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PfrJ Global Newspaper f' 

I -I Edited in Paris I 
/;‘ l{ y>T i. Printed Simultaneously r 
Uih’i. '> Paris. London, Zurich, K^T 
i ' ^ k Ms 

r i Hague and Marseille 

r.’ 

• ' R DATA APPEAR ON PACE 14 


INTERNATIONAL 


31,747 



o* \i^5> 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Poet 

** ! PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


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vzil Installs 
. ce President 
Interim Move 

By Jackson Diehl 

Washington Post Service 
iSILIA — Vice President 
' «roey inaugurated Brazil’s 
-vDian government here Fri- 

■ j President-elect Tancredo 
■recuperated from an ana -- 
-intestinal operation. 

■ Samey, elected with Mr. Ne- 
' Jan. 15 by a sperial electoral 

took the oath of office as 
esidem in a simple ceremony 





. ' Vi' f • 

Belgium to Deploy Cruise Missiles; 


U.K. Publicly Questions Space Arms 


Howe Calls Reagan Plan 
' Complex and Difficult 9 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Timet Service 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment raised serious questions 


around its northern cud into the 
bean of Fiance. 

gov. “We must make sure we are not 
uons developing what might prove to be 
only a limited defense against 



Friday about the technical practi- otu y a ™*»» defense against 
caMity and the strategic desirabil- we^xins of devastating destructive 
ity of President Ronald Reagan’s force. foreign secretary said in 
prapnwj of hubwIk a speech described by iris office as a 


. _ the nation's Congress. Un- 
real’s Constitution, he as- 
the powers of the presiden- 
ich was vacated Friday when 
em JoSo Baptista Figudrc- 
. x-year term expired. 

■V Neves, 75,. was prevented 
• : taking office by a constitn- 
' r, requirement that he be 
in before the Congress. He 
: ported to be recovering satis- 
uy Friday at a Brazilian hos- 
oll owing an emergency oper- 
sariy Fnday. 

! /eminent officials said that 
■* f . eves would be inaugurated as 

• as he was able to leave the 
aL His doctors estimated he 

• • . be able to return to work in 
15 days. 

. • ■ president-elect was rushed 
: hospital at 10 PM. Thins* 
uffenng from severe abdotm- 
lin, according to official ao- 
js. His condition, originally 
used as appendicitis, was Iat- 
. ' Ermined to be MeckcTs diver- 
is, a disorder of the intestine. 

. Samey presided over the 
. Log-in of the new cabinet as 
s a reception for foreign dig- 
- ■ — c s at the Foreign Ministry. 
,:ee speedies planned for de- 
' by Mr. Neves were canceled, 
— with other events including a 
wny in which General H- 
~sdo’ was to have transferred 
residential sash. 

[• i thousands of people poured 
he streets to cheer die return 
;vflian government after 21 
of military rule. 

: . Same) - , 54 r a. Jawyer.and.a.: 
\J writer, served as a senator 
nate governor under military 
md was president of the mill- 
hacked Social Democratic 

• - from 1980 until last July. He 

lamed as Mr. Neves's running 
- after joining a group of party 
stents who formed an alhance 
Mr. Neves’s opposition Brazil- 
temocratic Movement Party. 

conomy Is First ChaBenge 

rlicr, Alan Riding of The New 
Times reported from Brasilia: 
azil's new government faces 
unenviable task of imposing 
jpolar austerity measures to 
le an acute economic crisis, 
le incoming government's 
opal challenge lies in the con- 
ng economic threat to Brazil's 
iHty. Mr. Neves has defined his 

• large as “the very difficult 
" of simultaneously fighting in- 
on and recovering traditional 
} of economic growth. 

« el senior aides to Mr. Neves 
; conceded that prolongation of 
ur-year recession is the price to 
paid for preventing inflation 
' ‘a rising above the rate of 230 
, cot that it reached last year, 
he new president’s own pqpu- 
t y, paradoxically, also is a prob- 
. He has the badring of widely 
sgetn political forces. Opinion 
s indicated that 80 percent of 


Jos6 Safney raises his hand on Friday as he takes the oath 
of office in Brasilia, becoming BrazETs new vice president . 

Donovan Quits as Court 
Refuses to Drop Charges 


in space. nwyu* auucumu imu 

M . . diplomats here as a o 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the foreign hi the strategic 

secretary, asted m _a speech at the betweeh Washmg£Ta 
Royal umted Services Insntnte, a «w e mustbc esoed 
military study gronp, whether the guard against raisingh 
^swm mvisipn^m the presi- may ^ impossible w 


force.” the foreign secretary said in 
a speech described by his office as a 
major statement and viewed by 
diplomats here as a complicating 
factor in the strategic relationship 
between Washington and London. 

“We must be especially on our 
guard against raising hopes that it 
may be impossible to mlfiH.” he 


dent’s Strategic Defense Initiative ^ his London audience. 


could be put in operation “without 
gener ating dangerous uncertainty." 


Sir Geoffrey reiterated the main 
points agreed to by Prime Minis ter 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Labor Sec- 
retary Raymond J. Donovan re- 
signed Fnday after a New York 
judge refused to dismiss charges of 
fraud and larceny against him. 

President Ronald Reagan ac- 
cepted the r esignati on “with deep 
regret,” saying that Mr. Donovan 
was “entitled to the benefit of a 
presumption of innocence/’ a 
White House announcement mid 

Mr. Donovan, the first sitting 
ILS. cabinet member to be indict- 
ed, cmitimifld to inrist on his inno- 
cence on Friday. In a statement 
issued by his lawyers, he said, “I 
have not violated any law and I am 
confident that a juty will find me 
not guilty after hearing all the evi- 
dence." 

, On Oct 1, Mr. Donovan was 
named in a 137-count indictniau 
issued by a grand jury in New York 
Gty char g in g him and nine other 
defendants with larceny and fraud. 
He has been on unpaid leave since 
then. 

“The evidence , in this case, if 


Its as IDIUT He described that as bnt me of the fargaret Thatch* and Mr. Rea- 
* complex and difficult questions" gau it their meeting before Christ- 
raised by the project ^ _ that research should' pro- 

lYin V While paying tribute to what be ceed but that deployment would be 

“■ called “the enormous tedmdogical subject to East-West negotia t ion. 

fttru-atigp- flnH pp imtinl r£ fh# t inif. But his tone was more dubious 
has been run by Undersecretary cd States," Sn Geoffrey asserted than that of Mrs. Thatcher’s speech 
Ford B. Ford. that “there would be no advantage in Washington earlier this month, 

Mr. Donovan has denied any in creating a new MaginoE Line of which was widely interpreted in the 
knowledge of a subcontract that is the 21st century, liable to be out- United States as offering almost 
at the heart of the charges against nanV^ by relatively simpler and unqualified badring to Mr. Rea- 
hiiiL The subcontract was entered demonstrably cheaper countermea- gan’s initiative, 
into while Mr. Donovan was execu- sures.” The Magrnot Line of fortifi- Doubts have been expressed 
tive vice president of Schiavone cations was buift before Worid War about the project in most west Eu- 
Constmction Ca of Secaucus, New n by the French but proved almost ropean ccmntries rince Mr. Reagan 
-fercfy- . useless when the Gomans swept (Continued ou Page 2, CoL 4) 



, useless when the Gomans swept (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) WQfried Martens after die cabinet discussed the ndssB es. 
The mdictment accused Mr. ■ 

Donovan and nine other defeo- 

iS^requm^coniractors recciv- Economy Is Big Hurdle for Gorbachev Moscow Said 

mg federal funds to give some of •/ C7 J 

X Radical Steps to Counter Soviet Malaise Not Expected To Pressure 

defrauded New Yoric Q'ty’s Transit _ _ „ , . _ ... ... ■*-* -■ * 

Authority of S7.4 rnfflim. By Serge Schmcmann meat makmg it entrrehr uneco- Crst sooahsi sate, remain elusive P a L{ c tan A ti 

In urang Judge Collins to dis- New Yak Timet Service nonncal to maintain stocks around — and politically nsky. The party ± aiUMiUI OU 
miss the indictment, defense law- MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- . , . chairman, S. Khrushchev 

chev, the new Soviet leado, has Inmoency is glaring, as are ab- was forced out m 1964m some part AffThnniofon 

come to power pledging to rouse sesieeism, dru n kenness and sloth, because of bis meddling with the -T1J agnail I WUlll 

-i_.il - -TT. _ r Whm mntrartinD nnlh WnImti imrh!n«ni nf pAniral «vuinmii> O 


Authority of S7.4 millio n 
In urgin g Judge Collins to dis- 
miss the indictment, defense law- 


ment, malting it enti 
nomical to maintain su 
the country. 


uneco- first sorialist state, r emain elusive 
around — and politically risky. The party 
chairman NOdta S. Khrushchev 


IIIIAI ML*- limiVUUWUL UM,l«UiH/ II*" M VJUi UU Y cr • ■ | . v „ ■ , . . 

yers accused prosecutors of mis- chev. the new Soviet leader, has Ineffioency is glanng, as are ab- was forced ou t m 1964m some pan 
leading the grand jury with come to power pledging to rouse ”jat ee * sm i drunkenness^ and sloth, because of his meddling with the 
incomplete or tainted evidence. the Soviet economy from its stupor. ^ Ka contacting with Western ma c h i n ery of central economic 


The indic tment^ which includes That stupor, however, has resist- 

one count of second-degree larceny ed assaults over the. la* 40 years, 


NEWS. ANALYSIS 

suppliers to bring in heavy machin- 


control and Prime Minister Alexei 
N. Kosygin's milder moves toward 
change in 1965 were quickly de- 
fanged. 

Mr. Gorbachev has been identi- 


By Dusko Doder 

Washington Pott Service 

MOSCOW — It was reported in 


Installation 
Set to Begin 
Immediately 

By Richard Bernstein 

Xftr York Times Sen ice 

BRUSSELS — The Belgian gm 1 - 
ernment, ending months of uncer- 
lainty, formally announced Friday 
that it would gq ahead with deploy- 
ment of medium-range nuclear 
missiles on its soil. 

Prime Minister Wilfried Mar- 
tens. often speaking above the jeers 
of members of the opposition, an- 
nounced the decision to a special 
session of the Parliament on Friday 
afternoon. The decision to deploy 
the missiles was made at a cabinet 
meeting late Thursday night. 

‘The missiles can be put in any 
time now,” a spokesman for Mr. 
Martens said. “It's up to the techni- 
cal people.” 

With the announcement Friday. 
Belgium became the fourth country 
in Western Europe —after Britain, 
West Germany and Italy — to pro- 
ceed with the deployment of cruise 
and Pershing- 2 missiles envisaged 
by NATO to balance Soviet SS-20 
missiles aimed at Western Europe. 
A total of 572 are to be deployed by 
the UR. allies. 

A fifth country, the Netherlands, 
has said it will make a final deci- 
sion about deployment of its share 
of 48 cruise missiles on Nov. I. 

[The Dutch defense minister, Ja- 
cob de Ruiter, said Friday that the 
Belgian announcement would not 
affect his government's decision, 
according to Reuters. 

[Mr. de Ruiter, in Stockholm to 
address the Conference on Security 
and Disarmament in Europe, said: 
“We are proceeding according to 
our own criteria as laid down in 
June 1984 ” 

[The Dutch government an- 
nounced last June that it would go 
ahead with deployment of its full 
quota of missiles if Moscow contin- 


ue cvKinrce ni irna asx, u estin a senes or legal battles mat apparent energy, air. uoroacnev ^ Russians have taken to > 1 T , "rr. 1 .T" mat N 

pro ^ cd e “S? Mw ®dj e “° nstratcs have dogged Mr. Donovan. wffl. be able or ready to take the j^^og Westerners build the hous- spcdfi 

a-earefoBy conurvnd-scheme- to, -At hfa Senate oonfinnatioa-hear-, radic^ steps required . ... -hwSr-m csi^Mvife'-Tmhmk , ? n X ll7Iie chief^of lbe 

ne in Jannarv 1981. Mr. Donovan The i 


a ■earefnlly. contrived- scheme- to-i 
steal property,” said New York 
state Supreme Court Judge John P. 
Collins, in refusing the secretary’s 
request to dismiss the charges. 
“There is no justification warrant- 


_ iir ir ■Vail m n .ii " ni Ln.i u ivui^uj uv - wi un, 

ing in January 1981, Mr. Donovan The task is a daunting one, as would not rust in the opetfwhfle ^ ®°^ el secrc !J*' l3Ct: 
was questioned intensively about any Western visitor tome Soviet WOf tHs go t around to fin- l?i eU, |“ ce agf ? cy ’ - w ^, camC vi° 

allegmons that Schiavoi paid Union quickly sees. Long lines SadSunT , m 

people for no-show jolxt. He was form far consumer goods that An Austrian company that built 10 ass f u l I 

the last of »fr. Reagan’s choios to would be scorned in Woitera a steel mill near in Bdo- ''STSf.LSS? Si, 


web-tofo^ed circle here Friday “ff ^up of S^20 .missUeL 
that Moscow was considering un- 11 P“ l ^fioal deasion unu. 
specified actions against Pakistan November 1985 and dropped a 
trPrwidenf Ranald Reagan rontin- 10 ^ depJqymeni 

ues U.S. military pressure on Nica- nLi • a r 

raeua _ ■ The Belgian decision was for an 


ing this court to dismiss the indict- be confirmed, winning approval an shops. By American standards the ni5S j B brought in Yugoslav and 


auraT tte c h a irma ns hm in November The reports Mowed Moscow's ^tiaJ deploymem of 16 of 48 

ianconmanv that built 1982 de !™r- 10 “S? sternest lining to date to Presi- groucd-latmched cruise missiles 
SStmtaBdo- eemornys inefficiency and doth, dent Zia ulKi's regime for its Belgium agreed to accq>t on its 

He intensified the aencultural sumnrt nf Afghan relvk temiory as part of the overall 


meat in the interests of justice.” an 80-17 vote. telephone service is rudimentary, 

• Speculation about Mr. Dono- A month later, in February 1981, banking is all but unknown, roads 
van’s successor, according to an- five Democratic senators asked for are few and poor, offices are fll- 
other adminis tration source, cen- a new probe of his activities, saying equipped and officials i na c cessible, 
lered on former Representative they had found two serious inaccu- The centralized pricing system is 


telephone smdcc is rudimemary. X^IS^ar^ev^- X 

banking is all but unknown, roads ,w„«, harrarlc ^ P^cesso^ Leonid L Brezh- 


support of Afghin rebas. » P 3 "- 01 “ c 

Signals that Moscow considers NATO buildup The implies will 
linking the question of Nicaragua ^ a Belgian Air Force 


tered on former Representative they had found two senous inaccu- The centralized pricing system is Newspapers are filled daily with s ,,? 1 ***“4 

John Erlenbom, an Ulinds Repub- rades in an Federal Bureau of In- so askew that meat costing the state stories of corruption, inefficiency, Ior ^rTT ■^ s “’ , 

lican; Kay McMuiray, director of vesugation investigation. Later $4 a pound (454 grams) to produce incompetence and mismanage- some olthe dmaon-mak- 

the Federal Mediation and Condli- that year, Mr. Donovan asked that sells for 80 cents a pound. Spare ment. Prominent economists de- a S ncultural - indu5 - 

ation Service, and James Miller, a special proseentor be named. pans are all but impossible to und; bate ooenlv about measures to re- maJ Amiens. 


ation Service, and James Miller, a special proseentor be named. 


head of the Federal Trade Com- Including Mr. 
mission. Since Mr. Donovan's in- members of the 
diciment. the Labor Department have left this year. 


„ J auilLUlK -W II1L UK UtUMUU-UUi- 

meompetence and mismanage- ■ vo regional agricultnral-indus- 
ment. Pronuman economists dc- Jg, ^ 


problems. 

It was not clear whether the Rus- 


The deployment was a major po- 
litical move for Mr. Martens, who 


bate openly about measures to re- 


Mr. Donovan, six pricing policy is that spare parts vive economic growth. 


1L w» w* urar wneuier inc imis- accater -rvghl, four-party CO- 

aansbold any prospects of posa- ^on govenmSnL The dedsion 
ble tradeoffs, .although they sug- had beJ. oosmoned several iim« 


In industry.. Mr. Andropov, be- “ JST - ^ 


the Reagan cabinet must cost the same as parts actually But solutions, almost 70 years ^ an experiment in five minis- the new Soviet leader, seemed de- 


installed in manufactured equip- after the founding of the world’s tnes w> giw managers more auton- 
_Z omy and to reward higher 


Blast Kills 6 
At Prayers 
In Tehran 


China and Soviet Exchange Greetings 


productivity. He cracked down on Mf. C 
comiption and sent policemen into Thursda 
toe streets to scare truant workers General 
back to thar jobs. ■ minister, 


tennined to seek a solution of the 
Afghan issue. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s warning came 
Thursday during his meeting with 
General Zia ana Pakistan’s foreign 
minister, Sahabzada Yaqub Khan. 


By Daniel Southerland eco 

Washington Post Service 

BEIJING — The Communist the 
parties of China and toe Soviet 3 


economic, cultural and scientific with the Soviet Union also might 
exchanges that have taken place in further their independent foreign 
toe past two years. policy image while not automati- 


Under Konstantin U. Cher- who were in Moscow for the funer- 
nenko, the “industrial experiment” al of President Konstantin U. 


1l > - 


le has straggled to form a cabi- 
^aitimied on Page 2, Qd. $) 


mSTOE 

^Clashes erupted in Christian 
in Beirut as rival militias 
;.ugfat for control of strategic 
Rations. Page Z 

The Budget Committee of the 
■S. Senate, dividing along par- 
;[ \ lines, ^Jprovcd a S966J-W- 
bodget Page 3. 

RTS/ INSURE 

Despite infiatioi in Old Mas- 
r drawings, bargains are avari- 
ce for the knowledgeable. 

wren Mehkian. Page 4. 
USINESS/FINANCE 

lOh» ordered 70 statc-char- 
Tcd savings and loan associa- 
on* closed for three days to 
Bh a run on them. Page 7. 

US. wholesale prices fell 0.1 
Kent in February while in- 
Jstrial production dropped 0.5 
aoent that month. Pane 7. 


for the first time in more than two 
TEHRAN — A bomb went off decades, it was disclosed here. 

Friday among thousands of wot- With this sample exchange, and 
shipers at a Tehran University other gestures by the Chinese, Chi- 
prayer meeting, killing six persons, na has moved to lower a hairier 
indudiiig the bomber, the official that has divided dm two countries 
Iranian news agency ERN A report- suk» a bitter idedogkal dispute in 
ed. President Ali Khamenei, who die late 1950s, diplomats here said er range of areas, 
was addressing the gathering, es- Thursday, 
caped injury. First, Hu Yaobang. general sec- 


BEUING — The Communist toepast two years. policy image while not autaman- 

parties of China and the Soviet Amhua, in a dispatch from Mos- caEy damaging their rdations with 
Union have exchanged greetings cow > said that Mr. Gorbachev reaf- the United States and other West- 
for the first time in more than two firmed the Soviet Union’s desire to em nations, 
decades, it was disclosed here. improve Chinese-Soviet relations Here are some of the signals 
With tod® sample exchange, and in his meeting with Mi. LL from toe Chinese side that tfiplo- 

otoer gestures by toe Chinese, Chi- He reportedly told the Chinese mats said panted to an improve- 
na has moved to lower a barrier e mi ss ar y that the Soviet Union and ment in relations: 
that has divided the two countries China should continue their di* • Beijing’s messages of condo- 


was expanded to 2,300 enterprises, Chernenko, 
responsible for 12 percent or total A report t 


responsible for 12 percent of total 
industrial production, and toe cam- 


sort on the meeting by Tass, 
dal Soviet news agency, in- 


paign against corruption snared a eluded extraordinarily harsh Ian- 
few more senior officials. gunge. It said that Mr. Gorbachev 

ime of the signals Yet results have not been dra- and Foreign Minister Andrei A 
ese side that diplo- matin The government newspaper Gromyko, who also attended the 
ited to an improve- Izvestia recently complained that meeting, gave “a frank, principled 
os: ministry officials have been slow assessment of the policy conduci- 

oessages of condo- “to relinquish petty m triage of en- cd” by General Zia’s government 
rise tor Mr. Cher- terp rises?’ And Abel G. Aganbc- It said that “aggressive actions" 
a be wanner than gian, a prominent Siberian econo- against Afghanistan, a Soviet ally 


gunge. It said that Mr. Gorbachev 
and Foreign Minister Andrei A 


i Beijing’s 


since a bitter ideological dispute in logues and make progress in a wid- Lences and praise for Mr. Cher- terprises. And Abel G. Aganbe- 


Thursda' 


None of this means a return to 


in recent weeks. 

With leftist opposition parties 
opposed to deployment and likely 
to make it toe central issue of par- 
liamentary elections to be held by 
mid -December, a faction within 
Mr. Manens’s own party argued 
that immediate deployment could 
cost the government its slim six- 
seat majority. The group favored 
postponing deployment to see 
whether the newly resumed U. S-- 
Soviet arms talks would produce 
some results. 

Mr. Martens told toe parliament 


auu Foreign ivmusier numa a. ot Friday ^ ~pos lponemen t 0 f 
Gromyko, who ako attended toe ±e deploymenTof the mis- 
meeting, ^ve “a frank, pnnapled siles in onr Sititiy would weaken 


of condo- 


oenko seem to be warmer than gum, a 
those sent last year when his prede- mist, at 


mineat Siberian econo- 


caped injury. First, Hu Yaobang. general sec- the old «Tlian« between the two ccssor ’ Yuri V. Andropov, died. 

The agency said a man carrying a retary of the Chinese Communist Co rmrinTiic t giants, dipimnwty <^y »The Chinese press has go 
homemade bomb around his waist Party, congratulated the new gem- Nor does it seem to m«m efcmi- mucb more erienave and facti 
was blown up shortly after noon oral secretary of the Soviet Com- nmirai (rf three obstacles that the coverage to toe Oremenko fane 
himself and five munist Party, Mikhail S. Gorba- Chinese have said hindered the 


that “there has whose government is maintained 


toe credibility and toe cohesion of 
the alliance and would thereby put 
into question the negotiations 
themselves.” 

He drew a chorus of cheers and 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL I) (Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) (Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


local time. 


others. Ten more persons were in- 
jured in the blast. 


Nor does it seem to mw*n dimi- much more extensive and factual 


to the Chernenko funeral 
' related events than it did 


On Thursday, according to toe elude the stationing of Soviet 


As is usual in Iran^Mr.'Khamen- Xinhua news agency, Mr. Gorba- troops along the Chinese border to be fr o m , an improvement 


(jiinasE have said hindered toe and omer related events than it din -m- PTH* /y tt w 

SBfWsSSSSWSat ‘SSSESLtm*. Le °n 1 unes Lome to Embassy Row 


chants of “God is great" from the Li Peng- Mr. Li headed the Chinese pation 


worshipers. 

Shortly after the explosion, Mr. 
Khamenei calmly resumed his ser- 


ddegation to the funeral of Kxm- But diplomats argue that , despite that mch'nn improvement in rda- 
srantin U. Chernenko. the existence of these obstacles, toe turns is in the interest not only of 

Whatever else it might mean, a Russians and toe Chines e are now the two nations, bnt also of. peace 


sy staff in Moscow on Thursday 
that ffidnm imp m vetneni in relfi- 


mon. He blamed the Paris-based renewal of party ties would be of dearly in the process of improving in toe Far Faer and in the world. 


tkm group known as the great symbolic importance for the relations. 


— ■; ■ ’ V- 




MONDAY 

Jnraits of Tito, dead almost 
'* years, hang on Belgrade of- 

se walls. "I like it better to 
tve toe picture and no s uc ces- 
ff," says a student, reflecting 
t attitude in Yugoslavia today. 


Mujahidin for toe bomb. 

[Separately, Iraq said its war- 
planes raided Tehran and toe pro- 
vincial capital of Qazyin on Friday 
night after a day of its most con- 
centrated air strikes of the Gulf 
war, Reuters repor t ed from Bagh- 
dad. 

[A communique from the mili- 
tary hi gh command said that Iraqi 
aircraft made 415 sorties and that 
helicopter gunsbips flew 320 com- 
bat missions, toe greatest number 
since war broke out in September 
1980.1 

As the Iran-Iraq war escalated, 
diplomats in Tehran reported that 

r ial flights were scheduled for 
evacuation of foreigners. 

The Italian airline Alitalia sent a 
special flight into Tehran’s airport 
Friday to pick up Italian nationals 
and others, and the West German 
airline Lufthansa was expected to 
send in a similar flight on Sunday, 
diplomats said. They said that no 
Western embassy had yet recom- 
mended evacuation. 


two nations, experts say. It would The Chmese ; 
hold toe potential of moving them less rtf a direct 
beyond the re-emergence of trade, they once did. ! 


less of a direct Soviet threat than 
they once did. Improved rdations 


Japan and 6 Eumpean Nations Agree 
On Card for Postal Cadi Withdrawals 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — The postal authorities from Japan and six European 
countries have reached basic agreement on a card that will enable its 
holder to withdraw local currenty from postal cash dispensexs in any 
of the seven nations, a Post and TdecaimmmicaDODS Ministry 
spokesman said Friday. 

The spokesman, Yoshinari Ucda. said. the agreement carnerim-ma a 
three-day meeting in Tokyo attended ty postal nfffrfah from mne 
Western countries and Japan, 

Details on use of the new card systan are to be coordinated among 
toe postal authorities of Japan, Britain, France, the Netherlands, 
Switzerland, Norway and Spain, Mr. Ueda said. The idea also will be 
conveyed to toe Universal Postal Union, a UN agency based in Bern. 

Mr. Ueda said toe card^ would lave a bufli-in integrated tiremt and 
100 times mare memory capacity than an mtfinay magnetic- bank 
card. Some countries may issue toe card as early as next year, he said. 


.• On at least fair occasions in 
perceive recent days, die Chinese have eon- 
eat than gratulated Mr. Gorbachev on his 
rdations rise to the post of general secretary 
of the Soviet Communist Party. 

Despite all this, some diplomats 
still doubt that the improved atmo- 
hm> sphere will had to a renewal of 
*** party-to-parw ties. But toe obsia- 
i des to establishing ties no longer 
tUS seem as formidable as they once 
did. 


■ Shake-Up at Bmk of China 

Jin Zeqin, president of the Bank 
of China, has been relieved of his 
position, it was reported Friday in 
Beijing. “First Vice P residen t Zhao 
Bingde took over Mr. Jin's respon- 
sibifities at the end of last month,” 
a bank spokesman told Agence 
France-Presse. He declined to give 
a reason. 

The Bank of China is the coun- 
ties, leading financial institution 
and is restoosible for virtually all 
of Beijing's foreign exchange busi- 
ness. 


By Maureen Dowd 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — This is 
not an international sob story. 

“We’re not yet at the pomt," 
one West German Academic said 
wryly, “where we’re aD sleeping 
on grates outside the State De- 
partment" 

But these are trying times, 
nonetheless, for Washington’s 
large foreign community. From 
ambassadors to Embassy Row 
janitors, from foreign correspon- 
dents to foreign exchange stu- 
dents, talk is of cutting expenses 
and recasting consumer habits as 
toe robust dollar continues to 
drain away the buying power of 
other currencies. 

“We have less money in our 
pockets and it does make life 
more difficult," said Luis 
Amorim de Sousa, a counselor at 
toe Poroigufise.Embassy. “When 
I have dinner parties at my 
home, instead of pheasant, 1 
serve Cornish chicken.” 

Countess Ulla Wachtmeister, 
the wife of the Swedish ambassa- 
dor and one. of the city’s top 
hostesses, says that as toe. Swed- 
ish krona has lost value against 
the dollar she baa leaned to 
“amplify." 


The Cost o! a $50 Washington Dinner for Two 


I SOMk ■ /: 

129 AS s : 

rt. 2 is. 2 & 

.34-26 . 1- 


French frame ; 

Cwmanmwfc. 
Japanese y»n 
British pound 


Bfardit985 

‘ ‘ - 511.SP' 

187.35 

. T3.Q10.65~ 

. * • 44.85 ' 


C fl w wfa Bi Bwfr mas a iw awpll fl H fta^ ceita»th»aiwaaHiitt&.' 
wi rl flt j wu l n Hi tta mw 


H» Nw Ymfc Tin 


“I cut my own branches from 
my garden that don’t cost any- 
thing to decorate at dinner par- 
ties," she said. “We try to orga- 
nize ourselves to have less help. I 
go to upholstery stores and can 
find leftovers of beautiful chintz 
that I can sew into a ball dress 
for S2Q. I wash my hair at home 
instead of going to slums.” 

“We try to cope and we hope 
one day the dollar goes down,” 
she said. “Meanwhile we have 


fun being creative:" . . , ., 

WhDeit is merely a matter of . Although there are provisions 
creative juggling for the top dip- J 0 onployraent contracts to ad- 
lomats, it uanroie seriouspnib- Jp fa Alienations m the «*■ 
lem of credit stretching for the 


as the most glamorous, of foreign 
postings have disappeared for 
many who are paid in their own 
currency' 

“We don’t do anything any 
more except paying rent and 
paying food" said Marie-The- 
rfese La wen, an employee in toe 
visa section at the French Em- 
bassy. “Movies, Kennedy Cen- 
ter, trips to New York — all 
time things which make life nice 
here we’ve had to cut out" 

Although there are provisions 
in employment contracts to ad- 


lower-level staff members. And 
the amenities that once made 
Washington toe cushiesi, as well 


of three to six months that leaves 
some staff workers in a financial 
(Continued ou Page 3, CoL 3) 







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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


Gromyko: No. 2 in Moscow? 

Western Analysts Differ on His Role in Soviet Hierarchy 


J 




By Hedrick Smith 

New York Times Strike 

WASHINGTON — US. spe- 
cialists are struck by the unusually 
prominent role of Foreign Minister 
Andrei A. Gromyko in the shift of 
the Soviet Communist Party lead- 
ership, and some say they now re- 
gard him as the second most pow- 
erful figure in the Soviet hierarchy. 

- The 75-year-old Soviet diplomat 
was gjven the politically significant 
and prestigious assignment of 
nominating Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
as the new Soviet leader on Mon- 
day. Normally dial task goes to a 
defeated rival for the party leader- 
ship or to the second-ranking figure 
in the Soviet hierarchy. In other 
ways. too. Mr. Gromyko has 
ranked high in Kremlin protocol 
lately. 

Prime Minister Nikolai A Tik- ■ 
honoY ranks second in Soviet pro- 
tocol and a year ago nominated 
Konstantin U. Chernenko for the 
top party position. The fact that 
Mr. Tikhonov was passed over this 
time for the nominating role is seen 
by some US. officials as evidence 
that he may be moved out in the 
coining months as Mr. Gorbachev 
seeks to rejuvenate the leadership. 

But some analysts offer another 
interpretation. They contend that 
there is circumstantial evidence 
that Mr. Gromyko, emerging as the 
point man for the old guard of 
leaders in their 70s, had opposed 
passing the top job to a younger 
man like Mr. Gorbachev at mis 
stage. By this logic, he was tapped 
to give the nominating speech to 
make it dear that the old guard 
endorsed the new leader. 

■ There are recent precedents for 
using the nominating process to 
.demonstrate that the leadership 
has closed ranks after internal dif- 
ferences. For example, in Novem- 
ber 1982, Yuri V. Andropov was 
nominated by Mr. Chernenko, who 
had been his chief rival for the top 
•party post and who subsequently 
ranked second in the party hierar- 
chy. 

Until it becomes dear how many 
■of the top state and party posts Mr. 



Andrei A Gromyko 


Gorbachev will personally control, 

U.S. analysts say they cannot be 
certain which way to interpret the 
latest developments. 

Nonetheless, those in both 
schools of thought agree that for 
the time bang Mr. Gromyko ap- 
pears to be the second most power- 
ful figure in the Soviet system and 
that in foreign policy, at least, Mr. 

Gorbachev appears to be deferring 
to him. 

Some LIS. government and aca- 
demic specialists read these recent 
developments as indications that 
Mr. Gromyko may even be in line 
to become the Soviet president, a 
post left vacant by the death of Mr. 

Chernenko, or to succeed Mr. Tik- 
honov, who is nearly 80, as prime 

minis ter 

Such academic sp ecialis ts ^ Jer- Many specialists read this as an 
ry F. Hough, professor of political indication of his 


relations, detente and arms negoti- 
ations, reflects the Chemenko- 
Gromyko line since late summer. 

“Gorbachev is linking himself to 
the .foreign policy of Gromyko,” 
Mr. Hough said. He suggested that 
the new leader, who is relatively 
inexperienced in foreign policy, 
was leaving that sphere of policy 
primarily under Mr. Gromyko's di- 
rection for now addle he tamed to 
internal affairs and the economy. 

But U.S. specialists disagree ova 
whether Mr. Gorbachev would be 

content to let the foreign minister 

become president, a largely cere- 
monial role but one that recent par- 
ty leaders have wanted for them- 
selves to bolster their political 
authority and their prestige at 
home and abroad. 

UJS. government analysts assert 
that in the past Mr. Gorbachev 
defended Mr. Chernenko’s tight to 
save as both party leader and pres- 
ident, presumably toying claim to 
such a combination of posts for 

But other government and aca- 
Hanic specialists, like Vernon V. 
Aspatunan, professor of political 
science at Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, question whether Mr. Gor- 
bachev will be allowed by older 
leaders to accumulate that much 
power. 

When the collective Soviet lead- 
ership made a formal group ap- 
pearance Monday at Mr. Chernen- 
ko's funeral bier and paid respects 
to his widow, Mr. Gromyko ranked 
directly behind Mr. Gorbachev and 
Mr. Tikhonov. 

Mr. Gromyko, who has never 
had an important rote in the party 
apparatus although he has been 

the^Hiburo since l$73^ranked 
ahe a d of party leaders like Viktor 
V. Grishin, the Moscow party lead- 
er. and Grigory V. Romanov, a 
member of the party secretariat. 



Militias Clash 
In East Beirut 
In Major Split 
01 Christians 




WORLD BRIEFS 


At 


ttk ?_ 


Castro Denies Friction With Moscm 




New York Times Sernce 


NEW YORK (AP) — President Fidd Castro of Cuba has dofed 
his failure to attend the funeral of the Soviet leader, Kamtanto - 
Chernenko, was a sign of strain in relations with the Soviet Unkn, 
reported Friday. 

Mr. Castro made die remarks during an interview in Havana, 
television network said. CBS added that 3 m C uban leader “says hei 
BEIRUT— Clashes erupted Fn- miffed with the Soviets and not in a pique of any kind, that his deti 
day in Ch ri s ti a n E a s t Beirut as rival abo^ not going to Moscow wasn’t a signal” Mr. Castro said 0 ■ 
militias Fought for control erf straw- relationship with the Soviet Union was never better, CBS said, 
gjc locations in the worst split in Reagan administration said tins week that they sm 

Lebanese Christian ranks in a de- Castro's absence as a sign of friction between Moscow and Hav 
cade. _ Cuban announcements have offered so explanation of why Mr, G 

Police said combat with machine jqu his brother, Raul, the vice president and defense mimstQ 
gnus and rocket-propelled gre- represent Cuba at Mr. funeral on Wednesday. Fidd G 

nodes broke out in the Beirut port wai t to Moscow for the burials of the previous two Soviet pread 
and Karantina port area, but there Leonid L Brezhnev in 1982 and Yuri V. Andropov tost year, 
were no immediate reports of casu- 

port is an important link Papandreou Withdraws Amendmei 

between the Christian and Moslem ATHENS (AP) — Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou’s Sod 

n, has dropped a prop 
enabled Pannunent to 


a revolt 

ion’s affiance with Syria^as he arrived Friday 
for a meeting of Christian military and political leaders. . 


Mubarak Adds Talks 
With Kohl to His Tour 


€orbachey Faces Economic Hurdles 


science at Duke University, con- 
tend that Mr. Gorbachev’s accep- 
tance speech, placing strong em- 
phasis on Soviet-American 


and of the dedine of Mr. 
nov, who had been re garded by 
some as Mr. Gorbachev’s most 
powerful rival for the leadership. 


(Continued from Page I) 
been no breakthrough in produc- 
tivity” 

The energy and speed with which 
Mr. Gorbachev revives the assault 
on the economy will probably de- 
pend on how quickly be can con- 
solidate his powers, m his speeches 
and writings he has given the im- 
pression of a man in a hurry. 

In December, he called for “pro- 
found transformations in the econ- 
omy and in the entire system of 
soda! relations.” In his acceptance 
speech on Monday, he called for 
“restructuring the material and 
technical base of production,” per- 
fecting “social relations” and de- 
veloping the worker’s “spiritual 
makeup.” 

Statements like these have made 
Mr. Gorbachev the object of con- 
siderable hope among the more 
progressive middle-aged Soviet of- 
ficials. He is seen as the man who 


Soviet Economy Continued Dedine 
In Most Areas in Beginning of 1985 

Ream 

MOSCOW — Economic figures for the first two months of 1985, 
released Friday, illustrate the uphill struggle that the Soviet Union's new 
leader, MTkhati S. Gorbachev, faces on the economic front. 

The official weekly Economic Gazette showed a marked slowdown in 
industrial production and productivity growth, with oQ and coal figures 
down and targets not met in the chemical, ferrous fertilizer and 
paper industries. 

In agriculture, milk yields were down compared with the same period 
last year. Overall meat production rose bin in the central Asian republic 
of Uzbekistan figures were more than 25 percent down and newspapers 
disclosed that farms had been falsifying figures. 

Industrial production in January and February 1985 was up only an 
average 3.7 percent, compared with an increase of 5.6 percent a year ago. 
Overall productivity grew by 1.2 percent, compared with 5J percent in 
the same period in 1984, the publication said. 

Production in two-thirds of the categories listed by the Economic 
Gazette was below 1984 levels. 


Untied Press ItamatUmd 

LONDON — President Hosni 
Mubarak of Egypt, politely re- 
buffed in attempts to draw Wash- 
ington and London into new Mid- 
dle East peace moves, on Friday 
added West Germany to his tour of 
Western nations. 

An Egyptian spokesman said 
that Mr. Mubarak would stop off 
in Frankfurt on Saturday to confer 
with Chancellor Hdmnt Kohl in “a 
gmeral review of the Middle East 
situation.” 

Originally, Mr. Mubarak, who 
met with President Ronald Reagan 
in Washington and Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher in London, had 
planned to fly directly from Lon- 
don to Venice for a meeting with 
Prime Minister Bettino Cnuri of 
Italy, the spokesman said. 

He said that Mr. Mubarak would 
also discuss bilateral West Gcr- 
man-Egyptian relations with Mr. 
Kohl 

After 80 minutes of talks with 
Mr. Mubarak on Thursday, Mis. 
Thatcher said she supported efforts 
by Egypt and Jordan to promote 
dialogue with Israel but made no 
offer to join Mr. Mubarak’s Middle 
East peace search. 

She pointedly omitted mention- 
ing the role of the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization in last month's 
agreement between Jordan and the 
PLO intended to defose conflict in 
die region- Mr. Mubarak has pro- 
posed an initial round of talks be- 
tween the United Slates and ajoim 
Jordanian -Palestinian delegation 
before a large round of peace talks 
on the Middle East. 

Hie United Slates has refused to 
take Mr. Mubarak up on his pro- 
posal 

Egypt had no comment on the 


London talks , which began Thurs- 
day afternoon at Mrs. Thatcher’s 
10 Downing Street residence and 
continued at a dinner there Thurs- 
day ni ght 

A spokesman for Mrs. Thatcher 
said her talks were “almost exclu- 
sively about the Middle East and 
focused on President Mubarak’s 
visit to Washington and its re- 
sults.” 

■ Egypt to Press U.S. 

An Egyptian diplomat in Israel 
said Friday that Egypt would con- 
tinue to press the United States to 
meet with a joint Jordaman-Paks- 
tririan delegation. The Associated 
Press reported from Tel Aviv. 

“We don’t want the United 
States to negotiate with a Jordani- 
an-Pales tfnian delegation. We only 
want them to listen, to make sure 
(or themselves that the delegation 
is keen to achieve peace,” the Egyp- 
tian chargi d'affaires in Israel Mo- 
hammed Abdel Aziz Bassiouny, 
said. He added: “Then negotia- 
tions can start directly with Israel” 

■ Egyptian Group in Isad 

A 10-member Egyptian delega- 
tion has arrived in Israel for four 
days of talks on the development of 
arid land in the latest of Egyptian- 
Isradi contacts. United Press Inter- 
national reported Friday from Je- 
rusalem. 

This is a meeting of eight per- 
sonnel and two assistant directors 
from the Egyptian Ministry of Ag- 
riculture. They are hoe in the 
framework of a steering committee 
for arid . zones.” a spokesman for 
Israel's Foreign Ministry said. 

The spokesman said tins is the 
third of three meetings about arid 
land among UJL, Israeli and Egyp- 
tian delegations. 


. . . , . , . The official report put some of the blame for the statistics, among the 

ran snatch tip Andropov's sagging ^ce 19S2, on a hard winter that.it said had cansed transport 
banner and revive the Soviet ^ 

Union’s sapping strength. 


But Western economists and 
diplomats who have followed the 
Soviet economic debate and have 
watched Mr. Gorbachev are almost 
unanimously skeptical that he can 
bring the sort of fundamental 
change f hat to Western thinking is 
the sole way out of the Soviet 
Union's economic morass. 

“Their real problem is the system 
of central control” said one senior 
Western diplomat in Moscow. 
“The economy cannot respond to 
changing conditions or advantages 
except by going through an enor- 
mous bureaucracy. The tystetn is 
deadening to innovation, initiative. 
They simply don’t have a mecha- 
nism that ran run itself — it is one 
they must continuously prime.” 

According to Western statistics, 
the average annual growth rate of 
ibe Soviet economy has fallen to 
about 2 percent in recent years 
from a peak of 52 percent during 
the 1966-1970 period. Soviet living 
standards have fallen to about one- 
third of American standards, ac- 
cording to Western statistics. 

“All the ‘reforms' attempted in 
(be past, in 1965. 1979, by Andro- 
pov, have been no more than tin- 
kering with the fringes of the sys- 


diffied- i™. I- • U-K. Voices 

difficulties and strained power supplies. 

The report also blamed ministries and management that it said “did /V ^ . • 
not take the necessary steps to make fuller use of existing capabilities and 1/1168110118 OTl 
technical equipment." 

An editorial in the official newspaper Prsvda said the Soviet Comma- C A 

nist Party now intended “decisive action against irresponsibility" and uDaCc r VPITIS 

r_. .L •. J..m. _n j i c i i*_ I 


‘support for those whose attitude to duty is reflected by practical results, 
deals not words.” 

Gas and electricity figures were among the few bright points. Gas 
production, aided by new fields in western Siberia, rose to 105 miOioa 
cubic meters (3.7 bfflion cubic feet) from 96.2 million in the comparable 
period last year. Electricity production, measured in kilowatt hours, was 
up by about 3 percent 


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181 Ave. Ch. -de-Gaulle, 
92521 Nenllly Cedex. France. 
Tel: 747.12.65. 


tern,” a Western economist said. 
“These innovations have been very 
modest, and quite often so piece- 
meal that they We made no effect 

“Andropov and his top aides, 
including Gorbachev, hoped to 
solve their economic problems 
without changing the political sys- 
tem. But probably the only cam- 
paign that had any effect was the 
discipline campaign — at least that 
got some people bade to work and 
deliveries more on time.” 

Pessimistic assessments Him this 
are founded on the presumption 
that serious reform of the economy 
would undermine the political sys- 
tem. 

The reform of the pricing system 
that most Western economists con- 
sider the first step in any serious 
reform would be certain to bring 
public discontent Letting market 
mechanisms loose would strip the 


central bureaucracy and the Com- 
munist Party of their control over 
all aspects tit Soviet life and raises 
the threat at the restoration erf capi- 

The question among Western 
diplomats is how tor Mr. Gorba- 
chev can go noth his plans for 
change. He is seen as likely to limit 
bis campaign to attacking the en- 
trenched and corrupt bureaucracy, 
reviving the campaign for disci- 
pline among workers. 

Although Mr. Gorbachev may 
not share the vivid memories of 
World War n and Stalinism with 
his predecessors, he may well share 
their fears of setting loose the sort 
of reaction that economic chang p 
spawned in Hungary, Czechoslova- 
kia or Poland. The sort of economic 
revival sweeping China, most dip- 
lomats believe, is not in tire cards 
for the Soviet Union anytime soon. 


Belgium Accepts Missiles 


(Continued from Page 1) 
laughter from opposition benches 
when he said that the missile de- 
ployment “has no aggressive or 
hostile character.” 

Mr. Martens said: “The deploy- 
ment in Western Europe of a limb- 
ed number of intermediate-range 
nuclear missiles — a number far 
lower than that already put in place 
by the Soviet Union — is intended 
only to re-establish a certain equi- 
librium of forces and a deterrent 
without which the security of the 
country would be seriously com- 
promised.” 

In what appeared a concession to 
the anti-deployment . forces here, 
Mr. Martens said the government 
would review the situation every six 
months to see whether a deploy- 
ment of the additional 32 cruise 
missiles destined for Belgium in the 
NATO plan would proceed. 

■ Tass Sees New Obstacles 

The Belgian derision raises addi- 
tional obstacles to reaching an 
agreement at the Geneva talks, the 
Tass news agency said Friday in 
Moscow. 


Tass, quoted by United Press In- 
ternational said that plans to go 
ahead with the deployment was a 
result of UiL pressure and ran 
counter to the wishes of the Belgian 
people.. 

Referring to the Geneva talks, 
Tass said: “One should also note 
the fact that NATO, above all the 
United States, undertakes the step 
of deploying in Western Europe yet 
another batch of American medi- 
um-range nuclear missiles at a time 
when in the international horizon 
there appeared sparkles of hope for 
relaxation of inte rnati onal ten- 
sion.” 


■ US. Lands Derision 

The White House welcomed the 
Belgian decision, saying that it 
would have a considerable effect on 
the arms control talks, Renters re- 
ported from Washington. 

“We applaud the s t ea d fas t n e ss 
of the Belgian gove rnmen t in mov-. United States not to go beyond 
ing ahead with the dyririnn to de- research without gaining the ap- 

first 


(Continued from Page 1) 

first began talking about it, but 
most of those have been made pri- 
vately. Sr Geoffrey’s public discus- 
sion of problems, which came just 
as the Geneva disarmament talks 
were getting under way, was one of 
the first by a ranking politician. 

British officials said that the 
speech did not represent a major 
shift in attitude but rather a deci- 
sion that the time had come to set 
out Britain’s views in detefl. 

Sr Geoffrey said that it was im- 
portant that the allies ask them- 
selves “how best to enhance deter- 
rence, how best to curb rather than 
stimulate a new arms race.” And he 

ations had to be considered daring, 
not after, the research work an the 
preposed system. 

