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PARIS, FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1985 


>meU.S. Staff 
racuated From 
mbassy in Beirut 



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; By Fred Farris 

■ aentaiional Herald Tribune 

. SHJNGTON — The United 
has evacuated some of its 
mbassy persoond from Bei- 
^.'s a temporary measure be- 

■ of unsettled conditions in 
Beirut,” the chief White 
■; spokesman announced 

Jlay. 

spokesman, Larry Speakes, 
. 'hat the US. ambassador. 
id Bartholomew, would ro- 
il his post in Lebanon be- 
. jF the importance of "main- 
i; our presence there.” 

• •'Mr. Speakes refused to say, 
•curity reasons,’' how many 
■ ans were being evacuated or 
. [nde other details about the 
. Jem of American peraonnd. 

. concern has risen ova- con- 
ano-AmericaQ threats by 
! Moslem extremists and a re- 
■' against President AmiaGe- 
1 by some Christian miKti a- 
' iposed to Ldwmffl's refiance 
..tan diplomacy. 

: a dispatched Mqor General 
mm KhoH, President Ha r 
. :\ssad’s national secuiity ad- 
. - jd Lebanon cm Thursday as 
.- .be! militiamen expanded 
. Control in the revoh 
Temayd's 


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Jima****’ 


The Associated Press 

rHDAD — Iraqi warplanes 
^ ~d a residential area of Teb- 
: t: l.r-niursday near the home of 
- »» nian leader, Aj-atoUah Rn~ 
4 ‘•StiTT Khomoni, after Iran an- 
d that its forces had fired a 
,1 into the center of Baghdad, 
ing the 13-story Kafidain 

' • ’"Itftlgr - 

■ ' _ officials Hwiiwl the Iranian 
’ hat the bank was hit by a 
They said that an explosion 
.bank was caused by sabo- 
1*0 planted charges on the 
ninth Door. 

‘■’’ bank's four upper floats 
,<rr eared off, and the rest of the 
g was reduced to a skeleton. 
,m »s were blown out in banks, 
* "nd offices within a radius of 
vds (300 meters) of the Rafi- 
mk including the Iraqi cen- 

planes also raided tim Ira- 
o<r aes of Tabriz and Kerman- 
xording to the Iraniaanews 
■y,.. monitored in London. It 
"**». attacks on Tabriz killed 17 
*.} and wcamded 2d. 

■ 1 ' Iranian leaderdtip, mean- 
wamed Iraq against further 
’ cm reridential areas, saying 
^.»tq threatened to widen the 
ie parliament speaker, Ha- 
^tafsaryani, tdd an open ses- 
^ tbs Majhs, or paraameat, 
in would fire more missiles 
j(p industrial and economic 
tions if the raids on residen- 
■ j- as continued. 

*** e ground war, fierce fighting 
ported in southern marsh- 
f Iraq, where the Iraqis said 
anaged to stop Iranian at- 
, ' lo gain a foothold and iso- 
rerion around the provin- 
. i ;/ of Basra. An Irarijnflitaiy 
.-ait said that Iraqi fences dis- 
Iranian troops, 
s news agemy quoted an 
mitilar y tv ymmimi qn^ as 
that more than 100 Iraqi 
'Waekflledandantmspeci- 
nber were captured in swift 
i against Iracn positions c3St 
Haris River. 

foreign minister, Ali Ak- 
1" ayati, sent a message to the 
•' nations secretary-general, 

- Pixez de Cu4Har, insisting 
■- tkm be taken to stc^ Iraq 

- deployin g chemical weap» 
gainst Iranian troops m 
n sectors of the battiaront 
sdav, the Umted-Natums 

..--led to mediate a truce to end 
;. on civilian tarots, but both 
■ mthmed their raids on rit- 

■it 

e war intenafied Thursday, 
issued a statement through 

aal news agency catering to 
icfcs on dvflian targets if the 

‘ ecipiocaled. 

i is ready to stop its raids oa 
rial areas the moment the 
dtegime comes toils senses 
ikes firm commitments to 
tional Organizations that it 
: resume attacks on dries,” 

. s agency, monitored in Nic- 

i 

htaiy spokesman in Bagh- 
S the «r attacks were “oar 
■ ‘ iCm against Iranian raids on 
. ie&” He said the raid op 
. covered mainly the “city 
.<,«?* where the duct charlatan 
ini lives.” 

> jet fighters also fired cm 
missile into the Pan atnani- 
jtered di tanker Lsdy>T, 
'"wait ablaze southeast erf 
.•jSiug Island ofl^ terminal in 
^ ulf 


The Associated Press reported 
from Beirut 

[In Damascus, meanwhile. Vice 
President Abdel Halim Khaddnm 
said that Syria could not tolerate 
any action “that is directed by Isra- 
el or that serves Israeli objectives in 
Lebanon.” 

[Samir Qeagea, who led the re- 
volt, seized control of major Chris- 
tian communities north of Beirut 
on Tuesday night. Mr. Gemayd set 
up a mediation group Wednesday 
mat tried to arrange a meeting. But 
a Geagea aide said the militia 

commander told the panel that his 

ilmwrilj fnrrn mri In^ yriniF mfhi - 

ence were not n^otiable.1 
■ Edward P. pjertjian, a State De- 
partment spokesman, said the 
Dnited Stales was concerned about 
these events challe nging the au- 
thority of the Gemayd govern- 
ment Only 20 to 30 Americans are 
thought to be working at the em- 



Tbe Soviet and U.S. negoriaring feama met Ttorsday for their first 
woidng session. Frwra left are die three Soviet envoys, Alexei Obukhov, 


YuH Kritsinsky and Moscow’s chief nc 
Kampehnan, buffing the TJ.S. team, J< 


■, Viktor Karpov, and Max 
Tower and Maynard hi tman. 


territorial integrity of Lebanon,’ 
Mr. Djexqian said, “and we sup- 
port the efforts of the central gov- 
erntnent under President Gemayd 
to restore sovereignly ova- all Leb- 
anese teeftory” 

Mr. Djergian derttned to say 
where the Americans had been 
evacuated to, or whether the pull- 
oat was confined to embassy per- 
sonnel. He also would not say when 
the partial evacuation occurred. 

But he said it was decided to 
keep the embassy open because 
“we believe it’s very important that 
we mam lam our presence in Leba- 
non in view erf the continuing U.S. 
interest” 

The Washington Post reported 
Thursday that one State Depart- 
ment official said, in reference to 
the heavy toD of American lives in 
three major bontb attacks in Beirut 
in the past two years, "Ibis admin- 
istration really cannot afford to 
have another American di plomat 
or soldia killed in Lebanon.” 

Last Friday, two U.S. 
were dcploytd in the eastern 
terranean from Spain. State De- 
partment officials said there were 
no plans to use the steps to evacu- 
ate Americans from Lebanon. ■ 

■ brad Dories Excesses . 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres de- 
nies assertions that the Israeli 
Army has been guilty of excesses in 
raids on Shiite Moslem villages 
during its withdrawal from south- 
ern Lebanon, a senior Israeli offi- 
cial said Ihsrsday, according to a 
United Press International report 
from Jerusalem. 

Israeli forces said Monday that 
they killed 34 “wanted terrorists” 
in the village of Zrariyeh. 

■ British Scientist Abducted 

Three gunmen kidnapped a Brit- 
ish scientist on Thursday as be left 
his West Beirut home. Reuters re- 

Beirut, citing a British 
jkesman. The scientist 
was identified as Geoffrey Nash, 
60, a metallurgist who works for 

the Lebanese government. 


Joint Talks on Arms Are Started in Geneva Reagan Saw 

Opportunity 
In Inviting 
Gorbachev 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Peat Service 

. GENEVA — US. and Soviet 
negotiators at the Geneva arms 
mar* held their first joint working 
session Thursday and agreed on an 
eady date to spht into three groups 
to plunge into exchanges 

on strategic nndear weapons, me- 
dium-range imtiren unm atnri spa- 
ce-based systems. 

After opening statements by the 


man of the United States and 
tor P. Karpov of the Soviet Unicm, 
the two teams engaged in a “sub- 
stantive discussion of the issues in- 
volved” for neariy two hours, ac- 
cording to the acting U.S. 
spokesman, Joseph TAirum 

The rapid progress in dispensing 
with procedural matters to delve 
into the issues showed that both 
sides “were behaving in a way that 
indicates seriousness of purpose,” 
Mr. I^hman said. 

He characterized tire session, in- 


volving 22 officials from each side, 
as “businesslike" and said it took 
place in “an atmosphere of mutual 
respect” with so harsh polemics. 

As he left the U.S. mission’s 
eighth-floor conference overiook- 

The three top Soviet negotiators 
in Genera have spent years 
studying arms controL Page 2. 

ing Lake Geneva, Mr. Karpov 
* smiled and said, “That's a start 
only.” He said the two delegations 
agreed to meet again Tuesday at 
the Soviet mission. 

The fixing of a date to begin 
separate sessions in the three areas 

flf <pafy. s tra ii- gir and TTUi-rmftdlatp 

arms was welcomed by US. offi- 
cials as a favorable sign that the 
Soviet Union wanted to begin con- 
crete negotiations quickly. 

U.S. officials refused to say when 
the separate groups would meet, 
but it could happen as early as next 


week outside of the regular plenary 
sessions. 

The two delegations have adopt- 
ed a confidentiality role forbidding 
public disclosure of what occurs in 
the negotiations, but US. sources 
said the Soviet team acted as ex- 
pected in aimmg the brunt of their 
-rjfirigm at U.S. plans to develop 
space-based defenses, starting wUn 
a $26-b2Hon research program over 
the next five years. 

The Russians have entered the 
negotiations intent on stopping 
President Ronald Reagan’s plans 
for a Strategic Defense Initiative 
aimed at shielding the United 
States and its allies from Moscow's 
powerful arsenal of ballistic mis- 
siles. 

Moscow reyntrnds the militariza- 
tion of space would provoke a de- 
stabilizing spiral in tne arms race, 
ft also contends that U.S. efforts to 
establish protection against Soviet 
missiles will violate the Anti-Ballis- 
tic Misale Treaty of 1972. 


The U.S. contests such argu- 
rint pKng nfSn^rt^ miBrilR w arTiwirk 

since 1972, while U.S. totals have 
doubled, and the construction of a 
huge radar system at Krasnoyarsk 
also jeopardize the status of the 
treaty. 

Washington also claims that re- 
search could never be properly con- 
trolled and that the Soviet Union is 
already proceeding with a space 
research program of its own. U.S. 
-iffiriak said the Russians recently 
■‘ffluminaied” nne of their sateDitca 
with lasers. 

“The erosion of the ABM treaty 
is an important issue for us,” said 
Mr. T-ehman - “We need to put 
starch back into the ABM treaty.” 

- Mr. Lehman said treaty compli- 
ance and the need to establish hel- 
ler methods of de termining adher- 
ence to the terms of aims control 

(Continued on Page 2, Col 8) 


Mastectomies Are Often Unnecessary, Study Says 


by survival five years after the dis- 
ease is detected. • - - — ? 

The fimfingt rar tiimr a tread 
away from what Dr. Fisher called 
tie “mutilating, debilitating Hal- 
sted radical mastectomy ” a widely 
used procedure in which a woman’s 


what happens to patients in the 
periodrbeyond five years. 

The institute’s director, Dr. Vin- 
cent T. DeVUa Jr., said candidates 
for lumpectomy, followed by radia- 
tion, might include about half of 
those women who discover they 


By Cristinc Russell 

- Workington Pcat Senux 

WASHINGTON — A major 
U.S. study of breast-cancer treat- 
mmt suggests that for many wom- 
en surgical removal of a malignant 
lump followed by radiation may be 
as effective as removal of the entire 
breast 

tioSi The study finds that half of all women who find 

tutioos around the United States, . . , . ,,, 

found that the less-disfiguring sur- they have breast cancer each year could he 

alternative tnCreS 1 for candidates for the least disfiguring surgery, 
most patients with small tumors • 

that woe detected early, Dr. Ber- 

nard Fisher said Wednesday. 

The study, the most thorough of 
its kind, provides the most defini- 
tive evidence yet that the “lumpec- 
tomy” or “segmental mastectomy,” 
the least disfiguring type of sur- 
gery, may be as effective as more 
extensive surgery when measured 


breast and surrounding nrasde and 
tissues are removed, to less radical 
surgery such as total mastectomy, 
in which the breast text not the 
surrounding muscle is removed. 

■ But many surgeons and critics 
say more follow-up is needed to see 


have breast cancer each year. The 
treatment is most appropriate, he 
said, for three in whom the tumor 
is smaller than 114 inches (four cen- 
timeters) in diameter. In the United 
States, about 1 19,000 women a year 
discover they have breast cancer. 


In Colombia, a Stalemate in the 'War’ on Drugs 


By Jackson Diehl 

Warhsnpan Pen Service 

BOGOTA — Carlos Lehder 
Rivas, an accused narcotics traf- 
ficker, sat comfortably on a 
wooden chair in a jungle dealing, 
brushing his shoulder-length hay 
away from his face for the televi- 
sion cameraman. In the back- 
ground, a guard in fatigues paced 
with an automatic rifle: 

“Cocaine and marijuana,” Mr. 
T ^ihdar declared in a nationally 
televised interview, “have be- 
come an arm of struggle against 
American imperialism. We have 
the same responsibility in this — 
he who takas up a rifle, he who 
plants coca, he who goes to the 
public plaza and denounces im- 
perialism.” 

The audacity of the fugitive’s 
clandestine meeting with a Span- 
ish film crew and the subsequent 
televising of it here were signs of 
the trouble facing the Colombian 
and U.S. authorities in their cam- 
paign against Colombia’s drug 
traffic. 

Nine months after declaring a 
“war without quarter” to break 
up the muitilmHoii-doUar em- 
pires of cocaine traffickers, Presi- 
dent Befisario Bctancur re main s 
in a stalemate with adversaries 
whose power sometimes seems to 
rival his own. 

“It reminds me of Nazi Germa- 
ny in the 1930s, when crimin a l 
dements- took over,” said Lews 
A. Tambs, the U.S. ambassador. 

Since last May, when Mr. Be- 
fnnwir responded to the assassi- 
nation of the justice minister, Ro- 
drigo Lara Bonilla, by dedaring a 
stare of siege, the heads erf the 
trafficking organizations have 
been driven to hideouts in the 
jungle or abroad. Arrests of nar- 
cotics suspects have nearly tri- 
pled and seizures of cocaine 
lumped from 2.7 short tons (2.4 
metric tons) in 1983 to 233 tons 

^Nevertheless, Colombia re- 




Preskfent Befisario Betancur, left, and the car in winch 
Justice Minister Rodrigo lara Bonilla was assassinated. 


t of 


mains a country satu ra ted by 
drugs and their accompanying 
corruption. Most of South Amer- 
ica's cocaine continues to be pro- 
by Colombian groups and 
through the country on its 

way to Europe and the United added. “Lara Bom 
States, nfffcfok say. Foflowiiig a ed by the people.” 
bumper crop of coca leaves in the Mr, Bctancur and Mr. Tambs 

growin g regions of Pern and Bo- also have been targets. A bomb 


“We have passed the 
no retain," Mr. Lehder i 
in his television appearance. 

“Lara Bonilla, Tambs and Be- 
tancur muted to conspire against 
die interests of this country,” he 
added. “Lara Bonilla was erecut- 


Irvia, a recent UJ>. State Depart- 
ment report said. the internation- 
al market is flooded. 

The read of the Colombian 

traffickers remains astounding. 
Last month, mm than 125 tons 
of cocaine was discovered in Mi- 
anti aboard a jet of the Colombi- 
an national arriine, Avianca. In 
December, a Colombian diplo- 
mat in Strain and functionaries of 

the prudential palace in Bogotk 
were arrested in connection with 
an attempt to smuggle cocaine in 
a diplomatic valise. 

Perhaps most seriously, the ac- 
cused leaders erf the Colom bi an 
drug trade have eluded the 
emmenfs dragnets, 
new hideouts in the jungles and 
mounted an increasingly violent 
campaign to defend their inter- 
ests. - 


reportedly was discovered on a 
train that Mr. Betancur was to 
take on a trip in the Colombian 
interior last month. Mr. Tambs, a 
high-profile advocate of anti- 


his family in December because 
of threats against bis He. He re- 
turned briefly last month only to 
formally leave iris post 
After acar bomb exploded out- 
ride d» U.S. Embassy in BogotA 
in November, about 17 potent of 
the embassy peraonnd were evac- 
uated from the country along 
with them families, Mr. Tambs 
said. 

In telephone cads and letters, 
pre sum ed Colombian traffickers 
repeatedly have promised to kiH 
Americans in retaliation for the 
extradition of seven 
i.drotg suspects to the 


United States. The threat, Mr. 
Tambs said, *Ts very reaL” 

C olomb ian officials and en- 
forcement officials say the esca- 
lating vidOKe is at least in part a 
sign erf progress. “It’s no secret 
that the retaliation Jevd has in- 
creased.” said one. “But that’s 
because we’re hurting them.” 

Government officials contend 
that the crackdown, HiHnftnig 
sweeps by the army and confisca- 
tion of suspected traffickers’ 
property, has dimmated the huge 
industrial complexes that once 
processed cocaine in ranote rural 
and jungle areas. They ay that 
traffickers have been forced to 
return to mobile, small-scale pro- 
cessing operations, to divert snip- 
meats erf cocaine through other 
South American countries and to 
spaid most, of their time abroad 
or in hiding. 

Tolerated and even admired \n 
many Colombians, accused traf- 
fickers such as Mr. Lehder and 
Pablo Escobar Gavaria had lived 
cm huge private estates, dabbled 
with soccer teams or other com- 


(Gxtffcseed on Page 3, Col 1) 


Dr. DeVita estimated that only 
about T5 percent of U.S. breast 
cancer patients today were getting 
lumpectomies or other surgery that 
spares the breast. While he predict- 
ed that the new study would mean 
pressure for the surgery’s more- 
widespread use, he said its accep- 
tance might be limited by the num- 
ber of trained radiation therapists 
in some areas and the emotional 
concerns of some women who 
might feel more comfortable with 
the traditional therapy. 

“What we've done hoe for the 
Gist time is provide firm data, so 
that a woman now has information 
at ber fingertips to make a deri- 
sion,” said Dr. Fisher, a Umveraity 
of Pittsburgh cancer expat who led 
the lumpectomy study. 

Its findings, and that of a 10-year 
follow-op of an earlier study in 
which total mastectomy was found 
as effective as the radical mastecto- 
my, were reported in the current 
issue of the New England Journal 
of Medicine. 

An editorial in the journal said 
that the 10-year study continued to 
show that the less radical surgery 
was as good as the more radical 
Halsted. It called the Dew conclu- 
sions about the lumpectomy “en- 
couraging” but cautioned that “it 
remains to be seen whether the 
same will be true" after 10 years. 

“An historic surgical debate may 
be nearing resolution, but conclu- 
sions for the present must remain, 
tentative,” said Dr. C. Barber 
Mudler, of die Canadian McMas- 
ter University Medical Center. 

The new lumpectomy study in- 
volved 1,843 patients in the United 
States and Canada with eariy-stage 
breast cancers who woe assigned 
randomly to one of three treatment 
groups and followed for an average 
of 39 mouths. In the lumpectomies, 
doctors removed the cancerous 
lump and a rim of normal tissue; if 
the surrounding contained 

can cer cells, the woman then re- 
ceived a mastectomy. 

From this date, the researche r s 
concluded that at the five-year 
print, treatment by lumpectomy, 
with or without radiation, resulted 
in r ec ur r e nce and survival rates 
that were “no worse" than total 
breast removal, but that the addi- 
tion of radiation treatment showed 
arid«>d benefits. 

Overall projected five-year sur- 
vival was statistically about the 
same for the three groups, ranging 
frtm 76 to 85 percent. 

The researchers also found that 
lump removal followed by radia- 
tion 

currence 

breast, showing that among 
vors at five years, 28 percent of 
those not given radiation had re- 
currences compared with 8 percent 
of those with radiation. 

Medical experts said that the 
study provided no new evidence 
that overall breast cancer survival 
was improving. Some critics say 
that breast cancer mortality rates 
have remained steady for 25 years, 
but gov ernme nt cancer experts say 
that a slight improvement in sur- 
vival has been offset by increasing 
breast-cancer cases. 


By Bernard Weinraub 

Hen York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — At a 9:30 
AM. meeting in the Oval Office on 
Monday, President Ronald Reagan 
conveyed two thoughts to his se- 
nior aides about his administra- 
tion’s relations with the new Soviet 
leadership. 

The first was that he was reluc- 
tant to fly to Moscow for the funer- 
al of Konstantin U. Chernenko, the 
Soviet leader who died on Sunday 
night, partly because of his sched- 
ule and partly because he was un- 
easy that a quick trip to the Soviet 
Union would be conrtnied, accord- 
ing to an aide, as “grandstanding” 
and “gimmicky.” 

The second opinion expressed by 
Mr. Reagan, according to a White 
House official was that he “wanted 
something other than a bland let- 
ter" to be presented from him to 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the new So- 
viet leader. 

Aides said Mr. Reagan has been 
intrigued by Mr. Gorbachev since 
December, when Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher of Britain told 
him at a meeting at Camp David, 
Maryland, hew impressed she had 
been with the Soviet official when 
be visited London that month. 

“In the Monday morning meet- 
ing the strategy developed to send a 
personal letter to Gorbachev to 
cover our desire for an improve- 
ment in relations, our assessment 
of the progress made to date and an 
outreach m the form of an invita- 
tion to Gorbachev to come to 
Washington for a visit when he was 
ready,” a White House official said. 

The invitation itself was present- 
ed Wednesday in Moscow to Mir. 
Gorbachev by Vice President 
George Bush, the head of the U-S. 
delegation to the funeral 

Although the shape of the invita- 
tion was discussed at the 30-minute 
White House meeting Monday, the 
details were constructed in nrid- 
aftemoon in an Oval Office session 
between Mr. Reagan, Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz and toe 
White House national security ad- 
riser, Robert C. McFariane. 

Mr. Reagan told aides be had a 
strong preference for a meeting in 
the United States, partly because 
talks between U.S. and Soviet lead- 
ers have taken place abroad in the 
past 10 years. According to aides, 
Mr. Reagan is also convinced that 
if Mr. Gorbathev visits toe United 

(Contmoedon Page 2, Col. 3) 


ussian 
Impresses 
Visitors 

Western Leaders 
Say Gorbachev 
Is in Command 


By Serb Mydans 

Nev York Tunes Service 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev plunged into his new role 
Thursday, meeting a series of for- 
eign leaders, sometimes at half- 
hour intervals, and impressing 
them with his knowledge and air of 
command. 

The day after his predecessor, 
Konstantin U. Chernenko, was 
buried, toe new Soviet leader held a 

The Chernenko funeral was a 
strange mixture of czarist past 
and military spectacle. Page 2. . 

score of meetings with world lead- 
ers who came for the funeraL 

U.S.-Soviet relations and the Ge- 
neva arms rafts were at the top of 
the agenda in his discussions with 
Western leaders. In a meeting with 
a delegation, Mr. Gorba- 

chev pressed for a raising of the 
level of contacts between the two 
Communist nations 

“Here is a man who is very much 
in control and very knowledge- 
able," said Prime Minister Brian 
Mulroney of Canada. 

President Francois Mitterrand 
of France, who was one of nine 
leaders who met Mr. Gorbachev’ on 
Wednesday, said, “This is a calm, 
relaxed man who appears to be 
willing to take on problems firm- 
ly” 

“In a word,” said Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of West Germany, 
“there is a man sitting there now as 
general secretary, who knows it, 
and who expressed his opinions 
with- a sovereignty and a notable 
mastoy of matenal in the most 
differing areas." 

Some of his visitors, while prais- 
ing Mr. Gorbachev’s energy, prag- 
matism and directness, cautioned 
that this shift in style from that of 
his older predecessors did not nec- 
essarily nwan that changes in sub- ' 
stance would follow. 

Analysts here believe that for- 
eign policy remains under the guid- 
ance erf Foreign Minister Andrea A 
Gromyko, who sat in on Mr. Gor- 
bachev’s meetings on Thursday, 
and that no radical changes in di- 
rection can be expected. 

On Wednesday night. Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush came away after 
his talks with Mr. Gorbachev say- 
ing that he believed “we can move 
forward with progress." 

Tass said that Mr. Gorbachev, in 
the meeting with Mr. Bush, af- 
firmed Soviet readiness “to work in 
practice" to improve relations with 
toe United States. The Soviet press 
agency said that Mr. Gorbachev 
bad noted the importance of rela- 
tions with the United States and 
had “reiteraied the Soviet Union’s 
readiness to work in practice to 
improve them, provided the United 
States side was also ready." 

At the same time. Tass said, “It 
was stressed anew that toe U.S.S.R. 
would never forsake its legitimate 
security interests or the interests of 
its allies.” 

Mr. Bush spoke about toe meet- 
ing at a news conference at the 
residence of Ambassador Arthur 
AHartnum. 

The rice president said that Sec- 
retary of State George P. Shultz 
anti Foreign Minister Andrei A 
Gromyko had also taken pan in the 
discussion. 

[Mr. Shultz, making a surprise 
stopover in Iceland, held talks 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


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Top Soviet Negotiators 
Are Arms-Talk Veterans 


Conservative, Businesslike Approach 
ExpectedFrom Russians in Geneva 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Though they are 
fairly young compared to many So- 
viet officials, the' three men in Ge- 
neva to bead the Kremlin’s negoti- 
ating team have a deep background 
in U.S.-Soviet talks and an inornate 
knowledge of the nuts and bolts of 

arms control. 

“The U.S.S.R- delegation has 
been instructed by the Soviet lead- 
endup to negotiate in a businesslike 
and constructive manner seeking 
effective solutions,” the delegation 
leader, Viktor P. Karpov, said in an 
arrival statement. 

Unlike the U.S. side, Moscow 
has turned, as it usually does, to 
professional negotiators "who speak 
the lang ua g e of their opposite mim- 
bers and have dedicated the recent 
years of their careers to arms con- 
trol. 

Although Moscow insists that 
the talks are entirely new and are 
not a resumption of the negotia- 
tions on strategic and medium- 
range weapons that were broken 
off at the end of 1983, two of the 
three team leaders were the chief 
negotiators at those talks. 

Mr. Karpov, 56, who has more 
experience m nuclear arms than all 
three American negotiators, led the 
Soviet side at the 1982-83 strategic 
arms reduction talks in Geneva, 


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called the START talks. An arms 
negotiator since 1969, he will lead 
the Soviet group negotiating strate- 
gic weapons. 

YuE A. Kvitsinsky, 48, who win 
head the talks on space weapons, 
led the Soviet ride from 1981 to 
1983 in the Geneva talks on inter- 
mediate-range missfles. He was be- 
lieved to have fallen bom grace 
with his superiors after his 1982 
“walk in the woods,” an attempt at 
personal diplomacy with the Amer- 
ican ride. 

The third of the delegation lead- 
ers, Alexei A. Obukhov, 47, is lead- 
ing a Soviet delegation for the first 
time as he heads the team negotiat- 
ing intermediate-range weapons. 
But he has mare than a decade of 

ria yy in arms talks and was 

'’s deputy at the strate- 


gic aims reduction taTky 

Like Soviet negotiators at past 
arms talire , thgsg men can be ex- 
pected to take a conservative, busi- 
nesslike approach, sticking dosdy 
lo their instructions from Moscow. 

In contrast to a more “free- 
wheeling” American approach, Jo- 
seph G. Whelan of the Library of 
Congress wrote in an analysis of 
past Soviet negotiations that “the 
Soviet negotiator, molded by dif- 
ferent values, conditioned by a 
spirit of collectivism and fearful of 
self-initiative, operated directly, 
and safely, under strict orders born 
a superior.” 

A main task of the current team, 
under the coordination of Mr. Kar- 
pov, will be to keep the pressure cm 
W ashington to modify its plans to 
develop space weapons. 

To this end, the Soviet ride intro- 
duced an ambiguous formulation 
into the agreement in January be- 
tween Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz and Foreign Minister An- 
drei A. Gromyko. 

According to this formulation in 
their agreement to proceed with 
talks, the three topics under discus- 
sion, strategic nuclear weapons, 
medium-range nudear weapons 
and space weapons, wQl be ^con- 
sidered and resolved in their inter- 
relationship.” 

It is a phrase Mr. faipov made a 
point of repeating in Ins arrival 
statement Sunday. 

U.S. diplomats in Moscow say 
they find the phrase imprecise and 
•unclear. The Russians say it is quite 
clean No agreement in any of the 
three areas will be possible until 
agreement is readied in all three 
areas; a demand, in effect, for pro- 
gress in halting the development of 
space weapons. 

Mr. Karpov has long experience 
in carrying out the directives of his 
Moscow superiors. He took part in 
the negotiations that led to the 
1972 strategic aims limitation trea- 
ty, and in 1978 was named to head 
the final stage of talks that pro- 
duced the 1979 accord. 

His opposite numbers at these 
negotiations have found ham a 
hart-nosed professional: “tough,” 
in the words of one, “all meat and 
potatoes.” He has been described 
as a skilled negotiator, urbane, wit- 
ty, weB-versea in aims control and 
fluent in English. 

On the job, he is said to be some- 
thing of a workaholic, but in his 
off-hours, he is stud to have a taste 
fori 



EC Deputies 
Call for Rise 
La Guarantees 
For Farmers 


WORLD BRIEFS 


•«#** Wf 


Ethiopia Denies Forced Resetdemei 


Mr. Gorbachev, right, with Andrei A. Gromyko, center, and Prime Minister Tikhonov. 


Touches of Czarist Past at Funeral 

Rite Mixes 18th-Century Gilt With Military Spectacle 


Return 

STRASBOURG, France — The 
European Parliament called Thurs- 
day for a 3.5-percem average in- 
crease in guaranteed farm prices 
next season, rejecting a European 
Commission plan fora virtual price 
freeze. 

The Parliament voted by a nar- 
row majority fora Christian Demo- 
cratic group proposal after the as- 
sembly’s agriculture committee 
spnkyyman said that it was an ac- 
ceptable compromise to the panel's 
demand for a 4,5-percent rise. 

The amendment said that the av- 
erage increase should be 3.5 per- 
cent, with the biggest increase go- 
ing to crops in short supply. 

The Parliament’s vote is only ad- 
visory, but a dear message from its 
members could influence EC farm 
ministers who on March 25 resume 
efforts to fix guaranteed farm 
prices for the marketing year begin- 
ning in April 

Par liam ent dismissed the EC 
Commission’s price-freeze propos- 
als as provocative to farmers, say- 
ing the cuts would reduce rural in- 
comes by from 4 to 6 percent It 
also said national governments 
mi gh t dedde to take back the role 


ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (Reuters) —An Ethiopian minister do 
Thursday Western allegations that force has been widely used in rr 
tl ipg famine victims, but acknowledged that some, people might 1 

been hurt by “overaeatous” official* 

The labor and social affairs minister, Bcrhanu Bayefa, one of the 
senior members of Ethiopia's ruling Politburo, said that the gcwetun 
had issued guidelines on now to cany out the plan to resettle 1.5 nrij 
of the estimated 8 million drought victims. He emphiwi^ that e 
person moved had to be a volunteer. 

Famine refugees migh t have been hurt when discipline was color 
but this did not amount to forcing people to move, be stud. “Such en 
such overzealous activity, could happen and do happen. But the pan. 
is not and cannot be to force them to be rchabiEtalcd,” he said. War , 
aid officials, who asked they not be identified, said the resettlement ■ 
been enforced with violence and by the wi thh o lding of food. 


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Basque Lawmakers Deplore Vialenc 


VITORIA. Spain (AP) — The Basque 

unanimo usly Thursday to approve a start ^ 

“ as the first such vote since the partoiKQt 


a statement 


Vt 

Pofi 


wsly 

violence and terrorism. It was 
created in 1980. 

The vote, in a special session of the 75-member body, was 62 inti 
Thirteen deputies did not attend the session; of these, 11 ait depuft 
Herri Batasuna, the de facto political arm of the Basque gna 
organization ETA, who have never taken their seats. The statement ! 
out any negotiation with ETA. which stands for Basque Homeland 
Liberty in tine Basque language. 

The action came 24 hours after the Basque autonomous governs 
one of 17 in Spain, called on the more than two million inhabitants o 
region to fight a gains t violence. 


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... f-m 


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Oh 


in farm aid now played by the ECs 
ltural policy. 


By "Warren 

Netv York Times 

MOSCOW — Hours before Wednesdays funeral 
for Konstantin U. Chernenko, government security 
men took up positions in the front rooms of a historic 
hotel on a comer of Gorki Street overlooking the path 
the cortege would follow to Red Square. 

The agents found themselves in frescoed smtes with 
grand pianos, cut-glass chandeliers and minors in 
gilded migree frames. 

As they moved to their surveillance posts by the 
windows, they passed century -old inlaid furniture 
pieces and china lamp stands of lords and ladies 
dancing the minneL Looking down from the lofty 


fore him, and during the rest of the service he ap- 
’ rather startlingly informal, looking around 


dy and whispering with Politburo members 
him by the graveside. 


ceiling s were cupids bearing garlands and birds of 
paradise painted by Impressionists. 

This brief encounter of the grim apparatus of the 
Soviet state with the bent for flourish -m Russia’s past 
was emblematic of Wednesdays rite of transition. 

It was a ceremony that began with the body of the 
Soviet leader lying m state in an 18th-century palace 
built far the Club of the Nobility, and ended with the 
new leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, greeting heads of 
state and other visiting dignitaries in a grand Kremlin 
hall dedicated to the victories of czarist armies. 

It all took place at a distance from the mammoth 
Gothic structures of the Stahn era that gave full 
dimension to the spirit of gigantism in Soviet architec- 
ture and even farther from the graceless prefabricated 
buddings that encircle the city in ever-increasing 
ranks. 

The Moscow of these pageants is the old rare city 
with its buddings of pastel hues and white trim that, 
with the season's continual dustings of mow, appear 
to be the work of confectioners. 

The day dawned an unmistakably Russian gray 
with no suggestion of sun in the eastern sky. Dump 
trucks carrying loads of snow down to the Moscow 
River vied for passage in the eady morning streets 
with, snow plows clearing the night's fad from major 
avenues ana troop transports bringing soldiers in tram 
their barracks. 

There were thousands of soldiers taking part 
Wednesday, and they were nnnristakahly Russian with 
their high boots, weighty greatcoats and gray karakul 
astrakhan hats with the Soviet Army star panned on 
the front 

In the midst of the spectacle, Mr. Gorbachev cut a 
single figure. He delivered his funeral speech with no 
effort to match oratoricady the sweeping display be- 


fl a Wiring 

The afternoon’s reception gave him his first contact 
with worid leaders since becoming one himself Mon- 
day. He appeared distinctly more comfortable and 
concentrated now that attention was trained solely cm 

him 

He stood at the head of a receiving fine that also 
included Prime Minister Nikolai A. Tikhonov, For- 
eign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko and the acting head 
ofstate, Vasily V. Kuznetsov. 

The new leader was dressed in a dark bine suit and 
dark blue tie with broad stripes of lighter bine across 
it l ike many of those who had just come in from the 
outdoor funeral, he wore crcpe-solcd boots. 

Mr. Gorbachev, a baldish man, bears a prominent 
purple birthmark beginning at the top of his forehead 
and extending midway bade across the top of ins head. 
Seeing it has oome as something of a surprise for many 
people, since it is not present in the official portrait of 
Mr. Gorbachev that circulates here and appears in 
Soviet publications. 

For an hour he shook hands and chatted with the 
guests as they filed by. Mr. Gorbachev talked with 
parti cular animatio n to P rime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher and the members of the British delegation. 

Others who chose to extend the handshake into a 
brief conversation were Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
of Tnrfia, Imelda R. Marcos, the first lady of the 
Phflhrotnes, Yasser Arafat, the chairman of the Pales- 
tion Organization, Prime Minister Yasu- 


common agricultural pol 

The farm commissioner, Frans 
Andriessen, has appealed to parlia- 
mentarians not to heed the agricul- 
ture committee's plan, which he 
said ooukl add as much as 2L5 bil- 
lion European Currency Units 
(S1.66 billion) to budgetary costs in 
1985 and 1986. 

Farm costs already account for 
two-thirds of the finances of the 
EC The 10-nation community is 
without a 1985 budget following 
Parliament's rejection in December 
erf a 26-billion ECU draft that it 
*aiH was inadequate to meet all 
sp ending conumtmenis- 

Mr. Andriessen stressed the need 


New Central American Peace Plan S. m in»* ’> t >'* 

BRASILIA (AP) — A new Central American peace initiative 1 * ?"«■ 

drawn up and talks for a regional settlement could be renewed 1 
of the mouth. Foreign Minister Carlos Jest GutiArrez of Costa 
here Thursday. . . . „„ . _j 

He ynd be and the foreign ministers of Honduras and El Salvadoi ■ • 
last week in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, to draft the agreement Mr. Gt : 
rez s aid the plan contained more detailed provisions about “super? . * 
and control” than the stalled plan backed by the Contadora group, i . 
comprises Colombia, Venezuela, Mexico and Pa n a ma . 


Item 


to discourage overproduction, di- 

Ins stocks su 


tme 


him Nakasane of Japan, President Francois Mitter- 
rand of France, Prime Minister Brian Mahoney of 
Canada and Vice President George Bush of the United 
States. 

Mr. Gorbachev showed a command of the moment 
and a sense erf energy that many onlookers remarked 
had been noticeably missing at the last funeral of a 
leader 13 months ago. when Mr. Chernenko was the 
host. 

Tie’s very alert, he’s keen, he’s eager,” said Armand 
Hammer, the chairman of the Occidental Petroleum 
Carp., whose dose associations with Soviet officials 
over the years have made him something of an institu- 
tion here. 

The 86-year-old industrialist said Mr. Gorbachev 
was the seventh Soviet chief he had known in a 
sequence that began with Lenin. 


such as more 
than 800,000 tons (727,000 metric 
tans) of butter and 600,000 tons of 
milk powder. 

Mr. Andriessen 's tough line has 
been endorsed by the parliament's 
budgets committee. 

But Pierre-Bctqamin Pranchere 
erf France, a spokesman for the 
agriculture committee, has called 
instead for price increases campled 
with a more aggressive farm-export 
policy linked to import controls. 

James Elies of Britain, a spokes- 
man for the budget committee, has 
dismissed Mr. Pranchere’s recom- 
mendations as unrealistic and said 
that they would invite retaliation 
from the United States. 

Parliamentarians are split, into 
various camps on the farm-price 
issue, with Christian Democrats of- 
ficially seeking an average 3.5-per- 
cent increase, Liberals favoring a 
25-percent increase and the Social- 
ists giving no figure but stressing 
the need for structural aids to help 
poorer farmers. 

In Brussels, meanwhile, me Eu- 
ropean Commission called upon 
EC nations Thursday to bade plans 
for a new round of multilateral 
trade talks with General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade nations. 


T emp orary Artificial Heart Approve ■ ; 

HERSHEY, Pennsylvania (AP) — A doctor at the HcrsheyMC 
Center here received federal approval Thursday to use an 
artificial heart he helped develop to keep patients alive until a donor. * 
can be found. • 

Dr. William S. Pierce received the authonzatioa from the US.; 
and Drug A dminis tration, a week after doctors in Tucson, Azj 
impiantfS an anamho rized artificial heart to keep a man alive uc 
could receive a transplant of a human heart. The patient later dier' 
The derice developed by Dr. Pierce is similar to the perm"/ 
mechanical pumps- keeping two men alive in a hospital in Lorn 
Kentucky. Hospital officials there said Thursday that one of the-' .. 
W illiam j. Schroedcr, would not be permitted to attend his son’s wb ' 
this weekend because the 90-mile ( 1 30-kUotneter) trip to Jasper, Im 
might endanger his health. 



Mark 


Mexico Holds 4 in Agent’s Kidnappi 

GUADALAJARA, Mexico (UPI) — Authorities have detainer ; 
law enforcement officers as suspects in the Feb. 7 kidnapping of i - 
Drug Enforcement Administration agent who was found dead last 
an official in the attorney general's office said Thursday. - 

The, announcement came amid charges by the United States that ' 
Mexican authorities were obstructing the investigation of the k 
Policefound the bodies of the agent, Enrique Camarena Salazar, nt 
a Mcxkan-bom UJ3. citizen, and his Mexican pilot, Alfredo 1~ 
A velar, on March 6. p: 

The attorney general’s office said Wednesday that time poKcr„ 
manders, four state police agents and five federal judicial ponce or- 
had been detained, along with about 20 ovflians. ““We believe that,, 
the four state agents had some participation in the kidnapping i n- 
official said Thursday. 


FortheRecord 

The Argentine Senate, after two days of debate, ratified the l- ’’ 
Canal treaty with Chile by a 23-22 vote Thursday, giving Preskto :::■■■• 
Alfonsin bis most important legislative triumph since he caroew of}-; - ... 
months ago. The treaty had already been approved by the Cham-- 
Deputies. 5. 

A UJS. Army heficopter crashed and burned Wednesday at Fort 1 - 
North Carolina, killing all 12 soldiers aboard. Authorities »“ • 
accident happened during, a routine exercise when the craft, a L*- : 
Blackhawfc nosedived. 

France sort 60 poBcemen to Goadekmpe on Thursday to l 
security after a bomb attack in Pointe-k-Pitre restaurant owned 
official of a rightist group killed one person and injured 11. N-H/Uu 
c laime d responsibility for tne bombing on the Caribbean overseas d 
meat of France. 


: Kvitsinsky is considered a 


specialist on Germany, having 
served in the Soviet Embassy in 
East Berlin in the early 1960s and 
in Bonn from 1978 to 1981. In 1979 


Reagan Saw Opportunity in Inviting Gorbachev 


he played an important back-stage 
role at the four-power talks over 
West Berlin. As a relatively junior 
diplomat, he is said to have served 
as a channel between Western ne- 
gotiators and the Moscow leader- 
ship. 

During the talks on intermedi- 
ate-range weapons, he developed a 
close relationship with the chief 
UJ5. negotiator, Paul H. Nitze, 
which led to their walk in Geneva’s 
botanical gardens, across from the 
American Embassy, on July 16, 
1982. The two men worked out a 
private compromise on European 
missile deployment that was reject- 
ed by born their governments. 

Though he is believed to be a 
protege of Mr. Gromyko, Mr. Krit- 
sinsky's star was said to have fallen 
after that exercise in private initia- 
tive. 

Mr. Obukhov, the most junior of 
the three team leaders, has experi- 
ence in nudear arms negotiations 
from the talks on both the first and 
second strategic arms limitation 
treaties and from the 1982-83 stra- 
tegic arms reduction talks in Gene- 
va, where he worked closely with 
Mr. Karpov. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
States, the Soviet leader will be 
highly impressed. 

“The president has a deeply bdd 
conviction that the Soviet leaders 
don’t understand the U.S. and are 
fearful erf us,” a White House offi- 
cial said. “He believes that more 
opportunity to meet with Ameri- 
cans, including the president, 
would help dissipate some of this 
concern the Soviets have over per- 
ceived American hostility.” 

At the Monday morning meet- 
ing, according to White House 
aides, Mr. McFarlane laid out the 
arguments for and against attend- 
ing the funeral and there was dis- 
cussion among the participants, in- 
cluding Mr. Shultz; Donald T. 
Regan, the chief of staff, and Mi- 
chael K. Deaver. the deputy chief 
of staff and a long-time aide to Mr. 
Reagan. 

Mr. Reagan has traditionally op- 
posed quick, symbolic meetings 
with his Soviet counterpart, mak- 
ing it plain that he prefers a fixed 
agenda with prospects for success. 
Kit the selection of Mr. Gorba- 
chev, 54, and the emergence of a 


new generation of Soviet leados, 
stirred some debate about whether, 
as an aide said, “a symbolic ges- 
ture,” such as a Reagan visit, was 
necessary. 

Although there was a report that 
Mr. McFarlane urged Mr. Reagan 
to go to Moscow, White House 
officials say the national security 
adviser only “laid out the options, 
discussed the pros and cons.” Mr. 
McFarlane said through an aide: 
“The president's derision-making 
is off- limi ts. The president made 
the right decision and advice to hnn 


from aides is a privileged matter.” 

Mr. Reagan conveyed his deri- 
sion to Ms aides about halfway 
through the Monday morning 
meeting, and the group then dis- 
cussed who should represent the 
United States. It was quickly decid- 
ed that Mr. Bush, who was in Gene- 
va after a visit to African nations 
affected by drought, would lead the 
ition. He was joined by Mr. 
itz, who carried the letter that 
was presented to Mr. Gorbachev 


on 


Finally, the White House group 


turned to the details of the message 
to the Soviet leader, and it was 
decided to invite Mr. Gorbachev to 
the United States. “With this new 
leader,” said a White House offi- 
cial, “the president wanted to get 
off on the right foot” 

The possible meeting was dis- 
cussed Wednesday by Mr. Reagan 
and Henry A. Kissinger, the former 
secretary of state, at a White House 
lunch. Mr. Kissinger said he agreed 
with Mr. Reagan that a get- ac- 
quainted session was not the an- 
swer. 


Absence of Castro 
Surprises die US 


New York Tunes Service 
WASHINGTON — The 
Reagan administration was sur- 
prised by Fidel Castro’s deri- 
sion not to attend the funeral of 
Konstantin U. Chernenko. 

It saw this as evidence of fric- 
tion between Havana and Mos- 
cow and of a periodic urge by 
the Cuban leader to show inde- 
pendence. U5. officials said 
they saw Mr. Castro's absence 
as a sign of displeasure with the 
terms of Soviet economic rid. 


U.S., Soviet 1 ^ 


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On Nortl 


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LUC JUUU UUL U1C ______ 

Westerners See Gorbachev as Being in Command 



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(Continued from Page 1) 

Thursday with Iceland's 
meat leaders following a 
between Washington and Iceland, 
Reuters reported from Reykjavik. 

[Icelandic officials said that Mr. 
Shultz's via t was arranged on short 
notice after the United States sad 
he wanted a rest stop on his 
home from Moscow. The 
said they expected Mr. Shultz to 
reassure Iceland after a recent con- 
troversy over U.S. contingency 
plans to station nudear aims on the 
island, the only unarmed member 
of NATO.) 

Describing his session with Mr. 
Gorbachev, Mr. Bush said: 

“Mr. Gorbachev conducted the 
meeting, and he did it with great 
confidence and assurance. He 
made a wry good impression.” 

The vice president called the 
meeting constructive and nonpote- 
mical and said that it had touched 
on a wide array of issues. He de- 
dined to discuss the substance. 

“If there ever was a time when 
we can move forward with progress 
in the last few years, I would say 
this is a good time for that,” he 
said. “Our aspirations fa that are 


Chinese Aide Urges Better Soviet Ties 


Reuters 


BEIJING — Deputy Prime Minister Li Peng has instructed Chinese 
diplomats in Moscow to strive for better ties with the Soviet Union, the 
Xinhua news agency said Thursday. 

Mr. Li, 57, in Moscow for the funeral Wednesday of President 
Konstantin U. Chernenko, told embassy staff, other personnel and 
Chinese students that improved relations were in the interests of both 
countries and of peace in Aria and the world, the agency said. It said he 
“urged them to devote their efforts toward that end.” 

Mr. Li was accompanied to Moscow by a Soviet affairs expert, Deputy 
Foreign Minister Qian Qicheo. Mr. Li’s comm ents followed a amflflr 
to the Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, by Peng Zben, head 
Committee of the National People’s < 


“Whai is most evident," Mr. 
Reagan said, “is that the Soviet 
Union is in a different frame of 
mind than they’ve been in the 
past.” He was referring to the re- 
sumption of arms negotiations in 
Geneva. 

Mr. Reagan, responding to ques- 
tions from a group of magazine 
editors, said he believed that Mr. 
Gorbachev is as “dominated 


their system and their philosophy*’ 


l inor ptuiosoph 
ut predecessors. 
L “I think he L 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 

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PACIFIC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

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high. We are not euphoric. We are 
realistic. 

“We encountered nothing to dis- 
courage us in any way. We are high 
on hope, high that we can make 
progress in Geneva, high for an 
overall reduction of tensions,” he 
said. “The f rankness and the use- 
fulness and the content ol the meet- 
ing were such that we have every 
reason to be encouraged." 

Asked why he believed tins was a 
good moment for an improvement 
in Soviet-American relations, Mr. 
Burii said, “My view on that would 

haw hwm i*nhanfyd hy »lu» mw»rinp 

we just had." 

Although he declined to charac- 
terize Mr. Gorbachev’s reaction to 
the idea of a meeting wiihPrcsideat 
Ronald Reagan, Mr. Bush said he 
was confident that such a meeting 
“would be fruitful and would be 
good." 

“We felt that we had perhaps 


made some progress and I know 
that the preadem would fed exact- 
ly the same way,” the vice president 
said. 

Though there are “big problems, 
major differences” between the two 
countries, Mr. Bush said, Mr. Rea- 
“is very, very serious and in- 
. hopeful” for progress in rela- 
tions. 

Mr. Bush also held meetings with 
Chancellor Kohl of West Germa- 
ny, Prime bfinisler Rajiv Gandhi of 
India, President Mohammed 2a 
ul-Haq of Pakistan, Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher of Britain and 
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 
sone of Japan. 


as were his recent 
But he added: “I think he has 
ten out there to his own people 
ut improvements in tire econo- 
my there, particularly for advocat- 
ing, you mtou say, more private 
venture in the agricultural section 
than the present system erf govern- 
ment farms, and I look forward to 
d gating with him.” 


(Continued from Page 1 

accords win also be eaqdiasfc'-' 1 
UiL negotiators. _ ' 

“Pledges without verifii; . 

Mly produce more instability. . 
said. 

Mr. Kwnp^man, a VCtCTI-" v- 

yer, is expected to devote corf; ’ 
able attention to such questi „ 
his role as chief of the ddef-v ■... 

He will also conduct talks oo> - 
arms with Yuli A. KvitandJ:^. . ■'•J 
A former senator, John. G'^; '■ 

sr, will meet with Mr. Kaq-^. ' 
the subgroup on strategic, c# c : ' 

range, nuclear weapons, wbil . .. • 
reer Foreign Service officer, 
oard W. Gutman, will handL, 
an intermediate nudear ant *. 

Alexei A. Obukhov. : 

The U.S. delegation is cc. \ ’• 
ted to seeking “radical redurij - 
in both long-range and inte/ ‘ ; - 
ate nudear weapons, but tbe ; ' ' : 
Union is expected to balk .. ~ ... 

agreement unless it gains s*--- . . 
tion on the space issue. 

The Soviet Union broke a 
vious negotiations on nodes _ 

15 months ago when the . % 

Atlantic Treaty Organhaui. - • 
gan deploying Pershing-^ 
cruise missiles m Western I> . , 
to counter the Soviet brnk .* 


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Pentagon Moves to Trim 


David Hoffman of The Washing- 
tan Post reported from Washington: 

President Reagan said Thursday 
that he looked forward to dealing 
with Mr. Gorbachev. 


Washington Poet Service 
WASHINGTON — The Penta- 
gon has issued guidelines making h 
illegal for military contractors 
knowingly to pad bills for weapons 
systems with overhead expenses 
unrelated to thdr government 
wo*. 

The steps strengthen what De- 
fense Secretary Caspar W. Wein- 
berger calls a “get-tough policy" 
against defense contractors whose 
extraordinary billings have fueled 
congressional moves to cut the ad- 
ministration's 1986 defense budget 


Since that time, Mosco 
boosted its force erf triple-w - . 
SS-20s by 36 to a total of 4I>-, 
“thdr long-range missile jn • 
continues in robust fasti'-,'/-' 
well,” Mr. Lahman said. 

Several UJ5. senators an - , 
gressmen who intend to a * 
closely the notation of ut . 
talks said the crux of the n - 
tions ought rest with the k v 
tration's wiffinguess to abat v 



,cept deep cuts in its nrisate) 


• The U.S. legislators sai*u-.. 
were impressed by lhe.US. -"d 
tion and the successful opfc • 
what many of them 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1985 


Page 3 


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snate Panel Approves U.S. Budget Plan 


- Jonathan Fuabringcr reduce domestic spending and 
■ - Vew York Times Soviet warned that be would veto any tax 

: " - jHINGTON— H ie Senate * increase Congress might pass this 

v \ Comnriuee, on a straight y®- 
>. . ne vote, has approved a def- Tlie proposal approved by the 

uction package that would Budget Committee wouldproduce 
lower militaiy spending, larger savings than Mr. Reagan’s 
r ,te for one year a cost-*- plan, bat he is likely to oppose it 
i ncrease for Social. Security because much of its savings would 
t or eliminate many of the come in reduced military spending. 
• . ie programs targeted by Among the mmor proposals are 

■ nt Ronald Reagan. thefoUo ’ 

The 


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-Vjockage, approved Wednes- 
it, would cat S55.I trillion 
.e deficit in 1986 and $296.7 
three years. It does not 
increase. 

woe adopted by 
, vote, with one Republican 
■-.i * e Democrat voting present, 
* for or against the package. 

‘ followed a day of intense 
- dug among the 12 Repobli- 
mbers of the committee, led 
- Aairman, Pete V. Domenid 
; iv Mexico, in an effort to 
;n impasse and get a plan out 
committee to the Sengra 


entnU American i. 


Wednesday, Mr. 

1 the committee of a 
!treat n from the battle to 


tary budget would be 
increased only to account for infla- 
tion in 1986, then increased 3 per* 

cent on top of inflation in 1 987 and 
1988. 

• Cost-of-living increases for So- 
cial Security and other benefit and 
pension programs would be elimi- 
nated for one year. 

• Agricultural price supports 
would be frozen at 198S levds but 
not cat as Mr. Reagan proposed, 
and revenue sharing , wbicn Mr. 
Reagan had proposed eliminating, 
would be cut in half in 1986 and 
1987 and then eliminated. 

• Mass transit operating and 
capital subsidies would be cut by 
25 percent, but not eliminated, and 
the subsidy for Amlrak. the nation- 
al passenger railroad, would be cut 




by about 50 percent over three 
years. 

• Salaries for federal workers, 
including the military, would be 
frozen in 1986. Mr. Reagan- had 
proposed a 5-percent pay cut for 
federal workers and a 3- percent 
pay increase for the armed forces. 

• In Medicare, the program that 
provides bealth-care benefits for 
the elderly, levds of reimbursement 
to hospitals and physicians would 
be frozen, but the premi ums for 
visits to doctors would increase 
gradually from 25 percent to 35 
percent. 

The plan would freeze all non- 
military discretionary spending 
and reduce the student-loan pro- 
gram. It would mafo> a 20- 
percent cut in Urban Development 
Action Grants, a two-thirds cut in 
funds for the Small Business Ad- 
ministration and would 
of the S2~b2Hon rural hi 
gram in the Fanners Home, 
rstration. 

The Export-Import Bank direct- 
loan program would be cut to S1.25 
billion mem 53.8 billion, but not 
eliminated as Mr, Reagan pro- 
posed- The Legal Services Crap, 
and the Job Craps would be re- 


tained, but the president’s plan to 
eliminate school lunch subsidies 
for middle- and upper-income fam- 
Dies was included in the commit- 
tee’s proposal. 

The plan would not reduce 
spending as much as Mr. Domenid 
had wanted, but it indudes more 
cuts than the committee had ap- 
proved in tie last week, when it 
generally voted to freeze programs 
but not to cut them. 

Prospects for the package in the 
full Senate were still ondcar. If it is 
approved, the deficit in 1986, now 
projected to be at S227 billion, 
would be 5172 billion, and would 
decline to 5102 billion in 1988. 

One of the key voles tame from 
Senator Mark Andrews, Republi- 
can of North Dakota, whohad sup- 
ported an across-the-board freeze 
and increases in taxes. He voted for 
the proposal, he said, ‘‘to get this 
turkey” to the Senate floor so be 
would have a rfunw to change it 

Before the vote Wednesday, the 
committee was unable to reach a 
consensus on several other budget 
proposals and had voted to ng'cct 
Mr. Reagan’s budget, 17-4. The 
committee also rejected an across- 
the-board freeze combined with a 
package of tax increases, 18-4. 


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etter Suggests Twain Strongly Opposed Racism 


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Edwin McDowell 

cj; New York runs Service 

; . ; . ' / - i.w YORK — A letter by 
. . * ;7 '■ : J Twain, written in the same 
that “The Adventures of 
• * *, debeny Finn’’ was pub- 
UU np^HU in the United States, de- 
‘■ms offer to provide financial 
±ance to one of the first black 
‘ aits at Yale Law School 
' ‘ •* 1 -:"^'e letter, recently authenti- 
' by a scholar at Yale, is 
- ■_ -st certain to become part of 

1 '■ - -> -longstanding debate over 

■ tr her the book or its author 
- ‘'- : ,racisL 

^'■'ain’s offer, addressed to the 
■ of the law school, offers to 
‘ ; .m;. . he expenses of the stndent, 
- ' .'ierT.McGumn.lt is said to 
■ - ; » -he only document from 
"n hhnsd f dirrin g thg period 
“Huckleberry Finn*’ was 
i . r ., n i 4 t-ished attesting to bis interest 
nl Sluing blacks. 

.... lucklebeixy Finn,” pub- 
_ rl 100 years ago, has come 
.. I .. Sr particulariy sharp attack in 
’-^ 't years by a small but grow- 
. " -umber of par ents, te achers 
” wbool boards in dozens of 
— communities. 

, '--st year, fra example, school 
als in Waukegan, Illinois, 
ved “Huckleberry Finn” 

‘ "■ - a required reading list after 
' ~der man complained that it 
* dfensive to blacks. And last 
' -h, a member of the Chicago 
ol Board said the book 
it to be burned." 
t two weeks ago. President 
■ Jd Reagan told the National 
ciation of Independent 
that the book epitomized 
. s that American schools 
dbeteadunL 
e letter from Twain strongly 
sts that the author was vig- 
iy opposed to racism. 




r* 


Marik Twain 

“I do not believe I would very 
cheerfully help a white student 
who would ask a benevolence of a 
stranger, but I do not feel so 
about the Other color, ” Twain 
wrote to Francis Wayland, the 
law school dean, rat Omsmuig 
Eve 1885. “We have ground the 
manhood out of than. & the 
shame is ours, not than; A we 
should pay fra it." 

Twain added that he would like 
to know the cost of the students 
expenses “so that I may send 6, 
12, or 24 months’ board as the 
size of the bill may determine.” In 
fact. Twain wound Up financing 
the student's board until his grad- 
uation in 1887. 

Shelley Fisher Fishlrin, the 
Yale scholar who authenticated 
the letter, said: “Twain’s brutally 
succinct comment on racism in 
the letter is a rare nonirrauc state- 
ment of the personal an guish 
Twain fdt regarding the destruc- 
tive legacy of slavey.” . 

Stating Stuckey, a professor of 
history at Northwestern Univer- 


sity. had a similar reaction to the 
letter. 

“It’s a dear condemnation of 
the larger society fra what it bad 
done and was m the p r oce ss of 
doing to black people," said Mr. 
Stuckey, who is black and who 
indudes Twain’s works in his 
course on the arts and history. “It 
couldn’t be a clearer, more cate- 
gorical indictment of racism in 
American life and Fm not at all 
surprised to find that it came 
from Twain.” 

Although his letter does not 
narnp the Evident , Ms. FishVin 
discovered that it was Mr. 
McGumn when she gr«mw>ad 
copies of letters from Mr. Way- 
land to Twain. Those papers, in 
the Bancroft library at tne Uni- 
versity of California, quote the 
dean as Idling Twain be thought 
Mr. McGuinn was deserving of 
Twain’s help. 

Twain, who lived in Hartford, 
Connecticut, from 1874 to 1891, 
met Mr. McGuinn briefly during 
a visit to Yale in New Haven, 
Connecticut, a few weeks before 
he wrote to Mr. Wayland. 

Ms. Fishlrin, who has taught 
American literature at Yale, said 
she airihgnuVatpd the Letter by 
comparing Twain’s bandwriting 
and paper, which are identical to 
other tetters Twain sent from 
Hartford during that period and 
which are in Yale’s Bonecke Li- 
brary. 

In a diary miry in 1887, Twain 
proclaimed bis intention to sup- 
port another blade student at 
Yale Law School, bnt that stu- 
dent chose not to attend. 

Although his father and unde 
owned slaves. Twain supported a 
number of promising young 
blade studoits, including Mr. 
McGuinn. Ms. Fishkin said. 


After graduating from the law 
school, Mr. McGuinn was the 
editor of a black newspaper in 
Kansas Gty, Kansas. In 1890 be 
moved to Baltimore, where he be- 
came a lawyer. 

He was elected twice to the 
Baltimore City Council, and was 
a director of the local branch of 
the National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People. 
In 1917 he scored a major legal 


ing in federal court a' Baltimore 
dty ordinance that TngnriaTi»rf 
segregated city housing. 

“He was one of the greatest 
lawyers who ever lived," said As- 
sociate Justice Thurgood Mar- 
shall of the U.S. Supreme Court, 
who as a young lawyer in Balti- 
more shared adjoining offices 
with Mr.’ McGuinn. “If he had 
bear white he’d have been a 
judge.” 

“Huckleberry Finn" and its 
author have generated particular 
interest this year, because of the 
dual edehratian of the 150th an- 
niversary of the birth, of Samuel 
L. Clemens, who toed: the pen 
name Mark Twain, and the cente- 
nary of the pnbhcation of “Huck- 
leberry Finn.” 

Few libraries ban “Huckleber- 
ry Finn” today, but its frequent 
use of the word “nigger” has an- 
gered school boards and has led 
to criticisms that it is offensive to 
blacks. - - ■ 

Mr. Stuckey of Northwestern 
said: “My sense of the criticism is 
that it comes mainl y from the 
nonacademic sector erf the black 
community, not from black intel- 
lectuals. In my judgment, ‘Huck 
Finn* is one of the most devastat- 
ing attacks on racism ever writ- 
ten." 


Colombia, Canada Outlines New Pact With U.S. 


I 


Stalemate 
Rrug r War’ 

11 ’ jontinued from Page I) 
-projects and openly worked 


On North American Air Defenses 

By Christopher S. Wren 

New York Tima Service 


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Escobar was elected as an 
te delegate to the legislature 
on the ticket of the Liberal 
Colombia's largest political 
ation. Mr. Lender, who so- 
c .^dges admiration for Hitler, 
discotheque, founded his 
rfitical group, the National 
- ' 3vic Movement, and pub- 

- 1 newspaper. 

