S/S — Stock Spilt; * — Ee-Oivldenif; ~ — Ex-ms : *** — 
M«»Peri a r ni a iK» Index Fen.: • — Rademw JTteeK E i offwo n- «e 
^rtdwMe Fund LM; » — Offer Price Bid. 3% nrailm. charge; ++■ — dolly stack 
Witt os on Amsterdam Stock Exchonee 


Textile Machinery Quarrel 
Frays Japan-Mexico Dealings 


COMPANY NOTES 


(Cootmaed from P#ge 9) 
spondcncc leading up to what has 
become a $ 60 - 1 X 111000 lawsuit by 
Mr. Alkdn against the Japanese 
company tend to support his asscr- 
ti<m that what he received was not 
what he ordered. 

Mr. Alkdu's plant, as a result, 
has been shut down for three years, 
and most of his staff of 200 workers 
has been laid off — an expensive 
proposition in Mexico, where gen- 
erous severance pay is required by 
law. He estimates that Ins company 
has lost more than 530 million. 

The Mexican government, which 
is finding itself increasingly embar- 
rassed by the case, certified after an 
inspection of the equipment last 
year that “the machinery that is 
installed in AQrira Textil Sa de CV, 
does not correspond to die refer- 
ence contracts, nor to the permits 
authorized by the Secretary of 
Commerce and Industrial Devel- 
opment." 

A U.S. textile expert brought in 
by Mexico’s National Chamber of 
the Textile Industry, Pasquale Bel- 
mont, pronounced the equipment 
“used, defective and not appropri- 
ate for the aids specified in the 
contracts.” 

Mr. AIkdo said he suspects that 
he was delivered a less sophisticat- 
ed plant after Mitsui discovered he 
was planning to export his fabrics, 
thus competing with Japanese tex- 
tile producers. 

He is certain, for example, that 
what he has instead of a machine to 
make the foam backing for the fab- 
ric actually is a dough-kneading 
machine. The original cost of tex- 
tile equipment was SI .5 mflhon. 
Transportation, Mexican taxes and 
duties brought the installed cost to 
about $33 million, according to 
Mr. Alk 6 m 


But he said be did not discover 
the switch until after the equipment 
was in place, because the Japanese 
installers barred him from his own 
plant on the grounds that they were 
protecting trade secrets. The Japa- 
nese engineer sent by Mitsui failed 
to get the plant to operate properly 
in 21 separate tests, and finally was 
forcibly expelled from the plaint by 
Mr. Alkdn in 1982. 

Efforts by Rohm & Haas Mexi- 
co, Mr. AJQcdn’s chemical supplier, 
to get the plant operating were a bit 
more successful, but sml failed to 
produce a marketable product, ac- 
cording to trial reports from the 
company. 

Mr. Alkdn took his case to the 
Mexican Institute erf Foreign Trade 
last year, but Mitsui first sent a 
lawyer who argued that he was not 
legally authorized to represent it, 
then failed to show up at all, ac- 
cording to mumtes of the meetings 
and correspondence from the Mex- 
ican government. 

Finally, earlier this year. Mr. Al- 
kdn entered a criminal fraud com- 
plaint, which landed the three Mit- 
sui executives in Mexico Gty’s 
Northern Penitentiary, where two 
of them still reside. 

Mr. Alkdn insisted that only tbe 
personal intervention of Mr. de la 
Madrid led to the release of Mr. 
Fqiwara, an assertion that Mexi- 
can government officials flatly de- 
nied. 

After the jailing, Mr. Alkdn said, 
Mitsui did offer to replace the ma- 
chinery with what he originally or- 
dered and back it with a S60-mil- 
fa'on performance bond. 

Having gotten this far. however, 
Mr. Alkdn is masting on damages. 
“For Mitsui this is pennies," he 
said. ‘Tor me, it’s the story of Da- 
vid and Goliath.” 


Betted (China) Inn, a unit or 
Bechtel Group Inc. of die United 
States, has signed a letter of intent 
to help develop China's far western 
Xinjiang province, tbe Xinhua 
news agency said. The agreement, 
with Xinjiang International Eco- 
nomic Cooperation Co ? will cover 
ofl refining, petrochemicals, fann- 
ing, transport and mining. 

Canon Ini, a major Japanese 
camera maker, reported ih»i con- 
solidated net prom in the business 
year ended in December, rose 233 
percent from tbe previous year to 
35.03 billion yen (5135 mflfion) on 
a 263-percent increase in sales to 
83039 bilfion yen. 

Compateri^ndCosp. will be “de- 
mocratized" by a group of outside 
investors that won control of 20 
percent of the company Monday, 
according to tbe group’s attorney. 


He said tbe group would try to take 
the computer retailer public and to 
decrease the control now exercised 
by the chain’s founder, W illiam H. 
Millard. 


FPS Reportedly Sells Assets 


past 


(Condoned from Page 9) 
action with the opportunities of- 
fered by modem laumiques.” 

Tbe letter said that the Anbert 
name has been prominent in Swiss 
inking since 1708. 

Jean-Kerre Aubert, who heads 
Aubert ft Cie, has developed the 
business rapidly dm-ing the i 
decade. “He has an 
charisma," a former colleague 
“Either people love him or they 
hate him." 

The former colleague described 
Aubert ft Ge. as traditional but 
nonetheless willing to invest in 
novel ventures at times. As an ex- 
ample, he cited Mr. Auberf s back- 
ing for a U5. doctor promoting a 
stress-control medication. 

Mr. Aubert said that investment 
“was not a success” but that his 
company advises cheats to make 
only small investments in q»eh 
risky ventures and has established a 
strong overall investment record. 

The ownership of FPS is unclear: 
FPS officials have said that all 
shares in the firm are held in trust 
by John E King of Worldwide 
Trust Services Ltd, Nassau, the 
Bahamas. 


FPS has denied press reports 
that it was owned by David Win- 
ched a businessman who was con- 
victed in a Canadian court is April 
1980 of theft from Iniemarinnal 
ChemaDoy and fined 1 million Ca- 
nadian dollars. 

One of FPSTs mam investment 
recommendations is Federal Ven- 
tures Ltd, formerly known as Por- 
trnax Development Ltd., which de- 
scribes itself as a venture-capital 
company with interests in a coffee 
extract, cat litter, wine distribution 
and gas production. Diaries Stein, 
chairman of Federal Ventures, said 
in an interview that he has known 
Mr. WincheD for years but that he 
was unaware of any posable con- 
nection between Mr. Winchell and 
FPS. 


Agaux Fnatce-Prwsse 
LONDON — Alfred D imhffl 
Lid, the British maker of smokers’ 
paraphernalia and luxury goods for 
men, has bought Cbloe, tire French 
ready-to-wear and perfume group, 
for £6.4 rmffioc (S6.94 mutton), 
D unhiTI said Wednesday. 


_ luIw untHHWl Ltd. is 
p lanning two joint-venture hotel 
projects in Beijing at a cost of 
about $177 minion, with China’s 
Shorn Yip Si Trading Ox. Zhu- 
hai Special Economic Zone Co^ the 
Jiangmen city government and the 
Guangdong provincial govern- 
ment. 

Paradyne Corpt should be barred 
from getting government contracts 
for up to three years, tbe U.S. De- 
partment -of Health and Homan 
Services has proposed The depart- 
ment charges that the company had 
“misrepresented” equipment it 
sold under tenns of a 1981 $100- 


nrilhon contract with the Social Se- 
curity Administration. 

Peps Cob Bottfing Co. of the 
Philippines, a subsidiary of Pepsic© 
Inc. has sold all its assets to a Fili- 
pino group led by a businessman, 
Ernesto Fscaler. The amount paid 
for tire assets, which include 13 
bottling plants, was not disclosed 

Seam Hokfings PLC has made a 
recommended offer for Foster 
Brothers nothing PLC of 21 new 
Sears’ shares for every eight in Fos- 
ter valuing tbe company at £1 143 
millian ($124 million). 

UhnumirPLC, the British oil ex- 
ploration and development compa- 
ny, reported that pretax profit rose 
by 82.6 percent in 1984 to £284.9 
nuBion ($310 miThon). up from 
£156 million the previous year. 
Sales rose 58 percent to £336 bil- 
lion from £106 billion. 


United Biscuits Hokfings PLC 
said his raising about £983 rmllioQ 
($107 million) through a onc-for- 
five underwritten rights issue of up 
to 64,176,479 new ordinary shares 
at 158 pence each. The company 
also reported that pretax profit rose 
5 percent to £87 2 millio n in 1984 
from £833 million in 1983, as vol- 
ume increased to £1 .74 billion from 
£1.42 billion. 

Unreal Corp. has sued Security 
Pacific National Bank, its principal 
bank, in connection with loans to a 
partnership controlled byT. Boone 
Pickens, chairman of the Mesa Pe- 
troleum Co. Unocal said it had 
sued “for breaches of contract and 
fiduciary duty and for deceit and 
misrepresentation" and asked for 
more than $555 million in punitive 
damages. 


THE KEY TO 
CM Ps NEW OPTIONS 




The Chicago Mercantile Exchange, the 
world’s most successful foreign currency 
futures and options market, is now trading currency 
options on the British Pound and the Swiss franc. 
The prices of these options are available 
from Reuters and Telerate with these access codes: 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Hokfings N.V. 

=4 on March IT. 1985: U.S. $136.88. 
Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Inf orma tion: Pierson, Hatching & Pferaon N.V., 

HmngracMZt4,tOl6BS Amsterdam. 


British Pound 

Reuters : 

STIG to STIJ for call 
options. 

STIKtoSTINforput 

options. 

Telerate : 959 to 960. 

For a free copy of 
“Options on Currency Futures : 
An Introduction”, write to or 
telephone Keith Woodbridge 
at Chicago Mercantile Exchange, 
27 Throgmorton Street 
London EC2N 2AN. 
(01)9200722. 


Swiss Franc 

Reuters : 

SWIG to SWIK for call 
optiona 

SWILtoSWINforput 

optiona 

Telerate : 961 to 962. 

CHICAGO 
MERCANTILE 
EXCHANGE 
FUTURES AND OPTIONS WORLDWSE 

27 Throgmorton Street London EC2N 2AN 01 -920 0722 
30 South Wicker Drive. Chicago. Illinois 60606 
312/930-1000 

67 Wall Sheet Now York 1 0005 21 2/363-7000 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14 , 1985 


II T ■ _ _ S. 


HManm 
High low Stock 


Sh. Obk ) ttMonfti 

HEHMlLOw QtatOrtNI HSU Low Stock 


Dh.YW.PE fetiWiLcw qSch’g* 



u Month 
WBtlLBP such 


B| Cl«* 

Ph.YM.PE wnwaiLnw Quote 


(Continued from Page 10) 


34 25* 

sm 4i 

sa 42 
MH 45 
2 6* 1114 
28* 21 
14ft W* 
44ft 51 
91 77 

17ft 12ft 
41ft 51ft 

19* is 
23ft Iff* 
8ft 7 
34% 24ft 

28 s% 
19ft 14 
nft 24ft 
25% 19ft 
13ft 4ft 
27ft 19ft 
13% 8ft 


10ft 4ft 

31ft 24 


am w* 

33ft 17 
20 13 

37 25ft 
44ft 31ft 
135 94 

149k 10ft 


KM 154 
734 MJ 
7J6 144 

xao us 
ISO 1X7 
X92 142 

UO IM 
9.12 144 
1X76 123 . 
40 » II 
740 124 
127 124 
240 9.1 9 
' JO 103 
14 U 9 
X 

40 14 10 
156 02 9 
1M U I 
-55* 44 IS 
06 332*8 

50 54 
175 94 
M 2.1 10 
44 24 14 
SO XI 10 
140 43 9 
14*4.1 9 
433 34 . 
44 34 9 


lOz 28ft 28ft 
290z soft n ft 
Mk 51ft 50ft 
MODE 56ft 56ft 
W 25% 23 
6 27ft 27ft 
1 14ft 14ft 
400z 63 62 

Tea shi. 07% 

39 15ft 15ft 
2702 S9ft 59ft 

6 in* nft 

584 23ft 31ft 
3501 7ft 7ft 
734 35ft 34ft 
150 8ft 7ft 
38 15 Mft 
76 31ft 31ft 

40 2fi* am 
104 lift lift 
449 am 24 
321 lift lift 

6 8ft 8ft 
61 30ft 3Dft 
221 30V. 30ft 
382 31ft 32ft 

41 15ft 15ft 
338 33ft 33ft 

1077 41ft 40ft 
1 122 122 
34 12ft 12ft 


3M -4ft 
soft— ft 

50ft— 1 
56ft— 2 
Kft— ft 
27ft 
14ft 

6218-41* 

87% 

15ft— ft 
59ft 

18ft— ft 
22 — ft 
7ft— ft 
35 — ft 
7ft— ft 
14ft 

31ft— ft 

am— ft 

lift 

24ft— ft 
lift— ft 
Oft 

: w «*— ft 

30ft 

32ft 

15ft + ft 
33ft— ft 
40ft— ft 

m +m 

12ft + ft 


iwftiaoft 
41ft « 
30ft 24ft 
341* 18ft 
31ft 17ft 
7)8 5ft 
34ft 25ft 
48ft 35ft 
24ft 12 
20ft 12ft 
35 27ft 
39ft 23 
71ft 48ft 
55* 27ft 
21ft 10)8 
ZD* 6ft 

1318 m 

4ft 2ft 

19 1298 
34ft 34 
14ft 8ft 
S5ft 41ft 
50 32ft 
at 13 

20 15ft 
28ft 17ft 
57 38ft 
26ft 12ft 
17 8ft 


1 TOTftl 07ft T07ft 

170 27 4 402 3*4*1 am 36ft— ft 

108 57 9 75 29ft 39ft 29ft— ft 

1 70 90 109 1 9ft 18ft Oft— ft 

JO U 17 7*9 32 31 31ft 

14 B3 5ft S* m 
1.12 3J S 143 33ft 33 XM-f ft 

.1 JO 4.1 20 39ft 29ft Wft— ft 

M 15 16 75 22 21ft ZIft . 

220 112 5 400 1998 19ft 179* + ft 

244 » 9 345 33ft 3J» 33ft 

UO 27 U 837 36ft 36ft 36ft + ft 

270 20 10 145 6798 6618 46ft— ft 
9 481 SI 47 47ft— 2ft 

. 308 IS 29 239 20ft 20ft 20ft 

jOSb 2 27 354 21ft ZIft 21ft + ft 

M 45 14 500 10ft TOft 18ft— ft 

SO 2ft 2ft 218 

.M 47 10 90 14ft 15ft 14 

LI? 35 U iM 30 29ft 29ft— ft 
J» 5111 2337 9ft 8ft 8ft— ft 

2579 53 5 3320 54)8 54ft 54ft— ft 

54 1J 17 92 49 67ft 47ft— 1ft 

17 770 849k 34 34 — ft 

56 44 8 22 17ft T7M 17ft— ft 

130 4,1 14 219 24ft 24Vj Mft 

150 23 9 S71 53ft 52ft 52ft— ft 

JO 25 16 28 24ft 244* am— ft 

4 » 13ft 13 13ft + ft , 


JO 25 16 


200 42 T3 295 


20b U 9 
JO 29 13 


1J IS 323x 
64 192 


18 PHH J8 23 
24ft PPG ISO 4J 
15 PSA JO £7 
13ft PSActpf 150 10J 
lift POCA5 L54 121 
12ft PocOE 1J72 TO.! 
30ft PoeLtn 132 8J0 
21ft PcLum 150 45 
5ft PocRes JBr J 
13K> Poc Rapt 200 115 
im Pacsd jo 2J 
54 POCTCrt 5J0 7J 
21 PBClfcp 232 85 
27ft PQCHpt +07 125 
25 PabtWb JO 1J 
am pomwpJ225 7J 
25ft PolmBc UO 12 
20ft PonABk JO 24 
4 PanAm 
lft ponAwt 
13ft Panddcn 20 1.1 
31 PcrtiEC 230 64 
3 PontPr 
12 Popreft jbo 47 
10ft Pnrdvn 
12ft PUKE a 
5ft ParkDrl .16 24 
2Sft PorttH 1.13 32 
12ft PorkPn J3 X3 
lft PotPhl 
Uft PsvINW J4 13 
lift PoyNP J0 45 
13ft PavCsh .16 5 

6ft PMtetV 30 2A 
PenSQ 
PenGwi 


PoPLaf 440 123 
PaPLpf 450 133 
PaPLdPr£42 125 
PaPLpr 840 133 
PaPLdnm35 129 
PaPLdPrSJS 111 
PnPLsr 850 Hi 
Ponwtt 230 S3 
Penwpf 1J0 6J 
Punzd 230 45 
PbopEp 130 7.1 
PepBav J6 13 
Paul Co U8 35 
Perk El 56 23 
Pnnlon 135 117 
PeryOr 38 15 
Petrie 140 40 

PetRs 3J2a14J 

Pet Rapt 157 104 
Ptrinw 133*175 
Pftnr 148 17 
PtwtaD 

PMppt 5JOO 112 
PtilbrS 54 15 
PHIaEI 230 144 
PtlllE pf 300 135 
PMIEpf 440 111 
PM1E pf 4J8 140 
PMIE Pf 7 JO 135 
PtlllE pf 141 116 
PtlllE Pf 123 115 
PMIE Pf 755 U.1 
PtlllE Pf 130 117 
Pllllpf 17.12 144 
PMIEpf 75 S 135 
Phi [Sub 122 74 
PtdlMr 400 44 
Phi loin 48 23 
PhllPet 240 45 
PM1VH 40 15 
PiedAs 35 5 

PtoNG 232 75 
Pier! 

PlttDrv ISA 23 
Pioneer 134 44 
PlonrEI .179 5 


12 1975 30ft 
9 351 M 
76 23 
60 18ft 
56 12ft 
6 4SOT 17 
12 318 41ft 
U 41 26ft 
34 8ft 
70 16ft 

12 29 15ft 

8 1448 71 

8 234 26ft 
105 33ft 

65 883 38ft 
56 31ft 

10 452 38ft 

9 4 26ft 

1101 498 

45 2ft 
18 261 18% 
9 712 3M 
IS 363 4ft 

14 141 16ft 
28 2436 14% 

10 94 14 

134 6ft 

11 507 31ft 
27 T71 16ft 

13 323 2ft 
IB 11 26ft 

11 623 12ft 

15 1288 18ft 

a is 

II 641 51ft 
8 2279 67ft 
I 297 25ft 
120* 36 
Zlftt 34 


30ft 

37ft— ft 
22ft— ft 
Uft— ft 
Uft 

17 + ft 
41 V. — ft 

am— « 
a + ft 
169k + ft 
Uft + ft 
TO —1 
26ft- ft 
32ft— ft 
37ft— ft 
30ft— ft 


n 

40 15 22 232 
1J0 5.1 10 1454 
-S U 12 304 
1J2 85 7 2 

UO 114 09 

87 

.16 J 14 543 
£10 9.1 012366 
M17K W 
56 14 17 1164 
154 75 13 30 

UOO 3L7 10 4393 
140 45 IS 3 
50 U 43 8 

140 16 1 O 

,aB '« <£ 
150 11J 36 

£16 .95 7 330 
1J0 44 11 3990 
150 35 9 5574 
.12 1.1 20 709 

J6 25 12 an 

10 169 
1.12 XI 9 1499 
52 U 11 845 
1-52 33 14 3 

42 1.1 7 254 

146 13J) 34 

£10 1X5 30 

£10 1X8 26 

48 15 7 770 


26ft 

4ft 

2ft 

13ft + ft 

34ft — ft 


10 26ft 
Ufa 64M 
17 25V. 
21 28ft 
400z 61 

12 29 30ft 

4 24ft 
22 2212 49 

8 667* 17 
16 SI 3618 
22 3030 40% 

13 2192 24ft 
7 617 9M 
M 161 19% 
15 734 36 

55 2Sft 

5 15ft 

36 5% 

13 3084 40% 
741 18ft 
187 45ft 
25 5313 37% 
6 1229 15ft 
lOOx 28ft 
2B0r 32ft 
40* 33ft 
10220* 52 
55 10ft 
73 9ft 
2100* 55% 
68 9% 

90*119 
200* SA 

11 29 U 

12 2318 91ft 
11 148 21ft 


16ft— ft 
13ft— 1H 
Uft— ft 
6ft— ft 
35ft + ft 
15ft— ft 
2 

2f% 

Uft— ft 
17ft— lft 
7ft 
18 

49ft— 17k 
47%+ ft 
25ft 

36 +11* 

34 —1 
36ft 

63ft + ft 
25ft— ft 
28ft— ft 
61 —ft 
38ft— ft 
24* 

U* + * 
36% — ft 
48%— % 
W — ft 
9ft 

19ft— ft 

35 —1 

sa. ft 

5% + ft 
40ft + ft 
18ft— ft 
44ft— 1 
3698—1 
15ft + ft 
28% + ft 
32 — ft 
33ft 

50%— % 
10% 4-% 

9% + ft 

*%** 

119 

56 56 +| 

St^-1% 


1-52 17 14 3 

42 1.1 7 254 

146 13J) 34 

£10 1X5 30 

£18 1X8 26 

48 15 7 770 
289 

JO 15 W 215 
16 24 

40 10 14 347 
UO 3J 8 327 
sa 3 17 1310 
1J6 XI 9 3067 
854* 03 375 

853 
15 

40 U 17 228 
J2 45 31 1429 
JO £4 I 254 
MO 34 10 30 

2.U8 6J 5 6313 
JO 25 7 85 

52 £9 11 277 

10 191 
LO IS 31 
100 7 116 
XO 13 2003 
72 19 

33 1 

J 10 499 
40 35 20 1242 
52 £8 20 344 
£80 4J 10 1178 
56 1J 14 36 

1.16 10 13 189 

145 SJ 7 545 

.156 J 14 4973 
U0 4J 10 235 


SrcCPPf 240 115 43 

5CrEpf £50 1U 1 
SoJarln 240 9X1 10 21 

Souchwi U0 22 11 25 

SoetBfc U0 45 8 124 
SootPS 1451205 25 70 

SCal C s £04 9J 7 2001 
SauttlCO 152 105 6 1208 
SoInGE £68 75 7 104 
SNETI £72 65 10 267 
SaNEpf 3J2 105 2 

SPRY pf 160 105 2 

SaUnCfl 1J2 64 17 406 
Sauttnd 150 30 W 1378 


947984 49ft 
9 75 26ft 


ar?* 

47% 47ft— ft 


PltnrB 150 XI 
Plttstn 


Phaer 45# XI 
PtmoPa m 14 
Polarld 100 35 


Pamirs 40 J 

S PopTal jo 43 
ft Portae 40 £3 
PartGE 1J3 104 


9 T7U 31% 
9 41 31ft 

n 101 19 
II 4 93 48 
6 1810 29ft 
44 4 22ft 

11 768 39ft 

244 10ft 

13 86 13% 

16 65 15ft 

12 S ?S 

35 35 17% 

31 187b 




17ft ParGpf £60 1Z0 
Uft ParGpt 440 1X2 
21ft PorO Pf 402 1X6 
25% PDtilcfl 156 45 
19ft PotmEI £16 X3 


56ft PotElPf 244 12 
31 PPfEIPf 404 114 
16% Premia 56 u 
34ft Prlntrk £00 55 


ii% PrtmeC 
Uft PrlmM* 

46ft ProctG £68 44 
7% PTdRsti 52 25 
Prater 140 35 
PSvCol 152 IOjO 
PSColPf £10 II J 
PSlnd uoo u.1 
psinpf 1J4 143 
PS In pf 101 144 
PSlnpf 944 145 
PSInpf 858 1 64 


PSlnpf 940 164 
PSvNN 


PSNHPf 
PNHpfC 
PNHPfD 
PNHPfC 
PMHPfF 
PNHpfC 
PSvNM £88 115 
PSvEO £72 104 
PSEGPf 140 114 
P3EGM 5J5 12-5 
PSEGM X28 112 
PSEGRf £17 l£4 
PSEG pf 752 122 
PSEGM 740 l£l 
PSEG Pf 942 l£6 
PuMIch 

PuMM .18 14 
PRCem 

PupefP 156 125 
PufteHm .12 5 

PuroJd 128 49 
Pyro 


13 37 36 

8 305 25% 

4 Uft 
20te 35ft 
16 SI 24ft 
7 76 36% 

13 4627 lift 
33 144 Mft 

12 1X» 57 

22 30 Uft 

9 a 40ft 
B 261 19ft 

10 Mft 

7 1111 7% 

500* 7% 
14SB* 7% 
xnz 58ft 
570* 50ft 
28* 50ft 
2 24? 4% 

1S&E Uft 
8 15ft 
3 13ft 
22 13% 
21 12ft 
63 12ft 

8 689 24% 

7 49* 26% 

14 12% 
3400* 41 
530* 43ft 
3 17ft 
1801 41ft 
900* 41ft 
SO* 76ft 
1744 3ft 

8 60 11% 

5 7 7ft 

9 425 Mft 
26 SM 17 

13 82 26% 

8 151 9ft 


ii * 

s«-» 

§£$ 

m 

mi 


124 15 « w 
540 74 8 397 
52 15 12 82 

158 93 8 299 
52 34 52 371 
25 71 

152 £7 11 5561 
L52 44 9 10 

154 4J 10 2144 
140 10 14 343 
JO 4.1 16 150 
54 24 12 350 
.32 22 TO 2M 
13 U 1 2619 
£00 62 7 W9I 
10 64 

52 15 10 237 
36 U 11 104 
UO 35 11 3 

UOaOJ 16 
144 £2 418 

.12 14 66 

J6 40 11 1 

J6 6J 10 S 

1.16 45 U 999 
U0 6J 11 973 

144 55 16 40 

U0 07 340* 

140 07 9 190 
JiO 23 11 474 
U0 22 10 67? 
104 BJ 15 275 


47% -lft 
KM 
27ft 
Uft 

17% — ft 
M — % 
7% I 
lft 

30ft— lft 
31ft— ft 1 
30 + ft , 

20% + ft ' 

Uft 

4%— ft 
26ft— ft 
231* — ft i 
8%+ ft I 
JHk—Kk ; 

am— % 

27ft + ft 1 

30% 

16ft— ft 
Uft— ft 
lift + ft 
B%— ft 
-12% — ft 
22%— % 
37ft 
37ft— 1 
lift— % 
27ft— 1% 
68ft ! 
35ft— ft i 
14% — ft 
411* 

3B%— 1% 
11% 

15ft + ft 
15%— ft 
25%— ft 

m— % ; 

41%— ft 
10% - 
23%—* 
27%+ ft 
56ft— ft I 
34%— % 
102% — ft ; 
20% — ft 
15% 

34% — ft 
14ft— ft 
25 — % 
59%— Hi 
33% — ft 
27ft— ft i 
31%—% 
6ft— ft 
Mft 
Uft 

33% + % 
57% — % 
66ft + ft 
36ft- % 
14ft— % 
11%— % 
99*+ % 
33%+ % 
30%+ % 
39ft— % 
17% — ft 

am— ft 

37% 


22 %—% 

27ft 

46ft + ft 
27%—% 
8ft + ft 
22% + ft 
Mft— ft 
34 —ft I 
39%+ ft 
34%+ ft ! 
34 — ft 1 

am+ % 

32* + % 
14ft- ft 
7ft 

4* +1 

25 —1 
14*— ft 
Mft + ft 
73*+ I* 
27*+ ft 
20% — ft 
15ft— % 
19% — % 
51% — ft 
34%+ % . 


