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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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ZURICH, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


Mubarak, Hussein U.S. Court 
7 isit Iraq Together Ends Limit 

(hi Funds 


Reuters 

BAGHDAD — President Hosni 
ibarak of Egypt and King Hus- 
. i of Jordan arrived here tmex- 
letfly Monday as the Gulf war 
rosined. Iran issued a warning 
l the Iraqi capita] was unsafe 
1 could be attacked at any mo- 
at. 

diplomatic sources in Baghdad 


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d the two leaden would - hold 
ks with Iraqi officials on ending 
: 53-month war, which lately has 
olved bitter ground battles and 
acfcg on both ca pital, and other 
es. Mr. Mubarak and the king 
* been staunch supporters of 

q- 

■According to diplomatic sources 
Cairo, Mr. Mubarak's visit seals 



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Uadrifl Karami 

Proops Battle 
liristiaii 
lilitiamen 
r n Lebanon 


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s _ , . ...Compiled by Our Sufi Fnm Dupauha 

^ u BEIRUT — Lebanese Army 
"■ lits battled rebellious Ch ristian 
* ihtiamen Monday in southern 
sbanon, radio reports said. 

. Prime Minister Rashid Karami 
* vimed that the Christian revolt 
as “driving the nation to anmhDa- 

50." 

ir Moslem Mourabitoun radio said 
— ^bting broke out in the village of 
,^.,abra overlooldng the coastal 
wn of Sidon, 24 n5es (38 lrilome- 
rs) south of Beirut. The radio said 
•- = my units were fighting Christian 
’•^‘ilitias loyal to Samir Geagpa, 
„. # a da of the revolt against Presi- 
v art Amin GemayePs rapproche- 
eat with Syria. 

lb In Damascus. Vice President 
l&v bdd Halim Khaddam of Syria 
mcelod plans Monday u> travel to 
^ arut for talks with Mr. Gemayd 
% i demands by the breakaway 
Christian nrilitiaiDeo for a greater 
"*f,,de in Lebanon’s govenunent 
' 4 ’ " There was no official explana- 
%oo for the canceflarion, but politi- 
a 'il sources told United Presslnter- 
^atipnal that Damascus was 
«■*- airingforMr. Gemayd to act first 
** f taking a dear stand on the re- 
ait devdopments in the Christian 
,4.. unp. i 

^ Syrian forces have moved withizf 
- mshot range of rebel-con trolled 
• Triiory north of Beirut, and Da- 
•>»!*•“ tascus has indjea t ed it would fight 
j suppon Mr. Gemayel, who ua 
hrinan. Syria has ban the major 
i ' acker of Ldbanon's coalition cabi- 
■ it since its formation April 30, 
;«4. 

Prime Minister Karami, a Mos- 
warned that the rebellion 
‘^ffeatened to “undermine Lebanon 
-£ " id termmate its existence.” 

0 He said in a statement broadcast 
a Lebanon’s state radio that the 
" mtiny was aimed at« partitioning 
. ebanon into mini-states, whim 
.light fare Mr. Gemayd, 42, to 
down. 

“If they consdidate their control 
4 a the ground, then they will hold 
reins of power” Mr. Karami 
.^lid. ‘The president then will have 
t 0> bow to their will or resign." 


an Egyptian- Iraqi bond that has 
been building in recoil years and 
points to the emergence of an 
Egypt-Lraq -Jordan bloc in the 
Arab world. An undisclosed num- 
ber of Egyptian volunteers have 
gone to fight alongside the Iraqi 
Army. 

The two Arab leaders boarded 
Mr. Mubarak’s Boeing 707 at Am- 
man’s mifitaxy airfield three hours 
after the Egyptian president ar- 
rived in Jordan for discussions with 
the king. Cairo radio said the two 
woe greeted an their arrival in 
Baghdad by the Iraqi president, 
Saddam Hussein. 

Iraq and most other Arab coun- 
tries ended ties with Egypt because 
of its 1979 peace treaty with Israel 
In Sqjtember, King Hussein re- 
stored diplomatic relations with 
Egypt ana argsd other Arab coun- 
tries, including Iraq, to follow his 
example. 

Jordan’s state radio said that Mr. 
Mubarak, on his one-day visit to 
Amman , briefed King Hussein cat 
recent talks with President Ronald 
Reagan and the leaders of Britain, 
France, Italy and West Germany. 
It gave no details. 

After the two leaders arrived in 
Baghdad the I ranian press agency, 
IRNA. said that the Iraqi capital 
was “completely unsaf e and could 
be attarfr^d at any moment.” 

Baghdad was rocked earlier 
Monday by its third explosion in a 
week. The Mast hit a nearly com- 
pleted budding that di plomats said 
was to have served as the new For- 
eign Ministry. It ca^i«yd panic 
among street marchers who were 
celebrating what Iraq reported to 
be a victory over Iranian forces in 
the marshlands of southern Iraq. 

Iran said it lanudted a missile at 
Baghdad near the time aftheex- 
plpfl fl in . Irq qi nffif»li<Mwi i» HMiM 
the previous explosions on I ranian 
agents in the ca pi tal 

Shipping sources reported sight- 
ing I ranian planes Monday over 
the Gulf. Attacks an Sunday by 
both Iranian and Iraqi planes bit 
three ships, including two tankers. 

Iraq said its planes were in action 

a gain Monday a gains t five Iranian 
towns, bitting Tehran Hamarian , 

(Continued on PUge 2, Coi. 6) 


Units May Spend 
Freely in Race 
For President 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Political ac- 
tion committees may spend unlim- 
ited amounts of money to suppon a 
presidential candidate, the Su- 
preme Court ruled Monday. 

By a 7-2 vote, the court ruled that 
a federal law linn ting the spending 
of any political committee to 
S 1,000 per candidate violated the 
constitutionally protected freedom 
of speech. 

Political action committees, 
known as PACs, are independent 
organizations dedicated to roecific 
goals that campaign on behalf of 
candidates who agree with their 
goals. 

The $1,000 spend 
PACs was imposed ’ 
part of the reforms 
mg revelations of widespread cam- 
paign fund-raising abuses in the 
Watergate scandal. 

Monday’s rfawsion came mi 8 

lawsuit in which the Democratic 
Party accused theNational Conser- 
vative Pofitieal Action Committee 
and the Fund for a Conservative 
Majority of planning to violate the 
$1,000 spending limit. The Federal 
Election Commission later joined 
in die accusation. 

Both the U.S. district court and 
the U.S. court of appeals had in- 
validated the spending Until, and 
an Monday the high court agreed 
that the law impermissibly restricts 
“dearly protected conduct.” 

Writing for the court’s mqority. 
Justice WOUam H. Rehnquist said, 
“The fact that candidates and 
elected officials may alter or reaf- 
firm their own petitions on issues 
in response to political messages 
paid for by the PACs can hardly be 
called corruption, for one of the 
essential features of democracy is 

(Continue d on Page 2. CoL 4 ) 



SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF ERIN — President Rea- 
gan and Prime Ministe r Brian Muironey of Canada and 
their wives, Nancy and MOa, and Maureen Forrester, left, 
the opera singer, took center stage at a gab theatrical 


evening in Quebec on St Patrick’s Day. The two leaders 
announced Monday that they had appointed special envoys 
to examine the add rain issue. They ended two days of 
talks at winch they announced a ‘new partnership.’ Page 4. 


£1CC WIU1 U1G&I - 

Reagan, Citing Soviet Violations , Stitt, Asks Summit 

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By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Serrice 

QUEBEC — President Ronald 
Reagan said Monday that the Sovi- 
et Union is “now violating” a host 
of treaties with the West, but the 


stated that no such plans for cruise 
missile defenses are planned and 
that no derision would be maA> 
without Canada’s agreement. Joe 
Clark, Canada's external affairs 
minister, said. “I have no reason to 


U.S. president reiterated to Prime Wieve it might be necessary” to 
Minister Brian Muironey of Cana- s^on such anti-missOe defenses 


.in Canada. 

In a speech after two days of 
talks with Mr. Muironey, Mr. Rea- 
gan said that the Russians “are now 
violating” the SALT-2 arms limita- 
tion accord, the Geneva Conven- 
tion HanniriP the use of phemiffl l 
weapons ana the anti-ballistic mis- 
sile treaty. He also accused the 
Russians of violating the Yalta and 

H elsinki aCOOfds 

Mr. Reagan has made these criti- 
cisms previously, but this marked a 
fresh round of harsh anti-Soviet 
Mr. Weinberger’s remark, in re- rhetoric from the president, who 
spouse to a question on Canadian has talked in more conohaiory 
television, touched off immediate tones in recent months. 
repercussions here because of the He and Mr. Muironey discussed 
sensitivity of Canada to the station- Mr. Gorbachev, the Geneva arms 
mg of UJS. weapons on its sofl. negotiations and Genual America 
White House officials quickly in a series of meetings Tuesday. 


da that he is ready for a s ummi t 
meeting with the new Soviet leader, 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

The second day of the Reagan- 
Muironey meeting here was jarred 
by a statement from Defense Secre- 
tary Caspar W. Weinberger that 
the United States might station 
anti -cruise missil e defensive weap- 
ons in. Canada, as well as the Unit- 
ed Slates and at sea. 

“Some might be here, some 
might be in the United States, some 
might be at sea,” he said. 


A senior U.S. official, who spoke 
on the condition that he not be 
identified, said that Mr. Reagan 
told Mr. Muironey of his invitation 
to Mr. Gorbachev for a posable 
summit mw*mg 

“The ball is in their cant,” Mr. 
Reagan saM, according to the offi- 
cial, who indicated that the Rus- 
sians had not yet provided much of 
a response to the invitation. 


■ Shnltz Concerned on Talks 

Bemad Gwmznum of The New 
York Times reported earlier from 
Washington: 

Secretary of State- George P. 

Shultz has expressed concern that 
public criticism of the American 
position on arms control voiced by 
Moscow’s chief negotiator in Gene- mean that the 


va ought not bode well for the fu- those negotiations as p: 
ture of the rnwririgs there. * — hl 

On Saturday night, Moscow tele- 
vision earned an interview with 
Viktor P. Karpov, the head of the 
Soviet delegation to the Geneva 
talks, which began Tuesday. 


In Urging Choice of Gorbachev, Gromyko Eased Generational Change 



Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the new Sonet leader, and a 
sentry standing at the bier of Konstantin U. Chernenko. 


' By Duslco Doder 

Washington Paa Serna 

MOSCOW —It is said that it was one of the 
most eloquent speeches Andrei A. Gromyko 
ever made. Speaking, to members of the Soviet 
Communist Party Central Committee on March 
11, without notes, be told them why they should 
elect Mikhail S. Gorbachev as the Soviet leader. 

The veteran foreign minister praised his 
younger Politburo colleague, his qualities and 
hispohtical experience. 

“Comrades,” Mr. Gromyko said, “this man 
has a nice smile, but he's got iron teeth.” 

It was the vote of confidence that nobody in 
the room could match, coming from a man who 
sat at Stalin’s elbow in Yalta and Potsdam, who 
was a key adviser to all subsequent Kremlin 
chiefs and who has come to symbolize, at least 
in the party’s eyes, the last viable link of conti- 
nuity for more than 40 years. 

After Mr. Gromyko ended his speech, anoth- 
er Politburo member, Dinmukhammed A. Kun- 
ayev, asked for the floor. Mr. Kunayev, an 
associate of Leonid L Brezhnev, has come to be 
regarded by younger Soviet generations as 
merely another intransigent member of the old 
guard. He was deputy prime minister of the 
republic of Kazakhstan when Mr. Gorbachev 
was 11 years old. 

“You should not think I am saying this be- 
cause I'm speaking second.” Mr. Kunayev said, 
according to an authoritative account, “but I 
want to teD you that the 800,000 Communists of 
Kazakhstan want this man.” 

Generational change, alter two quick Krem- 


lin transitions and the paralysis cf Brezhnev’s 
last year in power, was formalized when Mr. 
Gorbachev, 54, was elected general secretary of 
the Soviet Communist Party. 

. The actual selection of Mr. Gorbachev for the 
post was made on die night of March 10, three 
horns after the death of Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko. Again Mr. Gromyko, speaking first at a 

'Comrades,’ Gromyko said, 
’this man has a nice smile, 
but he’s got iron teeth. 9 ' 

meeting of the leaders, immediately proposed 
Mr. Gorbachev to be chairman of the funeral 
commission. The proposal was endorsed. 

Only Moscow-based members of the Politbu- 
ro, alternate members and secretaries of the 
Central Committee were present at that meet- 
ing. 

Bat the transfer of power was so smooth and 
quick as to indicate that Mr. Gorbachevas bar 
apparent had long ago been agreed upon to 
move into the top slot once Mr. Chernenko left 
the political stage. 

Indeed, all three power transitions during the 
past two and a half years seemed to have been 
based cm relatively coherent and conastent pro- 
cesses in contrast with the Kremlin intrigues 
and power struggles that marked past leadership 
changes. 


U.S. Gap 
In Trade 
Sets Mark 

. i 

’> Current Account 
Signals Nation 
Is a Net Debtor 

By Martin Crursinger 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The deficit 
of the broadest measure of U.S. 
foreign trade widened to a record 
$101.6 billion lost year, more ihan 
double the deficit in 1 983. the gov- 
ernment reported Monday. 

The deficit has been so severe 
that it was almost certain that early 
this year the United States became 
a net debtor Tor the first time in 71 
years, government analysts said. 

The united States was last a net 
debtor in 1914. when Americans 
owed $3.7 billion more to foreign- 
os than was owed to them. 

The figures released Mondav by 
the Commerce Department' re- 
vealed that .Americans' net invest- 
ments overseas had dwindled to 
$32 bflhon by the end of the year, 
down from $104 billion when 1984 
started. Analysts said that this 

0 cushion has almost certainly been 

gested that the United States was wiped out by now. although confir- 
badring away from the agreement matron will not come for three 
reached in January to discuss both months. 

The information on net debt is 
contained in the current account, 
which is the broadest measure of 
U.S. foreign trade. The current ac- 
count measures not only trade in 
merchandise but trade m services 
and investment flows between tbe 
United Slates and other countries. 

Although the country has run a 
trade deficit every year' since 1975, 
income from Americans’ foreign 
investments flowing back into the 
country has. in most years, been 
enough to offset the merchandise 
deficit. 

As recently as 1981. tbe United 
Semes had a surplus of S63 billion 
in its current account. However, 
the supluses have since turned into 
huge deficits. The previous record 
deficit was S41.6 billion in 1983. 

The SI 01.6-billion record set in 
1984 came although the trade pic- 
ture brightened somewhat in the 
final three months of the year. 

The current account deficit for 
the fourth quarter last year was 
$23-7 billion, a shrinking from tbe 
S33.6-billion deficit during the 
July-September period. 

Analysts said the U.S. economic 
slowdown in the early fall had tem- 
porarily dampened Americans’ ap- 
petite for imports. However, they 
pointed to the jump in the trade 
deficit in January as a sign that 
imports were again surging. 

The countrys poor trading per- 
formance has beat Named, among 
other things, on the high value of 
the dollar. A strong dollar makes 
UJS- exports more expensive and 
thus harder to sell overseas while 
attracting a flood of cheaper im- 
ports to the United Stales. 

The current account report said 
that imports rose $66 5 billion in 
1984 to a total of $327.8 billion 
while exports rose by only 520.1 
billion, to $2203 billion. A surplus 
of $17 billion in services and a 
deficit of almost $12 billion in for- 
eign-aid payments accounted for 
the rest of the current account fig- 
ures. 

There was disagreement about 
how much the United States would 
be hurt from becoming a net debtor 
country. Those who argued that the 
impact was minimal pointed out 
that the United States was a net 
debtor from the founding of the 


In the interview, said to have 
been recorded in Geneva on Fri- 
day, Mr. Karpov said that state- 
ments by 'Washington officials sug- 


tbe preventing of an arms race in 
space and deep reductions in nucle- 
ar arms. 

On an ABC program Sunday, 
Mr. Shultz was asked whether Mr. 
Karpov had been menacing at the 
negotiating table. “Oh, I don’t 
know about that,” he said. 

But then Mr. Shnltz volunteered 
that Mr. Karpov “did give a public 
interview yesterday.” 

“If that land of performance is to 
Soviets 


approach 


opportunities,” he said, “then that 
doesn’t bode very wdl for the nego- 
tiations. Tbe negotiations should 
take place as a private diplomatic 
effort in which the rules of confi- 
dentiality they set up are ob- 
served.” • 


In the last months of Brezhnev’s life, when 
distinct factions were dearly jockeying for posi- 
tions. it was said that the rating elite had crane 
to believe that h was mandatary to devise a 
mechanism for orderly succession. 

By aB in dicati ons, tbe current system was 
established during the course of struggle be- 
tween Mr. Chernenko and Yuri V. Andropov in 
the fall of 1982. Mr. Chernenko, a Brezhnev 
prot£g£, was defeated in the struggle, but he was 
given the post of party secretary in charge of 
ideology, the second position in the party hier- 
archy. 

Andropov hdd the second spot at the time of 
Brezhnev’s death and was elected to snoceed 
him. When Andropov died in February 1984, 
Mr. Chernenko moved from the second spot to 
become leader while Mr. Gorbachev, an Andro- 
pov prot£g&, was given the second spot. When 
Mr. Che rn e nko died. Mi. Gorbachev moved to 
the top spot, but it is not dear yet who will be 
party secretary in charge of ideology. 

There was speculation here that the job would 
go to Viktor V. Grishin, 70, the party boss of 
Moscow and a member of the old guard. 

AD that can be said about the latest transfer 
of power is that the system has demonstrated 
more maturity, resilience and flexibility than 
many thought it had. 

It is too early to ocpect any specific indication 
of the kind of policies Mr. Goroachev intends to 
pursue and the sort of coalition he intends to 
build. But his interests seem to focus primarily 
on domestic issues, and be clearly signaled that 
(Continued on Page 2, Cd. 7) 


country through the 19th century. 
Now that U.S. overseas earnings 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 8) 


Advocates for the Aging Mount Campaign Against Mandatory Retirement 


By Irvin Molocsky 

Vflv York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — In Con- 
gress, in the coarts and before fed- 
eral agencies, advocates for the el- 
derly are mounting a cam p ai gn 
against laws that permit < 




. .. The mutiny, he said, “wfll lead to 
* dimmarion of Lebanon.” It 

(Contained oa Page 2, CoL 5) 


of 65 for executives and 70 fra 
ocher workers. 

The law forbids the federal gov- 
ernment to establish a mandatory 
retirement age fra its own employ- 
ees. 

Mark A. de Bernardo, manager 
of labor law fra the U.S. Chamber 
of Commerce, said that removal of 






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INSIDE 

.. 8 France’s elections confirmed 
,-the resurgence of tbe conserva- 
. • -tive opposition. Page 2. 

■The House Budget Commit- 
>' tee leader said a Senate panel 
'.-budget measure is a “rebuke” to 
President Reagan. Page 4 . 

business/finance 

Tbe governor of CHBoexiend- 
c ’’ ed a “bank holiday” for 71 sav- 
^ tings and loan associations in- 
waived in a crisis. PaeelL 

^^ARTS/lfflSURE 

’* ^sDrasey reports that in 
i punk is pass£ and gen- 
reigns, page 9. 


to set mandatory retirement ages. 

“It is very important as a matter .... 

of principled said David M. an employcr’s nght lo reqmre re- 
Certner, a lobbyist for the Amen- tmement actually would hurt older 
can Association of Retired Persons, workers because “it would subject 
which opposes mandatory retire- them to muc h mo re rigorous per- 
inea t ages. “Otherwise, you are say- fonnance reviews.” 
mg that anyone over 70 is not com- “Instead of a set and dignified 

peient to work. The real question retireme nt age, you would haveem- 
should be whether the person can ployers, in effect, forced to fire dd- 
do tbe job.” er workers,” Mr. de Bernardo said. 

Rmresentative Qande D. Pep- “They would have to show that age 
per. Democrat of Florida, who is 84 has taken its effect and fire them 
years old, has reintroduced Jus laS far failure to perform their duties. 


retirement. 

Noting that Mr. Pe p per, a U.S. 
senator from 1937 to 1951, did not 
enter the House of representatives 
until be was 62, his press aide. Ro- 
chelle Jones; says, “He feels that if 

he had been forced to retire in three 

years at 65, or later at 70, he 
wouldn't have accomplished most 
of his major achievanats." 

Business groups, including the 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce and 
the National Association of Manu- 
facturers. and many colleges and 
universities favor keeping the cur- 
rent law. which permits no n fede ra l 
insti tutions and companies to es- 
tablish a mandatory retirement age 


It is difficult to subject longtime 
workers to that treatment-” 

Opponents of mandatory retire- 
ment contend that older workers 
frequently are more efficient and 
could contribute much to a compa- 
ny’s profitability. 

David Gamse, head of the older 
worker department at the Ameri- 
can Association of Retired Persons, 
said for example that McDonald’s 
Corp., a major employer of teen- 
age workers, had had good results 
from hiring tbe dderty. 

“McDonald’s is now recruiting 
older people because they are a 
tremendous role model,” Mr. 



Representative Claude 
Sheldon, who is also 


IhNMlMri 

center left, talks about the issue of age with 
at a gathering of elderly people 


m 


Gamse ^aid. “Productivity tends to 
increase when they are hired.” 

The Same’s companion bill to 


Cranston, Democrat of California, logical age,” said Susanna Marti- 
who is 70. - nez, an aide to Senator Cranston. 

“He views itas a dvfl rights is- Senate H. John Heinz 3d, Re- 
Mr. Pepper's measure has been in- sue, that people should be judged publican of Pennsylvania, has in- 
troduced fra several years by Alan on- their ability, not their chrono- traduced a similar bill abolishing 


mandatory retirement for most 
workers. But tbe Heinz bill would 
include a provision that would ex- 
tend for 15 years the provision al- 
lowing colleges and universities to 
require retirement of professors at 
70. 

Mr. Pepper’s aide. Miss Jones, 
said the congressman did not ac- 
cept the colleges’ argument that 
they had to have the ngh t to retire 
older professors. 

“If you have an exciting, compe- 
tent professor who is 71, why 
should his job be turned over to 
someone who is 35 just because of 
his age?” she said. - 

Mr. Gamse said that the Ameri- 
can Association of Retired Persons 
was mounting a broad campaiga to 
remove mandatory retirement. 

Age discrimination has already 
become the largest category of 
cases handled by the Equal Em- 
ployment Opportunity Commis- 
sion, surpassing race and sex dis- 
c rimman cn charges. There woe 
9,500 age discrimination charges 
filed in 1981; the number jumped 
to 18,000 in 1983. 

The prospects in Congress are 
uncertain, but there have been 
court and agency decisions favor- 
able to the abolition of mandatory 
retirement. 

Union Carbide Corp.’s chief la- 
bor lawyer. John Whittlesey, suc- 
cessfully challe nged his own forced 
retirement in federal disttic court. 


Union Carbide forced him to retire 
at 65 under the exemption that per- 
mits such mandatory action at that 
age for policy-making employees, 
but Mr. Whittlesey argued success- 
fully that he was not a policy-mak- 
er. 

Another victory came last week 
when the Equal Employment Op- 
portunity Commission tilled tenta- 
tively that employers were required 
to continue to provide pension 
benefits for employees who turn 65. 

Tbe UJS. Supreme Court has 
agreed to hear two major cases on 
mandatory retirement- One is a 
challenge to Western Airlines’ 
practice of applying to flight engi- 
neers die retirement age of 60 the 
Federal Aviation Administration 
requires for pilots. The other is a 
challenge to Baltimore’s require- 
ment that firefighters retire at 55. 

In a 1983 derision, the Supreme 
Court ruled that the federal law 
barring mandatory retirement be- 
fore 70 applied to states as weQ, 
and it has been applied to cities 
also. 

Mandatoiy retirement does not 
apply to Mr. Pepper. Senator Cran- 
ston or President Ronald Reagan, 
who at 74 is the oldest person ever 
to have served as president. 

Those opposed to mandatory re- 
tirement take heart in both' the 
president’s example and his sup- 
port for change in mandatory re- 
tirement rules. 



S*E|33VS 121 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, -MARCH 19, 1985 


Vote Confirms Resurgence of French Right 


WORLD BRIEFS 


fa Fitchett 
Herald Tribune 


PARIS — The resurgence of France’s opposi- 
tion conservative parties was confirmed Mon- 
day in the final results of local elections. 

Ten districts voted out Socialist leaders, put- 
ting conservatives in charge of local affairs in 69 
of France's 95 administrative departments. The 
Socialists failed to gain any new districts. 

The vote was the. Iasi national political test 
before parliamentary electrons next year. 

Socialist losses included Isfcre, the department 
that includes Grenoble, the stronghold of Louis 
Mermaz, who is the Socialist speaker, of the 
National Assembly and a dose associate of 
President Francois Mitterrand. Mr. Mennaz 
was not up for re-election but the conservative 
victory was a blow to his prestige. 

There were several encouraging signs for the 
government. Communist voters generally sup- 
ported Socialist candidates despite the Commu- 
nist Party’s criticism of government policies. A 
strong Socialist turnout also salvaged several 
key seats. 

Socialist politicians said that the turnout 
showed that leftist voters were starting to rally 
around the government to prevent the conserva- 
tives from returning to national power. Many 
Socialist supporters have abstained in recent 
elections because they objected to the govern- 
ment's austerity policies. 

Even with strong Socialist participation, how- 
ever, conservative parties said that they were 
well positioned for next year’s parliamentary 
dections. 

In the first round of local voting on March 10, 
rightist parties won a majority of the popular 


vote, which .they said strongly foreshadowed a 
parliamentary majority. 

Percentages were less significant in Sunday’s 
run-off elections because the voting excluded 
many rightist strongholds in which conserva- 
tives were elected outright in the first round. 

Politically, the big winner appeared to be 


A lay question in Sunday’s vote was whether 

commandite support of National From and 
Communist voters whose candidates had been 
eHminatfd in the first round. 


Italy Presses EC on Spain’s Entry 

Vint TMtT 0 u4iUh mmMflv tkn — ' 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Jacques Chirac, the mayor of Paris and the 
leader of die neo-Gaullist Rally for the Repub- 
lic. Mr. Chirac is hoping that a victory in next 
year’s parliamentary elections will be a step- 
ping-stone to the presidency in 1988. 

^li’s a success, nrt a triumph,” said Fran§ois 
Ltotard, a prominent politician of the Union for 
French Democracy. 

Exit polls, conducted during the first-round 


Supporters of the National Front, the ultra- 
nationalist party led by Jean-Marie Le Pen 
generally voted for mainsteam conservatives. 
But conservatives appeared to have abstained in 
large numbers in constituencies where National 
Front candidates faced Socialist rivals. 

Communist voters backed Socialist candi- 
dates but Socialists were less supportive of 

rVimTWiifiiqg 


vote but onlypublishcd Monday, showed that 
1 1 percent of French voters said that they might 


1 1 percent of French voters said that they might 
switch their votes in the parliamentary dections 

But many cited unemployment as the only' 
issue that n^ght incite than to chang e, and even 
the Socialist leadership has stopped predicting a 
dramatic breakthrough on that issue. 

Sunday’s elections concluded the selecti o n Of 
almost 2,000 local councilors for six-year terms. 
Every three years, half of the total 4,000 local 
councilors are elected to manage district affairs. 

The main winners were the Union for French 
Democracy with 525 seals, the neo-Ganllists 
with 400 mid the National Front with one, its 
first, in Marseille. Independent rightists won 
366. The Socialists won 424 seats and the Com- 
munists 149. The remainder was divided among 
smaller parties. 


Commentators saw several factors that might 
encourage the Socialists to change the electoral 
system to a partly proportional one before the 
parliamentary dam a ns. Faced with & probable 
conservative majority, Socialists coda exploit 
the National Front’s command of nearly IQ 
percent of the vote and the pro-Sorialist senti- 
ment of some rank-and-file Communists. 

A shift toward proportional representation 
would assure that the National From enters 
Parliament, thus threatening the rngin d raam 
conservatives. 


The Co mmunis ts would also gain but the 
Socialists could expect to pick up some Commu- 
nist votes despite the <4iany. 

With no dear nugority emerging, there would 
be a temptation for small centrist parties, now 
under , the umbrella of the Union for French 
Democracy led by framer President Yalfery Gis- 
card (FEstaing, to join a center-left coalition, 
rather than cooperate in a conservative nugority 
that included the National Front. 



BRUSSELS (Renters) — Italy, which currently holds the presdeoc 
the European Community, on Monday submined fresh proposals' 
Spain's entry into the the community in an attempt to resolve 
deadlock in membership negotiations with Spain and Portugal. 

The proposals indude wider access for Spam’s fishing fleet to conn 
nity waters and measures to ease the effects of proposed restrictions <* 
farm exports to other members. Diplomats predicted, however, that 
proposals were unlikely to be acceptable to some nations, such as Uri* 


P roposals were unnKciy to oc acccpuioic aqng muona. auen as 

ranee and Denmark, despite pressure to make progress in the neac 

,;mw thic nwt 


lions this week. . . , , 

Community foreign ministers opened four days of discussions Son 
in an effort to establish terms that would allow Iberian accession by 
January 1986 target date. 


U.S. Reports Major Cocaine Arrests 


SAN DIEGO <AP) — Federal authorities said Monday they 
arrested central figures in a smuggling operation believed to be respo 
ble for 20 percent to 25 percent of the cocaine entering the United St 


CV U^Aitoraey Peter Nunez, iaid 59 people are in custody and i 
others were bang sought in the investigation, which involved a smugg 
operation based in Peru and Colombia. 

“These people were the highest echelon of the cocaine market in Pe 
Mr. Nunez said. 


4 Injured in Bombings in Banglade 


Jean-Marie Le Pen preparing for a television appearance. 


Labor Party May Lose Union Funds 


New Law Won by Thatcher Seeks to Restrict Political Aid 


By R.W. Apple Jr 

New York Tuna Service 


LONDON — The British Labor 
Party, already in the doldrums af- 
ter six years of Conservative Party 


rule, could lose much of its finan- 
cial base as a result of a new law, 
won by Prime Minis ter Margaret 
Thatcher, that took effect this 
mouth. 


HOTEL DU RHONE GENEVA 


A prestigious dwelling 
on the River Rhone 
Next to business and 
shopping center. 


Quai Turrettini 
1201 Geneva 
Phone (022) 31 9831 
Tx. 22213 hrho 

A member of HRI 
The Leading Hotels 
of the World. 


In the process, the whole struc- 
ture of the party, and possibly its 
ideological coloration as well, 
could undergo profound changes. 

“Everybody in the party takes all 
of this very seriously, although 
there haven’t been many public 
statements yet,” said a spokesman 
at Labor headquarters. “We face 
die possibility of radical upheaval 
It’s terribly worrying." 


The Labor Party was created by 
the unions, and the unions have 
always been its principal contribu- 
tors. Last year they provided more 
than S6 milli on, which amounted to 
80 percent of the party's total in- 
come. That source of money now 
may be constricted —if not cut off 



UNIVERSITY 


— in 1986, just as the party is 
starting in earnest to prepare fora 


DEGREE 


starting in earnest to prepare for 
general election in 1987 or 1988. 


FarUta. AciMel WartrCaMilara 
ma» quaHy to* 


BACHELORS MASTERS ORpOCtORATE 
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tor a hpe evaluation 

PACIFIC WESTERN UMVERSTTY 

IfiZXJ V«*«J Hd Ppt23J. Erera CA17U34 USA 


Visiting # 
New York City? 


Gramercy 
Park Hotel 


Under the present system, a 
specified amount is deducted from 
the pay of each union member for a 
political fund unless he “contracts 
out," that is, unless he publicly asks 
that his name be excluded from the 
list of contributors. In practice, the 
political funds have been used ex- 
clusively to back Labor, although 
in theory each union can decide 
which party it wants to support 


Distinguished 500 room 
hotel with excellent 
Restaurant, Cocktail Lounge, 
Room Service and Piano Bar. 
Overlooking Gramercy Park 
with newly decorated, 
comfortable rooms. 
Singles $80-90 
Doubles $85-95 
Suites $110-150 
Group rates and attractive 
monthly races available. 
Call Gen. Mgr. Tom O’Brien 
(212)475-4320 
Telex 668-755 
Cable GRAMPARK 
21st St. and Lexington Ave. 
New York. NY. USA 10010 


Critics of the system, including 
Mis. Thatcher, argue that it makes 
it too easy for union leaders to 
bring pressure on their members. 

John Prescott, the opposition 
spokesman on employment, said in 
Yorkshire recently thk the govern- 
ment's goal was to “turn our unions 
into business-type. American-style 
unions” deprived of “a political 


1 The new law, enacted last year, 
requires any union that wishes to 
continue its political fund to hold a 
secret ballot of its members be- 
tween March 1 of this year and 
March 31 of next year. If a majority 
approves, the fund may continue; 
if a majority disapproves or if no 
ballot is taken, the fund must be 
discontinued. 


Unions without political money 
could no longer play a partisan 
role, so they could not be affiliated 


In Hong Kong 

we are in the Central Business District. 
And yet just minutes from Kowloon. 
You should be, too. 


HOTEL FURAM A 
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InterContinental sales office. 




Belgian Vote 
On Missiles 


Troops, Christian Militias 
Clash in Southern Lebanon 


DHAKA. Bangladesh (Reuters) — At least four persons have 1 
injured by bomb attacks m Bangladesh as the country prepares f 
referendum an the rule and policies of President Mohammed Hos 
Ershad, the police said Monday. 

No one has claimed responsibility for the explosions, but police sod 
said it could be the work of dissidents who are still trying to stop the 
ra Thursday. 

It was called by Lieutenant General Ershad after be cancdc 
parliamentary election and tightened martial law restrictions ove 
opposition refusal to take pan in the voting. He has said that a coafid 
vote would give him a mandate to pursue his policies and continue 
military ruler until parliamentary dections are held in preparation I 
civilian govemmenL 


with the Labor Party, as most of 
them now are. They would lose 


Set for Today 


their votes at the parly's annual 
policy-making conferences, where 
the unions now have an over- 
whelming majority. Nor would 
they be represented in the electoral 
college that chooses the party lead- 
er and his deputy, where the unions 
now have 40 percent of the votes. 


Any reduction in the voting 
strength of the unions would al- 
most certainly mean an increase in 
the power of the local constituency 
parties, which tend to be the most 
left-wing dement of the parly. 

Accenting to a poll by Market 
and Opinion Research Internation- 
al the ontlook for Labor is gloomy. 
The peril was conducted from Feb. 
14 to Feb. 16 among 1,526 union 
members throughout Britain. 


Asked whether they would vote 
for a political fund if the ballot 
were held tomorrow, only the Na- 
tional Union of Mineworkers’ 
members indicated overwhelming 
support, perhaps because many 
were cm strike when the sundry was 
conducted. A narrow majority of 
engineering workers, 48 percent to 
41 percent, also backed the fund. 


But members of five other trig 
unions expressed opposition to po- 
litical contributions. Among those 
were three large unions that, along 
with the miners and the engineer- 
ing workers, have been supplying 
most of Labor’s money — the 
Transport and General Workers’ 
Union, the National Union of Gen- 
eral and Municipal Workers and 
the National Union of Public Em- 
ployees. 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The lower house 
of the Belgian Parliament opened a 
debate Monday in advance of a 
confidence vote Tuesday on the in- 
stallation of U5. cruise missQes in 
Beighnn. 

Prime Minis ter Wilfried Mar- 
tens’ Christian Social Party, one of 
four parties in the governing coali- 
tion, is divided on the issue. Party 
sources said that up to five mem- 
bers might abstain from a vote en- 
dorsing the missile deployment, 
which began Friday. 

Most government officials said 
that the coalition, with a six-seat 
majority, should survive the parlia- 
mentary test with the support of 
small rightist groups that favor the 
missiles. 

Bankers said that the stability of 
the Belgian franc on foreign ex- 
change maiket; , with interest rates 
down slightly from Friday, showed 
banks were confident that Mr. 
Martens' government would sur- 
vive. 

Opponents bf the missile deploy- 
ment pointed to the trig turnout at 
an anti-nuclear rally in Brussels on 
Sunday to press for a parliamenta- 
ry vote against the govemmenL v 

“There is no majority in Belgium 
for missile deployment, so there 
should be no parliamentary major- 
ity for it either,” said an official of 
the opposition Flemish Socialist 
Party. 

The parliamentary debate Mon- 
day focused on the government's 


(Continued from Page 1) 

was bis first public denunciation of 
the movement. 

Mr. Karami said the rebels’ call 
for the election of a Christian par- 
liament to legislate is their areas 
“returns us to the hard years” of 
the nearly decade-old dvil war. 

Treading the mutiny in Mr. Ge- 
mayeTs party was a pro-Israeli 
Christian militia co mman der, Mr. 


2 £j' 'ft* 1 ““ Morocco to Modernize Armed Fore 


that it should not open until the 
security situation stabilizes." 

A caller claiming to represent the 
shadowy Islamic Jihad movement 
told a Western news agency Sun- 
day that the group seized a British 
businessman, David Levick, a Brit- 
ish 'scientist, Geoffrey Nash, and 
Terry A. Anderson, an American 
correspondent who is the bureau 
chief for The Associated Press in 
Beirut. (AP, UPI) 


LATOUN, Morocco (Reuters) — King Hassan H has announc 
plan to spend Si bfllion over the next five years to equip Moroccan fc 
for a long struggle against Algerian-backed Polisano From guerriU 


The king , making his first visit to this former Spanish colony when 
gnwr iiias have been fighting for independence, said Sunday that the 


The rebels seized control of most 
of the Christian heartland north of 
Beirut last Tuesday and declared 
the Lebanese Forces militia, the 
nation's largest Christian pa ramfli - 
taiy organization, independent 
from the Phalange Party. 

State-run Beirut Radio said Is- 
raeli planes flew reconnaissance 
runs Sunday over the northern 
fringes of Lebanon's Christian 
heartland, where Syria moved 
troops and armor to support Mr. 
Gemayel against the rebels. 

But David Kimche, director gen- 
eral of the Israeli Foreign Ministry, 
said Israel was monitoring the Syri- 
an moves, but so far has “no need 
to acL” 


could drag on for years. 

“We must modernize our army and prepare ourselves.'' he said. ' 
must have a billion dollars, neither more or less, spread over five ye 
The armed forces now use equipment that is more than 10 years ok 
said, adding: “We must now think of ways of financing and moderni 
our army.” 


2 Arab Chiefs Africa Iimite Military Spendii 

■ n W W W t/ M. 


Visit Baghdad 


Karim Pakradouni, one of the 
Lebanese rebellion's leaders said 
Sunday at a news conference, “1 
emphasize on behalf of the rebel- 
lion that our movement has no lies 
with IsraeL” 

“I have made a similar assurance 
to Syria’s vice president, Mr. Abdel 
Halim Khaddam,” he said 
He added: “There will be no Syr- 
ian invasion” of rebel-held areas. 


economic austerity policies; the 
missiles are listed for discussion 


Although the poll suggests that 
Mrs. Thatcher has lost some of the 
union following that die won in 
1979 and increased in 1983, Labor 
had only a «gnall majority among 
those interviewed, winning the 
backing of 54 percent to 45 percent 
for the Tories and the Liberal-So- 
cial Democratic alliance combined. 
In June 1983, Labor won the bark- 
ing of 39 percent of unionists, ac- 
cording to exit surveys at polling 
places. 


missiles are listed for discussion 
Tuesday. 

Parliamentary leaders of the ma- 
jor government and opposition 
parties most decide whether there 
will be one confidence vote or sepa- 
rate votes on the missiles and eco- 
nomic issues. 

Political sources said that the lib- 
erals in the coalition want a single 
vote, which would make it harder 
for Christian Social Party dissi- 
dents not to support the govern- 
ment 


Commanders of the Christian re- 
bels said they do not intend to 
overthrow Mr. Gemayel and want 
to negotiate with Walid Jumblat, 
the Druze warlord, and Nabih Bet- 


ti, his Shiite Moslem ally, for a 
charter for Moslem-Cnristian 


charter for Moslem-Christian 
“peaceful coexistence.” 

The British Embassy building in 
West Beirut, meanwhile, clued 
Monday for security reasons. 


We have temporarily dosed the 
bassy bunding in West Beirut,” 


embassy budding in West Beirut," 
said Ambassador David Miers of 
Britain. “I dedded this morning 


(Conti Dued from Page I) 
Tabriz, Isfahan, Kftrmandiflh and 
Arak. IRNA said that Iraqi aircraft 
bombed the northwest oil refinery 
town of Tabriz as its people were 
bedding a funeral for victims of 
previous attacks. 

Iran said it downed four Iraqi 
planes on Monday, Iraq said all its 
planes returned safely. 

Several international airlines, in- 
cluding Alitalia, British Airways, 
Luf thansa and Swissair, said they 
have suspended flights to Baghdad 
or Tehran or both after an Iraqi 
warning Sunday that Iranian air 
space would be a “prohibited zone” 
effective Tuesday. 

Both sides, meanwhile, claimed 
success in the ground f ighting . 

In Tehran, a military communi- 
que said t h"t Iran had killed or 
wounded 12,000 Iraqi troops and 
taken 3,000 prisoners since it 
l aunched its latest offensive. 

It said that Iranian forces had 
dealt heavy blows to the Iraqi 
Army both east and west of the 
Tigris river. 

Id Baghdad, a military an- 
nouncement said that Iraqi forces 
had won “the greatest battle in the 
history of the Iraq- Iran war.” 

Defense Minister Adnan Khair- 
allah, commander of Iraq's marsh- 
land counteroffensive, told Presi- 
dent Hussein in a telegram that the 
battlefield was littered with thou- 
sands of Iranian corpses “left as 
carrion for the vultures.” 


JOHANNESBURG (NYT) — South Africa announced a 30.7-bC 
rand (S15-b£Dion) budget for the 1985-86 fiscal year on Monday, wit 
increase in mflitaiy spending of only 8 percent, compared with a 
percent rise in military outlays last year. 

The finance minister, Barend du Plcssis, said that the budget, whfc 
disclosed in Cape Town, was the most important in years. The bu 
sought increased sales and company tax to raise revenue, but fores: 
deficit of more than 4 billion rand. 


The education budget, regarded as critical in efforts to placated 
fecled blacks, was increased by 19 percent over the previous budget 
du Plessis said that educational spending next year would total 
equivalent of 5.12 billion rand, a figure that covers education for all n 
groups. 


For the Record 


A Yugoslav has been charged with “criminal acts of hostile act 
terrorism and spreading hostile propaganda” by a court in the ooit 
town of Osijek, the newspaper Politika Ekspres reported Monday 
was identified as Ivo Tubanovic, 36. 


Vietnam wffl turn over die remains Wednesday of five 
are Americans listed as missing in action, the U.S. Pacific 
Monday in Honolulu. 


Wfl&ain J. Sctaroeder on Sunday surpassed the survival time of Ba 
dark, who lived 112 days with an artificial heart in 1983. fl 
President Ronald Reagan announced Monday that he would nons 
Faith Ryan Whittlesey as ambassador to Switzerland. If confirms 
would be the second time she has served in the post. ( 


In Urging Gorbachev Choi© 
Gromyko Eased Big Change 


In the newpoH 55 percent of the 
respondents said they disapproved 
of union participation in party 
politics; 31 percent supported the 
concept The zest said they did not 
know. 


U.S. Court Overturns limit on Political Funds 


(Continued bom Page 1) 


the presentation to the electorate of 
varying points erf view." 

“Even were we to determine that 
the large pooling of financial re- 
sources by NCPAC and FCM did 
pose a potential for corruption," 
Mr. Rehnquist wrote, the spending 
limit “is a fatally overbroad re- 
sponse to that evfl." 