- is own account, Mr. Lchdcr 
ranbia for seven months af- 
re government finally 

v : si its crackdown. Mr. Esco- 
' 5 has been abroad, officials 
. 1 remains in hiding. Howev- 
. 1 after Mr. Lebder’s return 

■ •- ting media- appearance, sc~ 

■ - 'races have bran unable to 

■ im or shut down his busi- 

■ more difficult than you 
.-'suppose to get these peo- 

-ud Nzdy Lozano, tire vice 
--•-r of justice “ThQr have 
•inanctal resources, more 
. ? do. And they have a lot of 
who protect them — be- 
lot (rf people have done we& 
.an.” 

- : crffidals say a few of tire 
l^orColranbian trafficking 
aliens may have increased 

- tensive strength through al- 
. with dissident factions erf 

dan leftist guerrilla organi- 
that have mused to accept 
aaso-fixe senkments with 
ailment. 

. 'ambs and Jeanc J. Kirkpat- 

- : chief U.S. debate to the 

Nations, have suggested 
cooperation between drug 
ters and revolutionary 

- sits may be extensive, in- 
die governments of .Cuba 

- caragua. Colombian offi- 
twever, say they do not be- 
u there are formal ocameo- 

‘ tween the Colombian gangs 
her guerrilla organizations 
governments. 


OTTAWA — Can ad a has an- 
nounced details of an agreement 
reached with tire Uni ted S tales to 
modernize North American air de- 
fenses. 

The agreement is to be 
Monday by President Ronald 
gan ana Prime Minister Brian Mnl- 
roncy at the end of their two-day 
meeting in Quebec 

Expected to cost about $5 bil- 
lion, tire defense plan includes the 
replacement erf tne Distant Early 
Warning, or DEW, line, with a 
more sophisticated chain of 52 
ground radar stations, to be called 
the North Warning System, across 
Labrador, the Canadian Arctic and 
northern Alaska. 

Tire new system, as outlined 
Wednesday, mil consist of 13 mini- 
mally attended long-range radar 
stations, 1 1 of than in Canada, and 
39 unmanned short-range radar 
stations, 36 of than in Canada. 

The radar stations would pro- 
vide surveillance of polar attack 
routes that might be used by Soviet 
bombers and cruise missfles, and 
alert jet interceptors at upgraded 
airfields in northern Canada to in- 
truders flying at any altitude. 

A system of advanced Badcscat- 
ter radar units, which can monitor 
aircraft over the horizon, also 
would be deployed in tbe United 
Slates to watch the eastern, western 
and southern approaches to North 
America. Hie Backscatter units 
camot watch northern Canada be- 
cause they are affected by the auro- 
ra borealis. 

U,S. Airborne Warning and 


Control System aircraft, better 
known as AWACS, would provide 
supplementary survefflance in a 
heightened alert. 

Although most of tire new sys- 
tem will be in Canada, the cost of 
building and operating it will be 
borne largely by the United States, 
according to Canada's announce- 
ment Wednesday. 

Tbe United States will pay for 60 
percent of the North Warning Sys- 
tem, which is estimated to cost 
nearly 51.1 billion, and all of tire 
Backscatter radar units, which con- 
stitute tire most expensive portion 
of the overall program. 

A mere southern chain of 24 ex- 
isting radar sites in southern Cana- 
da, called the Knetree tine, also will 
be closed down. Its militaxy value is 
considered Kntifed now because it 
is too far south to pick up modern 
bombers and cruise missiles. The 
United States win pay 55 percent of 
the cost of dosing down tire Pine- 
tree stations, according to the 
a greement. 

Tbe details of tire new 
were announced in tire House 
Commons by Erik Neilsen, the 
deputy prime minister and minister 
of national defense, and later is- 
sued by the Ministry of National 
Defense. 

■ Acid Ram Plan Expected 

The United States and Canada 
have dedded on a new *^‘omt ef- 
fort” to examine add rant, ride- 
stepping a politically sensitive dis- 
pute at a coming meeting between 
Mr. Reagan and Mr. Mulroney, 
The Washington Post reported 
Wednesday, ating Reagan admin- 
istration sources. 


The two leaders are expected to 
announce a greemwit on the effort 
after meeting Sunday and Monday 
in Quebec, and will ask for a report 
on tire results when they are next 
scheduled to meet a year from now. 
the sources said. 

Thrir approach is a compromise 
designed both to help Mr. Mul- 
roney, who has launched a major 
acid rain cleanup effort, and to 
maintain Mr. Reagan’s position 
that more research is needed before 
a costly U.S. program can be justi- 
fied, the sources said. 

Last week, Mr. Mahoney's envi- 
ronment minister, S uzanne Blais- 
Grenrer, announced a major add 
rain deanup plan designed to re- 
duce sulfur dioxide emissions by 50 
percent in eastern Canada over tire 
next nine years. 


V- r 

’ 


f garian Miners Killed 

.= Reuters 

■APEST — Two miners 
led and 19 others were in- 
V. vhetx five gas explosions 
" the Zobak coal mine in 
' a Hungary on Wednesday. 


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Page 4 


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Sribime 


Ppblnhtd Wflfa The New Yortt Times sod Hie Washington Poet 


MX Fails as Missile or Lever 


For President Reagan, the arms tails in 
Geneva offer the chance to strong-arm Con- 
gress as wdl as the Soviets. Give me all the MX 
missiles I want, he says; they are essential to 
my negotiating position. That is certainly not 
the case he would be making if be could argue 
that the MX is essential to national security. 

Mr. Re ag a n is not alone in trying to use the 
discredited weapon as a negotiating tool 
Rather than say no to the MX, several con- 
gressmen, including Democrats Les Aspin in 
the House and Sam Nunn in the Senate, pro- 
pose to vote for limited MX deployment in 
exchange for influence over the administra- 
tion's performance in the arms talks. 

The trouble with trying to use the MX for 
leverage, in cither direction, is that it is a 
broken reed, either as a lever or a weapon. 

W01 the Russians at Geneva cooperatively 
trade their own heavy missiles for the MX — 
or defiantly build more? Even if they are 
inclined to bargain, Mr. Reagan already has 
plenty of chips to bargain with. He has 
launched an extensive modernization of offen- 
sive strategic weapons, from the B-l bomber 
to the accurate D-5 submarine-based missile. 
His “star wars" program is a hefty bargaining 
counter, far more likely than the MX to be at 
the center of negotiations. 

And should there be intrinsic bargaining 
weight in MX missiles, well. Congress has 
already voted to build 21 of them. With testing 
and production well in hand, the mere threat 
of building more is enough. Last year Congress 
approved $1.5 billion for production of an 
additional 21. but fenced in the funds. The 
administration is asking both for that money 
to be released and for $4 billion to buy a 
further batch of 48. But the case for putting the 
MX on hold is more compelling than ever. 


The MX was concaved on a false premise: 
that the silos housing America's land-based 
missiles were becoming vulnera- 
ble to increasingly accurate Soviet warheads. 
To male the MX invulnerable, the Carter 
administration decided to base it in a mobile 
fcsWon in remote parts of Utah and Nevada, 
sh uttling each missil e between multiple shel- 
ters. That was the unlikely “racetrack" system 
that Mr. Reagan rejected on taking office. But 
then he discovered that every other basing 
mode was vulnerable. Backed into a techni- 
cal and political comer, he turned to a blue- 
ribbon panel of experts to help him out 
The Scowcroft commission was a brutal 
savior. It said the window of vulnerability 
never existed. That demolished the reason far 
an MX. Then it advocated housing the MX in 
the very Mini it em an sQos that Mr. Reagan had 
declared to be so dismayingly vulnerable; The 
commission also recognized that the day of 
the multi-headed, land-based missile is ending. 
It recommended development of a single- 
beaded missile, the “Mutgetman,” as an un- 
threatening untempting target that would add 
both to security and to stabmty. 

In short, the MX missile embodies a mistak- 
en turn in nuclear strategy. With 10 accurate 
warheads, it must be considered by Soviet 
planners as a first-strike weapon. If it is vul- 
nerable, it cannot deter. A weapons system 
that both threatens and is vulnerable to attack 
is the last thing needed in a crisis. 

A mistake is no asset, even when dressed up 
as a bargaining chip. To vote 21 more missiles 
would be to double die error. If Congress 
wishes to influence the negotiating strategy, its 
best course when the issue comes up in the 
Senate next week is to keep the MX on hold. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Mubarak Merits a Hearing 


The chang e in the Kremlin u pstag wri Presi- 
dent Hosni Mubarak of Egypt on his trip to 
Washington. Yet he deserved, and deserves, 
a respectful bearing Egypt remains the most 
important country in the Arab world, the 
strongest influence for stability and calm, and 
die model for other Arab countries in dealing 
with IsraeL Mr. Mubarak’s sincerity in tack- 
ling Egypt's problems is beyond question. 

His special effort here was to break the 
stalemate on the Isradi-Falestinian dispute. 
To this end he tried to draw the Reagan 
administration to support the tentative peace 
gestures made recently by Jordan and the 
Palestine Liberation Organization. The Egyp- 
tian argument is that the United States can 
best moderate the PLO by opening up a 
“dialogue" and thereby giving it the confi- 
dence to make the necessary further changas 
toward Israel. The Reagan administratio n, 
however, not rally has a co mmitmen t to Israel 
not to open a dialogue until the PLO recog- 
nizes the Jewish state; it also believes it can 
best moderate the PLO by making it plain that 
the PLO must deal directly with the Israelis. 

President Reagan and Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz were badly burned by earlier 
Mideast initiatives. Everyone can see that Isra- 
el is still digesting the almost indigestible 


challenges of withdrawing from Lebanon and 
coping with economic crisis. Whether Jordan’s 
and the PLO’s gesture are conciliatory, rather 
than simply devious, is something the two of 
them have yet to establish. So the U.S. admin- 
istration has some reason to hang back from 
the activist role — activism, eventually, means 
pressuring Israel — that Mr. Mubarak would 
cast it in. But it also must not make a habit 
or a virtue in itself of playing hard to gpL 

Meanwhile, Egypt's economic requirements 
remain urgent. President Mubarak asks for aid 
increases that, along with those sought by 
Israel, severely tax the American aid budget 
Both sets of requests have to be considered in 
terms of the American interest Regrettably, 
some pro-Israeli enthusiasts in Congress 
demand that Egypt’s requests be considered in 
terms of a presumed Israeli interest: They 
would tie aid to Cairo to Egypt’s return of its 
long-absent ambassador to Td Aviv. 

The issue of the ambassador cannot and 
should not be removed from its true context of 
Israel's and Egypt’s deep and deeply troubling 
mutual disappointment since Camp David. It 
would be an abuse, moreover, to tie American 
economic aid to. a needy second country to 
a fine point in its relations with a third. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


No Time for Recriminations 


Despite all the rhetoric about abolishing 
nuclear weapons forever, a practical assess- 
ment of the new round of anus talks in Geneva 
must deflate any sense of optimism. 

When the U.S. “team" numbers 90, when 
the Russian negotiator parrots the January 
protocol, we are reminded that propaganda 
often overwhelms substance in sum talks. 

Hie chief obstacles are fundamental and 
complex: conflicting motives, varying weap- 
ons technologies and ultimately the antago- 
nism between sharply differing political sys- 
tems. The Reagan administration’s dubious 
embrace of the “star wars" defense and full- 
scale modernization of nuclear missiles stands 
opposed to equally relentless Soviet advances 
and firm opposition to U.S. missiles in West- 
ern Europe. The negotiators know that the 
science of nuclear weaponry proceeds so 
swiftly that what is agreed upon today can 
very easily become obsolete tomorrow. 

Under normal circumstances, the most that 
can be hoped for is a honest elucidation of 
each side's opening positions — unaccompa- 
nied by categorical statements which insist 
that “star wars" is non-nego liable, the Euro- 
ntissfl es must be removed. But we have a right 
to expect far more from the Geneva talks. 

Ironically, the most dramatic event of recent 


days, the transition to a new Soviet leader , is 
not likely to affect the talks. The “consensus" 
Soviet position seems unchanged. 

So, while it may not be his style, it is 
a perfect time for President Reagan to send a 
signal of meaning and sincerity that would set 
the stage for serious talks and serious achieve- 
ments. Options are available, including a call 
for a moratorium on nuclear weapons testing 
and resumption of talks on a test-ban. treaty. 

The hardliners say verification procedures 
for such tests are inadequate, yet verification is 
a key ingredient of the administration's strate- 
gic defense system. It is verification, they say, 
which wQi enhance stability daring the most 
precarious transition from an offense-based 
to a defense-based deterrence. The Soviets 
may soon ay “You can’t have it both ways.” 

— The Baltimore Evening Sun. 


A New Age in Soviet Union? 


The late John F. Kennedy is said to have 
wondered what would happen if the Soviet; 
Union ever had a leader who campaigned on 
the slogan “Let’s get this country moving." 
That was over 20 years ago. After the deaths of 
throe Soviet presidents within three years, Mr. 
Gorbachov might have that opportunity. The 
era of the Soviet gerontocracy may be over. 

— Financial Times (London). 


FROM OUR MARCH 1 5 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910; High UA Tariffs Are Expected 

WASHINGTON — Another conference was 
hdd at the White House [on March 14] on the 
French and Ginadian tariff situations. Nearly 
all the time was devoted to France, as the 
French Chamber of Deputies adjourns in a 
few days, and liule time is left. M. Jusserand, 
the Ambassador, laid before Philander Chase 
Knox, the Secretary of State, the new French 
proposal, which wiD be considered by Presi- 
dent WJL Taft and his tariff aids. It seems to 
be realized by the authorities of France as well 
as those of the United States that the applica- 
tion of a maximum rate is probable, but every 
effort is being made to avoid a tariff war. It is 
also apparent that Canada is realizing for the 
first tune that the application of the American 
maximum rates to Canada's exports to the 
United States is a strong possibility. 


1935: U.S. Army Tests Robot P3rt 
OAKLAND, California — The Army’s new 
Douglas mystery plane, the first of a projected 
fleet equipped with robot pilots, radio direc- 
tional compass and other devices permitting 
the plane to be directed in the air without 
human aid, will leave here [on March 14] for 
Honolulu on its first long-distance test flight. 
Captain Alfred Hegenberger win be in the 
cockpit as “observer ” If the test if successful 
the Department of Commerce plans to order 
aD planes under its jurisdiction to be equipped 
with some of the devices, notably the new 
compass, to aid commercial pilots to overcome 
fog hazards. The principle of the compass is 
simple. It is tuned in on a station and as long as 
the pilot remains on his course the needle does 
not move. If he veers off so does the needle, to 
the right or left as the case may be. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


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Ca-Qgf mmi 


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CARLGEWIRTZ 


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Euxtahe EtBur RENE BOND Y Dtpuiy PMtiher 

E&tor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Deputy Edtir RICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Direar cf Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISQN5 Director qf Gmdaum 

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0 1985, International Herod Tribune, a Q righis reserved 




FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1985 


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MHWIfiUteUS 


The Strategic Concept Behind U.S. Aims in Geneva 


W ASHINGTON — The ap- 
proach of the United States to 


W proach of the United States to 
the arms-control talks in Geneva is 
rooted in a strategic concept that can 
be summarized in four sentences: 

• The U.S. objective for the next 
decade is a radical reduction in the 
power of casting and planned offen- 
sive nuclear arms, as well as stabiliza- 
tion of the relationship between of- 
fensive and defensive nuclear aims, 
whether on Earth or in space. 

• We are even now looking for- 
ward to a period of transition to a 
more stable world, with greatly 
reduced levels of nuclear arms and an 
wihanned ability to deter war based 
on an increasing contribution to de- 
fense of nonnuclear weapons. 

• This period of transition could 
1 ead to the elimination of all nuclear 
arms, offensive and defensive. 

• A world free of nuclear arms is 
an ultimate objective on which the 
United States, the Soviet Union and 
aD . other nations can agree. 

Some amplifications to this posi- 
tion are worth mentioning. 

For the immediate future, at least 
the next 10 years, we will continue to 
base deterrence oa the ultimate 
threat of nudear retaliation. Today’s 
technology provides no alternative. 

We win, however, press for radical 
cuts in strategic and intermedia te- 
range nuclear arms. We also will seek 
to reverse the erosion of the Anti- 
Ballistic Missile Treaty regime, ero- 
sion resulting from Soviet actions 
such as construction of a large 
phased- array radar in central Siberia. 

And we will pursue the Strategic 
Defense Initiative research program, 
in compliance with the ABM treaty. 


By Paul EL Nitze 


which pencils such research. The 
Russians are expected to continue 
their study of defensive technologies. 

In the transition period envisaged, 
the United States would want to be- 
gin moving toward greater reliance 
on defensive systems for oar protec- 
tion and that of our allies, should new 
defensive technologies prove feasible. 


ploy survival) ie and cost-effective 
tenses at a measured pace, with par- 
ticular »in phiL<is on nonnuclear 
defenses. Deterrence would thus be- 
gin to rely on a mix of offensive 
nuclear and defensive systems, in- 
stead of offensive nuclear aims alone. 

The transition would continue for 
some rime, perhaps for decades. As 
die U.S- and Soviet strategic and in- 
termediate-range nuclear arsenals de- 
clined significan tly, we WOUld Seek tO 

negotiate reductions in other types of 


The criteria by which we wiD judge 
the feasibility of such technologies 


sonably survivable as well as cost- 
effective at the margin — that is, they 


Were ice to eKnwwte nuclear arms, the need for. 
a stable aynventioned balance looMbecniciaL 


must be effective enough and cheap 
enough to add defensive capability 
without giving the other side an in- 
centive to tiy to overcome the defense 
with increased offensive capability. 

If new technologies cannot meet 
such standards, we would not deploy 
them. However, we hope that scien- 


tists would respond to the challenge. 
The United States looks to make 


The United States looks to make 
any transition a cooperative endeav- 
or with the Russians. That is why we 
have offered to begin discussions in 
Geneva now as to how we might 
together "take a transition to a mare 
stable and reliable relationship based 
on an increasing mix of defensive 
systems. In such a transition, arms 
control would play an important role. 
We would, for example, seek contin- 
ued reductions in nuclear aims. 


nudear weapons, and in some man- 
ner involve the other nudear powers. 

Given the right technical and polit- 
ical conditions, we would hope to 
continue the reduction of alt nudear 
weapons down to zero, according to 
the US. concept This would have 
far-reaching implications for the 
global military balance at all levels. 
For example, the deterrent effect of 
nudear arms has helped prerent con- 
ventional conflict were we to elimi- 
nate such weapons, the need for a 
stable conventional balance would 
become even more important We 
would have to Study bow to diminish 
the threat posed by imbalances of 
conventional weapons. 

The elimination of nudear weap- 
ons would be accompanied by de- 
ployments Of effective nonnuclear 


terrent balance from one based pri- 
marQv on the ultimate threat of aev- 


marfly on the ultimate threat of dev- 
astating nuclear retaliation to one in 
which nudear arms are greatly re- 
duced and nonnuclear defenses play 
a greater role. We believe this would 
provide a sounder basis for a stable 
and reliable strategic relationship. 

Were we to reach the ultimate 
phase and eliminate nudear weap- 
ons. deterrence would be based on 
the ability of the defense to deny 
success to a potential aggressor’s at- 
tack — whether nudear or conven- 
tional. The strategic relationship 
could then be characterized as one of 
mutual assured security. 


The miter, former secretary of the 
Navy, is special adviser to the president 
for arms-control negotiations. He con- 
tributed this to the Los Angeles Times. 


Jakarta’s Dalliance With Beijing Has Serious Aims 


P ONDOK GEDE, Indonesia — 
Just outside this sleepy west Java 


By Robert K. McCabe 


village is a monument to six Indone- 
sian generals murdered by Commu- 
nists during an abortive coup in 1965. 

The monument is called Pancasila 
Sakti, but is better known as Lnbang 
Boaya (Crocodile Hole), after the 
well down which the tortured bodies 
were stuffed by their killers. 

Those murders 20 years ago put an 
end. for aD practical purposes, to 
what had been an increasingly fer- 
vent relationship between Jakarta 
and Beijing. Just before the coup at- 
tempt. President Sukarno referred 
with gnat satisfaction to the “anti- 
impenalist axis” linking Jakarta with 
Hand. Beijing and Pyongyang and 
made it clear he fdt China was Indo- 
nesia’s dosest foreign friend. 

After the coup attempt, logically 


enough, China was criticized by the 
Indonesian military, who suspected 
Beijing of helping the Indonesian 
Communist Party (PKI) plan and 
stage the coup attempt But the 
charges were never fully proven and 
diplomatic relations were not frozen 
until 1967, when China’s Cultural 
Revolution spilled over into Jakarta. 

Now relations between Beijing and 
Jakarta seem to be wanning up once 
more — and not just in the trade area, 
the expectable starting point Despite 
deep dvil and military suspicion of 
China, there are strong hints of a 
thaw rat the political front as welL 

While no quick embrace is expect- 
ed , the reasons for sweet dalliance 

Fimf^jhfarta wanuftef* regularize 


and increase its informal trade with 
fhina With Indonesian oil revenues 
well below their peaks, the country 
wants to broaden its export base. 

Secondly, Indonesia has been cho- 
sen by the Association of South-East 
Asian Nations to lead the search for a 
solution to the Cambodia problem. 
Foreign minis ter Mochtar Kusu- 
maatmadja is expected to visit Hanoi 
soon for talks on Vietnam's position. 

Soon after that meeting, Indonesia 
will bring together many key players 
in the Cambodia arena. The venue 
will be the forthcoming 30th anniver- 
sary celebrations of the 1955 Afro- 
Aria talks at Bandung in west Java. 

The meeting 30 years ago brought 
together leaders of 29 newly indepen- 
dent nations. Among them were Chi- 


Mobilizing Mutton in New Zealand ■Esafe 

dnno tollre h«e sr 


By Jodie T. Allen 


W ASHINGTON — Armed 
only with conventional 


Indonesia's aimed forces, reportedly 
has cautioned President Suharto 
against moving too quickly on China. 

Also critical was aa editorial in the 
English-language newspaper. The In- 
donesia Times (Feb. 14). This warned 
that “the people as a whole should 
not give any opportunity for under- 
ground communists to consolidate 
themselves. We must remember that 
they are still assisted by the commu- 
nist party of China.” 

It seems that KADIN will for the 
present stay in charge of bilateral 
trade matters, although Mr. Mochtar 
wants diplomats to take over this 
■chore. Mr. Sukamdani is scheduled to 
attend this April’s Canton trade fair, 
and there are foreign analysts in Ja- 
karta who are betting be wm go on to 


TT only witb conventional 
weapons (five fly-fishing rods, three 


cameras and two pocket knives), 
my husband, two friends and I trav- 
eled last month to New Zealand. It 
happened that our trip occurred at 
the peak of the controversy over 
that nation's refusal to allow nucle- 
ar-armed ships to dock: at its pons. 

My observations during 16 days 
of travel in New Zealand have con- 
vinced me that, should the simmer- 
ing dispute between the United 
States and this long-time ally boil 
over into outright hostility, Ameri- 
ca will face a redoubtable foe. 

It is true that, in any engagement, 
the United States would enjoy an 
overwhelming majority in person- 
nel- New Zealand’s population is 







SSC.S. 


■vS8r:*5 






... 


Bering for talks durin g that visit. 

For his part, Mr. Mochtar seems 


composed of roughly 3 million hu- 
mans and 70 million sheep. The 


mans and 70 million sheep. The 
surface appeal of this ratio is appar- 
ent to anyone firing over the coun- 
try's valleys, fiords and snow- 
capped peaks. But anyone who has 
watched the frustrations of even the 
best-trained sheepdog will under- 
stand the difficulty of organizing 
mmtoo-on-the-hoof into a lean, 
mean fighting machine. 

What they lack in numbers, how- 
ever, New Zealanders make up in 
shrewdness. This is immediately 
sensed in the difficulty one has in 
arguing with them. Everyone we 
met — cabdrivera, fdlcw hotel 
wests, fishing guides, bellhops, air- 
line stewards and so on —was quite 
prepared, indeed eager, to discuss 
the nuclear-ship issue and its impH- 
cations for the Australia-New Zea- 
land-United States alliance. In New 
Zealand’s egalitarian society, opin- 
ions — like occupations — seem to 
vary more with age than with socio- 
economic class. The younger New 
Zealanders opposed a nudear pres- 
ence in the southern hemisphere, 
white (he older generation, remem- 




bering World War H, were mindful 
of the U.S. defensive shield. 

What they share, however, was a 
disconcerting tendency toward in- 
gratiating apology. New Zealanders 
have an atfdiogmendship with the 
United States. But they remind us 
politely that New Zealand is a bona 
fide democracy too, that it voted in 
its current government — on a 
dearly nonnuclear platform — and 
that many people in New Zealand 
detest aD things nudear. They can 
understand our not agreeing, but 
wish we would try to understand 
their point of view. 

This unfailing politeness made it 
difficult for us to press the Ameri- 
can viewpoint with sternness. 

Other examples of New Zealand 
guile abound The country bolds its 
summer while most of the rest of 
the civilized wodd is having winter. 
New Zealand money is denominat- 


ed in “dollars,” but you can buy 
than for only 45 cents in U.S. cur- 
rency — this means that if you 
think you have treated yourself to a 
first-class $5Q-a-person dinner, 
you've actually spent a mere $25. 
But the clearest affront to Ameri- 
can sensibilities is New Zealand’s 
custom of not tipping. 

Perhaps if diplomacy fails, the 
current dispute could be resolved in 
symbolic combat — combat, that is, 
between the chosen symbols of each 
nation. Both of these happen to be 
birds. America’s is the eagle. New 
Zealand's is the kiwi, a long- 
beaked round-bodied, wild-eyed 
bird with the interesting, disabling 
distinction of haring no wings. 

Thar may not seem like a fair 
fight — but after alL all's fair . . . 


reputation also is 
The president 


The president and Indonesia are 
under no pressure to restore full dip- 
lomatic relations with China, mil 
though government officials here 
routinely deny it, there is good reason 
to believe that China and Indonesia 
wiD official trade bureaus in 
each other's capitals before much 
longer, A full-scale exchange of em- 
bassies is farther down the road. At 
present, the site of the former Chi- 
nese embassy in Jakarta seems 
doomed to become a parking lot 


The writer ism the editorial page 
staff of The Washington Post. 


The writer, a dqtm editor of the 
International Herald Tribune on leave, 
is a specialist in Asian affairs. 



Israel Needf ^ 
To Tackle#"' 
Economy / ..«* 

By Hobart Rowen \ .. 


W ASHINGTON — 
ministers of finaru 


YY ministers of finance in 
world IsraeTs Yitzhak Modal 
have the toughest assignment, li 
responsibility to deal with an 
comic crisis symbolized by an i 
tipu rate that has —with theheh 
fuDy indexed economy — exu 
1,000 percent annually. 

But Mr. Modai, in Washing^ 
week to help negotiate IsraeTs 
gest-ever request For Americar 
displayed the kind of optinnsu/* 

has enabled Israel to fend off h 

neighbors and still scratch a d 
craric oasis out of die desert. 

Faced with Israeli request 
$800 million in emergency assis 
for fiscal 1985, on top of 52,6 b 
for rmliiaiyand economic aid at - 
being supplied and $4.05 t - 
planned tor fiscal 1986, the Ri 
administration for the first ths 
placed economic conditions oq j 
to a foreign country, despite the. 
rial relationship” with IsraeL 


r yng p yy 

■■■> rWgBMl 




-StHK I# 




* 


defens es. These would provide assur- 
ance that were one country to cheat 
— by, say, covertly building intercon- 
tinental b allis tic missil es — it would 
not achieve an exploitable advantage. 
To overcome the defenses, cheating 
would have to be cm a scale of too 
great a magnitude to pass unnoticed 

A nonnuclear world would not be 
risk-free. The knowledge of how’ to 
make nuclear arms cannot be excised 
But the risks of cheating in a nonnu- 
clear world would seem to be far less 
than the risks and potential costs 
posed by a possible breakdown in the 
current deterrence regime. 

Deterrence requires that a poten- 
tial opponent be convinced that the 
risks and costs of aggression far out- 
weigh the gains thathe might hope to 
achieve. Our goal is not to do away 
with deterrence, but to shift the de- 


ror Israel, tins will pose a ■ 
test: It is hard to advocate a i 
that means more imemploymer 
Mr. Modai said that the emb - 
Israelis “have come to the realk 
that we are the only ones a* 
cure our own economy, and th . 
have no alternative but to tal 
necessary measures.” But Mur 
sures? So far, the Israeli goven 
has not beat able or wilirag tc 
the extremely tough antwnf 
steps pushed by the United Sir ~ 
Israel, like other heavily ini 
nations, knows that this is easy i 
for outsiders to give, and tut ‘ 
governments to enforce and sti 
m office. The jobless rate in Is ■ - 
now 5.8 percent, and will rise ' 
planned manner this year to 7. ’ 
cent, which is what we fed - 
maximum that Israel can takt- - 
cording to Dan Hafoerin, eco - 
minister at the Israeli Embassy - 
Israel's economic crisis stem - 

the financial drain of the 197 

which put an end to (8 const 


A HlUfc 1 

-..--rb^jfcC (K*W 

«*8 


- 




• *T * *n 


years of real economic growth t I \ JJ, Ji 
of between 9 and 10 percent 1 ! ’M ( ' ■ W Mrall tW I 

.i t -i: ~.i -i. 


year, the Israeli real growth re 
zero, and it would have been a 
had it not been for exports. • 
Piled on top of the S12-billic ' 
of the 1973 war were the r 
shocks (1973 to 74 and 1979- - 
which quadrupled oil price- 
placed a special burden on Isn* - 
its indigenous oil output wr 
when Sinai was returned to Ef - 
Moreover, much of the ra&~- 
nary aid from the United 
starting after the Six Day Y - 
1967 and until a few years ago, . 
the form of loans, not grants 
third Israel's S23-Nuion ■ 




debt was borrowed to buy weq 
the United States — and the 


na's Chou En-lai. Vietnam’s Pham 
Van Dong, Cambodia's Norodom Si- 
hanouk, India's Jawaharlal Nehru 
and Egypt’s Gamal Nasser. This 
year’s meeting, scheduled for April 
24-25, will convoke representatives of 
aD those nations. Prince Sihanouk 
will attend. So, probably, wiD Chi- 
nese foreign minister Wu Xueqten. 

The busy Mr. Wu, in fact, is play- 
ing a prominent role in the Beging- 
Jakarta thaw. In Singapore recently, 
he talked with Indonesia’s Sugilo Su- 
karodani, who is chairman of KA- 
DIN, or the Indonesian Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry. Among 
points diyussed were visas for busi- 
nessmen, payment arrangements and 
shipping methods. Informal trade be- 
tween the two nations via Hoag 
Kong and Singapore has beoi going 
on quietly for the past five years. 

There seems to be general agree- 
ment in Indonesia on the need to 


the United States — and the - 
servicing cost runs to Sl.l bill— 
Mr. Modai. a member of the— 
party, knows that the Israeli si. 
of living must be cut But 1 
knows there are social and ri 
limits to austerity steps thajltl 
taken by the young unity JOTI J 
of Prime Minister Shimon ra 
The finance minister argoi 
the new unity govenuwillfl 


ready accomplished ranch to 
racl s economic house in 


Bovt 
=9e to adi 

PCONTR 

new law m 

sistem 


through temporary wage-rat^ 

controls, and $1.5 billion 

cuts, including slashes in j B 

dies for baric consumer prodtrwF v m 

He pointed to a new law m 
through the Israeli Knesset, 
meat, that wfll make it an 
punishable by loss of job or h “ • wtfw ■ g g 
for public employees, mdwhd 

isters, to exceed aDowahtebaft^ A. S ** 

pendi lures. A second law toWjflT S 

sented shortly by the I mil CBS 
government will give indepc 


of the thaw is disputed. 

For example, Mr. Moch tar’s invi- 
tation to China to attend the Ban- 
dung talks has aroused concern. Gen- 
eral LB. Mundani, the head of 


to thercntral bank mestab&aaj 

Bat without basic manges J* ^ 
indexation scheme, inflations m 
at the 900 to 1,000 percenimAi , 

UJS. State Department offiaaMJ I . 
working group of private ecca wl 
are looking for fundamental d 
a bigger reduction in tbebodflf^ ■ 
a wffl to rein in consumer dtjgf* 1 

But the Israelis look for a “ I 
pie rather than smaller portia 
basic economic solution for 
Mr. Modai insists, is for a re 
growth rates in the 6 to 7 l 
range, stimulated by a 10 , 

annual growth rate of export 
dally of high-technology goo 
a new andttistoric free-trade- 
mem with the United States. - 

Who is to tefi the ingenious ^ 
that it is impossible? Mr. Me. __ 
asts that ft can be done, even j ^ «- 
is elusive, requiring mamtenai:-^,, 
huge defense budget: “In gfl.' -- 
we have a peaceful time, it’s® -: 'C; -• 
the nerves, it's good for the pL- ’ -• 
it’s good for everything. Bui 
oue thing we cannot guarante 

Washington Post Writers Gr ■ . 


A 

,!f 


fptable 


cat* 


For his part, Mr. Mochtar seems to 
believe that China will always be a 
key factor in regional politics. Ban- 
dung will give Indonesian officials a 
rare chance for talks with Chhwsi» 
officials on trade and Cambodia. 

The Cambodian peace push, the 
Bandung conference and the move- 
ment toward China aD are seen here 
as manifestations of a more activist 
Indonesian forrim policy. Once a 
leader of thenonaOgned wodd, Indo- 
nesia now seems to be edging baric 
toward that position- Mr. Suharto’s 


LETTERS j V 

The Famine in Ugan : . , • 

Glenn Frankd’s report 
Warriors Face an Enemy: F ■■ V 


rf.v m 

conti 

mtsn* 


SYUl 


(Feb. 23) on famine in the Kr >. 
province of Uganda was eater. • 
would like to point out that « 
nization very involved there.;* 
was not mentioned, is Interr 
Christian Aid, which opera 
camp you referred lo of 16.0 . ' 
pie in Namalu. Karamqja. 
malu. Inte rnational Chnstii^ 
has a team of 100 full-time » T ‘ ^ 

L JOE BASS, 
International Christian 
Camarillo, Cahfr-v 




The Risk of an Acrid , 


H8C 

s&m 


I understand nothing aboi ■ • L? 
wars.” Can any star-wamor v ; ... t 

the next accident involving a-:;:. ' l 

missile going astray, a nude-. * 




me ucxi dvuuau 

missile going astray, a nude-. * 

running aground, a nuclear 

crashing or a de ra iling of a b. ’ •. r- 
man missile train? V.- 

VASANTlSAW -i *-V 




V ‘-na 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH IS, 1985 


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j, ^Complice Collection: 

^ Avoiding the Romantic 

\Y . :l fontana Shorn Ski , Apres-SkiLine 
ind Androgynous Look for Evening 




V 

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By Hebe Dorsey 

Inrmarkmal Herald Tribune 
MILAN — MBan has had a 
ry good fashion season. Gior- 
j Annam and Gianni Versace, 
' Mh ai the top their form, deliv- 
. *d collecuons that amounted to 
. ashioo royal flash. 

, The GanpEce collection, de- 
raed by uatxde Montana of 
ris, closed the season on a good 

. MILAN FASHIONS 

■te, but not a great one. As the 
. signer put it: **11115 has nothing 
do with Paris. It’s for another 
' uteL** 

- This explains the ladt of sns- 
. use. let alone surprises, in this 

Uecdoo. PloportiODS, Montana 
-..'id, have changed. And while 
■ sre are still a lot of shoulders, 

. 'iy are tooed down compared 
'. tb what he used to show. 

. Steering clear from the roman- 
' look inat other Milan design- 
.* have been showing, Montana 
."i 3 ski wear and apris-ski clothes, 
j s woman is still strong, the 
^id that goes siding on top of 
■' itiers in nested satin suits. 

; Tbe newest proportions were 
' orr jackets over very long 
^ waters huggjng the hips and da 
’ -nts like long jdhns. The big 
'Ited coat — the best in Milan 
J- will also be exhibited at the 
/ -ris showings, Montana said. 
-His evening wear, based cm 
‘ m’s tails; harked back to his 
“ok of last season of women 
■'issed k la Sarah Bernhardt. The 
-ost feminine were the purple 

- -Is. with blade pants and black 

- He wrapped around the neck. 

• u the solid black ones could 
-ten worn by Beau BnnmneL 
•-Colors were mainly black. 


white, gray, brown and purple; 
not much considering Montana’s 

sories inc^ded huge baroque 
rings over black gloves; wild hair' 
dosr, heavy aepo-soLed shoes or 
even sturdier hikers’ shoes worn 
with wool pantyhose. 

As they hop off to London, and 
to a more eccentric, less con- 
trolled fashion scene, many U.S. 
buyers are grumbling that the 
Italian prices, winch are being 
quoted to them in dollars, have 
gone too high 

“If the dollar went down, the 
Italians would go out of busi- 
ness,” said Selma Wdser, owner 
of the Charivari shops in New 
York. “In France, at least, they 
still quote prices in francs.” 

She saia she does not come to 
Milan for news but for quality 
clothes and her story carries a lot 
of them, especially sweaters, 
made under her own label 

Joan 'Weinstein, a retailer who 
runs a qmilar avant-garde fash- 
ion store called Ultimo in Ouca- 
buy- 
h a s 
IS 

years “because 1 have built up a 
clientele, but I won't add any 
more. 

“Tin going to save my money 
for London and Paris,” she said. 

This, however, did not seem to 
disturb Dawn Mdlo, the presi- 
. dent of Bergdorf -Goodman, who 
said the store has so many Italian 
labels that “we’re known as ‘the 
Italian store' in New York.” 

**Wc*ve launched a tot of them, 
including Ferre,” Mello said. 
“We’ve really endorsed the Ital- 
ians since the begimnng, 10 years 
ago” 

Prices do not worry her, she 



Li&a 

OnrtaCari 

An outfit from Claude Montana's Complice collection. 



said, because “for us the Italians 
represent the best quality in the 
world. Prices, up to now, have not 
been a problem.” 

As for the new evening wear 
direction,' which the Italians have 
now opened, it did not strike 
Mello as particularly interesting. 
“The Italian lode is based on 
sportwear,” she said, “and I still 

tnVnlr their stren g th is in day 

clothes.” 

Bloomingdale's is also confi- 
dent of the Italian market. In 
what will be Its biggest Italian 
promotion since 1965Tthe store is 
p lanning a show that wiD add up 
to $70 million to S75 million in 
retail prices for their “Ecco H ta- 
lk” promotion in September. 


This wBl include wines, cheese 
and furniture, but “fashion, if 
you indude shoes and knits, will 
represent two thirds of our pur- 
chases,” said Marvin Traub, 
Bloomingdale’s president. 

The fashion crowd was also 
talking about the Valentino and 
Armani posters which are all over 
town and feature half-node men 
in jeans or T-shirts. These look 
very much like Calvin Klein's ads 
by the photographer Bruce We- 
ber, who started a trend in fash- 
ion advertising. 

But a spokeswoman for Ar- 
mani said that their posters, with 
stony-faced men in slick hairdos,' 
were inspired by the statues of 
German athletes in the 1930s. 


Greek Opposition Sees Chance for Power 


By Jonathan C Randal 

Washington Past Service 

ATHENS — To Constantine 
Mitsotakis. the Greek opposition 
leader. Prime Minister Andxeas Pa- 
pan dreou's surprise withdrawal of 
support for the re-election of Presi- 
dent Constantine rammanlK was a 
blunder. As a result, Mr. Mitsota- 
kis says, his conservative New De- 
mocracy Party could regain power. 

Mr. Caramanlis, ?£ who re- 
signed as president after Mr. Fa- 
pandreou’s move Saturday, was re- 
garded as a buffer who prevented 

Printers in Italy 

Strike for a Day 

Reuters 

ROME — Italy was without 
newspapers Thursday because of a 
24-hour strike by printers, the lat- 
est in a series of stoppages by press 
workers and journalists demandi ng 
the renewal of their annual con- 
tracts. 

Journalists at RAI, the sta- 
te-owned radio and television net- 
work. also hdd coordinated stop- 
pages that reduced the local 
content of news broadcasts. They 
were demanding new wage con- 
tracts and were protesting political 
delays in nominations to the state 
network's governing body. 

Daily newspaper were to publish 
Friday, but another strike that be- 
gan Thursday morning was expect- 
ed to bah operations at Italian 
news agencies for 48 hours. 


I prime 

carrying out threats to dose US. 
military bases and to pull Greece 
out of NATO and the European 
Community. 

With Mr. Caramanlis gone, the 
centrists — who traditionally de- 
cide Greek elections, and who vot- 
ed overwhelmingly for the Social- 
ists in 1981 as a gesture against Mr. 
Caramanlis — now are faced with 
the prospect of complete rale bv 
the left. They are also concerned 
about Mr. Papandreou's proposed 
constitutional amendments that 
would sharply curtail presidential 
powers. 

Mr. Fapandxeou has indicated 
be would call elections for May 5. 
although they are not required until 
October. 

The prime minister's move 
against Mr. Caramanlis has pro- 
voked opposition charges of deceit 
and unreliability. Similar charges 


have been made for years against 
Mr. Mitsotakis, 66, for his role in 
the 1965 downfall of the govern- 
ment of Mr. Papandreou's father, 
George Papandreou. 

Many Greeks still agree with An- 
dreas Papandreou’s charges that 
Mr. Mitsotakis was a “traitor” for 
having left the centrist government 
of George Papandreou and having 
taken pari in an unsuccessful right- 
ist cabinet favored by the royal 
family. 

Andreas Papandreou and others 
charge that Mr, Mitsotakis' with- 
drawal helped lead to the army 
coup that imposed a military dicta- 
torship from 1967 to 1974." 

Mr. Mitsotakis said he would be 
pressing charges of unreliability 
against Mr. Papandreou, and “111 
be saying it very clearly and every 
day." 

“Andreas is on the defensive,” 
Mr. Mitsotakis said. 


Arguing that the “vast majority” 
of Greeks support his pro-Western 
and free-entoprise policies, Mr. 
Mitsotakis said that the totally un- 
acceptable hoodwinking of Cara- 
manlis” now “makes it much easi- 
er” to defeat Mr. Papandreou. 

But some political analysts say 
that Mr. Mitsotakis would face a 
tough battle against the charismat- 
ic prime minister in an election. 

Although “SO to 85 percent of 
the Greeks” are against confronta- 
tion with the United States, Mr. 
Mitsotakis said, “Certainly there 
are objective reasons to criticize 
Washington." 

Washington's support for the 
former military junta has left a resi- 
due of strong ami-Americamsm 
that Mr. Papandreou has used to 
his advantage. As a result. Mr. Mit- 
sotakis said, "The U.S. government 
should be very careful” about criti- 
cizing Mr. Papandreou. 


\S. Backs IJN Resolution Containing Criticism ofSahxidoi 


By Iain Guest 

■International Herald Tribune 
•.ENEVA— Xu a surprise move, 
_ ini ted States has voted to ao- 
a United Nations resolution 
"describes B Salvador’s legal 
as “patently inadequate.” 
■ resolution also calls for coufin.- 
-iialogue between the Salvador- 
" overmnent and the leftist guex- 
’ ^ and urges all states to rrfrain 
i “any rape of intervention” in 
dlvadors dvfl, war. 
te UN Human Rights Com- 
" ion accepted the resolution 
' Wednesday, 39-0, noth three 


abstentions. The United Stales, 
which provides military and eco- 
nomic support to the Salvadoran 
government, joined the Soviet 
Union and Nicaragua in voting in 
favor. Cameroon, Chma and the 
Philippines abstained. It was the 
first time the Reagan administra- 
tion had supported a UN human- 
rights resolution on El Salvador. 

Delegates said the U.S. vote be- 
came possible after Costa Rica and 
Venezuela, the joint sponsors of the 
resolution, dropped a caD for a sus- 
in weapons sales to the 
i government 


The commission’s staff report cm 
El Salvador aitidzed both govern- 
ment forces and leftist guerrillas 
for human-rights violations, in- 
cluding the taking of lives of non- 
combatants. 

It said that “the capacity of the 
legal system to investigate and pun- 
ish human-rights violations com- 
mitted in the country continues to 
be patently inadequate.” 

But the report welcomed wfaath 
said were President Jos6 Napolerin 
Duarte’s attempts to promote de- 
mocracy, to control abuses and to 


open a political dialogue with the 
guerrillas. 

Also Wednesday, the commis- 
sion expressed concern at the con- 
tinuation of “politically motivated 
violence” in Guatemala. 

' The commission also passed a 
resolution expressing hs “distress” 
at what it said were widespread 
human-rights violations in Afghan- 
istan. The vote was 26-8 with 8 
abstentions. Another resolution de- 
nouncing torture and summary ex- 
ecutions in Iran was approved, 21- 
5, with 13 abstentions. 


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s*;V-*' 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1985 



Dow Jones Averoaes 


OPM him Low Lad Chn 

Indus 125802 WM! 125430 126005 — 145 

Trans 60604 «M4f #22.17 6CS04 — 107 

U«l 14800 M?.14 J£.U W7-93 — 051 

Camp 51157 515AS 50095 51154— 1J2 


1 1 NYSE Diaries 1 


aw 

Pro*. 


730 

4SS 


775 

1037 

UnCtalMAd 

475 

473 


1910 

T9PS 

NOW HUB 

41 

44 

NOW LOWS 

7 

11 

VoiunMiip 

Volu»n* dawn 

39406040 

4201*510 




NYSE Index 


hu Low cibm Cr*t 
Com post I, IBM) mfio mil — 0.13 

industrials 1190a nui nui —an 

Tramp. 98JM 71 U TIM —044 

Utillti** 5340 SSM S3jS3 -1-009 

PfcWlCS 107 JO HU! 10704 +004 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


MW* 13. 
March ». 
March 11 . 
March 8 _ 
March 7 _ 


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Bn Sotos *sm 

mat S2#sa UM 

204019 556732 10U 

181538 565,785 627 

1S7J69 475051 UM 

181i7I3 474096 W52 


Thursdays 

MSE 

Closing 


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Prcr.fPJto wl_ WUflM 

Prw CDOHdMoM doss 1K1MJM 


T dries Ineitide the nnttonwkle prices 
up to the doting on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Asso cia t e d Ptess 


!■ i Mirr 


NASDAQ Index 


• ‘ 

AOwnd 

am 

341 

m». 

173 

; DHinid 

267 

362 

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254 

2S6 

Total issues 

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791 

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12 

13 

mw Leva 

5 

4 

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VefamcdMa 

4057095 

yntruv. 



Comport* 

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Finance 

iMoranc* 

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29554 — 1J0 31103 

mu* — ais sxlst mat 

dLJt— 0.11 32243 32349 
2j££_ M2 aus$ 

MW +023 MU6 
wn-id WJf 2*0*7 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


Htotr LM dam Cb’vs 
Mtustrlals 19941 1W3? Wffl— H? 


lodustrlats 
Tram .. 
UtWttos 


Compose* 


15441 153.13 15355— 044 
J875 7BJD 7844 +012 
»q mu SU4 +0B2 
17853 177-61 17754—035 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Whittles 

Industrial! 






NYSE Prices Decline Slightly 


y 




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in 

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United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange declined in active trading 
Thursday with little in the news to inspire 
buying interest. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which 
dropped 10.05 Wednesday, fell 1.65 to 1.260.05. 

Declines topped advances slightly. Volume 
totaled 103.4 mfllinn shares, up from 101.7 
million traded Wednesday. 

The action of the last few weeks tells me 
stock prices are at a level considoed an equilib- 
rium/ said David M. Polen, an investment 
adviser. "The upward swing [since early Janu- 
ary] has brought them to a level whrae new 
buying interest will not develop unless new 
positive information comes op to the plate.'’ 

Mr. Polen. said the stock market would like to 
see some move toward reduction of the federal 
budget deficit. He added that die market 
“stopped going up at the same exact moment 
Federal Reserve Chairman Paul A. Vokker stud 
the Fed slopped easing , and it’s dear that die 
market is dancing to that tune.” 

Before the stock market opened. The Com- 
merce Department reported (hat U.S. business 
inventories increased *2. 16 trillion in January to 
£568.43 billion. 

After the dose, the Federal Reserve reported 
that M-l, the narrowest measure of the UiL 
money supply, decreased $400 million in the 
week ending March 4. Analysts had been ex- 
pecting a decline. 

U.S. Trust Co. raised its broker loan rate to 
914 percent from 9tt percent and Bankers trust 
raised its broker loan rate to 10 percent from 9V4 
percent. 


M-l FaUs $44)0 Million 

The Assodmed Press 

NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 
die US. money supply, M-l,fcIl $400 million in 
eariy March, the Federal Reserve reported 
Thursday. 

It dropped to a seasonally adjusted average of 
$572.4 mffion in the week ended March 4 from a 
revised $5718 billion the previous week, the 
central bank said. The previous week’s figure 
originally was reported as $572.7 bSliozL 

M-l is a measure of money supply growth 
that includes currency in circulation, travelers 
cheelcs and checking deposits at f inancial insti- 
tutions. 

Hugh Johnson of First Albany Corp„ Alba- 
ny, New York, said there were signs that the 
Federal Reserve was "in the process, in a very 
measured way, of moving against excessive 
monetary growth." 

“It’s somewhat obvious that with the exces- 
sive monetary growth, regardless of the dollar, 
the Fed will be required to tighten somewhat, 
and I don’t expect conditions to change, for 
another four to eight weeks,” Mr. Johnson said. 

Jon Groveman of Ladenbur^ Thalmann & 
Co„ Inc. noted that the high degree of optimism 
that was present a few weeks ago appeared to be 
evaporating rapidly, a condition that could set 
the stage far a renewed advance. 

He said the stock market appears to be 
searching for a bottom and a rally could start as 
soon as next week. 


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iC$ 

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arch 15, 1985 


Hcralbii^SSrtbung 

WEEKEND 


Page 7 


avid Levine: Statements About Drawing 


*2 1 «* • HZ - ' •* 

*1;:. : : 7 '■ 



- (• 


! V 


P ARIS —That tweedy man with the 
watercolor box in the Louvre, the 
one with a smooth ovoid face and 
graying hair who is making color 
otes on DavicTs Sabine women, is no copy- 
• t or Sunday painter. He is David Levme, 
'us celebrated caricaturist and less celebrat- 
•i but impassioned painter. 

- He paints each summer at Coney Island, 
‘ hich more or less dictates his choice of 
; ibjects, and after a lifetime of making small 
lain tings he is going to start on a 22 -foot 
atexfroni scene. So he looks at sach epic 
iaintings as "Napoleon at the Pest House at 
.iffa" — "Not that I think of Coney Island 
;» a pest house,” he adds. 'Well aware of his 
over to wound, he watches his words as 
frefully as his line. 

* His paintings are highly accomplished and 
miniscent in style of such earner Amori- 
ms as Glackens or Eakins. They don't often 
^t reviewed, Levine says, and his supporters 
jtvide into painting and caricature camps. 
‘Each one says why are you doing so much 
•f the other?* 

? From Paris, where 80 of Ms caricatures are 
•a exhibit at the Galerie Claude Bernard 
jztii April 6 , he gpes to AIM to see the 
. oulo use-Lau trees, and then to Barcelona. 

Mary Blume 


opportunity to say more than anyone else, 1 
can't say enough.” 

He drew Ronald Reagan cheerfully 
thumbing his nose at the world and said, “If 
1 can’t awaken the American people with 
that one, what can 1 say?” 

B UT be knows he cannot awaken the 
American people. "The dog wags the 
taQ. Power is power and art power is 
not power. What Kissinger does is going to 
affect life, not what David Levine says about 
Kissinger.'' The most he can do, he says, is to 
say what other people might quietly be 
thinking. "It defines my feelings which con- 


firms other people's feelings. I’m happy with 
that, but I think I know my place” 

At Erasmus Hall High School in Brook- 
lyn, he was voted the school cartoonist 
When World War II broke out he was se- 
t reprimanded for drawing students 
5 through the school arch, under a 
statue of Erasmus with tears falling from his 
eyes. 

His parents derided that be should have 
proper art training if he wanted to be a 
cartoonist He spent a year with Hans Hof- 
mann, the distinguished mentor of the Ab- 
stract Express orustsTa group Levine detests 
(his drawing of Jackson Pollock suggests 
that the famous "dribbler” is urina ting on 


•*>"— *-• . ; '» ■> 
l •• i? k, 

irv . .»*» * 

ft* * * 



:• I :i don't visit rides so much as museums. I 
I) : • ;jn a traditionalist who lives like a museum 
, ;j » u in — how many paintings can I see?” 

;J ! The details he sees in museum paintings — 

» low, for example a stiff collar imposes a 
\. ~:srtain head position — will be recalled and 
:; a - ■ ised when be makes a caricature of a long- 
'■ < ‘ jead writer. His memory is formidable, and 
■ 'nforgiving. “1 don’t let go.” he says. When 
V-e mentions Barcelona he immediately 
-- — blinks of the first time he heard the name, 
p — .hen the Republicans were defeated there in 
: lie Spanish Civil War. *T cried, I was vexy 
t - ivdved. 1 cursed L4on Blum before I knew 
< - ho he was because he had denied arms to 
1 ” « Republicans.” 

While most Americans think of Gerald 
- ord as an amiable bumbler, he remembers 
; u-ie Ford-Dirksen partnership in Congress 
‘ -ad draws Ford as brutal ana sinister. “Be- 
•I : £ ,des, he was sinister m the way he concocted 
, . ■ > get Nixon off the book. He’s not a joke.” 

“ • *. Levine even remembers as far bade as 
• - ; ester day and is bonified that Geraldine 
1 : , ‘ erraro would sign up for Pepsi-Cola com- 
) 'terrials. "I thmk she was invested with a 
.. attain responsibility, not to do anything for 
buck likelier husband. Where do principles 
:: : .nd, or start?” 

• ' The most famous living caricaturist, and 
•' ! ■’lie most imitated (especially by the English, 

' \ie says, because they are good draftsmen), 

'- ovine was bom in Brooklyn and now lives 
•ght years away in Brooklyn Heights. His 
. . arents were of the left and very political. "I 
ill think politically,” Levine says. “There 
. t re days when 1 don’t dare read The New 
. . - ork Times,! get so furious. I who have the Levine’s de Gaulle. 



from “T>* Am of Dovid Uv*eT Alfrad A. Knopf (1978) 


the canvas, although he admir ed Hofmann’s 
vitality and enthusiasm. 

In a scholarly foreward to “The Arts of 
David Levine” (Knopf, 1978), Thomas S. 
Buechner finds in Levine's drawing influ- 
ences of such graphic artists as Daumier and 
Doi£ and Will Eisner, who drew comic strips 
and was expert in the use of hatched shadow 
(made up of closely set parallel lines). Le- 
vine’s virtuoso hatching has helped give him 
enormous range wi thin the limi t's his work 
imposes. 

He became a caricaturist through making 
drawings to head various sections of Esquire 
magazine. He began working for his main 
client. The New York Review Of Books, two 
weeks after h began, in 1963. 

Until then, he says, most book reviews 
were illustrated by dust jacket photographs 
that looked as if they had been taken by the 
author’s parents. Once he started providing 
drawings, be said, “It was like water on a 
blotter, they couldn't get enough- It was an 
arena that had been so unattended.” 

He draws only on commission and never 
from life. When he is asked to make a carica- 
ture to accompany a review, he asks for as 
many pictures as possible. “1 ask for variety 
and for ones where the modeling of light to 
dark is there ” For historical figures he often 
has to rely on lOth-hand engravings of van- 
ished portraits. "If I can convince yon that 
that’s the way he looked, that's enough,” he 
says. 

“It’s a much more haphazard procedure 
that you thmk, " he adds. 

His view of a subject is usually dictated by 
the review his drawing will accompany. So in 
one drawing Shakespeare will look like a 
dainty youth, in another the cynical student 
of Tudor statecraft 


L EVINE’S political caricatures followed 
the literary ones. “I feel Tm in control 
i of the distortion according to what I 
want to say.” Eleanor Roosevelt cranes out 
relatively unblemished, while the scar that 
Lyndon B. Johnson proudly reveals on his 
stomach is shap ed like Vietman and the lines 
of Charles de Gaulle’s face are hatched into 
monumental disdain. Richard Nixon vari- 
ously appears as the Godfather, Captain 
Queeg and a little Bo Peep with five o'clock 
shadow. 

When Time magazine (he has done covers 
for both Time and Newsweek) asked Mm to 
draw the azcbconservafive William Buckley, 
Levine was astonished since both he and 
Time knew the result would be devastating. 
“1 said how come you're coming to me when 
you know m attack? They said we’re aware 
of that, but you don't destroy.” 

“I can see the humanity in aO these people, 
too ” Levine says. If he is by nature a moral- 
ist, he emphasizes that ins drawings are 
statements about drawing and not state- 
ments about people. The-idea that a portrait 
gives some sort of penetrating inner view of 
the subject is, be sap, bunk. 

“I fed deeply,” he says, "and that ani- 


mates me, too. As far as I'm concerned. In 
the one time you have around you have to 
react exquisitely, whether it is p ainf ul or not. 
Otherwise you’re numb. Besides” he unex- 
pectedly adds, “I have a new backhand." 

He hasn’t tried out his new backhand yet 
but be thinks about it a lot. He is a tennis 
fanatic and says he gets ideas about move- 
ment and character from playing. 

"My tennis game is the game of a cartoon- 
ist, which is cute, funny, and inconsistent.” 
If he played as consistently as Bjorn Borg, be 
reasons, he would be as boring. He has made 
drawings of tennis players as a fan and 
without much success. “Oh. that’s not a nice 
thing to do,” Ken Rosewall said when Le- 
vine showed him his drawing. 

Usually people don't react as strongly as 
one might expect, although Norman Mailer 
stops talking to Levine for a while after a 
caricature of him appears. “The word carica- 
ture relieves people of having to believe it's a 
likeness” Levine says. 

Levine reckons that he has drawn a couple 
of thousand caricatures for The New York 
Review alone. 

"1 enjoy them all," he says. “I liked doing 
them. But I wouldn’t want to meet their 
mothers.” ■ 



David Levine. 



Levine's Picasso. 


Fioni Th* Am gf David LtHttm." Alfred A. Knofrf flBTB) 


Through Eugene Atget's Dual Lens 


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EW YORK — Over the last four 
years the Museum of Modern 
Art’s department of photography 
has organized a series of four ma- 
ir exhibitions involving dose to 500 photo- 
; raphs, supervised the publications of Tour 
' -i xquisitely reproduced books and devoted 
n acounted hours to research and writing, all 
: s ith .one aim: to establish Engine Atget 
. ''.857-1927) as a great photographer. 

: With the third and fourth exhibitions si- 
lultaneously opened at the museum this 
: ,-edc and the fourth book coming off the 
. resses, it now seems safe to say that the 
« fodem has accomplished its mission. There 
; 9 • no longer any doubt, if there ever was, that 
-tget is one of the great practitioners of the 
•' ‘tedium. But one question: What exactly is it 
>iat makes Aiget great? 

> The question remains because two polar 
( possibilities have been presented. On the one 
'and, we have been told that his work repre- 
. aits the apogee of straightforward, trans- 
. axent, no-trilJs-photography, done with im- 
- latched directness, unpretentiousness and 
; ~ Toroughncss. His dedication to a self-im- 


posed, encyclopedic task that went on for 
some 30 yeans — that of recording the ves- 
tiges of traditional French life before they 
were bulldozed by modernity — is surely a 
measure of this accomplishment. However, 
ihe museum is also Idling us something else, 
something more specific and more peculiar 
to its own sense of photography as a form of 
art: namely, that Atget is no less than the 
founding father of Modernist photography. 

What it means to call Atget a Modennst is 
a vastly complicated subject — especially 
since the photographer’s chief enthusiast, 
John Szarkowski, the museum's director of 
photography, has gone on record saying that 
photography by nature is a modem art. But 
in essence it suggests that the photographer 
knew what he was doing. His apparent 
awareness of the frame, his ability to com- 
pose on the basis of black-and-white tonali- 
ties, his ready acceptance of the oddities of 
lenticular perspective, of juxtaposition and 
reflection — all serve as evidence that Atget 
was not a naif who stumbled accidentally on 
a new way of using the camera but, in Szar- 
kowskTs words, “a conscious artist.” 

So we would appear to have a choice 
between looking on Atget as an exemplary 
documentary photographer and seeing him 


as a formally innovative artistic genius. Or. 
perhaps, we nave the luxury of seeing him as 
both. Certainly both aspects of his work are 
evident in the shows that run through May 
14 at the museum: “The Auden Regime” 
and “Modem Tunes.” 

The 120 pictures of "The Ancien Regime” 
are devoted primarily to the classically in- 
spired gardens of Saint-Good, Sceaux and 
Versailles. They are, paradoxically, more 
“artistic” than documentary in spirit, and 
more 20th than 1 9th century inf edmg. They 
show Atget at his most elegiac, ethereal and 
poetic — especially those taken al Sceanx, an 
overgrown ruin, within the last five years of 
Mshfe. 

In the pictures of “Modem Tunes,” con- 
versely, the subjects are erf the 20 th century 
but Atget's way of seeing them seems of an 
earlier age. Nowhere is this more dear than 
in the images that contain automobiles. The 
date that Atget first allowed them to cross 
the threshold of his view camera has not 
been fixed with certainty, but it is dear that 
he avoided horseless carriages as long as 
possible. When they do appear, as in a 1922 
image of Boulevard de Bonne-Nouvelle, 
their presence comes as a shock. Instead of 
being dynamic and animated, as they are in 


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XI 


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the young Jacques- Henri Lartigue’s pictures 
from 1912, they appear as still and ancient as 
the wide sidewalks they are parked next to. 

Indeed, the stateliness ana formality of all 
his views of Paris in the 1 920s belie the dty*s 
status as the capita] of avant-garde culture 
and ni^t Hfe of the time. His 1925 photo- 
graph of the cafe Le Ddme, at the height of 
Montparnasse's days as an artists’ hangout, 
shows it almost empty, coated in a dreamy 
mist- Similarly, the prostitutes, gypsies and 
small tradesmen that he portrayed/ with com- 
sionate skill seem to come to us from a 
; far more rustic than 20 th-century. 