38ft— ¥ft 
32ft— % 


32ft— % 
It*— ft 
20ft + ft 
Mft- ft 
63%+ ft 
45ft 

17 

15 — % 

20ft 

33ft— % 

IL 

18 

??% 

43 43 —ft 

20% 20*- ft 
W 2Xk 
SPA 57*— 3ft 


7M«* 


Mft— % 
36ft + ft 

fe 

39% « 


19% 19% — % 
18ft 18ft— % 
7ft 7ft 
7% 7% 

7ft 7ft + ft 
SB 58 —ft 
50ft 50ft 
5*ft 58ft— 1ft 
4% 4ft— ft 
10ft 10ft- * 
15% 15%+ % 
Uft 13ft 
13% 13% 

12ft 12ft 

12 — % 
»%— ft 
26ft + I* 
12 % — % 
40% — * 
43ft— ft 
17ft— ft 
61ft +lft 
61%+ % 
76%+ % 
3ft + % 
11%— ft 
7%— ft 
Mft + ft 
16%— % 
26ft— % 
9ft + ft 


JO 47 23 8 

„ 13 

UO 19 ID 236 
48 14 ID 43 


20ft am— ft 
16* 16*— ft 
5% 5ft 


48 14 ID 43 
174 

£30 44 11 486 
£25 23 2 

I JO 34 13 318 
M 368 
48 £2 II 1557 
42 U 14 233 
SU 34 10 67 

UB 34 II 45 
20 37 

142 14 13 1417 
56 U 15 WT 


30ft 30ft— ft 
32% 33%+ % 
0ft 0ft— ft 
49% 49*— ft 
103 103 + ft 
46% 46* 

0 —ft 
31ft— ft 
34% — ft 
16 +ft 
19*— ft 
Uft + ft 
54 -% 
35ft + % 


40* 28ft QlMtias U4 10 12 *32 41* 40 41%+1 

22 15 QuakSO JO X* 27 *115 22 19* 22 -M 

lift 6* Oumex 36 1J7 9ft 8* 9 

36% 23 Questar 140 4J 7 173 3«ft 33% »%— % 

25% 14 QkRell J4a U 19 140 24ft 23% 33%— % 


lft 0% 
39ft 38% 
32 32 


3f% 34% 
7% 7ft 
4* 4ft 
1*% 16% 
10% Mft 
38% 3Sft 
7 6% 

19% 19 
4% 4ft 
57ft S*% 
12% 72* 
43% 44% 

9% 9% 
20% 20% 
23 22% 

13% 13 
15ft 14% 

9ft 9 
1 * 
37* ” 
6ft 
lft 
M 


B%- % 
38%— % 
32 —lft 
29%— ft 
34%+% 
7% 

4ft 

16% 

1 0%— ft 
38% + % 
6*+ ft 
19 - ft 
4V, 

36% — % 

12 % 

44*— % 

23 +% 

13 — % 
Mft— ft 
9ft+ ft 
* 

37ft + % 

6 

23* 


24* Mft M* 

55% 55V. 5SH+ % 
33 32% 32ft— ft 

28% 28 28% 

20 19* 19* 

25ft 24% 24ft— % 
Uft 12% 12% 

35% 34% 35ft + % 
30ft 20% 70% + ft 
Uft Uft Uft 
S3* 82% 83ft— % 
40ft 40ft 48ft 


J9B 4 21 20 47% 47% 47% 

£20 70 7 2M 28ft 27* 27*— ft 
16 131 10ft 10ft ID* 

125 82 8 <2 15% 15 15% 

1J0 40 15 41 23ft 23 23 — ft 

350 30 II 273 BQ 70* 79% +lft 

450 £0 1 H7%M7%M7ft+!% 

98 4* 4ft 4ft 

l.U U 12 496 61% 60 60% + ft 

MS* J 12 90 Uft 15% 15ft + ft 

1-03 52 6 19 18% 18%— % 

£20 47 13 48 67ft 67 67ft + ft 

13 3647 32* 31* 31*— « 
13 <6 Mft 14 14% + ft 

150 U ■ 884 60ft 58ft St —1% 
8 43 4ft 3* 3*— % 

10 S5S MSI*. 257ft aU -4ft 
22 U 28 902 19*18% 19 — ft 
13 4015 43 39* 40% —3* 

44 1J 8 142 33ft 34* 15 

£92 72 10 3273. 40ft 40% 40*— ft 

740 95 6 78 77* 78 + ft 

12 1098 23% 22% 22ft— ft 
40 35 S3 473 13* 12ft 13* + % 

£16 84 38 - 

050 85 M 2128 


26 25* 25%+ * 

X0Q 85 M 2121 35ft 05ft 33% 

152 42 9 11 36* 34ft Mft— % 

156 XI 7 2291 41* 40% 40% — 1 

£20 4J 8 938 33 32* 32% + * 

50b 2J 17 94 3# 29* 29%— % 

£00 IS 8 327 108% 107ft 107ft— 1% 
15* 2% 2ft 2% 

.18 15 111598* 18% 17* 18ft—* 
40 1J IB 4 31% 31% 31%+% 
2-32 94 * 4957* a*% 2*ft 36*— ft 

43 3* 3% 3% 

150 O 13 2730 41* 40* 41ft + * 

250 4 j a -cm 44% cm +n* 

140 18 1 37ft 37ft 37ft + ft 

9 8% Bft 6ft— * 

4.15 ISJ 1 36ft 26ft 26ft 

23 183 26* 32* 22*— lft 
124 3215 40 39 30* 38* + ft 

■68b 43 8 78 W 13* 1S%— ft 

40 25 8 99 17* 17 17ft + ft 

44 21 U IN 21* 21ft 21ft 

.90 85 1336 17% 17ft 17ft— % 

1167 9* 9ft 9M— * 

166 18 9ft 9% — % 
UO £1 14 669 48ft 47% 41 — ft 

17 373 18* 17* 18 — * 

154 35 M 1207 4«% 44% 44*— 1* 

UOo £6 13 142 50* 50 5D% + * 

152 34 7 118 37ft 36% 36*— * 

J2 24 10 79 29% 28% 29ft + * 

£52 145 5 714 IBM II U 

X73 162 U 36ft 2S* Mft + % 

£75 144 13 26ft 23* Mft 

347 135 75 34* M 24*+ % 

428 145 5 29* 29* 29* 

25* 14.1 * 17 16% 16% — % 

221 145 20 16 15ft 15ft + ft 

40 J 2S 35 59 5B% 58%— ft 

1 23ft Wft 29ft + % 
48b 12 11 41 36* 36ft 36* + ft 

15Q £4 13 20)0 4?ft 41* 42* +1 
40 24 IT 377 16* M* 16*— % 

660 I* 1* 1* + ft 


aa si i 

J0b2J 17 
£00 IS 8 


s 

£73 144 
347 135 
428 M3 
£36 Ml 
221 145 
40 J 2S 


2S 10* 10% 10*— ft 
20 7ft 6* 7ft + ft 


44 42 20 7ft 6* 7ft + 

24 1277 30%. 29* 29*— 
54 1.1 15 350 32% 31* 31*— 
75 2058 13ft 12* 12*— 


Soles flpure* pie unotftdoL Yearly Meta and lows reflect 
the previous 52 weeks phis the current week, but ndt fti» latest 


tradhia dav. Where p spill or stock dividend amountlne to 25 

Percent or more tm been paid, the years WsMow nmoo aid 

dividend are shown for the new kfcx* ootv. Uniesi otherwise 

noted, rate* el dividends are anruisJ disbursements Dosed on 

the latest declaration. , , 

a— dividend aba mdrals}. 

b— ormwl I’Pf* ol dMdeml rtw itoefc dJvJdwd. 

c — llnuMat Ino dividend. 

ad— colled. 

d — new veorty Mw. 


Company Earnings 

RffwntM and profits, in millions, ore in local 
currencies unless otherwise Indicated 


e — dhrMand declared or paid In arecedlaa 12 months. 

B— dividend In Canadian rand* mtalect to IS* noiweiWonce 
tax. 

■ — dividend dectarad afiar salU+rp or stack dhrMand. 

I— dividend paid Rds voar. omitted, deferred, or no acthei 
Mcennr Mfeet dMdend ffMefUn 

k— dividend dddored or paid Ifafe year, m accumulative 
issue with dividends in arrears- 

n — new MM In the post 52 weeks. The nioMow reran begins 
ertth the start of (radbia. 
nd — next dcV deliver y. 

P/E — prtee-etnilnBS rotla. 

r— dividend declared or MU In Preceding U months, plus 
i— Stock spiff. Dividend twsJns nitti datr tri seW. 

A|ew mhfK 

i — (flvldend paid hi stack In preaKHng U months, estimated 
anti value aa exrdhridead or exHUstrUMlton dots. 


Britain Norway 

GKN Bomaa 


G K N Borregaatl 

_ Year IM4 im Yew ItM 1*3 

Revenue—— 2.1SX 1070. Revenue 4,700. ]*, 

Pretax Net— 12X2 8X1 Pretax N«_ 16&9 11 Jj 

Per Share 0214 £174 Per Share 4U8 24j) 

Full name of omomy Is 
Gutst Keen J tmtUMOs. 

lihrmnar United States 

uumnui 


Year IfM 1983 

Revenue UWL 2060. 

Pretax Net- 342 1540 

P*r Shore —. 047 0486 


being rearpailzed un- 
Cdtumed be such cam- 



Ufd Biscuits lUg 

Year 19M 1« 

-Revenue 1J40. 143 

Pretax Net— 872 83 

Per Shore — am 0.16 


1545 _ ttfiBaor. 

. .1* Revenue — 
Net Inc. 

dg J?** 

Revenue 

W8J Net Inc. - 
142X 


us* un 

5M. *m 
1750 2730 

191* 1903 

19400 1B4UL 


Japan 

CcncHt 


Woolworfh (F-W.) 

4th Qnar. ItM ltd 

Revenv* — U6X 149a 

Net inc. 920 810 

Per Shares £91 £5* 

rear i«M 1982 


Mft U* 

28 76ft 
30* 20* 
» 16* 
Bft 37* 
62 46% 

25% 19ft 
13ft 6ft 
24% SO 
13 6ft 
36ft 38 
37* Mft 
30* 9* 
31* 22ft 
17* M* 
48* 28ft 
25 19* 

2Mb 30% 
6* S 
22* 12* 
31% 30* 
41% 24ft 
6* 4 
9% 5* 

32 13% 

21* 11% 
13% 8* 
38% 29* 
19% 10* 
41 ■ 26* 
38ft 23ft 


225 Ml 49 14 
225 95 209 Ztft 

144 54 11 709 29ft 
£22 114 19 19* 

£16 4.1 18 1079 52* 
307 M 3*7 61 
£20 1X1 373 32% 

6 87 lift 

£50 1X6 1 23* 

8 177 13ft 
86 35% 
40 LI 11 737 35% 
U 18 

300 <4 39 31* 

U0 1X9 6 17ft 

30* 40 9 968 4) 
£5361+2 20S 24* 

£50 XI 51 3* 
4 24 3* 

40 23 M 10 lift 
100 £3 9 2* 38% 

J* £1 16 312 40*- 
53*114 9 7 4* 

.16 23 17 11 6* 

50 14 106 15ft 

.10b S 7X 536 ZDb 
L10 8L9 229 U 

300 U 9 401 35* 
03 24 1* 10W 30 
JO 35 9- 302 36ft 
JS £3 8 359 32* 


M + ft 
23*— * 
29ft— % 
19ft— % 
52ft + ft 
61 +1 
'ZIft— % 
11*-* 


U.S. Futures 13 


1 Season season 
Mail Law 


Open HMi Lew Ctoae Chp. 


Off* HMl LOW Close a«. 


I.i 1 '' +» 

a 1 ;* 


Season Season 
Web Law 


Open HftA Low Ooee Oft. 


13ft + * 
35% + * 
31 — * 

cm— ft 

31* 

17ft ■ 
Wk— ft 

24* 

28*— ft 


Groins 


17*—% 
30 —ft 
39*— lft 
4* 

6ft 

Mft— % 
19*— lft 
12*—* 
35% — U 
19* + ft 

as*— lft 

32 — % 



344ft 348 +02* 

£36% 338 +51 ft 

£06 £27% +01 

X36M £» +01 

336ft 330ft +01ft 
342 Mft +01 ft 


3130 1960 May 2828 2025 3028 3015 +30 

3038 I960 Jjjl +M 

Est. Sales Prav. Sorts 4092 

Prev.OayOpan Inf. 2MB7 aff01 
. orange jutai mnres) 

fflSTl MW 16400 16400 16X60 14X75 — 41 
mm i5uo wav iSS imjs 1 jsw imm -yu 

1I4 JK iIcm jul U7JD U7JD IMkTD 1MJB -1^ 

ion 1OT8 sS> 16700 15700 16+30 16+a -430 

18100 15700 NOV MM* 

MUI Jdfl WIM —l® 

inS SS m mw 

«250 ,6°» WCY ISJS =S 

Esf.Satet 400 Prev.Mas M 3M 
prev. Day Open IM. 4319 up 44 


BRITISH POUND (IMMl 


War UDD 1J960 13773 UR5 

ijoi jan im U048 utm ims J 

144 » UQD0 SOP 10730 URIO 1308 s mi 

uno useo dog uru lotto Lam uno 

10735 10400 MOT „ 10714 -J. 

Ett Sales 13345 Prav.sartejum - ^ 

prev. Day Open int 26408 aHW 


Metals 


SgJ^njgn.damragg^ „ ™ 

W IfT ^ ^ ^ 

Ulft 241ft sip 248% £68* 247ft 247* +00% 

205 £60* 0K SSft 243% £61% 243 +00% 

Jig £6*2 MW 2JI 2J1* £70% Z70* 

£21% 33** _MO Y_ . *** 

Est Sales Prev.SaM 2XU0 
prev. Day Open mt.TM472 upU76 


COPPER {COMBO 
25508 n*.- cents per lb. 

9X30 5550 Mar 5X9S 59.15 5895 £7.18 



UAL JSe 14 7 3Z7Z 

UAL pf 240 75 909 

UCCEL W 461 

UG1 204 10 11 3fl 
UHCftn 44 

URS 48b 14 17 125 

USPG8 £20 7.130 809 
USO 336 43 7 m 
Uni Fret 50 1.1 IS 19 
Unllvr LS9e £6 8 I 
UnlNV 303e 45 9 85 

U Conns 144 17 t sa 


UnCarb 340 93 I 2300 


UrtJonC 94 

UnElec 152 1X7 8 525 
UnElnf 450 1X0 7ft 
UnEf pfM60O 116 9 

UEIPfL 850 1X2 SOt 
UnElpf £08 130 * 38 

UnElpf £U 120 23 

UEIpfH 800 1X4 IDG 
Unpoc 100 30 13 1328 
UnPepr 70S 60 13 

Unlravl Jf U II 2139 
Unrytpf 800 1X1 4ft 
Unitor 61 39 

UnBrnd 16 108 

UBrdPf u 

UCWTV .M 4 66 510 

UnEnra 248 70 25 566 

Ullkim £08 110 3 150 

UlltUPf 307 155 26 

UlMuPf 2 30 Ml 10ft 
UlUuet 440 ISO 8 

UllUlPf 100 140 1 

Unttlnd 56 £6 13 30 

U rut Inn 32 4 30 6 

UJerBk 156 *5 8 41 

UtrJMM 7 72 

UPkMn 1 5 

UscrirG .12 5 7 1165 

USHam SM 


I soybeans cam , , „ 

«*_!% ^m'm^dntoeperbi^ ^ 

M*_ ft iS" tin Mar 5W 559 554 554* +02 

u —* i-E iaS jai 5J& $sm im ss4% +01 

2ZH — % 1X7 Aw 505% Ada 505ft £96% +52% 

m— % in xm sip sJift 50414 501ft sn +j uft 

11*— * *« sJJft Nov 502 597 501ft 503* +4*2 

gft— ft 504ft 4W 604 607 404 606 +02 

O*— % 742 606ft War 6.14ft All* 4.14ft 6.77 +M 

2 —ft 709 £15 WOY , 634 +32 

1. Eat. Sates Prev.Sales 17483 

22— ft PiewTSwOpen lot. 65596 etII7 


5638 HV M M 
5700 JM 4038 4055 4U0 

8750 Sep 4X80 6im IU 

SOSO Owe 61 sa 4230 4130 

9948 Jan .... 

8940 Mar 6240 6280 i£10 

41.10 Mar 429S 6X10 U09 

fUD JUI 6X60 6X60 6340 

£U0 Sep 6175 6405 63JS 


tpardlr.1 point equals 803001 

JIM Mar >728) TOO J19* 3303 

J70B4 Jun JUS J192 0149 J3U 
JUi Sep JT40 JIM .7140 Jug 
J366 J0O* Dec 7130 3130 J130 7118 

J3D4 4MI Mar .70* 

Est. sole* 2581 Prev, Sales 1873 
Prev. DayOoen lot lxm off ft* 

PUNCH FRANC (IMM) 

t per franC-1 Mint equals M0QO91 
.11905 09408 Mar 09740 09740 09740 097C 

.11020 09*» Jun 09700 09700 097W 09700 

.10430 0NH SOP 09720 

Dec JK70 59670 09670 JMOO 
Est Sales _ 1 1 PreftMe* 8 
Prtv. Oar Open infc £477 u>2 
OSBMAH MARtCOMW 


3j.-.* 

. ! 


7400 41.11 MOV 42-9S 6X 

7440 CUD JlU 6360 6X 

7X10 6230 Sep 6175 44J 

7D5e 64JB Dec 

6538 6550 Jan 

Est Sales Prev.Sales 734 

Prev. Dcry Open InL 01414 Off 284 
SILVER (COMBO 
8080 tray asr cents Per travel. 


MOT -3987 J992 5*67 Jw 1 ■ , 

5905 Jun 5087 5017 M 5993 Hu • . 

5930 sew 504 5836 5092 3m 

5971 D*C 50C9 5CH9 5869 5887 IS' 

5040 MPT. . 50*3 -S . 


4110 
5733 
5S4S 
5410 

Prev. Day Orta lilt. 52083 ONUS 


JAPANESE YEW (M8»> 

I per ran- 1 point equals SCJOPOBl 


5 7 1168 
SM 

25 ia S 
30 12 43 

37 10 2002 
95 349 

93 21 

■5 192 

45 U 274 
77 I 483 
34 ■ 2638 
75 ' 89 

14 9 856 
S3 3 

70 9 104 
3 17 25 

37 13 6 

45 16 30 

45 8 138 


34* ' 

37*— * 
5*— ft 
IM 
34ft 

29ft— % 
40% + % 
23 + ft 

16ft + ft 
Bft— lft 
47*+ % 
106%— ft 
IS — H 
M 

4% — % 
13ft—* 
13*+ ft 
37 —1% 
31%+lft 
K%— ft 
25ft— % 
15*+ H 


12*— ft 
21 % — % 
39% 



12770 12X90 12770 12870 +150 
□250 13400 137* 13370 +150 
13850 13900 1383D 13940 +L10 
14100 14240 14100 14230 +150 
14X50 14450 uua 14450 +50 

14650 14750 14650 14750 +150 
iaw 10200 15350 +150 

15150 15150 15150 1S120 +00 

[5850 15800 18700 15750 —50 

lies 1441 
I up 1004 


16207 

5487 

MOT 

58X8 

5117 

5377 

APT 

57X0 

15U7 

cwn 

MOV 

Jun 

5647 

2010 

14417 

8427 

Jul 

5710 

TUttO 

5737 

Seo 

583-5 

32100 

5907 

Dec 

4007 

12157 

9987 

Jan 


11927 

6077 

Mar 

6197 

104X7 

6217 

May 

63X0 

94X7 

•Ka 

Joi 


94X0 

4417 

Sep 

68X7 

7687 

4677 

Dec 

Jan 

6030 


«Kiw* > ' jBtm ' yer jnSjenu Jggf J cjeg _ 

0041S0 JBPt sS 003*34 003924 JWNgioSnS « 
004380 0OJ9OS _ Pec.0O3IM.JBMM 003938003*0 J 
Est. Sales J A2M Prrv. Soto 1UM 
Prev. Dav Open tnt. 17730 OffUSI 


SWISS FRANC CIMMt 

jg 549* _g V- . 

jS'SSSSSS 

4340 5831 Dec 3m 5*30 5*28 5HB 12 • 1 ■ 

Est. Sales 24440 prev. Sales 27449 
PrevTScrOoenlnt. 3USS uaU$3 


Est Softs Prev.SaM 2£741 

Prev. Donr Open Int 74788 eflWO 


Indwlrtals 


2970 2972 —70 

2705 2800 -.19 

2750 2706 —79 

2840 2640 —73 

2575 2577 —71 

2550 asm —59 
2400 2131 —.TO 
2470 3450 —.10 


X4 13 972 
27 11 631 
47 MU 
100 2 
180 9 428 
114 3 

1U 99 
114 1 

1L7 7 


14% 

2* 

IS. —1 
7ft + ft 
48*— ft 
29 
27 

53ft— ft 
129%— ft 
27% — ft 
3M+ ft 
74*— % 
41%— ft 
3B6— * 
22* 

28% — % 
Uft . 
38»— ft 
18*+ % 
25ft— ft 

22 — ft 
47 + ft 

76 — % 
38 *+ * 
23ft + ft 
9* 

21%-r.% 

24Vk 

34ft—* 


OATS (C8TJ ^ , 

5500bu m Inlmunv dollars per busbel 

106ft 1J0% Mir 179 179* 139 179% +00* 

1.91 147ft May 172% 177% U2 1J2» +0M 

178ft 143 Jtlt 147ft 147% U7H 147% +50% 

109 140 Sea 143 143% 140* 143% +50ft 

102ft 144 DOC 14» -J»% 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales _ 383 

Prev. Dav Open int 3438 of) 59 



34440 —100 
34650 245JC — 1.00 
34850 34900 — 150 
25*00 25540 —370 
26250 26240 —170 


^-3 per 1000 bd. ft. 

12X10 Mar 13100 13X90 13100 13350 4U . -* 

min MOV 13450 uuo 0500 i«jo «»■ , - 

MUD JUi 144JO 14970 M430 U870 «S 

M4J8 Sea UB50 15470 150.10 15450 423*1 

HUB NOV 15170 1SJ0 15250 15400 42j| ■ ’ . 

18700 US38 Jan 15X80 18900 15X88 1S9J0 420 , * 

moo 16050 Mar <6480 +L8 

EsLSales £434 Prev.Sales 1412 . -• 

Prev. Day Open Int 7434 D*f317 ' ■. ■ 


10600 10600 10X25 
10975 10575 10775 —00 

10850 10750 10650 
10775 10550 10578 — U5 
10650 10600 18M5 —103 


Livestock 



6470 6425 6X40 6347 —70 

6605 6702 6635 6600 —42 

6605 S&97 6575 6507 —30 

6475 6427 6452 6457 —3S 

6X60 6570 6X38 6X40 -30 

6X00 6800 6X80 6X80 —.15 

Sales 12446 
135 cm 455 


GOLD (COMBO 

wo tray nzj-dodws per tray ox _ . 

31100 28100 Mar 29X30 7915D 3830 

5143D 2B7 6B APT 29100 29740 29X70 

29200 29200 MOV 

81000 20700 Jun 21X20 30200 2M70 

48X00 29150 Alia 30030 30530 »90D 

49200 29750 Oct 307.10 21050 307.10 

489 JD 30100 DOC 30040 31750 30840 

48500 S0650 Feb 31730 32030 3T7J0 

49600 31470 Apr 32300 U40D m» 

43570 32050 Jun 33L5D 301 00 33100 

42840 33150 AUO 33740 33740 33740 

39X70 rwnn Oct 

34700 34250 Dee 34950 36950 34*50 

Est.Saies Prev.SaM 3L44B 

Prev. Dav Open tntlRUt off 1431 


COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

KTi rwwi lha - fGertf BTth. 

TUB 6326 MOV 6830 6633 O 1620 +U . 

7955 *355 Jul 6X21 6XS 6X20 iUB +4 . 

7700 6442 Od 6X20 6540 6X2B 6623 53 

7X00 6441 Dec 452S 4X00 6X70 6U0 +4 

7&7S SS30 war 6425 6640 6625 6608 +*.» 

70JK Atm Mar tun 4SJQ un 40X 4& 

7D55 6600 Jul 6751 <750 <750 67.10 +3 > 

Est. Sates Prev.Sales MSB - 

Prev. Oav Open Int. 10444 unil 


HEATING OIL (NYME7 

‘TW TSm 7X40 7440 » «. 

S2S SS 5T g| g SS S., 

nsa Asjs Jut rug mms mm 77 j? 3.. 

7200 <825 Aua 7U5 7170 7120 7178 43-* 

7170 7DL2S Sep 72J0 +J , 

7S0O TXM me 7XX 

Est.Saies Prev.Sales 6673 
Prev. Dav Open Int 16076 w» 117 


33% 21* VFCorp 1.H X5 
15ft 5ft Valero 
23ft 14 vaierpf 344 1U 
5% 2% Valeri n 
20% 16% VOnDri 02 38 
6* 2% Vans 


46ft 30% 
13% 9ft 
2Sft 17% 
6ft 3ft 
10ft 8% 
43ft 23ft 
M 54 
75* 60ft 
77ft <7% 
83* 68ft 
Mft 81% 
25 Mft 
41% 27 
70 98 


23 31* 31* 31*+* 
531 U 9* 9*— ft 
49 22 2T* 22 +* 

12 2* 2* 3* 

481 23ft 23% 24 —1% 
25 2ft 2* » 


FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
44500 ibaj-cmts par lb. 

7475 6X75 Mar 6950 6920 6828 6827 —48 

7429 6740 APT 6950 6S53 6925 6927 -40 

7X75 6495 Akay 7035 7033 6950 7052 — 4J 

7370 6640 AUO 7140 7140 71.15 7145 —23 

72U30 6750 5«P 71.15 R» JJ« -« 

7232 67.10 Oct 7U50 7080 W40 70^ —X 

TiM 7X40 NOV 7148 7145 7175 7178 —23 

Est.Saies UI0 Prev.SaM 930 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 10563 up 21 


Financial 


76 J 12 2644 33ft 31ft 32%— 1% 

49 37 14 54 12* » 12* 

40 10 13 1395 23ft 20 20* -2% 

34 4ft 3* 3*— ft 
1700117 5 W* 10% 10% 

42 10 19 644 42ft 42te 42ft— % 

772 1X3 llOOz 43 M 63 +% 

854 120 230r 72 71 71 — 1 

860 117 1 73% 73% 73%—% 

975 120 SOI 73% 71% 78% 

7 45 325 0 II H 

1J9 74 14 23% 25 25 • 

14 50 38% 3B% 38ft— ft 

2J0 37 11 10 77% 76* 76ft— ?ft 


HOGS (C MP 

Mn^cMinri^ sees 4608 4600 4608 —00 

S£« S« jm 52M aiM 5U 51^ 

BUT 4805 Jeff 5220 5US fiH H07 —M 

5437 4700 Aug 5270 5770 5100 51.95 — ^ 

SU5 4500 Od 4800 4830 4703 4802 —03 

4735 4500 Apr 4600 4600 46J0 4507 —.13 

4750 4700 Jun 4700 +05 

Est Sales 9783 Prev.SaM 7778 
Prev. Day Open Int. 29017 up 192 



£30 84 7 55 26* 26ft 26*— % 

02 10 ID 139 31% 30* 30*- ft 

40 10 5 20 20. 20 + % 

504 471 10% ID TOft + ft 

78 4 23 USD 45% 44% 44*—* 


PORK BELLIES (CM» 

38000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

BTJO Aid Mar 7X36 7140 7X10 7XU -vC 

8200 61.15 MOV 7X45 3X95 73D0 73.M —At 

83+7 62-15 Jul WM nm nsa n» —sa 

8045 6070 Alia 7100 7175 7&SS 7150 — 77 

Sl5 6X15 R* 7228 1 37MB 7155 HW —^8 

7X40 6650 Mw 7175 7175 7178 7175 — JB 

7040 7X40 MOV ^50 

■ms M Jut 7156 


US T. BILLS (IMMJ 

Si nuithm-ptsof meet. ^ 1 

9271 8779 Mar 9101 9102 9171 9171 — il* 

9151 87.14 Jun 9X56 9044 9000 W45 — -U 

9173 8604 Sep 9074 9X27 W.15 TOJB — ■« 

9000 AX77 Dec 0900 0904 »JS W4J —35 

9055 8640 Mor 8948 0948 8948 B943 — ■« 

9077 87J1J Jun 8902 «02 »39 W46 -xlfi 

9050 8R®5 Sep 0977 8977 IW9 WJJ —‘JJ 

' 0903 8954 Dec M.1S -vl7 

Est Sales Prev. Sorts 10916 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 30448 off 774 
! M YR. TREASURY (CRT) 

x uOO prl r>- pH £ 32nd! of 1 « pet 

03 70-25 Mae 78-30 79-4 3-29 — 14 

02-3 70-9 Jun 77-30 78-7 7M9 30 —15 

81-13 75-18 Sep 77-14 77-14 770 77-5 —18 

80-22 75-13 DOC 76-17 ■ — W 

888 75-18 WOT 75-31 —19 

79-26 77-22 Jun 75-14 —19 

Est Sales Prev.SaM 7057 

prev. Day Open Int. 504S3 up 239 
US TREASURY BONDS (CST) 

(IPCt-XlOO0OO-ntsX32ndsaf10OPCtl _ M 

77-15 57-27 Mar 686 69-H 6X3 69-7 —17 

77-15 57-20 Jun 688 68-14 1X4 6X9 —IS 

76-2 57-10 Sep 67-14 47-20 67-10 67-14 — 17 

768 574 Dec 6626 66-31 6X® 6646 —18 

72-30 57-2 MOT 66-12 66-U 664 664 —18 

70-16 5629 Jun 6946 <829 6S-1B 65-23 —18 

703 5629 Sep 65-17 69-17 65-9 65-11 —18 

<946 <5648 Dec 654 686 6441 68-1 —18 


CRUDE OIL(NYME) 

'W'-'tHrS S?- 37.14 *32 27.K 2856 
3CL28 24JB MOV 27+7 2745 27.10 2744 

2905 2400 Jun 2755 2702 2+66 2703 

2904 24.10 Jul 2605 2609 2641 2X74 

2907 2425 Aup 26.73 2675 2605 2670 


2900 

2900 

2M0 

2900 

290D 

2946 

2945 

2945 

2700 

26JO 

Est Sorts 


2670 3620 2670 3643 +J ‘ ; 


7445 OCt 2640 26.75 2140 2664 

3440 Nov 2640 3670 2640 2669 

2X90 DOC 2640 2645 2640 2669 

3485 Jon 2440 2640 2&6® 3649 

2X50 Feb 2640 2640 2640 2649 

2*02 MOT 2649 

2602 Apr 2469 

2602 MOV 2649 

3470 Jun 2649 

Prev.Sales .11831 


prev. Dav Onan hit. 82414 oHim 


Stock Indexei 


(Indexes compiled shortly before market dose! 

BP COMP . INDE X (CME1 

Mar 17XI0 18X18 17700 13X38 — 1J 
189.10 mw Jun 304«J 10X00 182JS 18300 -U ‘ . 

19270 T6O0B Map 10730 UMU5 lain 18XM — 2J 

19640 17870 Dec 19146 191J0 18940 70940 . 