He said, “It is not Hunted to 
multimiDicm-dollar war dusts; its 
terms apply equally to informal 
discussion groups that solicit 


neighborhood contributions to 
publicize their views about a partic- 



pubudze their views about a partic- 
ular pr esidential candidate.” 

Mr. Rehnquist was joined in 
finding the spending limit law un- 
constitutional by Chief Justice 
Warren E. Burger and Justices 
Harry A. Blackman. Lewis F. Pow- 
ell. Sandra Day O’Connor, William 
J. Brennan ana John Paul Stevens. 

Justices Byron R. White and 
Thurgood Marshall dissented. 

In his dissenting opinion, Mr. 
Marshall said, “I have come to be- 
lieve that the limitations on inde- 
pendent expenditures ... are justi- 
fied by the congressional interests 
in promoting the reality and ap- 
pearance of equal access to the po- 
litical arena and in eliminating po- 
litical corruption and the 
appearance of such corruption." 

In 1980, conservative political 


action committees spent more than 
S10 million, mostly for advertising, 
in support of Ronald Reagan. To- 
tal political committee spending in 
support of President Jimmy Car- 
ter’s re-election bid was less than 
S30,000. 

The SI, 000 spending limit was 
not enforced during the 1980 elec- 
tion because the district court bad 
ruled it was unconstitutional The 
spending limit also was left dor- 
mant during the 1984 election after 
the election commission Hm-Uned 
to ask the Supreme.Court for expe- 
dited consideration of the case. 


■ Justice Powell Stfll Absent 


U.S. Veterans Lose Charter 

The Associated Press 

SANTA CRUZ, California — 
The leader of the Veterans of For- 
eign Wars revoked on Monday the 
charter of a post here, comprised 
mostly of Vietnam veterans, that 
opposed the national organiza- 
tion’s call for strong U.S. militaiy 
involvement in Central America. 


Justice Powell who has not at- 
tended court sessions since surgery 
Jan. 4 for a cancerous prostate 
gland, was not on the bench Mon- 
day as the justices returned from a 
two-week recess. The Associated 
Press reported. 

A court spokeswoman said she 
did not know when Mr. Powdl 77, 
would return to work at the court 

The justice was admitted to the 
the National Naval Medical Center 
in suburban Washington on Thurs- 
day for what the spokeswoman 
called "a re-evaluation of his post- 
operative therapy." He was re- 
leased from the hospital Sunday. 


THE 

DON CARLOS 


MARBELLA’S FINEST BEACH AND GARDENS 


Re-decoration of luxury 
suites and rooms just completed 


(Continued from Page 1) 
he intended to continue Andro- 
pov's program for economic 

phangps 

Andropov planned to introduce 
initiatives that would introduce a 
measure of decentralization into 
die Soviet economy, such as offer- 
ing incentives to managers for im- 
proved production. 

At a rally in December, Mr. Gor- 
bachev made a speech that seemed 
to echo Andropov's program, 
which is likely to become his own 
now: 

“We will have to cany out a 
profound transformation in the 
economy and the entire system of 
soda] relations. The process of the 
intensification of the economy 
must be given truly nationwide 
character, the same political reso- 
nance that the country’s industrial- 
ization once bad.” 

The only specific reference that 
Mr. Gorbachev made in his accep- 
tance speech involved the Novem- 
ber 1982 Central Committee ple- 
num. It was at this plenum that 
Andropov was elected Soviet lead- 
er and that he made clear that he 
wanted to revitalize Soviet eco- 
nomic and social life. 

Analysts in Moscow say that Mr. 
Gorbachev has inherited Andro- 
pov’s political base, which com- 
prised the miliiaiy establishment, 
the KGB —the Soviet secret police 
and intelligence agency that An- 
dropov beaded for 15 years —and 
the younger and better-educated 
party cadres. 

Equally if not more important, 
however, is the fact that Mr. Gor- 
bachev has assumed power at a 
fortuitous time. The country has 
been dispirited by the frequent 
changes in the Kremlin ana the 
specter of old men ailing and un- 
able to assert themselves. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s youth, the ab- 
sence of personal links to the ex- 
cesses of the Stalinist period, his 
oratorical ability and personal style 
all have combined to give him a 
degree of instant public acceptance 
that few Soviet leaders ever have 


Gorbachev with the opparuini 
bring fresh blood into the PoBti 
and the Central Committee. 

On the other hand, be will i 
to contend with the old gt 
which still holds several of thei 
important positions in the p 
ana government, and be will 1 
to deal with the vast party bur 
cracy and its inefficiency. 

It is the party bureaucracy 
had made the system, partied 
the economic system, reastas 
changes in the pasL 


Trade Gap 
OfU.S.Grov 


DON CARLOS HOTEL 


enjoyed. 

“He has a chance,” a Soviet said, 
“to start with a clean slate:” 

A series of vacancies at the top 


The GoJondrmas Estate • Marbelb • Spain 
Telephone: 83 II 40/83 19 40 Telex: 77015/77481 


and the scheduled party congress 
later this year will provide Mr. 


(Coutinaed from Page 1] 

no longer cover what it paid 
,from abroad, the country musl 
on the willingness of forrigne 
hold dollars to finance the I 
deficits. 

This has not been & probler 
fact, the dollar has soared in ' 
by 40 percent tq 70 percent : 
1980, depending on which n 
currencies it is measured ag* 
But many economists are 
ceraed about what will ha] 
when tbe dollar starts lo 
strength. 

G Fred Bergsten, director o 
Institute for International 
nomics, a private research gr 
said the huge foreign debt sub 
the Untied States to global ui 

tain ties. 

“There is a real question ir 
mind whether you can be 
world’s greatest power if you i 
massive debtor country with 
rest of the world holding yo 
bock,” he said. 

Other economists say the da 
lies not so much in the fact tha 
United States has become a 
debtor, but in the underlying ! 
problem caused by the inabflii 
UK industries to compete inte 
rionally. 

“The issue isn’t whether we 
the money to foreigners or to 
selves," said Michael Evans, 1 
of a Washington forecasting I 
“The problem is we are destro 
the industrial fabric of our : 
ety” 


I* 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


Page 3 


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Youneed 
an IBM PC 

C osts going up, sales down, margins 
disappearing in the middle? 

You need to spot a trend like that early 
enough. And then do something about it. 

You may have all the relevant 
information somewhere on the premises, 
locked away in a filing cabinet. 


If it were on an IBM PC, you could 
find it quickly, interpret it intelligently, 
even amplify it by calling outside data 


sources. 


And then restructure your troops, or 
improve cash flow, or pitch for new 
business, or streamline administration, 
or control stock turnover, or chase 
incomings, or take care of whatever soft 
spot needs propping up. 

An IBM dealer - they’re all business 
experts - will help you find the 
personal computer that best fits your 
requirements. 

And with hundreds of programs to 
choose from, you can be certain that he 
has just the one you need. To get 
business moving in the right direction. 

Go see your nearest dealer. 

He can put together the system that 
may turn out to be a life-saver for your 
business. 



You need 

an IBM PC 

M ore people, more sales, more 

profits, more people, more sales... 
In business the problems of growth 
are usually nice problems. Still, 
they don’t go away if you do nothing 
about them. 

An IBM personal computer will keep 
the bandwagon on the road, and help 
you watch out for pitfalls ahead. 

If you deal in low cost items, the 
man-hours needed in the accounting 
department could be about to swallow 
up all your extra profit. 

Rapid expansion in a family firm can 
often create a need for investment 
which no family could underwrite. 

Is yours the sort of business that can 
remain profitable when it gets bigger? 

How long is demand likely to keep 
increasing? 

Will supply continue to meet it? 
When will you run out of space? 

There are four PCs in the IBM Family. 
The PC, XT and AT have progressively 
more power and larger memories and 
the IBM Portable PC is for people 
who like to take their solutions home 
with them. 

The number to find out about our 
dealers is the number of your local IBM 
office. It’s probably engaged at the 
moment because all the companies on 
the left are ringing it. 


LITTLB TB»MP CHAIUCTE N LICENSED ■ V BlI I1LES. IHC I * GQK 



■:J.?l8S?mi?5f?!SS!:*333iS}HHS!s*S53HSiK55KS5i IS I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 





Page 4 


.IK**’ 


House Budget Leader 
Gills Senators 9 Military 
Vote 'Rebuke 9 to Reagan 


By Dan Bab 

Washington Pat Service 

WASHINGTON — House 
Democrats begin this week, their 
first serious effort to decide bow to 
reduce the federal budget deficit, 
and the chairman of the House 
Budget Committee says the key lies 
in sharply slowing the growth of 
mihlary spending. 

Representative William H. Gray 
3d, a Pennsylvania Democrat who 
has been chairman of the House 
Budget Committee for only a few 
months, called the $5 5-billion defi- 
cit-reduction package approved 
last week by the Senate Budget 
Committee “a rebuke" to President 
Ronald Reagan by his own Repub- 
lican Party. 

He said the package is a chal- 
lenge to the White House to get 
serious about cutting the deficit. 

The Republican-backed package 
approved by the Senate committee 
calls for the Defense Department 
budget to grow only with inflation 
next year, followed by increases of 
3 percent above inflation in I9S7 
ana 1988. Mr. Reagan had asked 
for about a 6-percent increase after 
inflation in fiscal 1986, which be- 
gins Oct 1. 

Mr. Gray said it was significant 
that the Republican majority on 
the Senate committee rejected the 
administration’s priorities on mili- 
tary spending. The Defense De- 
partment represents the “greatest 
built-in growth" in government 
spending, he said. 

Mr. Gray emphasized that he fa- 
vored across-the-board equity in a 
budget package. He said that there 
was growing support among his 
House colleagues for a freeze on 
Pentagon spending next year, but 
that members interpreted a 
“freeze" differently. 

On Sunday, Representative Les 
Asp in, a Wisconsin Democrat and 
the chairman of the House Armed 
Sendees Committee, said the de- 
bate over next year's budget has 


become whether to “give the Penta- 
gon the rate of inflation or not — 
no real increase or actually a real 
decline." 

Mr. Gray dismissed as a “mis- 
take" the attention given to a target 
of S50 billion in cuts in final 1986. 
A defici t of S227 billion is project- 
ed for 1986. 

“I am not focusing on a num- 
ber," he said. “It's not the number 
that's important What is impor- 
tant is wnat is your deficit in 1987 
and 1988." 

He said that a substantial deficit- 
reduction package — one that 
would bring the deficit to about 
5100 billion in 1988 — could be 
achieved with cuts in the first year 
ranging from nearly $40 billion lo 
more than $60 bimon, depending 
on which programs were funded. 

His comments came as House 
Democrats prepared to examine 
options drawn up by the Budget 
Committee staff on reducing the 
deficit. 

The only option not dearly listed 
in a questionnaire sent to House 
Democrats was higher taxes. 
Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., Democrat of 
Massachusetts and the speaker of 
the House, ordered this option left 
out. He reportedly told other Dem- 
ocratic leaders that he did not want 
to give the Republicans a chance to 
chum that the Democrats again 
want to raise taxes to reduce the 
deficit 

In explaining the views of his 
Democratic colleagues on a 
“freeze," Mr. Gray noted that there 
were various ways to freeze the 
Pentagon budget He indicated he 
approved of a freeze in budget au- 
thority, rather than in actual 1986 
outlays, which he said would be 
difficult to enforce. 

A freeze in budget authority 
would save $25.2 billion in fiscal 
1986 and $63.2 billion in fiscal 
1988, he said. In contrast the Sen- 
ate committee action would save 
$19.2 billion in 1986 and $51.2 bil- 
lion in 1988. 



William H. Gray 3d 


But Mr. Gray emphasized that 
this would not represent any reduc- 
tion in funds for the miHiaiy. He 
said that under a freeze in budget 
authority. Pentagon outlays would 
rise $17 billion over their 1985 lev- 
el- 


He predicted that Democrats on 
his committee would not go along 
with cuts in education, child nutri- 
tion and other programs for the 
poor that the Senate committee ap- 
proved. 


■ Aspin Backs MX Funding 

Kathy Sawyer and Walter Pmcus 
of The Washington Past rqxtrted 
from Washington : 

Mr. Aspin, while warning that 
Congress might hold the fiscal 1986 
Pentagon budget increase below 
the inflation rate, also said Sunday 
that he would support President 
Reagan’s request to release funds 
for 2t more MX missiles. 

Speaking in a television inter- 
view, Mr. Aspin said that he would 
vote for 1985 funding of the MX 
intercontinental ballistic missile as 
“mostly a bargaining chip" for U.S. 
negotiators at the arms controls 
talks with the Soviet Union. 

Until Sunday, Mr. Aspin bad not 
publicly stated his support for re- 
leasing $Ii billion for the missiles, 
funds that Congress froze last year 
pending further actions this year. 


Mimtchip: Key to Typing Revolution? 

New Technology and Old Design Allow Faster Work 


By T.R. Rrid 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The fa- 
miliar typewriter keyboard used 
around toe world for more than a 
century may be replaced in the 
microelectronic age by a faster, 
simpler arrangement of keys that 
lets many touch typists cruise at 
speeds of more than 100 words a 
minste. 

Directory-assistance tele- 
phone operators across the coun- 
try are already using the new 
sykem. State governments in Or- 
egon and New Jersey have begun 
converting their typing opera- 
tions, and federal agencies such 
as the Department of Agricul- 
ture are experimenting with the 
keyboard. Many insurance com- 
panies and manufacturers are 
also boarding the bandwagon. 



The Washington Pan 


for decades that the 
keyboard, known as QWERTY, 
after the first six letters of the top 
letter row, is slow and unproduc- 
tive. Indeed, it was designed that 
way. 

Christopher Tatham Sholes 
laid out the QWERTY keyboard 
in the 1870s. His first machines 
jammed when typists went too 
fast So he spread the most com- 
mon letters — E, T, O, A, N and 
I — all over the board and en- 
sured that frequent combina- 
tions, such as “ed," had to be 
strode by the same finger — the 
slowest motion. 

By the 1930s, typewriters were 
fast enough mechanically to keep 
up with most typists, but the pur- 
posely Inefficient QWERTY 
held sway because nobody 
poshed hard for change. 

Thai came August Dvorak, a 
University of Washington psy- 
chologist who was a pioneer of 
ergonomics, the study of the in- 
teraction between man and ma- 
chine. Mr. Dvorak designed a 
keyboard buflt for speed, putting 
all five vowels and the five most 
commo n consonants on the cen- 


ter, or home, row, right under the 
fingers. 

With, the letters on Mr. Dvo- 
rak’s hone row — A, O, E, U, I, 
D, H, T, N and S — the typist 
can produce about 3,000 com- 
mon English words. The 
QWERTY keyboard’s home row 
—A, S, D, F, G, H, J, Kand L— 
makes fewer 100 common 
wards. 


QWERTY is not quitting qui- 
etly. Industry officials estimate 
that there are 30 million stan- 
dard QWERTY keyboards in 
use today, and about one-tenth 
as many with Dvorak capability. 


Most typing schools still concen- 
on QWERTY, although of- 


Mr. Dvorak’s design also per- 
mits a much faster two-handed 
rhythm by splitting the strokes 
evenly between right and left. 
With QWERTY, the left hand 
does almost 60 percent of the 
typing; on Mr. Dvorak’s key- 
board each hand types 50 per- 
cent of the letters. 

“When yon see Dvorak typ- 
ists, it looks like their hands 
aren’t even moving," said Palli- 
da Kaplus, a supervisor in an 
Oregon government office that 
has made the switch. “You don’t 


have to jump from row to row, so 
if s faster and more accurate." • 


Donald Seaton, a Smith-Coro- 
na executive said his company 
offered a Dvorak keyboard for 
years but phased out the model 
because of limited demand. 


trace on. Q\ 
fice managers are starting to look 
for Dvorak-trained secretaries. 

Mr. Dvorak died in 1975, just 
before the breakthrough that has 
made his keyboard accessible to 
every hone and office. 

The invention of electronic 
keyboards controlled by a pro- 
grammed microchip Iim hiaap it 
possible to switch from 
QWERTY to Dvorak and back 
with the touch of a key. 

“Ever since they pat the chip 
into a keyboard, there's been a 
groundswdT for the faster ver- 
sion, said Virginia Russell, 
founder and head of the Interna- 
tional Dvorak Federation in 
Brandon, Vermont. 

Many computer companies 
are bunding in Dvorak conver- 
sion capability as standard 
equipment on their keyboards, 
and plenty of low-cost programs 
are available to reprogram key- 
boards on other computers. 


U.S. and Canada Name 
Special Envoys to Stud) 
Problems of Add Rain 






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linked Prat International 

■ QUEBEC — President Ronald 
Reagan and Prime Minister Brian 
Mulroney of Canada ende d two 
days of taflr* Monday in which the 
two leaders announced they had 
appointed special envoys to exam- 
ine the issue of add ram. 


In an address prepared for a lun- 
. Mr. Rea 


chcon Monday. Mr. Reagan said 
that the two natio ns have em- 
barked on a “new partnership" that 
will be more min dful of the need 
for closer cooperation and respect. 

Mr. Reagan announced that they 
would: 

• Issue a declaration on interna- 


tional securit^and sign a memo- 


randum on the modernization of 
their North American Air Defense 
System. 

• Brine into effect the Pacific 


the issue, said the agreement w 
“break a deadlock which has 
vented some action on this." 

Mr. Reagan, who has tea 
any costly OS. cleanup dr* 
for add rain, said, ‘Together 
will find an answer to this n 
lem." F 

Mr. Reagan said the for 
transportation secretary, D 
Lewis Jr., who is Ihr chief ettetr' 
of Warner- Amex, would be 
U.S. special envoy. Mr. MuIk 
named the former premier of 
tario. William G. Dans, as C. 
da's representative. 

The duties of the new m 
envoys were left vague in a j 
statement issued after a half-] 
meeting between the two teat 
The statement, the result of 
agreement worked out in re 


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■ 




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-(**<*•*« 


Salmon Treaty, ending a 15-ycar weeks by Ottawa and Wasbiiw 
battle over fishing rights. said the envoys would “pursue. 

• Sign a mutual legal assistance saltations on laws and regulat 
treaty that will aid law-enforce- fbat bear on pollutants though 
Ttv-nr auth orities in both countries. 


.. fl 

il 


• Issue a declaration on trade 
aimed at opening UiL markets to 
more Canadian goods. 

“Mr. Prime Minister," Mr. Rea- 
gan said, Tm confident there isn’t 
an area where you and I cannot 
reach an agreement for the good of 
our two countries.” 

“In all that we do, we seek to go 
forward with Canada as our part- 
ner, two leaders for progress 
through shared vision ana enlight- 
ened cooperation," the president 
said. 

“That new partnership," he con- 
tinued, “begins with our being 
more mindful of our need for dose 
cooperation and constant commu- 
nication, each of us carefully re- 
specting the other’s interest and 
sovereignty" 

The president said the prosperity 
of Panada and the United States 
depends upon freer flowing trade 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely apartments with magnificent 
t of Ufa Geneva ond roounknx. 


Montrem, ViHon, Verfater. Los Diabfar- 
“ nu (TOtt near Gstaod, L*y- 


ets, Ctatoau 

tin. Fxcslmt Opportumfitos ft 
F oreigner! 

Prices from SnaOOO. 
lifaerd mortgage s ot 6»% interest. 
GtaunAN SA. 

Av Mon Rapes 24, 

04-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland. 
Tefc pi) 22 35 12. The 251 85 MBJS 
1 Sanaa 1970 


SUNNY SOUTHERN SWTTZBBLAND 

LAGO MAGGfORE 

In bast loeatiori we offer several new 
apartmeiris & houses in ths beautiful 
jwBOM in ASGONA and PORTO 
RONCO, ■ n - luji (inert, 133 ayn. + 
terrace, ovwoaang kfa & mountains, 
I50mtothekfa, lit quaity, manning 
poafc oarage. Price 5r760.000. 

nee tor sale to fareqpieis. 
Mortgages at low Swiss interest lattft. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD. 


Via G. Cotton 3, CH690Q LUGANO 
Tefc CH/91-542913 
The 73612 HOME Ot 


CHOOSE 

SWIIZEMAND 

We haw far foreigners; A very big 
choice of beautiful APARTMENTS/ 
VILLAS / CHALETS in the whale 
1*901 of Lake Geneva. Mortreux & afl 
famous mountain resorts. Very reason- 
ably priced but afco the best and mast 
exauivc. Price from about USSJOjOO. 
Mortgaas or 6 MX Please writ us or 
phone before you mote a daemon. 


■fore you moke c 
H. SBKXD SA. 

Tour Grim A 04-1007 Lausanne. 
Tab 21/25 26 11 The 24298 SE80 CH 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LOPDOtJ. For the best fumehed flats 

and houses. CcxoJt the Speae&ts; 
PMEpc, Kay aid Lewis. Tefc London 
3520VI1. Telex 27846 RESIDE G. 


MAYFAIR a KBEMGION. 2 svpeib 

7-bedraam flak, £250/ week Tel: 01 • 
589 8223 


PARES AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 


I An i 

75001 Paris 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


AGENT IN PARIS 

mONE 562 78 99 


AT HOME IN PADS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR RM OR SALE 

563 25 60 


total u p o rftnents nets- the 
or. From one week upwards, fair 
•quipped sfudns to 5 rooms, with or 
welhout hotel service. Contact: FIA- 
TOTEL 14 rue du ThMtre. 75015 
PmsTfel: 575 62 20. Tt* 205211 F. 


mmma hothibk Piem & vq. 

concej, Paris lStft, Linwious stirios & 
Z room flats. My equipped. Whale 


ran^aofhatal senocst ot yow tfcpco- 


I rotas on 
request. Feel completely a hone, to- 
farin oli on & reservations 557 01 79 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSSS 8th 


2 or 34oam apartment, 
ton mortti or mart 
LE OAJBDGE 359 67 97. 


PCX SHOBT TERM 5TAT FMJS&Sfr 

efiot «id 2 rooms, decorated. Contort: 
SoGiegie ^6 ave D 
Tet {U3g 99 30 


BEAL FOR SHORTTERM STAY. Paris 

audma & 2 rooms, decorated. Contact 
SoreEnt 80 nte Uriverate, Pen 7th. 
Tet til 544 39 40. 


HE ST. LOUS. Magnificent duplex an 

Seine, oremd sewn, 2 bedroom, 2 
i, bcautiMy farmstied. very sujv 
720 3799 


Tet 720 37! 


Mfe VICTOR HUGO. Very lovely 
large double Swig, 3 bedrooms, 




on garden. I 



P|gj§g 

71H: INVAUDES. Very nice hing -f- 

'yir’w.'m 


1 1 > 

H * ™ " r, » 1 .4.1 i 1 , l i 1 1 ■ 1 , 1 H ) : ! 

■■■» MGH FASHION MODS, 

27, PfUPA expenenae, Hotory of Art 
praduote, free to travel, Uingud. 
woks far London based openings. Tefc 

3 pje, 9 pn. 01-225 0368|Uiq 

BTHbRlIEFBGSTHONORE. Lmtunoia 
tfudio, neWly redone, 40 mjti, F4200 
net. S«r: 712 32 53 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


AVE FOCH S OUTH F AOHG garden 
flat, finest apartment avuIuUe in the 
man pnstigous avenue in Perk. Ideal 
far diplomotic or corporate en terta m - 
mg. Ready far immednK ooaupekon. 
Huge sMan with superb 18* century 
panathiig. large abrary & (fining 
room, twister suite ponded in A. 
Shrff ild & ptoleaanJy equfaped 
Indian. SuIntuVed price for tone & 
farnshing. Entire apartment tatefly ro- 
deooralea legod wt of cost. Write 
owners representative with phone 
contort number far «rtv apporntment 
to view. No agenb. write la Bax 
1902. Herdd Triune, 92527 Nevly 
Gedex, France 


16th LUXURIOUS 


Double fiving + 1 bedroom, r 
Idlchen, bdaviy. F5500. Tet 5 


SWITZERLAND 


TORBfTNGBCVA luxurious fur- 


rushed aportmeiv, residentidl area, 4 
oats, large iving, modern My 


btdrooms, kprgRi 
equipped kitchen. For' further rnfor- 
n5on. tok 22/21 5062. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENIAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 


YOUNG CBURAN AORESS, highly 
educrted looks far an jnterestxig posi- 
fion. London 2450060. 


G8CROUS EMPLOYS WANTE3 
an penand astfont. Tet 


far young rntxi penanc 
PI 1 385 M76 London 


CHAUFFER very good reference s . 
Gada. 17 rue Dcru, Paris 8th. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


E-LE. 

with cw. free to stmt now. 
Gdb 2*4 76 24 PARK 


CENTER SEEKS B4GU5H 
tonal* trrinen. bpenence & pepen. 


Send Ot, photo & ovolabihy to Box 
1931, Horrid Triune, 92521 NeuRy 


Gedex. France 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


TOWN OF ROUS, 20 mins, from Ge- 
neva & Lausanne, near school, pool, 
tennis. New luxury Vila 300 iqai 
SF4JOO/ month. Tel 1021^5 39 BS. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


IIP buys o 

PARIS, beautiful bulking Z000 to 
5£Q0 iqj#. Gommerdal or bourgeois. 

Afl guarantees & cfocrerion aswred. 

Wnte under ref. 1235 to PUBLOIE 

GAUTTON, 29r Soder, 75009 Fora, 

Franco. 


WAN1B TO BUY/ TO4T tarn area, 
3-faedroom martment, Neufly or 
Western suburb*. Tel {5} 958 1718 / 
(1) 776 01 12 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


4 STAR DBJJXE HOTEL. Paris Bth, 
seeks executive secroury with same 
PJL mmerience, perfectly biinguaJ 
Frendi/Enflfijh. Mease write with 
C.V., photo & dewed salary ID Bob 
I 9ld,rlmdd Tribune, 92521 NeuDy 
Cede*, frmce. 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


YOUNG USA/SC OTOBI. educat- 
ed, fluent Engksh, French, maeOant 
working knowledge German, Itafian. 
Past experiences m mvestment & 
sdav seeks dxdlengrng patAon 
marketing/salci with European sub- 
tnbxy in Now York. Write to floe 

1932. Herald Tribune, 92S21 Newly 

Cedex, France 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


INTERNATIONAL 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Seeks dyncmic mato/famste far 


infannatvon department. English mother 
tongue, fluent French, knowledge of 
typing. Send complet e resume to: 
tniliotiv es Met Sa 

21, rue Henri todiefart, 7501 7 Pah 


MARKETING Repre se nt chve London 

based for major US offshore contract 
drfller. Must be experienced & be 
knowledgeable & famJiar with Euro- 
pean oil opwotara. Bax 40565, LKT, 
63 Lang Acre, London, WC2E 9JHL 


PJL GKL FRIDAY to 

irons & leisure lime 


non. Send photo & 
HecddTnbune, 


reap- 


1923, 

Cedex, France 


^ to Box 
! Neufly 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


32 YEAR OLD G8IT1BIIAN. 12 yecn 

M i d dl e East & Amhiqn G utf sales 

experience, seeks position as area 
sees manager ■ Msddfa East. Fluent 
Aratfa, EnSsh 4 French. Reply G-AJ. 
tek Wee Place, 


Teh 01 2583834. 


PARK BASH) British woman. UGngud. 
12 yeors experience Anglo-Saxon pc- 


counting. seeks part-time accounting 
work / tmanod aa 


accounting transla- 
tion. Box 1930, Herald Tribune, 92521 
Neufly Cedex, France. 


NANNK/GOVBtNBS AGS 35, 
seven yens with lost emdayer, highly 
ecomrnended far her efficiency, care 


and dewAanto the 
super ramie. Fry Staff 
rtgh St. Aldennot, Hants. 
0252 315369 UK Licenced. 


truly 
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AUTOMOBILES 


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194. 


O’Neill Praises Colleagues for Help 
In Cutting Americans’ Aid to IRA 


on the continent and across the 
seas. 

“We stand ready to improve fur- 
ther the fiwRda.ll.B- trading rda- im i 

tiouship and to work with you to f^ rada ov^Tnbe years. andS 
initiate a nw m^ttbieral trade ^ ^ ^ 

round m early 1986, he added. 


be linked to add rain. 

The envoys are also to “enhi 
cooperation” in add-rain resea 
seek improved exchange of scic 
ic infonnation and “ideniify ell 
to improve the U.S. and Cana 
environment.” 

When a reporter asked Mr.I 
gan. “What are they supposa 
do?” he said he could not am 
questions. But the president ad 
“We shall go forward with fin 
an answer to what is a problem 
belongs to both of us.” 

The chief White House spt 
man, Larry Speakes, later 
plained thai Mr. Reagan “hai 
changed his basic view” that i 
research is necessary into add 
before money is spent to de 
up. 

Mr. Speakes said Mr. Re 
had an “open min d,” but that 
day’s announcement would & 
quire added spending for add 
this year. 

Mr. Mulroney recently 
□ounoed a plan to cut sulfur C 
ide emissions by half in ea 


i 


v oMsm 

n* 


S T n*il 

■‘"‘“I 

- V . 


The Associated Press 

DUBLIN —Thomas P. ONefll, 
speaker of the U.S. House of Rep- 
resentatives, says he and otter 
Iris h-Ameri can politicians have 


Mr. O’Neill said he and others, 


inducting two fellow Democrats, 
Senator ^Edv 


3 ward M. Kennedy of 
Massachusetts and Senator Daniel 
Patrick Moynihan of New York, 


■ Acid Rain Agreement 

Earlier, David Hoffman of The 
Washington Post reported from 
Quebec: 

In their agreement on acid rain, 
Mr. Reagan and Mr. Mulroney 
said their spedal envoys would ex- 
amine the issue and report bade 
next year. 


done a “tremend ous job” persuad- have helped bring annual contribn- 
ing Americans of Irish descent not tions by Americans to the IRA 

to give money to the Irish Republi- “down from $3 million or $4 mil- Mr. Mulroney, who has been un- 
can Army, which is fighting to end lion to about a quarter of a million" der political pressure to end a long 
British rule in Northern Ireland. a year. stalemate with the United Slates on 


than just research or study. 

Add rain is caused by ends 
of sulfur dioxide and other cfa 
cals from factories, coal-bin 
power plants, autos and na 
sources on both sides of the bo 
The emissions mix with wale 
por and are carried by windsb 
falling to the ground as weak 
tions of sulfunc add that is bit 
for damage to lakes and fore 
the northeastern United State; 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 19.985 


Page 5 


&mr . . ^ 

W*** **-« V 

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M rjllv oys| oj .S. Appears Unable 
eills <>f .-\<Jo Rein In Egypt, Israel 

ispite TheJr Huge Military Ddyts^, 
*£'/ v ; o iUies Fail to Reform Economies 


. '■■ By David B. Orta way 

M’asAingiofl PmI Service 

ASHINGTON — Egypt and 
- ■ *J have come to depend so 
. h on U.S. economic and potiti- 
uppon that they have almost 
‘ me client states. 

/' spite this potential leverage. 
.; : -.sver, the United States seems 


and silence from the Saadi Arabi- 
ans. 

“It’s not dear yet what we can 
accomplish, a senior administra- 
tion official conceded. 

“Is tins the moment?" he asked. 
“This is the question that hasn't 
beat answered.” 

Secrctaiy of State George P. 


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. s ;; r >le or unwilling to force either Shultz is sending Ins top Middle 

■■. East expert Richard W. Murphy, 

NEWS .ANALYSIS the “as*® 11 secretary of state for 

; Near Eastern and South Asian af- 

’ * • .* to make economic reforms or fairs, to the region soon to find out 
• -: ; .esolve their political differ- primarily whether more Arab 


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•'? % ‘ie visit of President Hosai Mu- 
- k of Egypt to Washington last 
underscored this paradox. 

went looking for a big in- 
. ie in economic assistance and 
. 'ter American activism in the 


movement is possible before the 
United States makes a decision. 

The administration «»«wi u> see 
the Feb. 11 agreement between 
King Hussein of Jordan and Yasser 
Arafat, the leader of the Palestine 
Liberation Organization, as repre- 


U" v : .'Jocked Middle East peace pro- seating a significant step forward. 
: ->v ' But he left without a U.S. But it also seems to fed that the 


".miuncnL on either front, and 
' 7 ^..* ‘X)k with him the message, that 
•* '- ./.Arabs must try harder before 
*:^1 hmgum will fully re-eng^e jt- 
n the search for a settlement of 
• ■ Palestinian issue. 


But it also seems to fed that tiw 
Arab side can move further; name- 
ly toward acceptance of U-S-oondi- 
oons for talks. 

The primary U.S. condition is an. 
explicit PLO endorsemou of Unit- 
ed Nations Resolution 242, which 



Roger H. Sssions, U.S. Composer, Dies 


By Donal Henahin pemed with invariable dispatch 
New York Tuna Service inwYoit In 1977, when b« Was 

NEW YORK — Roger Huntin g- SOars old, his Symphony No. 6, 
von Sessions, 88, one of the fore- wk he wrote in 1966, was given 
most composers of symphonies, itsw York premiere by the Juil- 
opera and chamber music in the U: School Orchestra as pan of a 
United States, died Saturday in cat paying tribute to the cora- 


jryard Bloom'd,” a setting of 
It Whitman's poem. 


' “Z-.espite new Arab initiatives, ac- recognizes the right of Israel to live 
ing to U.S. officials, the Rea- *®. peace whale requiring land to 
_ r V administration believes tHat it withdraw from territories occupied 
f . -. T'-o early to judge whether the in the 1967 war. These principles 
* : •« process can be revived. ®re incorporated in President Ron- 

;r, a result, the adnmristration Rein’s Mideast initiative of 
■ '..‘'.toered a middle course of con- September 1982. 

. ; ng the search for common ne- Meanwhile, according to a Slate 
. ' :'■■■ «ating ground among Israel, Department official, “a lot of 
' . / "Jt, Jordan and the Pakstiirians thinking” is going on in Washing- 
^ out deciding whether to shift toa “We are in a mode of consuJta- 
Z * --f its diplomatic wrighl behind- don,” he said. 

• . process. U JL offirialc seem to think that 

it will take at least several months 
before it becomes dear whether 
such a scenario is likely, and that it 


The Aaodmd Pm 

Presktent Hosni Mubarak saying goodbye to President 
Ronald Reagan after they met last week in Washington. 


lis caution appears lo reflect 
hington’s bitter experience in 
.ering the abortive peace tre^y 


— .viutg, uvtuj — . — - ***** * •* 

-•’Em Lebanon and Israel in 'may depend on Mr. Mubarak’s 
-c and 1983. and its doubts ability to work out an agreement 

- *jit whether Egypt and Jordan wtb the Israeli prime minister, Sbi- 


' ^it whether Egypt and Jordan — r - — 

*- deliver peace in the face of mon Peres. It is a possibility the 
'i . ions amon g the Palestinians, officials do not exclude in light of 

- i oppoation from (he Syrians developing relationship be- 

/.. : tween the two leaders. 

Mr. Mubarak’s visit last week 

'■rrinrfi Said tn S«Jc ***> P°““d “P the even mote 

jaocn aara lO veex. pressing issue of what the United 

"dm Ties With Chinese states should do to help the two 

Mideast nations deal with vast 
The AssodtMd Press debts and mounting economic 

-ELIING — Rupert Murdoch, problems. 

- - Australian publisher, who is For years, the United States has 
ing China, was quoted Monday been struggling — without much 

' ‘fifing collaboration with Chi- success — to nndge Egypt toward 
broadcasters. basic fiscal and economic reforms. 

. ne Xinhua press agewy quoted Now it is doing the same thing with 
as telling Deputy Prime Minis- Israel, whose economy is m far 
yao Yihn on Monday that he worse shape. 

:ed “that there will be a long- In both countries, Washington is 


»S 

lir town 


Mh2 U> 

Mi »«-i 
MS «Bu ! 


, wfc, h>.- 




jdoch Said to Seek 
- dia Ties With Oiinese 

The Associated Press 

' -SUING — Rupert Mordodv, 
'-• --Australian publisher, who is 

■ reeking raUaboration with 
- broadcasters. 


‘that there will be a long- 


GLASMI'int ^ 


i collaboration'’ in broaxfcast- cast as the outside reformer, a role 
.television and other fields. usually played, with more mfiu«>cf- 


and success, by the International 
Monetary Fund. 

Neither the administration nor 
Congress has begun to focus seri- 
ously on the implications of the two 
countries’ growing dependence on 
Washington, or on the disturbing 
tread in which these countries use 
an increasingly large preportion of 
U5. aid to help pay thor nrifitary 
debts to the United States rather 
than to deal with underlying eco- 
nomic problems. 

Both Egypt and Israel are turn- 
ing increasingly to Washington for 
bigger grants, lower interest rates 
or forgiveness of debts. 

Egypt is requesting about $1.8 
bfition in additional funds in fiscal 
1985 and 1986, and Israel at least 
$IJ billion. The two countries al- 
ready receive 40 percent of UJ>. 
foreign aid. 

Egypt's total foreign debt ap- 
proaches $30 fcdffion, while Israel’s 
is at $24 bfflioo. Of these debts, 
tend owes about $10 billion to the 
United States, and Egypt about $8 
billion. 

Both spend more than 30 percent 
of their annual foreign-exchange 
earnings to pay interest and princi- 
pal on their debts. 

Last Wednesday, Mr. Mubarak 
said that he had told Mr. Reagan 
that Egypt's $43-billion nrihtaiy 
debt to the United Stales would 
drain its coffers. 


“I said. ‘Look, the whole interest 
we are going to pay for the $4.5 
biflion in foreign military sales is 
going to read) $10.5 bilnon, plus 
the $4.5 billion — as a whole $15 
bOhon,’" he said. 

Officials of the Agency for Inter- 
national Development said that 
Mr. Mubarak had miscalculated 
and that the $10.5 bQBou he had 
mentioned as payment on interest 
was about the (oral Egypt would be 
repaying to the United States by 
the year 2000. 

But they did not quarrel with his 
other startling figure, that Egypt 
would have to pay about $560 mu- 
lion in interest and principal on its 
military debt to the United States 
in fiscal 1986, while probably re- 
ceiving $815 million in U.S. eco- 
nomic aid. 

Mr. Mubarak said he got a sym- 
pathetic bearing from Mr. Reagan 
but not any commitments. Egypt's 
case, he was told, is linked to the 
larger problem of mounting debts 
to the United States incurred by 
Third World countries. 

“He promised he’s going to do 
Ms best to find a way out fra tins 
problem,” Mr. Mubarak said. But 
be said that Mr. Reagan also told 
him that “because so many coun- 
tries are taking loans” from die 
United States, “he can’t do this for 
me and leave the others out” 


Princeton, New Jersey. pr. 

After a stroke last month, be > had taught composition at 
contracted pneumonia and was ad- tfehool since 1 965, when be left 
mined to the hospital last Tuesday, faculty at Princeton University, 
Mr. Sessions's last major work, 76 ^ had reached the manda- 
the “Concerto for Orchestra,” was t retirement age of 68. 
written for the centenary of the ne of Ms most ambitious but 
Boston Symphony Orchestra in It forbidding Late works was the 
1981. cata “When Lilacs Last in the 

Mr. Sessions enjoyed such es- Jtyard Bloom'd," a setting of 
teem among composers and other it Whitman's poem, 
musicians that h was once said by Jetweea 1928 and 1931, Mr. Ses- 
one of his colleagues that “every- 05 W( 1 a fellow composer, Aaron 
body loves Roger Sessions except pland, collaborated in present- 
Lhe public.” In fact, his works > the Copland-Sessions Concerts 
gained little af f **p tgnr '** during his New York City, a series that 
lifetime beyond professional and xeeded in galvanizing support 
academic circles. r modem music in the city's artis- 

Audiences and many critics : community, 
found his music “difficult,” and the HE am E. Farrell, 
composer came to take a wiy pride .Y. Times Reporter 

sssirSfis ssss 

asked the Italian composer, Al- Farrell, 48, a reporter whose as- 
fredo Casefla, who had pointed out 

technical difficulties into Violin ■‘r “ ^ X 0 ^ 10 ^ ieiTOT ^ 
Concerto, “what could be done to^ff* Wiy of m 

make it easier. He answered that lew Yoric - 

nothing could be done; for you see. 

be said, ‘e nato difficile ’ — it is bom - 

difficult. ” n n# 1 

Although most of his sympho- II IV 

nies were written on amnmsriOD 

and promptly performed, souk A * rSkflt 

works languished unplayed foi “ UOUI 

posed in 1935. wait^25^Ss out For over 150 y« 

providing privet 
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They said the 14 volume Coulthard on 01-930 4Bti. 

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sion, the sources said. Embassf- I 13 St James's Square. Adcfres 

finals tdd them they were vioiig London SW1Y4LF. 

U5. neutrality laws, the soes I England. 

said. . 1 


In 23 years as reporter, editor, 
columnist and foreign correspon- 
dent for The New York Times, Mr. 
Farrell bmlt a reputation as a writ- 
er drawn more to life's rich human 
detail than to its front-pane crises. 
In a decade, Mr. Farrell moved 
from Albany bureau chief to Chi- 
cago correspondent to Israel bu- 
reau chief, then to New York as 
deputy metropolitan editor and lat- 
er columnist, writing “About New. 
York.” then abroad again, to Cairo 
as bureau chief. His most recent 


assignment was in the Washington 
bateau, from where he covered last 
year’s presidential campaign. 

• Orher Deaths: 

Bishop George L Leech, 94, who 
played an active role in the Second 
Vatican Council and headed the 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, diocese 
for more than 35 years from 1935 
until retiring in 1971, in Harrisburg 
last Tuesday. 

Georg Prader, 68, Austrian de- 
fense minister from 1964 until 
1970, Sunday in Vienna. 





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Page 6 


JATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


Chum’s Soviet Stance Vexes U 


By Bernard Gwerrzman 

.Vew York Tima Semce 

. WASHINGTON — Some offi- 
cials in the Reagan administration 
are concerned that Beijing's efforts 
to improve relations with Moscow 
have fed to a softer stand try China 
against Soviet involvement in Viet- 
nam and Afghanistan. 

Even before the latest friendly 
exchanges between Beijing and 
Moscow hi connection with the ac- 
cession to power last week of Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev as the Soviet 
leader, the Americans noted what 
they called unsettling indications 
from China about Afghanistan and 
Indochina. 

A key element in the U.S. policy 
of seeking close relations with Chi- 
na has been the strategic compo- 
nent. This involves the belief that 
U.S.-Chinese ties compel the Sonet 
Union to main tain large forces 
along the Chinese border that 
might otherwise be deployed in 
Eastern Europe, and that an anti- 
Soviet China provides support for 
Southeast Asian countries that 
might otherwise be cowed by Viet- 
namese or Soviet pressure. 

When U.S. diplomats raised the 
subject in recent months, the Chi- 
nese have been ambiguous, offi- 
cials said. An official said the Chi- 
nese seemed embarrassed in 
mid-January when it was pointed 
out that they had been relatively 


inactive toward the dashes be- 
tween Vietnamese troops and 
Cambodian rebels on the Thai bor- 
der. 

The officials said there were not 
even private assurances that Beij- 
ing was not backing away from its 
opposition to Soviet moves on the 
Chinese borders. 

Since mid-January, the U.S. offi- 
cials said, the Chinese have been 
more active both in polemics to- 
ward Vietnam and in sending two 
more divisions to the Vietnamese 
border. But the response has been 
less harsh than in previous con- 
frontations, the officials said. 

This has led to expressions of 
concern by Thailand and other 
Southeast Asian nations that have 
counted on China to offset Viet- 
namese mili tary power. The South- 
east Asians have made their appre- 
hension known to the United 
States and to China. 

A high-ranking U.S. official 
voiced concern (hat if Thailand felt 
it might lose a Chinese military 
counterweight to Vietnam, the 
Thais might strike a deal with Viet- 
nam acknowledging its control 
over Cambodia. 