B UT there is more than atmosphere at 
work in making these images redolent 
of temps perdu. Atget’s style is more 
conservative and controlled than in the paric 
pictures of “The Ancien Regime.” It is, if 
any thing comparable to that of Charles 
Marvin e, whose extensive survey of Paris in 
the 186teL in advance of Baron Haussmamfs 
street-widening crews, serves as a precedent 
for Atget's endeavors. The images of Saint- 
Goud and Sceaux are clearly the more Mod- 
ernist and, in their abandonment of practi- 
cally any pretense of reportage, the more 
ilhisiomstic. 

In the two exhibitions, then, Atget is 
shown both ways: as primitive and as pio- 
neer, as the tradesman photographer whose 
business provided Documents pour Artistes 
and as a genius of aesthetic discovery unrec- 
ognized until after his death. But Szar- 
kowski, having long championed Atget’s 
case, clearly is most concerned with giving 
the photographer a preeminent position 
withm-his own rubric of 20 th-century pho- 
tography. Consequently, in the essay that 
accompanies the book “The Work of Atget: 
Modem Times'* (Museum of Modem Art, 
$45), he devotes most of his space to describ- 
ing how Atget’s work was received by the 
next generation of photographers. He ar- 
gues, albeit in an 


t poo 
eflipt 

hs of- 



l-buds over Versailles. 


ideal, tentative way, 
that the photographs of Atget directly influ- 
enced those of such primary American Mod- 
ennsts as Berenice Abbott, Ansel Adams, 
Walker Evans and Edward Weston. 

Except in the case of Abbott, who saved 
the bulk of Atget's work and was quite 
obviously taken by it, this influence is not so 
easy tosee.^ 

Given this rather strained effort to con- 
struct a chain influence forward from Atget, 
it is peculiar that Szarkowski has nothing to 
say about how Atget may have -been influ- 
enced by photographers who came before 
him. It is especially odd since the curator's 
collaborator on this long prqject, Maria 
Morris Hamboura, is not only a scholar of 
Atget but also of MarviHe, the photographer 
whose kinship with Atget is most obvious. 
Nor are we told of tbeFrench Mission Hfclio- 
graphique of 1851. one of the first photo- 
graphic surveys ever commissioned, of sub- 
sequent attempts to preserve and record 
aspects of the "old order” of France, or of 
Atget’s contemporaries the Seebergers, who 
also took it as thdr mission to document 
tum-<^-the-centiiry Fans. Such comparisons 
would help put Atget in the perspective of 
history, but they would not help Szaikows- 


In the garden at Sceaux. 


ki’s attempt to place Mm in a totally Mod- 
ernist context 

G early ,’A tget is neither a purely historical 
figure nor a purely modem one. Indeed, Ms 
importance to us today is largely a matter of 
Ms position as a hinge joining 1 9th- and 
20tMcentuiy ways erf seeing the world. Be- 
sides spanning pre-industrial and industrial 
France, Ms work bridges die gap between 
photography as a transparent, almost anony- 
mous record of reality and as an artisne 
construct practiced self-consciously and in- 
tentionally. As the critic Ben Lifson wrote in 
198 1, on toe occasion of the museum’s 
tag Atget show, “Atget's genius comes 
the reconciliation, often within angle pic- 
tures, of documentation and lyricism, of ob- 
jective fact and personal perception.” By this 
account, Atgets greatness does not fie in 
either his documentary or aesthetic abilities, 
but in their synthesis. 

But what makes Atget great also involves 
what he managed to say with this synthesis, 
and what it means to us today. 'His un- 
matched ability to express a sense of loss ta 




the face of an increasiiigly machine-oriented, 
homogenized, rapidly paced world surely 
offers as much solace now as it did 75 years 
ago. More than any other photographer, he 
makes explicit photography’s ability to ren- 
der all things nostalgic, so that the past 
seems to ache in us. Nowhere is this demon- 
strated more convincingly than in Atget’s 
pictures of ihe gardens of Sceaux, where the 
tangled vines, overgrown weeds and fallen 
statues we see are, tike photographs them- 
selves , metaphors of what cannot be repos- 


“TTie Ancien Regime” — which opened in 
1983 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston — 
will travel to the Sl Louis Art Museum (June 
1 3 -July 28) and the Montreal Museum of Fine 
Am (Aug 29-Oct. 27); " Modem Times” can 
also be seen at the Minneapolis Institute of 
Arts (Nov. 1 6 Jan. 5, 1986). the Detroit Insti- 
tute of Arts (Map 13 June 29, 1986) and the 
Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington (Nov. 
11. 1986- Jan. 4 1987). ■ 

» 1985 The New Yori Times 


■% 



Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH IS, 1985 


„ ftiM AM0 


TRAVEL 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


AUSTRIA (Bach, Mahler). cal de France. Michel Trenchant con- 

March 17: London Philharmonic Or- duetor(Boascb, Mefano). 

chestra, Maurice Handford couduc- EXHIBITION — To April 8‘. ‘’Klaus 
VIENNA. Konzert h ausftel: 72.12.1 1). tor, William Stephenson piano (Han- Rinke." 

CONCERTS — March 16: Vienna del, Rachmaninov). •Eysie Montswtrcftd; 252-25. 15). 

Chamber Orchestra, Paul Angerer Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- JAZZ — March 19: Benefit for Kenny 
conductor rHaydn). speare Company —March 16, 18, 19: Oarise, "So Long Kenny," Maau Du- 

March20: 0 RF Sympb ony Orchestra, ‘Twelfth Nighr (Shakespeare). bango, Claude Nogaro, Lavdle, Dee 

GQnther Schuller conductor (Gruber, March 20 and 21: “Mother Courage" Dee Bridgewater." 

Schuller). (Brecht)- •Mempis Melody (td: 329.60. 73 L 

RECITALS — March 16:Ivo Pogore- March 22 and 23: “Comedy of Errors" JAZZ — March J9: Yves Chdala pW 
ticti piano (Chopm, Schumann). (Shakespeare). ano. 

March 22: Martin Hasdbflck organ •Hayward Gallery (tel: 928.57.08). »Mus6e d’Art Modeme (tel: 


Maxdi2l:ClandioAbbadooonductor CONCERT — March 20: GroupeVo- HAMBURG. Staatsopcr (tel: 


Geneva and Its Treasures 


VIENNA. Kouzerthausftel: 72.12.1 IL 
CONCERTS — March 16: Vienna 


cal de France. Michd Trenchant con- 
ductor (Bousch, Mefano). 
EXHIBITION —To April 8: ‘'Klaus 
Rinke.** 

•Eysfe Montmartre (tel; 25223.15). 


35.15,55)- | 

OPERA — March 20: “Arabella" (R. | 
Strauss). 

March 22: “Madame Butterfly" (Puc- 
cwj). ‘ , 

MUNICH, National Theater (tel: | 


# in 


tlu* Ii 
tli<* F 


by Paid Hofmann 


SchuBer). (Brecht). 

RECITALS — March 16:lvo Pogore- March 22 and 23: “Comedy c 
tich piano (Chopin, Schumann). (Shakespeare). 

March 22: Martin Hasdbfldt organ • Hayward Gallery (tel: 9282 
(Bach, Liszt). EXHIBITIONS —To April 

•Mosikvercm (td: 65.81.90). noir ” “John Walker Pauti 

CONCERTS — March 20 and 21: Vi- thq Albw n i n ) tv winia Sgi ft ' 
enna Symphonilcer. Juri Ah- •! Cyi li«wim (rri- 876 


Oaike. “So Long Kenny," Maau Du- 22.1316). 

bangs, Claude Nognra, Lavdle, Dee OPERETTA— Feb. 17 and 19' “Die 

Dee Bridgewater." Fledexmaus” (J. Strauss). 

•MemmsMdodvftd: 329.60. 73L 

JAZZ— March J9: Yves Chdala pi- ' 


G ENEVA — Archaeologists digging 
.below the Cathidrale Saint- 
Pierre, in which Calvin used to 
preach austerity, recently hit a 
dump of 300 ancient silver pieces. An inhab- 
itant of what is today Geneva buried the 
coins about 2,050 years ago, perhaps because 
be knew, that the legions of Julius Caesar 
would soon march into the strategic city at 
the point where the Rhone River rushes out 
of the largest Alpine lake, and he feared the 
greed of the R oman soldiers. 

Today Geneva hoards immeasurably vas- 
ter treasures; the underground safes in the 
majestic bank buildings reach so deep, tier 
below basement tier, as to approach the 
water table. Wealthy people from all over the 


•Hayward Gallery (tel: 928.57.08). aMusfle d’Art Modeme (tel: 

EXHIBITIONS — To April 21 : “Re- 72331.27). . . . _ „ 

noir ” “John Walker Paintings &xxn EXHIBITION— To March 3 1 : “Gus- ATHENS, Aihens An GaBay (td: 
the Alba and Oceania Series.” tav Mahler.” SlrciSS:-.. 


ranowitsch conductor (Franck, Profo- OPERA — March 16 and 21: “Count 
kiev). Orv" (Rossini). 


•London CoUseom (tel: 836.01 .11). •Music de la PabSdli (td: 246. EXHIBITION— March 18-30: “Klir- 


(td: 53240). 


1309) ' onomos. , 

EXHIBITION — To April 15: torFolk An and Tradition 


r (Beethoven). “French FOm Posters." 


(Mb 324J937). 
EXHIBITION — ' 


OPERETTA— March 22: “The Land aRoyal Academy of Arts (tel: aMusie du Grand Palais (tel: EJanBmON— ToMay:*ToIkArt 
of Smiles*’ (UhSr). 734.90-52). 261.54.10). ^TrwlilwnorTJraa. 


BELGIUM 


734.90-52). 261.54 IOl anuiraaiuanainiace." 

Mrffi0N-T0M a rch3I:“Cha. OMBlAoNS - To April 15: ^fn^^TowS 


anon" I 

Froadi Countryside." • Kourd GaDerv (tel: 36U1.I3\_ I deposit or withdraw funds or to oversee their 


— ToMardi3I:“Kan- 








'v‘*. 


MW**. ****<# 7*. 

ssltsm ks 

Snnderlins conductor Malcolm chad Colder” (Confer, Profotaev). XVmCenhirv" ">f\pwn. VI 


EXHIBITION— To March 30: “Folk 
AnbyTbeofxlos." 


Sanderlmg conductor. Malcolm w „- a i L m,.in 

Frager piano (Mendelssohn, Schu- ICa P°- 

puiuu i. awo*™, owiu- ^ e j Mcmtecdu (Bellini). 

„ /..t. *TaieGallery(td:82I.13.]3). 


ffunn) . 

•Royal Flemish Opera (tel: 
233.66J5S). 

OPERETTA — March 16, 17, 20, 22: 
“Gr&fm Maritza” (Kalman). 


Mnste Rodin (id: 705.01.34). 
XHIBmONS— 1 To Man* 18: “Ro- 


lis Kyprafos." 


•TaieGalJo 7 (td: 821.13.13). ‘ 

EXHIBITIONS — To March 31: 

“WIDiam James Muller," “John Walk- 5jS™*J;2SffiSSSfnS%n 

w SSET^^ch^i^'fLe^a 


deposit or withdraw funds or to oversee their 
investments. 

The elegant, cosmopolitan city of 180,000 
is welT worth a visit even if you have no 
dealings with its financial institutions. Plen- 
ty of good music can be heard, its museums 




FRANCE 


hint: 


MT. BLANC — ~ 


ZZZLukeQvMv aZzz 


-jatifEau. 


and its many an galleries are among Eu- 
rope’s best, and the winter resorts of the 


wa kuuui IQT/LTMA " W 1 OCUUCaC TOIU I UK 

“Griffin Maritza" (Kalman). Sv£2a ftd- BALLET — March 19-22: Le Jeune 

GHENT, Royal Opera (td: 25.24.25). Albert Museum (td. BaJleldtFnul<x _ 

OPERA — March 17: “The Rakes EXHIBITIONS — To April 14: “Mi- •ThAitre des Champs Elysies (td: 
Progress” (Stravinsky). chad ‘Angdo* Rooker (1743-1801) 723.47.77).. 


Progress” (Stravinsky). chad 

LIEGE, ThfeStre Royal (td: 23-59.10). and John' 
OPERA — March 16: “Turandot” To June 9: 
(Puccini). Constant 


Constantinople: watercolours by ductor (Mozart). 


DEMMARK 


Rond-Point (tel; 


Jean-Jaqucs 


-March 24: Glinka de 1a 


DUBLIN, Abbey Theatre (tel: 
74.45.05). 

THEATER — ■nuoudt March: “AD 
the Way Back” (Farrell). 

•Gate Theatre (td: 74405). 
THEATER — To March 31: “Two 
Faced” (Des KeoahL 
•National Concert Hall (tel: 
71.18-88). 

CONCERTS— Man* 21: New Irish 
Chamber Ordjestra, David Jones con- 


rope’s best, and the winter resorts of the 
nearby French Savoy region and Swiss Va- 
lais b«dcon. 

On a clear day the snowy ridges and the 
glaciers of the Mont Blanc massif, with a 
maximum height of 15,781 feet (4,807 me- 
ters) the highest peak in the Alps, are visible 
from many points in Geneva. 

Cross Che fast-flowing Rhone River to the 
south bank and walk up one of the narrow 
streets to the ViexDe Vme. This historic core 





HsajlM 




COPENHAGEN. Knud Grothe Gal- 


lerie (Id: 63.53.43). 

EXHIBITION — ToMarch30: “Dan- ^ narpa ' 

ish Naive Painters.” chord (Bach, Menddssofan). 

•Rosenboig Castle (id: 1532.86). 

EXHIBITION — To March 3 1 : “Am- BMUM B 

ber at Rosenborg." 

•Tivoli Hall (td: 14.17.65). 

BALLET — March 16, 18, 20: “Circus HELSINKI, Finlandia Hall (tel: 

n-.it— •• m cv — . 1 .A nr* 


of Geneva is one of Europe’s architectural 
gems. The hill on which the ancient seigh- 


iano. Alastair Ross harpsi- Ravel). 

ach, Mendelssohn). •Tht&tre Musical de Paris (tel: 

261.19.83)- 

— OPERA — March 16: “La Traviata” 

(Venfi). 


Bishop-Kovacevich piano (Brahms). 
•Projects Art Centre ( td: 7 1 3337). 


EXHEBmON— To 
Works by Thomas M 


gems. The hill on which the ancient neigh- 
borhood dusters is dominated by the Cam6- 
drale Samt-Piene. Built eidit centuries ago 
as a Roman Catholic church, it was stormed 


waterfront chalet (in France) where Lenin 
lived in 1914, “preparing the Russian Revo- 
Intion,” as the toor folder puts it. (The lake- 


neighboring Grand Th£&tre (Place Neovc 


Intion, as the toor folder puts iL (the lake- 
side residences are privately owned and not 


for opera and bail« performances. 
Among other offerings of the 


3: “Recent ; 


and taken over by the Protestant townspeo- 
ple in 1536, and became the religious bul- 
wark of John Calvin, the French reformer 
who was to rule Geneva for two decades as 
its spiritual leader and supreme lawgiver. 
The fortress-like cathedral, a biend of Ro- 
manesque, Gothic and neodassical styles, is 
bong restored, but its stark interior can be 
visited. The main service is at 10 AJtL on 
Sunday. An international monum ent to the 
Reformation rises in a park called Prome- 
nade des Bastions, southwest of the cathe- 
dral hill; statues of Calvin and three other 
Protestant leaders — Thfcodore de Btae, 
Guillaume Farel and John Knox — stand in 


Polka” (Robbins. Stravinsky), “Cap- 4024 1 ). 

priedo” (Balanchine. Stravinsky). CONCERTS — March 


ITALY 


20: Radio 


ony Orchestra, Erich Beigel COLOGNE, Oper der Stadt (lei: 


(Brahms, R. Strauss). 


21.25.81). 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). 


March 21: Helsinki Philharmonic Or- OPERA — March 11, 13, 19: “The 
ches Ira. David Shaitan conductor. Thievish Magpie” (Rossini). 

Fi w vl i n ■nil lflinAq AH ran (Ctminnalnr 1kjfn«4i 1 "7 nn/i T) 1 rthn an n 11 AUiit- 


Ferdinand Klinda organ (Stravinsky, March 17 


Tchaikovsky). 


Barbican Art Gallery — To April 8: RECITAL — March 17: Ferdinand March 20: “Madame Butterfly" (Pucr 
“MunchandihcWoiiers," Tradition Klinda oigan (Bach, Eben). dm> 


“MunchandihcWoiien," Tradition Klinda oigan (Bach, Eben). 

and Renewal: Contemporary Art in 

the Ge rman Democratic Republic." PRANCE 


March 16- April 14: “Mahler. Vienna.” 
Barbican Hall — London Symphony 


fWr Hr r « 5 r»H f fid- WLDGNA, Galleria d’Arte Mo- 
Opor aer btaat (lei. dema (id: 503839). 

. . , Q EXHIBITIONS — To March 18: “Le 

Corbusier: Journey to the Far East, 
Die (Kossun). 1911 ” 

22: Lohengrin” (Wag- ToApril30: “BranoSaettL” 

iWfrflu" rpnr * Tea tro Qsnnnale (td: 2229.99). 
ladame Bottemy” (Pucr RECITAL— March 18: GimgjoZag- 

am ^- _ . noni flute, Alddo Bennid viola, Gio- 

FRANKFURT, Cafe Theater (tel: vanmAdamo violin. Franca BnmiceL 
77.74. 66). lo(Mozait). 

THEATER— Through March: The 


side residences are privately owned ana noi 
open to the public.) 

Below the Palais des Nations is the Jardin 


Among other offerings of the wintei 
spring concert season: David Zmman car 
ducts BArtok. Mozart and Dvorak, Aprils _ 
Gilbert Varga conducts Tchaikovsky an ’ 

n a ■» nf, TJr- ^ aL. l - 


hothouses, an Alpine rock garden, a pond 
and a deer pen are the attractions. 

There are also splendid public parks on 
the south shore of Lake Geneva: among 
them the Parc de la Grange, which contains a 
rose garden and an 18th- century mansion, 
and the adjoining Parc des Eaux Yives, 
through which one ^allowed to drive. 


A shuttle bus links Cointrin Airpon with 
ie Gare Comavin, the central railroad sta- 


Barbican mil — London Symphony 

Orchestra — March 16: Richard PARIS, Centre Georges fVxnpidou 


Ifickox conductor (Bach). 


(id: 277.1233). 


WEEKEND 


and Tobia Scxrpa: architects and de- 1 
.signers," The Imaginary and the 
Real: Paolo De Pol£ Candid! Hot, 
ToniZaccberi." 

OPERA — March 17, 20, 22: “Die I 
Zauberildte” (Mozart). ' 


and such charmingly irregular squares as 
Place Bourg de Four — is distinguished by 
man y well-preserved houses as well as book- 
stores and businesses trading in antiques, 
paintings, sculptures, objets d’art and rugs. 


HOTELS 


HOTELS 


NAPLES. Museo di Capodimonte 
a41.08.81). 


a41.08.81). 

EXHIBITION —To April 14: The ; 

ill ^ u M i M ** 


Look at Galeries Hydra (12 Grand Rue). 
Interart (33-35 Grand Rue) or Gal eric Calil- 


***** The Grand Hotel in the mountains 

n * „ The hotel surrounded by snow-covered 

e T I forests. SldschooL Chairlift and skitifts to 

^ ^ v. tiie sunny slopes. Downhill runs to the 

vS' sisgJ Sy doorstep. Cross country skiing. 

Curling- and skating rinks. 

Elegant indoor swimming-pool 
N 1 Sauna and massage. Solarium. Bars. 

Dancing. Restaurant &an$ais «Le Miroira. 

SUVHETTA HOUSE ST. MORITZ 

v Phone 082-211 21 Telex 74491 R. F. MiUIer, Mgr. . 


17th Century Gvflizarion in Nmlra," 
Caravaaoo, Caracririlo, de Rioeras, 


Caravaggio, Caracriolo, de Riberas, 
Domemduno, paintings, marbles and 
furniture. 

■ ROME, Accademia Nazionaledi San- 
ta Cecilia (tel: 679JJ339). 

CONCERTS March 17-19: Or- 

cfaestre ddTAccademia Nazionale de 
Santa CecDm Gianandtea. Gavazzem 
conductor, Alessandro De Luca piano, 
Wieslaw Ochman tenor (Bartok, 
liszt). 


HOflRCHAMARTN 
MADRID 
378 TOtum. 

0uar«9s radttes. 
Fmtdaas. 


Estaridn Chamaitm. 28016 Madrid 
Tek(91) 733 71 H -7339011 
Tefejc 49331 HCHME 
Cable ENIURSA 


Interart (33-35 Grand Rue) or Gal eric CalO- 
Ieux (22 Rue Etienne Dumont). 

The Geneva Tourist Office (Tour de file, 
an island in the Rhone) will supply a cassette 
tape and recorder for a tour of the Yieifle 
V&le. Tapes are available in six languages 
including En glish; a deposit of about $20 is 
refunded upon return of the gadget 


NETHERLANDS 


AMSTERDAM, Concertgebouw(tek 


RESTAURANTS 


71.83.45). 

CONCERTS — March 16: Nether- 
lands Chamber Orchestra, Antoni 
Ros-Mazba conductor, Eliane Rodri- 
gues piano (Haydn, Mcnart). 

Marti 19: Raphael Quartet (Banokl 
RECITAL -—March 22: Charles van 

Tassd baritone. Marten van Nieuker- 
ken piano (Schumann). 
•Rgksnmseum Vincent Van Gogh 


£%ei&xeunn/ 

W 



GRAN HOTEL SARRIA 
BARCHONA 
314 roams 


GIWiD HOTEL 
SOTirfEMBICHL 


First dass 


(td: 76.48.811 

EXHIBITION— 


EXHEMTK 

Identity.” 


To April 15: “Dutch 


FRANKFURT: FINEST 1FZNE 
RESTAURANT 

srxa 1692 




G ci i ri« c h -Ptat«il dr then 1 
Germany 

The only Grand Hold 
hi Uppar-Bavoria 
Totafy imwutnd m 1984 
T«Ls (0)8821-7020 
CbMk 05-9632 


Ada. SarriS, 5CL 0BQ29 BanxJona 
Ta.052»n09 
Tetec 5TQ33 y 51638 OC8 E 
Cable: CRANHOTa 


PORTUGAL 


FESTIVAL 


LISBON, Calouste Gulbenkian 
Foun datio n (7331 31). 

CONCERT — Marti 20: Gulbenkian 
Orchestra Soloists (Brahms. Mozart). 
RECITALS — March 19: Seta Kara- 


T HE 400-foot fountain near the end of 
Jet tTEau. a jetty on the south bank of 
Lake Geneva, is a landmark and sym- 
bol of the city that doesn’t play during the 
cold months; even during the winter, howev- 
er, a sightseeing boat leaves daily at 10:15 
Ait and again at 3 PJSL bom the Quai du 
Mont Blanc for a tour that lasts one hour 
and 55 minutes. Ihe fare is about $5. En- 
glish-speaking guides point out the Palais 
des Nations, the complex on the north shore 
that was the headquarters of the short-lived 
League of Nations (1936 to 1946), and now 
booses United Nations offices. The world 
organization conducts guided tours of its 
Geneva home (call 31-02-11 or 34-60-11) 
whenever enough people want to see iL 
Passengers on the sightseeing boat always 
seem more interested in what are known as 
the famous residences around the lake: the 
Diodati villa where Byron stayed in 18 16, die 
Villa Barakat where the former Aga Khan 
died in 1958, a villa in winch Josephine 
(Napoleon’s first wife) once resided, and a 


the Gare Comavin, the central railroad sta- 
tion, a 10-minute ride. Tickets for Geneva’s 
buses and trolley cars are bought from vend- 
ing machines marking each stop. A 1.20- 
franc ticket entitles the holder to one hour’s 
travel with any number of transfers; children 
half fare. A 70-centime ticket is good for 
certain sections indicated on the network 
maps on the vending machines. An all-day 
pass for the entire system costs 5 francs, 
children under 11 half price; buy at the 
Geneva Transit window in the underpass in 
front of the Gare Comavin. 

Cabs are plentiful. For radio-dispatched 
taxis call 141, (a three-digit telephone num- 
ber), 21-22-23 or 94- 71-13. 

For side trips to the French Savoy or the 
Swiss Valais regions, or to other winter re- 
sorts; inquire; at. the joprist information of- 
fice in the. Gare Coroavin or at the bus 
terminal, Gare Rout&re (Place des Alpes). 

A private operator; Key Tours (7 Rue des 
Alpes; 31-41-40), conducts a full-day guided 
coach tour, with cable-car trips, to the Mont 
Blanc resort of Chamonix, in France, and up 
to the Aiguille du Midi and other peaks or 
glaciers. The tours are offered daily through- 
out the year, departing from the bus terminal 
at 8:30 AM, returning around 6 PM The 
price, which includes lunch, is about S50 a 
person, accompanied children between 4 
and 12. a little more than half price. The 
Swiss Federal Railroad has weekend bargain 
trips to various destinations; lock for posters 
at the Gare Comavin. 


Peter Schreier and Tom Krause, May 1. : 

On April 18, the Grand Th&tre will per 
sent “The Return of Casanova," with mus- .. 
by Girolamo Arrigo, after Artht*. 
Schni trier's novel; Reynold Giovamnef' 
will conduct ■ ' 

The Museum of Art and History (Rr ' 
Charles Galland) is currently offering tr 
special exhibitions: “Islam and Fignrariv ‘ 
Art” (through May 26) and “Everyday Ii' 
in the 15th Century” (dirough Sept 16) wi 
an abundance of paintings, prints, tapestn ' 
and artifacts. Elsewhere in the musag - 
don’t miss the Italian and Flemish art ai 


the altarpiece by the 15th-century punt 
Konrad wirtz, showing a background «k- - 
of Geneva. The museum is open from 
AM to 5 PM Tuesday through Sunda- 
admissiou is free. 

The Ethnographic Museum (65-67 Bold ' 
yard Carl Vogt) has a new Amazon fix 
Open 10 AM to noon and 2 to 5 PA. " 
Tuesday through Sunday; admission is fit ^ 

The Natural History Museum (Route * - 
Malagnou) currently features an exhitatir, - 
of living regional and exotic fish and reptik- . 
Open 10 AM to 5 PM Tuesday; throit- 
Sunday, admission is free. . ...i-t ■; . 


A MONG Geneva’s top-rated holds, L'i\ 
Armures (1 Puits Saint-Pierre; 28-9. ' ’ . 
-LA_72) stands out owing to its locate 
and decor. The comfortable rooms in a I6t ' 
century building on a quiet little square ne: '. _ 
the cathedral are all dirferenL A double wi' •’ 
bath costs $70 to $90. (All Geneva hotel nr; 
include continental breakfast) Other deftr ~ 
favorites, on or dose to the lake, are h : 
Richemond (Jardin Brunswick;' 31-14-0' 


Sfi 


T HE Orchestre de la Suisse Romaode, 
wdl known from its many recordings, 
calls the tiioeih Gentva’s rich musical 


_-E- calls the tiine^ Geflevi’s rich musical 
life. The group, founded by the late, imfor- 
gotten Ernest Ansermet, ^ves two Wednes- 
day concerts every month in Victoria Hall 
besides staffing the orchestra pit in the 




R«.i Utell International + Staigenbargcr 
Bat Service 


2T- FESTIVAL DE 


bashiaopiano (Gomides, Liszt). 
March 22: ElmvOlivdravtolm, Jorge 
Moyano piano (Mozart, Bcabovcn). 
•Trmdade Theatre (teL 53.88.71). 


j iTT 


HOLIDAYS 


PRIVATE FRENCH CHATEAUS 

iu Normandy, Brittany, Anjou, Poitou, 

Gnreale*. Atrvergoe, Languedoc, Burgundy, 

Qe-de- France, etc™ 

Weekends, short or long stays 
PAYING GUESTS WELCOMED BY OWNERS, 
Including board, meals and entertainment 
Catalog on request (US S5) from 


14-24 MARS 
24-30, quai cTAusterfitz 

Tif. &H-SH / Saa. Ota. II H - 20 H 
hann Mac. VtaalU H - H H 


BALLET— March 22: “Swan Lake" 
(Petipa, Tchaikovsky), Transparen- 
des(Jorgc, Freitas Braoco). 



BJ*. 4 - 78220 VTROFLAY - FRANCE 
TeL: 33 (3) 024.18.16 


PRIVATE CLINICS 


VALMONT 


WORLD RENOWNED MEDICAL CLINIC 

Glion-sirr-Moittreux, Lcdc« Genova/ Switzerland 

Located at 2,000 feet altitude in a modwate and protected dfanate, the 
cCnic has the -finest accommodations available for yov comfort. In a 
beautiful end ealm setting ovwiooidng the lake of Geneva and file Mart- 
Bianc chain the CLINIC VALMONT provides complete medfcxrf chedwips, 
outstanding medical care as well as rest, indMdual diet I rejuvenation. 
Centers are provided for eanMogy, p hysi o ther a py, uladratherapy, 
hy dr otherapy, ei ect rocord ioip or H, X-ray and laboratory analysis, 
fiooms with air conditioning. 

Plotao ask tor our brochuro and pricot. 

Write to Mr. K. Tuar - Director 
CLINIC VALMONT, 1*23 Ogoro-eur-Montre ux , Switeorfcsnd 
r e d epftewr 021 /&3 48 91 (10 Pnw] - Tdtox: 453 157 vabitf-cb 



EDINBURGH, National Gallery (teL- 
556,89311 

EXHIBrnON —To April 28: “The 
Face of Nature: Landscape drawings 
from the permanent coOection." 
•Usher Hall (tel: 228.1 135). 
CONCERT — Marcb22:ScottishNa- 
tioual Orchestra, Neeme Jarvi conduc- 
tor, Elisabeth Sodcrstrom soprano 
(Korsakov, Tchaikovsky). 
GLASGOW, City Hall (tel: 
■55239.61). 

CONCERTS — Scottish Chamber Or- 
chestra — March 17: Matthias Bamert 
conductor, Paul Tortelier cdk> (Bar 
men. Mozart). 

March 3 1 : Raymond Leppard conduc- 
tor (Bach). 


•Theatre Royal (td: 331.1234). 
OPERA — March 19 and 21: 


OPERA — March 19 and I 
Barber of Seville" (Rossini). 


Get the big picture on 
world business, trends in 


ZURICH, Opemhausfld: 251.69301 
OPERA — March 17: *The Escape 
from the SeraglkT (Mozart! 
•TonhaDe(leD2213L83). 

. RECITALS — March 17: Werner 
Rfrfsrfri/Gcargcs Martin piano (Mo- 
zart, Schubert). 

March 22: Malcolm Frager piano 
(Haydn, Weber). 


• - -r- v 


. 


$105 to S130), and Noga HUton Intenuitior-' •- 

al (19 Quai du Mont Blanc; 31-98-11; $1( T - 

to $140), winch has gambling and entertar^ • - 

ment in its Grand Casino. . - . : r- , i 

Many less expensive hotels can be four - A . 
near the Gare Comavin. Try Mon RqpS.. ■; 

(231 Rue de Lausanne; 32-80-10; double ; v 
about $45) or Lido (8 Rue de Chaniepodkr - : . 

31-55-30; from about $20 to $30). r 

French cuisine is dominant in Genevt. -^ . ‘ ‘ 

best restaurants, but Italian pasta dishes - 

advancing, and several Chinese, Korest -^ ' y 1 
Turkish, Arab and other exotic eating 
have recently been opened. 

For sophisticated Hrmng in the Vie3^,'~ * 

VUle, reserve at Le Chandelier (23 Gnu"*'*-' 

Rue; 28-11-88). Main courses include 

from the tank, finely cut and braised ve — 1 

with three different mustard flavors, Ch ]■ , 

teaubriand for two, and fondue Bourgtujl ||x I 

nonne, at prices ranging from about $7 *L4$M I % 

$12 a person. Bottles of Swiss vintages H * V V. 7 

Dflle, Goron or Fendant start at $12. 

Airo recommended: tire second floor dill 
ing room of Laurent (13 Rue de la 
leine; 21-24-22), at the approaches to 
Vieflle Ville, where a special menu ieceirt;>:i 7 " - 


*•*«*( 




«»4 m 
*w«w! 


wtte 

Om 



y* f .. -'\<w 

; • * . -J*v — '-.v - *- 

. r - : 

». -v 





Ai, 


:* _ 

*^v 


Leonand 


DOONESBURY 




HOLIDAYS 


Salks 

Eoonctnic 

Scene 


NEW YORK, Guggenheim Museum 
(tel: 3603SJ30X 

EXHIBrnONS— ToMarch24: “Rce 
Morton.” 

To April 14: M KaduukymParis: 1934- 
1944. 

To April 21 : “Fra n lce n t ha l er on Paper: 
ARetrospotive, 1950-84." 
•Metropolitan Museum of Art (tdh 
535.77.10). 

EXHIBITIONS — To April 14: "The 
Age of Caravaggio 
To Sept. 1: "Man and the Horse.” 
•Museum of Modern Art 
(wd:7Q8 .94.00). 

EXHIBITIONS — To May 14: “Henri 
Matisse" 

To June 4: "Henri Rousseau." 


comsupoN 

MRSOLO.. 






BEAUTIFUL. 
NAfiwrr. 
THANKS, JIMMY. 



IPO JUST 


SYLLABLE*. NEXT! 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1985 


Page 9 



FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


Resetting the Inner Clock 
Life in the Fast Lane 


by Roger Collis 


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OT even, the most relentless 
workaholic is likely to schedule a 
meeting for the middle of the 
ni gh t. And yet this is what a busi- 
es traveler does by going to a meeting at 
•A.M. in Paris after flying all night from 
ew York, a time when the traveler’s biolog- 
al dock says it is three in the morning — F. 
u Fitzgerald's M daxk night of the soul" 
( flow two hours of sleep, a dose of travel 

ress and a subhznmal hangover and yon 
: ive a classic case of jet lag. 

I Everyone knows the symptoms — muzzy 
lad, dehydrated, strained eyes, general fa- 
pie and disorientation. Even for high-fly- 
achievers, this can make for a distmdy 

- bsonic perfo a m ance and bizarre business 
•„ . snsions, especially hazardous when the 

‘ »ple around you are at their sharpest, 
/ery day, thousands of executives may be 
itting their jobs on the tine, or at least 
.ortchanging themselves. 

Of course, there are sensible things you 
n do to ease the agony of jet lag — drink a 
^-’•v hw t of fluids (not tea and coffee), eat sparing- 

■ Wand cot out the booze, maybe do some ni- 

ght aerobics, and certainly use the ear- 
■, ugs and eyeshades and try to get some 

■*lv- 2 ep. From the United States, most east- 
jtmd Eights leave in the evening, which 
s you a short night So try to schedule 
to of the rare flights during the day. Going 
■ ■ sst, try to arrive as late in the evening as 
: . . .."'ossible so as to get to bed and avoid the 
.! . Scorning committee. 

. . But most of this is easier said than done, 
;■ v pedally if you fly longer distances, say to 
e Far East And it’s wdl established that 
tossing several time zones seriously affects 
^jysical and mental performance until the 
*-'jdy*s metabolism adjusts. This may take up 
five days. So isn’t jetlag an inevitable fact 
' fife in the fast lane? 

'.‘.'.Well, yes and no. Most experts would 
'<ree that until someone invents a new fcrio- 
.. gical dock, jet lag is here to stay. But 
v.^eeal research among astronauts and nriK- 
"ry and civil aircrews has shown that sleep 
. sturbances, a key element in jet lag, can be 
. ’ fee tively managed by new short-acting 

' ,/pnotic drugs. And promising results have 
ton obtained with a naturally occurring 
..'Vsurohormone called melatonin, which 
.. 'larks directly on the biological clock, ad- 
sting it to a new local time: It is possible 
at this may soon be marketed as a jet lag 
. . V. 41 

-The so-called biological clock, or inner 
; j -ode, of man and other is set to a 

Lhour (circadian) rhythm of metabolic ac- 
•'rity. It governs things like sleep patterns, 
topera ture, blood sugar, liver ana kidney 
‘ actions and the cardiovascular and ner- 

- ~ his systems. It prepares the body for alter- 
■“ " i ting periods of simp and wakefulness cor- 
responding to the dark and light cycle of the 
-wmal day. For example, during the sleep 
• tried the body tends to shut down: Tern- 
mature is lowered, the kidneys produce less 

1 -ine and mental efficiency falls off copsid- 
r ably. Light is the main trigger, or synchro- 
zer, of the dock, although social cues, like 
eal times, also affect circadian rhythm. 

“ Jet lag is wbat happens when the biologi- 
- 1 clock gets out of step with the chronologi- 

■ 1 dock of a new time zone. Your body is 
' ared for sleep at a time yon are expected to 
‘ *. awake, and vice versa. This only happens 
■” l traveling east and west Flying north and 

nth, where there is link or no time change 
-■w get no more than normal travel fatigue. 
One approach to jet lag is to stay on your 
. . - use schedule and ignore what is going on 

- ound you. This is what some aircrew mem- 
' as da Astronauts, who fly in perpetual 

lylight, arc reported to base their sleep and 
, ikefuiness periods on .home time on carth. 
. it on a business trip you can hardly order 

- -cakfast when you've been asked to dinner. 
Another way is to make a return trip- 
toss the Atlantic the same day, keeping to 

, tor local time. Discussions would have to 

■ : brief and very important It would proba- 
. y mean flying the Concorde both ways. 

So the only real choice for die business 
- . avder is .to adapt as quickly as posable to 
e new environment. And this means the 
‘ ,-oper management of sleep. 

“The main problem is not getting to sleep, 
a staying asleep for an adequate period of 


time,’' according to Group Captain Anthony 
Nicholson of the Royal Air Force’s Institute 
of Aviation Medicine at Famborough, En- 
gland. ’This is important when you arrive in 
a new time zone, n you can force the individ- 
ual to sleep at 11 o’clock local time every 
night, he’s going to adapt that much quicker 
to the new circadian rhythm. Get your sleep 
right and the world is marvelous.*’ 

Nicholson recommends a short-acting 
hypnotic called brotizolam, which sustains 
sleep without producing a hangover the next 
day. This is the drag to use when you arrive. 
If you can’t sleep on the plane, then use 
temezfrpam, which was used by the RAF 
when flying two crews on the long flights 
down to the Falkland*, each crew 
for half the trip. One major airline p 
medazolam for its pilots, another short-act- 
ing drag that works for four to five hoars. 
Better still, Nicholson says, is to use a sleep- 
erette seat, which he believes is the major 
advantage of first-dass travel. The RAF is 
testing the sleeperette in a. current 
research study that involves flying . 
bade and forth across the Atlantic with and 
without hypnotic drugs. Nicholson’s advice 
to the business travderis to fly business class 
to the United States and return by Concorde 
or in first class. 

Despite sane contradictory evidence from 
scientific studies, most people say they get 
more jet lag flying east than west It seems 
that people have less trouble coping with a 
long sulgective day than a short night: And 


Drugs, hormone 
may soon help 
to curb jet lag 


of course, if you fly west dnring the day, yon 
are not disturbing your sleep but simply 
displacing it A biological-dock; expert says 
that as you fly west you are gaming on 
yourself all the time and your dock just has 
to nm a bit faster, whereas coming the other 
way it has to ran slower, which is ap pare n tly 
harder for it to do. 

A more homespun explanation comes 
from Dr. Fridoiin Hoidener, Tn««r»i direc- 
tor of Swissair “When I go to New York 
that’s the only day in my life when I fed fine 
if I get up at seven in the morning, because 
my inner dock says it's lunchtime. But com- 
ing the other way, who likes to get up at two 
in the morning? ” 

Hoidener suggests that one way to rednee 
jetlag is to prepare for the trip a few days in 
advance by going to bed a couple of hours 
earlier or later so as to anticipate the prob- 
lem of sleeping when you arrive. For exam- 
ple, if yon are flying west, yon start going to 
bed in Zurich at 1 AM. instead of 11 PM. 
Then when you arrive in New York, you 
compromise by going to bed at 9 PM and 
adjust gradually to your normal bedtime: 

Bat perhaps the most promumg news on 
jet lag is the work cm melatonin by Professor 
Vincent Marks and Dr. Josephine Arendt in 
the biochemistry department of the Univer- 
sity of Surrey in England. 

Melatonin is a sleep-inducing hormone 
secreted by the pineal gland at the front of 
the brain. Melatonin levels are higher at 
night than during the day, which led 
researchers to believe that it may be a master 
synchronizer of various biological rhythms. 

According to Marks, if you administer 
melatonin during the day you can resynch- 
ronize the biological dock by deceiving the 
body into thinking that it is night Based on 
this discovery, Marks and ms colleagues 
have developed a dosage schedule for jet lag. 

“Going to the U. JL, we nudge the dock 
back a bit by taking melatonin at about 7 
AM the morning we travel so as to extend 
the previous night Coming the other way. 
we nudge the clock forwaxd by taking mela- 
tonin when we get cm the plane in the. eve- 
ning,” Marks says. 

There is stffl a lot more work to be done 
and controlled clinical studies have not yet 
started. But Marks believes it is Hkely that a 
melatonin jet lag product could be on the 
market in a year. ■ 


in a Little Spanish Inn 


by Mary Peirson Kennedy 


■ Jlt U O U luuaj Ao A1U wnfia 

; /’“’SAUCIN, Spain — There is a small new road opened up last year that connc 
hotel in this town of 2^47 whose the village to thenvam coastal highwfcy.in 

. W owner displays guest books going, ine it about an hoar’s drive to MarbdLa. 


— back to the 1860s. It was . 
id by British officers stationed at Gibrat- 
: r who took the old Roman stone road from 
. : Pefion (as Gibraltar is known here). 

A modest hotel with seven rooms and no 
■ . bate baths, La National makes no claims 
... the luxury of the Costa del Sol hostdnes, 
■1 it does offer a different view of Strain: 
ace and quiet, simple but dehtious meals 
*d modest prices. 

. Dofla dement Bautista Moncada, a slight 
. i-haired woman with a shy smfle, says her 
. tee is a traditional Spanish inn. While 
■ sterely furnished, the rooms are spotless, 
d die vegetables, poultry, eggs, fruit and 
. 3k come from the nearby farm of Doha 
trruen Mendoza TSneo, who presides over 
s small kitchen and dining room. 
Although she guards the guest books care- 

n.. . . . _ - . * t. - - - — • l ~ — a — ...j 


.* f 




-V 



off the at tries by Danish and Ga- 
in royalty, statesmen, bullfighters, French 
mists who liked the wines, a few Ameri- 
ca, nature lovers (one of unknown nation- 
ty wrote that Gancm in the spring is a 
aradise of flowers.”) 

However the great majority were English 
-to repeatedly praised Don Pedro Reales 
w great grandfather of Doha Clementina) 
•• r his cooking, for the cleanliness of his 
' 4d and occasionally commented on “his 
*: ty bad temper.” 

• v The fim cars appeared in 1901 , but walk- 
i and horseback were the mam travel 
ahods up to the Civil War in 1936/ A 
, giggly blue foe appears in the middle of 
' f. - page and someone has written, “Spanish 
J/ar." The next entry was 1945, and the 
Wt otd Ingles had become La NacumaL 
V A Captain Leslie ef the 71st “***' 

4 tan try wrote in 1869, “Very muc 
P th ourselves, with one another and more 
niculariy with the hospitality and comfort 
< this hold whteh is prettily situated in the 


S 


center of one of the most inaccessible spots 
in Europe." 

Gancm today is no longer inaccessible. A 
.new road opened up last year that connects 
' village to the mam coastal highway, mak- 
ing it about an hoar’s drive to Marbdla. 

WMeh would be absurd to say that time 
has stood still in Gaocin, progress has dealt 
gently with it The balconies and walls of the 
houses abound in greenery, the ancient 
whitewashed houses present a solid front to 
the world and sometimes on 'a moonlight 
night the nanow streets and plazas are so rail 
of silence that they' seem unreal. 

Dominating the town is what is left of a 
magnificent 13th-centory construction. It is 
a long rfimh up but the stairs are artfully 
arranged and each turn offers a magnificent 
view. Near the top you will meet Elenterio 
Andrade who is 68 and climbs these steps 
four times a day to show visitors around and 
to tend the gardens. Two summers ago the 
archaeology department of the provincial 
government of Malaga restored some of the 
walls, cleaned oat tons of debris and left very 

dear outlines of both the fortress and die 

castle. The panorama is breathtaking. 

Gancm now boasts of restaurant with in- 
ternational arisme, La Casita, opened two 
years ago by Mary and Frank Beker, who 
settled m Gancm after seeing an ad in the 
London papers for inexpensive houses. The 
food is excellent, featuring not only French 
cooking (Mary studied at the La Varenne 
cooking school in Paris) but Polish dishes 
from Frank's native land, and the atmo- 
sphere is warm and friendly. Mary Bdcer 
estimates that than are about 50 foreign 
Families living here — painters, sculptors, 
farmers, retirees and one young man who is 
trying to make a go of a bakery, 

The one thing they all seezn to share is 
enthusiasm about Gaurin. Some mountain 
villages in this part of the world have not 
taVen kindly to the invasion of forrignep, 
but this doesn’t seem to be true of Gaudn. 
Perhaps because viators have beet coming 

romany years to La National, the townspeo- 
ple have become used to outsiders. ■ 


TRAVEL 


Australia’s Surf and Other Splendors 


by Jane Periez 


O N the south coast of New South 
I Wales lies Bingie Beach, a scallop 
1 of pale cream sand embraced by 
two craggy points of rocks and 
sbdtered by the dopes of scrub-covered 
dunes. Gentle waves of the Pacific Ocean, 
crested by white foam that glistens in the 
high morning sun, roll in a perpetual surf 
that only a few people happen upon. 

For this beach 180 miles south of Sydney 
is unmarked on most map s of the rrwqltne, 
its existence made known to strangers by a 
friendly gas station attendant in the nearby 
hamlet of Moruya. It is one of the dozens 
upon dozens of beaches that stretch to the 
Victoria border and beyond, all of them 
perfect — although not all so secluded — for 
swimming, running, sunbathing and picnics 


that are interrupted only by the persistent 
bat harmless Australian bushflies. 

.On a five-day car trip from Sydney, it is 
~ le to combine the solitary peace of 
Beach, with a series of forests and the 
of the Snowy Mountains 
and in between traverse rough dirt roads 
across what Australians fondly call “cowboy 
country”: rolling shcep-grazzng halls, then 
grass bleached to straw bythe relentless 
Australian sun. 

It is a car tour best taken in the Southern 
Hemisphere's warm months from October to 
April (in the win ter the mountains are trans- 
formed into ski resorts and the beaches are 
too cool). Beware of January, the Australian 
equivalent of August is France, when practi- 
cally every Australian worker hitches a trail- 
er to the back of the car and takes to the 
road. 

The trip, a kind not uncommonly taken by 
Australians themselves, reveals the isolated 
island continent to have a greater variety of 
f«Tawi than the Vi rillhin t Ant als of the Great 
Barrier Reef and the scarlet desert of the 
fabled outbade By driving a southern route 
to the nation’s captial, Canberra, and on to 
cmll towns, many of them flourishing 19th- 
century hubs of gold mining, with a special 
trek to Mount Kosciusko, Australia’s highest 
peak, the visitor absorbs a sense of Austra- 
lia’s frontier history and a knowledge of its 
strange f anna and flora. 

Yes, if you are vigilant you may spot a 

lcawgftr nn alo ng the mad but do n o * be 
pointed if oner ails to appear In these parts 
the yeflo w-and- bl ack road signs warning 
drivers of the hazards of hitting bounding 
kangaroos are more prevalent than the mar- 
supials themselves. Unfortunately, you will 
see no koala bears, for they are a rare species, 
not to be found in their natural stale any- 
where on this route, and hardly anywhere 
else except for zoos. 

A four-hour drive southwest from Sydney 
lies Canberra, a dty of stolid official budd- 
ings scattered around an artificial lake and 
nestled in a Valley surrounded by hills that 
ebb from brown to eerie mauve at dosk. 
Designed 70 years ago by an American ar- 
chitect named Walter Burley Griffin, who 
had beat an associate of Frank Lloyd 
Wright in Chicago. Canberra is situated ou 
an arid plain between the two competing 
cities of Sydney and Melbourne and had 
until recently changed only ever so gradually 
over the decades. • 

But now soaring cranes, their angles and 
latticework weaving geometric patterns in 
die sky, dominate the landscape and an- 
nounce, to anyone who had not already 
heard the national swagger about it. the 
construction of a new Parliament House. It 
is being bmlt with great architectural fanfare 
for. the country’s bicentennial in 1988. 


T HE 250,000 civil servants and others 
who live in Canberra believe the new 
Parliament will do for the capital 
what the Opera House has dene for Sydney. 
It may wefl. It was conceived by the New 
York firm of MhcbeD/Giurgria Architects, 
who designed the Fairchild Center for the 
life Sciences at Columbia and the master 
plan for the future development of the Capi- 
tol grounds in Washington. The Parliament 
takes the shape of two boomerangs with 
their arches laid back to back. The entire 
structure is being sunk into Capital JED so 
that rather than sitting on top, dte two cham- 
bers, one for each boomerang, will blend 
into the mound ctf the MIL 
After masrive excavations of rock to allow 
for the sunken budding, granite, steel, con- 
crete, and even the red roof tile that is a 
fixture of Australian bungalows are being 
heaved interlace as the builders race to meet 
their deadline. An excellent viewing plat- 
form bpilt for visitors allows them to observe 
the work in progress along with scale models 
showing that, in true Australian sporting 
fashion, the new Parliament will come with 
outdoor tennis courts and bowling greens. 
Two recently completed symbols of Can- 




Tlie Nn YoA Tmcs 


berta’s coming of age, stand on the shore of 
Lake Burley Griffin — the National Gallery, 
a concrete-an d -glass box that bears some 
resemblance to a modern-day warehouse, 
and an almost look-alike High Court bidd- 
ing next door. The two-year-old gallery 
boasts a fledgling international collection, 
including Jackson Pollock's “Blue Poles,” 
which caused a storm a decade agp when the 
Labor government of Gough Whitlam paid 
more than $2 million for it For most visitors 
the eclectic Australian collection should 
prove the most intriguing. The colonial-era 
paintings, until recently unheralded, include 
an oil dated 1 840 and titled “Mr. Robinson’s 
First Interview With Timmy.’* The artist, 
Benjamin Duterrau, catches the awkward 
emotions of an early encounter in Tasmania 
between a white man and a mystified look- 
ing aborigine. 

Australia has bred an interesting stable of 
postwar painters who work in a diversity of 
styles,., all wdl represented in the gallery. 
Notable are the works of Sidney Nolan, 
whose starkly portrayed narrative on canvas 
of the life of Ned Kelly, the infamous bush- 
ranger, or outlaw, hangs in the first gallery. 

For years, Canberra’s dreary hold accom- 
modations have been the butt of derisive 
jokes, among visiting diplomats. The city 
once had an elegant hotel, the Canberra, a 
sprawling one-story pink compound with 
garden courtyards extending from spacious 
suites. The Whitlam government dosed the 
hotel in 1973 and in what some thought was 
a national scandal turned the place into a 
depository for government files. The Labor 
government of Robert Hawke, conscious of 
the looming bicentennial festivities, is in the 
midst of undoing the damage and restoring 
the.hotel to its original charm. 

In the meantime, the Lakeside Hotel, an 
undistinguished international style high-rise 
with small rooms overiooldng the hills or the 
lake, is the most serviceabTe, although at 
about 550 a double room, expensive for what 
it is. 


T WO hours from Canberra across a 
spectacularbut perilous road that fi- 
nally leads into a pretty valley filled 
with peach trees, sits Araluen, a deserted 
mining town that once reverberated with the 
revelry of 39 hotels and 15,000 gold miners. 
It is the getting to Araluen, through the 
indirect 70-mile route of Captain’s Fiat and 
Major’s Creek, that is the main point. A 
twisting dirt track wide enough to handle 
one car carries you down the side of a steep 
mountain. On either side of the car stand 
tall, scraegly eucalyptus trees, so dense they 
almost block out the sky, and the air, per- 



Ccmberra. 


fumed with the distinctive dry scent of the 
Australian bush, resonates with the calls of 
native birds. 

Goannas, grotesque lizardlike creatures 
indigenous to Australia that sometimes 
reach three feet in length, slither across the 
road from time to time. At the sound of acar 
or a human, these creatures usually scamper 
for the nearest tree trunk and climb out of 
harm’s way. While a goanna bite is not 
poisonous, they are scavengers and carriers 
of disease and park rangers recommend they 
be left alone. 

Absolutely nothing happens in Araluen. a 
place of one hotel and a population that 
barely reaches triple digits. Yet its quiet and 
beauty have made it a favorite weekend 
haunt for Canberra residents. If you call 
ahead, the Hold Araluen, mainly a way 
station for thirsty drivers, has several meager 
rooms, or the more attractive Old Court 
House Restaurant, which advertises French 
cuisine by a German owner, offers satisfac- 
tory rooms on the weekend only. 

Rather than staying in Araluen, it is prob- 
ably advisable to push on another 40 miles to 
Moruya on the coast, an adventurous drive 
through equally rugged terrain. A town of 
2,000 that hasn’t changed in 25 years, Mor- 
uya exists mainly for its beaches. Ask anyone 
you meet for Ms favorite along the coast, 
making dear that you want to be away from 
the trailers. To get to Bingie, drive eight 
mfles south on the Prince’s Highway, turn 
left at the signpost to Congo, and a few mfles 
on branch off along the tUrt strip to Bingie. 

If you wish to stay overnight in Moruya, 
there are several motels that serve mainly as 
stopovers for traveling salesmen. Not cheap, 
they run $28 a night with a rather pedestrian 
breakfast served in the room. A more inter- 
esting place and slightly less expensive is the 
Monarch Hold, an old-fashioned brick 
structure ou the main street with apub. clean 
rooms and a handsome dining room serving 
almost home-style meals. A dozen oysters, a 
steak, dessert and a bottle' of Australian 
wine, all of it wholesome but none of it 
sensational, came to about $28 for two. 

Driving south from Moruya, the highway 
hugs the coast to Narooma, a popular holi- 
day resort where cold meats, cheeses, fruit, 
takeout coffee and other makings of an im- 
promptu picnic can easily be pitied up. The 
comer butcher shop as. you eater town has 
an assortment of charcuterie, and the owner, 
who has been there for 30 years, provides 
plenty of folklore to go with the provisions. 
With food in hand, choose any of a string of 
beaches within a 10-minute drive. 

Farther south, the landscape changes from 
undulating pastoral country (sharp, hard 
cheeses are produced in the towns of Bodalla 
and Tllba) to pockets of rain forest, resplen- 
dent with emerald-green ferns, and heavy 
densities of the ever-present eucalyptus 
trees. 

Three hours down the narrow but un- 
crowded highway from Narooma. just over 
the border into Victoria, lies Mallacoota, 
once a whaling and gold-rush town, which 
was reachable only by water until 1914. It is 
well worth a detour off the main road to the 
entrance of the sprawling Mallacoota inlet' 
At firat sight, Maflacoota is an unprepossess- 
ing abakme fishing village of 600, surround- 
ed by endless trailer parks blessedly empty 
y, when the place should be 
at all costs. 

It doesn’t take much exploring, however, 
to find why all these people descend here. 
Once the home of the Kumai aboriginal 
tribe, Mallacoota abounds in wildlife and 
ancient rocky bluffs that stand guard to the 
swirling ocean at the entrance to the Tasman 
Sea. 

Croajingalong National Park envelops the 
inlet where a number of rivers and creeks 
flow into- the sea. and its wilderness can be 


penetrated either with sturdy walking shoes 
or by careful driving along the dirt track to 
Shipwreck Creek. Be wary here of goannas 
(if they cannot find a tree trunk to climb up. 
they are known to climb up a standing hu- 
man if it is the nearest thing around) and 
snakes, which are usually more frightened of 
you than you of them. This is a habitat for 
kangaroos but since they are nocturnal, 
dawn and dusk are the best times to see 
them. 

Bush fires ravaged the forest in 1983, leav- 
ing hollowed ana blackened cylinders that 
were once eucalyptus trunks standing stark 
against the sky. But heavy rains last year 
fostered fast green undergrowth, swathes of 
tall yellow and purple wildflowcrs survived, 
and' the birds — colorful parrots, native 
lyrebirds that have long tails shaped like the 
musical instrument after which they are 
named — break into a cacophony of sound. 

The Flag Hotel-Motel, with a swimming 
pool in its central courtyard, is by Australian 
small-town standards top-notch and worth a 
two-night stay. That is to say, the units, with 
a kitchen, are clean, basic but roomy and 
fairly priced at $36. 

[ ROM Mallacoota, the highway turns 
west to Cann River, from which a 
bumpy dirt road leads north through 
the bare mils and thinly populated area of 
“cowboy country.” During this stretch of the 
drive, it is easy to comprehend how Sir 
Joseph Banks, the English botanist who ac- 
companied the first settlers to Australia in 
1788, described the new land as the “barren- 
est” he had ever seen. 

On the road to Bombala, an old sheep- 
grazing town where customers are still invit- 
ed to the local bank on Christmas Eve for 
morning tea with the management, passing 
care are a rarity. Indeed, homesteads are 
scarce. Australia is a sparsely populated con- 
tinent, and nowhere on the trip is it more 
evident than here. At Jincumbtily, the rail 
station consists of a forlorn wooden hut that 
would serve as a fine stage prop for a 19th- 
century American western. 

Jmdabyne, poised on the banks of a lake 
created by a massive hydroelectric project 
that takes water to the arid western part of 
New South Wales, serves as the door to the 
Snowy Mountains, a majestic but not very 
(all. range, suitable for skiing only a few 
months of tire year. 

In the summer, the 30-mile paved road 
form Jmdabyne to Charlotte’s Pass, the 
starting print for the walk to the 7,305-foot 
peak of Kosciusko, makes the trip easy. The 
mountain has only swatches of snow in the 
warm months, but the winds are brisk and 
the air dully; a hat, a warm jacket and 
walking shoes are essential for the well- 
marked trail that takes 90 minutes at a fast 
clip to the summit. From the rooftop of 
Australia — an outcropping of rocks and a 
plaque commemorating the Polish explorer 
who first scaled it — sweeping vistas extend 
up and down the tree-covered ridges below. 

The Jmdabyne Lake Hotel-Motel, with 
first-floor rooms that open onto the lake, 
provides another comfortable stay. In the 
noisy bar, a typical Australian beer-swilling 
hangout for an almost all-male clientele, the 
barmaids dispense sure-fire instructions on 
how to see kangaroos. 

And, indeed, at dusk, if you drive 20 
minutes back up toward Kosciusko to a 
camping ground beyond the entrance to the 
national park, there adult kangaroos and a 
baby emerge from the shadows to feast on 
(he grassy Helds. 

After the triumph of sighting kangaroos, 
the return six-hour ride to Sydney from Jm- 
dabyne through Canberra on smooth high- 
way seems all the easier. ■ 

© 19SS The New York Timet 


■ADVERTISEMENT-- 


“ MAKE MINE A LARGE ONE.” 

BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF HAPPIER TIMES. 

WHO WOULD have thought a new play on botany would prove a 
source of constant hilarity throughout the evening? But despite the 
lethargy the topic instantly induced in one at school, such a subject is 
keeping audiences rolling throughout Europe. 

ON TOUR 

PART OF ITS immense charm is that "Make mine a large one” has 
such a wide appeal. (Though one must confess that those with a more 
cultured taste will probably find it wittier than those who labour 
under the misconception that Shakespeare's 'Taming of the Shrew’ 
is a course in animal husbandry.) The plot has an international 
flavour. The main personalities are drawn from 
countries as diverse as Morocco, Saxony and Indo- 
China and feature such characters as Coriander, 

Angelica, Orris and Juniper. Although at first sight 
such a mixture might appear a little uncomfortable, 
it is the skill with which they have been seamlessly 
blended that guarantees the end result 

I raise my glass to the creators of the production, 

Bombay Gin. It is indeed their unique distillation 
that keeps one amused. 

And I for one shall oft return to my favourite bar 
to watch it run and run — into my glass. 



DIHTlIXgP WWWW 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1985 


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04a 10 19 

234 




1 



A 



__ 

1 


18* 

41ft 

M» 

31* 

35* 

9* 

4* 

18 

11* 

39* 

9* 


6* RBInd 
29* RCA 

47* RCA pt 

24* RCA pf 
29* RCA pf 
6* RLC 
3 RPC n 
12* RTE 
6* Rodlee 


.16 18 
184 20 12 
480 48 
2.12 72 
X65 10LA 
20 26 9 


J6 


32 10 
a 


25 RatePur 100 26 14 
5ft Rotnod S3 


11 8ft 
3549 JW 
» 88* 
194 29ft 
1826 34* 
33 7ft 
52 4ft 
17 16* 
56 10* 
970 39* 
439 7 


b* a* 

38* 38ft— ft 
87* 117* — 2 
29 29* + ft 

34* 34ft— ft 
7ft 7ft 
4ft 4ft 
16* 16* 

10ft 10ft— ft 
38* 39 +* 
6* 4ft 


12 Month 
HWt Low SlOCh 


SIX CtoM 

DfV. YM- PE IQOtHUl LW Quot OTOe 


44 O 9 


: Ranea 

1 BonwO 

i Rcvcm -44 J 17 
i Roymk 

. RaVTtai 1 JO 14 17 
i ReadDI -40 XI 39 
i RAM Pf 2.12 104 
i RttRef 123c102 
RecnEa _ l* 

Reflmn 20 12 II 
i Reece 20 

‘ MAC JO XI II 
. RepAlr 11 

i RepAwt 

i RopOvp 26 24 11 
: RepNY 144 U I 
, RNYpf 212 TO-9 


55 

39 

2 

8 

63 

"S 

27 


RNY pfC 112 TX6 
117361 1J 


RNYpfU 
i RcpBk IJ4 SO 7 
, ReP6*ef2.12 72 

■ RshCot 02 10 21 
I Revco 80 32 11 
i vl never 

i Rovten 124 52 12 

■ Return JO 13 12 
, Reared 44 32 9 
i Ravnln UO 4.1 I 

R8Vln pf 4.10 84 

■ Rovlnpf 

R6V Mft 180 22 4 
i Renvck 148 SJ 9 
, RteootT 180 97 
i RtHAM JO 12 19 
RvrOfcn 14 

Robsiiw 1.12 34 7 
140 41. 