Est.Salaa Prev.Sales 72059 , 

Prev. Dav Open I nL 7X3*5 affUSI 
VALUE UNI (KCHT) 

paints and cinli \ * 

20600 T68.FJ Mar 19S70 1X640 19X90 19400 -£1 . 


JB 1J 17 224 5DH 50 


Est.Saies 6324 Prev.Sales SJ2D 
Prev. Day Open int 16285 off IBS 


148 30 14 
106 83 8 


WMsMk 70 10 14 
WellsF. £40.44 I 


140 00 20* 20ft 28ft 

41 13 17 29 3m 34% 34ft + ft 

140 62 7 663 33* 31* 33%—% 
140 34 6 4S 44* 44*— % 

J8 60 11 379 22 22 22 

041 25ft 23% 23*— ft 
140 Xf 14 1282 38% 37% 31 ‘—ft- I 
106 87 8 3143 19ft 18ft 19ft 
00 £9 8 146 28 27% 27ft— Tff 
IAS 124 6 25 * a s 
JB 17 16 1(09 48% 47% 41ft—* ' 
46 14 11 180 26 25ft 25ft— % j 

70 £0 10 7 V* 99k 9»— ft I 

140 7J 4 21% 21% 21% 

122 11* 10* 10*— ft 
JM 10 13 Z73 20% 20ft 20ft— ft | 
33*+ * 


*9-12 5X27 MOT 6+29 6+29 6+2Z 4+M 

69-2 64-3 Jun 4+30 4+20 6+14 6+M 

6X26 43-22 Sep 6+16 6+14 6441 6+10 

EstSoM Prev. SaMI 00004 

Prev. Dav Open int22X571 aft 61 17 


GNMA(CBT) 



WE PM £00 1X0 11 38 

Wendvs 70 U 17 1216 

Wendy wl 271 

WestCo 44 £1 12 Ml 

WPenPpKTO 117 430z 

WstPfP 220 67 10 1158 

WstctT B UN fffl 

WnAIrL 1113 

VWAIrwt 150 

WAIT Pf 270 114 90 k 

WAIrpf £14 114 61x 

WCMA 661 

WCNApf77S 165 2 

WFwd 4 120 

WUlStKI 539 

WnUnpf 4 

WnUpfiS 56 

WnUpfE 17 

WUTIPf 6 

WUTTplA 16 

WetpES 170 37 ID 6847 

Westvc 172 34 8 61 

Wftvefh 1J0 68 19 2444 

Weyrpf 278 77 270 

Wevrpr 630 97 126 

WhelPtt 74 

WPttPfB Urt 

WllPttpf 4602 

WMrtpl 270 47 9 646 

WhltC LSD 57 401 

White PfQDO 74 1 

WMMI 10 76 

Wblttak 40 24 10 931 

Wlebtdt 68 . 18 

WUfrdn • 13 12 

WHNpm 140 XI 6 8T7 

wnmei so* 

WlrthrO .10 14 18 72 

Win DU 148 5J 12 51 

winnbg -10e J 17 247 

Winner 17 <1 

WlntarJ 7 

WlecEP 271 77 7 304 

WIscPL £64 87 8 94 

WlscPS 206 80 7 385 

WHco 148 27 9 128 

WMvrW 74 24 14 362 

WDOdPt 70 16 U 516 

Wnlwttl 170 40 10 380 

Wolwot £20 30 2 

WrtdAr 16 

WrfBlV 170a XI 10 40 

WylaLb 72 £5 10 H 

Wynns 40 £7 8 82 


54*— ft 

45ft + * 

21 —ft 

JStS 

38ft 

35ft— * 
10*— ft 
5*—* 
l*+ft 
T7% 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE) 

37000 H»A- cents per Rk „ 

15X70 12X50 Mar 1 OB 14208 141^ MISB — 178 

15270 12271 May M470 14600 M2JD M2J7 —104 

14970 moo Jul 14X50 M30O M206 14373 —02 

1470D 12770 Sep 14270 14370 MLM 14235 —71 

. 14X25 12975 DSC M270 14275 14175 14103 —07 

14270 12800 MOT 14000 14048 14070 14X65 —75 

139J75 13170 May 14070 14000 14070 14070 —45 

13X80 13500 Jul 13970 13970 13970 13970 +08 

Est. SeM Prev.SaM £013 

Prev. DayOaen int 12013 
SUGAR WORLD 1) (NYC9CE3 


1 12780 Iter- cents per Ibu 

376 

4M 

276 

471 

+02 


471 

Jui 

47V 

402 

478 

401 

+34 


4J2 


400 

407 

400 

407 

+01 


400 


403 

405 

403 

402 

+31 


473 


477 

4J7 

477 

S.U 

+06 


502 

Mar 

508 

5S0 

507 


+01 

7-13 

£58 

May 

502 

572 

502 

508 

+.19 

609 

573 

Jul 

670 

674 

578 


+.10 


70-17 



6040 

69-28 

69-20 

6+21 

—8 

69-27 

57-17 

Jun 

6+23 

6001 

6+22 

68-34 




Sea 


68-7 

<7-30 

67-31 

-* 

48-13 

59-4 

Dec 




67-9 


68 

58-20 

fisar 

4+20 

6+30 

4+20 

6+21 

— 11 

47-8 

58-B 


66-5 

6+13 

4+3 

46-4 . 

—11 

67-3 

65-11 

Sap 




68-21 

— n 

Est. Solve 



IS . 




Prev. Oenr Open lid. 4760 off 23 





CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 
SI million- art Of 100 pet 






9100 

7863 

Mm- 

9095 

9X96 

90J9 

9X87 

—.13 

9100 

1500 

Jun 

0X91 

8971 

■964 

•941 

-0i 



Sep 


09.13 

8979 

8977 

■^36 

9XT7 


Doc 

8X75 

8X78 

1X72 

H4B 

^25 

0900 

0674 

Mar 

8804 

8X06 

•846 

8X41 

-04 

■906 

8603 

Jun 

8805 

8X25 

8829 

8X18 

-06 

■800 

8776 


8X04 

1174 

8X04 

8758 

— 06 

Est. Sales 


Prev.Sales 

603 





31900 17370 Jun 20270 20130 19900 30X70 

21X30 18X75 Sep 20770 20770 20440 30440 

Est Softs Prev.Sales 5714 

Prev. Day OpsrrlnX 1975 ue471 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE1 

potato ondcimts 

mm' 8070 Mar i0470 rmto taxis lxuo 

11X00 9070 Jun M770 10705 10679 10600 

11100 »1JS Sep 10905 10905 10X30 BX60 

11378 10170 Dec 11175 HITS 11LS5 111JS 

est. Sorts Prev.SaM ii2» 

Prev. Day Open Int 16481 up 70S 


Commodity Indexes 


close 

Moody's- ■..■■■■■ 95040* 

Reuters,, 20 1070 

DJ. Futures NA - 

Com. Research Bureau, NA 

Moody’s : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : bow 100 : See. is. 1931. 
Daw Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Pnwfl - • 

9492-'" 

im*.:. 
12D J: 
ms ■ 


Ext Softs 16735 Prev.Sales 9406 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 80004 off 844 



**»+ ft 
30ft— % 
38ft— ft 
29 —ft 
+ % 
48*— ft 
12 + ft 
36 — * 
21* +1* 
44% — ft 
28%— % 
40ft + * 
25 + % 
24ft— % 
10*— ft 
13% + ft 
27ft— ft 
4%— * 
7V. + ft 
33ft— 1 
19 — ft 
6% 

4ft 

31% + ft 
30% — ft 
30ft + ft 


% 

COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tons-Sper ton 
2570 1905 Mar 

ZUB 

2300 

2138 

2210 

486 

1 

2570 

1998 

May 

2167 

2236 

2183 

2216 

+68 

% 

3m 

1996 

Jut 

son 

2138 

2055 

SlU 

+3 

2415 

1987 

5ap 

WAS 

2110 

2042 

2090 

+50 

*. 

23X7 

1*45 

Dec 

7022 

2015 

1995 

2025 

-H5 

% 

ft 

2145 

1*85 

Mar 

2000 

2026 

2000 

2015 

+20 


+71 Prev. Ooy Open lid. HW3B off 292 

EURODOLLARS (I88M} 

+, “ U mllllon-Ptsof lOOpc).- 

9178 *5.14 Mar 9X43 9X43 9X48 9X45 — »U 

9878 8249 Jun *904 8904 B906 B92B —33 

mm 8403 Sep 8X81 8X83 1848 8849 —75 


Market Guide 


0977 

8940 

19.13 

0X04 

8977 

EOLSOM 


8600 Dec 0046 8X47 8X38 8X30 —46 

8X10 Mar 8X17 8X17 8873 8872 —M 

86J3 Jun *7.95 87.95 8744 B770 -76 

■778 SOP 0734 0734 8747 8740 —Mi 

8708 DOC *700 H70O *741 0743 — J4 

Prev.SaM 30714 


Prev. Dav Open lnt.il.4202 up 33 


NY CSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX; 

NYME: 

KC8T: 

NYFEs 


CMcaao Board of Trade 
Chlaavo Mercantile exchange 
I n ternat i onal Monetary Market 
Of ailcnao Mercantile Exchaiw _ __ 
New York Cacao. Sugar. Coffee Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodify Exchamm. New York 
New York Merc an tile Exchmoe 
Kansas City Board of Trade 
Now York Futures Exctxmue 


Asian Commodities 

Mxrdi 13 


London Metals 

March 13 


Dividends March 13 I Cash Prices Mmhlii 


WM 

22 

39% + ft 
5M+ ft 
3ft + ft 
58 + ft 

13 — ft 
31* + ft 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER B W Alk 

OrtS 10 Pravtoos 

Api 1«S 19170 19% 19270 , ffig i SSSS 

May 19400 19535 19533 S5W WWWP 17WJIU 173070 I7J6JXJ iju&nu 

Jun 19600 197-75 19700 19X30 COPPER CATHODES (HWlGrOdt) 

Jly 19870 19970 19970 20070 starting per medic ton . . „ 

Aua 20270 20X00 20370 20680 soot US EM 1.25970 13000 3000 

Sap 20570 20170 20670 20770 (onrard 107700 107870 107970 137900 

VUunw: 14 lots. COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

SINGAPORE RUBBER SterUm per metric tan 

snoope r s ce n ts per HBo _ . spot 1J4X70 U4670 1JJ570 J47.M 

etas# Prev hH S forward 1M9M 107270 106670 107070 

Bid Ask Bid Ask . ... 

RSSIAPI— 16705 16805 16855 16970 •«- metric ton 

wot 31X00 31650 31X00 31970 

“JS forward 32370 32X50 32600 32770 


Company Per Amt Pay Roc 

STOCK SPLIT 
Amor Integrity carp — Mor-2 
. USUAL 


Collins Food Inti 
Farah MfsCa 
Fluor Corp 
fflblet Prod. Core 


Spencer Cosine 

Tidewater lnc ^ „ 

waste Manage, loe Q 00 +4 3-22 

Wiener Enterprises Q .10 +17 +1£ soorcm^AP 

A-AMint; 41 Meeft U r G-qaarferly/ S-8emt- I 


Q 74 +15 £29 

Q .22 6-3 54 

Q .10 +18 3-27 

Q JO +23 .+8 

Q 76 +12 £29 

q 02 ft +15 3-29 

Q JO +4 3-22 

Q .10 +17 +1X 


Cam modlty and IMH 
Coffee 41 Santas. 

Printdolh 64A» 38 ft. Vd _ 
Steel Wilert (Pmj,rtn_I 
lnm. 2Fdry .PhHa, ton 

KgS3 p ^ pl,wyPI »-- 

Cpancr elect, bi 

Tin (Straits), id 

Lrt&E. 01. L Basis, lb 

Palladium, oz 


■ -1% 

DM 4 1 * 

142 

a* J..* 

47370 «;* 

21300 

7980 103-'- 
17-21 


50774 64 

045 I 

lis-i a u 

SJl ! 


rn* 31X50 31650 31X70 31*70 

RUJAfll- 16370 16470 16300 16450 Parwnnl 771 nn -l yigi 32600 32770 

1SS S S SIS?l 

RSS5 Apl — 15070 15270 I5Q0Q 15200 Ptr m J<MWt ,. M n« 

6 tSm 4$sm 4^70 676070 

dose Previous SILVER 


DM Futures Options 

March 12 

W. Ganra Mort-l&jM mortsanb w wrt 


113. Treasary BSD. Rata 

March 12 


46% 33% Xerox £80 77 17 4518 43ft 43 43 — * 
51% 45% Xerox pf 545 117 S29 49* 49% 49* 


30 24 ZoleCn 03 40 9 7 29ft 29ft 29ft 

24* 13* Zopoto 74 61 16 229 13* 13* 13% 

9 2xrfr * 4Bb J 14 473 54ft 54 84— ft 

31% Mft ZentttiE 7 1404 22 21% 21ft— ft 

21* 1«% Zeros 19 12 20% 20 2D 

31* 21ft Zurnln 02 66 11 270 29ft 29 29— * 


Volume: 0 MIS Of 28 tons. 
"Source: « wbn 


060 1J88 1080 SPOT 52600 52770 51X00 51170 I 

iS forward 54570 54670 52700 52X00 hRN^rt^MBHI 

1030 1080 1040 TIN (Standard) 

jS m Sff ^ "mjSo 0 " 1X150 10.140 1X188 gSS Jun °s£S ,M D« J - ‘’*-”0 

So ^ SS tanwd ,(LT4D 1W * W3S io-“5 a 1 * t£ ZP oS x« - 

l3o 1CT 1060 »Np 29 101 275 — 000 ON — 

® s a w""— ■sarwo. ^ s a at = ?s ia = 

forward 79970 80X00 79X00 79X59 32 03$ 076 — 225 £33 - 

Source: AP. 33 X* 002 — 374 377 - 


0J2 Xffl — 
000 OH — 
052 1.11 — 

102 CM — 

225 £33 — 

374 377 — 


Offer Bid VMM 
XmwHh . 851 E49 SJB 

+<nantti XI2 800 U6 

One year US Ul UI 

.Snare*; Salomon Brattmrs 


Jo °u r Read® 

* Vtheriands, 

^0 iV t ■! :. - : .f * * 

^ to hcai 


NYSE Highs-Lows 


March 13 


-Paris Commodities 

aCxrch 13 


London Commodities 

March 13 


EstrtroM toW veL 7 J95 
OdH: Mon. vol 630 open laL 240U 
Pots : Moil voL 2418 open ML 1X721 
Sourcm: CMB. 


AflledCps Am Not Res s A m WabWks AshlandOII 

A4<fdOPt BkTrdMFf. Bendlxcvpf CPC Inti 

CP Natl . - CoosHCppCA CM50345DI ConEd465pf 

Oe»E312nf DetE4pr De«972pl FstUnR Es 

fid CO GenCorp HwiGman Heinz pf 

Iforebev iWMavInA Houseimt Houslnt 250 

Houslnt 62S IP Timber n LanrsnSewt McKesson 

MgrttlCp Merck Co MdIkwco NaMscoBrd 

Nat Can NrtCanpfA PemzaU OuakerOat s 

RoHU tsEny 1 SntoAnHRt SouNEneTl StaatfCbm 

rnmaOFbi TullJM vbtmyfntrt WribForCo 


SUGAR «« Unr Bid Art Ortft «« 
Franck Bases per metric too May 

MOV U70 1030 1066 1068 +16 Ah 

Auft L440 1J85 1031 1038 +9 OC 

Ocf 1085 10SS 1080 1088 +3 Dec 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1045 1.560 +10 «* 

Mar 1405 1015 1AS0 1060 + 10 MOV 

May 1090 1460 1095 1010 +10 Ah 

Est. VOL: 1700 krfs of 50 toas. Prtv. actual Vc 
■arts: 1012 lots. Ooon Interest: 23,783 cOF 

COCOA Stor 

Preach francs P«r 108 ka uar 


HMi Low BW°*Lfc Ud Vh Mk 

** «» InribwperPHdrlctH 

May 1167011X40 1U0O 11570 11270 11370 1 
1060 +16 Ah 121 JB 11640 nija IZ10O 11800 1 1870 

1438 +9 oa T77M mm 12600 imse 12440 12570 

1^ +2 Dec 13270 12X80 13X40 13470 13048 13270 

1060 +10 Mar 14770 14260 14600 14770 14460 MS20 

a a +10 Mat 13200 14760 15100 15200 14960 13000 

o + 10 Ah 15X40 15570 15770 15X00 15SJ0 15700 

jrov. actual Volume: £M0 lots of 50 lanx 
WB3 COFFEE 

Storttap per metric tap 

Mar 2080 2073 2065 2075 2079 2080 


2d Bank Son^it'4T n ^.;; ; 
By Credit Suisse 


T1 A oi aw huemaatmd Herald Tribmt r 

DAe snare uner frankjfurt — owit suir. ot - > • 1 ■ 

c a. £ ¥7 i tom- having acquired the private V % - ; -iU* •- 

Set for Larly May German Gmndig Bank GmbH s( . ; 

J J Januaiy, is sedemg to acquire cc s, 

Kaaen trol of a second private GenD 1 '^."' . , 


, trol oT a second private Gerin'-i.-rs-., t ( 

iAJNDON — Bndsh Aerospace bank. Effeoenbamc-Warburi AuL *■ 
PLC said on Wednesday that the of Frankfurt, according to banki ,r< , 
pJannod public offer of the govern- sources in Frankfurt ;f, 


•icnieUkifui 
AupniHtf 
! 198 

-iMtri* 

■ ! to news 
vin early 
:s :’tkxit 


CampbRspf 

Compfvsi 

Masse yF 


Carl Iras 
vIEvansPd 

Narlki 


CentrnDala 
Far West Fn 
whiaPirepl 


Chock FON 

FtaivPrap 


!S* 2 X 1 G xSi xal 5ty T MvalSilSxSoiSzS ““ts slake in the company akmg Effectenbank is owned jointly' 1 >'•! , ■ 

^ zS 2 J 76 ^£ 2 S- , SSR ^.‘hc raising of more equity cap- JM. V«th Gmba a privat-h y.„ 

SR K: £?: SS : :f s X W ^ as IS 5® IS «p^«3 to take pfece ady owned diversified industrial gf?,/ 


New Stability Reported 
In Hong Kong Property 


Reuters ^ 

HONG KONG — Conditions in the Hong ^ 
Kong property market have strengthened and 
are more stable after turning the comer last r 
year, according to a report Wednesday by the J j 
stockbroker Hoare Govett (Far East) Ltd. I 
Factors underijnng the turnaround include I 
an economic upswing, falling interest rates, res- 11 
t oration of affordaHle rents and prices, and ^ 
removal of political uncertainty about Uk teni- w 
tiny’s future, it said. All these factors have led to H 
a recovery that has cut into a large amount of }£ 
vacant property, it said. f” 

The review said price increases of 20 percent m 
to 25 percent are ukdy during 1985 in sectors 3s 


Sep £280 £276 Z251 2060 —4 Nov 

Dec N-T. N.T. £125 — — 20 Jan 

Mar N.T. N-T. £120 — —15 Mar 

MOV NjT. N.T. £113 — —IS Vo 

Est vaL: 130 la* Df 10 tans. Prov. actual 
Mias: 172 loti. Oban Htraf: 952 gAf 

COFFEE 

FrBKb frmx per 180 ka 7°, T 

Mar £610 £618 £570 2400 —40 Mery 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2042 24H +/ jSi 

Jly 2490 2490 UM 2495 +5 j™ 

S4P N.T. N.T. 2000 £725 -10 Mg 

MW N.T. N.T. £700 2030 -10 £» 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2460 2715 — 10 oS 

Mar N-T. N.T. £647 2409 —3 r*av 

Est. voL: 9 lots of 5 Ions. Prev. actual sales: vn 

22 lots. Open interest: 156 

Source: BatrmauGommareo. 32E 


£260 — 4 NOV £500 £487 £500 2405 2090 £493 

— —20 Jan 2063 2058 £458 2063 £452 £435 

- -IS Mat N-T- N-T. 2010 2040 2030 2025 

- — — TS Volume: 2063 tots Of Stans. 

T**- aChM ' GASOIL 


. . based in Hddenheim, West G^ ji.n 

It also intends to make the issue many, and by S.G. Waitoffg * v ’ ‘ 


Mar dD a7^m^ t »M l 2355o 236J0 23X75 1 P 8 ^ “ two tostaUmoiis. The j Co., the London-based merdu 


company has not decided the exact bank, each with 50 percent T<;., 

j” HSjs Uxb 2 iSS iS 2iS3i 2 iS* ***> altbou gh wholesale bank, which is amc, ‘ N 

ah n.t. n.t. Z1970 222S0 zixwi 22XD0 Jts equity base wul not be expanded the leading dealers on the Fra^\ I, 

oS Si K&SHfflSSS3 ^nmrethanMperamL-rfeBS- fun SnLge repartee,, %'r. 

™ ZKJ " ^ eovemmmi*s plan to sell off its balance sheet total of 1.65 bill -<■. . . 
'Saarcea: keuknanaLMoaPtirmm Ex- regaining 4S .4-percent interest in Deutsche marks ($4915 million! . ■ . k '' i 1 

cfloog * fgtaafl; - RAe was announced in mid-Janu- the year ended March 1984 m ' 1 

ar ¥; . net nrofit that vear rf 3 J8 miH il , . 


-^mssinv 

■ tin? 

:; >i l‘n 

r 

•••mI 

■ \\i 


S&P 100 Index Options 

March 12 


ItaJy’g T^ratk Deficit Grows 

Reuters 


. . . ... . net profit that year of 3i8 mitt 1 | 

. Existing shareholders will be giv- DM. 

en preferential rights to subscribe An official at. Vdth said t ^ ' N 
to the new stares issued by the Credit Suisse, Switzerland’s tb 


StiBx Cdb+na 
Prica Mor M IIHt Jrt* 


IS 8 S W - - - _ _ 

163 13% IS - — - 1H6 % ini 

no 7R Mft l<% m U16 H R 1ft 

ITS 1 MIN 3(16 IH 2 l/u M 
.UO SUM 5ft M 2ft » A a 
0B 1/14 lft 2ft £* ft 7ft | Hk 

no _ <tt lft IfA - |» 12ft _ 

ms - ft iw " — - - - 


J® where shortages are either already evident or TMUen«<6oM usju 

•in I T%.. ,«• .A — tlK—A ». — : -wi — 1 ToMoNlpan hd.R7JM 

TbWbN MNtnt TWfl 
ToMput H U.471J04 


ary 1984, the official statistics tial allocations of up to five million through its purchase of Grufl 
institute said Wednesday. government stares. Ranlr. 


WWW G66L16UJ WIUUU 

no expected. Ttay are identified as prime of rice 
ltH buildings in Kowloon and Hong Kong Island, 


IW* IVr i - - - - 
115015 


ifcml^^E^Sribunr 


EST ” — SSTS?— uft mS n,e ‘tt ,im " s tjm residential units and top-grade ur- 

PW Share _ £W 50.94 Per Shan, 405 3J2 ban factories. 


ToMput H UL47M04 
IB6CC 

HMI7UU LOW 17(03 Ck»]7TJ1 + Un 
Soar ix : CBOF, 


Reaching MoreThan a Third ofa Million Readers 
in 164 Countries Around tfte ^Aforfd. 















iy 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


Dver-the-Counter 


March 13 


NASDAQ National Market Prices • 


Mala N*t 

im Hitfi low 3pjM.cn> 


BrwTom 

Bruno 

Butfton 

BuJhJTr 

Brnhni 

BurrBr 

BMA 

BwinM 

BUtlrJ 

BattrMl 


CPRhb 

CBTBc M U 


12 7* 7ft 
MOW* IS* 
37 36ft BVj 

MIM mu 
333V*. 3316 

in S' 6 m 

163 2716 26* 
1919* m& 
MlJft mt, 
ZISRi 52ft 
fflTH BV 
SOW* 1812 
83616 3616 


7ft- Vi 

JSS + * 

*jft— 16 

2*— St 


26*- * 

1916 

1916 + * 
«6 +K . 

IBft 

2114— 16 


ljttb 65 31 22 

13411* 

Ml 15* 
1375 1IA6 
87 8* 
5922* 

lb 11 50 1| 

MO U 1836 
ISO 63 U8M 
336 512 
342 4* 
22920ft 
169 8 

JOa 2 36127* 
_ 2210 * 
MN4.1 4536* 

1010 4* 
6913* 
116 5* 
37 6ft 
6 Ift 


31ft 33 + ft 
lift 11*+ U 
6* 6ft— ft 
10ft 10ft 
IS* 15*+ U 

9* 10 + ft 
8ft 8ft— * 
22 22 — * 
18 18 - * 
35* 35* • 

28 28 
5* 5ft 
4 4*—* 

3D* 20ft + ft 
S* 5ft— ft 
27 27ft— ft 

10* 10* 

36ft 36ft— 1 * 
4 4ft +46 
17* 17* — ft 
5* 5ft + ft 
6 6 —ft 

7* Bft . 


IN* Hluk LOW 3 PJACtTW 

gnwm _ . 36M*t4fti4*+ft 

PrvLM 2J8Q 10 2298 94ft 96ft— ft 

PbSNC 1J0 85 B2TW 21ft 21ft— ft 

g«Bc 1.12 18 239ft 2*ft 29ft 

PufiTrm 2537 6ft 6ft 6ft— ft 

PortBn jo 15 29321* 28ft 31* +1 


> N*t 

HW8 uw tPJJLOrM 


.10 

J 

At 

24 


8 * 

31ft 
38* 
MR* 
17* I7ft 
Oft Aft 
■* *ft 
3* 4 
3* 3* 
4* 4* 
17* 18 
1ft 1ft 
28 3ft 3* 3* 

ta m lu m 
27 3ft 2ft 3ft 
354 3ft 3ft 3* 
7713* 13 13* 

311* 11* 11* 
14723ft 23ft 22* 
Bft Oft' 
M* 16*. 
9* 


415 
153 
13 

1337 27 

6930ft 10ft 
16206 34* 
306 1ft 1* 
14* 
12ft 
7* 



32* 33 
IM 19ft 
26* 26* 
17* IM 
33* 34 
5SJ M 



10610 
6020* 
I 6156 
9117* 
> 77230ft 
I 2210* 
55 13* 
I 6824* 
! W 17 
• 513 

29 2* 
129 B* 
21021 
8410ft 
45 11 
11 10ft 
12 3* 
556 X* 
245 SW 
32 7* 
171827* 

no 4* 

2S9 19ft 
32131* 
116 29 
19923* 

-S’* 0 ** 
282 21 
497 14* 
5 4 
16 9* 
10 5ft 
20 5ft 
W 5ft 
4 25* 


fft Vft— * 
20ft 20*+ ft 
55ft 55ft 
16ft 17 — * 

X XW+ * 
10ft ID* + ft 
Mft 13* + ft 
24* 24* 

16ft 17 
13 13 

2* 2* 

8ft Bft- ft 
X 30ft + ft 

10* raft— ft 
iov. ip*— w 
10ft raw 
3U 3ft 
29ft 29ft— * 
5ft 5ft 
7* 7* 

27 27ft+ ft 

4* 4*+ ft 
19ft 19ft— ft 
12* 12ft— ft 
28ft 28ft 
22* 23ft + ft 
40ft 40ft— ft 
50ft 21 + * 

UVi 14ft 

4 4 

9W 9* + ft 
I 5ft 
Sft 5ft- ft 
5ft 5ft 
25ft 2Sft + ft 


14 9 8* 

772 4 3* 

26 20ft 19* 
7611* W* 
IV 
21* 


To our Readers 


4 2 




62fi0ft TO 20ft 
1 4ft 4ft 4ft 
16 12* 12ft 12*— ft 
22 37ft 37 37 + ft 

14* 4* 4*+ ft 
75 7ft 6* 6* 

22 ID 9* 10 
399 2ft T* 2 —ft 
362 1* 1ft 1* + ft 


ft 


t :>y y ' 


* OHit 

*h M:n 


We would like to hear 
from you. 

Since the International 
Herald Tribune began printing 
in The Hague in October 1983, 
we have sought to ensure 
delivery of the paper to news- 
stands and subscribers early 
every morning throughout 
The Netherlands. 

If you are having any 
difficulty obtaining the 
International Herald Tribune 
in a timely manner, please 
contact our distributor: 
Edipress International 
Bloemendaaleweg 224 

Postbus 111 
2050 AC Overveen 
Tel:: 023 25 29 69 
Telex: 41833. 

RcralbSL^ribune 


C k .! in k 



m 







V 


:-v t ' Lfy 



wm. 





mzm ii ; ; £QI1VJB7fl 


♦ * t’XsflP. I iTFUrf 


v j * V-* 


























































Tables Include tbe nationwide prices 
m» to ttw dosing an Wall Street 
and do net reflect late trades elsewhere, 

Via The Associated Press 


1M 9th 
1M 1M 
37» ZM 
19* 11* 
4th 2* 

■ w n 
30* 21* 
15th ira 
32* 22* 
34 2314 

4 . TM 

5 2th 

5* 3* 

-34* ina 


8 rwn» MO 
raws 


20 

M 13 17 


Brawl 7 

BfflFA JO 24 10 
BmFB 30 U 10 
Bm*<* • 30. MJ 

Bucfcfi Of JO M 
BuM 40 23 « 


40 IW 
1 171h . 
307 2 7* 

S 12th 
34 H 
■ id W* 
132 3llh 

* IS* 

s nth 

373 33Jh 
10 3th 
21 4Vh 

* m 

n a o* 


17*— K 
17*— M 
36* +1* 

m 

. 3t*'+ * 
W* + K 
34* — 14 
I2>h-th 
m 

3M + * 
.3t6+ K 
- 3*— * 
M 

26* + Vh 


Q Month 

HtttLow Stock 


M*. YId. PE lODtKUiUow QuotOrto 


Floating Rate Notes 


Dollar 





M* 

5 Comte 

14* 

o* comm 

314 

. wcaro* 

n* 


12* 

414 Con*)- 

19* 

7* Crrmc 

' lew 

9* CmflF 

s 

14* Cnehn 

12* 

7* Conod 

10* 


20* 

12 ConrH 

11* 

5* Cored 

7* 

1* Com, 

11* 

8* canto 

* 

* ConoC 

0* 

4* viced 

12* 

5* vlCno 

24* 

12* Csew 

3(4 

* Cornu 

3* 

3* CosCr 

1 

* CMCr 

5* 

S* Cnrcn 

2* 

i* count 

12* 

7* CntFl 

.32* 

TPS Crass 

22* 

9W CmCF 

17* 

7* CiCFI 

914 

4* Crown 

WV, 

5V, crawo 

4* 

1 Crutd 


2* Crate 

23* 

13* Cable 

-30- 

- 9* 

21* Cattle 
* cane 


n H K 
31 th 31th 31th 
m Oth Bte 
27V, 2»h Wh 

20*20*21* 
if 19“ 

p it r 

27th 2» 27* 
22* 3116 ZtM 
1114 W* nth 
» » M 
1M 13 U 
311b Site 31* 
MU 36* 30* 
23* 23* 31* 
»te 9* m 
a a a 

1114 10th m 
12* 12* 12H 
2014 20* 2Hh 


W*— Vh 
nth— * 


IS* 12 

i» ns 

IW 7th 
V 14* 
31 10* 

34* ZK 
46* 2714 
21* 14M 
9* 5te 
19* 12* 
14 * IM 
9* 4Vh 
MB 7* 
5* 2* 
2T« 3* 
2 * * 
0* 4* 


9M 9* 
12H w* 

15* 13V, 

w* ute 

25* 23* 
27* a 
33* 33* 
M* 34* 
2CW. 2K4 
I* ■* 

iTS" 

i5*i5* 
2 * 2 * 
4(4 4* 


10* 

9* 

3* 

3 

17* 

0* 

2* 

* 

24* 10* 

If* 

8* 

35 

19* 

9* 

4* 

m* 

3* 

ZZ* 21* 

3M 

10* 

19* 

7* 

I* 

5 

22* 

17th 

19* 

no 

29* 

10 

17* 

4014 

at 

11* 

0 

3* 

2* 

3* 

2* 

11* 

7* 

74* 

32 

10* 

12* 

to* 

5* 

1414 

B* 

20 

11* 

25 

14* 

8* 

4H 


3** M 

1 ££ 'aw— * 

9* 9*— M 

32* na— * 

a* **— * 

15* 14 — * 
3* 3te— * 
4* 4*— Vh 
39V, 39*+ * 
S3Vh S3Vh— 114 
1014 10* 

7V3 m 


10*. 

4* 

>A4 

1296 

7* 

3* 

4* 

2* 

Z3* 

15 

« 

31* 

11*. 