The United Slates has agreed to 
sell T hailand 12 F-16 fighters in 
response to the latest events, the 
first tune such an advanced plane 
has been sold to a nation in South- 
east Asia. 


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Publicly. China says it wanti- I 
ter relations with both (he Uti * 
‘ States and the Soviet Union, ait ^ 
has stated that three issues stall > 

the way of improved relations h i 
the Soviet Union: the Soviet £ | 
tary concentration along the L £ 
nese border, Soviet military ol f 
pation of Afghanistan, and So 
backing for the Vietnamese pj 
ence in Cambodia. Moscow I 

also established a Soviet naval I 
air base at Cam Ranh Bay in M 

nam I 

The United States is trouH 
that China has evidently mad! 
decision to pursue improved nj 
dons even though the Soviet Una 
has not made concessions on an >4 
these issues. U.S. officials betid 
this is connected to China’s desl 
to take advantage of any econom 
and technical aid the Soviet Unid 
can provide and to seek overJ 
cairn on its borders. J 

U.S. questioning of China bega 
quietly, with no public statement 
in December when Ivan V. Alien 
pov, a first deputy prime ministd 
of the Soviet Union, visited Chid 
and signed economic and technica 
accords. ] 

While Mr. Arkhipov was in Bern 
eng. the fifth anniversary of lb* 
Soviet mili tary intervention in Af 
gh-inistan pa ra-d on Dec. 26. with 
out any acknowledgment by tin 
Chin rag 

China and (he United State: 
both support the Afghan rebels 
and while there is no sign that Chi- 
na is backing off such support, its 
silence on the anniversary was un- 
settling, officials said. After Mr. 
Arkhipov left, the Chinese resumed 
their criticism of Soviet actions in 

A fghanistan 

Also while Mr. Arkhipov was in 
China, Vietnam began its dry- sea- 
son offensive in Cambodia. The 
Vietnamese first moved against the 
two non-Communisi rebel groups 
along the Thai border, wiping out 
their camps, and causing 230.000 
Cambodians to flee into Thailand. 
Then, in January, the Vietnamese 
turned their guns on the Khmer 
Rouge, the Communist Cambodi- 
ans who had been forced out of 
power in 1979 by Vie tnam 

The Chinese reaction became 
stronger in mid-January after Gen- 
eral John W. Vessey Jr„ chairman 
of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
visited C hina officials said. In ad- 
dition. Foreign Minister Wu Xue- 
qian of China toured Southeast 
Asia in late January and early last 
month and said on mote than one 
occasion that “if Vie tnam contin- 
ues its provocation along the Chi- 
nese- Vietnamese border, C hina re- 
serves the right to give Vietnam a 
second lesson.” 

That was an allusion to a Chi- 
nese attack on Vietnam in Febru- 
ary 1980 after Vietnam had occu- 
pied Cambodia. 




*• / 


Tha A Bo djed Pres 

Ivan V. Arkhipov, a Soviet first deputy prime minister, 
drank a toast with the Chinese deputy prime minister, Yao 
Yilin, daring trade negotiations in Bdpng in December. 

U.S. Aide Reopens Talks 
n China on Key Issues 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Past Service 

JG — The U.S. undersec- 
state for political affairs. 
H. Armacost has arrived 
open a dialogue with Chi-' 
raiegic issues thought lo 
Indochina, Afghanistan 
mits of U.S.-Chinese mili- 
dination. 

rmacost said that he ex- 
discuss a “broad range of 
id regional issues” with 
officials, including the 
rime minister. Yao YOin. 
ign Minister Wu Xueqian 
ay and Tuesday, 
sr likely issue is possible 
stance in the modemiza- 
bina's military forces. Ac- 
3 officials and military ex- 
re is a need to clarify how 
oiled States is prepared to 
sffons. 

iing lo several of them, the 
y has moved faster and 
oward agreeing to help 
e destroyers in the Chi- 
than some State Depart- 
cials would like. The see- 
the navy. John F. Lehman 
1 China in August 
ire also divisions reported 
i Defense Department as 
si and how far the United 
ght to move iu military 
on. 


A U.S. military specialist argued 
in Washington recently that there 
were at least four schools of 
thought within the Pentagon on 
this issue, ran g in g from the official 
view- that the countries have paral- 
lel strategic interests to those con- 
tending China is a strategic liabil- 
ity. 

“In Lehman ’s view, it's full speed 
ahead,” said this specialist. “He did 
a lot on his own initiative. He got 
way ahead of the pack.” 

An argument apparently being 
made inside the U.S. government 
for expanding the military relation- 
ship is that it gives China’s top 
officers more of a stake in the na- 
tion's relations with the United 
Slates and in China's moderniza- 
tion process. 


East German Escape Foiled 

Roam 

HANNOVER, West Germany 
— An apparent attempt to cross 
the East German border faded 
Monday night when a truck being 
driven along a railroad track took, a 
wrong fork and hit a buffer near 
Walkenried, West German border 
police said Tuesday. It was not dis- 
closed how many people were in 
the truck or whether they were ar- 
rested. 


Trade Friction Eroding 
U.S. Ties , Japan Fears 

Tokyo Officials Warn That Americans 
Are Restive About Import Restrictions 


By Clyde Haberman 

Net* York Tima Sorrier 

TOKYO — Japanese officials 
have expressed concern in recent 
days that relations with the United 
States are deteriorating because of 
stubborn two-way trade problems. 

“The sentiment in the United 
States is tike that before the out- 
break of a war,” said Saburo Okita, 
bead of a government advisory 
committee on trade. 

Mr. Okita, a former foreign min- 
ister. met with U.S. officials in 
Washington and cam** home last 
week warning that the American 
government had grown increasing- 
ly impatient with what it viewed as 
Japan's reluctance to open its mar- 
kets to imports. 

On a broader issue, he said, an 
unidentified official in Washington 
complained that Japan, despite its 
huge trade surpluses, was **doing 
nothing” to contribute to the wodd 
economy. 

While Mr. Okita’s statements 
were among the more graphic, oth- 
er Japanese officials nave voiced 
‘similar concerns. Nobuo Matsuna- 
ga, who wiD take over late this 
month as Japan’s ambassador to 
the United States, said recently 
tbar “we are facing a critical situa- 
tion now ” 

There was a danger, Mr. Matsu- 
naga said, of the United States en- 
acting protectionist measures, 
which, he said, would be “most 
unfortunate” for both countries 
and for global free trade. 

However, he said that his own 
government had to move quickly to 
open domestic markets, warning 
that Japan could no lunger “contin- 
ue the present situation of huge 
export surpluses." 

Trade disputes between the two 
countries are hardly new. bm they 
have become far more insistent in 
recent weeks and now threaten to 
dnminAu* an overall relationship 
characterized as fundamentally 
sound by officials on both sides. 
The frictions contrast with the 
mood last year, when political lead- 
ers in both countries were seeking 
re-election and pul aside disagree- 
ments. 

Adding an dement of urgency is 
a late-Maxch deadline set for the 
most critical issue on the U.S. agen- 
da — increasing American exports 

to Japan after April L^^n^ 
government-run telephone compa- 
ny is placed in private hands. 
[Japan gave ground Monday in a 
debate with the United States over 


protection of computer software 
bom unauthorized copying- Page 
11-1 

Politically, Prime Minister Yasu- 

hiroNakasone is in a delicate situa- 
tion N^n sr he promised President 
Ronald Reagan .in California on 
Jan. 2 that action would be taken 
on irfwvunnmTiiratinns and other 
trade matters. 

But nothing of consequence has 
happened. In an apparent attempt 
to bolster his credibility, Mr. Naka- 
sone recently ordered cabinet 
members to work faster to come up 
with substantial concessions. 

He offered two deadlines — a 
mid -April meeting in Pans of the 
Organization for Economic Coop- 
eration and Development and the 
;inpmii economic summit confer- 
ence of the seven industrial democ- 
racies that witi be held in Bonn in 
May. 

On both the U£. and Japanese 
sides, officials have offered varying 
statements depending on the audi- 
ence, with the tougher talks gener- 
ally reserved for domestic con- 
sumption. 

Mr. Matstmaga told the Japan 
National Press Gub in February 
that one reason US and European 
businessmen did not do well here 
was dial “they don’t try hard 
enough.” 

Wednesday, with the U.S. re- 
porters, he put more emphasis on 
how his government viewed seri- 
ously the “strong perception in the 
United States that the Japanese 
market is not .open enough to as- 
sure fair competition." 

The U.S. undersecretary rtf com- 
merce, Lionel H. Olmec, said in 
Tokyo last week that whole much 
work remained he was encouraged 
by p ro g re ss in the telecommunica- 
tions negotiations. 

In Washington later, ML Ohner 
told a congressional committee 

that pmpre^ Tff giilafiung 

on this issue supported “a growing 
international perception that de- 
spite political statements to the 
contrary Japan remains committed 
to keeping its market protected 
from foreign competition.” 

In Japan, there seems to be a 
growing weariness with U.S. trade 
demands, deepened by a widely 
held conviction that Americans 
Kiamafl others when things went 
wrong. 

Yoshio Okawara, the Japanese 
ambassador to Washington, said 
recently that “although Japan is 
becoming irritated by that, it 
should be carefuL” - ■ 


President 
OfBrazil r 
Orders Ban 
On Spending 

By Juan de Onis 

lot Angela Tunes Serrue 

RIO DE JANEIRO —The first 
cabinet meeting of Brazfl s demo- 
cratic administration has received a 
written order from 
Tancredo Neves prohibiting j»Tf , 
government spending for 90 dayT 
as part of a “frontal attack on infla- 
tion-" 

Mr. Neves imposed the spending 
freeze in a message sod Sunday to 
the TTiwfmg of 26 ministers fro® 
the hospital in Brasilia, the capital 
where he is recovering from emer- 
gency surgery that kept him from 
being sworn in by Congress on Fn- 

da <Mfioals said that Mr. Neves 
would probably take office formal- 
ly on Monday. Mr. Neves under- 
went surgery for an intestinal infec- 
tion anobas been reported to be 
recovering rapidly. 

The message to the cabinet, read 
by Vice President Jos6 Samey, 
showed that Mr. Neves has made 
control of inflation the chief priori- 
ty for the new civilian democracy in 
office after 21 years of authoritar- 
ian military rule. 

Inflati on was above 225 percent^;* 

violated agreements wit^theJnter- 
national Monetary Fund to limit 
deficits, boosting the internal debt 
to more than $27 billion and the 
for eig n debt to S100 billion. 

In the past three months, the 
government has been paying debts 
by issuing growing amounts of par 
per money. The monetary base in- 
creased 19 percent in February, 
when it was supposed to contract 6 
percent under tire terms of an IMF 
agreement. 

Mr. Neves discarded recommen- 
dations from some of his political 
advisers that the government 
should begin with “impact pro- 
grams,” devoting money to small 
public works projects that would 
create' jobs in depressed urban ar- 
eas and distribute food-for-work in 
rural areas. 

Mr. Neves said there would be^ . 
“no im p ac t programs and no new|P 
starts on pubfic works” until minis- 
ters review their budgets and come 
up with the necessary resources. 

The new president said that the 
government’s example on spending 
would, inspire confidence m busi- 
nessmen and workers. He called on 
businessmen to show restraint in 
price increases in the neat three 
TTwith* Negotiations with unions 
on new contracts in key industries 
begin n ext month. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


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ransform Gamps Into Village 


This year, the Vietnamese are not pulling back. Thus, the displaced 
Cambodians are not returning for the rainy season and evacuation camps 
have taken on a permanence that disturbs Thailand. 


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Some of the camps are new, 
like Khao Ta Ngoc, above, 
because for the first time the 
Khmer Rouge are sending 
their civilians into Thailand 
to evade the Vietnamese. 
The first impression is of 
endless tents and of people 
tightly packed, but that vi- 
sion can dissolve into one of 
three children as they meet a 
Western photographer. 



is 






Photographs hy 3m Wilson 
New York limes News Service 








v 






ro men at Khao Ta Ngoc carry rice and 
ijer distributed by the United Nations 
filer Relief Operation. Bags of rice are 
liVered to Site One. 




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injured woman gets a blood transfusion 
ic hospital tent at Khao Ta Ngoc. 


A child’s labor to help build a hut at Site One was wasted when the fighting 
neared the camp on a recent day and its inhabitants were again displaced 




trails isi 


Page 8 


TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


PnMtthed With The New York 'Ham udTbe WnUagMm Port 


Mobilizing Youth to Lend Apica a Hand 


A Savage War Drags On 


No modern war has been more lawless than 

side or the other has slaughtered civilians, 
spewed poison gas. sent children into battle, 
bombarded neutral shipping, abused prison- 
ers. And now they spread the war to the cities. 

Alas, there is no sheriff available to end this 
four-and-o-half-year shootout. The belliger- 
ents are sovereign, both possessing the power 
and resources to continue the butchery, what- 
ever the world thinlcc Saddam Hussein, the 
president of better armed and less populous 
Iraq, has widened the war in the hope of 
forcing a settlement. But Iran shows no sign of 
settling for anything less than Mr. Hussein's 
“punishment" for igniting the conflict. 

The only pro mising gleam is that neither 
side wants to appear wholly barbarian. This 
gives international agencies a modicum of le- 
verage, and it is high time to make better use 
of iu The United Nadons did encourage 
an agreement last June to spare civilians. That 
has now broken down. 

Another repugnant case in point is the mis- 
treatment of prisoners of war. Under a 1949 
Geneva convention, Iran and Iraq pledged 
themselves to treat captives decently, and to 
open camps to routine visits by the Interna- 
tional Red Goss. To their shame, both sides 
have dealt brutally with prisoners. To its 


shame, the United Nations Security Council, 
in the name of remaining “neutral, " cannot 
bring itself to condemn either side. 

Iran’s offense is worse. It holds 50,000 pris- 
oners, compared with Iraq’s 9,000, and has 
scorned and slandered the Red Cross moni- 
tors, all Swiss nationals. AO their activities 
were suspended last October, depriving pris- 
oners of any outside protection from abuse 
and forced “re-education.” This is not conjec- 
ture. The Red Cross's charges against both 
countries have been corroborated by a UN 
team, the Em ever to inspect POW camps. 

The warring countries are quid: to seize cm 
inter natio nal judgments that discredit the ad- 
versary. When Iraq was caught using chemical 
weapons last year, Iran piously invoked evi- 
dence provided by the Red Cross. Iraq adroitly 
picked up the prisoner issue, proposing a mo- 
sided exchange while ignoring the explicit lan- 
guage on such transfers contained in the Gene- 
va convention. And both now strive to put the 
onus on the other for the “war of die cities.” 

Yet as the war grinds on. the Security Coun- 
cil still cannot bring itself to pass real judg- 
ment, not even to the extent of reaffirming the 
findings of a United Nations team. The sav- 
agery can be blamed on Baghdad and Tehran, 
but not this moral collapse. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Supporting a New Brazil 


Brazil, by reason of its size and rapid 
growth, is probably the most influential of the 
countries joining the world’s industrial econo- 
my. Its political choices are important not only 
for Brazilians but as examples to a world that 
constantly and unsentimemally assesses the 
patterns of national advancement. 

When the military seized control of Brazil in 
1964, it was the most significant event in South 
America’s long retreat from elected govern- 
ment. Similarly, Brazil's return to democracy 
reflects a great cycle running through South 
America. The inauguration of Brazil's newly 
elected president, Tancredo Neves, has been 
postponed by his illness. Bui his vice president, 
Jos£ Samey, has taken over the administration 
in a smooth and_assured transfer of power. 

This transfer does severe damage to the 
stereotype that considers democracy to be a 
fair- weather form of government among South 
Americans, who, it alleges, will always turn 
authoritarian in the face of adversity. Brazil 
has been carefully restoring democratic prac- 


tice while undergoing a drastic recession and 
an economic reorganization forced on it by the 
weight of its gigantic foreign debt Rather than 
generating social upheaval and military repres- 
sion, it has brought forward the adoption of a 
genuinely democratic government. 

Bat it would be reckless to thmlc that the 
present degree of hardship could continue for- 
ever without political effect, and hem the Unit- 
ed States has large responsibilities. The sudden 
increase in Brazil’s debt burden over the last 
five years is the result of higher interest rales in 
the United States. It is possible to argue that 
Brazil's debts are tolerable even at these levels 
of interest, as long as it can sell its exports in a 
strong and rapidly expanding U.S. market. But 
if iheU-S. economy should stop growing, or if 
North Americans should try to dose their 
markets to South American imports, the con- 
sequences for Brazil would be severe. The 
United Stales has an obligation to support the 
B razilians * great a chievemen t 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Shultz’s Good Advice 


Secretary of State George Shultz has been 
giving the Israelis very good advice on eco- 
nomic policy. In the recent talks on expanded 
U.S. aid, he stuck to his position that any 
increase is going to have to be accompanied. by 
fiscal reforms in Israel. By spending too much, 
borrowing too much and depending too heavi- 
ly on foreign lending, the Israelis have got 
themselves into a genuinely dangerous place. 
But Israel’s is not the only government that is 
currently spending too much, borrowing too 
much and depending too heavily on foreign 
lending: The United States itself could benefit 
from Mr. Shultz's advice. 

The differences between the Israeli and 
American economies are rather obvious. In an 
illuminating essay recently published by the 
Institute for International Economics, Profes- 
sor Stanley Fischer of the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology argues that Israeli policy 
has been crippled by fear of recessions. In the 
late 1960s, Israel successfully forced its infla- 
tion rate almost to zero by methods that sent 
its traditionally low unemployment over 10 
percent. The results, Mr. Fischer observes, 
were social demoralization, net emigration 
for the first time in Israel's history, and 
the political conclusion that Israel as a na- 
tion cannot afford unemployment. 


For the next decade, successive govern- 
ments kept employment high, and wages rose 
rapidly. There was another attempt at restraint 
in 1980, but it was unpopular and, with elec- 
tions coming, the government abandoned it in 
less than a year. Caught between its defense 
requirements and high social spending, Israel 
has increasingly resorted to inflation. Last fall, 
before the temporary freeze was imposed, the 
annual inflation rate was in four digits. Israel 
is now teetering on the edge of hyperinflation 
— the spiral that destroys the currency. 

In the United States, in contrast, there is less 
concent about unemployment than perhaps 
there ought to be. The essential reason for the 
low inflation amid rising incomes is that the 
United States can still borrow abroad to fi- 
nance its large deficits. But no country's credit 
is infinite. When lenders begin to get anxious, 
the borrower’s previously pleasant Ufe sudden- 
ly becomes much more difficult. 

Mr. Shultz is right, unfortunately, in teflmg 
the Israelis that they are going to have to 
balance their accounts. Americans, also unfor- 
tunately, are going to have to do the same 
Good American advice to other countries is 
bring undercut by Americans' refusal to apply 
that same advice to their own economy. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 

Gulf Wan Unconvincing Grief **ffj*“ 4S 


Nonbelligerent powers may wring their 
hands at this latest spectacle of slaughter, but 
in most cases their grief lacks conviction. The 
unpleasant fact is that this war suits almost 
everyone except those actually being killed, 
wounded or bereaved. 

It is probably true that both belligerents can 
be more confident of staying in power while 
the war lasts than after it finishes. It is certain- 
ly true that Kurds claiming autonomy on both 
sides of the border, aided by each other's 
governments, are able to hold their own much 


better than they could hope to if peace came. 

True, too, Turkey is doing excellent b usiness 
with both sides; that Syria and Israel can 
confront each other with relative serenity so 
long as Iraq is occupied to the east; that the 
small Gulf states fed more threatened by the 
victory of either side than by the war’s contin- 
uation; that OPEC would find it even more 
difficult to hold the present afl price if Iran 
and Iraqresumed full production; and that the 
United States can enjoy better relations with 
moderate Arab states so long as the latter are 
more worried about Iran than about Israel 
— The Times (London). 


FROM OUR MARCH 19 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910; Western Show Denies It Is Cruel 
LONDON — A libel action arising out of a 
visit which Sir William Cospa trick Dunbar, 
the Registrar-General, paid to the Wild West 
show at Earl's Court last year is bring tried. 
The Red Man's Syndicate, which organizes the 
show, claims damages against the Associated 
Newspapers in respect of an alleged libelous 
letter by Sir William which appeared in the 
“Daily Mail" In the letter Sir William said 
that the bronco buck-jumping horses used in 
the show were ill- treated. Witnesses denied 
that there was cruelty in the shape of unduly 
tightening the girths, twisting and pinching 
broncos’ ears, spurring horses in the neck. An 
Arizona “cow-girT said that the cowboy who 
was cruel to horses in Arizona was apt to get 
shot. Other witnesses gave evidence that they 
saw no cruelty, and the hearing was adjourned. 


1935; bvestia Warns of Gennan Threat 
MOSCOW — The “Izvestia" charges [cm 
March 18] that Nazi Germany is preparing to 
wage war and appeals to “all powers interested 
in the cause of peace” to begin consultations in 
the face of Hitler’s “open challenge." This 
journal insists that, the Third Reich having 
made clear the German aggressive design 
through its conscription proclamation, the 
other powers should display their ability to 
“protect the cause of peace for Europe and for 
humanity." The “Izvestia” adds: “In the pre- 
sou emergency everything will depend upon 
whether the powers against which the German 
move is directed will speedily work out a 
system of mutual aid to be employed in case of 
a German aggression.” Germany, “Izvestia” 
points out, can be made to see that she is 
outnumbered by the champions of peace. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen ■ 


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Editor 
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© 1985, International Herod Tribune. AU rights reserved. 


iy 


P ARIS —The progressive disintegration of 
Africa, a generation after independence, is a 
global distress. None of the efforts to help is 
anywhere near keeping pace with what is bong 
lost The overwhelming dimension of the disas- 
ter, not only in the vast numbers of people 
affected but m its complex trend to sdf-accdera- 
tion, is daunting to the best intentions. Still, a 
variety of new approaches is needed. 

Technology can provide some help. Peter S. 
Spencer, director of the Institute of Neurotoxico- 
logy at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 

breed edibte^tirim drtwg^res^mnt 

plants that are poisonous in their natural form. 

Bernard Kouchner has a double-barreled idea, 
nimud at reviving European spirits as well as 
African prospects. He is an intensely energetic, 
driven Frenchman who helped found Midedns 
Sans Frontifcres (Doctors Without Borders) fol- 
lowing the Biafra war to provide care in stricken 
areas. It has served wdL 
Mr. Koochncr now seeks to persuade the 
countries of the European Community to offer 
their youth an alternative to military duty: serv- 
ingin the Third World, especially Africa. 

They would be trained together before setting 
out; it would be an opportunity to bring young 
Frenchmen and Danes and Gomans and Ital- 
ians into small , combined trains where they could 
regain a sense of common European effort 
Then, as European “development volunteers," 
they would be sou to work on “micro-projects" 
alongside Africans their own age, establishing 


By Flora Lewis 


mechanical repair stations or sman proo^ng 
plants in the countryside, helping bund feeder 
roads, setting up demonstration farms. 

Retired people with skills would be welcomed 
as r«m leaders. Local governments would be 
fully involved in the pla nnin g, but the focus 
would be on the village level 

It sounds rather like the Peace Craps, or the 
equivalent of what the French call coopiremts, 
but Mr. Kouchner points out important differ- 
ences. For one thing , it would be multinational. 
For another, it would have room for participa- 
tion by private enterprise and seek oai financial- 
ly self-supporting projects, mninraining diem in- 
definitely with each year's recruits instead of 
aiming them over to a dubious fate. 

And, frankly, it sounds like a backdoor farm 
of recdonlzation. Mr. Kouchner is aware of that. 
But he argues that by having mixed rather than 

national European learns, t raining local youth on 
fully equal toms and working only with local 
consent, that charge can be rebuffed. 

‘These people can’t survive without us,” he 
says; sadly, he is probably right. If the cyde of 
degeneration is to be reversed, a way has to be 
found to reintroduce Western capacity for orga- 
nization, without old forms of domination. Aid 
money and business investment are not enough. 

The cold, dreadful conrinskm to be drawn 
from a generation of independence is that Afri- 
can governments are incapable of providing the 


framework and sendees that development re- 
quires. Traditional village society, which at least 
provided subsistence, has largely broken down. 
Nothing adequate is replacing it 

Even if tens of thousands at young Europeans 
fanned outtosharethewoikofmodenuzatKHi.it 
probably would not solve this problem of social 
structure. But it could help provide some basic 
drills and the renewed sense of community on 
which progress must be founded. 

One appeal of Mr. Kouchner’s proposal that 
attracts President Francois Mitterrand and other 

European leaders is that be presents ii as a way of 
saving Europe: not in the usual material teems of 
expanding African markets and raw-material 
supplies, but as a source of Europe’s shortest 
commodity — an exhilarating ideal for youth. 

“There’s no adventure for this generation," 
Mr. Kouchner says, “nothing more exalting than 
to drive in the Paris-Dakar race. They have no 
way to discover the real world out there. What 
exciting memories w31 they have for later — 
dance halls, football games, cars?” He speaks 
rapidly, with derision for what he c o n si ders the 
bleak, tame stagnati on offered today’s youth. 

“At least the war left memories. Something has 
to happen in your life, but it doesn't in this old, 
old continent Fm proposing a risk.” 

That is a good way to look at this human 
misery, as another frontier, not to be conquered 
Ian to be rescued. The reward of having met a 
challenge can be even greater than the moral 
satisfaction of extending a band. 

The New York Timex. 


Gorbachev: The Tailwinds 
In His Sprint to Power 


HPT 


(Tribune- 


By Seweryn Bialer 

This is the first qf two parts. 


W ASHINGTON — After a two- 
week visit I left Moscow on 


March 3, seven days before Konstan- 
tin Chernenko's death. The mood 
was one of gloom, frustration, impa- 
tience and embarrassment — gloom 
about the country’s huge problems, 
frustration with the inactivity of 
those who were supposed to lead, 
impatience with an “old guard” of 
party leaders who refusea to yield 
power, and embarrassment that a 
great nation and great power was 
essentially leaderless. 

The embarrassment readied its 
apex in the macabre attempt to prop 
up, for election to the Supreme Soviet 
of the Russian Republic, what every- 
body knew was a living corpse: Presi- 
dent Chernenko. 

Beneath that grim mood, however, 
there was hope that soon there would 
.be a new leader, and that leader 
would be Mikhail Gorbachev. People 
were so eager to believe that Mr. 
Gorbachev would really be “new” 
that daring Mr. Chernenko’s year in 
power, a mini-cult of personality 
formed in Moscow around Mr. Gor- 
bachev — an unusual development 

Now Mr. Gorbachev has been 
named leader. In iust ax years a rank- 
and-file party official from a minor 
province became 'the inevitable 
choice to lead the Soviet Union. The 
stray of his rise illuminates the work- 

T of the Soviet system. 

recent years, there were unmis- 
takable signs in the Kremlin erf an 
ongoing power struggle. A fragmen- 
tation of power gave Foreign Minis- 
ter Andrei Gromyko extraordinary 
powers to shape Soviet foreign po- 
licy, and gave the civilian head of the 
aimed forces, Dmitri Ustinov (who 
died in December), similar powers in 
securitypoliries. Prime Minister Ni- 
kolai Tikhonov had wide latitude 
in economic matters. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s selection as gen- 
eral secretary of tire Communist far- 
cy wiB quickly end the period of frag- 
mentation, though a power struggle 
could continue far some time. Mr. 
Gorbachev is not a transitional lead- 
er, but will be in place for years. It 
may not be so important that he be- 
longs to a new generation of Soviet 
leaders. What is important is that 
Russia again will have a continuity of 


University and became a Communist 
Party member in 1952. After gradua- 
tion in 19S5 be returned to his home 
region of Stavropol and served in 
various political positions for the 
next 23 years. 

In 1 978 he was transferred to Mos- 
cow to become secretary of the Cen- 
tral Committee of the Communist 
Party in charge of agriculture. In 
1979, while stiff a Central Committee 
secretary, he was named a candidate 
member, and in 1980 a foil member 
of the party’s highest decision-mak- 
ing body, the Politburo. Although he 
has a law degree, there is no evidence 
of his ever practicing law. He entered 
the university when S talin was in 
power — winch meant the study of 
law was not exactly a prestigious pur- 
suit Nor is Mr. Gorbachev an agri- 
cultural economist, although he grad- 
uated from a local correspondence 
school- of agricultural economics. 

What Mr. Gorbachev is, first and 
foremost, is a professional party poli- 
tician and an organization man. 

At Moscow University he was the 
secretary of Ms faculty’s Young Com- 
munist League, or KomsomoL Be- 
tween 1955 and 1978 he occupied 
staff positions in the Stavropol Kom- 
somol and then the Communist Party 
organization, ending up as provincial 
first secretary. 

Nothing in Mr. Gorbachev’s per- 
formance in Stavropol was especially 
notable — nothing that would ex- 
plain his major promotion to Mos- 
cow in 1978. Perhaps he stood out 
because of his intdhgeace or special 
organizational talents. He certainly 
must have had a high-ranking patron 
in Moscow, but we do not know for 
certain who it was — perhaps Mi- 
hail Suslov, for years the party's chief 
ideologist, or the previous secretary 
for agriculture, FT). Kulakov. At 
someprant Yuri Andropov adopted 
Mr. Gorbachev as Ms own protege 

The process of participating in the 
weak of the Politburo, and the access 
to data and analysis available to Po- 
litburo members, must have been ex- 
hilarating and broadening for Mr. 
Gorbachev: Suddenly he found him- 
self exposed to all the most sensitive 
— and interesting — information. 

His career was still focused rax agri- 



could in bad circumstances, or both. 

By early 1982 he had earned;* 
reputation among Ms colleagues in 
the party elite fra high intelligence, 
considerable organizational abilities, 
political acumen and a talent for sur- 
vival. He started to be looked upon as 

a young man of the future. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s great chance 
came with Leonid Brezhnev's debili- 
tating illness in the early 1980s, the 
death of Mr. Suslov in 1982 and the 
transfer of the KGB chief, Yuri An- 
dropov, to the central party Secretari- 
at in May 1983 — changes that began 
the “post-Brezhnev” era even while 
Brezhnev was stfll alive. 

There are numerous in di c a tion s 
that Andropov took Mr. Gorbachev 
tinder his wmg soon after Andropov 
was transferred from the KGB to the 
party secretariat, making the younger 
man a key lieutenant Evidence of 
their close ties grew stronger after 
Andropov replaced Brezhnev in No- 
vember 1982. Bty mid-’83 there were 
strong indications that the old and 
sick Andropov considered Mr. Gor- 
bachev Ms eventual successor and 


leadership at the top, under a new, 
vigorous and probably strong lea d er . 


vigorous and probably strong leads. 

What is hiAAm behind the facade 
of the young Mr. Gorbachev? 

A Russian by origin, Mr. Gorba- 
chev studied law at Moscow State 


culture. Soviet agriculture performed 
badly during the years (1978-83) 
when Mr Gorbachev was responsible 
for it, but his stature was not dimin- 
ished. This suggests either a very 
powerful patron, or the judgment of 
top leaders that he did everything he 


as preparing him for the job. 

Mr. Gorbachev was sent on a mis 


sion to Canada, where he demon- 
strated Ms ability to deal effectively 
with Westerners. He began to appear 
at receptions of foreign leaders. He 
developed a group of unofficial aides 


Condolences for Russia \s Man of Hope 


P ARIS —It is a paradox that the 
totalitarian dictatorships corn- 


T totalitarian dictatorships com- 
monly thought to have been the char- 
acteristic political product of modern 
times have all really been personal 
despotisms. Big Brother has been no 
anonymous brain behind the bureau- 
cratic and technocratic machinery. 
He has been a disappointed seminar- 
ian, an ambitious ex-journalist, or a 
half-baked racial theorist and frus- 
trated architect. Stalin, Mussolini 
and Hitler all possessed a malevolent 
genius as weQ, and personal magne- - 
tism (“When one sits beside him it’s 
like sitting beside the sun, he gives 
out rays or something," said the Jove- 
struck Unity Milford of Hitler). The 
last thing they were was anonymous. 
Bui it was they who d ominated the 
20th cen tiny and what it has become. 

Mikhail S. Gorbachev gives off no 
such malign radiance. There are no 
such men evident in today’s Soviet 
Union. Bureaucratic power has taken 
over from personal despotism. The 
most striking thing about what has 
happened to the policy of the Soviet 
Union from the ume of Nikita Khru- 
shchev to the appointment of Mr. 
Gorbachev is that chang in g the rul- 
ing personality has produced so little 
change in government 

The country is run by an organiza- 
tion, not by an individual. Much has 
been made of the reform efforts of 
Yuri Andropov. That is all they were 
— efforts. Mr. Andropov cleaned up 
some atrocious abuses of privilege in 
the i ruler’s entourage and made a start 
at improving accountability and dis- 
cipline in industry — but this pro- 
duced no base change. 

Even if his efforts had succeeded, 
they would not in themselves have 
changed the national course erf the 
Soviet Union. They could have given 
the country a sounder and better dis- 


By William Piaff 


cip lined productive plant and agri- 
cultural base. They could not have 
transformed the Soviet Union into a 
self-sufficient technological power, a 
modern industrial innovator, capable 
of competing on serious terms with 
the Um ted Slates, Japan, or Western 
Europe in nonmilitary areas. 

The Soviet economy has now 
slipped behind, to the point of bring 
the most advanced among the Third 
World countries. It once was sup- 
posed by its leaders (and by its more 
fearful Western critics) to be the 
compelling alternative pok of attrac- 
tion not only to the developing world 
but to the working masses of Western 
society. That idea now seems laugh- 
aMe —but between the time of Lemn 
and that of Khrushchev it was taken 


tionaJ and historical inhibitio ns on 
rhangB- Regional and dis tric t party 
leaders have considerable say over 


imveOed late this year — and supervi- 
sion of the party apparatus. From 
almost the beginning, Mr. Gorbachev 
became Mr. Chernenko's right-hand 
man, while Ms own responsibilities 
eventually expanded lo culture, 
world communist affairs, the econo- 
my and personnel Mr. Gorbachev 
never shewed any sign of disloyalty 
to Mr. Chernenko. 


how policies are, or are not, carried 
oul The memory of Stalin — of ter- 


J uite seriously. Khrushchev said is 
961 that physical labor itself would 


1961 that physical labor itself would 
be abolished m the Soviet Union dur- 
ing the 1960s, and that by 1970 the 
country would overtake the United 
States in terms of per capita output. 
He undoubtedly believed this. Mr. 
Gorbachev faces the sad reality. 

It is all but imposable to see how 
real progress can be brought to the 
Soviet Union under the existing sys- 
tem. The nation is a rich one, and its 
people are brave and talented, but the 
Soviet Union is a dedining force in 
world affairs. Could the system itself 
be changed? It is hard to see how this 
could be done peacefully. 

Mr. Gorbachev will be allotted 
only very limited power to change 
things by the veteran members of the 
Politburo. Most erf them possess 
more than 30 years' experience in 
power in Moscow, to Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s seven. Eventually, they- will 
pass on. But there are other instilu- 


oul The memory of Stalin — of ter- 
ror, trials and leadership purges — is 
a barrier to centraHzmg power. 

The problems Mr. Gorbachev 
faces seem, within the existing politi- 
cal structure, all but insurmountable. 
So what happens when a society finds 
itself blocked, as the Soviet Union 
today is Mocked, and when it lives 

imrlur the miKlwr y threat rhnt weighs 

upon the U.&SJL today? The an- 
swers are not all reassuring. 

One would like to see constructive 
changes in the Soviet Union, making 
it a less deadening and dangerous 
factor on the international scene. One 
would like to see Russia recover its 
better traditions, which made of it so 
expansively creative a society in the 
I9th and early 20th centuries. One 
can only fed apprehension at the 
stress it today experiences. 

The Soviet Union confronts genu- 
inely frightening problems. Its posi- 
tion in Eastern Europe is, in the long 
run, unsustainable. Getting out in- 
volves a risk of upheaval and will 
overturn the geopolitical balance be- 
tween East and West Staying there 
may have even worse consequences. 
Guerrilla war in Afghanistan has no 
evident solution but fra retreat. The 
American determination to create a 
new generation of strategic mflitaiy 
technology through the "star warn" 
program sets the United States on a 
course that the Soviet Union can fol- 
low only at ruinous costs. 

This is the burden Mr. Gorbachev 
now assumes. One would like to wish 
Mm wdL One is more inclined to 
offer him condolences. One cannot 
remain indifferent. 

® 1985 William Pfaff. 


Guatemala: ]jp 

HelplsNot 1 . Pa 


Yet in Ordei ’ " 


By Beatriz Manz 

p AMB RIDGE Massachusetts - 
v-' The Reagan administration 


proposing a major increase, fin 
■S30WJ0Q to 535 million, MooS 
assistance to Guatemala based on 
dual deception — that human risk 
have improved under General Osq 
Humberto Mejia Victores and th/ 
the military wifi soon turn over powt ■ 
to an elected civilian government. 

In contrast to the informant 
from virtually every indepoideiu h 
man rights organization, a State D 


last mouth maintained that “overi 
human rights conditions improved 
1984.” In fact, ghastly violence • 
beatings, rape, torture, muiflatki 
and assassinations — has become 
normal state of affairs. Nor is it 
secret war Hundreds of people ha 
been publicly abducted, and mutflj 
ed crapses are strewn throughout t 
countryside. More than 159 anid 
have appeared in the Guatemal; 
press detailing killings, disappa 
ances and gruesome atrocities in t 
last three months alone. 

The military has come to rely ■ 
terror as the centerpiece of acounij 


smash the guerrillas base of suppt 
— to disrupt life among hundreds 
th oniymH*; of ordinary Guatemal 


and experts who advised him on for- 
eign policy and military marten. 

With Nikolai Ryzhkov, another 
young party secretary appointed by 
Andropov, he worked rax plans for 
economic reforms. He made impor- 
tant speeches at the plenary meetings 
of the party’s Central Committee and 
at meetings of party leaders and ac- 
tivists in many areas of the country. 
He started to develop a power base. 

It seems likely that if Andropov 
had survived and remained active for 
another year, Mr. Gorbachev would 
have been Ms successor. But when 
Andropov died in February 1984, the 
old guard could still argue that Mr. 
Gorbachev, though growing in stat- 
ure, was still too young and inexperi- 
enced. Huy chine Mr. Chernenko 
instead, knowing that his weakness 
would maximize their own power. 

There is sufficient evidence to con- 
clude that neither Mr. Gorbachev nor 
Ms allies challenged the selection of 
Mr. Chernenko m February 1984. 
This fact, and Mr. Gorbachev's be- 
havior during the Ghanenlrp inter- 
regnum, show Ms political sense, pa- 
tience and talent fra tactics. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s tactic in the 
Chernenko succession was to beoome 
Mr. Chernenko's dose ally, instead of 
opposing him. This was decisive in 
Mr. Gorbachev’s ascendancy. 

In the fragmented arrangement 
that prevailed during the year Mr. 
Chernenko was in power, Mr. Cher- 
nenko himself was responsible only 
fra ideological affairs — the prepara- 
tion of a new jparty program to be 


are staggering even by the Moo 
standards of Guatemala. Soi ' 

100.000 children are said to have k - 
one or both parents to political v-- 
lence. Of the me million inhabits! : 
in the northwest ol the country, t 
center of army activity. 150,000 hi - 
fled to Mexico and 250,000 have be 
displaced or had their lives sever - 
disrupted. In one highland area, 
villages were abandoned. One * 
these villages, Finca San Frauds - 
Nation, was the site of a nrikij 
massacre on July 17, 1982, of 3 
men. women and children. 

In the years since then, select . 
killing s arid abductions have more . 
less replaced large-scale massaa . 
but the architects of yes tenia 
slaughter are still designing policy, 
fact, many of those responsible 
atrocities have been promoted rati 
than punish ed — and killing s a 
disappearances still occur daily, a 
rale of more than 100 a month. 

In this climate, the generals hr 
declared that elections will be hdti 
Oct. 27, 1985. This may look good 
Washington, but what could el 
tions mean to Guatemalans when 
army has crippled or destroyed uf 
independent organizations and vii - 
ally the entire country is consun : 
with fur? The average Guatema' - 
would not presume to criticize or : 
ganbe openly against the status q 

Whether or not elections t- 
place, the military is simply not ab - 
le relinquish rail power. The oc - 
pant of the presidential palace n~ . 
wear a pinstripe suit instead a. 
uniform, bat the army will still,, 
main in charge. 

The generals will continue to 
pose the lopsided pattern of It 
ownership and income distribut _ 
that has given rise to much of . . 
conflict Potential civilian Candida. 
recognize this, and none who mi_ 
favor land reform dare propose it- 

Nor does anyone imagine that; 
military mil relinquish die powe . 
has amassed in the countiys ~ 
through civil patrols and model ^ 
lages. The army has conscrip 

900.000 predommamly Indian n ' * 
into unpaid patrols and begun to 
tern 100,000 Indians in 70 model : 


lages. Together, the two polides 
forcefully transforming toe lives' - 


forcefully transforming toe lives' • 
the indigenous population. 

In fact, far from getting ready; 
give up power, the army is fuit : -v 
entrenching itself in realms nonni 
controlled by civilians. A Novem r 
1984 law, fra example, extends it 
taxy control over virtually all ii._. 
reconstruction and development 
forts — precisely the area wb^\; 
much of the proposed economic . 
from the United States would go. 

New security assistance oould o 
send a signal that atrocities are ? 
ccp table. It also would be sure.; ’ 
further strengthen the military's o' ' ' v 
trol. Is there an alternative? i 
should be limited to economic as- • ' 
tance and it should be dependent^ 
three conditions; II should go to k' . 

communities and not be managed : 
the military; those guilty of atrocr " 
must be brought to justice; peas 
organizations and grassroots groi . 


must be able to function freely. 
The choice is dean The Um v 


The writer is a professor of political 
science at Columbia University and a 
frequent visitor to the Soviet Union. 
This is adapted from an article in The 
Washington Post 


The choice is dean The Umv. 
Slates can bankroll the further ' 
trendunent of the militaiy. or it p. 
support the establishment of a sta^l 
and just Guatemalan society. / s -'- 


The writer, who leaches andiron 
gy at Wellesley College, contribu 
this comment to The New York Tin: 


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 




Watchdog for the Media 


Regarding the opinion columns such a showing; widely enough pul 'A.. 
“ Courtrooms Are Not the Proper Fo- aired, public demand will force 
non” and 11 Juries Seem to Be Saying media to acknowledge their faltxbi), ‘ 
the System Js Unfair M (Feb. 27): and their obligation to the truth. £ . 

General William G Westmoreland utary bousedeaning win follow. ’ 
and Jim Fain deplore the absence of J-M. BRADLEY" 

any aeenev that can exnose irresnon- Bonn's/' r 


| pr^-iML 


I : - f 

1 i -f ' 

• 1 *v 


and Jim Fain deplore the absence of 
any agency that can expose irrespon- 
sible reprating and that has the pow- 
er to redress victims of media bias or 
falsification. Both acknowledge that 
courts of law cannot do the job, with 
Mr. Fain contending that it “is for 
the media to dean up their acL" This 
ignores the question of why they 
should do so, since the act is one they 
have laid ont for themselves. 

Fortunately, for the objectives of 
both men, a solution to the problem 
already exists, and that in the fonn of 
Accuracy in Media, which has offices 
in Washington. AIM’s business, pur- 
sued for over IQyeara, is the exposure 
of media bias and inaccuracy, via a 
carefully prepared newsletter. Ad- 
mittedly, exposure alone cannot re- 


;rt@j 


Sci-Fi History 

Regarding the feature “ Sd-Ft .'y- 

ers Split on 'Star Won' Plan” (Mo ^ \ ” _ 't * 






2) by William J. Broad: 

Ray Bradbury's statement “Eve !. 
body has forgotten that RuS 
helped start the Second Worid W/ ~ 
is a rather funny version of histc; 

We in Germany have been uugWS' • 9 
different lesson. I remember p 
Russia was not armed when Hi' ; ' J w- • 
broke Ms treaty with it and invade ^ f _ ‘ : 
also remember the conferences. 