He declared that in the first 
stages of the deployment of a sys- 
tem of active rather than passive 
defenses, that is, a system that 
could destroy enemy missiles rath- 
er than one whose effectiveness 
rested upon the threat of a retalia- 
tory attack, “these would be bound 
to be more vulnerable than com- 
prehensive systems to countermea- 
sures.” 

“Would these holes in the dyke,” 
he asked, “produce and even en- 
courage a nuclear flood?” 

The foreign secretary, whose 
speech would require the clearance 
of the prime minister and the cabi- 
net, also expressed anxiety about 
the ability of politicians to retain 
control over any new system, rather 
than rdying “upon computers and 
automatic derision-making.” 

On another question, he quoted 
Paul H. Nitze, the American disar- 
mament specialist, to the effect that 
any space defense would have to be 
not only workable hot also cost- 
effective and survivable. With a 
cost running “into many hundreds 
of billions of dollars,” he said, the 
allies must ask “whether the enor- 
mous funds to be devoted to such 
systems might be better employed" 
on other forms of deterrence. 

Although his language was high- 
ly diplomatic throughout. Sir Geof- 
frey appeared to be warning the 



ploy.” said the chid - White House 
spokesman, Larry Speakes. 

“It demonstrates the resolve of 
the NATO allies,” he said. 


Sir Geoffrey Howe 


erosion of the Anti-Balfistic Missile 
Treaty,” the secretary sakl “But to 
go beyond research into defensive 
systems would be inconsistent with 
the ABM treaty as it stands. I at- 
tach importance to convincing the 
Soviet leadership that we in the 
West are indeed serious in our aim 
of maintaining s trat egic stability at 
significantly lower levels of nuclear 
weapons. 

“We do not want to give them 
the impression that we have some- 
thing else in mind. We are serious 
about arms control And we most 
be seen and heard to be so. 

“Finally, as members of the At- 
lantic alliance, we must consider 
the potential consequences for this 
unique relationship. We must be 
sure that the United States' nuclear 
gnarantee to Europe will indeed be 
enhanced not al the end of the 
process, but from its very incep- 
tion.” 

Officials said that Sir Geoffrey's 
comments reflected a number of 
worries. Britain is not sure that it 
will ever be able to afford a space 
defense system; in d eed, it is al- 
ready having difficulty finding the 
money to pay simultaneously for 
its naval and militar y c ommitments 
to the North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization. its defense of the Falk- 
land Islands and its purchase of 
U.S. Trident missiles. 

In addition, Britain, along with 
others in Europe, fears that for the 
first several years of any deploy- 
ment, all the new weapons would 
stay in the United States, leaving 
the European continent vulnerable. 

However difficult the questions, 
the foreign secretary added, they 


bullets and explosions were heard The government, however, said it will press ahead with plans to n 

on urn Moslem side of the ime. other articles of tire 1975 constitution to curb what it calls the exce ' 
Lebanese pnvate radui stefiems pQwas ^ ^ presidaiL 

said that Cbustian mhma rebels r pren ucrhasderi(kd to withdraw the airerndment of Art^ • 

onder the command of SannrGea- the constitution,” the goverprarot spokesman, Dimitri Maroudas, sa 
gea lwe gamM the up^ Mnd a staten^ fes^ed Thursday night, border to ensure a political ffial 
against their rivals m the Phalange . which has been undermined by misleading statements 

Party. The rebds are protesting 

Lebanon s yearlong rapproche- The scrapped amendment would have permitted rewsion of the co 

mmt witti Syria. ... . ration by a three-fifths majority in the 300-member single cha 

[Late Friday, the rebel ntihaa- parliament at any time, 
men seized the last position m East ^ 3 

Beirut loyal to President Amin Ge- m i • l n__ 

Press ”■ Greece Turns Down luridshFropot 

P< tS fighting erupted hours after ATHENS(AP) — Greece an Friday rqcctod a proposal by thelhi • 
at hq 18 U.S. Embassy officials prime minister; Turgul Oral, far talks on Greek-Tunosfa drffotao . . 

were evacuated from Lebanon and neither “serious nor responsible.” .. . • • * 

flown to Cyprus in reaction to what Dnmln Maroudas, a goymmrait spokesman raid the “tro l • 

a White House spokesman called conditions necessary for a Grok-Tunash maloguc don t exist He 
an “unsettled” situation in East there can be no talks between the two neighbors vrtule Turkish tr 

occupy northern Cyprus and Turkey maintains a claim on control o 
rTir ictian Aegean Sea region. He said Mr. Oz&Ts proposal was neith er “sm og 

cytaIkswithMr.Gemayri.aCto- responsible, but designed to impress international public Mrinion.” 
Dan, at the presidential pa la ce in the Turiririi prime nnnistersmd^ Tuesday that he was wflfing to de 

Baabda in the hills east of the city. Greek-Turirisb problems with the Greek prime minister, Andreas Pa 
The Moslem prime minister, Ra- dreou “anywhere, anytime.” 
shid Karami, took part in the talks. 

Students in Seoul dash With Police 

vice president, Abdd Halim Khad- SEOUL (Reuters) — About 4,000 students demanding the reagn.. 

dam. of President Chun Doo Hwan of South Korea dashed with riot p 

Mr. Khaddam issued a stem Friday at Korea University in Seoul, witnesses said. No casualty rt 
warning Thursday night that his were available. 

country would not r emain in differ- Nearly 1,000 policemen fired tear gas as students tried to lake t .- 

ent in the face of what he-caOed streets, the observers said. The students retal ia te d by hurling stones. ■ 
“Israeli-inspired movements seek- were demanding the withdrawal of the resi gn ati on of the muw 
ing to undermine Lebanese and president, who thty said was forced to resign because of his leu 
Arab interests.” toward radical anti-government students. 

The leadcnfaip of Christian re- The demonstration turned into an anti-government protest ' ■ 
bels issued a statement Friday de- police stopped the students from marching off the campus. The proa : 
nying allegations that Israel was an end to what they called the miliiary dictatorship of 

behind the revolt. “Rumors to this Chun’s government and the release of political prisoners, 
effect spread by hostile media are 

false,” the statement broadcast by r* 1 

the group’s “Radio Free Lebanon” T Or the ileCOTU 
said. 

Mr. Geagea, 32, led his militia- 
men Tuesday in a sweep in Chris- 
tian areas north of Beirut defying 
the leadership of the Phalange Par- 
ty, which has thus far been in con- 
trol of about 6,000 fighters forming 
a private army called the Lebanese 
Forces. 

This u the first major split in the 
Phalange Party since its foundation 
about 50 years ago. It also divided 
the heretofore united Christian 
co mm uni ty after Mr. Geagea said 
thar his movement reflected the in- 
dependence of the Christian deri- 
sion-making. 

■ Earfier Withdrawal Seen 
Defense Minister Yitzak Rabin 
at Israel was quoted Friday as ray- 
ing his country probably will has- 
ten its withdrawal from southern 
Lebanon by shortening and par- 
tially combining the two remaining 
stages. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Tel Aviv. 

“I estimate that everything win 
be done to shorten [the second 
stage], and theoretically there exists 
a possibility of combining parts of 
stage two and stage three." the dai- 
ly newspaper Yedioth Ahronoth 
quoted Mr. Rabin as raying: 

However, the newspaper quoted 
Mr. Rabin as saying he did not 
ihink Israel could finish pulling out 
of Lebanon in one combined stage. 

Meanwhile, Israeli soldiers re- 
portedly made arrests and searched 
for weapons in a raid on the Shiite 
Moslem town of Barish. about 
eight miles (13 kilometers) east of 
Tyre. Two villagers were killed a 


The Justice Department a federal judge in Phitod 
Friday to dismiss a lawsuit dullmg in g the establishment of U. 
made relations with the Vatican. The suit, which names President Ifyt-rj . - . * 
Reagan as a defendant, was brought by Americans United for Separ]|' }( \ \ 
ofChurch and State. 

Nomnaon drivers rammed their coal trucks through a United 
Workers blockade in Lobata, West Virginia, on Thursday. Some < „ 

drivers were slightly injured and 10 miner s’ cars were damaged. Itwi‘ 

second day of violence in a five-month-old strike. vs/'i,.. 

Three convicts who barricaded themselves in a maximum set 
prison with four hostages in Kingston, Ontario, were arrested afte 
hostages manag ed to escape, prison officials said Friday. flte- 

New Zealand, frozen out of militaiy exercises with the United S'T . 
because of its ban on visits by U.S. nuclear warships, is sedung c " 
defense ties with Canada, Defense Minister Frank OTlyim said Frid ’ 

Sydney, Australia. 

E5gbt South African dissidents arrested on treason diarges lost a « ; 
battle for bail Friday in Durban. South Africa, after the state fee ' 
their release. (Ra " 

Moscow Said to Consider 
Action Against Pakistan 

(Conthmed-from Page 1) 

by about 100,000 Soviet troops, are 
being earned out from Pakistan’s 
territory. 

“It was also stressed that this 
cannot but affect in the most nt»8r 
live way Soviet- Pakistani rela- 
tions,” said the Tass report on the 
meeting. 

An earlier article in Pravda, the 
Soviet Communist Party newspa- 
per, included more explicit allega- 
tions against General Zia’s r e gim e. 

That article asserted that the U.S. 

Central Intelligence Agency was 


providing arms and other r 
tance to dissidents in Baluchi -- - 
One was led to believe tb *' : • 
American militar y ac tion ag ' 

effort to topple ‘ 

General 23a. -. . 

It was not possible to deter* 
to what extent these official 
blings were designed to inc" - .. 
pressure an General Sa to ct 
his polity or whether they in . .. 
made a drastic drift in Mon 
polity. ■ 

There is little doubt that :• 2 
Gorbachev would like to find .1 


day earlier trying to smuggle am- maintaining a “number” of bases out of the Afghan impasse.- 
muni tion mto Israeli-occupied ter- and camps m Pakistan to train and Soviet invasion of Afghanisti 


ntory. 

Sources in southern Lebanon, 
who spoke on the condition that 
they not be identified, said the Is- 
raelis entered Barish on Friday 
with 12 armored personnel carriers 
and 150 firildierx 

■ UJL Businessman Abducted 

Brian Levick, a British badness- 
man who has worked in Beirut fra 
the past 18 months, was kidnapped 
Friday in West Beirut, The Associ- 
ated Press reported. 

He was the second Briton to be 
abducted in the Moslem sector of 
the capital in as many days. On 
Thursday, Geoffrey Nash. 60, a 
metallurgist who works for the 
Lebanese government, was forced 


equip Moslem insurgents who sub- 
sequently are sent mto Afghani- 
stan. 

Pravda also said that “American 
instructors” are training General 
Zia’s police forces, which are ro be 
“used in the restless northwestern 
border province of Pakistan.” In 
the area, known as Baluchistan, op- 
position to General Zia’s regime is 
running high Russians traditional- 
ly have maintained ties with Balu- 
chistan tribes. 

Sources in Moscow hinted Fri- 
day that intensified pressure on 
General Zia was linked to Mos- 
cow’ s effort not only to seek a solu- 
tion to the five-year-old nrilitaiy 


1979 has complicated Soviet .- 
tions with china, the Me 
countries and the West. . , 

Mr. Gorbachev took the um . 

Step to associate himself with ' 
assertions ifarmg the summi t l ■ . 
ing with the Pakistani leader. 

Western diplomats in 
said that Mr. Gorbachev’s a , 
possibly reflected Moscow’s j 
ing fru^ration with the Afghai; , 


However, the new ieade 
seems to have linked the pro-., 
of Afghan insozgence to U5 . 
licy in Central America and sp> 
cally to Mr. Reagan's press® 
Nicaragua. 

Diplomatic observers here 


V — ■ — — . | m mg a _ . » i/ll/iUUIUIv UU3lM WO ||U 1 > 

by three gunmen into a car and stagnate m Afghanistan but also gc^ed that Moscow seemed t ' 

J : CT fn Mr HflQMlt C IfllWMCM n ran t ■ ■ ■■■ ®. .. _ _ 


driven off. 

David Nfiets. the British ambas- 
sador in Lebanon, confirmed re- 
ports of Mr. Levick’s kidnapping 
and said the victim was the manag- 
ing director of Coral Oil Co. m 
Lebanon. 


to Mr. Reagan's increased pressure 
on tbe Sandinist government of 
Nicaragua. 

According to these reports, the 
Russians are considering the possi- 
bility of encouraging anti-Tin de- 
meats in Pakistan presumably by 


signaling that it is capable o 
flicting some real damages to 
interests in an area dose to 
Soviet borders if Mr. Reagan 
sues his policy aimed at toppb 
pro-Soviet government in M 
gua. 


Neves Falls IH ; Brazil Installs Vice Fresiden 


praval of the Europeans; 

“In his statement to Congress must be asked now, because they 
last month. President Reagan are “so vital to our future that we 
spoke of the need to reverse the cannot afford to shrug them off.” 


(Condoned from Page 1) 

net that would satisfy all his sup- 
porters and be has worked hard to 
defuse the widespread expectation 
that tbe end of military rule will 
bring automatic solutions to accu- 
mulated economic and social ills. 
But he remains besieged by overop- 

‘ timiwn 

Among the immediate problems 
he faces are imminent negotiations 
with the International Monetary 
Fund and commercial creditors, as 
well as a series of financial scan- 
dals. There are also fears of strikes 
in the industrial city of Sho Paulo 
in the coming weeks. 


After 21 years of mfliiaxy rale, 
the country, economically, bears 
tittle resemblance- to the Brazil of 
1964. A sharp rise in production of 
steel electricity, oil cement, arma- 
ments, machinery and sophisticat- 
ed manufactured goods converted 
Brazil into amiddte-rartidng indus- 
trial power. 

The stale's role in the economy 
also grew dramatically. The gov- 
ernment now owes 65 percent of 
Brazil’s^ 100-bifiion foreign debt. 

Vast strides were also made in 
agriculture, with highways opening 
up enormous areas of the interior 
to cattle fanning and soybean plan- 


tations. Brazil is now the wo 
second largest food exporter. 

The Hait side of this cconi . 
model was neglect of social xv 
Brazil’s health, wniriiwwaL ed 
tional and housing standards ti . 
are little better than those of i 
Central American republics. 

There also was a weakenin 
the nation's political life by & i - 
taiyregime that turned first Mfc 
Communists and leftists and ‘ 
against most independent pt 
cians, forcing some into exile . 
proscribing tpe political right , 
others. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


Page 3 


. _ ivided Senate Panel 
^ t,u ' 1 ^ ^Approves $966-Billion 




’.Ja 1 

J . ‘ 

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***t « H:-. - t -_ 

* V. 

hr Vvhi ; ... 

*0 a . 

‘1 *#«4 ■ 

*P«SU Siv.r •*■ 

M- . Vi 

! tn r? - !. !•>:.- 


|U.S. Budget lor 1986 


Washington Post Senior 


mhtee tentatively approved its 
broad spending outline, both liber- 
als and conservatives were express- 
ing reservations about iu 
At the White House, Larry 
.7* $>des a one-year freeze on Social Speakes, the deputy press secre- 
J ...fecurity retirement benefits awl lary, sadd the Mr. Reagan was “dis- 
.‘lisabibty payments, but no provi- appointed in some dements of the 
' : y. ioo for new taxes. package,” particularly the conumt- 

The package incorporates a tee’s refusal to go along with the 


WASHINGTON — A sharply 
' ; , livided Senate Budget Committee 

*’■ .Vs approved a $966.I-billion fed- 
** “ t Tjal budget for next year Out in- 


«« Withdraw, 



fc-i 

Is:: 

. Jv-fts »;■» ■ 

• I T . 

« sir- 

i - ■ 

■> hi-, tur 

; r, 


Reagan 

A be military spending Increase to 
^Itlffhe inflation rate. 

; K The proposed budget was ap- 
. proved Thursday in an 11-10 party- 
. ■ .‘. 'ine vote after a debate m which 
" ■-.democrats accused the Republican 
•, uajority of manipulating figures to 
„ ■’ xaggerate the degree to which def- 
“ -.its would be reduced. 

The budget resolution incorpo- 
; J ; ates some but not all of the pro- 
v -ram cuts and eliminations that 
. y’ dr. Reagan recommended in Ms 
~S nidget request. 

r. -. Programs such as the Economic 
i-K- 1 development Administration 

' ' rauld be killed; revenue sharing 
nth local governments would be 
STOMbmn Tii i, hased out; programs providing 
1 l *r Kl>|] p^ubsidies for Amtrak, the nation- 
4 : vide passenger rail system, and 

gi’.' i . t Vj ^ >.-unds for the Medicare system of 

? fcsw-.?* . ! - ' 1 -x ealtfa insurance for the elderly 

^ -4 tr—- -- ■.• . wild be cut sharply. 

Committee Republicans calcu- 
-‘ate that their budget would pro- 
‘/-luce a deficit of S172J billion in 
. V.^-he watt fiscal year, which begins 
ito. 1, dedining to $101.8 billion 
, ' l‘ . ~ r - -fter three years. 

Using different e con o mi c as- 
: 'amptions t han the Republicans, 
le nonpartisan Congressional 
ii / I i n , , udget Office said next year’s defi- 

II Hit V ULMl Yi iftlrt reductions amounted to a total 

*«ir f 539 j billion, cc * -**■ 

”~X..epublican Haim 


is Ifc'SU 1 
2 !’-' ' 

he V 


* Wj. \ ‘It 

i iiv • 


with the 
$5Sb3Kon. 


ivuv • • 

■i I-.-.* 

< toi.t *• 
|T*vfr • 
i « 

••• - 

vr*i u . 

fun! 


vu »>» ■ 


H .* » -• :• 




T/J Budget Faces Many Hunfies 

* Karat Tumulty of the Los Angeles 
: .lmes reported from Washington: 
The Senate Budget Committee’s 
' ackage faces an iipHill climb be- 
>re any of its provisions become 
iw. 

~v. The package and. other defidt- 
"sIucuod. alternatives w31 be hag- 
*-'• ;ied over by the Reagan admims- 
'■■r-ation, the full Senate and House 
f Representatives and almost ev- 
ry committee and subcommittee 
n both sides of theCapiloL 
Only hours after the Senate com- 


However, Mr. Speakes said that 
completion of the Senate commit- 
tee's plan “gives us an opport uni ty 
to begin working closely with the 
Senate in order to develop a pack- 
age more to our lfiong.” 

The House Budget Committee 
chairman. William H. Gray 3d, 
Democrat of Pennsylvania, disr 
missed the senators' plan as merely 
an effort to “get the monkey off 
their backs" after the committee’s 
Republicans and Democrats were 
unable to agree on an overall defi- 
cit-reduction strategy. 

Democrats on the committee, 
with some Republican support, 
hurt argued the panel should 
increase taxes on corporations 
rather than force domestic pro- 
grams to cany such a laige share of 
(he deficit-reduction burden. How- 
ever, any tax increase would have 
put the committee at odds with the 
president 

The first major test of the plan 
wiU likely come within two weeks 
on the floor of the Senate. 

The committee’s proposal to 
deny Social Security cost-of-living 
increases next year is certain to 
provoke strong opposition in the 
Senate. And even if it passes, it will 
face a new challenge m the House, 
where even the Republican minor- 
ity is on record as Ming against any 
cut in the program. 

A top aide to House Speaker 
Thomas P. O’Neal] Jr n Democrat of 
Massachusetts, said it was “unlike- 
ly, but not absolutely out of the 
question” that the House would go 
along with the Social Security 
freeze. 

Now that (he Senate committee 
has produced a package the aide 
added, h puts pressure on the 
House Budget Committee to come 
up with its own spending alterna- 
tive that would slice the deficit 

“At a minimum, what we have to 
do is match their number” for over- 
all deficit reduction, he said. 



Bush Rejects Reagan Pressuring 22 Senators 

Invitation Republicans Told Re-Election Help Depends on Votes 

ToMeetWWi ^ 

Nicaraguan 


George Bush, wearing a U.S. 82d Airborne DhisioD beret, 
waves to the crowd at Grenada’s Point Salines airport 

40% of U.S. Admirals 
To Handle Arms Buying 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


'7s.-.- 


fcre-fe- 

mmr- 

- 

ii iVi ■-> 


Si. 1 1 


m 


Again-I 




;1 Mink, 2 Brooches 
• On the Side, to Go 

,L7 . Fast-rood chains are on the' 
• march up Fifth Avenue, New 
’ Yak’s most elegant commer- 

■ : dal thoroughfare. The Fifth 
7 Avenue Association has asked 

‘ the dty to ban food sales along 
the avenue’s most glittering 

■ -'stretch, from 32d to S9lh 
- 1 Streets, before it goes the way of 

Paris’s Champs Hystes, largely 

-given over to cinemas, caf6s and 

fast-food chains. 

t ■ '• It may be too late. McDon- 

loUWb it aid’s already has set up shop 
across the street from the Em- 

I ft I ’ I- P> re State Building, Burger 
il KWi King is at 37th Street, and God- 
father’s Pizza is across from the 
main library at 42d Street Now 
I Roy Rogers, at 46th Street, lit- 
erally casts its shadow farther 
' , ' _ uptown on Saks, Gucd, Cartier, 
Tiffany. Bergdorf Goodman 
• ' ' and Bon wit Teller. 

Robert Stem, an architect, 

. says the eateries are “culturally, 
sodally and architecturally" of- 
. . fenave. Kent Barwick, of the 
Municipal Arts Society, says 
'■ the "loud, garish” fast-food 
‘ outlets create “an area of chaos 
out of one of the great ceremo- 
.nial streets of the world." 

Fifth Avenue, with only 
• ■ ■ mixed success, always has 
■ fought to keep out sidewalk 
' vendors, banks, airline offices 
- and souvenir shops. Murray 
, Riese, of Roy Rogers, said of 
the big stores: “If they don’t 
prosper, we don’t prospa. 


*f idh 


Short Takes 

An Alaska RaBroad freight 
train, although slowing to 40 
■ mph (65 kph) or less, killed 48 
moose this month on a one- 
, night round trip between An- 
dwrage and Fairbanks. The 
■ ■ ■ moose preferred walking on the 

- plowed track than on snow up 
, .to 18 indms (46 centimeters} 
deep. Arnold Polanchek, an ex- 
eemh-e of the state-owned line, 
• , said; “Normally, you hit one or 
two a trip. I’ve been here 14 
years and 1 can't remember 
anything like it." 

The case that prompted the 
New Jersey Supreme Court’s 
decision last June that a host is 
liable for Ms drunken guests’ 
3r accidents has been settled 
XU of court. The automobile 
1 U insurance company of Donald 
I ‘ t . *i * I ; Z. Gwinnd, who had pleaded 
T 1 ' guilty to drunken driving, will 


guilty to drunken drivmg. will 
»y 4100,000 to Marie E Kelly, 
H, who suffered a broken jaw 
isd ankle in a bead-on crash 
vith Mr. GwinseTs car. The 
u>me-owners' insurance com- 
wuy used by Josqth and Catb- 
. sine Zak, who had served Mr. 
Twnnd several Scotches be- 
ore the accident, will pay her. 
T7^500. 

Ahboo^b Odfe- 64 pocent of 
Americans own their own 


hones, down slightly from 65.4 
percent five years ago after a 
steady rise from 55 percent in 
1959, aNew York Times survey 
shows that 76 percent of afi 
Americans believe that “the 
prospect of owning and living 
in a freestanding house on its 
own land" is “an important 
part of the American dream.” 
Of people who rent, 55 percent 
intend to buy. 



John F. Lehman Jr. 

Army and Navy 
At Lager-Heads 

Navy Secretary John F. Leh- 
man Jr. is said to agree with 
Genoa! George S. Ration that 
“if you don’t drink wdl, you 
don’t fight weU,” The Washing- 
ton Post reports. General John 
A. Wickham Jr., the army chief 
of staff, says that alcohol erodes 
fighting spirit. 

At a recent Pentagon meeting 
cm the proper drinkin g age at 
military dubs and the propriety 
of cut-rate drinks durum “hap- 
py hours," General Wickham 
said the army had banned dis- 
count drinks. Mr. 1-ehman, ac- 
cording to a senior officer who 
attended, “said that happy 
hairs contributed to esprit de 
corps and shonldn’t be compro- 
mised. Wickham then gave Ms 

speech about drunk driving and 

alc oholism and bow it doesn’t 
make sense for the military to 
subsidize it” 

As a result, the navy toB dis- 
count drinks; the army won’t 
On the drinking age, William 
H. Taft 4th. the deputy defense 
secretary, ruled that military 
dubs must adhere to state laws, 
except when the base is near the 
border of a state with more le- 
nient drinking laws. 


ARTHUR HIGBEE 


By Michael Wdsskopf 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The US. 
Navy, is a major policy shift that 
reflects its riiffienTtW with 
contractors, will ensure that 40 per- 
cent of offiorc promoted to admi- 
ral wdl have specialized in weapons 
procurement or managimmt rath- 
er than command at sea, according 
to Navy Secretary John F. Lehman 
Jr. 

Mr. L ehman said Thursday that 
the move is at attracting top. 

flight officers to the arcane and 
ungjamorous world of weapons ao- 
quiation, offering them a dear 
path to a rank previously filled 
mainly by those who had proved 
tbemsdves at sea. 

Calling his decision the most far- 
reaching personnel reform in 100 
years, Mr. TAmm said the navy 
would send officers to such institu- 
tions as Harvard Business School 
U) develop business managenw-nt 
skills to match those Of riefmcp 

contractors. 

It serves notice that the contrac- 
tors “are going to see across the 
table from them a steadily increas- 
ing level of esperience and exper- 
tise that win make the process a lot 
more effective,” Mr. Ti-hman said. 

The shift conies as f/wg ress is 
challenging the Reagan admmis- 
tratioo’s S313-b31um defense bud- 
get and focusing on the hilling 
practices of the top U.S. weapons 
makers as evidence of runaway 
costs allowed by the Pentagon. 
Contractor charges to the navy of 
$600 for a toilet seat and $16^71 
for a refrigerator have heightened 
budget-cutting sentiment on Capi- 
tol HHL 

Navy officials say that two- 
thirds of the 100 admirals in top 
procurement jobs and most of their 
subordinates have little expertise. 
Since those posts have been seen as 
dead ends in a service that rewards 
sea duty, they re t u rn to the fleet as 
soon as posable. 

As a remedy, Mr. Lehman said, 
the navy will reserve 100 of its 253 
admiral slots — 100 posts that al- 
ready involve weapons procure- 
ment and marntenanry — for offi- 
cers who have “solid credentials as 
experts" in n«mgmg and acquir- 
ing weapons systems. 

A new officer program for “ma- 
teriel professionals” will be estab- 
lished for those of the rank of com- 
mander or higher who will devote 
the rest c# then- careers to procure- 
ment, maintenance, technology 
and logistics of weapons. They are 
to be screened by a board of top 
navy officials who wiB select the 
first class in July. 

Those qualifying fa the pro- 
gram will be offered a 15-month 
business management course at the 
Naval Postgraduate School in 
Monterey, California, or at snch 
places as Harvard and the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania’s Wharton 
School. 

As Mr. Lehman was moving to 
improve the navy’s ability to deal 
with contractors. Representative 
BiD Nichols, Democrat of Ala- 
bama. announced that P. Talris Ve- 
liotis, a former General Dynamics 
Coip. executive who fives in Greece 
as a fugitive, has agreed to testify 


Compiled bj QurSutff From Dispatches 

BRASILIA — Vice President 
George Bush rejected Friday a Nic- 
araguan invitation 'to -meet with 
President Daniel Ortega Saavedra, 
Mr. Bush's press secretory said. 

Mr. Bush and Mr. Ortega were in 
Brasilia on Friday to attend the 
inauguration of the president-elect, 
• Tancredo Neves. Mr. Bush, in- 
stead, attended the swearing-in of 
Vice President Jos6 Samey after 
Mr. Neves was hospitalized. 

Mr. Bush’s press secretary said 
that a Nicaraguan official, in urg- 
ing the American to meet with Mr. 
Ortega, had said the meeting would 
help “give continuity to the dia- 
logue between the United States 
and Nicaragua." 

The spokesman said the mf **tin^ 
was rejected because Mr. Bush's 
schedule was full He was to meet 
with other Central American lead- 
ers and with Hans-Dietrich 
Genscher, the West German for- 
eign minister. 

On Thursday, during a stopover 
subcommittee, possibly by satellite, in Grenada, Mr. Bush turned down 
Mr. Vdiotis’s assertions of com- a request from the island's govern- 
pany fraud in b illing the navy fa meet to let 250 American soldiers 
cost overruns on submarine con- stay in Grenada, 
tracts have triggered several inves- Grenada’s foreign minister, Ben 
tigations of General Dynamics, the Jones, said the government wanted 
largest defense contractor. He the United Stales to keep its Hoops 
is under indictment fa allegedly on the island for two years more, 
taking kickbacks on $Mp construe- »n«t<»arf of pulling out the remain- 
don. ing 250 by June 12 (AFP.AP) 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — White 
House officials say that Republi- 
can senators up fa re-election in 
1986 are being informed that Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan's involvement 
in their campaigns would be limit- 
ed unless they supported adminis- 
tration programs. 

In what one official described as 
“hardball” political tactics, the 
White House has decided in recent 
days to step up the pressure on the 
22 Republican senators in the hope 
of cementing their support on 
pending votes. 

These include votes that are ex- 
pected to be close on whether to 
continue building the MX missile 
and on the budget package, which 
involves cuts ana freezes in numer- 
ous domestic programs. 

One White House official de- 
scribed the new tactic as “a carrot 
and a stick thing." He added, “Ba- 
sically, what it means is that if the 
senator doesn’t support us on the 
MX and he wants a fund-raiser in 
the next three a four months, he's 
not gang to get a fund-raiser.” 

The White House tried to 


president has agreed to the propos- 
al that was shaped by rankin g 
White House aides. 

One Republican senator up for 
re-election. Charles E. Grassiey of 
Iowa, said that his office received a 
telephone call from the White 
House earlier this week. 

“They said that the president’s 
gang to campaign," Mr. Grassiey 
said, “and he has so many days and 
so many trips and probably greater 
priority would be put in those 
states where senators were cooper- 
ative with the White House." 

Larry Speakes, the chief White 
House spokesman, said: “The pres- 
ident has always bent committed 
to holding the Senate fa the Re- 
publicans in 1986. There are 22 
Republicans up, and our rale is 
we’re gong to take care of our 
friends first. But in the case of the 
MX and other votes, we’re ap- 
proaching these votes on their mer- 
its and the president’s using friend- 
ly persuasion." 

White House officials indicated 
that that effort was essentially a 
result of three threads: Mr. Rea- 


before a House Armed Services 


similar pressure on Repubhcan 
members of Congress in 1982 when 
Mr. Reagan was seeking legislative 
support fa tax increases. But. in 
the face of angry congressional re- 
action. the threat was quickly 
shelved by the pres den L 
This tune, however, with Mr. 
Reagan increasingly concerned 
about the fate of his legislative pro- 
gram, White House officials say the 



of staff, in contrast to the accom- 
modating manner of his predeces- 
sor. James A Baker 3d. and the 
new Senate majority leadership of 
Robert J. Dole of Kansas as well as 
Alan K. Simpson, of Wyoming, the 
majority whip. 

Mr. Dole, through a spokesman, 
declined to discuss White House 
legislative efforts. But Mr. Simpson 


said there were one or two Republi- 
can senators up Tor re-election 
“who constantly gel a perverse lack 
out of doing something which does 
not meet the president’s require- 
ments or the leadership's desire." 

“With those cate or two, we have 
to slap them along the head with a 
piece of stove wood," Mr. Simpson 
said. “Let them know there’s a big- 
ger picture than just plain selfish- 
ness." 

■ Denial by White House 

A deputy While House press sec- 
retary, Robert Sims, said Thursday 
that he had “never heard 3 policy’ 
expressed” that would support 
linking senators’ votes and Mr. 
Reagan's campaign support. The 
Associated Press reported from 
Washington. “These reports are 
without foundation," he added. 

■ Farm State Coalition 

Members of Congress from agri- 
cultural states say they are forming 
a “silo coalition" to block funding 
of the MX system, linking their 
opposition to' President Reagan’s 
veto of emergency farm credit leg- 
islation, United Press International 
reported from Washington. 

Representative Thomas A. 
Daschle, a Democrat of South Da- 
kota, and Representative Byron L 
Dorgan, a Democrat of North Da- 
kota, predicted that the vote on the 
MX would be close. The Senate 
votes twice in the next week on 
whether to release $1.5 billion that 
the administration wants to build 
21 of the missil es this fiscal year. 




tin Aoobitfad Ptmi 


Unhttlft— Immena mJ 

AIRPORT DISPUTES — Garbage littered the floor at Charles de Ganlle Airport near 
Paris where a strike over wages by cleaning workers entered its 17th day Friday. Above, 
police tried to tmdog a traffic jam at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York where 
striking employees of Pan American World Airways blocked the entrance to a tenninaL 
The Pan Am strike, which began Feb. 28, involves a dispute over wages and pensions. 



Undercover Officer Says He Also Sold Cocaine to Dealers 


By Jon Nordhermer 

New York Tima Service 
MIAMI — A farmer agent of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
has pleaded guilty to charges of 
taking $850,000 in bribes and pay- 
offs from a drag ring he was inves- 
tigating as an undercover agent, the 
VS. attorney’s office reported. 

The former agent, Dan A M5- 
trione Jr., 38, also admitted Thnrs- 


Tfae FBI said that Mr. Mitrione 
was assigned to undercover work in 
“Operation Airlift” shortly after it 
was begun in June 1982 
He went to work with an FBI 
informer who was active in the nar- 
cotics trade. But within months, 
according to (JJ5. Attorney Stanley 
Marcus, Mr. Mitrione was accept- 
ing bribes to overlook drug deals 
that the informer was making with 


day to having tpken more than 90' the ring that the pair were sup- 
pounds (41 kilo g rams) of cocaine posed to be investi g at in g. 


from a shipment he had been or- 
dered to seize and reselling it to 
drug dealers. 

Mr. Milo one, an FBI agent fa 
10 years, had beat assigned to an 
undercover operation that sought 
to break up the channels fa distri- 
bution of cocaine coming into the 
United States through MiamL 

WQHam H. Webster, director of 
the FBI, called the case “sad" and 
said it showed the determination of 
the bureau topolkx its own ranks. 

Richard^ Wffliam MiJkx, an agent 
is Los Angeles with 20 years of 
service, became the first FBI agent 
charged with espionage when he 
was arrested last October on 
charges of spying fa the Soviet 
Union. 


In March 1983, Mr. Mitrione 
was sent to Memphis, Tennessee: to 
seize 235 kilograms of cocaine. In- 
stead, according to court records, 
Mr. Mitrione brought back only 
193 kilograms, skimming off 42 ki- 
lograms to sell back to cocaine 
dealers fa an unspecified sum of 
money and gifts. 

Hjs colleagues in the Miami of- 
fice of the FBI became suspicious 
of Mr. Mitrione shortly after the 
Memphis incident. A special team 
of agents was assembled from bu- 
reaus around the country to investi- 
gate him, Mr. Marcus said, and Mr. 
Mitrione resigned in June, 

■ Mexican Suspect Dies 

One of the 14 suspects arrested 
this week in connection with the 


abduction and murder of a U.S. 
narcotics agent has confessed to 
involvement in the kidnapping, the 
Mexican attorney generars office 
announced Thursday, the Los An- 
geles Times reported from Mexico 
Gty. Another suspect died in cus- 
tody. 

Seven of the suspects are mem- 
bers of the Jalisco state judicial 
police. 

Enrique Gamarena Salazar, an 
agent of the U.S. Drag Enforce- 
ment Administration, ami Alfredo 
Zavala Avelar, a Mexican govern- 
ment pilot, were kidnapped in sep- 
arate incidents on Feb. 7 in Guada- 
lajara and found dead last week 

One of the 14 suspects. Gabriel 
Gonzalez GcmzAkz, died of “an 
acute pancreatic hemorrhage" 
while in detention, a news release 
from the attorney general's office 
said. Mr. Gonzalez, a section com- 
mander and homicide investigator 
in the JaHsco state judicial police, 
was described as “a cocaine addict” 
and “intimate friend" of various 
known narcotics traffickers. 

“He received a monthly stipend 
fa his services to the narcotics traf- 
fic, as wdl as arms,” according to 
the attorney general's statement 


Lean Times Come to Embassy Row u.s. Tens Hans 

•/ XT' r • mn • 


(Continued bum Page 1) 

crunch. Mrs. Lawtat has petitioned 
the embassy hierarchy to adjust 
employees’ salaries monthly to pro- 
vide a more accurate reflection of ’ 
the exchange rale. 

A French - diplomat said that 
when he moved to Washington in 
1981 his monthfy rent was $1,600, 
which at that time equaled 6,000 
francs. Although the rent has in- 
creased only $100 in fonryeac, to * 
$1,700, the exchange rate is such 
that his cost went tip 14,000 francs, 
to 20,000 francs. 

Peter Mendc, an official at the 
West Goman Embassy, said that 
staff members there had stopped 
skiing in Colorado. And they nave 
stopped buying the American cars 
they had preferred and arch 
ing duty-free BMWs with a 
static discount. 

Robert Andrew Bums, a coun- 
selor at the British Embassy, said 
he has given up slumping fa 
clothes at Woodward & Lothrop 
and now stocks up at Marks & 
Spencer when he is in London. 

He and Ins wife, Sarah, used to 
travel together on his business trips . 
to New York, but she said she now 
takes the cheapest route possible 
because she has to pay her own 
way. “He goes by air a Metraliner, 
and 1 go Cm the ordinary premie 5 
tram,”sbe said. “But I save 


While Washington has not yet 
been designated a hardship post, 
some embassies have been adapt- 
ing practices usually reserved for 
the Third World. 

At the Italian and French Em- 
bassies, staff members have been 
pooling resources to buy duty-free 
canned food and wines from Eu- 
rope. 

*Tfs totally unusual fa (hat to 
be done here," said Giovanni Car- 
acdolo dr Vietri, an Italian diplo- 
mat. “It reminds me of my last post, 
in Ethiopia." 

The west German Embassy has 

gone even further, officially forsak- 
ing the convenience of the Safeway 

UA Man Pleads Guilty 
In Espionage 'Sting 9 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES 7 - An aero- 
space engineer faces two life prison 
terms after pleading guilty to trying 
to sell papers about the Stealth 
bomber to men he believed were 
Russians. 

Thomas P. Cavanagjh. 40. of 
Downey, Cafifornia, an engineer at 
Northrop Carp„ pleaded guilry 
Thursday to trying rosefl the docu- 
ments for S55,fi)0 to men be 
thought wot Russians bul who ac- 
tually were undercover FBI agents. 


grocery in favor of wholesale food 
nnportss from Europe that nor- 
mally carer to the diplomatic corps 
in poor countries. 

Mr. Meade said the embassy im- 
ported two 40-foot containers of 
such staples as rice, noodles, floor, 
cheese gsmenop. las t year. This 
year h increased the proportion of 
imported food to eight containers. 

Gebhard Schwrigler, a visiting 
West Gennan scholar, said his big- 
gest regret was bang unable to turn 
the situation to Ms advantage. 

“When I came, the dollar was 
hitting three maiks and I was reluc- 
tant to transfer a laige amount of 
money," he raid. “But if I had, now 
I would be in a position to resell it 
at three and a fa»f and make a neat 
profit." 

Many foreign correspondents 
have become so strapped that they 
are forgoing expense-account 
lunches and trading copies of 
Amoican newspapers rather than 
buying their own. 

One American journalist be 
realized the seriousness Of tire situ- 
ation when an East European col- 


For Cruise Missiles 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Navy plans to deploy nndear- 
armed cruise missiles cm more than 
180 of its surface ships and subma- 
rines during tire next decade. 

Commodore Roger F. Bacon, di- 
recta of the navy’s strategic and 
theater nuclear warfare division, 
told the House subcommittee on 
procurement and militar y midear 
systems Wednesday that the first 
deployments of nuclear-armed 
Tomahawk cruise missies occurred 
as scheduled in June “with intro- 
duction into both the Atlantic and 
Pacific fleets.” 

Commodore Bacon did not say 
how many of the navy’s ships bad 
already received nuclear-armed 
cruise missiles, but he added; “The 
deployment continues and will 
eventually encompass 82 surface 
ships and 101 submarines by the 
mid-1990s.” 


to lavish lunches suddenly began 
taking him to a salad bar. 

The only consolation for the in- 
ternational set comes on trips 
hozn& “Then we can afford to 
splash out a little more," Mr. Sonsa 
said. 


Mfllimis IJKtarartP m Pima 

A gence France- Presse 
BEIJING — Mae than 10 per- 
cent of the Communist Party’s 40 
nrillicHi members ate illiterate and 
70 percent have . not graduated 
from primary school, tire newspa- 
per Guangming Ribao reported 
Friday. 



Bulgttri quartz u«tcK- Water-resistonz. 
Stainless-steel, gold-steel, 1SK gold. 
Available in four sizes. 

BVLGAR I 

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El 


Ala 

Am 

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Lift 

MM 

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Page 4 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Cognoscenti Can Still Find Bargains in Old Master Drawings 


InienunUmnt Herald T.ibune 

P iaris — Old Master drawings 
have become the object of in- 
tease speculative buying in the past 
few months, triggering an unprece- 
dented infla tion in this category. 
Even so, this area remains one of 

SOUREN MeLTK TAN 

the few where those with flair and 
knowledge can make superb acqui- 
sitions at a comparatively low cost 
The reasons were instantly ap- 
parent to anyone attending the sale 
conducted Monday at Drout by 
Paul Renaud. The auction included 
210 lots, spanned four centuries 
and covered Britain, France, Ger- 
many, Italy, the Netherlands and 
Switzerland. No one could possibly 
be at home with all the schools of 
all these countries at all times. Yet, 
there was only one expert in charge, 
' Bruno de Bayser, a highly respect- 
ed professional with more than 20 


18th-century French draftsmen 
and a reasonable degree of compe- 
tence concerning Italy. He seemed 
to be less concerned by the north- 
ern schools, particularly the Brit- 
ish. 

But whether one is passionately 
or mildly interested by a school 
there is no way an expert can spend 
days trying to identify an anony- 
mous sketch that may go for 4,000 
or 5,000 francs — about $400 to 
S5Q0 — even if the details are fully 
established. Until the 18th century 
it was unusual for drawings to be 
signed; most are studies, not in- 
tended to be sold or shown. As a 
result, large numbers of 16th- and 
17th-century sketches are sur- 
rounded by uncertainty. They are 
riddles, and prices paid for than 
will be called high or moderate de- 
pending not so much on tbe intrin- 
sic quality of the piece as on the 
degree of credibility attached to the 
attribution. 

Was the drawing illustrated on 
the catalog cover tbs weak of Gio- 
vanni Batista di Matteo Naldini? 
There is no catalogue raisonni of 
the paintings, lei alone of the draw- 
ings. of this artist (1537-1591). 
Bom in Florence, he went to Rome, 
then returned to his hometown, 
where he spent 14 years participat- 
ing in the decoration of the Palazzo 
Vccchio. The drawing, in pen and 
brown ink over blade pencil, shows 
Hercules and the Nemean lion on 
one ride and Hercules and tbe Cre- 
tan bull on the other. It is sketched 
in nervous, confused strokes, and 
water staining that would not bear 


Oil Valued at $7,000 Fetches $242,000 


The Associated Press 

N EW YORK — By the auction house’s esti- 
mate, the undated on painting of a smell- 

ing an onion was worth $5,000 to $7,000. But when 
the biddingwas over. “Sense of Smell” had sold for 
5242,000. Christie’s in New York “has never had 
this land of escalation at this kind of price,” JUl 
Wettzman, spokeswoman for Christie's East, said 
Thursday. 

The discrepancy *as explained by the presence ■ 
of two bidders who were convinced that the paint- 
ing was by the Spanish baroque artist Jusepe 
Ribera (c. 1590-16521 not just by the school of - 
Ribera, as listed in Christie's catalog. 

*T paid $242,000 because it’s the lost original of 


'Sense of Smcfl,’ ” said Richard Ftigeo, who out- 
bid another dealer, Stanley Moss. But a statement 
from Ian Kennedy, Christie's director for Old 
Master paintings, said: “We stand by our opin- 
ion.” Christie’s said it was keeping the seller's 
name co nfidential. 

If genuine, the picture would be part of a series 
by Ribera on die senses. “Taste,” “Touch" and 
“Sight” are in mnwimw in Ha r t f ord, Connecticut; 
Pasadena, California; and Mexico City, respec- 
tively. “Hearing" is also thought to be lost 

Ribera was a coon painter to the Spanish vice- 
roy in Naples. Greatly influenced by Caravaggio, 
he combined naturalism with a Spanish fading of 
mysticism. 


Jean 

He 


name was Jan van der Street- Borne century French parnti 
in Bruges in 1523, he worked first CaiHeux, had no such q 
in Antwerp and later in Lyon be- paid 29.000 francs for what to him 
fore moving to Venice and Flor- was a genuine Hubert Robert. 
ence.HedjedinRomeinl605.lfis Compared with these prices, oth- 
sxyle is manneristic, in an eminent- ers may seem incomprehensibly 
ly northern way —he seemed dos- " '* * " J 

er to southern Germany than to 
Flanders. His two drawings here 

were in pen and sepia wash height- 
ened with white. One represents 


low. A beautiful landscape in sepia 
wash datable to 1840-1850 had a 
monogram, EW, that has not 
been identified- At 2300 francs it is 

hardly overpriced. Like the Floren- 

Venus perched on a doud and rais- tine profile of a woman that sold 

* for 27,000 francs, it gave one the 

impression of having been over- 
looked. Both were overshadowed 
by tbe drawings' with impressive 
attributions and unimpressive but 
dearly inscribed signatures. This is 
tbe kmd of confusion that makes 
most drawings sales so attractive 
for connoisseurs. 


cleaning malms it even less dear, uninspired. Yet it went up to 9,000 
The expert at first had doubts francs, possibly thanks to the letter 
about the authorship, for he sped- "P” on the mount The first impor- 
fies “attributed to” m the enny. in tant drawing more plausibly attrib- 
auction-room language this is tried represents a Venetian doge 
meant to be understood as “pcssi- greeting half-naked men in chains 


from several generations ago, stffl 
carry weight. One of these is that a 
woman is worth twice as much as a 
Txmn i other thing s being equal, as 
economists like to say. A danon- 
stradon of tins was provided when 


mg a bow with one hand, while 
trying with the other to calm down 
an enterprising Eros; it was 
knocked down at 70,000 francs. 
The other' shows Jupiter uncom- 
fortably riding an eagle that is flap- 
ping its wings. Jupiter bolds a scep- 
ter and looks every bit ss absurd as 
Venus. Although done as a 
and similarly signed in full it was 
knocked down at 35,000 francs. 