4* 

J* 

Hfc 

22* 

IS* 

5* 

3* 


5* 

12* 

ID* 

5* 

2* 

I* 

* 

17* 

12 . 

3* 

3* 

72* 

5* 

33* 19* 

7* 

r* 

H* 

7 

9*. 

7 

' 4* 

2* 



9* 9* 
U* Mte 
4* 4* 
2 * 2V, 

23 22V, 

34* 35* 
9* 9* 

T* 1* 
20V. 19* 
3* 314 


9* + * 
14*— * 


12V, 12V, 
14* 14* 


12 * 11 * 
2214 21 
3 2 * 

« 5* 
9 m 
5* 5* 


2th— * 
22 *+ * 
a + * 
9*+ * 
I* 

19*—* 
314— * 
7*—* 
12*— * 

14*—* 

3* 

11 *—* 
a —i* 
2* 

0*4 

9 

SH— (4 


J5 ig 
J5r 13 

24 

.12 20 a 

-JOr 4J B 


* 11 

3 S W 54 

ast 93 


JTt 17 M 

.12 13 n 


12 

7 

30 24 24 


117 10914 
24 4* 

22 TA 

45 12 

.50 2* 

! 3 & 

a o* 

1 2014 

“! k 
*2 K 

itn n* 

"S & 

? % 

27 1* 

12 ZTVh 
4 2W. 
24 3th 


108 109* +1 

«* 4* 

ii* ins— u 

2 s * sta* 

M* 34*— * 
9* 9*+ * 
20 * 20 * 

1 * 2 
2* 2* 

9* 9* 

S* •* 

12 * 12 * 

2* 3*— * 
4* 4*— * 
2 * 2 * 

7* 7W + * 
1* 1*— * 
24* 24*— * 
29* 29* — * 
3* 3*+Vh 


to 


a* •* 
12 * 12 * 
17* 14* 
17* 17 
15* »* 
20* 19* 
41* 40* . 
5* 5* 
15* 15* 
1 * 1 * 
10* 9* 

2 3 

2* 2* 
11* II* 
IS* 15 
3* 3te 
* U 
10* 10* 
9* 9* 



17* llte Joctvn 30b 33 9 * im M * U* 

9* 5* Jacob, 13 6V, 6* 4te 

14 in 7 I 1 S» V 5 * 15 * 

5* 2*JhtMI 4 00 3 2* 3*~ Vh 

2* 4h Jaf A Wf 2 * * * — •» 

m-MhjSrw* 39153 17 19 M W Mh 

4V4 2* JtSmPd 47 5 4* 4* + * 

II* 7* JahrtAm JO 29 14 5497 JO* TO* lgj» — * 

7* 4te JmpJkn 5 25 5 4U 4*— * 

3i* a* Jupttar 4 2 a* a* a*— * 


4 1* 

144h 10 
14* 9* 

20* 14* 
18 10* 
9* 5* 
17* « 
15 5 

4* 2* 
4* 2* 
5* 3* 
4* 3 
5* 3» 
3* 2* 
15 8* 

15* B* 
27* a 


KWOkC 

koyCd as ' 

KacrNfl -40 

K*nwl n 30 o 

Krtdvn Stt 

Key Co as 

KwvPfl as 

KovCn 

KlOdawt 

Wkm 

Ktaark 

Klrbv 

Kit 

KteerVs 32r 

Know 

Knoll 

KasarC 232 I 


44 2 H 
12 14 * 
36 13 * 
7 19 
27 15 * 

3 no 

548 10 * 
10 4* 

a 4* 
3 4 

83 4 * 

231 3 * 

22 5 * 

14 3 

io n 

It 13 

a 24* 


2 * 3 * 

14 * 14 *— * 
13 13 * + W 

10 * 19 + * 

15 * 15 * + * 

m o* 

»* 9 *— * 

4 * «h+ * 

4 * 4 * 

4 4 

4 * 4 W + * 

3 * 3 * 

5 5 * 

2 * 2 *—* 
12* 12*— W 
12 * 13 + * 

M »*+ * 


n* 

314 GNCEfl 



17 

4 * 

4 

4 

n* 

2 * GlExst 


4 

47 

9 * 

9 

9 — * 

0 * 

414 GRI 


14 

2 D 

4 * 

4 * 

4 *— * 

5 

2* on 


32 

7 

3 * 

J* 

3 *— * 

IBM 

996 GalaxC 


» 

94 

11 * 

10 * 

11 *+ * 

3 * 

I* GatxvO 



74 

2 * 

2 * 

7 *— * 

33 - 

24 * Goran . 1 J 0 

4.1 

9 

17 

29 * 

29 

29 * + W 

10 * 

-TO Gar Lb 



34 

11 * 

n 

11 * 

MW 

7 Goriro 


14 

0 

f* 

i §5 

M 

13 * 

9 * G«mS 


w 

16 

10 * 

10 *+ * 

5 * 

2 * Gam co- 


a 

■ 

«* 

4 * 

4 *— * 

17 * 

12 * GMra JO 

54 

to 

« 

14 * 

15 * 

IS*—* 

4 * 

2 * GnEms Ju 

43 

14 

31 

4 * 

4 * 

4 * 

17 * 

11 * GnMla* .10 

J 

13 

27 

15 V. 

15 * 

15 V.— « 

0 

* 2 * Ganiscs 



IT 

4 * 

4 * 

4 * 

14 * 

11 * GanvDr 30 

L 4 

14 

4 

14 * 

14 * 

74 * 

‘ 2 * 

1 * GooRwt 



5 

2 * 

2 * 

2 * 


2* I* ; 
4 * 2 * 
7 * 2 * I 
40 * 23 * I 
14 * 11 * I 
17 * 11 I 
H* 9 * I 
13 >* I 

4 * 41 A I 
9 * 2 * I 
54 * 25 * I 
4* 3* I 
9 * 5 I 
4 * 2 * I 


39 * 22 * 
14 * M 
13 * 6 V, 
16 104 h 

J 4 W 9 * . 
35 * 13 ' 


41 

34 22 4 

7 S 
.ISh 49 

34 13 9 34 

. 14 a 3 a 

a a 

3 

4 

14 172 
30 a 3 11 19 

a 43 
7 10 

4 

5 

19 205 
30 3 25 35 

it a 
All 14 * 44 

4 13 

JO 13 14 241 


1 * 1 * 
2 * 2 * 
5 * 5 * 

27 * am 

14 * 14 * 
17 * 17 * 
12 * 12 * 
12* 12* 
4 * 4 * 
6 * 5 * 

so* a 
4 * 4 * 
7 * 7 * 

ah a* 
2 * 2 * 
a 37* 

15 * VI* 
12 * 1214 
12 11* 
13 * 13 * 
a 29 * 


1 *— * 
a-* 

27 * 

14 *— * 
17 * 

12 *— * 
12 *— * 
4 * 

5 *—* 
5014 + 14 
4 *—* 
7 * 

2* 

214 — * 
37 *+ lb 
15 * + * 
12*+ M 
12 

nth— v. 

29 *— 1 * 


m 


£ 5 


| 4 *fc 








sSffifSSfWWSi 


j Herat 









sen 




T?" 


I iT 




warn 




i ‘ * i 


$ 



. If you purchased Ibis Trib at a news- 
stand, you’re already enjoying a rare 
bargain - tbe whole world in just a few 
tightly-written, fact-packed pages. 

f But why not double your bargain by 
subscribing to the International Herald 
Tribune and saving up to half the news- 
stand price? "With our low-cost subscription 
rates, you can double your value and enjoy 
almost twice as many Tribs, and each for a 
price which is no more than you have to 
pay. for a cup of coffee. . 


Think of it The combined editorial 
product of hundreds of the world’s finest 
journalists in every comer of the planet - 
available to youfor such a relatively modest 
expenditure. 

Subscribe now, and we'll speed . 
bargain-price Tribs to your home or office 
day after day. 

Just fill out the coupon below and 
mail For maximum savings, subscribe for 
- a full year. This cut-price subscription offer 
is for new subscribers only. 


m 


9* 




| Subscribe to the IHT today and save up to half the newsstand pnee. For new subscribers only. 

To: Subscription Manager, International Herald Tribune, 181 avenue Charles de Gaulle, 92521 Neuillv 
Cedes, France. TeL : 747.07.29. Telex: 612832. 

I Yes, I would like to accept your bargain offer. Please send me the IHT each day from the priming site 

| nearest me, for the time period and at the reduced price circled on this coupon. 

□ My payment is enclosed ccbect or 










code below the reduced subscription 
price selected. For new subscribers only. 
(Rates valid through April 30. 1965) 


r 

ra - 


Please charge my: 

□ Access 


monfey order to the IHT). 


□ Eurocard 


□ American-Express □ Mastercard 


^-jrXr 


G Diners Club 
Card account number: 


D Visa 








job/Profesaon 


Rest of A£aca. Csnada. La&n Amenca. Gulf Stmss. 


Company ftcuvity 


14^45 

































































Page 17 



rr*: :' r : 


■* +* r 6 


U 7-i 


* ■* 


•*%. I -4 


t JTO 


hut 


F '» 

.-■*-. I -~ 


ht-r.-O 

b • ri 


*ud. 


m. 

Ul V* 


Si-IV 

H?:-v 

?t‘; r.; T 

ir< 'A * 


fl : i ' 
V- > 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


U.S. Universities Seek Profit in Research Parks 


Nov York Tima Service 

NEW YORK, — Hard-pressed 
: for funds and eager to support 
; . more research, scores of uruversi- 
' ties around the United States are 
’■ developing corporate research 

■ parks in their backyards. 

Yale Univeraty, the University 
of Missouri at Kansas City and tin 
Polytechnic Institute of New York 
. are among those following the suc- 
cessful lead of Princeton Universi- 

• ty, with its Forresial Center, and 
i. Stanford University, with iu Re- 
search Park. 

‘ Douglas R. Porter, associate di- 
rector Tor research at the Urban 
' Land Institute, a private consulting 
: group based in Washington, said 31 

: universities were developing re- 
search parks. Fifteen or so more, he 
. said, were in the “initial invesliga- 
: lion phase." while another dozen or 
two “are being very quiet about 
their plans or thinking to them- 
. selves.” 

“There are hundreds of office 
parks across the country, but the 
\ interest and involvement of univer- 
sides is a new phenomenon that is 
: gaining momentum,” he said. Mr. 
= Porter wanted, however, that there 
. . was no guarantee that other schools 
< would fare as wen as Princeton and 
Stanford, mainly because of com- 
. petition. 

^ The attraction of such develop- 
x meats f or universities is the money 

> they can earn as landlords or on 
equity in new companies locating 
at the research parks. For business- 

‘..es, it is the easy access they gain to 

> faculty, graduate students and re- 
search laboratories. 

* The Siemens Corp., for example, 
decided to locate its research and 

_ technology laboratories division in 
^ihe Forrestal CenleT because 

■ “Princeton is the mecca of research 
; in the East,” said Dr. Carl Zain- 
‘ inger, executive vice presidenL 

“Here we can find the kind of peo- 
ple we need,” he explained. 

Other corporations (hat have 
chosen to locate in such research 
parks are Xerox Corp., Interna- 
tiona] Business Machines Corp., 
Syntex Corp. and Exxon Corp. 

This surge of entrepreneurial de- 
velopment is the result of a variety 
of trends in academia, industry and 
community life. 

For the private sector, the high- 
technology revolution has created a 

■ demand for more research in gener- 
' al, making access to faculties, lab- 
oratories and other resources of 

. universities increasmgty important. 


Two University Office Parks 


Princeton Forrester Cento, . 
Princeton, HJ. 

Owner: Princeton thUvenrity 
fear begun: 1975 
Estimated -annual eanungs tor 
thauniversfjy: si million 
Total Acres; 1,604 
Number of tenants: 50. 
indudJngl.Sjm^Bocon. RCA • ■ 
Number oteoipfoYWs: 5,000 



Moreover, university communi- 
ties are considered good places to 
live. With high-technology industry 
being very different from industry 
of the past, Mr. Porter said, factors 
such as access to markets, raw ma- 
terials or high-volume transporta- 
tion do not have the same urgency 
they once did. Instead, companies 
are paying more attention to quali- 
ty-of-hfe concents: a pleasant envi- 
ronment, affordable housing, rea- 
sonable commuting, good schools 
and a range of cultural and recre- 
ational activities. 

“The locational criteria for this 
new generation of companies dif- 
fers dramatically from traditional 
industrial concents," said Richard 
A. Kahan, a former president of 
New Ycut State Urban Develop- 
ment Carp, who recently estab- 
lished his own company, Continen- 
tal Development Group Inc, to 


Few See Butt Market Decline 


(Continned from Page 9) 
stock like Ford. It doesn’t have 
much downside risk, but unless you 
are convinced that imports won't 
hurt the company, there’s not much 
upside potential either.” 

_ Ove Brandsmip-Andersen, head 
of foreign trading and investment 
at Copenhagen Handelsbank, ech- 
oed the fundamentalist view that a 
Wall Street advance will not occur 
until interest rates decline. 

“Encouraging news about the 
economy growing would also help, 
but not enough, of course, to put 


upward pressure on rates,” he add- 
ed. 

The dollar's sharp rise has made 
him much more cannons about in- 
vesting on Wall Street because “its 
fall could Itill an otherwise sound 
in vestment” Mr. Brandstrup- An- 
dersen says he is only recommend- 
ing Wall Street now when clients 
insist- In bis opinion and that of the 
bank's economists, the long-term 
trend of the dollar is down. 

He said any buying is focused on 
drug stocks, such as StmihKlme 
and Bristol-Myers, plus aerospace 
issues, notably Lockheed. 


: Sbrtw> H > >wiA P«»fc,P»te - 
AJta,CeW- 

\ Owner: Stanton! Unfcvsniity 
Year Begun: 1851 • / . 

■' Estimated annua) aaminCsIor 
... ttwiirem^y: *2 nation 
'• Tattf acres: 6$0 -. “ . 

■ Number of tenants: BO, ’ , : 

•tadmlihfl Xerox, MmMfe* ■' 
Pbcfcard. Swotsk ** •• ■ 

•’ Number o# £wiptpy«os-36j300 

Hm ABaoaMd Prwn 

develop research parks with univer- 
sities. 

Universities, faced with tighten- 
ing budgets and dedining enroll-' 
meats, are casting about for new 
ways to support and enlarge their 
research activities. They are finding 
that (me of the few potential in- 
come-producing assets they have 
left is land. Most schools, m fact, 
have extensive property holdings, 
which have been held in trust over 
the years for the day when expan- 
sion — new classrooms, dormito- 
ries, and athletic facilities, for in- 
stance — would require its 
development. 

“We had about 325 acres that 
was once used for some experimen- 
tal agricultural research, but had 
become less and less desirable for 
this function,'' said Wayne 
McGown, special assistant to the 
chancellor at the University of Wis- 
consin at Madison. “It was an is- 
land of relatively unused land in an 
otherwise urbanized area, and 
when we began to receive a string 
of overtures from developers ft 
seemed the time had come to exam- 
ine some alternatives.” 

Closer ties with industry, many 
schools have also concluded, is one 
way to help stay the flight of pro- 
fessors to the private sector, with its 
typically higher salaries. _ 

In addition, jobs are usually cre- 
ated for the community surround- 
ing a research park, a factor that is 
drawing many cities and towns into 
the development process. And 
since few schools can afford to de- 
velop sites entirely on their own, 
with costs usually in the millions of 
dollars, most are choosing joint 


ventures with public agencies or 
with private developers. 

Princeton, which was among the 
earliest to recognize the potential 
for an office park, expects its earn- 
ings from the Forrestal Cotter to 
exceed SI million annually within a 
couple of years. The 1,604-acre 
(649-hectare) complex has attract- 
ed 50 companies and research insti- 
tutions, employing more than 5,000 
people. The university has already 
recouped its entire investment of 
about S10 million. And t $100- 
million expansion, a commercial 
complex offering restaurants, retail 
shops and other amenities, is now 
on the drawing boards. It rents the 
land in its center, under 50-year 
prepaid leases, for an average of 
$250,000 an acre. 

The Stanford Research Park, 
which 1ms attracted 50 tenants on 
its 660-acre site since starling de- 
velopment in 195 1, is providing the 
university with income of 52 mO- 
lion a year. There are 26,000 people 
employed at the park. 

xale, Olin Corp. and the city of 
New Haven have joined together to 
develop a park on an abandoned 
OHn manufacturing site, next to the 
school, that once supported 15,000 
jobs. The joint venture, called the 
Science Park Development Corp., 
has spent $10 million cm theprqject 
so far and $40 million more is ex- 
pected to be invested over the next 
five years. 

“The park was conceived as an 
economic revival project,” said 
Matthew Nemerson, a vice presi- 
dent of Science Park Development, 
who said that 400 jobs had been 
nested so far. “The idea is to use 
the academic and research assets of 
Yale, to capitalize on its reputa- 
tion, while relying on the finan cial 
backing of others.” 

Olin has contributed 80 acres of 
land and three b uilding s as well as 
some operating funds; Yale shares 
all of the resources of its campus, 
and the dry has created a $1 -mil- 
lion venture capital fund to help 
email companies that will occupy 
the site, lie state of Connecticut 
has also provided about $2 million 
in ate improvements. 

In contrast, the University of 
Missouri at Kansas City, has decid- 
ed to collaborate with a private 
developer. Mr. Kahan of the Conti- 
nental Development Group. 

“Weloofced at different develop- 
ment options, bat derided . that 
there was no way we coaid go it 
alone,” said George A. Russell, 
chancellor of the univeraty. “De- 
velopment isn't oar business.” 

In fact, only a handful of schools 
have derided to go it alone. Some 
schools, such as Princeton, have 
employed a management compa- 
ny; others, such as the Univeraty 
of Wisconsin or Purdue Univeraty. 
have created a university-affiliated 
foundation for the purpose. 

Success, however, has been hard- 
won, even by schools, with consid- 
erable resources and prestige. And 
competition has increased. 

“Some will take off, but most are 
gping to limp along,” said Dr. 
George BugGardla, president of 
the Polytechnic Institute of New 
York, which is building a park 
called Metro tech adjacent to its 
Brooklyn campus. 


We dnesdays 

AMEX 


Tonies Include the notlonwWa prices 
UPto the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late frottas etsewtero. 


>3 Month 

-Hah Low Stock 


M*. YkLPE 


SK. 

nOsHIgn Lon 


Out* cat* 


204 131* 
to m 
3 Vj 2V, 

B -atlVto 

7Vt 4H 
im 7a* 
17V* 12 
E 173* 
7H SVt 
ant. iff* 
■ft *v% 
II* V3 

n *v* 

* M 
21 UW 
27V» in* 
Utt W* 
2M* ISM 

«n 


PkxDs 

Piydns 

PlyRB 

PntvSc 

PopeEv 

Ports vs 

PMtIPr 


(Continued from Page 16) 

1 171* 171* 

9 in* Mi* 
3 a ns 
a an* 24 

w M m 
11* 11V* 

6 14 151* 

7 301* 30V* 
ID kVi JJ* 

3 224* 22V, 
20 74k TO 

4S ift ii* 
138 TO Tft 
ID » » 
to aa in* 

2 a m 27Vk 
250x 34 W 
a» am 2ffi* 

10 6W 6 


ProlrOs 

ProtlL 

P rati Rd 

PrvmRs 

PrvsRB 

Pr*iM 

PrpCTs 

PruvEn 

PSOriof 

PBlpfP 

PtxiioG 


12 

1X0 42 n 

7« 

IS 

.146 S St 

J! 4.1 9 
.12 IX 

M 9A ^4 

1SZ 7J II 
ZW 7J 7 
42S ns 
2JM 112 


17V*— V* 

T ^ 

a* - 1* 
m 

is* . 
13*+ v* 

m + w 
«* 

»— » 
i»— v* 
271*— Vk 
34 — » 
2044+ V. 
4—1* 



~ Q 

□ 

35 10 Quctaot 58 


4 2416 34ft 24ft— ft 


Ft 

- 3 


W* 

T«H 

ID 

.41* 

■ 1 a 

17H 
S3* 
• ^ 
iT 

M14 

ss 

i 

j 714 
uv* 

B*k 


5 RAl 
131* Rouon 
12V» Rants 
44 RottFH 
10V* Ravon 
* RnncT 
14* ftadlaw 
10V* RMQIB 
TTh RntIA 
304* RasHB 
SH RntAsc 
3V. RaxNar 
94* RIDWtP 
10H RhMUQ 
4* RtoGOr 
114* Rckvrva 
201* Room 
2 RootlP n 
344 ftoypkn 
22 ti RudKfc 
231w Roddtnf 
31* RBW 
mi. Rusian 

Ml* RvkOK 


S4 11 
.12 3 25 

72 17 

X U I 
J06 4X M 

I 

II 

30 I J 14 
JS 13 

St 2X 21 
.12 A 14 


sto V 11 
34 ia 

JO U II 
JO 271 12 


3 

7k 

42 
5 

17 

1 

“S 

1W 

3 S 0 I 

4 
10 
22 

1 

1* 

43 

g 

10 


44* 4U 
14VC. 1414 
11*4 W4* 

.3 J 

<v* m 
iSift 

4244 4144 
45V* 44 
fl 71* 
4A% 4 

104* in* 

!«* 144* 
1W 1 

agf 
an* 2 b™ 

4*4 44* 
41* 41* 
3244 32** 
3144 sm 
7V. TV* 
16V* Utt 
2114 21V» 


14V4+ t* 

Tzl 

St* 

104* 

144k— Mi 
IVk+ 1* 
244k— 4* 
an*— i* 

41*— V» 
41* 

32V. 

Wt4- 14 
2114 


s* 

ni 

iSJ 

104* 

& 

43 

61 

*m 

w* 

s* 

a 

M14 

sr 

M 

& 

fl* 

m* 

1114 

94* 

IN 

* 

)N 

? 

2> 

s* 

IN 

lit* 

IK* 

n. 

VBV* 


44k SFM 
71* SFNBfA 
3H SMO 
7 Sum 
7V* ScVwfi 
4* 5 Carlo 
M> SDooPf 

» sooopr 

49 SDoOBf 
1714 SDooPt 
31V* UhM 

IflVfc SDsoPf 

23V* taidoto 
3V> Sonmrk 

41* Sound A 

314 Seaptrn 
14 sawn 
144 SdlOOtP 

I0H SOmob 

PI SJS 

11 SeuciM 
>4 5Ddd> 
U* Saaoort 
lMhg» 

wJ Sonten 

SV* sarvotr 
>14 Sttona 
M Shows 
1 Shorqo 
ft* SlWowt 
1 BV* siorcn 
flbSlfca 
t SHuaM 
4V% SUwrcU 
2V* SlmcsS 
TO* smttiA 

N Smma 
IM* snyaw 
ft* saniran 
nhSCUnf 
nv xcEapf 

2 * scea of 

tv> sCEdof 
33 seed of 


Mr IS 

M VIA 
7 JO 114 
7 JO 12.1 
2A7 US 
ASS OA 
2 sa iu 

JO M 10 

mun 

JO IT » 


“a 

12 


.10 


JO 


.» 7 
17 

,M*U 8 

6 

11 

M U ■> 

$ 7 U 

1JM U fl 
.Uh U «4 

m it n 

JO II 23 
a un 


J> u 
At 22 
2X0 Ul 14 

1X2 11 J 
1X4 IU 
IJS 123 
1.19 IU 
4X6 TJ 


74 7Mt 714 

"S & St 

0 imv ™ 

5 71* 74* 

13 TO TO 
14D 744 7*4 

lOOt 62 42 

M83 

IU 349* 341* 

aS 

4 444 44 * 

37 «* «* 

1 ilk 4» 

1 ZWk 244* 
13 214 .2W. 

io mw rm 

50 04 CM 

21 2V14 2N 
57 ISIS W* 

1 57 v* sw 

3 2 2 

13 % 13 % 
1% TO 
7H 7Vi 
«4 44* 
. m 44* 

m w 

5 in* 10 

2i m m 

5 171 * 171 * 
IS 119 * 119 * 
282 1 M 
Uf 13V, W* 
33 141 * 141 * 

2 41 * M* 

m mi* Mi* 

7 4Vt 41* 

51 34 * 31 * 
» UK 14V* 

30 15V* MV, 

47 Ml* 

0 7 V, 79 * 

i m pi 

SI M. 1 
1 M Ht 

1 mw 

5001 42 42 


54 

24 

iff 

I 


7*fc— V* 
71b . 

34b— J* 

79k— V* 
19b— 1* 
79k + 14 
62 

591* -TO 
3414 + 9* 

PIS 

44* 

214*— V* 
2V4— 1* 

vm 

49* 

3896— 1? 
15V*- 1* 
5JV»— 9* 
2 + 1 * 
139*+ M. 
IW 

7V*— 1* 
444 + 14 

44* 

1244-14 
10 -W 

(9* 

171* 

111*- A 
94— 1* 

13V*- ,«■ 

M9* + 1* 

SI*— W 
Ml* 

414 + V* 
3Vk— Hi 
1CV*— U. 

MM 

MV* 

Mb— J* 
69*— 16 
TV* + M 
89k— 4* 
WU.+ w 
42 


l2Mondi 
HUdLnw Stack 


Df». YU. PE lllfcHtBflLW* 


2S 


art* 


SB 


1344 in* SCEdpf 145 JIJ 
110 MV* SCEd of 12XO IU 
21 Vh 14K SCEd of 230 11S 
204k 16 SCEd of 2X1 11J 

154* 4V* sorianii 

I0V* 61* Sorkpf 1X0 VU 
149* 794 SpCtTOfl X» S 13 
61* 31* SdddOP . 

15 84* SodncM- M Z5 IT 

51* 24* SqrOwf 
996 49* SiHaun 
239* 1 3V, SMPfd 
111* BV4 Stamkd 
ink 119* starrtH 
121* 69* Slatox 
21 14Vt sum 
39k 14* StwIEI 
9V. 54* SlWlSft 

4 196 STTVtW 

BV. 5V, SumllE 
u ill* sunne pfi jo 12J 
11 69* SulCfV _ 8 

179* 111* SunJr M Ifl 12 
279* WA SufKFd J4b IS 12 
39* Vi SuaCr* 

129* SV, Suplnd Mb J 10 
159* 111* SuorSr J6 2J W 
49* 394 StjMUOh 6 

914 29* Suwjwpn 

21* 11* SwfTE n 11 

2816 1M* Swfflln U0 *8 11 
84* 49* Synatov 
144* 41* SVffEni 21 


IX 56 
2t 


34 12 
U 

.I3e U 2* 


22 121* 124* 124*— J* 
146 105K105K 10596 +114 

15 1T4* 1*9* lg* „ 

16 m* 1T1* 1*1* + V* 

310 694 6V* 6H 

1 79* 79* 79* „ 

38 151* 15% 151*— J* 

1 51* 51* 5%— V* 

30 101* *94 99k— 9* 

125 5 5 S 

lx 79* 79* 71* + 1* 
21 22K. 22V* 22V* — J* 

IT 81* 0 I -J* 
1!M 17 169* 17 —9* 

2 99k 99* «*+ V* 

11 SSR5, 2014 2016 

r » » » 

79 746 71k 7J6— 1* 

1 n. iu m 

34 6% *1* A*—?* 

2 14 14 14 + lb 

3 104* 104* lg*— * 

fl T54k 15% 15% + % 

4 27V* 27 27„ — W 

*» 19* TO TO 

34 11 189k 10%— v» 

154 15% 141* 144* + V* 

12 614 41* «*— 1* 

2 3 3 3 

127 14* TO II* 

37 25% 25 25% 

292 54* 5% 5V.— 9* 

81 14% 139* 134* 


11V* 

12 

21 

149* 

189k 

10ft 

13 

69* 

44* 

229* 

STO 

TO 

2Mb 

414 

1794* 

TV. 

319* 

11 

ltK 

S9* 

69* 

STO 

lift 

101* 

22Vk 

Ml* 

TO 

89* 

721* 

99* 

12V. 

2K 

2614 

1294 

199* 

IBIS 

111 * 

r 

MV* 

4 

1H* 

Z7ft 

6K 


M 3.1 11 

16 

13 

7 

X0 13 10 
JO* X126 


6ft T BOT XI4J » 

7V* TEC .»• J 23 

51* TIE 15 

4ft Til 48 

13 TobPdl JD 1.1 B 

4ft TondBr 
99* Toxtv 
2ft Town 
n* TchAm 
13V. TchSwn 
331* TtCflOp 
3ft TocTlTp 
TO TocWrl 
14* TochotJ 
771* TokwR 
2 Totaeon 
211* TolfftX A* IS 13 
Bib ToiDttJ JtoUlf 
TO T«J»d *1 

2ft Tttotodi 

piopim u 

SJTSS J,n 2 

16ft ToxAEpf _ 

3ft TXKOn 2 

2 ThorEn . M 
TO ThTDB J4 UVJ 
56 TMEOpnOJO 15X „ 
4ft TortU _ 11 

7ft Toll PI B J4 
K TofPtwt 
22 TotPlOl 2JB 12.1 
89* Tmrtj. Mr J T 
lift TTmToc J* U 9 
13ft Tromon X 15 I 
7ft TT«M -«• *3 
6ft TrtaCP JTt 93 
394 TrlHino 11 

396 TrVdoX 22 

24* TuMMX , 11 

996 Tulto X X B 
201* TunvC 1X0 AA 9 
3ft TytorwT 


59 TO 7* 7ft — ft 

2 lift lift lift „ 
2187 TO M TO- * 

■ ill* lift lift „ 
19 18 171* 18 +1* 

* TV* 7ft 7ft 

i 'to ’to t to— ft 

3 54ft 5494 54ft 

23 5ft 5 5 — ft 

19 1*4* W IS — ft 

37»rl77V* 140*6 TO* —fift 

ft’s 5=8 

7 1 99k 9ft 94* + ft 

949 4 TO TO 

38 61* 5*6 5ft— 9* 

S - 22ft 22V* 229*— 4* 
IN 104* tOft 
192 7 69* «*+ 1* 

1J 2Mb 2DW WS 
174 49* 416 416— ft 

18 3 TO 3 

3 Oft 494 49h— ft 
64» 64ft 46ft— ft 
11 ft Ik 8ft— ft 
3S3 119* lift IJSh+J* 
AS 1ft l» iff— W 
I 24 2Jta 2396— ft 
28 10ft 10 18—1* 

78 179* 1691. 169*— ft 
3 16 16 16 

6 94* 99* TO 

S3 7ft 7ft 7ft 

10 M6 616 6V6 + ft 

14 * TO SW— ft 

8 TO TO TO— ft 
5® 14 mu 
49 27ft 27ft 27ft 
33 5ft 5ft 516 + ft 


12MMHI 



sa 


=» 

ME* Low Stock 

Dhr. TkL PE 

KttHWiLo* QootChVB 

MS *1 WstlP* 

M IX 

14 

» Mil 

100ft 100H + 9k 


1JQ 65 23 

44 

MVS 

M 24 — H 

ink 24* Wthfrd 



98 

5 

4ft «fc 

27 1396 WlMdpf 2X2 LSJ 


2 

17 

17 17 

6 19* Wabcor 



206 

2 

2 * T * 

17ft 114* Vladlen 
61* 3ft Wehnon 

SOa 3 
.12 11 

14 

7 

» 

3 

l*fc 

596 

VSVs 15H + 9* 

5* SK 

139a 7 WaMTb 

XII 


2 

8ft 

Jft 816 

14 69k Wrldtrn 

W 

£ 

12ft 

12ft 1TO 

1016 49* wanes 



109* 

3© 10 

5ft 216 WMGrd 



30 

3 

TO 3 + H 


M 15 

7 

6 

MW MW MVS— ft 

7 96 Wsspcp 



61 

14* 

19* TO- ft 

38 319* WT*x ef 4A0 12.) 