220 1X1 5 
244 72 9 
1J0 X7 10 
220 XI 10 

20a 12 29 


ROHM 

Rabin* 

RnM 

ROCKTl 

Rockwt 
RotvnH 
Rehrtn 
i ROICmn 


A 19ft 18* lift— U 
172 4* 4ft 4ft— ft 

121 57* 56ft fifft + * 
20 IZft 12* CZ* + ft 
194S 45ft 44* 44*— ft 
1424 9* 9* 9* + ft 

15 30ft 20* 20ft + * 
1 13 13 13 

14* MU MW— ft 
9ft 9ft 9*— ft 
8ft 8* Ift— ft 
1 ft * . 
38* 37* 38* + ft 
Aft 5ft 6 
1U 1* lft + ft 
_ 23ft 23* 23ft- * 

123 42ft 43ft 42ft 

7 19ft 19ft 19U + U 
4 34ft 24ft 34ft 
151 52ft 51* 51*6— ft 
809 32ft 31* 32* 

43 » 27ft 27ft— * 
278 19* W 19*—* 
530 25 24* 24*— * 

37 1ZM lift 12 — * 
3290 35* 35 M6 + ft 
33 20* 20* 30* 

220 13ft 13* Uft— ft 
7377 B3ft 82* n + ft 
42 48* 48* 48ft + * 
25 108ft 108ft lOM-i- W 
345 36* 36 36 — * 

31 29* 29U 29U 
37 18* 18U 18*— ft 
320 32 31 31*— * 

186 6 8* Sft-t-ft 

17 33* 33* 33*—* 
342 39* 3>* 39*+ * 
812 21* 21 Ztft— * 
2436 30 19ft 19*+ ft 
33* 33* 33* 33* 

1202 37* 36 36*+* 

254 46 64* 44ft— 1ft 

400 49* 49 49*— * 

150 30* 30 30 — * 


J5e 2 27 
A6 4J 16 


RoftiEs 
Rolllm 
Ramon 
I Ropar J4 4LD W 
Rarar 1.12 X7 14 
Rowm JO SlOO 
ROY ID 287a SJ 5 
l Rubrmd 84 10 17 
RussB n 17 

i RusTas 74 44 I 
i tmmn UN) *2 14 
i RvcterS 120 23 9 
: Rvfand JO 2J 16 
i Rymtri 4 


300 22 Zlft 21* 

164 10* 10* 10*— * 
17 3* Z* 2* + * 

28 U* 16 16*+ * 

MB 30 29* 53)ft + * 

3434 8ft 8ft 8ft— U 
3777 S3* 53 ft 

231 47* 46* 47* 

397 34* 24 24* + * 

30 17ft 17* 17* 

266 34* 24 24 —ft 

722 53* 52 52 — * 

19 24* 24* 24* 

9 13* 13* Mft 


50* 35* SCM 
12* 7ft SLInda 
30 19* S PS Tec 

36 15 Sabine 

XI 16 SaMRY 

18* lift StadfiS 


2J0 42 13 
20b 28 9 
80 28 13 
84 2 29 

278016J 
84 18 15 


221 48 47* 47ft 

11 10* IQV. 10*— * 

181 27* 27* 27* 

412 17* 16ft 17* + * 

2SZ 17* 17 17 — * 

106 lift 16 16* + * 



3 

1? 


1 nS 

5- 

r 

tltlirP.fi March 14 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open Hisft Low Close dm. 


Grains 


wheat ican 

i minimum- doliara per bushel 


5800 bu 

£ 

xw 

176* 
383* 
324ft 
Eel. Salas 


Mar X47 151* 

May 327* 3A1 
JUf 124* J2WS 
Sec 327* 320 
Dec 327ft X41 
Mar 3A4* 3A5* 

Prov.Sales 5859 

Pfbv. Day Open ML 04-799 UP 192 
CORN (CST) 


037* 

032* 

384* 

326 

006 

3J0* 


047 151 +03 

327* 3A0* +82* 
024* 029* +8256 
327* 320 +82 

037* 3A1 +82* 

044* 045* +82* 


5800 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
325* 2J1* Mar 2~ 


130 269* 

201 273 

321ft 2J6ft 

225 2J0* 

X10 2J9* 

321* 174* 

EsL Sales 


_ 273ft 273ft 
May 3-74* 274* 
JUI 275* 273* 
Sep X68* 2Jflft 
Dec 262* 263 
Mar 271* 271* 

MOV 276ft 277* 

Prev.Sales 39.913 


371* 272* +81^ 


373* 274* 

274* 375 
267 X67* -wOOft 

281* 2J1ft — JB'A 
270 270 — JO* 

276* 276* +80* 


Prev. Day Openlnt.il 4832 up i860 
SOYBEANS (CBD 
&000 bu minimum- dHJors per bushel 


7J0M 

509 

Mar 508* 

5X3* 

SJ6K 

5X2* 

+JSK 

707 

500* 

May 5X5* 

591 

£83* 

500* 

+05* 

709 

500* 

JUI 

£94 

5.99 

£93 

£98* +04* 

7.54 

502 


£96* 

6X0 

505 

509* 

+JD 

40T 

5X1 


502 

£96* 

501* 

£95* +03* 

6X8 

503* 


£94* 

599 

£92* 

507* 

+03* 

609 

504* 


6X5 

6X8* 

6X4 

6X8* 

+03* 

7X2 

606* 

Mar 

L16 

620 

6.15 

620 

+03 

709 

L15 

May 




627 

+08 


Est. Safes 


Prev.Sales 20798 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 65804 off 292 


SOYBEAN MEAL (am 
100 tana- dal lars per tan 
20980 12X60 Mar 12980 129 JO 


129 JO 
13470 
11780 
14QJOO 
14X10 
147 JO 
14980 
15480 


May 13480 13420 
Jut 13980 13980 
Aw 14280 14X50 
SbP 14420 144J0 
Oct 145JD 14680 
Dec 15X50 151 JO 
Jan 15X50 15X50 
Mar 

Prev.Sales 7-556 


20580 
196J0 
11080 
179 JO 
18050 
18480 
16380 
206,50 

Ext Sales . , — 

Prev. Day Open Int 41,918 UP 147 
SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

40800 1 to- dollars per 100 Rn. 

30A0 2295 Mar 2975 3085 

30.10 2280 May 2882 2980 

3070 2270 Jut 2787 2880 

2720 77.50 Aw 2645 272S 

2650 2250 Sep 2585 2660 

2480 22J0 Oct 2383 2580 

25.15 22J0 Dec 2452 2580 

2485 Z3J0 Jan 2450 3470 

EsLSaies Prev.Sales 15J72 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 48.105 up 1271 
OATS (CBT1 


127 JO 
13X10 
13780 
14DJ0 
14240 
145J0 
15030 
15150 


12880 j^TO 


13260 
13X50 — 80 

14120 -V10 
14X10 —JO 
14600 — UD 
visa —m 
15250 — JO 

15720 —.10 


29J5 

2773 

3697 

2620 

2570 

2495 

2450 

3450 


3D87 +1.15 
3980 +180 
3X00 -KM 
27 JO +90 
2660 +81 
2575 +74 

25J® +A8 

3470 +A0 


5000 bu minimum- do! tare per buibel 
106* 100* Mar 109 1X0 

IJTtt 

108 

—01* 

101 

1X7* 

May 

102* 

103 

103 

-J»W 

108* 

1X3 

Jul 

1X7* 

1X0 

1X7* 

1X7* 


10V 

1X0 

Step 

1X1* 

1X3* 

1X1* 

1X3* 

+00* 

1JO* 

1X4 

Dec 

1X6 

1X6 

1X6 

1X6 


Est. Sales 


Piev-Satae 537 


Prev. Day Open InL X519 off 116 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICME) 

401000 OMr cents per lb. 


69 JB 

6305 

Apt 

6120 

63X0 

4252 

4205 

—92 

49 JO 

4500 

Jun 

6625 

66X7 

65X0 

6172 

—08 

67X7 

63.15 

Auo 

6000 

65X2 

6UQ 

6522 

— XS 

45.90 

61X0 

Oct 

6300 

64X2 

63l52 

63X0 

— X7 

C7XS 

6140 

Dec 

4537 

6507 

64X8 

6407 

— X3 

67X5 

47 J7 

6520 

66.10 

Feb 

Apt 

65J5 

65X0 

6520 

6520 

4695 

—XO 


Est. Sales 17813 Prav. Sales 18813 
Prey. Day Oaan lol. 41801 w866 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
44800 lbs.- cents per lb. 


7405 

6505 

Mar 

6840 

68X0 

<7 JO 

67 JO 

7420 

67X0 

Apr 

6900 

6920 

68.10 

6815 

7205 

64 95 

May 

<9X0 

6908 

*6X0 

6845 

7300 

64X0 

AW 

D.10 

D.10 

70.10 

78.17 

7300 

6700 


7000 

7000 

6900 

6900 

7222 

47.10 

Oct 

70X5 

70X5 

6903 

69X5 

7300 

70X0 


D20 

71 JO 

73.10 

70H5 

Eat. Sales 

1039 Prev.Satao 1.1*0 




-}3 


Prev. Dav Opanint. 10854 up9l 


HOOS (CMC) 

30800 lbs.- cents per lb. 



54X5 

4£M 

Apt 

4&A5 

4620 

45X0 

43X3 

-03 


5SX0 

4840 


5125 

31X2 

3020 

50X7 

—93 

1 . 

5537 

4805 

Jul 

5250 

52J2 

51X5 

51X2 

—05 


4427 

47 JO 

Aus 

51X5 

5107 

51X2 


— JB 

** 

5105 


Oct 

47 J5 

4(20 

4702 

47X2 

—JO 


50X5 

4620 

Dec 

<700 

4830 

4700 

4707 

^68 



4628 

Feb 

48J7 


4810 


—JO 


4725 

4530 

Apr 

46X0 

46X0 

46X0 

46X0 

+X3 


47X0 

47X0 

Jun 

47X0 

47X0 

47X0 

47X0 



Est. Salas 9744 Prav.5ales 9207 
Prev. Day Open Hit 2X546 off 471 


PORK BELLIES (CME) 
38800 lbs.- cents per fa. 


8120 

40.10 

Mar 

7200 

7325 

DX5 

7205 

—1.10 

82XD 

61.15 

May 

7200 

73X5 

DX5 

7110 

-300 

82X7 

62.15 

Jul 

73X0 


72.15 

72X5 

—03 

80X5 

6020 

Aut. 

7005 

D2S 

7005 

7022 

-01 

75.15 

63.13 

Feb 

DJO 

DX0 

71X0 

DJS 

— J3 

73X0 

64X0 

MW 




70X0 

— X5 

70X0 

7840 

May 




DXC 

— XO 

7090 

70.90 

Jul 




DJO 

— XO 


Est. Sates 8240 Prev.Sales 5 849 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 14808 off 197 


Food 


COFFEE C(NYCX» 

37joon>sr cents per tb. 

15X70 12X50 Mar 141 SI Ml JO 

15X00 12281 May 14280 14270 

14920 12180 Jul 14285 M2 

147 JO 12780 Sep 14X10 14X75 

14325 12925 Dec 141-65 14280 

14X00 12630 Mar 141 JQ 141-50 

14080 17180 May 

13TDQ 13530 JUl 13925 MU5 

Est. Sates Prev. Sales 32*4 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. 13739 up 224 
SUEAHWORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 

112800 lbs.- OKifs per lb _ 

1050 182 May 410 48S 

995 481 Jul 425 62S 

975 IB Sw 48 48 

985 4A0 OO 487 4J1 

7JS AXt Jan Sm 581 

923 3J2 Mar 5J0 5^ 

7.15 558 May 574 575 

469 583 Jul 595 __S8 7 

EsL Safes 6620 Prev.5<ries 14834 
Prev. Dav Open ML 78706 off 1791 
COCOA INTCSCEJ 
10 metric Ians- S per ion 

«70 |W tar 2U 

2S7D 1998 MOV 2200 220Q 


14021 140AS 
141J0 14X12 
14X21 14X14 
1412S 14289 
14120 14X00 
14130 14130 
14081 
13925 13925 


—185 


+.11 

+24 

+87 

+85 

+88 

+25 


389 .195 
489 413 
471 429 
440 445 
587 AM 
525 528 
562 561 
586 586 


^.13 
—.18 
— -18 
— «17 
—.16 
—.17 
—.17 
—,16 


8153 2175 

2158 2U9 


Season Season 
High Law 


2400 W9B Jul MR 2095 

2415 19S7 Sep a« 2075 

2337 IMS Pec 2006 2015 

2145 1955 Mar 1*95 2002 

2130 I960 MOV 

8035 I960 Jul _ 

Est. Soles Prev.Sales 6253 

Prev. Dar open int 26424 off an 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

nim ih.. — n — lh 

18350 118-50 Mar 16400 16480 

15180 MOV U600 16610 
15580 Jul 16780 16720 
5 cp 16670 mw 
Nov 16500 16580 


Ctaeo 

CUB. 

High 

Low 


Open 

High 

Lew 

Close 

Ota. 

2000 

—33 

90X3 

8453 

Sep 

88X7 

8868 

8855 

88X6 

-03 

am 

—as 

89X7 

84X0 

Dec 

8821 

1829 

0836 

1834 

—X< 

2005 

—20 

89X8 

8810 

Mar 

8801 

88X1 

87X6 

B7J8 

—04 

1999 

—30 

09.13 

1 0603 

Jun 

8709 

■709 

87X5 

8706 

— 04 

1995 

—20 

8804 

87X8 

Sep 

87X8 

87X0 

■7X6 

■7J6 

—04 

1995 

-20 

8927 

8728 

Dec 

8726 

87X3 

0728 

8728 

— 04 


18580 
1848S 
18X00 15775 

1B180 15780 


15680 Jan 
15630 Mar 


16X00 May 
Jul 


Est. Sales Prav. Sales 349 

Prev. Day Oaen InL 6274 up SS 


16325 16X50 
16570 16620 
16650 167.10 
16620 16650 
16500 165.15 
16XR) 
16485 
16425 
16425 


+20 

+20 

+35 

+.10 


+.15 

+.15 

+.15 


Metals 


COPPER (COMBO 


25X00 IbA- cent* per lb. 
9320 35J0 Mar 

5900 

99JM 

5800 

5900 

—.10 

62X0 

S3 

APT 

5905 

59X5 

59 JO 

9925 

5900 

—.15 

—.15 

H25 

5700 

Jul 

40X0 

60X0 

4010 

6025 

—.10 


57 JD 

Sea 

6000 

4090 

6000 

40X5 

—.10 

8423 


Dec 

6105 

61X0 

61X0 

6100 

—05 

8420 

$9An 

JOT 




4105 

—05 

8000 

99X0 

Mor 

63 JS 

4265 

62J0 

6250 

—05 

7400 

61.10 

May 

6320 

6320 

6329 

63.10 

—05 

74X0 

6120 

Jul 




6300 

—05 

7000 

6220 

Sop 

64X0 

64X0 

6420 

6425 

—05 

7020 


Dec 




6505 

—05 

65X0 

6520 

Jan 




6525 

—05 

Est. Sales 


Prev.Sales 7093 





Prev. Day Oaen Inf. 8X119 up 503 
SILVER (COMEX3 


5X00 fray at, cents per trov ax. 



5680 

16200 

5480 

Mar 

5670 

5710 

564J 

5810 

5570 

Apt 




570.7 


xcin 


5DX 

5790 

569J 

574X 

14610 

5620 

Jul 

5810 

5880 

579J 

5830 

11830 

3730 

50P 

3920 

9970 

5900 

S9U 

13X0 

5900 

Dec 

6085 

6130 

A06X 

6181 

11150 

5950 

Jan 




415.9 

11980 

4070 

M or 

6350 

6280 


4389 

TO4B0 

SZ10 

MOV 

6430 

6430 

6400 

4JV.I 

945X 

tun 

Jul 




451 J 

*400 

6410 

Sop 




4642 

7650 

6670 

Dec 




4860 



Jen 




6900 


EsI. Sales Prev.Sales 43246 

Prev. Day Open InL 7X150 up 095 


PLATINUM (NYMB) 

90 trey ax.- dbilara per troy an. 

21X01 Z4O80 Mar 

44730 23680 Apr 24500 24650 

449 JO 24180 Jill 249 JO 29U0 

39380 23080 Oct 25580 25600 

3319 26080 Jan 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 1721 

Prev. Day Open IW. U7M Off 48 
PALLADIUM (NYME1 
100 fray n- dal lars per an 
16330 10500 Mar 10680 10780 


354X40 
34200 24320 
24780 24720 
25480 25X80 
239J0 


—ZOO 

—280 

—250 

—280 

—230 


15930 

14980 

141 JO 

1 127 JO ■ 
Est. Sales 


10650 Jun 107 JO 109JM 
10650 Sap 1062S 107 JO 
105J0 Dec 10680 10780 
10650 Mar 

Prev.Sales 386 


10600 10630 
10730 10680 
10625 10735 
10600 10680 
10630 


+185 

+185 

+185 

+185 

+186 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 6484 off 11 
EsL Sales Prev.Sales 386 
Prev. Day Open Int. 6484 nffll 


OOLDfCOMDO 


31 un 


Mar 




29100 

-.10 

51450 

212X0 

Apr 

29000 29320 

290X0 

291X0 

-OO 







39320 

—.10 

51000 

28700 

Jim 

295X0 

29720 
301 JO 
30430 

29470 

296X0 

—.10 

a a 

29100 

AUB 

Oct 

29900 

30300 

29900 

30500 

30840 

305X0 

—.10 

4*9 J0 

301X0 

Uec 

31050 

711X0 

31020 

DUO 


40520 

30800 

Fab 

317X0 

31720 

316X0 


+10 

496X0 

31470 

Apr 




33320 

+.10 

43070 

32850 

Jun 




32820 

+20 

421X0 

33100 

Auo 




33470 

+20 

39870 

34900 

31500 

342X0 

Oct 

Dec 




34120 

347X0 

+20 

+20 


Esf-Sales Prev.Sales 6X142 

Prev. Day Open inLlSQJSi up 41 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million. Btsot 100 pet 
nil 87.14 Jun 9033 9068 

9183 8694 Sap 9019 9019 

9090 8677 Dec 8979 8981 

9055 8640 Mar 8933 8931 

9027 8781 Jun 9944 894* 

n ura nun Sep 89J0 8980 

B933 1986 DK S»4» 

EsL Safes Prev.Sales 1X493 
Prev. Dav Open InL 38843 off 202 
18 YE. TREASURY (CBTJ 
SI 00800 pci n-pt» A32nds of loo pet 


9052 9061 
9083 9013 
8972 BVJH 
89 J1 8936 
8982 1989 

0920 0923 
8989 8989 


83 

70-23 

Mar 

78-34 

79 

78-20 

78-30 

82-3 

7D-9 

Jun 

77-24 

78-1 

77-19 

77-31 

11-13 

75-18 

Sop 

71 

D-0 

76-31 

77+ 

80-22 

73-13 

Dec 




76- 18 

(H 

75-18 

Ator 




76 

79-M 

77-22 

Jun 




75-17 

E*L Sales 


Prey .3am 10X29 




+1 

+1 


Prev. Day Open int. 51745 ve>392 
US TREASURY BONDS (car) 

(8 pet-srauno-pts 6 32nds Of 100 pH) 


77-15 

57-27 

tear 

48-31 

690 

68-26 

6+0 

+1 

77*15 



6731 

48-12 

47-28 

48-10 

+2 

76-2 

57-10 

Sep 

67+ 

67-18 

47+ 

67-14 

-+0 

7+5 

57-1 

Dec 

46-18 

4+27 

4+M 

4+04 


72-30 

57-2 

Mar 

6+3 

46-9 

65+9 

4+0 

+1 

70-16 

56-S 

Jun 

4+15 

45-26 

65-13 

65-24 


71KJ 

56-29 


65 

65-13 

65 

65-11 


69-36 

56-29 

Dec 

sss 

45-2 

64+2 

45 


69-12 

56-27 

Mar 

6+25 

6+14 

6+23 


*9-2 



6+6 

6+17 

6+6 

6+15 


60-26 

63-22 

Sep 

63+0 

6+10 

63+0 

64+ 


EsL Sales 


Prav. SaiesTD J00 





Prev. Day Open lnt72Xl76 upuuh 


OMMAfCBT} 

8100000 prin-pft632mb at 100 pet 
70-17 57-5 Mar 69-20 49-21 

49-27 57-17 Jun 69-XJ 

Ot-* 59-13 SOP *7-29 67-30 

45-13 SM DaC 

68 38-20 MOT 

6741 58-25 Jim 

67-3 69-11 Sep _ . 

EsL Sales Prev. Sales 133 

Prev. Day Open InL UBattl 


69-18 69-20 
*8-20 4B-23 
67-29 *7-29 
67-7 
46-19 
66-2 
69-19 


CERT. DEPOSIT! IMM) 

SI roll I Ion- pte of 100 pet 
9170 8933 Mar 9079 9090 

9170 BUD Jun 8942 8949 

9060 8580 SOP 8599 89JH 

9017 8X34 DK 039 8836 

K71 8636 Mar 8873 8823 

8946 8643 Jun 8880 8887 

8848 8786 Sea 

Esi. Sates Prev.Sales 577 

Prev. Day Open Int. 10132 ue4 
EU RO DOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mllllan-ptsoi UOpct. 

9178 8X14 Mar 9045 9050 

9088 8249 Jun 8973 1971 


9077 9089 
8934 8948 

8871 8985 

8233 8844 

8623 8875 
1880 88.15 
0774 


—82 

—84 


—83 

—84 


9035 9048 
89.15 8978 


Season Season 


Est. Sates Prev.Sates 46478 

Prav. Day Open Inti 1X251 up 1349 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

S Per pound- 1 paint Mua Is 508001 
13170 18345 Mar 18790 18830 UJ7&5 187B5 

17350 18235 Jun 18690 UJ735 18640 18675 

1.4450 18200 SM> 18670 187TB 18645 18653 

1-2710 18200 Doc 18670 18670 186*0 18655 

18735 18680 Mar 1871D 18710 18710 18660 

Est. Sales Prav. Sates 13793 

Prav. Day Open InL 27713 up 808 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 


-70 
—70 
— TO 


S per dir- 1 pokrt eauats 900001 
JU50 .7100 Mar .7185 

2200 

2178 

2195 

-0 

2B35 

2054 


2142 

2170 

2135 

2161 

—7 

J5B5 

2025 

SOP 

2127 

2135 

2127 

2127 

—13 

2346 

2006 


2725 

2125 

2114 

2109 

—9 

-7304 

XV81 





2092 

—4 

EsL Soles 


Prev.Sales 2X61 





Prev. Day Open Int. 1X483 Off 740 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 
s per time- 1 point eaua is saoooai 
.11905 89405 Mar 89660 

.11020 89410 Jun 89680 89680 89625 89610 

.10430 89600 Sep 89570 

-S-J&m 89670 Dec 89530 

Est. Sates Prev.Sales 12 

Prev. Day Open int. 2481 up4 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Spermarli-l point eeuals HUNMl _ 

4110 7881 Mar 2952 7961 7946 79S5 

7733 7905 Jun 7977 7987 7972 7981 

7545 7930 Sep 8008 8014 8003 8011 

8610 7771 Dec 7029 7039 8029 8043 

7251 8040 Mar 8008 

Est. Sates Pray. Sales 30706 

- itLSM 


—150 


—14 

—12 

—11 

—14 

—IS 


Prev. Day Open InL SI 802 off 381 


JAPANESE YEN (IMM 
S Per yen- 1 point equals B1800001 
004695 803794 Mar 803836 803842 JXS3S31 803B40 
00*450 803826 Jun 803S65 80*73 803659 803S4V 

004150 803870 Sw 803904 893713 803903 803913 
00435D 803905 Dec 803960 

Est. Sol ts Prav. Sates 9870 

Prev. Day Open InL 17714 up 86 


-2 

—1 


SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S Per franc-1 polntwua Is 8 08001 
J035 8*08 Mar 3m 2400 7*1 7668 

4900 8439 Jun 8511 8517 J4E2 8501 

4830 8480 Sen 2353 8553 8534 8542 

4360 8531 Dec 8585 85BS 8580 7581 

ESL Sates Prev.Sales 2X200 

Prev. Day Open Int. 31700 upMS 


—20 

—25 

-75 

—17 


industrial! 


LUMBER (CME) 

130000 bd.fL-5 per 10001x1 ft. 

22040 12X10 Ntar 13440 13670 


22580 

230J0 


13X00 May 13980 14080 
14100 Jul 14X80 14070 
197 JO 14600 Sep 15340 15480 

186.10 149 JO Nov 154JD 15490 

1870 0 15570 Jan U90O 15980 

1*380 160J8 MOT 16X90 16400 

Est. Sales 1723 Prev.Sales 2781 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 7445 oil 179 

COTTON 2 (KYCE) 

50000 lbs.- cents per Bl 


i m in 

13770 13780 
146J0 14600 
15240 15330 
15340 15400 
15970 15850 
16300 16X10 


—670 
—270 
—180 
— 70" 
-80 




7920 

4324 

May 

4600 

6600 

65X5 

65X0 

—52 

79X5 

6105 

JW 

6520 

45X4 

65.10 

6SJB 

-20 

DJO 

64X2 

Od 

6520 

&120 

6500 


-20 

7300 

fUl 

Dec 

65X0 

4546 

6520 

6520 

—20 

7625 

65X0 

Mor 




6620 

—JO 

7000 

64X1 

May 





— 00 

7005 

4650 

Jul 




<625 

—05 

ESL Safes 


Prev.Sales 5X66 





Prev. Day Onen InL 17808 oflSM 


HEATING OIL (NY MCI 
42000 aal- cents per pal 
8275 6585 APT 7480 7640 

8260 648® May 7255 7370 

SMI 6X50 Jun 7140 7175 

7180 65X5 Jul m« 7140 

72J0 6875 Aw 7170 7170 

71.70 M23 Sep 

7SJ0 7200 Dec 

Peb 

EsL Sates Prev.Sales 8062 

Prav. Day Own Int. 16834 up 258 
CRUDE OIL (NY ME) 

1000 bbL- dollars par bbL 


7480 76J3 
7245 7X10 


71.13 7140 
7000 71 J 


71.13 71 J3 
7115 


74J0 

7570 



DX5 

24X7 


27.95 

3833 

2792 

30.19 

+.n 


3020 

2400 

May 

2708 

27 JB 

2705 

27J3 

+07 


29J5 

2400 


3893 

27.16 

3690 

2708 

+05 

—04 

2R54 

34.10 

Jul 

34X4 

2593 

26X4 

r '‘I 

+.17 

—as 

29 J7 

3405 

Aug 

24X0 

26X5 

2650 


+05 

—07 

29 JO 

3400 

% 




Liil 

+05 

— 07 

29JD 

24X5 




2621 

+05 


29X0 

34X0 

Nov 

24X5 

26X6 


2624 

+05 

—M 

29 JD 

Z3L90 

Dec 

2850 

36J0 

24X0 

3874 

+05 


2950 

34JK 

Jan 



3<Jd 

2874 

+05 


29X6 

2550 

Feb 

26J0 

3650 

3624 

+05 


29X5 

34X2 

Mar 




2874 

+05 


29X5 

34X2 






+05 


27 JO 

24X2 

Mav 





+05 

—1 


3470 





LiZl 

+05 




3650 

2+50 

2850 

2850 





Seip 

2525 

2850 

2525 

3850 



Est Sales 


Prev.Sales 21X56 





Prev. Dav Oo#n InL J20S1 w267 


Stock indexes 


SP COMP. INDEXfCME) 
points and cents 

185.55 15X30 Mar 17000 17865 

189.10 156.10 Jun 18240 183J5 

1PX7D 74000 Sep 106J3 18X98 

19640 17X7B Dec 189.10 1 8940 

Est- Sato 63457 Prev.Sales 77031 
Prev. Day Open Int. 7X1T7 up 1732 
VALUE LINE CKCBT) 

Paints and cents 

10600 168.10 Mar 19380 19440 

21940 17380 Jun 20020 20090 

21X30 18X75 Sep BOSS 20473 

SlOOO 20940 Dec _ 

EsL Salas Prev.Sales A322 

Prev. Day Open InL 8436 all 539 


17740 17745 
18280 18X25 
18530 UX45 
10900 189 JO 


19X10 19370 
19X50 19040 
20X00 2D280 
20775 


—80 

—145 

—140 

—ITS 


NYSE COMP. INDEX CNYFE} 

Paints and cants 

10880 8870 Mar 10205 WX55 

11080 9080 Jun 10670 10X90 

11180 9175 Sep 10X20 10X70 

11X75 WUB Dec 1KL58 1I0J0 

Esi.SHes 10794 Prev.Sales U74* 
Prav, Day Open Int. 14710 off 281 


10280 10180 
10580 106.10 
10X00 10X15 
1KL5D 110.15 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's. 


Reuters. 


Dj. Futures. 


Close 
949 M f 
umjo 

12024 

23880 


Com. Research Bureau _ 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 

b- preliminary; f- final 

Reuters : base 100 : S«P. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Previous 
95040 f 
241340 
12043 
239 JO 



PRUDENTIAL BACHE TRADE CORPORATION 


is pleased to announce the opening 
of its wholly owned subsidiary 


PB INTERNATIONAL BANK S.A. 

LUXEMBOURG 


29 Avenue Monterey, B.P. 821, 
L-2163 Luxembourg. 

Tel.: (352) 475581; Tlx.- 60203 pbib lu ; 
Fax : (352) 25106 


Douglas C. Rice - Chairman; John M. Casirn - General Manager 
Wholly owned by the Prudential Insurance Company of America 


CANON DM. 


Advfcs hot bsm i*«wad to" lf*yo to lha 
84* CVdwy Gsnird Maeagrf ShsdnkbH 
of it» Company wB be hdd Sra Ktod OfBae 


of *e Conipony, 1V2. Shsmaaruta) JChon*, 

Cm Talcyo 


OteaXu. 
Mach 79*1. 19 


144. IS 9 am. on Friday. 


Molten ft b*B*pwted 
Esperten 0 h (unisi wot baton dew ond 
nom MmM ter mi Bbb hmi term 
(from January 1st; 1984 ta Decem- 
ber 31*. 1984. 

Molten la be Rambled 
I. Apprwdof the prafiiaRropnason plm for 
tee 8*fi buanaa term. 

2 ftprld amoadpwS ef dw otida of kwypa 
nteati (pemb el ihs papsckan araad 
forth a Tfoforanbd mfonncPon on eserces 
of VMng RflhnT. 

1 Bnaion of )wasy4ra diaOPS 
4. &dtaBaf1tef*Swufo7f>«tot. 
ranwu as 


X Grantang ef I 


tanceiateaksa 


ehoomon of The Board and Diector, Dr. To* 
ted* Mtni. 

6. Oiango nlhe rswodp pf Dndoni and 
Stetufcry Audton. 

Hddsn of Dspaeiary Recaps to Bsarar (HUTi 
& BDEi} wtttep la axarew thee rising rights in 



3 tun. on March 22nd. 198S, cr «8h one of ihe 
m bogmti by 3pm. an Morehjlit, 1985, 
«We lodgw re r^ forme mi aidfcfcla. " 
Bgtei may ody be 


ihdres an #m rmner ai ■ Decanter 31* 1' 

.oftiKhStma 


tad of Iht Nt*tm cowm« the 
nmWmgaw d iaibbl l rFraqwd. 
fB3amM>4L Ox, UnfMi 
43, B*Kh ShML I-*-. ECa»2tX 


Deere & G). to Got 
600 Salaried Worikers 


The Associated Press 

MOLINE, Illinois — Deere & 
Co. said Thursday that it win trim 
600 salaried employees from its 
East Moline and Waterloo, Iowa, 
operations. 

The company said the reduo 
dons, which represent 5 percent of 
its salaried work force in North 
America, reflect current and pro- 
spective production requirements 
for large farm tractors. 


Gold OptlODS (prices ia S/ol), 


Vnm 

Mar 

A* 

tev. 

290 

13734525 

77.757175 


XO 

025-935 

165 MUD 

34253575 

310 

ift *m 

1225-1375 

190DOO5D 

370 

235-375 

875-1025 

15051675 

330 

100-200 

600-750 

1200-1350 

340 

— 

400-550 

tOMB9D 


Gdi 80X3.291.2 

VakanWUteWcU&JL 

L Qua da Mtew-Bfamr 

1211 Cam L SwtarrtssN 
T«L JIB2SI -T«te* 2*385 



12 Month 

MtallLow Stoft 


Sis. dace_ 

Dfv. YU. PE TPteHtan Low Quot. orsa 


10 

2ft 

33* 

34* 

35ft 

2IM 

Uft 

10* 

34* 

23* 

DM 

51 

25ft 

30ft 

34* 

17* 

19ft 

lift 

8ft 

13ft 

23ft 

41ft 

55 

13* 

32ft 

40ft 

39* 

16* 

43V- 

45 

12ft 

ISft 

15ft 

TP/t 

5ft 

43ft 

Zlft 

28* 

32ft 

65ft 

37* 

101* 

31* 

22 

35* 

20* 

25ft 

61ft 

39* 

30* 

35* 

B* 

lift 

U* 

37 

99* 

72 

38* 

18 

20ft 

62ft 

36* 

41* 

38* 

19* 

29ft 

38ft 

21* 


72 U 
7* 27 


L12 X2 
.52 IS 
L53 X7 
42 I.! 


49ft 

30ft 

n* 

34* 

19 

36 

39ft 

36ft 

24ft 

31 

36ft 

17 

8* 

26 

22ft 

15 

7Sft 

27ft 

22 

17* 

27* 

54ft 


55* 

24* 

22 

21 

63* 

50ft 

17ft 

77 

30* 

35ft 

Uft 


5J4 SffldSc 
ft SfodSwt 

aoftsofKios jo ia 
Ziusotewv 160 50 
25* SOM J2 L7 

16 SUOLF 172 W 
9 SPoul UO 1U 
3* visaknt 

22* SoffleM .14 Jt 
17* SOteGs 2J0 9J 
6* SJoonB JM 9J 
31 Sundrs 56 U 
If* SAnURf 184 70 
20* SFbSoP 100 35 
25H SfitWal M0 47 
U* SCRriRE 20 U 
Mft SovElP U0 45 
9* SOvEpf U8 110 
4* Savin 

9* savin pf U0 1U 
13* SCANA 2J6 95 
73 Soma 108 40 
34ft Schimb U0 37 
7* SOAK 
19* Scoalnd 
40 SoofFaf 
25* ScbtlP 
IT* Sartlrs 

20ft SCBVfll 

18ft SaaCat 

9ft SaoCtpf 106 127 
izft saaCpfBXia U7 
n SaaCPfCXKl 1X1 
14* Seoul n 00 15 

00 18 

79* IcaUUr 00 17 
IP* ScatPw 100 30 
37ft SaatteG 82 U 
2 Tea Saars 156 XI 

97 Ssanpf 08*47 
M StcPacs 
11* StkiLt 
23 SvcCas 
n* Sbaktee 
10* Shawl n 
SZ* StwUO 
28ft ShoflT 
17* ShelGte 

23* Sttrwta 

4ft Shaotwa 
12 Sbswbf 
12* SterPac 100 107 
24ft StefflS 100 XI 
48* SlgrUpf 4.12 77 
50 Slgtripf 200 XI 
23ft Stager .10 J 
lZUShylln* Jt 37 
9* smith* 72 20 
50 StnkB 2JXI 47 
36ft SmucJcr M 10 
28ft SnaaOn U* 30 
27 Snrafl 105 5J 
12* SonvGP .150 0 
22* SooLln 170 48 
27* SourcC 370 80 
18 SreCPPf 200 110 
22 SaJarin 208 88 
39ft Saudwn 100 XI 

22 SooISfc 170 47 
SftSaetPS 105*2X3 
T7* SCalEs 204 90 
14* SaulhCa 182 102 
25ft SoInGE 201 75 
27* SNETI X72 48 
31ft SaNEpf 302 HU 
21* SoRypf 200 100 
Z1* SoUnCO 152 68 

23 South* 100 23 

11* So Roy .12 0 

<* Seumrk 70 25 
14* SwAM .13 J 
13ft SwtFar 

10ft SwfGas 

19* IHllw 

17 SwtPS 
lift Spartan 

18 SpsctP 
33* Soerry 

30ft Springs 

31ft SauarO 
37ft Squibb 


69 


00 17 
J2 SB 
00 20 
200 30 
X12e 60 
00 28 
82 28 


00 40 


f 

10 112 
5 1105 
7 18 

IT 190 
7 136 

15 8 

7 St 
13 1958 
3 
3 


174 43 
500 70 
22 18 
108 97 
J2 37 


17* Staley 
SfBPnt 


152 38 
LS2 4J 
104 48 
100 10 
00 40 
74 25 
52 27 
350 52 
200 67 


4* 

20* 

12* 

30 

22 

36 

12 




53ft 

21* 

12* 


16ft 

U StMotr 
50* Stoind 
39* swoon 
6ft StPacCs 
imSAirKttx 82 15 
19ft ftoaWk 86 34 
23ft Stmratt 1JM 28 
8* SfaMSe 170al27 

^SSS? ^ S' 

14* SlercM 56 38 
9ft StrlRcp 56 65 
23* Start Do 1.16 40 
15* OtevnJ 170 60 
2Sft StwWm 108 50 
8ft StkVCpf 100 87 
StaneW 100 37 
StaneC 00 U 


32* StapShp 100 27 
15ft StorEq 104 10 


21* 

21ft 

BM 

33* 

34 

Uft 

59ft 

122 

49ft 

15* 

34ft 


2 vlStnrT 
31 Surer 
20 StrtMtn 


00 5 


14ft SfrMRf 
iuavSh 


3* Su 

21* SunBks 
24* SunOi 
7ft SunB 


170 38 
01 1J 


43ft SunCo 
SunCpf 




250 46 
225 27 
100 38 


17* 

Zlft 

35* 

15* 

5V* 

38ft 


23ft SWPTVI 

19* SupMkf 
M Swank 

16ft Sybnm ... 

28ft Sybmpf 240 7.1 
10ft SymsCp 
37* Syntax 182 15 
25* 5 Vaco -36 LI 


08 27 
02 17 
80 50 
LOB 5J 


336 8* 7* 1* + * 

« m ft m+ft 
22 274 31 30 31 +* 

10 3961 32ft 31* £* + Vi 
12 IMS 30 »» » ^ 

7 U 28ft 20ft 20ft— ft 
TO TO* 10ft Wh+ft 

. 28 4ft flh 4* 

14 387 27 26* 26* 

7 2738k 22* 22* 23*— * 
10 171 8* «ft 8*+ ft 

S 654 39ft 33* M*-l 
Q 29 25 04* 8* +* 

B UM 27 26* 26*— * 
30 29* 29ft * 
44 B 17* 16* 17* + * 
7 fS 18* l£j 

4 11 10* 19*— * 

971 9ft Ift 9 + ft 

4i is* ia* n + ft 

7 TO 22* 22* 32* 

)) 1518 38ft 37* 38ft + * 

9 4890 38* 37* 38 + ft 

8 u in* lift— ft 

12 158 28ft 36* 28 +ft 

W 179 60* 60ft 60ft . 

9 624 36ft 35ft 25ft— ft 
11 53 15 M* 15 +* 

U. 34 41ft 41ft 41* + ft 
7 104 39ft 38 39ft + * 
* IT* Uft- lift +* 
21 15* IS* SB— ft 

as isft is* B* 

7 877 25 24ft 94*- ft 

19 4* 4* 4* + ft 

w 131 m. 40ft 41ft— ft 
16 302 n* W* 18ft + ft 
urns* 23* a* + * 

• 7 27ft 27* 27ft + ft 

17 2145 56ft 54* 54* -Z* 
9 3192 39 34ft 34ft— K 
60 noth KB* KZft + K 
3008 2Mi 27 27*— 1* 

6 15ft 15* 15* 

17 227 34ft 34 34*+ ft 

31 140 M* 14* 14*— * 

- 25* 24ft 34ft— ft 

59* 59* 59* 

34 33* 33*— ft 

27* 27* 27*— * 

32* 21* 31* + ft 

6ft 6* 4ft 
Uft 14* 14ft 

15* 15* 15* + ft 

33ft 32* 37*— ft 

57ft 57ft 57ft— * 

_ 65ft 65ft 65ft— 1 

10 290 35* 34ft 35 — ft 

21 198 15 Mft 15 +ft 

20 71 lift 11* lift— ft 

10 2033 40* 59* 60 +* 

14 45 54* S3* 54* + ft 

13 88 38* 38ft 30* 

7 13«6 36* 35ft 36ft +1 
14 2172 17* 17ft 17* + ft 
10 29 24* 34* 34*— * 

15 37* 37 37* + ft 

79 31* 2] 21 + ft 

ID 10 27* 27* 27*+ * 
11 25 46* 46* 46* + * 

8 72 28 27* 27* + ft 

25 9 8ft 8ft 8ft 

7 4601 23 22* 22* 

6 9040 18* 10* 18* + ft 

7 22 34ft 33* 34ft + ft 

10 4057 39* 39* 39* + ft 

14 36* 36* 36* 

3 31 24 24 

16 75 26* 26ft lift— * 

10 590 32ft 32ft 32*— ft 

18 624 MH U 14ft 

7ft 7* 7% 

25ft 24ft 25 

15* 14ft 15* + * 

15 14* Uft + * 

74* 73* 74 + ft 

28 27* 28 +* 

20* 20 20* 

15* 15ft 15ft + * 

_ ... 19* IV* 19* + ft 

1018945 51* 50 50 —IK 

0 281 34 34 34 — * 

10 759 38* 37ft 37*— ft 

14 692 53* SZ* 53 + ft 

16 376 20* 19* 20* + ft 

2Bft 30ft 20*— * 

Uft 14V!r 14ft + * 

63* CZ* 62ft— * 

45* 45* 45ft 

17 16* 16*— * 

15* M* Mft— ft 

28ft 28 28ft 

34 33ft 34 + ft 

10 9ft 9ft— ft 
28 27ft 27ft 
3* 3ft 3* + ft 
W* 19 19* + * 

.. .. 11*11 11*+* 

12 2076 29ft 28*. 29ft + * 

10 753 17ft 17ft 17*— * 

16 32 29* 2Sft 29 

S30z Uft 11* lift 

9 32 Oft 43* 43* + * 

11 311 26 25* 25*— * 

W 63 45* 44* 45* + ft 

IS 281 21* 20* 20ft + * 

603 2ft 2* 2*—* 
6M 57* 57 57* 

m as* 20 id — * 

23 88 16ft W* 16*— ft 

2 5ft 5* 5ft 
10 364 30* 30* 30*+* 

10 2 33 33 33 — * 

131 8* ff* flft— * 

11 1552 49ft 49* 49*— U 
2 107*102*102*— ft 
13 108 46* 46* 46ft— * 
25 566 8ft I Bft + ft 
11 600 31ft 31* 31*— * 
14 192 34* 34ft 34* — ft 

10 41 16ft 16 16ft + ft 

11 73 19ft 19* 19*— * 

3 34 33* 33*—* 

20 1 13* Q* 13* + ft 

U 930 55* 53ft 55* +1* 
IS 260 35ft 34* 34*— ft 


4 

15 904 
18 252 
9 206 
■ SU 
12 101 
B 1061 
53 239 
25 103 


412 


11 

10 ... 

8 2643 
7 1265 

10 97 

» er 

11 112 

11 30 

36 

2421 

172 

11 8 
10 31 


62 35* TDK 

31* 24 TECO 
13* 7ft TGI F 
15* IT* TNP 
27* 17 THE 
81ft 50* TRW 


370 0 
220 70 


10* ^3ft TocBoat 


105 XI 
100 43 
300 35 


70 51* TafIBnf -LI2 15 

16* 10ft Talley 05e 0 
19* 13* Taller pf M0 14 
72 ft 46* Tambrd X20 46 


15ft lift Tndycft 
60* Sift Tektrra 100 
5* 2ft Teteam 
382*147* Tetehm 
22* T3ft Telrate 
48* 19* Telex 
39ft 25ft Temp In 
44* »* Termae 


17 


02 10 


04 

un 


HE. S7ft Tencpr 1100 110 


35* 21* Tenfyn 
20ft V* Tesoro 00 
35* 20* TUOraf 2-16 


41* 37ft Texaco 100 80 


1-52 42 
106 35 
250 65 
00b 20 
200 10 


.18 1.1 
00 10 
212 90 


TVABc 

40* 36* TexCm 

35 ft 26ft TxE*ti 
35* 25 Texlnd 
149ft TOSft Texlnst 
»ft 1 Texiot 
27ft 16* TaxOGs 
39 20* TxPac 

28ft 20* Tex Util 
7ft 2 Texflin 
43* 25* Textron 100 40 
01 2>K Textrpf 200 46 

38* 23* Textrpf 100 37 
9ft 5ft TTXJCX 
27 23* Thac* pf 4.15 157 

26 13* ThomiE 

43* 28* ThmBtS 104 X2 
Uft 12* Thomln 08b 43 
26ft 13ft ThmMed 00 20 
22* lift Thrtftv 00 21 
17ft Tktwtr 00 XI 
ism 4ft Ttoerln 
10* 0 TtgrlPl 
52* 33* Tlmw 1M 27 
VI* 60ft Tim I pfB 107 15 
23* 12 TtmplX 
51 33ft TbneM 176 30 
59ft 47ft Timken 100a 36 
39ft 30* TodStlP 102 36 
31* 22* Totem 72 20 
18ft U* TolEtOS 252 1X8 
27ft 24* TCI Ed pf 372 140 
27* 22 Tel Ed Pi X7S 144 
31* 25* TotEd pf 42 8 MJ 
17* 13* Tot Ed pf 236 143 
17* Uft TolEdPf 221 111 
65ft 26* Tanka 00 7 

40ft 17ft. TootRal 00b U 
44* 19ft Trdtrns 100 20 
17ft 9ft TdTdCo 00 20 
4* 1 TOKO 

22 10* Towle 

15* 6 Towle Pf 04 XI 


20 Zt 
8 1760 
16 55 

8 72 

15 130 

11 310 

52 

12 ID 

12 s 

12 39S 

13 2847 
13 115 

8 249 

7 186 
10 211 
29 3081 
12 3822 

8 239 

10 2140 

61 

12 3488 

51 733 
16 

34 2760 

9 78 

7 1672 

8 537 

16 83 
8 414 

92 

1015503 

11 4 
6 3439 

50 

13 2685 

II 
1 
34 
1 
215 



47* 47 

15* 15* 

23* — 

79* 

4ft 

60ft _ _ 

13 ££ 

69* 67* 

HI 

3* 3* ... .. 

262ft 259*259*— * 
19ft 19 19ft + ft 
40ft 39ft 40*—* 
X 34* 34*— * 
40ft 40 40* — M 

98ft 98 98ft + ft 
23ft 22ft 23 + ft 
13* U 13* 

36ft 25* 25*+ ft 
35* 3S 35 — * 
J5M 36ft 


M* 


41 40 40*— ft 


15 129 
24 


no 
157 
624 
1453 
54 

14 1341 
7 

10 81 
13 910 
13 79 

7 42 

18 23 

5 618 
29 
9 

4 

5 

» 

25 14 

12 28 
U 508 
10 ID 
392 
23 
5 


32* 31ft 31* — ft 
29* 28ft 20ft— 1* 
109*107*108* +1* 
2* 2ft 2* 

18* 17ft 17ft— 1 
31* 31* 3T* 

26ft 26* 26ft— * 
3* 3* 3* 

41* 41 41 — ft 

45* 44* 44*— * 
37* 37* 37*+ * 
8* 8* **+* 
26* 26* 26*— ft 
22* Zlft 21*— 1 , 
38ft 38* 38*— * 
15ft IS* 15ft+ ft 
17* Uft 17 — ft 
Zl* 20ft 21* 

17ft 17ft 17ft + * 
9* 9* 9ft + U 
9* 9* 9ft + * 
48* 47* 47ft— » 
84ft B4ft 84ft— 1 
10* lift lift + ft 
45* 44* 45* + * 
50ft 499W 50ft + * 
36* 36 35*- * 

29* 28ft 29*— * 
18* 18 18* + * 
26* 25ft 2Sft— * 
26_ 26* 

29ft 29* 

16* 16* 

IS* 16 + ft 
57ft 57ft—* 
38* 36* 37ft +1* 
43 42* 42* + * 

16* 1C* 16*— * 
lft 1* 1ft 


12 Month 
High Low 


SlQCk 


Sts, 

Otv. YM. PE MQSHIgni 


.82 




35* 23ft 
35* lift 
13* 7* 
Mft lift 
25 Mft 
30* 20ft 
30 16* 

12ft 10* 
55ft 37ft 
62 44* 

25* 19ft 
Uft 6M 
W* 00 
92* 77 
13ft 5ft 
36* X 
37ft Mft 
20ft 9ft 
31* 22ft 
17* 14* 
45ft 25ft 
25 19* 

28ft 20* 
6ft 5 
22ft 12* 
31* 20* 
41* 24ft 
6ft 4 
9* 5ft 
22 13* 

21ft 11* 
73* 0* 
38* 2V* 
20 18* 
20 16 
41 26ft 
35ft 21ft 


TayRUs V 2995 30 

Traaor 34 1.1 u 3» im 

TWA 73 2283 12* 

TWA pi 225 160 WJ 13ft 

TWApfS 225 *A 2M Bft 

Traram 104 M 11 HM 29ft 

Tran Inc 202 110 6 19ft 

TARIty 1000 X2 $ 4 12ft 

Iran*. 2.T6 4.1 10 1IU S3 w 

226 22 
6 " 

TrOM HUB )0J 
TrGfpf 004 90 
TrrepOh 14 

Tranwv 100 5.1 10 
TrnwM 00 1.1 11 

TwfowtA 
TertdPf 200 60 
TwtdPf U« 100 


29ft 29*+ ft 
31* 31ft— ft 


12* 12ft— * 


TriHCPf 307 60 
Tran Ex 220 100 
Tranxn 
Trail l 


26 11* 
90s 95ft 
21b 91ft 
191 lift 


27 35ft 
9)9 35* 


16 18ft 
5 31ft 
» 17ft 


Travtar 204 40 9 1543 41* 


111 Mft 


M 28* 
25 5ft 
I7ta 
90 


Tricon 3J3el4J 
TrlCnnf 2J0 80 
TrtSeln 6 

Trtalnd 00 X3 M 
TrtaPc U0 U f 
Tribune 
Trtaitr 

Trfoo ... . 

Trinfy JD X3 _ 

TrttEng .10b J 24 565 20* 

TVffE pt I.HI Xfl J* 12ft 
TucsEP 300 M * J9 35* 
TuHJM 52 U li 976 20* 

TwtnDs jo 40 10 9 17ft 

TreoLb 00 20 9 1045 35* 

Tyler 05 14 8 101 31ft 


04 XI 15 138 39* 
J581X6 9 
.16 20 17 


69 
51 6ft 
120 15 


13* Uft— .. 
29* Bft— ft 
39 29* + l% 

19 19ft 

12* 19* 

52ft S3 + ft 
61 61ft + ft 
21* 22 + ft 
lift lift— ft 
95ft 95ft + ft 
92ft 92ft + ft 
U 13* + ft 
35 3S — * 
35 35*+ ft 

14 nft+ * 
31* 31*- ft 

17* T7VS 
41* 41ft— ft 
34* 2WW— ft 
28ft 2*ft— * 
5* 5ft 
17ft T7V>— * 
30 30 

30ft 39ft— ft 
6* 4ft— ft 
6ft 6ft 
14* 15 + ft 
19ft 20 + * 
12* 12ft + ft 
35* 35ft + ft 
19* 20ft + ft 
17ft 17* + * 
34 35 — ft 

31ft 31ft— ft 


34* 24* 

15* 7* 

21ft Mft 

24ft 19ft 

lift 3 
14 10 

32* 17* 
DK 45 
19ft Uft 
Uft 45 
94* 75 
41ft 30* 

SO* 22* 

7ft 4* 
16ft 13 
51* 39ft 

30ft 24ft 

Mft 4Mb 
Mft 18* 

17ft 13ft 

61* 49 
50ft 34* 

111 * a 

16ft 9* 
70 53ft 
6* 3* 
19ft IS* 
16ft 9* 
40 20* 

31* 22ft 
22ft 9 
28ft 19 
16ft 11 
14ft 10 
22* 14* 

3ft 2ft 
38ft 32 
9* 5ft 
4Zft 21* 
34* 21 
31 32 

5BM 49* 
149*115* 
30 22* 

39* 31* 
75 55* 

13 5* 

45 29ft 
39* 28* 
Mft T7M 

22* UV> 
27* 18* 
22* 15* 
50 38 

77 45 

39* 23* 
37 25 

9* 8* 
25ft 20* 
25 21* 

25ft 21ft 

21* 17ft 


UAL JSe 10 7 

UAL Of 200 7 3 
UCCEL 19 

UGI 2JM 90 11 
UGI Pf 205 120 
UNCRn 

URS 00b X5 17 

USFOs 200 70392 
USG 306 40 7 
Uni Prat 00 10 15 
linftvr 109e 15 9 

UnlNV US, 40 » 

UCcenasUM 43 9 
UnCorta 800 9.1 8 
UnhxiC 

Unelec 102 108 5 
UnEJ pf «0O 120 
UnEI PCM4JN 1X4 
UEIPfL 800 130 
UnEI pf 258 129 
UnEI Pf XU 120 
UEI PfH xoa 1X2 
UnPoc 100 30 12 
UnPCPt 725 60 
Unlravl .18 U 10 
Unrvl pf 800 110 
UnltDr 61 

UnBmd 16 

UBnf pf 

UCbfTV .14 0 66 

UnEnro 10 U H 
U I [Turn 200 1U 3 
Ulttupf 307 15.1 
* 220 140 
100 140 
■“ 

7 
1 

J 7 


1177 

46* 

45* 

89 

31* 

31* 

a 

14* 

13* 

00 


22* 

SOC 33 

23 

196 


0* 

43 

11* 

11* 


6747 


20 9 

20 12 


UlllUPf 

U I IIU PI 

Unltlnd 

UJer-Bk 1J4 
UldMM 
UPkMn 
ileal rG .13 
USHom 
USLen 00 
USSfwo 06 _ 
USSteat 100 X7 10 
USSIIPf 4044 90 
USSH or 1205 90 
USSIIPf 225 62 
USTofi 102 4J B 
U SWest 571 77 « 
USfekn 32 

UnTcbs 100 X4 8 
UTctiPf 2J5 70 
Unrrei 102 u * 
UWRs 108 70 10 
Unltrde 20 3 17 

unhrar 08b 3J7 13 
UntvFd 104 XI 16 
UnLeot UK) 45 8 
Unocal 100 22 11 
Upfchn SJ4 32 13 
USUFE 104 X* 12 
U3LF pf Z25 X5 
UHfoPd 104OHL9 
UtaPL 232 100 * 
UtPLpf 200 110 
UtPLpf X90 110 
UtPLpf 2J6 110 


23 —l 
9 + ft 

lift— * 

31ft 91 31*+ * 

MM 68ft 68ft— * 

~ 19* W 19* + * 
38 34* 33 54* 42* 

49 92ft 91ft DW-lta 
134 35 34* 35 + ft 

1395 37* 37ft Bft—* 

22 5* 5ft 5* 

1951 16* 16 M — ft 
MOx 49ft 47ft 49ft +2 
M 29* 29ft 29* + * 
IMz 61ft 61ft 
» 23U 2Z» 23ft + ft 

5 16ft 16* 16* + ft 
1601 40ft S9* 

2155 47* 47 47ft + * 

6 IMft 106* 106ft +* 
305 15 Mft M*— * 
loot 47ft 66ft 67ft +lft 

V 4*' 4ft 4* 

162 13ft 12* 13ft + * 
36 13ft 13* 13*— * 
M83 37ft 36* 36ft— ft 
538 Bft 31 31ft— * 

111 M* I6ft I4U 

23 26* 26ft 24*+* 
500x 15* 15* IS* + ft 

36 13 12* 13* 

21ft 21* 21* 

35 34* 35 

14* 14ft Mft— ft 
2* 2* 2* 

35* 34* 34ft— ft 
7* 7ft 7ft— ft 
40* 49* 40*— « 
29* 28* 29*+ * 
27* 36* 27*+ ft 
HUM 52)4 52* 52ft+* 
131 129ft 128ft 129* 

383 27* 37ft Bft + * 
257 38ft 37* 38ft 
—* 75 74 74ft + * 

11* 11* U*— ft 
41* 40* 40ft— * 
36* 35ft 36*+ ft 
23* 22ft 23* + * 
16ft Mft Mft + * 
28ft 28* Mft + ft 
18* 18ft 18*— ft 
25* 3* 25ft 
2Z* 22 22*+ * 

46ft 46 46ft— ft 

76* 75ft 76ft + ft 

9488 40ft 38* 40 +1* 

1325 34ft 33* 34ft +1 
34 9* 9ft 9ft 

21* 21* 21* + ft 
24* 24ft 24ft 
Zlft 24* 24*+ ft 
20* 20* 20*-* 


18 


573 

112 

101 

2267 


1 

2587 

781 

582 

80 

384 


IIS 

3398 

1825 


854 

4 

33 

11 


33* 21* VF Oarp 1.12 U 

15ft 5ft Valera 

23ft 14 Voter pf 304 150 


298 

891 

39 


31* 30* 30*— 1ft 
ID 9* 9ft 
2Tft Zl* Zlft— ft 


Company Earnings 


Revenue and profits, In millions, are In local 
currencies unless otherwise indicated 


Australia 


United States 


Mysr Emporium 

1st Halt WB TIM 

Revenue 109a lJia 

Profits 40J1 3406 

Per Shares- 0.14 0.M1 


Britain 


RownlrM 


3rd Rear. 

Revenue 

Oner Net 

Oper Share— 
9 M ant es 
Revenue — 

Oper Net 

Oper Share— 


Conagra 


ms 19M 
1020. 8440 

190 1X3 

OSS 039 
1985 UM 
X10a 2050 
64.1 450 

UO 107 


Year 1984 1983 

Revenue LMO ms 

Pretax Net - 7X5 610 

Par Share 036 0309 


me of company 
Rom ta na MackMoA. 

T1 Group 


1944 nets exclude loom of 
S3UanntouorhrondofS4.l 
million m year Awn discon- 
Nwetf aue ra W orn. DM also 
oxdudo am of OS million In 
bath perfects vs earn of SfJ 
million. 


Dayton Hudson 


Year l»M 1983 

Revenue 9D0 9140 

Pretax Net— 190 160 

Per Share 0222 0185 


** • / UbiLmbI i le 

iiiihni/ ramNnaxn 


Royal Dutch/ Shel 

Yew UM tm 

Revenue— 6X950 54040 

Pniftl 3050 2030 

Per Share A 10745 00997 
Per Share B 3SJ6 2708 
_a : per sharp results of Shu ft 
T r ans port 0 Trading pic. In 
smrUnes fl.-per share results 
at Royal Dutch Petroleum, tn 
poUdero. An other results In 
storUnp. 


4tti Gear. 

19*5 

1984 

Revenue 

2240. 

2090. 

Net Inc. 

148X7 

142.16 

Per Shore 

L54 

1X7 

Year 

19S5 

1IM 

Revenue — 

8010. 

8960. 

Net Inc. 

259 J5 

245X6 

Per Share 

2X8 

2J4 

K-Mart 


4th Quar. 

1905 

.1984 

Revenue — 
Net Inc. 

as 

S5£ 

Per Share™ 

1J7 

iji 

Year 

Revenue — 

1985 

21090. 

..1904 

10X00. 

4920 

Net Inc. 

499.1 

Per Share— . 

304 

0JO 


France 


National Sami. 


Ga Fsa Pttrafas 


Hong Kong 

HangKong Land 


3rd Quar. 1985 1914 

Revenue 39X5 3821 

Net Inc. I J 150 

Per Share— 002 018 

9 Months 1985 .1984 

Revenue ljsa 1080 

Met Int 400 390 

Per Share — 006 007 


Yew 

Prom. 


198* 1983 

35X0 1680 


nteruits Include pain orsu 
settlement of 


Per Share — 0.165 0078 


26M 

30 

T7 

M 


10ft 10* 10*— * 
7* 7* 7*+ ft 


Malaysia 


mlUton from „ . 

ctatm. IMS 9-montti not also 
Includes gain of SU million. 
Dot excludes tax credit of S3 
rdllJan. 


H carito ns Plant. 

y lAORthS 1914 1983 

Revenue BSL41 3570 

Profits 95AS 3504 

Per Share — OZ29 00743 

Full name of company Is 
Harrisons Malaysian ptanto- 
tfono. 


SCOAInd. 


HQwr. UBS 19S4 
Revenue — 439.1 OU 

Net Inc. 2X77 3701 

Per Share 1-50 106 

Year 1985 19M 

Revenue 1020 1000 

Net Inc. 4103 4101 

Per Shore — 228 112 


Switzerland 


Swissair 

Year 19M 1981 

Revenue xoio um 

Prom 607 560 


West Germany 

Deutsche Babcock 


Ye*- 1984 lfH 

Revenue 6050 7080 

Profit# 28.1 330 


12 - Monih 
Utah Law Much 


' 5* 3* ycdevhi 
M* M* VonOr* 

6ft 2* Vera 

46ft SO* Vartaa 
19* 9* Vera 


Pf* YW- PB TOkHtahLowSS?^ 

14 2ft 2* » 1 

8 3ft 7ft s* 

» mti« jH -• 
so 12* lift 


M IV 6 


M 4 11 

00 X3 M 



25ft IF* Veecp 00 20 U 3878 39* 19ft 

Oft 3* Vends „ tv 4 3ft "“t! 