Doubts sometimes persist even 
where a signature appears. An Ital- 
ianate view of a bodge and a Ro- 
man 


■ British Paintings Auctioned 
A sale of 118 British paintings 
dating from 1500 to 1850 made 
almost £1.7 million ($1.8 million) 
Wednesday at Sotheby’s in Lon- 
don, The Associated mss report- 
£269,500 for 


Such a statement is typical of the 
whiffs of enthusiasm that will carry 
a small group of cognoscenti. They 
may later get beset by doubts, but 
tbe huge prire here, 60,000 francs 
for a drawing in unsatisfactory 
condition, indicates that, for the 
time being, enthusiasm is running 
high. 

The opposite case was illustrated 
by a stunning portrait of a woman 
in pen and brown ink simply de- 
scribed by the expert as “Floren- 
tine school, 16th century.” The 
woman, seen sideways, head and 


and sepia wash 'heightened with 
white, was a study for a warrior 
incongruously standing in a niche; 
it went up to 24,00 francs. By then 
tbe letter *T” was having its effect. 
A drawing of a doge flanked by two 
figures triggered enthusiastic bid- 
ding. The letter “P” appears on the 
mount and an inscription reading 
“Paolo V.” is written at the bottom. 
The price was 74,500 francs. 

But a drawing of the Virgin and 
Quid among musician angels left 
everyone cold despite the *T” 
dearly written on the mount De 


inscribed “H. Robert 1781,” left 

oan Stradanns the expert g k<*pfiral He refers to ed. The lop price was 3269.3UU for 
Few non -spe cialis ts have the signature as “an inscription." an 1737 painting, in rather poor 
artist, whose real But tbe best Paris specialist ml 8th- condition, by John Wootion . 



Drawing attributed to Hubert Robot drew 29,000 fran 


Camera Work Marks Better-Than-Average Thriller by Devillt 


shoulder ^ fas a com pelling mures- Bayser had rejected it, adding after 
sion. The handling of the twisted the name of the artist “circle of,” 


hair reminds one of Crivefli. It was 
knocked down at 37,000 francs to a 
London dealer and wQl undoubt- 
edly resurface with a much more 
precise label and possibly a price 
five or six rimet higher. 

An amusing reminder fost the 
game of attributions has been 
played for a long time came with a 
group of drawings with 18-century 
mounts. These show that the draw- 
ings were removed from one of the 
albums compiled in 18th-century 
Italy that are known to specialists 
as the “Borghese albums.” The let- 
ter P appeared an most mounts, 
meaning that in the 18th century 
the drawings were considered to be 
by Paolo Caliari, better known as 
Veronese (1528-1588). The expert 
had prudently cataloged them as 
“attributed to” Veronese, with the 
exception of one said to be ty Car- 
letto Caliari (1570-1596). 

The latter represents Marsyas 
being flayed It is manneri stic and 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

International Herald Tribune 

P > ARIS — Michel Devflle has 
delivered a better- than-average 
thriller in “P£ril en la dememe,” 
from a Rend Baletto novel. 

The wife of an affluent business- 
man engages a ytrnng ftnm pnser as 

MOVIE MARQUEE 


which in auction language means her adolescent daughter's guitar 
“of the penod and in the mann er readier, then takes him as her lover, 
f" ti~_ t i i j — Complications soot arise, which 


of.” Tms was knocked down at 
2,100 francs. 

Much more remarkable among 
the drawings from tbe album was 

the smiling head of a w oman look- 
ing down. The metmt carries the 
letters “SB,” for “Scuda Bokmese” 
or School of Bologna. Apparently 
the 18th-century collector felt un- 
certain about the author, which is 
understandable — the black and 
red chalk profile is admirable but 
bears no obvious resemblance to 
known works. A later owner had no 
such qualms and inscribed “di Gui- 
do” (Hi the bade, ascribing it to 
Guido Reni (1575-1642). De 
Bayser, who shared this conviction, 
called it “Ran” with no qualifying 
statement A buyer who apparently 
agreed got it for 40,000 bancs. 

Signatures are not the only con- 
sideration in Old Master drawings. 
Other conventions, some of them 


threaten tbe composer’s life and 
involve him in a murder case. De- 
vflle has managed the plot's twists 
and turns with a deft nand and a 
striking use of Ins cameras, build- 
ing the suspense until the unexpect- 
ed climax. 

Christophe Malavoy conveys the. 
sensitivity of the music professor 
uriwitt 
Nicole 

wife effectively' and 
is « gam cast in the stock role of a 
jealous husband. In support there 

inter f ering anting hy ApfaPOPg as 

a prying neighbor and by Richard 
Bohringer as a hired assassin. To 
sooth tEe naves during all tbe ex- 
citement, tbe score indudes themes 
by Brahms and Schubert. 

□ 

Jean Aurd’s “StaEne," inspired 



by Boris Souvariue’s biography, 
paints the Soviet dictator as the 
most ferocious monster since Ivan 
the Terrible. His crimes are parad- 
ed in newsreel visions of his speech- 
es and in fictionalized episodes in 
which actors substitute for the orig- 
inals, while a commentary thunders 
condemnation. All this is news 
from the day before yestoday. 
More inte r est in g is the attempted 
analysis. 

According to the Anrd-Souvar- 
ine version, Stalin distrusted every- 
one save — during a lapse into 
incredible credulity — Hitler. After 
the signing of the Nazi -Soviet pact, 
Stalin believed Hitler to be his best 
friend, a miscalculation that 
brought tragedy to Russia. 

There are shots of the purge tri- 
als, when S talin in the 1930s rid 
himself of his old Bolshevik asso- 
ciates, who, though doubtless inno- 
cent of the fantastic charges 
brought against them,, were never- 
theless guilty of mass mnnHws 

when they laid hig h rank, as then- 
leader wdl knew. 

Was Stalin as mad as Hitler? 
That he was obsessed about sup- 
posed conspiracies to assassinate 
him is no evidence that be was 
rnsane Many a Russian must have 
wished him dead, but tbe Russians 
never knew what to do about him. 


ewy A Madrid carnival sequence 
from “Tbe Devil Is a Woman” is 
included, as is one from “Tbe Scar- 
let Empress” in which she enacts 
Catherine tbe Great taking the 
Winter Palace disgu^d as a caval- 
ry officer. AD three inserts are re- 

Han me markable for their pictorial quality. 

him having been directed by ha “dis- 


Even after iris death they woe un- 
certain, plating his remains next to 
t hose of Lenin and then without 
comment whisking his corpse away 
from the sacred tomb. They have 
still to make up their minds OD the 
matt er. 

This cinematic 

My, ttougbitnotes thathis mega- coverer,” Josef vcm Stcrnbeig^ 
SrSSeased as he azeS The. actr^ mterviewed by 
that he was about to introaure an- Schell m FiencfrGemum and En 
other wave of terror when death ghsh, gives 


stiHed his hand. 


Ma ximilian Schell’s “Marlene” 
is a candidate for the Oscar as best 
foreign documentary of the year. 
During its hoar-and-a-half course, 
Marlene Dietrich, the personifica- 
tion of screen glamour in the 1930s, 
is heard but not seen. The German 


questions. She regards Orson 
Welles as a genius, but disliked 
Fritz l-»ng and, by inference, Em il 
■ Tannings, Tier acting partner in the 
film that made ha famous, “The 
Blue Angel” Ernest Hemingway 
was a close friend but, contrary to 
tire rumors, she makes it dear there 
was no romance. She talks of pre- 
Hitler Berlin arid ha return to 


actor-director succeeded in enlist- postwar Batin, where she was 

with mixed feelings; of 
and of ha stage experi- 


ing ha participation, but die re- 
fused to face the cameras and re- 
mains invisible, save for excerpts 
from ha movies. 

We see her in a scene from “Mo- 
rocco” as, impersonating a French 
cabaret artist stranded in Casa- 
blanca, she renders “Quand Fa- 
monr meurt,” with Gary Cooper as 
a legionnaire and Adolphe Menjou 
as a suave cosmopolite among the 
members of an enthralled audi- 


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its worst, and there seems to 
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marvel of hilarity as the nei 
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the swain of his master’s dau 
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boudoir to a tinkling tune on « 
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not, and Cdudie does a fc- 
impersonation with the vdren - 
of King Kong in a rage. Zer 
ZidL 

□ 

“tranches de vie,” which G 
Lauzier, the animated cartoon 
plier, has written and which i 
9 ois Letemer has directed, is 
ries of extended blackout:- 
material is akin to tire feeble 
sense of tire meaner species os 
theaters, where appaUiiig pun - 
references to backsides are ' 
with guffaws. 

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his views on permissive sooet 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALQ.TR1BIINE, SATUKPAY-SUWDAT, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


Page 5 


AlfTS/ LEISURE 




Instrumentarium’: 
Water in Movement 


By Michael Gibson 

. liuervationat Herald Tribune 

lARZS —The pit dui occupies 
|jbe center of the ground floor at 
Pompidou Center has been 
“ ' with transparent plastic hoses 
pipes, barrels, buckets and 
(OK of them from the for- 
Dussddorf train station), 
■lines, law parabolic metal 
and other objects in metal and 
vMl the reccptadts and 
are filled with water in move* 
oral rest (50 tons of it. by one 
it) and- the whole thing is 
as. Klaus Rinke’s “In- 
terim” 

5 Rinke, who grew up in the gray, 
■■wa^Tio ggy Ruhr of the postwar years. 
2 / me to the attention of the mter- 
itional art community with Us 
rformances of “body ait," in 
•^•liK-rr »if v rich he used his body as an in- 
'■hunent for some ratter tautolom- 
1 demonstrations. He also end 
'ormances with water and other 




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e 20-by-3O-tneia: (2l.5-by-32j-. 
. rd) pit at the Pompidou Center. 
. i6 museum would not say how 
. . uch the installation cost. 

' ••• -Rinke seems to have affinities 
'«'K 1 r. t 'tb the ideas set forth by the 
.•ench philosopher Gaston Bacte- 
■ . 2d, who wrote about the reveries 
-. 1 .. . Grounding the four dements of 
' v. . .tiqmty — earthy water, air end 
e. Last year Rinke proposed a 


fountain for a city in northern 
France that would have been dedi- 
cated to Bacbdard. But his reveries' 
are corseted in the austere materi- 
als and colors of the industrial 
world, and in a certain minimalist 
spirit or mystique that is deter- 
mined to find the poetic core of 
events and things beneath the grim 
industrial shroud. 

Klaus Rinke, “ Instrumentarium , ” 
Pompidou Center, through April & 


Jean-Pierre Raynaud represents 
a different, more Jansenistic form 
of minimalism He is showing at 
Gilbert Brownstone’s gallery and 
at the ARC gallery in the Paris city 
museum of modem art, where be 
appears in the company of two 
dreary confrtsres — one of whom, 
Niels Toroni, has devoted the past 
15 years to making imprints of a 
paintbrush of a given width at in- 
tervals of 30 ccs timetem (11.5 mch- 


RaynaiKfs work to date has 
made predominant but not exclu- 
sive use o S square white ceramic 
tiles with black jointing He builds 

walls and pwtesfak and r a-tangnlnr 
objects mat suggest pointings out 
of these tiles. The interior of his 
bouse on the outskirts of Paris is 
entirely covered with them. Even 
the fund tore is made of white rile, 
without cushions. 

Such absolute mo n a s tic commit- 
ment adds some scope to the bare 



Three Phases of Gastone Novelli 


Klairs Rjbake setting up his “Instrumentarium' 


X Fnjour/ftmpidou Center 

in the Pompidou pit. 


minimalism of Raynaud’s medium. 
But perhaps the best use that has 
been made of his unusual talent 
and attitude so far was not a rile 
work but the commission to pro- 
duce stained-glass windows for the 
Romanesque Cisteririan Abbey of 
Noirlac in 1576. 

Raynaud has reportedly decided 
no longer to work with riles. In the 
ARC show that departure is appar- 
ent in the biggest piece, a large 


room in which about 20 austere 
white metal beds are aligned 
against the wall Over each there is 
a canvas carrying five rather thick 
vertical stripes that in the context 
might suggest windows with heavy 
bars on than. The beds, a nonstan- 
dard 86 centimeters wide, were 
made to Raynaud’s specifications. 

Raynaud in France, rather like 
Pollock or de Kooning in the Unit- 
ed States, has “made a gift of his 


person to art." His riles can remind 
one of the philosopher Ernst 
Bloch's remark to the effect that 
the bathroom will be the most char- 
acteristic work of the 20th century, 
as the cathedral was of the 12th. 

Jean Pierre-Raynaud, Galerie 
Gilbert Brownstone & Cie, 17 rue 
Saint Gilies, through March 29; 
ARC. Musee tPArt Modente de la 
Vide de Paris, II Avenue du Presi- 
dent Wilson, through April 24. 


By Edith Schloss 

International Herald Tribune 

R OME — At a moment when 
shamelessly mediocre an is 
blighting the scene in many world 
capitals, five shows in Rome allow 
for a breath of fresh air, contempla- 
tion and hope. 

The most stimulating are shows 
in three galleries that examine the 
career of Gastone Novelli, who 
died in Rome 17 years ago at age 
43. Novelli was a modernist of 
great invention and individuality. 
Despite many international exhibi- 
tions he has not gained the recogni- 
tion be deserves for his contribu- 
tion to contemporary art. 

In the beginning Novelli was a 
follower of the Abstract Expres- 
sionist movement (called L’lnfor- 
male in Italy), which burgeoned af- 
ter World War II as an expression 
of new pofiiical freedom. That he 
was as Quest and as experimental 
as his d dears is dearly visible in the 
show of his earlier canvases at the 
Salita Gallery. In the 1950s he not 
only explored the splash and drip- 
pin ess of diluted paint, but also the 
thicknesses of pamt, its relief quali- 
ty: building ii up, scratching and 
cutting lines and wounds into it 


3 Contemporary East German Artists Show Works in London 

By Max Wykes-Joyce 

International Herald Tribune 



h t 

;•! i*r 

s • 


cs*. 


t *MT 

w*< 

*. * **'■ 


* 

Obt IWHl' 

- 


• ONDON — The East Germans, 
. -.4/ represented at the Barbican 
• . rnter Gallery by a 13-arrist show 
. contemporary art, “Tradition 
■ ~-d Renewal,” appear to be little 
- .lerested in political social realism 
..'it instead to be working in the 
. ,'eat tradition of late German 
Tabic painting. “Three Women 
. Twn Cefalu” (1983) by Werner 
T' ibke much resembles an updated 
4 rsion erf a trio erf saints by Ste 
' an Lodmer (a 1410-1451), while 
. i cadaver in the left-hand panel 
- the 1976 triptych “Investiga- 
by Voflcer Stdzmann could, 
1 . thout violence to the image; be 

: ;X>rporated in a Deposition ot a 
- • •. .-sti by one of the anonymous 

. : . . isters of the early 15th century 
>!ogne schooL 

Tabke (b. 1929), for some years 
, - - sector of the Leipzig An School, 
d Stelzmann (b. 1940), professor 
, the Leipzig School of Graphic 
. • t and Printing Design, have in- 
.. tenced other exhrlxtois in this 
. ow. 

.. Most, in their catalog state- 
arts, highlight the inmortance to 
irir art of a dose study of nature 

d history: “My subjects are the 

t .man figure, nature in general” 
K h »N1 **!'!■ udrun Briinc). “My pictures are 

toUy concerned with people and 

n network of their relationships” 
j ubertus Giebe). “No nation can 
.:e wiihont its past, without it 
;:re is no nation, and of course no 
;-iual art either” (Bernard Heisig). 
jesearch in the past gives insignt 
, o the present Search among by- 



“Inv 
panel by 

days prepares for the future” 
r olfgang Petrovsky and Frank 
Voigt, who collaborate on large 
graphics. “I am mainly interested 
in the human figure, especially in 

An additional boons at the Bar- 
bican is a concurrent exhibition, 
“Munch and the Workers” a loan. 



f xmdon Festival on Mahler, 
/ienna Opened by Abbado 


UN 

« otnr V 

m * ■ 


fimsday night of a seven-month 
aival devoted to Gustav Mahler, 
d his circle in Vienna. 

The London Symphony Orches- 
tat the Barbican Hall performed 
alder’s first symphony and works 
■ Gyorgy Ligeti and Alban Berg. 


f 


Rich 7 American, 




S * St -* 


The Associated Press Almost all of Mahler’s works will 

ONDON — Claudio Abbado be performed at the 21 festival con- 
u efmdiiptfid the opening concert certs, which will highlig ht his influ- 
ence on Arnold Sdroenberg, Berg 
and Anton Webern. 

Mahler died in 1911, at age 50, 
from a blood infection brought on 
by a heart ailment. His music, 
which often expresses intense emo- 
tionalism, was sometimes derided 
in his lifetime and neglected after 
bis death, biu a revival began in the 

1950s. 

The festival was Abbado’ s idea. 
,T»i j « The Itaban-bora conductor said he 

‘tmaenaneOj Jouys wanted to trace the history ctf mod- 
■j r . n era music, moving from Mahler 

turkes Peerage 

The Associated Press 

.ONDON — An American has 

bought the British bluebloods’ 

.^de, Burke’s Peerage, for several 
hion pounds from the bolding 
■upany Ravendale Securities, 
v : rice’s publishing director, Har- 
1 Brooks-Baka, said Friday. 

.• ‘Our new owner won't allow 
■ \ aself to be identified for about a 
, nth or so, while all the papers 
'being signed." said Brooks- 
. ■” ter, himself an American “He is 
1 but not well-known. He’s an 
repreneur with various busi- 
/scs. I feel delighted that a great 
glish institution has been 


toconiem- 




A • *►’ 


m* 


-At 


'4 


be sale of Burke’s, first pub- 
F ed in 3826, came four days after 
al-Fayed family of E§rpt 
■ ■?— ' right another British institution, 
• House of Fraser, owner of Har- 
* department suhcl 
boob-Baker said he hoped the 
. -lish press would not “go all jin- 
. Stic and chauvinistic about 
. » He said Burke's needed fresh 
ilal to publish its first new edi- 
. 1 since 1970 and continue its 
^petition with Dchrctt’s Peer- 
y ' .'••'. founded in 1769. There was an 

• ' -ter American owner of Burke’s, 

■ *> Zunmerman, in iht 1930s. 

■ /Selling a painting that goes 
' sad and can’t he seen by En- 

p eople is vastly different to 
SJgners' injecting capital into 
lish companies.* Brooks-Baker 


and the Viennese! 
porary music. 

“Many of today’s composers are 
the heirs to this development and 
most of them, like Benjamin Brit- 
ten and Dmitri Shostakovich, woe 
directly influenced by Mahler,” 
Abbado said at a news conference 
last month. 

The festival includes art exhibi- 
tions and performances of music, 
opera and plays by Mahler and his 
contemporaries, all in London.. 
railed “Mahler. Vienna and the 
20th Century,” it runs through Oct- 
24. 

Other conductors at the festival 
will be Simon Rattle, Kent Boulez, 
Leonard Bernstein and Sir Odin 
Davis. 


show organized by the Newcastle 
Polytechnic Gallery. In more than 
100 paintings, drawings and prints 
it demonstrates the semtnaf attn 
tudes of the Norwegian artist Ed- 
vard Munch (1836-1944) toward 
workers, notably builders, forest- 
ers, fanners and fisberfolk. 

“ Tradition and Renewal: Con- 
temporary Art in the German Demo- 
■ erotic Republic V “Munch and the 
Workers," Barbican Center Gallery, 
Barbican, EC2, through April & 

□ 

The aspect of “Modern Chinese 
Painting” represented at the War- 
wick Arts Trust continues the “lite- 
rati” tradition. The show incorpo- 
rates the work erf forerunners of the 
contemporary, such as Wo Chang- 
shi (1844-1927), whose chief sub- 
jects were plants and flowers and 
whose aesthetic is maintained by 
such as Zhu Qi Zban (b. 1 892), who 
turned to painting in the traditional 
manner only in tee 1970s. 

“ Modem .Chinese Painting, ” 
Warwick Arts Trust, 33 Warwick 
Square, SW1, through March 24. 
Open Wednesdays to Sundays 10 
A.M. to 5 P.M. 

O 

The work of a recently rediscov- 
ered Sunday painter, Martin-Jules 
Cbouard (1839-1919), is celebrated 
at Hazlitt, Gooden and Fox. In 
large watercolor and pen-and-ink 
drawings over the basic penal de- 
tails, Chouard, a peregrinating 
French schoolmaster m the Seine et 
Marne region, portrayed the things 
and places that most took his fan- 
cy; chiefly still lifes of ripe fiuit, 
sometimes on the branch, more of- 
ten in the basket or bowl, showing a 
great appreciation for the visual 
qualities of apples, phnns and 
peaches. His portrayals of tire vil- 
lages and towns where he labored 
equally show an affectionate obser- 
vation. 

“ Martin-Jules Chouard 1839- 
1919," Hazlitt, Gooden and Fox, 38 
Bury Street, SL James’s, SW1 , 
through March 29. 

□ 

It would be unfair to compare 
the work of Chouard with that of 
Vuillard; nevertheless it is instruc- 
tive to see how different are the 
»maiflnr and the professional ap- 
proaches to similar themes, as evi- 
denced in the show at JPL Fine 
Arts of more than 50 “Pain tings. 
Pastels and Drawings by Edouard 
Vuillard 1868-1940 .^ Gone are the 
nervous amateur brick-by-brick de- 
tails, as VmDard make s a fine 
spring portrayal of “Vintimflle 
Square” in a few quick strokes of 
pastel; small sheets of economical 
pencil and pen-and-ink sketches of 
vases of flowers nevertheless cap- 
ture a whole envi ro n m ent and am- 
bience. And, quite absent from the 
work of the Sunday painter, there 
are people in interiors, long-hailed 
models, portraits of Madame Vuil- 
lard. 


“ Edouard Vuillard 1868-1940," 
JPL Fine Arts, 24 Davies Street, 
Wl, through April 6. 

□ 

Lorenzo (T Andrea is an Italian 
whose first one- man exhibition in 
England, at the Locus Gallery, 
shows him to be technically a 
painter and draftsman of great skill 
whose “monumental” images are a 
canons amalg am erf the classical 
and the surreal. He was born in 
Lucca in 1943. After studies at Car- 
rara and Milan he became a nota- 
ble book illustrator. The large can- 
vases in this show have a markedly 
literary bias. 

"D’Andrea," Locus Gallery, 116 
Heath Street, Hampstead, NW3, 
through March 29. 

. □ 

Jenny Oktm is a young American 
who trained in England as painter, 
filmmak er and photographer and 
unites all three disciplines in “Ar- 
chitectural Photographic Collages", 
at the Royal Institute of British 
Architects. She uses the compost- 

of the filmmaker to represent^ 
spirit of place. These work equally 
well to give the feeling of the Vic- 
torian bridge over the Thames at 
Chelsea — “Albert Bridge” — 
which looks as though at any min- 
ute it may grow wings and fly into 
the air; or the canyons of lire tall 
buildings of New Yolk as they 
seem to the pedestrian. The show 
will be at the Bertha Urdang Gal- 
lery in New York in June. 

“Architectural Photographic Col- 
lages by Jenny Ohm " Royal Insti- 
tute of British Architects, 66 Port- 
land Place, Wl, through March 29. 
□ 

Miro and Spizman is a recently 
opened gallery specializing in con- 
temporary Russian .wl In “The 
Rabin Family” the artists are Oscar 
Rabin, who was bom in Moscow in 
1928, exiled 50 years later and now 
lives in Paris; Ms wife, Valentina 
Krcmivnitskaya, the daughter of bis 
teacher and adoptive ratter, Eu- 
geni Kropivnitsky, and also a pupil 
of ter fatter, and son Alexander, 
bom in 1952. Oscar Rabin exempli- 
fies Eastern to Western 

affluence; Kropivnitskaya, work- 
ing principally in colored penal, 
produces fantasy images; Alexan- 
der is also a romantic fantasist, 
who neatly combines the merits of 
both his elders. 

“T he Rabin Family, " Miro and 


Spizman Fine Arts, 37 Craven Raid, 
W2, through March 30. 

□ 

Another first London one-man 
show is that of the Swiss painter 
J. C. Prfitre’s “Gasacal and Myth- 
ological Themes” at the Brampton 
Gallery, the pnmtfng* include the 
abstract “learns the Painter”; a se- 
ries of paintings of the Susannah of 
“S usannah and the Elders”; ‘The- 
seus and the Minotaur”; and a 
number of works related to the 
myth of Danae. 

V. C. Prhtre, ” Brompton Gallery, 
15117 Brompton Arcade, Knights- 
bridge, SW3, through April 6. 


and playing its matness against its 
sbumess. In keeping with the col- 
lage style of the era, swatches of 
wrapping paper or newsprint are 
made to work as added structural 
elements cm the canvas, so that, for 
instance, a column called “Court 
and Social News” from The Times 
of London is wittDy matte to work 
as a field of texture. 

The dusky shades contrasting 
with silver and cream, the free 
painterly attack and moodiness 
make the Salita show one of the 
most satisfying of the three. 

That NoveQfs predilection for 
line became ever stronger, so that 
he used not just the brush but the 
penal, is demonstrated in the show 
at the Isola Gallery, in the later 
canvases. Here constellations of 
scribbles — fossils, stars, anatomi- 
cal detail ironic sentences and 
curses — form sequmces like com- 
ic strips for the sophisticated, or are 
arranged in swarms and dusters 
gathering or scattering among 
patches of delicate, flower-petal 
paint color. From 1965 to the last 
year of his life, this idling of poetic 
insight, personal stories and opin- 
ions turns into simpler images, as in 
the beautiful “The Mamcian’s 
Kite” and “Homage for Ho Chi 
Min." 


The Segno Gallery shows draw- 
ings and etchings from all periods; 
Novelli’s idiosyncratic vocabulary, 
meandering labyrinths, sharp 
splintery marks and enigmatic in- 
vemories, which are to be felt rath- 
er than to be read. 

Novelli had an aristocratic back- 
ground. His mother was Austrian. 
Active in the underground at the 
age of 18, he was arrested and tor- 
tured by the Germans and then 
condemned to 30 years in prison. 
After the the war hie was freed and 
began to develop his style as a 
painter. 

From the start he was keenly 
aware of the styles then in the air: 
Tipies may have teen responsible 
for his early use of rich darks and 
for his manipulation erf surface, the 
American Abstract Expressionists 
for his attack with drip and splash, 
and Twombly for the linear mark. 
But like any attentive artist he was 
pan of the currents of his time, and 
never for a moment merely deriva- 
tive. 

Gastone Novelli (1925-1968}: 
Paintings from 1957 to I960, Gal- 
leria La Salita. Via Garibaldi 86; 
paintings from i960 to 1968, Gal- 
leria L' Isola. Via Gregoriana 5; 
drawings and prints from 1957 to 
1968, Galleria II Segno, Via Capole- 
case 4. All through March SO 

a 

Giuiio Turcato, one of the lead- 
ing participants in the Abstract Ex- 
pressionist movement in Italy after 
Word War II, is still not only an 
influential painter but, at 73, con- 
stantly renewing himself. While his 
peers turn out work that often has a 
dated and stale look, his recent ab- 
stractions appear fresh and lively. 

His freely brushed new canvases 
are bright, fluent and glistening. 
Wide surfaces of one even color are 
run over by quick rows of teardrop 
shapes, arabesques, jittery wiry 
Hues or sudden bursts of smoky 
flame forms. The blandness erf 
background surface is nearly tom 
up by the outrageously different 
color of the shapes and flourishes 
traveling over it Who but Turcato 
would dare to put together salmon 
pink with sulfurous purple and dri- 
ed-blood brown, baby blue with 
grft grey, volcano red with lava 
black and melon orange, contriving 
not only to make warring shades 
match and behave but make them 
vibrate. 

He seems to push intensity of 
paint, as wdl as sensibility, as far as 
they will go, almost to the edge 


where they would flip over and 
make the picture turn into mere 
decoration — then brings forth just 
die opposite, abstractions of subtle 
refinement and meaning. 

For him. color is everything. 
“The picture without color is liter- 
ary ” be writes in the catalog. 
“When there is color there is life." 

The brightness of some canvases, 
however, is enhanced and made iri- 
descent by a scatter of minute me- 
tallic spangles added to oil point; 
one wonders if this is necessary and 
if this technique will hold up 
against changes of temperature and 
time. 

Giuiio Turcato. Galleria 11 Ponte. 
Via S. fgnazio 6, through March 30. 
□ 

The success of the new Italian 
painters in their early 30s. hailed 
and exported on an international 
scale, lay in the fact that, encour- 
aged by critics and dealers, they 
began to use their hands and paint 
again, after the intellectual and in- 
direct exercises and games of con- 
ceptual art. Some erf these young 
men — there are no women among 
them — are not uninteresting, and 
are actually gaining deftness while 
being promoted. The 3 Cs — Cuc- 
chi, Chia and Ctemenu — are the 
best known; they’ have heavily bor- 
rowed from the Surrealists, ’meta- 
physical an and Chagall, and arc 
largely figurative. A second wave, 
less brash and more circumspect, is 
closer to abstraction and puts even- 
greater emphasis on the general 
collage style, which the former- 
group also employs. 

Gianni Dcssl belongs to this sec- 
ond wave. His recent canvases are- 
squarish, large and darkly evoca- 
tive. In these semi abstractions a 
shape like a window is cut here, am 
odd scroll of paper or a piece of 
lumber is glued there, a small- 
painted star is balanced over a mys-' 
lerious patch of slate grey, a cloud, 
of black paint is slowly bursting' 
forward but not descending. 

The blacks and greys seem to 
mean understatement, not gloomi- - 
ness, and all the materials and di-. 
vergent elements are lightly placed., 
without exaggerated emphasis. - 
Though pictorial meaning is not, 
obvious, a source of intelligent de-! 
liberation is somehow conveyed. In 
an oblique but positive way, Dessi's, 
canvases are thoughtful and in-- 
triguing. 

Gianni Dessi, Galleria Sperone,, 
Viadi Pallacarda 15. through March 
30. 


Strike Delays Mozart's Thte’ 

The Associated Press 

MILAN — A strike by orchestra 
members forced the postponement 
of Friday’s opening of Mozart’s 
“The Magic Fnite” aiLaScala.Tte 
performance has been rescheduled 
for Sunday, theater officials said. 



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5A1E BY AUCTION NOUVEAU DROUOT - Room 13 
Friday 29th March, 1985at2pjn. 

. -Yievwng: 28fh March, 19B5, fnwn-11 am. to 6 p.m. 
ond 29th March, 1985, from 11 tun. to noon 

IMPORTANT COLLECTION OF 1,000 TILES, 

mainly from Hofland, 17th and 18th Century 
from Delft, Gouda, Loiden, Rotterdam, 
Amsterdam, etc., manufactories 


Mm. Y. M. IE ROUX 
AudoOMT 

18, n» ds la Grmg* BataHra 
75009 Ptefe 
TaL: (1) 770.83.00 


Mo. J. X MATHIAS 

Auctioneer 
19, riM Amptra 
75017 Pen 
Td.: (1)622.70.25 


Expert; M. LEFBVRE 

24. rue du Bee. 75007 Pori* - Tel.: (1) 261 .19.40 
— — ■■ Trim; DROUOT 642 260 


PALAIS DES BEAUX-ARTS 

rue Royale, 10 - 1000 Brussels 

26, 27 and 28 March, 1985 

Paintings: Dali - Dommguez - De Vlaminck, M. - 

Keith, WH. - Knopff, F. signed French 
furniture - Jewels: Cartier and Van 
Cleef & Arpds. Bronze Sculptures - 
Old master paintings - Antique rugs. 

ExhHridon: 22, 23 and 24 March from 10 a.m. to 12:30 

pan. and from 2 p-m. to 6 pan. 

Information: Service des Ventes Publiques. TeL . 
2/512.18.94 - 512.85.78. 


Prints. Drawings. Paintings and Sculpture 
from the Collection of Tatyana Grosman 

Foundress of Universal Limited Art Editions 


Auction to he held on Thursday, April IK. I ' >S5 at 2 p.m 
in our galleries at 502 Park Avenue in New York. 

Viewing is from April 11 to April 17. 
Catalogue #5S52-IH is mailable for S 14 or SIP 
if ordered hv mail. 

For further information, please contact 
Jennifer Dodee Josselson in New York at 
2 1 2 ■540-1024. 

This sale will include works b\ 

Dine. Frnneis. Frankcnthafcr. Glamor. Johns. 
Motherwell. Newman. Rauschenberg. Risers. 
Rosenutiisi. Twornhlv and other's. 


CHRISTIES 


INTERNATIONAL 
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centre dart plashque contemporoin 


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Oeuvres 1964-1984 


S. Delaunay, Dumitresco, Gilioli, Le Pare, Malta, 
Meurice, Penalba, Rougemont, Schaffer, Valmier. 
Topis originoux 


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Estompes 


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Art contemporoin architecture, grapbisme 


9, crv. malignon pans Q - 299.16.16 
'A£A du mardi au somedi de 
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77, rue de Varenne, Paris 7*). Metro Varerme 

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Recent paintings 

ZYGOS GALLERY 

(Behind National Gaflety) 

MARCH 19- APRIL 4, 1985 
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Impressionists and 

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2 Ave. Matignon - Peris 8th 

T«L: XU JO. 7 i. mead* An. fcUo 1 
IO<w. to 1 pjn- - 2i30 to 7 pjo. 


Hotel George V - 72334.00 
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men. &n«. tot KUO ajn.-7 pjn.-2J0 in 9 pm 
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"ART EXHIBITIONS’ 
"ANTIQUES” 
"AUCTION SALES” 

appear 
on Saturday 
















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Page 6 


SATURDAT-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


Herald 


ATIONAL 



Published With Tb« iVew Tort Time* and The WWuogioo Pom 


SrtbuUC Why U.S. Should Help 


The Facts in Afghanistan 


It is always a pleasure to be able to 
good news about the United Nations, me 
current occasion is the acceptance of a critical 
report on Afghanistan by its Commission on 
Human Rights. It was already a plus that the 
commission last year overcame Soviet- bud t 
and procedural obstacles and authorized its 
first specific account of abuses perpetrated by 
the Soviet invaders of Afghanistan and their 
client government is KabuL Now the report 
has been submitted to the human rights body 
and accepted by a vote of 26 for and eight 
against, with eight abstentions. 

In a more ideal world, it would not be 
surprising that a representative international 
body, having looked at the best evidence avail- 
able, would condemn the perpetrators of Af- 
ghanistan’s agony. The United Nations, how- 
ever, to put it mildly, is not that ideal world. 
In areas where the Third World and the Com- 
munists find common cause, their transgres- 
sions are usually noted, if at all, almost inaodi- 
biy. The real and imagined sins of the Western 
nations and their partners are pursued with 
vigor — often with venom, too. This pattern 
has led to a special effort by the Reagan 
administration to apply a single standard in 
judging allegations of violations. 

. In this instance, the administration was aid- 
ed by the fact that the victim is a Third World 
state. Soviet aggression against A fghanistan is 


an issue — Vie tnam ’s invasion of Cambodia is 
another — where the Communists and the 
Third Woriders split. For six years, large ma- 
jorities at the United Nations have condemned 
Soviet policy. To freshen the issue, it was 
decided last year to launch an investigation in 
the Human Rights Commission. Afghanistan 
refused to cooperate, but Pakistan facilitated 
access to the refugees whose numbers and 
misery in themselves arc evidence as stark as 
their testimony of Soviet terror. 

For his painstaking report, Felix Ermacora, 
the Austrian law professor who compiled it, 
was called a neo-Nazi by the Soviet delegate 
The personal smear on an international civil 
servant, who .under the rules cannot defend 
himself, presumably reflects the Soviet 
Union’s finding that there were no valid 
objections to the substance of the repot 

Mr. Ermacora's document expresses “pro- 
found concern at the grave and massive viola- 
tion of human rights in Afghanistan" and also 
“distress ... at the widespread violations of 
the right to liberty and security of person, 
including the commonplace practice of torture 
against the regime's opponents, indiscriminate 
bombardments of the civilian population and 
the deliberate destruction of crops.'’ 

These are the facts in Afghanistan. It is 
necessary for everyone to know them. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Those Pregnant Children 


To sell something you must have a gimmick. 
In the United States, the tried-and-true gim- 
mick is sex. It sells jeans, cars, perfume, under- 
wear and detergents. It powers hit records, 
best-sellers, TV dramas and videos. It is a 
staple of many an evening with a VCR and the 
reason for many a celebrity's celebrity. It is big 
bucks, the gimmi ck that makes the merchan- 
dise move. The retailers are happy and so are 
the customers. But what about the children? 

■ Can America shield its children from the 
sexual sell? It does not want to try. Then can 
society teach them how to deal with sex? Yes, 
but it does not want to tiy that, either. 

J Obviously not, even though the United 
States leads neatly all other developed nations 
of the world in teen-age pregnancy, abortion 
apd childbearing rates. Not when we are the 
only developed country where teen-age preg- 
nancy has been increasing. Not when it is oar 
most vulnerable adolescents — girls under 15 
whose pregnancies account for the maxi- 
ujnm difference between our teen-age birth- 
rate and that of other countries. 

| America's children are bearing children at a 
rate unparalleled in the Netherlands, Sweden, 
France, Canada, England and Wales —coun- 
ties similar to the United States in general 
cultural background and economic devdop- 
nJenL The reason, according to a study just 
released by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, is 
not that U S. adolescents are more apt to be 
spcuaDy active. The median age at ink inter- 
course is similar in all the countries studied. 

| Neither is it because adolescents in other 
countries have more abortions. They have few- . 
er. Nor is the teen-age fertility in this country 
ejcplained by the very high pregnancy rates 


among black teen-agers, many of whom live in 
a degree of poverty unknown in Europe. The 
rate for white adolescents alone exceeds that 
for the other teen-age populations. Nor does 
welfare appear to serve as an incentive to out- 
of-wedlock childbearing. If so, one would ex- 
pect lower birthrates here than in the other five 
countries, where email support is generous. 

Instead, the answer lies in our reluctance to 
accept responsibility for the sexual revolution 
— and prepare our children for life in this 
changed society. Contraceptive counseling 
and sex education in the schools can make a 
powerful difference, yet they suffer constant 
attack. Some states severely limit the advertis- 
ing and display of contraceptives, and it is the 
rare TV channel that will run even the most 
tasteful contraceptive advertising. 

Although the pill is accepted as a highly 
appropriate contraceptive method elsewhere, 
ami despite the ever-increasing scientific evi- 
dence of its safety and efficacy for adolescents, 
it is greeted with suspicion in America. 


Teen-agers need help to avoid pregnancy, 
sxactly why 


and to avoid abortion. That is exactly why 
France, the Netherlands and Sweden have 
committed themselves to providing contracep- 
tive services for young people. But as toe 
Guttmacher study notes, “the nature and the 
intensity of religions feeling in America serve 
to inject an emotional quality into public de- 
bate dealing with adolescent sexual behavior.” 

America wallows in the byproducts of sexu- 
al liberation — raunchy TV, suggestive adver- 
tising and pornographic movies. In theory, 
adults arc able to coper But one can only fed 
pity for the teen-agers, and for their chfldren. 

- THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 

ITie Con-ect Thing to Do Harrods and the Egyptians 


; Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the new Soviet lead- 
er, may find it impossible — or at least impoli- 
tic at home — to drop his new duties and agree 
r(ght away to President Reagan's offer for a 
summit meeting But making the offer was the 
right thing for the president to do. 
j Mr. Reagan has obvious reasons to want a 
summit with Mr. Gorbachev. He is sensitive to 
the fact that he is the first president since 
Herbert Hoover not to meet at least once with 
his opposite number in the Kremlin. But there 
aje more substantive reasons. 

■ U.S. -Soviet relations show signs of emerging 
(tom the shadows of great stress and strain. It 
is important thm small improvements in rda- 
uonsbroaden into nuclear-arms reduction and 
l^ss confrontational relations generally. 

. This will require realistic, flexible approach- 
es from Moscow as well as from Washington. 
And it remains to be seen whether Mr. Gorba- 
chev's elevation will lead to more realism and 
flexibility in Soviet policies at borne and 
abroad. As Henry A. Kissinger commented 
this week, “You don’t get to be head of the 
Politburo by being a choir boy.” Even if Mr. 
Gorbachev has benign intentions, he must win 
over Politburo colleagues to polity shifts. Mr. 
Reagan's advisers emphasize that the presi- 
dent wants merely to open the door. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


You can still do the grand tour in London of 
Harrods, Form urns, Sotheby’s, Hampton 
Court, the Old Vic and back to the Dorchester 
for the night. God's in his heaven and all’s 
right with the world. Nothing has changed. 

Nothing, that is, except the ownership. Har- 
rods is bring sold to the Egyptian A! -Fayed 
brothers. Others have already fallen. Sotheby's 
(to the United States), the Dorchester (to 
Hong Kong), and the Old Vic (to Canada). 
Parts of Hampton Court are to be privatized. 
Enough to make one weep on one’s Times 
(Australian owned) or caned one's Encyclope- 
dia Britannica (write to Chicago). 

One of the motives behind the Al-Fayed 
takeover of Harrods is reported to be exploita- 
tion of the prestige of the name by building 
other stores abroad and marketing Harrods 
goods. Why, pray, did this not occur before to 
the British in this nation of shopkeepers? 

If five years of the Thatcher government 
cannot produce better use of existing capital 
assets we should, perhaps, be grateful that 
others will do the job for us, courtesy of an 
ownership switch. If you extracted from Brit- 
ain's GNP growth such immigrant contribu- 
tions. the figures would look sicker. But the 
Dorchester and Fortnums bound on — even if 
there is no honey still for tea. 

— The Guardian (London). 


FROM OUR MARCH 16 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


X910: Debate Hols Up on Sooth Pole 
NEW YORK — The race for the South Pole is 
attracting interest. The New Haven Register 
says: “What's the hurry about starting for the 
South Pole? Surely we are entitled to at least a 
year of peace. This Polar discovery has all 
become a strenuous business.” The Pittsburgh 
Dispatch remarks: “While it is improbable 
that the discovery will add to the material 
wealth of the world, it may satisfy curiosity 
and scientists may glean information that may 
be of interest, if not of value.” The San Fran- 
cisco Chronicle adds: “Further accounts of the 
new land which the French explorer Charcot 
discovered in the Antarctic Ocean describe it 
as consisting of ice, glaciers and rocks. That 
bring so there will be no objection from any- 
wjtere to the French flag being hoisted over it" 


1935: U.S, Agents Open Crime War 
WASHINGTON — In the greatest drive ever 
launched by the Federal government against 
organized crime, 1,200 Secret Service and De- 
partment of Justice agents, operating along a 
front which included the entire forty -right 
states, arrested 1,747 smugglers, counterfeiters 
and narcotic dealers [on March IS]. In New 
York, raiders engaged in a gun battle at 233 
West Sixty-Second Street when they swooped 
down on the headquarters of Ollie Simmons, 
known as “The Zulu Kid,” and leader of a 
gang of dope peddlers. Simmo ns was arrested 
and thirty-five ounces of heroin seized. In 
other parts of the country Federal agents were 
forced to put up fights in making arrests. 
Secretary of the Treasuiy Henry Morgen thau 
Jr. said be was pleased with (he results. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


IPHIUP M. FOISIE 
,wAl 


. /ALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL AST 
CARL GFW1RTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 
Executne Editor RENE BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Asnetme Publisher 

Deputy Editor RICH ARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 
Axmwte Editor FRANCOIS DESMA1SONS Director Qrododati 

■ ROLF D. KRANEPUHL DiraSarqfAdmtamgSala 

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1 © 19S5. International Herald Tribune. AH rights resented 




Rebels in Cambodia 


By Marvin Ott 


W ASHINGTON — Imagine a 
strategically placed country 
occupied by a Communist power. 

The invader is deeply hostile to the 
United States, with which it has re- 
cently fought a bitter war. It is sup- 
plied and backed by the Soviet 
Union. The occupied country has lost 
one-quarter of its population since 
events preceding the invasion. 

The invading army faces an indige- 
nous resistance movement — roughly 
one-half under nationalist, non- 
Commuoist leadership. The resis- 
tance is supported politically by 
neighboring pro-Western states. 
President Reagan has indicated that 
the broader regkm of the conflict is of 
paramount interest to America. 

This scenario, while oversinqtii- 
jfied, is real. It describes Vietnam’s 
occupation of Cambodia. That con- 
flict has recently intruded on Ameri- 
can consciousness as a large-scale 
Vietnamese offensive has overrun 
major resistance base camps in Cam- 
bodia, driving the occupants (includ- 
ing 250,000 civilians) into Thailand 


j&ysia. Indonesia, Brunei and (he 
’betheeme 
.S, war in 
leaders bdieve that the 



decade of U.S. involvement bought 
time for the non-Conmnmist states of 
the region to get onto their feet 
Underpressure from the grouping, 
the UN General Assembly has recog- 
nized the coalition of resistance orga- 
nizations as the legitimate govern- 
ment of Cambodia. And last month 
the ASEAN foreign minis ters jointly 
issued a tough communique con- 
demning Vietnamese aggression and 


:nmng 

calling Tor international support — 
’ ' nds for 


and leading to dashes between the 
dVie 


Thai and Vietnamese armies. 

The Cambodian resistance consists 
of three groups: the Khmer Rouge, a 
peasant-based. Communist organiza- 
tion that ruled Cambodia between 
.1975 and 1978 with unparalleled bru- 
tality, and two non-Commurrist orga- 
nizations formed in 1979. The non- 
Communists have become a 
significant force, with about 25,000 
armed men and thousands more 
trained but lacking weapons. China 
has provided the only effective mili- 
tary support fra the insurgents. 

Diplomatic condemnation of Viet- 
nam has been led by the Association 
of South-East Asian Nations, which 
consists of Thailand, Singapore, Ma- 


tbat is, weapons and funds for ibe 
resistance. It is the first time ASEAN 
has publidy made such an appeal 

How should the United States re- 
spond? To date, Washington has lim- 
ited its involvement to humanitarian 
assistance for refugees. There are per- 
suasive reasons to maintain this po- 
licy. It keeps the conflict at arm’s 
length, avoids disturbing the uneasy 
political ghosts of the Vietnam War, 
and does not jeopardize painful nego- 
tiations with Hand over the recovery 
of missing-iii-action remains. 

But there are other considerations, 
and. if events proceed on the present 
course, one of two results is likely: 

First, the Cambodian resistance 
will be ground down by superior 
Vietnamese firepower, and interna- 
tional political support for the insur- 
gents will wane. The movement of 
Vietnamese settlers into Cambodia 
win accelerate, and a process of Viet- 
namese colonization will effectively 
eliminate Cambodia as a nation, 
leaving re maining Cambodians as a 
minority in their own country. 

A second possibility is that China 
win try to forestall the first outcome, 
even at great cost This will require a 



.Wall IVwp* 


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4- 


7.j wi rip 


-.1 


i.-rtmtri Ml 


g o A -wftrT 4 




;j W feril 


massive Chinese invasion of Vietnam 
— Tar exceeding the scale of 1979, 
when thousands of Chinese troops 
crossed the Vietnamese border. 