Tehran and Yalta — and the resu\ - •; ~\ 
ROSMAJUE GAUTIER 1 ' i. ’ 
Starnherg. West Germany.. "* "'-T 







A 





gj* .*** *; ■**. 

I** *>4W 4,-* • 
t^N^NWw.*-; ..-* .. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESD AY, MARCH 19, 1985 

ABTS / LEISURE 


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By Hcbc Dor, 

hutmaaora} Herald Ti 

1 0NDON — This is the 10th 
/ anniversary of London Fash- 
ion Wed: and the message is that 


McIntyre said he drew 

tion from Vita SadcviSe-West be- 
cause “there’s so much confusion 
in the fashion world today that you 
have to establish an identity, vita 


* 

inspire- 3*? -&■ 

,f_r V . -v- '■4r . ft ' 'y-' i-J. : .:■ 'L 


■■UV- 
{^ l\: St 

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punk is finished; we are deep into hated dothes, but her style was 


-gentility. 

.-' Most of the credit 
.the Princess of W 


to Diana, 
whose ro- 


. . LONDON FASHION 

" jnanric looks and love of dothes 

- . V iiave revitalized the indnstiy, giving 
. '' hope to everybody associated with 

. faadoa, iodudug hat, glove and 
stocking makers. 

^ “We’ve never had stoddngs like 
. . this before, with lace and flowers 
. ’ and cdored seams,” said a British 
journalist. Even King's Road, once 
.-. '• a punk domain, now has windows 
V : . banting with brocade garments in 
; pastel colors. 

. V.V Diana is scheduled to attend a 
fashion recq^tion for oversea buy- 
' ere and reported today ai Lancas- 

' ‘ ter House, hosted by Norman La- 
• c-^'Jmont, minister of state for 
: industry. The reemtion will mark 
' the third time the Thatcher govera- 
. - ■ mat has officially acknowledged 
. . fadiioo. (The first such, event was 
- t hosted a year ago at 10 Downing 
. Street by Prime Minister Margaret 

' Thatcher and the second was given 
* by Lamont six months later.) 

■_T. - The London designers' greatest 
H'; contribution to fastucm is thdr 
. ability to fantasize and come back 
with ddightM, updated versions of 
_‘v their eccentric past Last season's 
influential Regency Dandy look, 

. "'.fj with tight brocade pants and tapes- 
; 7-- try floral vests, is gaining more mo- 
: mentran. 

. If anything, this season the Lon- 

: don designers are even deeper into 
fantasy. Reaching far and wide, 

* '"'they have revived the languid and 
-aniriguous world of Vita SackviBe- 
■ ■ - West, (he bagQr hand-me-downs of 
zmsdnevoos Dickensian children, 
the underground world of Oscar 
; ^ Wilde’s Dcrian Gray, the faded 
tweeds of country squires and the 
’ grand manor look of British eques- 

- : .trian society, with jodhpurs and 
v-rkfing jackets, canes and riding 

boots. 

The romantic floral prints look 
like taige boxes of potpourri. Cued- 
' m British editors are already dress- 

- mg in fabrics that appear to be 

- straight out of Liberty’s home fur- 
.mshings department. 

. : In the collections, roses turned 
up over everything, from shins to 
. ovosized shirtwaist dresses. The 
-faaodkmtted floral sweaters of Su» 
an Duckworth, who runs a cottage 
. industry outside London, were ex- 
pensive but outstanding. Dashing 

- - accessories included lorgnettes 

- hanging from black silk cords, ex- 
travagantly long pearls, fox boas, 
beauty spots, vols, and little bou- 
quets of violets matching the pur- 
ple outfits. 

■ - Even Katharine Hamnett, who is 
. . pest known for slogan T-shirts (her 
■iaiest one is “Stay Alive in ’S5") did 
jpoofy bustled dresses of thick 
brown wool, and wrapped both 
men and women’s faces with 
mauve tulle. 

Despite a few minis, the look was 
predominantly long, sometimes 
reacting all the way to the floor, 
the silhouette was either thin and 
tubular or closely fitted, with a 
song, small jacket over a wide, 
swirlmg skirt The Inner was seen in 
MBan last week, but the British did 
it with more flair and abandon. 

Pants abounded but never cuffed 
and classic. They ranged from the 
kngjohns variety to ski pants; the 
. most typically British were the 
jodhpurs. 

Jodhpurs, including some made 

- of black leather, opened the collec- 
tion of John McIntyre, one of the 
most exciting of London's new tal- 

. arts, McIntyre. 29, a graduate of 
. . the Royal College of Art, has 
worked in Milan as an assistan t (o 
. Luciano Soprani and Krizia's Mar- 
meda' " 


Coming from a Liverpool work- 
ing-class background, McIntyre 
said he showed grand country-life 
clothes “because everybodywants 
to look British nowadays. They’re 
tired of their high-tech look.” This 
also means the demise of the shape- 
less, sepulchral Japanese look. 

“I think the Japanese look has 
done such harm to fastion." McIn- 
tyre said. “I think th at fit and con- 
tour, cutting and shape are the 
most important things today. Fash- 
ion has to be happy. Life is too 
short to be nriserabje.** 

McIntyre’s rendition of the 
1920s, done with a light and hu- 
morous hand, was anything but 
miserable. Long, loose suits in sub- 
tle, low-key colon or in parole 
(SaciviHe-West's favorite color), 
veto finished with miles of pearls, 
fox boas and (he typical, to-the- 
eyebrows frit hat. The models also 
wore beauty spots and funny, grid- 


jgiiA 

* * *> At-. ■■ ■; 


Stunning Victorian coats, short 
and rounded and made, of crewel- 
embroidered fabrics, came in spice 
colors such as cinnamon and curry. 

Desimers such as Bern 1 Jackson, 
Jasper Conran, ‘Wendy Dagworthy 
and Janice Wain wright continued 
to make an impact with totally pro- 
fessional collections, full of real 
clothes for real people. 

Jackson, well known . for her 
prints, showed Edwardian outfits 
printed with thin, inky scribbles. 
Despite crazy accessories such as 
key-shaped jewelry, purple gloves 



John McIntyre’s fitted jacket with pleated skirt; Betty Jackson’s lace top with velvet pants. 


Modem Premiere 
For Bach Preludes 

By Ruth. Youngblood because it was inconspicuously la- 
Umud Pros Imemmona/ Wed “chorales without text" and 

N EW HAVEN, Connecticut — n ? references to composers were 
Music lovers attending the 6 iveQ in the library catalogue, 
modem premiere of 33 organ cho- ■ Programs for Tricentennral 

The 300th anniversary of Bach’s 
birth is being remembered with 
new recordings and biographies, as 
well as concert after concert The 
Associated Press reported from 
Frankfurt. 

Although many concerts in West 
and East Germany are pegged to 
Thursday's celebrations, tributes 
will continue throughout 1985 in 
connection with what has been de- 
clared the European Year of Music. 

In Leipzig, where Bach scored 
many of his greatest works, more 
than 50 dr oral, orchestral and 
chamber music concerts featuring 
90 of his compositions will be pre- 
sented in nine days. 

The United Stales will be repre- 
sented by the Washington Bach 
Consort with a performance Sun- 
day including the Sanctus from the 
B Minor Mass, a violin concerto, a 
motet and a cantata. 

“We have a nice little stash of 
encores,” said the group’s director, 
J. Reilly Lems, who will be leading 
70 instrumentalists and ringers on 
a tour of the major Bach rites. 

West German television devoted 
six hours to a “Bach After Eight” 
spectacular Saturday in West Ber- 
lin. Bach festivals are also sched- 
uled in Frankfurt, Stuttgart. W da- 
burg, Darmstadt, Kassel and other 
cities. And Deutsche Grammo- 
phon Gesellschaft has released a 
new set of Bach works on 130 long- 
playing records. 


and shirts hanging out of long jack- 
ets, her look was definitely adulL 

Somber colors, such as claret, 
purple and olive, dominated the 
runways, but Dagwortby showed 
bright mid cheerful yeuows and 
reds. 

Last but not least, Zandra 
Rhodes and Jean Muir showed col- 
lections that are the backbone of 


Londofl fashion* Famo ns at hnme 
and abroad, these deagners, whose 
businesses have survived for more 
than two decades, are proof that 
the British can be professional 
Stylewise, they could not be 
more different. The exuberant 
Rhodes's success is rooted in bril- 
liant fabric design, while Muir is a 
purist whose introverted styles are 
based on impeccable cm and tech- 
nique. 


Rhodes’s “India Revisited” col- 
lection, shown amid wafts of in- 
cense, was even more dramatic and 
colorful than usual, with long Neh- 
ru coats and embroidered rajah 
jackets with matching tur bans The 
colors included raj blue, mysore 
ruby and Indian spice. 

Muir is a tiny, birdlike woman 
whose dothes look best on small - 
boned women. This season, howev- 


er, she may attract bigger women as 
well, with fluid jerseys, lightweight 
suedes and a leather that looked 
Hke alligator. Her newest dress was 
wrapped around the neck, leaving 
the shoulders bare. 

Often accused of using strictly 
black and navy, Muir showed a lot 


rak preludes by J( 

Bach said the works nthtfrii«y i the 
gprius of Bach as a young m»n 
Before an audience of more than 
2,000 Sunday at Yale University’s 
Battell Chapel, Yale’s assistant 
head music librarian, Victor Car- 
dell, said, “This is a beautiful way 
to celebrate Bach’s 300th birth- 
day.” 

The triceateanial is not until 
Thursday, but the excitement gen- 
erated by the presentation of the 
chorale preludes on the newly reno- 
vated chapd organ attracted musi- 
cians and Bach connoisseurs from 
throughout the United Slates for 
twoperformances. 

The works, among the earliest by 
Bach discovered, are believed to 
have been written before the com- 
poser was 25. 

“These pieces show a youthful 
genius experimenting with differ- 
ent styles, said the Yale organist, 
Charles Krigbaom, who played 17 
preludes after his Harvard Univer- 
sity counterpart, John Ferris, 
played the first 16. 

fKrigbaum said be and the Bach 
scholar who discovered the pre- 
ludes, Christoph J. Wolff of Har- 
vard, found the manuscript to con- 
tain numerous copyist’s errors. The 
Associated Press reported.] 

The chorale prelude was devel- 
oped in the 17th century as a way 
for organists to introduce hymns. 

The traditional order was re- 
versed Sunday: Members of the au- 
dience seemed particularly pleased 
with the introduction of each half 
erf the program by a trombone 
quartet, with the Yale Bach Choir 
-ringing right of the chorales before 
the organist played the preludes, so 
the listeners became familiar with 
the melody before hearing the or- 
gan version. 

Threc months ago, Wolff, chair- 


S trike Cancels Thrte’ Again 

The Assoaoied Press 

MILAN — The La Scala pre- 
miere of Mozart's “The Magic 
Flute” was blocked by an orchestra 
walkout Sunday, for the second 
time in three days. 


New collection 

ESCAD& 

at European 
export prices 

Marie-Martme 

8, Rue deS^ms, Paris 6th. 
TeL (1)222 1844. 


The home 
| of Burberrys Paris, 
since 1909 

(Near the Madeleine) 



The full fange of 
traditional Burberrys Mcns,| 
Ladies & Children clothing. | 

Burberrys 

8, bd MaJesherbes 

Paris V -266.13.01 


and blue often mixed in rash com- 
binations. 


Roots of Rap: Last Poets Still Speaking ( Spoetry 9 


This may account for the maturi- 
ty of his collection (this is his third) 
as wdl as its polish. Using mostly 
fresh, blond, little-seen British 
models, McIntyre managed to put 
■cross a good dose of wit, a quality 
often lacking in die routine perfor- 
®ances of international models. 


By Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

P i AR1S — Some music histori- 
ans say that “rap" the ghetto- 
bom spoken rock songs (hat start- 
ed winning wider audiences in the 
early 1980s, descends from “jail 
toasts” — black prisoners reciting 
their troubles to others. Rap is. 
street poetry put to music. 

Toward the end of the 1960s a 
man called Ughtnin’ Rod recorded 
a jail toast with Jinn Hendrix. In 
1969 he was with the street-poetry 
group the Last Poets on their first 
album as Alafia Pudim, an African 
name. 

By 1973, when the Last Poets 
made their classic “Hustler’s Con- 
vention.” he had converted to Is- 
lam with the name JalalUdin Man- 
sur Nuridin. He is now the last of 
the first Last Poets. 

What happened to the others? 
“Our first record sold over a mil- 
lion copies. It was all word of 
mouth. You couldn’t find it in the 
white stores and we never got a 
platinum record. It was invisible, 
an impossible situation. And I sup- 
pose I became unbearable." 

The Last Poets were formed after 
a South African exile poet named 
Willy Kgastile visited a writers’ 
workshop in Harlem. “Dus is the 
last age of poetry and essays.” he 
said. “Guns and nfles will now take 
their place.” Some of the students 
at the workshop said, “That’s what 
we are, the Last Poets.” 

And that is how rap was bom. 
Grandmaster Flash, Kurds Blow 

Last Poets as^thrir^wtaf^ori- 
din raps them: “They were nappin’ 
while we were rappinV The rap 
craze has revived interest in the 
founders of collective spoken 
swinging street poetry. 

Nuridin calls the form 
phics, spoetry for short. 

f rapidly.” The post-rap Last 
comprise Nuridin, who has a 



of color, with red, purple, green man of the music department at 

Harvard, discovered the ch orates m 
an 18th-century collection of Ger- 
man music at Yale’s Beiuedce Rare 
Bode and Manuscript Library. 

“This was a sped ai find,” Wolff 
said, noting that the works helped 
“in tracing and evaluating the for- 
mative stages of Bach’s art." 
Listeners soiled to recognize 
familiar in Protestant 


“We started on the corner and fin- 
ished on the square. We are trouba- melodies 
dours, soothsayers, griots, observ- hymns such as “Lord God Now 
ers; we tel] real-life stories, stories Open Wide Thy Heaven” and “A 
of the times and thdr significance. Mighty Fortress Is Our God.” 

We tefl stories about the oppressed The preludes were hailed by 
and the oppressor.” ’ Harold E. Samuel, music professor 

.“The Mr takes a conservative and curator of the Yale library, as 
; -position on sexual politics: “Are “the most significant Bach discov- 
you aware of the pill? It's basic cry of the last century." He said the 
design is to Itifl. the fertile womb preludes would “become part erf 
becomes a tomb for the new child the repertoire of every church cr- 
tmbom stflL Are you aware of the ganist is the world.” 
brute whose job is to wither the For the performance, carried live 

fruit? ... and make the begin- by public radio, the organ was com- 
ning the end." It stems in part from pletely restored, its 3.691 pipes, 
Islam and in part from the view most of them metal, washed in hot, 
that birth control is a plot to limit 
Third World power and liberate 
only white women. 


Last ‘spoets” Jalal Ucfin Mansur Nuridin (right), d-Hady 


degree in and practices acupunc- 
ture; the teacher and poet SuHa- 
majon d-Hady in the front hue; a 
conga drummer and a bass guitar- 
ist. 

Their latest album, “Oh My Peo- 
ple" (Celluloid), released earlier 
this month, was produced by Bill 
Laswefl, master of techno-pop and 
one of the hottest producers m the 
business (Herbie Hancock, Mick 


“Hustler’s Convention” was a 
brightly colored portrait of the 
ghetto, with hustling voices playing 
s, prostitutes, dealers and 
>lm backed by gunshots, 
j glass, barking dogs and 
an. eclectic group erf rnnacians in- 
cluding Kod and the Gang, Eric 
Gale and Julius HemphtlL ft is no 
longer on the market 
“In show business most people 
show their business but we were 
taking care of business,” Nuridin 
oard He tends to rap just talking. 


“There’s plenty of unused land 
to grow enough food to support the 
present population of the Earth 
and any likely increase," d-Hady 
said. “Look at bow the Israehs 
made the desert flower." 

“When we get finished spott- 
ing,” said Nuridin, “then the audi- 
ence is no longer interested in being 
en t ert a ined because they know that 
they can be entertained and en- 
lightened at the same time.” 

Although the Last Poets are 
touring Europe in April, Nuridin 
refused to give their itinerary. “I 
don’t hke people to know where I 
am, and 1 don’t want to fall into : 
show-biz routine. I'm not interest- 
ed in advertising. WeD be there 
when we get there.” 


soapy water and its wooden pipes 
renmshed. The instrument was 
built in 1951. 

Bach, who was not widely fam- 
ous during his lifetime, was born in 
E ise n ach , Germany, on March 21, 
1685, and died in Leipzig in 1750. 

Scholars said the manuscript ap- 
parently escaped earlier attention 


Despite the Facts, York Plans 
To Glorify Dick Turpin Tale 


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ping synthesizers behind the spoo- 
tics — despite the fact that rate of 
the tracks, “Mean Machine.” gpes: 

“Driving me nuts bolts screws 1 
got tire blues paying dues for pro- 
gram news of noneyeoated lies that 
your eyes can’t believe that weave 
the devil's magic with the latest 
gadget from the mean machine. 

. . the computer’s equation for 
worldwide invasion that comes in 

the name of peace and good will The Associated Pres thug," said James 

... to set the people up for the VT ORK, England — History and ex in history at York 
Irill. ” L tourism are at odds here over Sflaimi blam e 

While Nuridin raps these lines the l eg e nd of a highwayman, 
quickly without punctuation, d- The York Tourist Development 
Hady chants stow verbal counts- Association wants to dean up a 
point britied him: “Automatics — neglected grave reputed to belong 
pushbutton — remote control — to Richard Turpin, a robber 
synthetics genetics — control the hanged in 1739 and supposedly 
souL” buried in SL Georges Churchyard 

The two “spoets” see no conflict with his h orse. Black Bess, 
in using madmtery to criticize ma- . According to l eg e nd. Dick Tur- 
ctunery. “The marinne depends on phi rode to York m 15 hours — a 
who operates it," d-Hady said. 190-mile (300-lotomeier) journey 


“The fhinwg had gunpowder. — to give himself an alibi when he 
They used it for fireworks, enter- “ ’ 

tainmenL Marco Polo took it to the 


was under threat of arrest in Lon- 
don. His horse, legend has it. 


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I H A N N E L 


West and it was hooked up to droprped dead at the end trf the ride, 
guns.” Historians have long labeled 

When the Last Potts’ first album Turpin a rustler, poacher and 
was released in 1970, the Blade smuggler who became a horse thttf 
Panthers and !be FBI were in a ^ was hanged for it. 

face-off, with both sides armed, “There was no evidence to suggest 
audit looked serious. The Last Po- T ™P“ anything but a nasty 
tts were not spokesman, however; 
they considered themselves “loud- 
speakers" reporting objective daily 
news from the ghetto. 

The album was well-covered inj 
the media, with long articles in The 
New Ycuk Times and Drily News, 
the San Francisco Chronicle, Roll- 
ing Sterne magarina and other pub- 
lications. After “Hustler’s Conven- 
tion," the record industry told 
Nuridin: “We do not know how to 
market yon.” 

That, he said, “was just another 
way of saying, ’We don’t want to 
bear the truth.’ When you start out 
with a Be you got to alibi for the lie 
then you gtt to alibi for the alibi. 

Go to the iiebtny, all the lies are 
buried in the liebury.” 


Sharpe, a lectur- 
nk University. 

Historians blame the novelist 
Harrison Ainsworth for the legend 
of Tinpin and Black Bess. In 
“Rookwood” (1834), Ainsworth, 
by acci den t or design, apparently 
confused Tinpin with a ‘‘gentlem 
of the roacr named John (Swift 
Nicks) Nevison, who lived 50 years 
earlier. 

York Castle Museum, which 
contains the cell where Turpin 
spent his last night, has set ootthe 
facts in a booklet, but the legend is 
too romantic to be overturned. 

"The myth says be is buried with 
his horse, and that has become pan 
of our heritage.” John Bevan, 
chairman of the tourist association, 
told the Sunday Times of London. 
The association wants to smarten 
op the grave, reletter the gravestone 
and erect signs. 


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iTtxi 


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tivaiKiauta 


I 



Dow Jones Averages 


ladu> 125245 126033 124232 12(9 JSt + U2 

-mm «oua MH.il snun smj7— ixi 

Util 147.lt 14m 14634 147.M + 8J6 

Comp SMI STUB SUB 5M.U — 1.11 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE index 


Advanced 
DacUnvd 
Unc ha n ge d 
TOftrf IJSOM 
Nh Htohj 
Nkw Lows 


<14 4U 

94 m 

44 473 

soi im 

41 48 

14 11 


previous Todov 
MSB IM One 3 PJM. 
Campaslt* 1MJ7 1046 W046 104 

industrials 11079 1T7J2 IM IPJ4 

Tramp. 9740 WH 9U5 MM 

utilities sua sis .as sue 

Finance HHJ2 T0S43 W663 105JS 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Buy Soles Hilrt 

March IS 179317 tfJJK M26 

March 14 17949S 483345 3J67 

SSSn 2 M 626 526843 144 

March TZ 304219 556JB W 

March 11 - 1B1J38 565385 427 

•Indudad tai hwsaia flaum 


Monda y 

NM* 


Tc: 



NASDAQ Index 


eta Nom am am 

mas — 3304 27020 

319 m - mm m 
55497 — JOJO m*j 
550.74 — 34937 MWJ 

2SSJ1 — MUM 239-42 


AMEX Most AcWsnuc 


ComWMlio 

inoustriob 

Fhwic* 

Insurance 

UffllHu 

flortki 

Tranm 


VnlnMPU 

74220080 

Prev.3 PAL vrol 

TSAWm 

PrevaMoSthdedctow 

12USM80 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


VM. 

HWt 

7638 

3M 

3M 

414 

2N2 

WV. 

3483 

79% 

2276 

14*4 

1715 

1*4 

1754 

3114 

1549 

151% 

1537 

314 

1465 

4*k 

1387 In 

1297 

3V4 

1195 

13*4 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up In the chain? on wall street and 
do put reflect Hite trades clMWMrfc 

Via The Associated Press 


Previous Today 

HIM low aos# 1PJH. 
IlMtastrWs 200 J 3 194 W 194 A 1 * 7.14 

USM 157 JH 151.71 Uft4S 

B TUI M M JM 

Ftana 2070 2037 2427 wm 

Campdoltu 17*44 17453 17443 17475 



Prev. 

Today 


cion 

Mom 

Bonds 

7039 

NA 

Utilities 

wm 

NlAi 

industrials 

7073 

NA 


AMEX Stock index 


*4 twill! 



aw 129 
JO 12 2 
1JJ0 11.1 
964 121 
93 7J 11 
.14 J 9 
JS U U 
74 U U 
IS UH 
MB 15 13 
1JH 32 





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50 371k Exxon M M 7 4346 4V 40*% 44*4 + Vk 


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14*4 UVi— V% 
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Statistics Index 


bm£X nrkes P.l* Earning# marts P .12 
•u£X h tons/ lows P.12 Fttn* rat* notes p.M 

CvSEnrkH ' P .10 flow mwWa P.ll 

mvse MgK/uwi P-12 inter*** ran* P.11 
oaMSonUodo P.M Market summory P.io 
^rmyraltt P-H Options P.15 

CWJOBimto P.15 OTC Stock P.14 
j^rtwxfc P.15 Other morkMi P.16 


TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


HeraliMSfeSribune 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 



\T$ :L* ” L 

? t >1 *V . M 

si % 4 **> 7 # 


N ^ 


FUTURES AND OPTIONS 

Lumber Prices Sho wing 
Unusual Spring Softness 

B j ELIZABETH M. FOWLER 

New York Timet Service 

N EW YORK — In the spring, lumber prices — spurred 
higher by the end of a long, inactive winter in the 
borne-bull ding industry — traditionally have been a 
harbinger of an awakening economy. This year, howev- 
er, lumber prices have been dropping sharply, despite statistics 
indicating that U.S. housing starts for the year could total 1.7 
milli on units. That would be a good year for the budding trades, 
although still short of the record 23 million starts in 1972. 

Despite the housing industry’s health, however, lumber prices 
continue to bump along slightly above their contract lows, 
showing little impetus to rise. Tor example, Chicago Mercantile 
Exchange contracts for May _ 


Despite good signs 


• ■ i. 
4.- " 

*£■ r 

m-H. 


year, lumber prices 
continue to drop. 


: 


V" 


■V «•. 


‘l- 


' i v : - 


»• -- : 


* -V 

.=» . 

Hi- **. 
Ml 

; «i 

* 


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it ' 


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a • * 


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r 

v: 


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• 


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4 ", 

: =5 2 
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- 


: ’ 


delivery have been dawdling 
along for weeks at less than 
S 1 37-a- thousand board feet 
A. futures contract in lumber 
covers 130,000 board feet of 
basic spruce fir — the land 
that carpenters typically use 
in houses. 

The May contract's high " 
was $225 in March 1983 and its low was 5132 made eadier this 
month on March 7. On Friday, the contract closed at $133.40, 
compared with $135.20 a week ago. Prices have shown a dramat- 
ic, almost steady, slide since the second week in January when the 
May contract sold for more than $176. 

- On Friday, Walter L. Emery, research director for the Com- 
modity Research Bureau, stressed that this year the coming of 
wanner weather will not improve prices. 

“There was a blip up earlier tins week," but it was trfjmiral he 
said. “Even the Friday closing price will be difficult to sustain 
unless the Ca na di an dollar strengthens. I must say I am surprised 
at how prices have been reacting, but it is basically a problem of 
overproduction.” 

Carmen Sol da to, a vice president of Pershing Futures in 
Chicago, a unit of Donaldson, L ufkin & Jenrette Securities, said 
that interest-rate worries and oversupply problems will cause 
prices of lumber to drop even further. 

“We are headed lower," he said. In fact, he thinks the May 
contract could work down to 5110. Trading in the May contract 
ends around the middle of that month, he pointed out, which 
means prices still have about eight weeks to sag. “If we do have a 
temporary rally of about 58 to 512, 1 advise selling into it,” he 
said. 

Meanwhile, many producers and users of lumber also expect 
lower futures prices. One lumber manufacturer reportedly sai d 
that “he was looking for the price of May to move down to $1 15.” 

Curt Cunningham, a forest-products analyst for Prudential 
Bache Securities in Bellevue, W ashing ton, wrote in Ins latest 
report that “the imbalance between supply and demand” contin- 
ues to dominate the lumber market li We do not believe,” he 
wrote, “that a significant percentage of the lumber far this 
building season has been purchased yet. The question remains, 
however, more one of absorbing the volume of unsold wood in 
the market currently.'’ 

He guesses that dealers, knowing tint lumber mills are over- 
loaded, will continue to keep inventories low, buying on “a hand- 
to-mouth basis, while waiting for possible lower prices." 

U.S. producers have become increasingly concerned about the 
competition from Canadian companies. Recently, members of 
Congress from some of the major mmbcr-producing states in the 
West introduced legislation to limit Canadian imports to about 
25 percent of consumption for die next five years. 


To Our Readers 

Some statistical material is missing from this edition be- 
cause of tdecoimnunications problems. We regret the incon- 
venience to readers. 


Currency Rates 


2 PM 

• 

c 

DM. 

FA 

Itl_ 

CUr. 

6F. 

IF. 

Yu 

. Affittardan 
>«Wa) 

NA 

57JB7S 

7438 

20.101 

659 

11919* 

17.773 


23595 

2604* 

Frankfort 

iMdnatM 

KA. 

1.1065 


35955 

1U93B 

2336.95 

4.1125 

74J9S 

3.1495 

297 JO 

.Uta 

2.13050 

Z333M 

831.29 

20674 

— 

53941 

31415 

749JQ 

Ml 

~HMYOf*(c) 



1.114 

3X29 

10.1725 

2.10600 

17425 

<7X5 

2*37 

259*5 

•Vigil 

- TOJ1 

11X72 

2A54 

— 

6837* 

UU7 

15.195 ■ 

15848X9575 • 


25045 
NA. 

NA 

0.954221 0X74459 


ToOra 

Xmk* 

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ISDN 


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.flUDHcnKSMI 7X0)5 


25X4 12X7 * 68.17 384.10 1 


9066 


3X2782 945964 N-Q. 34509 44X849 2J5DB 349X96 

Dollar Values 
* P * r * 

Bah. CarrTfxr UXX Em*, 

wan trwii tvs? 

axon iraftriMU 919J0 

32774 KawAIAWr 0X051 

0X857 Matav.rUHU 2X93 OOB54 5*0*. PCM* 11 

0L1O44 Nan*.krWM «7? 

0X544 PtAiwn WXK 

0X054 PtrLwcadB WX0 

8X789 Sort rival 3X11 


0JJ 

044 Staaaml 22725 
8X13 LAAfcnrad 2XJ2S 
00012 


9X35 

39X3 


01849 

0X254 TWMaS 
0X154 TMbatt 28X25 
0X733 UAE-dtriKoa 3X735 


"l9Nrttar.UfMhtaht 

'• irt COrniwretal franc (b) Amount* needed to Oav caw pound let Amounts needed to buy one dollar 1*1 
..iwt« or loo tx) umi* onxo8 tvi units oi hum 

* HQ.: dm quoted; ha.: no* avoHa*. 

'Xnras; Banov* du Benelux (Brussels): Banco ConunardcOe ffalkma (Milan); Chemical 
,ftnk (New York); Banaue Wllanala He Paris (Parts); IMF (SDR); Banaue Arabs et 
. ertaveshssemenl (dinar. rhnU. efimom). Omw data from Rmiten oadAP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Ha 

-tn. 


March 18 


Donor P M am Franc Staffing Franc' ECU SDR 
. 9 o . 4ta Sh -5H 141b - 141* TO 1h- lOWi 1014 ■ TM* — 

— * * -91b 41b -4U 514 - 5ta 13bb- »»fc »*■- 11 fc »*■- W*. — 

914-944 4 V. . 4M. 54b-5bW 13 tk - 13 m, IT H. - IT «. 10 »W - 10 fb If A. 

914 . TO 4)4 - 414 594 - 4 nbt- 124b 1114 - 11 4b !<M ■ 1W4 — 

j 1 *. 104b- TO 4b 4 4b . 4 4b 54b - 54b 1214 - 1214 12 - 1214 Iff* - ID*. — 

'tafttfODpffcoOtofD Marten* deposits of SI million minimum (or ewlvtUenf). 

**ms: Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM, SF. Pound. FF): Lloyds Bank (ECU); Redon 
GOBI. 


Asian Dollar Rates 

loro. 3 mu. 

*14 -»H vu. -914 


March 15 


3 met. 
91b -94b 


4 RHML 
10 1b -101b 


, Key Money Rates 


' xiasurt Rat* 

‘’ntara Fundi 

•frkoo R«* 

' .' n * w i-eon.Rota 
? wt l> wr. »179 dove 
■ ■mcmiv Tmaurv Btlta 
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Britain 


8 V Bank Bom Dm* 

R4 K4 coil Manor 

lOvs idw fi-dnv Traemirv Bin 

934.10 914-10 34norrth IntarimU 

na 9X5 Japan 

8J7 L a ■-* — 

8.93 $.99 Obeounl Rat* 

NA UP C" 0 M * w 

NA 9X3 M-day Intartumk 


Claw Frev. 

u 14 
NA 1414 
- 1314 

—13 13/14 


5. 5 

M 4 7/14 
4M 414 


.< «iTOaw Hoi, 
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Z!^T^ rM,nk 

Z** 1 ‘“tafban* 
;-"»ilh Mwtmk 

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.£R,S3r* 

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6X0 4X6 

190 ODD 
4X5 US 
US US 
US 4X5 


MVS 10V4 
mk 1094 
u M/1410 nm 

Wfc 1W4 
TO 9/14 M 9/14 


etannwr iA n ta t CnW P Lr- 
'***■ Uom* Bank. Bank of Tokyo. 


AM. pjh- aim 
Hans Kara 394X5 294X0 +4X0 

mnmXoura NA — — 

Porta (05 Ubl 293X4 29277 +4X7 

Zurich 29125 298X0 +175 

London 293XD 299X5 + 4.15 

Now York - 303X0 + UP 

OfneW HKim» tar Um5«v Paris aid Lnxem- 
tewg, owning end dating grioa tar Hang Koag 
and Surtcta N*w York Cmtwx eunnii contract 
M orlan h U&X per ounce. 

Source: Rooters. 


ABC Set 
To Be 
Acquired 

U.S. Network 
Agrees to Merger 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Capital Cities 
Cotnmnnicatioas Inc. will acquire 
American Broadcasting Compa- 
nies Inc. in a transaction valued at 
more than S3.5 billion, under a 
plan announced jointly an Mon- 
day- 

Under the agreement, which has 
been approved by the boards of 
directors of both companies, each 
ABC shareholder will receive SI 18 
in cash phis a tenth of a warrant for 
the purchase of Capital Cities com- 
mon stock. Each whole warrant 
will entitle the holder to purchase 
one share of Capital Goes com- 
mon stock at £250 a share for 2 14 
years after the merger. 

For 90 days after the merger, 
bidders of warrants will have the 
right to sell the warrants to Capital 
Cities for $30 each. 

The companies said the transac- 
tion is worth $121 a share. ABC has 
29.1 million shares outstanding, 

ABC closed at £74.50 a share, up 
$2,125, on Friday. Capital Cities, 
which has both television and 
newspaper operations, fell S2 a 
share to $176. Both asked the New 
York Stock Exchange not to open 
trading in their stock Monday. 

Capital Gties, winch had reve- 
nues of $939.7 million last year, has 
four ABC affiliate television sta- 
tions in Philadelphia; Houston; 
Hartford-New Haven, Connecti- 
cut; and Buffalo. New York. It 
owns CBS affiliates in Raleigb- 
Durham. North Carolina, and 
Fresno, California, and an inde- 
pendent station in Tampa-St Pe- 
tersburg, Florida. 

Capital Cities holds licenses for 
12 radio stations and owns 50 cable 
television systems in 16 states. It 
owns the Fairchild Publications 
business newspaper group and four 
daily newspapers in Missouri, Tex- 
as and Michigan 

The ABC television group pro- 
vides entertainment and sports 
programs for more than 200 affifc- 
ated television stations. ABC owns 
five of its TV affiliates. ABCs ra- 
dio division has 1,596 affiliated ra- 
dio stations. 

The company, which had reve- 
nues of £3.71 billion in 1984, is also 
involved in recorded music, pub- 
lishing, video enterprises arid mo- 
tion pictures. 

Federal Communications Com- 
mission rules do not permit owners 
to hold more than one station in a 
major dty. 


Many U.S. Companies Stop Hedging 

But Firms Find 


Their Equity 
Is Diminishing 

By James Stemgold 

New Yak Tima Service 

. NEW YORK — U.S. compa-' 
rdes with operations abroad long 
used hedging techniques to pro- 
tect earnings from the ravages of 
foreign currency fluctuations. 
But, lulled by an accounting 
change that serves to protect, 
those earnings, many U.S. com- 
panies have stopped hedging, 
and now find their corporate 
equity being eaten away by the 
strength of the dollar — and the 
shrinking value of their assets in 
foreign countries. 

Until 1981, increases or de- 
creases in the value of assets held 
abroad had to be reflected in 
earnings, as well as in equity. But 
a change in accounting rules that 
year allowed companies to show 
the unrealized changes in the val- 
ue of foreign assets only on their 
balance sheets, and not in earn- 



H 

The CteeUnn In oQuity from 1 9fll to June 30, 1B84 

tnrefflom 

Cwwmkv of data* 

u a permit 

Boroughs 

8215.4 

-9.5% 

Coca-Cola 

14&3 

-5.5 

Colgate P tarn ultra 

258.7 

-18.7 

Dart a Kraft 

27B.4 

-11.2 

EnhartCoip. 

B3A 

-18.9 

Goodyear 

368.1 

-12.3 

1AM. 

2(293.0 

-9.3 

•lotimaa A Johnson 

297.4 

-9.8 

KoBoae 

104.1 

-10.1 

Nabisco Brandi 

175.2 

-10.6 

IWHOfl 

136.0 

-ISA 

Staffing Drue 

109.S 

-12.0 

Unkm CartUda 

357.0 

-7.1 

Upjohn 

106.0 

-9.4 

Saotm; Aabm tatarnaflorar Manor ftaport. Mamdwtuwg raraw Tnaf 



while many companies try 
to protect themselves against for- 
eign-exchange losses in their 
highly visible earnings (using 
such means as forward contracts, 
futures contracts or currency op- 
tions contracts, for example), 
most of them have left their bal- 
ance sheets unprotected, and 
thus vulnerable. 

“When the rule was changed, a 
lot of companies were no longer 
hedging; they felt insulated," 
said Marc Grimalda, a foreign- 


exchange adviser for Bank of 
America. “Hedging almost 
stopped, even though the risk is 
bunding," 

The problem now is that the 
impact of translation losses on 
equity has grown so large for 
many companies that the losses 
are becoming too large to ignore. 

Merrill Lynch Economics esti- 
mates that there were capital 
losses on direct U.S. investment 
abroad of $6.3 billion in 1983, 
and $5.2 billion in first three 
quarters of last year, before the 
dollar began its strongest run. 
And calculations by Manufac- 
turers Hanover Trust Co. show 
that the erosion amounts to hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars for 
many companies. 

According to the bank’s calcu- 
lations, in the first half of last 


Die Nw Yod Tns 

year, Goodyear Tire & Rubber 
Co.'s equity was reduced by 
£42.6 million. Johnson & John- 
son’s by $36.7 million, Procter & 
Gamble Ox’s by £36 milli on and 
Colgate-Palmolive Co.’s by £34.8 
miTTinn International Business 
Machines Corp.’s equity account 
incurred a loss of £223 million 
for the first half of last year be- 
cause of the dollar’s rise. Union 
Carbide Corp.’s equity was cut 
£86 million for the full year. 

“Here's this maverick force 
crashing around on their balance 
sheets^ said Howard. McLean, 
head of currency options plan- 
ning at McLeod Young weir 
Ltd., a Canadian investment 
dealer. “It's a horrendous thing 
to be exposed to. But many seem 
willing to live with it, as though it 
(Continued on Page 15, GoL 5) 


Ohio Extends 
Bank Holiday for 
71 Thrift Units 


The Associated Press 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Gover- 
nor Richard F. Celeste extended on 
Monday a “bank holiday" for 71 
state savings and loan associations 
as a special session of the state 
legislature debated a plan to end 
the crisis that has frozen assets of a 

half-mini on depositors. 

After conferring with lawmakers 
and other officials, the governor 
said Sunday night that the legisla- 

Obio bank order leaves anger, 
disbelief in wake. Page 15. 

urre would meet in emergency ses- 
sion to consider a measure that 
would allow the thrifts to 
“in a matter of days, rather 
weeks." 

Identical bills were introduced 
on Monday in the state Senate and 
House that would require; as a con- 
dition for reopening, that each in- 
stitution apply for federal insur- 
ance and then — while awaiting 
acceptance — qualify for insurance 
in a new stale fund. 

Also Monday, one savings and 
loan filed suit against the state, 
seeking a temporary restraining or- 
der that would allow it to reopen. 
George Hazlett, president of Buck- 
eye Savings & Loan Co. of Beflaire, 
said in his suit that his thrift would 
suffer irreparable damage if the 
closing continues. 


Japanese Yield in Software Dispute With U.S. 


By John Burgess 

Washington Past Service 

TOKYO — Japan, apparently 
seeking to defuse growing trade 
tension with the united States, 
gave ground Monday on an issue 
the two countries have debated for 
more than a year, the protection of 
computer software from unautho- 
rized copying. 

Japanese officials told US. trade 
negotiators that the government 
would soon submit legislation spec- 
ifying that software qualifies for 50 
years' protection under Japanese 
copyright laws. 

That on 


The patent vs. 


copyright d 

is highly technical, but UJ>. offi- 


panies to license software that they 
did not want to sell in Japan. 

Washington has consistently m ai nt ain that it holds a key to 
pushed Japan to apply copyright w ^ cl ^ r foreign companies can 
laws, as is done in the United Stales profitably market their best wares 
and many other industrialized 111 Japan. 


put an end to a 

floated by the Ministry of interna- 
tional Trade and Industry to treat ; official 
js trial 


countries. [Japanese officials have 
expressed concern that relations 
with the United States are deterio- 
rating because of trade problems. 
Page 6.] 

A U.S. official in Tokyo called 
the Japanese move Monday “a wel- 
come development” but said the 
United States continued to have 
concerns oyer the Ministry of In- 
ternational Trade's idea. 


In recent years, Japanese courts 
have ruled that software is covered 
by existing Japanese copyright 
laws, according to Japanese offi- 
cials. But manufacturers complain 
that in practice protection is inef- 
fective and pirating common. A 
year ago, at least 44 lawsuits were 
pending. 

The Ministry of International 
Trade's proposal, which appeared 


debate license programs that for whatever 
reason the owner did not want to 
sell in Japan. The foreign compa- 
nies also objected to Japanese pro- 
posals that key data on their pro- 
grams be placed on -file with the 
government for use in the event of 
litigation. 

Foreign software producers and 
the U.S. government argued that 
software is an "intellectual proper- 
ty," Hke a novel or play, and de- 
serves (he 50-year protection nor- 
mally given such works. 


Meanwhile, thousands of people 
and businesses were separated 
from their savings and cash by the 
three-day bank holiday declared 
Friday. Federal officials and bank 
executives said they could not re- 
call a similar action since President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt shut all the 
nation's banks in 1933 to stem a 
panic during the Great Depression. 

A telephone hotline explaining 
the dosings had 10,000 calls over 
the weekend, and Cardinal Federal 
Savings Bank in Oevdand offered 
emergency cash loans of up to S500 
for customers of the closed institu- 
tions. 

The plan presented to the legisla- 
ture calls Cor all the closed institu- 
tions; now insured privately, to ap- 
ply for coverage by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Carp, 
before being allowed to reopen. 

In addition, the legislation re- 
quires the thrifts to demonstrate to 
the state Commerce Department’s 
Division of Savings and Loan As- 
sodatioos that they meet the basic 
criteria and regulations of the 
FSLIC, proving their deposits and 
secure arid protected. 

The governor said that, under 
the proposed legislation, once any 
of the institutions receive FSLIC 
approval or demonstrate to stale 
officials that they have sufficient 
outside financial backing, they will 
be allowed to reopen. 

The orderly reopening of many 
of our institutions snoukl be a mat- 
ter of days, rather than weeks." he 
said. 

The crisis began when the Home 
State Savings Association of Cin- 
cinnati said it had lost up to $150 
million stemming from the collapse 
of a Florida government securities 
dealer, prompting hundreds of de- 
positors to withdraw their money. 
Home State, one of Ohio’s largest 
savings and loans, was closed by 
the state on March 8. 

Depositors then camped outside 
other savings institutions waiting 
to make withdrawals, prompting 
the governor on Friday to order the 
71 institutions to remain closed. 


software .as ah industrial product 
and subject it to patent law, ac- 
cording to Japanese officials. 

Under that plan, protection was 
to be hunted to IS years, qhd, in 
special cases, the government 
would be empowered to force oom- 



“wili disappear. „ 

patents approach, Japan has 50 years’ protection was too long a 
dropped plans for compulsory li- period in so fast-cha n gi n g a fidd. 
censing and registration, he said. Under the Ministry of Intema- 
The United States is generally tional Trade's plan, if it were 
held to have an edge over Japan in deemed to be in the national inter- 
tbe fidd of software. est, the government could forcibly 


] 


tote inter btxik rate on March 18, excluding foes. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 


Economists See 4 % U.S. Growth in First Quarter 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York Tima Senice 

NEW YORK — Strong consum- 
er spending will propel the U.S. 
economy to a 4-percent growth rate 
this quarter, as has been forecast by 
the Reagan administration, accord- 
ing to many economists. 