18ft i* V«etSe UOaiU 3 w* 10* Ml6* vv— 

*" " 4M CW Afc, -0^ 

llllt 


43* 25ft Viacom 02 10 it 
66 54 VoEPPf 702 123 

ZSft 60* VaEPef 884 122 
71ft 67* VoEP of 860 1L4 
10* 57* VoElFf M0 m* 
83* . 68ft VaEPpI 905 12J 
5Tft 49ft VUEPPf 70S 1X1 
Bft 51* VOEPpf 70S 120 
35* Mft Vftnay USt 70 M 
41* 27 Varnad 14 

78 91 VotenM 2X6 20 11 


478Z 71* 71* nil 
9400x 99* 59 
1ft 61 (IV, B 
42 35ft 25 
41 39 Mft 
40 77 76ft 


‘>1 


nil* 




T 






28 21 ft 1 COR UO U 6 70 27 26* 

35* 21 WbchVB 02 20 10 777 32ft 31 ^ 

25* Mft wackht 00 M 14 » left jnZ. 1 

S* 6* wotnoc __ SU 369 18ft 9* + 

47ft 31 WolMfl M 0M 2U4 «* 44* 

104 68 WIMTTPf 5 98 98 a 

54* S* Watarn J8 10 18 236 50ft 50ft S* 4^ 

31* 15ft WkHRsal0O 53 20* 2Bft S*! 

38ft 23* WelCSv 05 10 17 IM Mft 34* Ml? 

S M WafUm 100 XI 7 57V 33* 32* 

zt* it* w™ 08 *0 11 W a ' 

25* 17 Wn»Cm W rot m 3H*+‘ 

n* 3B* WornrL ]-* 40 13 915 »* 17* 

19* M* ftashOs IX u I — 

ZB* IS* VMiNdt 108 U 8 
SO* 16 Wehwt 208 122 ■ 

32ft »* WBfle. » W M 

S XI 10 


v.f K 


-i#ia B 


•■3ft 


■urn 


Jlk 

20a LO 13 
JO 10 u 
200 40 B 


1 

74 

43 

519 

s 

31 


76 19* Ifft SS 
65 27ft 271ft ijii4 
305 30* 30 Jra&T 

g* 4*5 

97 25* 35 Sft_ 

to ft ft 

36 10ft 10ft W* + 
lift lift lift! 
20* 38ft tt*4< 
37* 37ft SftZ 

££ » S*; 

21 38* 31 + * 

6QZ 40 « « + 

2*3 36 35ft 35*4 

lz io* n* m* 

sm 5* SH 5ft4 
n i* ift 
5 17* IT* ItnT 
64 W Uft 19*4 

“? FF? . 

1 115 116 115 
940 Sft 8* SK- 
IS 3* 3* M - 

37 7ft (ft 7 _ 
U 8ft . fft |ft 


130 


28* If* WotkJn 
12* b* wnyGas 
12ft 4 JMtanU 
13 9* Wban pf 

23* 12* WabbO 
38* 29* WeftMk 

a 30* WeffsF . 

S 40 WelFnf XVOalDX 
28* 23* W8IFM 2X8 100 11 
17* s* Wandvs u 

26ft M* WeifCe 04 IT 12 
43 34 WPenPpNJO 1U 

4*u 34* WStPfF 220 62 10 
11* 9* watetTB 104 

oft a* wnAM. 

1* * wtAlrwt 

18* 8* WAIT Pf 200 110 
19* 8* WAtrpf XM 11 J 

lift 4 VVCNA 
52* 47 WCNApf 705 1X5 
116 85 WPOCI 6 

26* S4i VVUnJon 

fft 3* WnU P« 

15ft 4* WirtiPfE 

S* WL W^bE^ )0O 30 W 24M *>* » » - 

u S* 100 XS 19 44M min Wtl 

44* 34* Wavrpf 2X0 7.1 40* Wj, 91*— 

51* 43* Weyrpr 4J0 9J 39 «* Oft N* 

33* 11* WhelPft » n 12 - 

4) 26 WPttpfB 44te 26W » 36 ' 

38 20 WhPttPf IHte 21* 21ft 2HL~ 

49ft Mft WhlrtPi 200 4J 9 540 44ft 4WS 46ft 

36* 34* WhltC UO 5X IB 29* 2H6 2*6 + 

29* 17* Wnltthl 10 » K* Wt J3 

25ft Mft Wtilttok 00 20 10 8W 25 JHh 24* + 

12* 6* wtabw 4JD 43 lift *M' 
14* 0 wilted n 13 4 im Uft Uft- 

31* 23* WITHam T0O il 6 292 27* 27* 17K_ 

5* 2 WlhtlEI „ 185 4ft 4ft 4* + 

«* 6ft WlWirO i.TO 10 15 72 7 * 7 7K— 

35 25* WfoDlx 100 50 12 105 »* UK 33* + 

20* 7* Wlnnbo .Me Jf 17 246 19 Mft 1M- 

13* Sft Whiner 17 37 M 6* «* 

8 3* Win ter J 

33* 25* WHcEP 228 70 7 
80ft 68* WKEpf 8X0 110 
71 59ft WISE Bf 70S 110 
25* 23ft WftGpf X55 100 
31 25* MSCPL 204 57 I 

33* 34* WlscPS 2 M M 7 

04 23 14 
JO 30 M 
1X0 4J ID 


f *** 


-PHI MN 

-a+tei I 




:i:J V.l* rU fm 


•np«ir» wB 

rimm* 


1 ■: t 




Vrrat m 


,*3 


40ft 27* Wltca 
17* rn WoJvrW 
27 18* WoadPt 

43* 29* Wotwttl 
5* 2* WrtdAr 
61 45* Wrtahr 

18ft 10* WyteLb 
DM 16* Wvrms 


IXOa XI 10 
02 25 10 
00 17 ■ 


6 4ft 4ft 4ft . 
127 Mft 31K 31ft + 
1U« 79* 79* 71* 

400s 70 69* 6f*_ '• 

4 M* 24* 31*- 
251 30* 30 9M + 
349 30* m 38*4 
187 39ft 38ft ML + 
636 18* 10* MK-6T.' 
•35 22IL 22 2M 4 
532 40 3V* 40 4 - 

6 3ft 3ft 2ft _ 
40 58 57* 57fti:- 

61 13 n u ■ 

344 23* 22 206 4 


46* 33* Xerox 300 70 17 2048 43ft 4B6 Oft-' 
51* 45* Xerox Pf 505 110 11D «*«££*■(- 

29 19 XTRA 04 20 9 ID 26ft 25* Sh- - . 





30 24 roteCP 

24* 13* Zapata 
so 30 zayre 
31K Mft ZenUbE 
21 * 14* Zeros 
31* 21ft Zumln 


L0Z XI 9 
04 60 16 
00b 7 14 

19 

102 40 M 


11 29* 29 2H4-' 

354 13* 13ft UK- 
425 55 54 55 - 

456 71ft Zlft 21*- 
57 2Bft 19* 21*- 
70 28* .Mft Wh- 


NYSE Highs-LowB 


Mard J - 


NSW HIGHS 41 


Am Home 

BeroEnl 

Cans Food 

GAFGopt 

ICNPhrmpf 

IntNlhcvpf 

Merck Co 

QuakerOats 

Savin 1 SOpf 

TuJUM 

Wynralnt 


Am Nat Res 1 
CP Natl 
Duke Paw 
GefcoCp 
IP Timber n 
Lamsn5c9n 
NabbtcaBrd 
RetehChem 
SouNEngTI 
USLIFE Cp 


AmWatrWks 
Cased* NGs 
FlexJV 1 6lp 
Hooslnt62S 
Int North 
UllyEII 
PennzeN 
RafilnsEnv s 
SthwstEnr 
VoEP I60pf 


Andnde' 
CeoMtCP 
Gaf Con 


Inrnntii 

McKtno 

PhE17N . 

SovfnCp- 

TnmsOf 

VMnvlr 




NEW LOOTS 


CempbRsM 

MosseyF 


Few West Fn LactllaCP LanaSHf 

NEXrtSvs SfoneCont 


U.S. Sales Figured 
Down in January: 



The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — - Sales of manufactn ..... 

goods dropped 0.7 pcrccnL in January, thcli 

est decline in almost two years, theU.Sgpvr 

meat reoorted Thnrsdav. T 

The C^mrce Department said total s llUTt'llr* 
declined to S41SJ bilfion in Januaiy h 
increases of 1 percent in both Deamber i 
November. 

As sales were declining unsold invenlb 
w we rising at more than twice the raic of, 
previous month. The report said invento 
climbed by 0.4 percent to a level of SSc 
billion. Hus followed gains of 02 perceal - 
both December and November. ' 

Stock and bond prices tumbled and inte 
rales moved higher after the Commerce Dep - ■ 
meat reported Wednesday that retail s ■ ■ 
jumped 1.4 percent in Fdaruaiy for their 
advance since November. 

Major U.S. automakers, meanwhile, s 
their combined eariy March sales rose a rax * 

33 percent from a year earlier. 'J. 

And the nation’s 1,000 largest manufactm - 





-ft Mftv 


■48IP* 


'*** * 


i a 


'tar 
mp 

4U * *4***' 

*-**■*» 


“‘■’.07 \ 


«ee 


boosted their capital appropriations 32 pen* : 
in 1984 to SI 16 " * 


* JM I ft*. 


m the petroleum industry. 
Board said. 


0n€ 


*>** *«Hb 


Asian Commodities 

March 14 


HOMO-KONG GOLD FUTURES 

USX per ounce 

Cton Prate— » 

High Lew BU A— B6d A— 

MOT- N.T. N.T. 290JD0 292B0 289JB 291J» 
API — 292X0 292X0 291X0 29X00 290X0 292X0 


Mov._M.T. H.T. 291X0 29500 292X0 294X0 
— 29SUO 397X0 


jun _ 2KOO 296X0 39SX0 

AN. N.T. N.T. 30000 TO0O2990D 30100 
Ocf— N.T. N.T. 305X0 3D7JI0 304JM 304X0 
Dec- N.T. N.T. 310X0 DZXO 30KX0 310X0 
Feb r N.T. N.T. 31600 31800 31500 31700 
Volume: 23 krte of 100 nt 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UXXl 


Hlgb Low settle settle 
N.T. ALT. 28800 288X0 

29300 29000 29000 290X0 

29600 29600 29400 29400 


Volume; 398 tale of 100 ox 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mahmtan cent* per Ulo . 

Ctaee . Prav ted 

BM Aik BM Aik 

API 18773 18100 19075 191X0 

May 19225 192J0 19X50 19575 

Jun IM50 19575 19X50 19775 

JIT 196X0 mm mxo -mm 

AUB 200X0 201X8 202X0 203X0 

SOP 20300 204X0 203X0 20600 


Volume: 29 tats. 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
rfcBo 


BM 

«M)APl_ 16X75 . 

RSS 1 May. 16825 1 

R3$3ApI_ 16200 1 
RSS 3 Ad) _ uaxa 
RSS 4 Apt 15X50 



HSSSApI^ 14900 15100 15000 15200 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 

MBfamn Hogg itt per 25 tons 

Prav loo* 



volume; 0 lotxoi 25 tons. 
Source: Reuters. 


Ask 

L360 

1335 

1030 

1000 

1790 

1700 

1770 

1760 

1760 


To Oar Readers 


The T BiHs were not available in 
this editon because of transmission 
delays. 


Paris 


Commodities 

March 14 


■■■ ™ 







Low 

Bid 

Aik 

Oft 

SUGAR 






French francs per metric to 



Mav 

1390 

1355 

1060 

1065 

—6 


1X55 

1X10 

1X20 


— 11 

Oct 

1X00 

1X72 

1X76 

1*479 

— 4 



N.T. 

1J3C 

Ijw 

— U 


1X60 

1X38 

1X38 

1X4? 

— 12 


N.T. 

. N_T. 

1X84 

1X95 

— 11 

Est. VOL: un 
safes: 2054 ms. 

tats of 30 tons. Prav. 
Open Interest: 23,105 

actual 

COCOA 






Prencti traecspar 160 kg 




2350 

2350 

2020 

2045 

+ Id 

Mav 

Jlv 

2337 

N.T. 

2005 

N.T. 

££ 

2306 

+20 

+40 

Sep 

K.T. 

N.T. 

ivj 

2390 

+ 14 

Dec 

. N.T. 

N.T. 

1165 

2.185 

+ 411 


N.T. 

N.T. 


2175 

+ 3( 


N.T. 

N.T. 

— — 

2170 

+ 35 

Est. vni.: US lots Of 10 tans. Prev. 
sates: 156 tafftOean Inleresf: 946 

actual 

COFFEE 





French itenore per tea in 




N.T. 

NX 

2JJ90 

2620 

+ 20 

Mav 

2X40 

2X60 

2X45 


+ 3 

Jiy 

N.T, 

N.T. 

2X00 

7,705 

-5 

SOP 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2706 


— S 

NOV 


N.T. 

£702 

2738 

+ 3 




2X63 

2010 

+ 2 


N.T. 

N.T. 

2X58 

2000 

+ 11 

EsLvOL.‘5lotsaf5tons.Prev.aclual sates: f 

tats. Open umwen: 157 




Source: 

Bourse du Commerce. 



r 

London Metals 


L 


March 14 


J 


BM ASk 


Bid Ask 

ALUMINU M 

SMfttig per BMtrtc ton 

spot 999 J0 10OOJQ 992J0 99150 

forward ISJTM 1M7JB 102900 103000 

COPPER CATHODES (HMD Grade) 

Sterling per metric Ion 
spot liTOOO 179900 

t u nward 177900 178000 1777.‘g 177800 
COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

forward 177300 177300 176900 177200 

LEAD _ 

Sterling per mettle lea 
mat 31300 31400 3UJ0 31X50 

tanHORl 321 JO 32250 32100 32250 

NICKEL 

g^^^Smoo 

for ftwte X3BL00 X78SJU 4J, 

SILVER 

pwee per troy eunra 
SWf SW0 52200 

forward 53900 54000 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric tea 

■oat 10,130 10,M0 10,140 

forward 10,130 10,135 10.140 

ZINC 

StarHeg per metric tea 
spot 83900 04100 

farword 80900 81000 

SovftntAP. 


409000 

47B0O 


52700 

54600 




82400 

79900 


82600 

80000 


London Commodities 

March 14 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


Ciese 

High Lew BM A 

SUGAR 
Sterling per metric ton 

115X0 11300 11X40 11140 115X0 115X0 


12000 TOM 11X60 119X0 121X0 1 21 AO 
■UHMJHn mxo 12X40 126X0 


May 


isos uutromromHB 

N.T. N.T. 13070 131J0 13240 134X0 
14X00 14X20 14X40 M4JD 14640 147X8 


15100 T49JD 14900 149,40 151 M 1S2JO 
!540O 15500 I57JW 158X0 


-May 

Jiy 


L102 NA Na 


2070 

2047 


2X30 


157X0 156X0 1 

volume: 1717 tats of 50 Ions. 

Sterling per metric ton 
2,140 2009 2.1 
2.133 2085 20 
2.162 2066 20 
sen 2007 2050 Z0 __ 

Dec 1X92 LM7 isn 1073 

Mar 1000 1040 1,964 1069 

May 1,960 1/M5 1.963 1065 

Volume: SXOI tats of 10 tens. 

COFFEE 

Storftag per metric too 
tear 2785 2776 3776 2778 
Mt nr 1440 2^27 2^31 2A3* . 

Jly 2 J02 Z*7\ 2X73 2X77 2768 2770 

Sep 2514 2502 2504 Z5U 2798 2799 

raw 2514 2J0Q 3504 750A 2500 3505 

JOB 2X75 2766 2760 2765 2758 2763 

Mar N.T. N.T. 3700 2750 2710 2740 

Volume: 1J52 lots of 5 tarn. 

GASOIL 

UJL denars per melrlc ten 
Mar 23600 23L75 34J0 23500 23500 ZU50 
22X00 22275 TOjO 22X75 223J0 2Z17S 
22075 219 25 379J0 ZI9J3 21905 22000 
21875 31805 318J0 218J5 2180D 71BJQ 
219X0 21900 21 UO 219X0 21825 21650 
N.T. N.T. 318J0 22100 21900 222J1 
223X0 223X0 21BJD 236X0 221 Xa 22650 
N.T. N.T. 219X0 23000 220X0 Z2VJ0 
N.T. N.T. 21900 23300 22000 236J0 
volume: 877 lets oflQB tans. 

Sources; Reuters ond London Petroleum Ex- 
chonao {pooatti. 


mt 

Jun 

JW 

Aug 

See 

Ocf 

Nor 


S&P 100 Index Options 

March 14 


»** CeRpbnt 

Pries Mer am Her JOtej 

ia - - - - 

g N- - - 

160 1« - TOh — 

145 »ft DR UK ^ 

no J m » » 

115 «UA tt I 

W l/M » 3* SB 

W V* 1VM2 3K 
HO l/U K I 2 

It! 1/1* 1/14 * IV 

Tswmitateme max 

Total aril emntaL 9 <mi 
ToM wf Mhms mao 
7 atm aui ooMiMdca 
ledne 

M*tl&99 LAW 17417 0«*174M-M7 

Soime: CBOE. 


MMNt _ 

Mar AM Mer 0 ms 

u« - - - 

- 1/U - — 

- im * - 

- k sns k 

l/U teU IMiJfe 
ll 9 » R 

M M » 5 ft 

HR m u «* 


Uft 14 — 14 


Cash Prices March b~ 


PAR.. 

teteW 


Comi uo tOtYaad Cteff TM 

Coffee 4 Santas. Bti 172 

Prlntclotn 64/30 3S W, yd 070 

Steel billets (PHtJ, tan 473JJA 

iron 2 Fdry. PWla. Ton MO 
Steel yrgp_Na I hvy PWt - 7M0 

Loan Soot, Us 17-11 

Capper elect, lb 6441 

Tta (StnoUsS, lb 5J0J2 

anc. E. SL L Busts, lb (US 

FWHatflum, or ______ 7W4 

Silver N.Y„ oi 1675 

Source: AP. 


■ - * 





Dividends March : 


C om pa ny 


Per Amt POT 
USUAL 

Florid a CenwniBka O .14 MJ-/ 

ChEEF&ftCX 0 8 ?, JS 

i ronsen Enemy Cb O J4 M-. 

A-Axnuol; MJUontMy; O-Ouoriertv; 3 “ ' 


M 

Mft 

1 ft. ft* 

ft **» 


Source: UPI. 


n.f 

«\\ 


DM Futures Option. 

March 14 

^{krmonMnrt-Q^mofticjNaperrai: 


SW» CoBvStette _ 

Frloi Jee see Dae Jw See I 

a 2.10 - - 029 UO - 

a MO Mt - MO TO - 

30 MS IX - 1X3 1J6 

M 0J1 -0.M — 10 W ■ 

5 uo 066 - an I* -■ 

33 0L17 877 — 121 JJO - 


Estimated total roL LIU 

SESSS: KSUW 

Source: CMC 




Pakistan to Get UAJBssfl 


Raders 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — 
United States win supply 
AIM-9 Sidewinder air-to-air 
sites to Pakistan to be fitta 
advanced F-16 jets to improv* 
lostani atr defenses against it 
sons from Afghanistan, a s . 
UJS, offidai said this week- ■ 









(y 


Jtp riGK P.T® CnrUnns resorts P.10 
s-j |x MgKANnP.12 Fit™ rale notes P.12 
. * '!££cn P.6 GoW mortrt P.H 

; ;•« Hhta/iMs P.io ware* row. Ml 
•J coda P.14 MorutxunnnarvP.fi 
: .* : 'wi ct row P.ll Ontta« P.W 

lljSw WP OTCBoek PM. 

■ > tteralx P.1B Mwrmtateta P.14 

i -UDAY, MARCH 15, 1985 


Rcralb^fe-Sribunc 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


** 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 6 

Page 11 


TECHNOLOGY 


■» :» Wte :-**s » 

* ■*. .'«*■•» J, 

;**•■*' 

mm. 

« t * ■ WH • » 

V » « i ♦*«* 

• 


*:W nx 

N - 5* * 


supercomputer Challenged 
■or Speed-Champion Tide 


» : ta : 91 

i*fW ; »>•. 

*:• *"4 ; »» 


* «■< : *•- 

mii >n 

i* -B. ■•••* 

* * »• • y 

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'ft \’- X*-* 


bT» «. M a , 

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* i W »'«■ «t* 

% - w • 


tate -4* .... 

. >*» • ct ... 

*• . n 

- ; ’* ; a* tv (■ 

• a .1 

< « 1 -* - « .« 
i- % ' A 


i « '« rrm - a 

. * 6 * ‘ * «<* Ml _ 

► VI”.. 

i ■* -* : **»■ * » i. r 

. H • mHt. n :i 

-in:*' •* - m ,r 

-4 ; S»ta •■'*»» . .. 

.•-»■ ^ t '*•* p. .. . 

: • : »■*■•«• 

* *» • w ■■ '-ma- 
im: - M «• . A.-. 

:«w ........ 

i V* 1 **■* »-i A. - 

'• » ft : *» rt , 

* *» ; ** «:a u t 

-■• % 1 »P S : ‘|T«. » . > 

t -I ' ?> ■% ‘it. a... 

■*m : 


;* By DAVID E. SANGER 

• * '* . flt* York Times Serrice 

! ; v* ~T~ EW YORK — Supercomputers have long been the 
| heavyweights of number crunching, their terrific 

speeds achieved by an equal mixture of artful design 
N and brute force. Most have relied on a singl e, state-of- 
“ ' 9-art processor that goes about its tasks methodically, bringing 
; c f wn even the most intimidating diore with a barrage of fight- 
i ~ig-quick punches. 

> ; i -But soon the speed title may be stolen away by some Iight- 
; R ights. 

- i " i univwsity campuses and in corporate develc^moat labora- 

l <ies, scientists are stringing together hundreds — sometimes 
: .ousands — of microproces- * — - 


computer’ will be 
more efficient 


riii. 


* :* 

N) • ni 

<4 f 

' n •••ii 

?T*4 '*» 
■1:M ' . 


- -s in a single machine. The * c . Y 

‘ '-.-ailt is what experts call a Some Hunk 

'massively parallel 

v - . -lOblem into hundreds of computer 1 WlB be 
* | “iris and parceling each - of * 

;? , . [an crat to a separate micro- more efficient 

Itxessor, exactly the kind _______ 

“- sd in personal computers. 

■I. !- 1 j’Most computer scientists think such machines will prove far 
~ ; i 1 ire efficient and flexible than traditional supercomputers — 

* fid a lot cheaper. But getting several hundred independent 
■ , j .croprocessors to stick together is a little tike oiganizing a 

, ] ? vsload of scho^children on a trip to Coney Island. More than a 
. ) .v are likely to wander off. 

• * "■‘There is a crucial balance to be struck, and no one is quite sure 

r* . \ "iere it is,” Skid Kenueth. Kennedy, rfiaiTmwn of the computer 
~ - i- i,ence dq»rtment at Rice University in Houston. “Everyone 
^ c jows that it takes less time to get things done when a bunch of 
1 ' tipple are wonting together. But you reach a point where 

•- /■ ; ? Anyone is getting in everyone else’s way — and that’s when 
Z t \ * t -‘are’s just chaos.” 

a ~ ‘The current generatkm of supercomputers, called vector pro- 
- f = sors, is designed to bring rigid order to unruhr problems. They 
*■ : ’ •« iti eve their tremendous speeds — upward of 800 million float- 
; -'S point instructions a second — by dividing their problems in to 
‘ v—iilar mathematical operations. Thus, in a complex equation 
^ Solving miTtinrm of calculations, a vector processor would sort 
‘ ' ‘L all of the rnnitipHratinn operations first, then all of the 
7 — qsion operations and so on. By doing all like operations at once 
— ; without having to shift gears by switching to another type of 
:j • ■ e olation — the machines can achieve remarkable speeds. 


A- v 

Atari* - 


tr- -w.' 


ita • -^UT there are trade-offs. Vector processors perform most 

"V efficiently when they are handling repetitive scientific 
i v " ‘-^calculations; the range of small, separate problems dis- 

I tehed with ease by a general-purpose mainframe would reduce 

wMMWMwMMM^^^iperconmuter to a th»ss of hdpless circuits. Even with more 
lerly problems, most superconqnuers are able to operate at 
”*■ *"*'■ • ly 15 or 70 percent of the optimal speed. 

' ‘■--•‘I compare vector machines to those pens that bureaucrats 
■ ^ to use to sign letters,” said Jacob T. Schwartz, a professor at 

r-Z ’■ - ' . . 7,7 w York University’s Cotirant Institute. “You sign with one 

* ■. r , _ a, and all the attadied pens copy that signatoiCL It’s efficient, 

^*•“7 _ . r k ^:;t the use is Hunted.” ‘ 

- r’-' v .’“ .It was the search for flexibility that led computer designers to 

issive parafidism. The idea is ample: Rather than reorganize 
«e* .*r. . equation, just pared out each discrete calculating task to a 
• ».Terent microprocessor, a self-contained computer-on-a-chip. 

’ e processors act in parallel but indqiendQit of each other. 
It is hardly a new idea, but it was an expensive one. Only with 

VF l : rise of very large scale integrated circuit technology, or VLSI, 
j-j the idea of multiple processors become affordable.. .. 

Ift is no small challenge. To retain speed, massively parallel 
nputers must be designed without a central processor that 
1 vi in hirys traffic oop. Otherwise there will be huge bottlenecks as each 

|fU“ * * ■ J dependent processor awaits its work. Without a central proces- 
. , though, microprocessors could pick up the same tasks or 

k. ... (Coufinaedon Pqp 13, Got 3) 


:\SP V s --' ■ ■* 


Currency Rates 


jJS* ; V v . - 
? » 

*m *" 

.ta . 

V • 



• 

C 

DAL 

FF. 

IU- 

GKfr. 

»J=. 

SF. Yen 

■4m 

M29S 

cm 

mm". 

37 

0-1906 


5431* 

T3125 *14639 y 

Mo) 

4U9 

7X0 

20106 

63763 

12025* 

173625 

— 

23365 20103* 

tat 

13422 

1452 

- 

32325* 

13M* 

40345* 

4375* 

11773- 1799 • 

,i(b) 

1-0105 

— _ 

3A543 

11.170 

029430 

4.131 

7430 

3.100 24135 

xmoo 

Z294D0 

SOM 

20fi^» 

— 

55*30 

3130 

73930 1U 

«t(c) 

— _ 

1 JX 

0374 

1033 

012000 

03275 

6736 

04425 260L34 


103415 

11.175 

00554 

— 

4367* 

16996 

15-202 * 

05962 3569 • 


atojo 

IBM 

7730 

2239 

11X2* 

4032 

3K31-* 

9U8. 


2Joa 

3.1100 

8SJJ3* 

27.79 * 

0.1353 

TIBBS* 

42275* 

1.104 • 


04572 

04047 

23252 

63943 

139*30 

Z5I46 

447264 

13493 1713V 


495002 0JRU393 

022099 

932305 

NA 

3356 

643444 

2708 248309 


Dollar Values 




ContaKV 

Pw 

U3J 


P«r 

UJJ 

_ * CtaTHKf 

E«*v. 

PW 

ILS4 

MtnfiOBS 

1-4493 

09249 irtt> 

13765 

04487 SOUtaOtaS 

2319 

' ustrtoa tcMWoo 

2X90 

OM12 IMUMW 

489 JO 

4503 S. African rood 

1JH 

atatatteifrMc 

<733 

32776 KbMMOaar 

0X51 

430)2 S. Norm MR 

HMD. 

-ooodtaai 

13444 

03461 Matay.rtMMR 

259 

413054 snupwta 

18530 

Mtaluw 

12.1! 

anas NarMLlma 

946 

BJ04 5—d.trano 

9415 

tanbhmatam 

6M5 

ossa m.iw 

1735 

43354 Idml 

1940 

rwfctavdma 

14236 

03054 teftncita 

14534 

43155 TMbaM 

SLITS 

«n» Kami 

7JD35 

03769 5awfi riyol 

34111 

03723 UJLE-lUrtaai 

05125 


lauuii 


KUTSlrtsei 

Utatawifoocnil AnrnnmMn bur one Bound (d Amounts necdM to tair on* donor!*) 
H» M linttsd um tv) units of ttLOOO 
ouoM: not ovaDobta.' 

Bonne do Btveka (Brussels); Bom Commerda# ttaHoaa {Milan); Bona m 
<• dm ParH (Porta); IMF (SDR); Bonouo Arobe at Internationale mmoatO am mnt 
firm, dirham), other don tram Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 

ocnrrency Deposits 


Match 14 


SwtfB PfMfl) 

Dollar d Ma rt Froftc fiforllH Franc ECU SDR 
M -M fiM -fiW S% -S% MW - lOtV- 101V 1BW • *Vb 

0 .1*. VA -«H SW - 5W MM*- MW 1» - U lOW - UBi flU. 

- »W fitb - <N SfW - 51k 13M.- 131k 11 *k- 111k Wfc - 10» Ilk 

»W - 10 fifk - filk S» -4 12W - 13 11 W ■ 11 M. URb - WW IW 

ww . nw i*. -t*is\ - sn. «*k- »ik uik- n« losk-iovs f » 

I * ^ apUcabie h> Interbank dumlt%olST mtUioo mtntrmnn (or tmtvalenf}. 

Morgan Guaranty taottor. DM, SF, pound, FF): UoyOt Bonk (ECU); Reuters 


• W 


PI 

- 

*d W» 


it Dollar Rates 


Match 14 


tuft. 

f.’ t ‘ -Ilk 


inn. 

-l*k 


Money Rates 

liM ' *[ {.States a 


: t Rate l s 

. - , Foma 1 3/16 ** 

lOM IBM 

Lo«i Rata Vlft'lS TVS 

Prow. 30-171 dev> US Wo 

-i Tfmwv bo is as as 2 

Treownr ams ara aw 

Sldon uo 129 

ass as? 


ftitain 

Bta* Bos* Rate 
CaH Manor 
ntar TToosorv Bill 
3-month intarfeaik 


Discount Rota 
CoH Manor 
fiiHSav Interbank 


14 

U 

14M 

15 

13 15/32 

Ufe 

1315732 

14 

5 

5 

6 7/16 

6H 

6 9/16 

6 7/1* 


GgTMHy 


I* 


, >'•« Rote 

Z - r M Rw» 

w> intatbank 

■ntananj, 

Intetbonk 


ihm Rate 
meo 

Hb Interbank 
, i interbank 
1 , *'wta* 


fi JO too 

4A5 405 

US US 
450 450 

470 470 


1 DK ion 

lOllfifi lota 
10 U/lfilO U/14 

idu wa 

' W 1/H 10 9/14 


Gold Prices 


Harrods 

Takeover 

Approved 

U. K Clears Way 
For Egyptians 

By Bob Hagerty 

JnunttuumaJ Heron Tribute 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment Thursday cleared the Al- 
Fayed family to buy House of Fra- 
ser PLC. ending an eight-year fight 
far control of the department store 
company whose prime asset is Har- 
rods. 

The Departmmt of Trade and 
Industry said it would not demand 
an investigation by the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission into the 
merits of the offer of £615 million 
($664 nriffion) from Alf&yed In- 
vestment Holdings PLC a compa- 
ny owned by the Egyptian family. 
The bid, supported by Frasers 
board, already has attracted accep- 
tances giving the family sure than 
50 percent of Fraser’s shares. 

At the same time, the depart- 
ment released Lonrho PLC horn a 
1981 promise not to take over Fra- 
ser. But that decision came too late 
for the company and its chief exec- 
utive. Roland W. Rowland, to 
make a new takeover bid. 

Lonrho's rharrman, Sir Edward 
Du Caim, said it was a “scandal” 
that the government Hw-ifnad to 
review the Al-Fayed bid. especially 
since Lombo’s attempts to gain 
control had been exhaustively stud- 
ied. He said, “Is tins purchase a 
precedent for the government al- 
lowing large sectors of the British 
economy at a time of weakness of 
the pound sterling to fall into the 
hands of foreigners?" 

Fraser welcomed the end of Mr. 
Rowland’s siege. Commenting on 
his adversary’s predicament. Fra- 
ser’s chairman, Roland Smith, ob- 
served: “It is a bit like arriving at 
the right platform to find that your 
train has just gone;” 

Lonrho had urged the govern- 
ment to block the Al-Fayeds’ offer 
and suggested that another Lonrho 
bid might be made. Pan! Spicer, a 
Lonrho director, said that a conso- 
lation Lonrho showed a profit of 
£80 million cm Fraser shares it had 
sold to the Al-Fayeds. 

The Al-Fayed brothers — Mo- 

(Cnmhwed on Page 15, CoL 8) 






rim mrn‘ 

» -w-' 4 


•' 


R Sperry Corporation 

Lines ol Business 

as a percern of $4 9 billion revenues, 
fiscal year ended March 3t. 19B4 

*.• : vtV Computor 

•' ••iff; / : System*.- 57% \ 

: /camawroU and coacsrieniX 


Tha Non York Tim 

Gerald G. Probst, center, the chairman of Sperry Carp., 
with Vincent RL McLean, left, and Joseph J. Kroger. 

Turnaround at Sperry 
May Result in Merger 


By David E. Sanger 

Sew York Times Serriee 

NEW YORK — Just outside 
the 43d-floor office window of 
Gerald G. Probst, the chairman 
of Sperry Corp^ looms the Chip- 
pendale-topped headquarters erf 
AT&T and the reflective-glass 
tower of the new IBM building. 

“We keep the curtains dosed,” 
Mr. Probst said, barely cracking 
a smile , “so they can’t peer in.” 

Lots of people seem to be 
looking at Sperry these days, 
most with an eye toward acquisi- 
tion. One of them is ITT Corp^ 
which mad/* an abortive first ef- 
fort to merge with the company a 
week ago. 

Since th o se merger mlks fell 
through. Wall Street has 
abounded with rumors about 
other possible partners for the 
company, including American 
Telephone & Telegr aph, General 
Motors. Ford and GTE Indus- 
try experts say a merger is likely. 
And Sperry officers are not do- 
iggjmjnfting to discourage the 

There is no question that the 
$5-biDioo-a-year company is in 
better shape now than just a few 
years ago. But while the recent 
revamping of two of its key busi- 
nesses — computer mainframes 
and military equipment — has 
made it a far more attractive can- 


Import Surcharge Idea 
Gains U.S. Momentum 


Lot* interbank rata* on March 14, exdudmg fee*, 
lad fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. N*w York rates at 


; Beam Commenbaok, Credit LF- 
Ueras Bank.- B ook at ro*w. 


AJM. ML Crto 
Hons Korn iti JO 291 JO + 1JD 

Ltfwrobouro WU0 — + 0.W 

Parts (05 kite) 290Ji 239.43 — 0.15 

zurleb - 291.45 291.75 Until. 

London 29025 29075 +050 

New York — — ttlO 

OfOetel fixtegs for Lowlon, Pom tad Uotfinv 
bttaWOPMlM ond dortw Pri»s ter hoh* ton* 
anrf Zurtdw N** Vwk C9m« emnt contract. 
All Prion te UJM Ptr wnc* 

Source: Reuters. 


By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Last June, 
when Motorola President John 
Mitchell suggested a tax on imports 
as a “partial solution” toward eas- 
ing the growing U.S. trade surplus 
during testimony before the Senate 
Finance Committee, he caused 
hardly a ripple. 

Since that inauspicious begin- 
ning, however, the idea of an im- 
port surcharge has gained ava- 
lanche momentum in the business 
community and on Capitol ffiH, 
where it is seen as a posable quick 
fix far (he two biggest problems in 
the U-S. economy — the budget 
deficit of more than $200 bfihon 
and the $123.3 billion trade deficit 

So far there is more sound than 
action on the surcharge, although it 
is seen as Hkdy to gam support 
from lawmakers who are unable to 
deal with the budget deficit at the 
same time they see the trade deficit 
mounting. 

“Something hog, sudden and un- 
stoppable will take place this sum- 
mer in Congress,” Senator John 
Heinz, Republican of Pennsylva- 
nia, told a meeting this week at the 
Institute for International Eco- 
nomics. 

“An import surcharge is the 
leading candidate,” added Mr. 
Heinz, although he said he favors 
“a more constructive way” of deal- 
ing with the trade deficit by hitting 
“the worst offenders” with retalia- 


BoUar Rises 
In European, 
U.S. Trading 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Rising inter- 
est rates in the United States 
lifted the dollar broadly in early 
trading Thursday, with the cur- 
rency stabilizing at higher levels 
late m the day. 

The federal funds rate, the 
interest on interbank loans, 
rose Thursday above 9 percent 
for a second straight day after 
trading at 816 percent on Tues- 
day. 

In late trading Thursday in 
Loudon, the pound was at 
$1.0805, down from $14)868 on 
Wednesday. Other late dollar 
rates in Europe, compared with 
the levels of late Wednesday: 
33822 Deutsche marks, up 
from 3354 and 103415 French 
francs, up from 1025. 

In New York, the dollar rose 
to 1033 flaws from 10388 on 
Wednesday and climbed to 
3378 DM from 33665 the day 
beforerThe pound fell to $14)8 
from $1.0837. 


tion. “Don’t retaliate against the 
world,” Mr. Heinz said. “Retaliate 
against the Japanese. They deserve 
it” 

Although there is no specific sur- 
charge plan before Congress, the 
one most commonly being dis- 
cussed calls for a three-year sliding 
tax on imports that starts at 20 
percent in 1986, goes to 15 percent 
in 1987 and drops to 7 percent in 
1988, the final year. 

Its most attractive feature, con- 
gressional aides said, is the possi- 
bility erf a quick increase in federal 
revenue without raising taxes. Un- 
der a first-year scenario prepared 
by the University of Pennsylvania's 
Nobel Prize-winning economist, 
Lawrence R. IGero, federal revenue 
would go up in the first year of a 
surcharge between $35.1 billion 
and $583 bflfion, depending on 
how the dollar reacts and whether 
trading partners retaliate. 

A critic of the proposal, Harvey 
Bale of the Office of the U.S. Trade 
Representative, said a surcharge 
would be seen as a sign of Ameri- 
ca’s inability to get brad of its bud- 
get deficit and thus cause the dollar 
to fall precipitously. 

“Pd give the European Commu- 
nity about a week and Canada 
about the same time to retaliate,” 
be said. . 

Wnfiam A. Niskaneo Jr., in his 
final weeks as a member of the 
White House Council of Economic 
Advisers, said an import surcharge 
would have “a disastrous effect” oh 
exports and “little or no effect on 
the trade deficit except as it influ- 
ences the fiscal deficit. 

“What bothers me about this 
town,” he cot tinned, “is that we 
take ideas [Eke tins' one] seriously 
that should be blown out of the 
water." He said he had hoped the 
Tuesday night discussion would 
push the idea of a surcharge further 
bade on the burner “rather than 
legitimize it." 

“It would have been langhed out 
of the Senate a few yeais ago” in- 
stead of gening serious discussion, 
said Senator Max Bancus, Demo- 
crat of Montana. 

As an indication of congressio- 
nal interest. Representative John 
DmgeU, Democrat of Michigan, 
chairman of the House Energy and 
Commerce Committee, is drafting 
smehatge legislation. 

The highly rejected nonparti- 
san Congresaooal Budget Office is 
conducting a study erf the import 
surcharge. The report is due to be 
completed-shorttyr State Depart- 
ment economists aSd arariftnics 
are creating models to try to learn 
the- effects, of a surcharge, wink 
foreign governments are issuing 
warning* of its potentially bad ef- 
fects on wbrid trade. 

The surcharge idea has drawn 
grong oppositioa from the Reagan 

a dmnus tra non 


didate than at any time in recent 
memory, some basic problems 
remain. Industry analysts say 
Sperry is still desperately in need 
of a corporate partner that can 
make it competitive once again, 
especially in telecommunica- 
tions, microcomputers and office 
automation. Those technologies, 
the buzzwords of the mainframe 
computer business today, have 
largely passed Sperry by. 

“I think everyone agrees that 
at this point there’s no nope that 
Sperry will make it alone.” said 
Robert T. Ferug, a computer in- 
dustry analyst who left a plan- 
ning post at Sperry a decade ago. 
“It’s a big ship, and it will take 

time to sink, but it’s already Iist- 

- _ ** 

mg. 

Not everyone is this pessimis- 
tic Sperry officials said that, if 
necessary, they could solve their 
problems with strategic alliances 
with other companies, a process 
that is already under way. But in 
a recent interview in Sperry's 
board room atop its Sixth Ave- 
nue headquarters, Mr. Probst 
and top deputies did little to 
quash rumors that a merger was 
in the offing. 

“We are not interested in 
merging with just anybody,” said 
Mr. Probst, a former World War 
□ bomber pQot described by col- 
leagues as a conservative and 
somewhat detached chief execu- 


Electranie Systems: 20% 
radar. Right and marine 
navigation systems 
Flight System a: 9% 
includes Right management 
(autopilot), space gyros, related 
electronics lor commercial and 
business aircraft, aerospace 
projects 

Now Holland (tarni equipment): 14% 

rive. “But of course we will look 
to opportunities as they come.” 

Whatever Sperry's fate in the 
next few months, few doubt that 
the merger talk last week is mere- 
ly a prelude to a broad reorgani- 
zation of the nation's computer 
industry. 

“Five years from now. in 1990, 
you wQ] see an entirely different 
cast of characters.” predicted 
John J. McManus, the computer 
analyst for Bear, Steams & Co. 
“You wfll have IBM and AT&T 
of course, but other, bigger enti- 
ties will absorb the Burroughs. 
Spenys and NCRs of the world.” 

Thirty years ago, such a pre- 
diction about Sperry would have 
been laughable. Univac, the 
computer name Sperry inherited 
when it acquired Remington 
Rand in 1955, was indisputably a 
leader in mainframe technology. 
The Univac I became a public 
marvel when it predicted Dwight 
D. Eisenhowers victory on elec- 
tion eve in 1951 Quickly, Sperry 
attracted some erf the most im- 
portant customers in the com- 
puter industry: airline manufac- 
turers. the Defense Department, 
the Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration. 

Meanwhile, the company's 
military business, mostly in navi- 
gation systems, was also fating 
well, accounting for half the 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 



Shell Group Net 
Up 32% for ’84, 
Off for Quarter 


By Bob Hagercy 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The Royal Dutch/ 
Shell Group announced Thursday 
that net income slipped 7. 1 percent 
in the fourth quarter as refining 
and marketing operations pro- 
duced losses in West Germany, 
France and Britain 

For the full year, however, higher 
ofl and gas production, along with 
currency-exchange gains, helped 
Shell increase net income 32 per- 
cent, the group said. 

Fourth-quarter net income to- 
taled £910 million ($983 million), 
down from £980 million a year ear- 
lier. Revenue jumped 23 percent to 
£18.15 billion from £14.76 billion. 

Full-year net rose to £3.65 billion 
from £2.75 billion as sales in- 
creased 1 9 percent to £64.95 billion 
from £54.44 billion. 

Shell Transport & Trading Co_ 
the British arm of the group, de- 
clared a total dividend for 1984 of 
33 pence a share, up 26 percent 
from 1983’s 263 pence: 

The Dutch arm. Royal Dutch 
Petroleum Co„ raised its total divi- 
dend 20 percent to 10.60 guilders 
($2.80) from 8.85 guilders. 

The results were in line with 
most forecasts. On the Amsterdam 
Stock Exchange, Royal Dutch 
shares slipped 020 guilders to 
205.80 guilders. Shell Transport 
shares closed on the London Stock 
Exchange at 775 peace, down 2 
pence. 

Sir Peter Baxenddl, chairman of 
Shell Transport, predicted that the 
group would continue to benefit 
from gradually rising oil and gas 
production. But he said the chemi- 
cal market was likely to be tougher 
in the next few years, partly be- 
cause of competition from Saudi 
Arabia. 

The group's profit increase for 
1984 largely reflects a bigger con- 
tribution from U.S.-based Shell 
(ML While Shell (Ml’s net income in 
dollar terms rose modestly, to $1.77 
billion from $1.63 billion, the con- 
tribution to the group’s net income 
in pound terms surged to £1.12 
billion from £359 miDi on. 

Most of that increase reflected 
the dollar’s steep rise against the 
pound. The rest resulted from an 
increase in the group's sharehold- 


ing in Shell Oil, to 95 percent from 
70 percent. The group is trying to 
win 100 percent of Snell OiL 

For the third year in a row. the 
group pumped more crude ofl, 
showing gains in Britain, the Unit- 
ed States, Nigeria, Oman. Thailand 
and Egypt. The daily average rose 7 
percent float a year earlier to 1.6 
million barrels. ’Natural gas sales 
rose 4 percent to 5.72 billion cubic 
feet daily. 

Like other oil companies, the 
group said its profit margins were 
squeezed by fierce competition and 
excess capacity in “downstream” 
operations: refining, marketing 
and shipping. Profits from these 
activities outside the United States 
and Canada, adjusted to remove 
inventory gains, shrank 27 permit 
in the fourth quarter and 50 per- 
cent for the year. 

In Europe, the group had down- 
stream losses in major markets be- 
cause it could not push up local- 
currency prices for gasoline and 
other oil products fast enough to 
match the rising dollar cost of 
crude oQ. 

Chemical profits outside North 
America surged 156 percent to a 
record £210 million, though the 
group said margins on petrochemi- 
cals deteriorated late in the year 
after showing sharp improvements 
in early 1984. U3. chemical earn- 
ings more than doubled. 

Coal operations produced a £12- 
million profit after a £1 2-million 
loss in 1983. The turnaround re- 
flected the dollar's strength and 
higher productivity. 

The group's loss on metals nar- 
rowed to £62 million from £91 mil- 
lion. but the market remained 
weak, particularly for al uminum, 
and the group had write-offs and 
loss provisions on its tm-dredgjng 
operations. 

Even though it spent £334 bil- 
lion last year on Shell Oil shares, 
the group retains huge reserves. 
Hdmngs of cash and short-term 
securities at year-end totaled £5.93 
billion, down slightly from £6 bil- 
lion a year earlier. 


ly to rise about 16 percent to £65 
btlHon, Sir Peter said. 








i 



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needs an exceptional bank. 


Above all, our personal service. 


P ersonal service is more than 
just a tradition at TDB - it’s 
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In fast decisions, for exam- 
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We assign an experienced 


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he is personally responsible for 
seeing that things get done on 
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the letter. 

Whether your business 
requires trade and export financ- 
ing, foreign exchange, precious 
metals or any of our full range 
of banking services, you’ll find 
that TDB has something a bit 
special to offer. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust with 


your business, get in touch with 
us. Now that we have joined 
American Express International 
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89 offices in 39 countries, we are 
even better placed to serve your 
individual banking needs. 

TDB banks in Geneva , London, 
Paris. Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monte 
Carlo, Nassau, Zurich. 

TDB is a member of the American 
Express Company , which has assets of 
US$ 62.8 billion and shareholders’ 
equity of US$ 44 billion. 



Trade Development Bank 


Shown at left, the head office 
uf Trade Development Bank, Geneva. 


An American Express Company 



.1 

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Floating Bate Notes March n 


Dollar 






A 







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NIKKO GROWTH PACKAGE FUND, SICAV 

Registarad Office Luxembourg, 16 Blvd. Royal 
H.C. Luxembourg B 210.433 


Notice b hereby ghnen. that the 
ANNUAL GENERAL MEEUNC 


Be 



of the shareholders of Nikko Growth Package Fond. ScBV will be held on 
25th March, 1985 at lL00a.m. at the registered office of the company with 
the following ajywlg 


AGENDA 


COUNTRY 


6 months I 3 mraifht 



Austria A Set 

Belgium- . BJFr. 

Denmark DJCr. 

Finland F.M. 

Franc* FJ. 

Germany D.M. 

Great Britain. £ 

Gre e ce. - Dr. 

Ireland flrL 

Italy. Lire 

Luxembourg - LFr. 

Netherlands FL 

Norway — NJLr. 

Portugal Esc 

Spam™,„_„ Pm. 

Sweden — SJCr. 

Swiueriaad SJFr. 

Rest of Europe, North Africa, fanner 
French Africa. U.SA, French 

Polywwa, Middle East — S 

Rest of Africa. Canada, Larin 
America. Gnlf States, Aria S 






L Submission of the reports of the board of director, of the statutory 
auditors and the indopendant expert. 

2. Approval of rite statement of nei a»eta a& of December 31, 1984 
the statement of operations for the period from 2nd April, 1964 to 
3 1st December, 1984 and allocation of the results as at 31st 

December, 1984. 

3- Discharge to the directors, statutory auditor and independaat 
expert 

4. Ejection of die board of directors to sene until the next annual 



Cord account number 


Card expiry date 

Signature 

My name 


Address 


Gty 


Job/ Profession 

Nationality 


5. Section of the statutory auditor and indcoencimt expert to serve 
until the next annoel general meeting of u&reholden. 

6l Authorization to be granted to tha board of directors to appoint one 
of its members managing director. 

7, Miscellaneous. 






»ia III 


CEESIK 


In order to lake pan in the general meeting of shareholders on 2Stfa March. 
1985, the owners of bearer shares are required to deposit their shares three 
business days before the meeting at the registered office of the company or 
with any of the information centres of the fund. 

Bearer or registered shareholders should lodge their prudes with the 
company three business days before tbe meeting. 




The Board of Direetore. 


iy 

































































***** * ***** a v * 1 rV.. >j‘ ; 


t : '+ : ; ?4 ■• 


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busmbs roundup 

ANR, Coastal Agree 
On $2.4-Billion Merger 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1985 


Page 13 


90 % ftefaftJ Hongkong Land Posts 
h Reported by $45-Million Net for ’84 


East Meets East at Leipzig Trade Fair; 
Companies 9 Displays Not for Masses 


„ 3 nr 90 “ . „ “I would be less than candid if I 

DETROIT — American Natural didn’t say I fed very badly n Mr 
sources Co. accepted Thursday a Seder said. “ANR has been a pnb^ 
,4-billion takeover offer by lie company for a little over 80 


’ ' Resources Co. accepted Thursday a 
■ 2.4-billion takeover offer by 
: ■' Postal Corp. of Houston. 

< .■ Is a joint statement, the ANR 
.« . harrman, Arthur R. Seder Jr., and 
Coastal’s chairman, Oscar $. Wyatt 
1 .; -r„ said, tbe agreement “reflects 
; ,;^oastal’s confidence in ANR’s 
.. Manag ement and our joint 
■ ieterminatkm that ANR continue 
* J is excdlent record of service to its 
. kistomers and communities.” 
r Coastal, through a subsidiary, 
; tomedialdy will increase its offer 
, or ANR common stock from the 
' ,’ rfigmal $60 per share to $65 a 
‘ time. After the offer is complete, 
1 with a Coastal 


ANR will be 


. . ;nbsidiaryand all remaining own- 
• • . is of ANR shares wifl receive $65 
^n cash per share. 

' The merger agreement most be 
nit to a vote by shareholders of 
•: .‘xnh companies. 
r .* Under the agreement, ANR 
ieadmuitas wfll remainin Detroit 
■ A ■ md, for at least two years, it win 
\axnmoe to operate as it does now. 
i;vCr_ Seder said he expected no loss 
•jfjobs in opcrarionaJ areas bet that 
■ here would be a decrease in jobs at 

' teadquanere. 

-Aj Under the agreement, William T. 
^^jomask, president of ANR, 
nil become chairman and chief ex- 
ecutive officer of ANR when the 
** sutmany becomes part of CoastaL 
- mi. Seder had earlier announced 
j iis intention to retire this year. 

COMPANY NOTES 


— AST Research Inc. has formed a 
; -long Kong-based subsidiary 
; j ailed AST Far East Ltd. to devdr 
**• :'tp and produce microcomputer 
: irodocts for worldwide distribu- 
* . ion. The company plans to start 
facing products from the facility, 
Audi wul concentrate particularly 

• m Asian and Pacific markets, in 
, ; April 

Davy Corp. shares surged 11 
. . .cnee to 120 pence on the Loudon 
c 'itock Exchange Thursday after 
iYafalgar House PLC confirmed 
hat it had acquired a 55-percent 
' icWin^m the construction and ea- 
~ jneenng concern. Trafalgar, a 
- onstruction, shipping and energy 
- ompany, said tne stake was an 
: ‘ nvestmeat 

Deutsche Bank AG's European 
isian Bank (Eurasbahk) su oad - 
j ary has had to make high-risk pro- 

• • isions for doubtful loans to com- 

>anies in Tawam A Deutsche 
Tlank spokesman in Frankfurt 
tressed that Eurasbank was not 
“ ■siting off losses already incurred 


years. We’ve served our sharehold- 
ers quite well. 

“But I have to be realistic I have 
to consider the interest of the 

shareholders of ANR, and I had to 

be concerned about the effect on 
the employees and tbe c on-mu mir y 
if the deal went forward cm an 
unfriendly basis.” 

Mr. Seder and Mr. Wyatt met 
earlier this week in Detroit and the 
two companies announced on 
Wednesday the sweetened offer by 
Coastal The two companies i.cowvi 
a joint statement saying ANR di- 
rectors woe discussing the offer. 

Mr. Wyatt last week opened the 
takeover bid with a $60-per-share 
offer, which Mr. Seder termed m- 


Tfae two companies filed lawsuits 
against each other following tbe 
takeover hid. And ANR, in a fifing 
with the Securities and Exchange 
Commission, had outlined a wide 
range of strategies to combat the 
takeover, indiutin g using the com- 
pany’s assets as collateral to raise 
tbe money to buy its own stock. 

Mr. Wyatt has said a combina- 
tion of the two companies would 
produce a pipeline system covering 
the central United States and ex- 
tending into all major production 
areas between the Appalachian 
Mountains and the Rocky Moun- 
tains. 


National Semi 

United Press Intentatund 

SANTA CLARA, California 
— National Semiconductor 
Corp. reported Thursday that 
sales were up slightly for the 
third quarter but profits were 
down 90 percent from the same 
three-month period last year. 

Sales stood at $3945 million 
compared with $382.8 mQHaa 
in the third quarter of 1984. Net 
earnings were $15 million or 2 
cats per share compared to 
$15.4 milli on or 18 cents per 
share a year ago. 

For the first three quarters of 
i the fiscal year. National Sari- 
conductor reported net sales of 
$135 bilEon with net ramtngs 
of $40.9 mfllioa or 46 cents per 
share. That compares with net 
earnings of S395 million or 47 
cats a share on sales of SI. 18 
billion for the same period last 
year. 

Charles EL Sporck, president 
and chief executive officer, said 
that in the last quarter the com- 
pany suffered its largest prod- 
nct backlog in history. “1ms is 
the deepest downturn 1 have 
experienced during my entire 
career in the fcnricon dn c t or fo- 
ri ustry," he said. 

“We- have sea no improve- 
ment from the veiy weak semi- 
conductor order rates of the 
past several quarters," Mr. 
Sporck said. 


from a peak of 14.8 Trillion rWW LEIPZIG — Tbe first major The famous names from the 
HUNG KONG — After two at tbe end of last year, the compar transaction candnded at the Lap- West in chemicals, electronics and 
consecutive years of losses. Hog- ay's managing director, David Da- rig spring trade fair this year was a slee ^ were represented, especially 
kong Land Co. announced Thors- vies, said Thnrsdav Rentes re- 230- million-ruble fS207-mfflion^ those from West Germany. Thor 


By Henry Tanner 

hOenu uumal HenM Tribune 

LEIPZIG — The first major 


ter how huge, seemed common- 
place in comparison. 

The famous names from the 


ui nys managing director, David Da- z^spnjignaae imr tins year was a siec * were represented, especially 

kong Land Co. announced Thors- vies, said Thursday, Rentas re- 230-milhon-nible (S207-miHion) those from West Germany. Their 
day a consolidated net profit of 354 ported from Hong Kong. sale of East German machine tools, stands are altogether different from 

nnBion Hong ROOg dollars ($453 . „ - . manufacturing systems and sne- the big national pavilions. Here the 

1984. after taxation ^ M S of 16 biffion ci< HP ,,I P»«mnBy totheSovi- Industrial Revolution” is 

and minority interests but before doI1 Z ^ et Umon, accotding to the official stffl for msidm, not for the masses, 

extraordinary item „ <My fair bolletm. The West Gomans, with more 

The conq>any also announced an <x “ n P m y reoewed The sale was not surpriana. than800eaduWtoisoutof atotalrf 

issue of preferred ordinary shares ^ bfflion doaars-from the sale last Xhoogh the Leipzig fair nodes it- 9,000, are the most prominent Sic- 
with warrants to raise about 750 g 011 * of 34.4-pcrcent stake m self on being the biggest and most mas AG, Krupp, liysscn, Snbgit- 
urilhon dollars to Tepay variable- ^^Skong^fcicctoc HouSngs. This important regular pfs»r ter AG and many others have corn- 

rate borrowings. Md the 750 nmKon ddlars from between Western and East-bloc in- P*^ windowless prefabricated 

The profit was more than double me preferred share issue vm be dnstries, it is also a place where the structures along narrow “streets” 


the company's 168 million dollars l r cd , t0 , re® 06 ® debt, he said, Russians and Eastern Ec 
in 1983. Earnings per share were be noted that there was a meet among themsdves. 
165 cats, compared with 7.8 cats I™ 211 ., 10 “®bt reduction because of All the nurior 
in 1983, Hongkong Land's chair- 1 f ads f gWMttncnt on the third mes of the East Bloc areal 
man, Shnon Keswick, said in a pro- phas e of Fjc ai aa gejrower, a devd- And although agreaneats ! 
pared statemat «^>mat m cmtral Hong Kraig. them are ncgMated to 


dustries. 

The company stands look and 


The profit after extraordinary Mr. Davies said the company's vance in the framework of the You introduce yourself to one of 
items was 50 million dollars, com- hotel mnt. Mandarin Tnfwq»»imm| countries’ five-year plans, many of 2 battery of friendly but deter- 
pared with losses of 1382 biffion Hotels Ltd, had signed a contract the more important announce- timed reception people guarding 
dollars in 1983 and 500 million to manage a new hotel in Sen Fran- mats are mack in Ldpzig. the door. If your oird is impressive 


And although agreements between operate Eke discreet members-only 

them are negnr»atM i fing in Md- men’s dubs. 

vance in the framework of the You introduce yourself to one of 


dollars in 1982. tisco. 

JfaAfaSlShhll! Honglcong Land wffl hdd a spe- 

^ shareholder meeting April 3to 
Hot^k^ Umffs share of Hoqg; vote on the proposed issoTofpre- 


Halfway throad 
fair, Western cxia 


enough — huge bundles of a calling 
suds are thefairgoer’s most essa- 


kong Electric’s auaordinaiy f cned sbsresand^i^ Jar££ «■ ***** bad indications 
tosses. Tbe snrphis of 116 mflhon Matheson, wKch owns 40 percat that East-Woe mvcstmenis m West- 
dollais was credited to capital re- of Land, win not be mdudedin the cnx technology would pick op in 
servts - offer Mr Davies said. 1985 after a ^°w 1984. But most 


dal* were reporting Kvdy discos- tial tod — you are admitted to the 
sioos with wonld-be Easton buy- uiner sanctum. 


. . . _ ... offer, Mr. Davies said. 

Mr. Keswick said a dmdendofl „ . « 

cot pa riure^nnciianged from last “b^o«d Hong „ c CUSIOIDCrs w «n cuagnuns, 

yew. had bea recommended to at this fair. chans, pocket calculators and 

mamtam tbe company’s trustee ^ bnge Soviet parilion, be- sometimes miniature models of the 

■ Debts Expected to Fafl ^Ui H erM it»» top, 15 by fat the food is provided. 

Hongkong Land’s debts will fall and the company’s residential fiats f!!iEr!rind< tj rS? Ecol °Ef is one cf the main 

bdow 12 bfflion dollars in 1585 w« *£^1^**°* SEKtKSSL-SS iSS55^S3 


ers. Some said they had indications This is a warren of narrow corri- 
that East-bloc investments in West- docs and as many as a dozen small, 
em technology would pick op in discreet conference rooms with ta- 
1985 after a slow 1984. But most btes and soft chairs where techni- 
stuck to their earlier predictions dans and salesmen receive would- 


tx» . -J v- V.H J »“*** omucj preuic«OTs oans ana saicsma receive wouia- 

^.^wddbenoseasational be customers with diagrams, 
to^opp»tr»nlisto._. . dim, pooko, adcolato^Td 


Ecology is one of the mam 
themes of this year’s fair — dis- 


taken in this jpart of the world to 
check industrial pollution. 

Huge sums of money will have to 
be diverted to this purpose a n d 
much of the technology wfll come 
from the West, at least initially. 

Thyssa has come with a squad 
of more ihan a dozen technicians 
specializing in this field. One of 
them said tbe company was offer- 
ing technology that is only a year 
old. More conventionally, it is Dy- 
ing to sell devices like scrubbers to 
reduce factory emissions. 

The main target of tbe sales drive 
is East Germany, where both tbe 
means and the pressures for pofin- 
tiem controls are greatest 
West German producers in this 
field say they have no Elusions that 
they will tie able to sell entire 
plants, as they do in other parts of 
the world. 

Tbe East Germans may buy a 
license for one particular installa- 
tion or perhaps l et Western compa- 
nies participate as engineering 
partners in the construction of the 
first plant, a representative of one 
Western company said. “After that 
they wiO want to do it themselves,” 
he said. 

Leipzig provides an appropriate 
background for talk about pollu- 
tion control 

The city lived through its sharp- 
est and longest period of growth u 
the early days o? the first industrial 
revolution, m the second half of the 
19th century; today’s industries are 
still based on this foundation. 

Moreover, the dty ties in the 
heart of Europe’s largest lignite- 


year endx 
payingne 
years.Th 
company 


March 31, 1985, after 
vidad in the last three 

anpany expects parent 
ofit of 5 billion to 6 


EC Missing Opportunity , Japan Says 


annmi nflqynt 

over the entrai 


The Jooaated Prat “Enroj 

TOKYO — European businesses recent 


billion yen ($19 nrilKon to $23 nril- are not warkmghard enough to sell 
Hon) on sales of 720 lallion in 1984- their products to the Japanese, a 


Nesttt, 


People Express Afefiaes Inc. may 
have had losses of as much as $25 


their products to the Japanese a West German automobiles were requiring new Japanese tests for ery and mncknpy of 

Foreign Ministry spokesman said one area of “spectacular” growth in goods entering thar market. space devices. 