90c 361* 

34 36W+ W 

18 ft 7ft WfetsrC 


13 

608 

14ft 

Uft 13W — 3W 

13V* 816 WaTOro 

JO 

12 

aa 

10ft 

10ft 18ft + W 



If 3485 

lift low lift— ft 

TOft 7V6 WIHIttl n 


17 

S3 

18 

17W 17W 

IN Uft WIRET 

152 BX 15 

6 

1* 

1BH 19 + ft 

31 16 WatoSU 

AOm 17 22 


27ft 

27W 27ft 

28 94* WhEntS 


36 

473 

27 

am am— 4* 

5ft 21* WlchSto 



26 

TO 

24* TO- H 

lift 7ft WlllcxG 


5 

41 

lift 

11 Ilk* + ft 

3V* 1 WlbnB 



2 

1ft 

14k 196 

23ft 1T4* Wlrrfln 

2L2401O2 


4 

22 

21H 22 


*50 IU 


into «ft 

«. 40 — ft 

1 

JO U 

11 

3 

10ft 

10ft 10ft— H 
1TO 139k +H 

154* 11 wkwaor 

J2 17 

7 

TO 

131* 

6ft 2K WwttoE 


3* 

It 

5ft 

5 5—9* 

T79* 124* WVMepf 1J0 IU 


169* 

15ft 15ft 

34 2796 Worffm 

SO IX 

u 

68 

31ft 

31ft 31 Mi 

TOft 13 WroBil 

set .i 


74 

IN 

19ft IN— ft 

79* 3V> WrotHo 

X5* 

16 

64 

4ft 

4V* 446 + V* 

rz . ■ _v 

1416 59* Yank Co 


9 

3 

6W 

69* 64k 

5ft 4 Yatdnv 

JOB U 13 

30 

5ft 

5ft 5ft 

11 - ? 1 

11K SH Zinur 

.10 U 


111 

79* 

7 7 — V* 

^ AMEXHi^K-Lows 




Marring] 


NSW HIGHS 

a 


SatorPhann Martin Pipe 

MHoCarp 



PUa7£4pf 


PsSPLPfD RirtdlckCp 

Ruddiekpf 

WaleoMatl 

WWko Enr 







MEW LOWS 

6 


BaltixaiCp SharaiiSn 

Stamuoad 

TOKocaCdoa 

WanaUTOB WansLabC 






U 


at 2 

249* TO 
1* ft 
1596 lift 
lift 896 
31 M16 

3ft 19* 
TO 1ft 
15 10ft 
229* 10ft 
B9k 6ft 
14V4 14ft 
21 Vi l«k 
13ft 7ft 
104* 5ft 
229* 15 
159* fft 


USRind 

Uttimo 

Untcorv 

UlUCBpf 

VJnbrvn 

UAirPd 

VUVtad 

USAGWt 

unitorv 

UiWHId 


JS 13 

3*25 11 
.to 5X as 
. 30 
X5t 5J 15 

J 4 T 14 JZ 13 

A0b IS 
UnttvB WXOt 
UnvCm 15 

UnlvR* 24 

UidvRU JOBSS 7 
1 /nvPot- 


49 3ft 

589 13^ 
432 ft 

75 Mft 
296 in* 
8 IJ 
S4 2 
. 47 19* 

1 13ft 
70 38 
* 6H 

1 16M 

2 2BK 
6 129* 

74 74* 

4 17ft 
37 14ft 


31* » + ft 
11 II —I 
9* ft 
Ml* Mft— ft 

xu n* .. 

18ft 19 —ft 
1ft 2 + ft 
IK TK 
13ft UH - 
19ft 19ft— ft 
64* 6ft 
16V* 14ft + ft 
2DK 20K + V6 
121* 129*+ ft 
74* 7ft— ft 
17ft 17ft 
1496 Uft 



30 Uft 10ft IN— ft 


If! U I 4 

M U M W 

3363 
13 38 

JOO 2X 9 


JO U 9 


JO 16 12 

3 38 


34 34 

244* an* 
6ft 516 

3 TO 
am 20 i* 

44* 44* 
m* in* 
5ft 5ft 
796 7ft 

4 4 
61ft 61ft 

7ft TO 
IN TOft 

in* in* 


34+ft 

241* 

6ft +1 
TO- ft 
20ft— ft 
44*— ft 
lift- ft 
5ft— ft 
796— ft 
4 — ft 
Clft— ft 
7ft 
TOft 

Uft— ft 


W 


•ft 6ft wTS 

TTft nftWMr 
15 101* WoJco 

31ft 204* WdnsE 
32ft 38ft WomC 
3 ft WmCwf 
VH 34b W01H8 


21 

M U U 
jo 2J 10 
.16 J 12^ 
,11 S 12 2*J 
33 
4 IB 


79k 79* 79* 

249* 24 1* 24ft -+9* 
154* 15V* 159* +19* 
21 194* 30 —9k 

20 19ft IN— 1 
1ft 1H 1H 

tv. a ■ — i* 


Cocoa Pact Talks 
Stall Over Prices 

Rttuten 

GENEVA — Efforts by 70 countries to nego- 

tiate a new international cocoa agreement mat 
would stabilize the volatile world market ap- 
peared headed toward collapse, delegates to a 
conference sponsored by the United Nations 

said Wednesday. 

The conference, which began Feb. 19 and was 

to end lata this week, is the third attempt at a 

new accord. Delegates said differences between 

producing and consuming countries on price- 

support levels remained unresolved. 

The current agreement, which guarantees a 
price of $146 a pound (453 grams), became 

inoperative three years ago because of alack of 

financial backing to lift prices from levels at 

which they would normally trade. Cocoa now 
trades at about 96 cents a pound. 

“We are now at the critical part of the negoti- 
ations,” said Rene Montes of Guatemala, the 
conference chairman. “Price levels and price 
adjustments are for both rides fundamental.'’ 
Cocoa economists said the failure of the ne- 

gotiations probably would not unduly concern 
the world’s two largest producers, the Ivory 

Coast and Brazil, but would cause problems for 

other coantries, such as Ghana, that still rdy cm 

cocoa for most of their foreign exchange in- 

come. 


The editors of 
the International 
HeraldTiibune 
would like your 

help. 

Have you spent at least five minutes reading this copy of 
the International Herald Tribune? Will you help the editors by taking 
part in a readership research project 9 

The Tnb is written for people like you living in 164 
countries round the world. The editors want to know how well it is 
serving your needs and how useful and enjoyable you find the contents. 

Your opinion is important even if you see the paper only 
occasionally. The best means we have of identifying you and learning 
about your opinions, is by reaching you through this letter today. 

We would like to send you a simple questionnaire. It will 
take about fifteen minutes to fill out It will ask about your likes and 
dislikes. There will be space for any comments you would like passed 
on to our editors. 

If you would like to help, just fill in the form below and 
send it to our research consultants at the address that is indicated 
below. M replies to this and to the subsequent questionnaire will, of 
course, be treated in complete confidence. A small tbankyou gift will 
be sent to those who return that subsequent questionnaire. 

Thank you very much for your assistance. 


-m Mi m m m m mm m m ■& 


& 

M 

M 

t.i ■ 




Name 


Address 
Tel 


Country 


s* 

□ 

24 or under 

□ 

:* A 
jgO ■ 

□ 

25-34 

□ 

i-x 

8 

□ 

35-44 

□ 

M 

□ 

45—54 

□ 


□ 

55-64 

□ 


□ 

65+ 

□ 


i i urner 

Sex: What is your occupation? 

le EH Female 

/ 

r in which you became a regular reader of the 1 


□ Male 

/ 

Yrarjnv^i^vouberam^ 

EH First time reader today 
EH last year 
EH 2— 5 years ago 
EH 6— 10 years ago 
EH Longer ago 

H^esaidjiisfomito: 

Media Department, Research Services Ltd. 
Station House, Harrow Road,Stonebridge Park 
Middlesex HA9 6DE, England. 


yr 

; * 


14-3-85 







Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


fi [a |3 m 


IB IS 17 IB 10 


|io lit iia M3 


PEANUTS 


THANK. \0U FOR HELPING VOULL G6T SOMETHING 
ME WITH MV HOMEUJORK, OUT OF THIS, TOO, 

BIG BROTHER.. _ YOU KNOW... 


BOOKS 


UJHATs THAT? 


MV EVERA5K1N6 \ . 

^ GRATlTUPEi J A 


k ’Si 


t ? <r- o 


32 



33 


IN 

1 

ST" 


_E 

3?“ 


it 

30 

5“ 


43 




47 ” 



48 

£ 

^■oo 


52 




54 

66 






55“ 



■ 

ST" 

M W 


5T" 




5" 



5 f 








TO GET RICH IS GLORIOUS: 
China in the Eighties 

By Orville Schell 2 JO pp. SJ5.95, 
Pantheon, 201 East 50th Street, 

Hew York, N. Y. 10022. 


loricaHy been either economically self-suffi- 
cient or unable to eke out the money to buy an 
appreciable amount of Western goods; a coun- 
try that even in 1981 had to back off from its 
massive modernization program, which over- 
-committed it to purchases from abroad. Ffisto- 




VMc* 1 W 

# — — 


ty in this sense is not a source of hope; for in 
the past West era dreams, like Chinese dreams, 
have more often than not been disappointed.' 1 

Schell does not deny that Deng Xiaoping's 
reforms have brought some dramatic economic 
progress, including “a surge in over-all agricul- 
tural production. But he worries about an 
inequitable distribution of the gains. He fears 
that free market practices may cause a decrease 
in grain production, an increase in grain prices 
for city workers, and uncontrolled inflation. 
The author shares the concern of William Hin- 
ton, an American farmer who worked in China 
for many years and who now feats that in their 
eagerness to “privatize," the Chinese are 
throwing out everything which was of value 
from the past, including the collective mainte- 
nance of dam, irrigation, and flood control 
projects. 

Schell is also concerned that in their zeal to 
acquire Western technology and the latest iq 
Western luxuries, the Chinese are also, inad- 
vertently, allowing the develop men t of an un- 
derworld dess of young opportunists, specula- 
tors and criminals. Scndl describes well those 
among China's youth who are unemployed or 
who have lost confidence in the communist 
system. One young hustler whom he meets in a 
private restaurant in Beijing boasts that foe 
cold cash. “We can get you anything you want 
Clothes from Hong Kong, tape recorders, cam- 
eras, watches, televisions, radios.” 

More poignant is his account of a Saturday 
night dance sponsored by a Taishan county 
labor-union organization. Schell ends up chat- 
ting with a Miss Wu, who asks him to teach ha- 
how to dance. She tells him that she loves to 
practice dancing and listen to Western pop 
music in the evening as a diversion from lux 
boring job in an electrical wire factory. Before 
long every youth in the room is looking at 
Schell and a European friend “with great in- 
tensity, os if they expected us to momentarily 
unlock the riddle of the universe.'' 

“The open door policy may have meant the 
mastering of Western science and technology 
to China’s leaders, but to these Taishan youths 


MWi 


in in M ii 


BLOND IE 


I WHO IS J MV LAZY UNCLE WHOT Wfi HS W HE ^ 

L/rwis wEMceu. pbofesson /— T never 


HE VW *5 NOT ONLY 

TOUT OF WORK... r 


«| HE DON *T EVEN KNOW 
tWWAT KIND OF WORK T* 
jL, ME WAS OUT OFV 


ACROSS 


1 Freud’s 
•Totem 

und " 

5 An O'Neal 

10 Its cap. Is 
Pierre 

14 Pavlov 

15 Rancher's 
lariat 

16 Dock support 

17 Auriferous 
Connery film? 

19” Rock” 


44 Admit 

46 de France 

47 Dubious story 
50 Sings like a 


fSlmon- 

Garfunkel 


song) 

20 Approve 

21 Billy the Kid, 
e.g. 

23 Snood 

24 Urey or 
Stassen.to 
Guido 

26 Become 
manifest 

29 Fruit of an 

Asiatic palm 
32 Hamlet's cry 
of distaste 
S3 Smith and 
Jackson 
35 Whirl 
38 " Clear 


52 Arachnid 

53 Prepare 
leather 

54 Lacking 
pigmentation 

56 Pale and worn 

60 " America" Is 
a proper one 

61 Glowing song- 
and-dancegal? 

64 Gambler’s 
“bones” 

65 Wear away 

68 Fountain treat 

87 Pens 

68 Come to 
fruition 

89 Check 
DOWN 

1 Buster 
Brown's dog 

2 Rugby's river 

3 Glabrous 

4 Ruined 

5 Sterne’s ” 

Shandy” 

6 Eldest, to Yves 

7 Children’s 


3 / 14 /as 

13 Sartre work 
18 Crotchets 
22 Robber tree 

24 Actor Vigoda 

25 Correct a 
watch 

28 On the move 

27 A 1482 caravel 

28 “The Good 
Earth” was 
me of her 




BEETLE BAILEY 


SIR/ 1 CANT GET 
ALONG WITH THIS 

MAN'OcWv S~ 


AH PX CAN’T 
GET ALONG 
^ANITHTHIS 
PJ MAN 


30 J.F.KL’a Sec. of 
the Interior 

31 Sorts 

34 Fabric named 
after a French 
city 

'38 Frost’s "The 
Road ” 

40 Madden 

43 Goats, 
butterflies or 
plants 

45 Always, In 
poesy 

48 Container 




ANDY CAPP 


THANXS.PFT. 

CHEERIO THEN 


49 Criche figure 
51 Swallow 

54 “The 
King- — " 

55 Cut of meat 


CHEERIO, PET 


VKNOW, SWEEr*E4RTi 
funny thing / eoLrr>ou 
- YOU fcONtf tfXX A WW I 

OLW 7 HAN WHBV I 

zasfcfW? 5| 


THESBSRETOF ETERNAL 
NOUTW — MAKE SURE J 
^ THEY GET PlB^TY—A 

7 OF POCKET MONEY V 


37 T.C.U. rival 

38 Compass pt. 

41 Once around 
the track 

42 vez 

(again, to 
Alfonso) 


• Actress Kidder 
18 Lathe part 

11 Sparkling West 
role? 

12 Woman In 
“Summer and 
Smoke” 


56 Park, 

birthplace of 
F.D.R. 

57 Medicinal 
plant 

58 Beatty film 
Si Mild oath 

62 Psychic Gelier 

63 Jazz form 


WIZARD of ID 


Reviewed by Daniel Southerland 

T 1 HIS little book on a big subject happens to 
contain some of the best recent writing on 
China. Orville Schell has an eye for color, irony 
and nuance which is extraordinary. By vividly 
describing the Chinese whom he mods and 
their hopes for a better life imderan increas- 
ingly decentralized and decollectivized econo* 
my, Schell takes some of the mystery out of 
China and humanizes iL This is au to the good. 
As (me China scholar. Hairy Harding, of the 
•Brookings Institution, has noted, American 
attitudes toward China have undergone regu- 
lar cycles of romanticism and cynicism which 
cloud our vision of that huge nation. Or as 
Schell himself describes it, to the West, China 
has been “anything from a billion red ants 
threatening to destroy the world to a billion 
staunch socialists, the only hope for its salva- 
tion.' 1 

If ScheH is correct, many of ps may currently 
be in danger of romantidziiig, or idealizing, 
China's recent economic reforms. The ABC 
News “Nightline" program earlier this wimer 
called the reforms China's “new capi talism.' 1 
Editorial writers, meanwhile, delight in argu- 
ing that China is “going capitalist- But Schell 
reminds us of how complicated things really 
are, pointing to some of the mines that could 
be lying there, waiting to explode as ' China’s 
economic planners blaze new experimental 
trails. The author provides a counterpoint to 
the “Oh; how wonderful how exciting! 11 cur- 
rent in American thinking about China, which 
coexists with an equally forceful “Oh how 
terrible! 1 ' school of thought. 

As ScMIputs it, “Western dreams of China, 
whether of business or revolution, have fallen 
terribly short of their hoped-for realization. 
Yet the dreaming goes on — and once more, as 
in the 19th century, the West, from vantage 
points like the Great Wall Hotel (in Beijing), is 
dreaming of China as an endless sinkhole for 
Western capital and goods; a trading partner 
par excellence, a billion customers just waiting 
to drink our Cokes, wear our jeans, buy our 
factories, power plants and weapons." 

The author correctly asserts that “it is aD too 
easy to forget that what is actually out there is a 
relatively impoverished country that has his- 


•T-.-m 

" ,y •: -*»■ 

- ve »J* 

. -7 fl 

***** 
.l/fTO**#! 
. ■ **** 


K # 

-- 


•*.- •’« Mi 


Hit I El 


fa* 


- — 94 


.,11,.!., \\ hn ‘"iilnStl 


craving a little foreign culture and glamour, it 
meaxHleaming how to dance and having sock 
fun." 

The dancing had its limits. When Schell's 
European friend burst into a jitterbug and 
some of the bolder Chinese boys began to 
laugh and clap, a cadre in a gray Mao suit 
sprang into action: 

“He jumped to his feet, walked over to the 
performance, and motioned my friend to cease 
with a palms-forward fluttering gesture, the 
kind someone makes crying to dissipate a bad 
smell. 11 

. But on one important point, letihe reader be 
warned. Schell’s writing is so engaging that one 
mi gh t he tempted to think that this is the whole 
story. China ts so big and moving so fast that 
it’s doubtful any one writer can grasp the 
whole. And readers should be aware that there 
are more optimistic views concerning China's 
economic future. But this slender bode is a 
quick and readable introduction to today’s 
China, even if not the final word. 


i New York Tones, edited by Eugene Medesko. 




DENNIS THE MENACE 



$1 


comm 

mm-- 

mYcxi„ 

yom&j 






Solution to Previous Puzzle' 


WHO 

cm 

mm 



REX MORGAN 


WHEN I TOLD CLAUDIA l 
MADE AN APPOINTMENT 
FOR HER TO HAVE A A 
PHYSICAL, SHE BECAME 


MEANWHILE, IN ANOTHER CITY 


qurm UPSET WITH ME, DR. 
MORGAN ( PERHAPS IT WAS 
A MISTAKE FOR ME TO f 
MENTION IT OVER THE h 
PHONE i tM AFRAID SHE J 

rrrr? wont keep the <, 
rrri appointments 


TM SURE YOU'VE MADE K. 
5 A SALE, MRS. BISHOP' I'LL ^7 
I TALK -to OUR TREASURER /j 
• AT LUNCH/ WHERE CAN I 
S REACH YOU THIS AFTERNOON 1, 


I'LL VSfiMT FOR 
YOUR CALL AT 
MY HOTEL/ 


HDQQ □□□□ □□□D 

□bob Qaann aann 
HnmanQnaQH aana 
□on ana anjanao 
EQBnaQDaa 
nnanoaaa Qaaana 
□□an □□□□□ 

□cats anaciD aasa 
□Dana aaas omaa 
BEmana □asaaaaa 

BQQEISaBGI0 
Eaaaaa ncoa naa 
tannin □aaaaaaania 
□man aaaaa aaoa 
□ebb mmm C3DQD 


-- --wi slM 

. ttef 
: V *0 

. : Swfrrf 

. J 8 


■-i 

: 

i -tufted ■ 


Win- Mi l *|i«dl 


•'wur 

» 

. * Ti 

• L-aat <H 


iViit’r^ Pmlirt Htigl 


■Tt 


Daniel Southerland has just become Bet/uig ; 
bureau chief for The Washington Post. • 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


O N the diagramed deal 
South opened one heart 


GARFIELD 


* Winnie The fbon? Bor l 'iouNmfi 6 W' 

WANT ME TO GOTO SLEEP'* 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


UnscramMe those four Jumbles, 
ons loner lo each square, to form 
tour ordinary words. 


O o 


TUXEL 


GYTIN 



pleeeeease/ 




CHOICE ISA 
POWERFUL 
THING- r 




VJ South opened one heart 
He reached six hearts rapidly, 
and received a trump lead. He 
had hoped to find a high dia- 
mond honor in the dummy, 
and the actual void was a 
mixed blessing. His communi- 
cations were not good enough 
to take three ruffs in his own 
hand or the dummy and then 
drew trumps. 

However he found a clever 
way to make the slam. After 
winning with the heart queen, 
he led the diamond eight 
When West played low. he dis- 
carded a dub from the dum- 
my. There was general aston- 
ishment when this held the 


trick, and the slam became 
easy to make. A diamond was 
ruffed, and it was easy to ma- 
neuver another diamond ruff 
and draw trumps. 

West blamed himself for not 
covering the diamond eight 
with the ten. But that would 
not have helped the defense for 
South would have ruffed, led a 
trump to his hand and ruffed 
out another diamond honor 
with dummy’s last trump. He 
would then have crossed to the 
spade ace, drawn the remain- 
ing trump and surrendered a 
diamond trick to make the 

slam . 

South had played on the rea- 
sonable assumption that West, 
held at least two of the three' 
missing diamond honors, and 


had been rewarded. If East had 
been able to capture the dia- 
mood eight two more ruffing 
finesses would have followed. 


3j»ii>n Onirn/ |n 


NOME 
* K Q > 76 
O J 101 4 
O — 

4k K 10 8 4 

WEST * EAST 

1 1 tr." 

0 A Q 1072 0054 

*Q#S2 * A 7 763 

SOOTH (B) 

A A 89 4 
9AZQ2 
« K J8I3 


•.d* 

* 

' m 


aboard 


Boa «Mm wore 

bfakdlx^* 




The Ro. 


17 Fmi 4 
8 O Pttm Pi 
Wmt ted Om heart j 


IROAMONI 


PLECOI 


HOW SOCIETY 
GIRL'S START IN. 


WiridStockMarkete 

Via Afience France-Presse March 13 


Closing prices in local amendes unless otherwise indicated. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
Torre ihe surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Ansffir. BY 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: STUNG DOWDY VERIFY FROSTY 
Answer Whet people who growl alt day often tael at 
night— DOG-TIRED 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Aiwrm 

Amsterdam 

When 

Barcelona 

Mlgurade 

Baron 

Brands 

Battmrest 

BaOapest 

CaeentmoM 

com Dal Sol 

Dublin 

EdJnborati 

FTaieace 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

istanBal 

Lai Palmas 

Uvboa 

London 

Madrid 

Ml km 

Moscow 

Munich 

Met 

OSl 0 

Ports 

Pnraue 

Reykkaalk 

Rama 

StOCKMlHI 

StrtnMura 

Venice 

Vienna 

Worspw 

ZurJctt 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

15 59 10 SO fr 

5 41 -3 27 a 

10 50 7 45 o 

14 57 2 34 W 

B 44 . 3 27 fr 

7 45 -3 27 Ir 

7 34 -J 30 o 

3 37 .9 14 fr 

7 45 0 32 cl 

1 34 - 2 21 a 

15 B 7 45 fr 

8 44 4 43 a 

7 45 3 37 lh 

13 55 6 43 fr 

7 45 . 3 27 fr 

5 41 -5 23 fr 

0 S3 .5 23 o 

7 45 2 34 fr 

22 72 15 5V Ir 

14 57 10 50 fr 

4 43 -2 28 a 

9 4» -1 30 fr 

11 3 4 39 fr 

0 32 -3 27 e 

2 34 -t 30 a 

13 55 7 45 fr 

J <1 ■< B fr 

4 43 1 34 cl 

3 37 - 4 25 o 

1 34 -1 30 U 

12 54 3 37 o 

1 31 1 34 sw 

8 44 1 34 fr 

11 52 4 39 fr 

9 48 1 34 a 

4 43 - 5 23 d 

3 37 0 32 0 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 


ffism»Stak 

33 

90 

27 

81 

fr 

Sirtltos 

J 

41 

-4 

27 

fr 

Hnw Kane 

16 

61 

13 

55 


Wteella 

30 

84 

24 

79 

d 

New Delhi 

30 

84 

17 

43 

tr 

Seem 

S 

44 

3 

37 

fr 

Slw»®®tesf 

8 

44 

5 

41 


Stoaoporo 

29 

84 

24 

75 

d 

Tntasi 

17 

43 

14 

57 


Tokyo 

AFRICA 

10 

so 

4 

43 

0 

Alaters 

12 

54 

4 

43 

el 

CoJra 

30 

84 

12 

54 

h- 

con Town 

22 

72 

11 

57 

fr 

CmaMaaca 

17 

43 

S 

41 

fr 

Koran* 

34 

75 

15 

59 

r 

Lkboi 

— 

— 

— 

— 


KMlrob! 

25 

77 

10 

50 


Tunis 

13 

55 

7 

45 

ih 


ABN 

ACF H owing 

Annan 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

. ATJom Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buoftrmorai T 

CatandHWa 

Elsavfer^IDU 

Pakker 

Gist Brocades 

Hafneken 

Hoaaovefis 

KLM 

Naardan 

NalNedder 

Nodltavd 

OceVandor G 

Pakhort 

pumps 

Robaaa . 

Rodamca 

Pol Inca 

Rorantn 

Rovoi Dutch 

Unilever 

VOnOmmeren 

VMP Stork 

VNU 


Close Pr«. 

Kail + 5a IZ 241 24050 

Karstadt 212 213 

Kaufhof 715m 21 5 

Ktoeckner H-D 241 M 241 

KJoedcnerWerbQ 8020 B1 

Krwp Stahl 90 9030 

Undo ' 417.50 419 

LufltiORsa 191 T96 

MAN 15650 157 

Monnosmarm 15750 157J0 

Metal hi esolischaft 241 24B.90 I 
MuenOvRuKk 1190 1190 

Pfnissoa 27150 247 

RuetoeroWerke sen mb 1 

RWE 151 152 

Scfterfnu 444 449 

Siemens 57* 57350 

Thyssnn raxanow 

Varta ill ibuq 

vena 17650 17450 

VEW 12750 171 JD 

VoBa w oa o nwerh 200 199 

Com n m it mak Index : 14145 a 
Pravtoas : 171411 


ANP.CS 5 General Index : 2*929 
(PravleM: 29BJS 


Bk East Asia 
Cheuna Kona 
aunaXtohi 
Cross Harbor 
HaAo Sana Bank 
HK Electric 
hk Hotels 
HK Land 


HK Shanghai 
HK Telephone 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 
JardtoeMatti 
Janllnc Sec 
Now World 
Snow Brothers 
SHK Praps 
Shne Darby 
Sfebux 

5 wire Pacific A 
Wheal Mar 
When lack 
Wlnsor 
World lofl 


LATIN AMERICA 


Bueno* Aires 2* 84 IB 64 fr 

Lima - - - - 1 * 

Mexico CTy 25 77 3 37 Fr 

RtodvJtnMlre 29 04 20 48 Cl 

Saa Paolo — — — — no 


NORTH AMERICA 


Arted 

Bekaerl 

Cockertll 

Cobcaa 

EBES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

Gevaen 

Hoboken 

Intercom 

Kredettiank 

Patrofluo 

SecGeneroie 

Soflna 


22 M 2X40, 
1120 1140 
1190 1190 
950 955 

462S 4675 
7.15 7 JO 
32 32jS8 
4J0 450 

*55 *75 

4*50 SOJO 
5J5 531 
1950 20 

*45 9 JO 

Its 9J0 

175 iflO 
140 150 

*70 *95 
655 645 

1JB 1J0 
2TJ23 21 Jo 
Susp. — 

7-40 7J5 

640 4J3S 
103 US 


AngiOAin Goto »iw snow 

Babcock 144 147 

Bardavs 994 sn 

BOW SXJ 534 

BAT. 348 270 

BOOChom 348 370 

BICC 230 230 

BL 43 43 

Blue Circle 510 SIS 

BOC Group 290 299 

Bools ^ 172 172 

Bowalcr Indus 241 241 

BP 523 534 

Brh Home Si 255 253 

1 Bril Telecom 134 Mi 1371 * 

Brff Aanwoce 340 373 

BTR 704 701 

Burmah 200 205 

Coble Wire!*** 535 535 

Cadbury Schw 144 144 

Charier Coos 200 ICQ 

Coot, Patens 143 144 

Commercial U 193 ire 

Cons Gold 479 402 

Courtaukfs 140 141 

Daloetv J01 503 

Oe Beers r 453 450 

D Millers 1298 5294 

Drtotomeln 25W ZOk 

Ftwns 3W 30$ 

Proo SI God 1114 m 

GEC 19B 19B 

OKN 224 219 

Glaxo E 1145/44 lift 


F Insider 
Generali 
11=1 

Itolccmenil 

HolmeMUerl 

Medlabonca 

MmdedHon 

Olivetti 

Plrolll 

HAS 

Rlnascante 

SIP 

Snto 

Standa 

siei 


3000 3000 
5125 0.75 

tamo 4 0350 

7748 770S 
04340 84500 
74300 7WI8J 
84090 84906 
1489 1447 
4784 4740 
2261 2231 
47400 44650 
47040 47*50, 
2041 2041 : 
2949 2TO 
12500 12400 | 
2490 2530 


Close P»»r. 
Sime Darby 1.95 2 

S SleamshlP 1.14 l^D 

St Trading am am 

UOB 444 AM 


OUB Index : «2*2i 
Prevtous : 423J9 


SamUmIbi 


MIB Current Ind 
Previous J MU 


AGA 

Alla Laved 

Asea 

Astra 

AMas Copco 

BoIkJen 

Electrolux 


Horn Soog Index : 1UX82 
Piov lou s : unit 


Grand Met 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

Inins 

Joguar 

UoydsBank 

Lonrtw 

Lucas 

Marks ml So 

Midland Bank 

Nat west Bank 

PandO 

Pilklneton 

Piessev 

Racal Elect 

Randfonfein 

Rank 

Rond bill 

Reuters 


283 2B6 

237 252 

742 737 

711 213 

414 423 

BM 807 

IBS 189 

356 356 

547 559 

170 149 

279 274 

144 142 

344 342 

4Z7 622 


XI 303 

1B4 188 

21B 218 

S90lfe 5871* 

370 m 

574 572 

341 358 


AirUautde 
AMhsmAiL 
Av Dassault 
Bcmcolre 
BIC 

usnsr 

GarrefOur 

Club Med 

Coflmea 

□ucnez 

ElNAaultolne 

Europe 1 

Gen Eaux 

Hadwtif 

I metal 

LafaraoCop 

Lewnxxt 

iTTraat 

Matra 

AMdwUn 

MM Pmmar 

Moet HcnnessY 

Moulinex 

twrd-BF 

Oeddenlaie 

Pernod lUc. 