The first quarter's growth rate, 
which will be foreshadowed 
.Wednesday in the Commerce De- 
partment’s “flash” estimate; wifi be 
a key indication of whether the 
economy is maintaining its mo- 
mentum after recovering from a 
slowdown in the fall 

The gross national product, 
which measures an economy’s total 
output of goods and services, grew 
at a lethargic 1 -6-percent annua l 
rate in the thud quarter, but re- 
bounded in October through De- 
cember 81 a 4.9-percent rate; 

If a 4-percent growth rate is in- 
deed achieved, the most common 


Dollar Declines 
In Wo Europe 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — The dollar fell 
Monday in early trading in 
Western Europe against major 
currencies. 

At the opening, the dollar fell 
to 26035 yen in Tokyo, down 
from 260.80 yen late Friday. 

In London, the pound rose to 
$1.1065 from S1.0S3 late Fri- 
day. Eariy dollar rates against 
other currencies, compared 
with late rates Friday, inemded: 


3J767 Deutsche marks, down 
from 3.4015; 2.8762 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.8865, and 
1031 French francs, down from 
103925. 


prognosis is for a fairly good per- 
formance for the rest of the year. 
That optimism contrasts with some 
fears last fall that the Lhen-daw- 

a irK^dOT^ew expats^nw be- 
lieve that a recession is imminent 

“There’s a lot of strength in the 
economy,” said Robert A. Gough, 
a senior rice president of Data Re- 
sources Inc., an economic consult- 
ing concern in Lexington, Massa- 
chusetts. “We’re beaded for a 
4-percent year. Despite the trade 
deficit and federal budget ddfirii, 
we’re learning to acclimate” 

The administration is counting 
on growth at a rate of almost 4 
percent a year through 1990 to trim 
the record federal budget deficits. 

Mr. Goiqgh, who believes that 
theflashesunmewfllbemthc3%- 
percent to 4-percent range, said the 
trade deficit was a wild card that 
could skew projections. A rising 
trade deficit, which means that im- 
ports are growing more quickly 
than exports and that rising de- 
mand is satisfied more from 
abroad, cots into growth. 

“With all the confusing cross 
currents, the strong sector is con- 
sumer spending,” said Michael K. 
Evans, president of Evans Eco- 
nomics m Washington. “Housing 
should also rebound, and defense 
spending is still strong. Capital 


seems weak, so that 
Id show no gain. And. of 
course, net exports wifi lake us 
down. When you add those all to- 
gether, you get about 4 percent 
growth." 

But Michael J. Bazdarich, chief 
economist of the Claremont Eco- 
nomics Institute in Claremont, Cal- 
ifornia, believes the economy will 
grow only at a rate of 3 percent to 
3 14 percent for the quarter — in 
large part because be believes con- 
sumer spending is not as robust as ! 
others think/ 

The economy is stQl in the lull 
that began last summer, he said. 
The fourth-quarter rebound was 
helped by heavy molding before 
Christmas, he said, but that trill hot 
rescue the economy this quarter. 
He said that the 1. 4-percent in- 
crease in retail sales in Febm 
announced last week, was probably 
a fluke. 

Donald Ratajcak, director of the 
economic forecasting project at 
Georgia Stale University, predict- 
ed a 444-peroeut growth rate during 
the first quarter but added that 
consumers probably were dipping 
into savings to achieve that growth. 

Moreover, slight inventory accu- 
mulation might indicate that the 
long baying spree is slowing, he 
said. These factors suggest a w 
eating of the dynamo of the econo- 


my, 

accounts for two- 


tint 

of GNP. 

Lawrence Cbimerine, chairman 
of Chase Econometrics, expects the 
government’s flash estimate on 
Wednesday to be between 4 per- 
cent and 5 percent. But after the 
quarter ends March 31, the figin-e 
wifi be revised downward, be said, 
because recent statistics on such 
sectors as the trade deficit arc not 
yet available. 






I 


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INTERNATIONAL 




TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


Monday 


mse 


Chaig 


Tobies include n» nanonwMa prices 
op to flw cfOsios oo Walt Strsof 
aid do not reflect tale trades dsewtierB. 


12 Month 
Hfahlm* Stack 


Dtv. YM PE IflteHWlLowQiHLgitoa 


(Continued horn rage 10) 


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240 39 38* 

92 1014 10 
213 13 12* 

177 1514 IS 
U 11* 

14 21 
4 18 
1455 2S* 

711 
51 

45 49 

4 443 


im 




43* 28* QuakOa L24 25 13 575 43* 42* 42*— lft 

22* IS QuokSO JO 18 24 141 22 21* 21*— *4 

11* 6* Quantx 35 H » M K 

34*4 23 Questor 1.40 +8 9 272 33* 33 33* + * 

25* 14 QkRefl 24a 1J U 133 23* 22* 22*— 1 






77* 45 
40* 33* 
37 -a 

n, 8* 

23* 20* 

23* 71* 
21* 17* 
II* 15* 


UpM«i 354 U 14 441 

USLIPE MM 1ft 12 1018 


USLPPf 125 45 
UsIftFd ljMdKLf 


UfaPL 132 HU 9 1389 


UtPLpf 180 11 J 
UtPLPf 190 UJ 
UIPLpJ 3J4U.V 
UtPL.Pl 104 1L7 


78* 77 

40* 40 , 
35 34* 

9* 9* 
22 * 21 * 
24 21 

ZM M * 
If* If* 
17* 17* 


7*0+ * 
40 — Vft 
3«+ * 
9* 

23to+ W 
24 - M 
34* 

19*+ * 
17*+ to 


21* vp com 

Sik valera 
14 Vatorpf 
2U VMn’fn 
16* VbnDri 
2 U Vara 
5* Vorapf 
30* Vartan 
9* vara 
imvtm 
3* Vends 
8* Vans* 
25* Viacom 
48* VaCPpf 
52* VaEpfJ 
49* VaEP Pf 
SI* VoEPPf 
14* Vbhav 
27 voraad 
51 lAricnM 


80* 31* + * 


Jft J 11 
40 U U 
JO 10 13 


lJOollJ . 
J2 1 j6 18 
9J3 12J 
7J2 KLS 
7 JO 112 

7J5 122 
1J» 72 14 

IS 

180 17 11 


1353 f* 914 «*— * 
32 30* 20* 20*— * 
13 2* a* 3* 

24 24* 24* 24*+ * 
44 2* 3* 2* 

2 7* 7* 7* 

1289 31* 31* 31*— * 
95 12* 11* 11* + * 
UU 20* 28 20* 

T9 4 4 4 

52 10* 1014 ID* + W 
995 41* 40* 41 — * 
SOX 78* 7W4 78*—* 
SB* 82 42 fit 

SOt 59 59 99 

S0Q* 81 40 81 — * 

87 25* 25* 25* + * 
12 39* 31* 39* - * 
38 76 75* 7SH— 1* 



44* 33* KffW 100 7.1 17 3478 43* 
51* 45V. X*TUXpf 5J3 T1J 11 49* 
29 19 XTRA J4 IS 9 41 28* 


Si ss- 


a 


44* 





1J2 

107 

350 

130 

+00 

129 

k+00 

25B 

}% 

I JO 

38 

7JS 

+9 

.18 

12 

BJOO 

118 

.14 

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3JS 


250 11J 
197 15.1 
+00 15.1 
150 1+9 

-56 

27 

22 

4 

154 

+4 

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JO 

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IS 

L00 

37 

4J4e 9J 

275 

98 

2J5 

84 

1J2 

+8 

322 

78 

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XS 

255 

7J 

152 


1J8 

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20*+ V. 
3414— * 
32—44 
43* -1* 
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24V + * 
34 —44 
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20—14 
4814—2 
23 - 14 
tv, 

!0tt— * 
20 *— * 
3744+ 16 
58+14 
2414 + * 
18+14 
21 *— * 
38 — * 
35*— 44 

nm 

594— * 
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1716 + 14 
18* 

5 *— * 
ITS 

m— * 

2894— * 
3* 

7*+4t 

a* b* 

2944 29*— U 
38 3Mft + to 
27* 27*— * 
39* »J6 + * 
48* 4844— 14 
12 + * 
28 
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24 ZoleCu 

1J2 

47 

13* ZOPOKI 

84 

57 

30 Zovra 

job 

3 ' 

llto ZanHhE 



i.UVlmi 



i SM Zurnln 

1J2 

4J ' 


NYSE Highs*Low9 




Lwij 




Company Earnings 


Revenue and profits. In minions, or* in loco 
currencies unless otherwise Indicated 


Sates Mura ora unofficial. Vrariy hlotp and llwwi reftotf 
Itw previous 52 weeks plus the curran t wwfc. but not mel wat 
Irwflno doY.Wlwctwin or stock dividend amounttno la 25 

31 + to Jpenant or more has bran paid, tbjyeartnwwowrojma^ 

30* + 44 I dividend ora shown tor the new slot* only. Unless olharwfM 
noted, rales of dividends ore onnual disbursements based on 
the latest dado ration. 


a— dividend also eKtra(s). , 

b— annuol rale of dividend plus Stock owtaenL 
c~ iiauMatine dividend, 
dd — called, 
d— new yearly low. 

e— dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months. 

a — dhiMend In Canadian funds. tuMed to l» norwesldence 

tox, 

I — divkletid declared after seOiMto cr stpctc div idend. 

1 — dividend paid this year, omitted, d eferred, or no action 

takan at taint dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or paid mb year, an accumulative 
Issue with dividends M arrears. .. .. . 

n — new Issue In the past 52 weeks. The hlan-law nmoe beolns 

with Hie start of tradina. 
nd— next day delivery. 

P/E — arlce-aarntnoi ratio. ^ 

r— diurdond decta-M or paid ki praaedlne 12 manna, plus 
slock dividend. 

*— stock split. Dividend begins with dole of sent. 

sis— solos. ^ .. .... 


Kubota 

3rd guar. 198S iim 

Revenue _ 131 J4L I3VJ0. 

Net Inc. XnO. 2740. 

Per AOS 58 81 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 43X840. 43X8*0. 

Net Inc. 12JN0. 1XM0. 

Per AD5 190 l» 


Revenue — 

Mel Inc. 

Per Share—. 


Worthington h 

3rd Qw. ms 
Revenue — 147 J 

Net Inc. 8B1 

Per snore _ a* 

9 Months 1981 

Revenue — W3 

Net Inc. 3km 

Per Share— M2 


lit gear. ™« «** 

Revenue — 3378*. 30O«. 
Net inc. — 19JJCL 17J7a 
Per AOS— 84 75 


W. German) 

Kloedcner-Wer 


t— dlvfdand paid in stock In praaRilna 12 months, ostlmated 
cosh volwo on ex-dtvidend or ex-dlstrltxjttaa date. 


u — new yearly Moh. 
v— tradina halted. 

vt — in ba nk r u ptcy or racehenUilP or being reqroanlaea utv 
der itw Bankruptcy Ad. or tecorl ties assumed bv such com- 
panies. 

wd — when distributed, 
wt— whan Issued, 
ww— with warrants, 
x — ex dividend or ex-rlehts. 
xdls — ex-dtatr ibuhan. 
xw— without wurronK. 
v —ex-dhrldand and Mies In tulk 
vtd- yield, 
s— sales la fuiL 


The Global 
Newspaper.) 




Mondarl s - 

AM 

E 

X i 

Oo^ilK 

? . . 


12 Month Sis. Oow 

High Low Slock Ohr. YkL PE IQteHloh LnwQuot.Oto 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Sb. Oasa 

Div. Yld. PE 1 DOS High Low OuoLOTgi! 


IS Month 
HMiLow Stock 


Sh. Oom 1 12 Month 

Dtv. YM PE lOQsHlohLowOuor. OiUo I Hlati Low Stock 


Div. YM PE lOteHlsn LdwQwjl.C 


VoLatS PM. ■— simm 

Pray. 3 PJ+vol MUM 

Prey, consolidated dose 7478J08 


Tables bdBde (tie nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on wall Street 
and do not refled late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 



14* 

3* 

11* 7 
12* 8* 
19* 7* 

WW 5* 
22 14 * 

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20* 12 Frtsdis 12 1.1 17 U 20* 20* 20* + H 
14* 814 PmtHd 1195 13* 13* tj*— * 

19* W* FurVHn 18 18 II 17* W 


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pf X7S M7 2 
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27a 1 j 12 573 
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27* 18* ProvEn w 74 7 

19 144b PotpfC 234 123 

33 25* POtPfE 437 1X9 


3 19* 19* T9* +* 
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2*W 16* 
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1644 4* 

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14 6 

JBto A 14 32 

43 48 

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J3t 4J 13 41 

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7* 71ft 7* + * 
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1786 11* Jochm job 35 9 

9* 5* Jacobi 

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5K ZV JitAm 8 

2* * JetAwt 

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11* 71ft JohnAm JO 29 16 

7* 4* JmpJkn 5 


14* 14* 14*— * 
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15* 15* 15* + * 
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8Vft TV 7*- U, 
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BU FPA 73 

18* pqblnd JO 2J 7 
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9* FTCoon 1:00a 9J 7 
18V FTtFSLn JOb 2.7 7 
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7* FrMm 28b 22 12 
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280 32 12 


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92 7V6 
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18 8* 

48 39 

49 27* 
28 11* 
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45 S* 
10* 95 

252 19V* 
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200 BM 
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259 1816 


11 11 + * 
17* 17*+ * 
4* <*— * 
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13 13 

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34* 24*—* 
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38* XU 
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14* 10 
14* 9* 
17* 10* 

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KnGsM 450 1X0 

Karaite A 

KoyCp 20 1J 32 
KaarNn JO 32 13 
Katchra _5Bt 18 
KavCe 20 25 
TCevPti 20 11 15 
KevCo 10 

Klddewt 

KOern X 

KlrtJ* ” 

KJtMfg 13 

Kiaarvs jar J 
Knopo 18 

Knoll U 

KooerC ZJ2 BJ1X 


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1745 9* 

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71 32* 32* 
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/t 


AMEX ffighg-Lows 


Castle AMs 
HealthMor 
SaobrdCp 


Crowley MU 
MurttnProc 


France Needs Alternalfe 
To Dollar, Fabius Says • 


The Assodatal Press 

NEW YORK - France needs to fi* 


7*— to 
«-* 

1» - to 

7* — to 

12*+ V 
3*+ to 
19*+ to 
54 - V 

ife-* 
2* + * 
176*— a 
2 * 

28* 


alternative to the U.S. dollar, probably bj 
phasizing the Japanese yen and the Eura 
Currency Unit, Prime Nfinistcr Laurent fiS 
said Sunday. 

In an interview with Time magazine; 1 
Fabius said, "A smooth decline of UkmJoS 
required. From the U.S., a more balanced:, 
get and a better policy on interest rates V 
be helpfuL As for us, we need a detoic. 
political and economic European wilL” ’ 

He added: “Quite frankly, if we don't wr. 
be overdependent on the dollar, our Eurb' - 
economies have to be strong, and we nee 
alternative to the dollar, which means th* 
and the development of die European Cun 

On the French elections, the prime ®it \ 
said the interim elections had not been decuj 
“Generally speaking, people in a period of ■ 
vote against incumbents in this kind bfj| 
non.” he observed. “That was good for BS“ 
we were in opposition. It is differeafij 
now.” 

Mr. Fabius said France fell lob far 
modernization between 1975 and 1 
have to do it intensely right now. w 
easy economically or socially," he said. 


SS-* 

5V— W 

* 

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4 

4 * + * 
to 
to 


4* 2 USRInd 
24V 5* UHmfe 


17 3V 3* !Ffc — V 
>89 17* II* >136 + V 





















































































3 


* ; & 


4 V 

. « • U , r ? 


AT&T’s New Computer 
Ready After a Struggle 




r:;l Mv 


. 

* » * 


»„n : 


"• Juiv: 


SSSrr c v* ' 


Reuters 

; NEW YORK —After struggling 
for months to untangle a web of 
mechanical problems, American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. is pre- 
;• ..paring to unveil its '‘Safari" per* 
.. soaal computer lata- this month, 
industry sources said. 

Hie PC 7300, also known by the 
' - code name Safari, is the centerpiece 
1 of AT&T’s plan to sharpen its chal- 
■ knee to the industry leader. Inter- 
national Business Machines Cocp. 

“AT&T has put a lot of time and 
money into this product,” stud 
. Leonard Hyman, an analyst for 
/^Merrill Lynch. “A lot of the com- 
' s • pony’s credibility hangs on its suc- 
cess or failure." 

• The new machine is designed to 
match the capabilities of IBM’s 
" l - PC-AT. 

■ . • But AT&T is likely to face sever- 
al difficulties, analysts said. 

*. Private Businesses Grow 
To 9.3 Million in China 

Reuters 

X' BEUING — China had 93 mil- 
L^lioo private businesses by the end 
uf 1984, 57 percent more than the 
previous year, a spokesman for the 
‘ 1 s i«»g administration of industry 
* s °*Hand commerce announced Mon- 
day. 

All large industries in China are 
•• -state-owned, but private enterprise 
n>.is being encouraged 


Chief among these is resistance 
from computer retailers, whose re- 
lations with AT&T have been 
soured by delays in the introduc- 
tion of Safari. 

Computer analysts had original- 
ly expected AT&T to unveil its new 
desk-top machine last November. 
When Safari failed to materialize, 
the experts set their rights an Janu- 
ary, only to be disappointed a g?'ni 

The delays apparently stemmed 
from a sects of technical and man- 
ufacturing snags, analysts said. The 
computer was designed by AT&T 
engineers and is being built by 
Convergent Technologies Inc. of 
Santa Clara, California. According 
to industry sources, Convergent 
Technologies was months behind 
schedule in retooling its production 
lines to manufacture the new com- 
puter. 

With several hundred Safari pro- 
totypes in the hands of software 
writers and prospective customers, 
AT&T has heard a chorus of com- 
plaints about the computer’s slow 
response to user commands. 

“If AT&T doesn't speed up the 
functions of the PC 7300. IBM will 
eat them alive when it comes to 
m a r ket ." said a software company 
executive who had tested a demon- 
stration model. 

Responding to the criticisms. 
AT&T pushed bade the introduc- 
tion date and set its te chnicians to 
the task of sharply accelerating the 
computer’s response time. 


GM Chief Cites 
Requirements 
\For New Plant 

United Press International 
DETROIT — The chairman 
I of General Motors Corp., Rog- 
} ef Smith, has said that Amen- 
l can states with heavy debts and 
I poor educational systems will 
not be chosen for the automak- 
i el's new Batura plant — regard - 
1 less of what tax breaks anaoth- 
| er incentives they offer. 

in an interview with the De- 
| trail Free Press, Mr. Smith said 
! such incentives "are a factor, 
but they are not so predomi- 
I nani a factor” He said “tax 
1 breaks can’t make a sQk purse 
out of a sow’s ear.” 

He did opt naipe specific 
states in the interview with the 
newspaper's editorial board, 
nor did he say how GM rales 
Michigan's economic health 
and the quality of its .schools. 

The Saturn plant will employ 
6,000 workers on two shifts. 
Several states and hundreds of 
communities have been court- 
ing GM for the plant A deci- 
sion is expected by May 1. 

GM officials quoted by the 
newspaper said Sunday that 
only Florida has been ruled out 
as a Saturn rite. 


Bally Diversification Saved Firm From Disaster amc to Offer 


By Steven Greenhouse 

Nett York Times Service 

CHICAGO— When BaDy Man- 
ufacturing Corp. began diversify- 
ing in the late 1970s, spending the 
jackpot it had won selling pinball 
and Pac-Man machines, its aim was 
to expand into less cyclical busi- 
nesses. The company was not seek- 
ing a life preserver in case the then- 
thriving video arcade games 
business collapsed. 

Bat collapse it did. And today, 
Robert E Mullane, Bally's chair- 
man and chief executive officer, 
readily acknowledges that, were it 
not for the company’s diversifica- 
tion into casinos, amusement packs 
and health dubs, Bally might have 
gone the way of the nickel pin ball 
machine. 

“I wish we could say we were 
farsighted in diversifying," Bally’s 
chain-smoking. 52-year-old chan- 
man said. "Even in our worst-case 
scenarios, we never dreamed the 
video-game business would disap- 
pear the way it did." 

The plunge in demand for arcade 
games was so severe — from about 

100.000 video and pinball ma- 
chines a year in 1982 to fewer than 

15.000 last year — that it forced 
several ocher game makers out of 
business. Bally, though still in busi- 
ness, has nonetheless had prob- 
lems: Its profit plunged to $52 


million in 1983 and it had a loss of 
S1QQ rmlli/Yn Inst year, largely be- 
cause of an arcade games write-off 
and an operating loss in that divi- 
sion. The company earned a record 
$91 minion in 1982. Bally’s com- 
mon stock dosed atSM.625 a share 
Friday on the New York Stock Ex- 
change, down from $32 in 1981 

“It's not a strong company at 
this pant," said Harold VogeL an 
analyst with Merrill Lynch, Pierce, 
Fenner & Smith. “They have to get 
back on track. It will probably take 
six months or a year before they 
make significant progress." Mr. 
Vogel estimates that Bally will earn 
$32 million this year — slightly 
below the company’s own $35-mif- 
lion projection. 

Bally executives are confident, 
however, that their company is an 
the mend, with hs health dobs, its 
cas in o hold and its lottery division 
all expected to provide growth. Mr. 
Mullane estimated that Bally’s 
overall revenue would increase 
slightly to about $1.4 billion this 
year. Last year’s revenue rose near- 
ly 15 percent, principally because 
of Bally’s $72-mfllion purchase of 
Heal th & Tennis Ctup. of America, 
a chain of 285 dubs and \ 3 million 
members that makes BaOy the larg- 
est health chib operator in the 
United Slates. 

"This year will certainly be a 


great improvement over the last 
two," Mr. Mullane said. “Every 
business will be profitable, except, 
perhaps, video games." 

Pinball gnd other arcade 
had been Bally’s bread and batter 
ever the Chicago-based com- 
pany was founded in 1931. It was 
the late 1970s, however, when the 
company’s games division sudden- 
ly took off, thanks to its introduc- 
tion of slick, new electronic pinball 
machines to replace the electrome- 
chanical machines of old. 

In 1979, BaUy began producing 
Space Invaders, a phenomenally 
successful machine licensed from 
Japan. And in 1980, h introduced 
the even more successful Pac-Man. 
Thanks principally to P&o-Man, 
sales of Bally’s video and pinball 
games jumped to $435 million in 
1982 from $27.9 million two years 
earlier. 

Then arcade games sales, like the 
roller coasters at Bally’s Six Flags 
amusement parks, began almost a 
free faB, The industry plunged, Mr. 
Mullane said, because young peo- 
ple tired of the fad and because 
manufacturers could not come up 
with a game that attracted young- 
sters the way Pac-Man did. 

BaDy's coin -operated video and 
pinball games sales plummeted to 
$99 midi on in 1983, and to $68 
million last year. The company was 


forced to take a 5169-miliion pre- 
tax write-off last December as it 
shrank its arcade games division. 

“Arcade games went from bring 
our angle largest business — the 
thing that drove ns for the last 50 
years — to our fiftb-Jaigesi busi- 
ness,” said Mr. Mullane 

Bally, which is still the largest 
arcade games maker, has laid off 
3,000 people from its arcade games 
division mid slashed the division's 
break-even point from $300 million 
to $40 million, which is what Mr. 
Mullane estimates division shies 
will be in 1985. 

In Mr. Mullane's view, BaDy's 
fastest-growing division wffl be Its 
chain of health clubs. They indude 
the Vic Tanny chain and the Jack 
LaLannc dubs in the New York 
area. With $350 million in revenue 
last year, the clubs have already 
become Bally’s largest revenue pro- 
ducer. Health & Tennis Corp.'s 
revenue has jumped an average of 
more than 20 percent a year in the 
past decade. 

Many analysts are not so exuber- 
ant as Mr. Mullane about the dubs’ 
prospects. “Certainly, a lot of peo- 
ple go to these facilities," said Mar- 
vin B. Rolf man, an analyst with 
Janney Montgomery Scott Inc. in 
Philadelphia. “But remember, fads 
can last two months, two years or a 
hundred years." 


New Warranty 

The Associated Press 

DETROIT— American Mo- 
tore Corp. announced Monday 
that it would offer a five-year, 
50.000- mile (80,000-kiloroeter) 
warranty on its 1985 Renault 
Alliance and Encore subcom- 
pact cars. The warranty is 
AMC*s latest effort to spur lag- 


Laie last year. AMC lowered 
the prices of the Encore and 
Alliance by 1.6 percent and of- 
fered 10.3-perceni f inanc ing 
The company now offers 8.5- 
percent financing. 

The five-year warranty cov- 
ers the drive train and any rust 
on exterior body panels, like the 
company's normal 12-month or 
12,000-nule warranty. 


Chrysler Spending Plans 

Reuters 

DETROIT — Chrysler Corp. 


motive News magazine reported 
Monday. Quoting a senior Chrysler 
executive, it said $3.5 billion would 
be allocated for cars, $2.1 billion 
for trucks, $1.1 bilDon for power 
trains and $3.8 billion for plant 
modernization. 


U.S. Steelmakers Are Raising Prices 


i *»-«•*». , Ur.itvv Vr.'oj 


r* 


Ford Motor Workers Agree 
ZOnGobalSoUdarUyFUm 

' Reuters 

• . Tt; LONDON — Ford Motor Co. workers from 16 countries have 

i agreed on a plan of international solidarity to prevent the company 
from crushing industrial action in any one plant, union leaders said 
Monday. 

T r The plan was the key decision made at the first Ford world workers’ 

£!£' sJiOR conference hdd in Liverpool and attended by representatives of 
jk? cV ^ 140.000 Ford workers worldwide, the officials said. 

i % 3w3»JB “W e have agreed that when our colleagues are in dispute we will not 
“ * allow Ford to increase or substi tute production dsewbere or to import 
... - j substitute vehicles or parts," the conference chairman, Beraie Pas- 
singbam, told reporters. 

■ Mr. Passingham said he was confident that gQ of the automaker’s 
1 plants woridwide would am together if Ford tried to dose a plant in 
Jr yf 1 Europe, as had been rumored. 

r rLjjjf j The strategy has already proved effective, Mr. Passingham said. 

; When the West German union was involved in a dispute over working 
1 boms. Ford attempted to import parts from South Africa into Britain 
j but the workers refused to use them, he said. 

. ~ He predicted that nidi actions would now increase. "I am not 
saying it wffl happen overnight, but we have laid the foundations,” he 
said. 


By Qaire Miller 

Reuters 

NEW YORK —The largest U.S. 
sted makers have been increasing 
prices by an average of 5 percent as 
a result of an improved business 
climate and recent curbs an im- 
ports, but industry analysts caution 
that higher prices may be only tem- 
porary. 

“If s a temporary increase, which 
will be pressured in the third quar- 
ter," said Jane CnTlbi an analyst at 
Standard & Poor’s Corp. 

She noted that the July-Septem- 
ber period is typically marked by 
reduced demand for steel because 
many metalworking plants curtail 
operations for the summer. 

She predicted that the price im- 
provement wfll average only 3 per- 
cent at the end of 1985 from the 
levels at the end of 1984. 

Other analysis said imports will 
continue to provide competition 
for U.S. steelmakers. The Reagan 
administration has negotiated 
agreements with other countries to 
reduce finished steel products to 
18 3 percent of the U.S. market, but 
accords on specific products have 
yet to be resolved. 

“Imports of semifinished steel 


are not included in the import deal 
and that could boost total imports 
this year to more than 20 percent of 
the market," John Jacobson of 
Chase Econometrics said. 

Imports accounted for 26.7 per- 
cent of the market last year. 

Mr. Jacobson also predicted a 
“double-digit" rise in import prices 
as foreign steel shipments are re- 
duced. He noted that overseas pro- 
ducers also may choose to push 
their high-price items to compen- 
sate for the U.S. import restric- 
tions. 

U.S. Steel Corp. raised prices on 
carbon structural steel, which is 
used in the construction industry, 
effective April l through SepL 30, & 
company spokesman said. Prices 
on the company's basic carbon 
structural steel shapes will go up to 
$455 a short ton ($409.50 a metric 
ton) from $430. 

Bethlehem Steel Corp. increased 
prices on wide-flange and standard 
structural shapes and H-piles by 
$20 a ton to $23.90 per 100 pounds, 
effective with shipments of March 
31. Discounts on new business will 
be reduced. 

Bethlehem said the action re- 


stored prices to April 1982 levels. 

Specialty steel producers also 
have raised prices. Allegheny Lud- 
lum Steel Corp. reportedly in- 
creased stainless-steel grades for 
automotive emission applications 
by 6 percent beginning July ]. 

Armco Inc, said it was still 
studying Allegheny’s action. 
Armco previously announced a 5- 
perceni reduction in discounts to 
distributors on flat-rolled stainless 
steel as of April 1. 

Cyclops Corp. increased prices 
for high-temperature alloys far the 
aerospace industry by 5 percent ef- 
fective March 18. 


“Producers feel they wiD soon 
see benefits from the ITS. adminis- 
tration’s plan to reduce imports to 
18 J percent of the domestic mar- 
ket This coupled with a rcasonal 
pickup in second-quarter demand 

has given them the leeway to up 
prices." said John Gagliano of 
Paine Webber Mitchell Hutchins 
Inc. 

“With cash flows constrained, 
now is as good a time as any to 
secure additional revenue," Mr. 
Gagliano adde d. 


Alexander & Baldwin Inc. said 
fharrman RJf. Pfeiffer was 

its 6,700 shareholders to vote 
against Harry Weinberg's attempt 
to tnVe. over the company. Mr. 
Weinberg, owner of 25 percent of 
the company’s stock, is starting a 
proxy fight to elect his own slate of 
directors at the annual nwring 

April 25. 

Arbed SA said it made its first 
net profit in 10 years in 1984 — 645 
million Luxembourg francs ($934 
million) after posting a loss of 2.4 
billion francs m 1983. It said rising 
exports helped increase volume by 
183 percent to 56.7 Whon francs. 

Broken B5B Pty. Co/s unit, Utah 
Development Co., said production 
had stopped at live open-pit coal 
mines in the Australian state of 
Queensland because of a strike by 
2300 workers over boons pay- 
ments. 

WX Our, Sms & Co. (Over- 
seas) has obtained a license from 
the Japanese finance Ministry to 
m jrpgp in A-aiing broking, under- 
writing and setting securities in Ja- 
pan, the ministry annonnn«H. 

Control Data Corp. and Kobe 
Steel Ltd. plan a joint venture to 
provide Control Data’s Cybernet 


science and engineering data is Ja- 
pan beginning in Jane, according 
to Control Data Japan Ltd. 

Hitachi Ltd. said it plans to pub- 
licly place in May a 100- billion-yen 
convertible bond with a maturity of 
at least 10 years. Securities sources 
said Nomura Securities Co. Ltd. 
was expected to be lead manager. 

HyinU Motor Co. is to export 
50,000 Pony and Stellar modd cars 
to Canada this year under an agree- 
ment reached with a group of 300 
Canadian dealers who visited 
South Korea. Hyundai sold 38,000 
cars in Canada last year, its first in 
die Canadian market 

National AetrafiaBuk Ltd. said 
it would expand operations in To- 
kyo and Hong Kong to full branch 
representation. The bank said it 
was invited by authorities in both 
places to submit applications. 

Fan American World Airways 
and representatives of striking 
transport workers were meeting 
again Monday after four days of 
talks produced no significant pro- 
gress toward ending the walkout, 
winch began Feb. 28. Pan Am soys 
it is operating about 275 of its 400 
daily flights. 

Phnfips Petrofeun Co. said Mon- 


day that around 133 million shares 
of stock were tendered back to the 
company in response to its offer to 
buy back 72.58 million shares. Phil- 
lips had offered to exchange the 
shares for securities valued at $62 a 
share in response to a hostile take- 
over attempt by a New York finan- 
cier, Carl Icahn, who then agreed to 
drop his bid. Because the offer Has 
oversubscribed, Phillips said it 
would accept approximately 54 
percent of the snares tendered by 
its shareholders, and return the 
rest. 

Shamrock Holdings hoc. said it 
formed a limited partnership, 
Shamrock Capital LP, a financing 
group, to effect its proposed acqui- 
sition of Central Soya Co. General 
partner is Shamrock Ventures Inc, 
a subsidiary of Shamrock Hold- 
ings. The limited partners are sub- 
sidiaries of Transcontinental Ser- 
vices Group NV and J. Rothschild 
Holdings PLC. 

Sheraton Corp. signed a 10-year 
contract to manage the 1,007-room 
Great Wall Hotel in Beijing, which 
was opened in December 1983 by 
joint owners China International 
Travel Service and E-S Pacific De- 
velopment & Construction Co. 








Portland General Electric N.V. 


14%% Guaranteed Notes Due 1987 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the provisions of Sectioned) of the Fiscal Agency 


6ft 
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Agreement dated as of May 1 , 1980 (the "Fiscal Agency Agreement"} . among Portland General 
Electric N.V. (the "Company"), Portland General Electric Company and The Chase Manhattan 


Electric N.V. (the "Company"], Portland General Electric Company and The Chase Manhattan 
Bank (National Association), as Fiscal Agent and Paying Agent (the "Fiscal Agent"), all of the 


5629 HM 1960 Wort, Suite 210 
Bouton, Tsu 77069. 

TeL: (713) 5864399. The 387356 


Company's I4fc% Guaranteed Notes Due 1987 (the "Notes") issued and outstanding under the 
Fiscal Agency Agreement will be redeemed on May 1, 1985 (the “Redemption Date") at a 
redemption price of 100 % of the principal amount thereof, plus accrued interest to the 
Redemption Date. 

The Company has elected to call the Notes for redemption pursuant to Paragraph 4 of the Notes, 
has given notice to the Agents (as such term Is defined in the Fiscal Agency Agreement) of such 
election and has certified that all conditions precedent to the redemption have occurred. As of the 
date of this notice, there is $46,642,000 aggregate principal amount of Notes outstanding. 

On the Redemption Date the redemption price will become and be due and payable upon each 
Note in such coin or currency of the United States of America as at the time of payment is legal 
tender for the payment of public and private debts therein. Interest on the Notes will cease to 
accrue on and after the Redemption Date. Payment of the redemption price will be made upon 
presentation and surrender of the Notes, together with ail appurtenant coupons maturing 
subsequent to May 1. 1985, at any of thB following paying agencies: 


The Chase Manhattan Bank, NA Chase Manhattan Bank (Switzartand) 

1 New York Plaza 83 Rue du Rhone, Poatfach 476 

New York, New York 10081 1204 Geneva, Switzerland 

United States ol America „ ___ _ . „ . 

„ . . _ . The Chase Manhattan Bank, NJL 

Banque National* de Paris Wodgate House, Coleman Street 

16 Boulevard des ItaHens 75450 London EC2P 2HD. England 

Parts, France 

Algemene^Nederiand.N.V. * BSUSSKB 

Amsterdam, Netherlands Brussels, Belgium 

Chase Manhattan Bank Luxembourg 5 A Wwldeutache Landesbank Glrozentrale 

Coin Blvd. Royal & Grand-Rue, C P 240 56Frtedr»ehatrBSse 4000 

Luxembourg villa, Luxembourg Dusaeldorf, Germany 

Kredletbank SJL Ltnembourgeoise 
43 Boulevard Royal 
Luxembourg, Luxembourg 

All unpaid interest instalments represented by coupons which shall have matured on or priorto 
the Redemption Date shall continue to be payable to the bearers of such coupons severally and 
respectively, and the amounts payable to the holders of Notes presented for redemption shall not 
include such unpaid instalments of interest unless coupons representing such instalments shall 
accompany the Notes presented for redemption. . 

Payment at any paying agency will be made, at the direction of tne holder, by check drawn on. 
or transfer to a United States dollar account maintained by the payee with, a bank in the Borough 
of Manhattan. The City of New York. 


Banque de Commerce 
51/52 Avenue dM Arts 
Brussels, Belgium 


LUXLANE TRUST S.A. 

NOTICE OF MEETING 

Notice is hereby given thal the Annual General Meettagcrf the comparer will 
be held at the offices of Uoogewerf sod Co. SA (HOCOLUX) 43. Rue 
Goethe, Luxembourg on Friday 12th April 1985 at 2.00 p.m. for the 

following purposes: 

To conduct the ordinary business of the company and to pass the following 
special revolutions; 

1. That die following amendments to the articles of incorporation be adopted 
and approved: 

A. Article 1 to read "die name of the corporation is LUXLANE SA" 

B. All references in articles 41 (B), 49 (A) and 49 (B) lo "alternate 
director" to read "proxy" 

C Article 25 (D) be renumbered 25 (15 

D. New article 25 (D) to read "The reappointment of auditors annually by 
the shareholders in general meeting." 

2. That the president and secretary of the company be authorised to execute 
the certificates of amendment of uie articles certifying the above mentioned 
amendments. 


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audited accounted be availsil as Iran Mairb 29tb 1985 for ejection 
from the offices of HOCOLUX and the specified paying agents. 

Shareholders may vole at ibe meeting either by attending in person with their 
share certificates or by depositing their certificates with a bonk. In the latter 
nv inmil hank rWmsilarv wmm in thn nnW nf a wrifiAl lucins mini 


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case special bank depositary necapa to the ortler ol a specified paying agent, 
voting certificates and certificates of block voting instruction most be filed 
with a specified paying agon by 2.00 p.m- on Wednesday 10th April 1985. 
The certificate of block voting Instruction, voting certificate and special 
bank depositary receipts may Be obtained from a specified paying agent. 


MohFfl JHa 4.1 
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NCmne M in 
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1 ftKtrir JO 1J 


Re. Office 

Emfido Bank of Ameriea 
Calk 50 Apartado 6307 
PANAMAS. 


By artier of the Board 
F. N. HOOGEWERJ 


F. N. HOOGEWERF 
SECRETARY 


Nttumb 
NMIcrn 
NTtcn t 


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC N.V. 


By : THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, NJL, 

as Fiscal Agent 


Paying agents: Banque Ginbrie de Luxembourg SA 
27 Avenue Monterey, Lux em bourg 


Dated: March 19. 1985 


Rea Broe pk 

King'* House, 36-37 Kin| 

London EC2, ENGLAND. 


Maurros 

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54ft + % 
3ft + ft 
B%+ % 


*«M»**# HUM 


*' « j ** V 


Sft 5* 

0 SI 
wft 

37ft 

10 lONv 
fft Jffi 
2S S* 

n ». 

T2fc 14ft 41 


1 

7ft 

39% + % 

2IA 

9ft 

12ft— % 
10 

l«ft+ % 
8% 

10 — % 
6ft + ft 
5%-l 


& w’Nnn^jj 


-i 

**■ 94* •-! *•<( W r ., 


a n<S ~ 

34ft 24U . 




10012% 

4 7 

^ m 
320 27% 29% 
35813 12% 

14 1 7% 

16511ft 17% 
7 46 45ft 
8810 17% 

^ Sft 5% 
233 29 BA 
SB* 25ft 
18JA 7% 
2« 4l Aft 
09 1 % 1 % 
18 7% 7 
1.0% 2% 
63013% 13% 
4013% 13V* 

41 7A 7ft 
1115 IS 

12511% 11 

42 4% 4ft 
94 27 26ft 


12% 

5% + ft 
17 + ft 

8% + % 
7 

5ft— ft 

14 —1 
31ft +1V* 

15 — % 
a + ft 

4ft— % 
24%+ % 
7 —ft 
2 — ft 
12% 

34ft 

17%-! ft 
6ft 
15% 

30% — ft 
29ft— % 
17%— % 
12 

26% — % 
14% 

5 

a — ft 
13 

14%— % 

ia — % 
7% 

10ft+ ft 

15 — % 

16 

4ft— ft 
19 — % 
12%— % 

3%+ft 
■ft— % 

39% — ft 
12A 
7% 

ia 

46 + ft 

17ft— % 
SH 

29 + ft 
25ft— % 
7% 

40V* 

1% 

.7%+ ft 
3% 

13ft 

13%— % 
«*— ft 
15 + % 
11 % + % 
4ft — % 
26ft + % 


725 5% 3, 

SS8».S*iS 


Y tow Ft U00 34 1*54 34 g* Sjf 
YoffcFd M 3J 34413% » W 


1 %». ■ 
7a 


ZebnMl 

ZBnLbs 

2*W; 

Ztooter Mu 
Z1M 

zivod 

Zondvn J4 


7 - 

137 5 4% 5 

- 3* 5 


’ 9 * I E99BeV IftlM 




22 6% g B 

ma id f* W 


3J 68 10 f® 
0943 2l* 1ft 


2943 2ft Jft *- 
153 1% 1W 


■i m 


Production Ris> 

In U.K. Industr ■ . 

The Anoamed Press . ' 

LON DON — Industrial pn 
tion in Briiain rose 1.3 penj;. 

January from December, as t ri,} •» 

3 ouput offset a declr^, ■vj 

Bcturing output cause s I M i x \ 

cold weather, the gaveramen* f 

tistics ofFice said Monday. , Ireta,— 

Output m manufacturing L - 
tries alone fell 0.4 percent in .. . 
ary, the office sdd- This cotn:\ 


22 

* 






with a 0.5-pereent increase 
cember from the previous roc ! • 
January’s 1 J-perccnt grov 
output in ail industries own, 
with a OJ-percent increase il ■ 
cember. 


“lit- 


re 

-■? k f 

•* * -M--.:-- 














































































ENTEBNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


x i j; 

if - 


S IL x 


• S. Futures March 18 



i sr , w 

Ob « Hhtft Low Obm Ota. 

L 

Grains } 


*<■ } 

! . 


. + i* 

s * * ri 

% ' 5 — - 


. *■ . 
SrT» , 

t • 

I « v 

fc> * — 


V 


5 fc 
** » #”■ < - f 

« it. .. , 

V~ ■, 

'»■ » = *B .. 


?> ■-- 7 

*- M . 

J r --. 

fcft « **•*. v 

■fc- i 

?* 4*n*t . :» 

>■ (U : <M , 

* t'ta 

■'* M » -- 


i ■*■•■. 

* >■» -te .. 

k •« i. - ; _ 

V* 1* ■ -4. -. i« 

S'-'* 1 *. *•«!, 

K >* « 

fh RN u . r , 
\ • *#-./ 

» W* -n „ 

> ■ i» h h 

♦ t*. *•.. v, 

4 

I Ifi^a *«, fu 
**+ » a • -.» . -. 

N>r i i i 

* ■*”* 

Z 5 1 ‘ x 

ft 6* W* ■ *• t -7 . 