Japan’s martrt following aggrea- Mr. Phan Van Rri called for a Wednesday marsm_ 

It’s op to the industries to do sive marketing campaigns, Mr. reduction of the current two years of visitors crowded around a dozen 


Erich Honecka, the East German devoted tol^tionfof tedfr f ? eateT - 

nrrrvr rr^ ^ ** « °f STmattrials. fud and ^^“l°^i? dustncsare 
Inside; a red carpet covered the rnpr ov Tlie sublet k nt nara. even nearcr the cater. 

entire floor, two or three acres. The ^S mitaest to Wesrem A smokestack bridling blade 

exhfeits ranged fram photognqjhs SuSd inSSuiSgr^T^ gouds stands a few hundred yards 

of Soviet soldiers, woricas and L &■ p from the at/s new Japanese-built 

fanners to pieces of heavy madrin- . ^"9^ ® ave come to the condu- 26-stoty luxury hotel the Meritor, 
ay and mndmpy of planes and aon ® 00n ^ Extern Europe- A blanket of smog has covered the 
space devices. ^ countnes wiB be compelled to dty for much of tne time sirieg the 

Wednesday morning, hundreds Iaundl 5151 “ajor steps ever fair opened Sunday. 


million in the first two months of research to kn ow the p references of Ogawa said. In 1984, 32,6 34 Ger- and two months it takes to register or so tdeviskm sets showing Cha- 

1985. The no-frifis airline also re- Japanese consumers, to produce m»m mi* were sold in Japan while a foreign trademark in Japan. neoko's funeral parade five from 

ported that it has filed a registra- goods that suit^tfae Japanese con- the Wat German automakers’ The trade talks stalled over bow Red Square. 


ported that it has filed a registra- goods that suiMbe Japanese con- the Wat German automakers’ The trade talks stalled over bow 
tion statemat with the Securities sumo’s tastes,” said a ministry closest rival the United States, sold to approach that and other issues 
and Exchange Commission for a spokesman, Gotaro Ogawa. 2^69. Italy came next whh 2J42, surrounding *e estimated S10-W- 
public offering of one million ‘The companies should ensure fcesaid. Eon trade deficit the 10-nation EC 


shares of newly' issued stock. quick delivery, and after-care [fol- 

„ . _ _ ^ lowing the sale] is very important," 

Provincetown-Bostou Alrfine, he ^3. 

ftiuggling to recover from a fatal “In this respect,’ 
crash and losses dnring a shut- said, “the efforts of 
down, has filed for protection from tenn is e s are not qi< 
is creditors under Chapter 11 of fecW that Europe 
U.S. bankruptcy laws. Officials hawiot taken off 
said the earner, which flies to 13 measures to poretrat 
cities in Florida as weO as in the market” 

Northeast, will continue its flights However Mr. Oea 
as scheduled. '_ 


"rti,refleq»[to d egrttjet efr 

(SoflS carm ^ crs » qpokc on comfition he not be iden- 


a foreign trademark in Japan. neoko’s funeral parade five from 
The trade talks stalled over how Red Square 
to approach that and other issues The soviet and Fasiwn Europe-' 
surrounding the estimated $10-b3- an national pav ilion s a tt ract tens of 
Hon trade deficit the ID-nation EC thousands of visitors, mduriing 
had with Japan last year. many young people and women, 

A Foreign Ministry source, who every day. There are caffe and 


tilled, said the European delega- 


_ . ...... — ' M/u&b uu UJULUUUU UC nui OC IQCZl- 

“In this respect,” Mr. Ogawa ^ °S» wa ^ tified, said the European deleea- 

said, “the efforts of European cn- Two weeks ago, the Enrqjean tion was not well prepared whm it 
terprises are not enough. It is oar Community asked Japan to give made its request for OTnphfied reg- 
feehng that European companies European companies easier access illations, 
have not taken sufficient risks or to the Japanese market through “We asked for complete suggo- 
measures to penetrate the Japanese simpler impart procedures. At a tions, but the European side wasn’t 
market’’ three-day trade meeting here, Ray- ready to give us any. We woe a bit 

However. Mr. Ogawa cited some mand Phan Van Phi, an EC exta- disappointed,” tbe source said. 


A Foreign Ministry source, who every day. There are caffe and 
oke rai condition be not be iden- stands offering god beer. , 


— — A DVERTISEMENT 

INTHTNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
14 March 1985 




A sumptuous silver Cadillac with 
Zurich baseplates and an aristo- 
cratic Rolls-Royce convertible 
from West Germany, both parked 
outride die chemical industries ex- 
hibit, were the ™rin attraction for 
yotura Lripagfira. Mercedes, Volvo 
and Soviet Zu Hmoutines, no mat- 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(W) AHM Tmtf.S A 

CLANK JULIUS BAERS CO. Ltd. 


114173 OBANGE NASSAU GROUP 


Tilting off losses already incurred prudential Insurance Co. of 
■ut making lAosaneots for posri- America repwted substantial losses 
Je future baa dati last year in two subsidiaries. Eru- 

■ Eastern Kodak has agreed to daoal-Bache Securities and Plru- 
uy 49 pooent of the shares of denrial Ronsurance Co. The secu^ 
crbatimCorp. fOT$755asharein jities unit had losses of $120 
ash. The company also said about miffion in 1984 and the other sub- 
5,000 US. employees will recehit ridiaiylossaof $130nriffion. 


le future bad debts. 

— Eastman Kodak has agreed to 
•uy 49 percent of the shares of 
^’erbatiffl Corp, for $755 a share in 
ash. The company also said about 
5,000 U.S. employees wSl receive 
wage dividod totaling about 
250 million on March 15. 

Ford Motor Co. strengthened Us 
cation as the leading car importer 
a France in January, with 8.89 
_jerc®i of new car registrations as 
gainst 751 percent m December 
c nd 7 .88 percent in January 1984. 
folkswagenwerfc AG was m sec- 
md place with 7.1 1 percent 
Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. 
riH pay a 3-yen dividend fa the 


SpeedKing 
Is Challenged 


Sperry Appears Ripe lor Takeover 


— (d) BoortJonrf—— 
— m » n»iw 

— (d > Equlbcwr Arrwrlca 

— (d > EoiHboer Euroo* 

3 d J Emutxwr Pociflc— 

d} Kniliflr - _ . _ - 

— (d ) ITF Fund H.V 

BARQUE INOOSUEZ 

-<u > Aslan Gnwrth Fund 

— fwj CHwortond 

— (w) FIF — AmMlca 

— tw> FIF — EuraM 

— !w) FIF— Poeti c. 

— <di indaHNcMuMbOKWA. 
-Hd i ludosmz Mumbonds 8. 




SnmM LLOYOS BANK INTL POB43LG*Wvall 

. -+twjuwd»i nmxmor sibaso 

SF oSSo — Uoy* inn EuruM SF 111JD 

SF 120300 — +W Lior«b Inti Gnwtfi— SF1MO30 

SF li»So Llovd* inn incomn. sfsuloo 

sp 174T?S — Hwj Uoytfeinn pockic sfwuw- 



(C n u dnued from Page 11) say, so .did the insides of their corn- 

company’s revenues. And Speny paters. 


abortive effort to build a new, low- 
cost mainframe using radically dif- 


baiy losses of $130 million. (Continued from I^ge II) was also in farm equipment and missed some rings,” ao- ferent semiconductor technology. 

Rowutree Madrmtosh PLC re- ft* aeces to the same inf or- hydraulics, among other buaness- knowkdged Joseph J. Kroger, tbe When the effort failed last year, 


exaco, Nigeria Toyoto Motor c,,^ ^ported by Keanetn wiison. a INODC1 janre- 

Srttlp Ttivmitfi 146,145 vdiides last month/up 5.6 to ****** the P* 0 ^ 

percent 6om February last year, processor ever made. 
imenuaiomt Hendd Tribune with domestic sales amounting to Last month Intel Corp. an- 

LONDON - Texaco tax has fZ 

nfirmed a report that it and Ni- F 31 *}? W*** M 0 * 01 P°-’ P® 1 * . ^ 

nV« ctn<A «L,iv second-largest automaker m Japan, paralld system, based cm a design 

fel] 7 PWfflt in Febrnatyto devrfqpedatCalTech.Ttusat5to 
a mirteS T^nrri^ S nirr«s l °8,438 units, and domestic sales 128 microprocessors, each sur- 
a crude-ou production agree- r^^peroeotbomayaaa^to rounded by a coprocessor for ad- 

Failure to settle Ihe dispufe carii- W.188 nmla. ^al nmtommduag aud 512 , 

ihic uaaalml tn , wlTtaonl mFJTIL Tk« WoxMnotre, Vtare* Cn Sac XUOOyta Ot mCUMCy. 


ported pretax profit of £745 mil- ***** m T computer’s central 
W ($81 million) for the year end- nwray- In other case, the result 
cd December 1984, a 21.7-perccnt wquldbeffiscrgainzahonandiiicf- 
increase from £6 12 million m 1983. hooey. 

Sates were £1.16 billion, compared Results are already an the way. 
with £951.9 million. IBM researchers have developed an 

experimental 512-microprocessor 
^ system called the Yoittown Sinm- 
na International Triist & Invest- jaiion Fnghir It is based on anoth- 
mem Corp. have sgned an agree- am achmc, called Ultra, devdoped 
n^t CTeati^ a jCTt dcvel^mat at Professor Schwartz’s laboratory, 
o^my, Qnna-SwreDevdop- And IBM is contributing $30 mfl- 
r^nt Co to make investments in lion in equipment, and personnel to 
Ouoa and Hong Kong. a C^ttOjluVOTty pta«, nm 

Tnvnte Mntfnr An wr»nrf«t by Kenneth WIsoo, a Nobdlanre- 


es. enthusiastic salesman who now 

Today, Sperry's installed base — heads Sperry’s Information Sys- 


Speoy took a $24 miffion after-tax 
write-down. 



SOJiC- 

iJS; 
sasta 
tl^M 

S SKANDIFOND IN TV FUND (4*4-334270) 

C75JB — (w»lnc.: BW. SUOOftaT SS.il 

joSS — ivOAcc.: BW mWBOHw, _S5.11 

HU17- 


Hiswmas who arc now picuy wcu lu* umui viiai n ... . 

locked in to Sperry’s hardware and mentioned as the most Ekdy sue- . A v sp ? te , tttc ““Ogy wnte-down 
software — have bought an esti- ccssortoMir.ftobsL “Ourcusttan- “J® 6 ^ c ^ vcr ’ ^ 

mated $17 billion in Speny equip- ers wtxe buying their mimeoniput- 5 

meat That is one oftbe largest as,andthaihdrmicrtK,fromthe 
pooNof customers in the industry, ou^da, became wa were not in a 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— <*»» CoPUal intT Fund 

— <wj Capital Italia SA 


and thus attractive to any compa- poritian to stropN them. Now, “ 

ny, such as HT, seeking a stremg that’s iah changing.^ finally bang shipped in volume 

poritian in the conqjuter industry. It is, in fact, changing in part Meanwhile, Speny has an 
But Sperry’s apparent strength is Lately because of a shake-up or- effort to clean up its noncomputer 
misleading. By the mid-1960s, IBM ganized by Mr. Kroger in the past businesses. It sold off Speny 
began to race ahead in computer “iree years, Speny has made no- Vickers, the world's largest hydran- 
tedanology with its System-360, merous deals with outride snppli- h c equipment company, but has 


Ituentadond Herald Tribune 


Last month Intel Corp. an- 
nounced its first “concurrent corn- 



by Kenneth Wilson, a Nobd lamp- technology with its System-360, merons aeais wun tmtaoe snppu- y c equipment company, but has 
ate, to develop the fastest paralld Shorrt m«kermg efforts «, mdudmg iMStsufeste toe pa- bea unable to get rid of Speny 
processw ever made: also fell behind. Meanwhile, mih- so na l computers, and NCR and New Holland, a maker of combines 


-SsziTSZgZiS; 

jn.credS preduefion agre. 

Failure to settle the dispute earii- “ nits - 

v this year had farced a local affffi- The Washington Post Co. has 

tie of Texaco to sharply reduce agreed to purchase 17 percent of 


tary eqmprr 
Speny, *05 
its business 


at began to falter at ^***4**^ Consides for desktop an<j other farm equipment. 

ling to 15 percent of wo »c stations. Some of these veu- 'Through strict new 

»y 1980, although it tmq ”8 succeeding better than controls, Vincent R. McLean, the 


Q'T INVESTMENT FFM 
— t-WJ rwnw t. 

— HO ) rnfJ Ranlcnfond 

Duon 
— Im) 


UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 
— telUflgnta- — — - „ DMaiAO 

— M J UrHfonda — _ DM 2230 

— Id 1 Unirak — — — DM77JO 

Other Funds 


rebounded to 28 percent last year, others. 


Today, the company’s corporate 
offices still have the low- tech look 


The new policy of reaching out 


offices still have the low-tech look has had its costs. Speny was a lars/and turned around Its n^p r 
of the 1950s; until recently, experts heavy investor in Trilogy Lfil, tbe itable international operations. 

tSih Much. 1985 

Notice of Annual General Meeting of Shareholders 

JEH3 

UQUIBAER 

Julius Baer US Dollar Fund Limited 

(A.cmnpKy incorpotaled in the Cayman Islands with tanked lability) 


chief financial o ffice r, reduced the 
company’s debt by a billion doT 


F 4C MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
I. Lawnjnc* KuRhr Hill. EGA 01-42W410 

— <w) FLC Armitic SI22S 

—in pat Biyowan SVA7 

-twl FSCOrtantal S2SJ3 


was a lars. and turned around Its unprraf- 


woduction from five Dads it oper- Cowles Media Co. Tbe Post said it n nn 
ties off Nigeria's shore. Ofl pro- was buying Cowles Media stock 

iuced in the fidds is owned 20 from the Kingsley H. Murphy Jr. The Associated Press 

lerceai by Texaco, 20 percent by family, but financial terms were BRASILIA, Brazil — The gov- 
3wvron Corp. and 60 percent by not disclosed. Cowles owns the eminent devalued the cruzeiro 
^igerian National Petroleum Minneapolis Star and Tribune, and Wednesday night for the 15th time 


three smaller dafl 


Texaco did not provide details of South Dakota, 
he settlement. ho. 


newspapers m this year, setting the sellers rate at 
Uana and Ida- 4,161 and tbe buyers rate at 4,140 
cruzeiros for cadi U5. dollar. 


NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 
To the Holders of 

KINGDOM OF SWEDEN 

Floating/ Fixed Rate Bonds Dne 1991 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the holders of the outstanding Floating/ Fixed Rate Bonds 
Due 1991 of the Kingdom of Sweden that, pursuant to the provisions of die Fiscal Agency 
Agreement dated October 16 , 109 and the Terms and Conditions of the Bonds, the Kingdom of 
Sweden intends to redeem on April 24, 1985 all of its outsta n d i ng Bonds, at a redemption price 
equal to 100*% of the principal amount thereof plus accrued interest to tbe redemption date. 

Payments will be made on and after April 24, 1985 against presentation and surrender of 
Bonds with coupons due July, 1985 and subsequent attached in U. S- dollars, subject to applicable 
laws and regulations, either (a) at the office of the Fiscal Agent in New York City, or (b) at 
the win.n offices of Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York in Brussels, Frankfurt am 
Main, London and Zurich or Banque Internationale a Luxembourg SA. in Luxonbourg or 
Skandinaviska EmririMs Banka in Stockholm. Payments at the offices referred to in (b) above 
-wifi be made by a dollar check drawn upon a bank in New York City os by transfer to a doflni 

-account maintained by the payee with a bank in New York Gty. 

Bonds surrendered for payment should have attached ail unmanned coupons pertinent 
thereto. Coupons due April, 1985 should be detached and collected in the usual manner. 

From and after April 2&, 1965 the Bonds will no longer be outstanding and interest thereon 
shall cease to accrue. 

KINGDOM OF SWEDEN 
By : Morgan Guaranty Trust Company 
or nxw tool. Fiscal Ageat 

Dated: March 15, 1985 



w 

lb 
td 
ft* 

a <w 
Id 

S7J2* ft* 
JAW (b 
SMS <w 
SU1 

GEFINOR FUNDS. , j” 

— <*) EmMnvutaMnt Fond__ ISUI {!, 

— Urt Seofllsft Worid Fund CUIM H 

-KW) State SLAn»ricon__ S)4LU H 

fmH r^iWt 4rit tin ArwAtRl.reimn \ a 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the Annual 
General Meeting for the year 1985 to be held al 
Julius Baer Bank and Trust Company LuL, 
Butterfield House, Grand Cayman, on the 9th 
day of April 1985 at II a.m. for the following 
purposes: 

L lb receive and consider and, if thought fit 
adopt the accounts presented by the Directors 
for the year ended Jbt December; 1984 and the 
reports of the Directors and Auditors. 

2. To appoint Auditors and authorize Ihe Direc- 
tors to fix the Auditors’ remuneration. 

By order of the Board UquibaB' Julius Baer (J. S. 
Dollar Rind Limited, £0. Box 1100, Grand Cay- 
man, Cayman Islands. 

A shareholder holding registered shares is 
entitled to attend, vote and appoint one or more 
proxies lo attend and vote instead of him. A pro- 
xy need not be a shareholder of the company. 

A shareholder bolding bearer shares is entitled 
lo attend and vote. Exercise of these rights in 


respect of bearer shares will be recognized only 
on presentation at the meeting of the bearer cer- 
tificate or satisfactory evidence of the bolding. 
Such evidence may be obtained by depositing 
the certificate with one of tiie Agents listed 
below against written receipt, which must be 

produced at the meeting. 

Copies of the Annual Report including Audited 
Accounts are available for inspection and may 
be obtained at the registered office of the Com- 
pany and Grom the Agents listed below. 

There are no service contracts in existence be- 
tween the Companyand any of its Directors and 
none are proposed. 

Participating shares are listed on the London 
Stock Exchange and particulars of the Com- 
pany are available In tbe Extel Statistical Ser- 
vice. 

■ Secretary and Registrar: 

Johns Baer Bank and Hust Company LUL. 
Botterfieid House, P. O. Box 1100. Graad Cayman 



tett ggBEsis as 

ID I WtOKPQflUITi hW. 


JAROlNE FLEMING. POB 70 GPO Ha Ks 

— ItJ 5 jr Jiwan Trust r 49(4 

—re j j.f sawtn Eatt Ado sxu7 

—(fa ) JJ= Japan Tecftnotoov Y23W 

-rib) JJPftdRcSKitAa:) tUJ 

— <0 ) J.P Austrafln tut 


NIMARBEM 
— (flj CJen A. 


U-Ui— 
C- Jason. 


? \ i ’i l 


\ ■■ 


provmo us with, end ceruly under penuues ot perjury, a 

(employer identification number or social security number, as appropriate) or an exonpuon 
certificate on or before ihe date the securities are unseated for payment. Those holders whoara 
requfred to provide their correct taxpayer idon tinea nsm number on jtetenml Revenue Service 
Fona $9-9 and who hul to do so may also be subject to a penalty of 550. Please thwefoxe pro- 
vide the appropriate certification when presenting your securities for payment 


Agents: 

Bank Johns Baer Bank Johns Baer 

3 Lombard Sheet. London EC3V 9ER Bahnho&trasse 36, CH-8022 Zurich 

United Kingdom Switzeriand 

First Austrian Bank 
Grebes 21, A401I Vienna 
Anstris 



: — Bctolum Francs: FL — Duiea Fiwin: LP — 
Swlcs Francs; o — askad: + — otter prlcei;b — Md 
NA- Not Available; me.— NotCommonJartrow — 
- Store SoUn * — Ex-DlvHtend; — — Ex-Rtjj — 
Etempt-Prtce- ExCmn; Formerhr 
oci.3% orallm. dunw: ++— dotty stock 



8>3 v.ssIS 131 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, 


15,1985 


Over-the-CouBter 


March 14 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Satan Nat 

Hh HMl LOW 3PJH.CV0* 


Avatar 
AvtatGa „ 
AxKM X *a 
AzKti 


IMs KM Law JP-M-OiV* 
34 13 tin lift— * 
117 7 4ft 7 
t£ 5ft 5ft 51% 

in » n h 

7 ttft Hft lZft + 1% 
217133V!. a* 23ft— VS 
34 1714 OTfc I7H 
mn ms w + « 

I A3. » 4ft 4ft 4ft + 1% 

10 24% m 24% 



INTERNATIONAL 



Votre adresse 
a Paris 8 feme 

22, rue Jean Goujon, 
entre 1’Alma et les Champs-Elysees. 




Du studio au 4 pieces 
habitables immediatement. 


Visite sur place le samedi et le lundi 
de 14 h il8 h. 

A utres jours sur R.V. (l) 7 45.6622 


by kcUbowii architect. Large 



0 


fftmmwfialintj fln 

Patrice Mnsy 

36. rot Yb»y - 83300 Hmffljr 



in LE5PARGS DE SAINT-TROPEZ 

5^00 square meters overlooking the bay, Insurious vegetation. 

OUTSTANDING MEDITERRANEAN HOUSE 


on both 


S atlo. Sommer dining-room viu barbecue and bar, 
bedrooms, 2 dresaing-bathrooma, library, HI-FI Botnid ayatem* 
In all rooms. Maid-room, cratbafldings. Annex: bed, bath, living 
and kitchen. 

Luxurious equipment, fittings and interior design.. 
F.Fr. 5,500,000. 

Contact: Ageace des Fares -4 me Allard, F 83990 Sahu-lVooee. 
T«Li Paris (1) 624 38 S7-, Si. Trope* (94) 9 7.00 .51/ 97.08 .T6. 


ROME - EUR 

Luxury top floor panoramic 
apartment 450 sq.m., 
350 sq.m„ terrace, represen- 
tational, quality finishes, 
large garages, swimming 
pool, tennis. 


Possible as 2 apartments 

Box 206> Herald Tribune* 

Via Mfai Merced* 55, Roma. 


= TALI VERDE- 

AT THE B&TMOMEfr Phoenix, 
Arizona, ILIA. 

Sumptuously elegant 3 bedroom luxury 
homo an the grounds of The BSfmam. 
Lott of emeritm ind. enftftdral win. 
down, gorgeous pool, hah brxfacaping. 

$415,000. 

CoB Mary Helen McGinn 
(6QZ) 9490000 or 1-800433-1 133. 

TOM JACKSON 
A ASSOCIATES, INC 
6801 E Comeback IhL, 
Scottsdale, Arizona 85251. 


HjORAZAR 2 

RgH on 4* beadi of CUUERA m the vwy 
heat of the "CHANGE SAIT your ditto* of 
14 bedoan flan and pwAcwni aportmrt. 
Al v4h krai tamo and ptnmnic wew. 
HORAZNta a on eOrDOMt roA th rt U am 
wMi nwmrout prime h wdfcok we 3lenco 
mm 3 Mem** iwfc 2 xjuoh eourta, fiwv 
MV mm tana, nool dub. 
nOIMZMUZ bang *> deee ft *• eomoerdet 
ante erf OJiBtA. hm atom Id rMourtav 
borffc dnAequa, ha*M and yadtodd^ 
o Hen eiiiatSMC MHny epponurih* pfca a*L 
Id appniobfcn Go* anxm rimlevad at 
port 25 nrieL 

MBMhamU5.f14.00a 
Ready for occupation. 

Far brochun aid dtoah. canlod 
{pleoae dot* price bttofi - 
MCOMMION: ROMZAR SA. 
P.a sax 72 - TCL. (344) 1530310. 
miXiMofSiuik 

= CUtlBIAIVA(B)CIA-SMMl=S 


Bft + X 

sS 

30Wr — 1 
37ft +11% 
10ft— Vfc 
17 — ft 
4ft— Vi 
YU— ft 

3ft 3ft+fc 
41% 4»— 1% 
171% 181%+ 1% 
11% 11% — Vi 
3ft 3ft 
ISM lift 
sfe m&+ Vi 
m n 

31 36 +1 

31% M*-V% 
13% 12ft— 1% 
7ft 7ft— Vi 
211% 21ft— ft 
7ft 7ft 
17ft 17ft + ft 

m s® + u 

5ft 5ft 
7ft 1ft— ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 


Mft 

3 fl% + ft 

Mft— ft 
7ft 

31ft +2ft 

7ft— ft 

71%-IJ 

3ft— ft 
30ft 
25 

2ft + ft 

«=s 

Wft+ ft 

7ft 

60ft +1ft 

«% + v% 

lift + H 



7ft S + ft 
31% 3ft— ft 
lift lift— ft 
1ft 

5M- ft 
5ft— ft 

a=a 

22 —ft 
1714— ft 
14ft— 1 
7ft— ft 

7ft— ft 

TtZ 


SwnbT 

SB 

Syntrw 

Svsan JS 

SvJuac 

SySHfi 

Snlatg 

SVBtOn 

Syamt 4* 


IBM Htal Ice 

M-* '$$ 

«3 9ft Bft « +1 

U 5114ft lift Uft+v 
43114 2M* 2l V 

155 SS SS + ‘ 

a in lift if 4 vt* 


s& r-r 

«»ir. + 
n 


QMS 1 . 

Quadnc 

QuakCs X 

QualSy 

Qntnws 

Quonhn 

QueetM 

Quixote 

Quotm 


144413ft 13 
25 51% 5 


1314— ft 
.1 


1113 13 13 —ft 

42 2ft 3ft 2ft— N 
10413ft 12ft 13 -ft 
40225ft 24 25ft +1 
83 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 
7211ft 11 11 —ft 

*24 10 *1% 10 + ft 


OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 

Your awn vacation land on the fabulous Lake of the Ozarks In Central 
Missouri. Right In the heartland of America. Away from dries, noise, 
pofiutfon and (he rat-race of the workaday world. 

Forbes Inc., pubBshen of Forbes Magazine, through Its subsidiary. 
Sangre de Crtsto Ranches Inc. Is offering the opportunity of a fiferime far 
you to acquire one or more acres of our choice Missouri lakeland. 

There's no better time than right now to find out ff Forbes Lake of the 
Ozarks is the place for you. AU our homcsiles. Including lake front and lake 
view, wffl be a minimum stoe of one acre — ranging to over three acres. 
Cash prices start at $6,000. One or more acres of this Incredibly beautiful 
lakeland can be yours far the modest payment of S60 per month, wtth 
easy credtt terms available. 

For complete information. Including pictures, maps and fid] details 
on our liberel money-back and exchange privileges, please write to: 
Forbes Europe Inc., Dept H, P.O. Box 86, London SWll 3UT England 
CMa* me Property Report requtrw by Federal law and read a oehm 
Ejgnng anvtung. No Federal agency n*s judged the moms or ralue. 4 any. 
ms properly Equal Credii and Housing Opporumry 


SUNNY ARIZONA HOME 

3 bedrooms. 3 baths on 3 acre comer lot 30 palms, cacti, lawns, 
shrubs, flowers, all automatic watering. Master bedroom has glass 
doorway to IT x 26’ exercise area, has 1 1* Jacuzzi, shower and 
sauna, transparent roof, picture windows to lawns and mountain 
view, enters into 11* x 41* glassed Arizona room. Large entertain- 
ment room, wet bar. slot machine leads to 18' x 34* walled glass and 
screened sun bathing area, bathroom. A 24*x 2<T raznads room 
with breathtaking view of Santa Rita Mountains. Workshop and 
carport next to large kitchen and breakfast nook, off patio and 
flower garden. Formal dining room, large living room with fire- 
place, 12* glass doors to patio, lawns, colored water fountains. AJbo 
complete self-contained guest quartets. Secluded, yet 1/2 mile to 
shopping mall, post office. In low crime area. 25 miles to Tucson 
InL Airport and 35 miles to Nogales, Mexico. 

SS10.000 - Owner a rra nge m ents. 

Co nt ac t: CJE. Ferns, 1671 S. La Canada Dn, Green Valley, 
Ariz. 85614. Phone: (602) 625-4948, for pictures and details. 


A SPECIAL REPORT ONf 
COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 
IN BRITAIN 

wSl appear on April 25 



83ft + ft 
34 +ft 

K' 

5? 

23ft — ft 

10ft— 1% 
6ft 
33 

W — ft 
24ft— ft 
1714i— 4% 

3314— ft 
30 


101%+ ft 

1414—ft 


INTBtNATtONAL INC 
CRANDON REALTY 

380 Gordon BW. fay SKsyna, ft 3314V. 
Oaf, POS) 36i-S417i Maingi. (33$ J414H1 



Rmrtable, top location 70- 
700 iqjn. odvwrtiwnq ipoca on 
front foce. No down payment 
required. No commotion. 

nr. Kovach; A-1080 Vienna, 


634 

m 

36 

ii 

■* 

% 

15ft 

13 

*7 

18 

17ft 

12 


+ SWITZERLAND 

FOREIGNERS CAN SUV 

!'H- , F ' 

LAK£ GENEVA MCNTREUX 

CRAMS WON TAN A. 

LES DIABLERETS. VER3IER. 
VI L LARS. JURA ■ . 


International HenUd Tribune, 
63 Long Acre, London I TT2E9JB, 
TeU 01-836 4902 , Telex: 262009 
or yonr nearest HIT representative. 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES 
ON THE FRENCH RIVIERA, PROVOKE REGION, 
CORSICA & LANGUEDOC-ROUSSIUON 

wiff bn published on March 22 
for advertising information, please contact 

Ms. Dominique Bouvet, 

International Herald Tribune , 181 Awe. Charfes-de-Gaulfa, 
9252 1 Nouilfy Cede*. France. Td.: 747.1 2.65. 


Global Vision 

As the largest full service 
real estate firm in Texas 
and the southwestern US., 
we provide expertise in 
property acquisitions and 
management 


Please note specific Interest 
In request to .. 


AS 


HENRY S. MILLER COL, 
REALTORS* 

David Donosty CEO • ' 
Corporate Headquansrs; 
2001 Bryan lower 
Defies. Texas 7S201 
214OT89171 Telex 732459 
Jhe DrMng A» in nuaa Peel Sam. 
PBrtnw* in 8oviat with QatM» 6 08*. 


a 14V 
44 Wt 
W 12ft 
til A 

t 2 W 

7384 3D 
22Mk 
40 5ft 

•P -.•! 7W 

M Iri 337 231% 
12412ft 
393 4 
24 4ft 
47 41% 
30 >ft 
121714 
37 fift 
811 
571 14ft 
1442214 
4417ft 
55 1ft 
14 11 


14ft 1414— ft 
* » — ft 

1»% 12ft 
5ft 4 + ft 
10 10 —ft 
271% 2714+14 
2BH 28ft 
5ft Sft + ft 
77 77 +3ft 

22ft 33 —1% 
12ft Oft +.14 
514 5ft + t% 
414 4ft 
3ft 4ft 
m s aft 
1414 17ft 
4ft 6ft 

171% 1714 
14 16ft— ft 

22ft 22M + ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 
H% 1ft + ft 
«R4 1014- ft 


12 lift lift— ft 
5ft S 5 —ft 
fft 714 7M+ 14 
7ft *ft 9ft— ft 
IMH 15ft 
14ft 14 Uft + ft 
tft m 6ft— ft 
2D 17ft IPft— ft 
4ft «ft 4ft— ft 
5ft 94 514+ ft 
1314 131% Uft + ft 
1714 17 17 

•ft Bft >14 
14ft 14ft 14ft 


2D f ft 

1M lBft— ft 
.4ft 4ft + 14 
14 Uft— 1% 
1814 Uft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
2ft 2ft— ft 
A4 4ft— 1% 

2h ZH+ft 
■3ft 151% 

35ft 36 + ft. 

31ft 32 -ff 
27ft 291%+ (4 
Tift 71ft 
X 4014 +11* 
13ft 1414—14 
2814 20ft 
914 714 
1H% 18ft- ft 
30ft 21ft +1 
<ft 4ft— 1ft 

3 3ft + ft 

23ft » 

23ft 23ft— ft 
7 71% 

33ft 3214+ ft 
37 37ft + ft 
45H 45ft 
51% 6 +1% 
Jft 3ft 
21ft 21ft- ft 
lift lift— ft 
« 6ft— 1% 
23ft 2314-14 
IBM 1014+14 
1514 14 + ft 
7ft 10ft + ft 
M4 814 + 14 
22 23 + ft 

1714 IB 
35ft Ml% + ft 

514 514+14 

4 

30ft 
5ft 

27ft ♦ ft 
Wft+ft 
37ft + 14 
4ft 

TTft- ft 
5ft 

4ft + ft 
7ft- ft 


Jto 4.1 
Tax M i 9 
2J0Q 5.1 
378 B2 
2JB 5.1 
JD 1J 
M 43 


7ft 7ft 
4>% 4ft— ft 
15ft 15ft— ft 
1M4 121%+ft 
23 231% + ft 

21ft 21ft— 14 
971% 39ft + ft 
45 45 + 1% 

SJft 55 +lft 
22ft 22ft 
» 10ft + ft 
4 4 

4ft 4ft 
Bft 014+ ft 
4 4ft 

4 4 - Vi 

5 51% 

714 7ft + ft 
814 Bft + ft 
oft ea + 1% 
25ft S4 + ft 
«tt 5ft + Vi 
25ft 251%— ft 
514 9 — ft 
32ft 32ft— ft 

£5 23* “ 

t W 

18 II + ft 
714 7ft— ft 
2114 22% 4 ft 
51% 6 —ft 
3ft 31% 

n% ift-v% 

23ft SJVl— ft 
TTft 17ft 
38ft 39 +1% 
43ft 42ft— ft 
6ft 4ft— ft 
7ft 9ft + ft 
7ft 714 + 14 
9ft 7ft— ft 
Uft 17 —ft 

Oi CU 

51fc 51ft — 1% 
Ml 3414— ft 
22ft 22ft + ft 
41% 6ft 

.«% 4H 
Uft 17 
311 Sib 
44ft 44ft— ft 

u u 

Sft 5ft . 

S 714 + ft 
7ft 
Mft 14ft 


o” 



Hft 15ft- 
34ft 30%- 
5ft 5«- 
25ft 25ft- 

m «u, 

13ft 13ft- 
fH 7 - 
Uft Uft 

1b ft 
uft Hi% : 
4ft 4ft- 

1% 14- 

3*ft 24H 
34ft 33ft 
4 4ft 
Uft Uft 
raft ran 
T71A lift 
4U 4ft- 
lft lft 
7ft 9ft 
Uft 1M 
30ft Sift 
•ft Bft- 
7ft 7» 


VtowCt ISO 
Yarik Pd M 


3j 0 772 34 33ft 3flt 
3S 1 13ft Uft IP* 


2210 201 % m* raft 

29 41% 4ft 41* 

,u 

" £'5*1 SV 

445 lft lft m 


- • :» ->i ^htr mere 

XAfto^r 


Prices Rise 0.5? 
la OECD Natioi ’^"-T 

Reuters ‘ * 'A i 

PARIS — Consumer prices 
,0J percent in OECD countrii^--- 
January after a 02-percent - 

in December, the Organizaricr. 

Economic Coopera tkm and D^u ^ ^ 

opment reported Thursday. ^ 

The year-to-year increase wr 


OPEC Monitor Graft 
Postpones Meeting 

Reuters 

ABVDHABl—AaOpect 
taring committee has postpo 
meeting scheduled for next 
because of talks in Riyadh be* 
the Saudi Arabian cal ministC' 
med Znlfi Yamani, and his N 
gian counterpart. Kaare Kri 
sen, industry sources 
Thursday. 

The ccanminee. which Shd 
manj chairs, was due to m* 
Geneva on Monday and Tu 
to review member country cc 
ance .with production goals 
committee was set up by the 
nization of PetroieuEQ Expi\ 
Countries last December to - 
tor production and pricing, . 





























































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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

gBSP I (Continued From Back Page) 1 EMPLOYMEN T 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 15 , 1985 

- I BUSINESS PEOPLE 


; . REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

' " ■ PAKIS A SUBURBS 
• V ORE IARGE DU^EC Njh 

. errn»,a*n,iwwy.T*fe65riSS22or 

. 122 31 14 

:> it UMVHBTOWS iwria Wflu 
• s »^T«k)reartd*s™i». 581 3305 

"" PORTUGAL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

SWITZERLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


employment GE Sets Up European Unit 
Headed by Paolo Fresco 

ICATHL ATTRACTTVfi Lnrtv n 91 • 


^ SALE TORENT/SHARE LONDON — General Electric applied Tom Cross Brown, John 

__ USA residential GREAT BRITAIN m” •n 19 r 2 *i Tribl ' ne ' 92571 ^° - 15 set ^ D 8 “P a Dew wo* with Dear, Timothy Kimber, Ranjii 

« ZTZ lllVImv 7^7 Ny°y &***■ fn m._ • offices in London and Frankfurt 10 Mathiam, Anthony Pudmdge and 

AM) MANHATTAN. NYC room fuB^SSSSJiS: kSrS coordinate its European operations MaA Richardson as execuffre di- 

boldrg TQ^r Bnd^ & Thanes, fan. London 2450080. ■ Slid look at pOSSlble joint Ventures rectors effective April 1. 

* ONE OF A iriNn »*ous employer WANTED wjjjj European partners. Bunnah OQ ttC has named 

VMK wr M IVI,,U E250 f* * 'W. Te t 01-48B 3001 TlL Tbe U.S.-based electronics giant James M. Long treasurer, succeed- 

Tb «tv iw$ . . -r— sETMTARm named Paolo Fresco president and mg David Gawfcr, who. as prcvi- 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


5UNNT SOUTHWN SWnZBLAM) MANHAHAN NYC 

LAKE LUGANO 

. Utaxts opofflwnis in 0 ksix AAlr ap 




qm£ PBOPBtTIES TWOUGHOUT Udaode aparnnerti in o lam alip ap ■ 

.brtuad ore oromoted m tha Untfed baouAd Bafcp7n0O i^r} wnhimnh ONE OF A 

priwAB manna and anvere 

Kndw- beorf«.ls V (*iy.Aflartnwfta6snm. T% acrW i SCO's 

CCS*S)OMMUMWi 
SmSMM ■ 50,121600 ion's "M»- {oMba otle 

— SiI h rf*5S e 7S 8, ^S? m» m t»» bw 60s. 

SPAIN °* *• Laka offinrs aportmen tt 




GREAT BRITAIN 


Tta b-ASna dfe« lha dberimmm 
TOiSSn bujp*r o rare didca of wbstantid foot* 

^IQ^O- Sf 685AM. Free fa sgtelo oqe aM doable h«ghi ^ 1 « 2 
SS* at law Swfas b^oom apartmerts. Studios ae aha 


Tao^mSt A &“SS POsSi ^vXSlBLE <rf Ibfi new nniL ously n^jorted. has jcmrcd Hong- 

itgwo ftrt. Swin Coi ta g e . Homp- — — — General Electnc Europe. He re- kong Land Co. as general manager, 

g Tel engu sHspnaa^-xecafn-aaetey tains his duties as vice presidem utasny and corporate Bnance. 
jaTw pm,,. . ^"T vmtnwrt parnjr reewred for PmssSenf and director general of wetanons Mr. Lone was Mr. Gawlcr^s assis- 
KwSCTb ” Europe, the Mddlelak and umtatBSnnah, 

^ yn» m c mi T d tandon ae cn. & »- aied.^ prasais job to agreeable Africa and as president o£ General Eduard de Graaff & Co BV said 

Hcctric Industrial Automation- Adrian Klop has become a partner 


'■■ MALLORCA'S NEW m Europe, the Middle East and tant at Bunnah. 

■ . ^Salnor &%£JT WolIowSwfa >z^**^***°"'*° Africa and as president erf General Eduard de Graaff & Co BV said 

SUPHP0RT cAA^.s-k u. ZT^ ^ Electric Industrial Automation- Adrian Klop has become a partner 

■ ‘iho boy ef Pokos, 5 rm Pdkn^ 15 - HOME LTD. on“4 lx^ toNDON. far the b» iun^d ffa* ^ ^ ? ?* Amsterdam-based money 

rti. trqxxi.te* bertfa B to 3fl rr«»v, VtoG. v CMIon ^OWMO loflono rnnoTmamh wesT^ STIR'S*- Co ^* ^Spedofaiv Tr4wne . 92551 Cede^, Francs The company said GE Europe broker. He ptWiOUdy W2S a dlieC- 

-teSutSS 3 ® YoainasriasaninMwl SfflCS far AMfflCAN ™ dnS f I ¥ k StTalC ^ Otf in bstillltional sales 

tevond poll iTOno gOT was n Kwn firn gmS iF iSoBn MMERVE S£S ^? wf^sis^ al European level, ttghiencoop- with Paribas-Bccker in Paris. 

- '5T^S2 ^j 1 2£ 1 I?^ s !£^E^ R«a« eoitet Ms. Aflbf of hoaxes & fas for rsrW in Nsnh. &»**. Baiacn. Du3» or G^an erauon among GE businesses and Canadian Imperial Bank of Com- 

SrhS^ondj.^^odo^m? SWITZERLAND 212-^85-6200 & c * rtrd Lon£fen ' Tet ° 1 ' Fr ^L l 5 I(X * 81 possibilities for investment merce has established banking and 




Tab Owl -54291 3 - 
Tbc 73612 HOME GH 


' Her herddaodj. Unround cor- pod. 

, dwc. Compiemarivy unica & lei- 
* foolbtt metical, Dadt u ig. dnp- 
yg, catering, anieriainment. Goff & 
aw neerb/. On — kM area ccnv- 
• mi 85 ants an 13,171 gym, m d. 

« 21 Riper apartaant* abova & 78 in 
■; weft luxury condo - aB in frort Ena 
-. yea main pert. Top inr Um a dfl A5% 
cH Hurry now befara next pnorU 
; rtocf deadly dauelopen; 

' ASBOO PUKTA PORTALS, SJL 
Dirador Oxnarod 
C/ Marina 101, Portals Now 
■ ■ jflorco. Spain or Tlx 68686 CALIU E- 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


common areas are n progress. 

Tour inquiries, are rrrted 
Reuse oortad Ms. Miller 

212-685-6200 

419 Pork Ave South. NY 10016 USA 


212-685-6200 JWr«s.&G«ral London. TetOl- secretariat, 

419 Pork A« South, NY 10016 USA r~rZ 

WALTBt A SAMUH5 INC 

OffBriagffyPrwpeousOdy ^—L 


Espinosa Quits 
AsIberiaChief 

Reuters 

MADRID — Spain’s state 
airimes, Iberia, has announced 
the resignation of its chairman, 
Carlos Espinosa de los Monte- 
ros. 

A company spokesman de- 
diaed to say if Mr. Espinosa 
volunteered to step down or 
was fired by Iberia's parenL, the 
state industrial hol ding compa- 
ny INI. INI named Narcisc An- 
drew Music, president of the 
Banco de Credito Loral, to re- 
place him 

Tbe atmouncanent Wednes- 
day followed a public debate 
ova - air safely after a crash Iasi 
month in which 148 persons 
died when an Iberia jet bit a hill 
near Bilbao. Last summer. Mr. 


do you wish- 

• RJYANAPAmAENT NYC <J-Story COKOO 

• to retire w Switzerland? Dag Hammarslqold Tower 

• TO INVEST W SWIIZEBlAND? 2<0 EAST 47ih ST. 


■ MARBB1A HILL CLUB 

a sunn NEW VK1A 

-iff CLASSICAL SPANISH DC51GN 

■^rc^Kl^tSS: c ho o s e 

• Otm with mcrble bathrooms «oiM, , SWiUBUM) 

aibiefloon throughout end extetiBvu We hov« for lawgnent A v»y big 
.. roc«. Set mkrampad garden with choica of bagAffuT AFMBMWy 
•> ge swimming pod, the property ■ 

- anted in Am mar desrt&le area oe- 


CONTACT l& 25 YEARS OF EXPO- 
ENCE IN BUHWNG Ahffl SHUNG 
FINE SWISS REAL ESTATE 

SOC8MSA. 

P.O. Box 62. 

18W Vifart. WtarrW 
Tbe. 456213 GESE CH 


1 Block To Uritad NeHiom 
■SPECTACULAR 

1, 2, 3, & 4 Beckoom A p art n rt 
kn m cdotB Ommn 
Nox Full ServiceBudSta With 
Swirammo Pod, HooAh tib and 


FOR RMMSHR) lETTINOS M S.W. 
London Surrey & Berkshire. Contact 
MAYS, Gxshon (037 284 3811 UC 

T«fax=B9S5iq 

SURREY UX Superior quday houses 
to Id. Bterfxsm properties. Wood- 
(eWi Horl» Lome Lens, RerM 


Po nt mbf 
MIBMAUONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSmONS 

TUESDAYS 

in die HT flnirHIed Secfian. 
SECRETARIES AVAILABLE" 


.about SL5 biffion last year. merra (Channel Islands) Ud -«n cast ibena more than SI 5 md- 

KonriNaniftH ArTviKPr pw^de ! corporate and mtemaiM®- ^on. foreigners. Hairo£ concentrating 

Mnn earned Adviser ^ bantong services andwfll be on op endoUhe market, S 

By First Boston Unit by Peter A. Ganard, who items as diverse as £5,000 chess sets 

/ iiflLXAUsuju uiui wffl serve as mana^ng director, the aimed ai international clients, and spinach juice ai £1 .30 a glass. It 

rust Boston International has bank said. He was formerly a man- Most recently he was first vice pres- also offers a full-service bank, a 

appointed Perm JiL Koun as ad- agermthe bank s European opera- idem, chief operating officer, for lending library, genealogy research 

visory director and a member of its noos office m London, with re- AHBC global private banking. Mr. and even a funeral serv^. 


CHOOSE 

swnzBUAm 


Swirammo Pod, HoaKh Oab cad 
Kousakeeping Serviczs Audlctie 

SvTAL APAJfTMSMTS 
ARE AL50 AVA1ABLE 
For Wo Cdl 212-759-8844 
Sa<, Sun 1 1-4; Mon to Fri 9-5 


Page 15 


Takeover 
Of Harrods 
Is Approved 

(Continued from Page 11) 
hammed, Ali and Sal ah — are An- 
glophiles whose great grandfather 
amassed a fortune exporting coitoD 
to Britain. Their business empire 
includes the Riu Hotel in Paris, 
acquired in 1978 for $30 million. 
The family also owns real estate in 
New York, London and Paris, 
shipping lines in the Mediterranean 
and a small stake in National Banc- 
shares Corp. of Texas. 

In bidding for Fraser, the family 
clearly is focusing on Harrods. the 
six-siory department store in Lon- 
don's Knightsbridge district. 

The store, established as a small 
grocery shop in 1849 by Henry 
Claries Harrod. says it averages 
about 50.000 customers a day, with 
an estimated 40 percent of them 
foreigners. Harrods, concentrating 
on the top end of the market, sells 
items as diverse as £ 5,000 chess sets 


VILLAS / CHALETS m the whole 
regpon oF Ufa Geftro. Mortret* & a* 


‘ een Ma- b cfa aid Puerto Bans, and Wnotft mowftin resorts. Very reaKto 
i a inamficent sea view. ably priced bat dio the best ata mart 

PRICE IBC£3SOlOOO ndaM.Prke horn about U5S40.000. 

v hAy detaied brodtwe show* ibis and Mortgage! of 6M%. Plean vint is or 
* ’ier pmtnaus uruoei li e v AvaBoble phone bufore you radte a dunl 
• . on requert nckenehr front H. SSOUJSA. 

. INVEST ASOL Tour Gree 6,CH10fl7 Inusame. 

r‘ Aveeido (Bcartfo Soricno, 32 TA 21 /25 26 n Tbc 24298 SSO CH 
■ afaeOa. Spaa Tel. 34 (32) 776250 

: ^S?&S52£i£™~2 VALAIS / SWTTZBtlANb 

-i-xr*Lr l u~il£r^ jJtSi rtiur ummu 


phene before you radee a deddoA. 
H. SSOiD SA. 

Tour Gas© 6, CH-1 007 Lousatne. 

A 21/25 26 71 Tlx 24298 SEBO OH 


tg for MorbeBo - Casta del Soli 
Zbntact Ufa We buy, nB, rert, eon- 
.«d, «iln and t^artmenls, beadv. 


CRAMS MONTANA 
HYORi tB COtLONS 
LUC, VAL D-AFMVHS 


i * ids, qi the ittounlanE ond on the ooff. Fkm end dtoleb 25 to 150 sq.m. 1 »5 
Ve ore rather sure to Hove got what room*; Credit 60%. Interest ra»* 675% 
. ou are kxikrig for and if not wel Dwotion 15 yean. Ounen buSdert. 
'xoduon it for you! PROMOTUR - . Dued stk 

— vaxtado 118. Mxbetkt, Scan. Tlx- VAL PROMOTION SA 

-WOTUR Y ThTBSftatoeriy 1° A^du^CHlWJ Sen, 


E Off FROM YOUR FRONT ■ a 
lichen door? in Guadcdnuno Gaff 
Arhefla, we hove for rent or tda. 
4o, inoainpaably ibcb flats, town - & 
" wthouset with ocean view, nice tur- 
ouncknas & inte r n uri ond residents 
round, nopp^ living the e asyG vo- 
iVolnwowov-atafe. tdcrrnttGA; 
ROMOTUR ■ Apartado 118 > Mar- 
«la- Spain. TTxi 77610 OTIS E.1he 
CST Propery Peopfe". 


HA- New luxury house, fcicenco- 1 
tyle, 183sam_3bedroonB, 3 baths, I - 
ivng room wdh chimney, ckrxng- 1 SWTTZHUAND: We ore M&ng 2 very 
oom. fully ©quipped Utchen. tesrace. I enoumm homes withn 30 mnites of 
, .All hmshadTrST pod dekghtfuj downtown Zurich. These homes will 


APARTMENTS - CHALETS 

AvaMrie far ftmdiaM by 
foi iijnti'i 

Prices from SR23J00. Mortgages at 
6h% mtorest. Write; 

GLOBE FLAN 5JL 
Aw. MooA^xx 24 
CH-1 005 Lausanne Switzerland ! 
Tofc {021 J22351 2 Hic25lB5MflJSCH. 
tiMHlil 1 1 Sface 1970 



HOLLAND 

DUTCH HOUSMQ CBfTRE BlV. 
Mine rertds. Vderijsstr. 174 
Amsterdam. 020-621234 a R>trm 


Jime-Aig. San frandsco 4I5t 
1753. iaO/1 700 Pad time. 

DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 

ALWAYS AVAILABLE - AU PAI 
cfddren's namy, tiwm't helpers S 


X £ H^xfcu^'y ™ to 

I “ ^ “Spects of its intematioiial ^ idsted SlSnldnuelfSmL^^i^ analysis fig»«c that tSrrods is 


PEIB 8RUN MAKHAARDU 
bits Ho—jng Sftxkft Rontiti 
AiraSwtW Tefc 020-768022. 


help vwxlchvide. 


aril said. noimced vriio w31 head that unit. Kong. In his new post, he will over- 

Mr. Kouri. who is Finnish, is a Klein wort, Benson Ltd. has see operations in Hong Kong, Chi- 
director of Sanoma Corp., a news- opened a representative office in na. South Korea, the Philippines 
paper publishing company, and of Dallas, bringing to four the number and Macao. 

Nokia Corp, the largest publicly of rroresentative offices the Lon- Japan National Ofl Corp. said the 
traded company in Finland. He is don-based merchant bank has in re-election of Toshinobu Wada as 


* r^ri^ Jn CZ rw For to y«r ended Jan. 30. Mr. 

^nS, H fhe S Maconochie said, Harrods had pre- 

dlSrao*^ ^ Pti^es ^ pro fu 0 f around £27 million on 

Japan National 03 Corp. said the ^ store at 

-.TLwTxw, about £270 million. Fraser as a 


noted house, fern room. 3 ted- Uconad u% new ion university, specializing 

always avauahe London only in international finance. He has 


, .dl tenoned. TaL, pool dakghtful 
nden. 5,000 sam. Pmicate hoS- 
by/ratkenwnt vila wrth tpuctoenlar 
Knoronk view. USSHOjXXL Con- 
oct: EAGASA, Gran Wo 57, 28013 
■ ttodrid. Tulpll 12483411. 

AXBELLA U KM. 264 

. qjtv *iBa 180 ram. tern, 2175 
- qjn. lovely Kdudnd jyocxxi + ah 
ago. 5 both, 3 baths, jjooL gcroge, 
• dephone. Superb seovtaur. nunepo- 
-Jfion 600 nt beach, 8 bn golf. 

(SS225m Sun YAs,U Rrfcxxfo 
.“ Edif Lneo 3-8. Mortela, Spain. TeL 


be 200 ram. each, c 
lake. Priced at USS4 
Mortgages from 5HX 


57TH ST Off PARK AVENYC Unbe- 
ievafale fee in g of home at heext of 
Mm to ton. Ocobc & dehor with al 
hotel services, modi, room service, 
aaraga. svribhfaoatL Private terraoe. 
TteSoom 5225-5290 mO- 2-3 bed- 
rooms, mas room, formal dWng 
ream 5500-5880000. Cd Quo Me- 
mo 212-6888700 or 212-9805491 
WILIAM a MAY CQ 


ISRAEL 

BEST LOCATION IN TH. AVIV. Fw- 
noted house. Svrc room. 3 bed- 
rooms, 2 baths, acraen. Rent or sde. 
Cc£ {9723} SM^or write: P.O.Box 
838, Td Aviv, hraol 

ITALY 

POKTO E8COIE Beautiful Wsxie vilo 
to let July to ndStpterbar. minirauni 
1 month. 2 double be dr ooms. 3 nafr 
tiora, Sulhner grand pten. S6JXX1 
mondy teduSng cook S doily help. 
Tel {0564)833957. 

PARS AREA FURNISHED 

AN ATTRACTIVE BREAK from hotels 
with Halotil, far vow short (or long) 
stays in Paris. Fu*y equipped stadias 
toj-roore o p ort m ai ts , mdurfinq latch- 
en and haW services if desired from 
stays of one week upwards, hfonw 
ten / centred booking FLATOTH. 14 
rue du ThWtre. 75015 Pais- Tet 575 
62 2D, Tk;2Q521T F. 


derthc*, Hants I 
Licenced (X. 


He is a professor of economics ax rq>resentative in Dallas. 
New York University, specializing American Express Inf 


sSr&Sf.USnf'sra / Sf 8 ”* S^nrard, .Stock- 

svtt licftiote eg^teynvtot oHency bdm and Hdsinb University and 
D4GUSH naime5 & Awters Kelps has worked as an eoonomst at the 
^ International Monetary Fund. 

goo d, ftay, UK. T d; j 027^ 290U /5 y ^ i tA h.. 


representative in Dallas. Saad N. Salamah was appointed For all its success, analysts say, 

American Express International director general of administration Harrods has not reached its full 
Banking Com. has elected Charles and organization and Nasser al- potential. The Al-Fayeds apparem- 
W.B. Warded 3d and William J. Sayyari director general of plan- ty agree. They have' suggested at- 
Blocoquist senior vice presidents, ning and research. SABIC said Ab- inching the Harrods name to mer- 
Mr. WardeD MB work with other dnlrahman al-Garawi was Ttarnwt chan disc worldwide and opening 
units of American Express Co. to president of Saudi European Petro- Harrods stores in cities outside 


Lazard Brothers Sl Co. L 

AUTOMOBILES 

FOR SALE -ANTKJOE CARS: Ovyter I 

.^AtrrosTAxram 

1934 510,400, Aiate TovFour 1934 
V0X. Stayr-Cobno 1935 $11500. 

NEW MERCEDES 

' OHO * “ w - “>« ““ 

CoZUG AG, BotxBrstrceae 77, 6300 gfi ft%n CTA%/'I/ 
ZLfG. Switzerland. Tel: 042/21 5656. rKOM J/C/CK 
Tlx 865262 CASC. W uumtATF 


Ltd. has develop products and services chemical Co. 


chan disc worldwide and opening 
Harrods stores in cities outside 
Britain. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


NEW MERCEDES 

ffORSOC. BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


oh^TS: 74 CHAMPS-aYSKS 8th 

ftxrnd (teing Stwfio, 2 or 3raom o part— It 

Ona no* or more. 

r 212-9885491 L£ 359 67 97. 


ASTON MARTIN D85, l965,obtoluA 
ley perfect condition. 5 gears, car 
corahening. All orianci. 05527^00. 
Contact: ». Gt Vdn * tetkhove, 
Antwerp, BMm. Tck 233 7575 


for IMMBKAJErUmy 
BEST SERVICE 


rvenion in USJL. 

RUIEINC 


■wW«VO WILLIAM R MAY CO. 

NYC -EAST 60’S Off PARK. Begort PABS Mfc. EAUTWJU.Y newly «feco- 

x.’zsz SEr^fai-'sais: ssi!t?Bras* 


S w”rtW?nn" 0Tt l! £ W 559 
Ut 56919 SMART NL 


r price. ServirirnS monoge- 

menrhovoiobfa. For f uil erinfonmo- 
ten dteto write; Box 2125. IHT. 
Frimtodtar.15.6CCOFratf u rt/Man 

USA GENERAL 


rtfed flat. Evktg with fireplace, new 
Idftten, new bah with j uru i ii tab. 
matter bedroom, with canopy Una- 


Tab Hoflond O 4S273183 or 224644. 
Hx: 56919 SMART NL 



BOATS & 
RECREATIONAL 
. VEHICLES 

READY TO LIVE N tern, cruse ewy- 
wtere. owner uA 1 Mstrd 33 & 
Motor SoJer Bate 37, nxxxigFmii. 
Tefc 307 55 90, lOcxn-iprn / 6-flpm. 

AVUTTON 


SERVICES 
YOUNG LADY 

PA/Merpreter & Tourum Gude 

PARIS 562 0587 


SERVICES 

HONG KONG (K-3) 723 12 37 
yowg tophgtiaaad compoivon. 

RANKHNn YOUNG LADY avnpon 
m + travel gude. TeL 069/6MC2 


LOffOON -Yoim Caribbean lady Ql- 
724 1859 Airgorh / Travel 


FRANKFURT. Young tody c omponion. 
Free to travel. fOwj 44 77 75/ 

HONG XONG 3-671267 young tody 


** PARIS 553 62 62** 

JLIPYOWG IADY PARIS LADY fNIBtPRETER. Troral 


mod bed. xtady with 
$1000/ week. USA (61 7> 


CADILLAC SEVILLE, eiegart. al op- 
tent. Bert offer aver USSIOjOOQ. lei 
PorisB25&76. 


eWuetton. S1294 momtenane. E. Do- { 6*h ST. GSUWARL fart 3 of JAGUAR 


NEW AJA.G. MERCEDES 

500 SEC WhteMtenxno Dm 130iXX) 


■^^ t !S£v l ( S 1 i5 EAST HAMPTON, NEW YORK 

>seaaa5ts houses 4 un* 

BY THE OCEAN 

mm, idt wrtar pool, 20 kmtogoff nSSSS-^r^S 

. ourte, 50 km to Gerano txrport wrartorao w the Itentieort Cocat of 

terti oc Tottoe. Mawcl Girono 17-7. u 2*i ^^rucur ■ ■« 
arcetono 31 let 04-31 2038321 FOR NVBTM04T * U* 


vid Irwin Realty. 845 IHrd Ave^ NY 
10022 Virion Smxfhr 212-2468484. 

BRONXVU1& NY- quart vflaae on 
ml m3*. 28 omv tram NYC fimou 
saiool K-12. Graooas home & ctK* 


May. Double & ande bfdroornj. I 
■346848*. I k™ hv»r« + fuBy apufpped ktfehen [ 
vOkxK Ct» I * teth. AAacft serviee 4 dayv'»«Jc. I 
rSranl Na ogenB. Teb fl| 222 13 24. . 


UAR < 2 XL Brand new eryy. 500 SB. White/Manino DM 12Z0X 
500 SH. Bkek/Btodf DM 122^B^ 

AUTO RENTALS I 


IC ‘\ 2 -.9S^ KS ^ Qm f s 4 K*ALFOR5HORT1BUASTAY. Porol CHARC REHT A CAR. Ptesfige cars 


STA DB.SOUOUA. Golf, teni, 
.each, 1-bednaom Hot US$20^Xia 
ftrfo U5S1?,000. Jbedroom 
C$19,000. 4tedroom . US$50,000. 
-onuneraal locodtons, suitable hedth 
toh.eteHQU510N.Apte34.Neno 
vVtepoi Spain. Tel 04^152^72 
JSTA BIANCA, JAVEA, Spda 

hgh dan 2-bedroom seafront town- 
ones ($24000) & I -bedroom mo- 
onertes ($12^00), garden & tenooe. 
-Tomodones Goa, Oft Lepotto. 
81 GatodeGoraoe/ABccrte/Spdn. 


FOR NVBTMBU AUSE 

Gdl or ma8 inquiries to: 

Lona Rubenstein 

INTBNAHONAL 

82 Park H, E Hampton. NY 11937 

(516) 324-8200 
980 ACRE RANCH 


apartments. Write for brodxn. Dead 
Real fatale, 120 Kraft Ave^ Browvfle, 
NY 1070BL (9M| 337-afiL We m 


L A JOLL A CAUFQRMA. Luxurious 
modern estate owtooking the Pocif- 
< with pool, tennis oaurt & mony 
exftm. $2,10X000. Contact agents 
AC Batrom or Lee Teochet, do 
Mckuudt & Assoc- 1291 Cave Sb la 
Join. CA92^Tefe (6191 454 884E 

RMBUIB MOUNT API LAM) in 
Tennessee USA. 500 aora. Some 
cod aid Umber, leased far ai and 
gas explorN i dn . US$3251100. Aft. 
Exit, Bcrups ABe 150. 1 T>CdK -2000 
Fraderifaberg, Denmork. Ti +-45-1- 
19 38 98. 

M 50UTHBM CAUPORfRA far sole 
by btAfer. New 3 bedroom, 2 both 
energy efficient home far $120/300. 
For detdh write SoSy Pioirowski, 
26551 Dortmoufh, Kemmat, CA 92144 
714-929-0943. 


statia & 2 roans, decorrted. Lomoa 
SaraSnfc 80 rue Unwerste, For# 7th. 
Tet P) 544 39 4a 

FOR SHORT TBtM STAY PAHS: 5to- 
dosond 2 rooms, decor atecL Contort: 
Sofiregtei ove Defcossa, 75008 ftris 
Tet {1530 99 50 


Batroni or Lee T tocher, do 15IH. 15 daw. 3 months, fine 

tek & Ahoc, 1291 Cove St, Lo 2, 3 & 4 nm «b 

CA 92C^Tet {6191 454 8846, phone, cdor TV, knerv. Tet 306 70 32 

TH) MOUNTAM LAM) in A **£ EAU ' V|h l rw»itad^55mm. 
eeecv USA. 500 ooec. Some li* f ' Q, ? , v5 ri 5?'x^? 

rad ember, leased far oil and 1st Apr8 to 14th ApriL Tet 622 40 16 

l S?( Oral ?Sii^^r 0 SS:-^ 14 *- 2 rooms short rertd 

BorupsA tel50.1 T>l. DK-20Q0 F3500/morth + north suburb Paris 4 
rratern, Uerxnort. let +45-1- rooraLF3600/manlh.35D352Saher5 


vrth pharxt Reis Spirt. AAercedes, 
Joguer, BMW, Smousmes, smofl axe. 
46 r Pierre Otarrorv 75008 Pftk. TeL- 
72Q3(Ma Telex 6X797 FCHAFIOC 

AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR INTO 1HE UAA. 