Petrol es (toe) 

Peuaoot 

Podaki 

Prlntemps 

RacHetedin 

Redoato 

Roussel Uclaf 

Skis RosWgnol 

SourJ’errler 

TelemeeM 

Thomson CSF 

Valeo 


Esselte 

HandeUbankm 

Pharmacia 

Soob-Scanla 

Sandvtk 

Skanka 

SKF 

SwwMshMotch 

V4lM 


N-OL m 
193 190 

350 342 

350 340 

1E8 101 

ib 5 tea 

329 324 

285 270 

ss 

212 238 

440 N.Q. 
410 NA 
94 94 

215 211 

2X 222 
255 255 


Aftaersvaertden index : WAt 
' Prt v U ni ; J94JB 


- 

T) 1 — ey 


ACI 

AMI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bora! 

Bougainville 

Brambles 
Coles 
Comal ce 
CRA 
CSR 
□union 
EMers lei 
Hooker 
Maaoltan 
MIM 
Mrer 
■Oakbrtdge 
Pelta 
Poaetoon 
RGC 
Scsnos 
Stelah 
South tond 
WOodslde 
wormaM 


193 190 

253 252 

431 430 

542 S56 
325 334 

188 187 

341 340 

368 345 

250 250 

570 546 

271 271 

218 217 

319 319 

2W » 

230 235 

347 342 

172 172 

75 73 

394 381 

295 295 

418 415 
528 524 

170 147 ; 

26 X , 

79 78 I 

355 349 I 


Honda 

Japan Air Unas 
Kallma 
Kansoi P owet 
Kawasaki Sleet 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu ltd 
Kubota 

Matu Elec Hub 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem" 
Mltsubtahl Elec 
MUwblihl Heavy 

Mitsubishi Carp 

Mitsui and co 

MHsukoahl 

Mitsumi 

NGK insulators 

NlkkaSec 

Nippon Steel 

Nippon YUsen 

Nissan 

Nomura Sec 

Olympus 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 

Sumitomo Metal 
robot Carp 
Tabha Marine 
Takeda Own 
T* 

Tallin 

Tokyo Etec Power 

Tokyo Marine 
Tarov Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

YamaicMSoc 


Wdnt/iu. mow : 1M19. 
Previo u s : 1X394*7 
New Index :«4S3 
Previous : 977.14 


ZarMi 


Aoefi Index : 3B4JB3 
Pmrtoos : 2B37B 
CAC Index : 28*48 


AD OnttaaMes Index :7S7 jN 
Pnrvkws :78U6 
Source: Reuters. 


MIDDLE EA5T 


Ankara 

Beirut 

Damascus 

Jerusalem 

TelAvlv 


4 » -8 18 

21 70 12 54 

17 « 7 4S 


17 43 10 SO tr 


22 7) 7 45 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 

Sydney 


70 48 17 43 r 
35 79 20 48 cl 


Aortoraae 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

Honolulu - 

Houston 

Las Angeles 

Miami 

Mbmcapofll 

Montreal 

Nassau 

New York 

saaPranctai 

Seattle 

Taranto 

Washington 


4 39 -3 27 iw 

21 78 B 44 fr 

9 48 I 34 nc 

7 45 1 34 r 

4 43 -2 28 cl 

4 43 -I 30 d 

27 81 20 48 fr 

25 77 18 44 nC 

19 64 8 44 fr 


Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

VleWeMantoBna 


Royal Dutch E 50 57645015/64 


Current Slock Index : 2310*5 
Previous : 230698 


VnuUvt 


29 84 19 44 fr 

4 39 -1 30 d 

4 43 -7 19 gw 

25 77 18 44 Ir 

14 57 I 34 fr 

14 61 * 44 fr 

28 82 21 70 Ir 

4 43 Q 32 cl 

15 99 1 34 fr 


cLchwdv: to-fasgv: tr-tair; trtiall; «wcnst; nogarttv doudv; r-rahi: 
sh-shawers; sw-snnw; st -stormy. 


1 AEG-Teletunken 
Allianz Vdrs 

8“ 

Bayer 

Buyer Jtvaa. 

Bover.VerBank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 

Cortiloumml 

Daimler-Benz 

Deausui 


THURSDAY^ FORECAST — CHANNEL: SilBhL FrankFurt: Overcast. 
TeiYlB.4 — 2 (43 — 341. LONDON; Cloudy. Tern p.4—1 (39 — 34I.MAORID: Fair. 
Toma. 11 — - 1 153 — 301. NEW YORK: Partly cloudy. Tama. 12—3 (54 — 371 


Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 


PARIS: CkKjav. Ternn. fi — 2J4J — Jo). ROME: Overcost. Temp. 10—4 
150 — 43). TEL AVIV; Overcast. Temp. 2D— * (48—441. ZURICH: Cloudy. 
Tema. 4 — -1 (39—301. BANGKOK: FOOT. Temp. 35 — 27 195 — 81). HONG 


KONG: Cloudy. Temp. 15-11 (59 — 52). MANILA: Fair. Temp. 31— 24 
1 144 ,rH , 5S! Ml ifir o * e: Mmwn-Ternp. 

3* — 25 188— 7?>. TOKYO: Rain. Temp. 16 —4 (so — S9I. 


Deutsche Bank 

Dreskier Bank 

DUB-SChun 

GHH 

Hoehtw 

Heeerist 

Hoescti 

Holzmann 

Horten 


IOMO 1 1*50 
MM KOI 
21221180 
221 JO 23150 
321 319 

324 327 JO 
38450 3UL5D 
144 145 

134 13100 
488 486 
. 353 355 

157.59 144 

423J0 424 

18430 18730 
215 21530 
15430 154 

460 443 

nurn&re 

11070 1)4 

402 400 

149 172 


AEC1 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am Gold - 
Barlows 
Bfruuor 
BafMs 
De Beers 
Drletonieln 
Elands 

,GF5A 

Harmony 

HjVjWWG., 

Ned batik 
PftaSttyn 
Ruspiat 
SA Brews 
51 Helena 
Sasol 

west Holding 


440 655 

2240 3260 
14200 14000 
970 970 

1W1 1600 
7050 4900 
905 90S 

5000 4900 
1370 1340 
3MS0 2875 
2700 2440 
387 395 
7125 7000 
888 880 
5025 4900 
1490 1508 
590 400 

32S0 3200 
sn 400 
5400 1345 


RTZ 

Seotehl 

oalnstwry 

STpHS 

STC 

SManrtaret) 
Tote and Lvfo 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
T.l.ereua 
Trafalgar Hu 


442 644 

915 900 

294 30* 

778 784 

204 308 

477 479 

448 450 

Z34 238 

9 S 

m is 

204 210 

1229/4413 39/44 
188 193 

£2814 £2734 

3498 asm 

420 <38 



Bousf&xf 
COld Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Heave 

Haw Par 

Inchcnm 

KeppalSMp 

Mol Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

Semb SbJpvonj 


175 1J7 
248 221, 
6J0 4.10: 

% % 

ft ft 

9^ 

334 190 

I M Ut 


Akal 

Asahl Chem 


Asnhl Glass 
Bank at Tokyo 
Brhtee stona 
Canon 
Cttob 

Ooi Nippon Prfni 
Galwg House 
Full Bank 


kh cr- 


us 540 
™ 784, 

890 883 

750 775 1 

505 515! 

1450 1430 
333 331 

1(00 1030 
541 550 

1430 1410 
1850 1830 
1340 1310 
878 643 


Adla 

Bank Leu 
Brawn Boveri 

cibaGetav 
Credit Suisse 
eioclrowatt 
Gaorn Fischer 
lnt«rdl»caunt 

Jacob Sucfnrtf 
Jolmoll 

Landfs Gvr 

Nestle 

gerilken-B 

Roche Batty 

Sandaz 

Schindler 

sutzer 

SBC 

S»>iaalr 

Swiss RelKuance 
Swiss Vollafaank 
Union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich ln» 



Hl»h LewCteeeCM* 

sasre asHi'aSto^. 

415 410 41S +5- 

*14% 16 16W + to 


§ 71* 17 1719 + JJ 

11* 211* 21&-JJ - » . 

s 24% 2flS 7«* + S : , 

Slow 1914 19W— S rt 

Sl«* 1414 14U-M 

g* T to 6 *** 

v* - : 

3414 3414 - • 


esa 


rap.fi m 


■ s ■ * 4 .8 


28* 29*+* 


2710 2475 
3575 3400 
1495 1700 
3100 3060 
2420 2420 
2790 2735 
740 755 

1B95 1850 

mt 4250 
1915 1900 
1450 1450 
4570 4540 
1495 1485 
ms 5900 
7930 8025 
4000 3975 
340 358 

348 348 

1151 7740 
93)0 9450 
1409 1480 
3435 3430 
4130 4130 
20400 20400 


105 105 . „ „ 

23H 23R+* ’ 1 
8194* Wb 194b 
340 330 340 
MV* P* fib. „ - 

879* 79k 79k—* ; » . 

S12U, 12V* ire+J . 

las** »v* am—* 

81494 14% 1494 .» * - 

22s an no +«2 

130 IX 138 „ . 3 , • 

V. 916 9W- * . ; -, 

._! 119* 12 vC ' I .. 

S41V* 4H* 411* 

» Stk - ■ 

S2IW 21V* «* + S : -- ’ s ”-__ 
879k 74* 7to+ £ ' 

■ 

are an* aw** j - .- , 

V& ^ 3auv.:l^-; ;[ 
s 3 a =a ■ 


M. * 



* ' ! ‘ 


’ 

*» **» * l| " 






Silt* 111* l»k+* 

mre « «vk-* . 

sis nre nre „ - - > 

S33X, 3214 JVU- * ■ , ^ 

SST sue 54* • - * * 

SI 916 19 191*+ * . ^ 

5199k T» 19+* .. 

S7V* 7* 71* + * 

445 435 435 — 5 : - 
Svt 23 BjG-Sv' . 

534 23* a*-* . 1 

450 430 430 — *> 

*2716 271* 271*— * , 1 ^ 


■’r-* 


*’ ■* 




StnwoodwdA 
. 10 Yk Boor 


niv* nA ilft-rJS . 

SllV* til* iw* + * . 

ssre «* 8*+ * * 

mo iw no 

s»* w* }«+5S . 

*]«* ln5 iwt-« -! 




■!«* 
' ** •■'bn 




in ir revw «iun iww tuwm — 

Total Sales: 9 ttOM shares 

Oust PWkW 
>J0 2402.19 \ 


SBC Index: 43450 
Pravtoos : 43SJO 


NXL: .not quoted:. Njt: not 
aval fame.' xd: ex-aw^iend, 


Cemaetfe Stoek 
Previous ; MOSS 


FOR THE LATEST WORD ON 
EUROBONDS 
READ CARL GEW1RTZ 
EACH MONDAY IN THE IHT 


AA Coro 
AMM-LvonS 



' • ■ **.»! 


****** 


iW 


SAnRE IN WORM AND PICTURES 

doonrbuky 

0 AHYINTH 6 WT 














OOKs 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1985 


Page 19 


SPORTS 




?*«_ M. ... 
iwjlv- • 
fc" k*-: ■=•=-.- 


<«*- Uo-> r - 

it* . ..-V . , . 

*5 % *•; . 

*» ‘ft-.:-. • 


j.-i •• 

«« .-*> .> , 
«’ j-- _ > : . 




in<;r: 


tit' --.I 
i * M • 
» * »• - 

v-. .! :• 

»«• ^ -• ■ 
e 3 ‘* >.■ ■ 

iw 


iird, Scoring 60 for Celtics, 
trumps McHale’s New Mark 


Tht Axtoaaltd Press 

JEW ORLEANS — “I don’t 
lk I've ever seen him shoot bet' 
* Boston Coach K.C. Jones 
l 

hat was a bit of an understate- 
: it Larry Bird had just scored a 
lies- record 60 points, including 
1 team's last 16 to stifle an Atlan- 
ally, and bad iedlhem to a 126- 
Nationa] Basketball Assoda- 
: victory over the Hawks here 
«day night 

ird's 60 points matched the sea- 
■high scored by Bernard King 


NBA FOCUS 

of the New York Knicks against 
New Jersey on Dee. 25. 

“When be started hitting those 
shots from the outside . . . he's al- 
most unstoppable,” Jones said. 

“My teammates helped me out 
an awful lot because they kept giv- 
ing me the ball at the end of the 
game,” Bird said. 

The Atlanta coach, Mike Fra- 
tello, said the Celtics fed the ball to 
Bird to pay him back for the way he 
helped Kevin McHale set a team 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

; aw (Means Group Buys NFL Saints 

.. T EW ORLEANS (API — Automobile dealer Tom Benson and a 
ip of at least right other businessmen have signed a contract to buy 
-- New Orleans Saints for £64 million from John Mecom Jr_ who 
gbt the National Football League franchise fen- $8 million in 1967. 
he purchase price was about what the Dallas Cowboys sold Tor last 
. *. although the Cowboys are per ennial championship challengers and 
-"Saints have never had a winning season. 

- enson said the sale was contingent on four things: approval by NFL 

; lease on the Superdome andremoval of taxeswnltif evem^at the 
. ium, which has been a drain on the state treasury since it opened in 
. >. Benson and the governor of Louisiana, Edwin Edwards, who was 
eni at Tuesday's new conference, said there appeared to be no 
. items with getting those points worked out. 

Y. Signs Mels, Who Sign Strawberry 

- lend $36 million to renege Shea Stadium and that the Newport 
/ s will extend their lease there for 10 years, to the year 2004. 

•V: Florida, the team announced that outfielder Darryl Strawberry had 
' sd a multiyear contract with the potential of earning nearly S8 million 
. . the next six years. 

.scame one- third of the money will be deferred, a team official said, 

. wherry, who turned 23 Tuesday, will receive $500,000 annually for 
. -emainder of his fife when he retires from basebalL 

: iw Mexico Wins NTT Opening Game 

LBUQUERQUE, New Mexico (AP) — Forward Johnny Brown 
1 Id 20 points and New Mexico's basketball team, by holding Texas 

- 4 to one field goal in a seven-minute stretch early in the second half, 
its opening-round game of the National Invitation Tournament, 80- 

: iere Tuesday night. Texas A&M played without its leading scorer, 
-’it guard Kenny Brown, who quit the team Monday. 

seball Owners Predict Huge Losses 


N Wli w I MU 3 liTifi ETftx ‘6^3 CTTTO in >1 


" cied a future “deterioration” of baseball's finances, with operating 
s that could top $150 million by 1988, if management and the 
irs* union cannot agree on a plan “to safeguard" the game, 
hile full financial statements woe not available from all 26 dubs for 
, the management repot, presented during a short bargaining 
3n. said 18 of 26 teams showed 1983 operating losses totaling about 
trillion, an average of 52,5 million per dub. Of the right franchises 
ing profits, five reported gains of less than $1 million. 

— report said 11 clubs had returned financial statements for 1984, 
af which showed losses of more than $27 mQHan, an average of more 
$2.4 million. 

BA Champion Quiroz to Meet Olivo 

. NAMA CITY (AP) — Francisco Quiroz, will defend Iris World 
. ig Association light-flyweight championship title for the first time 
h 29 in Miami against Joey Olivo of me United States. The titlebout 
aeen postponed twice, both times because of problems between 
»z, a Dominican who lives in Venezuela, and his manager, Rafito 
.. cno. 


IARD 


' 1 record of 56 points nine days earli- 
er. 

“That’s team camaraderie,” Fra- 
tello said. “It’s infectious, and ev- 
erybody wants to be pan of it.” 

“He was unread,” the Hawks' 
Dominique Wilki ns cairi of Bird. “1 
was all over him, bumping him. He 
hit shots other guys couldn’t even 
gel out of their hands.” 

In other games it was Houston 
131, Denver 129: Indiana 109, New 
Jersey 108; Phoenix 123, New York 
119; Kansas City 120, Portland 
1 14; Chicago 111, Detroit 110; Los 
Angeles Lakers 123, Utah 108; and 
Golden State 145, San Antonio 
122 . 

The Hawks, led by Wilkins's 36 
points, kept the game dose most of 
the way. Bui early in the third quar- 
ter a lay-up by Dennis Johnson 
gave the Critics the lead for good at 
71-69. 

After leading by 11 at the end of 
the third period, Boston took its 
largest lead, at 108-93, on two Grid 
goals by Robert Parish with 8:30 
left in the game. Atlanta then out- 
scored the Celtics by 12-2, with 
WQldns scoring eight of those, to 
dose to 110-105 with 4K minutes 
left. 

But that was as close as the 
Hawks could get. Bird scored the 
next six points for a 116-105 lead, 
and as a finishin g flourish scored 
Boston's last 16 points. 

Bird made 22 of his 36 shots and 
15 of 16 free throws en route to 
breaking McHale's team record 
Bird also improved on his personal 
career-high of 53 set in 1983. 

Bird 23 points at halftime, 
when the Critics led by 65-58. He 
scored 19 points in the third quar- 
ter. which ended with Boston 
ahead, 100-89. The 6-foot-9 for- 
ward. the most valuable player in 
the NBA last season, then got 18 in 
the final period to keep Boston in 
fronL 

Johnson had 15 points for Bos- 
ton. while Parish had 12 and a 
game-high 19 rebounds. 

Eddie Johnson added 26 points 
for the Hawks. 

A sellout crowd 10.079 attended 
the game at the University of New 
Orleans’ Lakefnmt Arena. It was 
the 10th of 12 “home” games the 

TJ I L .. J..T . J -n A . 


leans, with most of the games hav- 
ing drawn fewer than 4,000 fans. 

“I didn’t think that I would like 
this gym,” Bird said. “But I had a 
good feeling from the first quarter 
on, even though it was awfully 
hot,” 

Both Bird and Jones kidded 
McHale about losing the team 
scoring record after holding it for 
such a short time. 

“It was Kevin’s fault, because he 
should have gotten 60 or mare last 
time,” Bird raid. “Hus, he commit- 
ted a foul at the end of the game 
that gave me a chance to get two 
more right before the buzzer.” 

“So much for Kevin McHale.” 
Jones said. 



RMan/Unifcd litfanuttorad 

Larry Bird worked through a thicket of defenders in the 
first quarter to score two of Ms 60 points against Hawks. 


Guerrillas’ Threats Curtailing 
Northern Ireland Sports Meets 




By Andrew Warshaw 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Scared off by 
guerrilla threats, sportsmen from 
the British mainland are refusing to 
compete in Northern Ireland, forc- 
ing a number of events to be can- 


Sutler’s on Track, if Islanders Aren’t 


The Associated Pros twot mm: Blues came bade on goals three 

ST. LOUIS — After becoming IMiL MJLUS minutes apart by Marie Johnson 

the fourth player in New York Is- and Joe Mullen, but Pat Hatley 

landers history to score 100 points five straight _appearances in Jhe restored the Islander lead 10 sec- 

ffenn F 


down the achievement Tuesday 
night and emphasized the impor- 
tance of his team's 6-5 victory over 
the Sl Louis Blues in the National 
Hockey League. 

“It’s nice, he said more than 
once as other players ran for the 
team bos. “To me, the most impor- 
tant thing Is winning the hockey 
game If you get points, it doesn't 
mean anything if you don’t win.” 

There are six Sutter brothers 
playing in the NHL Each has 
earned a reputation for playing to 
win and not letting personal 
achievements outweigh the team's. 

Brent Sutler, who got two goals 
and two assists, said he hoped this 
victory indicated a run for the play- 
offs. the struggling Islanders, after 


victories, have displayed a loose 
defense this year and are likdy to 
finish third in the Patrick Division. 

In Tuesday’s only other game. 
Winnipeg beat NewJersey, 6-3. 

After a 1-1 Fust period, both 
dubs abandoned their usual defen- 
sive styles and reconded nine goals 
in the middle session. Sutter started 
the scoring while the Islanders had 
a four-on-three advantage. lifting 
the puck over fallen goalie Greg 
Mfllen. 

Less than a minute later, Sutter 
scored his 42d of the season after a 
scramble in front of the net as the 
New York power play continued, 
Terry Johnson having drawn a dou- 
ble minor penalty for SL Louis. The 


foot blast over Miflen’s shoulder. 

The teams then traded two goals 
each, as Denis Potvin scored from 
the point for New York at 15:10, 
and Benrie Fcderko got Ms second 
of the night for Sl Louis 35 sec- 
onds later. 

Tomas .Jonsson moved in from 
the point to restore the two-goal 
blander lead 1:09 after Federico’s 
goal, but Brian Sutter, St Louis 
captain and the oldest of the Sutter 
dan, scored with 40 seconds left to 
dose the Blues, to 6-5. 

They came mi in the third period, 
but goalie Billy Smith turned them 
hack with some sliding saves, espe- 
cially in the final minute when MS- 
ten was pulled for an extra attacker. 


Bowling, wrestling and badmin- 
ton tournaments already have been 
called off and, last weekend, sever- 
al leading British athletes an- 
nounced they were considering 
boycotting the national track and 
field championships at Antrim in 
May. 

The reason is threats of attack by 
the Irish National Liberation 
Army, an extreme breakaway fac- 
tion of the Irish Republican Army, 
in an area that has been relatively 
untouched by 15 years of violence 
between Catholics and Protestants. 

In the 1970s, uack and Geld, soc- 
cer and rugby teams were among 
those that canceled trips because of 
the “troubles.” But since then, 
sports in the province had returned 
to comparative normality, and au- 
thorities have nurtured sports as a 
bridge between the feuding com- 
munities. 

According to Irish press reports, 
however, sports officials now are 
worried that the British-ruled prov- 
ince again could become a “no-go 
area” for British and international 
teams. 

Despite the sudden resurgence of 
fear in some quarters about playing 
spans in Northern Ireland, plans 
for an international sports festival 
in June are going ahead. 

Niue nations, including the 
United States, are scheduled to join 
British and Irish teams in a variety 
of sports ranging from karate to 
ba dminton, and cul minating in a 
star-studded track meet at the 
Mary Peters Stadium in Belfast on 
June 24. 

The IRA and INLA, whose 


membership is predominantly 
Catholic, is fighting to drive Britain 
out of primarily Protestant North- 
ern Ireland and unite the province 
with the Irish Republic. 

Last month, the INLA planted a 
bomb close to Belfast's Windsor 
Park soccer stadium where En- 
gland was playing Northern Ire- 
land in a world Cup qualifying 
match. 

The bomb went off an hour after 
the game and injured no one, but 
the INLA warned ihaL in the fu- 
ture. all visiting sports teams from 
the British mainland would be in 
danger. Next time, the organization 
said, it would bomb to kilL 

The threat had an immediate im- 
pact. The British amateur wrestling 
championships, due to be held for 
the fust time m Northern Ireland in 
May. were called off. 

Then, the Scottish Badminton 
Association decided not to field an 
under-18 team to play an all-Ire- 
land side in Belfast 

The British Isles indoor bowling 
championships, scheduled for Bel- 
fast next year, have been switched 
to the British mainland, and now 
there are growing doubts about the 
national trade and field champion- 
ships. 

“1 don't mind admitting that the 
thought of competing at Antrim 
terrifies me,” said the British track 
star. Todd Bennett, who recently 


broke the world indoor 400-meter 
record. 

“Now that the INLA have made 
their views known, it could change 
the minds of a lot of people. We , 
only have one life, and it only takes' 
a small bomb to end it,” Bennett- 1 
was quoted as saying. 

Ade Mafe, 17, a sprinter, said he, 
too, was considering withdrawing, 
from the Antrim championships. 
“You don't know whether they'll 
try to pick off one or two or blow 
up a whole bps,” he said. “There's a- 
lot of feeling among the athletes 
about not going." 

Les Jones, secretary of the 
Northern Ireland Amateur Athletic 
Association, said “tough security 
measures” were planned for the 
championships. He played down 
the guerrilla threat, saying there 
were no incidents the last time the 
championships were held in North- 
ern Ireland, in 1981, even though 
anti-British sentiment was running 
higher then than now. 

About 700 athletes are expected 
for what traditionally is the cur- 
tain-raiser to Britain's outdoor 
track season. Nigel Cooper, secre- 
tary of the British Amateur Athlet- 
ic Board, said he did not know how 
many competitors would choose , 
not (o compete, since invitations 
had only recently been sent. 

“The advice we have received is 
that our athletes will not be at 
risk,” he said. 



New Jersey’s Dave Lewis rode Scott Arnid off the pock in 
Tuesday’s earfy going, but AraieTs goal at 13:59 of the 


second period put Winnipeg ahead for good as the Jets 
posted a 6-3 victory in the National Hockey League contest. 


Basketball 


Football 


M A Standings 




* v- ■ ' 




. EASTERN CONFERENCE 
* c Atlantic Division 

•- 1 * ‘ W L Pet. GB 

1 • Sl lJ w — 

•« elphto 48 N -750 214 

u ' Wton 33 39 SOB IB 

■ w x arwv 32 33 Ati If 

„ Y ■« ''«* 21 44 .323 30 

Central DtaUM 

_Jkoe 45 19 .703 — 

- ' 3ft » 4S4 9Vt 

•r'o 31 34 J07 14Vl 

>na 24 38 .404 19 

l 2S 40 J85 MVj 

3 20 45 JOS 25M> 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
DMWan 

42 33 444 — 

’ " 39 24 .400 3 

3* 29 J54 4 

ItanlB 33 34 ASS MVS 

31 34 .477 11 

.■ Otv 24 41 -369 18 

PKUU Division 

lUffS 44 It .719 — 

« 31 34 477 15V? 

W 30 34 ASS 17 

27 38 .415 ms 

• fawn 32 43 J38 34VS 

- Slat* IB 44 JB1 28 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
f 33 31 21 39-133 

' « 33 31 M 33—111 

'• 11-137-8311 Edwards 7-109-1323; Kins 
*11 37, Tockwr 9-14 1*3 20. Raboands: 

1 4* l Edwards. Janas 71; New York 54 
Har 14). Assists: Phoanl* 24 fMocv 71 ; 

' Vic 33 [Soar row 14). 

rut 34 32 23 25— 1M 

38 24 27 ' 18—189 
. Hams 11-21 3-3 25. Kattom 9-22 >471: 

« 1M1 5-11 31, Dawkins 7-11 5 * 19. 
M: Now Janwv 57 (B.wnUflms 11): 

44 (M. Williams H ). Assists; Now Jar- 
Bkftontson?),- Indiana 31 1 KalloaB4). 

23 37 29 32—118 
> 24 28 38 U-»l 

n ii-24 io.il 33. Waalridoe 7-15 4-5 18; 
ar 9-1* 3-3 31. Rautidflald 7-20 7-7 31. 
.*-14 44 T9. TriPUCkfl 7.14 4-4 19. Rc- 

• DttTatt47ILobra>aarl3).-e>itcnoa40 
motS 91. Assists'- DMfott 31 {Thomas 

. lean 23 (Da[t*v. Jordan 41. 

35 34 34 34—139 
i 31 S3 39 23-131 

■•an 14-34 8-11 3*. McCray WO 2-3 2S)i 
<7.24 0-0 24. Evens 1-13 10- W 39. So* 

Denver 47 (NUT til: Hvwton ST 
w 14 J. Assists: DMnr27 (Laver ]0t; 

' 30 45o «im son 41, 

35 28 35 24—134 
27 *1 31 24— IIS 
- ' 2*1* 15-11 tfl, DJahraan 7-18 1-3 15; 
**-34 4-6 34. EJShMOA B-14 10-11 2*. 
-*4! Boston 59 (Porlsn l*j; Atlanta 45 
■ -Assists: Bodoit 4« <a Johnson 17); 

X IE Johnson 121. 

18 31 34 33 — Mk 
. t «W 17 33 » 33-132 

M4-7T0.M ILScaltt-ttO-l 1B.MCMOQ 
L Worthy 7-14&} 14; frliiim M-304-7 
1*5-8 54 ULBofeotiMfs; Utah 48 (Ea* 
u LA. Lakers *?{ Rambtt 13J. Assists: 
^ . Stockton 91: LA. Lakors 33 (Johnson 

13 33 21 27-133 

• «ot» AS 41 38 39—145 

7-M S-) 4R, Fiord 7-13 44 IX; Gliiooro 
0. Gcrvln ?«17 5-7 19. RrtoomK: San 
42 {CThmrc 91; Goman Slate 54 
«*k»lnai I). AssW*: San Antonio 28 
rii Gwoen Stalo 35 (Flovd 171. 

• ' 27 n 38 25— 1H 

30 29 » 38-131 

• *•* 1W« 5-4 34 Johnson 10-11 04 »J 
M4-738.Va W HweBhe9-K4-S23.RC* , 
^•muno 41 taowte 18); Kansas City 

- wnpMn mi. Assists: Ramona 31 ' 
. 'WNw’UKomwsaiyasiOrowro. 


The Road to the N.C.A.A. Championship 


United States Football League Leaders 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


FIRST ROUND 




kmiaCtt-iOi 
■ S^UK»C»y.«8roh i* 

. SatttatoCaw.MmialiU ' 
£M*OUWtSLtaCSH) - 

Aftwaaw. MancUIS - 

j& m S SZS S SS u&m 

V.CJU-212&4S) . . *. . 

' Attxjquerqutf. Usrcm 1 E 
Staraff*1S(2T>1». 


••• 

■* ! W MK UfrOfcgpjrift :V V 

1 j. . 