Vietnamese absorption of Cambo- 
dia would eliminate the historic buff- 
er between Vietnam and Thailand. 
Southeast Asia would be divided be- 
tween a garrisoned Soviet-aligned, 
Marxist mini -empire and a group of 
pro-Western, pluralist societies. 

Alternatively, the Chinese at- 


American and ASEAN interests 
require the continued existence of an 
autonomous Cambodia — even one 
heavily influenced (bm not occupied) 
by Vietnam. Failure to achieve this 
mmi m um objective would jeopardize 
the cohesion and security of ASEAN 
and cast new doubts on the ability of 
America to defend its interests. 

Hanoi will stick to its course unless 


mauveiy, 

tempts at a military solution could 


mean a new fndoefama war. One like- 
ly consequence, anathema to all 
states of the region, would be a great- 
ly expanded Chinese role in toe af- 
fairs of Southeast Asia. 


unsupportable. This wdl occur only if 
it faces a combination of pressures: 
Chinese politico-military coercion, 
international diplomatic isolation, 
economic deterioration (particularly 
compared to ASEAN success) and 
military pressure from the Cambodi- 


an resistance. If the insurgents are 
be effective, they must be betr 
trained and supplied. This nee 
American money and equipment. 

Aid can be restricted to the no 
Communist components of the res 
lance. It can be supplied to ASEA! 
which can handle distribution a 
t raining . The result would be a lo 
profile, tut not covert Americ 
role. There need be no concede* 
of support for legitimate national a 
humanitarian interests. 


:Ut i-w 

!.- .rvifEtf 


s jM 


4f 


' *i*!WN 

# ' dm 


The miter, a senior associate of t 
Carnegie Endowment for Inlenuaii 
al Peace in Washington, amiribtt, 
this so the Los Angeles Times. 


rr 

■kik-WD f 

•i-'. 


Israeli Unity Is Latest Casualty of War in Lebanon Summit Cal 

By Reagan 
Bodes Wefc 


: : itO 

a* Mr 

i , - 


By Hirsch Goodman 


J ERUSALEM — By late July, Is- 
rael’s prolonged adventure in 
Lebanon will be ended. Left behind 
in what was once a Christian-domi- 
nated authority is an ayatollah-type 
disorder, where the Shia majority has 
learned to use the gun as an essential 
dement of political debate. And 
where some consider it a privilege to 
serve Allah as h uman bombs. 

Ariel Sharon, the defense minister 
at that time, set oat to destroy Pales- 
tinian terror, and created Shia terror 
instead. He intended to put Phalan- 


anon. but Mr. Gemayd was killed 
before he could take up office in 
September. 1982. Mr. Sharon’s 
dream of a South Lebanese Army on 
Israel's northern border has vanished 
as well; the SLA is characterized 
more. by fratricide than unity. 

The ironies of this war are endless. 
Bui none is greater than the re-emer- 
gence of the PLO as a double threat 
to Israel: militarily, from radicals; 
diplomatically, from moderates. 

in June 1 982, when Israel launched 
Operation Peace for Galilee, as this 
war was called before Sharon ex- 
panded it, Israel feared the military 
threat from the Palestinians. 

Now, while Israel's leaders think 
they have the military answers to 
what may develop on the northern 
border after their forces withdraw 
from Lebanon, they are less certain 
about dealing with the diplomatic 
initiative emanating from Cairo. And 
while there is almost total political 
consensus in the cabinet on the need 
to leave Lebanon, there is absolutely 
no consensus on how to pursue peace 
— if indeed it is peace being offered 
by President Hosni Mubarak in the 
name of “moderate Arab alliance.” 





32 




By Flora Lewis 


!■» if 


IKSfSfr 


deeply d 

ed over the seriousness of Mr. Mu- 
barak’s initiative. Prime Minister Shi- 
mon Peres is prepared lo make major 
concessions to see the peace process 
regenerated: his deputy. Yitzhak 
Shamir, is noL The Labor wing of the 
coalition, led by Mr. Peres, would be 
open to the inclusion of moderate 
Pales tinians in future talks, and is 
prepared to discuss territorial com- 
promise: the Likud faction, led by 
Mr. Shamir,' remains dedicated to a 
Greater Israel which would include 
all of the West Bank and Gaza. 

Some cabinet ministers believe 
that Mr. Mubarak’s gesture was gen- 


uine; others see the Egyptian’s moves 
over the past month as a maneuver to 
ensure Mr. Mubarak a warm wel- 
come in Washington this past week. 
If the latter war the case, the visit 
seems to have done little to change 
U.S. policy toward the Middle EasL 
Both sides of the Israeli coalition 
are mutually suspicions of Mr. Mu- 
barak's sudden warming up of a 
peace process he reluctantly inherited 
from Anwar Sadat The Egyptian 
president’s moves come after months 
of refusal to meet with any Israeli 
official, after withdrawing his envoy 
in Tel Aviv, after making no move to 
implement (be clauses of the treaty 


Danes Discover NATO’s Drawbacks 


C OPENHAGEN — If ever 
there were a people who are 
peace loving and simply want to 
enjoy the good things of hfe, it is the 
Danes. But geography has made 
them the guardians of the entry to 
the Baltic, and NATO has provided 
them with strategically important 
airfields on the Jutland Pe ninsula. 

As a remit erf World War IL the 
Danes discovered that larger pow- 
ers do not always respect the desires 
of small, neutral states. When, 
therefore, they had to pick sides in 
the Cold War, they picked NATO. 
The difficulty was that Danish 

governments have never really been 
willing to draw fully the conse- 
quences of this decision. After U.S. 
military aid ran out in the late 
1960s, the Folketing, or parliament, 
was unwilling to spend the money 
necessary to main tain and modern- 
ize the Danish forces. There also 
were inadequate arrangements for 
the receipt of allied remforcements. 

The Dianes comforted themselves 
with the assumption that their terri- 
tory was so important to the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization that 
they would be defended no matter 
whaL A West German division in 
Schleswig-Holstein stands between 
them and the Red Army. Substan- 
tial German naval and air forces are 
ready to help them guard the Dan- 
ish straits in a seaborne attack. 

NATO implicitly encouraged 
Danish illusions by arranging peri- 
odic exercises of allied forces in 
Denmark. However, what most 
Danes did not understand, and 
many still do not understand. Is 
that it is one thing for troops to 
exercise and another to fight. Com- 
bat requires large amounts of am- 
munition and other supplies. Fur- 
thermore, it lakes time to move 
heavy equipment by sea, particular- 
ly if it most cross the Atlantic. 

While recent events — such as 
alleged incursions by Soviet subma- 
rines into Swedish waters and the 
arrest in 1984 of an alleged KGB 
agent in the Norwegian Foreign Of- 


By John C. Ansland 


Gee — have disturbed the Danes, ic 
became dear during a recent visit to 
Copenhagen that security polity is 
a political football. 

The minority non-Sodalist gov- 
ernment led by Foul Scfaluter is 
preoccupied with the Danish econ- 
omy. The Social Democrats, led by 


Anker Jorgfiison, are ^preoccupied 
security po- 


with the abstractions of security po- 
licy. While there are a number of 


Soviet gmerah are 
unlikefy to lose much 
sleep over Denmark. 


ships. Others in the fleet are old. 
The army requires more equipment 
than it is gening, and its ammuni- 
tion stocks are dangerously low. 
The air force is acquiring F- 16s, but 
its Swedish-built Drakens will need 
to be replaced in (he 1990s. But the 
money far all this seems lacking. 

Steps to improve the arrange- 
ments related to allied reinforce- 
ments are moving slowly. As a re- 
sult of the U.S. Air Force’s 
co-located operational base (COB) 
program, four Danish airfields have 
been designated to receive UJS. air 


balloons in the air, the one that 
contains the largest amount of air is 
the Soviet-supported proposal fra a 
Nordic nuclear-free zone. 


The balance of power in the FoU 
tneRadic 


keting is held by the Radical Liber- 
al Party, which supports the 
Schluter government's economic 
policies but backs the Social Demo- 
cratic Party’s anti-nuclear cam- 
paign. This has led to defeats for 
the government in parliament on 
security issues which are not direct- 
ly related to Danish defense, such 
as the deployment erf U.S. missiles 
in Europe. As a remit, Denmark 
has become known in NATO cir- 
cles as a “footnote nation” because 
of ministerial reservations which 
have been added to communiques. 

The Social Democratic leader- 


ship, which supports Denmark's 
‘ in NATO, 


originally built fra use by West 
German forces, it has been possible 
to pre-position some 7.500 tons of 
aircraft ammunition. But there are 
still not enough hardened shelters 
fra the U.S. aircraft 

Some British and U.S. ground 
force units have been designated to 
Denmark, bm there are no plans to 
pre-position heavy equipment. 

In his Rapid Reinforcement 
Plan, General Bernard Rogers, the 
supreme allied mmmanrirr in Eu- 
rope, also proposes to seed a U.S. 
division to Denmark. But as there 
are no plans to pre-position equip- 
ment for this division, Soviet gener- 
als will not lose much sleep over it 

Thus, in eyem of war tomorrow, 
the Danes would probably get some 
allied air remforcements, but it is 
questionable whether it would get 
any substantial ground reinforce- 
ments. These are not questions to 
which both the D anish media or 
politicians pay much attention. 

Given the paucity of interest in 


designed to flesh out the skeleton left 
by Mr. Sadat, Menachem Begin and 
Jimmy Carter at Camp David. 

But while the Likud half of the 
government tends toward blanket 
suspicion, the Labor half believes 
that this is an opportunity for break- 
ing the deadlock not to be missed. 
They argue that never before has the 
geopolitical reality of the Middle 
East been more propitious for peace, 
than now. Cairo is no longer isolated. 
Egypt and Jordan have exchanged 
ambassadors. Iran continues to lose 
ground against Iraq and Syria is no 
longer the pacesetter in Arab politics. 

There is tittle doubt, however, that 
if Mr. Mubarak manages to sur- 
mount the difficulties inherent in 
bringing a viable, mutually accept- 
able, Palestinian delegation to the ne- 
gotiating table along with the Jorda- 
nians, then the fragile national unity 
government would shatter and Israel 
would face new elections. 

But first, Mr. Mubarak has to find 
a way to the negotiating table, where 
the central issue will be the future of 
the Palestinian people, without 
Yasser Arafat sitting at the head of 
the Palestinian delegation. 

Mr. Arafat was banished from Bei- 
rut, Tripoli and Damascus, to emerge 
as apparently pivotal in any future 
diplomatic process — perhaps more 
so than in the past WhDe the Israeli 
force was debilitated in Lebanon, 
Mr. Arafat grew stronger. 

It has long been joked in Israel that 
the government’s biggest nightmare 
will be when Mr. Ararat says that he 
is prepared to recognize Israel’s right 
to exist Can he do so and survive? 
Probably, given his past record. Will 
he? Again, given his past record, 
probably not A pity. At least that 
would have been one positive factor 
to emerge from the Israeli adventure. 


G ENEVA — President Ron 
Reagan has invited the new . : 
viet leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev ” 
a summit meeting, apparently wi <T 
out the precondition of a nearly cc" . 
pleted agrwanent set for the th ' . 
previous Soviet leaders since 1~' 
Reagan has been in the White Har ' 
This is a good sign. The Sov'~ 
U.S. arms talks here are just start .• ' 
It is too early to judge their prosp© - 
Despite talk of new “flexibility" 
the vS. side, it is hinted that - 
Americans expect the first new f 
pass! to come from the Russians^ 
U5. officials speculate that-:._- 
Rnssians may come up with a o 
malic offer of concessions on stir 
gic missiles, and perhaps on Euror . 
ales, in return for a space arms b \ 
Some fear this would reverse 
U.S. political andpropagandaadv 
rage. Moscow failed in us camps 


to split the alliance on the dep] . 
meat of UJS. missiles in Europe. LlUTCll 
Trading off real Soviet 
against tne vision of future 
wars” could have broad appeal .. ^ f ' 

U5. allies. Europeans have been i 
suaded not to object to research 
the feasibility of a missile defens , 
space, but they are uncomfartt j . 
and skeptical aboul the ixnplkati: ~ 



Kate* 




E ft 




of the idea for their own security - _ 

Other Americans involved, hov : 
er. would be very interested if ft' i. 
cow came up with an effective , 
on reducing the arms race. It is at)! 
point that Mr. Reagan’s comnritrr^ Lt 
to space defense and his call 
“deep cuts” in missile levels cc 
come into contradiction. , * 

So far, be is talking as though 
can have both. Bui if Moscow dot o 
to put forward a straight choice, tl'^ =‘ 
will be a tough decision to make: 
probably great pressure from ^ . 

Western alliance. Therefore, an :n - 
summit conference before theseT :/ 
sues come to a head would help. 

Paul H. Nitze, the U.S. preside,' 
special arms control adviser, has ■ 'S'- 
fined two criteria for assessr -V 
whether it will be worthwhile to £ 
ceed beyond initial research forsj:.. ' 
defense. One is the vulnerability v 
the envisioned antimissil e wcapoc v ^ _ 
attack from the other side. The 
ond is their probable cost. reJacv J»»» 
the cost of countermeasures &xm^^ 1 ** I'f 
creased offensive arsenals. 


' b - 


■— M 

• 



.* W 

* -m 

DM 

- • 


Wr4H 

V 4) 


JM 

• t-:'. % 

: «M) 


‘ * 

mm 

ad 



mm 

- 


mm 





* 


"**' Nlkit 


■ m M « « t 
Hfl» 9 


t Kittr# 


Experts say it is likely lo lake i . 

r t h i w. ware hrfnr# nwn fentA * ‘* - r 


The writer, defense corespondent 
for die Jerusalem Post, contributed this 
comment to the Los Angeles Times. 


LETTER 


Justice in Middle East 


or three years before even tenia 
answers can be provided. This she 1 
mean that Mr. Reagan is noL as ti 
ly locked into his space plan a:! 
sounds. There is room to negptia 

Establishing direct contact t. 
Mr. Gorbachev before both sides- 
meat their postions would provii . 
better chance of weighing what i 
be diplomatically possible. 

It will take Mr. Gorbachev » . : 
time to move his own men up thru ■■ 
the apparatus. Since Foreign Mi 
ter Andrei A. Gromyko has boa 
charge of the failed diplomacy, 
cannot be expected to turn into ' 
advocate of a change of course. B 


■’’•Ml- 


- 85*. 

• -. -t* n 


am 




1 -V 


Reading editorial comments such 
as “Mideast: A War Too Late” 


Mr. Gorbachev wants to ease v:f> 
-.1 


(March 1) makes one wonder if peace 
based on justice in the Arab-Isradi 


membership in NATO, has initiat- 
ed a parliamentary study designed 
io restore the Danish consensus on 
security polity. But there seems to 
be little prospect for any significant 
improvement in the near future in 
the Danish defense posture. 

The defense bwket which is now 
in effect set until 1988, is one of the 
most modest in NATO. The D anish 
navy is mothballing several of its 


Denmark re garding military mat- 
" ble that the 


ters, it is understandabl 
government does not want a show- 
down oa the abstractions of its se- 
curity policy. For tins would lead to 
an election. In tins contest, the 
Danish people would have to 
choose between their support for 
NATO and their fear of nuclear 
weapons. It is far from certain that 
NATO’s supporters would prevail 
International Herald Tribune. 


conflict has any meanmg to the au- 
Tin 


thors. The New York Tunes in that 
respect sounds like an Israeli opposi- 
tion party in the United States, trying 
to dictate what Israel should or 
should not consider what constitutes 
a positive development in the Isradd- 
Palestinian conflict. 

Israel has no right to keep the Pal- 
estinian and the other occupied Arab 
lands or to deprive tiie Palestinian 
people of their legitimate right to self- 
determination in their homeland, 
Palestinians in the West Bank at Jor- 
dan and Gaza are not Israeli citizens. 

AYADAL-YASIRL. 

Vienna. 


sions, a summit session with Mr. r 
gan could hdp him strengthen P 
boro support tor the necessary st- 
On the Americas side, one of 
most encouraging aspects of the • 
the Geneva talks have begun is - 
presence of congressional obse. 
teams. Theynot only bring a nw 
partisanship to the United States 
preach, but they also link arms i 
trol more immediately with the ■ 
defense spending debates ahead.' 

Both Senate and House par* 
pants say they intend to keep a 
steady watch on developments. If 1 
proves (bechances of keeping nq 
ations from deteriorating into a 
rude mounted to avoid agreemer s 
There seems to be a fresh star 
around. It is welcome, at last. 

The New York Times. 


• , S?m 


" . .. 


■■ • 



*■* " o w* m 




















Oitigties Index 


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BUSINESS /FINANCE 


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AY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


ECONOMIC SCENE 

py-on-the-Wall Perspective 
Oh Bush-Gorbachev Chat 

fe ’ By LEONARD SILK 

. Ww Vorfc Tima Serein 

HW YORK — “In today’s world, there is no way that 
Fit | we can successfully address international political 
problems Mthout giving full weight to the economic 
' issues,” Richard A Debs, president of Morgan Stanley 
[piapjMonal, recently told the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
b5*c£ “Nor is there any way we can address international 
S&aomifc problems without considering the political issues.” 
Jflus maybe a truism but, as Mr. Debs said, “unfortunately it is 
i Truism that is often neglected in die way we run our govem- 
nent.” However, useful truth lies not in grnrraKtics but in the 

fofaifk . . 

All the main items on the U.S. foreign-policy agenda are 
leavily freighted with ■ ea>- . 


>n Summit i 

i 

I lodes i 

HurjL. 


W%* 


*1‘"> : .. 
iW. 

,*? •» 

•» *• 

*■»:; • 

<•.« ■_ i- i- 

it - 

ft* 

» \i.:~ ' 

jT-: • 

'■* 


Incmaics. The list begins with 

American relations with the U.S. policy-makers 
Soviet Union under its new * , , , ‘ 

leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 86CD1 to DC bored 
.Vice President George Bush u 

said, after his first sesaon with b 7 Complexities 

of foreign relations. 

Gorbachev conducted the 

meeting, and he did it with great confidence and assurance. He 
made a very good impression.” 

Bat what did the men at the top say to each other? Mr. Bush 
said the meeting was constructive and nonpolemical and touched 
on a wide variety of issues but would not say what they talked 
abouL It seems reasonably certain that, even if one had been a fly 
on the wall, one would have heard nothing like the following 
exchanges: 

Mr. Bush: “We realize that you need arms control a heck of a 
lot more than we do. Your economy is in serious trouble and 
unless you can get os to slow down the arms race, you are in 
danger of an economic collapse.” 

Mr- Gorbachev: “That's nonsense. If we survived the horrible 
death and destruction of World War n, we can certainly survive 
your efforts to outspend us or not trade with us. As for ’star wars,* 
it won't work and if you want to spend yourself into bankruptcy, 
that 5 s your problem. What we are afraid’of is that you are going to 
give another twist to the arms race and make the strategic balance 
all the more precarious.” 

Mr. Bnsh: “Why don’t you think of these things when you are 
building your own antimissile systems and outspeoding us mi 
military weapons?” 

Mr. Gorbachev: “Yon exaggerate, sir. Your own Central Intel- 
ligence Agency, whose congressional testimony I read religiously, 
or at least spiritually, has cut their estimate of our rate of growth 
in military spending from 4 to 5 percent to 2 percent, and yon 
have been increasing outlays by tuple that rate or more since Mr. 
Reagan took office.” 

Mr. Bash: “Right you are, and we intend to keep it up, if only 
those nervous ndhes in Congress don’t chicken out” 

Mr. Gorbachev: “Isn't it really the budget deficit they are 
worried about? Your economy is more threatened than ours, 
since you are capitalists with unstable markets.” 

Mir. Bush: “We can grow our way out of the deficit” 

Mr. Gorbachev: “I thought you were the fellow who invented 
the term ‘voodoo economics.' ” 

Mr. Bush: “Fair is fair, and when I have new facts I change my 
view, don’t you? Our performance since Mr. Reagan took office is 
the economic miracle of the 1980s. And our huge advantage is in 
our technology.” 

Mr. Gorbachev: “I know that If I may quote your CIA people 
again, your military equipment is produced with inore sophisti- 
cation, more quality, better performance, more? Safety, ffloit' 
quality con tror than ours. As the chairman of your Joint Chiefs 
of Staff, General Vessey, told the Senate Aimed Services Com- 
mittee, *1116 Soviet Union has a quantitative advantage in many 
(CoBthned on Page 9, CoL 2) 


Currency Rates 


Lota interbank rate on March 15, excluding fees. 

Official firing* for Amsterdam. Brunch. Frankfurt, Milan, Pore. New Yorfc rote at 
4 PM 


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Ud 

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230540 

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130*30 

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20*00 

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55735 

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1033 

2.13*00 

1027 

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10544 

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2499* 

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22242 

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1*54 

1.1073* 

MU 170MS 
Z7597 24*544 


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04W AutroflmS U62B 
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027*7 Sawfl rival 31134 02723 UAM.4MMI : 


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Mvcb 15 


Dollar D-Mark Prase llarflne Flwic ECO SDR 
1M. 9 -tva *h - *K »-59* 14W ■ 14W 10 W- 10 W ion. - 1091. 1 VS 

2M. OU -94k *W-*K 50W-SW 14 M» - 14 fh 1DW - 11 TOW - 10Hr BOh 

3m. m - «k «v> - cw 5H.-J* na-Dii mw-mw ww-iow i« 
6M. KM-HU 4K, - IK S* -i 13 lb - 13 W T1 % - II Bh 10W - MM »W 

1Y, JT . HW IW-lfl. 5W ■ SI. I2W - T» 110W-12W 10W-10W TVs 

Bates apoilcaale to Jnlertonk deoostts at Si mutton minimum (oreootvotwatt. 

Sources. : Mo rom Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Poond. FF): Uoyds Bank (ECU); Beaton 
(SDBI. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


March 15 


1 mo. 

V Vh - Vtto 
Source: Reuters. 


Key Money Rates 

United States c 

Mfcounr Role 
Podtral Funds 
Prime Rote 

Brokor Laon Roto 93 

Cafflrn. Peier. 30-179 day* 
TrnoftHi Trmunr Bills 
Unonth Trasmry Blits 
CM 30-59 days 
COl«M9davs 


3 mas. 
VSfc -9V* 


imas. 

10 w -10*. 


Britain 

CSm Prtv. 

punk Bern Rote 

*4 

U 1 

Coil Money 

Mfc 

14» : 

91-dov Treasury Bill 

IM 


Xnonth intartank 

Japan 

13WT3 lSrn | 

Discount Rate 

5 

5 j 

Call Moray 

4 7/14 4 7/14 | 

4W0V Infarnonk 

M 6 9/16 


Uomtard Ref* 
OramhW Role 
On* Month Inlertonk 
3fltonm Inferbonfc 
*-monlti Infetmnk 


Intervention Rate 
Cbm Manor 
Onemonfti infert on k 
hnbnifi naartawik 
6-mamti in f arte n fc 


*J» 4i« 
000 *JS 
425 435 
445 45D 
445 470 


lOte ww 
unit u/14 
10 11/1410 17/14 
MM Iff* 
n 9/14 10 9/16 


Gold Prices 


Somes: Routers. Commenoank. CrMlt Ly 
awM Uoyds Book. Bank Of Tokyo. 


KM. P* cuve 

Hone Kane MOM *»40 

LurtnftWY HD2S — — 0-10 

Paris (123 41*0) 33145 M -1.13 

Turfdi 29035 29225 + 1J» 

3*9.90 29220 +195 

HtoTvU - »•+» 

Official fixFnai far London, Peri* md Umif 
Oagg. opening and dnrirapricaalof Han o icana 
ood BiricD, Nn York Cnmax cvrraet aHdrad. 
AD orlee* In IU5 ver ounce. 

Source: Reuters. 


** 


Output 
Declines 
In U.S. 

Price Index Folk 
0.1% for Month 

By Jane Scabcny 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Production 
at Ua. factories. Utilities end mines 
last mouth plunged OJ percent and 
prices at the producer level de- 
clined 0.1 percent, reflecting the 
strong dollar’s role in keeping 
prices low while eroding domestic 
production. 

The decline in the Producer Price 
Index for ruiichrri goods followed 
no ihany in January mid a 0.2- 
percent increase in December, the 
Labor Department reported Fri- 
day. For the past 12 months, prices 
of finished goods at the wholesale 
level increased 0.7 percent, the low- 
est increase since prices rose 0.6 
percent frtim December 1982 to 
December 1983. the Labor Depart- 
ment said. 

In a separate report, the Federal 
Reserve Board said that U.S. in- 
dustrial production last month de- 
clined 0.5 percent after a rise of 03 
percent in January and an increase 
of 0.1 percent in December. 

Manufacturing production 
dropped 0.4 percent m February, 
following a rise of 0.1 percent in 
January and 03 percent m Decem- 
ber, the Fed said. Mining produc- 
tion declined 23 percent in Febru- 
ary and utilities output increased 
0.1 percent, the Fed said. 

The Fed said the February de- 
cline was partly the result of ad- 
verse weather, arid economists said 
it »l5» reflected efforts by business- 
es to reduce inventories, resulting 
in a cutback in production. 

However, economists also said 

^hat the ran tinnin g stren gth of the 

dollar has caused imports to be 
cheaper dun domestic goods and is 
resulting in a flood of foreign goods 
into the U nited States, which is 
bolding back domestic production. 

“The industrial production num- 
bers for Fefaniaxy, I think, tend to 
reflect more of an inventory correc- 
tion ih«n the strong trade deficit,” 
said Jerry Jasinowslti, chief econo- 
mist for tiie National Association 

of Manufacturers. 


The Growth of New 
Equipment Leasing 

volume of new business, 
annually, in billions 
of dollars 


1980 1981 1982 1883 1984 

Source: American Association of 
Equipment Lessors '• estimated 



U.S. Firms Turn to Lease Financing 

Tax Write-Offs Spur Buying of Equipment for Rental 


By Fred R. Blehkley 

Ne*f York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Some of the strangest assets are 
showing up on the books of many large U.S. 
corporations. Food companies are suddenly buy- 
ing oil rigs and computer companies are purchas- 
inghay balers. 

They are not on a buying binge for themselves, 
however. These corporations are among a group of 
new entrants in the booming business of lease 
Frnanrang — buying equipment for other compa- 
nies that win. rent the equipment back. 

Olis Corp, a malrw of cnemicals, brass, ammu- 
nition and &£, went into the leasing business a few 
months ago and will buy virtually any type of 
equipment for its new customers: computers, drill 
presses, jet aircraft and everything but the walls 
and roof of a new sted.mflL 

Other newcomers to the field include United 
Technologies Coro., which formed a subsidiary 
last May to expand beyond leasing the helicopters 
it ninlf^K! and major consum er goods companies 
mob as P hillip Monis, General MSls, General 
Foods and Pflbbury. 

IBM also has branched out over the past year to 
fake on to its own books a potpourri of noncom- 
puter items for lease to others. 

“You can't go to a cocktail party these days 
without running into someone who ism the leasing 
business, or who wants to know how to get in,” 
said Gary Wendt, executive vice president of Gen- 
eral Electric Credit Coxp^ the largest, and one of 
the oldest, learing companies. 

In just the past year, the number of e quipm ent- 
l earing companies listed as members of the Ameri- 
can Association of Equipment Lessors has jumped 
to 950 from 800. 

The amount of new leases each year has jumped 
to an estimated S74.4 billion in 1984 from $433 


billion in 1980, and Michael Fleming, president of 
the leasing association, expects it to approach $88 
billion tins year. 

A study by Brimmer & Co„ a consulting firm, 
has noted: “Lease financing has «yp«n<faH to the 
point where it is the most important angle source 
of funds to support business expenditures for capi- 
tal equipment'’ 

The big appeal for many of the new entrants is 
lowering the parent company’s taxes. Tearing 
companies can get the benefit of the 10 percent 
investment tax credit and accelerated-depredation 
write-off for the equipment placed with their cus- 
tomers. 

The parent company of a leasing company that 
purchases a $1 million piece of equipment, for 
instance, would be able to reduce its taxes by 
$100,000 from the investment tax credit — and 
deduct from taxable income about $142,000 in the 
first year for depredation. 

charging animal rents fr^woidcf^mable it to 
recoup most, if not afl, of its costs before the lease 
is up. 

The tax benefits are often multiplied cm expen- 
sive items, such as ajrfaers and raflmad equip- 
ment, whidi are the two largest leasing marke ts. 

In so-called leveraged lea se fmamnng, leas- 
ing com panies turn to the banks for loans to pay 
more than half of the costs. But the tearing compa- 
nies still receive all of the tax benefits, plus deduct 
the interest they pay on the loans. 

Also, “it’s an attractive business to be in,” said 
Michael Aflik, a group president of Dan & Kraft 
Corp., which has acquired two leasing companies 
in recent years. __ 

Said wfniam Strachan, president of Olin Finan- 
(Coutiimed on Page 9, CoL 5) 


Growth in Japan Neared 10% in 4th Quarter 


■ Reuters 

TOKYO — The Japanese econ- 
omy grew at an animal rate of near- 
ly 10 percent in the last quarter of 
1984, making it one of the faslest- 
- growing economies in the industri- 
al world, the government’s Eco- 
nomic Planning Agency said 
Friday. 

In the three months from Octo- 
ber to December, the growth rate, 
adjusted for inflation, was 9.6 per- 
cent, in contrast with U3. growth 
of 3.9 percent It was one of Japan’s 
best performances since the 1973 
oil shock. 

The year-end rate boosted 
growth for all of 1984 to 5.8 percent 
against 3.4 percent in 1983, which 
compared with the U.S. after-infla- 
tion rate of 63 percent for 1984. 

Strong exports, more spending 
on new factories and production 
lines, and a drop in oil imports 
accelerated the Japanese growth 
rate from only 2.6 percent in the 
previous quarter, economists said. 


Economists at Nomura Research 
Institute said a decline in the value 
of the yen had bolstered the expor- 
t-oriented manufacturing indus- 
tries and helped sustain growth in 
exports. 

Ihe latest figures show that dur- 
ing the last quarter of 1984 Japa- 
nese electronics companies invest- 
ed 80 percent more on new 
production lines than in the same 
1983 period. 

Machinery- companies spent 
about 60 percent more and auto 
companies raised their capital 
spending about 25 percent 

But Japan may not be eqoying 
the same growth rate now, said 
Koichi Tsmtibara, a senior Sumi- 
tomo Bank economist Both the 
growth in exports and investment 
m their production were slowing 
down ana some companies in the 
first half of 1985 seemed to be in- 
vesting less than they did at the 
same time last year, he said. 

“Japan’s 1985 growth rate will 


only be about 4.7 percent” he fore- 
cast 

■ Progress Reported at Talks 
U.S. authorities have made pro- 
gress in dimmating barriers to for- 

S ‘ n participation in the Japanese 
ecommunications market a se- 
nior U.S. official quoted by United 
Press Internationa] in Tokyo said 
Friday. 

“We have not reached any defi- 
nite conclusions. We have hopes,” 
said W. Allen Wallis, undersecre- 
tary of state for economic affairs. 

The Reagan administration has 
been pressing Japan to eliminate 
standards and regulations that will 
mate U.S. participation m the mar- 
ket cumbersome and could give 
NIT, the Japanese telecommuni- 
cations giant a significant compet- 
itive edge. 

A resolution in the Diet the Jap- 
anese parliament to denationalize 
NTT becomes law April I. 

U.S. officials are pushing for 


modifications in the new law be- 
fore then and have warned that 
failure to eliminate red tape that 
hamper foreign entries could have 
serious repercussions in Washing- 
ton. 

Mr. Wallis said “there has been 
some progress made” in eHminat- 
ing the barriers to foreign partici- 
pation. “It’s premature for us to 
mate any specific statements about 
what steps the Japanese may trice,” 
he said. 

Mr. Wallis said U.S. officials 
hope to see a written report from 
the Japanese, outlining their re- 
sponse to nine specific U3. pro- 
posals “within the next few days.” 

Besides telecommunications, the 
United States has tar geted the Jap- 
anese markets for forest products, 
electronics, medical equipment and 
pharmaceuticals, where they hope 
to see US. products make inroads 
to pare down trade deficit that 
reached almost $37 billion last 
year. 


U.S. Proposes Easing of Rules on Sales to East Bloc 


By Clyde EL Farnsworth 

New York Timei'Servtce 

WASHINGTON — The Com- 
merce Department, in a potentially 
significant concession to exporters, 
has proposed changes that might 
mate it easier for U3. companies 
to sell to the Soviet bloc 

The action on Thursday fol- 
lowed strong criticism from busi- 
ness groups, who have said that the 
elaborate apparatus of U3. export 
controls often hurts American ex- 
porters without strengthening na- 
tional security. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Bakirige, who expects to lead the 
U5. delegation to trade talks in 
Moscow this spring or summer, an- 
nounced a proposed procedure for 
the department to gauge the avail- 
ability of a product abroad. 

U A companies have l ong main- 
tained that the United States 
blocks exports of many products 


that the Soviet Union is able to buy 
easily in Japan or Western Europe. 

Business representatives say the 
United States is injuring only itself 
by denying American companies 
business that foreign fyimpflmw 
are eager for. They note that the 
Uni tea States is now running a 
trade deficit of more than $100. 
billion. 

The proposed change, which was 
to be published Friday in the Fed- 
eral Register and to be open for ■ 
comment far 60 days, could affect, 
far example, such goods as seismo- 
graphic equipment, weather-fore- 
casting instruments, earth-moving 
equipment and od-drillmg materi- 
al. 

Until now. there has been a pre- 
sumption that the department 
would block such exports to the 
Soviet Union. 

Under the proposed new regula- 
tions, the products could be 


shipped if the exporter could show 
that similar goods from other in- 
dustrial countries are available in 
“comparable quality and in such 
quantities that controlling than 
would no longer imp rove" U.S. na- 
tional security. 

Reaction of business representa- 
tives was welcoming but cautious. 
“We've heard it a million times 
before,” said Lawrence A. Fox, 
vice president for international 
economic affairs of the National 
Association of Manufacturers. 


“We hope they really mean it and 
doit” 

He was alluding to statements 
from Commerce Department offi- 
cials that foreign availability has 
always been considered one or the 
factors in determining whether to 
grant an export license. 

The Export Administration Act 
of 1979, which has expired, man- 
dated that the department set up a 
procedure for determining foreign 
availability. Thursday’s action was 
in response to this. 


Strategy Investment Fund S. a. 

Societe Anonyms dlnvestkssment 
Luxem b ourg. .37. rue Noire- Dame 
R.C. Luxembourg B 20093 

Avis de convocation 

Messieurs les acnonnaires sont copvoques par le present 
=mN£e Ceoirale Siannsire qmauni Deu le 26 mars 1985a 15.00 1 


Messieurs les acucnnaires sont copvoques par le present avis a 
l'Assemblfce Genirale SiaUiiaire qmauni Deu le 26 man 1985a 15.00 h cures 
dans les bureaux de la Kiedietbank SA. Luxembourgeotse.43. Boulevard 
Royal u Luxembourg, a vec Pordre du jour sonant : 

Ordredujour 

1. Examendes rapports du Conseil tfAd mini stratioo et dn C omm is s a i re 

aux Complex. 

.2. Approbation du bilan et des eoroptes de resaluus au 21 decem- 
bre 1984 eiaffectation des resuhats. 

X Decharge aux Administrate urs et au Co mmisxai re aux Comptcs pour 

rannfee ecoutee. 

4. Renou veiled ent du mandat du Comnnssnie sax Com pies. 

5. Nomination d'Adminutiateurs. 

Le CoradI d* Administration 


Capital Italia 

Societe Ananyrne dlnvesrisseroent 
43. boulevard Royal. Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B 8458 

Notice of Meeting 

Shareholders are invited 10 attend a 

General Meeting of Shareholders 
which will be held at 43. Boulevard RoyaL Luxembourg, on March 26th, 1985 
at 10,00 a.m. with die following agenda: 

I. Reports of the Board of Directors and of the Statutory Auditor 

1 Approval of the Balance Sheet and Profit and Los Account at Decern- 
ber3J 1984 

3. Modifications to Articles 1. 3. 21. 23. 24 and 31 of the Arddes of 

Incorporation, pursuant to the Luxembourg Law of August 25. 1983. 

4. Discharge of the Direciore and of the Statutory Audita: 

5. Election of the Statutory Awfitoc 
(x Miscellaneous. 

Resolutions on the above mentioned agebda will requite a quorum ot oae 
half of the shares issued and outstanding and a majority of 2/3 of the shares 
present ct represented at the Meeting, except that decisions on items 1,2.4. 5. 
and 6 shall require no quorum but a simple majority of the shares present or 
represented at the Meeting. 

Holders of bearer shares may vote at the Meeting in person by producing 
at the Meeting a certificate of deposit which has been or wOl be issued to them 
a onima deposit of their share-certificates with Krecfietbank S.A. Luxembour- 
geoisc. 43. boulevard Royal, Luxembourg or all offices of Credho Italiano in 
Italy. 5 days prior to the Meeting. . 

Holders of bearer shares may vote K the Meeting by proxy by completing 
the form of proxy which will be made available to them against deposit of tb«r 
share-certificates as aforesaid or presentation of their certificates oT deposit. 
In order to be valid all forms of proxy must reach the company at Kredxertjani 
SA. Luxemboutgemse oral Credito Itafiano five clear days price to the Meeting. 

Share certificates so deposited will be retained until the Meeting or any 
adjournment thereof has been concinded- 

Tbc Secretary 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 

Page 7 


70 Savings Units 
Closed by Ohio 
To Stop a Run 


Ccnpiled by Our Swff Front Dispatcher 

_ CINCINNATI — Governor 
Richard F. Celeste of Ohio on Fri- 
day ordered 70 state-charteied sav- 
ings and loan associations dosed 
for three days to halt a run on the 
institutions by thousands of depos- 
itors alarmed by the closure last 
week of one of Ohio’s biggest thrift 
units. 

The governor, invoking emer- 
gency powers for the unusual ac- 
tion. ordered the savings and loan 
institutions insured by the private, 
state- regulated Ohio Deposit 
Guarantee Fund dosed Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday. The fund 
insures a percentage of the deposits 
at the 70 institutions. 

The action, which freezes an esti- 
mated S5_5 billion in deposits, is 
believed to be the first bank holi- 
day declared by any state since the 
Great Depression. “It’s certainly 
the first in a long, long time,*’ said 
an official of the Federal Reserve 
Board in Washington. 

The stare Commerce Depart- 
ment said the order would not af- 
fect about 125 other state-char- 
tered savings and loans, where 
deposits are insured by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

“Ohio’s agencies and legislature 
wiD need more time to work coop- 
eratively with federal authorities 
and our own banking community 
to complete a practicafplan that, in 
these circumstances, gives the best 
protection we can devise to ODGF 
savers,” the governor said. 

He said state officials will work 
throughout the weekend to devise a 
plan under which deposits in 
ODGF-bacted institutions will be 
insured by the federal government 

The governor, flanked at a news 
conference here by state officials 
and Karen Horn, the president of 
the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleve- 
land, said he planned for the sav- 
ings and loans to reopen Monday, 
but indicated that the closure could 
last longer. 

Asked whether the three-holiday 
could be extended, he said: ‘T per- 
sonally am reluctant to speculate 
on extension because I intend for 
all of us u> use the next 72 hours as 
wisely as humanly posable.” 

But later, he said, “I don’t be- 
lieve we will reopen the institutions 
unless we have come forward with 
a plan that commands the confi- 
dence of the public.” 

: Die run began earlier this week 
after state regulators closed Home 
State Savings Bank in Qncinnati 
on Saturday and appointed a con- 
servator to oversee the sale or liqui- 
dation of the 33-branch institution. 

The closure followed a threc-day 
run by depositors, which was trig- 
gered by reports that Home State 
stood to lose as much as $100 mil- 
lion from its ties to the failed ESM 
Government Securities Inc. of Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida. Die bank bor- 
rowed $670 million from ESM and 
used securities as collateral 

Meanwhile, in Washington, the 
head of the Federal Hone Loan 
iBank Board assored Ohio con- 
gressmen that any applications 
(from the Ohio Deposit Guarantee 
'Fund for federal deposit insurance 
would be expedited “as quickly as 
{possible,” sources said. 

The governor’s action, an- 
nounced less than 90 minutes be- 
fore most of the thrift institutions 
would have opened for business, 
followed a day of mounting con- 
cern at Gncmnati-area banks over i 
runs on deposits. { 

Although state legislators acted 
this week fo reassure depositors by 
creating a $90-tmIlioQ deposit in- 
surance fund separate from the 
Ohio Deposit Guarantee Fund, 
customers at Gnannaii-area insti- 
tutions began lining up outside 


banks Thursday to withdraw their 
money. 

Depositors of some of those sav- 
ings and loans camped overnight 
Thursday outride the thrifts, in- 
cluding Chaner Oak Savings Asso- 
ciation and Molitor Loan and 
BuDding Co_ to withdraw their . 
money Friday. Molitor and Char- ’ 
ter Oak also were mobbed by de- 
positors withdrawing cash Durrs-' - 
.day. 

Ohio's commerce director. Ken- 1, 
neth Cox, who arrived here Thurs- 
day hoping to restore confidence in 
the institutions, said a third, which 
he did not identify, had also experi- 
enced problems in Columbus. 

“As lines began forming Thurs- 
day at other institutions, 1 received 
several requests from bank execu- 
tives for temporary closings or oth- 
er stopgap measures,” Mr. Celeste 
said. “Acting under the emergency 
authorin' as governor, I have con- 
cluded that Ohio's agencies and au- 
thorities need more time to formu- 
late a plan.” 

U3. Representative Chalmers" * 
Wylie, an Ohio Republican who is ' 
the senior GOP member on the 
House Banking Committee, said • 
several of the Ohio banks are “ex- 
periencing heavy [depositor] with- ■ 
drawals” worth millions of dollars.- ' 
About $23 million was withdrawn 
from one bank alone on Wednes- - 
day. he said. (AP, UP1 J 


Dollar Rebounds 
After Early Drop 
InNewYork 

United Press Intenttuumal 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
plunged in early trading in New 
York Friday before rebounding 
late in the day. 

The dollar, which had been 
trading at 3.4060 German 
marks, fell to 336 marks right 
after announcemen t that Gov- 
ernor Richard Celeste of Ohio 
had dosed 70 state-insured sav- 
ings- and-loan institutions to 
halt a “run" on deposits 
sparked by the problems of one 
savings bank. 

“Europeans were concerned 
because they were not sure at 
first of the implications in the 
dosing of the Ohio thrifts,” said 
Daniel Holland, vice president 
at Discount Corp. of New 
York. “Their first reaction was 
to sell the dollar.” 

“The federal funds rate was 
high, at 8% to 9 percent and that 
ordinarily would have support- 
ed the dollar, especially with the 
smaller than expected decline in 
money supply Dmrsday," said 
Wiliam V. Sullivan, Jr, senior 
vice president at Dean Witter 
Reynolds. “Clearly, the dollar’s 
drop was related to the Ohio 
thrift situation and not to mon- 
ey-market conditions. 

In late trading' in New York, 
the dollar rose to 33820 Deut- 
sche marks, from 3378 late 
Thursday. It was at 10.330 
French francs, unchanged from 
late Thursday. The pound rose 
to SI. 0830, compared with 
51.08. 


= CHARTER = 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE" 

123 ft. 12 persons go anywhere. 
We are the best in Greek Islands. 

Mediterranean Cruises Ltd. 

3 Statfiou SL, Athens. 

TeL: 3236494. Tlx.: 222288. 


Capital International Fund 

Soctee Anonyme d’InvesDSsemem 
R.C. Luxembourg N° B8833 
43, Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg 

Notice of Meeting 

Messrs. Shareholders are hereby convened to attend the Annual General 
Meeting which win be held at ibe offices oTKrediei hank SA. Luxctn boon? corse. 
43. boulevard RoyaL Luxembourg, on March 26th. 1985 at 11-00 &jn. with the 
following agenda: 

Agenda 

1. Reports of tbe Board of Directors and the Starutory Auditor 

2. Approval/)! the Balance Sheet and the Profit and Loss Statements as of 
December 31. 1984. 

3. Amendments of articles 1.3. 13. 14.21. 23.24. 29, 30 and 32 to the Articles 
of Incorporation of the Company. 

4. Declaration of a cash dividend. 

5. Discharge of die Directors and the Statutory Auditor 

& Receipt ot and action on nomination of the Directors and the Statutory 
Auditor. 

7. . Miscellaneous. 

Shareholders arc advised that there is no quorum requirement for the 
tldms 1, 2, 4, 5. 6 and 7 and the resohidons tbcrcon will be paked at die ample 
majority of the shares present or represented at the Meeting, subject to the 
restriction that no shareholder either by himself or by proxy can vote for a 

number of shares m excess of 1/5 of the shares issued or 2/5 of me shars present 
or repres e nted at the Meeting. 

Approval of Item 3 of the above agenda will require a quorum of one half 
of the shares issued and outstanding and the affirmative vote of two thirds at 
the shares present or represented at tbe Meeting. 

Holders of bearer riiares may vote at the Meeting in person by producing 
at tbe Meeting either share certificates or a certificate of deposit which will 
be issued to them against deposit of their share certificates with Kredietbank 
S^Luxembourgeoise. 43. boulevard RoyaL Luxembourg. 


tbe form of proxy which will be made available to them against deposit of the 
share certificates as aforesaid. 

Share certificates so deposited wifi be retained until the Meeting or any 
adjournment thereof has been concluded. 

Holders of registered shares may vote at the Meeting either m person or 
proxy by completing tbe form of proxy which will be sent to them. 

In order to be valid all forms of proxy mist reach the- registered office of 
tbe company at least one day before the date of the Meeting. 

Bv order of tbe Board of Directors 
The Secretary 



fl8«SFEKSSIfHB3KSIiHS&SSHiSH?SKS*HSK 151 


‘Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


0*h HHk Law cioh wm 
Indus 12S9J2 12 44X7 1W.1I T247J5— T2JS 
Tran* 60SJ5 ms* 59M3 402.19 —is 
Ultl \an 148.95 MM* 147X0 — M3 

Comp 5IIJ? 5\*M SOSSf 567.19 —435 


Commit* 

I ndustr ials 

Tronss. 

UIHMes 

Rnonot 


Hist Low. One CVW 
VOS! IB145 VOM —845 
nut 11772 11772 —00 
9740 9*45 9445 —07! 
5333 5157 5357—034 
10472 10643 10443—041 


1 

Fridays 

N 

c 

1 s 

hang 

E 


NASDAQ Index 



AMEX Most Actives 


NYSE Diaries 


ciom nw. 




Arfvonc*d 
CMdiiwd 
unchanged 
Total Issues 
N«w Highs 
Mow Lows 
Volume no 
volume down 


443 7» 

179 773 

<70 <73 

vm two 

<5 <1 

10 7 

342997ft 

5747J4E0 


March to 
Mwetl 13 
March 12 
March 11 
March*. 