Ths decoment exploins fufly w4xjt or 
must do to bring o ocr into the US. 


Afl Options including board CORVXtar. 
AJ4.G. factory fitted steering wteeL 
suspension, exhaust, 5 tooters. po&shed 

wteek 8 X 16 with MB 22S/5DVR 16. 
k w n ed te e definry. 

-Li- L AUTOMOBOJE, Tel: Munich 
(0589-95 85 10. Tk 524566. 


10 YEARS 

We Defiver Cm to the World 

TRANSCO 


PBVATfi RUStCSS AIRCRAFT FOR A REAL VIP. YOUNG LADY e^K lany « 

eie a Dtoto^Bucotod^WtoL 'SSEJSSM 
; — — . CB5NA 414 A pass 722 51 7 

TAX Hft CARSc MBKKB, Sols SPECIAL OFFER , nn . . gant tody, ever* 

foyce, A«t Vote,, ftw*e, BMW. kxtortrielontor sefc 1982 Cessna 414 A VIP LADY GUIDE TgsjMlHI 

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ond good and cam. We do the USS300JOO {factory standard price myorK 7 atru/' 

our men pro- U5^2^ toS PARS 633^0 26 TOKYO LADY 

auefa We alto tote ewe of the ship- US. DeraorafroXion Sort and consign- Personal Assrta 

SSSffipg 5S=5t55S P^V- YOUNG LADY 

PARIS 565 03 80 ««*,»« 

Agn * CT1 »ger seats, dte seafing, exeaAvs to- •«— « •— ~ 

<7, 9990 AAJd^m. Beaten. blm. refreshmert certer, roilrt. Inlenar - 

ar ^^ £,,t !S r '^L' * PARIS 527 01 93 * 

„ . TAX FRff AUTO SA1S A^he^rtf?^ YOUNG IADY 1RKINGUAL VIP^A 

L>der yort European - US - and UK economic twin o otovdess comfort. 

^ “tamobtefa Cd M3LETKJKONT08 Ges. MBA, pawc ™ ~ 


PJL YOUNG LADY 
PARIS 565 03 80 


* PARIS 527 01 93 ★ 


rwd^'piTS^^ mah'nB.Sro^happycfart,^^. 


r-jjuu/manm -p norm suouro rrx» * dM _ ■ , _ __ 

jgy.BWB* 38053^.; ISlLmSUSySi SZ&5 , a* A*ia - 

P 1SJS Sten^bcSlfteTS SSL^S.? ' Td 323/542 6240ril£ ^gniANS B 

S3o«tl572?78 9r U5S18L5D(cxWUS$lJ0tepSje)ta 


sono iDr irtt imwcoiarcGrcBoa 
Transco SA, 95 Noordrioan, 


GEORGIA, U5.A. r»s¥K; 

' IBCT PROM OWVBl vdo far rent Two houn; drive sooth of Atbrta Inti 26551 Dartmouth, Kemmat, CA 92144 

t Berad orm bcoc h^Aprt . May. June. Airport. Slow rofing fond. Fenced pas- 71-4-929-0943, 

.^rtoaMonono Horta, A«. turt,cnopand tetfa tawft COfft , end HY-6 BBMOOM HOUSE. 30k22 ft. 

A 

SWITZERLAND §^£^W ,UxtBO<i *«kW 

y 516/791-491^ rfx: 424-899. 

Ptwng area, rrcc pkjuqk as rann • 

equipment, 150 head of cattle, 16 re^s- USA 

ZURICH teed garter hones ate ftare. COMMERCIAL 

AiUMVn Abundont gome> deer, turkey S quo4 6 INniKTBUI 

$1.1 8UOM US. Cate orty * INDUSTRIAL 

SWITZERLAND 

■;Krix‘isa?3 

. i raw apartments which in out- 

nSngbathmqMbtyandniardaieo 

ddepfla Indoor iwunming pool fit- NORTH SALEM - NEW YORK 
a. restaurant + roam wrwt PRIMP inTATIQNl 


States. To receive ton moral, send 
USS18J50 (add US$1.50 far postage] lot 
PL Schradt. Portfadt 313r 
7000 Steljprt 1, West Germony 


SHORT IBM « Late Quarter. vSSrteil— MEKH»K»USA 

No agents, let 329 38 83. 7000 Hrttgrt I, Wert Germony i^w, o8 types immedatefy or short 

CHAMPS ELYSEE5, Slwte, fwto dan, FRANKFURT/ MAt*-W. GermanyH. m SSSe^^ 

.awfart,sunny,Td:562^ 

LA1M QUARTER. 2 rooms, hath tilrh. t°rope -to/ro-slxps. MERCTOB RfGHlHAM) DRIVE 


Cor rertol, iftfiteted tnteage. 
loosing new car 1 to 6 months. 
Telex 200572. Teh 651 4342. 
toon, 2 Ave Porto deSakif Cloud 
M 75016. 


For Deed Defivory 

IwnnB 

380 SE SO. 500 % SB. 

380 SL 500 SL 380 SEQ 500 SEC 
PORSCHE 911 Carrera A Turbo 
, A wfahu ue S ued GmbH 
BodxxnerStr 103, 4350 Reddbghausai 
Tel 02361 / 70(^4 Tx 8299S7 AHSD 


Tdephone 0043/662/851212/18 
or Wax 633771 

LEGAL SERVICES 


PARS 704 80 27 
VIP PA YOUNG LADY 
Mukfaigurt. 


co m panion, ftxis 633 68 09. 

PARS 722 51 77 VIP Assistance. Be- 


747 59 58 TOURIST GUDE. Peril, 
grporK. 7 pol/ midnight, totljravoL 

TOKYO LADY COMPANION, PA 
Personal Asswrax 03-4565539 

YOUNG IADY COMPANION Lon- 
dcxi/Heothrow. Tet 244 7671 

YOUNG SOPH5HCA7H) VIP lady, 
trifagual PA Pore 500 89 72. 


TOKYO 645 .2741. Touring & shop- 


■IRfSSas. YOUNG LADY VJ.P. 
Comparvon Tel: 347 358 49 

H/KONG CHARMMG HJROPEAN 
Lody gwde / componion. 1682483 
HONG KONG K- 3-632826 Young 



Bocxtf ortiM- PARS; 520 97 95 

FOR SALE * WANTED BIUNGUAL YOUNG LADY 


PARS VIP SOPWSTICATH) YOUNG PARS 574 81 98 YOUNG Eduarted 


kxfy componion. Why don’t you , . . . 

Y 2S5?® OCWN1C IADY 01-245 
9002 london/Aeports/Travd , 
even ror your s no pprag. ^ y{jwG ^ ^ ^ ^ 

PARS: 520 97 95 W PA 5 Mngd totorpreter. 

K5UAL YOUNG LADY A dS^^a^° ,rfpe,,0,fc 


™ AD ® S M VDEO SHOPS ATIBmONI 


m«# *ed, newton rteB horse bmn and 
Mining oretL Price i wk ida ai fann 
equipment, 150 hood or eertle, 18 reg»- 
tered quarter horses and more. 
Abundont gome> deer, turkey & quo*. 

fl.llOflOO US. Cate only 
Write or ccA WNG HOWWGTON 
3650 Iktoer sh m n Road. N.W, 
***** Oearara 30305 
Phenm (404) 2*2 . 3540 


oeflerir neighborhood. 5 

51d/791-49l3i fc 424-899. 
USA 

COMMERCIAL 
* INDUSTRIAL 


! lAUM QUARTER, 2 rooms, bath tteh- 
en, teat, phone. Tet 354 65 fB 
1 14M PARC MONISOUSIS. Luxurv 
I pus 3 rooms. F7500. Tab 720 94 95 

SPAIN 


ol datifln Indoor swunmng pool fit- NORTH SALEM - NEW YOBC 
A restexwtf + roam service. PRIME LOCATION! 

feltedurt apartment pope to Sfiertgoitor 100-f- a gete we 

i metropofa of Zonch with late per- _„E r t !P: d oored 

Tsttreasrf oiwaswsato 

• nc* or an u t tuxji ve investment far 
tone wtop appreciates the dtorni and 
(Ml of o dekghtful enwrorenent 
nn easy reach of Zurich 

■to 85% of the purchase prioe can be 
- »ed an vary easy term. So please 
■tod a-Your copy of our 34 page 

, xhure emti you. Such an opperto- USA RESUllJ'l I1AL 

it t as Ite wl not report rtseff. 

DARKEN 4 F«W CANAAN Comerti- 
, REBDB4ZA AG cut. Executive type homes far rent & 

I 'Q4-8001 Zurich. Trtadker 5U sate. Fleasart N.Y. Oy suburb. 

1 01)221 33 95 Tig B13 376 ESI CH French sprtwi. Nafonw* awwc- 
tens. Cu Tibbetts RE. 203655-7724. 




REAL ESTATE 

TIMESHARING 

A PIECE OF SCOTTISH heritage for 
fuel US$4 J»a Tree shore one of the I 

three oportmerts in my castle. I week Alrcfc 
for 25 years $4000, 2 weeks far 25 acres j v, 


SWITZERLAND 


GBSVA - FOR EDIT 


T1ANSCAR 20 roe Lb Sueur, 75116 
Pbris. Teh 500 03 04. Mc» A 95 XL 
AnWpe 23399 81 Comes 39 43 44 

AUTOS TAX FREE 

BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FREE AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 

WRITE FOR NK CATALOG OR 
FRS BUY-SAOC FOiDB TO; 
SWPSOEB.V., P.O. Sox 7568, 1118 ZH 


MERCHS RTOHIHAM) DRIVE 
Bnrad new, iraadirtaly ataUte 
190 t 190. 22D.ZJ0 E. 

300 D, 280 CE 280 S 
RUNDE AUTOMONLE EXPORTS 


Mercedes, BMW, Porsche, offer fol TOGO 
service xnpart / export US DOT & far sale most 

EPA far tounsf & dealer. OataWe W! 

MoSars, Ter il eeg eiuJi . 8. 4 ttaesseb Tteu 

« 2,1 ■ -SSJ 


Jaguar, Mercedes, Porsche & US ver- 
son BMW. Sateway Inc. 415944- 

TAX FREE CARS ■««. ifa 31425B. 


Amsterdam Air port, T he Netherlands. 
Phene (Q20TI 52831 Telex; 12568 

SMPSOE Inc, 576 fifth Aveitae. 
7th Boer, NewYort N.Y. IOQ3d.m 


TAX FRS CARS 
P.CT. 

tergert Showroom 6 Iwvertui ) 

AM makes, dl models, brtnd new 
Ijzeriocn 1, 2008 Antwerp, Btogiurn 
Teb 3/231 59 00 
H» 35546 PHCART B 
Apply far am cater catalogue 
US$5 corn 


reAfiBMLftW KLGWH 21 Getab MMNATIONAL FBI PAIS vranted. 

■srfs^irtjs services 

76099, TVs 312242 MID T1X ..77—. ~ T 


YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 

SHOPS ATTBfflONI Ne MBng u d PA. Paris: 525 81 01 

J Cassettes offered 

set pros UNDER US$18. 

NTSC and PAL AMSTERDAM (0201 182197 

xrsends of Met TRUSTHIL IADY COMPANION 

flms. For fist comaeb Chorming, educated, traveled 

«> ELECTRONICS > 

PARS NOTE 1M5PHOI* AT ONCE 

Titfff ft ^^TnrtfaV.lP.fady.bral 

wjnsy t>at C DO YOU NTO5 A H»ICH-0VlGUSH- 

mn rAU Sponah sjXMbng young lady guide? 

)NALfEN PAtS wonted. - 531 — ~ 

f to: Lisa Schmitt PDl Box SOOETE DIANE PARIS 260 87 43 
Odenfaarg, W Genwony. Men & wonwn prides, security Ins* 
Mg car serwoes. 8 am - 12 pm. 

PIR VICES LONDON. Young German/ French eft- 


NTSC crad PAL 
Thounrads of titles 
American fans. For fist contact: 
KlAfV BECTROMCS 
PO Box 3299 
I ten scl / CYPRUS 
Telex: # 3292 PRC CT 



mi PALS 


EXCAUBUR. Sea Mr ad in Wedna- 
day erfitea 


M1BMMXMU REAUTIRJL PeMte 
UH.7D. USA & WORLDWIDE T5 
212-7657793 / 7657794 


w you on yort ' 
< UK 01-381 EESk 


SINGAPORE INTI GUMS. Cc* Sb- 
gapore 734 96 28. 


Get 

Ridays 

Qosing 

lTioes. 


raws $75CD.D«tofc from the Ew, fahSore. harbor, Mdurteg a l2-raam >T>a ne piZ) BWM484, Tetex, A2?W 5 
ftmmore Castle, Tarherf, Argyll ketury axetoy home a r o o nd n ontng. SKPSDE 5A. Otaussea de Wavre 


ESCORTS & GUIDES { ESCORTS & GUIDES j ESCORTS <& GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES 


Scpdond. t eryart house , gate-keeper lodge. 


Plan Yowr Oassifisd Ad Qoiddy and Sadly 

In the 

INTERNATIONAL HEKA1D TRIBUNE 

far Phone: Coll yowr local IHT reprasentotM with your text You 
w* be Mfarmed of the cost immbfiatefy, and anon prepayment ts 
nxxfe year ad wil appear wihm 48 hoixs. 

Cert: The base rate is $9^0 per line per day -ftooDltora.Thrt«aro 

25 loMtrK siy» and ipacai in lha first Kne ond 36 in fha fofav^ng Snes. 
Mmum spate a 2 Eras. No atbrevialioM oeapNd. 

CredR Cartel American Express, Diner's Club. Ewroamt Mortar 
Card, Accras and Visa. 


HaM services. 2 pooh, restaurort, 
mpenrmrke#. Quay bertth m fuB prop- 
erty. F25^D0a Tab 651 43 56 Pbris. 

REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

ST. JEAN CAP FBKAT. between fifice 
& Monaco, May xTirniil view ow- 


ed intruder olorin system. An ixiccn^ 
won ojMrtrty to crtch before nrxd- 
ApriL $8J00 a month on a 3^ear lecee 


base stortirg Aug. 85. Write to Ariequm 
finances. 2 rue de La Muse, 1205 Gene- 
va. Total tecretion. j 


465. 1040 Bruaek, Belgum. 
Phone: |02}6499062 life* 63290 


TRASCO 

THE MBtCEDK SPEOAU5I5 


^ lona aBaenon - Tm free U®. AB modeb induing 1000 

®aWts. SFl^OO - SF4J00. Cat ffATOOT certfitati o n & shfaptog by 


looiteg ha rbor or 3. Traced ag es. 8 TOWN OF ROUE, 20 mins, from Ge- 

ne ?* d 2sj’ po °'* 

ttiwig room, modern BHJBfl, wrraca luxury vRa, 300 ram. 

' “ ' USA 


HUP QfffICC 

faete* JFor ctoseBed ortyf: 
747-4*00. 

EUROPE 

A mrt ette n. 26-36-15. 
Athene: 36l«397/3fi&242L 
■niHele: 343-1899. 
Copenhagera (01] 329440. 
fn*hfartsp69)7M7-S5. 
Umtanr w 29-58-94. 

Ibhora 67-27-93/66-2S44. 
Uffthra: (01)8364802. 
Madrid 455-2891/4553306. 
MIok 102} 7531445. 
Norway: (03) 845545. 
SrauK 679-3437. 

Swwlera 08 7569229. 

Tel Avert 03-455 559. 
Vfa»o« Contort Frankfurt. 

WWP5TATB 

Now Ywfa {213752-3890. 
Wta* Coart: (41^3623339. 


LATlWAMgUCA 

Bogota: 2129603 
Imoos Aims; 41 40 31 
(Dept. 312) 

GMyoqufc 431 943/431 
Unto: 417 852 
Panama: 64-4372 
San Jm« 22-1055 
Saifioga: 69 61 555 
SaoPoaioc 852 1993 

MUDDLE EAST 

•rttrate 246303. 
fanfare 25214. 

Kuorah: 5614485. 
Lehman: 340044. 
Qafc*: 416535. 

Saudi Antekc 
faddafa 667.1500. 
UJLE_- tfabai 224161. 

MREAST 
fiBfcofa 39G06-57. 

Sao*7aSWnL 

Toky* 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Melb ourn e - 690 8233. 


LSSl SiXXL Contort Jacques Frsndft, 

250 vTSlSt NYC I0019USA. 
5B6-2607. 

PROVBKX BETW9I ST JEM Y 5 
Les Soul Small house, large port, .1 
acre. Sleeps 4/5. Availobie irtl June 
29 & from Aug. 31 it. From 
£1504 week. Also weekends Tel Lon- 
don 90 6658. 


twees. New (waxy vfla, 300 sqjtx 
SF4 JOO/wartE. Tel (021)75 39 » 



REAL ESTATE 


BEAUmniY S1UATH) o o m fbrtabfa WANTED/EXCHANGE 

nfa near 5t.Tropez-_4^ bndroorre. EAST HAMPTON, NY 2^ acrxi house 


wftnmingjxxjl, barbecue, kxge gor- 
denpknalusud conveniences. Phone 
efirert to owner 41544 Rebate, 


AST HAMPTON, NY lA aaw house 
tot, an radudu woods rood, near 
beaches & vflage for Pcras qpertment 

3-4 roams (long toasehdd arrange- 
mart conadered. Bn 1518 Amcgav 
seta NY 11930. 


CAWE5 30 traits vfla, superb pan- sett, NY 1193a 

Siffiiir aSSSSIaeS 


of Paris new Metro. Last 2 weeks July 

MENTON PceonfrtMl, Sumy redone + August, Bn 1816, Herald Tribune, 
flef $1 25/week oho redone (tone 92521 ^teJy Calex. Fratce 
- ESP*-. Wf - 3222817 “Sl. AMERICAN COUPIE wates to our- 

MOUdNS. Spiendd vfflcLCemes Film dxse ped-a-terre in Ptn, 1 55. 
festeroi 5 summer. P35 75 75 26. room, 7 arrondsemert trefafrod. 

- S100JJ00 US. K Satt, 500 R Broad 

CHEAT BRITAIN way, St Louis, MO 63102 USA 

ElIXUkY EXECUTIVE APARTMENTS. 
jWghsbridge/G«heo.,Over 100 

My serviced studA 1 &2 bedroom rert »ejary^2 


7 arrondoemert prefafrod. 
DUS. K Batt, 500N. Broad 
. Louis, MO 63102 USA. 


Krtghsbridge/CWraa.Over 100 

ftdy serviced rtutfCA 1 &2 bedroom rear foerary^- [ 

tSrtmunTstay 22 ft^PriTc] ssrsfs^sssr * ! 

EMPLOYMENT 

i^Joi^l^lt^aiTG GENERAL POSITIONS 
GOTIKAL LONDON - Executive t*- AVAILABLE 

vi BB r op ? fi ne rts rt ne w MASKSING Sepraentatiw lacdf 

^neertoaty turnitw ana tuny based far inoior LB offshore contra 

*IK. «S«Sd&i 

Fhgt wfaf.bt^ ImwtedgBabh & faraicr veto Ert 
«fairel01) 3B8 130 n wrm Pfnteft. pmadoparton. Bn 4Q565, LH' 


EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

MARKSING Eeprescntotee landon 
based far major LB offshore contra* 
teller. Must be expert seed & be 
knowtedgeabh & fcmiar veto Erto- 
pean ai opertHi Bn 4Q565, LKT^ 


St, London WC1E 61c- 

X AW m CH hm 20 yeore experience 
in Rentals, loro or short teaenpes, 

Central & «*«*", >fSo8i5 Abef- 
deed. Efinh 5 Go- 01-499fflfl2. 


EXHKIB4CED NEWS HX10R (oriD> 
nrnrtianal desk portion. KnpiH 
5«1 eorrrtrte reume n confidaice, 
to-. Bn 2WTftefrtd Triune, 55 Via 
defa Merced*, 00187 Bane. 


the experts. 

DIRSCT FROM SOURCE 

Trasco London Ltd 
11 Howard*) KJ Larxfon NW2 7BS. 
Tab OliDB 0007. 

Telex 8956022 IRAS G. • 


Cars of 
COPBMAGB* 
TAX FREE 

* bCernat i arid Sales 
■ Worldwide Defavery 

* faropean Price Leaders 
« Tet, wr 45 1 37 78 00 
» Telex 19932 DK 

55 Vodrrtfsvej DK-1900 
CTH V.-DENrtMK 

ROLLS-ROYCE 

BENTLEY 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHTR5 

MONTE CAJUO 
PtfadpaBhr of Monaco 
Teb (93J 50 64 84 
Talera 469475 MC 
OffisU Overt Pnfary Dwlrt 
TrtnhSrhed teice 1925 

-EUROPORT TAX 
FRS CARS 

Ced or write far free c a ta log. 
12011 

brttevteen Airport. Hrftevi 

TdJB ]CSOD77 
Tdex2Sa71 ffCAR NL 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SBtVKE 

USA t WORLDWIDE 

Head office ri New York ’ 
330 W. 56to St, N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS AND 
OCCX5 ACCSTO 
Private Mimbeishfar AvaUde 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SBIVICE 
VEL 200 8585 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SERVICE 

10 KBtfMGTON CHURCH ST. V» 
IS: 937 9136 OR 9379133 
Aff mater aadff arte nccenteiL 


ban toatarad a tha tap 6 mart 
erd wl w Escort Snrvke by 
USA A Intern rtinn id news meffin 
in du ffin g rwffio ond TV. 

★ USA A TRANSWORLD 

A-AMER1CAN 

ESCORT SBNKE 
EVBYWHSE YOU ARE Ct GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

CoB free from Ui 1-800-237-0892 

Oft fra from Florida, 1-800-282-0692. 
Lowed Etatent vmloones you bodd 

CAPRICE 

BCORTSBIVKZ 

N NEW YORK 

THj 212-737 3291. 

LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Serviee. 

Tel: 736 5877. 
LONDON 

Pot t n xm Escort Agency 

67 Chatera Start. 

London W1 

Tab 486 3724 or 466 1158 
AH witter m3 ante Mated 


ARBTOCA7S 

London Eraort Service 

128 Winner* SL Londcxi W.l. 
Al major Crete Uxdt Aaxpted 
Tet 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 nooq - midnight 


MAYFAIR CU» 

OWE SBtVKX from Sen 
ROTTBHJAM (0110-254155 
THE HAGUE fO) 70-60 79 96 


ZURICH 

CAROIMi ESCORT SERVKZ. 
Teb 01/252 61 74 


ZURICH 

Sanaffiw'* faert 6 Guide Sews 
Mete A Peserte. Teb 01/56 96 92 


ZURICH-GENEVA 

GMGB’S BC08T SBMCE. 
TBiOl/363 08 64-022/34 41 86 


MADRID STARS 

ESCORT SERVICE 
Tel: 2503496. CISXT CARDS. 

GBEVA RST ESCORT SBIVICE 
Re tervrf — TKAVB/HlldBt) 
6 5W STATIONS. IB: 31 49 87 


SWITZERLAND 

★STAR ESCORT* 

. Sendee Trt: 01/ 55 11 49 


★ MADRID ★ 

TASTE ESCORT SStVKX 
Tefc 411 72 57 


ZURICH 


TB: 01/ 47 55 82 


GOPEMIAGEN 

BEST ESCORT SBMCE 
Teb 01-29 52 13 


. ROME CUJB EUROBE ESCORT 

& Guide ServioeTek 06/589 2S0C 589 
1146 (foam 4 pm to 10 pm} 




LOMWN YASMME ESCORT ond 
travel serwee. Teb 328 B459. 


MADRID WTl ESCORT SERVICE 
Tab 2456548. Crete cods 




BRtGTTTE BCORT SERVHZ Hanburg 
040/2298144. 

BRUSSB5. CHANT AL ESCORT Ser- 
wax Teb 02/520 23 65. 


AMSTBBAM, Broorts. Antwerp. Thai AWIBTOAM ESCORT 

Hogue. Rotterdam. Cafeae boort) __GwdeServiea. Teb P2EQ 763842 
Service. Amsterda m (0031201 -906266 ( MUNICH PRIVATE BCORT SBIVICE 

Teb 089/ 91 23 14 

AMSTKDAM JEANET Escort Service 

Teb (020)326420 or 3401 la 

MADRID SBECnONS ESCORT Ser- 
vice Tek 4011507 Crete Cntfa 

noxrs e5CORT Service Darmaodi 
Tet 06151/423268. 


DOMINA JADE GENEVA Escort Ser- 
wce. Teli 022 / 31 26 73. 

IADY ESCORT SBIVICE Mmich Tet 
089/47 77 53. 

IONDON BAY5WATBI E5CORI5 

Trt 01 2290D76. 



GBCVA ESCORT 

SBTVICE. Tefc 46 1 1 58 


GBCVA •BEAUTY* 
ESCORT SERVICE. 
TEk 29 51 30 


GBCVA - BBT 
ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL 022/29 13 74 


Amsterdam jasmine 

ESCORT SERVICE. 020-366655 





COLOGNE/ DUSSHDORF/ BONN 
Escort Service. 0221/56 33 04. 


WANKRJRT AREA. FEMA1E + Mote 
Esaxt & hovel tervtce. Td 62 84 32. 

LOfOON GABRIHIA ESCORT irt- 

m. TeL 01-229 4541. 


AMSTERDAM SYLVIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice n 20255191 



MOAN ESCORT 

SHMC& 03/69762402 


MUSSELS DBCHB1E BCORT AND 
GUDE 5BCV1CL TO: 733 07 9f 


GBCVA - IBBC BCORT SBCVICE 
Tel: 36 29 32 


fRANKH/ RT— STEVE Eicort Service. 
Tek 069/ 5978181 

LOMJONPWVATE BCORT Service. 
TeL 402 7389. 


MUNICH. 8UWDT + XBOA faeort 
Service. Tel 311 » 00 or 311 79 36 


LONDON 1WHE BCORT Service. 
Tel 01-373 8849. 


LONDON GBtE BCORT Sense. 
Tefc 37Q 7151. 

VmOiA VU> BCORT SBIVKX. Ti 
nr >45 41 58 









Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1985 


|7 18 19 110 111 |12 113 


PEANUTS 


A History of 
the World. 


Volcanoes erupted 
Oceans boiled. 


[33 ^■STT IM 




The universe was in Then came the 
a turmoil. dog. 


BOOKS 





LADY GREGORY: The Woman Be- 
hind the Irish Renaissance 


Cook, the house that had been built in the 


By Mary Lou Kohfeldt. 366pp. 
Illustrated $19.95. 

Atheneum, 597 Fifth Avenue, 
New York. N. Y. 10017. 


1PIM 


1 1 I [ [** T*a 


BLOND IE 


Reviewed by John Gross 


ACROSS 
1 Roman 
conspirator 
7 Partner of 1 
Across 

14 Tebaldi and 
Scotto 

16 Triple : 

1907-17 

17 Plain 

18 Storyteller 

19 Douceur 

20 Italian saint 

22 D.C. ecology 
group 

23 Wang Lung’s 
wife 

25 Cather’s " 

Lady” 

26 Piquancy 

27 A fiddler and a 
pianist 

29 "Hamlet" part 
SO Very, to Verdi 
32 Pub game 
34 Encourages 
36 What a 
cicerone 

wwd ii r B; 

38 Director De 


51 Thing, to 
Tacitus 

52 Cougars 

54 RecnercM 

55 This, in Paris 

56 Silver-eagle 
wearer 

58 Org. fostering 
opera, etc. 

59 Van Gogh's 

"Room " 


61 Believes 

63 Cloy 

64 Wind 

65 March 15 

66 Victim on 65 
Across 


11 Considerable 

12 Idealist 

13 Jones's prize in 
1779 

15 Pillarlike 

21 Marshal of 
France in 
W.V.I 

MOurteyroleln 
■■The Honey- 

moaners” 

28 Tolerated 

30 Followed a 
curving course 

31 Turbine part 



YirHEtf W.B. Yeats received the Nbbd 
W Prize in Literature in 1923 he said in his 
acceptance s peech that he should really have 
been sharing the award with J. M. Synge, who 
had died 14 years earlier, and with Lady Greg- 


JLondoa. Browning, Tennyson and WKsiV 
were among her guests; so was Wilfrid Scawt 
Blunt, a mediocre poet but accomplished L 
thaxio with whom she bad a long love affair 
Widowed at 40, she continued to we 
mourning for the rest of her life. Her Hr 
concern was to maintain Coole for her x 
Robert (though he never lived to be its mane 
he was shot down while serving as a pQot 

World War I). But she was also on the thres / 
old of the career that was io make her famou' 

In 1894, she recorded in her diary her fir 


.* 

. • *1* 


V- 

. £**<*.. 1 


iiou U«« i*» jr«aia miio, ““ meeting with Yeais, who was then 29, « 


BEETLE BAILEY 


YOU shoulpw*j$ 
BE IN THERE, 
BEETLE/ XV* 


f ponYtell 
AAE THE ARMY 
HAS A RULE 
ASA1HST 

V THIS 


THE ARMY 
HAS A RULE 
AGAIMST 

EVERYTHING 


amp RULE#623,5Z7 
SAYS YOU SHOULDN'T EE 
TELLIMS HIM THAT/ 


the compliment he had paid Lady Gregory — ■ 
who was as vigorous and active as ever at the 
age of 71 — by going on to describe her as “an 
old woman anting mto the infirmities of age." 
(“Not even fi ghting a gains t them!" she com- 
plained in her diary.) Yet if his tribute to b« 
literary achievements was exaggerated, it had 
its point, and it gives some idea of the reputa- 
tion she enjoyed at the time as one of the 
presiding spirits of the Irish Renaissance. 

Today, except among specialists, she has 
rather receded into the shadows, and it is for 
her role in Yeats's career that she is chiefly 
remembered. But she was a commanding per- 
sonality in her own right, and a good biogra- 


miiuence. sue naa taken a fitful interest 
Irish literature since childhood; now she beg 


□fay has long been overdue. Mary Lou 
fddfs is the first full-scale account to topple 
over into hagiography. 

She was bom Isabella Augusta Ferae 
(though she was always known as Augusta) in 
1 852, the 12th of 16 children of a greedy, gouty, 
fierce- tempered Protestant landlord whose 
family had lived in County Galway for genera- 
tions, and a mother who took refuge in born- 
again evangelical piety. Her mother’s fore- 
bears, the Barrys, had been among the earliest 
English invaders of Ireland, and on both sides 
she was related to many of the leading families 
of the Protestant ascendancy. Hunting and 
drinking were the main pastimes of the Persse 
men; the women had a firmly subordinate 
position, and Augusta, who was not only the 
youngest of the Persse daughters, but the plain- 
est, was generally slighted and disregarded. 

That, at 28, she astonished everyone by 
manying a cultivated and wealthy neighbor, 
Sir William Gregory — 35 years her senior, a 
member of Parliament and former governor of 
Ceylon. As his wife, she became mistress of 


39 Taught 
43 Mercury, e.g. 

48 Lend (aid) 

47 Mail conveni- 
ence: Abbr. 

49 Thomas’s 

» Go 

Gentle..." 


DOWN 

lAfounderof 

Surrealism 

2 Vilipended 

3 A woman who 
has borne one 
child 

4 Dramatist 
Mosel 

5 Salt Lake City 
team 

6 Bagman 

. 7 Homed viper 

8 Concerning 

9 Manche’s 
capital 

19 Celebes or 
China 


33 Rio Grande do 

, Brazil 

35 Object 
37 Disgusts 

39 Caustic wit 

40 Swift cat 

41 Arrow-shaped 

42 Major- 

44 Biblical fibber 

45 Singer Lynn 
48 Judges' seats 
SOEcdysiasLe.g. 

52 Rostand or 
Ronsard 

53 Silken 


I1E& 




ANDY CAPP 


cuss* merle, w ^—w-ue- 


ALLRH3HT, T 

frHEARb r" 


'/ABSOLUTELY 
. RAWSt-eS a 


...ITMOtfr 


NOL*LLH/VE 
V TO WATT. < 


'I RECKZ3N THEAC5T 1 

muawj 


56 Draped, e.g. 

57 Miss Genst? 
88 Venezia’s 

ra Tints 

62 Proper 


> to WATT. -« 
flW ANT IO 
SEE IF HE 
k. CAN GET y 

r outof S 

THIS HOLD — . 


' COMPLETED/ ’ 


eda new focus for Irish national fe eling aft 
the fall of ParneLL 

' Kohfeldt traces the history of Lady Gre 
oiy’s involvement with the Irish Renaissance, 
absorbing detail — her collaboration wi 
Yeats on “Gathleea ni Houlihan** and T 
Pot of Broth.” two plays that he put his nai 
to as though he were the sole author; t 
backstage imbroglios of the Abbey Theab 
her own career as a dramatist (and in its eat 
jjearetbe Abbt^^gedmore performances 

put together). 

There were also her retellings of Irish qn 
beginning in 1902 with "Cuchulain/'a wc 
that was greatly admired by, among otbe 
Theodore Roosevelt. An enthusiastictetur 
sem her from the White House prompted t 
casual comment — for the lady coula be vt 
lordly — “I see Roosevelt is puffing my boc 
again.” 

Picturesque though many of her anecdo 


■■■« rfrfW i 

- + 


m 


'*•** u mm 


Picturesque though many ot uer sneak 
are, Kohfeldt doesn't allow herself to 


* 


swamped by them. She is clear-sighted ah : 
the element of make-believe in Yeats’s ceUb 


lion of life at Coole and about the extent.' 
which he and Lady Gregoty made use of et 
other. If anything, she is almost too intern - 
nnmnslcmfl the impulse toward . sdf-aggn - 
dizemem that helped to fuel Lady Gregor 
dedication to the national cause. Ana ; 
keeps in view how far the Irish literary reri 
was the work of members of the Protest! : 




ruling caste rather than the Catholic 
and the tensions that this inevitably ( 
Those tensions were at the root of 
occasioned by the original Dublin i 
of “The Plavbov of the Western W 


WIZARD of ID 


© New Yaric Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 




' 3-lS- 



>!Fft4iprr9 
A UTO& 
)IAT& ft# 

tn 


IWMli 

tMt 


tu t&X&V CUHII&SINPBCK ES 

s 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


of “The Playboy 




REX MORGAN 


Boinjey 

EDGNS&I 

-vs-ftH 


‘Wilson says he found a 5UYer for our house, 
AND WE DOVr EVEN HAVE iTON THE MARKET < * 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold end Bob Lee 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one let ter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


LOBAT 


BAFLE 



ODD □ □□□□□ □□□□ 
Dcnci nanan aaoo 
EBBBQinClEIQCl □□□□ 
□C0EQQa □□□□□□ 
BHD □□GHtDH 

□EQQan □□aaaanio 
□no ooaoo oaoa 
bdo ona ocio naa 

HOOD OOS3EO QBO 

□aaaaaao aooiaao 

oaaoaa aaa 
ddodoh nnoonoa 
□Etna oaonaaonoa 
echo oaaoo oaoia 
ncoo onaQa aooa 


•tdsifp i'.imi 


a lively account of this tour, which 


ory found a liberating experience, and* 
which she revealed unsuspected prowess a. . 
public speaker. 

Surviving her son, living on through the ~ 
of the Troubles, she showed a good dcaT 
courage and character, and her story rq . 
sents a memorable chapter in Irish history. .1 
the time of her death in 1932, however, she > ' . 
already a figure from a past that the new F 
State had begun to leave finnly behind. N 
years later Code was demolished and its std 
carted away by a budding contractor. -~ 




John Gross is on the staff of The New J - 
a/is/as Times. : • 


_ ’"Main 


BRIDGE 


By Alan’Truscott 


T l HE weirdest system in use 
sewed a theoretical m- 


JTM PAV^fe I £] iBOSUnttadPMIura Svn<scan.inc 


X scored a theoretical tri- 
umph that turned to ashes on 
the diagramed deal The sys- 
tem is used by East-West, who 
play what might be called an 
“average pass” — in Gist, sec- 
ond or third position, a pass 
promises 9 to 12 high-card 
points. 

With 0 to 8 points, as in the 
North hand shown in the dia- 
gram the bid i» always one dia- 
mond. However, this might 
also be a natural diamond 
opening or a very strong bal- 
anced hand. 

The one-heart response 
asked -North to darify, and his 
one-spade bid confirmed the 
weak opening. Three hearts 


was a strong invitation to 
game, which North did not ac- 
cept. This was an accurate de- 
cision: Since there are no dear- 
cut entries to the dummy. 
South should expect to lose a 
trick in each suit. After a neu- 
tral lead, his only real hope is 
to find the dub long with West , 
and the diamond king with 
East 


partner had bid that suit, 
the contract roDed in for af • 
of 10 international points.' .. 




West led a spade and as de- 
clarer duly lost four tricks, 
making his contract exactly. 
This display of accuracy 
availed him nothing, however, 
for in the replay the opening 
bid was one diamond by East 
South took a shot at four 
hearts and was happy with his 
resulL West not unnaturally 
led the diamond king since his 


wssr<D) 
A J 1043 
OAIS2 
0K2 
*74* 


BM - 

*A*v 

OJ 
4 JIB 
*KK 


j UUdM 

mS 


SOUTH 

M 

OKQJMS04 

OAQ 

*AJ3 


Nil - ) irM Ruum 


• North and Sooth were wtow 
The bidding: 

Wok Nartfc EM S 

Vest 10 Paw 1, 

Pm 1* Paw 3] 

Pass Paw paw ‘ 

Wot lad tbeapade three. 




1®ard 


HOGUNE 


GODIN! 


WHAT TOSmOKl 
170 Ef5 A 

/MONSTER PLAYC7N/ 
A HOCKEY TEAM? 


Wm*W Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse March 14 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Now arrange tlw circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by ihe above cartoon. 


Print answer here: 


Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: EXULT TYING MAROON POLICE 


Answer: How society girls start In — 
BY COMING "OUT’ 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


ABN . 

ACF Holding 

Ae gon 

AKZO 

Amid 

AMEV 

Attain Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVO 

Pue lHinimn T 
ColandHklg 
Etnvien-NOU 
Fokkar 
Cm Brocades 
Hal no Icon 
Hooeovens 
KLM 


Amsterdam 

Attaera 

Barcelona 


BW arul 

Budapest 

Capetweea 

Costa Del Sol 

DataUn 

Bdlnbarga 

moreaor 


SeiKva 
Helsinki 
Istanbul 
Las Palmas 
Lisbon 


7 45 fr 

1 34 sh 

7 45 o 

2 36 fr 

-a 28 d 

-2 28 fr 

2 34 st 

-5 23 a 

-2 33 o 

a 32 lo 

5 41 fr 

0 32 d 

0 30 d 

3 44 e 

-2 23 sw 

0, 32 o 
-1 30 e 

3 37 fr 

14 41 fr 

5 41 fr 

1 34 cl 

-2 » fr 

1 37 fr 

-2 28 d 


Bangkok 

Bolilng 

HangKogg 

Manila 

Now Daltal 

Sooal 

Shangbal 

Sbiaapont 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


LOW 

c F 
34 73 d 

-1 27 fr 

11 S3 o 

24 79 d 

17 43 fr 

-I M ft 

5 41 o 

25 77 o 

12 54 r 

4 39 O 


Not Naddar 
NedUovd 
Oct Vendor G 

ruKiuoa 

Philips 

fUAWUJ 


Kall+Sab 24050 241 

Kanforft JOT 212 

iKoufliof 219 Z1&B0 

Kloecknar H-O 243 261A0 

. Ktoeckner Worto 7VJ0 SOJD 

KniDpStarri 90 90 

Undo 41030 41730 

Lufthansa 19130 191 

MAN 15215430 

Mannas mann 15430 15730 

MalallssaallKtian 270 241 

Musnch-Rueck 1150 1190 

Rroussag 274.10 27330 

Ruetgen-werico 350 350 

RWE 15030 151 

SOwrlna 454 444 

Siemens 558 570 

myssan 1KZJ0 103JQ 

Varta U1J0 181 

Vebo 17&7U 17430 

vew 12150 12130 


VMksrvagonwaHc 19630 200 


i ComaMRtKwk Index : 1 OOM 
Prevloos : 141430 


RolllKO 
Roronta 
naval Dutch 
Unilever 

Van Ommrm 
VMF Stork • 
VNU 


AMers 

Cafra 

Co po Town 

CatabtaMca 

Horan 

Lagos 

Nairobi 

Tunis 


7 45 r- 

13 ss fr 

15 59 r 

6 43 fr 
11 U .it 
24 79 st 
10 50 fr 

7 45 o 


AN PjCBSGeetnri Index : 2Bt» 
Prwvlaas : WTO 


LATIN AMjgH 


Reykfavot 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Wake 

Vienna 


Zurich 5 4' 

MIDDLE EAST 


6 43 cl 
0 32 fr 
5 41 cl 
0 32 a 

-4 25 sw 

7 45 a 

0 32 cl 
3 37 a 
5 41 d 

1 34 a 

-1 30 fr 

1 34 o 


Batata Aires 32 90 14 57 d 

Lima — . — — — na 

MexkoCIfV 23 73 9 48 PC 

Mode Janeiro 39 84 24 75 fr 

SaePaulo — — — — na 


NORTH AMERII 


Ankara I 46 -7 19 cl 

Beirut 21 70 12 54 Ir 

Damascus 21 70 3 37 fr 

Jerusalem 19 66 8 46 fr 

Tel Ad* 17 63 8 46 cl 

OCEANIA 


AtKktaUM 16 <1 12 54 0 

Sydney 24 75 20 48 tii 

d -cloudy; ft>foggv: fr-falr; lt-full; 
sh-shawers. swanow; sl-skmty. 


Anchorage 

4 

39 

-6 

21 

d 

Attoofa 

21 

70 

10 

SO 

d 

BettM 

10 

50 

2 

36 

oe 

Otlcaoe 

6 

43 

0 

33 

PC 

Denver 

11 

S 

-3 

23 

fr 

D«Srol? 

7 

45 

0 

33 

d 

Hffltatolo 

27 

8) 

25 

68 

PC 

HsuitM 

21 

70 

16 

61 


Las Aagftes 

22 

72 

9 

41 

fr 

Miami 

29 

84 

18 

64 

fr 

MtoMStatb 

7 

45 

-3 

27 

fr 

Montreal 

6 

43 

2 

» 

d 

Nanan 

21 

89 

17 

63 

fr 

New York 

12 

34 

4 

39 

PC 

Son Franctta 

IS 

64 

7 

45 

fr 

Seattle 

12 

54 

2 

36 

d 

TweitS® 

6 

43 

-2 

n 

d 

Wamingfen 

14 

37 

2 

36 

d 


Artaad 

Bekaert 

Cockerill 

•Ca b aoo 

EBES 

GBL 
Gevoert 
Ho boken 
intercom 
Kmilrftank 
■Pefroflria 
Sac General* 
Safina 
Sotvsy 

Traction Elec 

UCfl 

Uinrg 

vieUa Mordaone 



2230 2230 
13A0 13.20 
1330 1190 
9JM 9X 
4&50 4A25 
745 7.15 
32JO 32 
4375 4J0 

BL45 BJB 
69 48^5 
s^s 545 
19J0 1950 
PjCffi) 835 
9JS 940 
175 545 
130 140 
suss 840 
6 665 
W? '-70 
31 2140 
_7A0 7M> 


435 440 
135 133 


Hone. Sene Index : 13563s 
Pmevlea* : l3BJf 


Current Stock Index ; 
PryvtOaS ; 221085 


FmUurt 


AEG-Tefefanken 

Alt lenz Vera 

Bast 

Bayer 

Bavwjtvno. 

Baver.Veraank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 

Conttsummi 

Damiler-Benz 


108 10930 
1025 1034 
207.10 Z12 


217J0 221JQ 
317 SO 331 
322 324 

380 38430 
16440 146 
136 134 
48330 488 
352 353 

148 14730 
41830 42330 
18518650 
218 215 

156 IS430 


FBIDAT-S FORECAST -7 CHANNEL: Very CfWTOT. FRANKFURT: Sbowen. 
Temp. 4 — 1 r»_»l LONDON: OaudV Wflh rain. Tema. 5—2 MI — 341. 


Ternft 4— -I 09-301. LONDON: CMudV wflh rain. Temp, 5— 2 MI— 361. 
{■AO®*?! ft, t5S ,r 3 ^L NBW J roRlc i cloudy. Temp, 

i— * U8— Ml. j PARIS: j Cloudy with shewnra. Temp. 5— 0 Ml— 32). ROME: 
Rainy. Tern a 12— 6 (54 - 43). TEL AVIV; RHr. Temp. 19— 9 (44-411. 
ZURICH: Cloudy. Tama. 6— 2 (43 —36). BANGKOK; Foggy. Toma. 34—26 
197-79). HONC KONG: Cloudy. Ten*. 11— 10 (52— -WKMANILA: Fair 
Temp 33 - 24 (91 - 75). SEOUL; Fair. Tempi » — 4 r«8 - mTsjngapORE: 
Stormy. Temp. 3) — 25 (18 — 77). TOKYO: Rainy. Temp. S— 5 141 — si 


Deutsdw Babrack 

Deutsche Bank 

Drtwbw Bank 

DUB-SchuH 

GHH 

Hochtief 


AEC! 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am Gold 
Bor Iowa 
Biwoor 
Buffets 
De Beera 
Drte f onfe l n 
Sands 
GF5A 

Hormony . 
Hive Id Stool 
Kloof 
Nedbank 
presStgyn 
Rueplot 
! &A Brews 
St Helena 
Saaol 

west Holding 


670 640 

2270 2240 

1600 1590 


7 m m 


no 90s 
4975 son 
1390 1370 
ox 2BSQ 
Z7M 27H 
395 387 

7100 7IH 
■085 MO 
5050 58S 
1490 1490 
590 S90 

3300 329 
599 577 

9400 5400 


deee Prey 

Anglo Am Gold SBWi S8iw 

Botxrock 143 )44 

BorcJoVS 5B7 594 

Bras 539 S37 

BA.T. 371 348 

Beediam 346 368 

BL CC ' TS 

.Blue Circle 513 510 

BOC Group 299 298 

Boats 171 172 

Bowater Indus 260 mi 

BP 528 523 

Brit Home St 255 255 

Brit Telecom 137 136W 

Bril Ayroiooce 381 348 

BTR 719 704 

Burmflh 301 200 

Cable Wireless 540 535 

cmawrySchw 144 144 

Charter Coos 200 200 

Coats Pawns 143 143 

Commercial U 196 193 

Cons Gold 400 479 

GeurtouMs 159 140 

Oatoety 501 501 

DeBeera* at 453 

Distiller* 298 298 

Drlefontebi 25V8 

FhOfW _ 310 3U 

free Si Ged *21 «. S2iw 

GEC 197 198 

GKN 234 224 

Glaxo C 1125/3211 45/64 

Grand Met 386 2S3 

Guinness 2S6 257 

GUS 742 742 

Hanson 217 211 

Hawker 409 414 ! 

■Cl 809 804 

imps 183 186 

Jaguar 353 356 

Lloyds Bank 559 567 

Lonrtio 1*9 in 

Lucas Z79 279 

Marks andSp T45 144 

MMktadBank 337 344 

Not West Bank 619 627 

PondO 355 355 

Pllklnetan 301 301 

Pte«ov 184 186 

Rocal Elect 214 218 

Randfontabi USM SSovs 

Rank 365 370 

R«d httl 580 574 

Reurers 369 361 

Royal Dutch £ 4737/64 50 5/64 
RTZ 644 642 

Scolchl 920 • 915 

Sdnsfaurv m 396 

Shell 775 778 

STC 201 306 

Std Chartered 472 477 

Tats and Lvie 443 448 

TOSCO 235 236 

Thom EMI 422 422 

T.I.aroup 240 218 

Trafalgar Hw 353 353 

THF 156 156 

Ultramar 318 206 


Flat 

Flnstder 

Gensrall 

IR 

ital cement] 
ItalmeMllarl 
Mediobanca 
Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascente 

SIP 

Snla 

5tanda 

Stat 


"tSS'ZS 

84100 04360 
73000 74300 


SI Trading 
UOB 


OUB index : <2240 


1487 1489 
6800 *786 
2342 2261 
66850 67408 
640 67050 
2025 2041 
2942 29*9 
12590 12500 
3470 3490 


SUB Current index : me 
Prevtonm: 1211 


Astra 

Alins Copco 
B odlden 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 


% NA 

190 193 

360 350 

34® 350 

106 108 
NA 185 


Ah' Liquid* 
AUfflom AB. 
Av Dassault 


BIC 

Bauvgues 

BSN-GD 

Comtfour— 

dub Med 

CoHmcg 

Dumez 

EWAquItaJne 


Handefsbanken 

Phormacta 

3oat>SCddla 

Sondvfk 

Skomfco 

SKF 

SwedlshMaicti 

Volvo 


365 HQ. 
171 170 

306 212 

nr. m 

415 410 

NA 96 

™ 7W 

230 230 

256 2S5 


Previous :3?MB 


% JBi eiy 


GoaEOux 

Hochette 


LatoraeCap 

Legrand 

rOreal 

Matra 

AUdKfhl 

MMPmwr 

Moot Homessy 

Moulinex 

Nard-Cet 

Ocddeniaie 


Pernod Rfc 
PotnUe s (tee) 
Peugeot 

Pocf aln 

Prtntemps 
Rodlatedoi 
Redouts 
RousMl Itehri 
Skis Rosslgnol 
SaurJPgrrter 
Tefemedon 
Thomson CSF 
Valeo 


ACI 

ANI 

ANZ 

BMP 

Borai 

Boooalnvlll* 

Bramble* 

COfes 

Comal co 

CRA 

C5R 

□wilen 

EMerslxi 

Hooker 

Magellan 

MIM 

MY*r 

Oakbrldge 

Poke 

. PoseMon 

1 RGC 
Santos 
Sleigh 
South land 
Weodstde 
Warmaid 


Japan Air Urns 
.Kallma 
[ Konsat Power 
Kawasaki Sled 
Kkin Brewery 
Komatsu ltd 
Kubota 

Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Elec works 
MltsublJhl Bonk 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Coro 
Mitsui aid CO 
MMnikashl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 

NDckoSoc 

Nippon Shwt 

Nippon Yusen 

Nissan 

Nomura Sec 

Olympus 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Sony 

StrniUoma Bonk 
SOTiftamo Chem 
Sumitomo Moral 
Taber Cirp 
Tataho Marine 
TakedaChem 
Tdk 
Term 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tokyo Marina 
Torav ind 

Toshiba 

Toyo t a 

Yamalchl Sec 


Teronte March 14 | 
Canadian stoch via AP 




3672 AWf Pmco 
15600 AgatooE 


■Aura Ind A| 

Bgaerj 

1263 Algoma St* 
I 28 AndrsWAt 
79020 Arycen ■ 

I 140 Argus C prl 
loWAtaalf d 
I 739 BP C.: 

22925 Bank SCI 
(45651 Bank N sl 
1 4000 B drrtcko B 
4082 Bonanza RJ 
[2610 Brotorng I 
1900 Brantalea 
I 400 Brando Ml 
XH3BCFP m 
30065 BC ResH 

U16MBCPhonS 

S 1 Bn™* 
1*94 Budd Con 
2*550 CAE I 

falOOCOUrtbBI 
1880 Cad Frv I 
|7400CNorWe^ 
pB30C Can Trust ■ 
[317673 Cl Bk Cam 
k 14500 Cdn Nat Res 
92609 CTIre AIM 
■5828 C Util B| 

1 1000 Cara | 
[2011 CelantneH 
lOOCakmlTSw 
ISSSCOWtiA | 
lOOCDMbBf 
3770 CTl, Bank 
2*7CanvenfrJ 
Z700Coseka R| 
200 Conran A I 
15271 Crawnv I 
888*790 Czar Rest 
TTDWDaonDev 
L 1200 Daon A ■ 


NUVIU Index : 1X40LBS 
PnrvtaM : T2A1W6 
New index : 99192 

< Previous : MASS 


Well Low dose Chge 

S13W 13 13M— Vk 

WVk 6W 6V1 

S19W 1BV ins— U 
*1516 15V. 15V, — 2 
S2M6 SOW 2016 — 1 

S24W 24% 24% 

*19*6 1916 1916 
*11 11 11—4* 

sm su bu 

szrva 26W 2616— V. 

556< 548 » 

row 13 13W-I- 16 

136 133 136 -1-2 

405 400 485 +5 
B IIS 495 —5 

§5* IS* 

£ =1“ 

2148 Zl« 

fH 15 IS — Vb 


402 Murphv 
1725 Nabisco L 
263144 Nortmdo 
60413 Moreen 
106134 NvaAttAf 


*25 2418 25 +48 

ST71& 1648 17V, + 16 




Adta 
Balk Leu 
Brown Boverl 


SS,?S&. 

EleUiuenjII 

GeoroFfedier 

intenFscount 

Jacob Suchard 

jelmaii 

LendteCvr 

Nestle 

Oertlfcon-B 

Roche Baby 

Sandoz 

Schindler 

Sutter 

SBC 

Swissair 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss Votkstxmk 
Union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich ins 


Afifi Index :m$7 


CAC index : 28041 


Ah Or dinaries ind 
Prorio«ij7«74« 
Source: Reufvro 


Bousteod 
Cold Storage 
DBS 

FrasarNetM 
How Par 


KepoelShlp 
Met Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 

Swnb smpygrd 
Sime Derry 
S Steamship 


1J3 

N.T. 248 
*.15 (.10 
S3S 525 
2X7 T3S 
2X2 2X1 

12B UB 
«M 
9 JO 9X5 
3A6 184 

1J» 1J5 

1.74 1.14 


Akal 

Canon 

CJtoh 

Of' Nippon Print 
Dawa House 
Pull Bank 


Fuff Photo 
Fujitsu 


S3B S4S 

i | 

1^ iS 

333 332 

108 1838. 
557 541 

1630 1820 
1B40 1850 
1330 1340 
874 878 


2490 2710 
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as Angeles Times Service 

r LAKE CITY — Fafiow- 
inesday night’s 120-105 vio- 
er Utah at the Salt Palace, 
‘ Angles Lakers' coach. Pat 
. aBed the coach of the Jazz, 
' jaydea, 'Trigger than life.” 
idering Layden’s weight, be 

. NBAFOCt^ 

r than almost anything you 
ne. Life, the Salt Palace, 

' Ifley wasn’t making a joke 
je size of the Jazz coach’s 

e opening minute of the 
' tarter, the Lakers’ forward, 

; Vorthy, drove toward the 
and caught an elbow of 
award Rich Kdley in the 

.'takers took a 20-second 
. t while their trainer, Gary 
vntimeA Worthy. 

. mining that the injury re- 
a closer look, Vltti took 
to the dressing room, 
forced Riley to call a two- 
timeout, hoping that War- 
'd return to shoot his two 
,' ows. Riley knew that if 
didn’t return in time, not 
mid Layden be able to 
he Laker to take the shots 
l.-rtby wouldn’t be allowed 
the game. 

the two minutes passed, 
; 3t21 hadn't come bade, 
•ydec called a time-out, giv- 
’ thy two more minutes. 

■-‘s a particularly selfless ges- 


“It was one of the classiest thing* 
I*ve ever seen in this league." 


■ 'ladering the Lakers then 
-iding by only four paints 

1 team mat has not secured 
T berth. 

• idn’t have to do that, but 

■ '-ank Layden," Riley said. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

L Expels Gismos, May Fold 

YORK. (AP) — The Cosmos, who withdrew last month from the 
jtdoor Soccer League, were expelled Wednesday from the North 
n Soccer League for failing to post a letter of credit. A team 
aid he was told the league would fold Friday. 

; Pinion, the team’s general manager said ‘The league counsel 
board of directors of the Minnesota Strikers informed the 
that the league would shut down on March 15.” Jim Henderson, 
it's public relations director, said, “I can’t say because I wasn’t at 
mgs, but I would be surprised if it’s true.” 

(pulsion of the Cosmos, trim entered the NASL in 1971 and 
its hottest draw, often attracting 70,000 -spectators, reduces the 
> only Minnesota and Toronto. 

_ Begins Deliberating McLain Case 

’A, Florida (AP) — After 350 hrrars of testimony - ! over four 
a jury Wednesday began deliberating racketeering charges 
he former baseball star, Denny McLam, and three co-defen- 


lizabeth Kovachevich of U.S. District Court dismissed one 
jtot and kept the lone woman alternate without announcing her 
he nine-woman, three-man panel broke off dehberations for the 
' but reaching a verdict 

1 n, a three-time American League all-star and the last major- 
icber to win 30 games, is charged with racketeering, conspiracy, 
* , possession of cocaine and conspiracy to import 400 kilograms 
te. He faces a maximum of 90 years in prison and $90,000 in 


aska Wins in NFFs First Round 

„ JLN, Nebraska (AP) — Center Dave Hoppen, making 13 of It 
’■ vs, sewed 21 points Wednesday as the University of Nebraska's 
' 1 team beat Canishis, 79-66, in the first round of the Nationa 
* i Tournament, 



Layden said he owed it to the 
10,158 fans, many of whom, he 
knew, came to see the Lakers and 
not the Jazz, and to his players and 
to the integrity of the league. 

“The people paid to see Worthy 
play, and ) think we wanted to play 
with him in the game," Layden 
said. "I didn’t book their junior 
varsity.” 

Worthy still couldn’t return fol- 
lowing Utah’s tune-ont. He had 
suffered a scratched cornea that 
could keep Mm out of one gimp 

If Layden were truly generous, 
he would have put Magic Johnson, 
an 83.2 percent free- throw shooter, 
on the hne in Worthy’s place. Bui 
there is a limit to charity. 

Layden chose Kurt Rambis, a 
63.5 percent free- throw shooter. 

“Nothing personal,” Layden 
called to Rambis, who, much to the 
crowd’s delight, missed the first 
free-tjjtow. 

Layden. whose team suffered its 
second 15-point loss to the Lakers 
in two nights, was not so charitable 
when discusring the officiating of 

John Vanak and Mike T-auerman 

He was especially upset with 
Laueraum after a third-quarter ex- 
change. Utah's assistant coach, Jer- 
ry Sloan, had complained about a 
call, which drew a retort from 
Lau ermm that Layden considered 
disrespectful 

But the Jazz lost because of 27 
points and 10 rebounds by Kareem 
Abdul- Jabbar, 23 points by Byron 
Scott. 

In other games it was Boston 
123, Phoenix 106; New Jersey 114. 
Washington 109; Philadelphia 121, 
LA. dippers 103; Milwaukee 128, 
Cleveland 93. and Dallas 1 18, Kan- 
sas Gty 100. 


Roffe Wins Giant Slalom, 
But Cup Victory Marred 





,-y »•/- 




Diaim Roffe, speeding past a gate, woo tbe World Cup giant slalom race. At the finish fine, 
she teamed two friends had been kilted in an automobile accident es route to the meet. 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatches 

WILMINGTON. New York— 
Diana Roffe, the U.S. teen-ager 
who has become a giant in interna- 
tional skiing, followed the advice of 
A veteran Wednesday and attacked 
a 51-gate course to win a World 
Cop giant slalom event after start- 
ing the second run in )0th place. 

Five weeks ago, the 17-year-old 
from Williamson, New York, won 
the pant slalom at tbe 1985 World 
Championships, the first such vic- 
tory by a U.S. woman in World 
Championships in a non-Olympic 
year. 

But Ruffe's triumph Wednesday 
was maned by tragedy. Two 
friends from Williamson, Maureen 
Wright. 18. and her brother. Mi- 
chad, 20, were killed early in the 
morning when a logging truck 
struck their tuning car as they 
were eu route to Whiteface Moun- 
tain and the ski meet. Roffe learned 
about it at the finish fine and burst 
into tears, with her mother and 
teammates trying to comfort her. 

Still red-eyed, she spoke with re- 
porters only on condition she not 
be to the deaths. 

Roffe said she talked with Cindy 
Nelson. 29. who is completing her 
14th year of international competi- 
tion, just before starting tbe slalom. 


“She said 1 didn't have to set up, 
to just straighten it out at the bot- 
tom so 1 said I was just going to 
take my chances," Roffe said. 

She came up with die fastest run 
of the day. shouldering flagpoles 
aside in a dynamic, headlong dash 
down the 349-meter-deep course in 
1 minute. 18.05 seconds after a Fust 
run of 1 : 19.68. Her combined time 
was 2:37.73. 

Maicja Svet of Yugoslavia was 
second in 2:37.87 and Marina 
KichJ of West Germany finished 
third in 2:37.95. 

“The first run felt kind of funny, 
because it was hard and icy on the 
top and the transition felt really 
soft," Roffe said. “The second run 
was just hard com, a little bumpy , a 
little grooved." 

Roffe, who came from fifth place 
in the world meet Feb. 6 at Bonrrio, 
Italy, said “there’s no strategy in- 
volved" on her second runs. 

“I didn’t get any FIS (Interna- 
tional Ski Federation) points, and I 
wanted them. But they only give 
points on the first run; the World 
Cup gives you points on the second 
race." she said. 

Svet. who put together runs of 
1:19.18 and 1:18.69, said she 
moved from fourth to second by 
concentrating cm the course. 

Her second run was the third- 


NCAA Tourney Starts With Davids Eyeing Goliaths 


The Associated Press 
Lightly regarded Fairieigh Dick- 
inson was to be thrown to the Wol- 
verines. while Ti4iigh North Caro- 
lina A&T and Southern University 
faced equally difficult first-round 
tests in (he NCAA hagVethafl play- 
offs starting Thursday. ' 

Each of those schools had the 
dubious distinction of facing the 
top-ranked teams in the four divi- 
sions: Lehigh against Georgetown 
in the East Regional North Caroli- 
na A&T against Oklahoma in tbe 
Midwest and Southern against St 
John’s in the West, all on Thurs- 
day. and Fairieigh Dickson against 
Michigan in the Southeast on Fri- 
day. 