* d? T- ! * * * 


, ]ffi «U<niw»*ll«i»wfliwM 
<ju m MD7 3-57 341 

■ TS 332ft May 34AM X47W 

■ tM 134 lb Jlf U U 

SS% Ut M> UU* U4 

'• lBft 13* Dec 041% 144 

if}v? 240% Mar 347 34SM 

, »SaW Rrev. Salas lifts 

prav. Dav Open li*. 3*1*4 eff» 

. CORK (CBT) 

' (sail Hu nOntmuffl-aellars per Huetiel 
Tl 25VS Ultt Mar X7JW 274M 

JJ9 249% MOV 274V4 ITS 

•'Si 173 Jut XTSMr 2J* 

3J1% 2461* Sea UH Uft 

. 205 260% Ot« 142% 2 MTi 

i in xw% mot in 171 

. unw IKK May ITS 1764k 

■ EetSaiM Prev.Satea 2U77 

Prrv.DarOpwi Hrt.nQUHO off 478 

soybeans <crn 

j^Ofl bo mini mum- Ool tart wrrbiahol 

■■7JOVt | 5J9 Mar 547 iM 

■. 7J7 um May £93 5J9M 

7 $p UM Jul U3VS S09 

1 7J6 £82 Aug 643% SAM 

u\ 5JJ) Sep if* 6M2Vs 

at s mft. Hw inn ias 

■■ 639 JMa Jan 100 115 

7J» 1DM> Mar 130 12 R* 

7J9 1 U »MW 

ES.Salas Prw.SalH*n7 

; 'prev. Day Open IM. M.1U afffOi 

. SOYBEAN MBAL(CBT) 

- HB tons- denarc per tan 

7B9M 11140 MvOUIlldt 

20500 120JD MOV 13240 1300 

IflSB 13470 Jul 13140 HUD 

•" UOM 137J0 AUB 14140 MZJD 

.. mse MOM Sep 14400 14US 

I-MBOSO 14250 Oct US40 MBOO 

- W.M WTSB Dec 151250 1 S 2 S 0 

l; M300 14*j*3 Jan 15250 15150 

■ msj 73100 MOT 

Eat. Sales Prev. Soles 7J4A 

. pnrv.Day Open int 4UB upfM 

’ SOYBEAN OJL(CBT) 

' auooitie- donors per UM Km. 

.3250 22*5 Mar »J5 3155 

,;.. 30.18 2240 May 2245 2*45 

, 3K3S 2220 Jul 2U5 2130 

me 2250 Aaa 3740 Z74S 

- MM 2250 Sep 2145 2S40 

MJXl 2290 Oct 2545 2545 

: 2541 22*0 Dec 2525 2525 

' 2525 2X40 Jon 2S40 3500 

EsL Sales Prev. Sales T72B6 

Prev. Day Open In*. 472*1 sfMI 

.■ oxmcnt 

: 5400 bumbrtanun- dollars PfrtHMNel 
ljM 1 JM Mar U7 I71h 

151 T47V5 May ITM UM 

‘.ljm 141 Jul UO \43Vk 

17* 140 Sep 142% 142% 

152*1 144 DK 144 144 

, ■ Eat Sates Prev. So In 2*4 

'•prev. Day O p en lid. 1374 off 47 


&5Mfe 
243 
23 m 

as 

347 


um +mh 
%& +so * 



545 

5*2 

441% 

UO 

5*7 

5M 

40* 

430 


moo 

13400 
14 UO 
14440 

SR 

ipi at 


s*i +jum 
5SP6 +JM% 
6JJ7*a -fJH 

tSaVi + 
4«n% -urm 

414% +44% 
525% +316% 
432 +X 6 


13*40 +2J0 
13340 +220 
13920 +230 

!SS S3 

14740 +230 
15230 +200 
15320 4220 
13150 +40 



125% 

171% 

147 

142% 

146 


1 J 6 VS 

urn +41 
147% +B0Va 
142% +40% 
746 


Uvestocfc 


# -A% -r -r-* 

e‘v 


1 

1 

«* e* ■ j* 

‘ 3*. "■ 

Ti^ta *'+ ^ 

?*■ • 

***'■'* ■— • 

** »A » + » ; 

I :| to . w» . 

« *re. *■» • 

« * ■ » ... 

*n •« - 


: =ATTLE(CME) 

, HBOS Bn.- cants per fc. 
v nun 6157 Apr 6125 6241 

.- . 6940 6440 Jun 64*5 6550 

■ 6747 6X15 Aim 6420 6535 

- . 46*0 6140 Oct 6247 6322 

6745 6140 Dec 6425 6440 

-6745 6450 FOb 6450 6460 

6747 6400 APT 

>r =st Sales 1530 Piev.Satas 21466 
; =»rBv. Day Open lot 61238 up Tee 

: SEEDER CATTLE (CMS) 

iW^SSrftr 67.15 67M 
•— 7420 6745 Apr .6720 <745 

_ 7275 6495 May 6410 6435 

~~ 7120 6460 Aw 6**5 TODS 

7100 6740 Sap 6*52 6940 

•;• 7222 67.10 Oct 6495 <425 

-• 7320 6*45 Nov 6*J5 6945 

-• • Sit Sotos ISI Prev. Sain Ztfs 
" 3 nrv. Day Open Int 11433 up 190 
;.HOG5(CME) 


6145 

6477 

<440 

6240 

63*2 

6425 


67.15 

<625 

6720 

6925 

4940 


6140 

6447 

6425 

62*0 

<402 

6440 

4410 


<745 

<475 

6727 

6927 

69.15 


=3 

—.15 
— .17 


Season Season 
Hum u»w 


Page 15 


Open Hioti Low Close Cite. 


10400 

>5465 

182J50 

U1J» 

laoeo 

177 JO 
14150 


15100 
15400 
15725 
1 5740 
15400 
15620 

u&n 


2tCS +22 


-JO 


_ MS 1*60 Jul 

Est. Sates 4083 Prev. Sates 2222 
Pm.OayOpen IM. 24230 up 119 

obmwk juice mven 

ujHOnarOTKperh 

1BJ0 11450 Mar 1*410 1*430 16340 16110 

MOV U4S5 16460 16430 IttS _ 

c t fis 5ss as ats =3 
^ isj =a 

s m 

»0 prev.Satea » 

Prev. Day Open lot, 4*19 oH 9 


Metals 


COPPER (COMCTO 

3M46tta.-antaBerih. 

SB Mar 5950 <005 
6Z40 <225 Apr 

ga 5620 May <0.10 4040 

S-K g-M Jul 6075 6 MO 

e .10 950 sen 6125 also 

M3 SL50 Dec 6X15 <270 

84^ 5940 Jan 

59+0 Mar 6340 6X45 
J'-’D May <320 63J0 
7440 6U0 Jul 

70L90 6X30 S«6 

7020 6400 Die 

<5Jo 6&X Jan 

Eto-Srtn TJOO Prey-Sales 5083 
Prev. Day Ooea Int SIAM OMITS 

SILVER (CQME7Q 
5J»o Irov at- cents per fray ol 
“M 5440 Mar 5770 5*95 

.SI- 0 55-° Aar 9fZ0 5920 

15130 OLD May SOU 6040 

14610 5620 Ju] 5090 <130 

118X0 57X0 5ep 6610 <250 

IDOO 5WO Dec <190 64X0 

12150 SKA Jan 

IIS 0 l S J> Mcr ° 3M «« 

10480 6210 May 

2SS ^ JW 0,10 <“« 

MOO 4414 Sep 6740 4KL0 

7654 6670 Dec 7004 7004 

Eel. Safes 3*4*1 pulsates 1X436 
Prev. Day Open Int. 74+93 up 24* 

PLATINUM CHYME} 

SO troy az.-dollarsper Iray aa. 

2C40 24000 Mar K9O0 25900 

i£-2 SfS AOr 2tfS10 26100 

449-50 24100 Jul 2*500 

3»M MOJO Oct 25*06 35oS 

37X50 26000 Jan Z7£L50 Z7250 

Ext. Sates 4>W 
Prev. Day Open Int K367 off] 
PALLADIUM (NYME1 
iMtaay otr Mtorsper ee 
1A3JD 1DS4Q Mar 


3* JO 6005 
< 02 $ 
40*5 6030 
6025 <125 
6120 <140 
6X15 6X66 
< 2*0 
6X00 6X45 
6X30 6405 
*440 

65.15 

<5*5 

6625 


+45 

440 

+40 

+J0 

+JS 

+25 

+25 

+20 

+20 

+45 

+05 

+45 

+45 


63*4 

6704 

7000 


5*74 +374 
2§7 +772 
60X5 +273 
<114 +Z7J 

<223 +282 

<3*4 +294 
6454 +292 
<572 +29* 
670,1 +305 

<834 +314 
6962 +914 
7147 +322 
7334 +223 


25940 29*40 +1120 
2*830 26020 +(1200 
35X30 2642S +1220 
25940 27000 +7230 
27030 Z7430 +1230 
29940 28340 


15930 70630 Jun 11025 117 

14940 10425 Sea 10925 11025 

Ml 30 10530 Dec 10940 11040 

12730 10430 MOT 10925 1092S 

Ext- Sales 674 Prev. Sales 257 

prev. dov Open Int. 6456 effl7 

BOLD (COM RTO 
MO trey olt dathrs per Irov ol 
31140 38140 MOT 

51430 28X60 Apr 29540 EX40 

29230 29240 MOV 

51040 28740 Jun 29840 30X50 

4*540 29140 Alia 30*20 SW2C 

*9340 39740 Oct 309*0 31640 

*0930 30130 Dec 314.00 32330 

M530 30640 Feb 32520 32520 

496J0 31+70 Apr 33040 30500 

43520 32030 Jun 

42X40 33140 Auu 34X50 34550 

39520 33540 Oe# 3*040 3HLOO 

34940 34240 Dec 1SZAI 35740 

Eat. Sale* <0400 Prev. Sales 37281 
Prev. Day Open lnt.l4UD9 00302 


10*40 
11025 I12J0 
10*25 11145 
10940 11040 
10925 10*40 


+145 

+1*5 

+145 

+1*5 

+1*5 


39540 

20*40 

30420 

309*0 

31530 

32520 


30UO 4640 
30340 +860 


34550 


35X40 


30620 +8*0 
31X40 +*.10 
SIAM +920 
32340 +* JO 
32940 +960 
31110 +940 
34L48 +T0.W 

3SS$S3 

36140 +1040 


<930 <930 


t; 


^Brsarz, 

4570 

4547 

55-40 

4X40 

Jun 

4967 

5060 

5577 

4X95 

Joi 

51*0 

5160 

5467 

47*0 

Aoo 

5160 

51*5 

51 JS 

4560 

Oct 

4775 

4747 

5065 

4*70 

Doc 

4760 

4X15 

. 4770 

4625 

Hto 

4765 

4X2S 

47J5 

4150 

■Aor 



4400 

4760 

Jun 

4765 

4765 



Hit Sales <47* Prev.SaM 13300 
-^rov. Day Open Int 26*81 00904 

PORK BELLIES ICME1 
: JUMBto.- cenh Per to. 


• • 

. , BUD 

<0.10 

Mor 

7260 

7X15 


- -. «nn 

6L15 

May 

7278 

7X2S 

• * •. *• *■ I 

_:-8147 

42.15 

jm 

7240 

7X17 

" • . 

8065 

4020 

Auo 

7060 

71.10 

" t — 1 r 

. 35.15 

6X15 

FOB 

7145 

7145 

8 

. . 1340 

<um 

Mar 




— 7X4* 

7040 

May 



8 - 

J 7860 

7060 

JUl 




4540 

8)25 

5120 

5X95 

47.15 

4740 

4745 

8725 


7225 

7227 

7225 

70.W 

7040 


4545 

50.15 

5135 

5142 

4720 

4847 

4X17 

4525 

4727 


+45 

+.18 

+28 

+27 

+.10 

+27 

+.10 

—25 

—.18 


+23 


sN.SaHs 5222 Prev. Sates 9235 
%ev. Day Open Int. 1X30* oH75B 


7260 
7220 
7237 

7020 _ 

7X92 -48 
70-10 —35 

7020 — m 

7120 —JO 


Food 


A •* 


COFFBR C(NYCSCE) 

37300 ftja^amn per I&. 

- 15X7B .12330 MOT 14120 14340 14045 

U2j» mm May 14223 mso 14 x 40 

14921 12140 Jul 143- It 14465 1*240 

' 14730 12740 SeP 14225 UX*5 14X15 

*4X25 12925 D#C MTJO 14260 1D40 

*4240 12850 MOT 14140 18X40 18X40 

14080 13140 Very 

13925 13530 JUl 

-5*t- Sales V750 Prev. Sates 3671 
'rev. Day Open Int 13671 up 302 

iUOARWORLD 11 (NYCSCEJ 
1 X 000 rbA- cents per Bv 


+121 
+124 
_ -MJ0I 
14XX5 +22 

14260 +35 

14148 +29 

14030 +.72 

13*25 +25 


Jh 


r 

. 10*0 

362 

Mor 

363 

X96 

36* 

36* 


» _ 

965 

4JH 

Ji» 

414 

*17 

*09 

409 


• m 

973 

4*2 


*29 

*33 

*27 

427 

+63 


9JH 

440 

oct 

447 

*51 

440 

441 

—61 


7JS 

467 


469 

500 

46* 

461 



' 963 

SJ3 

Mar 

543 

545 

565 

537 



7.15 

5*8 

MOV 

5ft* 

5ft* 

542 

542 

— 61 


. 649 

563 

Jul 

563 

564 

MO 

467 

—61 


SSL Sates 

4550 Prev. Sates 6409 




*rev.DsyOpunl0L 7X574 off 53 





* 

2DCDA WYCSCK) 







2570 

2400 

JSS 5£T 

2170 

2074 

2240 

2121 

21M 

2072 

2253 

7121 

+74 

-M2 

n 

• 241S 

W07 


2057 

20*5 

2066 

2040 

+3* 


2337 

1945 

Doe 

2020 

2050 

2(00 

+27 


2145 

1955 

Mar 

2030 

2040 

2029 

am 

— WW 

•i 

2130 

1960 

MOV 




am 

+22 


Ftnonclql 


SS 


8840 Sep 8*22 


9045 

sss 

•963 

896* 

0*22 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SlmllHon-ptsof iSOpct 
*141 87.14 Jun 

V& %% & 

9035 B<60 Mar 

M7 >741 Jan 

9040 

EstSalB* mJa pmtSala 30121 
Prev. Day OnenlnL 426*1 upOUZ 

18 YR- TREASURY (CRT) 
siaoon pda- ats & 3Xnds of 1 aa pet 
83 70-25 Mar 7* 7* 

B32 70* Jun 78-2 71-2 

8VI3 75-1* Sep 77 77 

80-02 75-73 DK 7+8 7641 

8M 75-16 Mar 7530 75-30 

7+2* 77-22 Jun 75-14 75-14 

Eat Soles Prev. Sates 11400 

Prev. Day Open Int 51297 up 147 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
<Bpct-S1OG4O+0'sE,33nd»o110Qpcft> 
77-15 

S3 5 

^0 
70-16 

Si 

69-12 
694 
<04* 

EsL Sales 

Prev. Day Open lat2244J3 off 982 


906* 

9X12 

•966 

•MS 

1966 

1*22 


70-13 

77-13 

7+21 

76 

75-14 

7+30 


904* —49 
90-17 —49 

0945 —49 

8960 —.10 

8962 —.71 

8927 —11 

09.11 —.13 


70-16 

77-16 

7+23 

7+1 

75-14 

7430 


—11 
—12 
—12 
—13 
— U 
—15 


5727 

Mar 

69-4 

<M 

<0-15 

<•>« 

—11 

57-20 

Jun 

48-7 

60-10 

<7-15 

S7-T7 

—If 

57-10 

Up 

<7-12 

<7-16 

S3 

6*23 

—19 

57-1 

Doc 

<6-23 

66-24 

<61 

—19 

57-2 

Mar 

<63 

<63 

<5-13 

65-13 

—19 

56-29 

Jun 

<5-7 

*51 

<*27 

6630 

—19 

56-29 

San 

<*25 

**25 

6*13 

6*13 

— 2D 

56-25 

Dac 

6*23 

6633 

6*1 

661 

—20 

56-27 

Mar 




63-22 

-20 

640 

Jun 

S3 

<3-13 

63-12 

<3-12 

—20 

*3-22 


0-15 

<34 

<34 

-40 


GNMA (CBT) 

woaooo prin- Pb 6 32nds of 100 pel 

70-17 

57-5 

Mar 

69-16 

<9-10 

<637 

S7-T7 

Jun 

*628 

*678 

<94 

59-13 

Sep 

<7-29 

<7-29 

<613 

594 

DOC 

67 

<7 

<8 

5620 



■» 

<7-0 

5625 





*5-11 

Sop 



EaLSota* 



193 

Prev. Day OPanltiL 4501 off M 


enrr. deposit (immi 



51 million- tm afl 




91 JO 

B5ft3 

Mor 

9051 

9051 

91 JO 

sue 

Jun 

8940 

•969 

9040 

*SJD 

Sap 

89 J2 

*722 

10.17 

8534 


nun 

■LB1 

B9.J8 

«X5* 

Mar 



8946 

8643 


88L2* 

Ml 

8848 

87-8* 

Sop 

8X12 

8X12 

EM-Satas 

773 Prev.Salaa 2443 


69-10 

6+12 

<7-10 


9X30 

0*21 

09.10 

■872 


Prev. Day Open int 7201 off 1617 

EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mlHtavptaonoBpct 
*120 85.14 Mar 

9081 8X6* Jun 

9028 *433 Sep 

8967 8460 Dec mum eUAI 

8968 84.10 Mar 88.14 80.14 

89.15 5673 JW1 87*1 87*1 

8864 8748 Sep 8768 1360 

0*27 57-28 Dec (733 8733 

Eat. Sates 4+807 Prev.Satea 52*14 
Prev. Day (Men Inf-117247 up 703 


Mar 9042 9062 905* 


87** 

«7J0 

1366 

■762 


69-10 

4+73 

<7-1* 

<+29 

4+9 

65M 


9063 

1025 

89.11 

«70 


9X62 

■923 

*869 


8761 

*767 

■763 


—12 

rB 

‘=B 

—TO 

—11 


=5 

r5 

-JJ9 


+6* 
— 69 
—09 


—69 

— M 


Season Season 
HWi Lew 


Open Htoh LOW Ones Cho. 


2912 

& 

2100 


J22B 

21X3 

2767 

2154 


St 

2175 

2U0 

2741 


BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

SPeraauns 1 paint equatsSLOOOl 
1*170 16345 tear 16)20 1.1005 16920 169*5 

ura UQS Jun 16045 1.1073 16835 1,1055 

1M50 16200 SOP 76M5 1.1080 16845 LUOS 

12710 16000 Dec 16726 U0» 16720 11040 

16735 16680 Mar 16720 16675 10)20 11MS 

Est soles UM Prev. Sales *605 
Prev. Day Open iol 9M« off 275 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Sperdlr -1 point equate X 0 J 061 
60 SQ 7100 Mar TOO 

JOS JOS* Jun 2154 

25X5 2525 Sep 2W7 

JS6i 2006 Dec 2154 

2504 6*01 Mar 

EstSatu 2634 Prev. Sates <303 
Pw. Oar Osen Int 12,106 off 2*5 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 
s per franc -1 point equals mmoi 

.11905 6*486 Mar 6*795 6*735 6*735 69735 

.11010 6M10 jun 6910a arm mm arm 

-WOO 6*400 Sen 6*720 

6W0 69570 Dec 

Eftf. Sales 57 Prev. Sales ID 

Prev. Day Open Infc 2671 o«10 

GERMAN MARK r IMM) 

Seer mark - 1 petal equals 0X0801 
*110 -2M1 Mar 2*43 290S 

J733 29B5 JlUl 2991 JO? _ 

254$ 29)0 Sep 201* 2047 2015 JOSS 

3610 2)71 DK J065 J094 2M5 2890 

2251 2040 Mar 2133 2133 2133 212* 

Est.Salee ZB617 Prev.sotes 2*642 
Prev. Day Open inL 4*605 up 1644 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S per Yt+lPelrrf equate »6(X>an 
-0046*5 603794 Mur 603848 603847 60389* 603845 
004450 603826 jun 603871 6038*5 603X8 6CT79 

00415) 603870 Sep 603*13-0039X8 603913 J»3f20 
JB43S0 603905 Dec 6039*2603962 603*43603*42 
Bat Sates 7AS* Prav.Sates 6249 
Prev. Day Open lid. 16*36 off IBS 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 


2« a am 


+181 

-use 

+M0 

«4S 

+345 


■m 

+95 

+20 

+« 

+32 


+m 

+120 

+110 


42* 

-HR 

+62 

+52 

+56 


+15 

+20 

+17 

+12 


ii Wl 

J03S 

m- iwwi 

■3408 

Mar 

iWUNI 

J4V7 

J47B 

JfK 

+34 

.4900 

J439 

J480 

Jun 

Sep 


JS72 

3612 

St 

J54J 

M03 

+70 

+69 

3S31 

Dac. 

3*50 

MX 

MX 

mso 

+64 


Etf-SaJes 71*45 Prev.Satea 17,14 < 
Prev. Day Open lie. 20600 up324 


industrials 


LUMBER <CME) 

130660 bcL +1 per U»0 bd. ft 
225-09 13260 May 131*0 121*0 12X60 

23X50 14160 Jul 119 JO 14X60 13768 

197-50 1466Q Sep 14660 14620 144JD 

186.10 149-50 Nov 14860 14820 14X40 

12760 15560 Jan 154JC 15420 15X80 

1*560 14X50 Mar MX60 14068 15860 

May 16450 16420 ISAM 
Eat Sales 1688 Prev.Satea 2*57 
Prev. Day Open Int 7248 ani 

COTTON XMYCE) 

50680 lbs, amts per to. 


7X20 

7X00 

<13* 

6X8S 

May 

<540 

**10 

£3 

<442 

6441 

oa 

Dec 

65.15 

6540 

<520 

<540 

6X10 

7005 

*641 

<*50 

Mar 

May 

Jul 

6*10 

<440 

4*10 


EjJ.5o4es 1000 Prev.sotes +10 
Prev. Day Oeen lid. 1X1*0 up 59 


HEATING OIL (MY MB} 
42560 oaf- coots per oof 
8X75 *X05 Apr 

7748 

7X20 

7740 

8240 

6*00 

May 

7430 

7550 

7*30 

7X40 

6X50 

Jun 

7230 

7X23 

7230 

71 JO 

6535 

Jul 

71 JO 

7235 

7UC 

7250 

68JS 

Auo 

7XM 

7X20 

7X1Q 

72-50 

7X25 

■up . 

7240 

7250 

7225 

7550 

7240 

DOC 

Fab 





Est Sates Prev. Sales <616 

Prev. Day Op ea int. 17672 up 754 
CRUDe OILUfYMR) 

1609 bbL-dadars per bbt 


3145 

3447 


2X28 

1X47 

3X28 

3X28 

2428 

May 

2744 

3X27 

2740 

2935 

3430 


2740 

2731 

2740 

2*34 

2418 

Ju) 

2730 

2750 

27.16 


24J2S 

Auo 

2744 

2730 

2744 

2930 

2400 


auo 

27.19 

26M 

7930 

2440 

Oct 

2836 

2740 

267* 

7930 

2440 

Nov 

2*75 

2748 

2*35 

2930 

£3 

Dac 

3675 

26M 

2635 

2650 


2740 

2740 

2740 

2650 

2535 

Sw 

2740 

zun 

2740 


Prev.sotes 1A461 

Prev. Dav Open Int 50220 off 1633 


QUO 

13760 

144J0 

USA) 

15160 

15110 

158*0 


<5*6 

6S2B 

65,10 


4171 

<<67 


7*63 

7532 

33 

7270 

72*8 

7525 

7105 


2770 

27*0 

2725 

27.19 

2760 

2760 

2660 

2768 

2760 


—500 

-500 


-560 


*» 

+65 

+2* 

+21 

+29 

+25 


+1*3 

+167 

+L37 

+25 

+60 

+65 

+AS 

+AS 


+M 

+*1 

+J4 

+64 

+25 

+27 

+63 

+21 

+51 


Stock indexes 


(Indexes compiled Nierttv before mar*et dose) 

SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points crnd cents 

189.10 156.10 Jun 1(165 162.15 moo 1RL05 —175 

19270 14060 Sop 104JO 11540 18140 18X40 — 160 

DA60 17520 Dec 18X10 1M2S 15760 117 66 — *5 

Mar 19125 mj5 19125 19125 
EsL Sales Prev. Sates M2>9 

Prev. Day Open lei 78*65 up 2618 
VALUE LINE (KCBT1 
points and cants 

20660 148.10 Star 1*270 m.10 19X95 1*160 — ' LSD 

219*0 17360 Jun 19800 19X3 19575 WSJO —270 

21230 1B575 Sop 201-80 20220 19960 19960 —255 

Est Safes Prev.Satea 4306 

Ptev. Day Open Hit 7654 off 2X1 
NYSE COMP. INDEX {HYPE) 
potnts and cents 

11060 9060 Jun 10560 10560 18465 10465 —121 

111*0 91 JS Sep 107*0 107*0 10470 10L80 —165 

11375 10120 Dec 11060 11X00 10875 10075 —115 

Mar 10215 10215 10115 10215 -21 

Eat Sales Prev.Satea TUBS 

Prev. Day Open Int *702 0(144*7 


Commodity Indexes 


(Moody's. 

Reuters - 

DJ. Future*. 


Close Previous. 

- - ' NA.f M9J0f 

WniDQ- Z0XL3C - 

NA 120-16 

Com. RoseartXi Bureau- NA. 23170 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 37, 1931. 
p- preliminary; f- final . 

Reuters : base 100 : Sea. 11 1931. 

Daw Jones: base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 


CNT: OUcooo Board of Trade 

2® OUcnoo Merennffle Exchmt 

IMM: htfemattenoi Maotanrv Wcrtta 

» „ Of Ortcaoo Mercantile Exchanee 

NYOOE: New Yore Cocoa Smoot, Coffee E 

ST£|= ffw Yarli Co fftti E Xtffonge 

E*Owna% New Yorti 
NY**E-. N*w York Mercantile Exdaw 

IKBT: Kansu Olv Soord at Trade 

NYFE: New York Futures Exctmae 


Asian Commodities 

March 18 


KUA LA UIMPUR RUBBER 
Wdavston ceete per kilo 
close 

bib Ask 

W 10725 18775 

Wav 19160 197-50 

tan 19360 10460 

Rr- 195*0 196*0 

Nfl 19560 mso 

tee- 202*0 303*0 

-VOteme: 17 tots. 

■Saureo: ntufrrs. 



**■ » 



■4* ' 

*11 ' ' 

’ ' •! 

Offor 

BM 

Ytald 

Prav 

YteM 

a :»••» ■»> 

.’KtoOft 

144 

MM 

X» 

94 9 

m- 

. tetanth 

159 

941 

946 

9J0 

■ r 

;3hmw 

XTT 

X19 

W42 

1XW 


J4 '*-■ •'* 

f ■ : 

Jt ' » > '■ 

?»“-=■ M * 

fr-y 

4 * r 

. jrm a— . 

w ;. 


tetePr,- Sotomaj g r v ttt erj 


r 1 : 


* * ■ 
i « 
-t 

\ f 

* * 


1- 


■jrs _ ; 

iM -■ 

i -t • 

< - i a. 1 

"?i« r »-« ■’ 

? r 

t <-- » 

i ,'i • < 

, ■* 

- — L •*• 

V * rta ■ 

' 


f* 

nrr 


•M •;? : 

•ter *- • 

*4 

** 

M ^ ... 


X -• • 


r? 

hi 


,uh 11 


Hong Kong Police 
Search Apartment 

. „ Agent France-Prase 

■ HONG KONG — Police 
.. -.torched the apartment of an Aus- 

■ raiian joumanst Monday follow- 

her report* on a ma or business 
.caudal hire. 

The reponcr, Ali Cromie, had 
• 'nitteD for the Sydney Morning 
vnld c® committal proceedings 
° a fraud case involving the now 
- *fbaa Carrian group in Hong 
kOUg. 

The Hong Kong court had 
- flnoed reporting on the committal 
4 r °«cdings. although foreign 
.ewspapers that are not published 
. wdis&ibuted in Hong Krag were 
” ,ot covered by the ban. Bnt the 
defense counsel protested 
" 'the court that there wwt 12 o«- 
is m Hong Kang where (he Mom- 
'fj? % Herald could be bought. 


ii’ 


r eaezudan Dd)t Pact 

■ * Near, Official Says 

Setters 

CARACAS — Only one clause 
to agreement for rescheduling 
fOttueh’s S20.75 billion of pub- 
'Beetor debt remains to be nego- 
tod the Venezuelan debt ncgoli- 
. i^» Carios GuiUernw Ran g rt, has 
KL 

Mr. Rangd. arriving here from 
** Jw Sunday with VeaKzuc- 

■ | wot Degotiating team, said fi- 
. 1 agreenKnt is expected in June, 


Paris Commodities 

Much 18 



HlSM Low BM 

SUGAR 

Fraacb teases Bsrsodtrle ton 
May 1257 U44 1J54 

Auo 1620 1614 1620 

Oct .1645 164* 1646 

DSC H.T. H.T. 1 

Mar 1*30 1*30 1 

vot: 1 *™ tote of sn’lora. Pnyv. actual 
sates: 712 tote. Opun latorart 39.1(8 
COCOA 

FTBOdi iraaes per 100 ko 
Mar 2310 2210 IM* 2326 —20 

MOV 2210 2284 2291 22*2 — MW 

JtV N.T. N.T. 2*3 — —5 

SW N.T. N.T. 2250 22*0 — 10% 

Dec N.T. N.T. 26*1 — Unch. 

MOT N.T. N.T. 2150 — UnA 

May N.T. N.T. 2M0 — UndL 

Est- vaU B late M ID ions. Prav. octaal 
sates: 79 tote. Open tatsrstt: *<■ 

COFFEE 


London Commodities 

March 18 


3420 

2428 

7M 

2430 

2455 

—w 

Z655 

2455 


—5 

N-T. 

N.T. 

2jAU 

2300 

+ 3 

N.T. 

N-T. 

2J2 


+ 10 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

SS 


+2 
+ 2 

N.T. 

N.T. 

24*8 

2470, 

+ 9 


MOV 
JIV 
SSP 
NOV 

Jon 

Mof — _ __ 

Eat voL: State of 5 tans. Prav. actual sates: 
11 lots. Open Intorata: Ui 
Source: Bourse Cto Commerce. 


London Metals 

Mardt 18 


Pravlou 

*M As* Bte Art. 
aluminum . . 

S^tfoypwntajrictaa 

tamard 161*60 161*20 163560 1X0*00 

COPPER CATHODES (H tab Grate) 

iot i«a 

forward L25960 1759*0 127860 127*60 

COPPER CATH^ES (StaadcrOI 

25 U, * ,,W, i3S«M2C5 IMM 1 MOM 
tamant 125500 12KUXI W*»60 12BX0O 

UAD 

gjrlMBrerntogcloa 

Snlard 31560 31660 32060 32050 


terwanl 

SILVER 




eu fflrw ss 

W «.VU 

Mud 1X070 10675 TO.152 M.I5S 

tXUO 83560 

tanLtml 7*560 7W60 SJS-50 80*60 

Source: AF. 


I S&P 100 Index Options 
March 15 


nrtee 

Fries <tar W 

i isz?» 

w % 1» 

no 3% a 
RS 1/H 43* 

S ^ Sum m 

HO - % W*1 


IM 1S% 

» ira 

<u a* 

M 5% 


rowl . 

MTM MHtoi 

Utt - - - 

5* a in 5 

iMfcifi; 
s* a a a 
!• * S, 


ns - in* a 1 1716 — - - - 

Total o0 tafons, sonf 

taMranoMiM-mgg 

IMS ml wflsnw ffl 

ToM sul sew UAW 

nSTisn uwnu* oai*nK«-ui 

Soum: cboe. 


oa 


AOO 


CVrtO 

HJgb Low Bid Ask Bkf 

UOAB 

psr statnetofl 

11360 11160 11260 11220 11160 11160 
11X40 11760 11720 117*0 11720 11760 
12420 12260 122*0 12280 12260 12240 
13060 12860 12860 12960 12X40 13960 
14460 14160 14360 U32D 14220 14240 
14968 147.® 14X00 148*0 1*7*0 14860 
15460 15560 15160 15560 15320 15460 
Volume: 9S< late of 50 tans. 

COCOA 

StartteB oar raebicten 
Mar 2092 2077 2688 2090 26*7 26** 

May 266* 2043 2000 1082 2689 2691 

Jty 2063 2638 2655 1056 ZM4 ZOU 

sap 2649 202* 2639 26*0 2652 2053 

oac 1.973 IBM 1778 1273 1677 IBM 

Mar 16*5 1657 1,9<0 1643 1.973 1674, 

May N-T. N.T. 16*2 16*3 1,9*8 167S 1 

Voiume: 3634 tats cf 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Stertteu per metric tan 
Mar 1374 1351 1350 2652 1371 260 

MOT 1425 1397 1399 1400 2431 1^ 

JIV 1468 1433 1433 1434 1472 1OT 

5*P 1497 14M 1470 2472 250C ZSB2 

HOY 1490 1470 1468 2673 2498 2OT 

JOB 1450 1425 1423 1425 1455 2459 

MOT N.T. N.T. 1390 2«Q 1421 1428 

Volume: 1655 lets of S tans. 

GASOIL * 

US. doBors per mMc tea 
Mar 23760 23SJD2MJ0 2*75 23360 23115 
AM 237 JS 22525 22730 727 JS 2Z3JS 22460 

22*50 22175 22*60 22*50 S160 22165 
23375 22X75 22*60 TMJSTIMS 21975 
22465 22160 22460 22*65 719-50 22060 
233*0 221*0 22460 22760 21960 22*60 
N.T. N.T. 22460 2»60 71960 22XM 
N-T. N.T. 22566 23460 71960 23360 
N-T. N.T. 22*60 23760 22X00 23060 
Volume: 1*83 tote of 100 tans. 

Sources: Re uters and London Pefrptevm Ex* 

eftanae (omoW. 


May 

Jan 

JIT 


oct 

Nov 


WHAT ARETHE EXPffiTSSXMNG? 
READ 

WAU. STREET WATCH 

8YH3WXRDROCHBACH 

tNEACHTHURSQsySIHT 


Cash Prices March 18 


tUsif Mob Aoo 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb 1-0 1*0 

Prlntdoth <4/30 28 VX-yd _ 070 060 

Steel Wilets tPIttJ. ton . 47360 45368 

Iron 2 Fdrv. Philo, fan — 2110 C 21360 
Steel scrap No I hvy Pitt - >96 o TK-ltn 

Lead Spot, at 17-71 »28 

Copper elect, lb M+8 72%-Ti 

Tin (Straits), lb NA 6J317 

Zinc E-SLL Baste, to —. CU5 0*3 

Paltadlotn,sz : • note 159% 

SltVW X.Y„ at NJL 9*7 

SoureorAP. 


Dividends March 18 




Are Coro 
CTSGorp 

Duckwoll AlcoStrs 
MITE Core 
Na«ao oJ_Ft>el Sas 
Pmtan Coro 
Snyder Ofl Partners 



M Mo nt hly J Q-Qsmfertr/ SGemf- 


DM Futures Options 

March 15 

K Genoa MolHSttmts oak per Bart 


strifes 


55 ?* 5“ 

u* 

0*3 
058 
021 
ai7 


164 — 

094 — 

044 — 


129 

048 

las 

172 

IE 

U< 


ss £r 

0*3 — 

a = 
a = 


EsBrnofoa teas ysLun7 
csitK Tourc, m i7B mm tot aan 
Pots :Thura.<si 1391 boss tel IMP 
SPurat: CME 


Ohio Bank Order Leaves 
Anger, Disbelief in Wake 


By Jeffrey A. Leib 

New York Tima Service 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Michael 
deary, 33, and his young son were 
watching the Sl Patrick’s Day pa- 
rade hot Saturday, but the festivi- 
ties woe not the only thing on Ms 
mind. He was worrying about what 
would happen to his agreement to 
buy a new house. 

- Mr. Cleary, like millions of other 
Americans, was stunned cm Friday 
when Governor Richard F. Celeste 
of Ohio declared a “bank holiday” 
affecting 71 privately insured sav- 
ings and loan institutions. Among 
them was one that Mr. Cleary used. 

Mr. Celeste's action came in re- 
sponse to a tun on the thrift institu- 
tions after die collapse a week earli- 
er of one of the state’s largest 
savings and loan institutions, the 
Home State Savings Bank of Cin- 
cinnati, which threatened to wipe 
out the private insurance fund cov- 
ering Oa; saving? and loan associa- 
tions. 

Although the governor had said 
on Friday that the dosings would 
be for three days, that proved opti- 
mistic. The incritiiriftn« will now 
remain closed at least until 
Wednesday, state offidals said 
Monday. 

Mr. Cleary said be attempted to 
move all of his savings last Thurs- 
day from a privately insured thrift 
institution, Scioto Savings Associa- 
tion, to a federally insured thrift 
unit across the street But he could 
not complete the transaction be- 
fore the governor’s action put a 
lock on his funds. Mr. Geary said 
he needed the money to be anle to 
complete the purchase of a home. 

“1 guess X was one of those pan- 
icking." he “1 realized That I 
bad ail my eggs in one basket” 

Since the closing, Mr. Geary has 
received letters from Scioto Saw 
Logs’ parent, Society Corp^ a 
Cleveland-based bank bolding 
company, idling him of its inten- 
tion to combine Scioto Savings 
with another subsidiary that is fed- 
erally insured. 



Prwa 

Mor 

A« 

No* 


30 

1500-liSD 

2325*75 



333 

&25-IQ2S 

IBOD-RS 

23)700 


310 

550 740 

1300-1+50 

50%97ffl 


320 

256 40) 

MD.T1.ro 

ii»t7a 

r 

330 

135 22 

*5D am 

122105 


3C 

■ — — 

5S-7J0D 

MO-1140 


in,” he said. 

Society Coin., with $18 billion 
in assets and 210 brandies in 31 
Ohio cities; has been running full 
page advertisements in some of the 
state’s newspapers. The advertise- 
ments are aimed at reassuring con - 
aimers by stressing the company's 
financial strength. 

For Tom and Crystal Pipic, the 
dosing on Friday of the thrift insti- 
tutions was the second blow of a 
one-two punch. 

The first was the dosing of 
Home State, where the Pipics had 
both a personal account and an 
account for their business. Togeth- 
er, the accounts contain about 85 
percent of their funds, Mrs. Pipic 
said. 

Another 10 percent of tbdr mon- 
ey was in the First State Savings & 
Loan Association of Columbus, 
which was one of the institutions 
closed Friday. 

“We can't touch any of that 
money,” Mrs. Pipic said. “I just 
hope the federal government is go- 
ing to understand Rhea tax time 
comes.” 

She said that Home State inves- 
tors have been ignored in rise past 
several days. “We want to know 
what's gping to happen to our mon- 
ey,” she said. The negotiations on 
Home State have beat so shrouded 
in secrecy that we don’t know 
what's going on.” 

To some extent, there has been 
more worrying than impact on the 
half-million depositors of the 
closed institutions. 

Many local businesses, including 
food stores and drugstores, are ac- 
cepting checks written on accounts 
at the dosed institutions, winch do 
not include Home State. However, 
other merchants and the United 
States Postal Service have refused 
to honor the checks, state officials 

said 

In addition, a number of banks 
are offering short-term loans to de- 
positors of the thrift units. 


U.S. Companies Stop Hedging 
But Find EquityDiminishing 


(Continued from Page 11) 
were some force of nature that they 
can't do anything about” 

• And a banker who advises cor- 
porations on their- foreign-ex- 
change exposure commented: ”11 
those amounts had gone right 
through to the companies’ inc om e 
statements,” as was done under the 
old accounting rule, “it would have 
been traumatic.” ' 

Many companies regard the ero- 
sion in equity as nothing more than 
an annoyance; an accounting loss 
that exists only on paper, with the 
damage removed whenever the dol- 


lar starts to faD. 

The argument of many compa- 
nies was summed up by Juanita H. 
Hmshaw, assistant treasurer for 
Monsanto Co. “That’s papa,” she 
said of the tranriatian losses. “We 
do not use hard cash to cover paper 
losses. That's our policy.” 

None theles s, the dollar's contin- 
ued rise is compounding the equity 
losses, and making them appear 
increasingly important, bout to, 
corooraie executives and to finan- 
cial analysts. 

Harold Goldberg chairman of 
the rating committee at Moody’s 
Investors Service Imx, called tire 
growing balance sheet losses “a 
kind of impairment, some sort rtf 
hurt” Although these translation 
losses are less important than oper- 
ating problems in Moody’s credit 
rating decisions, Mr. Goldberg 
added, “They are a reflection of the 
fact that the enterprise is not really 
in controf of its own destiny/ 

And Roy Taub, a managing di- 
rector for Standard & Poor’s Corp., 
another credit rating agency, said: 
“Clearly, that will be one of the 
areas we will be looking at pretty 
closely this year, as wdl as the 
question of what companies are do- 
ing to mitigate it. 

But companies are risking more 
than a lower credit rating if (heir 
equity decreases. Some could find 
themselves in the position of the 
New Jersey-based computer com- 
pany whose ratio of debt to equity 
fell bdcrw Emits set in its bank loan 
agreements. Although he declined 
to name the company, Ezra Zask of 
Manufacturers Hanover said the 
equity slide put the company into 
default on its loans, and contribut- 
ed to its bankruptcy. 

In fact, some companies are now 
beginning to look more closely at 
wiikher — and how — to try to 
mitigate the balance sheet losses. 

“You’re going to see a lot of 
people coming out of the wood- 


work cm tins when it «inks in what 
damage, is being done,” Jeffery 
Donahue, director of international 
money management for Union 
Carbide, said. “We certainly have 
to think about covering it now.’ 

Mr. Donahue added: “For sever- 
al years, people were not worried 
about the impact on their balance 
sheets. But the dialogue now is: 
What have we done to ourselves?” 

A principal means of providing 
this kind of balance-sheet protec- 
tioc is by borrowing funds in for- 
eign currencies. Keeping a forward 
coo tract position — a agreement 
made, usually with a bank, to buy 
or sell a set amount of a foreign 
currency a a set price at a future 
dare — is also used in some situa- 
tions. 

Creating a foreign-currency li 
ability where there are assets in 
foreign countries counterbalances 
the gain or loss in the asset’s value 
due to the dollar’s movements. 


BANQUE DE 
L’UNION 
EUROPEENNE 

TJ.S. $50,000,000 

Floating Bale Notes 

1979 - 1989 


la accordance with the 
terms and conditions of 
the Notes, the rate of in- 
terest has been fixed at 
9%% per annum for the 
interest period running 
from March 20th to June 
20th, 1985. 


-ADVE RT1SEMBNT- 


BOTANICALS 


13i 9i Coriander 

■90 

3-8 

1-2 

28 

3 

28 

+ 20 

71 i 62 Angelica 

6-0 

8-6 

7 

69 

70} 

80 

+ 9} 

38J 18 Orris 

■88 

3-7 

542 

24 

65* 

- 93 

+ 26} 

2 12 Jnniper 

•40 

3-0 

110 

13} 

13 

56} 

+ 43} 

56 25} Licorice 

9-3 

16 

69-6 17 

12} 

67 

+ 44} 

67J 12 Lemon Peel 

-90 

56 

132 

56 

23 

no 

+ 87 

38i 15} Almonds 

7-5 

67 

56-3 67 

40 

567 • 

+517 

23} 13} Cassia Bark 

' -50 

6-8 

72 

82} 

23} 987} 

+964 


Source: Any d iscerning bar in Europe. 


An encouraging end to the day with all 
Botanicals showing strongly. 

The news of the Cabinet’s new open 
door policy pushed Dry Martmi cocktails 
in front of the gilt edged Gin. & Tonics. 
Though somewhat surprised by this 
advance, the market remained . calm'. 
D. F. Glienburger Jr. of Glienburger, 
Glienborger & Glienburger commented 
"We are shaken, but not stirred." 