J Tm»c{23-T? T ^ 

:T MniqUftrata. ; Alat<^l6 »■ -I 
■ ttiTJEJP; It'ffWBi- v ; 




TNtnoxam •• • 

Hartford, March 14 
Va.TocbfiI*O40 . 

lOM 13(294} 7 

mt»ofo3(a4« • • : 

■ABaoia.ltech.16 • 
Wat th o E a lw mlA^N}. 
&«KWlafri>g(2»D , 

. ABaifla. Match is • 

HSSST - 

ILS-C-GrtW 

Tutsa. March I* 

BBnota SL • • 

Otdo«.A{1»E> -. _ 

. . Tulaa,MPCh T* • „ 

rewoSt, 13 (21-123 •• • 

HouMort. March iff “ 

. riouMM.Mwtfi-15 1 7 


HUUiSl 

va>aoovEBn»«»- r 
: Daywn. March IS 
DmtoaSflMQ 7” "" 

UBJL'4(t940 

Payton, March 15 

NMni 

Won— o S (28*71 

South Band. Ma«h 
OMoU.14t2a-?I . 

K. CareEna 2(24-8? 

SauthBand. March 14 
MW- Tm t dd — 18C1T-WJ 


, Hamwfuwwa**-; 

,toh)ahiB(ia>t8):..-. a--: • 

; ajxa.5122^ 

' Hanfotd.-Marefa 

.0raPct4mw“i2{»-n) ' '^7 
I oaottfaBgi-*} ■ 

' ■■■ \ 

, ; wfohiwsLia •• 

; S»nacMBayg1^. i. • 

. r* " A^muiMwch " ;:-r\ 

, mPm$tp£194b’- ■ L. •? 


QiMiomstGm^' . • -is- 

• TtiWt«WW*iV4 ■ '• 


Tto«ETa«H»gt»7> 

BotoocrnwgatTfiM^ 
At».-gtonfn9Nwn-7(24^ 
HotBtori,*teoii15 H '. :• j 

MR*. ULiettW*:- -■ ■ ■ 


■ Peyton, raoroft 15 • 

Payton. Mareti tS . 
mottmfrpaMV 

StmBl BantUfaiCttK ' 
Asbare 11(20.1 11 . 

Sou*Oa«itLiteMh.i47 
OnaonSLIOpEM} .- 


SECOND 

ROUND 


San Lato City . March 1 6 


Salt LaRoCtty. March 18 


MOuquefqua. March 17 


Albuquorqua. March 17 


Harttord. March 16 


Hartford. March 16 


Atlanta. March 1 7 


Atlanta. March 17 


Tuba, March! 6 


rwaa, March 1 6 


Houston. March 17 


Houston. March 17 


Davton. March 17 


Dayton.Marchl?'- 


South Band. March 1 6 


' South Band, March ig 
■ Mumtoarc foUw tntf ochoola' tn 


REGIONAL REGIONAL FINAL 
SEMIFINAL FINAL FOUR 


Oimvar 
March 22 424 


Lexington. Kantucky 
March SO 


. ftttndenca . 
March 21 423 



Pallas 

March 21 423 


LAfongtoaKaMucty 
Man* 3D 


Bbndngham 
March 22 4 24 


>— Ulngr»iBtiliiraglona1a;i 



Yards 

Rush 

Pass 

Tom DO Bay 

1273 

445 

828 

tolmeae lareeu 
ftocw jm *wr 

1029 

573 

456 

Batthnora 

1026 

416 

610 

Memohts 

970 

602 

368 

Jaduonvllie 

774 

280 

494 

Bli infawlKim 

658 

230 

428 

Orlando 

576 

Defense 

228 

348 

Memphis 

793 

278 

515 

Tampa Bay 

793 

214 

579 

New Jenev 

889 

397 

492 

Birmingham 

UQ6 

416 

610 

Jacksonville 

1034 

<M 

565 

Baltimore 

1062 

303 

7S9 

Orlande 

1186 

683 

503 


MOMeuz. Jock 
Lowts, Memp 
Stoudr. Blrm 
Roootm, TB 
Futina. Balt 
Fluha. HJ 
Belli*. Jock 
Gaistvn. on 
Jonkm, TB 


ATT COM YDS TD 1NT 
» 31 TO 2 0 

49 24 440 4 0 

94 49 &S8 7 4 

85 49 610 5 4 

89 58 707 2 4 

70 30 480 6 3 

66 36 290 3 3 

87 43 441 3 4 

37 18 236 1 5 




ATT YDS AVG LG TO 


Anderasn, TB 

52 260 54 68t S 


WTHtoms. Memo 

40 247 67 37 0 


Lewis. Memp 

23 208 87 43 3 


Garihon. HJ 

36 194 5>J 5St 1 


WsUcer, KJ 

49 m 38 13 2 


Bryant, Ball 

43 1(8 37 16 1 


Flutle. NJ 

17 166 9J 25 3 


Rosier, Jack 

43 159 37 13 1 

Q 

Bledsoe. Or) 

39 149 LB 15 0 



Recehren 

5 


NO YDS AVG LG TD 


Truvlllloii, TB 

18 270 UL0 32 3 


Smith, Blrm 

16 268 168 441 4 

2 -1 

Coirtor, Bait 

14 186 1U 27 0 

S: S 

DumL Balt 

14 167 113 27 0 

S g 

Keel. Jack 

U 116 19 30 0 

s Sz 

Fitxkea, Boh 

12 172 147 22 0 


Horvln. Bolt 

U 94 7.8 16 0 

o 

Roller, jock 

12 17 73 U 1 

-J c . 

Ntdalek. Ort 

11 117 IDA 20 2 

3 1 


Ponton 

£ 5 

NO YDS AVG TB 120 LG 

o 

Cater. Ort 

19 BM 444 2 2 57 

P 

Andrusvdiya TB 

8 350 4M 1 259 

< 

Millar, Memo 

17 7384X4 4 4 53 

2 

5 wider, jack 

13 569 422 1 2 51 


Partridge, NJ 

16 6S3 408 3 4 51 


Panonx Blrm 

16 631 39A 1 3 50 


Landeta, Balt 

13 506 309 3 3 49 


Fmt fltotaraara 


MO YDS AVG FC LG TD 


McFoddeti Blrm 

5 65 130 5 37 8 


Lone, Bolt 

11 128 114 I 20 0 


Williams, Memp 

7 80 114 0 47 0 


JackuraOrt 

9 77 BA 1 21 0 


Butts. Jack 

5 40 60 0 72 0 


Daniel. NJ 

12 71 W 2 15 0 

— 

Kickoff RBlumert 



NO YDS AVG LG TD 


Harris, Beit 

9 199 22.1 48 0 


Parrish. Ort 

13. 262 21 J 45 0 


Carter, TB 

4 87 21 i 33 0 


Hocfcett NJ 

6 127 21 J 30 0 


Miller, Ort 

3 61 203 21 0 


Sutton. Blrm 

4 78 193 22 0 


Comrttw Blrm 

4 78 194 26 0 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Offense 


ion In paronthaoaa. 


Houston 

1300 

99 

1201 

Denver 

1140 

517 

623 

Oakland 

1DD6 

381 

625 

Arizona 

946 

306 

640 

Las Angeles 

945 

395 

550 

Portland 

900 

406 

096 

San Antonia 

629 

Defease 

224 

405 

Arizona 

650 

242 

408 

Oakland 

1006 

381 

625 

Portland 

1059 


6S5 


Denver 
Mown on 
Son Antonio 
Us Aiwoles 


Kelly. How 
William*. Arts 
Hebert, Oak 
You no. LA 
Woodward. Port 
Evans. Don 
NnuhoiaeLSA 


Johnson, Den 
Jordan, Port 
YOune, LA 
Gerhart. Don 
Bentley. Oak 
Williams. Oak 
Evans, Don 
Brown. Arts 
Newton. Oak 


Johnson, Hou 
Verdin. Hou 
Harris, Dan 
Carter. Oak 
Tewnsell, LA 
Lockett, Port 
Wheeler. Arts 
ROSS. Port 
Gumv LA 


IMS 380 685 

1046 389 757 

1081 461 620 

1164 347 797 

Hw ii l w lwdu 
ATT COM YDS TD INT 
125 83 1239 U 2 

>1 54 655 3 3 

87 39 404 4 4 

84 45 473 2 5 

t 90 42 548 2 4 

103 44 662 3 6 

78 31 402 1 4 

Rushers 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD 
27 218 XI 29 3 

39 218 5A 25 2 

2U 142 7.1 22 1 

25 142 57 15 0 

19 117 A2 31 1 

34 111 3J 15 0 

12 1M 87 26 2 

21 HQ 4.9 16t 3 

26 89 14 9 0 

Receivers 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 
23 325 14.1 521 3 
18 355 147 74 3 
15 192 124 39! 1 

13 290 227 50t 2 
11 245 223 641 7 
11 192 175 50 1 
11 188 17.1 43 2 
11 182 165 371 1 
11 173 157 48 0 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 


Talley. OOk 
Gessen, Port 
Speolmart. Den 
Wnlttrs, Hou 
DeBniiln, ArU 
Partrtdee. LA 
Hartley. SA 


Gunn. LA 
McNelL Hou 
HaiL Port 
Martin, Den 
Harris. ArU 
Faulkner, Oak 
Banks. Osh 


Harris. Art 
Jackson. Port 
McGhee. Hou 
Verdin. Hou 
wunams. SA 
Benltov. OOk 
Brawn, Oak 
Faulkner, Oak 


Exhibition Baseball 

TUESDAY’S RESULTS 
Toronto 4. GMcaao White Sex 2 
Cincinnati 2. Las Anoeles D 
PhllodelaMa 7. Mew York Mels 6 
Boston 2 Atlanta 1 
Texas S. New York Yankees 4 
Detroit 11, Kansas CHv 2 
Son Francisco S, Seattle 1 
Milwaukee 9. Oakland 4 
Chtcaao Cubs X San Dfaeao 2 
Montreal 14. Baltimore 6 
Minnesota 10. Houston 6 

European Soccer 

ENGLISH FIRST division 
S ioka «. West, Bromwich 0 
SwWkrtond 1, Wofford 1 
M«Kh*si*r United 2. Tottenham 1 



W L 

T 

PIS 

GF 

GA 

x-PhllodelpWo 

l 41 

» 

7 

89 

291 

214 

x-Washlnoton 

39 

20 

9 

87 

277 

200 

N.Y. Islanders 

35 

28 

5 

75 

304 

265 

N.Y. Rangers 

22 

35 

10 

54 

256 

290 * 

pmtfwrah 

22 

39 

5 

49 

232 

320 • 

Mew jersey 

20 

» 

9 

49 

229 

3*4- ■ 


Adams DtvbhM 




x-Montraal 

34 

23 

11 

79 

362 

227 

x-BuHala 

39 

21 

13 

77 

244 

191 

Quebec 

33 

25 

9- 

73 

275 

342' 

Boston 

30 

28 

B 

68 

215 

229 

1 |«g. || i-8 

n«#i nora 

21 

38 

8 

50 

228 

290. 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Norris Dtvislaa 




x-SI. Louis 

33 

24 

II 

77 

263 

244 

x-Chieaao 

33 

32 

5 

71 

270 

20- 

Minnesota 

22 

36 

II 

55 

234 

273 

Detroit 

31 

36 

11 

S3 

257 

306 . 

Toronta 

17 

43 

7 

41 

211 

290 


Smvtlra Division 




x-EDmontnn 

44 

14 

B 

96 

337 

239 

x-Wlnnloes 

36 

27 

7 

79 

311 

29* 

X -Calvary 

34 

26 

8 

76 

312 

264 

LM Angeles 

30 

36 

13 

72 

295 

279 

Vancouver 

21 

39 

1 

50 

230 

348 


Punter* 

NO YDS AVG TB 120 LG 
19 797 41S 2 7 54 
U 57* 41 J 2 3 SO 
in 9 342 4U 0 058 

14 S9 ».9 3 2 SS 

4 I 31SF4 I 1 51 

t 14 545 3X9 1 4 51 

15 548 36S 0 2 54 
Font Retainer s 

MO YDS AVG FC LG TD 
4 56 MJ 3 451 1 

9 114 12.7 0 7Vtl 

6 53 U 1 32 0 

7 61 87 I 16 0 
10 S3 83 2 14 0 

k 4 30 75 3 19 0 

4 24 6-0 0 13 0 

Kickoff Re turners 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 
3 88 293 37 9 

3 83 277 40 0 

J ' 81 27JJ 39 0 
7 171 244 M 1 
7 M2 23.1 26 0 
3 65 317 31 0 

5 106 20X 36 0 
t 3 <2207 2$ 0 


U-dlnditd ntoyuH berth! 

TUESDAYS RESULTS 
WloMpeo 1 7 3—6 

New Jersey • 2 1—3 

Small 2 (78L Mower chuk (431, Amici (19). 
Boschmon (29) Lundhalm 112): Muller 1151. 
Broton (311. Brldoman (20). Shots oa ooal: 
Wlrmloofl (on Resell) M-12-13-38; New Jer- 
sey (on Hayward) 9-1D-T2 — 31. 

M.Y. iNaodn 15 8-6; 

SL Loots 1 4 *— S 

Bossy (S3). B. Sutter 2 (42). FlaHoy (17), 
Potvin (T2|. Jonsson (15); Federko 2 (28). M. , 
Johnson 121), Mullen (33). Sutter (36). Shots . 
on uoai: N.Y. Isfamders Ion Mllien) tijmo— 
»; St. Louts ton SniHti) 11-11-12—14. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
NoHoaol LaootH 

CINCINNATI— Aor<»d to termsonomlnor-'- 

league cord rod with John Stearns, catcher. ~ 
NEW YORK— Stated Darryl Strowbmv.' - 
OUMWder, to a muHivoar contract. 

FOOTBALL 

NoHoaol Footbalt Lcoyue 
Atlanta— N amed Joe Madden defensive . 
casMtant ana Sam Elllatl runnlr* back coach. .5 
GREEN baY—n anted R«y Wleiecho East v 
Coast colleae scout. ' 

United states Football Leoaw " m . 

ARIZONA— Suspended Trumaino Johnson. 
wtoe roeeWtr. todehnltwy. ■: ' 

HOCKEY 

Natkiaoi Hockey LaaQua 
DETROIT— Traded Dave Williams, rtah) ‘ i 
wing, to Las Anoeles ior future consider--'' 
ah ant. 

HARTFORD— Traded David A. Jensen, tor* '■ 
ward, to woshinoton for Peier Sldorklewrtcz. ' 
aealii, and Deal Evasen, earner. 

N.Y. ISLANDERS— Amulrad Loras Malls- - , 
kea oeattenaer, from Mhuiasata for future 
constoerartont. s 

new JERSEY— Sen) Rodcv Trait ler.rtahl -• 
wlno, to Maine of the A m eric a n Hockey 
Leooue. 

MINNESOTA— Agreed to terms with Jim >. 
Archibald, right wlno, an an amateur trvouL. ‘ 

. PtTTSBU ftGH— Traded Mark Tor lor, for- -. 
word, tdWashlnatonfer Jim McGeounh, cen- ' 
tor. Sent Bab Errw, left wfng,fo Softlmore af * 
the AHLAsslon»d Roger Betonanr, center, to • 
Hamilton at too Ontario Hockey Lmbuo. Re- ■ 
called Artojovanalnefl,rloiii whw. and Greg - - 
Fo«, defenseman, (ram Bammora, 
VANCOUVER— Acqirirad Glen Cochrane,'^ ' 
dotoraeman, inmr Phliadefphla for a third. 
rtond draft choice. .' 









5 H'i ^sjms htkis isi 


1 


ART BUCHWALD 


Tough Nuts to Crack The Continuing OiaUenge of Climbing 

C7 n__. if r*i n c ii • ft. i w _ • • * 7 . . ... .i _ if • . 


W ashington — Does the 
fact that Washington has the 
most psychotherapists mean that 
there are more men tally deranged 
people here than anywhere else? 
The answer is probably yes. 

Dr. Arnold Frisher, a noted psy- 
chiatrist who has been practicing 
here for 40 years, and only takes 

the toughest * 

cases, maintains 
that something 


to cany bar to the supermarket on 
his back.*’ 

“What other troubled patients 
do you see?" 

have a senator who took $5 
million from political action com- 
mittees in the last election, but still 
believes he’s his own man. Then 
there is a secretary of education 


For Mm Like Doug Scott, Alpin&Styie Mountaineering Narrows the Margin of Safety 


By Michael Keraan 

Washington Post Serried 


W ASHINGTON— In 1975, 
Dom Scott became the first 


who has a phobia about college 
kids, a U.S. Justice Department 
attorney for civil rights who loathes 
civil rights, a newspaper reporter 
who behaves like an animal, a lob- 
byist who claims to have 20 con- 
gressmen sewn up in his pocket, 
and a CIA official who has to con- 
tinually wadi his hands every time 
he testifies about Nicaragua." 

“Is that it?" 

“No, I have this high official in 
the White House who maintains be 
has a mandate to spend a trillion 
dollars on new weapons to keep the 
peace.*' 

“That wouldn’t make him gonzo. 
The White House did wm 49 
states.” 

“My patient doesn’t claim he has 
a mandate from the people — he 
says he has one from Goa." 

□ 


happens to peo- 
ple after they 
stay to Washing- 
ton awhile. 

He said, “To 
put it in profes- 
sional terms, 50 
percent are nut- 
tier than fruit- . , . 

cakes." Bochwald 

“How do yon account for it T 

“Pressure, power and politics. 
Although most of them are normal 
people when they come here, it 
doesn’t take long for them to lose 
all sense of reality. Let me give you 
an illustration. I have a patient who 
works for the Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget. He makes 
528,000 a year. Every time he 
comes to see me he says be has just 
chopped another biBion dollars out 
of a government program. Then he 
bites his fingernails." 

“Would that make him crazy?" 

“No. Bat on each visit he claims 
he's brought the money with him 
and wants me to put it in my safe so 
Congress can't get their mitts on 
it" 

“It sounds like he^ suffering 
from exhaustion." - 





▼V Doug Scott became the first 
Englishman to climb Mount Ev- 
erest He spent a night without 
sleeping bag or oxygen, 300 feet 
(91 meters) from the summit — 
the highest bivouac to history. He 
is one of the three or four greatest 
alpine-style climbers in the 
world. 




book of rules." Mountaineering 
has become so popular that 
mountains have to be booked, 
and frequently one runs into oth- 
er groups. 


“Haven't you ever had patients 
who talk to God?” 

“Yes, but I have never had one 
who told me God wanted him to 
spend a trillion dollars. Thai’s 
manic.” 

“At the same time, the way 
things seem to be going, a trillion 
dollars isn't too much to invest for 
security on Earth." 

“My patient doesn’t want to 
spend it on earth. He wants to 
spend it in the sky." 

“How is he going to do that?" 

“He doesn’t know. That is why 
he says he comes to me. He wants 
me to find the answer before people 
say he’s flipped out.” 

“It sounds like a hopeless case. 
Why don’t yon fire him as a pa- 
tient?" 

“Because I think I have the solu- 
tion. If I could hook np a network 
of lasers to 10 hydrogen bombs and 
explode- them just as the moon 
passed over the Soviet Union, I 
could create a nuclear winter, 
which would negate a first-strike 
capability, »rut then the Russians 
would come to me and say, ’Ain't 
going to go to war no more, ain't 
going to go to war no mote, ain’t g- 
o-i-n-g to go to war no 
moo onr r re .’” 


“That or guilt" Dr. Frisher said. 
“Six months ago he took a wheel- 
chair away from his 80-year-old 
mother because he said she wasn't 
entitled to it on Medicare." 

“Why would he fed guilty about 
that?" I asked. 

“She calls him every morning 
and tells him not to worry about 
her because his father has offered 


Grinese Find Habite Die Hard 

The Associated Pros 

BELTING — More than 200,000 
people have been fined here this 
year for spitting, the Beijing Eve- 
ning News said Wednesday. The 
government is trying to ciirt> the 
habit but even Drag Xiaoping, 
China's top leader, keeps a spittoon 
nearby when receiving guests. 


On 19 expeditions to the Hima- 
layas, be has forged new routes 
op many peaks. He has climbed 
to every mountainous continent 
except South America, has done 
Yose mite’s H Caphan “four or 
five times" and nas written a 
book about the epic conquest of 
the southwest- face of Tibet’s Shi- 
shapangma. more than 26,300 
feet high. 

He visited Washington to pro- 
mote “The Shishapangma Expe- 
dition.” which he wrote with Alex 
McIntyre, a brilliant climber who 
was killed two years ago. at age 
28, by falling rode on Annapurna. 

“Ibree of my friends have died 
just after writing books," Scott 

oftheS 0 dtoS)e^OT the&wrest 
expedition, he panted to “this 
one, this one, this one," picking 
out nine men who have died since . 
then. 



The new trend is to bring 
friends and family along on Hi- 
malayan climbs. An expedition 
can set up a base to a relaxed 
atmosphere, try two or three 

warm-up dimbs — also in the 

alpine tradition — and gradually 

adapt body and mind to the alti- 
tude. where the air contains one- 
third the oxygen most -people are 
accustomed to. 

*Tm right into the thing of hav- 
ing women in it," Scott said. “I've 
lost so many friends to the last 
few years, it didn't stop me from 
wanting to go but it did make me 
Think. I take risks still but I'm 
not blinkered by ambition. Wom- 
en help with this, I think. They 


bdp to give sane balance, so the 
lads don’t go off the deep end 
with their aggressiveness." 

A retired teacher, the 43-year- 
old Nottingham native is married 
to a teacher and has a 21 -year-old 
son. Money for expeditions 
comes from lectures, articles and 
the occasional construction job. 
Scott is a vegetarian (“You adapt 
to altitude faster, meat seems to 
take the liquids out of the body") 
but only last year did be give up 
smoking. The lungs are the most 
important thing to a climber, he 
says. 

He does not bother to mention 
the conditioning that enables him 
to dangle by his fingertips cm a 
rode face or spend the night in a 
hammock swung from two pitons 
a few thousand feet in the air. 

“I do a rock dimb at least once 
or twice a week, preferably every 
day. Six or seven hours up a rode 
gives you a peat feeling. You eat 
and sleep better. It takes you out 
of yourself.” 


Jam* M, llnteer/lhe W mlwtfu n Pad 

Climber Doug Scott: Death is always dose. 


Death is always dose in Doug 
Scott’s world. “Every trip, some- 


thing happens. Two weeks ago, 
on Vancouver Island, I was slid- 
ing down a face and a rock 
bounded down and hit the rope. I 
didn’t know it Afterward I found 
one strand cut nearly through. 
There’s always something Iflce 
that." 

Death takes a different form 
now than it did to the old days, 
when a Himalayan climh meant 
dozens of Sherpa guides, elabo- 
rately stocked camps all the way 


are going up the Himalayas al- 
pine style; no fixed ropes, no 
masses of equipment, no series of 
fixed bases. It is, Scott said, more 
like a commando raid than the 
army invasions that early Hima- 
layan attempts resembled. 


up and a network of fixed ropes. 
Today, with nearly all the great 


Today, with nearly all the great 
peaks conquered (except Namcha 
Barwa, 25,700 feet, which the 
Chinese are reserving for them- 
selves, having failed three times), 
mountaineers try for new and 
harder routes, as well as faster 
times, forever narrowing the safe- 
ty margin. 

What this m«iin is that they 


“People used to get lolled to 
avalanches and falling off the 
mountain, things like th«i Now 
we have more experience and bel- 
ter technique. Now they die of 
edemas, long or brain edemas 
caused tty going up too far too 
fast It has to do with the alpine 
style — you have to dimb faster 
because you carry less food.” 


Not that the early climbers 
were not just as committed and 
courageous as the new breed. 
Fixed-rope climbing can be dan- 
gerous, too, since one might have 
to pass a hazardous spot a dozen 
times in relaying supplies up the 
mountain, while alpine climbers 
would pass it only twice. 


“Ever since the southwest face 
of Everest was done.” said the 
quiet, bespectacled Scott, mod- 
estly using the passive form, “it 
was realized that if yon bad 
enough men, materials «nd mon- 
ey, and a break in the weather, 
you could dimb anything. And 
when 1 spent the night on Everest, 
l realized 1 can go anywhere I 
want” 

Future climbing to the Himala- 
yas, he said, will concentrate on 
steeper faces, ever higher on the 
massif “Up to now. no signifi- 
cant technological climbing has 
been done much above 24,000 
feet There are routes on K2 and 
Makalu still to be dona" 

Scott has made three attempts 
at one of the “unclimbable" 
routes up K2. “I want to try K2 
again to '86. But it's getting so 
complicated. 1 already had to 
send them $2,000 to advance for 
royalties. When you do a dimb in 
Nepal they send you a 48-page 


He was on his wav to try some 
at Banff to tne Canadian 


peaks at Banff to the Canadian 
Rockies, and later planned to re- 
turn east to dimb Mount Wash- 
ington. But always, the Himala- 
yas are waiting for him. 

“I can’t tell you — when you 
get up there in the sky, the ex- 
panse, the distances, you can see 
everywhere, everywhere. Just to 
be there." 


expert* — r - — 
organ transplant • — of sorts — at 
Yale University's Battell Chapel in 
time to celebrate the 300th anniver- 
sary of Johann Sebastian Bach’s 
birth and the First presentation in 
modem times of 33 recently discov- 
ered Bach chorales. The restored 
organ’s replacement value was pul 
at S750.0QQ by Joseph Dzeda, who. 
with his partner, Nick Thompson- 
Allen, removed each of the 34-year- 
old instrument's 3,691 pipes, most 
at them metal, and washed them iu 
hot. soapy water. They also refto- 
the organ’s big wooden pipes 
and restored the rest of the instru- 
ment- More than 1.000 spectators 
are expected in New Haven, Con- 
necticut, on Sunday for the nation- 
al premiere of the Bach chorales, to 
be played by the Yale organist 
Charles Krigbanra and the Hamid 
organist John Fans. The Voice of 
America will broadcast the concert 
to Europe on March 21. the 300th 
anniversary of Bach's birth. Qhts- 
toph J. Wolff, chairman of the mu- 
sic deportment at Harvard Univer- 
sity, recently found the 33 Bach 
chorale preludes in an obscure 
IStb-cenuny German music manu- 
script in the John Herrick Jackson 
Music Library at Yale. 

□ 

Television viewers have voted a 
New York model the most beauti- 
ful girl in the world. Pamela Cath- 
erine Gtdtej, 19, was selected from 
among 21 contestants to the second 
annum “most beautiful girl to the 
world pageant” broadcast from 
Sydney. Maristella Silva G razz ia. 
representing South America placed 
second; third-place honors went to 
Natalie Anffret-Lascoumes of 
France. Gidley was awarded more 
than $100,000 to cash and prizes. 
□ 

Former U.S President Jimmy 
Carter is the fust American to re- 
ceive a peace award from the 
World Methodist Council. A Meth- 
odist spokesman said Carter was 
chosen to receive the World Meth- 
odist Peace Award because of his 
activist role, as president and pri- 
vate ci tizen, in seeking solutions to 
international crises. The award, 
given when the 15 officers of the 
World Methodist Council agree an 
individual deserves il was present- 
ed at Emory University, where Car- 
ter's policy center and presidential 
library are being built. President 
Anwar Sadat of Egypt received the 


1978, ||)( J 
he and Prune Minister MtajX 
Begin of Israel agreed toTS 
between their countries wiihf 

insistence and aid of Carter Ail 

rad of 1978. Sadat and Bering 
named co-redpicnts the 
Peace Prize; the Nobel CoaM 
said since Carter was propo^f 
tto the deadline for nominuHi 
passed he was inclignjJcfa-T 
prize. r'> 

□ . 

Lord Louis Mauntbattm W 
of Queen EBzabeth n, I tatttoff 
be was head of the Briti&H| 


MSI',?. 


Beii 


during the 1956 Suez rati* dot - 
British government risked «** , 


British government risked son r ' 
a nuclear war. according to&j 
biography. “Mounlbatten;^ •' 
Philip Ziegler, says that Moon|'. - 
ten. who was assassinated )# - 
Irish Republican Army in jfr 
was desperately worried by 3 
by Anthony Eden's goventmaf 
a full-scale invasion of Egypt 

twice offered to resign. Sncfau ~ ' 

by a service chief m time . m 
would have been unpreceded -, 
and he was persuaded to : g 
Ziegler wrote. 

O 

A silver wine am f ashing- 
years ago for Wfesa Beadt- ' 
governor of Plymouth ColaijS,-* 
been bought from a EaroptS, -' 
Smithsonian Institution trot--; v ‘ 
nounced. The 12-ounce pfliJsf -z 
Charles I wine cup was ma : -T 
London to 1634. Bradfcnljf-r- • 
with tire Pilgrims aboard M 1 
flower to 1620 and was ekcto$ - 
governor to 1621. The Bra 
cup remained to PlymooM ’ 
generations of his descendaatj 
most recent owner to the H'-l - 
Bernard Wiest of New Ctf; 
sold it at auction to 19&3 
Smithsonian, the Pilgrim Sod?;.. 
Plymouth and a group of.^1 
ford's descendants bought iST 
from the European owncr.^r 
they did not identify. Nordkf' 
disclose the price. 

David Robinson, a 

and retired entrepreneur, has | 
knighted by Qoeen E&atetfci&U'K 
Buckingham Palace. Robion' 
who is confined to a wheek; j J 
lives to Cambridge with rl(1 * 
wire, Mabel, and ran 
home. Re has given mote thaii rt» . 
million to chanty since hejg|t [ j I ( 
television-rental chain m 198T 


I tv** 


m 

4- 

gats 

,..r2 fi 

. i*4 vfcr 
- i m ea#ij 


If*! 


-V ** J® J 


jMW 




-j-m mi 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUBSCRIBE 
to the 

INTERNATIONAL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
FRENCH PROVINCES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 




SAN Reno 
Bin, tad 


Park 3222817 am. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


HERALD 


TRIBUNE 


AND SAVE. 


A* a now subscriber to the 
International Herald Triune. 
you ayi s ave up to hdf 
tee newsstand pice depeixtng 
an your country ar residence. 