Lehigh players prepared them- 
selves lor what was bong heralded 
as one of the greatest mismatches 
in the history of the tournament 
“Let them think what they 
want” said a Lehigh forward, 
Daren Queenan. “Words don’t win 
agame. 

Odds makers installed the Engi- 
neers as 30-point-plus . underdogs 
for thdr meeting with the No. 1- 
ranked Hcryas. StiH the coach of 
Lehigh, Tom Schneider, insisted, 
“These gcres can hold their own. 
They’ve played some good teams 
before." 

But Lehigh’s strongest opponent 
of the year probably was Mar- 
quette and the Engineers lost that 
contest by 29 prams. They also lost 
by 31 points to Rider College and 
by 27 to George Washington. Le- 
high got into the NCAAs by virtue 
of its upset victory in the the East 
Coast Conference tournament 
In other first- round East games 
in Hartford, Connecticut Temple 
played Virginia Tech, Loyola met 
Iona and Southern Methodist 
faced Old Dominion. 

The Virginia Tech coach. 


Charles Moir, said Wednesday he 
probably would bench senior for- 
ward Perry Young and senior 
guard Tim Lewis for missing prac- 
tice. 

Young is the team's statistical 
leader, averaging 19 points and 
eight rebounds per game: Lewis 
was to start in place of the senior 
point guard, A1 Young, who under- 
went arthroscopic knee surgery last 
week. 

Oklahoma’s coach. BQly Tubbs, 
said he was sure North Carolina 
A&T “would hke to slow things 
down a bit But we’re going to do 
our best not to let them.” 

Tbe Soonera, riding afl-America 
center Wayman Tisdale’s 27-point 
average; I rad tbe nation in offense, 
scoring more than 91 points a 
game. The Aggies had held oppo- 
' nenls to an average of 66 points. 

They lost to Georgetown by only 
61-56 earlier in the season, holding 
another all-America center, Patrick 
Ewing, to 11 points. 

“Anybody that plays George- 
town jo a fw^pobt gone gets my 
attention real quickly,” Tubbs said: 

In other first-round games in 


Tulsa, Oklahoma, Southern Cali- 
fornia played Illinois State, Ohio 
State faced Iowa State and Louisi- 
ana Tech met Pittsburgh. 

In the West Regional in Provo. 
Utah. Sl John’s was a trig favorite 
to beat Southern. Lou CuraKwea 
the coach of Sl John's, said his 
knowledge of Southern was limited 
to tetephone calls with other coach- 
es, including Creighton’s Willis 
Reed. 

“He says they ran, they jump, 
they shoot,” Camesecca said. 
“What the heck, a lot of people ran, 
jump and shoot I still don’t know 
whai they goL" 

Michigan went into the tourna- 
ment with a 16-game victory streak, 
the longest of any of the 64 schools 
in the playoffs. 

The Big Ten champions finished 
their regular season with a dramat- 
ic 87-82 victory at Ohio State on 
March 6 and a last-second come- 
back that won, 73-71, at Indiana 
last Sunday. 

“Those are the types of games 
Jhat prepare, ypq for .a tournament* .. 
not loses,” said Michigan’s coach. 
Bill Frieder. 




Th» Anodotod Sw 

Wayman Tisdale got two sore points for Oklahoma team. 


fastest of the beat and founh-fast- 
est of tbe event Kiehl turned in the 
second-best time of the second run, 
climbing from sixth to third with a 
sparkling effort of 1:1857. 

West Germany’s Traudl Haecher 
and Maria Epple were fourth and 
fifth with times of 2:38.19 and 
2:38.21, respectively. 

Epple led after a first ran of 
1:18.11, nearly a full second faster 
than anyone dse. 

“What went wrong? The whole 
(second) run," Epple said. “Il was 
very bumpy and rutty. The snow 
was very soft." 

The race, the sixth of seven giant 
slaloms on the women’s World Cup 
circuit, also saw the first use of a 
new FIS format, a cut onwi.-tr to 
that used in professional golf. 

Because of this format, only the 
top 31 of the 74 women who started 
the first run qualified for the sec- 
ond ran. The cut is at 30th place, 
but Maria Rosa Quario of Italy and 
Poland’s Dorota TUdka tied for 
30th after one run. (AP, UP1) 
■ Skiers Call ‘FKp-30’ a Flop 

F3S*s experiment with what is 
becoming known as “Flip-30” — a 
combined qualifying cut and re- 
verse start — drew almost unani- 
mous complaints from the skiers 
following its first international tri- 
al The Associated Press reported. 

“I hope I don't get in trouble 
with the FIS. but I think it's un- 
fair," said Roffe; 

“This is the first race that I’ve 
been in the first seed," she contin- 
ued. “I used to be in the 20s Cower 
seed), which is where you ran into 

S and nits, but I think the 
who always run in the first 
e upset" 

The new format cuts fields of 70 
to 80 entrants to tbe 30 best with 
one qualifying heat On the second 
heat those 30 ski in reverse order, 
with 30th going first and first start- 
ing last. Most race courses offer an 
advantage to the first skiers. 

“I spent years trying to get into 
tbe first seed (the top 15), and now 
I can win the first run and have to 
start 30th, just like when ] was in 
tbe second seed," said West Ger- 
many’s Kidd, who started in 26th 
place in the second race and fin- 
ished third. "In the first seed, you 
don’t practice like in the second 
seed, over bumps and holes." 

Last week in Aspen, Colorado, 
mate skiers at a World Cup meet 
rebelled, with the Swedish star. In- 
gemar Stenmark. saying he would 
retire from racing rather than ac- 
cept the formaL 

Said Kidil: “It’s easier for the 
boys. They always stick together." 


Bruins Think They Are Gearing Up for Playoffs 


Las Angelo Tima Service 

The Boston Brains are finally 
beginning to play the way then 
general manager, Harry Smtten. 
thought they could. It is too late to 
finish higher than fourth place in 
the tough Adams Division, bm 
they may be ready for a big effort in 
the playoffs. 

Louis Sleigher scored 16 seconds 
after the opening face-off Wednes- 
day night ai Pittsburgh to touch off 
a five-goal first period, and the 


Bruins coasted to a 7-3 victoiy over 
the struggling Penguins. 

It was the Brains’ second victoiy 
in a row and gave than a 6-4-1 

nhlkxxis 

record since Sindea replaced Gerry 
Cheevers as coach on Feb. 14. 

“I think our guys are starting to 
realize how much fun it is to win,” 
Smden said. "I was very pleased 
with the way we passed the puck, 


and we’re getting a good effort out 
of our young players. 

"I dunk they learned their les- 
son. Last week at home against the 
Penguins, we were up 4-2 and took 
it for granted it was all over. We 
wound op losing in overtime. 

“After the first period tonight I 
reminded them about what hap- 
pened, and they came out and 
scared two more.’’ 

Tbe Penguins, who missed an- 
other chance to gain on the New 


York Rangers in their bid for tbe 
last playoff spot in the Patrick Di- 
vision, broke Pete Peelers’ bid for a 
shutout halfway through the last 
period. They added two more 
goals, but it was far too late. 

In other games it was Quebec 8, 
Minnesota 0; Philadelphia 5, N.Y. 
Rangers 2; Calgary 5, Toronto 3; 
N.Y. Islanders 4. Chicago 3; Ed- 
monton 7, Detroit 6; Hartford 3, 
Los Angeles 3 and Vancouver 6, 
Buffalo 4. 


College for Pros 

The Associated Pros 

WARREN, Ohio — Beraie 
Kosar, the quarterback who led 
the University of Miami to a 
national championship, said he 
will end his college career and 
make himself eligible for the 
NFL draft. 

"1 have derided to turn pro,” 
Kosar told the Miami News on 
Thursday. Tm glad the deci- 
sion finally has been made.” 


IARD 


Basketball 


WOTidCnp s iding I h’ s Taps Off Time at the Old Ball Game 


iSTERN CONFERENCE 

■ AMontta Of vlilM 

W L Pet. OB 
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33 33 JN 19 
31 U J23 30ft 

CtMrol DMstoa 
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34 29 £H 10 

31 34 <177 IS . 

34 39 .400 20 

25 40 J8S 31 
M 45 JO* 24 

■STERN CONFERENCE 

■ MUM Division 

42 33 Mi — 

39 24 _i00 3 

37 39 Ml 5ft 

32 34 ASS 10W 

31 25 470 lift 

24 42 344 lift 

PHCMe Mvtsloo 
■» 47 18 ,723 — 

31 35 .470 14ft 

38 34 ASS T7ft 


Seattle 27 38 .415 20 

1_A. Clippers 22 44 J33 25ft 

Golden Stole IB 46 JBl 58ft 

lx-dlnctied ptav-oH berth) 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Phoenix M V 34 19-104 

Boston 34 24 27 34-121 

Bird 13-225-4 31 JWcHala 12-17 1-225; Jones 4- 
67-919, Edwards 8-182-4 18. Rebounds: Ptwo- 
nlx 55 (Jonas. Luca* 81 ; Boston M (Partxti 14L 
Assists: Phoenix 2» (Scott 7); Boston 33 (Bird 

LA. cappers 21 2* 25 B-1B 

PtrftaMoMci 37 24 27 41-121 

Mo lone 4-13 UM32Z Toney 7-2) 4-720; Smith 
0-14 7-9 23. MJgftnmn 7-15 4-7 20. Rebounds: 
l_A. Clippers 50 (/uuohnson 11) ; PhUodelptilo 
47 (Malone. GJohnaon 8). Assists; l_A. Cup- 
pers 2« (Nixon 9); Philadelphia 25 (Janos 4). 
WasUnotOO 24 22 31 JS-989 

New Jersey 31 22 31 30-114 

Richardson 10-15 7-9 27. Birdsong 10-16 40 
24; Gw Williams 12-223-529. Robinson 9-1754 
23. nu b miw tst Wellington S3 | RoWns an 17) ; 
New Jersey 49 (B. Williams 22). ABtsts: 
Washington 24 (Malone 7); New Jersey 24 
(McKenna 6). 

Kansas Oty 31 20 23 13-MO 

Donas 32 32 24 2*— 111 


Hockey 


. . ALES CONFERENCE 

Witt DtvMoa 

W L T Pis OF GA 
.tt 42 W 7 91 294 214 

- * 39 20 9 «7 277 208 

*W M 28 S 77 308 241 

* 22 34 10 54 25S 295 

27 40 5 49 235 327 

» 30 9 49 25* 284 

Ad a ms OMsIm 

34 23 11 79 348 227 

32 22 13 77 2*8 198 

34 25 9 n 283 W 

31 28 8 70 2S2 332 

31 38 V 51 231 293 

PBCU. CONFERENCE 
Hurts Dhrtstat 

33 24 11 77 243 244 

' ■ 33 33 S 71 273 271 

■ 22 37 It 55 234 2tl 

21 37 11 S3 243 313 

17 41 7 41 214 293 

a >»7tte Otvtsloa 

« M 8 18 314 2*5 

W . 34 27 7 79 311 2» 

", 35 24 8 78 317 IB 

30 28 13 73 298 282 

22 39 8 52 744 352 

ttrnff bortti) 

>»o*rs results 

3 2 0-5 

1 1 8-4 

-•ergon 14). StntsolodlS. Proop 
. ■ M)i Saidslrwn 2 04). Shots 
. JMPWolonVtxKUasOroacKJ 18- 
f ROngermxi Urntterohl W - 

J * W 

0 8 3-3 

-Court noil oi. Fergus (24 J. 

- 4 fcoonehy («. Uatemon (23), 


RoW 111); McCarthy IB). BuHort Vtn. I*- 
mhnn (33). Shots on goal: Boston Ion Roma- 
no. Ford) J3-12-U—34; Pittsburgh (on 
Poolers) *6.74-23- 

Mln o et ol e 8 • ■ 

Quebec 3 0 5-8 

Lomleux2 (l3>.A-5toshtv2 U»). P.Stastnv 
190), Pofement (16), GauM («J, AsWon (28). 
SIMS oa goal: Minnesota (on Ganelin) 7-10- 

13— 30; Quebec (an Metoche) 1WW1— 39. 

8LY. Islanders 2 1 »-4 

Chicago » 3 8-3 

D. Sutter (U). Joneson <141, Nvstnon (2). 
PMvtn (13); Gardner (15). tanner 7 (41). 
shuts «U god: N.V, I Handers (on Banner- 
man) 14-U-9—34; CMcaoo (on HnidgyJ IMS- 

Toronto * * 1—3 

RlsebfBBah3(5). Nilsson tmCavallW 12). 
LuebtlOV. CfiurttwM lll).Gwh (HI. Tertian 
1 14). Shott on oaei: Cofsonr (on wregget) li- 

14- 15— C; Toronto (on Lemelln) 12-9-11—31 

Oehgft ' 1 *-* 

Edmonton * 1 

Messier (IB), Kruihelnvakl (37). Gretzky 
145). Kuril 2 (44), Harter (17) r Semettto (4): 
Gore (22),oorednlck 3 (50). Port (11), Larson 
( 17). Shod 0b gool: Oetrplt (on Four) 96-12- 
24; Edmonton (an Mteatofl IWM1-E 
Buffato « « £ 

Vancouver 3 * *— • 

Gillie (5). Neely (171. Lonfhtor (3). Klrton 2 
(Ul.Sundstram (23) ; Davis (17). Tucker {171. 
MOCenna (U), Roatsev (7). Shots oa goal: 
Buffalo (on Brodaur) 7-2M4— 431 Vancouver 
(on Sauve) 4-8-3-17. 

H u i W U rd 8 12 9-3 

lot enCHSI 1 9 2 0— I 

Tippett (7). Fenton (4),D»een(20)? Dionne 
(40), wtnton* (4). Htohrtio (421, Shell an 
peal: Hartford (on JoMtiyk) 94-IU-32; US 
Ange les (bo Llut) 17-8-W-2— 41. 


Aguirre U-2246 32. Blackman 9-11 3-5 71: 
Theus 9-20 Ml 2& Johnson 8-14 4-4 20. Re- 
tMMiods: Kansas aiy 49 (Thompscn 13) ; Dal- 
las 47 (Bryant 13). Assists: Kansas City 27 
(Thetis 10); Dalles 34 (Davis, Blackman. 
Harper 8). 

Cleveland 38 * 13 23- 93 

Milwaukee 33 32 23 41—128 

Oimrtngs M-W 4624, Pierce 10-19 263; 
Hubbard 7-11 4-10 2B Free 4-1698 20. West 3-4 
2-3 S, Bagiev 4-T2 0-0 8, J,Dcvta 3-9 2-2 8. Re- 
bounds'. Cleveland S2 (Hlnaon.wesl Sl; Mil- 
waukee 44 (Pierce 9). Assists: Cleveland 17 
(Bagiev 51: Milwaukee 34 (Presscy 13). 
UA. Lakers 28 38 24 28— 1» 

Utah 33 29 22 2V-M5 

Abdui-JahDar 9-14 913 Z 7. Scott 8-15 6-7 3; 
Roberts 917 H 24, Griffith MB M 28. Re- 
beaads: l_A. Lakers 54 (Ahdul-JObbar 10); 
Utafi 49 (Bailey ll>- Assists: LA. Lakers 31 
tiohiann Ills Utah » (Stockton 01. 


College Leaders 

NCAA DMstoo I leaders through March IS: 
TEAM OFFENSE . 

G Pts Avg 

Oklahoma 33 3010 91.2 

Lavoto (I ID 30 2S75 SSJ 

Alcorn State 29 2480 85J 

Southern 29 3441 t*A 

Utah State 28 2345 845 

TEAM DEFENSE 

G Pts Avg 

Fresno St 291547 548 

Princeton 241429 55JJ 

Colgate 261451 55J 

Oregon State 30 1709 578 

Illinois 321825 5M 

AVERAGE SCORING MARGIN 

OH Det Mar 

Georgetown 7S8 5SJ> \19 

Oklahoma 91.2 757 155 

Navy 79 J) 45J 113 

Louisiana Tech 777 447 U0 

Iowa 717 584 12.1 


Hughes. Loyola 
McdanTeL Wkft St 
palombbiasalisi 
Du mors, McNccseSt 
CaKedge. S-Ata. 
Garvin. Tex-SA 


SCORING 

G Fg ft Pts avB 
30 345 132822 274 
t ' 30 340 142 822 ZM 
29279208 742243 
■51 27248201 497 258 

282851487182*6 
28272 174 718 256 


REBOUNDING 


G Na Avg 

McDaniel. Wichita St 30449 I5J 

Beniamin, Crrtghton 32441 144 

Scurry, Lons Mtond 28394 M.1 

Towns. Monmovtti-NJ 24319 12J 

Sanders. Mte VaUey St 26314 ill 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

G FG FGAPct. 
Walker, UHca 27 154 216 717 

Moore, Cretan (on 3224539367,4 

Hoaaen. Nebraska 28254390456 

Robinson, Now 30283437441 

Slaves. Southern 38144255443 

FREE THROW PERCENTAGE 

G FTFTA Pet 

Centres, Penn 5) 2794 98 959 

Afford, Indiana 2794103 912 

E«0 Ink. Marls) 2881 88 924) 

HulL TCU 2877 84 917 

Timka, Yaungsaam 81 3078 84 90.7 


WOMEN'S GIANT SLALOM 
(Al WUmlngton. New York) 

1. Olewi Rofie. US* 1:3373 
Z MaMo Svet Yugoslavia. 2-J7J7 
X Marina KMd. West Germany, 2:3795 
4 Traudl Hatcher, Wes! Germany. 2:38.19 

5. Mario Epple. West Germany, 23871 

6. Christens Gulgnard. France, 2:3864 
T. Perrine Peten. France, 23880 

6l Catherine dosser- B lamer, Sweden. 
2:3194 

9. Erika Hut. Switzerland, 2:3834 
m Tamara MOCinney, US. 2:39.09 
IL Maria Wallber, Switzerland. 2J97S 

12. Karon Lancaster. UB. VJBJ.I 

13. Bianca Fernande z Ochoa Spain. 2:39-57 
U. Resine Mocsemechner, West Germany, 
2:3980 

11 Eva Twardokens. U8. 2:3964 


Transition 


HOCKEY 

Ncrtkmf HaOev uagug 

ST. LOUIS — Announced that DoogWiekan- 
hstser, center, will beaut tor Ihe remainder of 
Ihe season and Playoffs because of severe 
ligament damage In Ms left knee resulting 
from on occMent Womes d oy ntahL A snakes- 
man far St Louis sold ihot WldcgnMnr was 
struck by a car as he cros srd a street In 
Eureka, Missouri 

COLLEGE 

FLORIDA STATE— Suspended Roosevelt 
Snlnes. tailback, fmm the foothofl season for 
skipping ctosnt. 

IDAHO STATE Announced the resigna- 
tion of Wayne Ballard, bas ke tball coach. 

INDIANA STATE— Reassigned Dave 
Schet those, basketball coach, to aiher duties 
In Ihe school’s athletic office. 

ORAL ROBERTS— Announced the resim. 
Hon ot Dick Acres, basketball coach. 

SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT STATE— 
Named Rtonard Cavanaugh football coach. 


Exhibition Baseball 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
aiicoao White sax (8S) 4. n.y. Met* (ss) a 
Bart I mare 7, Oncbinail 3 
Lac Angetts 9, Montreal 6 
Kansas City 3; AhanJa 2 
Chicago white sox (ss) X Plttsburan 1 
Phltodefobta 5. NUnn esu to (ss) 4 
Houston 19. Minneseto Us) ID 
Toronto 4. N.Y. Mete (») 3 
Detroit o. Boston 2 
Texas la H.Y: Yankees 7 
Chicago. Cuhs-J.OoWami-4 
Cleveland 9. Saa Diego 5 
Milwaukee 5» Son Frand i c o 3 
California 9, Seattle 3 , 

(NOTEl snUkaauad games (sr > c o urt In 
s ta n egnas. to addiftoa to games ogabuf for- 
elga teams). * 


European Soccer 

ENGLISH ROST DIVISION 
Aston Villa a Arsenal 0 


The Associated Pros 

Only low-alcohol beer wifi be 
sold to baseball fans in Detroit tins 
season at Tiger S (adjoin, where of- 
ficials hope to promote a “more 
healthy atmosphere." 

At Three Rivers Stadium in 
Pittsburgh, fans of tbe Pirates can 
sit in a new “family section” if they 
want to avoid rowdy beer drinkers. 

And folks attending Denver 
Gold football games can’t boy beer 
daring much of tbe fourth quarto 
at Mfie High Stadium. 

It’s all part of a move by officials 
to try to control excessive drinking 
at sports events. 

“The management of our arenas 
has crane to recognize that this has 
become an increasing problem over 
the years,” said Frank M. Rose, 
vice president of the Harry M. Ste- 
vens company that runs conces- 
sions at Shea Stadium, Fenway 
Park, Giants Stadium and Candle- 
stick Park, as well as the Astro- 
dome, Nassau Coliseum. Madison 
Square Garden and Byrne Arena. 

Rose said (Efferent pohdes are in 
effect for different arenas. In some 
cases, such as Giants Stadium in 
New Jersey, outside New York 
Gty, beer is sold only at concession 
stands; in others, beer is not sold at 
specific events. In addition, he said, 
low-alcohol and no-alcohol beers 
are also being offered 

In keeping with the Stevens po- 
licy, the New York Mas will be 
offering low-alcohol beer at all of 
Shea Sodium’s vending stands. 
Last year, half of the vendors car- 
ried the low-alcohol product. A 
spokesman for the dub said the 
Mets hope to reduce excessive 
drinking with the new product In 
addition, he said, there wifi be re- 
stricuoos on the time beer is sold 

Tbe Tigers have had a policy of 
per mi tt i ng only two beers per cus- 
tomer at a time. Beginning with the 
1985 season. Tiger Stadium ven- 
dors wifi sell only low-alcohol beer. 

Pittsburgh’s “family section" 
will consist of 500 seats set aside in 
box seat and general admission ar- 
eas. where additional security 


guards wifi be stationed and a no- 
alcohol rate enforced. 

Steve Greenberg, director of 
sales an d marketing, said drunken- 
ness has not been a major problem 
at Three Rivera Stadium. 

“There have been scattered inci- 
dents. But we think the fans per- 
ceive this as a problem,” Greenberg 
said. 

Rich Bjoddund, the stadium's 
general manager, said studies are 
under way to determine fan reac- 
tion to the sale of only low-alcohol 
beer. 

“I* not an easy thing." Bjork- 
land said. “Pittsburgh is a damn 
good crowd from the standpoint of 
behavior. I would classify Pitts- 
burgh’s ‘public’ as borer than aver- 
age. We deal with drunks here — 
they’re simply not allowed to stay.” 

At the California Angels’ games. 
In Anaheim, California, fans can 


only buy beer at snack stands, not 
in the seats. 

“We try to monitor people as 
they come to the stands and tf they 
do seem intoxicated, we would not 
sdl them beer,” said Kevin Uhlich, 
director of stadium operations. 

Uhlich took his hat off to the 
Tigers “fra a bold and initiative 
step" in selling only low-alcohol 
brar. 

“Tm sure it wifi be looked at by 
other chibs, evaluated and contem- 
plated,” Uhlich said. “We might 
see other dubs taking steps in that 
direction.” 

Officials of the Denver Gold, of 
the UJ>. Football League, said they 
plan to stop selling beer early in the 
fourth quarter at home games in 
Mile High Stadium. Officials said 
the purpose was to allow fans to 
sober up before going home. 

Al Chicago’s. Comiskey Farit. 


40 Hurt in Soccer Match Rampage 

United Press Imemrnionai 

LUTON, England — More than 40 people were injured, one a . 
policeman revived with moutb-to-mouth resuscitation, and 30 were 
arrested as spectators at a soccer match went on a rampage Wednes- 
day night at an English FA Cup contest between Luton and bfifiwafi. 

Thousands of Mill wall fans fought before, during and after the 
quarterfinal tie; which Luton won, l-O. They spilled onto the field, 
fracing the referee, David Hutchinson, to halt the game fra 25 
minutes, and again invaded tbe pitch at the end of tbe matrfi- 

Seats were ripped up and hurled at police, who responded by 
charging with batons half tbe length of the Kenilworth Road ground. 
Luton’s goalkeeper. Les Sealey, narrowly missed being hit by a six- 
inch knife, one of many items thrown from the crowd behind him. 

Police said at least 30 policemen were injured as they straggled to 
restore order. The one who bad stopped breathing had been caught in 
a crush in the stands, 

“We did not have enough officas on doty to cope with tbe 
situation,” a police spokesman said. “It was unprecedented football 
violence.^ 

It continued after the game as shops and trains taking the MSlwafl 
fans back to London were vandalized. Ihe Luton soccer ground was 
extensively damaged. 

Sports Minister Neil Macfarlane on Thursday asked the chairmen 
(rf both clubs to meet with him to discuss Ihe rioting, and the Football , 
Association ordered an inquiry. 

This riot came only nine days after a similar one when Chelsea was i 
knocked out of the English league Cup by Sunderland. Chrises fans 
also fought with police, tried to attack me Sunderland goal scorer and < 
rampaged through West London. 


management has discussed offering 
low-alcohol beer this season, said 
Pat Redden, Comiskey manager 
for Sports Sendee, Inc. 

Redden said if there was an in- 
crease in alcohol-related incidents 
at the ballpark, they would probar 
bly begin using low-alcohol beer. 
Redden said his outfit stops selling 
beer in the seats in tbe middle of 
the eighth inning, and stops selling 
in individual sections or in the 
whole ballpark if things get too 
rowdy. 

The Metrodome in Minneapolis 
only sells 3.2 beer, at both baseball 
and football games. When the 
baseball team, the Twins, play, 
vendors selling beer stop sales m 
tbe seventh inning. But sales con- 
tinue at tbe stands until the eighth 
or ninth inning. AL the football 
Vikings’ g a mes, vendors stop sell- 
ing beer after halftime, but sales 
continue al stands until the aid of 
Ihe game; 

No changes in this policy are 
expected; however, the Twins are 
exploring the possibility of a “fam- 
ily section" similar to Pittsburgh's. 
David Moore, operations manager 
for the Twins, said they may tty it 
on an experimental baas. 

The Los Angeles Dodgers say 
they have long had a program on 
serving alcohol at their baseball 
games. 

“We work with the alcohol bev- 
erage control board and ask them 
bow we should conduct ourselves,’’ 
said a concessionaire at Dodger 
Stadium who asked not to be iden- 
tified. “We instruct our bartenders. 
We don't sdl any beer in the aides. 
We sdl it behind the counters. We 
died: IDs and tell bartenders not 
to serve anybody they think might ' 
have bad too much to drink 

“I thmlc that every sladilUn m thy. 

country is in to some kind of pro- . 
gram to keep this thing from bang - 
abused. It certainly is no feather in 
our cap to send somebody ran of 
the s tadium who’s had tOO much tO - 
drink. We haven't sold beers for 
years in the pavilions. We just 
thought there has to be some areas 
where some people who don’t want 
to drink beer can gp.” 







OBSERVER 


The Exfoliation Trap 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — While polish- 
ing my skis the ocher morning 
to uncover its best-looking surface, 
I fell to thinking about my father, 


Helps dean pores. Fades tiny 
fines." 

If only he wouldn’t listen so at- 
tentively, so respectfully. 


Cincinnati’s Marge Schott 
Mixes Baseball and Business 


'if' 'tY>' mMU\ t : :t rii 


By Judy Klcmesrud 

New Yak Tima Same 


I feel a desperate urge to cry, 
foil don’t have to listen to me talk 


to him, if the need arose, wbat 1 was 
up to at that instant 

The easiest way to deal with him, 
I concluded, would be to read him 
the advertising copy for the skin 
polish bong used. 

“Look,” I would say to him, “the 
world has changed a lot since 
1 930." (That wasure year be left it) 
“We've discovered a lot about our 
skin since then. For instance, like 
many other valuable things, skin 
needs a special polish to uncover iis 
best-looking surface." 

I begin to see him now. He is 
sitting on the edge of the bathtub. I 
wish he would teU me to stop talk- 
ing nonsense, but he obviously is 
not going, to bail me out that readi- 
ly. He is looking at me with respect- 
ful attention, the way iny son looks 
at me when I am speaking non- 
sense. 

"The way to polish skin" — hav- 
ing started on this explanation, I 


“You don't have to listen to me talk 
rot. Daddy, because no matter how 
old and dilapidated Hook, I'm just 
your son." 

I stifle that urge because, just as I 
am about to teu him the truth, I 
realize how cruel it would be. I do 
not know what ambition he had for 
me, but, like most fathers' hopes 
for their sons, his were probably 
fairly high. It would be heartbreak- 
ing to let him know his son had 
turned out to be a fellow who pol- 
ished his skin. 


C incinnati — Mention 

the name “Marge" in Gu- 


am powerless to stop — “is by 
exfoliation. To suit various skins. 


exfoliation. To suit various skins, 
exfoliation has to take several 
forms. Here is one." 

I hold out a gray tube. “See," I 
say, “Clinique Exfoliating Scrub ” 
□ 


“I know it sounds silly" — in the 
power of the advertisng copywrit- 
er, I am unable to turn myself off 
— “but this stuff contains unique 
safety-monitored granules. Rinses 
off with only water. Leaves skin 
looking fresher and younger — " 

The expression on his face tells it 
all now: He believes he is dealing 
with a madman. No, no, I don’t 
dare let him know now that 1 am 
his son It would take too much 
explanation, and bow could I ever 
list for him all the experiences, so 
bizarre to him, that have made me 
the skin polisher who has sum- 
moned him here? 


the name “Marge" in Cin- 
cinnati and almost everyone 
knows whom you are talking 
about: Marge Schott, the new 
principal owner of the Cincinnati 
Reds baseball team — feisty, 
flamboyant and plain-talking. 

“I just fdt somebody from Cin- 
cinnati had to step up to the 
plate," she said, explaining why 
she decided to buy the Reds in 
December. “This is a city of brat- 
wurst, beer and baseball, and I 
couldn’t stand the thought of the 
Reds moving somewhere else." 

Schott, 56, a widow, is one of 
three women who will own major 
league teams this season, a record 
for baseball. What sets her apart 
is that she bought her dub hersdf , 
while Joan Krocof the San Diego 
Padres and Jean R. Yawkey of the 
Boston Red Sox inherited the 
clubs from their husbands. Two 
other women have owned base- 
ball teams: Grace Comiskey had 
the White Sot in the 1940s and 
1950s, and Joan Payson owned 
the Mecs in the 1960s and 1970s. 


she began a two-and-a-half-year 
fight with General Motors Corp. 
to retain her husband’s Buick 
dealership after he died. She won. 

She gained more fame in 1981 
when she became a limited part- 
ner in the Reds. Never one of the 
“invisible” baseball owners, 
Schott was always up front and 
on the scene. She would talk 
about the team with fans in res- 
taurants, on the street and in Ri- 
verfront Stadium. The advertising 
tanners she hired a plane to fly 
over the stadium during games 
began to dicer the Reds as much 
as they plugged her Buicks. When 
the Reds lost Fete Rose, Joe Mor- 
gan and Tony Perez a few years 
ago, the banner read, “Pete, Joe, 
Tony, Help. Love, Marge.’' When 
Rose returned to the Reds as 
manapw las t year, the message 

one. Unw WnK TWvo ftnl 


I am startled suddenly to note 
how young he looks. But of course. 
That explains why be listens to me 
so respect/uUy, like my son. Having 
died at the age of 33, he is now 
young enough to be my son. 

It occurs to me that he is utterly 
baffled about who 1 am, this aging 
gray man who has summoned mm 
to the edge of this fancy bathtub to 
be lectured about skin polish. 
Courtesy demands that I introduce 
myself. 

Mentally I canvass the possibili- 
ties: 

“See here, young fellow," I might 
say, “I know yoirre not going to 
believe this, since the last time you 
saw me I was still in Short pants, 
but — well, the truth of the matter 
is. Pm your son." 

There is something about this 
approach I dislike, so instead I con- 
tinue talking about drin po lish _ 

“This product is totally oil-free. 
It’s meant to deflake and refine 
oilier skin. Exfoliating Scrub hdps 
speed up natural skin renewal 


It would take weeks to make him 
see that skin polishing is not so 
weird as he supposes. “Look," I 
might begin, “you used to go to the 
barber for a hot towd and a singe, 
remember? Since then we all have 
learned to do things that are even 
crazier, like — " 


Sitting in her castJ e-like home 
in the affluent Indian Hill suburb 
of Cincinnati, with her beloved 
Sl Bernard, Scbottzie, at her side, 
Schott said one of the first things 
she wanted to make clear was that 
she was not a feminis t. 


“I can’t stand *MC " she said 
in her husky, chain-smoker voice. 
“Every time somebody addresses 
me as Ms. on a letter, I throw it 


How could I tell him about using 
plastic to pay for a $50 meal? 
About setting into an electrified 
box to darken the <fcin- About go- 
ing out in public in our underwear 
with funny sayings printed on the 
undershirt. About having yourself 
put in extraterrestrial orbit after 
the funeral 


away. I mean, there’s been so 
much of this woman stuff. I 


He is such a young man. It is 
disturbing to think of all tha t he 
will never see and never be able to 
understand. Better not to try to tell 
him. Better to wish him away by 
contznuzng to play the antique fool 
And so I drone on: 

“Exfoliation. Part of the regular 
care you give to valued things, like 
fine wood. Silver. Skm.” 


much of this woman stuff. I 
bought this team as a Cincinnati- 
an, not as a woman. The women I 
admire most are the women who 
are wives and mothers. They 
don’t get enough credit I think 
people have pooh-poohed wives 
mid mothers, but it’s a hdl of a 
job to stay home. These women 
are raising the future of Ameri- 
ca." 


was: ,T No More Woes, We've Got 
Pete Rose. Love, Marge." 

“I love Fete." Schott said of the 
man whose nickname is Charlie 
Hustle. She smiled and added: 
“People call os Hustle and Bustle. 
Between our two big mouths, I 
don’t think anyone else will get a 
word in edgewise." 

With ber gruff voice, her hearty 
manner ana ber use of barnyard 
epithets, Schott comes across as a 
tough person who can handle al- 
most anything. But she lias a soft 
side. She kisses her three St Ber- 
nards on the mouths and treats 
them like the chOdrai she never 
had. And, &e says, she cries easi- 
ly. She broke into tears at a news 
conference in December at which 
she was announced as a prospec- 
tive majority owner of the Reds. 

Her tough side surfaced a few 
■days later when she became in- 
volved in a dispute with George 
Steinbreaner, principal owner of 
the New York Yankees. She said 
in an interview that Sieinbrenner 
spent too freely on players and 
was “ruining baseball/ He re- 
plied that he wonldn’i buy a car 
from her. 


CinptntiafiatK first began hear- 
ing about “Marge" in tne 1950s 
and 1960s when she was a society 
matron who gave memorable par- 
ties for friends and for charity at 
her sprawling estate 20 minutes 
from central GnrinnatL 
They beard more in 1968, when 


The two made up at a meeting 
of the owners of the 26 major 
league teams, at which Stembreo- 
ner called out, “Where is Schott- 
zic?” She later sent him a photo- 
graph of Scbottzie wearing a 
Yankee cap. 

Schott said she planned to use 
her business skills to help turn 


aroond the Reds, a team that lost 
S4 mittinn last year. She said she 
planned to bring back Ladies’ 
Day, keep a close watch on ex- 
penses and get down into the 
stands and talk to the Tans. “Be- 
ing in the car business has hdped 
me learn how to deal with the 
public." she said. 

Silling on her mantel was a tiny 
stuffed Sl Bernard wearing a 
Reds cap; she said she planned to 
sdl these in the Reds gift shop. 
Does that mean Scbottzie will be- 
come the Reds' official mascot? 
“You better believe h," she re- 
plied, adding that a television 
commercial starring her, Scbott- 
zie and Pete Rose will be aired 
this spring. 

She said she also planned to 
stay actively involved m her busi- 
nesses, which in addition to car 
dealerships include insurance, 
bridemaking, concrete products 
and landfill. She is president of 
the parent company, Schonco 
Corp., and in 1972 she became the 
first woman named to die board 
of trustees of the Cincinnati 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Margaret Unnewehr Schott is a 
lifetime Gurinnatian, as were her 
father, who owned a plywood 
company, and her grandfather. 
The second of five gins, she was 
nicknamed Buxch by her father, 
Edward, because of her love for 
sports. 

In 1952 she married another 
native Cincinnatian, fhaTiws J. 
Schott, heir to- an industrial for- 
tune. He died of a heart attack in 
1 968 at age 41 There followed the 
fight with GM over whether die 
could take over his Buick dealer- 
ship. 

“They said they didn't want to 
see a widow lose her money” she 
said. “The real reason, of course, 
was that they didn't want to gjve 
it to a woman.” With her running 
the dealership, though, sales rose 
40 percent, and eventually GM 
relented. The company invited 
her to go to Detroit to sign the 
contract. She replied, “No, you 
come here.” They did. 

She drives a shiny black Buick 
Century with “Marge” on the li- 
cense plates and her initials on 
both sides. She keeps a 1963 
Riolls-Rayce in her garage. 

She said that not having chfl- 


HmckleyBookRoyo 

Paid D. Kamenar, a Wash 
Legal Foundation attonu 
Timothy J. McCarthy, a Sea/ 
vice agent shot along with 




ttL j M. 





ues from a book about hU j 
nation attempt. George ( 
Jr„ a news editor with Star 
zinc in Tanytown, New Yor 
reporters in Washington j 


for nearly three 


CrTflRJflH 
RWRifJrjWl 


• v.:. .«:• 

J 



ry.” Hinckley was commmr -J 
Elizabeth Hospital in WasT*" 
after shooting Reagan an 
others March 30, 1981. A* ; ‘' 
law prohibiting convicted ci 
from profiting from the sale: '■ ‘ 
stories will not apply to H 
because be never was comic 
crime. He was judged inno 
reason of insanity. But K 
said he and McCarthy wo 
everything in our power l 
sure Hinckley does not n 
peony for any bock, article 1 
thing dse dealing with his i 
actions,” the Rocky M< 
News said. A S54-miUion t 
filed against Hinckley by 
thy and two other victims 
mg in federal court. 

□ 


Onid KoU/tTa Nm Ttrt Tout 

Marge Schott and Scbottzie. 


gmgpnan BrCWSter, thl 

U. S. ambassador to . 
Wednesday was named c 
University College at Oxf 
lows of the college, which 
the 13th century and is the 
the 20 colleges that mab 
ford University, elected 
to succeed Lord Goodins 
to retire in the summer, 
after 10 years in the posL 
□ 


dreu was “a terrible heartache" in 
her life. “T wanted 10 boys, no 
girls, because I came from a fam- 
ily of girls. I even went to a doctor 
who treated the Shah erf Iran's 
wife. And of course, in those days, 
adopting wasn't the thing." 

She has 20 nieces and nephews, 
some of whom appear with her 
and her dogs on television com- 
mercials for her car agencies. 

Asked if she would uke to mar- 
ry again, she smiled and said, 
“My family says if I spent as 


much time husband-hunting as I 
do on my businesses, I would 
have found someone. My employ- 
ees wanted to get me with Lee 
Iacocca, just to get rid of me. But 
as I always say, everything good is 
already taken." 

It was for that reason, Schott 
stud, that she once took alive bear 
as an escort to a party at the 
Queen City Club in Cincinnati. 
“Being a widow, 1 didn't have a 
date. It turned out to be cme of my 
most enjoyable evenings." 


The French-bora art 
Ungerer said Wednesday 
felt “insulted" by the pi 
sure of a London exhibit 
work, after protests that i 
nographic. Following th 
and women picketing out- 


don's dtv council ordered 
in tire snow of 500 drat 


500 drat 


sculptures at the Roya. 
HaU to be screened fre 


New York Tima Service 


Hall to be screened he 
view. Ungerer, 54, said - 
home in west Cork, Irela - 
showing the plight of wi 
poring absurdity throng 
Erotic, yes, but not pom 


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A1SACE - FRANCE- COLMAR. Cen- 
ter old town in orignd framework 


100 meters from ocean. 


saradudic 

Decorator 


house, completely renovated, spfc- 
kvmf h o ard , 2 rooms, Wefts". 


bath, quiet 
US$51 noo. 




MgkF5SOX)OQ. McDandd. tel (91) 


69 - 72 18 after 3 pnvaB Saturdays | NK&fRENOJ JUVBBA penthouse, 7 


NORMANDY. IQ unites Caen. 2 hn 
Paris. Chateau & 10 ha tad with 


ponds & woods. Owo*f htftw, 
Free now. Tet Mr Labbe 31-77 62 03. 


69 KMS SOUTH PAMS, charm old 
country house, 200 KjJn. 2 bafts, 
1,850 sqjn. woBedin Borden, quiet, 
privacy, fVOOm (371 34 £7 22. 


M ASIA AND PACIFIC 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


contod our local dotributor on 


Iny,,, ..■TiieirJ ll-.-Jil TiHisine 
iwm w iwi mnn imuim 

tOOS Tni Seng Cocnrnf cfri Bttitfag 
24-34hemaacy Rood 

HONG KONG 


FOR MORE SEAL ESTATE 
OPPORfUMTUS S3 
PAGE 16 


Tab HX 5-286726 


BAHAMAS 



74, TrouvSe 


VAR NEAR RANDOL Beautiful largo 



SAN Remo {neat, 2 stole 
sun, land SZUBO Fora I 


Porij 3222817 an. 



VAR 12 Ian. from sea Property, jyuaf 
comfort, 340 m living spaa on 
2JJ00 14m. tad. Po d, ga rage, auto- 
ntac gtaUflU- FifidOfiOOYek (94) 


MUNCH. Best location uptown Mu- 
nich, nea- Avn. Nymphsnburg, IT 7 
som. penthouse optjrtmert with 
southwest terrace. 2 bedrooms, fire- 
ptaea. Far detailed iwbancbon, a& 
Munich (0) 89/28 29 27. 


International Business Message Center 




PERSONALS 

NOVttYN. P1EASE TREX/phone 
soonest your departure Iraq. See you 
Phils riser 16 Math, love Michael 

MOVING 


COTE D'AZUR 

14 HOUR ROM GAMES 
Great value, 3 receptions, 5 bedrooms, 
4 baths a- showers. ihodedoonden. 
healed pool. All |Vm for R,7uDi)00. 
Ref TSfi ffiaWy reconsneoded b^ 
JOHN TAYLOR !LA. ' 

55 La Croisetta 
06400 Conner 

Td: (93) 38 00 6A Th 470921. 


ATTBUJON EXECUTIVES 

Mrisas SK Blg 

btmo, wNruaMAanelW 
of a <ni lBn w renders mwsAJ- 
svMa mad at whom am in 
b trtm wm and Mathy, ml 

rand A Jwf Max we (Pad* 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


DIAMONDS 



KSnoKE MONASTERY 
SANGtSMONDO 

Romantic technkdiy perfect opai- 
merth m a 23,5iO sqjn. perk ground *n 
the heart of Tuscany. Tenns, pod. care- 
nker. Prices Le. *65,000 5 J106JXXL 


VHHti AKA 1 

CHAMPS a 


- 7 ROOMS. 250 iqjn : 
+ 4 bedrooms, 2 bo 


garden, edm, 2 ma 
Price F3j00t 

D. FEAU294 

132 Bd ftrwunam 


EMBA1D HOME I7D. 

Dorfstr. 

CH8872 Weesen SG 
Seifartad. 

Tat CH 58431778. 
The 876062 HOME CH. 


QRANTI CLASSCOi MQguhami his- 
toned Tuscan country estate. Com- 
plerdy restored in original stale; fire- 
place. beams, «St Landscaped 
garden, panoramic view privacy " 
comfort. 4 bedrooms, 2 Ml brtts, 
kftftero. oordrd heafng. 


MONACO 


Printipafity of Monaco 


Subiedto corfrod*1d' m-351 5410 
HfGHGATE BORDERS. Luxury sum Z 
bedrooms, purpose built flat C41.950. 
Teb 01 215 5146 (Day). 341 657D 


Teb 01 21 



IOW OVERHEADS 


INVESTMENT MCMTIVB 


613S9SJ bmfam 10am. , ma- 
turing mat w» am Mime yon 


bade, and your momagm eB . 
awe 1 wii bin 48 bean. The | 


North Eod Lawashire_,The pro fitdti e 
location m the UK . 
flrochure & ifunation 


■m. 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMIUDMC 
USA. « WORU7MDE 


■ aw wdMn *• aoan. itm 
/S Sail US f9SO or load 
aifoiutdmit par Bn*. You mutt 


MmbXngMmn. 



A complete scad & business service 


DIAMONDS 

Yaur bed buy. 

Hne ddmondt in any priae range 
at lowed wholesale prices 
drect from Antwerp 
center of the dkmond world. 

FxjB parontes. 

. For free prior fet write 
Joadthu GoMentlain 


SOUT H KENS INGTON 

opep tnwnr n pitstnous 
Vicmjan block, hanner roydreskwee. 

CmUuIb MUyfilaAll |6|aMuieAtfWtl 
wwyevc w Wlluw IIR U V y mw as , 

3 bedroom, 2 bathrooms, fifly 
equipped kitchen / (finer. Landscaped 
garoero, fuD security. 


GREECE 


ra. 

For dl i 

call twine agent: 

JOHN TAYHJB A SON 
20 BwL dee Muufin e, Monte Carlo 


P IRAEUS: On the seo, 1 bedroom 
apartment facing Zoo iiKjina and 
histone Passdanami. Ether 56 or 71 
sqjn. Trcns p O not ta and shopping at 


TeL- (93] SO 30 70 
Toe 4691 SO 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


fiyeor lease. £199,000. 
TEL- O) - S73 5599 


ALLIED 


VANUNES INTL 

OVB 1,000 AGB4TS 
ki U5A - CANADA 
350 WORLD-WIDE 
fJ8£ B71MA7B 

PARIS Desbordes Intamafiond 
JOT) 343 23 64 


FRANKFURT 


(069) 250066 

MUNICH ijas. 

(089) T 42244 

LONDON jTZZZi 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSES; z mgWSA. 

(02) 425 66 14 

GENEVA bJJB. 

(023) 32 64 40 

CAIRO Alfisd Vai Lam Ml 

C20-2) 712901 

USA A i d ed Van L2n« Inf) Carp 

(0101) 312-681-8100 



BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


299 Mocfaon Ambm, New Yort. 
NY10017 Tol (272) 697 Sl99 Tbt 62455 



EstdjfahedlKB 

Pe H t om atroor 62. B-2013 Antwerp 
Wcwrn - Tat (32 3J 234 07 51 
Ufc 71779 syl b. Altwt Komond Club. 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry 


FACING OVBt SU3AFE SQUARE. 
3300 sg.fr. nor tived in. Over 
ET90J300 spaed in renovations, wit- 
dde far ederlainng. Large entrance 


Cdfc Jcdr Mdweod (031) 4531248 
BEAUTIFULLY LOCATED HOUSE in 
Kara. Potmen, fmmeefiate sde. 
USS300^00. SauSer, 3 rue de la Perie, 
75003 Paris, Frcawe. 


MYKONOS: fond far consfructian. 


hdl, formal <finmg ream, 20 stdlL, 
axnsmrKohnq *«ft nxacHion 30x2D 
ft^ doabroom, 4 doubfe & 1 single 
bedrooms, 5 ensuite baths, complete 
new designer kitchen 14 ft * 18 fr. 
separate foundry & utSty room, 90 
years £550000. Td 01.580 4941. 


7500 soul, sea view r*o*cfci» in 
France. Bo* 1913, Herald Tribune, 
92521 Nowlty Cede*, frcjncB 


MALLORCA'S NEW 
SUPER PORT 


WORLD NOVHTY 

fi 1 1— A-h-L-J 

VwmhWWVWT' rwPuN 

Medtadcd Pradad rar Lefaure H 


212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 

330 W. 56th Sl, KY.C 10019 


OFFICE SERVICES 


h fte bay of Pakna, 5 mew. 75 
rtim. drport. 664 berths 8 to 38 meters- 
2 far up to 60 meters each. Intfendud 
YU team/ wmter/phone cormectioxs. 
Profesaon ol port management co. FuO 
m arine serviauu tom. rocSo. sSp, trav- 
eWt, repair, fad station, in & outdoor 
winter frontward^ Uground car part 
Ladners. Complementary serwra & let- 
sure fadHc* mwfioal, Wang, shmj- 
ping, entering, etua tenement. Golf & 
MtiM nearby. Commardd area oorn- 
praes 85 um» on 13,171 iqai e dL 
Plus 71 super ap a imems oboye & 76 m 
icporate Imurycancfa- ofl m front fne 
dang mein ptart, Top invesniwilfl 45% 
loUlHirty now before next price rise! 
CanJotf rwedfy devefaperv 


Worldwide production aid icfas Easnse 
avdlwia. rtigh return an mv wt meitf . 
Irtvestmenf from SF5 n*on. 
Phase contact iinmedradyi 


Service Represenlativni 
NoededworVJwide. 


Your Office in Germany 


Ploaie contact immedradyi 
ALHDA TSEUHAND AG 
CH8040 Zurich. Tlx 622609 ALH CH 



■ITERNATIONAL COMPANY 
FORMATION 

UK ccmpcnies from £7S LOJA Panama 
& qS mqior offshore camera Fufl ad* 
mnatrahon, nommm uniint, powers 
d otiorney, redstered offices, accoun- 
tancy, confidential bode accounts 
opened. eoraSricnfid fdephont tdex, 
fax & mdbno sorvka. 

EfLS. limited 


we are “Al Your Service" 
Complete office servos <4 two 


equipped office* for the short 
or the tag term. _ 


term or the fang term. 

1 M om atianoby fttaed cffice and 
profooiond stall at yaw cfi ip oi d . 

1 Can be leflaBy used as your aarpo- 
rote doresofe tor Germooy/Eurape. 

1 Your buvoess operation aon start 
ir n m etfut ely. 


years £550001 Td 01-580 4941, 

SMAU COUNTRY ESTATE, tad Sur- 
rey location 24 mies south of London 
near M25. 6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 
4 receptions, large modern kitchen / 
family room, exceSent decorative or- 
der . Owrana garden in seduded 

iwd setting, heated pool, tarns 
court, 4 cor garage, stables with 3 
aero paddodc ’ropitrty tatofa 115 
oeras.^ff« aver mwoa Teb 44. 
342«2453 


IRELAND 

OAREMO R B fS , MAYO, NEW 7 
room bungalow in Ik acre 9 rote 
cwpart S3o5w. London 01-289.6349. 

I ITALY 


A VE RAPP-CHAMP MARS 

Immaatiate rasortmert, spfarrfd ton of 
century buitaig. 315 Kpn, F6/X10ji00 

16 THNEARTROCADERO 

' Saga! detgn TOD iqJiL harm wth 
, 2 awdera + . caretakers house, 
H5.000XXXL. Superb throughout 

\ CABINET MARCEAU 

720 01 44 


VBtSAtLLES, hstorta ; 
house formeriy awns-, 
aeon, 253 stjJtt, art? ~ 
on 1024 tain. tad. . . 
ESI 

YVHJNE5 60 to frar 


terndL comfort. 7 
outfaeikingt, guanfa 
land with nwr. Td 
mealti m a. 


LEVESffrET, RBfrrne - 
ry property. 5 bed- ' -. 

aajawsg --. 

1A1R NEWHIGFIG ’ 
last, large 3 roo«ta,s. 

kWien. bit ^ ■ 
net 2 pm* 


ROME. LUMINOUS 3WJ FLOOR flat, 
120 sq. 111 . 200 m. from fiazza Novona 
in era 1400 buidna 2 badroana, 
bath, kitchen, targe living. 

USS190jOOOTalM6S683W. 


WEST OF PARIS 

40 MIS RAMBOUL1B AKA 

ahdun sq.m. endased part, 2 broub- 
fidy tutored 15ft oenhiry form, taraa 

■nn^SS?"*- BWfdfans 
apartment. Fl.900.000. 
^MNTANDiEA 11} 561 90 91 
28, Avenue Hedue, 75008 Ifarts 


PAGE 

FOR 

CLASSIC 


43 Canrang Street, Liverpool, L8 7NN, 
Teb 051 709 1480. Tbt 62f6l3 BUSSSL 


Fax: 051 7TO 5757 
Associated Offices Worldwide. 


Laras Sentecr Servxea GmbH 
LorcoHom am HohhauMfparfc 
Justmtastran ZZ 
6000 Frankfurt an Mom 1 


SAVOIE near COURCHEVH, outherv 
ftf htstaricaf 1730 watermill, by own- 
er. Ai a whale or separately mifeng 
maehino. Entirely made of wood 60 


sqjn Swing spaa. 2 bedrooms, ivtna 
an 300 sqjti. laid Bax 1905, Haraul 


njerro punta portals, sa 

Dirafar Comtadte 
C/Marinn 101. PbrfsN Nous _ 
Mdtarca. Spain or Tb< 68686 CAUU E. 


Tribune, 92521 Neufiy Cadn, 
France. 


PARTNERS 

lirt erit aH a n d Bank 



CONTWffiX Costfausten » MO dries 
waridwids - Air/Sea Cal Ossfa 
281 1881 Paris (near Opera! Cos too 


place. Dining roam, office, 80 Kpn. 
ifdenid swmning pad. Peril, out- 
bakings. Law rwnmg expenses. SSI, 
47 la fiwette. OiWOWNB. 
(93)381919. 


Successful in business, is Wang 
far AKAmmerf m Germany Acs- 
brio, Belgium 8> dwwltere. Wtanlyfrf 
came broad on w mnteii o n S8 - lOJOO. 
Our bank procures eapM & top-yield. 
ina inv«lni*nls to eTMStars oil aw the 
world 

Brochures end solas material (notable 
in Engfah + German. 
DepatoewaranM mhmcHe with 
irterest, 57,500 required 

You must be wtlng la wit 
our German omas. 


UNIQUE. TV/VTOO Rntid & Sales 
Company, Algarve, Portugal Estab- 
fahed aver 2 yeers. Aucfiiea aceaiBili. 
PROSPECTS: SataCte TV & expandon. 
PHCE QSOJOOa or US eqirivatert. 
Would aba be inler^d m saing 
20% of congxjry. AH enquiries fo 
ATVa, P.Ofc fc 8200 Aftufiairo. 
Algorve, PORTUGAL 

BAHAMAS TAX HAVEN feadenee- 
Joeit ownership luxury beach apart- 
ment offered tty present owner, sel- 
dom there, far 595,000 fo tnefare, 


OPHON TRADER 
S/P 100 

Major US. Broker house has further 
cepoo ty far new accounts. Minimum 
Lq$ 20,000. Phans or write 
CA. Martyn, Thomson MOCmcn, 


Tmb 061 1-950061 
Tatar 414561 


LONDON AIRPORT 2 HOURS: IBft 
century mcfthotwi superbly convarted 
providing tathfafiy moderated oc- 
commadcnon in awn guonds w- 
looJang tidd estuary. Discover 
Drake t Engtad by the sea. South 
Devon. New is the time to use the 
ddlcr. $250,000. hil detafc ah 054 
853 606. 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS I HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 4 HOLIDAYS & 


ST. JQfMS WOOD. 400 yards Ameri- 
can School in London, 6m floor with 


USA ^ 


-A Martyn. Thomson MOGmcn, 

Koerigstr. 43 A, 7000 Stutorh 99 Keo 
’- Germany, TeL (0) 711 ■ 291 0, Telt 31 


W. Germany, Td 
or ffx 


ELKO BUSINESS CENTER 
Reioftften asmtencu 

Fwmula fan 

eaersgracftL 1015 04 Amsterdam 
31^)35 57 49 Trie* 161S1 
WorfdWde Basntaa Ceam 


fine ariiealt, 3 double & 1 angle 
bedrooms, modern bceakfart/t&mfl 
Ul aapltacas) IS / 1 S ft, 2 baths. 2 , 
InHcaom re c ephoro 40ft x 23ft, go- 


EAST COAST FROM 
MD WEST FROM 
WEST COAST FROM 

south EAsrnaM 


SAIL TURKEY OR GBECEwifttny of 
Yachtouri fleet of 51 m o lar 8. saing 
boats based Bodrutn - fromexi cmaz- 

brochure. Yochtours, 309 Bromftian 
Rdl KWtfsbridg- . London SW1 UK. 
Twfcey » Itspast fleet of bamboals far 


HOSPITALITY OPFE 


Krighhbndgsflatti 
in June. 3 imM Hr 
&— s n are Grrdero 
don 589 3655 


rage avnfaUe, 84 year lew. 
£145X00 to indudB cirpet S wrtnm. 
Tet 01 870 4701 


Anywhere Is anywhere 
in OSA oa BSAMFF £95 

NATC London 734 8100 


aitt. careful, nonemafeer. without 
cradren, pets, etc. Abo outright tale 
avatar ad John CP. 2495. tv- 

aono. SwitzarimL Tel: 091/68 57 47. 


gonp.Switxerfeiifl.Tel: 091*68 57 47. 

DBCOIKH RESTAURANT, BAR + 
2 opartmeto, jwfa ' ng 500 ok 
N ortnwn holy. Estobfafie d 12 y eora 
Open 3<hm a week. Net USCOOOOO 
pa wwr. 5e0 USSSX000 utidt uv 


dudes tad & buldtam. Write Bax 
1918, Harold Tnbune. Y2521 Neuly | 
Gedex, France 


VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 


CHARIBS) BANK UD. 
son 4 - 2000 Hoitarg 60 
West Germany 


— WORLD FA MOL S JEM FIXERS — 
EXCLUSIVE JEWELS & WATCHES 


VS. MARKETING FIRM interefled in 


MAJOR CONSTRUaiON RUM 

seeks condrutfson projeas over S100 
rafion in 3rd World or Arab nations. 
We aon finance. Abo can exchange 
any currency for US1 Galt 3616500 
Zurich. 


oaptefaed & am 


LONDON 


purdoM goodl autrimt or partia- 
pate ina ioinf^enture. Cai cur Zwiot 


153 NEW BOM) STREET. 

TEL.: OJ-tyi nor, TELEX. 266263 


pate ina tant^antureL U3> our Zuridt 
offa ab Of 241 98 81. Th 814313 
NC2 OC or write Zurich, 
lowatd Str. 71 0+8004, 2mA., 
Swreteriond 


PANAMA UBflMAi CORPORATIONS 
from U55400 avaUde now. Tel 
(06341 20240. Trie* 628352 HAND 
JTfrwlKL 



YQUR LONDON OFTKE 
at the 

CHESHAM EXECUTIVE CENTRE 
Campreteraive roue of services 
150 Regent Street. London WI. 
Tab (01)439 6288 The 261426 


MBS ACOBESS, OunipvSysta 
Si nee 1957 LIP. provtas nxri, derto, 
trim, meeting rooms. 5 rue uArtos, 
75006. Tel & 4704. Tle&25Q4. 


ROYAL ASCOT. Immedote vocort 
possession; cotnerted sts-bls Uodc, 2 
oc^ocent base boxes, whale for po- 
tentid converaan to luxury residence 
m >4 acre seduded waodkind, pwote 
road 25 mm London Hwmw Air- 
port, 5 min Ascot Racecourse. Offers 
tnexcMS £150000- Box 40567, HT, 63 
long Am London WQL 


CHARTBI A YACHT M GREECE. Dt- 
reef from owner of targe s/ fleer. 
Aireneon monoaement. Excdent 
enwi, gout, bonded VoM Yachs, 


HBLA5 YACHTRJG 
Aa3dentiasS,Aftff 


NEW YORK 


Greece. Teh 45S571, 45*486. The 
21-2000. USA officat: Fir Rood, Am. 
bter, PA 190(0. Trit 215 641 16k 


rARB-HOTBL DU* 
• trfll.WlW* 


MAYFAIR P04THOUSE 


YOUR OFFICE M PAHS: TEBC. 
ANSWHING SBEVK2, Secretary, 
errands, mcribax, five 24fVday. 
TeL PAT- 6099595. 


4 b e dr ooms and 4 bathrooms, large 
fivmg room ad tfinmn roam. Garage. , 
Long lease. £650.000. 
fefc 01499 1226 


FI 990 ONE WAY 

+ From London to NYC FI 500 ■ oho 
Amsterdam to NYC Qecago, LA 
HSTOUR - Teh 260 40 23 (Porte) 


NORTH SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS 
spnrig migration fan to JaM. supesh 


fastis.'- 

aaw: 

PAHS-IW-M^' 
Aw.EZo^W-3- 
IMmv hifrt Tet 


Patties up ta 6 in barannial lodge on 
targe private estate, luwry catering, 
bacnire from M. Wigan, 29 Qasdon 


NY ONE WAY SlSO.Ewydoy N.Y. - 
West Coast $139. Para 225 92 90. I 


GREAT Bi 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


TRADE DIRECTORIES for It 
Smarter*. Free. FO Bax J 
pate 9144. Tbr RS39194AB 


TAX SERVICES 

UK CHARTBS Aacouniartt provrd 


GENEVA, cam 

TOUT 

Office 4 roams, fal/ equipped 


KENSINGTON LONDON. 2-badtoom 
ftau Prestige block/ location. 999-year 
leate. Low capital outgoings, paw. 
cgA central heating, entry anone, 5 
rws. wafcKcnsington Hta S. / tube. 
Price E85XDQ ta indude fitted carpete, 
curtaira. T«l 01 93? 5150. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


Far man HpU)AY 8 TRAVEL ADS BW.PIAZAHW 


PLEASE TURN TO 
PAGE 8W 

Bt THE WEEKEND SECTION 


ROUND THE WORLD 


SFdSOO monthly. 
Write Bo* Horrid 1 
521 Neutiy Cedn, Prana 




EXCEPTIONAL PRIVATE SGI 2 Aaes 
an Bh* Thanes ■ 1000ft River Moor- 
ta. BuUng Per arnica Grafled. Tel: 
Mon. - Fn. after 6 pm. 01 577 l<6l 


(ROM £769 

AusttaSa return from £499, New Zea- 
land return from £679 Detefli from 
Deri 1HT, TransConNwriri Travel Co,, 
62 Wai£« -mm. London WC2, UK. 
Tel: 01-M0475I fW ham) 



TUSCANY, worn tow flrifr reri, Be r. 
encfc paoUteriw, Munich 43QKI93. 


dryer, ritfatafo, 

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tax. 68 Queen i & ■ 

TrijQlG706U1-P 
DIBSCOa HOUSE: ; 

Teh 01 703 4175. , 


Jmprimi par Offprint, 73 rue de rEvangile, 75018 Paris. 


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