In general, spirits were raised by the. - 
performance of Bombay Gin. It’s unique 
distillation keeps one amused- 



un m » ■ I.*— «o n>* 


STOCK 


BID 

uss 

DeVoe-HoQxm 
International bv 514 
Giy-Oock 

International nv 294 

Quotes so c fc March 15. 1965 


ASK 

USS 


6*4 

3*4 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newslerter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Sccurit i es bv 
Herengracht 483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
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RESERVE ASSET FUND 

PRICES AT 1H8S: 
A; US. DOLLAR CASH $1025 

B: MULftaJSSSNCY CASH $ 935 

Ci DOUAK BOWS $1CW9 

Di MULTICURRENCY 60NDS S 976 

E. STBSJNG ASSET £10.46 

FOR0GN A COLCMAL 
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Tlw Mtassuf value Nuototlm sbowa below are MtPPllDd by toe Fomte HUM wnft ne 
eaaaatton of tame fundi wtmt quote* are Rased as isstM price*. Thft foUawIno 
marginal svmtwlt Indicate frawieacv M qaatattan sonatina tor toe IHT: 

Id) -dally; (w) -weekly; (b) -bMnontlilv; (r)- regularly; (I)- irregularly. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
I w) A+Moi Trust, s- ft — 


BANK JULIUS BAERS. C0.Lla 


— <dl 
—Id) I 

-Halt 

—Id) 


s yin ORANGE NASSAU GROUP _ 
* Pfl JSS71 TP* HOOU* 1 070) 469*70 

— Id ) Bcw B*l«g0lnoof»++ 


S3Z6D 


Unaar. 


- jrlbaer America. 
.. . _5ouibo*r Eurape_ 

— (d I EaulbMr Pacific— 

— Id ] Grabar 

— (d ) stockbar 

— ftf l CSF Fund. 


Sp F l5l» LLOYDS BANK tNTUPOS 43X Geneva 11 
% liiiDO — + *» Licryds mri Dollar. 

5F 122 EM —+(•*) Lloyds infl Europe _. . 

SF 12)9 00 —+<«*] Lloyds Inn GroteHt— SFIIMLSD 

SF 112Xi£ — 4-lwi uwds tad Incan* SF 31X60 

5 F 173460* — +(«> LJovdi Infl Pacific— SF 14460- 


S MAM 
SF 11131 


—la ) CrcHstmv Fund— 
— (d ) ITF Fund N.v... .. 

BANQUE IND05UEZ 
— Id ) Aslan Grotetti Fund. 

— IwJ CHvortmnd. 

— i*> FIF — Amsrico. 

— 1*0 FIF — Europe 

— Iw) FIF-Poefflc. 


u vu PAR1SBAS— GROUP 
SFT1BJ — Id ' Corwxo Inrtrrntfionol . 
j 1X4? — (wlOBLI-OM— 

- S,W7 — (w) OBLICE5TION. 

— IWl OBLI-DOLLAH. 

. S1XI6 — IwlOBLI-YEN 

SF 8265 — (Ml OBLt-GUUOEN 

- S 1970 —Id I PA ROIL- FUND 

1068 — (dl PARINTER FUND. 


—Id ) indoauez Mulllbanai A. 
—Id ] indosuaz Multbonds B- 


Y 105*6560 

FL 1039.97 

5 ^ S 181*0 

S 1068 — (d 1 PARINTER FUND S 99JT 

S 15*1 —Id I PAR US Treawrv Band— S 10042 
3*4M5 FO YAL B. OF CAMADAT’OB 24ACU ERN5EY 


-H«rt RBC Canadian Fund LW_ 


snoo 


BRITANN1AJN3B 271. SLHMler. Jersey -Hwl RBC For EopXPoelflC Fd S10J6- 

— Ini] BittJMMr Income 10643- -h») RBC nrii CooKoi Fd. — liojr 

4+ W |i - 


— IwJ Bril* MonoaCurr . 


—fd | BrH- lniL* Manaaportf S067S -+io i RBC MaitCutrann Fd. S22X2 


1X31* 


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S 1X79* 


— fd i Brff. intM AtanaaPortf. 

—Ox) Br1tJJnt«eraal Grawili. 

— Iw) BrfLGoM Fund 

— Iw) BrtUAanaBXumncv_ 

—Id 1 BrH. Japan Dir Pert. Fd 
— (wl Bril Jersey Gill Fund— 

—id ) Brff. Worm Leis. Fuiw- 
— Id ) Brit World TecM. Fund 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— (wl Capital Inti Fund- — 

— twicepHonwlteSA '1177 —Id 1 America Valor 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICESI “ I D-Mark Bond Setoctkm 

— Id ) Actions Subset SF34&7S 

— 16} Bstto Voter Swt. 


£ 1.237 rtHwl ROC Monti Amer. Fd SV.1S* 

s *njn? 5KANDIF0ND INTL FUND (4+8-ZK220) 

il4« — (wltncj Bid Lun Offer-— to-U 

ST609 — (wlAcc.; Bid 5460 Offer S5.ll 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 
81^ 17 Devoramre Sa+ondon+11-3776340 
1X792 —lb > SUB Bond Fund_____5 71.18 

— Iw) SHB inM Growtft Fund S 10*6 

S 35.17 SWISS BANK CORP. 

SF ffiLSQ 

DM 1I13B 

—id 1 Dollar Band Selection S 12XU- 

SFm&5 — (d 1 p torln Bond seieewn— FL n/.li- 

— m , SF 0 -1 SC 

SF 896-75 
SFBL50- 
SF 29X2S 
SFt+SO 
SF 124*0 


— di Bond Valor D-mcrk DM104.M — 

— <0) Band Valor US430LLAR 5109^1 

— tdl Bond Valor Yen— Yen 1109060 |S ! SH “ 

—Id) Cortvarl Voter Swf SF 109 JO — J3 \ 


-+d) Convert Voter US^DDLLAR. SUITS “JS { 

—id ) Ctmane SF9injo Id I Unlveml Fund — 

— <2 1 CS Foods— BonQt SF 74.7S UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

— (d ) C5 Funds — InT) 5F 11100 [a ) Amen U*. Sll SF 4X75 

-Id ICS Money MortcelFund_ S 104560 — fiiSSiiiSu SfSS 

— j CS Money Mortal Fund dm hckm — }q > FoiSa SwS SF lSsoo 

—Id) Japan- i"y«i SFi037jo 

Sf 1033.00 —Id ) Sant south Air. Sit - SF 50760 

IE — < d > Wmo (Stack price) ^ — 5F 196*0 

6r I81J& 


—Id } Enerote — Voter. 

—Id i Useec 

—Id > Eur oo o V aior_— 
— (d I Pacfflc — Valor 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

— MO ) Cdneontro 

—fid ) I nT I RsnKnfOnd— . 


UNION INVESTMENT Frank tori 

, „ —Id | Unlrenta— — . DM 41.90 

DM3466 —id) UnMonds.. — DM2260 

DM S76S —(d | Unlrak OM7X2S 


Dunn X Harem 6 Uovd George. Brussels 
—4m) DAH Commodity Pool— 130X77 — 

— (io» Currency S> Goto Pool .11896* — 

— im) winch. UtaFut. Pdo)_ 161460 — 
—(ml Trans World Fut. Pool. 1979JM — 


Other Funds 

Iw) Actlbonds Investments Fund. 1 2X55 

twi Actives) inn 11X64 

(ml Allied Ltd- - 1360 

(w) Aqulla international Fund— S 107.16 
(r ) Area Finance i.F- 
(b 1 Arkmt. 


F*C MGMT. LTD. IN V. ADVISERS lr ) AraO FtnanceT.F-_____— S 14X03 

1. Laurence Pountv Hill, EC4. 0+6234*0) lb] » 1-49Y63 

“■J W icKc Mnnt4c ■”* Iwl TruWcorlnt7Fd.lAE)FI SiaiB 

—Iw) FAC European SMJ Iw) BNP Interbond Fund 19X69- 

—lw) F*C Oriental _______ 12S51 iw) Boodsetan-lisuo Pr SF 137.40 

FIDELITY POB <7X HamUtan Bermuda in’* Cnnpdo Gtd-Mortopge Fd__ s X90 


18*50 «» CotaUS. 1 2™?“’ RL,n, ‘- 

Amer Values Cum.Pref HOUS !?( — iiu 

Fidelity Amor. Assets 165.14- ) CJ-8- A^lralta Fund JW 


— (in 

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FORBES PO BI87 GRAND CAYMAN 


Jltv Austraita S Fund 5777 

Fidelity Discovery Fund 11X26 

Fld*HtyDir.Svi».Tr 1121.72 

FWoftty Far East Fund— 119.95 

Fidelity IntT. Fund 15378 

Fidelity Orient Fund 57673 

Fidelity Frontier Fuad 112*3 

FMeiltv Podflc Fund 113170 


UKidbnApent 01-B3W013 


-4w)Gowinceme^_ 
— Iw) GotdAparadoilon. 
— Iw) Donor income. 


—(ml Strategic Trading. 


GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— |w) East Investment tout 

— Iw) ScattWi World Fund 

— Iw) State 5t. Amertcon. 


ST 170 
S 1JQ 


197* 


d ) CJ.R. Japan Furtd.^ 

ml Cleveland Offshore Fd 1260773 

wl Columbia Securities— _ FL 1997* 

b ) COMETE. 197173 

w) Convert. Fd. Inll A Certs— 19*4 
;w) convert. Fd. mil B Certs— _ 12574 
■mr-r 17478 

d ID. tWIler Wld Wide IvlTsI 5967 


KM*; sod.&raid?rscz_ iM76 ‘SJ 9s££S!fS!s , i Sr aHM - 1 vaas 

Fidelity Fund 5 *6* -» *£g 


jw) The EstabUstunenl Trust. 1 167 

Id ) Europe OoNactlons LF 6269 

1762" (w) Ftrat Eoovo Fund S1UM».« 

. 54*0 lb I Fifty Stars Ltd.—— 507869 

. 1&45 |w) Finsbury Group Ud— _ 111567 

sl.11 iw) FonsetoK issue Pr. SF 22875 

IX) g— etann.. 17.18 

(wl Formula Select tan Fd. SF 79.98 

«t I PondllDlla *2260 

W 1 Gavornm. Sec. Fund* S87.72 

5148.10 id ) Frteikf-Truil imerclns — DM 4065 

Iw) HiMBrnannNIdgs. N.V 5 10764 

tw) Hestla Funds 


CapttGuteLLJlJXonABent 6+491 4230 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. - - - — - 

PB 1)9. SI Peter Pori, Guernsey. MU-21715 w) Horizon Pitod— _ 

(ml FuturGAMSA ST2SJ9 £b > | LA i nil Goto Bond 

[mi GAM Arbitrage Inc S1227S ^ — . 

Iw) GAMertcn Inc— — . H33ite <W) tntwmorteet Fimd 
(wl GAM Boaon Inc. 


(w) GAM ErmJtooe- 
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(d ) GAM Intarnationto Inc. 


(w) gam Norm America Inc— 

(w) GAM N. America Unit Trust. 

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S 1024* !*•> Inn Currency Fund Ltd- 
1 12.94 (r) inti Securities Fund. 

SF 9X38 Id » liwesn DWS. 

S 10178 tr ) Invest Atlontli.__ 

S 10271 (rl Itatfortune infl Fundi 


(w) gam Start x inn Unit Trust. 

(ml gam Systems Inc 

(w) GAM worldwide Inc— 

Im) GAM Tycho SA. Class A — . 

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— Iw) Barry Pnc.Fd.Lld. 59.76 

— Id ) G.7. APPUed Science 515.92- 

— +d ) G.T. Ateon H.K. GwttvFd— 51227- 

— Iw) G.T. Asia Fund 5364- 

— <dlG.T. Australia Fund— S2Q54- 

— fd 1 G.T. Europe Fund 59.13 

— Iw) G.T. Eure. Small Cot. Fund .5969 

— <d)G.T.DollorFund 1)469 

—10 ) g.t. B and Fund. 5967 

— Id) G.T. Globa) TechntovFd— 1 1364 

—la ) G.T. Honshu pathfinder 52465 

—Id ) G.T. investment Fund 51740 

—Id I G.T. Japan Small CoJund— 54260* 

—(d ) G.T. Tedmotopy Fund $14.19 

—Id ) G.T. Saute anna Fund 51369* 

EBC TRUST COJJERSEY) LTD. 

+3 Seale SCSI. Heller JK3+3633I 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

MUIltlc: B)«l 5965 Offer 5975* 

0(d) COP.: BM 11005 Offer— .5103*1 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

— fd 1 Short Term TV (Accuml 514564 

-Id ) Short Term ‘A' CDIstr) 516077 

-id) snort Term 'B'lAccum) — 516887 

— Id> Short TeraTB'IDIstr) 5063* 

— I w) Long Term S2051 


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) Japan Pod He Fund— 

Iwl JefferPtiw-lnlLLW 51# 

id ) Kleinwort Benton Inn Fd. 

(wJ KWnwort Bern. jop. 

Id > Letcom Fund 

oe cap Hold 


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w) Lwtund_ — _ 

ml Moonofund N.V. 

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w) Nippon Fund 5296S- 

w) Novotec Investment Fund — *9644 

wl NAM.F — — 514X59 

mlNSPF.l.T — S 15267 

w) PANCURRI Inc. *1666 

r ) Parfoa Sw. R Est Getwva SF T 
r ) Penrtol Value Fund N.V.— 51.' 

b ) Ptatodts ■ — — sl 

wl PSCO Fund N.V 1121.77 

d ) Putnam mri Fund 5 5670 

b ) Pri — Tech 587229 

wl Quantum Fund N.V 13730.19 

d | Ronto Fund LF 269*60 

d ) Rent In vest LF 165538 

d I Resarva Insured Deposits- 5 106669 

w) Samurai Portfolio SF11SJ0 

d > SCI/TeciL SA Luxembourg — S 9.77 
w> State SL Bank Eaultv HdosNV *9 .io 


w) Strateav investment Fund — 11977 

d I Synlax LteL'Idast Af 5 770 

JARDINE FLEMING. POB 78 GPO Ho ICo Iw) Techno Growth Fund SF9761 

—lb | XF Japan Trust Y4927 (w) Tokyo Poc. Hotl (Sea! S9968 

—lb > J.F South Eos) Asia. 1 2962 lw> Tokyo Pac. Hotel. N.v 5 13*68- 

— lb ) j.F Japan Technology — Y 23707 Iw) Trantpocfflc Fund — _ 5 86.76 

— (b) J.F Poctflc SecilAcC) 5576 Id ) Tureuofse Fund 5*3*3 


— (b) j^Ausfralk 
HIMARBEN 

— (d ) Class A. 

—Iw) Close B-UA. 


5 363 (w) TwoadV.Browna n.v.CiossA 
Iw) Twoedv.Browne n.vXtossB 
Id ) UNICO Fund- 


-58X96 


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— Iw ) Oats C • Japan _ 
OBLIFLEX LIMITED 
— Iw) Multicurrency . 


— Iw) Dollar Medium Term. 


— iwi Dollar Long Term- 
— (w) Japanese Yen. 


s 26*864 
5TA7S69 
DM7670 
590640 

(w| United Can. imrt. Funs Ltd. — 5170 

I w> Wodoe Europe N.V 54X81 

J 97437 (wl Wbdoe Japan N.V. 58365 

; 9.9<oi Iw) Wedee Pacific n.v. <57a* 


-•JSSfi (b ) UNi Capital Fund 
— * 72.99 (w) United Cod. Irtvt. I 


tw) 


,w. U 6 . N.V iwn- 

Itn) Wlnehester Financial Ltd — S 1053 
(ml Wlnriwoter Diversified**-- 5 2JJ9- 

id ) World Fund S-fl 5 1M1 

-FL 96165 (w> Worldwide 5ecurilles S/S J*H- 142JO 
-SF 97194 Iw) Worldwide ipectol Piatt. 51*4X93 

DM — Omitsche Mark; BF — Betotem Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs; SF — Swiss Francs; a — asked; + — Offer Prices; 6 _ bid 
cAanas P/VSIO lost per unit; NA.— Not Available: N.C — NotCommunlcated;o— 
Now; S — suspended; S/S — Stock Split; ■ — Ex-Dividend; •• — Ex-Rts; — 
Gross Performance Index Fehj ■— Redempt-Prlce- Ex-Coupon; •• — Farmerlv 
Worldwide Fund Ud; 9 — Offer Price Ind. 3% prelim. Charge; ++ — dally stock 
price es on Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


=fci 


Pound Steritaa- 
Iw) Deutsche Mark. 

— (w) Dutch Florin 

— Iw) Swiss Franc 


.DM9.9231 


800% GAIN 


The success our readers have experienced is based upon the “law of contrary reason", 
the refusal to succumb to "expert" opinion. When the DOW was drooping below 795, C.G .R. 
defied universally publicized oracies, predicting that the "DJI WILL TOUCH 1,000. BEFORE 
HnTING 750", subsequently stating that the "Average” will rocket above 2000. 

Atthetime, mostfinancial publications mirrored themood of 1he“Street", with BARRON’S 
commenting (August 9th, 1982)... “The market seems to be saying it’s seen the future and it 
doesn’t work". Before the ink dried on their funeral dirge, the market zoomed 132 points, 
closing on September 8th, 1982 at 915. 

As mavericks, C.G.R. was considered heretical in recommending SEARS at Si 6, and 
FORD around $17, or in challenging investment banking behemoths. Perhaps our most 
riveting prophecy was furthered in July 1983. when we mocked the mania for "high tech" 
shares selling at bloated prices, writing... “CONTINUE TO EASE OUR OF APPLE 556, 
COLECO $50. COMMODORE $56. AND TANDY $54; the Quartet is not in harmony with 
reality". Current quotes? APPLE $28, COLECO $13. COMMODORE $13. TANDY S 33. In 
detecting "classic” buys, or .short sales", our analysts flout the manic-depressive behavior 
of investors, guided by the adage... "Buy into weakness, sell into strength". 

Our forthcoming letter reviews “senior” securities that appear to be logical morsels for 
predators, in addition, we locus upon a low-priced equity with the potential to mature into 
prominence, emulating the dossier of a recently recommended “special situation’ that 
spiralled from $2 to $16 in a brief time span, a "junior" oil that discovered a major field m 
Texas. 

For your complimentary copy, please write to, or telephone... 



CAPITAL 

GAINS 

RESEARCH 


F-P.5. Financial Planning Services bv 
Katverstraat112, 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (Q2Q) 25 04 77/27 SI 81 
Telex 18536 


Address: 




I 


Phone: 


LZ 


_ IHT I?:’ 


J 


Past performance does not guaraniee (mure results 


. ^ 1* ■- r T0 






Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


10 

11 12 13 

18 


1« 



PEANUTS 


I WROTE MY RB’ORT ON 
MY NEW STATE-OF-THE- 
ART stationery... 


I WROTE IT WITH 
MV NEW STATE-OF- 
THE-ART PEN... 


WHAT HAPPENED? 


I GOT A STATE-OF- 
THE-ART MINUS* 


BOOKS 





m 



A BREATH OF FRESH AIR 


By Dorothea Letessier. Translated by 
Matthew Ward. 98 pp. $ 4.95 L 
Penguin, 625 Madison Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 10021 


Maiyvonne had taken a week’s sick 1 cm 
from the factory, fed up with the endless pm. T 

cession of demands advanrino imunrrie u * 


cession of demands advancing towards tuf-bl 
the shape of machine parts. At home, 
demands —her husband's, her dnhft -.k-, 
coming. So die goes. ^ 


vii'U*’ 11 ^ 

'liunl S 


ft » r t 




In ii ii ill in li 


BLOND EE 


r MATE THESE 
f MARCH winds 


LOOK.THERe'S A SUBE 
^ SJSNOFSPRINS i— 


VEAH? WHAT 
— TlS fT?h— ^ 


.iMeTWASK RNAU-Y 

e rn-tcew cxrr ms 
|!o«asrMAS trass ) 


Reviewed by Richard Eder 

I N a way, this is a French verson of “The 
Road to Wigan Pier.” Like Orwell's book, it 


fleshes out a world quite far from its readers: 
that of a working class imprisoned in its cir- 
cumstances. Like Orwdl’s book, it has a touch 
of educated impersonation to it; a haidine 


A tiny escape; 25 miles by bus through th 
cold Briuany countryside, from her home in $ 
Brieuc to the tourist port of Paimpol, la 
reduced world, even the flights are reduced. 

She has a big tea, she checks into a hotel, sh 
eats dinner, reads a book, takes a bubble bad 
It is the unspeakable, and unspeakably fa 2 
luxury of being on her own. She gloats, fasti 
sizes, thinks of her daily life at home, of “m 
fife without me." 


,*ft fMSi 


. A. 


ACROSS 

lChiui 

5 Carries intoa 
carrier 
10 Back of the 

neck 

14 Karenina or 
Chrisde 

15 Tflted, as the 
Titanic 

18 Musical work 
1? N.B -A. team 

fromN.J. 

I8"0roy >” 

Montana motto 

19 Camper's gear 
ZB Hypocritical 

sorrow 

23 La tin-lesson 
word 

24 Countryside, to 
Cicero 

25 Avocados 

33 Twosome 

34 Autocrat 

35 Peephole or 
loophole 

36 Saharan 

38 Capek classic 

40 Weak 

41 Sign of 
affection 

44 Bidde ford’s 
neighbor 

47 Silent 

48 Largest 
publications 

51 mode 


and the material 

Dorothte Letesstcfs book is fiction, not re- 
portage; yet in hs own way, it is a documenta- 
ry, as wdL It is the story of Maryvonne, a 
factory worker, and her brief, hallucinatory 


52 Opposite of 
pos. 

53 Where trials 

proceed by 
leaps and 
bounds 1 

61 Employ 

62 What a mob 
takes a rat for 

63 On 

64 mater 

65 Type of boat 

66 Wolfe of fiction 

67 Shine 

68 Dark-complex- 
ioned, in poesy 

68 Prin.'s aide 


1 Bench for 
Burger 

2 Lollapalooza 

3 Aware of 

4 Imp 

5 Chihuahua and 
Pomeranian 

6" Know,” 

.Jim Webb song 

7 Channel 
- changer 

8 Inlet 

9 Prestige 

10 bene 

It Mimic 
12 Evokers of 
groans 
13Partofi.e. 


21 Leave out 

22 Make out 
25 Of the ear or 

air 

28 French area, 
rich in coal 

27 Rhine feeder 

28 Reliance 

29 Slippery one 

30 "Remember , 

the " 

31 Co-founder of 
Rome 

32 Check 

33 European fish 

37 Airport abbr. 

39 W.W.Il heroes 

42 Type of rug 

43 Compliments 

45 Pops event 

46 .Margarine 
49 Short of 

breadth 
59 Harmless 
lizard 

53 Scot’s garb 

54 "AenekT’ 


and touching attempt to escape from her life by 
running away from home. It is not a Wigan- 


But what is me? The pastries in tbe pastr 
shop, the minimal comfort of the off-ieaso ' 
hotel, the stiff dinner in the nearly earn 
dining room, the cheap novel she can rea ' 
without interruption, two hours at a haixdns 
er’s. 


BEETLE B AILE Y Andy Capp will resume later this week. 


WHEN YOU GIVE 
ZERO A JOB 
YOU SHOULD 
KEEP AN EVE / 
ON HIM y 


\ Yes, sir, 
/ i'll go 

CHECK ON 
HIM NOW 


TAKE YOU R 
^ JEEP ^ 


f 'fjpn 



running away from home. It is not a wigan- 
like poverty she is running from. It is contem- 
porary European; bleakness rather than mis- 
ery. 

Maryvonne and her husband, a feflow work- 
er, have a house, enough to eat, a television set, 
a paid vacation and a child whose principal 
deprivation is the prospect of a life quite as 
constricted as that of its parents. The punish- 
ing and monotonous routine of factory work 
— but it could be, for Letessier, that of a dak 
or shop employee as wefl — has eroded their 
spirits and tightened their horizon into a noose. 

The noose will not strangle; it w£Q merely 
subject And so, Maryvonne slips it briefly ana 
th en, comically, mournfully, has nowhere to 

go, really. 


CRIME IN THIS 
CAMP HAS . 
INCREASED IO% 


REALLY? 


YEAH, BUT ITfe 
PARTLY DUE 
TO THE NEW 
THINGS THEY 
CONSIDER AS , 
CRIMES y 


LIKE ? 
WHAT | 

v* i 


LIKE ME LOOKING 
AT MISS BOX LEY 


Solution to Pre v io u s Puzzle 


55 Kind of beer 

56 City ou Kyushu 

57 Aroma 
58Hwys. 

59 Rocky peaks 

60 What Lady 
Macbeth 
curses 

61 Owns 


Ik # f 

l&i&Z 


® Note Yale Times, edited by Eugene Malabo. 


WIZARD of ID 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




□ebb naam □□□□□ 
nnno □□□□ aansa 
□nno aaaa unuurj 
QOQ □□□□0030300 
QEQE3Q □□□□□□ 

□non □□□□□ 

□13000a 300 0300 

□on □□□□□aa ana 
doqq □□□ Haaoaa 
aaaao 00 m 

D EQG00 □□□□□ 

□□□□3a30a0l3 000 
□□□□□ □□□□ 0000 
□□□00 □□□□ 0E3Q0 
DE0D0 □□□□ □□□□ 


She fantasizes, and since she is on the Id 
and an active unionist, her fantasies hre oath 
left as well. She is a beautiful stranger, beans 

a message across Siberia for the Russian Rew 

lution. Ideology doesn't hold, though; it tore 
cozy. She cum up beside Lenin, who has a - 
earache. In the 1919 Spartacisi uprising j 
Germany, she is not Rosa Luxemburg, fai -■ 
Rosa's aster, who plays dreamily on the pun 
while the workers march outside. 

Maryvonne’s fantasies, tike her life at hoqY 
and her Paimpol fling, are bridled. In fc.1 
bubble bath, she is Marilyn Monroe, but the 
she goes on to inventory her hairy legs an 
knobby knees. She hears two lovers talkh 
intensely at the next table. ‘T had my ow 
swefct talker once,” she reflects, “and it wi 
only when he stopped talking that 1 start*' 
getting old.” She imagines going out with - 
reporta who once interviewed her during 
factory strike. He bad told her to say whatew 
came to mind. The only thing that came to h • 
mind, she recalls, was that he was handsom 
“but he seemed to be pretty well informed c' 
that score already." Longing and a pntetio 
skepticism are the poles of her character. 

That is her charm and the charm of * ' 
Breath of Fresh Air.” The notion of escape 
not particularly original, nor is the portrait i' 
the bleak skin of welfare that barely covers d 

K ’ hing routine of workers’ lives. It is a am 
almost a sketch. What gives it lifer" 
Maxyvoone's spirit, doted out in him ted me 
sures, but the real thing; so that the 
ending, a cool mix of absurdity azu 
break, fills us entirely. 


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THANKS FOR RETURNING MY 
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Zurbriggen Wins 
Super Giant Slalor 

nvi^ Stitt in Race for (heratt Tide 


The Anoaeseti Pres) 

INVERMERE British Cdum- 
.a — Ptrmin Zurbriggen of Swit- 
tland won Sunday's super giant 
ilom to k eep alive his fading 
ipes of overtaking Luxembourg’s 
. arc Girardelli for the overall 
'odd Cop championship. 

. Zurbriggen, who finished fourth 
■ Saturday’s Moison downhill, 
aneuvered his way through SI 
ties on Panorama Mountain’s icy 
arse in 1 minute, 47.10 seconds. 

- Robert Eriadter dltaW finished 

- distant second, in 1:4837, with 
lomas BOrgler of Switzerland 
ird in 1:48.62. 

Zurbriffiea’s victory, in the first 
arid Cup super giant slalom 

- ced in North America, gave him 
•Q points in the giant slalom 

i and 233 in overall. Super 


pant slalom points, on a declining 
scale from 25 for first, count for the 
giant slalom title. 

Girardelli, who has won four gi- 
ant slaloms (his season, has 
clinched that title with 120 points 
and has an almost insurmountable 
lead in the overall standings with 
262 points. 

There are only two races left on 
IheWorld Cup circuit, a slalom and 
a giant slalom this week at Heaven- 
ly Valley, California. 

Zurbriggen would have to finish 
in the top three of both to have a 
chance of overtaking Girardelli for 
the overall championship. 

Of the 75 ski ere who left the 
starting gate Sunday. 10 failed to 
finish. They ail miwrf gates in the 
upper half of the course. 



Upsets Strike NCAA Tournament 
As Michigan, Duke, VCU Tumble 


Robert Grbcher of Italy concentrated on the course at 
Invennere, British Columbia, bat finished a distant second. 


flyers Show Islanders Short-Hand Skills 

shot. But my primary purpose i 
kill off the penalties. Toe set 
were just big bonuses.' 1 . 


Los Angeles Times Service 
When 51-goal scorer Tun Kerr 

■■ .ait out with a knee injury Man* 

■ in a game against Washington, 

Philadelphia Flyers thought 
" .ey had lost a lot of their offense. 
' • -.The injury has turned out to be a 
. ■ essing m disguise. In the absence 
their scoring leader, the other 

■ yers have stepped up the pace. 

.. ’With Murray Craven and Doug 
>ossman getting short-handed 
ols Sunday at Philadelphia, the 
-yers defeated the New York Is- 
.7 '-'Dders, 5-3. 

•. • In other games, it was Winnipeg 


5, Buffalo 3; Hartford 4, Pittsburgh 
3; N.Y. Rangers 7, New Jersey 3; 
Chicago 6, Vancouver 4 and Los 
Angeles 5. Edmonton 4. 

In the four contests without 

NHL FOCUS 

Kerr, the Flyers have gotten 27 
goals, scored by 13 players. 

In the game’ in which Kerr was 
hurl, the Flyers were trying to catch 
the Patrick Division-leadmg Capi- 
tals. After he was hurt, the Flyers 
scored twice, won the game and, 
suddenly, they are six points in 
from of the Capitals. 


The Flyers got goals from five 
players in beating the Islanders. 
But the star of the game was TtVVa 
Sinisalo of Finland, who set up 
both short-handed goals. Halfway 
through the first period, with the 
Flyers holding a 1-0 lead, Sinisalo 
intercepted apass and went in with 
Craven on a two-on-zero 'break. 
Craven missed the net with his first 
shot, but Sinisalo retrieved the 
puck and this time Craven scored. 

“On the second one, I dug it out 
of the comer," said Sinisalo, who 
has four goals since Kerr was hurt, 
“and Crossman made an excellent 


is to 
scores 


“1 guess a lot of our players don't 
like 2 o’clock games because most 
of them didn’t show up," said the 
Islanders' erafft, A1 Arbour. “Only 
five players rally played for us. 
Giving up two short-handed goals 
is ridiculous.” 

The Islanders’ goalie, Billy 
Smith, blamed himself. -We lost 
because 1 had a bad game,*’ he said. 
"The team played well in front of 
me, but I didn’t pla 
win." 


t play well enough to 


The Associated Press 

ViUanova, behind a solid perfor- 
mance from Dwayne McClain, 
made second-rankeo Michigan die 
.first major upset victim in the 
NCAA basketball tournament 
Sunday. 

The 59-55 victory over the Big 
Ten champion, which had a 26-3 
record and was the No. 1 w>j in 
the Southeast Regional, put ViDan- 
ova into the regional semifinals. 

The Wildcats, the eighth «H in 
the region, held a 30-26 Halftif fift 
lead, but Michigan scored the fust 
nine points of the second half. 

McClain, a senior forward, made 
three straight jumpers awrf ViDan- 
ova had the lead for good-The 
Wildcats made 25 of their 31 free 
throws in the game, with McClain 
good on all four of his and right or 
12 shooting from the floor. He 
scored 20 points. 

“When he’s shooting well and 
has the rhythm going, be can shoot 
with anybody." saidRoQie Massi- 
mino, who coached ViUanova to six 
straight NCAA tournament berths. 

“I rhinlf their experience (in the 
tournament) helped," said Michi- 
gan 1 coach, Bid Fried er, whose 
team was led by center Roy Tar- 
ploy’s 14 points. "Veteran dims are 
the ones that survive.” 

ViUanova next plays Maryland, 
which beat Navy, 64-59. 

In Other games, Iflinni<f Ivaf 
Georgia, 74-58, and Georgia Tech 
defeated Syracuse, 70-53, in the 
East Regional Memphis State got 
by Alabama-Birmingham, 67-66. in 
overtime and Boston College edged 
Duke, 74-73, in the Midwest Re- 
gional. Alabama beat Virginia 
Commonwealth, 63-59, and North 



Carolina State beat Texas-El Paso, 
86-73, in the West Regional. 

Eleven of the 16 teams to reach 
the r egio nal semifinals come from 
three conferences: the Big East 
(ViUanova, Sl John’s, Georgetown 
and Boston College), the Atlantic 
Coast (North Carolina, Maryland, 
Georgia Tech and North Carolina 


Thu Aoooaaad Prsa 

/, but his Michigan 
in the Southeast Regional. 

State) and the Southeastern (Ken- 
tucky. Auburn and Alabama). 

Jeff Adlans and Keith Gatlin 
each made two free throws in the 
final minute for Maryland. 

Maryland trailed. 45-34, with 
16:18 to play and used a press to 
force a 14-2 run that gave it a 48-47 
lead on three straight baskets by 


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^ 



That Old Spark Has Returned to Tigers 9 Manager Anderson 


it ear,” he 
t to last a 


By Thomas Boswell 

Washington Pest Service 

LAKELAND, Florida — “If Pete Rose can catch 
Ty Cobb in hits, then I can pass John McGraw in 
wins. If my health holds up. m get him about the 
year 2000.” Sparky Anderson, manager of the De- 
troit Tigers, was speaking. 

Most folks sneak up on a goal. Not Rose. Not 
Anderson. Ten years ago, Rose told the world that 
Ty Cobb's ghost better stop resting so easy because 

4,193 looked like a nice round number to him; now, _ IC . , am ___ ^ 

S£as®ase* SS53SFS** 

record. 


“Fm about 70 percent deaf in my 
added, “but, otherwise, they say I ou 
while. 

“HI get him." 

You might say that Anderson, caught up in the 
bliss of being the Gnt manager to win a Wond Series 
in both leagues, has overlooked something Or, 
scan cone. 

The Encyclopedia of Baseball says Cornelius 
McGfllicuddy, Connie Mack to ns, had 3,776 vic- 
tories in 53 seasons. So. you might think, if Anderson 


Sparky Anderson 


figure m break the record Aug 26. 

Now, we can aide 2000 AD. on our calendars. 

“I’ve got 1342 (victories) now. McGraw had 
2,840.” said Anderson, smoking a pipe worthy of 
Sherlock Holmes. “I'm 51. 1 have the lowest blood 
pressure on the team The doctors say I have a perfect 
heart. I don’t drink. I know how to get mad 


: might have a shot at Mack’s 


Fear not Anderson has this one finessed, to his 
satisfaction: “I don’t really think Mack was a man- 
ager a lot of those years." The record committee 
won’t boy that one. but it probably is. true Made 
wasn’t calling every hit-and-iun play in 1950 -when 
he was 88 years old. 


Everybody knows there’s enough hot air in Sparicy 
Anderson to stop an Ice Age m its tracks. Once 
Anderson makes up his mind, he never changes h. 
Unless somebody new enters the room. 

Despite the cheerful waywardness of Anderson's 
monologues, there is a new Sparky on display this 
spring. Can this be the same man who, Iasi October, 
looked haggard and 01 in his moment of greatness? 
When Anderson, whose father had died just months 
before, said he would retire after 1986, there were no 
jokes. 

.What has happened? 

“I felt that when I was fired in Cincinnati On 
1978), it took all those accomplishments (four pen- 
nants) away from me,” he said. “AD I heard was how 
I had inherited a team of superstars and was just a 
‘push-button manager.’ 

“Now, I have (the accomplishments) back. Was 1 
bitter? Yeah. WdL Ijust say I didn't get latter. I got 
better. 

- “By the end of last year, I was tired, totally wore 


out. That’s why my wife and I had long talks all 
winter We’re all confused about what we want to do 
(in life). 

“I pm everything on my own back, even though it 
didn't have to be there. Losing, or the thought of 
losing, will never affect me like that again. I'll be 
laid-back now forever. Just watch. JTI never bum 
out. I don’t have to prove anything any more. They 
can say, 'He managed bad in ’85.' Bat nobody can 
ever again say that 1 can’t numqg w. 

“I didn't know what an obsession it had become 
with me until a couple of weeks ago when 1 got down 
here. It lingered in me to three months in winter- 
time. I went to every banquet and I didn't have time 
to at down and let it go. 

“TO never do that again, either. You bum out 
when you forget die lug picture, take yourself too 
seriously. The game goes on without anybody. Babe 
Ruth’s m a graveyard in Baltimore and we’re still 
playin’ today, aren’t we?" 


reserve Tom Jones. The Terrapins 
took the lead for good, at 58-57, on 
a basket by Len Bias. He led his 
team with 20 points. 

Maryland Coach Lefty Driesdl 
ordered a four-comer offense with 
4:33 to play. Thai ran the clock 
down until Adkins was fouled with 
40 seconds left and he made both 
free throws for a 60-57 lead. Gatlin 
added two more free throws eight 
seconds later. 

Illinois used a 16-0 spurt in the 
first half to take control of Georgia. 
Doug Altenberger scored the first 
and last baskets of the rally as the 
Fighting filini took a 32-15' lead. 

“We have been working on the 
fast break the last couple of 
months,” Altenberger said. “I don’t 
think Georgia thought we could get 
up and down the court like we did." 

Georgia Tech used its inside 
strength — Yvon Joseph and John 
Salley getting 30 points and 14 re- 
bounds — to beat Syracuse, racing 
away from a 28-27 halftime lead 
with die first six points or the sec- 
ond half. Andre Turner’s 17-foot 
jumpo- with six seconds left in 
overtime gave Memphis State its 
victory. 

Turner, who got 23 points, had a 
chance to win the game in regula- 
tion. But his 30-foot jumper 
bounced off the back rim as the 
buzzer sounded. Memphis State's 
all-America. Keith Lee. had tied 
the score at 60 when he made one 
of two free throws with 20 seconds 
left. But Lee fouled out 50 seconds 
into the overtime. 

Anthony Gordon, who had 14 
points and 15 rebounds, gave Ala- 
bama-Birmingham a 66-65 lead 
with 39 seconds left. 

Roger McCrcady scored 20 
points and Michael Adams 19 as 
Boston College beat Duke after 
trailing by 1 1 in the first half. The 
Eagles finally took the lead for 
good, at 59-57, with 10:53 to go. 

Duke's Johnny Dawkins missed 
two of three free throws in the final 
29 seconds and Tyrone Scou's free 
throw with 13 seconds to play gave 
Boston College a 74-71 lead.' 

"I thought maybe we had con- 
cluded a good season when they 
had an 11 -point lead," said Boston 
College’s coach. Gary Williams" 

Bobby Lee Hun's 19 points and 
13 rebounds helped Alabama upset 
second-seeded Virginia Common- 
wealth in the West. 

The Crimson Tide, which has 
won nine of its last 10, held Virgin- 
ia Commonwealth without a field 
goal the last 9:10 of the first half. 

North Carolina State wore down 
Texas-El Paso in the second half. 
Lorenzo Charles scored 20 of his 30 
points and Spud Webb 22 of his 29 
that period. 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 


Basketball 


World Cup Skiing 


RL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 


NBA Standings 


NCAA Tournament 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


EAST REGIONAL 



Patriot Dfvtsua 




Aitartlc Dtotalea 



Second Ratted 


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GA 


Mr 

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Pet. 

GB- 

March 17 

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54 

14 

294 


(ai Attanta) 

■ashlrtaton 

40 21 

9 

89 

285 

214 

x-PWtadelptito 51 

16 

.761 

2V> 

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.Y. islanders 37 29 

5 

79 

3)7 

377. 

Washington 

. 34 

33 

J07 

19KS 

Georgia Tedt 7a Syracuse 53 

. Rangers 

23 37 

10 

56 

265 

307 

New Jersey 

34 

34 

-500 

20 


tourgti 

23 41 

5 

51 

243 

331 

New York 

23 

45 

-338 

31 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL 

t Jersey 

20 41 

9 

49 

240 

296 


CBBtrol Dfvisloa 



Second Round 


Adams Division 




x -Milwaukee 

47 

30 

.701 

_ 

March T7 

anfrcol 

34 25 

IT 

79 

365 

235 

Detroit 

36 

30 

-545 

101* 

(At Dayton. Ohio) 

attato 

32 23 

14 

7B 

253 

207 

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33 

35 

ASS 

Ml* 

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MMC 

34 26 

9 

77 

265 

245 

Cleveland 

27 

40 

M3 

20 

Maryland 64, Now 59 

ten 

32 29 

8 

72 

262 

241 

Atlanta 

26 

42 

-382 

2m 


llord 

23 36 

9 

55 

240 

296 

Indiana 

20 

48 

JS4 

271* 

MIDWEST REGIONAL 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Hunt* OWSw 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MIBNi t DhWm 


«*J ten V- 

r 

V •# 


. Louis 

33 

25 

11 

77 

263 

249 

Denver 

42 

S 

-627 



nlcngo 

34 

33 

5 

73 

279 

275 

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39 

26 

■583 

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sworn 

23 

37 

11 

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23ft 

2*3 

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38 

30 

J59 

4V» 

reft 

22 

38 

11 

55 

272 

326 

San Antonia 

34 

35 

-493 

9 

'anta 

17 

46 

7 

41 

215 

305 

Utah 

37 

36 

471 

1015 

» 

SBlTthe Division 



Kansas a tv 

25 

43 

-368 

171* 

Anontan 

45 

17 

9 

99 

352 

254 


Pacific DMslan 



Inntoeg 

39 

27 

7 

S5 

323 

305 

y-LA. Lakers 

49 

18 

731 

_ 

Money 

36 

36 

ft 

60 

352 

OT 

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33 

36 

.471 

171* 

* Angeles 

33 

26 

13 

77 

311 

269 

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31 

37 

451 

161* 

comer 

22 

41 

8 

52 

255 

364 

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29 

39 

•426 

20V4 

■totted Playoff berth) 





t-A. Clippers 

23 

46 

333 

27 

• 







Golden State 

19 

46 

-284 

30 


Second Raced 
•torch 17 
CAt Houston) 

MetmMa St. (J. AJa^BIrmloohom U. OT 
Ballon College 7*. Duke 73 


MENS SUPER GIANT SLALOM 
l At Invennere, British Cotemblo) 

1. Pirmln Zurbriggen. Switzerland 1:47.10 

2. Robert Ertaetier. Italy UOZ7 

X Thome* Burster. Switzerland 1:042 
4. Markus Wasmater, West Germany 
1:4X42 

X Hubert 5 hub, Austria 1:4M5 

6. Jure Fronka Yugoslavia 1:4V.14 

7. Marc GlranMIl. Luxembourg i:4»J7 
X Franck Piccard. France l:4»j» 

». Rok Petrov fc. Yugoslavia 1:49.94 

10. Michael Eder. West Gemxxiv liSUB. 

11. Ernst Rledbperger. Austria 1:50.19 
IX Peter Roth, West Germany 1:5044 
IX Thomas Swagnssinge, Austrian 1:5075 
14. Rkfcard P r om ollo n. Italy 1:5051 

li Oswald ToHscft, Italy, 1 J093 
1L Ham Ena. Austria 1:5095 
17. Gerhart ueW Austria 1-J09S 
IX Peter Mueller, Switzerland 1:SUH 
19. Martin Hanoi. Switzerland 1 JLO* 

20 Franz Heteer, Swttzertand l-.SliM 


SUNDAY’S RESULTS 
, iHaodtn 1 l V- 3 

MeMIe a 2 9—5 

Xrfeninon (a). Craven 123). Poulin (25). 
“non w, Conan f»»j Trottter ml. O. 
*f[l4J,BaufN!er (12). Stefs an goat; N.Y. 
■«Nrs fan Lindbergh) 10-110—28; Phi to- 
Ha (on B. Smith) 9-16-11—34. 


3l 


r.'-f 

JV' 

tr 

.*9“ 

*•' 


t."' 

ir- . .. 

* 

} 

JT* ■- 

f 

ft* 


. TW (W, Ntll 17). HuworchuK 144). Slew 
MtKLeon (37); Ruff (». Selling (13), 
- ama UU. Stats ee seal: Buffalo (oa 
*4) 8-104—34; Winnipeg (on Bar- 
\}i IVie-15-36. 