-Inchided In Itw sales figures 


Bvr •SJi'ri 

179495 483745 1547 

20404 S2&JSB 1XM 

204219 554722 1414 

101430 S45XE 427 

107,9*9 <74351 1745 


VoLaMPJA UU9U0B 

Pmr.4PJI.vgL TUSUN 

PnvcoBsoMaMdOM UUOStt 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


ToW*f Include no Mfioitwide prices 
an to the dosing on Wall Stmt and 
da not reflect tote trades etsewtiere. 

Via The Associat e d Press 


Ind us tri als 

Transp. 

uunttos 

Rnanc* 

C o mpos i te 


mm low aoK am 
2DU3 1949* 1949* —131 


1SL47 15171 15L7I — 4J1 
7144 7790 7153 +0J8 


7144 7750 7153 + 
■eim sn?r taTT _ 
TJ9XA 17453 17SX3- 





AMEX Stock Index 





12 

Zl 

Pi 254ell3 
pfA 373 1341 
dot J7 1U 
Pi 9X0 123 
Pf 114)0 1141 
Pi 1U 124 
pf STB 125 
.92 73 11 
.14 3 B 

3 25 14 
3* 25 12 175 

130 45 ID IMS 
130 35 12 143 
14)0 33 554 

25 30 

3Mt 27 30 33 

254 II A 
\M 53 
1133 12.1 
2.70 9.1 S 
40)11 11 
130 <7 B 
434 10J 
1239012.1 . 




£ £ 




N.Y. Stock Price FaU Again 


y i i' i i ilL 


By Chet Currier 

The As so ci ated Pros 

NEW YORK — The New York Stock Ex- 
change closed out its second straight week of 
losses with another decline Friday, yielding to a 
barrage of setting in the final moments of trad- 
ing. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, off 
just a fraction heading into the last half hour of 
the session, dosed with a 12.70-point loss at 
J 7*47.35. For the week the average had a net 
decline of 2231 points. 

Friday’s volume was 105.19 million shares, 
up from 10335 million the day before. Losers 
outnumbered gainers by about 4 to 3. 

Analysts said it appeared that professional 
traders caught up in complex transactions in- 
volving stock-index options were behind the 
sdloff. They said they aid not believe it had any 
link to the temporary closing of some Ohio 
savings institutions announced early in the day. 

Richard Celeste, the governor of Ohio, or- 
dered that about 70 privately insured savings 
and loans be closed for three days because of 
some reported runs oa deposits. 

The situation arose after one savings institu- 
tion shut down because of losses associated with 
the collapse of a Florida investment firm. ESM 
Government Securities Inc. 

The news touched off an apparent “flight to 
safety” in the credit markets, with heavy buying 
of short-term Treasury bills at the start of trad- 
ing. 

But Wall Street analysts pointed out that the 
great majority of h anks and savings institutions 
around the country are covered by federal de- 
posit insurance. They said there was nothing to 


indicate that the b anking system as a whole 
would be affected in any significant way. 

Meanwhile, the market bad some positive 
news on inflation working in its favor. The 
government reported that the producer price 
index of finished goods droppedO.l percent last 
month. 

Stocks of most big hanks and savings and 
loans showed only mixed and fractional price 


31* 20* Estring 32 33 10 177 21* 219* 2H6 — V. 

MW 20 Eonn M2 33 11 347 37* 37* 37*+* 

7% IVrlEvonP W ffi S 2ft + M 

9ft 2* vIEvonpf 45 N 3 3ft + ft 

14 4ft vfEvnpfB 33 <ft 4ft 4ft + ft 

41ft 30 ExCgJo 150 A3 9 108 37ft 37 37ft— ft 

14ft T3U Excofer 154*113 3 15ft MV 15ft A- ft 

50 37ft Exxon 340 7J> 710*80 49ft 4M* 48ft— ft 


3] 21ft Human 58 24 14 1445 29 3M 38ft 

27ft 17ft HwntMl JO 24) 14 If 25ft 25ft 2Sft— ft 

41ft 21ft HuttEF JO Ul* 174* 34ft 3* 34ft + ft 

25ft left Hydra! 1.92 MB 35 MU a% MM + % 


One exception, was Texas Commerce Bank- 
shares, which fell to 3641. The company said 
it expected its net income for the first quarter to 
come in at about 92 cents a share, down from 
S1.41 in the comparable period a year ago. 

It cared problem loans in the energy industry 
as a primary facto r behind the earnings d«»rfin^ 

Lasers among the bine chips inc lu de d Inter- 
national Business Machines, down % at 128%; 
DuPont, down 1% at 50%; Merck, down 2% at 
99%, and Procter & Gamble, off % at 55. 

K mart dropped V* to 32% on top of a lft- 
point loss Thursday, when the company report- 
ed lower quarterly profits. 

Thompson Medical, which estimated lower 
ea rning s for the quarter ended Feb. 28, fell 1 to 

The exchange’s composite index dropped .65 
to 102.46. 

Nationwide turnover in NYSE-listed issues, 
including trades in those stocks on regional 
exchanges and in the over-the-counter market, 
totaled 122.19 milli on shares. 

The NASDAQ composite index for the over- 
the-counter market rose il to 277.97. 

At the American Stock Exchange, the market 
value index closed at 223.43. up .53. 


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12* 1&± 2 
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29ft 17ft 
45ft 77 
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li 12 <21 29*8 2898 2898 — 9* 

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33 A 189* 109* 1096— ft 

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135 7ft 498 418— 16 

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193 341* 34)6 349* 


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198 1ft 1ft 
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28ft 2788 27ft— ft 
17 1698 16ft 

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29 2898 2M8— ft 

34ft Mft 36ft 
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229* 22ft 2298+ ft 
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lift lift 111*— 98 

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— 

L > HISINESS ROUNDUP 

? i 1 — : 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


Page 9 


\Aramca Cancels 
yiBechtd Awards 

United Press International 
SAN FRANCISCO— Bccb- 
- Group lax, the inicmation- 

construction company, has 


lost contracts worth 52 billion 
bcdld two oil refineries in 
w Saadi Arabia for the Arabian- 
' American 03 Co. 

Officials at Bcchtd’s head- 
1 quarters in San Francisco said 
• 1 { Thursday that they had been 
V •. ) £\ given no reason for the caned- 
*■ Jadon of the Aramco projects in 

*’ Qasim and Ashuqaik. These 
• ; r, two refineries would have had a 
^ j, capacity of about 340,000 bar- 
^ *• *■ ! it 7 rets of oil per day. 

- “Some personnel regrettably 
will be subject to layoff," Bech- 
- ; id said, adding that the full 
k ; impact of the decision would 
" i. not be known until Bechtd offi- 
, m ^ : u : dais meet with Aramco. Bech- 

** 1 £** * "• v 1 . . . « id's revenue declined 39 per- 

' ** ; g* * 1 ^ ; i'.- cent, or 58.6 billion, last year. 



HK Wharf Wins Battle for Wheelock 


Rouen 

HONG KONG — Wheelock 
Warden & Co, said Friday that 
Hongkong & Kowloon Wharf & 
. Godown Co. has obtained 50.1 per- 
cent of its voting rights and that 
John L Maiden had resigned as 

chairman 

Falwyn Co., an investment vehi- 
cle of Khoo Tcck Puat, a Singapore 
businessman, withdrew from the 
takeover battle for Wheelock, its 
financial advisor. NJvL Rothschild 
& Sons (Hong Kong) Ltd., said. 
Falwyn wi2 sdl its stake of about 
25 percent in Wheelock to HK 
Wharf. 

Wheelock said Mr. Marden was 

K ai a board meeting by Sir 
o, who has a controlling 
interest in HK Wharf. Mr. Marden 
will be nominated to the new post 
of president and will remain a di- 
rector. 

HK Wharf is offering 7.40 Hong 
Kong dollars for each Wheelock A 
share and 74 cents for each. B share. 
HK Wharf would have to pay a 


over 15 billion dol- 
lars (5320 million) to acquire all 
Wheelock shares. 

Wheelock A ended down 10 
cents at 7J0 dollars Friday and B 
was last quoted at 73 cents. 

Falwyn first made a bid of 1.9 
billion dollars for controlling inter- 
est in Wheelock on Feb. 14. At the 
time, Mr. Khoo had bought 6.7 
percent of the A shares and 22.7 
percent of the B shares from the 
family interests of Mr. Marden. 
Falwyn offered remaining share- 


holders 6 dollars per A share and 
60 cents per B share. 

Sir Y.lL, on Feb. 16, made a bid 
that was 10 pacent higher, or 6.60 
dollars for A shares and 66 cents 
for B shares. Wanfley Ltd, a Hong 
Kong merchant bank acting on be- 
half of HK Wharf, indicated that 
Sir Y.K. had acquired 34 percent of 
the voting rights of the group. 

By Thursday, after weeks of 
counterbidding against Mr. Khoo, 
Sir Y.K. had secured a 49.5-perceni 
stake in Wheelock. 


AMC Delays Import of Renault Vans 


United Press International 

SOUTHFIELD, Michigan — 
American Motors Corp. said Fri- 
day that it has indefinitely delayed 
the introduction of the Renault 
Espace minivan but will import a 
new line of Renault-made compact 
models. 

A company spokesman said the 
minivan program was delayed be- 
cause of price negotiations with 


Matra, the French company that 
builds the van's fiberglass body. 

The cancellation is the second 
time this year the automaker ha< 
postponed or scrapped a new im- 
port line. Last month it said it 
would not import a larger Renault 
to augment the domestically n*aH<» 
Alliance and Encore models, built 
in Kenosha, Wisconsin. AMC is 46 
percent owned by Renault. 


Veba Says Profit 
Rose 55% in ’84 

Agmce France- Prose 

DUSSELDORF — Veba 
AG, West Germany’s biggest 
industrial holding company, 
said Friday that its 19 54 pretax 
profit rose 55 percent from a 
year earlier, to 575 minio n 
Deutsche marks (about S170.1 
million). 

The group said it win pay a 
dividend of 9 DM per 50-DM 
share this year, up from 15 DM 
in 1983. In its 1984 interim re- 

h iranrferraMj^ billion DM 
to reserves in the year, up from 
4.04 billion a year earlier. 

Veba said its provisional net 
income for the year rose to 692 
million DM from 472 million 
DM. The company, which is 30- 
percem owned by the federal 
government, is engaged in the 
production and distribution of 
electricity, hydrocarbons and 
chemicals. 


Shamrock in Bid for Central Soya 


Las Angela Times Set riff 

LOS ANGELES — Shamrock 
Holdings, the private company 
owned by the Roy E. Disney fam- 
ily, has offered to acquire Central 
Soya Co, a major agricultural com- 
modities company based in Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, for 523 a share in 
cash, or $289.5 million in cash. 

Shamrock disclosed Thursday 
that it already owns 4.7 percent of 
Central Soya’s 14 milli on shares 
outstanding, and said it has signed 
agreements to acquire another 5.9 
percent from two investment 
groups. 

Central Soya's chairman, Doug- 
las G. Fleming, said be bad not yet 
seen the Shamrock proposal and 
had no immediate comment. 

At fust glance, the bid appears 
out of character for Shamrock, 
whose other holdings consist of 
three television stations, eight radio 
stations, real estate and an invest- 
ment portfolio. 

But in a telephone interview, a 


Shamrock spokesman. Clifford 
Miller, characterized the proposal 
as an “absolutely” sincere bid. “Its 
core business is excellent," he said, 
expl aining that Shamrock officials 
consider the long-term prospects of 
the soy bean business “awfully 
good." 

Mr. Miller declined to disclose 
Shamrock's balance sheet or earn- 
ings, but he said the company is 
confident that it can arrange “tra- 
ditional financing with some of the 
usual commercial banks," and also 
plans to bring in a "couple of 
equity partners" for the Central 
Soya acquisition. He said Sham- 
rock has retained Lazard Freres &. 
Co. as an adviser in the bid. 

Although he would not identify 
Shamrock's prospective partners. 
Mr. Miller said the Bass Family of 
Fort Worth, Texas, is sot involved 
in the proposed takeover. The Dis- 
ney and Bass families have sub- 
stantial holdings in Walt Disney 
Productions, and worked together 


last fall to install the studio's cur- 
rent management team. Roy EL, 
Disney is a son of one of the stu- 
dio's co-founders and currently 
serves as its vice chairman, 

Central Soya reported sales of 
51.73 billion in the fiscal vear end- 
ed Aug. 31. 1984. up from S1.51 
billion a year earlier. Earnings fell 
to $21.87 million from S25.20 mil- 
lion a year earlier. 

Soybean processing and other 
commodity operations accounted 
for about 38 percent of the compa- 
ny's profits last year, feed and farm 
supplies for about 33 percent, and 
food products the re mainin g 29 
percent. The company has divested 
broiler processing plants and some 
underperforming operations. 

Shamrock's announcement was 
made after the New York Stock 
Exchange had dosed Thursday. 
Central Soya's shares dosed at S22 
Friday, up 52.75 on a volume of 
514.000 shares. 


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Ford to Make 
Microchips of 
. ! New Material 

1 ; L By Donald- Woutar 

' Los Angela Times Service 

jf: LOS ANGELES — Ford Motor 
j: 2b. says it vriD make and sell semi- 
1 *h -conductors made of gallium aise- 
S /ride, a promising material that is 
F t'ncpected to replace silicon in many 


6 Companies Receive NASA Contracts AU.S.Boom 

Id Leasing 


2 • )'• -* T* : * V- J s ntfpcs of integrated riremts. 

* f S'! "I* 1 - ’ • <*• ' * r‘: rord. which now designs 

» • ■>» ?V b ^oversees the manufacture of 


V-- 


1m 




1 


"‘hi -v 

fcrr:-.. 


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and 

sili- 

• x ■! ! 3 '^on-based chips for use in its own 
^ y ■ r !.sars and aerqquce products, will 

' j j ;\be the first Mgh-vdume producer 
x :! ‘ *; i"bf tbc new dups for sale on the 
. . ,i '.open market 

•'*. ; . ^ ' ; Gafiium arsenide can transmit 
T 1 ; '^electronic signals tip to 10 times 
I'M faster than silicon, realnng jt al- 
' ^ tractive for powerful computers 
r -and other uses. It is expected to be 
, — -Losed in the next generatitm of su- 
, ^-^-percomputers in the United States 
‘ - .[ and Japan. 

However, eqxits say the materi- 
« ' j r al — a compound of the elements 
.i " gaflhim and arsenic — is expensive 
' t - and tricky to make into chips on a 
, .. i- high- volume baas. 

V . a gaDhns-arsenide wafer now 

- i L costs$200,CH-15 timesasmuchasa 
; *. silicon one, Ford says. 

- -a v Ford was to announce details of 
^ i its production rdans Friday when it 

* ;l , opened a S33-m3Uon factory in 

, . I ^ Colorado Springs, Colorado. The 
. factory w31 be operated by its high- 

■ i technology sul»idiaiy, Fend Mi- 

, , crodectronics Inc. Ford says the 
. • *> - plant is the first designed for low- 

. . cost, high-yidd production of gaHi- 

r -\ um-arsemde circuits. 

: ‘ . Sfflicon is tije-most commonly^ 

■ used" conducting medhrm for mi- 

1 ' crodrips. One hmit on the speed 

^ • and capacity of memory devices is 
- the speed at which a semiconductor 
' . permits electrcms to travel through 

. - . SL 

Ultra-fast computers now on the 
‘ , 4- drawing boards “are requiring per- 

_ . , t ' formance levels that are out of the 
reach of silicon," said Anthony 
” ■ l *■ Livingston, sales and marketing 
■ vice president at Gigahit Logic Inc. 

1 ; of Newbury Park, California, the 
'I • j ; first company to specialize in pro- 
i . duction of gallhnn-arsemde dups 
for outside use. 

. ■; Ford has become a m^or design- 

* , . er and producer of microchips for 

' ' under- the- hood computers that 

‘. a ' ; control emissions, en^ne timing 

j . ; and other functions is cars. As the 
£ ,• 'auto companies have gairralexper- 
V *.; yise in dectronics and industrial 
'' ' , automation, they have been diver- 
“ *• sifying into high-tedmdogy areas. 


United Pros International 

WASHINGTON — NASA has 
awarded preliminary design coo- 
tracts to six aerospace companies 
in a major step toward the develop- 
ment of the planned SS-bClion or- 
bital space station. 

In addition, Lhe agency an- 
nounced Thursday, it wiQ negotiate 
with three other companies For one 
or more additional contracts. 

The contracts will be for 56 mil- 
lion to 527 milli on, dep ending on 
the work to be done. They wOlnm 
21 months and wfll cover the initial 
design of the major elements of the 
space station. 

The permanently manned orbit- 
al assembly, the next big U.S. space 
project, is expected to begin opera- 
tion in 1993. It will be a modular 
station housing six to eight men 
and women at a time and will be 
serviced by space shuttles. 

The work will be directed by four 


Gorbachev 
And Bush 

(Coothmed from Page 7) 
weapons, but, over all, would I 
trade with Marshal Ogmkov? Not 
on your Hfa’ ” 

Mr. Bush: “Is that why you got 
rid of Marshal Ogarkov?” 

Mr. Gorbachev: “T thought this 
was supposed to be a constructive, 
nonpoianical discussion." 

Mr. Bush: “It is. Back to the 
good old generalities. 1 believe we 
'share a common interest in peace 
and social and economic develop- 
ment, right?” * “• 

Similar talks are needed on the 
other major items of the 
ping foreign pobcy-economic 
fairs agenda, which indude: 

• Relations with Japan, particu- 
larly vexed by the 545-lnffion Japa- 
nese trade surplus with the United 
States and the enormous Japanese 
capital outflow of 550 turnon to 
5100 billion a year. 

• Relations with Europe, exacer- 
bated by the overstrong dollar, the 
big UJ>. budget deficit, high inter- 
est rates and the European capital 
outflow to the United States, which 
is hurting their growth and worsen- 
ing unemployment 

These painfully detailed and 
complex matters seen to bore top 
American policy-makers, who evi- 
dently agree with the dictum of 
Oscar Wilde: “One should absorb 
the cola: of life, but one should 
never remember its derails. Details 
are always vulgar." 


National Aeronautics and Space 
Adminis tration field centers: the 
Johnson Space Center, Houston; 
Lewis Research Center, Cleveland; 
Goddard Space Flight Center, 
Greenbelt, Maryland, and Mar- 
shall Space Flight Center, Hunts- 
ville, Alabama. 

Boring Aerospace Co. of Seattle 
and Martin-Marietta Aerospace 
Corp. of Denver each received a 
contract for the work directed by 
the Marshall center. That includes 
design of pressurized common 
modules for use as laboratories and 
living areas along with environ- 
mental control systems and propul- 
sion systems. Each contract is ex- 
pected to be for about 524 million. 

RCA Astro Electronics of 
Princeton. New Jersey, and Gener- 
al Electric's Space Systems Divi- 
sion, Philadelphia, were awarded 
contracts to perform studies of 
free-flying platforms, ways to ser- 


vice satellites and equipping a lab- 
oratory module. The work w£Q be 
directed by the Goddard center. 
Each contract is expected to be for 
$10 mflli nn 

RockweD International’s Rock- 
etdyne Division of Canoga Park, 
California, and TRW Imx, Redon- 
do Beach, California, were award- 
ed am tracts to design electric pow- 
er systems for the Lewis center. 
Each contract is expected to be far 

$6 mflli nn 

In addition, NASA said it would 
negotiate with Lockheed Missiles 
and Space Co n McDonnell Doug- 
las Astronautics Co. and Rockwell 
international Space Station Sys- 
tems Divisions for contracts to de- 
sign the overall space station struc- 
ture and other systems for the 
Johnson center. NASA said one or 
more contracts, at $27 milli on each, 
would be awarded to cover the 
work. 


COMPANY NOTES 


CBS Inc. has agreed to a $4.2- 
miTK on out-of-court settlement in a 
federal lawsuit charging that nine 
record companies, including CBS, 
had conspired to fix the price of 
records and pre-recorded tapes be- 
tween 1971 and 1982. CBS admit- 
ted no wrongdoing. 

Eastman Kodak Co. has made a 
cash tender offer for common 
shares outstanding of Verbatim 
Corp. at $735 a share. It said the 
offer is conditioned on 22,382,000 
of the 23.213,178 shares being ten- 
dered, and that the offer expires on 
April 5. - 

. IbcploratiooCo. ofLorisianahas 
agreed "m prinaple to apqmre "L 
Texas Petroleum Co n which is fist- 
ed on the London Stock Exchange. 
Exploration, a privately held com- 
pany, said it would issue convert- 
ible preferred stock in exchange for 
all of L Texas Petroleum’s com- 
mon shares. Terms were not given. 

Exxon Corp-'s Esso Exploration 
& Production Australia Inc. has 
renewed its commitment to the 
Run die oil-shale project in Queens- 
land, the Australian partners. Cen- 
tral Fadflc Minerals NL and 
Southern Pacific Petroleum NL, 
announced. 

First Gty Bancocporation and 
Cullen /Frost Bankers Ina. two 
large Texas bank holding compa- 
nies, have announced the cancella- 
tion of a $20.7-bilfion merger that 
was announced in July 1983. A 
First Gty spokesman said the 
merger, which would have created 
the tmid-largest bank bedding com- 


pany in the state, had been called 
off because it was progressing too 

dowly. 

General Electric Co. of Britain 
has bought a further 10.6 million of 
its own shares as part of its pro- 
gram to buy shares for cancella- 
tion- The shires were bought on the 
m arket at 196 pence (S131) each 

GTE Coro, nas announced the 
launching of a fully automatic disc 
camera that operates without a bat- 
tery and that costs $20. The new 
camera has a chemical flash that 
can be coordinated with the speed 
of the film and the shutter, GTE| 
said. 

IQ Australia Ltd. Said it and a 
subsidiary, AFL Holdings LuL, 
will try to acquire Indtec Ltd. ICI 
holds 45.4 pattern of Inatec and 
wfll hold a majority stake in the 
merged company. 

National Can Corp. said a suit 
filed by NVF Co., controlled by 
Victor Posner, a Miami investor, 
seeks to prevent the company from 
making a tender offer for 52.7 per- 
cent of its shares. NVF owns 38 
percent of the company’s outstand- 
ing voting stock, and made an un- 
successful offer earlier this year for 
a friendly merger. 

Northern Foods FLC has agn 
in prinaple to buy part of Gra 
Metropolitan PLCs Express Dairy 
UK lid. for about £51 million (555 
million), the companies an- 
nounced. Northern is acqmri 
milk processing and distribution 
businesses in Lancashire, York- 
shire, Cheshire and Derbyshire. 


(Continued from Page 7). 

rial Services Inc., “It’s just like 
banking; it’s another way to make 
money." 

There are, however, business 
judgments that can make or break a 
leasing company, such as determin- 
ing the creditworthiness of custom- 
ers, pricing the agreement and fig- 
uring out what the value of the 
equipment will be during, and af- 
ter, the life of the lease. 

Because of this, some leasing 
subsidiaries of large corporations 
risk by altering into joint 
ventures with es tablished players. 

Florida Progress, the ' lidding 
company lor the Florida Power 
Company, for instance, formed 
Progress Leasing Corp. last year, a 
corporation that could not use die 
investment tax credits available to 
it from the purchase of new equip- 
ment could sell those credits to an- 
other company. 

From the customer's standpoint, 
leasing is appealing because there is 
ah indirect return of the tax bene- 
fits through reduced rental costs. 
Many leases, especially those on 
lower-cost equipment, also allow 
the customer to cJmiwi the invest- 
ment tax credit The leasing subsid- 
iary still gains in such cases because 
it prices the rental equipment at a 
profit, and the company can make 
money from reselling or leasing it 
again later on. 

Leasing is especially popular for 
bigh-technok>gy equipment. 


800% GAIN 


The success our readers have experienced is based upon the ‘law of contrary reason”, 
the refusal to succumb to ‘expert 11 opinion. When the DOW was drooping below 795, C.G.R. 
defied universally publicized oracles, predicting that the ‘DJI WILL TOUCH 1,000, BEFORE 
HITTING 750", subsequently-stating that the ‘Average” will rocket above 2000. 

Atthetime, most financial publications mirrored the mood of the ‘Street”, with BARRON’S 
commenting (August 9th, 1982)... ‘The market seems to be saying it's seen the future and it 
doesn’t work”. Before the ink dried on their funeral dirge, the market zoomed 132 points, 
closing on September 8th, 1982 at 915. 

As mavericks, C.G.R. was considered 1 heretical in recommending SEARS at SI 6, and 
FORD around Si 7, or in challenging investment banking behemoths. Perhaps our most 
riveting prophecy was furthered in July 1983, when we mocked the mania for ‘high tech‘ 
shares selling at bloated prices, writing... ‘CONTINUE TO EASE OUR OF APPLE S56, 
COLECO S50, COMMODORE $56, AND TANDY S54; the Quartet is not in harmony with 
reality”. Current quotes? APPLE S28. COLECO S13, COMMODORE $13, TANDY S 33. In 
detecting ‘classic” buys, or .short sales”, our analysts flout the manic-depressive behavior 
of investors, guided by the adage... ‘Buy into weakness, sell into strength”. 

Our forthcoming letter reviews ‘senior” securities that appear to be logical morsels for 
predators, in addition, we focus upon a low-priced equity with the potential to mature into 
prominence, emulating the dossier of a recently recommended ‘special situation” that 
spiralled from $2 to $16 in a brief time span, a ‘junior oil that discovered a major field in 
Texas. 

For your complimentary copy, please write to, or telephone... 


i ’ 

I ri ■ : 4- 


**-«, sy « ■- rv.*w_ r 


FP.S. Financial Planning Services bv 
KafverstraatT12, 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) 25 04 77/27 51 81 
Telex-18536 


H 


Name: 


I 


Address: 

T 

1 


i 

i 

Phone: 

IHT 16/3 ^ 




Past performance does not guarantee future results 


£•- •“ 


S. Africa’s GDP Rises 

Renters 

- PRETORIA — South Africa's 
'real gross domestic product rose by 
4.7 percent in 1984 after falling 3.1 
percent in 1983, the government 
reported Friday. Nonagricnltnral 
SjDP rose A2 percent in 1984 after 
Tailing 1.6 percent in 1981 and ag- 
ricultural GDP rase 13.7 percent 
after a 213-percent fall. Mming- 
sector GDP rose 2.6 percent m 
,1984, secondary industries 2.4 per- 
cent, manufacturing 3.1 percent 
and tertiary industries 5.6 percent, 
it said. 


fill RESERVE 

V INSURED DEPOSITS TRUST 


RES IN DS* 

An Amour# far lha Cautious Investor 
to Protect and Increasa Capitol 


UJS. DoHar Denominated 
Insured by UJL Govt. Entities 
Important Tw Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
immedterfe Liquidity 
Abwluto Canfidenfkxfity 


CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

RESIN D0* 

Cow Poskde 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

H*as« send prospectus and 
account application to: 


Name_ 

Address. 


NoriMUhMMAUU 


OPPENHEIMER 
OFFERS YOUR IRA AN 
ALTERNATIVE 
TO GUARANTEED 
LOW RATES. 


F or IRA investors seeking the 
assurance of a fixed race, we 
suggest a bank!" 

■ For those investors more 
concerned with how high the 
rate of return is, than with how 
fixed, we suggest another route. 
The Oppenheimer Special Fund. 

Because over its life, the 
Special Fund has the best perfor- 
mance "record of all 361 mutual 
funds that have been in existence 
that long— an astonishing total 
return of 940%** 


So if you had been able to 
put $2,000 a year into a Special 
Fund IRA since the Fund’s 
inception, your IRA would have 
been worth $104,570*** as of 
December 31, 1984. That’s an 
average annual return of 21.5%. 

The Special Fund provides 
an IRA investment based on the 
philosophy that the 
opportunity for a 
higher return is pref- 
erable to the certain- 
ty of a lower one. 



ifi/3/sT! 


I - To M. Tucker Smith 

I Oppenheimer & Co. 62-64 Cannon Sc. London EC4N 6 AE England 
I Telephone 01- 236 6578 t 

I PleaseReftd mean IRA applies w>r> and a Special Furvd proipecru* vitb more complete raforrna- | 

| rkm. Including all charua and expires lllreadircamulfybcfbrelinvescoriendmcwy j 

□I'd like to open an UlA. OMURe to switch myRA. 


Nunr 


Add(»» 


Ch y 


San 


Bp 


Phone 


the oppenheimer special fund 


Ueral 

LET THE TRIB 



Sribime 

YOUR GUIDE. 



'EM 


LKI GUIDE TO 
BUSINESS TRAVB.& 

ENTERTAINMENT: 

EUROPE. 

Theres never been 
a guide quite Eke t 
Trib business readers ai 
across Europe shared 
their mast treasured 
travd secrets with 
journal Peter Graham. 

The resuth a book for 
business travelers with 
contributions from business travelers. 

Turn an ordray business trip into a pleasant, more 
efficient journey. Guide cavers Amsterdam, Brussels, 
Copenhagen, Dusseldorf, Frankfort, Geneva, London, 
Lyon, Mfcxi, Munich, ftxis, Stockholm, Zurich. Over 
200 facf-fiBed pages, this hardcover ecltion is a great gift 
idea for coleagues, business contacts, or yourseff. 

Seven subdivisions for each city indude: 1. Basic c3y 
ovsrview with vital irifonnarioa Z Hotels, wth emphasis 
on business services. 3. Restaurants, for on- md off-duty 
pleasune. 4. After-hours suggestions. 5. Diversions, from 
grand opera to jogging. 6. Shopping. 7. WeekencSng 
ideas. 

Rave revtews ftom (IW iravef anefosfry ejqperfs; 

•Where to stay dne and revet h Europe-, a handy 
corr^panion.* 

Travel and Leisure, American Express. 
_a good deal of information in compact easily 
asarnktied form." 

Signature, Diners Cbb International. 
Tfefer G rah am and IHT have 


masterpiece" 


IHT have produced a small 

Executive Travel 



FOOD LOVER’S 
GUIDE TO HARIS. 

As restaurant critic 
for the Trib, Patricia Wfefis 
has explored the 
treasures of food 
shopping and eating in 
Paris, from the bistros, 
cafes, cheese shops and 
outdoor market^ to the 
classic feasts. 

The gastronomic 
deCghts of Pbris are 
varied, historic, abundant - and too delicious to be left 
to chance. Food lover's uncovers the many defights to 
be found cl over this extraordinary city, and takes an 
up-to-date look at some of Paris* htemationdly known 
restaurants. 

Wefls indudes critical commentary, anecdotes, 
history, local lore - as well as base fads like business 
hours and nearest metro station. To recreate the taste 
of France at home, 50 recipes are included, gleaned 
from the notebooks of Parisian chefs. 

Paperback, over 300 pages featuring a French/ 
English food glossary and 140 evocative photographs. 

* Bound lor France? Don't go without fbtrida We&ss 
food Lover's Guide to fbrif 

Houston Chronicle 

sp8s the beans here~ No serious hedonist 
should g6 to fans wtihoutiC 

Gael Greene, New Hbrk Magazine 
"An Sustated tour through- one af tire great food 

atiesoflhe world" 

Philadelphia DaByNews 


£i |Q 85 Oppenheimer Investor Services, Inc. ‘Bank IRA’s are insured and generally have fixed mieresj 
rates, whereas the Fund's net asset value fluctuates and mayhe subfcctto loss. "March IS, W3 -December 
31 1984 Uppef Analytical Services, Inc..** ’Assuming a $2,000 investment on March IS, 1973 finccpUan 
of" fund) and $2 £00 annual investments cm Brat busmess day of each year thereafter wfth all dividends and 
distributions reinvested Past performance is not an indication of future resuka In the period shown, 
oocfc prices fluctuated severe!* and were generally higher ai r be end than* the beginning. . 


international HeraU Tribune, Book Division, 

181, avenue Charies-de-Gaufle, 

92521 Neuffly Cedex, Franca 

Pleas* chock method of payment: 

Enclosed is my payment (Payment can be made in any 
I I conver&le European currency at current exchang e rate) . 
Please charge to my 

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□ ■■■ □ □ SK8&* 


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Ptaose send mes 

codes of LHX GUIDE TO BUSINESS 
TRAVR & ENTERTAINMENT: EUROPE 
at US$16 each, plus postages 

add$150 each in Europe,$4 each outside Europe. 

copies of FOOD LOVER’S GUIDE TO PARIS 

at US$TL95 each, plus postage: 

add$1.50 each in Europe, 54 eadi outside Europe. 


N°_ 


Exp.date^ 


Address. 


Signature 

(necessary for card purchases) 


GfyCodo/Cbuntry. 


16-3-85 




HISSIKtliifilfriHniSSHIHSSJHWSKHWHfSK 151 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


U.Se Futures March 15 


Soawi Season 
High • Law 


Opart HWi Low Close Chg. 


Sea so n Seaton 
Hteh Low 


Oean High Low CMS* (Ho. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBT1 

MOO bu minimum- dollars per bushol 
AM 137% MOT US 15* 333% 3J5% +04% 

«H 132% MOV US US lO 3*4% +ja% 

WO 3*4% Jut JJOVt 132 130 171* +02% 

1MIO 12* Sep 130% 313 1*0% 132 +0? 

1*3% 3*6 Dec 3*0% 3*2% 140% 147* 4-7H* 


3130 I960 MOV 

2035 1W0 Jul 

Est. Sales Prev.Saias 4005 

Prev. Day Open int 26011 wW 

ORAN0E JUICE (MY Cffl 

UOOOIbs^ cents Per la. 

ibjo mat mot me imjo i«ui 

tKJJO UUO May 16600 1*7*5 3 MM 

. mat Jut 16475 W/00 16475 

U20O 15775 Sep. 1*7.00 147.W 164*5 

ifn nn 14700 NOV 

UU0 SflS Jon 1*410 14*20 1*4*0 

177 JO 154* 

1*250 1*000 






3-74% 140% Mar 144% M8% 146% 141% +52% 

Est. Sates Prev. Soles 7055 
Prev, DovOncnlnt. 34123 ottw 


Jul 

Est, Soles 300 Prev. Soles • 221 
Prev. ooy Open Int 4221 of!** 


171% 172 —AM 


ill 




|j|lK 


■nT^»FTT r 












OATS (CBT1 

5000 bu minimum, dollars per bushel 
106% 1*0% Mar 179% 178% 17*% 

151 107% May 172% 177% 171 

178% 143 Jul 100 148 UfVk 

179 100 Sep 1J3 103 102% 

152% 144 Dec 106 146 106 

Est. Sales Prev. Scries 43* 

Prev. Dav Open Ini 1423 off 96 


17*% — j01% 
171%'— 00% 

um —Jii 
102 % — 00 % 
146 


Livestock 


CATTLE I CMS) 

40000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

WSKI 6252 Apr *250 625S *157 *100 —75 

6950 MG0 Jun 6S5S *575 *460 *525 —77 

87-6'f 63.15 Aua 65.10 6530 6470 6450 —72 

6590 *150 Ocr *355 *157 *2*5 *2*7 —53 

*7*5 634* Dec 6450 647* 6352 6475 —42 

6745 6520 Feb 6520 *520 6450 64*5 —55 

6757 66.10 Aar 66*0 66.10 66*0 66.10 —85 

ESt.Sales 21467 Prev. Sain 70379 
Prev. DOV Open im. 61*50 oHTCl 






™ 58% PaPLPT 870 132 3S0c 66 *5% *6 

fOJ* 31% Penwtt IS? 57 12 20 31% 38% 3*%— M 

25% SO Pmwpf 1J0 40 19 24% 24% 24% 

50% 3(0* Penmal 220 45 fi 14*5 50% 40 49-% 

17% 9% PeopCn 17D 7.1 I 157 16% 1*3* 16% + % 
38 Dl> PbpSov JO l.T 16 85 36% 36% 36% — % 

49% ant PepsiCo 108 IS 22 1343 48% 48% *S%- H 

30% 17% ParfcEI JS22M084 25 34% 25+16 

ine 7% Prraipn 125 143 7 451 f a% am — % 

n% ia% p*rvor j u u in m n w%+% 

38% at Petrie 1*0 42 IS 4U 35 33% 33%— % 

30% 24% PeKe 372eT4* 92 25% 25% 25% — % 

16% 1* PstRSPt 157 103 9 IS* 1514 15%+ % 

7% 4 Ptrtnv ljoeao* 7 5% 5 5 — % 

42% 29% Pfizer 158 17 13 81*9 MH 39% 40 — % 

27% 12% PhetpD 434 n% IS 18% 

48% 34 PMppr 5*0 112 1 M % *4% 44% 

41% 20% PhtbrS 54 15 25 3720 36% 36% J6%— % 

lfltr 9 PMIaEI 120 147 6 1973 -15% 15 IS — % 


Industrials 




US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- pts el 100 pcL 
91*1 07.14 Jun 9056 90*5 

9123 9494 Sep 90J6 V0L37 

9070 8177 Dec S974 90*7 

9055 8*60 MOT 

9027 87*1 Jun 89*4 89*4 

90*0 88*0 Sea 8956 0956 

1953 89*6 Dec 10.16 89.16 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 11009 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 38519 up 274 
IS YR. TREASURY (CBT1 

Sioaaoo prln- nta B 3MS of 108 pdt 

83 70-25 Mar 79-1 79-11 

03-3 799 Jun 78-2 78-11 

■1-13 75-18 SOP 77-13 77-16 

80-22 75-13 Dec 

SM 75-11 Mar 

79-26 77-33 Jun , 

at Salas Prov.Sales T3J05 

Prev. Day Open lid. 51250 up 5 
US TREASURY BONDS (CRT} 


9054 9018 
90*8 9026 

8924 8954 
•9 JO 
89*4 0953 
89 29 8928 
89.16 *92* 


78-27 78-27 
77-Z7 77-38 
7M 77-3 
76-14 
7548 
75-13 


LUMBER (CM El 






130000 bd. ff^J pm-UODbiLtL 






12X18 

Mar 

13820 

130*0 

12400 

125*0 


22500 

13200 

MOV 13700 

13800 

13200 

133*0 



U10O 

Jut 

14650 

14600 

14100 

142*0 


197 JO 

14600 

Sea 


l«a 

148*0 

149*0 



149 JO 

Nov 

15308 

15300 

14950 

150*0 


18700 

155*0 

Jan 

158*8 

158*0 

15500 

TUiUI 

—290 

Esf. Salas 

16050 

Mar 




161.10 


2*94 prev. Soles 1592 




Prev. Day Opon Inf. 7*70 off 75 




COTTON 2{HYCE7 
50000 canto par to. 






79*0 

6X26 

May 

65*6 

66*0 

65*5 


— *0 

7905 

6305 

Jul 

6502 

65*0 

6500 

6505 

—.13 

77 JO 

6402 

Oct 

6535 

6130 

6505 

6505 

+03 

7300 

6401 

Doc 

65*5 

AKA* 

6400 

6502 

— J8 

76*5 

6550 

Mar 

6650 

6600 

6500 

6600 

-JO 

7800 

66*1 

May 




46*2 

—sa 

78XS 

6650 

Jul 




6602 

—.13 

Est. Solos 


Prev. Sales 1067 




Prev. DovOPon Irtl. 17*61 oHM7 




HEATING OIL (NYMB3 









77.10 


82*5 

KIK 


7720 

77*5 

76*0 

+J7 

8200 

6400 

May 

7300 

7300 

7305 

7305 

+55 

78*0 

Aim 


7200 

75*1 

71*5 

7103 

+33 

7100 

65*5 

Jul 

71 JO 

7100 

71.15 

7100 

+J0 

7250 

6X25 


71 JO 

7100 

71*0 

7100 

+J7 

71*0 

7X25 


72*5 

7250 

7205 

72*5 

+30 

7SJ0 

7208 

Dec 




7400 

+J0 



Frt 




7900 

+30 

Est. Solos 


Prev. Sales 5*85 




Prwv. Dov Ooen Inf. I6J1S off id 




CRUDE OILWYMIl 



2X19 

28*2 

+.13 




MM 

28*7 




2700 

27*3 

27*7 

2703 

+J0 

2955 

2430 

jun 

27*0 

27*8 

2705 

27*3 

+J5 

2954 

24.10 

Jul 

2705 

Z705 

£8 

2605 

+04 

2957 



2690 

2605 






26*5 

26*7 

26*5 


+09 

2950 

24*0 

Nov 

26*5 

2605 

26*0 

26*5 

+01 

2950 

2X90 

Dec 

26*5 

26*5 

26*5 

26*5 

+01 

Est. Solos 

Prev. Sales 140BS 




Prev. Dov Open Int. 51*61 off 1020 






g* g PMIEof 3*0 13J 70Z2fl% 28% 28%+% 

35 35 PhKC pt 440 HI 40z 33% 33% 33%—) 

*2 uoz 33% 33 m 331*— % 

53% 40 PMIEpf 7*0 0.1 TMz 53% £1% 53% +1 

« »K PWlEpI 875 142 110r *2 61% *!%— % 

10% 9% PMIEpf Ml 13* 52 T0% MM2. UM— % 

10% 6% PMIEpf 123 125 74 9% 9% 9%+ % 

57 43 PMIEpf 7*5 1U TIBBS 57 55% 57 +1% 
30 6% PtaMEpf 1.28 13* 35 «H 9% 9% 

120% 97 Pbllpf 17.12 145 SOOzUO 118% 118% + % 
68 51 PMIEpf 9 JO 142 3Uz 66% 66% 66% — 1% 

57 44 PMIEpf 7*0 m 300z 56 55% 56 —1 

56% 40% PMIEpf 7 JS 13* 90z 54 55 56+1 

n 15% PMiSub 122 72 11 57 IS* 18% U% + % 

W% 62% PhllMr 4*0 45 12 3517 91% 89% 89%— 1% 

25 in PMtpla *8 23 12 TIB 21% 2Wt 20%— % 

»% PWlPef 140 49 926313 47% 4» 49% 

23% 16% PMIVH *0 U 8 149 24% 24 24— % 

31% 22% PSeriAS 28 * 9 1057 32 31% 31% 

an 23% PleNG 222 7J 9 200 71% 30% 71 — % 

21 . W ES**’ 1 13 21 IS* 18% 18%— % 

48% 33% Pllsbrv 1*6 32 11 632 48% 47% 47%+ % 

34 21% Pioneer 1*6 42 6 3064 29% 27% 28% +1% 

43% 27% PttayB 120 11 11 919 39% 38% 38% —1% 

15% 9% Pfitstn • 282 16% 10 10% + % 

15% 8% PtanRs 20 U 13 56 13% 13% 13% — % 

18% in Planfra .16b 1* 16 142 15% 14% 15% + % 

ran 7% piavtwr 3 97 n* n% n%— % 

22% 15% PooaPd *0 3* 36 11 17% 17% 17% + % 

32 24% Potarfd 1*0 3* 31 131* 26 25% 26 + % 

22% 11% Punrbe *0 2 8 442 17% 12% 13% + % 

22% 15 PepTai *0 42 19 18% 18% 11% + % 

19% 13% Portec JO 23 65 66 17% 17% 17% + % 

18 13 Portce 1*2 103 6 4687 17% 12% 17% + % 

99 90 PoGpf 11*0 11* 101 97% 97% 97% 


56% 40% PMIEpf 725 U* 
2D 15% PMiSub 122 72 


15% 9% Pimm 282 UK* u> 10% + % 

15% 5% PtanRs 20 U 12 56 13% 13% 13% — % 

18% TBk Plaatm ,16b 1* 16 142 15% 14% 15% + % 

13% 7% Playboy 3 97 n% T1% I1%— % 

22% 15% PoeoPd *0 34 36 11 17% 17% 17%+ % 

32 24% Polar..:; 1*0 3* 31 131* 26 25% 26 + % 

22% 11% Pandrs jO 3 8 442 13% n% 13% + % 

15 PopTal *0 42 19 18% 18% 11% + % 

19% 13% Portec J0 23 65 66 17% 17% 17% + % 

18 13 Porte E 1*2 103 6 4687 17% 17% 17% + % 

99 SO PoGpf 11*0 11* 101 97% 97% 97% 

33% 28% PorGpf AM ELD 33 33%33 3m + % 

33% 28% ParG Of 422133 2332%32%32V>+% 

38% 25% Pottrcb 1J6 45 12 120 35% 34% 14% —1 

27 19% PotmEl 216 82 B 244 26% 36 26% 

42% 36 PetElpf 450 11.1 1001 4DKc 40% *0% 

37% 31 PalEl pf 4*4 n.l mu 36% 35% 36% +1% 

25% 16% Pram) s 26 15 16 110 24% » M — % 

37% 24% Prfrarfc 2*0 SJ 7 59 36% 36% 36% + % 

20% 11% PrimeC 13 27*1 15% 15% 15% + % 

26% 12% PrtmMS 22 195 23% 23% 23% + % 

59% 46% PTOCKS 2*0 47 12 3727 56% 55 55 — % 

15 7% PrdRsh 22 2J 21 42 13 12% 12%— % 

1«% 16% PSvCnl 1*2 9* ■ 807 19% 19% 19%+ % 


33 33% 33 33% + % 

23 32% 32% 32%+% 


19% 16% PSCalpI Z10 11 J 

9 % 6 % psind 1*3 -fas 

8% 6 PSInpf 1*4 141 
47 36% PSIn pf 7.15 164 

61% 49% PSInpf 9J4 15* 
55 44% PSInpf 052 164 

55 43 PSInpf 828 16* 

10% 3% PSvNH 
16% 6 PSNHpf 
16% 6% PNHpfB 
25 8% PNHpfC 

22% 7 PNHpfD 

22% 7 PNHpfE 
19 5% PNHpfF 

19% 7% PNHpfG 
25% 19% PSvNM 288 11* 


3727 56% 55 55 — % 

42 13 12% 12%- % 

807 19% 19% 19% + U 

9 18% 18% 18%+ % 

858 7% 7% 7% — % 

5902 7% 7% 7%+ % 

3002 43% 43% 43% 

50* 59% 59Vx 99% +1% 
10)02 52 50% 50%—l% 

300z 51 50% 50% 

332 4% 4% 4%— % 

8002 10% 10% 10% — % 

14 10% 1016 MH4— V6 

13 15 IS 15 

10 13% 13% 13% 

5 13% 13* 13% 

16 12 12 12 

33 12% 12 12% + % 

1195 24% 24% 24% — % 


27% 20% PSvEG 2J2 105 7 1132 26% 26 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37 JOO Hu.- cents per lb. 

153JD 123JD Mar 14040 14150 

1512*0 12201 MOV 141.90 14X15 

149*0 121*0 Jut 142*5 14X60 

14750 127*0 Sep MU0 143*0 

14325 129-25 Dec 142*0 14235 

142*0 128J0 Mar 14060 14150 

Min 131*0 May 

139*5 13550 Jul 139*0 139*0 

ElLSales 3*50 Prev. Sale* <151 
Prev. Day Open infc 1X176 up 437 
SUOARWORLD u (NYCSCE) 

1 12*00 1 be^ cents per lb. 