For detail 

an ftis ipeaol introductory offer, 
write te 


ROYAL QUXKBTBtSHnS Oeforv 
ham. I JS fours London, heart af marf 
beautiful Gatawflid Spa. Be a neigh- 
bor to the Royal FqnuTy & enjoy fee 
best of Oidnhms famous iu* iy 
This house stonds in 1 acre of londei 
the bat private ai) da sac road. 2 
bedroom suites with luxury en suite 
baths further 3 beds, bathroom, 5 
WCs, mogiificert oak paneled 
faimp with rpyai frepfacn, large dn- 
■ng/pom / freqa ai. stwty, sp acious 
bfchm Ineuk f usl room, indy room. 
Gas control herd throughout, grind 
drivrwoy & bea*3vl gardens, tout 
5225,000 investment NOW could not 
be better. UK. Cheltenham 527291 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

ITALY 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


OSTIA ANTTCA. A real b 
er'i patridvi estate for 


mg a very large 
gaoge&l7ha.( 


GREAT BRITAIN 

"Lfinn. HMNISHH) 2rKDROOM COTTAGE 
Thanes vofley, Berks. 5hort reach 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


SEAL ESTATE 
TO KENT/SHARE 


EMPLOYMENT 


EMPLOYMENT 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 


Umton, available Aug. 1. Monthly 
rental SRJ00. Gortaet 94 77 35. 


REAL ESTATE 
TIMESHARING 

RS) Oral storing, salmon & sea trout, 
fishing with pivots sporting lodge 
ix zom m od ut ron. Buy 1 wek or mere 
for 20 years an one af ScakrxTs 


Geneva- 

LONDON, for the beet furnished Rob 
(tod houses. Conn* the SpedcAstt 


Embassy Service 


8 Ave de ama 
75008 Paris 


PhiSps, Key ctod Laws. Tet London 
3S2aIII. Telex 27*46 KE9DE G. 


YOUR REAL ESTATE 


HOLLAND- 


AG»fT IN PARIS 

MOW 562 78 99 


fin^ sporting estates. Box 40534. 
LHX, 63 Long Aae. London WC2E 


181, Avenae Oiidn de C ne l’ l, 
92300 Neuily «ur Sa me. Franca. 
Or tot Parte 747-07-29 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


DUTCH H0USM6 C2NTRE 8.V. 
Deluxe rente*. Vderiusstr. 174, 
AimtaRlaa. 020621234 ar 623M2. 


IN ASIA AM) PAQHC 


Embassy 

8Ava.de 


Service 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
FRENCH PROVINCES 


AGENCE DE L’ETOILE 

SEAL ESTATE A GBIT 

764 03 17 


I AVE FOCH SOUTH FAGMG garden 
| Rat, finest o p arhnent avalable in tfa 
mo rtprco gxxs aven ue in ftya. idea l 
far diplomatic ar corporate etoertom- 
1 tog. Heady for occupabcn 

Huge saJon velh aeerb IBrh a uftury 
pcxrefag. large tbrary & cEiiig 
' roan, ffosler saite parwSed in sl£ 
I Staff flat & profedancAy equipped 
krtdary Su brtcntiol price fo r lease & 
lunasrinjj. Eflbre nxjrtawfrt luKwy re- 
decor cUed regardless of cost. Write 
| owners rtpresertative with phone 
(xrtocf numdif fix effhr OppooTtraETtf 
to view. No agents. Write to Be* 
1902. Herald ftEane, 92521 NeoHy 
Ceden France 


OBftAMSIWF 
DE FORMATION 
tedwrdi e pour vacmees 

T FORMATEUR 


ADMM5IRAnVE SECRETARY posi- 
tion wonted m Pane. Ruont Frerv 


ch/Engfah. Typal/copy editor dab. 3 
yean (cssistont) to VA Busineis De- 


CONSIATANT 

tow b imt biEngue 


uelapmant Dept, at mceor French 
bark/ NY. NrtionoSty: Americtm. Col- 


Pfoca Your CkusHtod Ad Qiriddy and Eofi- 

Inth* 

INTBtNATIOIIAL HERALD TRIBUNE i- 

By Wiona; Col your local W r ep te w rlrtive with your totLY. 
wdl bo informad of the cost u nted ta tely, and once pregnywir 
mode yw ad wifl appear within 48 hatn. - 

Ccek The bask rate is S9JX) per fine per day + bed tarn Thai 
25 tetwv ■»» and ipooes in the first fate ond 36 n tm fbltw«ig|_ 
Wimurn space h 2 fates. No abbraviaMra occepted. •- . . ,fr- 
Oe* Cardsj Amerioan Express, Diner's Chib, Ewoart, Map. - 
Gxd. Access and Visa. . -:j8- 


CVwiti* 


lege: GJumbia Univ. Attn; Dondd 
Kna_c/o MBe. Nicole Vdcy, after 3 
pmjPorii 233 00271 


HEAP OFFICE 


v taut rtf . 207 ifc 
50 rwe Gfacr d 
5. Cfi trcrsmetiro 


When n (feme: 
PALAZZO AL VRABJtO 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


WTHNATIONAL 
ADVERTISING AGB4CY 


APPLICANT SfflCS dtaUengm post 
requiring fbent French & English, «- 
odlent secretorid sHls. & travel. Ap- 
pSatot has ] year of hoodKjn bud- 
nees, experience, o BA xi French & 1 
year tfixfy ohrtxxl experience. WA- 


Parite pur daaified only); 
747-4600. 


HJROK 


to relboatei K. Bowen, P.O. Bar 
t29. bxfianapofe, IN 46W0 USA. 


cortact our bed (fistrfarior or: 


I nte l ii uti o n al Herald Tribane 
1005 Tal Svw Commercial BaBifa 
34-34 rlemwenr Read 
HONGKONG 


7500B Pert* 

Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


RESW2NCE Hotefee Pwrr. 4 Vo- [ ‘VWhnert house with Furnijhed 


canc el Luxurious studios 4 2 room 
ncw» lenncm cn yaj K mfxO u t weci- 


ffafa, awriade far 1 weekend mere 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 

Studio, 2 or 3-room upuli ims. . 
On# month or more. 


Tab HK 5-216726 


AGENT *4 PARIS 

PHONE S62-1640 


hr/ monthly rpcad rates an request, 
red completely at homo, bfar oii io u 
557 01 79 Rons I 


Phanfc 6794325. 6793450. 
Write: Vb del Vdabrn 16. 
00186 Rome. ' 


LE CLABHLGE 3S9 67 97. 



. # See fa djmarax: mrtrv'femde for 
ir/oiTOoticn deportment. Engtsh mother 
tongue, fluent French, knowledge af 
typxng. Send oampfate resume to 
bihativei M«Sa 

31. rue Hem Rodseftxt, 75017 Peris 


EMPLOYMENT 


WTH04ATKJNAI DiAMOW) expert 

tai. Adivifies SS" buying, w££ 
tale & retcxl trade «■ roc^i mdustrid 
& pofehed efiamonds, & indudes iteri- 
ocfiin Haflctod. Belpum, brad, LKA, 
England & Africa Beer 40566. IHT, 
63 long Acre, London. WC2E 9JH. 


Aimtordam: 26-36-15. 
Alftenc 361-8397/360-2421. 
BraMrtm 343-1899. 


Bogota: 712-W08 
■•toiMAiraetilW 

(Dept. 312] ** 

Gwayequir 431 943/4 
lima: 417857 . ^ 
Pananito 64-4373 *- 
San JaeM 22-1055 
Santiago: 69 61 555 
Sa» Paata 8S2 m : 



BAC 

Renovated baking, about 70 *^rn 

movn, noar. rerrea CDoaoon. 

n^MOOOO - TBs 22S 64 14 


FOR SUMMER TEAR CHARTRES, 

lovely country house, 3 bedocae, 
Wp available, phone. WOOD/ month. 
CcA Paris: 878 27 28 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


irw, about 70 jqJTL. MB4TON h eed, fantostic stone house, 
t &g e I wn^ f bed- redone, $75/ week. Paris 32ZB17 cxn. 

reu CCXVtoOfL r.. > 



MARKETING KrpreamttAe Uwfan " ^ 
based for mqor US offAoro contract 1 115 BUSINESS LADY 6 YEARS fincxv 


FOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS 
LOOKUWBL 

“»4TBINAT)ONAl PCsmcNS” 
PAGES 


drier. Mat be experienced S be 
knowledgeable & Famiar with &xo- 
pean ai operator*. Bex 40565, IRT, 
63 tang Acre. London, WC2E7JH 


GENERAL PORTIONS 
AVAILABLE 


432VERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


dd sale/ corporate banking «raen- 
enee, hry league MBA seels chang- 
ing career n Europe. Working 
IWdge of French. Xjohmcxt 3 
Edaecombe Ave, NY NY or Tet [212] 
281-4495 


US NEWS A WORLD REPORT 
ON SALE AT 
BSBfTANO'S 

37 Am. de (“Opera, Pads 2 


WTENSIVE FTO4CH Courses Irani 
Apnl 15 - May 1(L(Mof> - Frv 5 JO 
pin.. BJOpjnJ Contad: MCE. M. 
fic»o« 260 WO Paris 


PAULS, T6TR Pied o ton* Mijejjtti J 
bedroom (firepbceL 1 »«ng iW 
plcxe]. battwoexn. haBwoy, btehen. 
Eaiy reach of shopping center, bus, 

mtora.residentidmeq.lel: 303 4006 
NEAR PLACE DE5 VOSGES, large 5 
room duplex, with private garden. 
Vint today 1 pjn . 4_pjn. 17 rue da 
Toumeflet 


nasaewa rasBSSESS^s 


SHORT TBtM in Latin Quarter, I EXP«B4CB3 »EWS HXTCM far b- 


Fevwd & summer, (93) 


Corsmffkn 
5 75 26. 


Sordini 80 rue U 
Tto: (1)544 » 4a 


temtorond desk posriarv. Kinguol. 


Paris 7lh. NRJTliY top floor lowly 2 nxrrn, 
with bdeony. Tel: 544 39 40 -l 


5ead conviote resume in confid un ce, 

aBsScRUte*' 



26-YEA* OLD COMMERCIAL Pflai. 
S weo b . with eirceiint r eferences, ex- i 
peri e rx j e d wid er very hard ajnciliqiB. | 
oftsmai & world clmnpion ^ 
in model bALna & lynfl. ■ 

avaioble ra pmmfe pfct. For ilttcifL 
Geneva 22/44 14 00 Ms. Vren. 


CopMhaeeB: |31) 32944a 
Fixtolcfart (069) 7267-5S. 
Lauxanae: 29-58-94. 

Uebara 67-27-93/66-25-4A 
London: pi ) 836-4802. 
Marti* 455-2891/455-3306. 
MrtM,p9 7531445. 
Norway: p3) 845545., 
Rama: 679-3437. 

Sweden: 0B 7569229. 

Tto Avfcr. 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Cortact Fraridwt. 


iafirafii.- 246303. , 

Jordan: 25214. ' 
Kuwait 5614485. ' i«- 
U fa wt e ra 340044, i' 
QtAar 416535 .-jF* 

Saudi Artoda: 

Jeddtot 667-150 lM\ 
UJLElDi*to22tl6l7| > 


- • m n\ 

, ** 

4 " 

.* 1* if) 

* VMM U 

• -rV« 


MIKSTrc 


Hang Kons 5-00904 
Mratoee 81707 49. , 
Sara* 7258773. ■. 


•• 4 « 1 


International Business Message Center 


Geneva 22/44 14 00 tas. Vrea. 

ATTRACTIVE. CAPABLL eduattd, 
naveted American lady vmnts poa- 
eon m Peris a assatont or Grri Fnctay 
far ewcutive man/ women. Cuny, 
4847 W. Sunset BIvcL, Tonpo, H. 
33629. Tet 813/837^6. 


UNTO STATES 


Tatorara 752 44 25 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


1 


New York: {212} 75*3890. 
Weet Canto: (415) 362-8339. 


5yrtwyr 9295639. 
Mtoho u rn ei 690 B23 


in ( him 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS n 


EnoSsh. Pons.- 634 5965. Rone 
6780320. 


16* MKHBnANGE. Chawing 5- 
room house m odb residor*d street. 


MOVING 


Goodprioe. njDOJBL Tel : 651 65 
22 - 222 31 14 

I NATION: 4 roo m duplex cBartment. 
I sun. Price: F700aQOTtor(lj53 43 99 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


B4BKJ01C LADY, 30, Butmm de- 
nt, Soda ratpontfltle finonce/Mcx- 
keting portion. WEno to rtoocate 
and/or l rovto. Ruert En^sh, Gor- 


sstm nr ee m a Hn na r /s e r osa /n- 
bane, where asm than a third 
of a r wRfinw re ader s en d- 
wMn meet af whom ran in 


SILICON VALLEY USA 


ALLIED 


II WS1NBS CCWKTKWS 

amaS that ere am tote you II W«« tosefl yax* products m USAT 


VAN LINES 1NTL 

OVBt 1000 AGENTS 
IN UXA. -CANADA 
350 WORLD-WIDE 

fltS BTJMATES 
PARIS Pe sbu i dee Inter n uth 
(01) 343 23 6« 


MALLORCA’S NEW 
SUPK PORT 


In the bay af Matte 5 inns. Mm a 15 1 


FRANKFURT 


(069] 250066 

MUNICH LM.S. 

(089] 142244 

LONDON JKB 

(01] 953 3636 

CAIRO ARM Van Linra fan 
(20-2J 712901 

USA Al li ed Veei Unas Infl Carp 
(OlOl] 312-681-8100 


2 far up to 60 m eters eoA Indvidud 
TV/ mcxm/wcler/ phone comedbra. 
P ro rem«and port mcnagement ca FuB 
marine tervioes; tower, ratio, dp, tw- 
to-SR, repair, fad stcrion, in & outdoor 
winter h uidrta xh. U-tround car- perk 
Lorten. Coraplamertory service £la- 
sure focWiet medied, baiima shop- 
ping, catering, crtertaninenL Caff & 


•smog mat we can tote you 
hark, rwsd year metttsge idl 
apaem wOrin 48 bears. The 
rA « US. $ 9.90 or had 
etpderd e nt par fmo. Yea mast 
asdoda a s n sp lHe and vmdh 
oWeUfagaddea. 


SBC PARTTCR 

fa* exploitaixxi France & abroad, ex- 1 
ceCert exdubve produa, patented in 

7 si as 

ST ^0 l 80 l 3B front 9 am to 9 an. 
The 250303 Pubic Paris (430 0497). 


MTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC 
USA. 6 WORLDWIDE 


Wert to snfi yaw produds. m USA.? Hx 250303 Pubic Paris (430 049 

iriff I Lootono far a CcariM or faint verture 

Tta | [ partner ? Neal ccngrte^tdeaxaiw- AAAEL OF COMPUTERS? Let 
aaJ |( QttWBS or Ofter FfcK-TSCy ptoduo s ftow you fa* fnaxiy they OT 
from USA.* We ccn help- We ^edd- Far buwiexx or paTond uml An 

Bo« , «reserfflMfajteieOTOanms | n raed dpden for 1B»A Apde, crii 
USA- Forod ritond uio, please corv Huge tfccounts. We cwTfSp dc 
too w veto taedFc rtoeds. m*ie roar needs. Cat At. I«tb 


ftow you ho« fnendy they CCBi be. 
For buwiestor penood uml Aiflho- 


A complete rood & butinan service 
provitSng a umgue cotledwr of 
fdenled, vwsahfe & iTxitSnguto 


Lnlfagpd 

I TO T: 


nzed d eai m for 1BA\ . 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MILBUSOSS VB4T1MB INC 

630 Princewi l> 1 ve 
Swnyvale, CoCforT»a94£l87 USA 
f!08) 739-6572 


Huge dsownts. We can heU 

nme rmr needs. QJ Mr. hsaraxe. 

Paris SS3 2989 or 348 3000 


FoditotvC cn w wOul -Piitoftonio ft aa 


deter- ConvenbpmTrode Shovs^ress Paries 



EMPLOYMENT 


-Ik Whs 0 
• Asm A i 


RtMCHMAN. 

Sehoolj RuenT E 


Europeon Busnen 
Sch/GermoL Expe- 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Free to hovel, ; 
pcrtVfuB time nl 


YOUNG GERMAN ACTRESS, hgHy 
educated loots For ar interesting pc»- 
tkxL London 2456080. 


Dent mlie 
INTERNATIONAL 
SECRE T ARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

fa-rte HT Cliteeffiedl Setoion. 


Sptaol Events aicge Mrtarrttr* 
Sood Hosts-Hosteses^ntertcrw 
Sood Corepcnons-Tour grides, tot 


OFFICE SERVICES 


LADY ntSUNGUAL art yah xoer- 
^te^^.doys.weetentk^ 


SECRETARIES AVAILABSr 


EXPORT ASSISTANCE 

Mcrttoing inUi 


i nearby. Comraerdd area com- 
85 wns an 13,171 tqnL in dL 


b an 13,171 sqm. in □*. 
apartmerts above & 78 in 


nusZI super aMnra™ aoerve 6 ro m 
sep ar ate bocury condo - dl in Front &ne 
dong man pwi. Top mvesmentU 45% 
yddf Hurry new before next prieeriseJ 
Contact areeny d e v d opa n : 


LIQUID GOLD 

JOJOBA 


MONEY TREES ? 


or auto with expert, joint venture con- 
sidered AIM 078 27 28 Pare 


| sdered AIM 878 27 28 Pore 
MAJOR CONSTRUCTION 


212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C 10019 
Service Eepresertafives 
- NeededWoridwide. 


WORLDWIDE 
No) MOVER 
FOUR WINDS INTI 


njBtrO PUNTA PORTALS, SA 
Director Corarbd 
C/Mama 101 Porwds Nous 
Mofloroo, Spam or tix 68686 CAUU E. 


VESI Invert in one of America's mart 
mdmg teehnolodcd bredeftrough* in 

200 yean. Ueee: Lafaricctoon. aoanet- ed soorc] rtgh omud earengs reared 


mBon ei jkd World or Arab rex 
We eon finance. Abo asn mth 
m currency far USS. Co#: 361 
Zurioi. 


GENEVA 

SWflZBOAND 

FuH Servica 
is our Busutfass 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MUaiUMGUAL French/ Amertei"^ 
ten. bepenenod tooetary. In Fara. 




fadurinjt Dr, D. Yermanas, CAfamia 
Urieenity, rtotod. 'No other plant 
product m the worid a cmade of re- 


ed soon. Kgh croud e mengs aourta * iglOL 


Material aveikrtle 


SWITZERLAND 


dodng pelroleum based lubriutos". 
™dhg G eld s provide return on in- 


Geraxxi, Ardxc Sax 1778. Her al d 
Tribune, 92521 Naily Codex. Franca 


CAtL US FOR YOUR NEXT MOVE 
PALOS (3) 036 63 11 


CONTMX Coitburtan fa 300 oten 
"gr|*H* - Ar/Seo. CdT Chafe 
2B1 1881 Pore (neorOperd Con loo 


LAKE GBffiVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lowly uau rrinen to with m ugri fice n t 
view of Ld» Geneva and motrtoini. 


veetoteto in 6M ytrar. Store anowt 

returned by 6th year. Projections shew 
anud income thereafter af 23V 

taiajiriot fra as i nvirt o n told 
■■en mImm. 


charters rod specif hading dvp. 

SMaKlOtA! 

220056 France 


^ckm-London-London 

'onnaion, aomcreetfron ana man- 
bBtoisent - LK 4 offshore cooperies 

COWORATE sraVKS (UK1 LTD 
VS OW Bonds, UndoaWIX 310 
Tet 01-493 4244 
Tfra 2*347 9CSUM G 


M** I*A1B5. Ac. recognized ipe- 
odats m the reavxtment of fx and 
froavry deafer for ktfvnatignd 
bads, we ore been to receive oppS- 
aatare from experienced dedere m- 
tererted m improving their caccr by 
drtigingio^Vltefiave openingi in 


T R A N,S C4: 

sreoAUStTii'.^ 

pahs Eg;. . 

CANbB/hKE Mi? 
FRANKFURT 

BONN / COIOO* ^ . 
STUTTGART jE®. 

MUNICH ®<-‘ s 

68EMERHA.VB-J t 

NEW YORK ES- J 

HOUSTON 
LOS ANGBE5 

MONTREAL - ; 

AGENTS WORLD W 
Leave it to ut to bring* 


'm#m i 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


• International low ond taxes 

• Moffbax. tdephone ond tefst 


Europe, tackle East Far Eart and 
London from chief aeafe ro dealer , 


• Tronskjtxn and xu eton ui screen 

• Formation, don eJo hon and 
u d we ertobon of Swiss aid foreig n 


London from chief deafer to dealer , 
faveL AI oppiwtiora are treaed in 
*e rtnetert confidence. Awly to Dud- 
ley Edrawh. The Roger Pakar Or- 


F eeehe mraGfied 

teocher of En^ ah 
with rar, free to stert now. 
Ctoh 264 76 24 PARIS 


DOT/WA CONVaSK*^. • 

s imssgciz 


loto, oom 


axnporees 

FuB aonfidencs and J s crtoMn anxred 


gtnxthon, 65 London WaB, Ladav 
jzSjT^TekOrSB 25 fe Telex: I 
5811725 aUON G 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


mBtogiwn- Teh 
82209. 


^ : *fa. 

-*•« 

r . 

: V «4»J trt I 
tvnfhf 

* ** m 

■: ’■ H x-»f 

: V, 

'V 

1 a 

5 1 v or 

■ • hM 4 


[fc&ySfe* contact, AUOBA Urods. S ^ 

RESEAROL Box 1777, HerddTrtwne, "owetalilteno 6 wort e ft hp ra ureas. PANAMA LB8BA. CORPORATIONS 
raSlNeuBy Cecfec France. P? n P* ete . *W»rt_frrfti« 1 from USS40D avdafafe now. Tto 


OFFSHORE TAX SHUTERS 

From £75 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


BAHAMAS 


BAHAMAS BE51DENCE Opportunrty- 
See today*! 'Badnets Op port un hes* 


MotoravK, valors, Verfxer, Las DtoUer* 
efr, Oiofaou d*0« nev Gstaad, Ley- 
an. E x ce ll e nt O HJuUttnfflWi For 
r o r etgwe re 

Prices from SF123JQQ. 
liberal mcrtongei of 6V% irttresi. 

GUWEPIAN SJL. 

Av Man Repos 24. 

04-1006 Lausanne, Switzerland. 
Tefe (211 22 35 12. Tfe 251 85 MH1S 
wrtterted State T97D 


CAUFORNlA-5TYl£ modern brtss» Tto: M247 5CSIDN G 

rierrataunant far safe Houston, eresL * 

lent facalion n heavy traffic cna _ 

Oi Andrews & BrwH, AHn Hoate f H®5 COMPANY HAS ran* more 


BUSINESS ADVISORY 
SERVICES S JL 


Cedes. France. 


Vajr strictly confidenriaL 
■icc ccrauterian; 
8oga Grffin ILB, FjCA 
Brochae: Corporate Manqgemer 
Western House,. Yidana Sfre 


I OWOVB HEAD5 
94TB5WSE ZONK 

aw&MBtrUiSimB 


from USS400 avrddsle raw. Tto 
(0624} 20240, Telex: 628352 tSLAhC 


o apoaty t o le yesen t yaw product m i 
faxnpean caurtnes * or SfetmrifinJ 
only. Please cotoact Navapex Ca, 
P.O. Bo* 9* 1211 Gama 11. IK- 
423070. 


7 be May. 1207 GfrEVA 
Tet 35 05 Of Telex, 23342 


DMECTOR/ PUBLIC RELATIONS. Ex. 
celert writina design, edhorial dab 
•m^ed in Btgfeh t French Sad- 
yowd m odverttona, ■narfcetag de- 
»cile. Wart permri retjured. 5rod 
Cv. wrxng mroplos & refo Amwiawi 


Seek aeutoe toBfaaut totodrea 

cook - chanter maid A.dtouffw - 
aware ifhaml wdh re f eren ce s. 


Send Of fimet stdaty reqwred to: 
rtwwcB 8104 tot 


CoBege in Pare, Office rf Devfecp- 
wto, 31 Ave. Bosquet. 75007 PAHS. 




CcrorateMGragemertlhL WSH H3N MOCB. ^TodSS 

m I&«,VirtBrKjSfreto. ^ 9 U 4 g2 a “perience, frirtonr af Art eKfiyequpped 

pare 9144. Tlx RS39194AB fltaiwte. free to trowf, Hnguto. wSfe 


North Eart lanadwa-Hw p ufi t uU e 
location in the IX 
Btedem A lrhsnndm 


23303/4. 
COfMAN Q. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


for London based < 
c9 pm. Q1-22S 036 


Your Office in Germany 

we ora “At Year Service" 

• Complete office terecn at two 

• Kflyecpwped offices fix the shat 
term or tne fang term. 

• bternorionoBy trained office and 
professoral staff tf W de pre d. 


wm, 31 Ave. Boeguet. 75007 PAMS. 
♦ STAR DBDXE HOTH. Pare 8ft. 
«ws exeartve secretory with ton* 

ajgpfirwts 

SkiStfASgras; 

Cedex, France. 


ENGUSH 5PEAXMG NANNY re- 
awed May 1 for 2 bays 5 and Z 
Itxernd Monte Cafe, grad stoory & 


eonditions. 5end photo. refworcB & 
Of. to Mrs. A. Taylor. 43 Bd. del 
MoaCns. Monte Corn, Mongoo. 


Moujjm, Monte i 


FRENCH PROVINCES 



DAV0S-PLAT2 

Or t»t offer in Daws: exclusive 
apartment wbh large firing roan, fire- 
pface 6 gaflery, wood tnverod writ, w 
orod vSa amt under rfr«rtir«Jtoa 
2 becroams, one boftroonL one show'- 
or, betf location, ovtoloatoM momv 


Norft Eart Lancashire 
Dieluyinent A suxertiun 
Stephen house. D edtesdo Street, 
flunrty. 881 f IF*, finc&md, 
ft 0282 3741 1.Th:fi35537T®5ef{ 


COMPUTS PORTRAITS 


DIAMONDS 


• Can be lewdly used a your o*po- 
rate domiale tor-Germatr/terspa. 

• Your bashess o p eration con start 
enmeefioteiy. .. 


299 Madison Amu, New York, 
NYTO0E7 Tto (2I2J 697 31?? Tic 62455 



LhC Qomparxg from £75 LOM FWia 
&d! n xyr off -tea * centers, Fufi od- 
nnKtrotion, nommeo iwv icw nowerr 

ZTzisszrsS'zz.i 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


PARK. Please* purified nanny -moth, 
ers help needed fa are for pleaionr } 
nor aid or) mid new bom baby. 

btsn&xnfa-' 


AUTOS TAX B ;'. ’I 

TAKE THE PRO -- ; 

0nvwir " liw ■ 

maLe thw buk buycfl pria ' 
far your artbwM y-u* 1 . 

unaat 

■ you lake Ihe pn* ‘ 

■ we do tee wet ‘ ’ A* • 

Woridfede dgwfe* s \ 
speofieawL ;. . • ■ 

^VrSS*” 

afUWfl* .- 
Tie UK 8813271 OS®. 

MYCAR 




■* -Mtel- 
1 -t S«N| 

- 

: , M i iMhmm 


-■* 0m. 

1 ■$****? 

to 


' 


DIAMONDS 


’47808 Tbt 412713 


tm 116 jqjn. + 10 sqjti, 

terrace. Price: SFW^OOaSee far stoe 
to foreigners. 

Manages at lowr Swiss intern rotes. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 

Drtfrrfr, Om72 Weesea 
Teb CH-S 8-431 778. 

The 876062 HME CH 


CANNES CBdBI near CROGETTE, 
renovated house, 2 fevdk 150 tain. 
F14CO.OOO negotiaUe. 5tM SI 47 


BRmHlINVBfllVE GBW5 ha to- 


reian inrmiiu ww a ™ a - 1 .. ulu ,. ■ - .. . jxii 

tJOyA bum t. — :. I Joint ownership feury beach arart- 1 Ttoi 


*«y- , corT ^fe*d bonk accounts 
opered, wnfWentid tetechano, telex, 
fra & mam sernce. 

. tB^. United 


Now you con benefit by feretfirg in a 
new generehon of products which 
need mnluie tt n X to secure worid 
■markeft Take advantage of Ihevdue 
your oAr ha in UK now. L Satoer- 


Joiirt ownen h i p luxury beach apvt- 

nw» offered^- aesert tx* »1 7W 5757 ~ - EstobUwi 1928 OC0MM EXECUTIVE GMTRE Engfah, Bek 

deni dm. far J95JXX) to mam. A»oaoted Offices Waridwida. PeBiaore k B rt 62. B-2018 Aremra Gomprehmra range of steviaes ttatoanes, I 

arief, txrehi navsmoker, without - Boiprixe - TeL-p2 3 234 OR 51 - ISO brosrt Street, LoreJan Wl. owed. 6 hSi 

RISK CAHTAl faptetke & totem in »f>' *■ ^ (01 f4S9 5288 The: 261426 

*£S 2762x. 


Fax: 051 709 5757 
Awdated Offices Warthrida. 


Your best buy. 

Rn# taw* to any poet range 
<rt lowest whalerale pices 
direct from Antwerp 
center of the efiamand wortL 
Ful {pwtme. 

For free pnee fist write 
Joadm Onltfemfaei 


Idrae B urin txi S ervioee OwteH 
LaraeHow Qto Hohhtuienparit 
Jurtfesretraae 22 
^000 Frankfurt an Main 1 


Tefe 0511-590061 
Telex, 414561 


MJCUSH spatoeng execVIrye secretary 
Mlh wart penMreaxred for President 
of Anenean firm headquartered in 
BrwtoL Management quofaws re- 
reired. tagh pressure job » agreeable 
peasant penavtety a must. Comparer 
ewtenoe apfai. Send resume + tele- 

ftaisfiasfaEss 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


sa^fil^ a«ryne Wtok. London. Tit j 


YOUR LOMLON OfflCE 

CKESiAM EMCUTTVE ffilTRE 
am Comprehensv* range of smrioes 
^ 150 Iraeto Street, Lorfaan Wl. 

Odd. Teh (OlfWfM The 261436 


MIN9VF SSSfar aMCIOCAN 

?Vrr B :: b fsms in fabs: 

Wp n >. Ihrtdi or Genoa, 
wcrotq ne^ e w i ito wlpe of French re- 
quwed. Enofith rtnteond. B4rW 
ttoensts. Wrte or phone, 138 Avmm 
W oor_lftco. 751 16 fans. France. Tefe 



CAUTORJfA IMW* 

I 4866, tec 314258. * 1 

TRANSMUNB.»*! , 1\ 5 ' : 


' r *Y * 

M99#, 

• *■- .% 

u ‘ VM 


■ l y a* 


W 1 S! -,h - AW 


PAGE 4. 

form o»; 

CLASSlFltt 


: *** ** 

. : * ■~ mmm 

'■■flaws' hZ™ 

. V*/ 


Printed by gdz in Zurich (Switzerland) 




— 


\yM “ ^