1 2 6—3 

2 5 0—7 

‘ ^nirtck (7). Erlxon <7). Brooke C7>. Le- 
a (7), Sundttram {iaL Maloney (ll).Os- 
• OliMcAdom (l).Broten (22).V*rbeefi 
NMtseeeeel; New Jersey la" Hanlon) 9- 
N.Y. Rangers (oa Reset). Law) 11-12- 

:■» 12 3-4 

•ever 3 ■ 3—4 

'orroy 2(255,0. Wilson (20), Sovard (36), 
■r (43). Olayk (17): Tantl 135). McNOB 
■ 4««d*hBm (24), Smvl (23). Shots on 
Oleaeo (an Bradeur) 10+9-35: Vfln- 
r (*) Bonnermon) M-1M3-34. 

.’•SB 2 • v-a 

1 « 2 6 3-4 

•Non (9). NeuMd 124). Malone (20), 
0 tn>: BuHsrt (39). Young 134), Le- 
‘ (V). Skets oe goal: Pittsburgh Ion 
. H*9— 27; Hertford (an Herron) 15-12- 

2 11-4 
2 11-4 

_ *2 143J. Shut t im.Hortty t13),Mcl.el- 
«; Coffey an. Lumiev (6). Krusnel- 
nkMOMler (20). Shots an eoal: Ed- 
1 . n <M Janecvh) M-D-aS; los Anaetes 

14- Q- IV— 37. 


Transition 




*S- V 

t i 

^ » • 
krf* 
s 




'• * 

♦ " 1 


TC C ' 


fS' 


BASEBALL 
«"NWCBn LBODUt 

. 66— Saw Jgon Nieves, pitcher. 

. ’ ™)lor-te»u* comstac for reossfpn- 

• "BINtW LHPUt 
. VOBK-Sent Jtfl BWIger. Terry 
1 “""WetiEleteltrtkhersjEdHeom 
1 try Lyons, caterers, and mSeieite 
. H>m «IB«'.lattielrinlnor4aasvecani- 
‘ f »wiBnmeni. 

’ COLLEGE 

n*»BSTERn state— N amed Don 

bMkettwi ctoc*. 

H CAROLINA— Extended BN eott- 

^•MofTtan.loottoH coash, through 


(x-dincffed o layoff berth) 

I v-O inched division title) 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Hanzen BUB 29—120 

Boston 99 39 32 34-124 

Bint 17-32 14-15 48. PorWl 15-20 S-10 38; 
Sampson 34-29 4-6 XL. Uwyd 9-12 2-2 20. Rs- 
beemts: Houston 46 (Samnson 12); Boston 56 
(Bird 151. Assists: Houston 27 (Lloyd ill; 
Boston 37 (Bird, Buckner 71. 

Indiana 21 21 39 27-405 

New jersey 31 31 3$ 31-129 

B. Williams 1 1-18 7-1 1 29, Dawkins 7-0 *J 1A 
Richardson B-142-3 18; Fleming 9-138-10 26, H. 
wilDarm 2-3 U. RebotMds: Indiana 49 
(Garnett 6); New Jersey 49 (B-Wlliroms 12). 
Assists: Indiana 24 (Flemina, Stansburr. 
Brown 4); New Jersey 32 (Ronsey. RhAud- 
son 7). 

MBwcmleee 29 26 31 21 6-117 

CM COW 2ft 25 27 37 1ft— 119 

Jordan 11-25 16-13 32. Dailey 1630 W 26; 
Cummings 11-21 49 3S. Atoncrief 7-16 13-17 2A 
Hodges 6-12 24 11. Rdbeands: MUwaukee 45 
tCummlnes 111; Chicago 71 (Woolrtdoo. Jor- 
dtei 11). Assists: Milwaukee 21 (Prossey ft); 
OOam 31 (Jordan 16). 

peaver 35 23 38 33—119 

San Antonio 34 30 33 2F-KH 

Moore3-U7-62XGerv1nft-167-32XBanfcS*4l 

►7 14. Gilmore 5-10 44 14: issel 11-17 5-5 27. 
English 7-13 11-13 25. Rebounds: Denver 38 
(Lever 9): Son Antonio 57 [lovororrl 6). As- 
sists: Denver 29 (Lever 8); 5an Antonia 31 
(Moore 71. 

Vtae R 23 n 25-161 

Kamos CUT 24 35 26 24-167 

Thorpe ID-14 5-11 35. Thompson 5ft M lfc 
Woodson 6-11 3-415; Danlley 1 0-177-9 27,Eahui 
7-10 « 19. Reteantfs: Utah 49 (Eaton 10); 
Kansas Cltv 43 ITherpe 15). A»Ms: UWl » 
(Green 6): Kansas ah' 33 (Drew 12). 

Attanta 17 30 20 24-WI 

portkmd 36 27 29 2B-1M 

Vandswftfthft 1S-17S-5K Dree tor M3 44 26; 
Johnson ra-W 44 26. MflUdns 9-24 « 22. R#- 
boundv AWonto42 (Levlngston 9); Portland 
49 (M.Thomp*oo«). Assbh: Attanta 23 (Jobn- 
aisi 11); Portland 32 (Colter 81. 

Detroit M 14 15 25- 98 

Seattle 10 3ft 39 37-164 

Cnomoers 7-l4 74 21, SuMwoW 8-10 2-2 18; 
Thomas 9-183422. TrlmKka 4-13 W 14. Lalm- 
DeerB-UO-O lAReteente: DetrottW (Lalm- 
beer 6); Seattle SO (Vrom* SHung 10). As- 
sists: Detroit 26 (Thomas 13); Seattle 30 
(Henderson 131. 

Gotten State 22 30 26 29—169 

LJL GtOPtrs 19 31 21 23-1M 

Short «1 *>7 2IL Ftovd 7-14 4-4 26i wwieteaa 
7.13 5-5 19; Smith BM44-T3S. Donaldson 54 *4 
H Rebounds: Golden state 55 It— Smirfi 16); 
LJL C Uppers 50 (CaleMngs HI: Assists: 
Golden Stole 25 (Ftoyd ■»-* *-A- admen 30 
(HUan U). 


WEST REGIONAL 
Second Rooad 
March 17 

(At Albuquerque. MALI 
Alabama 4X Va. Commonwealth 59 
North Carolina SI. 86. Texas-El Paso 73 

College Top-20 Results 

How Rm Associated Press too-M caneae 
Msketban teams fared last week: 

Georgetown (32-2) dof. Lehlgti 48-t3; dot 
Temple 434*. 

Mk±HMm(264) dec. FaliieighDlckfnmn se- 
tt; lost to ViUanova 59-55. 

SL Jotiel (29-3) def. Southern U. 83-59; del. 
Arkansas 68-65. 

Okiaboma (3 04) del North Carolina ALT 
9643; def. Illinois SL 75-69. 

Memphis SL (29-31 derf. Pennsylvania 67-55; 
def. Alatoamo- Birmingham 67-66, OT. 

oeoreto Tech (24-7) def. Mercer 4548; del 
Syracuse 70-53. 

North Coral lefl (264) dot Middle Tennessee 
76-57; def- Noire Dome 4046. 

Lowtsfcmq Tech (29-2) def. Pittsburgh 7»44; 
oef. Ohio SL 7947. 

Nevodo-Las Vegas (28-4) def. San Diego SL 
65-60; tost to Kentucky 6441. 

Duke 1234) def. Peoperdlae 7542; lost to 
Boston College 74-7X 
Vinmua Co mm on w e alt h (364) def. Mar- 
shall 81-65; lost to Alabama 6349. 

liUnols (26-6) del Northeastern 7647; def. 
Georgia 7*46. 

Kobm (264) def. Ohio U. 49-35: lost to Au- 
burn 66-64. 

Lovelfe intnal* 127-5) dot. leno 5943; art. 
Southern Methodist 70-57. 

Syracuse (22ft) deL DePaul 7045; lost to 
Georgia Tech 7043. 

North Carolina SL 122ft) def. Nevado-Reno 
65-56; Oef. Tcwe-EI Pose 86-73. 

Tens Tech (234) toot to Boston College 55- 
5X 

Tufso (234) tost to Texas- EJ Paso 7WS. 
eesrata 123ft) deL WVchtto SI. 4446; Wet to 
Illinois 74-58. 

LOtfiSiOM SL 119-101 tost to Navy 7845. 


WOMEN'S GIANT SLALOM 
(At WatervIBe VOttev. IlHJ 
L VTwi) Schneider. Swllzortqnd. 2 mlwrte& 


III 

i DUm Raffs, Ui. 2:08X1. 

XTrawfl Hoacher.weat Germany, 2:0646. 

4. Marta Watltser, Switzerland. 2M71. 

5. Eva Twmrtokens. UE. 2:0641. 

. 6. Catherine Quittot. France. 2:09.19. 

7. Perrine Pelen, France. 3:09X1 
6- Marino KlehL West Germanv. 2:09X2. 
9. Tamara McKinney, US* 2:0947. 
la Debbie Armstrong. Ui 3d)9-4L 
IV QtrtsteUe Gutanard, France. 2:0940. 
IX Matelo Svet YugeuJavl, 2:0944 

IX Svlvta Eder. Austria 3-JNJ1 

U. Olga Chorvotova Cxschostavckla 
2:0949. 

IS. Anita Wort ne r. Austria 2:994a 
WOMEN* OVERALL CUP STANDINGS 
l.x-MJcheta F1ginLSwtt2eiiond.259 potato. 

X Brtglne OertIL Swiberkma 217. 

1 Wotlber, 197. 

A. KletlL MX 

5 Charvatova 167. 

6 Elisabeth KJ rcMer, Austria 154. 

7. Erika Hess. Switzerland, USL 

X McKinney. 139. 

9. BJanaa Fen iandez-Ochoa Spain. MX 
IX Scftnetaor. IDS. 

(*-cJ Inched Kite) 



SPORTS BRIEFS 

Ballesteros Given a Victory in Golf 

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Severiano Ballesteros got three birdies on 
the back nine, then survived a bogey on the 1 8th hole Sunday to win the 
USFifcG Golf Classic when John Mahaffey double-bogeved the hole. 

Ballesteros began the round (railing fay two shots. The Spaniard’s 
bogey on 18 tied him with Mahaifcy at 1 1 under par, with Mahkfey still 
having two holes to play. 

ButMahaffey. on the 18th, knocked his first shot into tree roots on the 
right side of the fairway, put bis second shot into the trees on the left, 
chipped back onto the fairway, then two-putted from about eight feet 
after a second chip shot to the green. That dropped him into a tie with 
Peter Jacobsen. 



Celtics Topple Rockets, 
Bird Scoring 48 Points 



USFL S tandings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

W L T Pel. PF PA 
Blratireawn 3 1 o xso 12» 97 

Memphis 3 1 0 J30 S4 70 

Tampa Bov 3 1 t 750 117 8 

New Jersey 2 2 0 400 100 161 

Baffbnere 1 2 1 J75 79 « 

Jacksonville 1 3 0 250 93 121 

Ortondo 9 4 9 -SOO 44 120 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Houston 3 0 0 1JD0 124 46 


Golf 


Float scores rin d ea rning! offer lbeU5F*G 
Oalf Classic whRJ *ai cpm o l et sd Suqdor op 
too Par72,7j068-ygrd Lakewood Country aob 
course to Mew Orleans (tournament itert- 

cned to M Boies bvrwnoatafsulpittiy'slblni 
round): • 

Severiano Ballesteros. S72JD0 664*46-205 
Peter Jacobsen. SOO 65-72-78-307 

John MahaHaVr S3U0Q 63-73-71-® 

Mark Lye, 5174C6 67-7249-208 

Tony Slta. *17409 6W9-73-2DB 

Klkua Arab 31U20 68-3MB— 209 

Joe Inman, *1X530 6&-7D-7T-JB9 

Gareflce Rose. *1X530 714670-209 

Hal Sutton, 51Z520 707)46-209 

Lannv Wodktns. *12X20 47-7270-209 

George Archer. *7.943 71-4671—210 

Ketttl Fergus; *7543 69-7049-719 

GJbbv Gilbert, *7.90 (WWWB 

ail dll Rodrtsun $7,90 JO-49-71 — 210 

Greg Twfcge. VMS 73-7346-210 

Brett Upper. *750 6«6*-Z10 

Richard Zehol. *7.943 69-7349-710 


Denver 

3 

1 

0 

JO 

79 

71 

Oakland 

2 

l 

1 

JOS 

97 

IK 

Arizona 

2 

9 

0 

■530 

77 

67 

Portland 

2 

2 

0 

J00 

61 

65 

Las Angetee 

1 

3 

0 

OSD 

105 

90 

San Antonio 1 3 0 .250 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 

44 

103 


Baltimore 29, New Jersey 9 
Birmingham 34 Memphis 19 
Oakland <2. JackjonwHlr 34 


Exhibition Baseball 


SUNDAY’S RESULTS' 
Detroit 7. Mbmesde I 
OKtnnali X PHtsbutoh X 10 Innbws 
Los Anuetee L Houston 5 
N.Y. urns 5. St, Louis 2 
Toronto 8, PWlaSstoWo 2 
Boftintora 17, Allonto 2 
N.Y. Yankees 9, Boston • 

Oftcoga WMte Scot 7, Kansas Oty 2 
Cleveland 4 San Francisco 3 
Seattle i Oakland 1 
Chicago Cubs X Milwaukee 2 
California 4 San Dtege 3 
Texas *i Moo t reoL pod, rata 


LoxAngeies Times Service 

Just about the most difficult feat 
in professional sports these days is 
to repeat as champion. In the 
1980s, in major professional team 
sports, it has been done only in 
hockey. 

Thee hasn’t been a repeat in 
baseball since 1978. No team has 
won back-to-back victories in Ibe 
Super Bowl since 1979. The last 
lime it happened in the National 
Basketball Association, in 1969, 
the Boston Critics repeated with a 
player-coach named Bill RusselL 

It is the goal of Larry Bad and 
the present-day Critics to become 
the first to do it since Russell's 

NBA FOCUS 

team. In getting ready for the play- 
offs, the Celtics are letting poten- 
tial postseason opponents know 
they mean business. 

Sunday, the Houston Rockets 
were given a taste of what to ex- 
pect-.' 

With Ralph Sampson and 
Akeem Olajuwon looking better 
with almost every game, many ex- 
perts have predicted the Rockets 
will represent the West in the 
championship series. 

Evidently, if they do get there, 
they are in for a rough time. 

With Bird scoring 48 points, the 
Critics took the Rockets apart in 


the third quarter and raced to an 
easy 134-120 victory at Boston. 

. After a slow start the Critics bdd 
only a two-point lead ai halftime. 
Bat in the third quarter, their front 
Ene of Bird, Kevin McHale and 
Robert Parish scored all 32 of Bos- 
ton’s points and the Critics pulled 
away to a 100-91 lead. 

Parish, who finished with 38 
prints, got Olajuwon in foul trou- 
ble in the third period and the 
rookie was ineffective the rest of 
the way. 

It was the Critics’ fifth straight 
victory and the fourth straight 
amazing game for Bird. The 6-foot- 
9 (2.6-metm) forward began the 
streak with a chib-record 60 prints 
last Tuesday. In the four games, he 
scored 174 points, averaging 43.5 
per game. 

“We expect Bird to play well,” 
said his coach, K.C Jones. “But he 
is doing more than we have a right 
to expect. He's not only shooting 
well, he's diving for loose balls and 
sneaking around stealing balls on 
defense. His offense is [he second 
best part of his game.” 

In other games, it was New Jer- 
sey 129, Indiana 105; Kansas Gtv 
107, Utah 101; Chicago 119, Mil- 
waukee 117; San Antonio 124, 
Denver 119; Grides Stale 109, 
LA. Clippers 100; Portland 114, 
Atlanta 101, a 
troit98. 


and Seattle 106, De- 


Jpper75. 

Navratilova Beats Evert in Dallas 

DALLAS (AP) — Martina Navratilova put pressure on Chris Evert 
Lloyd’s serve Sunday and won a Virginia Slims tennis championship, 6-3, 
64. In their third meeting this year, Navratilova broke Even’s serve twice 
in each set. 

Even said “the quality of the match was very high, comparable to any 
that we’ve played the past two years. It was about the best I’ve played 
against hex except for the time 1 beat her fat Key Biscayne, Florida, in 
January).” 

Janyd Upsets WUander in Brussels 

BRUSSELS (AP) — Anders Janyd upset Mats Wilander, 64, 3-6, 7-5, 
in a match between Sweden's top tennis players and won the Belgian 
Indoor tournament. 

Wilander said Janyd had played “his best match" yet against him. The 
Daws Cup partners have met five times in Grand Prix events, with 
Wilander wnming three tunes. 

McLain Ordered Held Without Bond 

TAMPA, Florida (AP) — Denny McLain, the former baseball star 
convicted of racketeering, doesn’t deserve to remain free until sentencing, 
said U.S. District Court Judge Elizabeth Kovachevich, ruling Sunday 
that McLain is a potential threat to the community. 

Judge Kovachevich agreed with prosecutors that McLain is a bad risk 
and denied a request by defense attorneys to set the former Detroit Tigers 
pitcher free on bond until his sentencing April 19. McLain, 41, has been 
free on 5200,000 bond since his indictment in March 1984. 

Codefendant Seymour Sher also was ordered held without bond while 
another co-defendant, Frank Cdcchiaro, is in a federal prison in Atlanta 
on a separate conviction. Each face a marimum 60 years in prison and 
fines of 560,000, having been convicted of racketeering, conspiracy and 
extortion. 

Another Richards Is Vaulting to Fame 

PRINCETON, New Jersey (AP) — Brandon Richards, son of the only 
two-time Olympic pole vault gold medalist, set a national scholastic 
indoor mark Sunday when he vaulted 17 feet, 6 inches (S32 centimeters) 
during competition at a track and field meet at Princeton University. 

Richards, of Santa Barbara, California, broke his own mark of 17 feet, 

5 inches, then watched as his father, Bob, deared 12 feet in an exhibition 
fra- athletes over 40. 

Mays, Mantle Can Rejoin Baseball 

NEW YORK (AP) — Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle, two Hall or 
Famers banned from baseball because of jobs with gambling casinos, are 
bong reinstated by the sport's sew commissioner. Pets' Ueberroth. 

Mantle and Mays were ordered to disassociate themselves from base- 
lull by the framer commissi oner, Bowie Kuhn, because of their employ- 
mem by gambling casinos in Atlantic City. New Jersey. Ueberroth said 
when he succeeded Kuhn last October that he would study the cases of 
the two superstar outfielders. 

Both had held part-time posts with thdr former teams. Mantle as a ' 
spring training batting instructor with the New York Yankees and Mays 
with the New York Mets. 





Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


n Tkjrtr t dd Carriage Works: A Drive Into the Past ^ . j r - w 

Those MUhom for PR - - Queen and I m IS X 



W 'ASHINGTON — The big- 
eest item in the General Dy- 


VV gest item in the General Dy- 
namics billing dispute with the gov- 
ernment is $4.3 million for “public 
relations.” 

“What has public relations got to 
do with building submarines, 

planes anil tpnfrsT * I a sVfl j a COm- 

^ifwe'Svinform the people 
as to the good job we were doing, 
we wouldn't get 
any reorders for 
new weapons. 

Whenever the 


we wmlre is as important to this 
country's survival as the weapons 
themselves." ' 





taxpayer needs a 
Trident subma- 
rine, an F-16 
fighter or an M- 
1 tank, we want 
him to think 
General Dy- 
namics." , 

“I can see the BucbwaM 
advantage from your standpoint. 
But I'm not dear why the taiq>ayer 
should be billed millions of dollars 
for your company’s advertising and 
PR campaign.” 

He replied, “The average Ameri- 
can doesn’t know one bOlion-doUar 
system from another, and it is es- 
sential that he believes he is getting 
top-of-the-line merchandise for his 
money. The only way he will ever 
become a discr iminating buyer and 
a connoisseur of fine weaponry is if 
be knows what defense contractors 
be can count on. That’s why educa- 
tion through the media is so impor- 
tant.” 

“I don’t quarrel with that,” I 
said. “But you would think since 
you make so much money on your 
weapons, you would throw in your 
public relations costs fa* nothing.” 

“It’s impossible to separate the 
price of our hardware from our PR 
costs. The consumer's faith in what 


I then asked, “How does the tax- 
payer know the press releases he is 
paying for tell the entire story as to 
wlia: your company is doing for 
him?” 

□ 

“Because we adhere rigorously 
to the Truth in Defense Contract- 
ing’ code. It prohibits us from ad- 
vertising unsubstantiated claims 
about our weapons, deliberately 
underbidding to get a contract and 
rearing false information about 
cost overruns. Under the code we 
have agreed to pot a Surgeon Gen- 
eral’s warning on all our products, 
saying. This weapon could be dan- 
gerous to yonr health.’ Without the 
code we contractors are nothing.” 

“1 would like to ask you about 
some specific items you people 
charged us Tor. Why the 10,000 F- 
16 necktie tacks?” 

He said, “The F-16 is the finest 


fighter the company has ever built 
and we felt our friends in and out of 
the Pentagon needed a tie clasp to 
remind them of it. With our mark- 
up they still cost less than a dollar 
apiece.” 

T don't think the taxpayer ob- 
jects to you giving gifts to anybody. 
But there is still the question of 
who should have to pay for them.” 

“It is written in our contract that 
all tie tacks, cufflinks and gifts to 
Admiral Kickover’s wife may be 
listed as spare parts and included in 
the price of a weapon. That goes for 
baseball hats, neddaces and special 
branding irons." 

□ 

“1 was going to ask about those 
branding irons. What do they have 
to do with the defense of the coun- 
try?” 

“Those branding irons were one 
of the most popular gifts we ever 
banded out There are people all 
over Texas and Oklahoma who 
would have never heard of our 
fighter if they hadn't seen a steer 
with an F-16 logo on his butt.” 

“What other justification do you 
have for the Pentagon paying your 
public relations fen?” 

“The obvious one is so we can 
defend ourselves in Congress and 
the media against charg es that we 
are bflkingme public. Itwould be 
c riminal for an established defense 
contractor to pay those costs out of 
his own pocket.” 


1851 German Stamp 
Sold for 2.3 Millimi DM 


The Associated Press 

WIESBADEN, West Germany 
— An 18S1 stamp from Baden has 
been sold fra- 13 million Deutsche 
marks ($676,000) at an auction of 
the collection of a New York busi- 
nessman, John R. Boker. 

The price was the highest ever 
paid for a stamp in West Germany, 
and one of the highest worldwide, 
traders said. The stamp is an off- 
color misprint originally worth the 
equivalent of a pfennig. 


By Charles Hillinger 

Los Angdes Times Sera# 

O AKLAND, Oregon — The biggest in- 
dustry in this hamlet, filled with 19th- 
century houses and stores, is a tnm-back-the- 
clock factory called the. Carriage Works, 
which makes replicas of old-fashioned stage- 
coaches , buggies, surreys with fringes on top. 
Stanhope gigs, four-wheel phaeton carriages, 
cutlers and sleighs. 

“Our customers are people who believe 
weVe gone far enough forward and prefer 
going back in time,” said Barbara Evensizer, 
38, who owns and operates the Carriage 
Works with her husband, John 37. 

The old-time buggy shop, which has been 
in business 10 yearsm an old-rime farm town 
that has a population of 825, did $350,000 
worth of business this year, three rimes the 
sales of five years ago. 

“We're six months to two years behind in 
bade orders. Way things are going, we could 
double the size, of our operation and still not 
meet the demand," John Evensizer said. 

Word of mouth and “ads in just about 
every horse magazine published" bring in the 
customers. The Carriage Works has snipped 
rigs as far away as Sweden, Japan, Costa 
Rica, Australia and South Africa. 

A Texas doctor ordered a buggy to fulfill a 
lifelong dream of making house calls the way 
they used to be made. 

Much of tin company’s business comes 
from carriage dabs, which are popular in 
scattered communities across the United 
States. Members driving horse-drawn bug- 
gies and sleighs get off the highways and mt 
the dirt roads, reliving the good old days. 

Ski resorts buy cutters and sleighs from the 
Ev ensiac fs. Summer resorts purchase buggies 
and stagecoaches. 

When Steven J. Ross, chairman of Warner 
Communications Ino, and bis wife, Court- 
ney, wanted a 40th birthday present for 
George Lucas, creator of the “Star Wars” 
films, they pul in a call to the Evensfrcrs. 
Barbara Evenazer delivered a custom-built, 
single-seat top buggy to Lucas's 3, 000-acre 
(1300-hectare) ranch in San Rafael, Califor- 
nia, and showed him bow to drive H. 

Carriages created by the Evensizers ap- 
peared in the 1983 TV miniseries “The Thorn 
Birds.” The late actor Sim Pickens once 
bought a surrey with a fringe on top. 

“We can make anything horse-drawn to 
custom specification, from stagecoaches to 
pony carts, in the same quality and precision 
craftsmanship as they were constructed 100 
to 150 years ago” Evensizer said. A stage- 
coach mil run $26,000, while a pony cart will 
go for 1275, he said 
Wheelwrights, carpenters, woodworkers, 
blacksmiths and upholsterers in the shop use 
19th-century tools such as hub borers, spoke 
pointers and tenon angers — but they also 
make use of modem production techniques 



Queen Scrikit of Thailand, on a 
visit to New York, saw “The King 
and I,” a musical banned in her 
country because it is regarded as 
disrespectful to ihe Thai monarchy. 

•n i. : 


The queen, 20 ladies-in-waiting 
and 25 other attendants went back- 
stage after the show to meet the 
star, Yd Brynner. said a spokes- 
woman for the production. Neither 
the play or the movie ‘The King 
and I ” which is about a 19th-cen- 
uiry king of Thailand, has ever 
beat available there. King Mong- 
knt, a Buddhist modi: until he as- 
cended the throne of what was then 
called Siam at age 48, provided the 
inspiration for the pby. The cast 
formally welcomed the queen at the 
beginning of the show. She gave 
Brynner and his co-star. Mary Beth 
Pol, several silk-wrapped bodes 
about Thailand. 

□ 

Ted Hughes, Britain's new poet 
laureate, has written a porno called 
“The Best Worker in Europe,” 
about a salmon. Composed to en- 
courage conservation of the fish, it 
is Hughes’s third work since he was 
named poet laureate in December 
to succeed Si r John Betjeman; the 


with the explosion of an au» 
bomb. During rehearsals in v» 
na, Russell hinted that he expea , 
similar outraged reaction f « • '* 

“Faust,” but his changes -a«o , • l t If It 
them, he made Marguerite anil_,*f I** 1 1 
and her brother Va&e a nfifU 1 ’ 
gious fanatic — raised few pi' 1 * 

brows. Ruggero Raimondi pin . ■ 14 1 

Mephis to. Gabriels Bemcfcm. ’/#*** *1 
Cap was Marguerite and Franck iitl*» I/*' ’ 


Cap was Marguerite and Franck ji»1 * 
Anna sang Faust Despite sail** 1 ' 


Fi 


NUJg i sum. uespue SOI l* m 

good reviews, the Kurier wvw - I I - 

StaSS** 8 pofon ™ < * t loDlt 

□ I'll' 


first two were for Prince Hany and 
Prince William, the sons of Prince 


CHf OmAoi tagtltt Tbm 

Barbara and John Evensizer examining a replica of a carriage they brail 


Restoration is a big part of the Carriage 
Works's business, as is the manufacture of 
buggy wheels and spare parts for horse- 
drawn vehicles. 

Evensizer, a Vietnam veteran, grew uo on a 


ranch. “My grandparents were raised on a 

fftnfldian homestead, working the land with 


to make the carriages out of oak (primarily 
for the frames), maple, ash and hickory. 


horses,” he said. “They did everything with 
horses, pinwing their farmland, hauling pota- 
toes to market in horse-drawn wagons. In 
winter their only transportation was hoise- 
drawn sleighs.” 

Before getting into the buggy business, 
Evensizer worked as a logger and lived in a 
cabin without electricity in a remote Oregon 
canyon. Barbara Evensizer grew up in South- 
ern California. “1 have always been nuts 
about horses. My first word was TxKsie^ not 
‘Mommy’ or ‘Daddy,’ ” she said. 


The idea for their buggy business came to 
the Evensizere in 1974, when they spotted an 
old single-seat top buggy gathering dust in a 
neighbor’s chicken coop. 

“We fell in love with that old bum at first 
sight. The owner sold it to us for 5300. We 
d caned [it] and went to work fixing it up,” 
Barbara Evensizer recalled. 

Craftsmen at the Carriage Works consider 
their work a dream come true. 

“It’s like stepping back in time every day 
when 1 go to work,” said Greg DeLeon, 59, 


who spent 33 years in the automobile body- 
and-fender business before hiring on at the 


and-fender business before hiring on at the 
Carriage Works. 

The buggy shop advertises itself as “No. 1 
in the Carriage Trade.” It may wdl be. There 
is not much competition out there. 


Prince Wffliam, the sons of Prince 
Charles and his wife, Diana. The 
Times of London printed the first 
three verses of the nine-verse poem 
Monday. It tdls of a salmon’s mi- 
gration to the Atlantic Ocean and 
ns return to its native river. The 
poem begins: 

The best worker in Europe 

You thought he’d lx a bigger chap ? 
Wait tillyouhearmysong, my dears, 
Wait till you hear my song. 

□ 

Ren Russell hinted at a new op- 
era scandal with his production of 
Gounod's “Faust” in Vienna. But 
the closest the British director came 
to shocking was during a curtain 
call after the generally tame pre- 
miere performance: He turned bus 
bade on the audience and bent over 
in the general direction of a group 
of booing audience members. Crit- 
ics savaged Russell's production of 
PncrinTs “La Bohfcme” in July in 
Macerata, Italy; his version of 
Mimi, who dies of tuberculosis, was 
a drug addict who overdoses. Rus- 
sell’s version of Puccini's “Madams 


The Polish composer Witold ] 
toshwski, 72, has been chosen - 
first winner of the $150,000 U 
vemty of Louisville Grawene ’ 

Award for Music, described as 1 
largest annual award for compc 
don. The prize-winning Syraphc 
No. 3 had its world premiereby 
Georg Solti and the Chicago $j 
phony in 1983. Luiaslawskl, « 
lives u Warsaw, is scheduled to 
to Louisvilk. Kentucky, to rcce ■ 
the award, probably in October 
early November, when Lam* 
Leighton Smith will conduct . 
Louisville Orchestra in a concep 
Lutoslawski’s works. 

□ 


Former Prime Ministers H» . 
Wilson of Britain and Herre E* 
Trudeau of Canada were arm - 
450 Savoyards at a lunch in 
don marking the centenary of 
first performance of Gflwt i 
Suffi van's “The Mikado.” Also p 
seat was Dame Bridget D'C 
Carte, 76, granddaughter of a, 
aril D'Qyty Carte, who prodn ■ 
most of the Gil ben and Sufir 
operettas. The lunch was at - 
Savoy Hotel, built by Rich, 
D'Oyly Carte. 

□ 


Shelby Coffey, 38, assist, 
managing editor for national n 
at The Washington Post, has b 
named editor of U.S. News- 
World Report magazine, repUt;* 
Marvin L Stone. President Rtf' 
Reagan bos selected Stone asde 
ty director of the U.S. Informal 
Agency, though no formal nous 
don has been submitted to the! ' 


ate. Coffey will be the fourth cd 
of U.S. News & World Rear 


Butterfly,” which opened the 1983 
Spoleto U. S. A. Festival, was set in 


Spoleto U. S. A. Festival, was set in 
pre-Worid War II Japan and ended 


of U. S. News & World Reptr 
SI years. Mortimer Zockenr ~ 
owner of U. S. News, said Cob 
would take over as editor wif 
two weeks. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MOVING 



AiCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS in 

English. Pwis, 634 99 65. Kama 
67003 20. 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - Eure 
Write Keyter, POB 2. Bt 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 



PARIS ft SUBURBS 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SP 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

SWITZERLAND** 


MOVING 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


AGHUl PAKASKEVV super hmjrioug 
officos tor ids, dr conditioning, sk- 
ond floor, 305 sq,m. Real baraan. Tot 
72MI9& 


COTED AZUR. Theoute-sur-Mer, view 
sea 4 Comas. Lott for vflas far sate, 
330-900 sqjii. USS15Q/sqjn. Envis- 


aged txwrwiiQrifwawTimgpool, 
Write Dr. S. NWsan, Tudw 


771000 Fronkftjrt/Mcm 70. 



Embassy Service 

8 An, A Mi rim 
75008 Pnrim 

W 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGOfT 

380 26 08 


1 6TH TOWNHOUSE, 350 KtJit I 1 damc nr cr mile m f ,.,f, .1 , j 
dw. 55D sam. Ivina wo, 2 en- P £* B *£, ST w . 

vanuL tenant baaaBfunaptiQa 6 ta^WsqAWtonnf.RBodyto 


MALLORCA’S NEW 
SUPER PORT 


bi tho chonring maunkMi ma 

IEYSIN: 


aranciK, terrors, bnaafifuJ ircaptioa 6 
bndnxmt, 5 bdfe. Good coivftion. 
2966138. 


mow in. View (treaty on Sana, sun. 
50303)8 


BEACH AMRTMBITS, AREA Of 

Puerto Beams MARBELLA 


AG&fT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562-1640 


MONACO 


Hi 


PARIS DwfaenlM bAmatiand 

(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT sJSfiS* 

(069) 250066 

MUNICH I.M.S. 

(089) 142244 

w*«on JCSSZ 

(Ol) 953 3636 

CAIRO AIM Van Unas Inti 
(20-2) 712901 

USA ABvsl Van Una Ml Carp 
(OlOl) 312-681-6100 


ST. PAUL DE VENCT, ina vigw, exccp- 
nanal stone property, 450 iqin. Evan 
mace, reound level, maanitkeri 
MOO sanv land, enn be dvried. 


1^00 sqjn. land, an be 
Pbal, pcssbSSy Wnflii. F9, 
PromotiQn Mozart Nice P3 1 


GREAT BRITAIN 


FWNCWAUTY OP MONACO 

Faring beaches, wry beautiful apcrl- 
mert, decorated & lunihed. upper 
floor, pancr u m i c sea view. I0191 kr- 
race. Living, 1 master bedroom with 
boudoir, 1 bsdnxm, 2 bad*, seperate 
W.C. feted kitchen, pwkng, ceior plus 
indepandwt rtucio. 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 


WHY USE AGENTS? 


tie Bmt Sent* tram 8m 
in amt Wa r idmi Ja Mover 
CAIIPARB (3) 036 63 11 


CONT1NEX Cosfewters to 300 c*« 
watlAvide - Aa/Sm, Col Ctarie 
2B\ 1881 Fans [near Opera) Cars too 



Pnce: F73XJX0. bcduuvtty 

JOHNraViOR 4 SON 
20 Bd. dee MeeGm, Monte Crola 
Tel: (93) 50 30 70 
llic 469180 MC 


RACE MS VOSGS. bnefUoad 
bukfing, 45 sqjn. + mezzaning luxu- 
note, tvgh pnce. Teh 333 53 03 



PARIS & SUBURBS 


MONTPARNASSE 

In the heart of one the most prestigious 
anas, daa btA&ig, <pn£ty 

Ri? rS>m snjno to s rooms 

To be ready in Spring 1986 

COGHMM: 266 34 56 



WAflKAM. LUXUROUS LARGE 
tavrohame, garage, nden. PotsWe 
pefesaond use. Justified high price. 


STGBtMAlN DCS PIES 
opartment, ccrin, tastefuly fitted 
UVBMG + B8XOQM, ECMPPH), 

KITCHEN, BATH, DRESSING I Verv refrod 2 roceoboni. 4 bedrooms. 

R.lflOjm. toabity aey buifcuM s^ra. 766 33 00 

nembuJdlng.ViatTiteiday2pjn.ta7i 
pm, 8 Incase des 2 Angej 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


Them «wduaw beoch apatl w di are 
constructed <&ed an the saoshore with 
wide bathing benches, near to the wel 
known inwnoriond harbor Puerto 
Bams. The low-rise bai 
advtedural style cfdd 
wch nradwn anemties as oir coreftion- 
ing, modern kilch ens, exclusive sur- 
as privede pom garden, uv- 


CAUHMNA NOME LOCATE) m 
beaitiful Mason Viejo, viewrf lata & 


mounta i n^ dose to gdf coune. 3 
beckooms & den, m baths. Eying 
loom, fontfy room 2 f»«lacBs, rBe 


In the bay of Pohno, 5 nns. Pabaq, 15 
nine, aeport, 664 berths 8 to 38 mete*., 
2 far vp to 60 meters eodi. Indwdua 
W/magm/water/phane corxnctionv. 
IVareaional part management ax M 
marine servioee tower, radio, dp. trov- 
eHSt. repar. fuel shrion, in & outdoor 
wnter hardsfaefc, U-graund oar- pat 
lockers. Ccsipteowtory service & lee- 
sura foafities; medkal, Mniang shop- 
ping, catering, erfertanmenl.lSdf & 
terns nearby. Commerad area com. 
prim 85 uA on 13,171 tqjn. m oB. 
Plus 21 upw qrortmerM abewe & 7B in 
separata hoary condo -dim front fare 
along man piers. Top ewestmentfl 45% 
sofcM Hurnr now before next pnce-risel 
Contact deadly dmlopen; 


RESKMENCE LES HfflS- 

Ovedookmg a splenid Alpine £. 
tna 30 nun. from Mantraw one- 
Geneva by car. : 

• you can own qooily rndeea 


with in door w wwtg poo< t 
fitness fixfifaei in an ad 
enviroanetd far Irism ok! i.. 

Sir.*': 

up to ou% m w tgagw. > , 


to Semac rodtort 4482 Baranoa 
Parkway, brine, 12714 CaRama 


IMBIAID - HOME LTD. 

Dartirtr.. GH-8872 Weesea SG 


The 876062 HOME CH 


!UB(IO ftJNTA PORTALS, SJL 
Director Conteidd 
C/Mareia 101, Portals Nau 
Mofloroa. Span a lb 6B686 CAUU E. 


International Business Message Center 



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43 Bd Mriesherfaes, Pwis 8th 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


THIS WEEK 


MARCH 25TH, 


BUSINESS WEEK 


INTERNATIONAL 


• General Dynamo Under Fir* 


• Soviet Union; Gorbachev May 
G8»re Easd-Weri Rekdfanc A Skat 


GJra EasA-Weri RalaHenc A SI 
In flu Arm. 

■ I n le m ofla uii OoRoole Iraq'i 
Hnw e i n b S ta Cna To See A 
■ Payoff From Hb ran To The 
Wett 




UMITH) COMPANIES 
BANKS 

MSURANCE COMPANIES 


Woridmde 
From £75 

Mailing - telephone - Teh* 
Seaetarid 

UJC, Ue of Map, Jeney, Guenray, Gi- 
braltar, Penan, Libena, Lmcamboug, 
AntiHes, Ready made or spedoL Free 
ex/ktndery booklet. 


Alton Company 
Dept Tl, 8 V. 


Farmatkm 
icJoria St 


Daufias, Ua of Man. 

T»0624 26»l 
Telex 627691 SWA G 



SECRETARIAL 
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POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


HWf-TWl'S 


M° OPERA 

Leading American low Arm 
■eefas far ib Paris office 

(8 person*) 


SECRETARY 


to *mrfc far a young American 
aaooa te in a pleasant atmosphere 


ENGLISH MOTHER TONGUE 
S A MUST 

as wel as fcmrt French. 
Weriang hours, ore: 

10 am. to 645 pjo. 
Salary wffl remm from 
F110/JU0 to 130/XK) per yea 
gacort*'tg to qurf f i cal i aB i. 



M1BWAT10N4L LAW HRM 

■ BffiJMOUAL TYPIST 
Engtsh morher tongue 
strictly 

with expenenco. 

Send CV. with photo 


■MW/y.^FVTT - 


Mil' ’ . 37T 


UNUMTHl INC 
UJJL A WOnOWBE 


A conflate social & busnest Knicc 


ptonting a uraaue cofledmn af 
trierued. verscMeSt (Uitttngud 
niriduab fix: 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 
IN ZURICH 


Plate apply with resume, photo to 
81*36881: 
-MAHEGUMERT 
CONSOL EN RECRUIEMmT 
47. Jbte * Prooy 
>3017 PAMS 


COC«R ^tflaRASSoWSBLS 
B.P. 451-08 

75366 Pais Cedex OB 


h wp ot xj y waric 

, T™At£nAL DB>A«TMa4T 
seeks urgamiy 

BILINGUAL SECRETARY 

Shall na id and word proces si ng 
on odrantoge. Apphr 106 ter rue 
St. laacra. Penis fl/let 293 50 02. 


FUiY INTEGRATED 
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CLOSE TO HNANdAL CE4TH 
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/ Telex t Mol Service; 

/ Translation 


OFFSHORE TAX SHELTERS 

From 175- 

UK,ble of Man, Turks, Channel Wands, 
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Complete support Fo&ties. 


Very stnaiy confidemiaL 
tree oonsuKatian; 

Roger Grfffin LLA, F.CA. 
Btadxire: Corporate Managem e nt Ltd, 
Western House, Victoria Street, 
Dougltt We of Men 
23303/4. 

Tdex 627389 CORMAN G. 


NOW ON SALE 
AT ALL MTERNATIONAL 
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IMMIGRAIiaN TO USA 
MADE EASY 


Alnmey&SeaitoroUaiivriscB&per* 

manent reedera. Helps to W up USA 
wrinassei 6 locotec co rnmerdol, ndus- 
tnal A rtsider ria i rad estate. Far free 
brochure write David Hnat, 1201 


■ MTBOIATIONAL COMPANY 
FOfiMATlON 

UK compcnes from £75 LCUA Panma 
& dU major off-shore centers. FuU ad- 
nwwraiion, nominee service*, powers 
of attorney, reddwed offices, accoun- 
tancy, confioMiol baik. oaaunts 
opened, uaifi denfal telephone, tries, 
few & mafing service. 

cS.S limited 

43 Canning Street. Liverpool, LB 7NN. 
Tot 051 7W 14®. Ttx 6S613 BUSSS. 
Few. 051 709 5757 
Associated Offices Woddeada 


BAHNNOFSTftASSE 52 

THE FINANCIAL CBMTS 
• Your oomplntn office at our hd ier- 
vioo uJ6iui 







MIMfWF SfflCS far AMBOCAN 
"■f®*** FIRMS in PARS: 
English. Belgian,. Dutch or German 
•eaetarw, knawtedga af French re- 
^ Bfingud 

tetexsfj. Wreeor dxjne-. 138 Avenue 
Jtoor Fk^ot 75116 Pons, f7atee. 7eL 




• Busirwa decisions by denial mofam 

• Mtteagemort nrvicesi oompaty far- 
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fa to meteonri Co. seeks 
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PROTEST ETT 
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WORD PROCESSOR 
vtaaiExr 


i 


Font. Tel: 562 II 


BdtnhofclresM 5LCH-8022 Zurich. 
Tel: 01/211 92 07. Tin 813 062 


BILINGUAL SECRETARY 
(TYPIST, TRANSLATOR) 

with minimum 5 years experience in 
enginee rin g or machinery induriry, 


Tel Pcra265.16A2 / 


1-7. 


AMBOCAN COSME71CS 
urgently seeks aid Friday 
lysing. Tel Fans 225 39 31 


I . J , 


tiaft. TeL Pans 543 99 



Lomlon-Undoo-Londofl 

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who w* forward. 


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nominee directors, bearer shares and 
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professional services. 

JLP.CR-. 17 Wdeoate Si.. London 
EI7HP. Tet 01 377 wT The BOTH G 



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AVE MARCEAU - ETORE 

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