KUO 3*2 May X97 4JM 

9.95 4*1 Jul AH *21 

9J5 422 Sep 433 4J6 

9*5 , 440 OCt 4*9 453 

775 4*7 Jan 496 4M 

9*3 532 Mar 5*8 543 

7.15 558 May 5*5 5*6 

6*9 1* Jul I* I* 

Est. Safes 6*05 Prev. Sales 8*63 
Prev. Day Open ML 78*27 off 79 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tew Sper fan 

2570 1985 Mar 2154 2168 

2570 1998 May 2139 2185 

2400 1998 Jul 2DJO ‘MSB 

3415 1987 Sep 2040 mm. 

2337 1945 Dec 1996 2020 

2145 1955 Mar 3020 2020 


14080 14177 
14175 142J3 
142*0 MX19 
142.15 142*3 
14153 142*5 
140*0 14179 
140*8 
189*0 139*0 


3*5 3*6 
409 4*9 
474 476 
4J2 442 
4*6 4*1 
5135 5*7 
5*3 5*3 
5*6 5*8 


2154 2139 
2087 2179 
2066 2079 
2055 2051 
1916 2013 
2010 2013 


77-15 57-27 Mar 69-12 4*-» 

77-15 57-20 Jun 68-16 68-22 

767 57-18 Sep 67-14 67-27 

76-5 57-8 Dec 66-28 *7-5 

7340 57-2 MOT 66-9 66-10 

70-16 56-29 Jun M 66 

70S 56-29 Sep *5-3 45-7 

6946 56-25 Dec 6+30 6440 

69-12 5647 NBr 6640 <4-10 

69- 2 644 Jun 

6846 63-22 Sen 63-29 6349 

EsL Sates Pnw.Sale>ii3*79 

Prev. Day Open IAL223J15 up 239 
ONMA(CBT) 

SlOOLOOO PTliF pfs A 32ndsaf MO pet 

70- 17 57-5 Mar 6942 1942 

6947 57-17 Jim 6843 68-21 

69-4 59-13 Sep 48-1 68-1 

68-13 594 Dec 67-11 67-11 

68 5840 Mar 

67-1 5845 JIM 

674 65-11 sen 

Ext. Sales Prev. Sates 386 

Pnw. Day Open lid. 4938 off 14 
CENT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

81 million- pts of 100 pet 
91*0 85*3 Mar 90*0 90*5 

91*0 8X30 Jun 89J7 09*6 

fo*o sun sop 89.10 mja 

90.17 8134 Dec SSJO 8U6 

I9J8 8656 Mar 

89J6 86J3 Jim 81*6 88*6 

88*0 87*6 Sec 

Est. Sates Prev. Sales UK 

Prev. Day Open in. 9,118 off 1*14 
BU RODOLUUUfUNM) 

81 mllllaiMfisof 180 Pd. 

91*8 8114 Mar 90*3 90*6 

90*8 82J9 Jun 89.17 89JA 

90*3 84J1 SOB 8X57 1X10 

89*7 8480 DSC 18*0 5X41 

89 J8 86.10 Mar 87*6 88*8 

89.13 8673 Jun 8774 87*6 

BAM 17*8 S«> 87*7 D*6 

89*7 87*8 DOC 17 JO B7J9 

Est. sales Prev. Sates 62J87 

Prev. DayOpenlnt.il 6*44 up 893 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP . IND EX (CME) 
points and cents 

18155 153*0 Mar 177 JO 17X35 T77* 

189.10 15410 Jun 182.10 183*0 181JI 

19270 160*0 S«P 18120 18655 1847! 

*196*0 17570 DOC 18855 119*0 188Ji 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 62*46 

Prev. Day Open Int. 74477 up 1*60 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
paints and cents 

206*0 16X10 Mar 19150 193*5 192*1 

219*0 173*0 Jun 19X75 199*5 T97JI 

212*0 18175 SOP 203*5 20150 2014! 

310*0 209 JO Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 1970 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7*85 off 551 
NYSE COMP. INDEX CNYFE) 
points and cents 

mjm 88*0 Mar 10285 103*5 1027! 

11000 90*0 Jun 10195 10670 10XS 

111*0 91*5 Sep 108*5 MOJO 187.55 

11375 101*0 Dec 11X15 11X15 11X1! 

Est. Sales 13*81 Prev. Sales, 12.123 
Prev. Dav open Infc M.199 ohai 


Commodity indexes 


Close 

Moody's....... 949 JO f 

Raulys 2*2130 . 

DJ. Futures ... — • mif 

Com. Research Bureau. 23X70 

/Moody's : base 100 ; Dec. 31, 1931. 

P - preliminary; f ■ Anal 
Routers : base 100 : Sep. 1X1931. 

Dow Jams : base 10Q : Dec. 31, 1974. 


CBT: aOCOBP Board of Trade 

CME: Oilcaae Mercantile Exchange 

IMM: International Momrfary Market 

: Of Chicago Mercantile Exchanoe 

NYCSCE: New York Cocoa. Sugar, Coffee Exchange 

NYC*: New York Cotton Exchange 

COM3: Commodity Exchange, New York 

NYME i Now York Mercantile Exchange 

KCBT: Kansas aty Board of Trade 

NYFE: New York Putins Exchange 


13% 10% PSEGpf 1J0 117 
36% 28 PSEGpf 4*8 12* 
18% 15 PSEGpf Z17 125 
S3 46% PSEGpf 6*0 125 
20% 16% PSEGpf 2J3 125 
106% 96 PSEGpfms 122 
64% 53 PSEGpf 770 125 

66 SS PSEGpf 7*0 125 

67 53 PSEGpf 8J« 127 

65 51 PSEGpf 7J0 120 

4% 2% Public* 

13% 8 Pueblo .16 1J 

15 9% PugetP 176 12J 


5 12 12 12 

5D0Z 32% 32% 32% + % 
3 17% 17% 17%+ % 
50z 54% 54% 54% + % 
2 19% 19% 19% 
100x100% 100% 100%— % 
4520QZ 61% 61% 61% + % 
3001 Ox 62% 6216 62% + IA 
HKs 63% 63 63% 

100Z 61% 61% 61% 

516 3% 2% 3 — U 

I 46 11% 11% 11%— % 
9 330 14% 14 14% 


1334 f% 9% 
1U W M 
639 4Mb 47% 
29 10% 

1196 45% 

34 50% 

48 36% 

37 29% 

411 18% 

52 26 
12 26 
12 30% 


46% 

33U Xerox 

300 

70 

17 2549 

43% 42% 42%-. 

51% 

45K Xerox pf 5*5 110 

1003 

49% 49% 4P%— 

29 

19 XTRA 

04 

25 

9 32 

26 25% 26 +. 


71% 10% PutfeHm .12 7 25 394 16% 15% 16% 
38% 23% Purolot 1*8 49 13 72 26% 26 26% 
10% 5% Pyre 7 230 8V 8% 1% 


Previous 

WMf 

2412X70 

120.24 

23X90 



Cash Prices March 15 



Asian Commodities 

March 15 


Ttt. 

~rr J , 


iijv. ’• <• 

:aKv 

fi i ■ 

«Y' ( i /+t.4> • 

r.'r.‘. ww 

'tk.i i! 

-1}v 

m 


"V r*. 

: /f/v ■ 


}frf 


'inv 



DM Futures Options 

March 15 

W. Germ Mark-nun marb arts so- nub 


Strike Coin- Settle 

Prtcr Joe see Dec , 

a no — . — 

29 1*6 1*4 — 

20 0*3 U4 - 

31 B50 8M — 

32 OJS 866 — 

31 at7 846 — 

Side mt td t o t al vet S.7E7 
Cenc mm. vaL X733 opm I 
Pets: Thun. veL T*o« oo«n I 
Soot 1 Cm: CMS. 


Pvt* Settle 

Jse 5w Da 

0*1 OS — 

ora <ua — 

1*5 1*1 — 

172 1*4 — 

252 2J0 - 

3*6 3*8 — 


HMk Low BM Ask Ofte 

SUGAR 

ProeCB irana per metric tan 
May 1*65 1*50 l*so 1*40 —10 

AUO 1J35 1J1I Mil 1J20 —9 

OCt 1J65 1J65 M65 1J72 —11 

Dec N.T. N.T. IJM M50 UnctV 

Mar IJffl 1*40 1*30 1*33 —I 

May 17* 1*80 1*75 1*85 -9 

EsL vaL: 600 Ms of 50 fork Prev. actual 
sale*: 1*15 lots. Open interest; 22.932 
COCOA 

French francs Per 108 kg 
Mar 2*35 2*25 2*3t 3*45 +1 

MOV 2*15 Z2B5 2*05 2*06 —6 

Jfv N.T. N.T. 2*55 — —10 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2*40 — —10 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2.160 — —5 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2.150 — — 10 

May M.T. I4T. 2,140 — — W 

EsL voL: H lots of 10 Tone. Prev. actual 

■ales: 117 lots. Open In terest: Ml 
COFFEE 

FtcimSi francs per 108 kg 
Mar 2*10 2*10 2*10 2*50 + 20' 
May N.T. N.T. 2*55 2*70 +10 

JlV N.T. N.T. 2*05 2715 +5 

Sep N.T. 2710 2730 +4 

Nov 2735 2733 2720 2750 +7 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2*70 - +8 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2*60 — +2 

Est. va I.: 11 loti ot 5 tans. Prev. actual tales: 

8 (OfL Open Intensf: 158 
Source: Sours# chi Commerce 


Volume: 225 lots of 100 ox. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malar i l en cents Mr kilo 
Clese 

BU Ask 

API 18650 187.50 

May — 19000 19100 

Jun 19250 19150 

JlV. — . — _ 19500 min 

Aug 19900 30000 

Sep —,.20200 20300 

volume : 30 lots. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Hln gepora carts per kilo 


London Metals 

March 15 


One Previous 

BU Ask lid Adc 

ALUMINUM 

Merflnn per metric ton 
spot 999 J0 100050 999 JO 10OOJO 

forward 103500 103600 103700 1037 JO 
COPPER CATHODES (High Oracle) 

Sterling per metric fan 

spot 1*57 JO 1*5850 1*5800 1*5900 

tax-ward 137UH 1*7900 1*2900 1*8000 

COPPER CATHODES {Standard] 

stewUM per metric ton _ 

not 1*5800 1*6000 1*5300 1*5500 

forward 1*7800 1*8000 1*7300 1*7500 

■ 

Start lea per metric ton 
soot 31100 31200 maa suoo 

forward 32000 32050 321J0 322J0 

NICKEL 

Spot 8 "" * 472500*473000 471500 4*2000 
forward 477500 478000 478200 4*8500 
SILVER 


BM Ask 
18775 1B80O 
192*5 19250 

19450 19975 

1*600 19700 

MO0O 20LDO 
20300 20400 


RSSlApf_ 1 43,00 16350 

RSS 1 MOV- 16700 16750 

R3S2ApI~ 16200 16300 

RSS 3 Apt— 16000 16100 

RSS4API— 15450 156J0 

R55J Apt- 14900 15100 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Molorsloe rtngglH^per 25 tons 


P re v i e w 
Bid Art 

14475 165*5 
168M 14875 

16200 14300 

16000 16100 
1MJC 15650 
14900 15100 


■pat 52400 52500 

forward 54300 54400 

TIN (itandanl) 
startkifl per metric tan 
not 10-165 1X166 

forward 1X152 1X155 

axe 

Start lap per metric fan 
net 8XU» B3SJD0 

forward B0S50 80600 

Source: AP. 


52100 52200 
53900 54000 


1X130 1X140 

1X130 1X135 


83*00 84100 
80900 81000 



VALUE LINE brings ^ 

COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE of 
1700 AMERICAN STOCKS 
to European Investors 

THE VALUE LINE INVESTMENT SURVEY continually reviews mono 
than 1700 widely held American stocks. Key data and ranking far 
relative future price performance of each stock are kept up-to^tete in 
the weekly Index. And about 130 new (ull-pege reports are issued 
every week, so that each company Is the subject of a complete report 
every 13 weeks. The full-page reports include operating and finan- 
cial statistics going back 15 years and estimated 3 to 5 years ahead. 

As a special introductory offer, you can receive 12 w eeks of Value 
Line for only S65— about Half the regular rate— providing you have 
not had a subscription in tile past two years. As a SONUS, you will 
also receive the 72-page booklet "A Subscriber's Guide,' Send 
payment (no cash please) along with name and address together 
with this ad to Dept 313 LQ3 

THE VALUE LINE 

711 THIRD AVENUE; NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017, U.SJk. 

Payment In local currendn (British £55, French fr 610. Swiss fr 165. 0M 2001 
and requests lor Information should bg directed hr. Value Um. Atti Alexandra 
do Saint -Phase. 2 Are da VUUra, 75007 Peris. (Tel. 551.83.58) 

Distributed by KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Publication Distribution ssrvtca 
HoUand Allow 4 to 8 weeks for doRwy. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

March 15 


Pun-Lad 

1 

MV API MOT JM 

1/16 - - 

- 

VM VI* % 



— I/M 5/14 

1* 

1/lt 9/16 1 1/16 IM 

15/M! 1/M 2R 

3 

M M 6H 


n in m 

» 

— - 14» 

m 


London Commodities 

. March 15 


_ Com Prev lo u t 

Htgfl LOW Bid Art BM Art 

SUGAR 

Starting gar motric ton 
May 11500 111*0 111*0 11100 113*0 113*0 
Aug 11900 117*0 117*0 117*0 118*0 11900 
Oct 12460 12200 Y&m 522*0 12420 124*0 
Dec WO0O 13000 128*0 12900 13030 131*0 
Mar 143*0 142J0 142*0 142*0 143*0 14400 
May 148*0 14700 147*0 14800 14900 149*0 
AM 154*0 154*0 153*0 15440 15400 15500 
Volume: 1*38 lots of 50 fora, 

COCOA 

SterDag per metric fan 
Mar lWn 3082 2097 3099 3*01 X1D2 

May 2099 2072 2089 2091 2094 2096 

JlV 2080 20S5 2066 2068 2066 2070 

Sep 2063 2045 2052 2053 2045 2047 

Dec 10K 1763 1077 1080 1,970 1.973 

Mar 1078 1060 1,973 1074 1.964 1,969 

May N.T. N.T. 1060 1,97s 1063 1.9*5 

Volume: 3*23 lols of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Star-Hag por metric lea 
Mar 2*92 2*75 2*78 2*80 3*76 2*78 

May 3*47 3*25 2*3! 3*33 3*31 2*34 

JlV 2*86 2*65 2*72 2*73 2*73 2*77 

SCP 1520 2*96 1500 1502 1504 1506 

Nov 3JJ9 2*9Q 1478 23® 1504 2J06 

Jen 3*78 2*60 2*55 2*59 1460 2*65 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2*21 2*20 2*00 2*50 

Volume: 1*93 loti of Stans. 



30 24 ZataCp 1*2 44 9 31 2M 28% 2M- 

24% 13% Zapata 04 60 T6 1281 14% UH 14 + 

58 30 Zayre *0t> 3 14 26S 56. 55 35% + 

31% 18% ZanlthE 7 4*7 31% 31 21 - 

21% 14% Zeros 19 8 201& 20% 20% + 

31% 21% Zuraln 1*3 4* 10 89 28% 38 7% - 


NYSE HigM/ma 



NEW HIOHS 41 

• VT - 

Am Home 
BkTr422pf 
Coat Sava 
Duka Paw 
GAFCorp 
Heine 

MNIttcvpl 

NabtaooBrd 

PledmlAvs 

RatatnPur 

Trantcapf 

U5UFECP 

AmnaiKm 

BklynuGpfA 

CoastalCp 

Eraarcb 

Gem II feu 
Hauslnt 625 
McKauon 

Nat Distill 
PorTG 4 40pf 
RalcA Cham 
TulUM 

Mimnrmj 

CP NOB 

CooaftCppfA 

FatUnRIU 

GarberPrds 

HuMard Ri 

McKaannol 

N5Pw680uf 

QuakerOati 

Sort RtElt 

USWest 

c££5i?Sl 

Coast IQbs 
F laaHMt* , . 
GWoHoCc 
litfNam 
Mcrtnat • 
NYNEX -) 
QuakSfOtL 
SfimaiEor.- 
UpMmCO . 


NEW LOWS M 


Amfesco 

BQKRtvn 

TexCamBn 

CompbRapf 
McGrHIIIpf 
WtMMlPIt Stl 

Centra Data 
StaneCant 

Chi NWS) : 
StnxMts ■ i 


inxuv:i»l 


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l-fntlr 

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TDM coll wkm 230314 
Tokftailooai W.9JSS3 
ToMpot votunc 3S5jn 
TDMM 0040 kit 474880 
latax: 

IWUBJJ LrelTUi Ctannui— lJl 

SaunaneaoE. 



GASOIL 

UJ. doitars per metric Ion 
MOT 3MM 2J3J0 233J0 233JS 33450 23500 
Avl 224J0 22X2 22X75 23400 22350 22175 
MOV 321*5 219*5 22100 221*5 21150 219*5 
Juo 219 JO 21850 219*3 719*3 I1L5D 21X75 
JlV 31X75 21X75 21750 22000 21830 21900 
An N.T. N.T. 21900 22400 21X50 22U0 
Seg N.T. N.T. 21900 22800 21850 72MSi 

OCt N.T. N.T. 31900 ZSLD0 21900 23000 

NOV N.T. N.T. 32000 23X00 21900 ZQ0Q 
Volume: 1*18 ktfi ot 100 tons. 

Sourats: Rmjtan anti London Peiraknjrn Ex- 
change tBOSO III. 


UA Treasury B3L Rates 

March 14 


GdH 29000-29050 

VakmWUteWdi&A. 

I.Qaefde MooKBteoc 
IZn Centre 1. 

ToL 310251 - Tdex 28385 . 


13 141 47% 4714 4714 — -% 
9 2 10% 10% 10% + % 

13 13 27% 27% 27% 

29 267 17% 17 17%+ % 

189 17% H 17% + % 
16 59 16% 1614 16% + % 

73 826 8% OK 8% + % 

104 1% 1% 1% + 14 

23 50 31% 31 31% + % 

10 2943 32% 31% 32%+ % 

12 45 30% 29% 29%— % 

7 4 20% 20% 20% 

33 10% 10% 10% + % 
21 4% 4% 4%+% 

14 632 26% 26 26 — % 

7 2020 .22% 22 22% + % 

ID 915 MS 8% 8% — % 

20 23 9% 9% 9% 

16 1371 38% 37 3714— !Vj 

13 37 25 24% 2«S— % 

10 3347 27 26 2tt%— % 

14 4 29% 29% 29% 

45 27 17% 17% 17%+% 

6 112 18% 18% 1S%— % 

*25 9% 1% 9 

35 13% 13 13 

7 319 22% 22% 22% — % 

11 1362 39% 38% 38% + % 

9 4503 38% 37% 38 

20 599 11% 11% 11U + K 

12 151 28% 27% 27% — % 

10 2T7 6016 60 60 — % 

9 784 35% 34% 34% — . % 

11 46 15 14% 14%— % 

T£ S 41% 41% 41% + % 

7 52 39% 39 39%+ % 

7 n% iik iik— k 

19 15% 1516 1514 — % 

36 15% 15% 15%+ U 

7 314 25 24% 24% 

63 4% 4% 4% 

9 830 41% 40% -UK— A 
16 175 10% 18% 18% 

14 153 24 z» 34 
■ 32 27% 27% 27% 

16 3322 54K 53 5314— 1 

8 6310 34% 33% 33% — % 

5 102 102 102 — % 
4223 28% Z7% 27% 

19 I5K 15 15 — K 

17 54 34% 34% 34%— 14 

31 177 14% 14% 14% + % 

8 149 25% 24% 25% + U> 

Iti 669 59V. 58% 58% — % 
5 4851 33% 3J 3314— % 
7 3D4 27% 26% 27 — 14 
11 3M 32% 31% 21%— % 





I i)UlI-B 1 1 



i, [ ' % . , )1 , 1'j ! 





He said that objectionable defense tactics*,.' 1 •* . 

arise out of “a portfolio of restraints," such as 1 *Si ‘ ; . % '• • 
federal requirements that reports be filed as 
stock is acquired and waiting periods between [\f n - 
filmg forms and buying Stock. a-.., 

The 1968 Williams Act, w hich governs the »U!»* <*¥| 


i ill 1 1 1 ii > ippnpMpppMR 

i n- i lj jfffly.IgTj i j> i W yi i i pj . ( i T i i j i i TS w 



Scwriar; Sofermn Brvttmrj 


7 91 6% 6% 6V. — U. 

U 4 14% 14% UK— % 

.7 98 15% 15% 15% 

13 1106 33% 31% 31%-4% 

4 57 57 57 — % 

11 64U 64% 64% — % 

10 133 35 34% 34%— K 

__ 3 2M4 29% 29% 

22 326x 15% 14% 1534 + % 
20 286 11% 11% 11% 

10 1619 60 59% 59% 

14 40 54% 54% 5414 

13 3JJ M% 37% 37%-% 
7 2618 37% 36% 27 + % 
13 4622 18% 18 «%+% 

10 N 24H 34% 24% + % 
43 37% 36% 36%— % 

.. 52 21% 21 21 

M U 27% 27% 27% 

11 14 4«% 46% 46%— % 

J 134 28 27% 27% 

25 . 4 8% 8% 8% 

7 3140 23% 22% 22% 

4 7525 18% 18% 18% 

7 58 34% 34 34% + % 

W 1211 39% 38% 38% — % 
> 36% 36% 36% — U 
lOOz 44% 44% 44% + % 


taWni j i tViJ 1 1 f.1 >1 mi IJ4 




iwr. Miner said, various provisions of the act, , - 
together with “various interpretations" by the 
Stturities and Hxdmnge Commission, create'' 
incentives to corporate defense tactics that 
cause public concern, he said. \ , ■■ 

“Greenmail is a manifestation of an institu- j ; . 
tional arrangement that we might take a 

He also suggested reviewing the tax code 
determine whether it creates incentives for 


^ The Daily Source for 
Intematfonal Jmeskas. 




-f 

• - •: 

1 *-Tj 



1 


iy 
































































DVTERNATIONAjL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


Page 11 


ADYERHSEMENT' 


IOTER^TTONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
IS March 1985 


; °»mI iBeffwlMfflMMtaeMIlownbctow era umIM bribe Fmd* listed with the 
caption of mm twH te eftwe.eOa tM ore baud on ttwt prices. The foUawtoo 
raarpJaal *ym**>U h^torij freowcy Of opotettans supplied tor The tirf: 
M>-doUV; furi -**•*«»; (M-M-moothhr/ {rl -nwotarty ; 0) - irreoakirtT. 


_ MAL MANAGEMENT 
I) AKMal Trust. S, A 


S748J3 gEMIM 

PB BSPs TO* 


*$. - •* ■- . 


EouHsow America 

■Id 1 Enuttoer EorpPt 

id V e«wtt»*v Poclflr . . 
'Id ) Grabnr ... 

■ 'Id > Swcktwr, 


FWSH Uj>YMBAUK IWTL^PpB 4M. Genavn ij 

S112M — Hwl Lloyds InTI Dollar . * id 

F 1272X41 — «•*> H°W» IntT EuropeZH^ SF ir 


tan 


,VH>C JVJUUSflAER &CQ.LM. —Id 

(d 1 Boarbona SF 9J1J0 

'id I rirrh” SF 

4dl EouHmh- A merica S 

sf niS® —tty. inn Growth" 

SF llSuo — +<wi Uovtts infl income. 

SF 17«*P —+■(**) Uavdc Infl PacMe. 

_ SF 2X47 PARISBAS-GROUP 
_ SF 1203 i a l Curtexa International SttJS 

- *a^a®iTO==j“.v a 

-SoBLI^EN^: -M 


S10C5C 
F I1UD 

UBS 

SF 14400- 


-W ) CSF Fund;—— 

■>!d) Cratdmr Fund. — . 

, ’idl 1TF Fund H.v_; 

>INQUE IMDOSUEZ 

'd > Aikm Growth Fund, 
w] Dmrtxmd 


FIF— America. 


* FIF— Europe. 

FIF— PodftC- 


.. > OBL1-YEN. 

SF COS — furl OBLI-GULOEN 
I) PAROIL-FUND 



C -* - , . 


— •+ ■ ■ ^ ■ 


i ‘.HI Indeawz MutHbonds A. 

< ■•*) fndosMsMpnilMna&B. 
i .«t A.HNI «J*Gb zn, St. Hdier. Jeroev 

. BrltJSofler Income S ~ ‘ 

■I BrfUMdBBSCuir 

msn -hoIrk 


, .«) Brito 

:-dt Brtl.IntVS- __ 

i disrit. intUHttnoB-Portf f 1.234 -Hw> rbc 

■ ;» Brit.uistvend Grnwitt *&®sa 


S1MD — td 

XTD08 -Ml PARINTER FUND „ 

|U41 MdJ PAHUSTroosurvflond^ X 10047 

!&s 3SS 

*J» -+<») R«C imi Income HL IHJP 

sw! 


. w) BritGoW Fund— — _ 

; : :.'w» BritJHanooXwTMCr— 

* . dj Brit Jaaon Dir Perl. Fd 

• ■ w) BriUersey Cm Fund— 

. d I Brit. World Lew. Fund — 
■>_ a i Brit, wortd TcOhn. Fund, 
X 1 PITAL INTERNATIONAL 

. •>wi Capital Intr Fund — . 

t - wj Capital UntidSA 



SF 42838 


i '» 14 


S0O94 

SVEN SICA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

® 2¥rasastte^2s 

— twISHB intf Growtti Fund I 

!&K SWISS BANK CORF. 

Selection DM H 143 
Dollar Bond SMacflon— » 13034 * 

Fforin Bond 5et*dOri FL 1T7J1* 

Intervafar— — l_ — _ — SF «J0 

Jewan POrNoKa 5FBML9I 

Swtn Farelan Bend Set SF 1 &L 47 * 

SuHenn at er new Ser. SF2972 

Untv. Band Select. SF84JH 

' " SF 124L76 


J1TJ7 -(d) 

1 lEDIT SUISSE I ISSUE PRICES) — |F 

- d ) AritaRS Sulwas— SF 34475- 

: - 3) Bend VBIorSwf. ,— SF 103115 

•. -dl Bond Vaiw Mwt. — - DM10444 — 

' d) Bond vofor US- DOLLAR. — S 10*41 

•• =«* 

tSJSS5SrSS5“ J&.'l&U UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

; id I CS Fonda— Inn,. . ■ SFUMO — (d | Aijiqa U3. Sh. SF 

' yd ICS Money Maricot Fond — nogs — Id { BorSinveet Z If 


. d ) CS Money Market Fund 
cdl Enriokf — Vador— — 
dl Uisec. 


•> . d) g un cpo Vaiur. 
dl Pacific— VMor 


DM 1D2WJ0 — (d 
SF 17475 Z-4d 

sFiimoa 

SF IS4H0 
SF 1S1J5 


FoMOSwtKSh.. 
Jaoan- hruest_re 


— (di Sam South AIT, Sh.. 
— id > r 


SF 13500 
SF 104200 
SF 51 UB 
SF 20130 


'■ ; r INVESTMENT RFM 


rid) CMKzntro 
■ -<d 1 mn Renta 


Rentenbnd. 


"nfi & Horuttl 4 Lloyd George. Brussels 
m) DiM Commodity i ‘ 


Sima Mock price) 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

^ — <d) umronta DM4UD 

DM —id > DnfWnds . DM2170 

DM87.17 — (d)Unliak DM TUB 


„ i POOL S 30077 — 

I Cwrenev A Gold Pooi__s WS4 — 
•- ml Winch. Life Fat. Pool— 141440 — 


Other Funds 


**H 


* « 


u 


- ^ 
* % 


:'ml 

m) Tram Wortd Fat PaoU S97V24 — 
-c MGMT. LTD. inv. advisers 
' nuFenae Paunty HIU. ECXOVSU4089 

' »wl F&CAiianHc snia 

. 1 w! P&C Eurooean S972 

: «)FSC Oriental S25J1 

-T -9ELITY POB 67|l HomJi ion Bermuda 
ri - m American VabwtConmttKC. SRC5Q 
. • m Amr Vtalues CoouPref *101.16 

- d Fldeflty Arner. Aswls *4535* 

i -d FMeflty Australia Fund— S7J4 

J d Fidelity Dtacaverv Fund. sin® 

d FMefflyOtr.Suss.Tr *12170 

; d FkSeittv For East Fund— *1975 

. *d FkleOTv Ian. Fund 15351 

-Id FMefflv orient Fund 12424 

: .d Fkteilfv Frontier Fuad Slia 

" d FMeiltv Pacific Fund S 131 46 

*d FWoBty SjjcL Grawtfi Fd SI4.14 

jl Fldernv world Fund *2974 

i-RBES PO 8887 GRAND CAYMAN 

- p-tdon Aoont 014DW013 

. wl Gold Income 1 7J2* 

5439 


(wl ActHnufe investments Fund. 

(») ACttvtt infl 

(ml Allied Ltd. 


.. . Aouita International Fund— s 107.14 
jr I Arab Finance I F— - - SS4&S3 

iBIAriane $131224 

twl Trustcor IntT Fd. (AEIFI *1030 

Iw BNP Interbond Fund - I98J®* 

Bondselex- Issue Pr SF 137.* 

Canada GWMertBCW Fd SBJO 

Capital Prasmv.Fd.tntl *TU9 

.wl Citadel Fund S 1 JD 

.’dj CJ.R. Australia Fund *929 

(d I CJ.R. japan Fund——— *975 


Imi Cleveland offshore Fd *2075.71 

Iwl Cohimbla Securities FL 19224 

a lOOMETE — 

I Convert Fd. Inn A I 
:wj Convert FdL Inn B I 


W •• 

■it • 

* >-■ 

1 .. »•. 
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— — .w) GoMAmectatun. 

• w) Donor income—. 

— m) 5tratealcTrodlna- 


5!^ 


. FIMOR FUNDS. 

: 'wl East investment ... 
: ,‘wl Scottish World Fund- 


*350X1 %u 
112170 p 


tine 



ORAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. JwJ 
ite.St Peter Part. Guernsey. DSWU ("> 

) FvlurGAMSTt ST 28.19 (5 

IGAMArhitraoelnc *12223 «, 

\ GAMerica Inc— — — _ J1353J- (w) 
GAM Boston Inc— S104J9 « 

GAM ErmHaoo *1320 jr 

OAM Frmtc-vol 5 F 9724 WJ 

GAM International Inc—. SWOT* 


GAM North America me 

GAM N. America Unit Trait. 
GAM Pacific Inc. 


*2055 

*1854 

sug 


Wl 

?! 


S935M 
*954 
*2527 

*7424 

D. Witter WM Wide I vt Tot *954 

Drakkar ImwstFUnd N-V^ SU12.M 

Oreyftu Fund IrdX *2128 

w) Dreyfus ln* wa mfln«nt *22*5 

The EstabUstwient Trust SUB7 

Europe Obfioat Ions LFO02 

First Eaeie Fund *000955 

FWiyStorsUd. sms» 

w) Finsbury Group Lid *11 


Fonseltx Is sue Pr. 
I in ■ 1 1 1 1 ii ii I 


Formota S election I 

Fostdttalta 


Gevernm. Sac Fund* 

... Fronkf-Tnntintsnins— 
iw) Haussmom Hldas. M.V— 
Hestfa Funds., 
n Fund. 


ILA mn GcSd Bond- 
InterfundSA 


lirtermarket Fund . 


SF 

— 17.18 
SF795I 

_ SUM 

— S 8772 
DM 4852 

. * 1D7_54 
. S 10455 
f 158730 

— *950 
_ * 1 X 20 
. S 21955 


Inf 1 ! Currency Fund Ltd S754 

IntT Securities Fund *8.95 

- . Invtata pws — — — DM 4440 

r I Invest AliantleMH— SAM 

nM Fund SA— * 1072 


$ 101*0 ir) ItaHariune i 

1B150O Cw) Japan Selectlan Fund. 
*11390 iwl Janaa Pacfflc Fund. 


1T045S 

GAM Steri. 8. Intt Unit Trust. 13X50 o M Jelfer Ptns.lnlLL«— _. S10U348 

M GAM Systems Int S107J4 > WWwwurt Bsnson inllFd — SOM 

. ,• GAM Woridwlds Inc— S 13*70* w) KletnwtBeii*. Jap. Fd_ *7033 

’ iGAMrycheSA-CKWA sMJO 

• <t . .MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. M > i IhiJIm w , i ,imm 

• '■ s if) Berry Pac. Fd. Ltd.— *971 (w) UavdS Inti. Smollar rtv« j iTjj 

1 ) G.T. Applied Science—. . I I5J2* (") ri ffjKrt * 71 ^ 

> 1 ! G-I- Aawn HJLGwtHFd__ S1X37- (ml HmrrthmdM £ 1 T *19774 

(d l Mediolanum Set. Fd SUM 


-r. w) G.T. Asia Fund. 


i ) G.T. Australia Fund. 
1 ) G.T. Europe Fund. 


■1 . A) G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fond 
J)GX Dollar Fund 

... . d ) G.T. Band FuraL_ 

... : i 1 G.T. Gtsbai Tectvrfey Fd 

S1G.T. Honshu Pathfinder 


*355- 

•■wo; (b) Metecne- 
- *J23 MAAT- 
W id >NK - 


1) G.T. Investment Fund—— _ *1740 w) 
Co^und_ *4143- (rj 1 


*J1 S (wi Nippon Fund — . — *21 

— — *!■£! w) Novofec (nvestmenf Fund. — *9 
!1?J5 iw) MA4AF-. *14 


m> MSP F.l.T. 


ii &T. Japan smml 
» G.T. TerimaMpy Riind 
I) G.T. South China ~ 

. • C TRUST COlUERSEY) LTD. 

7 ■■» (fill IP VSeah»SCSt.Hrtler.tS3*36XI1 
Ikll: JtDED CURRENCY FUND. 

fllnc: BM. SX45 Offer - 


PANCURRI Inc. 


(r) PortaPSw.REstL...--^- 
ir) Permal Value Fund ttvZ^ 

ftiKS'S 


I97S4 


. .. , IJCdpj Bid *1055 oner S1R341 

. »S I v »ik! PH* ERN ATIONAL INCOME' FUND 
Ii! lUMLiU) snort Term -A* (Acamil — *14564 
1 ) Short Term ‘A’ {DWri 
. , ... 1) snort TermTlMAccun 

I • Jj Short Term ■B'(Dlsfr) 
l!l< l JKU»> Lana Term- 


(wl Quantum Fund N.v„ 
id ) Renta Fund. — — 


*15978 
*15899 
*08377 
*2051 

DINE FLEMING, FOB 70 GPO H9 KS 
1 1 J.F Japan Tnnt— Y4*M 

1 ) JJ= South East Asia— 13847 

J.F Japan Tscbnaioey. — Y 23934 


. - J3S£ 

Id I Rent Invest LF 155558 

id) Reserve IniMiedDapostbL. S 106676 

(w) Samurai, Portfolio SF 1T3T5 

;d) SCI/Tech. SAUawmbours — S9J 


u • 

_ -.-A*.:' 

,1 J.F PodflctacSttAco 

— -5» 

- \ARBEN 



€ ioQ.47 





' .1 FLEX LIMITED 








M 


- Ymm 



.< > Doutactw MorK 

wOM 95231 

■xwr. : r' •' 1 


__FL 95165 

SFMIM 


undN.V.. 

1 Putnam intT Fund. 
I Pri— Tech. 


I stalest. Bank Eoul 

I Stnrteor I 


lank Eoulty HdssNV *9.10 

Investment Fond — S1927 

Syntax Ud.'iaass A)* — - *7.17 

Techno Growth Fund. — — SF 9751 
Tokyo Pac. Hold. (Seat— *99*8 


Tokyo Poc Hutd. N.V.. 

w) Trmispocfflc Fund 

,d 1 Tuc^uoW* Fund. 


* 12458* 

: sSS 

’w> Tweedy^rawne cv^JatsA *25482* 
iw) TwMdv^nrwne n-v.OossB $147549 

d ) UNI CO Fund— — DM 7630 

(d I UNI Band Fund-. S90840 

(h) UNI Capital Fund S1032.ll 

(w) United Cam invt Fund Ltd. — *128 

iw) We dpe Europe N.V *4851 

(w) Wedae Jopm H.V SBXK 

Pacific N.V. *5744 

(LS, »i.v 1 5X4, 

*9.9SB jirb Wtacfiesler Financial LM — *1023 
' ,m) Winchester DtvendfledM— *2X39- 

:: : T skui 

w) worldwide Securities s^2ta. *A5D 
!w) Worldwide Special 5/S 21b. SLSS154 


*r..; •• 
*■ 

. *Sf 
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■ os on Amsterdam Stock Exchanoe 


Nudear-PkmtDoumtiM 
Hurts a Canada Industry 


By Doughs Martin 

f/etv York Times -Service 

PORT HAWKESBURY* Nova 
Scotia — Each day, a plant here 
takes 14 million gallons (53 mi|lti? n 
liters) of normal water and turns ii 
into three or four 45-gaflon bathes 
of a substance called heavy water. 

If they could be sold, each batch 
would fetch more than $50,000. But 
there will be no sale; heavy water is 
a white elephant, as unmarketable 
as the nuclear reactors in which it is 
used. A warehouse here holds near- 
ly 7,000 stainless steel drums of the 
stuff, weighing more than 1,500 
tans. 

“If the industry ends, it aids, I 
guess," said Inn Amey, 34, as he 
performed the final stage of the 
Dcess, using a tiny metal hose to 
i another band. Mr. Amey, who 
has worked here since the plant 
eued 15 years ago, summed up 
s community’s sentiments with 
some understatement. 'Nobody’s 
jpyful,*' he said. 

Indeed, 297 workers, among the 
highest pud in the area, stand to 
lose (hear jobs if the government- 
owned company that produces 
heavy water gets its way. Atomic 
Energy of Canada Lid. has asked 
Parliament to close either this plant 
or another at Glace Bay, Nova Sco- 
tia , which employs 315. And, under 
the plan, production at the plant 
that is not dosed would he sus- 
pended indefinitely. 

The workers are trapped by the 
reduced demand for nuclear power 
and by an increasing national re- 
luctance to bolster a side regional 

ers more than 

Although the government of 
Prime Munster Brian Mahoney 
has yet to make a decision cm the 


dosing, most observers expect the 
new government’s budget this 
to announce the shutdown 
at least one of the plants. 

The plants have made enough 
heavy water to supply the needs of 
more than three reactors indefinite- 
ly. Company officials say the un- 
sold stocks are sufficient to satisfy 
any foreseeable market prospects 
for the next 10 years. 

Heavy water differs from normal 
water in that it has an extra neutron 
in its molecular structure. It occurs 

naturally, one part for each 7,000 
parts of normal water. Except for 
occasional sma ll aridiiiono one 
dose of heavy water is enough to 
keep a reactor running for its entire 
life. In nuclear reactors, Dying neu- 
trons bounce off heavy water much 
more easily than they do off normal 
water. 

But today almost nobody is buy- 
ing reactors, even the highly vaunt- 
ed Candu model, which uses heavy 
water. (Most other reactors in the 
world, including those made by the 
United States, France and West 
Germany, operate with highly pres- 
surized normal water.) Despite effi- 
ciency studies showing that five op- 
erating fxnriivf rank m the top 10 
in the world, none has been sold for 
three years, and future prospects 
are nol encouraging. 

In a somber analysis two years 
ago, the Canadian government 
warned that the nuclear industry 
was in deep trouble. In a recent 
interview, Norman Aspin, presi- 
dent of the Canadian Nuclear As- 
sociation, said that his industry is 
simply ‘‘hanging on," hoping for 
new orders. 

Hanging on and hoping is what 
people have been doing for years 
amid the craggy beauty of Cape 



EC Economic Growth 
Was 2.4% for 1984 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dtspadus 

BRUSSELS — Economic 
growth in the European Communi- 
ty was 2.4 percent Iasi year, slightly 
higher than expected but lower 
■ than growth rates in other major 
C Ex- 


AeoamdPren 

A Canadian government beavy-water plant in Nova Scotia. 
The plant has a huge unsold inventory and may be dosed. 


Breton Island, which is connected 
by a causeway to mainland Nova 
Scotia. Here in Port Hawkesbury, 
the dreamers 20 years ago thought 
this would be a city of 40,000 by 
now. 

Instead, it is one- tenth that size, 
and shrinking. A four-lane street 
that was built in the expectation 
that it would run through the cen- 
ter of town remains at the eastern 
edge. The unemployment rate is at 
least 20 percent. 

One oil refinery opened and 
closed. Another was promised, 
even celebrated at a gala, but was 
never builL The adjoining Strait of 
Canso never became a super port, 
despite politicians* promises. 

Now about all that is left is the 
heavy-water plant. And Canada’s 
heavy-water program seems, in a. 
sense, a victim of its own success. 
In the early 1960s, Candu sales 
were rating along at sod) a pace 
that officials were considering the 
unpleasant prospect of buying 
heavy water from the Soviet Union. 
Then, two private companies expe- 


British Steel 
Loses Appeal 
(MILS. Tariff 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — A federal 
court has ruled that the British gov- 
ernment’s investments in British 
Steel Corp. are subsidies and that 
products made and exported with 
those subsidies are subject to coun- 
tervailing tariffs on their arrival in 
the United States. 

Supporters praised the decision, 
saying that it gives domestic indus- 
tries anew weapon in their effort to 
limit foreign penetration in hone 
markets. Opponents said it would 
raise another barrier to free trade. 

The ruling by Senior Judge Ber- 
nard Newman of theUjS. Court of 
International Trade in New York 
Gty upholds a 1983 finding by the 
International Ikade 'Administra- 
tion that British Steel, in effect, 
held an unfair competitive advan- 
tage over U-S. companies because 
its operations were subsidized by 
the British government. 

To compensate for that advan- 
tage the trade administration ruled 
that exports of British Steel’s spe- 
cialty steel products to the United 
States should be subjected to a 
193-percent tariff based on the 
amount added to those products by 
subsidies. Specialty steels include 
stainless steel sheet and plate, 
among other products. 

British Steri appealed to the 
Court of International Trade in 
July 1983. 

Judge Newman late last week 
rejected British Steel’s appeal But 
be said he would hold the 193- 
perceai tariff rate in abeyance until 
the international Trade Adminis- 
tration provided more information 
about how it arrived at that figure. 


T&rneco Reports Tentative Plans to Buy 
International Ha rvester Unite in Ei^ 


The Assodated Press 

CHICAGO — Tenneco In a says 
it has tentative plans to buy Inter- 
national Harvester Co.’s remaining 
farm-equipment subsidiaries in Eu- 
rope, winch would intensify its 
competition with Deere & Co. 

The announcement was made 
Thursday as Deere; the industry 
leader, said it was cutting 600 more 
people from its salaried work force 
m Iowa and Illinois. 

Tenneco said it would buy Inter- 
national Harvester's nnits in 
France, West Germany and Den- 
mark if it can negotiate satisfactory 
financing arran gements and labor 


concessions to cut operating costs. 

The Houston-based company re- 
cently bought most of Internation- 
al Harvester’s farm-equipment as- 
sets in North America and Britain 
and merged them into its JI Case 
Co. tractor unit 

Tenneco' s chairman, James L. 
Ketdsen, has said the company 
would not be interested in acquir- 
ing the European units of Interna- 
tional Harvester if the work force 
in France cannot be scaled back. A 
source at Tenneco said Thursday 
that that remained the significant 
obstacle to the sale. 


*i« u -1. • 

v 


*«• - 


■* 


>• t- ■ • 

A ‘ 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


Salas Representative Wanted 

'lor Dele Cantor, Inc. an dSUbOsIwd end reopected uippBer oh 
IBM FC end athirant patent end trademarii record numegement 
qratetu. 

Wwtdntde patent end trademark tu payment sendee*, 
xfunfty to rtpraMnt hi! apoctnim oJ pMMnf *nd tredeoiw* rtconf niiMgmM wwenm 
P*ym«w ttrasn ta VMMtn Europe. Sen to Winnie pelenOBiderwrti department* 
*« tire*. 

mtuo* and *e™iee*»» ««fl prowm end document** eo*np*w»ie)y prtratt s*V » iratafi 

. 9 *«*ne* in togoi rnvMt*. MfMro and **nica MW and IBM PC tamUy I* iwfeluL 
tatamiaweneo lattwtn *»4 eentae sale*. 

tam plate teftmn product and aanrlc* 8m tor patent and trademark auppdrt. 
•OOrawtaa lead gene rat io n program. 

BebedidHtg European I n tend* me tar Aptfl 188 S. 

Contact Peter A McAteer. PreaWeni 
npplpr npf« Canter, laa. 

28i DO Nortfiwearani Higimay. Suite MO • SCtilliflMd. MMBCO* 

I • TLX; 2 ' 


Phone: 313-332-5810 • 


■ 23-5870 - Cable: MASTER DATA 


a j 




f ■ ' 


INTERNATIONAL 
humanitarian organization 

has a vacancy far a 

UBUC INFORMATION OFFICER 

initially' -based in- Geneva. 

KlkUtea should preferably be in their thirties, with extensive 
erience in advertising ana marketing public information mate- 
■ Journalistic experience with demonstrated witiim mdediting 
la required. Professional fluency in English and French, good 
- * ’ge of German. 

?ei monthly subtly approximately U-S. 12,500.—. 

Write to; Box 0 213S, Hwold Tribune, 

92527 Nauifly Cmfax, Franca. 


VERSEAS ASSIGNMENTS 


**ct positions are available for qualified professionals and 
■naans in Aria, the Pacific Basm and the Middle Ebsl 
lidaies must have a minimum of 5+ years experience and 
ipriate training -or educational background in Construction, 
>ch£inical. Communications, Logistics and most Medxcal and 
Meting disdnfincs. Housing, Travel,. Medical Insurance and 
,flent salaries are available. Some positions are tax exempt 


I, 1 htuhi/hm uvi*w 

C cowrideration forward resumefCY. tot 

!*■&% — Il l — 



Si 


tantauus international 

Tut tantalus gkolif 


IS Flow OTB Tcjw'.t. 

3 Quoins Road, Ccnlrjl 
Moot; Kong 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 



INTERNATIONAL 

ACCOUNT MANAGER 

■ Scope: 

Europe-wide campaign. i 

Strategy- and Implementation. 1 

I Reports to: VP Business. J 

Location: 

Paris. 

Giant: 

Mufti-national Corporation. 

Divisional headquarters. 

Products: 

High technology office products. 

Function: 

Direct dienf contact. 

Budget responsibility. 

Raquirad: 

5 y eras advertising agency experience. 
International savvy. 

Creative liaison capability. 

Organizational skills. 

Fluent English, some French, German. 

Salary: 

Very competitive package. 

Start: 

Immediate. 

Reply: 

C.V., photo, references, plus salary needs to; 

Box D 21 39, International Herald Tribune, 


181 Av. Ch-de-Gaufle, 92521 Neuilly Cedex. 



i 


GENERAL MANAGER 
PERFUMERY 


MUSCAT Over £35,000 P. A. 

+ excellent benefits 

A leading Omani Group, manufacturing an exclusive and expensive perfume, 
wishes to recruit a General Manager to head the operations of their Perfumery. He 
will report to the Chief Executive of the holding company. 

The incumbent wilt be responsible for all aspects of the operations of the 
perfumery including manufacturing, marketing and finance. In particular, he 
will be expected to contribute to and further strengthen the market position of the 
perfume both in the Gulf and international markets. He should be able to 
demonstrate a proven capability in creative and innovative marketing techniques 
* and show a fresh and dynamic approach in establishing this prestlgeous project In 
the fiercely competitive world of perfumes. 

Candidates should have a strong sales and marketing background with previous 
experience either in the Perfumery or Cosmetic Industry. A business management 
degree and an ability to understand the minds of the potential (Arab) customer are 
desirable. 

Besides the salary indicated above, benefits include free furnished air-conditioned 
housing, a company maintained car, annual home leave (42 days per annum) with 
fares for self and family, free utilities, generous medical Insurance etc. The entire 
package will be tax free. 

Please air mall applications giving details of age, qualifications, experience and 
salaries drawn to: 

The Chief Executive 
P.O. Box 4086, Ruwi 
Sultanate of Oman 

All applications mV be bested in strict confidence. 


vtf- 

m 

'ip: 

Jfji 

•« 

■c. 

7; <x 


W- ■ 


V ;h- 

p-i 

. : s'! 


: ?£:; 


'*v 


rieuced difficulties and Ottawa 
purchased the Cape Bmon plants 
in the mid-1970s. 

The plants here quickly devel- 
oped the capacity to meet growing 
Candu orders. They, along with an- 
other plant in Ontario that is 
owned by the provincial utility, 
have made the mavy water for 13 
completed Candus as well as nine 
undo - construction. 

But world recession and the tur- 
bulence in enesgy markets led to 
the mothballing of a plant in Que- 
bec and three others in Ontario. 
Meanwhile, inventories grew at (he 
two plants in Nova Scotia. 

Now, a revival of the industry 
depends on both a renewed market 
for nuclear reactors and on Cana- 


over its light-water rivals — includ- 
ing the United States, France and . 
West Germany. 


industrialized nations, the EC 
ecutive Commission said Friday. 

in a summary of recent econom- 
ic trends in the world’s largest trad- 
ing bloc, the commission said that 
gross national product for the 10 
member nations grew by an aver- 
age of 2.4 percent in 1984. com- 
pared with a 1.0- percent gain the 
previous year and a 05-percent in- 
crease in 1982. 

Gross national product is the to- 
tal value of all goods' and services 
produced. The figures cited by the 
EC were adjusted for inflation. 

The commission as recently as 
last October bad projected a 23- 
percent increase in economic 
growth for 19g4. 

Even with the added growth last 
year, economic activity in the EC 
remained markedly slower than in 
man' 

The 

cem last year. Japan recorded 
percent expansion and growth in 
canada was 4.6 percent. 

The Commission slightly in- 
creased its forecast of economic 
growth in the EC for 1985, but said 
unemployment would continue lo 
rise. 

'The commission revised its 
growth prediction for 1985 from 


13 percent to 2.4 percent. But it 
said 19S5 would see a further rise in 
unemployment, mainly because of 
new job losses in manufacturing. 

Unemployment was forecast to 
average 113 percent of the bloc's 
work force as against 10.9 percent 
in 1984. 

Inflation however should be low- 
er, with an easing in pressure from 
import prices ana labor costs. The 
commission said it expected prices 
to rise 5.1 percent this year after 
increases of 7.6 percent in 1983 and 
6.1 percent in 1984. (AP. Reuters) 

■ EC Steel Output Stable 

St ed production in the Luropean 
Community, excluding Greece, 
amounted to a little more than 9.7 

million metric tons (10.67 short 
tons) in January, about the level of 
a year earlier, according to figures 
released Friday by the EC statistics 
office. 

Agence France- Presse reported 
from Brussels that output was 
down 0.9 percent from December 

syJg" pro<tei °” 

Production by country was: 
West Germany. 3731 million metric 
tons: Italy 1.99 million tons: 
France, 135 million tons 1 . Britain 
1.14 million tons: Belgium, 868.000 
tons; the Netherlands. 479.000 
tons; Luxembourg, 320,000 tons; 
Denmark, 41.000 tons: and Ire- 
land, 16,000 tons. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


HUMAN RESOURCES 

Brussels — BF 2,000,000 Plus 


My client is a true leader in high 
technology with many unique products 
supplied to several industries including 
textiles, printing, cartography electronics 
and seismic exploration, A controlled 
growth over many years of 5Q% in sales 
and more in profit has established a 
substantial international (not American) 
organisation. The European Company 
based in Brussels employs some 200 
highly qualified people producing 40% of 
total turnover, approximately $40 million. 
The present Personnel Manager will 
return to Corporate Headquarters to take 
on an international role and he is to be 
replaced by a seasoned professional with 
full V.P. status. 

Recruitment is perhaps the most 
important aspect ofthisjob but controlling 
the growth and the decentralisation of 
activities must also be key The company 
places great store by it's interpersonal 
relationships using psychological, 
psychometric and graphology testing 


to support people decisions. With 
colleagues in Operations. Sales, Marketing 
and Finance the incumbent will report 
directly to the President. 

Applicants aged 35-50 should be 
personnel professionals with all round 
experience gained in a hi-tech inter- 
national environment You should speak 
at leasttwo languages and be educated 
to degree level probably having studied 
Psychology. 

Remuneration will not be a limiting 
factor and the other benefits are also 
generous and include expatriate allow- 
ances following relocation to Brussels 
where appropriate. A company car will 
be provided. 

Please forward a detailed curriculum 
vitae to Phillip Rich, the Consultant 
advising on this important appointment 
You may call him if you wish in England 
on 07535 51212 in office hours or on 
0344 772048 in the evening. 


Personnel Consultants 

. 31 Pea scod. Street Windsor, Berkshire SL4 1EA, England. 


Senior Technical 
Consultant 

Saudi Arabia 

to $35,000 

for a major financial institution in Rjyatfi, providing finance for the development of 
the private industrial sector. The successful candidate wifl join a professional 
organisation playing a major role in developing trie Kfogdom's industrial base. 

The Senior Technical Consultant is responsHe for providing a comprehensive 
assessment of the technical side of proposed industrial projects, covering a wide 
variety of manufacturing processes and end-products. He also provides technical 
advice and guidance fo existing industrial ventures, and wiB play an active part in 
on-the-job training and development of Saudi nationals. 

Candidates must have a degree or equivalent in engineering and should preferably 
have professional membership. They must have a minimum of ten years' practical 
experience of a variety of manufacturing processes, ideally as a production or 
industrial engineer, and five years of technical consultancy exposure at a senior 
level. They must demonstrate recent, specific and significant involvement fo the 
technical evaluation of a new industrial project or a major expansion to an existing 
project 

Total fluency fo written -and spokenJEngfish _fe essential; knowledge of Arabic would 
obviously be an advantage. Previous overseas experience would be useM, 
especially where experience bas been gained of joint venture projects andfor 
technology transfer. Those under the age of 35 are unSkety to have had sufficiently 
wide and varied experience: 

In addition to th e salary paid free of tax fo Saucfi Arabia, the successful candidate wfll 
be offered an excellent benefits package which includes ^ - performance and end of 
contract bonuses - free housing and utilities - leased car- generous leave and 
leave fare provisions --freemedfoa! treatment^ - overseas school fee and student 
travel benefits - first class recreation /acuities. Initial appointments wiH be for a 
period of two years, renewable by mutual agreement 

Interviews wfll be held fo London and possibly in Europe in late Aprifeariy May. 
Please reply vvith ahril curriculum vitae, includfog current compensation level Your 
appffcatidn wffibe forwarded direct to oca - client. Ust separately ary organisations to 
whom your appficatkxvstoufci not be sen B. G. Woodrow ref. CD. 1944. 

HA' Y-MSL Selection and Advertising Limited, 

. 52Grosvenor Gardens, London SW1 W (JAW. 

OUa-I-^L j jCa fc* ** 



middle east 





Br Uagfe 

AVIEX 


VoiatHPM— 

Prav. 4 PJlA.vaL 


. 7 , 87 mm 

. 1 U 4 UH 


Tables Include me nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do net reflect late trades elsewhere. 
Via The Ass o ciated Press 




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119 15 14 * 

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NEW HIGHS 15 

CHS Foods 
iCHCorp 

NV Timet 
Unftfln 

CrewtoyMH 
Martin Proc 
RnrtlntA 
WoAPod 

Ofllanie 

MEMCa 

RtsrtlntB 

WlRETn 


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2 DW 7 * 


Cocoa Pad Talks Enc 
Without Price Accor* 


20 V. 2 DW— 1 W 

S* 5 *— * 

0 * f»— * 


75 10 Qucbfls 3 


53 34 * 24 W 34 * + W 


Rumen 

GENEVA — Talks an a new Intern,-. 
Cocoa Agreement ended Friday with pic 
and consumers still divided over price - 
aimed at ctohniring the volatile world r 
delegates said. 

The talks, which started on Feb. 19 , in 
70 countries that account for most of 
trade in the commodity. The current 
expires at the end of September but cc 
extended for up to 12 months. 

Producers were seeking a price of 3 
pound but would probably go lower; ti 
Somers were unlikely to agree to 
$ 1 . 05 , delegates said. 

The current agreement offering ii 
price of S 1 j 06 a pound became 
years ago because of a lack of 
to lift fiee-maricet prices. Cocoa 
about 96 cents a pound. - 




Over-the-Counter 


March 15 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Salts in Net 

190 s Hfpb Low 3 P.M. CUbe 


20 *+ W 

17 * 

25 * + W 
4 *— W 
*4 + * 
0 *+ W 
4 *— * 
AW 


BBDO 220 « 4940 * 47 * 47 *— * 

BP I Cm 47 I* 1 * 1 *— * 

BlWCb .100 18 39 Ate » Ate— * 

BPI Sr 39 2* 2* 2* + * 

BFCom Z 7 B 12 W 11 * WA— * 

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19 

13 

13 

151 b 

15 

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% 

MW 

34 ft 

5 

5 

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20 % 

17 % 

14 % 

4 % 

4 U 

125 

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7 

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14 ft 

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34 — * 
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20 

29 

307 8W 0 * 
41 12 * 12 * 
4022 mb 28 
340 WW 12 W 
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71 3 * 
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Hon l no J 4 
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UN 
LSI Las 
LTX 
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LsZBv 120 

LOCKS? 

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LamoT 80 
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205 9 8 % 9 + U 

21710 % 10 % MJ%— te 
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33 43 41 W 41 41 — W 

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180 17 71 40 39 % 
222 58 250 50 

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□ Id Rap J 8 is MOg,,. 3 *% 
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47 2 1 % 

431 4 % 4 % 
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2 7 ft 

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446 UW 17 % 
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IJT 








































































































’Over-lhe-Couiiter 


March 15 


Solatia Hat 

loot High Lew 3P_M.CJ.-n* 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


r 


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Thrmfla 

Thetfd 

TMNs 

Thorift 

Uwrtec 

THogT 5 

3Com 

TlmeEs 

TmaPTb 

Tlwrarf 

Tofu 5 

ToleOTr 

ToosyA 

T0H59S 

TrakAu 

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Tran LB 

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TribCrti 

Trim 

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32 4.1 

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134 63 


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3 4% 4% 414— fa 

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31 9 a% 9 +14 

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14U21W SOW SOW— Vi 

'«» a ai 
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13 TO 17W 17% + W 
37 SW 5fa Sfa— W 
12 7% 7W 7% 

3 3 J 3 — % 
5023 27W32W— W 

17a aw aw. aw + fa 
U 1% 1% 1% 
io iw ns ns 

14 13% 13% 13% 

211 1614 1514 15W— % 

2 10 10 10 + W 

52 37% 36% 37 

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67? 16W 16 1A 

» w n t%+(a 

542 Ufa m 10%— % 
2010 TO ID 
675 1 % 1 

538 15W Ufa 15U + W 
101 38 VS 37*S 3814 + fa 

3 4% 4% 4% 

8UW 14% 14% + % 

6 14 13% 14 

80 3% 3% 3% 

20 20 19fa 19% + VS 
TO 3W 3 a 
532 9% 9% 9fa— W 

fl Wr A) A 

91 3% 3Vs 3W+ fa 
32 9% 9ft 9% 

2» 29 29 —fa 

123 32VS 32% 32W + W 

i£ UK « « 

343 *3W 4214 42fa— lfa 



SaU&ln 

Net . I 


IWX -HMn Law JPJVLWBe 1 

VotVB 

25131TO 31 


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■TO 

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5 7ft 7ft 

7ft 

1 "» - ■ 1 


Page 13 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


JS 

M 


14t U 
ttoif 


.12 

AD 


M J 
M 24 
U0 15J 


£ 


4 2 


WO 40 
WMbtC 
WlkiTei 
Wane 
WFSL* 

WM5B 

» 

Wraps 
WMstn 
WeJBftt 
WeaPn 

1 254 
WStFSL 
WMUTc 
WS1U4 
wsteor 

wen As 

WmorC 
WstfadO 
WttwdC 
Wettro 
mod 
WWcom 
WkssaJ 
WHlmi 1A5 
Wiirww st 
W1I1AL 
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WnroTf ZOO 
WllmF 
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WtanEit 

WJl5G» !MO 
WtaorO jb U 
WoJehn .16 LA 
WBodhd 40 35 
Worths -&a 2J 
wrltor .iso U 
Wyman SB 13 


■40 IS 
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. 42W. 23% 23%— fa 

S 7230 29 29%+% 

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1573014 29% 30 
. 6711% IM 11% 

*521 20W » + VS 

1010(4 9% ID — fa 

139 a% a a 

317% 17% 17%+ % 
2713 MW 13 +% 
4 7% 7% 7% — % 
■1225% 25% 25% + W 
aDATOW 9W ID — w 
30 47% 67 6714— (4 

35 10% in TOW— fa 
2 7% 7% 7fa— Vi 
13 13% 13 12W + W 

710 9W fW+W 
90 im w ww+w 
221 16fa 15ft Ufa + 14 
5»«W 3* 24fa+W 
25251*. Wfa 24fa— fa 
29124W 24% 24% — TO 
230 AH 6ft 6W— TO 
34 BW Bfa BW+ fa 
14 10% TOW 10% + TO 
701 3814 34 37VS— % 

7UW 13W Wft— TO 
3M 10TO TO 10 — TO 
2 9Yi 9V4 9W— fa 

1313% 13% 13% 
1549% tfS 49W+1 
IDAS SW 7% SW— fa 
Ulf 16 16 — % 

25 4fa 4V. 4fa+ to 
223 «W AW 4TO+ TO 
a 4fa 4TO 414 + W 
1 27 27 27 + fa 

*20% 20% 20% — fa 

5 6 fa 6V4 6(4 
251714 14% 1714 
U62SW 27% 28W + TO 
M 8 % BW 8 W+ fa 
398 34W 3*fa 3IW + 14 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHAR E 
ITALY 


(Contiimed From Back Page) 


HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


16 


13* 4J 


U0o 24 
.15* J 


1JW 

.10 

148 


JS 4 


2.1 


Sortech 
SoftwA 
Sonocf' 

SenrFd 
50HUP 
SfhdFn 
Soutm 
Sow«n 
Sovran 
SpcMic 
SpanA 
Speed/ 

Spctnm 
SpecOI 

SpatTId 

Spfra 
StorSra 

Sfofaia 30 

stondva 140 
SMMJC 
SMRog 1.16 
SKmfcni 
snmfdT 

SfOThOS 120 44 
SM£tB 146 24 
ShrioG .15b 22 
SMBOr 
Soma 
STOwStv 

Stwlnt 22 11 
SHM 
SlockSy 
Slrotus 

SfnwCs JOB 12 
Slryktr 

Subaru 148 12 

SubAIrl 45 14 

SubrB 122 42 

Sudbrv 

SuffSB 

Sunmia 

SunUBm 24 44 
SomfHI 49* J 
StmCst 

Sumrir 24 AS 

SunMod 

SunSL < 

Swwwt 140 34 

SwpRTO .16 2 

SupSfcv 

Suprlax 

SuprEq 

S/to 

S/mbT 

Syncor 

Svnnrch 

Syntrm 

Oman 2B 12 

S/Awe 

Syttin 

Svslnte 

SystGn 

S/stoit 44 2 


TOW 13 + fa 
7% 7%— fa 
1716 17% + W 
45ft 45W 
17V* 17%— fa 


ggWLMaoro-* 

m a 
397 IB 
54 44 

2 * 1 * 

363 5% 5fa 5% 

370 39 28% 29 

204 25% 25% 25%+ 14 
490 8 7% 7% 

355 41TO 40% 41 + fa 

301 2 IW IW— % 
44 7% 7W 7tt+ TO 
9613W 13TO UW— 14 
*0 13% 13VS 13% 


140 44 
140 14 
« t+ 


. 7W 7% + W 
5MB % 2W + W 
3414% 14% 14% 
7211(4 11 11TO+ W 

729 6% CTO «%+ fa 

6 24% 2416 2416 
51515% 15TO Ufa— M 

255416 Sfa 55%— TO 
10 5% 5W 5W— M 
2I3TO 13TO UW— TO 
87 25V. 24% 2*%— fa 
4451% *Ofa 3216 
38 6TO ifa 4TO 
3 an 4% <% 

5 <14 6fa 6fa + fa 
5DI4TO 14U Ufa 
223% 2316 2316 

7 7TO 7TO 7TO 

34 1DTO 10 10 — TO 

1227 U 13W 13% + fa 
3752% 52 52 —1 

177 30 2916 29%+ fa 

2037TOU4 136TO— 1 
10 5 5 5 — Vi 

4745W 45% 45fa— fa 
152 m 9% 9% 

56 Ufa 13 1214+ fa 

1000 4TO 7% 3TO + w 
20721 20ft 21 
422 11 10ft 10ft 
430 2 1ft 2 

20 6 A 6 — fa 

- 14 Hi 9% 10 + fa 

23 SVi 9% 916 

15 38% 38% 3B%— fa 

3ia rm u 

7 916 914 9fa— TO 
25 4 4 4 — fa 

15111 7% ID —Ifa 

101 1TO 1 1TO + TO 

220 UW U 13 — TO 
M 4VS 4TO 4TO — TO 
148 9% ffa 9ft— fa 
152 4ft 4% 4ft — TO 
1616% Ufa 1616 — VS 
21 21 21 
STO Sfa 5ft — fa 

21 9Vi 9 9 —TO 

24 7 6% 7 + TO 

llBIBfa U IB 


DSL I CO MO 
UTL 
UgrBcp MB 45 
Ultra/ Me s 
Unarm 
Unrbco 

unjhept LSD IM 

uain 

UnPfnfr 

IWTrBc 140 43 
UACm s 

UBAiiz M is 

UBCoS 
UCtvGs 
UnDom 
UnEds 
UFnGrp 
UFsiFd 
UGrdn 
UnNifax 
UPresd 
US Ant 
US BCD 
US Cop 
US Man 
US Em- 
us HI 1 
US Stilt 
USSur 
USTrk 
US Tr * 
usratni 
UnTalev 
UVOBs 
UnvFm 
UnvHlr 
UnvHId 
UFSBfc 
UpRsht 
UtbaCt 
uacpfe 
UtabBc 


1A4M5J 
2SA 24 


1J0 3J 


Me i a 

.100 s 

MO 9J 


223 Sfa 32ft 33ft- TO 
*0821% 21 21% + TO 

328TO 38V* 28TO 
1?7 8 7ft 7ft- W 
387 18% IBM 18% + TO 
44 13 U 13 + W 
W1 13ft S31t I3VS + ft 
33 9ft 9% 9ft 
71 Lift 20TO 20% 

356 SA 54 —fa 
747 MW Ufa ia%— % 
105 ams 30% 30W 
134 TOW 10% 1D% — w 
IV Ufa 13ft 13fa 
424% 24% 24% 
a 14% 14% I6%— fa 
1113 12% 12% — fa 

lift 3ti 2W + TO 
M a% BVi STO— ft 
42521 aott 20%+ TO 
4 i u low m + to 

1110% Ufa 10% 

20 10 9% 9ft— vs 

3 3W 3W 3W+ TO 
867 30 29% 30 + fa 

9 M M STO— fa 
HO Sfa 5 STO 
821 8W 7fc SW+TO 
233728% 27W 28 + TO 
IB ft M 4ft— TO 
15Q 19ft 19ft 19% + TO 
41 UTO 12ft 12W — ft 


If 

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~~~~ 


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Xabec 

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JUCar 

22S 9% 

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3 


„ Wwi in feonwi 
nUAZZO AL VBJVno 
If^opMmtBhauMw^furririKd 
Aaftf, avaBaUi far 1 weekend more 

Phor* 67W325. <5793450. 

Wni« V« MVeUim Id, 

00186 Ham,. 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

TINT AMSHCAN RABY GBU. safe 
P°ra oportment far henoK and her: 
*»7 ntporOM parertt. father it, 
for. Anenan adtovtsaan. 

imltf “• -—91 - - — — 

BQBffP 

ebto April Tita'ftre 544 64 P ’ 

EMPLOYMENT 

FOR MOCE HQKintVE POS2TKM6S 
LOOK UNDB 

"INIBtNATlONAL POSITIONS" 
PAOE 11 

KXEarnvK 

POSmOWS AVAILABLE 

ARAB BUSN55 REPORT 

httma fand . BSngotil 


: EMPLOYMENT 

edccahonal positions 

AVAILABLE 

SWOOtifflS^fipBnenffld Hcher 
of Engfiai. having a car, fix 2D • 25 
faur week job m company amide 

^iSJokStSL 1 ^ 

TBARWOOrgarmtionHels Engfish 

TOaefara. Mature pnofafaoaA with 
wrfana P0P« rernfad Bigufar hA 

iSasi s^ 

EDUCATIONAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


TLAO® OF CHBttSE 

WB travel. 2 monrhi infandve Ironing , 

braath^terhm^QwTraomil^ j 



AUTOMOBILES 

1 ASTON MAKTW DBS. 19«, otwhB- 
H ewfcfion. 5 dm, pir 
mUama. AH arigindL iSB7,500. 
Cbntaeh At. O' Van di Kcnthms, 
Aimwtrp, Belfl^y feL 233 75 75 

! re*MaODB 230 a Pwodaa*. I 
nofa. Single owner, 76^00niaes. ah 

AUTO RENTALS 

OMHC RMT A CAH. Prra. g. m 

wdh phone: Rob Spirit, Atecedes, 

?ZL30JO.T4U* 630797 FCHaRjCX- 

AUSTHA* EAST EUROPE U5S?5lOO 

per d of. Autohania Franrenbruedi- 

B. A-T02D Vienna Tat 2*169 4. 

AUTOSHimNG 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

3X500 SEC, lew, 1985 
iX 500 SSL, ftW, 1985 
2 X 500 51, NBW, 1985 
2 X Fundi* Rfa* fUw . 1985 
1 X Fondie 944, NEW, 1985 Yi 
A* opharn ■ D.O.T. + U>A 

gssmzSBk 

Am FfeNwch 99. 4150 Krefad 
W. Germaw. He 8531187 CUC D 
fcfc fol 51-562751. 


DAWAJI TRADE 

NTL DSiVKY 


group?- For rtb write qr cot Afc. 
Angdw. 0^5*0 , 

DOMESTIC 
POSTnONS AVAILABLE 
i BffflFlirmHAHNY needed i 


We Imp p 

mod cor 

Teh 02/648 55 13 
Tifaw 65668 
42 rue Lent, 
1050 Bruaeb. 


dad of 


GENEVA 

RSDMCEDEnANCX 
4 Aye. de Fronot 01-1202 Genevo 
, TeL 0041 fe/31 1479 
| BeaAful, fird dcu, OKStdooned ■> 
rradenhd furnished ummoer ft cna 
fludte. FuBy equipped Hkhen, 
daly nod ttrvioe. 

WeeUy and nujrrtWy [ata. 

EnceUenr IwoHa 

for sa le & wanted 

VIDEO 

|WSH OUALTTY VIDEO CASSETTES 

*» vfeHTA « VHS. USS22 each or 
519^) for 10a more + pottage. 

i from, far 


NEW 1985 MERCEDES BSNZ 

P.O.E. Miami Rorida 


“ftar 


fa^Btupeofrag 


ZertLbe 

Zentec 

ZieMer 

zianUt 

zjiel 

ztvod 

ZOntfim 

Z/moe 

Zytrex 


412J22TO 20V* 22 +1% 

80 4TO 4ft 4ft 
281266 12W 12% 

4437 37 37 

12 4ft 4TO 4% 

27 7 4ft 7 + ft 
26 10 9ft 9ft— fa 
IB Dll 1 2 —Hi 

VO 1% Hi IW 


Cana^ Hfl yi Infla tion 

Remains Under 4% 

The Associated Press 
OTTAWA — Canada’s amuml 
_ _ rale of inflation remained at 3.7 

'3 *i "SSt ^ §£+ & I P«cent in February — die seventh 
a? in* wro law + to I straight month it has been at or 
below 4.0 percent, the government 
said Friday. 

The inflation rate for 1984 as a 
whole was a 13-year low of 4.4 
percent. 

| French Prices Increase 0.5% 

Agence Franpe-Presse 

PARIS — Consumer prices in 
France rose by 0J percent in Feb- 
X” "sft 's%- to | ruaiy from January, according to 
hto 24% 25 - v. preiuninaq, fignres released Friday 
by the government statistics bu- 
rean. The increase brought the rate 
over the 12 months ended in Febru- 
ary to 6.4 percent, down from 6.7 
percent at the end of 1984. 


■ uri h BM J niw i udlrt /WtiTOr 

Jo write, «ft A ccnduo baarvwwi for I 
fa*jnass A courtly fauns. Abie to J 

futdion wR require 

world-wide. E *- 

bortto & 

+/-2B.fa 

n» An* . _ 

Avows lane 
I OSD Brumh, R 

U 32-2-6405085. Ibc dSfib ARAB BL 

^XECUnVffi AVAILABLE 
■ttWOUAI. AMSUCAN MBA wit 

«*ponence Frmc* & U5Ay is 



Washington D£. 

required. TrauaL 

baaqyaind w f onn u fan toW~. AMtv. 


r U5AoraJM 

AUMOL Age 19-25 wartedfoxn June 

1985 Ip an fa newborn h NIC 

roam with brth/lV. Sene «pe- 

swisssr'“™ ,s ' 


-Me 17 
MB *3 


245 40V* 39A 40V* — % 
238 20% X 20% + TO 
IM 14(6 U Ufa + fa 
-® *% *TO 416 + fa 
8 9% 9W 9% 

13 5TO 5ft 5fa 
45B 5ft Jft 5TO— TO 
1*1 5ft STO Sfa 
1225% 25 25% 


ISrtw. To receive manual, semi 
TWO Stirttgart 1, West Germany 

SMFFMO CARS WOBDWOi 

"xswl^ss . was- 

cau MATINA at 

( UVUT WANTED far 7 north old ( ANTWERP 20 faw (3] 234 36 68 1 
boby in & HAUSA. Must be ctf least I ■ . 

18, W loving & e*pm- S«F YOWICMITO ATSONUSA 

If ntereded, send refarenoBS, I VlA^Af/TVVEEP SAVE. Free ho- 1 
& rewnw. Kspfy Jeff Shcnro, [ 

^,NW 95* Mfay.Su™,. HA, 

wab'dai-l B4GUSH SPEAXMG NANNY re- HtAffltfUBT/ MAM-W. German/. H. 

■ ' ' for 2 boys 5 and 2. fcwtnaitn GntoH. Tel: 069-448071. 

Corio, good Safely & nefc-up afl owr Europe 'rp/io-ihips. 

cv..«^&^sr d £ 

werp, Belgium. 03/231 1 

£*3 1 TRANSCAR 20 me l£ Suw. 75116 
<W Tet_aXim04.Jftcte 8^9533. 

wage. Write ta 

maezeno. Bof/. 

Tsf 0383/912*8. 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
„ . , CAB INTO THE U.SJL 
Uw document enpfani folly what one 
nnt do to bring a car ifa US. 

500 sa DaTO BWGray'Lecilber 
WOSENpefcBWflleiuSSr 

□OT 5. e’Aoonverapn odTOesn^as- 210 SI Red/Prtonftta Uather 

Tiaeheeieef/BlBcfc 
. Far 

wltetbMtraaJVto>£«i nw ’SSPSS? P* Mun,0, w - Ger- 

I 522851. 


E»BW<KBt«M«<Y ne«M*i*Ba-|VA : ti«a'*-GomeraenoddiisseS,C6- 2B0 SL Red/Prtnmhui Unth 

I » —hh-s-jJ? us». 


US$19j0for 10ormaro'+ ; 

Over 4^0 Utes to (hoose ft 

tfaols write 1CH. PA?AS1AN U1.32 

A Ancwsrtaso Si. timossd Cyprus. 

BOOKS 

PIETRO FRANCESCO MELeT Soots, 

gasjStsr-xes 

(Hni edten), Ubonori. Hong- 

Mueede SS, Bome. holy. 

MBI1SH BOOKSHOP, FRANKHOT 
offers a vwte selecaon of Bntah t 
American boob (cdsochAiren'i], Bn)- 
ah tourist pubfaftons. Atal order ur. 


Kribbestroar 2, Antwerp, i 

Brigium. fefc 231 42 39. Tk 71469. 1 


HIROPE ■ USA SPECS. 

AI mates far worldwide datvery from 
stock. Send for a TAX-FREE catokn. 

BMW - MERCEDES - POKSCHr 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

EUROPE AUTO WOKBS 
F06 214, 3430 AB Meuwegevi HoBemd 
Tefc (Of 3402-413*6. TW&68 EAS NL 

BMW, JAGUAR, AUSTIN ROVES 
land (fever. Afl LHD/RHD BeO Pram 
iamdrte deSvery. Gdf Hofand 

VAN LAAKHOVB4 LTD 

PO Bon 2178, 5600 CD Snrflioven 
{0)40-413615 Tx 51213 Heffa M 


EDUCATION 


VACATION/ STUDY IN SPAM, (we 
with Spanish famty in MaAtd Prac- 
tice the Innaiaga & loarn their adrure. 
Write fra vraofTnahon P.O. Bos SOibl 
Madrid, Span 


PENPALS 


CUBS AT® GUYS aH cartnwnts war* 

E pak Dekxis free Hermes Verba 
110660/M. D-1000 Berlin 11 
West Germraty. 

SERVICES 


L Taytor, . __ 
Moufcft Aterte Carfo, Mo nocoi 

S8UOUS AU-PAflt girl i 

Jute to 5epL to i 

chSdren Ti m 


TBC 

TCACb 

TX5 


.12 A 


61 1* Ufa 13% 
3419% T9fa 19TO+ TO 
3 6ft 4ft 4ft 


JfU 349 79* 7TO 7% + TO 

VIAI 123 10% I 0 TO law 

vaut 44 law ion. iaw— to 

V3 E -14r Li 211 11 11 

EK* W ! ***+» 

vSSri L 131 3JS ’ctS 34ft J4ft +1 
VaNek 39m It 35 6 5ft 
ValLn >© 1A 41425V* 24% 25 

JESS M “ 'gT* « 'K 
m .* TTST 1 ?^* 

Vartan 40 44 54 13% uw 13% + fa 

VecfrG 54 W W W— Vk 

VetoBd TO16W liW 16TO 

Ventnu 331 ill ill ifa 

Yjra-T JO 1.1 (7JJ+TO 

VJconF 44 2% 2% 2%— % 

Vfcorp .12* s 74224% WTO 2*%+ M 
VJOBri IDO AI 1MTO 2*V* 24TO-1 

XJefroS 45 4ft 4ft 4ft — ft 

JOeOeFr 32m TJ U 12% 12ft 13% 
VJWno 7 tl It 11 + TO 

VfaBfeJ 7617TO TTfa 17TO+ fa 

VaBetfi Mr 13 3 4TO 4TO 6TO + fa 

VteTeeh 48 19* 1% 11* + ft 

Vodavl 124 10ft 9 % 9ft— ft 

Vomn» . 294 14% 1»TO 14TO— TO 


GENERAL positions 

AVAILABLE 

MODS, 23 8 OJEAN CUT. 1.70 m. - 

ISO m, large glove & boc* sfaa. 

Handtama memorefafe strong fea- 
•uw, mififtsy Pastore. WH model 
race era & matorcyde Irartter outfit* 

AUPAMNSDH>far21/2cfd.&aiK, 
SSimert in + P toS jffd ^ 

based o nx^, Sub. - B!25»- *"■»•« faWWfaB 

reewd tot AVJ>. #1^46^ 

Oioriei floquet 790C7 Prak 
MAJUO1W0 Kepresentarive London 

baled far major US afbhore contract 
<Mter- Mud be experienced A be 
knowledgeable S Ur with Enro- 

pean oil opereAm. Bax 4QS&5, LH.T, 

63 Long Ace, London, WCZ9K 


3000 Ant- nnkM ■; 
' T* 31 535 


RG TEAM 

Offers tax free can rt four 
used 


Holand. Td I 


prices. Afl 
faride&v- 
BREDA / 
7*282. 


Antwerp* 233 99 8& Cannes 39 43 44 ; 

AUTO CONVERSION 

DOT/EPA CONVERSIONS to U^. 

VIA' 


Bjger.^OWAv^Branx.Nrl «»«. *84. S.OOO fcre, artfoajta 


Centre, BaU- 
301-63^8611, 


EXPBOINCHJ CAR TRAOOS fra 
MeraedH. BMW, Porsche, offer fol 
service import / export US DOT & 
S*A far tourist & dealer. Oosanwxfe 
Motors. Temeegenstr. 8. 4 Dusssd- 

Stft w 211 ■ 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/ Interpreter & Tourism Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 


YOUNG afGANT 

bcEa ovralabh es you PA‘i 

H. Kong 3-7242425(2) 


EXPBNENCB) ICWS BXTOR far in 

wnvjtt u n td desk position. OogxL 

Send oampleiB resume in confidence, . 

toft* JCDtereld Tribune. 55 Via Ail MM WANT® far American faro- 
cteBo Mraced w, C0187 tone. J 3y- Bring a friend, tve r 


PARS. Pleasant auAfted namy-modt- 

d fa care far [kiiimi? 
and new bran baby. 

. accmmxkitiom, otrv 
IWcd 563 41 98- 
AU MM WANTS Boston ere* 2l 

cMdren. Sdory + room & board. 
Nrawmofar, driver preferred, &t(" ‘ 
“ ‘ ,6 MacDonald 
01701 USA. 


in Belgium. Tefc 32-50-715071. Tbu 
82209. 

AUTOS TAX FREE 




general 

POSITIONS WANTED 


To Oar Readers 

Floating Rates Notes were not 
available in this edition because of 
computer problems. 


applicant sracs ch* 
requiring Hoert Frend) & 
odfert secretarial ddk, & trowLAp- 
pficant has 1 year of harafcan buw 

neK nperienon, a BLA in french & 1 


nora beach & 

fames Kely. 1406 
ooga, a 6 0610 USA 




Cfa 


postlAU PAM WANTS) in Washington. DC I 

ex-1 orea. Send resume & * 
mere* tor _ 

Squrae, Certrevie, 


wJESfi 

rtre/afoVA 22020 USC teforawfanaBy 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

f " l Sg?S^ 

to ■hfoy ki ^ tararttocn. beret 

oomre iuu n m U-SJL 

RUTFINC 

Tounuedr. 52, 6000 Frankfurt, 

W Germ, taJ (01 69-232351, tlx 41^599 1 
tefonoation anfo by phene ra telex. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 






» fa-- 

* 4 . 

% t-- 

* ft 

'As -*■-» 

.9* 


(* 


%• *t - 

n 




yeo* study rtxocd experience. WB- , 

‘26-YEA* OU) COMMStOAL Pto.j 

Swede, with etuBfart referenatL ex. 
perien ce d under very hard coralkons, 
nwetar orafoaxm & world dboninon 
it model airplane budding & flying, 

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Geneva 22/44 14 OOMri Vreni. 

ATTRACTIVE, CAPABIf, eduerted,. 
lpveled Aatericari lady warts ™- 
tion in Poris as aaakmf or Girl Friday 
far executive man/ woman. Curry. I 
4647 W. Sunset Bvd, Tampa. PL 
33629. Tefc 813/837-1 

SWISS LADY 40, EXPBOENCBD, 

French, Archie, English, saeta chrt- 
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ALWAYS AVAttAME Al l aura A.M.G. MERCEDES 

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steering wheel, 
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hold serviaH. for on overseas job, Tel tavn e AX e dehery. 

380 89 91 Puis / reply Hmrard de 

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NANNY/ GOVERPBS, orttq, copa- 
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danhol, (farts UK, TefcQ252 31S369. 
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to 191Z Srtdd Triune, 92S21 
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YOUNG MAN 31. fluent Engfch- 

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reaKHMAN 

to travel Tefc (3| 973 3Q92. frraK7i. 


3Q Ext. 137 _ 

ALWAYS AVAILABLE LONDON only / 

btdjynfaders & Id dost dody maids. I 
Stone toeau, London 730 8122 / j 

5142. licenced employment agency 


Merrede s 500 SC new, dork blue 
Mercedes 500 SL new, black 
Mereedei 500 S/SEL/SK, new 
and many others at 

r. Dangs Rawer. , 

. Mertwes and f 

other leaefng mrtats. 

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Tefc 01/202 76 10. Teto 815715. 


velours block, 

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4866, foe 314258. 

TRANSMUNM BBjGBJM, 21 Geiiel- 
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node Mercedes. BMW, ASa 

MERCEDES 1985. LARGE stock. 
TRASCO, G& BJUD. CH. Col John in 
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MERCEDES!, PORSCHE. New/Uied I 
bnmndata drtwray. Fix, AVI. Trtr 
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| TAX Free eras, <8 mates & models. 

TRUCKS 

WANTED.. Airiericon mode heavy 
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FOR A REAL VIP. YOUNG LADY 
Dtamgudied, Educated, MuKSnguoL 

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YOUNG LADY TRILINGUAL VBM>A 
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Charming, educated, ftaveted 


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LADY IMUNGUAL seeks job ntar- 
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references, reCcAfe, seeks permraurt 

S 

YOUNG MAN with coobng knowi-I 
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LEGAL SERVICES 

US IMMIGRATION visas, Aitys. Spites 

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VIP PA YOUNG LADY 
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LONDON. Young German /French dfc- 
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young lophptiaaed coaiponioa 

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free to travel 


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SEORETABIAL 
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BRUSH speating executive Hxrrtary I 

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Brussels. Management queftie* ra- 1 


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I PART TIME OEAMNG or babysitting 

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a l934$l, 
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10 YEARS 

We Deliver On to the World 

TRANSCO 


MH^TOa^ffeSSwL HO NG KO NG 3-67 1 267 yo ung lady 
I DOMMCAN DIVORCES. Bax 20002, ,lOriwto/Eracpean) componiofi. 
Santo Dootingo, Domnicon EepubGc. 

LOW COST FUGHTS 


I NY 

West 


WAY 


Y $150. Everyday MY. - 

$139. Paris Zo 92 90. 


TO USA FROM £119 rase way. 

1 NATCLaxJon 01-734 8100. 

HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

RSU8UC OF SAN MAMNa 

June - American football camp - one] 


PARS INTI PBSONAL/ BUSINESS 

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PARS LADY MTRPRETBL Travel 
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747 59 58 TOUBCT GUIDE. Prais. 
■goto 7 omJaicUddL hfUrovel 

TOKYO LADY COMPANION, PA 
Perianal Agatant 03-456-5539 

YOUNG LADY COMPANION. Uxv- 
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BMJSSBS. YOUNG LADY VAP. 

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MERCEDES tom EUROPE 
WE FEDERALIZE CARS TO MET US. | 
SAFETY STANDARDS 


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cd types immecEafe}/ or short I 


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CUUtEMORRlS, MAYO 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


ACROSS 

I Out of bed 

6 Buccaneers' 
home 

II Leave the 
Union 

17 Bargain-hunt 

21 Start of a 
limerick 

22 Scarf 

23 Gap 

24 Baylor U.'s 
city 

25 Limerick: 

Part II 

29 Echidna's 
edible 

30 Liberate 

31 Gay 

32 Heavens 
holder 

33 Traces of hope 
35 Baked in a kiln 
37 Songs from 

Erin 

39 Octavi an’s foe 

40 Marked 

• murderer 
42 On (a specified 


ACROSS ACROSS 

82 Whimpering 97 Auras 

one 98 Limerick: 

03 Misplace ParcV 

64 Some swans 103 t.Ita Minnelli's 

65 Utah’s or s^jer 

Vermont’s 104 City near 

Creek Phoenix 

105 Zenith 


60 Leader's 
leader 

67 Teases 

08 English horn’s 
kin 

69 Hold sway 

70 Ornamental 
band 

71 Limerick: 
Part IV 


Matron of Honor by jow* mccarthy samson 


PEANUTS 


100 Most faultless 
109 Hippo chaser 
112 Prefix for film 
115 Gaff 

119 Prophet fed by 
ravens 


i 

2 

21 


25 


Z9 


33 




III I III In Ini M|u In 11 in in I III in ini I III 


DIP YOU ENJOY 
YOUR. DINNER?, 


|‘P OFFER YOU 50ME 
PES5BST, BUT I CAN'T.. 


DOGS PON T EAT 
, PESSERT v 


THAT'S TRUE, BUT t 
LIKE TO BE ASKa 






79 It's for the 
birds 

80 He lived by his 
own golden 
rule 


time) 

44 Children 
46 Limerick: 
PartHI 

55 Secluded 

56 “Our Miss 
Brooks” star 

57 Harmonium 

58 Bill 
60 Wane 
81 Tendon 


81 Esau 

82 Veil material 

83 Trident 

84 Uncovered 
86 Eschar 

90 breve 

91 Rebuff 

92 Relay-race 
item 

93 River of 
Scotland 


120 Manicurist’s 
board 

122 Collars 

123" Blue?,’ 

1929 song 

124 Limerick: 
Part VI 

131 Confine, in a 
way 

132 Lute-family 
members 


BLONDIE 


we've seen H maybe . 

t his g uy H E*S ■< 

eeroae j ( cwsnsep 




t WE'RE L 
SELLIN6... 


n I n its 17* 


133 More 
calamitous 

134 Riley’s friend 
Digger 

135 Hearken 

136 In — -(so to 


94 Chou En 137 October 

95 Pianist Victor birthstones 

96 Conductor Sir 138 End of 

Georg limerick 


fioe fHJ7 1 108 | 


IttZ fits If *4 I 



□ 


J 


1 

■ 

S3 

07 









P * MEEK )f HE V 

■03 IT A Be C 

EW3TH..>>OP^ 


.ji m+m. 


BEETLE BAILEY 


TJ5l1iaTl?7Tti8| 




|1Zfi [12* 1127 | 


BARGE, PO 
YOU HAVE A 
HAMS- <3 


X OVERPtP 
IT LAST 
. NiSHT 


VDU OVERDO IT 
EVERY Kil&MT 


DOWN DOWN 


DOWN 


2 in instate j? 
conflict 

2 Columnist 
Alexander 

3 Peevish 

4 Tax-deferred 
acct. 

5 Juan Carlos I, 
e.g. 

6 Bull-like 

7 He played Lou 
Grant 

8 Fibber or 
Molly 

9 Spanish 
preposition 

10 At the pinnacle 

11 Robin Hood's 
pursuer 

12 Plateau of W. 
Germany 

13 Insertion 
symbol 


14 W.W. II arena 

15" Spiro, 

Spero’ ' (S.C. 
motto) 

16 Partofi.e. 

17 Fly follower 

18 Call to the 
hounds 

19 Where the 
Shannon ends 

20 Lovelace's 
fane 

26 Pols seek this 

27 Bar 

28 Amassed, as 
debts 

34 Skedaddles 

36 Temper 

38 Maureen 
McGovern, 
e-g. 

39 Part of A.M .A. 

41 Pot ingredient 


43 Mulligan’s 
specialty 

45 Mosel 
tributary 

46 Encase 

47 Hercules’ wife 

48 Mideast 
sultanate 

49 Garmon 

50 County 
Donegal river 

51 Precede 

52 Become 
aligned 

53 Prima 
ballerina 

54 Lent’s 
conclusion 

59 Defeats 

61 Pack away 

62 Vouchers 

63 Tiffany 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DOWN 

65 Comply 

66 U.F.W.’s 
Chavez 

67 Novelist 
Stoker 

68 Czech river 

69 Fortification 

70 Eel, e.g. 

71 Dating from 
birth 

72 Like a small 


DOWN 
78 Early garden 
spot 

83 Unfurl 

84 Christmas tree 

85 Aleutian Island 
80 Foothills 


DOWN 

96 Fleers 

97 Greet first 
99 Contented 

100 Walden's "Lou 
Grant’’ role 


DOWN 


116 Carer’s cousin 

117 Soap plant 

118 Carbine' 



73 ANelson 

74 Reception hall 

75 Criticize 

76 Arranged in • 
rows 

77 An adjective 
for St. Patrick 


87 Flower cluster 

88 Month before 
Nisan 

89 Actr ess 
Armstrong 

91 Son, in 
Stuttgart 

92 Sources of peat 

93 How some 
preppies prep 

95 Ernie’s 

Moppet-mate 


101 Absorb deeply 

102 Clings to 

106 Nectarine 

107 Forearm 
bones 

108 Riva .1972 

Derby winner 

110 Ada, from 

Limerick 

111 Old Hebrew 
measures 

113 Below: Prefix 

114 Dromedary 


121 Tokyo, 
formerly 

125 The Federal 
Register is this 
agcy.’s 
concern 


ANDY CAPP 


I DONT WISH TO ' 
HEAR ANY /YORE > 


OHjGOOtO 
► LETTS GETy 
TO BED—) 


126 Serbian city 

127 -Foy, 

Que. 


128 Back talk 

129 Peppery 

130 Old English 
letter 


I 

P* 


f SHE FINDS SQWET Or 
MY CONFESSIONS TOO 
hWRJLTO BE BEUEVED, 
k BUT NOTTO AWFUL < 
1' TO HAVE HAPPENED 


X> \ 
ED 

i y 




WIZARD of ID 


INSIDE HOOVER’S FBI: 

The Top Field Chief Reports 

By NeilJ. Welch and David W. Marston. 
324pp. $17.95. 

Doubleday. 245 Park Avenue, 

New York. N. Y. 10167. 


BOOKS 


outdated obsessions (auto theft, for instance) lin- 


Reviewed by Edwin M. Yoder Jr 

\ if OST portraits of J. Edgar Hoover and “his” 
1VX FBI offer the subliminal impression that in 
Hoover we had a peculiarly American hybrid of 
Ivan the Terrible and ihe head file clerk at the 
Circumlocution Office in Dickens’ “Little Dorrit,” 
the ultimate bureaucracy where they really knew 
how to keep important things from happening. He 
maintained no Gulag, of course, and had no Siberia 
to send deviant agents to; but summary powers of 
transfer and demotion, freely exercised, often 
served the same intimidating purposes. 

This entertaining and informative book is essen- 
tially the self-told story of Ndl I. Wdch, a tough 
Nebraskan who rose to become the FBI’s “top field 


agent,” that is, special agent in charge of the New 
York office with one crucial tour of duty in Wash- 


ington. His coauthor is David W. Marston, the 
boyish Philadelphia prosecutor whose dash with the 
Carter administra tion made hrief heedlin es in 1977. 

Iconoclastic to a point, this book is not quite in 
the conventional an n- Hoover mold. Indeed, it pays 
the usual obeisances to Hoover’s avoidance of poli- 
tics and corruption (the obvious kinds, anyway) and 
bis political mmbkness. Otherwise, it is an exercise 
in limited enthusiasm. 

Of course, it concedes to Hoover's credit certain 
solid accomplishments. Appointed tty Harlan F. 
Stone in 1924, Hoover cleaned up a scandal-ridden 
agency and kept it scandal-free. The investigative 
techniques he developed in the 1930s made kidnap- 
ing, once epidemic, a relative rarity, and showed the 
famous “gangsters” of that day that they were not 
invulnerable. Welch is impressed, also, with the skill 
Hoover showed in investigating the Mississippi civil 
rights atrocities in the early 1960s, once challenged 
to enter the scene. 

The basic problem with Hoover, as Wdch sfees it, 
is that he lingered much too long, and certain 


gened with him. Lyndon Johnson, Hoover’s long- 
time W ashing ton neighbor, committed the first er- 
ror. He waived, in Hoovers favor, the mandatory 
federal retirement age. Soon the director had be- 
come immovable, although Wdch ndther confirms 
nor refutes the old rumor that it was the dirt in 
Hoover’s private files that terrified presidents (with 
the exception of Harry Truman). 

Even conceding Hoover’s virtues, Welch's argu- 


nemuesi.jH& anscan 
m>w*MAWiX)fmce<x : 
TBftH /INPHOHfSir 






meat is that bureaucratic rigidities severely limite d 
the scope and effect of FBI operations. There was 
an iron-curtain division between headquarters man- 
darins and agents in the field; and the former, loyal 
to Hoover at all costs, insisted on making all the 
important dedaons. Crime statistics were a fetish, 
but apoor and misleading measure of effectiveness. 
There was far too much emphasis, Wdch believes, 
on domestic subversion (there was a time whoa most 
Communist Party cells in the United States were 
rumored to consist, in largo measure, of FBI agents) 
and modi, much too little on organized crime. 

Essentially, then, this is a tale of what mi g ht be 
called heroic insubordination — how Wdch, work- 
ing in various big-city field offices, worked out the 
techniques for penetrating organized crime and po- 
litical corruption whose monument would be Ab- 
stain. Had Hoover known what was going on under 
Welch’s direction, he would, we are led to believe, 
have stopped it cold. 

' One is given pause only by his reiteration of how 
he cleverly defied, evaded or bent standard proce- 
dures or regulations, all for the greater good of 

crime fighting. He netted some big fish in organized 

crime and political payoffs, always taking care to 
gratify the director’s vaniy by gyving him credit. 

ue to cat^wh^ But I couldn't help wondering, 
from time to time, what would become of orderly 
government if every agency had an abundance of 
innovative, clever, inventive insubordinates like 
Neil J. Wdch. Finally, I had the feeling that one is 
about all each agency could possibly manage, or 
benefit from. But every agency needs one. 

Edwin M. Yoder. Jr^ a syndicated Washington 
columnist, wrote this review, which appeared in The 
Washington Past 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 




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auaa aaaa aaaaaoQ 
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□□cos tiaan auuuna 
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□□□a □□□uunaaauu □□□□ 
□minu □□□□□□□ □□□□□□□ 
auanau uuua uaaau 
□□□ □□□□□ □□□□ □□□□□□ 
□□□ □□□□ □□□□□HOD □□□ 

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□uu □□□□□ □□□□ □□□□ 


REX MORGAN 





wWwSH is 


GARFIELD 


THESE GAME SHOWS 
, ARE PISGOSTING 


IT’S rathetic HOW 
SOME PEOPLE WILL 
-UMMILIATC THE/W5ELVEO 
TO WIN MONEV j 


\ JON POES IT Y|CV 
V FOR. FREE 



Work! Stock Martlets 


Via Agence France-Presse March 15 

Qari/ig prices in local currmaet unless otherwise indicated. 








































o* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SIJNDAY, MARCH 16-17, 1985 


Page 15 


i • j 

TV * 

].>• 

r «* 


i '-*ni 




%,± 


xton’s Soccer Biot 
by Lead London to 
ass Stricter Laws 








3 . 14 * i 





~ w " IF 

P. s. 

• . ! 


"• 77 k Associated Pros 

■ JDON — Prime Minis ter 
jrei Thatcher has intervened 
.ally in an effort io end the 
} g violence of British soccer 
. allowing the riot London's 
r ■ \ous MillwaU supporters 
when tlxdr team lost to Lu- 

’^.‘^■sday, the prime minister 
£ Football Association, the 
^ScontrrfHng body, a week in 
"-•v. o submit a report to Sports 
Nr Neil MacFariane on how 
,jd s to deal with violence 
; soccer fans. 

' then plans a meeting with 
idaJs to discuss the report, 
riane told the House of 
■3ns. 

Guardian newspaper said 
^ r court penalties, a ban an 
“ < ales at soccer grounds and 
’ • measures against soccer 
‘nth violent supporters will 

» " a on the prime miznsta^s 
after the rampage Wednes- 
Loton, 25 miles (40 kilome- 
vrth of London. 

— beds of the 8,000 MflhraJl 
.. Titers at the am test battled 
•gripped op stadium seats, 
■4 ^ -;d cars ana house windows 
TT, Treked a train taking them 
'■"•■Tn? flea- Luton won, 1-0, to take 

~ am out of the FA Cup com- 

— *i-j. 

. e said at least 47 persons, 
ag 31 police, were injured in 
l It broke out inside the 
j and spilled over into snr- 
^Jg streets as the game ended. 
- made 33 arrests in what 


€.*H H»i 

me* 



_ — . — *• — ^ ~ • *• : 


.. . • • '*•' 


V 





mm' 

iru.«.. 

41 tv* 

v 


l* i - 

^ , ■ 
Skfe. f 

r 


Jfidal examined die wreckage after the visiti 
jtore op the stadinm daring match at Luton, 

{ SPORTS BRIEFS 


AriPmn 

team’s 


■*,’ vJWENIX, Arizona (NYT) — The National Football League owners 
/V Tmrsday to award Super Bowl XXIII, in 1989, to Miami and the 
— 'afs game to New Orleans. They discussed awarding Snow Bowl 
i, a northern city with a domed stadium, but tabled further 
ion until they meet in May in Chicago. 

shot Rudy Perpich, wbo attended the meeting with a disappmm- 
oesota delegation, called the awarding erf two more games to cities 
inn climates “unfair.” “ Next stop. Iguana,” be said. 

‘ i call for Super Bowl XXHJ to be played in the stadium that Joe 
■, the manag in g general partner of the Miami Dolphins, intends to 

- fit is not completed in ome; the game will be played in the Orange 
there four previous Super Bowls have been played. 

mes, Bey Trade Jabs Outside Ring 

VEGAS (UPI) — Heavyweight champion Larcy Holmes and 
Bey, who have a less than cordial relationship outside the rin£, 
jed angry words Thursday at their weigh-in for Friday night s 

asked about cuts be sustained in his last bout, a victory over Greg 
lid, *T got cut because 1 went swimming before the fight and my 
is soft.” 

- i’re gang to bleed, but not because of swimming,” Holmes 
led. “You're going to bleed because you’re a half-breed." 

the son of a black father and white mother, shouted back at (he 
hampion: “Larty, you’re did and senile. Td fight you for nothing;” 

) Royals Agree to lifetime Pads 

T MYERS. Honda (API -—The Kansas Gtv Royals have reached 
- shake agreement on a lifetime contract with their premier relief 
, Dan Qudsenberry, according to the team's co-owner, Avion 
tan. 

hnan said Thursday that the basics had been agreed upon for a 
deal with outfielder Willie Wilson. “There is nothing signed yet,” 
’gdman. “But when I shake hands with Dan Qutsenbeny aim his 
’resen ia lives, and we say we have an agreement. I'm assuming we 
i agreement.” 

it Germany to Host European Cup 

" WN (AP) — - West Germany wfll host the 198S European Cup 
championships, awarded by a vote of the European Soccer 
.* executive committee. En gland, West Germany’s rival to host the 
tbdrew its application. 

Berlin will not host any cup matches, although both government 
4 position politicians in Bonn had demanded that there be no 
«nise on ute issue. 

li/iirtgart, Helmut Benthaus said he would quit as coach of the 
ng West German soccer champion, YFB Stuttgart, at the end of 
on. Benthaus, 49, died two factors: the expiration of his contract 
sions with the sixth-place chib's 1 management. 

the Bonn government’s spokesman, Peter Boenisch, said “the 
government deplores this decision” to exclude West Berlin. 

e-Sweden Davis Cup Match Reset 

DON (AP) — Chile and Sweden wfll play their delayed world 
rst round Davis Cup match at Santiago during the week of April 
. ~ he International Tennis Federation has ruled. 

natch was to have been played last weekend but th e Swed es, 
j-' of the Cop, decided not to risk staying in Santiago because of 
• dees in the Ch ilean capital 


SPORTS 


officials called one of the worn 
nights of soccer violence in Britain. 

Luton’s chief executive. John 
Smith, vowed his team would never 
again play Mfllwafl. “We have to 
make a stand,” he said. “When 
there is a threat to our public, we 
wfll pull out of matches, even if it 
means forfeiting points.” 

MillwaU officials said they were 
“shattered” by Wednesday’s vio- 
lence and issued a statement blam- 
ing “a few hundred animals.” 

Ai one stage, the match was halt- 
ed for 25 minutes, and the two 
teams fled to the dressing rooms. 
Police, heavily outnumbered, were 
beaten back but regrouped and 
cleared the field. After play re- 
sumed, a six-inch knife was thrown 
at Luton’s goalkeeper, Les Sealey. 

Aftex inflicting dwrn«<y» estimat- 
ed at £15,000 (about 516,000) in- 
side the stadium, hundreds of fans 
— many of them apparently drunk 
— charged through neighboring 
streets and terrorized household- 
ers. 

John Howarlh said only curtains 
slopped wooden p lanks from hur- 
tling through his front windows. 
“We have had gangs shouting an d 
brawling in past, bnt nothing Kin* 
tins,” he said. His wife added: “I 
would flog the devils until they 
have to b«g for mercy.” 

Then, on a train back to London, 
fans ripped up carriage seats, 
pulled down luggage racks and 
smiwheri tight* and minors. In 30 
minutes, they did about $48,600 in 

damag e , officials said. 



Top Teams Win NCAA Openers 


The Assodaud Pros 
Form held true for the most part 
as the NCAA basketball tourna- 
ment got underway Thursday with 


Bill Martin got squeezed 


ItaMra/UrM Proa I 


of die NCAA 


tournament and 


defense of its national tide on a 68 - 
43 victory over f-atiig h behind the 
sharpshooting of Re ggi e Williams 
and David Wingate. 

The Hoy as held a 28-point lead 
at halftim e of thear first-round 
game, then coasted to their East 
Regional victory at Hartford, Con- 
necticut. Lehigh, at 12-19, was the 
<mly team in the field of 64 with a 
losing mark, 

“After we got up, it was difficult 
to ma i nta in a certain level of con- 
centration,” said Georgetown’s 
coach, John Thompson. “It’s 
tough, when you have a lend like 
that, to keep that team-oriented de- 
fense." 

In Saturday’s second round, the 
Hoyas face Temple, a 60-57 winner 
over Virginia Tech. In other East 
games. Loyola of Chicago- beat 
Iona, 59-58, and Southern Method- 
ist beat Old Dominion, 85-68- 

In the Southeast Regional, at 
Somh Bend, Indiana, North Caro- 
lina beat Middle Tennessee State, 
76-57; Kansas defeated Ohio Uni- 
versity, 49-38; Auburn beat Pur- 
due, 59-58, and Notre Dame hdd 
off Oregon State, 79-70. 

In the Midwest Regional at Tul- 
sa, Oklahoma, fourth-ranked Okla- 
homa beat North fjernKna A&T, 
96-83; Louisiana Tech crushed 
Pittsburgh, 78-54; Ohio State beat 
Iowa State, 75-64, and BHncds State 
shaded Southern California, 58-55. 

In the West Regional, at Salt 
Lake Gty, Utah, No. 3 St John’s 
eased past Southern University, 83- 
59; Nevada-Las Vegas outlasted 
San Diego State, 85-80; Arkansas 
beat Iowa, 63-54, and Kentucky 
downed Washington, 66-58. 


aii toiS There Are Few limits for True Fans 

77 he AssocuUal Press 

;tleona 68 - GRAND RAPIDS. Michigan — Not everyone would drive 670 
behind the “ sean * NCAA tournament basketball tickets, but, Elmer 

e Williams VanBoc t he’s just a typical Michigan Wolverines fan. 

VanBeek, 63, a retired electrical engineer and 194S graduate of the 
-point lead university, said he “dropped everything” when the University of 
first-round Dayton ticket office in Onto told him Tuesday morning that tickets to 
their East Michigan's NCAA Southeast Regional contest Friday night would be 
[ford. Con- avail *“ e for only six hours. 

19 was the " Some Pf°P lc might think it was foolish to drive so far for 
F 64 with a basketball tickets, but those people wouldn’t understand anyways,” 
VanBeek said Wednesday. “Real Michigan basketball fans will un- 
as difficult dersian< *’ though." 

vel of con- ^ ^ reac hed the ticket office with 45 minutes to spare. He 
iroeinwn’. was bade home at 8:45 p.m.. 1 1 hours and 670 miles later. And faring 
irgeiown s another round trip to the game. 


W illiams and 'Wingate each had 
14 points and Patrick Ewing 1 1 for 
Georgetown. The 7-foot Evnng had 
blocked four shots by halftime as 
Georgetown dominated the game. 
Granger Hall scored 22 points and 
had 13 rebounds for Temple as 
Virginia Tech was held to nearly 25 
points under its average- Perry 
Young, Tech’s leading scorer, did 
not start the game. 

Alfredrick Hughes scored 24 
points and Loyola won when Io- 
na’s Tony Hargraves missed a free 
throw with three seconds left. 

Carl Wright led a balanced at- 
tack with ISpoints as SMU pulled 
away from Old Dominion, whose 
Mark Davis scored 32 points on 14- 
of -22 shooting. 

Calvin Thompson's 12 points led 
Kansas over Ohio University, 
which slowed the game with a 
spread offense. 

Chris Morris's tie-breaking free 
throw with 14 seconds got Auburn 
past Purdue. Morris scored 19 


points, while Chuck Person led the 
Tigers with 20. 

Purdue tied the score at 58 on a 
basket by freshman Troy Lewis 
with 55 seconds left. After a time- 
out. Auburn hdd for one shot and 
Morris was fouled by Purdue's 
Mark Atkinson. He missed the sec- 
ond of his two free throws, but 
Purdue's James Bullock missed a 
short turnaround jumper with two 
seconds left 

Brad Daugherty scored 25 points 
as North Carolina beat Middle 
Tennessee. The Tar Heels traded, 
45-44, with 11:23 to play but 
Daugherty scored eight of his 
team's next 12 points and the Tar 
Heels pulled away. 

Freshman guard David Rivers 
darted through Oregon State's de- 
fense for 21 points and helped No- 
tre Dame withstand a second-half 
rally. Oregon State dosed behind 
A.C. Green, who had 26 points, 
and tied at 56 with 6:11 to go. 
Rivers, who until then had not 
scored in the second half, got eight 


of Notre Dame’s next 10 points 
and the Irish opened a 68-61 kad 
with 2:41 to go. 

Ronnie Stokes' threc-poim play 
with 17:26 left began Ohio State's 
10-2 run that beat Iowa State. 
Stokes finished with 21 points. 

Robert Godbolt scored 17 points 
and Willie Bland 16 as Louisiana 
Tech defeated Pin with the help of 
14 straight points midway through 
the second half. 

Wayman Tisdale got 28 points 
and 12 rebounds as Oklahoma beat 
North Carolina A&T. The 6-9 Tis- 
dale, closely checked by an Aggie 
team whose tallest player is 6 - 6 . got 
12 of bis points on three-point 
plays. 

Michael McKenny sank six free 
throws in the last two minutes to 
help Illinois State defeat Southern 
Cal 

Walter Berry scored 24 points as 
Su John's overcame a slow start to 
beat Southern. Bill Wenniagton 
added 23 points and all-America 
Chris Mulun had 21 for the Red- 
men. 

Arkansas rallied to beat Iowa 
behind center Joe Kldne. who 
scored 15 of his 25 points in the 
second half, and grabbed 14 re- 
bounds. Iowa led by as many as 1 1 
points early in the last half, then 
went cold. 

Sophomore Armon Gilliam 
scored 21 points and .Anthony 
Jones got 18 as Nevada-Las Vegas 
withstood foul trouble to defeat 
Son Diego State. 

Kenny Walker got 29 points as 
Kentucky, making 17 of 21 free 
throws in the last four minutes, 
ended the 40-year college coaching 
career of Washington's Marv 
Harshman. Harshman, 67, finished 
seventh in career victories with 642, 
plus 448 losses. 


NIT Tourney: 
Close Calls 

The Associated Pros 

Virginia, Tennessee and Sl Jo- 
seph’s. Pennsylvania, all won tense 
contests Thursday night as the Na- 
tional Invitation Tournament 
swung into high gear with 10 first- 
round games. 

Darrick Simms's three-point 
play with 35 seconds left gave Vir- 
ginia a 56-55 victory at West Vir- 
ginia, and Tennessee's Fred Jen- 
kins scored on a tip-in with 14 
seconds left to beat Tennessee 
Tech, 65-62. Sl Joseph's Rodney 
Blake tipped in a desperation shot 
at the buzzer to brat Missouri, 68 - 
67. The Tigers, trailing by 17 at 
halftime, took the lead with five 
seconds left. 

Rjgjgte Mfler’sgame-hi^i 21 
pomtsnehwf UCLA' brat Mon- 
tana, 78-47, and Mitch Arnold’s 
20 -foot jump shot with 18 seconds 
left in the third overtime gave Fres- 
no State a 79-76 victory over Santa 
Clara. 

In other games, it was Louisville 
77, Alcorn State 75; CSnonnati 77, 
Kent State 61; Southwestern Loui- 
siana 65, Florida 64; South Florida 
77, Wake Forest 66 and Marquette 
77, Bradley 64. 



Clippers 9 Victory Ends 
Long Wait for Coach 



Th« AuooOtod Plan 

Henry Smitb of Ohio University found a way through Cedric Hunter, 22; Danny Manning, 
25, and Greg Drefluig, 30. Kansas, however, found a bigger hole in Ohio’s spread offense. 


The Associated Press 

INDIANAPOLIS — After five 
straight losses since taking over as 
coach of the Los Angeles Clippers 
on March 6 , Don Chaney was won- 
dering what had happened to the 
adage that a team plays better after 
getting a new leader. 

“I fdt like a hex,” Chaney said 
after the Clippers ended an 11- 
game losing sneak by edging the 
Indiana Pacers, 113-1 12, Thursday 
night “You gel a little punchy after 
a while. You lose so many that you 
should win until, even though you 
feel positive, at times you begin to 
wonder.” 

The National Basketball Aiss 6 d : 
atian season is so long that even the 
best coaches realize they will have 
to absorb some losses. But, said 
Chaney, an assistant coach with the 
Clippers before taking over for the 
fired Jim Lynam, “I hate losing, 

“You play so many games that 
they say you shouldn't linger on a 
loss too long. But because I’ve just 
gotten involved as a bead coach, I 
let it get to me.” 


His first victory wasn't assured 
until after James Donaldson put 
the Clippers ahead on a six-footer 
with two seconds left. 

In other games it was New York 
106, Chicago 97; Atlanta 120, 

NBA FOCUS 

Golden State 1 12 and San Antonio 
100, Seattle 93. 

Chaney said his team's last shot 
was supposed to be taken by Derek 
Smith, who led the Clippers with 22 
points, or veteran forward Marques 
Johnson. 

“We wanted to clear om for 
Marques one-on-one,” Chaney 
smd- Marques got the ball, put i"t 
on the floor and they doubled him. 
He kicked it bad; to James.” 

Indiana Coach George Irvine 
said the Facers’ guard, Jim Thom- 
as, almost knocked the ball away. 
But the 7-foot-2 Donaldson, the 
NBA’s leading field-goal percent- 
age shooter, get control and made 
his shot Donaldson finished with 
12 points, 14 rebounds and five 
blocked shots. 




NBA Standings 


IARD 


3* V .554 10 
J) B I7D lift 
24 39 20 

n, m m* aovi 
20 « SB 2 fife 


EASTKRM CONFERENCE 
Attune DtvtMaa 

. w L Pet GB 
* -Batten 52 74 JB8 — 

X-PMlwMPllla 49 14 JS4 3V» 

Now Jorsoy 33 33 JOO 19 

Washington 33 33 .500 19 

NOW York 22 44 J33 X 

CartrU Division 

x-MftMRikM 44 19 JOB — 

Detroll 34 29 J554 ID 

Chicago J1 B 471) 1M 

Cleveland 24 39 .400 20 

Atlanta 24 40 JB4 26Vi 

lodkna 20 44 J03 24W 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Mktwvtt Division 

Denver 42 23 Mb — 

Houston 39 2b M0 3 

-Dallas 37 29 -54t 5*> 

San AnronW >3 34 .493 10 

utoct n 3$ xn u% 

Kanos Q tV 24 42 J64 lOU 

Pacific Division 

x-i-A. uncart 47 IB J33 — 

Phoenix 31 35 A70 Ifln 

Portland 30 34 -455 17H 

Seattle 27 39 ,409 20V, 

LA. dippers 23 44 .343 25 

Golden state 18 a Xn 39 

(jt-dlnched ptavoff berth) 

THURSDAY’S RESULTS 
Ctrfcaoo 2S M 21 24—97 

New York 32 2f 24 19— IN 

tOnp 10-21 44 24. Walker 7-15 8-12 22; Daflev 
9-11 5-5 23. WooJrktae 10-13 2-5 22. RetMaads: 
ChlcaBoSD (Greenwoods); New Yorfc 47 (Bol- 
tov to). Assists: auemo 27 (Jordan 8); Now 
Yort 27 (Walker 8). - 
LA. aiepen 18 38 24 14-113 

ladle bo 24 It 24 27—112 

Smith 7-U8-I022. Nixon 8-163321; Stlpano- 
vtcti 14-23 6* 34. Williams B-18 35 18. Re- 
baunde: LA. Clippers 42 (Donatdsan 14); in- 
cflona si < william*, stlpanovicb 12). Assists: 
LA. Cuppers 24 (Nixon 5); Indiana 30 (Flem- 

ins n, 

Saa Antonio 23 3# 22 25— MS 

Seattle 21 31 19 a— « 

Mitchell 1MJ S- 5 25. Gilmore Ml « Ml 

Wood 4-19 3-5 W. Ctvjmber* 9- u 1-1T9, Sttmo 3- 

107* Ht Henderson 6-15 1-2 13. Re&ooads: Son 
Antonio SB ( Gilmore. Cook 71; Seattle 44 
rSifona in. Assists: San Antonio 26 (Paxfon 
Mi Seattle 24 (Henderson 71. 

AltPOta 33 27 29 31— RD 

Guides Stale 34 21 25 32-112 

Wilkins 12-25 5-7 29. Wlttnun 11>M 2*2 24.' 
Short 13-28 7*10 34. Gamer B-12 34 IS. R*- 
bocMds: Atlanta 48 ( WHHs 16); Golden Stole 
59 (Whitehead 14). Assists: Atlanta 15 
(EJktiMtan 7); Golden Slate 21 (Hovd 8). 


Exhibition Baseball 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Detroit 5. st. Louts 4 
Hootten m> 3. los AMrtes i 
Cleveland 13. Oakland 3 
Baltimore 5, Tew* 5 
Toronto & MMMMfel 
Milwaukee & Cat! tan la 4 
Montreal 4. Artanto 2 
CMcooo White Sox 7. PMIcxMoMi 2 
Boston 9, Cincinnati 7 
Kansas Cltv A Pittsburgh 3 
K.Y. Mats Z Houston us) 1 
N.Y. Yankees 7. Florida SL 3 
son Fmodsen 9. QUenoo Cuhc3 
Seattle & San DJeso 4 
(NOTE: tes) Monies snUt-eouad). 


Basketball 


NCAA Tournament 

EAST REGIONAL RESULTS 
Hr*! Round 

Georgetown 48, Lehigh 43 

Temple M, Virginia Tech 57 

Loyola. ML 5V, Iona SB 

Southern Methods) 85. OVd Dominion 68 

March is pomes, at Atlanta: 

Illinois. 344. vs. Northeastern, 22-4 
Georgia. 214, vs. Wichita SL, 18-12 
Syracuse, 214, vs. DePoul, 19-9 
Georgia Tech, 24-7, vs. Mercer, 22-8 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL RESULTS . 
First Round 
Kansas 49, Ohio U. 38 
Auhurn 59, Purdue 58 
North Carol Ino 76, Middle Tennessee 57 
Notre Dome 79. Oregon SL W 
March 15 games, at Dayton, Ohio: 
Louisiana SL 19-9. vs. Now, 25-5 
Maryland, 23-11. vx Miami, Ohio. 23-10 
Michigan. 25-3. vs. FalrleWl Dickinson. 214 

Villa novo, 79- TO, vs. Davfrxv IM 

MIDWEST REGIONAL RESULTS 
Flrtt Hound 
Ohio St. 75. Iowa St. 64 
Lotftslnno Tech 78. Pittsburgh 54 
Oklahoma 96. North Carolina A&T 83 
I Hindi St. 58. Southern COlHomJa 55 
March 15 games, at Houston: 

Memehls SL ZM, vs. Pennsylvania, 13-13 
Ala-6lrm Ingham, 24-8. vs. Michigan St. 19-9 


Caps Hone Up on Maple Leafs 


Texas Tsctv 23-7. w Boston CeUeoa. 13-10 
Duke. 22-7, vs. Pepperdbw, 2M 

WEST REGIONAL RESULTS 
First Honed 
SL John* SX Southern U. 59 
Arkansas 63, lowa 54 
Nevada-Las Vegas 8& San Diego SL 80 
Kentucky 66, WaaMnaten SB 
(March 15 games, at AdtoaoeraiM, HMesieo: 
North Caranna St- 20-9, vs. Nevada- Rena, 21^ * 
Tulsa, 23-7. vs. Texas-E! Paso. ZT-9 
Vo. Commonwealth. 25-6, n. Marshall, 2VT2 
Alabama, 21-9, vs. Arizona, 21-9 

NTT Tournament 

First Romd 

New Mexico 80. Texas A&M 47 
Nebraska 79. Contain 66 
Louisville 77, Alcorn St 75 
Virginia 56. West Virginia 55 
Cincinnati 77, Kent St 61 
Southwestern Louisiana 65. Florida 64 
South Florida 77, Wake Forest 44 
Marquette 77, Bradley it 
Tennessee 45, Tennessee Tech 42 
SL Joseph’s, pa. 68. Mluaurl 67 
UCLA 7|, Montana 47 
Fresno SL 79, Santa Clara 74. 3 OT 
March 15 games: 

Butler, 19-9, at Indiana, 15-13 
asmson, 14-12, at TiL-Outtcnoopa 22-7 
Fardham. 19-11, at Richmond. 20-10 
Houston, 14-13, at Lamar, 19-11 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Al Jensen’s 
dull state gave Mm as mndi trou- 
ble Thursday night as did the dnB 
Toronto Maple Leafs. Despite 
both, be got Ms first shutout in 15 
months, Ms 17 saves helping the 
Washington Capitals win, 4-0. 

The Maple Leafs justifiably own 
the NHL’s worst record. For the 
skate problem, the Capitals’ coach, 
Bryan Murray, called time early in 
the third period so Jensen could 
sharpen it at the beach. Thereafter, 
the goalie kept a stone near the net 
for touch-ops during time-outs. 

■“My skate hit a post and I lost 
my edge,” be said. “The ref allowed 
me to keep a stone by the net, 
which he didn’t have to do. 

“The team played very well to- 
night and they didn’t give much. 
Tonight was a team shutout. I’m 
just trying to be confident and play 
the brat Iran.” 

In other games it was Winnipeg 


4, Montreal 1 and Boston 7, New 
Jersey 4. 

The whole Washington team was 
trying to regain some confidence, 
after three straight losses, and the 
Maple Leafs proved the perfect 
tonic. The Capitals outshot them, 

NHL FOCUS 

31-8, over the first two periods and. 
only sharp goahxnnding by Ken 
Wregget kept Toronto within four 


Washington closed within two 
points of first-place Philadelphia in 
the Patrick Division. Bnt Saturday 
the Flyers play the Maple Leafs, 
who have lost five straight and 
Thursday night tied the dub's all- 
time total of defeats, 45, set last 
season. Toronto has 11 games left 
in which to worsen iL 
The Maple Leafs produced the 
usual quota of jokes in the press 
box and when their owner, Harold 


Ballard, bought a hoi dog in the 
second period, a fey spirit com- 
mented, “He’s trying to kill him- 
self” 

Mike McEwen, Bengt Gustafs- 
son. Bob Carpenter and Craig 
Laughlm scored for Washington, 
which tested Wregget 40 times. 
Carpenter had two assists for his 
sixth three-point game this season. 
■ Wickenbeiser Hit by Car 

Damage to the knee ligaments of 
center Dwg Wickenheuer, of the 
Norris Division-leading St Louis 
Blues, was corrected by more than 
four boars of surgery Thursday, 
but doctors said it will be nine 
months to a year before he fully 
recovers, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Sl Louis. 

Wickenheiser, 23, was hit by a 
slow-moving car Wednesday night 
while on a imth outing in Eureka, 
Missouri. He will remain hospital- 
ized for eight to 10 days and will be 
in a long leg cast, for four weeks. 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Standings 


Sailor Has Dream, if Reality Allows 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dlvttloa 



W L 

T 

pts 

GF 

GA 

x-PtaitaMeHa 42 

19 

7 

91 

m 

m 

x-WattiliwtaB 

40 

20 

V 

89 

281- 

208 

x-K-Y. tatamtors 36 

28 

5 

77 

308 

268 

N.Y. Rangers 

22 

36 

10 

54 

258 

295 

Plttttwrgti 

22 

40 

5 

49 

235 

327 

New Jersey 

30 

40 

9 

49 

23 

293 


Adorns Dtvltten 



k-Moalreal 

34 

24 

11 

79 

243 

231 

x-Buftata 

32 

22 

u 

77 

2tt 

■m 

x-OuAec 

34 

25 

9 

77 

283 

242 

Boston 

32 

28 

8 

72 

259 

236 

HarHord 

21 

38 

9 

51 

231 

293 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Marls Dhrtstoo 




X-St. Loots 

33 

24 

11 

77 

263 

244 

x-OUcago 

33 

33 

5 

71 

273 

271 

Minnesota 

2! 

37 

11 

55 

234 

281 

Detroit 

21 

37 

II 

S3 

243 

313 

Toronto 

17 

45 

7 

41 

214 

299 


Sffivtfee (Xvfcboft 



x-E<3monton 

45 

U 

8 

98 

344 

245 

x-Wimlpeg 

37 

37 

7 

81 

315 

300 

x-Colgary 

35 

24 

S 

78 

317 

247 

Las Anetas 

30 

1b 

u 

73 

z» 

283 

Vancouver 

22 

39 

8 

53 

244 

352 


(x-dlnclMd ptavofl bcrtti) 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Winnipeg 3 a 1—4 

Montreal 1 0 0—1 

Mullen (29),Wottat (i).Haweretwk2 (45); 
Cortwmeaa 119). Stats on seal; Wwajpeg (on 
Penney) Mt-ar Montreal (on Hayward) 
«■ 12*5—29. 

Toronto 8 8 0-8 

Wtattitagtoa 1 3 8-4 

McE won (HD# Gactotaaa (8), Carpenter 
|47).UiuBhi|fl (ULSMsaemi: Toronto (on 


Jeratfi) 4-4-9 — 17; wosMnotoa (an Wregget) 
12-19-9— -40. 

Batten 4 2 1-7 

Hew Jenev 1 1 *— 4 

Gorina (13). Simmer (31). Lufcowridi (10). 
Crowder (2»),Thelin (4) Fergus (27).MMcne- 
tan <24>; P (chattel (16), Hoffmew fl). Luc*- 
vie (12). Shots en goal: Boston (on Low) 10-7- 
7—24; New Jersey (on Keens) 8-13-Q—31 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
Amerfeoa Leogee 

MILWAUKEE— Rfroisiwd Chuck Por- 
tor. Chuek Crlm. Scott Robert*, Andy Beene, 
Chris Basto, Tam CondloHL Brad Lesley and 
Pott HortaJ I, pitchers; Blliv RobUoux. Dale 
Svcum and Jim Castilla, Inftetdm; Mike 
PeMer# nutfletder; Daw Hupoert, catcher, 
end Jim Adduct flnrt baseman, to ttittlr minor 
league training cammex. 

NntNttdl Lecttue 

atlahta— Sent Mike Ptrroa, pitcher ■ and 
Leo Vargas, outfielder, to Richmond of toe 
International League. Reassigned Andrei 
Thames, tofMder, and Joe Johnson and Mott 
West, puttiers, to toeir minor league training 
cample*. Returned Daw Schuler, pitcher; 
Matt Sinatra and John LlctarL catchers, ana 
Gton Gulliver, Inflelder, to their original mi- 
nor league dubs. 

HOCKEY 
Mgffnng i Hockey 

MINNESOTA— Sent Ken SoJDetm, left wing, ' 
down to Springfield of the American Hockey 
League, 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — An old television series fea- 
tured an actor, Gardner McKay, as he sailed to 
Tahiti with an afl-giri crew. Miranda Dehnar- 
Morgan has bigger aspirations. She's recruiting 
women to race around the world. 

Hie 30-year-old British skipper is putting to- 
gether an all-female crew of 13 for the Whitbread 
Round-the- World race. She has a long list of 
applicants, ranging Iroxn an auto merfianir to a 
nurse who served in the Falkland Islands war. 

Bnt Gauloises III will never ride the waves 
unless Ddmar-Morgan comes up with $400,000 to 
pay the Mils for the race, which begins Sept. 28 in 
Portsmouth, England. 

“1 haven’t raised a penny.” she said this month 
by telephone from Newport, Rhode Island, one of 
the portsof-call in her fundr raising effort. 

While she insisted she wfll have no problem 
putting together a competent crew, finding coipo- 
me sponsorship to pay the expenses of a six- 
month, 27,000-mile race is another matter. 

“I need a major sponsor at 5200,000 and I've got 
an interested party she said. “ As soot as I get the 
major sponsor I'm sure the others will join. At- 
tracting the first one, that’s the problem.” 

Ddmar-M organ, who skippers luxury yachts for 
jet-setters on vacation in the Bahamas and the 
Riviera, hopes the novelty of her idea will attract 
the financial support to make it a reality. 


She has made the equivalent of three trips 
around the world under sail in a lifetime on the 
water. 

She was raised aboard a 1908 Morecambe bay 
prawner in the River Crouch in Essex, England, 
but the seafaring history of her family can be 
traced badt to the 18th century. Her great-great- 
great-grandfather, Captain William Locker, once 
commanded Horatio Nelson, who later, as a Brit- 
ish admiral, defeated the French fleet in the Na- 
poleonic Wars. 

Although she defines herself as “anything but an 
ardent lemmist,” Dehnar-Morgan is out to prove 
women can compete against men on the high seas- 

“It is a test of endurance and stamina, strength 


could do it and do very weD. 

“I am a great believer that women are perfectly 
capable of doing most things that meu do, ana 
with a little forethought can overcome the minor 
drawback of lesser physical strength.” 

To dale, Delmai-Morgap has chosen four wom- 
en — Maty Anne Brady, a sail maker from Mar- 
blehead, Massachusetts, Celia Marr of England, 
Deborah Fry of Australia and Yunri Murakami of 
Japan — to crew the 65-foot sloop in which she wfll 
chase her dream. But without sponsorship, they 
will remain ashore. 








Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, 


16-17, 1985 



ART BUCHWALD 


A MiMon-DoUar Home 


The Fiction Touch of Simone Signoret 


TjffffT 


W ASHINGTON — There was 
a great deal of excitement in 




VV a peat deal of excitement in 
our neighborhood last week. The 
first bouse advertised to sefl at 
more than a milli on dollars was put 
upforsale. 

Most of the homes in our area 
were bmlt in the '40s and '50s and 
originally sold for $30,000 to 
$50,000. Over 
the years they 
have increased 
in value, but no 
one ever 
dreamed that 
one of them 
would ever be 
advertised for a 
million 

Trembling, 

who reported _ , 

the news to me, Bucnwald 
said, “I knew someone would break 
the six-figure barrier sooner or lat- 
er, but I never thought it would be 
Ed Hurwitz." 

“I can’t believe Hurwitz is asking 
a million for his lean-to. I don’t 


more than a million dollars for 
your house.” 

“Aren’t they disappointed when 


By Marilyn August 

The Assodatd Press 


they arrive?" 

“They don’t seem to be," Hur- 


F IARIS — Simone Signoret may be losing 
her eyesight, but thehusky-voiml actress 
and writer has not lost her touch. 

Signoret, 63, whose myriad film roles in- 
clude the sensuous older woman in “Room at 
the Top” and an aging prostitute in “Ma- 
dame Rosa," has topped France’s best-seller 
list with a poignant novel tracing the lives of 
two families oi Jewish immigrants from 1921 
through 1944. 

“Adieu Volodia," her first novel (the 1977 
memoir “Nostalgia Isn’t What It Used to Be" 
was a best seller in several languages), was 
published by Fayard in late January. 

By the time Signoret completed revisions 
on the 566-page manuscript, she no longer 
could decipher her own handwriting because 
of a deteriorating retina condition. 

“I’ve always recognized the connection be- 
tween the mud anti the body,” she told the 
critic Rene Deroeron in a recent magazine 
interview. “My eyes held out until 1 finished 
the noveL I had the feeling they needed a 
vacation, but, unfortunately, they haven’t 
come back.” 

The novel is b uD t around h istorical land- 
marks, including (he aremssmar fop of Simon 
Petlyura, the former Ukrainian general who 
ordered pogroms against thousands of Polish 
Jews after World War.L 
“Adieu Volodia” is a portrait of struggling 
immigrants who flee persecution in one coun- 
try only to face it 2d years later in another. 
Olga and Sonia are Yiddish-speaking seam- 
stresses who turn their one-room Paris sweat- 
shop into a money -making costume coopera- 
tive. Their husbands, Sttpan and EHe, are 
garment workers, ardent supporters of the 
leftist Popular Frost 
The Roginskis and Guttmans occupy ad- 
j oining flats in an immigrant neighborhood. 
They swear never total their French- bom 
offspring, Maurice and Zaza, of the night- 
marish pogroms that drove t^wn from Po- 
land in 1921. 

In 1939, the parents die in a train crash, 
thus, as Maurice puts it, escaping eventual 


witz said. “They figure if you're 
asking over a million there’s got to 
be more to it than they can see. 
Besides, people who can pay prices 
like that want to gut the structure 
anyway, and spend another minion 
to make U livable.’ One of the big 
attractions of this place is they can 
throw out everything in the house 
and not feel gimty about it” 

□ 



think he paid more than $63,000 
for it 10 years ago.” 

□ 


“I saw the ad in the paper this 
morning. It said, ‘Historical mini- 
estate, located in one of the most 
prestigious neighborhoods in 
Washington. A on ce-in-a-lif e time 
opportunity for that special afflu- 
ent family who wants more from a 
home than just a place to live. Of- 
fered ai $1,450,000. Within walking 
distance of the Swedish Embassy. 

I said, “It’s a joke. It has to be a 
joke." 

“Oh yeah? You should see the 
lineup of cars in front of the 
house.” 

Out of curiosity we decided to 
wander over to Hurwitz's house. 
Sure enough, there were Mercedes- 
Benzes, BMWs, Jaguars, Lincolns 
and chauffeured Cadillacs parked 
all along the street Women in fur 
coats stood in line waiting to get in, 
and Hurwitz passed out a mimeo- 
graphed sheet describing the fea- 
tures of the house. This included 
“antique lighting fixtures, a wet bar 
in the basement, contemporary li- 
brary with original moldings, and a 
state-of-the-art laundry room.” 

“What a turnout" 1 said to Hur- 
witz. 

“It even surprised me," he said, 
“but not the real estate agent She 
said the only way to keep out the 
bargain-hunters and attract the up- 
per-bracket crowd is to ask for 


Hurwitz took Trembling and me 
inside. 

“You didn’t even paint it” I 
said. 

“Why.paint it? Whoever is going 
to buy it will only repaint it Wom- 
en’s eyes light up when they sec this 
joint and they can hardly wait to 
call their decorator. The one thing I 
learned in selling a house for a 
milli on bucks is the less you offer 
somebody the more chance you 
have of getting them to buy it.* 

We went into the kitchen. There 
was a 1960 gas stove, a 1970 refrig- 
erator, a scarred wooden table, two 
chairs, and a spice shelf that Hnr- 
witz had gotten with trading 
stamps. 

One of the women said to the 
other, “It’s utterly charming. You 
don't see kitchens like this any- 
more.” 

The second woman said, “It’s a 
dream. You can start from scratch 
and do anything you want with it.” 
□ 


room I said, “I wouldn’t believe itu 
I hadn’t seen it with my own eyes. 
The people are actually salivating 
to buy this hunk of junk.” 

Hurwitz seemed offended. “It 
may be a hunk of junk to you, but 
for the people who came hoe today 

it’s the dream they worked for all of 

their fives.” 


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Novelist Signoret: “Writing fiction came naturally.’ 




deportation in cattle cars. 

Simone Signoret, bean Simone Kammker 
in Wiesbaden, Germany (she t^nfc her moth- 
er’s non-Jewish name), was raised in a bour- 
geois Paris suburb. Her past bears little re- 
semblance to the history of ihe poor 
immigrants whose lives she traces from 1921 
through the Nazi occupation <rf France dur- 
ing World War H. 

“ Adieu Volodia” is, nevertheless, filled 
with scenes from her life and that of her 
husband, the smger and actor Yves Montand. 

“I described the joyous celebration of ’be- 
coming French' and getting papers exactly 
the way it happened m Montand’s family, 
she said, referring to Montand’s imm i gran t 
I talian parents. 


“Hey, wait a minute," Trembling 
said, “if you get one million four 


said. ‘If you get one million four 
hundred thousand for this wreck 
that means all our homes in the 
neighborhood will be reassessed for 
tax purposes and well be paying 
for your scam." 

“Don’t blame me." Hurwitz said. 
“I originally asked $100,000 for the 
house and had no bites. Now that 
Tm asking for a million 1 can’t keep 
people from kicking down the 
door.” 


“The horns spent among non-French- 
speaking dressmakers being fitted for cos- 
tumes and the shame I fell when my mother 
forced me to return a Japanese-made tooth 
brush during the war to a p harmacist who 
could have cared less — those are right out of 
my own life.” 


Signoret said her novel was the result of an 
inability to capture on paper the “essential 
truth of my experience. It was easier when I 
turned the T into ’she.’” 


The novel, 18 months in the making, was 
written from her country home in Normandy. 
“I kept bothering my family to read each 
chapter, never rally sure whether I had a 
bock or not,” she said. 


“One day, ray neighbor, a dear lady who 
had been reading the manuscript in install- 
ments, told me that she would thmk about the 
Guttmans and the Reginalds during the 


week. For her, they existed. Hut’s when I 
knew I had a novo.” 

The Volodia of the title is a character in the 
novel a cousin of the Guttmans whom they 
presumed dead. Volodia mms qp is Paris but 
is whisked away by suspicious authorities 
before he can visit his family. Years later, the 
family to* pu»ti he died in Siberia, circum- 
stances unknown, soon after his Paris visit 

“This is exactly what happened with my 
cousin from Bratislava, who was not allowed 
to approach me,” said Signoret “It shows 
how carefully thing * are organized to make 
sure people don’t mid each other, meet and 
talk.” 

Signoret recently told a literary talk show 
host: “People are always amazed when an 
actor shows talent as a writer of fiction. Bui 
I’ve been throwing myself into fictional char- 
acters — creations of somebody’s rise’s 
imagingfinn — all my fife, SO wri ting fiction 
came naturally.” 





conducted by the Gallup organiza- 
tion. Cosby was named favorite 
male performer in a new TV series, 
and "The Cosby Slow” won as top 
TV comedy and favorite new show. 
Cosby’s co-star, Pfcyida Ayers-Al- 
ien, mid Angela Laasbuzy, star of 
“Murder, She Wrote,” shared the 
award for favorite female perform- 
er in a new TV series. Other multi- 
ple award winners included the 
singers Barbara Mandrell and 
Prince, the actors Tom SeDeck and 
Eddie MtKphy and the actresses 
Linda Evans and Joan Coffins. 


he gave her. Thyssen's lawyer, 
eit Johnson, said that, apart 
the jewelry, the baron had 
property worth £8.7 ntifiioo. 


Coke-Is-It is still Cokc-Is-It, un- 
der an agreement reached with the 


Sarah CahhreH, artistic di 
of the Boston Opera Compaf 
been released from a hospita 
a long bout with double pn 
nia, and plans to go to m 
recuperate. Caldwell, 61, htu 
undergoing special therapy 1 
past month. No date was set: 
to return to work. She was he 
ized Jan. 3. The opera cm 
canceled its winter season af 
became ill 


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international and eclectic, culminating u 
International Baccalaureate programme.' 
Director is the chief executive officer respo 
for all aspects of the conduct of the S. 
reporting to the Board of Governors. 
Qualifications required include minimum S 
experience in school administration and exti 
experience in international education. Fta ei 
Goman highly desirable. 


Enquiries and application, including 
c.v* and names of mirunaan 3 profea- 
referees to Dr. W.G. Mattem , Exet 
Secretary, European Coandl of Interna 
Schools, 18 Lavani Street, Feosn/iehi, . 
CTJ32 SEW, England. Deadline: 1 April, 
of appointment I August 1985, 


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